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VIRGINIA 

REBIRTH OF THE OLD DOMINION 



Virginia Biography 
By Special Staff of Writers 



Issued in Five Volumes 



VOLUME III 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 
CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 

1929 



VIRGINIA BEACH PU'^UC LIBRARY 



0.3 



VIRGINIA 



BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY SYSTEM - DUP 




AiaaBO 0=16276 



Copyright, 1929 
The Lewis Publishing Company 






HISTORY of VIRGINIA 



Harry Flood Byrd was barely forty years old when elected 
governor of Virginia, being one of the youngest in the long list 
of executives of the state during one and a half centuries. As 
governor he at once instituted a large number of constitutional 
reforms, which were confirmed by popular vote in June, 1927. 
Some account of these reforms is given in Volume II of the 
present history of Virginia. 

It is doubtful if any family of Colonial Virginians has been 
more persistently productive of men talented for professional, 
business and public life. Governor Byrd is the seventh genera- 
tion from the first William Byrd of Westover, whose son, William 
Byrd II, has been called the founder of Richmond. 

Governor Byrd was born in Berkeley County, Virginia, June 
10, 1887. His father, Richard Evelyn Byrd, was born in Texas, 
August 13, 1860. His birth in Texas was due to the fact that 
his father. Col. William Byrd, had moved to Texas a short time 
before the outbreak of the war between the states, and became a 
colonel in the Confederate army. After the war he returned 
to Virginia and practiced law at Winchester. Richard Evelyn 
Byrd, Sr., was reared at Winchester, attended the University of 
Virginia and the University of Maryland, was admitted to the 
bar in 1884, and for over forty years practiced law at Winchester 
and Richmond. He was speaker of the House of Delegates from 
1908 to 1914, served as United States district attorney of the 
Western District of Virginia from 1914 to 1920, and for some 
months following that was special assistant to the attorney gen- 
eral of the United States. He also served as a member of the 
State Tax Commission and as a member of the Educational Com- 
mission of Virginia from 1908 to 1912, was a member of the 
State Commission on Efficiency and Economy from 1916 to 
1918, was chairman of the State Industrial Council of Safety 
in 1917. 

Richard Evelyn Byrd, Sr., married, September 15, 1886, Miss 
Elinor Boiling Flood, daughter of Maj. Joel W. and Ella (Faulk- 
ner) Flood. They had three sons, all of whom have become 
prominent, Harry Flood, Richard Evelyn, Jr., and Capt. Thomas 
Boiling Byrd. All the world knows of the great exploits of 
Richard Evelyn Byrd, Jr., who by special act of Congress in 
January, 1927, was promoted from lieutenant commander of the 
United States Navy retired to the grade of commander on the 
retired list, and was also presented with a medal of honor for 
his achievement in making a successful flight across the North 
Polar regions. 

Governor Byrd was reared in Winchester, attended the Shen- 
andoah Valley Academy, and chose a business rather than a pro- 
fessional career. At the age of sixteen he was manager of the 
Winchester Evening Star, subsequently was superintendent of 
the Southern Bell Telephone & Telegraph Company, and in 1907, 
at the age of twenty, started the Martinsburg Journal. He 
turned from the newspaper business to become one of the out- 



4 VIRGINIA 

standing fruit growers and orchardists of the Shenandoah Val- 
ley, acquiring by planting and purchase 1,500 acres containing 
65,000 trees, one of the largest individually owned apple orchards 
east of the Mississippi. He became president of the Winchester 
Cold Storage Company and was identified with a number of 
other business organizations at Winchester. 

It was his qualifications as an unusually successful business 
executive that gave him such a notable influence with the people 
of Virginia in general. For a number of years he has been a 
leader in politics in his section. In 1917 he was elected a mem- 
ber of the State Senate and was reelected without opposition 
in 1921. He was a leader in good roads legislation, becoming 
chairman of the Senate Committee on roads. In 1922 he became 
chairman of the State Democratic Central Committee, and in 
that year for the first time in twenty years Virginia sent a solid 
Democratic delegation to Congress. 

Governor Byrd married, October 7, 1913, Miss Annie Douglas 
Beverly, daughter of J. B. Beverly, of Winchester. Their chil- 
dren are: H. F. Byrd, Jr., Beverly Byrd, Miss Westwood Byrd 
and Richard Evelyn Byrd. 

Edwin Anderson Alderman is a native of North Carolina, 
and that state recognizes a lasting debt of gratitude to him for 
his pioneer work as an educational statesman. From North 
Carolina his work extended to other states, and since 1904 he has 
been president of the University of Virginia and has long been 
regarded as the strongest single constructive influence in the 
educational progress of the entire South. 

He was born at Wilmington, North Carolina, May 15, 1861, 
son of James and Susan J. Alderman, and member of a family 
that has been in North Caroline since Colonial times, one of his 
forefathers having been a soldier of the Revolution. He at- 
tended Bethel Military Academy of Virginia, in 1878 entered the 
University of North Carolina, and graduated in 1882 with the 
Bachelor of Philosophy degree and the Mangum Medal in 
oratory. His first intention was to practice law, but a year of 
teaching gave him a stronger interest in education. In 1885 he 
became superintendent of the city schools of Goldsboro. In 
1889 he and Charles Duncan Mclver took upon themselves the 
heavy and unpopular responsibilities of leading a crusade 
throughout Noi'th Carolina in behalf of educational reform, in- 
volving primarily the fundamentals of popular education sup- 
ported by general taxation. In 1892, when Doctor Mclver 
founded and became president of the Normal and Industrial 
College for Women at Greensboro, Mr. Alderman accepted the 
chair of history, but in 1893 took the chair of education in the 
University of North Carolina, and in 1896 was elected president 
of that institution. In April, 1900, he became president of 
Tulane University at New Orleans. In 1897 Armistead Gordon 
had as a member of the Board of Visitors started an inquiry into 
the expediency of creating the office of president for the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and after some years such an office was 
created and Edwin A. Alderman was invited to become the first 
incumbent. Doctor Alderman was installed as head of this old 
and famous institution of learning in the South in 1904. Dur- 
ing the past quarter of a century the university has been thor- 
oughly reorganized, and without the loss of any of its splendid 
traditions and atmosphere of quiet culture the various schools 
and departments of the ijniversity proper have been so strength- 





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VIRGINIA 5 

ened and improved as to conform to the highest standards of 
later day educational classification, and the opportunities of some 
of the departments are not excelled by any university in the 
country. 

In his native state, at Tulane, at the University of Virginia, 
over a period of forty years, the labors of Doctor Alderman have 
been directed to the fulfillment of a great ideal, and the measure 
of that fulfillment is the real basis of Doctor Alderman's great- 
ness as an educational leader and builder. The definition of his 
ideal of education he gave in an address many years ago in the 
following words: "Humanism produce the man of culture, and 
his peril was self-sufficiency and a conception of culture as orna- 
ment. Applied science and the interior demands of commerce 
have produced the man of efficiency, and his peril is personal 
barrenness and instinctive greed. Our country needs the ideal- 
ism of the one and the lordship over things of the other, and such 
a blend will be the great citizen whose advent industrial democ- 
racy has so long foreshadowed. The kind of work he shall do in 
the world is immaterial. He shall be an upward striving man 
who wants the truth and dares to utter it, who knows his own 
need and the need of his age, who counts adaptability and tolera- 
tion among his virtues, who insists on a little leisure for his 
soul's sake, and who has a care, whether amid the warfare of 
trade or in the quiet and still air of study, for the building of 
things ever better and better about him." 

Doctor Alderman has not neglected the manifold agencies 
and organizations outside of his immediate sphere of duties in 
order to give full expression to his influence and usefulness. He 
is a member of the General Educational Board, the Board of 
Trustees of the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, member of the 
Board of Governors of the Institute of Economics, the Thomas 
Jefferson Memorial Foundation, the Board of Advisors of the 
Institute of Politics, member of the American Academy of Social 
Sciences and a member of the American Academy of Arts and 
Letters. His chief writings comprise A Brief History of North 
Carolina, Life, of William Hooper, Life of J. L. M. Curry, Obliga- 
tions and Opportitnities of Citizenship, Southern Idealism, The 
Spirit of the South, Sectionalism and Nationality, The Groiving 
Smith, Can Democracy be Organized? Causes of European War, 
Some Tests of an Educated Man, Function and Needs of Schools 
of Education in Universities and Colleges, Memorial Address on 
Woodroiv Wilson, The Nation Exalts Jefferson. He was editor 
in chief of the Library of Southern Literature. 

The degree Doctor of Civil Law was conferred on him by 
the University of the South in 1896, and that of Doctor of Laws 
by Tulane, Johns Hopkins, Columbia, Yale, University of North 
Carolina, Williams College, Harvard, University of Pennsylvania 
and the College of William and Mary. 

Doctor Alderman married, in 1886, Miss Emma Graves, 
whose brother, Ralph Graves, was a professor in the University 
of North Carolina. She died in 1896, and in 1904 he married 
Bessie Green Hearn, of New Orleans. He has one son, Edwin 
Anderson, Jr., born in 1905. 



Carter Glass has given a consecutive service to the Nation 
of such value as to make him one of the most distinguished men 
at Washington. That service began more than a quarter of a 
century ago when he went to Congress. He resigned his seat in 



6 VIRGINIA 

the House of Representatives to become secretary of the treas- 
ury, and that cabinet post was relinquished to iDecome United 
States senator from Virginia. Senator Glass' home community 
is Lynchburg, where he was born January 4, 1858. His father. 
Major Robert Henry Glass, was born in Amherst County, Vir- 
ginia, in 1822, son of Thomas and Lavinia (Cauthorne) Glass. 
Major Glass was one of the great newspaper men of Virginia, a 
vigorous, fearless writer, possessed of physical and moral cour- 
age to perform his duties as he saw them, but never intention- 
ally or carelessly wounding the feelings of an honest man. He 
was for many years editor and proprietor of the Daily Repiibli- 
can at Lynchburg, and in his advanced years still kept in touch 
with newspaper work in the editorial office of the Lynchburg 
Advance. He died May 6, 1896. For many years he was also 
postmaster of Lynchburg, and at the close of the Civil war was 
offered reappointment by President Lincoln. For a portion of 
the war he served with the rank of major on General Floyd's 
staff. Major Glass married Elizabeth Augusta Christian, 
daughter of Judge Samuel Christian and granddaughter of Capt. 
Henry Christian, a Revolutionary officer. She was born in 1826 
and died January 15, 1860, Carter Glass being one of her five 
children. 

Carter Glass was educated in public and private schools in 
Lynchburg, and at the age of fourteen went to work in his fath- 
er's printing office. He served in the mechanical department 
of a printing office for eight years, that experience being the 
foundation of his profession as a newspaper man. He was with 
the Lynchburg Republican and also with the Petersburg Netvs 
while his father was editor of that paper. For several years he 
had some experience as clerk in the auditor's office of what is 
now the Norfolk and Western Railway. 

In 1880 he became local reporter on the staff of the Lynch- 
burg News, was promoted to editor, and in 1888 acquired the 
plant of the News, and has owned that influential morning news- 
paper of Southwest Virginia for forty years. In 1895 he bought 
the Lynchburg Virginian and the Evening Advance, merging 
the Virginian with the News, and has continued the publication 
of the Advance as an evening daily. 

Carter Glass was one of the first Virginia newspaper men to 
achieve some of the highest honors of leadership in the Demo- 
cratic party of the state and nation. His first important politi- 
cal service was in making the nominating speech for J. Hoge 
Tyler for governor in 1897. In 1899 he was elected a member 
of the State Senate, served as a member of the Virginia Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1902-03, and wrote the suffrage article 
in the new constitution. He resigned from the State Senate in 
1902, when elected to the Fifty-seventh Congress as successor 
to Peter J. Otey, deceased, and by reelections continued to repre- 
sent this district through the Fifty-eighth and Sixty-fifth Con- 
gresses. He resigned his seat in 1918 to accept the invitation of 
President Wilson to become secretary of the treasury in the 
Wilson cabinet. While in Congi-ess Mr. Glass had gained great 
distinction by his service in connection with the passage of 
the Fedei-al Reserve Act, and his close study of banking and 
financial questions made him an authority on those subjects, 
and this was the basis of his appointment to the cabinet. Mr. 
Glass in February, 1920, resigned to accept the appointment of 



VIRGINIA 7 

United States senator for the unexpired term of Thomas S. 
Martin. He was subsequently elected for the remainder of the 
unexpired term, and in 1924 was elected for the full term expir- 
ing in 1931. 

Senator Glass married, in 1886, Aurelia Caldwell, of Lynch- 
burg. He is the father of four children. 

Harris Hart, state superintendent of public instruction at 
Richmond, has held that office since 1918. 

He was formerly a member of the State Board of Examiners 
of Teachers, and has given nearly thirty years to the responsi- 
bilities of teaching and school administration. Mr. Hart was 
teacher and principal of the Roanoke High School from 1900 
to 1909, and superintendent of Roanoke schools until he became 
state superintendent. He is a graduate of Richmond College 
and has been a graduate student at the University of Chicago 
and Harvard University. 

Mr. Hart was born in Richmond, Virginia, Februai-y 24, 
1878, son of John and Sallie L. (Coleman) Hart, the father a 
native of Louisa County and the mother of Spotsylvania County, 
Virginia. The father served in an engineers corps in the Con- 
federate army. He then became an educator and was president 
of Richmond Female Institute and later of Albemarle Female 
Institute and co-principal in several academies for boys. He 
died in March, 1897, and the mother died in October, 1914. 

Harris Hart was educated in Bowling Green Academy, Caro- 
line County, Virginia, and in high school in Bowling Green, 
Virginia. He married Miss Mayola Gillespie, of Tazewell, Vir- 
ginia, in June, 1922. She is a daughter of A. P. and Mary (Hig- 
ginbotham) Gillespie, natives of Virginia. The parents are de- 
ceased. The father was a member of the State Constitutional 
Convention in 1901. He was a very distinguished attorney and 
resided at Tazewell, Virginia. He died in 1913 and the mother 
died in 1914. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hart have three children, namely: Olivia 
Johnston, born in June, 1923 ; Helen Lewis, born in October, 
1925 ; and Harris II, born in April, 1928. 

From 1905 to 1909 Mr. Hart served as district school super- 
visor in charge of Southwest Virginia. He is a director of the 
Richmond Trust Company, a member of the Westmoreland Club, 
Hermitage Club, Richmond Country Club and is a teacher of 
the Young Men's Business Class in the Second Baptist Church 
of Richmond. Politically he is a Democrat and is a member of 
the Sons of Confederate Veterans. 

LeRoy Hodges, managing director of the Virginia State 
Chamber of Commerce, is both a scholar and a practical expert 
in the field of economics and commercial administration. 

He was born at Tarboro, North Carolina, July 12, 1888, son 
of Eli Blucher and Rosa Hammond (Warringion) Hodges. Dur- 
ing 1905-06, befoi'e he was eighteen years of age, he had ex- 
perience in railroad and topographical surveying which took 
him over the Southern and Southwestern states and Mexico. 
During 1906-08 he was a student in the School of Commerce of 
Washington and Lee University, and subsequently was a stu- 
dent in the department of political economy at the University 
of Chicago and in the Law School of Washington and Lee Uni- 



8 VIRGINIA 

versity. Mr. Hodges was a special agent of the United States 
Immigration Commission, 1908-1910, was commercial geographer 
of the United States Tariff Board, 1910-11, commissioner of 
immigration for the Southern Commercial Congress in 1911, 
field secretary of the National Citizen's League for Promotion 
of a Sound Banking System in 1912. He served as secretary of 
the Winston-Salem Board of Trade in 1912-13, and in 1913 was 
chosen Virginia's representative on the American Commission 
for the investigation in Europe of cooperative agricultural 
finance and other subjects. He was also assistant to the United 
States commission on rural credits. During 1915-16 he was 
director of the Department of Municipal Efficiency and Admin- 
istration in the Bureau of Applied Economics at Washington, 
served as associate editor of the Petersburg Daily Index-Appeal, 
and during 1916-17 as a member and secretary of the Virginia 
Commission on Economy and Efficiency. 

Mr. Hodges in 1917 was appointed a special field representa- 
tive of the United States Food Administration, and was director 
of the Petersburg Bureau of Governmental Research. He also 
engaged in private practice as a consulting economist. Mr. 
Hodges had charge of the preparation of the Virginia State 
budget from 1918 to 1924, was president of the Virginia Prison 
Board from 1920 to 1926, was a director of the National Budget 
Committee, 1922-24, and the first director of the Budget of the 
Commonwealth of Virginia, 1922-24. He has been managing 
director of the Virginia State Chamber of Commerce since 
February 1, 1924. 

He served as secretary and personal military aide to the 
governor of Virginia with the rank of colonel, February 1, 1918- 
1922. He was commissioned major. Ordnance Department, Vir- 
ginia National Guard, September 11, 1920, and assigned to duty 
as state ordnance officer and on September 29, 1921, was com- 
missioned major. Ordnance Officers' Reserve Corps, United 
States Army. 

Among the many responsible duties with which he has been 
charged he acted as technical advisor to the Virginia Commis- 
sion on Simplification of State Government, as chairman of the 
Committee in Allocation of Prison Industries, and as a director 
of the National Committee on Prisons and Prison Labor, and 
national treasurer of the Lower Taxes — Less Legislation League. 

Major Hodges is a Fhi Beta Kappa, a Democrat and an 
Episcopalian. He is an officer of the Order of the Crown of 
Italy, and an officer of the Order of the White Lion of Czecho- 
slovakia ; and a member of the Country Club of Virginia and 
Westmoreland Club at Richmond, the country clubs at Peters- 
burg and Fredericksburg, and of the National Press Club of 
Washington. He married, January 18, 1911, Almeria Orr Hill, 
of Petersburg, Virginia. They had three children, LeRoy, Rosa 
Batte, and Almeria Hill (deceased). In connection with his 
work Major Hodges has prepared for the press a great many 
bulletins and other articles, and some of the formal publications 
which attest his scholarship and experience include: Agricul- 
tural Credit Systeyns Abroad, published in 1913; Petersburg, 
Virginia — Economic and Muni-cipal, published in 1917; Post- 
war Ordnance, published in 1923. He was editor of The South's 
Physical Recovery, published in 1911, and Agricultural Coopera^ 
tion and Rural Credit in Europe, published in 1913. 




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VIRGINIA . 9 

Francis Howe McGuire, who was called the father of the 
Virginia Bar Association, achieved an eminence in his profession 
that cannot be measured by the comparatively brief period of 
yeai's allotted him by the destiny of life. 

He was born in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, June 4, 1850, 
and died October 30, 1894, at the age of forty-four. The name 
McGuire brings up a host of distinguished associations in Vir- 
ginia. The Virginia McGuires were descended from the Chiefs 
of Fermanagh, one branch of which was established in County 
Kerry, Ireland, in 1641. The founder of the Virginia family 
was Edward McGuire, a native of County Fermanagh, who came 
to this country in 1754, settling at Winchester in Frederick 
County. Some of his descendants have gained great distinction 
in the field of medicine and surgery, others in the law, and still 
others in the educational field and in the clergy. One of the 
ancestors of the late Francis Howe McGuire was Col. William 
McGuire, of Winchester, who enlisted at the age of thirteen for 
service in the War of the Revolution and became a lieutenant of 
artillery. At the battle of Eutaw Springs he was permanently 
disabled. After the war he studied law, and became the first 
chief justice of the Territory of Mississippi, but because of ill 
health left that territory and removed to land he owned on the 
Ohio River near Wheeling, where he died November 20, 1820. 
He was at one time paymaster at Harpers Ferry and was a 
member of the Society of the Cincinnati. Col. William McGuire 
married Mary Little, daughter of William Little. She died in 
April, 1821. Colonel McGuire was a member of the Virginia 
Legislature during 1796-1799. Part of his education was 
acquired in William and Mary College. One of his grandsons 
was the noted Richmond educator, John P. McGuire. 

A son of Col. William McGuire was at one time mayor of 
Winchester and county magistrate for many years. This 
McGuire was the father of Rev. Francis H. McGuire and grand- 
father of the Richmond attorney of the same name. Rev. Fran- 
cis H. McGuire was born in Virginia, in 1809, was educated at 
Kenyon College in Ohio and in the Episcopal Theological Semi- 
nary of Virginia. He was ordained in the Episcopal Church in 
1836, preached at Christs Church at Lancaster, Virginia, and 
subsequently went to the Mecklenburg parish, where he re- 
mained until a few years before his death on April 22, 1865. 
Rev. Francis H. McGuire married Mary Willing Harrison, of 
the distinguished Harrison family of Virginia. 

Francis Howe McGuire was educated in private schools, in 
Randolph-Macon College and the University of Virginia, enter- 
ing the latter institution in 1871. He also taught school at 
Huntsville, Alabama, and in Col. Thomas Carter's School in 
King William County, Virginia. He completed his law studies 
under John P. Minor at the University of Virginia, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1874, and by his industry and good character 
soon established the reputation his abilities so justly merited. 
In 1878 he formed a partnership with Col. Tazewell Ellett, and 
they were together for twelve years. Mr. McGuire was a stu- 
dent of the law, and always regarded it as a profession rather 
than a vocation. Even after he had made a reputation as a 
lawyer he continued to take summer courses at the university. 
He was. a charter member of the Richmond Bar Association, of 
which he was at one time president, and was chairman of the 
executive committee of the Virginia State Bar Association from 



10 VIRGINIA 

its inception until one year before his death. Another fact 
that should be mentioned to his credit was his work in bringing 
about the establishment of the Court of Law and Equity at 
Richmond. A great part of his extensive law practice was in 
chancery and common law cases. He was noted for his thor- 
oughness, energy and tenacity. One of his best known cases 
was that of Bosher versus the Harrisburg Land Company, and 
in winning this case before the Supreme Court of Appeals the 
decision of the court established a new principle of law in Vir- 
ginia. Mr. McGuire was counsel for Colonel Spottswood in the 
contested primary election case of Spottswood versus Smith. 

He was always a loyal friend of the University of Virginia. 
He was for a number of years a member of the Howitzer Bat- 
tery at Richmond and at one time lieutenant in command. He 
was a member of the committee on statistics of the Chamber of 
Commerce, member of the Society of Alumni of the University 
of Virginia, was director of the Male Orphan Asylum, and the 
Board of Incorporators of the Protestant Episcopal Church 
Home, a director of the Peterkin Memorial Association, treas- 
urer of the church fund of the diocese, member of the Virginia 
Historical Society, and was on the board of the Virginia State 
Insurance Company. He was a member of the vestry of St. 
James Episcopal Church and prominent in the Brotherhood of 
St. James, which he founded. 

Mr. McGuire married a daughter of Emile Otto Knolting, 
who was Belgian consul at Richmond during the Civil war and 
became president of the National Bank of Virginia. After his 
death two brothers of Mrs. McGuire served successively as Bel- 
gian consul. Mrs. McGuire is a member of the Richmond 
Woman's Club. She has been deeply interested for a number 
of years in mountain mission work, and she donated the cost of 
a house at Schiflets Hollow, made as a memorial to Francis 
Howe McGuire, though the title she chose for the building was 
simply the Mission Home. 

The only child of the late Francis Howe McGuire is Susie, 
now Mrs. Tazewell Ellett, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Ellett were mar- 
ried December 14, 1917, and have three children, Helen McGuire, 
Tazewell III and Josephine Scott. Mr. Ellett was formerly an 
official of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway and is now a member 
of the State Highway Commission of Virginia. Mrs. Susie 
Ellett is a member of the Richmond Woman's Club. 

Andrew Jackson Montague is a lawyer and scholar whose 
services have done much to enrich Virginia's distinctions abroad, 
and he has earned notable dignities and positions in his own 
state and nation. 

He was born in Campbell County, Virginia, October 3, 1862, 
son of Robert Latane and Gay (Eubank) Montague. Graduat- 
ing from Richmond College in 1882, he took his law degree at 
the University of Virginia in 1885, and so far as the cares and 
responsibilities of public life would permit has practiced law 
steadily since that year. Brown University and the University 
of Pennsylvania have honored him with the degree Doctor of 
Laws. 

He was United States district attorney for the Western Dis- 
trict of Virginia from 1894 to 1898, was attorney general of 
Virginia, 1898-1902, and came to the office of governor in 1902, 
serving four years and one month. When he retired from this 
office in 1906 he accepted the position of dean of the Law School 



VIRGINIA 11 

of Richmond College. Governor Montague in 1909 resumed his 
private law practice at Richmond, but in 1912 again accepted 
an opportunity to serve his state when he was chosen from the 
Third Virginia District a member of the Sixty-third Congress. 
That district has continued his representation at Washington 
and in 1928 he was elected a member of the Seventieth Congress. 
He is now the senior member of the Virginia delegation. 

Governor Montague was a United States delegate to the Pan- 
American Conference at Rio de Janiero in 1906, to the Third 
International Conference on Maritime Law at Brussels in 1909- 
10, in 1917 was president of the American Society for the Judi- 
cial Settlement of International Disputes, and from 1920 to 1924 
was president of the American Peace Society. In 1910 he be- 
came a trustee for the Carnegie Institution of Washington and 
the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. William and 
Mary College elected him a member of the Phi Beta Kappa fra- 
ternity in 1908. Author, Life of John Marshall, Secretary of 
State Tin American Secretary of State and Their Diplomacy), 
Volume II. 

Governor Montague married, December 11, 1889, Elizabeth 
Lyne Hoskins. 

Henry G. Shirley, chairman of the State Highway Commis- 
sion of Virginia, has had a successful career as an engineer, in 
railroad and general engineering as well as highway building. 

He is a native of West Virginia, born at Locust Grove, 
Shenandoah Valley, Jefferson County, son of Robert Vincent 
and Julia (Baylor) Shirley. His maternal grandfather was 
Col. R. W. Baylor, a Confederate officer of the Twelfth Virginia 
Cavalry. 

Henry G. Shirley was educated by a private governess, also 
in public schools, preparing for college at the Charles Town 
Male Academy and graduating with the degree Civil Engineer 
from the Virginia Military Institute. Then followed several 
years of practical experience, after which he submitted a thesis 
and received a formal degi-ee of Civil Engineer. Since then 
two institutions of learning have seen fit to recognize his service 
and attainments, Maryland University and Hampden-Sidney 
College having conferred upon him the honorary degree Doctor 
of Science. For a time Mr. Shirley was commandant of Cadets 
at Horner Military School in North Carolina. His professional 
experience includes service in the engineering departments of 
the District of Columbia, New York Central Railroad, West 
Virginia Central Railroad and Baltimore &. Ohio systems. He 
was formerly road engineer of Baltimore County and chief 
engineer of the State Roads Commission of Maryland. During 
the World war he was a member of the Highway Transport 
Committee of the Council of National Defense and secretary of 
the Federal Highway Council. He was then called to his work 
as state highway commissioner of the Virginia Highway De- 
partment. 

Mr. Shirley is a member of the American Society of Civil 
Engineers, is a past president and member of the Board of 
Directors of the American Road Builders Association, and had 
the honor of being elected the first president of the American 
State Highway Officials Association. His home is in Richmond. 
Mr. Shirley married Miss Alice Graham, member of one of the 
most distinguished families of North Carolina, daughter of 
Judge A. W. Graham, of Oxford. They have five children. 



12 VIRGINIA 

Robert Riddick Prentis, chief justice of the Supreme Court 
of Appeals of Virginia, has a distinguished ancestry, and his 
own career has been animated by the spirit of service which 
seems inherent in the name and hneage. 

Judge Prentis was born at University, in Albemarle County, 
May 24, 1855, and is in the fifth generation from William Pren- 
tis, who was born in Norfolk County, England, in 1701, and as 
a young man came to America, settUng in York County, Vir- 
ginia. He was a merchant of the firm Blair & Prentis at Wil- 
liamsburg, where he died August 4, 1765. William Prentis 
married Mary Brooke, who was born in 1710 and died April 9, 
1768, daughter of John and Ann Brooke, of York County, 
Virginia. 

Their son, Joseph Prentis, of Williamsburg, born January 24, 
1754, was a member of the Virginia Convention which met in 
December, 1775, was appointed a commissioner in admiralty 
in 1776, was a member of the first House of Delegates in 1777 
from Williamsburg, subsequently serving as a member from 
York, and was speaker of the House in 1788. He was a member 
of Governor Patrick Henry's Privy Council in 1779, and was 
judge of the General Court from 1789 until his death June 18, 
1809. He was also credited with an important share in the ne- 
gotiations and propositions on the part of Virginia which led 
to the convention for the drawing up of the Federal Constitution. 
He married, December 16, 1778, Margaret Bowdoin, who was 
born November 27, 1758, and died August 27, 1801. She was a 
daughter of John Bowdoin and also a descendant of Sir George 
Yeardley, colonial governor of Virginia. 

Their son, Joseph Prentis, Jr., of Suffolk, was born at Wil- 
liamsburg January 24, 1783, and died at Suffolk April 29, 1851. 
He was a lawyer, was a member of the convention of 1829-30, 
and for many years clerk of Nansemond County. He married, 
January 10, 1810, Susan Caroline Riddick, who was born in 
Nansemond County and died October 19, 1862, being a daughter 
of Col. Robert Moore and Elizabeth Riddick, she being a daugh- 
ter of Col. Willis and Mary (Foulke) Riddick. 

Robert Riddick Prentis, Sr., representing the fourth genera- 
tion of the family, was born at Suffolk April 11, 1818, and died 
at Charlottesville November 23, 1871. He was educated for the 
bar, but spent most of his life in the University community at 
Charlottesville, serving as proctor of the University for some 
years, as clerk of Albemarle County, and during the Civil war 
as collector of internal revenue. He married Margaret Ann 
Whitehead, who was born August 8, 1826, and died February 16, 
1910, daughter of Elliott and Catherine Flynn Whitehead. 

Judge Robert Riddick Prentis was sixteen years old when 
his father died. He had attended the Oak Grove Academy at 
Charlottesville, but after the death of his father had to make 
his own way and also contribute to the support of his widowed 
mother and younger children. In 1874 he graduated from the 
Eastman Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York, and 
after one session at the University of Virginia was given the 
Bachelor of Laws degree in 1876. He at once engaged in prac- 
tice at Charlottesville, remaining there until 1879, during that 
year was at Norfolk, and in 1879 established his home and law 
business at Suffolk. He served as mayor of Suffolk in 1883-85, 
and gave his time to a growing law practice until 1895. During 
the past thirty years his attention has been fully taken up by 
judicial and other official duties. He was judge of the Virginia 





.A.^^ 



VIRGINIA 13 

Circuit Court in the Norfolk Circuit from 1895 until he resigned 
in 1907 to become chairman of the State Corporation Commis- 
sion. Judge Prentis left the chairmanship of the Corporation 
Commission in 1916 to become associate justice of the Supreme 
Court of Appeals. Since March 10, 1925, he has been president 
or chief justice of the Supreme Court. His offices are at Rich- 
mond and he still retains his residence at Suffolk. 

Judge I rentis was a member of the Democratic State Com- 
mittee from 1887 to 1892, was a presidential elector in 1892, a 
member of the Virginia State Tax Commission in 1910, member 
of the State Advisory Board on Taxation in 1916, and during 
1915-16 was president of the National Association of Railway 
Commissioners. He also served for some years as director of 
the Lee Camp Soldiers Home, the state institution for disabled 
Confederate veterans. He is a member of the Virginia State 
and American Bar Associations, Virginia Historical Society, 
Virginia Society of Colonial Wars, Sons of the Revolution. He 
is a Phi Beta Kappa, member of the Episcopal Church, and is a 
member of a number of clubs at Richmond, Norfolk and other 
communities. In 1919 he became a member of the Virginia 
War History Commission. He was given the LL. D. degree 
from the College of William and Mary in 1925. He was chair- 
man of the Judicial Section, American Bar Association, 1926 ; 
chairman of the Commission on Revision and Amendment of 
the Virginia Constitution, 1927; chairman of the Judicial Coun- 
cil in Virginia in 1928. 

Judge Prentis married, January 6, 1888, Mary Allen Darden. 
She died in 1904. 

John Archer Coke. It is well that this publication enter 
a memoir to the late Capt. John Archer Coke, who was long one 
of the leading members of the Virginia bar, who stood exponent 
of the patrician regime of the fine old Southern school of culture 
and refinement, and who was a representative of a Virginia 
family whose name has been one of prominence and influence 
in the history of the Old Dominion since the early Colonial 
period. Captain Coke was long engaged in the practice of law 
in the City of Richmond, and was here the senior member of 
the representative law firm of Coke & Pickrell at the time of his 
death, which occurred on the 27th of January, 1920. 

In the historic old city of Williamsburg, Virginia, the birth 
of Captain Coke occurred July 14, 1842, he having been a direct 
descendant of John Coke, who was born in England, in 1704, of 
patrician ancestry, and who thence came, from Derbyshire, to 
America in the year 1724 to become a member of the original 
English colony founded at Williamsburg, Virginia. Representa- 
tives of the Coke family were patriot soldiers in the War of the 
Revolution, as well as in subsequent wars in which the nation 
was involved. Captain Coke of this memoir and his seven 
brothers all volunteered for service in defence of the cause of 
the Confederate States when the Civil war was precipitated on 
a divided nation, and each of the brothers gained in this service 
the rank of captain. One of the number was Capt. Octavious 
Coke, who later served as secretary of state in North Carolina, 
and another of the brothers was Capt. Richard Coke, who went 
to Texas after the close of the war and who there had a long 
and distinguished career in public life, he having served as gov- 
ernor of Texas and having long represented the Lone Star State 



14 VIRGINIA 

in the United States Senate. Of this remarkable group of 
brothers the subject of this memoir was the last survivor. 

Capt. John A. Coke v^^as a student in historic old William and 
Mary College at the inception of the Civil war, and he forth- 
with subordinated all other interests to volunteer for service in 
the Confederate army. In April, 1861, he initiated his service 
as lieutenant in a battery of artillery that became a part of the 
forces under the command of Gen. Robert E. Lee. In the reor- 
ganization of his battery in 1862 he was made its captain, and 
he continued in service in the Army of Northern Virginia until, 
in 1864, he was assigned to special recruiting service at Rich- 
mond, where he was thus stationed until the close of the war. 
While in active field service he was slightly wounded in connec- 
tion with the Dahlgreen raids about Richmond. 

After the close of the war Captain Coke turned his atten- 
tion to the study of law, and upon gaining admission to the bar 
he engaged in the practice of his profession in the City of Rich- 
mond in 1866. Here he continued in individual practice until 
1883, when he formed a partnership with John Pickrell, under 
the firm name of Coke & Pickrell. His firm gained precedence 
as one of the strongest and most influential of the Virginia bar, 
gave special attention to corporation law, and was retained as 
counsel for the Life Insurance Company of Virginia, the Vir- 
ginia-Carolina Chemical Company, the Imperial Tobacco Com- 
pany and numerous other corporations of major importance. 
Captain Coke continued as senior member of the firm of Coke 
& Pickrell until his death, and as lawyer, citizen and man of 
exalted integrity he ever commanded inviolable place in popular 
confidence and esteem. In his bearing he exemplified the best 
in the typifying of a Southern gentleman of the old school, as he 
was courtly and dignified, affable and considerate, striking in 
appearance by reason of his superior height, his patrician face 
and commanding presence, and was known for his high intellec- 
tual and professional attainments, as well as for his abiding 
human sympathy and tolerance. 

April 17, 1867, recorded the marriage of Captain Coke and 
Miss Emma Overby, likewise a representative of an old and 
distinguished Virginia family, she having been a daughter of 
Robert Y. and Mary (Pool) Overby, both natives of Mecklenburg 
County, Virginia. Mrs. Coke preceded her husband to the life 
eternal, as her death occurred October 5, 1917, and of their chil- 
dren one son and one daughter are living. The historic old 
capital city of Richmond long claimed Captain and Mrs. Coke as 
leaders in its social and cultural life, and here they shall long be 
retained in gracious memory by those who came within the 
sphere of their benignant influence. 

John Archer Coke, Jr., is well upholding in his native city 
of Richmond the high civic and professional honors of the 
family name. He is one of the representative members of the 
bar of Virginia's fair old capital city and is here attorney for 
the Life Insurance Company of Virginia. Mr. Coke is a scion 
of one of the old and distinguished families of Virginia, and 
adequate data concerning the family history are given in the 
preceding sketch, in the memoir dedicated to his father, 
the late Capt. John Archer Coke. 

John A. Coke, Jr., was born in Richmond on the 15th of 
January, 1877, and after his course in Richmond College he 



VIRGINIA 15 

continued his studies in the historic old University of Virginia, 
in the law department of which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1898. After thus receiving his degree of Bach- 
elor of Laws he became associated with his father's law firm, 
that of Coke & Pickrell, of which he was made a constituent 
member and with which he continued his alliance until the firm 
was dissolved by the death of his father in 1920. Since that 
year Mr. Coke has given much of his professional attention to 
his service as counsel for the Life Insurance Company of Vir- 
ginia, with headquarters in the company's fine building in 
Richmond. 

Mr. Coke has continued unreservedly in the ancestral polit- 
ical faith, that of the Democratic party, and his pati'iotic ante- 
cedents are shown in his afliliation with the Society of the Sons 
of the American Revolution and also the Society of the Cincin- 
nati, his eligibility for the latter being through his ancestor in 
the maternal line, Capt. Robert Yancey of the First Continental 
Dragoons. In the suburban district of Westhampton Mr. and 
Mrs. Coke have their beautiful home, named "Trusley," after 
the title of the Coke ancestral estate in England. 

Mr. Coke wedded Miss Anne Elizabeth Harrison, representa- 
tive of the historic old Virginia family of that name, and the two 
children of this union are daughters — Elizabeth H. and Archer. 

Simon H. Rosenthal, M. D. With the exception of a short 
period of army service during the World war and the time spent 
in taking post-graduate work, the entire career of Dr. Simon H. 
Rosenthal has been passed at Lynchburg, where through indus- 
try, close application and natural and acquired talent he has risen 
to a recognized position among the leaders of his profession. 
During recent years Doctor Rosenthal has found his greatest 
field of usefulness in the special field of urology, a department in 
which he has gained a widespread reputation and which he fol- 
lows as a member of the staff's of all the Lynchburg hospitals. 

Doctor Rosenthal was born at Lynchburg, December 16, 1890, 
and is a son of M. and Rebecca (Tobac) Rosenthal. M. Rosen- 
thal was born in Russian Poland and was a man of splendid edu- 
cation, being a master of seven languages. This knowledge led 
him to become an interpreter, which vocation he followed in Rus- 
sia until 1880, in which year he immigrated to the United States, 
feeling that here he could find better opportunities for the 
achievement of success. He gathered together his somewhat 
meager capital and stai'ted on his journey, but while on ship- 
board fell in with bad companions and was robbed of all his 
means. Thus he arrived at Danville, Virginia, in a strange 
country, without means or friends, and the next eight years of 
his life were ones of stern struggle. Eventually he became the 
proprietor of a small furniture store, made possible by his work 
as an interpreter. This was the first furniture store of Lynch- 
burg and was built up to important proportions by Mr. Rosen- 
thal, who conducted the business until his death in 1919. He was 
a man of excellent ability, great industry and fine judgment and 
won his own way to success and preferment. Of his five chil- 
dren four are living: Louis E., who has conducted the furniture 
business since the death of his father; Simon H., of this review; 
Mrs. J. Klots, a resident of Staunton ; and Mrs. Maurice Klots, 
also of Staunton. Mrs. Rosenthal was born in Russia, and she 
and her husband were orthodox Jews. He was a member of the 



16 VIRGINIA 

Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, 
and in his political allegiance was a stalwart Democrat. 

Simon H. Rosenthal attended the public schools of Lynch- 
burg, including high school, and then entered Jefferson Medical 
College, from which institution he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1913, receiving the degree Doctor of Medicine. 
He then spent eighteen months as an interne in the Philadelphia 
General Hospital, but at the end of that period returned to 
Lynchburg, where he engaged in the general practice of his pro- 
fesssion. He was called into the army in February, 1918, and as 
a member of the Medical Corps served at the Base Hospital at 
Camp Lee until receiving his honorable discharge in April, 1919. 
He then returned to Lynchburg, but in 1920 went to New York, 
where he did post-graduate work in urology at the New York 
Post-Graduate College and Hospital. Upon his return to his 
home city he became a specialist in urology and has practically 
confined himself to this department ever since. In addition to a 
large private practice Doctor Rosenthal is a member of the staffs 
of all of the hospitals at Lynchburg, and is held in the highest 
esteem by his fellow practitioners, who have realized his worth 
and accorded him that respect due those who have achieved dis- 
tinction in any line. He maintains well appointed and perfectly 
equipped offices at 1112 Church Street, and is a member of 
the Campbell County Medical Society, Virginia State Medical 
Society, South Piedmont Medical Society and American Medical 
Association. He is a Mason and a member of the Phi Delta 
Epsilon fraternity, and holds membership in the Jewish Syna- 
gogue. He has never been sufficiently interested in politics to 
seek preferment at the hands of any party, but is a good citizen 
of public spirit. 

On June 5, 1920, Doctor Rosenthal was united in marriage 
with Miss Bettye Greenberg, of Danville, Virginia, who was edu- 
cated at the public schools of Danville and at Randolph-Macon 
Institute at Danville, Virginia. To this union there have been 
born two children : Macey Herschel, born in December, 1921 ; 
and Ceevah Miriam, born in September, 1924. 

Edgar L. Sutherland, M. D. The broad field of medical en- 
deavor offers much to the conscientious man in the way of public 
service, research, teaching, surgery, public health, general prac- 
tice, or in following, perhaps, some particular path, and through 
some combination of methods and manners which are individual 
and distinctive, prove natural ability and careful training. The 
physician of today must possess a wide range of general culture, 
must be an observant clinician and well read neurologist. The 
stamp of an original mind is never more to be observed than in 
the case of the hard worked medical man whose soul has often 
fainted within him when studying the mysteries of his calling. 
Among the many skilled and distinguished medical men of Vir- 
ginia, one who has gained special notice through his steady 
nerve, patience, technical manual skill and the courage which are 
distinctive of his profession is Dr. Edgar L. Sutherland, phy- 
sician and surgeon of Lynchburg. He was born in Hillsville, 
Virginia, December 5, 1875, a son of William Hamilton and 
Rhoda J. (Cassell) Sutherland, he born in Rockingham, North 
Carolina, and she in Wythe County, Virginia, and both are 
deceased. They had five children, four of whom survive : Doc- 
tor Sutherland, who is the eldest ; Alice, who married Robert M. 
Black, cashier of the Hillsville Bank ; Walter, who is deceased ; 



VIRGINIA 17 

Mrs. C. E. Lundy, who resides in Raleigii, North Carolina, where 
her husband is a realtor; and Mrs. J. C. Rutrouyh, who resides 
in Willis, Virginia, where her husband is engaged in the practice 
of medicine. The mother was a devout member of the Lutheran 
Church, and active in church and charitable work. An active 
Democrat, the father held the office of county clerk for forty-two 
years, from 1865 until 1907, a record of faithful service not often 
found. During the war between the states, which brought out 
all of the valor and courage in human nature, he served as cap- 
tain of a local company, and was wounded in the battle of 
Gettysburg, but recovered, rejoined his regiment and was pres- 
ent at the surrender at Appomattox when a great cause was 
relinquished at the word of the immortal leader Gen. Robert E. 
Lee. A few days prior to the surrender he had been elected 
county clerk, so upon his return home from the army he had 
definite work to do, and discharged his duties so admirably that 
his fellow citizens kept him in office for the longest consecutive 
period in the history of this part of Virginia, and he was still 
in office when claimed by death. He was a son of John L. 
Sutherland, a native of North Carolina, but for many years a 
resident of Saint Joseph, Missouri, where he was first engaged 
in the practice of law, and later served on the bench, in which 
capacity he was rendering a valuable service when he died. The 
maternal grandfather, J. F. Cassell, was a farmer of Carroll 
County, Virginia. 

Doctor Sutherland grew up in his native place, attended its 
schools, and early decided upon a professional career. He there- 
fore entered Roanoke College, where he was prepared for the 
University of Virginia, and was graduated from the latter in 
1898, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and the youngest 
man in his class. While at college he was a member of the Phi 
Delta Theta. For several years thereafter he was engaged in a 
general practice in Pulaski County, Virginia, but then took post 
graduate work in the New York Post-Graduate School and Hos- 
pital, New York City, studying diseases of the eye, ear, nose and 
throat. With this country's entry into the World war he offered 
his services through enlistment, but was rejected, and he then 
made himself useful by serving in the examining of the recruits 
on the draft board in Pulaski County. After the close of the war 
he was engaged with a partner in practice at Roanoke for a 
short time, going from there to Charlottesville, and finally com- 
ing to Lynchburg in May, 1927. While he was engaged in a 
general practice he was also surgeon for the Norfolk & Western 
Railroad, the Virginia Iron, Coal and Coke Company and the 
Pulaski Iron Company. He belongs to the Virginia Society of 
Opthalmology and Oto-laryngectomy, ths Campbell County Medi- 
cal Society, the Virginia State Medical Society, the Southern 
Medical Association and the American Medical Association. His 
fraternal affiliations are those which he mantains with the 
Masonic Order and the Elks. While a re-ident of Charlottesville 
he belonged to the Kiwanis Club. He is a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church. 

In October, 1898, Doctor Sutherland married Miss Vera Rob- 
inson, born in Fluvanna County. Virginia, and educated in the 
W'oman's College, Richmond, Virginia. She is a consistent mem- 
ber of the Presbyterian Church, and continues as active in its 
good work as she has always been, and she is also prominent in 
social life, so that she is a valuable addition to Lynchburg. 



18 VIRGINIA 

Charles W. Brook is one of the active business men of 
Lynchburg, owner and active head of the Harris Carriage Com- 
pany, manufacturers of bodies for automobiles. 

Mr. Brook was born in Amherst County, Virginia, July 9, 
1881, son of George H. and Mary Elizabeth (Jones) Brook and 
grandson of William Nickolas Brook and Thomas Jones. William 
Nickolas Brook brought his family from England and became 
a farmer in Amherst County, Virginia. Thomas Jones was born 
in Amherst County and was a great plantation owner before 
the Civil war, using the labor of forty slaves. Two of his sons 
were Confederate soldiers. George H. Brook was born in Eng- 
land, while his wife was a natve of Amherst County. He was 
for many years identified with merchandising. They were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. They had six 
children: William N., a jeweler in Georgia; Annie L., wife of 
Edward M. Wright, superintendent of the Lynchburg Foundry 
Company; Miss Ola, of Amherst; Mary and Dora, twins, the 
former the wife of Charles E. Bell, manager of the R. C. Dunn 
& Company of Lynchburg, while Dora is the wife of Norvell 
N. Holt, a Lynchburg insurance man ; and Charles W. 

Charles W. Brook was educated in a private school conducted 
by an aunt, a very brilliant woman, well known in educational 
circles. He also attended the Lynchburg High School, and for 
fifteen years was identified with the tobacco business of that 
city. On February 1, 1919, he acquired the plant and business 
of the Harris Carriage Company and has greatly extended the 
facilities and service of this organization in the manufacture of 
bodies and tops for automobiles. He is a director of Lynchburg 
Finance Company. 

Mr. Brook married in June, 1920, Miss Emma Berford, a 
native of Marshall, Texas, who was educated in that state and 
in Tennessee and Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Brook are members 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church and he is a steward of the 
Rivermont Church at Lynchburg. He is a member of the Lions 
Club and a Democrat in politics. 

Walter Frederick Whately is secretary and treasurer of 
the Lynchburg Lumber Company. Mr. Whately has had a 
widely extended experience in commercial affairs, and is one of 
the prominent business men of Lynchburg, where he has lived 
most of his life. 

He was born in Campbell County, Virginia, in 1876, son of 
W. E. and Rosa L. (Fore) Whately. His mother was born in 
Campbell County, Virginia, where her father was a well-to-do 
farmer. W. E. Whately was born in England, son of George 
Frederick Whately, a prominent surgeon who spent all his life 
in England. W. E. Whately on coming to America located in 
Campbell County, Virginia, and engaged in farming. He was a 
Democrat in politics, and served as vestryman of the Episcopal 
Church. He and his wife had five children, four of whom are 
living: Walter Frederick; Lena, wife of C. A. Tanner, of 
Gladys, Virginia ; William E., connected with the C. & P. Tele- 
phone Company at Roanoke; and C. F. Whately, a farmer in 
Campbell County. 

Walter F. Whately attended school in Lynchburg, graduating 
from high school, and has made an intensive application of his 
energies to business ever since leaving school. For several years 
he was employed by a tobacco company, spent four or five years 
with R. C. Scott & Company, flour millers, and for three years 



'^ 




/'^ xJoLuiAA 




—^- 



VIRGINIA 19 

was with the Alkali Works at Saltville, Virginia. Having thus 
acquired a good general training in business, he became identi- 
fied with the lumber industry with C. I. Johnson at Wingina in 
Nelson County. He was located there for eleven years and since 
then has made his headquarters at Lynchburg as secretary and 
treasurer of the Lynchburg Lumber Company, one of the very 
prosperous and successful organizations in the city. 

Mr. Whately is a vestryman in Grace Memorial Episcopal 
Church at Lynchburg. He is a past high priest of the Royal 
Arch Chapter of Masonry and a member of the Lions Club. He 
married, in 1907, Miss Bessie Rosen, a native of Buckingham 
County, Virginia, daughter of Charles R. Rosen. They have two 
children, Mable Elizabeth and Walter Roy. The daughter Mable 
has completed a high school education. 

James Taylor Ellyson, who was lieutenant governor of 
Virginia from 1905 to 1917, was well worthy of all the official 
distinctions conferred upon him, but the real value of his life 
could not be measured by offices and titles. He was a man of 
unusual breadth of interest and varied gifts, and his activities 
and positions he held represented a steady force and influence 
for uplift and advancement exerted over a long period of years 
and characterized by a completeness of devotion and a fidelity 
to high ideals unusual even in the great commonwealth of 
Virginia. 

James Taylor Ellyson was born at Richmond May 20, 1847, 
and died in that city March 18, 1919, at the age of seventy-two. 
He represented the seventh generation of the Ellyson family 
in America, which was founded by Capt. and Dr. Robert Ellyson, 
who first came to Maryland and afterwards to Virginia, where 
in 1656-1672 he served as justice, high sheriff and burgess of 
James City County. He was the father of Gerard Ellyson, 
grandfather of Robert Ellyson, who lived in Henrico County. 
William Ellyson, of Chesterfield County, was a son of Robert 
Ellyson and was the father of Onan Ellyson, who married Mary 
Huot, of French Canadian ancestry. They were the parents 
of Henry Keeling Ellyson, who was born in Richmond in 1823 
and died in 1890. Henry Keeling Ellyson married, in 1843, 
Elizabeth Pinkney Barnes, and they reared four children: The- 
odore Ellyson, who married Elizabeth Walker; James Taylor 
Ellyson, who married Lora Effie Hotchkiss; William Ellyson, 
who married Mary Morris John.son ; Miss Bettie, who died in 
1922, the last of her family; and three, Luther Barnes, who was 
born September 30, 1849, and died November 7, 1864; Nannie, 
who was born December 6, 1857, and died February 28, 1864; 
and Sally, who was born February 13, 1853, and died July 15, 
1853. 

James Taylor Ellyson was educated in Columbia College, 
and in Richmond College, and graduated from the University of 
Virginia in 1869. At the age of sixteen, in 1862, he became 
a member of the Second Company of the Richmond Howitzers. 
He surrendered with that company at Appomattox. Mr. Elly- 
son had many years of successful activities as a business man 
at Richmond, but the greater part of his time was devoted to 
civic and religious service, and most of the positions he held 
were without remuneration. He was a member of the Common 
Council of Richmond from 1881 to 1887, being president of that 
body in 1884, and in 1888 was elected mayor, serving three 
terms. He was a member of the Virginia Senate in 1885-87, 



20 VIRGINIA 

and was lieutenant-governor three terms, a period of twelve 
years. For more than a quarter of a century he was chairman 
of the Democratic State Committee of Virginia, and was also 
national committeeman of his party. He was for sixteen years 
president of the Richmond School Board, for more than twenty 
years represented the state as director of the Richmond, Fred- 
ericksburg and Potomac Railroad, and was a member of the 
Richmond Chamber of Commerce. He was lieutenant governor 
when the Jamestown Exposition was held in 1907, and besides 
being a member of the Board of Governors of the exposition he 
acted as governor of history and education and social economy. 

Governor Ellyson was a member of Lee Camp and Pickett 
Camp of Confederate Veterans, member of the Richmond How- 
itzer Association, member of the Jefferson Davis Monument 
Association and president of the Confederate Memorial Associa- 
tion which erected the Confederate Memorial Institute. This 
remarkably beautiful building and institution, one of the finest 
in the South, will always recall to those who know of its incep- 
tion and progress the important services rendered by the late 
Mr. Ellyson. He was also a life member of the Confederate 
Memorial Literary Society, was a memer of the Virginia His- 
torical Society, life members of the Association for the Preser- 
vation of Virginia Antiquities, member of the National Geo- 
graphic Society, and on the executive committee of the American 
National Red Cross. He was affiliated with Richmond Lodge 
No. 10, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, Washington Chapter 
No. 9, Roj^al Arch Masons, Commandery of St. Andrew, Knights 
of Malta No. 13, member of the Grand Council of the Royal 
Arcanum, and Richmond Lodge, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Governor Ellyson for over thirty years was a deacon of the 
Second Baptist Church of Richmond, was a member of the 
Board of Trustees of the Virginia Baptist Orphanage, in 1908 
became president of the Board of Trustees of Richmond College, 
served three terms as president of the Virginia Baptist General 
Association, was vice president of the Southern Baptist Con- 
vention in 1895, and for forty-six years corresponding secretary 
of the Virginia Baptist Education Board. Perhaps no better 
estimate of the qualities of his character can be found than the 
following sentences taken from a memorial adopted by the dea- 
cons of the Second Baptist Church : "A noble spirit has gone 
from us, and we do well today not only to honor his memory but 
to catch inspiration from his life. He was not given to thinking 
too highly of himself. There was a modesty about him, almost 
a shyness at times, which strangers or casual acquaintances 
may have mistaken for coldness or indifference, but those who 
knew him intimately need no assurance of the wealth of his 
nature, the strength of his friendship or the genuineness of 
his heart. The nobility and fineness of his spirit was exhibited 
in many ways, but in no way more strikingly than in his attitude 
toward those who were unfriendly to him. How freely he for- 
gave them and how unwillingly he was to cherish in his heart 
anything akin to hatred. He had a host of friends who loved 
to come to him for counsel and who never came to him in vain. 




&.(^ou 




uM^c^dM^ 



VIRGINIA 21 

He was generous and unselfish in his friendship and gave it to 
all who wished it and who would be even half-way worthy of it." 

James Taylor Ellyson married, December 2, 1869, Lora Effie 
Hotchkiss, who survives him. She was descended from the New 
England Hotchkiss family which .settled at an early date at New 
Haven, Connecticut. Samuel Hotchkiss, of Essex, England, in 
1642 married Elizabeth Cleverly, and died in 1663. His fourth 
son, Joshua, Ensign, born in Ssptember, 1651, at New Haven, 
married Hannah Tuttle in 1683, r.nd died in 1722; Deacon 
Stephen, son of Ensign Joshua, married in 1704 Elizabeth 
Sperry; his son, Gideon, married Anna Brockett. Their second 
son, David, born in 1740, married Abigail Douglass in 1763. 
Amraphael Hotchkiss, son of David and Abigail, married Appa- 
lina Hotchkiss, and had a son. Stiles Hotchkiss, who married 
Lydia Beecher in 1813. They were the parents of Nelson Hill 
Hotchkiss, who married Harriet Russell in 1845, daughter of 
Elmore and Betsy (Griggs) Russell, and these were the parents 
of Mrs. Ellyson. Her ancestor, Gideon Hotchkiss, was a captain 
in the Revolutionary war, and Stephen Hotchkiss was also a 
captain. Captain Gideon was deputy to the Connecticut General 
Court, member of the session from May to October, 1757, and 
in 1777 at Danbury, Connecticut, led a company in repulsing 
a British attack. 

Mrs. Ellyson is a member of the Colonial Dames of America 
in the State of Virginia, the Commonwealth Chapter of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution, Richmond Chapter of 
the Daughters of the Confederacy, and vice regent of the 
Confederate Memorial Literary Society, member of the Lady 
Board of Managers of the Confederate Memorial Institute, 
president of the Ladies Hollywood Memorial Association, and 
a charter member of the Retreat for the Sick Hospital. She is 
an honorary member of the Country Club of Yorktown, Virginia. 
She was commissioned by Governor Harry F. Byrd a member 
of the Cape Henry Memorial Commission. She was elected 
president of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia 
Antiquities January 4, 1911, after having seiwed seven years 
as acting and associate president, and is still holding that office 
(1929). She appointed and w-as a member of the committee in 
charge of the arrangements for erecting and unveiling a bronze 
tablet, June 30, 1928, on the wharf at Blackwall, England, mark- 
ing the approximate point from which sailed on December 19, 
1606, the three vessels under the command of Capt. Christopher 
Newport, which landed May 13, 1607, at Jamestown and estab- 
lished the first permanent colony in what is now the United 
States, the Jamestown Colony of Virginia. Dr. Philip Alexander 
Bruce in 1913-14 had received permission for the Association 
for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities to place a monu- 
ment to commemorate the sailing of these three ships. The war 
stopped the effort to raise the fund for the purpose. The tablet 
was proposed by Lord Richie, of Dundee, who was chairman of 
the port authority. 

Mrs. Ellyson has one daughter, Nannie Moore, who is the 
wife of Frank Thomas Crump, a prominent chui-chman and 
business man of Richmond, Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Crump have 
also one son, James Taylor Ellyson Crump, who has a position 
in the bond department of the American Bank & Trust Company, 
of Richmond, Virginia. He was the amateur golf champion of 
Virginia in 1926. 



22 VIRGINIA 

Joseph Carter Smith. Although he is still numbered among 
the younger members of the legal calling, the professional inti- 
mates of Joseph C. Smith unhesitatingly place him among the 
most able young general practitioners who have come to the bar 
of Lynchburg in recent years, as he seems to be perfectly at 
home in every department, whether civil or criminal, common 
law or chancery, real estate or corporation law. Because of this 
breadth and comprehensiveness of knowledge he has earned a 
place as a splendid lawyer at an age when most young profes- 
sional men are struggling for recognition and going through a 
long, arduous and disheartening period of probation. 

Mr. Smith was born near Galliopolis, Ohio, in August, 1900, 
and is a son of A. J. and Myrtle (Carter) Smith, residents of 
Ohio and natives of that state. The family is one of the old 
and distinguished ones of the Buckeye State, having settled in 
the Western Reserve during pioneer days, and most of its mem- 
bers there have been agriculturists. The paternal grandfather 
of Joseph C. Smith was Brice Smith, a tiller of the soil, who at 
the call to arms during the war between the states enlisted in 
the Union army and through his gallant service demonstrated 
how fiercely civilians can fight. A. J. Smith received a public 
school education and was reared in the midst of agricultural 
surroundings, so that it was but natural he should adopt farming 
as his life work. For a number of years he carried on his opera- 
tions in his native state, but in 1907 came to Culpeper County, 
Virginia, where he purchased a farm and resided thereon for 
about twenty years. Mr. Smith then disposed of his property 
and went back to Ohio, where he is now spending the evening 
of life in comfortable retirement, free from the worries of busi- 
ness activities. Mr. Smith is a Democrat in his political views 
and one of the strong and influential men of his community, 
where he has served capably in the office of justice of the peace, 
as well as in other local capacities. He and his worthy wife are 
faithful members of the Baptist Church, which both joined in 
their youth. They are the parents of three children : Joseph C. 
Smith, of this review; Mary Louise, the wife of Dr. B. E. Hunt, 
a practicing physician of Logan, West Virginia; and Helen Car- 
ter, who is the wife of Dr. R. S. VanMetre. The maternal grand- 
father of Mr. Smith, Richard Carter, was also born in Ohio, and 
served as a Union soldier during the war between the states. 
Like the paternal grandfather, also, he was an agriculturist, 
and a man who was held in high esteem in his community. 

Joseph C. Smith was a child when his parents came to Vir- 
ginia, and attended the public schools of Richmond and the 
University of Richmond, and at the same time was employed 
by the Western Electric Company in order to keep himself in 
funds. In 1924 he completed his law studies and at once com- 
menced the practice of his profession at Richmond. After two 
years at the capital he removed to Lynchburg, where he has since 
remained, having well appointed offices in the Law Building. 
He has pressed his suits with ardor, ability and success in many 
of the county courts and has been connected with much import- 
ant litigation. For so young a man Mr. Smith has demonstrated 
much hard-headed common sense and keen insight into human 
nature, while his personal charm and magnetism have brought 
him into close and immediate touch with juries, so that every 
man on the panel feels that here is a man without mysticism 
or obscurity. Thus he has won a way to success and to a place 
in the esteem and respect of his fellow members of the Camp- 



VIRGINIA 23 

bell County Bar Association, the Virginia State Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. For a time after his arrival 
Mr. Smith was engaged in practice with Alfred B. Perry, but 
since the latter's death, October 19, 1927, has practiced alone. 

Mr. Smith married Miss Gladys Millar Reams, daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. G. L. Reams, of Lynchburg. He belongs to the 
Baptist Church and the Kappa Sigma and Delta Theta Phi 
fraternities, and in his political views is a Democrat. 

Greenwood H. Nowlin, Jr., of Lynchburg, is a prominent 
coal operator of Southern West Virginia, and his talents have 
been employed in the exploitation of the Pocahontas and other 
smokeless coal areas of West Virginia for many years. 

He was born at Lynchburg, August 30, 1878, son of G. H. 
and Lelia (Pendleton) Nowlin, and grandson of Peyton Wade 
Nowlin and James Shepherd Pendleton, the former a native of 
Virginia, also the latter, born at Clifford in Amherst County. 
James S. Pendleton was a doctor and farmer, having attended 
the Virginia Military Institute about 1836, and afterwards 
graduated from the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia. 
Peyton Wade Nowlin lived near Brookneal, Virginia, and his 
ancestors came to Virginia from County Carlow, Ireland. G. H. 
Nowlin, Sr., was born in Osage County, Missouri, but spent most 
of his life in Virginia and died in 1914. He was on detached 
duty for the Confederate government during the Civil war, and 
at the end of the war had only fifteen cents in money. He cut 
wood and hauled it to town as a means of supporting himself 
and getting a start, and for several years was in the leaf tobacco 
business. He became associated with the coal industry on the 
opening up of the Pocahontas fields in West Virginia, and became 
one of the large operators. Through all the years he retained 
some connection with the tobacco business and was a director 
of the Lynchburg and Durham Railway Company. He was a 
member of the vestry of St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Lynch- 
burg, was a Mason and a Democrat. His wife died in 1899, and 
of their five children four are living: Greenwood H., Jr.; R. P. 
Nowlin, in the tobacco industry, Lynchburg, Virginia; R. A. 
Nowlin, associated with the Crozer Land Association and the 
Crozer Coal & Coke Company at Elkhorn, West Virginia; and 
James Pendleton, in the coal business at Beckley, West Virginia. 

Greenwood H. Nowlin, Jr., attended school at Lynchburg, 
continuing his education in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute 
and the University of Virginia, and took a special course in 
steel analyses and metallography under Dr. Albert Saveur at 
Boston in 1903. He was an assistant metallurgist for the United 
States Steel Corporation, assigned to duty at the Illinois Steel 
Works at Chicago, and later with the Tennessee' Coal, Iron & 
Railway Company at Ensley, Alabama. He was taken ill at 
Ensley, and after recuperating he engaged in the coal business, 
becoming secretary of the Killarney Smokeless Company. He 
is now president of that company and is also president of the 
Lynchburg Coal & Coke Company, president of the Eureka Coal 
& Coke Company, president of the Lynchburg Colliery Company. 
The source of production of coal by all these organizations is in 
West Virginia, and Lynchburg is the headquarters of the busi- 
ness management and sales agencies. 

Mr. Nowlin married, in 1917, Beulah Terrell, who was born 
in Bedford County, Virginia, but has spent all her life in Lynch- 
burg, attending public schools there. Her father, Charles H. 

2— VOL. 3 



24 VIRGINIA 

Terrell, was a farmer in Bedford County. Mr. and Mrs. Nowlin 
are members of St. Paul's Episcopal Church and he has been a 
member of the church choir for over thirty years. He is a York 
Rite Mason and Shriner, member of the B. P. 0. Elks, the Pied- 
mont Club, and has membership in the American Institute of 
Mining and Metallurgical Engineers, the American Chemical 
Society, and not only enjoys prominence among the coal opera- 
tors and executives of the industry, but also with the technical 
and engineering side of the industry. 

James A. Fix. Among the building contractors who have 
contributed by their expert labors to the development, upbuild- 
ing and architectural beauty of Lynchburg, none are more 
worthy of mention than James A. Fix, head of the old estab- 
lished firm of J. A. Fix & Sons. Stai-ting to learn the trade of 
carpenter when a lad of but fifteen years, by industry, honest 
workmanship and close application to his calling he has worked 
his way to a leading position among the contractors of Campbell 
County, where numerous commodious and attractive structures 
of various kinds stand as monuments to his ability. 

Mr. Fix was born at Staunton, Virginia, December 30, 1865, 
and is a son of Joseph H. and Barbara (Snapp) Fix. His father, 
a native of Pennsylvania, came to Virginia in his youth and 
learned carpentry, a vocation which he followed until the out- 
break of the war between the states, when he enlisted in the 
Confederate army and saw active service until the close of hostil- 
ities. He then returned to Staunton and continued to follow 
his trade until his death, at which time he was also the owner 
of a valuable farm. He was a man of integrity and one who 
was held in high esteem in his community, was active in the 
Methodist Church, and a Democrat in his political allegiance. 
He married Barbara Snapp, also a native of Pennsylvania, and 
a member of the Methodist Church, in the faith of which she 
died. They were married in Virginia and became the parents 
of eleven children, of whom nine are living. 

The second in order of birth of his parents' children, James 
A. Fix received only a common school education, as his assist- 
ance was needed to help support the family, and when he was 
only fifteen years of age he began to learn the carpenter trade 
under the preceptorship of his father. While his schooling was 
not extensive in his youth, in later years he has attained a good 
practical education through reading, observation and constant 
contact with his fellow men. For a number of years he worked 
as a journeyman, but finally embarked in business on his own 
account at Charlottesville and later at Staunton, and finally, in 
1894, settled at Lynchburg, where he has since been known as 
one of the city's leading contractors. His sons are now associates 
in the firm of J. A. Fix & Sons, and this concern has erected 
many of the substantial and attractive! residences, business 
structures and public buildings of this and adjacent communi- 
ties. Mr. Fix is a member of the Rivermont Presbyterian 
Church, and as a fraternalist belongs to the Woodmen of the 
World. He is a Democrat in politics, but has found little time to 
devote to public affairs aside from those which affect the im- 
mediate welfare of his community, when he can be relied upon 
to support measures for the general progress and advancement 
of Lynchburg. 

In 1898 Mr. Fix married Miss Fannie Dooms, who was bom 
and educated in Nelson County, Virginia, and is a daughter of 




*Wm.f.. 



VIRGINIA 



25 



Henry Dooms, who was a life long farmer in that county. ; To 
this union there were born six children : Henry S., who is 
associated with his father in business; Gussie Elizabeth, who 
resides at home; George W., who is associated with his father 
in business ; Anna Belle, the wife of Dr. W. C. Adkinson, a prac- 
ticing physician of Lynchburg; Gladys, the wife of Lloyd 
Rickets, identified with a mercantile establishment at Lynch- 
burg; and Mary Frances, attending a school at Farmville, where 
she is preparing for a career as an educator. Mr. Fix's offices 
are located in the Lynch Building. 

Lawrence H. McWane. Among the former business men 
of Lynchburg who have now completed their labors and passed 
to the Great Beyond, one who left the impress of his personality 
upon his community and generation was the late Lawrence H. 
McWane. At the time of his death, in 1925, he was still a young 
man, being but forty-two years of age, but already had accom- 
plished much in the way of advancing himself in public con- 
fidence and esteem and was the capable and energetic presi- 
dent of the Lynchburg Foundry Company, one of the city's 
principal manufacturing industries. Without any time for the 
activities which bring men before the public as molders of 
thought and opinion, he nevertheless was accounted a good and 
public-spirited citizen who discharged his duties and responsi- 
bilities in a commendable manner. 

Mr. McWane was born at Wytheville, Wythe County, Vir- 
ginia, in 1883, and received a public school education at Lynch- 
burg. A complete report of the life of his father will be found 
on another page of this work, included in the sketch of F. W. 
McWane. After leaving public school Mr. McWane entered Mil- 
ligan College, Tennessee, where he completed a full course, and 
then enrolled as an employe of the McWane Pipe Works, at 
Lynchburg, of which his father had been the founder. He was 
content to begin his work in a humble capacity and to learn the 
business thoroughly, with the result that at the time of his 
father's demise he was ready to step into the elder man's place 
as president at the time of his death and to hold this position 
until his own demise. As before noted, Mr. McWane was a man 
of energy and sound ability and one who was achieving an envi- 
able success when called in death. He had won the respect and 
esteem of his associates and of the employes of the plant, who 
found him a man who was fair-minded and possessed of a sense 
of justice. The bu-siness profited materially under his adminis- 
tration of its affairs, and is still operated as the Lynchburg 
Foundry Company. 

In 1904 Mr. McWane was united in marriage with Miss Car- 
rie Witt, daughter of J. F. and Dora (Hurst) Witt, natives of 
Virginia, both of whom survive as residents of the southwest- 
ern part of the state. For many years Mr. Witt was a mer- 
chant at Pennington Gap, Virginia, but is now retired from 
business affairs. To Mr. and Mrs. Witt there were born seven 
children, Mrs. McWane, of this review, being the eldest. Mr. 
and Mrs. Witt are active members of the Christian Church, and 
Mr. Witt is a Democrat in his political allegiance. 

To Mr. and Mrs. McWane there was born one daughter, 
Maurine, who attended the public schools of Lynchburg and the 
Holton-Arms School, Washington, D. C, and now resides with 
her mother in their home on Lee Circle, Lynchburg. On April 
7, 1928, she was united in marriage with Garnett Sowder, of 



26 VIRGINIA 

Radford, Virginia. Mrs. McWane and her daughter are mem- 
bers of the Christian Church, to which Mr. McWane belonged. 
He was appreciative of the society of his fellows and was a 
member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and at 
one time president of the local Lions Club. He was always in- 
terested in civic affairs, to which he gave of his time, ability 
and means. 

Richard A. Carrington, the chief expression of whose com- 
mercial energies has been a large and successful wholesale shoe 
business at Lynchburg, is a member of the distinguished Car- 
rington family of Virginia which has given men of leadership 
in the professions, business and military affairs for generations. 

He was born at Rustburg in Campbell County, Virginia, 
August 17, 1869, son of Dr. George W. and Mary A. (Alex- 
ander) Carrington, and his grandfather was Dr. Richard 
Carrington, a Virginian, who for many years practiced medicine 
at Richmond, where he owned a beautiful home, burned during 
the Civil war. The maternal grandfather was John D. Alex- 
ander, a native of Campbell County, who was clerk of courts in 
that county for many years. One of the Alexander family was 
the first clerk of courts in the county. Dr. George W. Carring- 
ton was born at Richmond, was educated in the University of 
Virginia, had hospital training in New York and practiced in 
Richmond and Ashland, and in his later years lived at Rustburg. 
He finally gave up his professional practice to serve as grand 
secretary of the Grand Lodge of Masons of Virginia. He was a 
Democrat in politics, had served as a surgeon in the Confederate 
army during the Civil war, and was a vestryman of the Epis- 
copal Church. He and his wife had five children, the three now 
living being Richard A. ; Mary, wife of L. T. Stanard, connected 
with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railway at Richmond ; and Louise, 
wife of P. C. Hubard. 

Richard A. Carrington was educated in common schools and 
began work at an early age. He was first employed in a tobacco 
factory, for five years was with the Virginia Nail and Iron 
Company, and his first connections with the shoe business were 
as a traveling salesman. He was on the road ten years and in 
1905 became one of the organizers of the Lynchburg Shoe Com- 
pany, Incorporated. He was president of this company for some 
years, and the "active officers today are : R. A. Carrington, Jr., 
president, and E. L. Carrington, vice president, with Mr. Car- 
rington still on the Board of Directors. This is one of the 
large wholesale shoe houses of the Southeast, and maintains 
a staff of twenty-six traveling salesmen covering territory in 
West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, Virginia and all the other 
Southern states. 

Mr. Carrington began work at the age of sixteen and his 
well directed energies brought him a competence at a compara- 
tively early age. Among other property he owns the old estate 
of the late John W. Daniel. Mr. Carrington attends St. Paul's 
Episcopal Church at Lynchburg and is affiliated with the 
Masonic fraternity and B. P. O. Elks. 

He married, November 8, 1893, Miss Katherine Page Lang- 
horne, a native of Lynchburg, daughter of Charles S. and Kath- 
erine Page (Haller) Langhorne, the former of whom was in 
the milling business. Mr. and Mrs. Carrington have two sons. 
Edward Langhorne Carrington, the older, vice president of the 
Lynchburg Shoe Company, was educated at Bellevue, Virginia, 



VIRGINIA 27 

and the Episcopal High School at Alexandria. He married 
Nannie 0. Pettyjohn. Richard Alexander Carrington, Jr., was 
educated in the Episcopal High School at Alexandria and the 
University of Virginia. He married Miss Harold James, who 
was born at Danville. Her father, Dr. Bruce James, is a pro- 
fessor in the Virginia Military Institute. Richard A. Carring- 
ton, Jr., and wife have one daughter, Kate Langhorne Car- 
rington. 

John Early Jackson. With the ever-expanding need for 
electricity has come technical training for the various phases 
of the industries thus created, and then men thus prepared are 
able to assume vast responsibilities and to render valuable ser- 
vice, not only to the companies employing them, but to their 
communities as well. One of these thoroughly trained and 
responsible men above referred to is John Early Jackson, man- 
ager of the Appalacian Electric Power Company of Lynchburg, 
whose ability is unquestioned and whose citizenship is pro- 
ductive of great constructive results. Mr. Jackson was born 
in Nashville, Tennessee, January 29, 1902, a son of Granbery 
and Margaret (Early) Jackson, he born in Mount Pleasant 
and she in Nashville, Tennessee, and they are still residing in 
Nashville. Although a civil engineer the father is not now 
practicing his profession but is engaged in the phosphate bus- 
iness, in which he was a pioneer in his part of Tennessee. He 
owns considerable phosphate land that is operated by different 
big corporations. Vanderbilt University, Nashville, educated 
him, and he is a worthy product of that great instittuion. Two 
children wei'e bora to him and his wife, of whom Mr. Jackson of 
this review is the elder, the other being Granbery, Junior, who 
is studying architecture in the University of Pennsylvania. The 
father is a Presbyterian and the mother a Methodist, and both 
are devoted church workers. The Democratic party has his 
staunch support. His father, paternal grandfather of John 
Early Jackson, was a native of Virginia. The maternal grand- 
father, John F. Early, was a son of Right Reverend John Early, 
the Methodist Bishop so long a resident of Lynchburg. 

Growing up in his native city, John Early Jackson attended 
its public schools and Vanderbilt University, and later was a 
student of Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which 
he was graduated in 1924. For a year thereafter he was in 
the employ of the General Electric Company, Schenectady, New 
York, and then, in 1925, he came to Lynchburg to become man- 
ager of his present company, in which connection he is giving 
unqualified satisfaction. 

In June, 1926, Mr. Jackson married Miss Elinor Jones, who 
was born in Saint Louis, Missouri, and was educated in Farm- 
ington College and the Choate School, Brookline, Massachusetts. 
Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have one daughter, Margaret Early Jack- 
son. They are members of the different social organizations of 
their neighborhood, and have a delightful home life. She is an 
Episcopalian and he a Methodist. While in Vanderbilt Univer- 
sity Mr. Jackson made Kappa Alpha, and he is a member of the 
Lynchburg Rotary Club. All of his time is taken up with his 
responsibilities as manager of his company so he has no other 
business connections. Mrs. Jackson is a daughter of George R. 
Jones, a native of Nashville, and a shoe merchant of that city. 
At one time he had a shoe factory in Saint Louis, and it was 
while living there that Mrs. Jackson was born. The Jones 



28 VIRGINIA 

family originated in Virginia, and it is claimed that Petersburg, 
this state, was named in honor of Peter Jones, a pioneer of the 
region, from whom Mrs. Jackson is directly descended. 

Howell C. Featherston. In almost every case those who 
have reached high position in public confidence and esteem and 
who are accounted among the most influential in business and 
professional lines are those whose lives have been devoted with- 
out cessation to deep study ai^d close application. It is probable 
that the law has been the main highway by which more men of 
merit have advanced to prominence and position in this country 
than any other road, and it is not unusual to find among the 
leading citizens of a community a legal practitioner. To respond 
to the call of the law, to devote every energy in this direction, to 
broaden and deepen every possible channel of knowledge and to 
finally enter upon his chosen career and find its rewards worth 
while — such has been the happy experience of Howell C. Feath- 
erston, one of the leading legalists practicing at the bar of 
Lynchburg. Mr. Featherston has gained honor and prestige in 
his profession through the application of honesty, energy, per- 
severance, conscientiousness and self-reliance, and has kept 
abreast of his calling in its advancement; but it is not alone as 
a lawyer that he is known to the people of Lynchburg, for he 
has a recognized standing as one who understands sound invest- 
ments, and is the owner of large real estate holdings. 

Howell C. Featherston was born in Campbell County, April 
27, 1871, a son of John C. and Letitia Preston (Floyd) Feather- 
ston, he born in Limestone County, Alabama, and she in Camp- 
bell County, Virginia, and both are now deceased. The father 
was a farmer for many years, and for a long period he served 
as chief of the business bureau of the State Grange. Active in 
politics, he was sent to represent Campbell County in the Vir- 
ginia General Assembly, and he held minor local offices as well. 
Two children were born to him and his wife, namely : N. F. 
Featherston, who is connected with the United States Treasury 
Depai'tment, Washington City and Mr. Featherston of this re- 
view. Both of the parents were active workers, he as a Method- 
ist and she as an Episcopalian. In fraternal affairs he was a 
Mason and was advanced to the Chapter in his order. During the 
war between the states he served as a first lieutenant and later as 
captain, remaining in the service until peace was declared, al- 
though he was shot through the body in the battle of Gettysburg. 
After the close of the war he wrote a description of the battle of 
the "Crater" at Petersburg which Senator Daniel declared was 
the best ever written. Captain Featherston delivered it before a 
meeting of the Grand Camp of Confederate Veterans at Peters- 
burg, and later delivered it before a meeting of the Pottsville 
Camp of the Grand Army of the Republic at the organization's 
annual meeting in Pennsylvania, and among his audience were 
veterans who had blown up the crater July 31, 1864, leaving a 
hole 170 feet long, sixty feet wide and thirty feet deep, into 
which the Union forces poured before they could be stopped, 
and were engulfed and smothered. It was generally conceded 
by both sides as being the most horrible of any of the engage- 
ments of the war. A fine portrait of Captain Featherston hangs 
in the Confederate Battle Abbey at Richmond, Virginia. The 
paternal grandfather of Attorney Featherston was Maj. Howell 
C. Featherston, a native of South Carolina, who moved to Ala- 
bama, and there became an extensive cotton planter. The ma- 



VIRGINIA 29 

ternal grandfather was Nathaniel Wilson Floyd, born in Ken- 
tucky, but a resident of Virginia for the greater part of his life, 
and a very large cotton planter, not only of Virginia but of 
Texas as well. His brother, Charles Floyd, was a sergeant on 
the Lewis and Clark Expedition into what became the North- 
west Territory. 

Howell C. Featherston of this review first attended the schools 
of Lynchburg, New London Academy, and finally the University 
of Virginia, and was graduated from the latter in 1893, with the 
degree Bachelor of Laws. Immediately thereafter he began the 
practice of his profession in Lynchburg, and here he has since 
remained, having built up a very large and valuable connection, 
and handling a general line of cases. Like his father he is deeply 
interested in politics, and served in the Lower House in 1908, 
and in the Senate in 1912, and he is accepted as one of the leaders 
of the Democratic party in his part of the state. 

In 1909 Mr. Featherston married Miss Virginia Carroll Kelly, 
who was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, a daughter of Rev. Gilby 
C. Kelly, a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Mrs. Featherston was educated in Louisville, Kentucky, Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, and Birmingham, Alabama, and in Randolph- 
Macon College. Reverend Kelly is now retired and is residing 
in Norfolk, Virginia, after a long and useful ministerial career. 
Mr. and Mrs. Featherston have one child, Virginia Kelly Feather- 
ston, who is attending school. Both Mr. Featherston and his 
wife are Methodists, and he is a steward of the Court Street 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Fraternally he is a Mason ; 
and he belongs to the Piedmont Country Club, the Campbell 
County Bar Association, the Virginia State Bar Association and 
the American Bar Association. Mr. Featherston is a man who 
has ever lived up to high ideals in his profession, and is now 
reaping the rewards of his years of faithful service. Standing 
high among his associates, he earnestly strives to prove worthy 
of his responsibilities, and the success which attends him proves 
that his skill is unquestioned and the confidence he inspires well 
merited. Broad in his sympathies, he has always given liberally 
to aid worthy charities, and his support can be depended upon 
in the furtherance of measures he believes will work for the 
advancement of the majority. 

Martin L. Brown. Printing, the art of producing impres- 
sions from characters or figures on paper or any other sub- 
stance, is of comparatively modern origin, only about four and 
a quarter centuries having passed since the first book was issued 
from the press, yet there is to be found proof that the principles 
on which it was ultimately developed existed among the ancient 
Assyrian nations. Printing from movable types was practiced 
in China as early as the twelfth or thirteenth century, as there 
are Korean books printed from movable clay or wooden types 
in 1317. The great discovery was that of forming every letter 
or character of the alphabet separately, and the credit of in- 
venting this simple yet marvelous art is contested by the Dutch 
and Germans. Among the men of Virginia who have made the 
art of printing their life work, and who have won success and 
position in this line of endeavor, one of the best known is 
Martin L. Brown, who in 1909 founded at Lynchburg the pres- 
ent firm of Brown-Morrison Company, printers and engravers. 
Mr. Brown was born on a fami in Amherst County, Vir- 
ginia, August 13, 1877, and is a son of Martin L. and Flora 



30 VIRGINIA 

(Higginbotham) Brown, natives of Amherst County, both of 
whom are now deceased. Mr. Brown traces his ancestry on 
the paternal side directly to another Martin L. Brown, who was 
a soldier of the Continental forces during the winning of 
American independence. The paternal grandfather of Mr. 
Brown was Joseph M. Brown, a pioneer of Amherst County, 
who passed his life there in agricultural pursuits. Martin L. 
Brown, the elder, father of Martin L. of this review, grew up 
in a tobacco country and as a young man engaged in business 
as a tobacconist, which vocation he followed for some years. 
During the war between the states he enlisted in the Confed- 
erate army, with which he served until the close of the strug- 
gle. During his service he contracted consumption, but man- 
aged to keep the dreaded disease at bay for many years. On 
leaving Amherst County he took up his residence at Lynchburg, 
where he engaged in the grocery business, and this home con- 
tinued to be his place of residence until his death in 1893. He 
and his wife were the parents of ten children, of whom seven 
are living: James R., a traveling salesman of Benefield, West 
Virginia ; William T., a woodworker of Washington, D. C. ; 
Martin L., of this review; Mrs. J. W. Coleman, of Lynchburg; 
Miss Lottie K., secretary to the pastor of the First Baptist 
Church of Lynchburg; Walter W., who is engaged in business 
with his brother, Martin L. ; and Mrs. James T. Spracher, the 
vdfe of a department store proprietor of Bluefield, Virginia. 
The parents of the foregoing children were honorable God- 
fearing people and active members of the Baptist Church. He 
was a Mason fraternally and a Democrat in his political views, 
and for some years served in the capacity of justice of the 
peace. The maternal grandfather of Martin L. Brown was 
James A. Higginbotham, a pioneer farmer and sheriff of Am- 
herst County, where he, his father and his grandfather all were 
born. This was one of the old and honored families of the Old 
Dominion, and its members were highly respected and esteemed 
people of high character. 

Martin L. Brown received only a public school education, 
following which he applied himself, when only a youth, to the 
mastery of the printer's art, in which he has been engaged 
throughout a long, active, varied and ultimately successful 
career. For an extended period he was employed by others in 
various places, and for three years he was the manager of a 
printing business at Canton, China, but eventually returned to 
the city of his youth and in 1909 founded the present business 
of Brown-Morrison Company, which has been developed into 
one of the best in the state. The large, modern plant, located 
at 718 Main Street, in the heart of the business district, is 
equipped with the latest improved machinery of every char- 
acter, so that the company is capable of turning out all kinds 
of work in printing, engraving and lithographing. Approxi- 
mately fifty-five skilled printers are given employment in the 
various departments of this concern, in the operation of which 
the skilled, guiding hand of Mr. Brown can everywhere be seen. 
He bears an excellent reputation in business circles as a man of 
integrity and a master of his trade, and also has the respect, 
esteem and loyalty of his employes. While he is a very busy 
man with extensive interests, Mr. Brown has been active in 
civic and other afl:airs. He is a member of the College Hill 
Baptist Church, in which he has held numerous offices, and has 
been a member of the Board of Directors of the local Young 




LA^A^'^i' Ijla^9^.^. 4^4,^A% 



VIRGINIA 31 

Men's Christian Association. He ie a Scottish Rite Mason and 
divan of the Mystic Shrine, and also belongs to the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

On May 24, 1900, Mr. Brown married Miss Annie Yoder, 
who was born at Lynchburg, a daughter of Jacob E. Yoder, 
who came to Lynchburg with the Freedman's Bureau following 
the close of the war between the states. Her father married 
Anna Frances Whittaker, who came to Lynchburg with the 
North Baptist Missionary Society, and was a descendant of 
Roger Williams, the founder of the State of Rhode Island, and 
nobly distinguished as the first asserter in modern Christen- 
dom of the sanctity and perfect freedom of conscience. To Mr. 
and Mrs. Brown there were born five children: Wayland Y., of 
Hopewell, Virginia, who is identified with the silk company 
there and is the father of one daughter, Corinne Wayland, born 
in 1923; Calvin C, who is superintendent of his father's print- 
ing plant and a young man of much ability; Mary E., a student 
at Randolph-Macon Woman's College ; Martin L., who is attend- 
ing high school at Lynchburg; and Annie Yoder, a pupil in the 
public school. 

William D. Mount, M. E. One of the outstanding figures 
of Lynchburg, William D. Mount, with offices in the Peoples 
Bank Building, has steadily advanced in his profession of 
engineering until today he is one of the leading consulting 
engineers of Virginia, and a man who has been connected with 
some of the most important construction operations not only 
of private corporations, but of the Government. He was born 
at Groton, Tompkins County, New York, July 13, 1867, a son 
of William and Lucretia (Giles) Mount, both of whom were 
natives of New York State, and are now deceased. He was a 
carpenter by trade, but became a school teacher and served as 
local magistrate. Two children were born to him and his wife, 
Mr. Mount of this review and his younger brother, Joseph 
Mount, of Tonawanda, New York, where he is superintendent 
of a pulp mill. The father belonged to the Congregational 
Church. In politics a Prohibitionist and Republican, he lived 
up to his convictions, and being a well educated man, could 
always give cogent reasons for his actions. During the war 
between the states he served as captain of Company F, One 
Hundred and Ninth New York Volunteer Infantry. His father, 
William D. Mount, was born in New Jersey, but moved to New 
York at the time of his marriage, settled in a wilderness, and 
became a tanner, and later was made a magistrate. The mater- 
nal grandfather was James Giles, a native of New York, who 
pioneered into its sparsely settled regions and became a very 
successful farmer. He was a contemporary and personal friend 
of Ezra Cornell, whose donations of $750,000 made possible the 
founding of Cornell University at Ithaca, New York, named in 
his honor. 

William D. Mount attended public schools and Sibley College, 
Cornell University, and was graduated from the latter with the 
degree of Mechanical Engineer in 1890. From 1890 to 1894 
he was a member of the faculty of Brown University, for three 
years being an instructor in physics and for one year, assistant 
professor of mechanical engineering. 

In July, 1894. Mr. Mount began work as an electrical engineer 
for the Mathieson Alkali Works, Saltville, Virginia. During 
1895 and 1896 he was in charge of the development work of 



32 VIRGINIA 

the Castner Process for electrolytic production of caustic soda 
and bleaching powder, which work afterward developed into 
the Castner Electrolytic Alkali Company, Niagara Falls, New 
York. In August, 1898, he was made general superintendent 
of the Mathieson Company, in entire charge of all operations 
as well as all engineering work. Later he was made general 
manager and a director of the company, which positions were 
held until November, 1918, since which date he has been in 
business for himself as consulting mechanical and electrical 
engineer, giving special attention to development of continuous 
gas fired vertical lime kilns, continuous causticizing and lime 
recovery ; filtration problems and chemical plant design. During 
the period of his connection with the Mathieson Company very 
extensive changes and improvements in the plant and processes 
were planned and carried through under his supervision. He 
also had charge of the commercialization of the Bucher Process 
for the fixation of nitrogen, which process was taken over by 
the Government, and he served in a consulting capacity during 
the construction of Government Chemical Plant Number 4. 

Since 1897 Mr. Mount has been a full member of the Amer- 
ican Society of Mechanical Engineers, and he is also a member 
of the American Chemical Society and an honorary member 
of the Alpha Chapter of Sigma Xi. In addition he is a member 
of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Tech- 
nical Association of the Pulp & Paper Industry. 

The following is a list of foreign patents which have been 
issued in the name of William D. Mount: Cmiadian Patents — 
Methods and Apparatus for Handling Foaming and Frothing 
Liquids, Pat. No. 246859, February 17, 1925 ; Causticizing Units, 
Pat. No. 249783, May 19, 1925; Continuous Filters, Pat. No. 
257166, January 12, 1926. French Patents — Improvement in 
Kilns, Pat. No. 602729, dated August 28, 1925; Continuous 
Filters, Pat. No. 610898, dated August 28, 1925; Causticizing 
Unit, Pat. No. 608190, dated September 15, 1925; Process and 
Apparatus for Wood Pulp Production, Pat. No. 607726, dated 
October 15, 1925. Norway Patents — Causticizing Unit, Pat. No. 
43059, dated September 2, 1925; Continuous Filters, Pat. No. 
43784, September 11, 1925. Siveden Patents — Causticizing 
Units, Pat. No. 62972, dated August 22, 1925. Belgian Patents 
—Continuous Filters, Pat. No. 328924, dated August 29, 1925; 
Causticizing Units, Pat. No. 328686, dated August 29, 1925; 
Kilns, Pat. No. 328652, dated August 29, 1925; Process and 
Apparatus for Wood Pulp Production, Pat. No. 329414, dated 
October 17, 1925. Finland Parents— Causticizing Units, Pat. 
No. 11287, dated September 2, 1926; Continuous Filters, Pat. 
No. 11454, dated September 7, 1925; Method and Apparatus 
for Handling Foaming and Frothing Liquids, Pat. No. 11526, 
dated September 3, 1925; Process and Apparatus for Wood 
Pulp Production, Pat. No. 11527, dated November 3, 1925. 
English Patents — Continuous Filters, Pat. No. 265679, dated 
August 12, 1925: Causticizing Units, Pat. No. 265669, dated 
August 12, 1925; Kilns, Pat. No. 265654, dated August 12, 1926; 
Process and Apparatus for Wood Pulp Production, Pat. No. 
269256, dated August 12, 1925. United States — Flakers, No. 
1340732. Patented May 18, 1920; Filters, No. 1348036, Patented 
.July 27, 1920; Power-Ti-ansmission Devices, No. 1392348, Pat- 
ented October 4, 1921 ; Storage Devices, No. 1526171, Patented 
February 10, 1925: Filters (Washers), No. 1558038, Patented 
October 20, 1925; Methods and Apparatus for Handling Foam- 
ing and Frothing Liquids, No. 1560286, November 3, 1925. 



VIRGINIA 



33 



Philip W. Payne. Those who daily see the thousands of 
automobiles which crowd every street and highway, passing and 
repassing in countless numbers, find it hard to reconcile them- 
selves to the fact that in point of years this is still really an 
infant industry, the extent of whose growth in the future cannot 
be even approximated. Yet the fact remains that the automobile 
still is to be considered as only in its first growth of maturity. 
In 1902, which is but a quarter of a century ago, one of the most 
authentic encyclopedias gave the following somewhat quaint 
description : "Automobiles, a term under which are comprised 
horseless carriages, motor vans, motor omnibus, and all other 
motor traction vehicles adapted for use on ordinary roads un- 
provided with rails." The same work is authority for the fact 
that in the summer of 1898 there were not thirty automobiles in 
use in the United States, but by August, 1899, at least eighty 
companies had been organized for the manufacture of motor 
cars. By 1926, according to the number of cars registered, 
there were 19,237,171 passenger cars and 2,784,222 trucks in use 
in this country. 

One of the men who had the vision to note the great oppor- 
tunities which the future held out in this business was Philip 
W. Payne, who first became identified with the industry in 1910, 
and since 1919 has been the head of the Phil Payne Motor Com- 
pany of Lynchburg, dealers in Nash and Marmon automobiles. 
Mr. Payne was born at Lynchburg, October 27, 1889, and is a 
son of Elias and Belle Stuart (Walker) Payne. His paternal 
grandfather, Philip W. Payne, was born in Campbell County, 
Vii'ginia, and at the outbreak of the war between the states 
enlisted in the Confederate army, with which he served until the 
close of hostilities. He then located at Lynchburg, where for 
many years he was engaged in the dry goods business, and where 
he was known as a substantial business man of high character 
and personal probity. 

Elias Payne was born at Lynchburg, where he secured a 
public school education, and was in the coal, lumber, wood and 
general supplies business in association with the firm of Adams 
& Brothers & Company, being with that concern at the time of 
his death in 1916. He was an active member of the Westminster 
Presbyterian Church, was affiliated with the Masonic Order, and 
his political convictions made him a Democrat. He married Miss 
Belle Stuart Walker, who was born at Richmond, and died in 
1919 at Lynchburg, and they became the parents of thirteen 
children, of whom three survive : Isabelle, the wife of J. R. 
Wheeler, a druggist of Lynchburg ; H. A., who is connected with 
the Southern Railway at Lynchburg; and Philip W., of this 
review. The maternal grandfather of Philip W. Payne was 
Lindsey Walker, a native of Richmond, who was a noted civil 
engineer of his day and assisted in the building of the Chesa- 
peake & Ohio Railroad from Richmond to Lynchburg. 

The public schools of Lynchburg furnished Philip W. Payne 
with his educational training, and following his high school 
training he secured a position as clerk and bookkeeper in a 
retail shoe store. From this position he advanced to that of 
bookkeeper for an insurance company, but in 1910 resigned his 
position to enter the employ of the Apperson-Lee Motor Com- 
pany. Mr. Payne knew immediately that he had found the 
business for which he was best equipped, and set about learning 
its every detail. In the meantime he conserved his financial 
resources, and in 1919 found himself in a position to establish 



34 VIRGINIA 

an automobile agency under the style of the Payne and Dillon 
Company, at first handling the Chandler car. Later he took 
over the Nash and Marmon agencies, for which he is the auth- 
orized agent in six counties surrounding Lynchburg. He has 
built up a large and successful enterprise and maintains a com- 
modious and modern salesroom and service and filling station at 
815 Fifth Street, where he also handles all kinds of automo- 
bile parts and accessories. The firm is now known as the Phil 
Payne Motor Company. 

Mr. Payne is unmarried. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner, and belongs to the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, the United Commercial Travelers and the Travelers Pro- 
tective Association. As a citizen he has always been public 
spirited and a supporter of the causes of education, religion and 
higher morality. 

Edgar Patton Miller, president of the First National Bank 
of Lynchburg, was born in that city December 12, 1861, son of 
John M. and Mary E. (Norvell) Miller. His great-grandfather 
was a teacher at Richmond, and the grandfather, Samuel T. 
Miller, who was born at Richmond November 22, 1789, gave 
practically his entire life to educational work, and for many 
years conducted a noted boys school at Cedar Forest on the 
Staunton River. He died at Lynchburg March 30, 1870. By 
his marriage to Frances Fitzpatrick he was the father of eight 
sons and six daughters, all of whom were educated and in one 
way or another continued the educational tradition and interest 
of the family. 

John M. Miller, one of the sons, was born October 5, 1827, 
left school at the age of sixteen to take up a commercial career, 
soon located at Lynchburg, and was teller and subsequently 
cashier of the Exchange Bank of Virginia before and during the 
Civil war. When the First National Bank of Lynchburg was 
organized in 1865 he was offered but declined the office of cashier. 
Subsequently he became associated with James Franklin in the 
private banking firm of Miller & Franklin, and was active in this 
banking house until his death on January 25, 1881. After his 
death the interests of the firm were taken over by the newly 
organized National Exchange Bank, which subsequently became 
the Lynchburg National Bank. 

John M. Miller was for many years a prominent official in 
St. Paul's Episcopal Church of Lynchburg. His wife, Mary E. 
Norvell, was a daughter of Lorenzo and Lucy (Harrison) Nor- 
vell, and her maternal grandfather located at Lynchburg about 
1785 and was a member of the first town council when Lynch- 
burg was incorporated in 1805. 

Edgar Patton Miller was educated in private schools, in 
Doctor Abbott's Bellevue School in Bedford County, and in 1878 
became a junior clerk in the banking firm of Miller and Franklin. 
After his father's death he continued with the National Ex- 
change Bank as junior clerk, and later was made teller. In 
September, 1890, he became the first cashier of the Lynchburg 
Trust & Savings Bank, and in June, 1895, became cashier of the 
First National Bank of Lynchburg, an institution with which he 
has been identified for over thirty years. Mr. Miller has been 
continuously in the banking business at Lynchburg for just half 
a century. He has been president of the First National Bank 
since December 2, 1909. He is a former president of the Virginia 
State Bankers Association, and was one of the organizers of 



VIRGINIA 



35 



the Cooperative Building and Loan Association and one of the 
founders of the Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce. He attends 
the Episcopal Church and has served as a trustee of the Lynch- 
burg Orphan Asylum, and has also been on the City Council. 

He married, October 15, 1903, Eleanor Selden Lucke. They 
had three daughters: Eleanor Selden and Lucy Harrison, and 
Norvell Harrison, who died at the age of two years. 

James W. Walters, a specialist in eye, ear, nose and throat, 
is a native of Virginia and since establishing himself at Lynch- 
burg has gained a reputation that has extended all over Cen- 
tral Virginia as a man of acknowledged skill and resourceful- 
ness. 

Doctor Walters was born in Madison County, Virginia, in 
1880, son of John P. and Anna J. (Walker) Walters, and a 
grandson of Isaac H. Walters and Col. James W. Walker, all 
residents of Madison County. His maternal grandfather was a 
colonel of militia before the Civil war. Isaac H. Walters spent 
his life as a farmer. John P. Walters, who died in 1895, was 
educated in the University of Virginia, was a civil engineer by 
profession, but devoted most of his active years to farming in 
Madison County. His widow died June 19, 1928, at Orange. 
Both were active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, and John P. Walters was a Confederate soldier. There 
were four children and the three now living are Dr. James W., 
Annie E., wife of E. B. Grimes, of Orange, and Charles, a resi- 
dent of Orange, who is interested in the lumber business at 
Charlottesville. 

Dr. James W. Walters was educated in the public schools of 
Madison County, in the Woodbury Forest School, Randolph- 
Macon College at Ashland, and in 1901 entered the Medical 
College of Virginia at Richmond, graduating in 1905. He was 
a member of the Pi Mu medical fraternity at Richmond. Doc- 
tor Walters distinguished himself for his scholarship and all 
round ability, and after taking his medical degree he spent 
eighteen months as an interne in the Memorial Hospital at 
Richmond, and for three years was on the adjunct teaching 
staff of Cornell University of New York, and was resident 
phj'sician at the New York Eye and Ear Infirmary in New 
York City. With this exceptional training and experience he 
located at Lynchburg in 1911, and has since limited his work 
to eye, ear, nose and throat. He is a member of the Lynchburg 
and Campbell County and South Piedmont Medical Societies, 
the Medical Society of Virginia, and the American Medical As- 
sociation. Doctor Walters is a Methodist, a Scottish Rite 
Mason and Shriner, and member of the Kiwanis Club. He was 
a captain in the Medical Corps during the Woi'ld war. 

He married, in 1914, Miss Kate E. Edmunds, of Lynchburg, 
who was educated in Randolph-Macon Woman's College. He 
is a member of the Episcopal Church. They have one daugh- 
ter, Harriett Prescott Walters, born in 1919. 

Benjamin Allen Ruffin was born in Richmond, Virginia, 
May 9, 1879. He is a son of George Edwin and Ada Cora 
(Harden) RufRn and a grandson of George Edmund Ruffin, a 
relative of Judge Thomas Ruffin of North Carolina. 

Mr. Ruffin was educated in the public schools of Chesterfield 
County, Virginia, the Chester Academy and Randolph-Macon 
College. His business career begun in Richmond as an insurance 



36 VIRGINIA 

agent. After twenty-five years in business in Richmond and 
New York City Mr. Ruffin is today president and principal 
owner of B. A. Ruffin & Company, general insurance agents, is 
a partner of Charles M. Robinson, architects, and vice president 
of W. C. Hill Printing Company. 

From 1914 to 1918 Mr. Ruffin served on the Insurance Com- 
mittee of the American Bankers Association and is the author 
of various copyright insurance policies and bonds adopted and 
used by member banks of the association. He is a past grand 
chancellor of the order of Knights of Pythias and at this writ- 
ing is president of Lions Interaational. 

He is also lecturer for the Greater Men's Bible Class of Monu- 
ment M. E. Church at Richmond. In these various activities he 
is widely known as a speaker and author. 

Charles S. Adams, president of the Adams Brothers-Paynes 
Company of Lynchburg, is with the lumber organization of which 
his father was one of the founders, and has had a very successful 
experience of nearly thirty years in the lumber business in 
Virginia. 

Mr. Adams was born at Lynchburg, Virginia, November 28, 
1873, son of Richard H. T. and Susan (Scott) Adams. His 
grandfather, Isaac Adams, was a farm owner in Appomattox 
County, Virginia. The maternal grandfather, Charles Scott, 
was a railroad contractor of Lynchburg and also owned a large 
farm in Bedford County. Richard H. T. Adams grew up on a 
farm, and as a young man was in the grocery business at Rich- 
mond until the war broke out. He then joined the Home Guard 
at Lynchburg and served throughout the war under the com- 
mand of Gen. A. P. Hill. He rose to the rank of captain. After 
the war he removed to Lynchburg, where he joined an older 
brother, I. H. Adams, who had started a coal, lumber and build- 
ing supply business. Still another brother, W. D. Adams, came 
into the partnership and finally J. G. Payne entered the business. 
In 1898 the Adams Brothers-Paynes Company was incorpo- 
rated, and that name has been retained for thirty years. It is 
one of the oldest incorporated lumber firms in Southwest Vir- 
ginia. The original officers of the corporation were: I. H. 
Adams, president; C. I. Johnson, vice president; J. G. Payne, 
secretary and treasurer. The officers of the company today are : 
Charles S. Adams, president ; J. C. Dabney, vice president ; J. G. 
Payne, secretary and treasurer. Richard H. T. Adams contin- 
ued active in this organization until his death in 1901, but for 
some years had also given much of his attention to the export 
tobacco trade. His widow is still living in Lynchburg. Both 
were active members of the Court Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church and Richard H. T. Adams was a Mason and a Democrat 
in politics. There were nine children, eight of whom are living : 
Mrs. H. H. Harris ; R. H. T. Adams, Junior, a Lynchburg attor- 
ney ; Charles S. ; Jack Adams, connected with the George W. 
Helme Snuff Company ; James D. Adams, secretary-treasurer of 
Harris Woodson Company ; Susan Scott Adams, who lives with 
her mother; Mrs. D. D. Hull, of Roanoke; and H. C. Adams, 
proprietor of the White Star Laundry. 

Charles S. Adams attended school at Lynchburg and was a 
boy of seventeen when he first became an employe of the Adams 
Brothers-Paynes Company in 1890. However, in 1896 he left 
the firm to become associated with his father in the tobacco busi- 



VIRGINIA 



87 



ness. In 1903 he returned to the himber business and for a quar- 
ter of a century has had a prominent part in its growth and 
development as one of the largest wholesale lumber and building 
supply firms of the state. Mr. Adams is also a director in the 
Peoples National Bank of Lynchburg. 

He married, in 1905, Miss Lottie Griifiin, who was born in 
Bedford County and was educated in the Girls' Seminary at 
Bedford. Her father, Samuel Griffin, was a lawyer at Bedford 
and Roanoke. Mr. and Mrs. Adams have three children. Char- 
lotte Russell is a graduate of the Cathedral School for girls at 
Washington. Nancy Scott Adams is a student in the Gardner 
School at New York. Charles S. Adams, Junior, was born in 
1914 and is attending the Lynchburg High School. The family 
are members of the Saint Johns Episcopal Church. Mr. Adams 
is a York Rite Mason and Shriner, member of the B. P. 0. Elks, 
the Piedmont Club, the Oak Wood Country Club and is a charter 
member of the Rotary Club. 

Robert S. Burruss. The successful man in any line is the 
one who first determines his natural abilities and the occupation 
in which they will have free play, and then operates so as to 
provide something for which there is a demand, or goes about 
creating such a demand. In spite of all of the inventions of 
substitutes, and the discoveries of other substances to take the 
place, lumber remains the basic need for countless industries, 
and its production is of vast importance, especially in those 
sections adjacent to the timberlands. Virginia still has large 
stores of timber upon which, even in strict compliance with con- 
servation laws and principles, its operators in the industry may 
still draw, and so has its sister state of North Carolina, and one 
of the men who is doing a very large business in manufacturing 
lumber and wholesaling it is Robert S. Burruss, of Lynchburg, 
one of the city's substantial business men. 

Robert S. Burruss was born in Campbell County, Virginia, 
August 6, 1884, a son of James M. and Ida F. Pringle Burruss, 
the latter of whom, a native of Halifax County, Virginia, is 
still living on the home farm, but the former, born in Campbell 
County, died in September, 1904. He was a farmer and lum- 
berrnan. The parents had six children, two of whom survive, 
Mr. Burruss of this review, and W. H. Burruss, the two being 
in partnership in their lumber business. W. H. Burruss was 
also born in Campbell County. He married Miss Helen Currell, 
and they have three children : Sarah, Helen and William H., 
Junior. The parents belonged from youth up to the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in which he was a leader, and she 
continues to be active in it. He was a Mason and a Democrat, 
and zealous in behalf of fraternity and party. His father was 
Thomas Burruss, a native of Virginia, and with five brothers 
served in the Confederate army. The paternal great-grand- 
father was an Englishman who settled in Virginia at an early 
day. The maternal grandfather, Richard Pringle, was a native 
of Halifax County, Virginia, and a physician, and he, too, was 
a veteran of the Confederate army. 

Robert S. Burruss attended public school until he was sixteen 
years old, at which time he began working in his father's lum- 
ber business, remaining with him until his death. In 1905 he 
and his brother came to Lynchburg and established themselves 
in the lumber business here, and have built up very wide con- 
nections, having mills in Virginia and North Carolina, and 



38 VIRGINIA 

selling their product at wholesale. Theirs is one of the largest 
concerns of its kind in this part of the state. 

In 1913 Mr. Burruss married Miss Ada Moorman, who was 
bom in Campbell County, Virginia, and here educated. Mr. and 
Mrs. Burruss have one child, Robert S., Junior, a schoolboy. 
Mrs. Burruss belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
As a York Rite and Shriner Mason, an Odd Fellow and Elk, 
and as a member of the Hoo Hoos, Mr. Burruss lives up to high 
ideals, and he has served the last named order as vice president 
since moving to Lynchburg. It is his honest belief that what 
he has accomplished any industrious young man can do, espe- 
cially when so many advantages are now offered that never 
came his way. He is never satisfied to rest upon what he has 
done, but is ever working for something just beyond, and as 
he has great ability he never fails to grasp firmly what he 
undertakes. Having worked his way up from the bottom of his 
business, he knows what to expect of his men, how to make due 
allowance for them, and is greatly respected by them and by his 
whole community, in his neighborhood and in his fraternities. 

James Morrison, M. D. Medical science has so progressed 
that advances are made in it almost hourly. Specializing ob- 
servations on disease have worked marvelous changes in meth- 
ods of treatment; tireless theoretic experiments have proven 
the truth of contentions, and only after results have been dem- 
onstrated beyond any reasonable doubt are discoveries given 
to the public. In the work of tTie past quarter of the century 
are to be noticed such practical advances as the development 
of bacteriology, the partially successful effort to wipe out tuber- 
culosis, bubonic plague, cholera, diphtheria, typhoid, spinal 
meningitis and similar maladies. This marvelous progress has 
not come naturally, but is the outcome of the tireless, aggres- 
sive and self-sacrificing work of the men who have devoted 
themselves to the profession of medicine. One of the men 
whose name is connected with some excellent work in his large 
practice at Lynchburg is Dr. James Morrison, a physician who 
has risen through his own efforts to a high position. Having 
the misfortune to lose his parents while still small, he was early 
thrown upon his own resources, and must be regarded as self- 
made in the highest conception of the term. 

Doctor Morrison was born in Lexington, Rockbridge County, 
Virginia, November 2, 1871, a son of Dr. Robert Hall and Mar- 
garet (White) Morrison, the former of whom was born in 
Rockbridge County and the latter in Lexington. The father 
was a physician, educated in the University of Virginia and 
Jefferson Medical College, and when he had received his degree 
he engaged in the practice of his profession in Lexington. With 
the outbreak of war between the states he ofi'ered his services 
to the Confederacy, and served under Gen. Fitzhugh Lee. He 
and his wife had three children born to them, but Doctor Mor- 
rison is the only survivor. Both were active members of the 
Presbyterian Church and very fine people, and their son in- 
herits many of their admirable characteristics. 

From childhood he resolved upon a medical career. Doctor 
Morrison struggled to secure the necessary education, first along 
academic lines, and later in medicine, studying the latter in the 
medical department of the University of Virginia, from which 
he was graduated in 1898, with the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine. Later he took work in the New York Polyclinic, and had 



VIRGINIA 



39 



an interneship in New York City. After several years devoted 
to a countiy practice he did post-graduate work in diseases of 
the eye, ear, nose and throat, and in 1901 came to Lynchburg, 
where he has since been specializing in this branch of the 
domain of medicine. 

In 1901 Doctor Morrison married Miss Elizabeth McCulloch, 
a daughter of Fred McCulloch, he born in Fort Wayne, Indiana, 
a son of Hugh McCulloch, who served in the cabinet under 
President Lincoln. Doctor and Mrs. Morrison have had two 
children born to them: Fred McCulloch, who is studying medi- 
cine in the University of Virginia, and a prominent member of 
Phi Kappa Psi, and Margaret Carolyn. Robert Dabney is an 
adopted son, is also attending the University of Virginia. Mrs. 
Morrison is an Episcopalian, and he is a Presbyterian. His 
fraternal aliiliations are with the Masonic Order and the Elks. 
He belongs to the Oakwood Country Club, the Campbell County 
Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical Society, the South- 
ern Medical Association, the American Medical Association, the 
State Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Association, and he is a Fellow 
of the American College of Surgeons. His entire time is de- 
voted to his practice so that he has no business connections, but 
he is interested in the progress and continued prosperity of 
Lynchburg and its vicinity, and willing to give liberally of his 
means to forward and maintain these conditions. 



Richard E. White, of Bedford, is a banker, president of the 
Citizens National Bank, one of the strongest financial institu- 
tions in that section of the state. Its otTicers and directors in- 
clude some of the outstanding citizens of Bedford County. The 
Citizens National Bank has capital and surplus of $200,000, and 
it is one of the banks whose steady growth has brought its re- 
sources above a million dollars. At the close of business in 1927 
the resources stood at the figure of over one million six hun- 
dred thousand dollars. 

Mr. White was born on a farm in Bedford County, March 10. 
1870, son of Henry Milton and Louise (Majors) White and 
grandson of Jacob S. White. The White family for several 
generations have been identified with farming and planting in 
Bedford County. His maternal grandfather, Howard Majors, 
was also a Bedford County farmer. Henry Milton White was 
reared on a farm and at the age of twenty-two engaged in mer- 
chandising at Big Island, and died at the comparatively early 
age of thirty-one. His widow, who was educated at Hollins 
College, died in 1897, having married a Mr. Smith. By the first 
marriage there were two children, Richard E. and Samuel, the 
latter of whom died at the age of eight years. The three chil- 
dren from the second marriage were : Robei't Fullerton Smith, 
with the National Stock Yards at Saint Louis; Duncan Smith, 
an architect at Saint Louis; and Harry Pritchard Smith, also 
with the National Stock Yards at Saint Louis. Henry Milton 
Vvhite was a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Richard E. White received his early education in country 
schools and the New London Academy, and had his first business 
training in a store at Bedford. From there he went with the 
Lynchburg Trust & Savings Bank, and was with that institution 
nine years, gaining a tnorough knowledge of banking. He 
started as bookkeeper and was assistant cashier when he left. 
Returning to Bedford, he was made cashier of the Citizens Na- 
tional Bank in 1914, and has been president of the institution 



40 VIRGINIA 

since 1921. He has concentrated his business energies fully on 
the bank and personally deserves a large amount of credit for 
its steady growth and prosperity. 

Mr. White married, in 1898, Magnolia Pendleton Wright, 
who was born in Nelson County, Virginia, daughter of William 
H. Wright, who moved to Bedford County about 1888 and lived 
the rest of his life on the Colonel Davis farm. Mrs. White was 
educated at Bedford and in the Belmont Seminary there. They 
have two children, Marion Louise and Isabelle, the former a 
student in Hollins College. Mr. and Mrs. White are active 
members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Bedford. He 
has been on the Board of Stewards of the church for twenty- 
seven years, chairman of the financial committee, and for seven- 
teen years has taught a Bible class of young men. He is affili- 
ated with the Masonic fraternity. 

E. Craige Pelouze, manager of Pelouze Printers Supply 
Company, is a prominent citizen of Richmond, and a member of 
a family of famous typefounders, of whom the best known, per- 
haps, was the late Henry L. Pelouze, father of E. Craige Pelouze, 
and he was a son of Edward Pelouze, the first of the name to 
engage in typefounding. Edward Pelouze was born in West 
Windsor, Connecticut, March 22, 1799, of French parents. His 
father, who was an officer in the French army, was imprisoned 
at the time of the French Revolution, but made his escape and 
came to America. 

In 1801 Edward Pelouze was taken by his parents. Dr. 
Edmond Pelouze and Sarah de'Jean Pelouze, to Charlestown, 
New Hampshire, where the Pelouze home remains to this day 
in an excellent state of preservation. In 1794 Doctor Pelouze 
was employed in a French printing office in Philadelphia as 
translator. During the interruption of his practice in medicine 
Edward was reared and educated in Charlestown. 

From boyhood he exhibited a taste for mechanics, and in 
1818, leaving his old home, went to Boston, Massachusetts, seek- 
ing an opportunity to develop that taste. There he entered the 
only type foundry in the city, that had just been opened by 
Bedlington & Ewer, and in it he soon proved his ability. One 
of his associates was Michael Dalton, and these two formed a 
warm friendship. Mr. Dalton married the sister of Mr. Pelouze. 
The latter learned typemaking in all of its branches, as was the 
custom in those days, but became especially skillful in mold- 
making and matrix fitting. He also learned punch-cutting, and 
was one of the few cutters at that time. 

Not long after he came to Boston Mr. Pelouze married Har- 
riet Maria Thompson, of New York, and he continued to make 
that city his home until 1829, when he went to New York City 
and was employed in White's foundry as punch-cutter and 
matrix fitter, but did not remain there long, for in June, 1830, 
he embarked in his own business, corner of Fulton and Nassau 
streets. While there his three sons, Edward, William and Henry, 
took their first lessons in typefounding, each starting as a 
breaker boy, and working up through the various branches as 
they grew older. 

In 1849, like so many others, he decided to go to California 
on the quest for gold, and therefore sold his business, but did 
not succeed, as he had expected, so returned to New York in 1850 
and took a position in the foundry of James Conner, with whom 



t 




VIRGINIA . 41 

he continued for about three years, going then to Boston once 
more, and with John K. Rogers and David Watson purchased 
the Boston Typefoundry, operating it under the name of John K. 
Rogers & Company. His health failing, in 1864 he sold his 
interests in Boston and went to Camden, New Jersey, where he 
continued to reside at the home of a daughter until his death, 
June 4, 1876. 

The life of Edward Pelouze was too active to allow him to 
remain idle, and much of his time in his later years was spent 
with his brother Lewis in Philadelphia, where he continued to 
assist by his advice and experience in the foundry of the latter. 
During the many years he was connected with typefounding he 
made numerous inventions and added largely to the improve- 
ments of the tools of his trade. He was the inventor of a type- 
casting machine which was used for some time, until superseded 
by the more perfect one of David Bruce, Jr., which was so long 
in use, and continues as the only practical machine for hand 
casting. He is also given credit for the invention of the electro- 
typed matrix, which permitted a rapid duplication of type faces. 
As a moldmaker he had no superior in his day, and but few 
equals. While not ranking high as a punch-cutter, he produced 
several faces which were used extensively. Belonging to a period 
in typefounding when rapid changes were taking place, he had 
an oppoi'tunity of observing and aiding in the wonderful ad- 
vances. He was contemporary with Bruce, White, Conner, 
Hager, Smith and Cortelyou, and shared with them the honors 
of typefounding. 

While Edward Pelouze was making a name for himself in 
New York City in connection with the typefounding industry, 
his younger brother, Lewis Pelouze, was gaining a strong foot- 
hold in Philadelphia. He was born in North Charlestown, New 
Hampshire, March 25, 1808, and he too learned typefounding, 
passing through all the different branches and became proficient 
in all to a degree seldom attained by the workmen of today. For 
fifteen years he was with Binny & Ronaldson, later the Ronald- 
son Type Foundry, and then, in 1841, he established himself in 
business as a typefounder, corner of Third and Chestnut streets, 
Philadelphia, and there he continued actively in business until 
his death, March 5, 1876, the original sign bearing the name 
"Lewis Pelouze" being a landmark to the printing fraternity of 
that city long after he was no more. He soon built up a lucra- 
tive business, having among his life long patrons such news- 
papers as the Public Ledger, the Philadelphia North American, 
the Baltimore Sun and the Washington Evening Star. His 
foundry was among the first to introduce typecasting machines, 
and at one time the Lewis Pelouze Type Foundry gave every 
indication of becoming one of the leading concerns of the coun- 
try. Ill health and the preference of the two sons for other 
pursuits, the elder entering West Point Military Academy, and 
afterwards achieving success as an officer in the Regular Army, 
caused his foundi->' to fall behind in the race, although he con- 
tinued to retain the good will and patronage of his friends and 
early customers as long as he lived. 

After the death of Louis Pelouze the business descended to 
relatives, and was conducted under the old name until 1892, 
when it was sold to the American Type Founders Company, and 
by them closed out. Thus passed out of existence one of the 
landmarks of Philadelphia, and a business which had been hon- 



42 VIRGINIA 

orably conducted and enjoyed the patronage and good will of 
so many. 

Henry L. Pelouze, son of Edward Pelouze and nephew of 
Lewis, was born at the time that his father was carrying on the 
business of typefounding in New York City and his uncle was 
engaged in the same business in Philadelphia, and he grew up 
in the business and mastered all of its branches under his 
father's supervision. When he was eighteen years old he became 
foreman of his uncle's foundry in Philadelphia, then one of the 
leading foundries of the country. In 1854 he made a trip to 
Chicago, where he was convinced there was an opening for a 
typefoundry, and he received so much encouragement from 
printers and publishers that he decided to locate there, and 
returned to Philadelphia to complete his arrangements. His 
wife, Eliza Jane Tuthill, was so opposed to the idea of leaving 
her friends and old associations for what was then the "far 
West" that he was forced to abandon the project. Soon there- 
after he as offered an opportunity to locate in New York City, 
and he and S. R. Walker founded the firm of Walker & Pelouze, 
and their foundry was located corner of Fulton and Dutch 
streets, then in the heart of the printing district. The new firm 
secured the business of the New York Tribune, and among the 
warm personal friends of Mr. Pelouze at that time was Thomas 
Rocker, so long foreman of that newspaper, and Robert Bonner, 
a compositor on the same paper, and they greatly aided the 
new firm. 

In 1859, in order to enlarge the business, a branch was 
opened in Richmond, Virginia, by Mr. Pelouze, Mr. Walker re- 
maining in charge of the New York business. Before his plans 
were completed, however, war was declared, and Mr. Pelouze 
was not able to get through the lines until 1862, when, receiving 
permission, he returned to New York to learn that because of 
the illness of his partner the business had become demoralized, 
and a fresh start had to be made. While he was in Richmond 
he was imprisoned for some time in Libby Prison as a Northern 
sympathizer, but later, through the intercession of the pro- 
prietors of the Richmond Whig and influence of Gen. Harry 
Pelouze, adjutant under General Grant, he was paroled and 
engaged in typefounding, as the whole Confederacy was suffer- 
ing for type. Many were the straits he experienced to get the 
raw material. It was impossible to secure antimony and tin, 
so the principal ingredients of his type-metal were lead and 
what little old type could be secured. One dress of the Richmond 
Dispatch lasted just six weeks as it was almost entirely of lead. 

At the close of the Civil war Mr. Pelouze returned to Rich- 
mond and found his machinery in working order. With the 
assistance of his cousin, Charles E. Pelouze, and his nephew, 
H. L. Hartshorn, he began to rebuild his fortunes under the 
style of H. L. Pelouze & Company. In spite of adverse circum- 
stances the firm prospered fairly well and in 1869 the idea was 
conceived of starting a branch at Washington to be near the 
Governmental printing office, and this was placed under the 
charge of the nephew, H. L. Hartshorn. The venture was suc- 
cessful until 1875, when the nephew retired from the firm to go 
to Philadephia, and he was succeeded by Frank Pelouze, and the 
style was changed to H. L. Pelouze & Son. 

The new firm purchased the old Baltimore Type Foundry in 
1879, thus establishing a chain that embraced Baltimore, Rich- 



VIRGINIA 43 

mond and Washing-ton, the head of the firm giving the most of 
his attention to the Richmond house, while Washington and 
Baltimore branches were managed by the son. The Baltimore 
branch was sold to Charles J. Gary about 1883, and the firm 
concentrated on the Richmond and Washington branches. In 
1895 Henry L. Pelouze made over his interests to his youngest 
son, E. Graige Pelouze, who reorganized under the name of the 
Pelouze Paper and Type Company. 

In the meanwhile Mr. Pelouze had become interested in 
politics, and was nominated for Congress from the Richmond 
district in the campaign which elected Garfield to the Presi- 
dency. The situation in Virginia was very much mixed up, and 
in the interests of harmony he was induced to withdraw in favor 
of John S. Wise, the representative of what is known as the 
Mahone wing. Later he was asked to accept the position of 
postmaster at Richmond, but again declined in the interest of 
harmony in his party. Dropping politics, he gave more of his 
time to social and other duties, and served for two terms as 
worshipful master of Lodge Francais, A. F. and A. M. He 
also served Richmond Gommandery as its eminent commander, 
and was a member of the Ancient Ai-abic Order Nobles of the 
Mystic Shrine. 

It was the ambition of Henry L. Pelouze to see opened at 
Richmond a successful hotel, and this idea became so absorbing 
that after he had disposed of his business he purchased the Law 
Building and began to remodel it for a hotel. This occupied his 
time and energies until the time of his death. During the winter 
of 1895-96 he was attacked with Bright's disease, and this 
malady increased until August 11, 1896, when death relieved 
his sufferings. 

Henry J. Pelouze was a very active man, one of untiring 
energy, but of a nervous temperament, but, while at times his 
manner was brusque, those who knew him admired him for his 
many excellent qualties of mind and heart. He was well known 
to the old school of typefounders— Dalton, Bruce, James, Wil- 
liam Connor, Hager, MacKellar, grandfather of Joseph Her- 
gesheimer, the writer, and in fact all of those engaged in the 
industry during the last half of the nineteenth century. That 
he was popular in the city of his adoption is shown by his 
election and appointment for several years to the City Council 
of Richmond, where he ever labored for the development and 
impro\ement of its material aff'airs. He also served as director 
in several state institutions in Virginia, giving his time and 
talents to their cause. While always an avowed LTnion man, 
he was none the less popular with his neighbors, who were almost 
unanimous in their allegiance to the cause of the Confederacy, 
and numbered many of them among his most intimate friends. 

E. Graige Pelouze attended Glaverack College, New York, 
from which he was graduated in 1887. He had grown up in 
the typefounding business, as had his father before him, and 
has always been identified with it. As above stated, in 1895, 
his father made over the business to him, and he reorganized 
as the Pelouze Paper and Type Company, continuing to operate 
it until it was absorbed by the American Typefounders Com- 
pany, he continuing as manager of the Richmond branch until 
February, 1928, when he severed his connections to establish 
the Pelouze Printers Supply Company, in the same building his 
father started the type founders business in 1859. 



44 VIRGINIA 

Although he has never cared to enter politics, E. Craige 
Pelouze has always been active in civic affairs, and he accom- 
plished especially effective work, covering a period of four years, 
in bringing about the construction of the Washington-Richmond 
Highway, which was completed in June, 1927. Among other 
interesting events of his career may be mentioned that he was 
the owner and driver of the first automobile in Virginia. 

For many years Mr. Pelouze has been prominent in Masonry, 
and belongs to Joppa Lodge No. 40, A. F. and A. M. ; Washington 
Chapter No. 9, R. A. M. ; Richmond Commandery No. 2, K. T. ; 
and Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He was 
the originator of Samis Grotto of the Mystic Order Veiled 
Prophets of the Enchanted Realm in Richmond, and is a past 
grand monarch of this order in the United States and Canada. 
At the annual convention of the order in Cleveland, Ohio, in 
June, 1927, he was instrumental in having Richmond designated 
as the place for the annual gathering in 1928. 

Mr. Pelouze married Miss Nannie J. Tillyer, of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, a descendant of one of the prominent American 
families of Colonial and Revolutionary history through inter- 
marriage of the Rapaley family, of French origin, and Hogeland 
family of Holland, who were among the original settlers of New 
Amsterdam, New York City. Mrs. Pelouze is active in the 
affairs of the local chapters of both the Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution and the Colonial Dames. Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze 
have two children : Henry L., who is a graduate of the Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute ; and Lucile Tillyer Pelouze. 

Howell A. Robinson is a prominent Lynchburg citizen and 
business man. He has lived in that locality practically all his 
life, started his career without financial resources, and has been 
instrumental in giving widespread distribution to one of the 
most important of Virginia's agricultural products, the peanut. 
Mr. Robinson is head of H. A. Robinson & Company, Incorpo- 
rated, manufacturers and distributors of peanut products. 

He was born at Lynchburg, July 19, 1857, son of James A. 
and Mary V. (Love) Robinson, his father a native of Lynch- 
burg, while his mother was born in Bedford County, Virginia. 
His grandfather, Howell Robinson, was born in Bedford County, 
and when he died in 1855 was the first person buried in the 
Spring Hill Cemetery at Lynchburg and was accorded the 
honors of a military funeral. The maternal grandfather, 
Charles Love, was born at Lynchburg and through his life was 
connected with the tobacco business. James A. Robinson was 
also a tobacconist. He was in the provost marshal's office dur- 
ing the Civil war. He began voting as a Whig and later became 
a Democrat, and both he and his wife were active members of 
the Baptist Church. Of their seven children Howell A. is the 
only one now living. 

Howell A. Robinson had his educational advantages in 
Lynchburg and Petersburg, and he came to manhood about the 
close of the reconstruction era. On leaving school he clerked 
in a tobacco house, and it was in 1895 that he engaged in the 
peanut business. The firm of H. A. Robinson & Company, In- 
corporated, has developed an extensive business in the roasting 
of peanuts, the making and packing of peanut butter and other 
peanut products. These products are widely distributed under 
the brand Robinson Crusoe Salted Peanuts and Glove Kid Pea- 
nut Butter. The output is sold chiefly through brokers and job- 



VIRGINIA 45 

bers over twelve states of the Union, and the firm also keeps sev- 
eral traveling representatives on the road. 

Mr. Robinson married, in 1883, Miss Nanie Gresham, who 
was born in Chesterfield County, Virginia, and was reared and 
educated at Richmond. Her father, Edwin A. Gresham, was 
born in King and Queen County, was a lumberman, and in his 
later years lived at Washington and was in the insurance busi- 
ness. Mr. and Mrs. Robinson had a family of four sons and one 
daughter : James Edward, who was educated at Lynchburg and 
is now a traveling representative for his father's firm; Mary, 
wife of S. B. Fishel, of Lynchburg; Charles Eaton, who at- 
tended school at Lynchburg and the University of Virginia, is 
associated with his father's business; William G. and Joseph 
A., both of whom are in business with their father. The mother 
of these children died in May, 1925. Mr. Robinson is a member 
of the First Baptist Church, is a Scottish Rite Mason, a past 
grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and for a num- 
ber of years was treasurer and director of the Odd Fellows 
Home at Lynchburg. 

Jesse L. Davidson, co-publisher of the Bedford Bulletin, has 
been interested in the publishing and printing business since 
early manhood and has also been an important citizen in the 
aff'airs of his home locality. 

He was born at Bedford, August 22, 1876, son of Arch V. 
and Amanda F. (Sublett) Davidson, both natives of Charlotte 
County, and grandson of Allen Davidson and Benjamin F. Sub- 
lett, also of Charlotte County, farmers of that locality. Arch V. 
Davidson followed the trade of blacksmith at Bedford for a 
great many years, and died in 1903, at the age of seventy-nine. 
His widow is now ninety-one years of age, living at Bedford. 
Both were active members of the Baptist Church and Arch 
Davidson was a Confederate soldier in the Civil war. Of his 
seven children four are living. 

Jesse L. Davidson, who has never married, was educated in 
public schools and as a boy learned the printing trade. That 
trade has given him his chief occupation and his main business 
for over thirty years, and he has made the Bulletin a very 
strong and influential newspaper. Mr. Davidson sei^ved some 
time as president of the Rotary Club, is active in Democratic 
politics and is supervisor of game wardens in the Lynchburg 
District. He holds stock in several banks and has employed his 
personal influences as well as the power of his newspaper to 
promote better schools and other organizations connected with 
community welfare. 

Dice Robins Anderson since April, 1920, has been president 
of Randolph-Macon Woman's College at Lynchburg. As an in- 
stitution for the higher education of young women Randolph- 
Macon has had a splendid history, and fortunately its modern 
equipment, facilities and personnel enable it to take advantage 
of its traditions. According to the exacting standards of pres- 
ent day classification it ranks as one of the leading colleges for 
women in the United States. 

Dice Robins Anderson is a native Virginian, born at Char- 
lottesville April 18, 1880, son of Rev. James Madison and Mar- 
garet Olivia (Robins) Anderson. His father was born in 
Amelia County, Virginia, in 1837, received part of his educa- 
tion in Randolph-Macon College, then located at Boydton, Vir- 



46 VIRGINIA 

ginia, was ordained in the Methodist ministry at the age of 
nineteen, and labored in the Virginia Conference until his death 
in 1906. He was chaplain of a Virginia regiment during the 
Civil war. Among other pastorates he was located at Norfolk 
in the Cumberland Street Church, at Hertford, North Carolina, 
Blackstone, Virginia, and for four years each was presiding 
elder of the Danville and Charlottesville districts. His second 
wife, Margaret Olivia Robins, was born in Accomac County in 
1842, of a family that has lived on the eastern shore of Virginia 
for many generations. They had two sons. Dice R. and Joseph 
E., the latter a Methodist minister and business man. 

Dice Robins Anderson was educated in the Hoge Military 
Academy, subsequently known as the Blackstone Military Acad- 
emy, took his A. B. degree at Randolph-Macon College for Men, 
at Ashland, in 1900, his Master of Arts degree there in 1901, and 
the Doctor of Philosophy degree at the University of Chicago in 
1912. William and Mary College in 1924 bestowed upon him 
the Doctor of Laws degree. His early service as an educator 
was spent with a number of institutions. He was professor of 
mathematics at the Central Female College of Lexington, Mis- 
souri, in 1901-02, instructor in history at Randolph-Macon 
Academy at Bedford City, Virginia, in 1902-03, principal of the 
Chesapeake Academy at Irvington, Virginia, from 1903 to 1906, 
and president of the Willie Halsell College at Vinita. Oklahoma, 
in 1906-07. During 1907-08 he was fellow in history at the 
Universitv of Chicago, and instructor in history there in 
1908-09. 

Doctor Anderson in 1909 took the chair of history and polit- 
ical science at Richmond College, and for ten years was a resi- 
dent of the capital city. During 1919-20 he was professor of 
economics and political science, and director of the School of 
Business Administration. From 1915 to 1920, in addition to 
his work at the college, he was executive secretary of the Rich- 
mond Civic Association. In December, 1919, he was elected 
president of Randolph-Macon Woman's College and took up his 
administrative duties there in April of the following year. He 
was a lecturer at the Richmond School of Social Economy in 
1917, at the Virginia Mechanics Institute in 1919, was president 
of the Department of Colleges of the Virginia Educational Con- 
ference in 1922-23, president of the Virginia Association of Col- 
leges in 1923, was editor of the Richmond College Historical 
Papei's for 1915, 1916 and 1917, and has prepared and delivered 
and also published many articles on historical and political sub- 
jects. He is author of William Branch Giles: A Study in the 
Politics of Virginia and the Nation. 1790-1815, published in 
1914, and Edmund Randolph, second Secretary of State, is 
in the Secretaries of State Series. 

Doctor Anderson is a Phi Beta Kappa, also a Tau Kappa 
Alpha and Phi Kappa Sigma, member of the American Histor- 
ical Association, and has been a member of the Virginia Annual 
Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for a 
number of sessions, He was a member of the General Confer- 
ence of the church at Hot Springs, Arkansas, and was recently 
elected Lay Leader for the Virginia Conference of the Method- 
ist Church, South. He is a Democrat. 

Doctor Anderson married, June 24, 1903, Miss Ada James 
Ash, who was born at Somerset, Perry County, Ohio, daughter 
of James Ash. She graduated from high school at Kansas City, 
Missouri, also attended Vassar College, and is a graduate in 



M 




^^^^^^^^^^.t^^^ >ir-c/ 



VIRGINIA 47 

music from Oberlin College, continuing her musical studies in 
Saint Louis and Chicago. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson have two 
children, Dice R., Jr., and William Dodd. The older son gradu- 
ated from Randolph-Macon College at Ashland in 1925. 

Thomas Jefferson Hughes, M. D. Success in life along 
any path of endeavor demands honesty, energy, proper prepara- 
tion, conscientiousness and self-reliance. Genius may also be 
present, but for permanency, practical qualities and the homely 
virtues are necessary. To the undoubted possession of these 
may we, in part, attribute the success that has crowned the 
efforts of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Hughes, who has figured promi- 
nently in the medical profession of Roanoke for a number of 
years, and has maintained throughout his entire career a high 
standard of professional ethics and scientific principles. 

Doctor Hughes was born in Smyth County, Virginia, Novem- 
ber 27, 1876. He was the second son of William Hector Hughes, 
who was the fifth son of Jesse Hughes. Jesse Hughes was in 
the fourth generation of descent from Robert Hughes, who im- 
migrated to Virginia from Toffe, near Cardiff in Wales, Eng- 
land, and who was a direct descendant of the King of Gwent, 
Prince of Cardigan. The Hughes family belonged to the Welsh 
nobility and had their coat-of-arms and motto. Robert Hughes 
on coming to Virginia settled in Powhatan and Cumberland 
counties, reared a large family, members of which intermarried 
with the well known Colonial families of Randolph, Jefferson, 
Woodson and Flemings. 

Through his father's mother Doctor Hughes is descended 
from William Randolph of Yorkshire, England, who settled at 
Turkey Island on the James River in Virginia, and afterwards 
acquired Curies Neck just across the river. William Randolph 
married Mary Isham, of Gloucester County, and one of their 
children was Isham Randolph, who settled at Dungeness, a splen- 
did estate on the Upper James River in what is now Goochland 
County. His eldest daughter, Jane, married Peter Jefferson, 
from which union sprang the immortal Thomas Jefferson, third 
President of the United States. A sister of Mrs. Peter Jefferson 
was Dorothes Randolph, who married Col. John Woodson. Col. 
John Woodson was a son of Dr. John Woodson, who came over 
with Sir George Yeardly. Mary Royal, daughter of Col. John 
and Dorothes (Randolph) Woodson, married Thomas Cheadle, 
of Cheadletown, England. Their son, John Cheadle, married 
Judith Clarke, of Albemarle County, Virginia, and their daugh- 
ter, Mary Woodson Cheadle, became the wife of Jesse Hughes. 
They were the grandparents of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Hughes. 
Thus Doctor Hughes is descended from families whose names 
and deeds have gone into the making of history across the seas 
and have been foremost in the upbuilding of and making famous 
the Old Dominion of Virginia. 

William Hector Hughes, father of Doctor Hughes, was born 
in Prince Edward County, Virginia, and married Mary Davis, 
who was born in Smyth County. For years William H. Hughes 
was secretai-y of what is now the Norfolk & Western Railroad 
Company, holding that office for the fourteen years immediately 
preceding the war period of the '60s. He entered the army, but 
was sent back to the railroad, where the authorities felt he was 
more urgently needed. Four sons were born to his %\'ife and 
himself: Jesse Martin Hughes, who lives near Washington City, 



48 VIRGINIA 

being connected with the Farm Loan Bank there; Doctor 
Hughes; William Hector, Jr., a farmer in Smyth County; and 
Dr. Robert E. Hughes, who practices medicine at North Holston, 
Smyth County. Both parents were active members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South. His father was a York Rite 
Mason, being a past master of the lodge. 

The early educational training of Doctor Hughes was secured 
in the public schools of his native county, and he later entered 
Sharron College, Bland County, Virginia, and he took his pro- 
fessional work in the Virginia College of Medicine, Richmond, 
and was graduated therefrom in 1898, with the degree Doctor of 
Medicine. Later he did post-graduate work in the New York 
Polyclinic. After ten years practice in Smyth County he spent 
eighteen months in Europe studying surgery. Upon his return 
home he began the practice of his profession at Roanoke, in 
1910, and since then has remained in this city. For some years 
he was a general practitioner, but is now specializing in surgery, 
in which he is a recognized expert, and he is serving as president 
of Shenandoah Hospital. 

In 1910 Doctor Hughes married Florence Preston Starritt, 
born in Albemarle County, Virginia, and educated in Roanoke. 
Doctor and Mrs. Hughes have one child, Thomas J., Jr., who 
was born December 12, 1911, and is a student of the Augusta 
Military Academy. Doctor Hughes belongs to the Presbyterian 
Church, and for several years was deacon of the West End 
Church of that denomination. He is a York Rite and Shriner 
Mason, being a past master of the Blue Lodge ; and belongs to 
the Knights of Pythias, the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks and the University Club. Dr. Hughes is a Democrat. In 
addition to his practice he has other interests and is president 
of the Graham- White Sander Corporation, and a director of the 
American National Bank, the Shenandoah Life Insurance Com- 
pany and (General Finance Corporation. Although he began 
life with very little he has now an extensive and lucrative con- 
nection and is justly numbered among the leading professional 
men of his city, which is distinguished for high rank in the 
medical profession. The spirit of progress which has been the 
dominant factor of the first quarter of the new century has 
been manifest in no connection more strongly than in the science 
of medicine. Investigation and research have brought forth 
many scientific facts and established principles, and Doctor 
Hughes has kept pace with the advance. His professional serv- 
ice has ever been discharged with a keen sense of conscientious 
obligation and his skill has brought him to a prominent position. 
He is intelligently interested in all that pertains to modern 
progress and improvement, not only along professional but ma- 
terial and moral lines, and he always finds time to study great 
public questions and is ever ready to lend his influence for the 
betterment of humanity. 

David A. Christian, M. D., descended from some of the first 
families to settle in Appomattox County, is a highly educated 
physician and surgeon, a man of leadership in his profession and 
has also been a positive factor in the good citizenship of his 
locality. 

Doctor Christian was born in Appomattox County, May 20, 
1880, son of David A. and Mary A. (Thornhill) Christian. His 
mother was a daughter of Albert T. Thornhill, a native of Appo- 






VIRGINIA 49 

mattox County, son of Thomas G. Thornhill, who secured a deed 
to attractive land in that county from King George of England. 
Doctor Christian is a grandson of William Diuguid Christian, a 
pioneer physician, who graduated in medicine from the Univer- 
sity of Pennsylvania and practiced his profession in Appomattox 
County from 1832 until his death in 1880. Doctor Christian's 
father continued the tradition of the family for important serv- 
ice in the office of judge of the County Court for fifteen years. 
He graduated in law from the University of Virginia and since 
1906 has been a resident of Richmond, where for a number of 
years he was a clerk in the department of public instruction. 
He is now eighty-two years of age. For two years he was a 
Confederate soldier, joining the army at the age of fifteen, and 
was in the Signal Corps. He has been a life long Baptist. 

Dr. David A. Christian was the oldest in a family of eight 
children, six of whom are living. He was educated at the South 
Side Academy at Chase City, and while getting his higher edu- 
cation and preparing himself for a professional career he did 
farm work, for two years was a mail carrier and was also census 
enumerator. Doctor Christian graduated from the Richmond 
Medical College in May, 1908, and has given twenty years of 
service in his profession in his home county. He is a member 
of the Medical Society of Virginia and since 1909 has been physi- 
cian to the Woodmen of the World. He is on the medical staff 
of the Southside Community Hospital at Farmville, Virginia. 
During the World war he was a member of Medical Advisory 
Board No. 36. He was a delegate to the conference on higher 
education at Richmond in February, 1927, this conference hav- 
ing been called by Governor Byrd. Doctor Christian is a mem- 
ber of the Baptist Church and the Masonic fraternity. 

He married, in 1916, Miss Bessie S. Stratton, who was bom 
in Appomattox County, and taught school there two years be- 
fore her marriage. Her father, Chesley Stratton, is a farmer 
in the Stonewall Community. Doctor and Mrs. Christian have 
six children : Agnes Virginia, bom in 1918, Bessie, born in 1920, 
Mildred, born in 1922, David A. Ill, born in 1924, Catherine 
Thornhill, born in 1926, and Chesley Stratton Christian, born in 
1928. 

William Lyle Ould, physician and surgeon, now established 
in his professional work at Appomattox, was a brilliant student 
when in school and college, and graduated with a diploma and 
other qualifications for the practice of medicine when he was 
only nineteen and one-half years old. 

Doctor Ould was born in Bedford Springs, Campbell County, 
Virginia, November 3, 1874, son of William and Ellen (O'Drain) 
Ould. His father was a native of Halifax County, was a lawyer 
with an extensive practice in that and adjoining counties and 
held the oflice of commonwealth attorney. He was veiy active 
in politics. He served as a captain of militia before the war and 
during the war between the states, but most of his time was 
given up to recruiting duty. He was a member of the Presby- 
terian Church. By his first marriage he had three children, and 
Ellen O'Drain was his second wife. She was born in Canada 
and now lives at Lynchburg, being the mother of three children. 
One son. Eugene, now deceased, served several terms in the 
Legislature. 

Dr. William Lyle Ould was educated in the New London 
Academy and in the University of Virginia attended four ses- 

V^GINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY 



50 VIRGINIA 

sions of medical lectures, 1891-93. On March 13, 1894, he 
graduated M. D. from the University of Louisville. Doctor Ould 
practiced for over thirty years at Concord in Campbell County. 
In 1925 he removed to Appomattox, where he has found impor- 
tant responsibilities of a professional nature. He is also inter- 
ested in local real estate, in a hardware store, and has been 
prominent in Masonry, being a past district deputy and now 
conducts a class in lodge work at Appomattox. He is a Royal 
Arch Mason and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Doctor Ould married in 1895 Florence Ballou, granddaugh- 
ter of General Ballou, of a prominent family of Halifax County, 
where she was reared and educated. Doctor and Mrs. Ould 
have three children. The son William Carroll is a salesman at 
Roanoke and the second son, L. Herman, is in the automobile 
business at Appomattox. 

The daughter, Ruth Ould, has had a distinguished career as 
a scholar and teacher and is the wife of Robert W. Manton, who 
is head of the department of music in the University at New 
Hampshire. Mrs. Manton graduated from Randolph-Macon 
Woman's College at Lynchburg, obtaining an A. M. degree, also 
studied at Columbia University, where she received her B. A. 
degree, and in other institutions, including Yale, and for some 
time held the chair of English at the University of New Hamp- 
shire, being the youngest woman head of a department in any 
university in the country. She was the assistant in the Depart- 
ment of Corrective Work. She has always been interested in 
athletics, and has spent much time in encouraging physical 
training and athletic work among women in different schools. 
Robert W. Manton, her husband, served with the United States 
Marine Corps during the World war. He is a graduate of Har- 
vard University, and while overseas with the Fifth Regiment of 
the Marines and after the armistice he continued his musical 
studies in Paris. He was a volunteer, and was at the front 
when the armistice was signed and was one of the first Ameri'- 
cans to land in France. He has held the chair of music at the 
University of New Hampshire since June, 1903. Mr. and Mrs. 
Manton have one son, Robert W., Junior, born October 15, 1927. 

Edv/ard C. Glass. Some superintendents of schools, old in 
their ways, combat the application of modern standards to 
escape disturbance by new conditions. They do not wish to 
bear the responsibility, and so they retard progress in their 
systems and have no place as leadei's any longer. However, 
"When one is found who is both able and willing to take up every- 
thing calculated to advance his schools, then additional power 
should be accorded him. To such a man all the phases of admin- 
istration should be left, for he understands the needs of the 
pupils and how to meet them. Sucn a man in addition to being 
a good educator would be one who would not bend to the pressure 
of political or other vicious influences, whether exerted by 
school boards or others. The superintendent, with the coopera- 
tion of the teachers, should develop an educational policy to fit 
the local conditions, which would include the curriculum, text- 
books, promotions, salaries and similar matters. The develop- 
ing of policies with the cooperation of the teachers is necessary 
because the joint wisdom of all is better than the wisdom of one 
individual or of one working with a hand-picked group of 
friends. No one is an educational automaton and no one super- 
intendent without the cooperation of the teaching force can 



VIRGINIA 51 

accomplish what should be accomplished in the system. The 
policy of cooperation is for growth. One of the very able 
men who fully measures up to the above standards, and who is 
securing in a marked degree the cooperation of all with whom 
he is associated, is Edward C. Glass, superintendent of the 
schools of Lynchburg. 

Superintendent Glass was born in Lynchburg, September 7, 
1852, and he has the distinction of being the oldest, in point of 
service, of the school superintendents in the United States. He 
is a son of Robert Henry and Betta Augusta (Christian) Glass, 
she born in Appomattox, Virginia, and he in Amherst County, 
Virginia. A very prominent citizen of Lynchburg, Robert 
Henry Glass left his impress upon the history of his own times. 
For many years he was editor of the Lynchburg Republican, and 
served as postmaster of the city from 1852 until the outbreak of 
the war between the states, and throughout that great conflict 
he remained in office in spite of the difficulty in getting the mails 
through the lines. A strong Democrat and a sesessionist, he 
served for six months on the staff of .John B. Floyd, and partici- 
pated in the battle of Winchester. For years he took a leading 
part in the work of the Court Street Methodist Church, South. 
Of the twelve children born to him and his wife nine are now 
living, and of them all Superintendent Glass is the third in order 
of birth. The paternal grandfather of Superintendent Glass 
was Thomas Glass, a native of Virginia. The family was estab- 
lished in Virginia at a very early day, in the beginning of the 
seventeenth century, by John Glass. 

Superintendent Glass remembers distinctly the troubled 
period immediately preceding the outbreak of war, although 
then but a mere child. His father was a spirited defender of 
State's Rights, and bitterly opposed to the newly organized Re- 
publican party, fighting it by the spoken and written word. 
Because of a trenchant editorial voicing a bitter denunciation, 
true in every contention, of the dishonesty of certain office hold- 
ers of the new political faith, he was shot and lost an eye in the 
affray. After the close of the war his friends nominated him 
for Congress, desiring to have him represent their district in 
the National Assembly, but his name was withdrawn. 

During his boyhood Superintendent Glass attended a private 
school, and later took his high school work at Norwood, Nelson 
Ccuntj', Virginia. He began his educational work in Lynch- 
burg April 5, 1871, the first day the public-school system began 
to function in Lynchburg. For the succeeding five years he 
continued teaching, for one of those years being principal of the 
grammar school, and on January 9, 1879, he was appointed 
superintendent of schools, and has continued to hold that position 
ever since with distinguished capability. 

On November 4, 1879, Superintendent Glass married Miss 
Susie G. Carter, who was born in Appomattox County, Virginia, 
and educated in the preparatory seminary of Lynchburg, being 
a member of its first graduating class. Ten children were born 
of this marriage, seven of whom are living: E. C, Junior, who 
is in the Lynchburg street car service; Mary C, who married 
W. P. Tyree, a tobacconist of Lynchburg; Robert, who was edu- 
cated in Lynchburg and at Washington and Lee University, 
where he obtained his A. B. degree and who is now the editor of 
the Liinchbwg Morning News; Nannie G., who married Edward 
Mayfield, and is now a widow residing in Lynchburg; Henry B., 
who is an attorney, but has been in the in:,uran;e bucinass at 



52 VIRGINIA 

Lynchburg since his return from the World war, in which he 
served overseas, was gassed, and had conferred upon him for 
valor the Distinguished Service Medal; EKzabeth C, who was 
graduated from Randolph-Macon College, is a teacher of Latin 
in the Lynchburg High School; Susie Sanford, who was gradu- 
ated from the Lynchburg High School and the Washington Nor- 
mal Training School, married Richard Henry Lee, an Episcopal 
clergyman, now stationed near Norfolk, Virginia. The children 
have all done well, and are a great credit to their parents, who 
have reared them with loving watchfulness. All the children 
and their parents belong to the Court Street Methodist Church, 
South, which he has served as steward. In addition to his long 
and valued service to Lynchburg Superintendent Glass was for 
sixteen years the conductor of the Virginia Summer School of 
Methods, was a member of the first board of William and Mary 
College, and of the first State Board of Education. He is a mem- 
ber of the present state board of education from Lynchburg. A 
close student, he has not only perfected himself in the classics, 
but kept abreast of modern thought and progress, and has inaug- 
urated many innovations and carried them out most successfully 
in the Lynchburg schools. During his entire term of service as 
superintendent of the Lynchburg schools he has been a member 
of the National Education Association. 

George Johnson Tompkins, physician and surgeon, was one 
of the first members of his profession at Lynchburg to limit his 
practice to a special field. In eye, ear, nose and throat he is 
not only one of the oldest in point of service in that city but one 
of the doctors of generally recognized ability and standing in 
Central Virginia. 

Doctor Tompkins was born in Lexington, Virginia, March 
27, 1873, son of J. Fulton and Sallie D. (Pendleton) Tompkins. 
His grandfather, Edmund Giles Tompkins, was a commission 
merchant at Richmond and one of the founders of Saint James 
Episcopal Church in that city, where he died. He married a 
sister of the mother of Senator Thomas Staples, who after his 
death moved to Lexington. Both are buried in the Hollywood 
Cemetery at Richmond. Doctor Tompkin's maternal grand- 
father was Dr. Micajah Pendleton, a physician who practiced at 
Buchanan, Virginia, and was a splendid type of the old time 
country doctor, riding horseback over a great extensive country 
in his own and adjacent counties. He had been educated for his 
profession in the University of New York. Doctor Pendleton 
married Louisa Jane Davis, a native of Amherst County, Vir- 
ginia and a member of the old family of that name there. 

J. Fulton Tompkins, father of Doctor Tompkins, was born in 
Albemarle County, Virginia, attended common schools, and as 
a young man entered the employ of Percell Ladd & Company, a 
drug house at Richmond. He left that city in 1851 and moved 
to Buchanan, where he was in the drug business. For a short 
period he was engaged in the drug business at Columbus, Mis- 
sissippi. Then returning to Buchanan he reentered the drug 
business. Later he moved to Lexington, Virginia, and engaged 
in business until the outbreak of the war, when he volunteered 
with the Richbridge Artillery and fought in several battles, in- 
cluding the first battle of Manassas. At the close of the war he 
returned to Lexington and in 1867 married Sallie D. Pendleton, 
widow of George W. Johnson. For many years he lived at 
Lexington, where he served as apothecary to the Virginia Mill- 



VIRGINIA 53 

tary Institute. He became a member of the Grace Memorial 
(Episcopal) Church at Lexin^on. He finally located on a farm 
near Natural Bridge, Virginia, where he lived out his life. He 
was a member of the Episcopal Church there, which he helped 
build, and served as vestryman and warden. He was a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and for a number of years held the of- 
fice of justice of the peace in Rockbridge County. He was the 
father of four children : Dr. E. Pendleton Tompkins, of Lexing- 
ton; Sallie Louise, wife of W. M. McNutt, of Rockbridge County; 
Dr. George Johnson, and Bertie Lee. 

George Johnson Tompkins attended public and private 
schools, the Fishburne Military Academy and was graduated 
from the Medical College of Virginia in 1894. He had hospital 
experience at Washington, D. C, and for several years was en- 
gaged in general practice at Roanoke. He spent some time in 
New York City in eye, ear, nose and throat work, and after this 
special preparation located at Lynchburg in 1899. Doctor 
Tompkins is a member of the staff of all three hospitals at 
Lynchburg and has charge of the eye, ear, nose and throat clinic 
for the city. He is a member of the Virginia State Society of 
Oto-Laryngology and Ophthalmology, is a member of the South 
Piedmont Medical Society, the Medical Society of Virginia, the 
Lynchburg and Campbell County Medical Society, and Ameri- 
can Medical Associations. 

Doctor Tompkins married in December, 1904, Miss Elizabeth 
Haskins Dillard, who was born at Lynchburg, daughter of James 
P. and Ellen N. (Woodroof) Dillard. They have a family of 
five children : Ella Pendleton, wife of John M. Robeson, Jr., who 
with her husband is a student in the University of Virginia ; 
Miss Margaret Louise, attending the Woman's College at Farm- 
ville ; Elizabeth Dillard, wife of William J. Paxton, a commer- 
cial artist at Roanoke ; Sallie Dudley, member of the class of 
1928 in Lynchburg High School ; and George Johnson Junior, 
bom October 6, 1922. 

Doctor Tompkins has given many years of faithful service 
to the Episcopal Church in Lynchburg, having served as vestry- 
man and warden in Saint Paul's Church and in 1928 helped re- 
organize and build the new Grace Memorial Church, of which he 
is vestryman and Vv^arden. He is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity. 

Wade Hill Adams, vice president and general manager of 
the Southern Biscuit Company, although comparatively a new- 
comer in Richmond, has been signally honored in this city by 
various civic, business and social organizations. He is president 
of the Sphinx Club, a member of the Rotary Club, active in the 
affairs of the Chamber of Commerce and a director thereof, a 
member of the Country Club of Virginia and the Commonwealth 
Club, and he is a thirty-second degree Mason and a Shriner. He 
is a communicant of the Presbyterian Church. 

Born in Mooresville, Iredell County, North Carolina, Novem- 
ber 2, 1876, he is a son of James Pinckney and Julia (Proctor) 
Adams, the latter being a daughter of Richard and Elizabeth 
(King) Proctor, of Lincoln County, North Carolina. His 
branch of the Adams family originated in South Carolina, and 
its members were among the very prominent people of its earlier 
history. 

In spite of the fact that he had to work his way through 
Trinity College, now Duke University, Durham, North Caro- 



54 VIRGINIA 

lina, Wade Hill Adams had the highest standing in his class 
when he was graduated with the degree of A. B. in 1899. In 
the following year he took his A. M. degree. Having in view a 
scholastic career, it was his ambition that he might return to 
Trinity College in the department of English. He attended the 
Graduate School of English at Harvard University in 1901-02. 
With the completion of his education, however, he decided to 
enter a business career instead of taking up educational work. 

In 1902 Mr. Adams entered the service of the American 
Tobacco Company in New York. There he gained experience 
in the various departments of this great corporation, becoming 
acquainted with accounting, financing, production, marketing 
and sales methods ; in fact every activity of a modern industrial 
corporation. After being with the American Tobacco Company 
for about eight years he became affiliated with the Durham Du- 
plex Razor Company, whose plant is at Jersey City, New Jersey. 
He started in with that company as secretary and later became 
vice president in charge of sales and advertising. While with 
the Durham Duplex Razor Company he went to Paris, France, 
where he established and put in operation the Paris plant of 
this company, and remained in France for a year. At the be- 
ginning of 1918 he was commissioned captain in the United 
States Army and assigned to the Ordnance Department, Wash- 
ington, D. C., where he remained until after the Armistice. 

In 1925 Mr. Adams came to Richmond and took over the 
active management, as vice president, of the Southern Biscuit 
Company. It is needless to say that with his wide and varied 
experience with two great industrial concerns Mr. Adams at 
once inaugurated modern methods in every department of the 
local plant and began to build up an organization of note. In 
1927 he began the preliminary work for the erection of a 
$500,000 plant on Terminal Place in the West End of Richmond. 
In addition to a completely modern building, the plant has the 
latest types of ovens and baking equipment. 

The new building conforms to the classic style of architec- 
ture, and is somewhat patterned after Battle Abbey in its facade. 
This type of architecture was more expensive, but the Board of 
Directors and stockholders preferred to invest a little more 
money in order to erect a plant that would serve as a monu- 
ment to the industry of the company which originated in Rich- 
mond, and whose stock is owned by local people. At the same 
time it was their intention to produce an artistic building for 
Richmond and depart somewhat from the old-time conception 
of an industrial plant. 

Seven stories in height, this building is constructed of white 
concrete; is 100 x 140 feet, thus giving a iioor space of 100,000 
square feet. The same architects, Francisco and Jacobus, who 
built many of the plants for the American Tobacco Company 
and those for many other tobacco and bread-baking corpora- 
tions throughout the country, designed the new building for the 
Richmond people. 

This plant is not only a beautiful example of industrial archi- 
tecture, but it is also the exemplification of labor-saving devices 
and modern conceptions of efficiency. All flour, sugar and other 



VIRGINIA 55 

raw materials used in the work of the company are conveyed to 
the top floor by elevators, and from there are distributed 
through gravity conveyers to the shipping floor, thus saving 
much operating cost. All of the manufacturing equipment is 
motor-driven, and the greater part of the baking is done 
with gas. 

Refrigerating and humidifying plants, designed by the most 
up-to-date engineers in the country, have been installed at a 
cost of about $30,000. 

The company was established in 1899 in Richmond, and was 
from the start a successful venture, but as its volume increased 
those in charge saw that a large expansion was necessary, and 
therefore looked about to find the man best fitted for the work 
of carrying on these improvements, and in Mr. Adams found 
the ideal man. Since the completion of the new building there 
has been a large increase in the output as compared to the 
previous year. The company manufactures more than a hun- 
dred varieties of soda crackers, saltines, oyster crackers, cookies, 
plain and fancy cakes. Sales in Richmond have increased more 
than 600 per cent under Mr. Adams' management, and in outside 
territory more than 300 per cent. 

In the erection of this handsome building the company has 
shown to the world its faith in the South, and followed out the 
suggestions made along this line by the state and city Chambers 
of Commerce. Associated with Mr. Adams in this work are 
B. M. Gwathmey, president; W. E. Albus, treasurer; Harry L. 
Stone, secretary; and Ernest G. Gustafson, superintendent of 
the plant. 

Mr. Adams married Miss Jane Douglass Cockrell, a daughter 
of the late Judge Joseph E. Crockrell, an eminent lawyer and 
jurist, and one of the most distinguished citizens of Dallas, 
whose death April 7, 1927, removed one of the leading men of 
Texas, who at the time of his death was president of the Board 
of Trustees of the Southern Methodist University, and president 
of the Dallas National Bank. Mr. and Mrs. Adams have four 
children, namely: Wade Hill Adams, Jr., who was born July 
24, 1911 ; Joseph Cockrell Adams, who was born January 23, 
1915 ; Mary Jane Adams, who was born July 6, 1919 ; and Julia 
Proctor Adams, who was born June 19, 1925. 

Wade Hill Adams is a man who carries great responsibilities 
and is deeply engrossed in business, but not so much so that he 
cannot find time for civic betterment work. He is a great cap- 
tain of industry, all who know him readily admit this, and many 
men earn their living because of his enterprise, ability and com- 
mand of resources. Whatever success he has accomplished is 
largely due to himself, and one of his most marked character- 
istics is his bravery of belief in himself. He adheres in action 
to whatever his reason brings forth. Under the strain of great 
business operations he has never faltered in confronting risks. 
His whole business life has been a campaign of pluck, per- 
severance and principle. To extol his benevolence, his sympathy 
for the suffering of others, his never-sleeping generosity, his 
hand ever open to patriotic causes and to charity, is but to 
repeat a well-known tale. That the people of Richmond know 
all this, and appreciate the man and his character, is shown by 
the local honors which have been bestowed upon him from the 
beginning of his residence here. His genial manner, magnetic 



56 VIRGINIA 

personality and dynamic force make him a leader, and those 
following him in different lines of work know that they will 
reach the goal of their endeavor, for he has never learned the 
meaning of failure. 

Duncan Drysdale, Lynchburg attorney, is a native of Scot- 
land, though his father was a naturalized American citizen. 

He was born at Stiiiing, Scotland, January 13, 1861, son of 
Alexander and Janet (Smart) Drysdale, both natives of Scot- 
land. His father came to the United States when a young man, 
and while here took out naturalization papers. He went back 
to Scotland to visit, married while there and never carried out 
his intentions of returning to America. He was a member of 
the Presbyterian Church, and of his ten children Duncan was 
the oldest. The Drysdale family were originally members of 
the Douglas family or clan. The tradition is that members of 
the family became engaged in a feud with their neighbors, the 
Johnstones, over water rights and after a number on both sides 
had been killed this branch of the Douglas clan left the country, 
moving many miles distant, and in their new home took the 
name of a Parish known as Drysdale in their old locality. 

Duncan Drysdale was reared and educated in Scotland, at- 
tending common schools there. In 1899 he came to Virginia, 
locating at Norfolk, and for three years was in the confection- 
ery business there. While in business he studied law, took his 
law degree at Richmond College in 1903 and began practice at 
Rustburg. In 1906 he located at Lynchburg, and has had a 
very large practice in that city and section of the state. 

Mr. Drysdale married in June, 1918, Margaret Pollock, who 
was born in Scotland. Her family came to the United States in 
1915 and two of her brothers were soldiers in the World war, 
John Pollock going with the One Hundred Sixteenth Regiment 
from Lvnchburg while George Pollock enlisted from Philadel- 
phia. Mr. and Mrs. Drysdale have two children : Jean, now in 
school, and Douglas, born in 1925. They are members of the 
Unitarian Church at Lynchburg and Mr. Drysdale is chairman 
of the Church Board. 

He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, is a member of 
the City, Virginia and American Bar Associations and has been 
admitted to practice before the United States Supreme Court. 
He handles a general law practice, and at one time probably no 
other Lynchburg attorney had so large a practice in the crim- 
inal branch of the law. 

Hon. Waller J. Henson, former judge of the Circuit Court, 
and one of the ablest lawyers practicing at the bar of Roanoke, 
has been general counsel for the Shenandoah Life Insurance 
Company since 1914, and is a recognized authority in all matters 
pertaining to corporation law. He exemplified at the bar before 
his elevation to the bench a quiet exactness, a profound knowl- 
edge of the law. and a clear, impartial judgment, which char- 
acteristics are invaluable to both a lawyer and judge. When 
he retired from the bench he came to Roanoke, and here he has 
found the environment for which his abilities fit him, and is 
here accorded an appreciation to which he is justly entitled. 

Judge Henson was born in Buckingham, Virginia, November 
18, 1864, a son of John Waller and Martha A. (Chambers) 
Henson, both natives of Virginia, the latter born in Bucking- 
ham. The former was a clergyman of the Baptist faith, having 



VIRGINIA 57 

been prepared for his work in Richmond College, but his life 
was terminated by death in 1873, when he was only thirty-five 
years old. She survived him many years, passing away in 1920. 
Of the four children born to them, three are now living, and of 
them all Judge Henson was the first born. The father served 
all through the war between the states, and, being captured, 
was confined in a Federal prison. He was a zealous Ma.son, 
and lived up to the highest ideals of church and fraternity. The 
Henson family was founded in Virginia by John Henson, an 
extensive planter, and a member of the Legislature. When the 
capitol building collapsed he was in it, and only saved his life 
by his quickness in clutching a window sill, to which he held 
until rescued. The maternal grandfather, William A. Chambers, 
was a native of Virginia. 

Judge Henson attended private schools, in which he was 
prepared for high school, and he took his high school work in 
the night sessions in Lynchburg, and at the same time worked 
as telegrapher and train dispatcher. From 1883 to 1888 he 
continued in that work, and also studied law. In July, 1888, 
he resigned his position, took a course in the summer school of 
the University of Virginia, took the state bar examinations, and 
was admitted to the bar in September, 1888. He began his 
practice in Giles County, Virginia, and became so prominent 
and generally esteemed as an able lawyer that February 1, 1904, 
he was elected Circuit Court judge, and so served until 1909. 
With the expiration of his term of office he came to Roanoke, 
where he has since been engaged in private practice, as already 
noted. All his life he has been very active in Democratic politics, 
and served as commonwealth attorney in Giles County, but has 
not been willing to accept nomination since coming to Roanoke. 
The Baptist Church holds his membership. He is a York Rite 
and Shriner Mason, and takes great interest in his fraternal 
work. 

On July 4, 1887, Judge Henson married Cornelia Dulaney, 
who was born in Giles County, Virginia. They have had three 
children born to their marriage : William E., who was edu- 
cated in Washington and Lee University, and is an attorney 
engaged in the practice of law with his father ; Mary E., who 
is a resident of Washington, District of Columbia; and Poin- 
dexter S., who was educated in the Universitv of Virginia, and 
died February 28, 1928. 

William S. MeGGINSON. There is no work which makes 
such incessant demand upon the sympathies of those engaged in 
it than as of caring for the children orphaned and left to the 
mercy of an unkind world. Parents sheltering their own loved 
ones, tenderly watching over them with brooding thoughtfulness, 
seldom spare the time to reflect that there are little ones lacking 
the actual necessities of life, to say nothing of the attention to 
their needs from a moral and spiritual standpoint. Fortunately 
there are those whose minds and hearts are open to the appeals 
of these unfortunates and some noble chai'acters who are devot- 
ing themselves, their lives and their talents to substituting for 
the parents many of these children have never known. Of a 
verity such work is divine in its scope and effects. 

One of the men whose broad sympathies and Christian char- 
acter, as well as his ministerial training, fit him for work among 
the orphans. Rev. William S. Megginson is now rendering a won- 
derful service as superintendent of the Presbyterian Orphans' 



58 VIRGINIA 

Home at Lynchburg, one of the splendidly managed institutions 
of the Presbyterian Church in Virginia. 

William S. Megginson was born in Greenville, Tennessee, 
July 30, 1869, a son of John Thomas and Sarah Emily (Smith) 
Megginson, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectfully, both 
of whom are now deceased. A college man, John Thomas Meg- 
ginson took up engineering, and followed that profession for 
many years, but, retiring, spent the remainder of his life in the 
enjoyment of the comforts his former activities had provided. 
During the war between the states he raised a company and 
served under the command of Gen. John Mosby. Owing to the 
hardships he suffered in the war his health was never very good 
thereafter, and this in part led to his retirement. His death 
occurred in 1897, but his wife survived him until 1921, she pass- 
ing away at the age of eighty-one years. There were three chil- 
dren : Rev. William Megginson, who was the first born ; Edward 
T., who lives in Northern Georgia; and Henry E., who is a mer- 
chant of El Paso, Texas. The parents were both members of the 
Presbyterian Church, and very active in all of its work. The 
paternal grandfather, William Cabell Megginson, married Miss 
Amanda Bocock, of Buckingham County, Virginia, and through 
her Rev. Mr. Megginson is connected with another very promi- 
nent family of Virginia, in addition to the Cabell family. The 
maternal grandfather, Jordan Smith, was a cattle raiser of East 
Tennessee, and owned a large plantation, well-stocked with cattle 
and horses, and he was also an extensive slave owner. During 
the war between the states he suffered heavy losses in addition to 
that incurred by the freeing of the negroes. 

Rev. Mr. Megginson first attended several excellent private 
schools, but at the same time had to work, as his father was ill, 
and he was the eldest child. Later he secured a secretaryship 
with the Atlanta, Georgia, Young Men's Christian Association, 
and while discharging its duties he secured further educational 
training. Subsequently, he attended the Louisville, Kentucky, 
Seminary, and was licensed to preach in 1897, and continued his 
ministerial work until 1900, when he took post-graduate work in 
the same seminary, paying his own way through at the time he 
was studying. In the meanwhile, in 1897, he had gone to San 
Antonio, Texas, as pastor of Utica Presbyterian Church, re- 
turning to Kentucky to carry on his further studies, and when 
that course was completed he went to Elizabethtown, Kentucky, 
and was engaged there in ministerial work for three and one- 
half years, and when he left it was to spend four years in the 
General Sunday School work of the Presbyterian Church. From 
that work he accepted a call to the church in Biloxi, Mississippi, 
for six years, and at the expiration of that period he went to 
Richmond as Dean of the Assembly Training School, which he 
organized, and placed the institution upon a solid basis. In 
that work he displayed executive ability of such a high order 
that he was transferred to the Presbyterian Orphanage. 

The Presbyterian Orphanage of Lynchburg has 165 children, 
and conducts a school in connection with it that employs nine 
teachers and carries the pupils from the first grade through the 
high school work. The moving spirit in the Home, in work and 
play is Superintendent Megginson, and that he encourages whole- 
some activities and sports may be gleaned from the following 
excerpt from the Bulletin of the Presbyterian Orphans' Home : 

"Our Football Team: Our team is still the 'Shoeless Won- 
ders,' although four of the original team left us during the sum- 



VIRGINIA 59 

mer and some lighter boys had to be substituted. They hold the 
title for three reasons : First, because they play barefooted, sec- 
ond, because they really are the most agile, smoothest piece of 
machinery about here, and third, because so far this year they 
have maintained the record of the last two years, having not al- 
lowed an opposing team to score." 

In 1895 Reverend Megginson married Miss Amanda Leonard 
Allen, born in Louisville, Kentucky, and there educated a daugh- 
ter of David H. and Mary (Waters) Allen, and a direct descend- 
ant of Barthomew Dupuy. Mr. Allen was a manufacturer and 
merchant, but is now deceased. There are no children in the 
Megginson family, and therefore Reverend and Mrs. Megginson 
lavish upon their little charges the tender parental affection and 
care they would have given their own had they been sent into 
their home. He is a Knight Templar Mason and belongs to the 
Kiwanis Club, and both are members of the Pi-esbyterian Church. 
Reverend Megginson is admirably fitted for his present labor of 
love, for he has known poverty and hardships and has been given 
a wide and broadening experience since he entered the ministry. 
The children are devoted to him and his wife, and they are mak- 
ing splendid progress in their school work. 

Thomas Burton Snead of Richmond, descends from a very 
old family in England, and is a lineal descendant of Robert 
Sneade, one of the pioneer settlers of Virginia, who settled in 
Elizabeth City County in 1654. The name Snead is very ancient 
in England and signifies the handle of a scythe. It has taken 
many forms, such as Sned, Sneyd, Sneed, but the most usual 
form in modern times is Snead, as adopted by this family. Wil- 
liam Snead, great-grandfather of the subject of this sketch, 
served in the Revolutionary war as a non-commissioned officer, 
having volunteered for service at the age of eighteen, and his 
grandfather, whose name was also William, served in the Con- 
federate army throughout the entire period of the Civil war. 

William Snead II, who was born in 1811 in Nelson County, 
afterwards moved to Albemarle County, and there married 
Sarah Elizabeth Clark. They were the parents of Chapman 
Price Snead, born July 25, 1850, in Albemarle, died October 7, 
1907. His wife, Frances Elizabeth (Hutchinson) Snead, was 
a daughter of Warner Winston and Mary Ella (Harris) Hutchin- 
son. Chapman Price Snead was a farmer in King William 
County, and in political alliance a Republican. 

Thomas Burton Snead, a son of Chapman Price Snead, was 
born March 10. 1878, at Etna Mills, King William County, Vir- 
ginia, and received his early education under the direction of 
private tutors in his father's home. He later attended the 
College of William and Mary, and was a student there in 1895-98. 
In the fall of 1900 he entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, from which he received the degree Bachelor 
of Laws in the class of 1902. He was immediately admitted to 
the bar and begun the practice of law at Richmond. On January 
16, 1905, he was appointed referee in bankruptcy by the District 
Court of the United States, Eastern District of Virginia, for the 
district composed of the City of Richmond and the counties of 
Henrico, Chesterfield, Powhatan and Goochland, which position 
he has held continuously since. 

In his position as referee in bankruptcy during the past 
twenty-three years Mr. Snead has rendered decisions in hun- 



60 VIRGINIA 

dreds of cases, some of them involving nice questions of law and 
important interests. Considering these facts his record as 
referee in bankruptcy has been quite unusual. Only fourteen 
of his many decisions have reached the Circuit Court of Appeals 
for review, and in only three of these was he reversed. Only two 
of the cases decided by him have reached the Supreme Court 
of the United States for review and in both of these his decisions 
were sustained. Though he attends to the bankruptcy business 
for a population of some 300,000, Mr. Snead also practices law, 
and one-third of his professional work consists of his private 
practice. 

Of modest and retiring nature, Mr. Snead has never sought 
to mingle in the conduct of public affairs, and devotes most of 
his spare time to his family and home. He is a friend of educa- 
tion, and is ever ready to lend his time, influence and support 
to those higher social movements which are calculated to develop 
the best in man and promote the progress and welfare of the 
community. He is a Republican in politics and a communicant 
of the Episcopal Church. He served his enlistment as a member 
of Company C, Richmond Blues, one of the finest and oldest mil- 
itary organizations in the United States. He is a member of the 
Richmond Bar Association, the Virginia State Bar Association, 
the American Bar Association, the Commonwealth Club, Uni- 
versity Club, Country Club of Virginia and Sons of the American 
Revolution. 

Mr. Snead has been twice married. His first wife, whom he 
married April 19, 1911, was Miss Mary Cooke Branch, the only 
daughter of Col. James Ransom and Lilian (Hubball) Branch, 
and a lineal descendant of Christian Branch of "Arrowhattocks" 
and "Kingsland," who came from England in 1620. She died 
December 31, 1921. On April 18, 1927, he married Miss Mary 
Ragan Macgill Bertrand, daughter of Frederick Olia and Minnie 
(Drewry) Bertrand, a granddaughter of Dr. Samuel Davies 
Drewry, and a lineal descendant of the great Presbyterian divine, 
Samuel Davies, first president of Princeton University. 

Col. William Richard Phelps is principal of the Randolph- 
Macon Academy of Bedford, a boys' preparatory school, one of 
the fine institutions comprised in what is known as the Randolph- 
Macon System, including several academies for boys and girls 
and culminating in the Randolph-Macon College for men at 
Ashland and Randolph-Macon Woman's College at Lynchburg. 

Colonel Phelps is a cultured Virginia gentleman, and has 
a thorough understanding of the spirit and traditions of the 
educational institutions with which he has been identified. He 
was born at Keyton Plantation, in Bedford County, August 2, 
1886, and is a descendant of the Key family which founded 
Keyton Plantation. His people have been in Bedford County 
since early Colonial times. One of his ancestors, John Phelps, 
Sr., was a member of the House of Burgesses and served as 
lieutenant-colonel of militia in Bedford County. His son, John 
Phelps, Jr., was the father of Thomas Phelps and grandfather 
of Thomas J. Phelps, who married Malinda Perkins Key. These 
latter were the grandparents of Colonel Phelps. The father of 
Colonel Phelps was Thomas Key Phelps, who was born Septem- 
ber 21, 1847, and married Sarah Elizabeth Moulton, who was 
bom in Bedford County May 8, 1849, and died in 1914. Her 
father. Dr. Benjamin H. Moulton, practiced medicine for many 



VIRGINIA 61 

years at Davis Mills and served as a member of the Virginia 
Senate. Thomas Key Phelps was one of the cadets called out 
from the Virginia Military Institute to take part in the battle 
of New Market. His father, Thomas J. Phelps, was also a 
soldier of the Confederacy. 

William Richard Phelps was one of a large family of eleven 
children. These children were educated at home under instruc- 
tors employed by their father, and later the older sons and 
daughters took charge of the instruction of the younger mem- 
bers of the household. Education has been an essential tradi- 
tion of the Phelps family. 

Colonel Phelps completed the four-year course at Randolph- 
Macon College at Ashland in three years, graduating second 
honor man of his class in 1908. Since graduating he has been 
connected with the Randolph-Macon System, for the first three 
years as instructor of mathematics in the academy at Bedford, 
seven years as assistant principal of Randolph-Macon Institute 
at Danville, and in 1918 returned to the academy at Bedford 
as associate principal, and since June, 1922, as principal. Colonel 
Phelps has the degree Master of Arts, given him by Columbia 
University of New York, where he spent four summers in resi- 
dence as a graduate student. He is a member of the Virginia 
Association of Preparatory Schools and in 1925 was made its 
president. He is also a member of the Virginia Commission of 
Southern Association of Schools and Colleges. 

Colonel Phelps was chairman of the Red Cross Chapter at 
Danville and member of the Legal Advisory Board during the 
World war. He has been a steward in the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, is a member of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, 
the Phi Delta Theta college fraternity, and Pi Gamma Mu social 
fraternity. He married, August 9, 1911, Miss Mildred May 
Davis of Dinwiddie County, Virginia. She is a graduate of the 
State Teachers College of Farmville and taught school several 
years before her marriage. Their children are: Rosa King, 
William Richard, Jr., and Moulton Davis. 

Gordon B. Pace, president of the Pace Construction Com- 
pany, Incorporated, is connected through the operations of his 
corporation with some of the most extensive construction 
projects, bridge building, the installation of sewers, waterworks 
and similar important contracts, in this part of the country, and 
has built up a reputation that is second to none for carrying 
out the spirit as well as the letter of his agreements. He was 
born in Roanoke, July 18, 1895, a son of Sidney B. and Carrie 
(Backus) Pace, natives of Virginia and West Virginia, re- 
spectively. Coming to Roanoke when it was still a village, 
Sidney B. Pace began operating in real estate, in which line he 
has been engaged all his life, and subsequently he was engaged 
in organizing the Mountain Trust Bank, was its first president, 
and is now its vice president. Four children have been born 
to him and his wife: Gordon B., who is the eldest; Lloyd, who 
is in the real estate business with his father; Madeline, who 
married C. R. Wentworth, of Roanoke, engineer with the Vir- 
ginia Bridge & Iron Company; and Dorothy, who married 
Everett Richardson, a manufacturer of the State of Massachu- 
setts. Mr. Pace is a member of the Baptist Church, and his 
wife of the Presbyterian Church, and both are active in church 
work. He is a Mason, a Shriner and an Elk, and is active in 



62 VIRGINIA 

the Rotary Club. In political faith he is a Democrat. The 
paternal grandfather, Sidney W. Pace, also a native of Virginia, 
served in the Confederate army during the war between the 
states. The maternal grandfather was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, but was living in Virginia at the time of his death, and 
was connected with the Norfolk & Western Railroad. 

Growing to manhood in Roanoke, Gordon B. Pace was given 
the advantage of attending its excellent schools and a military 
institute, and was graduated from the latter in 1915, after 
which he took two years in the University of Virginia, but his 
studies were interrupted in 1917 by this country's entry into 
the World war, and he entered the service and was trained in 
Camp Lee, Virginia ; Camp Taylor, Kentucky, and Camp Lewis, 
Washington, near Tacoma. He served as first lieutenant of the 
Thirty-eighth Field Artillery. In January, 1919, he was honor- 
ably discharged, and returned to Roanoke. Here he organized 
the Pace Construction Company, of which he is president, and 
his father vice president. The company is incorporated and is 
a close corporation. In addition to private contracts, the com- 
pany is doing a large amount of work for the Norfolk & Western 
Railroad, the Virginia Highway Commission and the Tennessee 
Highway -Commission, and has numerous contracts for cities, 
towns, counties and private industrial works. 

On June 18, 1918, Mr. Pace married Miss Louise Vaughan, 
who was born in Roanoke, where she attended school, later 
going to National Park Seminary, Forest Glen, Maryland. She 
is a daughter of L. H. Vaughan, retired railroad contractor and 
capitalist. Mr. and Mrs. Pace have one son, Gordon Vaughan 
Pace. Mrs. Pace belongs to the Christian Church, while Mr. 
Pace belongs to the Presbyterian Church. While in college he 
made Delta Tau Delta, and he belongs to the Shenandoah Club 
and the Roanoke Country Club, but aside from these has but 
little contact with anything but his business affairs, to which 
he is devoting himself with wholehearted absorption. 

William Thomas McNamara, Junior. Within the memory 
of those now only middle aged has come what amounts to a revo- 
lution in household furnishings and methods of housekeeping. 
So many and varied are the inventions to make easy the life of 
the homemaker, and assist her in solving the many times bewil- 
dering problems of securing adequate assistance in her house- 
hold tasks, that those who learned to keep house in the days 
when servants were plentiful and could be secured for a mere 
pittance feel that an era of great ease has dawned, and many 
whose means would justify their living in complete idleness have 
resumed, of their own fi'ee will, the conduct of their homes to 
enjoy the many comforts and conveniences now on the market. 
Perhaps none of them afford such comfort, and at the same time 
gratify the inherent love of the beautiful, as the floor coverings 
now manufactured and distributed that require no dusty sweep- 
ing, but can be easily cleaned with a damp mop, and in this way 
the problem that could formerly only be solved by hours of back- 
breaking labor has practically disappeared. Another feature 
that attracts many v/omen is the fact that they can secure com- 
fortable sleeping accommodations, at a reasonable price, without 
extra floor space, and consequent additional rent. While the 
manufacturers of these different aids to the housekeeper, to say 
nothing of the inventors of them, deserve great credit, those who 
distribute them play an important part in the business life of 



VIRGINIA 6S 

every community and render a much appreciated service to its 
people. One of these men, alert and progressive, is William T. 
McNamara, Jr., president of the American Beauty Mattress 
Company of Lynchburg. 

William T. McNamara, Jr., was born in Lynchburg, February 
3, 1874, a son of W. T. and Johanna (Martin) McNamara, both 
of whom were born in Ireland, from whence they came to the 
United States in childhood. For years the father was a con- 
tracting plumber and steamfitter, and had charge of the steam- 
fitting on the Nortolk & Western Railroad from Lynchburg to 
Bristol. During the early days of its existence he was a captain 
of the Lynchbuig Fire Department, and he also owned and con- 
ducted a heater and range establishment. He put in the city 
water works at Dublin, Virginia, and had other important con- 
tracts, and evinced a strong interest in public afi'airs. After 
other contractors had declared it impossible to fix the water 
works in the Blue Ridge Springs Hotel he took the contract and 
carried it out in a very satisfactory manner. In spite of all he 
accomplished he was only twenty-nine years old when he died in 
1877, and his prosperity was the result of his own, unaided 
efforts, for he began lite with absolutely nothing. A zealous 
Catholic, he was very active in the church and various Catholic 
societies. He and his wife had two children : William T. and 
Alice J., the latter being the wife of Thomas F. Driscoll, of 
Chicago, who has charge of all of the advertising for Armour & 
Company all over the United States. At the time of her mar- 
riage to Mr. McNamara, Mrs. McNamara was the widow of 
James Byrne, to whom she had borne three children, one of 
whom survives, Mary T. Byrne, a Sister of Charity in Washing- 
ton City. The paternal grandfather was William McNamara, a 
native of Ireland, who settled in Lynchburg upon coming to this 
country, and became an officer of the Lynchburg Gas Company. 
The maternal grandfather was also a native of Ireland, and set- 
tled in Richmond, Virginia. 

Vv^illiam T. McNamara was educated in the parochial schools 
of Lynchburg, in Rock Hill College, Maryland, and Eastman's 
Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York. From 1893 to 1900 
he was engaged in work as a bookkeeper in Roanoke, Virginia, 
but in the latter year he returned to Lynchburg and tor a short 
time continued work as a bookkeeper, but in 1901 became secre- 
tary and treasurer of the Lynchburg Lounge Company, manu- 
facturers of lounges, couches and parlor furniture. After about 
eight years' connection with this company he left it, in 1909, to 
engage with the National Manufacturing Company, manufac- 
turers of mattresses, which he served as president and general 
manager until 1911, when the plant was destroyed by fire. The 
following year he organized the National Mattress Company, 
which was operated under that name until the spring of 1926, 
when it was reorganized as the American Beauty Mattress Com- 
pany, of which Mr. McNamara has since continued president. 
The company employs one regular mattress man and two com- 
mission men, and covers Virginia, parts of North Carolina and 
West Virginia, and sells mattresses to the trade in other places. 
The principal brand is the American Beauty, a very fine mattress 
made from the best material. The business has been greatly 
increased, and the sales in 1927 were greatly in excess of those 
of previous years. The company manufacture mattresses, 
pillows and awnings, and distributes the Simmons beds and 
springs, and Gold Seal Congoleum and Linoleum. 



64 VIRGINIA 

In 1901 Mr. McNamara married Miss Norah Regina Wholey, 
who was born in Staunton, Virginia, where she attended the 
Mary Baldwin School. She is a daughter of William Wholey, 
who for the last twenty years of his life lived retired. During 
the war between the states he had the honor to serve as Ordi- 
nance Sergeant under Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson. Mrs. Mc- 
Namara is active in the United Daughters of the Confederacy, 
Old Dominion Chapter of Lynchburg, having served as secretary 
and treasurer, and organized its Junior Chapter. She is an 
active member of the Carrie Harper Club of Lynchburg and is 
an active member of the Travelers' Aid Society. Four sons 
have been born to Mr. and Mrs. McNamara, namely: William 
Francis, who was educated in the Virginia Military Institute, is 
in his father's office and is a reserve officer in the United States 
army; Maurice, who was also educated in the Virginia Military 
Institute, is in the employ of the Chesapeake Telephone Company 
as office manager and assistant to the company manager at 
Lynchburg; Charles Edwin, who is a medical student in the 
Georgetown University, Washington City; and Richard, who is 
attending the high school at Lynchburg. The family all belong 
to the Holy Cross Catholic Church, and Mr. McNamara is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus, and is a life member of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. While he devotes 
himself to his business he is deeply interested in civic affairs, and 
has always been an active participant in them. He served as 
secretary of the Lynchburg Woodrow Wilson Club. 

Thomas X. Parsons. One of the brilliant young attorneys 
practicing at the bar of Roanoke, Thomas X. Parsons has 
attained to an enviable prestige through his undoubted talents, 
both natural and acquired, and he is regarded as one of the 
most desirable of the city's citizens. He was born in Inde- 
pendence, Virginia, September 3, 1896, a son of John M. and 
Mary Belle (Bryant) Parsons, both of whom were born in Vir- 
ginia, he at Potato Creek and she at Fox. Her death occurred 
in 1907, but he survives and is living in Independence, where 
he is engaged in the practice of the law, and he is representing 
his district in the Virginia State Senate. A strong Republican, 
at present he is the only Republican from his part of the state 
in the Senate. Several years ago he served as commonwealth 
attorney of Grayson County, and at one time he was his party's 
candidate for Congress. Although defeated, his opponent won 
by only sixty-two votes, so personally popular is he. Of the 
five children born to the parents, Thomas X. Parsons is the 
second in order of birth. 

Growing up in Independence, Thomas X. Parsons attended 
the Virginia Military Institute, from which he was graduated in 
1915, and took his law training in Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity, from which he was graduated in 1921. After leaving 
the university he taught law for one year as associate professor 
of law. Coming to Roanoke in 1923, he formed a partnership 
with Judge Clifton A. Woodrum and John W. McCauley, and 
they enjoy a large patronage and are connected on one side or 
the other with much of the important jurisprudence of this 
section. Mr. Parsons is unmarried. Like his father, he is an 
ardent Republican, and was appointed in 1927 assistant district 
attorney, in which office he is making an admirable record. At 
the university he made Phi Delta Phi, the honorary law fra- 
ternity, and Phi Kappa Psi. He is a Blue Lodge Mason, and 




I O . -A-l.rw;e«.,j^^lAJu(V«X*>-3 



VIRGINIA 65 

he is a member of the Shenandoah Club, the University Club, 
the Country Club, the Roanoke German Club, and the Lions 
Club. During the World war he served as captain of infantry 
and was stationed at Fort Myer until his honorable discharge 
September 8, 1919. 

B. Morgan Shepherd. The evolution of a newspaper is a 
difficult problem, for in addition to the physical property there 
is that something which is of much greater value, the vital spark 
of the personality of those who have established and developed 
it. This, of course, applies in some degree to other great enter- 
prises. It may be said of a bank or railway or shop, but con- 
ducting a newspaper is more than management, it is an entirely 
different thing in essence from the providing of public transport, 
the handling of moneys or the sale of merchandise. 

When this country was ninety years younger than it is today 
The Southern Planter, the oldest agricultural paper in the United 
States, came into being. It was founded in 1840 by Charles 
Tyler Botts, and has been published regularly during the many 
years which have passed. At the evacuation of Richmond pub- 
lication was immediately resumed, and not an issue was missed. 
It is the recognized authority on agriculture throughout the 
South, and a most helpful journal in bringing about efficient 
organization for farmers, constructive legislation for the agri- 
cultural interests. B. Morgan Shepherd, mayor of Ashland, 
and one of the outstanding figures in this part of Virginia, is 
the secretary of the company and managing editor. 

The birth of Mayor Shepherd occurred at Berryville, Clarke 
County, Virginia, in 1878, and he is a son of J. H. and Martha 
Elizabeth (Morgan) Shepherd, and grandson of Champe Shep- 
herd, the latter of whom was one of the prominent old-time 
citizens of Clarke County. The maternal grandfather of Mayor 
Shepherd was Col. Benjamin Morgan, belonged to the historic 
Morgan family of Virginia, whose valorous leadership in the 
American Revolution gives all bearing the name a distinguished 
place in the history of the Old Dominion. 

Mayor Shepherd was educated inthe public schools of Berry- 
ville and by private tutors. When only sixteen years old he 
began working for himself, and came to Richmond, the mecca 
for so many ambitious youths of Virginia, and became connected 
as an employe with The Southern Planter. From then on he 
has continued with this famous publication, and gradually 
bought stock in it until he acquired a substantial interest in the 
business. For many years he has been vice president of the 
pubhshing company issuing the paper and executive manager 
of it. His home is at Ashland, the historic town of Hanover 
County, a few miles noi'th of Richmond. For a number of years 
he has served as mayor of Ashland and as judge of the Juvenile 
Court of Hanover County, striving to express in his newspaper 
and his life a courageous condemnation of what he believes to 
be wrong, and an encouragement of what is proper and right, 
and to get others to join and sympathize in his work, so that 
the tide will gather volume till the whole of public opinion is 
affected. It is his contention that there is as much good in 
men's heai-ts as there is evil, but selfishness so controls the 
majority that it is difficult to awaken public condemnation and 
arouse a better spirit and an ambition toward nobler aims. 
Experience has taught him that these things cannot be accom- 



66 VIRGINIA 

plished by standing remote, but only by active personal labor. 
For twenty-two years he has been secretary of the Virginia State 
Farmers Institute, and needless to say he is vitally interested 
in everything pertaining to the agricultural situation. 

Mr. Shepherd is the oldest active worker in agriculture in 
the state in point of service. He was president of various farm 
organizations and a director in a number of others, and is a 
member of practically all farm organizations in the state. 

John Brockenbrough Newton, president of the Virginia 
Iron, Coal & Coke Company of Roanoke, bears the name of his 
father, who was a bishop of the Episcopal Church in Virginia, 
and represents the ninth generation of the family which has 
given many distinguished men to Virginia's annals. 

Mr. Newton was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia, 
son of Rt. Rev. John Brockenbrough and Roberta Page (Wil- 
liamson) Newton, grandson of Willoughby Newton, who was in 
the seventh generation of descent from Thomas Newton, a resi- 
dent of Yorkshire, England. Capt. John Newton, son of Thomas, 
came to Virginia about 1666, establishing his home in Westmore- 
land County, where the Newtons have lived for nearly three 
centuries. The Newtons intermarried with some of the other 
distinguished families of old Virginia. 

Willoughby Newton, grandfather of the Roanoke business 
man, was born in 1802 and died in 1875. He owned the "Linden" 
estate in Westmoreland County. He was a member of Congress 
and at one time president of the Virginia State Agricultural 
Society. His wife, whom he married in 1829, was Mary Steven- 
son Brockenbrough, whose father, Judge William Brocken- 
brough, was a judge of the Virginia Court of Appeals. 

Bishop John Brockenbrough Newton was born February 7, 
1840. Before the war he had graduated from the Virginia Medi- 
cal College and served with the rank of major and surgeon in the 
Confederate army. Later he attended the Episcopal Theological 
Seminary, was ordained in 1871, served several prominent 
churches in Norfolk and Richmond, and on May 16, 1894, was 
consecrated Bishop Coadjutor of the Diocese of Virginia. He 
had filled that office about three years before his death, which 
occurred in 1897. His wife, Roberta Page Williamson, was a 
daughter of Joseph A. and Mary Mann (Page) Williamson, her 
mother being a daughter of Robert Page, who served with the 
rank of captain in the Revolutionary army and was a member 
of the First Congress. Among other noted names in her an- 
cestry was that of Col. William Byrd, founder of Richmond. 

John Brockenbrough Newton, Jr., was one of a large family 
of eleven children. He was educated in the Norfolk Male Acad- 
emy, the Episcopal High School at Alexandria, and had the 
training of a civil engineer. As a civil engineer he became inter- 
ested in railroading, particularly construction of lines for the 
development and proper utilization of the rich mineral resources 
of the West, and finally became identified with and active head of 
that great group of financial and industrial interests comprised 
under the corporate title of Virginia Iron, Coal & Coke Company. 
He was vice president and general manager until 1907, and since 
that date has been president of the corporation. Since 1914 his 
home and the home offices of the company have been at Roanoke. 
This company controls and directs operations covering half a 



VIRGINIA 67 

dozen states, including the ownership of great tracts of mineral 
lands, coal mines, iron mines, furnaces and factories. 

Mr. Newton has served as senior warden of St. John's Epis- 
copal Church at Roanoke. He is a member of the Shenandoah 
and Country Clubs. He married, in 1890, Laura Neal, a native 
of Marion, North Carolina, daughter of J. G. and Rowena Neal. 
They have a son, John Brockenbrough Newton III, who on 
April 29, 1915, married Dorothy Ball Judkins, of Virginia, she 
being a direct descendant of Mary Ball, mother of George Wash- 
ington. 

Garnett Owen Lee. Among the far-sighted business men 
who have taken advantage of the opportunities offered by the 
wonderful growth and development of the automobile indu.stry 
is Garnett 0. Lee, who conducts the agency for Ford automo- 
biles at Lynchburg. He has been identified with his present 
business since 1910, and it now bears the name of the Apperson- 
Lee Motor Company, of which he is president, and which is one 
of the most successful concerns of its kind in the city. During 
his career he has won a reputation for business ability and 
judgment, as well as for public-spirited cooperation in all move- 
ments pertaining to the welfare and progress of the city. 

Mr. Lee was born March 14, 1881, at Lynchburg, and is a 
son of James I. and Nannie B. (Anthony) Lee, natives of Vir- 
ginia, who are both deceased. This branch of the Lee family 
traces its ancestry back to France, whence the original American 
ancestor came to Colonial Virginia long prior to the war of the 
Revolution. The Town of Leesville, in Campbell County, was 
named in honor of the great-gi-andfather of Mr. Lee, and there 
was born his grandfather, John Lee. James I. Lee, father of 
Garnett 0., was for many years a wholesale grocer at Lynch- 
burg, where he was the owner of a prosperous business and the 
possessor of a splendid reputation for business integrity and 
straightforward dealing. He and his worthy wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church, in the work of which both were 
active, and Mr. Lee was also a leading public figure, serving for 
many years as a member of the City Council of Lynchburg, to 
which he was elected on the Democratic ticket. Fraternally 
he was a Mason. During the war between the states he enlisted 
in the Confederate army under Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, and saw 
four years of service as a member of Company F, Second Regi- 
ment, Virginia Volunteer Infantry, during which time he sus- 
tained three wounds. At the close of the struggle he returned 
to Lynchburg to resume his business activities, in which he con- 
tinued until the close of his life. He and his wife became the 
parents of four children : James I., Jr., who is identified with 
the Southern Railway of Washington, D. C. ; Garnett 0., of this 
review; Alice Anthony, the wife of Mr. Van Swearingen, who 
is connected with the Republic Rubber Company of Boston, 
Massachusetts; and Mary Gill, the wife of Alfred Farrar, of 
Saint Louis, connected with the International Shoe Company 
of Saint Louis, of which he is one of the three principal owners, 
and a man who has been very successful in his business career. 

Garnett 0. Lee acquired his education in the public schools 
of Lynchburg, and after graduating from high school his first 
work was with the Oglesby DeWitt Company, a wholesale dry 
goods concern, with which he remained for five years. When 
he started he was first employed in the house, but later was 



68 VIRGINIA 

advanced to traveling salesman and thus gained much valuable 
experience and a wide acquaintance. Later he went to Boston, 
where he was associated with the Interstate Chemical Com- 
pany for one year, at the end of which time the plant of the 
company was destroyed by fire and Mr. Lee returned to Lynch- 
burg, where he acquired a position as teller in the American 
National Bank. Mr. Lee remained in this bank until 1910, 
when he saw an opportunity to embark in the automobile busi- 
ness as representative of the Palmer-Singer car. Four years 
later he took over the agency for the Hudson and Haines cars, 
but at the end of four years' time disposed of his holdings and 
took over the Ford, which he has handled ever since as presi- 
dent of the Apperson-Lee Motor Company, P. D. Winston being 
vice president. This company does a large and profitable busi- 
ness and maintains a salesroom, oflSce and service station at 516 
Main Street, Lynchburg, as well as branches at Rustburg, 
Amherst and Farmville. Mr. Lee is widely and favorably known 
in business circles and has numerous friends. 

In 1910 Mr. Lee was united in marriage with Miss Jessie 
Apperson, who was born at Little Rock, Arkansas, and edu- 
cated at Mary Baldwin's School at Staunton. Four children 
have been born to this union : Jacqueline Apperson, born in 
1912; Geraldine Anthony, born in 1914; Garnett Owen, Jr., born 
in 1916; and Richard Adams, born in 1918. Mr. and Mrs. Lee 
are consistent members of St. John's Episcopal Church, and 
Mrs. Lee has been particularly active in religious and charitable 
work. Mr. Lee is an ardent fisherman and hunter, and possesses 
many trophies of these sports. His hobby is research work and 
investigation along the lines of agricultural activities, and he 
is a close student of the problems of the soil. 

Blair J. Fishburn in his individual career has been closely 
identified with the rise of a most important city of Southwest 
Virginia, Roanoke. He was born at what was known in local 
geography as the village of Big Lick, the site of which long since 
has been taken into the City of Roanoke, and he was a boy during 
the '80s when Roanoke acquired its first city charter. 

The Fishburns have been a family of pioneers in Virginia 
and many of the names have reached positions of distinction and 
success. His father, Reuben Harvey Fishburn, was born in 
Franklin County, Virginia, February 27, 1835, son of Samuel 
Washington and Frances (Tyree) Tinsley Fishburn. As a youth 
he learned the business of farming and tanning. He volunteered 
at the outbreak of the Civil war, joining Company A, Thirty- 
seventh Battalion, Virginia Cavalry, participated in some of the 
early campaigns in Southwestern Virginia and West Virginia, 
and then fought up and down the Valley of Virginia until the end 
of the war. Afterwards he became a merchant, and in 1873 
moved to the village of Big Lick, where he and his brothers, Tip- 
ton T. and John Robert Fishburn, engaged in tobacco manufac- 
ture. They gave early Roanoke one of its largest commercial 
and industrial establishments. Reuben Fishburn retired from 
business in 1905. He married, April 27, 1873, Emma Virginia 
Phillips, daughter of Joshua and Sallie (Hughes) Phillips, of 
Campbell County, Virginia. Of their five children the only son 
is Blair J. 

Blair J. Fishburn was educated in public schools at Roanoke, 
in Randolph-Macon Academy at Front Royal, and also had the 



VIRGINIA 69 

benefit of travel and study abroad in Europe and the Holy Land. 
For several years he was associated with R. H. Fishburn & Com- 
pany, manufacturers of smoking tobacco, who sold out their 
business in 1905, but the business which has absorbed most of 
his energies has been the S. P. Hite Company, manufacturers of 
drugs and flavoring extracts. He acquired a financial interest 
in this in 1905, and is now its president and manager. Mr. 
Fishburn is a director of the First National Exchange Bank of 
Roanoke, Virginia Bridge & Iron Company, Roanoke Securities 
Corporation and Shenandoah Life Insurance Company, and, 
like his late father, his financial connections would comprise 
almost a directory of the leading commercial and industrial 
affairs of Roanoke. 

He has been none the less helpful and public-spirited in his 
citizenship. He was a member of the City Council of Roanoke 
from 1907 until 1918, his last term closing at the time Roanoke 
adopted a new city charter, providing for a city manager. In 
1922 he was elected one of the five councilmen of the city, and 
was president of the council and mayor of the city from then 
until September 1, 1926. He is now president of the Play- 
grounds and Recreation Association of Roanoke, so that the city 
is not without his wise participation in its continued growth and 
development. 

He is a steward of the Greene Memorial Methodist Episcopal 
Church, of which both his parents were members. He is a 
thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, member of Kazim 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine, belongs to the Knights of Pythias, 
B. P. 0. Elks, Rotarj' Club and for many years was a prominent 
official in the United Commercial Travelers. He is a member 
of the Roanoke Gun Club, Shenandoah Club, Roanoke Country 
Club, United States, State of Virginia and City of Roanoke 
Chambers of Commerce. 

Hon. Joseph Crockett Shaffer, United States District at- 
torney, with headquarters in Roanoke, is one of the ablest law- 
yers in this part of the Old Dominion, and a man whose knowl- 
edge of the law and brilliant attainments are recognized by the 
profession and public as well. He possesses a vigorous mind that 
seems never to need rest or to become dull. His memory is 
phenomenal. He knows not dimly or hazily, but with substantial 
accuracy, the law and how to interpret it. In his office he is 
utterly indiff'erent to the applause of the multitude, the blandish- 
ment of power, as well as the bitterness of those who take offense 
at his conduct, and with these characteristics he is invaluable 
to the Government, and at the same time he is safeguarding the 
rights of the citizens by refraining from the arbitrary exercise 
of the powers invested in him. He was born in Wythe County, 
Virginia, January 19, 1880, a son of Joseph B. and Elizabeth 
(Crockett) Shaffer, both of whom were also born in Wythe 
County. She is deceased, but he is living, and, after a lifetime 
of farming, is residing in Wytheville. There were two children 
born to the parents: Edith, who married J. P. Hert, of Wythe- 
ville, employed by a West Virginia coal company ; and Attorney 
Shaffer. Both parents early united with the Presbyterian 
Church, and they reared their children in that faith, to which 
she adhered until her death, and to which he still subscribes. 
Fraternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
A strong Republican, he has held several county offices, and has 

4— VOL. 3 



70 VIRGINIA 

always been interested in party affairs. The paternal grand- 
father of Attorney Shaffer was Joseph Shaffer, born in Virginia, 
but the great-grandfather was a Pennsylvanian, and came to 
Virginia many years ago, and here he lived and died, as did the 
grandfather. The maternal grandfather was Montgomery 
Crockett, a native of Wythe County, Virginia, and a member of 
one of the very old families of Virginia. In fact on both sides 
of the house Attorney Shaffer comes of fine old Virginian stock, 
of which he may well be proud. 

After the usual preliminary schooling Joseph Crockett Shaf- 
fer entered the University of Virginia, and was graduated there- 
from in 1904 with the degree of Bachelor of Laws, and he 
entered at once upon the practice of his profession in Wytheville, 
where he remained until he was appointed United States district 
attorney January 13, 1924, and took charge of his office with 
characteristic energj^ and efficiency. Prior to his appointment 
he had already demonstrated his fitness for the office he now 
holds by serving for four years as commonwealth attorney of 
Wytheville, and he was also attorney for the prohibition admin- 
istrator for a short period, so that his appointment caused no 
surprise. Since he cast his first vote he has been a Republican, 
and he is active in his party. 

On May 15, 1912, Attorney Shaffer married Miss Ada Hon- 
aker, born in Bland County, Virginia, and educated in Sullivan s 
College, Bristol, Virginia. Five children have been born to 
them, namely: Joseph C, Junior, John Scott, Mary Elizabeth, 
Edwin Gray and Edwina Gay, the last two being twins. The 
three elder children are attending school in Roanoke. Mr. 
Shaffer is a Presbyterian, while Mrs. Shaffer is a Methodist, 
and both are active in church work. Fraternally he has been 
advanced in the Scottish Rite in Masonry, and he also belongs 
to the Mystic Shrine. It would be difficult to find a man more 
generally representative of the best ideals of his learned pro- 
fession and of good citizenship than he, and further advance- 
ment is looked for him by his many friends. 

Isaac Eldridge Huff, physician and surgeon at Roanoke, 
graduated from the University of Maryland in 1892, and for 
many years has been recognized as a man of real distinction in 
his profession, with a wide scope of service for his talents. 

He was born in Floyd County, Virginia, May 26, 1866, and 
his people have lived in that section of Virginia for several gen- 
erations. His parents, Isaac and Adeline (Kitterman) Huff, 
were born in Floyd County. His father was a Confederate 
soldier, a farmer, and died in November, 1895. 

Doctor Huff finished his medical education in what was then 
known as the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore, 
now the Medical Department of the University of Maryland. 
He was an interne in Mercy Hospital of Baltimore, and for 
twelve years practiced in Floyd, his home county. His home has 
been at Roanoke since 1904. Doctor Huff has offices in the 
Shenandoah Life Building, and for a number of years has been 
president of the Shenandoah Hospital. He has conducted a 
general practice, and has a high reputation as an obstetrician. 
He has been president of the Roanoke Academy of Medicine, an 
active member of the Medical Society of Virginia, the South- 
west Virginia Medical Society, Southern and American Medical 
Associations. He became a member of the Roanoke Board of 



VIRGINIA 71 

Health upon its organization. Doctor Huff has been active in 
the First Baptist Church of Roanoke, serving as a deacon of 
the church and a teacher in the Sunday School. He is a mem- 
ber of the University Club and Kiwanis Club. 

He married at Roanoke Miss Flora Mclvor Francis, daughter 
of Capt. W. H. and Eliza A. (Shelor) Francis, of Floyd County. 
Her father commanded a company in the Confederate army. Of 
the three children of Doctor and Mrs. Huff, William Banks is an 
A. B. graduate of Roanoke College, took his medical degree in 
1922 at the University of Maryland, was connected with the 
Walter Reed Hospital at Washington during the World war, and 
began practice with his father. The daughter, Doris, graduated 
with the A. B. degree from Hollins College, and married D. R. 
Hunt. Francis Eldridge, the second son, was educated in Rich- 
mond College and Washington and Lee University, and took up 
a business career. 

Charles G. Lindsey. Among the men who have worked 
their way to prominence and affluence solely through the medium 
of their own efforts, one of the foremost at Roanoke is Charles 
G. Lindsey, president of Lindsey, Robinson & Company, whole- 
sale distributors ; president of the Victory Specialty Company ; 
president of Maddox & Jennings Bakery and a stockholder or 
director in various other enterprises. The business qualities 
that are essential for the management of so vast and intricate 
operations are obvious. To breadth and comprehensiveness of 
mind, quickness to perceive opportunities and readiness to grasp 
them, energy and push, there must be added a capacity for or- 
ganization, as well as an attention to detail, that every part of 
the complicated machinery move harmoniously. The difference 
between profit and loss in a great industry often turns on nice 
calculations of cost of production and small economies. He who 
neglects little things often fails in great ones. In all these 
qualities Mr. Lindsey excels. Under his quiet but efficient con- 
trol the diversified operations move with the regularity and 
power of one of his great machines, he himself being the balance 
wheel that controls and steadies the action of all the parts. 

Mr. Lindsey was born in Carroll County, Virginia, February 
6, 1879, and is a son of Charles Wesley and Margaret Louise 
(Quesenberry) Lindsey, and a grandson of Henry K. Lindsey, 
also a native of that county, where he passed his entire career in 
agricultural pursuits. Charles Wesley Lindsey was born in 
Carroll County, Virginia, and during his young manhood taught 
school in the rural districts. Later he turned his attention to 
farming, which he followed for many years, but at present is 
engaged in general merchandising in Pulaski County, this state. 
He married Margaret Louise Quesenberry, daughter of Crockett 
Quesenberry, who was born in Pulaski County, where he spent 
his entire life in farming with the exception of the duration of 
the war between the states, in which, as a soldier of the Confed- 
eracy, he saw much hard fighting, and suffered both wounds and 
capture. Mrs. Lindsey was reared in the faith of the Method- 
ist Church, in the work of which she always has been active. 
She and her husband have had eight children, of whom seven 
survive, Charles G. being the fifth in order of birth. 

Charles G. Lindsey received his education in Carroll County, 
where he taught school for two years, and then came to Roanoke, 
a poor but ambitious youth, to seek his fortune. He subse- 
quently became cashier of the Virginia Iron and Coal Company 



72 VIRGINIA 

at Crosier Furnace, Roanoke, and remained with that concern 
for four years, resigning to accept a position as a traveling sales- 
man for a flour milling concern. During the next four years he 
traveled through Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina and 
South Carolina, learning every detail of the business, and in 
1911 returned to Roanoke to join the firm of Davis, Robinson & 
Company. Later Mr. Davis sold his interest and the firm became 
Lindsey, Robinson & Company, under which style it was incor- 
porated in July, 1918. This has grown to large proportions and 
Mr. Lindsey is now president and manager, George C. Huff, vice 
president, J. E. Robinson, secretary, and J. M. McGee, treas- 
urer. This concern makes certain kinds of feeds, including 
poultry feed and meal, and does a general jobbing business in 
flour and groceries. In addition to a large force at the head- 
quarters, 365 Salem Avenue, Roanoke, the concern keeps six 
traveling salesmen on the road, covering Virginia, West Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina. Mr. Lindsey naturally centers his 
interests in this enterprise, but also has other important con- 
nections. He is president of the Victory Specialty Company, 
manufacturers and distributors of candies, cigars, cigarettes and 
tobacco ; and president of the Maddox & Jennings Bakery, Inc., 
and is importantly interested in the Roanoke Ice and Cold Stor- 
age Company and in the Griggs Packing Company. He has 
been very active in civic affairs, and is an enthusiastic member 
of the Chamber of Commerce and the Booster Club. He is a 
Democrat in his political views, but not a seeker for public 
office, and is a consistent member of the First Presbyterian 
Church, in which he is an elder. He likewise belongs to the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Lions Club, the 
Country Club and the Shenandoah Club, in all of which he is 
very popular and has numerous warm friends. 

In 1909 Mr. Lindsey was united in marriage with Miss Annie 
Snyder Huff, who was born at Roanoke, daughter of George C. 
Huff and Blanche Vinyard Huff, now residents of Washington 
County, Virginia. To this union there have been born two chil- 
dren: Blanche Vinyard, born in 1912, who is in third year of 
high school; and Charles Grattan, Jr., born in 1916, who is 
attending public school. Mr. Lindsey had been previously mar- 
ried, in 1904, to Miss Lula Belle Smith, of Pulaski County, Vir- 
ginia, who died in 1905 without issue. 

Robert L. McGuire. For a number of years Robert L. Mc- 
Guire has been engaged in the real estate business in Richmond, 
and it is partially due to his efforts that Bellevue Court, Sum- 
merfield, Wildwood, Westover Gardens and other choice resi- 
dential developments have been successfully carried on, both in 
Virginia and other Southern States. In his operations he has 
developed into a financier with extensive interests in the states 
of Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Missouri, South Dakota and Ten- 
nessee. He is now president of the National Finance & Mort- 
gage Corporation, the National Holdings Corporation and the 
National Securities Corporation. 

Robert L. McGuire was born in Winchester, Virginia, May 
12, 1895, a son of Saint George and Anna Marie (von Boehm) 
McGuire, and a member of the historic McGuire family of Vir- 
ginia, of which Dr. Hunter McGuire, distinguished surgeon of 
the Confederacy, was a notable example, and a direct descendant 
of the Lord McGuire, Baron of Enniskillen, of Ireland and 



I 



VIRGINIA 73 

France. Saint George McGuire had a distinguished diplomatic 
career, ending with the inauguration of Woodrow Wilson to the 
presidency in 1913. He was sent on various diplomatic missions 
of importance to Germany, South America and Asia, and died 
of yellow fever at the age of forty years, while en route to 
Sumatra from China. His wife was born in Saxony, Germany, 
a daughter of Robert von Boehm, of an Austrian family, who 
had a distinguished record in the German army, and was deco- 
rated by the former Kaiser ; and was a near relative of General 
von Boehm, who commanded a German division in the World 
war. 

When still a child Robert L. McGuire accompanied his father 
to South America, where he studied under private tutors, and 
he continued his studies in the same manner in Europe and 
Asia, completing his quite extensive education with a legal course 
in the University of Leipsic, and still later had one year's work 
at LaSalle University. He was later a junior member of a 
German expedition into the interior of Brazil and subsequently 
was present at one of the earlier revolts in Nicaragua, Central 
America. 

In August, 1917, Mr. McGuire enlisted for the World war in 
the field artillery, was commissioned a lieutenant, and went over- 
seas, and because of linguistic ability and knowledge of the 
peoples was placed on duty with the Headquarters Staff in 
France. After the close of the war and his honorable discharge 
Mr. McGuire returned to civilian life and began handling real 
estate, as above indicated, in Richmond, becoming treasurer of 
the Northside Development Corporation and later vice president 
of Your Home Building Corporation. He then became president 
of the Westover Gardens Corporation and in July, 1927, he 
organized the National Finance & Mortgage Corporation, of 
which he is president. This latter corporation has a unique 
method to finance mortgages and developments for Richmond 
real estate men. This service provides the opportunity for pub- 
lic participation through authorizing the issuance of six and one- 
quarter per cent ten-year accumulative installment certificates 
for the investment of savings ; and also used as sinking fund by 
other corporations, that wish to protect their stockholders from 
loss. The funds thus received will, in turn, be used for the 
purchase of superior mortgages and other negotiable paper. 

Mr. McGuire married the Marchioness Wilmina Eleanora de 
Bonneville, of Bonneville, France, a daughter of the Marquis 
Arthur A. de Bonneville, of the French army, and a descendant 
of Cecelia de Treauneaux, who was lady-in-waiting to the 
Empress Josephine. Colonel de Bonneville, an engineer officer, 
representing the French army, came to America during the 
World war and assisted in establishing army camps, in which 
he was an instructor. ' 

Through his financial company Mr. McGuire is not only aid- 
ing others in their development work, but he is going ahead with 
some enterprises of his own which promise to be more than 
usually successful. He has lately established a corporation for 
the purpose of taking over a large tract of land in the State of 
Tennessee and will form the Town of Bonneville, an industrial 
and residential enterprise. While not a native son of Richmond, 
he is a Virginian, and as such bears a deep love in his heart for 
the beautiful Southern city of such historic memories, and it is 
a source of great pride to him that he has been able to accom- 



74 VIRGINIA 

plish so much for it, and plans to greatly increase his benefac- 
tions in the next few years. He has contributed articles to trade 
papers on phases of financing and promotions, and is author of 
an extensive work on salesmanship. 

Rev. William Arthur Pearman as a clergyman of the 
Episcopal Church began his service in his native state of Ohio, 
afterwards was in Missouri, and on coming to Virginia first 
located at Richmond. He is now pastor of the church at Bed- 
ford City. 

He was born on a farm in Noble County, Indiana, in 1868, 
son of Benjamin F. and Adaline (Wittmer) Pearman, and a 
grandson of William Pearman and John Wittmer. William 
Pearman was a pioneer farmer of Indiana. John Wittmer was 
born in Pennsylvania, became a miller by trade, and he walked 
all the way from Niagara Falls, New York, to Northern Indi- 
ana, looking for, and where he finally found, a site for a mill. 
Benjamin F. Pearman was born in Virginia and spent his active 
life as a farmer in Indiana. He was a Methodist, a Democrat 
and a member of the Masonic fraternity. His wife, Adaline 
Wittmer, was born at Niagara Falls, New York. They had a 
family of seven children and those now living are: Mrs. Mary 
A. Bowser, of Elkhart, Indiana; Levi W., of Nappanee, Indiana; 
Chloe, widow of W. B. Jacoby, living in California; Martha J., 
wife of H. S. Funk, of California; and William Arthur. 

William Arthur Pearman was reared on a farm, attended 
Indiana public schools and finished his literary education in the 
old Lutheran College, Wittenberg College, at Springfield, Ohio, 
graduating Bachelor of Arts in 1896. He completed his course 
in the theological seminary in preparation for the Episcopal 
ministry in 1899. His first church was at Mechanicsburg, Ohio, 
where he remained four years. Going to Missouri he was rector 
of a church at Clinton two years and at Warrenburg two years. 
Rev. Mr. Pearman was assistant pastor of St. Paul's Church at 
Richmond, Virginia, for two years. He was at Covington, Vir- 
ginia, four years, and on October 1, 1918, came to Bedford. The 
church at Bedford was established in 1847, and when Mr. Pear- 
man began his work in the parish the congregation was still 
worshipping in a very small building. He has succeeded in 
erecting a handsome new church edifice costing approximately 
$100,000, one that is an honor to the town and the parish. This 
church was opened for worship June, 1924. St. John's Church 
has over two hundred communicants. 

Rev. Mr. Pearman married in 1900, Edith Keller Schindler, 
a native of Springfield, Ohio, where she was educated in the 
public schools. Her father, Charles Schindler, was an under- 
taker. Mr. and Mrs. Pearman had five children : Carl Schind- 
ler, born in 1902, now with a motor truck company at San Fran- 
cisco; Benjamin Vincent, a graduate of high school and of the 
University of the South at Sewanee, Tennessee, in 1926, now 
with the American Pigment Corporation, of Bedford, Virginia; 
Robert William, a chemist with the Frazer Paint Company, of 
Detroit, Michigan ; Frederick Keller, a student in Washington 
and Lee University ; and Edith Adaline, attending the Junior 
high school at Bedford. Rev. Mr. Pearman is a Royal Arch 
Mason, member of the Phi Gamma Delta, and all his sons are 
members of the same fraternity in college. He also belongs to 
the B. P. 0. Elks. 




^>crAy)ay /v^'H^aA/C 



VIRGINIA 75 

John Wright, an Englishman by birth, identified himself 
with Richmond a few years after the close of the Civil war, 
and for a quarter of a century was a prominent tobacco manu- 
facturer, becoming one of the very successful men in an age 
when that industry was largely under individual ownership and 
control. 

Mr. Wright was born in Lancashire, England, November 19, 
1833, son of Thomas Anthony and Catherine Elizabeth (Knight) 
Wright, both of whom represented the substantial landed gentry 
of England. His father was a gentleman farmer. 

John Wright, one of eight children, was educated by private 
tutors in his father's home. When he came to America he 
traveled on a sailing vessel and for a number of years made 
his home in New York City. On coming to Richmond in 1875 
Mr. Wright bought a country home in Henrico County. He 
established his tobacco factory near Nineteenth and Franklin 
streets, and for twenty-seven years he gave his close personal 
supervision to his growing business there. He retired to his 
farm in 1902, and lived quietly there until his death in 1907. 
Mr. Wright was a member of the Tobacco Association and was 
counted one of the most enterprising and public spirited citizens 
of his time. He and all his family were members of the Epis- 
copal Church. 

His first wife was Miss Annie Helpin, who died shortly after 
they came to Richmond, leaving no children. On November 17, 
1893, Mr. Wright married Margaret Snell. Mrs. Wright, whose 
home is now at 1715 Grove Avenue in Richmond, is a member 
of the United Daughters of the Confederacy and Daughters of 
the American Revolution, and has taken an active part in the 
guilds and societies of the Episcopal Church. Her grandparents 
were James and Millicent (Archer ) Snell. Her father, James 
Archer Snell, was born in Henrico County in 1818, was educated 
by private tutors, and as a young man entered merchandising, 
which he continued for over twenty years, and then retired. 
He served three years in a Virginia regiment with the Con- 
federate army. His business was located at Seventeenth and 
Main streets, at that time Richmond being a comparatively small 
city. James Archer Snell married Nancy Bibb Rison, of Amelia 
County, and they had a family of eight children : James Archer, 
Sallie Booker Snell, Millicent Jane, John Reighley, William 
Booker, Nannie Irvin, Mrs. Margaret Ella Wright and Coakley. 

To the marriage of Mr. John Wright and Margaret E. Snell 
were born three children. The son Thomas Arthur, a distin- 
guished scholar, was educated in the McGuire's School for Boys 
at Richmond, took his Bachelor of Science degree at William 
and Mary College, his Doctor's degree at Harvard University, 
and for twelve years was principal of the Baker School in Rich- 
mond, and for the past ten years has been a member of the 
faculty of Dartmouth College at Hanover, New Hampshire. He 
is author of a book on Principles of Vocational Guidance. 
Thomas Arthur Wright married Minnie Rowe, of Hampton, Vir- 
ginia, and has two children, named Mary Morris and Margaret 
Elizabeth. John Halpin Wright, the second son of Mrs. Wright, 
graduated from William and Mary College and has since made 
a great success in the real estate business, being one of the lead- 
ing realtors of Washington, D. C. He is a member of the Real 
Estate Board of Washington and belongs to several college and 
other fraternities and civic organizations. John Halpin Wright 



76 VIRGINIA 

married Dorothy Jones, of Washington, and their chree children 
are Margaret Madison, John Halpin, Jr., and Dorothy Knowles. 
Nancy Bibb Wright, the only daughter, was educated in Mrs. 
Morris' School at Richmond, and takes an active part in Sundav 
School work in the Episcopal Church. She is now the wife of 
Louis C. Adair, of Richmond, Mr. Adair being a brother pf 
Cornelia Adair, president of the Virginia Teachers Association 
and one of the outstanding educational leaders in the state. Mr. 
and Mrs. Adair have three children, Nancy Bibb, Cornelia Stor- 
ris and Catherine. 

John Nottingham Upshur, M. D., by his own life of ser- 
vice in the medical profession upheld the standards of a very 
distinguished Virginia family name. 

Doctor Upshur was born at Norfolk, Virginia, February 14, 
1848, and died at Richmond, December 10, 1924. He was a 
nephew of Abel Parker Upshur, who served as Secretary of 
the Navy under President Tyler, and then succeeded Daniel 
Webster as Secretary of State. 

Doctor Upshur was a son of Doctor George Littleton Upshur 
and a grandson of Colonel Littleton and Anne (Parker) Upshur. 
Doctor George Littleton Upshur practiced medicine at Norfolk, 
and fell a victim to one of the yellow fever epidemics that over- 
spread that city. Doctor George Littleton Upshur was a brother 
of the late John Henry Upshur, who became a rear admiral of 
the United States Navy and served with Commodore Perry in 
the expedition that opened Japan to commerce. He was on the 
Union side during the Civil war and had many important com- 
mands after the war, retiring after forty-four years of service. 

Doctor John Nottingham Upshur was educated at Norfolk, 
attended the University of Virginia and gi'aduated from the 
Medical College of Virginia in 1869. For more than half a cen- 
tury he pursued his professional routine with a skill and devo- 
tion that earned the admiration of thousands who Were included 
at one time or other in his private practice, and he also reached 
eminence in the opinion of his professional associates. He was 
at one time president of the Virginia State Medical Association, 
and was founder of the Tri-State Medical Society, comprising 
the states of Virginia, North and South Carolina. He was also 
a member of the American Medical Association. 

Doctor Upshur at the age of sixteen was a cadet at the Vir- 
ginia Military Institute in Lexington, Virginia, and was severely 
wounded at the battle of New Market. He was always a staunch 
Democrat, and an active member of St. James Episcopal Church. 
He was affiliated with the Masonic fraternity. 

Doctor Upshur married Miss Lucy Whittle, who died leav- 
ing one son, Doctor Francis Whittle Upshur. On December 10, 
1879, he married Miss Elizabeth Peterkin, who survives him 
and resides at 1613 Grove Avenue in Richmond. Mrs. Upshqr 
is a member of the Richmond Woman's Club. She is a native 
of New Orleans, daughter of William S. and Emma (Meeteer) 
Peterkin, who were born in Baltimore and lived for many years 
in New Orleans, where her father was a cotton broker. 

Mrs. Upshur is the mother of three children. Her son. 
Colonel William Peterkin Upshur, graduated from the Virginia 
Military Institute, having previously attended the McGuire 
School for Boys in Richmond, and during the World war was in 
France, and he was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor 
for bravery while on duty at Haiti. Colonel Upshur married 



VIRGINIA 77 

Lucy Munford. The daughter, Elizabeth Nottingham, is the 
wife of George J. Benson, a business man at Charlottesville, 
Virginia, and they have three children, Elizabeth Peterkin, 
Frances Day, and John Upshur Benson. The youngest child is 
Doctor Alfred P. Upshur, of New York, who attended the 
McGuire School at Richmond, the Virginia Military Institute at 
Lexington, and the Virginia Medical College, and is now asso- 
ciated with the Life Extension Institute of New York City. He 
is a member of the Virginia State and American Medical Asso- 
ciations. He served with many hospitals during the war as com- 
mandant. 

Dr. J. N. Upshur was professor of Materia Medica and 
Therapeutics, and of the Practice of Medicine at the Medical 
College of Virginia. He was also chief medical examiner in 
Richmond, for the Equitable Life Insurance Company. He 
was a member of the Lee Camp, N. C. V., and served on the 
staff of the commanding General of that camp, as surgeon. Dur- 
ing the World war, he was active as a speaker in behalf of 
recruiting, at many public gatherings. 

Robert B. Griggs was born and grew up in Roanoke County, 
has been a participant in the development of the important city 
of Roanoke, and is founder and active head of the Griggs Pack- 
ing Company, one of the large and important industries of the 
city. 

Mr. Griggs was born in Roanoke County in 1861, son of 
Samuel and Eva (Kefauber) Griggs, his father a native of Floyd 
County and his mother of Roanoke County. Her father, Peter 
Kefauber, was a pioneer farmer of this section of Virginia. 
Samuel Griggs spent his life as a fai'mer and merchant, and was 
a Confederate soldier throughout the Civil war. He always 
voted as a Democrat, was a member of the Baptist Church, and 
in a quiet, unostentatious way achieved a great deal of life's 
most substantial rewards. He and his wife had eight children, 
six of whom are living. 

Robert B. Griggs grew up on a Roanoke County farm and 
attended school at Big Lick, the village community which was the 
nucleus of the larger city of Roanoke. He began his career as a 
farmer, and as a farmer and stock raiser laid the substantial 
basis of his larger enterprises. Mr. Griggs retained large land 
holdings and farming interests in the vicinity of Roanoke until 
1912, when he disposed of most of this property. 

A number of years ago he started a small packing plant lor 
hogs, and his individual push and enterprise have accounted for 
the remarkable growth of this industry, which now kills and 
packs ten thousand hogs annually, making a specialty of the 
manufacture of Virginia hams, widely sold all over the Roanoke 
territory. The great packing company is an incorjjorated. in- 
stitution with Mr. Griggs as president and active manager, and 
C. M. Griggs, vice president. 

Mr. Griggs married, in 1891, Miss Hallie Mead, a native of 
Bedford County, daughter of Oliver Mead, and her maternal 
grandfather was Col. Richard Crenshaw, one of the extensive 
land owners of his day in Bedford County, and who gave each 
of his grandchildren a large farm. Mr/ and Mrs. Griggs have 
had a family of five children : Mrs. Stewart Barber, whose hus- 
band is a conti-actor at Roanoke, and mother of one daughter, 
Lutitia, born in 1917 ; Robert C. Griggs, who died in 1926 at the 
age of twenty-three ; Evelyn, who married Louis Hock, of Char- 



78 VIRGINIA 

lottsville, Virginia ; Ruth Griggs, a student in Virginia College ; 
and Hallie Mead, in high school. The family are members of 
the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Griggs is 
a Democrat and a member of the Roanoke Chamber of Com- 
merce. 

Branch W. Stonebraker. The career of Branch W. Stone- 
braker, president and a member of the Board of Directors of the 
Roanoke Iron Works, possesses all of the elements so dear to the 
hearts of the lovers of self-made manhood. Starting life with 
only a common school education, his first experience in the busi- 
ness world was in a humble clerkship. Hard work, constant 
application, thorough assimilation of the details of the job 
which he held and fidelity to the interests of his employers car- 
ried him up the ladder, and at present he has the respect and 
esteem of his associates in one of the largest enterprises of its 
kind in Virginia. 

Mr. Stonebraker was born February 26, 1886, in Washing- 
ton County, Maryland, and is a son of J. C. and Sarah W. 
(Dalby) Stonebraker. His father, a native of the same county, 
was given good educational advantages and after leaving col- 
lege turned his attention to literature, in which he has spent the 
greater part of his life, among his better known works being 
"The Unwritten South" and "Puritan and Cavalier." He is a 
member of the Reformed Church of the United States. A Demo- 
crat in politics, he served one or more terms in the State Legis- 
lature of Maryland, but is now living in retirement at Hagers- 
town. Mr. Stonebraker married Sarah W. Dalby, who was born 
near Farmville, Virginia, and graduated as salutatorian of her 
class from Farmville College, where later for several years she 
served as a teacher. She was a member of the first families 
of Virginia, being a descendant of the Mayos, Branchs, Wor- 
shams and Cabells, and is of the stock of the early French- 
Huguenots, the original settlers of eastern Virginia. She is also 
a direct descendant of William Mayo, who assisted in laying out 
the City of Richmond and surveyed the first boundary line 
between Virginia and North Carolina. To Mr. and Mrs. Stone- 
braker there were born eight sons and two daughters, of whom 
Branch W. was the third in order of birth, and five sons are now 
living. 

Branch W. Stonebraker received his education in the public 
schools of Hagerstown, Maryland, and was seventeen years of 
age when he started work as a clerk in the oifices of the Nor- 
folk & Western Railroad at Roanoke. In 1908 he purchased an 
interest in the Roanoke Iron Works, Inc., of which he became 
assistant to the manager, and continued in that capacity until 
1913, when he went to Chicago to become erection superintend- 
ent of one of the largest ornamental iron works plants in the 
United States. Returning to Roanoke, he became superintend- 
ent of the Roanoke Iron Works, and in 1917 was made general 
manager and a member of the directorate. On January 1, 1928, 
he became president of the company. This company manufac- 
tures ornamental iron work of all kinds and finds a ready and 
eager market for its product from Maine to Florida and as 
far west as Ogden, Utah. Mr. Stonebraker, who devotes his 
entire time and energies to the responsibilities of his office, is 
acknowledged to be one of the best informed and most capable 
men in his line in the country. He has won his way to his pres- 
ent position through hard and conscientious work, which has 



VIRGINIA 79 

met with well merited recognition and appreciation, and in his 
labors has the full confidence of his associates and the friend- 
ship and co-operation of the men under his management. He 
has found no time for public life or political activities, but gives 
his support to movements for civic improvement. He is a past 
president of the local Lions Club and a member of the Loyal 
Order of Moose and the Travelers Protective Association. 

In 1906 Mr. Stonebraker was united in marriage with Miss 
Lula F. Via, a daughter of N. W. Via, an Albemarle County 
farmer. She was educated in the schools of Roanoke and is an 
active member of St. Paul's Reformed Church, in which Mr, 
Stonebraker is a member of the Board of Elders. 

Joseph Wolfe Bear. One ot the alert and enterprising 
business men of Roanoke who has made his mark through his 
own efforts and who stands deservedly high with all classes of 
people is Joseph W. Bear, president of the Double Envelope 
Company, and interested in other enterprises of the city. Mr. 
Bear was born in Rockingham County, Virginia, February 26, 
1896, a son of Decatur B. and Anna Virginia (Gibboney) Bear, 
he born at Elkton. Rockingham County, where he died in 1919, 
and she born in Wytheville, Virginia, survives and living at Elk- 
ton. During his younger life the father was a farmer, but 
retired from that occupation early and gave his attention to 
private matters and took some interest in politics, working in 
conjunction with the Democratic party. Both he and his wife 
were strictly religious people, but not of the same faith, as he 
was a Methodist and she a Presbyterian. Of their eight chil- 
dren, all of whom are living, Joseph W. Bear is the second in 
order of birth. His father's father, his paternal grandfather, 
was Adam Bear, an extensive farmer and prominent citizen of 
Rockingham County. 

Until he was eleven years old Joseph W. Bear attended the 
local schools, but at that tender age he left home and began to 
earn his own living. But a child, with no backing or training, 
he had to do the little jobs that he could find and it was not until 
he was sixteen that he was able to get a start. At that time 
he began making envelopes, and he has continued in this line of 
business ever since. His initial work was done in Richmond, but 
later he moved to Roanoke, and in 1917 organized the Double 
Envelope Company, of which he is president and manager. The 
plant, modern in every respect, is conveniently located at 532- 
534 Luck Avenue, West, and the product is shipped all over the 
United States. The company specializes in double envelopes 
for church collections and prints them in eight diff'erent 
languages. 

In November, 1922, Mr. Bear married Miss Jean McDonald 
Franklin, who was born in Roanoke, a daughter of M. C. Frank- 
lin, a broker of Roanoke. Mr. and Mrs. Bear have two children : 
Joseph Wolfe, Junior, born August 7, 1923, and Clay Franklin, 
born May 7, 1925. Mr. Bear is a member of the Second Presby- 
terian Church of Roanoke, and Mrs. Bear of the First Baptist 
Church of Roanoke, and both are active in church work. Mr. 
Bear belongs to the Shenandoah Club, Roanoke Chamber of 
Commerce and the Country Club. His political convictions make 
him a Democrat, and he exerts his right of suffrage but does not 
aspire to public honors, for all of his time is taken up with his 
company's affairs. He is a director of the Mountain Trust 



80 VIRGINIA 

Bank and of the Roanoke Mutual Building & Loan Association. 
Recognized as one of the really self-made men of Roanoke, Mr. 
Bear is accorded a great deal of credit because of what he has 
accomplished. Many were the obstacles that stood in his way, 
but he did not allow them to keep him from advancing; he 
worked long and faithfully at what he had undertaken, and gave 
the best service that lay in his power from the very inception 
of his business, and his rewards have proven that industry, 
thrift and strict integrity are valuable assets to any man no 
matter what he undertakes. 

Thomas Elmer Jamison, president of Jamison's Chain 
Stores and of the Roanoke Grocery & Milling Company, is easily 
one of the leaders in the business life of his city and county, as 
he is along other lines, for his is a nature that naturally assumes 
control of affairs and carries them on to a successful completion. 
He knows exactly what he is aiming for and does not deviate 
from his planned course, and in his operations carries with him 
others, so that the rewards which come of enterprising industry 
and efficient thoughtfulness are not shared by him alone, but 
are also participated in by his associates. 

The birth of Thomas Elmer Jamison took place in Franklin 
County, Virginia, May 4, 1865, and he is a son of John and 
Christana (Hartsell) Jamison. Growing to useful manhood in 
his native county, he attended the local schools and in them 
secured a solid foundation upon which to erect the superstruc- 
ture of his after life, supplemented as this instruction was by the 
lessons inculcated in the home circle of the dignity of labor and 
the value of wise economy. 

When he reached his majority the future capitalist left the 
shelter of the rooftree of his parents and went on the road as a 
traveling salesman for the Wrought Iron Range Company of 
Saint Louis. Missouri, his territory being the eastern part of 
Virginia. After a year on the road, in 1888 he came to Roanoke, 
arriving here at a time when the present citv was little more 
than a village. However, with that faculty of looking into the 
future that is so characteristic of him he realized its possibilities, 
and commenced at once to plan to develop them. His first sten 
in that direction was to ."secure congenial employment, and this 
was obtained with the P. L. Terrv Milling Company as shipping 
clerk, and he continued to hold it for a couple of years, and while 
faithfully performing his allotted duties he was also learning the 
business, and when the company was reorganized as the 
Roanoke Grocery & Milling Company he was one of the old 
employes to be retained by the new management, and he was 
sent on the road. For the succeeding five years he visited the 
trade, building up wide connections and gaining favor for his 
company, and when he was recalled from the road it was to take 
charge of the sales department. Two vears later he was elected 
vice president of the company, and after he had held that office 
for two vears he was elected president of the company, and still 
retains that office. The Roanoke Grocery & Milling Company 
controls a lartre wholesale trade in Roanoke and throughout Vir- 
jrinia. West Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee and a part of 
Kentucky. 

Not content with what he had accomplished in one line. Mr. 
Jamison began to branch out and organizing the Roanoke Coffee 
& Spice Company, of Roanoke, the Salem Grocery Comnany, 
Salem, Virginia, and the Mullens Grocery Company, Mullens, 



VIRGINIA 81 

West Virginia, he carried these enterprises on as president of 
each one until they were placed upon a firm foundation. In the 
meanwhile he became impressed with the value of the chain 
store system, and September 9, 1921, established a chain of 
grocery stores known as Jamison's, there being at the opening 
of business seventy-six of these stores, but since that time the 
number has been increased to eighty-one. These stores are con- 
veniently located in the states of Virginia, West Virginia, North 
Carolina and Tennessee, and it is the hope of Mr. Jamison to 
have the territory expanded in the near future so as to take in 
many other states. The Jamison Stores are conducted as sub- 
sidiaries to the Roanoke Grocery & Milling Company. In or- 
ganizing this system Mr. Jamison had in mind the plan of fur- 
nishing the people of the different communities in which his 
stores are placed not only foodstuffs at a much lower price, but 
also to give them commodities of the very best quality, and so 
rigidly has he followed this plan that the name of Jamison's is 
now indissolubly connected with quality and fair prices, and the 
stores have become very popular. Through his parent company, 
the Roanoke Grocery & Milling Company, he is able to buy direct 
from the manufacturer in such immense quantities that neces- 
sarily he can place his goods on the market at prices that always 
prove attractive. 

With the market furnished by the chain stores the Roanoke 
Grocery & Milling Company has steadily grown, from time to 
time, increasing its capital until it is now capitalized at one-half 
million dollars, and is the largest distributor of foods in Roanoke, 
if not in this part of Virginia. Not only does the Roanoke 
Grocery & Milling Company distribute foodstuffs to the general 
trade, but also to a number of public institutions of Virginia, to 
colleges and to hotels, the volume of business done annually 
being greater than any other company operating between Rich- 
mond, Virginia, and Cincinnati, Ohio. The work entailed upon 
Mr. Jamison is tremendous, but he not only attends to it in a 
most capable manner, but finds time to give considerable thought 
and attention to the affairs of the Magic City, and has succeeded 
in bettering conditions in a most remarkable degree. As the 
principal promoter of the ordinance which provides increased 
salaries for the fireman, he secured adequate fire protection, and 
lowered the insurance rate. It was he who began the agitation 
that resulted in the establishment of the Roanoke Chamber of 
Commerce, of which he was an organizer and first vice presi- 
dent. In all matters pertaining to improving and beautifying 
Roanoke Mr. Jamison can be depended upon to take the initia- 
tive, and in this connection special mention must be made of his 
work in purchasing the Terry property for park purposes. Mr. 
Jamison has served his city as an alderman, and while a member 
of the council was appointed by the president of the Chamber 
of Commerce to draft a plan for a better form of government for 
the city. For many years he served as president of the Whole- 
sale Grocers Association, and was a member of the Manufac- 
turers Association that was later absorbed by the Chamber of 
Commerce. The Presbyterian Church has in him an earnest 
and generous member. His fraternal connections are those 
which he maintains with the Knights of Pythias. 

On November 10, 1892, Mr. Jamison married Miss Lillie 
Davidson, of Roanoke, and they have three children : Gladys 
Ann, who married D. R. Carpenter, a teacher in Roanoke Col- 
lege, Salem, Virginia; Thelma Virginia, who married H. K. 



82 VIRGINIA 

Adams, who is with the First National Exchange Bank of 
Roanoke ; and Frank Elmer, who has charge of the bakery of the 
Roanoke Grocery «&: Milling Company. The children have all 
been well educated, Gladys being a graduate of Hollins College ; 
Thelma was also educated at the same college, and Frank is a 
graduate of the University of Virginia, class of 1926. 

John William Hancock, division manager of the Appala- 
chian Electric Power Company, is also president of the Roanoke 
Public Library. This latter office is something more than a 
casual duty of a successful business man. Mr. Hancock for 
many years has been interested in books and the things they 
represent, the broad range of literature, arts and sciences. The 
life of the world and its people have always interested him, and 
he has made one of the best private collections of books on Vir- 
ginia history. He has been fond of hunting, fishing, moun- 
taineering, nature study and amateur photography. 

Mr. Hancock was born in Franklin County, Virginia, June 
17, 1870, son of Benjamin Peter and Sarah Frances (Hutchin- 
son) Hancock, grandson of William Thomas and Agnes (Booth) 
Hancock. His ancestors, the Hancocks, Booths, Duncans and 
Hollands, have been in Virginia since early Colonial times. Ben- 
jamin Peter Hancock was born in Franklin County, June 19, 
1842, served in the Confederate army in Company D, Second 
Virginia Cavalry, under Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, and was three 
times wounded. After the war he followed farming in Frank- 
lin County until he retired. He died at Washington, February 
19, 1925. His wife was also a native of Franklin County, 
daughter of John C. and Lucy (Meredith) Hutchinson. 

John William Hancock, oldest of the four children of his 
parents, was reared on a farm, had a common school and aca- 
demic education, and acquired a sound business training as 
clerk in stores and employe of banks at Rocky Mount and 
Roanoke. 

His experience in the electrical public utility field covers a 
period of over thirty years. From 1895 to 1899 he was account- 
ant and cashier of the Roanoke Street Railway Company and 
the Roanoke Electric Light & Power Company. Upon the re- 
organization and consolidation of these companies in 1899 as 
the Roanoke Railway & Electric Company, Mr. Hancock was 
made general manager and director, and in 1913 he also became 
general manager of the Lynchburg Traction & Light Company, 
which position he held until the formation of the Appalachian 
Electric Power Company in 1926. He is president of the State 
Association of PubKc Utilities, member of the American Insti- 
tute of Electrical Engineers, National Electric Light Association 
and American Gas Association. 

During the Spanish-American war he was second lieutenant 
of Company G, Second Virginia Volunteer Infantry, and acted 
as assistant to the quartermaster of the Second Division, Sev- 
enth United States Army Corps, at Jacksonville, Florida, Mr. 
Hancock is a fellow of the American Geographical Society, mem- 
ber of the Virginia Historical Society, Wisconsin State His- 
torical Society, Sons of the American Revolution, Sons of Con- 
federate Veterans, member of the Army and Navy Club of 
Washington, Shenandoah Club of Roanoke, Roanoke Country 
Club and Oakwood Country Club of Lynchburg. He is a mem- 
ber of the Grolier Club of New York and the California Book 
Club. 



VIRGINIA 83 

He married at Roanoke, April 30, 1898, Miss Mary Carr 
Leffler. Her ancestor, Joiin Carr, of Loudoun County, was an 
ensign in the Revolutionary army. The children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Hancock were: John William, Jr., who graduated as 
a mining engineer from the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, took 
a post graduate course at the Wharton School of Finance of the 
University of Pennsylvania, and is now with an investment 
banking house in New York City; Karl Bulow, now a student 
of the University of Virginia; Mary Alice, who graduated from 
Wellesley College; Elizabeth Dee; and Benjamin Philip, born in 
1908 and died in infancy. 

Edward L. Johnson is a talented physician and surgeon at 
Bedford, where he has practiced a number of years, always 
enjoying a large professional business, and has also established 
connections in a business and civic way with his community. 

Doctor Johnson was born on a farm in Bedford County, Vir- 
ginia, December 19, 1879. His people have lived in Bedford 
County for several generations. His parents, Jason and Mary 
(Cottrell) Johnson, were natives of the same county. His 
grandfather, John T. Johnson, was born in that county, as also 
his maternal grandfather, James Cottrell. Jason Johnson spent 
his life as a farmer and the old homestead is still owned by the 
family. He was physically disqualified for service during the 
Civil war, but rendered good service by helping neighbors who 
had sons or husbands in the war. He was a Democrat and both 
he and his wife members of the Baptist Church. Of their seven 
children six are living. 

Dr. Edward L. Johnson was educated at the old Jeter School 
in Bedford County and from early manhood learned the les- 
sons of self reliance. He had to earn the money and contrive 
the means to complete his medical education. He determined to 
become a doctor when a youth. Going to New York City he 
found employment in the City Hospital on Blackwell's Island, 
working there eighteen months and taking the course in nursing 
at the same time. He was then employed as a nurse in another 
hospital in New York, and had a certificate as a graduate nurse. 
This work gave him opportunities for study and observation, 
and he spent the greater part of each winter studying medi- 
cine. He went to New York with thirty-seven dollars and when 
he came away he had increased that capital to sixty dollars and 
had made large progress in his professional education. Doctor 
Johnson graduated in medicine from the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia at Richmond in 1907. He has since practiced in Bed- 
ford County. The day he established himself as a doctor he 
had two professional calls. Since 1911 his home has been in 
Bedford City, where in addition to his general private practice 
he is surgeon for the Bedford Tire Company. 

Doctor Johnson married in 1909 Ella Noell, a native of Bote- 
toui't County, Virginia, who was educated there and at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and taught school for a number of years. 
She is very active in the Methodist Church and teaches the 
Philathea class in the Sunday School. She is also matron of 
Eastern Star. She is secretary of the local branch of the Daugh- 
ters of the Confederacy. Her father, John Noell, was a farmer. 
Dr. and Mrs. Johnson have one daughter, Eloise Noell, born 
June 5, 1916. Both are members of the Methodist Church, and 
Doctor Johnson is a past master of the Masonic Lodge, member 
of the Royal Arch Chapter, Woodmen of the World, Benevolent 



84 VIRGINIA 

and Protective Order of Elks, Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He is a member of Bedford County Medical Society and the Med- 
ical Society of Virginia. Doctor Johnson owns a farm and 
orchard, is a director of the Citizens National Bank of Bedford, 
and is a member of the city council. He is also a director of the 
Bedford Tire & Rubber Company, and of the Nardin, Armstrong 
Corporation. He is the owner of the Johnson Service Station at 
Bedford, Virginia. 

Wilson Miles Cary belonged to the generation that fur- 
nished some of the most youthful soldiers to the Confederate 
armies, and in the half century after the war he became a prom- 
inent figure in the tobacco industry at Richmond. 

Colonel Cary was born at Williamsburg, Virginia, in 1843 
and died at Richmond in April, 1919. He was the only son of 
Lucius Falkland and Anne (Henley) Cary, his father a mer- 
chant of Williamsburg. He was one of two children, his sister, 
Hattie Coke Cary, now being Mrs. William Christian, of 
Richmond. 

Wilson Miles Cary was reared in the classical seat of learn- 
ing at Williamsburg, attending William and Mary College. He 
left college to enlist in the Virginia troops, and gave four years 
to the service of the Southern cause. After the war he com- 
pleted his college education, and then located at Richmond, en- 
tering the tobacco business. 

He served with the rank of colonel on the staff of two gover- 
nors of Virginia, Governor Philip McKinney land Governor 
Fitzhugh Lee. Colonel Cary was an ardent Democrat and for 
many years held an official place in the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Richmond. He was a member of the Westmoreland 
Club. 

His first wife was Anne E'. Sublett, and by that marriage 
there are two children, Emily Sampson and Hunsdon. Emily 
married Thomas Marshall, great grandson of the Chief Justice 
Marshall, and has two children. Hunsdon married Mary Miller, 
daughter of George D. Miller, of Albany, New York, and a 
Richmond attorney. 

Colonel Cary on October 10, 1878, married Lilias Blair 
McPhail, who survives him and resides at 19 North Boulevard 
in Richmond. She is a daughter of John Blair McPhail, 
who was educated at Yale College and was a Norfolk attorney, 
and married Ann Cabell Carrington. Mrs. Cary was educated 
by a private tutor at Mulberry Hill, the home of her ancestor. 
Judge Paul Carrington. 

Mrs. Cary has a son and daughter, Lucius Falkland Cary, 
and Lilias Blair Cary. The son was educated at Hampden- 
Sidney College, graduated in law from the University of Vir- 
ginia, and is now assistant city attorney of Richmond. He mar- 
ried Alma Cecil, daughter of Rev. Russell and Alma (Miller) 
Cecil, her father being pastor of the Second Presbyterian 
Church of Richmond, while her mother was a daughter of Dr. 
LaFayette Miller, a surgeon in the Confederate army. Mr. 
and Mrs. L. F. Cary have three children, Lucius F., Jr., now 
a student in the Virginia Military Institute, Elizabeth Cecil, and 
Miles Fairfax. Lilias Blair Cary married Rev. T. K. Currie, of 
Davidson, North Carolina, and now of Richmond, Virginia, and 
has two sons, Thomas Lauchlin and Albert LaDoux. 





4 * « 



VIRGINIA 85 

Thomas E. Payne, D. D. S. As a follower of one of the 
skilled and learned professions, Dr. Thomas E. Payne, of 
Roanoke, has achieved that success which comes to a man who 
finds his vocation congenial and who invests it with determina- 
tion, enthusiasm and natural talent. The modern dental prac- 
titioner has ever before him the chance of making himself an 
enormously important factor in the welfare of his community, 
and a realization of this possibility has come to Doctor Payne 
at Roanoke, of which city he has been a resident for about nine- 
teen years. 

Doctor Payne was born December 9, 1883, in Westmoreland 
County, Virginia, and is a son of John T. and Ellen Cushen 
(Jones) Payne. The Payne family is an old and honored one 
in Virginia, having settled in the colony as early as 1620, at 
which time the original ancestor took up his residence in what 
is now Northumberland County. John T. Payne was a son of 
Thomas Eweil, a native of King George County, Virginia, who 
had large farming interests and also carried on an extensive 
mercantile business. Mr. Payne was likewise a nephew and an 
adopted son of Bishop John Payne, a noted dignitary of the 
Episcopal diocese of Virginia. John T. Payne was born in King 
George County, Virginia, and was given good educational advan- 
tages in his youth, including preparation for the law. He was 
admitted to the bar and for some years in his early life practiced 
with a measure of success, but eventually disposed of his prac- 
tice, gave up his profession, and became a minister of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. For thirty-five years, or until his death 
in 1918, he was a member of the Virginia Conference, filling 
numerous pulpits and becoming widely known and greatly 
beloved for his many good works, his zeal, piety, and humani- 
tarianism. He was laid to rest at Charlottesville, this state, 
where Mrs. Payne, likewise a native of King George County, 
still makes her home. Mr. Payne was a member of the Masons 
and the Indei^endent Order of Odd Fellows, and was a Democrat 
in his political allegiance, although he never sought public office. 
He married Ellen Cushen Jones, a daughter of James Edward 
Jones, a native of King George County, of which county he 
served ably as treasurer for many years, and a member of a 
family that settled in Virginia during Colonial days. 

His father, John T. Payne, furnished Thomas E. Payne, who 
was one of eleven children, with his early educational training, 
following which he pursued a course at the New London Acad- 
emy in Bedford County and the Bridle Creek Academy in Gray- 
son County. His dental studies were prosecuted at the Medical 
College of Virginia, at Richmond, where he took the dental 
course, and in 1909 was graduated with the degree Doctor of 
Dentistry. Doctor Payne commenced practice at Lynchburg, 
but in 1910 located at Roanoke, where he has since attained 
prominence in his profession as a general practitioner, and now 
occupies well-appointed and perfectly equipped offices in the 
Shenandoah Life Building. He has all of the appliances and 
instruments known to modern dental science, and is a careful, 
kind, considerate and highly skilled operator, who has won the 
confidence and esteem of a large patronage, which has been 
attracted by his diligent attention to his work. By keeping 
himself fully abreast of all current developments and improved 
methods in his art, he has maintained an excellent professional 
standing, and meanwhile his amiable disposition and general 



86 VIRGINIA 

deportment have attracted to him many stanch friends. Doctor 
Payne is a member of the Roanoke Dental Society, the Virginia 
Dental Society and the National Dental Association, and his 
religious connection is with Green Memorial Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He is a past master of Lakeland Lodge, A. F. 
and A. M., and a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, and is like- 
wise prominent in the Knights of Pythias, being a past chan- 
cellor commander, a past grand chancellor of the state, a past 
royal vizier of the D. 0. K. K. and present imperial representa- 
tive. He belongs to the Kiwanis Club and is an enthusiastic 
supporter of all worthy civic movements. During the war he 
served as a first lieutenant in the Dental Corps, was overseas 
and was honorably discharged January 21, 1919, at Camp Stuart, 
Virginia. 

In October, 1920, at Roanoke, Doctor Payne was united in 
marriage with Miss Katherine L. Lowry, who was born at 
Lowry, Bedford County, and educated at Bedford City, and they 
have one son, John Thomas, born March 19, 1922. Mrs. Payne 
is a member of the First Baptist Church. 

Lee R. Gills of Bedford has had a remarkably successful 
career. He grew up on a farm, started to work at an early age, 
never had many or special opportunities conferred upon him and 
from his own industry and genius for handling business affairs 
has made himself an influence in a number of communities and 
cities in southwestern Virginia. 

He was born in Bedford County, April 13, 1856, son of Asa 
and Caroline E. (Poindexter) Gills, grandson of Anthony Gills 
and Richard Poindexter, the former a native of Nottaway 
County and the latter of Bedford County. On both sides 
the family have been farmers and planters for a number 
of generations. His father was born in Nottaway County, 
served four years in the Confederate Army, and in June, 
1865, returned home to find his farm devastated, his negroes 
gone, but he adapted himself to the new conditions and 
gained some measure of substantial prosperity before his death. 
He was always a Democrat and a member of the Methodist 
Church. He and his wife had eight children and four are now 
living: Eliza A., wife of Joseph Skinell of Bedford City; 
Edward Gills, a farmer and canner of Bedford County ; Lee R. ; 
and Munford C, who is in the real estate business at Bluefield, 
West Virginia. 

Lee R. Gills was about nine years old when the Civil war 
closed. He had had a few terms of common schooling and after 
the war he took his place in the fields working as his strength 
permitted. Afterwards he attended a private school, the Hale 
Ford Academy in Franklin County, and qualified himself for 
teaching. He taught seven terms of school during winter 
months, working on the farm in the summer. He early became 
interested in saw milling and merchandising, and these two 
lines have accounted for most of his years of energy and gave 
him the foundation of his material prosperity. In this business 
he was associated with his brother C. W. Gills and Mr. Johnson 
for a period of twenty-six years. It was a very unusual part- 
nership, unbusinesslike in a way, since each of the firm paid 
his household running expenses out of the business cash drawer, 
but in other respects it was a real partnership of interest and 
work and commended its methods because of the success that 



VIRGINIA 87 

rewarded the members. The firm had different titles at dif- 
ferent times, Gills Brothers, Gills & Johnson, at Rocky Mount, 
Gills and Holland, again Gills and Johnson and the Gills Grocery 
Company at Felicia. Mr. Gills has been a resident of Bedford 
for over thirty years. He was one of the organizers of the Peo- 
ples National Bank of Bedford in 1901 and was elected the first 
president and has served in that capacity for over a quarter of a 
century. During his active career he has traded in timberlands 
and bought millions of feet of lumber. His business operations 
extended 4;o Roanoke where he began buying and building in 
1907, and in recent years he has made a gift to his children of 
several pieces of property in that city but still owns other im- 
proved real estate there. For the last eighteen years he has 
been president of the Grand Piano Company. In 1925 he organ- 
ized the Bedford Tire & Rubber Company of which he was presi- 
dent to January, 1S28. This is a corporation capitalized at one 
million dollars, with $400,000 stock issued. Mr. Gills is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Bedford and is on 
the Board of Stewards. He is a Uemocrat in politics. 

He married, October 17, 1884, Cora M. Dudley, who was 
born in Franklin County, Virginia, daughter of William R. Dud- 
ley, a farmer and ex-Confederate soldier, who represented his 
district in the State Senate. Mr. and Mrs. Gills have four chil- 
dren. The oldest is Dr. W. L. Gills who was educated in the 
high school at Bedford, graduated from the academy there at 
the age of sixteen, took the regular four year course at the 
Randolph-Macon College at Ashland in three years, making the 
best grade credited to any student in a period of twenty-eight 
years. For three years he taught in the academy at Bedford, 
then entered Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore, taking the 
four years' medical course and winning a scholarship every year. 
On graduating he was offered an interneship in the Johns Hop- 
kins Hospital, but declined to accept a post as interne he had 
won in a competitive examination with forty other young doctors 
at a hospital at Hartford, Connecticut. After twenty months 
there he was licensed to practice in Virginia, spent two and one- 
half years in general practice at Roanoke and since then has 
specialized in eye, ear, nose and throat at Hartford, Connecticut, 
where he is one of the outstanding physicians and surgeons. The 
second child, Bessie G. Gills, is the wife of Dr. W. P. Jackson, a 
physician at Roanoke. Clara E. Gills, married Major E. R. 
Richardson, an instructor in the Bedford Academy. Harry A. 
Gills, the youngest, a marchant at Bedford, married Roberta 
Moncure of Stafford Court House, member of the distinguished 
Moncure family of Virginia. She was educated at Nashville, 
Tennessee. 

David P. Scott, physician and surgeon at Lynchburg, is a 
member of the Scott family that settled in Caroline County, Vir- 
ginia, in 1690, and is one of a long succession of physicians in 
the family. 

Doctor Scott was born in Bedford County, Virginia, October 
30, 1890, son of Dr. Hugh Donald and Evelyn (Davies) Scott, 
grandson of Dr. Samuel Burks Scott, a Bedford County physi- 
cian, and great-grandson of Hugh Roy Scott. The founder of 
the Virginia branch of the family was James Scott, father of 
Col. Thomas Scott, who came from Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1690. 
There were six members of the family who held commissions 
under General Washington in the Revolutionary war. Dr. Hugh 



88 VIRGINIA 

Donald Scott was born in Bedford County, was educated in the 
Medical College of Virginia and practiced for thirty-five years 
in Amherst County. He was a member of the Episcopal Church, 
a York Rite Mason and Shriner, and belonged to the B. P. 0. 
Elks. His wife was a daughter of Henry Landon Davies, a 
native of Bedford County. 

David P. Scott is one of a family of three children. His 
brother Stuart Donald lives at Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and 
his brother Samuel Burks, at Andover, New York. David P. 
Scott was educated in the Hoge Military Academy, graduated 
from the Medical College of Virginia in 1911, was an interne in 
the Retreat for the Sick at Richmond and the Johnston-Willis 
Sanitarium in that city. Doctor Scott engaged in practice at 
Ashland, West Virginia, until 1915, and then took post-graduate 
work in New York and at Harvard University and the Massa- 
chusetts General Hospital in Boston until 1917. 

In April, 1917, he volunteered his services and was assigned 
active duty at Washington in November. He was given various 
advancements, and for a time acted as assistant chief medical 
examiner at Camp Lee. He received his honorable discharge in 
March, 1919, and soon afterward located at Lynchburg, where 
he has practiced with a steadily growing reputation. He spe- 
cializes in diagnosis. He is a fellow of the American College of 
Physicians, member of the Medical Society of Virginia, the 
Lynchburg, Southern Piedmont and American Medical Associa- 
tions. 

Doctor Scott married, February 14, 1914, Miss Beulah Davis, 
who was born at Charlottesville and was educated there and in 
the Blackstone Girls School. They have one daughter, Judith 
Donald Scott, born in 1922. Doctor Scott and wife are members 
of St. John's Episcopal Church. 

Forrest W. Whitaker is a veteran attorney of the Lynch- 
burg bar, having practiced there for Over thirty-five years. In 
recent years he has also taken upon himself the responsibilities 
and honors of judicial office, being a judge of the municipal 
court. 

Judge Whitaker was born in Halifax County, North Caro- 
lina, October 6, 1865, son of Ferdinand H. and Louise (D'Berry) 
Whitaker, both natives of North Carolina. His mother was a 
daughter of Lemuel and Elizabeth (Staunton) D'Berry. The 
D'Berrys came from France. The Whitakers have been in 
America since Colonial times. His Revolutionary ancestor was 
John Whitaker, who served under General Washington and was 
a son of Richard Whitaker. John Whitaker was the father of 
Wilson Carey Whitaker, grandfather of Judge Whitaker. Fer- 
dinand H. Whitaker was a farm owner in Halifax County, 
North Carolina, was a member of the Methodist Protestant 
Church. 

Forrest W. Whitaker was the eighth in a family of eleven 
children, four of whom are living. He attended private school 
in North Carolina, completing his literary education in the Oak 
Ridge Institute. He studied law in the famous Dick and Dil- 
lard Law School at Greensboro, North Carolina, completing his 
course in 1887. For several years he practiced in North Caro- 
lina, and in 1892 removed to Lynchburg, where his abilities as 
a lawyer and other qualifications have made him an important 
figure in the community. Since October 1, 1922, he has been a 
judge of the Municipal Court, assigned to juvenile and domestic 




(J_^^^?^<H^ /^ 




VIRGINIA 89 

relations division, and in that capacity has rendered a service 
that cannot be measured by any financial standard. To the 
examination of cases involving the delicate adjustments of 
family life and individual development he has brought a wide 
experience of humanity as well as a thoroughly seasoned knowl- 
edge of the law. 

Judge Whitaker is active in the Democratic party and has 
been a delegate to state conventions. He is a steward in the 
Methodist Protestant Church, a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, and the Lions Club. 

Judge Whitaker married October 4, 1900, Miss Carrie Kin- 
near, who was born at Lynchburg and was reared and educated 
there. Her father, George A. Kinnear, was for many years a 
merchant. Judge and Mrs. Whitaker have one daughter, Louise 
Kinnear, who attended the public schools and Salem College. 

J. Frank Payne, D. D. S. Included among the various 
branches of professional knowledge on which civilized humanity 
is more or less dependent for the maintenance of healthful con- 
ditions and the preservation of exemption from physical distress 
is the science of dental surgery. Careless habits of living and 
indulgences in articles of food and drink which are injurious to 
the teeth have become so general that in all communities skilled 
dental practitioners are indispensable factors. But, as in med- 
icine and surgery, the science of dentistry is constantly develop- 
ing new phases of usefulness, and in order to insure success 
the dentist of today must keep fully abreast of the latest achieve- 
ments of his profession. He must add skill to thorough research 
and combine close application to his task with the ability gained 
through experience. A modern practitioner of this type is found 
in Dr. J. Frank Payne, of Roanoke, who while carrying on a 
general practice is somewhat of a specialist in the making of 
plates and crowns and of extraction. 

Doctor Payne was born November 15, 1877, in Westmore- 
land County, Virginia, and is a son of John T. and Ellen Cushen 
(Jones) Payne, and a member of a family which came to 
Northumberland County, Virginia, as early as 1620. John T. 
Payne was a son of Thomas Ewell, a native of King George 
County, Virginia, who followed merchandising throughout his 
career, and a nephew and adopted son of Bishop John Payne, 
a noted Episcopal divine. John T. Payne . was born in King 
George County, Virginia, where he was educated for the law, 
a profession with which he was identified successfully for a 
number of years. In the middle part of his life he became a 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for thirty-five 
years, or until his death in 1918, was a member of the Virginia 
Conference. He was buried at Charlottesville, where Mrs. 
Payne, also a native of King George County, still makes her 
home. Mr. PajTie was a member of the Masons and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and in politics was a Democrat. 
He and his wife became the parents of eleven children, of whom 
Dr. J. Frank was the second in order of birth. The maternal 
grandfather of Doctor Payne was James Edward Jones, a native 
of King George County, who was treasurer of that county for 
many years, and a member of an early settled family of Virginia. 

J. Frank Payne attended public schools of Virginia, spent 
three years at Chesapeake Academy and a short time at Bowling 
Green Academy, and then for five years was an instructor at 



90 VIRGINIA 

the Gordonsville Female College and for a few months was a 
teacher in the public schools, and then prosecuted his dental 
studies at the Virginia Medical College, where he completed 
the regular three-year course in two years. Eventually, in 1911, 
he settled permanently at Roanoke, where he has since been in 
the enjoyment of a large and constantly increasing practice. As 
before noted, he practices general dentistry, but makes a spe- 
cialty of crowns, plates and extraction work, and his offices in 
the McBain Building are fully equipped with the latest appli- 
ances and instruments known to modern dental science. Doctor 
Payne is a skilled operator and a man of kindly and gentle 
personality. He was a member of the Roanoke Dental Society, 
the Virginia State Dental Society and the National Dental Asso- 
ciation, and fraternally is identified with the Knights of Pythias 
and the Order of Owls. He is a Democrat in politics, without 
political aspirations, and a consistent member of the Methodist 
Church. 

On February 24, 1904, Doctor Payne was united in marriage 
with Miss Mary J. Mortimer, of Campbell County, Virginia, 
who was educated in the public schools and at New London 
Academy. They have two children: Caroline Mortimer, a 
teacher in the public schools of Roanoke ; and Ellen Cushen, 
still attending school. 

Charles A. Metzgee. The name of Metzger has had hon- 
ored associations with the industrial and business affairs of 
Richmond for three quarters of a century. One of its repre- 
sentatives was the late Charles A. Metzger, whose widow, Mrs. 
Metzger, resides at 1 South Boulevard in that city. 

Charles A. Metzger was born at Richmond, December 12, 
1862, and died in that city August 29, 1923. His father, Harry 
Metzger, came from Germany and settled in Richmond about 
1850. He established a cooperage business, and was a very 
thoroughgoing business man and also much interested in local 
politics, serving for a time on the Richmond City Council. He 
married Caroline Meyer, of Germany. They were married in 
Richmond in the late '50s, and of their six children Charles A. 
was the second son. 

The late Mr. Metzger attended school at Richmond and as a 
very young man went to work in his father's establishment, and 
after about six years was appointed manager. He had the 
controlling interest in H. Metzger & Son, cooperage business, 
after his father's death, and his two brothers, Lewis T. and 
Edward H., were associated with him, and since his death these 
brothers have continued it. It is one of the oldest firms of its 
kind in Richmond or in the State of Virginia. The late Mr. 
Metzger was a Democrat. 

Mrs. Metzger is an active worker in St. John's Evangelical 
Church and for thirty-two years has been a member of the 
Ladies Aid Society. She also belongs to the Kings Daughters. 
Mr. Metzger and Miss Elizabeth C. Frick were married at Rich- 
mond, October 9, 1884. She was reared in that city, attending 
St. Joseph's Academy. Her father, Theodore Frick, came from 
Germany to Richmond in 1850 and organized the Theodore Frick 
Packing Company, one of the early meat packing houses of Vir- 
ginia. Theodore Frick married, in Richmond, Miss Christine 
Wunsch, who also came from Germany. They had six children : 
Mrs. Caroline Oeters, deceased ; Theodore F., now deceased, who 



VIRGINIA 91 

continued the packing business after the death of his father; 
Emma, whose first husband was Charles Frommer, and she is 
now the wife of William H. Essig; Mrs. Metzger; Alvina W., 
who married J. H. Leisfield and has two children, J. H. Jr., and 
Marie, wife of J. Cunningham and mother of a daughter, Eliza- 
beth Cunningham ; and Pauline, wife of W. P. Klein, a Richmond 
merchant, and they have two daughters, Mrs. Robert Waldbauer, 
who has a son, Robert, and Mrs. H. Waldbauer, whose two sons 
are Walter and Henry. Mr. H. Waldbauer is a member of the 
firm Boedecker Drug Company of Richmond. 

Randolph G. Whittle. Among the younger members of 
the legal fraternity who are practicing at the bar of Roanoke, 
one who has made rapid strides in his profession and is gaining 
prestige and a large and important clientage is Randolph G. 
Whittle. While his career has not been as lengthy as many 
others of his fellow practitioners whose biographies appear in 
this volume, he has made such good use of his opportunities and 
has brought his natural abilities into play so energetically that 
he has already attained a place in his profession beyond that of 
many men who are his senior in years and experience. 

Mr. Whittle comes of good legal stock, and was born May 4, 
1900, at Martinsville, Virginia, a son of Judge Stafford G. and 
Ruth (Drewry) Whittle. His father, a native of Virginia, and 
a member of a fine old Southern family, received excellent edu- 
cational advantages in his youth, at Washington & Lee Uni- 
versity and at the University of Virginia, where he prosecuted 
his legal studies. Judge Whittle commenced practice at Mar- 
tinsville, where almost immediately he gained a position at the 
bar. In a number of cases that attracted widespread interest 
and attention he secured recognition, and as a consequence he 
soon was elevated to the bench, where he rendered splendid 
service. For many years he was judge of the Supreme Court of 
Virginia, retiring in December, 1919, after a service of two 
decades, during the last five years of which he was president of 
the court. He is now living in comfortable and honored retire- 
ment at Martinsville, where Mrs. Whittle died in 1923. Few 
Virginia judges have made a more favorable impression upon 
the people of their day than Judge Whittle. A man of profound 
learning in legal lore, he was possessed of the judicial tem- 
perament, and was wise, temperate and at all times fair-minded. 
His retirement from the Supreme bench removed therefrom one 
who possessed all the elementals of judicial distinction. 

Randolph G. Whittle attended the grammar and high schools 
of Martinsville, following which he entered Washington and Lee 
University, and was graduated therefrom in 1924, with the 
degree of Bachelor of Law. Immediately thereafter he engaged 
in practice at Roanoke, where he has since continued with con- 
stantly increasing success. He has specialized in no subject, his 
business being of a general civil character, and the success that 
he has gained has come through constant industry and able 
application of the knowledge gained through thorough prepara- 
tion. Mr. Whittle is a member of the Roanoke City Bar Associa- 
tion, the Virginia State Bar Association and the American Bar 
Association. He was president of the student body during his 
last year at college, and is a member of the Phi Kappa Sigma 
academic fraternity, Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity and Omicron 
Delta Kappa honorary fraternity. Mr. Whittle is likewise a 
Scottish Rite Mason, and in politics is a Democrat. While he is 



92 VIRGINIA 

greatly interested in civic affairs and is a modern citizen of en- 
lightened views, he finds his practice sufficiently engrossing and 
interesting to take up all his time. He is unmarried and a mem- 
ber of St. John's Episcopal Church. 

.. Prof. Elbert Murray Coulter. The art of drawing out or 
developing the faculties, or the training of human beings for 
the functions in life for which they are destined, more com- 
monly known as education, means the imparting or gaining of 
knowledge of every kind, good as well as evil, but specifically it 
signifies all that broadens an individual's mind, develops his 
tastes, corrects his manners and molds his habits. In a still 
more limited sense it means any course of training pursued by 
parents, teachers or a whole community to train the young 
physically, morally and mentally. In recent years, in answer 
to a constantly growing demand for training along 'commercial 
lines, there have come into existence many institutions which 
fit their students for the serious business problems of life. 
Among the leaders in this field is the National Business College 
of Roanoke, Virginia, of which Prof. Elbert Murray Coulter is 
president. Professor Coulter's own life is an inspiration to his 
students, as he started his career a poor youth and has worked 
his own way, unaided, to prosperity and position. 

Professor Coulter was born July 31, 1871, at Pittsfield, Illi- 
nois, and is a son of John and Mary (Jones) Coulter. His 
paternal grandfather was John Coulter, who was born in Ireland 
and as a young man came to the United States and settled in 
Canada, later moving to Ohio and still later moving to Western 
Illinois, where he passed the remainder of his life in agricultural 
operations. His maternal grandfather, Isaac Jones, married 
Martha Preble, a descendant of Commodore Preble, U. S. N., a 
hero of the Tripolitan war between the United States and Tripoli 
in 1801-1805, which was caused by the refusal of this country 
to increase its payment for immunity from the depredations of 
the Tripolitan Corsairs. After several conflicts by sea and land 
peace was concluded June 4, 1805. John Coulter, the father of 
Professor Coulter, was born in Ohio, whence he removed in 
young manhood to Illinois and engaged in agricultural pursuits 
in the vicinity of Pittsfield. He later moved with his wife to 
Missouri, ancl there they passed the remainder of their lives. 
Mr. Coulter was a Republican in his political views, and he and 
his wife were faithful members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. Of their ten children only two are living, Elbert Mur- 
ray being the second in order of birth. 

Elbert Murray Coulter attended the public schools of Illinois 
and Missouri, and supplemented this by a course at a normal 
school in Kansas. He entered upon his career as a teacher at 
the Saint Joseph Business University, Saint Joseph, Missouri, 
and in 1896 came to Roanoke, Virginia, to take a professorship 
in the National Business College at a salary of sixty dollars per 
month. Aside from his meager salary he possessed nothing, but 
was thrifty and economical, and by 1898 had saved enough to 
buy a half-interest in the institution. Two years later he became 
sole owner by purchase and commenced his independent opera- 
tions in a little building which was entirely inadequate for his 
needs, but the best he could afford in the circumstances. At 
the end of thirteen years he found himself in possession of suf- 
ficient capital to buy a lot and erect a building on Church Street, 



VIRGINIA 93 

where he remained for ten years, and then bought his present 
quarters from the Fraternal Order of Eagles in 1919. Later 
he found it necessary to build an addition to this structure, and 
in 1928 another addition was constructed, so that at the present 
time the school has 40,000 square feet of floor space. Because 
of the able manner in which it has been conducted and the high 
standard which has always been maintained by Professor 
Coulter the school has prospered greatly, and is now one of the 
leading institutions of its kind in the country, having an average 
of from 700 to 800 students annually, and employing a teaching 
staff of fifteen able and experienced instructors. Its curriculum 
includes all of the regular branches, fitting its graduates to 
take well salaried positions in business life and equipping them 
in a modern and capable manner to meet and solve the problems 
of business life and self-support. Professor Coulter is greatly 
interested in civic aflTairs, but makes his home in the country on 
a farm located five miles from Roanoke, where the family enjoy 
the rural existence, and where he conducts a model dairy farm 
with Holstein cattle. He is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church and of the Board of Deacons thereof, and fraternally 
is a York Rite Mason and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He 
is a stanch Democrat in his political views, but has not cared 
for public office. 

In 1902 Professor Coulter was united in marriage with Miss 
Mary Elva Keedick, who was born at Mount Vernon, Iowa, and 
educated at Cornell College in that community, and taught in 
the same schools where her husband was an instructor. To this 
union there have been born two children : Dorothy Viola, who 
attended high school at Roanoke, spent one year at the National 
Business College and two years at Hollins College, and is now 
completing her education at Columbia University, New York ; 
and Murray Keedick, who is attending'high school at Roanoke. 

Hon. Martin A. Hutchinson, secretary of the Common- 
wealth of Virginia, is truly a self-made young man, and through 
his own efforts, aided by the inspiration and helpfulness of his 
father and mother, has achieved his present success in life. 
While he has strong personal political influence at Richmond 
and throughout Virginia, he may justly take pride in the fact 
that his elevation to the important position he now holds is 
due solely to merit and as a reward for faithful and efficient 
service rendered, and not to the weight of this influence. As the 
Richmond-Times Dispatch said editorially in part of his ap- 
pointment: 

"Prompt elevation of Martin A. Hutchinson from chief clerk 
to secretary of the Commonwealth augurs well for the future 
appointments to be made by Governor Harry F. Byrd under the 
governmental reorganization plan adopted by the extra session 
of the General Assembly. Without permitting politics to enter 
into the selection of a successor of the late Colonel B. 0. James, 
the Governor made an appointment which was a recognition of 
services rendered and an implied promise that faithful work 
will be rewarded in other departments. 

"While one of the youngest men to occupy such an important 

post as secretary of the Commonwealth, Mr. Hutchinson is well 

qualified to perform the duties. He first came into the service 

of the State as assistant to James M. Hayes, Jr., then chief clerk 

• to Colonel James. He soon had a fine grasp of the duties of the 

5— VOL. 3 



94 VIRGINIA 

office, and on the elevation of Mr. Hayes to the post of Motor 
Vehicle Commissioner, Mr. Hutchinson stepped into his shoes. 

"As chief clerk Mr. Hutchinson has been carrying the bur- 
den of the office for many months, owing to the physical condi- 
tion of Colonel James, who could give little more than a cursory 
supervision of the work. In addition to the many duties of the 
office Mr. Hutchinson has found time to reorganize the Land 
Office, where untold history lies concealed in musty documents 
long forgotten. He holds the position of secretary to the State 
Democratic Committee, which he has filled with credit for 
several years." 

Martin A. Hutchinson was born near Newport, Giles County, 
Virginia, September 13, 1892, a son of Daniel Mason and Theresa 
Viola (Jones) Hutchinson. The mother passed away in March, 
1928. Mr. Hutchinson, Sr., still makes his home at Newport, 
Giles County. The Hutchinsons are of Scotch-Irish ancestry, 
the sturdy race that, migrating from Pennsylvania, founded and 
continued to maintain the forces of civilization in the Appala- 
chian region of Virginia and the Carolinas. 

For many years Daniel Mason Hutchinson was a country 
school teacher, and he is a man of scholarship, a fine type of 
citizen whose concern for the home, the church, the school and 
the state develops and maintains the truly Christian and civilized 
community. The home life of the Hutchinsons has been always 
ideal, and this ideal has been transmitted to the rising genera- 
tion. The paternal grandfather of Mr. Hutchinson of this re- 
view was George W. Hutchinson, of Craig County, Virginia, a 
man of genuine prominence and great influence in his day. The 
maternal uncle of Secretary Hutchinson, the late Judge P. V. 
Jones, of Newcastle, Craig County, Virginia, was for several 
years judge of the Court of Craig County, and widely known in 
public life. Both the Hutchinson and Jones families in fact have 
been for many years very active factors in the public affairs of 
the Old Dominion. 

Growing up in his native community, Martin A. Hutchinson 
attended the graded and high schools of Newport, after which 
he took a thorough commercial training in the Roanoke, Vir- 
ginia, Business College. Following his graduation from the 
last named institution he entered the employ of the Bank of 
Pembroke, Giles County, Virginia. While with this bank he was 
appointed deputy county treasurer of Giles County, and was 
serving in both capacities when his career was interrupted by 
the call of his country, and he resigned from both to enter the 
service for the World war. He took his training in the Officers 
Training Camp, Fort Humphreys, Virginia, and was still sta- 
tioned thei-e when the armistice was declared. Honorably dis- 
charged from the army, he returned to Newport and civilian life. 

In 1920 through the efforts of Governor Trinkle, then a mem- 
ber of the Virginia State Senate, he was appointed to a clerk- 
ship. During the regular session of 1922 and the extra session 
of 1923 Mr. Hutchinson had the honor of serving as clerk of 
the Virginia Senate. Following this service he was appointed to 
a position in the office of the late Col. B. 0. James, first as assist- 
ant to the chief clerk and later as chief clerk, and finally, after 
the death of Colonel James, he was appointed secretary of the 
commonwealth, as already stated. As may be gathered from the 
editorial quoted above, this appointment met with general 
approval, for Mr. Hutchinson is a young man who has proven his 



"^.. 








Zlu^c^^^ 




VIRGINIA 95 

worth in whatever he has undertaken. He has not only ability, 
but initiative, and has never been content to rest upon the mere 
performance of the duties assigned him, but is ever reaching out 
for more opportunities for service, and a man is never doing 
better service than when he is trying to raise the standards of 
commercial or political morality. The condition of political 
morality is especially important, for its influence works down- 
ward through all the grades of society, and a country that is 
corrupt at the top cannot expect to be better at the bottom. 
Public service means that every department of public life shall 
be conducted in the best possible manner for the welfare of 
the largest number, and to accomplish this and to inspire others 
to follow his example Mr. Hutchinson is devoting his time, his 
ability and his whole heart. 

Mr. Hutchinson married Miss Mary Estelle Givens, of Craig 
County, Virginia, and they have a daughter, Madge Givens 
Hutchinson. Mr. Hutchinson belongs to Newport Lodge No. 
261, A. F. and A. M. He is a consistent member of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South. An ardent Democrat, he has 
given his party loyal support, and is serving it as secretary of 
the State Executive Committee. 

On December 20, 1927, Mr. Hutchinson passed the bar exam- 
ination and is now qualified to practice law. In order to do this 
he studied at night, and he has gained the reputation of being 
specially conversant with election laws, on which he is con- 
sidered an expert. His office handles all such cases, and he is 
therefore well qualified. 

Waller Jameson, M. D. The opportunities in medicine are 
are attractive to a certain type of man to whom they give an 
occupation in which he can use all the intellectual energy and 
faculties he has. It requires technical skill based on scientific 
knowledge to be a physician, but, unlike many scientific pursuits, 
does not take a man out of contact with the everyday world. On 
the contrary it puts him in contact with men in an unusually 
intimate way, appealing to the man who is interested in his fel- 
lows and who has an altruistic bent. Finally it gives him an 
honorable opening to make a living. The material rewards of 
medicine, however, never were and are not now commensurate 
with those of other vocations equally exacting and responsible. 
But the rewards, if not large, are dependable, and the conscien- 
tious practitioner has also the gratification that comes from 
a sense of social service and from the esteem and gratitude of 
those he serves. Such facts as the above apply directly to Dr. 
Waller Jameson, one of the able physicians and surgeons of 
Roanoke, a man of the highest standing, and a member of one 
of the old and honored families of Virginia. He was born in 
Lynchburg, Campbell County, Virginia, April 15, 1878, a son of 
Morton Clifford and Marie Frances (Ferguson) Jameson, na- 
tives of Stafford County and Franklin County, Virginia, respec- 
tively, both of whom are now deceased. For thirty-five years 
prior to his death in 1903 the father was connected with the 
Norfolk & Western Railroad, and rose to be its comptroller. The 
mother died in 1892, having borne her husband seven children, 
five of whom are living, and of them all Doctor Jameson is the 
youngest. The father was an Episcopalian, and a vestryman of 
the church. High in Masonry, he was advanced through all of 
the bodies of the Scottish Rite and to the thirty-second degree. 



96 VIRGINIA 

A strong Democrat, he worked hard for his party, and at one 
time was city collector of taxes in Lynchburg. 

Doctor Jameson had the advantage of attending the excellent 
public schools of Philadelphia, where his father lived for twelve 
years, and he took his preliminary medical course in Randolph- 
Macon College, and his regular medical training in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, being graduated therefrom in 1903, with 
the degree Doctor of Medicine. For a year thereafter he was 
abroad studying in the East London General Hospital and the 
Rotunda Hospital, Dublin, Ireland. Returning to Virginia, he 
established himself in practice in Roanoke in 1905, and here he 
has since carried on a general practice, building up a large con- 
nection and winning and holding the confidence and affectionate 
respect of all with whom he is associated. 

In 1905 Doctor Jameson married Miss Frances Chalmers, 
who was born in Lafayette, Kentucky, and educated in the 
public schools of Danville, Chatham, and in Chatham Institute. 
There are no children. Doctor and Mrs. Jameson have long been 
members of Saint John's Episcopal Church of Roanoke. While 
in college he made Sigma Chi, Pi Mu, the Tilka Club and the 
Thirteen Club, an honorary organization. He maintains mem- 
bership with the Roanoke County Medical Society, the Virginia 
State Medical Society, the Tri-State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association, and the Shenandoah Club of 
Roanoke, Virginia. 

Joseph A. Rucker, M. D. has a professional record in Bed- 
ford County covering a third of a century. He is an able doctor, 
and had likewise made himself indispensable as a citizen of his 
community. 

Doctor Rucker was born in Bedford County, June 27, 1871, 
son of M. p. and Sallie Fannie (Parker) Rucker. The Rucker 
family came from France, and some of his ancestors were 
soldiers in the Revolution. His grandfather Anthony Rucker 
was a farmer in Bedford County. The maternal grandfather 
Joseph Parker was both a farmer and local Baptist Preacher. 
M. p. Rucker was born in Bedford County, spent his life as a 
farmer except for the four years he was a soldier in the Con- 
federate Army and died in 1926. His wife was educated in the 
Roanoke Institute at Danville and died February 4, 1924. They 
were the parents of six children : Annie M., wife of William 
Southerland of Franklin County; David H. and William P., 
farmers and merchants in Bedford County ; Dr. Joseph A. ; Dr. 
M. P., a physician at Bedford ; and Sallie Margaret wife of Ira 
P. Dixon of Covington, Virginia. Doctor Rucker's father was 
a Methodist and his mother a Baptist, both being active in their 
Church. He served for a number of years as superintendent of 
the Sunday school, and was also on the School Board and a 
justice of the peace. 

Joseph A. Rucker was educated in the Sunnyside School near 
Bedford, the New London Academy, the University of Virginia 
where he began to study medicine and in 1893 graduated from 
the University of Louisville. For eighteen months he practiced 
and then returned to Bedford, where he has carried on his pro- 
fessional work thirty-three years. He is local surgeon for the 
Norfolk & Western Railway, physician to the Elks National 
Home and physician to the Randolph-Macon Academy, while 
the rest of his time is taken up with his duties as a general 



VIRGINIA 97 

practitioner. He is now County Healtii Officer of Bedford 
County and for twenty years was secretary and has also served 
as president of the Bedford County Medical Society. He is a 
member of the Medical Society of Virginia and the American 
Medical Association. Doctor Rucker is a director of the Citizens 
National Bank of Bedford, is Independent in politics, is Past 
Master of Liberty Lodge of Masons at Bedford, past district 
deputy grand master of the B. P. 0. Elks at Lynchburg. 

He married in 1901, Miss Eliza Cauthorn, a native of Bed- 
ford, where her father Dr. George Cauthorn practiced medicine 
for many years. She was educated in the Belmont Seminary at 
Bedford. Doctor and Mrs. Rucker have four children : Joseph 
A. Junior, member of the class of 1928 and William Vincent, 
member of the class of 1929 in Washington and Lee University 
at Lexington ; Ambrose A. and Virginia Browning, twins, both 
attending public school at Bedford. Doctor Rucker is a deacon 
in the Baptist Church and teaches an adult class of fifty mem- 
bers. This is a very brief statement of the principal activities 
and services of one of the best known citizens of Bedford County. 

Walter A. Fitzpatrick is a Bedford City banker, a native 
of Bedford County, grew up on a farm, has contrived his own 
opportunities and has made an important success of his career. 

He was born on a farm in Bedford County in 1865, son of 
Hiram A. and Lucinda (Preston) Fitzpatrick, his father a 
native of Buckingham County and his mother of Bedford 
County. Hiram Fitzpatrick was a tanner and harness maker, 
and during the war between the North and South employed the 
resources of his business in making leather for the Confederate 
government. He served as a justice of the peace, was a Demo- 
crat and a member of the Methodist Church, while his first wife, 
who died in 1868, was a Baptist. She was the mother of five 
children, the two now living being Walter A. and Mrs. J. S. 
Saunders. By a second marriage there was a son, Burke Fitz- 
patrick, who is now an instructor in the State Teachers College 
at Radford, Virginia. 

Walter A. Fitzpatrick while a boy attended one of the old 
Field schools in Bedford County, continuing his education in 
the Hales Ford College in Franklin County, and spent one 
session at the Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg. Mr. 
Fitzpatrick in 1886, at the age of twenty-one, began clerking 
at Bedford in the Liberty Woolen Mills. He was there three 
years, for one year was employed in the county clerk's oilice, 
and one year with a commission house at Lynchburg. He 
returned to Bedford to become an employee of the Bedford 
branch of the Lynchburg Trust & Savings Bank. From that 
time to the present his best energies have been devoted to the 
banking business. In 1901 when the Peoples Bank was organ- 
ized he was made its cashier. In 1919 this bank became the 
Peoples National Bank, and for the past five years Mr. Fitz- 
patrick has been the active vice president of the institution. He 
has other business interests in Bedford and conducts an insur- 
ance business. 

He married in 1893, Mamie Turner, who was born in Bed- 
ford County and was educated there and at Lynchburg, and 
taught school for a time. Her father, ]Milton J. Turner, was a 
well known resident of Bedford County. Mrs. Fitzpatrick died 
in 1896. In 1907 he married Caroline White of Pittsylvania 
County, daughter of B. S. White. Mrs. Fitzpatrick finished her 



98 VIRGINIA 

education in the Peace Institute at Raleigh, North CaroHna. 
She is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He is active in 
the Methodist Church at Bedford, being a steward of the church 
and has been a regular attendant and worker in the Sunday 
school for a number of years. 

Martin P. Burks, Jr. In the allotments of human life few 
individuals, comparatively, attain to true eminence. It is an 
interesting and curious study to note how opportunity waits on 
fitness and capacity, so that all at last fill the places for which 
they are best qualified. In the profession of law there is no 
royal road to promotion. Its high rewards are gained by dili- 
gent study and long and tedious attention to elementary prin- 
ciples, and are awarded only to those who develop, in the arena 
of forensic strife, characters of integrity and moral worth. All 
men generally fall into the niches of the elaborate edifice of life 
that they are qualified to fill. However "natural selection" may 
work in the production of species, there is a wondrous selection 
in the sifting out of the fittest from the mass of common mate- 
rial that crowds all the avenues of the law. In that most diffi- 
cult and perplexing vocation the very occupation of superior 
position argues for its possessor solid ability, signal skill, sound 
learning and untiring industry. These are characteristics to be 
noted in the career of Martin P. Burks, Jr., a leading member of 
the Roanoke bar. 

Mr. Burks was born April 3, 1882, at Liberty, Virginia, now 
Bedford, and is a son of Prof. Martin P. and Roberta (Gambrell) 
Burks, natives of Liberty, Virginia. A member of an old and 
honored family, Professor Burks was given the best of educa- 
tional advantages, and after graduating from Washington and 
Lee University at Lexington, Virginia, pursued a law course at 
the University of Virginia. For a number of years he was en- 
gaged in the practice of his profession at Bedford, this state, 
appearing in litigated cases and developing an aptitude and 
capacity for forensic practice. Eventually, in 1899, he was 
called to a professorship at Washington and Lee University, 
where he was a member of the faculty of this noted institution 
for many years. He was accounted one of the best legists in 
the state and one who had no superior as an instructor of young 
lawyers. 

Martin P. Burks the younger seems to have inherited his 
father's predilection and ability for the law and was given every 
opportunity to develop his talents. He attended Randolph- 
Macon Academy and the Episcopal High School at Alexandria, 
Virginia, for two years, following which he completed his prepa- 
rations at Washington and Lee University and graduated in 
1905 with the degree Bachelor of Law. Mr. Burks commenced 
the practice of his calling at Christianburg, Virginia, but after 
a short time went to Bristol and later to Big Stone Gap, subse- 
quently returning to Bristol. Eventually, in 1912, he settled 
permanently at Roanoke, where he has since been engaged in a 
general practice, his present offices being located in the Boxley 
Building. He has attained a recognized position in his profes- 
sion, and is a member of the Roanoke City Bar Association. 
While at the Episcopal High School he was a member of the 
debating society, and also of the Sigma Chi fraternity while at 
Washington and Lee University. He became a charter member 
of the Loyal Order of Moose at Roanoke when that order was 
established at this place, and has a number of civic and o+her 



VIRGINIA 99 

connections. In politics Mr. Burks is a Democrat, but has pre- 
ferred to devote himself to his profession rather than to the 
doubtful honors of public hfe or the constant bickerings and 
struggles of political activities. With his family he belongs to 
Christ Church, Episcopal. 

On February 4, 1908, Mr. Burks was united in marriage with 
Miss Laura French Mangum Oglesby, who was born'in North 
Carolina and educated at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, and 
tau<i:ht school for two years prior to her marriage. To this 
union there were born four children: Martin P. Ill, a student at 
Washington and Lee University; Albert Oglesby,. who graduated 
from high school in 1929; Laura French Mangum, who is at- 
tending school; and Edward Calohill, who commenced school in 
the fall of 1927. ■ • 

Thomas Fraser, who died at Richmond March 10, 1925, 
was prominent not only in that city but over the state as a doctor 
of veterinary medicine, and in the course of his long experience 
in private practice he did much to improve the standards of the 
profession throughout the state. 

He was of pure Scotch ancestry on both sides and was born 
in Inverness, Scotland, June 2, 1864. His father was Robert 
Fraser, and he was the second son in a family of six children. 

His early education was acquired in Inverness, Scotland, and 
several years later he came to America and located at Richmond 
in 1886, entering a partnership with Mr. F. Finlayson in the 
latter's blacksmith shop. He was made a member of the firm 
of Finlayson and Fraser, and when Mr. Finlayson died Mr. 
Fraser continued the business, finally' selling it to his brother, 
who died in 1926. In the meantime Thomas Fraser turned his 
attention to veterinary medicine and in 1901 was graduated 
from the Veterinary College of Toronto, Canada. From that 
date until his death he carried oil an extensive practice with 
headquarters at Richmond, and during that time he served as 
secretary of the Virginia State Veterinary Medical Association, 
and was also a member of the legislative committee of the State 
Board of Examiners. Doctor Fraser was an interested student 
of Masonry, served as master of Amity Lodge No. 76, A. F. and 
A. M., and was a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner. He and his family were Presbyterians. 

He married, August 8, 1888, Miss Jessie Anderson Rankine, 
who was reared and educated in Lanark, Scotland. She was the 
seventh of the twelve children of Jahies and Jessie (Anderson) 
Rankine. Mrs. Fraser survives her husband and resides at 
2623 Hanover Avenue in Richmond. 

Robert T. Hubard. Virginia attorney, is a residen,t of Salem, 
and has served consecutively for over three terms as common- 
wealth attorney of Roanoke County. 

He was born at Lynchburg, Virginia, July 7, 1881,, son of 
Rev. E. W. and Julia L. (Taylor) Hubard. His father was 
born on a plantation in Buckingham, Virginia, in 1841. and when 
about twenty years of age he enrolled in the Buckingham Troop 
of the Fourth Virginia Cavalry. He was wounded early in his 
service and was unable to rejoin his command until 1863. After 
the war he studied in the Episcopal Seminary, was ordained in 
1868, and for nearly half a century was active in the ministry, 
serving pastorates in Fincastle, Brandon, Lynchburg, Washing- 



100 VIRGINIA 

ton, Salem, and at Owensboro, Kentucky. He died August 8, 
1915. He was a member of the Masonic Lodge at Lynchburg. 
Rev. E. W. Hubard, whose father was R. T. Hubard, married 
Julia L. Taylor, who was born in Caroline County, Virginia, 
daughter of Henry Taylor, a Virginia planter. She died Novem- 
ber 16, 1918, at the age of seventy-six. They had three chil- 
dren : Julia T., deceased, E. B. Hubard, a civil and mining engi- 
neer at Livingston, Montana, and Robert T. 

Robert T. Hubard, who has never married, was educated 
under his parents and also in private schools at Salem, gradu- 
ated in 1901 with the A. B. degree from Roanoke College, and 
took his law course at the University of Virginia, graduating in 
1907. During the four years between his college course and 
entering law school he worked in the oil fields of West Virginia. 
Mr. Hubard since 1907 has practiced law at Salem. In 1914 he 
was appointed to fill out an unexpired term as commonwealth 
attorney, and since then has been elected for three successive 
terms. 

During the World war Mr. Hubard was United States appeal 
agent. He has interested himself in various movements for 
public improvement, particularly education and good roads. He 
is a past master of the Masonic Lodge, member of the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd Fellows, and a Democrat in politics. His 
church home is St. Paul's Episcopal Church at Salem. 

Charles Hilton Weber has become one of the prominent 
figures in connection with public utility service in Virginia, 
maintains his executive headquarters in the City of Richmond, 
and here he served as division manager of the Chesapeake & 
Potomac Telephone Company from 1913 until May, 1927, when 
he was advanced to his present office, that of vice-president. 

Mr. Weber is a representative of one of the old and influen- 
tial citizens of Baltimore, Maryland, in which city he was born 
January 7, 1879. He is a son of the late August Weber, who 
was for many years president of the National Central Bank of 
Baltimore, an institution that was founded by his father, 
Charles Weber, and in point of continuous identification with 
this important line of financial enterprise August Weber held 
rank as the oldest banker in Baltimore at the time of his death, 
in October, 1926. 

The earlier education of Charles H. Weber was acquired in 
private schools in his native city and was there advanced by his 
attending Baltimore City College and thereafter Marston's Uni- 
versity School, he having been graduated from the Marston 
School as a member of the class of 1898. 

Interesting data relative to the career of Mr. Weber are to be 
found in the following extracts from a newspaper article that 
appeared at the time of his election to the office of vice presi- 
dent of the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company : 

"Entering the service of the telephone company as chief 
clerk in Baltimore, in 1902, Mr. Weber has progressed steadily 
from position to position of increasing importance in the tele- 
phone organization. A few months after he was engaged as 
chief clerk he was made chief collector, and in 1903 he was 
appointed cashier. Shortly after this he was made manager for 
the City of Baltimore. Successively Mr. Weber was division 
manager, Baltimore district, and then division manager of Mary- 
land, when he was transferred to Richmond in 1913. In the 
fourteen years that Mr. Weber has been in charge of the tele- 



VIRGINIA 101 

phone matters in Virginia he has seen the company make sub- 
stantial gains in telephone growth until today the system serves 
every section of the state. When he came to Virginia in 1913 
there were only 45,000 telephones connected with the system. 
Today the Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Company of Vir- 
ginia serves about 130,000 stations. 

"Besides being a director of the Petersburg Telephone Com- 
pany at Petersburg and the Intermountain Telephone Company, 
whose headquarters are at Bristol, Tennessee, Mr. Weber is con- 
nected with a number of important financial organizations in 
Virginia. Principal among these are the Richmond Trust Com- 
pany, of which he is a director, and the Richmond Trust Building 
Corporation, of which he is president." 

In Virginia's capital city Mr. Weber has proven himself a 
most loyal and progressive citizen and man of affairs, and he is 
here actively identified with various civic and social organiza- 
tions of representative order. He is a member of the Board of 
Governors of the Westmoreland Club, and has membership also 
in the Commonwealth Club and the Country Club of Virginia. 

On April 11, 1908, in New York City, occurred the marriage 
of Mr. Weber and Miss Gladys Vereen McNair, daughter of Col. 
John Taylor and Mary Charlton (Strathy) McNair, of South 
Carolina. 

Rev. Francis H. Scott, pastor of the First Christian Church 
of Roanoke, is one of the eloquent and scholarly divines of his 
communion, and a man whose zeal in behalf of his Master may 
be gleaned from the fact that ever since he was eleven years old 
he has steadily worked to become a minister of the Gospel and 
to remain faithful to his obligations. From one charge to an- 
other he has ascended in the importance of his labors until to- 
day he is ministering to a membership of 1,000 souls, and en- 
joying the warm support of his community in his efforts to 
better existing conditions. Rev. Mr. Scott was born in Essex 
County, Virginia, a son of Francis and Kate (Ware) Scott, na- 
tives of Virginia, he born in King William County, and she in 
Essex County. For many years he was a merchant at Dunns- 
ville, Virginia, and a consistent member of the Bapti.st Church, 
but she was a member of the Christian Church. One of the 
leading Masons of his locality, he held membership in Arling- 
ton Lodge, A. F. and A. M., of Essex County. The following 
children were born to him and his wife: Anne Elizabeth, who 
married R. R. Rice, of Richmond, manager of the Slive .store: 
Reverend Scott, who is the second in order of birth: Jeanette 
Latane. who married E. M. Lewis, a son of Dr. Frank Lewis, 
superintendent of education of Lancaster County, Virginia, and 
himself cashier of the Chesapeake Bank of Lively, Virginia; and 
Katherine Holt, who married J. P. Warren, of Richmond, con- 
nected with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. The paternal 
grandfather of Reverend Scott was Rev. Azariah Francis Scott, 
a Baptist minister for a long period. The maternal grand- 
father was Robert Ware, a native of Essex County, and a farmer 
upon an extensive scale. 

Reverend Scott attended the local .schools of his native county 
and Johnson Bible College at Knoxville, Tennessee, and he com- 
pleted his theological education in Lynchburg College, where he 
took special studies, but he returned to Knoxville for his degree, 
which he received in 1907. His first charge was that of assistant 
to Dr. Peter Ainslie, of Baltimore, Maryland, and during his 



102 VIRGINIA 

association with that outstanding figure in the church of the 
Disciples of Christ he advanced considerably. After ten useful 
years spent in Baltimore he came to Roanoke, October 1, 1917, 
to take charge of his present church. Under his inspirational 
leadership this church has made rapid progress, and has a mem- 
bership of over 1,000. 

On January 30, 1917, Reverend Scott married Imogene 
Welck, born in Hagerstown, Maryland, and educated in an ex- 
cellent private school of that city. Two children have been 
born of this marriage: Francis H. Scott III, and Kathryn Vir- 
ginia Scott. Rev. Mr. Scott is one of the valued members of the 
Kiwanis Club and is now (1928) its president. During the 
past ten years he has been reaching many people outside his 
church through the medium of his lectures, the favorite one of 
which, "An Evening in Dixie," he has given 250 times, and it is 
still in great demand. He is president of the Virginia State 
Conventon of Disciples of Christ, and a member of the Board of 
Managers of the United Christian Missionary Society. During 
1928 he served as president of the Roanoke Ministerial Associa- 
tion. It is not easy to overestimate the value of the work of a 
man like Reverend Scott, for it is so far-reaching and compre- 
hensive in its scope and effect. Deeply imbued with the spirit 
of his sacred calling, he never spares himself, but works con- 
tinuously to convert sinners and to keep Christians who are try- 
ing to live according to their vows in the straight and narrow 
path. In all that he undertakes his upright honorable life is 
an example others would do well to emulate, and Roanoke can 
well consider itself fortunate in having him in its midst. 

John W. McCauley. Roanoke has no more brilliant young 
attorney than John W. McCauley, nor a man who devotes more 
time and attention to his professional duties, and therefore his 
undoubted success is not so remarkable. A very ardent Demo- 
crat, he has received recognition at the hands of his party's 
leaders, and in 1927 was nominated on the regular Democratic 
ticket for the office of state representative from Roanoke 
County. Mr. McCauley was born in Sweetwater, Texas, March 
21, 1900, a son of Claud and Ora May (Ward) McCauley, both 
natives of Tennessee, who were taken to Texas in childhood. 
In addition to being engaged in the practice of law in Sweet- 
water, in which he has attained to distinction, the father is a 
banker. Two children have been born to him and his wife, 
namely: John W., whose name heads this review; and Ray, a 
Texas rancher, residing in San Antonio. The parents belong to 
the Christian Church, in which they are very prominent. He is 
a Mason and a Democrat, and at one time served as district 
attorney of his county. His father, Jefferson McCauley, a native 
of Tennessee, founded the family in Texas not long after the 
close of the war between the states, in which he served as a 
Confederate soldier, and received a serious wound in action, 
but recovered and spent his life in farming. The maternal 
grandfather, John W. Ward, went to Texas at an early day, and 
as he was a man of large means had many interests, the most 
of them centered in Waco. 

John W. McCauley was graduated from high school in San 
Antonio, and from the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, 
Virginia, in 1917, after which he studied law at home and was 
admitted to the bar in 1921. For one year he was assistant 
professor of mathematics in the Virginia Military Institute, and 



VIRGINIA 103 

at the same time was captain of infantry assigned to that insti- 
tution during- the World war, being honorably discharged there- 
from in the early part of 1919. Upon his admission to the bar 
in 1921 Mr. McCauley entered upon the active practice of his 
profession in Roanoke, in partnership with Bruce Hunt, but a 
year later the firm of Woodrum, McCauley & Parsons came into 
existence as successor to Woodrum & McCauley. 

On June 7, 1919, Mr. McCauley married Elisabeth Sayers, 
born in Wytheville, Virginia, where she attended school, but 
she completed her education at The Castle, New York. She is 
a daughter of Dr. W. S. Sayers, a retired physician residing in 
Roanoke. Mr. and Mrs. McCauley have two sons, William 
Sayers McCauley, who was born May 27, 1921, and Claud Ward 
McCauley, born February 22, 1928. Mr. McCauley belongs to the 
Christian Church, and Mrs. McCauley to Saint John's Episcopal 
Church. High in Masonry, he has been advanced through both 
the Scottish and York Rites, and he also belongs to the Mystic 
Shrine. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias, the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose and 
the Woodmen of the World. As a lawyer he is a prodigious 
worker and he is making a most enviable record. Recognition 
of his standing has been given by his appointment to the staff 
of Governor Byard. 

George E. Markley. The advent of George E. Markley at 
Roanoke in 1884 was not a pai'ticularly auspicious one, as shortly 
after his arrival he was overtaken with ill health that caused 
him to return to his native Keystone State, but evidently the 
community had made a strong and favorable impression upon 
the young man who was then just entering upon his career, for 
the year 1887 saw him again a resident of the growing city, 
ready to take his place among its toilers and to accept such 
opportunities as came to his hand. By virtue of the possession 
of the homely qualities of industry and determination, overlying 
a strong strain of natural ability, he has since made a place for 
himself among the substantial and highly respected business 
men of the city. 

Mr. Markley was born on a farm in Juniata County, Pennsyl- 
vania, in January, 1866, and is a son of Samuel and Mary J. 
(Harmon) Markley, natives of the same state. Samuel Markley 
came of a long line of agricultural stock, and after having 
secured a public school education adopted the vocation of his 
forefathers and for many years was a tiller of the soil in Penn- 
sylvania. In the evening of life, after the death of his wife at 
Altoona, Pennsylvania, in 1898, he retired from active pursuits 
and moved to Virginia, where he died in 1913. They were con- 
sistent members of the Lutheran Church and highly respected 
people of their community. 

George E. Markley was given the advantages of a public 
school education in his native state, where his boyhood and 
youth were passed on the home farm. Subsequently he was a 
clerk in a grocery store and was employed otherwise until 1884, 
at which time he first came to Roanoke. As before mentioned, 
not long after his arrival he was taken seriouslv ill and forced 
to return to his Pennsylvania home, but in 1887, at the time of 
the attainment of his majority, he left the parental roof and 
established himself in one of the largest retail grocery busine.sses 
in Roanoke with his brother, Chris Marklev. After two vears 



104 VIRGINIA 

he left this business to accept the position of cashier of the 
Traders Loan, Trust and Deposit Company, an institution with 
which he continued to be identified for seven years, and in 1896 
embarked in the plumbing- business, being at this time the oldest 
plumber in point of consecutive years of service at Roanoke. 
During the thirty-two years that have followed the business of 
George E. Markley & Company, contract plumbers and jobbers, 
has grown to be one of the largest in this part of the state and 
has built up a reputation for high integrity and straightfor- 
ward dealing. Mr. Markley also carries on an extensive roofing 
business, and some of the largest contracts for roofing and 
plumbing at Roanoke and the surrounding cities have been let 
to his concern. He is a Democrat in his political views, but 
has been so engrossed in business that politics has played only 
a small part in his career. However, as a public spirited citizen 
of civic pride he has given of his best in the support of all move- 
ments making for progress and advancement, be they civic, 
educational or religious. He is a consistent member of the 
Lutheran Church, as are the members of his family. Being a 
genial and sociable man, and one who enjoys the companionship 
of his fellows, he is a popular member of the Country Club 
and also a York Rite Mason and Shriner. 

In 1894 Mr. Markley was united in marriage with Miss Flora 
B. Hooge, of Martinsburg, West Virginia, who was educated at 
her native place, a daughter of George H. Hooge, a machinist 
in the employ of the Norfolk & Western Railway for many years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Markley are the parents of two children: Her- 
bert Ryneal, an electrician by trade, who is at present in the 
West ; and Margaret Louise, aged fourteen years, who is attend- 
ing school. 

Charles M. Armes. Among the self-made men of Roanoke 
County who by their ability, enterprise and industry have 
reached prominence in business life and at the same time have 
contributed to the welfare and prosperity of their several com- 
munities, one who is well entitled to mention in any hi-story of 
Virginia is Charles M. Armes, for many years identified with 
the real estate business at Roanoke, but who now confines his 
activities to the business of real estate loans. Mr. Armes com- 
menced his career when still a lad, and without financial support 
or friendly influence has made himself a leading business citizen, 
and one who has a number of prominent civic connections. 

Charles M. Armes was born in Charlotte County, Virginia, 
March 6, 1866, and is a son of John W. and Mary A. (Anderson) 
Armes, natives of Prince Edward County, Virginia, both of 
whom are now deceased. His father was a railroad man for 
many years, and he and Mrs. Armes were faithful members of 
the Baptist Church. They were the parents of eight children, 
of whom six are living, Charles M. having been the fourth in 
order of birth. 

Charles M. Armes received his education in the country 
schools of Charlotte County, and was only eleven years of age 
when he commenced work as a clerk in a small country store. 
Although his school attendance was decidedly limited, he has 
always made the most of his advantages and opportunities, and 
today has a reputation as a man of sound and practical educa- 
tion. When he had grown to sturdy young manhood he secured 
a position in the railroad service, and was thus employed for a 



VIRGINIA 105 

number of years, in the meanwhile carefully conserving his 
savings. When he gave up railroading he became a bookkeeper 
for a wholesale house, but finally, in 1901, embarked in the real 
estate business, to which he subsequently added a real estate 
loan department. In 1906 Mr. Armes established the Columbia 
Savings and Loan Corporation, and in 1917 retired from the 
real estate field to give his entire attention to the loan business, 
in which he is now engaged, with offices in the Colonial Bank 
Building. Mr. Armes has large and important financial inter- 
ests at Roanoke and in various other communities and stands 
high in the confidence and estimation of his business associates. 
In 1916 he established the Evergreen Burial Park, known as 
the most beautiful cemetery in the United States, of which 
he is the active head, holding the office of treasurer. Recently 
Mr. Armes was elected a member of the Board of Trustes of 
Roanoke College, and is a member of Green Memorial Methodist 
Church. Fraternally he is a member of the Knights of Pythias, 
and a York Rite Mason and Shriner, devoting considerable 
of his time to the work of the Shrine. Politically a Democrat, 
he is active and influential in the ranks of his party, although 
not as a seeker for personal preferment or public office. All 
public spirited civic movements have received his whole hearted 
support and cooperation. 

In 1888 Mr. Armes was united in marriage with Miss Belle 
Norman, who was born at Mount Airy, North Carolina, but 
brought as a child to Virginia, where she received her education. 
They have no children. 

JONATH.A.N C. Woodson is active head of one of the oldest and 
largest organizations for handling real estate in the City of 
Lynchburg. Mr. Woodson has been in the real estate business 
thirty-five years, and his firm has developed and marketed the 
finest residential subdivisions in the community. 

Mr. Woodson was born in Appomattox County. Virginia, 
January 30, 1853, son of John W. and Mary Elizabeth (Chris- 
tian) Woodson. The Woodson family came from Scotland. His 
grandfather, Drury W. Woodson, was a planter in Appomattox 
County and also a tailor by trade. He married Louisa Hendrick. 
John William Woodson was born in 1823, learned the trade of 
tailor, taught school in order to complete his education at the 
University of Virginia, and after graduating from the Law 
School practiced his profession until the Civil war. He entered 
the army, was in the Quarterma.ster's Department, and died of 
tvphoid fever Julv 4, 1864. His wife. Mary Elizabeth Christian, 
was horn in 1827 and died in 1892. Her father, Jonathan 
Christian, was a native of Appomattox County. John W. Wood- 
son and wife had five children. The three now living are: 
Mary Elizabeth, wife of L. D. Isbell, judge of the Relations 
Court of Huntington. West Virginia ; Henry P., of Clearwater, 
Florida, and Jonathan Christian. 

Jonathan Christian Woodson grew up in Appomattox 
County, attended the common schools there, and ud to 1877 
taught school. On locating in Lynchburg he clerked for a 
tobacco firm and was in the tobacco business for about twenty 
years. In 1893 he took up real estate, and since 1924 his firm 
has also had a department devoted to fire insurance. 

Mr. Woodson married in May, 1885, Miss Fannie C. Binford. 
a native of Appomattox County. She died in 1887, leaving one 



106 VIRGINIA 

son, John William Woodson, who is associated with his father 
in the real estate business and was educated at the Lynchburg 
High School. He served four years on the Lynchburg City 
Council. He married second. Miss Agusta Camm. They have 
two sons, Jonathan Christian II and Henry Palmer. Mr. Wood- 
son in 1890 married Miss Bennie M. Gipson, a native of Buck- 
ingham County. She died in 1911, leaving two sons, Thomas 
Gipson and Richard Boatwright. Thomas Gipson was educated 
in the Lynchburg High School and Washington and Lee Uni_- 
versity, and is with his father, in charge of the insurance de- 
partment. Richard Boatwright is now studying public account- 
ing at Atlanta. Both sons were in the World war, Thomas G. 
in the Ambulance Corps until taken ill, and later joined the 
navy on the V. S. S. Pamlico. He was honorably discharged 
December 11, 1918. The other son was on transport duty during 
the war. 

Mr. Woodson and family are members of the Rivermont 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He is affiliated with the 
B. P. 0. Elks and is a Democi'at. The firm of J. C. Woodson & 
Company has acted as brokers for city and farm property. 
Some years ago they developed the Randolph-Macon Heights 
property, the first high class subdivision at Lynchburg, and 
later they opened the Peakland Division and also the Rivermont 
Subdivision. 

Frederick M. Davis. No profession or calling has ever 
presented such opportunities for the really capable man as that 
of the law, and from its ranks have come the ablest men of the 
country. It has always been impossible for any man to rise to 
distinction without a thorough preparation, even if self-earned, 
and this study and thought naturally develop the reasoning fac- 
ulties and broaden the understanding and character so that other 
problems are more easily solved as they arise for disposal by 
every public spirited citizen, and whenever, as is often the case, 
a lawyer becomes interested in business as well he succeeds be- 
cause of this professional training. Such training has brought 
out in marked degree the varied capabilities of Frederick M. 
Davis, able attorney and successful business man of Lynchburg, 
well known to the people of his city and county because of his 
valuable service as assistant commonwealth attorney in 1924 
and 1925. 

Frederick M. Davis was born in Lynchburg, February 28, 
1893, a son of Micajah Preston and Maud (Mathews) Davis, he 
born in Lynchburg and she in Rockingham County, Virginia. 
His death occurred November 28, 1925, but she survives and 
still resides in Lynchburg. After being graduated from the 
Virginia Military Institute the father went into the insurance 
business, which he built up to large proportions and through 
which he became a well known man all over this part of the 
state. He and his wife early united with the Westminster Pres- 
byterian Church of which he was an elder at the time of his 
death, and he was also a member of the Masonic Order. In 
politics he was a Democrat. His father, George D. Davis, was 
born in Bedford County, Virginia. The maternal grandfather, 
John D. Mathews, was born in Port Republic, Virginia, but for 
some years was a jeweler of Aberdeen, Mississippi, but returned 
to Virginia, and continued to farm during the remainder of his 
life. During the war between the states he was under the com- 
mand of Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson. Both the Davis and 




4M»^ ^, //^d^ 



VIRGINIA 107 

Mathews families are old and aristocratic ones of the Old 
Dominion. 

The only son of his parents, Frederick M. Davis was sent to 
Washington and Lee University after he was through his high 
school work in Lychburg, and he was graduated from that Uni- 
versity in 1914. From 1914 to 1915 he was deputy clerk of the 
Corporation Court of Lynchburg, Virginia. He returned in 1915 
to Washington and Lee University and in 1917 he graduated in 
law, but his service in the United States Navy during the World 
war as supply officer, with rank of assistant paymaster on board 
the U. S. S. Gulf port, prevented his entering upon his practice un- 
til 1919. Since then he has resided in Lynchburg, being engaged 
in the activities of his profession until the death of his father in 
1925 when he took over his father's insurance business, con- 
ducting it in association with Norvell N. Holt. Mr. Davis is still 
a member of the legal profession. Unmarried, he resides with 
his mother. He belongs to the Rivermont Presbyterian Church. 
High in Masonry, he has been advanced through the Scottish 
Rite to the thirty-second degree. He belongs to Phi Delta Theta, 
and Phi Delta Phi, the legal fraternity, and is the national his- 
torian of Square and Compass, was president of Washington and 
Lee Square, and helped to organize the Square and Compass. 
At present he is secretary and treasurer of the Lions Club, of 
Lynchburg. He is service officer of the Lynchburg Post No. 16 
of the American Legion. He has been scout master of Troop 
No. 1 since 1921, and takes a great deal of interest in the Scout 
movement. 

Mrs. Ellen G. Kidd is the founder of the Pin Money Pickle 
Manufacturing Company, and while her home all her life has 
been in Richmond both she and her business have been given 
national and international recognition. Mrs. Kidd for twenty- 
eight years was the only woman member of the Richmond 
Chamber of Commerce, and for fifteen years she was a mem- 
ber of the Chamber of Commerce of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 
these being slight tokens of the respect that has been paid her 
remarkable achievements as a woman in the field of commerce. 

Ellen Gertrude Tompkins was born at Richmond, and her 
ancestry includes several notable families. She is a daughter 
of Edmund William and Julia Mosby (Burton) Tompkins, and 
a granddaughter of Harry and Fanny (Taylor) Tompkins. 
Through her mother she is in the sixth generation of descent 
from John Taylor, who came from Carlisle, England, and settled 
in Virginia. Another ancestor, in the fourth generation, was 
Major Day, a member of General Washington's staff in the Revo- 
lutionary war. Her father had two second cousins, one of whom 
became the wife of Carter Lee, a brother of Gen. Robert E. Lee, 
and the other married a sister of General Grant. Mrs. Kidd's 
father was at one time city treasurer of Richmond. 

The old Tompkins home in Richmond was at 706 East Leigh 
Street, and it was m the. kitchen of that home that Ellen Ger- 
trude in the years following the Civil war made pickles according 
to an old recipe that had long been in the family. An old recipe 
like an old violin needs a capable performer to insure a perfect 
product, and the millions who have eaten Pin Money Pickles 
would pi-obably agree that the quality and flavor are due at least 
as much to the skill and artistry of the woman who first gave 
her product that name and whose phenomenal ability as a busi- 
ness organizer has made possible the continuation of the stand- 



108 VIRGINIA 

ard of quality on large scale manufacturing, as to the special 
virtues of the original recipe. 

It is said that Miss Tompkins only yielded after much urging 
to sell pickles from the kettle in her own kitchen, and then for 
the sake of "pin money," and so she happened upon the fortu- 
nate name for the product. She started the business on a very 
small scale, using her own kitchen as her plant, about 1872. 
The manufacture of Pin Money Pickles at Richmond is an in- 
dustry that has been in existence for over half a century, and 
throughout its destiny has been carefully guided by Mrs. Ellen 
G. Kidd. For several years it was a seasonal occupation, de- 
pending upon custom orders. One of the first important orders 
she received was from the Pullman Company dining car depart- 
ment, for the sum of four hundred dollars. For many years 
Pin Money Pickles have been one of the few special brands of 
food products served on the standard menus of the Pullman 
dining cars, and this alone has made the name and the product 
familiar to the traveling public throughout America. Pin 
Money Pickles are served in hotels and other fine establishments 
in many foreign countries. From the small business that started 
in Ellen Tompkin's kitchen the business has been developed 
until it utilizes a large seven-story factory in Richmond. Be- 
sides this factory there is another monument to the business at 
Richmond, the Shenandoah Apartment Building, one of the 
largest and most exclusive and luxurious apartment houses in 
Virginia. Mrs. Kidd has her own home in that building. 

Mrs. Kidd has attended many national conventions of the 
Business and Professional Women's Clubs and has served as 
vice president and treasurer of the League of Women Voters, 
and for over a third of a century she has been on the board of 
the Sheltering Arms Hospital. She has traveled extensively 
abroad, and many articles have been published concerning this 
remarkable Richmond business woman in the foreign as well as 
the American press. She is a member of St. James Episcopal 
Church, the King's Daughters and Musicians Club. Mrs. Kidd 
completed her early education in the Pegram School for Girls 
at Richmond. 

A source of constant encouragement to her in the early years 
of her business as a manufacturer came from her husband, the 
late John Boulware Kidd. She had started the manufacture of 
pickles on a commercial scale before her marriage, and Mr. Kidd, 
an attorney by education, did everything in his power to assist 
and build up the business. John Boulware Kidd was born in 
King William County, Virginia, February 28, 1836, and died at 
Richmond in October, 1910. He was a son of John and Kather- 
ine (Boulware) Kidd, of King and Queen County. His mother 
was a sister of William Boulware, who was United States min- 
ister to Italy under President Tyler. John Kidd was an educator 
by profession. 

John Boulware Kidd was educated by private tutor, gradu- 
ated in law at Columbian College at Georgetown, D. C, but never 
practiced the profession. He taught school for some years, and 
his chief profession was insurance, which he followed until his 
death. He had studied law under Hon. James Lyons. The late 
Mr. Kidd was during the Civil war employed in the treasury 
department of the Confederate Government. He was a thorough 
Greek and Latin scholar. 

Mrs. Kidd is the mother of four children. Her daughter 
Louise, who is a member of the A. V. P. A., Virginia League of 



VIRGINIA 109 

Fine Arts, Colonial Daughters of America, a member of the 
board of the Sheltering Arms Hospital, the League of Women 
Voters, and active in St. James Episcopal Church, is the wife 
of E. Henry Meanley. The second daughter, Caroline, married 
Thomas J. Foote, of Wilson, North Carolina, and they have three 
children, named Henry A., John Boulware and Ellen Tompkins. 
The son Leo Miller Kidd married Lydia Hamilton, and the 
younger son is Hugh Tompkins Kidd. 

William L. Powell, M. D. Many of the biographies ap- 
pearing in this publication, illustrating the growth and progress 
of the grand Old Dominion State, are those of early settlers or 
of the founders of great business enterprises, or of leaders in 
public life or in the professions. Such men through the circum- 
stances of their coming, or of the period of their connection with 
affairs, possess a certain factitious advantage quite apart from 
their individual and intrinsic characters. Those following 
these, while they may possess equal or greater endowments, are 
in a measure overshadowed by the veneration in which men hold 
their elders, and are quite submerged in the vaster multitudes 
who, in great communities, compete with one another for prom- 
inence, crowding every avenue of business and filling every 
opening for fame. Nevei'theless, the life of the state cannot be 
adequately illustrated without taking into account those who 
have assumed the work of their fathers and carried it on with 
success quite equal to and often exceeding theirs. 

Dr. William L. Powell, a leading member of the Roanoke 
County medical profession, belongs to one of the later genera- 
tions of citizens. He was born at Winchester, Virginia, August 
31, 1876, and is a son of William L. and Eva C. (Magill) Powell, 
natives of Virginia, both of whom are deceased. His paternal 
grandfather was Humphrey Powell, a native of Loudoun County, 
Virginia, who passed his life on a large plantation which he 
owned and which was worked by his numerous slaves until the 
misfortunes of the war between the states swept away his for- 
tunes. W. L. Powell, the father of Dr. William L. Powell, was 
born in Virginia and given good educational advantages, includ- 
ing a course at the Virginia Military Institute. He took up 
civil engineering as a profession and was thus engaged at the 
outbreak of the war between the states, when he entered the 
Confederate army and was made a captain. Following the close 
of that struggle, in which he established an excellent record, he 
again applied himself to his profession, in which he won prestige 
and success, and was engaged on many important improvements 
from Virginia to Florida. He was a Democrat in politics, al- 
though he never cared for public office, and his religious faith 
was that of the Presbyterian Church, in the work of which 
both he and Mrs. Powell were very active. She was a daughter 
of Doctor Magill, for many years a prominent physician and sur- 
geon of this state, and at one time a pi'ofessor of medicine in 
the University of Virginia. 

The only child of his parents, William L. Powell received his 
early education in Washington and the Miller School in Albe- 
marle County, following which he entered the University of 
Virginia, from the medical department of which he graduated 
with the degree Doctor of Medicine as a member of the class of 
1900. For the next six years he was variously occupied in dif- 
ferent hospitals at Philadelphia, Cleveland and other cities, and 
in 1906 took up his permanent residence at Roanoke. For the 



110 VIRGINIA 

first two years he was in charge of the Roanoke Hospital, but 
since then has been engaged in a general practice, his present 
offices being located in the Shenandoah Building. Doctor Powell 
makes something of a specialty of surgery, a field in which he 
has gained well merited prominence, and is on the surgical staff 
of the Roanoke Hospital. He belongs to the Roanoke Medical 
Society, of which he formerly was president, the Virginia State 
Medical Society, the Southwestern Virginia Medical Society, the 
Southern Medical Society and the American Medical Associa- 
tion, and attends all possible meetings of these bodies, in addi- 
tion to which he has done much post-graduate work in various 
cities. He is a close and careful student of his profession and 
keeps fully abreast of its various discoveries and inventions. 
Doctor Powell is a member of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, 
the Pi Mu honorary medical fraternity. During the World war 
he served for one year in the United States Medical Corps, being 
stationed at base hospitals at Philadelphia, Camp Sherman and 
Camp Greenleaf. He belongs to the Masons, the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of Pythias, in all of which 
he has numerous friends, and his religious connection is with 
the Second Presbyterian Church, in which he is a member of the 
Board of Deacons. He is a public spirited supporter of all 
worthy civic movements and a contributor to charitable and 
religious enterprises. 

In 1908 Doctor Powell was united in marriage with Miss 
Eleanor Kerr, who was born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and 
educated in that city, where she was equipped for employment 
as a trained nurse, a vocation which she followed for several 
years prior to her marriage. Doctor and Mrs. Powell are the 
parents of one son, John Randolph, born in 1911, who is now 
attending high school at Roanoke. 

Hon. Clifton A. Woodrum. Three generations of the Wood- 
rum family have been identified with the practice of law in 
Virginia, and all have attained high places in their profession, 
as well as in public affairs. It would seem that the present 
representative of the family, Hon. Clifton A. Woodrum, had 
other plans in his youth, for he studied both pharmacy and 
medicine, hut evidently the magnetic pull of hereditary traits 
proved too strong. In any case, that he made a wise choice 
finally is shown in the fact that he is senior member of one of 
the leading law firms of Roanoke, that of Woodrum, McCauley 
& Parsons, and is also a leader in public life, being at present 
a member of the national House of Representatives as represent- 
ative from the Sixth Congressional District of Virginia. 

Judge Woodrum was born at Roanoke, April 27, 1887, and 
is a son of Robert H. and Anna (Musgrove) Woodrum. His 
paternal grandfather, Jordan Woodrum, was born in that part 
of Virginia now included in West Virginia, but moved to Salem, 
Virginia, where for many years he was engaged successfully in 
the practice of law. His son, Robert H. Woodrum, was born in 
what is now West Virginia and received good educational 
advantages, attending Roanoke College and the law department 
of the University of Virginia. For a number of years he was 
engaged in the practice of his profession, and was also the 
first commonwealth's attorney at Roanoke, but in his declining 
years gave up his law practice and turned his attention to com- 
mercial pursuits, to which he was devoting his activities at the 
time of his demise in 1914. He was a man who was held in high 



VIRGINIA 111 

esteem throughout the community, and during the period of his 
law practice was connected with much important litigation. He 
was a Democrat in his political allegiance, and a strong and 
active worker in the party, and his religious faith was that of 
the Lutheran Church. Mr. Woodrum married Miss Anna Mus- 
grove, who was born in Texas, a daughter of Robert Musgrove. 
who for many years was a prominent stockman of Sweetwater, 
Texas. Mrs. Woodrum, who is now sixty-seven years of age, 
survives her husband and I'esides at Roanoke, where she is 
active in the work of the Lutheran Church. Four children were 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Woodrum: Clifton A., of this review; 
Robert J. ; and two who are deceased. 

The public schools of Roanoke furnished Clifton A. Wood- 
rum with his early educational training, following which he 
became a student of pharmacy at the University of Medicine, 
Richmond. Eventually he turned his attention to the family 
profession of law at the University of Virginia, from which he 
was graduated with the degree Bachelor of Laws as a member 
of the class of 1908. He was admitted to the bar in the same 
year and at once commenced practice at Roanoke, where he is 
now senior member of the firm of Woodrum, McCauley & Par- 
sons, general practitioners, with offices in the Shenandoah Life 
Building. Mr. Woodrum is equally conversant with all branches 
of his profession, and therefore has made a specialty of none. 
He is accounted a forceful, thorough and well-grounded lawyer, 
and bears an excellent reputation among his professional 
colleagues. He belongs to the Roanoke City Bar Association, 
the Virginia State Bar Association and the American Bar As- 
sociation, the Phi Delta Phi law fraternity and the Sigma Chi 
fraternity. A Democrat in his political views, Judge Woodrum 
long has taken a prominent part in public affairs. He served 
as commonwealth's attorney and as judge of the Hustings Court, 
and in 1922 was elected to represent the Sixth Congressional 
District of Virginia in the national Congress. He was again 
elected to this body in 1926, and his work has been of a highly 
valuable and constructive character. He has been active and 
sincere in his support of all public-spirited measures launched 
in his community, and in every way has shown his civic pride 
and far sightedness as a citizen. Judge Woodrum is well known 
in fraternal circles, being a thirty-third degree Mason, and a 
past potentate of Kazim Temple, A. A. 0. N. M. S. ; and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of P>i:hias, the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Woodmen of the World. 

In 1906 Judge Woodrum was united in marriage with Miss 
Lena Hancock, who was born at Bedford, Virginia, and educated 
in the public schools of that city and at Jeter Institute. To this 
union there have been born two children : Clifton A., Jr., 
attending Virginia Military Institute and Martha Anne, in the 
graded schools. The family belongs to the Green Methodi-st 
Episcopal Church, South. 

William B. Harris is active head of one of the largest lum- 
ber manufacturing organizations in the Southeast, the Williams 
McKeitham Lumber Company of Lynchburg. 

Mr. Harris, who has earned a steady succession of promo- 
tions and important attainments in the commercial field, was 
born in Appomattox County, Virginia, in 1882, son of Tandy and 
Reberta Alice (Marks) Harris and grandson of John A. Harris, 



112 VIRGINIA 

a native of Buckingham County, Virginia, who moved to Appo- 
mattox County, where he acquired a farm which, passing from 
son to son, has been in the possession of the family for three 
generations. Tandy Harris was born in Buckingham County, 
was two years of age when the family went to Appomattox 
County and he succeeded to the ownership of the old homestead 
and lived on it until his death in June, 1927. He was a Confed- 
erate soldier, joining the army at the age of fifteen, and served 
four years, until the final surrender. The homestead farm 
which has been in the family for three generations in Appomat- 
tox County is known as Locust Hill. He was a Democrat in poli- 
tics and an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, serving as superintendent of its Sunday School. His wife, 
Alice Marks, was born in Botetourt County, Virginia, and died in 
1919. Her father, Hudson Marks, was also born in Botetourt 
County. There were six children, three sons and three daugh- 
ters, William B. being the oldest son and second child. 

William B. Harris attended common schools while a boy on 
the home farm, and at the age of eighteen began his business 
career with C. I. Johnson, a prominent merchant and lumber- 
man. He was in the service of Mr. Johnson for seven years 
and then located at Lynchburg and became a stenographer for 
the Williams McKeitham Lumber Company. In the consecu- 
tive service of this one organization he accepted larger respon- 
sibilities until he rose to the presidency of the company. It is 
a large manufacturing organization, owning and directing a 
number of plants in the two Carolinas and Florida. 

Mr. Harris married in January, 1912, Ruby Smith, a native 
of Tennessee. Her father, Pryor N. Smith, was at one time 
president of the Smith-Briscoe Shoe Company of Lynchburg. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris have twin sons, William Ballard, Junior, 
and Robert Smith. The family are members of the Episcopal 
Church, and Mr. Harris is affiliated with the Oak Wood and 
Piedmont Clubs. 

Robert Withers Massie, a lumber dealer at Lynchburg, is a 
member of an old Colonial family of Virginia, and has contrib- 
uted something to the honorable prestige enjoyed by the family 
in this state for several generations. 

He was born in Campbell County, Virginia, April 24, 1858, 
and grew up in Nelson County. He is a son of Patrick Cabell 
and Susan C. (Withers) Massie, a grandson of Dr. Thomas 
Massie, a physician and surgeon who was in service in the Ameri- 
can forces as a surgeon in the War of 1812. The maternal 
grandfather, Robert Walter Withers, was a planter and physi- 
cian and married a Miss Alexander. Patrick Cabell Massie was 
born in Nelson County, Virginia, and died in 1877. His wife 
was born in Campbell County and died in 1903. Of their eight 
children two are now living, Robert W. and Mrs. L. P. Brown. 

Robert Withers Massie was given good home educational 
opportunities and was a student in the Virginia Military Insti- 
tute when the death of his father called him home to the respon- 
sibilities of the farm and head of the family, since he was the 
oldest child. During the next twenty years of his life he gave 
his time to the management of the farm, and after his brothers 
and sisters were all educated and established for themselves he 
located at Lynchburg, in 1897, and since that year has been in 
the lumber business. He has made the Massie Lumber Com- 
pany, Incorporated, one of the largest manufacturing and whole- 




sXu^^A£.^^c^J^-^ 



VIRGINIA 113 

sale organizations in the Southeast, operating mills in South 
Carolina and three mills in Virginia. Mr. Massie is president of 
the lumber company. He is also a director of the First National 
Bank of Lynchburg. 

He married, in 1885, Miss Mattie W. W. Manson, who was 
born in Bedford County, Virginia, daughter of Nathaniel C. 
Manson, a Lynchburg attorney. They have three children. 
Robert W. Junior, who was educated in the Virginia Military 
Institute, is associated with his father's lumber business. By 
his marriage to Wayatt McKinnon, of Red Springs, North Caro- 
lina, he has one son, R. W. III. N. C. M. Massie, the second son, 
a business man at Glasgow, Virginia, married Agnes Minne- 
garode. Martha W. is at home. 

Mr. Massie and family are members of Saint Paul's Epis- 
copal Church at Lynchburg. He belongs to the Sigma Nu col- 
lege fraternity, is a Democrat, and is president of the Board of 
Visitors of Virginia Institute. For three years he was elected 
president of the Order of the Cincinnati. He has membership in 
this organization, made up originally of former officers of the 
Revolutonary war, because of the service of his great-grand- 
father, Major Thomas Massie, who served with the rank of 
major in the war for independence and was in service from the 
beginning until the final surrender at Yorktown. He was given 
a large grant of land for his military services, and that land was 
located near Chilicothe, Ohio, where the Massies were one of the 
most conspicuous families in the early political history of that 
state. 

Ira H. Hurt, M. D. One of the brilliant young physicians 
and surgeons of Roanoke who has already achieved distinction 
in his profession, Dr. Ira H. Hurt, holds the confidence of the 
public and the commendation of his associates because of the 
able manner in which he discharges the heavy responsibilities 
of his calling. Both by inclination and intensive training is he 
fitted for his work, and while giving it every possible attention, 
he does not neglect his obligations as a good citizen, and few 
men stand better than he. Doctor Hurt was born in Franklin 
County, Virginia, October 21, 1890, a son of Henry A. and Julia 
(Huff) Hurt, natives of Virginia, he born in Franklin County 
and she in Floyd County. The mother is deceased, but the 
father survives and is now living in Roanoke. Formerly he was 
a farmer, but after he came to Roanoke he worked in the car 
shops for several years, later going into the bus business, and 
finally becoming a grocer, in which line of business he is now 
engaged. Of the seven children born to the parents six survive, 
and of them all Doctor Hurt was the first born. All her life 
the mother was an active member of the Baptist Church, to 
which the father belongs, and he is also a Mason. In political 
faith he is a Democrat. His father, Ira Hurt, was also a native 
of Franklin County, Virginia, and at one time he was one of its 
wealthiest men, and a very extensive planter. The Methodist 
Episcopal Church. South, had in him a devout member. The 
maternal grandfather, Isaac Huff, was born in Virginia, and he, 
too, was a large landowner and planter. 

Doctor Hurt attended the public schools of Roanoke, and 
following his graduation from the high school course, had a year 
of work in Roanoke College, after which he took two vears in 
the Medical College of the University of North Carolina. He 



114 VIRGINIA 

was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, in 1919, and interned for one year in the Presby- 
terian Hospital of the same city. In 1920 he established himself 
in general practice in Roanoke, where he has since remained 
with admirable results. In addition to his private practice Doc- 
tor Hurt is an assistant at the Shenandoah Hospital. 

In 1923 Doctor Hurt married Miss Edith Jackson, born in 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and there educated. She was a 
trained nurse, in practice. One child has been born to Doctor 
and Mrs. Hurt, Phyllis Julia, born December 23, 1925. Doctor 
Hurt belongs to the Melrose Baptist Church, and he is a York 
Rite and Shriner Mason, and belongs to the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. For several years he has taken an active 
part in the work of the Roanoke Chamber of Commerce. He 
belongs to the Roanoke Academy of Medicine, the Virginia State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association. During 
the World war he was in the Students Army Training Corps, 
and he now holds the rank of captain in the Medical Corps of 
the Virginia National Guard and the Officers Reserve Corps, 
U. S. A. He is commanding the Medical Detachment of the Two 
Hundred and Forty-sixth Coast Artillery, and attends its en- 
campment every year. From the above brief review can be 
gathered the fact that Doctor Hurt measures up to the highest 
ideals of his profession and good citizenship, and that his future 
stretches out very bright before him. 

Hon. Robert C. Jackson. For more than forty-six years 
Hon. Robert C. Jackson has been a member of the Virginia bar, 
and during the past two decades has been engaged in practice at 
Roanoke. For a large part of his career he has been the in- 
cumbent of positions of honor and trust, and at present is city 
attorney of Roanoke, an office in which he has discharged his 
duties with marked ability and conscientiousness. It has been 
his fortune to have attained well merited distinction in his pro- 
fession, and to have been identified with many important move- 
ments that have contributed to the civic and general welfare. 

Judge Jackson was born December 26, 1861, at Austinville, 
Wythe County, Virginia, and is a son of Thomas and Amanda 
(Porter) Jackson, and a grandson of Samuel Porter, a native of 
Wythe County, where the family was prominent for many years, 
its members for the greater part being planters. Thomas Jack- 
son was born in England and came to the United States in young 
manhood, settling in Wythe County, where he spent the remain- 
der of his life in agricultural pursuits. He and his wife, who 
was born in Wythe County, were the parents of seven children, 
of whom six are living, Robert C. being the youngest. Two of 
the sons were soldiers of the Confederacy during the war be- 
tween the states: Samuel, who resides in Kansas, and John C, 
of Galax, Grayson County, this state. The parents were faith- 
ful members of the Methodist church. 

Robert C. Jackson acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Wythe County, and was graduated from Emory and 
Henry College, Emory, Virginia, as a member of the class of 
1879, receiving the degree Bachelor of Arts. He then entered 
the University of Virginia, where he spent three years, and in 
1882 was graduated with the degree Bachelor of Laws. Com- 
mencing practice in Grayson County, he was elected county 
judge when he was only twenty-two years of age, and held that 



VIRGINIA 115 

office for four years. When he resigned from that office he was 
elected commonwealth's attorney, in which capacity he acted for 
a like period, and continued to practice in Grayson County until 
1896, when he moved to Wytheville. That community continued 
to be the scene of his professional labors until 1898, when he was 
elected judge of the Twenty-first Judicial Circuit, comprising 
the counties of Wythe, Pulaski, Giles, Carroll, Bland and Taze- 
well. Judge Jackson could have held this office indefinitely had 
he so desired, but resigned and moved to Roanoke County in 
1908, where he has since made his home, his present offices 
being in the Shenandoah Life Building. He carries on a gen- 
eral practice and has attained to a high position in his profession, 
being the legal representative of a large and important clientage. 
In addition to his private practice he has served for several 
years in the capacity of city attorney. He is a member of the 
Roanoke County Bar Association, the Virginia State Bar Asso- 
ciation and the American Bar Association, and has been a mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity for many years, having passed 
through the chairs of the York Rite. He likewise has been 
active in civic affairs and politics, and is a leading member of 
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which he is a 
steward and has been a Sunday School teacher for thirty years. 
Judge Jackson married, in 1886, Miss Lelia Dickinson, who 
was born in Grayson County, Virginia, and to this union there 
were born three children: Hurd, who resides in the West; Eliza- 
beth, who married a Mr. Anderson and resides in New Jersey ; 
and Lelia, who married John Dechert, a resident of Harrison- 
burg, Virginia. The mother of these children died in 1893 and 
Mr. Jackson married, in 1900, Miss Marian R. Early, of Hills- 
ville, Carroll County, Virginia, and has one .son, Ralph, who re- 
sides in Florida. 

Charles G. Craddock. Lessons are daily brought home to 
us ; tuition is ours for the asking in the various fields of human 
endeavor ; we need no school or instructors to show us in which 
direction we must lay the course of our energies to gain position 
and success. It is true that study is needed, but the careers of 
the men who have tried and have attained furnish better instruc- 
tion than can be gained through any other line. One of these 
lessons is that a real man does not allow himself to know that the 
word "quit" has found a place in our dictionary, our vocabulary 
or our personality. We may take a case in this connection and 
illustrate our point. Charles G. Craddock, president of the 
Craddock-Terry Company, has worked his way up in his present 
company from his initial position of clerk to that of president, 
and his thoughtful interest in other persons and things and his 
genial social qualities have well earned him the confidence and 
high esteem in which he is held by all who know him. 

Charles G. Craddock was born in Lynchburg, Virginia, No- 
vember 17, 1890, a son of John W. Craddock, a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this work. Reared in his native city, 
Charles G. Craddock attended its graded and high schools and 
the Episcopal High School of Virginia, Alexandria, and had one 
year in the University of Virginia and another year in the 
University of Pennsylvania. 

With the completion of his educational training Mr. Craddock 
entered the auditing department of his present company, and 
has steadily risen until today he is its president, which office he 
has held since 1924. Under his wise and aggresive administra- 

6— VOL. 3 



116 VIRGINIA 

tion the volume of business has expanded, while at the same 
time the quality of the product has been maintained, and today 
the company has a very high rating both commercially and in- 
dustrially. 

In 1916 Mr. Craddock married Miss Katharine Baker, born in 
Lynchburg, a daughter of Dr. W. H. Baker, the first eye, ear, 
nose and throat specialist of Lynchburg. Mrs. Craddock at- 
tended the schools of Lynchburg and Agnes Scott College, and 
is a finely educated lady of social graces. Three children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Craddock: Eliza Deane Craddock, 
Charles G., Junior, and Frank Baker Craddock. Mr. Craddock 
is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Lynchburg, 
and one of its most active workers. He belongs to the Delta 
Tau Delta Greek letter fraternity, the Rotary Club and the Coun- 
try Club, as well as to other organizations of the city. In close 
touch with the progress of events he displays a thorough knowl- 
edge of public and business conditions, and brings it to bear in 
his skillful and systematic conduct of his affairs. From the 
start he has shown an appreciation of those traits of character 
which insure safe and sound business processes, and not only 
has endeavored to develop them in himself, but to surround 
himself with others who possess them, and because of this and 
other reasons already enumerated has kept his concern in the 
forefront of progress. Such men as he set the pace for others, 
and encourage development and expansion along all lines. 

David Hampton Kizer is an attorney, has practiced law at 
Lynchburg since finishing his course at the University of Vir- 
ginia, and has made a good record in his profession and in the 
affairs and relationship of a citizen. 

He was born in South Carolina, November 12, 1876, son of 
Ellis R. and Rosa (Shuler) Kizer, also natives of South Caro- 
lina. His mother was a daughter of Oliver Shuler, who was 
born in South Carolina and was a planter and slave owner be- 
fore the war. The paternal grandparents were David Frederick 
and Elizabeth (Jackson) Kizer, the latter of whom died Janu- 
ary 9, 1928, in her native State of South Carolina at the age of 
103 years. David F. Kizer was a farmer. He and his wife 
reared eleven out of fourteen children, and all of them married 
and had sons and daughters. Ellis R. Kizer spent his life as a 
farmer, was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South, the Masonic fraternity and a Democrat in politics. He 
was born December 27, 1853, and died October 20, 1913, while 
his wife was born in 1854 and died August 4, 1897. They had 
a family of ten children. 

David Hampton Kizer attended the common schools in South 
Carolina, the Carlisle Fitting School at Bamberg, and in 1907 
was graduated from the law department of the University of 
Virginia, having had several terms of experience as a teacher 
before finishing his law course. Mr. Kizer was admitted to the 
bar January 11, 1907, and in the same year established his 
offices in the Law Building at Lynchburg, where he has been for 
twenty years. 

Mr. Kizer married, November 15, 1911, Miss Lucille Bullock, 
who was born in Russellville, Alabama, and was educated there 
and in the State Normal School at Florence, Alabama. She 
taught school before her marriage. Five children were born 
to their union: D. H. Junior, Shuler Anderson, William Bul- 
lock, Mildred Lawler and Charles Walter. 



VIRGINIA 117 

Mr. Kizer has served as steward of the Methodist Church of 
Lynchburg fifteen years, also as superintendent of the Sunday 
School and his wife takes an active part in the same church and 
its social and charitable agencies. Mr. Kizer is a past master of 
Marshall Lodge No. 39, A. F. and A. M., at Lynchburg, member 
of Lynchburg Chapter No. 10, Royal Arch Masons, DeMolay 
Commandei-y No. 4, Knights Templar, Kazim Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine at Roanoke, and is also affiliated with Lynchburg 
Lodge No. 17, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a past 
chancellor of Lynchburg Courtney Lodge No. 11, Knights of 
Pythias, and for the past twenty years has been treasurer of 
the Knights of Pythias Lodge and is a member of the D. 0. K. K. 
He also belongs to the Junior Order of the American Mechanics 
and the Improved Order of Red Men, Tribe No. 96. He is a 
member of the Piedmont Club, the Delta Chi legal fraternity and 
is a Democrat in politics. 

John W. Simmerman is an accomplished physician and sur- 
geon whose most successful years in his profession have been 
spent at Roanoke. 

Doctor Simmerman was born at Ivanhoe, Wythe County, 
Virginia, February 17, 1887, son of S. S. and Lula (Painter) 
Simmerman, natives of the same county. His parents reside at 
Wytheville, where his father is a farmer and banker. He is a 
Methodist and his wife a Presbyterian, and he belongs to the 
B. P. 0. Elks. There were three children : Dr. John W. ; S. S., 
Junior, a farmer at Wytheville; and Elizabeth, wife of C. P. 
Huff, a merchant at Pulaski, Virginia. 

John W. Simmerman was educated in local schools in Wythe 
County, continued his education in the Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute at Blacksburg and was graduated in 1911 from the 
Maryland Medical College at Baltimore. He had his training 
as an interne at the Chesapeake and Ohio Hospital at Richmond 
and for two years practiced at McDonalds Mill. Doctor Simmer- 
man in 1913 located at Roanoke, and has achieved a very excel- 
lent general practice. He is a member of the Roanoke Academy 
of Medicine, Medical Society of Virginia, American Medical 
Association. 

Doctor Simmerman is a director of the Colonial National 
Bank of Roanoke and the Peoples Bank of Vinton. He is inter- 
ested in community affairs, serving as a member of the School 
Board and is a York and Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias and its social adjuncts, the D. 0. 
K. K. He and his family are members of Saint Peter's Epis- 
copal Church. 

He married, in 1910, Mae L. Quarles who was born in Hal- 
ifax, Virginia. They have two daughters, Mary Louise and Mae 
Morrison, both attending school at Roanoke. 

Robert T. Lemmon, M. D. Indelibly inscribed on the pages 
of the medical history of Campbell County and deeply graven 
in the hearts of those who know him is the name and personality 
of Dr. Robert T. Lemmon, of Lynchburg, whose modest deport- 
ment, kindness of heart and true beneficence mark him as a 
gentleman, while his strong intellect and experience directed in 
the channels of materia medica have gained for him distinction 
among the members of his profession in this part of Virginia. 
The salient features in the life of Doctor Lemmon may be 



118 VIRGINIA 

deduced from the fact that he is beloved by all who know him, 
as much in professional circles as by those with whom he comes 
in contact in social relations. He has figured for a number of 
years as a prominent member of the medical fraternity of 
Lynchburg, which has always been distinguished for high rank 
in the profession, and he has not shirked his duty as a citizen, 
but has responded gladly to whatever calls have been made 
upon him. 

Doctor Lemmon was born in Campbell County, Virginia, 
October 5, 1878, a son of Richard H. and Elizabeth (Maury) 
Lemmon, the former of whom was born near Charlottesville, 
Virginia, and the latter in Campbell County, and both are now 
deceased. The father was also a physician, and was prepared 
for professional work in the University of Virginia and the 
University of Maryland. Beginning his practice in Charlottes- 
ville, he later went to New Orleans, Louisiana, and from that 
far away city of the South he came to Lynchburg, and here 
he continued in active practice until his death in 1885. He was 
one of the old-time physicians, devoted to his profession and 
willing to sacrifice everything to it. For many years he was 
remembered as the "beloved physician" of Lynchburg, and there 
are those still living who were ministered to by him. The excel- 
lent wife and mother passed away in 1880, five years before her 
husband. After her death Dr. Robert Lemmon was taken into 
the home of Robert Massie, and there he was practically reared. 
He has one sister, Ann Maury, now the wife of John B. Light- 
foot, Jr., of Richmond, an attorney, the two constituting the 
children of their parents. The elder Doctor Lemmon was a 
Democrat in political faith, but never an office seeker. A man 
ahead of his times, he realized the necessity for additional train- 
ing and did post-graduate work in Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore, Maryland. His father, Dr. Robert T. Lemmon, was 
also a physician, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, 
and a general practitioner of Campbell County, so that Doctor 
Lemmon of this review is the third in direct descent to practice 
medicine in Campbell County. The great-grandfather on the 
paternal side was Reverend Lemmon, a minister of the Episcopal 
Church. The maternal grandfather, Jesse L. Maury, was born 
in Albermarle County, Virginia, and in addition to extensive 
operations as a farmer he built Piedmont, Virginia, and lived 
to be ninety-two years old. 

Doctor Lemmon, of whom we write, first attended the Cleve- 
land High School and that at Woodbury Forest. Still later he 
attended Kenmore High School, and in 1898 he entered the 
University of Virginia, and was graduated therefrom in 1902, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. Going then to Norfolk, 
he was the first to serve as interne in the Sarah Lee Hospital of 
that city, and while there he took a six-months course in the 
New York Polyclinic Hospital. From there he went to Saint 
Joseph Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland. Entering the Medical 
Reserve Corps of the United States Army, he served as a first 
lieutenant in it for eight years, and for two years was in the 
Philippines. In January, 1913, he came to Lynchburg, and here 
he has since been engaged in practice, building up very wide 
connections in the city and county. While he carries on a gen- 
eral practice he specializes to a certain extent in genito-urinary 
diseases. 

On November 5, 1918, Doctor Lemmon married Miss Mary 
Bigbie, a native of Lynchburg and a product of its public schools 



VIRGINIA 119 

and seminary. Two children have been born to Doctor and Mrs. 
Lemmon: Robert T., Jr., and Richard H. Mrs. Lemmon be- 
longs to the Episcopal Church. He is a member of Phi Kappa 
Psi, the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Campbell 
County Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association, and at one time he served 
the county medical society as secretary. Doctor Lemmon is a 
man who possesses depths of feeling, of purpose, of high resolve, 
that lead, when occasion demands, to virile action, and his 
associates know that he will devote time and energy to plan for 
and accomplish that which is best in civic life. 

William C. Stephenson. In the broad and intricate field 
of insurance success is the portion only of those who possess 
certain qualifications and characteristics. Contrary to ordinary 
belief, insurance is a highly specialized business, and its devotees 
must be men of sound character, keen knowledge of human na- 
ture, self confidence and untiring persistence. Diplomacy and 
tact are desirable concomitants, and above all the insurance man 
must be thoroughly conversant with his subject in its every de- 
tail, be able to "think on his feet" and one ready instantaneously 
to grasp an opportunity. Of the men who have possessed the 
above characteristics and through their use have gained success, 
one of the best known at Roanoke is William C. Stephenson, who 
is also widely known in other business activities, particularly 
those identified with the coal industry and with finance. 

/Mr. Stephengon was born July 13, 1872, at East Brady, 
Clarion County, cPennsylvania, and is a son of James B. and 
Katherine G. "(Cowell) Stephenson. His father, who was born 
in- New Jersey, became identified with the coal business at an 
early age, and was- a pioneer in the Pocahontas fields of West 
Virginia, where' he- opened the fifth.-mine in this field at Bram- 
well, West Virginia. He eventually secured large and impor- 
tant interests and was one of the leading men in the trade at 
the time of his' demi^, which occurred at Roanoke, where he 
maintained offices for many years. He was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and. the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks, and in his political convictions was a Republican. He 
belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church, while Mrs. Stephen- 
son, who was born in Pennsylvania, held membership in the 
Presbyterian Churcl;?,jin -the work of which she was very active. 
.They became the parents of five children, of whom three are 
living; William C;. of thisireview; H. L., a manufacturer of 
Buffalo, New York; and N$lt' J., wife of Dr. J. O. Boyd, of 
Roanoke, Virginia;..'-: i. •:■ 

The early educa^on af William C. Stephenson was acquired 
in the public- schools of his- native county, following which he 
pursued a course at the Clarion State Normal School. His first 
Employment wa-s-with the Second National Bank of Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. In 1893 ihe located at Roanoke, where he became 
interested in the various big business operations of his father. 
He now maintainsi well appointed offices at 112 Kirk Avenue, 
South West, and has a large and appreciative patronage which 
extends to all parts of the city and the surrounding countryside. 
Few men are better kno\vn^to the coal trade of the city and 
state, and he is now president and treasurer of the Buckeye Coal 
and Coke Company. He is also vice president of the firm of 
Davis & Stephenson, Jneorporated, and a director in the First 
National Exchange Bank of Roanoke and the Virginia Bridge 



120 VIRGINIA 

and Iron Company, all of which concerns have profited mate- 
rially by his ability, judgment and acumen. In his political 
views Mr. Stephenson is a stanch Republican, but has no desire 
for public office. However, few citizens are more public spirited 
or have contributed in greater degree to the welfare of their city 
by their constructive support of worth while measures. He has 
long been prominent as a York and Scottish Rite Mason, and 
served as hig-h priest of his Chapter and eminent commander of 
his Commandery at the same time, in addition to which on an- 
other occasion he was grand commander of the state. With his 
family he belongs to Christ Episcopal Church. 

In 1899 Mr. Stephenson was united in marriage with Miss 
Elizabeth M. Greenland, who was born in Clarion County, Penn- 
sylvania, and educated at Wilson College, Chambersburg, Penn- 
sylvania. To this union there have been born four children : Wil- 
liam C, Jr., a medical student at the University of Virginia; 
Walter G., a traveling salesman for Castner, Currant & Bullitt, 
Incorporated; James B. II, and Richard C, attending school. 

H. Herbert Harris has given the best years of his life to 
the commercial interests of the City of Lynchburg, where under 
his experienced hand the Harris-Woodson Company, of which 
he is president, has become one of the largest manufacturing 
and wholesale confectionery firms in the South. 

Mr. Harris was born at Charlottesville, Virginia, October 1, 
1869, son of Henry Herbert and Emma (Bibb) Harris. His 
paternal grandparents, Henry and Susan (Hart) Harris, were 
residents of Louisa County, Henry Harris being a farmer and 
planter. 

Henry Herbert Harris, a scholar and educator, for many 
years identified with Richmond College, was born in Louisa 
County December 17, 1836. Much of his early education was 
acquired from an older sister, a very gifted woman. He was 
graduated from the University of Virginia, and when the Civil 
war came on he served with the Engineering Corps. After the 
war he taught in a female seminary at Charlottesville, and left 
that to become professor of Greek in Richmond College, a chair 
he filled for twenty-nine years, and part of the time was also 
professor of modern languages and philosophy. He was an in- 
spiring teacher, and hundreds of graduates of Richmond College 
have a most grateful memory for not only his scholarship and 
learning, but for his kindly and generous character. He was a 
member of the Baptist Church and for many years taught a 
Bible class in the Grace Street Baptist Church at Richmond. 
He resigned his position at Richmond College in 1895 to become 
identified with the Baptist Theological Seminary at Louisville. 
He died February 4, 1897, at Lynchburg and was buried in 
Hollywood Cemetery at Richmond. 

He married, November 26, 1862, Miss Emma Bibb, daugh- 
ter of William A. Bibb, of Charlottesville, William A. Bibb was a 
merchant and clerk of court. Professor Harris had six chil- 
dren : William A., who succeeded his father as professor of 
Greek at Richmond College, and has been with that institution a 
quarter of a century, having been educated in the college under 
his father and also at Johns Hopkins University. The second 
son is H. Herbert, of Lynchburg. Janet is the wife of R. E. 
Gaines, professor of mathematics at the University of Richmond. 
Dr. George T. Harris is a Lynchburg physician. Isabelle is a 
graduate of Richmond College and Columbia University, and 



VIRGINIA 121 

is teaching mathematics in the West Hampton School at Rich- 
mond. The youngest of the family, Emma, married James H. 
Hancock, a coal operator at Lynchburg. 

H. Herbert Harris was reared in Richmond, attended the 
McGuire Boys School, and graduated A. B. from Richmond 
College in 1888. For three years he clerked in a wholesale 
grocery store at Richmond, for two years was in the brokerage 
business, and removing to Lynchburg was with a wholesale 
grocery company there until 1901. In 1901 he established the 
Harris-Woodson Company, candy manufacturers, and during 
the past quarter of a century this has become one of the impor- 
tant commercial institutions of Lynchburg. The company main- 
tains a force of fourteen traveling salesmen covering Virginia, 
West Virginia, Tennessee, North and South Carolina and Geor- 
gia, and also distribute a large amount of their confectionery 
products through brokers in other places. Mr. Harris is presi- 
dent of the company, T. A. Woodson, vice president, and R. A. 
Harris, vice president. 

Mr. Harris is vice president of the Lynchburg City Savings 
and Loan Corporation, vice president of the Guaranty Title and 
Bond Corporation, and is a director in the First National Bank, 
the Lynchburg Mutual Building and Loan Association, the Pilot 
Building and Loan Association and a member of the Board of 
Directors of the Atlantic Life Insurance Company, of Richmond. 

For many years he has taken an active part in civic affairs. 
He is treasurer and member of the board of the Baptist Hos- 
pital, the best equipped institution of its kind in the South. He 
is former president of the Lynchburg Chamber of Commerce 
and Lynchburg Rotary Club, member of the Virginia State 
Chamber of Commerce, is a member of the City School Board, 
and is a deacon in the Rivermont Baptist Church and superin- 
tendent of its Sunday School and chairman of the church build- 
ing committee. Mr. Harris has membership in the United Com- 
mercial Travelers, the Beta Theta Pi college fraternity, and is a 
Democrat. 

He married, October 25, 1902, Miss Annie Adams, a native 
of Lynchburg. They have three children. The son, Richard 
Adams Harris, was educated in the Episcopal High School at 
Alexandria, the University of Virginia, where he was a member 
of the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity, and is now vice president 
of the Harris- Woodson Company. He married Martha Latham, 
of Richmond, daughter of Rev. J. N. Latham, a Methodist min- 
ister, and has one son, Richard A., Jr. The two daughters of 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris are Annie Scott and Emma Maxwell Har- 
ris, who were educated in the Mary Baldwin Seminary at Staun- 
ton and Dana Hall at Wellesley, Massachusetts. 

James V. Ramos, Jr., was a Richmond pharmacist, and a well 
known member of a well known family in Virginia. 

He was boi'n at Richmond in September, 1854, and died in 
that city July 8, 1901. His father, Jose Ramos, came from the 
Azores Islands to Richmond, and married in that city Maria 
Kirby, a native of Virginia. Of their six children one was 
Miss Essie Ramos, a graduate of the Richmond Woman's Col- 
lege and a well known educator who taught for many years 
in the Richmond High School. 

James V. Ramos, Jr., attended Richmond College and com- 
pleted his course in pharmacy in the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia. For a time he was employed by the Polk Miller Com- 



122 VIRGINIA 

pany and in 1881 engaged in the drug business at 8 Main Street 
under the firm name of Thornbury and Ramos, and it was one 
of the leading drug stores of the city for ten years. For a brief 
time before his death he had been interested in a drug business 
at Norfolk. Mr. Ramos practically all his life was a member of 
the Second Baptist Church of Richmond. 

Mr. Ramos was survived by Mrs. Ramos and three children. 
Mrs. Lutie Page Ramos, whose home is at 2018 Gi'ove Avenue, 
has in her ancestry some of the distinguished family names of 
old Virginia. Mr. Ramos and Miss Lutie Page were married 
January 8, 1884, at the St. James Hotel in Richmond, in the 
presence of her father. Major John M. Page, then on his death- 
bed, it having been his expressed wish and determination that 
the ceremony should take place before his death. They were 
married by Rev. Dr. James G. Armstrong, of the Episcopal 
Church, assisted by Rev. William W. Landrum, of the Baptist 
denomination, and Rev. J. W. Bledsoe. Major John M. Page, 
who died at the age of fifty years, was born in Campbell County, 
Virginia, and early in the war between the states became a first 
lieutenant in the Scottsville Greys commanded by Gen. James C. 
Hill. His company became a part of the Forty-sixth Virginia 
Regiment of Infantry in Wise's Brigade. He was made adju- 
tant of the regiment and was conspicuous for his coolness and 
courage as well as for his qualities as a drill master. After the 
war he lived at Charlottesville, and several years before his 
death became proprietor of the St. James Hotel at Richmond. 
He was a member of the Charlottesville Lodge of Masons. 
Major John M. Page married Lucy Maria Flanagan, and they 
were the parents of six children : William Louis, John Leonard, 
cashier of the Peoples Bank of Charlottesville ; James, who mar- 
ried Jennie Frazier and had three children, named Almira, John 
Leonard and Martha; Thomas L. ; Fannie L. ; and Mrs. Luttie 
Page Ramos. 

Through her mother Mrs. Ramos is a descendant of the 
Payne and Flanagan families. George P. Payne, who died in 
December, 1744, was a justice of Goochland County in 1729-33, 
was sheriff of the county, 1734-37. He married Mary Woodson, 
daughter of Robert and Elizabeth (Feris) Woodson, and grand- 
daughter of Doctor John Woodson, who came from England to 
Virginia in 1619. A son of George P. Payne was Josias Payne, 
born October 30, 1705, and died in 1785. He was a member of 
the House of Burgesses from Goochland County during several 
sessions, from 1761 to 1765. He married Anna Fleming, daugh- 
ter of Tarleton Fleming, Sr. Their son, William Payne, born 
February 10, 1732, and died March 2, 1822, married Mary Bar- 
rett, and of their nine children one was Col. James Payne, born 
April 2, 1762. Col. James Payne married Frances Dix, and the 
fourth among their eight children was Frances M. Payne. 

Frances M. Payne, born February 8, 1791, and died Decem- 
ber 14, 1873, became the wife of Capt. William Flanagan, of 
Fluvanna County. Their daughter, Lucy Maria Flanagan, born 
February 1, 1830, was the mother of Mrs. Ramos. William 
Payne, the great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Ramos, was com- 
missioned a first lieutenant in Virginia troops March 22, 1776. 
Capt. William Flanagan was captain of Buford's Company of 
Militia in the War of 1812. 

Of the three children of Mrs. Ramos the oldest is John Page, 
who married Pattie Haskins, of Mecklenburg County, and their 
two children are John Page, Jr., and Nathaniel Haskins. The 



VIRGINIA 123 

daughter Maria Vieria, now Mrs. W. R. Jones, is a graduate of 
Miss Coleman's School of Richmond. The third child is Jose 
Berrian Ramos. 

The records of the Pension Bureau at Washington supply 
some further information concerning Captain Flanagan. He 
enlisted October 28, 1814, and was in service until January 13, 
1815. His application for a pension was allowed January 18, 
1872, when he was ninety years of age. He was born in Louisa 
County, Virginia, son of James Flanagan, whose first wife was 
Phoebe Simpson, and his second wife was the widow Mary 
Bowles Johnson. William Flanagan married in December, 1809, 
Sarah Curd Johnson, who died May 10, 1859, and his second 
wife was Anne E. Hughson, daughter of James and Mary 
Hughson. 

Edward Roberts Johnson, president of the Roanoke Securi- 
ties Corporation, has made his home at Roanoke almost continu- 
ously since he was fifteen years of age, at which time his father, 
the late Lucius E. Johnson, located at Roanoke to begin a service 
of more than twenty years as general superintendent and after- 
wards as general manager and president of the Norfolk & West- 
ern Railway Company. In transportation, industrial and finan- 
cial affairs hardly any name in the present century has been 
accorded more prestige in Virginia than that of Johnson. 

Lucius E. Johnson was born at Aurora, Illinois, April 13, 
1846, son of J. Spencer and Eliza (Brown) Johnson. He was 
educated in public schools, served during the concluding months 
of the Civil war in Company C, One Hundred and Thirty-second 
Illinois Infantry, and in 1866 was working as a locomotive fire- 
man, with headquarters at Aurora, the division point of the 
Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway. He was with that com- 
pany, vdth headquarters at Aurora, for twenty years, rising to 
the position of master mechanic. In 1886 he was made superin- 
tendent of the Saint Louis Division of the Burlington System, 
two years later became superintendent of the Chicago Division, 
from 1890 to 1893 was superintendent of the Montana Central 
Railway, and from 1893 to 1897, superintendent of the Michigan 
Division of the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern, New York 
Central Lines, located at Toledo, Ohio. 

On July 10, 1897, Lucius E. Johnson became a resident of 
Roanoke, having been called to the important responsibilities 
of the office of general superintendent of the Norfolk & Western, 
which at that time was in its formative stage of development as 
one of the great industrial railway systems of the East. As a 
practical railroad executive no man impressed his abilities more 
thoroughly on this system than Lucius E. Johnson. In 1899 he 
became vice president and general manager, on October 1, 1903, 
was elected president of the company, and on resigning that 
office January 1, 1918, was chosen chairman of the Board of 
Directors. From June 1, 1918, until March 1, 1920, during the 
United States Railroad administration, he was again president 
of the corporation, after which he resumed his post as chaii-man 
of the Board of Directors. Lucius E. Johnson died February 11, 
1921. 

An appreciation of what he did as a railroad man, particu- 
larly for the Norfolk & Western, is contained in the following 
paragraph : "Mr. Johnson came to the Norfolk & Western with 
a splendid reputation as a practical railroad executive. That 



124 VIRGINIA 

reputation was greatly enhanced during his management of 
the Norfolk & Western. His administration wrought a great 
improvement in physical condition, increase of equipment, and 
betterment of its general transportation facilities and service. 
His mastery of the many technical problems involved in railroad 
operation enabled him to devise and put in force plans that 
placed every department in position to meet the requirements of 
a traffic, the continued growth of which has been one of the most 
remarkable in the railroad history of the country. An important 
direct result of this efficient management was the improvement 
of the financial status of the Norfolk & Western from year to 
year until its stock came to be regarded as one of the best rail- 
road securities in the United States. The Norfolk & Western 
was rendering efficient service not only from the technical 
operating standpoint, but as head of the company Mr. Johnson 
succeeded in developing a most cordial feeling between the 
public and the railway management, this factor of good-will 
being hardly less valuable to a transportation company than the 
more tangible asset." 

Lucius E. Johnson married, April 10, 1869, Miss Ella Parker, 
of Aurora, Illinois, and they both lived to celebrate their golden 
wedding anniversary. The two sons of the marriage were 
George P. and Edward Roberts Johnson. 

Edward Roberts Johnson was born at Aurora, Illinois, Sep- 
tember 10, 1882, and acquired his early education in public 
schools in that city, in Helena and Great Falls, Montana, at 
Toledo, Ohio, and after coming to Roanoke was a student in the 
Allegheny Institute of that city. He had a thorough technical 
education in Purdue University at Lafayette, Indiana. After 
his university career he was with the traffic department of the 
Norfolk & Western Railway at Suffolk, Virginia, resigning to 
engage in the coal business. From 1906 to 1910 he was vice 
president of the H. T. Wilson Coal Company at Detroit, and 
from 1911 to 1913 was president of the Borderland Coal Sales 
Company of Cincinnati. He became general manager of the 
Virginia Supply Company at Roanoke in 1914, and in 1917 was 
elected president of the company. Mr. Johnson is identified 
with other important interests and is a director in the Walker 
Machine and Foundry Company, the Securities Insurance Cor- 
poration and the Johnson-Carper Furniture Company. He served 
as president of the Roanoke Rotary Club from July 1, 1927, to 
June 30, 1928. He was president of the Roanoke Chamber of 
Commerce for 1928. 

On account of his experience as a practical traffic man he 
was in a position to render special service of great value to the 
Government during the World war. On May 20, 1918, he was 
appointed fuel expert. Quartermaster Corps, as a dollar a year 
man; June 25, 1918, was commissioned captain. Quartermaster 
Corps, in charge of coal procurement branch, raw materials 
division; August 1, 1918, was made executive officer, raw ma- 
terials division; October 17, 1918, was commissioned major. 
Quartermaster Corps ; December 14, 1918, was made chief, raw 
materials division ; and was given his honorable discharge 
April 3, 1919. In the early months of the war he was employed 
under the auspices of the Young Men's Christian Association 
War Council at Atlanta, Georgia, and Camp Lee, Virginia. 

Mr. Johnson organized in 1921 Johnson, Brown and Com- 
pany, which subsequently became the Roanoke Securities Corpo- 



VIRGINIA 125 

ration, of which he has since been president. He is also a direc- 
tor of the National Exchange Bank of Roanoke. Mr. Johnson 
is a Republican, member of the Phi Delta Theta college fra- 
ternity, is a Royal Arch, Council and Knight Templar York Rite 
Mason, also a Scottish Rite IMason and Shriner. He is a member 
of the Shenandoah Club, Roanoke Country Club, has served on 
the Official Board of the Greene Memorial Methodist Church and 
as president of the Roanoke Y. M. C. A. 

He married at Toledo, Ohio, January 16, 1905, Miss Edith 
Grace Carson, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Carson. They 
have two children, Lucius C. and Ruth Johnson. 

Rev. William Fred Locke is a gifted minister of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, South, known and loved in many commu- 
nities, not only in Virginia but in Maryland and elsewhere. 

His present pastorate is the Green Memorial Church at 
Roanoke, Virginia. Rev. Mr. Locke was born at Charles Town, 
West Virginia, in 1865, son of Thomas and Esther (Locke) 
Locke. Both parents were natives of Virginia and his father 
was a merchant and later a farmer. They were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the father was a 
Democrat and a Mason. Of their eight children one son, Wil-. 
liam S., was killed at Ashland during the Civil war. Three are 
now living: Dr. T. F. Locke, a dentist at Woodstock, Virginia; 
Mrs. Sudie E. Lloyd, of Charles Town, West Virginia; and Wil- 
liam F. 

William F. Locke attended the Charles Town High School, 
continued his education in an academy conducted by Captain 
Cabell, and was also under the instruction of his brother, Austin 
M. Locke, a graduate of the University of Virginia. At an 
early age he began his studies preparatory for the ministry and 
was ordained in 1892. His first church was in the Springfield 
Circuit. For three years he was pastor at Piedmont, West Vir- 
ginia, for two years had charge of St. James Church at Roanoke, 
and for four years was at Washington, D. C, with the Marvin 
Church. He was pastor three years at Front Royal, at Rock- 
ville, Maryland, at Mount Vernon Place Church in Washington 
three years, spent four years at IMartinsburg, West Virginia, 
four years at Lexington, Virginia, six years in Baltimore, and 
five years at Fredericksburg, Virginia, and in October, 1927. 
was assigned pastoral duties with the Green Memorial Church 
at Roanoke, Virginia. 

Rev. Mr. Locke married, in 1893, Daise E. Jamesson, who 
was born at Westernport, Maryland, and was educated in the 
Western Female Institute at Staunton, Virginia. They have one 
daughter, Dorothy Jamesson. 

Rev. Mr. Locke is a York Rite Mason and Shriner, being a 
past master of the lodge at Front Royal. He also belongs to 
the B. P. 0. Elks, is a Rotarian and a member of the Kiwanis 
Club. 

William F. Lawrence in his business career belonged to the 
Richmond of both ante-bellum as well as post-bellum times. He 
was one of the noteworthy men of his generation, and among 
other services to his credit was his record as a soldier of the 
Confederacy. 

He was born in Henrico County July 4, 1830, and died at 
Richmond December 28. 1908, at the age of seventy-eight. His 
parents were William and Susanne (Ford) Lawrence, his father 



126 VIRGINIA 

having been identified with planting and farming in Henrico 
County. 

William F. Lawrence, oldest son of his parents, was educated 
in schools in Henrico County, grew up on a farm and plantation, 
and worked there until he took up a business career at Rich- 
mond. As a clerk he learned the grocery trade, and about 1858 
engaged in the business on his own account. He left this when 
the war broke out and had three years of service with the Vir- 
ginia troops, serving in a regiment of cavalry. 

At the close of the war he returned to Richmond and re- 
opened a grocery store at Graham and Broad streets. At that 
time Richmond was under military rule, and he did an extensive 
business with the Northern soldiers who were camped in Monroe 
Park, across the street from his store. About 1874 he retired 
from merchandising, and gave his chief attention to the owner- 
ship and management of valuable parcels of real estate he 
owned in the business district, much of it on Broad Street, his 
keen knowledge in values bringing him a substantial fortune. 
He was always a Democrat in politics but never sought political 
preferment. 

Mr. Lawrence first married Virginia Schumaker, who died 
in 1885, leaving no children. On March 6, 1895, he married 
Arlie R. Taylor, who survives him and resides at 22 North 
Boulevard. Mrs. Lawrence is a daughter of W. T. and Julia R. 
(Ford) Taylor. Her father was an early day merchant in 
Richmond, conducting a general store. Mrs. Lawrence was the 
oldest child of her parents. Her brother, W. T. Taylor, became 
a Richmond merchant and married Hattie Bowles. Her sister 
Kate Jane is now Mrs. C. M. Waldrop. Her brother Charles L. 
is deceased. Mrs. Lawrence's father served as a courier in the 
Confederate army and was once wounded in action. 

Mrs. Lawrence became the mother of four children, the old- 
est, William F., being now deceased. Henry J. is a graduate of 
the University of Virginia and a successful architect at Hous- 
ton, Texas; he married Helen Brook. Virginia C. Lawrence is 
the wife of J. C. Watson, secretary and treasurer of the Fire and 
Marine Insurance Company of Virginia, and has a daughter, 
Jeanne. Walter L. Lawrence, an employe of the State of Vir- 
ginia, married Louise Boschen, daughter of Louis Boschen, a 
former member of the Virginia House of Delegates. 

John E. Topping both as a Doctor of Dental Surgery and as 
a business man and citizen has made himself a popular and 
prominent factor in the citizenship of Roanoke. 

Doctor Topping was born in Middlesex County, Virginia, in 
1886, son of F. E. and Mary F. (Purcell) Topping, both natives 
of the same county, and grandson of Edward Topping and John 
Purcell, likewise natives of Middlesex County and farmers and 
planters of that region. Doctor Topping's parents both died in 
1925. His father was a substantial farmer and for twelve 
years held the office of sheriff of Middlesex County. They were 
members of the Baptist Church and he belonged to the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. 

John E. Topping was third in a family of five children. He 
grew up on the home farm in Middlesex County, attended public 
schools there and for three years acted as quartermaster on a 
boat on the Chesapeake Bay. He left that to study dentistry, 
paying most of his expenses while he studied. He took his 
degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery at the Baltimore Medical 




C^<^i^&::^. 



VIRGINIA 127 

College, which is now the Maryland University, in 1913. Doc- 
tor Topping for several years practiced at Fincastle and in 1917 
located at Roanoke. He performs the general service of a well 
trained and capable dentist. In addition he is vice president of 
the Rutrough-Gilbert Motor Company, Incorporated, one of the 
largest and finest sales and service stations in Southwest Vir- 
ginia. 

Doctor Topping married, in 1921, Miss Jamie Arline Wilhoit, 
who was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, and was educated 
at Bedford and in North Carolina and taught before her mar- 
riage. Doctor and Mrs. Topping attend the Calvary Baptist 
Church. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner and is direc- 
tor of the Degree Team of the Shrine. He belongs to the Xi Si 
Psi dental fraternity and the B. P. 0. Elks. 

David P. Sites. Strength of purpose, intelligently directed, 
results in almost every case in material advancement. The man 
who fluctuates from one line of endeavor to another seldom 
achieves lasting success. It is the man who, knowing well 
what he desires to accomplish, forges ahead, undeterred by 
obstacles, undismayed by the chances and changes of life, until 
he reaches his ultimate goal. It sometimes happens that in his 
enthusiastic endeavors he sacrifices health and strength and is 
gathered to his forefathers before his time, but even then in the 
brief span of years he has accomplished more than one who is 
content to sit still and idly watch the army of workers pass by. 
No man can reach heights of prosperity through his own efi'orts 
if he shirks duty or seeks to lay upon other shoulders the respon- 
sibilities belonging to him. Centers of indu.stry develop men of 
large affairs, for competition acts as a stimulus to action and 
brings forth the best in a man, and so it is that David P. Sites, 
secretary and treasurer of Caldwell-Sites Company, Incorpo- 
rated, wholesale and retail booksellers, stationers, paper dealers 
and office outfitters, has achieved a solid success in the work for 
which he is fitted and to which he has given his attention since 
1897, or for more than thirty years. 

David P. Sites was born in Rockingham County, Virginia, 
April 20, 1870, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Helbei't) Sites, 
both of whom were born in Rockingham County, and are now 
deceased. For many years the father was a cabinet maker and 
farmer, and worked very successfully at his trade. During the 
war between the states he served as a brave and valorous soldier 
of the Confederacy. Of the four children born to him and his 
wife David P. Sites is the third in order of birth. Both parents 
were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and 
the mother was always active in its good work. 

After he had attended the common schools of his native 
county David P. Sites became a student of Cedar Grove Semi- 
nary and still later of Dunsmore College, Saunton, Virginia. For 
a time he worked as a stenographer for the general passenger 
agent of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in Washington, D. C, 
until he could get a start, and then, in 1897, coming to Roanoke, 
established a wholesale and retail book and stationery store, 
which from somewhat small beginnings he has built up to one 
of the largest concerns of its kind in this part of the state, and 
gives employment to forty people. The business is conducted 
under the name of Caldwell-Sites Company, Incorporated, of 
which C. R. Caldwell is president and David P. Sites is secretary 



128 VIRGINIA 

and treasurer. Mr. Sites is the active head of the business, as 
Mr. Caldwell is a resident of Staunton. 

In 1896 Mr. Sites married Miss Christine Harman, a daugh- 
ter of John and Elizabeth Harman. Two children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Sites, namely: Elizabeth, who married 
Gordon B. Macke, of Washington, D. C, an operator in tobacco; 
and Henry G., who is manager of the wholesale paper depart- 
ment of his father's company. Mr. Sites is an Episcopalian, and 
is serving his church as a vestryman. He belongs to the Roanoke 
Rotary Club, of which he is a past president, and served Rotary 
International as governor of the Fourth District, consisting of 
Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. He is a member 
of the Roanoke Country Club, and he has been president of the 
Roanoke Chamber of Commerce and of the Retail Merchants 
Association. He was the first president of the Lee Highway 
Association that sponsored Lee Highway, the transcontinental 
highway from Washington, D. C, to San Diego, California. Dur- 
ing the World war he served as chairman of Unessential Indus- 
tries in the district and was chairman of Virginia State Smileage 
Committee. At present he is a vice president and chairman of 
the board of the Mountain Trust Bank, and is on the directorate 
of several other banking concerns. Starting out in life as a 
poor boy, his advance has been steady and has come as a result 
of his own untiring industry and good management. At differ- 
ent times he has held the office of chairman of committees 
appointed to advance this locality. In fact it would be difficult 
to find a man more generally representative of the best interests 
of this section of the South than he. 

Daniel Robert Hunt. One of the most important offices in 
the government of any large and growing municipality is that 
of the city commissioner of revenue. This is a post that de- 
mands the utmost accuracy, the highest ability and the strictest 
integrity in order that the business of the city, as pertaining to 
this department, may move with the smoothness of well-oiled 
machinery. The City of Roanoke, therefore, is to be congratu- 
lated as possessing for the incumbent of this office such an able, 
energetic and honorable man as Daniel Robert Hunt, a resident 
of the city for thirty-three years, who has held his present office 
since 1913, it being a notable fact that he has had no opposition 
at the polls during the last four elections. 

Mr. Hunt was born October 8, 1876, at Chatham, Pittsylvania 
County, Virginia, and is a son of Daniel Robert and Emma 
(Mebane) Hunt, the former a native of Pittsylvania County and 
the latter of the State of North Carolina. The parents of Mr. 
Hunt were both active members of the Presbyterian Church, 
and his father, who was a merchant at Chatham for many years, 
was a Mason fraternally and a Democrat in his political convic- 
tions. There were six children in the family, of whom Daniel 
Robert was the fifth in order of birth, and one child is deceased. 

Daniel R. Hunt attended the public schools of Henry County 
and Ruffner Institute, but was only eleven years of age when he 
started to work in a tobacco factory. Following this for two 
years he worked on a farm in North Carolina, where he lived 
with an elder brother, Frank D. Hunt, a preacher of the Presby- 
terian faith. Following this he went to Charlotte, North Caro- 
lina, where he was employed on a farm for four years, and in 
1895 came to Roanoke, which has since been his home and the 



VIRGINIA 129 

scene of his unqualified success. At the time of his arrival he 
secured a modest position in the general offices of the Norfolk & 
Western Railway, and continued with that company for a period 
of eighteen years, during which time he rose steadily by reason 
of ability, great industry and fidelity until finally he was second 
in charge of the claim department of the auditor's office. He 
was holding this position in 1913 when he was elected city com- 
missioner of revenue, a position which he still retains by virtue 
of four reelections, all without opposition in his party. Mr. 
Hunt has long been active in local Democratic politics and in 
movements which have contributed to the material welfare of 
his adopted community. In 1926, with C. H. Morrissett and 
J. Vaughan Gary, he was appointed by Governor Byrd to codify 
the tax laws of Virginia, this being one of the most progressive 
features of Governor Byrd's administration. Mr. Hunt is a 
member and elder of the Raleigh Court Presbyterian Church and 
teacher of a class in the Sunday School. Fraternally he is a 
York and Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, belongs to the 
Knights of Pythias and is a life member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He likewise holds membership in the 
Improved Order of Red Men, the Shenandoah Club, the Kiwanis 
Club and the Billy Sunday Club, and is a sociable man who en- 
joys the companionship of his fellows. 

In 1922 Mr. Hunt was united in marriage with Miss Doris 
Huff", who was born in Floyd County, Virginia, and educated in 
the public schools of Roanoke and at HoUins College, where she, 
carried off high honors. Prior to her marriage Mrs. Hunt 
taught in the public schools of Roanoke for several years. She 
is active in the social life of the city and a helpful member of the 
Raleigh Court Presbyterian Church. > 

Sylvester K. Bitterman. The wonderful growth in realty 
values in Roanoke during the past decade has brought to the 
forefront a class of men who for general ability, astuteness and 
driving force are unsurpassed in the annals of trade in this sec- 
tion. It may be well to say that conditions develop men, but it 
is better to say that men bring about conditions. Roanoke owes 
what it is today to the men who have had the courage to per- 
severe, to act wisely and keep their operations clean in one of 
the most difficult fields of endeavor. Each section of the city 
can boast of a business man who has been practically its builder, 
and in the Church Avenue neighborhood is to be found Sylvester 
K. Bitterman, whose name is nearly as familiar as the proverbial 
household word. Since 1916 he has been operating in real 
estate with remarkable success. Starting out in life a poor 
boy, conditions of their own accord did not favor him ; he made 
them what he wished them to be. 

Sylvester K. Bitterman was born in Pennsylvania, August 1, 
1864, a son of John and Harriet (Kehler) Bitterman, both of 
whom were born in Pennsylvania, but are now deceased. For 
many years the father was engaged in business in the Mahan- 
tango Valley, but died in 1865. The mother survived him for 
many years, passing away in 1926, aged eighty-four years. They 
had two children : Ellsworth, who is living retired in Pennsyl- 
vania, and Sylvester K., who is the younger. 

The parents were conscientious members of the Evangelical 
Church, in which they took an active part, and they were held 
in high esteem by all who knew them. The paternal grand- 
father was John Bitterman, a native of Germany, who came to 



130 VIRGINIA 

this country in young manhood, settled in Pennsylvania, and 
there, through his industry and thrift, became a prosperous 
farmer and highly respected citizen. 

Sylvester K. Bitterman was educated in the public schools of 
Pennsylvania, and was early taught to work hard and save a 
portion of what he earned. His first business life came through 
his connection with the butchering industry, first in Pennsyl- 
vania and later in McDowell County, West Virginia, and later in 
Roanoke, to which latter community he came in 1886. After a 
short time spent in the city he went to West Virginia, but re- 
turned to Roanoke in 1889, and here he has since remained. 
From 1893 to 1916 he was in the retail liquor business, but in the 
latter year he went into the real estate field, in which, as already 
stated, he has been so strikingly successful. 

In 1883 Mr. Bitterman married Miss Sallie E. Umlauf, who 
was born in Pennsylvania, and they became the parents of seven 
children, of whom five survive, namely : Sylvia, who is unmar- 
ried ; Myrtle, who married Henry Scholz, a theatre manager ; 
Edna, who married J. C. Johnson, Jr., of Roanoke, chief clerk in 
the motor power office; Virdie, who is a student at Beaver Col- 
lege, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; and Margaret, who is also in 
the same college. Mr. Bitterman belongs to Christ Episcopal 
Church, and is active in church work. He is a life member of 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and of the Frater- 
nal Order of Eagles. In addition to his extensive real estate 
operations and holdings Mr. Bitterman has other interests, and 
is a director and vice president of the Roanoke Industrial Loan 
Corporation. A man of many charities, he seldom lets the world 
know his benefactions, but his kindly heart can never let a case 
of destitution go unrelieved. His advice is oftentimes sought, 
for his sound judgment and knowledge of men and the motives 
which influence them are recognized, and it would be difficult to 
find one who is more closely identified with the progress of 
events than he. 

Charles M. Broun. It is sometimes found that efi'orts die 
away and enterprise becomes engulfed in inertia when the in- 
dividual gains his desired goal, while, on the other hand, the 
chances for successful attainment continually encourage the 
exercise of perseverance and energy. In almost every case 
those who have reached the highest positions in public confi- 
dence and esteem and who are accounted among the most in- 
fluential in business and professional lines are those whose lives 
have been devoted, without cessation, to deep study and close 
application. It is probable that the law has been the main high- 
way by which more men of merit have advanced to prominence 
and position in the United States than any other road, and it 
is not unusual to find among the leading citizens of a community 
a legal practitioner. To respond to the call of the law, to devote 
every energy in this direction, to broaden and deepen every 
highway of knowledge, and finally to enter upon this chosen 
career and finds its rewards worth while — such has been the 
happy experience of Charles M. Broun, one of the learned legal- 
ists practicing at the bar of Roanoke. Mr. Broun has gained 
honor and position in his profession through the application of 
honesty, energy, perseverance, conscientiousness and self- 
reliance, and has kept abreast of his calling in its constant ad- 
vancement; but it is not alone as a lawyer that he is known to 



VIRGINIA 131 

the people of his city, for he has also attained to distinction in 
politics, is interested in business enterprises, and, perhaps, best 
of all, gives freely of his time and money in promoting religious 
and charitable movements. 

Charles M. Broun was born in Middleburg, Loudoun County, 
Virginia, July 14, 1862, a son of Dr. James Conway and Ann 
Rebecca (McCormick) Broun, natives of Virginia, he born in 
Loudoun County and she in Clarke County. A physician, Doc- 
tor Broun received his professional training in the University 
of Virginia, and was engaged in the practice of his calling in 
Middleburg and Alexandria, Virginia. During the war between 
the states he served in the Confederate army, but, contracting 
a cold because of exposure, was stricken and died in 1864, leav- 
ing two children, of whom Charles M. Broun is now the only 
survivor. He and his wife, also deceased, were members of the 
Episcopal Church, and he was a Mason. 

First attending the Shenandoah Academy, Charles M. Broun 
later became a student of the Kanawha Military Institute, 
Charleston, West Virginia, and took his professional training in 
the law department of the University of Virginia. His first 
experience in legal practice was gained in Berryville, Virginia, 
and he continued a resident of that community until 1908, during 
which period he steadily advanced in public confidence, and then 
came to Koanoke, and, forming the connection he now maintains, 
is engaged in a very large practice under the iirm name of Broun 
& Price, with offices in the American National Bank Building. 

In 1900 Mr. Broun married Miss Elizabeth Rice Page, who 
was born in Berryville, Virginia, and there educated. Two chil- 
dren have been born of this marriage : Charles Conway, and 
Elizabeth Page, the son attending Roanoke College at Salem and 
the daughter, a pri\ate school in Roanoke City. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Broun are members of the Episcopal Church, of which he 
was a vestryman for many years at Berryville, Virginia. He is 
a past master of Treadwell Lodge, A. F. and A. M., of Berry- 
ville, and he belongs to Pleasant Lodge, A. F. and A. M., of 
Roanoke. Mr. Broun is also a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, tiie Roanoke Country Club and the 
Shenandoah Club. For some years he served as commonwealth 
attorney of Clarke County, being elected on the Democratic 
ticket, and after coming to Roanoke he served as president of 
the Board of Aiderman and mayor of the city. In fact he has 
always been active in the Democratic party, and one of the local 
leaders. Several years ago he organized the National Theati-e 
Corporation, of which he is president. He is vice president of 
the Sun Investment Company and of the Consolidated Ice Com- 
panies, and president of the General Finance Small Loan Cor- 
poration. While stid living in Berryville he organized the First 
National Bank of that town, and was its first president. An- 
other enterprise in which he is largely interested is a power plant 
near Roanoke for the deve.opment of electric powar, and his 
assistance is given to many other undertakings, for he is a man 
who believes in encouraging local enterprise, and proves it by 
investing his money at home. Beginning life with nothing, all 
that he has today has been earned by him in a legitimate way 
and his material success has been accompanied by the approval 
and warm friendship of all with whom he has been associated. 



132 VIRGINIA 

John C. Burks, M. D. In noting the representative men 
of Roanoke County, a prominent one in medical science is found 
in Dr. John C. Burks, able and experienced physician and sur- 
geon at Roanoke, where he is director and chief surgeon of St. 
Charles Hospital, with which institution he has been identified 
for sixteen years. Doctor Burks has reached high place in his 
profession, and has won confidence, consideration and esteem 
throughout a wide area of his native state. 

Dr. John C. Burks was born in 1873, in Rockbridge County, 
Virginia, son of Dr. Charles Richard and Frances (Stoner) 
Burks, both of whom were born also in Rockbridge County, 
where their families had been early settlers and once owners of 
large estates. Dr. Charles Richard Burks, whose memory in 
Rockbridge County as honorable man and faithful physician is 
still preserved although many years have gone by since he 
passed away, was born in 1833, in Rockbridge County, Virginia, 
where he received his early schooling. As a student of medicine 
he spent one year in the Medical College of Virginia, and then 
entered Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
where he completed his course and from which he was gradu- 
ated with his degree. His life was one of faithful devotion to 
his profession, both before and after the war between the states, 
in which he played no insignificant part, being attached during 
the entire period to the command of Gen. James E. Stuart, Con- 
federate army, and took part as a cavalryman in the first battle 
of Bull Run, and participated later at Chancellorsville and at 
Gettysburg. For some years he resided at Buffalo Forge and 
then moved to Natural Bridge, where, until his death in 1904, 
he carried on a large practice, both local and beyond, the number 
of his patients being yearly augmented by tourists from all over 
the world who came to view, wonder and admire one of Amer- 
ica's most beautiful and picturesque regions. To his marriage 
with Miss Frances Stoner, who survived until 1916, four sons 
and four daughters were born, John C. being second in order of 
birth, and all were reared in the faith of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

John C. Burks received his early educational training in the 
public schools, later attended Fancy Hill Academy, and then, 
whether influenced by heredity or not. Doctor Burks is the one 
qualified to decide, he needed no urging to enter the Medical 
College of Virginia to prepare for a future career. From this 
well known institution he was most creditably graduated in 
1897, and shortly afterward established himself in medical 
practice at Glasgow, Virginia, and practiced there and at Poca- 
hontas until 1900, when he came to Roanoke, his object being a 
wider field of professional opportunity and the scientific advan- 
tages close at hand in a large city. 

Doctor Burks' judgment was not at fault. Upon locating at 
Roanoke he entered into partnership with Dr. C. G. Cannedy, 
with whom he continued until the latter's death in 1908, after 
which he operated the Rebecca Hospital until 1912. In the 
meanwhile, through further intensive scientific study, together 
with attendance on numerous and important clinics in the great 
medical centers of the country and Canada, Doctor Burks had 
not only kept thoroughly abreast of the times in medical dis- 
covery, but had through personal investigation of many hos- 
pitals, both great and small, been able to plan satisfactorily the 
present St. Charles Hospital at Roanoke, which he built in 1912, 
and of which he has been chief surgeon ever since. At that time 




Idy^c^ 



VIRGINIA 133 

considered a model institution, later discoveries in mechanics 
have been taken advantage of and modern conveniences have 
been increased, and perhaps no city hospital of its size in the 
state offers better accommodation to the ill and afflicted or more 
reasonable expectancy of relief. Doctor Burks maintains thirty- 
three beds in the hospital and his patients come from all over 
the country. 

Doctor Burks married Miss Lelia McCorkle, daughter of 
Dr. George B. McCorkle, a physician practicing at Covington 
and Glasgow, Virginia. Mrs. Burks, beloved by all who knew 
her, and a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church, passed 
away at Roanoke in January, 1927, leaving no issue. 

Professionally connected with such organizations as the Vir- 
ginia State Medical Society and the American Medical Associa- 
tion, Doctor Burks has a wide and appreciative acquaintance. 
He is a Scottish Rite Mason and a Shriner, belongs to the Elks 
and the Shenandoah Club, and since boyhood has belonged to the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Daniel Sayler Good. To succeed as a member of the 
Roanoke bar requires more than ordinary ability which has been 
carefully trained along the lines of the legal profession, as well 
as a vast fund of general information and keen judgment with 
regard to men and their motives. In a city oijthe size of Roan- 
oke there is so much competition ; events crqWd each other ; 
circumstances play so important a part in the shaping of events, 
that the lawyer has to be a man capable of grasping affairs with 
a competent hand to effect satisfactory results. Among those who 
have won enviable distinction as a member of the legal pro- 
fession of this city is Daniel Sayler Good, with oflfcffes "ah the 
Mountain Trust Bank Building. He was born in ShenaiftloaH 
County, Virginia, January 16, 1865, a son of Samuel and S^^a^i 
(Wampler) Good, both of whom were born in Rockirr£*:RSra 
County, Virginia, where they were reared. Mr. H^ood ;i^'t/f 
German descent but nevertheless tried to enlist in the late World 
war but was rejected on account of age limit. He did, howev4^ 
enlist and served in Company A of Joe Lane Stern Battalion bf 
Virginia Volunteers, Wm. S. Mounfield captain and R. F. Taylor 
being the major of the four Roanoke companies, A, B, C and D, 
and was honorably discharged when this company was merged 
with the National Guard. 

His paternal ancester located in Pennsylvania according to 
a strong family tradition and had three sons, one of whom re- 
mained in Pennsylvania, another went West and the third came 
to Virginia. 

William Good, the great-great-grandfather of the subject of 
this review, bought land in Dunmore, now Shenandoah County, 
Virginia, as early as May, 1772. Said William Good's eldest 
child was named Jacob and his youngest child was named 
Susanna, who married David Kaufmann, who served in the War 
of 1812. The said Jacob Good has a number of children : the 
younger also being named Jacob was the grandfather of the 
subject of this review. He married a young widow named 
Susanna Silvius, whose maiden name was Myers (sometimes 
spelled Moyers). The said widow had one son, Jacob, by her 
first marriage, and Samuel Good, the father of the subject of 
this review was her first child by this second marriage. The 
father Samuel was a farmer all of his life, and was a Democrat, 



134 VIRGINIA 

and served as road commissioner of Shenandoah County, to 
which locality he and his wife moved after their marriage, buy- 
ing a farm near New Market, on which both of them passed 
away. They are buried in Cedar Grove Cemetery in that neigh- 
borhood. For many years they were members of the German 
Baptist Brethren Church. Of their twelve children, ten lived 
to reach maturity, and of them all Daniel Sayler was the eighth 
in order of birth. The paternal grandfather of Attorney Good 
was Jacob Good, a farmer and wagonmaker, who married 
Susanna Silvius, as above stated. Both of them were born in 
Shenandoah County, Virginia. The maternal grandparents, 
John and Mary (Cline) Wampler, were both born near Timber- 
ville, Rockingham County, Virginia, and he was also a farmer 
by occupation. 

Daniel Sayler Good attended the public schools of Virginia, 
and had a short course in the Polytechnic Institute, New Market, 
Virginia. Later he took a special course at Woodstock under 
J. Monroe Hottel and Worth Logan, as well as several courses 
at different normal schools, all being preparatory to entering 
the George Peabody College for Teachers, Nashville, Tennessee, 
from which he was graduated with the degree of Licentiate of 
Instruction, in 1887. That summer he taught grammar and pen- 
manship in the State Normal school of Strasburg, Virginia. Dur- 
ing 1887 and 1888 he was principal of the graded schools of New 
Market, and during the summer of the latter year he conducted 
a summer normal school at New Market. With that work con- 
cluded, in the fall of 1888 Mr. Good came to Roanoke, and en- 
tered the law offices of Griffin & Watts, where he read law, and 
during the summer session of 1890, attended the Law School 
of the University of Virginia, where he was under the preceptor- 
ship of John B. Minor, studying to such purpose that he was 
admitted to the bar in 1890, and established himself in a prac- 
tice in Roanoke which he is still continuing with marked success. 

Mr. Good is unmarried. He is a member of Calvary Baptist 
Church, and is secretary of the elementary department of the 
Sunday school. For years he has belonged to the Knights of 
Pythias, and he is a member of the Roanoke Country Club. 
Always interested in politics, he is a staunch Democrat, and, 
although never aspiring to office, preferring to work in behalf 
of his friends, he was alternate to the convention that nominated 
Charles T. O'Ferrell for governor of Virginia ; and a delegate 
to the convention that nominated Governor Montague and Lieut.- 
Gov. Joseph E. Willard, the latter being a former law classmate 
of Mr. Good. He has also served as delegate to other state con- 
ventions, and was a delegate to the State Convention that elected 
delegates to the National Convention that first nominated Wood- 
row Wilson for the presidency and was a delegate to the State 
Convention held at Norfolk, that chose the delegates to the 
National Convention of 1924. Mr. Good has real estate holdings, 
as well as other local interests, which, together with his law 
practice, take up his time and attention. 

He is a member of the Roanoke Chamber of Commerce and 
the Roanoke and the American Bar Associations. Essentially a 
self-made man, Mr. Good has every reason to be proud of what 
he has accomplished. His schooling was paid for by him, his 
course at George Peabody being paid for in part by a scholar- 
ship he won, and he has never ceased his interest in that body. 
Upon the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary he represented his 



VIRGINIA 135 

class, and was historian of his class in 1909, when a directory 
of the alumni was published. When the drive for $20,000,000 
endowment was made in 1926 in behalf of the college, he was 
local representative in Roanoke, and more than filled his quota. 
A man of distinction, learned, able, public-spirited, the personal 
friend of the great men of the state, Mr. Good occupies a high 
position, not only at the bar, but in his community, and confers 
honor upon whatever project he undertakes. 

Waddie Pennington Jackson is a physician at Roanoke, 
specializing in internal medicines, and his attainments and serv- 
ice have such as to give him a steadily mounting reputation all 
over Southwest Virginia. 

Doctor Jackson was born at South Hill, Mecklenburg County, 
Virginia, February 18, 1888, son of Thomas J. and Elva 
(Ogburn) Jackson, natives of the same county. His grand- 
father, William Green Jackson, was a Mecklenburg soldier of the 
Confederacy, being a captain and later colonel, and was all 
through the war, though once captured in battle. The maternal 
grandfather of Doctor Jackson was Benjamin W. Ogburn, of 
Mecklenburg County. He was a graduate of Randolph-Macon 
College and for several years president of the Girls' School at 
Danville, Virginia. Doctor Jackson's parents were well-to-do 
farming people in Mecklenburg County, members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal Church, South. Of their four children three are 
living: William Green, a merchant at Lawrenceville, Virginia; 
Julian A., a farmer at Baskerville ; and Doctor Jackson. 

Doctor Jackson attended high school at South Hill, graduated 
from Randolph-Macon Academy at Bedford in 1907 and from 
Randolph-Macon College at Ashland in 1910. After graduating 
from college he had to earn his own living, and during the sev- 
eral years before he was ready to enter medical college he en- 
gaged in teaching. He began his medical studies in Johns Hop- 
kins University at Baltimore, where he was graduated in 1917 
and during summer vacations had also taken additional work at 
the University of Michigan and Columbia University. After 
graduating he enrolled in the United States Navy, served on the 
U. S. S'. Galveston and later was attached to the Naval Base 
Hospital at Hampton Roads, Virginia, until 1919. After the 
war and after being put on the inactive list Doctor Jackson spent 
a year in post-graduate work at Johns Hopkins University. 
Few doctors begin their careers with a more thorough training 
and ample preparation than Doctor Jackson. He located at 
Roanoke October 25, 1920. He is a member of the Roanoke 
Academy of Medicine, the Medical Society of Virginia, the South- 
west Virginia, Southern and American Medical Associations and 
is an associate member of the American College of Physicians. 
He belongs to the Phi Chi medical fraternity. 

Doctor Jackson married, September 16, 1918, Bessie Mae 
Gills, who was born at Union Hall, Franklin County, Virginia, 
and was reared and educated in Bedford County, finishing in 
Randolph-Macon Institute at Danville, where she was graduated 
in 1909. Doctor and Mrs. Jackson have two children : Eliza- 
beth Harwell, born November 2, 1919, and Dudley Pennington, 
born April 1, 1924. Doctor and Mrs. Jackson are menibers of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he is serving as a 
steward of the church. He is at member of the Masonic frater- 
nity. 



136 VIRGINIA 

Walter M. Otey is a capable physician and surgeon practic- 
ing at Roanoke, having spent all the twelve years of his active 
experience in the medical profession in that city. 

Doctor Otey was born in Bedford County, Virginia, Febru- 
ary 8, 1891, son of Frank C. and Ossie (Sheer) Otey, Iboth na- 
tives of Bedford County. His grandfather, Charles C. Otey, was 
born in the same county, became a captain in the Confederate 
army and was killed at the battle of Seven Pines. Frank C. 
Otey devoted his life to the farm, and died in 1925. His widow 
now resides with her son, Doctor Otey, at Roanoke. He was 
an active member in the Presbyterian Church and a Democrat 
in politics. 

Doctor Otey was the second in a family of five children, four 
of whom are living. He was reared in a rural locality in Bed- 
ford County, and after the local schools attended Randolph- 
Macon College and the Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacks- 
burg. He then entered the Medical College of Virginia at Rich- 
mond, was graduated in 1916, and for about a year was in the 
hospital at Roanoke under Doctor Sheer. Since 1916 he has 
engaged in a general practice as a physician and surgeon and a 
high degree of success has attended his efforts. He is a member 
of the Roanoke Academy of Medicine, the Medical Society of 
Virginia and the American Medical Association. In addition 
to his medical practice Doctor Otey superintends the manage- 
ment of the old homestead farm in Bedford County. He is a 
Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, member of the B. P. 0. Elks, 
Country Club and Shenandoah Club, and he and his family 
belong to Saint John's Episcopal Church. 

Doctor Otey married, in 1914, Mary Hairston, a native of 
Henry County, Virginia, who was reared and educated at Dan- 
ville. They have two children, Mary Elizabeth and Walter 
Maynard, Jr., both attending school in Roanoke. 

Louis A. Scholz is a veteran Roanoke business man and, 
having been identified with that city since 1889, participating in 
its grow1;h from a small railroad town to a community of mani- 
fold industries and commercial prestige all over the Southeast. 

Mr. Scholz was born at Freiburg, Germany, November 28, 
1862, and spent his early years in that famous university town. 
His parents, Joseph and Pauline (Teichler) Scholz, lived all their 
lives in Germany, where his father was a blacksmith. They 
were Catholics. Of their seven children three are living, two 
sons, Louis and Fritz, being residents of Roanoke, while the only 
living daughter, Anna, is the wife of Martin Baier and lives in 
Germany. 

Louis A. Scholz had a common school education in Germany 
and when fourteen years old began his apprenticeship to learn 
the brewing and malting trade. From the practical standpoint 
he was given very thorough instructions in every branch of the 
industry. When, in 1882, he came to the United States, a young 
man of twenty, he was thoroughly skilled in the brewing profes- 
sion. His first six months in America were spent at Cincinnati, 
Ohio, where he was employed by Peter Schwab, after which he 
was with the Green Tree Brewery at Saint Louis for six months, 
then followed a journeyman experience in Kansas City, Omaha, 
Seattle and in San Francisco. At San Francisco in 1884 he 
brewed the first lager beer in that city for the National Brewing 
Company. His next location was at Baltimore, and in Decem- 
ber, 1889, he arrived at Roanoke, thus ending his experience of 




j^IV'^ ^^^t--*^^^^^*^ 



VIRGINIA 137 

travel. Mr. Scholz was in the brewery business at Roanoke, 
active manager of the Virginia Brewing Company Plant from 
1889 to 1916. In connection with the brewery he also engaged 
in ice manufacture, and he and his brother Henry became in- 
terested in quite a number of local enterprises and acquired a 
large amount of real estate. 

Mr. Scholz is probably best known over Southwestern Vir- 
ginia for his long and active identification with the Roanoke 
Fair Association, which he has served continuously as secretary 
since the fair was inaugurated in 1903. Mr. Scholz, a self-made 
business man, has prospered through his industry and the intent 
way he has applied himself to every undertaking. He owns an 
attractive country estate fifteen miles from Roanoke and makes 
his home there. Mr. Scholz and his family are Lutherans. He 
is one of the three surviving charter members of Roanoke Lodge, 
B. P. 0. Elks, and is also affiliated with the Shenandoah Club and 
a life member of the Order of Eagles. 

He married, in 1888, Henrietta Schaeffer, who was born at 
O'Fallon, Illinois. There are three children : Miss Pauline ; 
Walter, a druggist at Roanoke; and Henrietta, wife of Stanley C. 
Weaver, a Roanoke real estate man. 

Hon. Jacob H. Frantz. After he had won the approval of 
his fellow citizens as a sound business man of undoubted finan- 
cial ability in his operation of large real estate transactions, 
Hon. Jacob H. Frantz was elected city treasurer of Roanoke, and 
the manner in which he is handling the affairs of this important 
office proves the good judgment displayed in his selection. He 
was born in the vicinity of Roanoke, June 17, 1869, a son of 
Emory J. and Clarinda (Obenchain) Frantz, both of whom were 
born in Virginia, and are now deceased. The father was a 
farmer all his life, and was a substantial citizen of Roanoke 
County standing well with his neighbors, voting the straight 
Democratic ticket, and giving a splendid support to the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South, in which work he was actively 
assisted by the mother. His fraternal connections were those 
which he maintained with the Masonic Order. During the 
last two years of the war between the states he served in the 
Confederate army, in which he enlisted at the age of sixteen 
years. Of the seven children born to the parents five are living, 
and of them all Jacob H. Frantz is the eldest. The paternal 
grandfather, Jacob Frantz, was born and reared on Mason's 
Creek. Early in life he was a farmer, but later became a 
tanner, and for many years operated a large tannery on Peters 
Creek. The maternal grandfather was a native of Botetourt 
County, Virginia, and he spent his life as a farmer. Both 
grandfathers were men of the highest standing, and gave a loyal 
support to progressive movements in their communities. 

While his educational training was limited to the common 
schools, Jacob H. Frantz has since added much to his store of 
knowledge, and is today a very well informed man. Until he 
was thirty-five years old he was engaged in farming, but about 
190.5 he moved to Roanoke and embarked in the real estate busi- 
ness, conducting it until in 1925 he was elected city treasurer. 
Since then he has been devoting himself to the duties of his 
office. 

In April, 190.3, Mr. Frantz married Miss Mary K. Nelms. 
who was born in Bedford County, Virginia, a daughter of 

7— VOL. 3 



138 VIRGINIA 

Charles Dandridge Nelms, a farmer of Bedford County. Mrs. 
Frantz was educated in Roanoke County, and she is connected 
with church work as a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, to which her husband also belongs, and of which he is a 
steward. They have had four children born to them, namely: 
Jacob Henry, who graduated from William and Mary College 
class of 1928; Mary Dandridge, attending Randolph-Macon Col- 
lege; Clarinda Ellen and Eben Nelms, who are attending the 
Roanoke High School. Mr. Frantz belongs to the Roanoke Lions 
Club. He is one of those who proves that the influence of a good 
and capable man is not confined to his own personal transactions, 
but rather is reflected in the lives of those with whom he be- 
comes associated, and through them filters to the oncoming gen- 
eration which shall contribute to the community's growth. Lib- 
eral in his views and in his contributions to worthy objects, Mr. 
Frantz has long been a decided addition to the citizenship of 
Roanoke and proven a notable increase of strength to the cause 
of public progress. 

John M. Otey. In 1878 the late Col. Kirkwood Otey was 
made city auditor of Lynchburg. When he died in 1897 he was 
succeeded by his son, John M. Otey. The latter is still serving, 
thus making an uninterrupted succession of service of father 
and son in one municipal office for half a century. This is a 
noteworthy record in itself, and it is also significant of the citi- 
zenship of the Otey family, which for generations has expressed 
itself in terms of usefulness and self sacrificing devotion to com- 
munity and state. 

There have been many distinguished men of the Otey family 
in Virginia. At the corner of Eleventh and Federal streets in 
Lynchburg is the old Colonial home of the Otey family. The 
Revolutionary ancestor was John Otey, who had a son, Major 
Isaac Otey, who lived in Bedford County, Virginia, and mar- 
ried Elizabeth Matthews. Major Isaac Otey and wife had a 
son, John M. Otey, who in turn was the father of Col. Kirkwood 
Otey. Col. Kirkwood Otey married Lucy Dabney Norvell, and 
of their four children John M. Otey is the oldest. His sister 
Norvell is the wife of James A. Scott, of the insurance firm of 
Scott & Otey at Lynchburg. The second son, Kirkwood Otey, 
Jr., is in the automobile business at Charleston, West Virginia. 
The youngest of the four children died when eighteen years of 
age. John M. Otey also has the distinction of being a direct 
descendant of Sir John Pettus, who was one of the founders of 
the Virginia Colony established on the banks of the James 
River in 1607. 

Col. Kirkwood Otey was born at Lynchburg October 19, 1829, 
graduated from the Virginia Military Institute and the Uni- 
versity of Virginia, and before Virginia seceded from the Union 
helped organize and became first lieutenant of the Lynchburg 
Home Guard, which on April 22, 1861, was mustered into the 
Confederate service as Company G of the Eleventh Virginia 
Volunteers. He soon became captain of the company and under 
his command the company participated in thirteen battles and 
twenty-two skirmishes. Colonel Otey was three times wounded. 
He commanded his company as a part of Pickett's famous 
division in the charge at Gettysburg, and after that battle he 
was promoted to colonel in command of the Eleventh Regiment. 
After the war he was honorary captain of the Lynchburg Home 



VIRGINIA 139 

Guard, was also commander of the local camp of the Confed- 
erate Veterans, and he was buried with the Masonic and military 
honors that his career merited. Like many other prominent 
Virginians he was impoverished as a result of the war, and his 
wounds made him practically an invalid for a number of years. 
During this time his talented wife, daughter of a professor of 
the college at Lexington, Kentucky, supported the family by 
making tobacco bags. His mother during the war had bought 
an old warehouse at Lynchburg and converted it into a Con- 
federate hospital. Mrs. Lucy Dabney Otey, who died August 
25, 1903, was for many years active in charitable work, bei'hg 
the first member of the Salvation Army at Lynchburg, also active 
in the Florence Crittenden Home. Col. Kirkwood Otey after 
recovering from his wounds engaged in the insurance business, 
and in connection therewith performed the duties of city auditor 
from 1878 until his death. He and his wife were active members 
of the Court Street Methodist Episcopal Church, and he was a 
member of Marshall Lodge of the Masonic fraternity. 

John M. Otey was born at Lynchburg February 5, 1866, and 
was educated in public schools and also in the academy con- 
ducted by Col. Thomas H. Carter. At the age of nineteen he 
went to work in his father's insurance office, and has been in 
that line of business ever since. The firm is now known as 
James A. Scott and John M. Otey, Incorporated, handling a 
general line of insurance. 

Mr. Otey married, June 15, 1898, Miss Maggie Marshall 
Murrell, who was born at Lynchburg and was educated in 
public schools there and the Randolph-Macon Woman's College. 
Her father, Thomas E. Murrell, was a prominent tobacconist. 
Mr. and Mrs. Otey have one son, John M. Otey, Jr., who was 
educated ih the Augusta Military Academy and the University of 
Virginia, and is now in the insurance business. 

Mr. Otey for over thirty years was active in the Lynchburg 
Y. M. C. A., and for a number of years was its treasurer. He 
is one of the older members of Acca Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine at Richmond, and has membership in the various York 
Rite bodies of Masonry at Lynchburg, including the lodge to 
which both his father and grandfather belonged. He is also 
affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
B. P. 0. Elks. He is a member of Grace Memorial Episcopal 
Church. 

Albert Sidney Nowlin, a prominent coal merchant of 
Lynchburg, with offices in the Peoples National Bank Building, 
is a member of one of the best known families of that city, one 
that has been closely identified with the history of Virginia since 
early Colonial times. 

He was born in Appomattox County, September 8, 1878, son 
of Col. John H. and Sallie Louise (Woodson) Nowlin. He is a 
descendant of James Nowlin, a native of Ireland, who came to 
Virginia about 1700 and married Catherine Ward, a daughter 
of Bryan Ward. Their son James was the father of Abraham 
Nowlin, who married Mildred Watkins, and their son, Capt. 
Bryan Watkins Nowlin, married Mary Spencer and was the 
father of Col. John H. Nowlin. 

Col. John H. Nowlin was a soldier and officer in the Confed- 
eracy during the Civil war and for many years followed plant- 
ing and merchandising in Appomattox County. The home of 



140 VIRGINIA 

the Nowlins in the county was in the vicinity of Oakville. 
Colonel Nowlin married Louise Woodson, daughter of John W. 
Woodson, of another prominent Virginia family of Appomattox 
County. Of their six children Albert Sidney Nowlin was the 
oldest son. 

Albert Sidney Nowlin grew up and received his early educa- 
tional advantages in Appomattox County. He has been a resi- 
dent of Lynchburg for thirty years, and has had a very success- 
ful career in the wholesale coal business, handling over an exten- 
sive territory in the Southeast the output of a number of coal 
companies. 

He married, February 28, 1915, Miss Annie Mosely Thorn- 
hill. They have one son, Albert Sidney, Jr., born January 30, 
1917, and a daughter, Helen Thornhill, born November 21, 1924. 

John 0. D. Copenhaver, a resident of Roanoke, is president 
of the Evergreen Cemetery Association. He was born in Taze- 
well County, Virginia, December 30, 1877, and is a son of An- 
drew J. and Eliza (Barnes) Copenhaver. The Copenhaver 
family originated in Denmark, and the original immigrant set- 
tled in Pennsylvania, whence the family came to Virginia at a 
very early day. The paternal grandfather of Mr. Copenhaver 
was Samuel Copenhaver, a native of Virginia, who followed the 
life of a planter throughout his career. Andrew J. Copenhaver, 
the father of John 0. D. Copenhaver, was born in Smyth County, 
Virginia, and in young manhood enlisted for service in the Con- 
federate army during the war between the states, at the close of 
which he resumed his activities as a farmer. Later he removed 
to Tazewell County, where he married a native of that county, 
Eliza Barnes, a daughter of Robert Barnes, a Virginia farmer 
whose family had come from Ireland at an early date and set- 
tled in the Old Dominion. Andrew Copenhaver and his wife 
spent the remainder of their lives in Tazewell County, where 
both passed away. He was a Republican in politics, and he and 
his wife were faithful members of the Methodist Church, in 
Vv-hich he served as steward for forty-one years. Of their seven 
children five are living, John 0. D. having been the fifth in order 
of birth. 

John 0. D. Copenhaver attended the country schools of Taze- 
well County, the Virginia Polytechnic Institute and Emory and 
Henry College at Emory, Virginia, and after he finished from the 
latter returned to the home place, where he was associated with 
his father in the elder man's agricultural activities. At the age 
of twenty-one years he went to Bluefield, West Virginia, where 
he entered the employ of the Baldwin-Felts Detective Agency, 
with which he continued to be identified for more than a (luarter 
of a century. This concern did much work for the Norfolk & 
Western Railway Company, and Mr. Copenhaver was really 
connected with the railroad company through the agency. In 
March, 1926, Mr. Copenhaver resigned his position and took up 
his residence at Roanoke, becoming president of Evergreen 
Cemetery, which is conceded to be the most beautiful as well as 
the best cared for cemetery in the United States. He has con- 
tinued to act in this capacity and maintains offices in the Colonial 
Bank Building. Mr. Copenhaver is a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South, in which he has been a steward for ten 
years. He is a thirty-third degree Mason, and in addition to 
having been master of all bodies in the Scottish Rite has served 
as potentate of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the 



VIRGINIA 141 

Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and th6 Kiwanis Club, 
and is a Republican in his political convictions. 

In 1907 Mr. Copenhaver was united in marriage with Miss 
Letha A. Witten, who was born at Graham, Virginia, and re- 
ceived her education there and at Bristol, supplemented by at- 
tendance at Madison Hall, Washington, D. C. Two children 
have been born to this union : John Dresden, attending high 
school, and Martha Jane, attending public school. 

John Garnett Dew was admitted to practice law in Vir- 
ginia in 1867, and from that time until his death his career added 
many new associations and distinctions to the family names of 
Garnett and Dew. Judge Dew was a descendant of William 
Dew, who came from England in Colonial times and settled in 
Maryland. The Garnett family came from Essex, England, and 
there are many representatives of both names found in the 
military and professional annals of Virginia. 

The father of Judge Dew was Benjamin Franklin Dew, an 
attorney, teacher and farmer of King and Queen County, who 
was a magistrate and a member of the County Court for a num- 
ber of years. He was a brother of the notable educator, Thomas 
R. Dew, who was born in King and Queen County in 1802, son 
of Thomas R. and Lucy (Gatewood) Dew. Thomas R. Dew 
graduated from William and Mary College, and in 1826 was 
elected professor of history and political law in William and 
Mary College, and in that capacity he developed the chair of 
history and political science to real dignity and importance. 
He was elected president of William and Mary College in 1836, 
and the college enjoyed an unprecedented era of prosperity under 
him. He died in 1846. Benjamin Franklin Dew married Mary 
Susan Garnett. 

She died when her son John Garnett Dew was ten years of 
age. The latter, with his brother, James Harvie, who later be- 
came a distinguished physician in New York City, attended 
school under Dr. Gessner Harrison. He was not yet sixteen when 
the war broke out between the states, and before it was over 
he had been in the service of the Confederacy for two years. He 
resumed his work at the University of Virginia during 1865-67 
and took his degree Bachelor of Laws there in 1867. Judge Dew 
began practice in King and Queen County in 1868, and for over 
thirty years devoted his time to his large general practice and 
his public duties. He was a member of the County School Board 
from the time of its inception until 1884, and from 1884 to 1900 
was judge of the County Court of King and Queen. In 1900 
he became second auditor of State of Virginia and served in that 
office two term. 

Judge Dew was a member of the Baptist Church and belonged 
to the Virginia State and American Bar Associations. 

He married, October 28, 1875, Lelia Fauntleroy, descended 
from the distinguished Fauntleroy family of Virginia. The 
Fauntleroys have been prominent in their own name and many 
of them intermarried with other distinguished Virginia lines. 
Lelia Fauntleroy was born in King and Queen County, where 
her father, Dr. S. G. Fauntleroy, was a distinguished phvsician. 
Doctor Fauntleroy, who died in 1899, was highly educated in 
medicine, but it was not so much his vocation as an opportunity 
for useful service to his community. He owned three large plan- 



142 VIRGINIA 

tations and before the war was a slave owner, and much of his 
practice was among his own people, and his service was ren- 
dered without compensation. He also held the office of overseer 
of the poor. Doctor Fauntleroy was eighty-one years of age 
when he died. He had four daughters and two sons. The son 
Dr. Claybrook Fauntleroy was a practicing physician and fol- 
lowed the worthy example of his father in his extensive char- 
itable work. He died in 1924 after having practiced for forty 
years in King and Queen County. Dr. Claybrook Fauntleroy, 
his father and grandfather made up three generations who are 
represented on the list of alumni of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Mrs. Dew, who resides at 1520 Grove Avenue in Richmond, 
is the mother of four children : Miss Mary Susan, a graduate 
of Hollins College; S. G. Dew, now deceased, who married Miss 
Nettie Thompson; B. Frank Dew, vice president of the State 
Planters Bank of Richmond, a Knight Templar Mason and 
Shriner and member of the Commonwealth Club, married Miss 
Gertrude Clark and has a son, B. Frank, Jr. ; and Miss Eliza- 
beth Dew. 

Judge Dew was born at Newtown, King and Queen County, 
Virginia, July 23, 1845, and passed away at his home in Rich- 
mond in January, 1920. 

John William Smith, D. D. During the more than eight 
years that Dr. John William Smith has served as pastor of 
Greene Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of 
Roanoke, he has vigorously and continuously attacked ignorance, 
sophistry and error with the fearless loyalty to his honest con- 
victions that is so characteristic of him. He has preached as 
he has lived, has been useful in all good works as a citizen and 
has borne himself in every position so that he has commended 
himself as an example for both young and old, and he is contin- 
uing in this work along the same lines with the prospect of many 
years of usefulness before him. 

A native son of Virginia, for he was born in Loudoun County, 
his appointments have been held in Fairfax County, Virginia, 
Washington, District of Columbia, Baltimore, Maryland, and 
Roanoke, and he is deeply attached to the Southland, to which 
he so essentially belongs. His parents, John and America 
Smith, gave him a wholesome early environment in the home 
circle, and he attended the public schools of Washington City and 
Randolph-Macon College at Front Royal, Virginia. Upon his 
graduation from the latter he received his degree of Bachelor of 
Arts, and he has since carried on post-graduate work in George 
Washington University and Johns Hopkins University. In 

1920 Randolph-Macon College honored him by conferring upon 
him the degree of Doctor of Divinity, and in 1925 he was given 
his Phi Beta Kappa key from the same institution because of his 
outstanding service and recognized leadership among her alumni. 
While in college he had distinguished himself as editor of the 
college annual, and in his preparatory school he won a medal as 
being its best debator. 

From the beginning of his ministerial work Doctor Smith 
has proven his worth to his church, and honors have been con- 
ferred upon him with increasing frequency as he has become 
recognized as one of the outstanding figures in the Southern field, 
and of the Baltimore Conference, to which he is attached. In 

1921 he was sent as a delegate to the Fifth Ecumenical Method- 



VIRGINIA 143 

ist Conference held in London, England, where he delivered the 
first of a series of addresses on "The Church and Modern Indus- 
trial Problems." From London he went on a trip through Eng- 
land and the continent, Mrs. Smith accompanying him. In 1924 
he and Mrs. Smith made their second trip abroad, visiting Syria, 
Egypt, Greece and the Holy Land, and upon his return to Ro- 
anoke Doctor Smith gave many lectures upon his travels, espe- 
cially those in the Holy Land, and brought vividly before his 
audiences conditions in these countries. However, these are 
not the first lectures he has delivered, for throughout his career 
he has appeared frequently upon the lecture platform, and is a 
very popular speaker. One of his lectures, the one on the Psalms 
and other portions of the Bible, is a special favorite, and he 
delivers it, and others, before minister's gatherings, summer 
conferences, young people's assemblies, Sunday School Training 
Institutes and similar church and lay meetings, his powerful 
oratory and flaming sincerity being particularly convincing. 
Doctor Smith does not confine his activities to his ministerial 
and lecture work, but branches out in many directions, and he 
is president of the Boy Scout's Council, president of the Chil- 
dren's Home Society, and a trustee of the Roanoke Hospital. 
For two years he was president of the Minister's Conference, 
and also served for several years as a director of the Roanoke 
Kiwanis Club. 

Mrs. Smith belongs to an old and honored family, she being 
a daughter of Dr. W. E. Edwards, at one time a member of the 
Virginia Conference of the Methodist Church, and her grand- 
father, great-grandfather and brother were all clergymen. Doc- 
tor and Mrs. Smith have four children: Landon E., who is a 
business man of Roanoke; Emory E. and Ashby W., both of 
whom are attending Emory and Henry College; and Ethelbert 
Grake, who is a student in the local high school. 

Rev. Thomas Kay Young, D. D. No other profession makes 
such demands upon its members as does that of the ministry, 
and were it not for the fact that these "Men of God" are sus- 
tained by a power higher than their own many would fall 
fainting by the way. The intellectual attainments of the major- 
ity are beyond the ordinary, oratoiy plays an important part, 
and business acumen is frequently a necessary requisite, tact 
in marked degree must be present, but above all there must be 
a deep sincerity and steadfast belief in the divine origin of the 
call in order that the best results be obtained, and the Master's 
work be properly performed. But few of these ministers are 
adequately recompensed for their labors, their presence in times 
of deep sorrow and affliction, their influence in all uplift move- 
ments, and their example of godly living and speech, but they 
work on, "sustained by an unfaltering trust" and great must be 
their eternal reward. In Rev. Thomas Kay Young, pastor of the 
First Presbyterian Church of Roanoke, is to be found a man of 
the above described type, a man of learning, eloquence, business 
acumen and unblemished character, who is not only sustaining 
his church, but influencing his community in a manner that is 
attracting favorable comment from outsiders all over this part of 
the state. 

Doctor Young was born in West Virginia, Fayette County, 
a son of William Wilsen and Elizabeth (Kay) Young, natives of 
Scotland, he born in Edinburgh and she in Lanark, and she 
survives and is living with her son. Doctor Young. The father 



1441 VIRGINIA 

was a miner, and was engaged in operating mines for big coal 
companies after coming to this country in 1880. He met his 
wife in Fayette County, West Virginia, although she had lived 
in Pennsylvania for some years, her parents having settled in 
that state upon coming to the United States in 1870, and they 
were married January 1, 1884. They had six sons and three 
daughters born to them, of whom five are living, and of them 
all Doctor .Young is the second in order of birth. After he had 
secured his citizenship papers the father espoused the principles 
of the Democratic party, and continued to vote its ticket until 
his death. He was a Mason, an Odd Fellow and a Knight of 
Pythias, and both he and his wife early united with the Presby- 
terian Chui'ch, to which she still belongs. 

Doctor Young attended the public school of Royal, West Vir- 
ginia, and the West Virginia State Normal School at Athens, 
and later became a student of Hampden Sidney College, Virginia, 
from which he was graduated in 1908, with the degree Bachelor 
of Arts. His theological training was taken in the Union Theo- 
logical Seminary, Richmond, Virginia, and he was graduated 
therefrom in 1911, with the degree Bachelor of Divinity. His 
first charge was a mountain mission at Holden, West Virginia, 
and he held it for eighteen months, his work there, diflScult as it 
was, being productive of a real spiritual awakening, and a sub- 
stantial increase in membership to the church. In October, 
1912, he was sent to Covington, Virginia, and for the six suc- 
ceeding years he labored faithfully and well, and when he left, 
March 1, 1918, he was followed by the regrets of his congre- 
gation. Sent to the Presbyterian Church at Lexington, Vir- 
ginia, he repeated his good work there for six years, and Janu- 
ary 1, 1924, was assigned to the pa.storate of the First Presbyte- 
rian Church of Roanoke. This is an important charge with a 
membership of 1,100 souls, and the responsibilities are weighty, 
but Doctor Young is discharging them with inspired capability. 

On September 21, 1907, Doctor Young married Miss Harriet 
Rebecca Cox, who was born in Farmville, Virginia, and edu- 
cated in the Virginia State Normal School. She is a daughter 
of Benjamin Matthew Cox, for thirty-eight years manager of 
the above mentioned school, which position he held at the time 
of his death in 1924. Four children have been born to Doctor 
and Mrs. Young: Thomas Kay, Junior, who is a high school 
student; William Benjamin, who died in 1915, at the age of 
three months; Helen Laing; and Mary Elizabeth. Doctor 
Young was made a Mason in Petersburg, Virginia, and retains 
his membership with that lodge. He belongs to the Lions Club 
and the University Club. For several years he has been on the 
Board of Stewards of Jackson College, and for nine years he has 
been a trustee of Union Theological Seminary, Richmond, Vir- 
ginia. 

Joel T. Bandy. It is said that the keynote of salesman- 
ship, any kind of salesmanship, is sincerity, and that a salesman 
should not ti-y to sell goods that he vvfould not buy himself, and 
at the same price, same place and same time, and if it is true, as 
it is, then is it especially applicable to the real estate and invest- 
ment business. In no other line does insincerity and lack of 
confidence prove obstacles as they do in that dealing with the sell- 
ing of realty and the making of investments. These facts were 
long ago appreciated and approved by Joel T. Bandy, and in the 
years that he has been handling real estate and investments in 



VIRGINIA 145 

Roanoke he has been guided by them with very satisfactory 
results, and stands today in the fore front of operators in these 
lines. However, if a man is going to build up a profitable sales 
business in real estate over a term of years he ought to be more 
than a salesman; he ought to be an advisor in economics to the 
people with whom he deals. When a salesman has sold a client, 
the client ought to be so well pleased that he will go out and 
bring in his friends. The neglect of such suggestions Mr. Bandy 
has found will nearly always work to the disadvantage of the 
salesman himself, and is simply ruinous to the house which he 
serves, and therefore he has tried to train his men to accept 
them, and act accordingly, and the successful ones have done so. 
Starting in life without any capital, by safeguarding the inter- 
ests of his clients he has advanced until he is one of the leading 
realtors of Roanoke. 

Joel T. Bandy was born on a farm in Roanoke County, Vir- 
ginia, December 12, 1860, a son of Thomas L. and Frances J. 
(Huddleston) Bandy, both of whom were born in Bedford- 
County, where he was engaged in farming throughout his life. 
Throughout the entire war period of the sixties he served in 
the Confederate army. In political faith he was a Democrat. 
Both he and his wife were active members of the First Presbyte- 
rian Church of Roanoke. Of the four children born to the par- 
ents two survive: Mrs. E. S. McNanel, of Roanoke, where Mr. 
McNanel is now a retired railroad man, and Joel T. The pater- 
nal grandfather was George Bandy, born in Bedford County, a 
lifelong farmer. The maternal grandfather, Joel Huddieston, 
was also born in Bedford County. The Bandys are of Welsh 
extraction, and the Hudd.estons are of English origin. 

Ihe local schools and Roanoke College educated Joel T. 
I2andy, and he earned his first money by farm work. Later he 
taught school, and after he located in Roanoke he was in the 
coal and feed business for several years. It was not, however, 
until he embarked in the real estate busines in ISOO that he 
found the vocation for which he was fitted, and in it he has 
steadily progressed and has to his credit some of the best of the 
development projects carried to successful completion in this 
region, notably that of Virginia Heights. He bought the land, 
put in the improvements, and buiit up what is recognized to be 
one of the most desirable residential suburbs of Roanoke. Re- 
garding this property as a gilt-edged investment, he has retained 
ownership of several houses. Mr. Bandy is a director in the 
Colonial National Bank, and is otherwise interested in local en- 
terprises. A strong Democi-at, he works for his party's suc- 
cess, and served for twenty years as a member of the school 
board. 

In March, 1891, Mr. Bandy married Miss Nannie P. Nelms, 
who was born in Bedford County, but reared in Roanoke County. 
After being graduated from Sufiivan's College, Bristol, Virginia, 
she taught school until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Bandy have 
one child, Frances, who married W. M. Denny Taylor, of Ro- 
anoke, and they have two children : Nancy E. Taylor and Frances 
Taylor. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bandy belong to the Raleigh Court- 
house Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which he is a 
steward. A high Mason, he has been advanced through the 
Scottish and York Rites, and he also belongs to the Mystic 
Shrine. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Roanoke Kiwanis Club, and is popular in all of these organiza- 
tions. 



146 VIRGINIA 

Robert E. L. Abbott. Like many men who have won suc- 
cess in commercial and industrial life, Robert E. L. Abbott, sec- 
retary, treasurer and general manager of the Virginia Lumber 
Manufacturing Company of Roanoke, commenced his career as 
a school teacher. His experience in the educational profession 
lasted for ten years, but his inclinations were always for a busi- 
ness career, and in 1906 he entered the employ of the firm with 
which he is now connected, and in which he has gained promo- 
tion and success through the application of sound and substan- 
tial abilities. 

Mr. Abbott was born May 4, 1868, in Craig County, Virginia, 
and is a son of Sinclair C. and Lucinda Jane (Williams) Abbott, 
natives of the same county. His paternal grandfather was 
James Abbott, who passed his entire life as a farmer in Virginia, 
principally in Craig County, where he was held in high esteem 
and respect by his fellow citizens. Sinclair C. Abbott received 
a public school education and as a youth learned the trade of 
cabinet maker, which he followed until the outbreak of the war 
between the states, when he enlisted in the Confederate army 
and subsequently served throughout the four years of the war. 
At the close of the struggle the young soldier returned to Craig 
County, having recovered from a slight wound, and resumed his 
activities as a cabinet maker, in which he was engaged during 
the remainder of his life. For some years he served as post- 
master of the little Town of Abbott in Craig County, which was 
named in his honor. He was a Democrat in his political views 
and a member of the Christian Church. He married Lucinda 
Jane Williams, a daughter of Rev. Philip Williams, a native of 
Virginia and a minister of the Christian Church. They had ten 
children, of whom four are living, Robert E. L. having been the 
fourth in order of birth. One of the children. Dr. B. A. Abbott, 
a prominent minister of the Christian Church, is editor of the 
religious publication, the Christian Evangelist, of Saint Louis, 
and in 1927 went to Lausanne, Switzerland, to attend the con- 
vention of members of all denominations for the general ad- 
vancement of Christianity. Some ninety churches representing 
a score of different beliefs sent delegates to this world confer- 
ence on faith and order. 

Robert E. L. Abbott attended the local schools of Craig 
County, following which he pursued a course at Kentucky Uni- 
versity (.now Transylvania) at Lexington, and after his gradu- 
ation therefrom began teaching school. During the following 
ten years he was employed as a teacher in various schools in 
Craig, Henry and Tazewell counties, but in the fall of 1906 ac- 
cepted a position as bookkeeper for the Virginia Lumber Manu- 
facturing Company of Roanoke. He has been identified with 
this concern for twenty-three years, and now acts as secretary, 
treasurer and general manager, having risen to these posts by 
industry and merit. He is widely and favorably known in busi- 
ness circles and particularly in the lumber trade, and is known 
as a man of the highest integrity and of broad information. Mr. 
Abbott has applied himself devotedly to his business affairs and 
has few outside interests, although he is a Mason of the Scottish 
Rite and a member of the Mystic Shrine. He has cooperated 
willingly and energetically in worthy civic movements, and with 
his family belongs to the Christian Church. 

In 1904 Mr. Abbott was united in marriage with Miss Bertie 
Shelburne, who was born in Lee County, Virginia, and educated 
at Milligan College, Tennessee, and to this union there have been 





Q5J'Si/>^<£. 



VIRGINIA 147 

born three children: Elizabeth Christal, who resides with her 
parents; Robert Shelburne, who holds a position with the Vir- 
ginia Lumber Manufacturing Company, and Edward Lee, who 
died when two years of age. The pleasant family residence is 
situated at 210 Wasena Avenue, Roanoke. 

Henry M. Stowe, postmaster of Bedford City, became a 
Virginian through his interest in the National Elks Home at 
Bedford. Few men among his contemporaries have had a career 
of greater variety of experience and association with prominent 
men than Mr. Stowe. 

He was born at Cleveland, Ohio, September 10^ 1854, son of 
Thomas A. and Maria (McKinzie) Stowe, and grandson of 
William Stowe, who was born at Middletown, Connecticut, No- 
vember 15, 1795, and was an early settler in Ohio, where he 
married Emily Kelsey. This branch of the Stowe family was 
established in America by John Stowe, a native of England, son 
of John Stowe, the historian. John Stowe, the American, arrived 
in the United States April 9, 1734, on the ship Elizabeth, bring- 
ing with him six children. Thomas A. Stowe was born at Hud- 
son, Ohio, July 23, 1827, was educated in Western Reserve 
College, became a printer and was connected with the Cleveland 
Plain Dealer from the establishment of that old and influential 
newspaper at Cleveland. He was on the staff of the Plain Dealer 
at the time of his death. For three years he was in a printing 
office in Iowa, but with that exception lived all his life in Ohio. 
He was a leading Democrat, served fifteen years on the board of 
education of Cleveland, and was president of the board when he 
died in 1877. At one time he was nominated for lieutenant- 
governor, and he served as a lieutenant in the Civil war. His 
wife, Maria (McKinzie) Stowe, was born January 1, 1834, and 
is still living at the age of ninety-four, making her home with a 
daughter in Los Angeles. She had a family of three children: 
Henry M. ; Josephine Maria, a widow in Los Angeles ; and 
Charles Brown, head of the Stowe-Fuller Corporation, fire-brick 
manufacturers at Cleveland. Thomes A. Stowe was an active 
Presbyterian, member of the church choir, served as grand 
master of the State of Ohio in the Ancient Order of United 
Workmen. 

Henry M. Stowe was educated at Cleveland, as a boy sold 
newspapers on the streets, left school in 1871 at the age of 
seventeen to become a chainman with a surveying party. For 
five years he was in the news room of the Plain Dealer, but in 
December, 1877, left the printing office on account of lead poison- 
ing. Three months later he became connected with the Wors- 
wick Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of plumbing and 
steam fitting supplies. He went to work for this company at 
thirty dollars a month. 

In 1875 Mr. Stowe had married Angelina N. Worswick, 
daughter of the manufacturer. Two children were born to their 
union. The daughter, Winifred Olive, is the wife of Stanley L. 
Galpin, a member of the faculty of Trinity University in Con- 
necticut. The daughter Marjorie is an art teacher living in 
Cleveland. The mother of these children died in 1922. 

While with the Worswick Company Mr. Stowe acquired a 
thorough knowledge of the pipe fitting and plumbing business. 
He was put in the sales department and in January, 1880, was 
offered general supervision of the plant. Instead he organized 



148 VIRGINIA 

the Union Machine Works, which did a prosperous business. In 
1882 he had to give up his work on account of ill health, and 
spent three months on the salt waters on the coast of Florida. 
He then became a traveling salesman for the Macintosh Goode 
& Company, covering Ohio, Indiana and Michigan, and in 1886 
went with the Continental Tube Works. Mr. Stowe in Septem- 
ber, 1888, while in the employ of its Pittsburgh Tube Company, 
he located at Marion, Ohio, where he organized the firm of Cun- 
ningham & Stowe, heating engineers. This business later em- 
ployed about twenty-five skilled workers. Owing to the panic 
of 1893 he returned to his plumbing business at Marion. He 
sold out in 1896, and for a time was identified with the work of 
the Monarch Cement Company in establishing a plant at Bron- 
son, Michigan. Mr. Stowe in 1897 went to Alaska in the gold 
fields, but this was an experience without profit. He arrived 
in Chicago with only 25 cents, and through the friendship of 
a conductor was able to get back to Marion, Ohio. Mr. Stowe 
in February, 1899, went with the Forest City Electric Company, 
for nine months sold insurance, then resumed employment with 
the Forest City Company, and again took up insurance, a busi- 
ness he followed until 1918, when faihng eyesight compelled him 
to seek a residence in the Elks National Home at Bedford, 
Virginia. 

He remained there until he was appointed postmaster by his 
friend President Harding in 1918. He now gives all his time to 
his official work. Mr. Stowe in 1896 was president of the Bryan 
Silver Club in Ohio, but while living at Marion became interested 
in Warren G. Harding and was one of his local friends and 
admirers who brought him into politics. 

Mr. Stowe married June 16, 1927, Camille Binnix Houston, 
a native of Philadelphia, daughter of John Binnix, general man- 
ager of the Central Iron Works at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. 
Mrs. Stowe is a member of the Episcopal Church. Mr. Stowe 
has been actively identified with the B. P. 0. Elks since 1888. 
For twelve years he was secretary of Cleveland Lodge of Elks, 
No. 18, being No. 5 on the membership roll and now the oldest 
member of that oraganization. 

Hugh J. Hagan, M. D., has practiced medicine in Roanoke 
since 1914. He was born in Atlanta, Georgia, December 11, 
1888, a son of Hugh and Sallie Cobb (Johnson) Hagan, the 
latter of whom was born in Selma, Alabama, and the former in 
Richmond, Virginia. He studied medicine in the College of 
Physicians and Surgeons, New York City, and in Berlin, Ger- 
many, and Vienna, Austria, and upon his return to the United 
States was engaged in the practice of his profession in Atlanta, 
Georgia, for ten years. His death occurred in 1898, but she 
survives and is now living in Roanoke. They had two children : 
Doctor Hagan and Willis Cobb, the latter being a banker of Bir- 
mingham, Alabama. The parents belonged to the Episcopal 
Church from their youth up. 

Doctor Hagan of this review attended school in Atlanta and 
Roanoke, and then entered Washington and Lee University, 
from which he was graduated in 1910. He then became a stu- 
dent of Johns Hopkins University, and was gi-aduated therefrom 
in 1914, after having completed the four-year medical course, 
with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. His interneship was 
taken in Jefferson Hospital, Roanoke. During the World war 



VIRGINIA 149 

he served, with the rank of captain, in the Medical Corps from 
May 10, 1917, to January 30, 1919, being honorably discharged 
on the latter date. He was stationed at Monroe, Vale, Forrest, 
Devens and Dix camps, his service being entirely performed in 
this country. 

On July 14, 1917, Doctor Hagan married Miss Barbara 
Fowle Campbell, who was born in Charles Town, West Virginia, 
and educated in that city and in a finishing school of New York 
City. Two children have been born to Doctor and Mrs. Hagan: 
Hugh Campbell and Robert Cameron. Doctor Hagan belongs to 
the Episcopal Church. He is a member of Kappa Alpha, Phi 
Beta Kappa, the Southwest Virginia Medical Society, the Med- 
ical Society of Virginia, the Southern Medical Association, the 
American College of Physicians, the Shenandoah Club, the 
Roanoke Country Club, the Dinner Dance Club and other local 
organizations, in all of which he is deservedly popular. His 
practice is internal medicine, and he devotes all of his time to 
it, not being connected with any business concerns. 

Preston Garnett Hundley, physician and surgeon at 
Lynchburg, comes of a family of prominent professional people, 
being a brother of John T. T. Hundley, president of Lynchburg 
College, and his father was also an educator, though his out- 
standing service was in the upbuilding and extension of the in- 
fluence of the Christian Church in Virginia. 

Doctor Hundley was born at Dunnsville, Essex County, Vir- 
ginia, March 14. 1880, son of John T. T. and Sarah Elizabeth 
(Garnett) Hundley, both natives of Essex County,, and a grand- 
son of Andrew Hundley, a planter and slave owner of Essex 
County who served as sheriff and treasurer of his county. An- 
drew Hundley married Nancy Trible. John Trible Thomas 
Hundley, Sr., was born in Essex County and was educated in 
Bethany College in West Virginia, the institution founded by 
Alexander Campbell of the Church of the Disciples. He began 
teaching in Essex County when little more than a boy, and kept 
up the work of teaching for over thirty-nine years in a two-room 
school known as the Dunnsville Academy, and his personal 
scholarship and inspiring influence made that an institution of 
the highest service in preparing young men for college en- 
trance. He taught higher mathematics, surveying, Greek and 
Latin and other subjects. Throughout his life he was one of 
the most prominent laymen of the Christian Church in Virginia, 
and probably no ordained minister of the church did more for it 
than this educator. He died in 1890, at the age of fifty-nine 
years. His wife, Sarah Elizabeth Garnett, was a daughter of 
Judge Muscoe Garnett, who was a lawyer, for seventeen years a 
member of the House of Delegates, and an elder in the Christian 
Church. Sarah Elizabeth Hundley died in 1895. 

Preston Garnett Hundley was the youngest son in a family of 
thirteen children. After the local schools he attended William 
and Mary College during 1897-99, and completed the work of the 
Virginia School of Pharmacy in 1903. From 1903 to 1905 he 
was manager of the Johnson Pharmacy at Hampton, and then 
entered the medical department of the University of Maryland at 
Baltimore and was graduated with the M. D. degree in 1909. 
Doctor Hundley practiced two years in the coal fields of West 
Virginia, for seven years at Pembroke, Virginia, and since 1921 
has had his home and a busy practice at Lynchburg, a large 
amount of his work being in gynecologj- and obstetrics. Doc- 



150 VIRGINIA 

tor Hundley is a member of the Lynchburg Medical Society, Med- 
ical Society of Virginia and American Medical Association. He 
is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, the Lions Club, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a deacon in the First Chris- 
tian Church. 

He married, November 24, 1909, Miss Maiy E. Lyell, who 
was born in Richmond County, Virginia, and was educated in 
Baltimore College. They have three children: Robert Lyell, 
born in 1914 ; Preston Booker, born in 1915 ; and Olivia Ander- 
son, born in 1917. 

Mrs. Hundley is a daughter of John M. and Anna (Booker) 
Lyell. Her father served in the Ninth Virginia Cavalry in the 
Civil war and for a number of years was a member of the Legis- 
lature. He was a merchant in Richmond County, and owned the 
first automobile in the North Neck of Virginia. 

John Otto Boyd, M. D. In sketching the career of one who 
has impressed himself by his versatile gifts upon the passing 
generation, one is pleased to find the unusual union of high 
philanthropic ends with such practical qualities as have made 
him a successful physician and surgeon. However rare may be 
such a combination of qualities, that they are not altogether 
incompatible is illustrated in the career of Dr. John 0. Boyd, of 
Roanoke, who has a large practice and high standing in his pro- 
fession, particularly in the field of his specialties, gynecology 
and obstetrics. With the exception of the period of his military 
service during the World war he has been located in the dis- 
charge of his- professional duties at Roanoke since 1905, and dur- 
ing this time has established himself firmly in the confidence and 
esteem of the people. 

Doctor Boyd was born March 12, 1881, at Winchester, Vir- 
ginia, and is a son of Dr. P. W. and Fredericka (Schultz) Boyd. 
His paternal grandfather was Rev. Andrew Hunter Holmes 
Boyd, a well known early Presbyterian minister of Virginia, who 
filled many pulpits in various parts of the state and was a man 
who was held in great esteem and respect. Dr. P. W. Boyd was 
born in Frederick County, Virginia, where he received his early 
education, and as a youth entered Washington and Lee Univer- 
sity, where he was graduated, and later graduated from the 
University of Maryland with the degree Doctor of Medicine. 
After engaging in practice for a few years he turned his atten- 
tion to the hardware business, which he followed for many years 
at Winchester, both he and Mrs. Boyd, also a native of Frederick 
County, dying at that place. She was a daughter of Frederick 
Schultz, a native of Virginia and a larger planter, whose father, 
John Schultz, served in the American army during the War of 
1812. Doctor and Mrs. Boyd were faithful members of the 
Presbyterian Church, in the work of which they were active, and 
Doctor Boyd was a Confederate soldier during the war between 
the states, serving as a private in Chew's battery. They had a 
family of eight children, of whom seven are living. Dr. John 0. 
of this review being the last in order of birth. 

John 0. Boyd received his early education at Shenandoah 
Academy, Winchester, following which he pursued a course at 
the University College of Medicine at Richmond, and was gi-adu- 
ated with the class of 1905, receiving the degree Doctor of Medi- 
cine. For a short time he served as an interne in the Virginia 
Hospital, but in 1905 located permanently at Roanoke, where he 
since has achieved remarkable success and high standing, his 



VIRGINIA 151 

present offices being located in the Shenandoah Life Building. 
When the United States became embroiled in the great Euro- 
pean struggle Doctor Boyd offered his services to the Medical 
Corps, and, being accepted, was sent to Camp Greenleaf, where 
he underwent intensive training. He was then assigned to Base 
Hospital No. 45, and subsequently was sent to the Base Hospital 
at Camp Pike, serving in surgical work in all its branches and 
also as acting chief surgeon. He finally was transferred to Hos- 
pital No. 23 at Philadelphia, whence he was discharged in 1919 
and returned to his practice at Roanoke, after doing post-grad- 
uate work at Philadelphia and New York. Although he is 
equally at home in any branch of his profession. Doctor Boyd 
specializes as a gynecologist and in obstetrical cases, and is fre- 
quently called into consultation by his fellow practitioners for 
advice. He is a member of the Pi Mu honorary medical frater- 
nity, the Roanoke Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical 
Society, the Southern Medical Society and the American Medical 
Association and is a fellow of the American College of Surgeons. 
He belongs also to the local Kiwanis Club and takes a keen inter- 
est in all that affects the welfare of the city, its institutions and 
its people. While he is an exceptionally busy man, he is much 
more than a professional drudge, for he is sociable by nature and 
enjoys the companionship of his fellows. He is a popular mem- 
ber of the Shenandoah Club and the Country Club, and his prin- 
cipal hobby and pastime is tennis, the Doctor being known as a 
very capable performer on the courts. 

In 1912 Doctor Boyd was united in marriage at Roanoke with 
Miss Nellie J. Stephenson, who was born at Doylestown, Penn- 
sylvania, and educated in the schools of Roanoke and at Wilson 
College, Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and to this union there 
have been born four children : John Otto, Jr., Katharine Cowell, 
William Stephenson and Nellie Stephenson. The family belongs 
to the Presbyterian Church, in the work of which Mrs. Boyd is 
active and helpful. 

David Denton Hull, Jr., during a law practice covering a 
period of a third of a century early became identified in a pro- 
fessional capacity with the great iron and coal industries of the 
South, and for many years he has not only handled the legal 
affairs but has also served in an executive capacity for large cor- 
porations. 

He represents the tenth generation of the American Hull 
family, one of the oldest of consecutive record from the time of 
the establishment of the original English colonies. His first 
American ancestor was George Hull, who was born in England 
in 1590 and was a member of the original Massachusetts Bay 
Colony, locating at Dorchester, Massachusetts, (now a part of 
Boston) and became a man of considerable local prominence, and 
was a representative in the first General Court of the Massachu- 
setts Bay Colony. Members of successive generations of the 
family lives in New England, were soldiers in the Colonial Wars, 
business men and statesmen. The founder of the Virginia 
branch of the family was Samuel Hull, representing the sixth 
generation of the American family. Samuel Hull came from 
Ulster County, New York, to Virginia and settled in Smyth 
County in 1789. His son Norton Hull was born in Smyth County 
in 1792, and the only child of his first marriage was Thomas T. 
Hull, who was born in Smyth County, February 23, 1811, and 
died September 30, 1851. 



152 VIRGINIA 

He was the father of David Denton Hull, Sr., who was born 
at Marion, Smyth County, December 26, 1837, and who died 
June 19, 1919. Before the Civil war David Denton Hull, Sr., was 
a merchant, entered the Confederate army with the rank of 
lieutenant, and later was a captain in the Sixty-third Virginia 
Volunteer Infantry, General Humphrey Marshall's Division, and 
for a considerable time was with General Morgan's forces in Ten- 
nessee and Kentucky. After the war he became a man of ex- 
tensive business enterprises at Marion, engaged in merchandis- 
ing and milling, was one of the organizers and was successively 
vice president and until his death president of the Bank of 
Marion. He also served on the county board of supervisors, was 
a member of the board to supervise the erection of the South- 
western State Hospital, took a prominent part in maintaining 
educational facilities for Marion and his section of the state, 
being a member of the board of trustees of the Marion Female 
College and for over seventeen years chairman of the board of 
Emory and Henry College. He was a steward in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. He married July 29, 1868, Mary A. H. 
Graham, of Wythe County, Virginia. Of their family of seven 
children David Denton, Jr., was the second child and second son. 

David Denton Hull, Jr., was born March 26, 1872, and grew 
up in the attractive home which his father had established on a 
farm west of Marion. He attended private schools, and in 1891 
was graduated valedictorian of his class at Emory and Henry 
College with the Bachelor of Arts degree. He spent about two 
years in the Law Department of the University of Virginia and 
in 1894 began practice at Pulaski. In 1900 he removed to Bris- 
tol and since 1908 has made his home at Roanoke. Mr. Hull in 
1903 bceame general counsel and in 1917 also vice president of 
the Virginia Iron, Coal and Coke Company; a corporation that 
has owned and operated extensive coal and iron properties in the 
State of Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Georgia and North Caro- 
lina. That relationship has been maintained ever since. 

Mr. Hull takes an active part in the civic affairs of the com- 
munity in which he resides. He is a member of the Roanoke, 
Virginia State and American Bar Associations, belongs to the 
American Steel and Iron Institute, the Trinity Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at Roanoke, is a Kappa Sigma, a Pi Gamma Mu, a 
member of the Shenandoah Club of Roanoke, of the Roanoke 
Country Club and of the Westmoreland Club of Richmond. He 
served a term as president of the Roanoke Chamber of Com- 
merce; is a member of the Board of Visitors of the University of 
Virginia ; and is president and a member of the Board of Trus- 
tees of Hollins College Corporation. 

He married June 16, 1923, Miss Elizabeth Duval Adams, 
daughter of Captain and Mrs. Richard Henry Toler Adams of 
Lynchburg. There are three children of this union : Annie Max- 
well Hull, Susan Elizabeth Hull and Mary Graham Hull. 

William Wise Boxley. Prominent among the citizens of 
Roanoke who have risen from obscurity and poverty to high posi- 
tion and affluence solely through the medium of their own abili- 
ties is William Wise Boxley, known throughout Virginia and 
the adjoining states as one of the foremost railroad contractors 
in this part of the country. When he commenced his connection 
with railroad work Mr. Boxley was fresh from the farm, and his 
wage earning career began at the modest salary of one dollar 
per day. During the forty years that have passed since that 



VIRGINIA 153 

time he has improved every opportunity that has arisen, and 
today is first vice president of the Colonial National Bank, an 
ex-mayor of the city, and a man universally looked up to and 
admired. 

Mr. Boxley was born July 17, 1861, at the ancestral home, 
known as the "Great House," situated on the banks of the North 
Anna River, adjoining Spotsylvania, Louisa County, Virginia, 
and is a son of James and Sallie Ann (Lipscomb) Boxley. His 
paternal grandfather was Joseph Boxley, a native of Boxley, 
England, who came to the United States in young manhood and 
settled in Louisa County, Virginia, where he built the home above 
mentioned and passed the remainder of his life as a planter. 
His son, James Boxley, was born in his father's home, and fol- 
lowed in his father's footsteps as to the matter of a vocation, 
being a planter all of his life. He espoused the cause of the Con- 
federacy during the war between the states and was active in se- 
curing food supplies for the army, but the misfortunes of war 
practically wrecked the family fortunes. Both he and his worthy 
wife were active members of the Baptist Church. Mr. Boxley 
married Miss Sallie Ann Lipscomb, who was born at Spotsyl- 
vania, a daughter of John Lipscomb, also born there, a farmer 
by vocation and a prominent leader in the Baptist Church. Five 
sons and three daughters were born to Mr. and Mrs. Boxley, of 
whom two sons survive : C. A., a retired capitalist of Charles- 
ton, West Virginia ; and William Wise, of this review. 

William Wise Boxley received only the advantages of a public 
school education and was reared on his father's farm, where he 
remained until the age of twenty-seven. In 1888, tiring of agri- 
cultural work and being attracted by the glamor and romance of 
railroading, he took a position as a common laborer in a con- 
struction gang, at wages of one dollar per day. It was not long 
before his employers took note of his industry and intelligence, 
and he was advanced to a foremanship and later to a superin- 
tendency. It was while thus employed that he embarked on a 
venture of his own, in the way of railroad construction, in 1892. 
At first, because of his limited capital, his operations were small, 
but with the accumulation of a larger source of income, as well 
as growing confidence, he increased and broadened his scope, and 
at the present time has to his credit many miles of railroad con- 
struction. He still continues in the same line of business and is 
interested in four of the most highly improved rock-crushing 
outfits obtainable. He maintains well appointed offices in his 
own building, bearing his name, which has eight stores and 
numei'ous offices, and was erected by him in 1923, although his 
headquarters have been at Roanoke since 1906. Mr. Boxley is 
first vice president and chairman of the executive committee of 
the Colonial National Bank of Roanoke, and in 1926 was presi- 
dent of the Chamber of Commerce. A Democrat in politics, he 
has been prominent in public aft'airs, and served four years as 
mayor under the first term of the city manager form of govern- 
ment. Mr. Boxley is a Scottish Rite Mason and a Noble of the 
Mystic Shrine. He belongs to the First Baptist Church of 
Roanoke, in which he is a member of the Board of Deacons, while 
his wife belongs to St. John's Episcopal Church. 

In 1884 Mr. Boxley was united in marriage with Miss Fannie 
Haley, who was born in Louisa County, Virginia, and to this 
union there were born two children: William, who is deceased; 
and Littlebui-ry James, a graduate of Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity, who is associated in business with his father. Mrs. 



154 VIRGINIA 

Boxley met death by drowning in 1893, and in 1903 Mr. Boxley 
married Miss Willie Saunders, who was born in Louisa County, 
the marriage ceremony being performed at Richmond. Three 
children have been born to this union : Abney, a graduate of the 
Virginia Military Institute, in 1925, degree Bachelor of Science, 
who is now engaged in the contracting business with his father 
and half-brother; Mary Wise, a graduate of the National Cathe- 
dral, Washington, D. C; and Cheyenne, a daughter, attending 
school at Gunston Hall, Washington, D. C. 

J. Burton Nowlin, who has had a broad and successful ex- 
perience in medical practice, now specializing in internal medi- 
cine at Lynchburg, is a member of an old Campbell County fam- 
ily, one that has been in Virginia for a number of generations. 

The founder of the family was James Nowlin, who was born 
in Ireland in 1655. The name was spelled Nowlan in that coun- 
try. James Nowlin on account of participation in religious wars 
came to America about 1700, and died in 1725. In order to pay 
his passage across the ocean he indentured himself to a Virginia 
planter named Bryan Ward, and he subsequently married Cath- 
erine Ward, the planter's daughter. One of their sons, Bryan 
Ward, married Lucy Wade, and their son, James Nowlin, a 
native of Pittsylvania County, married Rainey Downey. Mathew 
Bates Nowlin, son of James and Rainey (Downey) Nowlin, was 
born in Pittsylvania County, was a farmer, mill owner, and a 
man of large property interests, owning a hundred slaves before 
the war. At an early date he located on a large plantation in 
Campbell County, where he also operated a store. He died in 
1856. He had served in the State Legislature. Mathew Bates 
Nowlin married Elizabeth Preston, and they were the grand- 
parents of Doctor Nowlin of Lynchburg. 

Doctor Nowlin was born in Campbell County in July, 1873, 
son of James Bowker and Susan Hamner (Burton) Nowlin. 
His mother was born near Lynchburg on her father's plantation 
"The Oaks." Her mother was Damaris Cobbs. Her grand- 
father, John Hudson Burton, who married Margaret Macon, was 
a descendant of Thomas Burton, who came from England in 
1634 and settled in Henrico County, Virginia, being one of the 
pioneer planters in the vicinity of Richmond. James Bowker 
Nowlin spent most of his active life in the banking business at 
Lynchburg. He was a member of Kirkpatrick's Battery in the 
Confederate army. He was a Methodist, while his wife be- 
longed to the Methodist Protestant Church. Of their four chil- 
dren two are now living, Dr. J. Burton and J. Graham, of Lynch- 
burg. 

Dr. J. Burton Nowiin was educated at the Lynchburg High 
School and graduated from the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons at Baltimore in 1896. For twelve years he practiced in 
Buckingham County, for two years was in Richmond specializing 
in children's diseases, and since 1910 has practiced at Lynch- 
burg. 

Doctor Nowlin married. September 21, 1898, Roberta Ellis 
Hall, daughter of Thomas B. Hall, a farmer. Doctor and Mrs. 
Nowlin have two children. The son, Preston Nowlin, was edu- 
cated at the University of Virginia, graduating in medicine in 
1924, spent twenty months as an interne in the Boston City Hos- 
pital and is now specializing in surgery. The second child, Ellis 
Nowlin, is the wife of George H. Cosby, Jr., a special insurance 
agent and insurance inspector at Charlottesville. Doctor Now- 



VIRGINIA 155 

lin and family are members of the Presbyterian Church. He is 
a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, member of the Woodmen of 
the World, and belongs to the Lynchburg and Campbell County 
Medical Society and the Medical Society of Virginia. 

David Halbert Howard. During the many years that he 
was identified with the bar of Lynchburg, the late David Hal- 
bert Howard demonstrated the possession of splendid legal abili- 
ties, in the exercise of which he gained the right to be known as 
one of the leaders of his profession in Campbell County. From 
the time that he left college in young manhood until his death, 
in 1925, he led an active, useful and successful career, and as a 
member of the firm of Kirkpatrick & Howard was identified 
with much litigation of a highly important character. While 
he never sought office that would bring him to the forefront as 
a public figure, in a quiet and unassuming way he exerted an 
influence for good and was known as a man of public spirit and 
civic pride. 

Mr. Howard was born July 19, 1865, in Wythe County, Vir- 
ginia, a son of J. Milton and Rhoda Jane (Allison) Howard. His 
father, who spent his entire life in Wythe County, was an agri- 
culturist, and the early environment of David H. Howard was 
that of the home farm. After attending the rural schools he 
took an academic course at King's College, Bristol, and then 
became a law student at the University of Virginia, from which 
he was duly graduated with his degree in 1890. He at once took 
up his residence at Lynchburg, where he followed his profes- 
sion with great success during the remainder of his life. He 
was a member of the Virginia State Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association, and carried on a civil practice, being 
at all times an upholder of the ethics and amenities of his calling. 
Mr. Howard was an elder in the First Presbyterian Church, and 
belonged to the Masons, the Knights Templar and the Mystic 
Shrine, and the Piedmont and Oakwood Clubs. Politically he 
gave his allegiance to the Democratic party. 

In 1897 Mr. Howard was united in marriage with Miss Nan- 
nie Vaughan, who was born at Danville, Virginia, and educated 
in the schools of Lynchburg. She is a daughter of Dr. Egbert 
G. and Lucie Guinn (Estes) Vaughan, the former a native of 
Amelia County, Virginia, and the latter of Nelson County, Vir- 
ginia. Doctor Vaughan received his medical degree from the 
University of Pennsylvania and for many years was engaged in 
practice in Halifax County, this state, where he became greatly 
respected because of his skill and high personal character. He 
is now deceased, but is survived by his widow, who resides with 
Mrs. Howard, and who, although now at the advanced age of 
ninety-five years, is in good health and both mentally and 
physically active. Of the six children in the Vaughan family, 
four are living: James Oscar, a traveling man, who resides at 
Atlanta, Georgia; B. Estes, president of the First National Bank 
of Lexington, Virginia, and also president of three other bank- 
ing institutions in this state; Mrs. Janie V. Hudson, a widow 
residing at Lynchburg; and Mrs. Howard. To Mr. and Mrs. 
Howard there were born five children : Lucie, who completed 
her education at the Agnes Scott School, at Atlanta. Georgia; 
Nannie Vaughan, a graduate of Randolph-Macon College, who 
studied art at New York City for one year and completed her 
education at Paris, France, where she received the degree of 
Interior Decorator and is now following her profession in New 



156 VIRGINIA 

York City ; Rhoda, who graduated from Hollins College with 
the class of 1927 ; David Halbert, Jr., who graduated from 
Davidson College in 1928; and Estes Vaughan, who graduated 
from McCauley Preparatory School, Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 
1928 and who is now attending the University of Virginia. Mrs. 
Howard has always been active in religious affairs, and belongs 
to the Woman's Auxiliary of the First Presbyterian Church. 

Charles W. Womack is head of the firm C. W. Womack & 
Company, general contractors, whose work is found in a number 
of the prominent public buildings in Lynchburg. 

Mr. Womack learned the contracting business thoroughly 
from a beginning as a building mechanic, and has long been one 
of the prominent representatives of business in the civic affairs 
of his home city. He was born on a farm in Campbell County, 
August 30, 1866, son of James and Mildred (Yancey) Womack, 
natives of the same county. His father spent most of his life 
as a contractor, largely in rural construction, and erected a num- 
ber of the fine country homes ai'ound Lynchburg. He was quite 
active until his death at the age of eighty-one. He was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Church and a Democrat in politics. Of ten 
children, five sons and five daughters, one son, Benjamin L., was 
a Confederate soldier in the Civil war. 

Charles W. Womack attended public schools and learned the 
trade of carpenter under his father. He was associated with 
his father until the latter's death, and in 1887 removed to Lynch- 
burg and there became associated with another veteran building 
contractor, John P. Pettyjohn, and was Mr. Pettyjohn's fore- 
man twenty years. Mr. Womack in 1907 engaged in business 
for himself, organizing the firm of C. W. Womack & Company. 
Most of the important contracts handled by this firm have been 
in the City of Lynchburg. They include the Market House, the 
Christian Church, John Wyatt School, West End Shoe Factory, 
Lynchburg Hospital and many others involving similar amounts 
but less well known to the public. 

Mr. Womack married in 1890 Miss Ellen A. Luck, who was 
born in Bedford County, Virginia, daughter of Marshall Luck. 
She attended schools in Bedford. Mr. and Mrs. Womack are 
members of the College Hill Baptist Church. He is a York Rite 
Mason and Shriner, member of the Grotto of Masons, and has 
filled all the chairs in James River Lodge No. 48, Independent Or- 
der of Odd Fellows. He and his wife are members of the East- 
ern Star and Rebekahs, and Mrs. Womack has filled the chairs in 
the Eastern Star Chapter. He is a member of the Lions Club, a 
Democrat, and is a former member of the Board of Aldermen of 
Lynchburg. 

John Hundley Hoskins, M. D., is a native Virginian, grad- 
uated from the Medical College of Virginia, and a large part of 
his professional service has been in the line of surgery, in con- 
nection with hospitals. He is one of the leading surgeons in the 
City of Lynchburg. 

Doctor Hoskins was born in Essex County, Virginia, April 
22, 1892, son of Willard Dunbard and Ella Garnett (Hundley) 
Hoskins, and grandson of William Hoskins and John T. Hund- 
ley. William Hoskins was born in King and Queen County, was 
a physician and practiced his profession in his native county for 
many years. John T. Hundley was born in Essex County, Vir- 
ginia, spent most of his life as an educator, and was a Confed- 



VIRGINIA 157 

erate soldier in the Civil war. Willard D. Hoskins was born in 
King and Queen County, and his wife, in Essex County, and both 
died on the same day and were buried in the same grave, in 
1910. He was a merchant at Dunnsville, a member of the 
Christian Church, a Mason and Democrat. In their family of 
eight children, five sons and three daughters, Doctor Hoskins 
was the second. 

Doctor Hoskins after the common schools attended William 
and Mary College for two years. He graduated with his medi- 
cal diploma from the Medical College of Virginia in 1915 and 
had some special training at the Marine Hospital at Buffalo, 
New York. He began practice at Beckley, West Virginia, an 
important industrial community, leaving there at the time of 
the World war and was with the colors as a medical oflScer for 
nineteen months. He was stationed at Fort Oglethorpe, Geor- 
gia, and Metuchen, New Jersey, until discharged. After leaving 
the army Doctor Hoskins had post-graduate work in the great 
Bellevue Hospital of New York, then resumed practice at Beck- 
ley, and in 1923 bought a hospital at Hazard, Kentucky, which 
he conducted until 1925. Since 1925 he has practiced at Lynch- 
burg, his work being almost exclusively in general surgery. He 
is a member of the Lynchburg and Campbell County Medical 
Society, the Medical Society of Virginia, the Piedmont and the 
American Medical Associations. 

Doctor Hoskins married, January 5, 1918, Miss Emma Kelly, 
of Culpeper, Virginia. She was educated in the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory of Music and was teaching at Beckley, West Virginia, 
when she met Doctor Hoskins. They have one daughter, Emily 
Hume Hoskins, born October 6, 1920, and they lost their only 
son, John H., Jr., who died in May, 1927. Doctor and Mrs. Hos- 
kins are active members of the First Baptist Church of Lynch- 
burg, and he is serving on the Board of Trustees. He is a Royal 
Arch Mason, member of the B. P. 0. Elks, the Pi Kappa Alpha 
fraternity at William and Mary College, and the Phi Chi medical 
fraternity. 

Frank Scott Cooper, M. D. The son and grandson of 
physicians, it was but natural that Dr. Frank Scott Cooper, of 
Roanoke, should evidence an inclination for the profession of 
medicine in his youth and that he should apply himself thereto 
with success. However, versatility has always been one of his 
strong points, and as he is possessed of a degree of business 
judgment and foresight not always to be found among strictly 
professional men he has gradually drifted away from the moor- 
ings of his youth, and for many years has not been identified 
with medical or surgical science, various large business and 
financial interests having claimed his attention and interest to 
the exclusion of other activities. At present he is widely known 
in the automobile business, with which he has been connected 
since 1914, and in which he has attained an unqualified success 
and prestige. 

Doctor Cooper was born at Fayetteville, Fayette County, 
West Virginia, March 22, 1878, and is a son of Dr. Calvin S. 
and Stella (Jones) Cooper. His paternal grandfather. Dr. John 
Cooper, was born in what is now the State of West Virginia, and 
was a country physician of the old-time type, who put his pro- 
fession far above any emolument he might secure for his ser- 
vices, and who in the process of his practice covered an area of 
many miles in the vicinity of Fayetteville. His son. Dr. Calvin 



158 VIRGINIA 

S. Cooper, was born at Sewell, West Virginia, and received his 
medical education principally under the preceptorship of his 
father, although he also attended a medical school in Tennessee. 
For a time he was engaged in practice in West Virginia, but 
finally located at Roanoke, where he continued to follow his call- 
ing until his death in 1888. He was a Mason and a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, and a man who was held in uni- 
versal esteem in his community. His worthy wife, a member 
of the Baptist Church, and a native of Amherst County, West 
Virginia, died in 1878, shortly after the birth of her son. There 
were two children : Mrs. Lottie C. Troegle, of Huntington, West 
Virginia, whose husband is a retired business man ; and Dr. 
Frank Scott, of this review. 

Frank Scott Cooper was but twelve years of age when he 
was forced to become partly self-supporting, his mother having 
died about the time of his birth and his father having passed 
away when the lad was only ten years old. He acquired a 
hardly-gained common school education, but seems to have in- 
herited a heritage of love of learning from his father and grand- 
father, and spent what leisure time he could get in reading and 
study, when he was not employed in the coal mines in the vicin- 
ity of his home. He received some support from his maternal 
grandfather, Llewellyn W. Jones, who was born in Virginia and 
became a pioneer in Fayette County, West Virginia, where he 
acquired 10,000 acres of land and many slaves, but met a tragic 
death by drowning in the Mississippi River. Eventually Frank 
Scott Cooper accumulated sufficient funds with which to pursue 
a course at the University of West Virginia, following which 
he spent three years at the Medical College of Virginia, and then 
entered the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, 
Maryland, from which he was graduated with the degree Doctor 
of Medicine as a member of the class of 1903. Having some 
knowledge of conditions in the coal regions. Doctor Cooper com- 
menced his practice in the coal fields of Giatto, West Virginia, 
where he remained for about six years, and in 1908 took up his 
permanent residence at Roanoke. Here he opened an office and 
followed his profession as a physician and surgeon, and con- 
tinued therein until 1914, building up an excellent practice and 
becoming recognized as a capable, thorough and reliable practi- 
tioner. During this time he had become increasingly interested 
in the automobile industry, and in 1914 formally gave up his 
practice to establish an agency, handling Overland, Dodge, Hud- 
son and Essex cars. This he has developed into one of the larg- 
est enterprises of its kind in the state, and the Virginia Motor 
Car Company, Inc., of which he is the owner, now controls 
thirty-six successful and going agencies in the Old Dominion. 
Its remarkable growth may be attributed to Doctor Cooper's 
good business judgment, great industry and absolute integrity 
and to the thorough knowledge which he has gained through 
study and experience of the automobile industry in all its 
branches. Doctor Cooper also has a number of other important 
business connections and is a member of the Board of Directors 
of the First National Exchange Bank of Roanoke. He was one 
of the organizers of the large and handsome Patrick Henry 
Hotel, and has been vice president of the corporation since its 
inception. At all times he has had the civic welfare of the city 
thoroughly at heart, and formerly was vice president of the 
Chamber of Commerce. As has been noted, his career has been 
one of intense industry since boyhood, and he has made the most 



VIRGINIA 159 

of his opportunities, at all times preserving a love of high stand- 
ards and ideals. Politics has played no pai't in his career and 
he maintains an independent stand, exercising his right of fran- 
chise by voting for the man rather than for the party. He is a 
York Rite Mason and Shriner and member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and his religious faith is that of the 
Presbyterian Church. 

In 1905 Doctor Cooper was united in marriage with Miss 
Elizabeth Williams, who was born in Bland County, Virginia, 
and educated in her native community, and to this union there 
have been born three childi'en : Flora, attending the Flora Mc- 
Donald School in North Carolina ; Frank Scott, Jr., a graduate 
of Mercersburg (Pennsylvania) Academy, and now a medical 
student at Princeton University; and Paul S., born in 1916, 
who is attending public school at Roanoke. 

Moses Peter Rucker, physician and surgeon, is a profes- 
sional man of high standing, credited with many years of service 
in Bedford County, his home being at Bedford City. 

He was born on a farm in that county June 27, 1876. The 
Rucker family came from France. Doctor Rucker is of Revolu- 
tionary ancestry. His parents were M. P. and Sallie Fannie 
(Parker) Rucker, and his grandfathers were Anthony Rucker 
and Joseph Parker. M. P. Rucker was a soldier in the Confed- 
erate army, and otherwise devoted his life to his farm in Bed- 
ford County, where he died in 1926. His wife passed away 
February 4, 192.5. Of the four sons two became farmers and 
merchants and two physicians. 

Moses Peter Rucker was educated in the Bedford High 
School, the New London Academy, and graduated with the 
M. D. degree from the Maryland Medical College in 1904. 
Since that year he has practiced steadily in Bedford, handling a 
general practice and also doing work as general surgeon for the 
Norfolk & Western Railway. He is a member of the Bedford 
County Medical Society, Medical Society of Virginia, and Ameri- 
can Medical Association. 

Doctor Rucker married June 28, 1910, Miss Mary Pryor 
Williams, who was born in Essex County, Virginia, descended 
from one of the first families in that county. Her father, Wil- 
liam A. Williams, was an Essex County farmer. Mrs. Rucker 
finished her education in a girls school at Uniontown, Pennsyl- 
vania, and for two years taught at Norfolk. They have one 
daughter, Nancy Williams, now attending school. Doctor Rucker 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, is affiliated 
with the Masonic fraternity. Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

Edward L. Stone. While the art of producing impressions 
from characters or figures on paper or any other substance is 
of comparatively recent origin, less than five centuries having 
elapsed since the first book was issued from the press, there 
is proof that the principles on which it was ultimately developed 
existed among the ancient Assyrian nations. Printing from 
movable types was probably practiced in China as early as the 
twelfth or thirteenth century, as there are Korean books printed 
from movable clay or wooden types in 1317. The first book 
printed from cast, movable metal type was the Bible, printed 
by Gutenberg at Mainz, 1450-1455. Printing was taken to 
England in 1476 or 1477 by William Caxton, and the first 



160 VIRGINIA 

printing press set up in America was introduced by the Vicero 
of Mexico, Antonio de Mendoza, in 1536. The earliest press 
in the British-American colonies was brought over for Har- 
vard College in 1638. In Philadelphia a press was set up in 
1685 and in New York in 1693, and from that time to the present 
the history of printing has been one of constant advancement and 
marvelous improvement. In this connection there is often too 
much stress laid upon the inventors of new appliances, who, while 
undoubtedly due to unqualified credit for their inventions, had to 
have the support of the printing concerns themselves, and it is 
in the latter connection that Edward L. Stone, president of the 
Stone Printing and Manufacturing Company, past president of 
the Chamber of Commerce, business man and book lover, of 
Roanoke, should be given extended mention in any history of 
Virginia. 

Edward L. Stone was born at Liberty (now Bedford City), 
Virginia, September 15, 1864, and after receiving a public 
school education, at the age of eleven years took a job as 
an apprentice in a small printing office located in his home 
town. Several years later he took a more promising position 
with J. P. Bell, at that time the most progressive printer at 
Lynchburg. When the Shenandoah Valley Railroad was com- 
pleted to Roanoke in June 1882, the former little way-station 
took on new life, and Mr. Bell, a man of great foresight and busi- 
ness judgment, visioning the development and growth that was 
to come, determined to open a printing office in the embryo city. 
He arrived in July, 1883, bringing with him young Stone, and 
they set up a printery in a small frame building on Commerce 
Street, opposite the old Trout House. The mechanical equip- 
ment of the plant consisted of two Gordon presses, a few cases 
of body type, several dozen fonts of display type and the essen- 
tial tools for a small office. There had been two other small 
printing offices at Roanoke, but these were soon passed by the 
Bell concern, although the financial returns for the first few 
years were far from satisfactory. In 1885 Samuel G. Fields, of 
Abingdon, the manager, died, and Mr. Bell appointed the twenty- 
one-year-old Ed Stone to succeed him. By 1887 the business had 
expanded to such an extent that it was necessary to install two 
new presses, a large amount of new type and a two horse-power 
steam engine to operate the machinery. On February 28, 1889, 
the plant was entirely destroyed by fire, but this probably was a 
blessing in disguise, for the firm decided to build more substan- 
tially and permanently, upon Mr. Stone's advice, and a short 
time after the conflagration leased the second and third floors of 
the Gale Building, located on Jefferson Street, where new presses, 
type and equipment were installed. By 1890 a working force of 
thirty-three persons was essential to handle the business, and in 
1891, when J. P. Bell retired from the presidency, the controlling 
interest was purchased by Edward L. Stone, J. B. Fishburn and 
T. T. Fishburn. At this time the capacity of the plant was 
practically doubled, and Mr. Stone succeeded to the presidency, 
under whose management the industry was developed into a 
national business. In September, 1891, the reorganized com- 
pany removed to its own three-story brick building on Jefferson 
Street, and in 1892 the corporate name of the firm was changed 
to The Stone Printing and Manufacturing Company, which it 
retains to this day. Later the building on North Jefferson Street 
was doubled and trebled in size to provide for the constantly 
growing business, and in 1907 the present building was erected> 



VIRGINIA 161 

this being two stories and basement, with a frontage of 218 feet 
and a depth of 110 feet. At present the company employs from 
150 to 200 skilled workers and is operating one of the best 
equipped printing plants in America. For many years the com- 
pany has been specializing in such lines as railroad tariffs, busi- 
ness stationery, twelve-sheet calendars and commercial printing 
in general. Great quantities of printed matter are being pro- 
duced for railroads, mining companies, banks and trust compa- 
nies, and for big business concerns in general. Recently the com- 
pany added the 45-year continuous-service bar to Mr. Stone's 
golcl medal. 

The company has long been noted for fine typography and 
excellent quality of process color printing. At the Jamestown 
Tercentennial Exposition, held at Hampton Roads in 1907, the 
company won the bronze medal for its exhibit. At the Fourth 
District Typothetae Federation Convention, held at Wilmington, 
Delaware, April 17 and 18, 1925, the company was awarded 
first prize for booklets and catalogues, and second prize for 
printer's own advertising. It also won prizes at other conven- 
tions of this organization at Winston-Salem in 1923 and at Nor- 
folk in 1924. 

Mr. Stone is an enthusiastic member and honorary vice presi- 
dent of the American Institute of Graphic Arts of New York 
City, to the members of which the Stone Company, in 1926, pre- 
sented "Keepsake No. 21," which consists of a facsimile of 
"Typographia : an Ode on Printing," one of the earliest books 
printed by William Parks, at Williamsburg, Virginia, and 
dated 1730. Mr. Stone with his own hands set the type mat- 
ter for the introductory pages of this unique keepsake. Only 
one copy of this book, which some authorities claim to have 
been the first printed in Virginia, is known to be in existence, 
this being in the John Carter Brown Library at Providence. By 
special permission from this library Mr. Stone obtained the 
photostat prints of this rare book, from which photoengravings 
were made, and from these plates the keepsake was printed in the 
plant of the company. Mr. Stone's energetic work in behalf of 
Typothetae and similar organizations is well known, he having 
been one of the pioneers in perfecting and establishing the Stand- 
ard cost system in the printing and other industries. He was a 
member of the executive council and cost commission of the 
United Typothetae and Franklin Clubs of America, and is a 
member of the Better Printing Committee. For the U. T. A. he 
has also served as a member of the executive committee, a mem- 
ber of the cost commission and a member of the legislative com- 
mittee. He was president of the Virginia Printers' Cost Con- 
gress, and was a member of the directorate of the same organi- 
zation. 

At his home Mr. Stone has a collection of rare books which is 
quite unique and comprehensive. The library is already famous 
and is bound to become more renowned among book lovers. IMr. 
Stone knows the works of both the early printers and the great 
modern printers as few other book collectors know them, and 
to hear him talk on this subject is a pleasure for anyone in- 
terested in the "Art Preservative of all Arts." Mr. Stone is a 
member of the National Geographic Society; a life member of 
the Virginia Historical Society. Richmond : Florida Historical 
Society; Westmoreland Club, Richmond; Manufacturers' Club, 
Philadelphia; Huntingdon Valley Country Club, Philadelphia; 
American Institute of Graphic Arts (honorary vice president), 

8— VOL. 3 



162 VIRGINIA 

New York City ; Grolier Club, New York City ; director member 
(honorary), University Club, Roanoke; Roanoke Country Club; 
Roanoke Dinner Dance Club; Life Member Roanoke Realtors 
Association (honorary) ; Associated Advertising Clubs of the 
World ; Bibliographical Society of London, England ; Miami An- 
glers' Club, Miami; Roanoke German Club, Roanoke; Interna- 
tional Benjamin Franklin Society, New York City; a charter 
member of the Lee Highway Association, Washington ; Virginia 
Historic Highway Association, Lynchburg; Board of Trustees, 
Roanoke Community Fund; Board of Trustees, Committee to 
Assist the Blind ; The Virginia Academy of Science, Richmond ; 
Past-President, Chamber of Commerce, Roanoke; President, 
Secretary, Treasurer, "an' everything," Quadraginta Club, New 
York and Roanoke ; Southwest Virginia Historical Society, Roan- 
oke; Chairman City Planning and Zoning Commissions, 
Roanoke. 

Mr. Stone's activities are not confined to the printing com- 
pany. He is a vice-president and director of the First National 
Exchange Bank, Roanoke, the Walker Machine and Foundry 
Corporation. He is also a director of the Virginia Bridge and 
Iron Company, Roanoke; the Borderland Coal Corporation, the 
Roanoke Auditorium Company, and many others. His civic ac- 
tivities are numerous, and he is also identified with several civic 
and fraternal organizations. 

Stonewall Jackson Gill, M. D. For twenty-one years Dr. 
Stonewall Jackson Gill has carried on a general practice in Roan- 
oke, and when he came here it was as the experienced physician, 
ripened by years of experience in his profession and service to 
humanity. During the long period he has ministered to the 
people of Roanoke he has won and holds their warm esteem and 
approval, and there are very few men held as high as he by the 
general public. He was born in Amherst County, Virginia, 
December 16, 1861, a son of Curtis and Elizabeth (Martin) 
Gill, both natives of Amherst County, now deceased. During 
the earlier part of his life he was a contractor, and in addition 
to erecting the first houses in Rockbridge and Elm Springs he 
had contracts for building houses and milling plants all over 
Virginia and West Virginia. After he married he bought a 
farm on Indian Creek, and the remainder of his life was devoted 
to farming. A man fond of outdoor life, during the last fifteen 
years he lived he made it a practice to spend three months of 
each year camping at the breakwaters of Big Piney River, a 
number of his friends joining him in the outing. Of the nine 
children born to him and his wife five are living, and Doctor 
Gill is the youngest born. Both he and his wife were long very 
active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and 
he was a very real pillar of the church, and carried his faith into 
his everyday life. Too old himself for military service during 
the war between the states, his son, Thomas Gill, enlisted at 
the age of sixteen years, during the latter part of the war. An 
ardent Democrat, he took part in politics, although not an office 
seeker. His father, Jonas Gill, was born in Chesterfield County, 
Virginia, and became a prosperous farmer. The maternal 
grandfather, Lowe Martin, was born in Amherst County, and 
was a farmer by occupation. Although he owned many slaves, 
one of the great-grandfathers of Doctor Gill was so impressed 
by the evils of slavery that he set free 100 and sent those who 
wished to go to Liberia at his expense. 



VIRGINIA 163 

Doctor Gill attended school in Harrisonburg, Virginia, and 
took his degree in medicine in Vanderbilt University, Nashville, 
Tennessee. Later he took post-graduate work in Georgetown 
University of Medicine, Washington City. He began the prac- 
tice of his profession in Lowesville, Virginia, but after three 
years settled in Bedford County, Virginia, and there he remained 
in active practice for seventeen years, coming then to Roanoke, 
where he has found congenial surroundings and a large measure 
of success. 

In 1887 Doctor Gill married Miss Lillian Page, who was born 
in Nelson County, Virginia, a daughter of James Page, a farmer. 
The following children have been born to Doctor and Mrs. Gill : 
Charlie Briggs, who died at the age of twenty-one years ; Eliza- 
beth H., who is in the hospital with her brother ; Dr. Elburne G., 
a practicing physician of Roanoke ; and Fannie Lou, who mai*- 
ried Dr. W. H. Stryker, a dental surgeon of Williamsburg, Vir- 
ginia. For four years Mrs. Stryker taught domestic science in 
William and Mary College, Williamsburg. 

Doctor and Mrs. Gill belong to Cavalry Baptist Church. He 
is a Mason, a Knight of P>i:hias and an Elk. The Roanoke 
County Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical Society and 
the Southern Medical Society all hold his membership. During 
the past few years Doctor Gill has become veiy much interested 
in horticulture and owns an apple orchard in Bedford County 
which is bearing heavily, in 1927 producing about 18,000 
bushels. When he bought the land he paid S2.25 per acre for 
it, and during the thirty-five years he has owned it, it has 
steadily advanced until today, with all his improvements upon 
it, this is a very valuable property. 

Elburne Gray Gill graduated from medical college in 1916, 
and has enjoyed a steadily growing reputation in his profession 
at Roanoke, and has also been active in the club and civic affairs 
of that city. 

Doctor Gill was born at Sedalia, Bedford County, Virginia, 
October 21, 1891, son of Dr. Stonewall Jackson and Lillian Gill, 
and grandson of Mr. and Mrs. Curtis Gill of Amherst County, 
and of Mr. and Mrs. James W. Page of Nelson County. 

Doctor Gill attended the Roanoke City High School and from 
1912 to 1916 was a student in the medical department of Vander- 
bilt University at Nashville, Tennessee, where he obtained the 
degree Doctor of Medicine. In his work at Roanoke he has 
largely specialized in diseases of the eye, ear, nose and throat. 
In 1926 he was responsible for the construction of the Gill 
Memorial Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital, which is the only insti- 
tution of its kind in Virginia. 

Doctor Gill is a member of the American College of Surgeons 
and in 1921 was president of the Virginia Society of Ophthal- 
mology and Oto-Laryngology. 

He is a director of the Liberty Trust Company of Roanoke, 
was president of the University Club in 1921 and the Roanoke 
Lions Club in 1925. He is a Democrat, a Mason and Shriner, 
member of the Roanoke Country Club, and is a deacon in the 
Calvary Baptist Church and teacher of the Young Men's Bible 
Class, which has a membership of one hundred. 

Mr. Gill married Miss Ruth Meals, a daughter of I. J. Meals, 
of Roanoke. She is a graduate of the Mary Baldwin Seminary 
at Staunton, Virginia. They have two daughters, Edith Page 
and Martha Vaughan Gill. 



164 VIRGINIA 

Paul C. Hubard. There are, unquestionably, men of natural 
force found in every prosperous community, who by reason of 
their inherent ability, by the use of their brains and the sound- 
ness of their judgment, attain distinction and acquire authority. 
They are men who industriously work for an end, and in helping 
themselves add to the sum of comfort and happiness for all 
about them. These quiet, resourceful men are the dependence of 
the whole social fabric, for their efforts not only bring into being 
the substantial industries that support commerce, but conduct 
along the safe and sane channels which assure public prosperity 
and general contentment. They may be men of versatile gifts 
and talents of a high order in many directions, but it is their 
soundness, their vitality and their steadfastness that sum up the 
whole and make them such important factors in the work of 
their communities. Such a man is Paul C. Hubard, proprietor 
of the Hubard Foundry & Machine Works, Incorporated, of 
which he is president. 

Paul C. Hubard was born in Nelson County, Virginia, Decem- 
ber 22, 1865, a son of William B. and Eliza (Callaway) Hub- 
ard, natives of Buckingham and Nelson counties, respectively, 
and both are deceased. The father was a planter and a man of 
prominence in Nelson County. Both he and his wife were active 
members of the Episcopal Church, and he was a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. In political faith he was a Democrat. Of 
the eleven children born to the parents three survive, those in 
addition to Paul C. Hubard being: Mrs. Sommerville, a widow, 
who lives on a farm, is the relict of Rev. George S. Sommerville, 
a clergyman of the Episcopal Church ; and Anna, who is unmar- 
ried, is employed in the Forestry Department in Washington 
City. 

Paul C. Hubard was educated in a local normal school and 
college, and his first work was done in the Glenmorgan foundry, 
where he learned draughting, completing his work in this line 
in Franklin Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Returning 
to his old foundry, he remained there for a number of years, and 
was its designer. He also was a practical machinist, and became 
so adept that he also served as an instructor in the Virginia 
Polytechnic Institute for several years. During all of this time, 
however, he was steadily working toward the end of establishing 
his own business, and this he was able to do in 1896, when he 
opened the Hubard Foundry & Machine Worlvs in Lynchburg. 
From the start the business was a success, and in 1904 he incor- 
porated it, and is now president and general manager ; C. W. 
Gooch, vice president; and A. B. Dabney, secretary and treas- 
urer. A general line of machine work is done, and the quality 
is rated very high. 

Mr. Hubard married in Richmond in the latter part of the 
last century Miss Louise Carrington, a native of that city, and 
a daughter of Dr. George Carrington, one of the prominent 
physicians and surgeons of Richmond and Rustburg until his 
death. Very prominent in Masonry, he at one time held the 
office of grand secretary of his order. Three children have been 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Hubard, but one only survives, she being 
Eleanor, who is attending school. A man of strong religious 
convictions, Mr. Hubard belongs to the International Bible Stu- 
dents Association. He is a Mason and a Knight of Pythias. 
While he votes the Democratic ticket and supports his party's 
principles, he is not an aspirent for political honors. A man of 
uncommon ability, kindly disposition and broad sympathies, he 




C::; 'Cl:^z^c-<^,.,-^^^ X>. /^'^^y z.^^^ 



VIRGINIA 165 

knows how to win the approval of men and earn and retain their 
friendship. His interest in Lynchburg and its development is 
warm and sincere and he has ever contributed generously toward 
the advancement of those measures which appeal to him as 
worthy ones. His success in life is all the more noteworthy in 
that it has been attained entirely through his own efforts. 

LiNWOOD Dickens Keyser, of Roanoke, took his A. B. degree 
at the University of Virginia in 1914, the M. D. degree at Johns 
Hopkins University in 1918, and has also been accorded a dis- 
tinction readily recognized by all members of the medical and 
surgical profession, the degree Master of Science in Pathology 
from the University of Minnesota in 1921, bestowed in recog- 
nition of the several years of active connection with the Mayo 
Clinic. 

Doctor Keyser was born at Victoria, Texas, September 26, 
1893, but is a member of an old and well known family of Vir- 
ginia. His great-grandfather, Christopher Keyser, was an elder 
and minister of the Baptist Church. Doctor Keyser's grand- 
father, Henry Marcellus Keyser, was a doctor of medicine and 
was born in Page County, Virginia, January 22, 1835. He grad- 
uated from the Cincinnati Medical College, later attended the 
Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, and in addition to 
practicing medicine was superintendent of schools in Page 
County, and for five terms a member of the State Legislature. 
He died in 1898. 

The father of Doctor Linwood Dickens Keyser is Ernest Lin- 
wood Keyser, a well known business man of Roanoke. He was 
born in Page County October 21, 1868, attended the New Mar- 
ket Polytechnic Institute, graduated in pharmacy at Chicago in 
1892, and for ten years was in the drug business at San Antonio 
and Victoria, Texas. In 1902 he located at Roanoke, and in re- 
cent years has given most of his time to drug and chemical 
manufacturing. He is president of the Keyser Chemical Com- 
pany and has also been president of the Keyser-Warren Drug 
Company, and an official in the Keyser-Holback Drug Company. 
Ernest L. Keyser has been prominent in the Democratic party 
for many years, having been a delegate to the National Conven- 
tions of 1908 and 1912, was elected to the Virginia House of 
Delegates in 1910, and made himself especially valuable to Roa- 
noke while in the Legislature. He is a Royal Arch thirty-second 
degree, Knight Templar and Shriner Mason, member of the 
B. P. 0. Elks, and he is a member of the Baptist Church, while 
his wife is a member of St. John's Episcopal Church. He mar- 
ried, in 1889, Lillie Dickens, daughter of M. H. Dickens, of Bee 
County, Texas. 

Their only son, Linwood Dickens Keyser, has spent most of 
his life at Roanoke, having been about six years of age when 
his parents established their home here on returning from 
Texas. Doctor Kevser graduated with the A. B. degree from 
the LTniversity of Virginia in 1914. He took his degree at Johns 
Hopkins University School of Medicine at Baltimore in 1918, 
and the degree Master of Science in Pathology was bestowed by 
the University of Minnesota in 1921. 

During the World war Doctor Keyser was commissioned a 
first lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps, but was not called 
to active duty. From June, 1917, to March, 1918, he was an 
interne in the Church Home and Infirmary, Baltimore; June, 
1918, to July, 1919, was an interne in the Johns Hopkins Hos- 



166 VIRGINIA 

pital at Baltimore, and from July to December, 1919, was 
assistant resident surgeon at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital 
in Boston. He was resident surgeon at the New York Post- 
Graduate Hospital from January to June, 1920, and on Septem- 
ber 8, 1920, entered the Mayo Foundation as a fellow in pathol- 
ogy. He had a range of service and experience with the Foun- 
dation lasting several years, including nine and a half months 
in surgical pathology, nine months in urology, three months in 
general diagnosis, nine months in operative surgery, three 
months in orthopedic surgery, and twenty-seven months in ex- 
perimental surgery and pathology, this last work being carried 
en in connection with his duties in other special departments. 

Doctor Keyser on July 1, 1923, left the Mayo Foundation and 
is now attending surgeon and surgical pathologist at the Roa- 
noke Hospital. He is a member of the Roanoke Academy of 
Medicine, Southwest Virginia Medical Society, Virginia State 
Medical Society, Tri-State Medical Society, Southern Medical 
Association and American Medical Association. He belongs to 
the Association of Resident and Ex-resident Physicians of the 
Mayo Clinics. He is a member of the American Urological Society 
and belongs to the Sigma Xi honorary iraternity and Phi Chi 
medical fraternity and is a fellow of the American College of 
Surgeons. Doctor Keyser is one of the brilliant men of his pro- 
fession in Virginia today. In addition to his work in labora- 
tories, clinics and the general routine of his service he has con- 
tributed about twenty-five articles to various medical and surgi- 
cal journals, chiefly on surgery and urological subjects. 

While at the University of Virginia Doctor Keyser was a 
member of the Raven Society and acted as student assistant in 
chemistry during 1912-14. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner, member of the Lions Club, Chamber of Commerce, Uni- 
versity Club, Shenandoah Club, Country Club and St. John's 
Episcopal Church. He is also assistant surgeon-in-chief to the 
Sons of Confederate Veterans. 

Howard Seville Hunt for many years was in the railway 
train service, being associated with some of the great trunk 
lines of railway traversing Virginia and other eastern states, 
was prompt, vigilant and efficient, and enjoyed the esteem of 
both his associates and superiors. 

He was born in North Carolina August 2, 1866,, and lost his 
life while in the line of duty at Okonoko, West Virginia, in Feb- 
ruary, 1907. His father, Samuel H. Hunt, was born in Alabama, 
entered the Confederate army when young, and at the end of 
the war was mustered out in North Carolina, met his wife there, 
Frances Ellerson, and after a few years in that state moved to 
Virginia and spent the rest of his life as a merchant and farmer. 
Howard S. Hunt was the oldest in a family of eight children, 
seven sons and one daughter. He finished his education in the 
Fishburne Military Academy at Waynesboro, Virginia. As a 
youth he learned telegraphy with the Chesapeake & Ohio Rail- 
way at Lynchburg, spent two years there, and resigned from 
that branch of the service to become a locomotive engineer. He 
was an engineer for the Chesapeake & Ohio several years and 
then with the Baltimore & Ohio, having an important run be- 
tween Cumberland and Brunswick, Maryland, and lost his life 
in a wreck on that division. He was a popular member of the 
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, belonged to the Masonic 



VIRGINIA 167 

fraternity, was a Democrat, and both he and his wife were active 
members of the Baptist Church. 

He married at Crozet, Virginia, in February, 1892, Miss 
Dora Lee Wood, who survives him and resides at 1529 Morris 
Avenue in Norfolk. Mrs. Hunt was educated in the Gordans- 
ville Female Institute in Virginia and the Centi-al Female In- 
stitute at Clinton, Mississippi. Her father, William H. Wood, 
was a merchant at Granada, Mississippi, and had served in the 
cavalry in the Confederate army during the Civil war. Her 
mother was Mary Elizabeth Robertson, a native of Virginia, and 
Mrs. Hunt is one of two living children. Mr. and Mrs. Hunt had 
five children : Samuel, who served overseas during the World 
war in the Signal Corps, is now an electrician living in New 
Jersey, and by his marriage with Amy Street has two children, 
Russell Hunt and Margarett Hunt ; Hai'vey Lee, a chemi-st, who 
served two years in the Chemical Warfare Division in labora- 
tory work during the World war, is a member of the firm Nor- 
folk Testing Laboratories, and married May Hudson ; William 
Hamilton, assistant manager of the Monticello, Norfolk's largest 
hotel, married Reva Hawkins, of Charlottesville, Virginia, and 
has one daughter, Marcia ; Miss Eunice May lives with her 
mother, and James Wood is a student of aviation. 

H. Hilton Anderson. Among the men prominently identi- 
fied with the real estate, loan and insurance business of Fairfax 
County, one who has at all times maintained high ideals of busi- 
ness integrity is H. Hilton Anderson, of the firm of H. H. Ander- 
son & Company of East Falls Church. His career has been sig- 
nalized by participation in a number of large and important 
transactions and by strict adherence to the ethics and amenities 
of his business, and as a result he has not only won personal 
success and prominence, but has also attracted and held the con- 
fidence and esteem of the people of his community. 

Mr. Anderson was born March 11, 1875, on a farm in Rappa- 
hannock County, Virginia, and is a son of H. B. and Eugenia 
(Griffin) Anderson, natives of the same county. H. B. Ander- 
son was reared on a farm, on which he worked until the out- 
break of the war between the states, at which time he, with his 
brothers Peji:on and Joseph, enlisted in the Confederate army 
and went almost immediately to the field of conflict. Although 
Fort Sumter had been fired upon April 12, 1861, and the first 
blood had been shed April 19 in a street attack on the Sixth 
Massachusetts Regiment, which was on its way to Washington, 
it is thought that Peyton Anderson was the first soldier wounded 
in the war in actual conflict between forces of the South and 
North. His wound was not a fatal one, but his brother Joseph 
later met a soldier's death on the field of battle. Following the 
close of the war H. B. Anderson returned to Rappahannock 
County, where he resumed his farming operations, and also en- 
gaged in the operation of a sawmill. These activities he con- 
tinued until his retirement several yeai's before his death, which 
occurred February 17, 1909. Mrs. Anderson had passed away 
years before, February 18, 1886. 

The education of H. Hilton Anderson was acquired in the 
public schools of Rappahannock County, and he was reared in 
a rural atmosphere. It was natural that he should adopt farm- 
ing in his youth, and he remained with his parents until reach- 
ing the age of twenty-six years, at which time he moved to 
Fairfax County. In 1902 he took up his residence at Falls 



168 VIRGINIA 

Church, where he embarked in the feed and lumber business, 
and continued therein for about twenty years, with much suc- 
cess. In 1922 he received his introduction to the real estate 
loan and insurance business with Garland L. Kendrick, and in 
January, 1923, bought out the business, which he has conducted 
with much success to the present. While this is an old estab- 
lished business, it has prospered most materially since Mr. An- 
derson became its owner, and the firm of H. H. Anderson & 
Company now occupies a place among the leaders in its field in 
Fairfax County. Mr. Anderson applies himself strictly to his 
business and has few outside interests, not being a club or 
fraternity man. He is a staunch Democrat in his political con- 
victions and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, while 
the members of his family are Baptists. 

On February 21, 1905, Mr. Anderson married Miss Lulu 
Wileorbin, daughter of W. B. and Emma N. (Spillman) Wile- 
orbin, natives of Rappahannock County. Mr. Anderson's father- 
in-law has always been a farmer, and is now eighty-four years 
of age, his worthy wife also surviving. He is a Confederate 
veteran of the war between the states. To Mr. and Mrs. Ander- 
son there has come one son, E. James, born May 16, 1913, who 
is attending school. 

William Power Tyree. Although unknown to the present 
generation of business men of Virginia, his death having oc- 
curred in 1906, the late William Power Tyree was one of the 
strong and forceful men of his day at Danville, where he was 
engaged for a number of years in the wholesale brokerage busi- 
ness. His career, cut short by death when he was only forty- 
five years of age, was an active, varied and useful one, and in 
each of his several avenues of activity he won the respect of 
men who admire and appreciate the abilities of others. 

Mr. Tyree was born at Danville, Virginia, in April, 1861, and 
was a son of David and Hannah (O'Brien) Tyree. His parents 
were born and married in Dublin, Ireland, where David Tyree 
was a merchant, and following their union immigrated to the 
United States and settled at Danville, where Mr. Tyree continued 
his business as a merchant until his death. William Power 
Tyree was the fourth child in a family of eight children, among 
whom was a son Tom, who rose to a captaincy in the Confederate 
army during the war between the states, and another son, David, 
who was engaged in business affairs at Danville for many years. 

The public schools of Danville, as well as a private school, 
furnished William Power Tyree with his educational training, 
following which he became teacher of mathematics at the Bap- 
tist College of Danville, a position which he retained for two 
years. He then entered the Commercial Bank of Danville, with 
which he remained until elected city tax collector of Danville. 
When he left that office four years later he embarked in the 
wholesale grocery business as a broker, and continued therein 
until his death May 2, 1906. Although he was a Democrat in 
his political views, Mr. Tyree was a life long fighter in the cause 
of temperance and for many years was the head of the prohibi- 
tion party at Danville. Fraternally he was a popular member 
of the Knights of the Maccabees. As a man of civic pride and 
public spirit, he was one of the enthusiastic workers in the 
Chamber of Commerce and the Board of Trade, and his asso- 
ciates in the business world frequently came to him for counsel 
and guidance. He belonged to Epiphany Episcopal Church of 



%. 






/^1, 



VIRGINIA 169 

Danville, in which he was superintendent of the Sunday school 
and missed onlv one Sunday in thirteen consecutive years. 

On July 2, 1891, in Halifax County, Virginia, Mr. Tyree was 
united in marriage with Miss Jennie C. Clarke, of that county, 
daughter of E. H. Clarke, a prominent plantation owner. The 
Clarke family is descended from an ancestor who sat in the 
House of Burgesses, and the family resided in Cumberland 
County, Virginia, prior to the War of the Revolution. E. H. 
Clarke was a member of the Home Guards stationed at Rich- 
mond during the war between the states, and he and his wife, 
Mary Robinson, of Campbell County, Virginia, were the parents 
of three sons, Frank, Thomas and Samuel, all of whom were 
soldiers of the Confederacy, and all now farmers of Halifax 
County. To Mr. and Mrs. Tyree there was born one son, William 
Power, who was educated at Danville and Norfolk and since 
his twenty-first year has been manager of the tractor depart- 
ment of the Ford Motor Company at Norfolk. He married Mary 
Elizabeth Fritchard, of Pantego, Beaufort County, North Caro- 
lina. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Tyree has resided at 
Norfolk, where she has an attractive home at 533 Maryland 
Avenue. She is a member of the Episcopal Church, and has been 
active and helpful in its work. 

Charles Lee Robinson. To the civic and industrial advance- 
ment and prestige of the City of Winchester, judicial center of 
Frederick County, the late Charles L. Robinson made splendid 
contribution. He was a business man of remarkable initiative 
and executive ability, and had the courage to carry forward 
important industrial enterprises to success in the face of objec- 
tive predictions of his failure. He developed two of the leading 
industries of Winchester and was one of the most valued and 
honored citizens of this historic old city at the time of his death, 
which occurred April 1, 1922. It is obvious that a tribute to 
his achievement and to his memory will be a fitting contribution 
to this publication. 

Mr. Robinson was born in the State of Indiana, January 1, 
1855, and was a boy when the family home was established at 
Fairmont, Marion County, West Virginia, which state was at the 
time still a part of Virginia. His father, Francis Harrison 
Robinson, came to West Virginia as a representative of the 
construction and service of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad, with 
which he long continued his alliance, both he and his wife hav- 
ing continued their residence to Fairmont until their death. 

To the public schools of Fairmont the subject of this memoir 
was indebted for his early education, and even as a boy he mani- 
fested exceptional mental alertness, self-reliance and tenacity 
of purpose — attributes that distinctly marked and conserved 
the success of his later business career. His early experience 
in business affairs was gained at Fairmont, and there he initi- 
ated his independent activities by engaging in the retail coal and 
ice business on a modest scale. He made this venture a success, 
but he constantly was on the outlook for broader opportunities, 
with the result that eventually, in 1902, he removed with his 
family to Winchester, Virginia, and entered upon the vigorous 
and constructive business career that led to his advancement 
to the status of one of the leading figures in the industrial and 
commercial life of this community. He came to Frederick 
County before the apple industry of this section of the state 
had developed to its present large and important proportions. 



170 VIRGINIA 

Though discouraged in such action by other men of affairs at 
Winchester, Mr. Robinson here purchased a small ice manufac- 
turing plant that had been operated with negligible success. In 
his initial stage of developing this enterprise he encountered 
many perplexities and discouragements, but he had faith in him- 
self and his judgment and, as ever, refused to be baffled or dis- 
mayed by adverse conditions. He built up a prosperous ice and 
storage business and likevv^ise turned his attention to developing 
other enterprises that had been semi-failures under previous 
control. He believed in Winchester and its great future, and 
proved that he had a reason for this faith. In 1907 Mr. Rob- 
inson bought the Winchester Steam Laundry, and under his 
resourceful and vigorous policies this likewise was made a suc- 
cess. The Snapp Foundry next attracted him as an investment. 
This likewise had proved a waning industrial enterprise, but 
he promptly infused his characteristic energy and progressive- 
ness into its management, with the ultimate result that it now 
stands as one of the leading industrial concerns of this section 
of Virginia. He purchased this property in 1910, and in the 
upbuilding of the business he had the effective co-operation of 
his sons, under whose control the business has been successfully 
continued since his death. 

It was in April, 1902, that Mr. Robinson made his initial 
business venture in Winchester, by purchasing the modest ice 
plant that as to prove the nucleus around which has been 
developed the substantial and important enterprise now con- 
ducted under the corporate title of the C. L. Robinson Ice & Cold 
Storage Corporation. The original manufactory of this con- 
cern had a production capacity of only ten tons of ice daily, and 
the output was used almost exclusively in local consumption. 
The capacity of the present modern plant in 100 tons of ice 
daily. In connection with the enterprise Mr. Robinson pro- 
ceeded with the development also of a cold-storage plant, to 
meet the demands of apple-growers of this section of the state. 
In 1905 he established a cold-storage plant with a capacity of 
20,000 barrels, and this was used almost entirely for the stor- 
age of apples for market demands. By subsequent expansions 
the capacity of the Winchester storage plant has been increased 
to 200,000 barrels, and the scope of the business has been 
increased through the operation of a well equipped storage plant 
at Berryville, Clarke County, Virginia, and another at Charles 
Town, West Virginia. In 1912 Mr. Robinson and his sons 
assumed control of the Berryville Ice & Refrigerating Com- 
pany, and later developed the prosperous ice and storage busi- 
ness at Charles Town, both of these plants being of modern 
equipment and large capacity. In 1911 was effected the incor- 
poration of the business under the present title of C. L. Rob- 
inson Ice & Cold Storage Corporation, the stock of which is 
retained entirely by the Robinson family. Of this corporation, 
the service of which has been of inestimable value in affording 
market outlet for the great apple industry, Mr. Robinson con- 
tinued the president until his death, and its operations are based 
on a capital stock of $150,000. In 1917 Mr. Robinson bought 
the entire capital stock of the business at Berryville and also of 
the holdings at Winchester and Charles Town. The association 
of the Robinson family with the apple industry became still 
closer when, in 1910 the subject of this memoir acquired his first 
orchard, and since that year the family holdings of bearing 
orchards have been increased to 1,200 acres, — in Frederick 



VIRGINIA 171 

County, Virginia ; Jefferson and Berkeley counties, West Vir- 
ginia; and Washington and Allegany counties, Maryland. In 
these splendid orchards are produced the finest types of apples, 
including New Town Pippins, Grimes Golden, Golden Delicious, 
Stark's Delicious, King David, Jonathans, Stayman Wine Saps, 
York Imperials, Ben Davis, Yellow Transparent, Dutchess, 
Wealthy, Mcintosh, Rome Beauty, etc. 

In 1910 Mr. Robinson purchased the Snapp Foundry, which 
is now incorporated under this title and the stock of which is 
owned by his family. The Snapp Foundry was established in 
1865, by F. R. Snapp, and the original plant stood on the site 
of the present large and modern plant. Mr. Robinson acquired 
the property from the heirs of the founder of the business, and 
as owner he entrusted the operations of the foundry to eflficient 
managers, this arrangement having continued until his death. 
From a run-down status he developed the business into a sub- 
stantial and important industry, and the work of progress has 
been effectively carried forward by his sons since he himself 
passed away. After the death of Mr. Robinson the business of the 
Snapp Foundry was reorganized and incorporated, and his 
widow became its president, his daughter Mary E. was made 
vice president, and his son Charles A. became secretary and 
treasurer. The capital stock of the Snapp Foundry is S15,000, 
and the son Frank B. is now president of the corporation, while 
the son Charles A. continues not only as secretary and treasurer 
but also as general manager. The major development of this 
enterprise has occurred within the past eight years, and the 
foundry now maintains a corps of thirty employes, most of 
whom are skilled workmen. The establishment manufacturers 
gray-iron castings, and these are shipped over a wide territory, 
from Albany, New York, to New Orleans, Louisiana, and as far 
west as Butte, Montana. In the machine shop are maintained 
the best of modern facilities for the handling of general repair 
work for the industries of this section of the state, and the cor- 
poration has also provision for the fabrication and erection of 
structural steel, in which connection it has executed important 
contracts and provided service that previously had required 
recourse to concerns in outside cities. The company figures 
likewise as jobbers of machine supplies and material, and this 
effective service obviates former expenditure of time, with inci- 
dental financial losses, in connection with providing supplies 
that formerly had to be shipped from distant points. 

The late Charles L. Robinson is survived by his widow, whose 
maiden name was Marie Elizabeth Barnes and who was born 
and reared at Fairmont, West Virginia, she being still a resident 
of Winchester and being a loved figure in the social life of this 
community. Of the five children the eldest is Frederick A., who 
is now vice president of both the Snapp Foundry and the C. L. 
Robinson Ice & Cold Storage Company; Frank B. is president 
of these companies and maintains his home at Charles Town, 
West Virginia; Harry D. is treasurer of both corporations; 
Charles A. is secretary, treasurer and general manager of the 
Snapp Foundry; and Miss Mary Elizabeth remains with her 
widowed mother in the attractive home at Winchester. All of 
the children were born at Fairmont, West Virginia. Frederick 
A. married Miss Mamie Brown, of Winchester; Frank B., mar- 
ried Miss Blanch Boxwell, of the same city ; and Harry D. mar- 
ried Miss Louise Hall, of Fairmont, West Virginia. Charles A., 
youngest of the sons, is familiarly kno^vn by his second personal 



172 VIRGINIA 

name, Arthur, and he married Miss Reba Beam, of Carlisle, 
Pennsylvania, in which city he and his brother Harry D. 
attended Dickerson College. All of the sons are affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity, including the Mystic Shrine. 

The late Charles L. Robinson was a zealous member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, as is also his widow, and he was a 
Knight Templar Mason, besides being a Noble of the Mystic 
Shrine. He was affiliated also with the Knights of Pythias, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Improved Order of 
Red Men. He was a business man of exceptional ability, was 
loyal and public-spirited as a citizen, and his sterling character 
found expression in kindly and generous human helpfulness, 
ever extended in an unostentatious way. His genial and buoy- 
ant personality gained to him the high regard of all who came 
within the sphere of his influence. 

Hon. Wilson Mahone Farr, commonwealth's attorney of 
Fairfax County, and one of the ablest men practicing at the bar 
of Fairfax, is a man fortunate in his choice of a profession. Its 
employments are congenial to him, and he follows them with 
unflagging interest and zest. To him the work of the law is not 
drudgery, but a source of keen intellectual pleasure, and its con- 
troversies aflford him frequent opportunities to show his ability 
to meet his opponent upon any ground. It is his rare good for- 
tune to be a man in love with his work and to find in it adequate 
and satisfying occupation for all his faculties. So generally 
recognized are his unusual capabilities, his uprightness and his 
unflinching courage that he is regarded as the ideal man for 
the important office he holds, a fact attested by his election and 
reelection to it during a period of over six years. 

Mr. Farr was born in Henrico County, Virginia, October 17, 
1884, while his parents were residing there temporarily, but his 
family belongs to Fairfax County. He is a son of Richard Rat- 
cliffe Farr, born at Farr's Crossroads, Fairfax County, Virginia. 
During the second year of the war between the states, when only 
a little over sixteen years old, his father enlisted in Company B, 
of General Mosby's command. Seriously wounded in the Blazer 
fight, he was paroled at the close of the war, at the time being 
only in his eighteenth year. After the close of the war he took 
a prominent part in local aff'airs, was active in politics, and 
served in the State Legislature for a number of terms. Another 
honor was his, that of being one of the early state superinten- 
dents of public instruction, holding that important office for the 
term beginning January 1, 1882, and ending January 1, 1886. 
He married Miss Margaret E. Malone, born in Buncombe 
County, North Carolina, a daughter of John and Ann Rebecca 
(Gooding) Malone of Fairfax County. 

Growing up in Fairfax, Wilson M. Farr attended its public 
schools, and later the Central High School, Washington City, 
after which he entered Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia, and 
remained there through the sophomore year. His legal educa- 
tion was taken in Georgetown University of Law, Washington, 
and he was graduated therefrom in 1907, with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws. For the term of 1906-07 Mr. Farr taught 
school in the town of Fairfax, and in 1906, he passed the state 
bar examinations and was admitted to the bar. From then on he 
has been engaged in a general practice with offices in Fairfax, 
with increasing success. In 1922 he was appointed common- 
wealth's attorney to fill out an unexpired term, was reelected 
without opposition in 1924, and again reelected in 1927, and is 
the present incumbent of the office. 



VIRGINIA 173 

On November 24, 1915, Mr. Farr married Miss Edith Wiley, 
a daughter of Robert Wiley (a member of Jackson's Corps) and 
Mary E. (Lee) Wiley, and they have two daughters: Edith 
Malone Farr, who was born September 7, 1923; and Ann Rat- 
cliffe Farr, who was born November 22, 1924. Mr. and Mrs. 
Farr maintain their home in Fairfax, and here they welcome 
their many friends with true Southern hospitality. Mr. Farr 
belongs to the Belle Haven Country Club, the Fairfax Chamber 
of Commerce, the Sons of Confederate Veterans, the Virginia 
State Bar Association and is a director of the National Bank of 
Fairfax. 

Robert Lee Strange. The late Robert Lee Strange was 
given but a little more than half a century in this world, but 
during that time he accomplished much, and left behind him the 
memory of a life well spent, of duty faithfully discharged, and 
of good citizenship proved and sustained. He was born in Flu- 
vanna County, Virginia, in 1866, and died in Richmond, Virginia, 
in November, 1923. He was a son of William George Strange, 
a commission merchant, saw-mill owner and prominent business 
man of Richmond for many years. Descended in direct line from 
Gen. John Bony Strange, of Revolutionai-y fame, Robert Lee 
Strange was proud of the connection and that other members of 
the family were notable, one of them more nearly in his genera- 
tion being his father's cousin, who was clerk of the County 
Court of Fluvanna County for many years. 

Educated in the public schools of his native county, Robert 
Lee Strange grew- up to useful manhood, and when old enough 
for its responsibilities went into the saw-mill business with his 
father in Dinwiddle County, Virginia, maintaining that connec- 
tion until after the death of his father, when he went to Gooch- 
land County and engaged in farming for himse'f. He also 
bought and .sold and fattened cattle for market. Still later he 
reentered the saw-mill business and remained in it for ten years, 
and then he and H. S. Holland began quarrying stone from the 
quarry in Goochland County, and in this occupation he com- 
pleted his business career, retiring in 1922 and locating in Rich- 
mond. While he was in the last named line he served as post- 
master and freight agent for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad 
at the station adjacent to his quarry. In political faith he was a 
Democrat, and quite active locally. However, he was not a man 
who sought publicity, but rather tried to do his duty as privately 
and unostentatiously as possible. His home and his family came 
first with him, and with his loved ones he found his greatest hap- 
piness. A devoted husband, a careful father and a kind friend, 
he was a man whose loss was deeply felt when death removed 
him from the midst of those who knew and appreciated him. 

On December 28, 1899. Mr. Strange married Miss Kathrine 
Tillman, a daughter of P. R. and Sarah Virginia (Brown) Till- 
man, and granddaughter on her mother's side of James Dabney 
Brown, a private courier for Gen. Robert E. Lee during the war 
between the states, an honor his descendants deeply appreciate. 
Mrs. Strange was educated in public and private schools in 
Goochland County, and she is a lady deeply interested in current 
events, a good mother and neighbor. Four children were born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Strange : Virginia, who married Elmer Kiser, 
of Tazewell, Virginia ; Bernice, who is a registered nurse, grad- 
uated from the Retreat of the Sick Hospital, Richmond, class of 
1925, and engaged in the practice of her profession ; Catherine, 
who is in the employ of the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad; and 
Robert Lee, Junior, at home, aged ten years. 



174 VIRGINIA 

Henry Louis Smith since 1912 has had the distinction of 
presiding over one of the South's finest institutions of learning, 
Washington and Lee University at Lexington. 

Doctor Smith was born at Greensboro, North Carolina, 
July 30, 1859, son of Jacob Henry and Mary Kelly (Watson) 
Smith and a great-grandson of Henry Louis Smith, a pioneer 
of the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia, Jacob Henry Smith was 
born in the Shenandoah Valley and his wife was a daughter of 
Judge Egbert R. Watson, long a member of the bar of Charlottes- 
ville. Jacob Henry Smith gave his life to the Presbyterian min- 
istry in Virginia and North Carolina. He was the father of five 
sons who gained eminence in the ministry and in the learned 
professions, all five listed in "Who's Who in America." One of 
them was Dr. Samuel M. Smith, of Columbia, South Carolina, 
who was known as a scholar, preacher and orator in the South- 
ern Presbyterian Church ; another was the late Dr. Charles 
Alphonso Smith, at one time professor of English in the Uni- 
versity of Virginia and in the United States Naval Academy, 
who died in 1924 ; another is Dr. Egbert Watson Smith, secre- 
tary of Foreign Missions of the Presbyterian Church in the 
United States since 1911 ; and a fourth is Dr. Hay Watson 
Smith, of Little Rock Arkansas. 

Henry Louis Smith was reared in a home of high ideals and 
of religious influences, and learned to appreciate the qualities of 
intellectual culture when a boy. He also had the interests of a 
normal boy, participating in all outdoor sports both in school 
and college. He received his early education at Greensboro, en- 
tered Davidson College of North Carolina in 1877, and was 
graduated in 1881 with the A. B. degree maxima cum laude and 
winning gold medals for his work in Greek, mathematics and 
English essay. For five years he was principal of a classical 
academy at Selma, North Carolina, and in 1886 Davidson Col- 
lege bestowed upon him the Master of Arts degree and called 
him to the chair of physics and geology. He held that chair 
until 1901. From 1898 to 1901 he was vice president of the col- 
lege, and from 1901 to 1912, president. In the meantime he had 
continued his post-graduate studies at the University of Vir- 
ginia, which awarded him the Doctor of Philosophy degree in 
1891, his major work being in physics and geology. He is cred- 
ited with being the first scientist in the United States to use 
the X-Ray in medical and surgical cases, and made the first 
X-Ray photograph ever taken in the South. He did laboratory 
work at Cornell and Harvard Universities in 1893 and 1894. He 
was president of the North Carolina Teachers Assembly in 1889, 
and of the Association of Virginia Colleges in 1914-15. The 
University of North Carolina awarded him the honorary LL. D. 
degree in 1906. He has been vice president of the American Col- 
lege Association, is a member of the American Academy of 
Political and Social Science, American Society for Broader Edu- 
cation, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 
and is a Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Delta Theta and Omicron Delta 
Kappa. 

In the closing months of the World war much influence 
was credited, in the weakening of the German popular morale, 
to the widespread distribution of pamphlets behind the lines, 
dropped from balloons. This device was originated by Doctor 
Smith, who for it was awarded the prize offered by the Na- 
tional Security League for the best means of distributing among 
the German people such propaganda. Doctor Smith is the 




'ZJ 



SO...-^^ 'v^.'^ 



VIRGINIA 175 

author of many articles and bulletins on educational and scien- 
tific subjects and a widely known lecturer on educational and 
scientific subjects. He has for many years been a ruling elder 
in the Presbyterian Church. In 1921, representing the governor 
of Virginia, he headed the delegation which formally presented 
to the government and people of Great Britain in Trafalgar 
Square, a bronze duplicate of Houdon's statue of Washington. 

He married at Davidson, North Carolina, August 4, 1896, 
Julia Lorraine Dupuy, a descendant of Bartholomew Depuy and 
his wife, the Countess Susanne Lavillon, Huguenots, who came 
to Virginia from France during the era of religious persecution. 
Doctor and Mrs. Smith had the following children : Jacob 
Henry, deceased ; Helen Lorraine, Raymond Dupuy, Julia Dupuy, 
Louise Watson, Opie Norris and Francis Sampson. 

William Lewis Schafer, M. D. Were all the good deeds 
of the members of the medical profession to be published the 
pages of this work would be crowded with nothing else, for no 
class of men are so innately charitable and self-sacrificing as 
those who take upon themselves the responsibilities of this most 
exacting as well as noble calling. No physician lets his charities 
be known to the general public. Where the need exists, he gives 
of his care, experience and knowledge without thought of a 
return, and a very few of the profession rise to great wealth 
through their practice. The requirements of the profession are 
such as to demand the highest class of characteristics, and the 
development of character is very pronounced. In many com- 
munities the medical men are the leading factors in municipal 
life, and always they give their support, usually taking the 
initiative, in inaugurating sanitary reforms and improvements. 
Such a man is Dr. W. Lewis Schafer, one of the brilliant young 
physicians of Alexandria, whose success is marked, and who has 
wen and holds the confidence of his fellow citizens. 

Doctor Schafer is not only carrying on a large private prac- 
tice, with offices at 511 Prince Street, but he is serving as city 
bacteriologist with exceptional capability. He was born in 
Alexandria, February 22, 1899, a son of W. Lewis and Effie L. 
(McCracken) Schafer, natives of the same city. The father is 
manager of the Doremus Machine Company, having charge of 
the company's electric plating shop in Washington City, a 
responsible position. 

Fcllcwing his graduation from the Alexandria High School 
in 1916 Doctor Schafer entered George Washington University, 
Washington, and had been there but a year when he enlisted, 
in 1917, as a private in the regular army, and was assigned to 
the Medical Corps. He served for ten months overseas, was 
gassed twice, and was invalided for six months on account of 
his injuries from the gassing, but upon his recovery and honor- 
able discharge he returned to the University, and was graduated 
therefrom in 1925, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. For 
the subsequent year he interned in Stuart Circle Hospital, Rich- 
mond, and in the latter part of 1926 came to Alexandria and 
entered upon the practice of his profession, in which he has 
succeeded so wonderfully. Almost immediately he was made 
bacteriologist, and has since continued to so serve the city. 
He is unmarried. Doctor Schafer belongs to the Alexandria 
Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical Society and the 
American Medical Association. On January 1, 1929, he was 
appointed to the position of city health officer. He still holds 



176 VIRGINIA 

the rank of first lieutenant in the Six Hundred and Ninth Coast 
Artillery Reserve Corps. The Masonic Order, the American 
Legion, the 40 and 8, and the Old Dominion Boat Club hold his 
membership. He is numbered among- the stalwart Democrats 
of Alexandria, although his various professional responsibilities 
prevent his participating as actively in politics as he might 
otherwise. The Episcopal Church is his religious home. 

Hon. Bryan Gordon. Among the men who have contrib- 
uted to the dignity and stability of public affairs at Clarendon, 
few have rendered more valuable and capable service than Hon. 
Bryan Gordon, justice of the peace and assistant police juage at 
Clarendon, with offices at the Arlington County Court House. 
For more than thirty-two years a member of the bench and bar 
of Virginia, West Virginia and Oklahoma, his experience had 
been broad and varied, and he has been successful in building up 
a substantial reputation for legal ability and personal probity. 

Judge Gordon was born August 7, 1873, in Albemarle County, 
Virginia, and is a son of Dr. John C. and Mary (Pigram) Gor- 
don. His father, a native of Orange County, Virginia, was 
educated for the profession of medicine, which he followed 
throughout his life in Albemarle County, with the exception 
of his service with the Confederate army as a surgeon during 
the war between the states. He was a man of high standing in 
his calling, who won respect no less by his high character than 
by his professional ability, and was an honored member of the 
Albemarle County Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical 
Society and the American Medical Association. He also had 
several business connections, and in his death in 1919 his com- 
munity lost a valuable member of society. Mrs. Gordon, who is 
also deceased, was a native of Norfolk, this state. 

In his boyhood Bryan Gordon's parents took up their resi- 
dence at Charlottesville, where the youth received his early edu- 
cational training at Major Jones' University School. He then 
entered the University of Virginia, in the law department of 
which institution he took the three year course with the excep- 
tion of C. and T., and immediately engaged in the practice of 
his profession at Charlottesville. Subsequently he went to 
Morgantown, West Virginia, where he remained for five years, 
removing to Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and this was followed 
by twelve years of practice at Manassas, Virginia. On leaving 
Manassas Judge Gordon accepted a position in the United States 
Internal Revenue Department at Washington, D. C, and at the 
end of six years, in 1924, took up his residence at Arlington 
County Court House, where he has since become a prominent 
figure in his profession. For several years Judge Gordon served 
very capably as justice of the peace, a position which he still 
holds, and January 1, 1928, was appointed assistant police judge. 
He is able, courageous and thoroughly learned in all depart- 
ments of the law, and is a member of the local bar association 
and the Virginia State Bar Association. He belongs to the Blue 
Lodge of Masonry and the Monarch Club and politically is a 
Democrat. In his youth Judge Gordon joined the Baptist 
Church, and at present is a member of the Board of Deacons and 
also teaches a class of boys in the Sunday School. He has always 
been a staunch supporter of all measures fostered for the benefit 
of the community, and has the reputation, well earned, of being 
a public spirited and constructively inclined citizen. 



VIRGINIA 177 

In December, 1913, Judge Gordon was united in marriage 
with Miss Elise Stevens, a daughter of Dr. William L. and Eloise 
P. (Gibson) Stevens, of Orange County, Virginia. Doctor Ste- 
vens served as a contract surgeon during the Spanish-American 
war, and for many years was successfully engaged in the prac- 
tice of his profession at Orange, where his death occurred in 
1921. To Judge and Mrs. Gordon there have been born two 
children: Bryan, Jr., born in 1916 and Julia Lindsay, born in 
1920. By a former marriage Judge Gordon has one daughter : 
Mary Frances, who is a student at the University of Pittsburgh. 

Kenneth H. Gayle was born shortly before the inception of 
the great Civil war that brought much of distress and devasta- 
tion to his native state of Virginia, and the period of his boy- 
hood was marked by the depressed and inconsistant conditions 
that prevailed during the so called period of reconstruction after 
the close of the war. He passed his entire life in Norfolk 
County, Virginia, was long and actively concerned with business 
affairs in the City of Norfolk, and was one of the sterling and 
honored citizens of Norfolk at the time of his death, in October, 
1926. 

Mr. Gayle was born at Portsmouth, judicial center of Norfolk 
County, June 7, 1860, and thus was sixty-six years of age at the 
time of his death. He was the fifth in order of birth in the fam- 
ily of eight children born to Robert F. and Sarah B. Gayle. The 
public schools of Portsmouth afforded Kenneth H. Gayle his 
early education, and after having been employed about two years 
in a grocery store he formed the business association that was 
to continue during the remainder of his earnest and worthy life. 
He was still little more than a boy when he entered the employ 
of C. C. Billups & Son, engaged in the agricultural implement 
business in Norfolk, and with this representative concern he 
continued his alliance fully half a century, that alliance having 
been terminated by his death. In his inviolable loyalty and effi- 
ciency Mr. Gayle contributed much to the upbuilding of the large 
and important business of this concern, and every stage of his 
career was marked by his retention of the confidence and the 
esteem of his business associates, the while his circle of friends 
in his native county and state was limited only by that of his 
acquaintances. 

Mr. Gayle was loyal and public spirited in his civic attitude, 
was a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic party, 
but he never manifested any ambition for political office. In his 
youth he served as a member of the Old Dominion Guards of 
Portsmouth, in which military organization he was a member 
of Grimes' Battery. He was long and actively affiliated with 
the Royal Arcanum, and was an earnest member of the Method- 
dist Episcopal Church, South, as is also his widow-. The subject 
of this memoir was a member of the Gayle family that was 
founded in Mathews County, Virginia, many years ago, and it 
may be noted that he was a brother of Rev. Finley Gayle, D. D., 
a distinguished clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. 

On the 6th of April, 1885, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Gayle and Miss Irene R. Young, who was born and reared 
in Portsmouth, where she received the advantages of the public 
schools. She is a daughter of the late Joseph L. and Caroline E. 
Young, she having been the third in their family of eight chil- 
dren. Joseph L. Young long gave service as a clerk in the United 



178 VIRGINIA 

States Navy Yards at Portsmouth and was one of the honored 
and public spirited citizens of that city, where he was for a 
number of years a valued member of the Board of Education. 
The Young family, of French and Welsh lineage, made settle- 
ment on the Slashes plantation, near Richmond, Virginia, prior 
to the War of the Revolution. The father of Mrs. Gayle was a 
gallant young soldier of the Confederacy during virtually the 
entire period of the Civil war, and in that service his brother 
George was killed in battle. Joseph L. Young in his earlier 
career followed the printing trade and was for a number of 
years employed in the office of the Richmoyid Enquirer, in the 
fair old capital city of Virginia. After the close of his service 
in the Civil war he was for many years manager of the Old 
Landmark Publishing Company at Norfolk, and it was after his 
experience that, under civil-service regulations, he initiated his 
effective clerical service with the United States Navy Yards at 
Portsmouth, where he and his wife passed the remainder of their 
lives. 

Mr. Gayle is survived by his widow and their two children. 
Irene Y., elder of the children, is a graduate in music and is a 
popular figure in the social and cultural circles of her home city 
of Norfolk, where she was born and reared and where she re- 
ceived the advantages of the public schools, including high 
school. She now is retained as an efficient private secretary in 
Norfolk. Kenneth H. Gayle, Jr., younger of the two children, 
was graduated fi'om the Virginia Military Institute with the 
degree of Civil Engineer, and is now executive head in the New 
York City office of the Ingall's Iron Works. He married Miss 
Mary Jackson, of Montgomery, Alabama. 

Frederick Ridings Savage. One of the very sound financial 
institutions of James City County is the Peninsula Bank & Trust 
Company, and its patronage and high standing is sustained by 
the character of the men associated with its management. Of 
them none is of more moment in the world of business and 
finance than Frederick Ridings Savage, its vice president and 
treasurer. 

The birth of Mr. Savage occurred in Berlin, Maryland, Oc- 
tober 7, 1884, and he is a son of Thomas T. and Emma (Ridings) 
Savage, he born in Accomac County, Virginia, and she born in 
Maryland. The father was a hotel proprietor of Berlin, Mary- 
land, all of his life, and for years he was a well known figure to 
the traveling public, for his hotel was noted for its excellent 
accommodation. His death occurred in April, 1916, but he is 
survived by the mother, who makes her home with a daughter 
in Dover, Delaware. 

His boyhood and youth passed in Berlin, Maryland, Fi-ederick 
Ridings Savage went into the local bank when he left school, and 
was also in one of Accomac County, and in these connections he 
learned the banking business from the bottom up. In 1903 he 
came to Williamsburg and organized a branch of the banking 
house of L. L. Dirickson & Company that is now the First Na- 
tional Bank of Williamsburg. Although at that time he was but 
eighteen years old, he was made its first cashier, and discharged 
his duties in a most satisfactory manner. The bank was incor- 
porated in 1909 and nationalized in 1916, and during these 
changes Mr. Savage continued with it. On May 1, 1917, he re- 
signed and February 11, 1918, was made secretary and ti'easurer 
of the Peninsula Bank & Trust Company of Williamsburg, and 



VIRGINIA 179 

in 1928 was made its vice president and treasurer. This bank 
was organized in 1897 and reorganized in 1917 by William A. 
Bozarth. In 1918 the present modern banking home was erected, 
which furnishes every facility for the conduct of a general bank- 
ing business. The bank is capitalized at $100,000 ; has a surplus 
of $55,000, and deposits of $1,500,000. Within the last year the 
deposits have been doubled in proportion to the growth of the 
bank in public confidence. At the time Mr. Savage came into it 
the bank was in bad condition, and its deposits were only 
$260,000. A level-headed business man and experienced banker, 
Mr. Savage knew just how to build up his institution and win 
and retain the confidence of the people of this section, and that 
he has done so the financial statement last issued proves. Mr. 
Savage's fellow officers are : George P. Coleman, president ; 
F. R. Savage, first vice president ; H. M. Clements, second vice 
president; A. D. Jones, secretary and assistant treasurer. Some 
of the leading business men of Williamsburg are on the direc- 
torate of this bank. 

On July 11, 1912, Mr. Savage married Miss Lorna Daley, a 
daughter of Thomas R. and Minnie (Cole) Daley, he born in the 
State of Wisconsin and she born in the State of Maine. They 
are now residents of Leesburg, Florida. Mr. and Mrs. Savage 
have two children : Minnie Cole, who was born in July, 1913 ; 
and Thomas Daley, who was born in December, 1917. A Demo- 
crat both by inheritance and conviction, Mr. Savage has always 
given his party loyal support, and has been honored by being its 
successful nominee for the City Council a number of times, his 
period of service with that body covering some years, during 
which he has given an excellent account of himself. Active in 
Masonry, he has served several times as master of his lod:?e, and 
he is a member of the Mystic Shrine, also of the Odd Fellows, 
and is a life member of the Elks. Interested as he is in the wel- 
fare of the city, he cooperates with the Rotary Club, of which he 
is a member, in forwarding public spirited movements, and is a 
valuable citizen in many ways. He is an Episcopalian. 

Charles C. Bowe is now the senior member of the repre- 
sentative Richmond real estate firm of N. W. Bowe & Son, and 
in this connection, as well as in his civic loyalty, he is well 
upholding the high honors of the family name. This business 
was established by his father in Virginia's capital city nearly 
sixty years ago, and the firm now has prestige as one of the 
oldest and most important in the domain of real estate operations 
in this section of the Old Dominion. 

Mr. Eowe was born in Richmond, July 2, 1884, and is the 
son of Nathaniel Woodson Bowe and Emma Lewis Bowe, the 
former of whom died March 14, 1914, at his home in Richmond. 

Nathaniel W. Bowe was born in Hanover County, Virginia, 
and received in his youth excellent educational advantages. 
When the Civil war was precipitated on a divided nation he 
gave loyal and gallant service as a soldier of the Confederacy, as 
a member of the First Virginia Infantry, which became a part 
of the Army of Northern Virginia, commanded by the revered 
Gen. Robert E. Lee. After the war he did well his part in 
reviving the depressed civic and industrial affairs of "\'irginia 
and in overcoming the chaotic conditions that resulted from the 
misrule of the so-called reconstruction period. After the war 
he served one term as sheriif of Hanover County, and upon 
removal to Richmond he here assumed a clerical position in the 



180 VIRGINIA 

office of Grubbs & Williams, a leading real estate firm of that 
period. Upon the death of Mr. Grubbs he was admitted to part- 
nership in the business, which thereafter was conducted under 
the title of Williams & Bowe. Later Mr. Bowe operated as N. W. 
Bowe until 1902, when his son Bruce was taken into partnership 
under the title of N. W. Bowe & Son. In 1914, after Mr. Bowe, 
Sr., died, the business was incorporated with Bruce Bowe as 
president and Charles C. Bowe vice president. 

Nathaniel W. Bowe was a man whose life was ordered on 
the highest plane of integrity and honor in all its relations, and 
thus it was that he brought to his real estate firm not only con- 
structive service but also a reputation for inviolable fidelity 
to trust, he having insisted that at all times the interests of the 
buyer must be held on a parity with those of the seller. His 
careful and honorable policies gained to his firm a large and 
representative clientage, and year after year he had charge of 
properties and investments of many of the oldest and most in- 
fluential families in Richmond. He thus functioned in connec- 
tion with the historic Ravensworth and Whitehouse estates of 
the Gen. Robert E. Lee family, and since his death his sons have 
continued the same safeguarding of all of these varied interests. 
The sons were by their honored father thoroughly schooled in 
the business and in the sterling policies he had adopted therefor. 
There has continued to be a close and mutually appreciative 
social and business relationship between the Lee and the Bowe 
families, and in this connection it is interesting to note that 
Charles C. Bowe, immediate subject of this review, was chosen 
to act as godfather at the baptism of Robert E. Lee IV in 1924, 
the youngster who thus perpetuates for his generation one of 
the most distinguished names in American history, being a son 
of Dr. George Boiling Lee of New York City, who is a son of 
William Fitzhugh Lee and a grandson of Gen. Robert E. Lee. 

Bruce Bowe, son of the late Nathaniel W. Bowe, was, as 
previously stated, the first of the number to be admitted to 
partnership in the old established real estate business, and he 
continued his close executive connection with the firm until his 
death March 26, 1923. Like his father, he was uniformly re- 
spected and trusted by all who knew him, and his death was a 
distinct loss to the business circles of the Virginia capital, as 
well as a source of sorrow to his host of friends. Since his death 
the business has been conducted by the younger sons, Charles C. 
and Nathaniel W., Jr. 

Charles C. Bowe was graduated from Richmond College as 
a member of the class of 1901, and received therefrom the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. His entire active career has been marked 
by close and efi'ective association with the real estate business 
of N. W. Bowe & Son, and he is now senior member of the firm, 
which has membership in the National Association of Real Estate 
Boards, in which Mr. Bowe is a member of the committee on 
code of ethics. Governor Trinkle appointed Mr. Bowe a mem- 
ber of the Virginia Real Estate Commission at the time of its 
organization in 1924, and subsequently advanced him to the posi- 
tion of chairman of this commission. He was reappointed by 
Governor Byrd, and continued his service as chairman until 
1926, when he resigned the post, owing to the insistent demands 
placed upon him by his private business interests. Mr. Bowe 
is secretary of the Union Stockyards Company of Richmond, his 
father having having held this office many years and having been 
the incumbent of the same at the time of his death. 



VIRGINIA 181 

Henry Phineas Thomas. Efficiency is the keynote of suc- 
cess in every profession, along all lines of endeavor. It is the 
symbol, the co-related sign and working feature of the marvel- 
lous accomplishments of every age and of all people. Without 
it civilization today would never have passed beyond the state 
of the cave man. None of the learned professions would have 
been developed from the faint beginnings of people striving for 
mental advancement, nor would the air, the earth, the water 
and even the Heavens above all be bound together to produce 
power and place for each generation. Half-way methods can- 
not succeed in anything. To raise anything beyond the low 
level of mediocrity requires skilled and carefully trained knowl- 
edge and the power to use this to the highest degree. In nothing 
is this truer than in the practice of the law. The attorney with- 
out efficiency is a dead letter; his progress is measured by his 
lack of this important quality, and his failure is a foregone con- 
clusion from the beginning. Among those who have forged to 
the front among the members of the bar of Alexandria none 
deserves higher praise than Henry P. Thomas, for he is a 
man who has always striven to develop his natural and acquired 
talents and add to his store of knowledge until he has reached 
the highest degree of efficiency in each line, and this policy, 
inaugurated at the beginning of his professional career, still 
continues to animate his actions. 

Mr. Thomas was born in Leesburg, Loudoun County, Vir- 
ginia, May 22, 1894, a son of William Phineas and Sallie (Bite- 
cor) Thomas, both of whom were born in Loudoun County. 
After the close of the war between the states the father, who 
had been a soldier of the Confederacy, engaged in farming, and 
following that occupation the remainder of his life, became one 
of the well known agriculturists of his county, and he died in 
Loudoun County in July, 1915, aged sixty-nine years. The 
mother died in November, 1919, aged sixty-nine years. 

Reared in Leesburg, Henry P. Thomas was graduated from 
High School in 1915, after which for two years he was 
a student of the University of Virginia. In 1917 he enlisted 
in the United States Navy, and served in that branch of the 
country's forces until May, 1919, when he was honorably dis- 
charged. With his return to civilian life Mr. Thomas entered 
the National University of Law, Washington, District of Colum- 
bia, and was graduated therefrom in June, 1923, with the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and the following year received his degree 
of Master of Laws from the same institution. In 1923 he came 
to Alexandria and became associated with Judge C. E. Nicol in 
the practice of law, continuing with him until Judge Nicol died 
two years later, since which time he has practiced alone, and 
has built up a very large clientele, and has been markedly suc- 
cessful. In addition to attending to his law practice Mr. Thomas 
has other interests and is president of the Alexandria Realty, 
Investment, Finance Corporation. He is an officer in George 
Washington Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and he has been advanced 
to the Mystic Shrine in the Masonic order. The Alexandria 
Bar Association and the Virginia Bar Association hold his mem- 
bership, and he belongs to the American Legion and the Belle 
Haven Country Club. As a director of the Alexandria National 
Bank he is becoming well known in banking circles. For several 
years he has been an enthusiastic member of the Kiwanis Club, 
and he has also had charge of the Boy Scouts of Alexandria 
for about the same length of time. His support in politics is 



182 VIRGINIA 

given to the Democratic ticket, but he is not one who seeks public 
honors. Long a consistent member of the Presbyterian Church, 
he is active in its different bodies, and is now treasurer of the 
Men's Bible Class. Mr. Thomas is unmarried. He resides at 
428 North Washington Street, and maintains his office at 115 
North Fairfax Street, Alexandria. A public-spirited man, and 
one who has the welfare of his fellow citizens at heart, he is 
always ready and glad to assist them as far as lies in his power. 

Hon. Richard C. L. Moncure. During the past several dec- 
ades there has been undoubtedly no single factor that has played 
such an important part in the advancement and success of young 
business men of ambition and energy as the automobile industry. 
The marvelous growth of this business, which still is going for- 
ward to such an extent that no man can predict the size of its 
future, has furnished the opportunity for young men from all 
walks of life to secure positions which, in proportion to their 
importance, were formerly held only by men many years their 
senior. In this relation mention should be made of Hon. Rich- 
ard C. L. Moncure, mayor of Falls Church, Fairfax County, and 
president of the Moncure Motor Company, Inc., who is the 
authorized Ford dealer for his community and who has already 
achieved a success that many men would consider desirable if 
gained only after a lifetime of effort. 

Mr. Moncure was born at Macon, Georgia, March 30, 1903, 
and is a son of R. C. L. and Irene (Winship) Moncure. His 
father, a native of Stafford, Virginia, was given good educational 
advantages, and for a number of years was engaged in the suc- 
cessful practice of law at Arlington County Court House and 
Washington, D. C. He made his home at Falls Church for a 
number of years, and was a man of high ability in his profession, 
whose promising career was cut short by death at the age of 
forty-three years, April 23, 1918. Mrs. Moncure, who was born 
at Macon, Georgia, now lives at Falls Church. 

The education of Richard C. L. Moncure was thorough and 
comprehensive, including attendance at the public schools of 
Falls Church and the high schools of Macon, Georgia, and Wash- 
ington, D. C. After studying French abroad he entered New 
York University, and then returned to Washington and entered 
George Washington University, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Laws in 1925. Mr. Moncure 
commenced his career as a lawyer and was well on his way 
toward the attainment of a large and representative practice 
when he decided to enter the automobile industry as a dealer. 
He accordingly secured the Ford agency, in March, 1926, taking 
over the Moses Motor Company, which he renamed the Moncure 
Motor Company, Inc., of which he has since been president. He 
deals in Ford and Lincoln cars and Fordson trucks and in addi- 
tion maintains an up-to-date service station and repair depart- 
ment and deals in equipment and accessories of all kinds. Mr. 
Moncure has made a success of his business and is accounted 
one of the successful young men of his community. In local 
affairs he has also taken an active part, and March 1, 1927, was 
elected to the office of mayor of Falls Church. Although prob- 
ably one of the youngest mayors in the United States, he has 
given his city a splendid administration, which has included the 
installing of a number of improvements. 

Mr. Moncure is unmarried. He is treasurer of the Falls 
Church Fire Department, and a member of the Masonic Order, 



VIRGINIA 183 

the Order of the Eastern Star, the Washington Golf and Coun- 
try Club and the Episcopal Church. His mother, with whom he 
makes his home on Brown Avenue, is a Christian Scientist. 

William Aaron Gaylord, Jr., passed his entire life in Nor- 
folk and gained status as one of its progressive business men, 
he having for many years represented in this seaboard section 
a large English concern and having had supervision of the load- 
ing and unloading of tramp steamers in the interests of this 
English corporation. He became widely and favorably known 
in ocean navigation circles, and as citizen and business man in 
his native county he commanded unqualified popular confidence 
and esteem. 

Mr. Gaylord was born in Norfolk on the 23d of January, 
1875, and here his death occurred in October, 1919, his early 
education having been received mainly in St. Mary's Academy 
in this city. He was the second of the seven children born to 
William Aaron Gaylord, Sr., and Anna Theresa (Farrell) Gay- 
lord, his father having here given many years of service as 
foreman of the Reid Bakery, one of the leading concerns of this 
kind in Norfolk. The original American representatives of the 
Gaylord family came from France and settled in Virginia in 
the Colonial era. The paternal grandfather of the subject of 
this memoir was a loyal soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil 
war. Reuben Nicholls Farrell, an uncle of Mr. Gaylord on the 
maternal side, served many years as high constable of Norfolk 
County. Richard Gaylord, a brother of the subject of this sketch, 
was a loyal and efficient member of the Norfolk fire department 
and as such sacrificed his life at the post of duty in the great fire 
that swept the city in 1918. He was killed while on duty in 
that conflagration, his death having occurred June 30, 1918. 
Edward T. Smith, a brother of Mrs. Gaylord, is likewise a brave 
and honored member of the Norfolk fire department, at Station 
No. 2, on Battle Street, and while on duty at the fire that de- 
stroyed the Monticello Hotel he was so severely burned he was 
for many months incapacitated and in the care of physicians. 

At the age of fifteen years Mr. Gaylord found employment 
in the bakery of which his father was the foreman, and he was 
thus enga^'ed about two years. At the age of seventeen years 
he entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade of wheelwright, 
which he followed until he was nineteen. At the age of twenty 
years he initiated his service with the English concern previously 
mentioned, and With this service he continued to be identified 
during the remainder of his life. He had supervision of the 
unloadng of tramp steamers from all parts of the world and 
laden with all manner of cargoes, his activities in this connec- 
tion having gained to him a wide acquaintanceship among those 
engaged in the shipping trade touching the maritime ports of 
America's Atlantic coast. 

Mr. Gaylord was a Democrat in political allegiance, was 
affiliated with the Improved Order of Red Men and the Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles, and his widow is a member of the Ladies 
of the Maccabees. 

On the 12th of February, 1895, was solemnized the marriage 
of Mr. Gaylord and Miss Susie Smith, who was born and reared 
in Norfolk. Of the children of this union five survive the hon- 
ored father : William James, who is a city employe of Norfolk ; 
Myrtle Louise, who is the wife of Henry Lewis Farrell, a civil 
engineer in the service of the Virginian Railway ; Edward L., 



184 VIRGINIA 

who is a printer by trade and vocation ; James L., who likewise 
resides in Norfolk ; and Seabright, who is the wife of Thomas 
0. Downing. Mr. and Mrs. Downing reside in Norfolk, where 
Mr. Downing is connected with the American Oil Company, and 
their one child is a son, Thomas 0., Jr. 

Mrs. Gaylord is a daughter of James L. and Maria (Warren) 
Smith, both natives of Virginia, where they were reared and 
educated and where the father became a substantial business 
man in Norfolk. The first American representative of this 
Smith family came from Ireland and settled in Virginia prior 
to the Revolution, and five generations have lived in the Norfolk 
community. Settlement was here made more than 200 years 
ago, and members of the family were patriot soldiers in the War 
of the Revolution. Andrew J. Smith, an uncle of Mrs. Gaylord, 
was wounded while he was serving as a soldier of the Confed- 
eracy in the Civil war, as were also two of her maternal uncles, 
William and Major Warren. Mrs. Gaylord still resides in her 
native city, where her attractive home is at 428 Twentieth Street, 
and where her circle of friends is limited only by that of her 
acquaintances. 

John W. Moore, one of the leading realtors of Richmond, 
and a member of the Virginia Real Estate Commission, was for 
many years a member of the Common Council of Richmond, and 
an active figui'e in politics and civic affairs. He has the honor 
at present of being state president of the Ancient Order of Hi- 
bernians, and he belongs to other fraternal organizations, in 
all of which he is highly regarded. Mr. Moore was born at 
Richmond, in 1874, a son of Michael and Catherine (Kane) 
Moore, the former of whom was born in Ireland. 

Growing to useful manhood in his native city, John W. Moore 
attended the parochial schools, and when old enough went into 
a grocery business, later leaving it to engage in handling real 
estate, in which he found his fife work. For some years he 
has been senior member of the old and reliable realty firm of 
Moore & McGranighan. 

Always a Democrat, Mr. Moore has been for many years a 
forceful figure in local politics, and for twenty-two years, ending 
in 1928, he was a member of the Common Council of Richmond, 
first of the City of Manchester on the South Side of the James 
River from Richmond, and following the consolidation of the 
two cities in 1910 he continued a member, representing after 
that the Madison Ward in the Richmond Common Council. He 
has always been a progressive in municipal aff'airs, and was 
among those who brought about the city manager plan for 
municipalities, which originated in Virginia. For several years 
Mr. Moore was also president of the Virginia League of Munici- 
palities, and he is still carrying on the same line of work, for 
his heart is centered in his home city, and he is deeply interested 
in continuing its prosperity and advancing still further its 
progress. 

In addition to his other interests Mr. Moore is a director of 
the Mechanics & Merchants Bank. In May, 1927, he was sig- 
nally honored by appointment by Governor Byrd to membership 
in the Virginia State Real Estate Commission. He belongs to the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, whicli he formerly served as state president in Vir- 
ginia, and the Ancient Order of Hibernians, of which he is state 
president in Virginia, having held the oflice since 1922. 



VIRGINIA 185 

Mr. Moore married Miss Annie M. Kain. They maintain 
their residence at 1509 Porter Street, where they have a very 
pleasant home, one of the most desirable in Richmond. Mr. 
Moore's business address is 18 North Seventh Street, and here 
he has been located for some years. It would be difficult to 
find a man more thoroughly representative of the best interests 
of Richmond and Henrico County than Mr. Moore, and his per- 
sonal popularity is at its height and his commercial standing is 
unquestioned. All that he today possesses has been won through 
his own efforts, and great credit is due him for what he has 
accomplished. 

Aylett Bauder Nicol. The legal profession is one that 
demands much and requii-es of its devotees implicit and 
unswerving devotion to its exactions. Long and continued 
study, natural ability and keen judgment with regard to men 
and their motives are all required in the making of a successful 
lawyer. That so many pass beyond the line of the ordinary 
in this calling and become figures of note in political life demon- 
strates that this profession brings out all that is best and most 
capable in a man. For ages the most brilliant men of all coun- 
tries have turned their attention to the study of the law, and 
especially is this true in the United States, where the form of 
government gives opportunity for the man of brains to climb 
even into the very highest position within the gift of the people, 
and it is a notable fact that from among the lawyers have more 
of our great men come than from all the other callings combined. 
One of the men who is already giving promise of great things 
in his part of the state, Aylett B. Nicol, of Alexandria, is measur- 
ing up to the highest ideals of his profession, and is enjoying 
a very large and constantly augmenting practice. He was born 
in Prince William County, Virginia, August 5, 1883, a son of 
Charles Edgar and Mary Louise (Bauder) Nicol, natives of 
Prince William and Port Royal, Caroline County, Virginia, 
respectively. The father was engaged in the practice of law 
in Brentsville, Virginia, and in Manassas until 1908, when he 
moved to Alexandria, and here he continued in his law practice 
until his death. He was elected judge of the Circuit Court of 
the Sixteenth Circuit in 1894, and served in that capacity until 
1907, when he resigned to become a candidate for Congress. 
While he made an excellent running, he was defeated, and 
resumed his law practice, in which he continued until October 
21, 1924, when he was claimed by death, at the age of seventy 
years. His prominence was not confined to the domain of the 
law, however, for he served for two or three terms in the House 
of Burgesses, and he was one of the leaders of his political 
party. The mother died December 31, 1901. 

Growing to manhood in his native state, Aylett B. Nicol 
attended the public schools of Manassas, and had some instruc- 
tion in an excellent private school, and attended the high school 
of that city and also Richmond College. His professional train- 
ing was gained in the University of Virginia, and he was 
admitted to the bar in 1905, and that same year entered upon 
the practice of his profession in Alexandria. After the retire- 
rnent of his father from the bench he practiced with him. After 
his father's death he continued the work of the firm alone, and 
has never taken another associate. In all of his practice he has 
been eminently successful. A man of unusual capabilities, Mr. 
Nicol is a valued addition to the legal fraternity and to the 



186 VIRGINIA 

City of Alexandria, and is, without doubt, one of the best types 
of a Virginia gentleman and professional man. 

On June 16, 1926, Mr. Nicol married Miss Mary Prudence 
Terry, a daughter of Frank F. and Mary Terry, natives of 
Massachusetts, the former of whom is retired and a resident 
of Assonet, Massachusetts. The latter died in February, 1926. 
On September 4, 1928, Mrs. Nicol died. There are no children. 
Mr. Nicol is substitute civil and police justice of Alexandria, 
and he belongs to the Virginia and Alexandria Bar Associations. 
Fraternally he maintains membership with the Fraternal Amer- 
icans and the Improved Order of Red Men. He belongs to the 
Belle Haven Country Club and the Alexandria Chamber of 
Commerce. During the World war he was in training, but was 
not sent overseas as the armistice was signed before he was 
fully prepared. In political faith he is a Democrat. The First 
Baptist Church of Alexandria holds his membership, and he is 
one of its trustees. His father left a large estate, principally 
in real estate, and Mr. Nicol as one of the five children inherited 
some very valuable residential and business properties, and he 
has invested in others. All of the father's six children are now 
living with the exception of one. Mr. Nicol has a most desirable 
residence at 112 Myrtle Avenue, and possesses one of the finest 
law libraries in the state, which reflects his originality, profound 
grasp of the law and his studious habits. 

J. Franklin McLaughlin has been since May, 1927, the 
vice president in charge of operations of the Virginia Electric 
& Power Company, of which important corporation more specific 
record is given on other pages of this work, in the personal 
sketch of its president, William E. Wood, so that a repetition 
of the data is not here required. 

Mr. McLaughlin claims the historic old Bay State as the 
place of his nativity, as he was born at Hingham, Massachusetts, 
his early education having been acquired in public schools and 
having been supplemented by his special courses in Brown Uni- 
versity, Providence, Rhode Island. In 1912 he initiated his 
association with the Stone & Webster Management Corporation, 
the headquarters of which are in Boston, Massachusetts, and 
with this great corporation he has since continued his alliance. 
He won successive promotions and was finally assigned by this 
corporation to take charge of the Norfolk division of the Vir- 
ginia Electric & Power Company, and he thus continued his 
residence at Norfolk, Virginia, until May, 1927, when he was 
elected vice president of the company and assigned to take 
charge of operations at the company's headquarters at Richmond. 
Prior to coming to Norfolk, Virginia, in the interest of the 
Stone & Webster Management Corporation, which assumed con- 
trol of the Virginia Electric & Power Company at that time, 
Mr. McLaughlin had represented the corporation in efifective 
service in Boston, Massachusetts ; Providence, Rhode Island ; El 
Paso, Texas; and Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Concerning his loyal 
civic attitude while he was a resident of Norfolk the following 
estimate has been written : "He accomplished much progressive 
work in Norfolk. He was chairman of the industrial commis- 
sion, a vice president and director of the Norfolk-Portsmouth 
Chamber of Commerce, and was a director of the Rotary Club, 
the Maritime Exchange, the Norfolk National Bank of Com- 
merce & Trusts, and of the Boys Club of that city." 



VIRGINIA 187 

In the period of the nation's participation in the World war 
Mr. McLaughlin made a record of loyal and efficient service in 
the aviation department of the United States Army, in which 
he won the rank of captain. His initial training for this service 
was gained at Kelly Field, San Antonio, Texas, and thereafter 
he was sent to England as a staff officer with a squadron of 
army flyers, he having there continued on staff duty until the 
close of the war. He came to Norfolk, Virginia, June 30, 1925, 
and there remained until his transfer to Richmond in May, 1927. 
as previously noted in this review. In the historic old capital 
city of Virginia Mr. McLaughlin has become a member of the 
Commonwealth Club, the Westmoreland Club, the Hermitage 
Club and the Country Club of Virginia. He is a progressive and 
popular accession to the civic, business and social circles of the 
iair old capital city. 

Frank St. Clair in the later years of his life was identified 
with Norfolk, a prominent figure in real estate circles there. 
The foundation of his successful life had been laid as a journalist 
in Southwest Virginia, particularly at Wytheville, where he and 
his father were in the newspaper business for a long period of 
years. 

Frank St. Clair was born at Wytheville May 15, 1857, son 
of David and Sarah V. . (Walker) St. Clair. His father for 
many years was a newspaper publisher at Wytheville. Frank 
St. Clair was the oldest of seven children and was reared and 
educated in Wytheville. As a boy he worked in his father's news- 
paper office, learned the trade of printer and had experience in 
all departments. In 1885 he established the Wytheville Eyiter- 
prise, and that newspaper has now had a continuous existence 
for forty-three years. It has been one of the most popular 
newspapers in Southwest Virginia, and today it exemplifies the 
progressive policy given it by its former publisher, Frank St. 
Clair. Mr. St. Clair about 1888 also established the Farmers 
Alliance, a newspaper for the rural population and expressing 
the doctrines of the Farmers Alliance organization. It con- 
tinued to be printed for several years. Mr. St. Clair sold both 
newspapers in 1903 and at that time moved to Norfolk, where 
he engaged in the real estate business. He spent his last years 
in retirement and died September 21, 1925. He was as success- 
ful in the real estate field as he had been as manager, editor 
and owner of the Wytheville Enterprise. 

He married at Norfolk October 2, 1889, Miss Alice Genevieve 
Smith, who was reared and educated in that city, daughter of 
Thomas and Mary Jane Smith. Mrs. St. Clair, who resides at 
400 Raleigh Avenue in Norfolk, is a member of the Catholic 
Church. Her grandfather came from Ireland and settled in 
Virginia. Her father was in the wholesale dry goods business 
for many years at Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. St. Clair had two 
children, Frank, Jr., and Robert. 

Randall Davisson Taylor Elliott was born in Loudoun 
County, Virginia, August 30, 1897. After completing his pri- 
mary schooling in the public schools and the Western High 
School of Washington, D. C, he attended the University of Vir- 
ginia, where he took one year of academic work, followed by a 
law course, from which he graduated in 1923 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Laws (LL. B.). Mr. Elliott is the son of Henry- 
Randall and Elizabeth (Taylor) Elliott. 



188 VIRGINIA 

Mr. Elliott is admitted to practice before all of the courts 
of Virginia and the District of Columbia and before the 
Court of Claims. He was admitted to the bar of the State of 
Virginia in 1922 and to the bar of the District of Columbia in 
1925. He maintains his offices at 1331 G Street and at 119 South 
Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia. From 1925 until 1928 
Mr. Elliott was senior member of the law firm of Elliott & 
Nelms, being associated with Henning C. Nelms, of Washington. 

Mr. Elliott has specialized in the practice of corporation law, 
having gained prominence through his representation of cor- 
porations which have retained him as general counsel, among 
which may be mentioned : Washington — Shenandoah Valley 
Motor Lines, Inc., a subsidiary of the Eastern Public Service 
Corporation ; the National Biographical Society, Inc. ; Lee Jack- 
son Caverns, Inc. ; Automatic Railroad Inspector Corporation ; 
Battlefield Crystal Caverns, Inc. ; Allied Brokerage Corporation 
and the Hotel Development Corporation. 

On November 16, 1926, Mr. Elliott married Miss Gladys 
Mary Berry, daughter of William Wallace and Gladys (Kelsey) 
Berry, natives of Bedford, Virginia. Mrs. Elliott is a graduate 
of Columbia University of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott 
have one child, Randall Davisson Taylor Elliott, Jr., born Octo- 
ber 24, 1927. 

During the World war Mr. Elliott served in the United States 
Railroad Administration as Assistant to the Title Examiner. 

Mr. Elliott belongs to the International Association of Cos- 
mopolitan Clubs, the City Club of Washington, the University of 
Virginia Club of New York City, and the Board of Trade of 
Washington. He holds the rank of Assistant Deputy Commis- 
sioner of the District of Columbia Council of the Boy Scouts of 
America. Mr. and Mrs. Elliott reside at 3315 Garfield Street, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Charles Frederick Petrie for forty years was a resident of 
Norfolk, and in his profession as a civil engineer had an ex- 
tensive practice that kept him in touch with many of the great 
landed and industrial interests of the Atlantic Seaboard. 

Mr. Petrie was born in Dundee, Scotland, May 24, 1860, and 
died at Norfolk May 13, 1928, at the age of sixty-eight. His 
father, David R. Petrie, was a broker in the jute business at 
Dundee, Scotland. The only son of the family now living is 
Dr. Reginald 0. Petrie, a physician in England. One other son, 
Alexander, was a shipping agent at Calcutta, India, and another, 
David, was a ship owner in Scotland. 

Charles Frederick Petrie was educated at Dundee, graduated 
from a technical school as a civil engineer, and after some years 
of experience in his native country came to New York City in 
1888, and in 1889 established his home at Norfolk. At Norfolk 
he was associated with the firm of W. D. Murray Company as 
a partner for six years. After selling his interest in this firm 
he established himself in practice under his own name, and for 
thirty years looked after an extensive business as a civil engineer 
and surveyor. He retired from Business in 1927. Mr. Petrie 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church. 

He married Helen Williamson, of Edinburgh, Scotland, who 
died at Norfolk in 1908. At Norfolk October 27, 1910, he mar- 
ried Ella Landrum Rice, daughter of W. L. and Sallie C. (Wing- 
field) Landrum. Her father was a carriage manufacturer for 
many years and served in the Confederate army. The Landrum 



VIRGINIA 189 

family came from England and settled in Albemarle County, 
Virginia, before the Revolutionary war. The Wingfields were 
also a distinguished Colonial Virginia family. Sallie C. Wing- 
field's father was a captain in the Confederate army. Mrs. 
Petrie, who resides at 112 West Twenty-eighth Street in Norfolk, 
by her first marriage had two children, Lillian May and Edward 

A. Rice. Lillian May is the wife of James R. Guy, superintendent 
of the Southern Transportation Company, and his two children, 
Laluce, wife of Irving H. Dwyer, and Louis Lee. Edward A. 
Rice, assistant superintendent of the Richmond office of the 
Otis Elevator Company, married Mamie G. Bransford and has 
two sons, Adolph and Ralph E. Rice. 

Hon. Paul Morton, city manager of Alexandria, is a civil 
engineer by profession, and served for two and one-half years 
overseas during the World war, so that he is a man of broad 
vision, wide experience and trained ability, and in his present 
office in rendering an excellent account of himself. He was born 
in Louisville, Kentucky, December 24, 1894, a son of Thomas 

B. and Margaret (Williams) Morton, natives of Kentucky and 
Tennessee, respectively. The father is president of the Armored 
Car Company of Louisville, Kentucky, and a man of considerable 
prominence in that city. 

Reared and educated in Louisville, Kentucky, Paul Morton 
was graduated from the Dupont Training School of that city in 
1913, and for the succeeding year was a railroad engineer on 
the Louisville & Nashville Railroad in Alabama, where he was 
connected with Railway construction. In 1914 he came to Vir- 
ginia and was engaged in building double tracks; for the South- 
ern Railroad from Charlottesville to Orange. Later he went 
with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad in West Virginia, and was 
stationed in different parts of the state, during the last two 
years having his headquarters in Richmond. In January, 1922, 
he came to Alexandria as director of public safety, and in May, 
1925, was made city manager, in which office he has since con- 
tinued with eminently satisfactory results. While serving as 
city manager he still looks after the public safety, and his time 
is fully occupied. 

In December, 1919, Mr. Morton married Miss Elizabeth R. 
Smith, a daughter of Russell and Mamie (English) Smith, 
natives of Virginia and New Jersey, respectively. Mr. English 
was an admiral in the United States Navy for many years. For 
the past thirty-five or forty years Mr. Smith has served as 
treasurer of Culpeper County, Virginia. Two children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. Morton, namely : Paul, Junior, and 
Earlena English, the former born in November, 1920, and the 
latter in February, 1923. Mr. Morton is a member of Wash- 
ington Lodge, A. F. and A. M., No. 22 and of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks. 

In June, 1917, Mr. Morton volunteered for the World war, 
and was sent overseas with the unit commanded by General 
Dawes, now vice president of the United States. He enlisted 
as a civil engineer, and served overseas until the month of May, 
1919, when he was returned to the United States and honorably 
discharged. The American Legion, the Belle Haven Country 
Club and the Kiwanis Club, of which he is a director, and the 
Chamber of Commerce hold his membership. His political 
convictions make him a Democrat, but he has never aspired to 
public honors. In religious faith he is an Episcopalian. Mr. 



190 VIRGINIA 

Morton maintains his residence at 122 Walnut Street. With 
his enHghtened mind and strong intellect, coupled with his 
knowledge upon many subjects, Mr. Morton is a valuable asset 
to his community, a fact that is heartily appreciated by his fel- 
low citizens. 

William Wallace Wills is a Fluvanna County farmer who 
has had a prominent part in promoting the planting industry 
in this section of Virginia. Mr. Wills lives at Palmyra on a 
farm a mile south of town. The property has been in the family 
for generations. Originally it comprised a great estate, but 
has been reduced until the property now owned by Mr. Wills 
consist of 464 acres. 

Mr. Wills was born there August 11, 1860. The farm for 
many years was called "Falling Gardens," but in later years 
has borne the name "Solitude." Mr. Willis is a son of Dr. Al- 
bert J. and Martha (Coodington) Wills. His grandfather was 
John Wills. His mother was born in Cumberland County on the 
old Hatcher estate, being a descendant of the prominent Hatcher 
family. Dr. Albert Wills was born at Chatham, practiced med- 
icine for many years at Palmyra, and when he died left his 
estate to his children, and it subsequently came into the posses- 
sion of William Wallace Wills. Doctor Wills was on the medical 
board of the Confederate army. He was a Democrat but not 
active in politics. In his later years he removed to Texas for 
his health, and one or two of his sons also went out to that state. 
There were five children in the family: Virginia, wife of Pen- 
brook Pettit, of Palmyra; Albert, now deceased; William Wal- 
lace; John; and Mattie Q. The son John in 1884 went to the 
Panhandle of Texas and was one of the founders of what is now 
the outstanding city of the Panhandle, Amarillo. He was con- 
nected with the United States Government survey in laying out 
a route for express and mails across the southwest plains. 

William Wallace Wills attended school at Palmyra, and prac- 
tically all his life has bean spent on the old homestead. He 
early took part in the management of the property, and has 
been one of the progressive and far-seeing farmers who have 
sought to develop good markets for the products of this rich 
section. He was instrumental in having numerous canning 
factories established over Fluvanna County and owned and 
operated three of his own. For many years he shipped canned 
tomatoes to midwest centers such as Chicago, Omaha, Kansas 
City, but of late years the local canneries have been compelled 
to develop other markets partly through the competition of the 
western state canneries and also on account of the high freight 
rates from Virginia. 

Mr. Wills has been quite active in the Democratic party, 
though never seeking a public office. He is a steward of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and for many years was 
superintendent of the Sunday School. He belongs to the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. He married, October 1, 1890, 
Miss Alice B. Bell, of Fluvanna County, daughter of Askley and 
Hardenia (Leslie) Bell. Her parents are still living, her father 
being a planter. Mr. and Mrs. Wills had three children, Askley, 
now deceased, Cora and John. Cora is the wife of W. N. Han- 
nah, of Palmyra, and her three children are William N., Jr., 
Askley Bell and Alice Rebecca. John Wills, connected with the 
Virginia State Highway Department at Richmond, married Miss 
Jessie Campbell, of Wellington, Vii'ginia. 



VIRGINIA 191 

James Hatton Watters. The late James Hatton Waiters, 
president of the wholesale hardware house of Watters & Martin, 
the only concern of its kind in Norfolk, was a public spirited 
man, active in political and civic affairs, and prominent in finan- 
cial circles. Very charitable, he gave generously wherever he 
saw the need of assistance, and he was a zealous church worker 
and popular with all classes. He was born in Norfolk, Virginia, 
July 13, 1840, and died at Virginia Beach, Virginia, July 9, 1918. 

James Hatton Watters was a descendant of William Wood- 
house, the father of the Episcopal Church in Princess Anne 
County, who died in 1774. His son, Jonathan Woodhouse, was 
a soldier of the American Revolution, and for his services in that 
war was commissioned a major in the Virginia State Militia by 
the governor. The parents of Mr. Watters of this review were 
James and Georgiana (Martin) Watters. She was a daughter 
of Alexander Martin, of Norfolk, and a member of the oldest 
family of that name in Norfolk. 

When war was declared between the states James Hatton 
Watters enlisted in the Confederate army and served for four 
years with the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues. While he was 
wounded in the battle of Chancellorsville, he recovered, rejoined 
his regiment, and was with General Lee at the time of the sur- 
render at Appomattox. 

Returning to Norfolk at the close of the war, he entered the 
wholesale hardware business under the name of Taylor, Martin 
& Company, which firm was composed of Walter H. Taylor, S. 
Martin and Thomas Elliott. Mr. Watters later bought Mr. Mar- 
tin's interest and the name was changed to that of Taylor, 
Elliott & Watters. Still later the firm became Watters & Martin, 
was incorporated, and Mr. Watters continued to serve it as 
president until his death. His son James Watters is general 
manager of the business, and it is located at 110 Water Street, 
Norfolk. A Mason, Mr. Watters belonged to Owens Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M. He belonged to Epworth Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, of Norfolk, and served it as steward for many 
yeai's. Banking also attracted his attention and for a long 
period he was a director of the Marine Bank of Norfolk. The 
city benefited by his work in its behalf and he served at difl^erent 
times as chairman of the Finance Committee, chairman of the 
Waterworks Committee and chairman of the Police Commission. 

After the death of his first wife, who bore the maiden name 
of Margaret Garrett, Mr. Watters married Miss Mattie Lee 
Watts, who was born in Richmond, Vii'ginia, a graduate of Nor- 
folk College, the ceremony taking place Januaiy 21, 1893. She 
is a daughter of Joseph Cranberry Watts, a prominent business 
man of Norfolk, who had been engaged in the manufacture of 
brick in Richmond prior to moving to Norfolk. The following 
children were born to Mr. Watters : Garrett, who was graduated 
from the Law School of the University of Virginia, is connected 
with his father's hardware business, and is a prominent Elk ; 
James H., who is vice president of the New York Air Brake 
Company of New York City, married Miss Pearl Luthy ; Martha, 
who married William C. Griffiths, a business man of Narberth, 
Pennsylvania; and Elizabeth, who for two years was a student 
of Goucher School, after which she entered Teachers' College, 
Farmville, Virginia, and w^as graduated therefrom. Mrs. Wat- 
ters still resides in Norfolk, her home being at 315 Fairfax 
Avenue, and here she and her daughter are enjoying life sur- 



192 VIRGINIA 

rounded by the comforts provided for them by Mr. Watters, and 
the companionship of their many friends. They are active 
church workers, and continue many of the charities of the good 
husband and father. 

Edmond Gary Lindsay. During the more than forty years 
that the late Gapt. Edmond Gary Lindsay followed the sea he 
passed through many experiences and vicissitudes of fortune, 
but when his life ended at his home at Norfolk in September, 
1921, it could be said of him that his career had been a worthy 
and useful one, characterized by a high sense of Christian obli- 
gation and featured by numerous instances of sheer bravery 
and indomitable courage. The life of the captain of a sea-going 
tug or United States revenue cutter is necessarily a hard one, 
tending to coarsen many men's nature, but Gaptain Lindsay 
always preserved the manner and actions of a gentleman, while 
at no time allowing the finality and sternness of his discipline 
to be abated. 

Gaptain Lindsay was born March 19, 1858, in York County, 
Virginia, a son of William J. and Martha Ann (Elliott) Lind- 
say. His father was a native of Scotland, who came to the 
United States and settled in York County, where he passed the 
remainder of his life in agricultural operations. Edmond Gary 
Lindsay acquired his education in the country schools of York 
County, and his early boyhood v/as passed in an agricultural 
atmosphere and environment, but he had inherited an adven- 
turous nature and a natural love for the sea. Accordingly, when 
he was still a young lad he shipped as a mess boy, and in the 
years that followed visited many ports of the world. He grad- 
ually worked his way upward until when only twenty years of 
age he secured his master's papers and took the title of captain. 
For the greater part of his life he was captain of a tug boat, 
but during his later years was captain of a United States revenue 
cutter, and held this position at the time of his retirement from 
active service in 1919. As before noted, he had many experi- 
ences. On one occasion he was captain of a tug stationed at 
Old Point Comfort, where he saved the life of a small girl from 
drowning, and at another time, when he was captain of the 
tug Matt White and that vessel blew up, he saved a man from 
drowning, these two being the only survivors of the ill-fated 
vessel. Captain Lindsay was a popular and highly respected 
member of the Captains and Pilots Association, and in his 
political convictions was a stanch Democrat. 

On November 14, 1878, Captain Lindsay was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary R. Conkle, of Richmond, daughter of 
Gottlieb and Fredericka Conkle, natives of Germany. Ten chil- 
dren were born to this union : William Lee, captain of a tug- 
boat, who married Gertie Harrington ; Bessie May, the wife of 
Edward William Winder, a farmer of Norfolk County, who has 
two daughters, Mary and Elizabeth ; Francis Edwai'd, who fol- 
lows the profession of a marine engineer ; Lottie Pearl, the wife 
of Ed Smith, a locomotive engineer ; Edmond Cary, a command- 
ing officer in the United States Navy during the World war, 
who was in the coast service for twenty-six months, and is now 
a captain in the service of the Old Dominion Steamship Com- 
pany, who married Mary Petty ; John Laurence, an ensign in the 
United States Naval Reserves for twenty-two months during 
the World war, in which he made many trips between the United 
States, England and France, and is now engaged in business at 



t}- 



VIRGINIA 193 

Norfolk as a flour miller, married Eugenia Manuel and has three 
sons, Charles Vernon, John Laurence and Gary ; Glaudius May- 
nard, Ralph Stewart and Allen Earleston, all members of the 
Norfolk police department ; and Annie Madeleine, who married 
Howard Lambert and has one child, Beverly Ann. Mrs. Lind- 
say, who survives her husband and resides at 327 Poole Street, 
Norfolk, is an active member of the Methodist Church. 

Reese Charles Bowton is giving a most constructive and 
progressive administration as city superintendent of schools in 
Alexandria, and has been the incumbent of this office since 1923. 

Mr. Bowton is able to advert to the staunch old Hoosier 
State as the place of his nativity, his birth having occurred at 
Lawrenceburg, Indiana, April 28, 1876. He is a son of James 
and Eleanor (Reese) Bowton, both of whom were born and 
reared in Indiana, the parents of James Bowton having come 
to the United States from London, England, and having gained 
pioneer prestige in Indiana. The father of Mrs. Eleanor (Reese) 
Bowton was a native of Pennsylvania, and her mother was born 
in Virginia. James Bowton became and long continued one of 
the substantial exponents of farm industry in his native state, 
but passed the closing years of his life in Illinois, where he died 
in March, 1925, his birth having occurred August 19, 1844. His 
widow, now (1929) seventy-eight years of age, is a loved mem- 
ber of the family circle of her son Reese C., subject of this 
review. 

The childhood and early youth of Reese C. Bowton were 
compassed by the influences of the old home farm in Dearborn 
County, Indiana, and in the public schools of that county he 
continued his studies until he was graduated from the high 
school at Lawrenceburg. Thereafter he completed a course in 
the University of Indiana, in which he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1911 and with the degree of Bachelor 
of Ai'ts. Through his post-graduate work in the University of 
Wisconsin he received from the latter institution in 1915 the 
supplemental degree of Master of Arts, and in Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York City, he has thus far taken eighteen months 
of the work that will lead to his reception of the degree of 
Doctor of Philosophy. Mr. Bowton taught his first term of 
school when he was twenty years of age, in 1896, and he con- 
tinued his pedagogic service at intervals while he was pursuing 
his university courses. Mr. Bowton is an enthusiast in all that 
pertains to the work of his profession, and his service therein 
has been cumulative in its success. He has taught in the public 
schools of Indiana, Illinois and Missouri, and has been in active 
educational work in Virginia during a period of ten years. He 
gave five years of service as superintendent of the public schools 
of Clifton Forge, Alleghany County, Virginia, and since July, 
1923, he has been superintendent of the city schools of Alex- 
andria. He is a member of the National Education Association, 
is affiliated with the Phi Delta Kappa college fraternity, is an 
active member of the Kiwanis Club in his home city, is a Demo- 
crat in his political allegiance, and his religious faith is that of 
the Methodist Church, of which he has been a member since 
his boyhood and in which he and his wife now maintain active 
affiliation with the local organization of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. He has valuable farm interests in Iroquois 
County, Illinois, where his father passed the closing years of 
his life. The one other child of the family was Alma T., who 



194 VIRGINIA 

likewise became a successful and popular teacher, her death 
having occurred November 13, 1903. 

In July, 1918, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Bowton 
and Miss Edna Iddings, who likewise was born and reared in 
Indiana, as were also her parents, Charles and Martha (Wil- 
son) Iddings, who there passed their entire lives. Mr. Iddings 
was long and successfully engaged in farm enterprise in Indiana, 
and there his death occurred in March, 1922, his widow having 
survived him about three months, as her death occurred in June 
of the same year. Mr. and Mrs. Bowton have four children, 
Reese C, Jr., Forrest Lowell, James Russell, and Virginia Elder. 
Mr. Bowton purchased from the City of Alexandria the fine and 
historic old home now occupied by him and his family at 323 
South Fairfax Street. The house was erected more than a 
century ago, and this venerable residence has as its popular 
chatelaine a gracious and cultured woman, Mrs. Bowton, who 
is well upholding the social prestige that has attached to it for 
many years. 

William Otis Bailey, specialist in eye, ear, nose and throat, 
is a resident of Leesburg and has had an interesting career in 
his profession, and particularly as an officer in the Medical 
Corps of the United States Navy during and subsequent to the 
World war. 

He was born September 12, 1889, at Charleston. South Caro- 
lina, son of Ephraim Mikell and Helen (Trenholm-Prentiss) 
Bailey, his father a native of Edisto Island and his mother of 
Cheraw, South Carolina. His father, for several years a pros- 
perous hardware merchant of Charleston, died in that city in 
February, 1910. The mother lives with her son at Aldie. 

After attending public schools in Charleston and Washington, 
D. C, William Otis Bailey entered Emerson Institute at Wash- 
ington, graduating with the class of 1907. In 1912 he gradu- 
ated from the medical department of George Washington Uni- 
versity, was an interne in the public health service at Boston, 
Massachusetts, and at the Providence and Casualty Hospitals at 
Washington. He took post-graduate work in the Army Medical 
School in 1914 and at the Naval Medical School in 1917 and 
1920. Doctor Bailey during 1914-15 was on active duty with 
the Medical Reserve Corps, U. S. A., and following that spent 
six months in the Indian service in Arizona and Minnesota. 
During 1916-17 he practiced as an eye, ear, nose and throat 
physician at Washington. In 1917 he joined the Medical Re- 
serve Corps of the navy, with which he was connected for about 
two months, and upon America's entrance into the World war 
was commissioned a lieutenant, junior grade, later becoming 
a lieutenant commander (T.). 

Capt. C. S. Butler, of the United States Naval Medical School 
at Washington, has furnished an interesting account of Doctor 
Bailey's World war service. He was on duty in connection with 
the naval establishment in the Virgin Islands from September, 
1917, to about the same date in 1920. Shortly after reporting 
at St. Thomas in September, 1917, he was ordered to assume 
charge of the medical work of the Island of St. Croix, as chief 
municipal physician. As he was the senior naval medical officer 
on the island he was responsible for all medical work and sani- 
tation for the entire island and its population, about 16,000 
souls. This is the largest of the three islands purchased from 
Denmark and officially transferred to the United States in Feb- 



VIRGINIA 195 

ruary, 1917. He found at St. Croix two run-down municipal 
hospitals, a poorly equipped leper asylum, an insane asylum, and 
everywhere ordinary sanitary provisions neglected. With the 
trained personnel furnished him by the naval government Doctor 
Bailey during the three years of his stay in St. Croix accom- 
plished results that make Americans proud. The municipal 
hospitals and other institutions were organized along modern 
lines, brought to a high degree of working efficiency, the natives 
were taught in the training schools how to care for their sick, 
and sanitation as a whole was perfected so that the entire popu- 
lation experienced benefits. These constructive measures re- 
sulted in a great decrease in infant mortality, in the better care 
of women in child-bed, in the treatment of internal disease, in 
the establishment of the means to carry out modern procedures 
in surgery as well as the actual work of surgery, and in sani- 
tation and prophylaxis. To this work Doctor Bailey took, in 
the words of Captain Butler, an honesty of purpose, a desire to 
serve, a disarming ap'proachableness and a happy disposition, 
and consequently he at all times enjoyed the esteem of his subor- 
dinates and made great headway in winning the afl'ection of 
the natives. 

Doctor Bailey resigned his commission in March, 1924, and 
then took up his residence at Leesburg, where he has since car- 
ried on the routine of his private practice as a specialist and 
has charge of the eye, ear, nose and throat work at the Loudoun 
County Hospital and the Fauquier County Hospital. He also 
has offices at Warrenton and Charles Town, West Virginia, 
Manassas and Culpeper. 

Doctor Bailey is a member of the District of Columbia Med- 
ical Society, the Maryland and Virginia Medical Societies, the 
Loudoun County and Fauquier County Societies, and the Ameri- 
can Medical Association. During the fall of 1928 he was abroad 
studying at Vienna and Budapest. He is a member of the Lou- 
doun County Golf and Country Club, is a Democrat and a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal Church. Associated with him in charge of 
the offices at Warrenton, Culpeper and Manassas is his brother, 
Dr. M. Prentiss Bailey. 

Doctor Bailey married, March 24, 1917, Miss Mary Hardin 
Parker, daughter of Edwin Pearson and Mary Lillington (Har- 
din) Parker, her father a native of Portsmouth, Virginia, and 
her mother of Hickorj', North Carolina. Mr. Parker is now 
in the insurance business at Washington, D. C. Doctor and 
Mrs. Bailey, whose home is at Aldie, have three children : Wil- 
liam Otis, Jr., born December 28, 1917, Mary Lillington, born 
August 10, 1923, and Edwin Pearson, born May 7, 1928. 

The Portsmouth Star, a newspaper that has reflected the 
modern spirit in the Virginia Tidewater country, bringing daily 
to its readers the life of the outside world and at the same time 
providing a medium for the expression of the views and inter- 
ests of the home people, and using its influence first and last and 
all the time for a better and greater Portsmouth and Eastern 
Virginia, was founded September 3, 1894, just a century after 
the first beginnings of journalism in Norfolk County. 

The founders of the Star were Paul C. Trugien and William 
B. Wilder. They made the Star a modern newspaper from the 
start, publishing the full afteimoon report of the old Southern 
Associated Press. After the retirement of Mr. Wilder, Mr. 
Trugien carried on for many years, steadily building a news- 



196 VIRGINIA 

paper of power and influence. In 1900 he incorporated the 
Portsmouth Star Publishing Company, enlarged and modernized 
the plant, putting in the first typesetting machines and the first 
perfecting press used by any newspaper in Tidewater, Virginia. 
He brought into business and financial cooperation with him 
many of the prominent men of Portsmouth of that day. Mr. 
Trugien in 1906 sold the majority stock in the company to 
A. McK. Griggs, who had been associated with the paper since 
1900. He was its editor and publisher for twenty years. 

Early in 1917 the Portsmouth Star Corporation, with Nor- 
man R. Hamilton as president, acquired the business and inter- 
ests of the Portsmouth Star Publishing Company. Norman R. 
Hamilton was one of the first .subscribers to the original Star 
while he was a student in the Portsmouth High School and for 
Messrs. Trugien and Wilder secured its first subscription lists. 
Later he became the Star representative in Norfolk, and it may 
be said he has had an interest in the Sta.r throughout the third 
of a century of its history. Under the new ownership in 1917 
improvements and developments were inaugurated to give the 
Star increased influence and power among Virginia newspapers. 
One was the establishment of the Sunday Star. Mr. Hamilton in 
1924 acquired the controlling ownership of the Star, and during 
the past five years the equipment and the facilities of the paper 
have been steadily enlarged and improved. 

In addition to realizing its primary function as a daily news- 
paper circulated throughout Tidewater, Virginia, the Star has 
also adhered to a notable tradition of public service and public 
duty. The achievements standing to its credit comprise a chap- 
ter in constructive journalism. It was instrumental in the or- 
ganization of the Kings Daughters Hospital while Mr. Trugien 
was in charge ; in the formation of the original Business Men's 
Association of Portsmouth, in establishing the Home for the 
Aged, and twice used the full power of its public influence in 
preventing the removal of the general offices of the Seaboard 
Air Line from Portsmouth. It has given valuable publicity to 
the work of the Navy Yard, to the city in campaigns for physical 
betterment and moral improvement, to schools, churches and 
other institutions, and a number of years ago it did much to 
arouse sentiment for the construction of the George Washington 
Highway between Portsmouth and Eastern North Carolina. The 
Portsmouth Star is an independent newspaper, published every 
afternoon and Sunday morning, devoted to the interest and wel- 
fare of the people it serves. It is the people's paper, standing 
feai'lessly for that which it believes to be right, independent of 
influences of every kind, except those of the best. 

Norman R. Hamilton. In the history of Portsmouth's only 
newspaper, the Portsmouth Star, brief reference was made to 
its owner and publisher, Norman R. Hamilton. Mr. Hamilton 
was born at Portsmouth November 13, 1877, was educated in 
the public schools of that city and has had practically a life long 
experience and contact with newspaper work. His early train- 
ing was at Norfolk and for a number of years he has figured 
in the history of the Portsmouth Star. 

Mr. Hamilton is a son of Richard Dabney Hamilton, printer 
and journalist, and the great-grandson of Rev. William Hamil- 
ton, who with Rev. Gideon Ousley was one of the earliest pioneer 
Methodist missionaries sent out to Northern Ireland by John 
Wesley, founder of Methodism. Mr. Hamilton's ancestors fought 



VIRGINIA 197 

in the Revolutionary war, in tlie Mexican war, in the Seminole- 
Indian wars in Florida, and were in the Confederate ai-my and 
navy. 

Mr. Hamilton in addition to being a publisher has a note- 
worthy record in politics and public affairs. In 1912 he was 
Democratic presidential elector from Virginia. In 1914 Presi- 
dent Wil'-on appointed him collector of customs for the district 
of Virginia, and he served two terms in that position. Before 
America entered the war Mr. Hamilton as collector of customs 
at Norfolk and Newport News, was charged with the enforce- 
ment of American neutrality in the waters of Virginia, and it 
became his duty to handle difficult diRlomatic problems in con- 
nection with the arrival in Hampton Roads, first, of the German 
raider T^rinz Eitel Frederick, next, the Krom Prinz Wilhelm and 
later, the German prize ship Appam. All of these shins he in- 
terned, along with other enemy vessels that had taken haven in 
Vireinia waters and which were there when the United States 
entered the World war. 

For this and other conspicuous service rendered the Govern- 
ment as collector of customs and as representative of the treas- 
ury and state department at Hampton Roads Mr. Hamilton re- 
ceived the commendation of President Wilson, and at the close 
of his term as collector was similarly commended by President 
Harding. 

Mr. Hamilton in 1924 was a delegate from Virginia to the 
Democratic National Convention at New York. The Demo- 
ci-atic State Convention at Roanoke June 21, 1928, named him 
delegate to the Houston convention. As a result of automobile 
injuries received while attending the state convention at Roa- 
noke he was unable to go to Houston and the Virginia State Con- 
vention named as alternate in his stead his son, Richard Douglas 
Hamilton, a .student at Washington and Lee University, just of 
voting age, who in consequence served as the youngest member 
of the National Democratic Convention at Houston. 

Mr. Hamilton and Miss Adelaide Etheredge were married 
October 10, 1901, in the First Presbyterian Church of Ports- 
mouth. Among Mrs. Hamilton's ancestors were members of the 
Madison family of Virginia. The two sons of Mr. and Mrs. 
Hamilton are Norman Etheredge, a young Norfolk business man, 
and Richard Douglas Hamilton. 

James Hoge Tyler, member of a family that has conferred 
so many distinctions upon old Virginia, was in his long career a 
soldier of the Confederacy, a business man and farmer, and 
climaxed his service to the State as governor from 1898 to 1902. 

He was born at his father's old home "Blenheim" in Caroline 
County, August 11, 1846. He died at East Radford, Virginia, 
January 3, 1925, when in his seventy-ninth year. Blenheim, 
his birthplace, had been the home of the Tyler family for 170 
years. His parents were George and Eliza (Hoge) Tyler, his 
mother a daughter of Gen. James Hoge. His mother dying at 
his birth, James Hoge Tyler was reared by his grandparents. 
General and Mrs. James Hoge, at their home "Belle Hampton" in 
Pulaski County. There at an early age he 'became assistant to 
his grandfather, who was stricken with paralysis. He was in- 
structed by private tutors and by his grandfather, and after the 
death of General Hoge in 1861 he joined his father in Caroline 
County and attended the school of Franklin Minor in Albemarle 
County. He also attended Schooler's Academy. He enlisted 



198 VIRGINIA 

as a private in the Confederate army and served throughout the 
vi^ar with characteristic courage and fidelity. After the war he 
engaged in farming in Pulaski County, and through his writings 
for the press and his individual influence had much to do with 
awakening the need of the country to manufacturing and mining 
development and the bringing in of necessary capital for that 
purpose. In 1877 he was elected a member of the State Senate 
and in the Senate urged the reduction of state taxes and made 
another early contribution to economy as a member of the com- 
mission which settled the state debt. He also served as a mem- 
ber of the Board of Public Buildings at Blacksburg and Marion, 
and was made rector of the Virginia Agricultural and Mechan- 
ical College, now the Virginia Pol>i;echnic Institute at Blacks- 
burg. This position he resigned to become lieutenant governor, 
having been elected in 1889. He was a member of the commis- 
sion to examine into the disputed Virginia-Maryland boundary 
line, and was elected chairman of the joint committee of the two 
states. 

Governor Tyler from early youth was affiliated with the 
Presbyterian Church, being chosen a deacon at the age of eigh- 
teen and an elder at twenty-three, and for three times was dele- 
gate to the General Assembly, attending the Pan-Presbyterian 
Council at Toronto, Canada, and at Glasgow, Scotland, where he 
presided over the session. 

In 1897 he was given the nomination for governor by accla- 
mation and was elected by a majority of more than 52,000. His 
administration was a triumph in its combination of economy 
with constructive progress. The state debt was reduced by more 
than a million dollars without hampering any important public 
interest, and at the same time the public school fund was in- 
creased, and at the close the public treasury contained more than 
$800,000. 

In the words of an editorial in the Norfolk Ledger-Dispatch : 
"Assuming the governorship of Virginia when the common- 
wealth was just recovering from the transitory stages following 
the reaction to the reconstruction regime, James Hoge Tyler 
was a chief executive of the State who set a pace which may 
have well been followed by some of his successors. A young 
man, virtually a youth coming out of the Confederate army, he 
entered business life and was the last governor of Virginia who 
had seen service under the stars and bars, and in that way in 
particular may be designated as the connecting link between the 
old and the new Virginia. It was during Governor Tyler's ad- 
ministration that the call for a constitutional convention was 
submitted to the people and the document of the 1902-03 was 
the result. He urged many reforms in the operation of the 
State government which failed of adoption, but the establish- 
ment of a Bureau of Labor was one achievement, while the 
State tax rate was reduced and appropriations for State institu- 
tions increased, an accomplishment that is almost paradoxical. 
Governor Tyler was perhaps not a brilliant executive, but of all 
of Virginia's leaders past and present no man stands higher for 
rugged honesty, integrity and fidelity to the State's interests, and 
displayed a desire to put his administration on the road to sub- 
stantial constructive achievement. Perhaps, judged by modern 
ideas, he did not go as far as he might have done, but neverthe- 
less he initiated ideas that have been accepted since the time of 
his active participation in State affairs and have been taken up 



■^ 




"^^^ii^^t-^^^f^^-i^y^^/^^v^^^^ 



VIRGINIA 199 

by his successors with more or less credit to themselves. Nor- 
folk feels that it has been linked with Governor Tyler's family 
for many years. His son, the present mayor of the city, ex- 
emplifies many of the qualities that characterized the public life 
of the father." 

Governor Tyler was in a great measure a representative of 
the agriculture side of Virginia's life. He was interested in 
farming and served as president of the Virginia State Farmers 
Institute and as president of the Southwest Virginia Live Stock 
Association. He was a trustee of Hampden-Sidney College, was 
on the board of the Union Theological Seminary and the Synod- 
ic'al Orphans Home at Lynchburg. 

Governor Tyler married, November 16, 1868, Miss Sue M. 
Hammet, of East Radford. His children were : S. Heth Tyler, 
of Norfolk; E. H. Tyler, of Pulaski Countv; James Hoge Tyler, 
Jr., of Roanoke ; Hal C. Tvler, of East Radford ; Mrs. Frank P. 
McConnell, of East Radford; Mrs. Robert W. Joplin, of Lan- 
caster, South Carolina ; and Mrs. Henry Wilson, of Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

Thomas Brooke Howard, one of the brilliant young attor- 
neys practicing at the bar of Alexandria, has achieved a dis- 
tinction that has brought his name into favorable notice all 
over Virginia and at the national capital, and he is not only 
recognized because of his professional attainments, which are 
somewhat remarkable, but also because of his high personal 
character and pleasing personality. He was born in Alex- 
andria, Virginia, September 28, 1902, a son of Thomas Clifton 
and Minnie (Stansbury) Howard, natives of that part of Alex- 
andria County that is now Fairfax County. While he is in 
business as a merchandise broker in Washington City, Thomas 
Clifton Howard still maintains his residence in Alexandria, 
where he is regarded as one of the leading citizens of this his- 
toric city. 

Growing up in Alexandria, T. Brooke Howard attended the 
local schools, including the high school, from which he was 
graduated in 1919, and even thus early displayed abilities that 
led his teachers to advise his developing them along the line of 
professional training. Encouraged by his wise and helpful 
parents, he took a course in law in the University of Virginia, 
and was graduated therefrom in 1924. In October of the suc- 
ceeding year he established himself in practice in Alexandria, 
his offices being at 10.5 South Royal Street, and his residence at 
207 South Washington Street. He is a young man who from 
the start has deeply impressed others with his unshakable hon- 
esty as well as his ability to lay hold of the essentials of a 
situation, and has won and holds the respect too often withheld 
from beginners in any line. His influence is and has been in- 
variably for enlightened progress, for his sympathies are true 
and his judgment sound. He represents in character and accom- 
plishment the qualities which raise and dignify democratic 
citizenship and are the foundation of our best leadership. In 
addition to his careful and masterly professional services he is 
ever ready to give the best that lies within his unusual powers, 
his qualities of heart and brain. 

Mr. Howard is unmarried. He is a member of the Virginia 
State Bar Association and of the Alexandria Bar Association. 
One of the social leaders, he finds relaxation and congenial com- 



200 VIRGINIA 

panionship as a member of the Belle Haven Country Club and 
the Old Dominion Boat Club. While he has not entered public 
life, he is a staunch Democrat, and gives his support to his 
party's principles and candidates. The Presbyterian Church 
has in him a consistent member. 

Henry Wood Campbell, Doctor of Dental Surgery, F. A. 
C. D., who has practiced dental surgery at Suffolk since 1889, 
was born at Amherst, Virginia, July 9, 1866, son of an old and 
prominent Virginia family. 

His father, Rev. Thomas Horace Campbell, a native Virgi- 
nian, was born December 18, 1838, and was a soldier of the South 
in the Confederate army, being in the command under Gen. 
George E. Pickett. A bullet received in the battle of Gaines 
Mills he carried to his grave. After the close of the war he 
entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and was distinguished by his eloquence, his devotion to the 
church and humanity, and for thirty-two years carried on his 
labors as a pastor, from 1874 until his death on July 14, 1906. 
Rev. Thomas Horace Campbell married Miss Henry Virginia 
Wood, whose father. Rev. Henry D. Wood, was a Methodist 
minister who died in Georgia. Henry Virginia Wood was born 
April 12, 1843, in Buckingham County, Virginia, was married 
at "Spring Garden," Amherst County, Virginia, April 16, 1864, 
and died January 5, 1920, at her home, "The Oaks," in Amherst 
County. She was interred at Lynchburg, Virginia. 

After completing his early education in the schools of Am- 
herst and under private tutors Henry Wood Campbell entered 
the University of Maryland, from which he was graduated with 
the degree Doctor of Dental Surgery in 1889. In the same year 
he established an office at Suffolk, Virginia. His professional 
work has, always had a broader range than that of routine prac- 
tice. He has been influential in setting higher standards in the 
profession generally. From 1896 to 1918 he was president of 
the Virginia State Board of Dental Examiners, retiring in that 
year from the board. He was reappointed to the state board 
in 1920 by Governor E. Lee Trinkle of Virginia, and was re- 
elected its president, in which capacity he still serves. He was 
honored with election as president of the Virginia State Dental 
Association for the year 1894-95, and was chairman of its legis- 
lative committee from 1909-11. It was largely through his in- 
fluence that the General Assembly of Virginia passed a bill recog- 
nizing dentistry as a specialty of medicine in the same class 
with the other specialties of medicine which required the degree 
of M. D. This bill was passed in 1910, and became effective in 
1914. This standard, if continued, would have required a com- 
plete medical education for all dentists practicing in Virginia. 
He is a member of the American Dental Association, and has the 
honorary degree of "Fellow of the American College of Den- 
tists." He is a member of the committee of the National Asso- 
ciation of Dental Examiners in conjunction with the Carnegie 
Educational Foundation working to create a National Board of 
Dental Examiners. He served as president of the National Asso- 
ciation of Dental Examiners in 1905-06. He also is an honorary 
member of the North Carolina Dental Society, the South Side 
Virginia Dental Society, and a member of the Virginia Tide- 
water Dental Association, and for many years he has been a 
contributor to periodicals and journals of his profession. 



VIRGINIA 201 

Aside from his profession Doctor Campbell is president of 
the Suffolk Mutual Building- & Loan Association, a director of 
the American Bank & Trust Company, Inc., and from 1903 to 
1919 he was a member of the Suffolk City Council, being its 
president from 1914-16, and chairman of the finance committee 
in 1918. During the World war he was appointed a member 
of the Medical Advisory Board, and was secretary of this board 
during its existence. Doctor Campbell is affiliated with the Ma- 
sonic fraternity, is a member of the Country Club, former presi- 
dent of the Lions Club, a member of the Association for the 
Preservation of Virginia Antiquities, a member of the Virginia 
State Chamber of Commerce, is a Democrat and a Methodist. 

On June 4, 1895, he married Miss Emmeline Eley, of Suffolk, 
daughter of Richard Seth and Eliza Priscilla (Riddick) Eley. 
Her parents were native Virginians, and her father was a lieu- 
tenant in the Confederate 'army, and was imprisoned upon 
Johnson's Island. Afte¥'"'tfi^^VW-' Itfe'-Hvas a retail merchant in 
Suffolk until the tirtfe^\3f ^if^'tJeErtli irfl^^B^"'' flfei< ffli^tjl.er died in 
1.924, at the age of gighty^se%iiv' BbtH^aW iflfet^ife^-if^S^lk, 
Virginia. Doctor and ; Mrs; 'Campbell havfe 'a'fitttiftT^ ^f'^our 
children: Seth Ele/, "an felectrical ehgineer with' the*'&eneral 




■ CLAtJDE L?-Yt5WEifct^Wlrft%1^6f'^*^;_Wa-%^ g?;hool, 

Hampsteaid, M'arvland, is a ■member'^'6~P%n'^'6ld*-cii^^^^fffilient 
family of Madisbn Coiirfty, Virginia.^ >' '- •■"^^T s^s^r -^i^ 

Mr. Yowell was born' in Madison County, March 7, iSS^STson 
of Casper and MSry (-Weaver) Yowell. The Yowells came'from 
England and the''We^\'^ei3i;^from Germany, settling in Virginia 
in Colonial tirnes.'-Md feoth-fJfeiMi^^'ftere'i'epi'esented by^ soldiers 
in- the War of th^-lt-e.\'^Hiti5K -The Weavers Were 'Elitfergns and 
helped establish the "fiVM Llitheran Churehln th> stMe'^'frt 1-726. 
Mr. Yowell's grandfather 'Weaver enlisted at the age'io'Pseven- 
teen in the Confederate army, serving'with' the Reserves. 'His 
grandfather Yowell served in the Madison cavalry under Gen- 
eral Lee. Casper Yowell has been a noted stock farmer and 
breeder in Madison County, having a farm specializing- in Black 
Angus cattle, Poland China hogs and Shropshire sheep. He is 
a deacon in the Baptist Church and active in the Sunday School. 
Casper Yowell and wife had two sons, Claude L. and Russell W. 
Russell was born March 23, 1908, and is a student in the Uni- 
versity of Vii'ginia. 

Claude L. Yowell grew up on the home farm in Madison 
County, attended local schools and in 1922 graduated Bachelor 
of Science from the University of Virginia. He took the Mas- 
ter of Science degree at the University in 1927, and is now doing 
work on a Doctor of Philosophy degree in the summer sessions 
at Johns Hopkins LTniversity. He has been teaching for the 
past six years, two years at the Handley High School, Winches- 
ter, Virginia ; three years as principal of the Stanardsville High 
School. For his theses in taking the Master's degree he wrote 
a history of Madison County which is now on the market and 
is the first work of this nature finished on the history of this 
county. The publication of this book led to his becoming a 
member of the Pi Gamma Mu, honorary social science fraternity, 
of which he is now an active member. 

Mr. Yowell married, June 30, 1925, Miss Grace T. Yowell, 
of Rappahannock County, daughter of Weldon A. and Mazie 



202 VIRGINIA 

(Leathers) Yowell. Her father is a farmer and stock raiser 
in Rappahannock County. Mrs. Yowell is one of five children, 
Gladys R., Susie G., Kelsey A., Grace T. and Hugh A., being 
the only one of these now married. Mrs. Yowell graduated from 
the Harrisonburg Teachers College in 1925, and was engaged 
as a teacher in the Stanardsville High School for the next three 
sessions. Mrs. Yowell is active in the clubs of her adopted town. 

John W. Darden. No better illustration of the value of 
industry, perseverance and determination, guided by integrity 
and probity and directed by natural and developed ability, could 
be found than the career of the late John W. Darden. Left an 
orphan at a tender age, he faced life with but a meagre educa- 
tion and without the aid of friendly alliances or other adventi- 
tious circumstances worked his way to a position among the sub- 
stantial men of his community, being long a well known figure 
in railway, mercantile and agricultural circles in Nansemond 
and Southampton counties. He was a man of high character 
and public spirit, and in his death, which occurred in October, 
.1914, his community lost one of its reliable and valued citizens. 

Mr. Darden was born at Southampton, Virginia, July 16, 
1847, the oldest of six children of John Wilson Darden, a farmer, 
and his wife, Nannie (Norfleet) Darden. He was descended 
from a family which urigxBSked in. Scotland, whence the Ameri- 
can jjragenitor immigrated to iixis country during the early 
{^lonial period «nd settled in Virginia. John W. Darden was 
«lily twelve years of age when his parents died and he was 
forced to leave school at Southampton to face life's responsibili- 
ties on his own account. He was variously employed at such 
honorable employment as he could find until he reached the age 
of seventeen years, and then enlisted in a regiment of Virginia 
volunteer infantry, with which he served bravely until the close 
of the war between the states, seeing much active service and 
receiving a wound in the arm, the scar of which he carried until 
his death. At the close of his military service he sought rail- 
roading as a means of livelihood, and through industry and 
fidelity rose to be section master of the Seaboard Airline Rail- 
way in Southampton County. Later he held a like position 
with the Southern Railway, and during its construction was in 
charge of the leveling of rails. Resigning from this position, 
Mr. Darden embarked in mercantile affairs and for several years 
was the proprietor of an establishment at Franklin and subse- 
quently at Southampton, but following his marriage sold his 
business interests, purchased a farm in Nansemond County, and 
from that time forward until his demise was successfully en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. Mr. Darden was a man of high 
character and a consistent member of the Baptist Church. While 
he took much interest in public affairs, he never sought office, 
but supported generously the movements that his good judgment 
told him would benefit his community. 

In November, 1874, Mr. Darden married Miss Margaret Jane 
Edney, a descendant of a family which originated in England 
and settled in Virginia prior to the Revolutionary war. She was 
educated at private schools and is a daughter of Jonathan and 
Margaret (Spence) Edney, her father being originally an in- 
ventor and manufacturer of machinery in Camden County, 
North Carolina, who later moved to Franklin, Virginia, and 
spent the rest of his life in the lumber and grain milling business. 
Mrs. Darden was the fifth in order of birth in a family of ten 



VIRGINIA 203 

children. To Mr. and Mrs. Darden there were born ten chil- 
dren : Junius Willard, who is deceased ; John W. H., a merchant 
of Branchville, Virginia, who married May Taylor and has one 
son, John Taylor ; Nancy Norfleet, who married Thomas Ewre, of 
Camp Mill, Franklin, and has three children, Oretha, Margue- 
ritte and Thomas ; Lucy Emma, who is deceased ; Margaret In- 
diana, the wife of Robert L. Harper, of Raleigh, North Carolina, 
and has one child, Darden ; William Mosby, of California, who 
has two children, Sarah and William Mosby, Jr. ; Wallace Alex- 
ander, who is deceased ; Annie Asenath, the wife of John E. 
Coggin, a lumberman of Philadelphia ; Dr. St. Clair, a medical 
college graduate and specialist in tuberculosis, in charge of the 
Healthwin Sanitarium at South Bend, Indiana, who has two 
children, Thomas and Robert ; and Sarah Mabel, who married 
Rochelle Harrell, of Suffolk, Virginia, and has two children, 
Sarah and Rochelle. Mrs. Darden, who survives her husband 
and resides at 615 Colonial Avenue, is one of the highly esteemed 
ladies of Norfolk, and is active in the work of the Baptist Church. 

Carter Perkins, D. D. S., was one of the veteran and 
honored representatives of his profession in his native state of 
Virginia at the time of his death, which occurred in the city of 
Newport News December 7, 1926. Not only his professional 
skill and precedence but also his sterling character and high 
communal standing make specially consistent the memorial 
tribute here accorded to him. 

Doctor Perkins was born in Middlesex County, Virginia, 
August 13, 1832, and thus he had attained to the patriarchal age 
of ninety-four years when his earnest and worthy life came to 
its close. Aside from the marked success that he gained in the 
practice of his profession Doctor Perkins became a leader in 
real estate development and exploitation after he had estab- 
lished his residence in Newport News, and as a young man he 
gave loyal service in defense of the cause of the Confederate 
states in the Civil war. 

The subject of this memoir was a son of Col. Carter Perkins 
and Mary Ann (Humphrey) Perkins, of whose six children he 
was the fourth in order of birth. Colonel Perkins was owner 
and operator of a fine plantation estate in Middlesex County, 
and he made a record of gallant service as a soldier in the War 
of 1812, in which he held the rank of colonel. 

Doctor Perkins gained his early education mainly in private 
schools and under the direction of private tutors. In fortifying 
himself for the work of his chosen profession, before the era of 
regular dental colleges, he was favored in gaining technical and 
practical instruction under the preceptorship of Doctor Cowlen, 
of Baltimore, Maryland, who was one of the eminent dental 
practitioners and authorities -of that period. After completing 
his through course in dentistry Doctor Perkins returned to Vir- 
ginia, and thereafter he continued in the active practice of his 
profession in Middlesex and Lancaster counties until 1858, when 
he removed to Charles City County, where he continued in 
practice until the inception of the Civil war, when he promptly 
subordinated all personal interests and enlisted for service in the 
Confederate army. On the 5th of July, 1861, when he was 
twenty-nine years of age, he enlisted at Jamestown in Company 
K, Fifty-third Virginia Infantry, and soon afterward he was 
detailed to duty as quartermaster clerk. In September, 1861, 
he was assigned to a clerkship in the commissary department, 
and in 1862 he was placed in hospital service, supply department, 



204 VIRGINIA 

in the city of Richmond. Before the close of 1862 he was hon- 
orably discharged, by reason of physical disability. 

After the close of the Civil war Doctor Perkins engaged in 
the lumber business in Charles City County, and there he con- 
tinued operations on an extensive scale until 1889, when he 
sold his interests in the lumber business and removed to New- 
port News, where he resumed the practice of his profession. In 
1894 the Doctor retired from practice and turned his attention 
to the real estate business. He became president of the Newport 
News Development Company, which promoted the development 
of the east end of the city, and after a few years of association 
with this line of enterprise he became associated with his son 
Robert W., in the furniture business, under the title of Newport 
News Furniture Company. He sold his interest in this business 
in 1901, and for the ensuing five yeai's he was cashier and a 
substantial stockholder of the Newport News Savings Bank. 
In 190f) the Doctor here resumed the practice of his profession, 
from which he did not retire until 1920, when he was eighty- 
eight years of age. He thereafter lived in gracious and well 
earned retirement in Newport News until his death at the 
venerable age of ninety-four years. Doctor Perkins long held 
meTibership in the American Dental Association and the Vii'- 
ginia State Dental Association, and as author he made valuable 
contributions to the .standard and periodical literature of his 
profession. He was a stalwart advocate of the principles of the 
Democratic party, and he served as a member of the City Coun- 
cil of NewDort News, as well as a member of the Board of Edu- 
cation H'^ WPS an earne.st member of Trinity Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, South, as is also his widow, who continues a gra- 
cious figure in the social and cultural circles of Newport News, 
whei-e she is a member of the Woman's Club and also of the 
American Legion Auxiliary. 

In May, 1858, Doctor Perkins was united in marriage with 
Miss Mai'y Minge Graves, of Charles Citv County, and of this 
union were born five children : Robert W. became one of the 
representative business men of Newport News and served as a 
member of the Virginia Legis'ature. Carter, William C, and 
John Freeman likewise became actively identified with business 
enterprises, and the only daughter was Mary Minge. The death 
of Mrs. Perkins occurred prior to the removal of the Doctor to 
Newport News, and he was still a resident of Charles City 
County when his marriage to Miss Mary Sue Richardson was 
there solemnized in Charles City Chapel of the Methodist 
Church, November 25, 1885. Mrs. Perkins is a daughter of 
the 'ate Dr. Pryor Richardson and William America (Christian) 
Richardson, the former of whom was born in New Kent County 
and the latter of whom was a member of the influential Christian 
family that was founded in Virginia in the Colonial days. Dr. 
Pryor Richardson was graduated from William and Mary Col- 
lege as a member of the class of 1837, and thereafter he took 
a course in a leading medical college in Baltimore, Maryland. 
He became one of the leading physicians and surgeons in Charles 
City County, where he likewise owned a large and valuable 
plantation estate, and he was influential in the councils of the 
Democratic party during the course of many years. Ann, eldest 
of the children of Dr. Carter Perkins and Mary S. (Richardson) 
Perkins, is the wife of William E. Scruggs, a Government 
employe at Newport News, and they have one child, Ann Carter. 
Pryor Richardson Perkins, second of the children, sacrified his 
life in the World war, he having been killed in action while with 
his command at the Argonne front in France, October 3, 1918. 



VIRGINIA 205 

He held the rank of first lieutenant in the Twentieth Aerial 
Squadron. This gallant young Virginian had received prelimin- 
ary training at the University of Ohio, Columbus, and was of 
the first contingent of Americans to receive training with the 
school of the Royal Air Force at Oxford University, England, 
where he was graduated as a technical expert in air service 
early in 1918, his commission as first lieutenant having been re- 
ceived by him in May of that year. Margaret, next younger of 
the children, is the widow of Benjamin C. Flannagan, who was 
in the service of the Norfolk Southern (electric) Railway, and 
their two children are Margaret Perkins Flannagan, and Rich- 
ard Perkins Flannagan. Elizabeth, youngest of the children, 
is the wife of Frank E. Kuhn, an employe of the Chesapeake & 
Ohio Railroad, and their one child is Frank E., Jr. 

Lemuel Cornick Shepherd, M. D., was through a period of 
forty years one of the able representatives of his profession in 
the City of Norfolk. He was a doctor of broad and liberal cul- 
ture, of progressive ideas, enjoyed not only a successful private 
practice, but was also a leader in public health work. 

He was born at Petersburg, Vii'ginia, January 26, 1864, son 
of Jchn Camp and Susan (Land) Shephei'd. At the time of his 
birth his mother was living as refugee from Norfolk, which was 
the home of the family. After the war John Camp Shepherd 
became a merchant in Princess Anne County, Virginia, and was 
also a farmer. He served in the Confederate cavalry through- 
out the period of the war. 

Doctor Shepherd was one of a family of six children and was 
educated in country schools in Princess Anne County, attended 
the Episcopal High School at Alexandria, and was graduated 
from the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of Long Island in 
1888. A few years later he interrrupted his private practice to 
JO abroad and spent portions of the years 1892-93 in study at 
Vienna and Berlin. For several years Doctor Shepherd was a 
member of the Norfolk Board of Health and also served as city 
bacteriologist. He was a mem^^er of the Norfolk and American 
Medical Associations and the Medical Society of Virginia. Doc- 
tor Shepherd was a Democrat in pohtics, and he and his wife 
were active members of St. ^aul's Episcopal Church. 

Doctor Shepherd was still a comparatively young man when 
he died April 4, 1926. He married, September 6, 1894, Emma 
Cartwright. Mrs. Shepherd, whose home is at 1219 Westover 
Avenue, f orfolk, was born in Nantucket, Massachusetts, and 
was i-eired and educated in that state, attending the State Nor- 
mal School at New Britain, Connecticut. Her father, Benjamin 
Cartwright, was an old time whaling captain who sailed out of 
the Port of New Bedford. Her mother was Agnes Hamilton, 
and Mrs. Shepherd was one of four children. Mrs. Shepherd is 
an active member of the Norfolk Society of Arts. She is the 
mother of three children. Her son Lemuel C. II was educated 
in the Norfolk Academy and the Virginia Military Institute and 
is a captain in the United States Marine Corps. Captain Shep- 
herd married Virginia Tunstall Driver, of Norfolk, and has two 
sons, Lemuel III, and Wilson Driver. Edith Shepherd, who was 
educated in the Randolph-Macon Woman's College at Lynchburg, 
is the wife of James Vass Brooke, a civil engineer, and they 
have two daughters, Mary Goode Brooke and Edith Shepherd. 
The youngest child. Miss Virginia Hamilton, attended school at 
Norfolk and Skidmore College at Saratoga Springs, New York. 



206 VIRGINIA 

Adam Addison Wendel, sheriff of Norfolk County, is a 
prominent type of the new Virginian, a western man who was 
attracted to this section of Tidewater, Virginia, many years ago. 
He has taken a prominent part in the development of its indus- 
trial resources, and has given an administration of the office of 
sheriff which has been approved three times by the votes of the 
people. 

Mr. Wendel was born at Washington Court House, Fayette 
County, Ohio, July 8, 1869. His people were early settlers in 
Ohio. Mr. Wendel was reared and educated in that locality, and 
as a young man became interested in the lumber industry. It 
was his connections with lumbering which brought him to Nor- 
folk County in 1901 as superintendent and manager of an or- 
ganization which had secured ten thousand acres of timber land 
in the famous Dismal Swamp region. He and his associates put 
up a saw mill which had a daily cut of sixty thousand feet of 
lumber. This inaugurated the production of lumber in a region 
which for centuries had been practically waste land, and for 
twenty years Mr. Wendel gave his time and energies to this 
business. Besides clearing away the timber and utilizing it for 
lumber, some eight hundred acres were turned into valuable and 
productive farming land. For this drainage was essential, and 
this was secured through the formation of a drainage district. 
Besides its possibilities for farming the region is a natural game 
preserve, abounding in deer, bear and other prizes of sports. 
All these advantages have made Mr. Wendel very much attached 
to the region, and he spends a considerable part of the year in 
that recreation ground. 

He has never been a seeker for office, but the possibilities of 
a real public service led him to become a candidate for sheriff 
in 1919. He was elected, was reelected in 1923, and in the 
August primaries of 1927 was nominated by a large margin of 
votes. The three hundred square miles of territory in Norfolk 
County, with six hundred miles of road, demand utmost vigi- 
lance on the part of the sheriff and his nine full-time deputies 
in the enforcement of the laws providing for peace and good 
order. 

Mr. Wendel is a member of the B. P. 0. Elks and the Izaak 
Walton League, and is deeply interested in the fish and game 
conservation work with a view to making the Dismal Swamp a 
nationally known game preserve. Mr. Wendel married Olive 
Durnell, of Washington Court House, Ohio. She is active in 
church and social life at Portsmouth. 

Luther Spurgon Ballard was for many years well known 
in business circles in Portsmouth, a leader in the insurance field 
there, and had a great many friends and business associates who 
keenly felt his loss when he died December 15, 1925. 

He was born in North Carolina, in 1875, one of the thirteen 
children of Stephen Ballard, a planter of the old North State. 
Luther S. Ballai'd was educated in public schools, and learned 
the insurance business by several years of active experience at 
Philadelphia. From there he removed to Portsmouth, and built 
up a large business as general agent for the Mutual Insurance 
Company of Richmond. He always voted as a Democrat and was 
a member of the Court Street Baptist Church at Portsmouth. 

He married in September, 1909, at Port-smouth, Mrs. Ella 
(Scott) Savage, widow of William Savage and daughter of David 
and Sarah (Bunting) Scott. Her father was a Norfolk County 




U A-<-«J: ot-^J^vt^ iyjJ(U.-riJ^ 




VIRGINIA 207 

farmer and Mrs. Ballard was reared and educated in that county. 
She was left a widow with one small child, Russell Scott Savage, 
who also took the name of his step-father, and is now continuing 
in the insurance business in Virginia, being one of the leaders 
in that field. He married Minnie Allen and has two children, 
David Savage and Jack Allen. 

Mrs. Ballard, who resides in Portsmouth, at 225 North Elm 
Avenue, is a member of the Central Methodist Church, is presi- 
dent of its aid society and treasurer of the Earnest Workers 
Society. She is also a member of Stonewall Chapter, United 
Daughters of the Confederacy. 

Martin Donohue Delaney, M. D., has been established in 
the practice of his profession in the City of Alexandria more 
than a quarter of a century, and his unqualified success offers 
the best evidence of his professional skill as well as of his secure 
place in popular confidence and esteem in the community that 
has profited by his earnest and able ministrations. He gives 
special attention to the surgical branch of his profession, and 
in the same has attained to high reputation. He maintains 
both his residence and office headquarters at 131 North Wash- 
ington Street. 

Doctor Delaney was born in the City of Toledo, Ohio, April 
28, 1874, and is a son of Dennis William and Josephine (Dono- 
hue) Delaney, both of whom were born in Ireland and both of 
whom were young at the time of the coming of the respective 
families to the United States. They lived in Philadelphia and 
he served three years under General McClellan. During the 
greater part of his active career Dennis W. Delaney was a suc- 
cessful contractor and builder in Prince William County, Vir- 
ginia, and there his death occurred Februaiy 5, 1911, his wife 
having passed away on the 12th of January of the following 
year and both having been devoted communicants of the Catholic 
Church. Doctor Delaney is a direct descendant on his mother's 
side of Commodore Barry, the father of the old American Navy. 
On his father's side he is descended from the nobility of France. 

As a boy and youth Doctor Delaney attended the Christian 
Brothers School of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and thereafter 
continued his studies in St. John's Academy in his present home 
City of Alexandria. His higher academic education was 
acquired in Mount St. Mary's College at Emmettsburg, Mary- 
land, from which he received the degrees of both Bachelor and 
Master of Arts. His technical education for his chosen calling 
was gained in the medical department of Georgetown University, 
District of Columbia, from which he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1898. After thus receiving his degree of Doctor 
of Medicine he gained fortifying experience by serving two 
years as an interne in Columbia Hospital, Washington, D. C, 
and he then, in 1900, established himself in the practice of his 
profession in Alexandria, where he has since continued his 
ministrations with marked success and where he specializes in 
surgery, with many delicate operations to his credit, both of 
major and minor order. Recognition of his special skill as a 
surgeon is attested by his being a fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Surgeons, the representative national organization. He 
has membership also in the American Medical Association, the 
Virginia State Medical Society, the Northern Virginia Medical 
Society and the Alexandria Medical Society. He is surgeon for 
the Southern Railway, Richmond, Fredericksburg & Potomac 



208 VIRGINIA 

Railroad, and the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad. Doctor Delaney 
is a member of the Virginia Governing Committee of the Gorgas 
Memorial Institute of Tropical and Preventive Medicine. He 
is also a life member of the Service Veterans of the United 
States. 

The political allegiance of Doctor Delaney is given to the 
Democratic party, and both he and his wife are zealous com- 
municants of the Catholic Church. The Doctor is affiliated with 
the Knights of Columbus and the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks, is a charter member of the Washington Society, 
and in his home community is a member of the Belle Haven 
Country Club. Ancestors of Doctor Delaney were gallant 
soldiers in the War of the American Revolution, though his par- 
ents were natives of Ireland, and he is thus eligible for affilia- 
tion with the Sons of the American Revolution, while by similar 
ancestral heritage Mrs. Delaney has eligibility for membership 
in the Daughters of the American Revolution and also the 
Colonial Dames, she being a descendant of Col. John Fitzgerald, 
who served as an aide-de-camp on the staff of Gen. George 
Washington in the great struggle that gained American Inde- 
pendence. 

On the 4th of June, 1906, was solemnized the marriage of 
Doctor Delaney and Miss Catharine O'Donoghue, a daughter of 
Martin and Margaret (Lyne) O'Donoghue, of Georgetown, Dis- 
trict of Columbia, where her father was a wholesale merchant, 
both he and his wife having been born in Ireland. Mr. 
O'Donoghue died at the age of fifty-two years, June 28, 1888, 
and his widow attained to the age of seventy-five years, she 
having passed to the life eternal on the 9th of September, 1917. 
Martin O'Donoghue was descended from the O'Donoghues of 
Ross Castle, Ireland. Martin Donohue, eldest of the children 
of Doctor and Mrs. Delaney, was born June 5, 1907, and is now 
(1928) a student in the Virginia Military Institute; Paul Lyne 
was born April 5, 1909, and is attending Georgetown Univer- 
sity, where he is pursuing studies in both the literary and law 
departments ; Catharine, the only daughter, was born Novem- 
ber 28, 1913, and is a student in the Alexandria High School ; 
William Morgan, youngest of the children, was born February 
20, 1916, and is attending school in his home city. 

Eugene Marcellis Pollard. A veteran of the Confederate 
service and a business man of unquestioned ability, the late 
Eugene Marcellis Pollard, after years of faithful service as a 
railroad man and druggist retired to Richmond, and here, in the 
capital city of the South, he passed away in 1913, beloved and 
honored by all who knew him. He was born in Chesterfield 
County, Virginia, July 27, 1845, and was educated in its schools 
up to the age of sixteen years. He was a son of Joseph and 
Lydia Frances (Bottom) Pollard, who had five children. 

The school days of Eugene Marcellis Pollard were inter- 
rupted by the tocsin of war, and in spite of his youth he en- 
listed in the Confederate army, and remained in the service 
for four years, during which period he was wounded in action, 
and rose to the rank of sergeant. After the close of the war he 
entered the employ of the Norfolk & Western Railroad, and 
remained with that company for three years, leaving to go into 
the drug store of Dr. W. B. Conway, and rose, during the fifteen 
years he remained with him, to be manager of the business. 
Never very strong as a result of his war experience, he then 



VIRGINIA 209 

retired, and, coming to Richmond, here passed the remainder of 
his life. He was a member of Virginia May Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., and Stonewall Jackson Post, Confederate Veterans. He 
and all his family were Presbyterians, and earnest church work- 
ers and supporters. ' 

On December 13, 1871, Mr. Pollard married Miss Virginia 
M. Jones, a daughter of David T. and Martha Ann (Beville) 
Jones, and granddaughter of John Archer Beville, a French 
Huguenot who came from France to Virginia. For several 
generations the Jones family has resided in Chesterfield County, 
Virginia. David T. Jones was a planter, and served as a cap- 
tain of a company of Virginia militia in the ante-bellum days. 
He and his wife had two children, Mrs. Pollard's brother, Ulysses 
Boiling Jones, being her senior. Mrs. Pollard was educated in 
the Masonic Female Institute in Blacksburg, Virginia. Of the 
children born to Mr. and Mrs. Pollard eight lived to reach ma- 
turity, namely : Maude, who is the owner of the Poe Court 
Book Shop and an authority on. antiques, married Joseph Kelly 
Hull, a railroad man connected with the Chesapeake & Ohio 
Railroad ; Mrs. Virginia May Wright, widow of the late John 
Wright, formerly with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, and 
mother of five children, John Caskie, Randolph, Evelyn, David 
and Charles ; Stella Frances, who is cashier of the Postal Tele- 
graph Company and lives in Richmond ; Parke P., an electrical 
contractor of Richmond, who married Eva Lee Russel, of Meck- 
lenburg County, Virginia, and has two children, Parke P., Junior, 
and Dorothy Elizabeth; Lulu, who is the wife of T. W. Graves, 
manager of the Wilson Packing Company, Danville, Virginia; 
Edith Argyle, who is the wife of Howard Mann Morecook, trav- 
eling freight agent for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad, and 
mother of Howard Mann Morecook, Junior ; Glenna Leville 
Pollard, who is with the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad ; and Eu- 
genia Minon Pollard, who resides in Richmond. 

William Edward Reese. In recalling the life and activities 
of those who once trod the old familiar ways with ourselves but 
have now passed from the scene of life, their characteristics are 
remembered, their generous impulses are recollected and the 
real value of their influence is determined. In such a review a 
loving and appreciative light shines on the life and personality 
of William Edward Reese, who for many years was one of the 
honored citizens of Richmond, where his widow is still residing. 
He was born in Virginia, September 23, 1868, and died in Rich- 
mond April 15, 1924. His father, William Reese, was a farm 
owner and planter of Halifax County, Virginia, a man well and 
favorably known throughout a wide region, and his mother's 
first name was Rebecca. They had thi-ee children: Albert, who 
is a truck farmer upon an extensive scale ; Mrs. Eliza Dawson ; 
and William Edward, who was the youngest of the family. 

The public schools of Halifax County educated William Ed- 
ward Reese, and when he completed his education he became 
a clerk in a hardware store at Cody, Halifax County, but after 
several years he left that employment to enter the sawmill busi- 
ness. Selling his mill later on, he engaged in the wholesale lum- 
ber business in Lynchburg, Virginia, and at the same time he 
was interested in a stone quarry. When he sold these interests 
he located permanently in Richmond, and for two years handled 
scrap iron, and for two years more he was in the bag business. 
He was also interested in a fertilizer plant in Ellerson, Virginia, 



210 VIRGINIA 

that is still in operation. However his health failing, he found 
it necessary to dispose of all his holdings, and for several years 
prior to his death lived retired. He w^as an enthusiastic member 
of the North Side Baptist Church, but outside of that connection 
his interests were centered in his family. A public spirited 
citizen, warm hearted and generous, anxious to help others and 
to sustain through his contributions the higher things of life, his 
influence lives on. 

In November, 1900, Mr. Reese married Miss Dollie McDaniel, 
a daughter of James W. and Dolly (Ridgeway) McDaniel, who 
had seven children, of whom Mrs. Reese was the third in order 
of birth. She was educated in Halifax County, and is a very 
fine lady, a good mother and kind neighborhood visitor, no 
trouble or calamity coming to those in her vicinity without her 
offering her sympathy and material help. One child, Dr. Clyde 
Bishop Reese, was born to Mr. and Mrs. Reese. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Lynchburg, Virginia, and the Vir- 
ginia Military Institute, from which he was graduated in 1923 
with the degree .of Doctor of Dental Surgery, and since then has 
been engaged in the practice of dentistry in Richmond. Doctor 
Reese married Miss Vernesse Cecelia Batterfield, of Virginia. 
His fraternal connections are with the Masonic order and the 
Odd Fellows, and his professional ones are with the Virginia 
State Dental Association. A young man of undoubted ability, 
well trained, he has forged ahead, and is today one of the leading 
dentists of the city, and a man of whom the best is spoken, for 
he stands well with the public. 

John 0. Gamage was born at Norfolk, Virginia, in January, 
1837, and here he maintained his home until his death, which 
occurred in February, 1910. He was an honored representative 
of one of the sterling and influential pioneer families of Norfolk, 
here succeeded to the control of a large and important wholesale 
merchandise business that had been founded by his father fully 
ninety-five years ago, and here he continued as a leading citizen 
and business man until the close of his long and worthy life. 
The business founded by his father, Elisha Gamage, nearly a 
century ago is still continued under the family name and its ex- 
ecutive head at the present time is Miss Nancy C. Gamage, who 
is a daughter of the subject of this memoir and who provided the 
data on which this tribute to her honored father is based. 

John 0. Gamage was reared and educated in Norfolk and 
was the first of three generations of the Gamage family to be 
educated at the Norfolk Academy. He was a son of Elisha and 
Mary Ann (Fulton) Gamage, of whose seven children he was 
the third in order of birth. The Gamage family was founded in 
America in the early Colonial period, and its lineage is one of 
ancient and distinguished order in France and England. The 
French branch spelled the name, De Gamache. The family rec- 
ord traces back to 900, A. D., and it was one of royal status in one 
of the minor kingdoms of ancient France, whence representa- 
tives went into England with William the Conqueror. It was 
from England that came the original representatives of the fam- 
ily to America, where settlement was made in the Massachu- 
setts colony long prior to the war of the Revolution, members of 
the family having later been established in the State of New 
York. 

Elisha Gamage, the pioneer merchant of Norfolk, Virginia, 
was born and reared in the State of New York and was a son 



VIRGINIA 211 

of Samuel Gamage II, who was a large landowner in that com- 
monwealth and whose father, Samuel, Sr., went forth from 
Massachusetts as a patriot soldier in the Revolution, he having 
been a member of the Massachusetts troop commanded by Col. 
Thomas Croft, and another member having been Paul Revere, 
whose historic ride has made him a famed figure in American 
history. Subsequently this first Samuel Gamage became a lieu- 
tenant of marines on the frigate Demi, and on this war vessel 
he served under Capt. Samuel Nicholson in the naval arm of the 
Continental service in the Revolution. Samuel Gamage II was 
a gallant soldier in the War of 1812. 

It was in the year 1833 that Elisha Gamage established him- 
self in the wholesale general merchandise business in Norfolk, 
and the business has been continued under family name and 
control to the present time, though changing conditions in the 
passing years have brought both modification and expansion of 
its varied functions. It was about 1834 that Elisha Gamage 
became executive head of the Farmers Bank of Norfolk, and he 
continued the president after the reorganization under the title 
of Merchants & Mechanics Bank. He was long one of the most 
progressive and influential business men of Norfolk and was a 
citizen who commanded unqualified popular esteem and confi- 
dence, the high prestige of the family name having here been 
maintained by his son John 0. after he himself had passed 
from the stage of his mortal endeavors. 

As a young man John 0. Gamage became actively associated 
with his father's wholesale mercantile business, and his diversi- 
fied experience well fitted him for assuming eventual control. 
The enterprise is now conducted under the title of John 0. Gam- 
age, and its present functions are the handling of lime, cement 
and other building supplies and accessories. The business is 
one of substantial order and representative character, and is the 
oldest business in this line in Norfolk to be continuously con- 
ducted by one family. Since the death of her father in 1910 
Miss Nancy C. Gamage has been active president of the company 
and has directed the business with marked ability and success. 

John O. Gamage was a man of fine character, loyal and 
public spirited as a citizen, and progressive and resourceful in 
the handling of business interests of importance. He was sig- 
nificantly loyal to the cause of the Democratic party, though 
never a seeker of public office, and was a valued member of the 
Norfolk Board of Ti'ade and the local Chamber of Commerce. 
His original religious affiliation was with the Presbyterian 
Church, but he later became an active member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. He was a member of that splendid 
old organization, the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues, which was 
founded in 1828, and with this command he served as a loyal 
soldier of the Confederacy in the Civil war, as a member of 
Capt. C. R. Grandy's Battery, Garnett's Battalion of the army 
corps commanded by Gen. A. P. Hill. Mr. Gamage was wounded 
and captured, and was for some time held as a Federal prisoner 
of war at City Point, near Petersburg, Virginia. 

In 1859 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gamage and 
Miss Bell Sarah Williams, daughter of Rev. Peter Williams, of 
Northampton County, Virginia, her father having been a clergy- 
man of the Methodist Church and having been a descendant of 
Henry Williams, who settled on the Dale Gi-ant in Northamton 
County, he having been a brother of Roger Williams, the 
founder of the State of Rhode Island. Mrs. Gamage, venerable 



212 VIRGINIA 

in years, continues to maintain her home in Norfolk and was 
long a gracious figure in its social and cultural activities, besides 
being a devout member of the Methodist Church. She is a grand- 
daughter, on the maternal side, of Thomas Clay, who bought 
part of the historic Arlington estate from the Custis family. 

John W. Gamage, eldest of the children of Mr. and Mrs. 
John 0. Gamage, married Miss Fannie Camp, of Petersburg, 
Virginia, and he continued as a representative business man 
of Norfolk until his death. Albert E., the second son, was asso- 
ciated with his father in business and was about forty years 
of age at the time of his death. Mary Bell, eldest of the daugh- 
ters, died at the age of twenty-five years. Miss Nancy Clay 
Gamage assumed control of the business interests of her father 
at the time of his death and is now president of the John 0. 
Gamage business, which was established many years ago, and 
is engaged in the building material business of wholesale order. 
Miss Gamage has proven herself amply able to maintain the 
honors of the family name in both civic and business affairs and 
is a popular figure in both social and business circles in her 
native city, where she is a member of the Woman's Club and 
of the Chamber of Commerce, besides being a zealous member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Ida B., next younger of 
the daughters, was graduated from ' the Maryland Institute 
of Art and was twenty-three years of age at the time of her 
death. Miss Edna Sue, youngest of the children, was graduated 
in 1916 from the training school for nurses maintained by the 
Protestant Hospital in Norfolk, and as a nurse she served with 
the University of Virginia Corps in the World war period. She 
and her sister Nancy C. maintain a home in Norfolk, Virginia. 

Samuel Horace Hawes, whose record as one of the leading 
merchants and business men of the City of Richmond for over 
fifty years is recalled by all the older residents of the city, was 
a fine example of Virginia citizenship and a man of distinguished 
family connections. 

He was born in Powhatan County, Virginia, June 5, 1838, 
and died at Richmond February 13, 1922, at the age of eighty- 
four. His father, Samuel Pierce Hawes, was born in Dorchester, 
Massachusetts, in 1799, and was sixteen years of age when he 
came to Richmond in 1815. In 1845 he established a coal busi- 
ness in the city, and was active in that line of commercial work 
until his death. Samuel Pierce Hawes married Judith Ann 
Smith, of Virginia. They had a family of eight children. One 
of these was Rev. Dr. Herbert H. Hawes. Another, Mary Vir- 
ginia, was one of the most widely known American women of 
letters, under the pen name Marion Harland. She married the 
Rev. Edward Payson Terhune. 

Samuel Horace Hawes was educated in public schools in 
Richmond and as a youth became associated with his father's 
coal business. He took active charge of the business at his 
father's death. At the outbreak of the Civil war he enlisted in 
the Richmond Howitzers, and was in the service four years. 
During the last thirteen months of the war he was a prisoner at 
Fort Delaware and later at Morris Island, South Carolina. He 
held the rank of first lieutenant. After the war he returned to 
Richmond and thereafter gave his active attention to his busi- 
ness affairs. 

He was a director of the State Planters Bank of Richmond 
for many years and for two terms president of the Chamber of 





ayr~eSy'^^(^-<^<^^^c£hl^ 



VIRGINIA 213 

Commerce. He was on the Police Benevolent Association board 
and for many years a member of the board of the Male Orphan 
Asylum. Mr. Hawes used the prosperity gained in business in 
many ways for the benefit of the community in which he lived. 
He was a member of the Westmoreland Club and of Lee Chap- 
ter No. 1, United Confederate Veterans. 

On October 3, 1867, he married Miss Martha C. Heath, of 
Newark, New Jersey, where she was born and educated. She 
died February 13, 1897. Her father, S. R. W. Heath, was a mer- 
chant and president of the Firemen's Insurance Company of 
Newark. Mr. and Mrs. Hawes had three children. Horace 
Sterling Hawes, the oldest, was educated in Rutgers College at 
New Brunswick, New Jersey, and is a merchant at Richmond. 
He married Mary McCaw, daughter of William McCaw, of 
Richmond, and has two children: Mary McCaw, wife of Ran- 
dolph Cai'ter Harrison and mother of two children, Randolph 
Carter, Jr., and Mary Ann ; and Ann Sterling, wife of A. E. 
Willson Harrison and mother of a son, Horace Hawes. The sec- 
ond son. Heath Woodruff Hawes, is deceased. The daughter, 
Miss Katharine H. Hawes, who resides at 3211 Chamberlayne 
Avenue in Richmond, was educated in the Ely School in New 
York City. She is a member of the Richmond Woman's Club, is 
a life member of the Association for the Preservation of Virginia 
Antiquities, and for seven years was president of the Richmond 
Y. W. C. A. 

Samuel Horace Hawes' second wife was Mrs. Mary Mayo 
Blair Fitts, widow of James Henry Fitts. 

Charles McCulloch, physician and surgeon, is one of the 
prominent citizens of Lexington and has practiced medicine in 
the state nearly thirty years. 

Doctor McCulloch is a grandson of one of the most dis- 
tinguished figures in American finance, Hugh McCulloch, who 
was a native of Maine and in 1833 located at Fort Wayne, Indi- 
ana, where he soon became cashier and manager of the Fort 
Wayne branch of the State Bank of Indiana. In 1856 he was 
made president of the Bank of the State of Indiana, and from 
that post resigned in May, 1863, to become comptroller of the 
currency under Secretary of Treasury Chase, and had the task 
of enormous responsibility of organizing the newly created 
bureau and putting into operation the National Banking System. 
He was given the chief credit for making that transition without 
friction or delay, and he was also given high credit for funding 
the national debt at the close of the Civil war. In March, 1865, 
he was appointed secretary of the treasury by President Lincoln, 
serving until March, 1869, and in October, 1884, was again 
appointed secretary of treasury at the close of President 
Arthur's term, being the only man who ever held that oflRce by 
two appointments. He was the founder of the Hamilton 
National Bank of Fort Wayne, and his son Charles succeeded 
him in the bank, and his grandson, Ross McCulloch, is still head 
of the institution. 

Dr. Charles McCulloch was born at Fort Wavne, Indiana, 
June 2, 1873, son of Frederick H. and Caroline (Riddle) McCul- 
loch, his father a native of Fort Wayne and his mother of Cin- 
cinnati. Her father, Adam Riddle, was also born at Cincinnati 
and was a leading lawj'er of that city. Frederick McCulloch was 
in business as a merchant at Fort Wayne and after coming to 
Virginia followed farming for over forty years. He was a 



214 VIRGINIA 

vestryman in the Episcopal Church and a member of the 
Masonic Order. Of his three children two are hving: Doctor 
Charles and Elizabeth, the latter of whom is the wife of Dr. 
James Morrison, of Lynchburg. 

Charles McCulloch was given liberal educational advantages. 
He was a student in the University of Virginia during 1891-92, 
and while there became a member of the Phi Kappa Psi fra- 
ternity. His first call to a professional career was in veterinary 
surgery, and he graduated in that subject in New York in 1894. 
He practiced for a short time and then entered the medical 
department of George Washington University, taking his 
diploma in 1897. He first practiced at Howardsville, Virginia, 
and after two years became a member of the faculty of the 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, where he remained 
three years. From 1901 to 1922 he was busy with a very exten- 
sive country practice, with home at Howardsville, his profes- 
sional work taking him over three counties. Doctor McCulloch 
in 1922 retired from his profession and during the next five 
years lived on a farm near Lexington. He resumed general 
practice in 1928. He is a member of the Rockbridge County, 
Virginia State and American Medical Associations. 

Doctor McCulloch married Rosa Bruce Anderson, of Rich- 
mond, Virginia. They have two children, the son Hugh McCul- 
loch, a graduate of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, being a 
salesman for the Frigidaire and Delco Light products. The 
daughter, Nancy B., is a student in St. Hilda's Hall at Charles- 
ton, West Virginia. The mother of these children died in 1914, 
and Doctor McCulloch later married Ruth Floyd Anderson, of 
Lexington, daughter of Major William A. Anderson, former 
attorney-general of Virginia. 

John Thomas White. The late John Thomas Wliite, of 
Norfolk, was a well known figure in its business and civic life, 
and in addition to managing his large oyster planting and pack- 
ing business, he was concerned with other matters of general 
importance, in all of his operations showing keenness of per- 
ception, excellent judgment and cooperation in public eff'ort. He 
was a man of broad and abundant sympathies, always working 
for better conditions wherever public need was recognized, and 
his memory is tenderly cherished by those who knew and appre- 
ciated him. 

John Thomas White was born in Mathews County, Virginia, 
December 4, 1845, and died in Jacksonville, Florida, March 7, 
1919. He was a son of John and Sarah (Bohanon) White, grand- 
son of Capt. James White, captain of a company in the War of 
1812-, and great-grandson of John C. White, who was a Revo- 
lutionary soldier. Through his mother John Thomas White 
descended in a direct line from Ambrose Bohanon, who settled 
in Virginia in 1660, taking up a land grant in Kingston Parish, 
now Mathews County. Ambrose Bohanon, a son of the above, 
was quartermaster in General Washington's army during the 
American Revolution. Joseph Bohanon held the rank of colonel 
in the Continental army. He and his wife had eight children 
born to their marriage. 

Growing to manhood in his native county, John Thomas 
White attended its schools, and after his education was completed 
he went to the eastern shore of Maryland and was there engaged 
in merchandising until 1886, when he sold his interests and, 
coming to Norfolk, engaged in the oyster planting and packing 



VIRGINIA 215 

business, in which he continued until hia retirement in 1918, 
although he retained an interest in the business until his death. 
He was long a member of the City Council, and never lost his in- 
terest in the city's progress, nor in the success of the Democratic 
party, of which he was a loyal supporter all his life. A high 
Mason, he was a past master of the Blue Lodge and was advanced 
through the various bodies of the Scottish Rite to the thirty- 
second degree. He was a member of the Disciples Church. 

On May 29, 1873, Mr. White married Miss Rebecca Jane 
Furniss, born, reared and educated in Somerset County, Mai-y- 
land. She is a daughter of Ephraim and Amanda Furniss, the 
former being a brick mason by trade. Mrs. White is the young- 
est of the nine children born to her parents. The following 
children were born to Mr. and Mrs. White: Scotia Ann, \Yho 
married Crawford Nottingham, a retired business man of Nor- 
folk, was educated in Princess Anne, Maryland ; Ernest Floyd, 
now deceased, who was educated in the private schools of Nor- 
folk, married Mary Hundley; Rooker John, a practicing physi- 
cian, at Keller, Virginia, was graduated in medicine at the 
Medical College of Virginia at Richmond and is taking a post- 
graduate course at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 
Mai'yland, was active in the World war, and married Fairy 
Mapp ; Harry Fletcher, who attended the medical school of the 
University of Virginia, was active in the World war, is now 
major in the United States Public Health Service of the Regular 
Army, married Mrs. Jean Holmes ; Eunice Virginia, who was 
educated in Blackstone College, married H. H. Johnson, an 
insurance man. Although Mr. White has been dead for some 
years the force of his example remains and helps to make better 
the lives of those among whom he once moved. 

William John Matroni, who lived his life at Lynchburg, 
was a popular merchant and business man and citizen of that 
community. Since his death Mrs. Matroni has moved to Norfolk, 
where she has her home at 308 East Twenty-sixth Street, and 
some of her children also reside in that city. 

Mr. Matroni was born at Lynchburg in June, 1865, and died 
in that city April 23, 1919. He was the second son of nine 
children of Thomas and Levinia Matroni. His father was born 
in Italy, came to America and settled at Lynchburg just before 
the Civil war, and spent his active life as a merchant. 

William J. Matroni was educated in Lynchburg schools and at 
the age of nineteen took up a business career as a general mer- 
chant with a store at the corner of Salem and Jackson streets. 
To a general stock of merchandise he subsequently added coal 
and wood, and had a continually expanding business in those 
lines for over thirty years. He was a member of the Retail 
Merchants Association and Retail Coal Dealers Association, and 
was a man of marked charity, liberal with the use of his means 
and influence. 

He married at Lynchburg December 28, 1893, Ellen Nora 
Monahan, of that city, where she was reared and educated. She 
was the oldest of eight children of Patrick and Nora (O'Con- 
nell) Monahan. Her father was born in Limerick, Ireland, and 
settled in Lynchburg in 1852, spending many years of his life 
in the railroad service. Mrs. Matroni had a family of seven 
children. Mary Ethel, the oldest, is the wife of L. F. White, of 
Noi'folk, and their three children are Leroy, Mary and Annie; 
Miss Annie resides with her mother ; Millie married Curley Han- 



216 VIRGINIA 

son, of Norfolk, and has a son, Ernest ; Virginia married Hugh 
Hamilton, of Norfolk, and has one son, Hugh, Jr.; Ruth is the 
wife of Mack M. Lee, a railroad man ; Louise Margaret married 
Clarence Brimer, a business man of Norfolk, Virginia, and they 
have one son, Clarence, Jr.; and the youngest of the family is 
George. The late Mr. Matroni was affiliated with the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles, was a Democrat, and Mrs. Matroni and her 
children are members of St. Mary's Catholic Church. Her son- 
in-law, L. F. White, is a veteran of the World war and was 
gassed while overseas. 

Bernard Clifton Rhea was a scion of a sterling Scotch 
family that was founded in Virginia in the early Colonial period, 
its representatives having given loyal support to the Colonies 
in that great struggle for independence that is recorded in history 
as the War of the Revolution. 

Bernard Clifton Rhea was born in Norfolk, January 1, 1874, 
was here reared and educated, and here he passed his entire 
life, his death having occurred February 20, 1927. He was a 
son of John Thomas and Virginia (Tulane) Rhea and his father 
was long and successfully engaged in mercantile enterprise in 
Norfolk. The Tulane family was founded in America by a wid- 
owed mother and her two sons, her husband having been a 
magistrate in Ireland and having there been killed by enemies 
who were in ambush. It was a member of this family that 
founded the great Tulane University in New Orleans, and of 
this distinguished citizen the mother of the subject of this me- 
moir was a niece. 

At the age of twenty years Bernard C. Rhea entered the 
service of the municipal government of his native city by as- 
suming a position under the late John M. Broughton, who for 
the long period of thirty-three years was the efficient and hon- 
ored superintendent of the cemeteries maintained under direct 
supervision of the city government. Mr. Rhea eventually mar- 
ried the daughter of Mr. Broughton, and he continued his service 
with the cemetery department until the close of his life. He 
proved a loyal and capable executive in this connection, and in 
his native community his circle of friends was co-extensive with 
that of his acquaintances. Mr. Rhea was public spirited as a 
citizen and was a Democrat in political adherency. 

June 16, 1903, recorded the marriage of Mr. Rhea and Miss 
Eleanora Lee Broughton, who was born, reared and educated 
in Norfolk, and who is a daughter of John Manning and Susan 
Rogers (Taylor) Broughton, the latter a daughter of Beverley 
Kennon Taylor, who served the Confederacy as a lieutenant 
in the Atlantic Coast Artillery during the period of the Civil 
war and whose father had served as a midshipman in the 
United States Navy, under Commodore Beverley Kennon in 
the War of 1812. Mrs. Rhea's mother, Susan Rogers Taylor, 
was direct in descent of William Clayton Rogers, who married 
Priscilla Valentine. Arthur Tulane, an uncle of Mr. Rhea on 
the maternal side, was a gallant soldier of the Confederacy in 
the war between the states of the North and the South. 

John M. Broughton continued to maintain his home in Nor- 
folk until his death, at the age of seventy-five years, and it has 
already been noted that he gave fully a third of a century of 
service as superintendent of the city's cemetery department. 
In earlier years he had here been a prominent contractor and 
builder, and in the period of 1892-94 he served with characteris- 



VIRGINIA 217 

tic loyalty as a member of the City Council. He was a stalwart 
in the local ranks of the Democratic party, and was affiliatsd 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Independ- 
ent Order of Odd P'ellows and the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Brough- 
ton was a son of William Broughton, who was born in Princess 
Anne County, Virginia, in ISOi, and whose father was one of 
four brothers who came from England, and one ssttling in 
Georiiia, one in North Carolina and two made ssttlsrncnt in 
Virginia prior to the War of the Revolution. His mother's 
maiden nama was Penelops Jarvis. Since the deatJi of her hus- 
band LIrs. Rhea has continued to maintain her home in her 
native city, where she has ever been a popular factor in social 
circles, and bar residenco is at 119 West Eleventh Streot. The 
subjecc of this memoir is survived also by one child, Virginia 
Lroughton, who is the wife of Fran:; ± orter Lavdar, her husband 
being employed in the Norfolk National Bank of Commerce and 
Trust, lur. and Mrs. Lawler have a son, Beverley Rhea, born 
November 3, 1925. 

RoLERT Lee May, vital and progressive business man and 
loyal ciui^en of Alexandria, has shov/n exceptional initiative 
ability and versatile resourcefulness in the development of the 
virlua, lAibiic utility service represented in the Alexandria- 
Bareroit-Washiniiton Rapid Transit Company and the Rich- 
monu-V'/a h.ngton Motor Ccaihas, Inc. Of the former modern 
line of motor-coach transports Mr. May is the owner, and of the 
latcer ociijoration he is tne president. Throu:ih the admirable 
suvice iji.en by the t.,'o concerns, thus founded and developed 
by Mr. ..-.ay, Alexandria and Barcroft are given direct motor 
ti.an„pOrcat.on facilities to the national capital and similar ser- 
vice is e.vtanded betvv^een the nation's capital city and the historic 
old cit^ tiic»t is the capital of Virginia. 

L.r. May was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, i^Iarch 
13, Ih^k, and is a son of i.. arcin Luther and Susie A. (Clore) 
May, b cli ;L;ewise natives oi the county. Martin L. May was 
engaged a number of years in the work of his trade, that of 
Cc*rp.,ncor, priOr to enttr.ng service as a member of the police 
force in the City of V. ashingt^n, D. C, and after his retirement 
from tii-3 constabulary service he resumed work at his trade. 
He was ui the Dominion of Canada at the time of his death, and 
his wiaow died in 1.^20. 

Robort Lee May was a lad of twelve' years at the time of the 
family removal to Washington, D. C, and in the schools of that 
city he received the major part of his youthful education. As 
a young man he there gave hve years of service as car conductor 
on the lines of the Capital Traction Company, and he then 
joined the metropolitan police department in Washington, his 
service with which continued e.even years. He resigned his 
pcs.tion at the time of the nation's entrance into the World war, 
joined the secret-service departmant of the Government and had 
the distinction of serving as bodyguard to President Woodrow 
Wilson during the period of the war, his resignation having 
occurred after the armistice had brought the great conflict to a 
close. It was while he was thus engaged that a sequence of 
circumstances led to his initiation of the motor-transport enter- 
prise through the medium of which he has since gained splendid 
success and prestige. While engaged in Washington he had 
shown his loyalty to his native state by retaining his residence 
at Barcroft, a little Virginia hamlet about five miles distant from 



218 VIRGINIA 

the White House, and in making his daily trips between his 
home and the capital he utilized a motorcycle. A casual accident 
to the somewhat decrepit Ford automobile used by his wife led 
him to the train of thought that brought him to a decision to 
establish and operate a motor-bus line between Barcroft and 
Washington for the accommodation of the people of the village 
and those residing along the Columbia turnpike. Mr. May, with 
a Reo chassis, fitted up a sort of rudimentary transport that 
would accommodate about twenty persons when crowded, and 
this he placed in commission on the route, while he himself 
officiated as driver. The first trip was made June 27, 1921, 
and thus was given inception to what has become a large and 
important enterprise in the field of interurban motor trans- 
portation. The year 1928 finds five motor busses in operation 
on the Barcroft-Washington line, and July 1, 1924, Mr. May 
expanded his business by estabhshing his line between Wash- 
ington and Alexandria, fine de luxe cars being operated on this 
line and express service provided during rush hours. Mr. May 
encountered opposition in the latter project, but popular senti- 
ment was with him, as the pioneer, and he eventually gained 
control of the interests of his competitors and is now sole owner 
of the Alexandria-Barcroft-Washington Rapid Transit Com- 
pany, the service of which is maintained at the best modern 
standard. The service of the line is used by fully 3,000,000 
persons annually. 

It was in 1926 that Mr. May effected the organization of 
the Richmond-Washington Motor Coaches, Incorporated, and the 
de luxe service given by this admirable line between the national 
capital and the Virginia capital has met with unqualified popular 
approval and support, the while it constitutes a valuable public 
utility for the communities through which the line passes. Of 
this corporation Mr. May has been president from the beginning, 
and his progressive policies have been the force through which 
the service has been developed and perfected. Mr. May has been 
able to translate his thoughts into constructive action and has 
made an outstanding record in the domain of national motor 
transportation. He is chairman of the executive committee of 
the Virginia Motor Bus Association, at the time of this writing, 
in the summer of 1928, and is a member of the transportation 
committee of the Alexandria Chamber of Commerce. He main- 
tains his home in Barcroft and his busses activities have con- 
tributed much to the remarkable development and progress of 
that place. His executive headquarters are established at 127 
North Pitt Street in the City of Alexandria. 

Mr. May is a Democrat in politics, is a member of the Rotary 
Club of Alexandria, as well as of the Old Dominion Club, is 
affiliated with the Knights of the Maccabees, and he and his wife 
are members of the Baptist Church, though he was reared in 
the faith of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He is a 
stockholder in the American Fidelity and Casualty Company of 
Richmond. 

The two transportation concerns of which Mr. May is the 
executive head maintain at Alexandria a monster garage, with 
a floor space of 20,000 square feet, and this is equipped with all 
facilities for the repairing of the motor coaches of the two lines, 
more than fifty busses being now in operation, employment 
being given to seventy persons, and a smaller garage being main- 
tained in the City of Washington. 

October 12, 1904, marked the marriage of Mr. May and Miss 
Lulu Jackson Barr, daughter of Lewis J. and Virginia (Jack- 



VIRGINIA 219 

son) Barr, both of whom were born in Virginia and the latter 
of whom was a descendant of Gen. Stonewall Jackson. Mr. 
Barr is now a member of the A. B. & W. Rapid Transit Com- 
pany, his wife having died in November, 1887. Mr. and Mrs. 
May have two children: Beverly Cornell, who was born in 
November. 1905, is now associated with his father's business in 
the capacity of traffic manager and as vice-president of the Rich- 
mond-Washington Motor Coaches, Inc. He married Miss 
Margaret Louise Curtis, and they have two children, Robert 
Marshall, born October 15, 1925, and Martha Lou, born Novem- 
ber 4, 1926. Sidney Alice, younger of the two children of the 
subject of this review, was born January 1, 1907, and is the wife 
of Virgil Gaines, who is a director and second vice-president of 
the Richmond-Washington Motor Coaches, Inc. 

George Allison, Jr., was one of the valued local executives 
of the Virginia Electric & Power Company in the City of Nor- 
folk at the time of his death, which here occurred in September, 
1912. He had been long and prominently concerned with public 
utility service in Virginia and had made a record of successful 
achievement in this connection, the while his sterling charac- 
teristics gave him a strong hold upon the confidence and good 
will of all who knew him. 

Mr. Allison was born in the City of Knoxville, Tennessee, 
in November, 1870, the Allison family having been established 
at Charleston, South Carolina, prior to the Civil war and the 
ancestral line having been marked by kinship with the dis- 
tinguished Harrison family that gave two Presidents to the 
United States, Gen. William Henry Harrison and Benjamin Har- 
rison. The subject of this memoir was a son of George and 
Margaret (Parham) Allison, his father having been a skilled 
electrician and having been for a long period in navy yard 
service. 

Mr. Allison received most of his early educational discipline 
in the City of Richmond, Virginia, where the family home was 
maintained in the period of his boyhood and early youth. His 
father was for some time a construction foreman for the Western 
Union Telegraph Company, and the subject of this memoir 
gained practical experience by assisting his father in this con- 
nection. Thereafter he was for ten years in the employ of the 
Southern Bell Telephone Company, his next connection, with 
the Southern States Telephone Company, was of about equal 
duration, and finally he entei'ed the service of the Virginia Elec- 
tric & Power Company, with which he continued his association 
until the time of his death. 

Mr. Allison gained high reputation as a technical and prac- 
tical expert in the various phases of applied electricity, and his 
service in this connection was ever marked by loyalty and effi- 
ciency. He had no ambition for the activities of practical poli- 
tics, iDut was a staunch supporter of the cause of the Democratic 
party. He was a communicant of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church, and his widow, who still resides in Norfolk, is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church, in the faith of which she was 
reared. 

In June, 1892, Mr. Allison was united in marriage to Miss 
Minnie Martin Davis, who was born and reared in Prince Ed- 
ward County, Virginia, a daughter of John W. and Sarah Eliza- 
beth Davis, her father having been a substantial farmer of 
that county and a scion of a family that was founded in Vir- 



220 VIRGINIA 

ginia in the early Colonial period, the lineage tracing back to 
sterling Scotch origin. Prior to the Civil war members of the 
Davis family held large landed estates and were extensive ex- 
ponents of plantation industry in Charlotte County. The father 
of Mrs. Allison gave loyal service in support of the Confederacy 
during the period of the Civil war, his assignment having been 
to the commissary department of the Confederate army. Con- 
cerning the children of Mr. and Mrs. Allison the following brief 
data are available : Percy E. is in the service of the Virginia 
Electric & Power Company, as is also the next younger son, 
George L., who likewise maintains his home in Norfolk, the 
maiden name of his wife having been Mildred Dillon and their 
two children being daughters, Mildred and Jane. Robert, who 
is, like his older brothers, associated with the same utility com- 
pany, as v/as the honored father, married Miss Rae Lipschutz, 
and their one child is Frank. Minnie, older of the two daughters, 
is the wife of Vincent Thomas, who is engaged in the mercantile 
business in Norfolk, and they have two children, Vincent, Jr., 
and William. Margaret, the younger daughter, is the wife of 
Erskine Blackburne, who is in the service of the Norfolk Loan 
& Bank Company. Frank, youngest of the sons, likewise is 
connected with the Virginia Electric & Power Company. 

Luther Paul Baum. The knowledge that a man is judged 
for what he accomplishes and the effect his work has on others, 
not alone with reference to himself, should encourage the average 
American to put forth his best efforts so that when he has 
passed from this earthly sphere he will be remembered with 
kindly interest and respectful regard. Many opportunities are 
within the grasp of every man who is determined to live an 
honest and upright life, and among the men of Norfolk who 
during his lifetime set an example to his fellow citizens not 
only as a private citizen, but also as an able public official was 
the late Luther Paul Baum. For some years he was connected 
with the Norfolk County engineer's office, and his service in 
this particular is sufficient evidence of his ability and fidelity 
to duty, but it is but due to his memory to state that he in his 
public capacity displayed only the same traits which charac- 
terized his private life — strict attention to the details of his 
work and thoughtful and intelligent management, qualities which 
could not fail to bring about satisfactory results. 

Luther Paul Baum was born in Princess Anne County, Vir- 
ginia, in October, 1861, and died in Norfolk in April, 1904. He 
WES educated in Reynoldson College, Gates County, North Caro- 
lina, but he did not complete his collegiate course, as he returned 
home and began farming on the portion of his father's estate 
that he had inherited at the time of his father's death. There 
he remained until 1887, and in that year came to Norfolk County, 
Virginia, and here he continued his farming, but subsequently 
moved to the City of Norfolk to assume the duties assigned him 
in the office of the county engineer, and it was while he was in 
office that he died. 

In February, 1884, Mr. Baum married Miss Penelope Jack- 
son, of Norfolk County, Virginia, a daughter of William A. and 
Penelope (Pendleton) Jackson. Mr. Jackson was a landowner 
and lumberman of Norfolk County, and one of the leading cit- 
izens of this section of the state. Eight children were born to 
Mr. and Mrs. Baum, namely : Renan C, who is an electrical en- 
gineer, married Miss Emma Patterson, of Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 



VIRGINIA 221 

\ania, and they have two children, Elizabeth and Marjory; Mary 
Pendleton, who married Temple L. Gatewood, of Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, an extensive drayman and transfer man, owning his own 
business, has no children ; Harvey A., who is vice president and 
general manager of the Atlantic Commission Company, married 
Miss Gladys Lanning, and they have three children, John Minch, 
Harvey A., Junior, and Phyllis Matilda ; Lillie, who married 
John Plant, of Boston, Massachusetts, has two children, John 
and Elizabeth ; Christie, who is a business man of Norfolk, is 
a veteran of the World war, during which he served overseas 
with the One Hundred and Sixteenth Infantry, A. E. F., was 
wounded and gassed in the Argonne offensive, married Miss 
Carolyn Rapeltz, and they have one child, Carolyn Penelope ; 
Nellie Bryan Baum ; Luther Paul, who is a business man, married 
Miss Hattie Schultz ; and William A. Jackson Baum. 

Mr. Baum was a member of the Royal Arcanum and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. For years he belonged to 
the Baptist Church, of which his wife is still a member. She 
is very active in the Woman's Club and the Art Club Society. 
The Baum family is of German origin, and was established in 
Virginia when it was still a colony of England. The Pendletons 
came to Virginia from England at a very early day, and took 
possession of a grant of 12,000 acres of land in New Kent County. 
From that time to the present those bearing the name have been 
active factors in the professions and public life, and all of them 
have been honorable and upright gentlemen. The Jackson fam- 
ily was early established in Norfolk County, and its members 
have also been in the public eye ever since, holding positions 
of importance and acquitting themselves most creditably. Dur- 
ing the summer months Mrs. Baum maintains her residence at 
204 Nineteenth Street, Virginia Beach, but after October 1 of 
each year she lives at 1017 Colonial Avenue, Norfolk. Her 
position in society is well established and she is most highly 
regarded by all with whom she is associated. The children are 
a credit to her and her husband, and she is naturally very 
proud of them and what they are accomplishing. 

Rev. John Willi.^mson Daugherty. Both at Richmond and 
in Norfolk County the name of the late Rev. John Williamson 
Daugherty is held in affectionate memory for the zeal and earn- 
estness of his ministry and the work he did in building up the 
institutions of organized Christianity. 

Doctor Daugherty was born at Williamsburg, Virginia, in 
January, 1856, and died at Richmond in April, 1909. His grand- 
father was a native of Ireland and came to America and settled 
in Maryland after the Revolutionary war. The Daughertys were 
for several generations identified with the sea. Doctor Daugh- 
erty's father, John Fenton Daugherty, was a sea captain. The 
mother of Rev. Doctor Daugherty was Lucy Bassett, member 
of the old Colonial family of Bassetts of Williamsburg, a family 
that gave soldiers to the Revolution and men high in poltical 
station. 

John Williamson Daugherty was the oldest of three children. 
For several years he clerked in stores, and at the age of twenty- 
four engaged in the commission business. He followed an active 
business career until he was thirty years of age, when he left 
commercial pursuits to enter the ministry, and was ordained 
and had as his first charge the Court Street Baptist Church of 
Portsmouth. Later he was assigned to the South Street Baptist 



222 VIRGINIA 

Church for six years. While in those pastorates he was able 
to raise practically all of the donation for the addition to the 
Court Street Baptist Church Sunday School building and secured 
most of the fund for the original building of the South Street 
Baptist Church. On leaving Portsmouth he became pastor of 
the Fulton Baptist Church at Richmond. In 1896 Doctor 
Daugherty withdrew from the Baptist communion and organized 
the Apostolic Chui'ch at Fulton, in Richmond, and devoted his 
full time and energies to this denomination until his death. He 
was a Democrat in politics. 

Doctor Daugherty first married Margaret Guy, of Ports- 
mouth. She died leaving five children : Lucius ; John Williamson, 
Jr., now a physician at Flushing, Long Island ; Thomas B., a 
physician engaged in practice at Fayetteville, West Virginia; 
Elizabeth B., wife of Frank B. King, of Orlando, Florida ; and 
Margaret H., wife of Fred Bates, of Richmond. The son, John 
W., Jr., served with the rank of first lieutenant in the Medical 
Corps of the United States Navy during the World war, con- 
tinuing in the service altogether for three and a half years. 

Doctor Daugherty married in January, 1894, at Portsmouth, 
Miss Minnie Lee Fulford, of Portsmouth, her father being a 
descendant of Sir John Celestus Fulford, who was with the 
King's Court of James II, and who later settled on the Virginia 
coast, acquiring a grant of land. Capt. John C. Fulford was 
captain of the Portsmouth Grays in the Confederate army, and 
married Virginia C. Davis. Mrs. Daugherty was the oldest of 
four children. Mrs. Daugherty, who now makes her home at 
Portsmouth, at 1055 Ann Street, is the mother of six children : 
Richard F., who served as a chief yeoman with the United States 
Navy during the World war, is now an employe of the Standard 
Oil Company at Norfolk, married Ruth Wainwright and they 
have one daughter, Ann Lee ; Paul C, a dental technician at 
Norfolk, married Percy Ethel York ; Emily J. is the wife of 
Malcolm F. Beazley, a railway engineer, and has a son, Mal- 
colm F., Jr., Mary P. is the wife of W. T. Beck, a railway em- 
ploye, and they have two sons, W. T., Jr., and Richard Edward ; 
Daniel, with the Burrow & Martin Drug Company, married 
Mary R. Unser ; and James B., dental technician at Portsmouth, 
married Isabel Hooks and has one daughter, Jane Lee. 

John Gary Curling was a prominent business man of Nor- 
folk County, winning his own way from an early age and in a 
comparatively brief lifetime secured more than a normal prestige 
and degree of success. 

He was born in Norfolk County in October, 1886, and died 
at Portsmouth in July, 1921, son of J. W. and Virginia F. 
(Grimes) Curling. He was four years old when his father died 
and had to face the prospect of working to make his own oppor- 
tunities. He attended the schools in Norfolk County and for 
several years he and his brother operated the home farm for 
their mother. From seventeen to nineteen years of age Mr. 
Curling was with the Roper Lumber Mill. At Portsmouth for 
several years he was in the furniture business and also in the 
fish business, leaving that to become associated with J. E. Nor- 
man in a merchant tailoring business known as the Silver Dollar 
Tailoring Company. From one shop this business steadily grew 
until they were operating stores in twelve cities of Virginia 
and North Carolina. Mr. Curling gave all his time to this busi- 
ness for ten years, when he sold out to his partner and then 



VIRGINIA 223 

concentrated his attention on a clothing store at Portsmouth. 
He was also interested in the fish business during his later years. 
Mr. Curling married Rosa Hanrahan, of Portsmouth, daugh- 
ter of J. W. and Sarah Frances Hanrahan. Her father was a 
Portsmouth business man and was descended from a family that 
settled in this section of Virginia shortly after the Revolutionary 
war. Mrs. Curling is a Methodist. Her brother, Frank C. Han- 
rahan, is a prominent Portsmouth business man, now serving his 
second term as city manager of Portsmouth. Mrs. Curling, who 
resides at 415 Webster Street in Portsmouth, has one daughter, 
Ruth Elizabeth, now deputy city collector. 

Howard Malcolm Smith is one of the progressive young 
business men of the City of Alexandria, metropolis of Arlington 
County, where he is engaged in the real estate and general insur- 
ance business and is regional superintendent for the Provident 
Relief Association of Washington, D. C. His office headquarters 
are at 624 King Street, in the Smith Building. 

In the picturesque little mountain city of Staunton, Virginia, 
Howard M. Smith was born January 15, 1896, and he is a son of 
Howard M. and Margaret (Bacon) Smith, the former of whom 
was born in Nelson County, this state, and the latter at Waynes- 
boro, Augusta County. Wilson Smith, grandfather of the sub- 
ject of -this review, operated wagon trains between the City of 
Richmond and the Shenandoah Valley prior to the Civil war. 
Howard M. Smith, Sr., was long and successfully identified with 
the insurance business, and at the time of his death was deputy 
superintendent of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company at 
Staunton, Virginia, where he died January 15, 1924, and where 
his widow still maintains her home. 

Howard M. Smith of this sketch was reared and educated in 
his native city and there gained his youthful experience in the 
insurance business as an associate of his father. In 1916, as 
a member of a Virginia regiment of the National Guard, Mr. 
Smith entered military service on the Mexican border, where his 
command was inducted into the United States Army and where 
he held the rank of sergeant until he received his honorable dis- 
charge in May, 1917. Thereafter he continued his as3ociation 
with the insurance business in his native city of Staunton until 
May, 1920, when he established his headquarters in Alexandria, 
where he has built up a substantial real estate and insurance 
business and is superintendent for the Provident Relief Associa- 
tion of Washington, D. C, which issues health, accident and 
life insurance. As a general underwriter of insurance Mr. 
Smith likewise represents other important insurance corpora- 
tions in the various lines of indemnification. In his real estate 
operations Mr. Smith has figured as manager of development 
and exploitation for all of the Alexandria subdivisions of F. C. 
Gcodnow, has given similar service in connection with the Wash- 
in: ton & Kane subdivisions and also has a most attractive sub- 
division of his own, called Westwood and situated near Mount 
Vernon, the historic George Washington estate. He is a director 
of the Alexandria Realty Investment Corporation, of which he 
served as secretary three years. His political allegiance is given 
to the Democratic party, he and his wife are communicants of 
the Protestant Episcopal Church, and he is afiiliated with the 
American Legion. 

February 3, 1916, recorded the marriage of Mr. Smith and 
Miss Mary L. Smith, daughter of John D. and Ida V. (Clem- 



224 VIRGINIA 

ents) Smith, the latter of whom died at the birth of her daughter 
Mary L., who was doubly orphaned by the death of her father 
when she was a child of three years. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have 
two children : Dorothy Ann, born January 18, 1917, and Nancy 
Lee, born February 2, 1919. 

James Iredell. Probably no family has played a more prom- 
inent or conspicuous part in the history of North Carolina than 
that which bears the name of Iredell. It has not been alone in 
public and miltary life that it has shone brightly ever since the 
birth of the nation, but in the professions and arts and sciences, 
in finance and in business. Among the brilliant men of this dis- 
tinguished family, one who chose banking and the marts of 
commerce and trade as the medium through which to attain 
success was the late James Iredell of Norfolk, long identified 
with banks and railways, but at the time of his death an impor- 
tant factor in the business of nitrate shipping. 

Mr. Iredell was born in 1868, at Raleigh, North Carolina, 
and was a son of Cadwallader James and Martha (Southgate) 
Iredell. He was a direct descendant of the historical character. 
Justice James Iredell, who held his office under President George 
Washington, and who was his great-grandfather, while his 
grandparents were Governor James and Frances (Tredwell) 
Iredell. A complete review of the career of Governor Iredell 
will be found elsewhere in this work. Cadwallader Iredell was 
for many years a banker of South Carolina, making his home 
for the most part at Columbia, although he also resided for 
some years at Raleigh, North Carolina. He was a man of high 
character who upheld the best traditions of the family. During 
the war between the states he held the rank of captain of a 
company of North Carolina volunteer infantry. 

James Iredell was a child when taken by his parents to South 
Carolina, and there acquired his early education in public schools. 
Following this he went to Columbia College, from which insti- 
tution he was graduated with the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and 
not long thereafter entered the Bank of Columbia, South Caro- 
lina, where he arose to the position of cashier. He remained 
with that well known banking house in the same capacity for a 
period of fifteen years, during which time he formed a wide 
acquaintance among men high in finance and prominent in other 
lines of industry. In 1903 Mr. Iredell resigned his position and 
changed his scene of operations to Norfolk to become treasurer 
and auditor of the Norfolk Street Railway Company, and re- 
tained this position until 1917, in which year he became inter- 
ested extensively in the shipping of nitrate. He was engaged 
in this line of business at the time of his death, which occurred 
in July, 1919. Mr. Iredell was a Democrat, but did not seek 
public office or political preferment. He was a citizen of public 
spirit and civic pride, however, and always a supporter of worthy 
movements for the betterment of his community. He had a 
number of social and fraternal connections, and his business 
interests were many and varied. 

In September, 190.5, Mr. Iredell was united in marriage with 
Miss Laura Merle Higgs, of Raleigh, North Carolina, who was 
educated at St. Mary's College and is a daughter of Jacob and 
Laura (Sorrel) Higgs, both the Higgs and Sorrel families being 
well known in North Carolina, where they are of worthy pioneer 
stock. Jacob Higgs was for many years a merchant at Raleigh, 
where he had an excellent reputation for integrity and good 



VIRGINIA 225 

citizenship. Mrs. Iredell survives her husband and resides at 
5A Weynoke Apartment, Colley and Princess Anne avenues, 
Road W. She is a consistent member of the Episcopal Church 
and has been active in its work. There were three children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Iredell, James Iredell IV, born July 15, 
1906, connected with the Texas Oil Company at Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia ; Martha Southgate Iredell, born August 4, 1909, and Ann 
Stith Iredell, born September 22, 1918. 

Ira Jefferson Brooks II. Practically the entire career of 
the late Ira J. Brooks II, of Portsmouth, was passed in connec- 
tion with railroad work, and from 1900 until his death in 1919 
he was car inspector for the Norfolk & Portsmouth Belt Line 
Railway. During his life he depended solely upon his own 
ability and resources to win promotion and success, and it was 
his fortune so to conduct himself as to win the esteem and respect 
of his associates and fellow citizens. 

Mr. Brooks was born in Dinwiddle County, Virginia, Jan- 
uary 23, 1856, a son of Ira W. and Sarah (Mays) Brooks. His 
father, a native of Petersburg, this state, enlisted in the Con- 
federate army during the war between the states, in which he 
suffered a wound while in the cavalry service, but fought until 
the close of the great struggle. Following his return to the pur- 
suits of peace he took up the business of contracting, and fol- 
lowed that line with success until the time of his demise. He and 
Mrs. Brooks, who was a native of Dinwiddle, were the parents 
of nine children, of whom Ira J. was the eldest. 

Ira J. Brooks received his education under private teachers 
in Dinwiddle County, and as a young man was employed for a 
time at Petersburg. In 1877, at the age of twenty-one years, 
he secured a position with the Norfolk & Western Railroad, and 
remained with that line for a period of twenty-three years. In 
1900 he took up his residence at Portsmouth to accept the posi- 
tion of car inspector for the Norfolk & Portsmouth Belt Line 
Railway. As before noted, he continued with this concern until 
his death June 10, 1919, when he was sixty-three years of age. 
Mr. Brooks was a thorough master of every detail of his busi- 
ness, and at all times had the full confidence and respect of his 
associates and fellow citizens. He was a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Woodmen of the World, the Junior Order United 
American Mechanics, the Improved Order of Red Men and the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in all of which orders he 
had many friends and took a profound interest in the work. He 
was a stalwart Democrat in his political allegiance and was 
active in his support of the principles and candidates of his 
party. His religious connection was with the Methodist Church. 

On June 30, 1896, in Nansemond County, Mr. Brooks was 
united in marriage with Miss Rosa Saunders, who was reared 
and educated in that county and was a daughter of Benjamin 
Saunders, a farmer and lumberman, and a Confederate veteran 
of the war between the states, in which he was wounded. He 
was a son of Edward Saunders, a plantation owner, and the 
latter was a son of George Saunders, a soldier of the War of 
1812, while the latter's father was a member of the Virginia 
troops during the War of the Revolution and was present at the 
surrender of Yorktown. The men of the Saunders family have 
been planters almost without exception. The mother of Mrs. 
Brooks was Emily Hunter, and she and Mr. Saunders were the 
parents of fourteen children. To Mr. and Mrs. Brooks there 



226 VIRGINIA 

were born four living children : George Henry, who is employed 
by P. D. Guathmey, of Smithfield, Virginia ; Miss Florence Cath- 
erine, who is preparing for a career as a professional nurse, and 
will graduate from the Provident Hospital of Norfolk in the 
class of 1929 ; Miss Ida Laurine, who has a position with the 
Seaboard Air Line Railway ; and Ira Guy, who is attending 
school. Mrs. Brooks, who survives her husband and resides at 
459 Maryland Avenue, Portsmouth, belongs to the ladies' auxil- 
iary of the Woodmen of the World and the Pythian Sisters, and 
is also active in the work of the Methodist Church. 

Johnston Pettigrew Coffield. From the time of his ar- 
rival at Portsmouth in 1898 until failing health necessitated his 
retirement in 1919, the late Johnston Pettigrew Coffield was 
one of the substantial citizens of his community and was widely 
known in the risk and indemnity field as the capable manager 
of the Portsmouth office of the Virginia Life Insurance Company. 
His career was one in which he engaged in a variety of pursuits, 
in all of which he displayed ability and versatility, and while 
his connection with civic affairs was only that of a good citizen, 
he so comported himself in all walks of life as to be remembered 
as a man whom his community could ill afford to lose. 

Mr. Coffield was born at Edenton, Chowan County, North 
Carolina, August 18, 1864, and was a son of William Henderson 
Coffield, the owner of "Green Hall," one of the largest planta- 
tions of the Old North State, which was conducted with all the 
hospitality that characterized the pre-war South. This planta- 
tion comprised thousands of acres of land, and was worked by 
slave labor, while its owner was a true type of the old Southern 
gentleman. A large part of his wealth was swept away by the 
misfortunes of war, but up to his death he always maintained 
"open house" and was known far and wide for his generosity 
and benefactions. 

Johnston Pettigrew Coffield attended private school at Eden- 
ton, although his education was somewhat curtailed by the early 
death of his father. He was still little more than a youth when 
he was called upon to take charge of the great plantation, which 
consisted of land extending for eight miles on each side of the 
road to Edenton. After a few years the plantation was sold and 
the estate settled, and Mr. Coffield engaged in the fish packing 
business at Edenton, an industry to which he applied himself 
for six years. In 1895 he removed to Norfolk, where he entered 
the employ of the Virginia Life Insurance Company, and several 
years later was sent to the Portsmouth office in the capacity of 
superintendent. Here he greatly increased the volume of the 
company's business and built up a substantial reputation as a 
capable and energetic insurance man. Failing health caused his 
retirement in 1919, and from that time forward until his death, 
December 12, 1922, he lived quietly at his home, although still 
superintending the details of his large interests. Mr. Coffield 
was a Democrat, but in no sense a politician. His religious faith 
was that of the Baptist Church. 

In November, 1888, at Petersburg, Virginia, Mr. Coffield was 
united in marriage with Miss Roberta Powell, the youngest of 
the nine children of John H. and Mary (Wescott) Powell. Mr. 
Powell, who was born at Edenton, North Carolina, moved to 
Petersburg, Virginia, where he spent a long and successful 
career in merchandising. Four children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Coffield : Mary Louise, who died unmarried ; Minnie Petti- 





TUM-^-y^. 



VIRGINIA 227 

grew, the wife of Fletcher Smith, a business man and Mason and 
Elk of Petersburg, who has twin children, John Fletcher and 
John Newsome ; Dr. John Albert, a practicing dental surgeon of 
Portsmouth, who served in the hospital service during the World 
war ; and Roberta Powell, a teacher in the public schools of 
Portsmouth, and a member of the Virginia State Teachers' 
Association. Mrs. CofReld, who survives her husband and re- 
sides at 200 Florida Avenue, is an active member of the Woman's 
Club and the Monumental Methodist Church. 

Alexander M. Nelson, president of the Nelson Hardware 
Company, and connected in an official capacity with a number of 
other important business enterprises of Roanoke and its vicinity, 
has achieved a really great success. As a poor boy, without re- 
sources except his clean hands, high ideals, strong purpose and an 
ability to make friends, he began his business career. From the 
first he put such vision, understanding and fidelity into his work 
as to attract the favorable attention of those engaging him. Soon 
he was by himself, beginning in a small way, but an independent 
merchant. There were years of hard struggle ; there were criti- 
cal periods, and there were moments when his courage almost 
failed, but always there was a definite policy reaching into the 
years ahead ; there was a clearly defined program, and there was 
a magnificent purpose always pushing behind policy and pro- 
gram, and this condition still prevails. For fifty-two years Mr. 
Nelson has been engaged in the hardware business, and out of 
the 20,000 hardware stores in the United States he is one of the 
eighty-nine that has been continuously in operation for half 
a century. 

The subject of this review was the second born of one of 
those fine, prolific unions so popular before birth control propa- 
ganda became a factor in the domestic life of the country. His 
parents, William J. Nelson and Sally Harrison (Rodes) Nelson, 
respectively of Port Republic and Lynchburg, Virginia, settled 
and reared their children a few miles south of Staunton, in 
Augusta County. Virginia. Both parents and seven of the 
twelve children are now deceased. William J. Nelson and his 
wife were life time members of the Presbyterian Church, the 
former being an elder in the church that Woodrow Wilson's 
father served as pastor. After an academic course at Washing- 
ton and Lee University he graduated in law at the University 
of Virginia, leaving his profession to accept a lieutenancy in the 
Confederate army. After Appomattox he returned to Staunton 
and the practice of law, serving for a number of years as a 
member of the City Council. His wife's father marched under 
the Stars and Stripes in Mexico, but, later on, her brother. Gen. 
Robert Rodes. was killed fighting against this emblem at the 
battle of Winchester in the Civil war. 

Alexander M. Nelson attended the public schools of his native 
place, and was graduated from its high school in 1875. When 
only sixteen years old. however, he had begun working in a 
hardware store, receiving fifty cents a day at Lexington, Vir- 
ginia, and in 1883 was able to go into business for himself at 
Culpeper, Virginia. In 1888 he came to Roanoke and estab- 
lished a retail hardware store under the name of Nelson & 
Myers, and the partners continued to operate as retail merchants 
until 1902, when Mr. Nelson took over the business and estab- 
lished a wholesale hardware store which he operates as the 
Nelson Hardware Company. Associated with him in this busi- 



228 VIRGINIA 

ness, of which he is president, are John M. Nelson, vice presi- 
dent ; Robert R. Nelson, secretary-treasurer, and Alexander M. 
Nelson, Jr., purchasing agent. This is a close corporation, the 
stockholders being members of the Nelson family, each of the 
six sons being stockholders and actively engaged in the business. 
Mrs. Stout, sister of Mr. Nelson, and widow of the late Judge 
Stout of Augusta County, and Mrs. Sublett, another sister of 
Mr. Nelson, and widow of the late Ed Sublett, a former whole- 
sale produce dealer, are the only others owning stock in the 
company. Mr. Nelson is also vice president of the First Na- 
tional Exchange Bank, and a member of its executive committee, 
and he is president of the Nelson Coal Corporation. The Nelson 
Hardware Company covers Virginia and portions of West Vir- 
ginia and North Carolina, keeping four men on the road all the 
year. It is capitalized at 8400,000 and is the largest and oldest 
house in Roanoke, and one of the leading ones of the state. The 
name of Nelson was connected with Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity for many years, as Prof. Alexander L. Nelson, an uncle 
of Alexander M. Nelson, held the chair of mathematics in that 
institution of learning for fifty years. 

In 1888 Alexander M. Nelson married Miss Sallie Hart, who 
was born in Charlottesville, Virginia, a daughter of the late 
John Hart, a prominent educator. Eight of their ten children 
are living: John M., who was educated in Washington and Lee 
University ; Alexander M. Nelson, Jr., who attended the Roanoke 
High School ; Coleman H., who was educated in the Roanoke 
schools and the University of Virginia; William J., who was 
educated in the Roanoke schools ; Robert R., who attended Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute ; Katherine, who married Junius P. 
Fishburn ; Elizabeth, who is unmarried, and her twin brother, 
Charles L. The family was well represented in the World war, 
three of the sons serving in combat divisions of the A. E. F., 
while a fourth was on guard duty in this country. His family 
all belong to the Second Presbyterian Church, of which he has 
been a trustee for many years. He is a member of the Shenan- 
doah Club and the Roanoke Country Club. Very active in the 
local Democratic party, he served for several years as a member 
of the Roanoke City Council, and has been useful to his city 
in many other capacities. The success Mr. Nelson has achieved 
is no little thing. It is in no sense the fortuitous result of a 
combination of favoring circumstances, but the working out of 
a policy long held and definitely followed, often against great 
difficulties and discouragement, and such a success is the mark 
of a big man. 

Joseph H. Faber. From 1880 until his death in May, 1922, 
the late Joseph H. Faber was identified with the photographic 
business at Norfolk, where through his high character and great 
integrity he won the confidence and esteem of his fellow citizens. 
In no department of human activity have greater strides been 
made in recent years than in photography. The man who suc- 
ceeded several decades ago would find himself hopelessly in ar- 
rears should he, with no additional equipment, attempt to cope 
with the conditions of the present. Photographic portraiture 
is an art which admits of infinite conception and requires varied 
knowledge and great painstaking in its development. The men 
who maintain its highest artistic methods necessarily have a 
thorough knowledge of human nature and are artistic and schol- 



VIRGINIA 229 

arly in their inclinations, and it was to this class that the late 
Mr. Faber belonged. 

The Faber family originated in Germany, whence came the 
first American progenitor at an early day, the family taking 
up its residence in the vicinity of Charleston, South Carolina, 
where they became large planters prior to the war between the 
states. Joseph H. Faber was lorn at Charleston, South Carolina, 
and was reared and educated in his home community. In young 
manhood he removed to Fredericksburg, Virginia, where he and 
his brother established themselves in business as the proprietors 
of a photographic studio. After a few years Mr. Faber married 
and in 1880 moved to Norfolk, where he passed the remainder 
of his life. He was at the time of his death the senior member 
of the photographic firm of Faber & Son, and a man who was 
held in the highest esteem. 

Mr. Faber married Miss Emma J. Freeman, and they liecame 
the parents of three children : George Lewis, of whom more 
later ; Thomas L., a commercial photographer and member of 
the Masonic fi-aternity ; and Fred, a graduate of the University 
of Virginia, who was on the staff of engineers who built the 
Mount Royal tunnel in Canada, and now a consulting engineer 
of Crowley, Louisiana, married Tillie Ficklin and has two chil- 
dren, Ann and Jane. 

George Lewis Faber was born at Norfolk, Virginia, in Sep- 
tember, 1886, and received his education at Norfolk and Rich- 
mond College. At the close of his college career he returned to 
Norfolk to join his father in the firm of Faber & Son, of which 
he became the owner at the elder man's death, and which he 
conducted successfully until his own demise in December, 1925. 
He was a good business man and one who enjoyed the confidence 
and respect of those with whom he came in contact, and his 
death lost to his community a reliable and public spirited citizen. 
He belonged to the Rotary Club and the Princess Anne Country 
Club and was a Mason and Shriner. For several years he 
taught a class in the Sunday School of the Freemason Baptist 
Church. 

In July, 1914, George L. Faber was united in marriage with 
Emily Sheri'er LaBlanc, who was born at Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania, a daughter of Samuel and Sadie LaBlanc, and a member 
of a family which originated in France and settled at Phila- 
delphia prior to the war between the states. Samuel LaBlanc 
fought as a soldier in a Pennsylvania volunteer infantry regi- 
ment during that struggle, following which he followed the pro- 
fession of a construction engineer during the remainder of his 
life, his death occurring in 1907. He married Sarah (Sadie) 
Sherrer, of Reading, Pennsylvania, and Mrs. Faber is the oldest 
living child of this union. Her brother, Charles Wesley LaBlanc, 
was district manager in Westchester County, New York, for the 
Hoover Vacuum Cleaner Company, is a veteran of the World 
war, in which he enlisted as a private and rose to a lieutenancy 
in France. In July, 1929, he was appointed to the ofiice of 
assistant general manager of the same company at Philadelphia. 
He married Anne Dobson, of New York City, and they have one 
son, Charles Wesley, Jr. Another brother, Samuel LaBlanc. Jr., 
was in the engineering department at the NewiDort News Ship- 
building Company, was a well known baritone singer and in 
1906 he died in the height of his career. 

Mrs. Emily Faber, one of Norfolk's most talented women, 
attended school at Norfolk, and began her musical education in 

11— VOL. 3 



230 VIRGINIA 

New York City, where she took organ and piano under Gaston 
Detheir. She then went abroad, where she studied organ under 
Alexander Guilmont in France and Dr. Varley Roberts in Eng- 
land. She also attends the studio of Frank La Forge of New 
York City. She is now organist and choir director of the Free- 
mason Baptist Church and organist and director of Ohef Sholom 
Temple of Norfolk, and conducts a musical studio. She was one 
of the organizers of the Mifane Trio, a musical organization con- 
sisting of violin, Marian Carpenter Miles ; piano, Emily LaBlanc, 
and 'cello, Philip 0. Nelson, and is a member of the Norfolk 
Country Club, the Princess Anne Country Club, the Norfolk 
Society of Arts, and the Freemason Street Baptist Church. She 
is a past secretary of the Virginia Music Teachers State Asso- 
ciation and is a member of the National Federation of Music 
Clubs, representing the Emily LaBlanc Faber Junior Club. She 
is also a member of the American Guild of Organists. 

Wills Cowper was a merchant before the Civil war, having 
a reputation all over the Norfolk district. Members of his family 
still reside in that city. 

He was born in Gates County, North Carolina, son of Thomas 
Cowper, also of Gates County, and grandson of John and Louise 
(Godwin) Cowper. 

Dr. Thomas Cowper acquired a thorough education and in 
his youth was sent abroad, studying and completing his medical 
course in France. He remained abroad five years and after 
returning to the United States settled at Portsmouth, Virginia, 
where he took up the practice of his profession. He carried 
the routine work of a physician there until he fell a victim to 
a scourge of the yellow fever in 1858, dying in the line of duty. 

Wills Cowper married Dizer Saunders, who was born in 
Nansemond County, Virginia, daughter of Robert and Sarah 
(Hedges) Saunders, natives of the same county, and of English 
and Scotch ancestry. Mrs. Cowper became the mother of thir- 
teen children : Thomas, John G., Walter G., Elizabeth Ann, 
Emma Frances, Clarence, Laura, Anna, Virginia, Wills, Richard, 
Louise and James P. 

Of these children Laura Cowper became the wife of John N. 
Dewell, who was born at Garysburg, North Carolina, and from 
early manhood was a merchant at Norfolk and Portsmouth, 
where he lived until his death at the age of seventy-two. Mrs. 
Dewell and her sister Anna now reside at 314 East Free Mason 
Street in Norfolk. Their brothers, John Gilbert, Clarence and 
Walter G., were all soldiers in the Confederate army. Clarence 
lost a finger in one battle. John, though participating in fifty- 
two battles and in the war from beginning until the surrender 
at Appomattox, was never wounded or captured. 

Armistead Plummer Pannill, commissioner of revenue for 
the City of Norfolk, is descended from an old Colonial Virginia 
family. The Pannills have been active in the public life of 
Norfolk for a great many years. 

Mr. Pannill was born at Petersburg, Virginia, a great-grand- 
son of William Pannill, who was born in Orange County, Vir- 
ginia, February 1, 1768, and married Martha Ann Morton, who 
was born at Greenville, North Carohna, December 12, 1762. 

Their son. Col. William Pannill, was born at Oxford, North 
Carolina, July 6, 1794, located at Petersburg, was educated in 
William and Mary College, and during the war between the states 



VIRGINIA 231 

was provost marshal at Petersburg. He became the first presi- 
dent of what is now the Norfolk & Western Railway. Colonel 
Pannill married Eliza Binns Jones, who was born at Petersburg 
July 3, 1804. Her father, George Hamilton Jones, was born 
at Petersburg, May 1, 1775, being a lineal descendant of John 
Jones, who represented Brunswick County in the House of Bur- 
gesses. George Hamilton Jones married Elizabeth Binns, of 
a family that settled in Sus.sex County as early as 1652. 

Capt. Thomas Pannill, father of Armistead P. Pannill, was 
born at Petersburg March 8, 1834, and enlisted in the Third 
Regiment of Virginia Infantry, commanded by Roger Prior. 
This regiment was attached to Pendleton's Brigade. The bri- 
gade held a position on the south side of the James River at the 
time of the McClellan raid on Richmond, and members of the 
brigade witnessed the battle between the Merrimac and the 
Monitor in Hampton Roads. Captain Pannill participated in 
the battle of the Crater in the siege of Petersburg. After the 
war he engaged in business handling real estate, was an auc- 
tioneei", and died in 1919. He and his wife reared the following 
children : Henry ; Eliza Otey, who married George M. Pollard ; 
James Knox ; William ; Robert Houston ; Armistead Plummer ; 
Samuel Weisiger ; Louise Barlow, who married James H. Johns- 
ton ; and Charles Jackson, who married Ethel World. 

Armistead Pannill was educated in public schools, and as a 
young man became identified with the real estate business. In 
1898 he was appointed assistant health officer and in 1917 be- 
came commissioner of revenue for the City of Norfolk, an office 
he has filled for eleven years. He is affiliated with Atlantic 
Lodge No. 2, A. F. and A. M., John Waters Chapter No. 1, Royal 
Arch Masons, Grice Commandery of the Knights Templar, Khe- 
dive Temple of the Mystic Shrine, Norfolk Lodge No. 38, B. P. 0. 
Elks, and Norfolk Lodge No. 39, Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. 

Ml". Pannill married in 1901 Lillian Burke Archer. They 
have a daughter, Martha Archer, who is the wife of Robert W. 
Ribble and has a son, Robert W., Jr. 

Rev. Edw^ard Turner Dadmun. A gentle spirit, a splendid 
intellectual equipment, a deep and abiding human sympathy and 
tolerance, and a significant consecration to human service were 
expressed in the personality and achievement of the honored 
subject of this memoir. Mr. Dadmun was a leader in the work 
of the Y. M. C. A. in Virginia, served in this splendid organiza- 
tion in its overseas activities in the World war, and as a clergy- 
man of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, he made his 
powers a force in advancing Christian work and the aiding and 
uplifting of his fellow men. Mr. Dadmun was sixty years of 
age at the time of his death, which occurred in the City of Nor- 
folk, Virginia, December 5, 1923. and a tribute to his memory 
consistently finds place in this publication. 

Mr. Dadmun was born at Watertown, Massachusetts, in May, 
1863, and was the eldest of the three children of William Henry 
and Charlotte (Turner) Dadmun, the former of whom was 
born in Boston, Massachusetts, and the latter in Ontario, Can- 
ada. William Henry Dadmun was long and prominently con- 
cerned with the lumber industry, and both he and his wife 
continued to reside in Massachusetts until their death. 

The subject of this memoir gained his earlier education in 
the public schools of Massachusetts and under the private pre- 



232 VIRGINIA 

ceptorship of Prof. Henry Loomis. He early became animated 
with the spirit of constructive service in connection with the 
finer ideals of human thought and action, and he was twenty- 
one years of age when he came to Virginia to enter service as 
the first secretary of the Y. M. C. A. in the City of Norfolk. He 
acted as a general supervisor in the erection of the first building 
of the association in this city, and made a trip to the North to 
purchase furniture and other accessories for the new instiution. 
He here continued his faithful and constructive service about 
four years, and thereafter he served a few years as secretary 
of the Y. M. C. A. in the City of Staunton, this state. He was 
next advanced to the position of assistant secretary of the Vir- 
ginia state organization of the Y. M. C. A., and about five years 
later he resigned this office to enter active work in the ministry 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which he was duly 
ordained a clergyman. His work as a minister and evangelist 
was principally in the tidewater region of Virginia, and he 
served some time as presiding elder of the Farmville district 
of his conference. Sincere, earnest and loyal, a strong and 
brilliant pulpit orator, Mr. Dadmun labored zealously and effec- 
tively and brought many converts into the fold of the Divine 
Master whom he served. 

When the nation entered the World war Mr. Dadmun re- 
sumed his active association with the work of the Y. M. C. A. 
and was assigned to service at Camp Johnson, Florida, where 
he remained six months as camp secretary of the Y. M. C. A. 
As an overseas secretary of his organization he made one voyage 
to France, and upon his return he was assigned to duty at Ho- 
boken. New Jersey, where he had supervision of selecting men 
for Y. M. C. A. overseas service. Later he became port secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A. at Newport News, Virginia, and there 
he did valuable work in connection with assigning Y. M. C. A. 
workers to the transports that bore them to overseas service. 
After the armistice brought the war to a close Mr. Dadmun 
resumed his work in his conference of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South, and he held a pastorate at Lynchburg one year, 
he having then been assigned to the pastorate of the church at 
Hampton, where he continued his labors until he suffered the 
health impairment that resulted in his death. He was virtually 
a pioneer in Y. M. C. A. work in Virginia, and did much to infuse 
in the organization that vitality and usefulness that have con- 
tinued to characterize it in the intervening years. He was an 
implacable adversary of the liquor traffic and a resolute worker 
in behalf of the prohibition cause. His widow continues a 
zealous member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and 
also of the W. C. T. U. In a basic way Mr. Dadmun gave al- 
legiance to the Democratic party, and he was affiliated with the 
Improved Order of Red Men and the Junior Order United 
American Mechanics. His unfailing kindliness and his perfervid 
zeal in human service gained to him the affectionate regard of 
those who came within the sphere of his benignant influence. 

On the 21st of July, 1891, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Dadmun and Miss Olive Leigh Morgan, daughter of Olive 
Branch and Hope Alice (Davis) Morgan, of Petersburg, Vir- 
ginia, where the father was a representative business man. 
Since the death of her husband Mrs. Dadmun has maintained 
her residence in Norfolk, where her home is at 418 West Nine- 
teenth Street. Of the five children of this union the eldest is 
Miss Hope Alice, who was educated in the City of Richmond 



I 
I 



VIRGINIA 233 

and who remains with her widowed mother, as does also the 
next younger daughter, Charlotte, whose education was acquired 
in the Norfolk schools. Edward Henry, the eldest son, attended 
the Virginia Military Institute, and he entered World war service 
with the Norfolk Light Artillery Blues when that fine organiza- 
tion was mustered into the United States Army, he having been 
in active service in France one year and having reecived his 
honorable discharge after the armistice brought the great conflict 
to a close. He and his wife, whose maiden name was Julia 
Whitmore, maintain their home in Richmond. Branch Morgan, 
next younger of the sons, received the advantages of the Vir- 
ginia Militarj' Institute, is a civil engineer by profession and 
maintains his home in Norfolk. Robert, youngest of the children, 
is associated with business in this city. 

Alvin T. Dulaney. Emerson said "I cannot even hear of 
personal vigor of any kind, great power of performance, with- 
out fresh resolution. This is the moral of biography." Measured 
according to that standard how inspirational is the life of Alvin 
T. Dulaney, who in the short span of his mature years has made 
himself the wealthiest man in Greene County, and while thus 
gaining large material rewards he has not failed to win and 
hold the respect and confidence of his associates. Accounts of 
achievements like his encourage the disheartened to hold on 
when they are ready to let go ; they induce them to persevere 
when they had decided to go back ; they give them fresh help and 
renewed confidence in themselves. Ambition requires a great 
deal and a great variety of food to keep it vigorous, and perhaps 
one of the reasons for Mr. Dulaney's success has been that he 
has branched out and, not resting content ^\^th his progress in 
merchandising, entered the oil industiy, in both rising to high 
position. 

Alvin T. Dulaney was born in Greene County, Virginia, June 
8, 1881, a son of James Fillmore and Lou Alice (Wilhoit) 
Dulaney, and grandson of John G. Dulaney, a native of Greene 
County, and Ezekiel F. Wilhoit, a native of Albemarle Countj'. 
Both grandfathers were farmers, and that was also the occupa- 
tion of James Fillmore Dulaney, who was born in Greene 
County and who through his efforts developed a valuable prop- 
erty in his home farm. He died March 14, 1914, and his widow, 
who survives him, was born in Albemarle County. James Fill- 
more Dulaney was a Democrat in politics. They had five chil- 
dren : Charles Q., who owns and opei-ates the home farm ; 
Alvin T. ; Mrs. E. D. Ott, wife of a practicing attorney at Har- 
risonburg, Virginia ; John E. F.. associated ^\^th the State High- 
way Department at Richmond, Virginia ; and Gary B., with the 
Sanitary Grocery Company at Washington, D.C. Both parents 
were strong church members, the father a Methodist and the 
mother a Baptist, and they took their religion into their every 
day lives, and the influence they exerted among their children 
and in their communitj- was of an uplifting character. 

Alvin T. Dulaney acquired his education in local public and 
private schools and in several excellent academies. At the age 
of eighteen he left home and secured a position as salesman in 
the dry goods and notion store of Charles E. Hughes at Char- 
lottesville. In the fall of 1900, going to Covington, Virginia, he 
and his brother, C. Q. Dulaney, and F. M. Beale opened a small 
dry goods and notion store under the name Covington Bargain 
House. This business was sold out the following year, when 



234 VIRGINIA 

Mr. Dulaney and his brother opened at Ruckersville, Virginia, a 
general merchandise store under the firm name of Dulaney 
Brothers. This was operated as a partnership until 1919, and 
since then Mr. Alvin T. Dulaney has been sole owner, operating 
a department store carrying everything reciuired for the home, 
farm and automobile. Realizing- the market that existed for 
certain lines not then handled, the partners in 1903 established 
the Ruckersville Implement Company, handling a general line of 
farm implements, machinery, wagons, buggies, harness, et cetera. 
After the death of T. B. Jennings, a partner in 1912, the bus- 
iness was incorporated in the general business of Dulaney Broth- 
ers. In 1908 they established a firm at Barboursville, compris- 
ing C. Q. Dulaney, Alvin T. Dulaney and M. H. Williams, under 
the name Dulaney, Williams & Company, handling a general 
line of machinery, vehicles and farm supplies of all kinds. In 
1913 the interest of Dulaney Brothers was sold to M. H. Wil- 
liams, who later sold it to his nephews, Williams & Company, 
under which title the business is still operated. 

In 1914 the Dulaney Brothers added to their Ruckersville 
business a Ford agency. At that time there was one car in 
Greene County. They continued the operation of the agency 
until the fall of 1925, and during the twelve years it became 
the outstanding country automobile agency in Virginia. The 
success they had with the Ford business at Ruckersville caused 
the Ford Motor Company to request the Dulaney Brothers tc 
establish another agency at Gordonsville, Virginia. This vv^as 
started as the Gordonsville Motor Company, Incorporated, in 
1921, and the business was a success from the start. Mr. Alvin 
T. Dulaney was vice president and principal stockholder of the 
Gordonsville business until 1924, when he sold his interest to 
the remaining stockholders, who still carry it on. The first 
venture in oil made by Alvin T. Dulaney was the Gordonsville 
Gas & Oil Company at Gordonsville, a small distributing com- 
pany formed in 1923 and continued until 1926, at which time Mr. 
Dulaney sold out to his partners and then formed the Shenan- 
doah Park Oil Company, of which he is the manager. He is 
also a director in the Peoples National Bank of Charlottesville. 

On June 10, 1910, Mr. Dulaney married Buford J. Stephens, 
born in Standardsville, Virginia, a daughter of Doctor Stephens, 
one of the beloved physicians of Standardsville. Mr. and Mrs. 
Dulaney have three sons : James Fillmore, who is attending 
school in Standardsville, and Alvin T., Jr., and Albert Stephens, 
who are attending the Ruckersville schools. Mrs. Dulaney is 
a valued member of the local Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
V/hile Mr. Dulaney votes the Democratic ticket, he has not had 
the time or inclination to go into politics, his business interests 
absorbing all of his energies, but he is interested in the advance- 
ment of his home city and county, in which he takes great pride. 

Denham Arthur Kelsey is a prominent Norfolk attorney, 
with offices at 111 East Main Street in that city. He came to 
Norfolk from the Piedmont section. 

He was born at Bedford, son of Oswald W. Kelsey and grand- 
son of Alfred Kelsey. His father was born in the Cathedral 
Close near Salisbury, England. Alfred Kelsey spent all his life 
in England, a very devout member of the Established Church. 
Oswald W. Kelsey was educated in Christ Church School and 
about 1872 came to the United States, being the only representa- 
tive of his family to come to America. He bought a farm near 



VIRGINIA 235 

Bedford, in Bedford County, Virginia, but did not find farming 
profitable and subsequently engaged in the real estate business 
at Bedford. He died at the age of forty-seven. He married 
after coming to Virginia, Rosalie Bell, who was born at Bed- 
ford, which at that time went under the name of Liberty. She 
was a daughter of Alfred and Mary (Lowry) Bell, of English 
ancestry. D. Arthur Kelsey was one of two children. His sister, 
Gladys is the wife of William W. Berry and has two children. 

D. Arthur Kelsey attended public schools, including the Bed- 
ford High School, and was a young man when he came to Nor- 
folk. He was deputy clerk in the Federal Court until 1907, and 
while in that position studied law. After being admitted to the 
bar in 1907 he engaged in practice and later was appointed chief 
deputy clerk of the Norfolk District Court. He resigned this 
office in 1920 and has since engaged in a genei'al law practice, to 
which he gives all his time. 

Mr. Kelsey married in 1919 Nelle Buchanan, who was born 
at Richmond, daughter of H. L. and Elizabeth Buchanan. Mr. 
Kelsey by a previous marriage has two sons, D. Arthur, Jr., a 
student at the University of Virginia, and Sidney Harrison, a 
student at William and Mary College. Mr. Kelsey is a member 
of St. Luke's Episcopal Church, and in politics is a Republican. 

SiGMUND MiTTELBORFER BRANDT, Norfolk lawyer, member of 
a family that has been identified with the commercial interests 
of Eastern Virginia for many vears, was born at Norfolk in 
1880. 

His parents were Henry and Pauline (Mitteldorfer) Brandt. 
Henry Brandt, in 1876 established at Norfolk the foreign bank-, 
ing business which is yet in successful operation. The late Jo- 
seph Brandt, brother of Sigmund M., was admitted to partner- 
ship in 1906. Henry Brandt was born in Neustadt, Germany, 
son of Joseph Brandt, of the same city, and grandson of Herman 
Brandt, also of Nuestadt. The first of this family to come to 
America was Leon Brandt, who built up a name and reputation 
in American journalism, and died shortly before the Civil war, 
being buried at Albany, New York. It was through the influence 
of Leon Brandt that Henry Brandt, his brother, came to this 
country at the age of fifteen. Henry Brandt finished his educa- 
tion in schools in Noi'th Carolina, living in Fayetteville, that 
state, until the outbreak of the Civil war. As a member of the 
North Carolina Militia he entered the Confederate army with 
his brother George Brandt, who had come to Fayetteville at the 
instance of Leon Brandt several years earlier, and who also 
served in the Confederate army. Prior to the war George 
Brandt was connected with cotton mills in the vicinity of Fay- 
etteville, and also was intei'ested in sailing vessels operating be- 
tween the ports of Wilmington and Liverpool. 

Henry Brandt's wife, Pauline IMitteldorfer, was born in the 
City of Nuremberg, Bavaria, and was a very young girl when 
her father died. She came to Richmond, Virginia, living with 
her uncle, Moses Mitteldorfer, who had settled in Richmond 
many years earlier. She was followed by her mother, Jlrs. 
Cecilia Mitteldorfer. The first Mitteldorfer located at Richmond 
about 1840. Henry Brandt and wife were married in Norfolk, 
and they lived to celebrate their golden wedding anniversary 
April 3, 1921. They were married in what is known as Olaf 
Sholem Temple, and they held membership in that temple for 



236 VIRGINIA 

half a century. Henry Brandt was a member of Ruth Lodge, 
A. F. and A. M., forty years. 

Sigmund M. Brandt was educated in Norfolk Academy, spent 
one year in the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, and in 1901 was 
admitted to the bar by the Supreme Court of Appeals of Vir- 
ginia. He qualified in the Supreme Court of the United States 
April 25, 1913. Mr. Brandt is a member of the Virginia State 
and American Bar Associations. He is a member of the Croatan 
Country Club. 

He married, April 10, 1918, Miss Juliette Heller, of Atlanta, 
Georgia, daughter of Max and Clara (Kaufman) Heller. They 
have one daughter, Claire Pauline Brandt, born June 17, 1919. 

Claude Eugene Herbert. The Herbert family have lived 
in and around Norfolk for generation after generation. The 
family were established in this section of Virginia in the early 
Colonial period. 

As early as 1659 John Herbert was a resident of Norfolk 
County. His will was probated in Norfolk in 1675. His son, 
John Herbert, was born at Norfolk and was a landed proprietor. 
His will was probated in 1679. He left two children. One of 
them, Thomas Herbert, was born at Norfolk in 1679, and mar- 
ried Margaret Dale, daughter of Henry and Frances (Ballen- 
tine) Dale. He was a ship builder and owned and operated a 
ship yard, and took a prominent part in local affairs, bearing 
the title of captain. He died at the age of seventy-nine, his will 
being probated in 1749. Of his family of six sons and one 
daughter the son Henry, born at Norfolk about 1715, married 
Abigail Carson, daughter of Jonas Carson, of Accamac County, 
Virginia. Henry succeeded to the ownership of the ship yard 
and conducted it as a successful business. He was a vestryman 
of St. Brides Parish. His will was probated in 1778. 

His son, Caleb Herbert, one of nine children, was born in 
Norfolk about 1745 and was the chief representative of the 
family in this generation in the Revolutionary war period. He 
was a member of the committee of safety during the war and 
was listed on the committee as a master ship builder, owning 
a .ship yard. He married Ann Nicholson, daughter of James 
Nicholson. His will was probated in 1796, and he reared five 
children. 

His son Maximilian Herbert was born in Norfolk about 1772, 
succeeded to the ownership of the ship yard and also conducted 
a large plantation. He died in 1828. By his first marriage he 
had four children and one by his second marriage. A son of 
his first marriage was Maximilian II, born at Norfolk in 1806, 
and who followed planting, employing slave labor on his farm. 
He organized a company for service in the Confederate army 
and was commissioned a captain, serving in General Mahone's 
Brigade. He died in the camp at Petersburg in 1862. His wife 
was Lydia Herbert Nash, daughter of Thomas and Sarah Nash. 
He was survived by five children. 

His son Maximilian Herbert III was born in Norfolk March 
18, 1834, and became a farmer in Southampton County, but later 
returned to Norfolk and died there in 1903. He married Mrs. 
Eugenia (Briggs) Pace, daughter of Bennett and Louise Pace. 
They reared a family of eight children, one of whom was Claude 
Eugene Herbei't. 

Claude Eugene Herbert was born in Southampton County, 
October 18, 1869. He attended a one-room schoolhouse in his 




1 



VIRGINIA 237 

native county and since 1895 has been a resident of Norfolk. 
He learned the wholesale grocery business by several years of 
experience as a clerk, and later he and J. W. Hough formed a 
firm handling wholesale groceries. Later the Southern Distrib- 
uting Company was organized and he became its secretary and 
treasurer, and is now president of that successful Norfolk busi- 
ness. 

Claude Eugene Herbert married Eva Parrish Beale, who 
was born in Norfolk. Her father, Cype Beale, came from Hert- 
ford County, North Carolina, to Norfolk County, and for a 
number of years was in the dairy business and later a wholesale 
grocer. Cype Beale married Julia Ann Raboteau, who was 
born in Fayetteville, North Carolina, daughter of John Samuel 
and Esther (Barclay) Raboteau. Claude E. Herbert and wife 
reared two sons, Eastwood Davidson and Claude Page. Mr. 
Herbert is a member of Corinthian Lodge No. 266, A. F. and 
A. M., has membership in the various Scottish Rite bodies and 
Khedive Temple of the Mystic Shrine. He is a member of the 
Park Place Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He has always 
been keenly interested in the public affairs of Norfolk and has 
been a member of the City Council continuously since 1918. 

His son Eastwood Davidson Herbei"t, a prominent young 
Norfolk attorney, with offices in the Bank of Commerce Build- 
ing, was born at Norfolk, was educated in public schools in that 
city, attended the Episcopal High School at Alexandria, and 
in 1917 entered the University of Virginia, where he took his 
A. B. degree in 1920 and his degree in law in 1922. He was 
admitted to the bar and at once engaged in practice at Norfolk, 
where he has made himself an attorney of recognized ability and 
with a splendid practice. He is a member of the Park Place 
Methodist Episcopal Church, and of Corinthian Lodge No. 266, 
A. F. and A. M. 

Wilbur Curtis Hall has practiced law at Leesburg since 
1915. and for ten years has been a representative of Loudoun 
County in the Virginia Legislature. 

He was born at Mountain Gap, Loudoun County, February 
5, 1892, descended from a family of Halls that settled in Vir- 
ginia shortly after the close of the Revolutionary war. His 
grandfather, James M. Hall, was a native of Loudoun County, 
spending his life there as a farmer. John W. Hall, father of 
the Leesburg attorney, was born in 1857, and was engaged in 
farming until he retired in 1917. He married Annie E. Holli- 
day, who was born in Loudoun County in 1869. Their two sons 
are Wilbur Curtis and Stilson Hutchins, both prominent citizens 
of Leesburg. 

\\'ilbur C. Hall attended a two-room school at Mountain 
Gap, graduated in 1910 from the Leesburg High School, and 
as a means of financing himself in law school he worked in a 
printing office. He was a student in Washington and Lee Uni- 
versity during 1913-14. was licensed to practice in 1914, and 
in 1915 took his law degree at Georgetown University. 

During most of the time since he started his law practice 
he has engaged in some form of civic or patriotic service. July 
10, 1918, he joined the colors, being honorably discharged De- 
cember 4, 1918. He held the rank of petty officer in the navy 
and later was one of the organizers of the American Legion of 
Virginia, serving on the State Executive Committee and as 



238 VIRGINIA 

delegate at large to national conventions. He served as colonel 
on the staff of Governor Davis. 

He was elected to represent Loudoun County in the House 
of Delegates in November, 1917, and has been regularly 
reelected, his increasing experience making him one of the most 
influential members of the Lower House of the Virginia Legis- 
lature. Among other measures he has been actively identified 
with legislation in behalf of soldiers of the World war and the 
enforcement of the prohibition laws. He is the author of Vir- 
ginia insurance code, having instigated the fire insurance inves- 
tigation and wrote the bill providing for revocation of the 
license of any driver of an automobile convicted of driving 
while intoxicated. 

Mr. Hall is unmarried. He is a member of St. James Epis- 
copal Church at Leesburg, Ohve Branch Lodge No. 114, A. F. 
and A. M., of which he is a past master, Loudoun Chapter No. 
25, Royal Arch Masons, of which he is a past high priest, Pied- 
mont Commandery No. 26, Knights Templar, Acca Temple of 
the Mystic Shrine at Richmond, Loudoun Lodge No. 26, Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is a past grand, 
Hamilton Council No. 24, Junior Order United American 
Mechanics. He is a member of the University Club of 
Washington. 

Hugh Caperton Preston. Among the men of Virginia who 
wielded with equal energy and ability the implements of peace 
and the weapons of war, the late Hugh Caperton Preston, of 
East Radford, was a striking example. Coming of a long line 
of distinguished ancestors who had established splendid records 
as patriots, soldiers and statesmen, it was natural that he should 
inherit military ability, while in no less a degree did he rank 
high as a real estate dealer at East Radford, where his death 
occurred January 3, 1905. 

Mr. Preston was born at "Elmwood," the old Caperton 
estate in West Virginia, September 5, 1856, and was a son of 
Col. James Francis and Sarah (Caperton) Preston. Old records 
show the fact that one John Preston came from England to 
Virginia in 1745 and settled on a land grant at Tinkling Springs, 
Augusta County. His son, William Preston, after taking part 
in the Indian wars as a captain, became a colonel in the Colonial 
army during the War of the Revolution, following the close of 
which he became the founder of Smithfield Plantation, a tract of 
some 7,000 or 8,000 acres on a part of which is located the Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute. James Patton Preston, son of Wil- 
liam Preston and grandfather of Hugh Caperton Preston, was 
a colonel during the War of 1812, and afterward became gov- 
ernor of Virginia. Among his sons was Hon. William Ballard 
Preston, a famous lawyer and statesman, who in 1849 was secre- 
tary of the navy in President Taylor's cabinet, and during the 
war between the states a member of the Confederate Senate. 
Another son, Robert Taylor Preston, served as a colonel in the 
Confederate army. 

Col. James Francis Preston was born in Virginia and as a 
youth secured a commission to West Point Military Academy, 
from which institution he was duly graduated. During the 
Mexican war he volunteered for service, equipped and organized 
a complete company at his own expense, was commissioned a 
captain, and after the close of that struggle he returned to his 
estate, "White Home," in Montgomery County, Virginia. When 



VIRGINIA 239 

the trouble broke out between the forces of the North and South 
he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and became colonel 
of the Fourth Virginia Infantry, a part of the great "Stonewall" 
Brigade, which won deathless fame on many a hard-fought field. 
Colonel Preston did not live to see the fall of the Confederacy, 
his death occurring in 1862, caused by the exposure incidental 
to his military service. He married Sarah Caperton, of Elm- 
wood, Monroe County, Virginia (now West Virginia). One of 
their sons, William Ballard Preston, enlisted for service in the 
Spanish-American war under his brother, Hugh C, and received 
a commission as first lieutenant. Later he went to the Philip- 
pines, where he was commisisoned a captain on the Island Panay 
at Iloilo, and then was appointed governor of one of the group 
of islands, but died before assuming ofl[ice. He married Eliza- 
beth Scott. 

The education of Hugh Caperton Preston was completed at 
Virginia Military Institute, from which he was graduated as 
a senior captain and adjutant as a member of the class of 1877. 
As a young man he became head and master of his mother's 
estate, known as "White Thorn" in Montgomery County, Vir- 
ginia, but sold this in 1892 and went to East Radford, where 
he entered the real estate and insurance business, also serving 
two terms in the capacity of mayor. At the outbreak of the 
Spanish-American war he lived up to the family traditions by 
enlisting as a captain in the volunteers. Company M, Fourth 
Virginia Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Petit, and saw one 
year of service in Cuba. One month after his return the regiment 
was mustered out of the service, but he secured a commission in 
the Thirty-first United States Volunteers, and with the rank of 
first lieutenant went to Mindanao, Philippine Islands, where for 
two years he served as captain of the post. In 1901 Mr. Preston 
returned to the United States and again took up the real estate 
business at East Radford, in which he continued to be engaged 
until his death. He also had various other business connections, 
was widely and favorably known in business circles, and served 
as secretary of the Southwest Virginia Live Stock Association. 
He was a Democrat in his political convictions, was fraternally 
affiliated with the local lodge of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows, and was a member of the Episcopal Church. 

On April 30, 1878, at Staunton, Virginia, Mr. Preston was 
united in marriage with Miss Cary Marx Baldwin, of Winches- 
ter. Virginia, who was educated at Dunbar Institute and Mary 
Baldwin's School at Staunton, a daughter of Dr. Robert Fred- 
erick and Cary (Barton) Baldwin, the former of whom was a dis- 
tinguished surgeon of his day who held the rank of colonel in 
the Confederate army during the war betw'een the states. Seven 
children were born to ^Ir. and Mrs. Preston : James Francis, who 
died in infancy ; Robert Baldwin, county engineer of Norfolk 
County, who married Merle Page and has three children, Rob- 
ert Baldwin, Jr., Edwin Page and John Baldwin ; Cary Baldwin, 
the wife of Hartwell Henry Gary, a mechanical engineer of 
Norfolk and president of the Norfolk Tank Corporation, and has 
two children, Cary Preston and Hartwell Henry, Jr. ; Sarah 
Caperton, president of the Preston School of Dancing and di- 
rector and owner of the Camp Carybrook for Girls; William 
Ballard, who enlisted for service on patrol duty on the Mexican 
border and served as sergeant until the United States entered 
the World war, when he was appointed first lieutenant and sent 
to Camp Lee, and in May, 1918, went to France, where he was 



240 VIRGINIA 

promoted to the rank of captain of a machine gun company on 
the battlefield, and who married Lelia Harrison Dew and has 
two children, Bettie Harrison Braxton and William Ballard IV; 
Hugh Caperton, identified with the National Highway Commis- 
sion, who married Ann Cahill and has one child, Hugh Caperton 
III ; and Katherine Stuart, a registered nurse, who is a member 
of the McGuire clinical staff of St. Luke's Hospital at Richmond. 

John Henry Niningeris a Norfolk attorney, has practiced 
law there a number of years and represents one of the prominent 
families of Southwestern Virginia. 

He was born at Hollins in Roanoke County, son of Christ 
Nininger and grandson of Peter Nininger. Peter Nininger was 
a farmer in Botetourt County and also a preacher in the German 
Baptist Church. He married Lydia Gish, member of an old 
Virginia family. She died at the age of eighty-nine and he 
passed away at the age of eighty-seven. 

Christ Nininger was born at Daleville, Botetourt County, 
Virginia, in 1835, grew up on a farm, and from Botetourt moved 
to Roanoke County, where he acquired a plantation of 650 acres. 
He engaged in general farming and also established and con- 
ducted a cannery for fruits and vegetables. He was a lay 
preacher of the Progressive German Baptist Church and died 
at the age of seventy-three. Christ Nininger married Nannie 
Frantz, who was born near Salem in Roanoke County, daughter 
of Jacob Frantz. She was reared a Methodist. She died at the 
age of seventy-two, having reared nine children, named Rosa B., 
Letcher, George M., Lula G., Frank P., John H., Staples V., 
Harry C. and Charles M. 

John H. Nininger grew up on a farm in Roanoke County, 
attended a one-room country school, and afterwards entered the 
National Normal University at Lebanon, Ohio. He received a 
thorough academic training in that splendid school and subse- 
quently for two years attended the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia. Mr. Nininger was admitted to practice in 
1894 and first established his law offices at Bluefleld, West Vir- 
ginia. In 1898 he went to Washington to become a clerk in the 
treasury department, but after one year resigned and located 
at Norfolk, where he has become permanently established as a 
citizen and attorney, engaged in a general law practice. He 
is a man of wide experience, learned in the law, resourceful in 
the handling of his professional work, and has been deservedly 
successful. 

He married in 1903 Emily L. Eggleston, who was born in 
New Kent County, Virginia, daughter of William T. and Sarah 
(Williams) Eggleston. Mr. and Mrs. Nininger have three chil- 
dren, Mary Eggleston, Louise Fisher and John Henry, Jr. Mary 
is a student in William and Mary College. Mr. and Mrs. Nininger 
are members of the Park Place Baptist Church of Norfolk. 

William Brooks Smith. In those sections where the agri- 
cultural interests are important, many of the men who serve in 
public office come from the farming class, and rightly so, for it 
is their work and their property which support the machinery 
of the law, and they are the logical officeholders. There is an- 
other reason, and it is that they, living as they do close to the 
soil, know the needs of the people, their resources and possibili- 
ties, and they can therefore give a better and more comprehen- 
sive service than an outsider no matter how capable or experi- 



VIRGINIA 241 

enced he might be along other lines. As a case in question at- 
tention is called to William B. Smith, one of the leading agricul- 
turists of Mathews County, now serving as county clerk. In 
his office he is rendering a service that is appreciated by all who 
have reason to call upon him, and his fellow citizens are satis- 
fied that in him they have a friend and able representative, one 
who will safeguard their interests. 

William B. Smith was born at Mathews Court House, Vir- 
ginia, February 27, 1888, a son of Sands and Carrie W. (Diggs) 
Smith, natives of Mathews County. Vvhen war was declared 
between the states Sands Smith was one of the gallant young 
men who enlisted in the cause of the Confederacy, and served 
with the famous Black Horse Cavalry throughout the war period, 
winning distinction for his intrepid bravery. After the close of 
the war, and his return to IVIathews County, he served it as 
sheriff for a number of years, or until 1886, when he was ap- 
pointed clerk of the county, and at the following election was 
elected to the office. From then on he was continued as county 
clerk through successive elections until his death November 10, 
1914. The mother died September 23, 192.3. 

Reared and educated in Mathews County, William B. Smith 
attended its public schools and Randolph-I\Iacon Academy, Bed- 
ford City, Virginia. Returning home, he became deputy clerk of 
Mathews County, and November 16, 1914, after his father's 
death, was appointed his successor to fill out the unexpired term. 
With its expiration he was elected to the office, and has been 
reelected every eight years since that time. This is a somewhat 
remarkable case, as for forty-two years the office of county clerk 
of Mathews County has been filled by a father and son. Jlr. 
Smith is unmarried. He resides in ]\Iathews County, where he 
has COO acres of valuable farming land, 150 acres of which he 
operates himself, and is a scientific farmer. His fraternal con- 
nections are numerous and include membership with Oriental 
Lod.e Ni. 20, A. F. and A. M. ; the local lodge of the Junior 
Order United American Mechanics ; and Naoman Tribe, Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. In political faith he is a Democrat, 
and he is very active in the local party. While he is not a mem- 
ber of any religious organizations, he was reared by parents who 
were zealous members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, 
and is a liberal donor to different churches in his neighborhood. 

Hon. L. Sumter Davis. When Newport News was but a 
small town of no special impoi-tance, Hon. L. Sumter Davis 
came into its midst, and from thenceforward until his death, 
July 21, 1920, he continued to take a most important part in its 
development. On the day of his death the following appeared 
editorially in the local press : 

"Newport News has sustained a genuine bereavement in the 
death of Sumter Davis, one of its pioneer citizens and a man 
devoted to the best interests of the community. As citizen and 
member of the common council he discharged his duties with 
fidelity and he enjoyed the respect and good will of his fellows. 
We chronicle this record in the public print as a mark of respect, 
and we point to his character, his cai'eer and the esteem in which 
he was held as an incentive to good citizenship in others." 

L. Sumter Davis was born in Williamsburg, Virginia, in 
1861, a son of Philip and Rosa Davis, the former of whom was 
a farmer and Confederate veteran. The parents had ten chil- 
dren, of whom L. Sumter Davis was the youngest child. As a 



242 VIRGINIA 

boy he assisted his father on the farm, and at the same time 
attended school in Newmarket, Virginia. When he was eighteen 
years old he came to Newport News, entering the employ of 
the ship yards, and he maintained that connection the remain- 
der of his life, and when he died was manager of one of its 
important departments, a position he held for many years. 

In September, 1891, Mr. Davis married Miss Cora Puckett, 
a daughter of Walter and Virginia (Lee) Puckett. Mr. Puckett 
was a resident of Richmond, and later of Newport News, and 
while living in the former city he served on the school board. 
He was a Confederate veteran, having served in the Southern 
army during the war between the states. Of the four children 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Puckett, Mrs. Davis is the third in order 
of birth. 

Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Davis, namely: 
Horace, who is a draughtsman in the ship yard ; Sumter, who 
is instructor of apprentices in the ship yard ; Emerson, who is 
timekeeper in the ship yard ; Evelyn, who is the wife of Russel 
Cooper, a business man of Newport News ; and Lois, who i'-^ 
attending the public schools of Newport News. 

Mr. Davis was a charter member of Newport News Lodg«» 
No. 92, I. 0. 0. F. ; an energetic and helpful member of the 
Junior Order United American Mechanics, and for years he 
was in the City Council, practically serving from the incorpora- 
tion of the city until his death. 

The funeral of Mr. Davis was held in his late residence, 
Rev. W. P. Stuart of the Hampton Baptist Church officiating, 
and his remains were interred in Greenlawn Cemetery. The 
active pallbearers were two members of the Odd Fellows Lodge, 
Dr. F. B. Longan and H. B. West, of the Board of Aldermen, 
R. W. West and A. E. Lowder. The honorary pallbearers were 
D. S. Jones, R. Lee Davis, E. F. Piland, Floyd Hudgins, C. C. 
Smith, Dr. R. B. Gary, W. B. Yost, Arthur Davis and Minor 
Manning. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful, at- 
testing the high esteem in which he was held. A multitude 
attended, many more people than could be accommodated in the 
house in East End, where for many years he had made his home. 

The following is quoted from a local newspaper after the 
death of Mr. Davis : 

"L. Sumter Davis was one of those pioneer citizens of middle 
age who are peculiar to a young city. 

"He will be missed acutely because though a pioneer in resi- 
dence, he was one of the men who kept step in the march of 
village to city, who put his shoulder to the wheel, gave himself 
unselfishly to the service of his town and was never surprised 
at the good and development that came because he believed in 
his city and in himself. 

"It is citizenship of that character which will remain the 
hope of the city, however much it grows and develops with the 
years." 

At the regular meeting following the death of Alderman 
Davis, the City Council of Newport News appointed the follow- 
ing as a committee on resolutions : Guy P. Murray, H. B. West 
and James D. Bohlken. The following resolutions were drawn 
up by the committee and approved by the Council : 

"Whereas, God, in His infinite wisdom, saw fit to call from 
our midst to His eternal reward, Mr. L. Sumter Davis, one of 
the most active, faithful and conscientious members of the Board 
of Aldermen of Newport News ; therefore, be it resolved. 




1 



Qj ^"^ , CUU^-ii^....^^ 



VIRGINIA 243 

"First, That the city has sustained a great loss in the death 
of our fellow alderman. 

"Second, That we extend to the bereaved wife and children 
our deepest sympathy, and pray that they may be comforted by 
Him who doath all things well. 

"Third, That a copy of these resolutions be sent to the fam- 
ily, a copy to the press, and a copy be spread on the minutss of 
the board of aldermen. 

"Guv P. Murray, 
"H. B. West, 
"J. D. Bohlken." 

In conclusion it may be said of Mr. Davis that he peacefully, 
honorably and capably met and discharged all of the obligations 
of life ; honored and beloved he passed avi^ay, sincerely mourned 
by all who knew him. As a successful business man he was 
honorable, prompt and true to every engagement ; he was al- 
ways a warm friend of education, and the supporter of all worthy 
movements which have their root in unselfish devotion to the 
best interests of the country. As an alderman he left his impress 
indelibly inscribed upon the history of Newpoi't News, and to 
his friends and family his memory will ever remain enshrined 
in a hab of gracious presence and kindly spirit. 

Hon. Eugene Silvester Adrian. The man who honorably 
discharges the duties of the office of sheriff in these days of 
many perplexities and danrerous criminals must possess more 
than an ordinary amount of personal courage, and be a man of 
unflinching honesty. Within the past decade so many problems 
have arisen which must I e handled by the sheriff of a county 
that the office carries with it onarous duties, and the qualifica- 
tions are of necessity much higher than formerly. In Eugene 
S. Adrian, Loudoun County possesses one of the best men to 
serve as its sheriff it has ever had, and each day adds to the 
prestige he enioys. The lawless element understand that in him 
they have a relentless enforcement officer, and that his bailiwick 
is not a desirable field for operations of a criminal character. 
However, on the other hand he is a man who insists on a fair 
deal for everyone, and protects the rights of his charges no 
matter what ma.v be the crime of which they are accused. All 
of these qualities are appreciated by his fellow citizens, and 
they intend to keep him in his present office. 

Sheriff Adrian was born near Ashburn, Loudoun County. 
Virginia, September 6. 1878, a son of James Alexander and 
Olivia E. (Havner) Adrian, he born in Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania, and she in Loudoun County. During the war between 
the states he served in the Confederate army, and after peace 
was declared he returned to Loudoun County, from which 
locality he had enlisted in the artillery branch of the service, 
and was engaged in farming until his death, which occurred 
in May, 1915. The mother survives and resides with her 
children. 

Reared and educated in Loudoun County. Sheriff Adrian 
remained on the farm with his parents until he reached his 
majority, at which time he went into pump and well work, 
drilling wells all over this neighborhood, and this continued to 
occupy him for twenty-six years. He then became deputy sheriff 
of Loudoun County, and after serving in that capacity for seven 
years he was elected sheriff of the county, taking office January 
1, 1924. So admirable was his administration that he was 



244 VIRGINIA 

elected to succeed himself, taking office for his second term 
January 1, 1928. 

On August 6, 1902, Sheriff Adrian married Miss Mary Lil- 
Han Hummer, a daughter of Maurice A. and Catherine (Brown) 
Hummer, natives of Loudoun County. After serving as post- 
master for many years, Mr. Hummer is now living retired in 
Sterling, Virginia, and receives a pension from the United States 
Government. Sheriff and Mrs. Adrian have had thirteen chil- 
dren born to them, namely: Keith F., who is in the employ of 
the Washington-Potomac Electric & Power Company of Wash- 
ington City ; Allen M., who is with the Roberts Construction 
Company, Falls Church, Virginia; Helen C, who is in the 
employ of the Bell Telephone Company ; Alma and Elsie, both 
of whom are attending Leesburg High School ; and Etta, How- 
ard, Ruth, Dorothy, Nellie, Alice, James and Fred. Sheriff 
Adrian is a Mason, and he belongs to the International Sheriffs 
Association, the Business Men's Association of Leesburg, the 
Rotary Club and the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and Mrs. 
Adrian belongs to the Daughters of Confederate Veterans and 
the order of the Eastern Star. He is a staunch supporter of 
the Democratic party. In religious faith he is a Presbyterian. 
Sheriff Adrian's office is in the courthouse at Leesburg, and he 
lives at the county seat, his home being one of the comfortable 
ones of the city. Both he and Mrs. Adrian have many friends 
throughout the county and enjoy a pleasant social life. It can 
be truly said of him that no man ever had cause to regret his 
faith in him, nor has anyone any reason to feel that his con- 
fidence is misplaced, for Sheriff Adrian is an admirable, upright 
and conscientious official and true Christian gentleman of the 
highest personal character. 

Junius Francis Lynch, Norfolk physician and surgeon, is 
a former surgeon general of Virginia and was a division surgeon 
with the American Expeditionary Forces in the World war. 

Doctor Lynch has had many ancestors who served with dis- 
tinction in the army and navy. His people on both sides have 
lived in Virginia for a number of generations. However, Doctor 
Lynch himself was born in Alabama, December 2, 1865, son of 
Col. Francis Edward and Mary Knox (Buford) Lynch. The 
founder of the Lynch family was Francis Lynch, who came to 
this country about 1790, settling at Petersburg, Virginia. He 
acquired a fortune as a tobacco exporter. The old Lynch home 
is still standing on High Street in Petersburg. 

Doctor Lynch's grandfather was William F. Lynch, a captain 
in the United Staes Navy and later a commodore in the Confed- 
erate States Navy. As a captain and under the auspices of the 
United States Government he made the first and only authentic 
exploration of the Dead Sea and the Jordan in 1848. His book, 
Lynch's Expedition to the Dead Sea and the Jordan, was pub- 
lished shortly after this and attracted wide attention and was 
the source of most of the reliable information published in differ- 
ent accounts of these features of the Holy Land. The French 
Geographical Society awarded him a medal for the work. As a 
commodore of the Confederate States Navy he commanded the 
Confederate naval forces in the battle of Roanoke Island Feb- 
ruary 2, 1862. Commodore Lynch married Virginia Shaw, a 
daughter of Capt. John Shaw of the United States Navy. Cap- 
tain Shaw came from Ireland, and was also an officer of high 
standing in naval circles. 



VIRGINIA 245 

Francis Edward Lynch, who attained the rank of colonel in 
the Confederate army, was a physician by profession. He was 
born at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, was educated in Georgetown 
University and the College of Physicans and Surgeons at Balti- 
more. At the time of the war between the states he entered the 
Confederate army as a captain and before the close was a colonel 
in Wheeler's Cavalry Corps. His wife, Mary Knox Buford, was 
a daughter of William Knox Buford, of Virginia. The oldest son 
of their marriage is Dr. Junius Francis Lynch. 

Doctor Lynch graduated from the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia in 1888. He has always been a leader in his profession. 
For twenty-five years he was on the staff of Saint Vincent's Hos- 
pital at Norfolk. He was the founder, is a former president and 
now an honorary member of the Seaboard Medical Association 
of Virginia and North Carolina. He is a member of a number 
of other professional societies and in the course of his work 
covering forty years has used his experience and research as 
the source of a number of articles he has contributed to medical 
journals. He is former vice president of the Medical Society 
of Virginia. 

Doctor Lynch continues the tradition of the family in the 
military affairs of his home state and nation. For twenty-five 
years he has been identified with the Virginia National Guard, 
in service all the way from enlisted man to surgeon general of 
Virginia. In 1910 Governor William Hodges Mann commis- 
sioned him surgeon general, and he held that position at the 
time of the World war. He entered the Federal service as major, 
was made assistant division surgeon in the Twenty-ninth Di- 
vision at Camp McClellan, Alabama, was transferred to the 
Ninety-third Division as division surgeon at Camp Stuart, Vir- 
ginia, in December, 1917, and shortly afterward sailed for 
France. In France the Ninety-third Division was broken up and 
Doctor Lynch was attached to the Forty-second or Rainbow Di- 
vision until July, 1918, when he was put in command of a hos- 
pital at Saint Maixent, France. After the armistice he was 
ordered to Paris as chief of surgical service in the United States 
Army Hospital No. 57, the largest American hosiptal in Paris. 
He was discharged in Hoboken, New Jersey, in the fall of 1919. 
He went into the army as a major in the Medical Corps, was 
promoted to lieutenant colonel in France and was commissioned 
a colonel in the Medical Reserve Corps shortly after his return 
from service abroad. 

Colonel Lynch is a past department commander of the Ameri- 
can Legion, a past national executive committeeman of that 
organization, and founder and commander of Post No. 35. He 
is president of the Department of Virginia Reserve Officers' As- 
sociation of the United States and member of its executive coun- 
cil. Doctor Lynch has never held a political office, though deeply 
interested in the Democratic party. During the campaign of 
1924 he was president of the local Davis-Bryan Club. 

He married at Orange, Virginia, in 1891, Miss Lucy Virginia 
Kemper, who died in 1915. She was a daughter of James L. and 
Belle (Cave) Kemper. Her father for many years prior to the 
Civil war was speaker of the House of Delegates in the Virginia 
Legislature, and is best known in Virginia history as governor 
of the state from 1874 to 1878. He was the first Democratic 
governor of Virginia after the Civil war. He was one of Vir- 
ginia's sons to reach the rank of major-general in the Confed- 
erate army. While commanding a brigade in Pickett's memor- 



246 VIRGINIA 

able charge at the battle of Gettysburg he was desperately 
wounded at the head of his men and was left on the field for 
dead. He survived, and was commissioned a major-general. He 
died in Orange County in 1895. Doctor Lynch in 1921 married 
Mary Shield, of Hampton, Virginia, widow of Harvey L. Wilson 
and daughter of Dr. Mallory Shield, of "Little England," Hamp- 
ton. Doctor Shield entered the Confederate army at an early 
age, was severely wounded in action, and after the war took up 
the study of medicine, graduating from the University of Vir- 
ginia. Doctor Shield married Florence Winder Booker, a woman 
of rare charm and beauty, whose life was devoted to good works. 
Doctor Lynch's only child is a daughter by his first marriage, 
Virginia Kemper Lynch, who was married in 1916 to Lyman 
Millard, of Norfolk. Mr. and Mrs. Millard have two children, 
Lyman Millard, Jr., and Virginia Kemper Millard. 

Milton Benjamin Ames, well known in life insurance circles 
at Norfolk, represents some of the oldest and most prominent 
families of the eastern shore of Virginia-. 

Mr. Ames himself is a native of that section of Virginia. He 
was born in the Village of Pungoteague in Accomac County. 
His father, Samuel W. Ames, was born in the same village 
August 25, 1862. The grandfather, Leonard H. Ames, was born 
in the same locality, son of Levin Sneed Ames, grandson of 
Joseph Ames. Joseph Ames was a son of Levin Ames, grandson 
of Joseph Ames. The Ames family came from England and 
settled in Accomac County in early Colonial times, and through 
every generation since then they have played a prominent part 
in the civic, business, professional and social life of that section. 
The family was represented by soldiers in the Revolutionary 
war, the War of 1812 and in the Confederate army. Mr. Ames' 
great-great-grandfather, Capt. Joseph Ames, commanded a com- 
pany in the War of 1812. His grandfather, Leonard H. Ames, 
was a soldier in the Confederate army, rising to the rank of 
lieutenant. Leonard Ames married Virginia Joynes, another 
name of distinction in the eastern shore. She was a daughter 
of Edward Joynes, granddaughter of William R. Joynes, great- 
granddaughter of Reuben Joynes. The Joynes family is of 
Scotch ancestry. Reuben Joynes was a planter and land owner 
who served as a lieutenant in the Ninth Virginia Regiment in the 
War of the Revolution. He married Margaret Dunton. William 
R. Joynes was a life long resident of Accomac County, a planter 
and slave owner, and married Hester Rogers. Edward Joynes, 
father of Virginia Joynes, was a planter and merchant, conduct- 
ing a business at Old Warehouse Point in Accomac County. He 
married Catherine Scott. 

Samuel W. Ames was liberally educated, but chose a business 
rather than a professional career. As a young man he was a 
merchant at Pungoteague, and subsequent years brought an 
accumulation and enlargement of his commercial interests. At 
the present time he is president of the Accomac Farm Land As- 
sociation of the Federal Land Bank, is vice president of the 
Eastern Shore Banking Company, vice president of the Eastern 
Shore Agricultural Association, the oldest agricultural society in 
the United States, and he individually owns a large amount of 
land in that rich section of Virginia. 

Samuel W. Ames married Nannie Edmonds Mears. She was 
born at Keller in Accomac County. Her father, Benjamin W. 
Mears, was a son of William Mears, grandson of William Mears, 



VIRGINIA 247 

great-grandson of John Mears, and great-great-grandson of John 
Mears, whose father was William Mears. The records of the 
Mears family in Accomac County run back to 1755, and they 
have constituted a long line of planters and business men. Ben- 
jamin W. Clears was a planter and merchant, a Confederate sol- 
dier, and always deeply interested in educational matters, serv- 
ing as a member of the local school board. He married Emma 
S. Mapp, daughter of George B. Mapp and granddaughter of 
George Thomas Mapp, great-granddaughter of Howson Mapp, 
who was a son of Howson Mapp and grandson of John Mapp, 
the earliest representative of this well known family in Accomac 
County. Ann Edmonds, the mother of Emma S. Mapp, was a 
daughter of James and Nannie (Wharton) Edmonds. Nannie 
Wharton was a daughter of James and Susanna Wharton, grand- 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Bagwell) Wharton and great- 
granddaughter of Francis W. Wharton. 

Samuel W. Ames and wife reared the following children : 
Milton B., Susie M., Virginia Emma, Nannie Wharton, Lucy 
Mears, and Cora Byrd. 

Milton Benjamin Ames attended the Accomac High School, 
continued his education in Randolph-Macon College, taught one 
year in Accomac County, then entered Lehigh University in 
Pennsylvania and graduated from the Eastman Business College 
of Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1907. Mr. Ames had the benefit 
of an e.xtended experience in banking in New York, clerking in 
a Fifth Avenue Bank, and during the two years he was there 
he also attended night classes of New York University. 

After returning to Accomac County he engaged in banking. 
For several years he had been a student of life in=iurance, and he 
took up that business on the conviction that a much larger per- 
centage of young people should invest in life insurance, not only 
for the protective feature, but in order to secure a competency 
for old age. ]\Ir. Ames after taking up life insurance removed 
to Norfolk and for many years has represented the Mutual Bene- 
fit Life of Newark, New Jersey, in this district. 

He married in 1912 Miss Mabel Jordan Roberts, a native of 
Norfolk, daughter of Leonard P. and Ruth (Handy) Roberts. 
Mr. and I\Irs. Ames have three sons, I\Iilton B.. Jr., William Jor- 
dan and Samuel Roberts. Mr. Ames is a member of the Colonial 
Avenue Methodist Episcopal Church, and for several years he 
was on its Official Board and superintendent of the Sunday 
School. Mrs. Ames is a member of the First Baptist Church. 
Fraternally he is affiliated with Atlantic Lodge No. 2, A. F. and 
A. M., Norfolk, United Royal Arch Chapter No. 1. Grice Com- 
mandery No. 16, Knights Templar, and Khedive Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. 

Richard Buckner Spindle, Jr.. judge of the City Police 
Court of Norfolk, has had a very successful career as a lawyer 
since beginning practice. He is a native son of Virginia and 
member of a family that has been in this state since Colonial 
times. 

Judge Spindle was born at Christiansburg, Montgomery 
County, Virginia, and is a descendant of Robert Spindle, a native 
of England, who came to America in the period of Colonial set- 
tlement and located in Virginia. He was the father of William 
Spindle, who married Elizabeth Alsop, and they were the parents 
of Benjamin Spindle, a nativ'e of Spotsylvania County, Virginia, 



248 VIRGINIA 

where he Hved out his life as a planter. Benjamin Spindle was 
twice married ; first to Maria Claiborne Wigglesworth, daughter 
of Thomas and Matilda (Foster) Wigglesworth, granddaughter 
of John and Philadelphia Claiborne (Fox) Wigglesworth, and 
great-granddaughter of John Wigglesworth, who came from 
England when a young man and settled in Virginia ; and, second, 
to Sarah Hill Buckner, a daughter of Col. Richard Buckner, of 
Hazel Grove, Caroline County, and a descendant of Richard 
Buckner, of Essex County, planter and clerk of the House of 
Burgesses in 1714. 

Richard Buckner Spindle, Sr., son of Benjamin and Sarah 
Hill (Buckner) Spindle, was born near Spotsylvania Court House 
in 1854. The ancestral home was burned during the battle of 
Spotsylvania Court House, and he was only a boy when both his 
parents died. He was educated by his uncle, Cuthbert Buckner, 
principal of a boys' school at Fredericksburg, and at the age of 
sixteen went to Christiansburg and entered the service of his 
older brother, Capt. Thomas Wigglesworth Spindle, a merchant. 
He afterwards entered business for himself, in which he re- 
mained until his death in September, 1928. He married Bessie 
Gertrude Wardlaw, who was born in Oglethorpe, Georgia. Her 
father. Rev. John Wardlaw, was a minister of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church, South. Her aunt, Mrs. 0. S. Pollock, was the 
principal of the Montgomery Female College in Christiansburg, 
and Bessie Gertrude Wardlaw attended that school, acquiring a 
thorough culture and education, and she herself for several years 
conducted a private school in Christiansburg. She and her hus- 
band reared seven children, named Gertrude, Daniel H., now de- 
ceased, John W., William Henry, Katherine, deceased, Theodore 
and Richard Buckner, Jr. The daughter Gertrude is the wife of 
Alfred Randolph Wilson, president of the Amicable Life Insur- 
ance Company of Waco, Texas. 

Richard Buckner Spindle, Jr., received his preparatory train- 
ing in his mother's school. He graduated with the A. B. degree 
at Washington and Lee University in 1906, then was an instruc- 
tor for two years at the Augusta Military Academy. In 1910 he 
took his law degree at Washington and Lee, acting as instructor 
in English while pursuing his studies in the law school. In the 
same year he located at Norfolk, and has been busy with his gen- 
eral practice and his official duties. He was assistant city attor- 
ney from 1918 to 1922, and was elected judge of the City Police 
Court in 1923, and reelected in 1927. He has been particularly 
interested in the traffic problem, inaugurated the first distinct 
Traffic Court in Norfolk, was a member of the National Confer- 
ence of State and Highway Safety, popularly known as the 
Hoover Conference, which promulgated the Uniform Traffic 
Code subsequently adopted by the General Assembly of Virginia 
and the Model Municipal Traffic Ordinance. He is a director of 
the National Highway Traffic Association sponsored by the 
Automobile Club of Am.erica, and of the Tidewater Automobile 
Association. 

Judge Spindle married, October 20, 1914, Lettie Mae Mc- 
Roberts who was born at Lancaster, Kentucky, daughter of 
Robert E. and Annie (Ware) McRoberts. She is of old Virginia 
ancestry and has membership in the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. Judge and Mrs. Spindle have two children, Marjory 
Ware and Richard Buckner III. Successful as lawyer and judge, 
he has found time to be interested in varied outside activities. 
He is a Mason and a Shriner, a member of the local and state bar 



VIRGINIA 



249 



associations, president of the Norfolk Saddle Club, one of the 
trustees of the Norfolk Public Library, vestryman of Christ 
Church, and has membership in the Virginia Historical Society. 



Francis Patterson Landon. A man of sterling integrity 
and worth, possessing in a high degree the esteem and confid- 
ence of the entire community, Francis P. Landon, the genial 
and accommodating postmaster at Hopewell, is well worthy of 
representation in this biographical volume. A true Virginian, 
he was born in Salem, Roanoke County, Virginia, a descendant, 
several generations removed, of one of three Landon brothers, 
James, John and William, who immigrated from England to 
America in early Colonial days and settled in Virginia. His 
father, George Hopkins Landon, was a son of Alvin Landon, a 
life long resident of the "Old Dominion." 

Alvin Landon, who possessed not only good business ability, 
but keen foresight, owned and operated stages along the bound- 
ary line between Virginia and Tennessee, the line extending 
from Lynchburg to Bristol. This stage route was well patronized 
by people on business or pleasure bent, among the passengers of 
prominence having been Andrew Johnson, who frequently 
travelled over it, both as vice president of the United States 
and as president of our country. Alvin Landon married 
Candace Rogers, and into their household three sons were born, 
namely : James M.. Thomas and George Hopkins. 

As a youth George Hopkins Landon served an apprentice- 
ship in a printing establishment, becoming familiar while thus 
em.ployed with the art preservative of all arts. During the Civil 
war his sympathies were with the Southern people, and during 
the last years of the conflict he enlisted in the Confederate serv- 
ice, took part in several engagements, and when Lee surrendered 
was doing guard duty at New River Bridge. Soon after his 
return to Virginia he embarked in the drug business at Salem. 
He met with good success, and continued as a druggist the 
remainder of his active life. Lie far outlived the allotted period 
of three score and ten years, dying at the age of seventy-eight 
years. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary J. Acton, was 
born in I hiladelphia, Pennsylvania, a daughter of James and 
Elizabeth (Wood) Acton, well known families, both the Woods 
and Actons having been among the early settlers of Virginia. 
She, too, attained a ripe old age, passing away at the age of 
seventy-two years. 

One of a family of seven children, Francis P. Landon 
obtained his elementary education in the public schools of Salem, 
Virginia, in the meantime sjjending his leisure hours as a clerk 
in his father's store. At the age of sixteen years, having a 
decided taste for pharmaceutics, he entered the Philadelphia 
School of Pharmacy, from which in 1892 he was graduated ■\\ith 
the degree of Phar. D. Locating then in Richlands, Virginia, 
Mr. Landon was there associated with Doctor Roberts, a physi- 
cian and druggist, for a few years. He was afterward engaged 
in the drug business in different places, including Bluefield, West 
Virginia, Tazewell and Pocahontas, both in Virginia. Keystone, 
West Virginia, and Charlottesville, and Lynchburg, Virginia. 

In 1916 Mr. Landon located in Hopewell, Prince George 
County. Virginia, where he remained in the employ of a leading 
druggist until 1922. In that year he was appointed postmaster 
at Hopewell, and at the expiration of his term of service was 
reappointed to the same responsible position by Calvin Coolidge. 



250 VIRGINIA 

Mr. Landon has been twice married. He married first, in 
1892, Lata Frances Tuttle, who was born in Brooklyn, New 
York, a daughter of Charles and Elizabeth Tuttle. She died in 
1907, leaving four children, as follows: Bertha Groge, Ger- 
trude Acton, George Kemlo and Francis P. Bertha G., wife of 
J. C. Walters, has four children, all boys, Jesse C., Frank, Wil- 
liam and Douglas. Gertrude Acton, who married Theodore Ben- 
ning, has four children. George Kemlo married Mary Taylor 
Eggleston, and they are the parents of two children, Ann Taylor 
and George K., Jr. 

While a resident of West Virginia Mr. Landon was appointed 
by Governor Dawson a member of the State Board of Examing 
Pharmacists, and was one of the organizers, and a charter mem- 
ber of the West Virginia State Pharmaceutical Association. 
Prominent in public affairs, he was vice president and secretary 
of the Keystone Board of Trade and vice president of the West 
Virginia State Board of Trade. He is a member of the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, of the Kiwanis Club, and is a thirty-second 
degree Mason and a Noble in the Mystic Shrine, Potentate 
representative for Hopewell, Virginia, a past Master Mason, a 
past chancellor commander of the Knights of Pythias and a 
past noble grand of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
is a member of the National Geographic Society and is author 
of the Woman of the Clan. Mr. Landon has one of the finest 
reference libraries in the state. He is building a fine home 
at Broadway and Wilson, opposite Abbott Park. 

William Marvin Minter is an attorney practicing at 
Mathews, and was born in Mathews County November 26, 1886, 
son of J. Willie and Lillian Ethelyn Minter. 

Mr. Minter finished his education in the College of William 
and Mary, and has been practicing law since 1916. He was also 
a newspaper man, having been proprietor of the Mathetvs Jour- 
nal from 1908 to 1923. In November, 1917, he was commissioned 
a second lieutenant in the Ofl^cers Training School at Fort Myer 
and served in home camps until his discharge in December, 1918. 

He married, December 5, 1917, Eva M. Armistead, daughter 
of A. L. and Mary Virginia Armistead. 

George Edward Pickett. Far back, even to Colonial days, 
reach authentic records of a notable Virginia family, the Pick- 
etts, one that has contributed much to the state's prestige, par- 
ticularly along military lines. The name of Col. William Pickett, 
once owner of a great estate in Farquier County, is memorialized 
for his valor and activity in the early Colonial, French and In- 
dian wars, and no less distinction is accorded Col. Robert Pickett, 
of the next generation, who was a member of General Washing- 
ton's stafl" in the Revolutionary war and later identified with 
military affairs in the War of 1812. That same spirit of personal 
courage and determined independence has prevailed uninter- 
ruptedly in the family ever since. A worthy member of this 
old family is found in George Edward Pickett III, of Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, lawyer, business man, historian 
and honored overseas veteran of the World war. 

George Edward Pickett was born October 23, 1893, at Wash- 
ington, District of Columbia, second son of Maj. George Edward 
and Ida (Christiancy) Pickett, and grandson of Maj-Gen. 
George Edward Pickett, a distinguished officer both in the Mexi- 
can war and later in the Civil war. Maj. George Edward Pickett 



VIRGINIA 251 

was born at Richmond, Virginia, as was his father, whom he 
greatly resembled. He was a graduate of the Virginia Military 
Institute, and in 1898 entered military life as a major in rank 
in the United States Regular Army, and went to the Philippine 
Islands, where he remained until 1911, when he started on his 
return to the United States but did not survive to reach his home, 
his death occurring in mid-ocean on April 18, 1911. He married 
Miss Ida Christiancy, who was born in Monroe County, Michi- 
gan, and is now a resident of the City of Detroit. Their two 
sons survive : Christiancy and George Edward, both of whom 
are overseas veterans of the World war. 

Christiancy Pickett served in France as a member of the 
13th Field Artillery, Fourth Division, and, although in imminent 
danger throughout the entire period, was fortunate enough to 
escape all injury and returned at the end of the war practically 
unharmed. He is now a captain in the Regular Army, stationed 
at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and as a specialist on tractors and trucks 
has compiled valuable statistics on army motor transportation. 
He married Miss Eula Mae Cherry, and they have two children : 
Christiancy, Jr., and Marguerite, aged four and two years, re- 
spectively. 

George Edward Pickett enjoyed superior educational advan- 
tages during boyhood and youth, not only in Washington and 
Richmond, but also in San Franci.sco, California, in which city 
he was graduated from high school. He then accompanied his 
parents to the Philippine Islands, and while there attended Bish- 
op Brent's Boys School, and after returning to America entered 
the Virginia Military Institute at Lexington, from there going 
to Hai'vard University and taking a classical course. For some 
time he then was a student in Hobart College at Geneva, New 
York. 

Thus well equipped educationally for the future, Mr. Pickett 
turned his attention to the business field, accepting a clerkship 
in the National City Bank of New York in 1916, and received 
rapid promotion, filling the position of an assistant manager 
when in May, 1917, he hastened to Washington City in order to 
enlist for service in the World war. In this he was sadly disap- 
pointed, as a disability of color blindness cau.sed his rejection 
by army, navy and Marine Corps officials. Although he did not 
permit himself to be entirely discouraged, he returned tempo- 
rarily to the banking business, with the Riggs National Bank at 
Washington. In the meanwhile the great war, in which his 
heredity and instinct constantly urged his taking part, developed 
into more and more of a calamity, and when an opportunity came 
in December, 1917, to enlist as a private in the 20th Engineers 
he took advantage of it gladly, attended the Officers Training 
School at Camp Johnson and was graduated ninth in a class of 
350. After serving as sergeant and seargeant-major he re- 
ceived his commission as second lieutenant, and on April 6, 1918, 
when Company H, Quartermaster Supply, set sail from Newport 
News, Virginia, he accompanied this body, as second in com- 
mand, for France, and after reaching Depot No. 1 was assigned 
as personal officer, mess officer and semi-court officer, the duties 
of which he performed with the utmost efficiencj', and largely 
because of this unremitting attention to duty he met with his 
first serious war injury. In his official capacity it was his custom 
to frequently visit the front lines, and on one of these dangerous 
trips he received a bullet in his arm. He did not permit this 
painful wound to limit his activities materially, but a subsequent 



252 VIRGINIA 

injury ended his military service in France and almost closed 
his brave young life. It occurred when he was on duty as a 
mess officer, when his truck ran into a tree and was demolished, 
causing permanent injury to the bones of his knee. He was not 
able to leave France until July 18, 1919, when he returned to 
the United States and immediately went under treatment in 
Walter Reed Hospital, Washington City, from which he was 
honorably discharged from military service on August 18, 1921, 
with the surgical dictum of permanent total disability. This 
opinion, however, has been proved faulty, for since then he has 
improved seventy-five per cent. 

Upon his release from the hospital and with marked evidence 
of returning health, Mr. Pickett put into operation a business en- 
terprise in which he is still interested, this being an information 
brokerage business, by which reports were prepared for clients 
on any desired subject. It was not until 1924 that he began the 
study of law, and applied himself so closely that in 1926 he was 
graduated from the National University at Washington with his 
LL. B. degree, and in June, 1927, received his LL. M. and his 
M. P. L. degrees. He maintains his law office in the Interna- 
tional Building on F Street, Washington City, and was also 
licensed to practice in North Carolina on January .30, 1928. As 
resident manager in Washington, Mr. Pickett is identified with 
the Blackstone Institute, Chicago, Illinois, an institution of merit 
that prepares and sells law courses to non-resident students. 
Along additional lines Mr. Pickett is successfully engaged in 
literary work, as he is department historian of the Disabled 
Amei'ican Veteran organization. 

Mr. Pickett married on August 10, 1920, Miss June D. Ogles- 
by, daughter of Capt. Milton Landis and Ella (Drewhl) Oglesby, 
the former of whom was born in Kentucky and the latter in 
Illinois. Captain Oglesby is a captain in the Army Reserve 
Corps and formerly, during the World war, was a captain in the 
Ordnance Department. His present headquarters are in New 
York City, he being special repi-esentative and lecturer for the 
Bureau of Explosives for the American Railway Association. 
Mrs. Pickett is a highly educated lady and a member of the 
Daughters of the American Revolution. The two little children 
of the family are : George Edward, fourth, born in 1921 ; and 
Virginia, born in 1924. 

Mr. Pickett belongs to a number of clubs and organizations, 
including such bodies as the American Legion, the American War 
Veterans Club, Sons of the Loyal Legion, Sons of the Confeder- 
acy and the Military Order of the Aztecs. He is a member of 
St. Stephen's Episcopal Church and teaches the boys' class in 
the Sunday School. In political life he is independent. 

Clifford William Banks has for many years been asso- 
ciated with one of the greatest organizations in the world for 
the handling, transportation and marketing of fruit products, 
the American Fruit Growers Association. Mr. Banks is sales 
manager for that association, and as such has his business offices 
at Norfolk and also at Rural Retreat, he and his family spending 
the greater part of the j'ear at Norfolk. 

Mr. Banks is a native Georgian, and comes of a family that 
has been prominent in the state for a number of generations, 
and several communities cari-y the family name. Mr. Banks was 
born at Macon October 28, 1881, son of James A. and Lula 
(Asbury) Banks. His father was born and reared in Macon, 



VIRGINIA 253 

graduated from Emory College, now Emory University, of At- 
lanta, and at the age of thirteen was accepted as a soldier of 
the Confederacy. Three of his brothers were killed in action 
during the war. Following the war he became a farmer and 
fruit grower and merchant. He was interested in military 
affairs, being a captain in the Georgia State Militia, and while 
attending an encampment at Chickamauga he exposed himself 
and contracted pneumonia, from which he died. He is buried 
at Forsyth, Georgia. His wife, Lula Asbury, was born and 
reared at Forsyth, was educated in the Monroe Female College, 
now the Bessie Tift College, and has been distinguished by some 
unusual accomplishments, has been an artist, musician, a fine 
singer, and has used her talents in music in the Baptist Church 
for many years. She is now eighty-one and lives at Macon. Her 
family has been closely identified with the cause of female edu- 
cation in Georgia. Her parents were Richard T. and Katie 
(Peteet) Asbury. Richard T. Asbury was a splendid type of 
the old time southern gentleman, a lawyer by profession, and 
after the Civil war was in the same law oflSce with the great 
southern statesman, Alexander H. Stephens. He turned from 
the law to educational work, and he donated many acres and 
founded the Monroe Female College at Forsyth, and for many 
years served as president of the institution, now the Bessie Tift 
Female College. He died in 1914 and his wife in 1919. James 
A. Banks and wife had five children : Mattie Lou, Clifford W., 
James A., Bessie and Richard T. James A. is head of the St. 
Johns River Terminals of Jacksonville, Florida. 

Clifford W. Banks attended public school at Macon, Mercer 
University of Georgia, and after his college career was in the 
service of the American National Bank of Macon for about eight 
years. He was assistant cashier when he left. As a financier 
and business man he has long made a study of conditions effect- 
ing the marketing of the great volume of fruit grown in the 
southeastern states. He left the bank to become associated with 
the Georgia Fruit Exchange as sales manager. For ten years 
he was instrumental in providing adequate and profitable mar- 
keting facilities for the hundreds of carloads of choice Georgia 
peaches and other fruit. Mr. Banks for seven years was in the 
fruit and produce business for himself, with headquarters at 
Saint Louis. In 1921 he became associated with the American 
Fruit Growers Association as sales manager, with head offices 
at Norfolk and with branch offices at Staunton, Winchester, 
Rural Retreat and Cheriton, Virginia, and Martinsburg, West' 
Virginia. This organization probably handles more fruit in the 
course of a year than any other similar organization in the world. 

Mr. Banks is a member of the Norfolk Kiwanis Club, is affili- 
ated with the Knights of Pythias, is a Democrat and a member 
of the Episcopal Church. 

He married at Macon, Georgia, September 17, 1907, Miss 
Marion Lane, who was reared and educated at Macon and at- 
tended the Wesleyan Female College there. She is a member of 
the Society of Colonial Dames, Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution and United Daughters of the Confederacy, but her chief 
interest is in her home and her two talented daughters. She is 
a daughter of Gen. Jeff and Marion (Reese) Lane. Her grand- 
father was a general in the Confederate army and for many 
years after the war a leading figure in railroad transportation 
in the South, being at the time of his death general manager of 

12— VOL. 3 



254 VIRGINIA 

the Georgia Southern & Florida Railway, part of the Southern 
Railway System. He died in 1905, and both he and his wife are 
buried at Macon. The original Reese family home is still stand- 
ing at Athens, Georgia, and every American is interested in that 
home because it was there that John Howard Payne wrote his 
immortal song "Home Sweet Home," and the copy in his own 
handwriting was in the hands of the family until recent years. 
Mr. and Mrs. Banks had four daughters, two of whom died in 
infancy. The two now living are Lillian Williams and Marion 
Lane, both attending school at Norfolk. Lillian is a member of 
the class of 1929 in the Maury High School, and is one of the 
editors of the Maury Ne^vs. 

Albert Micou Sneed, M. D., chief surgeon for the Peninsula 
Transit Corporation, coroner of James City County, and a mem- 
ber of the County Board of Health, is one of the ablest members 
of his profession in this region, and he maintains his residence 
and office at Toano, Virginia. He is a man who has always 
placed professional ethics above personal convenience, and who 
has given freely of his skill and time to the furtherance of public 
health measures and the treatment of those unable to afford 
proper care. As a result he stands deservedly high in public 
esteem, and it is a matter of record that since he took charge 
of the affairs of the coroner's office are in better condition than 
ever before. 

Doctor Sneed was born in Albemarle County, Virginia, July 
9, 1889, a son of Dr. Edgar Morris and Stella Virginia (Stark) 
Sneed, natives of Albemarle County. Dr. Edgar Morris Sneed 
has been engaged in the practice of medicine in Stafford County, 
Virginia, since 1902, having previously practiced in Albemarle 
County from 1889, and is one of the eminent members of his pro- 
fession in that neighborhood. His father was a Confederate 
veteran, having served in the Southern army throughout the 
war between the states. The mother is also living. 

The early education of Dr. Albert Micou Sneed was secured 
in several private schools of Albemarle County and Stafford 
County, and he later became a student of William and Mary Col- 
lege, and while there became a member of Pi Kappa Alpha fra- 
ternity. Upon leaving William and Mary College he entered 
the Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, and was graduated 
therefrom in 1912, after taking the full course, with the degree 
of Doctor of Medicine, and as a member of Phi Chi, the medical 
Greek letter fi-aternity. For the subsequent two years he was 
one of a staff of eight doctors connected with the hospital main- 
tained at Stonega, Virginia, by the Stonega Coke & Coal Com- 
pany. When he left that company Doctor Sneed went to New 
York City and for one year was associated with Dr. H. L. Winter, 
nervous diseases. In December, 1915, Doctor Sneed came to 
Toano, James City County, where he has since been very suc- 
cessfully engaged in practice. 

On October 9, 1912, Doctor Sneed married Miss Lucy Harri- 
son Wade, a daughter of Dr. William and Annie F. (Powers) 
Wade, natives of Virginia, the father born in Albemarle County; 
and the mother in Richmond. Doctor Wade was engaged in the 
practice of dentistry in Richmond until his death, which occurred 
June 11, 1918. Mrs. Wade followed him in October of the same 
year. Doctor and Mrs. Sneed have three children : Ann Harri- 
son, who was born in January, 1914; Emily Gresham, who was 
born in February, 1916 ; and Mary Micou, who was born in Jan- 





g^f^^^. x^ 



i 



VIRGINIA 255 

uary, 1920. He is a member of the University Club of Rich- 
mond, and he and his wife belong to the Williamsburg Cotiiion 
Club. Professionally he maintains membership with the Vir- 
ginia State Medical Society, the American Medical Association, 
the Walter Reed Medical Society and the James City County 
Medical Society. A very active Democrat, he is a member of 
the James City County Central Committee of his party. For 
years an Episcopalian, he is now serving as vestryman of Hick- 
ory Neck Episcopal Church. During the World war he served 
as a member of the Medical Advisory Board of James City 
County. Mrs. Sneed is the first of her sex to be elected a mem- 
ber of the James City County School Board, and she is also 
motor vehicle agent for James City County and the City of 
Williamsburg. For several terms she has served as president 
of the Toano Woman's Club ; she is president of the Guild of the 
Episcopal Church ; State chairman of illiteracy, for the Parent- 
Teachers Association and is a past vice president of the State 
Parent-Teachers Association. Both Doctor Sneed and his wife, 
as will be seen from this brief review, are very potent factors 
in the life of James City County, and they are accomplishing a 
vast amount of good along many lines of endeavor. 

George Harrison Musgrave, M. D. A member of the med- 
ical profession of Virginia for eighteen years, it is not at all 
unlikely that Dr. George H. Musgrave, of Leesburg, owes the 
selection of his profession and much of his success therein 
largely to heredity, inasmuch as both his grandfather and great- 
grandfather were physicians. However that may be, he has 
honestly earned his present position as a skilled, conscientious 
and reliable practitioner through industry and faithful fidelity 
to the highest ethics of his calling, while his success in the care 
of his large practice has won him universal confidence and 
esteem. 

Doctor Musgrave was born July 12, 1884, in Southampton 
County, Virginia, and is a son of R. N. and Sallie H. (Pope) 
Musgrave. His great-grandfather was Dr. Robert T. Musgrave, 
one of the pioneer physicians of this section of Virginia, and his 
old ledger, showing his accounts from the years 1825 until 1832, 
inclusive, are not only kept by his great-grandson as a keep- 
sake, but as a valuable historical record of those early days 
and as matter indicative of the activities of the pioneer devotees 
of medicine. The grandfather of Doctor Musgrave, Dr. George 
N. Musgrave, was likewise an early country practitioner, whose 
practice extended over an area of many miles of territory and 
who was beloved and respected during his day. 

R. N. Musgrave was born in Southampton County, Virginia, 
and in young manhood adopted the lumber business, which he 
followed for a long period of years in his native locality. At 
this time he has an office at Norfolk, whence he conducts his 
numerous activities in this line of business. He has been suc- 
cessful in his operations and is known as one of Norfolk's sub- 
stantial business men and reliable citizens. Mrs. Musgrave 
passed away at Norfolk August 17, 1926. 

George H. Musgrave acquired his early education in the 
public schools of Southampton County, following which he pur- 
sued courses at Bedford Academy and Randolph-Macon College. 
He matriculated at the University of Virginia, from which insti- 
tution he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
as a member of the class of June, 1908, and then served his 



256 VIRGINIA 

interneship at the Norfolk Protestant Hospital. Doctor Mus- 
grave commenced practice at Capron, Virginia, January 1, 1910 
this being contract lumber practice, and then went to Boykins, 
Virginia, where he had his headquarters until he enlisted in the 
Medical Reserve Corps in April, 1917, for service during the 
World war. Securing a first lieutenant's commission, he saw 
twenty months of service overseas, and was honorably dis- 
charged with the rank of major in April, 1919. He then re- 
turned to Boykins and resumed practice, continuing until Janu- 
ary, 1924, when he became a member of the Virginia State 
Department of Health, and was identified therewith until Octo- 
ber, 1926, since when he has been engaged in general practice 
at Leesburg, his well appointed offices being located in the Orr 
Building. Doctor Musgrave has a splendid practice and has 
acquired a substantial reputation for reliability as a diagnosti- 
cian, skill as a practitioner and ability as an operator. He is a 
member of the Loudoun County Medical Society, the Virginia 
State Medical Society and the American Medical Association, 
and is a conscientious student of his profession, keeping fully 
in advance of its discoveries and developments. He is affiliated 
with the Masonic Order and belongs to the American Legion. 
Politically he is a Democrat, and his good citizenship is evi- 
denced by his willing support of civic movements of a worth- 
while nature. He belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

In June, 1919, Doctor Musgrave was united in marriage with 
Miss Bessie D. Ridley, daughter of John W. and Bettie (Good- 
win) Ridley, natives of Southampton County, where Mr. Ridley 
resides as a retired agriculturist, Mrs. Ridley having passed 
away in 1920. Doctor and Mrs. Musgrave have had three chil- 
dren: Bettie Goodwin, born April 26, 1920; George Harrison, 
Jr., born February 5, 1927, who died January 4, 1928, and 
Nancy Harrison, born February 7, 1929. 

Isaac Talbot Walke, proprietor of an insurance agency at 
Norfolk which has been in existence and under the ownership 
and management of the Walke family for six decades, is de- 
scended from one of the very first families to establish homes 
in what is now Norfolk County. 

He is a direct descendant of Thomas Walke, a native of Eng- 
land, who first went to the Barbadoes in 1622 and later moved 
to Virginia, estabhshing himself at Fairfield in Princess Anne 
County. He married Mary Lawson, whose father. Col. Anthony 
Lawson, was one of the eminent lawyers of Virginia Colony. 
Thomas Walke held the rank of colonel of militia under King 
Charles II. He was a vestryman in the Lynnhaven Parish 
Church, one of the famous churches of old Colonial Virginia. 

His son, Anthony Walke, married Anna Lee Armistead, a 
granddaughter of Capt. Hancock and Mary (Kendell) Lee. Mary 
Kendell was a daughter of Col. William Kendell, who served as 
collector of revenues at Accomac in 1660. Hancock Lee was a 
son of Col. Richard Lee, the ancestor of Richard Henry Lee, 
known as the champion of American Independence. In William 
Forest's sketches of Norfolk the statement is made that Anthony 
Walke purchased 150 acres of land on which at a later date the 
City of Norfolk was laid out, the first plat of the city being made 
in 1682. Anthony and Anna (Armistead) Walke had as one of 
their children Anthony Walke, who married Jane Randolph, and 
they were the parents of William Walke, who married Mary Cal- 
vert. The next generation was represented by William Walke, 



VIRGINIA 257 

who married Elizabeth Nash, and they in turn were the parents 
of Richard Walke, who married Diana Talbot. Richard and 
Diana were the grandparents of Isaac Talbot Walke. 

Mr. Walke was born at Norfolk. His father, William Talbot 
Walke, was also a native of that city, where he was reared and 
educated, and served in the Confederate government during the 
Civil war. Afterwards he took up the insurance business and 
followed it until his death. His wife was Sally Gary, born at 
Garysburg, North Carolina. They reared the following children, 
William Talbot, Richard Gray, James Newsom, Mary Diana, 
Sally Willoughby, Isaac Talbot and Herbert Nash. 

Isaac Talbot Walke after completing his course at Norfolk 
Academy entered Eastman's Business College at Poughkeepsie, 
New York, and with this training became associated with his 
father in the insurance business. In later years he acquired 
that business. This insurance agencv was established bv his 
father in 1869. It is located at 203 Granby Street in Norfolk. 

Mr. Walke married Linda Harrell, a native of Murfreesboro, 
North Carolina. They have three children, Isaac Talbot, Jr., 
Linda Harrell and Gertrude Willoughby. The family are mem- 
bers of Christ Episcopal Church in Norfolk. 

WILLI.4M Thomas Ellett. The late William Thomas Ellett, 
long one of the substantial business men of Richmond, and an 
active factor in the furniture industry, had a career typical of 
the period in which he lived when the South was recovering 
from the disastrous effects of over four years of warfare, and 
he participated in much of the constructive work of his city. 
His youth and young manhood spent on a Virginia farm, he 
came to Richmond at the age of twenty-two years, and followed 
the path of ambition and gave his native qualities of character 
and practical ability to assist in whatever came to hand. It is 
upon such men as he, their accomplishments and their strong 
faith, do those of the rising generation build their confident 
hope of the American future. 

\^'illiam Thomas Ellett was born in New Kent County, Vir- 
ginia, in February, 1861, and he died in Richmond, Virginia, 
July 7, 1922, a son of Cornelius and Mary Ann (Lacey) Ellett, 
the former of whom was a farmer and planter. Mrs. Ellett was 
a lady of superior education and in the absence of adequate 
schools taught her children, of whom there were ten, not only 
the lessons to be found in books, but those which come from the 
heart of a loving mother and good Christian woman. 

Farming in his native county until he was twenty-two, the 
ambitious young man sought a wider horizon in the capital city 
of the South, and here, in Richmond, he learned the carpenter 
trade, followed it for a few years, and then became a contractor 
and builder. The strenuous character of his work brought about 
a breakdown and he was forced to seek a change of occupation, 
returning to farming, and was engaged in that occupation for 
ten years, when once more he came to Richmond, entered the 
furniture business, and continued in it until 1920. He retired 
from it, and later entered the grocery field, but a few months 
later his death occurred. 

On April 27, 1887, Mr. Ellett married Miss Evelyn Thomas 
Long, a daughter of Andrew Jackson and Martha Ann (Blake) 
Long. Her father was a farmer and carpenter, and he and the 
mother had ten children born to them, of whom she was the 



258 VIRGINIA 

eighth in order of birth. Mrs. Ellett was educated in King 
William County. During the latter part of the war between 
the states Andrew Jackson Long served in the Confederate army. 
The Long family came to the United States from Ireland and 
settled in Caroline County, Virginia. The Ellett family settled 
in King William County, Virginia, just after the close of the 
American Revolution, so that both it and the Long family are 
old ones in the state. 

Of the children born to Mr. and Mrs. Ellett there are five 
now living, namely: Pearl Blake, who married Joseph Alexan- 
der Barlow, a farmer and planter, and they have two children, 
Joseph Alexander, Junior, and William Edward ; Chastine Clyde, 
who married Annie Laurie Gordon, and has two children, Mary 
Evelyn and Lester Earle ; William Wyatt, who is engaged in the 
plumbing business in Richmond, married Elizabeth Ruby Thorpe, 
and they have two children, William Wyatt, Junior, and Lowell 
E. ; Andrew Cornelius, who is an automobile salesman, married 
Lelia E. Anderson, and they have one child. Gay Nelle; and 
Evelyn Inez, who married Walter Dewitt Smith, a Government 
employe. Of the above children William Wyatt is the veteran 
of the World war, for which he voluntered, and served in the 
United States Navy for eighteen months, and had nine months of 
active service on the sea. 

Mrs. Ellett is a consistent mem.ber of the East End Baptist 
Church, to which Mr. Ellett belonged in line. He was a Mason 
and belonged to the Shrine in that order, and to the Owls, Junior 
Order United American Mechanics, and the Odd Fellows. 

John Walker Down was well known as a lumberman in 
Virginia, manufacturing large quantities of timber products that 
entered extensively into the coastwise trade and also went to 
foreign markets. 

Mr. Down was born in Gloucester County, New Jersey, April 
21, 1840, and died in Mathews County, Virginia, in November, 
1917. His father, John Walker Down, Sr., was in the lumber 
industry in New Jersey for many years. The Down family 
came in Colonial times to New Jersey. A town in Gloucester 
County, Downstown, was named for one of the family. Several 
monuments in that county refer by name or otherwise to the con- 
spicuous services rendered by members of the Down family 
in the Revolutionary war and Colonial affairs. 

John Walker Down was the youngest in a family of five chil- 
dren. He attended common schools and at the age of twelve 
years was driving a team for his father. When he was twenty- 
three years old he engaged in general merchandising, but after a 
few years left that to continue in the lumber business. From 
New Jersey he extended his interests down inlo Virginia, in 
Mathews County, and at one time had three mills in operation in 
this state, shipping lumber by the shipload to New Jersey and 
Philadelphia markets, and also large quantities to Europe. He 
retired four years before his death. He was a Democrat, a 
member of the Masonic fraternity, and he and his wife were 
Methodists. 

His first wife was Matilda Miller, of New Jersey, who died 
five years after their marriage. Of the two sons born to this 
marriage the one now living is Everett, a banker at Atlanta City. 
His second wife was Miss Anna McGonigall, who died twenty 
years later. Two of their three children are living. Lena 



I 





<' 



KX:L^^<y7^>U 



VIRGINIA 259 

Hester is the wife of Harry L. Nelson and has three children, 
Harry, Jr., William W., and Anna M. ; and Hannah R. married 
Herbert Ingram, of Hagerstown, ]Maryland, who was killed in 
action in France in the early part of the World war. 

Mr. Down in 1893 married Nannie Simpson Cromwell, of 
Petersburg, Virginia, who was reared and educated at Norfolk 
and who resides at 701 West Thirty-eighth Street in that city. 
Mrs. Down's father, John A. Simpson, was a farmer, and served 
all through the Civil war in the Confederate army. He was 
captured and was a prisoner when the war ended. Her mother 
was Sarah Hendren, and Mrs. Down was the third in a family of 
nine children. Mrs. Down has two daughters, Bessie Vernon 
and Sarah Louise. Bessie Vernon is the wife of William Waugh, 
of Bedford County, Virginia, and her four children are named 
Vernon, Lester, Merlyn and Elizabeth. Miss Sarah Louise 
Down is in the employ of the state government at Norfolk, with 
the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. 

Hon. Charles Robert Fawley. sheriff of Rockingham 
County, is one of the substantial men of that region, and has 
served not only as sheriff but as deputy under four other 
sheriffs. He has lived a life of action and responsibility and 
has proven his courage and resourcefulness innumerable times. 
His administration as sheriff has been one in keeping with the 
strength and integrity of his character, and has been attended by 
strict law enforcement and reduction of criminal activities. 

Sheriff Fawley was born on a farm in Rockingham County, 
Virginia, May 8, 1875, son of George W. and Sarah J. (Fulk) 
Fawley. Both the Fawley and Fulk families have been in Vir- 
ginia for many generations. The Fawleys were of Irish de- 
scent, and first established homes in Pennsylvania and then 
moved down into Virginia, into Loudoun County. His grand- 
father, Jacob Fawley, was a native of Loudoun County and spent 
all his life as a farmer. 

George W. Fawley was for many years a farmer and black- 
.smith. He served as a justice of the peace, was the first post- 
master at Fulk's Run, when the office was established in 1870, 
and he taught in the Fulk's Run district. He was a local leader 
in the Democi-atic party, and a member of the Baptist Church, 
while his wife belonged to the Church of the Brethren. 

Sarah J. (Fulk) Fawley was a descendant of Matthew Fulk, 
who was of Scotch-Irish descent and came to America about 
1735. He was with Colonel Lewis in an expedition to treat with 
the Indians and he married an Indian woman. Not long after 
the Indians were removed from Rockingham County he also 
went west, but left a large family of boys and some girls who 
settled in the vicinity of Broadway in Rockingham County. 
Sarah J. Fulk was a daughter of John G. Fulk, who was a son 
of Daniel Fulk and a grandson of John Fulk. John Fulk, a son 
of Matthew, was born in 1760, and married a Miss Bible. He 
moved to Brock's Gap in 1785. 

Sheriff Fawley was the youngest of ten children, seven of 
whom are living. He grew up in a rural neighborhood, attended 
school there, and farming was the business he first learned and 
the occupation he followed until 1912. For twelve years he was 
in the employe of the Virginia State Highway Commission and 
for years was district supervisor of the Seventh Congressional 
District for the Virginia State Game Commission. Mr. Fawley 



260 VIRGINIA 

in November, 1927, was elected sheriff by a majority of over 
1,400 votes and assumed the duties of his office in January, 
1928. He had been a deputy sheriff for a quarter of a century. 
In December, 1899, he married Augusta V. Siple, who was 
born in Pendleton County, West Virginia, and educated in the 
common schools of her home neighborhood. Sheriff and Mrs. 
Fawley have one daughter, Lucile Virginia, attending the Junior 
High School. He is a member of the United Brethren Church, 
while his wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Mr. Fawley is a member of the Masonic fraternity and 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He ovnis a farm in Rock- 
ingham County, and is interested in its operation. A man of 
high principles, upright and honorable in everything he under- 
takes, he is making an excellent record as sheriff, and law 
breakers have recognized his sturdy qualities in the enforce- 
ment of the laws. 

Hon. Bathurst Daingerfield Peachy, commonwealth's at- 
torney of James City County, and one of the most brilliant of 
the able attorneys practicing at the bar of Williamsburg, al- 
though still in the full flush of vigorous manhood, has a remark- 
able record of achievement behind him, and holds the confidence 
and respect of his professional associates as well as the public 
generally. He was born in Williamsburg, Virginia, July 5, 1893, 
a son of Bathurst Daingerfield and Mary Garnett (Lane) Peachy, 
natives of Williamsburg. 

The elder Bathurst Daingerfield Peachy was also an attor- 
ney, and was engaged in practice in Williamsburg, and his 
father, Samuel Peachy, was a member of the same learned pro- 
fession. For a number of years the office of commonwealth's 
attorney was filled by the older Bathurst Daingerfield Peachy, 
and he attained to a distinguished position among his associates 
in the law. His death, which occurred July 23, 1916, when he 
was fifty-eight years old, removed from Williamsburg one of its 
most distinguished citizens, and from his family a devoted hus- 
band and father. Mrs. Peachy survives her husband and is still 
living in Williamsburg. 

The younger Bathurst Daingerfield Peachy grew up in Wil- 
liamsburg, and enjoyed the normal life of any lad of his locality 
while attending the local schools, and, being an apt pupil, he was 
graduated from the high school in 1908, when he was but fifteen 
years old. Entering William and Mary College, Williamsburg, 
he was graduated therefrom in 1914 with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. For the succeeding year he was an instructor in his 
alma mater, and then took legal training in the law department 
of the University of Virginia, and was admitted to the bar that 
same year, in 1916. Establishing himself in practice in Wil- 
liamsburg, Mr. Peachy showed from the beginning of his career 
the same admirable qualities which had advanced both his father 
and grandfather at the bar, and has built up a very large and 
lucrative practice. For four years he served as judge of the 
Juvenile Court and the Domestic Relations Court, handling the 
difficult problems brought before him with masterly tact and 
kindly authority. On January 1, 1928, he assumed the duties of 
the office of commonwealth's attorney, to which he had been 
elected the preceding fall, and already has proven his courage, 
his thoroughness and his unflinching, uncompromising attitude 
toward offenders against the law. He has as one of his most 
cherished possessions the splendid law library of his grand- 



VIRGINIA 261 

father, and this, in addition to his own large collection of law 
books, gives him one of the best law libraries, of a private char- 
acter, in the state. 

On June 16, 1919, Mr. Peachy married Miss Grace Bozarth, a 
daughter of William A. and Flora (Weeks) Bozarth, native of 
New Jersey. Mr. Bozarth is a lumber dealer and president of 
the Peninsula Bank & Trust Company of Williamsburg, and he 
has been a resident of Williamsburg for thirty years. Mr. and 
Mrs. Peachy have two children : Grace Monro, who was born 
February 14, 1922 ; and Bathurst Daingerfield, Junior, who was 
born December 30, 1924. 

For some years Mr. Peachy has been a valued member of the 
Virginia State Bar Association and the American Bar Associa- 
tion. He belongs to the Williamsburg Rotary Club and the 
American Legion. His fraternal connections are those which he 
maintains with the Masonic Order and Kappa Sigma. In polit- 
ical faith he is a Democrat, and he is one of the leaders of his 
party in this section. He is an Episcopalian. During the World 
war Mr. Peachy enlisted in the Aviation Corps of the Marine 
branch of the service and was stationed at the Boston Institute 
of Technology. His honorable discharge bears the date of Feb- 
ruary 1, 1919. When he was released from military service he 
returned to Williamsburg and resumed his practice. Judge 
Peachy maintains his office in the First National Bank Building. 

Rev. Theodore Whitfield, D. D., an eminent Baptist divine, 
whose last years in the ministry were spent in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, was born in Hinds County, Mississippi, January 31, 1834, 
and died at Richmond May 28, 1894. 

The Whitfields came from England in the early part of the 
seventeenth century, settling in Elizabeth City and Nansemond 
counties, Virginia. They intermarried with the Bryan and 
Hatch families. His parents, Rev. Benjamin and Lucy (Hatch) 
Whitfield, were natives of North Carolina, from which state 
they moved to Mississippi. Theodore was the eighth in a 
family of twelve children. 

"Rev. Theodore Whitfield, D. D., was converted in the church 
next to his father's home 'Magnolia,' Hinds County, Mississippi, 
when thirteen years of age. * * * Reared in a lovely South- 
ern home, he was educated in the fine arts as well as in the more 
substantial sciences and classics; entered the University of 
North Cai-olina 1852, A. B., 1854; entered the Baptist ministry, 
studied at the Theological Seminary, Newton Center, Massachu- 
setts. * * * jjjg pastorates were in Danville, Kentucky, 
Aberdeen and Meridian, Mississippi, Charlotte, Goldsboro and 
Newbern, North Carolina, and Fulton, near Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, where he served for seven years before his death. He 
received the degree of D. D., from Wake Forest College, North 
Carolina, 1878. While in Greensboro, North Carolina, at the 
time of the war between the states, he preached for the Baptist 
Church and did local services for the Confederate States. While 
ministering to soldiers of both armies in Goldsboro, North Caro- 
lina, he contracted camp fever, from which he was desperately 
ill for a long time. Later he was superintendent of the State 
Institute for the Blind at Jackson, Mississippi, until removed 
when General Ames of Boston became governor of Mississippi. 

"Born of wealthy and distinguished parents, he was a gen- 
tleman both by breeding and culture. * * * jjis life was 
devout. * * * As a theologian he stood without a rival 



262 VIRGINIA 

among the Baptist ministers of Richmond and was called by 
them 'the Sage' of their Conference. For some years he served 
as North Carolina vice pi'esident of the Foreign Mission Board 
of the Southern Baptist Convention. Singularly guileless, he 
wras courteous and dignified in deportment. A concise preacher, 
indefatigable pastor, a facile writer, a beloved friend, he be- 
queathed to his wife and children the priceless legacy of an 
unsullied name and saintly memory. He died May 28, 1894." 
(Extract from a memorial volume published at the time of his 
decease.) 

Doctor Whitfield married into one of the oldest and most 
distinguished families of North Carolina, the Moreheads. He 
and Miss Annie Eliza Morehead weer married at Greensboro, 
North Carolina, October 11, 1859. Mrs. Whitfield was a daugh- 
ter of Hon. James Turner and Mary Teas (Lindsay) Morehead. 
Charles Morehead, founder of the Morehead family in the South, 
settled in the Northern Neck of Virginia about 1630. Joseph 
Morehead married Elizabeth Turner, a daughter of James Tur- 
ner and Keren-Happuch Norman, of Spotsylvania County, Vir- 
ginia. Their son, John Morehead, married Obedience Motley, 
of Amelia County, and settled in Rockingham County, North 
Carolina. John Morehead was a soldier of the Revolution. John 
Morehead and his wife. Obedience Motley, had two distinguished 
sons. One of them, John Motley Morehead, born in 1796 and 
died in 1886, became governor of North Carolina. 

The other son, James Turner Morehead, was born in Rock- 
ingham County, North Carolina, January 11, 1799, and died at 
Greensboro May 5, 1875. He was a lawyer, served in the State 
Senate 1935-42, and the United States Congress, 1851. 

Doctor and Mrs. Whitfield had three children : James More- 
head Whitfield, George H. Whitfield and Miss Emma M. Whit- 
field. 

James Morehead Whitfield graduated from the University 
of Virginia with the degree of M. D. He became a medical 
chemist and for some years served as city chemist and coroner 
of Richmond. He married Mary Graham Mathews, of Virginia, 
and has three living children: James M., Jr., a physician now 
practicing in Richmond ; Theodore M., a graduate Ph. D., of 
Johns Hopkins University, a teacher; and Philip Whitfield, ^ 
lawyer. All these sons were born in Richmond and all graduated 
at the University of Richmond. 

George H. Whitfield, at present director of the Department 
of Public Utilities of the City of Richmond, graduated at Rich- 
mond College with the degree of A. B. and at Cornell University, 
New York, 1896, as a mechanical and electrical engineer. Dur- 
ing the World war he was for several years connected with the 
International Arms & Fuze Company, Bloomfield, New Jersey, 
part of this time as manager of the shell factory. Previous to 
this he was one of the directors of the Virginia Railway & Power 
Company of Richmond. He married Laura Merryman Crane, 
of Baltimore, and has two daughters, Clare Merryman and Anne 
Morehead, both born in Richmond. 

Miss Emma Morehead Whitfield, of Richmond, was born at 
Greensboro, North Carolina, graduated at the Woman's College 
of Richmond, studied at the Art Students' League of New York 
and in Paris. Examples of her work as a portrait artist are 
to be found in the Confederate Battle Abbey and the Governor's 
Mansion at Richmond ; the Supreme Court Building at Raleigh, 
and at Greensboro, North Carolina, etc. Miss Whitfield is a 



VIRGINIA 263 

member of the Woman's Club, Society of Colonial Dames of 
America in the State of Virginia, United Daughters of the Con- 
federacy, Daughters of the American Revolution, and is historian 
of the Baptist Woman's Missionary Union of Virginia. 

Sidney Thompson. In the thriving town of Middleburg, 
Loudoun County, is a financial instituticn that gives the mosc 
effective of service in safeguarding and advancing communal 
interests along all lines, and of this substantial and well ordered 
institution, the Middleburg National Bank, Sidney Thompson is 
the cashier. 

Mr. Thompson w^?.s born in Washington, D. C, on the 13th 
of October, 1893, and is a son of John L. and Anne (Price) 
Thompson, the former a native of North Carolina and the latter 
of Maryland, and both representatives of old and influential 
famines that were early established in these respective common- 
wealths. Dr. Jacob Thompson, grandfather of the subject of 
this review, was a loyal surgeon of the Confederacy during the 
course of the Civil war, and was a son of Sidney Thompson, an 
influential citizen and extensive exponent of plantation indus- 
try in North Carolina. Jacob Thompson, like his father, was 
also a tobacco-grower on an extensive scale on his plantation 
estate in North Carolina. On the maternal side Sidney Thomp- 
son of this review is a scion of the Price family that was long 
one of prominence and influence in Southern Maryland. 

John L. Thompson was born and reared in North Carolina 
and received his education in that state. He finally e.stablished 
his residence in Washington, living there until he met his death 
in a railroad wreck at Danville, Virginia, in September, 1903, 
his widow having not long survived him, as her death occurred 
in August, 1905. 

Sidney Thompson was reared in the capitol city of the na- 
tion and there received his early education, and after his gradu- 
ation from a military academy he was employed in the Pooles- 
ville National Bank, Poolesville, Maryland, the attractive little 
town in which he now maintains his home and from which he 
makes trips to and from Middleburg, Virginia, for the discharge 
of his executive duties as cashier of the ]\Iiddleburg National 
Bank. 

Mr. Thompson has devoted his career to bank work since he 
graduated from school and in 1914 assumed his present execu- 
tive office, that of cashier of the Middleburg National Bank. 
Mr. Thompson has made a close study of financial affairs per- 
taining to practical banking, and his advancement has come 
through his own ability and loyal service. He is also now the 
financial advisor for the Foxcroft School for Girls, one of the 
exclusive girls' schools in America, located near the town of Mid- 
dleburg. 

The Middleburg National Bank was established and char- 
tered in 1924. When the bank was organized Mr. Thompson 
became its cashier through the recommendation given by E. F. 
Rorebeck, then the chief national bank examiner of the Fifth 
Federal Reserve District. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Thompson is given to the 
Democratic party, and he and his wife are communicants of the 
Protestant Episcopal Church. 

In September, 1915, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Thompson and Miss Katherine Walling, who was born and 



264 VIRGINIA 

reared in Maryland and who is a daughter of Dr. Byron W. 
Walling, for fifty years a representative physician at Poolesville, 
Maryland, where he is now living retired from active practice, 
he having been born in Maryland, as was also his wife, whose 
family name was Poole and who was a representative of the 
family in honor of which Poolesville was named. Mr. and Mrs. 
Thompson have two fine sons, Byron Walling and Sidney, Jr. 

Reginald L. Nixon. Among the men who have contributed 
to the good government of Virginia during recent years, through 
faithful and conscientious service in the discharge of the duties 
and responsibilities of the oflSces to which they have been elected 
by their fellow citizens, Reginald L. Nixon, of Leesburg, is 
worthy of more than passing mention. His career has been 
typical of the self-made man, and the success he has gained is 
another exemplification of the fact that industry and fidelity find 
their just rewards. For the last five years Mr. Nixon has been 
before the people of his community as a public servant, and dur- 
ing this period has won the confidence and respect of his fellow 
citizens in a marked degree, his present activities being carried 
on in the capacity of commissioner of revenue of Loudoun 
County. 

Mr. Nixon was born at Leesburg, December 26, 1881, and is 
a son of George H. and Virginia E. (Milbourne) Nixon, the lat- 
ter a native of Hamilton, Virginia. George H. Nixon was born 
at Leesburg, where he received a public school education, and 
when a mere lad volunteered for service in the Confederate army 
during the war between the states. He came through that strug- 
gle unscathed and returned to his native place, where after sev- 
eral other ventures he established himself in the hotel business. 
He became well known to the traveling public as the popular host 
of a modern hostelry, and bore an excellent reputation among 
his fellow townsmen for high character and good citizenship. 
He passed away in 1903, and is survived by his widow, who still 
makes her home at Leesburg. 

Reginald L. Nixon was given good educational opportunities 
in his youth, first attending the public schools of Leesburg, later 
pursuing a course at Randolph-Macon Academy, and finally 
being a student at a military academy at Danville, Virginia. 
He began his career as a bookkeeper in the employ of Chapin & 
Sacks of Washington, D. C, and later was with Golden & Com- 
pany, also of the capital, then becoming identified with the bank- 
ing business as a bookkeeper for the Loudoun National Bank of 
Leesburg. He remained with this institution, gaining steady 
promotion, for seven years, or until 1924, when he was elected 
commissioner of revenue of Leesburg. During his two-year 
term of office he discharged his duties in such a capable and ex- 
peditious manner that in 1926 he was elected commissioner of 
revenue for Loudoun County, and is still acting in that capacity. 
Mr. Nixon is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Rebekahs, and in his political allegiance supports the 
candidates and principles of the Democratic party. A member 
of the Methodist Episcopal Church since his youth, he is active 
in its work, and is now lay leader and teacher of the Men's Bible 
Class in the Sunday School. 

In February, 1920, Mr. Nixon was united in marriage wtih 
Miss Naomi Galleher, a daughter of W. R. and a Miss (Webb) 
Galleher, both natives of Loudoun County. Mr. Galleher has 



VIRGINIA 265 

been a traveling- salesman all of his life and makes his home at 
Leesburg, where he and his wife are held in high esteem. Mr. 
and Mrs. Nixon have no children. Mrs. Nixon is active in the 
work of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Cecil Connor, Leesburg attorney, is the present representa- 
tive of the Twenty-ninth Senatorial District in the Virginia 
State Senate. He has practiced law thirty years, and few men 
have be3n more diligent in makin<? use of the opportunities for 
individual accomplishment and public service. 

Mr. Connor was born at Philomont, Loudoun County, Vir- 
ginia, February 4, 1871. His grandfather, John T. Connor, 
was also a Virginian, a farmer, and married Susan A. Lyne, 
representative of another well known family name in Loudoun 
County. John T. Connor, father of Senator Connor, was born 
in Loudoun County in 1844, was a shoemaker, farmer, shoe 
merchant and postmaster at Philomont and Faxon. He died at 
Bluemcnt, Virg-inia, in May, 1916. His wife, Mary E. Brown, 
was born near Lincoln, in Loudoun County, in 1847. 

Cecil Connor, one of the children of these parents, grew up 
on his father's farm in Loudoun County, attended rural schools, 
and beyond those advantages had to contrive his own oppor- 
timities. At the age of eighteen he became a teacher, and teach- 
ing gave him the financial means and also some of the leisure 
required for his pi'ivate law studies. Later he spent a year in 
Washington and Lee University, graduating from the Law 
School in 1896. He was licensed to practice in June, 1898, and 
since that year has been a busy member of the bar at Leesburg, 
handling a general practice, and has also represented several 
banks and other corporations in his clientage. 

Mr. Connor prior to his election to the State Senate served 
four consecutive terms in the office of commonwealth attorney 
of Loudoun County. He was in that position during the World 
war, which brought a large addition of responsibilities to his 
official routine. He also served as counsel and appeal agent of 
the Local Draft Board. Senator Connor is a member of the 
Leesburg and Virfinia Bar Associations, and is a member of 
the Knights of Pythias. 

He married at Washington, D. C, November 8, 1905. Miss 
Edna F. Fadeley, daughter of Henry J. and Mary Estelle (John- 
son) Fadeley. They have one son, Cecil Fenton, born May 6th, 
1907. He is now practicing law in the law office of Charles 
Henry Smith at Alexandria, Virginia. 

George Mason Dillard is a member of the Norfolk bar, and 
has brought to his profession a ripe scholarship, integrity of 
character and a resourcefulness that have stood the test of many 
years of successful practice. 

He was born at Charlottesville, Virginia. His father, George 
Walden Dillard, was born in Caroline County in 1812 and at an 
early age was left an orphan, being reared in the family of an 
uncle. He had a fair education and at Scottsville became a 
merchant, invested in farm land in that vicinity and owned a 
country home four miles from Scottsville. He died in 1896, at 
the advanced age of eighty-four. George Walden Dillard mar- 
ried Lucy Jane Dillard, who was born in Spotsylvania County, 
daughter of William and Elizabeth (Mason) Diliard. In a local 
history of Henry County, Virginia, the statement is made that 
George Dillard of Wiltshire, England, settled at Jamestown in 



266 VIRGINIA 

1660, being then twenty-six years of age. He had a son, James 
Stephen, two years old. This George Dillard was granted 250 
acres for services in fighting Indians, and later 25,000 acres 
were granted to James Stephen Dillard, his son, and the Carys, 
Wises and Pages, a tract that became known in history as the 
Williamsburg Plantation. 

George Walden Dillard reared a family of nine children : 
Alice E., James Daniel, JuHa B., William B., Mary E., Martha 
F., Benjamin L., George Mason and Nora L. 

George Mason Dillard was educated at Scottsville, and grad- 
uated in law at the University of Virginia in 1882. Soon after- 
ward he moved to Norfolk, where he has practiced law for over 
forty-five years, being one of the oldest members of the bar of 
that city. 

Mr. Dillard married, in 1904, Elizabeth Allyn, who was born 
at Norfolk, daughter of Joseph T. and Mary R. (Bell) Allyn. 
They have four children, Allyn, George Mason, Mary Walden 
and Elizabeth Allyn. The son Allyn was educated in the Wood- 
bury Forest School, graduated in law at the University of Vir- 
ginia and is now practicing in New York City. The son George 
Mason graduated from the Maury High School at Norfolk, 
attended the Woodbury Forest School and the Virginia Military 
Institute, and is now associated with the Cleveland Illuminating 
Company at Cleveland, Ohio. The members of the family that 
remain at Norfolk are communicants of St. Paul's Episcopal 
Church. 

William Frederick Low. The really useful men of a com- 
munity are those on whom their fellow citizens can rely in mat- 
ters of import, especially those of finance ; men who have won this 
confidence by the wisdom of their own investments and by the 
honorable lives they have led in every field of effort and as neigh- 
bors and friends. Such a man in every particular is William F. 
Low, cashier of the First National Bank of Williamsburg, a 
prominent representative of the financial interests of his city 
and James City County. 

William F. Low was born April 1, 1891, in Richmond, Vir- 
ginia, a son of Fred and Mary Alice (Day) Low, natives of 
Richmond. During a large portion of his mature life the father 
was with the city fire department, and was a man highly re- 
spected by all who knew him. His death took place December 
18, 1903. The mother is still living and resides in Williamsburg. 

Growing up in Richmond, William F. Low attended its public 
schools, but, as there was necessity for him to become self-sup- 
porting, he did not plan for a collegiate training, but entered the 
American Locomotive Company as a mechanical draughtsman, 
and held that position for about five years. When he left that 
company it was to enter the banking business, first as runner for 
the Broad Street Bank. His faithfulness and reliability brought 
about promotions, and during the ten years he was connected 
with this bank he rose to be assistant manager of the savings de- 
partment. In March, 1918, he left Richmond and the Bi'oad 
Street Bank and came to Williamsburg to assume the duties of 
assistant cashier of the First National Bank, and one month 
later was made cashier, which position he still holds. The bank 
was organized about 1903, and has a capital of $30,000, a sur- 
plus of $30,000, and total resources of over a million dollars. 
Mr. Low is a stockholder in the bank. His associates are : L. W. 



VIRCxINIA 267 

Lane, president ; J. \V. Jones, vice president ; and T. L. Sheppard, 
assistant cashier. 

An active Democrat, Mr. Low is a member of the City School 
Board, and a friend of education. He is a thirty-second degree 
Meson, and belongs to the Rotary Club. Long an Episcopalian, 
he is now connected with Bruton parish, and is one of its vestry- 
men. Mr. Low is unmarried. Few men in banking circles in 
this section of the state have established a reputation broader 
and more striking than has he; few have gained a higher reputa- 
tion for efficiency, fidelity and faithfulness, and as a man of 
marked intellectual activity his labors have given an impetus 
to business life and educational progress. 

George Schley DeShazor, Jr., is clerk of the Circuit Court 
and county clerk of Warwick County, with home and headquar-' 
ters at Denbigh. 

His family have been identiiied with Virginia since Colonial 
times. Mr. DeShazor was born at Newport News, Virginia, 
September 19, 1899, son of George S. and Mary A. (Dugan) 
DeShazor. His father was born at Nashville, Tennessee, and a 
year after his birth his parents returned to Virginia. He was a 
son of John A. DeShazor, a native Virginian, who during the 
Civil war was a contractor for the Confederate government, 
building fortifications and other military works. Two of the 
brothers of George S. DeShazor, Sr.. were soldiers in the Con- 
federate army. Mary A. Dugan was born in Philadelphia and 
her father was a L'nion soldier in the war. 

George S. DeShazor, Jr., attended school at Newport News, 
graduating from high school in 1916. This was followed by a 
business course at Newport News, and his first employment there 
was clerk in the postoffice. After a year and a half he was made 
deputy clerk of Warwick County, January 9, 1924, and on August 
2, 1927, was elected to the office of Circuit Court clerk and clerk 
of the county for a term of eight years. 

Mr. DeShazor is unmarried. He is affiliated with Lodge No. 
1514 of the Loyal Order of Moose, and is a Democrat in politics. 

D.wiD Minor McDonald. Leesburg has its full representa- 
tion of men who, starting on their independent careers without 
financial resources or other adventitious aids, have forced their 
way through sheer energy and native business talent to posi- 
tions of independence and prestige, but it is doubtful if a better 
illustration could be found than David Minor McDonald, pro- 
prietor of the McDonald Auto Service. Losing his father when 
he was but nine years of age, his education was necessarily cur- 
tailed by the need of his assistance in contributing to the family 
support, but this proved no hindrance to the ambitious and 
determined youth, whose energies have since carried him so far. 
At present he is accounted one of the substantial citizens of the 
younger generation, and is contributing to the civic welfare of 
Leesl urg in the capacity of vice president of the Rotary Club. 

Mr. McDonald was born July 22, 1892, in Loudoun County, 
Virginia, and is a son of Capt. John B. and Virginia C. (Lyon) 
McDonald. His father, a native of Scotland, came to the United 
States in young manhood and took up his residence in Loudoun 
County. Eventually he became captain of a tusrboat plving the 
waters of Alexandria Bay, and there lost his life by drowning 
during a storm in 1901. Mrs. McDonald, who was born in 



268 VIRGINIA 

Loudoun County, survived him until April, 1922, and passed 
away at Leesburg. 

David Minor McDonald received a public school education 
in Loudoun County, and was still a youth when he started solicit- 
ing insurance. TJhis business he followed with a measure of 
success for some years, but he did not feel that he was making 
the progress that he should, and in 1918 took a position as an 
automobile mechanic for the Lambert Motor Company. During 
the six years that followed he applied himself to the fullest 
extent in learning every detail of the business, and in the mean- 
time saved hisj earnings carefully and added to them by several 
well placed investments. Finally he decided that he was equipped 
and ready to embark upon a venture of his own, and in 1924 
he founded the McDonald Auto Service, of which he has since 
been the proprietor. So successful was this business under his 
direction and management that from practically nothing it had 
grown within four years to an enterprise valued at $160,000. 
Mr. McDonald handles Chevrolet automobiles, and maintains a 
commodious salesroom and service station, making a specialty 
of repair work and the recharging and repairing of batteries. 
He also handles tires, equipment and accessories, and has one 
of the most modern establishments of its kind in this section of 
the state, his present building, erected in 1927, being 100 by 
50 feet, and his accessory building 36 by 16 feet. He now gives 
employment to ten people, including skilled mechanics. Mr. 
McDonald has an excellent reputation in business circles and is 
vice president of the Rotary Club and master of the Leesburg 
Hunt Club. He votes the Democratic ticket, and he and Mrs. 
McDonald are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

On January 17, 1917, Mr. McDonald was united in marriage 
with Miss Pauline Lambert, daughter of J. D. and Sallie B. 
(Weeden) Lambert, natives of Virginia. Mr. Lambert is a 
retired merchant of Ashburn, this state, where Mrs. Lambert 
died in 1925. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
McDonald : Marie Louise, born December 20, 1917 ; Ann Eliza- 
beth, born November 19, 1921 ; Eda Lee, born January 20, 1926; 
and David Minor, Jr., born November 1, 1928. 

Hon. John Pendleton Leachman, treasurer of Prince Wil- 
liam County, is one of the substantial farmers of the county, 
his finly developed property lying near Manassas, and there 
he resides, although he has his oflfices in the Farmers Bank 
Building, Manassas. He was born in Prince William County, 
Virginia, December 18, 1853, a son of John Thomas and Eliza- 
beth Ann (Lewis) Leachman, also natives of Prince William 
County. Although not an enlisted man, the father served as 
a guide during the first battle of Manassas, and he continued 
farming after the close of the war, being so engaged at the time 
of his death. His father was John Leachman, for many years 
sheriff of Prince William County and owner of the farm now 
owned and operated by Treasurer Leachman. The father passed 
away in December, 1912, and the mother in 1902, and both were 
most excellent people, highly esteemed by all who knew them. 

While he remained with his parents on the farm until he was 
twenty-five years old, John Pendleton Leachman attended the 
local schools and Bethel Military Academy near Warrenton, Vir- 
ginia. When he left the homestead it was to begin operating 
his present farm of 160 acres, and here he raises pure bred 
Shorthorn cattle. During the period he was getting his farm 



VIRGINIA 269 

in good shape he served for ten years as sheriff, and when he 
left office it was to become assistant cashier of the National 
Bank of Manassas. In 1911 he was elected treasurer of the 
county, and has continued to serve in this office ever since, his 
present term expiring in 1931, at which time he will have been 
county treasurer of Prince William County for twenty con- 
secutive years. In 1897 he had a little preliminary experience 
in his office, as he served at that time as deputy treasurer. 

I\Ir. Leachman married Mary Virginia Strother in October, 
1884. She is a daughter of Thomas and Mildred (Childs) 
Strother, natives of Fauquier County, Virginia. He died in 
1861, but she survived him many years and passed away in 
1916. Ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Leachman, 
namely : Mildred, who is the wife of D. B. Smith, of Warrenton, 
Virginia; Edith May, who is the wife of Robert H. Smith, of 
Manassas, Virginia; Olivia, who is the wife of Allen L. Oliver, 
of Cape Girai'deau, Missouri; Lillian, who is the wife of J. L. 
Hinson, of Manassas ; Marie, who is the wife of Douglas Janney, 
of Clarksburg, West Virginia ; William H., who is a traveling 
salesman, residing in Manassas ; John P., who died in New 
Mexico when he was twenty-three years old ; Thomas Keith, 
who was accidentally killed in New York City by a railroad 
when he was twenty-one years old ; James Lewis, who died at the 
age of eighteen months ; and one child, who was boim dead. 
Mrs. Leachman died in 1918. In November, 1925, Mr. Leach- 
man married Miss Emma Shisler, of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 
a daughter of John Shisler, a native of Pennsylvania, who with 
his wife resides in Philadelphia. Mr. Leachman is a thirty- 
second degree Mason, and belongs to Acca Temple, A. A. 0. N. 
M. S., Richmond. He belongs to the Manassas Kiwanis Club, 
is active in the local Democratic party, and is a member of the 
Episcopal Church. His farm four miles southwest of Manassas 
is, as already stated, a magnificent property, and is interesting 
historically as having been in the Leachman family for many 
generations, and on it is buried the paternal great-grandfather 
and great-grandmother of Mr. Leachman of this review. It 
was from Prince William County that his uncle, William Leach- 
man, enlisted for service in the Mexican war, and others bearing 
the name have been prominent in both war and peace in this 
and other regions of the state. 

Horace Bluford effectively upheld in all the relations of 
life the honors of a family name that has been worthily linked 
with the annals of Virginia history since the Colonial era. He 
passed his entire life in Norfolk and was one of the representa- 
tive business men and influential citizens of this community at 
the time of his death, which occurred April 6, 1905. Through 
his wide and constructive activities in fraternal circles Mr. 
Bluford became specially well known throughout his native state, 
and his circle of friends was limited only by that of his 
acquaintances. 

Horace Bluford was born at Norfolk September 6, 1861, and 
was a son of George A. and Margaret Ann (Cooke) Bluford, 
both representatives of old and honored Virginia families. 
George A. Bluford likewise was born and reared in Norfolk, and 
he became one of its most progressive and influential citizens, 
many of the streets of the city having been laid out by him 
and his other contributions to civic and material advancement 
having been of noteworthy order, besides which he here built 



270 VIRGINIA 

up an important hide and leather business that received his close 
attention many years. 

The schools of his native city afforded Horace Bluford his 
youthful education, and his initial business experience was 
acquired by his serving a short time as clerk in a local mer- 
cantile establishment. He finally engaged independently in the 
produce commission business, and in this connection he de- 
veloped one of the largest and most important enterprises of 
the kind in Norfolk. At the time of his death the business was 
conducted under the title of H. Bluford Company, and since he 
passed away the business has been eifectively carried forward 
under the control of his son Vernon, while the title of the con- 
cern has been changed to Crocker-Bluford Corporation. 

Mr. Bluford served as a gallant soldier in the Spanish- 
American war, he having been a member of Company B, Fourth 
Virginia Volunteer Infantry, and having been with this com- 
mand in active service in Cuba. His company was commanded 
by Captain Higgins. The political allegiance of Mr. Bluford was 
given unreservedly to the Democratic party, and his religious 
faith was that of the Presbyterian Church, of which his widow 
likewise is a zealous member. Mr. Bluford was specially prom- 
inent in fraternal circles and was the organizer and first presi- 
dent of the Virginia Grand Aerie of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles. He organized also the Norfolk Lodge of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, and he was prominently affiliated 
also with the Royal Arcanum and the Improved Order of Red 
Men. He took deep interest in all that concerned the civic, social 
and material welfare of his native city and was one of its 
progressive and public spirited citizens. His fraternal relations 
included his membership in the Virginia organization of the 
veterans of the Spanish-American War, and he was one of the 
loyal and influential members of the Norfolk Chamber of 
Commerce. 

On the 13th of June, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Bluford and Miss Annie Lee Fowler, who was born at 
Petersburg, this state, but who was educated in the schools of 
Norfolk. Mrs. Bluford is a daughter of Thomas Henry and 
Elizabeth V. (Bolsam) Fowler, the former of whom was born 
in Maryland and the latter of whom was born and reared in 
Norfolk, Virginia, the Bolsam family having been founded in 
Norfolk County prior to the War of the Revolution and having 
given patriot soldiers to the Continental Line in that great 
struggle for national independence. Thomas Henry Fowler gave 
loyal service to the Confederacy in the Civil war period, and 
for a time was in a hospital at Petersburg. He was active as a 
representative of the drug business for some time after the close 
of the war and later was an executive with the Old Dominion 
Steamship Company, with headquarters at Norfolk, in which 
city he and his wife continued to reside until their death. Mrs. 
Bluford is the gracious and popular chatelaine of one of the 
attractive and hospitable homes of Norfolk, where she resides 
at 323 West Fourteenth Street. Mr. Bluford is survived also 
by three children, the eldest of whom is Vernon, who is his 
successor in business as president of the Crocker-Bluford Cor- 
poration. Vernon Bluford received the advantages of the Nor- 
folk public schools and also those of a business college. He is 
one of the popular and progressive business men of his native 
city, his Masonic affiliations include his membership in the local 
Commandery of Knights Templar and also the Mystic Shrine, 



VIRGINIA 271 

and he is a member also of the Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks and the Fraternal Order of Eagles. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Lillian Ellis, was born and reared in Mary- 
land, and their one child is a daughter, Jean Ellis. Horace, 
Jr., the second son, is likewise a representative business man 
of Norfolk, and he is a member of the local lodge of Elks. He 
married Miss Capitola M. Prince, and they have five children: 
Marguerite, Doris K., Gloria Lee, Barbara A. and Frances Eliza- 
beth. Nellie Virginia, the only daughter, is the wife of Robert 
M. Boyd, who is president of the Twin City Tobacco Company, 
with his residence and executive headquarters in Norfolk, where 
he has served two terms as city treasurer. Mr. and Mrs. Boyd 
have two children, Robert M., Jr., and Patricia Lee. Mr. Boyd 
is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, including the Ancient 
Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. 

J. Green Carter has become one of the influential and pro- 
gressive representatives of the real estate and insurance bus- 
iness in the county in which he was born and reared, and at the 
county seat of which, the thriving city of Warrenton, he main- 
tains his residence and business headquarters. 

The birth of Mr. Carter occurred at Casanova, Fauquier 
County, Virginia, February 11, 1876, and he is a son of Cassius 
and Frances (Scott) Carter, the former of whom was born in 
Prince William County and the latter in Culpeper County, this 
state. When the Civil war was precipitated on a divided nation 
Cassius Carter loyally cast in his lot with the Confederacy, and 
his service in that conflict was with a fine black-horse company 
of cavalry that was recruited at Warrenton. He took part in 
the vai'ious engagements in which his command was involved 
and made a record of gallant and faithful service. After the 
close of the war he engaged in farm enterprise in Fauquier 
County, and he continued to give his supervision to his well 
improved farm estate near Casanova during the remainder of 
his life, his death having occurred December 2.5, 1914, and his 
wife having passed to the life eternal October 10, 1893. Cassius 
Carter was one of the substantial and honored citizens of 
Fauquier County, was a stalwart supporter of the cause of the 
Democratic party, was affiliated with the United Confederate 
Veterans, and he held the faith of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church. Both were representatives of sterling families that 
were early founded in Virginia. 

The public schools of Fauquier County were the medium 
through which J. Green Carter acquired his earlier education, 
and this discipline was supplemented by his course in the Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, where he studied civil 
engineering and became skilled in its various phases. This pro- 
fession he followed a number of years, during a portion of which 
he was in government service, and in the period of 1910-1.5 he 
was assistant manager of the Fellsmere Farms Company at 
Fellsmere, Florida, in which locality the corporation controlled 
a large and valuable landed property. During the period of 
the nation's participation in the World war Mr. Carter did his 
part in patriotic service, as he was retained as supervisor of 
the Bartlett-Hayward munition plant at Baltimore, Maryland. 
Since 1918 he has been successfully established in the real e.state 
business at Warrenton, and he has handled both city and farm 
properties in such degree and such manner as to make his opera- 
tions count much in furtherance of civic and material progress 



272 VIRGINIA 

in his native county. In connection with his real estate business 
he maintains a well ordered insurance department. 

The political allegiance of Mr. Carter is given loyally to 
the Democratic party, he is a communicant of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, and in his home city he has membership in the 
Chamber of Commerce, the Rotary Club and the Fauquier Club, 
besides being a popular and appreciative member of the War- 
renton Country Club. Mr. Carter still permits his name to 
appear on the roster of eligible bachelors in his native county, 
where his circle of friends is limited only by that of his 
acquaintances. 

James Louis Early graduated from medical college in 1901 
and has had a progressive record in the work of his profession, 
with a steadily increasing range of responsibilities and profes- 
sional honors. For many years he practiced at Saltville, but is 
now one of the leading men of his profession at Radford. 

Doctor Early was born at Woodlawn in Carroll County, Vir- 
ginia, September 14, 1876. His people have been in Southwest 
Virginia for a number of generations. His grandfather, 
James W. Early, was born in Wythe County in 1806, and for 
many years followed farming in Carroll County, where he died 
in 1889. The father of Doctor Early was William Kenny Early, 
who was born in Carroll County in 1847 and at the age of six- 
teen entered the Confederate army, serving with the cavalry 
until the end of the war. After the war he graduated from 
Roanoke College, was a farmer in Carroll County until 1908, 
and then moved to Galax, where he became a lumber manufac- 
turer. Both he and his wife are now deceased. His wife, 
Mary Louise Belo, was born at Salem, Virginia, in 1853. Dr. 
James L. Early had a brother, George B., who for many years 
was in the service of the Newport News Ship Building & Dry 
Dock Company and another brother, Charles William, is a grad- 
uate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis and 
was a commander in the navy during the World war. Harry 
Edward Early is an electrical engineer. 

James Louis Early was educated in private and public schools 
in Carroll County, graduated from the Woodlawn Normal Insti- 
tute in 1895, and in 1901 graduated from the University College 
of Medicine at Richmond. For several years he practiced at 
Woodlawn and Galax, and for a time was surgeon for the Caro- 
lina, Clinchfield & Ohio Railroad while it was in course of con- 
struction. Doctor Early in 1905 located at Saltville, where in 
addition to a general practice acted as surgeon and physician to 
the Norfolk & Western Railroad and several industrial organiza- 
tions. In October, 1926, Doctor Early moved to Radford, and 
has a fine suite of offices in the Farmers & Merchants Bank 
building. For a number of years, up to January, 1929, he was 
a director in the Mountain Trust Bank of Roanoke. He is a 
director of the Peoples State Bank of Radford. 

Doctor Early is a member of the Southwest Virginia, the 
Southern and American Medical Associations, the Medical So- 
ciety of Virginia and the Association of Norfolk & Western 
Railway Surgeons. During the World war he was chairman of 
the Examining Board of Smyth and Grayson counties. He is a 
director of the Kiwanis Club of Radford, a Royal Arch and 
Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, having filled a number of 
offices in Masonic bodies, and is also affiliated with the Indepen- 



VIRGINIA 273 

dent Order of Odd Fellows and B. P. 0. Elks. He is a member 
of the Presbyterian Church. 

Doctor Early married, June 29, 1910, Miss Melita Rorer Wil- 
son, daughter of Dr. William A. and Mary (Miller) Wilson, of 
Radford. Mrs. Early finished her education in the State 
Teachers College at Farmville. 

George Franklin Simpson, M. D., D. D. S. In the case of 
Dr. George Franklin Simpson, of Purcellville, is shown the 
effects of determination, hard work and aspiring ambition, for 
he worked his way through college and later on attended night 
classes while practicing dentistry during the daytime, for he 
is a graduate dental surgeon as well as a physician and surgeon. 
The fact that he was without money or influence did not dis- 
courage him, rather it braced him and enabled him to overcome 
obstacles and achieve success where one less persistent might 
have failed. This hard and intensive training has brought out 
admirable characteristics, broadened his viewpoint and made 
him a most desirable citizen, and one always willing to assume 
civic responsibilities. 

Doctor Simpson was born at Woodgrove, Loudoun County, 
Virginia, June 19, 1869, a son of John Thomas and Rose Anna 
Agnes (Allder) Simpson, natives of the same county as their 
son. During the war between the states John Thomas Simpson 
fought in the Twelfth Virginia Cavalry under the command of 
General Ashby. At one time he served as a member of the 
Charleston, West Virginia, Militia. After the close of hostilities 
he settled down to farming in Loudoun County, where he died 
on his ninetieth birthday. The mother and wife died at the 
age of eighty-three years, February 6, 1912. 

Doctor Simpson was reared in Loudoun County and went 
to school held in a one-room schoolhouse. However, during that 
period he had been able, at different times, to get a little school- 
ing in the public schools of Washington City, and was also under 
a private tutor. Beginning his studies for a professional career, 
he took dentistry and medicine, and was graduated in the former 
June 6, 1900, and was licensed to practice. In August, 1901, he 
was graduated in medicine, his courses having been taken in 
the National University, Washington. He was president of his 
graduating class. He was engaged in the practice of dentistry 
in Washington for a year and taught dentistry during 1901, 
1902 and 1903 in his alma mater and had charge of the dental 
infirmary of that institution. Until 1908 he was £ngaged in 
the practice of both dentistry and medicine in Washington, but 
in the latter year came to Loudoun County, first locating in 
Hillsboro, but coming to Purcellville January 26, 1916, and here 
he has built up a very large and valuable medical practice. 

WTiile a resident of Washington, Doctor Simpson married 
Miss Maude Evelyn Garner, of Washington, a daughter of 
George Thomas and Mary C. (Claggett) Garner, natives of Vir- 
ginia and Maryland, respectively. For a good many years Mr. 
Garner was in the Government employ, but is now deceased. 
He is survived by Mrs. Garner, a lady seventy-nine years old, 
and a resident of Norwood, Massachusetts. Doctor and Mrs. 
Simpson have no children. 

Doctor Simpson has served on the Town Council of Purcell- 
ville, as he did on that of Hillsboro. He is an e.x-president of 
the Purcellville Chamber of Commerce, having held the office 
for two successive terms. He is a director of the Loudoun 



274 VIRGINIA 

Light & Power Company and vice president of Loudoun Hos- 
pital. During the World war he was chairman of the Medical 
Advisory Board of Loudoun County. In Masonry he is a past 
master and a past district deputy grand master of the Blue 
Lodge ; belongs to Leesburg Chapter No. 55, R. A. M. ; Pied- 
mont Commandery, K. T., of Plains, Virginia ; and Acca Temple, 
A. A. 0. N. M. S., and the Shrine Club, of Alexandria, Virginia. 
He is a charter member of the Loudoun County Golf and Coun- 
ti\v Club, and belongs to the Virginia State Medical Association, 
the District of Columbia Medical Association, the Northern Vir- 
ginia and Maryland Medical Society, the Loudoun County Med- 
ical Society, and the American Medical Association. He is local 
surgeon for the Washington & Old Dominion Raih'oad. In 
politics he is a Democrat. A very zealous Methodist, he is chair- 
man of the building committee now constructing the new church 
edifice, and is a steward of the church. Lee Camp, Sons of 
Confederate Veterans, at Leesburg, holds his membership, he 
being eligible because of his father's military service in behalf 
of the Confederacy. The beautiful Simpson residence and office, 
one of the finest in Purcellville, was built by Doctor Simpson 
in 1915, and here he and his wife welcome their many friends 
on all occasions. 

Charles Adams Hubbard, of Denbigh, is commissioner of 
revenue of Warwick County, and has performed the duties of 
that responsible position for a period of twenty years. 

He was born at Yorktown, Virginia, January 20, 1874, son of 
Judge James Filmer and Emily C. (Adams) Hubbard. His 
mother was born in Massachusetts, while his father was a native 
of James City County, Virginia, and was an able and successful 
lawyer. For thirty-five years he served in the office of common- 
wealth's attorney of York County, and just prior to his death 
had been appointed circuit judge, dying before taking office. 
His death came in December, 1903, at the age of sixty-four. He 
had been a lieutenant in the Confederate army during his youth, 
was in the cavalry and served during the entire conflict. The 
wife of Judge Hubbard died in 1882. 

Charles A. Hubbard was reared and educated at Yorktown, 
attended Lee Hall and William and Mary College at Williams- 
burg. After his college training he managed his father's farm 
until 1902, in which year he took employment with S. R. Curtis, 
the county treasurer, a railway contractor, and was identified 
with that line of business until 1908, when he accepted appoint- 
ment as commissioner of revenue, the office in which he has 
served continuously. He has made a splendid record in handling 
the finances of Warwick County. 

Mr. Hubbard married, April 23, 1909, Miss Georgia Eller 
Garrow, daughter of James Toomer and Cornelia Nelson 
(Wright) Garrow, the former a native of Warwick County and 
the latter of Surry County. Her grandfather, John Toomer 
Garro\y, was at one time sheriff and a justice of the peace of 
Warwick County, and died as a result of his service in the Civil 
war. Mrs. Hubbard's father served as deputy sheriff and for 
many years was a merchant in Denbigh, being at the time of his 
death, February 3, 1929, the oldest business man of the com- 
munity, dying at the age of eighty years. Mrs. Hubbard's 
mother died in November, 1922, at the age of sixty-three. 

Mr. Hubbard is affiliated with the B. P. 0. Elks. He has 
been a practiced rider since a small child, and for forty or forty- 



VIRGINIA 275 

five years has kept fox hounds and has indulged In the sport 
of fox hunting. He Iinows and is known by all the followers 
of that sport in Eastern Virginia. The Hubbards are active in 
the Methodist Church, Mrs. Hubbard teaching an intermediate 
class in the Sunday School. She is a member of the United 
Daughters of the Confederacy and is secretary of the local 
chapter, Comte de Grasse. of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution, and is also a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the 
Veterans of Foreign Wars. Mr. Hubbard's father was a leading 
Mason. Mrs. Hubbard was a teacher for several years before 
her marriage. Recently they have completed one of the fine 
homes in Denbigh. 

Jeremy Pate Whitt is a prominent educator whose work 
for a number of years has been familiarly associated with the 
Radford State Teachers College and through that institution a 
large body of active school workers have learned to appreciate 
his ability and his fine personal character. 

He was born near East Radford, September 2-5, 1879, son 
of Hezekiah and Ellen (Cecil) Whitt. His great-grandfather 
was one of the early settlers of Montgomery County. His grand- 
father was also named Hezekiah Whitt. His father was born 
and reared in the Meadow Creek settlement near East Radford, 
attended private schools, was a Confederate soldier, and after 
the war followed farming and stock raising until his death. He 
owned and operated one of the first flour and corn mills in his 
community, known as Whitt's Mill. He was eighty-two years 
of age when he died in 1913, and is buried in the old Laurel Hill 
Church Cemetery. His wife, Ellen Cecil, was born and reared 
in Pulaski County, and was one of the first students of Martha 
Washington College at Abingdon. Her father, J. G. Cecil, had 
much to do with early educational afi'airs in Pulaski County, 
serving as the first county superintendent of schools, and w'as 
one of the founders of Emory and Henry College. He was in the 
Virginia Legislature during the Civil war. The mother of 
Jeremy P. Whitt taught school before her marriage. She was 
a member of the Christian Church. Her death occurred March 
26, 1906. Both of these parents had been married previously. 
The first wife of Hezekiah Whitt was Miss Mollie Harman, of 
Montgomery County, and the two children of that marriage were 
Walter Whitt, of Lockney, Texas, and Minnie, wife of A. H. 
Finks, of Roanoke, Virginia. Professor Whitt's mother first 
married Alford Goodykoontz, of Floyd County, Virginia, and 
her one son of that marriage, John, died in 1897. 

Jeremy Pate Whitt was the only child of his parents' second 
marriage. He attended public schools in Montgomery and 
Pulaski counties, and in 1902 was graduated with the degrees 
A. B. and A. M. from Milligan College of Tennessee. For twenty 
years he taught school in North Carolina. Tennessee, Kentucky, 
Florida and Virginia, being superintendent of the Radford city 
.schools from 1911 until 1920. During 1920-21 he spent a year 
in post-graduate study in the Peabody Normal College at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, and then came to the Radford State Teachers 
College as registrar and director of the training school of the 
depai'tment of education. 

Mr. Whitt is a member of the Pi Gamma Mu fraternity, is 
a Democrat, and an elder in the Christian Church, a teacher in 
the Sunday School and chairman of the Official Board of the 
church. He married at Milligan College, Tennessee, March 26, 

13— VOL. 3 



276 VIRGINIA 

1904, Miss Jaynie Clyde Shumate, of Danville, Kentucky. She 
was educated in private schools in Kentucky, graduated from 
girls' college in that state, and afterwards attended the Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. She taught in public schools, was in- 
structor in English in Sullins College in Bristol, Virginia, and 
in Milligan College. Tennessee, and from 191] to 1920 was prin- 
cipal of the Radford High School and instructor in English. For 
several years she has taught in the summer schools of the Rad- 
ford State Teachers College. Mrs. Whitt is active in church, 
and has been secretary and president of the Radford Woman's 
Club. She is a member of the United Daughters of the Con- 
federacy, an associate member of the American Association of 
University Women, and is eligible to membership in the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution. Her parents were Francis 
Marion and Elizabeth (Higginbotham) Shumate, of Danville, 
Kentucky. He and his wife after retiring moved to California, 
and he now resides at Glendale, where his wife died in 1924. 

Wilson R. Bowers, head of the department of mathematics 
in the Radford State Teachers College, had as the background 
of his experience before coming to the college many years of 
work as a teacher in country and town schools over Southwest- 
ern Virginia. 

Mr. Bowers was born near Galax, in Carroll County, Virginia, 
March 3, 187F>. son of William and Sarah (Gallimore) Bowers. 
He is a grandson of William Bowers and a great-grandson of 
George Bowers, who came from Germany and was one of the 
early settlers in Carroll County, Virginia. William Bowers, his 
father, was born and reared in Carroll County, attended private 
schools and at the age of sixteen was drafted for service in the 
Civil war, but the war closed before he was called to active duty. 
He spent his active career as a farmer and stock raiser and died 
May 10, 1917, being buried in the family cemetery near Galax. 
His widow, who survives him at the age of seventy-four, has 
always been a regular member of the Christian Church. She 
was born and reared near Austinville, Virginia, and attended 
private schools. She lives with a daughter at Hopewell, Vir- 
ginia. 

Wilson R. Bowers was the oldest in a family of eleven chil- 
dren. He attended public schools and private schools in Carroll 
County, the Stuart Normal School and Woodlawn Institute, and 
in 1900 graduated with the degrees Bachelor of Science and later 
Bachelor of Arts from Milligan College of Tennessee. Lynch- 
burg College gave him the honorary degree Master of Arts. For 
three summers he did graduate work at the University of Vir- 
ginia and for one and a quarter years at Columbia University 
of New York, where he won his Master of Arts degree in 1919. 
He has since done one and a quarter years work toward his 
Ph. D. degree. Mr. Bowers for eighteen years was engaged 
in grade and high school work in Virginia, all except the first 
three years as principal of high school. For several years he 
was head of the schools at Rural Retreat, and while there was 
instrumental in securing the erection of a handsome new high 
school building. Mr. Bowers in 1919 came with the Radford 
State Teachers College as head of the department of mathema- 
tics. He owns his home in Radford, other real estate and a farm 
in Carroll County. 

He is affiliated with Virginia May Lodge No. 38, A. F. and A. 
M., and the Knights of Pythias and Knights of the Mystic Chain, 




(^l^i^j^--ei^ . /J ' W^ 



VIRGINIA 277 

is a member of the Kiwanis Club, Chamber of Commerce and 
the Southwestern Virginia, incorporated. He is independent 
politically and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. Since 1921 he has been superintendent of the Grove 
Avenue Sunday School, Radford. 

He married at Rural Retreat Miss Nannie Brown Eiffert, 
who attended public school there and the Hawkins Institute 
and Milligan College. She was a teacher of music in the Rural 
Retreat High School for several years before and after her mar- 
riage, and she took an active part in choir work at East Rad- 
ford. She is a daughter of Henry A. and Susan (Brown) Eif- 
fert. Her father for many years was a farmer and stock raiser 
at Rural Retreat and then engaged in business as a merchant 
there. After retiring he moved to Cleveland, Tennessee, where 
he died in 1927 and where his widow lives with her youngest 
daughter, Mrs. Max Fouts. Mr. and Mrs. Bowers have two chil- 
dren, Eleanor Randolph and Warren Brown Bowers, the former 
a member of the class of 1929 and the latter in his first year in 
the Radford High School. Mr. Bowers is author of the following 
pamphlets and articles: America's Discontent, A Factor in Her 
Development ; Martin Luther's Contribution to Modern Educa- 
tion ; School Hygiene ; Principles and Methods in Teaching Pri- 
mary Arithmetic ; The Relationship of the Practical and the Cul- 
tural in Modern Education. He is now beginning to write a 
book on the "Teaching of Elementary Mathematics." 

Hon. Eppa Sherman Cox, county treasurer of Fauquier 
County, has a long and honorable career behind him in the 
service of his county, and has built up a reputation second to 
none for faithful performance of duty and strict adherence to 
high ideals of good citizenship. He was born near Elk Run, 
Fauquier County, Virginia, January 6, 1869, a son of James W. 
and Alvernon T. (Lake) Cox, natives of Virginia. During the 
war between the states James W. Cox served as a clerk in the 
commissary department at Richmond, and after the war was 
over he returned to Fauquier County and for thirty years was 
a teacher of the county and at the same time he was engaged 
in farming. His death occurred when he was fifty-seven years 
old, in 1889, but he was survived by the mother until 1902. 
Through his mother Treasurer Cox belongs to the Lake Clan, 
which has a membership of 300 in the difi'erent states of the 
Union, all of whom trace back to three brothers by the name of 
Lake who came to the American colonies prior to the Revolu- 
tion, in this hemisphere, and in the Old World to forebears for 
1,000 years. The clan holds annual meetini^s, and it is a source 
of interest and pleasure to those belonging to it to have the 
privilege of keeping in touch with those of common family ties 
and connections. The pride of race is something that lies very 
close to the heart of everyone, and when the family record is 
as honorable as that of the Lakes, then those allied to it ought 
to give every assistance in keeping it up to the high standards 
already reared, and this Treasurer Cox is doing. 

Reared and educated in Fauquier County, Eppa S. Cox had 
his father for his teacher during the greater portion of his 
school days. Subsequently he took a correspondence school busi- 
ness trainino: course, but he continued on the farm with his 
parents until he was thirty-three years old, after which he 
farmed on his own account for two years. In 1899 he was 
elected commissioner of revenue for the Cedar Run District, and 



278 VIRGINIA 

held that office for twelve years, at the termination of that period 
receiving appointment as deputy county treasurer, and holding 
the office from 1911 to 1915. In 1923 he v^^as elected county 
treasurer and reelected to the same office in 1927, without oppo- 
sition, and is still the incumbent of the office. 

On September 25, 1901, Mr. Cox married Miss Carrie May 
Lee, a daughter of James E. and Sarah Virginia (Lee) Lee, 
natives of Bedford County, Virginia, and Missouri, respectively. 
Mr. Lee was a Confederate veteran, and a distant relative of 
Gen. Robert E. Lee, and served with the rank of sergeant. Re- 
turning home after the close of the war, he was engaged in 
farming in Bedford County the remainder of his life, and died 
there in 1899. Mrs. Lee survived him until 1901, when she, 
too, passed away. Mr. and Mrs. Cox have had four children 
born to them : Virginia Alvernon, who was born January 15, 
1903, is a trained nurse, and is now superintendent of a hospital 
at Sheridan, Wyoming; Gilbert Lee, who was born March 2, 
1906, is a graduate of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute, class 
of 1928 ; James Edwin, who was born October 5, 1908, is a 
student of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute ; and Ida Louise, 
who was born December 25, 1912, is a student of Calverton 
High School. Mr. Cox belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, of which he has been a member for thirty years, 
and to Black Horse Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans. His 
political views make him a Democrat, and he is a strong sup- 
porter of his party's principles. For years a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, he is a trustee of the church 
at present, and also superintendent of the Sunday school. While 
his office is in Warrenton, he continues to reside at Calverton, 
and he is held in the highest esteem by the people of both com- 
munities and throughout Fauquier County. The welfare of the 
county is dear to him and he has worked hard both, as a public 
official and private citizen to do everything within his power to 
keep things abreast of the times, and it would be difficult to find 
anyone more universally respected or more highly honored. 

Adam Monroe Turner, whose home is at Broadway, Rock- 
ingham County, was born on the top of the Shenandoah Moun- 
tains in the same county March 2, 1859. His career has been 
made up of commendable industry and honorable relations with 
his fellowmen. 

He is a descendant of James Turner who came from Sweden 
and settled at Greencastle, Pennsylvania, about 1790. He was 
a very successful farmer, and while never in politics he wielded 
an important influence in the promotion of schools and churches. 
He was of the Dunkard faith. In 1803 he removed to Rocking- 
ham County, Virginia, settling about two miles above Brock's 
Gap on a little stream known as Lambs Run, a tributary of the 
north branch of the Shenandoah. He married a Fronkfodder, 
and among their children were John Turner, born in 1798, 
Jacob, born in 1800; Andrew, born in 1803; Joseph and James 
and also four daughters. Of the sons John married a Pear, 
Jacob, a Cherryholes, Andrew, a Zetty, Joseph, a Bible. 

James Turner, who was born on Lambs Run after his par- 
ents settled in Rockingham County, grew up with a farm train- 
ing and a fair education so that he qualified for teaching school. 
He was a member of the Christian Church, a Republican and in 
1861 served with the Virginia Militia. He married Mary Fulk, 
a daughter of John G. Fulk and a descendant of Mathew Fulk, 



VIRGINIA 279 

who was of Scotch-Irish descent and came to America about 
1735. He was with Colonel Lewis in an expedition to treat with 
the Indians, and he married an Indian woman. Not long after- 
ward the Indians were moved from Rockingham County and 
he also went, but left a large family of boys and some girls, 
who lived or settled about two miles west of Broadway in Rock- 
ingham County, at a place called Trissels Church. John Fulk, 
a son of Mathew Fulk, was born in 1760 and married a Miss 
Bible. He moved to Brock's Gap in 1785. One other member of 
the family was Adam Fulk, who moved to Ohio when it was still 
the Northwest Territory, and Adams County in the southern 
part of the state of Ohio was named for him, and he became 
prominent in county affairs. Another member of the family, 
Jacob Fulk, was an early settler near Fort Wayne, Indiana, and 
George Fulk figured in the early settlement of the South Branch 
Valley of West Virginia. John Fulk had a son, Daniel Fulk, who 
was the father of John G. Fulk and grandfather of Mary (Fulk) 
Turner. 

Another descendant of Mathew Fulk is Charles R. Fawley 
the present sheriff of Rockingham County. The sheriff's father, 
George W. Fawley, married Sarah J. Fulk, a daughter of John 
G. Fulk. George W. Fawley was a school teacher and for many 
years a justice of the peace, and in 1860 as a Union man voted 
for Douglas of Illinois and died a Democrat. He was a son of 
Jacon Fawley, who married a Minnick and settled at Brock's 
Gap about 1800 from Loudoun County, having come originally 
from Pennsylvania. 

Adam Monroe Turner, a son of Adam Monroe Turner, a son 
of James and Mary (Fulk) Turner, derived his education from 
the common schools and as a young man took up farming and 
lumbering. He owns about 800 acres of farming land, mostly 
in Rockingham and Shenandoah counties, besides several thous- 
and acres of mountain land. 

Mr. Turner in his public relations with the community has 
always been guided by a desire to better the conditions of the 
people, providing better schools, churches and good roads. One 
of his outstanding services was his work in bringing about the 
construction of the Brock Gap State Highway for the purpose 
of developing the northwestern section of Rockingham County, 
the greater part of which lies within Brock's Gap. He devised 
a plan by which this road could be built and paid for by the 
traffic, and this was the plan followed in its construction. In 
promoting this plan Mr. Turner was under the handicap of being 
a Republican, while the legislative board of supervi.sers of the 
county and district were all Democratic and the officials them- 
selves opposed to the project. In spite of all this Mr. Turner 
persisted until his ideas were adopted and the plan carried out, 
and the result has more than justified all his expectations, the 
highway having paid for itself and given revenue to the rest 
of the county. The road is about seventeen miles long and has 
since been taken over by the state as a part of the national sys- 
tem of highways leading into West Virginia. It was Mr. Turn- 
er's motion that put the Valley Pike in the hands of the state 
and he cast the first vote to that end. 

Mr. Turner taught seven terms under the free school system, 
and of the eleven children in his father's family eight became 
school teachers. In after years he built a house which he turned 
over to the county for a public school, and this has been the 



280 VIRGINIA 

means of giving a large number of men and women the funda- 
mentals of an education. 

Mr. Turner since early boyhood has been an enthusiastic 
sportsman. He has enjoyed hunting as a pastime for over half 
a century, and during that time has killed 154 bears besides 
many deer and other wild animals and wild fowl. The deer 
became extinct about 1900, and about six years ago he restocked 
a part of the mountain with deer and these are now accumulat- 
ing fast. In politics Mr. Turner has always been a Republican 
in national affairs, and also in the state except once when he 
supported and helped nominate Governor Byrd. He votes a 
mixed ticket in the county. He was twice elected to the Board 
of Supervisors, serving eight years, was twice appointed land 
assessor, holding that office until the law was changed, and only 
by a small majority was defeated for the House of Delegates, 
carrying the county but losing the city of Harrisonburg. Mr. 
Turner, his friends declare, is a thorough practical Christian, 
though not a member of any denomination. He has helped build 
every church in the western part of his district, and has given 
his time and means generously in behalf of other worthy institu- 
tions and charities. 

He married, December 25, 1879, at Fulks Run in Rocking- 
ham County, Miss Mary Catherine Ritchie. Her father, Jona- 
than Ritchie, was a fai-mer and served in the Confederate army 
from 1861 to 1865. This branch of the family is distantly re- 
lated to that of Governor Ritchie of Maryland. Her mother was 
a Sprinkle, descended from Peter Sprinkle, a soldier in the War 
of 1812, and a niece of John C. Sprinkle, a Confederate officer. 
Mr. and Mrs. Turner are the parents of two daughters. Hallie 
Hester, born September 27, 1881, near Fulks Run in the Brock's 
Gap community, is well educated, taught in public schools and 
is now the wife of Lahone Clutteur, a farmer living near Broad- 
way. Alice Virginia Dare, the second daughter, was born on 
Shenandoah Mountain in December, 1883, was educated in the 
common schools and is the wife of John W. Fulk, a farmer near 
Singers Glen in Rockingham County. 

ErvvIN Grover Hall, physician and surgeon, since locating 
at East Radford, has specialized in eye, ear, nose and throat, and 
is one of the outstanding specialists in that field in Southwest 
Virginia. 

He was born at Willis in Floyd County, Virginia, December 
18, 1886, son of Isaac Thomas and Leah (Young) Hall. His 
father was born and reared in the same locality, attended private 
schools, and spent his life as a farmer. He died in 1912 and is 
buried in Rockingham County. His wife, Leah Young, was born 
and reared in Floyd County, attended private schools, and now 
lives with her son, Doctor Hall, at Radford. She is an earnest 
member of the Baptist Church. Of the ten children born to the 
parents of Doctor Hall six died in childhood from diphtheria. 
Another, William, died at East Radford at the age of twenty- 
one, and Luther was drowned at East Radford when eleven 
years old. The two surviving children are : Addie, wife of A. H. 
Jennings, of East Radford ; and Doctor Erwin. 

Erwin Grover Hall attended public schools at East Radford, 
spent one year in the University of Richmond, and this was 
followed by the full four years course in the University College 
of Medicine at Richmond. He was graduated in 1911 and for 
ten years conducted a general practice in medicine and surgery 



VIRGINIA 281 

in Rockingham County. On giving up his work there he went 
to Baltimore, and for a year devoted his time to post-graduate 
work with the Presbyterian Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat Hos- 
pital. With this special training and his years of general medi- 
cal practice he located at East Radford in 1922, and his office 
hours have been crowded with work in his special line. Doctor 
Hall is a member of the Medical Society of Virginia and the 
Southwest Virginia Medical Association. He was for a number 
of years a member of the Rotary Club, and is affiliated with 
Virginia May Lodge No. 38, A. F. and A. M. He is a Democrat 
and is on the Board of Deacons in the Baptist Church and 
teacher of a men's Bible class. 

He married at Eclipse, Virginia, September 23, 1911, Miss 
Clara Earle Harrison, of Nansemond County, where she was 
reared and educated. She is a member of the Baptist Church 
and the Woman's Club of Radford. Her parents were William 
Allen and Lelia (Sweeney) Harrison. Her father, who died in 
1914, was for many years engaged in the oyster industry at 
Eclipse. Her mother is a resident of Eclipse. Doctor and Mrs. 
Hall have three sons, Stewart Harrison, Robert Allen and E. G., 
Jr., all attending the public schools of East Radford. 

John Calvin Hopkins is associated with his brother, Robert 
S. Hopkins, as joint owners of the Hopkins Pharmacy at East 
Radford, and both brothers are graduate pharmacists, masters 
of that profession and very capable and energetic young busi- 
ness men. 

John C. Hopkins was born at Tazewell, Virginia, March 14, 
1890, son of 0. E. and Rebecca W. (Peery) Hopkins, and grand- 
son of John Calvin Hopkins, who spent many years of his life 
as a merchant at Tazewell. 0. E. Hopkins was born in Taze- 
well, attended public schools there, and for many years has 
been engaged in farming and stock raising. He and his wife 
live at Tazewell and are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. His wife, Rebecca Peery, was born at Taze- 
well Court House and is a graduate of the Martha Washing- 
ton College of Abingdon. Her parents were Albert and Sarah 
(Smith) Peery. Her father was a merchant at Tazewell and 
died about thii'ty years ago. Her mother is now eighty-six years 
of age. 0. E. Hopkins and wife had seven children : Alice, 
wife of M. Zeigler; Elizabeth, wife of A. S. Greybeal; Albert; 
John C. ; Robert S. ; Martha, wife of J. A. Stimson ; and Edward. 

John Calvin Hopkins attended public schools in Tazewell 
and took his degree in pharmacy at the Medical College of Vir- 
ginia in 1919. For the past ten years he has been associated 
with his brother in the drug business at East Radford, and the 
Hopkins Pharmacy there is a very popular trading place, and 
especially enjoys the confidence of the medical profession be- 
cause of the skill in pharmacy of both the proprietors. Mr. 
Hopkins is also a director of the Peoples Bank. He is affiliated 
with Virginia May Lodge No. 38, A. F. and A. M., is a mem- 
ber of the Rotary Club, and is serving on the local school board. 
He is a Democrat and a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, South. 

He married at Tazewell, February 21, 1912, Miss Stella Ver- 
million, of Tazewell, who finished her education in Martha Wash- 
ington College at Abingdon. For a number of years she has 
been a teacher of art and holds a position as art instructor in 
the Radford State Teachers College. She is a Methodist, a mem- 



282 VIRGINIA 

ber of the Music and Art Clubs, and is very popular in the 
college community. Her parents were W. I. and Elizabeth 
(Williams) Vermillion, residents of Tazewell. Her father has 
carried on an extensive business as a road and stone contractor. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hopkins have one daughter, Elizabeth, who gradu- 
ated in 1929 from the Radford High School. 

Robert S. Hopkins was born at Tazewell October 27, 1892, 
was educated in public schools and Randolph-Macon College, and 
graduated from the School of Pharmacy of the Medical College 
of Virginia at Richmond in 1917. He has a war record, having 
enlisted in January, 1918, in the United States Marine Corps. 
He was trained at Paris Island, South Carolina, and at Quantico, 
Virginia, and in April, 1918, went overseas with the Third Re- 
placement Battalion, Second Division, and joined the Marine 
Headquarters in France. In September, 1918, he was invalided 
home, was honorably discharged on January 14, 1919, and soon 
afterwards removed to Radford, and in April joined his brother 
in the drug business. 

Robert S. Hopkins is affiliated with Virginia May Lodge No. 
38, A. F. and A. M., Peyton Coles Chapter No. 27, Royal Arch 
Masons, Bayard Commandery No. 15. Knights Templar at Roan- 
oke, and Kazim Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Roanoke. He 
is a member of Harvey Howe Post No. 30 of the American 
Legion, the Kiwanis Club, is a Democrat and a Baptist. 

He married at Radford, October 24, 1919, Miss Agnes John- 
son, daughter of Albert Sidney Johnson, and member of a very 
prominent family in this section of the state. Mrs. Hopkins 
attended high school at Radford and is a graduate of the State 
Teachers College, after which she taught school for several 
years before her marriage. She is a Baptist and a member of 
the United Daughters of the Confederacy and Daughters of the 
American Revolution. 

Charles H. Stimpson throughout his residence in Virginia 
was identified with some phase of the maritime interests center- 
ing around Norfolk and Portsmouth. He lived all his life close 
to and in touch with the affairs of the sea. 

He was born at Bath, Maine, in 1831, and died at Berkeley, 
Norfolk, in 1885. The Stimpsons were of English ancestry. 
His mother was a Lamont, of French Huguenot extraction. 
Charles H. Stimpson attended school at Bath, Maine, and as a 
young man came to Virginia, working in ship yards, but for the 
greater part of his active life was associated with Captain Baker 
in the business known as the Baker Ship Salvage & Wrecking 
Company, one of the largest organizations of its kind on the 
Virginia coast. 

Mr. Stimpson married, December 19, 1877, Ann J. Simpson, 
of Toronto, Canada, daughter of Samuel and Mary Simpson. 
The Simpsons were of Scotch-Irish ancestry, coming to Canada 
from Ireland. Her father was a pioneer lumberman in Canada, 
where the family settled about 1830. He did an extensive bus- 
iness in exporting lumber to the United Kingdom. Mrs. Stimp- 
son now resides at 309 Dinwiddle Street in Portsmouth. She 
is a member of the Episcopal Church and her husband was a 
Mason. She has two children, Harry L. and Miss Mary. Harry 
L. is mate of a steamship on the Pacific Ocean, and married a 
western girl. Miss Mary Stimpson has become well known in 
educational and social service work, is a member of the Virginia 
State Teachers Association, and is a graduate of Columbia Uni- 
versity of New York City. 



VIRGINIA 283 

Walter Gordon Trow, M. D., has been engaged in the suc- 
cessful practice of his profession at Warrenton, judicial center 
of Fauquier County, since 1911, save for the interval of his 
service in the Medical Corps of the United States Army in the 
World war and the subsequent period of his recuperation from 
the effects of being gassed while with his command at the front 
with his unit in France. 

Doctor Trow was born in the City of Washington, D. C, 
December 16, 1879, and is a son of Gordon Winthrop Trow and 
Fidelia Harriet (Bundy) Trow, who were born in the State of 
Vermont, of Colonial American ancestry. For a long term of 
years Gordon W. Trow was in Government service in the 
national capital, and there his death occurred in 1903, his 
venerable widow being now a loved member of the family circle 
of her son. Dr. Walter G., of this review. 

After his graduation from the Eastern High School in Wash- 
ington, D. C, Doctor Trow soon initiated his preparation for 
the exacting profession of his choice, and in 1905 he was gradu- 
ated from the medical college of George Washington University. 
After thus receiving his degree of Doctor of Medicine he forti- 
fied himself further by devoting much of the ensuing year to 
post-graduate work at the Hahnemann Hospital in the City of 
Philadelphia. Thereafter he was engaged in practice in his 
native city one year, and during the ensuing four years the 
stage of his professional activities was at Hallwood, Accomac 
County, Virginia. He then, in 1911, removed to Warrenton, 
where he has since continued in active and successful general 
practice save for the period of his World war service, and where 
he has been retained since 1916 as local surgeon for the Southern 
Railway. When in the spring of 1917 the nation became in- 
volved in the World war. Doctor Trow soon volunteered for 
service in the Medical Corps of the United States Army, gained 
therein the rank of first lieutenant, later was promoted to cap- 
tain and finally was advanced to the rank of major. He was 
with his unit in overseas service from April, 1918, until the 
following December, and in the meanwhile the armistice had 
brought the great conflict to a close. He suffered a severe gas 
attack while at the front, and after his return home he went 
to Camp Lee and then received treatment at the Walter Reed 
Hospital, Washington, D. C, where he was confined until July, 
1919. He has not as yet recovered fully from the effects of the 
gas attack, and February 9, 1929, he was retired under the 
Emergency Officers Retirement Act with the rank of major. 

After measurably recuperating in a physical way and after 
receiving his honorable discharge. Doctor Trow resumed his 
professional ministrations at Warrenton, where he controls a 
large and representative practice and has standing as one of the 
representative physicians and surgeons of this section of the 
Old Dominion State. 

Doctor Trow has membership in the Northern Virginia 
Medical Society, the Virginia State Medical Society, the Vir- 
ginia, Maryland and District of Columbia Medical Societies, the 
American Medical Association, the Southern Railroad Surgeons 
Association, besides being an influential member of the Fauquier 
County Medical Society. He is affiliated with the American 
Legion, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Royal 
Arcanum, and in his home city is a member of the ChamlDer 
of Commerce and the Community League. He and his wife are 
members of the Presbyterian Church, and Mrs. Trow is eligible 



284 VIRGINIA 

for affiliation with the Daughters of the American Revolution 
and also the Colonial Dames. The Doctor has had neither time 
nor desire to enter the arena of practical politics, but he is a 
staunch advocate and supporter of the cause of the Democratic 
party. 

In November, 1910, Doctor Trow was united in marriage 
with Miss Elizabeth Edmonds Harper, who was born near Lees- 
burg, Virginia, and who is a daughter of Robert and Roberta 
(Parrott) Harper, the former of whom was born in Stafford 
County, and the latter of whom was born in Petersburg. For 
a long term of years Robert Harper was engaged in the dry 
goods business in Alexander, and thereafter he was long engaged 
in the same line of enterprise at Leesburg, Loudoun County. 
He finally retired to his farm in Loudoun County, and he died 
in May, 1908, at the age of eighty-three years. His widow 
attained to the same age, and her death occurred in February, 
1926. Mr. Harper served as a member of the Confederate Home 
Guard in the Civil war period, he was a lifelong member of 
the Presbyterian Church and in the same served many years 
as an elder, an office of which he was still the incumbent at the 
time of his death, besides which he had served a long period 
as Sunday school superintendent. He was twice married and 
became the father of fourteen children. Doctor and Mrs. Trow 
have five children: Walter Gordon, Jr., and Robert Harper 
(twins) , born September 26, 1911 ; Randolph Edmonds, born 
March 7, 1914; William Newi;on, born April 20, 1916; and 
Roberta Parrott, born May 13, 1922. At the time of the prepara- 
tion of this review Robert H. is a student in the military 
academy at Danville, Virginia (summer of 1929), and his twin 
brother, Walter G., Jr.. is a student in the Warrenton High 
School, as is also Randolph E. 

Ambrose Wilson, senior member of the firm Wilson 
Brothers, druggists at East Radford, was born in that Southwest 
Virginia community September 6, 1893. Both he and his brother 
are World war veterans, and Mr. Wilson has had a wide and 
diversified experience in business. 

The Wilsons have long been prominent in and around Staun- 
ton, Virginia, and they are of the same stock as that from which 
was descended the World war president, Woodrow Wilson. Mr. 
Wilson's grandfather was a pioneer circuit riding Presbyterian 
minister. John A. Wilson, father of Ambrose, was born near 
Staunton, attended public schools and spent many years in the 
service of the Norfolk & Western Railway Company. He was 
foreman at Radford, general foreman at Roanoke, then was 
made master mechanic of the Radford Division, and after his 
health failed so that he was unable to keep up with the heavy 
responsibilities of this position he was made foreman in the 
shops at Radford and held that position when he died, April 1, 
1910. He is buried in the Central Cemetery at East Radford. 
His vdfe, Mary Catherine Locke, was born and reared in Vir- 
ginia. Her parents, Frederick and Wilhelmina Locke, came 
from Darmstadt, Germany, living for a time at Baltimore, later 
at Fredericksburg, then near Staunton, and made their final 
home near Lynchburg and Radford. Mrs. Mary Catherine Wil- 
son attended school at Lynchburg. She is a member of the 
Episcopal Church. Of her twelve children the daughters Ethel 
and Sue are deceased; Frederick; Louise, wife of E. Demming 
Lucas, a Petersburg attorney; Robert L., of Radford, foreman 



VIRGINIA 285 

in the Norfolk & Western Railway shops, married Stella Ross, a 
descendant of the famous Betsy Ross ; Rev. John A., Jr., an 
Episcopal minister at Richland, Virginia, married Bess Gilles- 
pie ; Henry R., general foreman of the Norfolk & Western Shops 
at Shenandoah, married Bessie Lucas, of Radford ; Frank S., of 
Detroit, Michigan, married Margaret Fink, of Radford ; Louis L., 
district manager at Huntington, West Virginia, for the Reliance 
Life Insurance Company, married Lillian Dorsey, of Hurricane, 
Putnam County, West Virginia ; Ambrose ; Edward, with the 
Foster Sumner Corporation at Radford, married Addie Painter; 
and Hugo L. Wilson. Hugo L. Wilson is the junior member of 
the firm of Wilson Brothers. He was born in East Radford in 
1898, graduated from high school and was with the colors three 
years, going with the First Virginia Field Hospital Corps, which 
subsequently was made a part of the Twenty-ninth Division. He 
returned from overseas in July, 1919, and at that time became 
associated with his brother in business. He is a charter member 
of Harvey Howe Post of the American Legion and is a member 
of the Episcopal Church. 

Ambrose Wilson attended the grade and high schools at Rad- 
ford, leaving school to take work as a clerk with the Goodykrantz 
Drug Company. Later he was with Scott Brothers at Charles- 
ton, West Virginia, for two years with the Frederick Pharmacy 
at Huntington, a year and a half with the Dow Drug Company at 
Cincinnati, for two years with the Van Lear Drug Store in 
Roanoke, two years with the Pearisburg Pharmacy and a year 
and a half with the Gus Washington Drug Store at Logan, West 
Virginia, and a year with the Covington Pharmacy at Covington, 
Virginia. 

In June, 1916. he enlisted and was sent to the Mexican border 
at San Antonio, Texas. In March, 1917, he returned home, but 
was almost immediately recalled for service in the World war. 
He was in training at Camp McClellan, Alabama, until June, 
1918, when he sailed for overseas, landing at Cherbourg, France, 
as a member of the One Hundred and Fifteenth Field Hospital, 
Twenty-ninth Division. He was in the Haute Alsace Sector and 
in the Meuse Argonne campaigns and received his honorable dis- 
charge at Camp Meade, Maryland, June 19, 1919. 

It was shortly after his return from overseas that he and 
his brother established the firm of Wilson Brothers in East Rad- 
ford. Both of them are very competent business men, and have 
given the town a very up-to-date establishment, affording a 
splendid service and also carrying a varied stock of goods that 
makes their store a very popular center of trade. Besides the 
regular stock of a drug store they handle the Atwater Kent, 
Fada and Kolster radio sets and equipment, and also phono- 
graphs and records. 

Mr. Ambrose Wilson took the lead in organizing the Rad- 
ford Kiwanis Club, and was secretary and director four years. 
He is a director and secretary of the Retail Merchants Associa- 
tion, and in 1926-27 was on the executive committee of the State 
Department of the American Legion. He is a Royal Arch 
Mason, member of Harvey Howe Post of the American Legion, 
belongs to the Kiwanis Club, and is a Democrat in politics. He 
is a vestryman in the Radford Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Wilson married at Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 
March 7, 1922, Miss Epsie Celina Rike, of Randleman, Ran- 
dolph County, North Carolina. She attended public schools and 
the North Carolina Woman's College of Greensboro. Mrs. Wil- 



286 VIRGINIA 

son is a member of the Episcopal Church, the Music Club and 
Woman's Club, and the American Legion Auxiliary. Her father, 
Samuel R. Rike, has for many years been a leading farmer and 
tobacco grower in Randolph County, North Carolina, where both 
her parents reside. 

John B. Spiers is an attorney, a World war veteran and 
since locating at Radford has accumulated a very satisfactory 
business and is enjoying a high degree of prestige in his pro- 
fession and as a public official. 

He was born at Newport News, Virginia, June 29, 1897, son 
of Louis H. and Nora (Belcher) Spiers. The Spiers and Bel- 
cher families lived in North Carolina and over the line in South- 
ern Virginia. His maternal grandfather, John E. Belcher, was 
a Confederate soldier. Louis H. Spiers was born in North Caro- 
lina, and for many years was a lumber inspector, being employed 
by the Newport News Ship Building and Dry Dock Company. 
In 1920 he was held up and robbed and killed by a highwayman. 
His wife, Nora Belcher, was born and reared in Chesterfield 
County, Virginia, and was a member of the Christian Church. 
She died in 1907. The five childi-en of these parents were: 
Helena 0., wife of W. G. Avery, of Newport News ; Anna P., 
wife of Fred L. Brucker, of Gary, Indiana ; John B. ; Louis J., 
of Greenville, South Carolina ; and Norma, wife of Ernest Fisher, 
of Norfolk, Virginia. 

John B. Spiers passed his boyhood days at Newport News, 
attended the grade and high schools there and eno'aged in some 
self-supporting activities before he entered the University of 
Virginia. In October, 1917. he resigned his position in Rich- 
mond to join the colors, and wps trained nt Fort Monroe with 
the Sixtieth Regiment of the Coast Artillery Corps. In the 
spring of 1918 he was commissioned a second lieutenant, went 
overseas with the Fifty-fourth Coast Artillery Corps, and while 
in the Officers Training School at Saumur, France, was in- 
jured, sustaining a broken foot, and during the remaining 
month'^ of the war he was in Ba^-e Ho^-pital No. 2'7 and other 
hospitals in France and finally was s-^nt home and given his 
honovab'e discharge at (^amo Lee in March, 1919. For a^^out 
six months after leaving the armv he was employed at Rich- 
mond and in the fall of 1919 began his studies at the University 
of Virginia. He is a member of Harvey Howe Post of the 
American Legion. 

Mr. Spiers graduated from the law department of the uni- 
vei'sitv in 1922. He had been admitted to the bar in 1921 and 
he first practiced at Lynchburg. In March. 1923, he re-no^'ed to 
Radford, where he opened an office and quickly made his abilities 
recognized in his profession and was accorded a larore general 
practice. His law offices are now in the First National Bank 
Building. In 1923 he was appointed commonwealth's attorney 
of the city of Radford and in 1924 was elected to that office. 
His administration as commonwealth's attorney has been one 
highly satisfactory to the good people of the county and has 
brought increased prestige to him both as a lawyer and man. 

Mr. Spiers is a director of the Radford Veneering Lumber 
Company, Inc., is president of the Radford Kiwanis Club, is a 
member of the Virginia Bar Association and a Democrat in 
politics. He is affiliated with Ginter Park Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., at Richmond, Virginia; May Lodge of the fraternity at 
Radford, Chapter No. 27 of the Royal Arch Masons, and the 



VIRGINIA 287 

Order of the Mystic Chain, Modern Woodmen of America. He 
belongs to the college fraternities Delta Upsilon and Delta Theta 
Phi. He is a deacon of the Christian Church. 

Mr. Spiers married in Orange County, Virginia, June 7, 1924, 
Miss Maxine Graves, of Liberty Mills, Virginia, where she grew 
up and where she attended public schools and later continued 
her education in the Episcopal School at Chatham and is a 
graduate of West Hampton College of Richmond in the class of 
1923. She taught in the high schools at Gordonsville, Virginia, 
and Danville, West Virginia, before her marriage. Mrs. Spiers 
is a member of the Christian Church, is a member of the Music 
Club at Radford and belongs to the Daughters of the American 
Revolution. Her father, L. W. Graves, was for over four years 
a member of the House of Delegates, representing Orange and 
Madison counties. He was one of the leading farmers of Orange 
County, was president of the Gordonsville National Bank and 
president of the Charlottesville Lumber Company. Mrs. Spiers' 
mother died in 1923. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Spiers 
was born one son, John B., Jr., in 1925. 

Col. Frank P. McConnell. prominent banker at Radford, 
is a native of Alabama, son and grandson of two distinguished 
citizens of that state, but in his home at Radford is closely asso- 
ciated with that section of Virginia where his earlier ancestors 
lived for several generations. One of his first ancestors in South- 
western Virginia and on the border country in Eastern Tennes- 
see was John McConnell, who married Martha Campbell. Their 
son, Major John P. McConnell, was born at Fayetteville, Tennes- 
see, and married Martha Campbell Kennedy. Major John P. 
McConnell was the great-grandfather of Frank P. McConnell of 
Radford. Major John P. McConnell's mother was a sister of 
General Lewis of Virginia. 

Felix Grundy McConnell. the grandfather, was born at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, April 1, 1809, and moved to Talladega County, 
Alabama, in 1834. He rose to prominence as a lawyer, served 
in both Houses of the Alabama Legislature, and in 1843 was 
elected to represent the Fourth Alabama District in Congress. 
He was reelected and died while still a member of Congress at 
WaFhington, September 10, 1846. He married in 183.5 Elizabeth 
Jennings Hogan, who was a great-granddaughter of William 
Jennings, a captain in the Revolutionary war. Felix Grundy 
McConnell had two daughters, Kathleen and Olivia, who were 
respectively the first and second wives of Gen. Charles M. 
Shel'ey. a brigadier general in the Confederate army and a 
member of Congress. 

Col. William Kennedy McConnell, father of Col. Frank P. 
McConnell, was born in Talladega County, Alabama, March 25, 
1841. He left LaGrange College to join Company B of the 
Sixteenth Alabama Infantry as a private, was made color bearer, 
drill master, and later transferred to the Thirtieth Alabama 
Infantry and participated in a long list of well known battles 
of the war and became a colonel of infantry in the Confederate 
service. After the war he spent two years in Mexico, then 
located at Selma, was appointed commandant of the University 
of Alabama, for seven years was tax collector of Dallas County, 
and in 1884 became agent for what is now a branch of the 
Southern Railway Company at Talladega and served in that 
capacity until his death, January 16, 1891. He married. May 7, 
1868, Martha Ellen Smith, of Columbia, Tennessee, who was 



288 VIRGINIA 

educated in the Columbia Female College, graduating with high 
honors in 1867. She died January 25, 1914. She possessed a 
decided literary talent and contributed a number of short stories 
and other articles to magazines. She was active in the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church, South, the United Daughters of the Con- 
federacy and Daughters of the American Revolution. Of her 
children the oldest is Felix G. McConnell, of Oklahoma City, and 
Col. Frank P. is the second son. William K., Jr., died in infancy. 
Dr. Ray M. McConnell became a noted scholar, a graduate of 
Southern University of Greensboro, Alabama, of Vanderbilt 
University of Tennessee, and the University of Chicago, took his 
Master and Doctor of Philosophy degrees at Harvard University, 
and won a traveling fellowship at Heidelberg, Leipsic and Bonn, 
Germany, and at the University of Paris, Paris, France. He 
traveled extensively abroad and was professor of philosophy in 
Harvard University when he died in June, 1911, being buried in 
the Professors Plat in Mt. Auburn Cemetery at Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. The daughter Lena married Capt. Clifton L. 
Sitton, a captain in the Spanish-American war, who died about 
1900, and she is now engaged in missionary work as matron of 
the Methodist Orphanage at Raleigh, North Carolina. 

Col. Frank P. McConnell was born at Union City, Tennessee, 
July 1, 1870. He attended public and private schools at Selma 
and Talladega, graduated in 1890 from the Alabama Polytechnic 
Institute at Auburn, and later attended the Law School at the 
University of Richmond. At the age of sixteen he became asso- 
ciated with his uncle, Houston Isbell, in the Isbell National Bank, 
and he was cashier of that institution in 1908, when he married. 
For several years he was actively associated with a group of 
banking interests in Oklahoma and Arkansas, and still has 
large holdings in the banks of those states. In 1911 Colonel 
McConnell removed to Richmond, Virginia, and became presi- 
dent of the Manchester National Bank, president of the South 
Richmond Bank and vice president of the Bank of Commerce and 
Trust. In 1920 he took up with the State Banking Depart- 
ment as state bank examiner, but in 1922 resigned to become 
associated in the organization of the Peoples Bank of Radford, 
of which institution he has since been president and cashier and 
a director. A number of prominent Virginia men are associated 
with this bank, including Hon. Hal C. Tyler as vice president, 
Judge R. L. Gardner, vice president, and another vice president 
is Harry S. Walker. Colonel McConnell is a director in the Rad- 
ford Real Estate and Insurance Corporation. 

He derived his military title from his service of four years 
as colonel in command of the Third Regiment of the Alabama 
National Guard. Colonel McConnell is a Royal Arch and Knight 
Templar and thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, member 
of Acca Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Richmond, is a past 
exalted ruler of the B. P. 0. Elks, member of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and for fifteen years was grand purser 
of the Kapna Alpha Fraternity. He is a member of the Army 
and Navy Club of New York. He is a Democrat and an elder in 
the Presbyterian Church at Radford. 

One of the interesting news dispatches published in Rich- 
mond, Virginia, newspapers, in the fall of 1908, may be quoted 
as the introduction to Colonel McConnell's family life: "Cul- 
minating a romance which had its origin at Virginia's executive 
mansion years ago will be the wedding of Miss Belle Norwood 
Tyler, daughter of ex-Governor and Mrs. J. Hoge Tyler, to Col. 



VIRGINIA 289 

Frank P. McConnell of Talladega, Alabama, at the Tyler home 
in East Radford, on November 16, 1908. The happy romance 
had its origin at a notable gathering of distinguished members 
of the Kappa Alpha fraternity in the executive mansion in 1901. 
The social affair was a reception given at the mansion to the 
Kappa Alpha convention and the naval hero, Capt. Richmond 
Pearson Hobson, by the Governor and his wife. The bride-to-be 
is one of the most prominent young ladies of Virginia society. 
She is a fine type of that queenly beauty which made Virginia 
famous." 

Mrs. McCcnnell as a girl lived at Governor Tyler's country 
home. Belle Hampton, and was educated by private tutors and 
governesses at Radford. She is an active member of the Pres- 
byterian Church and is well known in social circles in South- 
west Virginia. She is a member of the United Daughters of 
the Confederacy and Daughters of the American Revolution. 
Colonel and Mrs. McConnell have one son, J. Hoge Tyler Mc- 
Ccnnell, now attending the Radford High School. 

Daniel Cox Sands, president of the Middleburg National 
Bank at Middleburg, Loudoun County, is not only one of the 
substantial capitalists and loyal and progressive citizens of the 
historic Old Dominion, but is also doing a splendid service in 
maintaining Virginia's prestige in the breeding and exploiting 
of fine track horses. He has in this section of Virginia a splendid 
landed estate of 3,000 acres, given over primarily to the raising 
of thoroughbred horses and fine Guernsey cattle. 

Mr. Sands was born in New York City, in November, 1875, 
and is a son of Daniel C. and Martha (Titus) Sands, both like- 
wise natives of the old Empire State of the Union. Daniel C. 
Sands became a successful manufactui'er of woolen goods, but 
lived virtually retired for many years prior to his death, which 
occurred in March, 1917. his widow having passed awav in 
February, 1923. 

I'he public schools of New York City afforded Daniel C. 
Sands his early education, which was there supplemented by 
his attendin-:;: Columbia University. After leaving the univer- 
sity he gave two years of service as a civil engineer and he 
then turned his attention to farm industry and incidentally 
initiated his activities in the raising of turf horses of the best 
type. In March, 1908, Mr. Sands established his residence in 
Loudoun County, Virginia, where he has since continued to give 
supervision to his valuable landed estate, which he has made 
one of the finest of American stock farms, and his civic loyalty 
was further shown when he became, in 1924, one of the organ- 
iz?rs and incorporators of the Middleburg National Bank, of 
which he has since continued the president. He is likewise 
president of the Goose Creek Lime Grinding Works, and his 
influence and tangible aid are always to be counted upon in the 
furtherance of measures and enterprises tending to advance 
th?' communal welfare. Mr. Sands is an enthusiast in hunting 
and also in the game of polo, and at the time of this writing, in 
1928, he is the popular master of the Middleburg Hunt Club. 
In New York City he has membership in the Union League Club 
and the Riding Club, besides being an influential member of the 
Turf and Field Club. In his home community in Loudoun 
County he is a popular figure in both business and social circles, 
and at Warrenton, Fauquier County, he has membership in the 
Country Club and the Fauquier Country Club. His political 



290 VIRGINIA 

allegiance is given to the Democratic party, and though he is a 
birthright member of the Society of Friends, he attends and 
supports the Protestant Episcopal Church in his home town of 
Middleburg, his wife being an active communicant of this parish. 
In the World war period Mr. Sands was a zealous worker in 
behalf of patriotic activities and served as chairman of the 
various committees in charge of war work in Loudoun County. 

Mr. Sands is a prominent figure in leading turf circles and 
has exploited many of his fine horses on the American turf. He 
is the owner of "Playfellow," who has made a splendid track 
record, and is associated with Admiral Grayson, of the United 
States Navy, in the ownership of "My Own," another famous 
race horse. On his Loudoun County estate he has a stable of 
twenty selected brood mares of the best lineage and type, and 
maintains also a herd of purebred Guernsey cattle, representa- 
tives of which have been prize winners at local stock shows. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sands maintain their residence on their ideal 
rural estate four miles north of Middleburg, and the beautiful 
home is known for its gracious hospitality. 

In October, 1908, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Sands 
and Miss Edith M. Kennedy, daughter of the late David Ken- 
nedy, who was born in England and whose wife was born in the 
State of New York. David Kennedy was a successful contractor 
and builder, and both he and his wife were residents of New 
York City at the time of their death. Mr. and Mrs. Sands have 
no children. 

John Jacob Giesen, physician and surgeon, in the Hopkins 
Building at East Radford, is a native of Southwest Virginia, 
and is a man of splendid equipment for his profession. He com- 
pleted his medical course just in time to go into training and 
service with the Government during the World war. 

Doctor Giesen was born at Roanoke, Virginia, October 26, 
1891, son of Anthony and Emilia (Rossa) Giesen. His father 
was born and reared at Buffalo, New York, attended public 
schools there and from early manhood worked in and followed 
the business of ice manufacturing. About 1890 he became 
interested in an ice plant at Roanoke and in 1900 moved to Rad- 
ford, where he established the Radford Ice Corporation and 
was active head until 1928, when he sold the plant to the Cen- 
tral Atlantic States Service Corporation. He has not entirely 
retired from business, being associated with his sons in the 
automobile business at Radford. He is an active member of the 
Lutheran Church, and his wife was also identified with that 
church. She was born in Germany and attended school there, 
and came to this country with her parents, who located at Balti- 
more, where she finished her education. She died in 1926. Of 
their eight children one died in infancy, and the others are: 
Dr. John T. ; W. L. A. Giesen, of Radford ; Catherine, wife of 
H. H. Lowman, of Radford ; Dr. Andrew F., now practicing 
medicine at Konowa, Oklahoma ; Anthony Jr., of Radford ; 
Arthur R., of Radford; and Virginia, wife of J. L. Sharp, of 
Pottsville, Pennsylvania. 

John Jacob Giesen attended public schools at Roanoke and 
also at Radford, took his preparatory course at St. Albans 
Academy and was also in the National Business College at Roan- 
oke. In 1913 he received the A. B. degree from Roanoke College 
of Salem and followed that with his professional studies in the 
University of Maryland at Baltimore. The university conferred 



VIRGINIA 291 

upon him the M. D. degree in 1918. In the meantime he had 
enlisted with the 115th Field Hospital, Twenty-ninth Division, 
and was in training at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, and at Camp 
McClellan, Alabama. On July 1, 1918, he was commisioned a 
first lieutenant in the Medical Corps, was assigned duty with 
the Maryland General Hospital and remained there until Janu- 
ary 1, 1919. 

After leaving the service of the Government Doctor Giesen 
became a member of the staff of the St. Albans Sanatorium at 
Radford, and his work was with that institution from June 1, 
1919, until April 1, 1925. For two years his health was such 
that he retired from the active work of his profession, and on 
June 1, 1927, opened his private offices in the Hopkins Building 
at East Radford, and a large volume of practice has come to 
him. 

Doctor Giesen is a member of the Grand Chapter of the 
medical fraternity Chi Zeta Chi, is a member of the Medical 
Society of Virginia, the Southwest Virginia, Southern and Amer- 
ican Associations. He is a past secretary and now president of 
the Rotary Club, is an Independent Republican, and is president 
of the council of the Lutheran Church at Radford. He is also 
affiliated with Virginia May Lodge No. 38, A. F. and A. M., 
and a lodge of Elks at Baltimore. 

Doctor Gie=;en married at Elkton, Maryland, May 5, 1919, 
Miss Goldie Mae Miles, of Mathews County, Virginia, where 
she grew up and attended school. She is a graduate of the 
Nurses Training School at the Maryland General Hospital. Mrs. 
Giesen is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. 
Her father, James A. Miles, was for many years active in the fish 
and oyster business in Mathews and Westmoreland counties, 
and is now retired at Mathews Court House. Her mother died 
about 1903. The three children of Doctor and Mrs. Giesen are 
Jane Miles, Ann Elizabeth and John Williams, Jane being a 
student in the grade schools of Radford. Doctor Giesen is the 
present commander of Harvey Howe Post No. 30 of the Amer- 
ican Legion. 

Frank Y. Caldwell, city treasurer of Radford, was born 
in that city, where he is a member of a family that has been 
long and prominently identified with business and public affairs. 
In his official career he continues the traditions of public service 
set by his father. 

His father is Milton M. Caldwell, now retired, who was born 
in Craig County, Virginia, attended public schools and the Vir- 
ginia Polytechnic Institute at Blacksburg, and in early years 
was a merchant at Radford. For seventeen years he held the 
office and performed the duties of clerk of courts and for twelve 
years was city treasurer. He has lived retired since 1921. His 
father, George C. Caldwell, served in the Confederate army four 
years. Milton M. Caldwell married Carrie Yingling, who was 
born and reared at Radford, attended school there, and was al- 
ways a devoted member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, 
South. She died October 24, 1926, and is buried in the East 
Radford Cemetery. Her parents were George W. and Sallie 
(Cofer) Yingling. George W. Yingling for many years was 
employed as a machinist with the Norfolk & Western Railroad. 
Milton M. Caldwell and wife had five children : Frank Y. ; Paul 
R., a Norfolk & Western Railway employe at Bluefield, West 
Virginia ; Miss S. Lorena, a teacher at Radford ; Katherine, 



292 VIRGINIA 

widow of T. W. Lawford, and a teacher in the public schools 
of Radford ; and Wilda May, who died in infancy. 

Frank Y. Caldwell was born at Radford February 23, 1895, 
and was educated in the errade and high schools, graduating from 
high school in 1914. That was followed by four years at the 
Virginia Military Institute, where he was a member of the class 
of 1918, but on June 12, 1917, he answered the call to the colors 
and went for training to Fort Myer, Virginia, for two months, 
and on August 15, 1917, was commissioned a second lieutenant 
and transferred to Camp Lee. He remained there until May 
25, 1918, when he went overseas with the 317th Infantry, 
Eightieth Division, in Company F. He was put with the British 
and French troops south of Calais, France, until August 8, 
1918, when he was returned home and given duties in the train- 
ing camp at Greenville, South Carolina, and Charlotte, North 
Carolina, and received his honorable discharge at Camp Greene 
at Charlotte on March 15, 1919. 

Mr. Caldwell after his return home engaged in the mercantile 
business in April, 1920, and on January 1, 1922, began his term 
of service as city treasurer of Radford. He was reelected to 
this office in 1925. Mr. Caldwell is a Democrat, member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the Kiwanis Club, and is 
affiliated with Virginia May Lodge No. 38, A. F. and A. M., East 
Radford Chapter No 27, Royal Arch Masons, and Harvey Howe 
Post No. 30 of the American Legion. 

He married at Belspring, Virginia, January 9, 1926, Miss 
Pauline Perfater, who attended public school there and is a 
graduate of the Radford State Teachers College with the class 
of 1921. Prior to her marriage she taught in schools at Ports- 
mouth, Virginia, and in Pulaski County. Mrs. Caldwell is a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, the Amer- 
ican Legion Auxiliary, and takes a helpful part in the life of 
her community. She is a daughter of A. T. and Dora (Sifford) 
Perfater. Her parents reside at East Radford, her father for 
many years having been a locomotive engineer with the Nor- 
folk & Western Railway. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell have one son, 
Frank Y., Jr., born May 3, 1928. 

James A. Painter is a native of Southwest Virginia, and 
has given the years of his manhood to merchandising, the real 
estate business, and in later years to his duties as clerk of the 
Corporation Court of the city of Radford, where he and his 
family reside. 

He was born in Wythe County, Virginia, August 23, 1875, 
son of James Bell and Sallie (Gillespie) Painter, and grandson 
of Isaac Painter, who was a farmer and stock raiser in Wji:he 
County. James Bell Painter grew up in Wythe County, served 
four years as a Confederate soldier, taking part in many of the 
great battles of the war, part of the time as a member of the 
Stonewall Jackson Brigade. After the war he engaged in farm- 
ing and stock raising, and finally sold his property in Wythe 
County and moved to a farm in Tazewell County, where he lived 
until his death. His first wife, Sallie Gillespie, was born and 
reared in Tazewell County, daughter of Reese Gillespie, who for 
many years was clerk of the County Court there. .Mrs. Sallie 
Painter attended public schools and private schools in Tazewell 
County, and was always a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. She died in 1880. The second wife of James Bell 
Painter was Mary Jane Davis, of Rural Retreat, Virginia. There 



VIRGINIA 293 

were six children by each marriage, those of the first union be- 
ing: Warren G., of Harrisonburg, Virginia; Jesse H., of Dallas, 
Texas ; Lina Belle, who married Sidney Brown and is deceased ; 
Temple E., of Hopewell, Virginia; James A., of Radford, Vir- 
ginia, and Charles S., of Kingsport. Tennessee. The children of 
the second marriage were : Ida, wife of Tyler Witten, of Pearis- 
burg; William L.. of Tazewell; Francis Neal, of Bristol, Vir- 
ginia : Gary, of Bluefield, Virginia ; Mrs. Lillian Brown, de- 
ceased ; and George Whitefield. of Pearisburg. 

James A. Painter grew up in Tazewell County on his father's 
fai-m and had the advantages of public schools there. His first 
work after leaving school was clerking in a store at Tazewell 
for the firm of Britten and Greaver. This experience and that 
of five or six years with W. W. Jeter, of Pocahontas, Virginia, 
gave him a fundamental knowledge of business, and he then 
embarked his experience and capital in a general store at Nar- 
rows, Virginia, and was a merchant in that town for ten years. 
After selling his business he removed to Newport News, lived 
there about six years and was in the furniture business. On 
selling out he returned to Southwest Virginia and located at 
Radford in 1906, and for four years was a furniture merchant, 
and since then has conducted a real estate business, chiefly 
operating with his own properties. He is a director of the 
Peonies Bank of Radford. 

Mr. Painter was appointed clerk of the Corporation Court 
of Radford on January 31, 1910, and has performed the duties 
of that position consecutively for nineteen years, having been 
three times elected without opposition. Mr. Painter is a past 
master of Glencoe Lodge No. 148, A. F. and A. M., member of 
Royal Arch Chapter No. 27 at Radford, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America and the Order 
of the Mystic Chain. He is a Democrat and a Presbyterian. 

He married in Giles County, Virginia, December 2, 1893, 
Carrie Morrison Priddy. She attended school at Narrows. She 
is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. South, the 
United Daughters of the Confederacy and the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, her ancestors having been in Virginia 
since Colonial times. She is a daughter of Frank Nelson and 
Melvina (Stanley) Priddy. Her mother's people as well as her 
father's were Colonial Virginians. Her father spent most of 
his life as a merchant at Narrows and was a soldier of the 
Confederacy. Mr. and Mrs. Painter had a family of eight 
children, two of whom died in infancy. Eileen A., who was 
educated in the Radford High School, is the wife of B. C. 
Addington, a commercial traveler living at Bluefield, West Vir- 
ginia. James Frank Painter was educated in the public schools 
of Radford, in 1917 enlisted in the navy, and was in training 
at the Norfolk Navy Yard until honorably discharged because 
of disability in 1918, and has been more or less an invalid ever 
since, though for four years he carried on an insurance busi- 
ness and was deputv clerk under his father until 1925. He 
married Catherine DuBay, of Mount Clemens, Michigan, and 
they have two children, Jane Morrison, born in 1925. and James 
F., born in 1927. Miss Mary Belle Painter graduated in 1928 
from the Radford High School. Miss Virginia Wilson finished 
high school work in 1927, Miss Evelyn Elizabeth was a member 
of the high school class of 1929, and the youngest of the family, 
Thomas Wesley, is still in high school. 



294 VIRGINIA 

Leo S. Howard, city judge of East Radford, is representative 
of the younger group of attorneys and citizens of Southwest 
Virginia, and his career so far has been in line with the many 
distinguished attainments of the Howard family running back 
through the various generations. 

This is a family connection equally well known in England 
,and America. The Howards of Virginia were a branch of a 
very wealthy family of England, and the Virginia descendants 
today are among the claimants to a great estate which for many 
years has been a subject of prolonged chancery adjudication, 
and in the meantime is held in trust by the Bank of England. 
The founder of the Howard