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Full text of "Western Reserve University bulletin"

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Western Reserve University 



CATALOGUE. 



1901-1902 



CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



CLBVBI^ND, O.: 
PRBS8 OF WINN * JUOSON 

1902 



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CONTENTS. 

Gbnsral Statement 5 

i^ySTBES 6 

l^ACui,TY, Instructors and Officers 8 

Adei«bert Coi^lege— Historical Statement 23 

Faculty and Instructors 27 

Students 30 

Requirements for Admission 36 

Courses of Study : 43 

General Information 61 

Expenses 70 

The C01.1.EGE FOR Women— General Statement 73 

Faculty and Instructors 76 

Students 79 

Requirements for Admission 36 

Courses of Study 90 

General Information 112 

Expenses 120 

Graduate Department— General Statement 122 

Faculty and Instructors 123 

Students 125 

Courses of Study 126 

General Information 142 

Medical Coli^EGE— General Statement 145 

Faculty 148 

Students 153 

Requirements for Admission 157 

Courses of Study 159 

General Information 180 

Expenses 188 

Examination Papers 190 

The Schooi, of Law— Historical Statement 203 

Faculty 205 

Students 206 

Requirements for Admission 211 

Course of Instruction 211 

General Information 215 

Expenses ' 217 

Dental Department — General Statement 218 

Faculty 220 

Students 222 

Admission and Course of Study 225 

General Information 236 

Expenses 237 

Appendix 242 

Directory 249 



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CALENDAR. 



I90I. 






16-17 Sept. 


Monday-Tuesday 


Examinations for admission. 


17 Sept. 


Tuesday 


First term begins. 


28 Nov. 


Thursday 


Thanksgiving day. 


21 Dec. 


Saturday 


Winter recess begins. 


1902. 






I Jan. 


Wednesday 


Winter recess ends. 


23 Jan. 


Thursday 


Examinations begin. 


I Feb. 


Saturday 


First term ends. 


3 Feb. 


Monday 


Second term begins. 


9 Feb. 


Sunday 


Day of prayer for colleges. 


22 Feb. 


Saturday 


Washington's birthday. 


27 March 


Thursday 


Kaster recess begins. 


2 April 


Wednesday 


Easter recess ends. 


28 May 


Wednesday 


General examinations begin. 


30 May 


Friday 


Decoration day. 


8 June 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate sermon. 


9 June 


Monday 


Prize oratorical contest, Adel- 
bert College. 


II June 


Wednesday 


Meeting of alumni. 


II June 


Wednesday 


Commencement, College for 
Women. 


12 June 


Thursday 


COMMENCRMRNT. 


13-14 June 


Friday-Saturday 


Examinations for admission. 


SUMMER VACATION OF THIRTEEN WEEKS. 


22-23 Sept. 


Monday-Tuesday 


Examinations for admission. 


23 Sept 


Tuesday 


First term begins. 


27 Nov. 


Thursday 


Thanksgiving day. 


24 Dec. 


Wednesday 


Winter recess begins. 



28P333 



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..ieo2.. 


July. 


January. 


July. 


8. 


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T. 


F. 


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29 


80 


81 








28 


27 


28 


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30 


31 




27 


28 


29 


80 


81 






August. 


February. 


AUOU8T. 










1 


2 


8 














1 


1 








1 


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4 


6 


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3 4 


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24 


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31 .. 


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March. 


September. 


1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


6 


7 














1 




1! 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


8 


9 


10 


11 


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14 


2 


8 


4 


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8! 9 


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9 


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24 


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29 


80 












28 
80 


24 
31 


25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


28 


29 80 










October. 


April. 


October. 






1 


2 


8; 4 


5 






1 


2 8 


4 


6 








1 


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November. 


May. 


November. 












1 


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December. 


June. | December. 


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WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



Western Reserve University embraces six departments. 

Adetbctt G)IIc8fC— ^formerly the Western Reserve Col- 
lie — founded at Hudson in 1826, and removed to Cleveland 
in 1882. 

The CoUesfe for Wotntn, established in 1888. 

The Department of Graduate Instruction^ established 
in 1892 by the Faculties of Adelbert College and the College 
for Women ; designed to ofiPer to college graduates courses 
leading to the degree of A. M. and Ph. D. 

The Medical G>IIegfe — formerly known as the Cleve- 
land Medical College — fotmded in 1844, offering a course of 
four years in medicine. 

The Franklin T* Backus Law Schoolt opened in 1892 ; 
designed by means of a course of study covering three 
years, to give an adequate training for the practice of the 
law. 

The Dental Department, opened in 1892 ; designed to 
teach the art of dentistry as a department of medicine. 

Popular and educational lectures are included in the 
plans of the University. 

Chari^es F. Thwing, President. 



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TRUSTEES. 



CHARLES F. THWING, D. D., LL. D., President, Ci,evei.and. 

HIRAM C. HAYDN, D. D., LL. D.. Vice President, Ci.rvei.and. 

WILLIAM H. UPSON, A. B., Akron. 
JEBENEZER BUSHNELL, D. D.. Cwvei^and. 

JOHN HAY, LL. D., Washington, D. C. 

SAMUEL E. WILLIAMSON, LL. D.. New York. 

LIBERTY E. HOLDEN, A. M., Clevei.and. 

EDWIN R. PERKINS, A. B., Cleveland. 

SAMUEL MATHER, A. M., Cleveland. 

J. HOMER WADE, Cleveland. 
fWILLIAM H. BALDWIN, A. B., New York City. 
tJOEL M. SEYMOUR, A. B., B. D., Alliance. 

WASHINGTON S. TYLER, Cleveland. 
♦JOHN H. McBRIDE, Cleveland. 

EDWARD P. WILLIAMS, A. M., Cleveland. 
tHENRY M. LADD, D. D., East Cleveland. 
tCHARLES M. RUSSELL, A. B., Massillon. 
♦HARRY A. GARFIELD, A. B., Cleveland. 
♦CHARLES L. PACK, Cleveland. 
fMOSES G. WATTERSON, A. M., Cleveland. 
♦JARVIS M. ADAMS, A. B., CLEVELAND. 

HERBERT A. HITCHCOCK, A. B., Hudson. 

ALFRED A. POPE, Cleveland. 

LOUIS H. SEVERANCE, Cleveland. 

HENRY R. HATCH, Cleveland. 

WORCESTER R. WARNER, Cleveland. 

LEWIS H. JONES, A. M., Cleveland. 

WILLIAM D. REES, Cleveland. 
tWILLIAM G. MATHER, A. B., Cleveland. 
♦ANDREW SQUIRE, LL. D., Cleveland. 
fD. Z. NORTON, Cleveland. 
♦CHARLES W. BINGHAM, A. B., Cleveland. 
♦CHARLES F. BRUSH, Ph. D., LL. D., Cleveland. 



HARRY A. HARING, A. B., Secretary and Treasurer. 
Office in Adelbert College, Cleveland. 

^Trustees of the University only. fTrustees of Adelbert College only. All others 

sre Trustees of both corporations. 
{Deceased. 



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THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF 
THE UNIVERSITY. 



SAMUEL E. WILLIAMSON, 
LOUIS H. SEVERANCE, 
SAMUEL MATHER, 
J. HOMER WADE, 
WASHINGTON S. TYLER. 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE. 



THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, 

THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNIVERSITY, 

THE DEANS OF THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS, 

Professors M. M. Curtis and S. B. Pi^atnbr, for Adelbert College. 

Professors H. E. Bourne and H. N. Fowi^er, for the College for 
Women. 

Professors J. H. Lowman and D. P. Ai^tEN, for the Medical 
CoU^e. 

Professors H. H. Johnson and H. C. White, for the Law School. 



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FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arranged alphabeticali y within each division. 



Chari«es Frankijn Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President, 

A. B., Harvard Coll.. 1876; B. D., Andoyer Theological Seminanr. 
1879 ; D. D., Chicago Theological Seminary, 1888 ; LL. D., Illinois Coll. 
and Marietta Coll., 1894; President Adelbert College and Western Re- 
serve Unlyersltj, 1890 — 

Hiram Coixins Haydn, D. D., LL. D., 15 La Grange St. 

Vice President and Harkness Prof essor of Biblical Literature. 

A. B., Amherst Coll., 1856; D. D., Wooster Univ.. 1878; LL. D., 
Amherst Coll. and Marietta Coll., 1888; President Adelbert College and 
Western Reserve University, 1887-90 ; Instructor In Biblical Literature, 
1888-96 ; Professor of Biblical Literature, 1896— 

Hbrbbrt Austin Aikins, Ph. D., 40 Cornell St. 

Leffingwell Professor of Philosophy, 

A. B., Univ. of Toronto. 1887 ; Instructor, Univ. of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1888 : Yale Univ., 1888-91 ; Lecturer on History of Philosophy, 
Yale Univ., 1890-91 ; Ph. D., Yale. 1891 ; Professor of Logic and Phfl- 
osophy. Trinity Coll., N. C. 1891-93; Honorarv Fellow, Clark Univ.. 
1892-93; Professor of Philosophy, College for Women, 1893 — 

DUDI^BY P. Ai,i,en, a. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Theory and Pnutice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

A. B., Oberlln Coll., 1876 ; A. M., 1883 ; M. D., Harvard Univ., 1880 : 
Freiburg. Berlin, Vienna, London, Leipsic, 1880-82; Lecturer and Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, Western Reserve University, 1893 — 

Hrnry Lovp:joy Ambi^kr, M. S., D. D. S., M. D., 176 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Operative Dentistry and Hygiene. 

Dean of the Dental College. 

B. S., Hillsdale Coll., 1864; M. S., 1867; D. D. S., Ohio Coll. of 
Dental Surgery, 1867 ; M. D., Cleveland Univ. of Medicine and Surgery, 
1 868 ; Professor of Dental Science in the same institution, 1868-70 ; 
Lecturer in Dental Hygiene, Dental College of Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1892 ; Professor of Operative Dentistry and Hygiene, .1893 — 

George C. Ashmun, M. D., 794 Republic St. 

Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, 

Registrar and Bursar of the Medical College. 

M. D., Cleveland Medical Coll., 1873; Professor of Diseases of 
Children, Wooster Univ.. 1889-93 ; Professor of Hygiene, Western 
Reserve University, 1893 — 

Henry Eldridge Bourne, A. B., B. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of History, Registrar of the College for Women. 

A. B., Yale Coll., 1883 ; Principal of High School. Thomaston, Conn., 
1883-84 ; B. D., Yale Divinity School. 1887 ; Hooker Fellow, Tale Di- 
vinity School, 1887-88 : Teacher of History and Psychology, Free Acad- 
Norwich, Conn.. 1889-92 ; Professor of History and Instructor in Philo- 
sophy, College for Women. 1892-98 ; Professor of History, 1898 — 



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190I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 9 

Frank E. Bunts, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Prof essor 0/ the Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 

United States Naval Acad., 1881 ; M. D., The Medical Coll., Western 
Reserve Univ., 1886: Lecturer on Minor Sorsery, Medical Department 
of Wooster Univ.. 1887-88; Berlin, Vienna. Paris. 1888-89; Professor 
of Principles of Surgery, Wooster Univ., 1890-94; Professor of the 
Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in Medical College. Western 
Reserve University. 1894 — 

Ai^FRBD G. Carpenter, A. M., LL. B., 125 Streator Av. 

Professor of the Law of Contracts, 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan Univ., 1878 ; A. M.. 1876 ; LL. B., Univ. of 
Michigan, 1876: Professor of Law of Contracts, Western Reserve 
University, 1896 — 

Cai^vin Suvbrii^L Case, M. D., D. D. S., Stewart Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Professor of Orthodontia. 

D. D. S.» Ohio Dental Coll., 1871 : M. D., Univ. of Michigan. 1885 ; 
Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry, Univ. of Michigan, 1882-1885: 
Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry and Orthodontia, Chicago Coll. of 
Dental Surgery, 1889-1895; Professor of Orthodontia, Chicago Coll. 
of Dental Surgery, 1896 ; Professor of Orthodontia, western ueserve 
University, 1897— 

Henry Bardwei^i, Chapman, A. B., LL. B., East Cleveland. 

Professor of the Law of Agency^ and Bills and Notes, 

A. B., Oberlln, 1885; LL. B., Harvard Univ., 1890; Professor of 
the Law of Agency, Western Reserve University, 1897 — 

Wn^UAM Thomas Corlktt, M.D., L.R. C.P. (London), 553 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, 

M. D., Wooster Univ., 1877 ; L. R. C. P., London, 1882 ; Professor 
of Dermatology and Syphilology, Western Reserve University, 1898 — 

Ghorgb W. Crile, Ph. D., M. D., 169 Kensington St. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, 

A. B., Ohio Normal Univ.. 1882 ; A. B., Wooster Univ., 1887 ; M. D., 
1887 ; Student in New York, Vienna and London. 1887-95 : Professor of 
Physiology and Surgery, wooster Medical Coll., 1897-1900; Ph. D., 
Hiram Coll.. 1899; Professor of Clinical Surgery, Western Reserve 
University, 1900 — 

Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Handy Professor of Philosophy, 

A. B.. Hamilton Coll., 1880; B. D., Union Theological Seminary, 
1888 ; A. M., Hamilton Coll., 1883 ; Pastor at Hastings-on-Hudson and at 
Cleveland, 1888-88 ; Univ. of Lelpsic, 1888-91 ; Ph. D., 1890 ; Professor 
of Philosophy, Adelbert College. 1891— 

Henry Platt Gushing, M. S., 260 Sibley St. 

Professor of Geology. 

Ph. B.. Cornell Univ.. 1882: Cornell Univ., 1882-83; School of 
Mines, Columbia Coll., 1883-84; Cornell Univ., 1884-85; M. S., 1885; 
Instructor in Geology, Chemistry and Phvslcs. State Normal School, 
Mankato, Minn.. 1885-91: Univ. of Munich. 1891-92; Instructor in 
Geology and Chemistry. Adelbert College, 1892-93; Associate Profes- 
sor of Geology, 1898-96; Professor of Geology, 1895 — 



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lO FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [19OI-I902 

Edward F. Gushing, Ph. B., M. D., 1160 Euclid Av. 

Professor of the Diseases of Children, 

Ph. B., Cornell Univ., 1883; M. D^ Harvard Univ., 1888; Profeator 
of the Dlaeaaea of Children, Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

John E. Darby, A. M., M. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Therapeutics, 

A. B.. Williams Coll., 1868 ; A. M., 1861 ; M. D., Western Reserve 
Univ., 1861 ; Professor of Biaterla Medlca and Therapeutics, Western 
Reserve University, 1867 — 

ROBSRT Wallsr Deering, Ph. D., 41 Cornell St. 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature^ 

Dean of the Graduate School, 

Centre Coll., 1879-80; Yanderbllt Univ., 1880-85; A. B., 1884; 
A.'M., 1885: Instructor In German, Yanderbllt Univ., 1885-86: Univ. 
of Lelpslc, 1886-89; Ph. D., 1889: Adjunct Professor of Germanic Lan- 
guages and Literature. Yanderbllt Univ., 1889-92; Professor of Ger- 
manic Languages and Literature. College for Women, 1892 — 

Owyer Farrar Emerson, Ph. D., 50 Wilbur St. 

Oviatt Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology. 

A. B^ Iowa Coll., 1882: A. M., 1885: Superintendent of Schools, 
Grlnnell, la., 1882-84 : Muscatine, la., 1884-85 ; Principal of the Academy 
of Iowa Coll., 1885-88 ; Goldwln Smith Fellow In English, Cornell Univ., 
1888-89; Instructor In English, Cornell Univ., 1889-91 ; Ph. D., 1891; 
Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology, 1892-96; Pro- 
fessor of Rhetoric and English Philology, Adelbert College, 1896 — 

Harold North Fowler, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Clark Professor of Greek, 

A. B.. Harvard Coll.. 1880; Classical Master In Marston's Univer- 
sity School, Baltimore. 1880-82 ; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1880-81 ; Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1882-88; Univ. of Berlin, 
1888-84 ; Univ. of Bonn., 1884-85 ; Ph. D.. 1885 ; Instructor in Greek, 
Latin, and Archseology, Harvard Coll., 1885-88; Instructor in Latin, 
Phillips Exeter Acad., 1888-90; Professor of Latin, Phillips Exeter 
Acad.. 1890-92 ; Professor of Greek, Univ. of Texas, 1892-98 ; Professor 
of Greek, College for Women. 1898 — 

Abraham Lincoln Fullbr, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greeks Dean of Adelbert College. 

A. B.. Dartmouth Coll., 1885 ; A. M., 1888 ; Univ. of Lelpslc, 1885- 
87 ; Univ. of Eriangen, 1887-88 ; Ph. D., 1888 ; Instructor in Latin and 
French, Adelbert Coll.. 1889-90 ; Professor of Greek, College for Women. 
1890-93 : Professor of Greek, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

Alexander Hadden, A. B., 1670 Lexington Av. 

Professor of the Law oj Crimes, Criminal Procedure, and Damages., 

A. B., Oberlln Coll., 1878; Professor of the Law of Crimes and 
Damages, Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

Carl A. Hamann, M. D., 661 Prospect St. 

Professor of Anatomy, 

"iii. D., Univ. of Pennsylvania. 1890; Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
Univ. of Pennsylvania. 1890-98 ; Professor of Anatomy, Western 
Reserve University, 1893 — 



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1 90 1 - 1 902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY . 1 1 

Charles Harris, Ph. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of German, 

A. B., Indiana Uniy., 1879; Ph. D., Uniy. of Leipslc, 1883: In- 
strnctor In German, Academic Department of Vincennee Uniy., 1888-86 ; 
Profeasor of French and German, southern Illinois State Normal School, 
1886-88; Professor of German, Oberlin Coll., 1888-98; Professor of 
German, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

Francis Hobart Hbrrick, Ph. D., D. Sc., 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology and Curator of the Zoological Collection, 

A. B., Dartmouth Coll., 1881 ; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins Uniy., 1888 : 
D. Sc, Western Uniy. of Pennsylyania, 1897; Instructor In Biology, 
Adelbert College, 1888-91 ; Professor of Biology, 1891 — 

Prank Rufus Hbrrick, A. B., 449 Russell Av. 

Professor of the Law of Torts, 

A. B., Yale Uniy., 1888; Professor of Law of Torts, Western Be- 
serye Uniyersity, 1897 — 

Perry L. Hobbs, Ph. D. (Berlin), 1420 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Chemistry. 

B. S., Case School of Applied Science, 1886 ; Ph. D., Uniy. of Berlin. 
1889 ; Professor of Chemistry, Western Resenre Uniyersity, 1894 — 

CHARI.BS F. Hoover, A. B., M. D., 702 Rose Bldg. 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis, 

A. B., Harvard Univ., 1890; M. D.. 1892; Professor of Physical 
Diagnosis, Western Reserve University, 1895 — 

Evan Henry Hopkins, A. B., LL. B., 84 Miles Av. 

Professor of the Law of Contracts and Equity furisdiction. 

Dean of the Law School, 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1889 ; LL. B., Harvard Univ., 1892 ; Professor 
of Law of Contracts and Equity Jurisdiction and Dean of Law School, 
Western Reserve University, 1892 — 

William T. Howard, Jr., M. D , 88 Dorchester Av. 

Professor of Pathology^ Pathological Anatomy and Bacteriology, 

Univ. of Virginia, 1885-87 ; M. D., Univ. of Maryland, 1889 ; Johns 
Hopkins Univ., 1889-94; Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology, 
Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

Paul Howland, A. M., LL. B., 11 Granger St. 

Professor of the Law of Pleading and Practice, and Partnership. 

A. B., Oberlin Coll.. 1884; A. M., 1894; LL. B.. Harvard Univ., 
1890; Professor of Law of Pleading and Practice, and Partnership, 
Western Reserve Uniyersity, 1896 — 

William Hbnry Hulme, Ph. D., 48 Mayfield St. 

Professor of English , 

A. B., Vanderbilt Univ.. 1890; Assistant in Greek, 1889-90: Univ. 
of Leipslc. 1891-92; Univ. of Jena, 1892-98; Univ. of Freiburg. 1898-94; 
Ph. D.. 1894; Instructor in German, Adelbert College, 1894-96; Asso- 
ciate Professor of English, College for Women. 1896-1900 ; Professor of 
English, 1900 — 



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1 2 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [ [ 90 1 - 1 902 

HoMSR HosBA Johnson, A. M., LL. B., Overlook Road. 

Professor of Constitutional Law, 

A. B., Oberlln Coll., 1885; A. Ai., LL. B., Haryard Uniy.. 1888: 
Professor of the Law of Tmats and Constitotlonal Law, Weetem Reserye 
Uniyersity, 1893 — 

Jacob Laisy, A. M., M. D., Syracuse, Neb. 

Professor Emeritus of Anatomy, 

A. B., Western Reserye Coll., 1860 ; A. M., 1858 ; M. D., Cleyeland 
Medical Coll.. 1853; Professor of Anatomy, Cleyeland Medical Coll., 
1863-84 ; Professor Emeritus of Anatomy, western Reserye Uniyersity, 
1884— 

Jambs Lawrence, A. B., 709' Genesee Av. 

Professor of the Law of Public and Private Corporations. 

A. B., Kenyon Coll., 1871: Professor of the Law of Public and 
Prlyate Corporations, Western Reserye Uniyersity, I8»fl — 

Roger Mii^ler Lee, LL. B., 115 Ingleside Av. 

Professor of the Law of Shipping and Admiralty^ aad 

Common Carriers. 

LL. B., Unly. of Michigan, 1886 ; Professor of Law of Shipping and 
Admiralty and Common Carriers, Western Reserye Uniyersity, 1894 — 

John H. Lowman, A. M., M. D., 441 Prospect St. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 

A. B., Connecticut Wesleyan Uniy., 1871: A. M., 1874: M. D., 

Wooster Medical Coll., 1873; M. D., Coll. of Physicians and Surgeons, 

New York, 1876; Professor of Medicine, Western Reserye Uniyersity, 

1881— 

Benjamin L. Millikin, A. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of Opthalmology, 

Dean of the Medical Co lege. 

A, B., Allegheny Coll., 1874; A. M., 1877; M. D., Uniy. of Penn- 
sylyanla, 1879; Ophthalmic Surgeon Charity Hospital, 1884; Lakeside 
uoBpital, 1893; Professor of Ophthalmology, Western Reserye Uniy., 
1894; Dean of Medical College, Western Reserye Uniyersity, 1900 — 

Edward Wii^uams Morley, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Hurlbut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry. 

A. B., Williams Coll., 1860 ; A M., 1868 ; M. D., Cleyeland Medical 
Coll., 1877; Ph. D., Wooster Univ., 1879; LL. D., Western Reserve 
Unly., 1891 ; Professor of Chemistry, Western Reserve College and 
Adelbert College, 1869— 

Anna Hbi<ene Palmi^, Ph. B., 34 Sayles St. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph. B.. Cornell Univ., 1890: Fellow in Mathematics, 1890-91; In- 
structor In Mathematics and German. College for the Training of 
Teachers, New York City, 1891-92; Instructor in Mathematics. College 
for Women. 1892-93; Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1898-96; 
Professor of Mathematics. 1895^ 



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I90I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 13 

Charlbs Eixiott Pennewbix, 1254 Willson Av. 

Professor of the Law of Real Property, 

Profesaor of the Law of Real Property, Western Reserve Uniyerslty, 
1892 — 

Emma Maud Perkins, A. B., 121 Adelbert St 

Woods Professor of Latin, 

A. B., Vassar Coll.. 1879; Instructor in Classics, Central Hlffb 
School, Cleveland, 1879-92; Associate Professor of Latin, College for 
Women, 1892-98 ; Professor of Latin, 1898 — 

John Wiu^iam Pbrrin, Ph. D., 81 Cutler St. 

Haydn Professor of History. 

Plu B., Illinois Wesleyan Univ., 1887 ; Assistant Principal of High 
School, Danville, 111.. 1887-88; Superintendent of Schools, Petersburg, 
III.. 1888-89 : A. M., Wabash Coll., 1889 ; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1890-92 ; 
Univ. of Chicago. 1892-98 ; Professor of History and Political Economy, 
Wisconsin State Normal School, Plattevllle, Wis., 1898-94; Ph. D., 
Univ. of Chicago, 1895; Professor of History and Politics, Allegheny 
Coll., 1895-98 ; Professor of History, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

Samurl Bai^l Pi^atnbr, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit^ 

Secretary of the Faculty of Adelbert College, 

A. B.. Tale Coll., 1888; Ph. D., 1885; Instructor In Latin and 
French, Adelbert Coll., 1885-90; Assistant Professor of Latin, Adelbert 
Coll., 1890-92 ; Professor of Latin, Adelbert College, 1892— 

Lemuel Stoughton Potwin, A. M., D. D., 322 Rosedale Av. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature, 

A B., Yale Coll., 1854 ; A. M.. 1857 ; Tutor In Yale, 1858-60 ; D. D., 
1886; Professor of Latin, Western Reserve Coll. and Adelbert College, 
1871-92 ; Professor of the English Language and Literature, 1892 — 

Hunter H. Powell, A. M.,. M. D., 467 Prospect St. 

Professor of Obstetrics and Pediatrics, 

M. D., Virginia Medical Coll., 1867 ; A. M., Western Reserve Univ., 
1894 ; Professor of Obstetrics and Pediatrics, Western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1875—; Dean of Medical College, 1895-1900. 

HxTNTBR RoBB, A. B., M. D., 702 Rose Bldg. 

Professor of Gynecology. 

A B., Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1880; M. D., 1884; House StaflC, 
Presbyterian Hospital, Philadelphia, 1885; Episcopal Hospital, 1886; 
Assistant Snrgeon, Kensington Hospital, 1887 ; Vienna, Berlin, Prague, 
Lelpslc, Paris, London, 1888-89; Associate Professor of Gynecology, 
Johns Hopkins Univ., 1889-94; Professor of Gynecology. Western Re- 
serve University, 1894 — 

John Pascal Sawyer, A. M., M. D., 526 The Rose Bldg. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1888; A. M., M. D., Western Reserve Univ., 
1886; Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Western Reserve 
University, 1889— 



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14 FACUI<TY AND OFFICERS. [19OI-I902 

CharIvBS Josiah Smith, A. M., 35 Adelbert St. 

Professor of MathenuUics. 
A. B.. Western Reserve Coll., 1870; A M., 1878; Professor of 
Mathematics and Perkins Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astron- 
omy, Western Reserve Coll., 1870-82; Professor of Mathematics, Adel- 
bert College, 1882— 

Arthur AdeI/BERT Stearns, A. M., 87 Oakdale St. 

Professor of the Law of Suretyship and Mortgage, 

A. B.. Bnchtel Coll., 1879 ; A. M., 1888 ; Professor of Law of Surety- 
ship and Mortgsge, Western Reserve tJnlverslty, 1894 — 

John Franki.in Stephan, D. D. S., 29 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Operative Dental Technic. 
D. D. 8., Western Reserve University, 1892 ; Professor of Operative 
Dental Technic. 1898 — 

George NeiIv Stewart, M.A., D.Sc, M. D. (Edin.), D.P.H. (Camb.), 
Professor of Physiology and Histology. Medical College. 

M. A.. Univ. of Edinburs, 1882 ; D. Sc, 1887 ; M. D., 1888 ; D. P. H., 
Cambridge, 1890; Senior Demonstrator of Physiology, Owens Coll., 
Victoria Univ., 1888-90; Examiner In Physiology, Univ. of Aberdeen, 
1889-93 ; Medical Dept. Harvard Univ., 1893-94 ; Professor of Physiology 
and Histology, Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

Edwin L. Thurston, Ph. B., 865 Prospect St. 

Professor of Patent Law. 

Ph. B.. Brown Univ., 1881; Professor of Patent Law, Western 
Reserve University, 1896 — 

Henry S. Upson, A. B., M. D., 514 New England Bldg. 

Professor of Neurology. 

A. B., Western Reserve Coll.. 1880 ; M. D., Coll. of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New Yorl£, 1884 ; Staff of Roosevelt Hospital, New York, 
1885-86 ; Berlin and Heidelberg, 1886-87 ; Professor of Neurology, West- 
ern Reserve University, 1898 — 

John Wilwam Van Doorn, D. D. S., 455 The Arcade. 

Professor of Dental Medicine. 

Adelbert Coll.. 1885-87 : D. D. S., New York Coll. of Dentistry, 1890 ; 
Lecturer on Materia Medica and Dental Therapeutics, Western Reserve 
University, 1892-96 ; Professor of Dental Medicine, 1896 — 

Henry Ci.ay White, B. L., A. M., 344 Harkness Av. 

Professor of the Law of Wills and Estates. 

B. L., Univ. of Michigan, 1862 ; A. M., Hiram Coll., 1891 ; Probate 
Judge of Cuyahoga Co., 1888 — : Professor of Medical Jurisprudence, 
Cleveland Homeopathic Medical Coll., 1891 ; Professor of Testamentary 
Law and Probate Procedure, Western Reserve University, 1892 — 

Prank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc, 79 Adelbert St. 

Perkins Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

A. B., Brown Univ., 1874; A. M.. 1877; D. Sc, 1900; Brown Univ., 

Massachusetts Inst, of Technology, 1879 ; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1870-80 ; 

Professor of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst, 1880-86; Professor 

of Physics, Adelbert College, 1886 — 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 5 

Wrix Henry Whitsi,ar, M. D., D. D. S., 29 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Dental AncUomy and Pathology, 

Secretary of the Dental College, 

D. D. 8., Unly. of Michigan, 1885 ; li. D.. Rush Medical Coll., 1886 ; 
Prof easor of Dental Anatomy and Pathology and Secretary of the Dental 
College of Western Reserve University, 1892 — 

Prank Severity Wiluams, A. M., LL. B., iii Crawford Road. 

Professor of the Law of Evidence^ Personal Property ^ and Trusts, 

A. B., Harvard Univ., 1888 : Instructor In Political Economy and 

. Assistant In American History, 1889-90 ; A. M., 1890 ; Traveling Fellow, 

1890-1892 ; Instructor In Roman Law, 1892-97 ; LL. B., 1895 ; Assistant 

Professor of Law, 1897-98 ; Professor of the Law of Evidence, Personal 

Property and Trusts In Western Reserve University, 1899 — 

George Henry Wilson, D. D. S., 44 Exiclid Av. 

Professor of Prosthesis and Metallurgy, and 

Superintendent of Laboratories and C/inics. 

D. D. S., Univ. of Michigan, 1878; Professor of Prosthetics and 
Metallurgy, Western Reserve University, 1892 — 



Benjamin Parsons Bourland, Ph. D., 12 Adelbert Hall. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages, 

A. B., Univ. of Michigan, 1889 ; A. M., 1890 ; Instructor In French, 
1892-95: Student Paris and Vienna, Bom#, Florence, Madrid, 1895-98; 
Ph. D., Univ. of Vienna, 1897 ; Instructor In French, Univ. of Michigan. 
1898-99; Assistant Professor, 1899-1901; Associate Professor of 
Romance Languages, Adelbert College, 1901 — 

HiPPOLYTK Gruener, Ph. D,, 43 Knox St. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B., Yale Coll.. 1891 ; Ph. D., 1898 ; Instructor In Chemistry and 
Physics, Hill School. Pottstown, Pa., 1898-94 : Univ. of Munich, 1894- 
95 ; Instructor In Chemistry. Adelbert Coll., 1895 — ; Associate Professor 
of Chemistry, College for women, 1898 — 

William H. Humiston, M. D., 536 Rose Bldg. 

Associate Prof essor of Gynecology . 

M. D., Long Island College Hospital, 1879 ; Associate Professor of 
Gynecology, Medical Department of Western Reserve University, 1895 — 

Torald Sollmann, M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 

M. D., Western Reserve Univ.. 1896; Lecturer on Pharmacology, 
Western Reserve University, 1898-1901 ; Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology and Materia Medica, 1901 — 

Ashley Horace Thorndike, Ph. D., 95 May field St. 

Associate Professor of English, 

A. B., Wesleyan Univ., 1898: Principal, Smith Acad., Hatfield, 
Mass., 1898-95 ; Harvard Univ., 1895-98 ; A. M., Harvard, 1896 ; Ph. D.. 
Harvard, 1898 ; Instructor, Boston Univ., 1895-98 ; Instructor In English, 
College for Women, 1898-1900; Associate Professor of English, 1900— 

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l6 FACUI^TY AND OFFICBRS. [19OI-1902 

. Own Frbbman Towbr, Ph. D., 8 Nantucket St. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 

A. B., Wesleyan UniT., 1802 ; A M., 1898 ; Assistant In Chemistry, 
Wesleyan Univ., 1893-04 : Univ. of Lelpslc, 1894-95 ; Ph. D., 1895 ; As- 
sistant Chemist in Nutrition Inyestlgatlons, Department of Agriculture, 
1895-98: Assistant in Chemistry, Wesleyan Uniy., 1896-98; Instructor 
in Chemistry, Adelbert College, 1898-1901 ; Assistant Professor, 1901— 

PRBDBRICK C. Waite, A. M., Ph. D. (Harvard), 77 Hillbum Av. 
Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

B. L., Adelbert Coll., 1892 ; A. M.. Western Reserve Uniy., 1894 ; A. 
M., Harvard Uniy., 1890 ; Ph. D., 1898 ; Assistant in Biology, Adelbert 
Coll., 1892-95 : Assistant in Zoology, Harvard Univ., 1897-98 ; Instructor 
in Biology, Peter Cooper High School, New llork City, 1808-1900; In- 
structor in Biology, New York Univ., 1899-1900 ; Assistant in Anatomy, 
Rush Medical Coll., of the Univ. of Chicago, 1900-1901 ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Histology and Embryology, Western Reserve Univ., 1901 — 

Francis Walker, Ph. D., 46 Nantucket St. 

Associate Professor of Political and Social Science. 

S. B., Mass. Inst, of Technology, 1892; A. M., Columbia Univ.. 
1898; Ph. D., 1895; University Fellow in Economics, Columbia Univ., 
1892-94; Instructor in Political and Social Science. Colorado ColL, 
1895-97 ; Professor of Political and Social Science. 1897-1900 : Associate 
Professor of Political and Social Science, Adelbert College, 1900 — 



Edward Perkins Cartel, M. D., 8 Hayward St. 

Lecturer on Medical furisprudence and Diseases of Children. 

M. D., Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1894; Fellow in Pathology, Johns 
Hopkins Univ.. 1896-97 ; Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence, Western Re- 
serve University, 1899 — 

Harriet B. Chapman, A. B., M. D., 810 Rose Building. 

Lecturer on Hygiene y College for Women, 

a. B.. Wellesley Coll., 1898; M. D., Cleveland Medical Coll.. 1896; 
Clinical Assistant, Eye and Ear Department, Good Samaritan Dispens- 
ary, 1897 ; Lecturer on Hygiene, College for Women, 1900 — 

Harry J. Crawford, A. B., LL. B., 3 Republic PI. 

Lecturer on Common Carriers. 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan Univ., 1890; LL. B., Western Reserve Univ., 
1898; Lecturer on Common Carriers, Law School of Western Reserve 
Univ., 1901— 

Prbderick Wii^liam Green, LL. B., Rice Av., Newburgh. 

Lecturer on Sales, 

LL. B., Western Reserve Univ., 1890 ; Lecturer In Western Reserve 
University, 1897— 

Frederick Augustus Henry, A. M., LL. B., Williamson Building. 
Lecturer on Dental furisprudence, 

A. B.. Hiram Coll.. 1888 ; A. M., LL. B., Univ. of Michigan, 1891 ; 
Professor of Law of Torts, Western Reserve University, 1894-1899; 
Professor of Dental Jurisprudence, 1899 — 



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I9OI-1902] WBSTBRN RBSBRVE UNIVERSITY. 17 

John M. Ingbrsou^, A. M., M. D., 50 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer an Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

A, B.. Adelbert Coll., 1891 ; A. M., 1896 ; M. D., Medical Coll., West- 
ern Reserre Univ., 1898; House Staff Cleveland City Hospital, 1894; 
Uniyersities of Vienna, Berlin and London, 1894-96 ; Lecturer on Otol- 
ogy, Rhinology and Laryngology, Western Reserve Uniyersity, 1895— 

Hbrman Clifford Kknyon, D. D. S., • 677 The Arcade. 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy and Instructor in Operative and 

Prosthetic Dental Technics. 

Hiram College, 1895-96; D. D. S., Western Reserve Univ., College 
of Dentistry, 1898: Demonstrator of Prosthetic Technics, Western Re- 
serye Unly., 1898 — ; Instructor in Operatiye and Prosthetic Technics, 
1901 — ; Lecturer on Dental Anatomy, 1901 — 

LoRiN Williams Ladd, A. B., M. D., Russell and Euclid. 

The Leonard Hanna Lecturer on Clinical Microscopy. 

a. B., Tale Unly.. 1895; Johns Hopkins Unly., 1896-99; M. D., 
1899: Assistant Resident Physician Johns Hopkins Unly. Hospital, 
1899-1900 : Resident Physician, Lakeside Hospital, 1900-01 ; Lecturer In 
Clinical Microscopy, Western Reserye Uniyersity, 1901 — 

ROGBR G. Pbrkins. a. B., M. D., Russell and Euclid. 

Lecturer on Bacteriology and Assistant in Pathology. 

A. B.. Union Coll.. 1893 ; A. B.. Haryard Unly.. 1894 : M. D.. Johns 
Hopkins Unly.. 1898: Resident PathologlBt. Lakeside Hospital, 1898- 
1901 : Demonstrator of Pathology, Western Reserye Univ.. 1899-1901 ; 
Fellow in Research of the Rockefeller Institute, 1901-2 ; Lecturer In Bac- 
teriology. 1901 — 

Wkston a. Vallbau Prick, D. D. S., M. E.. 2238 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer on Electro-therapeutics and Electrical Appliances. 

D. D. S., Uniy. of Mich., 1898 : Demonstrator Electro-Therapeutics 
and Elect. Appliances, Western Reserye Unly., 1897 ; l^ecturer, 1901 — 



Clarbncb Powers Bill, Ph. D., 853 Logan Av. 

Instructor in Latin and Greek. 

A. B.. Adelbert Coll., 1894; A. M., 1895; A. M., Harvard Univ., 
1896 : Ph. D.. 1898 ; Instructor in Latin, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

WiLUAM Dinsmorb Briggs, Ph. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

lustructorin English. 

A. B., Stanford Univ., 1896; A. M., Harvard Univ., 1899; Ph. D., 
1900: Instructor in English and German, Univ. of Vermont, 1900-01; 
Instructor in English, Adelbert College, 1901 — 

Mary GborGB Clark, Guilford House. 

Instructor in Physical Training. 

Sargent Normal School of Gymnastics. 1900; Instructor in Hist- 
ology, Sargent Normal School, 1900-01 ; Instmctor in Histology, Hem- 
enway Gymnasium. Harvard Univ., summer 1901 ; Instructor of Physi- 
cal Training. College for Women, 1901 — 

Charlks E. Clbmens, 1093 Prospect St. 

Instructor in the History and Theory 0/ Music. 



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l8 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [190I-I902 

John Dickbrman, A. B., 852 Doan St. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1891; Instructor In Mathematics. Western 
Ueserve Acad^ 1891-04; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1894-95; Cnamberlln 
Observatory, Denver Univ., 1895-96: Univ. of Chicago, 1896-97; In- 
structor In Mathematics. Adelbert College, 1897 — 

Robert Hbrndon Fife, Jr., Ph. D., 91 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in German, 

A. B., Univ. of Virginia, 1890 ; A. M.. 1896 ; Instructor In Bngllsh, 
St. Albans School, Radford. Va., 1895-98 ; Univ. of Gottlngen, 1898-99 ; 
Univ. of Leipzig, 1899-1901 : Ph. D., 1901 ; Instructor In German. Col- 
lege for Women. 1901 — 

IvAWRBNCB Edmonds Griffin, Ph. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Biology. 

A. B., Hamllne Univ., 1895; Assistant In Biology. Univ. of Minne- 
sota, 1895-98 ; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1898-1900 ; Ph. D., 1900 : Instruc- 
tor In Biology. College for Women, 1900 — 

Howell Merriman Haydn, A. B., 15 La Grange St. 

Instructor in the Bible. 

A. B.. Adelbert Coll.. 1896 : Auburn Theological Sem.. 1896-99 ; In- 
structor In Bible, College for Women. 1899 — 

Grace Moreland Henderson, B. L., East Cleveland. 

Instructor in French. 

B. L., College for Women, 1899 ; Instructor of French and German, 
Carthage Collegiate Inst., 1899-1900; Preceptress and Instructor In 
French and German, Iowa College Academy, 1900-01; Instructor in 
French. College for women. 1901 — 

Agnes Hunt, Ph. D., 51 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in History. 

A. B.. Smith Coll., 1897; Ph. D., Yale Univ., 1900: Assistant in 
History, College for Women, 1900-1901; Instructor in History. College 
for Women 1901 — 

David Gaul Jabger, A. B., LL. B., 113 Brookfield St. 

Instrtictor in Charge of Review Work Preparatory to 

Ohio Bar Examinations. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll.. 1897; LL. B., Western Reserve Univ., 1900; 
Instructor In Law School, Western Reserve Univ., 1901. 

Walter Taylor Marvin, Ph. D., 36 Knox St. 

Instructor in Philosophy. 

A. B., Columbia, 1893 ; Univ. of Jena, 1898-94 ; General Theological 
Seminary, New York, 1894-95; Columbia, 1895-97; Halle and Bonn, 
1897-98 ; Ph. D., Bonn, 1898 ; Assistant In Philosophy, Columbia. 1898- 
99 ; Instructor in Philosophy, Adelbert College, 1899 — 

Edward MbybRi Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

Instructor in German. 

B. L., Adelbert Coll., 1898; Univ. of Lelpslc, 1898-94; Univ. of 
Heidelberg, 1894-96; Ph. D., 1896; Instructor In German, Western Re- 
serve Univ., 1896-99 ; Instructor in German, Adelbert College, 1899 — 



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I9OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 19 

Thomas Edward Oi^ivaR, Ph. D., 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Romance Languages, 

A. B., Hanrard tJnlT., 1898; Harvard Medical School, 1893-94; 
UnlT. of Lelpaic 1894-95 ; Univ. of Heidelberg, 1895-97 : The Sorbonne, 
Ecole des Haotes Etudes, 1897-98 ; Univ. of Heidelberg, 1898-99 ; Ph. D., 
1899; Instructor in French, Univ. of Michigan, 1899-1900; Instructor 
In Romance Languages, College for Women. 1900 — 

Fritz Rbichmann, Ph. D., 46 Knox St. 

Instructor in Physics, 

C. E. and B. B., Univ. of Texas 1896; M. S., 1897; Fellow in 
Physics. Uniy. of Texas, 1895-97 ; Tutor and Instructor, 1897-98 ; Fellow 
in Physics. Univ. of Chicago, 1898-1901; Ph. D.. 1901: Academy In- 
structor. Uniy. of Chicago. 1900-01; Instructor In Physics, College for 
Women. 1901 — 

Ai«i«BN Dudley Severance, A. M., B. D., 1981 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Historical Bibliography, 

A. B., Amherst Coll.. 1889; A. Bi., 1896: Oberlin Theological Sem., 
1890-92 : B. D., Hartford Theological Sem., 1898 : Unlyersitles of Halle, 
Berlin, and at Paris, 1898-97; B. D., Oberlin Theological Sem., 1896; 
Assistant in History, College for Women, 1897-1900 ; Instructor In His- 
torical Bibliography, 1900 — 

Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., 698 Republic St. 

Instructor in English, 

Ph. B., Wabash Coll., 1894 ; Fowler-Duhme Fellow in English, 1894- 
95 : Instructor in English, 1894-95 ; Professor in English, Vlncennes 
Uniy.. 1895-1900; A. M., Wabash Coll., 1900; Uniyerslty Scholar in 
English, Columbia Uniy., 1900-1901 ; Instructor in English, Adelbert 
College. 1901— 

Charles Jesse Wehr, A. B., M. D., 5 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Physical Culture and Director of Gymnasium, 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1898 ; M. D., Western Reserye Uniy., 1901 ; In- 
structor in Physical Culture and Director of Gymnasium, j^delbert Coll., 
1901. 



Varnbv Edward Barnes, D. D. S., New England Building. 

Demonstrator of Prosthesis and Instructor of Orthodontia. 

Henry A. Becker, A. M., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

Russell H. Birgb, A. B., M. D., 260 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery. 

Charles E. Briggs, A. M., M. D., The New Amsterdam. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

William E, Bruner, A. M., M. D., 514 New England Bldg. 

Demonstrator of Ophthalmology, 

Edward P. Carter, M. D., 8 Hayward St. 

Demonstrator of Dermatology and Syphilology, 



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20 FACUI.TY AND OFFICERS. [19OI-I902 

John C Darby, A. B., M D., lakeside Hospital. 

Defmmstrator of Faihology, 

Frank J, Geib, A. B., M. D., Cor. Willaon and Prospect St 

Denumsiraior of Medicine, 

Prbdbrick C. Hbrrick, a. B., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Demonstraior of Surgery, 

Wm. E. IvOWER, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Surgery at St, Alexis' Hospital, 

Walter H. Mbrriam, Ph. B., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

Gborgb W. Moorbhousb, M. L., M. D., ' 39 Cutler St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

William O. Osborn, B. I/., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

Henry P. Parker, A. B., M. D., Russell and Euclid. 

Demonstrator of Pathology and Bacteriology, 

Edwin B. Season, M. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

Hubert L. Spence, M. D., 512 New England Bldg. 

Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases, 

Robert H. Sunkle, A. B., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

Oscar T. Thomas, M. D., 85 Edgewood PI. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology, 

John S. Tierney, M. D., Medical College. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 

Jambs Freed Wark, D. D. S., Rose Building. 

Defnonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

Douglas Austin Wright, D. D. S., 332 Cedar Av. 

Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry, 

Daniel Hkndrix Zeigler, D. D. S., Rose Building. 

Chief Demonstrator in Operative Dentistry. 



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I90I - 1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 2 1 

Lyman W. Childs, M. D., Cor. Wade Park and Dunham A vs. 

Assislani in Throat, Nose and Ear at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

PRAKK S. Clark, A. M., M. D., 493 Colonial Arcade. 

Assistant in Obstetrics and Pediatrics at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

A1.1CB DoYi,E Drake, Ph. B., 792 Republic Si. 

Assistant in English. 

Jambs a. Evans, B. S., Medical College. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

T. E. Griffiths, M. D., 1104 Woodland Av. 

Assistant in Surgery at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 

R. A. Hatchkr, Ph. G., M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Assistant in Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 

H. J. Hbrrick, a. M., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Fanny C. Hutchins, M. D., 373 Jennings Av. 

Assistant in Nervous Diseases. 

Carl B. Jambs, B. S., 958 S. hogan Av. 

Assistant in Biology. 

S. H. Largb, M. D., 1012 New England Bldg. 

Assistant in Nose, Ear and Throat Diseases. 

Nina May Roberts, A. M., Alta House. 

Assistant in English. 

William E. Shacklbton, M. D., 605 The Osbom. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

WiNiFRBD Alice Storbr, B. L., 95 Ingleside Av. 

Assistant in English. 

John J. Thomas. A. M., M. D., 156 Crawford Rd. 

Assistant in Diseases of Children At Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

Maud Winship, A. M., 100 Kensington St. 

Assistant in Philosophy and Education. 



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22 



FACULTY AND OFPICBRS. 



[19OI-I902 



LECTURERS IN YEAR J900-J90J- 

Howard Crosby Butlbr, Ph. D., Princeton University. 

Lecturer on " The Deserted Villages of Northern Syria,** 

Thomas WentworthHigoinson, h. H.D., LL. D., Cambridge, Mass. 

Lecturer on American History ^ on the Foundation Endowed 

by the Daughters of the American Revolution. 

Frank K. Saunders, Ph. D., D. D. Yale University. 

Lecturer on " The Prophets of Israel and Their Messages.** 

The Florence Harkness Biblical Foundation. 

Wu Ting Fang, Chinese Minister to the United States, Washington. 

Lecturer on ** Washington and Education.** 

Martin L. D'Ooge, University of Michigan. 

Lecturer on ** Delphi and Recent French Excavations.** 



OTHER OFFICERS. 

Edward Christopher Wii;i,iams, B. L., 

Librarian, 

Esther Crawford, B. L., 

Assistant in Library, 
Anna Louise Mac Intyre, A. B,, 

Librarian, College for Women 

Frances L. Trowbridge, 

Librarian of Law School. 

Bertha Louise Torrey, A. B., 

Registrar^ College for Women 
Roy B. Metz, M. D., 

Clerk of Medical College, 

Miss K. G. Frankle, 

Clerk of Operative Clinic, 

Mrs. D. A. Wright, 

Clerk of Prosthetic Clinic, 
Elizabeth Currier Annin, Housemistress, 
Jessie Boggs, a. m., M. D., 

Medical Examiner^ College for Women, 
Andrew Flower, * Erie and St Clair Sts. 

Prosector and Curator Anatomical Rooms. 

Herman Douglass Graham, 7 Dodge Ct. 

Curator of Dental Museum, 



61 Grant St. 

972 Cedar Av.. 

136 Sawtell Av. 

84 Miles Av. 

Guilford House. 

Medical College. 

520 Woodland Av. 



Guilford House. 
1257 Euclid Av. 



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ADiELBERT COLLEGE. 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT. 



VVn i8oi The General Assembly of the Territory of 
Uj the United States northwest of the river Ohio was 
petitioned by residents of the Connecticut Western Reserve 
to grant a charter for a college to be situated within the 
limits of the Reserve. The petition was denied. In 1803, 
on tjie sixteenth of April, the first General Assembly of the 
State of Ohio, chartered the Erie Literary Society, a corpo- 
ration composed of several proprietors of land within the 
county of Trumbull (then comprising the entire Reserve) , 
who desired to appropriate a part thereof to found a semin- 
ary of learning within that county. Under this charter an 
Academy was established at Burton in 1805, the first insti- 
tution of this kind in Northern Ohio. This school, with the 
exception of the years 1810 to 1819, continued in operation 
until 1834. In 1817 the Presbytery of Grand River, which 
embraced nearly all the Presbyterian and Congregational 
ministers and churches of the Reserve, formed itself into a 
society ** for the education of indigent, pious young men for 
the ministry, within the limits of the Presbytery." The 
students aided by this society studied privately with clergy- 
men until the opening of the Academy at Burton, when 
they pursued their studies at that school. In 18 18 the 
Presbytery of Portage formed a similar society. In 1822 
the two Presbyteries appointed a committee to confer to- 
gether for the purpose of devising **ways and means for 
establishing on the Connecticut Western Reserve a Literary 
and Theological Institution. ' ' The report of the committee, 
which was adopted by the Presbyteries, provided for the 



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24 ADBI^BERT COLI^EGE. [19OI-1902 

establishment, under certain conditions, of a Theological 
Institution on the foundation of the Erie I^iterary Society 
at Burton. The Trustees of the Erie Uterary Society ac- 
cepted the conditions. A Board of Managers of the Edu- 
cation fund was then appointed by the Presbyteries. 

The connection between the Board of Managers and the 
Trustees of the Erie I^iterary Society lasted until June, 1824. 
During the year 1823 the managers became convinced that 
such an institution as they desired could not be built up at 
Burton, and consequently they requested the Trustees of the 
Erie Literary Society to move their establishment to a more 
eligible situation. As the Trustees held property on condi- 
tion that the school should be in Burton, they declined 
this proposition. In June, 1824, at a joint session of the 
Board of Managers, with special commissioners of the Pres- 
byteries, it was decided to discontinue the connection with 
the Erie Literary Society and to found a separate institu- 
tion. In January a special Board of Commissioners, repre- 
senting the Presbyteries, to which the Presbytery of Huron 
was now added, selected Hudson as the site of the college. 
The Board of Managers, with four additional members rep- 
resenting the Huron Presbytery, now became the Board of 
Trustees, and held their first meeting at Hudson, February 
15, 1825. They drafted a charter and drew up plans for 
the grounds. The charter was granted February 7, 1826, 
and on April 26 the comer stone of the first building was 
laid. The first students were received in December, 1826, 
and were instructed at Talmadge by Mr. Coe, the principal 
of the Academy at that place, who was appointed tutor pro 
tempore. In 1827 the new building at Hudson was occupied 
and the preparatory department established. A Theological 
Department was opened in 1830 and maintained until 1852.* 



*Thii sketch of the foundfttion of the College ii based upon ** A History of 
Western Reserve College. 1826-1876, by Rev. Carroll Cutler, D. D., President. 
Cleveland, 1876. 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 25 

In 1878 the question of removing the College from Hud- 
son to Cleveland was raised, and a committee of the Trus- 
tees was appointed to take the matter under consideration. 
In March, 1880, through a member of the Board of Trust, 
Mr. Amasa Stone, of Cleveland, proposed to give the Col- 
lege five hundred thousand dollars, provided it should be 
removed to Cleveland, occupy some suitable site to be do- 
nated by the citizens, and change its name to **Adelbert 
College of Western Reserve University.'* The new name 
was to be a memorial to Mr. Stone's only son, Adelbert, 
who had been drowned while a student at Yale. Mr. Stone 
proposed further, that of the sum offered by him one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars should be expended in build- 
ings and the remainder added to the permanent funds of 
the College. The committee weighed the comparative 
advantages of dty and country situation and especially the 
opportunities for growth and development in the new envi- 
ronment. Moreover an investigation showed that, in the 
fifty years from its foundation in 1876, the College had 
received in gifts some three hundred and seventy-five thou- 
sand dollars, two hundred thousand dollars of which had 
been given for current expenses. The remainder consti- 
tuted the College endowment, and included the funds used 
in establishing the Handy, Hurlbut, Oviatt, and Perkins 
professorships. Mr. Stone's offer would exactly treble the 
endowment, in addition to providing a modem equipment. 
The committee, therefore, recommended the acceptance of 
the proposition, and the Trustees voted, on September 20 
of the same year, to make the change whenever the condi- 
tions were fulfilled. On March 19, 1881, the Trustees 
voted that the conditions had been complied with and that 
the removal should be made. 

In accordance with this decision, in September, 1882, the 
College opened its doors on the new campus of twenty-two 
acres, situated in the midst. of the great park system of 



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26 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [190I-I902 

Cleveland. On this campus two buildings had been erected, 
one containing rooms for the work of instruction, with 
offices, chapel, librar>', and museum ; the other, apartments 
for sixty students. The ensuing years have fully proved 
the wisdom of the change, as shown by the increase of stu- 
dents and of endowment funds. In 1883 the sura of one 
hundred thousand dollars was added to the funds of the 
College by the will of Mr. Stone. In 1888 the gymnasium 
was erected and equipped by the gifts of numerous friends. 
During the same year fifty thousand dollars was received 
to found the Haydn Professorship. In 1894 Mr. Samuel 
Mather built and furnished the Physical Laboratory In 
the following year Mr. Henry R. Hatch presented the 
librar)' building bearing his name, and in 1898 added the 
wings as provided in the original designs. In 1 897 Eldred 
Hall, a building for the use of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, was erected through the gift of the late Rev. 
Henry B. Eldred. In 1899, the Biological Laboratory, to 
which many friends contributed, was completed. By the 
will of Daniel B. Fayerweather, of New York City, who 
died in 1890, the College has received an additional endow- 
ment fund of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 27 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arranged^ with exception of the President^ in the order oj graduation from College, 

Charles Frankun Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President, 
Lemuel StoughTON Potwin, A. M., D. D., 322 Rosedale Av. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature. 
Edward Williams Mor ley, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Hurlbut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry. 
Charles Josiah Smith, A. M., 35 AdeU)ert St. 

Professor of Mathemaiics. 
Frank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc, 79 Adelbert St. 

Perkins Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 
Charles Harris, Ph. D., (Absent on leave). 

Professor of German. 
Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Handy Professor of Philosophy. 

Francis Hobart Herrick, Ph. D., D. Sc, 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology and Curator of the Zoological Collection. 

Henrv Pi-ATT Cushing, M. S., 260 Sibley St. 

Professor of Geology. 
Oliver Farrar Emerson, Ph. D., 50 Wilbur St. 

Oviatt Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology. 

Samuel Ball PlaTner, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit. 

Secretary of the Faculty. 

Abraham Lincoln Fuller, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greek, Dean of the Faculty, 
John Wili*iam Perrin, Ph. D., 81 Cutler St. 

Haydn Prof essor of History . 
Benjamin Parsons Bourland, Ph. D., 12 Adelbert Hall 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 
Francis Walker, Ph. D., 44 Nantucket St. 

Associate Professor of Political and Social Science. 

OUN Freeman Tower, Ph. D., Euclid Av. and Nantucket St. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 



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28 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

John Dickbrman, A. B., S52 Doan St. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

HiPPOLYTE Grubner, Ph. D., 43 Knox St. 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Edward Meyer, Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

Instructor in German. 

Walter Taylor Marvin, Ph. D., 36 Knox St. 

Instructor in Philosophy. 
Clarbncb Powers Bill, Ph. D., 853 Logan Av. 

Instructor in Latin and Greek. 
Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., 698 Republic St. 

Instructor in Rhetoric and Elocution. 
Fritz Reichmann, Ph. D., 46 Knox. 

Instructor in Physics. 
William Dinsmorb Briggs, Ph. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

lustructor in English. 

Charles Jesse Wehr, A. B., M. D., 5 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Physical Culture and Director of Gymnasium. 

OTHER OFFICERS, 



Edward Christopher Williams, B. L., 61 Grant St. 

Librarian. 

Esther Crawford, B. L., 972 Cedar Av. 

Assistant in Library. 

Carl B. James, B. S., 958 S. Logan Av. 

Assistant in Biology. 

Additional instruction in their own departments is given by the 
following members of the Faculty of the College for Women. 

Harold North Fowler, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Professor of Greek. 
Robert Waller Pbering, Ph. D., 41 Cornell St. 

Professor of German. 
Allen Dudley Severance, A. M., B. D., 1981 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Historical Bibliography. 

Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph. D., 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 29 

Lawrence Edward Griffin, Ph. D., 2838 Euclid A v. 

Instructor in Biology. 

Howbi«l*Mbrriman Haydn, A. B., 15 Lagrange St. 

Instructor in Bible. 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY, 



i. committee on admission : 

Professors Fui.i*er*, Pi,atner, Smith. 

II. executive committee: 

( Having oversight of the classroom work and academic status of the students.) 

Professors Fui,i,ek*, Platner, Smith. 

III. committee on curriculum : 

Professors Emerson, Mori^ey*, Pi^atner. 

IV. committee on program of recitations and i^ectures : 

Professors Gushing*, Perrin, Whitman. 

v. committee on cataix)gue i 

Professors Emerson, Perrin*, Dr. Meyer. 

vi. committee on i«ibrary : 

Professors Curtis, Deering, Pi^atner*, Emerson, Whitman. 

vii. committee on rooms : 

Professors Herrick, Perrin, Whitman*. 

viii. committee on gymnasium. 

Professor Cushing, Mr. Dickerman* and Mr. Wehr. 

ix. committee on athi,etics i 

Professors Gushing*, Fui.i,er, and Mr. Dickerman. 

*Chaimiati. 



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30 



ADELBBRT COI,LKGE. 



[19OI-1902 



STUDENTS. 



John Alvin Alburn, CI. 
Wilfred IIenr>^ Alburn, CI. 
Edwin Clare Caldwell, CI. 
Richard Emmet Collins, L. S. 
Joseph Warren Conner, M. L. 
Claude Leroy Difford. CI. 
Clarence Earl Drayer, CI. 
Frank Brown Evarts, CI. 
Daniel Robert Fairfax, M. L. 
Harry Lindsley Findlay, CI. 
John Fish, L. S. 
Robert Thompson Gage, M. L. 
Raymond Hobart, M. h. 
Charles Samuel McKee, L. S. 
Henry Leonard Mach, CI. 
Ralph Woodward Mead, CI. 
Roy Rybum MoflPett, L. vS. 
Charles Augustus Morris, CI. 
Herbert Gans Muckley, CI. 
Walter Worthington Nims, CI. 
Herman Joel Nord, L. S. 
Harry Benton Parrott, h. S. 
Edward Peterka, CI. 
Raymond Vincent Phelan, h. S 
James Douglass Pilch er, L. S. 
William Harper Rider, CI. 
John Philander Rorabeck, L. S. 
George William Saywell, M. L. 
Edward Henry Sensel, CI. 
Frank North Shankland, L. S. 
Miles Reuben South worth, CI. 
Edwin Wesley Suits, L. S. 
Homer Fordyce Swift, L. S. 
Philip Hyatt Tarr, L. S. 
George Taylor, CI. 



SENIORS. 

Ay/es' Corners Eldred Hall. 

Kyles' Comers Eldred Hall. 

Warten ATA Rooms. 

Cleveland 1 734 Woodland Hills A v. 
Rochester, N. V. AY House. 



Cleveland 

Kenton 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Pemberville 

Mt. Vernon 

CI eve I arid 

Norwalk 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Belleviie 

Giddings 

Mt. Vernon 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Alliance 

Bedford 

Hudson 

Cleveland 

Willoughby 



49 Alum St. 

K ^ E House. 

99 Bellflower A v. 

63 Calvert St. 

151 Cornell St. 

A T O House. 

788 Republic St. 

A K E House. 

K * E House. 

688 Forest St. 

7 Adelbert Hall. 

715 N. Logan Av. 

189 W. Madison Av. 

148 Hawthorne A v. 

798 Republic St. 

60 Bellflower A v. 

805 Fairmount St. 

51 Goethe St. 

698 Bridge St. 

54 Auburndale St. 

A T O House. 

16 Adelbert Hall. 

K * E House. 

124 Putnam St. 

ATA Rooms. 



Schuyler's Lake, A^. K. A T O House. 
Cleveland 939 S. Logan Av. 

Beaver Falls, Pa. A T'O House. 
Mt. Vernon 79 Sayles St. 

Lima 89 Cutler St. 



♦Abbreviations': CI., Classical Course; L. S, Latin-Scientific Course; M. L.. 
Modern I^ang^uage Course. A number in parenthesis after the name of a special 
student indicates the year to which he belongs. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



31 



Frederick William Uhlman, M. L. IVeston A Y House. 

James Washburn Waite, L. S. Cleveland 1086 Scranton Av. 

Roydon Edward Weaver, L. S. Akron 153 Cornell St. 

Oliver Arkenburgh Weber, L. S. Miamisburg B 9 11 House. 

Arthur Garfield Wilcox, L. S. Akron 16 Adelbert Hall. 

Owen N. Wilcox, M. L. Cleveland 59 Olive St. 

Lewis Blair W^illiams, CI. Cleveland 64 Glen Park PI. 

Oliver Amos Wright, CI. 45 Knox St. 

Seniors, 43. 



JUNIORS. 



Edwin Allen Barnes, L. S. 
Edwin Childs Baxter, CI. 
Walter Lewis Bissell, CI. 
Charles Bushnell Byal, CI. 
Homer Charles Campbell, L. S. 
John Stanard Campbell, L. S. 
Edwin Leland Carle, CI. 
James Williams Carpenter, M. L. 
Paul Richard Chamberlain, CI. 
Francis Corrigan, CI. 
Raymond Garfield De Frees, L. S. 
David Love Dugan, CI. 
Arthur Bradley Eisenbrey, L. S. 
Albert Ellenberger, L. S. 
Robert Emmett Finley, L. S. 
Robert Edward Gammel, M. L. 
Birt Eugene Gaiver, M. L. 
Harlan Adolphus Hepfinger, L. S. 
James Julius Hoffman, CI. 
Bradley Hull, Jr., CI. 
Willis Burton Knisely, L. S. 
Frederick Tyler Lawton, L. S. 
Robert George Lotspietch, CI. 
Albert W. Meyer, CI. 
John William O'Brien. L. S. 
Edward Maynard Otis, L. S. 
Herbert Ernest Parker, L. S. 
William Robert Polhamus, 
Ernest James Reece, L. S. 
Hugh Griffith Rose, L. S. 
Rollin Henry Spelman, CI. 



Payne 20 Adelbert Hall. 

Los Angeles, Cal. A A ^ House. 



New Milford 
Findlay 
Akron 
Cleveland 
Geneva 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Troy 

Huntsburg 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Salem 
Cleveland 
Lorain 

Dunkirk, N. J 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Canlon 
Toledo 
London 
Cleveland 
Mi. Vernon 
Willoughby 



A K E House. 

A K E House. 

68 Bell Av. 

1035 St. Clair St. 

24.Streator Av. 

46 Knox St. 

76 White Av. 

66 Covington St. 

8 Adelbert Hall. 

K * E House. 

63 Adelbert St. 

Euclid Heights. 

730 Republic St. 

413 Dunham Av. 

Ben House. 

Willoughby. 

1059 Central Av. 

340 Euclid Av. 

1578 Cedar Av. 

K * E House. 

6 Cornell PI. 

844 Logan Av- 

Wain St. 

16 Mariner St. 



Binghamton^N. Y. 730 Republic St. 
Cleveland 20 Tennessee St. 

Cleveland 59 Beersford PI. 

Wellsville 142 Cornell St. 

RooistoTvn Euclid Heights. 



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32 



ADELBERT COLLEGE. 



[1901-1902 



Warren Daniel Spengler, M. h. 
Feist M. Strauss, CI. 
George Franklin Thomas, L. S. 
Herbert Alfred Thomas, L. S. 
Sidney Burnett Tryon, CI. 
Albert George Tuttle, CI. 
Lawrence Waldo Ustick, L. S. 
Isaac Roy Watts, L. S. 
Elmer Bertram Wolfram, M. L. 



Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Lima 

Willoughby 

Rowe^ Mass. 

Washington C. H. 

Willoughby 

Bellevue 



SOPHOMORES. 

Hiram Henry Canfield, M. L. Euclid Heights 
Sidney Loftus Chaffee, L. S. Cleveland 

Willis Brainard Clarke, M. L. E. Clatidon 
Clyde Lottridge Cummer, L. S. Cleveland 
William Jay Dawley, CI. Cleveland 

John Adam Eisenhauer, Jr., M. L. Cleveland 



M. L. 



L. S. 



Cleveland 

Toledo 

Warren 

Bedford 

Piqua 

Riitman 

Toledo 



Ralph Stevens Emery, 
Louis Englander, CI. 
George Tuttle Filius, CI. 
George Nathaniel Forbes, 
William Levi Fox, CI. 
Rayman Forrest Fritz, CI. 
Maurice Grifl5n, Jr., L. S. 
William Henry Charles Heinmiller, CI. Cleveland 
Kenneth Ethelbert Hodgman, L. S. Parma 

Isaac McCallum Hogg, L. S. Youngstown 

Wade Oakly Hulbert, CI. Thompson 

Charles J. Jackson, L. S. Huckleberry 

Percy R. Jenks, CI. Nottingham 
William Pendleton Lanphear, Jr., CI. Cleveland 

Leonard Corwin Loomis, CI. Cleveland 

Arthur Fraw McArthur, L. S. Cleveland 

Forest Oliver March, L. S. Chagrin Falls 

Victor Garfield Mills. M. L. Willoughby 

Walter George Miser, L. S. Annapolis 

Arthur Garfield Moore, CI. Cuyahoga Falls 

Willis Edwin Morehouse, CI. Huntsburg 

Edmond DeWitt Neer, L. S. De Graff 

Arthur Price Nutt, L. S. Sidney 

John Frederic Oberlin, L. S. Canton 



63 Fourth Av. 

1388 Superior St. 

ATA House. 

147 Cornell St. 

ATA Rooms. 

853 Doan St. 

iSAdelbertHall. 

ATA Rooms. 

A Y House. 

Juniors, 40. 



Euclid Heights. 

239 Genesee Av. 

345 Orange St. 

396 Bolton Ave. 

A K E House. 

1433 Willson Av. 

2036 Broadway. 

A T O House. 

117 AdelbertSt. 

14 Adelbert Hall. 

102 Adelbert St. 

49 Fairchild St. 

41 Cornell St. 

5 Steinway Av. 

29 Foster St. 

139 Cornell St. 

139 Cornell St. 

845 Fairmount St. 

Nottingham. 

782 Republic St. 

1280 Willson Av. 

203 Oakdale St. 

A A ^ House. 

Willoughby. 

14 Adelbert Hall. 

129 Burt St. 

14 Adelbert Hall. 

117 AdelbertSt. 

Ben House. 

67 Cornell St. 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



33 



Raymond Patton, h. S. 
Frank Herson Pelton, L. S. 
Frederick Early Pfeiffer, L. S. 
Ulrich John PfeiflFer, ly. S. 
Noyes BiUin^s Prentice, Jr., M. L. 
Ralph Roscoe Proctor, L. S. 
Henry K. Ronk, CI. 
Olivia Bumell Sharp, L. S. 
Louis Bennet Spanner, M. L. 
I^wrence Caleb Spieth, CI. 
Prank Holt Stedman, M. L. 
Emery E. Stevens, CI. 
Howard Clifford Summers, CI. 
Carl Peter Paul Vitz, CI. 
Raymond Crandall Warner, CI. 
Oarratt Smith Wilkin, L. S. 
Joseph Frank Williams, L. S. 
James Garfield Woodward, 
Charles Clarence Williamson, 
Robert Algar Woolfolk, M. L. 
James Herbert Young, CI. 
John LilHe Young, L. S. 



Sidney 

IVilloughby 

Kenton 

Kenton 

Cleveland 

Fremont 

Norwalk 

Jonesboro, III. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 



12 AdelbertHall. 

Collinwood. 

89 Sayles St. 

89 Sayles St. 

12 Lake view Av. 

A A ^ House. 

26 Wilbur St. 

45 Fairchild St. 

240 Orange St. 

A Y House. 



Belmont, Mass. 1944 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland 2036 Broadway. 

Cleveland 1528 Superior St. 

Cleveland 45 Marvin Av. 

Geneva ATA Rooms. 
New Philadelphia A K E House. 

YoungstoTvn A T O House. 

Painesville 203 Adelbert St. 

Salem K ^ E House. 

Danville, Va. 49 Fairchild St. 

Cleveland 17 Centennial St. 

Cleveland 345 Russell A v. 
Sophomores, 52. 



PRBSHMBN. 



Cary Rudolph Album, CI. 
Horace Barnes, M. L. 
George Forrest Bamett, L. S. 
James William Baxter, M. L. 
Henry Wilmer Blackburn, CI. 
Robert Swinton Campbell, M. L. 
Walter Baldwin Carnes, L. S. 
Carl Judd Case, CI. 
Howard Latham Clarke, M. L. 
Harold L. Cline, L. S. 
Charles Manchester Coe, M. L. 
John Lewis Conant, CI. 
Harvey Lee Comin, CI. 
Gomer Abraham Cook, CI. 
Walter Henry Cook, CI. 
Herbert Randolph Cox, L. S. 
Bainbridge Cowell , CI . 



Kyles' Comers Eldred Hall. 

Cleveland 21 Claremont St. 

Painesville 15 Adelbert Hall. 

Cleveland 29 Aetna St. 

Wellsville 142 Cornell St. 

Cleveland 2209 Superior St. 

Lima 147 Cornell St. 

Hudson 149 Cornell St. 
IV, Williamsfield 102 Adelbert St. 
New Philadelphia A K E House. 

Glenville Glenville. 

Cleveland 22 Bleeker St. 

Mansfield 168 Streator Av. 

Youngstown 49 Fairchild St. 

Cleveland 724 Republic St. 

Canton 2481 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland 91 Arlington St. 



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34 



ADELBERT COLLEGE. 



[19OI-I902 



Mo 



John Walter Daehler, M. L. Portsmouth 

John Benjamin Daugherty, L. S. SteubenviHe 
Charles Francis Enyeart, L. S. Troy 
Earl Roemer Findley, M. L. Akron 

Charles Clarence Gamian, CI. Troy 
Clark Peter Gamian, CI. Troy 

Clarence Edward Gibbons, L. S. Talhnadp^e 
Charles Albert Gilbert, L. S. CUidand 

William Hamilton Gillie, L. S. Tivinsburg 
John James Gunn, CI. Cleveland 

Roy Asa Haynes, L. S. Hillsboro 

Howard Warinj( Herrick, CI. Cleveland 

F)merson Freeman Hird, CI. Baldwinville, 
Wallace Holliday, CI. Cleveland 

I'Yank Merrick Hubl>ell, CI. Cleveland 

Daniel Ernest Johnson, CI. Cleveland 

Harris Cecil Johnston, L. S. BoonvilU\ 

Oliver Jones, CI. Cleveland 

Harry Ralph Lloyd, L. S. Wickliffe 

William Claude Martin, L. S. Cleveland 
Budd Noble Merrills, CI. Wickliffe 

Oscar Richard Micklethwaite, L. S. Portsmouth 
William Theodore Miller, M. L. Cleveland 
Arnold Minnig, L. S. 
Homer Lynn Nearpass, CI. 
William Thomson Nimmons, L. S 
Robert Henry Horace Pierce, L. S. Toledo 
Carl Adolph Riemenschneider, M. L. Cleveland 
Walter Iviiwrence Robison, M. L. 
John Richard Ruggles, L. S. 
Edgar Conrad Schmidt, M. L. 
Philip Wallace Seagrave, CI. 
William Ernest Singer, L. S. 
Clarence Evans Stinchcomb, L. S 
Clarence Ansel Strong, CI. 
Wilbert Rosco Strunk, L. S. 
John Hollam Stuart, CI. 
Roy Foster Van Voorhis, CI. 
Saul Charles Wachner, CI. 
Chester Marvin Wallace, CI. 
Andrew Bracken White, M. L. 
James Victor Wolcott, M. L. 



125 Adelbert St.. 

Euclid Heights. 

12 Adelbert Hall. 

151 Cornell St. 

23 Adelbert Hall. 

23 Adelbert Hall. 

766 Faimiount St. 

1604 Euclid Av. 

117 Adelbert St. 

153 Dibble A v. 

3S9 Cedar A v. 

3006 Euclid Av. 

Mass. 44 Nantucket St. 

30 Miles Park St. 

673 Franklin Av. 

53 Calvert St. 

45 Knox St. 

2370 Elmwood St. 

Wickliffe. 

84 Marvin Av. 

Wickliffe. 

125 Adelbert St. 

999 E. Madison A v. 



i\ew Philadelphia 24S1 Euclid Av. 

Culver y Ind. 761 N. Logan A v. 

Lincoln, Kan. 45 Knox St. 

1 68 Slreator A v. 

161 Beech wood St. 

5 Hay ward St. 

224 Streator Av. 

A Y House. 

55 Fourth Ave. 

A Y House. 

1177 Dennison Av. 

109 Cornell St. 

13 Adelbert Hall. 

136 Murray Hill A v. 

126 Murray Hill Av. 

440 Scovill Av 

Willoughby. 

19 La Grange St. 

72 Gra.smere St. 

Freshmen, 59. 



Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Dayton 

Cleveland 

Weston 

Perry 

Warren 

Sidney 

Youjigstown 

Van Wert 

Akron 

Willoughby 

Cleveland 

E. Cleveland 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



35 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 

Thomas Allan Boyle, (i) Salem 121 Bell A v. 

Albert Franklin Counts, (2) Sidney 13 Adelbert Hall. 

Bert Elijah Dean, (2) Faimiouni Fairmount. 

Roy Gould Harris, (i) ' Cleveland 221 1 Euclid Av. 

Harold Edward Ivangdou, (2) Akron 715 N. Logan Av. 

Joseph Jackson Lane ( i ) Cleveland 7 1 Streator Av. 

Benjamin Muhlhauser, (1) Cleveland no Walton Av. 

Clarence J. Neal, (3) Cleveland 616 Woodland Av. 

John Roy Petty, (i) East Cleveland East Cleveland. 

Charles Clark Thwing, (i), Leavenworthy Kan. 44 Nantucket St. 

Walter Herbert Warren, (2), Woosier 76 Bell Av. 

John Calvin Winter, ( i ) Terre Haute, Ind. 1252 Scranton Av. 

Speciai^, 12. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 43 

Juniors 40 

Sophomores 52 

Freshmen 59 

Special Students 12 

206 



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36 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



All applicants for admission, whether to the Freshman 
class, to advanced standing, or to partial courses, must pre- 
sent satisfactory testimonials of good moral character, and 
those from other colleges must also bring certificates of hon- 
orable dismission. Admission to the Freshman class may- 
be gained in one of two ways, either on examination, or on 
presentation of a certificate from an approved High School 
or Academy. Each of these methods is outlined below. 

ADMISSION ON EXAMINATION. 

The regular examination for admission to the Freshman 
class is held at Adelbert College on the Friday and Saturday 
following Commencement (June 13-14, 1902). Attendance 
is required at the opening of the examination on Friday 
morning. The examinations, which are partly oral and 
partly written, occur as follows: 

First Day— Mathematics, 9 a. M. to 12 M. (Arithmetic, 9 to 9:30; 
Algebra, 9:30 to 11; Geometry, 11 to 12); Greek, German and French, 
2 p. M. to 5 p. M.; Chemistry, 2 p. M. to 3 p. M.; Physics, 3 p. m. to 4 
p. M.; History, 4 p. M to 5 p. M. 

Second Day — Latin, 9 a. m. to 12 m.; English, 2 p. m. to 4 p. M. 

A second examination, to accommodate those unable to 
attend the first, is held at Adelbert College on the Monday 
and Tuesday before the opening of the first term (Septem- 
ber 15-16, 1902), beginning promptly at 9 A. m. The order 
of examinations is the same as at the regular examination. 
Candidates applying to be examined at other than these 
specified times, or late at the second examination, must ob- 
tain special permission from the Faculty. Candidates late 
at the regular examinations have no opportunity to make 
good their loss until the second examination. 



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190I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 37 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

All candidates, irrespective of the course they may choose, 
must be prepared in English, I^atin, and Mathematics, 
according tt> the outlines of those subjects given below. 
Students whose examination papers show marked deficiency 
in spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division into paragraphs, 
will not be admitted to any course. 

English: The examination consists of two parts. The student is 
required to show a general knowledge of the books marked A in the 
following lists, and to write several short paragraphs on different sub- 
jects chosen from them. In preparation for this part of the require- 
ment it is important that the candidate shall receive instruction in the 
fundamental principles of rhetoric. He is also required to answer 
questions testing a thorough acquaintance with the books marked B. 
These questions relate to the author and subject matter, to the essen- 
tials of English grammar, and to the leading facts in those periods of 
English literary history to which the prescribed books belong. 

Examinations in 1902: A. For Reading: Shakespeare's Merchant 
of Venice; Pope's Iliad, Books i, vi, xxii, and xxiv; The Sir Roger de 
Coverley Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Colerid>?e's Ancient 
Mariner; Scott's Ivauhoe; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Tennyson's 
Princess; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Mamer. 
B. For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, 
L' Allegro, II Penseroso; Burke's Conciliation with America; Mac- 
aulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Examinations in 1903 and 1904: A. For Reading: Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice, and Julius Caesar; The Sir Roger de Coverley 
Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Carlyle's Essay on Bums; Tenny- 
son's Princess; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas 
Mamer. B. For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's L' Allegro, 
U Penseroso, Comus, Lycidas; Burke's Conciliation with America; 
Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Latin: Grammar (Bennett, or Allen and Greenough); Roman 
pronunciation. Caesar — ^three books of the Gallic War, or two books 
of the Civil War. Cicero — six orations, inclu<fing De Imperio Gn. 
Pompeii. Virgil — the Bucolics, two books of the Georgics and five 
books of the ^neid, or the Bucolics and six books of the iEneid. 
Ovid — ^Translation at sight. The translation at sight of passages from 



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38 ADBLBBRT COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

prose authors. Prose Composition — rendering of simple English 
sentences into Latin. History of Rome — ^the amount required is indi- 
cated by Smith *s Smaller History of Rome, or Creighton's Primer of 
Roman History. Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics: Arithmetic, including the metric system of weights 
and measures. Algebra ( Milne^s or Taylor's Academic, or Wentworth's 
College), to the chapter on the Binomial Theorem. Geometry— 
(Beman and Smith, Milne or Wells) complete. 

Note : It is very important that students re\'iew a portion at least 
of both Algebra and Geometry in their last preparatory year. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 

In addition to the above, students entering the several 
courses must be prepared in the following subjects: For the 
Classical Course, Greek; for the Modern Language Course, 
French or German; for the Latin-Scientific Course, Chem- 
istry, Physics, and English History. The entrance require- 
ments in these subjects are as follows: 

Grekk: Grammar; pronunciation as recommended on page vii of 
the Preface to Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Xenophon — four books 
of the Anabasis (for which one hundred and ten pages of Goodwin's 
Greek Reader will be considered as equivalent). Homer — ^three 
books of the Iliad, with Prosody. The translation at sight of easy 
passages in Attic prose. Prose Composition— the rendering into 
Greek of simple English sentences. White's Beg^nner*s Greek Book 
(complete), Jones's Exercises in Greek Prose (twenty-six exercises), 
or Pearson's Greek Prose Composition are recommended. History of 
Greece — FyfTe's Primer, Oman's, Myers's, or Smith's History of 
Greece, or Pennell's Ancient Greece. Ancient Geography. 

French: Ability to write simple sentences in French. A thorough 
knowledge of French Grammar, special attention being paid to the 
verbs. Ability to read ordinary French at sight. The following 
course is advised: First Year — French Grammar and exercises; 
irregular verbs; Kuhns' French Reader; Hal^vy's L'Abb^ Constantin; 
Labiche's Voyage de M. Perrichon. Second Year — Grammar with 
Composition exercises from L'Abb^ Constantin (Grandgent). San- 
deau's Mile de la Seiglidre, Pailleron*s Le Monde oil I'on s'ennuie, 
Loti's Pdcheur d'Islande, Daudet's Contes (Cameron). Third Year — 
Review of irregular verbs, vnth composition exercises from I^a Belle 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 39 

Nivemaise. Moli^re's Bourgeois Gentilhomme, or any other comedy 
•of Moli^re. Racine's Athalie, Comeille's Cid, Balzac's Eugenie 
Grandet. 

German: Grammar, with translation at sight of easy German 
prose. Prose Composition — the rendering of simple connected prose 
from English into German. Ability to pronounce German and to 
recognize German words and simple phrases when uttered. Iw addi- 
tion, familiarity with the following works or their equivalents, is 
required: Riehl — Der Fluch der Schonheit. Freytag — Aus dem 
Staat Friedrichs des Grossen. Heine — Die Harzreise, Goethe — First 
three books of Dichtung und Wahrheit. Lessing— Minna von Barn- 
helra. Schiller — Wilhelm Tell and Das Lied von der Glocke Thirty 
pages of lyrics and ballads 

Chemistry: Remsen's Chemistry, briefer course, or an equivalent. 

Physics: Carhart and Chute, Avery, or an equivalent. Class- 
work through one year. Each student must perform in the labora- 
tory at least thirty^five or forty experiments, mainly quantitative, 
•such as are given in the best laboratory manuals. The laboratory 
note-book should be presented as part of the certificate. 

Engi^ish History: Ransom's Short History of England, or Mont- 
gomery's Leading Facts in English History. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Students from such High Schools and Academies as may 
be approved by the Faculty are admitted to the Freshman 
class without examination, on the presentation of certificates 
showing that they have completed the requisite amount of 
preparatory study. Blank forms of such certificates, similar 
to that given below, will be furnished instructors on appli- 
cation to the President, with whom they are invited to cor- 
respond. Applicants for admission are requested to present 
their certificates, or send them by mail to the Dean, Pro- 
fessor Fuller, during Commencement week, or as soon there- 
after as practicable. 

Students received on certificate are regarded as upon pro- 
bation during the first half-year, and those deficient in 
preparation are dropped whenever the deficiency has been 



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40 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [1901-1902^ 

clearly demonstrated. In order to co-operate with the sec- 
ondary schools in preparatory work, a report of the progress 
of each student admitted by certificate will be sent to the 
Principal of the school from which he comes. If those 
entering from any school during a term of years are found 
deficient in preparation, the privilege of entering on certifi- 
cate will be withdrawn from that school. 

[form of certificate]. 

Mr is a graduate of the 

School, in the course, Class of , 

has pursued the studies marked below with the success indicated by 
the attached standing, and is hereby recommended for admission to- 

the course. Freshman class, Adelbert College, Western 

Reserve University. 

(Requirements far admission common to all courses). 

English: Composition and Literature as prescribed in the cata- 
logue. 

Mathematics: Arithmetic, including the metric system; Algebra. 
(Milne's or Taylor's Academic, or Wentworth's College) to the 
Binomial Theorem; Geometry (Beman and Deniati, Milne, or Wells) 
complete. 

Latin — Grammar; Csesar — ^three books of the Gallic, or two books, 
of the Civil War; Cicero— six orations, including De Imperio Gn. 
Pompeii: Vergil — ^the Bucolics, two books of the Georgics, and five 
books of the ^neid, or the Bucolics and six books of the ^neid; 
translation at sight from Ovid and simple prose; Prose Composition — 
rendering simple English sentences into Latin; History of Rome;. 
Ancient Geography. 

In addition to the above for admission to 

THE CI^ASSICAI* COURSE: 

Greek: Grammar; Xenophon — ^four books of the Anabasis; 
Homer — three books of the Iliad, with Prosody; Translation at sight. 
Prose Composition; History of Greece; Ancient Geography. 

THE MODERN I«ANGUAGE COURSE: 

German: Grammar; Translation at sight; Prose Composition; 
Riehl — Der Fluch der Schonheit, Freytag — Aus dem Staat Friedrichs 
des Grossen; Heine — Die Harzreise; Goethe — First three books of 



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19OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 4I 

Dichtung und Wahrheit; Lessin^ — Minna von Barnhelm; Schiller— 
Wilhelm Tell und Das I^ied von der Glocke; thirty pages of lyrics or 
ballads; — or^ 

French: Grammar; Translation at sight; Prose Composition; 
Hal^vy — L'Abb^ Constantin; Daudet — Contes; Sandeau — Mile de 
la Seigli^re. Pailleron's Le Monde ou 1' on Sennuie; Lotis P^cheur 
d' Islande; Moli^re — Bourgeois Gentilhomme; Racine — Athalie; 
Comeille — Cid; Balzac— Eugenie Grandet. 

the i.atin-scientific course : 

Chemistry, Physics, English History. 

WTien the above requirements have not been exactly met, the 
equivalents offered therefor must be specified in detail. When a cer- 
tificate does not meet the above requirements in full, the applicant 
may be required to pass the usual examination in any or all the 
requirements. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior classes, whether from other colleges or not, may be 
required to pass examinations on studies previously pur- 
sued, but full credit will be given to such certificates as they 
bring from former instructors. No one is admitted to the 
Senior class after the beginning of the second half-year. 

In connection with entrance to advanced standing, atten- 
tion is called to the opportunity for combining professional 
training with the undergraduate work of the last year. For 
further particulars see the statement regarding th^ Medical 
College on page 56. 

ADMISSION TO PARTIAL COURSES. 

Students may receive instruction without becoming can- 
didates for a degree, provided they can meet the require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman class, or have pursued 
other studies which may be accepted as equivalent to the 
entrance requirements. Suck special students are permitted 



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42 ADEI.BERT COLLEGE. 1901-1902] 

to enter only those courses for which their previous training 
has fitted them. In general they are subject to the same 
requirements as to college regulations, number of hours of 
work, and standing in class as regular students, but each 
application is considered on its merits. 

Special students, on severing their connection with the 
College, receive certificates of all work satisfactorily com- 
pleted. The requirements for admission to each course may 
be learned on application to the Dean. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 43 

COURSES OF STUDY. 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

!>,»*» , /I hour a week ) ,^1,^ 

»^»^« ^ i First half-year. I '^hrs, 

English i ] 3 hours a week | 

Latin i and 2 > throughout the >- 102 hrs. 

Mathematics i, 2 and 3 J year. j 



ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 



Classical / GREEK i and 2 . 
Course. \ German i 



T^n'^^.fl^KNCHIAND2 



Latin f Chemistry 2 

Scientific -j Physics i A. First half-year 
Course. ( History A. Second half-yr ^ 



6 hours a weekl 
throughout the [► 204 hrs. 
year. j 



527 hrs. 
In addition to the above subjects all members of the Freshman class 
are required to take systematic exercises in the gymnasium three times 
a week during six months of the year. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 
English 2, i hour a week throughout the year, 34 hours. 
Electives, 15 hours a week throughout the year, 510 hours. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS. 

Electives, 15 hours a week throughout the year. 

With the exception of English 2, which is required of all students 
in their Sophomore year, each student, during the last three years, 
selects, with the approval of the Faculty, every course of study pur- 
sued by him. But during the three years in question, and before 
graduation, each student must complete not less than four half-year 
courses of three hours each in Language and Literature, not less than 
four in Mathematics and Natural Science, and not less than four in 
Philosophy, History and Social Science. 



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44 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 

SYNOPSIS OF COURSES. 



The following statements describe all courses offered both 
prescribed and elective. Prescribed courses are indicated 
on page 43 of this catalogue; all others are elective. 
Unless otherwise stated, each course consists of three one- 
hour recitations each week. Numbers of courses are not 
necessarily consecutive. The hours at which courses are 
given will be found on the schedule of recitations, a copy of 
which may be obtained at the Dean's office. 

ASTRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 

I. Astronomy. Young's General Astronomy. The course is 
mainly descriptive, and is amply illustrated. Some attention is given 
to the history of astronomy. Second half-year. 

BIBLICAL LITERATURE, 

PRESID5NT THWING. 
MR. HA YD EN. (CourseS 2, 3, 4.) 

1. The Life op Christ. Essays and discussions upon the prin- 
cipal doctrines of Christianity. One hour a week, first half of Fresh- 
man year. 

2. Hebrew Grammar and Reading. An introductory course. 
Harper's "Elements of Hebrew" will be used, later the Old Testament 
text. Three hours a week, throughout the year. 

3. New Testament Greek. A critical reading of selections 
from the Gospels, Acts and Epistles, to bring out the special charac- 
reristics of this Greek. Either half-year. 

4. Seminary in New Testament Exegesis. (Open to those 
who have taken Course 3). Written expositions of assigned passages, 
with discussions. Either half-year. 

BIBUCXJRAPHY. 

MR. WILLIAMS. 

I . Generai^ and National Bibuography. A study of the prin- 
cipal general bibliographies, and the national bibliographies of the 
United States, England, France and Germany. Familiarity with the 



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19OI-I9O2] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 45 

works studied will be induced by practical problems. The course will 
be supplemented by a study of some of the best library catalogues and 
of the principles of cataloguing from the standpoint of the user. 

2. Reference Work. A study of the better known works of 
reference, as the general and special cyclopedias, dictionaries, annuals, 
indexes to periodicals, and ready reference manuals of every kind. 
Works of a similar nature will be compared, and the limitations of 
each pointed out. Lists of questions to be solved by the use of the 
works studied will be given, and the methods of finding the answers 
discussed in class. One hour a week, second half-year. 

BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR HERRICK. 
DR. GRIFFIN. 

1. Ei*EMENTARY Bioi^OGY. An introduction to the study of living 
things upon the basis of morphology, physiology, and development. 
One recitation, two laboratory exercises of two hours each. Second 
half year. 

2. Zooi^oGY — Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates. A 
study of the structure, development and relationship of certain types 
of invertebrate animals. One lecture, two laboratory exercises of two 
hours each. First half-year. 

3-4. Zoology — Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. A 
laboratory course in the general anatomy of vertebrates. One recita- 
tion and two laboratory exercises throughout the year. 

6. Ei^ements of Vertebrate Histoi^ogy. The study of the 
tissues of the mammalian body. One recitation, two laboratory 
exercises of two hours each. Second half-year. 

7. Ei^EMEnts of Vertebrate Embryoi^ogy. a detailed study 
of the development of the bird, and general principles of the embry- 
ology of vertebrates. One recitation, two laboratory exercises of two 
hours each. Second half-year. 

9. Generai, Physioi^ogy. a course of reading, supplemented by 
experiments in the laboratory, on the general physiology of the cell; 
an examination of the facts and theories of life and of the problems 
which it offers. Two exercises weekly. First half-year. 

10. Botany. An introduction to the study of plants on the basis 
of their physiology, morphology and classification. Instruction is 
given by lectures, laboratory work and field excursions. Second 
half-year. 



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46 ADKLBERT COLI.EGE. [19OI-I902 

II. Reading Ci^ub. A voluntary association of students and 
instructors for reading and discussing works of general scientific 
interest. Meetings are held weekly from November i to May i at a 
time most convenient to the members. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are: Courses i, 2, 6, 
7, 10, $5.00; Course 3-4, $5.00 for each term; Course 9, $2.00. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR MORI^EY. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TOWER. 

DR. GRUENBR. 

1. Chemistry of the Non-Metai^wc Ei^ements. Wurtz*s Ele- 
ments of Chemistry. Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. A more advanced com-se in general 
chemistry, for the Freshman year of the Latin-Scientific Course. 
Newth's Inorganic Chemistry. Two laboratory exercises and one 
recitation, throughout the year. 

4. Chemistry of the Metals. Wurtz's Elements of Chemistry. 
Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours. First 
half-year. 

5. Elements of Qualitative Analysis. Three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each. Open to those who have taken either 
course 2 or course 4. Second half-year. 

6. Organic Chemistry. Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Two reci- 
tations and one laboratory exercise of three hours, throughout the year. 

7. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. Three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each, throughout the year. 

8. Physiological Chemistry. Halliburton's Essentials of 
Chemical Physiology. A course on the chemistry of the animal body, 
of nutrition, and of the ordinary food materials. Two recitations and 
one laboratory exercise of three hours. Open to those who have taken 
or are taking course 6. First half-year. 

9. Physical Chemistry. An elementary course treating princi- 
pally of the theory of solutions and electro-chemistry. Three times a 
week with occasional laboratory exercises. Second half-year. Open 
to those who have had three half-year courses in chemistry. 

The Laboratory Fee for Courses i, 4, 7, or 8 is I3.00; for Course 2, 
J4.00; for Course 6, $5.00; and for Course 5 or 7, $6.00. These fees are 
for each half-year. Breakage and other damage to apparatus are 
charged extra. 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 47 

ECX)NOMICS. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WALKER. 

In general the student will be required to take the first course in 
economics before pursuing any of the others. 

1. Elements of Economics. The work is conducted by lectures, 
recitations and required readings. The text-book used is Walker's 
Political Economy (Advanced Course). First half-year. 

2. Value and Distribution. A discussion of the problem of 
value in relation to distribution together with an historical treatment 
of the institution of property, systems of land tenure, slavery and the 
remuneration of free labor, interest and usury, profits and monopolies, 
etc. Lectures, recitations and readings. Second half-year. 

3. Money. The history and theory of money, considering the 
production of the precious metals, coinage, paper money, bank money, 
theory of value, prices, bimetallism, etc. Lectures and required 
readings. The text-books are Walker, Money, and White, Money 
and Banking. First half-year. 

4. Public Finance. This course deals with state economy — 
expenditure, taxation, debts, administration, etc. Lectures and 
required readings. The text-book is Bastable's Public Finance. 
Second half-year. 

5. Socialism. An historical and critical course in socialism and 
socialistic theory. Attention is paid to the historical basis of socialism, 
the various schools of the nineteenth century, and the efforts at social- 
istic reform. Lectures and required readings. The text-books are 
Ely*s French and German Socialism, Schaeffle's Quintessence of 
Socialism. First half-year. 

6. Railroads and Transportation. This treats of the history 
of transportation and its present problems, i^-ith especial reference to 
tlie relations of the railroads to the state, to the public, and to 
employes. Lectures and required readings in government reports, etc. 
The text-book is Hadley*s Railroad Transportation. Second half-year. 

7. History of Economic Theory. This deals, historically and 
comparatively, with the development of economic thought from the 
earliest times. Lectures, with required readings in examples of the 
principal schools. Ingram's History of Political Economy is used. 
1901-1902. First half-year. 

8. History of Political Theory. An historical and compara- 
tive course in the development or political thought from the earliest 
times. Lectures, with readings in examples of the principal schools. 
1902-1903. Second half-year. 



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48 ADKLBSRT COI.LEGE. [190I-1902 

9. HiSTORiCAi, PowTics. The evolution of the political institu- 
tions of mankind is traced from theirorigins to modem times, with a 
particular consideration of gentile society, the city state, the Athenian 
democracy, the Roman Republic and Kmpire, the feudal system, the 
mediaeval Empire, parliamentary institutions, etc. Text, Wilson: 
The State. First half-year. 

10. Comparative Poutics. The governments of four modem 
states, viz., the United States, British Empire, German Empire, and 

> French Republic are examined and compared. Text, Wilson: The 
State. Second half-year. 

ENGLISH. 

PROFESSOR POTWIN (COURSES 14, I5, 16, I9, 2o). 

PROFESSOR EMERSON (COURSES 4, 5, 7, lO, 13, 17, 21-23). 

DR. BRIGGS (COURSES 2, 4, 5, II). 

MR. STEVENS (COURSES I, 6, 30). 

RHETORIC AND ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

1. Rhetoric. Rhetorical theory from a text-book of rhetoric, 
and analysis of prose selections illustrating the principles of composi- 
tion during the first half-year. During the second half-year a study 
of masterpieces of poetry and prose with an historical survey of 
English literature. A short essay or its equivalent each week, with 
conference for the correction of individual faults. Freshman year. 

2. Theme Writing. Short themes each week with individual 
conferences. Lectures on writing and the use of good English. One 
hour a week throughout Sophomore year. 

4. Daii^y Themes. Five short themes each week on subjects 
chosen by the student. Weekly conferences with each student for 
correction and suggestion. First half-year. 

5. Daii^y Themes. Similar to Course 4, but of a more advanced 
character. Students must have had Course 4 or its equivalent. 
1 900- 190 1. Second half-year. 

6. FoRENSics. Critical study of masterpieces in argument and 
oratory, with preparation of briefs, argumentative essays and orations. 
First half-year. 

7. History of Engi.ish Prose. Lectures on prose writers and 
the development of prose style. Critical reading of specimens of 
English prose from Mandeville to Burke, with collateral readings and 
essajrs. Second half-year. 



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I90I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 49 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Students are advised to take at least two of the first five courses 
before beginning those which follow. 

10. Chaucer and Spenser. A study of the minor poems and the 
Canterbury Tales of Chaucer, together with the most important poetry 
of Spenser. A survey of English poetry between Chaucer and Spen- 
ser, with lectures and collateral reading. First half-year. 

11. Shakespeare and the Drama. A general course on 'the 
literature from 1600 to 1625-30, with special emphasis upon the drama. 
Second half-year. 

12. MUrTON AND THE Ci^ASSiciSTS. English poetry from Milton 
to Pope inclusive, with special emphasis of Milton. The classical 
influence on English writers. Readings in the minor writers of the 
period. First half-year. 

13. CoLi^iNS TO Keats. A rapid survey of the poets from the 
death of Pope to Cowper, and special study of Cowper, Bums, Words- 
worth, Coleridge, Scott, Southey, Byron, Shelley, Keats. Second 
half-year. 

14. Tennyson and the Poets from 1830. The poetry of Ten- 
nyson will be the central and principal study, with readings of other 
poets, except Browning who is the subject of a separate course. First 
half-year. 

15. American Literature. Its beginnings, dependence on 
English authors, and development under the influences of our history. 
First half-year. 

16. History of Engwsh Criticism. The study will begin with 
Dryden, and include the critical works of Addison, Johnson, Hallam 
and others down to Matthew Arnold, and the critics of todaj- . 

17. The Engwsh Novei*. An historical course beginning with 
the story-writers of the Elizabethan period, and following the devel- 
opment of the novel through the eighteenth, and early nineteenth 
century. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

18. The Engush Drama before Shakespeare. Text-book, 
Manley's Specimens of the Pre-Shakesperean Drama. First half-year. 

19. Shakespeare. All the plays of Shakespeare to be read 
rapidly in the probable order of composition, with selection of charac- 
teristic passages. As an introduction, one of the more familiar plays 
will be studied for its illustration of the language of that period. 
Second half-year. 



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50 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [I90I-I90^ 

20. The Poetry of Browning. The study will follow the order 
of time of composition, typical selections being made for careful 
analysis and explanation. Second half-year. 

21. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). Lectures and recitations 
upon the language, with readings of selections from Old English 
prose and poetry. Special attention to the development of the lan« 
guage. First half-year. 

22. Middle English. Lectures on Middle English language and 
literature, with readings of selections from prose and poetry. Special 
study of Chaucer and his contemporaries. Second half-year. 

23. Advanced Study of Old and Middle English. Critical 
reading of texts, study of sources, and of the development of languagei 
and literature. Throughout the year. 

ELOCUTION. 
30. A course in vocal training and drill in public speaking. In- 
struction is given by lectures; by individual training in the analysis 
and delivery of oratorical masterpieces; and in the writing of orations. 
Three hours a week, second half-year. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

PROFESSOR GUSHING. 

1. Mineralogy. Cr>'Stallography, and Descriptive Mineralogy. 
Two hours of recitation and lectures, and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. First half-year. 

2. MiNERAi^oGY. Determinative Mineralogy and Blow-pipe Anal- 
ysis. Three laboratory exercises of three hours each. Physical 
Crystallography may be substituted for the Blow-pipe work. Second 
half-year. 

3. Gkology. Dynamical and Structural Geology. Three hours a 
week. First lialf-year. 

4. GKOI.OGY. Historical Geology. Lectures and field work in 
vicinity of Cleveland. Second half-year. 

5. Physiography. The cause and manner of the development of 
topographic forms. Second half-year. 

A Laboratory fee of Ji.oo is charged for courses i, 2 and 4. 



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19OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 5 1 

GERMAN. 

PROFESSOR HARRIS. 
PROFESSOR DEERING (COURSE l). 
DR. MEYER (COURSES I, 2 AND 3). 

1. Elementary German. Harris's German Lessons; German 
Reader and German Composition; easy texts. In this and the follow- 
ing courses as much of the work as possible is done in German, but 
conversation is used as a means, not as an end. Required of all who 
begin German in college. Throughout the year. 

2. Selected Masterpieces of representative German authors, 
the latter part of the year being given to Schiller. The texts read 
vary from year to year. The first text in 1902- 1903 will be Lessing's 
Emilia Galotti. Composition and advanced grammar. For Modern 
Language Freshmen. Throughout the year. 

3. Second Year German. Whitney's German Grammar; 
Harris's German Composition. Reading of representative literary 
works. The texts riead vary from year to year. The first text in 1902- 
1903 will be Eichendorff, Aus dem Leben eines Tangenichts. Open to 
all who have had Course i or its equivalent. Throughout the year. 

4. Author Course. The greater part of the year is given up to 
the more detailed study of some of the great writers, usually Goethe, 
but some other texts are also read. The work is partly in the form of 
class exercises and partly private reading on which the student is 
examined. Drill in writing German. Open to all who have had 
Course 2 or 3, or an equivalent. Throughout the year. 

The following electives are open to all who have had Course 4 or its 
equivalent: 

5. OuTi^iNB History of German Literature. Recitations 
from a manual, with collateral readings; lectures on German history 
and Literature. Throughout the year. 

6. Middi^e High German. This course gives a reading knowl- 
edge of Middle High German through a careful study of the grammar 
and the reading of selections from various texts, such as the Nibe- 
lungenlied, Hartmann, Walther von der Vogelweide, etc 1 902-1 903. 
Throughout the year. 

8. Recent German Drama. Lectures on the history of the 
German drama since Goethe's death; with the reading of plays of rep- 
resentative modern dramatists. Second half-year. 

9. Modern German Prose. This course is given up to the study 
of a few of the modem writers in the fields of history, biography, 



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52 ADEI.BKRT COLI.EGE. [190I-1902 

travels, etc. Essays, lectures, and portions of larger works are read. 
Throughout the year. 

10. Faust. Goethe's Faust; connected history of the Faust legend 
(lectures), with selected readings from the more important Faust- 
biicher and Volksschauspiele. 1902- 1903. First half-year. 

12. Modern Fiction. German Fiction since 1848 (lectures); 
readings from Auerbach, SchefTel, Freytag, Spielhagen, Sudenhann, 
and others. 1902- 1903. Throughout the year. 

13. Franz Grillparzer. His life, works, and relations to con- 
temporary German dramatic literature. 1902-1903. First half-year. 

14. Heinrich Heine. A detailed study of the life and works of 
Heine and his relations to contemporary German literature. 1902- 
1903. Second half-year. 

GREEK* 

PROFESSOR FUI.I.ER. 

PROFESSOR FOWI^ER. 

DR. BII.I,. 

MR. HAYDN. 

1. Homer. First half Freshman year. 

2. Attic Orators. Rhetoric; Greek History from 404 to 338. 
Second half Freshman year. 

3. The Drama. Selections, with an introduction to the study of 
metres and scenic antiquities. First half Sophomore year. 

4. Pi^To. Greek Literature, connected survey, illustrated 
by extracts from authors not previously studied. Second half 
Sophomore year. 

5. Tragedy. Selected dramas of Buripides, Sophocles, and 
.<9Sschylus. First half-year. 

6. Thucydides, with comparative studies of Herodotus and 
Xenophon. Second half-year. 

7. PHII.OSOPHY. First half-year. 

8. Arch^oi^ogy. Second half-year. 

9. iDYi^uc Poetry. First half-year. 

10. ^SCHINES and Demosthenes on the Crown. First half- 
year. 

11. IvYRic Poetry. First half-year. 

12. New Testament Greek. See Bible, Course 3. 

13. New Testament Exegesis. See Bible, Course 4. 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 53 

HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR PERRIN. 

PROFESSOR PI^ATNER (COURSE 16). 

MR. SEVERANCE (COURSE I7). 

A. Outlines of European History. Text, George Burton Adams* 
•* European History.** Required of all Latin-Scientific Freshmen. 
Second half-year. 

Students are advised to take courses i and 2 before beginning any 
of the others. 

1. The Middi,e Ages. Europe from the foiulli century to the 
fourteenth. The migration and settlement of the Teutonic peoples, 
the rise of the Christian church, .Mohammedanism and the crusades, 
feudalism, the struggle of the Empire and Papacy, the growth of 
cities and the rise of modem kingdoms. First half-year. 

2. Modern Europe. An outline of the political, religious and 
social history of Europe from the fourteenth century to the present. 
Second half-year. 

3. History of France, from the fall of the Carolingians to the 
middle of the eighteenth century, with special reference to the growth 
of French institutions. Second half-year. 

4. The Reformation. A course based upon Fisher*s History of 
the Reformation with collateral reading in Schaff's History of the 
Christian Church, Hausser*s Period of the Reformation, Ranke's 
History of the Popes, and the writings of the reformers. Special 
topics are assigned for investigation. First half-year. 

5. Politic Ai, History of Engi,and, from the Tudor period to 
1815. Lectures and prescribed reading. First half-year. 

6. American Coi^oniai. History. The constitutional and insti- 
tutional development of the English colonies to 1783. Lectures with 
prescribed readings. First half-year. 

7. PowTiCAi, AND Constitutional, History of the United 
States, 1 783-1860. Lectures with required readings. The more im- 
portant documents in McDonald's Select Documents are read and 
discussed. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

8. The Old Rj^gime and the Revolution. France, with com- 
parisons drawn from other states, 1 774-1 789; the French Revolution, 
1789-1795, its social and political struggles and its permanent results 
in French society. First half-year. 



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54 ADELBERT COI.I.EGE. [l§OI-I902 

9. The History of Europe from 1815. A continuation of 
Course 8. Second half-year. 

10. (a) The United States i860- 1885. Lectures and reports 
upon topics assigned for investigation. Or, 

(d) American Poi^iTics. A study of the government of the 
United States, both National and State. Second half-year. 

11. History of Coi^onization since 1492. The history- of the 
English colonies in America is not included. First half-year. 

12. The Stuart Regime, 1603- 1 7 14. Especial attention given to 
constitutional questions. The more important documents of Gardiner's 
Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution are read and dis- 
cussed. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

13. Engi,and in the Nineteenth Century. A continuation 
of Course 5. Second half-year. 

14. Constitution Ai, History of Engi,and. Lectures and pre- 
scribed reading. The more important constitutional documents are 
discussed. First half-year. 

15. American Diplomacy, 1776-1877. Lectures and reports upon 
topics assigned for investigation. 

16. Roman History. Open to Juniors and Seniors. 

17. Church History. The growth of the Christian Church will 
be traced in its organization, doctrine and life to the Reformation. 
An especial attempt will be made to introduce students to the larger 
literature of the subject. 

LATIN. 
professor pi«atnbr. 

DR. Bll,!,. 

1. Livy. First half Freshman year. 

2. Pi,AUTus, two or three plays. Horace, Satires. Second half 
Freshman year. 

3. Odes of Horace. First half Sophomore year. 

4. Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. Juvenai,, Satires. Second 
half Sophomore year. 

5. Cicero's Letters. 

6. Lucretius. 

7. Roman Arch^EOIvOGy. Topography and monuments of ancient 
Rome. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 55 

4 

8. Latin of the Silver Age. This course is based mainly on 
the letters of Pliny the Younger, Seneca, Tacitus, and Suetonius. 

9. Roman Comedy, Terence and Plautus, with the antiquities of 
the Roman stage. 

10. Roman Elegiac and Lyric Poetry. 

12. Latin Epigraphy. Introductory course. 

13. Roman History. See History, Course 16. 

Bach of the elective courses, 5 to 12, is a half-year course, and in 
general they are given in a cycle, but no definite order can be stated, 
variations being introduced according to the number and character of 
the students. 

MATHEMATICS. 

professor smith, 
mr. dickbrman. 

1. Plane Trigonometry. 

2. Plane Analytic Geometry. Construction and discussion of 
Equation, Straight Line, Circle. Parabola, Ellipse. 

Courses i and 2 required in Freshman year. 

4. Algebra (advanced course). First half Sophomore year. 

5. Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry (advanced course). 
First half-year. 

6. Spherical Trigonometry. Surveying. Second half Sopho- 
more year. 

7. Elements of Differential and Integral Calculus. 
Second half Sophomore year. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus (advanced course). 
First half-year. 

9. The Theory of Equations. Burnside and Panton's Theory 
of Equations. 1 901- 1902. Second half-year. 

10. Quaternions. Kelland and Tait's Introduction to Qua- 
ternions. First half-year. 

1 1 . Differential Equations. Johnson's Differential Equations. 
1902-1903. Second half-year. 

12. Modern Analytic Geometry. Second half-year. 
The Laboratory fee for course 5 is |i.oo. 



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56 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

BflEMCINE. 

Seniors in Adelbert College may elect work in the Metlical College 
of the University provided it does not count for more than six hours a 
week, as leading to an academic degree. By availing themselves of 
this opportunity and by proper choice of electives in the College, 
students may complete one of the four years required for the degree 
in medicine during their academic course. For details of such 
courses application should be made to the Dean of the Medical College, 
Dr. Millikin. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

PROFESSOR CURTIS. 
DR. MAR\'n?. 

The following chronological order will be obser\-ed. Students 
wishing to elect any of the more advanced courses f 5-11 ) in the Senior 
year are ad^-ised to take Courses i, 3 and 4, in the Junior year. 

1. Psychology. An elementarj- course which presents in outline 
the entire subject matter, with special emphasis upon the functions of 
the Ner\'ous System and the process of perception. First half-year. 

2. Anthropology. The main problems and bearings of Anthro- 
pology are discussed in systematic order. Lectures are given on the 
history of Anthropology, and an effort is made to understand its posi- 
tion in the present century. First half-year. 

3. Logic. This course, of which the piupose is chiefly practical, 
presents the elements of deductive and inductive logic, laying especial 
emphasis on tlie formal and material fallacies. The text-book used is 
Hyslop's Elements of Logic, or Jevons' Lessons in Logic togjether with 
Minto's Logic for consultation on special topics. Second half-year. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. This course introduces the 
student to the chief problems of systematic philosophy, their history 
and present status. The instruction is given in the form of lectures 
and assigned private reading. Second half-year. 

5. Ethics. Muirhead's Elements of Ethics or Mackenzie's 
Manual of Ethics will be read to secure a general outline. Some of 
the more important problems of ethics will be studied in their histori- 
cal and philosophical aspects by reference to the works of Aristotle, 
Kant, Martineau, Sidgwick, Green, Spencer and Stephen. First half- 
year. 

6. (a) General History of Philosophy. A course for 
Seniors extending throughout the year. The first term reviews oriental 



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190I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 57 

aod Greek thought with their bearings upon patristic and scholastic 
philosophy to the close of the sixteenth century. The second term 
will consider the main lines of thought from Bacon and Descartes to 
Wundt and Si)encer, inclusive. The more important texts are those 
of Windelband, Weber, Ueberweg-Heinze, Zeller, Hoeffding. 

(d) British PHiix>soPHy prom Bacon to Hume. Lectures, 
recitations and private readings. The purpose is to acquaint the 
student with the classics of British Empiricism by means of selections 
from Bacon's Advancement of Learning and Novum Organum, 
Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understanding, 
Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge, and Hume's Treatise of 
Human Nature. The course will bring forward the main problems of 
Modem Philosophy. First half-year. 

7. (a) Introduction to the History and Phii^osophy of 
Religion. The aim is to present Religion in its psychological, histo- 
rical, critical, and constructive aspects. The course is based upon 
Menzie's History of Religion and Principal Caird's or Sabatier's 
Philosophy of Religion.— Or, 

(d) Philosophy of Society. Open only to students who have 
taken Courses i and 2. Lectures will be given by the instructor 
throughout the term and special work will be assigned to each student 
for report and discussion. Second half-year. 

8. (a) The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer. A critical 
study of Spencer's elaboration of the principle and process of Evolu- 
tion along with the application of Evolution to Philosophy. Digests 
and critical essays are required for the purpose of bringing into prom- 
inence the main questions of Cosmology, and the bearing of Evolution 
on recent thought.— Or, 

(d) The Philosophy of Kant. After the results of Hume's 
Philosophy have been reviewed, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason will 
be taken up and the object of knowledge carefully studied. This 
will be followed by a discussion of the Metaphysics of Morality, the 
Critique of Practical Reason, and the Critique of Judgment. Second 
half-year. Or, 

(c) Contemporary Thought. A study of some recent work of 
value, such as Balfour's The Foundations of Belief, or. Ward's Natur- 
alism and Agnosticism. 

10. Advanced Psychology. The subject of the course is the 
Psychology of Education. Its aim is to apply the results of psy- 
chology to the solution of some of the chief problems of education. 
First half-year. 



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58 ADKI.BERT COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

II. Applied Logic, or Scientific Method. In this course the 
general methods of science will be analyzed in order to study their 
principles and nature and logical justification. The chief works con- 
sulted are those of Mill, Sigwart and Venn. Second half-year. 

PHYSICS. 

PROPBSSOR WHITMAN. 
DR. REICHMANN. 

1. Mechanics, Sound, Heat. Hastings and Beach, General 
Physics, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year. 

2. Electricity and Magnetism, Light. Continuation of 
Course i. Second half-year. 

I. (^) General contents and text-book asin i. For Freshmen 
entering the Latin-Scientific course. The work is arranged to utilize 
as fully as possible the preparatory course in physics. First half-year. 

3. Physical Optics. Glazebrook's Physical Optics, or Preston's 
Theory of Light, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year. 

4. Theory op Heat. An introduction to thermodynamics, based 
mainly on Buckingham's Theory of Thermodynamics, with lectures 
and references. Second half-year. 

Alternating with 8. 

5. Electricity and Magnetism. A general review of electrical 
theory, with laboratory practice in electrical measurements. The 
text-book will depend somewhat on the character of the class. First 
half-year. 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Second half-year. 

7. Mechanical Drawing. A course involving the principles of 
Descriptive Geometry and their application to projective drawing. 
Second half-year. 

8. Mrch.\nics. a .study of the principles of applied mechanics. 
Text-book, Wright's Elements of Mechanics. Second half-year. 

Alternating with 4. 

9. Descriptive Physics. This course is intended for those who 
wish to obtain a general acquaintance with the more important phys- 
ical phenomena. It is given mainly by lectures, but includes refer- 
ences to Ha.stings and Beach, General Physics, and a few exercises in 
the laboratory. First half-year. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 59 

10. Physicai* Manipui,ation. Instruction is given in the ele- 
ments of the ordinary arts, as glass-blowing and soldering, in the use 
of the dividing engine and other general instruments, in the construc- 
tion of simple pieces of apparatus. One exercise weekly. Second 
half-year. 

11. Physicai, Experiment. Special topics in physics are as- 
signed to each student for detailed study. The aim of the course is to 
introduce somewhat more advanced experimental methods than are 
usually possible in the general courses. Each student is expected to 
spend from six to nine hours weekly in the laboratory. 

Courses 10 and 11 are intended primarily for those intending to 
teach physical science, or for students who expect to specialize in 
Physics. 

Two weekly exercises under Course 10 may be combined with Course 
1 1 to count for one three-hour course. 

An elementary knowledge of the Differential and Integral Calculus 
is necessary for Courses 4, 5, 6, 8 and 11. 

The Laboratory fee for Course 9 is $2.00; for each of the other 
courses, $4.00. 

THE ROMANCE LANGUAGES, 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BOURI..\ND. 
DR. OI*rVER (courses 3 AND 4 IN FRENCH). 

FRENCH. 

1 . Elementary. Grandgent's French Grammar; Kuhns' French 
Reader. Practice in speaking and writing French. First half-year. 

2. Elementary Course continued. Reading of modern prose 
and plays, with practice in speaking and writing. Second half-year. 

3. Rapid Reading of Nineteenth Century Texts, with 
practice in conversation. First half-year. 

4. Rapid Reading of Modern and Classic Texts, with prac- 
tice in conversation. Second half-year. 

The foregoing are elementary courses, which will be offered annu- 
ally; they or their equivalent must precede all other work in French. 
Of the following electives, not more than two may be expected in any 
one half-year: 

5. 6. French Prose Composition. Practice in writing French, 
with review of the Sjmtax. First and second half-years. 



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6o ADELBERT COLI.EGB. [19OI-1902 

7. French Literature of the Seventeenth Century. Lec- 
tures, recitations and collateral readings in the classic drama and the 
prose writers. First half-year. 

8. French Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Lec- 
tures and recitations, with special reference to Montesquieu, Voltaire, 
Diderot and J. J. Rousseau. Second half-year. 

9. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. Montaigne, 
Rabelais. Lectures and recitations. First half-year. 

10. Outlines of the History of French Literature to the 
END OF THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. Lectures with illustrative read- 
ings. Second half-year. 

11. 12. Historical French Grammar. Lectures on the Phonol- 
ogy and Morphology, with illustrative readings in Old French texts. 
First and second half-years. 

ITALIAN. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and easy reading, with prac- 
tice in speaking. First half-year. 

2. Dante. The Inferno and the Vita Nuova. Lectures, readings, 
and recitations. Second half-year. 

SPANISH. 

1. Ei<ementary Course. Grammar and easy reading, with 
practice in speaking. First half-year. 

2. Reading of Modern Prose and Plays, with special drill 
in .speaking and writing Spanish. Second half-year. 

3. The Classic Drama. Lectures on the dramatic literature of 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with readings from Lope de 
Vega, Tirso de Molina, Alarc6n, Calder6n. First half-year. 

4. Cervantes. Lectures, recitations and reports. Second half- 
year. 

SANSKRIT. 

professor platner. 
I. Elementary Course, designed for students who intend to 
make a specialty of Classical Philology. Throughout the year. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 6r 

GENERAL INFORMATION* 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The first half-year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a holiday 
recess of nine days, until the Saturday after the last Thurs- 
day in January. The second half-year begins on the Mon- 
day after the last Thursday in January, and continues, with 
an Easter recess of one week, until Commencement, which 
occurs on the Thursday after the eleventh day of June (or 
after the tenth in years in which February has twenty-nine 
days). No college exercises are held on Thanksgiving 
day, Washington's birthday, and Decoration day. On the 
day of prayer for colleges, religious exercises are held in 
Eldred Hall. The exercises of each half-year begin with 
prayers in the chapel at nine o'clock. 

RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 

All students are required to attend daily prayers in the 
chapel. At this service addresses are frequently made by 
the clergymen of Cleveland and other cities. Students are 
also expected to attend morning service on Sunday in the 
chiu-ches of the city. It is desired that students should 
connect themselves with the churches of their choice, and 
enter as far as possible into their religious activities. 

The Young Men's Christian Association of the college 
holds its meetings in Eldred Hall. This building is devoted 
entirely to the religious and social work of the Association. 

LIBRARIES. 

The College Library, including the collections of former 
literary societies, contains about forty-five thousand bound 
volumes and ten thousand unbound books and pamphlets. 
It is commodiously housed in the Hatch Library building, 
the gift of Mr. Henry R. Hatch, of Cleveland. The col- 



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62 ADRI.BERT COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

lections relating to the study of the German language and 
literature, French literature, United States history, and the 
histor}'^ of the French Revolution are particularly full. 
. The list of periodicals is very complete, and the library con- 
tains many sets of valuable publications in classical phil- 
ology and archaeology', Germanic and general philology, 
history, anthropology, and science, besides sets of the oldest 
and best literary magazines. These sets are kept up to 
date and their number is increased by constant additions. 
The whole collection is classified according to the Dewey 
system somewhat modified. Students have access to all the 
books on the shelves, and the library is open from eight in 
the morning to half -past five in the afternoon. 

In addition to the College Library, students may freely 
use the Free Public Library of Cleveland. It contains 
150,000 volumes, and includes valuable collections for the 
study of Shakespeare, modem literature, history, art, and 
archaeology. On request of members of the Faculty, books 
from the Public Library are delivered at the Hatch Library 
building, and may be retained for an extended period. 
This arrangement makes its collections readily accessible to 
students at all times. 

Through the courtesy of its directors, students also have 
free tickets to the Case Library. This collection, containing 
50,000 volumes, is well supplied with periodicals and 
general literature, and oifers excellent facilities for study of 
the fine arts, of political economy and sociology, and of the 
sciences, especially chemistry and botany. 

Students thus have access to collections aggregating about 
250,000 volumes, and constantly increasing in number. 

LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS. 

Biology. The biological laboratory is designed, for 
the study of the biological sciences, especially zoology and 
botany; for a biological museum, 'in the sense of a reference 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 63 

or teaching collection of objects drawn from the living 
world to illustrate types of structure, variations, life his- 
tories and kindred subjects; and for the maintenance of 
vivaria, or rooms in which certain animals and plants, both 
aquatic and terrestrial; may be kept alive while their habits 
are studied, and, when possible, their breeding and devel- 
opment watched. 

The building is of stone in Gothic design, and consists of 
three stories ninety-three by sixty-three feet, and two small 
wings, one of which contains the machinery used in heating. 
The first story contains suitable rooms for anatomy, botany 
and vivaria. The main elementary laboratory has an 
exposure of sixty feet on the north and twenty-seven feet 
on the east and west sides. It is lighted by eighteen win- 
dows and is designed for the conduct of large classes in 
elementary biology. In the same story are the offices of 
instructors, special laboratory rooms for zoology and 
embryology, coat, cloak and toilet rooms, and preparation 
and supply rooms for the main laboratories. The third 
story is divided into a large lecture room, a reference 
library and reading room, a photographic laboratory, and a 
series of museum and preparation rooms. 

Chemistry. The department of chemistry is well sup- 
plied with apparatus for use in illustrative lectures. The 
chemical laboratory is equipped with sufficient apparatus so 
that each student may become familiar with the facts of the 
science through experiments made by himself under the 
guidance of the instructor. Such experimental courses are 
offered in the chemistry of the non-metallic and metallic 
elements, in organic, analytical, and physiological chemistry. 

Geology and Mineralogy. The laboratory of this 
department is, at the present time, on the third floor of the 
main building. The collections at the service of the depart- 
ment are well chosen, and are rapidly growing. They com- 
prise sets of crystal models and crystals, crystal sections for 

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64 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 

optical Study, and rock sections in g^eat number, besides 
mineralogical, lithological, and palaeontological collections. 
The vicinity of Cleveland is interesting geologically, es- 
pecially in regard to its glacial deposits and its palaeon- 
tology. It furnishes abundance of material for the special 
investigator. 

Physics and Astronomy. The Physical laboratory is 
a three-story building of sound and substantial construction, 
containing large lecture and laboratory rooms for the ele- 
mentary courses, and a considerable number of smaller 
apartments for more advanced work. Especial attention 
has been paid to heating, lighting, and ventilation. The 
department is equipped with a large variety of apparatus 
bearing on the courses at present oflFered— all of which 
include work in the laboratory — and additional apparatus 
is continually being obtained. 

Upon the physical laboratory has been erected an equa- 
torial telescope, covered by a revolving dome. The tele- 
scope, of ten and one-half inches aperture and fifteen feet 
focal length, is equipped with all the necessary accessories 
for observation and measurement. This valuable addition 
to the scientific apparatus of the University is the gift of 
Messrs. W. R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey, of Cleveland. 

GYMNASIUM AND ATHLETIC FIELD. 

At the southern end of the campus is the gymnasium, and 
beside it the athletic field. The former is well equipped 
with apparatus of the latest and most approved style. All 
members of the Freshman class are required to take system- 
atic exercise three times a week during six months of the 
year. During the same period a similar opportunity is 
afforded members of the other classes. All work is under 
the supervision of the instructor in physical culture. 

The athletic field has been graded and fenced, and seats 
have been erected. All college games can thus be played 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 65 

on the campus itself, and most of the evils attendant upon 
inter-collegiate contests avoided. 

GRADES OF SCHOLARSHIPS. 

Students are graded in their studies by letters which have 
value on a scale of eight, as follows : 

E (excellent) 7-8 

G (good) 6-7 

F (fair) 5-6 

P (pass) 4-5 

D (deficient) -4 
At the close of each half-year, instructors combine the 
grades of the term's work and of examinations in any ratio 
they see fit, and report to the Dean the resultant grades 
expressed in letters. The Dean then reports the grades of 
each student to his parent or guardian. 

Care over the work of students is exercised by the execu- 
tive committee after the following method. When the 
grade of a student becomes D in any study, the instructor 
reports the fact at once to the Dean, who sends an official 
notification of the deficiency to the student and to his 
parent or guardian. The instructor keeps the Dean in- 
formed as to whether the student's grade continues D. 
Once a month the Dean reports to the faculty all infor- 
mation which he has received from instructors in regard to 
the grades of students. 

Any student whose grade is D in the class-work of any 
study may be dropped from that study at any time by a 
majority vote of the executive committee and the instructor 
whose course is involved. • He shall be so dropped when he 
has had grade D for six consecutive weeks, unless by a 
majority vote of the same persons he is allowed to remain in 
the study under special probation for a short time. In all 
cases the student's grade is determined by all his previous 
work in a study from the beginning of the half-year. 



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66 ADKLBERT COLI.EGE. .[iQOI-igo^ 

If a Student has grade D in the class-work of any study, 
he is not allowed to enter the examination, and cannot 
graduate until the head of the department reports to the 
Dean that the deficiency has been removed. In case the 
student is deficient in an elective study, he may take in 
class some other elective of the same number of hours a 
week, and the satisfactory completion of such elective will 
be regarded as removing his deficiency. 

If a student's term standing in any study is not below 
grade P, but he fails in his examination, the instructor 
hands in his grade as D and also a notice that he is to be 
re-examined in that study. When he has passed this 
re-examination the instructor notifies the Dean at once, and 
the deficiency is cancelled. 

When a student so fails in his work that, in the judgment 
of the executive committee, he cannot successfully continue 
h, a condition is placed upon him. He cannot then go on 
with any study unless he makes up the deficiency before a 
specified time. 

No student who has entrance conditions will be advanced 
to the rank of Junior. No student is allowed to enter the 
second half of his Senior year who has not made up all his 
deficiencies. 

In general, regular students are not allowed to become 
special students on account of failure to maintain them- 
selves in their regular work, but individual cases may be 
considered on their merits by the executive committee. 

DEGREES. 

In order to be recommended for a degree a student must 
have passed in all the studies of his course and have attained 
a grade of * * Fair " or a higher grade in at least one-third of 
them. The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred 
upon those who have completed that regular course which 
includes the study of the Greek language and literature; 
the degree of Bachelor of Letters on those who have 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 67 

completed the course in which modem languages are substi- 
tuted for Greek; and the degree of Bachelor of Phiix)S- 
OPHY on those who have completed the course in which 
more advanced science is substituted for languages. 

Members of classes earlier than that of 1893 ^^^y receive 
the degree of Master of Arts as heretofore, or, if they 
prefer, after a special course of study. The fee for the 
Master* s degree is ten dollars. For further information 
candidates should address the Secretary of the Faculty, 
Professor Platner. 

honors. 

In Chemistry, French, German, Greek, Latin and 
Mathematics, two-year honors are given to those students 
who, at the completion of the Sophomore year, have attained 
grade * * Excellent ' ' in each course of these departments 
during two yeats, and grade * * Fair ' * or a higher grade in 
all of their other studies. 

Honors are awarded to the graduating class at each 
Commencement, and to the Junior class at the end of the 
Junior year. These honors are determined by the standing 
of the students in all their previous college work. To be 
recommended for a degree with honors, a student must have 
attained grade ** Fair*' or a higher grade in all his college 
work; for degree summa cum lavde, grade "Excellent" in 
five-sixtbs of all his work; for degree magna cum laude, 
grade *' Excellent " in one-half of all his work, or ** Excel- 
lent '* or ** Good *' in five-sixths of it; for degree cum laude, 
** Excellent '' or " Good " in one-half of all his work. 

Opportunity is given to students with advanced prepara- 
tion to pursue studies and investigations outside the pre- 
scribed course under the direction and assistance of the 
Faculty, provided they maintain a standing of at least G in 
each of their regular studies. Students who pass successful 
examinations in these additional studies may be exempted 
from a portion of the regular examinations, and receive 
honorable mention in the catalogue. 

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68 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 

PRIZES. 

President's Prizes are oflFered as follows: 
Three prizes for excellence in producing and speaking 
orations are awarded to members of the Junior and Sopho- 
more Classes who engage in a Junior-Sophomore oratorical 
contest at Commencement. Of these, two first prizes of 
thirty-five dollars each are given to the contestants who 
rank first in each class. A second prize of twenty dollars is 
awarded irrespective of class. The following rule respect- 
ing the competion has been adopted by the faculty. A 
Sophomore who gains the first prize in any contest shall not 
compete again, and one who gains the second prize may 
compete, in his Junior year, for the first prize only. 

Six prizes for the highest records in scholarship are 
awarded at the end of the Freshman year as follows : In 
French and German (Modern lyanguage Freshmen) twenty- 
five dollars; in German (all except Modern Language Fresh- 
men) twenty-five dollars; in English, forty dollars; in Greek, 
twenty-five dollars; in Latin, forty dollars; in Mathematics, 
forty dollars. A prize of twenty-five dollars is also awarded 
for the best results in the work of the gymnasium during 
the Freshman year. These prizes are awarded only to those 
pursuing their Sophomore year in Adelbert College, and no 
prize will be given if it seems to the department or depart- 
ments concerned, that it is not clearly merited. 

Philosophical Prizes, founded by Mr. Truman P. 
Handy, and continued in his memory by his daughter, Mrs 
John S. Newberry, are offered as follows: Two prizes, one 
of sixty and one of thirty dollars, are awarded by a com- 
mittee at the close of the college year, to the two members 
of the philosophical group who shall excel in an original 
essay and a special examination. The subject assigned for 
1901-1902 is, A Critical Review of Hedonism. 



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1901-I902] WKSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 69 

English Prizes are oflfered as follows: The early Eng- 
lish Text Society offers a prize, consisting of publications 
of the Society, for the best examination in old and Middle 
English. The New Shakespeare Society offers a similar 
prize for the best examination in Shakespeare. Each prize 
consists of publications of the Society offering it. 

The Hughes Prize. By the kindness of Mr. Rupert 
Hughes, of the Class of 1892, two prizes, one of fifteen and 
one of ten dollars, are offered for the best poems written by 
undergraduates. These sums may be combined into a single 
prize in any year if any one poem is of exceptional merit. 
Competitors must submit their productions, in type-written 
form and under an assumed name, not later than May 
fifteenth of each year. 

The Holden Prize. Mr. L. E. Holden, of Cleveland, 
offers a prize of twenty-five dollars for the best essaj' writ- 
ten by a Senior on some subject* selected by the department 
of Rhetoric. Essays in competion for this prize must be 
type-written and submitted under an assumed name not later 
than May fifteenth, 1902. The subject for this academic 
year is ** Aspects of the Lyrical Spirit in English Poetry 
from Collins to Keats." 

The Debate Prize. In order to encourage and 
strengthen the debating interests of the College, an alumnus 
offers a prize of thirty dollars to be divided equally among 
the three students who win places on the debating team in 
the preliminary contests, and represent the institution in 
the annual contest of the Ohio Debating League. 

The Harriet Pelton Perkins Scholarship, the in- 
come of a fund of two thousand dollars, given for that pur- 
pose by Mr. Edwin R. Perkins, is awarded annually to that 
member of the Junior class who fills the following conditions: 
He must rank in the first third of his class in the study of 
the classics, having pursued Latin and Greek through the 



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70 ADBLBERl? COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

Sophomore year. He must also attain, among those fulfill- 
ing the first condition, the highest rank for excellence in 
the English Language and Literature, having taken, besides 
all required courses, at least three hours a week during both 
terms of the Junior year. Finally, he must continue his 
studies in the College through his Senior year, unless dis- 
abled by illness, or by some other cause which shall be 
deemed satisfactory. 

THE FRANCIS G. BUTLER PUBLICATION FUND. 

In March, 1893, Mrs Julia W. Butler gave one thousand 
dollars to found the Francis G. Butler Publication Fund, 
/'the income from the fund to be devoted to the publication 
of the results of original research in the field of American 
history, made by the professors or students of Adelbert Col- 
lege, the College for Women, or the Graduate School of 
Western Reserve University. 

EXPENSES. 
The College charges are as follows : 

Matricui,ation $ 5.00 

Tuition, Incidentals, Library, and Gymnasium. . . 85.00 

Students taking work in the biological, chemical, geo- 
logical and physical departments pay for the cost of perish- 
able material and the loss incident to the use of the instru- 
ments. Laboratory fees vary for different courses, and the 
amount for each is specified in the statement of courses. 

All College charges are paid to the Bursar — the matricula- 
tion fee at the time of registration; the laboratory fee, and 
one-half the charge for tuition, within fourteen days of the 
opening of each half-year. 

Board and rooms in private families in the vicinity of the 
College may be obtained at a cost of from three to five 
dollars a week; board in clubs for from two and a half to 
three dollars a week. 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 7 1 

BENEFICIARY AND OTHER AID. 

Certain scholarships are awarded to meritorious students 
who need pecuniary aid. By these they are relieved of a 
portion of the fixed charges of the College. The scholar- 
ships are founded by gifts of $500 each, and are worth the 
interest of that sum at six per cent., or $30 a year. All 
scholarships are granted upon the following conditions : 

1 . All applicants for scholarships shall file written state- 
ments of resources, expenses, and needs, accompanied in 
the case of those just entering college, whether as Fresh- 
men or in the higher classes, by testimonials as to character 
and attainments. 

2. Scholarships shall be granted annually upon each 
application, but may be withdrawn for cause at the end of 
one half-year. 

3. The granting and withdrawing of scholarships, for 
students who have attended the College as long as one half- 
year, shall be in the hands of the executive committee, who 
shall report to the Faculty at the beginning of each year the 
names of those students to whom scholarships are to be 
granted, and each half-year the names of those from whom 
scholarships have been withdrawn. 

4. In general only candidates for a degree in full stand- 
ing are eligible to a scholarship. But one may be granted 
to any student who, by reason of incomplete preparation, is 
obliged to enter college as a special student, but with the in- 
tention of making up his deficiencies and taking a degree, 
and it may be continued to him in successive years if his 
progress warrants the belief that he will carry out his inten- 
tion. But a student in full standing, who becomes a special 
student, shall not in general be eligible to a scholarship. A 
student, to be eligible to a scholarship, or to retain one, must 
in general maintain an average of ** Fair*' in all his studies 
and must not fall below the passing grade in any subject. 

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72 ADEIrBERT COL,LEGE. [19OI-I902 

5. A scholarship may be withdrawn from a student 
whose work or conduct ceases to be satisfactory. 

6. A limited number of scholarships of larger amount 
(covering perhaps four-fifths of, or even the whole of the term 
bills) shall be offered to students of distinctly higher grade, 
the number and conditions to be determined later. 

In addition to the scholarships, there are also certain 
funds which are loaned to students recommended by the 
Faculty. When repaid they will be used in aiding other 
students. A few of those students who have a thorough 
preparation for college are enabled to earn more or less 
money by teaching or other labor. 

Students placed upon the list of beneficiaries are expected 
to maintain their standing in scholarship, and also to finish 
their course here. Before dismissal to another institution 
can be granted, the college dues, including the amounts 
given or loaned, must first be paid. 



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THE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



DN ORDER to provide more adequate means for the 
separate higher education of young women, the 
Board of Trust of Western Reserve University established 
the College for Women in 1888. The first session began in 
September of the same year. For the first three years of 
its existence the college depended largely for its courses of 
instruction upon members of the faculty of Adelbert Col- 
lege. At the end of that period it acquired a separate corps 
of instructors, so that since that time each of the two col- 
leges, the one for women and the other for men, has had a 
faculty of its own. In this relation special mention should 
be made of the generous gifts and bequests through which 
have been established the Eliza Clark Professorship of 
Greek, the Emily A. Woods Professorship of Latin, the 
Florence Harkness Professorship of Biblical Literature, and 
the Lucy A. Leffingwell Professorship of Philosophy. The 
two colleges have a common standard of work, and the rela- 
tions of each to the other and to the rest of the University 
tend to develop a common breadth of outlook. Moreover, 
in a number of the departments, by exchange of work and 
other arrangements, instruction is given in each college by 
members of the faculty of the other. Graduates of the Col- 
lege far Women receive their degrees from the University, 
of which it is an integral part. The system is thus not one 
of co-education, nor of complete separation in education, 
but of co-ordination. 



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74 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 

In 1892 it moved to its present site on Bellflower Avenue, 
in the most attractive and healthful part of the city, a few 
steps from Euclid Avenue on one side and from Wade Park 
and the great system of parks and boulevards on the other. 
In 1898 the college grounds were enlarged, so that they 
now contain about four acres. Clark Hall, named from its 
donor, Eliza Clark, was erected in 1892 from designs by 
Richard M. Hunt. It contains the library, gymnasium, 
and offices, in addition to recitation and study rooms. A 
home for students, called Guilford House, the gift of Mrs. 
Samuel Mather, was built in 1892 and greatly enlarged in 
1894. The Florence Harkness Memorial is just completed; 
it contains, in addition to the main assembly room, the reci- 
tation room and library for the Bible classes. Haydn Hall 
will be completed this year; it is designed to supply rooms 
for study and social purposes, and also to serve as a dormi- 
tory. The laboratories in Biology, Chemistry, Geology 
and Physics are situate on the campus of Adelbert College 
and are used in common with the members pf that college. 
The Hatch Library and Astronomical Observatory are also 
used in common. 



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I9OI-I902] WBSTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVBRSITY. 75 



ADVISORY COUNCIL, 



President : 
Miss L. T. GUILFORD. 

Vice President: 
Mrs. WILLIAM A. LEONARD. 

Secretary : 
Miss MARY L. SOUTHWORTH. 

Mrs. SikMUBL Mathbr, Mrs. C. F. Oi*nry, 

Mrs. Edward W. Morley, Mrs. W. S. Tyi,br, 

Mrs. Henry S. Sherman, Mrs. George A. Garretson, 
Miss Harriet Shei^don Huri^but, Mrs. James J. Tracy, 

Miss Harriet L. Keei«er, Miss Mary E. Spencer, 

Miss Eixen G. Revbi^ey, Mrs. Jay C. Morse, 

Mrs. J. H. Wade, Mrs. D. Z. Norton, 

Mrs. Chari^bs J. Shefpiei^d, Mrs. H. E. Myers, 

Mrs. Luke Lascei«i«es, Miss Anna Burgess, 

Miss Hei^en L. Storke, Mrs. Dudi^ey P. Ai«i«en, 

Miss Augusta Mitti«eberger, Mrs. Edward W. Haines, 

Mrs. Pascai, H. Sawyer, Mrs. Arthur E. Lyman, 
Mrs. Worcester R. Warner, 

Miss Bertha L. Torrey, President of the Alumnae Association. 

Corresponding Members. 
Mrs. Wm. H. Upson, Akron, O. Mrs. G. H. McElevy,Youngstown, O. 
Mrs. C. W. Jacques, Ashtabula, O. Mrs. Henry B. Perkins, Warren, O. 
Mrs. J. Osborne Moss, New York. Mrs. Frank Swayne, Toledo, O. 
Mrs. James A. Garfield, Mentor, O. Mrs. J. S. Newberry, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. H.S. Lane, Crawfordsville, Ind. Mrs. Wm. E. Moore, Columbus, O. 
Mrs. C. O. Gridley, Erie, Pa. Mrs. Frank G. Sigler, Montclair, N.J. 

Mrs. Thos. Kilpatrick, Omaha, Neb. Mrs. Joseph Howells, Jefferson, O. 
Mrs. George H. Ely, Elyria, O. 



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76 COLLEGB FOR WOMBN. [igoi-igoa 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arrangedy with exception of the President^ in the order qt graduation from College, 

Charles Franklin Thwing, D. D., LI/. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President. 

Hiram Collins Haydn, D. D., LL. D., 15 La Grange St. 

Harkness Professor of Biblical Literature. 

Emma Maud Pbrkins, A. B., 121 Adelbert St. 

Woods Professor of Latin. 

Harold North Fowlkr, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Clark Professor of Greek. 

Henry Platt Cushing, M. S., 260 Sibley St. 

Professor of Geology. 

Henry Eldridge Bourne, a. B., B. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of History. 

Robert Waller Deering, Ph. D., 41 Cornell St. 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature. 

Herbert Austin Aikins, Ph. D., 40 Gomell St. 

Leffingwell Professor of Philosophy, 

Allen Dudley Severance, A. M., B. D., 198 i Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Historical Bibliography. 

Anna Helene Palmie, Ph. B., 34 Sayles St. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

William Henry Hulme, Ph. D., 48 Mayfield St. 

Professor of English. 

Hippolyte Gruener, Ph. D., 43 Knox St. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Charles E. Clemens, 1093 Prospect St. 

Instructor in the History and Theory of Music. 

Francis Walker, Ph. D., 46 Nantucket St. 

Associate Professor of Political and Social Science. 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 77 

AsHi^EY Horace Thorndikb, Ph. D., 95 Mayfield St. 

Associate Professor of English, 

Thomas Edward Owvbr, Ph. D., 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 

Lawrence Edmonds Griffin, Ph. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Biology, 

Robert Herndon Fife, Jr., Ph. D., 91 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in German, 

Fritz Reichmann, Ph. D., 46 Knox St 

Instructor in Physics. 

HowEiX Merriman Haydn, A. B., 15 La Grange St. 

Instructor in Bible, 

Agn^es Hunt, Ph. D., 51 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in History, 

Grace MoREi^AND Henderson, B. L., East Cleveland. 

Instructor in French. 

Mary GHORGE Clark, Guilford House. 

Instructor in Physical Training, 

Nina May Roberts, A.M., Alta House. 

Assistant in English, 

Maud Winship, A. M., 100 Kensington St. 

Assistant in Philosophy and Education, 

Winifred Ajwce Storer, B. L., 95 Ingleside Av. 

Assistant in English. 

AucE Doyle Drake, Ph. B., . 792 Republic St. 

Assistant in English. 



OTHER OFFICERS. 



Bertha Louise Torrey, A. B., Guilford House. 

Registrar and Assistant to Bursar. 

Anna Louise Mac Intyre, A. B., 136 Sawtell Av. 

Librarian. 
Harriet B. Chapman, A. B., M. D., Sio Rose Building. 

Lecturer on Hygiene, 



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78 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 

JBSSIB BoGGS, A. M., M. D., 1 257 Euclid Av. 

Medical Examiner, 

Elizabeth Currier Annin, Housemistress^ Guilford House. 

Harold N. Fowler, ^ 

Emma M. Perkins, \ Executive Committee, 

Robert W. Deering, ) 

Henry E. Bourne, Bursar, 



Additional instruction in their own departments is given by the. 
follounng members of the Adelbert College Faculty, 

Edward Williams Morley, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 
Hurlbut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry, 

Frank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc., 79 Adelbert St. 

Perkins Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Handy Professor of Philosophy, 

Francis Hobart Herrick, Ph. D., D. Sc, 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology, 

Samuel Ball Platner, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

f^fessor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit. 

Abraham Lincoln Fuller, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greek, 

Benjamin Parsons Bourland, Ph. D., 12 Adelbert Hall 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 

John Dickerman, A. B., 852 Doan St. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

Olin Freeman Tower, Ph. D., Euclid Av. and Nantucket St. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 

Edward Meyer, Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

In'Structor in German, 

Carl B. James, B. S., 958 S. Logan Av. 

Assistant in Biological Laboratory, 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



79 



STUDENTS. 



Helen Anderson Allen, 



SSNIORS. 

CI. * Salt Lake City, Utah «ii 

Guilford House. 



Bertha Elizabeth Beck, O. 
Charlotte Bdwina Black, L. E. 
Helen Olive Bouldon, CI. 
Barbara Sigwalt Brassington, M. I/. 

Arabella Swift Canfield, L. E. 
Bessie Mildred Chandler, L. E. 
Cordelia Elizabeth Claflin, M. L. 
Mabel Fay Clark, M.I,. 
Evelyn Maude Collins, CI. 
Minnie Anna Creedon, L. E. 
Sarah Smith Harbine, L. E. 
Eva Minerva Hauxhurst, L. E. 
Mabel Ainslie Holland, I/. E. 
Mathilde Emma Junge, M. L. 
Lura Claire Kurtz, L. E. 
Martha Lueke, M. L. 
Susan Ray McKean, M. I/. 
Effie McKinney, L. E. 
Rebecca Sjrville Markowitz, L. E. 
May Jane Meacham, M. L. 
Katherine Marie O'Brien, L. E. 
•Orpha Maud Peters, M. L. 
Thalia Maud Reese, M. I/. 
Zara Belle Rhoades, CI. 
Isabelle Dolores Roberts, CI. 
Lila Pauline Robeson, L. E. 
Jeannette Eunice Sague, L. E. 
Lucia Harriet Sanderson, CI. 
Hannah Eva Selby, CI. 
Harriet Marie Skeel, M. L. 
Margaret May Skeel, M. L. 
Carrie Belle Smith, L. E. 



Cleveland^ 85 Hower Av. 

Sandusky ^^ Guilford House. 

Cleveland » 119 Poplar St. 

Cleveland * 
Overlook Rd. E. Euclid Heights. 



Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland^ 
Painesville * 
Xenia^ 
Cleveland^ 
Sandusky ^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland ^ 



Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

446 Dunham Av. 

348 Dunham Av. 

1235 Cedar Av. 

69 Beechwood St. 

75 Adelbert St. 

13 Kenmore St. 

Guilford House. 

951 Detroit St. 

8 Cedar Av. 

708 Willson Av 

40 Summit St. 



Mechanicsburg^ Guilford House. 
Cleveland^ 21 Vine St. 

Cleveland ^ 109 Lincoln Av. 

Cleveland « The Milton. 

EastRinggold'^^ ^01 Murray Hill Av. 



Cleveland^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Clet^eland* 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland * 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland* 
Cleveland^ 



30 Tilden Av. 

499 Russell Av. 

ii6GaylordSt. 

106 White Av. 

Guilford House. 

166 Sawtell Av. 

25 Commonwealth Av. 

770 Republic St. 

17 Marble St. 

109 Oakdale St. 



*Abbr«viationa: CI. for Classical Course; M. I«. for Modern I^anruage Course; 
L. B. for Latin-BngUsh Course The numerals after the home address indicate 
the institution from which the student came to College (see page 85); those after 
special students, the year of their course. 



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So 



COIXBGK FOR WOMEN. 



[19OI-1902 



Grace Alice Taft, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


1082 Detroit St. 


Bessie Marian Templeton, L. E. 


Medina ^ 


Guilford House. 


Mabel Katherine Thomas, CI. 


Cleveland ^'^ 


2004 Superior St. 


Mabel Walker, h. E. 


Cleveland^ 


2803 Broadway. 


Ida Young, M. L. 


Pittsburgh^ 


Guilford House. 


Cornelia Anna Zismer, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


112 Mechanic St. 
Seniors, 39. 



Anna Leah Bailey, L. E. 
Mary Lawson Ballantyne, 



jxmiORS. 

St, Louis, Mich.^ 93 East Lake St. 
CI. Elizabeth, N.J,^ 

Hillcrest, East Cleveland. 



Emma Laveme Bishop, M. L. 

Caroline Arrowsmith Bruce, CI. 

Marcia Gertrude Bruckshaw, L. E. Cler/eland^ 

Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland * 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland ' 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 



Maud Isabel Bruckshaw, M. L. 
Matilda Clara Buschman, M. L. 
Luella Lenore ChaflFee, L. E. 
Blanche Genevieve Cole, L. E. 
Elizabeth Bertha Cristy, L. E. 
Susie Adah De Witt, M. L. 
Alice Dunham. M. L. 
Ethel Endora May Gifford, L. E. 
Juliette Alice Handerson, M. L. 
Ruth Evelyn Haydn, M. L. 
Mary Adeline Hird, CI. 

Elizabeth Hubbell. L. E. 

Maria Margaret Kelly, L. E. 

Sophia Clarke Kenyon, M. L. 

Maud Harriet King, M. L. 

Laura Helen Krejci, CI. 

Emilie Louise Krug, M. L. 

Bertha May Lee, L. E. 

Lillie Margaret SharlowLothrop, L. E. Cleveland^ 



Medina ®** 70 Ingleside Av. 

Cleveland^ 49 Lincoln A v. 

36 Beechwood St. 

36 Beechwood St. 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

199 Van Ness Av. 

Mayfield Hill. 

679 East Prospect St. 

388 Dunham Av. 

107 Gaylord St. 

444 Dunham Av. 

Guilford House. 

Baldwinville, Mass, * 

Guilford House. 
Cleveland^ 65 Arlington St. 

Cleveland^ 165 University St. 

Rochester, N. Y.^ Guilford House. 
Chardon ^ Guilford House. 

Cleveland * 290 Forest St. 

Cleveland'^ 51 Fourth Av. 

St,Johnsbury,Vt,^ 71 Tilden Av. 



Ethel MacDonald, CI. 
Charlotte May Parker, L. E. 
Edith Harris Parmenter, CI. 
Ethel Marian Peck, L. E. 
Bessie May Post, CI. 
May Cameron Quinby, CI. 

Bertha May Rosenfeld, M. L 



Cleveland^ 
Solon 1 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland* 
Cleveland^ 
East Cleveland^^ 

Hillcrest, East Cleveland, 
Cleveland '^'^ 1329 WiUson Av, 



1745 Harvard St. 
Guilford House. 
Guilford House. 
717 Republic St. 
28 Walker St. 
22 1 1 Euclid Av. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RBSBRVE UNIVERSITY. 



81 



Lydia Margaret Schwegler, CI. Cleveland^ 

Edith May Tanner, CI. Cleveland ^ 

Florence Jeanette Taylor, CI. Cleveland^ 

Fmnces Lncille Thomas, M. L. Cleveland'^ 

Edith Wynonah Thompson, L. E. Cleveland^ 

Grace Ethel Tompkins, M. L. Cleveland^ 

Gertrude Elizabeth Vilas, M. L. Cleveland^ 

Alice May Wallace, L. E. Cleveland^ 

SOPHOMORES. 



58 Euclid Place. 

25 Linwood St. 

78 Oakdale St. 
1467 Willson Av. 

72 Harriet Av. 

97 Luveme St. 

220 Kennard St. 

28 Marion St. 

Juniors, 39. 



Florence EUinwood Allen, CI. 
Carlyne Margaret Buschman, M. L. 
Katherine Evelyn CoUord, L. E. 
Jessie Edna Daniels, L. E. 
Agnes Mary Doster, M. L. 
Fanny Alice Dunsford, M. L. 
Lois Violet Ellett, L. E. 
Madge Ina Ferry, L. E. 
Matilda Fish, L. E. 
Bessie Gillmer, L. E. 
Alma Gertrude Gleason, CI. 
Jennie Adele Gleeson, L. E. 
Susan Elizabeth Gray, L. E. 
Alice Constance Hagan, CI. 
Frances Antoinette Hinde, L 



Salt Lake City ^-^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Canton « 
Cleveland^ 



Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

189 Taylor St. 

134 Murray Hill Av. 

72 Merchants Av. 



Avon, N. y. « Guilford House. 
Cuyahoga Falls'^ Guilford House. 
South Kirtland^ 821 FairmountSt. 



Mary Estelle Hopkinson, L. E. 
Clara Margaret Huddleston, L. E. 
Clara Ethelinde Jacobi, M. L. 
Ethel Irene Jones, CI. 
Carrie Hannah Kingsbury, 
Sadie Rose Koblitz, M. L. 
Ella Konigslow, M. L. 
Rhoda Landsberg, M. I/. 
Louise Reber Layman, CI. 
Florence Agnes Lessick, CI. 
Mabelle Amele Monson, L. E. 
Florence Elizabeth Myers. M. L. 
Addie Ellen Oakley, L. E. 
Lillian Elizabeth Oakley, L. E. 
Frances Isabel Odlin, L. E. 
Rhoda Katharine Parks, L. E. 



Cleveland^ 224 Streator Av. 

Warren ^ Guilford House. 

Cleveland ^ 168 Cedar Av. 

Cleveland ^ 54 Kenwood Av. 

Cleveland^ 199 Quincy St. 

Cleveland ^ 386 Willson Av. 

E. Cuyahoga Falls^'^ 

158 Murray Hill Av. 
Cleveland ^ 288 Gordon Av. 

Cincinnati^ Guilford House. 

East Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 



M. L. Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland * 
Cleveland^ 
Youngstozvn ^ 
Cleveland'^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland'^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Dayton ** 
Collinwood^'^ 



63 Beersford PI. 

1635 Harvard St. 

94 Bertram St. 

63 Osborne St. 

882 Scovill Av. 

The Euclid. 

Guilford House. 

486 Giddings Av. 

Guilford House. 

I Glen Park Place. 

800 Hough Av. 

800 Hough Av. 

Guilford House. 

Collinwood. 



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COLLEGB FOR WOMEN. 



[19OI-I902 



Mary Jeannette Proudfoot, CI. 
Florence Alice Reeve, CI. 
Etta Anthony Sampliner, M. L. 
Clara Beth Schneider, M. L. 
Anna Groh Seesholtz, M. L. 
Beulah Blanche Smith, L. £. 
Ruhamah Georgette Smith, CI. 
Lillian Belle StilweU, L. E. 
Fannie Langhom Stoney, CI. 
Jennie Camille Suits, CI. 
Mary Eugenia Suliot, M. L. 
Mary Helen Thayer, M. L. 
Mary Emily Van Epps, CI. 
Josephine Depear Walsh, CI. 
Ethel Georgia Ward, CI. 
Ethel Ogarita Weimer, CI. 
Katie Weis, M. L. 

Cecily Whelan, CI. 
Eleanor Worthington, M. L. 



Cleveland * 2320 Spafford St. 

Willaughby » 49 Wilbur Place. 
Cleveland^ 321 Kennard St. 

Canton " 821 Fairmount St. 

Canton ^ Guilford House. 

Cortland^ 1204 Cedar Av. 

Cleveland ^ 40 Cheshire St. 

East Cleveland^ 37 Stanwood Rd. 
Cleveland ^ 30 Bridge St. 

Cleveland ^ 50 Bertram St. 

Salem »7 2 Sturteyvant St. 

Canton ** * Guilford House. 

Cleveland^ 915 S. Logan Av. 

East Cleveland «-io 69 Hower Av. 
Willoughby^ Willoughby. 

Cleveland ^ 144 Hawthorne Av. 
Cleveland^ 

Cor. Marcelline & Harvard St. 
Cleveland^ 103 Kentucky St. 

Cleveland ^ 34 Cheshire St. 

Sophomores, 50. 



FRBSHMEN. 



Helen Grace Abbott, L. E. 
Ida Florence Budde, CI. 
Stella May Champ, L. E. 
Mabel Elizabeth Chapman, CI. 
Anita Marie Cleveland, M. L. 
Gruyce Mildred Daniels, M. L. 
Jeanette Agnes Davidson, L. E. 
Lillian Wenona Durstine, M. L. 
Alice Duty, M. L. 
Marina Everett, L. E. 
Frieda Fliedner, M. L. 
Etta Freedlander, M. L. 
Malvina Friedman, M. L. 
Hortense Furth, M. L. 
Helen Gilchrist, L. E. 
Gertrude Marie Gillin, L. E. 
Blanche Edna Hager, L. E. 
Elizabeth Hardy Hall, CI. 
Hilda Maud Hetzel, L. E. 
Edith Mabel Hill, L. E. 



Cleveland ^ 212 Bell Av. 

Cleveland * 116 Spangler Av. 

Cleveland * 59 Bolton Av. 

Cleveland • 103 Marcelline Av. 

Cleveland^ 392 Bolton Av. 

Canton * 134 Murray Hill Av. 

East Cleveland 7« 24 Elsinore St. 
Cleveland^ 757 Willson Av. 

Cleveland^ 2577 Euclid Av. 

Foxcroft, Me, i^-« 887 Doan St. 
Cleveiand^ 160 Wellington Av. 
Cleveland ^ 158 Putnam St. 

Cleveland^ 132 Hawthorne St 

St, Louis ^ The Brooklawn. 

Cleveland * 560 Franklin Av. 

Cleveland^ 91 Quincy St. 

Euclid ^ Nottingham. 

New Haven, CL » 75 Adelbert St. 
Miamisburg '^ 75 Adelbert St. 

Cleveland *••* 350 Russell Av. 



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1901-1902] WESTBRN RBSBRVB DNIYERSITY. 



83 



Vesta Maude Jackson, L. B. 
Edna Mary Jones, L. E. 
Julia Clair Kelly, L. E. 
Lena Rivere Kiefer, L. E. 
Grace Amanda King, M. L. 

Carrie Louise Krauss, M. L. 
LilHe Belle Krider, M. L. 
Florence Rose Lembeck, M. L. 
Irma Linn, M. L. 
Maud Eugenia L3mian, L. E. 
Jean Bailey McFall, L. E. 
Florence Worcester McLean, L. E 
Pauline Angelette Miser, M. L. 
Max^ret Isabel Morton, CI. 
Mabel Adelle Morris, L. E. 
Bmma May Mumaw, L. E. 
Dorothy Carrie Neitzel, L. E. 
Fannie Elvira Paulson, L. E. 
Grace Louise Pennington, CI. 
Jean Quay, CI. 
Mary Joy Rawson, M. L. 
Elizabeth Ellinwood Roberts, CI. 
Rita Remington Sabin, M. L. 
Louise Christina Schuele, L. E. 
Helen Dennison Shepherd, CI. 
Edith Roberta Smith, L. E. 
Olga Elizabeth Solberg, M. L. 
Lotta May Sprague, L. E. 
Helen Florence Stevens, M. L. 
Harriet Anna Thomas, CI. 
Gwendolyne Lloyd Thomas, CI. 
Faye Emma Tracy, L. E. 
Julia Benjamin Turner, L. E. 
Ruth Van Nostran, L. E. 
EUzabeth White, L. E. 
Lois Brockway Williams, CI. 
Maud Frances Wilson, M. L. 
Mary Wittier, L. E. 
Helen Maria Wright, CI. 
Jennie Young, L. E. 



Garrettsville ** 2900 Superior St. 
Cleveland « 158 Murray Hill Av. 
Cleveland ^'^ 165 University St. 
Findlay ** . Guilford House. 

Butle, Mont, « 

26 Wellesley St., East Cleveland. 
Cleveland^-^ 1997 Superior St. 

Cleveland ^ 423 Bolton Av. 

Cleveland ^'^ 46 Streator Av. 

Cleveland^ 151 Courtland St. 

Chardon ^ Guilford House. 

Pittsburgh, Pa, ^ Guilford House. 
New Philadelphia « 75 Adelbert St. 
Ml. Vernon » Guilford House. 
Mt, Vernon » Guilford House. 
Cleveland^ 189 W. Madison Av. 
Canton » 134 Murray Hill Av. 

Bedford^ Bedford. 

Cleveland "•!« 1806 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland ^ 79 Hough Av. 

East Cleveland ^^ 4050 Euclid Av. 
Lisbon *> 75 Adelbert St. 

IVinsted, Ct,^ Guilford House. 
Cleveland ^ < 89 Tilden Av. 

Cleveland ' Guilford House. 

Painesville ^ Guilford House. 

Cleveland^ Guilford House. 

Salem ^ 136 Stearns St. 

Cleveland^ 30 Bridge St. 

Cleveland^ 2036 Broadway. 

Cleveland^ 27 Walker St. 

Cleveland"^ 5 Hinman St. 

Euclid^^ Euclid. 

Geneva *^ 98 Murray Hill Av. 

Cleveland * 14 Stanley Av. 

Euclid^^ Euclid. 

Cleveland^ 127 Streator Av. 

Fremont <» 75 Adelbert St. 

Miamisburg ^ 75 Adelbert St. 

Akron ^ Guilford House. 

Cleveland ^ 22 Melrose Av. 

Freshmen, 60. 



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84 



COI.LEGK FOR WOMEN. 



[1901-1902 



STUDENTS PURSUING PARTIAL COURSES. 



Gertrude Pearl Badger, (4) 

Edith Pansy Barret, ( i ) 
Isabella Beaton, (4) 
Edna Brush, (i) 
Elsie Bailey Carrel, ( i ) 
Winifred Chapman, (2) 
Myra Clark, (2) 
Edith Cond^, (i) 
Edna Church Dailey , ( 2 ) 
Edith Leona Eastman, (2) 
Mary R. Freer, (2) 
Bessie Ruth Gilchrist, (2) 
Clover Althea Hartz, (2) 
Mary Margaret Hay, (4) 
Helen Sterrett Henning, (i) 
Pauline Waring Herrick, ( i ) 
Pearl Irene Horton, (4) 
Florence Edith Jones, (3) 
Lulu Kaufman, (2) 
Maude Barber Kendall, (2) 
Theresa Dorothy Luck, (3) 
Emma Bean McKim, (2) 
Wilamina Morrow, (2) 
Beatrice Moss, (3) 
Zillah Genevieve Quayle, (2) 
Clara Risdon, (2) 
Catherine Dingwall Ross, (2) 
Clara Adelaide RufBni, (2) 
Mary Grace Shanklin. (2) 
Grace Irene Smith, (2) 
Olive Louise Spengler, (4) 
Rizpah Norwood Tarr, ( i ) 
Pearl West, (i) 
Olive Gertrude Wills, ( i ) 



BinghamUm, N. 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland ^^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland'^ 

East Cleveland^ 

Cleveland ^ 

GlenvilW^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland * 

Cleveland^ 

Cre^ton^^ 

Fargo, N, D, » 



Y, ^ 

Guilford House. 
383 Norwood Av. 
462 Kinsman St. 
1003 Euclid Av. 
467 Bolton Av. 
445 Russell Av. 
130 Melvin St. 
33WellesleySt. 
281 Hough Av. 
161 Avondale Av. 
1528 Cedar Av. 
560 Franklin Av. 
987 Case Av. 
75 Adelbert St. 
Guilford House. 
East Cleveland ^ 3006 Euclid Av. 



Cleveland'^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland"^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Ravenna «* 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Norwalk *• 
Cleveland ^ 
Ml. Vernon^ 
CUteland^-'^^ 
Lakewood^ 



100 Claremont St. 

1635 Harvard St. 

981 Case Av. 

1306 Cedar Av. 

829 Scranton Av. 

100 Oakdale St. 

223 East Prospect St. 

39 Osbom St. 

290 Sibley St. 

Guilford House. 

249 Streator Av. 

891 Scovill Av. 

261 Hough Av, 

Guilford House. 

63 Fourth Av. 

79 Sayles St. 

203 Amesbury Av. 

38 Clarence Av. 

Special, 34. 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



85 



SUMMARY. 

Seniors 39 

Juniors 39 

Sophomores 50 

Freshmen 60 

Specials 34 

Total 222 



1— Cleveland Central High School. 

2— Clereland South High School. 

8— CIcveUnd West High School. 

4-CleveUnd Bast High School. 

5— Cleveland l4ncoln High School. 

6— New Iryme Institnte. 

7— Glenville High School. 

8— Willougrhby High School. 

9-I«alce Brie College. 
10— Bochtel Preparatory and College. 
U-Salt Lake Academy, UUh. 
1»-Prlvate Tuition. 
IS— Miss Mittleberger's School. 
14— Iowa College. 
15— Binghamton. N. T., Central High 

SchooL 
16— Harooart Place Seminary. 
17— Pozcroft Seminary, Maine. 
18-Hast Cleveland High School. 
1»-Enclid High School. 
20—Kayen School, Youngstown. 
21— Hill House, Ct., High School. 
22-Avon, N. Y., High School. 
2S— Miamisburg High School. 
24— Garrettaville High School. 
a&-Pindlay High SchooL 
28— Butte High School, Montana. 
27— PitUtmrgh, Pa.. Central High School. 
2B— New PhiUdelphia High School. 
2»— Mt. Vernon High School. 
80— Painesville High School. 
81— Sandusky High School. 
82-Bedford High School. 
88— Medina High School. 
84— Miss Barclay's School. Allegheny,Pa. 
85— Miss Buckingham's School, Canton. 
8e-St. Louis, Mo., High School. 
87— Mrs. Knapp's School, Blizabeth, N. J 
88— Northfield Seminary, Mass. 



89— University of Chicago. 

4D-Lisbon High School. 

41— Chardon High School. 

42— Akron High School. 

48— Wyoming High School. 

44-Ohio State University. 

45— Oberlin College. 

46-Collinwood High School. 

47— Geneva High School. 

48— Smith College. 

40— Fremont High School. 

60— Canton High School. 

51— Parmington, Me., Normal School. 

62— Cuyahoga Falls High School. 

68— Warren High School. 

54— University of Cincinnati. 

66— Steele High School, Dayton. 

66— Norwalk High School. 

67— Salem High School. 

68— University of Wooster. 

60-Mechanicshurg High School. 

60— Cortland High School. 

61— St. Johnsbury, Vt., Academy. 

62— Rochester, N. Y., High School and 

University. 
68-Salt Lake College, UUh. 
64— Ravenna High School. 
65— Toledo High School. 
66-Gilbert School, Winsted. Ct. 
07— Fargo, N. Dakota, High School. 
68— Wellesley College. 
69— Hathaway-Brown School. 
70— Rockford High School. Illinois. 
71— Oberlin Academy. 
72— Miss Andrews* School. 
73— Shepardaon College. 
74— Blyria High School. 
76— Western Reserve Academy 
70-Collinwood High School. 



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86 COI^LEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION- 



All applicants for admission, whether to the Freshman 
class, to advanced standing, or to partial courses, must pre- 
sent satisfactory testimonials of good moral character, and 
those from other colleges must also bring certificates of hon- 
orable dismission. Admission to the Freshman class may 
be gained in one of two ways, either on examination, or on 
presentation of a certificate from*an approved High School 
or Academy. Each of these methods is outlined below. 

ADMISSION ON EXAMINATION. 

Applicants for admission may be examined either during 
Commencement week or at the opening of the first term in 
September. Those who wish to be examined during Com- 
mencement week should notify the Registrar before June 
10; those who wish to be examined in September, before 
September 10. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

All candidates, irrespective of the course they may choose, 
must be prepared in English, I^atin, and Mathematics, 
according to the outlines of those subjects given below. 

English: The examination consists of two parts. On the books 
marked A in the following lists, the student is required to write a 
paragraph or two on each of several topics chosen by her from a con- 
siderable number set before her on the examination paper. In every 
case the knowledge of the book will be considered of less importance 
•than the ability to write English. On the books marked B^ the 
student is required to answer questions relating to the author, subject 
matter, the essentials of English grammar, and the important facts in 
those periods of English literary history to which the prescribed 
books belong. She is also expected to express her knowledge with 
clearness and accuracy. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 87 

Bzaminations in 1902: A. For Reading: Shakespeare's Merchant 
of Venice; Pope's Iliad, Books i, vi, xxii, and xxiv; The Sir Roger de 
Coverley Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Ancient 
Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; Tennyson's 
Princess; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas Mamer. 
B. For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's Lycidas, Comus, 
L' Allegro, II Penseroso; Burke's Conciliation with America; Mac- 
aulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Examinations in 1903 and 1904: Ai For Reading: Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice, and Julius Csesar; The Sir Roger de Coverley 
Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Carlyle's Essay on Bums; Tenny- 
son's Princess; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas 
Mamer. B. For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's L' Allegro, 
n Penseroso, Comus, Lycidas; Burke's Conciliation with America; 
Macaulay's Kssays on Milton and Addison. 

Latin: Grammar (Bennett, or Allen and Greenough); Roman 
pronunciation. Caesar — ^three books of the Gallic War, or two books 
of the Civil War. Cicero — six orations, including De Imperio Gn. 
Pompeii. Virgil — six books of the ^neid. Ovid — ^Translation at 
sight. The translation at sight of passages from prose authors. 
Prose Composition — rendering of simple English sentences into 
Latin. History of Rome — ^the amount required is indicated by 
Smith's Smaller History of Rome, or Creighton's Primer of Roman 
History. Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics: Arithmetic, including the metric S3rstem of weights 
and measures. Algebra (Loomis, Wells, or Wentworth's College), to 
the chapter on the Binomial Theorem. Geometry — (Wentworth or 
Wells) complete. 

Note: It is very important that students review a portion at least 
of both Algebra and Geometry in their last preparatory year. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 

In addition to the above, students entering the several 
courses must be prepared in the following subjects: For the 
Classical Course, Greek; for the Modem Language Course, 
French or German; for the Latin-English Course, Chem- 
ktry, Physics, and History. The entrance requirements in 
these subjects are as follows: 



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88 COLI^EGE FOR WOMEN. [1901-1902 

Greek: Grammar; pronunciation as recommended on page vii of 
the Preface to Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Xenophon — four books 
of the Anabasis (for which one hundred and ten pages of Goodwin's 
Greek Reader will be considered an equivalent). Homer — ^three 
books of the Iliad, with Prosody. The translation at sight of easy 
passages in Attic prose. Prose Composition— the rendering into 
Greek of simple English sentences. White's Beginner's Greek Book 
(complete), or Jones's Exercises in Greek Prose (twenty-six exercises)^ 
is recommended. History of Greece — ^the amount required is indicated 
by Botsford's, Oman's or Myer's History of Greece, or Pennell's 
Ancient Greece. Ancient Geography. 

French: A thorough knowledge of grammatical forms and of 
syntax; accuracy in pronunciation; ability to understand simple 
spoken French; facility in rendering English into easy French; ease 
and accuracy in sight translation. 

First year: Elementary grammar with exercises; the irregular verbs; 
Super's French Reader; Hal^vy's L'Abb^ Constantin, and similar 
easy texts. Second year: Advanced grammar; syntax; reading of 
some 500 pages from modem authors — Sand, M6rim^e, Labiche, 
Hugo, Sandeau, Daudet; composition based upon the texts (see such 
a series edited by Grandgent and Kimball, or Fran9ois' Introductory 
French Prose Composition). Third year: Advanced syntax and 
review of grammar; composition and dictation; reading of about 80a 
pages of prose, poetry and drama from the works of Comeille, Moli^re, 
Racine, La Fontaine, Voltaire, Rousseau, Balzac, Musset, Copp^e^ 
De Maupassant, Daudet, Zola; practice in sight translation. 

The following grammars are recommended : Grandgent, Whitney, 
Edgren, Chardenal, or a similar work. For suggestions of great 
value, regarding reading material, grading of courses, and methods of 
instruction, consult the "Report of the Committee of Twelve of the 
Modem Language Association of America." (D. C. Heath & Co.) 

Gbrman: Grammar, with translation at sight of easy German 
prose. Prose Composition — ^the rendering of simple connected prose 
from English into German. Ability to pronounce German and to 
recognize German words and simple phrases when spoken. In addi- 
tion, familiarity with the following works or their equivalents, is 
required : Riehl — Der Fluch der Schonheit. Freytag — Aus dem 
Staat Friedrichs des Grossen. Heine — ^Die Harzreise. Goethe — First 
three books of Dichtung und W^ahrheit. Lessing — Minna von Bam- 
helm. Schiller— Wilhelm Tell and Das Lied von der Glocke. Thirty 
pages of lyrics and ballads. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 89 

Chbmistry: Remsen^s Chemistry, briefer course, or an equivalent. 
Class work (through one year). Laboratory. 

Physics: Carhart and Chute, Avery, or an equivalent. Class- 
work through one year. Bach student must perform in the labora- 
tory at least thirty-five or forty experiments, mainly quantitative, 
such as are given in the best laboratory manuals. The laboratory 
note-book should be presented as part of the certificate. 

History: English or General (through one year). 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Students from such High Schools and Academies as may 
be approved by the Faculty are admitted to the Freshman 
class without examination, on the presentation of certificates 
showing that they have completed the requisite amount of 
preparatory study. Blank forms of such certificates will be 
furnished instructors on application to the President, with 
whom they are invited to correspond. Applicants for ad- 
mission are requested to present their certificates, or send 
them by mail to the Registrar, during Commencement 
week, or as soon thereafter as practicable. 

When the above requirements have not been met exactly, 
the equivalents offered must be specified in detail. When 
they have not been met in full, the applicant may be 
required to pass the usual examination in any or all of the 
requirements. 

Students received on certificate are regarded as upon pro- 
bation during the first half-year, and those deficient in 
preparation are dropped whenever the deficiency has been 
clearly demonstrated. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior classes, whether from other colleges or not, may be 
required to pass examinations on studies previously pur- 
sued, but full credit will be given to such certificates as they 
bring from their previous instructors. No one is admitted 
to the Senior class after the beginning of the second half-year. 



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90 



COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. 



[19OI-I902 



COURSES OF STUDY; 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 



REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

Hours Total 

a week. hours. 

Bible, 1,2 i (throughout the year) 34 

English, 12 3 •* ** •• 102 

Latin, I, 2 3 " ** *' 102 

Mathematics, I, 2 3 •* " ** 102 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 



Classical 
Course 



Modern 

Language ■ 

Course 



Latin- 
English 
Course 



Greek, i, 2 

AND 

German, i, 2] 

or 
French, 



German, 5, 6 j 
French, 
or 
French, 3, 4 j 
German, 



N, I, 2| 

I, I, 2J 

N, 5. 6 ^ 

I, I. 2f 

^ 3, 4 I 

^. I, 2 f 



Physics, i A (first half-year). . 
History, i (second half-year). 
German, i, 2] 

or 
French, 



N, I, 2| 

I, I. 2 I 



6 hours a week 

throughout 

the year. 



204 



544 

In addition to the above subjects all members of the Freshman class 
are required to attend lectures on Hygiene, one hour a week, first half- 
year. Systematic exercises in the gymnasium three times a week, 
throughout the year, are required of Freshmen and Sophomores. 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVB UNIVERSITY. 



91 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 



REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALI< COURSES. 

Hours 
a week. 

Bible 3 i (first half-year) 



Tcital 
hours. 

17 



ADDITIONAL REQIHREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 



Classical 

and 

Modem 

Language 

Courses 



History, i 3 (first half-year) 

Physics, 10 3 ^ first half-year) 

f ... 9 (first half-year) 
* \...I5 (second half-year) 



El,KCTIVES. 



5O 

51 
153 
255 



Latin- 
English 
Course 



French, i, 2 
German, 3, 4 

or 
Frbnch, 3, 4 
German, i, 2 
Philosophy i 

Electivbs . . . 



6 (throughout the year") . . 204 



{::: 



3 (second half-year) 51 

9 (first half-year) 153 

6 (second half-year) 102 



510 



527 
JUNIOR YEAR. 

Bible 4. 5 i (throughout the year) 34 

Electives . 15 ** ** " 510 

544 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Elbctivbs 15 (throughout the year) 510 

Among their electives students are required to take at least one 
course in either Bconomics or Philosophy, and at least one course 
each in two of the three sciences. Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. 
See also page 113. 



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92 COI^LBGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 



SYNOPSIS OF STUDIES- 



The following statements include all cx)urses oflFered, 
whether prescribed or elective. Unless otherwise stated, 
each course consists of three weekly recitations of one 
hour each. 

In making choice of elective courses students are ex- 
pected to confer with the President, Registrar, and mem- 
bers of the Faculty for advice and assistance. Students 
must give the Registrar written notice of their choice of 
electives for the second half-year of 1 901 -1902, on or 
before January i8th, 1902; for first half-year, 1902-1903, 
on or before May 27th, 1902. 

ANTHROPOLOGY, 

PROFESSOR CURTIS. 

AnThropoi<ogy. The main problems and bearings of Anthro- 
pology are discussed in systematic order. Lectures arc given on 
the history of Anthropology, and an effort is made to understand its 
position in the present century. First half-year. 

ART. 

PROFESSOR FOWI^ER. 

1. History of Art. Ancient Art— Lectures and collateral 
reading. 1902-1903. Through the year. 

2. History of Art. Post-classical Art; from the beginning of 
Christian Art through the period of the Renaissance — Lectures and 
collateral reading. 1901-1902. Through the year. 

ASTRONOMY. 

professor whitman. 
The course is mainly descriptive and is amply illustrated. The 
simpler problems of spherical astronomy are discussed. Some atten- 
tion is given to the history of astronomy. Text-book, Yoimg's 
General Astronomy. Second half-year. 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 93 

THE BIBLE* 

PRKSIDBNT THWING, I. 

DR. HAYDN. 

MR. HOWBI.I. M. HAYDN, 2-10. 

I, 2. The Life of Christ. One hour a week throughout the year. 

3. Thb Acts of the Aposti.es. One hour a week, first half-year. 

4, 5. STUDIES IN THE Oi,D TESTAMENT. One hour a week through- 
out the year. 

6. Studies in the Paui^ine Epistles. A critical course in- 
tended for those who can use the Greek Testament. Second half-year. 

7. The Pauline Epistles. A course in the English Testament, 
aiming to exhibit the circumstances of writing, content, and per- 
manent value of these epistles to the church. Second half-year. 

8. The General Epistles. A course similar to 7. First half-year. 

9. 10. Hebrew Grammar and Reading. An introductory 
course. Harper's "Elements of Hebrew." will be used, then the Old 
Testament text. Throughout the year. 

The establishment of the Florence Harkness Foundation has 
enabled this department not only to become exceptionally well sup- 
plied with maps and books, but to offer each year to all the students 
a series of lectures by eminent persons from outside the University. 
In 1896-7, Dr. William H. Ward, of the Independent, delivered five 
lectures on the connection of Old Testament History with that of 
Egypt, Babylon and Syria. In 1897-8 Professor Charles P. Fagnani, 
of Union Theological Seminary, gave a course of five lectures on The 
Bible and its Interpretation, and Mr. Gerald Stanley Lee, of North- 
ampton, Mass., five lectures on the Mind of Christ. In the Spring of 
1899, Professor George Adam Smith, of Free Church College, Glas- 
gow, Scotland, gave eight lectures on the Old Testament. In 
1 899- 1900, Professor Richard G. Moulton, of the University of Chicago, 
delivered five lectures on The Literary Interpretation of the Bible. 

In 1900-01 Professor Frank K. Saunders, Ph. D., D. D., of Yale 
University, gfave a course of five lectures on "The Prophets of Israel 
and their Messages." 

In Old Testament teaching the object is to trace the development 
of the idea of the kingdom of God, as wrought out in the history of 
the Hebrew people until the coming of Christ; to dwell upon the 
pivotal men and periods of the history; to take account of the several 
books, their significance and literary form — so to prepare the way for 
a more intelligent study of the Scriptures, in detail, in after life. 



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94 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1901-1902 

BIOLOGY. 

PROFBSSOR HBRRICK. 
DR. GRIFFIN. 

1. Elementary Biology. An introduction to the study of living 
things upon the basis of morphology, physiology, and development. 
One recitation, two laboratory exercises of two hours each. Second 
half-year. 

2. Zoology — Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates. A 
study of the structure, development and relationship of certain types 
of invertebrate animals. One lecture, two laboratory exercises of two 
hours each. First half-year. 

3. 4. Zoology— Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. A 
laboratory course in the general anatomy of the principal types of 
vertebrates, including amphioxus, a cyclostome, cartilaginous and 
bony fish, an amphibian, reptile, bird and mammal. One recitation 
and two laboratory exercises, throughout the year. 

6. Elements of Vertebrate Histology. The study of the 
tissues of the mammalian body. No student is admitted to this course 
who has not had preliminary training in general biology. One recita- 
tion, two laboratory exercises of two hours each. Second half-year. 

7. Elements of Vertebrate Embryology. A detailed study 
of the development of the bird, and general principles of the embry- 
ology of vertebrates. One recitation, two laboratory' exercises of two 
hours each. Second half-year. 

9. General Physiology. A course of reading, supplemented by 
experiments in the laboratory', in the general physiology of the cell; 
an examination of the facts and theories of life, and of the problems 
which it offers. For Seniors at discretion of instructor. 

10. Botany— Vegetable Morphology. An introduction to the 
study of plants on tiie basis of their physiolog>', morphology and 
general classification. Instruction is given by lectures, laboratory 
work and field excursions. Second half-year. 

11. Biologicai, Reading Club. A voluntary association of stu- 
dent<^ and instructors for reading and discussing works of general 
scientific interest. Meetings are held weekly from November ist to 
May 1st, at times most convenient to the members. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are : courses 1,2,6, 7> 
10, $5.00; course 3-4, $5.00 for each term; course 9, 12.00. 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 95 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFBSSOR MORI^EY. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GRUENER. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TOWER. 

1. Chemistry of the Non-Metai,uc Ei^ements. Wurtz*s 
Elements of Chemistry. Two hom^ a week in recitation and one 
laboratory exercise of three hours. First half-year. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. A more advanced course in general 
chemistry, designed for students entering with a preparation in 
chemistry. Newth's Inorganic Chemistry. One recitation and two 
laboratory exercises each week. First half-year. 

3. Chemistry op the Metaw. Wurtz's Elements of Chemistry. 
Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours. Open to 
those who have taken course i or course 2. Second half-year. 

4. Physioi^ogicai, Chemistry. This course will be popular in 
its nature, and will consist of lectures on the chemistry of the animal 
body, the chemistry of nutrition, and the chemistry of the ordinary 
food materials, including the influence of cooking on the chemical 
composition and on the nutritive value of foods. The laboratory 
exercises will include the preparation and some of the simpler 
methods of analysis of the compounds of most interest in physio- 
logical chemistry. Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. Open to those who have taken course i or course 2. 
Second half-year. 

5. Organic Chemistry. Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Two 
recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours. Open to those 
who have taken courses i and 3, or courses 2 and 3. Students 
choosing this course will take Chemistry 6 in the second half-year. 
First half-year. 

6. Course 5 continued. Second half-year. 

7. Elements of Quai^itative Anai<ysis. Three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each. Second half-year. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are : Courses i, 3 or 4, 
I3.00; Course 2, $4.00; Courses 5 or 6, $5.00; Course 7, |6.oo. 

ECONOMICS. 

associate professor wai«ker. 
I. Ei<bments of Economics. Recitations, lectures and required 
readings. Text-book, Walker's Political Economy (Advanced 
Course). First half-year. 



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96 COI.LEGK FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 

2. Vai^uk and Distribution. Consideration of the institution of 
property in history and theory, systems of land tenure and the doc- 
trine of rent, interest in theory and practice, methods of labor 
remuneration and theory of wages, monopolies, etc. Lectures, 
readings, recitations. Second half-year. 

3. History of Economic Theory. The development of eco- 
nomic thought from the earliest times. Lectures and readings in 
selections- from various writers. Text-book, Ingram's History of 
Political Economy. First half-year, 

4. Socialism. An historical and critical course in socialism, dis- 
cussing the historical basis, the various schools and movements of the 
nineteenth century, and such efforts at social reform as cooperation. 
Lectures, required readings. Text-books, Ely's French and German 
Socialism, Schaeffle's Quintessence of Socialism. Second half-year, 

5. Comparative P01.1TICS and Constitutionai. Law. An exam- 
ination and comparison of the governmental systems of the United 
States, England, France and Germany. Lectures, readings and 
recitations. Text-book, Wilson : The State. Second half-year. 

EDUCATION AND TEACHING. 

See Philosophy and Psychology. 

ENGLISH* 

professor hxji^me, 8-13, 16-19, 23. 
associate professor thorndike, 1-7, 14, 15, 20-22. 

COMPOSITION. 
I, 2. Principles of Engi<ish Composition. Lectures, recita- 
tions, themes and conferences. Especial attention will be given to 
paragraph writing and the study of modem prose writers. Required 
throughout Freshman year. 

3. DAII.Y Themes (for a considerable portion of the time); 
frequent long themes, lectures, conferences. Open to all who have 
taken courses i and 2. First half-year. 

4. Continuation of 3. In course of the year detailed attention 
will be given to exposition, criticism, description, narrative and 
argumentation. Second half-year. 

5. Themes. The work in this course will be adapted to the needs 
and tastes of the students electing it. Especial opportunity will be 
given for criticism by the members of the class. Open to those who 
have taken courses 3 and 4. First half-year. 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 97 

6. Continuation of 5. Under the direction of the instructor, 
each student will be required to plan and write a piece of composition 
of considerable length. This course may be elected two years in suc- 
cession. Second half-year. 

7. Argumentation. Two long forensics, preceded by briefs. 
The questions for these forensics will be so selected that each student 
may write on a subject connected with her college studies. Lectures, 
conferences, study of masterpieces of argumentation, briefs based on 
the latter, debates. 

LANGUAGE. 

8. A Beginner's Course in Oi,d Engwsh. In this course 
special attention is given to the elements of Old English grammar, 
and to the reading of selections from Old English prose and poetry. 
The etjrmological relations of Old and Modem English. Text-books: 
Smith's Old English Grammar; Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader. First 
half-year. 

9. Old Engwsh Epic Poetry. Beowulf is read and is made the 
basis of a detailed study of the mythology, and the religious and 
social life of the Anglo-Saxons. Advanced Old English Grammar. 
Parallel reading of other epic fragments in Old English. Text-books: 
Wyatt's Beowulf; the Cook-Sievers Old English Grammar. First 
half-year. 

10. Old and Middle English. This course is intended to follow 
course 8. The Blene is read with the class. Lectures on Cynewulf 
and Old English poetical literature. The history of the English 
language, and readings from late Old English and early Middle 
English. Text-books : Kent's Elene; Emerson's History of the 
English Language; Morris and Skeat's Specimens of Early English, 
Part I. Second half-year. 

11. Old English Religious Poetry. A detailed study of the 
so-called Caedmoniah poems, as well as of the poems of Cynewulf and 
his school. The class is required to read parts of Genesis, Exodus and 
Daniel, and two or more of the Cynewulfian poems. Second half-year. 

LITERATURE. 

12. Chaucer. Select readings from the Canterbury Tales. Lec- 
tures on Chaucer's life and works, and on his contemporaries and 
immediate successors in English literature. Text-books: Skeat's 
edition of The Prologue, The Knight's Tale, and The Nonne Prestes 
Tale (Clarendon Press Series). Second half-year. 



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98 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-I902 

13. Non-Dramatic Poetry of the Sixteenth and Early 
Seventeenth Centuries. In this course the work will be confined 
mainly to a careful study of the poetry of Spenser and Milton. 
1901-1902 First half-year. 

14. Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drabia. This course 
is preparatory to a more extended study of Shakespeare and his con- 
temporaries. A brief history of the Pre-Shakesperean drama in lec- 
tures. A study of three or four of Shakespeare's plays. First half-year. 

15. Shakespeare. Lectures on the development of Shakespeare's 
art and the later Elizabethan drama. The class is required to read all 
of Shakespeare's plays. Open to students who have had course 14 or 
its equivalent. 1 901 -1902. Second half-year. 

16. Classicism in English Literature. A history of modem 
English literature from Milton to the beginning of the Romantic 
movement in the eighteenth century. The development of Classicism 
in English poetry of the seventeen and eighteenth centuries. The 
rise of the Essay. The origin and development of the Novel. Lec- 
tures, select readings and papers. This course is arranged specially 
for Sophomores who intend to elect English literature. First half-year. 

17. The Romantic Movement of the Eighteenth Century. 
A history of English poetry from about 1760 to 1830. Select readings 
from the poetry of Bums, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, 
Keats, Shelley and other contemporaries. Outline of the rise and 
growth of the Historical Novel. The rise of periodical literature and 
modem literary criticism. Lectures and papers. Second half-year. 

18. English Literary Criticism. The history of literary criti- 
cism. The class will study select essays of Dryden, Steele and Addi- 
son, Johnson, Coleridge, Lamb, Hazlitt, DeQuincey, Leigh Hunt, 
Carlyle, Mathew Arnold and others. Lectures and papers. Open to 
students who have had courses 16 and 17 or their equivalents. First 
half-year. 

19. The English Novel. The history of the rise and growth of 
the English Novel from its beginning to the nineteenth century. 
Lectures, select readings and papers. Text-book: Cross* Development 
of the English Novel. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

20. English Poetry prom 1830 to 1880. Tennyson, Browning, 
IVIrs. Browning, Matthew Arnold, Arthur H. Clough, and other poets 
of the period. A large amount of reading and frequent papers are 
required on topics suggested by the course. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. 1902- 1903. First half-year. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. .99 

21. Kngush Prose from 1830 to 1880. Carlyle, Ruskin, 
Matthew Arnold, Newman, Thackeray, George Eliot, and other prose 
writers of the period. The course is a continuation of 20, but the 
two may be elected separately. Open to Seniors and Jtmiors. 1902- 
1903. Second half-year. 

22. The Devew)pment op English Prose. Ascham, Lyly, 
Sidney, Bacon, Taylor, Dryden, Temple and other prose writers from 
Tyndale to Addison. First half-year. 

23. American Literature. The historical development of Eng- 
lish literature in America from its beginning to the present day. Lec- 
tures, papers and extensive readings from the principal writers. Open 
to Juniors and Seniors. Second half-year. 

FRENCH. 

See Romance Languages. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

PROFESSOR GUSHING. 

1. MiNERAiX)GY. Crystallography, and Descriptive Mineralogy. 
Two hours of recitation and lectures, and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. First half-year. 

2. Mineralogy. Determinative Mineralogy and Blow-pipe Anal- 
ysis. Three laboratory exercises of three hours each. Physical 
Crystallography may be substituted for the Blow-pipe work. Second 
half-year. 

3. Geology. Dynamical and Stiuctural Geology. Three hours a 
week. First half-year. 

4. Geology. Historical Geology. Lectures and field work in 
vicinity of Cleveland. Second half-year. 

5. Physiography. The cause and manner of the development of 
topographic forms. Second half-year. 

A Laboratory fee of $1.00 is charged for courses i, 2 or 4. 

GERMAN. 

PROFESSOR DEERING. 

DR. MEYER 5b. 
DR. FIFE, I, 3, 5a. 

I, 2. German Grammar and Reader. Easy modern texts. In 
this and the following courses German is spoken as mnch as possible 
in the class-room, but such conversation is regarded as a means, not 
as an end. Throughout the year. 



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lOO COLLBGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-I902 

3, 4. Grammar contintjed— Prose Composition. Recent Ger- 
man prose and the simpler plays of Lessing, Goethe, or Schiller. In 
1 902- 1 903 the first text will be Bemhardt*s Auf der Sonnenseite. 
Throughout the year. 

5, 6. Advanced Grammar — Prosb Composition. Rapid read- 
ing of representative modem authors and, in the second half-year of 
classic German, with especial attention to Schiller. Practice in read- 
ing at sight. The first text for 1902-1903 will be Freytag's Die Jour- 
nalisten. Throughout the year. 

7. Goethe. His life and works and times, with selected readings 
from his lyrics, prose and dramas. An outline of the development of 
German literature during the classical period will be studied. First 
half-year. 

8. Nineteenth Century Authors. Outline history of German 
literature since Goethe's death, with especial reference to its prose 
development. Readings from the best modem novelists, essayists, 
historians and dramatists. Practice in writing German. Second 
half-year. 

9. Faust. Lectures on the development of the Faust legend, with 
parallel reading of the most important Faust literature; Goethe's 
Faust. First half-year. 

10. Lessing and the Ci^assic German Drama. Early eight- 
eenth century drama, Lessing's reforms and influence (lectures); all 
his important dramas and best critical works, with illustrative parallel 
reading. First half-year. 

12, 15. Middle High German. Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche 
Grammatik; Selections from the Nibelungenlied, from Hartmann, 
Walther, and Wolfram. Throughout the year. 

14. Heine. Lectures on the life and times of Heine, with readings 
from his most important works. Especial attention will be given to 
his contemporaries, as well as to the social and political aspects of the 
time. Second half-year. 

16. Advanced Composition. Studies in German style. Original 
German essays on subjects assigned. Lectures on the history of the 
German language. Recommended to tliose who intend teaching 
German. 

17. Contemporary German Literature- The new spirit of 
German literature. Sudermann, Hauptmann, Liliencron, Fontane. 

18. Oi,D Germanic Myths and Legends. Outline of Germanic 
Mythology. Study of the most important mediaeval saga cycles, 
lectures and papers. 



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I90I-I902] WESTERN RBSKRVK UNIVERSITY. lOr 

Courses 9-18 are open only to students who have taken courses 7 
and 8, or their equivalent. Not more than two of these courses will 
be given in any half-year. 

GREEK. 

PROFESSOR FOWI.ER. 
PROFESSOR FUI^LER. 

1. HoMBR. The Odyssey. Two books will be read consecutively 
and the remainder studied in representative selection and in English 
translation, with a view to a literary acquaintance with the entire 
poem. Considerable attention will be given to developing facility in 
translating at sight. First half-year. 

2. Attic Orators. Selections from Lysias, Isocrates and Demos- 
thenes. Greek Rhetoric. Lives of Attic Orators, Legislative Bodies 
and Law Practice in Athens. History of Greece from the beginning 
of the Peloponnesian war to the death of Philip. Greek Prose Com- 
position. Second half-year. 

Only two of the following elective courses will be given in any 
half-year. 

3. The Drama. Two tragedies; Metres and Theory of Music; 
Lectures on the Archaeology of the Drama (Actors, Costumes, 
Buildings, etc.) First half-year. 

4. Plato's Apology, Crito, and selections from other works. 
Second half-year. 

5. Phiw)SOPHY. Seminary work in the Fragments of the Early 
Philosophers (Diogenes Laertius, de Vitis, Dogmatibus et Apophtheg- 
matibus Philosophorum; Ritter et Preller, Fragmenta Philosophise 
Graecae), and selections from Plato and Aristotle. First half-year. 

6. History. Seminary work in Herodotus, Thucydides, Xeno- 
phon, and other sources of Greek history. Second half-year. 

7. Oratory. Comparative study of speeches of Attic Orators. 
The speeches in Thucydides, etc. First half-year. 

8. Aristophanes' Frogs and selected Dialogues of Lucian. History 
of Greek Literature illustrated by selections from authors not hitherto 
studied in class. Second half-year. 

9. Drama. The development of Attic Drama as exhibited in the 
extant plays and fragments. First half-year. 

10. Grsek Prosb Composition. An advanced course, the special 
features of which will be determined by the acquirements and needs 
of the class. Second half-year. 



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I02 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 

11. Grbbk Lyric Poetry. Elegiac, Iambic, Melic, Choric, and 
selections from the Anthology. First half-year. 

12. Idyllic and Choric Poetry. Selections from Theocritus 
and Pindar. Second half-year. 

HISTORICAL BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

MR. SEVERANCE. 

1. Historical and General Bibliography. The object of 
this course will be to familiarize the students with the best guides, 
indices, repertoria and helps to the study of history. An examina- 
tion ^11 be made of books mentioned. The course is adapted to the 
needs, not only of those specializing in history, but also of those look- 
ing forward to library work. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

2. The Sources and Literature of Medusval History. 
This course will describe the original material at the command of the 
historian of the Middle Ages, and show what use has been made of 
this source material by modem writers. The course is designed for 
students interested in historical study or library work. 

HISTORY, 

professor bourne. 
mr. severance, i3, i4, i5. 

DR. HUNT, 5, 6. 

1. History of the Middle Ages. The migrations, the develop- 
ment of the church as an institution, the mediaeval empire, feudal 
society. First half-year. 

2. History of Europe, 1400-1763. The Renaissance, the Reform- 
ation, development of modem states. Second half-year. 

Courses i and 2 are introductory to the more special courses which 
follow. They include some training in the elementary study of topics 
from original documents, contemporary narratives, etc., and the cul- 
tivation of an interest in historical literature. 

3. History of England, from the German migrations to the 
death of Elizabeth. The development of English institutions, and the 
rise of England to the position of a great state. First half-year. 

4. History of England, from the accession of the Stuarts to 
the present day; the development of a Parliamentary democracy, and 
the building of the British empire. Second half-year. 

5. American Colonial History, to the end of the Revolutionary 
War. The discovery and settlement of North America, the political 



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I901-1902] WKSTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I03 

growth of the colonies, and their development towards independence 
and union. First half-year. 

6. History op the United States, from 1783 to the close of the 
Reconstruction period. The consolidation of institutions, the growth 
of national life, expansion westward, the slavery question, etc. 
Second half-year. 

7. French Revoi,ution, 1789-1795, with introductory studies of 
the Old Regime. First half-year. 

8. Reorganization op Europe, in consequence of the Revolu- 
tion, 1 795- 185 1, including a study of the French empire, the Restora- 
tion, with the reorganization of Germany, and the revolutions of 1830 
and 1848. Second half-year. 

9. Modern Europe and the Great Powers. 1851-1900. The 
growth of the present political system since the failure of the Revolu- 
tion of 1848, the reconstruction of Germany, the imion of Italy, the 
Eastern Question. First half-year. 

10. History op Discovery and Colonization, including the 
progress of geographical knowledge, and with special reference to 
enterprises of European nations outside the limits of the United 
States since the banning of the sixteenth century. Second half- 
year. 

In courses 3-10 the work will include wide reading from the litera- 
ture of. the subject, as well as the study of official records and of 
contemporary writers. 

11. Epochs, OP History. The object is the more careful study 
of a particular epoch, from the sources and from other writers; for 
example, England under the Tudors or the Stuarts, Mediaeval 
France, the beginnings of the Bourbon monarchy, the Lutheran 
Reformation. Annual. First half-year. 

12. History and Historical Research. This includes a sketch 
of the development of the scope of history as a literature, a study of 
the masters of historical writing, a study of the elements of historical 
criticism, and practical work in investigation. Second half-year. 

Course 1 1 is open each year to Seniors who have had, in addition 
to I, two other courses selected from 2 to 10. Course 12 is open to 
Seniors who have had 11 or 15. 

13. Life in the Middi^E Ages. This course will deal with the 
dwellings, costumes, food, occupations and habits of the men and 
women of that epoch. It will be illustrated by means of photographs 
and prints taken from Mediaeval Manuscripts. 1902- 1903. First half- 
year. 



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104 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-I902 

14. The Bbwefs and Superstitions of the MroDLE Ages. 
Especial attention will be paid to magic and sorcery, and to their out- 
come in the witchcraft delusion. Portents, lucky and imlucky days, 
precious stones, palmistry, etc. will also be touched on. 1901-1902. 
First half-year. 

15. Speciai, Topics in Medijsvai, History. This course will be 
conducted according to the principles of the Seminary Method, and 
aims to teach the student how to investigate a topic in Mediaeval His- 
tory from the sources. The subject for 1902-3 will be either the "Vita 
Heinrici IV. Imperatoris,*' or *'The Crusades.** 

For the courses in Bibliography, see Historical Bibliography. 

The lectureship in History was founded by the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and was filled in 1900 by the late Professor 
Moses Coit Tyler, of Cornell University, and in 1901 by Mr. Thomas 
Wentworth Higginson, LL. D. 

HYGIENE. 

DR. CHAPMAN. 

I. The instruction consists of weekly lectures illustrated with 
charts, manikin and skeleton. These lectures embrace the funda- 
mental principles that underlie the promotion of health; the structure 
and functions of all the organs of the body; the proper exercise and 
rest of the muscles; the conversion of food into tissues; the importance 
of always keeping the body supplied with pure blood; ventilation, 
food and clothing. Special attention is given to the nervous system, 
including the care of the eyes First half-year. 

LATIN. 

professor PERKINS. 

professor platner, 8, 19. 

1. Livy, Books XXI, XXII; translation at sight and at hearing; 
the writing of Latin. Collateral reading in Roman History. First 
half-year. 

2. Cicero de Senectute; Plautus (one play); Horace, Satires. 
Translation at sight and at hearing; the writing of Latin. Second 
half-year. 

Only four of the following elective courses will be given in any 
half-year. 

3. Odes and Epodes of Horace. First half-year. 

4. CiCERO*s Letters. First half-year. 

5. Letters of Pliny the Younger. First half-year. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 105 

6. Tacitus and Suetonius. Tacitus, Agricola; Annales (Books 
1-2, entire; Books 3 and 4, selections). Suetonius, selections. First 
half-year. 

7. History of Latin Literature (Poetry). Lectures, with 
reading of typical selections, and direction of the student's private 
reading, one hour a week. Advanced courses in Latin writing, two 
hours a week. First half-year. 

8. Lucretius. First half-year. 

9. Catullus. Selections from Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid's 
Tristia. Second half-year. 

10. Thr Epistles of Horace. The Ars Poetica. Wilkins' 
Primer of Roman Literature. Second half-year. 

11. Roman Comedy. Terence and Plautus. Second half-year. 

12. Juvenal and Martial. Second half-year. 

13. Latin Rhetoric. Quintilian, Book x ; Cicero, De Oratore, 
Selections. Second half-year. 

14. Roman Oratory. Tacitus, Dialogus de Oratoribus, with 
selections from Cicero. Second half-year. 

15. Teachers' Training Course. This course is recommended 
only for students who have had two years of elective work in Latin. 
The aim of the course is to give prospective teachers assurance in their 
work. The course includes lectures on problems connected with the 
teaching of Latin in secondary schools; practical exercises in the study 
of the Grammar and the authors read in secondary schools. Second 
half-year. 

16. Selections from Cicero, de Officiis, and the Tusculan Disputa- 
tions. Second half-year. 

17. Seneca. Selections from (a) Prose writings, (d) Tragedies. 
Second half-year. 

18. History of Latin Literature. (Prose). Lectures, with 
direction of the student's private reading, one hour a week. Ad- 
vanced courses in Latin writing, two hours a week. Second half-year. 

19. Latin of the Silver Age. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR PALMIE. 
MR. DICKERMAN, I, b. 

I. Trigonometry. Jones* Drill Book in Trigonometry. First 
half-year. 



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I06 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-I902 

2. AusEBRA. Hall and Knight's. Second half-year. 

3. P1.ANE AND Solid Geometry. Exercises to be solved by the 
students; Chauvenet's Elementary Geometry. Second half-year. 

5. Analytical Geometry. Tanner and Allen's Analytical Geom- 
etry. First half-year. 

6. Differential Calculus. McMahon and Snyder's Differen- 
tial Calculus. Second half-year. 

7. Integral Cai^culus. Murray's Integral Calculus. First 
half-year. 

8. Dikferentiai. Calcui^us (advanced course). Hamack's 
Introduction to the Calculus. 

9. Analyticai, Geometry (advanced course). Salmon's Conic 
Sections. First half-year. 

10. Theory of Functions, of a complex variable. Introductory 
course. 

11. The Theory of Equations. Burnside and Panton's Theory 
of Equations. First half-year. 

12. Projective Geometry. Second half-year. 

13. Theory of Substitution Groups, and its application to 
algebraic equations. 

14. Theory of Numbers. Elementary course. 

Only three elective courses will be offered in any half-year. 

MUSIC. 

MR. CLEMENS. 

1. History of Music. A course in the history of music covering 
the periods embracing Primitive Music, Ancient Music, and the music 
of the Christian Era to the end of the sixteenth century. Fillmore's 
Lessons in Musical History is used as a text-book, supplemented by 
musically illustrated lectures and references to standard works. A 
short course in the elements of Harmony is combined with the more 
strictly historical study in order that the musical development and 
relations of the different periods may be more clearly understood. 
First half-year. 

2. A continuation of course i, embracing the periods from the 
beginning of the seventeenth century to the time of Handel and 
Bach. Substantially the same methods will be followed as in the 
work of the first half-year. 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I07 

Those desiring to elect the course iu the second term only must 
possess an adequate knowledge of this subject. 

3. Harmony and Counterpoint. The details of this course will 
be announced later. Second half-year. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR AIKINS. 

1 . Logic. The principles of logic, with practice in definition and 
the analysis of arguments. Required* of Latin-English Sophomores, 
elective for others. Three hours a week, second half-year. 

2. BlembnTary Psychoi/>GY. An outline of the subject, mainly 
from the physiological standpoint. This course is introductory to all 
the other work in the department, except Logic. It is open to 
Sophomores. First half-year. 

3. Ethics. An outline of ethical theory with incidental discussion 
of practical problems. First half-year. 

4. Introocction To Philosophy. A direct and simple discussion 
of the main problems of speculative philosophy, such as the ultimate 
nature of the mind and its relation to the body, the real nature of 
material things, the significance of evolution, the alleged conflict of 
science and religion, what knowledge is and what we can hope to 
know, idealism, realism and scepticism; the relation of knowledge to 
faith. Second half-year. 

5. History of Philosophy. The course can be made to cover a 
period or confined to the work of some single philosopher, according 
to the preparation and interests of the students who elect it. First 
half-year. 

6. HiSTOKY OF Morals. The moral ideals and practices of human 
beings in various stages of development. The origin of some of our 
present problems of right and wrong. Open only to those who have 
taken Ethics. First half-year. 

7. Advanced Coursb in Philosophy. A critical study of some 
one or two philosophers or of some group of philosophical problems. 
Second half-year. 

8. Psychology in Education. The course is intended to cover 
as much as possible of the following ground. Animals : their 
instincts, habits, intelligence and training. Children : aims and 
methods of child-study, practice in psychological observation, growth 
of mind and body and physical basis of precocity and dullness, con- 
tents of children's minds, their reasoning and their ideas of good and 



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I08 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1901-1902 

bad. Rhythm, fatigue, and other general relations of mind and 
body. Individual differences : the mental life and education of the 
blind, the deaf, and other defectives. The aims of education : the 
acquisition of specific habits and the alleged training of general 
faculties, such as memory, imagination, observation, judgment, atten- 
tion and will; diseases of various faculties; the meaning of culture, 
character, power and personality. The noticeable effects of education. 
Special educational means and their psychological basis: interest, 
imitation, sympathy, suggestion (hypnotism), apperception and cor- 
relation, manual training. Second half-year, alternating with 9. 

9. Principi.es and History op Education. The course is based 
on an historical study of educational theories and practice, especially 
since the Renaissance. It includes extensive readings from the great 
writers on education and the discussion of some of the current prob- 
lems and controversies concerning aims and methods. Second half- 
year, alternating with 8. 

PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 
DR. REICHMANN. 

I A. General contents and text-book as in course i. For Freshmen 
entering the Latin-English course. The work is arranged to utilize 
as fully as possible the preparatory course in Physics. First half- 
year. 

1. Mechanics, Sound, Heat, Hastings and Beach, General 
Physics, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year. 

2. Light, Electricity and Magnetism. Continuation of 
course i . Second half-year. 

3. Physical Optics. Glazebrook's Physical Optics, with lectures 
and laboratory work. First half-year. 

4. Theory of Heat. A course based mainly on Maxwell's 
Theory of Heat, with lectures and references. Second half-year. 
Alternating with 9. 

5. Electricity and Magnetism. A review of electrical theory, 
with laboratory practice in electrical measurements. The text-book 
will depend somewhat on the character of the class. First half-year. 

6. Continuation of course 5. Second half-year. 

9. Mechanics. The Elements of Applied Mechanics. Text- 
book: Wright's Elements of Mechanics. Second half-year. Alter- 
nating with 4. 



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19OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 109 

10. Descriptive Physics. This course is intended for those who 
wish to obtain a general acquaintance with the more important physi- 
cal phenomena. It is given mainly by lectures, but includes refer- 
ences to Hastings and Beach. General Physics and a few exercises in 
the laboratory. Required of Classical and Modern Language Soph- 
omores. First half-year. 

11. Physicai, Manipulation. Instruction is given in the ele- 
ments of the ordinary laboratory arts, as glass-blowing and soldering, 
in the use of the dividing engine and other general instruments, in 
the construction of simple pieces of apparatus. One exercise weekly. 
Second half-year. 

12. Physical Experiment. Special topics in Physics are 
assigned to each student for detailed study. The aim of the course is 
to introduce somewhat more advanced experimental methods than are 
usually possible in the general courses. Each student is ex|>ected to 
spend from six to nine hours weekly in the laboratory. 

Courses 11 and 12 are intended primarily for those intending to 
teach physical science, or for students who expect to specialize in 
Physics. 

The weekly exercises under course 1 2 may be combined with course 1 1 
to count for one three-hour course. 

The laboratory fee for course 10 is $2.00; for each of the other 
courses, $4 00. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

FRENCH. 

DR. OLIVER. 
MISS HENDERSON. 

I, 2. Beginners' Course. Grammar, easy reading, composition, 
conversation. Throughout the year. 

3, 4. Advanced Course. Rapid reading of modem prose, poetry 
and drama. Syntax and composition. Reports on outside reading. 
Throughout the year. 

Courses i, 2, 3, 4 or their equivalent must precede all others. 

Of the following courses not more than two will be given in any 
half-year: 

5. The Classic Drama. Lectures on the rise and development 
of French Drama. Interpretation of the masterpieces of Comeille, 
Racine, Molidre, Regnard. Collateral reading. Themes. First 
half-year. 



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no COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1901-I902 

6. The Drama of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Cen- 
turies. The Decadence of Classic Drama. Rise and growth of the 
romantic and realistic drama. Modem tendencies. Reading of Vol- 
taire, Beaumarchais, Destouches, Marivaux, Victor Hugo, Alfred de 
Musset, Scribe, Dumas p^re, Augier, Dumas fils, Sardou, Copp6e, 
Rostand. Themes on collateral reading. Second half-year. 

7. MoLi^RE. Lectures on the life and times of Moli^re. Inter- 
pretation of the greater comedies. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

8. French Lyric and Didactic Poetry. Boileau, La Fontaine,. 
Ch^nier, Victor Hugo, de Musset, Lamartine. Collateral reading. 



9, 10. Modern Novelists. Lectures and recitations. The Ro~ 
mantic School. First half-year. The Realistic School. Second 
half-year. 

11. Seventeenth Century Prose Classics. Lectures on 
French culture, society and prose literature of the seventeenth cen- 
tury'. The great preachers and moralists. Jansenism and Port Royal. 
The French Academy and the Salons. Memoirs and Letter- Writers. 
Readings from Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruydre, 
Bossuet, Bourdalone, Mme. de S^vign^, Mme. de La Fayette, F^nelonv 
Saint-Simon. Themes and collateral reading, i go i -1902. First 
half-year. 

12. Eighteenth Century Prose Classics. Lectures on the 
society and culture of the eighteenth century. Break-up of the classic 
ideals. Growth of the revolutionary spirit. First movements toward 
romanticism. Voltaire and the Encyclopedists. Rousseau, Diderot, 
Montesquieu, Le Sage, Bernardin de Saint Pierre. Themes and col- 
lateral reading. 1 901-1902. Second half-year. 

13. The Sixteenth Century. The Reformation and the Re- 
naissance. Rabelais, Calvin, Marot, Ronsard and the Pleiade, Mon- 
taigne. Readings from Damisteter and Hatzfeld*s Le Seizi^me Si^cle 
en France. Study of the language and syntax of the period. Themes 
and collateral reading. First half-year. 

14. History op Old French Literature, with representative 
readings from Bartsch's Chrestomathie, La Chanson de Roland, and 
Christian of Troyes. The Mediaeval Drama. Second half-year. 

15. French Historical Grammar. Phonetics, Morphology, 
Syntax. Illustrative reading from old French texts. First half-year. 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. Ill 

16. Comparative Historical Grammar of the Romance Lan- 
guages, with especial emphasis of Old French and Provencal. Illus- 
trative reading. Second half-year. 

ITALIAN. 

DR. 01,1 VER. 

1, 2. Grandgent's Itawan Grammar. Reading of modem 
Italian. Composition. 1902- 1903. Throughout the year. 

SPANISH. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BOURLAND. 

I Elementary Course. Edgren's Grammar and Matzke's 
Reader, with practice in speaking and writing Spanish. 1901-1902. 
First half-year. 

2. Reading of modem texts with practice in conversation and 
composition. 1901-1902. Second half-year. 

SOaOLOGY. 

professor CURTIS. 

Philosophy of Society. Open only to Seniors who have taken 
courses in Philosophy, Ethics and Economics. Lectures will be given 
by the instructor throughout the term and special work will be assigned 
to each student for report and discussion. Second half-year. 



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112 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [19OI-I902 



GENERAL INFORMATION- 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The first half-year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a Christmas 
recess of nine days, until the Saturday after the last Thtu-s- 
day in January. The second half-year begins on the Mon- 
day after the last Thursday in January, and continues, with 
an Easter recess of one week, until Commencement, which 
occurs on the Wednesday after the tenth day of June (or 
after the ninth in years in which February has twenty-nine 
days). No college exercises are held on Thanksgiving 
day, Washington's birthday, and Decoration day. On the 
day of prayer for colleges, religious exercises are held in 
the chapel. The exercises of the first half-year begin with 
prayers in the chapel at ten o'clock. 

DEFICIENT WORK. 

1. All entrance conditions must be removed before a 
student is allowed to begin the work of Sophomore year. 

2 . A student who fails in the work of an elective course 
must remove this deficiency, or complete another course as 
extra work. 

3. All conditions incurred at examinations must be re- 
moved at the next examinations held for the same courses; 
except that all conditions incurred and all work omitted in 
Freshman year must be made up before a student is allowed 
to begin the work of Junior year; and that all conditions 
incurred, and all work omitted in Sophomore year must be 
made up before a student is allowed to begin the work of 
Senior year; and that all other conditions, and all other 
omitted work, must be made up before a student is allowed 
to begin the work of the second term of Senior year. 



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I9OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. II3 

GRADUATION AND DEGREES. 

No student will be allowed to graduate unless she has 
taken at least one cx)urse in either Economics or Philosophy 
and Psychology and at least one course each in two of the 
three sciences, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students 
should consult the instructors in the departments concerned 
as to the best time at which to take these courses. 

Juniors and Seniors may diminish the number of their 
recitations, though not the total amount of their work, 
three hours a week, by arranging to do extra work in one 
or more courses. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on stu- 
dents who have completed the Classical course which 
includes the study of the Greek language and literature; 
the degree of Bachelor of Letters on those who have 
completed the Modern Language course, in which Modern 
Languages are substituted for Greek; and the degree of 
Bachelor of Philosophy on those who have completed 
the Latin-English course, which differs from the Modern 
Language course in that an entrance requirement of science 
and history is substituted for French or German. 

libraries. 

Hatch Library on the Adelbert College campus, five min- 
utes* walk from the College for Women, is open on equal 
terms to all members of the University. It is furnished with 
well lighted reading rooms, contains about forty-five thous- 
and bound volumes and ten thousand pamphlets, and is 
especially rich in German, French, historical and philosoph- 
ical literature. The list of periodicals is very complete, 
and the library contains many sets of valuable publications 
in classical philology and archaeology, Germanic and general 
philology, history, anthropology and science, besides sets of 
the oldest and best literary magazines. These sets are kept 
up to date and their number is increased by constant addi- 



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114 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1901-1902 

tions. Students have access to all the books on the shelves. 
The library is open every day from eight to half-past five 
o'clock. 

For the special convenience of students in the College for 
Women there is in Clark Hall itself a carefully selected and 
growing library containing encyclopaedias and other books 
of reference, magazines, duplicates of books in common use^ 
and a considerable number of other works. 

A special library in Biblical literature is placed in The Flor- 
ence Harkness Memorial Chapel. This collection is being 
constantly enlarged by means of funds from the Florence 
Harkness Foundation. 

In addition to these, students may freely use the prin- 
cipal libraries of Cleveland. The Free Public Library con- 
tains 150,000 volumes, and includes valuable collections for 
the study of Shakespeare, modern literature, histor>', art, 
and archaeology. On request of members of the Faculty > 
books from the Public Library are delivered at the Hatch 
Library building, and may be retained for an extended 
period. This arrangement makes its collections readily 
accessible to students at all times. 

Through the courtesy of its directors, students also have 
free tickets to the Case Library. This collection, containing 
50,000 volumes, is well supplied with periodicals and 
general literature, and offers excellent facilities for study of 
the fine arts, of political economy and sociolog>', and of the 
sciences, especially chemistry and botany. 

LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS. 

Biology. The laboratory is designed, first, for the 
study of the biological sciences, especially zoology and 
botany; second, for containing a biological museum, in the 
sense of a reference or teaching collection of objects drawn 
from the living world to illustrate types of structure, varia- 
tions, life histories and kindred subjects; and third, for the 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. II5 

maintenance of vivaria, or rooms in which certain animals 
and plants, both aquatic and terrestrial, may be kept alive 
while their habits are studied, and, when possible, their 
breeding and development watched. 

The building is of stone in Gothic design, and consists of 
three stories ninety-three by sixty-three feet, and two small 
wings, one of which contains the machinery used in heating. 
The first story contains suitable rooms for anatomy, botany 
and vivaria. The main elementary laboratory has an 
exposure of sixty feet on the north and twenty-seven feet 
on the east and west sides. It is lighted by eighteen win- 
dows and is designed for the conduct of large classes in 
elementary biology. In the same story are the offices of 
instructors, special laboratory rooms for zoology and 
embryology, coat, cloak and toilet rooms, and preparation 
and supply rooms for the main laboratories. The third 
story is divided into a large lecture room, a reference 
library and reading room, a photographic laboratory, and a 
series of museum and preparation rooms. 

Chemistry. The department of chemistry is well sup- 
plied with apparatus for use in illustrative lectures. The 
chemical laboratory is equipped with suflBcient apparatus so 
that each student may become familiar with the facts of the 
science through experiments made by herself under the 
guidance of the instructor. Such experimental courses are 
offered in the chemistry of the non-metallic and metallic 
elements, in organic, analytical, and physiological chemistry. 

Geology and Mineralogy. The collections at the 
service of the department are well chosen, and are rapidly 
growing. They comprise sets of cr>'^stal models and crystals, 
crystal sections for optical study, and rock sections in great 
number, besides mineralogical, Hthological, and palaeonto- 
logical collections. The library is good and constantly be- 
ing increased. The vicinity of Cleveland is interesting 



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Il6 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. L1901-1902 

geologically, especially in regard to its glacial deposits and 
its palaeontology. It furnishes abundance of material for 
special investigation. 

Physics and Astronomy. The Physical laboratory is 
a three-story building of sound and substantial construction, 
containing large lecture and laboratory rooms for the ele- 
mentary courses, and a considerable number of smaller 
apartments for more advanced work. Especial attention 
has been paid to heating, lighting, and ventilation. The 
department is equipped with a large variety of apparatus 
bearing on the courses at present offered— all of which 
include work in the laboratory — and additional apparatus 
is continually being obtained. 

Upon the physical laboratory has been erected an equa- 
torial telescope, covered by a revolving dome. The tele- 
scope, of ten and one-half inches aperture and fifteen feet 
focal length, is equipped with all the necessary accessories 
for observation and measurement. This valuable addition 
to the scientific apparatus of the University is the gift of 
Messrs. W. R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey, of Cleveland. 

GYMNASIUM. 

The Gymnasium in Clark Hall is well equipped with all 
the necessary apparatus, and is under the direction of a 
graduate of Dr. Sargent's School of Physical Training. 
Upon entering college each student is examined by the 
College Physician and the Director of the gymnasium, and 
information obtained concerning habits and general health. 
From this data and the measurements made by the Director, 
exercise is prescribed to meet the special need of each indi- 
vidual. Exercise in the gymnasium is required three hours 
a week of Freshmen and Sophomores, and is under the 
personal supervision of the Director. Students are advised 
to consult the Director before procuring their gymnasium 
suits. When the weather permits, work in the gymnasium 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. II7 

is replaced by tennis, basket ball, golf, and other games out 
of doors. Special instruction is given to those who wish it 
in fencing and track athletics. Wade Park pond furnishes 
the students with facilities for rowing and skating. 

Two prizes annually, one of fifteen, and the other of ten 
dollars, are awarded by the President to the students who, 
through their gymnastic work, make the greatest progress 
toward symmetrical development. 

GUILFORD HOUSE. 

Guilford House offers a good home for forty students. 
It is warmed by hot water, well lighted, and thoroughly 
ventilated. The rooms are large and fully furnished. The 
linen for beds and tables is provided, but each student pays 
fifty cents a month to meet the cost of its laundrying. The 
charge for other laundry work is fifty cents a dozen. The 
table is excellent and well served, and the aim of the house- 
keeping is to make the surroundings as homelike as possible. 

The rooms in Guilford House are arranged, for the most 
part, in suites consisting of a study and two sleeping rooms. 
The price of board and lodging for each of two students in 
such a suite is $250 for the college year. This rooming 
arrangement is earnestly recommended in preference to any 
other. There are, however, four choice, large single rooms, 
the price of which is also $250; five smaller rooms for $225 
each, and one for $200. There is also one especially' desir- 
able suite for two students paying $275 apiece. Any 
student entering within the first five weeks will be charged 
from the beginning of the year. If an applicant has had 
a special room retained for her, and if she fail to occupy it, 
she will be charged for one-half of a term. Claims for 
deductions arising from necessary withdrawal are to be 
adjusted with the OflBcers. The date of withdrawal of a 
student is reckoned from the time when the President is 
informed of the fact by the parent or guardian. It is re- 



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Il8 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1901-1902 

quested that students make separate payments for their 
tuition and board. Checks for board should be made pay- 
able to Guilford House. One-half the amount is due at the 
beginning of each term. 

HAYDN HALL. 

Haydn Hall offers a home for twenty-two students 'and 
also supplies rooms for the various needs of the student 
body. The basement contains a bicycle room and a well- 
equipped kitchen. The first floor is devoted especially 
to students who reside at their homes in Cleveland. It 
contains a study room, a lunch room, and a central hall. 
For social occasions these may be used as one large room. 
On the second floor are rooms for the use of the four college 
classes and the alumnae. The remainder of the second and 
the whole of the third floor are divided into living rooms 
for students. The occupants of tliese rooms may board at 
Guilford House. 

The price for a single room in Haydn Hall and board at 
Guilford House is $250 for the college year, and the terms 
of payment are the same as at Guilford House. Arrange- 
ments have also been made to provide for a few students 
who desire to live as economically as possible. 

The life in both Guilford House and Haydn Hall is 
founded upon the desire to give to each student such super- 
vision as earnest and able young women absent from home 
should receive, and yet to subject no one to unnecessary or 
annoying restraint. Certain members of the Faculty reside 
in each building. Their endeavor and the endeavor of all 
the officers — the Housemistress, the Faculty, the Advisory 
Council — is to make a home in every way suitable for 
college women. 

THE FLORENCE HARKNESS MEMORIAL. 
The Florence Harkness Memorial Chapel is a beautiful 
Early English Gothic structure in stone and quartered oak. 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. II9 

Its character is further indicated by the fact that the win- 
dows are from The Tiffany Company and the organ from 
The Austin Company. The chapel seats about six hun- 
dred. Under the same roof are a large lecture room, a 
library and study for the Biblical work of the college. The 
endowment of this bears the same name as the chapel 

The religious life of the college, the chapel service, the 
Young Women's Christian Association and Missionary 
societies as well as the Biblical instruction therefore centre 
in this building, which it is believed is as complete as pos- 
sible and one of the best for its purpose in the land. 

RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 

The principles and influences of the College are distinc- 
tively Christian, but the College has no formal connection 
with any particular denomination. A short service is held 
each morning in the Chapel at a quarter past nine o'clock. 
All students are expected to be present at this service and 
on Sunday to attend the services at the churches of their 
choice. It is desired that as far as possible each student 
should enter into the life of her church. Sunday Vesper 
Services are held in the Florence Harkness Memorial Chapel 
during a part of the college year. The students carry on a 
Young Women's Christian Association, the aims of which 
are to maintain in the College a healthy, progressive 
Christian spirit and to keep the students in touch with the 
religious and charitable work of the world. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

The students publish a monthly journal called The Col- 
lege Folio. This periodical gives them an opportunity, not 
merely to record or comment upon the events of the College 
life, but also to give expression to their literary interests. 
The College Annual, **Varia Historia" is published by the 
Junior class. 



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I20 COLLEGB FOR WOMEN. [19OI-1902 

The student organizations include a Young Women's 
Christian Association, a Glee Club, a Mandolin Club, a 
Dramatic Association, an Athletic Association, and several 
literary and scientific societies. 

The conduct of the student body as a whole is largely 
entrusted to the Student's Association. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters respecting the admission or dismission of students, 
requests for catalogues or general information should be 
addressed to the President of the University or to the 
Registrar of the College for Women. 

Communications in reference to board and rooms at 
Guilford House should be sent to Miss Elizabeth Annin. 

EXPENSES AND BENEFICIARY AID. 

The charge for tuition and incidentals tor each student is 
$85 per year. In addition to this each student pays a 
matriculation fee of $5 on entering College. All checks 
should be made payable to the Treasurer. No charge is 
made for diplomas. One-half of the charge for tuition is to 
be paid at the beginning of each half-year; no part will be 
refunded if the student retain her place in class. In labora- 
tory courses fees are charged to meet the cost of perishable 
material. The amount in each case is indicated with the 
description of the courses. 

There are certain annual scholarships which are awarded 
to students of high rank and slender means, by which 
they are relieved of a portion of the tuition fee of the 
College. Conference either in person or by letter with the 
President is invited. 

Scholarships are granted annually upon each applica- 
tion, but may be withdrawn for cause at the end of one 
half-year. The granting and withdrawing of scholarships, 
for students who have attended the College as long as one 
half-year, is in the hands of the executive committee^ 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 121 

who shall report to the Faculty at the beginning of each 
year the names of those students to whom scholarships are 
to be granted, and each half-year the names of those from 
whom scholarships have been withdrawn. 

From the Loan Fund certain grants are made to worthy 
students. The Alumnae Association has also established a 
Loan Fund to be used for similar purposes. Students re- 
ceiving these benefits are expected to maintain their standing 
in scholarship and to finish their course here. If dismissal 
to another college is sought, the College dues, including the 
amounts given or loaned, must first be paid. 

The opportunities offered by the College for the higher 
education of young women of limited means are presented 
to the attention of those who desire to promote such 
work by the establishment of scholarships for worthy 
students. Such foundations may be made to have an annual 
value of from $25 to $335. 

THE HOLDEN PRIZE. 

Mr. L. E. Holden, of Cleveland, offers a prize of twenty- 
five dollars for the best essay written by a Senior or Junior 
on some subject selected by the Department of Rhetoric. 
Essays in competition for this prize must be submitted not 
later than May 15, 1902. 

PUBLICATION FUND. 

The Francis G. Butler Publication Fund has been estab- 
lished, the income of which is to be devoted to the publi- 
cation of original researches in the field of American history 
by professors or students of this College as well as Adelbert 
College and the Graduate School. 



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DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE 
INSTRUCTION. 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 

HHE privileges of the Graduate Department are open, 
without distinction of sex, to graduates of this and 
other universities and colleges of good standing who present 
satisfactory evidence of character and scholarship. In 
exceptional cases, by special permission, other persons of suit- 
able age and attainments may also be received as students. 

The work of the department is under the general super- 
vision of an Executive Committee, consisting, this year, of 
Professors R. W. Deering (Dean), H. N. Fowler, and F. P. 
Whitman. Persons desiring to do graduate work are in- 
vited to confer or correspond with any member of this 
committee. 

Applications for admission as graduate students may be 
received at any time, but should be presented, if possible, 
at least a month before the beginning of the academic year. 
This is advisable because books and apparatus for special 
work must often be imported from Europe. All such ap- 
plications should be made to the Dean of the Graduate 
Faculty, and should be accompanied, except in the case of 
graduates of this university, by diplomas or such other 
official certificates as will satisfy the Executive Committee 
as to the student's character and attainments. Applicants 
admitted as students must then register with the Dean and 
file statements of the courses of study they intend to pursue, 
indicating also the degrees, if any, for which they wish to 
be candidates. Eligible students who do not wish to apply 
for higher degrees may be admitted and registered as 
resident graduates. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RBi>BRVE UNIVERSITY. 123 

FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arranged, with the exception of the President and Dean, in the order of 
College graduation. 



Charles Frankun Thwing, D. D., LL.. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President, 
Robert Waller Deering, Ph. D., Dean, 41 Cornell St. 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature, 
Lemuel Stoughton Potwin, A. M., D. D., 322 Rosedale Av. 

Professor of the English Language and Literature, 
Edward Williams Morley, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Natural History and Chemistry, 
Charles Josiah Smith, A. M., 35 Adelbert St. 

Professor of Mathematics. 
Prank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc, 79 Adelbert St. 

Professor of Physics and Astronomy. 

Emma Maud Perkins, A. B., 121 Adelbert St. 

Professor of L atin . 

Charles Harris, Ph. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of German, 

Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Professor of Philosophy. 
Harold North Fowler, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Professor of Greek. 
Francis Hobart Hkrrick, Ph. D., D. Sc, 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology, 

Oliver Farrar Emerson, Ph. D., 50 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology. 

Samuel Ball Platner, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit, 
Henry Eldridge Bourne, A. B., B. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of History, 
Abraham Lincoi^n Fuller, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greek, 

Herbert Austin Aikins, Ph. D., 40 Cornell St. 

Professor of Philosophy, 



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124 



GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. 



[1901-1902 
81 Cutler St. 
34 Sayles St. 
48 Maylield St. 
12 Adelbert Hall. 



John Wiluam Pkrrin, Ph. D., 

Professor of History, 
Anna Hei,ene Pai^mi^, Ph. B., 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Wii^WAM Henry Hui^me, Ph. D., 

Professor of English, 
Bbnjamin Parsons Boxjri,and, Ph. D., 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 
HiPPOLYTE Gruener, Ph. D., 43 Knox St. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, 
Francis Wai^ker, Ph. D., 46 Nantucket St. 

Associate Professor of Political and Social Science. 
Gun Freeman Tower, Ph. D., Euclid Av. and Nantucket St. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, 
Ashley Horace Thorndike, Ph. D., 95 Mayfield St. 

Associate Professor of English, 
Ai*i.EN DUDI.EY Severance, A. M., B. D., 1981 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Historical Bibliography. 
John Dickerman, A. B., 852 Doan St. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 
Edward Stockton Meyer, Jr. Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

Instructor in German. 
Walter Taylor Marvin, Ph. D., 36 Knox St. 

Instructor in Philosophy. 
Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph. D., 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Romance Languages. 
Clarence Powers Bill, Ph. D., 853 Logan Av. 

Instructor in Latin and Greek, 
Lawrence Edward Griffin, Ph. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Biology. 
Robert Herndon Fife, Jr., Ph. D., 91 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in German, 

Fritz Reichmann, Ph. D., 46 Knox St. 

Instructor in Physics, 



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I90I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I25 

STUDENTS. 



Edwin Hugh Edwards, Cleveland 259 W. Clinton St. 

B. S., University of Michigan, 1802. 8 year. Biology. 

Edna Hermine Fick, Cleveland 139 Kennard St. 

A. B., University of Cincinnati, 1800. 2 year. German. 

John Glanville Gill, Cleveland 788 Fainnount St. 

A. B., Ottawa University, 1896. 1 year. Romance Philology, German. 

Fmnds Florian Herr, Cleveland 1276 Scranton Av. 

Ph. B., Adelbert College. 1901. 1 year. English. 

Franklin Turner Jones, Cleveland 40 Knox St. 

A. B., Adelbert College, 1897. 2 year. Mathematics, Physics, German. 

Mary Lakin, Cleveland 51 Mayfield St. 

Ph. B., University of Chicago, 1889. 1 year. Education. 

Daniel Acker Lehman, • Cleveland 843 Fainnount St. 

Ph. B., Wesleyan University, 1898. 1 year. Mathematics, Physics, 
Astronomy. 

Elizabeth Lore McGrew, Cleveland 715 Case Av. 

B. S., Smith College. 1901. 1 year. Biology. 

Frederick Jacob Menger, Cleveland 107 Quinby St. 

Diploma, National Deutsches I«ehrerseminar, 1893. 2 year. German 
Literature, Education. 

Ida Catherine Messer, Cleveland 244 Becker Av. 

B. I«., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1000 2 year. 
German, French. 

Simon Peiser, Cleveland Cor. Willson and Woodland Avs. 

A. B., IJniversity of Cincinnati, 1896. 1 year. Germanic Philology, 
Education. 

Paul Hermann Phillipson, Cleveland Cor. Willson and Woodland Avs. 
Diploma, National Deutsches Lehrerseminar. 1897; A. M., Western 
Reserve University, 1001. 2 year. Philosophy. 

Nina May Roberts, Cleveland 30 Sayles St. 

A. B., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1897 ; A. M., 
1806. 4 year. English. 

Anna May Salzer. Cleveland 610 Giddings Av. 

Ph. B., Oberlin College, 1896. 1 year. English. 
Clarence Dimick Stevens, Cleveland 698 Republic St. 

Ph. B., Wabash College, 1804; A. M., 1900. 1 year. EnglUh. 
Albert Clarence Streich, Cleveland 2 Hodgson St. 

A. B., Otterbeln University, 1808. 1 year. English. 



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126 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1901-1902- 

COURSES OF GRADUATE INSTRUCTION. 



Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are undergraduate 
elective courses, but are open to graduate students, with 
the consent of the instructor and the approval of the Faculty. 
Hours for graduate work will be arranged to suit the con- 
venience of instructor and student. 

BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR HERRICK. 
DR. GRIFFIN. 

2. *ZooW)GY. Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates. A study 
of the structure, development, an4 relationship of certain types of 
invertebrate animals. One lecture, two laboratory exercises of two 
hours each. First half-year 

3, 4. *Zo6i,OGY. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. A labor- 
atory course in the general anatomy of the principal types of verte- 
brate animals. One recitation and two laboratory exercises through- 
out the year. 

5. Zoology. Research in Animal Morphology — ^The assignment 
of special problems for investigation, with individual instruction and 
supervision. Laboratory work throughout the year. 

6. *Ei.EMENTS OF VERTEBRATE HiSTOWJGY or Minute Anatomy. 
A study of the tissues of the mammalian body. One recitation, two- 
laboratory exercises. Second half-year. 

7. *Elements of Vertebrate Embryoi^ogy. A detailed study 
of the development of the bird, and general principles of the embry- 
ology of vertebrates. One recitation, two laboratory exercises of two 
hours each. Second lialf-year. 

9 General Physiology. A course of reading, supplemented by 
experiments in the laboratory, on the general physiology of the cell, 
together with an examination of the facts and theories of life and of 
the problems which it presents. Two exercises weekly. First half- 
year. 

10. Botany. An introduction to the study of plants on the basis 
of their physiology, morphology, and classification. Instruction is 
given by lectures, laboratory and field exercises. Second half-year. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 27 

II. BiOLOGiCAi, Reading Ci.ub. A voluntary association of stu- 
dents and instructors for reading and discussing works of general 
scientific interest. Meetings are held weekly, from November to May, 
at times most convenient to all. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are: Courses 2, 5, 6, 
7. 10, I5.00; Courses 3, 4, $5.00 for each term; Course 9, $2 00. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR MORI.Ey. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GRUENER. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TOWER. 

I *Organic Chemistry. Remsen*s Organic Chemistry. Two 
recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours, throughout 
the year. 

2. Organic Preparations. An equivalent of three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each, with occasional discussions, for one 
term or the entire year. This course may be taken in conjunction 
with or as supplementary to course i . 

3. *Ei,EMENTS OF QUANTITATIVE Anai^ysis. Three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each, throughout the year. 

4. *Physioi.ogicai, Chemistry. Halliburton's Essentials of 
Chemical Physiology. A course on the chemistry of the animal body, 
of nutrition, and of the ordinary food materials. Two recitations and 
one laboratory exercise q£ three hours, first half-year. 

5. ♦Physicai, Chemistry. An elementary course treating prin- 
cipally of the theory of solutions and electro-chemistry. Three times 
a week with occasional laboratory exercises. Second half-year. 

ECONOMICS. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR WALKER. 

I Statistics. Theory and method. General survey of the field 
of economic and sociological statistics, with the study of important 
statistical documents. First half-year 

2. Theory of Value and Distribution. A critical study and 
comparison of the principal theories from the eighteenth century to 
the present day, based on the writers considered. Second half-year. 

3. *MoNEY. A course in the history and theory of money, con- 
sidering the production of the metals, history of coinage, history of 
paper money, theory of money and credit, history and theory of pieces, 
bimetallism and other attempts at monetary reform. First half-year. 



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128 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1901-I902 

4. *SociAi«iSM. An historical and critical course in socialism, 
tracing the development of socialistic thought and effort and giving a 
critical examination of proposed reforms. First half-year. 

5. ♦Finance. A systematic course in public finance, including 
expenditure, revenue, debts, and administration. Second half-year. 

6. *Raii<roads. An historical course in the development of the 
transportation system in the principal modem states, with the con- 
sideration of the chief economic problems. Second half-year. 

7. *HiSTORY OF Economic Theory. A course in the develop- 
ment of general economic theory, with references to the originals. 
First half-year. 

8. History op Political Theory. A course in the develop- 
ment of political thought, with references to the originals. Second 
half-year, 1 902-1 903. 

9. Historical Politics. A course in the development of political 
institutions, considering especially the gentile system, the ancient 
city, the Athenian democracy, the Roman republic and empire, the 
feudal system, the origin and rise of representative government, etc. 
First half-year. 

10. Comparative Politics. A comparison of the political insti- 
tutions of four modem states, viz., the United States, Great Britain, 
the German Empire, and the French Republic. Second half-year. 

EDUCATION AND TEACHING. 

See Philosophy and Psychology. 

ENGLISH. 

PROPESSOR POTWIN (l). 

PROPESSOR EMERSON (2-7). 

PILOPESSOR HULME (8-I2). 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR THORNDIKE (13-16). 

1. Literary Sources op English Literature. Sources (i) 
Biblical, (2) Classical, (3) French, (4) Italian, (5) German. The 
study will include (a) Translations and Paraphrases, (b) Imitations in 
form and spirit — as Milton's Samson Agonistes, (c) Sources of Topics 
and Subject-matter, (d) Sources of Style. First half-year. 

2. Rhetorical Theory. An historical and critical study of 
rhetorical study with reference to Greek, Roman, mediseval, and 
English rhetoricians. Lectures and recitations, A course for those 
who expect to teach English. Throughout the year. 



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I9OI-I902] WBSTKRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 29 

3. Oi*D Bn6I«ish. Lectures on historical and descriptive gram- 
mar, with readings from Old English prose and poetry. Special 
attention to the development of the language. First half-year. 

4. Middle Kngush. Lectures on Middle English language and 
literature, with critical reading of selections from prose and poetry. 
Further development of the language. Second half-year. 

5. CYNEWUI.F AND His SCHOOL. The acknowledged poems of 
Cynewulf will be critically read and examined. This will be followed 
by a careful reading of the works believed to have been written by 
Cynewulf, or by those influenced by him. First half-year. 

6. The Middle English Poetical Romance. The sources of 
the poetical romance of Middle English times and its development on 
English soil. Lectures and readings. Second half-year. 

7. Phonetics. Lectures and recitations on the fundamental rela- 
tions of speech sounds, and on phonetic analysis. Special study of 
the phonetics of English. One hour a week, throughout the year. 

8. ♦The English Novel. The Historical development of the 
English novel. Lectures and recitations. Manual : Croft's develop- 
ment of the English novel. Second half-year. 

9. *Old English Epic Poetry. The B6owulf will be read with 
the class and made the basis of a careful study of Old English society, 
religion, etc. Advanced Old English grammar. Reading of other 
Old English epic fragments required as parallel work. First half-year. 

10. The Non-Dramatic Poetry of the Sixteenth and Early 
Seventeenth Centuries. This course will include special study of 
Spencer and Milton, with lectures, select reading and papers. First 
half-year. 

11 . *Chaucer. a study of Chaucer's life and works, with special 
reference to contemporary life and literature. Class will read and 
discuss selections from the Canterbury Tales. Second half-year, 

12 English Literary Criticism. Lectures on the develop- 
ment of English literary criticism from the sixteenth century to the 
present time. Selections from the critical essays of Dryden, Addison 
and Steele, Johnson, Coleridge, Lamb, DeQuincey, Leigh Hunt, 
Hazlitt, Christopher North, Landor, Carlyle, Macaulay, Matthew 
Arnold and others. Original papers. First half-year. 

13 *English Poetry, 1830-1880. Tennyson, Browning, Mrs. 
Browning, Matthew Arnold, Arthur H. Clough, with some attention 
to other poets of the period. Lectures, reports, and class-room dis- 



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130 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [19OI-I902 

cussions. A considerable amount of reading will be required, and a 
much larger amount recommended. First half-year. 

14. ♦Engush Pro^E, 1830-1880. Carlyle, Ruskin, Macaulay^ 
Emerson, Matthew Arnold, George Eliot, Hawthorne, Thackeray, 
with some attention to other prose writers. The course will be con- 
ducted by much the same method as Course 13. Second half-year. 

15. Bkginnings of Ei^izabethan Literature. A course of 
lectures dealing with the prominent literary genres of the period, with 
especial attention to Italian influence. The early history of the 
sonnet, pastoral, romance, novel, drama, and criticism will be care- 
fully studied, and opportunity given for individual research. Through- 
out the year. 

16. *Shakkspeare and the Jacobean Drama. All of Shake- 
speare's plays, and some of the best Jacobean plays will be read, and 
a course of lectures will be given discussing the development of 
Shakespeare's art from a historical point of view. Second half-year. 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES. 

professor deering (1-7). 
PROFESSOR HARRIS (Absent for the year), 8-9. 

DR. MEYER (10-I5). 
DR. FIFE (16-19). 

I Gothic. Introduction to Germanic Philologj' — ^aims, means, 
methods; Gothic Grammar (Braune); Readings from Wulfila*s Bible; 
Skeireins and other Fragments; Germanic Phonology. First half- 
year. 1902-1903. Or, 

2. O1.D German Literature. Critical study of the history of 
the older German literature from the beginning to the Reformation. 
Lectures and parallel readings. First half-year. 

3. Oi,D German Life. A study of Old German Life, Customs, 
Culture, and Institutions, using for reference the texts of Schultz, 
Scherr, Hirth, Freytag, Biedermann, etc. Special reports on assigned 
topics. Second half-year, 1 902-1903. 

4. Old High German. Old High German Grammar and Reader 
(Braune); Readings from Tatian, Notker, Otfrid, Williram; Special 
study of Old High German dialects, with illustrative readings. Sec- 
ond half-year. 

5. Germanic Mythology and Legends. Study of Germanic 
Mythologie and Heldensage. Lectures and reports. Second half- 
year. Omitted 1 901-1902. 



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190I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 13I 

6. ♦Faust. Lectures on the development of the Faust legend 
with parallel readings from the most important Faust literature; 
Critical study of Goethe's Faust. First half-year. 

7. Middle High German. Grammar (Paul). Selections from 
the Nibelungen, Gudrun, Walther, Wolfram, Hartmann, Gotfried. 
Throughout the year. 

8. *HisTORY OF German Literature. Outline History of Ger- 
man Literature from the earliest times to the present; Development of 
Lyric, Kpic, Drama; Illustrative parallel readings. Throughout the 
year. Omitted 1901-1902. 

9. *MiDDi.E High German. This course gives a reading knowl- 
edge of Middle High German through a careful study of the grammar 
and the reading of selections from various texts, such as the Nibe- 
lungenlied, Hartmann, .Walther von der Vogelweide, etc. Through- 
out the year. Omitted 1901-1902. 

10. The Oldest Germanic Poetry. Rapid reading and com- 
parison of Beowulf, Widsith, the Eddas and Volsunga Saga, the 
Hildebrandslied and Muspilli. First half-year. 

11. The Germanic Rewgious Epics. Comparative study of 
Csedmon, Otfrid, and the Heliand. Second half-year. 

12. The Court Epic. Reading of Wolfram's Parzival with lec- 
tuies on Heinrich von Veldeke, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von 
Eschenbach , an d Gottfried von Strassburg. First half-year, 1 902- 1 903. 

13. The Popui^ar Epic. Reading of the Nibelungenlied and 
Gudrun, with lectures on the six saga-cycles (Franconian, Burgim- 
dian Hunnish, Ostrogothic, Lombardic, and Norman-Saxon. Second 
half-year, 1902- 1903. 

14. GRILI.PARZER. Study of Sappho, Des Meeres und der Liebe 
Wellen, Wehe dem der Liigt (in part), Das Goldene Vliesz (in part), 
and die Jiidin von Toledo with lectures on the relation of Grillparzer's 
art to that of Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Alfieri, Goethe, and Schiller. 
Second half-year. 

15. The German Sociai. Drama of Today. In its relation to 
that of the French, Belgian, Norse and English. Reading of Suder- 
mann and Ilauptmann, Dumas fils and Sardou, Maeterlinck, Bjom.son 
and Ibsen, Jones and Pinero. Second half-year. 

16. Oi,D Icelandic. Elementary Course. Study of Phonology 
and forms, followed by the reading of easy prose selections. First 
half-year. 



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132 GRADUATB DEPARTMENT. [19OI-I902 

17. History of Eari^y Scandinavian Liter ature. Outline in 
lectures, with cursory readings from the sagas, and more intensive 
study of selections from the elder Bdda. Second half-year. 

18. Oi«D Saxon. Descriptive grammar, accompanied by readings 
from the H^liand and Genesis. Second half-year. 

Courses 16 and 18 are intended also to be of value to students of 
English Philology. 

19 German Lyric since Goethe. Outline in lectures, with 
illustrative reading of the masterpieces. Two hours a week, through- 
out the year. 

GREEK. 

professor FUIrLER (l-2). 

professor fowi^er (3-6). 

1. *Atheni AN Drama. Selected dramas of Euripides, Sophocles, 
and i^schylus. This course will aim to promote a careful comparison 
of the methods and spirit of the three great tragedians. Some of the 
more unusual idioms and the more prominent questions of text- 
criticism will be discussed. First half-year. 

2. *Philosophy. Fragments of the pre-Socratic Philosophers 
(Diogenes Laertius, de vitis, dogmatibus et apophthegmatis philoso- 
phorum; Ritter et Preller, Historia Philosophise Graecae), and Selec- 
tions from Plato and Aristotle. First half-year. 

These courses may be taken as minors only when they are being 
given to an imdergraduate elective class. Special graduate courses 
adapted to the needs and acquirements of the applicant may be 
arranged by conference. 

3. Introduction to Grbek Epigraphy. A selection of Greek 
inscriptions will be read, illustrating more especially the history, insti- 
tutions, and social customs of the Athenians. Of inscriptions valu- 
able for their form rather than their contents, a number will be 
studied to illustrate the history of the Greek alphabet and those 
dialect features which are prominent in Homer, Herodotus, and other 
authors. Text-books will be Rohl's Imagines Inscriptionum Anti- 
quissimarum, Roberts* Introduction to Greek Epigraphy, and Ditten- 
berger*s Sylloge Inscriptionum Grsecarum. First half-year. 

4. PieATo's Republic and Aristoti^e's Politics. Selections 
from these works will be read and studied for their contents rather 
than their language, with discussion of Greek forms and theories of 
government. First half-year. 



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I9OI-1902] WKSTBRN RESBRVE UNIVERSITY. ' 133 

5. *Arch^ow)GY. Extracts from the description of Olympia in 
Pausanias will be read and discussed « with full illustration from the 
great excavations, and a topical study of architecture and sculpture 
will be pursued. The object of the course is to acquaint the student 
with the great monuments of art, and to stimulate the faculty of inde- 
pendent observation and criticism. Second half-year. 

6. *HiSTORY. Seminary work in Herodotus, Thucydides, Xeno- 
phou, the Historicorum Graecorum Pragmenta, and other sources of 
Greek history. Second half-year. 

Professor Fowler will also give instruction, if desired, in the history 
of Greek Vase Painting, in the later Greek Philosophy, and in 
Modem Greek, the details of the work to be determined after con- 
ference with the students. 

HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR BOURNE (Absent for the year). 

PROFESSOR PERRIN (5-I2). 

MR. SEVERANCE (13-16). 

1. *HiSTORY OF Prance. From the fall of the Carolingians to 
the middle of the eighteenth century. This course concerns the 
growth of French institutions, and especially the development of 
the French monarchical system. Other phenomena of French his- 
tory — ^feudal society, the rise of the towns, commerce and industry — 
are treated in connection with this principal subject. Second half-year. 

2. *MoDERN European History since 1789. The French 
Revolution as a social and political movement, the Empire, the 
growth of the national movements in Germany and Italy, industrial 
and social changes, the development of the democratic spirit, will be 
the subjects chiefly investigated. Throughout the year. 

3. The French Government. From the Assembly of the 
Notables to the overthrow of the Directory. This course will be 
based on contemporary memoirs and documents, and upon the author- 
ities, chiefly French, whose works cover special phases of the Revo- 
lutionary movement. Two hours a week, either half-year. 

4. ♦European Discovery and Coi.onization. This course will 
begin with a brief review of the history of Mediaeval Travel and of the 
progress of geographical knowledge. This will be followed by a thor- 
ough investigation of the discoveries of the fifteenth and sixteenth 
centuries, of the origin and various phases of the colonial system, and 
of the effects of the discoveries upon Europe. First half-year. 



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134 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [19OI-I902 

5. *American Coi^onial History. The history of the Colonies 
to the close of the Revolutionary War. The founding of the Colonies, 
their institutions and political life. The struggle with France and 
the revolt from the mother country. Special topics are assigned for 
investigation and class discussion. First half-year. 

6. *0UTUNES OF THE POLITICAL AND CONSTITUTIONAL HISTORY 

OF THE United States, i 781-1860. Lectures with required readings 
in von Hoist, Schouler, McMasters, Rhodes, and other standard 
authorities; the more important documants in McDonald's Select 
Documents are read and discussed. Second half-year. 

7. The United States, 1781-1829. The Government under the 
Articles of Confederation. The formation of the Constitution, a 
study of the debates in the convention of 1787, and the ratification of 
the Constitution by the States. The organization of the National 
Government and the development of the Constitution and our polit- 
ical history to Jackson's administration. First half-year. 

8. *The United States, i860- 1885. Lectures and reports upon 
topics assigned for investigation. Second half-year. 

9. American Politics. A study of the government of the 
United States, both national and state, based upon Cooley's Princi- 
ples of Constitutional Law and Bryce's American Commonwealth. 
Second half-year. 

10. *PoLiTiCAL and Constitutional History of England 
FROM THE Accession of the Tudors. Lectures and prescribed 
readings in standard authorities; the more important constitutional 
documents are discussed. First half-year. 

11. The Stuart Regime, 1603-1714. Especial attention given to 
constitutional questions. The more important documents of Gardi- 
ner's Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution are read 
and discussed. Second half-year. — Or^ 

12. The Political and Constitutional History of England 
SINCE 1815. 

13. Life in the Middle Ages. This course will deal with the 
dwellings, costumes, food, occupations, and habits of the men and 
women of that epoch. It will be illustrated by photographs and prints 
taken from Mediaeval Manuscripts. First half-year. 

14. The Beliefs and Superstitions of the Middle Ages. 
Especial attention will be paid to magic and sorcery and their outcome 
in the witchcraft delusion. Portents, lucky and unlucky days, 
precious stones, palmistry, etc. YnW also be touched on. Second 
half-year. 



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I901-1902] WKSTBRN RESERVB UNIVERSITY. 1 35 

15. Spbciai, Topics in Medi-«vai, History. This course will be 
conducted according to the Seminary Method, and aims to teach the 
student how to investigate a topic in Mediaeval History from the 
"sources." The subject for 1902-3 will be either the "Vita Heinrici 
IV. Imperatoris," or "The Crusades.'* First half-year. 

16. Church History. The growth of the Christian Church will 
be traced in its organization, doctrine and life to the Reformation. 
Its heroes and saints will be portrayed, and an especial attempt will 
be made to introduce students to the lai^ger literature of tjie subject. 
Second half-year. 

If desired, Mr. Severance will also form special classes in Bibliog- 
raphy, and will conduct an "Historical Seminar" for graduate students. 

LATIN. 
professor pi,a.tner (i). 

professor PERKINS (2-6). 

1 . The Elective Courses in Latin in Adelbert College are open to 
graduate students. 

2. *RoMAN Satire, (a) Lectures on the beginnings of Satire, 
the history of its development, and its influence on later writers, 
(b) A course of reading in Lucilius, Horace, Persius, Juvenal, and 
Martial. First half-year. 

3. Roman Lyric and Ei,egiac Poetry. A course of reading 
covering the chief works in each of these divisions. First half-year. 

4. Latin Prose Composition. An advanced course, adapted to 
the acquirements and needs of the class. Second half-year. 

5. History of Latin Literature. Lectures, with reading of 
typical selections, and direction of the student's private reading. 
Throughout the year. 

6. Cicero's Letters. Lectures on the history of the period. 
Students will do critical work on various points in this correspond- 
ence and present reports. Second half-year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

professor smith. 

PROFESSOR PALMlfe (7-II). 
MR. DICKER MAN. 

I. ♦Plane and Soud Analytic Geometry (advanced course). 
First half-year. 

2 *Diffbrential and Integral Calcult-s (advanced course). 
First half-year. 



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136 GRADUATE DKPARTMENT. [1901-1962 

3. The Theory of Equations. Burasideand Panton's Theory 
of Equations. Second half-year. 

4. *QuATERNiONS. Kelland and Tait*s Introduction to Quater- 
nions. First half-year. 

5. *DiFFERENTiAi, Equations. Johnson's Differential Equations. 
1902- 1 903. Second half-year. 

6. ♦Modern Anai^ytic Geometry. Second half-year. 

7. Higher Pi^ane Curves. General Properties of Algebraic 
Curves; Multiple Points and Tangents; Poles and Polars; Envelopes, 
Reciprocal Curves, Tact-invariant of two curves; Caustics, Parallel 
Curves and Negative Pedals; Metrical Properties. Salmon's Higher 
Plane Curves. First half-year. 

8. Theory of Functions. General Theory of Functions. Sec- 
ond half-year. 

9. Differential Equations. Equations of the First Order; 
Linear Equations with constant Coefficients; Miscellaneous Methods; 
Legendre*s Equation; Bessel's Equation; Forsythe's Differential Equa- 
tions. First half-year. 

10. *Projective Geometry. Lectures on Parallel Projections; 
Perspective; Homology; Vanishing Points and Lines; Projective 
Figures; Cross Ratios; Harmonic Ratios; Projective Ranges and Pen- 
cils; Conic Involution; Conjugate Points and Lines; Reciprocal 
Figures; Centers and Diameters; Foci and Directrices. Second 
half-year. 

11. Theory OF Substitutions. General Theory of Substitutions, 
with applications to the solution of cubic and biquadratic equations. 
First half-year. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

professor CURTIS. 

PROFESSOR AIKINS (10-I7). 

DR. MARVIN. 

I. Greek Philosophy and its Relation to the Rise of 
Christianity. A review of the rise and trend of philosophic 
thought among the Greeks and Romans from about 600 B. C. to 500- 
A. D. The main points kept in view are: (a) how the early philos- 
ophers treated the problems of life and mind, and (b) how their treat- 
ment of these problems is related to the rise and development of 
Christian Doctrine. The works of Zeller, Marshall, Grote, Jowett^ 
Ueberweg, Heinze, Ritter, Harnack, and Hatch are among the refer- 
ences. First half-year. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 37 

2. British Philosophy from Bacon to Hume. Lectures, reci- 
tations and private readings. The purpose of this course is to 
acquaint the student with the classics of British Empiricism by means 
of selections from Bacon's Advancement of Learning and Novum 
Organum, Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's Essay Concerning Human 
Understanding, Berkeley's Principles of Himian Knowledge, and 
Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. The course will bring forward 
the main problems of Modern Philosophy. Such features as are 
specially prominent today will be indicated and outlined. Among 
the general reviews of this period mention may be made of Morris' 
British Thought and Thinkers, Fraser's Selections from Berkeley, 
and Grimm's Zur Geschichte des Erkenntnisproblems von Bacon bis 
Hume. First half year. 

3. The Philosophy of Hbrbert Spbncbr. A critical study of 
Spencer's elaboration of the principle and process of Evolution along 
with the application of Evolution to Philosophy. Selections from 
the following parts of his work are thus examined: First Principles, 
The Principles of Biolog>'', The Principles of Psychology, and The 
Principles of Sociology. Lectures will be given with the aim of 
showing the historical development and present condition of evolu- 
tional thought. Digests and critical essays will be required for the 
purpose of bringing into prominence the main questions of Cos- 
mology. The more important handbooks for this study are Spencer's 
First Principles, and Collins' An Epitome of the Synthetic Philosophy. 
Second half-year. — 6>r, 

4. The Philosophy of Kant. After the results of Hume's 
Philosophy have been reviewed, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason will 
be taken up and the object of knowledge carefully studied. This will 
be followed by a discussion of the Metaphysic of Morality, the 
Critique of Practical Reason, and the Critique of Judgment. For this 
course some knowledge of German is advantageous. Second half-year. 

5. *Introduction to Philosophy. This course is designed as a 
systematic review of the content of Philosophy. It will probably be 
given in the form of lectures by the instructor and reports on assigned 
topics by the students. Ladd's Philosophy of Mind, and Introduc- 
tion to Philosophy ; Royce's Spirit of Modern Philosophy ; Paulsen's 
Introduction to Philosophy ; Mill's Examination of Hamilton and 
Kiilpe's Einleitung in die Philosophic are among the books of refer- 
ence. Second half-year. 



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138 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [19OI-I902 

6. Advanced Ethics. Presupposes the undergraduate work in 
Psychology, Logic, Ethics and Introduction to Philosophy. The 
work is conducted by seminary methods in abstracts and discussions. 
Throughout the year. 

7. Socioi,OGY IN THE LiGHT OF ANTHROPOLOGY. The main 
problems and bearings of anthropology will be discussed in systematic 
order and their sociological import noted in such works as those of 
Morgan, Brinton, Quatrefages, Taylor, Pritchard, Darwin, Wallace, 
Ranke and Ratzel. Then a course of lectures will outline a more 
systematic treatment of Sociology based upon Anthropology, after 
which certain aspects of the works of Compte, Buckle, Spencer, 
Schaffle, Lilienfeld, Stein, Ward and Giddings will be discussed. 
Throughout the year. 

8. Advanced Logic and IvOGical Methods. This course will 
include a careful study of Sigwart's Logic in connection vdth other 
important German and English works on that subject. Throughout 
the year. 

9. Metaphysics. The main problems of systematic Metaphysics 
will be studied in connection with the reading of some recent writings 
belonging to this part of philosophy. Throughout the year. 

10. *Ei,ementary Psychology. An outline of the subject, mainly 
from the physiological standpoint. First half-year. 

11. Ethics. An outline of ethical theory with incidental dis- 
cussion of practical problems. First half-year. 

1 2. *Introduction to Philosophy. A direct and simple discus- 
sion of the main problems of speculative philosophy, such as the 
ultimate nature of the mind and its relation to the body, the real nature 
of material things, the significance of evolution, the alleged conflict of 
science and religion. Knowledge: what it is and what we can hope 
to know; idealism, realistn and scepticism; the relation of knowledge 
to faith. Second half-year. 

13. H1.ST0RY of Philosophy. The course can be made to cover a 
period or confined to the work of some single philosopher, according 
to the preparation and interests of the students who elect it. In 1900-1 
the course was devoted to Locke, Berkeley and Hume. In 190 1-2 it 
is devoted to Kant. First half-year. 

14. History of Morai^. The moral ideals and practices of human 
beings in various stages of development. The origin of some of our 
present ]iroblems of right and wrong. First half-year. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 139 

15. Advanced Course in Philosophy. A critical study of some 
one or two philosophers or of some group of philosophical problems. 
In 1900-1 and in 1901-2 the course has been a continuation of course 13. 
Second half-year. 

16. PSYCHOiXKJY IN EDUCATION. The course is intended to cover 
as much as possible of the following groimd. Animals: their 
instincts, habits, intelligence and training. Children: aims and 
methods of child-^udy, practice in psychological observation, growth 
of mind and body and physical basis of precocity and dullness, con- 
tents of children's minds, their reasoning and their ideas of good and 
bad. Rhythm, fatigue, and other general relations of mind and 
body. Individual differences: the mental life and education of the 
blind, the deaf, and other defectives. The aims of education: the 
acquisition of specific habits and the alleged training of general 
faculties, such as memory, imagination, observation, judgment, atten- 
tion and will; disease of various faculties; the meaning of culture, 
character, power and personality. The noticeable effects of education. 
Special educational means and their psychological basis: interest, 
imitation, sympathy, suggestion (hypnotism), apperception and cor- 
relation, manual training. Second half-year, alternating with 17. 

17. History and Principi^es of Education. An historical study 
of educational theories and practice, especially since the Renaissance. 
The course will include extensive readings from the great writers on 
education and the incidental discussion of some of the current prob- 
lems and controversies concerning aim's and methods. Second half- 
year, alternating with 16. 

PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 
DR. REICHMANN. 

1. *Physicai, Optics. Preston's Light, with lectures and labora- 
tory work. Two hours a week, and one laboratory exercise, first 
half-year. 

2. ^*Thbory OF Heat. A course based mainly on Maxwell's 
Theory of Heat, with lectures and references. Three hours a week, 
second half-year. 

3. *Theory and Practice of Electrical Measurements. 
While mainly a laboratory course, this includes a general review of 
Electrical Theory. The text used will depend somewhat on the char- 



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I40 GRADUATE DEPARTMBNT. [19OI-1902 

acter of the class. Two laboratory exercises, and one conference a 
week, throughout the year. 

4. Physicai, Experiment. This course involves detailed study, 
theoretically and experimentally, of selected topics in Physics. The 
amount of time to be given to the work is arranged with each indi- 
vidual student. 

A knowledge of the elements of the Calculus is necessary for 
Courses i, 2, 3, and 4. 

The laboratory fee for each of these courses is $4.00 for each term. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BOURI^AND (1-5). 
DR. OlrlVBR (6-10). 

1. Historic Ai« Grammar. Comparative Historical Grammar of 
the Romance Languages, with special reference to French, Spanish, 
and Italian. Lectures. Throughout the year. 

2. Spanish Literature. History of Spanish Literature, with 
special consideration of the old Spanish and classical periods. 
Throughout the year. 

3. Dante. Lectures and interpretations. Throughout the year. 

4. Proven^ai,. Lectures on the language and literature, with 
illustrative readings. Throughout the year. 

5. Introduction to Romance Phiia3i*ogy. Lectures on sources 
and methods of research. First half-year. 

Only one of the foregoing courses may be expected in any one 
half-year. 

6. The Seventeenth Century. Lectures on the culture, the 
society, and the literature of France in the seventeenth century. 
Interpretation of the great Prose Writers and the Classic Dramatists. 
First half-year. 

7. The Eighteenth Century. The literature and culture of 
France in the eighteenth century. Break up of the classic ideals; 
growth of the Revolutionary Spirit; The Philosophers and the Ency- 
clopedists: The Drama. Second half-year. 

8. The Sixteenth Century. The Reformation and the Renais- 
sance. Rabelais and Montaigne. The Pleiade and Literary Reform. 



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I901-1902] WSSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 141 

Study of the language and syntax of the period. Readings from 
Dannsteter and Hatzf eld's '^Lc Seizidme Sidcle en Ftance." First 
half-year. 

9. History of Old French Literature. With representative 
readings from the great epics, especially La Chanson de Roland and 
Christian of Troyes; The Mediaeval Drama. First half-year. 

10. Frbnch Historical Grammar. Phonetics; Morphology; 
Syntax. Illustrative Readings from Old French Texts. Second 
half-year. 

SANSKRIT. 

PROFESSOR PLATNBR. 

I. An Hlbmbntary Course. Designed primarily for those stu- 
dents who intend to become teachers of the classics. The text-books 
are Whitney*s Grammar and Lanman*s Reader. Number of exercises 
variable. Throughout the year. 



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142 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [19OI-1902 



GENERAL INFORMATION* 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The first-half year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a Christmas 
recess of nine days, until the Saturday after the last Thurs- 
day in January. The second half-year begins on the Mon- 
day after the last Thursday in January, and continues, with 
an Easter recess of one week, until Commencement, which 
occurs on the Wednesday after the loth day of June (or 
after the ninth in years in which February has twenty-nine 
days) . No exercises are held on Thanksgiving day, Wash- 
ington's birthday, and Decoration day. 

METHODS AND LIBRARY FACIUTIES. 

Instruction is given by lectures, seminaries, recitations, 
and conferences with instructors, by specially directed 
courses of reading or research, by work in laboratories, etc. 

The library facilities available are: (r) Hatch Library 
(about 55,000 books and pamphlets), with a very full peri- 
odical list, with good collections, especially in French 
literature, classical philology, archaeology, and history, and 
unusually well equipped in Germanic philology and litera- 
ture, including the library (12,000 vols.) of the late Prof. 
Wilhelm Scherer of the University of Berlin; (2) Library of 
the College for Women, a small, well selected collection for 
general work; (3) the Case Library (50,000 vols.) well sup- 
plied with periodicals and general literature, and offering 
excellent facilities for the study of the fine arts, of political 
economy and sociology, and of the sciences, especially chem- 



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1901-190*2] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 143 

istry and botany; (4) the Cleveland Public Library (150,000 
vols.), well supplied with Shakesperiana, with modern liter- 
ature, with works on history, art, and archaeology. 

DEGREES. 

The degrees conferred by the Trustees, on recommen- 
dation of the Graduate Faculty, are Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Master of Arts 
will be conferred on accepted candidates who shall have 
pursued successfully, in residence and under the direction 
of the Faculty, advanced courses of liberal study equal in 
amount to the work of one collegiate year — ordinarily the 
equivalent of four courses aggregating twelve hours a week. 
These courses must be divided among at least three different 
subjects. Etetailed information regarding courses of study 
may be obtained from the Dean of the Faculty. The 
degree will also be conferred without residence, upon grad- 
uates of the class of 1893 or before, of Adelbert College or 
the College for Women, provided the candidate sustain 
satisfactory examination in the courses prescribed, and 
submit either a thesis on a subject assigned or other suffi- 
cient evidence of fitness to receive the degree — such as 
printed essays. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy will be conferred 
only on persons who have previously received a Bachelor's 
degree either from this or from some other university or 
college of good standing. The candidate must have pursued 
courses of advanced study, mainly of university as dis- 
ting^shed from college grade. He must have shown special 
ability in one branch of study (major) and high attainments 
in two other branches (minors), as determined by written or 
oral examinations or both. The candidate must have sub- 
mitted to the Graduate Faculty a thesis, which shall be 
accepted as evincing powers of research and independent 
investigation. After its acceptance he must deposit at least 



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144 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [19OI-1902 

fifty copies of his thesis, printed either in full or in abstract 
as may be required, with the Dean of the Graduate Faculty. 
The degree will be granted to no one who does not possess 
a good reading knowledge of French and German and, 
unless specially excused, of Latin. The degree is not given 
merely for faithful study of courses taken or text-books 
assigned, but as evidence of special ability in some chosen 
field; hence no definite term of study can be specified. 
Ordinarily at least two years are necessary and often a 
longer time is advisable. Part of this time may be spent in 
advanced study at some other institution of high standing 
in this country or abroad; the last year, at least, must be 
spent in residence here. 

In cases where the undergraduate courses already taken 
are not equivalent to those given in this university, or 
where, for any reason, previous preparation is inadequate, 
students must do additional undergraduate work or prolong 
the term of graduate study, as may be required, before 
receiving higher degrees. 

EXPENSES. 

The regular fee for instruction for each graduate student 
is eighty-five dollars a year. This does not include special 
laboratory fees, for which students may apply to the 
instructors concerned. 

A limited number of scholarships has been established 
and will be awarded upon presentation of satisfactory- evi- 
dence of scholarly ability. The recipients of these scholar- 
ships may be called upon to render service to the university. 

THE FRANCIS G. BUTLER FUND. 

The Francis G. Butler Publication Fund is available 
to graduate students for the publication of the results of 
original research in the field of American history. 



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THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. 



GENERAL STATE»«ENT. 

B9HE Medical Department of the Western Reserve 
■ I University Was organized, in 1843, as the Cleveland 
Medical College, a branch of the Western Reserve 
College. The first Faculty contained the names of Drs. 
John Delemater, Jared P. Kirtland, Noah Worcester, 
Horace A. Ackley, John Lang Cassels, and Samuel St. 
John, names widely known in medicine. The first dass 
graduated in 1844. The requirements for graduation were 
three years study of medicine, including two required terms 
of attendance on medical lectures, each term extending over 
a period of sixteen weeks, together **with good moral 
character.'* The old college was built in 1844, on the site 
of the present college building, comer of St. Clair and Erie 
Streets. This ground has since been continuously occupied 
for medical college purposes. The length of the course 
remained sixteen weeks until 1868, when it was increased 
to seventeen weeks. In 1871 the course was increased to 
twenty weeks. In 1875 the old Cleveland City Hospital, 
with its fifty-nine beds, the predecessor of the Lakeside 
Hospital, was first utilized for clinical purposes. In 1878 
the length of the course became twenty-four weeks. In 
1881 an optional three years course was adopted. In 1881 
Charity Hospital was added as a clinical field, with about 
seventy-five beds, together with its Maternity Department. 
In 1887 the present commodious college building was first 
occupied; in the same year a preliminary examination was for 
the first time instituted. In 1888 the length of the course 
was increased to six months, and the number of the courses 



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146 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

required to three. In the same year laboratory work was 
made an obligatory part of the course, in Chemistry -and 
Pathology. An optional four years course was adopted in 
1895, 21^^ was made obligatory in the following year. In 
1895 the length of the course was increased to eight months; 
at the same time practical work in the laboratories of His- 
tology, Bacteriology and Physiology, was added as a part 
of the required college work. In 1896 also, the right to 
use the present City Hospital for four months in the year 
for clinical purposes was acquired. In January, 1898, the 
new Lakeside Hospital was formally occupied, and the new 
chemical laboratory was erected. At the same time labora- 
tory instruction in Pharmacology was added as one of the 
required courses of the curriculum. In 1 900 the new labora- 
tory of Clinical Microscopy and Clinical Medicine was 
erected and in 1901 it was fully equipped. In 1901, by 
unanimous recommendation of the Medical Faculty and by 
vote of the Trustees, the requirement^^ for admission to the 
first year of the Medical College have been increased to 
include the work of the Junior year in a recognized literary 
college. The rapid development of the curriculum in this 
school in these late years has only been possible through 
the generous financial assistance of its many friends, to 
whom the Medical Faculty thus desires to make public 
acknowledgment. The graduates of the Medical College 
now number two thousand, two hundred and twenty-two. 
The course of study for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
is now of four years duration. The school year or session 
continues eight months. Theoretical and applied branches 
of study are graded, and arranged with reference to their 
bearing upon and preparation for each other, and the effect 
of the whole course. Instruction is given by lectures, reci- 
tations, quizzes, laboratory work, clinical demonstrations, 
and practical dispensary and bedside work. Endowment of 
the chairs of Anatomy, Histology, Bacteriology, Physiology, 



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19OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I47 

Chemistry, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Clinical Micros- 
copy, permits the employment of teachers who devote all 
of their time to teaching and research in this college. The 
buildings are modem in plan, construction and equipment, 
and ample in size for their purposes. In the subjects of 
Anatomy, Chemistry, Physiology, Histology, Embryology 
and Comparative Anatomy, Bacteriology, Pathological Anat- 
omy, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, and Clinical Micros- 
copy, laboratory work accompanies the didactic instruction 
and is required of every student. In the Senior class every 
student is required to do practical work in the Dispensaries, 
at the bedside in the hospitals, and in the obstetrical wards. 



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148 THE MEDICAI. COLUBGE. [19OI-1902 

FACULTY. 



Chari.es F. Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

/Resident. 

Jacob Laisy, A. M., M. D., Syracuse, Neb. 

Professor Emeritus of Anatomy. 



John E. Darby, A. M., M. D., Doan St. and Euclid Av. 

Professor of Therapeutics. 

Hunter H. Powei^l, A. M., M.-D., 467 Prospect St. 

Professor of Obstetrics and Pediatrics. 
John H. Lowman, A. M., M. D., 441 Prospect St. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 
John P. Sawyer, A. M., M. D., 526 The Rose Bldg. 

Prof essor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 
Perry L. Hobbs, Ph. D. (Berlin), 1420 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Chemistry. 
Wii^WAM T. C0RI.ETT, M. D., L. R. C. P. (London), 553 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology, 
Henry S. Upson, A. B., M. D., New England Bldg. 

Professor of Neurology. 

George C. Ashmun, M. D., 794 Republic St. 

Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine ^ 

Registrar and Bursar. 

Dudley P. Allen, A. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Theory and Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

Benjamin L. Millikin, A. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of Opthalmology, 

Dean and Executive Officer of the Faculty. 

Carl A. Hamann, M. D., 661 Prospect St. 

Professor of Anatomy. 
Frank E. Bunts, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Principles of Surgery and Clical Surgery. 
Hunter Robb, A. B., M. D., 702 Rose Bldg. 

Professor of Gynecology. 
George N. Stewart, M. A., D. Sc, M. D., (Edin.), D. P. H. (Camb.), 
Professor of Physiology. Medical College. 



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190I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I49 

Wii,UAM T. Howard, Jr., A. B., M. D., 88 Dorchester Av. 

Professor of Pathology^ Pathological Anatomy and Bacteriology, 
Edward F. Cushing, Ph. B., M. D., 1160 Euclid Av. 

Professor of the Diseases of Children, 
Charles F. Hoover, A. B., M. D., 702 Rose Bldg. 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis, 
George W. Crilb, Ph. D., M. D., 169 Kensington St. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, 
William H. Humiston, M. D., 526 Rose Bldg. 

Associate Prof essor of Gynecology , 
Torald Sollmann, M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 
Frederick C. Waite. A. M., Ph. D. (Harvard), 77 Hillbum Av. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology, 
John M. Ingbrsoll, A. M., M. D., 50 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer on Otology^ Rhinology and Laryngology. 
William R. Lincoln, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Lecturer on Otology^ Rhinology and Laryngology, 
Edward P. Carter, M. D., 8 Hayward St. 

Lecturer on Medical Jurisprudence . 
L. W. Ladd, a. B., M. D., Colonial Flats, Russell & Euclid. 

The Leonard Hanna Lecturer on Clinical Microscopy, 

Roger G. Perkins, A. B., M. D., Colonial Flats, Russell & Euclid. 

Lecturer on Bacteriology and Assistant in Pathology. 

DEMONSTRATORS. 

Henry A. Becker. A. M., M. D., Pearl St. & Clark Av. 

Demonstrator in Surgery, 

William E. Bruner, A. M., M. D., 514 New England Bldg. 

Demonstrator in Ophthalmology. 

Roy B. MftTZ, M. D., Medical College. 

Demonstrator of Physiology , 

William O. Osborn, B. L., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator in Medicine, 
Walter H. Merriam, Ph. B., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator in Medicine. 
Frederick C. Herrick, A. B., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Demonstrator in Surgery. 



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150 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. L1901-1902 

Prank J. Geib, A. B., M. D., Cor. Willson and Prospect St. 

Demonstrator in Medicine. 

Charles E. Briggs, A. M., M. D., The New Amsterdam. 

Demonstrator in Surgery. 
Henry P. Parker, A. B., M. D., Colonial Flats, Russell & Euclid. 

Demonstrator in Pathology and Bacteriology. 
Hubert L. Spence, M. D., 512 New England Bldg. 

Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases. 
Oscar T. Thomas, M. D., 85 Edgewood PI. 

Demonstrator in Gynecology. 
Edwin B. Season, M. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator in Medicine. 
George W. Moorehouse, M. L., M. D., 39 Cutler St. 

Demonstrator in Medicine. 
John S. Tiernev, M. D., Medical College. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Edward P. Carter, M. D., 8 Hay ward St. 

Demonstrator of Dermatology and Syphilology. 

Robert H. Sunkle, A. B., M, D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology. 
John C. Darby, A. B., M. D., Lakeside Hospital. 

Demonstrator of Pathology. 

Russell H. Birge, A. B., M. D., 260 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery. 

Wm. E. Lower, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Surgery at St. Alexis^ Hospital, 

ASSISTANTS, 

Frank S. Clark, A. M., M. D., 493 Colonial Arcade. 

Assistant in Obstetrics and Pediatrics at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
William E. Bruner, A. M., M. D., 514 New England Bldg. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
Oscar T. Thomas, M. D., 85 Edgewood PL 

Assistant in Gynecology at Charity Hospital Dispensary, 

Henry A. Becker, A. M., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Assistant in Sufgery at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 151 

Hubert L. Spence, M. D , 512 New England Bldg. 

Assistant iu Nervous Diseases at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
John J. Thomas, A. M., M. D., 156 Crawford Rd. 

Assistant in Diseases of Children at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
ROBT. H. SUNKi^B, A. B., M. D., Pearl and Clark Sts. 

Assistant in Gynecology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
Wii^MAM O. OSBORN, B. L., M. D., 275 Prospect Sts. 

Assistant in Medicine at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 
Edwin B. Season, M. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Assistant in Medicine at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
T. E. Griffiths, M. D., 1104 Woodland Av. 

Assistant in Surgery at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 
Wai^TER H. Mkrriam, Ph. B., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Assistant in Medicine at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 
Frederick C. Herrick, A. B., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Assistant in Surgery at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 
H. J. Herrick, A. M., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
Lyman W. Chii^ds, M. D., Cor. Wade Park and Dunham A vs. 

Assistant in Throaty Nose and Ear at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Edward P. Carter, M. D., 8 Hayward St. 

Assistant in Dermatology and Syphilology at Lakeside 

Hospital Dispensary. 

Jambs A. Evans, B. S., Medical College. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Chari^rs E. Briggs, a. M, M. D., The New Amsterdam. 

Assistant in Surgery at Lakeside Hospital LHspensary. 
George W. Moorehouse, M. L., M. D., 39 Cutler St. 

Assistant in Medicine at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
Frank J. Geib, A. B., M. D., Willson Av. and Prospect St. 

Assistant in Medicine at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 

Wai^iAM E. Shacki,eton, M. D., 605 The Osbom 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 



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152 THE MEDICAL COIXEGE. [190I-1902 

Fanny C. Hutchins, JM. D., 373 Jennings Av. 

Assistant in Nervous Diseases. 
S. H. Large, M. D., 1012 New England Bldg. 

Assistant in Nose, Ear and Throat Diseases, 
R. A. Hatcher, Ph. G., M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Assistant in Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 
RUSSEI*!. H. BiRGE, A. B., M. D., 260 Euclid An- 

Assistant in Surgery at Lakeside Hospital. 

Roy B. Metz, M. D., Medical College. 

Clerk 0/ Medical College. 

Andrew Fi^ower, Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Prosector and Curator Anatomical Rooms. 

Mrs. Flower, Erie and St Clair Sts. 

Janitress. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



153 



STUDENTS, 190M9Q2. 

FOURTH YEAR. 



Jacob B. Austin, Ph. B., 

John W. Boss, A. B., 

E. D. Brown, 

Brady B. Buck, 

Mars W. Carpenter, 

Percy W. Cobb, B. S., 

Chris E. Corlett, 

Herbert E. Edwards, 

C. V. Garver, 

Arthur Leroy Garrison, 

Walter A. Haldy, 

Walter E. Hatch, 

James J. Hathaway, 

George R. Hays, 

Jesse E. Hunt, 

Frank H. Ikirt, 

J. B. Isham, 

Foster W. Jackson, 

Nathaniel M. Jones, Jr., B. L., 

Emanuel Klaus, 

Max H. Klaus, 
Claude W. Lane, 
John F. I/indsay, 
William J. Manning, 
John Mohr, 
William C. Park, 
Ben Peskind, B. S., 
John R. Philen, 
Carlos E, Pitkin, 
Henr>- Riewel, 
Clarence D. Selby, 
C. H. Senn, M. D., 
George W, Shepard, 
James A. Sherbondy, 
W. F. Stahl, 
Parker F, Southwick, 
Alvin S. Storey, B. S., 
B. C. Tamutzer, 
Thomas J. Taylor, 



Cleveland 217 Oakdale St. 

Cleveland 530 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland 161 7 Cedar Av. 

Carrollton 701 Superior St. 

Temple 451 Pearl St. 

Cleveland 37 Hazard St. 

Cleveland 264 Sawtell Av. 

Cleveland 161 Putnam St. 

Wooster 442 Euclid Av. 

Rochester 275 Prospect St. 

Cleveland 502 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland 141 Chestnut St. 

Cleveland 1378 Superior St. 

Massillon 57 Sibley St. 

Cleveland 726 E. Prospect St. 
Liverpool 

Cleveland 828 Rose Bldg. 

Warren 37 Hazard St. 

Cleveland 162 Taylor St. 

Cleveland 958 Lorain St. 

Cleveland 958 Lorain St. 
Kenilworth Erie & St. Clair Sts. 

Salineville 32 Hazard St. 

Cleveland i Dodge Ct. 

Cleveland 6 Cleve St. 

Grafton 141 Chestnut St. 

Cleveland 1354 Willson A v. 

Cleveland 232 Cham plain St. 

Brunswick 32 Hazard St. 

Cleveland 95 Perry St. 

Portsmouth 64 Hawthorne A v. 
IVilliamsport, Pa. 755 Superior St. 
Mantua Station 530 Euclid Av. 
Jamestown, Pa, 701 Superior St, 

Cleveland 171 Dodge St. 
KendallvUle, Ind, 141 Chestnut St. 

Cleveland 1083 St. Clair St. 
Portage^ Wis. 914 Franklin Av. 

Cleveland 294 Sterling Av. 



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154 



THB MEDICAI, COI^I^BGB. 



[1901-1901 



John H. Weber, Ph. B., 
B. W. Wilson, A. B., 
David Yohannon, A. B., 



George I. Bauman, 
Amo E. Bohm. 
John J. L. Bolden, 
Nathan W. Brown, B. S-, 
Webb P. Chamberlain, A. 
Carl Cherdron, 
Frederick E. Dilley, 
Ralph W. Elliott, Ph. B., 
Henry Gerstenberger, 
Homer H. Heath, B. S., 
W. C. Hill, 
Leon Hirsh, 
Alfred A. Jenkins, 
Henry C. Kelker, 
Wade A. Lewis, 
George W. Magargee, 
Frederick K. McCime, 
Sidney M. McCurdy, 
John F. Rudolph, A. B., 
William E. Sampliner, 
Frederick M. Sayle, 
Edward J. Scan Ion, 
O. M. Shirey, 
John A. Sipher, A. B., 
C. E. Spring, 
Chauncey C. Stewart, 
John R. Stewart, 
Charles W. Thomas, A. B. 
Harry D. Vail, 
John A. Vincent, 
Harry S. Watterson, 
Richard Wedler, 
Wm. H White, 
Irvin S. Workman, 
Thomas C. Young, 



Miamisburg 442 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland 530 Euclid Av. 

Persia 1083 St. Clair St. 

Fourth Year, 25. 



1279 Cedar A v. 

311 Huntington St. 

25 Newton St. 

331 Kennard St. 

6 Wycombe PI. 

no Erie St. 

3717 Euclid Av. 

855 Stark Av. 

113 Linden St. 

58 Marloes Av. 

459 Euclid Av. 



THIRD YEAR. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Swatow, China 
B., Tztnnsdufg 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

E. Cleveland 

Berlin Heights 
New Brunsivicky N.J. 393 Jennings Av. 

Cleveland 38 White Av. 

ML Gilead 28 Cheshire St 

Galion 88 Lawnview Av. 

Pordoe, Pa. 162 Dodge St. 

Buena Vista, Pa. 37 Plymouth St. 

Andover, Mass. 42 Lawnview Av. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Lovelandy Colo. 

Cleveland 

Elyria 

Poland 

Rochester, N. Y. 
, Cleveland 

Cleveland 



68 Mansion St. 

The Augusta. 

1499 Cedar Av. 

850 Woodland Av. 

171 Dodge St. 

442 Euclid Av. 

141 Chestnut St. 

162 Dodge St. 

818 Case Av. 

1394 Woodland Hills. 

190 Helen St. 



Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Chandlersville 

Danville 



Cleveland 



777 Superior St. 

564 E. Prospect St. 

160 Colfax St. 

459 Euclid Av. 

55 Sibley St. 



1372 Woodland Hills. 
Third Year, 35. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



155 



'SBCONB YEAR. 



Charles Albl, 

Samuel S. Berger, 

John H Brett, 

Shepard Burroughs, 

Arthur M. Cheetham, 

Albert E. Connell, 

J. R. Davis, D. D. S., D. D. Sc., 

John B. Donaldson, 

John F. Flynn, 

Henry G. Golden, A. B., 

Isadore Goodman, 

Albert Grills, 

Arden P. Hammond, 

Harry Holibaugh, 

Frank C. Hoskins, 

Perry F. King, B. S., 

Emanuel Koblitz, 

Carl A. Lenhart, Ph. B., 

J. George Mannhardt, Ph. G. 

Russell H. McClure, 

Carl E. Ochs, 

Nicholas A. O'Connor, 

George Pay, 

Charles Parkhurst, 

David A. Prendergast, 

W. A. Schlessinger, 

Demba M. Spicer, 

John A. Staral, 

Harry M. Tarr, 

Jesse E. Thompson, 

Bert E. Tyler, 

John H. Wells, 

Leslie A. Woolf, 

Michcal Cyrillus Yeagle, Ph. 

Harvey E. Yoder, 

Samuel A. Young, 

William Otto Ziemer, 



Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Nofihfield 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Lorain 

Erie^ Pa, 

Willoughby 

Cleveland 

Elyria 

Cleveland 

Marlboro 



1406 Broadway. 

1859 Superior St. 

34 Ocean St. 

229 Euclid Av. 

805 E. Madison Av. 

16 Dunham PI. 

99 Lawnview Av. 

154 N. Perry St. 

The Ellington. 

99 Lawnview Av. 

264 Columbus St. 

97 Rosedale Av. 

607 Lakeview Flats. 

753 Superior St. 



Grand Rapids^ Mich, 900 Fairmount St. 

N. Georgetown 99 Lawnview Av. 

Cleveland Broadway and Humboldt St. 



B., 



Wauseon 

Galion 

Elyria 

Kenton 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Fostoria 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Lagrange 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Bristolville 

Cleveland 

Glentnlle 

Atwater 

Clyde 

North Industry 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 



414 The Ellington. 

698 Clark Av. 

613 East Av. 

98 Herrick St. 

224 Starkweather Av. 

47 Chestnut St. 

753 Superior St. 

61 Burton St. 

129 McBride St. 

162 >^ Chestnut St. 

1 25 1 Willson Av. 

193 Clinton St. 

2 Livingston St. 

51 Daisy Av. 

Lonsdale Av. 

507 Prospect St. 

761 Superior St. 

9 Wycombe PI. 

2370 Crosby Av. 

34 Woodbridge Av. 



Second Year, 37. 



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156 



THE MEDICAL COI.LBGE. 



[19OI-1902 





FIRST YEAR. 




N. S. Banker, A. B., 


Canton 


739 Superior St. 


Ohio suite Normal. 






Claude L. Diflford, 


Cleveland 


49 Alum St. 


Carroll Cleveland Elliott, 


A. B., Cleveland 


855 Stark St. 


Adelbert. 






Raymond L. Hobart, 


Pemherville 


201 Adelbert St. 


N. W. Ingalls, B. S., 


Berea 




Baldwin University. 






J. Charles McFate, A. B., 


Cochran ton, Pa, 739 Superior St. 


J. Douglas Pilcher, 


Cleveland 


54 Aubumdale Av. 


Edward Peturcha, 


Cleveland 


51 Goethe St. 


S. H. Solmonson, B. S., 


Cleveland 


1022 Case Av. 


Case. 

Lubor Charles Sykora, 


Avon Lake 


221 Osbom St. 


Oliver A. Weber, 


Miamisburg 


127 Murray Hill Av. 


Arthur G. Wilcox, 


Akron 


Adelbert Hall. 



SUMMARY. 

Fourth Year 42 

Third Year 35 

Second Year 37 

First Year 12 

Total 126 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 57 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 
SESSION S9Q2-03. 

I. Graduates in Arts and Sciences of recognized colleges 
will be accepted without examination, on presentation of 
diploma. 

II. Students who present certificates from recognized 
colleges, showing that the work of the Junior year in such 
colleges has been completed, will be accepted without 
examination. 

III. Students who can not present certificates covering 
the entire work of the first three years in a recognized col- 
lege, will be required to passan examination upon the work 
in which they may be deficient. These examinations will 
be conducted by the Faculty of Adelbert College of Western 
Reserve University. 

IV. Students in the Senior class of Adelbert College are 
permitted to take elective courses in the first year of the 
Medical College. Such electives are counted toward the 
academic degree, so that in this way students may save one 
year in the combined literary and medical courses. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Graduates in Arts or Sciences of recognized colleges who 
have, during their academic course, devoted to the subjects 
the number of hours, or have covered the text-books men- 
tioned below or their equivalents, and have passed satisfac- 
tory examinations thereon, may be admitted to the second 
year of the course. But the amount of practical work in 
such courses must not be less than that required in the cor- 
responding subjects during the first year in this college. 

General Biology, 90 hours; Sedgwick and Minot, or Huxley and 
Martin. Comparative Anatomy, 75 hours; Kingsley or Wiedersheim. 
Embryology, 75 hours; Foster and Balfour, Hertwig, or Heisler. 
Human Anatomy, 120 hours. Histology, 210 hours; Bohm and 
DavidofT's, Schafer's, Piersol's, Stohr's, or Clarkson's Histology. 
Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, 300 hours. Physics, 60 hours; 
Carhart's University Physics, or Gage's Elements of Physics. 



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158 THE MBDICAL COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

Graduates in Arts or Sciences who are deficient in His- 
tology or Organic Chemistry may still be permitted to enter 
the second year on condition of making up the deficiency by 
private work and passing the examination on these sub- 
jects during the year. Students from other medical colleges 
will be admitted to advanced standing on the produc- 
tion of satisfactory proof that they have completed the 
required preliminary work and also that comprised in the 
portion of the curriculum of this college from which exemp- 
tion is sought. 

Graduates in Medicine from other schools, who desire to 
applj' for the degree of Doctor of Medicine in this school, 
must present satisfactory proof that they have completed 
the preliminary literary work required of the class to which 
they seek admission, must take at least the work of the 
fourth year, and must pass the examinations on all the 
subjects of this year, and any subjects of other years in 
which they may be deficient. Graduates in Medicine, or 
other students who desire to take special courses without 
graduation, will be admitted without examination. Such 
special courses will not count in any way for the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine in this College. 

Examination of certificates for admission will take place 
in the college building on the two week days preceding 
the opening of the session. Candidates should attend at 
the college on either of these days, bringing their certificates 
with them Diplomas or certificates may also be personally 
presented to the Registrar duiyng the week preceding the 
opening, or forwarded to him at any time. 

In accordance with the laws of certain states, not includ- 
ing Ohio, all persons desiring to practice medicine in these 
states are required to have attended before taking the 
state examination, four full years at a regular medical col- 
lege, whether they are graduates of a literary college or 
not. The attention of candidates for advanced standing is 
therefore called to this fact. 



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I9OI-I902] WBSTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVBRSITY. I59 

COURSES OF STUDYi 

Number of Hours Per Week. 



FIRST YEAR. 
I«BCTUR9S AND RBCITATIONS. 

Anatomy 4 hours 

Chemistry 3 hours 

Histology and Microscopical Anatomy i hour 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy i hour first half-year 

Vertebrate Embryology i hour second half-year 

LABORATORY WORK. 

Chemistry 7 hours throughout the year 

Bacteriology 9 hours second half-year 

Histology and Microscopical Anatomy . . .6 hours throughout the year 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 3 hours first half-year 

Vertebrate Embryology 3 hours second half-year 

Anatomical demonstrations and dissections throughout the year. 

SECOND YEAR. 

LKCTURBS AND RECITATIONS. 

Physiology 4 hours 

Anatomy and Applied Anatomy 4 hours 

Pathology 2 hours 

Bandaging and Splints 2 hours 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 4 hours after March ist 

Physical Diagnosis i or 2 hours last half-year 

LABORATORY BXBRCISBS. 

Physiology 8 hours 

Pathological Histology 9 hours till March ist 

Demonstration in Gross Pathology i hour 

Pharmacology 3 hours after March ist 

THIRD YEAR. 
LBCTURBS AND RECITATIONS. 

Pharmacology 3 hours 

Therapeutics 3 hours 

Obstetrics 2 hours 

Medicine 3 hours 

Surgery 2 hours 

Gynecology i hour 

Physical Diagnosis 2 hours 



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l6o THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 

DIDACTIC AND CLINICAL LECTURES. 

Medicine 4 hours 

Surgery 6 hours 

Nose, Ear and Throat i hour 

Dermatology i hour 

LABORATORY EXERCISES. 

Pharmacology 2-3 hours before February ist 

Applied Anatomy i hour 

Pathological Demonstrations i hour 

Clinical Laboratory 4 hours 

FOURTH YEAR. 
Daily work in Dispensary Section, i to 3 p. m., Lakeside Hospital. 
Indi\4dual Assignment for ward cases. Clinical Laboratory in con- 
nection with Clinics and Assigned Cases. Operative Surgery taught 
to Sections in second half-year. Exercises in Obstetric Mannikin 
taught to Sections Autopsies and Clinical Pathological material 
worked up throughout the year. No Sections to be detailed to Hos- 
pitals or Dispensaries in hours conflicting with schedule. 

GENERAL CI^INICS. 

Medicine 4 hours 

Surgery 6 hours 

Gynecology 2 hours 

Obstetrics As material offers 

LECTURES. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 2 hours 

Jurisprudence i hour 

LECTURES, CLINICAL AND DIDACTIC. 

Nervous Diseases I hour 

Pediatrics i hour 

Ophthalmology i hour 

Special clinics in medicine and surgery at St. Alexis or City Hos- 
pitals, two sections to half of class, two hours each per week. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 161 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS, DAYS AND HOURS, J90J-J902. 
FIRST YEAR. 

Monday — Histology Recitation, 9 to 10 a. m. Anatomy, n to 12 
a. m. Dissections, 1:30 to 5 p. m., first half-year; second half-year, 
Bacteriological Laboratory. 

Tuesday — Chemistry, 8 to 9 a. m. Chemical Laboratory, 9 to 12 
a. m. Dissections, 1 130 to 5 p. m 

Wednesday— Chemistry, 8 to 9 a. m. Histological Laboratory, 
9 to 12 a. m. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology, 2 to 3 p. m. 
Dissections, or Anatomical Demonstration, 3 to 5 p. m., first half-year; 
Bacteriology, second half-year. 

Thursday — Comparative Anatomy and Embryology', Laboratory, 
8 to II a. m. Anatomy, 11 to 12 a. m. Dissections, 1:30 to 5 p. m. 

Friday — Chemistry, 8 to 9 a. m. Histological Laboratory, 9 to 12 
a. m. Dissections, 1:30 to 5 p. m., first half-year; second half-year, 
Bacteriology'. 

Saturday — Chemical Laboratory, 8 to 12 a. m. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Monday — Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. General Pathology, 9 to 10 
a. m. Pathological Histology, 10 to 12 a. m. until March ist; after 
March ist, Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 10 to 12 a. m. Dissec- 
tions, 1:30 to 3 p. m. Applied Anatomy, 4 to 5 p. m. 

Tuesday — Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. General Pathology, 9 to 10 
a. m. Pathological Histology, 10 to 12 a. m. till March ist; after 
March ist. Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 10 to 12 a. m. Dissec- 
tions, 1:30 to 3 p. m. Anatomy, 3 to 4 p. m. Demonstration 4 to 5 
p. m. Demonstration Bandaging, 5 to 6 p. m. 

Wednesday — Physiological Laboratory, 8 to 12 a. m. Dissection 
first half-year, 1:30 to 3 p. m.; Physical Diagnosis, second half-year, 
2 to 3 p. m. Qandaging, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Thursday — Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. Demonstration Pathological 
Anatomy, 11 to 12 a. m. Pathological Histolog>', 9 to 11 a. m., first 
half-year. Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 10 to 12 a. m after 
March ist. Dissection, 1 130 to 3 p. m. Applied Anatomy, 4 to 5 p. m. 

Friday — Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. Pathological Histology, 9 to 11 
a.m. Quiz in Pathology, 11 to 12 a. m.; after March ist, Pharma- 
cology' and Materia Medica, 9 to 12 a. m. Dissection, 1:30 to 3 p. m. 



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l62 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

Anatomy, 3 to 4 p. m. Demonstratioii, 4 to 5 p. m. Demonstration 
Bandaging, 5 to 6 p. m. 
Saturday — Physiological Laboratory, 8 a. m. to 12 m. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Monday — Pharmacology, 8 to 9 a. m. Therapeutics, 9 to 10 a. m. 
Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Demonstration Pharmacology, i to 2 p. m. 
Pharmacological Laboratory, first half-year, 2 to 4 p. m. till Jan. 19. 
Applied Anatomy, 4 to 5 p. m. 

Tuesday— Medical Clinic, 8:30 to 10 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. 
Surgical Clinic, 10 to 12 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. Physical Diag- 
nosis, 2 to 3 p. m. Clinical Laboratory, 3 to 5 p. m. 

Wednesday — Medical Recitation, 8 to 9 a. m.. Charity Hospital. 
Medical Clinic, 9 to 10 a. m., Charity Hospital. Surgical Clinic, 10 to 

11 a. m., Charity Hospital. Principles of Surgery, 11 to 12 a. m.. 
Charity Hospital. Dermatology, 2 to 3 p. m. Pharmacological Labo- 
ratory, 3 to 5 p. m. till January 19. 

Thursday — Pharmacology, 8 to 9 a. m. Therapeutics, 9 to 10 a. m. 
Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Gross Pathology, Demonstration, ij to 12 
a. m. Physical Diagnosis, 2 to 3 p. m. Medicine, 3 to 4 p. m.. Lake- 
side Hospital. Applied Anatomy, 4 to 5 p. m. 

Friday — Therapeutics, 8 to 9 a. m. Gynecology, 9 to 10 a. m. 
Clinical Laboratory, 10 to 12 a. m. Nose, Ear, Throat, 2 to 3 p. m.. 
Lakeside Hospital. Medicine, 4 to 5 p. m., College Building. 

Saturday— Medicine, 9:30 to 10:30 a. m., Charity Hospital. Sur- 
gical Clinic, 10:30 to 11:30 a. m.. Charity Hospital. Principles of 
Surgery, 11:30 to 12:30 a. m.. Charity Hospital. Attendance on 
Autopsies as specially arranged. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Monday — St. Alexis Hospital Clinic, after Jan. ist, 8 to 9:30 a. m. 
Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Clinical Laboratory and Ward Cases, 10 to 

12 a. m. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. Nervous Diseased, 3:30 to 4:30 
p. m., Lakeside Hospital; after Jan. ist, Tuesdays. Physical Diag- 
nosis, 4:30 to 5:30 p. m. at City Hospital till Jan. ist. 

Tuesday — Medical Clinic, 8:30 to 10 a. m.. Lakeside Hospital. 
Surgical Clinic, 10 to 12 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. Dispensary, i to 
3 p. m. Surgical Diagnosis, 3 to 4 p. m., Lakeside Hospital; after Jan. 
ist, on Monday. 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



163 



Wednesday — Medical Clinic, 9 to 10 a. m., Charity Hospital. 
Surgical Clinic, 10 to 11 a. m., Charity Hospital. Dispensary, i to 2 
p. m. Pediatrics, 2 to 3 p. m.. Lakeside Hospital. Hygiene and Pre- 
ventive Medicine, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Thursday — Clinical Laboratory and Ward Cases, 8 to 9 a. m , by 
sections. Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Gynecological Clinic, 11 to 12 
a. m.. Lakeside Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. Medical Clinic, 
3 to 4 p. m. 

Friday — Jurisprudence, 9 to 10 a. ni. Surgical Clinic, 10 to 12 
a. m.. Lakeside Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. Ophthalmology, 

3 to 4 p. m., Lakeside Hospital. Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, 

4 to 5 p. m 

Saturday — Gynecological Clinic, 8 to 9:30 a m., Charity Hospital. 
Medicine, 9:30 to 10:30 a. m., Charity Hospital. Sur:gical Clinic, 
10:30 to 11:30 a. m.. Charity Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. City 
Hospital Clinics, 2 to 5 p. m., to Jan. ist. 

DISPENSARY SECTIONS. 



SECTION. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


Oct. 7 to 

Nov. 2, 


sye 


Paed. 


Med. 


N.D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N. E. T. 


Nov. 4 to 

Nov. 80, 


N. B. T. 


Eye 


Paed. 


Med. 


N.D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


Dec. 2 to 

Jan. 4, 


Gyn. 


N. B. T. 


Eye 


Paed. 


Med. 


N.D. 


Surg. 


Jan. 6 to 

Feb. L 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N. E. T. 


Eye 


Paed. 


Med. 


N.D. 


Feb. 3 to 

Mar. 1. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N. E. T. 


Eye 


Paed. 


Med. 


Mar. 8 to 

Mar. 29, 


Med. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N. B. T. 


Eye 


Paed. 


Mar. 81 to 

Apr. 26, 


Paed. 


Med. 


N.D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N. E. T. 


Eye 



After Janunry lat sections will visit St Alexis Clinics according to special 
arrangement. 



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l64 THE MEDICAI. COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 

DEPARTMENTS AND METHODS OF 
INSTRUCTION. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR HOBBS. 
MR. BVANS. 

Chemistry extends throughout the entire first year and consists of 
three hours of lectures and recitations and eight hours of laboratory 
work a week. 

The course opens with a preliminary review on inorganic Chemistry 
and qualitative chemical analysis, which covers about two month's 
time, and the balance of the first half of the year is devoted to lectures 
on general organic Chemistry, chemical philosophy and quantitative 
chemical methods and allied subjects. The last half-year is devoted 
to lectures on special subjects, such as the chemistry of foods, their 
composition and analysis, animal secretions and especially the urine, 
both normal and pathological, and the general application of chem- 
ical methods in clinical examinations. 

The laboratory work during the first half-year consists of a short 
course of qualitative chemical ahalysis, then the qualitative examina- 
tion of the more common articles of food and animal secretions and 
the study of the various chemical reactions involved; also the prepara- 
tion of some of the more common organic preparations. The last half 
of the year is devoted, mostly, to the quantitative chemical methods 
of analysis. The preparing of standard solutions and the quantitative 
chemical analysis of many of the food products and animal secretions, 
both under normal and diseased conditions. The laboratory work is 
all supplemented by a course of lectures involving full description of 
the laboratory methods. 

Besides the regular course as above outlined, the special laboratory 
is open at all times for any extra or advanced work. It is completely 
equipped for any special work and every aid will be given to any who 
desire to avail themselves of its use. 

ANATOMY. 

PROFESSOR HAM ANN. 
DR. TIERNEY. 

The course in anatomy consists of lectures upon descriptive and 
applied anatomy, together with demonstrations, recitations and 
quizzes. In order to facilitate the work in osteology, students of the 
first year are provided with separate portions of the skeleton, which 



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I9OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 65 

they are permitted to take to their rooms for study. Three hours in 
recitations, and eight hours for dissecting, in suitable periods weekly, 
are given to anatomy during the first year. Students are required to 
dissect all parts of the cadaver at least once. For demonstrations 
upon the cadaver and anatomical preparations the second year class is 
divided into a number of small sections, whose meetings take the form 
of anatomical conferences rather than of formal demonstrations. 
Each individual student thus has an excellent opportunity for becom- 
ing familiar with the various parts of the body, and for receiving direct 
personal instruction. Four hours a week are given to lectures and 
recitations in the second year and ten hours a week to dissecting. In 
the third year instruction is g^ven by lectures and recitations in 
applied anatomy. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR WAITE. 

HISTOLOGY AND MICROSCOPICAL ANATOMY. 

The course includes work upon the fundamental mammalian tissues 
followed by the study of the finer anatomy of the mammalian organs. 
The sections used are human tissue in large part, supplemented by 
tissue from other mammals. An essential part of the work is training 
in the standard methods of technique. Each student stains and 
mounts over two hundred sections which he later studies, describes 
and draves. He is required to carry a considerable number of tissues 
through all the steps of preparation, including removal from the 
animal, fixation by several methods, hardening, dehydration, infiltra- 
tion, embedding in celloidin and in paraffin, sectioning, including 
serial sectioning, staining in toto, in sections and on the slide and 
mounting The rapid preparation with the freezing microtome and 
the special methods for blood examination are used. 

The recitations supplement the laboratory work and aim to bring 
out those points which the student does not see in his sections. One 
recitation and six hours laboratory work per week throughout the 
Freshman year. 

COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY. 
The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the more 
important characteristics of the classes of vertebrates, and also to pre- 
pare for the experimental work in physiology. The student dissects, 
as carefully as the time will allow, representatives of the different 
classes of vertebrates. The lectures deal with the modifications of the 



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l66 THE MEDICAL COI.I.EGE. L1901-I902 

several systems of organs in the vertebrate series and are supple- 
mentary to assigned reading in a standard text-book. One lecture and 
three hours laboratory work per week, first half Freshman year. 

VERTEBRATE EMBRYOI.OGY. 
This 'course endeavors to instruct the student in the fundamental 
facts of vertebrate development. The laboratory work deals with 
cleavage and gastrulation, followed by the study of the development 
of the chick to the end of the fourth day. Certain later steps in the 
development of the pig are then studied. In the recitations emphasis 
is laid upon the development of the human embryo. One recitation 
and three hours laboratory work per week, second half Freshman year. 

PHYSIOLOGY* 

PROFESSOR STEWART. 
DR. MBTZ. 

The course includes two lectures, illustrated by diagrams and experi- 
ments, two conferences or quizzes, and eight hours laboratory work a 
week for each student throughout the second year. 

For the practical work on mammals, which is made a special feature 
of the course, the class is divided into sections of four men; in experi- 
ments on frogs two men work together; in other experiments each man 
works for himself. 

SYNOPSIS OF LABORATORY WORK. 

Blood. Chemistry; coagulation; spectroscopic examination of 
haemoglobin and its derivatives; other tests for blood-pigment; globuli- 
ddes; enumeration of the colored and white corpuscles and estimation 
of the haemoglobin in human blood; specific gravity. 

Circulation. Circulation in a frog's web; heart tracings; action 
of mammalian heart; action of vag^ and sympathetic nerves on heart; 
action of muscarin and atropia on heart; action of valves of heart; 
cardiographic, sphygmographic and plethysmographic tracings; blood- 
pressure tracings; effect of stimulation of nerves (vagus, sciatic, 
depressor) , of asphyxia, of supra-renal extract, of albumoses, of the 
position of the body, and of haemorrhage and transfusion on the blood- 
pressure; section and stimulation of the cervical sympathetic; deter- 
mination of the circulation time. 

Respiration. Respiratory tracings; eflPect of section and stimula- 
tion of nerves (vagi, sciatic, superior lar3mgeal) on respiration ; measure- 
ment of heat and carbon dioxide given off in respiration; influence of 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 167 

respiration on the blood-pressure; influence of temperature on the 
respiratory centre. 

DiGBSTiON AND ABSORPTION. Chemical and physiological prop- 
erties of saliva, gastric juice, pancreatic juice and bile; effect of stimu- 
lation of the chorda tympani on the secretion of saliva; evacuation of 
stomach by tube or emetic to obtain normal chyme; gastric fistula; 
examination of fseces, time required for digestion and absorption of 
various food substances, etc. 

Urine. Qualitative examination; quantitative determination of 
chlorides, phosphates, sulphates, urea, uric acid, total nitrogen, pro- 
teids, sugar. 

Metabolism. Glycogen; experimental glycosuria, including 
phlorhidzs in diabetes; variations in amount of urea with quantity of 
proteids in food: thyroidectomy. 

Musci^B AND Nerve. The various kinds of stimuli; the curve of 
muscular contraction; action of curare, veratria and supra-renal extract 
on the muscle-curve; influence of temperature, load and fatigue on 
the muscle-curve; seat of exhaustion in fatigue; superposition of 
stimuli; genesis of tetanus; velocity of the nerve impulse; chemistry 
of muscle. 

Electrophysioi^ogy. Galvani's experiment; contraction without 
metals; secondary contraction; demarcation cturent and cturent of 
action; electrotonus; Pfluger's formula of contraction ; Ritter's tetanus; 
positive and negative polarisation. 

Centrai* Nervous System. Section and stimulation of nerve- 
roots; reflex action; action of strychnia; excision of cerebral hemis- 
pheres (in frog); stimulation of motor areas. 

Speciai, Senses. Formation of retinal image; change of curvature 
of lens in accommodation; determination of near and far points of 
vision; mapping of the blind spot; effect of light, atropia and stimula- 
tion of cervical sympathetic on the pupil; Kiihne's artificial eye; 
ophthalmoscopic examination of the eye; color mixing. 

PHARMACOLOGY AND MATERIA MEDICA. 

professor SOLI/MANN. 
DR. HATCHER. 

The course comprises 40 hours of lectures and recitations, and 30 
hours of laboratory work in the last ten weeks of the second year; and 
30 hours of laboratory and 100 hom^ of lectures and recitations in the 
third year. 



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l6S THE MEDICAL COIXEGE. [19OI-I902 

In the second year are taught the preliminary subjects of pharma- 
cognosy, metrology and pharmacy, in as far as they are important for 
medical students; introduction to prescription writing, flavoring and 
materia medica of flavors; incompatibilities and solubilities; general 
principles of pharmacology; and the strychnia, caffein and picrotoxin 
groups. Outline lectures, illustrated by such experiments as can be 
profitably demonstrated to a class, are given on subjects previously 
assigned for reading. These are followed in the next lesson by recita- 
tions on the same topics. The laboratory work in this year is designed 
to familiarize the students with the chemical properties of important 
drugs, their incompatibilities, isolation and identification; action upon 
ferments, upon blood, etc.; chemical action of caustics; compounding 
of single prescriptions, etc. 

The course in the third year comprises lectures and recitations on 
the action of drugs, their symptomatology, toxicology, therapeutical 
uses, and materia medica. Whilst the presentation of these subjects 
is based as far as possible upon experimental data, care is taken to 
point out the practical application of the ascertained facts, the course 
being intended as a foundation to clinical therapeutics. For this 
reason, occasion is also taken to bring together and compare those 
drugs which act upon the same organ or disease. For the main part, 
however, the drugs are arranged into large groups, the principal 
member of each group being studied in detail, whilst the less impor- 
tant are introduced incidentally. The arrangement of lectures, demon- 
strations and recitations is as in the second year. From time to time 
there are given exercises in prescription- writing, intended to familiarize 
the students with the methods of administering the substances which 
have been studied. The instruction in materia medica is confined to 
those facts which have a practical value to the medical student. An 
extensive collection of drugs is kept easily accessible. 

The laboratory work is designed to illustrate the actions of impor- 
tant drugs upon animals. The experiments are arranged by methods 
rather than by drugs, the practical work being kept entirely separate 
from the lecture course. It serves in this way partly as a review of 
the latter. The results of the experiments are recorded in detail, the 
records being assigned to students for the preparation of papers which 
are read and discussed before the class, as far as time permits. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 69 

PATHOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR HOWARD. 
DRS. PBRKINS, PARKER AND DARBY. 

Instruction in this department is given by lectures, laboratory work, 
and demonstrations of fresh and prepared specimens. The most 
important feature of this course is the laboratory work done by each 
student. 

Bactbrioi<ogy. Drs. Perkins and Parker. Laboratory work in 
this course is given three half days a week from March i to the end of 
the first year. The subject is elucidated by informal lectures, demon- 
strations, and experiments on animals, as occasion requires. The stu- 
dent, after having prepared the various media required, is instructed 
in the principles of disinfection and sterilization, the bacteriological 
examination of air, water and soil, and the methods of cultivating, 
staining and studying bacteria. The pathogenic bacteria and various 
molds and yeasts are then studied. Altogether from thirty to thirty- 
five different micro-organisms are studied by each student. Students 
are trained in the employment of bacteriological methods in medical 
and surgical diagnosis, and those who prove themselves capable are 
permitted to pursue investigations along special lines, on subjects 
assigned them by the professor in charge. 

Pathologicai. Histoi^ogy. Prof. Howard and Dr. Parker. The 
course comprises nine hours a week of laboratory work for the first 
five months of the second year. It begins with the study of the 
various forms of tissue degeneration and necrosis. This is followed 
by the study of inflammation in the frog's mesentery and in sections 
of hardened tissue, showing all the various forms of inflammatory 
processes. The infectious granulomata are then taken up, and the 
forms and special characters of the reaction of the tissues to the specific 
organisms of infectious diseases are demonstrated. The study of the 
various pathological processes is based upon their aetiology, and in 
addition to human tissues, the material from the experiments on ani- 
mals in the bacteriological course is used for this purpose. The effects 
of bacterial and other toxines upon the tissues is taught in the same 
manner. Tumors are next considered. Based upon the above as a 
ground work, the pathological histology of the various organs and 
systems is studied. The use of fresh frozen sections of material de- 
rived from autopsies, the operating room and animal experiments 
forms an important feature of the course. Each student receives and 
is required to stain, mount, carefully study and draw from two liim- 
dred and fifty to three hundred sections. 



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lyo THE MEDICAL COLI<EGE. [19OI-19OI 

Dbmonstrations of Gross PATHOivOCiCAry Anatomy. Prof. 
Howard, and Drs. Parkbr and Darby. Demonstrations are made to 
second and third year students from the large amount of fresh material 
derived from autopsies and from the surgical and gynecological clinics. 
Students are required to handle and describe specimens and to make 
diagnoses from the gross appearances, the macroscopical diagnosis of 
tumors being an important feature. The hospital connections of the 
laboratory are such that students can be trained in making autopsies 
and in writing protocols of the lesions found. 

Gbnbral Pathology. Prof. Howard. Two lectures a week are 
given to the second year class. In these lectures the various infectious 
diseases, immunity, the degeneration and regeneration of tissue, the 
aetiology of tumors, and the special pathology of the various organs 
and systems are considered. 

Advanced and Special Work. A special room, well lighted and 
equipped, is provided for physicians and advanced students who wish 
to undertake special work in pathological histology, experimental 
pathology and bacteriology. The additions to the pathological labora- 
tory at Lakeside Hospital include a large students' laboratory for 
systematic courses in bacteriology, pathological histology and clinical 
microscopy for second and third year students; a clinical laboratory 
for the examination of urine and other discharges, a room for the 
microscopical examination of blood, pus, urinary and other sediments, 
tumors, etc., and a separate room for the study of sputum, and faeces. 
Besides these there are two research rooms, two private rooms for 
assistants, and one preparation and store room. All these laboratories 
will be fitted not only with all necessary apparatus and fixtures, but 
all the work tables will be provided with electric lights. 

CLINICAL LABORATORY. 

DR. LADD. 

The new clinical laboratory at Lakeside Hospital is thoroughly 
equipped with all the necessary apparatus for making complete 
examinations of the various secretions and excretions, normal and 
pathological; the blood, urine, sputum, gastric contents, faeces, etc. 

Microtome for frozen sections and celloidin work and the various 
necessary stain and reagents are at the disposal of the students, they 
being required to apply the methods of technique taught in the labo- 
ratory in the study of special cases assigned to them in the hospital 
wards. A large room of the clinical laboratory is devoted exclusively 
to the fourth year class, and the main lecture room is devoted entirely 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 171 

to the third year class who are given systematic instruction throughout 
the session. The fourth year students are required to apply the 
knowledge thus gained in working up the cases assigned to them dur- 
ing the fourth year. Special rooms are equipped for the examination 
of sputum and making chemical tests; also a dark room is fitted up for 
doing polaroscopic and haemoglobin work. A few rooms are available 
for the use of special workers, these rooms to be asigned at the discre- 
tion of the direetor of the laboratory. Microscopes and other instru- 
ments are available for the work in this department. The total labo- 
ratory capacity contains 2,600 square feet. 

CwNiCAi, Microscopy. Work in this departmeni will cover the 
third and fourth years. The third year work will comprise a system- 
atic course, consisting of two laboratory exercises a week throughout 
the term, on blood, sputum, gastric juice, urine, faeces and pathological 
exudates. 

The technique employed in doing paracentesis of the chest, abdomen 
and spinal canal; in taking throat, blood, bladder and uterine cultures 
as well as the further examination of the products obtained, will be 
carefully outlined. 

The methods of preparing material obtained at the operating table 
for microscopical examination will be shown and each student required 
to do such work before the completion of his course. The object of 
this course is not only to cover the ground outlined above, but to pre- 
pare the student for independent work. In the fourth year the stu- 
dents will work in small groups in the room assigned to them and 
especially equipped for their use They will receive no systematic 
instruction, but will work under the direction and control of the in- 
structor. Their work will consist of the examination of urine, blood, 
sputum, gastric juice, faeces, and purulent and other discharges from 
their ward and dispensary cases as well as of tumors and other material 
removed at operations. This work is obligator>', is done in connec- 
tiou with the students' own clinical cases, and is therefore thoroughly 
practical. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

PROFESSOR DARBY. 

Therapeutics is taught during the third year. The teaching is done 
by means of lectures and quizzes, and is designed to give the student a 
thorough and practical knowledge of the mode of administration, 
action and use of remedies in the treatment of disease. Due attention 
is given to massage, electricity, dietetics and climatology. 



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172 THE MEDICAL COU^EGE. [19OI-1902 

HYGIENE. 

PROFESSOR ASHMX7N. 

One lecture a week on hygiene is given to the second year class. 
The course comprises a consideration of heredity; normal development 
of races; climatic and meteorological influences; essentials to life and 
health; effects of habits of life; symmetrical development of indi- 
viduals; family and community sanitation. 

OBSTETRICS. 

PROFESSOR POWEI*!, 
DRS. CI^ARK AND THOMAS. 

Instruction in this course begins with the third and continues 
through the fourth year, two lectures a week throughout each year. 
The plan includes didactic lectures, quizzes, practical demonstrations 
and bedside instruction. Lectures are illustrated freely by charts, 
diagrams, models and operations upon the mannikin. Students are 
required to become familiar with the use of the various obstetric 
instruments. The Senior class is divided into small sections and 
given practical work outside of schedule hours. 

Each Senior student is expected to attend from three to five cases of 
labor under the supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics, or hb 
assistant The work of the class is chiefly practical. 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 

PROFESSOR HOOVER. 
DRS. OSBORN, MERRIAM, SEASON AND MOOREHOUSB. 

Physical diagnosis is taught in the second and third years. During 
the second year the student is taught to recognize and elicit all of the 
physical phenomena of the circulatory and respiratory organs and ab- 
dominal viscera that are demonstrable by inspection, palpation and 
auscultation. Pathological cases are shown only as they are found 
necessary for the demonstration and explanation of physiological signs. 
At the end of the year each student is required to demonstrate the normal 
physical signs of the thorax and abdomen. During the third year 
physical diagnosis is taught from pathological cases The students 
are required to demonstrate at every exercise, and are also given oppor- 
tunity to practice in the dispensary and hospital wards. The final 
examination in this course is a practical one. Each student is required 
to examine a patient, describe the physical signs and make an elimi- 
native physical diagnosis. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 73 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE, 

PROPBSSOR I/)WMAN. 

PROFESSOR SAWYBR. 

DRS- OSBORX, MERRIAM, SBASON, MOORBHOUSBi AND GBIB. 

The teaching of medicine is done in the third and fourth years. 
Lectures, largely clinical, are given to both classes, and the largest 
possible number of students make direct observation of the patients 
presented. It is found that very often the whole class can individ- 
ually verify the conditions described by the lecturer, and this plan 
has proved of great advantage in the presentation of the cases. The 
third year class will receive two hours per week in text book work, 
in which internal medicine not provided for in special departments 
will be covered in recitation and discussion. The same class has three 
hours of clinics, and is assigned to the individual study of select dis- 
pensary cases. Clinical laboratory drill is made a decided feature of 
this year's work In the fourth year the class is taught medicine by 
clinics, by drill in sections in the dispensary, by the assignment to 
ward cases, in connection with which the fullest use of the clinical 
laboratory will be insisted upon. Throughout the course thus out- 
lined, the endeavor is made to develop not only the knowledeg of 
diseases and their diagnosis, but also to thoroughly consider the use 
of remedies. 

SURGERY. 

PROFESSOR AI.LBN. 

PROFESSOR BUNTS. 

PROFESSOR CRII.E. 

DRS. BECKER, BRIGGS, HBRRICK, GRIFFITHS, I«OWER, AND BIRGB. 

Surgery is taught by means of lectures and demonstrations. During 
the second year one hour weekly is devoted to the systematic instruc- 
tion in the application of bandages, splints and in minor surgery. In 
addition to this the students are given practical drill, in sections, in 
the application of bandages and splints. During the third year the 
students receive two hours of lectures weekly upon the principles of 
surgery, and section work in Charity Hospital dispensary. A course 
of one hour a week is given in surgical diagnosis. The material from 
the dispensary of Lakeside Hospital is used for the latter course. There 
ar« at least four hours weekly devoted to public clinics and there is 
instruction of one hour weekly during a period of six months, in genito 
-urinary surgery. In addition to this a laboratory course has been 
arranged for the purpose of instruction beside that given during 



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174 ^HE MKDICAL COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

the second year in the line of general pathology. In this course 
students are taught to examine blood, and pus, to make cultures, 
to innoculate animals, to cut sections and make diagnosis of tumors 
and to perform personally all the laboratory work incident to the 
diagnosis of surgical cases. This course occupies, in conjunction 
with a similar course in clinical medicine, from four to six hours 
weekly during the entire year. 

During the fourth year the student attends clinics six hours weekly. 
After January ist, there is an additional clinic of one and a half hours 
weekly, in which instruction is given to sections of ten or twelve men. 
Optional clinics are given every Saturday afternoon from the begin- 
ning of the term until January ist, at the City Hospital. A course is 
also given in operative surgery, utilizing all means necessary for the 
best development of instruction in this department. Throughout the 
fourth year, also, the student is given cases for examination and 
diagnosis, upon which complete reports are required. Provision 
is made in the clinical laboratory for the complete examination 
of thes^ cases by all laboratory methods. The student is required 
to examine the blood, sputum, urine, faeces, to make sections and 
diagnosis of tumors and investigate infections, and to make Exhaustive 
reports, which shall be compared with those made by the clinical 
staif of the various hospitals In addition to this the class ie divided 
into sections for daily work in the dispensaries. For the purposes of 
instruction the material is ample, clinics being given at Lakeside, 
Charity, St. Alexis and the City Hospitals. 

GYNECOLCXJY. 

PROFESSOR ROBB. 
PROFESSOR HUMISTON. . 
DRS. THOMAS AND SUNKLE. 

Gynecology is taught by a weekly didactic lecture, lasting one hour, 
and by supplemental quizzes during the third year; through the fourth 
year two hours a week are devoted to clinical instruction. The 
patients admitted to the wards of the Lakeside, Charity and City Hos- 
pitals for laceration of the perinaeum and for vaginal, vesical, uterine, 
tubal and ovarian disease, will be shown either at the regular clinics 
in the amphitheatre or will be made the subjects of teaching at the 
bedside. Instruction will be given in the wards, so far as it is pos- 
sible, upon the management of such cases during the period immedi- 
ately following operation and during the period of convalescence. As 
a rule, each student will have an opportunity of performing some 
minor operation. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 75 

The work in the dispensary at Lakeside and Charity Hospitals will 
include history-taking and the ordinary methods of examination, the 
diagnosis and treatment of cases. This instruction is given daily dur- 
ing the school year to the students of tlie fourth year. For this work 
the class is divided into sections, so that each student can receive 
individual attention. Students in turn will be permitted to examine 
patients, and suitable cases will be operated upon before the class. 

DERMATOLOGY AND SYPHILOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR CORI.BTT. 
DR. CARTER. 

Instruction in this department is given to the third and fourth year 
classes. Clinical lectures are given once a week to the third year stu- 
dents throughout the college year. It is the endeavor to cover the 
whole field of dermatology with these demonstrative lectures. When 
necessary lantern-slide plates and other illustrations are used to further 
elucidate the subject of diseases of the skin. During the course the 
class will be quizzed by the assistant in Dermatology. 

The Senior class is divided into sections and given practical instruc- 
tion in the clinics three times a week. Thus the common diseases of 
the skin, as well as many of the more rare forms, are studied and 
progress under treatment noted. Ample opportunity is given to 
apply dressings and each student is called upon to make diagnoses 
and outline courses of treatment under the immediate supervision of 
the instructor. Clinical material is abundant 

DISEASES OF THE NOSE» THROAT AND EAR. 

DR. INGERSOI^i;. 

DR. I«IXCOI«N. 

DRS. CHII«DS AND I^ARGB. 

Didactic lectures on these diseases are given once a week during the 
third year. Clinical instruction is given during the fourth year and 
consists in daily work in the dispensary of Lakeside Hospital. Each 
section of the class is in turn given personal instruction in the use of 
instruments for examination and operation and also in the diagnosis 
and treatment of the various cases. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

PROPBSSOR GUSHING. 
DRS. CI^ARK AND THOMAS. 

The instruction in this course, given in the fourth year, consists of 
a weekly clinical lecture and recitation, followed by a ward visit. 
Abundant illustrative material is obtained from the Lakeside Hospital 
dispensary and the children's ward. 



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176 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR MILLIKIN. 
DRS. BRUNNBR, HERRICK, AND SHACKELTON. 

The method of instruction is largely clinical with didactic teaching 
interspersed. It is given to the Senior class. The class is divided 
into sections, each one being assigned in rotation to cases for exam- 
ination in the dark room. Each student will be given cases for special 
study, and is expected to make a report upon them before the class, 
and will be subject to quizzing by members of the class and the 
instructor. The aim is to teach the diagnosis and methods of treat- 
ment of the external diseases of the eye, and to give a working knowl- 
edge of the uses of the ophthalmoscope. The eye department has 
separate wards in Lakeside Hospital in which students have oppor- 
tunities for seeing work at the bedside. The class will be divided into 
sections for instruction with the ophtlialmoscope, and for daily work 
in the dispensary rooms during the year. This department has 
abundant facilities, appliances and material. A large **dark room" 
with ten lights, a Javal-Schiotz Ophthalmometer, a perimeter, test 
cases and ophthalmoscopes for practical ophthalmology are provided. 
A Haab's magnet has recently been adde<l to the equipment. 

NEUROLOGY. 

PROFESSOR UPSON. 
DRS. SPENCB AND HUTCH INS. 

Instruction in this branch of medicine is clinical and occupies one 
hour a week throughout the fourth year. In connection with the 
cases shown the class is instructed in the use of the different forms of 
electric current for diagnosis and treatment, and in other diagnostic 
methods. The material of the City Hospital is utilized from the 
beginning of the school year up to January i. Cases of nervous dis- 
eases in the hospital proper are shown, and the class is taken through 
the wards of the Department of the Insane and instruction given in 
the different forms of mental disturbance. During the remainder of 
the year material for demonstration is drawn from the Neurological 
Clinic of the Dispensary and from the wards of Lakeside Hospital. 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE, 

PROFESSOR ASHMUN. 

This subject is taught by lectures and conferences, one hour a week 
during the fourth year. The course includes the pathology, natural 
history and methods of limiting the spread of infectious diseases; the 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 77 

duties and powers of public officers of health; value and methods of 
keeping vital statistics; the relation and duties of the physician to the 
public in matters relating to the public health, etc. 

BAEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

DR. CARTER. 

Throughout the first half-year, one lecture a week is given to the 
fourth year class on the subject of Medicine in its relations to the 
existing layrs, and to the various decisions, which are rendered from 
time to time in important medico-legal cases. Taking up the ques- 
tion of real and apparent death, homicide, wounds, survivorship, 
identity, the determination of stains, feigned diseases, life insurance, 
etc., and considering in brief the relationship existing between the 
law and the practice of medicine. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Chemistry — Witthaus, Hartley, Prescott and Johnson. 

Anatomy — Gray, Morris. 

Histology and Microscopical Anatomy — Bohm-Davidoff-Huber. 

Comparative Anatomy — Kingsley or Wiedersheim. 

Embryology— Yi^Xex, 

Bacteriology — Abbot, Sternberg, Lehmann and Neumann. 

Physiology — Stewart's Manual ; for reference, Schafer*s Physiology. 

Pathology — Ziegler. 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica — Sollmann. 

Therapeutics — Wood, Brunton, Bartholow, Shoemaker, Butler, 
Schmiedeberg. 

Medicine— V^ood, & Fritz, Strumpell, Osier. 

Surgery— pLmimcaji Text - book of Surgery, Koenig's Surgery, 
Wanen*s Surgical Pathology. 

Gynecology— lAsi&^sf&& of Women (Dudley), An American Text- 
book of Gynecology (Baldy), A Text-book on Gynecology (Reed), 
Practical Gynecology (Montgomery), Hart and Barbour's Manual of 
Gynecology. Books of reference, Pozzi, Pritsch, Aseptic Surgical 
Technique (Rqbb). 

Obstetrics — ^Jewett, Reynolds, Davis, Hirst. 

Dermatology — Crocker, Hardway, Jackson, Morrow's System of 
Dermatology, Corlett's Acute Exanthemata. 



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178 THE MEDICAL COI.LEGE. [190I-1902 

Neurology — Church and Peterson, Dercum, Dana. Books of refer- 
ence, Gowers, Berkley on Mental Diseases. 

Ophthalmology — American Text-book, De Schweinitz, Norris and 
Oliver, Fuchs, Noyes. 

Nosey Ear and Throat — American Text-book, Kyle, Politzer, Bacon, 
Buck, Coakley, Bishop. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine — Stevenson and Murphy, Egbert, 
Abbot. 

Physical Diagnosis — Vierordt's Medical Diagnosis. 

Diseases of Children — Holt's Infancy and Childhood, Jacobi*s 
Therapeutics of Infancy, Ashby and Wright. 

Medical Jnrisprudence—TsLylor's (A. S.) Medical Jurisprudence, 
Taylor's (A. N.) The Law in its Relation to Physicians. 

EXAMINATIONS, J902. 

FIRST YEAR CLASS. 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy— TvLeadayy February 4th. 

Embryology — Saturday, May 24th. 

Histology — Monday, May 26th. 

Osteology— "lyxesidAy y May 27th. 

Chemistry— V^^n^si^y, May 28th. 

Bacteriology — Thursday, May 29th. 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Pathological Histology — Friday, February 28th. 

^«a/^wfrv— Tuesday, May 27th. 

Physiology — ^Practical, Wednesday, May 28th, 8 to 11 a. m.; i to 4, 
p. m. Written and oral, Thursday, May 29th, 8 a. m. 

Minor Surgery — Saturday, May 24th. 

Pharmacology — Practical, May i6th, 9 a. m. to 12 m. Written and 
oral, Friday, May 23d, 9 a. m. to 12 m. 

Physical Diagnosis — Monday, May 26th. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Therapeutics — Monday, May 26th. 

Pharmacology — Materia Medica, written and oral, 1:30 to 4:30 p. m.^ 
Tuesday, May 27th. Practical, Monday, January 19th, 1903, 1:30 to 
3:30 p. m. 



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190I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 79 

Obstetrics — ^Thursday, May 29th. 

Medicine— Wednesday, June 4th. 

Surgery — ^Thursday, June 5th. 

Pathotogy — ^Friday, June 6th. 

Physical Diagnosis — ^Thursday, May 15th to 29th. 

Gynecology — Saturday, May 31st. 

Anatomy — Wednesday, May 28th. 

Eatf Nose and Throat — Wednesday, June 4th. 

Dermatology — Monday, June 2d. 

Clinical Lctboratory— Tuesday, June 3d. 

FOURTH YEAR CI,ASS. 

Neurology — Monday, May 26th. 

Obstetrics — ^Tuesday, May 27th, 10 a. m. 

Surgery — ^Tuesday, June 3d. 

Physiail Diagnosis— Thva^ay , May 29th. 

^O'lf^^^^P'— Thursday, June 5th. 

Ophthalmology— Tndayy May 23rd. 

Medicine — Saturday, May 31st. 

Gynecology— yionday, June 2d. 

Surgery — ^Wednesday, May 28th. 

Medicine — Wednesday, June 4th. 

Jurisprudence — Saturday, May 24th. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine — ^Friday, June 6th. 

Pediatrics— Taeaday, May 27th, 2 p. m. 



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l8o THB MEDICAL COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The College session will open on October 1st, each year, 
unless this date falls on Sunday, in which case the opening 
shall be on October 2nd. 

There will be a holiday vacation of two weeks, beginning 
on December 24th., there will also be a vacation of one week 
at Easter time. No College exercises will be held on Thanks- 
giving Day, Washington's Birthday or Decoration Day. 

SITUATION OF BUILDINGS. 

The Medical College stands at the comer of Erie and 
St. Clair Streets, about five minutes* walk from the center 
of the city. 

The Irakeside Hospital fronts on Lake Street, comer of 
Muirson Street — five minutes* walk from the college. St. 
Vincent's Hospital (Charity) fronts on Perry Street, comer 
of Central Avenue. The Home of Maternity is on Marion 
Street, in the rear of St. Vincent's. The City Hospital 
fronts on Scranton Avenue, and is reached by either Jen- 
nings Avenue or Pearl Street and Brooklyn cars. The 
Medical Library building is at 586 Prospect Street. 

ENDOWMENTS. 
This College is indebted to the Perry- Payne Family for 
the valuable ground upon which its buildings have been 
erected, as well as for other generous assistance from time 
to time. In addition there are the following special funds: 
The John L. Woods Fund. 
The H. B. Hurlbut Fund. 
The John Huntington Fund. 
The John A. Vincent Fund. 
The H. Melville Hanna Fund. 
The Leonard Hanna Endowment for 
the Chair of Clinical Microscopy. 



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1901-1902] WBSTBRN RKSBRVK UNIVERSITY. 181 

It is also under a lasting bond of gratitude and obligation 
to other generous donors of funds for the erection of build- 
ings, and the endowment and equipment of laboratories and 
dispensaries, who have permanently increased its resources 
and advantages to students of medicine. 

LIBRARIES. 

The Free Public Library, 176,000 volumes, Case Library, 
50,0000 volumes, Hatch Library, 60,000 volumes, and the 
library of the Cleveland Medical Library Association are 
accessible to students of this College, and, with the exception 
of the Hatch Library, are within a few minutes* walk of 
the Medical College. By special arrangement of the 
Faculty members of the Senior class of this College may 
have the reading privileges of the Medical Library Associa- 
tion's books and journals during the year. This Library 
now has on its shelves more than 8,000 bound volumes, and 
one hundred and fifty Medical Journals on file in the reading 
rooms. There are more than two hundred volumes of mod- 
ern text-books and medical works. In addition there are 
small working libraries in the laboratories of the College 
itself. 

LABORATORIES. 

Chemistry. — A chemical laboratory building with over 
six thousand five hundred square feet of floor space, has 
been erected to the south of the main college building, and 
in connection with it. The laboratories are thoroughly 
equipped for all the details of the course, and each student 
has a separate desk assigned him with a general supply of 
apparatus. Extra and special apparatus is furnished upon 
requisition.. A special laboratory has been furnished for 
the work of advanced students, and every effort made to 
make it as complete as possible, with facilities for original 
and special work. 



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l82 THB MEDICAL COLLEGE. [190I-I902 

Anatomy. — The dissecting room is well lighted with 
electricity, heated and ventilated and provided with modem 
appliances. The anatomical rooms have about three thou- 
sand square feet of floor space. Anatomical material is 
preserved at all seasons of the year. 

Histology and Embryology. — ^The laboratory is well 
lighted by a north and east exposure, with means for arti- 
ficial light on dark days. Enough Leitz microscopes are 
owned so that each student has one for his individual use, 
available at all times. There is a good equipment of 
microtomes, ovens, glassware, stains and reagents. 

Bacteriology. — ^The work in bacteriology is carried 
on in the pathological laboratory. Students are required to 
provide their own material for drawings. Microscopes, 
culture media and animals are provided without charge, and 
material for staining and mounting specimens, to be retained 
by students at cost. The laboratory has the benefit of 
excellent lighting with space for individual work. 

Pharmacology. — There is a large, well-lighted labora- 
tory of two thousand one hundred square feet, devoted 
exclusively to this subject and fitted up for animal and 
chemical work. Apparatas and material are furnished 
without extra charge. The laboratory is open for advanced 
work in this department. A special laboratory for research 
has just been added. 

Physiology. -^The teaching laboratories comprise three 
well-lighted rooms with an aggregate floor space of nearly 
four thousand square feet. The room for experimental 
physiology is fifty by thirty feet, the room for chemical 
physiology measures thirty-five by thirty feet, and the 
lecture room, devoted exclusively to physiology, is capable 
of accommodating one hundred and forty students. The 
equipment for teaching practical physiology permits more 
than forty students to work in a class at one time, some in 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 183 

the chemical and some in the experimental room. Several 
separate rooms are available for research. There is also a 
dark room and workshop. 

Pathology. — The pathological laboratory occupies the 
entire west third floor, two thousand four hundred square 
feet, and has in addition a special room for research work, 
a museum and a professor's room. The teaching laboratory 
room, two thousand three hundred square feet, is on the 
east fourth floor, and affords each student separate locker 
and ample table space. Apparatus, instruments and teach- 
ing materials are provided without extra charge. 

A New Clinical Laboratory. — During the past sum- 
mer a new clinical laboratory has been completed at Lakeside 
Hospital, of sufficient size to accommodate an entire class. 
This provides the students with greatly increased facilities 
for the examination of secretions and excretions, sputum, 
purulent and other infections, blood, urine, stomach con- 
tents, stools, etc., and permits them to make personal exam- 
inations of tumors and other pathological specimens. This 
work is a part of the regular instruction in the third and 
fourth years and greatly increases the eflficiency with which 
the clinical work of these years is performed. Microscopes 
and other instruments are available for the work in this 
department. 

MUSEUMS. 
Rooms in the College building are set apart for the pres- 
ervation of anatomical and pathological preparations, casts 
and specimens. Persons not connected with the College 
who have specimens they wish preserved can place them in 
these rooms, with the owners* name attached and such 
histories, descriptions or remarks as they choose to give, 
respecting them. A very complete museum of Materia 
Medica is kept accessible to the students. 



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184 THE MEDICAI. COLLBGB. [1901-1902 

HOSPITALS. 

Lakeside Hospital. — ^The new Lakeside Hospital occu- 
pies a plot of ground four hundred feet long by three 
hundred and eighty feet deep, o^ the bank overlooking 
Lake Erie, about five minutes* walk from the College 
building. It affords accommodation for two hundred and 
fifty patients. The staff is composed of members of the 
Faculty of this College. The hospital has an amphitheatre 
seating about two hundred students for the surgical classes, 
and a smaller one with a seating capacity of over one 
hundred for the medical classes. On the third floor of the 
dispensary building are two lecture rooms, each capable of 
seating fifty to seventy-five students. There are eighteen 
resident assistants for the departments of surgery, gyne- 
cology, medicine, ophthalmology, children's diseases, pa- 
thology, etc. These positions are open to the graduates of 
this College, and afford great opportunities for practical 
work. 

There is in process of erection and now nearly completed 
^ pavilion for infectious and contagious diseases, having 
four small wards, with everj' facility for the proper care and 
study of these diseases. 

St. Vincent's (Charity) Hospital. — This is one of 
the oldest and best known institutions in the city and state. 
It has between seventy-five and one hundred beds. The 
staff is selected by the faculty, and the clinical material of 
the hospital is utilized for instruction -in this College. 
There are four hospital positions open each year to the 
graduates of this College only. 

This hospital is just adding a complete new wing for the 
accommodation of female patients. This will add about 
sixty beds, besides operating pavilion and recovery rooms, 
to the capacity of this institution. A complete dispensary 
department is added in the basement of this wing, with all 
facilities for the care of out-door patients. 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 185 

City Hospital. — This institution is under municipal 
control. It accommodates one hundred and fifty to one 
hundred and seventy- five patients continually in the adult 
department and has a new building for children, with one 
hundred beds, besides operating rooms, pathological labora- 
tory, etc. From September to January regular clinics in 
medicine, gjoiecology, surgery, neurology and cutaneous 
and venereal diseases are given here by members of this 
faculty. The insane department of this hospital affords 
material for clinical instruction in mental diseases. Fre- 
quent autopsies are held and abundant material for patho- 
logical demonstrations obtained. The resident staff is 
selected by competitive examination, and the students of 
this College are eligible. 

Home of Maternity. — This is a department of Charity 
Hospital, with a separate building, devoted to the care of 
women during their confinement and of mothers and 
children. From one hundred to one hundred and fifty 
cases are received annually, the members of the Senior 
class being assigned to them in rotation, so that each stu- 
dent sees from two to five casej^ of labor under the super- 
vision of the Professor of Obstetrics, who has charge of the 
department with its children's ward. 

CLINICAL facilities. 

The clinical facilities of this College comprise, through- 
out the course, the two hundred and fifty beds at Lakeside 
Hospital, one hundred and fifty beds of Charity Hospital, 
the Dispensaries at Lakeside and Charity Hospitals, the 
Maternity and Children's Home, and the two hundred and 
seventy-five beds of the City Hospital during four mouths 
of each year. 

resident physicians. 

From twenty-five to thirty resident positions are open to 
the graduates of the College in the hospitals of the city. 



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l86 THE MEDICAL COI^LEGE. [19OI-I9OI 

Of the class graduating in 1901, twenty men received hos- 
pital appointments. 

HOSPITAL SERVICE. 

LAKESIDE HOSPITAL STAFF. 

Medicine— HviS, H. H. Powell, J. H. Lowman, H. S Upson, E. 

F. CUSHING. 

Surgery — Dr. D. P. Allen; Dr. G. W. Crile, Associate. 
Ophthalmology— T^^. B. L. Millikin. 
Gynecology — Dr. H. Robb. 
Dermatology— D^, W. T. Corlett. 
Pathology— ly^, W. T. Howard, Jr. 

CHARITY hospital STAFF. 

Consulting Physicians— Drs. G. C. Ashmun, B. W. Holliday, J. 

H. LOWMAN. 

Consulting Surgeons— Drs. G. C. E. Weber and D. P. Allen. 

Consulting Ophthalmologist— Dk. B. L. Millikin. 

Consulting Dermatologist— Dk. W. T. Corlett. 

Consulting Gynecologist — Dr. H. Robb. 

Visiting Physicians — Drs. H. J. Lee, J. E. Cook, J. P. Sawyer, 
T. A. Burkb. 

Visiting Surgeons— Drs. F. E. Bunts and C. A. Hamann. 

Visiting Gytiecologist-VK. W. H. Humiston. 

Visiting Ophthalmologist— Dk, W. E. Bruner. 

Pathologist— Dr. W. T. Howard. Jr. 

home of maternity. 

Ods/etncs— Dr. H. H. Powell. 

CONSITLTING STAFF AT CITY HOSPITAL. 

Medicine — Drs. J. H. Lowman and J. E. Darby. * 
Sufgery— Drs. D. P. Ai.len and F. E. Bunts. 
Obstetrics— Dr. H. H. Powrll. 
Neurology— Dr. H. L. Spknce. 
Gynecology— Dr. \V. H. Humiston. 
Dermatology— Dr. W. T. Corlett. 
Pathology— Dr. W. T. Howard, Jr. 
Ophthalmology — Dr. VV. E. Bruner. 
Laryngology — Dr. J. M. Ingersoll. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 87 

VISITINO STAFF. 

Drs. C. p. Hoover and C. A. Hamann. 

DISPENSARIES. 
Free Dispensaries are maintained at Lakeside and Charity 
Hospitals with daily service except Sundays. These col- 
lege dispensaries were established on the Hurlbut and 
Huntington Funds and afford treatment to about ten thou- 
sand new cases annually. 

I^KESrDE HOSPITAI« SERVICE. 

Medicine — Dr. J. H. Lowman, Director; Drs. E. H. Season, G. 
W. MooREHOUSE, Physicians in Charge. 

Surgery— ly^, D. P. Ai^i^en, Director; Drs. H. A. BECKER, Chas. 
E. Brigcs, and R. H. Birge, Surgeons in Charge. 

Obstetrics— Dk, H. H. Powell, Director; Dr. F. S. Clark, Obste- 
trician in Charge. 

Diseases of Children— H^. E. F. Cushing, Director; Drs. F. S. 
Clark, J. J. Thomas, Physicians in Charge. 

Gynecology — Dr. H. Robb, Director; Dr. R. H. SunklE, Gyne- 
cologist in Charge. 

Nervous Diseases — Dr. H. S. Upson, Director; Dr. H. L. Spknce, 
Neurologrist in Charge; Dr. F. C. HtJTCHiNS, Assistant. 

Ophthalmology— T>K. B. L. Millikin, Director; Dr. W. E. Brunbr, 
Ophthalmologist in Charge; Drs. H. J. Herrick, Wm. E. ShaklE- 
Ton, Assistants. 

Dermatology and Syphilis— Br, W. T. Corlett, Director and 
Ph3rsician in Charge; Dr. E. P. Carter, Assistant. 

Diseases of Nose, Ear and Throat— Hvls. J. M. Ingersoll and 
William R. Lincoln, Surgeons in Charge; Drs. L. W. Childs, S. 
H. Large, Assistants. 

CHARITY hospital SERVICE. 

Medicine— DVi, J. P. Sawyer, Director; Drs. W. O. Osborne, W. 
H. Mbrriam, Frank J. Geib, Physicians in Charge. 

Surgery — Dr. F. E. Bunts, Director; Drs. Fred C. Herrick and 
T. E. Griffiths, Surgeons in Charge. 

Gynecology— Hr, W. H. Humiston, Director; O. T. Thomas, 
Gynecologist in Chaxge. 



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l88 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE, [190I-1902 

HOMB OP MATERNTTY. 

OdsUtrics—BR, H. H. Powell, Director; Dr. J. J. Thomas, Obste- 
tridan in Charge; Dr. Eugene O. Houck, Assistant. 

DISPENSARY APPOINTMENTS. 

Members of the third year class remaining in the city 
during the summer, may be appointed for practical work in 
the Dispensary, in sections, by applying to the Dean. 

SUMMER COURSES. 

Students or practitioners of medicine who desire to take 
special work in the laboratories and in the clinics, may 
arrange for summer courses by appl5dng to the Dean or the 
heads of the various laboratory departments. 

EXPENSES. 

The fees are |125 a year. This amount includes payment 
for tuition and all laboratory expenses, except the price of 
anatomical material, breakage and use of oil immersion 
microscopes, and is due before October twentieth of each 
year. Students who prefer may pay $75 by October twen^ 
tieth, and $55 by March fifteenth of the college year. No 
student shall be permitted to present himself for examina- 
tion in any branch who has not paid all dues and liabilities. 
Students who wish to pay for the entire four years* course 
by October twentieth of their first year, will be allowed a 
reduction of $50 on the whole amount. A deposit of $2 is 
required from students in each of the laboratories at the 
outset, in addition to the tuition fee, to cover breakage. 
The unused balance of such deposit is returned at the end 
of the session. A rental of $5.00 per year will be charged 
for the use of oil immersion microscopes, the students hav- 
ing full use of these instruments during their entire j^ear. 
Students who prefer may furnish their own microscopes. 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 189 

Good board can be procured at from three to five dollars 
a week, and furnished rooms at from five to ten dollars a 
month. By forming ** clubs*' students are able to bring 
their living expenses considerably below these prices. The 
janitor at the College building keeps a list of boarding 
houses for the convenience of students. By an arrange- 
ment with Goodrich House, which stands within one block 
of the College, a gymnasium, with bathing accommodations, 
is available to the students at a ver>' small cost. At the 
Y. M. C. A. building, which is near, similar opportunities 
are afforded. 



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I90 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1901-I902 

APPENDIX- 



CLASS EXAMINATIONS, t90U 

HISTOLOGY. 

1. Stain, mount, identify, draw and describe fully the specimens 
A, B, C, D. [A was lymph gland; B, cerebellum; C, large intestine; 
D, ovary]. 

2. Identify the stained and mounted specimens i to 7. [These 
were: i, bone; 2, cardiac end of stomach; 3, thyroid; 4, mucous 
salivary gland; 5, transverse section of nerve; 6, cerebrum; 7, cornea]. 

CHEMISTRY. 

1. What is Chemistry ? Name fifteen of the elements and give the 
atomic weight and quantivalence of each. 

2. Give a general description of the manufacture of sulphuric acid; 
and how much acid can be obtained from one ton of gelma, which 
assays 98% Pf. S 

3. Give the general analytical separation of the metals and the 
members belonging to each group. 

4. How would you proceed in a case of arsenical poisoning ? 

5. What are some of the more important acids of phosphorus, 
giving the formula and molecular weight of each ? 

6. What two classes of mercury salts are there and describe some 
of the most important salts of each ? 

7. A volume of oxygen measures 1200 C. C. at 4° C. and at a higher 
temperature the volume was observed to be 1460 C. C, what was its 
final temperature ? 

8. Wliat are some of the most important salts of sodium; give 
formulas, molecular weights and methods of preparation of each ? 

9. What elements constitute the Halogen Group? Describe each 
of them. 

10. What are acids, bases and salts, and how much oxygen, by 
volume, measured at 20° C. and 720 m. m. pressure, can be obtained 
from 30 grains of potassium chlorate ? 

The examination in the Laboratory consisted in the analysis of 
three solutions, containing not less than four unknowns each. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

I. What is Organic Chemistry, and into what general groups are 
the organic compounds divided ? Give illustrations of each. 



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I9OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 191 

2. A certain organic compound was analyzed and analysis gave 
results as follows: €=61.32%; 11=5.09%; 0=23.37%; N=i0 22%. 

The V. D.=68.5. 

3. What grouping of elements represent the following list of com- 
pounds, and give illustrations of each: Hydrocarbons, ethers, esters, 
ketones, aldehydides, acids, bases; primary, secondares £ind tertiary 
alcohols; phenoles, hydrazones, azo, diazo, and amides. 

4. What is fermentation and how does it differ from putrefaction ? 

5. What are the Carbohydrates ? Give the general classification 
and examples of each group. 

6. What are fats, and describe the process of saponification and 
the products formed ? ' 

7. Give a list of the di-and triatomic phenoles. 

8. What is benzoic aldehyde and how can it be converted into the 
corresponding acid and alcohol ? Give the formula of each. 

9. How can benzole be obtained from carbon ? Show the various 
chemical processes. 

10. What are some of the ptomaines belonging to the paraffine 
series, giving their formulas ? What are some of the groups of color 
bases derived from the phenoles ? 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

1. Into what groups were the micro-organisms studied in this 
course divided ? Name a member of each group. 

2. Classify bacteria morphologically. Where are they found in 
nature and what are their functions ? 

3. Name the bacteria that most commonly cause inflammation. 

4. Describe the morphological and cultural characters of B. typhos us, 
and name the points in the affirmative diagnosis between it and B. coli- 
communis. 

5. Describe morphological and cultural characters of (a) Pyocy- 
aneus; (d) B. prodigiosis. 

6. Describe the morphological and cultural characters of Sp. 
chaloial and state the difference between it and Sp. melschordovi. 

7. Name all the bacteria you studied which (a ) were morphological ; 
(d) stained by Grams, and {c) liquified gellatine. 

8. Describe ardium albicans. 

ANATOMY, 
Examinations in anatomy are oral. 



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192 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

PHARMACY. 

1 . Name the difTeretit vessels used for measuring fluids, and state 
the advantages of each. 

2. Express in the metric system: 2 pints; 6 J troy; 12 minims. 

3. How can you hasten (a) solution? (d) evaporation? 

4. Define: (a) Gum; (d) Gum-Resin; (c) Resin; (d) Alkaloid; 
(e) Glucoside; (/) Cellulose; (^) Fatty oil; (A) Essential oil; (/) Ele- 
optene; (k) Starch. 

5. (a) What is an ointment? (d) What substances may be used as 
the base ? (c) What are the advantages of each ? 

6. Define: {a) Pilula; (d) Pulvis; (c) mucilago; (d) Extractum 
fiuidum; {e) Mistura. 

MATERIA MEDICA. 

1 . Define Materia Medica; Pharmacy; Pharmacology; Therapeutics. 

2. Define a medicine; a remedy; a poison. 

3. By and through what avenues can medicines enter the body? 

4. What conditions may modify the action of medicines ? 

5. Define an astringent; a cathartic; an emetic; a diaphoretic; an 
emenogogue; a diuretic; a tonic; a stimulant. 

6. Opium: (a) describe; {d) its source; (c) its active principles; 
[d ) preparations; (e) dose of each; {/) action; (g-) use. 

7. Describe tannic acid; boric acid; hydrochloric acid; hydrocyanic 
acid; properties and dose of each. 

8. Aconite: (a) active principles; (d) preparations and dose of 
each; (c) action and use. 

9. Same of Belladonna. 
10. Same of Cinchona. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 
(written examination). 

I . Enumerate the factors concerned in maintaining the blood-flow 
in the veins. What are the characteristics of the circidation in the 
arteries, capillaries and veins respectively ? State clearly the reasons 
for these characteristics. 

2.- What gases can be extracted from blood? By what methods 
can the>' be extracted and in what amounts ? How are the gases dis- 
tributed in the blood? In what chemical or physical condition do 
they exist in it ? 



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I9OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 93 

3. Give as full account as you can of intestinal digestion. Are 
bacteria essentials for this part of digestion ? Give reasons for your 
answer. 

4. What is meant by the '* circulation of the bile?" Where is iron 
found in the body ? What is its source ? and its fate ? What evidence 
is there that bile-pigment is derived from blood-pigment ? 

5. State fully the effects of removal of (a) the pancreas; (d) the 
thyroid; (c) the spleen; (d) the salivary glands. What are the effects 
of intra-venous injection of extracts of the supra-renal gland ? 

6. Describe fully the histological and physiological effects of hemi- 
section of the spinal cord in the mid-dorsal region. 

7. What evidence is there that the Rolandic area has sensory 
functions ? 

8. What is (a) irregular; (d) regular astigmatism? To what are 
they due ? 

PHYSIOIX>GY. 
(practical examination). 
Two of the following experiments were assigned to each student 
after entering the examination room. The candidate is supplied only 
with such apparatus or reagents as he may ask for. 

1. Prepare and demonstrate haemoglobin crystals. 

2. Prepare and demonstrate haemin crystals. 

3 Estimate the quantity of urea in the specimens of urine A and B. 

4. Prepare glycogen, and demonstrate same. 

5. Determine what ferments, if any, are present in solutions A and B. 
[A was saliva; B, gastric juice]. 

6. Determine the amount of any pathological substance in the 
specimen of urine furnished. [Contained glucose 3^]. 

7. Take tracing to show effect of stimulation of frog's vagus on 
the heart. 

8. Take tracing to show the composition of tetanus. 

9. Insert a gastric canula, and obtain pure gastric juice, from 
the animal provided. 

10. Demonstrate, by stimulation of a nerve, pupillary dilatation. 

11. Demonstrate the effects of stimulation of the cortical motor 
areas in the mammal provided. 

12. Take tracing to show increase of respiration upon stimulation 
of some nerve. 



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194 'l^HE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

PATHOLOGICAL HISTOLOGY. 
The examination in pathological histology consisted in the thorough 
description and interpretation of three unknown sections. 

GROSS PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY. 
The examination in this branch is oral. 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY. 
An oral examination. The questions included the following sub- 
jects: The general principles of pathology, the etiology of infectious 
and non-infectious diseases, the portals of entrance of micro-organisms 
into the body, the bacterial flora of the body, the bacteria of wound 
infection, immunity, antitoxins, the etiology and pathological anatomy 
of typhoid fever, tuberculosis, diphtheria, sj-philis, pneumonia, 
arterio-sclerosis, the pathology of the circulation," etc. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

1 . How do antipyretics control temperature and illustrate each class . 

2. Alcohol: (a) its changes, if any, in the body; (d) destiny; {c) its 
influence on digestion; (d) circulation; (e) blood; (/) tissue change; 
(^) indications for use. 

3. Opium: {a) describe; (d) active principles; (c) preparations; 
id) dose of each; {e) action; (/) synergists as anodynes {^) as anti- 
phlogistic; (A) as hypnotic. 

4. Symptoms and treatment of opimn poisoning. 

5. Digitalis: (a) how and why is it a heart tonic; (^) a diuretic; 
(c) indications for use and preparations to be used in each case and why? 

6. Quinine: Illustrate its use; (a) as tonic; (d) as antiperiodic; 
(c) as antipyretic; {d) as oxytocic. 

7. Anaesthesia: {a) local; {b) general; [c) means and methods of 
producing; (d) sources of danger. 

8. Belladonna (a) active principles; (d) preparations and dose of 
each; {c) action; (d) indications for use; {e) symptoms and treatment 
of poisoning. 

9. Ergot: (a) action; (^) indications and contraindications for use 
in obstetrics. 

10. Outline the treatment of pneumonia. 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 195 

PHARMACOLOGY. 

(WRXTTBXff). 

1. Write a prescription for a diuretic mixture containing: (a) a 
drug stimulating the renal cells; (d) one acting as a salt or alkali; 
(/:) as an organic irritant; (^) as a cardiac tonic; (e) flavor, vehicle, etc. 
Write the names without abbreviations, and give the quantities in 
both metric and apothecaries' systems. 

2. Describe the different ways in which antipyretics may act, and 
the ways of differentiating between these. Give examples. 

3. Discuss the theoretical basis of the action of potassium iodide. 

4. Name one or more drugs which may be employed to secure: 
{a) stimulation of the arterial muscle; (d) paralysis of arterial muscle; 
(c) paralysis of vagus ganglia; (d) stimulation of vagus center; 
(e) stimulation of cerebral cortex. 

5. Name six of the most important emetics, stating dose for adults 
(metric system). 

6. Discuss fully the pharmacology, symptoms, antidote, and thera- 
peutics of one of the following drugs: Aconite, Acids, Mercury. 

PHARMACOLOGY. 
(practical examination). 

Each student performed a chemical experiment, and one on a frog 
and a mammal. 

*Chkmistry: Determine by chemical tests whether solutions R, S, 
T, contain strychnine, codeine, or morphine; U, quinine, veratrine, 
or atropine; V, a formate, oxalate, or cyanide; W, an alkaloid. 

Demonstrate the effect of the solutions X, Y, and Z on the ferment 
action of saliva. 

Frog: Inject i% of solution G into a frog; describe the symptoms 
and diagnose the poison. Determine by physiological tests whether 
solution I or K contain cocaine. Demonstrate the effects of solution 
L on maximal load lifted by frog's muscle. Demonstrate effects of 
solution M upon excitability of muscle and nerve; does it possess a 
curare action ? Demonstrate and describe the effects of solutions N, 
O, P, or Q, applied to the frog's heart in situ; to what group does the 
poison belong ? 

Mammals : ( a ) Insertion of tracheal and carotid canulae. ( d ) Anaes- 
thetic. Insertion of canulae into ureter. Intravenous injection of nor- 
mal saline on flow of urine, (c) Preparation of manometer for tracing. 
Insertion of vein canulae. Effect solution A on flow of urine, {d) Ap- 



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196 THE MEDICAI. COLI^GE. [1901-1902 

paratus for respiratory tracing— effect of solution A. {e) Blood pres- 
sure tracing with solution A. Insertion of femoral canulae. (/) Solu- 
tion A on venous pressure. Apparatus for pressure injection. (^) Solu- 
tion B on blood pressure tracing. Apparatus for cardiomyogram. 
(A) Respiratory tracing with solution B. Pressiu^ tracing with 
solution C. 

[A=Caffeine; B and G=Strychnine; C=Nitroglycerine; I=Cocaine; 
L=Caffeine i-iooo; M=Quinine i-ioooo; N=Aconite 1-25; 0=Digi- 
talis 1-25; P=Veratrine 1-200; Q=sBaCls i-ioo; R=Strychnine 1-500; 
S=Morphine i-ioo; T=Codeine i-ioo; U= Atropine i-ioo; V=HCN 
i-iooo; W=Quinine i-ioooo; X=Carbolic 5%; Y=Alcohol 10%; 
Z=HgCl20.2%]. 

DERMATOIX>GY. 

1. Give symptoms of, and treatment of impetigo. 

2. Mention the main points of distinction between lupus vulgaris 
and a tubercular syphilide. 

3. What is acne ? Give chief distinguishing features and the treat- 
ment of acne simplex. 

4. Herpes zoster, its symptoms, etiology, course and treatment. 

5. Discuss the treatment of syphilis; (a) During the first year of 
the disease; (d) After the disease has existed many years and is accom- 
panied by deep ulceration and loss of structure. 

NOSE, THROAT, AND EAR. • 

1. Discuss the physiology of the nose. 

2. Discuss epistaxis. 

3. Discuss otitis media acuta. 

1. Describe tuberculosis of larynx. 

2. Describe symptoms and treatment of acute folecular tonsillitis. 

3. Give treatment and symptoms of chronic pharyngitis. 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 
Examination in physical diagnosis is oral and clinical. 

GENITO-URINARY DISEASES. 

1. Give the etiology of gonorrhea and the treatment you would 
employ during the acute stage. 

2. What is paraphimosis, and when would you consider it neces- 
sary to relieve the condition ? How would you proceed to do this ? 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 197 

3. Give the principal causes, and the treatment of epididymitis. 

4. What treatment would you adopt in acute cystitis ? 

5. Give the etiology of organic urethral stricture. 

SURGICAI. PATHOXX>GY. 

1. Name (a) six bacteria common to surgery; (b) their origin and 
usual mode of infection and clinical manifestation. 

2. Define (a) fever; (d) name and define the grades of surgical fever. 

3. What is the difference between simple and infective inflamma- 
tion ? Outline proce«»s of repair. 

4. Name chief points of differential diagnosis of tubercular lesions 
of skin and mucous membranes with reference to non-tubercular 
lesions. 

5. What is (a) a benign tumor; (^) a malignant tumor; (c) define 
sarcoma, carcinoma. Give 1 two clinical examples of each with 
diagnosis. 

MEDICINE. 

DR. I«OWMAN. 

1. Jaundice: {a) Definition; {d) Symptoms; (c) Distinction be- 
tween obstructive and toxic jaundice; (d) What is grave jaundice ? 
(^) Causes of obstructive jaundice ? (/) Test for bile in the urine and 
blood. 

2. Typhoid Fever: {a) What is the diagnostic value of the serum 
reaction? (d) What is the diagnostic value of the diazo reaction? 
(c) Describe the method of making the above tests; (d) What is the 
value in diagnosis of iliac tenderness, chills, hemorrhage, white 
blood count, temperature? {e) What is the peculiar behavior of the 
tongue, abdomen, bowels, liver, pulse, skin, spleen in typhoid fever? 
(/) State immediate causes of death in typhoid fever. 

3. Pneumo-pyo-thorax: {a) Differential diagnosis; (d) Causes; 

(c) Treatment. 

4. Mitral Stenosis: (a) What is the form of the heart as outlined 
by percussion in M.-S. ? {b) What murmur is present and how is it 
caused? (c) What is the behavior of the heart as to rhythm and force ? 

(d) What are some of the remote systemic effects ? 

5. Rheumatism: {a) Name different forms; [b) Describe the 
course of acute articular rheimiatism; {c) What are the chief dangers 
and complications ? {d) Treatment in full ? 



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IQS the MEDICAt COI.LBGE. L1901-1902 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

1. Given the hand of a dead body, how can we determine the 
height of the body to which it belongs ? 

2. What is the most important sign of death by suffocation ? 

3. By what signs can we determine the probable length of time 
which has elapsed since death occurred ? 

4. How can we distinguish between wounds inflicted anti- and 
postmortem ? 

5. What important point is of value in distinguishing between 
postmortem decomposition, and lesions produced by poisons? 

6. What conditions retard putrefaction ? 

7. Describe in general the gross appearances of a body putrefying 
in air, soil, and water? 

8. What are the signs of death by drowning ? 

9. What is the most reliable test for a suspected blood stain, and 
upon what does it depend ? 

10. Of what value is the detection of red blood corpuscles in a sus- 
pected slain ? 

11. How soon after death does cadaveric rigidity set in, and how 
long does it last ? 

12. Is it always possible to determine the exact moment of death 
in a medico-legal "sense ? 

SURGERY. 

DR. ALLEN. 

1. Carcinoma Mammae: {a) Diagnosis; {d) Treatment; (c) Method 
of operation; {d) Prognosis. 

2. Hernia: (a) Name varieties; (d) Diagnosis of inguinal hernia; 
(c) Treatment of inguinal hernia; {d) Describe two operations. 

3. Fistula in ano: (a) Causes of same; {d) Treatment and care. 

4. What may cause collections of fluid in pleural cavity ? Name 
the same and by what methods these may be treated. 

5. What may cause oedema of a single lower extremity ? 

6. Tuberculosis: (a) Name the various manifestations of tuber- 
culosis which may require surgical treatment; {d) diagnosis of tuber- 
culosis of the dorsal or lumbar vertebrae; {c) Symptoms and treat- 
ment of same. 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 199 

DR. BUNTS. 

1. (a) Name the principal pus producing micro-organisms; (d) 
What are the essentials for their growth? {c) Give examples of mixed 
infection. 

2. Describe minute changes taking place in formation of an abscess. 

3. (a) What are the indications for treatment of inflammation? 
(d) What are the terminations of inflammation? {c) What are the 
causes of swelling ? 

4. {a ) Define gangrene; {b) What determines whether the gangrene 
shall be dry or moist gangrene ? (c) Cause, prognosis, treatment of 
senile gangrene; (d} What it cancrum oris ? 

5. (fl) Define septic intoxication; id) Septic infection; (c) Pyemia; 
(d) What are the causes of post-operative fevers ? 

6. Erysipelas: Diagnosis, cause, treatment, prognosis. Tetanus: 
Diagnosis, cause, treatment, prognosis. 

7. Aneurysm: Define, active clot, passive clot, Hunterian method 
and advantage. 

8. Lymphangitis: Etiology, treatment. Phlebitis: Diagnosis 
and treatment. 

9. Fractures: Symptoms, indications for treatment. Causes and 
treatment of delayed union of femur. 

10. Describe one of the following operations: i. Thoracoplasty. 
2. Amputation of hip joint. 3. Removal of infraorbital nerve. 4. In- 
testinal anastomosis. 

DR. CRILK. 

1. Give non-operative treatment of appendicitis. 

2. Define shock and give treatment. . 

3. Define collapse and give causes. 

4. Cause, diagnosis and treatment of tubercular glands of neck. 

5. Treatment of hernia in children. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

1. Name the structures of the eye-ball from behind forward, in 
their order. Which are the most important ? 

2. Give the varieties of conjunctivitis. State the causes, pathology, 
course and treatment of acute, purulent ophthalmia. 

3. Give the symptoms of paralysis of the third nerve.. 



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200 THE MEDICAX COIXBGB. [1901-1902 

4. Give the differential diagnosis of sympathetic irritation and 
inflammation. State the causes and treatment for sympathetic 
inflammation. 

5. Give the differential diagnosis between acute conjunctivitis, 
acute iritis, and acute glaucoma. Give the treatment for acute 
glaucoma. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

1. Symptoms and diagnosis of tubercular peritonitis. 

2. Causes and symptoms of post-laryngeal adenitis and abscess. 

3. Diet-list for a child at 18 months; at 2^ years. 

4. Conditions in which broncho-pneumonia is apt to arise; symp- 
toms and diagnosis. 

5. Treatment of scarlet fever with detail of isolation and disin- 
fection. 

GYNECOLOGY. 
DR. ROBB. 

1. What is the normal position of the uterus and to what extent 
may its position vary within physiological limits ? 

2. What are* the different forms of endometritis? Discuss the 
causes, symptoms and treatment. 

3. Define prolapsus of the uterus, and describe its symptoms and 
treatment. 

4. What is meant by retroflexion and retroversion of the uterus ? 
Give etiology, symptoms and treatment. 

5. How and under what circumstances would you apply a pessary*? 
Enumerate the different pessaries in common use. 

6. Mention the varieties of vaginitis, and their treatment. 

7. State the chief etiological factors which may be responsible in a 
case of pyosal pinx. 

8. Describe in detail the nature and symptoms of extra-uterine 
pregnancy. 

9. How would you treat a case of ruptured tubal pregnancy ? 

10. What are the symptoms and physical signs of malignant disease 

of the uterus and of the cervix ? What treatment would you Advise ? 

How is the condition to be differentiated from myoma of the uterus ? 

The examinations are partly oral and partly written. The method 

is to divide the ground covered during the year into say one hundred 



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I90I-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 20I 

questions and then to divide the class up into ten sections and to give 
two or three men the same set of questions and in this way very few 
men in the class get the same set of questions. 

DR. HUMISirON. 

1. What are the causes of dysmenorrhoea ? 

2. What are the indications for curettement? 

3. What are the clinical evidences of carcinoma of cervix uteri and 
how would you differentiate between a simple erosion and beginning 
carcinoma of the cervix ? 

4. What is the normal position of the uterus, and by what means 
would you diagnose a retroflexion of the uterus ? 

5. Give the treatment for an acute gonorrhoea! vaginitis. 

6. Give the clinical signs (objective and subjective) of ruptured 
tubal pregnancy. 

7. How would you differentiate retroflexion of the uterus from a 
fibroid in the posterior wall of that organ ? 

8. What is a pyo-salpinx and what are its etiologic factors ? 

9. Name the cystic formations fotmd in the ovary. 

10. Give the differentiation between a uterine fibroid and an 
ovarian cyst. 

OBSTETRICS. 

1. Give the diameter of the foetal skull. 

2. Give the foetal circulation. 

3. Give the treatment of abortion, (a) When threatened ;(^) When 
inevitable. 

4. Describe the usual mechanism observed in the third position of 
the head. 

5. Having determined a breech presentation, how would you man- 
age the case? 

6. Having determined a face presentation above the brim, give 
treatment in (a) mento-anterior position; {b) in mento-posterior 
position. 

7. Give causes, prognosis and treatment of prolapse of the umbil- 
ical cord. 

8. Give the cause and treatment of post-partum hemorrhage. 

9. Give the symptoms of extra-uterine gestation. 



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202 THE MBDICAI^ COI^LKGB. [1901-1902 

NKUROI.OGY. 

1. What are the causes of brachial monoplegia ? 

2. Give the symptoms caused by a tumor on the left side of the 
pons Varolii. 

3. Differentiate hysteric from epileptic convulsions. 

4. What is the treatment of hemiplegia ? 

5. How are the reflexes used in diagnosis ? 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. 

1. A knowledge of what facts, in respect to any communicable dis- 
ease, is essential to efficient action for the prevention of such disease ? 

2. How long should isolation be maintained for cases of (a) small 
pox; {d) scarlet fever; (c) diphtheiia ? 

3. How can infection through the skin and mucous surfaces best 
be prevented ? 

4. In what manner may inhalation of dust predispose to infection 
through the lungs ? 

5. Give three substances which may be effectively used as vapor, 
and three solutions which may be used as spray, for the disinfection 
of rooms and clothing. 



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THE FRANKLIN T^ BACKUS 
LAW SCHCX)L. 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT. 



VIE Franklin T. Backus Law School of Western Reserve 
University was founded in the year 1 892 . Its first class 
entered the school in September of that year. During the 
first two years it was located in rented quarters at the 
comer of Euclid Avenue and Adelbert Street. In the fall 
of 1894 the school was removed to temporary quarters in 
Adelbert Hall, where it remained for two years. In 1896 
the stone building now occupied by the school was erected. 
It contains, in addition to large halls, four rooms of equal 
size, twenty-five by forty feet, inside measurement. One of 
these rooms is fitted up for a library and reading room, and 
the other three are used for recitation work. Each recita- 
tion room is furnished with individual tables so constructed 
as to enable the students to take notes with as little incon- 
venience as possible. The basement is furnished with 
toilet, locker and smoking rooms. Each student is furn- 
ished a locker for the keeping of his coat, books, etc. The 
building is so constructed as to allow the erection of a large 
addition whenever the needs of the school shall require it. 

In 1892 the library numbered about five hundred volumes. 
Today it numbers thirteen thousand volumes and with one 
possible exception is the largest law school library west of 
Ithaca. There are but four or five better law school 
libraries in the entire country. 

In 1892 nine lectures a week were given ; now there are 
given fifty-four lectures a week, and the number of the 
members of the faculty has grown from five to seventeen. 



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204 THK SCHOOI. OF I.AW. [19OI-I902 

When the school was first opened candidates for a degree 
were required to have but little more than a common school 
education. Nearly all the law schools in the country, in- 
cluding some of the oldest and most prominent, demanded 
no more. Beginning with the year 1900 the requirements 
for candidates for a degree were raised so that they must now 
be, at least, qualified to enter college. 

The enrollment of students has grown from twenty in our 
first year to one hundred in the present year. 

In 1893 Mrs. Franklin T. Backus of Cleveland, Ohio, 
provided an endowment for the school and the name of the 
school was then changed from the 'Xaw School of Western 
Reserve University*' to the ** Franklin T. Backus Law 
School of Western Reserve University' * in honor of a man 
who, during his life, was one of the leaders of the Ohio bar 
and who always took the deepest interest in all matters 
pertaining to legal education. 



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FACULTY. 



Chari,es F. Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bell flower Av. 

Presifient. 
Chari^bs Eli^iott Pbnnbwbix, 1254 Willson Av. 

Pro/essof of the Law of Real Property. 

Evan Hbnry Hopkins, A. B., LL. B., 84 Miles Av. 

Professor of the Law of Contracts and Equity furtsdiction^ 

Dean of the Faculty. 

Hbnry Ci,ay White, A. M., 344 Harkness Av. 

Professor of the Law of Wills and Estates. 
HoMBR HosBA Johnson, A. M., LL. B., Overlook Road. 

Professor of Constitutional Law. 
Ai^BXANDBR Hadden, A. B., 1670 Lexington Av. 

Professor of the Law oj Crimes^ Criminal Procedure^ and Damages. 
Arthur Aoblbbrt Stearns, A. M., 87 Oakdale St. 

Professor of the Law of Suretyship and Mortgage. 
Roger Mii,i,BR Lee, LL. 6., 115 Ingleside Av 

Professor of the Law of Shipping and Admiralty. 
Jambs I^awrence, A. B., 709 Genesee Av. 

/Professor of the Law of Public and Private Corporations. 
AI.FRBD C. Carpenter, A. M., LL. B., 125 Stieator Av. 

Professor of the Law of Contracts. 
Paux, Howi^and, a. M., LL. B., 11 Granger St. 

Professor of the Law of Pleading and Practice, and Partnership. 
Henry Bardwell Chapman, A. B., LL. B., East Cleveland. 

Professor of the Law of Agency and Bills and Notes. 
Francis Rufus Hbrrick, A. B., 449 Russell Av. 

Professor of the Law of Torts. 
TvjLWi Beverly Williams, A. M., LL. B., iii Crawford Road. 

Professor of the Law of Evidence , Trusts, and Personal Property. 
Frbdbrick William Grben, LL. B., Rice Av., New burgh. 

Lecturer on Sales. 

Harry J. Crawford, A. B., LL. B., 3 Republic Place. 

Lecturer on Common Carriers 

David Gaul Jaeger, A. B., LL. B., 113 Brookfield St. 

Instructor in Charge of Review Work Preparatory to 

Ohio Bar Examinations. 

Frances L. Trowbridge, 84 Miles Av. 

Librarian. 



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206 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 



[190I-1902 



STUDENTS* 



THIRD 


YEAR CLASS. 




Max Emerson Brunswick, 


Youngstown 


1195 Case Av. 


Fred Samuel Chamberlain, 


Cleveland 


1267 Slater Av. 


John Aldrich Chamberlain, 


La Grange 


126 Murray Hill Av. 


A. B., Dennison Univenity, lb89. 




Sigmund J. Deutsch, 


Cleveland 


37 Walker St. 


A. B.. Adelbert, 1899. 






Edward John Hobday, 


Cleveland 


182 Ontario St. 


A. B., Adelbcrt, 1899. 






Horatio Clark Gould, 


Matloon, III. 


28 Mayfield St. 


Ph. B., Oberlin, 1898; Hansard University, 1808-99. 




Earl Hibbard Ja3mes, 


Des Moines, la, 7 Adelbert Hall. 


A. B., Adelbcrt. 1899. 






Walter Scott McAaron, 


Cleveland 


483 Cedar Av. 


James Edward Mathews, 


Cleveland 


106 Alabama St. 


Walter Edward Myers, 


Alliance 


126 Murray Hill A v. 


B. S., Mt. Union. 1899. 






Charles Fitch Ohl, 


Warren 


18 Adelbert Hall. 


B. S., 0. N. u., 1896. 






Lancelot Packer, 


Cleveland 


1066 Prospect St. 


Niles Abraham Sponseller, 


Canton 


18 Adelbert Hall. 


Mark Lawrence Thomsen, 


Cleveland 


502 Garfield Bldg. 


A. B , Oberlin. 1898. 






William Paul Trinter, 


Cleveland 


1 24 1 Willson Av. 


Julian Woodworth Tyler, 


Cleveland 


21 Morse Av. 


A. B., Adelbert, 1899. 






Harvey J. Webster, 


Brooklyn 


2378 Pearl St. 
Third Year, 17. 


SECOND 


YEAR CLASS. 




Walter S. Adams, 


Cleveland 


3714 Euclid A v. 


A. B., Adelbert, 1900; Harvard University, 1900-01. 




William T. Arnos, 


Defiance 


22 Adelbert Hall. 


A. B., Tri-State Normal, 1899. 






William Hugus Chapman, 


Cleveland 


II SackettSt. 



Adelbert, 1897-1898. 



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I901-1902] WBSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



207 



Eli Edwin Doster, 

Denniaon. 18W-1900. 

Harry Tracy Duncan, 

Ph. B , Adelbert, 1901. 

Benedict Leonidas Elder, 

A. M., spencer Institute. 

Earl Washington Parwell, 



Cleveland 
Danville^ Va. 

Cleveland 

Akron 

PortstnoiUh 

Cleveland 
Cleveland 

Salevi, 



A. B. Princeton, 1900; Harvard University, 1900-1901. 

Andrew James Haggerty, Cleveland 

Adelbert, 1909-1900. 

Edgar A. Hahn, 

Lewis Edwin Harvie, Jr., 

Danville Military Institute. 

Samuel Edmund Kramer, 
Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

William John Laub, 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

Joseph Timmons Micklethwait 
Ohio University, 1897-1900. 

John Allen Neiding, 

George Albert Palda, 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

Irving Holland Randolph, 

B. S., North-Eastem Ohio Normal, 1898. 

Norman Rushton, 

Ohio state University, 1808-1900. 

Raymond Terry Sawyer, 

A. B., Kenyon, 1900. 

Bmest Schwartz, 

Bartlett Carlton Shepherd, 
Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

Lewis D. Slusser, 

B. S., Mt. Union. 1896; Harvard University, 1900-1901 

Vernon Leland Stanford, Ravenna 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

Liberty Bernard Ware, Clez'eland 

David Ross Wamock, IJrbana 

Urbana University, 1889. 
Benjamin Breckenridge Wickham, Norwalk 

A. B., Adelbert, 1896. 



Cleveland iiy Murray Hill Av. 
Cleveland 78 Fifth Av. 

Taylorsville, fCy, 600 Lake St. 

Millersburg 820 Fairmount St. 



241 Hodge Av. 

633 Scovill Av. 
24 Adelbert Hall. 

34 Van Buren St. 

874 Fairmount St 

21 Adelbert Hall. 

186 Taylor St. 
1655 Broadway. 

24 Adelbert Hall. 



Selkirk, Canada 22 Adelbert Hall. 
54 Streator Av. 



Cleveland 

Cleveland 
Painesville 

Akron 



25 McKinstry St. 
21 Adelbert Hall. 

I Arey St. 

55 Euclid Av. 

1430 Detroit St. 
2097 Euclid Av. 



University School. 
Second Year, 25. 



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208 



THE SCHOOL OP LAW. 



FIRST YBAR CLASS. 



H. 



Ross Ake, 
Mt. Union, 



Mapleton 
Cleveland 



Cleveland 



Cleveland 

Marion 

Cleveland 

Renrock 



Max L. Bernsteen, 

Adelbert. 1899-01. 

Charles McN. Camngton, 

Clinton L. Case, Greensburg 

B. S., New South Lyme Institute, 1901. 

Allen S. Davis, Columbus 

B. S., Dennison University, 1900. 

Fred Desberg, 

Amos J. Eibling, 

Benjamin Feniger, 

University of Chicago, 1900-01. 

David Edward Green, 

B. S., Dennison University, 1901. 

Ben Haber, Cleveland 

B. Lm Adelbert, 1901. 
Ernest True Hall, 

Theodore Hall, Jr., Ashtabula 

A. B., Adelbert. 1901. 

Hugh Edmund Hawthorne, Cambridge 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 
Morris W. Kastriner, Cleveland 

A. B.. Adelbert. 1901. 
Joseph H. Kitchen, Cleveland 

A B., Yale, 1899. 

William Kurzenberger, Cleveland 

Harris Ray Loomis, Randolph 



[1901-1902 

461 Wade Park Av. 

67 Fifth Av. 

25 Vestry St. 
49 Fairchild St. 

131 Murray Hill Av. 

1050 Central Av. 
228 Payne Av. 
512 Orange St. 

131 Murray Hill Av. 

8 Lewiston St. 



B. S , Ohio Normal University, 1900. 
Henry Lustig, Cleveland 

Eugene C. Mathivet, Cleveland 

Adelbert, 1900-01. 
Walter Charles McClure, Woostef 

A. B., Wooster University, 1901. 

William Philpot Morris, Cleveland 

W. Clarence Mumaw, Welshfield 

Mt. Union, 1899-01; Hiram. 1898-99. 

Adrian G. Newcomb, Berea 

Baldwin- Wallace, 1807-1900. 



Cleveland 3218 Detroit St., Lake wood. 
40 Knox St. 

147 Cornell St. 

731 Scovill Ave. 

858 Euclid Ave. 

72 Noyes St. 
7 York St. 

2773 Broadway. 
380 Woodland Av. 

838 Doan St. 

2179 Euclid Ay. 
19 Adelbert Hall. 

19 Adelbert Hall. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



209 



Carl Frederick Orth, 
Oberlin. 1809-I900. 


IVauseon 


139 Cornell St 


John H. Price, 

A. B.. Mt. Union, 1900. 


Cleveland 


Eldred Hall 


Charies Scott Rose, 


Mt, Blanchard 


17 Adelbert Hall 


Harrington Simpson, 


Akron 


38 Quebec St 


Edward P. Strong, 

St. Iisnatias, 1886^. 


Cleveland 


486 Lake St 


Walter Herbert W^arren, 

Wooster University, 1887-1900 


Wooster 


838 Doan St 




First Year, 29. 


SPKCIAI. STUDENTS. 




John Alvin Album. 
Adelbert. 


Youngstown 


Eldred Hall 


Harold Leroy Beard, 

Thiel College, 1894-97; U^ B., 


Youngstowfi 
0. N. U.. 1900. 


117 Adelbert St 


Grant Bennett, 

A. B.. 0. N. u.. 1887. 


Cleveland 


987 Doan St. 


Thomas Bennett Bolton, 


Cleveland 


28 E. Prospect St. 


Arthur E. Bowdler, 


East Liverpool 


135 Adelbert St. 


James W. Bowes, 


Sharon Center 


117 Adelbert St 


John J. Boyle, 


Hubbard • 


49 Fairchild St 


George S. Cole 

tx,. B., 0. N. U., 1901. 


Bloom Center 


117 Adelbert St. 


John Logan Findlay, 


Cleveland 


151 Cornell St. 


Robert Thompson Gage, 
Adelbert. 


Cleveland 


788 Republic St. 


Frederick Charles Gillette, Cleveland 988 K. Madison Av. 
A. B.. Adelbert. 1897; University of Michigan, 1897-96; 
1,1,. B.. W. R. U. Law School, 1901. 


Walter Granger, 

Volant College, 1899-1900. 


Cleveland 


893 St. Clair St. 


John H. Hogg, 


Cleveland 


2638 St. Clair St. 


Frederick F. Hunt, 


St, Thomas, Ont, 


49 Fairchild St. 


Otho W. Kennedy, 
0. N. U., 1899. 


New Winchester 


49 Fairchild St. 


T. Mervin Kennedy, 

0. N. U., 1894-98. 


New Winchester 


49 Fairchild St. 


Manuel Levine, 


Cleveland 


66 Croton St. 



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2IO THE SCHOOI. OF LAW. [1901-1902 

Willard Lonzo Long, Clay Center^ Kan, 45 Knox St. 

A. B., Obcrlin, 1899. 

James Milton McCleary, Cleveland 728 Union St. 

James V. Murphy, East Palestine 20 Adelbert Hall. 

Harry T. Nolan, Painesville 45 Fairchild St. 

Herman Joel Nord, Giddings Adelbert Hall. 
Adelbert. 

Jerome Aloysious Ryan, Cleveland 795 Doan St. 

Niagara University, 1896-97. 

Ward Cleland Sager, Bryan 22 Adelbert Hall. 

A. B., Hiram, 1900; O. S. U., 1900-01. 

Joseph Frank Sawicki, Cleveland 346 Fleet St. 

St. Ignatius College, 1896-1900. 

John C. Shea, Dayton 74 Calvert St. 

Notre Dame University, 1892-96. 

Jacob Henry Slike, Mt, Blanchard 18 Adelbert Hall. 

Frank A. Stetson, Oberlin 117 Murray Hill Av. 

A. B., Oberlin, 1900. 

Lewis Blair Williams, Cleveland 64 Glen Park Place, 

Adelbert. 

Special Students, 29. 

SUMMARY. 

Third Year 17 

Second Year 25 

First Year 29 

Special Students 29 

Total 100 



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t 



19OI-I902] WESTERN RESBRVB UNIVERSITY. 211 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Each person entering the school, whether a candidate for 
a degree or not, must present a certificate of good moral 
character. 

Candidates for the degree of LL. B. entering the school 
must either be college graduates or matriculates, or graduates 
of high schools of approved standing or must pass the entrance 
examinations given by colleges of approved standing. 

Persons not candidates for a degree may be admitted to 
the school as special students at any time without examina- 
tion, and may pursue such studies as they may elect, under 
the advice of the Faculty. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION. 

First Year. 
Contracts. Lectures and LangdeIVs Cases, embracing the topics of 
mutual assent, consideration, and conditional contracts. Two hours 
each week throughout the year. Professor Hopkins. 

Common Law Pleading. Lectures and Ames's Cases on Pleading, 
embracing demurrers, pleas by way of confession and avoidance, pleas 
by way of traverse, duplicity, departure, new assignment, and motions 
based on pleadings. Two hours each week during last half-\'ear. 
Professor How land. 

Criminal Law. Lectures and Clark and Marshall's Criminal Law. 
Two hours each week. Professor Hadden. 

Personal Property. Lectures and Vol. I, Gray's Cases on Prop- 
erty, embracing distinction between real and personal property, nature 
and acquisition of rights, suits for the recovery of personal property, 
acquisition of rights not under former owner, transfer of rights and 
possession. Two hoiu^ each week. Professor Williams. 

Real Property. Lectures and Tiedeman on Real Property. Two 
hours each week. Professor Pennewell. 



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212 THE SCHOOI. OP LAW. [19OI-I902 

Torts. Lectures and Ames' and Smith's Cases, embracing trespass, 
disseisin and conversion, defamation, malicious prosecution, con- 
spiracy, legal cause, negligence, contributory and imputed negligence, 
degrees of care, extra-hazardous occupations, liability from fire and ex- 
plosives, deceit, merger, joint wrong-doers, and distinction between tort 
and breach of contract. Four hours each week throughout the year. 
Professor Herrick. 

History of Common Law Procedure. Lectures and selected 
readings from Pollock and Maitland's History of English Law, Bige- 
low's History of Procedure, Maitland's Domesday Book and Beyond, 
Inderwick's The King's Peace, Stubb's Constitutional History of 
England, Coke's Institutes, Blackstone's Commentaries, and Stephen 
on Pleading. Five hours each week during the first-half of the first- 
half-year. Professor Hopkins. 

Second Year. 

Agency. Lectures and Wambaugh's Cases, embracing introductory * 
topics, the agent's power to subject his principal to liabilities, the 
agent's responsibility to strangers, parties to writings, undisclosed 
principal, the principal's duties to the agent, delegation by an agent, 
termination of agency, and ratification. Two hours each veek. Pro- 
fessor Chapman. 

Bills and Notes. Lectures and Ames' Cases on Bills and Notes, 
embracing formal requisites, acceptance, indorsement, transfer, extin- 
guishment, obligations of parties to bills and notes, diligence, bill or 
note in the nature of a specialty, checks, negotiable paper other than 
bills, notes and checks. Two hours each week. Professor Chapman. 

Equity Jurisdiction. Accident, Mistake and Fraud. Lectures 
and Vol. Ill, Keener' s Cases on Equity. Two hours each week. Pro- 
fessor Hopkins. 

Equity Pleading. Cases and Lectures. Two hours each week 
during first half-year. Ptofessor Hopkins. 

Evidence. Lectures and Thayer's Cases, embracing preliminary 
topics, leading principles and rules of exclusion, qualifications and ex- 
ceptions to the rule against hearsay, real evidence, writings and wit- 
nesses. Two hours each week. Professor Williams. 

Code Pleading. Cases and Lectures. Two hours each week 
during last half-year. Professor Hopkins. 

Sales. Lectures and Williston's Cases, embracing subject matter 
of sale, executed and executory sales, stoppage in transitu, fraud and 



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1901-I902] WBSTKRN RESKRVB UNIVERSITY. 213 

related matters, warranty and Statute of Frauds. Two hours each 
week. Mr. Green. 

Wii.1^ AND Estates. Lectures and Bigelow on Wills. Two hours 
each week. Professor White. 

Trusts. Lectures and Ames*s Cases, embracing voluntary trusts, 
language and formalities necessary to the creation of a trust, resulting 
trusts, oral trusts, constructive trusts, executed and executory trusts. 
Nature of a cestuy que trust's interest in the trust property, and the 
interest of a trustee. Two houra each week. Professor Williams. 

Contracts. Lectures and Williston's Cases, embracing impossible 
contracts, illegal contracts, joint obligations, discharge of contracts and 
assignment of contract. Also, Keener*s Cases on Quasi-Contracts, em- 
bracing nature of the obligation, failure of consideration, benefits con- 
ferred without request, benefits conferred at request but in the creation 
or performance of a contract, recovery of money paid under compulsion 
and waiver of tort. Two hours each week. Professor Carpenter. 

Third Ykar. 

Constitution Ai, Law. Lectures and Thayer's Cases, embracing 
constitution of government, making and changing written constitu- 
tions, the jurisdiction of the United States, citizenship, police power, 
eminent domain, taxation, ex post facto and retroactive laws, state 
laws impairing the obligation of contracts, regulation of commerce, 
money and war. Four hours each week. Professor Johnson. 

Equity Jurisdiction. Lectures and Vol. II, Keener's Cases, deal- 
ing with specific performance of contracts. Two hours each week. 
Professor Hopkins. 

Suretyship and Mortgages. Lectures and selected cases. Two 
hours each week. Professor Steams. 

Damages. Lectures and Scale's Cases, embracing functions of 
court and jury in estimating damages, exemplary, liquidated and 
nominal damages, direct and consequential damages, avoidable con- 
sequences, counsel fees, certainty, compensation, damages for non- 
pecuniary injuries, values, interest, damages in certain actions of tort 
and on contracts. One hour each week. Professor Hadden. 

Criminai« Procedure. Lectures and Beale on Criminal Procedure. 
One hour each week during second half-year. Professor Hadden. 

Partnership. Lectures and Ames's Cases, embracing the creation 
of a partnerahip, quasi or nominal partners, partnership property and 
the interest of a partner therein, the separate property of a partner as 



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214 'THK SCHOOL OF LAW. [19OI-1902 

affected by the partnership relation, the relation of debtor and creditor 
between a partnership and a partner, the relation of debtor and creditor 
between two firms having a common member, action between a part- 
ner and one or more of his co-partners, and power of a partner to act 
in behalf of the partnership. Two hours each week during first half- 
year. Professor Rowland. 

Corporations. Lecture^ and Elliott's Cases. Two hours each 
week. Professor Lawrence. 

Shipping and Admiralty. Lectures and Selected Cases. Two 
hours each week. Professor Lee. 

Common Carriers. Lectures and McClain's Cases, embracing 
public callings, carriers of goods, and carriers of passengers. Two 
hours each week first half-year. Mr. Crawford. 

Pleadings and Practice in Ohio, including the drawing of deeds, 
mortgages, wills, etc., as well as pleadings. Two hours each week. 
Professor Rowland. 

Legal Ethics. Lectures. One hour each week for ten weeks. 
Professor Hopkins. 

Review of subjects embraced in examinations for admission to the 
Ohio Bar. Four hours each week. Mr. Jaeger. 

Each student is expected to be in the class-room during 
all the hours of the first year and at least ten hours a week 
during each of the last two years, and the purpose is that 
the students shall devote their entire time to the work of 
the school. 



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190I-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 215 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 
The first half-year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
. teenth day of September, and continues, with a holiday 
recess of nine days, until the Saturday after the last Thurs- 
day in January. The second half-year begins on the Mon- 
day after the last Thursday in January, and continues, with 
an Easter recess of one week, until Commencement, which 
occurs on the Thursday after the eleventh day of June (or 
after the tenth in years in which February has twenty-nine 
days) . No college exercises are held on Thanksgiving day, 
Washington's birthday, and Decoration day. 

LITERARY WORK. 
The members of the first year class conduct a regular de- 
bating society, meeting on Saturdays from ten to twelve 
o'clock. 

MOOT COURT WORK. 

The Junior Moot Court Association of Western Reserve 
Law School, composed of members of the junior class, holds 
court weekly, sitting as a justice of the peace court, one of the 
professors acting as justice, with members of the class as the 
other court ofiScers, attorneys, litigants, etc. The term of 
court is three weeks and an entirely new set of officers acts 
for each term, giving all the members an opportunity of be- 
coming familiar with the duties of each office. 

The cases are based upon actual facts and the trials are 
conducted in all respects like those in the regular courts. 

The third year course in pleading and practice is conducted 
in part as a moot court coiurse. Cases are tried in the man- 
ner prevailing in the common pleas court. 

Special attention is paid to the several steps in the course 
of trial, such as summoning and impanelling jury, statement 
of case, examination of witnesses, taking of exceptions, 



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2l6 THB SCHOOI, OF I.AW. [19OI-1902 

making of motions, argument, preparation of charge to jury, 
verdict, judgment, motion for new trial, bill of exceptions 
and petition in error. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Candidates for the degree of LL. B. must attend the school 
at least two years, and must pass satisfactory examinations 
in all the subjects of the first year and in enough courses of 
the second year to aggregate ten hours a week, and of 
the third year to aggregate eleven hours a week. If a stu- 
dent is absent a year he must take the examinations in the 
subjects of that year at the school with the class. 

At the beginning of the school year an examination on 
the subjects of the first year will be held for the benefit of 
such students as may desire to enter the second year class. 

LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL. 
The work of the school is carried on in a stone building 
of tasteful architecture erected for it on Adelbert Street op- 
posite the Adelbert College Campus. The building contains 
a library and reading room, several large lecture rooms and 
rooms where students can meet socially. Individual lockers 
and other appropriate conveniences are provided for the 
students. 

LIBRARIES. 
The Law School has a library containing a large collection 
of the leading text-books, an almost complete collection of 
the English Reports, and the Reports of the Courts of last 
resort of every state and territory together with the reports 
of the Supreme and Circuit Courts of the United States. 
Students also have the use of Hatch Library which is located 
near the school and contains fifty thousand volumes. They 
also have free access to the Cleveland Law Library contain- 
ing about seventeen thousand volumes, and the Cleveland 
Public Library of almost one hundred and fifty thousand 



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1901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 217 

volumes. The library facilities ofiFered students are there- 
fore abundant. The law school library is open on three 
nights in the week to 9:30 P. M. 

UNIVERSITY ADVANTAGES. 
Students of the Law School are admitted without extra 
charge to such classes in Adelbert College and the Graduate 
School as they are fitted to enter. They also have the 
privilege of attending many public lectures given at Adel- 
bert College, the College for Women, and Case School of 
Applied Science. 

EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition is one hundred dollars a year. One- 
half of this fee is payable at the beginning of the university 
year, and the other half is payable at the beginning of the 
second half-year. These fees are to be paid to the Bursar 
within ten days of the opening of each half-year. For any 
part of either half-year the tuition fee is fifty dollars. No 
fees are charged for examination. When paid in advance 
the fee for the tliree years will be two hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

Rooms can be secured in the vicinity of the school for 
from $25 to $75 a year. Table board can be secured for 
from $2.75 to $4 a week. Text-books used in the classes 
cost from $17 to $30 a year, but second-hand books can 
usually be procured at a considerable saving. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 
A limited number of scholarships may be awarded to 
meritorious students during the year 1902-3. 
For further information address the Dean, 

E. H. HOPKINS, 

Cleveland, O. 



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THE DENTAL COLLEGE- 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



DHE Dental Department of Western Reserve University 
was organized by the Trustees and Medical Faculty 
of the University in the belief that Dental Surgery 
should be regarded as a branch of Medicine, and with the 
piu-pose of training students to practice it as a medical 
specialty. The dental students thereof continue to be in- 
structed in several branches of medicine with the medical 
students. It is obvious that such an education tends to 
broaden the mind and give a keener insight into the basal 
principles of dentistry. The public also recognize the better 
qualifications of a medically educated dentist. 

Students of the Dental College are allowed to elect with- 
out charge such courses in Adelbert College and the Graduate 
School as they are fitted to pursue. 

The College is under the control of the University Trus- 
tees, and is thus in every sense a part of the University. 
Its Professors do not control the fees from students, nor do 
they accept fees for extra courses. The Dean of the College 
acts as Bursar for the department, to whom the fees are 
paid and by him transferred to the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. 

The College is active in its endeavors to place Dentistry 
upon a high plane. It therefore cooperates as a member 
with the National Association of Dental Faculties, the Na- 
tional Association of Dental Examiners, and the Institute 
of Dental Pedagogics, and conforms to all the rules of these 
Associations. 

Attention is directed to the fact that there are no extra 
fees except as hereinafter indicated, but that the general fee 
covers the expense of laboratory courses in chemistry. 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RBSERVK UNIVERSITY. 219 

histology, physiology, dissection, and bacteriology. The 
matriculation fee is paid only once, and there is no diploma 
fee. The College furnishes many instruments for the free 
use of the students, such as vulcanizers, extracting forceps, 
etc. , etc. , thus saving considerable expense for every student 
during the course. 

The course is graded and admirably adapted to preparing 
students for the practice of dentistry. It requires three 
years to complete the course. The studies of the first and 
second years require seven months full attendance in each 
year. All of the technical work is performed in these 
years. The third year requires eight and one-half months* 
attendance and is devoted largely to clinical work. The 
Faculty have decided to require constant attendance each 
day in the clinics from 9:30 A. M. to 4:30 P. M. from each 
senior student. This gives an unusual amount of opportu- 
nity for practice, and is the outcome of a large and increas- 
ing amount of clinical material as well as the desire of the 
Faculty to give a thoroughly practical education. 

The dty of Cleveland now numbers nearly 400,000 inhab- 
itants, and the Dental College is located in the center of the 
city. This situation insures a large amount of clinical ma- 
terial. 

Students have free access to Adelbert Library, the Public 
Library, and through the proper channels they can gain ad- 
mission to Case Library. The Young Men's Christian 
Association, in the adjoining building, oflFers to dental 
students special rates of membership, admitting them to its 
lectures, classes, gymnasium and other privileges. The 
Association dining hall is open to all dental students. Ex- 
cellent boarding houses are to be found in the neighborhood. 



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220 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 



FACULTY. 



Chari«bs PiTanklin Thwing, D. D., LI/. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President, 

Hbnry Lovejoy Ambi«br» M. S., D. D. S., M. D., 176 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Operative Dentistry and Hygiene. 

Dean of the Faculty, 

WiLi* Hbnry Whitslar, M. D., D. D. S., 29 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Dental Anatomy and Pathology. 
Secretary and Executive Officer of the Faculty. 

Gborgb Hbnry Wilson, D. D. S., 44 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Prosthesis and Metallurgy. 

John William Van Doorn, D. D. S., 455 The Arcade. 

Professor of Dental Medicine, 

Calvin Suvbrill Case, M. D., P. D. S., Stewart Bldg. Chicago, 111. 
Professor of Orthodontia, 

George Nbil Stewart, M. A., D. Sc., M. D., D. P. H., 

Professor of Physiology and Histology. Medical College. 

Carl A. Hamann, M. D., 282 Prospect St. 

Professor of Anatomy and Oral Surgery. 

Perry L. Hobbs, Ph. D., Medical College. 

Professor of Chemistry. 

Frbderick Clayton Waite, A. M., Ph. D. Medical College. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology. 

Roger Griswold Perkins, A. B., M. D., Medical College. 

Lecturer on Bacteriology. 

Frederick A. Henry, M. A., LL. B., Williamson Building. 

Lecturer on Dental furisprudence. 

Wbston a. Vallkau Price, D. D. S., M. E., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer on Electro-therapeutics and Dental Electric Appliances, 

Herman Clifford Kenyon, D. D. S., 677 The Arcade. 

Instructor of Prosthetic and Operative Technics and 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy, 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RKSBRVB UNIVERSITY. 221 

Daniei« Hendrix Zbigi,BR, D. D. Sm Rose Building. 

Chief Demonstrator in Operative Dentistry, 

DouGi,AS Austin Wright, D. D. S., 332 Cedar Av. 

Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry, 

Varney Edward Barnes, D. D. S., New England Building. 

Demonstrator of Prosthesis and Instructor of Orthodontia, 

Jambs Freed Wark, D. D. S., Rose Building. 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry, 

Carl B. James, B. S., 2430 Euclid Av. 

Assistant in Histology. 

James A. Evans, B. S., Medical College. 

Assistant in Chemistry, 

Professor Wilson, 

Superintendent of Laboratories and Clinics. 

Herman Douglass Graham, 

Curator of Museum, 

Miss K. G. Frankle, 

Clerk of Operative Clinic, 

Mrs. D. a. Wright, 

Clerk of Prosthetic Clinic, 

Andrew Artman, 

fanitor. 



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222 



THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 

STUDENTS. 



[1901-1902 



William Roy Brewster, 
George Lynn Carbon, 
Elmer Blsworth Chambers, 
Joseph Anson Coates, 
Ralph Edmund Davis, 
Lee Lamont De Arment, 
Alfred Lawrence Duff, 
John Wilson Fairbanks, 
William B. Graff, M. D., 
Herman Douglas Graham, 
Charles Brigham Hawn, 
George Hugh Irwin, 
Richard Kitzsteiner, 
Ralph Nosker Leonard, 
Walter Mitchell Leonard, 
Clinton Edward Line, 
James Calvin McConkey, 
John McKerrall, 
James Scott McLean, 
Lyman Allen Messecar, 
Albert William Nicholson, 
Frank Bates Parrish, 
Thomas Guy Patterson, 
Edward Lacey Pettibone, 
Albert C. Plant, 
Otto Henry Reisser, 
Herman B. Rosenwasser, 
Ralph Edward Sadler, 
Ira Maphis Saum, 
William Otto Spieth, 
Oscar Frederick Strong, 
Howard Oclydes Wearstler, 
Archie Leon Wood, 

Arthur Andrew Bates, 
Charles Christian Bachman, 
Will Deville Bissell, 
Leroy N. Bundy, 



SENIORS. 

Chagrin Falls The Gladstone, Muirson St. 



AshtabtUa 
Warren 
Gladerun^ Pa. 
Cleveland 
Conneaut Lake. 
Pi. Clinton 
Hubbard 
Cleveland 
Mercer, Pa, 
Youngstozvn 
Calcutta 
Clevelamd 
Bellevue 
Bellevue 
Rochester, N. 
Canton 
Cleveland 
Carleton PL, OnL 



17 Tennis St. 

44 Chestnut St. 

254 Scovill Av. 

44 Fairview Av. 

7 Dodge Ct. 

The Gladstone. 

154 North Perry St. 

694 Superior St. 

7 Dodge Ct. 

138 Dodge St. 

7 Wycombe PI. 

158 Luveme St. 

168 North Perry St. 

168 North Perry St. 

Y, riiSaylesSt. 

28 Cheshire St. 

215 Bayne St. 

Can. 187 Dodge St. 



Waterford, Ont., Can, The Gladstone. 



Sandusky 
Warren 
Norwalk 
Toledo 
Wheeling, W. Va 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Eagle Cliff 
Saumsville, Va, 
Wood River ^ Neb, 



701 Superior St. 

1255 Lexington A v. 

429^ Superior St. 

The Gladstone 

154 North Perr\' St. 

55 Vega Av. 

722 Woodland A v. 

188 Chestnut St. 

28 Cheshire St. 

17 Tennis St. 



Carleton PL, Ont„ 
Wadsworth 
Ridgeville 

JUNIORS. 

Bayard 
Cleveland 
Chicago, lU, 
Cleveland 



Can, 187 Dodge St. 
The Gladstone. 
The Gladstone. 

838 Superior St. 

14 Bailey St. 

30 Wilbur St. 

500 Erie St. 



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I90I-1902] WBSTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVERSITY. 



223 



Garfield Cannon, 
Caryll E. Cline. 
John William Culver, 
George William Doutdel, 
Gerald Felix Doyle, 
Frank Arthur Dunn, 
Wallace Hays Dunn, 
Louis Weber Evans, 
Phillip Henry Felger 
Albert Kenyon Friend, 
Joseph Garold Foltz, 
James Martin Freer, 
Albert Lorain Griffis, 
Dwight Chfirles Hahn, 
Edson Hill, 
Willis K. Hoch, 
Edward John Kocmit, 
Bertram Ward Livingston, 
Marion M. Lower, 
Harrison D. Lowrey, 
Isidore Lymon, 
Lloyd Andrew Mapes, 
Clarence Elworthy Magee, 
Frank Sumner Manchester, 
Ralph Edgar Miller, 
Franklynn J. R. Price, 
Robert Ralston, 
Henry Stephen Rogers, 
Harry H. Rosenberger, 
Frank Garfield Rummel, 
Orrin Franklin Sickman, 
Arthur Albert Smith, M. D., 
Herman Leiter Smith, 
Joseph Elmer Shultz, 
Charles Davis Stambaugh, 
Howard Clinton Standen, 
Clarence Roy Thompson, 
Thomas Cary Van Pelt, 
Robert Lee Wilson, 
Perry Winfield Workman, 
Kirkum Glenn Worrell, 
John Simon Windisch, M. D., 
Newton John Worley, 



Coulson, Pa, 701 Superior St. 

Appleion City, Mo. 504 Lake View Flats. 

Rural Dale 407 Prospect St. 

Cleveland 174 Lyman St. 

Cleveland 951 Cedar A v. 

Cleveland '2orj Dunham Av 

Meadville, Pa, 125 Huntington St* 
' Salineville 109 Huntington St. 

New Springfield, 68 Collins PI. 

Cleveland 1065 Pearl St. 

Canton 407 Prospect' St. 

Leamington, Ont., Can. 664 Castle Av. 

Andover 172 Dodge St. 

Bayard 159 Sterling Av. 

Richfield 312 Prospect St. 

Belleview 1065 Pearl St. 

Cleveland 62 Petrie St. 

Savannah 91 Huntington St. 

New Alexander 838 Superior St. 

Mansfield 168 North Perry St. 

New York City 190 Greenwood St. 

Cortland 172 Dodge St. 

Stratford, Ont., Can, 242 E. Prospect St. 

Canton 407 Prospect St. 

Bayard 159 Sterling A v. 

Ridgetown, Ont„ Can. 701 Superior St. 

Newman 120 White A v. 

Sandusky 701 Superior St 

• Tiffin 168 North Perry St. 

Mansfield 138 Dodge St. 

Burton City 



Berea 

Trumansherg, N 

Navarre 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

E. Rochester 



2238 Euclid Av. 

Berea. 

Y. 136 Dodge St. 

407 Prospect St. 

346 Genesee St. 

452 Scovill Av. 
798 Republic St. 
159 Sterling A v. 



Cleveland Genesee Block, Suite 10. 
Danville 28 Cheshire St. 

Chiliy III, 2238 Euclid Av. 

Cleveland 23 Freeman St. 

Glentnlle 18 E. Franklin St. 



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224 



THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 



[1901-1902 



Harrington Spencer Barrows, 
William Bell, 
Byron Hugo Bowman, 
G. Humphrey Camp, 
Leslie Merle Christie, 
William Clarence Cooper, 
Will Eugene Culp, 
Harry Dixon, 
Butler White Donaldson, 
Andrews George Donaldson, 
Otto Frank Dusek, 
John William Frazier, 
George Washington Green, 
Nevin David Grill, 
Albert Edward Hitch, 
Ralph Barclay Holeman, 
Raymond Edward Jackson, 
Prank Paul Leonard, 
John Francis McDonagh, 
Robert Raymond McGeorge, 
Abram Ostrander, 
Willis LeRoy Powell, 
Norval Jaseph Renouf, 
Laurin Lindenberger Smith, 
William Allen Smith, 
Tyrell Strangways, 
Edward Luke Teskey, 
Ross Clay Unger, 
Carl Henry Wadsworth, 
F^win Wendell Walker, 
Harry Watson, 
Edward Arthur Womachka, 
Thomas Watkins, 



FRESHMEN. 

Cleveland 44 Wooldridge St. 

Massillon 426 Superior St. 

Linesville, Pa, 508 Prospect St. 

Salem 313 Prospect St. 

Columbus^ Pa, 323 Huntington St. 

Akron 32 Public Square. 

Cleveland 664 Castle Av. 

Warre7i 749 Superior St. 

Lorain 154 North Perr>' St. 

Scroggsfield 109 Huntington St. 

Cleveland 123 Humboldt St. 

Bridgeport 88 Handy St. 

Battle Creek^Mich. 8i8SuperiorSt. 

Orrville 826 Superior St. 

Cleveland 35 Lake Front Av. 

2\fill Village, Pa. 184 Dodge St. 

Grafton 313 Prospect St. 

Bucytus 739 Superior St. 

Cleveland 449 W. Madison Av. 

New Galilee^ Pa, 812 Superior St. 
Brampton, Ont., Can, 48 Wallace St. 

Oxbo7v, N. IV, T, 260 Euclid Av. 

Kent Kent. 

Troy 785 Superior St. 

Nova 749 Superior St. 

Beeton, Ont., Can, 312 Prospect St. 

Willmot, Mich, 389 Prospect St. 

Niles 389 Prospect St. 

CooperstoTvn, N. Y. 1304 Euclid Av. 

Alliance 508 Prospect St. 

Zoar Station, 62 Sterling A v. 

Oxford Junction, Iowa 53 DoUoif St. 

Youngstown 62 Sterling Av. 



SUMMARY. 

Seniors 33 

Juniors 47 

Freshmen 33 

Total 113 



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19OI-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 225 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Each candidate for admission must be at least eighteen 
years of age, and must furnish to the Secretary at the time 
of matriculating a certificate of good moral character. A 
blank form of certificate will be provided upon application. 
The rules for admission and graduation are such as obtain 
in the National Association of Dental Faculties, of which 
the College is a member. 

The minimum preliminary education required of entrance 
is a certificate of entrance into the third year of a high school, 
or its equivalent. 

Those who are unable to provide certificates are subject 
to an examination given by an examiner appointed by the 
State School Commissioner. An examination which covers 
the branches required in the first two years of a high school 
will be given to those who do not present certificates. 

This College does not receive women students. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students from recognized dental colleges who present cer- 
tificates of attendance upon one full course of lectures of at 
least seven months, and give evidence satisfactory to the 
heads of the respective departments that they have a good 
knowledge of the work of the first year will be admitted to 
the second. Graduates of reputable medical colleges will 
also be admitted to the work of the second year and will be 
excused from lectiu-es and examinations upon general 
anatomy, chemistry, histology, physiology, pathology, ma- 
teria medica and therapeutics. They will be required, how- 
ever, to take the courses in operative and prosthetic technics, 
dental pathology and histology. 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing from 
European schools are required, like other applicants, to fur- 
nish properly attested evidence of study and of attendance 



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226 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 

upon lectures, and they must pass the intermediate examina- 
tions. Students from recognized dental schools may enter 
the senior class only upon evidence of having completed 
work equivalent to that of the first and second year in this 
school. 

Special Notice. — According to a rule of the National Asso- 
ciation of Dental Faculties credit for a full term cannot be 
given to students who enter more than ten days after the 
opening of the session. But if any student is prevented by 
sickness from entering within the ten days, and if his sick- 
ness is properly certified to by a reputable practicing physi- 
cian, he can enter not later than twenty days from the open- 
ing of the session. Students are requested to be present on 
the opening day. 

Applications for admission may be sent any time to the 
Secretary, Dr. W. H. Whitslar, 29 Euclid Avenue, who will 
cheerfully answer any inquiries about the school. As chairs 
in the operatory and places in the laboratory are selected in 
the order of matriculation and payment of fees, it is advis- 
able that students should have their names registered as 
early as possible. Names can be registered at any time for 
the following session. Jimiors and Seniors of this college 
are not required to pay a matriculation fee. 



COURSE OF STUDY. 

The course of study extends over three sessions. The 
session for 1902- 1903 begins on Wednesday, October first 
and closes on Thiu-sday, June eighteenth. 

Special Notice. — Beginning with the session commencing 
in October, 1903, a four year's course of study will be insti- 
tuted. This will be in conformity with the rules of the 
National Association of Dental Faculties. Students who 
have regularly entered the college previous to the session of 
1903-4 will not be affected by the four years* course. 



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1 901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 227 

The Students of the first and second year complete the re- 
quired work in seven months. 

The following table shows the work required in each year 
and the number of hours a week in each subject. 

FIRST YEAR. 

HOURS PER WEEK. 
Osteology 2. 

C"-**^ •" {drbSry. 

^*^^^ {.^^l!?a'S^tory. 

Histology 4 — 15 weeks. 

Dental Anatomy i. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Anatomy — Descriptive 4. 

Anatomy — Regional i . 

D|,„„. 1^^, f 2— lectures or demon- 
Physiology I strations. 

Dental Histology and Embryology i — to Christmas. 

Metallurgy i. 

Operative Technics 7—6 months. 

Crown and Bridge i. 

Prosthesis, Crown and Bridge Work io>^. 

Orthodontia Technics I2>^. 

Clinical Dentistry I7>4 . 

Dissection Evenings. 

Dental Pathology i (not completed. ) 

THIRD YEAR. 

Operative Dentistry { ^Z^ montt: 

Operative Clinics 17K. 

Prosthetic Clinics I2>^. 

Pathology, Completed i. 

Materia Medica and Therapeutics i. 

Oral Surgery i. 

Orthodontia Special lectures. 

Anaesthetics '* *' 

Jurisprudence '* •' 

Dental Hygiene " " 

Blectro-therapeutics '* '* 

Bacteriology 9 — 6 weeks. 



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228 THE PKNTAL COLLEGE. [19OI-I902 



METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND DESCRIPTION 
OF COURSES. 



The methods of instruction consist of lectures, recitations, demon- 
strations, clinics, and practical work in the chemical, physiological, 
histological, and bacteriological laboratories. Complete courses are 
given in the technic of operative and prosthetic dentistry, as well as 
in orthodontia and steel. Clinical material is abundant and in great 
variety. Anatomy, chemistry, physiology and histology are studied 
in the Medical College. With the general work in these subjects 
special instruction for dental students is interwoven. 

During the hours for clinics the demonstrators in charge devote 
their whole time to the work of instruction. It will be seen that this 
method gives each student constant personal attention. All practical 
work must be performed in the College, and every effort is made to 
prevent students from practicing dentistry illegally. Regular attend- 
ance at all the courses of instruction and clinics is required. No 
student is excused from the technic or practical courses. 

ANATOMY. 

FROFBSSOR HAM ANN. 

The course in anatomy consists of lectures upon descriptive and 
applied anatomy, together with demonstrations and recitations. In 
accordance with the needs of dental students especial attention is 
given to the anatomy of the head, neck and alimentary canal. In 
order to facilitate the work in osteology, students of the first year are 
provided with separate bones, which they are permitted to take home 
for purposes of study. For demonstrations upon the cadaver and 
anatomical preparations, the second-year class is divided into sections, 
in order that individual students may have every opportunity of 
becoming familiar with the various parts of the body, and of receiving 
direct personal instruction. Text-book, Gray's Anatomy. 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY. 

The advantages offered for the study of practical anatomy are very 
complete. The anatomical room is well lighted, and perfectly heated 
and ventilated. It has twenty-four tables, and is furnished with hot 
and cold water, elevator and every convenience for successfully con- 



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19OI-I902] WBSTKRN RESBRVE UNIVERSITY. 229 

ducting the work of dissection. Dissections are made under the 
immediate direction of the professor of anatomy. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR STEWART. 

Two lectures a week are given to the students of the second year. 
The lectures are illustrated by experiments in the claas-room and 
demonstrations in the laboratory. The properties of the circulating 
liquids of the body, blood and lymph, having been first described, the 
mechanical and physiological factors concerned in the maintencmce 
of the circulation are studied in detail. The physical and chemical 
phenomena of respiration and the relation of the nervous system to 
the respiratory- mechanism are next taken up. Then follows an 
account of digestion, including the secretion of the digestive juices 
and their action on the food substances, the movements of the stomach 
and intestines, and the influence of nerves on the functions of the 
alimentary canal. The absorption of the digested food into the blood- 
vessels and lacteals, the changes which the absored substances 
undergo in the body, and the channels by which the waste products 
are excreted form the next division of the subject. A general view is 
then taken of the statistics of nutrition and metabolism (including 
Animal Heat), from which the rules governing the constitution of 
dietaries are deduced. The general physiology of muscular and 
nervous tissues having been treated of, the physiological anatomy and 
functions of the brain and spinal cord are described at length. A 
brief account of reproduction and development completes the course. 

Care is taken to emphasize the special importance to the dental 
student of such subjects as the secretion of the saliva, the formation 
of salivary concretions, and the mechanism of mastication and of 
articulation. Text-book, Stewart's Manual of Physiology. 

HISTOLOGY. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR WAITE, MR. JAMES 

The course includes a study of the fundamental mammalian tissues, 
followed by a study of the finer anatomy of the principal organs. 
Especial attention is given to the structure of bone, teeth, salivary 
glands, and the structures connected with the mouth cavity. Each 
student stains and mounts the sections which he studies and these 
remain his property. The expense to each man for slides and material 
is about two dollars. A deposit of two dollars to cover breakage, and 
returnable at the end of the course, is required. Two two -hour 
laboratory exercises and one recitation per week until February ist, 
Freshman year. Text-book, Schaefer, Essentials of Histology. 



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230 THE DENTAI, COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 

DENTAL EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR WHITSLAR. 

The subject of histology is of so much importance to the dentisl 
that notwithstanding the subject is thoroughly taught to the dentat 
classes by the professor of histology in the medical department, the 
Faculty continue to have this instruction duplicated, in part, in the 
Dental College. In addition are some comparative studies of the 
teeth 

The import of this course is to give the student an insight to the 
practical uses of this study, and to inspire further investigation. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR HOBBS. 

Much care and attention have been devoted to the thorough arrange- 
ment and equipment of the chemical laboratory and lecture room 
according to modem methods. The course includes a series of illus- 
trative lectures on inorganic and organic chemistry, showing their 
relationship tb dental, medical and sanitary science, and laboratory 
practice. The latter offers the student advantages in acquiring chem- 
ical manipulations and favors his acquaintance with the principles of 
chemistry. Five hours a week throughout the year are given to the 
work. 

Special or advanced students will also be furnished the means for 
original work or research, under the guidance of the instructor. 
Text-book ,'\Vitthaus' Chemistry. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY. 

PROFESSOR AMBLER. 

In this department the teaching is partly accomplished by means of 
lectures and quizzes which constitute a systematic and progressive 
course, beginning with a concise history of ancient and modem den- 
tistry, followed by a careful presentation of the most useful methods, 
appliances and materials employed in filling teeth, together with the 
basal principles which make operative dentistry a positive science. 
The hygiene of the mouth, teeth, artificial dentmres, crown, and 
bridge-work will also be considered. 

In the senior year, the operatory offers to the student an opportu- 
nity to become acquainted with the details of office practice ; here he 
can apply the art of filling teeth, and have some opportunity for 
observing the relative value of different methods and materials ; being 
advanced from simple to complex operations so fast as his proficiency 
will justify. Each senior is allowed to operate for eighteen hours 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 23 1 

weekly ; thus he can develop his brain and hand in acquiring thought- 
ful manipulative skill. 

Text-book: American Text Book of Operative Dentistry. Ambler's 
Tin Foil and its Combinations for Pilling Teeth. 

DENTAL ANATOMY-OPERATIVE TECHNICS. 

One hour each week is given to dental anatomy in the Freshman 
year. The work is carried on principally^ by the recitation method 
and lessons are regularly assigned for each meeting of the class. The 
subject is thoroughly illustrated both by drawings and large models. 
Especial attention is given to pulp chambers and root canals, and their 
relation to the various suriaces of the teeth. 

The course in operative technics in the second year consists in lec- 
tures and technical training in the laboratory. The lectures cover the 
technical methods of treating the various conditions found in pulp 
chambers ; instrumentation, classification and measurements of oper- 
ating instnunents ; classification and forms of cavities ; and filling 
materials. 

The technical training includes treating and filling root canals in 
extracted teeth, excavating a large number of typical cavities repre- 
senting each class in rubber tooth forms, filling these cavities with the 
various filling materials, and exercises in engine technic upon 
extracted teeth. 

Note. — The operations in the technic department require a great 
number of natural teeth, and as it is difficult to procure a sufficient 
number, it would be to the interest of every student to obtain as many 
as possible before he returns for the work of the second year. 

PROSTHESIS AND METALLURGY, 

PROFESSOR WII^ON. 

Two lectures a week are given upon prosthesis, to the students of 
the first year, and two lectures a week upon crown and bridge work 
and metallurgy, to the students of the second year. 

The aim is to make this department thoroughly practical, to elucidate 
the mechanical and artistic principles as well as the science involved. 

The technic laboratories are conducted under the guidance of this 
chair. American Text Book of Prosthetic Dentistry, Essig's Metal- 
lurgy fourth edition. 

TECHNIC LABORATORIES. 

PROFESSORS WII^SON, KEN YON AND WRIGHT. 

There arc two dental laboratory class-rooms, one for students of the 
first, and one for those of the second year ; each room is provided with 



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232 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

sixty benches and with a platform furnished with complete laboratory 
appliances. There is also a dental laboratory furnished with lathes, 
plaster, and apparatus for molding and casting. There is a specially 
fitted forge room. Every effort is made to have the methods of 
instruction as practical as pa<$sible. Comprehensive and progressive 
technic courses are given in impressions — vulcanite, celluloid, cast 
metal, aluminum, gold, continuous gum (optional), crown and bridge 
work, steel and orthodontia. 

Seventeen and one-half hours a week for nearly two years are 
devoted to this work. 

PATHOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR WHITSLAR. 

This course covers a description of general and special pathology. 
It consists of an investigation of the principles of patholojgical pro- 
cesses, their histological changes and effects upon the organism. 
Dental pathology is elucidated and the general subject treated so as 
to make the subject one of practical utility. The decay of teeth and 
inflammation of the dental pulp and pericementum receive special 
attention. Diseases of the mouth are also discussed. The lectures 
commence in the Junior year and are continued to the end of the 
Senior year. Text-books : Marshall's Injuries and Surgical Diseases 
of the Face, Mouth and Jaws ; and Burchard's Dental Pathology. 

MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 

PROFESSOR VAN DOORN. 

An intelligent knowledge of the properties and application of medi- 
caments is so important that dental students should be as well grounded 
in this as in anatomy and physiology. The course consists of a series 
of comprehensive lectures upon all important drugs, with especial 
illustrations of their use in dentistry. The methods of administration 
and application are described in detail. The aim is to make these 
lectures of great practical value. Text- book : Gorgas' Dental Medicine. 

ORAL SURGERY. 

PROFESSOR HAMANN. 

Instruction in this branch will be given by means of lectures, clinics, 
and recitations. The aim is to furnish the student an opportunity of 
acquiring a practical knowledge of this department of surger>'. 

The principles underlying the treatment of pathological conditions 
of the mouth and jaws will be considered. Wounds, fractures^ 
tumors, ulcers and congenital defects are among the subjects to be 



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I901-1902] WESTERN RBSBRVB UNIVERSITY. 233 

discussed, especial attention being devoted to diagnosis. Dental 
students have access to the various hospitals. Marshall's Text Book 
on Diseases and Injuries of Jaw and Mouth. 

ANAESTHETICS. 

PROFBSSOR HAMANN, DR. D. H. ZIBGI^ER. 

The subject of anaesthetics is elucidated by special instruction. 
Professor Hamann describes and illustrates the uses of chloroform and 
ether in surgical operations about the mouth, and also the dangers 
that may arise. Dr. Ziegler presents the subject of anaesthesia from 
nitrous oxide gas and its combinations with other elements, also the 
uses of local anaesthetics. 

Realizing the dangers of anaesthetics, great care is bestowed upon 
the teaching of these subjects; so that no mistakes will be made. 
The clinics afford the students abundant experience in this college. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

DR. ROCBR G. PERKINS, A. B., M. D. 

The students will take up the various organisms which are found in 
the buccal cavity in health and disease, including those concerned in 
dental decay. The preliminary studies will deal with the chromogenic 
organisms, tmtil the students have acquired the necessary technique, 
when the bacteria peculiar to the mouth and those which use the 
mouth as a portal of entry in lesions of the buccal cavity or more 
general infections will be carefully investigated. 

Special instruction will be given as to the proper methods of sterili- 
zation of instruments, and asepsis in dental surgery. Microscopical 
sections of decayed teeth will be given out to the students, and 
stained to illustrate the invasion of the tissues by the bacteria of 
dental decay. 

ORTHODONTIA. 
PROFKSSOR CAi^viN s. CASB (Chicago). 

DR. V. K. BARNES. 

The course in orthodontia consists of lectures, technic work and 
practical cases. 

The didactic instruction is given by Profesror Case and is supple- 
mented by the demonstrator who has direct care of the practical and 
technic work. The lectures of Professor Case are illustrated by lantern 
slides, models and various appliances especially constructed for the 
purpose of instruction. 

The technic course is for the juniors and consists in the construction 
of material and a technic apparatus which is to be considered in the 



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234 THB DENTAL COI,LEGB. [19OI-1902 

fym\ senior examination in this branch. The practical work is done 
by senior students and ofiFers great advantages, for the clinical material 
is abundant. Various methods of correcting irregularities of the teeth 
are considered and their use and value explained. 

Junior students attend the regular course of lectures which are given 
to the senior students in this department. 

JURISPRUDENCE* 

F. A. HENRY, M. A., 1,1,. B. 

The legal responsibilities by dental practitioners, and also the rela- 
tions of the public to the dentist are clearly explained by the professor 
of this department. A knowledge of the subject of dental law is 
required in the course of instruction, and an examination at its close 

is given. 

ELECTRICITY* 

DR. PRICE. 

A thorough course of instruction is given in electro-physics and 
electro-chemistry, and the practical application of their principles in 
the processes employed in dentistry. It includes lectures, laboratory 
experiments and clinical demonstrations. Cataphoresis will be given 
special consideration and the various current controllers and millia- 
meters are studied by the students and thoroughly demonstrated clin- 
ically. The bleeching of teeth by means of electric currents with 
various agents, the treatment of pyorrhea alveolaris and aveolar 
abscess, and the use of the X Rays for locating unerupted teeth are 
elucidated. Instruction is also given in the construction and manage- 
ment of electric dental engines and motors, methods of controlling 
various kinds of currents, the galvanic effect and electrolytic products 
of various filling materials in the mouth, etc. Students should be 
familiar with the general principles of electricity before commencing 
the course. Text-book: Meadowcraft's A. B. C. of Electricity. 

DENTAL CERAMICS. 

PROFESSOR WII^SON. 

A Special course of instruction in dental ceramics is provided for 
those who desire to study this subject but it is not obligatory. The 
course includes all varieties of porcelain work that the dentist requires 
to use and is amply illustrated. Where students are able to provide 
materials of their own extra instruction is given free of charge. 

CLINICS. 

The operative and prosthetic clinics provide all kinds of clinic 
material. The prosthetic clinic is open from 9:30 to 12 a. m., and the 
operative clinic is open from i to 4:30 p. m. In the first year the 



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1901-1902] WBSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 235 

entire time is devoted to technic courses in prosthesis. In the second 
year technic courses are given in crown and bridge work, also ortho- 
dontia. After these the student is assigned to practical cases of arti- 
ficial dentures as well as operating in the mouth. It is necessary, 
however, to complete the operative technic course before cases are 
assigned in the operatory. In the third year the course is made as 
practical as possible. The morning clinic is devoted entirely to 
prosthetic work, crowns and bridges, and orthodontia. The afternoon 
clinic is devoted entirely to the filling of teeth, extracting, and the 
various surgical operations that can be performed in the college with- 
out hospital attendance. The extensive operations are performed in 
the hospital. Thus students are provided with an exceptionally large 
amount of actual clinical experience. The many clinical cases afford 
an excellent opportimity for the use of anaesthetics. In rotation the 
students are assigned to extracting and the use of ansesthetics under 
the immediate supervision of a skilled demonstrator. Every student 
thus gains experience that prepares him for actual practice. The 
location of the collie in the heart of the city, where the street cars 
center, enables the college to have an unusual advantage in securing 
a large clinic. 

Students are required to attend all clinics daily and perform opera- 
tions faithfully. At the opening of the session each senior has a chair 
assigned to him. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

First Year : Gray*s Anatomy, Schaeffer's Histology, Witthaus' 
Chemistry, American Text-Book Prosthetic Dentistry, Broomell*s 
Anatomy and Histology of the Teeth and Mouth. 

Sbcond Year : Stewart's Physiology, Essig's Metallurgy, Burch- 
ard's Pathology. 

Third Year : MarshalPs Injuries and Diseases of Pace, Mouth 
and Jaws, Goigas* Dental Medicine, American Text-Book Operative 
Dentistry, Ambler's Tin Foil and its Combinations for Filling Teeth, 
lleadowcraft's A. B. C. of Electricity. 

Books of Reference: Dictionary, Gould; American System of 
Dentistry; Garrettson's Oral Surgery; Week's Operative Technics; 
Evan's Crown and Bridge Work; Mitchell's Dental Chemistry; Mil- 
ler's Micro-organisms of the Mouth; Eckley's Anatomy of the Head 
and Neck; Cryer's Internal Anatomy of the Face. 



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236 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [19OI-1902 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The College session will open on October ist, each year, 
unless this date falls on Sunday, in which case the opening 
shall be on October 2nd. 

There will be a holiday vacation of two weeks, beginning 

on December 20th. No College exercises will be held on 

Thanksgiving Day, Washington's Birthday or Decoration 

Day. 

THE DENTAL BUILDING. 

When the College of Dentistry was established in 1892, 
rooms were assigned to it in the building erected by Mr. 
John L. Woods for the Medical College; but the work in 
both dentistry and medicine has been so much extended and 
the number of students in each department has so rapidly 
increased, that the Trustees of the University have provided 
separate acxx)modations for the Dental School in the new 
and handsome Bangor Building, situated next to the Young 
Men's Christian Association's building on Prospect Street. 
Already six sessions have been held in the new building, 
and they have proved its facilities to be excellent. Each 
room has perfect light and ventilation. The laboratories, 
one for the Freshmen and one for the Juniors, with an ad- 
joining room for both classes, are arranged for an advanced 
system of teaching. There is also a clinical laboratory for 
the Seniors and Juniors. Each room contains a complete 
laboratory equipment. Many tools and instuments are pro- 
vided for the students without charge. The operating room 
contains forty chairs and is fully equipped. The surgical 
and extracting room contains a standing amphitheatre. 
The building has been planned to accommodate one hundred 
and fifty students. When this number is reached, admis- 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 237 

sion to the Freshman dass will be by a suitable method of 
competition. It is advised that students matriculate early. 

DENTAL MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. 
A Dental Museum and Library is being formed. It is 
earnestly requested of those who have specimens or litera- 
ture of any interest to dental students, that they make con- 
tributions. Bach specimen and book receives proper care, 
and credit is given the donor. 

DEGREE. 
The degree of Doctor of Denial Surgery is conferred upon 
all students not under twenty-one years of age, who have 
satisfactorily completed the required course of study, paid 
all required fees, passed all examinations, performed such 
practical operations in the operative and prosthetic depart- 
ments, as may be required, and conformed with such other 
regulations as the faculty may prescribe. Graduates of 
Dentistry of other institutions are required to attend one full 
course and comply with all the regulations of the senior year 
in order to receive a degree from Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. Candidates who attain a general average of ninety per 
cent, in all their examinations receive honorable mention. 

FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES. 

The fees are as follows: (i) Matriculation fee of five 
dollars. This is paid only once. (2) An annual fee of one . 
hundred dollars, is payable at the opening of the term. 

Students who cannot pay the whole amount at that time 
may pay fifty dollars then and after January i of the college 
year there will be iifty-five dollars due, providing the whole 
amount is not paid on that date. (3) An annual examina- 
tion fee of ten dollars, due April i . 

Students who desire to pay for the entire three years' 
course by December ist of the first year will be allowed a 
reduction of fifty dollars on the whole amount. There is 



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238 THB DENTAL COLLBGB. [1901-I902 

no diploma fee. No fee is required for any of the laboratory 
courses or dissection. 

EXAMINATIONS. 

No student is permitted to present himself for examina- 
tion who has not paid all dues. A fee of ten dollars for 
examinations is required April est. 

Students who have failed in any branches are given an 
opportunity for a second examination, but it shall not be 
later than December ist in the succeeding year. A student 
may register in the succeeding year but will not be allowed 
to continue in it after December ist if he is deficient in 
more than two branches. 

A fee of two dollars is required for a re-examination. A 
second re-examination can only be given with the consent 
of the faculty. 

There are no scholarships or special prizes. 

Students are liable for breakage in the chemical and 
histological laboratories. An expense of about two dollars 
for microscopic slides is necessary in the first year, but they 
remain the property of the student. 

No student is permitted to enter the laboratories and op- 
eratory until he presents a receipt for fees, and also is pro- 
vided with the necessary equipment of instruments and tools. 
Books and instruments can be bought within a short distance 
of the college 

The College fees are paid to the Dean. 

The expenses for each year, including fees, are as follows: 

FIRST YEAR. 

Matriculation (paid only once) $ 5 00 

Tuition 100 00 

Instruments 26 00 

Books 24 00 

Examination at close of term 10 00 

165 00 



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I90I-I902] WBSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 239 

SECOND YEAR. 

Tuition $100 00 

Instruments, including engine, about 90 00 

Books II 00 

Examination at close of term 10 00 

211 00 

THIRD YEAR. 

Tuition $100 00 

Books 17 50 

Examination at close of term 10 00 

No Diploma Fee. 

127 50 

Good board may be had from $2.50 to $5.00 a week; good 
accommodations for board and lodging, from $4.00 a week 
and upwards. Students applying to the Janitor, Andrew 
Artman, at the College building, as soon as they reach the 
dty, will be directed to reliable boarding houses, of which 
he has a carefully prepared list. 

SCX3ALLIFE. 

The College seeks to surround its students with the best 
influences, and the Faculty therefore encourages them to 
exert their talents in commendable directions. During the 
session of 1896-97 a flourishing dental society was organized 
for the purpose of placing serious responsibilities upon the 
students, and of inculcating true professional ideas. Each 
year this society elects its own oflScers and the president is 
made Curator of the College Museum, which oflSce he holds 
during his Senior year. A glee and musical club is one of 
the interesting organizations to those musically inclined. 
Other societies and organizations exist among the students. 
Many of the students become members of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, whose building is next door to the 



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240 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [1901-1902 

College, and thus have use of a fine gymnasium and other 
means of amusement and recreation. A special rate of 
membership is made to students. There is a branch associa- 
tion of the Y. M. C. A. formed among the dental students. 
They hold meetings weekly. 

For further information, address the Secretary of the 
Faculty, Dr. W. H. Whitslar, No. 29 Euclid Ave., 
Cleveland, Ohio, who will cheerfully answer all inquiries. 



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GENERAL SUMMARY. 
TRUSTEES, INSTRUCTORS AND OTHER OFFICERS. 

Trustees. 

Western Reserve University only 7 

Adelbert College only 7 

Members of Both Corporations i8 

— 32 
Advisory Councii, (College for Women) 29 

Corresponding Members . . . . • 15 

— 44 

Instructors. 

Professors 60 

Associate Professors 5 

Assistant Professors 3 

Lecturers 10 

Instructors 18 

Demonstrators 22 

Assistants 15 

Non-Resident Lectures (1900-1901) 5 

-138 

Librarians and Library Assistants 4 

Other Officers 8 

— 12 



Total I. 



150 



STUDENTS. 

Adelbert College 206 

The Collie for Women 222 

The Graduate School 16 

The Medical School 126 

The Law School 100 

The Dental School 113 

Total 783 



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APPENDDC 
DEGREES GONFERRED AT GOMMENCEMENT, i90U 



ADBI.BBRT COLLEGE. 
BACHBIX>RS OF ARTS. 



Prank Smith Baker, 
Lamar Taney Beman, 
Herbert John Coates, 

(cum laude), 
Stanley Leman Galpin, 

{magna cum laude), 
Milton Stahl Garver, 

{magna cum laude)^ 
Theodore Hall, Jr., 

( magna cum laucte) , 
Harry Barren Howells, 
Roland Martin Jones, 
Walter Cutler Jones, 
Morris William Kastriner, 
Clifford Marshall King, 

Otto 



Winfred George Leutner, 

{magna cum laude)^ 
John Roy McDowell, 

{magna cum laude)^ 
Ezra J. Morgan, 
Wayland Buckingham Peck, 

{magna cum, laude)^ 
William Ganson Rose, 
George Ambrose Seaton, 

{magna cum laude), 
Claude Wilber Shimmon, 
Louis Bryant Tuckerman, Jr., 

{summa cum laude), 
Ralph Sargent Tyler, 

{magna cum laude), 
Manthey Zom. 



BACHBLORS OF LBTTBRS. 



Isadore Freiberger, 
George Washington Gumey, 
Benjamin Haber, 
Erie Clark Hopwood, 

{magna cum laude)^ 
John William Osbom, 

{magna cum laucU), 



Carroll Adelbert Peabody, 
{magna cum laude), 

Emil Bruce Pratt, 

Adelbert Hervey VanDuzer, 
{cum laude)t 

Edward Adolph Wankowsky. 



BACHELORS OP PHILOSOPHY. 



Ernest Ford Donley, 
Harry Tracy Duncan, 

{magna cum laude). 
Francis Florian Herr, 

{magna cum laude), 
Alfred Noah Kellogg, 



Carl Henri Lenhart, 
Thomas Leander Mead, 
Walter Martin Scott, 
Charles Farrand Taplin, 

{magna cum laude), 
Charles Albert Tilden, 



Michael Cyrillus Yeagle. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



243 



THE COI^LEGE FOR WOMEN. 
BACHBI«ORS OP ARTS. 

Hattie C. Carpenter, Laura Josephine King, 

Myrtle Blizabetb Dever, Florence May Knowles, 

Blanche Joanna Disaette, Ethel May Parmenter, 

Mabel Hope Dunsford, Helen Mary Pel ton, 

Caroline Church Hardy, Maud Stiles, 

Pearl Irene Horton, Mary Butler Thwing, 

Winifred Newton Jones, Alice Elizabeth Shanks. 

BACHBIX>RS OF LBTTBRS. 
Mabel Eugenia Corll, Viola L. Roth, 

Mabel Spence Crozton, Helen Electa Thomas, 

Eleanor Elizabeth Magruder, Marguerite Livingston Thomas, 

Myrtle May Wiser. 



BACHEIX>RS 
Edith Inez Beman, 
Alice Lorraine Campbell, 
Alice Doyle Drake, 
Elsie May Holliday, 
Evangeline Jenkins, 
Leonora Belle Lane, 
Elizabeth Anastatia McGorey, 



OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Alexandra McKechnie, 
Stella Stanley McKee, 
Alice Winifred Riggs, 
Norma Jeannette Smith, 
Winifred Worswick Stowe, 
Belle Waltz, 
Harriet Amanda Whiteside. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL. 
MASTERS OF ARTS. 

Edward Lewis Dodd, A. B., Paul Hermann Phillipson, 

Phoebe Mary Luehrs, B. L., Harry William Springsteen, B. 

Marda Masterman, B. L., George Edward Turrill, A. B., 

Maude Winship, B. L. 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. 
DOCTORS OF MEDICINE. 



William Simmons Baldwin, 
Arthur Holbrook Bill, A. M., 
Arthur fi. Brown, 
Paul P. Carlisle, 
Robert H. Cowley, 
John Dickenson, Jr., 



Simon Englander, 
Albert H. Gill, 
Arthur LeRoy Garrison, 
Edward Grossman, 
Charles H. Hay, 
Charles S. Hoover, 



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244 



APPENDIX. 



[19OI-I902 



Edmund M. Ickes, B. L., 
A. Irving Ludlow, A. B., 
James T. McConnell, 
Augustus W. Mercer, M. D., 
Roy B. Metz, 
John Neuberger, 



David W. Peppard, 
William H. Richardson, 
Roy L. Stackpole, 
Arthur H. Stall, 
Clarence B. Wean, 
Charles J Wehr, A. B., 



Logan B. Zintsmaster. 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 
BACHELORS OF LAW. 



Charles Kingsley Allen, A. B., 
Abraham Joseph Bialosky, 
Mark Anson Copeland, 
Thomas Henry Cowin, 
Moses Riley Dickey, Jr., 
Thomas H. Dillon, 
Frank Hazen Ewing, 
James Formanek, 
George Albert Gaston, 
Frederick Charles Gillette, A. B., 
Lew Dell Gripman, 
James Harlen Griswold, A. B., 
William Edward Gunn, Ph. B., 
Ernest Henry Herbkersman, 



David Klein, 
Charles Lessick, 
Clarence Jonathan Neal, 
Pierce David Metzger, 
Peter Painter, Jr. , 
Solomon Peskind, 
Charles Andrew Pulley, 
Harry Barber Sawyer, 
Jacob Paul Saxer, 
Christopher McClelland Smith, 
Jefferson William Sutton, 
Charles William Swartzel, 
Robert Curtis Taylor, 
David Udizky, 



Willis Emerson White. 



THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 
DOCTORS OF DENTAL SURGERY. 



Lewis Daily Aldrich, 
Roy Erwin Belden, 
Robert Bums Chamberlin, 

( honorable mention ) , 
Willard Fuller Chapin, 
Alvin J. Endle, 
Floyd Wesley Finch, 
Charles Brett Fletcher, 
John Baker Gillette, 
William Johnson Gillie, 

{honorable mention), 
Charles Vandersall Gougler, 



Joseph Patrick Henahan, 
Delbert Hiram Henninger, 
George Fenelon Hitchcock, 
Harry Clay Holmes, 
Arthur Wesley Maxwell, 
Algernon Payne, 
Samuel William Rice, 
Clarence Orbin Shepherd, 
William Alberto Sproull, 
Hamilton Frederic Strong, 
Archie Blanchard Wallace » 
Louis Pranks Wasson. 



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1901-1902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 245 



HONORS AND PRIZES. 

ADELBERT COI.I,EGE. 
Commencement Honors 

First Honor — Louis Bryant Tuckennan, Jr., 
Second Honor— Winfred George Leutner, 
Third Honor — Stanley Leman Galpin, 
Fourth Hoftor— John William Osbom. 

Junior Honors 

Equal Scholarship Honors to 
John Alvin Alburn, Wilfred Henry Alburn, 

Richard Emmet Collins, George William Say well. 

Phi Beta Kappa Society 
Elected in June. 1900, 

Harry Tracy Duncan, Stanley Leman Galpin, 

Erie Clark Hopwood, Louis Bryant Tuckerman, Jr. 

Elected in June, 1901. 

SKNIORS. 
Milton Stahl Garver, Winfred George Leutner, 

John William Osborn. Wayland Buckingham Peck, 

Charles Farrand Taplin, Ralph Sargent Tyler. 

JUNIORS. 

John Alvin Album, Wilfred Henry Album, 

Richard Emmet Collins, Herbert Gans Muckley, 

George William Say well. 

The Two Year Honor in German to 

Robert Emmet Finley, Birt Eugene Garver, 

Harlan Adolphus Hepfinger. 

The Two Year Honor in Greek to 

Feist M. Strauss. 

The Two Year Honor in Latin to 

Feist M. Strauss. 

THE HANDY PHII«OSOPHICAI« PRIZES 

First /W-ar^— W^ayland Buckingham Peck, 
Second Prize — Morris William Kastriner, 
Honorable Mention — Carl Henri Lenhart. 



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246 APPENDIX. [l 901 -1902 

HARRIET PEI.TON PERKINS SCHOLARSHIP 

Wilfred Henry Alburn. 

PRESIDENT'S PRIZES 

For the highest records for the Freshman Year in : 
English 

First Prize— ]o\m Frederic Oberlin, 
Second Prise— Roheri Crosby Lowe. 

German (Classical afid Latin Scientific Courses) 

Leonard Corwin Loomis. 
Greek 

Carl Peter Paul Vitz. 

Latin 

First /y7>^— Joseph Frank Williams, 
Second Prize — ^John Frederick Oberlin. 

Mathematics 

First Prize — John Frederic Oberlin, 

Second Prize — Kenneth Ethelbert Hodgman. 

Gymnasium 

Raymond Patton. 

Junior-Sophomore Oratorical Contest 

First Junior Prize — Herman Joel Nord, 

First Sophomore Prize — ^Walter Lewis Bissell, 

Second Prize {irrespective of class)— ]ohn Alvin Album. 

THE NEW SHAKSPKRE SOCIETY'S PRIZE 

Fof the best exatnination 

Roland Martin Jones. 

THE EARLY ENGLISH TEXT SOCIETY'S PRIZE 
Francis Florian Herr. 

THE HOLDEN PRIZE 

For the best Sophomore Essay in English 

Robert Emmet Finley. 
Honorable Mention — Walter Lewis Bissell. 

THE RUPERT HUGHES PRIZES 

For the best Poems 

First Prize — Erie Clark Hopwood, 
Second /V/V— Wilfred Henry Alburn. 



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I9OI-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 247 

THE COI.LEGE FOR WOMEN. 
PRESIDENT'S PRIZES 

For Freshmen Work in the Gymnasium 

Firsl—hois Violet Ellett. 
Second — Fanny Alice Dunsford. 

THE HOLDEN PRIZE 

For Sophomore fVork in English 

Charlotte May Parker. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 

ADELBERT COLLEGE. 

Presideniy C. M. RussELi,, 1873. 
Vice Presidents ^ Rev. J. P. Jones, 1875. 
Dr. J. P. Sawyer, 1883. 
Recording Secretary^ Ci.arbnce P. Bii,l, 1894. 
Corresponding Secretary y Sherman Arter, 1886. 
Necrologist, Rev. D. T. Thomas, 1885. 

VISITING committee OF THE AI^UMNI. 

W. C. Parsons, 1863, C. D. Everett, 1880. 

the coli«ege for women. 

President y Bertha L. Torrey, 1899. 
Vice President y Bertha Lee Coe, 1894. 
Recording Secretary, Grace E. Lottridge, 1897. 
Corresponding Secretary, Sarah Babbitt, 1899. 
Treasurer— MisXA O. Peters, 1896. 

I^INANCE COMMITTEE. 

HEI.EN M. Smith, 1894, Meta O. Peters, 1896. 

Edith A. Hughes, 1899. 



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248 APPENDIX. [19OI-I902 

THE MEDICAL COLI^EGE. 
President, Dr. J. P. Sawyer, 1883. 
Vice Presidents, Dr. L. F. Switzer, 

Dr. J. S. Wood. 
Recording Secretary, Dr. G. C. Ash»iun, 1873. 
Corresponding Secretary, Dr. W. O. Osborn, 1888. 
Treasurer, Dr. E. B. Rhodes. 

THE LAW SCHOOL. 
President, F. W. Grebn, 1896. 
Vice Presidents, D. B. WoLCOTT, 1899. 

W. E. White, 1901. 
Secretary, D. G. Jaeger, 1900. 
Treasurer, J. L Cannon, 1898. 

THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 
President, Dr. J. W. McDili,, 1898. 
Vice President, Dr. Raymond Kelley, 1898. 
Secretary^Treasurer, Dr. W. G. Ebersole, 1895. 



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DIRECTORY. 



The names of instructors and officers are printed in italics. Each name is followed by an 
abbreriation indicating^ the department to which the person belong^s, viz: — A, Adelbert 
College; D, Dental Department; G, Graduate Department; L, Law School; M, Medical 
College; W, College for Women. 



Abbot, H. G.— W 212 Bell Av. 

Adams, W. S.— -L 8714 Euclid Av. 

Aikint, H. A.—W 40 Cornell St. 

Ake, H. R.— L 461 Wade Park At. 

Aibl, Charles— M 1406 Broadway 

Album, C. R.— A Eldred Hall 

Album, J. A.— A Eldred Hall. 

Album, W. H. — A Eldred Hall. 

Allen, D, P.— M 278 Prospect St. 

Allen, F. E. — ^W Guilford House. 

Allen, H. A. — ^W Guilford House. 

AmWer^ H. L.— D 176 Euclid Av. 

Aimk^, B. O. — ^W Guilford House. 

Amos, W. T.—L Adelbert Hall. 

A9hv»un, G, C— M 704 Republic St. 

Austin, J. B.— M 217 Oakdale St. 

Baclunan, C. C— D 14 Bailey St. 

Badger, G. P. — W Guilford House. 

Bailey, A. L.— W 08 East Lake. 

Ballantyne, M. L. — W.-.East Cleveland. 

Banker, N. S. — ^M 780 Superior St. 

Barnes, E. A. — ^A Adelbert Hall. 

Barnes, Horace — A.... 21 Claremont St. 

Barnes, Y, B, — D N. E. Bldg. 

Bamett, G. F.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Barret. E. P. — W 883 Norwood Av. 

Barrows, H. & — D 44 Wooldridge St 

Bates, A. A. — D 888 Superior St. 

Bauman, G. I. — ^M 1270 Cedar Av. 

Baxter, E. C. — A 158 Cornell St. 

Baxter, J. W.—A 20 Aetna St. 

Beard, H. L.— L 117 Adelbert St. 

Beaton, Isabella — W...462 Kinsman St. 

Beck, B. B. — ^W 85 Hower Av. 

Beeker, U. A. — M Pearl and Clark. 

Bell, W. — D 426 Superior St. 

Bennett. Grant — L 087 Doan St 

Berger, S. S. — M 1850 Superior St. 



Bemsteen, M. L. — L 67 Fifth Av. 

Bilh O. P.— A 868 Logan Av. 

Birge, R, H.—U 260 Euclid Av. 

Bishop, B. L. — W 70 Ingleslde Av. 

Bissell, W. D.— D SO Wilbur St. 

Bissell, W. L.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

Black, C. E.--W Guilford House. 

Blackburn, H. W.— A 142 Cornell St. 

Boggs, Jeasie — ^W 1257 Euclid Av. 

Bohm, A. E. — M 811 Huntington St. 

Bolden, J. J. L.— M 25 Newton St. 

Bolton, T. B. — L 28 E. Prospect St. 

Boss, J. W.— M 580 Euclid Av. 

Boulden, H. O. — ^W 110 Poplar St. 

BaurUMd, B. P.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Bowme, H. E. — W Absent. 

Bowdler, A. E.^L 185 Adelbert St 

Bowes, J. W. — L 117 Adelbert St. 

Bowman, B. H. — D 508 Prospect St. 

Boyle, J. J— L 40 Fairchild St. 

Boyle, T. A.--A 121 Bell Av. 

Brassington, B. S. — ^W . . Euclid Heights. 

Brett, J. H.— M 84 Ocean St. 

Brewster, W. G. — ^D The Gladstone. 

Brigga* W. D.—A 2288 Euclid Av. 

Brigg$, O, B. — M. .The New Amsterdam. 

Brown, E. D. — M 1617 Cedar Av. 

Brown, N. W.— M 831 Kennard St, 

Bruce, C. A. — W 40 Lincoln Av. 

Bruckshaw, M. G. — ^W.86 Beechwood St. 
Bruckshaw, M. I. — W.86 Beechwood St. 

Bruner, W. B. — M N. E. Bldg. 

Brunswick, M. E. — L 1105 Case Av. 

Brash, Edna— W 1008 Euclid Av. 

Buck, B. B. — M 701 Superior St. 

Budde, I. F.— W 116 Spangler Av. 

Bundy, L. M. — D 600 Erie St. 

BunU, F. JB.— M 275 Prospect St. 

Burroughs, Shepard— M. .220 Euclid Av. 



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250 



DIRECTORY. 



[190I-1902 



Bnschman, M. C. — W . . . Guilford House. 
Byal, C. B.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

Caldwell, B. C— A. . Adelbert Hall. 

Camp, G. H. — D 318 Prospect St. 

Campbell, H. C— A 68 Bell Av. 

Campbell, J. S.— A 1035 St. Clair St 

Campbell, R. S. — A 2200 Superior St 

Canfleld, A. S. — W Guilford House. 

Canfleld, H. H.— A Euclid HeighU. 

Cannon, G. — D 701 Superior St. 

Carbon, G. L. — D 17 Tennis St. 

Carle, B. L. — ^A 24 Streator At. 

Carnes, W. B. — A 147 Cornell St 

Carpenter, A. 0. — L...126 Streator Av. 

Carpenter, J. W. — A 46 Knox St. 

Carpenter, M. W.— -M 451 Pearl St 

Carrell. B. B.— W 467 Bolton Av. 

Carrlngton, C. M.— L 25 Vestry St 

Carter, B. P. — M 8 Uayward St. 

Case. C. J.— A 149 Cornell St 

Case, C. L.— L 49 Fairchlld St 

Case, O. 8. — D.. Stewart Bldg, Chicago. 

Chaff e, L. L. — ^W Guilford House. 

Chaffee, S. L. — A 239 Genesee Av. 

Chamberlain, P. S. — L..1267 Slater Av. 
Chamberlain, J. A. — L.126 Murray Hill. 

Chamberlain, P. R. — A 76 White Av. 

Chamberlain, W. P. — M . . 6 Wycombe PI. 

Chambers, E. B. — D 44 Chestnut St. 

Champ, S. M. — ^W 59 Bolton Av. 

Chandler, B. M. — W Guilford House. 

Chapman, H. B. — L E. Cleveland. 

Chapman, U. B. — W 810 Rose Bldg. 

Chapman, M. E. — W 103 Marcelline. 

Chapman, Winifred — W.445 Russell Av. 

Chapman, W. H. — L 11 Sackett St 

Cheetham, A. M. — M...805 E. Madison. 

Cherdron, Carl— M 110 Erie St 

Childs, L. W. — M.Wade Park & Dunham. 
Christie, L. M.— D..323 Huntington St 

Claflln, C. E. — W 446 Dunham Av. 

Clark, F. 8. — M 493 Colonial Arcade. 

Clark, Myra— W 180 Melvin St 

Clark, M. F. — W 348 Dunham Av. 

Clark, M. G. — W Guilford House. 

Clarke, H. L.— A 102 Adelbert St 

Clarke, W. B. — A 345 Orange St 

Clemens, C. E. — W. . . .1093 Prospect St. 

Cleveland, A. M. — ^W 892 Bolton Av. 

Cllne, C. E.— D...504 Lake View Flats. 
Cllne. H. L.— A 201 Adelbert St 



Coates, J. A. — D 254 Scovil Av. 

Cobb, P. W.— M 87 Haaard St 

Coe, C. M. — ^A Olenville. 

Cole, B. G.— W 199 Van Ness Av. 

Cole, G. S.— L 117 Adelbert St 

Collard, K. E.— W 189 Taylor St 

Collins, A. W. — Jntr 106 Cornell St 

Collins, B. M. — W 1285 Cedar Av. 

Collins, R. B.— A.. 1784 Woodland Hills. 

Comin, H. L. — ^A 168 Streator Av. 

Conant J. L. — ^A 22 Bleeker St. 

Conde, Edith — ^W 88 Wellesley at. 

Connell, A. B. — ^M 16 Dunham PI. 

Conner, J. W. — A. 156 Murray Hill Av. 

Cook, G. A.— A 49 Fairchild St 

Cook, W. H.— A 724 Republic St. 

Cooper, W. C. — D 32 Public Sq. 

Corlett, C. B.— M 264 Sawtell Av. 

Corlett, W, T.— M 558 Euclid Av. 

Corrigan, Francis — A.. 66 Covington St. 

Counts, A. F. — A Adelbert Hall. 

Cowell, B.— A 91 Arlington St 

Cox, H. R.— A 2481 Euclid Av. 

Crawford, S. — A 972 Cedar Av. 

Crawford, H. J. — h 8 Republic PI. 

Creedon, M. A. — W ... 69 Beech wood St. 

Crile, G. W. — M 169 Kensington St. 

Christy, B. B.— W Mayfield Hill. 

Culp, W. B. — D 664 Castle Av. 

Culver, J. W. — D 407 Prospect St. 

Cummer, C. L. — A 896 Bolton Av. 

Curtis, M, M.—A 48 Adelbert St 

Gushing, B. F.^M 1160 Euclid Av. 

Oushino, H, P.— A 260 Sibley St 

Cutts, C. H. — A 24 Melvin St 

Daehler, J. W.— A 126 Adelbert St. 

Dalley, E. C. — ^W 281 Hough Av. 

Daniels, G. M. — W. .184 Murray Hill Av. 
Daniels, J. B.— W. .134 Murray Hill Av. 

Darlty, J. B. — M 2288 Euclid Av. 

Darlfv, J. O. — ^M Lakeside Hospital. 

Daugherty, J. B. — ^A Euclid Heights. 

Davidson, J. A. — W 24 Elslnore St 

Davis, A. S.— L 181 Murray Hill Av. 

Davis, J. R. — ^M 99 Lawnview Av. 

Davis, R. B. — D 44 Falrvlew Av. 

Dawley, W. J.— A 201 Adelbert St 

Dean, B. B. — A Falrmount. 

DeArment L. L. — D 7 Dodge Ct. 

Deering, R. W. — ^W 41 Cornell St. 

DeFrees. R. G. — A Adelbert Hall. 



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I901-I902] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



251 



Desberg, F. — L 1050 Central At. 

Deutsch, 8. J.— -L 87 Walker St. 

DeWitt, 8. A.— W.670 East Proapect St. 

Diokermon, John — A 852 Doan St. 

Dlfford, C. L. — ^A 49 Alum St. 

DUIey. P. B.— M 8717 Euclid Av. 

Dixon, Harry — D 749 Superior St. 

Donaldson, A. G. — D.109 Huntington St. 
Donaldson, O. W. — D..164 N. Perry St. 
Donaldson, J. B.— M..154 N. Perry St. 

Doster, A. M. — W 72 Merchants At. 

Doster, E. E.— L..117 Murray Hill At. 

Douttlel, G. W. — D 174 Lyman St. 

Doyle. G. F. — D 951 Cedar At. 

Drake, A. D. — ^W 792 Republic St. 

Drayer. C. B. — ^A 116 Streator at. 

Doff, A. L. — ^D The Gladstone. 

Dngan, D. L. — A 116 Streator At. 

Duncan, H. T. — L 78 Fifth At. 

Dunham, Alice — W 388 Dunham At. 

Dunn, F. A. — D 207 Dunham At. 

Dunn, W. H. — D 126 Huntington St. 

Dunsford, F. A. — W Guilford House. 

Durstine, L. W. — W 757 Willson aT. 

Dusek, O. F. — D 128 Humboldt St. 

Duty. Alice— W 2577 Euclid At. 

Eastman, E. L. — W . . . 161 ATondale At. 

Edwards, B. H. — G 29 W. Clinton St. 

Edwards, H. E. — M 161 Putnam St. 

Sibling, A. J. — L 228 Payne At. 

Eisenbrey, A. B. — A 68 Adelbert St. 

ELsenhauer, J. A., Jr. — A. .1433 Willson. 

Eider, B. L. — L 600 Lake St. 

Bllenberger, Albert — ^A.. Euclid Heights. 

Ellet, L. V. — ^W Guilford House. 

Elliott, C. C. — M 855 Stark At. 

Elliott; R. W. — M 855 Stark At. 

Emerson, O. F, — A 50 Wilbur St. 

Emery, R. S. — A 2086 Broadway. 

Englander. Louis — A 147 Cornell St. 

Bnyeart. C. T. — A Adelbert Hall. 

Brane, J. A. — ^M Medical College. 

Erans, L. W. — D 109 Huntington St. 

KTarts, F. B. — A 99 Bellflower At. 

Ererett, M. — W 887 Doan St. 

Fairbanks, J. W. — D. . .154 N. Perry St. 

Fairfax, D. B. — A 68 CalTert St. 

Farwell, E. W. — L...820 Fairmount St. 

Felger. T. H. — ^D 68 Collins PI. 

Fenlger, B. — L 512 Orange St. 



Ferry, M. I. — W 821 Fairmount bt 

B'lck, B. H.— G 189 Kennard St 

Fife, R. H.— W 91 Mayfleld St. 

Filius. G. T.— A 117 Adelbert St. 

Findlay, H. L.— A 151 Cornell St. 

Flndlay, J. L,— -L 151 Cornell St 

Findlay, Wm.— Jntr 149 Cornell St 

Findley, E. R.— A 151 Cornell St 

Finley, R. E.— A 730 Republic St 

Fish, John^A 147 Cornell St 

Fish, Matilda— W 224 Streator At. 

Fliedner, Frieda — W.160 Wellington At. 

Flower, A. — M Erie and St. Clair. 

Flower, Mrs. — ^M Erie and St. Clair. 

Flynn, J. F.— M The Ellington. 

Folts, J. G.— D 407 Prospect St 

Forbes, G. N.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Fowler, H. N.—W 49 Cornell St 

B'ox, W. L.— A 102 Adelbert St. 

Frankle, K. Q, — D. . . .520 Woodland at. 

Frazier, J. W.-— D 88 Handy St 

ITreedlander, Etta — W. . .158 Putnam St. 

Freer, J. N.— D 664 Castle At. 

P'reer. M. R.— W 1528 Cedar At. 

Friedman, MalTlna — W . . 132 Hawthorne. 

Friend, A. K.— D 1065 Pearl St 

Frits, R. F.— A 49 Falrchlld St 

Fuller, A. L.— A 45 Wilbur St 

Furth, Hortense — W The Brooklawn. 

Gage, R. T.— A 788 Republic St 

Gammel, R. E. — A 413 Dunham At. 

Garman, C. C. — A Adelbert Hall. 

Garman, C. P.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Garrison, A. L. — M 275 Prospect St. 

GarTer, C. V.— M 442 Euclid At. 

GarTer, B. E. — A.. 127 Murray Hill At. 

Oeib, F. J. — M Willson and Prospect 

Gerstenberger, Henry — M.113 Linden St 

Gleason, A. G.— W 168 Cedar At. 

Gleeson, J. A. — W 54 Kenwood A v. 

Gibbons, C. E. — A 766 Fairmount St 

Glfford, E. E. M.— W 107 Gaylord St 

Gilbert C. A.— A 1604 BucUd At. 

Gilchrist B. R.— W 560 Franklin At. 

Gilchrist, Helen— W...06O Franklin At. 

Gill, J. G.— G 788 Fairmount St 

Gillette, F. C— L...988 E. Madison At. 

Gillie, W. H.— A 117 Adelbert St 

Glllin, G. M.— W 91 Qulncy St 

Gillmer, Bessie — W Guilford House. 

Golden, II. G. — M 99 Lawnvlew Av. 



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Goodman, Isadore — M.264 Colambus St. 

Qould. H. C— L 28 Mayfleid St. 

Graff, W. B. — ^D 694 Superior St. 

Graham, H. D. — D 7 Dodge Ct. 

Granger. Walter— L 893 St. Clair St. 

Gray, S. B. — W 199 Qnlncy St. 

Green, D. E.-— L...131 Murray Hill Av. 
Chreen, F. W — L....Rlce Av., Newburg. 

Green, G. W. — D 818 Superior St. 

Oriffln, L. E.-^W 2238 Euclid Av. 

Griffin, Maurice, Jr. — A.. 41 Cornell St. 

Grlffla. A. L.— D 172 Dodge St. 

Griffiths, T. JE?.— M..1104 Woodland Av. 

Grill, N. D.-— D 826 Superior St. 

Grills, Albert— M 97 Rosedale Av. 

Qruener, H, — W 43 Knox St. 

Gunn, J. J.— A 158 Dibble Av. 

Haber, B. — L 8 Lewlston St. 

Hadden, Alex. — L. . .1670 Lexington A v. 

Uagan, A. C— W 38C Wllison Av. 

Uager, B. E. — W Nottingham. 

Haggerty. A. J.— L 240 Hodge St. 

Hahn, D. C— D 159 Sterling Av. 

llah^, E. A.— L 083 Scovll Av. 

Haldy, W. A.— M 502 Euclid Av. 

Hall, E. H.— W 75 Adelbert St. 

Hall, E. T.— L 3218 Detroit St. 

Hall, Theo.— L 40 Knox St. 

Hamann, C. A. — M 661 Prospect St. 

Hammond, A. P. — M.607 Lakevlew Flats 
Handerson, J. A. — W . . 444 Dunham Av. 

Harblne, S. S.— W 75 Adelbert St. 

i(aHno, H. A. — ^Treas 78 Cornell St. 

Harris , Charles — A Absent. 

Harris, R. G.— A 2211 Euclid Av. 

Hartz. C. A. — W 987 Case Av. 

ilarvle, L. E.— L Adelbert Hall. 

Hatch. W. B.— M 141 Chestnut St. 

Hatcher, R. A.— M.. Erie and St. Clair. 
Hathaway, J. J. — M . . 1378 Superior St. 
Hauxhurst, E. M.— W..13 Kenmore St. 

Hawn, C. B.—D 138 Dodge St. 

ilawthorne, H. B. — L 147 Cornell St. 

Hay, M. M.— W 75 Adelbert St. 

Haydn, H. O. — W 15 LaGrange St. 

Haydn, H. Jf.— W 15 LaGrange St. 

Haydn, R. E. — W Guilford House. 

Ilaynes, R. A. — A 389 Cedar Av. 

Hays. G. R.— M 57 Sibley St. 

Heath. H. II.— M 58 Marloes Av. 



Helnmiller, W. H. C— A.5 Stelnway Av. 
Henderson, G. M. — ^W . . . East Cleveland. 
Hennlng, H. S. — ^W. .. .Guilford House. 

Henry, F. A, — D Williamson Bldg. 

Hepflnger, H. A.— A Willoughby. 

Herr, F. F. — G 1276 Scranton Av. 

Herrick, F, 0.— M 367 Erie St. 

Herrick, F. H.— A 43 Cutler St. 

Herrick, F. U.— L 449 Russell Av. 

Herrick, H. .^.— M 367 Erie St. 

Hefrlck, H. W.— A 8006 Euclid Av. 

Herrick, P. W.— W 8006 Euclid Av. 

Hetzel. H. M.— W 75 Adeii>ert St. 

Hill. E.— D 312 Prospect St. 

Hill, E. M.— W 350 Russell Av. 

Hill, W. C— M 469 Euclid Av. 

Hinde, F. A.— W. . .168 Murray Hill At. 

Hird, E. F.— A 44 Nantucket St. 

Hlrd, M. A.— W Guilford House, 

Hlrsh, Leon — M 398 Jennings Av. 

Hitch, A. E.— D 35 Lake Front Av. 

Hobai-t, Raymond — ^A. . .201 Adelbert St. 

Hohhs, P. //.— M 1420 Euclid Av. 

Hobday, E. J.— L 182 Ontario St. 

Hoch, W. K.— D 1065 Pearl St. 

Hodgman, K. E. — A 29 Foster St. 

Hoffman, J. J. — A 1059 Central Av. 

Hogg. I. McC— A 139 Cornell St. 

Hogg. J. H.— L 2688 St. Clair St. 

Holeman, R. B. — D 184 Dodge St. 

Holibaugh. Harry — M..758 Superior St 

Holland, M. A. — W Guilford House. 

HoUlday, W.— A 30 Miles Park St. 

Hoover, O. F. — M 702 Rose Bldg. 

Hopkins, E. H.— L 84 Miles Av. 

Hopklnson. M. E. — ^W. . .288 Gordon Av. 

Horton, P. L — W 100 Claremont St. 

Hoskins, F. C. — ^M...900 Falrmount St 
Howard, W. T., Jr. — M..88 Dorchester. 

Howland, Paul — ^L 11 Granger St 

Ilubbel. Elizabeth— W.. 66 Arlington St 
Hubbell, F. M.— A. ..673 Franklin A v. 
Huddleston, C. M. — W.. Guilford House. 

Hulbert W. O.— A 139 Cornell St 

Hull, Bradley, Jr.— A 840 Euclid Av. 

Hulme, W. H.—W 48 Mayfleid St 

Humiston, W, H.— M 526 Rose Bldg. 

Hunt, Agnes — W..<; 61 Mayfleid St. 

Hunt F. P.— L 49 Falrchlld St 

Hunt J. E. — ^M 726 E. Prospect St. 

Hutching, F. 0. — M 373 Jennings Av. 



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Ikirt, F. H.— M Erie and St. Clair. 

Ingalls, N. W.— M Erie and St. Clair. 

IngeraoU, J. M. — M Arcade. 

Irwin, G. H.— D 7 Wycombe PI. 

iBham, J. B.— M 828 Rose Bldg. 

Jacobi, C. E. — W 68 Beersford PI. 

JackBon, C. J. — A. . . .845 Falrmount St. 

JackBon« F. W. — M 37 Hazard St. 

Jackson, R. E. — D 813 Prospect St. 

Jackson, Y. M. — W 2900 Superior St. 

Jaeger, D, G.— L 113 Brookfleld St. 

James, (7. B. — ^A 958 S. Logan At. 

Jaynes, B. H.— L Adelbert Hall. 

Jenkins, A. A.— M 88 White at. 

Jenks, P. B. — A Nottinghani. 

Johnson, D. E. — Ai 53 CalTert St. 

Johnaon, H. H. — L Euclid Heights. 

Johnston, H. C. — A 45 Knox St. 

Jones, E. I. — W 1635 Harvard St. 

Jones, E. M.— W..158 Murray Hill At. 

Jones, F. E. — W 1685 Harvard St. 

Jones, F. T. — Q 40 Knox St 

Jones, N. M.. Jr.— M 162 Taylor St. 

Jones. OliTer — A 2370 Elmwood St. 

Junge, M. £. — W 951 Detroit St. 

Kastriner, M. W. — L 731 ScotU At. 

Kaufman, Lulu — W 981 Case At. 

Kelker, H. C. — M 28 Cheshire St 

Kelly, J. C— W 165 UnlTerslty St 

Kelly. M. M.— W 165 UnlTerslty St 

Kendall. M. B. — W 1306 Cedar At. 

Kennedy, T. M.— L 49 Falrchlld St 

Kennedy. O. W.— L 49 Falrchlld St 

Kenyan, H. 0. — D 677 Arcade. 

Kenyon, S. C. — W Guilford House. 

Kief er, L. B. — W Guilford House. 

King, G. A. — ^W East CleTeland. 

King, M. H. — W Guilford House. 

King, P. F. — ^M 99 LawUTiew At. 

Kingsbury, C. H. — W 94 Bertram St 

Kitchen, J. H. — It 858 Euclid At. 

Kltsstelner, R. — D 158 LuTerne St. 

Klaus, Emannel — M 958 Lorain St 

Klaus, M. H. — ^M 958 Lorain St 

Knlsely, W. B. — A 1578 Cedar At. 

Koblits, B. — M.. Broadway A Humboldt 

KobliU, S. R. — W 63 Osborne St 

Kocmit, E. J. — D 62 Petrle St 

Konlgsiow, Ella — ^W 882 ScoTill At. 

Kramer, 8. E. — L 34 YanBuren St 



Krauss, C. L. — W 1997 Superior St 

Krejci. L. H.— W 290 Forest St 

Krider, L. B.— W 423 Bolton At. 

Krug. E. L. — W 51 Fourth At. 

Kurtz. L. C. — W 8 Cedar At. 

Kurzenberger, W. — L 72 Noyes St. 

Ladd, L. W.— M Colonial Flats. 

Laiay, Jacob — ^M Syracuse, Neb. 

Lakin, Mary— G 51 Mayfleld St 

Landsberg, Rhoda — W The Euclid. 

Lane, C. W. — M Erie and St Clair. 

Lane. J. J. — ^A 71 Streator At. 

Langdon, H. E. — A 715 N. Logan AT. 

Lanphear, W. P. — ^A. . . .782 Republic St 

Large, S, H.— M N. E. Bldg. 

Laub. W. J. — ^L 874 Falrmount St 

Lawrence, James — L . . . 709 Genesee At. 

Lawton, F. T. — A 116 Streator At. 

I<ayman, L. R. — W Guilford House. 

Lee, B. M.— W 71 Tilden At. 

Lee, R. if.— L 115 Ingleside At. 

Lehman. D. A. — G...843 Falrmount St 

Lembeck, F. R. — W 46 Streator At. 

Lenhart C A. — M The Ellington. 

Leonard, F. P. — D 739 Superior St 

Leonard, R. N.— D 168 N. Perry St 

Leonard, W. M. — D 168 N. Perry bt. 

Lessick, F. A.— W 486 Giddings At. 

Levine, M. — L 66 Croton St 

Lewis. W. A. — M 88 LawuTiew At. 

Lincoln, W. B. — M 275 Prospect St 

Lindsay, J. F.— M 32 Hazard St 

Line. C. E.— D Ill Sayles St 

Linn, Irma — W 151 Courtland St 

LlTingston. B. W. — D.91 Huntington St 

Lloyd, H. R.— A Wickliffe. 

Long, W. L. — L 45 Knox St 

Loomis. H. R.— L 7 York St 

Loomis, L. C— A 1280 Willson At. 

Lothrop. L. M. S. — W.1745 Harrard St 

Lotspietch, R. G.— A 6 Cornell PI. 

Lower, M. M.— D 838 Superior St 

Lower, Wm. E. — M 275 Prospect 

Lowman, J. H. — M 441 Prospect St 

Lowrey, H. D.—D 168 N. Perry St 

Luck, T. D. — W 829 Scranton At. 

Lueke, Martha — W 708 Wlllson At. 

Lustlg, H. — L 2773 Broadway 

Lyman, M. E. — W Guilford House. 

Lymon, I. — D 190 Greenwood St. 



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McAaroD. W. S. — L 483 Cedar At. 

McArthur, A. F.— A 203 Oakdole St. 

McCleary, J. M.— L 728 Union St. 

McClure, B. H.— M 618 Bast Av. 

McClure, W. C— L 888 Doan St 

McConkey, J. C— D 28 Cheshire St. 

McCune, F. K.— M 87 Plymouth St. 

McCurdyp 8. M. — ^M...42 Lawnvlew At. 
McDonongh, J. F. — D. .449 W. Madison. 

McFall, J. B. — ^W Guilford Honse. 

McFate, J. C. — M 789 Superior St. 

McGeorge, B. B.— D...812 Superior St 

McOrew, B. L. — 716 Case Ave. 

McKean, S. B. — ^W 40 Summit St 

McKee, C. S. — ^A 116 Streator Av. 

McKerrall, J.— D 215 Bayne St 

McKim, B. B.— W 100 Oakdale St 

McKInney, Bffle — W Guilford House 

McLean, F. W.— W 76 Adelbert St 

McLean, J. S. — D 187 Dodge St 

MacDonald, Ethel — W.. Guilford House. 

Mach, H. L.— A 688 Forest St 

Maclntyre, A. L.—W ... 136 Sawtell Av. 

Magargee, G. W.— M 162 Dodge St 

Magee, C. B. — D 242 E. Prospect St 

Manchester, F. S. — D . . . 407 Prospect St. 

Mannhardt J. G.— M 698 Clark Av. 

Manning, W. J. — M 1 Dodge Ct 

Mapes, L. A. — D 172 Dodge St 

March, F. O.— A 168 Cornell St 

Markowlti, B. S.— W 21 Vine St 

Martin, W. C— A 84 Marvin Av. 

Marvin, W, T. — A 86 Knoz St 

Mathews, J. B. — L 106 Alabama St 

Mathlvet B. C. — L. . .880 Woodland Av. 

Meacham, M. J. — ^W 109 Lincoln Av. 

Mead, B. W.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Menger, F. J.— G 107 Qulnby St 

Merriam, W, H. — M 276 Prospect St 

Merrills, B. N.— A Wicklihe. 

Messecar, L. A. — D The Gladstone. 

Messer, I. C. — G 244 Becker Av. 

Met8, R. B. — ^M Medical College. 

Meyer. A. W. — ^A 844 Logan Av. 

Meyer, Edward — A 844 Logan Av. 

Mlcklethwait J- T.—L. . .Adelbert Hall. 
Mlcklethwaite, O. B.— A..126 Adelbert 

Miller, B. B.~D 169 Sterling Av. 

Miller, W. T— A 999 B. Madison. 

MilHkin, B. L.—U 278 Prospect St 

Mills, V. G.— A Wllloughby. 

Mlnnlg. Arnold— A 2481 Euclid Av. 



Miser, P. A.— W Guilford Hoow. 

Miser, W. G.— A Adelbert HaU. 

Moffett B. B.— A 716 N. Logan Av. 

Mohr, John — ^W 6 Cleve St 

Monson, M. A. — W Guilford House. 

Moore, A. G.— A 129 Burt St 

Moorehouse, G. W. — M 39 Cutler St. 

Morehouse, W. B. — A Adelbert Hall. 

Morley, S. W.— A 2238 Euclid Av. 

Morris, C. A.— A... 189 W. Madison Av. 
Morris, M. A.— W..189 W. Madison Av. 

Morris, W. P.— L 2179 Euclid Av. 

Morrow, Wilamina — ^W.228 B. Prospect. 

Morton, M. 1, — ^W Guilford House. 

Moss, Beatrice — ^W 39 Osbom St. 

Muckley, H. G. — ^A..148 Hawthorne Av. 

Muhlhauser, B. — A 110 Walton Av. 

Mumaw, B. M.— W.184 Murray Hill Av. 

Mumaw, W. C. — L Adelbert Hall. 

Murphy, J. V.— L Adelbert Hall. 

Myers, F. E. — W 1 Glen Park PL 

Myers, W. B.— L. . .126 Murray Hill Av. 

Neal, C. J.— A 616 Woodland Av. 

Nearpass, H. L. — A. . .761 N. Logan Av. 

Neer, E. D.— A 117 Adelbert St 

Neitsel, D. C— W Bedford. 

Newcomb, A. G. — L Adelbert iaall. 

Nicholson, A. W. — D...701 Superior St 

Nieding, J. A.— L 186 Taylor St 

Nimmons, W. T. — ^A 45 Knox St 

Nlms, W. W.— A 798 Bepublic St 

Nolan, H. T.—L 46 Fairchlld St 

Nord, H. J.— A 60 Bellflower Av. 

Nostran, B. V.— W 14 Stanley Av. 

Nutt A. P.— A... 127 Murray Hill Av. 

Oakley, A. B. — ^W 800 Hough Av. 

Oakley, L. B. — W 800 Hough Av. 

Oberlin, J. F.— A 67 Cornell 8t 

O'Brien, J. W. — A Adelbert Hall. 

O'Brien, K. M.— W The MUton. 

Ochs, C. B. — ^M 98 Herrick St. 

O'Connor, N. A. — M . . 224 Starkweather. 

Odiln, F. I.— W Guilford House. 

Ohl, C. F.—L Adelbert Hall. 

Oliver, T, B.—W Adelbert Hall. 

Orth. C. F. — ^L 139 Cornell St, 

Oabom, W, O. — M 276 Prospect St. 

Ostrander. A. — D 48 Wallace St. 

Otis, E. M.— A 16 Mariner St. 



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I'acker. L.— L 1066 Prospect St. 

Palda, G. A.— L 1655 Broadway. 

Palmie, A. H.—W 84 Sayles St. 

Park. W. C— -M 141 Chestnut St. 

Parker. C. M.— W Guilford House. 

Parker, H. E.— A 780 Republic St. 

Parker, H. P.— M Colonial Flats. 

Parkhurst, Charles — M.753 Superior St. 

Parks, R. K.— W Colllnwood. 

Parmenter. E. H.— W. . .717 Republic St. 

Parrish. F. B. — D..1255 Lexington Av. 

Parrott, H. B. — A 806 Palrmount St. 

Patterson, T. G. — ^D 429 Superior St. 

Patton. Raymond — A Adelbert Hall. 

Paulson, F. E. — W 1806 Euclid Av. 

Pay, George— M 47 Chestnut St. 

Peck. E. M.— W 28 Walker St. 

Peiser, Simon — G.Willson and Woodland 

Pelton, F. H. — A Colllnwood. 

PennetoeU, C. E.—IL. . .1254 Wlllson At. 

Pennington, G. L. — ^W 79 Hough Av. 

Perkiiu, B, if.— W... 121 Adelbert St. 

PerhinB, R. G. — M Colonial Flats. 

Perrin, J. W. — A 81 Cutler St. 

Pesklnd, Ben— M 1354 Willson Av. 

Peterka, Edward— A 61 Goethe St. 

Peters, O. M.— W..301 Murray Hill Av. 

Pettibone, E. L. — D The Gladstone. 

Peturcha, Edward — M 51 Goethe St. 

Petty, J. R.— A Bast Cleveland. 

Pfelffer. F. E.— A 89 Sayles St. 

Pfeifer, U. J.— A 89 Sayles St. 

Phelan, R. V.— A 698 Bridge St. 

Philen, J. R.— M 282 Champlain St. 

Phillipson, P. H.— G.Willson A Woodland 
Pierce, B. H. H.— A...168 Streator Av. 

Pilcher, J. D.— M 64 Aubumdale Av. 

Pitkin, C. E.— M 32 Haxard St. 

Plant, A. C— D 164 N. Perry St. 

Plainer^ 8. B. — A 24 Cornell St. 

Polhamtu, W. R. — A. . .20 Tennessee St. 

Post, B. M.— W 2211 Euclid Av. 

Potwin, L, a, — ^A 322 Rosedale. 

Pawelh B. H. — M 467 Prospect St 

Powell, W. L.--D 260 Euclid Av. 

Prendergast, D. A. — M 61 Burton St. 

Prentice, N. B. — ^A 12 Lakeview Av. 

Price, J. H.— L Eldred Hall. 

Price, F. J. R,— D 701 Superior St. 

Price, W. A. F.— D 2288 Luclid Av. 

Proctor, R. R, — A 153 Cornell St. 

Proudfoot, M. J. — W..2320 Spafford St. 



Quay, Jean — W 4050 Euclid Av. 

Quayle, Z. G.— W 290 Sibley St. 

Quinby, M. C— W Bast Cleveland. 

Ralston, R.— D 120 White A v. 

Randolph, I. H.— L Adelbert Hall. 

Rawson, M. J. — W 76 Adelbert ftt. 

Reece. E. J.— A 50 Beersford PI. 

Reese, T. M. — W 30 Tilden Av. 

Reeve, F. A.— W 49 Wilbur PI. 

Beiohman, F. — W 46 Knox St. 

Reisser, O. H. — D 65 Vega St. 

Renouf, M. J. — D Kent, O. 

Rhoades, Z. B.— W 499 Russel Av. 

Rider, W. H. — ^A 147 Cornell St. 

Riemenschnelder, C. A. — ^A. 

161 Beecliwood St. 

Riewel, Henry— M 95 Perry St. 

Risdon, Clara— W Guilford House. 

Riser, M.— A 36 Mentor St. 

Rolflf, Hunter — M 702 Rose Bldg. 

Roberts, B. E. — W Guilford House. 

Roberts, I. D.— W 116 Gaylord St. 

Roberta, N. 3f. — ^W 30 Sayles St. 

Robeson, L. P.— W 106 White St. 

Robison, W. L. — A 5 Hay ward St. 

Rodgers, H. S.— D 701 Superior St. 

Ronk, H. K. — A 26 Wilbur St. 

Rorabeck, J. i*.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Rose, C. S.— L Adelbert Hall. 

Rose, H. G. — A 142 Cornell St. 

Rosenberger, H. H. — D.168 N. Perry St. 
Rosenfeld, B. M.— W..1329 Willson Av. 
Rosenwasser, H. B. — D. . .722 >Voodland. 

Ross, C. D.— W 249 Streator Av. 

Rudolph, J. F. — M 68 Mansion St. 

Ruffini, C. A.— W 891 Scovlll Av. 

Ruggles, J. R. — A 224 Streator Av. 

Rummel, F. G. — D 138 Dodge St 

Rushton, N.— L Adelbert HalL 

Ryan, J. A. — L 795 Doan St 

Sabln, R. R.— W 89 Tilden Av. 

Sadler, B. R.— D 188 Chestnut St 

Sager, W. C— L Adelbert Hall. 

Sague, J. B. — ^W Guilford House. 

Salzer, A. M.— G 619 Giddlngs Av. 

Sampllner, E. A. — W...321 Kennard St 

Sampiiner, W. B. — M The Augusta. 

Sanderson, L. H. — W ... 166 Sawtell av. 

Saum, I. M. — D 28 Cheshire St 

Sawlckl, J. F.— L 346 Fleet St 



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Sawyer, J. P. — M 526 Rose BIdg. 

Sawyer, R. T. — L 64 Streator Av. 

Sayle. F. M.—M 1499 Cedar Av. 

Say well, G. W. — A 116 Streator Av. 

Sdilesslnger, W. A.— M.129 McBride St. 
Schmidt, E. C— A. .166 Murray Hill Av. 
Schneider, C. B. — W. .821 Falrmount St. 

Schuele, L. C. — W Guilford House. 

Schwartz, E. — L 26 McKinatry St. 

Schwegler, L. M.— W 58 Euclid ±*1. 

Seagrave, P. W. — A 55 Fourth Av. 

Season, E. B. — M 18 Nantucket St. 

Seesholtz, A. G. — W Guilford House. 

Selby, C. D.— M 64 Hawthorne Av. 

Selby, H. E. — W . . 25 Commonwealth Av. 

Senn, C. H.— M 755 Superior St. 

Sensel, E. H.— A 124 Putnam St. 

Severance, A. D. — \V..1981 Euclid Av. 
Shahleton, Wm. E. — M..605 The Osbom. 

Shankland, F. N.— A Adalbert Hall. 

Shanklln, M. G. — W 261 Hough -cv. 

Sharp. O. B.^A 45 Falrchild St 

Shea. J. C— L 74 Calvert St. 

Shephard, G. W.— M 530 Euclid Av. 

Shepherd, B. C— L Adelbert Hall. 

Shepherd. H. D.— W Guilford House. 

Sherbondy, J. A. — M...701 Superior bt. 

Shlrey, O. M.— M 171 Dodge St. 

Shultz, J. E. — D 407 Prospect St. 

Sickman, O. F. — D 2288 Euclid Av. 

Simpson, n. — 1> 88 Quebec St. 

Skeel, H. M.— W 770 Republic St. 

Skeel, M. M.— \7 17 Marble St. 

Singer, W. E.— A..156 Murray Hill Av. 

Sipher. J. A.— M 442 Euclid Av. 

Slike, J. H.— L Adelbert Hall. 

Slusser, L. D. — ^L 1 Arey St. 

Smith, A. A. — D Berea, O. 

Smith. B. B.— W 1204 Cedar Av. 

Smith, C. B.— W 109 Oakdale St. 

Smith, C. J.— A 86 Adelbert St 

Smith, E. R. — W Guilford House. 

Smith. G. I. — W Guilford House. 

Smith. H. L.— D 136 Dodge St 

Smith. L. L. — D 785 Superior St 

Smith, R. G.-— W 40 Cheshire St 

Smith, W. A.— D 749 Superior St 

Solberg. O. E.— W 136 Stearns Bt 

SoUmann, T. — M Brie and St Clair. 

Solmanson, S. H. — M 1022 Case Av. 

Southwick, P. F.->M...141 Chestnut St 
South worth, M. R.— A...147 Cornell St 



Spanner, L. B. — A 240 Orange St. 

Spelman, R. H. — ^A Euclid Heights. 

Spenoe, H. L. — ^M N. E. Bldg. 

Spengler, O. L. — W 63 Fourth Av. 

Spengler, W. D.— A 68 Fourth St 

Splcer, D. M.—M 162 Chestnut St 

Spleth, L. C— A...166 Murray Hill Av. 

Spieth, W. O.— D 17 Tennis St. 

Sponseller, N. A. — L Adelbert Hall. 

Sprague, L. M. — ^W 30 Bridge St. 

Spring, C. E.— M 141 Chestnut St 

Stahl, W. F.— M 171 Dodge St 

Stambaugh, C. D. — D. . .346 Genesee Av. 

Standen, H. C— D 452 Scovil Av. 

Stanford, V. L. — h 55 BucUd Av. 

Staral. J. A.— M 1251 vVlUson Av. 

Steiuma, A. A. — ^L 87 Oakdale St 

Stedman, F. H.— A 1944 Buclld Av. 

Stetson, F. A.— L.117 Murray Hill At. 

Stewart C. C— M 162 Dodge St 

Stevens, 0, D. — A 698 Republic St 

Stevens, E. E. — ^A 2036 Broadway. 

Stevens, H. F. — W 2036 Broadway. 

Stewart, G, N.—U . . . Erie and St Clair. 

Stewart J. R. — M 818 Case Av. 

Stilwell, L. B.— W 87 Stanwood Rd. 

Stlnchcomb, C. B. — A. 1177 Dennison Av. 

Stoney, F. L.— W 30 Bridge St 

Storer, W. A. — W 95 Ingleslde Av. 

Storey, A. S.— M 1083 St Clair bt 

Strangways, T. — D....312 Prospect St. 

Strauss, F. M. — A 1388 Superior St 

Streich, A. C— G 2 Hodgson St 

Strong, C. A.— A 109 Cornell St 

Strong, E. P. — L 486 Lake St 

Strong. O. F.— D 187 Dodge St 

Stuart J. H.— A...136 Murray Hill AV. 

Strunk, W. R. — A Adelbert Halt 

Suits, E. W. — A 989 S. Logan Av. 

Suits, J. C— W 30 Bertram St 

Suliot M. E.— W 2 Sturtevant St 

Summers, H. C. — ^A...1528 Superior St 

Sunkle, R. H. — M Pearl and Clark, 

Swift H. F.— A 147 Cornell St 

Sykora. L. C— M 221 Osbom St 

Taft G. A.— W 1082 Detroit St 

Tanner, E. M. — W 25 Llnwood St 

Tamutzer, B. C. — M. . .914 Franklin Av. 

Tarr, H. M.--M 193 Clinton St 

Tarr, P. H.— A 79 Sayles St 

Tarr, R. N.— W 79 Sayles St 



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257 



Taylor. F. J.— W 78 Oakdale St. 

Taylor. George — A 89 Catler St. 

Taylor, T. J.— M 294 Sterling Av. 

Templeton, B. M. — W. .Oullford Honae. 

Teakey, E. L. — D 889 Proapect St. 

Thayerp M. H. — ^W Guilford Honae. 

Thomaa, C. W.--M.1394 Woodland Hilla. 

Thomaa, P. L.— W 1467 WiUaon Av. 

Thomaa, G. P.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Thomaa* G. L. — ^W 6 Hinman St 

TtaomaBp H. A. — A 147 Cornell St. 

Thomaa, H. A. — W 27 Walker St. 

Thomaa, J. /.— M 166 Crawford Rd. 

Thomaa, M. K.— W 2004 Superior St. 

Thomat, O. T. — M 85 Edgewood PI. 

Thompaon, C. R. — ^D...798 Republic St 

Thompaon, E. W. — W 72 Harriet Av. 

Thompaon, H. O. — Jntr...67 Cornell St. 

Thompaon, J. E. — M 2 Llvingaton St. 

Thomaen, M. L. — L. .602 Garfield Bldg. 

Thitrndike, A. H.—W 95 Mayfleld St. 

Thwing, C. C— A 44 Nantucket St. 

ThtDinff, Ofias. F. — W. .55 Bell flower Av. 

Tiemev, J, 8, — M Medical College. 

Tompklna, G. E.— W 97 Luveme St. 

Torrey, B, L. — W Guilford Houae. 

Tower, O. P. — A 8 Nantucket St. 

Tracy, F. E. — W Euclid. 

Trinter. W. P.— L 1241 Wlllaon Av. 

Trowbridge, F. L.—L 84 Milea Av. 

Tryon. S. B. — A Adelbert Hall. 

Turner, J. B. — W 98 Murray Hill Av. 

Tuttle, A. G.— A.^. 863 Doan St. 

Tyler, B. E.— M 51 Daiay Av. 

Tyler, J. W. — L 21 Morse Av. 

Uhlman, P. \\.— A.156 Murray Hill Av. 

Unger, R. C. — D 889 Proapect St. 

Upson, H, 5.— M N. E. Bldg. 

Uatlck, L. W.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Vail, H. D.— M 190 Helen St. 

Tan Doom, J, W. — D 455 Arcade. 

▼an Epps, M. E. — W. .915 S. Logan Av. 

Van Pelt, T. .C-— D. . .* 169 Sterling. 

Van Voorhia, R. F. .126 Murray Hill Av. 

Vilaa, G. E. — W 220 Kennard St. 

Vincent. J. A. — M 777 Superior St. 

Vita, C. P. P. — A 45 Marvin St. 

Wachner, S. C. — A 440 ScoviU Av. 

Wadaworth. C. H. — D. . .1804 Euclid Av. 



Waite, F, (7.— M 77 Hlllburn Av. 

Waite, J. W. — A 1086 Scranton Av. 

Walker, E. W. — D 508 Proapect St. 

WiUker, P.— A 44 Nantucket St. 

Walker, Mary — ^W 2808 Broadway. 

Wallace, A. M.— W 28 Marion St. 

Wallace, C. M.— A Wllloughby. 

Walsh, J. D. — W 69 x^ower Av. 

Ward, B. G.— W Wllloughby. 

Ware, L. B. — L 1480 Detroit St. 

Work, J. F. — D Rose Bldg. 

Warner, R. C. — A Adelbert Hall. 

Warnock, D. R. — L 2097 Euclid Av. 

Warren, W. H. — L 838 Doan St. 

Watson, Harry — ^D 62 SterllngAv. 

Watkina. T.—D 62 Sterling Av. 

Watteraon, H. S. — M.564 E. Prospect St. 

Watts, I. R.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Wearstler, H. O. — D The Gladatone. 

Weaver, R. B. — A 153 Cornell St. 

Weber, J. H.— M 442 Euclid Av. 

Weber, O. A,— A... 127 Murray Hill Av. 

Webster, H. J.— L 2378 Pearl St. 

Wedler, Richard— M 160 Colfax. 

Wehr, a. J.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Weimer, E. O. — W..144 Hawthorne Av. 
Weia, Katie — ^W. .Marcelllne & Harvard. 

Wells, J. H.— M Lonsdale Av. 

West, Pearl — W 203 Amesbury Av. 

Whelan, Cecily — ^W 108 Kentucky St. 

White, A. B. — A 19 LaGrange. 

White, Elisabeth— W Euclid. 

White, H, C— L 344 Harkneaa Av. 

White, Wm. H.— M 459 Euclid Av. 

Whitman, F, P. — A 79 Adei^ert St. 

Whitslar, W. H.— D 29 Euclid Av. 

Wickham, B. B. — L .. University School. 

Wilcox, A. G.— A Adelbert Hall. 

Wilcox, O. N.— A 59 Olive St. 

Wilkin, G. S.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

WUliams, B. 0.— Libr 61 Grant St. 

Williama, P. B.—L 111 Crawford Rd. 

Willlama, J. P.— A 153 Cornell St. 

WiUiama, L. B.— W...127 Streator Av. 
Willlama, L. B.— A...64 Glen Park PI. 
Williamson. C. C— A..116 Streator Av. 

Wills, O. G.— W 88 Clarence A7. 

Wilaon, B. W. — M 580 Euclid Av. 

Wilson, Q. H. — ^D 44 Euclid Av. 

Wilson. M. P.— W 75 Adelbert St. 

Wilson. R. L. — D The Genesee. 

Windlsch, J. S. — D 23 Freeman St. 



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258 



DIRECTORY. 



[19OI-I902 



WinsMp, Maud — ^W..1(K) Kensington St. 

Winter, J. C. — A 1252 Scranton Av. 

Wittier. Mary— W 75 Adelbert St. 

Wolcott, J. v.— A 72 Grasmere St. 

Wolfram, E. B. — ^A.166 Murray Hill Av. 

Womachka. E. A. — ^D 53 DoUoff St. 

Wood, A. L. — D The Gladstone. 

Woodward, J. G. — A. . . .203 Adelbert St. 

Woolf, L. A. — M 507 Prospect St. 

Woolfolk, R. A.— A. 156 Murray Hill At. 

Workman, I. S.— M 55 Sibley St. 

Workman, T. W. — D....28 Cheshire St. 

Worley. N. J.— D 18 B. Franklin St. 

Worrell, K. G.—D 2238 Euclid Av. 

Worthlngton, E. — ^W 34 Cheshire St. 

Wright, D. A.—D 832 Cedar Av. 



Wright, H. M. — W Guilford House. 

Wright, O. A.— A 45 Knox St. 

Yeagle, M. C— -M 761 Superior St. 

Yoder, H. B. — M. . 9 Wycombe PL 

Yohannon, David— M .. 1083 St. Clair St. 

Young, Ida — W Guilford House. 

Young, Jennie — W 22 Melrose Av. 

Young, J. L. — A 845 Russell Av. 

Young, J. H. — A 17 Centennial St. 

Young, S. A. — M 2370 Crosby Av. 

Young, T. C— M..1872 Woodland Hills. 

Zeigler, D, H. — D Rose Bldg. 

Ziemer, W. O. — ^M...34 Woodbrldge Av. 
Zlsmer, C. A.— W 112 Mechanic St. 



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INDEX 



APPENDIX 

ADBLBERT COLLEGE, 

Admission 86 

Aid to students 71 

Alumni Association 2f7 

Course of study 48-00 

Degrees 66 

Expenses 70 

Faculty 27 

Grades of scholarship 65 

Historical statement 28 

Honors 67 

Laboratories 62 

Libraries 61 

Physical training 64 

Prues 68 

Religious worship 61 

Requirements for admission 86 

Scholanhip— see Aid. 

Students 80 

Terms and vacations 61 

CALENDAR 4 

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN, 

Admission 86 

Advisory council 75 

Aid to students 120 

Alumni association 247 

Course of study 90-111 

Degrees 118 

Dormitory 117 

Expenses 120 

Faculty 76 

General statement 78 

Laboratories 114 

Libraries 118 

Physical training 116 

Religious worship 119 

Scholarship— see Aid. 

Students 79 

Terms and vacations 112 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT, 

Admission 225 

Alumni association 248 

Building 286 

Clinics 234 

Courses of study 226 

Degree 287 

Expenses 237 

Faculty 220 

General statement 218 

Libraries 61,287 

Students 222 



242 DIRECTORY AND OFFICERS ^9 

FACULTY S 

GRADUATE DEPARTMENT, 

Courses of instruction 126-141 

Faculty 128 

General information 122, 142 

Libraries 142 

Publication fund 144 

Students 125 

HISTORICAL STATEMENTS 

28, 73, 122, 145, 205$. 218 

LAW SCHOOL, 

Admission 211 

Alumni association 248 

Courses of instruction 211 

Degree— see Examinations. 

Examinations 216 

Expenses 217 

Faculty 205 

Historical statement 208 

Libraries 61,216 

Location 216 

Moot courts 216 

Scholarships 217 

StudcnU 206 

University advantages 217 

MEDICAL COLLEGE, 

Admission 157 

Alumni association 248 

Climes 185 

Courses of study 150-179 

Dispensaries 187 

Examinations 190 

Expenses 188 

Faculty 148 

General statement 145 

Hospital appointments 185 

Hospitals 184 

Laboratories 181 

Libraries 181 

Museums 188 

Schedule 161 

Students 158 

Text-books 177 

PUBLICATION FUND 70 

SENATE 7 



SUMMARY OF NUMBERS 241 

TRUSTEES 6 

TRUSTEE COMMITTEES 7 



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Western Reserve University 



CATALOGUE. 



1902-190? 



CLEVELAND. OHIO. 



CLEVELAND. O. 

PRESS OF WINN * JUDSON 

1008 



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CONTENTS. 

Gbnbrai. Statbmbnt 5 

Trustbbs 6 

FACUI.TY, Instructors and Oppicbrs 7 

Adbwbrt Collbgb— Historical Statement 23 

Faculty and Instructors 27 

Students 30 

Requirements for Admission 36 

Courses of Study 42 

General Information . . 62 

Expenses 72 

Thb Coi^lbgb for Wombn— General Statement 75 

Faculty and Instructors 78 

Students 81 

Requirements for Admission 88 

Courses of Study 92 

General Information 113 

Expenses 121 

Graduatb Dbpartmbnt— General Statement 123 

Faculty and Instructors 124 

Students 126 

Courses of Study 128 

General Information 143 

Mbdical Coi^lbge— General Statement 146 

Faculty 149 

Students 154 

Requirements for Admission 157 

Courses of Study 159 

General Information 180 

Expenses 189 

Examination Papers 192 

Thb School of Law — Historical Statement 203 

Faculty 205 

Students 206 

Requirements for Admission 210 

Course of Instruction 210 

General Information 214 

Expenses 216 

Dental Department— General Statement 217 

Faculty 219 

Students 221 

Admission and Course of Study 224 

General Information 235 

Expenses 237 

Summer School 243 

General Summary 244 

Appendix 245 

Directory 252 



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CALENDAR. 



1902. 
22-23 Sept. 


Monday-Tuesday 


Examinations for admission 


23 Sept. 


Tuesday 


First term begins. 


27 Nov. 


Thursday 


Thanksgiving day. 


24 Dec. 


Wednesday 


Winter recess begins. 


1903. 
4 Jan. 


Sunday 


Winter recess ends. 


29 Jan. 


Thursday 


Examinations begin. 


7 Feb. 


Saturday 


First term ends. 


8 Feb. 


Sunday 


Day of prayer for colleges. 


9 Feb. 


Monday 


Second term begins. 


22. Feb. 


Sunday 


Washington's birthday. 


9 April 


Thursday 


Easter recess begins. 


15 April 


Wednesday 


Easter recess ends. 


30 May 


Saturday 


Decoration day. 


4 June 


Thursday 


General examinations begin. 


14 June 


Sunday 


Baccalaureate sermon. 


15 June 


Monday 


Undergraduate day. 


16 June 


Tuesday 


Prize oratorical contest, Adel- 
bert College. 


17 June 


Wednesday 


Meeting of alumni. 


17 June 


Wednesday 


Commencement, College for 
Women. 


18 June 


Thursday 


Commencement. 


19-20 June 


Friday-Saturday 


Examinations for admission. 



SUMMER VACATION OF THIRTEEN WEEKS. 
2i~22 Sept. Monday-Tuesday Examinations for admission. 



22 Sept. 


Tuesday 


First term begins. 


26 Nov. 


Thursday 


Thanksgiving day. 


24 Dec. 


Thursday 


Winter recess begins, 



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8 


4 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 ! 5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


13 


14 


16 


16 


17 


18 


10 


11 


12 


13 


14 


15 


16 


17 12 


18 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


26 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22 


28 


24 19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


25 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 






25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


30 


31 26 


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80 


81 




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February. j August. 










1 


2 


















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a' 4 


5 


6 


7 


8 


9 


1 


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14 


15 


17ll8 


19 


20 


21 


22 


23 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 Il6 


17 


18 


19 20 


21 


22 


24 |25 


26 


27 


28 


29 


80 


22 


23 


24 


25 26 


27 


28|28 


24 


25 


26 27 


28 


29 


31 1 .. 






















.. l80 


31 




1 .. 






September. 


March. | September. 




1 2 


3 


4 


5 


6 








• 1 •• 




.. 1 .. 




1 


2 


8 


4 


5 


7 


S 9 


10 


11 


12 


18 


1 


2 


3 


41 5 


6 


7 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 


15, 16 


17 


18 


19 


20 


8 


9 


10 


11 , 12 


18 


14 113 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


21 


22123 


24 


25 


26 


27 


15 


16 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 20 


21 


22 


28 


24 


25 


26 


28 


29 80 

1 










22 
29 


28 
SO 


24 
81 


25 26 


27 


28 127 


28 


29 


80 








October. 


April. ' October. 


.. • .. 1 .. 1 1 


2! 8 


4 


..\ 






1 1 2 


3 4.. 




1 


1, 2 


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51 e' 7l 8 


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5 


6 


7 


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4 


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6 


7 


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10 


12^18 


14 i 15 


16 17 


18 


12 


13 


14 


15 16 


17 18 


11 


12 


18 


14 


15 16 


17 


19|20 


21 


22 


23124 


25 


19 


20 


21 


22 23 


24 25 


18 


19 


20 


21 


22I23 


24 


26l27 


28 


29 


30 31 

.. 1 .. 




26 


27 


28 


29 SO 




25 


26 


27 


28 


29,30 


31 


November. 


May. November. 


2 


3 4 6 


6 


7 


1 
8 


8 


. 1 .. 
4 5 


6 


7 


1 
8 


2 .. 
9; 1 


2 8 


4I 5 


6 


7 


9 


10 11 1 )2 


13 


14 


15 


10 


11 1 12 


13 


14 


15 


16, 8 


9 10 


11 12 


18 


14 


16 


17 1 18 19 


20 


21 


22 


17 


18 19 


20 


21 ,22 


23' 15 


16 17 


18 19 


20 


21 


2;^ 


24 25 1 26 


27 


28 


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24 


25 126 


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28129 


30122 


23|24 


25 26 


27 


28 


80 


. 1 .. 1 .. 








81 


1 




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80 .. 








December. 


June. 




December. 


.112 


3 


4 5 


6 




1 


2 3 4 


5 


6 






1 


2 


3 


4 


5 


7 8, 9 


10 


11 12 


18 


7 


8 


9 10 11 


12 


13l 6 


7 


8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


14 1 15 1 Itf 


17 


18 19 


20 


14 


16 


16;17 18 


19 


20 13 


14 


15 


16 


17 


18 


19 


21 I 22 2:^ 


24 


25 26 


27 


21 


22 


2:^1 24 25 


26 


27 20 


21 


22 


23 


24 


26 


26 


28 129 {30 


31 






28 


29 


30,.. .. 




.. 127 


28 


29 


30 


31 







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WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY/ 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



Western Reserve University embraces six departments. 

Addbert CoUesfc — formerly the Western Reserve Col- 
lege — founded at Hudson in 1826, and removed to Cleveland 
in 1882. 

The CoUcgc for Women^ established in 1888. 

The Department of Gradtsate Instruction, established 
in 1892 by tUe Faculties of Adelbert College and the College 
for Women; designed to offer to college graduates courses 
leading to the degree of A. M. and Ph. D. 

The Medical CoIles:e — formerly known as the Cleve- 
land Medical College — founded in 1844, oflFering a course of 
four years in medicine. 

The Franklin T* Backtss Law School, opened in 1892; 
designed by means of a course of study covering three 
years, to give an adequate training for the practice of the 
law. 

The Dental Department^ opened in 1892; designed to 
teach the art of dentistry as a department of medicine. 

Popular and educational lectures are included in the 
plans of the University. 

Charles F. Thwing, President, 



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TRUSTERS. 



CHARLES F. THWING, D. D., LL. D., President, Cleveland. 

HIRAM C. HAYDN, D. D., LL. D., Vice President, Cleveland. 

WILLIAM H. UPSON, A. B., Vice President, Akkov. 

JOHN HAY. LL. D., Washington, D. C 

SAMUEL E. WILLIAMSON, LL. D., Cleveland. 

LIBERTY E. HOLDEN, A. M., Cleveland. 

EDWIN R. PERKINS, A. B., Cleveland. 

SAMUEL MATHER,' A. M.. Cleveland. 

J. HOMER WADE, Cleveland. 
t WILLI AM H. BALDWIN, A. B., New York City. 
tJOEL M. SEYMOUR, A. B., B. D., Alliance. 

WASHINGTON S. TYLER, Cleveland. 
*JOHN H. McBRIDE, Cleveland. 

EDWARD P. WILLIAMS, A. M., Cleveland. 
tHENRY M. LADD, D. D., East Cleveland. 
fCHARLES M. RUSSELL, A. B., Massillon. 
*HARRY A. GARFIELD, A. B., Cleveland. 
«CHARLES L. PACK, CLEVELAND. 
tMOSES G. WATERSON, A. M., Cleveland. 
tJARVIS M. ADAMS, A. B., CLEVELAND. 

HERBERT A. HITCHCOCK, A. B.. Michigan City. Ind. 

ALFRED A. POPE, Cleveland. 

LOUIS H. SEVERANCE, Cleveland. 

HENRY R. HATCH, Cleveland. 

WORCESTER R. WARNER. Cleveland. 

LEWIS H. JONES, A. M., Ypsilanti, Mich. 

WILLIAM D. REES, Cleveland. 
tWILLIAM G. MATHER. A. B., Cleveland. 
•ANDREW SQUIRE, LL. D., Cleveland. 
tD. Z. NORTON, Cleveland. 
*CHARLES W. BINGHAM, A. B., Cleveland. 
*CHARLES F. BRUSH, Ph. D., LL. D., Cleveland. 



HARRY A. HARING, A. B., Secretary and Treasurer, 
Office in Adelbert College Building. 



•Tmstees of the Unirersity only. fTrugtees of Adelbert College only. All others 

are Tnaatees of both corporations. 
tDeoeaied. 



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THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF 
THE UNIVERSITY* 



SAMUEL E. WILLIAMSON, 
LOUIS H. SEVERANCE. 
SAMUEL MATHER, 
J. HOMER WADE, 
WASHINGTON S. TYLER. 



THE UNIVERSITY SENATE. 



THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

THE PRESIDENT OP THE UNIVERSITY. 

THE DEANS OP THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS. 

Profbssors M. M. Curtis and S. B. Pi^tnbr, for Adelbert College. 

Professors H. E. Bourne and H. N. Fowi^er, for the College for 
Women. 

Professors J. H. Lowman and D. P. Ai^len, for the Medical 
College. 

Professors H. H. Johnson and H. C. White, for the Law School. 



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FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arranged alphabetically within each division. 



Charlbs FrankIvIN Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President, 

A. B., Harvard Coll., 1876; B. D., Andover Theological SemlDary, 
1879; D. D.. Chicago Theological Seminary, 1888; LL. D.. IlllnoU Coll. 
and Marietta Coll., 1804; President Adelbert College and Western Re- 
serve University, 1890 — 

Hiram Coi^lins Haydn, D. D., LL. D., 15 La Grange St. 

Vice President and Harkness Professor of Biblical Literature, 

A. B., Amherst Coll., 1866; D. D., Wooster Univ.. 1878; LL. D., 
Amherst Coll. and Marietta Coll., 1888 : President Adelbert College and 
Western Reserve University, 1887-90; Instructor In Biblical Literature, 
1888-96; Professor of Biblical Literature, 1896 — 

Hbrbrrt Austin Aikins, Ph. D., 40 Cornell St. 

Leffingwell Professor of Philosophy, 

Acting Dean of the Graduate School, 

A. B., Univ. of Toronto, 1887 ; Instructor, Univ. of Southern Cali- 
fornia, 1888 ; Yale Univ., 1888-91; Lecturer on History of Philosophy, 
Yale Univ., 1890-91; Ph. D., Yale. 1891; Professor of Logic and Phil- 
osophy, Trinity Coll.. N. C, 1891-98; Honorary Fellow. Clark Univ., 
1892-98; Professor of Philosophy, College for Women, l898 — 

DuDi^EY Peter Ai.i,en, A. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Theory and Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

A. B., Oberlln Coll.. 1875 ; A. M., 1888 ; M. D.. Harvard Univ., 1880 ; 
Freiburg, Berlin, Vienna, London, Lelpsic, 1880-82; Lecturer and Pro- 
fessor of Surgery, Western Reserve University, 1898 — 

Henry Lovejoy Ambi^er, M. S., D. D. S., M. D., 176 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Operative Dentistry and Hygiene. 

Dean of the Dental College, 

B. S., Hillsdale Coll., 1864; M. S., 1867; D. D. S., Ohio ColL of 
Dental Surgery, 1867 ; M. D., Cleveland Univ. of Medicine and Surgery, 
1868; Professor of Dental Science In the same Institution, 1868-70; 
Lecturer in Dental Hygiene, Dental College of Western Reserve Uni- 
versity, 1892 ; Professor of Operative Dentistry and Hygiene, 1898 — 

George C. Ashmun, M. D., 794 Republic St. 

Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine^ 

Registrar and Bursar of the Medical College, 

M. D., Cleveland Medical Coll., 1878 : Professor of Diseases of 
Children, Wooster Univ., 1889-98; Professor of Hygiene, Western 
Reserve University, 1898 — 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 9 

Henry Eldridgb Bourne, A. B., B. D., 144 Cornell St. 

Professor of History, 

A. B., Yale Coll.. 1888 ; Principal of High School, Thomaston, Conn., 
1883-84; B. D., Yale Divinity School, 1887; Hooker Fellow, Yale Di- 
vinity School, 1887-88 : Teacher of Etistory and Psychology, Free Acad., 
Norwich, Conn., 1889-92; Professor of History and Instructor in Phil- 
osophy, College for Women, 1892-98; Professor of History, 1898 — 

Frank E. Bunts, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 

United States Naval Acad., 1881 ; M. D., The Medical Coll., Western 
Reserve Univ., 1886; Lectn;rer on Minor Surgery, Medical Department 
of Wooster Univ., 1887-88; Berlin, Vienna, Paris, 1888-89; Professor 
of Principles of Surgery, Wooster Univ., 1890-94; Professor of the 
Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery in Medical College, Western 
Reserve University, 1894 — 

Ai^FRED G. Carpenter, a. M., LL. B., 125 Streator Av. 

Professor of the Law of Pleading and Practice, 

A. B., Ohio Wesleyan Univ., 1878; A. M., 1876; LL. B., Univ. of 
Michigan, 1876; Professor of Law of Contracts, Western Reserve 
University, 1896-1902; Professor of the Law of Pleading and Practice, 
1902— 

Henry Bardwei^i, Chapman, A. B., LL. B., East Cleveland. 

Processor of the Law of Agency and Bills and Notes. 

A. B., Oberlln, 1885; LL. B., Harvard Univ.. 1890; Professor of 
the Law of Agency, Western Reserve University, 1897 — 

William Thomas CoRLETT, M. D., L R.C.P. (London), 553 Euclid Av. 
Professor of Dermatology and Syphilology. 
M. D., Wooster Univ., 1877 ; L. E. C. P., London, 1882 ; Professor 
of Dermatology and Syphilology, Western Reserve University, 1898 — 

George W. Crile, Ph. D., M. D., 169 Kensington Av. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery, 

A. B., Ohio Normal Univ., 1882 ; A. B., Wooster Univ., 1887 ; M. D., 
1887; Student In New York, Vienna and London. 1887-95; Professor of 
Phy8ioI(Mnr and Surgery, Wooster Medical Coll., 1897-1900; Ph. D, 
Hiram Coll., 1899; Professor of Clinical Surgery, Western Reserve 
University, 1900 — 

Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Handy Professor of Philosophy, 

A. B., Hamilton Coll.. 1880; B. D., Union Theological Seminary, 
1888; A. M., Hamilton Coll., 1883; Pastor at Hastings-on-Hudson and 
at Cleveland, 1888-88 ; Univ. of Leipslc, 1888-91 ; Ph. D., 1890 ; Profes- 
sor of Philosophy, Adelbert College 1891 — 

Henry Platt Gushing, M. S., 260 Sibley St. 

Professor of Geology, 

Ph. B., Cornell Univ.. 1882; Cornell Univ., 1882-83; School of 
Mines, Columbia Coll., 1883-84; Cornell Univ., 1884-85; M. S., 1885; 
Instructor In Geology, Chemistry and Physics. State Normal School, 
Mankato, Minn., 1885-91; Univ. of Munich, 1891-92: Instructor in 
Geology and Chemistry, College for Women, 1892-93 ; Associate Profes- 
sor oF Geology, 1898-96; Professor of Geology, 1895 — 

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lO FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [1902-I903 

Edward Fitch Gushing, Ph. B., M. D., 1160 Euclid Av. 

Professor 0/ the Diseases of Children. 

Ph. B., Cornell Unly., 1888 ; M. D., Harrard Unly., 1888 : Professor 
of the Diseases of Children. Western Reserve Unlyersity, 1894 — 

John E. Darby, A. M., M. D., Doan St. and Euclid Av. 

Professor of Therapeutics. 
A. B.. Williams Coll., 1858 ; A. M., 1861 ; M. D., Western Reserve 
Univ., 1861 : Professor of Materia Medlca and Therapeutics, Western 
Reserve University, 1867 — 

ROBBRT Wai.i,BR Deering, Ph. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature. 

Dean of the Graduate School. 

Centre Coll.. 1879-80; Vanderbllt Univ., 1880-85; A. B.. 1884; 
A. M., 1885; Instructor In German, Vanderbllt Univ., 1885-86; Univ. 
of Lelpslc. 1886-89 ; Ph. D., 1889 ; Adjunct Professor of Germanic Lan- 
guages and Literature, Vanderbllt Univ.. 1889-92; Professor of Ger- 
manic Languages and Iilterature, College for Women. 1892 — 

Oi^ivER Farrar Emerson, Ph. D., 50 Wilbur St. 

Otnatt Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology. 

A. B., Iowa Coll., 1882; A. M., 1885: Sunerlntendent of Schools, 
Grinnell, la.. 1882-84 : Muscatine, la., 1884-85 ; Principal of the Academy 
of Iowa Coll., 1885-88 ; Goodwin Smith Fellow in English, Cornell Univ., 
1888-89; Instructor In English, Cornell Univ., 1889-91; Ph. D., 1891; 
Assistant Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology, 1892-96; Pro- 
fessor of Rhetoric and English Philology, Adelbert College, 1896 — 

Haroi^d North Fowi.er, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Clark Professor of Greek, 

A. B., Harvard Coll., 1880; Classical Master in Marston's Univer- 
sity School, Baltimore, 1880-82; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1880-81; Ameri- 
can School of Classical Studies in Athens, 1882-83; Univ. of Berlin, 
1888-84; Univ. of Bonn., 1884-85; Ph. D., 1885; Instructor in Greek, 
Latin, and Archeology, Harvard Coll., 1885-88; Instructor in Latin, 
Phillips Exeter Acad., 1888-90; Professor of Latin. Phillips Bzeter 
Acad., 1890-92 ; Professor of Greek. Univ. of Texas, 1892-93 ; Professor 
of Greek, College for Women, 189$ — 

Abraham Lincoi^n Fuller, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greeks Dean of Adelbert College. 

A. B., Dartmouth Coll., 1885 : A. M., 1888 ; Univ. of Leipslc, 1885- 
87 ; Univ. of Erlangen, 1887-88 ; Ph. D., 1888 ; Instructor in Latin and 
French, Adelbert Coll., 1889-90 ; Professor of Greek, College for Women, 
1890-93; Professor of Greek, Adelbert College, 1893 — 

Alexander Hadden, A. B., 1670 Lexington Av. 

Professor of the Law of Crimes^ Criminal Procedure^ and Damages. 
a. B., Oberlln Coll., 1873; Professor of the Law of Crimes and 
Damages, Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

Carl A. Hamann, M. D., 661 Prospect St. 

Professor of Anatomy. 

M. D., Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1890; Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1890-93; Professor of Anatomy, Western 
Reserve University, 1893 — 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. II 

Chari^bs Harris, Ph. D.» 15 Adelbert Hall. 

Professor of German, 

K. B., Indiana Univ., 1879; Ph. D., Univ. of Lelpslc, 1888: In- 
ttmctor In German, Academic Department of Vlncennes uniy., 1883-86 ; 
Professor of French and German, Southern Illinois State Normal School, 
1886-88; Professor of German, Oberlln Coll., 1888-98; Professor of 
German, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

Francis Hobart Hbrrick, Ph. D., D. Sc., 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology and Curator of the Zoological Collection, 

A. B., Dartmouth Coll., 1881 ; Ph. D., Johns Hopkins Univ.. 1888 ; 
D. Sc, Western Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1897 ; Instructor in Biology, 
Adelbert College, 1888-91 ; Professor of Biology, 1891 — 

Frank Rufus Herrick, A. B., 449 Russell Av. 

Professor of the Law of Torts, 

A. B., Yale Univ., 1888; Professor of Law of Torts, Western Re- 
serve University, 1897 — 

Perry L. Hobbs, Ph. D. (Berlin), 1420 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Chemistry. 

B. 8., Case School of Applied Science, 1886 ; Ph. D., Univ. of Berlin, 
1889; Professor of Chemistry, Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

Chari^SS F. Hoovbr, a. B., M. D., 702 Rose Building. 

Professor of Physical Diagnosis, 

A. B., Harvard Univ., 1890; M. D., 1892; Professor of Physical 
Diagnosis, Western Reserve University, 1896 — 

Evan Henry Hopkins, A. B., LL. B., 84 Miles Av. 

Professor of the Law of Contracts and Equity furisdiction^ 

Dean of the Law School, 

A. B.. Adelbert Coll., 1889 ; LL. B.. Harvard Univ., 1892 ; Professor 
of Law of Contracts and Equity Jurisdiction and Dean of Law School, 
Western Reserve University, 1892 — 

William T. Howard, Jr., M. D., 88 Dorchester Av. 

Professor of Pathology ^ Pathological Anatomy and Bacteriology, 

Univ. of Virginia, 1885-87 ; M. D., Univ. of Maryland. 1889 ; Johns 
Hopkins Univ., 1889-94; Professor of Pathology and Bacteriology, 
Western Reserve University, 1894 — 

Paul Rowland, A. M., LL. B., 341 Huron St. 

Professor of the Law of Heading and Practice and Partnership, 

A. B., Oberlln Coll., 1884; A. M., 1894; LL. B., Harvard Univ., 
1890: Professor of Law of Pleading and Practice, and Partnership, 
Western Reserve University, 1896 — 

WiLUAM Hbnry Hulmb, Ph. D., 48 Mayfield St. 

Professor of English. 

A. B., Vanderbilt Univ., 1890; Assistant in Greek, 1889-90: Univ. 
of Lelpsic. 1891-92 ; Univ. of Jena. 1892-98 ; Univ. of Freiburg. 1893-94 : 
Ph. P., 1894: Instructor in German, Adelbert College, 1804-96: Asso- 
ciate Professor of English, College for Women, 1896-1900; Professor of 
English; 1900— 



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12 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [1902-I903 

HOMBR HosBA Johnson, A. M., LL. B., Overlook Road. 

Professor of Constitutional Law, 
A. B., Oberlln Coll^ 1886 ; A. M.. LL. B., Harvard Univ.. 1888 ; 
Professor of the Law of Trusts and Constitutional Law, Western Reserve 
University, 1898 — 

Jacob Laisy, A. M., M. D., Syracuse, Neb. 

Professor Emeritus of Anatomy. 

A. B., Western Reserve Coll., 1850 ; A. M., 1858 ; M. D., Cleveland 
Medical Coll., 1858; Professor of Anatomy, Cleveland Medical Coll., 
1863-84 ; Professor Emeritus of Anatomy, Western Reserve University, 
1884— 

James Lawrence, A. B., 709 Genesee Av. 

'Professor of the Law of Public and Private Corporations, 
A. B., Kenyon Coll., 1871: Professor of the Law of Public and 
Private Corporations, Western Reserve University, 1896 — 

John H. Lowman, A M., M. D., 441 Prospect St. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, 

A. B., Connecticut Weslevan Univ., 1871 ; A. M., 1874 : M. D., 
Wooster Medical Coll., 1878; M. D., Coll. of Physicians and Burgeons, 
New York, 1876; Professor of Medicine, Western Reserve University, 
1881— 

Benjamin Love Millikin, A. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of Ophthalmology ^ 

Dean of the Medical College, 

A. B., Allegheny Coll., 1874; A. M., 1877; M. D., Univ. of Penn- 
sylvania, 1879; Ophthalmic Surgeon Charity Hospital, 1884; Lakeside 
Hospital, 1898; Professor of Ophthalmology, Western Reserve Univ., 
1894; Dean of Medical College, western Reserve University, 1900 — 

Edward Williams Morlby, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 

The Everlyne, 63 Ingleside Av. 

Hurlbut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry, 

A. B., Williams Coll.. 1860 ; A. M., 1863 ; M. D., Cleveland Medical 
Coll., 1877; Ph. D., Wooster Univ., 1879; LL. D., Western Reserve 
Univ., 1891, Williams Coll., 1901 ; Professor of Chemistry, Western Re- 
serve College and Adelbert College, 1869 — 

Anna Hblene Palmi^, Ph. B., 2733 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Mathematics. 

Ph. B., Cornell Univ., 1890 ; Fellow in Mathematics, 1890-91; In- 
structor in Mathematics and German, College for the Training of 
Teachers, New York City. 1891-92 ; Instructor in Mathematics, College 
for Women, 1892-98; Associate Professor of Mathematics, 1893-96; 
Professor of Mathematics, 1895 — 

Charles Elliott Pennewei^Li 1254 Willson Av. 

Professor of the Law of Real Property, 

Professor of the Law of Real Property, Western Reserve University, 
1892—. 

Emma Maud Perkins, A. B., 121 Adelbert St. 

Professor of Latin. 

A. B., Vassar Coll., 1879; Instructor in Classics, Central High 
School, Cleveland, 1879-92 ; Associate Professor of Latin, College ror 
Women, 1892-93; Professor of Latin, 1898 — 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 3 

John Wii^uam Pkrrin, Ph. D., 81 Cutler St. 

Haydn Professor of History, 

Ph. B., Illinois Wesleyan Univ., 1887; AaslBtant Principal of High 
School, Danville, 111., 1887-88 ; Superintendent of Schools, Petersburg, 
111.. 1888-80; A. M., Wabash Coll.. 1889; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1890-92; 
Univ. of Chicago, 1892-98 ; Professor of History and Political Economy, 
Wisconsin State Normal School, Platteville, Wis., 1898-94; Ph. D., 
Univ. of Chicago, 1895; Professor of History and Politics, Allegheny 
Coll., 1896-98; Professor of History, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

Samuei. Baw, Platner, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit. 

Secretary of the Faculty of Adelbert College. 

A. B.. Yale Coll., 1883; Ph. D., 1885; Instructor In Latin and 
French, Adelbert Coll., 1885-90; Assistant Professor of Latin, Adelbert 
Coll., 1890-92; Professor of Latin, Adelbert College, 1892— 

I^EMUEi* Stoughton Potwin, A. M., D. D., 322 Rosedale Av. 

Professor of the English Language and L iterature. 

A. B., Yale Coll., 1854 ; A. M., 1857 ; Tutor in Yale, 1858-60 ; D. D., 
1886: Professor of Latin, Western Reserve Coll. and Adelbert College, 
1871-92; Professor of the English Language and Literature, 1892 — 

Hunter H. Powei.1*, A. M., M. D., 467 Prospect St. 

Professor of Obstetrics and Pediatrics. 

M. D., Virginia Medical Coll.. 1867 ; A. M., Western Reserve Univ.. 
1894; Professor of Obstetrics and ' Pediatrics, western Reserve Univer- 
sity, 1875— ; Dean of 'Medical College, 1895-1900. 

Hunter Robb, A. B.. M. D. 702 Rose Building. 

Professor of Gynecology. 

A. B., Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1880; M. D., 1884; House StafT, 
Presbyterian Hospital, Philadelphia, 1885: Episcopal Hospital, 1886; 
Assistant Surgeon, Kensington Hospital, 1887 ; Vienna, Berlin, Prague, 
Lelpsic, Paris, London, 1888-89; Associate Professor of Gynecology, 
Johns Hopkins Univ., 1889^94 ; Professor of Gynecology, Western Re- 
serve University, 1894-^— 

John Pascal Sawyer, A. M., M. D., 526 Rose Building. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1883 : A. M., M. D., Western Reserve Univ., 
1886; Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, Western Reserve 
University, 1889— 

Charles Josiah Smith, A. M., 35 Adelbert St, 

Professor of Mathematics. 

A. B., Western Reserve Coll., 1870 ; A. M., 1873 ; Professor of 
Mathematics and Perkins Professor of Natural Philosophy and Astron- 
omy, Western Reserve Coll., 1870-82 ; Professor of Mathematics, Adel- 
bert College, 1882 — 

Arthur Adelbert Stearns, A. M., 87 Oakdale St. 

Professor of the Law of Suretyship and Mortgage, 

A. B., Buchtel Coll., 1879 ; A. M., 1883 ; Professor of Law of Surety- 
ship and Mortgage, Western Reserve University, 1894 — 



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14 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [1902-1903 

George Neii, Stewart, M.A., D. Sc., M. D.,(Edin.),D. P. H.(Camb.), 

Professor of Physiology and Histology. Medical College. 

M. A., UnlT. of Edinburgh, 1882 ; D. Sc, 1887 ; M. D., 1888 : D. P. H., 
Cambridge, 1890; Senior Demonstrator of Physiologr, Owens Coll., 
Victoria Univ., 1888-90 : Examiner in Phjrsiolo^, Univ. of Aberdeen, 
1889-98 ; Medical Dept. Harrard UnlT., 1808-94 ; Professor of Physiology 
and Histology, Western Reserve Unlyersity, 1894 — 

Henry Swift Upson, A. B., M. D., 514 New England Building. 
Professor of Neurology, 

A. B., Western Reserve Coll., 1880: M. D., Coll. of Physicians and 
Surgeons, New York, 1884; Staff of Roosevelt Hospital, New York, 
1885-86 ; Berlin and Heidelberg, 1886-87 ; Professor of Neurology, West- 
ern Reserve University, 1893 — 

John Wilwam Van Doorn, D. D. S., 455 The Arcade. 

Professor of Denial Medicine, 

Adelbert Coll., 1886-87 ; D. D. S., New York Coll. of Dentistry, 1890 : 
Lecturer on Materia Medlca and Dental Therapeutics, Western Reserve 
University, 1892-96 ; Professor of Dental Medicine, 1896 — 

Henry Clay White, B. L., A. M., 344 Harkness Av. 

Professor of the Law of Wills and Estates, 

B. L., Univ. of Michigan, 1862 ; A. M., Hiram Coll., 1891 ; Probate 
Judge of Cuyahoga Co., 1888 — ; Professor of Medical Jurisprudence, 
Cleveland Homeopathic Medical Coll., 1891 ; Professor of Testamentary 
Law and Probate Procedure, Western Reserve University, 1892 — 

Frank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc., . 79 Adelbert St. 

Perkins Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 

A. B., Brown Univ^ 1874 ; A. M., 1877 ; D. Sc, 1900 ; Brown Univ., 
Massachusetts Inst, of Technology, 1879 ; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1879-80 : 
Professor of Physics, Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., 1880-85; Professor 
of Physics, Adelbert College, 1885 — 

Will Henry Whitslar, M. D., D. D. S., 700 Schofield Building. 

Professor of Dental Anatomy and Pathology, 

Secretary of the Dental College, 

D. D. S., Univ. of Michigan, 1885 ; M. D, Rush Medical Coll., 1886 : 
Professor of Dental Anatomy and Pathology and Secretary of the Dental 
College of Western Reserve University, 1892 — 

Frank Beverly Williams, A. M., LL. B., iii Crawford Road. 

Professor of the Law of Evidence ^ Trusts, and Personal Property, 

A. B., Harvard Univ., 1888; Instructor in Political Economy and 
Assistant In American History, 1889-90 ; A. M., 1890 : Traveling Fellow, 
1890-1892 ; Instructor In Roman Law, 1892-97 ; LL. B., 1896 ; Assistant 
Professor of Law, 1897-98 ; Professor of the Law of Evidence, Personal 
Property and Trusts In Western Reserve University, 1899 — 

George Henry Wilson, D. D. S , 701 Schofield Building. 

Professor of Prosthesis and Metallurgy, and 

Superintendent of Laboratories and Clinics, 

D. D. S., Univ. of Michigan, 1878; Professor of Prosthetics and 
Metallurgy, Western Reserve University, 1892 — 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I5 

Daniei, Hbndrix ZibglER, D. D. S., 726 Rose Building. 

Professor oj Clinical Operative Dentistry, 

D. D. S., Western Reserve Unly., 1899 ; Demonstrator In Operative 
Dentistry, Dental College of Western Reserve University, 1899-1902; 
Professor of Clinical Operative Dentistry, 1902 — 

Benjamin Parsons Boukxand, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid Av. 
Associate Professor of Romante Languages. 

A. B., Univ. of Michigan, 1889 ; A. M., 1890 ; Instructor in French, 
1892-95; Student Paris and Vienna, Rome, Florence, Madrid, 1895-98; 
Ph. D., Univ. of Vienna, 1897 ; Instructor in French, Univ. of Michigan, 
1898-99 ; Assistant Professor, 1899-1901 ; Associate Professor of 
Romance Languages, Adelbert College, 1901 — 

HippoLYTE Gruknsr, Ph D., 43 Knox St. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, 

A. B., Yale Coll., 1891 ; Ph. D., 1898 ; Instructor In Chemistry and 
Physics, Hill School, Pottstown, Pa., 1898-94 : Univ. of Munich, 1894- 
95 ; Instructor in Chemistry. Adelbert Coll., 1895 — ; Associate Professor 
of Chemistry, College for Women, 1898 — 

Wii^UAM H. HuMiSTON, M. D., 526 Rose Building. 

Associate Professor of Gynecology, 

M. D., Long Island College Hospital, 1879; Associate Professor of 
Gynecology, Medical Department of western Reserve University, 1895 — 

Edward Stockton Meyer, Ph. D.. 844 Ivogan Av. 

Assistant Professor of German, 

B. L., Adelbert Coll., 1893 ; Univ. of Lelpslc, 1898-94; Univ. of 
Heidelberg, 1894-96 ; Ph. D., 1896 ; Instructor fn Qerman, Western Re- 
serve Univ., 1896-09; Instructor in German, Adelbert College, 1899- 
1902; Assistant Professor of German, 1902 — 

Allen Dudley Severance, A. M., B. D., 1981 Euclid Av. 

Associate Professor of Church History, 

A. B., Amherst Coll., 1889 ; A. M., 1896 ; Oberlln Theological Sem., 
1890-92 ; B. D., Hartford Theological Sem., 1893 : Universities of Halle, 
Berlin, and at Paris, 1893-97; B. D., Oberlln Theological Sem., 1896; 



Assistant In History, College for Women, 1897-1900 ; Instructor in His- 
torical Bibliography, 19 -190" ' - - - - - — - 
Adelbert College, 1902 — 



torical Bibliography, 19 -1902 ; Associate Professor of Church History, 



TORALD SoLLMANN, M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Materia Medica, 

M. D., Western Reserve Univ., 1896; Lecturer on Pharmacology, 
Western Reserve University, 1898-1901 ; Assistant Professor of Pharma- 
cology and Materia Medica, 1901 — 

Olin Freeman Tower, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid Av. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

A. B., Wesleyan Univ., 1892 ; A. M.. 1893 ; Assistant In Chemistry, 
Wesleyan Univ., 1898-94 ; Univ. of Lelpslc, 1894-95 ; Ph. D., 1895 : As- 
sistant Chemist in Nutrition Investigations, Department of Agriculture. 
1895-98; Assistant in Chemistry. Wesleyan Univ., 1806-98; Instructor 
In Chemistry, Adelbert College, 1898-1901 ; Assistant Professor, Adelbert 
College, 1901— 



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l6 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [1902-1903 

Frederick Clayton Waite, A.M., Ph. D.( Harvard), 77 Hillburn Av. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology, 

B. L., Adelbert Coll., 1892 : A. M., Western Reserve Univ., 1894 ; A. 
M.. Harvard Univ., 1896; Ph. D., 1808; Assistant In Biology, Adelbert 
Coll., 1892-95 ; Assistant in Zoology, Harvard Univ., 1897-98 : Instructor 
in Biology, Peter Cooper High School, New York City, 1898-1900; In- 
structor in Biology New York Univ., 1899-1900 ; Assistant in Anatomy, 
Rush Medical Coll., of the Univ. of Chicago, 1900-1901 ; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Histology and Embryology, Western Reserve Univ., 1901 — 

Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph. D,, 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

A. B., Harvard Univ.. 1898; Harvard Medical School, 1893-94; 
Univ. of Leipsic, 1894-95 ; Univ. of Heidelberg. 1895-97 ; The Sorbonne, 
Ecole des Hautes Etudes, 1897-98 ; Univ. of Heidelberg. 1898-99 ; Ph. D., 
1899; Instructor in French, Univ. of Michigan, 1899-1900; Instructor, 
in Romance Languages, College for Women, 1900-1902; Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Romance Languages, 1902 — 

Harriet Bardwell Chapman, A. B., M. D., 810 Rose Bldg. 

Lecturer on Hygiene, College for Women. 

A. B., Wellesley Coll., 1893; M. D.. Cleveland Medical Coll„ 1896; 
Clinical Assistant. Eye and Ear Department. Good Samaritan Di^ens- 
ary, 1897 ; Lecturer on Hygiene, College for Women, 1900 — 

Clayton King Fauver, Ph. B., LL. B., 727 Case Av. 

Lecturer on Torts and History of Procedure^ and Instructor 
in charge of Review Work. 
Ph. B„ Oberlin Coll., 1897 ; Western Reserve University, 1897-1900 ; 
LL. B., 1900 ; Lecturer and Instructor, Western Reserve University, 
1901— 

Frederick William Green, LL. B., Rice Av., Newburgh. 

Lecturer on Sales. 

LL. B., Western Reserve Univ., 1896; Lecturer in Western Reserve 
University, 1897 — 

Frederick Augustus Henry, A. M., LL. B., Williamson Building. 
Lecturer on Dental Jurisprudence. 
A. B., Iliram Coll., 1888 ; A. M., LL. B., Univ. of Michigan, 1891 ; 
Professor of Law of Torts, Western Reserve University, 1894-1890; 
Professor of Dental Jurisprudence, 1899 — 

John M. Ingrrsoll, A. M., M. D., 50 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer on Otology, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1891 : A. M., 1896 : M. D., Medical Coll., West- 
ern Reserve Univ., 1893 ; House Staff Cleveland City Hospital, 1894 ; 
Universities of Vienna. Berlin and London. 1894-96 : Lecturer on Otol- 
ogy, Rhinology and Laryngology, Western Reserve University, 1895 — 

Herman Clifford Kenyon, D. D. S., 677 The Arcade. 

Lecturer on Denial Anatomy and Instructor in Operative and 

Prosthetic Dental Technics. 

Hiram College, 1895-96; D. D. S., Western Reserve Univ., College 
of Dentistry, 1808 ; Demonstrator of Prosthetic Technics, Western Re- 
serve Univ., 1898 — ; Instructor in Operative and Prosthetic Technics, 
1901 — ; Lecturer on Dental Anatomy, 1901 — 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. l^ 

Louis Wii^wams Ladd, A.B., M.D.,The Montana, Hay ward & Prospect 

The Leonard Hanna Lecturer on Clinical Microscopy, 

A. B., Yale Univ., 181)5; Johns Hopkins Univ.. 1896-99; M. D., 
1890;. Assistant Resident Physician Johns Hopkins Univ. Hospital, 
1899-1000; Resident rhysitian, Lakeside Hospital, 1900-01; Lecturer in 
Clinical Microscopy, Western Reserve University, 1001 — 

WiwjAM R. Lincoln, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Lecturer on Otoloj^y, Rhinology and Laryngology. 

M. I)., Univ. of Pennsylvania, 1888; Lecturer on Otology, Rhlnology 
and Laryngology, Western Reserve University, 1896 — 

Roger Griswold Perkins, A. B., M. D.,- 1527 Euclid Av, 

Lecturer on Bacteriology and Assistant in Pathology. 
A. B„ Union Coll., 1803; A. B.. Harvard Univ., 1894; M. D., Johns 
Hopkins T'niv., 1808; Resident Pathologist, Lakeside Hospital. 1898- 
1901; Demonstrator of l»athology. Western Reserve Univ., 1899-1901; 
Fellow in Research of the Rockefeller Institute, 1901-2 ; Lecturer in Bac- 
teriology. 1901 — 

Weston A. Valleau Pbice, D. D. S , M. E., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer on Electro-fherapeutics and Electrical Appliances. 
D. D. S., Univ. of Mich.. 1893: Demonstrator, Electro-Therapeutics 
and Bilect. Appliances, Western Reserve Univ., 1897 ; Lecturer, 1901 — 

ROLWN Abbott Wilbur, LL. B., 820 Fair mount St. 

Lecturer on Cofttracts and Carriers. 

Student, Western Reserve Univ. Law School, 1899-1900: Harvard 
Univ. Law School. 1900-1902: LL. R., 1002: Lecturer on Contracts and 
Carriers, Western Reserve University, 1902 — 

Ci^ARBNCE Powers Bill, Ph. D., (Absent on leave). 

Instructor in Latin and Greek. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1894: A. M., 1895: A. M., Harvard Univ., 
189C: Ph. 1)., 1808; Instructor in Latin, Adelbert College, 1898 — 

William Dinsmore Briggs, Ph. D , 18 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in English. 

A. B., Stanford Univ., 1890: A. M.. Harvard Univ., 1899; Ph. D., 
1900: Instructor in Knji?llsh and (iermnn, Univ. of Vermont, 1900-01; 
Instructor in Knglish. Adelbert College. 1901 — 

Mary George Clark, Guilford House. 

Instructor in Physical Training. 

Sargent Normal School of (Jymnastics. 1900; Instructor in Hist- 
ology, Sargent Normal School, 1900-01 : Instructor In Histology, Hein- 
enway Gymnasium. Harvard Univ., suranier 1901 ; Instructor of Physical 
Training. College for Women, 1901 — 

Charles Edwin Clemens, T093 Prospect St. 

Instructor in the History and Theory of Music. 

John Dickbrman, A. B., 852 Doan St. 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1891 : Instructor In' Mathematics, Western 
Reserve Acad.. 1891-94: Johns Hopkins T'niv., 1894-95: Chamberlin 
Observatory. Denver Univ., 1895-96: Univ. of Chicago, 1896-97; In- 
structor in Mathematics, Adelbert College, 1897 — 



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l8 FACUI.TY AND OFFICERS. [1902-I903 

Robert Hbrndon Fife, Jr., Ph. D., 91 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in German, 

A. B., Univ. of Virginia, 1895: A. M., 1895; Instructor in Bngllah, 
St. Albans School, Radford, Va., 1805-98 ; Unly. of Gottlngen, 1898-99 ; 
Univ. of Lelpsic, 1899-1901; Ph. D., 1901; Instructor in German, Col- 
lege for Women, 1901 — 

HowBLi, Merriman Haydn, A. B., 252 Sibley St. 

Instructor in Biblical Literature. 

A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1896; Auburn Theological Sem.. 1890-99; 
DiDloma, 1899; Instructor In Biblical Literature, College for Women, 

Agnes Hunt, Ph. D., 46 Nantucket St 

Instructor in History. 

A. B., Smith Coll., 1897 ; Ph. D., Yale Univ., 1900 ; Assistant in 
History, College for Women, 1900-1901 ; Instructor In History, College 
for Women, 1901 — 

Carl Byron James, B. S., 896 Hough Av. 

Instructor in Biology. 

B. S., Baldwin Univ., 1894 ; Johns Hopkins Univ., 1894-95 ; German 
Wallace Coll., 1895-96; Assistant in Biological Laboratory, Adelbert 
Coll., 1896-1902; Instructor in Biology, College for Women, 1902 — 

Walter Taylor Marvin, Ph. D., 36 Knox St. 

Instructor in Philosophy. 

A. B., Columbia, 1893 ; Univ. of Jena, 1893-94 ; General Theological 
Seminary, New York, 1894-95; Columbia, 1895-97; Halle and Bonn, 
1807-08 ; Ph. D., Bonn. 1898 ; Assistant in Philosophy, Columbia, 1898- 
99 ; Instructor in Philosophy, Adelbert College, 1899 — 

Fritz Rbichmann, Ph. D., 95 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in Physics, 

C. E. and E. E., Univ. of Texas, 1896; M. S., 1897; Fellow in 
Physics, Univ. of Texas, 1895-97 ; Tutor and Instructor, 1897-98 ; Fellow 
In Physics, Univ. of Chicago, 1898-1001; Ph. D.. 1901; Academy In- 
structor, Unlv. of Chicago. 1000-01 : Instructor In Physics, Adelbert Col- 
lege and the College for Women, 1901 — 

Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., 23 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in English, 

Ph. B., Wabash Coll., 1804: Fowler-Duhme Fellow In English, 
1804-1)5: Instructor In English. 1894-05: Professor In English, Vln- 
cennes Univ., 1895-1900: A. M., Wabash Coll., 1900: University Scholar 
in English, Columbia Univ., 1000-1901 : Instructor In English, Adelbert 
College, 1901-1902; Instructor in English, College for Women, 1902 — 

Charles Jesse Wehr, A. B., M. D., 5 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in Physical Culture and Director 0/ Gymnasium. 
A. B., Adelbert Coll., 1898 ; M. D., Western Reserve Univ., 1901 ; In- 
structor in I>hyslcal Culture and Director of Gymnasium, Adelbert 
College, 1901— 

Allyn Abbott Young, Ph. D., 46 Knox St. 

Instructor in Economics. 

Ph. B., Hiram College, 1894 ; Univ. of Wisconsin, 1898-99 ; Statisti- 
cian, U. S. Census Office, 1899-1900; Fellow in Economics, Univ. of 
Wisconsin, 1900-1901; Assistant In Economics, 1901-02; Ph. D., Univ. 
of Wisconsin. 1902 ; Instructor In Economics, Adelbert College and the 
College for Women, 1902 — 



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1902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 19 

Henry A. Bbcker» A. M., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

RUSSBI*!. H. BiRGB, A. B., M. D., 260 Buclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

Chari^SS E. Briggs, a. M., M. D., The New Amsterdam. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

WiLUAM E. Bruner, a. M., M. D., 514 New England Building. 
Demonstrator of Ophthalmology, 

Joseph Anson Coates, D. D. S., 45 Hough Av. 

Demonstrator in Operative Dentistry, 

John C. Darby, A. B., M. D., Lakeside Hospital. 

Demonstrator of Pathology, 

Fred Doiaey, A. B., M. D., Charity Hospital. 

Demonstrator of Pathology, 

Ci^UDE C. Guthrie, M. D., 129 Marcy Av. 

Demonstrator of Physiology, 

Frederick C. Herrick, A. B., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

WiixiAM E. Lower, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 

Wai«TBR H. Merriam, Ph. B., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

George Wii^ton Moorbhousb, M. L., M. D., 842 Logan Av 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

WiLWAM O. OSBORN, B. L., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

Henry P. Parker, A. B., M. D., Colonial Flats, Russell & Euclid. 
Demonstrator of Pathology and Bacteriology, 

Edwin B. Season, M. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 

CARI.YLB Pope, M. D., 855 Rose Building. 

Demonstrator in Diseases of Children^ 

Gilbert Povey, M. D., 693^4 Hough Av. 

Demonstrator in Gynecology, 



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20 FACULTY AND OFFICERS. [1902-I903 

Frank Lesue Smith, D. D. S., Denver, Colo. 

Demonstrator of Orthodontia. 

HxjBERT L. Spenck, M. D., 512 New England Building. 

Demonstrator of Nervous Diseases. 

Robert H. Sunkle, A. B., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

Oscar T. Thomas, M. D., 85 Edgewood PI. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

John Scheli, Tierney, M. D., 532 Rose Building. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy. 

Harrison G. Wagner, M. D., 702 Rose Building. 

Demonstrator of Physical Diagnosis. 

James Freed Wark, D. D. S., 362 Cedar Av. 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 

WiLUAM H. Weir, M. D., 260 Euclid A v. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology. 

Douglas Austin Wright, D. D. S., 269 Cedar Av. 

Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry. 

Wilfred Henry Alburn, A. B., Eldred Hall. 

Assistant in English. 

William Bricker Chamberlain, A. B., M, D., 725 Prospect St. 
Assistant in Throat, Nose and Ear. 

Bessie Mildred Chandler, Ph. B., 894 Case Av. 

Assistant in Biological Laboratory. 

Frank S Clark, A. M., M. D., 493 Colonial Arcade. 

Assistant in Obstetrics and Pediatrics at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Alice Doyle Drake, Ph. B., 792 Republic St. 

Assistant in English. 

James A. Evans, B. S., The Medical College. 

Assistant in Chemistry. 

Thomas Edward Griffiths, M. D., 1104 Woodland Av. 

Assistant in Surgery at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 

Henry Justus Herrick, A. M., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Charles M. Hole, M. D., 300 Cedar Av. 

Assistant in Dertnaiology and Syphilology. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN R^^RV^ UMV^RSlYY. 21 

Fanny C Hutchins, M D., 373 Jennings Av 

Assistant in Nervous Diseases, 

Secokd H. Large, 1013 New England Building. 

Assistant in Throat, Nose and Eat. 

J. CHARI.RS McFatk, a. B., 761 Superior St. 

Assistant in Histology, 

Nina May Roberts, A. M., Guilford House. 

Assistant in English. 

Wiluam E. Shackleton, M. D., jSosThe Osbom. 

Assistant in Ophth&lmology, 

Shandor Harry Soli^omonson, B. S., 1033 Case Av. 

Assistant in Histology. 

Chari«es C Stuart, M. D., 416 Rose Building. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology. 

John J. Thomas, A. M., M. D., 156 Crawford Rd. 

Assistant in Diseases of Children. 

Justin Miner Waugh, M. D , 44 Knowles St. 

Assistant in Throat, Nose and Ear. 

Wii^LiAM J. W. Wooi^GAR, M. D., 1444 Cedar Av. 

Assistant in Obstetrics. 



LECTURERS IN YEAR J90J-J902. 



W. D. Forrest, D D , Glasgow, Scotland. 

Lecturer on * * Christ's Teaching: as to Individual and Corporate Duty. ' * 

Right Reverend Henry C. Potter, D. D., New York, N. Y. 
Lecturer on ''The Place of the Bible in Modem Life.'' 

Richard G. Moui^ton, M. A. Ph. D , University of Chicago. 

Lecturer on ''The Bible. * ' 

John Peter Jones, D. p., Madura, India. 

Lecturer on "The Conditions, Problems and Results of 

Missionary Service " 



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22 I^ACUI.TY AND OI^FICERS. [1902-I903 

OTHER OFFICERS. 



Harry Albert Haring, A. B., • 78 Cornell St. 

Treasurer, 

Edward Christopher Wiluams, B. L., 

71 Elberon St., East Cleveland. 
Librarian, 

Esther Crawford, B. L., 39 Knox St. 

Assistant in. Library, 

Anna Louise MacIntyre, A. B., 136 Sawtell Av. 

Librarian t College for Women, 

Prances L. Trowbridge, 84 Miles Av. 

Librarian of Law School, 

Bertha Louise Torrey, A. B., 4132 Euclid Av., East Cleveland. 
Registrar ^ College far Women, 

Thomas J. Taylor, 2153 Superior St. 

Clerk of Medical College, 

Miss K. G. Frankle, 520 Woodland Av. 

Clerk of Operative Clinic, 

Mrs. D. a. Wright, 

Clerk of Prosthetic Clinic, 

Elizabeth Currier Annin, Housemistress, Guilford House. 

ISADORE Heydenburk, Housemisttcss^ Haydn Hall. 

JESSIE Boggs, a. M., M. D., 1257 Euclid Av. 

Medical Examiner ^ College for Women, 

Andrew Flower, Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Prosector and Curator Anatomical Rooms. 



STANDING COMMITTEES. • 



i. committee on the library. 
Professors Bourne, Curtis, Emerson, Platner,* Whitman. 

II. committee on athletics. 

Professors Bourland, Cushing,* Stewart, Wilson, 

Mr. Fauver. 



* Chairman. 

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ADELBERT COLLEGE. 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT. 



nN 1801 The General Assembly of the Territory of 
the United States northwest of the river Ohio was 
petitioned by residents of the Connecticut Western Reserve 
to grant a charter for a college to be situated within the 
limits of the Reserve. The petition was denied. In 1803, 
on the sixteenth of April, the first General Assembly of the 
State of Ohio chartered the Erie Literary Society, a corpo- 
ration composed of several proprietors of land within the 
county of Trumbull (then comprising the entire Reserve), 
who desired to appropriate a part thereof to found a semin- 
ary of learning within that county. Under this charter an 
Academy was established at Burton in 1805, the first insti- 
tution of this kind in Northern Ohio. This school, with the 
exception of the years 1810 to 1819, continued in operation 
until 1834. In 181 7 the Presbytery of Grand River, which 
embraced nearly all the Presbyterian and Congregational 
ministers and churches of the Reserve, formed itself into a 
society "for the education of indigent, pious young men for 
the ministry, within the limits of the Presbytery." The 
students aided by this society studied privately with clergy- 
men until the opening of the Academy at Burton, when 
they pursued their studies at that school. In 1818 the 
Presbytery of Portage formed a similar society. In 1822 
the two Presbyteries appointed a committee to confer to- 
gether for the purpose of devising "ways and means for 
establishing on the Connecticut Western Reserve a Literary 

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24 ADELBKRT COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

and Theological Institution." The report of the committee, 
which was adopted by the Presbyteries, provided for the 
establishment, under certain conditions, of a Theological 
Institution on the foundation of the Erie Literary Society 
at Burton. The Trustees of the Erie Literary Society ac- 
cepted the conditions. A Board of Managers of the Edu- 
cation Fund was then appointed by the Presbyteries. 

The connection between the Board of Managers and the 
Trustees of the Erie Literary Society lasted until June, 1824. 
During the year 1823 the managers became convinced that 
such an institution as they desired could not be built up at 
Burton, and consequently they requested the Trustees of the 
Erie Literary Society to move their establishment to a more 
eligible situation. As the Trustees held property on condi- 
tion that the 'school should be in Burton, they declined 
this proposition. In June, 1824, at a joint session of the 
Board of Managers, with special commissioners of the Pres- 
byteries, it was decided to discontinue the connection with 
the Erie Literary Society and to found a separate institu- 
tic«i. In January a special Board of Commissioners, repre- 
senting the Presbyteries, to which the Presbytery of Huron 
was now added, selected Hudson as the site of the college. 
The Board of Managers, with four additional members rep- 
resenting the Huron Presbytery, now became the Board of 
Trustees, and held their first meeting at Hudson, February 
15, 1825. They drafted a charter and drew up plans for 
the grounds. The charter was granted February 7, 1826, 
and on April 26 the comer stcMie of the first building was 
laid. The first students were received in December, 1826, 
and were instructed at Talmadge by Mr. Coe, the principal 
of the Academy at that place, who was appointed tutor pro 
tempore. In 1827 the new building at Hudson was occupied 
and the preparatory department established. A Theological 
department was opened in 1830 and maintained until 1852.* 

•This sketch of the foundation of the College is based apon "A History of 
Western Reserve College, 185»-1876," by Rev. Carroll Cutler, D. D., President, 
Cleveland, 1»76. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 25 

In 1878 the question of removing the College from Hud- 
son to Cleveland was raised, and a committee of the Trus- 
tees was appointed to take the matter under consideration. 
In March, 1880, through a member of the Board of Trust, 
Mr. Amasa Stone, of Cleveland, proposed to give the Col- 
lege five hundred thousand dollars, provided it should be 
removed to Cleveland, occupy some suitable site to be do- 
nated by the citizens, and change its name to "Adelbert 
College of Western Reserve University." The new name 
was to be a memorial to Mr. Stone's only son, Adelbert, 
who had been drowned while a student at Yale. Mr. Stone 
proposed further, that of the sum offered by him one hun- 
dred and fifty thousand dollars should be expended in build- 
ings and the remainder added to the permanent funds of 
the College. The committee weighed the comparative ad- 
vantages of city and country situation and especially the 
opportunities for growth and development in the new envi- 
ronment. Moreover an investigation showed that, in the 
fifty years from its foundation to 1876, the College had 
received in gifts some three hundred and seventy-five thou- 
sand dollars, two hundred thousand dollars of which had 
been given for current expenses. The remainder consti- 
tuted the College endowment, and included the funds used 
in establishing the Handy, Hurlbut, Oviatt, and Perkins 
professorships. Mr. Stone's offer would exactly treble the 
endowment, in addition to providing a modern equipment. 
The committee, therefore, recommended the acceptance of 
the proposition, and the Trustees voted, on September 20 
of the same year, to make the change whenever the condi- 
tions were fulfilled. On March 19, 1881, the Trustees voted 
that the conditions had been complied with and that the re- 
moval should be made. 

In accordance with this decision, in September, 1882, the 
College opened its doors on the new campus of twenty-two 
acres, situated in the midst of the great park system of 

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26 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

Cleveland. On this campus two buildings had been erected, 
one containing rooms for the work of instruction, with 
offices, chapel, library, and museum; the other, apartments 
for sixty students. The ensuing years have fully proved 
the wisdom of the change, as shown by the increase of stu- 
dents and of endowment funds. In 1883 the sum of one 
hundred thousand dollars was added to the funds of the 
College by the will of Mr. Stone. In 1888 the gymnasium 
was erected and equipped by the gifts of numerous friends. 
During the same year fifty thousand dollars was received 
to found the Haydn Professorship. In 1894 Mr. Samuel 
Mather built and furnished the Physical Laboratory. In 
the following year Mr. Henry R. Hatch presented the 
library building bearing his name, and in 1898 added the 
wings as provided in the original designs. In 1897 Eidred 
Hall, a building for the use of the Young Men's Christian 
Association, was erected through the gift of the late Rev. 
Henry B. Eidred. In 1899, the Biological Laboratory, to 
which many friends contributed, was completed. By the 
will of Daniel B. Fayerweather, of New York City, who 
died in 1890, the College has received an additional endow- 
ment fund of one hundred and fifty thousand dollars. In 
1 901 the interior of Adelbert Hall was entirely rebuilt and 
refitted, by a friend of the College, as a memorial to Mr. 
Stone. 



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I902-I903] WESTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVBRSITY. 2^ 

FAOJLTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arranged, with exception of the President, in the order 0/ graduation from college. 

Charlbs Franki^in Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President, 

LbmubIv Stoughton Potwin, a. M., D. D., 322 Rosedale A v. 

Professor 0/ the English Language and Literature. 

Edward WiLiviAMS MoRi^KY, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 

The Everl3'ne, 63 Ingleside Av. 
Hurlhut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry, 
Chari«bs Josiah Smith, A. M., 35 Adelbert St. 

Professor of Mathematics, 
Prank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc., 79 Adelbert St. 

Pet kins Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 
Chari^ss Harris, Ph. D., 15 Adelbert Hall. 

Professor of German, 
Mattoon Monrob Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Handy Professor of Philosophy, 
Francis Hobart Hbrrick, Ph. D., D. Sc., 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology and Curator of the Zoological Collection, 
Henry Pi^tt Cushing, M. S., 260 Sibley St. 

Professor of Geology. 
Ouvbr Farrar Emerson, Ph. D., 50 Wilbur St. 

Oviatt Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology. 
Samubl Bali, Pi^atnbr, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin^ Secretary of the Faculty. 
Abraham Lincoi^n Fui,i,br, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greeks Dean of the Faculty. 
John Wiluam Perrin, Ph. D., 81 Cutler St. 

Haydn Professor of History, 
Benjamin Parsons Bouri^and, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid Av. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages. 
AixBN Dudley Severance, a. M., B. D., 1981 Euclid Av. 

Associate Professor of Church History. 
OUN Freeman Tower, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid Av. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Edward Stockton Meyer, Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

Assistant Professor of German. 



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28 



ADALBERT COI.LEGB. 



John Dickbrman, A. B., 

Instructor in Mathematics. 

HlPPOLYTB GRUENKR, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Chemistry. 

Wai^ter Tayi/)r Marvin, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Philosophy, 

CivARBNCE Powers Bili,, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Latin and Greek, 
Ai^LYN Abbott Young, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Economics, 
Fritz Reichmann, Ph. D., 

Instructor in Physics, 

WiLUAM DiNSMORE BRIGGS, PH. D., 

Instructor in English. 
Chari^s Jesse Wehr, A. B., M. D., 



[1902-1903 

85s Doan St. 

43 Knox St. 

36 Knox St. 

(Absent on leave). 

46 Knox St. 

95 Mayfifeld St. 

18 Adelbeit Hall. 

5 Adelbert Hall. 



Instructor in Physical Culture and Director of Gymnasium. 



Additional instruction in their oztm departments is given by the 
follozoing members of the Faculty of the College for Women. 
Haroi,d North Fowler, Ph. D., 

Professor of Greek. 
Robert Waller Deering, Ph. D., 

Professor of German. 

Carl Byron James, B. S., 

Instructor in Biology, 
Howell Merriman Haydn, A. B., 

Instructor in Bible. 



49 Cornell St. 

(Absent on leave). 

896 Hough Av. 

252 Sibley St. 



OTHER OFFICERS. 
Harry A. Haring, A. B., 



78 Cornell St. 
45 Wilbur St. 



Treasurer. 
Abraham Lincoln Fuller, Ph. D., 

Bursar. 

Edward Christopher Williams, B. L., 71 Elderon St., E. Clev*d. 

Librarian. 

Esther Crawford, B. L., 972 Cedar A v. 

Assistant in Library. 

Wilfred Henry Alburn, A. B., Eldred Hall. 

Assistant in English. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 29 



STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY* 



i. committee on admission : 
Professors Fui^i^br*, Pi«atner, Smith. 

u. bxecutivb committbb : 

{Having oversigki oftKg clattroom work and academic status of the students). 

Professors FuhhSR*, Platnbr, Smith. 

III. committee on curriculum : 
Professors Emerson, Mori*by*, Platner. 

rv. committee on program of recitations and i^ectures : 
Professors Gushing*, Perrin, Whitman. 

V. committee on catai^ogue : 
Professors Emerson*, Perrin, Meyer. 

vi. committee on rooms : 
Professors Herrick, Perrin, Whitman*. 

VII. committee on gymnasium : 
Professor Gushing, Mr. Dickerman*, Mr. Wehr. 

^Chairman. 



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30 



ADBI.BBRT COLI^BGB. 



[1902- 1 903 



STUDENTS. 



SENIORS. 



Edwin Allen Barnes, L. S. ♦ 
Edwin Childs Baxter, CI. 
Walter Lewis Bisaell, CI. 
Charles Bushnell Byal, CI. 
Homer Charles Campbell, L. S. 
Edwin Leland Carle, CI. 
James Williams Carpenter, M. L. 
Paul Richard Chamberlain, CI. 
Francis Corrigan, CI. 
David Love Dugan, CI. 
Arthur Bradley Eisenbrey, L. S. 
Albert EHenberger, L. S. 
Robert Emmett Finley, L. S. 
Robert Edward Gammel, M. L. 
Birt Eugene Garver, M. L. 
Harlan Adolphus Hepfinger, L. S. 
James Julius Hoffman, CI. 
Isaac McCallum Hogg, L. S. 
Bradley Hull, Jr., CI. 
Willis Burton Knisely, L. S. 
Frederick Tyler Lawton, L. S. 
Robert George Lotspietch, CI. 
Albert W. Meyer, CI. 
John William O'Brien, L. S. 
Edward Maynard Otis, L. S. 
Herbert Ernest Parker, L. S. 
William Robert Polhamus, 
Ernest James Reece, L. S. 
Hugh Griffith Rose, L. S. 
Warren Daniel Spengler, M. L. 
Frank Holt Stedman, M. L. 
Feist M. Strauss, CI. 
George Franklin Thomas, L. S. 



Payne 

Los Angeles^ Col. 

New Mifford 

Findlay 

Akron 

Geneva 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Huntsburg 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Salem 

Cleveland 

Lorain 

]Villoughby 

Cleveland 

Youngstown 

Cleveland 

Canlon 

Toledo 

London 

Cleveland 

Ml, Vernon 

Willoughby 

Binghamlon, N. 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

WellsvUle 

Cleveland 

Belmont, Mass. 

Cleveland 

Akron 



$ r A House. 

A A ^ House. 

A K E House. 

A K E House. 

68 Bell Av. 

805 Fairmount St. 

46 Knox St. 

76 White Av. 

66 Gorman Av. 

* r A House. 

A A ^ House. 

Euclid Heights. 

838 Doan St. 

413 Dunham Av. 

6 n House. 

Willoughby. 

1059 Central Av. 

995 Doan St. 

340 Euclid Av. 

173 Streator Av. 

59 Mayfield St. 

A Y House. 

844 Logan Av. 

16 Adelbert HhU. 

13 Adelbert Hall. 

Y. 767 Doan St. 

20 Tennessee St. 

59 Beersford PI. 

142 Cornell St. 

63 Fourth Av. 

Hiram House. 

1390 Superior St. 

ATA Rooms. 



•Abbreviations : CI., Claa«ical Course; L. S.. Latin-Scicntiflc Course; M. L.. 
Modern Language Course. A number in parenthesis alter the name of a special 
student indicates the year to which he belongs. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



31 



Herbert Alfred Thomas, L. S. Lima 

Sidney Burnett Tryon, CI. Willoughby 

Albert George Tuttlc, CI. Rowe.Mass. 

Isaac Roy Watts, L. S. Willoughby 



134 Murray Hill Av. 

ATA Rooms. 

853 Doan St. 

ATA Rooms. 

Seniors, 37. 



JUNIORS. 

Henry Wilmer Blackburn, CI. Wellsville 
Hiram Henry Canfield, M. L. Euclid Heights 
Sidney Loftus Chaffee, L. S. Cleveland 

Ralph Ezra Chapel, CI. E. Claridon 

Clyde Lottridge Cummer, L. S. Cleveland 
William Jay Dawley, CI. Cleveland 

Raymond Garfield De Fries, L. S. Troy 
John Adam Eisenhauer, Jr., M. L. Cleveland 
Louis Englander, CI. Toledo 

George Tuttle Filius, CI. Warren 

Rayman Forrest Fritz, CI. Rittman 

Emil William Gaelzow, CI. Cleveland 

Frank Elmer Hale, CI. E, Claridon 

William Henry Charles Heinmiller, CI. Cleveland 



CI. 



Wade Oakly Hulbert. 

Percy R. Jenks, CI. 

Leonard Corwin Loomis, CI. 

Robert Crosby Lowe, L. S. 

Arthur Fraw McArthur, L. S. 

Forest Oliver March, L. S. 

Victor Garfield Mills, L. S. 

Edmond De Witt Neer, L. S. 

Arthur Price Nutt, L. S. 

John Frederic Oberlin, L. S. 

Raymond Patton, L. S. 

Frank Herson Pelton, L. S. 

Frederick Early Pfeiffer, L. S. 

Ulrich John Pfeiffer, L. S. 

Noyes Billings Prentice, Jr., M. L. Cleveland 

Ralph Roscoe Proctor, L. S. Fremont 

Olivia Bumell Sharp, L. S. Jonesboro^ III, 

Lawrence Caleb Spieth, CI. Cleveland 

Emery E. Stevens, CI. Cleveland 



Thompson 
Nottingham 
Cleveland 
Boneta 
Cleveland 
Chagrin Falls 
Willoughby 
De Graff 
Sidney 
Canton 
Sidney 
Willoughby 
Kenton 
Kenton 



* r A House. 
AY House. 

14 Adelbert Hall. 

92 Streator Av. 

396 Bolton Av. 

A K E House. 
8 Adelbert Hall. 
1433 Willson Av. 

A T n House. 

A K £ House. 
45 Fairchild St. 

50 Leading St. 

92 Streator Av. 
39 Steinway Av. 

139 Cornell St. 

Nottingham. 

1280 Willson Av. 

* r A House. 
203 Oakdale St. 

A A ^ House. 

Willoughby. 

B n House. 

B ® n House. 

67 Cornell St. 

24 Adelbert Hall. 

ATA Rooms. 

10 1 Halsey St. 

loi Halsey St. 

12 Lakeview Av. 

A A $ House. 

45 Fairchild St. 

1 29 1 Willson Av. 

2036 Broadway. 



John HoUam Stewart, CI. 



Youngstoztm 136 Murray Hill A v. 



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32 



ADBMERT COI.I.EGE. 



[1902-1903 



Howard Clifford Summers, CI. 
Carl Peter Paul Vitz, CI. 
Raymond Crandall Warner, CI. 
Howard Rees Williams, CI. 
Joseph Prank Williams, L. S. 
John Calvin Winter, h. S. 
James Garfield Woodward, 
Robert Algar Woolfolk, M. I,. 



Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Geneva 
Hunisburg 
YoungstOTvn 
Terr e Haute, Ind, 
Plainesville 
Danville i Va, 



SOPHOMORES. 



Cary Rudolph Album, CI. 

George Forrest Bamett, Iv. S. 

Robert S win ton Campbell, M. L. 

Walter Baldwin Cames, Iv. S. 

Carl Judd Case, CI. 

Harold L. Cline, L. S, 

Charles Manchester Coe, 

Harvey Lee Comin, CI. 

John Lewis Conant, CI. 

Walter Henry Cook. Q 

Herbert Randolph Cox, 

John Benjamin Daugherty, L. S, 

Charles Clarence Garman, CI. 

Clark Peter Garman, CI. 

Clarence Edward Gibbons, 

William Hamilton Gillie, 

John James Gunn, CI. 

Howard Waring Herrick, 

Emerson Freeman Hird, 

Wallace Trevor Holliday, 

Avery Hopwood, M. L. 

Frank Merrick Hubbell, 

Oliver Jones, CI. 

William Claude Martin, 

Budd Noble Merrills, CI. 

William Theodore Miller, 

Arnold Minnig, L. S. 

Homer Lynn Nearpass, CI. 

William Thomson Nimmons, L. S, 

Robert Henry Horace Pierce, L. S. Toledo 

Walter Lawrence Robison, M. L. Cleveland 



M. L. 



L.S 



L. S. 
L.S. 



CI. 
CI. 
CI. 

CI. 

L.S. 



M. L. 



Kyles* Comers 

Painesville 

Cleveland 

Lima 

Hudson 

Lima 

Glenville 

Mansfield 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Canton 

Steubenville 

Troy 

Troy 

Tallmadge 

Twinsburg 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 



1528 Superior St. 

45 Marvin Av. 

ATA Rooms. 

AY House. 

A T n House 

i252ScrantonAv. 

203 Adelbert St. 

A Y House. 

Juniors, 42. 

Eldred Hall. 

^ r A House. 

2209 Superior St. 

A K E House. 

29 Cornell St. 

A K E House. 

Glenville. 

168 Streator Av. 

1 70 1 Dennison Av. 

724 Republic St. 

Ben House. 

The Brooklawn. 

24 Streator Av. 

23 Adelbert Hall. 

Euclid Heights. 

117 Adelbert St. 

133 Dibble Av. 

3006 Euclid Av. 



Baldzuinville, Mass. 44 Nantucket St. 



Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Wickliffe 

Cleveland 



30 Miles Park St. 

39 Harbor St. 

673 Franklin Av. 

2370 Elmwood St. 

84 Marvin A v. 

A T A Rooms. 

A A <> House. 

New Philadelphia 2481 Euclid Av. 

Culver, Ind. 45 Fairchild St. 

Lincoln, Kan, 6 H House. 

loi Halsey St. 

5 Hayward St. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



33 



John Richard Ruggles, L. S. Cleveland 

Philip Wallace Seagrave, CI. Cleveland 

William Ernest Singer, L. S. JVeslon 

William Edward Smith, CI. Cleveland 

Clarence Ansel Strong, CI. Warren 

Roy Foster Van Voorhis, CI. Van Wert 

Saul Charles Wachner, CI. Akron 

Chester Marvin Wallace, CI. Wilhuehby 

Andrew Bracken White, M L, Cleveland 



224 Streator Av. 

75 Adelbert St. 

A Y House. 

592 Sterling Av. 

ATA Rooms. 

Ben House. 

Adelbert Hall. 

Willoughby. 

19 La Grange St. 

Sophomores, 40. 



FRESHMEN. 

David ClifiFord Alexander, L. S. Cleveland 

Abner Lee Roy Allison, CI. Cleveland 

Edwin Ruthven Andrews, M. L. Lakewoad 

Gale Le Mont Bailey, L. S. Ridgeville, Ind, 

John P. Barden, Jr., CI. Painesville 

Alton Hay Bemis, CI. Cleveland 

Harvey Alfred Berkes, L. S. Cleveland 

Saul Louis Berman, M L. Cleveland 

Horace Victor Bishop, CI. Cleveland 

Julius Bloomberg, M. L. Cleveland 

Oscar Bretz, M. L. Cleveland 

Fred Bukstein, M. L. Cleveland 

Fred Newton Burroughs, L. S. Collinwood 

Thomas Friday Cadle, L. S. West Mentor 

Robert Franklin Carpenter, CI. Cleveland 

William John Cermak, M. L. Cleveland 

Ladimir Alrich Chotek, L. S. Cleveland 

Carroll Dana Coffield, L. S. Cleveland 

Myron T. Cohn, M. L. Cleveland 

Alvah Radcliffe Corlett, L. S. Warrensville 

Alfred Phelps Crum, L. S. Cleveland 

Howard Hubbell Davis, L. S. Cleveland 

Famham Ernest Day, CI. Cleveland 

Gillum Hotchkiss Doolittle, L. S. Burton 

Sidney Simon Friedman, M. L. Cleveland 

Charles Elmer Gehlke, M. L. Cleveland 

Ford Gramlich, CI. Kenton 
Carleton Marshall Greenman, M. L. Cleveland 

Henry Lang Grund, M. L. Fremont 

Frank Gruendyke Hard, L. S. Medina 



65 Jennings Av. 

92 Fourth St. 

ATA House. 

290 Marcy Av. 

6 Cornell PI. 

225 E. Prospect St. 

52 Elberon St. 

835 Woodland Av. 

The Euclid. 

1582 Lorain St. 

416 Cedar A v. 

34 Paddock PI. 

Collinwood. 

West Mentor. 

125 Streator Av. 

147 1 Clark Av. 

58 Cable St. 

601 Franklin Av. 

330 Genesee Av. 

* r A House. 

30 Hilbum Av. 

457 Franklin Av. 

435 Dunham A v. 

Glenville. 

108 1 Case Av. 

40 Abram St. 

219 Streator Ave. 

18 Wilbur St. 

153 Cornell St. 

69 Vienna St. 



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34 



ADBI^BBRT COLtEGE. 



[1902- 1 903 



Thomas Richard Kennerdell, M. h. Oeveland 

Francis Allen Horton Lang, CI. Cleveland 
Gustav George Laubscher, M. L. Cleveland 

Harry Ralph Lloyd, L. S. Wickliffe 
Ernest McKelvy, L. S. 

James Snyder McKeon, L. S. YoungstoTvn 

Benjamin Bruce McMuUin, L. S. Sharon^ Pa. 

Howard Thomas McMyler, CI. iVarrensville 

William Clarence Malin, M. L. Glenville 

Martin Milford Mandel, M. L. Cleveland 

John Houston Marshall, CI. Warren 

William Claude Martin, L. S. Cleveland 

Henry Albright Mattill, M. L. Cleveland 

William Henry Meub, CI. Warren 

John Houser Meyer, CI. Cleveland 

Frank Carleton Mock, L. S. Cleveland 

Rienze Verne Myers, L. S. Shelby 

Arthur Ernest Opperman, CI. Cleveland 

Charles Norton Osborne, CI. Cleveland 

John Dexter Osmond M. L. Chat don 

James Allen Parker, M. L. Findlay 

George Benjamin Parkin, M. L. Cleveland 

Antony Joseph Petrash, CI. Cleveland 



88 Merchants Av. 

1383 Cedar A v. 

134 Duane St. 

Wickliffe. 

Upper Sandusky 14 Adelbert Hall. 

A T O House. 

39 Cutler St. 

Warren sville. 

Glenville. 

305 Huntington St. 

137 Brandon St. 

84 Marvin Av. 

20 Sanford St. 

137 Brandon St. 

844 Logan Av. 

843 Fairmount St. 

874 Pairmoimt St. 

127 N. Perry St. 

67 Irvington St. 

187 Oakdale St. 

147 Cornell St. 

45 Malcolm St. 

T191 Broadway. 



Paul Marvin Pope, M. L. West Palm Beach, Fla, 131 Murray Hill Av. 



Herbert Allen Quayle, L. S. 
George Byron Roth, M. L. 
Herbert Milford Senseny, CI. 
Charles Gray Shreve, L. S. 
Thomas Hamlin Silver, CI. 
Don Rollin Sipe, L. S. 
Albert Ralph Stickle, L. S. 
Leonard Flemming Stowe, L. S. 
William Melville Strachan, M. L. 
George Church Sutton, CI. 
William Ellsworth Talcott, CI. 
Frank Ira Truxal, M. L. 
George Winfield Truxal, M. L. 
Fred Lloyd Tuttle, CI. 
William Phillip Ward, M. L. 
Eugene Everett Wolf, M. L. 
Raymond Lee Wolven, CI. 



Cleveland 
ML Eaton 
Cleveland 
Martin' s Ferry 
WellsvilU 
Lisbon 
Kenton 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 



290 Sibley St. 

A Y House. 

148 Lincoln Av. 

847 Stark St. 

A T O House. 

6 ® n House. 

A T O House. 

3 Quito St. 

2423 Broadway. 

491 Central A v. 



Cleveland Rosedale and Crawford. 
Cleveland 23 Kelton St. 

Cleveland 23 Kelton St. 

Painesville Logan Av. 

Cleveland 37 Kenilworth St. 

Cleveland 529 Scovill Av. 

Bloomfield, N,J, 105 Murray Hill. 
Frbshmbn, 71. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



35 



SPBCIAI, STUDENTS. 



(3) 
(4) 



Harry Lester Bard, ( 2 ) 
Thomas Allan Boyle, (2) 
Albert Frank Counts, ( 3 ) 
Earl Roemer Findley, (2) 
George Nathaniel Forbes, 
Paul Fox, (3) 
Harry St. Clair Hathaway, 
John Michacel Herter, (i) 
William Jones, (i) 
Andrew Kaechele, ( 2 ) 
Horace Grove Jerome, ( i) 
William Pendleton Lanphear, 
Frank Wright Lea, (i) 
James Edward Mathews, (2) 
John Adam Patterson , ( i ) 
John Roy Petty, (2) 
Maurice Vinton Semple, L. S, 
Charles Clark Thwing. ( 2 ) 
Loren Edmunds Souers, ( 1 ) 
Roydon Edward Weaver, (4) 
Azel Howard Wetherbee, ( i ) 
Charles Clarence Williamson, 



(3) 



Cleveland 


134 1 Lorain St. 


SaUm 


A K E House, 


Sidney 


13 Adelbcrt Hall. 


Akron 


151 Cornell St. 


Bedford 


6 Adelbert Hall. 


Oberlin 


14 Adelbert Hall. 


White Plains, N 


. K. 33 Cornell St. 


Naperville, III. 


702 Dennison Av. 


Cleveland 


26>^ Bissell St. 


Cleveland 


78 Aaron St, 


Huntsburg 


355 Cedar Av. 


Cleveland 


782 Republic St. 


Danville, Va. 


12 Adelbert Hall. 


Cleveland 719 Garfield BPd'g. 


CUveland 


220 Dare St. 


East Cleveland 


East Cleveland, 


Ashland 


50 Chapman Av. 



Leavemuorthy Kan, A Y House. 
New Philadelphia 155 Sawtell Av. 
Akron A A $ House. 

Painesville i Cornell PI. 

Salem 444 Rosedale Av. 

Spbciai^, 22. 



SUMMARY. 

Seniors 37 

Juniors 42 

Sophomores 40 

Freshmen 71 

Special Students 22 



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36 ADKLBBRT COLLEGB. [1902-1903 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMBSIOR 



All applicants for admission, whether to the Freshman 
class, to advanced standing, or to partial courses, must pre- 
sent satisfactory testimonials of good moral character, and 
those from other colleges must also bring certificates of hon- 
orable dismission. Admission to the Freshman class may 
be gained in one of two ways, either on examination, or on 
presentation of a certificate from an approved High School 
or Academy. Each of these methods is outlined below. 

ADMISSION ON EXAMINATION. 

The regular examination for admission to the Freshman 
class is held at Adelbert College on the Friday and Saturday 
following Commencement (June 19-20, 1903). Attendance 
is required at the opening of the examination on Friday 
morning. The examinations, which are partly oral and 
partly written, occur as follows : 

First Day — Mathematics, 9 a. m. to 12 m. (Arithmetic, 9 to 9:30; 
Algebra, 9:30 to 11; Geometry, 11 to 12); Greek, German and 
French, 2 p. m. to 5 p. m.; Chemistry, 2 p. m. to 3 p. M. ; Physics, 
3 p. M. to 4 p. M. ; History, 4 p. m. to 5 p. M. 

Second Day — Latin, 9 a. m. to 12 m.; English, 2 p. m. to 4 p. m. 

A second examination, to accommodate those unable to 
attend the first, is held at Adelbert College on the Monday 
and Tuesday before the opening of the first term (September 
21-22, 1902), beginning promptly at 9 A. M. The order of 
examinations is the same as at the regular examination. 
Candidates applying to be examined at other than these 
specified times, or late at the second examination, must ob- 
tain special permission from the Faculty. Candidates late 
at the regular examinations have no opportunity to make 
good their loss until the second examination. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 37 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

Each candidate, irrespective of the course he may choose, 
must be prepared in English, Latin, and Mathematics, 
according to the outlines of those subjects given below. 
Students whose examination papers show marked deficiency 
in spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division into paragraphs, 
will not be admitted to any course. 

Engush : The examination consists of two parts. The student is 
required to show a general knowledge of the books marked A in the 
following lists, and to write several short paragraphs on different 
subjects chosen from them. In preparation for this part of the re- 
quirement it is important that the candidate shall receive instruction 
in the fundamental principles of rhetoric. He is also required to 
answer questions testing a thorough acquaintance with the books 
marked B. These questions relate to the author and subject matter, 
to the essentials of English grammar, and to the leading facts in 
those periods of English literary history to which the prescribed 
books belong. 

Examinations in 1902 : A. For Reading : Shakespeare's Merchant 
of Venice ; Pope's Iliad, Books i, vi, xxii, and xxiv ; The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; 
Tennyson's Princess ; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal ; George Eliot's 
Silas Mamer. B. For Study : Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Milton's Ly- 
cidas, Comus, L' Allegro, II Penseroso; Burke's Conciliation with 
America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Examinations in 1903 and 1904: A, For Reading: Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice, and Julius Caesar; The Sir Roger de Coverley 
Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Carlyle's Essay on Burns; Tenny- 
son's Princess; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal; George Eliot's Silas 
Marner. B. For Study : Shakespeare's Macbeth ; Milton's L' Allegro, 
II Penseroso, Comus, Lycidas; Burke's Conciliation with America; 
Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Latin : Grammar (Bennett, or Allen and Greenough) ; Roman 
pronunciation. Caesar — three books of the Gallic War, or two books 
of the Civil War. Cicero — six orations, including De Imperio Gn. 
Pompeii. Virgil — the Bucolics, two books of the Georgics and five 
books of the jCneid, or the Bucolics and six books of the ^Eneid. 



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38 ADELBERT COI.I.EGE. [1902-1903 

Ovid — Translation at sight. The translation at sight of passages 
from prose authors. Prose Composition — rendering of simple Eng- 
lish sentences into Latin. History of Rome — the amount required 
is indicated by Smith's Smaller History of Rome, or Creighton's 
Primer of Roman History. Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics : Arithmetic, including the metric system of weights 
and measures. Algebra (Milne's or Taylor's Academic, or Went- 
worth's College), to the chapter on the Binomial Theorem. Geom- 
etry — (Beman and Smith, Milne or Wells) complete. 

Note : It is very important that students review a portion at least 
of both Algebra and Geometry in their last preparatory year. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 

In addition to the above, students entering the several 
courses must be prepared in the following subjects : For the 
Classical Course, Greek ; for the Modem Language Course, 
French or German; for the Latin- Scientific Course, Chem- 
istry, Physics, and History. The entrance requirements in 
these subjects are as follows: 

Greek: Grammar; pronunciation as recommended on page vii of 
the Preface to Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Xenophon — four books 
of the Anabasis (for which one hundred and ten pages of Goodwin's 
Greek Reader will be considered as equivalent). Homer — three 
books of the Iliad with Prosody. The translation at sight of easy 
passages in Attic prose. Prose Composition — the rendering into 
Greek of simple Eiiglish sentences. White's Beginner's Greek Book 
(complete), Jones's Exercises in Greek Prose (twenty-six exer- 
cises), or Pearson's Greek Prose Composition are recommended. 
History of Greece — Fyffe's Primer, Oman's, Myers's, or Smith's His- 
tory of Greece, or Pennell's Ancient Greece. Ancient Geography. 

French : Ability to write simple sentences in French. A thorough 
knowledge of French Grammar, special attention being paid to the 
verbs. Ability to read ordinary French at sight. The following 
course is advised: First Year — French Grammar and exercises; 
irregular verbs; Kuhn's French Reader; Halevy's L'Abbe Constan- 
tin; Labiche's Voyage de M. Perrichon. Second Year — Grammar 
with Composition exercises from L'Abbe Constantin (Grandgent). 
Sandeau's Mile de la Seigliere, Pailleron's Le Monde oil Ton 
s'ennuie, Loti's Pecheur d'Islande, Daudet's Contes (Cameron). 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 39 

Third Year — Review of irregular verbs, with composition exercises 
from La Belle Nivernaise. Moliere*s Bourgeois Gentilhomme, or 
any other comedy of Moliere. Racine's Athalie, Corneille's Cid, Bal- 
zac's Eugenie Grandet. 

German: Grammar, with translation at sight of easy German 
prose. Prose Composition — the rendering of simple connected prose 
from English into German. Ability to pronounce German and to 
recognize German words and simple phrases when uttered. In addi- 
tion, familiarity with the following works or their equivalents, is 
required: Riehl — Der Fluch der Schonheit. Frcytag — Aus dem 
Staat Friedrichs des Grossen. Heine — ^Die Harzreise. Goethe — First 
three books of Dichtung und Wahrheit. Lessing — Minna von Barn- 
helm. Schiller — Wilhelm Tell and Das Lied von der Glocke. Thirty 
pages of lyrics and ballads. 

Chemistry : Remsen's Chemistry, briefer course, or an equivalent. 

Physics: Carhart and Chute, Avery, or an equivalent. Class- 
work through one year. Each student must perform in the labora- 
tory at least thirty-five or forty experiments, mainly quantitative, 
such as are given in the best laboratory manuals. The laboratory 
note-book should be presented as part of the certificate. 

History (through one year) : Courses suggested in the order of 
preference. Greek and Roman (a separate course distinct from work 
in Latin or Greek) ; medieval and modem; English; American His- 
tory and Civil Government. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Students from such High Schools and Academies as ma\ 
be approved by the Faculty are admitted to the Freshman 
class without examination, on the presentation of certificates 
showing that they have completed the requisite amount of 
preparatory study. Blank forms of such certificates, similar 
to that given below, will be furnished instructors on appli- 
cation to the President, with whom they are invited to cor- 
respond. Applicants for admission are requested to present 
their certificates, or send them by mail to the Dean, Pro- 
fessor Fuller, during Commencement week, or as soon there- 
after as practicable. 



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40 ADELBKRT COI.I.KGE. [1902-I903 

Students received on certificate are r^^rded as upon pro- 
bation during the first half-year, and those deficient in 
preparation are dropped whenever the deficiency has been 
clearly demonstrated. In order to co-operate with the sec- 
ondary schools in preparatory work, a report of the progress 
of each student admitted by certificate will be sent to the 
Principal of the school from which he comes. If those 
entering from any school during a term of years are found 
deficient in preparation, the privilege of entering on certifi- 
cate will be withdrawn from that school. 

[form of certificate]. 

Mr is a graduate of the 

School, in the course, Class of , 

has pursued the studies marked below with the success indicated by 
the attached standing, and is. hereby recommended for admission to 

the course, Freshman class, Adelbert College, Western 

Reserve University. 

(Requirements for admission common to all courses). 

English : As prescribed on page 37 of this catalogue. 

Mathematics: See page 38. 

Latin: See page 37. 

In addition to the above for admission to 

THE CLASSICAL COURSE : 

Greek: As on page 38. 

THE MODERN LANGUAGE COURSE: 

German : As on page 39. 
French : As on page 38. 

THE LATIN-SCIENTIFIC COURSE: 

Chemistry, Physics, English History: See page 39. 

When the above requirements have not been exactly met, the 
equivalents offered therefor must be specified in detail. When a cer- 
tificate does not meet the above requirements in full, the applicant 
may be required to pass the usual examination in any or all the 
requirements. 



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1902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 4I 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING, 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior classes, whether from other colleges or not, may be 
required to pass examinations on studies previously pur- 
sued, but full credit will be given to such certificates as they 
bring from former instructors. No one is admitted to the 
Senior class after the beginning of the second half-year. 

In connection with entrance to advanced standing, atten- 
tion is called to the opportunity for combining professional 
training with the undergraduate work of the last year. For 
further particulars see the statement regarding Law and 
Medicine on pages 55-56. 

ADMISSION TO PARTIAL COURSES. 

Students may receive instruction without becoming can- 
didates for a degree, provided they can meet the require- 
ments for admission to the Freshman class, or have pursued 
other studies which may be accepted as equivalent to the 
entrance requirements. Such special students are permitted 
to enter only those courses for which their previous training 
hcLS fitted them. In general they are subject to the same 
requirements as to college regulations, number of hours of 
work, and standing in class as regular students, but each 
application is considered on its merits. 

Special students, on severing their connection with the 
College, receive certificates of all work satisfactorily com- 
pleted. The requirements for admission to each course may 
be learned on application to the Dean. 



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42 ADELBERT COI^LEGE. [1902-I903 



COURSES OF STUDY* 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 
REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

T,,„, ^ , / I hour a week \ ,^, , 

^^^''^ ' : i First half-year. I '7^' 

English i | 3 hours a week | 

Latin i and 2 >• throughout the V 102 hrs. 

Mathematics t, 2 and 3 J year. j 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 

Classical f GREEK I and 2 1 

Course. \ German i 



T^„^f!^jFRENCHIAND2 



Latin ( Chemistry 2 

Scientific -j Physics i A. First half-year 
Course. ( History A. Second half-yr 



6 hours a week^j 
throughout the V 204 hrs. 
year. J 



527 hrs. 

In addition to the above subjects all members of the Freshman 
class are required to take systematic exercises in the gymnasium 
three times a week during six months of the year. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



43 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

Engush 2, I hour a week throughout the year, 34 hours. 
Electtves, 15 hours a week throughout the year, 510 hours. 

JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS. 

Electives^ 15 hours a week throughout the year. 

During the Sophomore, Junior and Senior years each student must 
complete not less than four half-year courses of three hours in each 
one of the following groups : 



I^NGUAGE 


MATHEMATICS 


PHILOSOPHY, 


AND 


and NATURAL 


HISTORY, AND SOCIAL 


UTSRATURB. 


SCIBNCB. 


SCIENCE. 


English, 


Astronomy, 


Bconomics and 


German, 


Biology, 


Politics, 


Greek. 


Chemistry, 


History, 


Latin, 


Geolog}* and 


Philosophy. 


Romance 


Mineralogy, 




Languages, 


Mathematics, 
Physics. 





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44 ADBLBBRT COLLEGE. [1902-1903 



SYNOPSIS OF COURSES 



The following statements describe all courses offered both 
prescribed and elective. Prescribed courses are indicated 
on pages 42-43 of this catalogue; all others are elective. 
Unless otherwise stated, each course consists of three one- 
hour recitations each week. Numbers of courses are not 
necessarily consecutive. The hours at which courses are 
given will be found on the schedule of recitations, a copy of 
which may be obtained at the Dean's office. 

ASTRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 

I. Astronomy. Young's General Astronomy. The course is 
mainly descriptive, and is amply illustrated. Some attention is given 
to the history of astronomy. Second half-year. 

BIBUCAL UTERATURE. 

PRESIDENT THWING. 
MR. HAYDN. (CoUfSCS 2, 3, 4.) 

1. The Life of Christ. Essays and discussions upon the prin- 
cipal doctrines of Christianity. One hour a week, first half of Fresh- 
man year. 

2. Hebrew Grammar and Reading. An introductory course. 
Harper's "Elements of Hebrew" will be used, later the Old Testa- 
men^ text. Three hours a week, throughout the year. 

3. New Testament Greek. A critical reading of selections 
from the Gospels, Acts and Epistles, to bring out the special charac- 
teristics of this Greek. Either half-year. 

4. Seminary in New Testament Exegesis. (Open to those 
who have taken Course 3). Written expositions of assigned pas- 
sages, with discussions. Either half-year. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 45 

BIBUCXjRAPHY. 

mr. williams. 
I. Reference Work. A study of the better known works of refer- 
ence, as the general and special cyclopedias, dictionaries, annuals, 
indexes to periodicals, and ready reference manuals of every kind. 
Works of a similar nature will be compared,. and the limitations of 
each pointed out. Lists of questions to be solved by the use of the 
works studied will be given, and the methods of finding the answers 
discussed in class. One hour a week, second half-year. 

BIOLCXiY. 

pRcnnessoR herrick. 

MR. JAMES. 

1. Elementary Biology. An introduction to the study of animal 
and plant life. One recitation, two laboratory exercises of two hours 
each. Second half-year. 

2. Zoology — Comparative Anatomy op Invertebrates. A com- 
parative study of a few important types of invertebrate animals. One 
lecture, two laboratory exercises of two hours each. First half-year. 

3. Zoology — Comparative Anatomy op Vertebrates. A com- 
parative study of the principal types of vertebrates. One recitation 
and two laboratory exercises. First half-year. 

6. Physiology. Elements of the physiology of man and lower 
animals. Three exercises, consisting of lectures, recitations, and 
demonstrations of one hour each. First half-year. 

7. Elements op Vertebrate Embryology. A study of the devel- 
opment of birds and mammals. One recitation, two laboratory ex- 
ercises of two hours each. Second half-year. 

9. Animal Behavior. A course for the reading and discussion 
of the most significant works upon the instinct and intelligence of 
animals. Two exercises weekly. First half-year. 

10. Botany. An introduction to the study of plants. Instruc- 
tion is given by lectures, laboratory work and field excursions. 
Second half-year. 

11. Reading Club. A voluntary association of students and in- 
structors for reading and discussing works of general scientific inter- 
est. Meetings are held weekly from December i to May i at a 
time most convenient to the members. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are: Course i, 2, 
3. 7, or 10, $5.00. 



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46 ADELBERT COLI.EGK. [1902-1903 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR MORLEY. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR TOWER. 

DR. GRUENER. 

I. a. Chemistry of the Non-Metallic Elements. Wurtz's Ele- 
ments of Chemistry. Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. First half-year. 

1. b. Chemistry of the Metals. Wurtz's Elements of Chem- 
istry. Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours. 
Second half-year 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. A more advanced course in general 
chemistry, for the Freshman year of the Latin-Scientific Course. 
Newth's Inorganic Chemistry. Two laboratory exercises and one 
recitation, throughout the year. 

3. Inorganic Preparations. This course will deal with the prep- 
aration of a number of inorganic compounds, making use of methods 
inapplicable to the elementary courses. Two laboratory exercises 
and one recitation each week. Open to those who have taken 
courses la and ib, or course 2. First half-year. 

5. Elements of Qualitative Analysis. Three laboratory exer- 
cises of three hours each. Open to those who have taken either 
course 2 or course ib. Second half-year. 

6. Organic Chemistry. Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Two rec- 
itations and one laboratory exercise of three hours, throughout the 
year. 

7. Elements of Quantitative Analysis. Three laboratory exer- 
cises of three hours each, throughout the year. 

8. Physiological Chemistry. Simon's Physiological Chemistry. 
A course on the chemistry of the animal body, of nutrition, and of 
the ordinary food materials. Two recitations and one laboratory 
exercise of three hours. Open to those who have taken course 6. 
First half-year. ' 

9. Physical Chemistry. An elementary course treating princi- 
pally of the theory of solutions and electro-chemistry. Three times a 
week with occasional laboratory exercises. Second half-year. Open 
to those who have had three half-year courses in chemistry. 

The Laboratory Fee for Course 9 is ^2.00 ; for Course la, ib, or 
8 is $3.00; for Course 2, $4.00; for Course 3 or 6, $5.00; and for 
Course 5 or 7, $6.00. These fees are for each half-year. Breakage 
and other damage to apparatus are charged extra. 



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I902-1903] WKSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 47 

CHURCH HISTORY. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SEVERANCE. 

1. Church History of the First Six Centuries. Especial at- 
tention will be devoted to the Patristic Literature and to the Doc- 
trinal Controversies that rent the Church. 1903-4. First half-year. 

2. Church History of the Middle Ages. The external history 
of the Papacy will be traced, and emphasis will be laid on the or- 
ganization and administration of the Church and of the Monastic 
Bodies and on the Scholastic Philosophy. First half-year. 

3. Modern Church History. The period of Confessional Or- 
thodoxy, Methodism, the Missionary Movement, and the Vatican 
Council are amongst the topics discussed. 

4. Life in the Middle Ages. This course will deal with the 
dwellings, costumes, food, occupations and habits of the men and 
women of that epoch. It will be illustrated by means of photographs 
and prints taken from Mediseval Manuscripts. First half-year. 
1903-1904. 

5. The Beuefs and Superstitions of the Middle Ages. Es- 
pecial attention will be paid to magic and sorcery, and to their out- 
come in the witchcraft delusion. Portents, lucky and unlucky days, 
precious stones, palmistry, etc, will also be touched on. Second 
half-year. 

6. Historical and General Bibliography. The object of this 
course will be to familiarize the students with the best guides, in- 
dices, repertoria and helps to the study of history. An examination 
will be made of books mentioned. The course is adapted to the 
needs, not only of those specializing in history, but also of those 
looking forward to library work. 

For courses on the Reformation and the Middle Ages, see History. 

ECONOMICS. 

DR. YOUNG. 

The first course is a prerequisite to the election of any of the 
others, except courses 8, 9 and 10. 

1. Elements of Economics. Lectures, recitations and required 
readings. The text-book is Bullock's Introduction* to the Study of 
Economics. First half-year. 

2. The Distribution of Wealth. A discussion of modern the- 
ories of value and distribution, together with an historical and crit- 



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48 ADBLBKRT COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

ical treatment of private property, contract, and other institutions 
that affect the distribution of wealth. Lectures and required read- 
ings. Second half-year. 

3. Money and Banking. The theory of money, the monetary 
history of the United States, and the banking systems of the United 
States and other countries are studied in this course. Lectures and 
required readings. First half-year. 1902-1903. 

4. PuBUC Finance. This course deals with public revenues and 
expenditures. Lectures, assigned readings, and individual investi- 
gation of special topics. Problems of state and local taxation are 
given special attention. The text-book is Adams* The Science of 
Finance. Second half-year. 1902-1903. 

5. Economic Problems. A brief treatment of socialism is fol- 
lowed by a discussion of labor problems. Lectures, assigned read- 
ings and class reports. The text books are Ely's Socialism and So- 
cial Reform and Levasseur's The American Workman. First half- 
year. 

6. Economic History. This course treats of the economic his- 
tory of England from the 13th to the middle of the 19th century. 
Lectures and required readings. The text-book is Cheyncy's Indus- 
trial and Social History of England. First half-year. 

7. Modern Industry. This course deals with the social economy 
of the present. The growth of corporations, the functions of spec- 
ulation, and the problems of railway transportation are among 
the topics discussed. Lectures, assigned readings, and class reports. 
Second half-year. 

8. History of Poutical Thought. The development of political 
philosophy from the Greeks to the present, and its connection with 
political history. Lectures, with readings in examples of the prin- 
cipal schools. First half-year. 

9. Historical Politics. The evolution of political institutions 
from their origins to modern times, with a particular consideration 
of the city state, the Roman Republic and Empire, the feudal system, 
the mediaeval empire, parliamentary institutions, etc The text-book 
is Wilson's The State. First half-year. 1902-1903. 

10. Comparative Politics. The governments of five modern 
states, viz., the United States, the British Empire, the German Em- 
pire, Switzerland, and France, are examined and compared. The 
text-book is Wilson's The State. Second half-year. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 49 

ENGLISH* 

PROFESSOR POTWIN (COURSES I4, I5, 16, I9, 20). 

PROFESSOR EMERSON (COURSES 2, 4, 5, 7, 10, I3, I7, 21-23). 

DR. BRIGGS (COURSES I, 4» 6> "i 3^) • 

RHETORIC AND ENGLISH COMPOSITION. 

1. Rhetoric. Rhetorical theory from a text-book of rhetoric, 
and analysis of prose selections illustrating the principles of composi- 
tion during the first half-year. During the second half-year a study 
of masterpieces of poetry and prose with an historical survey of Eng- 
lish literature. A short essay or its equivalent each week, with con- 
ference for the correction of individual faults. Freshman year. 

2. Theme Writing. Short themes each week with individual 
conferences. Lectures on writing and the use of good English. One 
hour a week throughout Sophomore year. 

' 4. Daily Themes. Five short themes each week on subjects 
chosen by the student. Weekly conferences with each student for 
correction and suggestion. First half-year. 

5. Daily Themes. Similar to Course 4, but of a more advanced 
character. Students must have had Course 4 or its equivalent. 
Second half-year. 

6. FoRENSics. Critical study of masterpieces in argument and 
oratory, with preparation of briefs, argumentative essays and ora- 
tions. First half-year. 

7. History of English Prose. Lectures on prose writers and the 
development of prose style. Critical reading of specimens of Eng- 
lish prose from Mandeville to Burke, with collateral readings and 
essays. Second half-year. 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE. 

Students are advised to take at least two of the first five courses 
before beginning those which follow. 

10. Chaucer and Spenser. A study of the minor poems and the 
Canterbury Tales of Chaucer, together with the most important po- 
etry of Spenser. A survey of English poetry between Chaucer and 
Spenser, with lectures and collateral reading. First half-year. 

11. Shakespeare and the Drama. A general course on the 
literature during the reigns of Elizabeth and James I, with special 
emphasis upon the drama. Second half-year. 



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50 ADELBKRT COLLRGK. [1902-I903 

12. Milton and the CLASsiasTS. English poetry from Milton 
to Pope inclusive, with special emphasis of Milton. The classical 
influence on English writers. Readings in the minor writers of the 
period. First half-year. 

13. Collins to Keats. A rapid survey of the poets from the 
death of Pope to Cowper, and special study of Cowper, Burns, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Southey, Byron, Shelley, Keats. 
First half-year. 

14. Tennyson and the Poets from 1830, The poetry of Ten- 
nyson will be the central and principal study, with readings of other 
poets, except Browning who is the subject of a separate course. 
First half-year. 

15. American Literature. Its beginnings, dependence on Eng- 
lish authors, and development under the influences of our history. 
First half-year. 

16. History of English Criticism. The study will begin with 
Dryden, and include the critical works of Addison, Johnson, Hallam 
and others down to Matthew Arnold and the critics of today. 

17. The English Novel. An historical course beginning with 
the storywriters of the Elizabethan period, and following the devel- 
opment of the novel through the eighteenth, and early nineteenth 
century. 1903-1904. Second half-year. 

18. The English Drama before Shakespeare. Text-book, 
Manley's Specimens of the Pre-Shakesperean Drama. First half-year. 

19. Shakespeare. All the plays of Shakespeare to be read 
rapidly in the probable order of composition, with' selection of charac- 
teristic passages. As an introduction, one of the more familiar plays 
will be studied for its illustration of the language of that period. 
Second half-year. 

20. The Poetry of Browning. The study will follow the order 
of time of composition, typical selections being made for careful 
analysis and explanation. Second half-year. 

21. Old English (Anglo-Saxon). Lectures and recitations 
upon the language, with readings of selections from Old English 
prose and poetry. Special attention to the development of the lan- 
guage. First half-year. 

22. Middle English. Lectures on Middle English language and 
literature, with readings of selections from prose and poetry. Special 
study of Chaucer and his contemporaries. Second half-year. 



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I902-I903] WHSTKRN RESERVB UNIVERSITY. 5 1 

23. Advanced Study of Old and Middle English. Critical read- 
ing of texts, study of sources, and of the development of language 
and literature. Throughout the year. 

ELOCUTION. 

30. A course in vocal training and drill in public speaking. In- 
struction is given by lectures; by individual training in the analysis 
and delivery of oratorical masterpieces; and in the writing of ora- 
tions. Three hours a week, second half-year. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

PROFESSOR GUSHING. 

1. Mineralogy. Crystallography, and Descriptive Mineralogy. 
Two hours of recitation and lectures, and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. First half-year. 

2. MiNERAixwY. Determinative Mineralogy and Blow-pipe Anal- 
ysis. Three laboratory exercises of three hours each. Physical 
Crystallography may be substituted for the Blow-pipe work. Second 
half-year. 

3. Geology. Dynamical and Structural Geology. Three hours a 
week. First half-year. 

4. Geology. Historical Geology. Lectures and field work in 
vicinity of Cleveland. Second half-year. 

5. Physiography. The cause and manner of the development of 
topographic forms. Second half-year. 

A Laboratory fee of $1.00 is charged for courses i, 2 and 4. 

GERMAN. 

professor HARRIS. 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR MEYER (COURSES I, 2, AND 3). 

1. Elemeno'Ary German. Grammar, reading and composition; 
easy texts. In this and the following courses as much of the work 
as possible is done in German, but conversation is used as a means, 
not as an end. Required of all who begin German in college. 
Throughout the year. 

2. Selected Masterpieces of representative German authors, 
the latter part of the year being given to Schiller. The texts read 
vary from year to year. The first text in 1903- 1904 will be Lessing's 
Emilia Galotti. Composition and advanced grammar. For Modem 
Language Freshmen. - Throughout the year. 



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52 ADELBKRT COLI^GK. [19P2-I903 

3. Second Year German. Whitney's German Grammar; 
Harris's German Composition. Reading of representative literary 
works. The texts read vary from year to year. The first text in 1903- 
1904 will be Arnold, Fritz auf Ferien. Open to all who have had 
Course i or its equivalent. Throughout the year. 

4. Author Course. The greater part of the year is given up to 
the more detailed study of some of the great writers, usually Goethe, 
but some other texts are also read. The work is partly in the form of 
class exercises and partly private reading on which the student is 
examined. Drill in writing German. Open to all who have had 
Course 2 or 3, or an equivalent. Throughout the year. 

The following electives are open to all who have had Course 4 or 
its equivalent. 

5. Outline History of German Literature. Recitations from 
a manual, with collateral readings; lectures on German history and 
literature. Throughout the year. 

6. Middle High German. This course gives a reading knowl- 
edge of Middle High German through a careful study of the gram- 
mar and the reading of selections from various texts, such as the 
Nibelungenlied, Hartmann, Walther von der Vogelweide, etc., 1903- 
1904. Throughout the year. 

9. Modern German Prose. This course is given up to the study 
of a few of the modem writers in the fields of history, biography, 
travels, etc. Essays, lectures, and portions of larger works are read. 
Throughout the year. 

11. GusTAV Freytag. a detailed study of the life and works of 
Gustav Freytag and of his relations to contemporary German litera- 
ture. 1903- 1904. Second half-year. 

12. Modern Fiction. German Fiction since 1848 (lectures) ; 
readings from Auerbach, Scheffel, Freytag, Spielhagen, Sudermann, 
and others. 1903-1904. Throughout the year. 

13. Franz Grillparzer. His life, works, and relations to con- 
temporary German dramatic literature. First half-year. 

14. Heinrich Heine. A detailed study of the life and works of 
Heine and his relations to contemporary German literature. Second 
half-year. 

15. Modern German Poetry. German poetry of the nineteenth 
century with particular reference to the lyrics. 1903-1904. First 

_ half-year. 



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1 902-1903] WKSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 53 

GREEK. 

PROFESSOR FULLER. 

PROFESSOR FOWLER. 

MR. HAYDN. 

1. Homer. First half Freshman year. 

2. Attic Orators. Rhetoric; Greek History. Second half 
Freshman year. 

3. The Drama. Selections, with an introduction to the study of 
metres and scenic antiquities. First half Sophomore year. 

4. Plato. Greek Literature, connected survey, illustrated by 
extracts from authors not previously studied. Second half Sopho- 
more year. 

5. Tragedy. Selected dramas of Euripides, Sophocles, and 
iCschylus. First half-year. 

6. Thucydides, with comparative studies of Herodotus and 
Xenophon. Second half-year. 

7. Philosophy. First half-year. 

8. Archaeology. Second half-year. 

g. Idyllic Poetry. First half-year. 

ID. iCscHiNEs and Demosthenes ON THE Crown. First half- 
year. 

11. Lyric Poetry. First half-year. 

12. New Testament Greek. See Bible, Course 3. 

HISTORY. 

professor perrin. 

A. Outlines of European History. Required of all Latin- 
Scientific Freshmen. Second half-year. 

Students are advised to take courses i and 2 before beginning any 
of the others. 

I. The Middle Ages. Europe from the fourth century to the 
fourteenth. The migration and settlement of the Teutonic peoples, 
the rise of the Christian church, Mohammedanism and the crusades, 
feudalism, the struggle of the Empire and Papacy, the growth of 
cities and the rise of modem kingdoms. First half-year. 



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54 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [1902-I9O3 

2. Modern Europe. An oucline of the political, religious and 
social history of Europe from the fourteenth century to the present. 
1902-1903. Second half-year. 

3 History of France, from the fall of the Carolingians to the 
middle of the eighteenth century, with special reference to the growth 
of French institutions. Second half-year. 

4. The Reformation. A course based upon Fisher's History of 
the Reformation with collateral reading in SchaflF's History of the 
Christian Oiurch, Hausser's Period of the Reformation, Ranke's 
History of the Popes, and the writings of the reformers. Special 
topics are assigned for investigation. First half-year. 

5. Political History of England, from the Tudor period to 
181 5. Lectures and prescribed reading. First half-year. 

6. American Colonial History. The constitutional and insti- 
tutional development of the English colonies to 1783. Lectures with 
prescribed readings. First half-year. 

7. Political and Constitutional History of the United 
States, 1 783-1860. Lectures with required readings. The more im- 
portant documents in McDonald's Select Documents are read and 
discussed. 1902-1903. Second half-year. 

8. The Old Regime and the Revolution. France, with com- 
parisons drawn from other states, 1774-1789; the French Revolution, 
1 789-1795, its social and political struggles and its permanent results 
in French society. First half-year. 

9. The History of Europe from 1815. A continuation of 
Course 8. Second half-year. 

10. (0). The United States 1860-1885. Lectures and reports 
upon topics assigned for investigation. Or, 

(b) American Poutics. A study of the government of the 
United States, both National and State. Second half-year. 

11. History of Colonization since 1492. The history of the 
English colonies in America is not included. Second half-year. 

12. The Stuart Regime, i6o3-'I7I4. Especial attention given to 
constitutional questions. The more important documents of Gardi- 
ner's Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution are read 
and discussed. Second half-year. 

13. England in the Nineteenth Century. A continuation of 
Course 5. Second half-year. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 55 

14. Constitutional History of England. Lectures and pre- 
scribed reading. The more important constitutional documents are 
discussed. First half-year. 

15. American Diplomacy, 1776-1877. Lectures and reports upon 
topics, assigned for investigation. 

17. Church History. For this course, now transferred to the 
Department of Church History, and for other courses on the history 
of the Christian Church, see Church History. 

LAV. 

Seniors in Adelbert College may elect work in the Law School 
of the University, provided it does not count for more than nine of 
the fifteen hours each week required for graduation, gy availing 
themselves of this opportunity and by proper choice of electives in 
the College, students may complete one of the three years required 
for the degree in law during their academic course. For details of 
such courses application should be made to the Dean of the Law 
School, Professor Hopkins. 

LATIN. 

professor platner. 

1. LivY. First half Freshman year. 

2. Plautus, two or three plays. Horace^ Satires. Second half 
Freshman year. 

3. Odes of Horace. First half Sophomore year. 

4. Tacitus, Germania and Agricola. Juvenal, Satires. Second 
half Sophomore year. • 

5. Cicero's Letters. • 

6. Lucretius. 

8. Latin of the Silver Age. This course is based mainly on 
the letters of Pliny the Younger, Seneca, Tacitus, and Suetonius. 

10. Roman Elegiac and Lyric Poetry. 

Each of the elective courses, 5 to 10, is a half-year course, and in 
general they are given in a cycle, but no definite order can be stated, 
variations being introduced according to the number and character 
of the students. 



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56 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR SMITH. 
MR. DICKERMAN. 

1. Plane Trigonometry. First half Freshman year. 

2. Plane Analytic Geometry. Second half Freshman year. 

4. Algebra (advanced course). First half Sophomore year. 

5. Plane and Solid Analytic Geometry (advanced course). 
First half-year. 

6. Spherical Trigonometry. Surveying. Second half Sopho- 
more "year. 

7. Elements of Differential and Integral Calculus; Second 
half Sophomore year. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus (advanced course). 
First half-year. 

9. The Theory of Equations. Burnside and Panton's Theory 
of Equations. 1903- 1904. Second half-year. 

10. Quaternions. Kelland and Tait*s Introduction to Quater- 
nions. First half-year. 

11. Differential Equations. Johnson's Differential Equations. 
1902-1903. Second half-year. 

12. Modern Analytic Geometry. Second half-year. 
The Laboratory fee for course 6 is $1.00. 

MEDICINE* 
Seniors in Adelbert College may elect work in the Medical College 
of the University, provided it does not count for more than nine of 
the fifteen hours each week required for graduation. By availing 
themselves of this opportunity and by proper choice of electives in 
the College, students may complete one of the four years required 
for the degree in medicine during their academic course. For details 
of such courses application should be made to the Dean of the Medi- 
cal College, Dr. Millikin. 

PHILOSOPHY. 

professor CURTIS. 
DR. MARVIN. 

The following chronological order will be observed. Students 
wishing to elect any of the more advanced courses (5-1 1) in the 
Junior or Senior year are advised to take Courses i, 2, 3 and 4, in 
the Sophomore or Junior year. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 57 

1. Psychology. An elementary course which presents in outline 
the entire subject matter, with special emphasis upon the functions 
of the Nervous System and the process of perception. First half- 
year. 

2. Anthropology. The main problems and bearings of Anthro- 
pology are discussed in systematic order. Lectures are given on the 
history of Anthropology, and an effort is made to understand its po- 
sition iti the present century. First half-year. 

3. Logic. This course, of which the purpose is chiefly practical, 
presents the elements of deductive and inductive logic, laying especial 
emphasis on the formal and material fallacies. Second half-year. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. This course introduces the 
student to the chief problems of systematic philosophy, their history 
and present status. The instruction is given in the form of lectures 
and assigned private reading. Second half-year. 

5. Ethics. An outline of Ethics will be given by lectures. Some 
of the more important problems of ethics will be studied in their his- 
torical and philosophical aspects by reference to the works of Aris- 
totle, Kant, Martineau, Sidgwick, Green, Spencer and Stephen. First 
half-year. 

6. (a) General History of Philosophy. A course for Seniors 
extending throughout the year. The first term reviews oriental and 
Greek thought with their bearings upon patristic and scholastic phil- 
osophy to the close of the sixteenth century. The second term will 
consider the main lines of thought from Bacon and Descartes to 
Wundt and Spencer, inclusive. 

(b). British Philosophy from Bacon to Hume. Lectures, 
recitations and private readings. The purpose is to acquaint the 
student with the classics of British Empiricism by means of selec- 
tions from Bacon's Advancement of Learning and Novum Organum, 
Hobbes* Leviathan, Locke's Essay Concerning Human Understand- 
ing, Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge, and Hume's Treat- 
ise of Human Nature. The course will bring forward the main 
problems of Modern Philosophy. First half-year. 

7. (a) Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Re- 
ligion. The aim is to present Religion in its psychological, histor- 
ical, critical, and constructive aspects. Second half-year. 



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58 ADHLBERT COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

(b) Philosophy op Society. Open only to students who have 
taken Courses i, 2 and 5. Lectures will be given by the instructor 
throughout the term and special work will be assigned to each student 
for report and discussion. Second half-year. Four hours. 

8. (a) The Philosophy of Kant. After the results of Hume's 
Philosophy have been reviewed, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason will 
be taken up and the object of knowledge carefully studied. This 
will be followed by a discussion of the Metaphysics of Morality, the 
Critique of Practical Reason, and the Critique of Judgment. First 
half-year. Or, 

(b) The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer. A critical study 
of Spencer's elaboration of the principle and process of Evolution 
along with the application of Evolution to Philosophy. Digests and 
critical essays are required for the purpose of bringing into promi- 
nence the main questions of Cosmology, and the bearing of Evolution 
on recent thought. 

(c) Contemporary Thought. A study of some recent work of 
value, such as Balfour's The Foundations of Belief, or Ward's Nat- 
uralism and Agnosticism. Second half-year. 

10. Advanced Psychology. The subject of the course is the 
Psychology of Education. Its aim is to apply the results of psy- 
chology to the solution of some of the chief problems of education. 
First half-year. 

11. Applied Logic, or Scientific Method. In this course the 
general methods of science will be analyzed in order to study their 
principles and nature and logical justification. The chief works con- 
sulted are those of Mill, Sigwart and Venn. Second half-year. 

PHYSICAL CULTURE. 

dr. wehr. 

1. Gymnastics and Hygiene. This course includes class and 
apparatus work in the gymnasium for three hours each week during 
six months of the year, and twelve lectures on hygiene. It counts 
as a one-hour course throughout the year. Required of Freshmen. 

2. Gymnastics and Physiology of Exercise. An elective course, 
consisting of the same amount of work on the gymnasium floor as in 
Course i, and twelve lectures on the physiology of exercise. Open 
to students of the three upper classes. One hour a week throughout 
the year. 



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I902-I903] WHSTBRN RBSERVE UNIVERSITY. 59 

PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 
DR. REICHMANN. 

1. Mechanics, Sound, Heat. Hastings and Beach, General 
Physics, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year. 

2. Electricity and Magnetism, Light. Continuation of Course 
I. Second half-year. 

I. (A) General contents and text book as in i. For Freshmen 
entering the Latin- Scientific course. The work is arranged to utilize 
as fully as possible the preparatory course in physics. First half-year. 

3. Physical Optics. Glazebrook's Physical Optics, or Preston's 
Theory of Light, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year 

4. Theory of Heat. An introduction to thermodynamics, based 
mainly on Buckingham's Theory of Thermodynamics, with lectures 
and references. Second half-year. 

Alternating with 8. 

5. Electricity and Magnetism. A general review of electrical 
theory, with laboratory practice in electrical measurements. The 
text-book will depend somewhat on the character of the class. First 
half-year. 

6. Continuation of Course 5. Second half-year. 

7. Mechanical Drawing. A course involving the principles of 
Descriptive Geometry and their application to Mechanical Drawing, 
the preparation of working drawings, elementary curve-tracing, etc. 
Faunce's Descriptive Geometry will be used as text. Second half- 
year. 

8. Mechanics. A study of the principles of applied mechanics. 
Text-book, Wright's Elements of Mechanics. Second half-year. 

Alternating with 4. 

9. Descriptive Physics. This course is intended for those who 
wish to obtain a general acquaintance with the more important phys- 
ical phenomena. It is given mainly by lectures, but includes refer- 
ences to text-books, and a few exercises in the laboratory. First 
half-year. 

10. Physical Manipulation. Instruction is given in the ele- 
ments of the ordinary arts, as glass-blowing and soldering, in the use 
of the dividing engine and other general instruments, in the construc- 
tion of simple pieces of apparatus. One exercise weekly. Second 
half-year. 



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6o ADELBKRT COLLBGR. [1902-I903 

11. Physical Experiment. Special topics in physics are as- 
signed to each student for detailed study. The aim of the course is to 
introduce somewhat more advanced experimental methods than are 
usually possible in the general courses. Each student is expected to 
spend from six to nine hours weekly in the laboratory. 

12. Appued Electricity. An elementary course of lectures on 
the modern application of electricity, including continuous and alter- 
nating current machinery, batteries, lighting, telegraphy, telephony, 
etc. Two exercises weekly. Second half-year. 

13. Physics Conference. Lectures on selected topics. Reports 
and discussions on special subjects and current physical literature 
by members of the conference. One meeting weekly. 

Courses 10 and 11 are intended primarily for those intending to 
teach physical science, or for students who expect to spe<iialize in 
Physics. 

Two weekly exercises under Course 11 may be combined with 
Course 10 to count for one three-hour course. 

An elementary knowledge of the Differential and Integral Calculus 
is necessary for Courses 4, 5, 6, 8 and 11. 

The Laboratory fee for Course 9 is $2.00; for each of the other 
lalx)ratory courses, $4.00. 

THE ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

ASSOaATE PROFESSOR BOURLAND. 

FRENCH. 

1. Elementary. Grammar and easy reading. Practice in speak- 
ing and writing French. First half-year. 

2. Elementary Course continued. Reading of modern prose 
and plays, with practice in speaking and writing. Second half-year. 

3. Rapid Reading of Nineteenth Century Texts, with prac- 
tice in conversation. This course may be elected twice. First half- 
year. 

4 (o) Literature of THE Seventeenth Century. Lectures, rec- 
itations and collateral readings in the classic drama and in prose 
writers. 1903-1904. Second half-year. 

4 (b) Literature of the Eighteenth Century. Lectures and 
recitations, with special reference to Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot 
and J. J. Rousseau. Second half-year. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 6 1 

The foregoing courses will be offered annually, except that 4 a or 
4 b will be given in alternate years; they or their equivalent must 
precede all other work in French. Of the following electives, not 
more than one may be expected in any half-year. 

5, 6. French Prose Composition. Practice in writing French, 
with review of syntax. First and second half-years. 

7. Literature of the Sixteenth Century. Montaigne, 
Rabelais. Lectures and recitations. First half-year. 

8. Outunes of the History of French Literature to the end 
OF the Sixteenth Century. Lectures with illustrative readings. 
Second half-year. 

9. 10. Historical French Grammar. Lectures on the phonology, 
and morphology, with illustrative readings in Old French texts. 
First and second half-years. 

ITALIAN. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and easy reading, with prac- 
tice in speaking. First half-year. 

2. Dante. The Inferno and the Vita Nuova. Lectures, readings, 
and recitations. 1902-3. Second half-year. 

SPANISH. 

1. Elementary Course. Grammar and easy reading, with prac- 
tice in speaking. 1903-4, first half year. 

2. Reading of Modern Prose and Plays^ with special drill in 
speaking and writing Spanish. Second half-year. 

3. The Classic Drama. Lectures on the dramatic literature of 
the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, with readings from Lope de 
Vega, Tirso de Molina, Alarc6n, Calderon. First half-year. 

4. Cervantes. Lectures, recitations and reports. Second half- 
year. 



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62 ADEI^BKRT COI^LBGE. [1902-1903 



GENERAL INFORMATION- , 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 
The first half-year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a holiday 
recess of nine days, until the first Saturday in February. 
The second half-year begins on the Monday after the first 
Saturday in February, and continues, with an Easter recess 
of one week, until Commencement, which occurs on the 
Thursday after the eleventh day of June (or after the tenth 
in years in which February has twenty-nine days). No 
college exercises are held on Thanksgiving day, Washing- 
ton's birthday, and Decoration day. On the day of prayer 
for colleges, religious exercises are held in Eldred Hall. The 
exercises of each half-year begin with prayers in the chapel 
at nine o'clock. 

RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 

All students are required to attend daily prayers in the 
chapel. At this service addresses are frequently made by 
the clergymen of Cleveland and other cities. Students are 
also expected to attend morning service on Sunday in the 
churches of the city. It is desired that students should 
connect themselves with the churches of their choice, and 
enter as far as possible into their religious activities. 

The Young Men's Christian Association of the college 
holds its meetings in Eldred Hall. This building is devoted 
entirely to the religious and social work of the Association. 

LIBRARIES. 

The College Library, including the collections of former 

literary societies, contains about forty-five thousand bound 

volumes and ten thousand unbound books and pamphlets. 

It is commodiously housed in the Hatch Library building. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 63 

the gift of Mr. Henry R. Hatch, of Cleveland. The col- 
lections relating to the study of the German language and 
literature, French literature, United States history, and the 
history of the French Revolution are particularly full. 
The list of periodicals is very complete, and the library con- 
tains many sets of valuable publications- in classical phil- 
ology and archaeology, Germanic and general philology, 
history, anthropology, and science, besides sets of the oldest 
and best literary magazines. These sets are kept up to 
date and their number is increased by constant additions. 
The whole collection is classified according to the Dewey 
system somewhat modified. Students have access to all the 
books on the shelves, and the library is open from eight in 
the morning to half-past five in the afternoon. 

In addition to the College Library, students may freely 
use the Public Library of Cleveland. It contains 150,000 
volumes, and includes valuable collections for the study of 
Shakespeare, modern literature, history, art and archaeolc^^y. 
On request of members of the Faculty, books from the Pub- 
lic Library are delivered at the Hatch Library building, and 
may be retained for an extended period. This arrangement 
makes its collection readily accessible to students at all times. 

Through the courtesy of its directors, students also have 
free tickets to the Case Library. This collection, containing 
50,000 volumes, is well supplied with periodicals and 
general literature, and offers excellent facilities for study of 
the fine arts, of political economy and sociology, and of the 
sciences, especially chemistry and botany. 

Students thus have access to collections aggregating about 
250,000 volumes, and constantly increasing in number. 
LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS. 

Biology. The biology laboratory is designed for 
the study of the biological sciences, especially zoology and 
botany ; for a biological museum, in the sense of a reference 
or teaching collection of objects drawn from the living 

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64 ADELBRRT COI^I^EGE. [1902-1903 

world to illustrate types of structure, variations, life his- 
tories and kindred subjects; and for the maintenance of 
vivaria, or rooms in which certain animals and plants, both 
aquatic and terrestrial, may be kept alive while their habits 
are studied, and, when possible, their breeding and devel- 
opment watched. 

Chemistry. The department of chemistry is well sup- 
plied with apparatus for use in illustrative lectures. The 
chemical laboratory is equipped with sufficient apparatus so 
that each student may become familiar with the facts of the 
science through experiments made by himself under the 
guidance of the instructor. Such experimental courses are 
offered in the chemistry of the non-metallic and metallic 
elements, in organic, analytical, and physiological chemistry. 

Geology and Mineralogy. The laboratory of this 
department is, at the present time, on the third floor of the 
main building. The collections at the service of the depart- 
ment are well chosen, and are rapidly growing. They com- 
prise sets of crystal models and crystals, crystal sections for 
optical study, and rock sections in great number, besides 
mineralogical, lithological, and palaeontological collections. 
The. vicinity of Cleveland is interesting geologically, es- 
pecially in regard to its glacial deposits and its palaeon- 
tology. It furnishes abundance of material for the special 
investigator. 

Physics and Astronomy. The Physical laboratory is 
a three-story building of sound and substantial construction, 
containing large lecture and laboratory rooms for the ele- 
mentary courses, and a considerable number of smaller 
apartments for more advanced work. Especial attention 
has been paid to heating, lighting, and ventilation. The 
department is equipped with a large variety of apparatus 
bearing on the courses at present offered — all of which 
include work in the laboratory — and additional apparatus 
is continually being obtained. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 65 

Upon the physical laboratory has been erected an equa- 
torial telescope, covered by a revolving dome. The tele- 
scope, of ten and one-half inches aperture and fifteen feet 
focal length, is equipped with all the necessary accessories 
for observation and measurement. This valuable addition 
to the scientific apparatus of the University is the gift of 
Messrs. W. R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey, of Cleveland. 

GYMNASIUM AND ATHLETIC FIELD. 

At the southern end of the campus is the gymnasium, and 
beside it the athletic field. The former is sufficiently well 
equipped with apparatus for ordinary use. All members of 
the Freshman class are required to take systematic exercise 
in the gymnasium three times a week during six months of 
the year. During the same period a similar opportunity is 
afforded members of the other classes. All work is under 
the supervision of the instructor in physical culture. 

The athletic field is graded, fenced, and provided with 
seats for viewing athletic contests. All college games can 
thus be played on the campus itself, and most of the evils at- 
tendant upon inter-collegiate contests avoided. 

RULES GOVERNING ATTENDANCE. 

Each student is allowed, during each half year, absences 
to the amount of one in twelve, from recitations in each study, 
provided that such absences do not immediately precede or 
follow a vacation or recess. Lack of preparation, when re- 
ported to the instructor beforehand, will be counted as an 
absence. Absences from chapel, or from work in the gymna- 
sium, are treated in the same way as absences from recitation. 
The absence of any considerable number of a class, by agree- 
ment, is not included in allowed absences, and will lessen the 
number of allowed absences, as may be determined by the 
Faculty. 

Absences beyond the number allowed will be excused 
only by vote of the Faculty, and excuses will be confined 



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66 ADELBERT COIyl^EGE. [1902-I903 

chiefly to cases of protracted illness. Applications for such 
excuses must be made through the Dean, in writing, within 
one week after the resumption of college duties, or they will 
not be considered. 

Absences of athletic teams, glee clubs, delegates to fra- 
ternity conventions, etc., must be made the subject of special 
permission, for which application must be made, in every 
case before the absence, to the Executive Committee. 

All omitted exercises, allowed or excused, must be made 
up within one week after the resumption of college duties, 
at a time and place appointed by the instructor whose exer- 
cises were omitted. The responsibility in this matter rests 
with the student. For special reasons the instructor may 
grant an extension of the time beyond one week, or the 
Faculty may excuse the student altogether, on application in 
writing, through the Dean. A single omitted exercise is con- 
sidered as made up if at the next exercise in that study there 
is a review, and the student reports that he is prepared upon 
the review as well as the advance lesson. In all cases a 
student will be held responsible for preparation on omitted 
work whenever involved in review or examination. 

Omitted exercises, not allowed or excused (or in any 
case, if not made up), will be counted as failures in reckon- 
ing a student's standing. Irregularities in attendance, not 
allowed or excused, will be marked as follows: Absence 
from examination, public or private, five marks. Absence 
from lectures, two marks. Absence from any other exercise, 
one mark. Tardiness at, or egress from any of the above, 
one mark. 

When the marks of a student amount to five, he will be 
informed of the fact, and a written notice will be sent to his 
father or guardian, together with a statement of all his ab- 
sences, allowed and excused, and a copy of the printed rules. 
When the marks amount to ten, a second notice will be sent ; 
when they amount to fifteen a third will be sent, and the 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 67 

Student will be suspended from the privileges of the college 
for a period determined by the Faculty. 

GRADES OF SCHOLARSHIP. 

Students are graded in their studies by letters which have 
value on a scale of eight, as follows : 

E (excellent) 7-8 

G (good) 6-7 

F (fair) 5-6 

P (pass) 4-5 

D (deficient) -4 

At the close of each half-year, instructors combine the 
grades of the term's work and of examinations in any ratio 
they see fit, and report to the Dean the resultant grades 
expressed in letters. The Dean then reports the grades of 
each student to his parent or guardian. 

Care over the work of students is exercised by the execu- 
tive committee after the following method. When the 
grade of a student becomes D in any study, the instructor 
reports the fact at once to the Dean, who sends an official 
notification of the deficiency to the student and to his 
parent or guardian. The instructor keeps the Dean in- 
formed as to whether the student's grade continues D. 
Once a month the Dean reports to the faculty all infor- 
mation which he has received from instructors in regard to 
the grades of students. 

Any student whose grade is D in the class-work of any 
study may be dropped from that study at any time by a 
majority vote of the executive committee and the instructor 
whose course is involved. He shall be so dropped when he 
has had grade D for six consecutive weeks, unless by a 
majority vote of the same persons he is allowed to remain in 
the study under special probation for a short time. In all 
cases the student's grade is determined by all his previous 
work in a study from the beginning of the half-year. 

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68 ADELBERT COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

If a Student has grade D in the class-work of any study, 
he is not allowed to enter the examination, and cannot 
graduate until the head of the department reports to the 
Dean that the deficiency has been removed. In case the 
student is deficient in an elective study, he may take in 
class some other elective of the same number of hours a 
week, and the satisfactory completion of such elective will 
be regarded as removing his deficiency. 

If a student's term standing in any study is not below 
grade P, but he fails in his examination, the instructor 
hands in his grade as D and also a notice that he is to be 
re-examined in that study. When he has passed this 
re-examination the instructor notifies the Dean at once, and 
the deficiency is cancelled. 

When a student so fails in his work that, in the judgment 
of the executive committee, he cannot successfully continue 
it, a condition is placed upon him. He cannot then go on 
with any study unless he makes up the deficiency before a 
specified time. 

No student who has entrance conditions will be advanced 
to the rank of Junior. No student is allowed to enter the 
second half of his Senior year who has not made up all his 
deficiencies. 

In general, regular students are not allowed to become 
special students on account of failure to maintain them- 
selves in their regular work, but individual cases may be 
considered on their merits by the executive committee. 

DEGREES. 

In order to be recommended for a degree a student must 
have passed in all the studies of his course and have attained 
a grad^ of "Fair" or a higher grade in at least one-third of 
them. The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred 
upon those who have completed that regular course which 



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1 902-1903] WBSTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 69 

includes the study of Greek language and literature; the 
degree of Bachelor of Letters on those who have com- 
pleted the course in which modern languages are substituted 
♦for Greek ; and the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy on 
those who have completed the course in which more ad- 
vanced science is substituted for languages. 

Members of classes earlier than that of 1893 may receive 
the degree of Master of Arts as heretofore, or, if they 
prefer, after a special course of study. The fee for the 
Master's degree is ten dollars. For further information 
candidates should address the Secretary of the Faculty, 
Professor Platner. 

HONORS. 

In Chemistry, French, German, Greek, Latin and 
Mathematics, two-year honors are given to those students 
who, at the completion of the Sophomore year, have attained 
grade "Excellent" in each course of these departments 
duriog two years, and grade "Fair" or a higher grade in 
all of their other studies. 

Honors are awarded to the graduating class at each 
Commencement, and to the Junior class at the end of the 
Junior year. These honors are determined by the standing 
of the students in . all their previous college work. To be 
recommended for a degree with honors, a student must have 
attained grade "Fair" or a higher grade in all his college 
work; for degree summa cum laude, grade "Excellent" in 
five-sixths of all his work; for degree magna cum laude, 
grade "Excellent" in one-half of all his work, or "Excel- 
lent" or "Good" in five-sixths of it ; for degree cum laude, 
"Excellent" or "Good" in one-half of all his work. 

Opportunity is given to students with advanced prepara- 
tion to pursue studies and investigations outside the pre- 
scribed course under the direction and assistance of the 
Faculty, provided they maintain a standing of at least G in 



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70 ADELBKRT COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

each of their regular studies. Students who pass successful 
examinations in these additional studies may be exempted 
from a portion of the regular examinations, and receive 
honorable mention in the catalogue. ♦ 

PRIZES. 
PREsroENx's Prizes are offered as follows : 
Three prizes for excellence in producing and speaking 
orations are awarded to members of the Junior and Sopho- 
more Classes who engage in a Junior-Sophomore oratorical 
contest at Commencement. Of these, two first prizes of 
thirty-five dollars each are given to the contestants who 
rank first in each class. A second prize of twenty dollars is 
awarded irrespective of class. The following rule* respect- 
ing the competition has been adopted by the faculty. A 
Sophomore who gains the first prize in any contest shall not 
compete again, and one who g^ins the second prize may 
compete, in his Junior year, for the first prize only. 

Six prizes for the highest records in scholarship are 
awarded at the end of the Freshman year as follows: In 
French and German (Modern Language Freshmen) twenty- 
five dollars ; in German (all except Modem Language Fresh- 
men) twenty-five dollars; in English, forty dollars; in Greek, 
twenty-five dollars ; in Latin, forty dollars ; in Mathematics, 
forty dollars. A prize of twenty-five dollars is also awarded 
for the best results in the work of the gymnasium during 
the Freshman year. These prizes are awarded only to those 
pursuing their Sophomore year in Adelbert College, and no 
prize will be given if it seems to the department or depart- 
ments concerned, that it is not clearly merited. 

Philosophical Prizes, founded by Mr. Truman P. 
Handy, and continued in his memory by his daughter, Mrs. 
John S. Newberry, are offered as follows : Two prizes, one 
of sixty and one of thirty dollars, are awarded by a com- 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 7 1 

mittee at the close of the college year, to the two members 
of the philosophical group who shall excel in an original 
essay and a special examination. The subject assigned for 
1902- 1903 is, "On Kant's Distinctions between the Pure and 
the Practical Reason." 

English Prizes are offered as follows : The early Eng- 
lish Text Society offers a prize, consisting of publications 
of the Society, for the best examination in old and Middle 
English. The New Shakespeare Society offers a similar 
prize for the best examination in Shakespeare. Each prize 
consists of publications of the Society offering it. 

The Hughes Prize. By the kindness of Mr. Rupert 
Hughes, of the Class of 1892, two prizes, one of fifteen and 
one of ten dollars, are offered for the best poems written by 
undergraduates. These sums may be combined into a single 
prize in any year if any one poem is of exceptional merit. 
Competitors must submit their productions, in type-written 
form and under an assumed name, not later than May 
fifteenth of each year. 

The Holden Prize. Mr. L. E. Holden, of Cleveland, 
offers a prize of twenty-five dollars for the best essay writ- 
ten by a Senior on some subject selected by the department 
of Rhetoric. Essays in competition for this prize must be 
type-written and submitted under an assumed name not later 
than May fifteenth, 1903. The subject for this academic 
year is "The Influence of the Classics on the Poetry of 
Wordsworth, Shelley and Keats." 

The Debate Prize. In order to encourage and 
strengthen the debating interests of the College, an alumnus 
offers a prize of thirty dollars to be divided equally among 
the three students who win places on the debating team in 
the preliminary contests, and represent the institution in 
the annual contest of the Ohio Debating League. 



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^2 ADBLBERT COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

The Harriet Pelton Perkins Scholarship, the in- 
come of a fund of two thousand dollars, given for that pur- 
pose by Mr. Edwin R. Perkins, is awarded annually to that 
member of the Junior class who fills the following condi- 
tions : He must rank in the first third of his class in the 
study of the classics, having pursued Latin and Greek 
through the Sophomore year. He must also attain, among 
those fulfilling the first condition, the highest rank for ex- 
cellence in the English Language and Literature, having 
taken, besides all required courses, at least three hours a 
week during both terms of the Junior year. 

Except to Seniors, prizes awarded at commencement are 
paid at the beginning of the ensuing term, and no prize will 
be so paid unless the student continues his connection with 
the College. 

THE FRANCIS G. BUTLER PUBLICATION FUND. 
In March, 1893, Mrs. Julia W. Butler gave one thousand 
dollars to found the Francis G. Butler Publication Fund, 
"the income from the fund to be devoted to the publication 
of the results of original research in the field of American 
history, made by the professors or students of Adelbert Col- 
lege, the College for Women, or the Graduate School of 
Western Reserve University." 

EXPENSES. 

The College charges are as follows : 

Matriculation $ 5,00 

Tuition, Incidentals, Library, and Gymnasium.. 85.00 

Students taking work in the biological, chemical, geo- 
logical and physical departments pay for the cost of perish- 
able material and the loss incident to the use of the instru- 
ments. Laboratory fees vary for different courses, and the 
amount for each is specified in the statement of courses. All 
College charges for the half-year are paid to the Bursar at 
the time of registration. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RBSRRVE UNIVERSITY. 73 

Board and rooms in private families in the vicinity of the 
College may be obtained at a cost of from three to five 
dollars a week ; board in clubs for from two and a half to 
three dollars a week. 

BENEFICIARY AND OTHER AID. 
Certain scholarships are awarded to meritorious students 
who need pecuniary aid. By these they are relieved of a 
portion of the fixed charges of the College. The scholar- 
ships are founded by gifts of $500 each, and are worth the 
interest of that sum at six per cent., or $30 a year. All 
scholarships are granted upon the following conditions : 

1. All applicants for scholarships shall file written state- 
ments of resources, expenses, and needs, accompanied in 
the case of those just entering college, whether as Fresh- 
men or in the higher classes, by testimonials as to character 
and attainments. 

2. Scholarships shall be granted annually upon each 
application, but may be withdrawn for cause at the end of 
one half-year. 

3. The granting and withdrawing of scholarships, for 
students who have attended the College as long as one half- 
year, shall be in the hands of the executive committee, who 
shall report to the Faculty at the beginning of each year the 
names of those students to whom scholarships are to be 
granted, and each half-year the names of those from whom 
scholarships have been withdrawn. 

4. In general only candidates for a degree in full stand- 
ing are eligible to a scholarship. But one may be granted 
to any student who, by reason of incomplete preparation, is 
obliged to enter college as a special student, but with the in- 
tention of making up his deficiencies and taking a degree, 
and it may be continued to him in successive years if his 
progress warrants the belief that he will carry out his inten- 
tion. But a student in full standing who becomes a special 



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74 ADBLBERT COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

Student, shall not in general be eligible to a scholarship. A 
student, to be eligible to a scholarship, or to retain one, must 
in general maintain an average of "Fair" in all his studies 
and must not fall below the passing grade in any subject. 

5. A scholarship may be withdrawn from a student 
whose work or conduct ceases to be satisfactory. 

In addition to the scholarships, there are also certain 
funds which are loaned to students recommended by the 
Faculty. When repaid they will be used in aiding other 
students. A few of those students who have a thorough 
preparation for college are enabled to earn more or less 
money by teaching or other labor. 

Students placed upon the list of beneficiaries are expected 
to maintain their standing in scholarship, and also to finish 
their course here. Before dismissal to another institution 
can be granted, the college dues, including the amounts 
given or loaned, must first be paid. 



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THE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. 



GENERAL STATEMENT* 



nN ORDER to provide more adequate means for the 
separate higher education of young women, the Trus- 
tees of Western Reserve University estabUshed the College 
for Women in 1888. The first session began in September 
of the same year. For the first three years of its existence 
the college depended largely for its courses of instruction 
upon members of the faculty of Adelbert College. At the 
end of that period it acquired a separate corps of instructors, 
so that since that time each of the two colleges, the one for 
women and the other for men, has had a faculty of its own. 
In this relation special mention should be made of the gen- 
erous gifts and bequests through which have been estab- 
lished the Eliza Clark Professorship of Greek, the Emily 
A. Woods Professorship of Latin, the Florence Harkness 
Professorship of Biblical Literature, and the Lucy A. 
Leffingwell Professorship of Philosophy. The two colleges 
have a common standard of work, and the relations of each 
to the other and to the rest of the University tend to develop 
a common breadth of outlook. Moreover, in a number of 
the departments, by exchange of work and other arrange- 
ments, instruction is given in each college by members of 
the faculty of the other. Graduates of the College for 
Women receive their degrees from the University, of which 
it is an integral part. The system is thus not one of co- 
education, nor of complete separation in education, but of 
co-ordination. 



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76 COLLBGB FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

In 1892 the College occupied its present site on Bellflower 
Avenue, in the most attractive and healthful part of the city, 
a few steps from Euclid Avenue on one side and from Wadie 
Park and the great system of parks and boulevards on the 
other. In 1898 the college grounds were enlarged, so that 
they now contain about four acres. Clark Hall, named 
from its donor, Eliza Clark, was erected in 1892 from de- 
signs by Richard M. Hunt. It contains the library, gym- 
nasium, and offices, in addition to recitation and studv 
rooms. A home for students, called Guilford House, the 
gift of Mrs. Samuel Mather, was built in 1892 and greatly 
enlarged in 1894. The Florence Harkness Memorial con- 
tains, in addition to the main assembly room, the recitation 
room and library for the Bible classes. Haydn Hall is de- 
signed to provide rooms for study and social purposes, and 
also to serve as a dormitory. The laboratories in Biology, 
Chemistry, Geology and Physics are situated on the campus 
of Adelbert College and are used in common with the mem- 
bers of that college. The Hatch Library and Astronomical 
Observatory are also used in common. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. ^^ 

ADVISORY COUNCIL. 



Honorary President, Miss L. T. Guilford. 

President, Mrs. W. R. Warner. 

Vice President, Mrs. D. Z. Norton. 

Recordinfr Secretary, Mrs. J.J. Tracy. 

Corresponding Secretary, Mrs Pascai, H. Sawyer. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Henry S Sherman. 

Mrs. Samubi. Mather, Mrs. George A. Garretson, 

Mrs. Edward W. Morley, Miss Mary L. Southworth, 
Miss Harriet Shei^donHurlbut, Mrs. Wii^uam A. Leonard, 

Miss Harriet L. Keei^er, Mrs. Jay C. Morse, 

Miss Ei^len G. Revei^ey, Mrs. H. E. Myers, 

Mrs. J. H. Wade, Miss Anna Burgess, 

Mrs. Charles J. Sheffield, Mrs. Dudley P. Allen, 

Mrs. Luke Lascelles, Mrs. Edward W. Haines, 

Miss Helen L. Storke, Mrs. Arthur E. Lyman, 

Miss Augusta Mittleberger, Mrs. Samuel A. Raymond, 

Mrs. C. F. Olney, Mrs. William E. Gushing, 
Mrs. W. S. Tyler, 
Mrs. Harry R. Collacott, President of the Alumnae Association. 

Corresponding Members, 

Mrs. Wm. H. Upson, Akron, O. Mrs. G. H. McElevy,Youngstown, O. 
Mrs. C. W. Jacques, Ashtabula, O. Mrs. Henry B. Perkins, Warren, O. 
Mrs. J. Osborne Moss, New York. Mrs. Frank Swayne, Toledo, O. 
Mrs. James A. Garfield, Mentor, O. Mrs. J. S. Newberry, Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. H. S. Lane, Crawfordsville, Ihd. Mrs. Frank G. Sigler, Montclair, N.J. 
Mrs. C. O. Gridley, Erie, Pa. Mrs. Joseph Howells, Jefferson, O. 

Mrs. Thos. Kilpatrick, Omaha, Neb. Mrs. George H. Ely, Elyria, O. 



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78 COLLBGB FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 



FACULTY AND INSTRUCTORS. 



Arranged^ vnth exception of ike President^ in the order of graduation from college. 

Chari^BS Pranewn Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President. 

Hiram Coluns Haydn, D. D., LL. D., 15 La Grange St. 

Harkness Professor of Biblical Literature. 

Emma Maud Perkins, A. B., 121 Adelbert St. 

Woods Professor of Latin. 

Haroi^d North Fowler, Ph. D., 49 Cornell St. 

Clark Professor of Greek, 

Henry Platt Gushing, M. S., 260 Sibley St. 

Professor of Geology, 

Henry Eldridge Bourne, A. B., B. D., 144 Cornell St. 

Professor of History. 

Robert Waller Deering, Ph. D., (Absent for the year). 

Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature, 

Herbert Austin Aikins, Ph. D., 40 Cornell St. 

Leffingwell Professor of Philosophy, 

Anna Helene Palmi^, Ph. B., 2733 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Mathematics, 

William Henry Hulme, Ph. D., 48 Mayfield St. 

Professor of English . 

HiPPOLYTE Gruener, Ph. D., 43 Knox St. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry. 

Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph. D., 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages, 

Charles Edwin Clemens, 1093 Prospect St. 

Instructor in the History and Theory of Music. 

Allen Dudley Severance, A. M., B. D., 1981 Euclid Av. 

Instructor in Historical Bibliography . 

Allyn Abbott Young, Ph. D., 46 Knox St. 

Instructor in Economics, 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 79 

Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., 22 Cornell St. 

Instructor in English. 

Carl Byron James, B. S., 896 Hough Av. 

Instructor in Biology, 

Robert Hbrndon Fife, Jr., Ph. D., 91 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in German, 

Fritz Reichmann, Ph. D., 95 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in Physics, 

Howell Merriman Haydn, A. B., 252 Sibley St. 

Instructor in Biblical Literature, 

Agnes Hunt, Ph. D., 46 Nantucket St. 

Ifistructdr in History, 

Mary George Clark, Guilford House. 

Instructor in Physical Training. 



Nina May Roberts, A. M., Guilford House. 

Assistant in English, 

Alice Doyle Drake, Ph. B., 792 Republic St. 

Assistant in English, 

Bessie Mildred Chandler, Ph. B., 894 Case Av. 

Assistant in Biological Laboratory, 

Harriet Bardwbll Chapman, A. B.. M. D., ^810 Rose Bldg. 

Lecturer on Hygiene. 

Jessie Boggs, a. M., M. D., 1257 Euclid Av. 

Medical Examiner, 



OTHER OFFICERS. 



Bertha Louise Torrey, A. B., 4132 Euclid Av., East Cleveland. 

Registrar. 

Henry Eldridge Bourne, A. B., B. D., 144 Cornell St. 

Bursar. 

Harry Albert Haring, A. B., 78 Cornell St. 

Treasurer. 



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8o COLLEGR FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

I 
Edward Christopher Wii^uams, B. L., 

71 Elberon St., East Cleveland. 
Librarian^ Hatch Library, 

Esther Crawford, B. L., 39 Knox St. 

Assistant in Library, 

Anna Louise MacIntyre, A. B., 136 Sawtell Av. 

Librarian ^ College for Women, 

Elizabeth Currier Annin, HousemistresSy Guilford House. 

Isadorb Heydenburk, HousemistresSy Haydn Hall. 



Additional instruction in their ozvn departments is given by the 
following members of the Adelbert College Faculty. 

Edward Wiluams Morley, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 

The Everlyne, 63 Ingleside Av. 
Hurlbut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry, 

Frank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc., 79 Adelbert St 

Perkins Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 

Charles Harris, Ph. D , 15 Adelbert Hall. 

Professor of Germain, 

Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 43 Adelbert St. 

Handy Professor of Philosophy, 

Francis Hobart Herrick, Ph. D., D. Sc, 43 Cutler St. 

Professor of Biology, 

Samuel Ball Platner, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit, 

Abraham Lincoln Fuller, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greek . 

Clin Freeman Tower, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid A v. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Edward Stockton Meyer, Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

Assistant Professor of German. 

Walter Taylor Marvin, Ph. D., 36 Knox St. 

Instructor in Philosophy, 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



81 



STUDENTS- 



SENIORS. 



Anna Leah Bailey, L. E.* 
Mary Lawson Ballantyne, CI. 
Emma Laveme Bishop, M. L. 
Caxx>line Arrowsmith Bruce, CI. 
Marcia Gertrude Bruckshaw, L. E. 
Maud Isabel Bruckshaw, M. L. 
Matilda Clara Buschman, M. L. 
Luella Lenore Chaffee, L. E. 
Blanche Genevieve Cole, h. E 
Elizabeth Bertha Cristy, L. E. 
Susie Adah De Witt, M. L. 
Alice Dunham, M. L. 
Matilda Pish, L. E. 
Ethel Eudora May Gifford, L. E. 
Juliette Alice Handerson, M. L. 
Ruth Evelyn Haydn, M. h. 
Mary Adeline Hird, CI. 



Detroii, MichJ^ 93 East Lake St. 
Elizabeth, N,J,^ Guilford House. 



Medina^-^ 
CUDeland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 



Haydn Hall. 

Haydn Hall. 

36 Beechwood St. 

36 Beechwood St 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 



Cleveland^ 215 Commonwealth Av. 
Providence, R, /. ^ Haydn Hall. 
Cleveland^ 679 East Prospect St 



Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland'^ 
Cleveland ^ 
Cleveland^ 



Guilford House. 
224 Streator Av 
107 Gay lord St. 
444 Dunham Av. 
Guilford House. 



Elizabeth Hubbell, L. E. 

Plorence Edith Jones, L. E. 

Maria Margaret Kelly, L. E. 

Sophia Clarke Kenyon, M. L 

Maud Harriet King, M. L. 

Laura Helen Krejci, CI. 

Emilie Louise Krug, M. L. 

Bertha May Lee, ' L. E. 

Lillie Margaret Sharlow Lothrop, L. E. Cleveland^ 



Baldwinville, Mass.^ 

Guilford House. 
Cleveland^ 65 Arlington St. 

Cleveland'^ 1635 Harvard St. 

Cleveland^ 165 University St. 

Rochester, N. >'.« Guilford House. 
Chardon " Haydn Hall . 

Cleveland^ 290 Forest St. 

Cleveland^ 51 Fourth Av. 

Stjohnsbury, K/.«» 71 Tilden Av. 



Ethel MacDonald, CI. 
Beatrice Moss, M. L. 
Charlotte May Parker, L. E. 
Edith Harris Parmenter, CI. 
Ethel Marian Peck, L. E. 
Bessie May Post, CI. 
May Cameron Quinby, CI. 
Clara Risdon, L. E. 
Bertha May Rosenfeld, M. L. 



Cleveland^ 
Cleveland * 
Solon 1 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
East Cleveland"^ 
Ravenna ** 
Cleveland ^'^ 



1745 Harvard St. 

Haydn Hall. 

1256 East Madison A v. 

Guilford House. 

717 Republic St. 

Haydn Hall. 

221 1 Euclid Av. 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

1329 Willson Av. 



* AbbreTiations : CI. for Classical Course; M. L. for Modern Lan^n^age Course; 
L. B. for Latin- English Course. The numerals after the home address indicate 
the institution irom which the student came to College (see page 87); those after 
special students, the year of their course. 



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82 



COLLKGB FOR WOMEN. 



[ I 902-1 903 



Lydia Margaret Schwegler, CI. 
Olive Louise Spengler, M. L 
Florence Jeannetle Taylor, CI. 
Prances Lucille Thomas, M. L. 
Grace Ethel Tompkins, M. L. 
Gertrude Elizabeth Vilas, M. L. 
Alice May Wallace, L. E. 



Cleveland^ 58 Euclid Place. 

Cleveland^ 63 Fourth A v. 

Cleveland^ 78 Oakdale St. 

Cleveland^ 33 Idlewood Av. 

Cleveland^ Haydn Hall. 

Cleveland^ 220 Kennard St. 

Cleveland^ 28 Marion St. 
Sbniors, 42. 

JUNIORS. 

Florence EUinwood Allen, CI. Salt Lake City » « Guilford House. 
Carlyne Margaret Buschman, M. L. Cleveland^ Guilford House. 

Katherine Evelyn Collord, L. E. Cleveland^ 189 Taylor St. 

Canton^ ' Haydn Hall. 

Cleveland^ 72 Merchants Av. 

Rochester, N. K. « Guilford House. 

Cuyahofra Falls^ Guilford House. 

South Kirtland^ 

Warren^ 



Jessie Edna Daniels, L. E. 
Agnes Mary Doster, M. L. 
Fanny Alice Dunsford, M. L. 
Lois Violet Ellett, L. E. 
Madge Ina Ferry, L. E. 
Bessie Gillmer, L. E. 
Alma Gertrude Gleason, CI. 
Jennie Adele Gleeson, L. E. 
Susan Elizabeth Gray, L. E. 
Alice Constance Hagan, CI. 
Frances Antoinette Hinde, L, E. 
Mary Estelle Hopkinson, L. E. 
Clara Ethelinde Jacobi, M. L. 
Ethel Irene Jones, CI. 
Ella Koningslow, M. L. 
Rhoda Landsberg, M. L. 
X/)uise Reber Layman, CI. 
Florence Agnes Lessick, CI. 
Sarah Emily McMurray, M. L. 
Mabelle Amele Monson, L. E. 
Florence Elizabeth Myers, M. L. 
Addie Ellen Oakley, L. E. 
Lillian Elizabeth Oakley, L. E. 
Frances Isabel Odlin, L. E. 
Phoebe Katharine Parks, L. E. 
Mary Jeannette Proudfoot, CI. 
Florence Alice Reeve, CI. 
Etta Anthony Sampliner, M. L. 
Clara Beth Schneider, M. L. 
Anna Groh Seesholtz, M. L. 



Cleveland^ 

Cleveland'^ 

Cleveland"^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cuyahoga Falls^ 

Cleveland^ 

East Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Ci^veland^ 

Voungstown ^ 

Cleveland^ 

Hubbard^ 

Cleveland ^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Dayton ^ 

Collinwood^'^ 

Cleveland^ 

miloufrhby^ 

Cleveland ^ 

Canton^ 

Canton * 



Haydn Hall. 

Guilford House. 

168 Cedar Av. 

54 Kenwood Av. 

199 Quincy St. 

386 Willson Av. 

75 Adelbert St. 

288 Gordon Av. 

63 Beersford PI. 

1635 Harvard St. 

882 Scovill Av. 

The Euclid. 

Guilford House. 

486 Giddings Av. 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

I Glen Park Place. 

800 Hough Av. 

800 Hough Av. 

Guilford House. 

Collin wood. 

2320 Spafford St. 

49 Wilbur Place. 

321 Kennard St. 

Haydn Hall. 

Guilford House. 



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1 902-1903] WESTBRN RBSKRVB UNIVERSITY. 



83 



Beulah Blanche Smith, L. B 
Ruhamah Georgette Smith, CI. 
Lilian Bell Stilwell, M. L. 
Fannie Langhome Stoney, CI. 
Jennie Camille Suits, CI. 
Mary Eugenia Suliot, M. L. 
Mary Helen Thayer, M. L. 
Mary Emily Van Epps, CI. 
Josephine Depear Walsh, CI. 
Ethel Georgia Ward, CI. 
Ethel Ogarita Weimer, CI. 
Katie Weis, M. h. 
Cecily Whelan, CI. 
Eleanor Worthington, M, L. 



Cortland^ 1204 Cedar Av. 

Cleveland^ 40 Cheshire St. 

East Cleveland'^ 37 Stan wood Rd. 



Cleveland^ 

Cleveland * 

Salem ^"f 

Canton^ 

Cleveland^ 

EastCUveland^^^^ 

miloughby^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland'^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland ^^ 



30 Bridge St. 
50 Bertram St. 
136 Siearns St. 
Guilford House. 
915 S. Logan A v. 
69 Hower Av. 
Willoughby. 
144 Hawthorne Av. 
354 Marcelline Av. 
103 Kentucky St. 
34 Cheshire St. 
Juniors, 47. 



Ida Florence Budde, CI. 
Stella May Champ, L. E. 
Mabel Elizabeth Chapman, 



CI. 



M. L. 



M. L 



Anita Marie Cleveland, 
Grayce Mildred Daniels, 
Alice Duty, M. L. 
Frieda Fliedner, M. L. 
Etta Freedlander, M. L. 
Malvina Friedman, M. L. 
Hortense Furth, L. E. 
Helen Gilchrist, L. E. 
Gertrude Marie Gillin, L. E 
Hilda Maud Hetzel, L. E. 
Edith Mabel Hill, L. E. 
Vesta Maude Jackson, L. E. 
Edna Mary Jones, L. E. 
Lena Rivers Kiefer, L. E. 
Grace Amanda King, M. L< 
Carrie Louise Krauss, M. L. 
Lillie Belle Krider, M. L. 
Florence Rose Lembeck, M. 
Irma Linn, M. L. 
Maud Eugenia Lyman, L. E. 
Jean Bailey McFall, L. E. 
Pauline Angelette Miser, M. L. 
Margaret Isabel Morton, CI. 



SOPHOMORBS. 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Canton^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland* 

SI. Louis » 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Miatnisburg ** 

CUveland^'^ 

Cleveland^^ 



L. 



116 Spangler Av. 

59 Bolton Av. 

103 Marcelline Av. 

392 Bolton Av. 

Haydn Hall. 

2577 Euclid Av. 

160 Wellington Av. 

158 Putnam St. 

132 Hawthorne Av. 

The Brooklawn. 

560 Franklin Av. 

91 Quincy St. 

Haydn Hall. 

350 Russell Av. 

2900 Superior St. 



Cleveland* 1 143 Woodland Hills A v. 
Find lay '^ Guilford House. 



Butte, Mont» 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^-^* 
Cleveland* 
Chardon ^^ 
Pittsburgh, Pa,^ 
ML Vernon*^ 
ML Vernon^ 



Haydn Hall. 

1997 Superior St. 

423 Bolton Av. 

46 Streator Av. 

151 Courtland St 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 

Guilford House. 



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84 



COLLBGE FOR WOMBN. 



[1902-1903 



Mabel Adele Morris, L. E. 


Cleveland^ ] 


[89 W. Madison Av. 


Emma May Mumaw, L. E. 


Canton » 


98 Murray Hill Av. 


Grace Louise Pennington, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


79 Hough Av. 


Jean Quay, CI. 


East Cleveland^ 4050 Euclid Av. 


Elizabeth EUinwood Roberts, CI. 


IVinsted, Ct.^ 


Guilford House. 


Louise Christina Schuele, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


15 Jay St, 


Helen Dennison Shepherd, CI. 


PainesvilU^ 


Guilford House. 


Olga Elizabeth Solberg, M. L. 


Salem ^"^ 


136 Stearns St 


Helen Florence Stevens, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


2036 Broadway. 


Harriet Anna Thomas, CI. 


Cleveland * 


27 Walker St. 


Gwendolyn Lloyd Thomas, CI. 


Cleveland* 


2688 Warner Rd. 


Faye Emma Tracy, L. E. 


Euclid ^^ 


Euclid. 


Ruth Van Nostran, L. E. 


Cleveland* 


204 Harkness Av. 


Elizabeth White, L. E. 


Euclid ^^ 


Euclid. 


Lois Brock w^y Williams, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


127 Streator A v. 


Mary Wittier, L. E. 


Miamisburg^ 


Haydn Hall. 


Helen Maria Wright, CI.' 


Akron ^ 


Guilford House. 


Jennie Young, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


22 Melrose Av, 
SoPHOMORBS, 44. 


FRESHMBN. 




Cora EstelU Albright, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


136 Mapledale Av. 


Mabel Estelle Anderson, L. E. 


Akron ^ 


Guilford House. 


Lola Armstrong, M. L. 


Painesville » 


962 Willson Av. 


Eva Clare Bauman, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


Bellflower Av. 


Josephine Elizabeth Brock, CI. 


CUveland^ 


149 Trumbull St". 


Bertha Katherine Budde, L. E. 


Cleveland'^ 


ii6Spangler A v. 


Helen Gertrude Campbell, M. L. 


Cleveland^^ 


993 Cedar Av. 


Lettie May Clague. CI. 


Madison * 


297 Marcy Av, 


Lila Emily Coit, CI. 


Ravenna^ 


75 Adelbert St. 


Helen Julia Converse, CI. 


Geneva^ 


309 Streator Av. 


Martha Cook, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


304 Franklin Av. 


Lida Margaret Cramer, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


861 Scranton Av. 


Cornelia Cranz, L. E. 


Akron^ 


Haydn Hall. 


Marguerite Eckstein Case Day, L. 


. E. Cleveland^ 


2100 Dennison A v. 


Mary Frances Day, M. L. 


Warren^ 


Guilford House. 


Irene Delahunt, L. E. 


Buffalo^* 


82 Hough Place. 


Mildred De Laney, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


305 Huron St. 


Helen Mar Detchon, M. L. 


Voungstozon ^ 


Haydn Hall. 


Viola Frances Doering, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


1817 Willson Av. 


Maude Caroline Eberhart, CI. 


Youngstown » 


Haydn Hall. 


Ruth Elliott, L. E. 


Lakewood^'^ 


17 Grace A V. 


Aimee Carolyn Friend, M. L. 


Milwaukee^ 


Guilford House. 



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1902-1903] WESTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVBRSITY. 



85 



Helen Barber Gaines, CI. 


CUveland^ 


173 Bell Av. 


Charlotte Christine Gender, M. L 


. Cleveland ^^ 


522 Kennard St. 


Florence Elsie Goodhart, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


1 102 Case Ave. 


Helen Louise Guise, L. B. 


Findlay^ 


Haydn Hall. 


Gussie Kelley Hamilton, M. L. 


Kelley s Island^ Haydn Hall. 


Winifred Hanlon, L. E. 


Coshocton « 


The Euclid. 


Laura Maria Hassler, M. L. 


CUveland^ 


39 Williams St. 


Elsie Sophia Hauser, L E. 


Sandusky ^^ 


Haydn Hall. 


Mary Eustelle Hagan, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


386 Willson Av. 


Florence Adelaide Hobson, L. E. 


Lakewood*'^ 


i23 0akdaleSt. 


Mildred lone Honecker, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


482 Jennings Av. 


Sarah Mildred Honeywell, L. E. 


. Cleveland^ 


315 Genesee Av. 


Mamie Hoover, CI. 


Youngstown ' 


» Haydn Hall. 


Clara Mary Horn, M. L. 


Cleveland * 


224 Slater Av. 


Ethel May Hurst, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


2 Norwood Av. 


Mary Sortor Irvine, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


1097 E. Madison Av. 


Henrietta Eunice Jones, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


32 Courtland St. 


Margaret Dorothy Jones, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


Independence St. 


Vera Pearl Jones, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


18 Ames Av. 


Elizabeth Coit Kelton, M. L. 


Columbus ^"^ 


Guilford House. 


Ruth Richmond Kennan, CI. 


Medina ^ 


Guilford House. 


Ruth Lehmiller, L. E. North Industry^ 98 Murray Hill Av. 


Gertrude Hortense Leon, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


300 Kennard St. 


Lillian Rhea Linn, M. L. 


Clevelana * 


112 Dibble Av. 


Nellie May Luehrs, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


580 Willson Av. 


Ruth Lovem Mann, M L. 


Cleveland^ 


22 Cable St. 


Blma Anne Marble, CI. 


Youngstoivn ' 


» Haydn Hall. 


Ruth Bixby McKean, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


40 Summit St. 


Eleanore Emma Michel, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


1869 Superior St. 


Margretta Catherine Molony, L. H 


;. Cleveland^ 


The Pelton. 


Anna Lotiise Morgan, M. L. 


Cleveland'^ 


2232 Willson Av. 


Alma Mueller, M. L. 


Cleveland^ 


53 Chestnut St. 


Nelly Bell Newton, M. L. 


Cleveland ^^ 


408 East Prospect St. 


Harriet Jane Noland, L. E. 


GlenvilU^ 


1 155 Doan St. 


Christine Ortli, L. E. 


Cleveland^ 


1083 Peari St. 


Ruby Mary Osborne, L. E. 


Binghamton, 


N, y, Ji 59 Knox St. 


Mary Ann Peabody, CI. 


Cleveland* 


16 Echo St. 


Rumah Adaline Peets, L. E. 


Noiiingham ' 


' 62 Tennis Avi 


Hazel Augusta Rand, CI. 


Madison " 


75 Adelbert St. 


Nellie Craig Saunders, CI. 


Cleveland^ 


1265 Slater Av. 


Helene Selminski, M. L. 


CUveland* 


34 Princeton St. 


Mary Senter, M. L. 


Columbus^* 


Guilford House. 



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86 



COLI^EGB FOR WOMEN. 



[1902-1903 



Adaline Sherman, L. E 
Harriet Smith, CI. 
Helen Smith, M. L. 
Else May Spengler, M. 
Florence Anne Stevens, 
Edith Belle Taylor, CI. 
Mary Arabella Thacher, 
Elva Held Thomas, CI. 



M. L. 
M.L. 



Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
East Cleveland^ 
Cleveland^ 
Ravenna •* 
Pen Yann, N. 
Toledo^ 
Cleveland^ 



542 Franklin Av. 

193 Oakdale St. 

37 Grasmere. 

63 Fourth Av. 

75 Adelbert St. 

y.« Guilford House. 

75 Adelbert St. 

31 Norton St. 



Marion Louise Van Vliet, L. E. East Aurora^ N, Y,^ 373 Harkness Av 



Anna Eliza Wallace, CI. Warren «» 

Nellie Fay Wallace, M. L. Cleveland^ 

Hazel Loucinda White, CI. Painesville^ 

Ethel Cora Whitworth, CI . Cleveland * 

Florence Woodward, L. E. Cleveland^ 
Gertrude Sumner Wright, M. L. Cleveland^^ 

Lucy Harriet Young, L. E. Cleveland^ 



Guilford House. 

67 Tilden Av. 

306 Cedar Av. 

61 Gorman Av. 

95 Mayfield BLd. 

739 Willson Av. 

22 Melrose Av. 

Freshmen, 80. 



STUDENTS PURSUING PARTIAL COURSES. 



Stella Grace Beitman, ( i ) 



(I) 



(0 
(2) 
(0 



Georgia Lucile Campbell, 
Edith Cond€, (21) 
Mabel Hamilton Cowgill, 
Rebecca Florence Davies, 
Elisabeth Lee Dunning, 
Edith Leona Eastman, (3) 
Alice Erskine Elmer, ( 2 ) 
Mary Freer, (3) 
Clover Althea Hartz, ( 3 ) 
Helen Sterrett Henning, (2) 
Emanuela Anna Janousek, (2) 
Jessie Thacher Johnson, ( 2) 
Carrie Hannah Kingsbury, (3) 
Margaret Kittrell, ( 2 ) 
Lula Kaufman, (3) 
Maude Barber Kendall, (3) 
Esther Isabell Knight, ( i ) 
Margaret Knowlton, ( i ) 
Theresa Dorothy Luck, (4) 
Emma Bean McKim, (3) 
Elizabeth Lewis Moore, ( i ) 
Wilamina Morrow, (3) 



Cleveland^ 
ML Vernon^ 
East Cleveland'^^ 



Cleveland ^'» 

Cleveland"^ 

Dayton ® 

Glenville^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Fargo, N. D,^ 

Cleveland* 

GlenvilU^ . 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland * 

Cleveland ^ 



25 Beech St. 
59 Knox St. 
33 Wellesley St. 



726 Republic St. 

841 Fairmount St. 

Haydn Hall. 

161 Avondale Av. 

292 Dare St. 

1528 Cedar Av. 

987 Case Av. 

Guilford House. 

1772 Broadway. 

576 Doan St. 

94 Bertram St. 

123 Adelbert St. 

981 Case Av. 

1306 Cedar Av, 



N. Brookfteld, Mass.** Guilford House. 
Cleveland^ Guilford House. 

Cleveland* 829 Scranton Av. 

Cleveland > 100 Oakdale St. 

Cleveland * 308 Bolton Av. 

Cleveland^ 223 East Prospect St. 



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1902-1903] WESTBRN RSSBKVB UNIVBRSITY. 



87 



Zilkh Genevieve Quayle, (3) 

Catharine Dingwall Ross, (3) 

Edith Russell, (i) 

Rita Remington Sabin, (2) 

Frances Gertrude Sellers, ( i ) 

Ethel Shrier, (i) 

Bertha Veronica Stevens, (2) 

Bessie Wistar, (2) 



Cleveland * 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Cleveland^ 

Mi. Vernon^ 

Cleveland^ 



290 Sibley St. 
249 Streator Av. 
153 Lincoln A v. 

89 Tilden Av. 
59 Knox St. 

930 Cedar Av. 



Cleveland " 1 193 East Madison Av. 
Cleveland * 1263 Cedar A v. 

Special Students, 31. 



SUMMARY. 

Seniors 42 

Juniors 47 

Sophomores 44 

Freshmen 80 

Specials 31 

Total 244 



1— CleTcland Central High School. 

2— CIcTeland South High School. 

8— Cleveland West High School. 

4— Cleveland East High School. 

&— Cleveland Lincoln High School. 

6--Smith College. 

7__Obcrlln College. 

8— University of Wooater. 

9— Lake Brie College. 
10— Buchtel Preparatory and College. 
11— Hathaway-Brown School. 
12— Private Tuition. 
13— Miss Mittleberger's School. 
14— Central High School, Buffalo. 
15— Binghamton, N. Y., Central High 

School. 
16— University School, Columbus. 
17— East High School. Columbus. 
IS— Bast Cleveland High School. 
l»-EucUd High School. 
20— Rayen School, Youn^town. 
21— South High School, Dayton. 
22— Avon, N. Y., High School. 
23— Miamisburg High School. 
24— Garrettsville High School. 
25— Pindlay High School. 
26— Butte High School, Montana. 
27— Pittsburgh, Pa., Central High School. 
2»-New Phifadelphia High School. 
29— Mt. Vernon High School. 
aO-PainesviUe High School. 
81— Sandusky High School. 
82— Central High School, Toledo. 
8»-Medtna High School. 
84— Madison High School. 
S&— Miss Buckingham's School, Canton. 



86— St. Louis, Mo., High School. 

87— Mrs. Knapp's School, Elizabeth, N. J. 

88— Northfield Seminary. Mass. 

89— Steele High School. Dayton. O. 

40— Milwaukee High School, Mich. 

41— Chardon High School. 

42— Akron High School. 

48— Pen Yann, N. Y., High School. 

44— North Brookfield.Mass., High School. 

45-Glenville High School. 

46— East Aurora High School, N. Y. 

47— Geneva High School. 

48— University of Rochester. 

49— Coshocton Hif h School. 

50— Canton High School. 

51— Lakewood High School. 

52— Cuyahoga Falls High School. 

5»-Warren High School. 

51— Cambridge. O., High School. 

65— New Lyme Institute. 

56— Kalamazoo High School. 

57— Salem High School. 

58— Willoughby High School. 

59— Rockford High School, 111. 

60— Cortland High School. 

61 — St. Johnsbury, Vt., Academy. 

62— Rochester, N. Y.. High School. 

68-Salt Lake College. Utah. 

64 — Ravenna High School. 

65— Toledo High School. 

69-Gilbert School, Winstcd, Ct. 

67— Fargo, N. Dakota, High School. 

68— Scio College. 

69— Hamburg, Ark., High School. 

70— RockfordHigh School, 111. 



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88 COI^LEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION- 

All applicants for admission, whether to the Freshman 
class, to advanced standing, or to partial courses, must pre- 
sent satisfactory testimonials of good moral character, and 
those from other colleges must also bring certificates of hon- 
orable dismission. Admission to the Freshman class may 
be gained in one of two ways, either on examination, or on 
presentation of a certificate from an approved High School 
or Academy. Each of these methods is outlined below. 

ADMISSION ON EXAMINATION. 

Applicants for admission may be examined either during 
Commencement week or at the opening of the first term in 
September. Those who wish to be examined during Com- 
mencement week should notify the Registrar before June 
10; those who wish to be examined in September, before 
September 10. 

REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALL COURSES. 

All candidates, irrespective of the course they may 
choose, must be prepared in English, Latin, and Mathemat- 
ics, according to the outlines of those subjects given below. 

English : The examination consists of two parts. On the books 
marked A in the following lists, the student is required to write a 
paragraph or two on each of several topics chosen by her from a con- 
siderable number set before her on the examination paper. In every 
case the knowledge of the book will be considered of less importance 
than the ability to write English. On the books marked B, the 
student is required to answer questions relating to the author, subject 
matter, the essentials of English grammar, and the important facts in 
those periods of English literary history to which the prescribed 
books belong. She is also expected to express her knowledge with 
clearness and accuracy. 

Examinations in 1902: A. For Reading: Shakespeare's Merchant 
of Venice; Pope's Iliad, Books i, vi, xxii, and xxiv; The Sir Roger 
de Coverley Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's 
Ancient Mariner; Scott's Ivanhoe; Cooper's Last of the Mohicans; 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 89 

Tennyson's Princess ; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal ; George Eliot's 
Silas Mamer. B. For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's 
Lycidas, Comtis, L' Allegro, II Penseroso; Burke's Conciliation with 
America; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Examinations in 1903 and 1904: A. For Reading: Shakespeare's 
Merchant of Venice, and Julius Caesar; The Sir Roger de Coverley 
Papers; Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield; Coleridge's Rime of the 
Ancient Mariner ; Scott's Ivanhoe ; Carlyle's Essay on Burns ; Tenny- 
son's Princess ; Lowell's Vision of Sir Launfal ; George Eliot's Silas 
Mamer. B. For Study: Shakespeare's Macbeth; Milton's L'Alle- 
gro, II Penseroso, Comus, Lycidas; Burke's Conciliation with Amer- 
ica ; Macaulay's Essays on Milton and Addison. 

Latin: Grammar (Bennett, or Allen and Greenough) ; Roman 
pronunciation. Caesar — three books of the Gallic War, or two books 
of the Civil War. Cicero — Six orations, including De Imperio Gn. 
Pompeii. Virgil — six books of the iEneid. Ovid — Translation at 
sight. The translation at sight of passages from prose authors. 
Prose Composition — rendering of simple English sentences into 
Latin. History of Rome — the amount required is indicated by Smith's 
Smaller History of Rome, or Creighton's Primer of Roman History. 
Ancient Geography. 

Mathematics : Arithmetic, including the metric system of weights 
and measures. Algebra (Loomis, Wells, or Wentworth's College), to 
the chapter on the Binomial Theorem. Geometry — (Went worth or 
Wells) complete. 

Note : It is very important that students review a portion at least 
of both Algebra and Geometry in their last preparatory year. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 

In addition to the above, students entering the several 
courses must be prepared in the following subjects : For the 
Classical Course, Greek ; for the Modern Language Course, 
French or German ; for the Latin-English Course, Chem- 
istr>% Physics, and History. The entrance requirements in 
these subjects are as follows : 

Greek : Grammar ; pronunciation as recommended on page vii of 
the Preface to Goodwin's Greek Grammar. Xenophon — four books 
of the Anabasis (for which one hundred and ten pages of Goodwin's 
Greek Reader will be considered an equivalent). Homer — three 
books of the Iliad, with Prosody. The translation at sight of easy 



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90 COI.I.EGB FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

passages in Attic prose. Prose Composition — the rendering into 
<jreek of simple English sentences. White's Beginner's Greek Book 
(complete), or Jones's Exercises in Greek Prose (twenty-six exer- 
cises), is recommended. History of Greece — the amount required is 
indicated by Botsford's, Oman's or Myers's History of Greece, or 
Pennell's Ancient Greece. Ancient Geography. 

French: A thorough knowledge of grammatical forms and of 
syntax; accuracy in pronunciation; ability to understand simple 
spoken French; facility in rendering English into easy French; ease 
and accuracy in sight translation. 

First year: Elementary grammar with exercises; the irregular 
verbs ; Super's French Reader ; Halevy's L'Abb6 Constantin. and sim- 
ilar easy texts. Second year: Advanced grammar; syntax; reading 
of some 500 pages from modem authors — Sand, M^rimee, Labiche, 
Hugo, Sandeau, Daudet ; composition based upon the texts (see such 
a series edited by Grandgent and Kimball, or Francois* Introductory 
French Prose Composition). Third year: Advanced syntax and re- 
view of grammar; composition and dictation; reading of about 800 
pages of prose, poetry and drama from the works of Comeille, 
Moliere, Racine, La Fontaine, Voltaire, Rousseau, Balzac, Musset, 
Coppee, De Maupassant, Daudet, Zola ; practice in sight translation. 

The following grammars are recommended : Grandgent, Whitney, 
Edgren, Chardenal, or a similar work. For suggestions of great 
value, regarding reading material, grading of courses, and methods of 
instruction, consult the "Report of the Committee of Twelve of the 
Modem Language Association of America." (D. C. Heath & Co.) 

German: Grammar, with translation at sight of easy German 
prose. Prose Composition— ^e rendering of simple connected prose 
from English into German. Ability to pronounce German and to 
recognize German words and simple phrases when spoken. In addi- 
tion, familiarity vfkh the following works or their equivalents, is 
required: Riehl — ^Der Fluch der Schonheit. Freytag — Aus dem 
Staat Friedrichs des Grossen. Heine — ^Die Harzreise. (joethe — First 
three books of Dichtung und Wahrheit. Lessing — Minna von Barn- 
helm. Schiller— Wilhelm Tell and Das Lied von der Glocke. Thirty 
pages of lyrics and ballads. 

Chemistry ; Remsen's Chemistry, briefer course, or an equivalent. 
Class work (through one year). Laboratory. 

Physics: Carhart and Chute, Avery, or an equivalent. Class- 
work through one year. Each student must perform in the labora- 
tory at least thirty-five or forty experiments, mainly quantitative, 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 9 1 

such as are given in the best laboratory manuals. The laboratory 
note-book should be presented as part of the certificate. 
. History: (through one year). Courses suggested in order of 
preference: Greek and Roman (studied as a separate course dis- 
tinct from work in Latin), or Mediaeval and Modern, or English. 

Note : Students presenting more than two years* preparatory work 
in history will be granted advanced standing upon passing an exam- 
ination. 

ADMISSION ON CERTIFICATE. 

Students from such High Schools and Academies as may 
be approved by the Faculty are admitted to the Freshman 
class without examination, on the presentation of certificates 
showing that they have completed the requisite amount of 
preparatory study. Blank forms of such certificates will be 
furnished instructors on application to the President, with 
whom they are invited to correspond. Applicants for ad- 
mission are requested to present their certificates, or send 
them by mail to the Registrar, during Commencement week, 
or as soon thereafter as practicable. 

When the above requirements have not been met exactly, 
the equivalents offered must be specified in detail. When 
they have not been met in full, the applicant may be re- 
quired to pass the usual examination in any or all of the re- 
quirements. 

Students received on certificate are regarded as upon pro- 
bation during the first half-year, and those deficient in prep- 
aration are dropped whenever the deficiency has been clearly 
demonstrated. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Candidates for admission to the Sophomore, Junior and 
Senior classes, whether from other colleges or not, may be 
required to pass examinations on studies previously pur- 
sued, but full credit will be given to such certificates as they 
bring from their previous instructors. No one is admitted 
to the Senior class after the beginning of the second half- 
year. 

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92 



COLLKGE FOR WOMEN. 



[1902-I903 



COURSES OF STUDY, 



FRESHMAN YEAR. 
REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO AI,L COURSES. 

Hours Total 

a week. houn. 

BiBi,s, 1,2 I (throughout the year) 34 

Engush, I 2 3 ** " " 102 

Latin, I, 2 3 ** " ** 102 

Mathematics. I, 2 3 " *' '* 102 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 
1 



Classical 
Course 



Modem 

Language 

Course 



Latin- 
English 
Course 



Greek, i, 2 , 

AND 

German, i, 2] 

or 
French, 



N, I, 2| 



German, 5, 6 | 
French, i, 2 \ 

or 
French, 3, 4 > 
German, i, 2 J 



Physics, i A (first half-year) . . 
History, i (second half-year). 
German, i, 2] 

or 
French, 



N, I, 2 I 
I, I, 2 I 



6 hours a week 

throughout 

the year. 



204 



544 
In addition to the above subjects all members of the Freshman class 
are required to attend lectures on Hygiene, one hour a week, first half- 
year. Systematic exercises in the gymnasium three times a week, 
throughout the year, are required of Freshmen and Sophomores. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



93 



SOPHOMORE YEAR. 
REQUIREMENTS COMMON TO ALI. COURSES. 
Hours 

BiBi«B 3 I ( first half-year) 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR EACH COURSE. 



ToUl 
hours. 

17 



Classical 

and 

Modem 

Language 

Courses 



Latin- 
English 
Course 



History, i 3 (first half-year) 

Physics, 10 3 (first half-year) 



ElECTIves. . . ^•• 9 (first balf.year 
^^^ \... 15 (second half -y< 



year) 



51 

153 
255 



French, i, 2 
German, 3, 4 

or 
French, 3, 4 
German, i, 2, 
Philosophy i 

Electives 



■••{::; 



6 (throughout the year) . . 204 



3 (second half-year) 51 

9 (first half-year) 153 

6 (second half-year) 102 



y 510 



527 

JUNIOR YEAR. 

Bible 4, 5 i (throughout the year) 34 

Electives 15 *' *' *' 510 

544 
SENIOR YEAR. 

Electives 15 (throughout the year) 510 

Among their electives Classical and Modem Language students are 
required to take at least one course in either Economics or Philosophy, 
and at least one course each in two of the three sciences, Biology, 
Chemistry, and Physics. Latin-English students are required to take 
at least one course in Economics or Philosophy in addition to Philos- 
ophy I, and at least one course in Biology or Chemistry. See also 
page 114. 



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94 COLLEGB FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

SYNOPSIS OF STUDIES, 



The following statements include all courses offered, 
whether prescribed or elective. Unless otherwise stated, 
each course consists of three weekly recitations of one hour 
each. 

In making choice of elective courses students are ex- 
pected to confer with the President, Registrar, and mem- 
bers of the Faculty for advice and assistance. Students must 
give the Registrar written notice of their choice of electives 
for the second half-year of 1902-1903, on or before January 
17th, 1903; for first half-year, 1903-1904, on or before May 
23d, 1903. 

ANTHROPOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR CURTIS. 

1. Anthropology. The main problems and bearings of Anthro- 
pology are discussed in systematic order. Lectures are given on 
the history of Anthropology, and an effort is made to understand its 
position in the present century. First half-year. 

2. Sociology. Open to Seniors who have taken the elementary 
courses in Psychology, Ethics and Economics. Lectures will be given 
by the instructor throughout the term and special work will be as- 
signed to each student for report and discussion. Second half-year. 
Four hours. 

ART. 

PROFESSOR FOWLER. 

1. History of Art. Ancient art — ^Lectures and collateral reading. 
1902-1903. Through the year. 

2. History of Art. Post- classical art; from the beginning of 
Christian art through the period of the Renaissance — ^Lectures and 
collateral reading. Through the year. [Not given in 1903-04.] 

ASTRONOMY. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 

The course is mainly descriptive and is amply illustrated. The 
simpler problems of spherical astronomy are discussed. Some atten- 
tion is given to the history of astronomy. Text-book, Young's Gen- 
eral Astronomy. Second half-year. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 95 

THE BIBLE. 

PRESIDENT THWING, I. 

DR. HAYDN. 

MR. HOWELL M. HAYDN, 2-12. 

I, 2. The Life of Christ.. One hour a week throughout the year. 

3. The Acts of the Apostles. One hour a week, first half-year. 

4, 5- Studies in the Old Testament. One hour a week through- 
out the year. 

6. Studies in the General Epistles. A critical course intended 
for those who can use the Greek Testament. Second half-year. 

7. The Pauline Epistles. A course in the English Testament, 
aiming to exhibit the circumstances of writing, content, and perma- 
nent value «f these epistles to the church. Second half-year, 1903- 
1904. 

8. The General Epistles. A course similar to 7. Second half- 
year, 1902- 1903. 

9. Old Testament Poetry. A series of studies in the English 
Old Testament, taking up Hebrew poetry as exhibited especially in 
the historical books, in Proverbs, and in Psalms. First half-year, 
1902-1903. • 

10. Old Testament Prophecy. A course in the English Old Tes- 
tament, aiming to exhibit fully the times and the personalities of the 
Hebrew prophets, as well as their distinctive messages. First half- 
year, 1903- 1904. 

Note: Courses 9 and 10 are open to those only who have had 
courses 4 and 5. 

II, 12. Hebrew Grammar and Reading. An introductory course. 
Harper's Elements of Hebrew will be used, with the Old Testament 
text. Throughout the year. 

The establishment of the Florence Harkness Foundation has en- 
abled this department not only to become exceptionally well supplied 
with maps and books, but to offer each year to all the students a 
series of lectures by eminent persons from outside the University. 
In 1896-7, Dr. William H. Ward, of the Independent, delivered five 
lectures on the connection of Old Testament History with that of 
Eg>'pt, Babylon and Syria. In 1897-8 Professor Charles P. Fagnani, 
of Union Theological Seminary, gave a course of five lectures on The 
Bible and Its Interpretation, and Mr. Gerald Stanley Lee, of North- 
ampton, Mass., five lectures on the Mind of Christ. In the Spring of 



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96 COI*I*EGK FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

1899, Professor George Adam Smith, of Free Church College, Glas- 
gow, Scotland, gave eight lectures on the Old Testament. In 1899- 

1900, Professor Richard G. Moulton, of the University of Chicago, 
delivered five lectures on The Literary Interpretation of the Bible. 

In 1900-01 Professor Frank K. Saunders, Ph. D., D. D., of Yale 
University, gave a course of five lectures on "The Prophets of Israel 
and their Messages." 

In 1901-02 Professor W. D. Forrest, D. D., of Glasgow, Scotland, 
gave one lecture on Christ's Teaching as to Individual and Corporate 
Duty. The Right Reverend Henry C. Potter, Bishop of New York, 
one on The Place of the Bible in Modern Life. Professor Richard 
G. Moulton, of the University of Chicago, three lectures on The 
Bible as a Story Book; The Book of Job, a Dramatic Masterpiece; 
The Place of the Bible in a Liberal Education. John Peter Jones, 
D. D., of Madura, India, gave three lectures on Conditions, Prob- 
lems, and Results of Missionary Service. 

In Old Testament teaching the object is to trace the development 
of the idea of the kingdom of God, as wrought out in the history of 
the Hebrew people until the coming of Christ; to dwell upon the 
pivotal men and periods of the history ; to take account of the several 
books, their significance and literary form — so to prepare tho way for 
a more intelligent study of the*Scriptures, in detail, in after life. 

BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

MR. SEVERANCE, I, 2. 
MR. WILLIAMS, 3. 

1. Historical and GenertVl Bibliography. The object of this 
course will be to familiarize the students with the best guides, indices, 
repertoria and helps to the study of history. An examination will 
be made of 'books mentioned. The course is adapted to the needs, 
not only of those specializing in history, but also of those looking 
forward to library work. 1902-1903. Second half-year. 

2. The Sources and Literature op Mediaeval History. This 
course will describe the original material at the command of the 
historian of the Middle Ages, and show what use has been made of 
this source of material by modem writers. The course is designed 
for students interested in historical study or library work. 

3. Reference Work. A study of the better known works of ref- 
erence, as the general and special cyclopedias, dictionaries, annuals, 
indexes to periodicals, and ready reference manuals of every kind. 
Works of a similar nature will be compared, and the limitations of 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. • 97 

each pointed out. Lists of questions to be solved by the use of the 
works studied will be given, and the methods of finding the answers 
discussed in class. One hour a week, second half-year. 

BIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR HERRICK. 
MR. JAMES. 

1. Elementary Biology. An introduction to the study of animal 
and plant life. One recitation, two laboratory exercises of two hours 
each. Second half-year. 

2. Zoology — Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates. A com- 
parative study of a few important types of invertebrate animals. One 
lecture, two laboratory exercises of two hours each. First half-year. 

3. Zoology — Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. A compar- 
ative study of the principal types of vertebrates. One recitation and 
two laboratory exercises. First half-year. 

6. Physiology. Elements of the physiology of man and the lower 
animals. Three exercises, consisting of lectures, recitations, and 
demonstrations of one hour each. First half-year. 

7. Elements of Vertebrate Embryology. A study of the devel- 
opment of birds and mammals. One recitation, two laboratory exer- 
cises of two hours each. Second half-year. 

9. Animal Behavior. A course for the reading and discussion 
of the most significant works upon the instinct and intelligence of 
animals. Two exercises weekly. First half-year. 

10. Botany. An introduction to the study of plants. Instruction 
is given by lectures, laboratory work and field excursions. Second 
half-year. 

11. Reading Club. A voluntary association of students and in- 
structors for reading and discussing works of general scientific in- 
terest. Meetings are held weekly from December i to May i at a 
time most convenient to the members. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are: Courses i, 2, 3, 
7, 10, $5.00. 

CHEMISTRY. 

professor morley. 

ASSOCIATE professor GRUENER. 

assistant professor tower. 
I. Chemistry of the Non- Metallic Elements. Remsen's Col- 
lege Chemistry. Two hours a week in recitation and one labora- 
tory exercise of three hours. First half-year. 



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98 . COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. A more advanced course in general 
chemistry, designed for students entering with a preparation in 
chemistry. Newth's Inorganic Chemistry. One recitation and two 
laboratory exercises each week. First half-year. 

3. Chemistry of the Metals. Remsen's College Chemistry. 
Two recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours. Open to 
those who have taken course i or course 2. Second half-year. 

4. Physiological Chemistry. This course will be popular in 
its nature, and will consist of lectures on the chemistry of the animal 
body, the chemistry of nutrition, and the chemistry of the ordinary 
food materials, including the influence of cooking on the chemical 
composition and on the nutritive value of foods. Two recitations 
and one laboratory exercise of three hours. Open to those who have 
taken course i or course 2. First half-year. 

5. Organic Chemistry. Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Two rec- 
itations and one laboratory exercise of three hours. Open to those 
who have taken courses i and 3, or courses 2 and 3. First half-year. 

6. Course 5 continued. Second half-year. 

7. Elements of Qualitative Analysis. Three laboratory exer- 
cises of three hours each. Second half-year. 

The Laboratory Fees for the different courses are: Courses i, 3 
or 4, $3.00; Course 2, $4.00; Courses 5 or 6, $5.00; Course 7, $6.00. 

ECONOMICS. 

dr. young. 

1. Elements of Economics. Recitations, lectures and required 
readings. Text-book, Bullock's Introduction to the Study of Eco- 
nomics. First half-year. 

2. The Distribution of Wealth. A discussion of modem theo- 
ries of value and distribution, together with an historical and critical 
treatment of the more important institutions affecting the distribution 
of wealth, such as property and contract. Lectures and required read- 
ings. Second half-year. 

3. Economic History. The economic history of England from 
the thirteenth to the middle of the nineteenth century. Lectures and 
required readings. Text-book, Cheyney's Industrial and Social His- 
tory of England. First half-year. 

4. Economic Problems. A brief discussion of socialism is fcA- 
lowed by a study of labor problems. Lectures and required readings. 



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Text-books, Ely's Socialism and Social Reform, and Levasseur's The 
American Workman. Second half-year. 

5. Charities and Correction. The problems connected with pau- 
perism and crime, and the methods of dealing with them. Lectures, 
assigned readings and class reports. Second half-year. 

ENGLISH. 

PROFESSOR HULME, 8-21. 
MR. STEVENS, I -7. 

COMPOSITION. 

I, 2. Principles of English Composition. Lectures, recitations, 
themes and conferences. Especial attention will be given to para- 
graph writing and the study of modem prose writers. Required 
throughout Freshman year. 

3. Daily Themes (for a considerable portion of the time) ; fre- 
quent long themes, lectures, conferences. Open to all who have taken 
courses i and 2. First half-year. 

4. Continuation of 3. In course of the year detailed attention 
will be given to exposition, criticism, description, narrative and argu- 
mentation. Second half-year. 

5. Themes. The work in this course will be adapted to the needs 
and tastes of the students electing it. Especial opportunity will be 
given for criticism by the members of the class. Open to those who 
have taken courses 3 and 4. First half-year. 

6. Continuation of 5. Under the direction of the instructor, each 
student will be required to plan and write a piece of composition of 
considerable length. This course may be elected two years in suc- 
cession. Second half-year. 

7. Argumentation. Two long forensics, preceded by briefs. The 
questions for these forensics will be so selected that each student may 
write on a subject connected with her college studies. Lectures, 
conferences, study of masterpieces of argumentation, briefs based on 
the latter, debates. 

LANGUAGE. 

8. A Beginners' Course in Old English. In this course special 
attention is given to the elements of Old English grammar, and to 
the reading of selections from Old English prose and poetry. Text- 
books: Smith's Old English Grammar; Bright's Anglo-Saxon Read- 
er. First half-year. 



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lOO COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

9. Old English Epic Poetry. Beowulf is read and is made the 
basis of a careful study of the mythology, and the religious and 
social life of the Anglo-Saxons. Advanced Old English Grammar. 
Parallel reading of other epic fragments in Old English. Text-books : 
Wyatt's Beowulf; the Cook-Sievers Old English Grammar. Second 
half-year. 

10. Old and Middle English. The Elene is read with the class. 
Lectures on Cynewulf and Old English poetical literature. The his- 
tory of the English language, and readings from late Old English and 
early Middle English. Text-books: Kent's Elene; Emerson's His- 
tory of the English Language; Morris and Skeat's Specimens of 
Early English, Part L First half-year. 

LITERATURE. 

11. Chaucer. Select readings from the Canterbury Tales. Lec- 
tures on Chaucer's life and works, and on his contemporaries and 
immediate successors in English literature. Text-books: Skeat's 
edition of The Prologue, The Knight's Tale, and The Nonne Prestes 
Tale (Clarendon Press Series). Second half-year. 

12. Non-Dramatic Poetry of the Sixteenth and Early Seven- 
teenth Centuries. In this course the work will be confined mainly 
to a careful study of the poetry of Spenser and Milton. 1903- 1904. 
First half-year. 

13. Shakespeare and the Elizabethan Drama. This course is 
preparatory to a more extended study of Shakespeare and his con- 
temporaries. A brief history of the Pre- Shakespearean drama in lec- 
tures. A study of three or four of Shakespeare's plays. 1903- 1904. 
First half-year. 

14. Shakespeare. Lectured on the development of Shakespeare's 
art and the later Elizabethan drama. The class is required to read all 
of Shakespeare's plays. Open to students who have had course 13 or 
its equivalent. 1903-1904. Second half-year. 

15. English Literary Criticism. The history of literary criti- 
cism. The class will study select essays of Dryden, Steele and Addi- 
son, Johnson, Coleridge, Lamb, Hazlitt, DeQuincey, Leigh Hunt, 
Carlyle, Mathew Arnold and others. Lectures and papers. Open to 
students who have had courses 16 and 17 or their equivalents. 1903- 
1904. First half-year. 

16. Classicism in English Literature. A history of modem 
English literature from Milton to the beginning of the Romantic 
movement in the eighteenth cenutry. The development of Classicism 



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in English poetry of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. This 
course is arranged specially for Sophomores who intend to elect 
English literature. First half-year. 

17. The Romantic Movement of the Eighteenth Century. A 
history of English poetry from about 1760 to 1830. Select readings 
from the poetry of Burns, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, 
Keats, Shelley and other contemporaries. Several papers required. 
Second half-year. 

18. American Literature. The historical development of English 
literature in America from its beginning to the present day. Lec- 
tures, papers and extensive readings from the principal writers. Open 
to Juniors and Seniors. Second half-year. 

19. The English Novel. The history of the rise and growth of 
the English Novel from its beginning to the nineteenth century. 
Lectures, select readings and papers. Text-book: Cross' Develop- 
ment of the English Novel. 1902- 1903. First half-year. Not given 
1903-1904. 

20. English Poetry from 1830 to 1880. Tennyson, Browning, 
Mrs. Browning, Matthew Arnold, Arthur H. Clough, and other poets 
of the period. A large amount of reading and frequent papers are 
required on topics suggested by the course. Open to Juniors and 
Seniors. Not given 1903-1904. 

21. English Prose from 1830 to 1880. Carlyle, Ruskin, Matthew 
Arnold, Newman, Thackeray, George Eliot, and other prose writers 
of the period. The course is a continuation of 20, but the two may 
be elected separately. Open to Seniors and Juniors. Not given 1903- 
1904. 

GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY. 

professor cushing. 

1. Mineralogy. Crystallography, and descriptive Mineralogy. 
Two hours of recitation and lectures, and one laboratory exercise of 
three hours. First half-year. 

2. Mineralogy. Determinative Mineralogy and blow-pipe analy- 
sis. Three laboratory exercises of three hours each. Physical crys- 
tallography may be substituted for the blow-pipe work. Second half- 
year. 

3. Geology. Dynamical Geology. Three hours a week. First 
half-year. 



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I02 COLLBGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

4. Geology. Structural and Historical Geology. Lectures and 
field work in vicinity of Cleveland. Second half-year. 

5. Physiography. Th€ cause and manner of the development of 
topographic forms. Second-half year. 

A Laboratory fee of $1.00 is charged for courses i, 2 or 4. 

GERMAN. 

PROFESSOR DEERING. 

PROFESSOR HARRIS, 3. 

DR. MEYER, 5a. 

DR. FIFE. 

I, 2. German Grammar and Reader. Easy modem texts. In 
this and the following courses German is spoken as much as possible 
in the class-room, but such conversation is regarded as a means, not 
as an end. Throughout the j-car. 

3, 4. Grammar continued— Prose Composition. Recent German 
prose and the simpler plays of Lessing, Goethe, or Schiller. In 1903- 
1904 the first text will be Wildenbruch's Der Letzte. Throughout the 
year. 

5, 6. Advanced Grammar— Prose Composition. Rapid reading of 
representative modem authors and, in the second half-year of classic 
German, with especial attention to Schiller. Practice in reading at 
sigfht. The first text for 1903- 1904 will be Riehl's Burg N«ideck. 
Throughout the year. 

7. Goethe. His life and works and times, with selected readings 
from his lyrics, prose and dramas. An outline of the development of 
German literature during the classical period will be studied. First 
half-year. 

8. Nineteenth Century Authors. Outline history of German 
literature since Goethe's death, with especial reference to its prose 
development. Readings from the best modem novelists, essayists, 
historians and dramatists. Practice in writing German. Second 
half-year. 

9. Faust. Lectures on the development of the Faust legend, with 
parallel reading of the most important Faust literature; Goethe's 
Faust. First half-year. 

10. Lessing and the Classic German Drama. Early eighteenth 
century drama, Lessing's reforms and influence (lectures) ; all his 
important dramas and best critical works, with illustrative parallel 
reading. First half-year. 



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I902-1903] WKSTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVERSITY. I03 

12. 15. Middle High German. Paul's Mittelhochdeutsche Gram- 
matik ; Selections from the Nibelungenlied, from Hartmann, Walther, 
and Wolfram. Throughout the year. 

14. Heine. Lectures on the life and times of Heine, with readings 
from his most important works. Especial attention will be given to 
his contemporaries, as well as to the social and political aspects of 
the time. Second half-year. 

16. Advanced Composition. Studies in German style. Original 
German essays on subjects assigned. Lectures on the history of the 
German language. Recommended to those who intend teaching Ger- 
man. 

17. Contemporary German Literature. The new spirit of Ger- 
man literature. Sudermann, Hauptmann, Liliencron, Fontane. 

18. Old Germanic Myths and Legends. Outline of Germanic 
Mythology. Study of the most important mediaeval saga cycles. 
Lectures and papers. 

Courses ^18 are open only to students who have taken courses 7 
and 8, or their equivalent. Not more than two of these courses will 
be given in any half-year. 

GREEK. 

PROFESSOR FOWLER. 
PROFESSOR FULLER. 

1. Homer. The Odyssey. Two books will be read consecutively 
and the remainder studied in representative selection and in English 
translation, with a view to a literary acquaintance with the entire 
poem. Considerable attention will be given to developing facility in 
translating at sight. First half-year. 

2. Attic Orators. Selections from Lysias, Isocrates and Demos- 
thenes. Greek rhetoric. Lives of Attic orators. Legislative bodies 
and law practice in Athens. History of Greece from the beginning 
of the Peloponnesian war to the death of Philip. Greek Prose Com- 
position. Second half-year. 

Only two of the following elective courses will be given in any 
half-year : 

3. The Drama. Two tragedies; metres and theory of music; 
lectures on the archaeology of the drama (actors, costumes, buildings, 
etc.) First half-year. 

4. Plato's Apology, Crito, and selections from other works. Sec- 
ond half-year. 



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I04 COLrlrEGB FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

5. Philosophy. Seminary work in the Fragments of the Early 
Philosophers (Diogenes Laertius, de Vitis, Dogmatibus et Apophtheg- 
matibus Philosophorum ; Ritter et Prellcr, Fragmenta Philosophise 
Graecae), and selections from Plato and Aristotle. First half-year. 

6. History. Seminary work in Herodotus, Thucydides, Xeno- 
phon, and other sources of Greek history. Second half-year, 

7. Oratory. Comparative study of speeches of Attic orators. 
The speeches of Thucydides, etc. First half-year. 

8. Aristophanes' Frogs and selected Dialogues of Lucian. History 
of Greek literature illustrated by selections from authors hot hitherto 
studied in class. Second half-year. 

9. Drama. The development of Attic drama as exhibited in the 
extant plays and fragments. First half-year. 

10. Greek Prose Composition, An advanced course, the special 
features of which will be determined by the acquirements and needs 
of the class. Second half-year. 

Courses 5-10 are open only to students who have taken courses 3 
and 4, or their equivalent. Not more than two of these courses will 
be given in any half-year, 

HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR BOURNE. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SEVERANCE, I3, I4, 1 5. 

DR. HUNT, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9. 

1. History of the middle ages. The migrations, the development 
of the church as aii institution, the mediaeval empire, feudal society. 
Either half-year. 

2. History of France, from the end of the Middle Ages to the 
death of Louis XV. Development of the political and social institu- 
tions of the Old Regime. Either half-year. 

3. History of England, from the end of the Middle Ages. The 
development of English institutions, and the rise of England to the 
position of a great state. First half-year. 

4. History of Germany, 1494-1786. The Renaissance, the Refor- 
mation, the Thirty Years' War, the Rise of Prussia, Frederick the 
Great. Second half-year. 

5. American Colonial History, to the end of the Revolutionary 
War. The discovery and settlement of North America, the political 
growth of the colonies, and their development towards independence 
and union. First half-year. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I05 

6. History op the United States, from 1783 to the dose of the 
Reconstruction period. The consolidation of institutions, the growth 
of national life, expansion westward, the slavery question, etc Sec- 
ond half-year. 

7. French Revolution, 1789- 1799, with introductory studies of 
the Old Regime. First half-year. 

8. Europe in the Nineteenth Century, including the Napoleon- 
ic period and the successive regimes in France, the reorganization 
of Germany, the union of Italy, and the general progress of civiliza- 
tion. Second half-year. 

9. Political Institutions of the United States, a study of 
national, state and city administration, of the system of party govern- 
ment and of political problems. Based on Bryce's American Com- 
monwealth. Second half-year. 

In courses 3-9 the work will include wide reading from the litera- 
ture of the subject, as well as some study of official records and of 
contemporary writers. 

11. Epochs of History. The object is the more careful study of 
a particular epoch, from the sources and from other writers; for 
example, the English Reformation, England under the Stuarts, Me- 
dieval France, the beginnings of the Bourbon monarchy, the Lutheran 
Reformation. First half-year. 

12. History and Historical Research. This includes a sketch 
of the development of the scope of history as a literature, a study of 
the masters of historical writing, a study of the elements of historical 
criticism, and practical work in investigation. Second half-year. 

Course 11 is open each year to Seniors who have had, in addition 
to I, two other courses selected from 2 to 9. Course 12 is open to 
Seniors who have had 11 or 15. 

13. Life in the Middle Ages. This course will deal with the 
dwellings, costumes, food, occupations and habits of the men and 
women of that epoch. It will be illustrated by means of photographs 
and prints taken from Mediaeval Manuscripts. First half-year. 

14. The Beliefs and Superstitions of the Middle Ages. Espe- 
cial attention will be paid to magic and sorcery, and to their outcome 
in the witchcraft delusion. Portents, lucky and unlucky days, pre- 
cious stones, palmistry, etc., will also be touched on. 1903-1904. 
First half-year. 

15. Special Topics in Mediaeval History. This course will be 
conducted according to the principles of the seminary method, and 



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I06 COI^LEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

aims to teach the student how to investigate a topic in Mediaeval His- 
tory from the sources. The subject for 1903-04 will be either the 
"Vita Heinrici IV. Imperatoris," or "The Crusades." 

For the courses in Historical Bibliography, see Bibliography. 

The lectureship in History was founded by the Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and was filled in 1900 by the late Professor 
Moses Coit Tyler, of Cornell University, and in 1901 by Mr. Thomas 
Wentworth Higginson, LL. D. 

For 1903 the lecturer will be Professor J. B.McMaster of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania. 

HYGIENE. 

DR. CHAPMAN. 

I. The instruction consists of weekly lectures illustrated with 
charts, manikin and skeleton. These lectures embrace the funda- 
mental principles that underlie the promotion of health ; the structure 
and functions of all the organs of the body ; the proper exercise and 
rest of the muscles; the conversion of food into tissues; the import- 
ance of always keeping the body supplied with pure blood; ventila- 
tion, food and clothing. Special attention is given to the nervous 
system, including the care of the eyes. First half-year. 

LATIN. 

PROFESSOR PERKINS. 
PROFESSOR PLATNER, I9. 

1. Livy, Books XXI, XXII; translation at sight and at hearing; 
the writing of Latin. Collateral reading in Roman History. First 
half-year. 

2. Cicero de Senectute ; Plautus (one play) ; Horace, Satires. 
Translation at sight and at hearing; the writing of Latin. Second 
half-year. 

Only four of the following elective courses will be given in any 
half-year : 

3. Odes and Epodes of Horace. First half-year. 

4. Cicero's Letters. First half-year. 

5. Letters op Pliny the Younger. First half-year. 

6. Tacitus and Suetonius. Tacitus, Agricola; Annales (Books 
1-2, entire; Books 3 and 4, selections). Suetonius, selections. First 
half-year. 



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7. History of Latin Literature (Poetry). Lectures, with read- 
ing of typical selections, and direction of the student's private read- 
ing, one hour a week. Advanced courses in Latin writing, two 
hours a week. First half-year. 

8. Lucretius. First half-year. 

9. Catullus. Selections from Tibullus, Propertius and Ovid's 
Tristia. Second half-year. 

10. The Epistles of Horace. The Ars Poetica. Wilkins' Primer 
of Roman Literature. Second half-year. 

11. Roman Comedy. Terence and Plautus. Second half-year. 

12. Juvenal and Martial. Second half-year. 

13. Latin Rhetoric. Quintilian, Book x; Cicero, De Oratore, 
Selections. Second half-year. 

14. Roman Oratory. Tacitus, Dialogus de Oratoribus, with se- 
lections from Cicero. Second half-year. 

15. Teachers' Training Course. This course is recommended 
only for students who have had two years of elective work in Latin. 
The aim of the course is to give prospective teachers assurance in 
their Work. The course includes lectures on problems connected 
with the teaching of Latin in secondary schools; practical exercises 
in the study of the Grammar and the authors read in secondary 
schools. Second half-year. 

16. Selections from Cicero, de Officiis, and the Tusculan Disputa- 
tions. Second half-year. 

17. Seneca. Selections from (a) Prose writings. (6) Tragedies. 
Second half-year. 

18. History of Latin Literature. (Prose.) Lectures, with 
direction of the student's private reading, one hour a week. Ad- 
vanced courses in Latin writing, two hours a week. Second half-year. 

19. Latin of the Silver Age. 1902-1903. Second half-year. 

MATHEMATICS. 

professor palmi^. 

1. Trigonometry. Jones's Drill Book in Trigonometry. First 
half-year. 

2. Algebra. Hall and Knight's Text-book. Second half-year. 

3. Plane and Solid Geometry. Exercises to be solved by the 
students; Chauvenet's Elementary Geometry. Second half-year. 



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Io8 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

5. Analytical Geometry. Loney's Analytical Geometry. First 

half-year. 

6. Differential Calculus. Osborne's Differential Calculus. Sec- 
ond half-year. 

7. Integral Calculus. Osborne's Calculus. First half-year. 

8. Differential Calculus (advanced course). Hamack's Intro- 
duction to the Calculus. 

9. Analytical Geometry (advanced course). Salmon's Conic 
Sections. First half-year. 

10. Theory of Functions, of a complex variable. Introductory 
course. 

11. The Theory of Equations. Burnside and Panton's Theory 
of Equations. First half-year. 

12. Projective Geometry. Second half-year. 

13. Theory of Substitution Groups, and its application to alge- 
braic equations. 

14. Theory of Numbers. Elementary course. 

Only three elective courses will be' offered in any half-year. 

MUSIC 

MR. CLEMENS. 

1. History of Music. A course in the history of music covering 
the periods embracing Primitive Music; Ancient Music, and the music 
of the Christian Era to the end of the sixteenth century. Fillmore's 
Lessons in Musical History is used as a text-book, supplemented by 
musically illustrated lectures and references to standard works. A 
short course in the elements of Harmony is combined with the more 
strictly historical study in order that the mimical development and 
relations of the different periods may be more clearly understood. 
First "half-year. 

2. A continuation of course i, embracing the periods from the 
beginning of the seventeenth century to the time of Handel and Bach. 
Substantially the same methods will be followed as in the work 
of the preceding course. Second half-year. 

Those desiring to elect the course in the second term only must 
possess an adequate knowledge of this subject. 

3. 4. Harmony and Counterpoint. Throughout the year. 



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PHILOSOPHY, PSYCHOLOGY AND EDUCATION. 

PROFESSOR AIKINS. 
DR. MARVIN. 

1. Logic. The principles of logic, with practice in definition and 
the analysis of arguments. Required of Latin-English Sophomores, 
elective for others. Second half-y^ar. 

2. Elementary Psychology. An outline of the subject, mainly 
from the physiological and pedagogical standpoints. This course is 
introductory to all the other work in the department, except Logic. 
It is open to Sophomores. First half-year. 

3. Ethics. An outline of ethical theory with incidental discussion 
of practical problems. First half-year. 

4. Introduction to Philosophy. A direct and simple discussion 
of the main problems of speculative philosophy, such as the ultimate 
nature of the mind and its relation to the body, the real nature of 
material things, the significance of evolution,i the alleged conflict of 
science and religion, what knowledge is and what we can hope to 
know, idealism, realism and scepticism; the relation of knowledge to 
faith. (Omitted in 1902-3.) 

5. History of Philosophy. Some of the greatest thinkers, and 
how they looked at life and the world. Second half-year. 

6. Advanced Course in Philosophy. A critical study of some one 
or two philosophers or of some group of philosophical problems. 
First half-year. 

7. History of Education. An historical study of educational 
theories and practices, with special reference to their relations to the 
history of philosophy and the history of morals. The course will 
include a large amount of outside reading. Second half-year. 

8. Psychology in Education. The course is intended to cover 
about the following ground. Animals and children: how to study 
them and what we learn from them. Individual differences: the 
mental life and education of the blind, the deaf and other defectives. 
Laws of mental and physical growth. Rhythm, fatigue, and other 
general relations of mind and body. The training and the breakdown 
of various mental faculties. Special educational devices and their 
psychological basis. Second half-year. 

9. Principles of Education. The meaning and aim of education, 
and the various problems of education itself, such as those of curricu- 
lum and method. Second haK-year. 

Only two of the last three courses are likely to be given in the 
same half-year. 



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no COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOE WHITMAN. 
DR. REICHMANN. 

lA. General contents and text-book as in course i. For Freshmen 
entering the Latin-English course. The work is arranged to utilize 
as fully as possible the preparatory course in Physics. First half- 
year. 

1. Mechanics, Sound, Heat. Hastings and Beach, General 
Physics, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year. 

2. Light, Electricity and Magnetism. Continuation of course 
I. Second half-year. 

3. Physical Optics. Glazetrook's Physical Optics or Preston's 
Theory of Light, with lectures and laboratory work. First half-year. 

4. Theory of Heat. A course based mainly on Maxwell's Theory 
of Heat, with lectures and references. Second half-year. Alternating 
with 9. 

5. Electricity and Magnetism. A review of electrical theory, 
with laboratory practice in electrical measurements. The text-book 
will depend somewhat on the character of the class. First half-yfear. 

6. Continuation of course 5. Second half-year. 

7. Mechanical Drawing. A course involving the principles of 
Descriptive Geometry and their application to mechanical drawing, 
the preparation of working drawings, elementary curve-tracing, etc. 
Faunce's Descriptive Geometry will be used as text. Second half- 
year. 

8. Applied Electricity. An elementary course of lectures on the 
modem applications of electricity, including continuous and alternat- 
ing current machinery, batteries, lighting, telegraphy, telephony, etc. 
Two exercises weekly. Second half-year. 

9. Mechanics. The Elements of Applied Mechanics. Texi- 
book : Wright's Elements of Mechanics. Second half-year. Alter- 
nating with 4. 

10. Descriptive Physics. This course is intended for those who 
wish to obtain a general acquaintance with the more important phys- 
ical phenomena. It is given mainly by lectures, but includes refer- 
ences to text-books, and a few exercises in the laboratory. Required 
of Classical and Modern Language Sophomores. First half-year. 

11. Physical Manipulation. Instruction is given in the ele- 
ments of the ordinary laboratory arts, as glass-blowing and soldering, 
in the use of the dividing engine and other general instruments, in 



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the construction of simple pieces of apparatus. One exercise weekly. 
Second half-year. 

12. Physical Experiment. Special topics in Physics are as- 
signed to each student for detailed study. The aim of the course is 
to introduce somewhat more advanced experimental methods than 
are usually possible in the general courses. Each student is expected 
to spend from six to nine hours weekly in the laboratory. 

13. Physics Conference. Lectures on selected topics. Reports 
and discussions on special subjects and current physical literature by 
members of the conference. One meeting weekly. 

Courses 11 and 12 are intended primarily for those intending to 
teach physical science, or for students who expect to specialize in 
Physics. 

The weekly exercise under course 11 may be combined with course 
12 to count for one three-hour course. 

The laboratory fee for course 10 is $2.00; for each of the other 
laboratory courses, $4.00. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OLIVER. 

FRENCH. 

I, 2. Beginners' Course. Grammar, easy reading, composition, 
conversation. Throughout the year. i 

3, 4. Advanced Course. Rapid reading of modern prose, poetry 
and drama. Syntax and composition. Conversation, reports on out- 
side reading. Throughout the year. 

Courses i, 2, 3, 4 or their equivalent must precede all others. 

By special permission students who do exceptionally good work in 
courses i, 2 and 3, may omit 4 and enter the elective courses. Such 
students, however, will not receive credit for the omitted course. 

Of the following courses not more than two will be given in any 
half-year : 

5. The Classic Drama. Lectures on the rise and development of 
French drama. Interpretation of the masterpieces of Corneille, 
Racine, Moliere, Regnard. Collateral reading. Themes. First half- 
year, 1902-1903. 

6. The Drama of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth Centuries. 
The Decadence of Classic drama. Rise and growth of the romantic 
and realistic drama. Modem tendencies. Reading of Voltaire, Beau- 
marchais, Destouches, Marivaux, Victor Hugo, Alfred dc Musset, 
Scribe, Dumas pere, Augier, Dumas fils, Sardou, Coppee, Rostand. 
Themes on collateral reading. Second half-year, 1902- 1903. 



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112 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

7. MoLi^RE. Lectures on the life and times of Moliere. Interpre- 
tation of the greater comedies. 

8. French Lyric and Didactic Poetry. Boileau, La Fontaine, 
Ch^nier, Victor Hugo, de Musset, Lamartine. Collateral reading.* 
Essays. 

9. 10. Modern Novelists. Lectures and recitations. The Roman- 
tic School. First half-year. The Realistic School. Second half-year. 
1903- 1904. 

11. Seventeenth Century Prose Classics. Lectures on French 
culture, society and prose literature of the seventeenth century. The 
great preachers and moralists. Jansenism and Port Royal. The 
French Academy and the Salons. Memoirs and Letter-Writers. 
Readings from Descartes, Pascal, La Rochefoucauld, La Bruyere, 
Bossuet, Bourdaloue, Mme. de Sevigne, Mme. de La Fayette, Fene- 
lon, Saint-Simon. Themes and collateral reading. First half-year. 

12. Eighteenth Century Prose Classics. Lectures on the soci- 
ety and culture of the eighteenth century. Break-up of the classic 
ideals. Growth of the revolutionary spirit. First movements toward 
romanticism. Voltaire and the Encyclopedists. Rousseau, Diderot, 
Montesquieu, Le Sage, Bernardin de Saint Pierre. Themes and col- 
lateral reading. Second half-year. 

13. The Sixteenth Century. The Reformation and the Renais- 
sance. Rabelais, Calvin, Marot, Ronsard and the Pleiade, Montaigne. 
Readings from Darmsteter and Hatzfeld's Le Seizieme Siecle en 
France. Study of the language and syntax of the period. Themes 
and collateral reading. First half-year. 

14- History of Old French Literature, with representative read- 
ings from Bartsch's Chrestomathie, La Chanson de Roland, and 
Christian of Troyes. The Mediaeval Drama. Second half-year. 

15. French Historical Grammar. Phonetics, morphology, syn- 
tax. Illustrative reading from old French texts. First half-year. 

16. Comparative Historical Grammar of the Romance Lan- 
guages, with especial reference to Old French and Provencal. Illus- 
trative readings. Second half-year. 

ITALIAN. 
I, 2. Grandgent's Italian Grammar. Reading of modern Ital- 
ian. Composition. 1902- 1903. Throughout the year. 

SPANISH. 

1. Elementary Course. Edgren's Grammar and Matzke's 
Reader, 1903- 1904. First half-year. 

2. Reading of modern texts. 1903- 1904. Second half-year. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. . II ^ 



GENERAL INFORMATION- 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The first half-year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a Christmas 
recess of nine days, until the first Saturday in February. 
The second half-year begins on the Monday after the first 
Saturday in February, and continues, with an Easter 
recess of one week, until Commencement, which occurs 
on the Wednesday after the tenth day of June (or 
after the ninth in years in which February has twenty-nine 
days) . No college exercises are held on Thanksgiving day, 
Washington's birthday, and Decoration day. On the Day 
of Prayer for colleges, religious exercises are held in the 
chapel. The exercises of the first half-year begin with 
prayers in the chapel at ten o'clock. 

DEFICIENT WORK. 

1. All entrance conditions must be removed before a 
student is allowed to begin the work of Sophomore year. 

2. A student who fails in the work of an elective course 
must remove this deficiency, or complete another course as 
extra work. 

3. All conditions incurred at examinations must be re- 
moved at the next examinations held for the same courses ; 
except that all conditions incurred and all work omitted in 
Freshman year must be made up before a student is allowed 
to begin the work of Junior year; and that all conditions 
incurred, and all work omitted in Sophomore year must be 
made up before a student is allowed to begin the work of 
Senior year; and that all other conditions, and all other 
omitted work, must be made up before a student is allowed 
to begin the work of the second term of Senior year. 



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114 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

Students are graded in their studies by letters which havQ 
value on a scale of eight, as follows : 



E 


(excellent) 


7-8 


G 


(good) 


6-7 


F 


(fair) 


5-6 


P 


(pass) 


4-5 


D 


(deficient) 


-4 



GRADUATION AND DEGREES. 

No student will be allowed to graduate unless she has 
taken at least one course in either Economics or Philosophy 
and Psychology and at least one course each in two of the 
three sciences, Biology, Chemistry and Physics. Students 
should consult the instructors in the departments concerned 
as to the best time at which to take these courses. 

Juniors and Seniors may diminish the number of their 
recitations, though not the total amount of their work, three 
hours a week, by arranging to do extra work in one or more 
courses. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts is conferred on stu- 
dents who have completed the Classical course which in- 
cludes the study of the Greek language and literature; the 
degree of Bachelor of Letters on those who have com- 
pleted the Modern Language course, in which modem Lan- 
guages are substituted for Greek ; and the degree of Bach- 
elor OF Philosophy on those who have completed the 
Latin-English course, which differs from the Modem Lan- 
guage course in that an entrance requirement of science and 
history is substituted for French or German. 

LIBRARIES. 
Hatch Library on the Adelbert College campus, five min- 
utes' walk from the College for Women, is open on equal 
terms to all members of the University. It is furnished with 
well lighted reading rooms, contains about forty-five thous- 
and bound volumes and ten thousand pamphlets, and is 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. II 5 

especially rich in German, French, historical and philosoph- 
ical literature. The list of periodicals is very complete, and 
the library contains many sets of valuable publications in 
classical philology and archaeology, Germanic and general 
philology, history, anthropology and science, besides sets of 
the oldest and best literary magazines. These sets are kept 
up to date and their number is increased by constant addi- 
tions. Students have access to all the books on the shelves. 
The library is open every day from eight to half-past five 
o'clock. 

For the special convenience of students in the College for 
Women there is in Clark Hall itself a carefully selected and 
growing library containing encyclopaedias and other books 
of reference, magazines, duplicates of books in common use, 
and a considerable number of other works. 

A special library in Biblical literziture is placed in The 
Florence Harkness Memorial Chapel. This collection is be- 
ing constantly enlarged by means of funds from the Flor- 
ence Harkness Foundation. 

In addition to these, students may freely use the prin- 
cipal libraries of Cleveland. The Free Public Library con- 
tains 150,000 volumes, and includes valuable collections for 
the study of Shakespeare, modern literature, history, art, 
and archaeology. On request of members of the Faculty, 
books from the Public Library are delivered at the Hatch 
Library building, and may be retained for an extended 
period. This arrangement makes its collections readily 
accessible to students at all times. 

Through the courtesy of its directors, students also have 
free tickets to the Case Library. This collection, containing 
50,000 volumes, is well supplied with periodicals and gen- 
eral literature, and offers excellent facilities for study of 
the fine arts, of political economy and sociology, and of the 
sciences, especially chemistry and botany. 



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Il6 COLLfEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-1903 

LABORATORIES AND MUSEUMS. 

Biology. The laboratory is designed, first, for the study 
of the biological sciences, especially zoology and botany; 
second, for containing a biological museum, in the sense 
of a reference or teaching collection of objects drawn from 
the living world to illustrate types of structure, variations, 
life histories and kindred subjects ; and third, for the main- 
tenance of vivaria, or rooms in which certain animals and 
plants, both aquatic and terrestial, may be kept alive while 
their habits are studied, and, when possible, their breeding 
and development watched. 

Chemistry. The department of chemistry is well sup- 
plied with apparatus for use in illustrative lectures. The 
chemical laboratory is equipped with sufficient apparatus so 
that each student may become familiar with the facts of the 
science through experiments made by herself under the 
guidance of the instructor. Such experimental courses are 
offered in the chemistry of the non-metallic and metallic 
elements, in organic, analytical, and physiological chemistry. 

Geology and Mineralogy. The collections at the ser- 
vice of the department are well chosen, and are rapidly 
growing. They comprise sets of crystal models and crys- 
tals, crystal sections for optical study, and rock sections in 
great number, besides mineralogical, lithological, and palae- 
ontological collections. The library is good and constantly 
being increased. The vicinity of Qeveland is interesting 
geologically, especially in regard to its glacial deposits and 
its palaeontology. It furnishes abundance of material for 
special investigation. 

Physics and Astronomy. The Physical laboratory is 
a three-story building of sound and substantial construction, 
containing large lecture and laboratory rooms for the ele- 
mentary courses, and a considerable number of smaller 
apartments for more advanced work. Elspecial attention 
has been paid to heating, lighting, and ventilation. The 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 ry 

department is equipped with a large variety of apparatus 
bearing on the courses at present offered — all of which in- 
clude work in the laboratory — and additional apparatus is 
continually being obtained. 

Upon the physical laboratory has been erected an equa- 
torial telescope, covered by a revolving dome. The tele- 
scope, of ten and one-half inches aperture and fifteen feet 
focal length, is equipped with all the necessary accessories 
for observation and measurement. This valuable addition 
to the scientific apparatus of the University is the gift of 
Messrs. W. R. Warner and Ambrose Swasey, of Cleveland. 

GYMNASIUM. 

The Gymnasium in Clark Hall is well equipped with all 
the necessary apparatus, and is under the direction of a 
graduate of Dr. Sargent's School of Physical Training. 
Upon entering college each student is examined by the 
College Physician and the Director of the gymnasium, and 
information obtained concerning habits and general health. 
From this data and the measurements made by the Director, 
exercise is prescribed to meet the special need of each indi- 
vidual. Exercise in the gymnasium is required three hours 
a week of Freshmen and Sophomores, and is under the per- 
sonal supervision of the Director. Students are advised to 
consult the Director before procuring their gymnasium 
suits. When the weather permits, work in the gymnasium 
is replaced by tennis, basket ball, golf, and other games out 
of doors. Special instruction is given to those who wish it 
in fencing and track athletics. Wade Park pond furnishes 
the students with facilities for rowing and skating. 

Two prizes annually, one of fifteen, and the other of ten 
dollars, are awarded by the President to the students who, 
through their gymnastic work, make the greatest progress 
toward symmetrical development. 

To receive these prizes a student must continue her work 
throughout the Sophomore year. 



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IlS COtlrEGK FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

GUILFORD HOUSE. 

Guilford House offers a good home for forty students. 
It is warmed by hot watery well lighted, and thoroughly 
ventilated. The rooms are large and fully furnished. The 
linen for beds and tables is provided, but each student pa)rs 
fifty cents a month to meet the cost of its laundrying. The 
charge for other laundry work is fifty cents a dozen. The 
table is excellent and well served, and the aim of the house- 
keeping is to make the surroundings as homelike as possible. 

The rooms in Guilford House are arranged, for the most 
part, in suites consisting of a study and two sleeping rooms. 
The price of board and lodging for each of two students in 
such a suite is $250 for the college year. This rooming 
arrangement is earnestly recommended in preference to any 
other. There are, however, four choice, large single rooms, 
the price of which is also $250 ; five smaller rooms for $225 
each, and one for $200. There is also one especially desir- 
able Stuite for two students paying $275 apiece. Any stu- 
dent entering within the first five weeks will be charged 
from the beginning of the year. If an applicant has had 
a special room retained for her, and if she fail to occupy it, 
she will be charged for one-half of a term. Claims for 
deductions arising from necessary withdrawal are to be ad- 
justed with the Ofiicers. The date of withdrawal of a stu- 
dent is reckoned from the time when the President is in- 
formed of the fact by the parent or guardian. It is re- 
quested that students make separate payments for their 
tuition and board. Checks for board should be made pay- 
able to Guilford House. One-half the amount is due at the 
beginning of each term. 

HAYDN HALL. 

Haydn Hall offers a home for twenty-four students and 
also supplies rooms for the various needs of the student 
bodv. The basement contains a locker room and a well- 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 19 

equipped kitchen. The first floor is devoted especially 
to students who reside at their homes in Cleveland. It 
contains a study room, a lunch room, and a central hall. 
For social occasions these may be used as one large room. 
On the second floor are rooms for the use of the four college 
classes and the alumnae. The remainder of the second and 
the whole of the third floor are divided into living rooms 
for students. The prices of rooms are $250, $225. Checks 
should be made payable to Haydn Hall. 

The life in both Guilford House and Haydn Hall is 
founded upon the desire to give to each student such super- 
vision as earnest and able young women absent from home 
should receive, and yet to subject no one to unnecessary or 
annoying restraint. Certain members of the Faculty reside 
in each building. Their endeavor and the endeavor of all 
the officers — ^the Housemistress, the Faculty, the Advisory 
Council — is to make a home in every way suitable for college 
women. 

THE FLORENCE HARKNESS MEMORIAL. 

The Florence Harkness Memorial is a Perpendicular 
Gothic structure in stone and quartered oak. Its char- 
acter is further indicated by the fact that the windows 
are from The Tiffany Company and the organ from The 
Austin Company. The chapel seats about six hundred. 
Under the same roof are a large lecture room, a library and 
study for the Biblical work of the college, the endowment 
of which bears the same name as the chapel. 

The religious life of the college, the chapel service, the 
Young Women's Christian Association and Missionary soci- 
eties as well as the Biblical instruction therefore centre in 
this building, which it is believed is as complete as possible 
and one of the best for its purpose in the land. 



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I20 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

RELIGIOUS WORSHIP. 
The principles and influences of the College are distinc- 
tively Christian, but the College has no formal connection 
with any particular denomination. A short service is held 
each morning in the Chapel at a quarter past nine o'clock. 
All students are expected to be present at this service and 
on Sunday to attend the services at the churches of their 
choice. It is desired that as far as possible each student 
should enter into the life of her church. Sunday Vesper 
Services are held in the Florence Harkness Memorial dur- 
ing the college year. The students carry on a Young 
Women's Christian Association, the aims of which are to 
maintain in the College a healthy, progressive Christian 
spirit and to keep the students in touch with the religious 
and charitable work of the world. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS. 

The students publish a monthly journal called The Col- 
lege Folio. This periodical gives them an opportunity, not 
merely to record or comment upon the events of the College 
life, but also to give expression to their literary interests. 
The College Annual, "Varia Historia," is published by the 
Junior class. 

The student organizations include a Young Women's 
Christian Association, a Glee Club, a Mandolin Club, a Dra- 
matic Association, an Athletic Association, and several lit- 
erary and scientific societies. 

The conduct of the student body as a whole is largely 
entrusted to the Students' Association. 

CORRESPONDENCE. 

Letters respecting the admission or dismission of students, 
requests for catalogues or general information should be 
addressed to the President of the University or to the Reg- 
istrar of the College for Women. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 121 

Communications in reference to board and rooms at Guil- 
ford House should be sent to Miss Elizabeth Annin. Those 
for Haydn Hall, to Miss Isadore Heydenburk. 

EXPENSES AND BENEFICIARY AID. 

The charge for tuition and incidentals for each student is 
$85 per year. In addition to this each student pays a 
matriculation fee of $5 on entering College. All checks 
should be made payable to the Treasurer. No charge is 
made for diplomas. One-half of the charge for tuition is to 
be paid at the beginning of each half-year; no part will be 
refunded if the student retain her place in class. In labora- 
tory courses fees are charged to meet the cost of perishable 
material. The amoimt in each case is indicated with the 
description of the courses. 

There are certain annual scholarships which are awarded 
to students of high rank and slender means, by which they 
are relieved of a portion of the tuition fee of the College. 
Conference either in person or by letter with the President 
is invited. 

Scholarships may be granted annually upon application, 
but may be withdrawn for cause at the end of one half-year. 
The granting and withdrawing of scholarships, for students 
who have attended the College as long as one half-year, is 
in the hands of the executive committee, who shall report 
to the Faculty at the beginning of each year the names of 
those students to whom scholarships are to be granted, and 
each half-year the names of those from whom scholarships 
have been withdrawn. 

From the Loan Fund certain grants are made to worthy 
students. The Alumnae Association has also established a 
Loan Fund to be used for similar purposes. Students re- 
ceiving these benefits are expected to maintain their standing 
in scholarship and to finish their course here. If dismissal 
to another college is sought, the College dues, including the 
amounts given or loaned, must first be paid. 

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122 COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. [1902-I903 

The opportunities offered by the College for the higher 
education of young women of limited means are presented 
to the attention of those who desire to promote such work 
by the establishment of scholarships for worthy students. 
Such foundations may be made to have an annual value of 
from $25 to $335. 

THE HOLDEN PRIZE. 

Mr. L. E. Holden, of Cleveland, offers a prize of twenty- 
five dollars for the best essay written by a Senior or Junior 
on some subject selected by the department of English. 
Essays in .competition for this prize must be submitted not 
later than May 15, 1903. 

PUBLICATION FUND. 

The Francis G. Butler Publication Fund has been estab- 
lished, the income of which is to be devoted to the publi- 
cation of original researches in the field of American history 
by professors or students of this College as well as of Adel- 
bert College and the Graduate School. 



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1 902-1903] WBSTKRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 23 



DEPARTMENT OF GRADUATE 

INSTRUCTION- 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 

EmHE privileg^es of the Graduate Department are open, 
U without distinction of sex, to g^raduates of this and 
other universities and colleges of good standing who present 
satisfactory evidence of character and scholarship. In 
exceptional cases, by special permission, other persons of suit- 
able age and attainments may also be received as students. 

The work of the department is under the general super- 
vision of an Executive Committee, consisting, this year, of 
Professors H. A. Aikins (Acting Dean), H. N. Fowler, and 
F. P. Whitman. Persons desiring to do graduate work are 
invited to confer or correspond with any member of this 
committee. 

Applications for admission as graduate students may be 
received at any time, but should be presented, if possible, 
at least a month before the beginning of the academic year. 
This is advisable because books and apparatus for special 
work must often be imported from Europe. All such ap- 
plications should be made to the Dean of the Graduate 
Faculty, and should be accompanied, except in the case of 
graduates of this university, by diplomas or such other 
official certificates as- will satisfy the Executive Committee 
as to the student's character and attainments. Applicants 
admitted as students must then register with the Dean and 
file statements of the courses of study they intend to pursue, 
indicating also the degrees, if any, for which they wish to 
be candidates. Eligible students who do not wish to apply 
for higher degrees may be admitted and registered as 
resident graduates. 



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124 



GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-1903 

FACULTY AND INStRUCTORS. 



Arranged^ with tfu exception of the President and Dean^ in the order of 

college graduation, ' 

Chari^ES Frankun Thwing, D. D., hh. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President. 

Robert Wali,ER Deering, Ph. D., Dean, (Absent for the year). 
Professor of Germanic Languages and Literature, 

Edward WiLWAMS MoRLEY, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D., 

The Everlyne, 63 Ingleside Av. 
Hurlhut Professor of Natural History and Chemistry, 

Chari.es Josiah Smith, A. M., 35 Adelbert St. 

Professor of Mathematics, 

Prank Perkins Whitman, A. M., D. Sc., 79 Adelbert St. 

Perkins Professor of Physics and Astronomy, 



Emma Maud Perkins, A. B., 

Professor of Latin . 



121 Adelbert St. 
15 Adelbert Hall. 
43 Adelbert St. 

49 Cornell St. 
43 Cutler St. 

50 Wilbur St. 



Charles Harris, Ph. D , 

Professor of German, 

Mattoon Monroe Curtis, Ph. D., 

Professor of Philosophy, 

Harold North Fowler, Ph. D., 

Professor of Greek, 
Francis Hob art Herrick, Ph. D., D. Sc, 
Professor of Biology, 
Oliver Farrar Emerson, Ph. D., 

Oviatt Professor of Rhetoric and English Philology, 

Samuel Ball Platner, Ph. D., 24 Cornell St. 

Professor of Latin and Instructor in Sanskrit, 
Henry Eldridge Bourne, A. B., B. D., 144 Cornell St. 

Professor of History, 
Abraham Lincoln Fuller, Ph. D., 45 Wilbur St. 

Professor of Greek, 

Herbert Austin Aikins, Ph. D., 40 Cornell St. 

Professor of Philosophy, 

John William Perrin, Ph. D., 81 Cutler St. 

Professor of History, 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 25 

Anna Hei«Bnk Pai.mi6, Ph. B., 2733 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Mathematics, 

William Henry Hulme, Ph. D. , 48 Mayfield St. 

Professor of English . 

Benjamin Parsons Bourland, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid Av. 
Associate Prof essor of Romance Languages, 

Allen Dudley Severance, A. M., B. D,, 1981 Euclid Av. 

Associate Professor of Church History and Instructor in Historical 

Bibliography. 

HiPPOLYTB Gruener, Ph. D., 43 Knox St. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, 

Olin Freeman Tower, Ph. D., The Euclid, 2662 Euclid A v. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry. 

Edward Stockton Meyer, Ph. D., 844 Logan Av. 

Assistant Professor of German, 

Charles Edwin Clemens, 1093 Prospect St. 

Instructof^ in the History and Theory of Music. 

John Dickerman, A. B., 852 Doan St. 

Instructor in Mathematics, 

Walter Taylor Marvin, Ph. D., 36 Knox St. 

Instructor in Philosophy. 

Thomas Edward Oliver, Ph. D., 10 Adelbert Hall. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages. 

Allyn Abbott Young, Ph. D., 46 Knox St. 

Instructor in Economics, 

Carl Byron James, B. S., 896 Hough Av. 

Instructor in Biology, 

Clarence Dimick Stevens, A. M., 23 Adelbert Hall. 

Instructor in English, 

JlOBERT HerNDON FifE, Jr., Ph. D., 91 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in German. 

Howell Merriman Haydn, A. B., 252 Sibley St. 

Instructor in Biblical Literature. 

Fritz Reichmann, Ph. D., 95 Mayfield St. 

Instructor in Physics. 



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126 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-I903 



STUDENTS, 



Wilfred Henry Album, Kyle's Comers Eldred HaU. 

A. B., Adelbert College of Westcm Reaerve Uniyenity, 1902. 1 year. 
English, History, Italian. 

Isabella Beaton, Cleveland ifii Kinsman St. 

Ph. B., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
Germanics, Italian, History, Physics. 

Arabella Swift Canfield, Cleveland 631 Franklin Av. 

Ph. B., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
Education, History. 

Bessie Mildred Chandler, Cleveland 894 Case Av. 

Ph. B., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
Biology, Chemistry, History, Philosophy. 

Frank Brown Evarts, Cleveland 99 Bellflower Av. 

A. B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
History, Italian. 

• 
John Fish, Cleveland 224 Streator Av. 

Ph. B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
History, Economics, Anthropology. 

Francis Florian Herr, Cleveland 1276 Scranton Av. 

Ph. B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University, 1901. 2 year. 
English, History, Psychology. 

Archer Butler Hulbert, Rome, O, 

A. B., Marietta College, 1896. 1 year. History. 

Rebecca Seville Markowitz, Cleveland 21 Vine St. 

Ph. B., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
Education, Chemistry, History. 

Ida Catherine Messer, Cleveland 244 Becker Av. 

B. L., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1900. 8 year. 
French. 

Herbert Gans Muckley, Cleveland 148 Hawthorne Av. 

A. B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
Physics, Mathematics, Chemistry, History. 

Emma Jean Oram, Cleveland 1692 Superior St. 

A. B., Woman's College, Baltimore, 1897. 1 year. History, English, 
Anthropology. 

Ethel Stirling Osgood, Cleveland 46 Nantucket St. 

A. B., Mount Holyoke, 1901. 1 year. English. 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 27 

Charles Thomas Paul, Hiram Hiram College, Hiram. 

A. B., Hiram College, 1901. 1 year. Spanish, French, Philosophy. 

Paul Hermann Phillipson, Cleveland Cor. Willson and Woodland A vs. 
Diploma, National Deutsches Lefarerseminar, 1807; A. M., Western 
Reserve University, 1901. 8 year. French, German. 

Edward Henry Sensel, Cleveland 124 Putnam St. 

A. B., Adelbert College of Western Reserve University, 1902. 1 year. 
History, Education. 

Albert Clarence Streich, Cleveland 2 Hodgson St. 

A. B., Otterbein University, 1883. 2 year. EngUsh. 

Jessie Martha Tumey, Fainesville 219 N. St. Clair St., Painesville. 

B. L., College for Women, Western Reserve University, 1809. 1 year. 

English. 

Geoige Ransom Twiss, Cleveland 56 Mayfield St. 

B. S., Ohio State University, 1885. 2 year. Physics. 

Julia Elizabeth Zimmerman, Cleveland 1355 Detroit St. 

A. B.. Vassar College, 1902. 1 year. History, Education. 



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128 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-I903 

' COURSES OF GRADUATE INSTRUCTION 



Courses marked with an asterisk (*) are undergraduate 
elective courses, but are open to graduate students, with the 
consent of the instructor and the approval of the Faculty. 
In such cases graduate students are expected to do extra 
work under the direction of the instructor. Hours for grad- 
uate work will be arranged to suit the convenience of in- 
structor and student. 

BIBUCAL LANGUAGES AND LITERATURE, 

MR. HOWELL M. HAYDN. 

1,2. *Hebrew Grammar and Reading. An IntFoductory 
course. Harper's Elements of Hebrew will be used, with the Old 
Testament text. Throughout the year. 

3. New Testament Greek. Grammar and reading, with espe- 
cial attention to the development of the New Testament vocabulary. 
First half-year. 

4. New Testament Exegesis. The critical analysis of selected 
passages or books. Given in Seminar if desired. Second half-year. 

BIOLOGY. 

professor herrick. 

MR. JAMES. 

2. *Zo6logv. Comparative Anatomy of Invertebrates. A com- 
parative study of a few important types of invertebrate animals. 
One lecture, two laboratory exercises of two hoUrs each. First half- 
year. 

3. *ZooLOGV. Comparative Anatomy of Vertebrates. A compar- 
ative study of the principal types of vertebrates. One recitation and 
two laboratory exercises. First half-year. 

5. Zoology. Research in Animal Morphology. The assignment 
of special problems for investigation, with individual instruction and 
supervision. Laboratory work throughout the year. 

6. Physiology. Elements of the physiology of man and lower ani- 
mals. Three exercises consisting of lectures, recitations and demon- 
strations of one hour each. First half-year. 

7. *Elements of Vertebrate Embryology. A practical study of 
the development of birds and mammals. One recitation, two labor- 
atory exercises of two hours each. Second half-year. 

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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 29 

9. Animal Behavior. A course for the reading and discussion 
of the most significant works upon the instinct and intelligence of 
animals. First half-year. 

10. Botany. An introduction to the study of plants. Instruction 
is given by lectures, laboratory and field exercises. Second half- 
year. 

11. Biological Reading Club. A voluntary association of stu- 
dents and instructors for reading and discussing works of general 
scientific interest. Meetings are held weekly, from December to 
May, at times most convenient to all. 

The laboratory fees for the different courses are: Course 2, 3, 7, 
or 10, $5.00; course 5, $5.00 for each half-year. 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR MORLEY. 
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR GRUENER. 
assistant PROFESSOR TOWER. 

1. *Organic Chemistry. Remsen's Organic Chemistry. Two 
recitations and one laboratory exercise of three hours, throughout 
the year. 

2. Organic Preparations. An equivalent of three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each, with occasional discussions, for one 
half-year or the entire year. This course may be taken in conjunc- 
tion with or as supplementary to course i. 

3. ♦Inorganic Preparations. This course will deal with the 
preparation of a number of inorganic compounds, making use of 
methods inapplicable in the elementary courses. Two laboratory 
exercises and one recitation. First half-year. 

4. ♦Elements of Quantitative Analysis. Three laboratory 
exercises of three hours each. Throughout the year. 

5. ♦Physiological Chemistry. Simon's Physiological Chemis- 
try. A course on the chemistry of the animal body, of nutrition, and 
of the ordinary food materials. Two recitations and one laboratory 
exercise of three hours. First half-year. 

6. ♦Physical Chemistry. An elementary course treating princi- 
pally of the theory of solutions and electro-chemistry. Three times 
a week with occasional laboratory exercises. Second half-year. 

Laboratory fees for the several courses are as follows : Course i 
or 3, $5.00; course 2, $10.00; course 4, $6.00; courses 5 or 6, $3.00. 



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I30 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-I903 

ECONOMICS. 

DR. YOUNG. 

1. Statistics. Theory and method. General survey of the field 
of economic and social statistics, and the study of important statis- 
tical documents, with special attention to the United States census. 
First half-year. 

2. Economic Theory. An historical and critical study of the 
principal theories of value and distribution. Second half-year. 

3. *MoNEY AND Banking. The theory of money, the monetary 
history of the United States, and the principal banking systems of 
the world. First half-year. 

4. *PuBLic Finance. A study of public revenues and expendi- 
tures, with special attention to the problems of state and local taxa- 
tion. Second half-year. 

5. ♦Economic Problems. A brief treatment of socialism is fol- 
lowed by the discussion of labor problems. First half-year. 

6. *MoDERN Industry. This course deals with the social econ- 
omy of the present. The growth of corporations, the functions of 
speculation, and the problems of railway transportation are among 
the subjects discussed. Second half-year. 

7. History of Political Thought. The development of political 
philosophy, with special reference to the theory of the state. First 
half-year. 

8. ♦Historical Politics. The development of political institu- 
tions, with special reference to the ancient city, the Athenian dem- 
ocracy, the Roman republic and empire, the feudal system, the origin 
and rise of representative government, etc First half-year. Alter- 
nates with course 7. 

9. ♦Comparative Politics. A comparison of the political institu- 
tions of five modern states, viz., the United States, Great Britain, 
the German Empire, the French Republic, and Switzerland. Second 
half-year. 

10. Economic Conference. Bi-weekly meetings for the consid- 
eration of present-day problems and the discussion of current eco- 
nomic literature. 

EDUCATION AND TEACHING, 

professor AlKINS. 
DR. MARVIN. 

I. History of Education. An historical study of educational 
theories and practices, with special reference to their relations to 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 13 1 

the history of philosophy and the history of morals. The course will 
include a large amount of outside reading. Second half-year. 

2. Psychology in Education. The course is intended to cover 
about the following ground. Animals and children: how to study 
them and what we learn from them. Individual differences: the 
mental life and education of the blind, the deaf and other defectives. 
Laws of mental and physical growth. Rhythm, fatigue, and other 
general relations of mind and body, the training and the breakdown 
of various mental faculties. Special educational devices and their 
psychological basis. Second half-year. 

3. Principles of Education. The meaning and aim of educa- 
tion, and the various problems of education itself, such as those of 
curriculum and method. Second half-year. 

Only two of the above courses are likely to be given in the same 
half-year. For further courses, see Philosophy. 

ENGLISH* 

PROFESSOR EMERSON (1-5). 

PROFESSOR HULME (6-II). 

MR. STEVENS (12-I3). 

1. Rhetorical Theory. An historical and critical study of 
rhetorical theory with reference to Greek, Roman, mediae^'al, and 
English rhetoricians. Lectures and recitations. A course for those 
who expect to teach English. Throughout the year. 

2. Old Engush. Lectures on historical and descriptive gram- 
mar, with readings from Old English prose and poetry. Special 
attention to the development of the language. First half-year. 

3. Middle English. Lectures on Middle English language and 
literature, with critical reading of selections from prose and poetry. 
Further development of the language. Second half-year. 

4. Cynewulf and His School. The acknowledged poems of 
Cynewulf will be critically read and examined. This will be followed 
by a careful reading of the works believed to have been written by 
Cynewulf, or by those influenced by him. First half-year. 

5. The Middle Engush Poetical Romance. The sources of 
the poetical romance of Middle English times and its development 
on English soil. Lectures and readings. Second half-year. 

6. *Thk English Novel. The historical development of the 
English novel. Lectures and recitations. Manual: Cross's devel- 
opment -of the English novel. 1902-3. First half-year. 



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132 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-I903 

7. The Non-Dramatic Poetry of the Sixteenth and Early 
Seventeenth Centuries. This course will include special study of 
Spencer and Milton, with lectures, select reading and papers. First 
half-year. 1503-4. 

8. English Literary Criticism. Lectures on the development 
of English literary criticism from the sixteenth century to the pres- 
ent time. Selections from the critical essays of Dryden, Addison 
and Steele, Johnson, Coleridge, Lamb, DeQuincey, Leigh Hunt, 
Hazlitt, Christopher North, Landor, Carlyle, Macaulay, Matthew 
Arnold and others. Original papers. First half-year. 1903-4. 

9. *English Poetry, 1830- 1880. Tennyson, Browning, Mrs. 
Browning, Matthew Arnold, Arthur H. Clough, with some attention 
to other poets of the period. Lectures, reports, and class-room dis- 
cussions. A considerable amount of reading will be required, and a 
much larger amount recommended. First half-year, 1902-3. 

10. ♦Engush Prose, 1830-1880. Carlyle, Ruskin, Macaulay, 
Emerson, Matthew Arnold, George Eliot, Hawthorne, Thackeray, 
with some attention to other prose writers. The course will be con- 
ducted by much the same method as course 13. Second half-year, 
1902-3. 

11. *Shakespeare and the Jacobean Drama. All of Shake- 
speare's plays, and some of the best Jacobean plays will be read, and 
a course of lectures will be given discussing the development of 
Shakespeare's art from a historical point of view. Second half-year, 
1903-4. 

12. Beginnings of Euzabethan Literature. A course of lec- 
tures dealing with the prominent literary genres of the period, with 
especial attention to Italian influence. The early history of the 
sonnet, pastoral, romance, novel, drama, and criticism will be care- 
fully studied, and opportunity given for individual research. 
Throughout the year. 

13. Lyric Poetry in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. 
This course will deal with the origin and development of poetic 
themes and lyric forms in the chief continental literatures from the 
close of the classical period to the end of the Renaissance. Lectures 
and private reading. Students should have a reading knowledge of 
French or German. Throughout the year. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 33 

GERMANIC LANGUAGES. 

PROFESSOR PEERING (Absent for the year, 1-7). 

PROFESSOR HARRIS (8-9). 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR MEYER (lO-IS). 

DR. FIFE (16-18). 

1. Gothic. Introduction to Germanic Philology — ^aims, means, 
methods; Gothic Grammar (Braune) ; Readings from Wulfila's 
Bible; Skeireins and other Fragments; Germanic Phonology. First 
half-year. 1903- 1904. Or, 

2. Old German Literature. Critical study of the history of 
the older German literature from the beginning to the Reformation. 
Lectures and parallel readings. First half-year. 

3. Old German Life. A study of Old German life, customs, 
culture, and institutions, using for reference the texts of Schultz, 
Scherr, Hirth, Freytag, Biedermann, etc. Special reports on as- 
signed topics. Second half-year, 1903- 1904. 

4. Old High German. Old High German Grammar and Reader 
(Braune). Readings from Tatian, Notker, Otfrid, Williram. Spe- 
cial study of Old High German dialects, with illustrative readings. 
Second half-year. 

5. Germanic Mythology and Legends. Study of Germanic 
Mythologie und Heldensage. Lectures and reports. Second half- 
year. 

6. ♦Faust. Lectures on the development of the Faust legend, 
with parallel readings from the most important Faust literature; 
critical study of Goethe's Faust. First half-year. 

7. Middle High German. Grammar (Paul). Selections from 
the Nibelungen, Gudrun, Walther, Wolfram, Hartmann, (Jottfried. 
Throughout the year. 

8. ♦History of German Literature. Outline history of German 
literature from the earliest times to the present; Development of 
Lyric, Epic, Drama; Illustrative parallel readings. Throughout the 
year. 

9. ♦Middle High German. This course gives a reading knowl- 
edge of Middle High German through a careful study of the gram- 
mar and the reading of selections from various texts, such as the 
Nibelungenlied, Hartmann, Walther von der Vogelweide, etc. 
Throughout the year. 

10. The Oldest Germanic Poetry. Rapid reading and compari- 



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134 GRADUATE DEPARTMBNT. [1902-I903 

son of Beowulf, Widsith, the Eddas and*Volsunga Saga, the Hilde- 
brandslied and Muspilli. First half-year. 

11. TttE Germanic Religious Epics. Comparative study of 
Caedmon, Otfrid, and the Heliand. Second half-year. 

12. The Court Epic. Reading of Wolfram's Parzival with lec- 
tures on Heinrich von Veldeke, Hartmann von Aue, Wolfram von 
Eschenbach, and Gottfried von Strassburg. First half-year, 1902- 
1903- 

13. The Popular Epic. Reading of the Nibelungenlied and 
Gudrun, with lectures on the six saga-cycles (Franconian, Burgun^ 
dian, Hunnish, Ostrogothic, Lombardic, and Norman- Saxon). Sec- 
ond half-year, 1902-1903. 

14. Grillparzer. Study of Sappho, Des Meeres und der Liebe 
Wellen, Wehe dem der Liigt (in part), Das Goldene Vliesz (in 
part), and die Judin von Toledo with lectures on the relation of 
Grillparzer's art to that of Shakespeare, Lope de Vega, Alfieri, 
Goethe, and Schiller. Second half-year. 

15. The German Social Drama of Today. In its relation to 
that of the French, Belgian, Norse and English. Reading of Suder- 
mann and Hauptmann, the younger Dumas and Sardou, Maeterlinck, 
Bjornson and Ibsen, Jones and Pinero. Second half-year. 

16. Old Icelandic. Elementary Course. Study of phonology and 
forms, followed by the reading of easy prose selections. First half- 
year. 

17. History of Early Scandinavian Literature. Outline of 
. lectures, with cursory readings from the sagas, and more intensive 

study of selections from the elder Edda. Second half-year. 

18. Old Saxon. Descriptive grammar, accompanied by readings 
from the Heliand and Genesis. Second half-year. 

Courses 16 and 18 are intended also to be of value to students of 
English Philology. 

GREEK* 

PROFESSOR FULLER (l-2). 
professor FOWLER (3,4). 

r. *Athenian Drama. Selected dramas of Euripides, Sophocles, 
and iEschylus. This course will aim to promote a careful compari- 
son of the methods and spirit of the three great tragedians. Some 
of the more unusual idioms and the more prominent questions of 
text-criticism will be discussed. First half-year. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 35 

2. ♦Philosophy. Fragments of the pre-Socratic philosophers 
(Diogenes Laertius, de Vitis, Dogmatibus et Apophthegmatis Phil- 
osophorum; Ritter et Preller, Historia Philosophic Graecae), and 
selections from Plato and Aristotle. First half-year. 

3. *Archaeology. Extracts from the description of Olympia in 
Pausanias will be read and discussed, with full illustration from the 
great excavations, and a topical study of architecture and sculpture 
will be pursued. The object of this course is to acquaint the student 
with the great monuments of art, and to stimulate the faculty of in- 
dependent observation and criticism. Second half-year. 

4. ♦History. Seminary work in Herodotus, Thucydides, Xeno- 
phon, the Historicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, and other sources of 
Greek history. Second .half-year. 

These courses may be taken as minors only when they are being 
given to an undergraduate elective class. Special graduate courses 
adapted to the needs and acquirements of the applicant may be 
arranged by conference. 

HISTORY. 

PROFESSOR BOURNE (1-3). 

PROFESSOR PERRIN (4-II). 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR SEVERANCE (l2-l8). 

1. Modern European History since 1789. The French Revolu- 
tion as a social and political movement, the Empire, the growth of 
the national movements in Germany and Italy, industrial and social 
changes, the development of the democratic spirit, will be the sub- 
jects chiefly investigated. Throughout the year; or, 3 and 4. 

2. European Discovery and Colonization. This course will be- 
gin with a review of the progress of geographical knowledge, and 
will include an investigation of the discoveries of the fifteenth and 
sixteenth centuries, of their effects. upon Europe and of the origin 
and various phases of the colonial system. First half-year. 

3. History of France, from the end of the Middle Ages. The 
growth of the old regime in all its aspects, political, religious and 
economic Second half-year. 

4. ♦American Colonial History. The history of the Colonies 
to the close of the Revolutionary War. The founding of the Colo- 
nies, their institutions and political life. The struggle with France 
and the revolt from the mother country. Special topics are assigned 
for investigation and class discussion. First half-year. 



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136 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-1903 

5. ♦Outlines of the Political and Constitutional History of 
THE United States, i 781-1860. Lectures with required readings in 
von Hoist, Schouler, McMasters, Rhodes, and other standard author- 
ities; the more important documents in McDonald's Select Docu- 
ments are read and discussed. Second half-year. 

6. The United States, i 781- 1829. The Government under the 
Articles of Confederation. The formation of the Constitution, a 
study of the debates in the convention of 1787, and the ratification 
of the Constitution by the States. The organization of the National 
Government and the development of the Constitution and our politi- 
cal history to Jackson's administration. First half-year. 

7. ♦The United States, 1860-1885. Lectures and reports upon 
topics assigned for investigation. Second half-year. 

8. American Poutics. A study of the government of the United 
States, both national and state, based upon Cooley's Principles of 
Constitutional Law and Bryce's American Commonwealth. Second 
half-year. 

9. ♦Political and Constitutional History of England from 
THE Accession of the Tudors. Lectures and prescribed readings in 
standard authorities; the more important constitutional documents 
are discussed. First half-year. 

10. The Stuart Regime, 1603- i 714. Especial attention given to 
constitutional questions. The more important documents of Gardi- 
ner's Constitutional Documents of the Puritan Revolution are read 
and discussed. Second half-year. — Or, 

11. The Political and Constitutional History of England 
SINCE 181 5. 

12. *Church History of the First Six Centuries. Especial 
attention will be devoted to the Patristic Literature and to the Doc- 
trinal Controversies that rent the Church. First half-year (1903-4). 

13. *Church History of the Middle Aces. The external history 
of the Papacy will be traced, and emphasis will be laid on the organ- 
ization and administration of the Church and of the monastic bodies 
and on the scholastic philosophy. Second half-year (1903-4). 

14. *Modern Church History. The period of Confessional Or- 
thodoxy, Methodism, the Missionary Movement, and the Vatican 
Council are amongst the topics discussed. Second half-year (1903-4). 

15. *LiFE IN the Middle Ages. This course will deal with the 
dwellings, costumes, food, occupations and habits of the men and 
women of that epoch. It will be illustrated by means of photo- 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 37 

graphs and prints taken from mediaeval manuscripts. First half- 
year (1902-3). 

16. *The Beliefs and Superstitions of the Middle Ages. Espe- 
cial attention will be paid to magic and sorcery, and to their out- 
come in the witchcraft delusion. Portents, lucky and unlucky days, 
precious stones, palmistry, etc., will also be touched on. Second 
half-year (1902-3). 

17. *Special Topics in Mediaeval History. This course will be 
conducted according to the principles of the seminary method, and 
aims to teach the student how to investigate a topic in Mediaeval 
History from the sources. The subject for 1902-3 will be either the 
Vita Heinrici IV. Imperatoris, or The Crusades. First half-year 
(1903-4). 

18. *Historical and General Bibuography. The object of this 
course will be to familiarize the students with the best guides, in- 
dices, repertoria and helps to the study of history. An examination 
will be made of books mentioned. The course is adapted to the 
needs, not only of those specializing in history, but also of those 
looking forward to library work. Second half-year (1902-3). 

LATIN. 

professor platner (l). 

professor PERKINS (2-6) . 

1. The Elective Courses in Latin in Adelbert College are open to 
graduate students. 

2. *RoMAN Satire, (a) Lectures on the beginnings of satire, 
the history of its development, and its influence on later writers, 
(b) A course of reading in Lucilius, Horace, Persius, Juvenal, and 
Martial. First half-year. 

3. Roman Lyric and Elegiac Poetry. A course of reading cov- 
ering the chief works in each of these divisions. First half-year. 

4. Latin Prose Composition. An advanced course, adapted to 
the acquirements and needs of the class. Second half-year. 

5. History of Latin Literature. Lectures, with reading of 
typical selections, and direction of the student's private reading. 
Throughout the year. 

6. Cicero's Letters. Lectures on the history of the period. 
Students will do critical work on various points in this correspond- 
ence and present reports. Second half-year. 



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138 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-I903 

MATHEMATICS. 

PROFESSOR SMITH (l). 

PROFESSOR PALMIE (2-6). 

MR. DICKERMAN (l). 

1. The elective courses in Mathematics in Adelbert College arc 
Open to graduate students. 

2. Higher Plane Curves. General properties of algebraic 
curves; multiple points and tangents; poles and polars; envelopes, 
reciprocal curves, tact-invariant of two curves; caustics, parallel 
curves and negative pedals; metrical properties. Salmon's Higher 
Plane Curves. First half-year. 

3. Theory of Functions. General Theory of Functions. Second 
half-year. 

4. Differential Equations. Equations of the First Order; 
linear equations with constant coefficients; miscellaneous methods; 
Legendre's Equation; Bessel's Equation; Forsythe's Differential 
Equations. First half-year. 

5. *Projective Geometry. Lectures on parallel projections; per- 
spective; homology; vanishing points and lines; projective figures; 
cross ratios; harmonic ratios; projective ranges and pencils; conic 
involution; conjugate points and lines; reciprocal figures; centers 
and (liameters ; foci and directrices. Second half-year. 

6. Theory of Substitutions. General Theory of Substitutions 
with applications to the solution of cubic and biquadratic equations. 
First half-year. 

MUSIC 

MR. CLEMENS. 

(Special arrangements must be made for work in this department.) 

1. ♦History of Music. A course in the history of music covering 
the periods embracing Primitive Music, Ancient Music, and the music 
of the Christian Era to the end of the sixteenth century. Fillmore's 
Lessons in Musical History is used as a text-book, supplemented by 
musically illustrated lectures and references to standard works. A 
short course in the elements of Harmony is combined with the more 
strictly historical study in order that the musical development and 
relations of the different periods may be more clearly understood. 
First half-year. 

2. *A continuation of course i, embracing the periods from the 
beginning of the seventeenth century to the time of Handel and 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 39 

Bach. Substantially the same methods will be followed as in the 
work of the preceding course. Second half-year. 

Those desiring to elect the course in the second term only must 
possess an adequate knowledge of this subject. 

3, 4. ♦Harmony and Counterpoint. Throughout the year. 

PMLOSOPHY. 

\ 

PROFESSOR CURTIS. 

PROFESSOR AIKINS (IO-I3). 

DR. MARVIN. 

1. Greek Philosophy and its Relation to the Rise of Chris- 
tianity. A review of the rise and trend of philosophic thought 
among the Greeks and Romans from about 600 B. C. to 500 A. D. 
The main points kept in view are: (a) how the early philosophers 
treated the problems of life and mind, and (b) how their treatment 
of these problems is related to the rise and development of Christian 
Doctrine. The works of Zeller, Marshall, Grote, Jowett, Ueberweg, 
Heinze, Ritter, Harnack, and Hatch are among the references. First 
half-year. 

2. British Philosophy from Bacon to Hume. Lectures, recita- 
tions, and private readings. The purpose of this course is to acquaint 
the student with the classics of British Empiricism by means of 
selections from Bacon's Advancement of Learning and Novum Or- 
ganum, Hobbes' Leviathan, Locke's Essay Concerning Human 
Understanding, Berkeley's Principles of Human Knowledge, and 
Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. The course will bring forward 
the main problems of Modern Philosophy. Such features as are 
specially prominent today will be indicated and outlined. Among 
the general reviews of this period mention may be made of Morris* 
British Thought and Thinkers, Eraser's Selections from Berkeley, 
and Grimm's Zur Geschichte des Erkenntnisproblems von Bacon bis 
Hume. First half-year. 

3. The Philosophy of Herbert Spencer. A critical study of 
Spencer's elaboration of the prfnciple and process of Evolution along 
with the application of Evolution to Philosophy. Selections from 
the following parts of his work are thus examined : First Principles, 
The Principles of Biology, The Principles of Psychology, and The 
Principles of Sociology. Lectures will be given with the aim of 
showing the historical development and present condition of evolu- 
tional thought. Digests and critical essays will be required for the 



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I40 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-I903 

purpose of bringing into prominence the main questions of Cosmol- 
ogy. The more important handbooks for this study arc Spencer's 
First Principles, and Collins' An Epitome of the Synthetic Philoso- 
phy. Second half-year. — Or^ 

4. The Philosophy of Kant. After the results of Hume's Phil- 
osophy have been reviewed, Kant's Critique of Pure Reason will be 
taken up and the object of knowledge carefully studied. This will 
be followed by a discussion of the Metaphysic of Morality, the 
Critique of Practical Reason, and the Critique of Judgment. For 
this course some knowledge of German is advantageous. Second 
half-year. 

5. ♦Introduction to Philosophy. This course is designed as a 
systematic review of the content of Philosophy. It will probably be 
given in the form of lectures by the instructor and reports on as- 
signed topics by the students. Ladd's Philosophy of Mind, and In- 
troduction to Philosophy; Royce's Spirit of Modern Philosophy; 
Paulsen's Introduction to Philosophy; Mill's Examination of Ham- 
ilton and Kulpe's Einleitung in die Philosophic are among the books 
of reference. Second half-year. 

6. Advanced Ethics. Presupposes the undergraduate work in 
Psychology, Logic, Ethics and Introduction to Philosophy. The 
work is conducted by seminary methods in abstracts and discussions. 
Throughout the year. 

7. Sociology in the Light of Anthropology. The main prob- 
lems and bearings of anthropology will be discussed in systematic 
order and their sociological import noted in such works as those of 
Morgan, Brinton, Quatrefages, Taylor, Pritchard, Darwin, Wallace, 
Ranke and Ratzel. Then a course of lectures will outline a more 
systematic treatment of Sociology based upon Anthropology, after 
which certain aspects of the works of Compte, Buckle, Spencer, 
Schaffle, Lilienfeld, Stein, Ward and Giddings will be discussed. 
Throughout the year. 

8. Advanced Logic and Logical Methods. This course will in- 
clude a careful study of Sigwart's Logic in connection with other 
important German and English works on that subject. Throughout 
the year. 

9. Metaphysics. The main problems of systematic Metaphysics 
will be studied in connection with the reading of some recent writ- 
ings belonging to this part of philosophy. Throughout the year. 

10. ♦Ethics. An outline of ethical theory with incidental discus- 
sion of practical problems. First half-year. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I4I 

11. *Introduction to Philosophy. A direct and simple discus- 
sion of the main problems of speculative philosophy, such as the 
ultimate nature of the mind and its relation to the body, the real 
nature of material things, the significance of evolution, the alleged 
conflict of science and religion. Knowledge : what it is and what we 
can hope to know; idealism, realism and scepticism; the relation of 
knowledge to faith. Second half-year. 

12. ♦Advanced Psychology. Mainly from the physiological 
standpoint. Second half-year. 

13. History of Philosophy. The course can be made to cover a 
period or confined to the work of some single philosopher, according 
to the preparation and interests of the students who elect it. Either 
half-year. 

For other courses, see Education and Teaching. 

PHYSICS. 

PROFESSOR WHITMAN. 
DR. REICHMANN. 

1. *Physical Optics. Preston's Light, with lectures and labora- 
tory work. Two hours a week, and one laboratory exercise. First 
half-year. 

2. ♦Theory of Heat. A course based mainly on Maxwell's The- 
ory of Heat, with lectures and references. Three hours a week. 
Second half-year. 

3. ♦Electricity and Magnetism. A general review of electrical 
theory, with laboratory practice in electrical measurements. The 
text-book will depend somewhat on the character of the class. First 
half-year. 

4. Physical Experiment. This course involves detailed study, 
theoretical and experimental, of selected topics in Physics. The 
amount of time to be given to the work is arranged with each indi- 
vidual student. 

5. ♦Physics Conference. Lectures on selected topics. Reports 
and discussion on special subjects and on current physical literature 
by members of the conference. One meeting, weekly. 

A knowledge of the elements of the Calculus is necessary for 
courses i, 2, 3, and 4. 

The laboratory fee for courses i, 2, 3, and 4 is $4.00 for each half- 
year. 



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142 GRADUATE DEPARTMENT. [1902-1903 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR BOURLAND (I-2). 
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OLIVER (3-5). 

Special work will be arranged for properly qualified graduate stu- 
dents. The following undergraduate courses are also open to grad- 
uates : 

1. Italian. Dante's Inferno anp Vita Nuova. Second half- 
year, 1902-1903. 

2. Spanish. Spanish Literature. Second half-year, 1903-1904. 

3. French. The Classic Drama. Lectures on the rise and de- 
velopment of the French classic drama, with interpretation of the 
masterpieces of Corneille, Racine, Moliere, Regnard. Collateral 
reading. Themes. First half-year. 1902-19P3. 

4. French. The Drama of the Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
Centuries. The decadence of the classic drama. Rise and growth of 
the romantic and realistic drama. Modem tendencies. Readings from 
Voltaire, Beaumarchais, Destouches, Marivaux, Victor Hugo, Alfred 
de Musset, Scribe, Dumas pere, Augier, Dumas fils, Sardou, Coppec, 
Rostand. Themes on collateral reading. Second half-year, 1902-1903. 

5. French. Modern Novelists. Lectures and recitations. The 
romantic school. First half-year. The realistic school. Second half- 
year, 1903- 1904. 

SANSKRIT. 

PROFESSOR PLATNER. 

I. An Elementary Course. Designed primarily for those stu- 
dents who intend to become teachers of the classics. The text-books 
are Whitney's Grammar and Lanman's Reader. Number of exer- 
cises variable. Throughout the year. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I43 



GENERAL INFORMATION. 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 
The first-half year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a Christmas 
recess of nine days, until the first Saturday in February. 
The second half year begins on the Monday after 
the first Saturday in February, and continues, with an 
Easter recess of one week, until Commencement, which 
occurs on the Wednesday after the loth day of June (or 
after the ninth in years in which February has twenty-nine 
days). No exercises are held on Thanksgiving day, Wash- 
ington's birthday ,and Decoration day. 

METHODS AND LIBRARY FAQLITIES. 

Instruction is given by lectures, seminaries, recitations, 
and conferences with instructors, by specially directed 
courses of reading or research, by work in laboratories, etc. 

The library facilities available are: (i) Hatch Library 
(about 55,000 books and pamphlets), with a very full peri- 
odical list, with good collections, especially in French 
literature, classical philology, archaeology, and history, and 
unusually well equipped in Germanic philology and litera- 
ture, including the library (12,000 vols.) of the late Prof. 
Wilhelm Scherer of the University of Berlin ; (2) Library of 
the College for Women, a small, well selected collection for 
general work ; (3) the Case Library (50,000 vols.) well sup- 
plied with periodicals and general literature, and offering 
excellent facilities for the study of the fine arts, of political 
economy and sociology, and of the sciences, especially chem- 
istry and botany; (4) the Cleveland Public Library (150,000 
vols.), well supplied with Shakesperiana, with modern liter- 
ature, with works on history, art, education, and archaeology. 

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144 GRADUATE DBPARTMBNT. [1902-1903 

DEGREES. 

The degrees conferred by the Trustees, on recommen- 
dation of the Graduate Faculty, are Master of Arts and 
Doctor of Philosophy. The degree of Master of Arts 
will be conferred on accepted candidates who shall have 
pursued successfully, in residence and under the direction 
of the Faculty, advanced courses of liberal study equal in 
amount to the work of one collegiate year^-ordinarily the 
equivalent of four courses aggregating twelve hours a week. 
These courses must be divided among at least three different 
subjects. Detailed information regarding courses of study 
may be obtained from the Dean of the Faculty. The 
degree will also be conferred without residence, upon grad- 
uates of the class of 1893 or before, of Adelbert College or 
the College for Women, provided the candidate sustain 
satisfactory examination in the courses prescribed, and 
submit either a thesis on a subject assigned or other suffi- 
cient evidence of fitness to receive the degree — such as 
printed essays. 

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy will be conferred 
only on persons who have previously received a Bachelor's 
degree either from this or from some other university or 
college of good standing. The candidate must have pursued 
courses of advanced study, mainly of university as dis- 
tinguished from college grade. He must have shown special 
ability in one branch of study (major) and high attainments 
in two other branches (minors), as determined by written or 
oral examinations or both. The candidate must have sub- 
mitted to the Graduate Faculty a thesis, which shall be 
accepted as evincing powers of research and independent 
investigation. After its acceptance he must deposit at least 
fifty copies of his thesis, printed either in full or in abstract 
as may be required, with the Dean of the Graduate Faculty. 
The degree will be granted to no one who does not possess 
a good reading knowledge of French and German and. 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESBRVK UNIVERSITY. 145 

unless specially excused, of Latin. The degree is not given 
merely for faithful study of courses taken or text-books 
assigned, but as evidence of special ability in some chosen 
field ; hence no definite term of study can be specified. 
Ordinarily at least two years are necessary and often a 
longer time is advisable. Part of this time may be spent in 
advanced study at some other institution of high standing 
in this country or abroad ; the last year, at least, must be 
spent in residence here. 

In cases where the undergraduate courses already taken 
are not equivalent to those given in this university, or 
where, for any reason, previous preparation is inadequate, 
students must do additional imdergraduate work or prolong 
the term of graduate study, as may be required, before 
receiving higher degrees. 

EXPENSES. 

The regular fee for instruction for each graduate student 
is eighty-five dollars a year. This does not include special 
laboratory fees, for which students may apply to the 
instructors concerned. 

A limited number of scholarships has been established and 
w;ll be awarded upon presentation of satisfactory evidence 
of scholarly ability. The recipients of these scholarships 
may be called upon to render service to the university. 

THE FRANCIS G. BUTLER FUND. 

The Francis G. Butler Publication Fund is available to 
graduate students for the publication of the results of origi- 
nal research in the field of American history. 



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THE MEDICAL COLLEGE* 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 

HHE Medical Department of the Western Reserve 
University was organized, in 1843, ^ ^^^ Qeveland 
Medical College, a branch of Western Reserve Col- 
lege. The first Faculty contained the names of Drs. John 
Delemater, Jared P. Kirtland, Noah Worcester, Horace A. 
Ackley, John Lang Cassels, and Samuel St. John, names 
widely known in medicine. The first class g^duated in 
1844. The requirements for graduation were three years 
study of medicine, including two terms of attendance on 
medical lectures, each term extending over a period of six- 
teen weeks, together "with good moral character." The old 
college building was erected in 1844, on the present site, at 
the corner of St. Clair and Erie Streets. This ground has 
since beefn continuously occupied for medical college pur- 
poses. The length of the course remained sixteen weeks 
until 1868, when it was increased to seventeen weeks. In 
1871 the course was increased to twenty weeks. In 1875 the 
old Cleveland City Hospital, with its fifty-nine beds, the pre- 
decessor of the Lakeside Hospital, was first utilized for clin- 
ical purposes. In 1878 the length of the course became 
twenty-four weeks. In 1881 Charity Hospital, with about 
seventy-five beds, together with its Maternity Department, 
was added as a clinical field. In 1887 the present com- 
modious college building was first occupied ; in the same year 
a preliminary examination was for the first time instituted. 
In 1888 the length of the course was increased to six months, 
and the number of the required courses to three. In the 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I47 

same year laboratory work in Chemistry and Pathology was 
made obligatory. An optional four-year course was adopted 
in 1895, Ind was made obligatory in the following year. In 
1895 the length of the course was increased to eight months ; 
at the same time practical work in the laboratories of His- 
tology, Bacteriology and Physiology, was added as a part of 
the required work. In 1896 the right to use the present City 
Hospital for clinical purposes during four months in the year 
was acquired. In January, 1898, the new Lakeside Hospital 
was formally occupied, and the new chemical laboratory 
was erected. At the same time laboratory instruction in 
Pharmacology was added as one of the required courses of 
the curriculum. In 1900 the new laboratory of Clinical 
Microscopy and Clinical Medicine was erected, and in 1901 
it was fully equipped. In 1901, by unanimous recommenda- 
tion of the Medical Faculty and by vote of the Trustees, the 
requirements for admission to the first year of the M-edical 
College were increased to include the work of the Junior 
year in an academic institution of recognized collegiate rank. 
The rapid development of the curriculum in this school in 
these late years has been possible only through the generous 
financial assistance of its many friends, to whom the Med- 
ical Faculty thus desires to make public acknowledgment. 
The graduates of the Medical College now number two 
thousand, two hundred and fifty-eight. 

The course of study for the degree of Doctor of Medicine 
is now of four years duration. The school year or session 
begins on the first of October, unless this falls on Sun- 
day, in which case it begins on the second, and continues 
*eight months. Theoretical and applied branches of study are 
graded, and arranged with reference to their bearing upon 
and preparation for each other, and the eflfect of the whole 
course. Instruction is given by lectures, recitations, quizzes, 
laboratory work, clinical demonstrations, clinical conferences 
and practical dispensary and bedside work. Endowment 

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148 THB MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

of the chairs of Anatomy, Histology, Bacteriology, Physi- 
ology, Chemistry, Pathology, Pharmacology, and Clinical 
Microscopy, permits the employment of teachers who devote 
all of their time to teaching and research in this college. 
The buildings are modem in plan, construction and equip- 
ment, and ample in size for their purposes. In the subjects 
of Anatomy, Chemistry, Physiology, Histology, Elmbryology 
and Comparative Anatomy, Bacteriology, Pathological 
Anatomy, Pharmacy and Pharmacology, and Qinical Micro- 
scopy, laboratory work accompanies the didactic instruction, 
and is required of every student. In the Senior class every 
student is required to do practical work in the Dispensaries, 
at the bedside in the hospitals, and in the obstetrical wards. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RKSHRVH UNIVERSITY, I49 



FACULTY. 



Chari^BS Frankun Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

PtesidenL 

'Jacob Laisy, A. M., M. D., Syracuse, Neb. 

Professor Emeritus 0/ Anatomy. 
John B. Darby, A. M., M. D., Doan St. and Euclid Av. 

Professor of Therapeutics. 
Hunter H. Powei*i., A. M., M. D., 467 Prospect St. 

Professor of Obstetrics and Pediatrics. 
John H. Lowman, A. M., M. D., 441 Prospect St. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine, 
John P. Sawyer, A. M., M. D., 526 Rose Building. 

Professor of Medicine and Clinical Medicine. 
Perry L. Hobbs, Ph. D. (Berlin), 1420 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Chemistry, 
William T. Corlett, M. D., L- R. C. P. (London), 553 Euclid Av. 

Prof essor of Dermatology and Syphilology. 
Henry S. Upson, A. B., M. D., New England Building. 

Professor of Neurology, 

George C. Ashmun, M. D., 794 Republic St. 

Professor of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine^ 

Registrar and Bursar, 

Dudley P. Allen, a. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Theory and Practice of Surgery and Clinical Surgery. 

Benjamin L. Millikin. A. M., M. D., 278 Prospect St. 

Professor of Ophthalmology^ 

Dean and Executive Officer of the Faculty. 

Carl A. Hamann, M. D., 661 Prospect St. 

Professor of Anatomy. 
Prank E. Bunts, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Professor of the Principles of Surgery and Clinical Surgery, 
Hunter Robb, A. B., M. D. 702 Rose Building. 

Professor of Gynecology. 
George N. Stewart, M. A., D. Sc, M. D.,(Edin.),D. P. H.(Camb.), 
Professor of Physiology, The Medical College. 



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I50 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

Wii«LiAM T. Howard, Jr., M. D., 88 Dorchester Av. 

Professor of Pathology^ Pathological Anatomy and Bacteriology, 

Edward P. Gushing, Ph. B., M. D., 1160 Buclid Av. 

Professor of the Diseases of Children, 

Chari^bs p. Hoover, A. B., M. D., 702 Rose Building. 

Professor of Physicai Diagnosis. 
Gborgb W. CrilB, Ph. D., M. D., 169 Kensington Av. 

Professor of Clinical Surgery. 
William H. Humistok, M. D., 526 Rose Building. 

Associate Professor of Gynecology. 
ToRALD SoLLMAKN, M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Materia Medica. 
Prbdbrick C. Waite, a. M., Ph. D., (Harvard), 77 Hillbum Av. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology. 
John M. Ingkrsoll, A. M., M. D., 50 Buclid A v. 

Lecturer on Otology^ Rhinology and Laryngology, 
William R. Lincoln, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Lecturer on Otology^ Rhinology and Laryngology. 
L. W. Ladd, a. B., M. D., Colonial Plats, Russell & Euclid. 

The Leonard Hanna Lecturer on Clinical Microscopy. 

ROGBR G. Perkins, A. B., M. D., Colonial Plats, Russell &. Euclid. 

Lecturer on Bacteriology and Assistant in Pathology. 

DEMONSTRATORS. 

Hbnry a. Bbcker, a. M., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery. 

William E. Bruner, A. M., M. D., 514 New England Building. 

Demonstrator of Ophthalmology. 

William O. Osborn, B. L., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine. 
Walter H. Merriam, Ph. B., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Medicine. 
Prbdbrick C. Herrick, A. B., M. D., 367 Erie St 

Demonstrator of Surgery. 
Charles E. Briggs, A. M., M. D., The New Amsterdam. 

Demonstrator of Surgery. 
Hbnry P. Parker, A. B., M. D., Colonial Plats, Russell & Euclid. 

Demonstrator of Pathology. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I51 

Hubert h, Spbncb, M. D., 512 New England Building, 

DemonstrcUor of Nervous Diseases, 
Oscar T. Thomas, M. D., 85 Bdgewood PI. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology, 
Bdwin B. Season, M. D., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Medicine, 
George W. Moorehouse, M. L., M. D., 842 Logan Av. 

Demonstrator of Medicine. 
John S. Tierney, M. D., The Medical College. 

Demonstrator of Anatomy, 
Robert H. Sunklb, A. B., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology, 

RUSSEI«I« H. BiRGE, A. B., M. D., 260 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Surgery, 
Wm. E. Lower, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Demonstrator of Surgery at St, Alexis Hospital, 
Carlylb Pope, M. D., 855 Rose Building. 

Demonstrator in Diseases of Children, 
Robert A. Hatcher, Ph. G., M. D., Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Demonstrator of narmacology and Materia Medica, 
Claude C. Guthrie, M. D., 129 Marcy Av. 

Demonstrator of Physiology, 
Harrison G. Wagner, M. D., 702 Rose Building. 

Demonstrator of Physical Diagnosis. 
W. H. Weir, M. D., 260 Euclid Av. 

Demonstrator of Gynecology. 
Fred Dolley, A. B., M. D., Charity Hospital. 

Demonstrator of Pathology at Charity Hospital. 

Gilbert Povey, M. D., 693 >4 Hough Av. 

Demonstrator in Gynecology, 

ASSISTANTS. 

Frank S. Clark, A. M., M. D., 493 Colonial Arcade. 

Assistant in Obstetrics at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 
William E. Bruner, A. M., M. D., 514 New England Building. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

Oscar T. Thomas, M. D., 85 Edgewood PI. 

Assistant in Gynecology at Charity Hospital Dispensary, 



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152 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

Hbnry a. Bbckbr, a. M., M. D., Pearl St. and Clark Av. 

Assistant in Surgery at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

Hubert L. Spbncb, M. D., 513 New England Building. 

Assistant in Nervous Diseases at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

John J. Thomas, A. M., M. D., 156 Crawford Rd. 

Assistant in Diseases of Children at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

ROBT. H. SUNKLB, A. B., M. D., Pearl and Clark 8ts. 

Assistant in Gynecology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

William O. Osborn, B. L., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Assistant in Medicine at Charity Hospital Dispensary, 

Edwin B. Season, M. D., 3238 Euclid Av. 

Assistant in Medicine at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

T. E. Griffiths, M. D., 1104 Woodland Av. 

Assistant in Surgery at Charity Hospital Dispensary, 

Walter H. Mbrriam, Ph. B., M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Assistant in Medicine at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 

Frederick C. Herrick, A. B., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Assistant in Surgery at Charity Hospital Dispensary, 

H. J. Herrick, A. M., M. D., 367 Erie St. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

J, M. Waugh, M. D., 44 Knowles St. 

Assistant in Throaty Nose and Ear at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Wm. B. Chamberlain, M. D., 275 Prospect St. 

Assistant in Throat, Nose and Ear at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

C, M. Hole, M. D., 300 Cedar A v. 

Assistant in Dermatology and Syphilology at Lakeside 

Hospital Dispensary, 

James A. Evans, B. S., The Medical College. 

Assistant in Chemistry, 

Charles E. Briggs, A. M., M. D., The New Amsterdam. 

Assistant in Surgery at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

George W. Moorehouse, M. L., M. D., 842 Logan Av. 

Assistant in Medicine at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary, 

William E. Shackleton, M. D., 605 The Osbom. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Fanny C. Hutchins, M. D., 373 Jennings Av. 

Assistant in Nervous Diseases, 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 53 

Russsu* H. BiRGB, A. B., M. D., 260 Euclid Av. 

Assistant in Surgery at Lakeside Hospital, 

Wm. J. W. WoowJAR, M. D., 1444 Cedar Av. 

Assistant in Obstetrics at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

C. C. Stuart, M. D., 416 Rose Building. 

Assistant in Ophthalmology at Charity Hospital Dispensary. 

W. H. Weir. M. D., 260 Euclid A v. 

Assistant in Gynecology at Lakeside Hospital Dispensary. 

Thos. J. TAYI.OR, M. D., 2153 Superior St. 

Clerk of Medical College, 



Andrew Fix>wer, Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Prosector and Curator Anatomical Rooms. 
Mrs. Pi^wkr, Erie and St. Clair Sts. 

Janitress. 



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154 



THE MBDICAI^ COI,I,BGS. 



[1902-1903 



STUDENTS. 



Geoi^e I. Bauman, 
John Joseph Lincoln Bolden, 
Nathan Worth Brown, B. S., 
Webb Parks Chamberlain, A. B., 
Carl Cherdron, 
Frederick Bdwards Dilley, 
Ralph Woodbury Elliott, Ph. B., 
Henry John Gerstenbei^er, 
Homer Harvey Heath, B. L., 
Walter Centennial Hill, 
Alfred Alexander Jenkins, 
Henry Creath Kelker, 
Wade Allison Lewis, 
George Washington Magargee, 
Fred Kern McCime, B. S., 
Sidney Morrill McCurdy, 
John Francis Rudolph, A. B., 
William Edward Sampliner, 
Fred M. Sayle, 
Edward Jacob Scanlon, 
George Wanzer Shepard, 
Oscar Merle Shirey, 
John Albro Sipher, A. B., 
Charles Edward Spring, 
Chauncey Calvin Stewart, 
John Ross Stewart, 
Charles Wesley Thomas, A. B., 
Harry David Vail, 
John Allen Vincent, 
Carl Richard Wedler, 
William Hervey White, 
Irvin Samuel Workman, B. S., 
Thomas Charles Young, 



FOURTH YBAR. 

Cleveland 1279 Cedar Av. 

Cleveland 25 Newton St. 

Swatow^ China y Suite 41, The Cary. 



Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
WhiU House 



24 Commodore St. 

no Erie St. 

606 Euclid Av. 

855 Stark Av. 

113 Linden St. 

Suite 41, The Cary. 



Berlin Heights 24 Commodore St. 

Cleveland 91 White Av. 

Kelker 28 Cheshire St. 

Galion 28 Cheshire St. 

Pardoey Pa. 12 Wycombe PI. 

Buena Vista, Pa. 24 Commodore St. 

AndoveTy Mass, 168 N. Perry St. 

Cleveland 68 Mansion St. 

Cleveland 1103 Case Av. 

Cleveland 1499 Cedar Av. 

Cleveland 850 Woodland Av. 

Mantua Station Lakeside Hospital. 

Lovelandy CoL 171 Dodge St. 

Medina Suite 41, The Carey. 

Elyria 739 Superior St 

Poland 12 Wycombe PI. 

Rochester y N, Y, Suite 4, Sagamore. 

Cleveland 1394 Woodland Hills Av. 

Cleveland 190 Helen St. 

Cleveland 777 Superior St. 

Cleveland 160 Colfax St. 

ChandlersviUe 24 Commodore St. 
S., Danville 134 Sibley St. 

Cleveland 1372 Woodland Hills Av. 
Fourth Ybar, 33. 
third year. 



Samuel Sylvester Berger, Cleveland 

John Henry Brett, Cleveland 

Shepard Burroughs, Northfield 

Albert Emmons Connell, Cleveland 

John Buchanan Donaldson, Lorain 



1 141 St. Clair St. 

34 Ocean St. 

524 Euclid Av. 

16 Dunham PI. 

154 North Perry St. 



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I90>-I903] W8STSRN RBSBRVB UNIVBRSITY. 



155 



Henry George Golden, A. B., 


Cleveland 


3425 Euclid Av. 


Isadore Jacob Goodman, 


Cleveland 


264 Coltmibus St. 


Albert Thomas Grills, 


Elyria 


811 Superior St. 


Ardon Philo Hammond, 


Cleveland 


378 Pearl St. 


Prank Carlton Hoskins, Grand Rapids^ Mich, 900 Fairmount St. 


Perry Firestone King, B. S., 


N, Georgetown 1 1 7 Chestnut St. 


Emanuel Koblitz, 


Cleveland 


183 Kennard St. 


Carl Henri Lenhart, Ph. B., 


Wauseon 


Suite 41, The Cary. 


Russell Hunter McClure, 


Elyria 


811 Superior St. 


Karl Elmer Ochs, 


Kenton 


131 Sayles St. 


Nicholas Aloysius O'Connor, 


Cleveland 


224 Starkweather Av. 


George Ovando Pay, 


Cleveland 


The Devonshire. 


Charles Trumbo Pankhurst, 


Fostoria 


830 Superior St. 


David Aloysius Prendeigast, 


Cleveland 


61 Burton St. 


William Arthur Schlesinger, 


Cleveland 


i29McBrideSt. 


Ralph Henry Sill, 


Millersbnrg 


192 Erie St. 


Demba Morton Spicer, 


La Grange 


739 Superior St. 


John Alfred Staral, 


Cleveland 


1251 Willson Av. 


Harry Minich Tarr, 


Cleveland 


193 Clinton St. 


Jesse Eugene Thompson, 


BristolviUe 


2 Livingston St. 


Bert E. Tyler, 


Cleveland 


51 Daisy A v. 


John Henry Wells, 


Glenville 


121 Lonsdale Av. 


LesUe Allen Woolf . 


Atwater 


1055 First Av. 


Micheal Cyrillus Yeagle, Ph. B., 


Clyde 


28 Parkwood Av. 


Harvey Elmer Yoder, 


North Industry 131 Sayles St. 


Samuel Alexander Young, 


Cleveland 


2370 Crosby St. 


William Otto Ziemer, 


Cleveland 


34 Woodbridge St. 
Third Year, 32. 


SBCOND YBAR. 




Charles Jacob Albl, 


Cleveland 


1406 Broadway. 


Newton S. Banker, A. B., 


Canton 


739 Superior St. 


Ohio Normal Unirersity. 






Arthur M. Cheetham, 


Cleveland 


805 East Madison Av. 


Ernest Harper Cox, B. S., 


Cleveland 


513 East Prospect St. 


Wabash College. 






Claude Leroy Difford, A. B., 


Cleveland 


49 Alum St. 


Adelbert College. 






Raymond Lubor Hobart, B. L., 


Pemberville 


368 St. Clair St. 


Adelbert College. 






Norman William Ingalls, B. S., 


Berea 




Baldwin University. 






Everton Jay Lawrence, A. B., 


Norwalk 


24 Collins PI. 








William Palmer Lucas, A. B., 


Cleveland 


99 Glen Park PI. 


Wooster University. 







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156 



THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

Medina Suite 41, The Gary, Payne Av. 
Cochrantofiy Pa. 739 Superior St. 



Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Nevada 



51 Goethe St. 

54 Aubumdale Av. 

24 Collins PI. 

13 Wageman St. 
I023 Case Av. 

739 Superior St. 

739 Superior St. 
Second Year, 18. 



John Roy McDowell, A. B., 

Adelbert CoUege. 
Joseph Charles McPate, A. B., 

GroTc City College. 
Edward Peterka, A. B., 

Adelbert College. 
J. Douglas Pilcher, Ph. B., 

Adelbert College. 
Fred Jacobs Ritterspach, A. B., 

Wittenberg CoUege. 
James Seliskar, Cleveland 

Shandor Harry Solomonson, B. S., Cleveland 

Case School of Applied Science. 
Oliver Arkenbuigh Weber, Ph. B., Miamisbutg 

Adelbert College. 
Arthur Garfield Wilcox, Ph. B., Akron 

Adelbert College. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Francis Patrick Corrigan, 

Senior, Adelbert CoUege. 
Arthur Bradley Eisenbrey, 

Senior, Adelbert College. 
Birt Eugene Garver, 

Senior, Adelbert College. 
John Allen Hofmann, Ph. B., 

Wooster University. 
Claude William Pogue, 

West Virginia Institute. 
Homer Fordyce Swift, Ph. B., 

Adelbert CoUege. 
George Franklin Thomas, 

Senior, Adelbert College. 

Herbert Alfred Thomas, 

Senior, Adelbert College. 

Sidney Burnett Try on. 

Senior, Adelbert College. 

Robert Franklin Wenger, A. B., 
Calvin College. 

Henry Klar Yaggi, 

Senior, Mt. Union CoUege. 
Homer Alexander Steer, B. S., 

Muskingum College. 

SUMMARY. 

Fourth Year 33 

Third Year 32 

Second Year 18 

First Year 12 

Total 95 

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Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Lorain 
Cleveland 



66 Gorman Av. 

153 Cornell St. 
127 Murray Hill Av. 

161 Putnam St. 

Ceredo, H^. Va, 85 Blaine St. 

Beaver Falls, Pa, 739 Superior St. 

Akron Adelbert Hall. 

Lima 134 Murray Hill Av. 

Willoughby Adelbert Hall . 

New Philadelphia Lakeside Hosp. 

Beloit 314 Dunham A v. 

Zanesville 

First Ysar, 12. 



I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 57 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 



L Graduates in Arts and Sciences of recognized colleges 
will be accepted without examination, on presentation of 
diploma. 

II. Students who present certificates from recognized 
colleges, showing that the work of the Junior year in such 
colleges has been completed, will be accepted without 
examination. 

III. Students who can not present certificates covering 
the entire work of the first three years in a recognized col- 
lege, will be required to pass an examination upon the work 
in which they may be deficient. These examinations will 
be conducted by the Faculty of Adelbert College of Western 
Reserve University. 

IV. Students in the Senior class of Adelbert College are 
permitted to take elective courses in the first year of the 
Medical College. Such electives, to the extent of nine hours 
a week, are counted toward the academic degree, so that in 
this way students may save one year in the combined literary 
and medical courses. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 
Graduates in Arts or Sciences of recognized colleges who 
have, during their academic course, devoted to the subjects 
the number of hours, or have covered the text-books men- 
tioned below or their equivalents, and have passed satisfac- 
tory examinations thereon, may be admitted to the second 
year of the course. But the amount of practical work in 
such courses must not be less than that required in the cor- 
responding subjects during the first year in this college. 

General Biology, 90 hours ; Sedgwick and Wilson, or Huxley and 
Martin. Comparative Anatomy, 75 hours ; Kingsley or Wiedersheim. 
Embryology, 75 hours; Foster and Balfour, Hertwig or Heisler. 
Human Anatomy, 120 hours. Histology, 200 hours; Bohm and 
DavidoflF's, Schafer's, Piersol's, Stohr's, or Clarkson's Histology. 
Inorganic and Organic Chemistry, 300 hours. Physics, 60 hours; 
Carhart's University Physics, or Gage's Elements of Physics. 

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158 THB MEDICAL COLLBGE. [1902-I903 

Graduates in Arts or Sciences who are deficient in His- 
tology or Organic Chemistry may still be permitted to enter 
the second year on condition of making up the deficiency by 
private work and passing the examination on these subjects 
during the year. Students from other medical colleges will 
be admitted to advanced standing on the production of sat- 
isfactory proof that they have completed the required pre- 
liminary work and also that comprised in the portion of the 
curriculum of this college from which exemption is sought. 

Graduates in Medicine from other schools, who desire to 
apply for the degree of Doctor of Medicine in this school, 
must present satisfactory proof that they have completed 
the preliminary literary work required of the class to which 
they seek admission, must take at least the work -of the 
fourth year, and must pass the examinations on all the sub- 
jects of this year, and any subjects of other years in which 
they may be deficient. Graduates in Medicine, or other stu- 
dents who desire to take special courses without graduation, 
will be admitted without examination. Such special courses 
will not count in any way for the degree of Doctor of Medi- 
cine in this College. 

Examination of certificates for admission will take place 
in the collie building on the two week days preceding the 
opening of the session. Candidates should attend at the col- 
lege on either of these days, bringing their certificates with 
them. Diplomas or certificates may also be personally pre- 
sented to the Registrar during the week preceding the open- 
ing, or forwarded to him at any time. 

In accordance with the laws of certain states, not includ- 
ing Ohio, all persons desiring to practice medicine in these 
states are required to have attended, before taking the state 
examination, four full years at a regular medical college, 
whether they are graduates of a literary college or not. The 
attention of candidates for advanced standing is therefore 
called to this fact. 



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1 902-1903] WBSTBRN SBSBRVB UNTVBRSITY. 1 59 

COURSES OF STUDY. 

Number of Hours Per Week. 



FIRST YEAR. 

LBCTURES AND BECITATIONS. 

Anatomy 4 hours 

Chemistry 3 hours 

Histology and Microscopical Anatomy. i hour 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy i hour first half-year 

Vertebrate Embryology i hour second half-year 

I«ABORATOKY WORK. 

Chemistry 7 hours throughout the year 

Bacteriology 9 hours second half-year 

Histology and Microscopical Anatomy. 6 hours throughout the year 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 5 hours first half-year 

Vertebrate Embryology 5 hours second half-year 

Anatomical demonstrations and dissections throughout the year. 

SECOND YEAR. 

LECTUSES AND RICITATIONS. 

Physiology 4 hours 

Anatomy and Applied Anatomy 4 hours 

Pathology 2 hours 

Bandaging and Splints 2 hours 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica 4 hours after March ist 

Physical Diagnosis i or 2 hours last half-year 

LABORATORY BXERaSBS. 

Physiology 8 hours 

Pathological Histology 9 hours till March ist 

Demonstration in Gross Pathology i hour 

Pharmacology 4 hours after March ist 

THIRD YEAR. 

LECTURES AND RECITATIONS. 

Pharmacology 3 hours 

Therapeutics .' 3 hours 

Obstetrics 2 hours 

Medicine 3 hours 

Surgery 2 hours 

Gynecology i hour 

Physical Diagnosis 2 hours 



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l6o THE MEDICAL COI^LEGB. [1902-I903 

DIDACTIC AND CLINICAL LECTURES. 

Medicine 4 hours 

Surgery 6 hours 

Nose, Ear and Throat i hour 

Dermatology i hour 

LABORATORY EXERaSES. 

Pharmacology 4 hours before January ist 

Applied Anatomy i hour 

Pathological Demonstrations i hour 

Clinical Laboratory 4 hours 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Daily work in Dispensary Section, i to 3 p. m., Lakeside Hospital. 
Individual Assignment for ward cases. Qinical Laboratory in con- 
nection with Clinics and Assigned Cases. Operative Surgery taught 
to Sections in second half-year. Exercises in Obstetric Mannikin 
taught to Sections. Autopsies and Clinical Pathological material 
worked up throughout the year. No Sections to be detailed to Hos- 
pitals or Dispensaries in hours conflicting with schedule. 

GENERAL CLINICS. 

Medicine 4 hours 

Surgery 6 hours 

Gynecology 2 hours 

Obstetrics As material offers 

LECTURES. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine 2 hours 

Jurisprudence i hour 

LECTURES, CUNICAL AND DIDACTIC. 

Nervous Diseases i hour 

Pediatrics i hour 

Ophthalmology i hour 

Special clinics in medicine and surgery at St. Alexis or City Hos- 
pitals, two sections to half of class, two hours each per week. 



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I902-I903J WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I6I 

SCHEDULE OF SUBJECTS, DAYS AND HOURS. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Monday — Histology Recitation, 10 to 11 a. m. Anatomy, 11 to 12 
a. m. Dissections, 1 130 to 5 p. m., first half-year ; second half-year, 
Bacteriological Laboratory. 

Tuesday — Chemistry, 8 to 9 a. m. Chemical Laboratory, 9 to 12 
a. m. Comparative Anatomy and Embryology, 2 to 5 p. m. 

Wednesday — Chemistry, 8 to 9 a. m. Histological Laboratory, 9 
io 12 a. m. Dissections, or Anatomical Demonstration, 2 to 5 p. m., 
first half-year; Bacteriology, second half-year. 

Thursday — Comparative Anatomy and Embryology, Laboratory, 

8 to II a. m. Anatomy, 11 to 12 a. m. Dissections, 1 130 to 5 p. m. 
Friday — Chemistry, 8 to 9 a. m. Histological Laboratory, 9 to 12 

a. m. Dissections, i :30 to 5 p. m., first half-year ; second half-year. 
Bacteriology. 
Saturday — Chemical Laboratory, 8 to 12 a. m. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Monday— Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. Pathological Lecture and 
Laboratory until March ist; after March ist, Pharmacology, 10 to 11 
a. m. ; Pharmacological Laboratory, 11 to 12 a. m. Dissections, 1 130 
to 3 p. m. Applied Anatomy, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Tuesday— Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. Pathology, Lecture and Labora- 
tory, till March ist; after March ist. Pharmacology, 10 to 11 a. m.; 
Pharmacological Laboratory, 11 to 12 a. m. Dissection, 1:30 to 3 
p. m. Anatomy, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Wednesday — Physiological Laboratory, 8 to 12 a. m. Dissection, 
first half-year, 1 :30 to 3 p. m. ; Physical Diagnosis, second half-year, 
2 to 3 p. m. Bandaging, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Thursday — Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. Pathological Laboratory and 
Quiz, 9 to II a. m., first half-year; Pharmacology, 9 to 10 a. m., sec- 
ond half-year; Laboratory, 10 to 11 a. m. Gross Pathology, Demon- 
stration, II to 12 a. m. Dissection, i :30 to 3 p. m. Applied Anat- 
omy, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Friday — Physiology, 8 to 9 a. m. Pathological Lecture and Labor- 
atory, till March ist, 9 to 12 a. m. ; after March ist. Pharmacology, 

9 to ID a. m. ; Pharmacological Laboratory, 10 to 12 a. m. Dissec- 
tion, 1 130 to 3 p. m. Anatomy, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Saturday— rPhysiological Laboratory, 8 a. m. to 12 m. 



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l62 THE MEDICAL COLI^GE. [1902-I903 

THIRD YEAR. 

Monday— Pharmacology, 8 to 9 a. m. Therapeutics, 9 to 10 a. m. 
Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Pharmacology, i to 2 p. m., to January 
1st; Pharmacological Laboratory, z to 4 p. m.; Pharmacology, after 
January ist, lecture, 3 to 4 p. m. ; Applied Anatomy, 4 to 5 p. m. 

TuESDAY^Medical Clinic, 8:30 to 10 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. 
Surgical Qinic, 10 to 12 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. Till January ist. 
Clinical Surgery, 2 to 3 130 p. m.. City Hospital ; Physical Diagnosis, 
3 :30 to 5 p. m., City Hospital. After January ist, Clinical Labora- 
tory, 2 to 5 p. m. 

Wednesday— Medical Recitations, 8 to 9 a. m.. Charity Hospital. 
Medical Clinic, 9 to 10 a. m., Charity Hospital. Surgical Clinic, 10 
to II a. m., Charity Hospital. Principles of Surgery, 11 to 12 a. m., 
Charity Hospital. Dermatology, 2 to 3 p. m. Pharmacological 
Laboratory, 3:15 to 6:15 p. m., to January ist; Pharmacological Con- 
ference, after January ist, optional. 

Thursday — Pharmacology, 8 to 9 a. m. Therapeutics, 9 to 10 a. m. 
Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Gross Pathology, Demonstration, 11 to 12 
a. m. Clinical Laboratory, 1 130 to 3 p. m., till January ist. Medi- 
cine, 3 to 4 p. m.. Lakeside Hospital. Applied Anatomy, 4 to 5 p. m. 

Friday — Therapeutics, 8 to 9 a. m. Gynecology, 9 to 10 a. m. 
Clinical Laboratory, 10 to 12 a. m. Nose, Ear, Throat, 2 to 3 p. m., 
Lakeside Hospital. Genito- Urinary, 3 to 4 p. m.. College Building, 
till January ist. Physical Diagnosis, 3 to 4 p. m., Lakeside Hospital, 
after January ist. Medicine, 4 to 5 p. m.. College Building. 

Saturday — Medicine, 9:30 to 10:30 a. m.. Charity Hospital. Sur- 
gical Qinic, 10:30 to 11 :30 a. m., Charity Hospital. Principles of 
Surgery, 11:30 to 12:30 a. m., Charity Hospital. Attendance on 
Autopsies as specially arranged. Till January 1st (as on Tuesday). 
After January ist, sections to Charity Hospital Dispensary. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Daily work in Dispensary Section, i to 3 p. m.. Lakeside Hospital. 
Individual Assignment for Ward Cases. Clinical Laboratory in con- 
nection with Clinics and Assigned Cases. Operative Surgery taught 
to Sections in second half-year. Exercises in Obstetric Mannikin 
taught to Sections. Autopsies and Qinical Pathological material 
worked up throughout the year. No Sections to be detailed to Hos- 
pitals or Dispensaries in hours conflicting with schedule. 



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I902-I903] WBSTBRN RBSBRVB UNIVERSITY. 



163 



Monday — Clinical Laboratory and Ward Cases, 8 to 10 a. m. Ob- 
stetrics, ID to II a. m. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. Nervous Diseases, 
3 to 4 p. m., Lakeside Hospital; after January ist, Tuesdays. 

Tuesday — Medical Qinic, 8 130 to 10 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. Sur- 
gical Clinic, 10 to 12 a. m., Lakeside Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 
p. m. Surgical Diagnosis, 3 to 4 p .m., Lakeside Hospital ; after Jan- 
uary 1st, on Monday. 

Wednesday— Medical Clinic, 9 to 10 a. m., Charity Hospital. Sur- 
gical Clinic, 10 to 1 1 a. m., Charity Hospital. Dispensary, i to 2 p. m. 
Pediatrics, 2 to 3 p. m., Lakeside Hospital. Hygiene and Preventive 
Medicine, 3 to 4 p. m. 

Thursday— Clinical Laboratory and Ward Cases, 8 to 10 a. m., by 
sections. Obstetrics, 10 to 11 a. m. Gynecological Clinic, 11 to 12 
a. m.. Lakeside Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. Medical Clinic, 
3 to 4 p. m. 

Friday — Jurisprudence, 8 to 9 a. m. Surgical Qinic, 10 to 12 a. m.. 
Lakeside Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. Ophthalmology, 3 to 4 
p. m.. Lakeside Hospital. Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, 4 to 5 
p. m. 

Saturday — Gynecological Clinic, 8 to 9 :30 a m.. Charity Hospital. 
Medicine, 9:30 to 10:30 a. m.. Charity Hospital. Surgical Qinic, 
10 :30 to 1 1 :30 a. m., Charity Hospital. Dispensary, i to 3 p. m. 
City Hospital Clinics, 2 to 5 p. m., to January ist. 







DISPE^ 


ISARY 


SECTIONS. 






SECTION. 


1 


2 


3 


4 


6 


6 


7 


Oct 6 to 

Nov. 1, 


Hye 


Fed. 


Med. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N.E.T. 


Nov. 8 to 

Nov. 29, 


N.B.T. 


Eye 


Fed. 


Med. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


Dec. 1 to 

Jan. 8, 


Gyn. 


N.B.T. 


Bye 


Fed. 


Med. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Jan. 6 to 

Jan. 31, 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N.E.T. 


«ye 


Fed. 


Med. 


N. D. 


Feb. 2 to 

Feb. 28. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N.K.T. 


Eye 


Fed. 


Med. 


Mar. 2 to 

Mar. 28, 


Med. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N.E.T. 


Eye 


Fed. 


Mar. 80 to 

Apr. 26, 


Fed. 


Med. 


N. D. 


Surg. 


Gyn. 


N.E.T. 


Eye 



After January lat acctiona will viait St. Alexia Clinlca Tueadaya and Pridaya 
aecording to apccial arrangement. 



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l64 THB MEDICAL COLLKGB. [1902-1903 

DEPARTMENTS AND METHODS OF 
INSTRUCTION. 



CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR HOBBS. 
MR. EVANS. 

Chemistry extends throughout the entire first year and consists of 
three hours of lectures and recitations and eight hours of laboratory 
work a Y^eek. 

The course opens with a preliminary review on inorganic Chemistry 
and qualitative chemical analysis, which covers about two months' 
time, and the balance of the first half of the year is devoted to lec- 
tures on general organic Chemistry, chemical philosophy and quanti- 
tative chemical methods and allied subjects. The last half-year is 
devoted to lectures on special subjects, such as the chemistry of 
foods, their composition and analysis, animal secretions and especially 
the urine, both normal and pathological, and the general application 
of chemical methods in clinical examinations. 

The laboratory work during the first half-year consists of a short 
course of qualitative chemical analysis, then the qualitative examina- 
tion of the more common articles of food and animal secretions and 
the study of the various chemical reactions involved ; also the prep- 
aration of some of the more common organic preparations. The last 
half of the year is devoted, mostly, to the quantitative chemical 
methods of analysis. The preparing of standard solutions and the 
quantitative chemical analysis of many of the food products and 
animal secretions, both under normal and diseased conditions. The 
laboratory work is all supplemented by a course of lectures involving 
full description of the laboratory methods. 

Besides the regular course as above outlined, the special laboratory 
is open at all times for any extra or advanced work. It is completely 
equipped for any special work and every aid will be given to any who 
desire to avail themselves of its use. 

ANATOMY. 

PROFESSOR HAMANN. 
DR. TIERNEY. 

The course in anatomy consists of lectures upon descriptive and 
applied anatomy, together with demonstrations, recitations and 
quizzes. In order to facilitate the work in osteology, students of the 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 165 

first year are provided with separate portions of the skeleton, which 
they are permitted to take to their rooms for study. Three hours in 
recitations, and eight hours for dissecting, in suitable periods weekly, 
are given to anatomy during the first year. Students are required to 
dissect all parts of the cadaver at least once. For demonstrations 
upon the cadaver and anatomical preparations the second year class is 
divided into a number of small sections, whose meetings take the 
form of anatomical conferences rather than of formal demonstra- 
tions. Each individual student thus has an excellent opportunity for 
becoming familiar with the various parts of the body, and for receiv- 
ing direct personal instruction. Four hours a week are given to lec- 
tures and recitations in the second year and ten hours a week to 
dissecting. In the third year instruction is given by lectures and 
recitations in applied anatomy. 

HISTOLOGY AND EMBRYOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR WATTE. 
HISTOLOGY AND MICROSCOPICAL ANATOMY. 

The course includes work upon the fundamental mammalian tis- 
sues, followed by the study of the finer anatomy of the mammalian 
organs. The material used is human tissue in large part, supple- 
mented by tissue from other mammals. In the study of the organs 
the student first becomes acquainted with the macroscopic features 
in fresh material and then proceeds to the finer anatomy. An essen- 
tial part of the work is training in the standard methods of technique. 
Each student stains and mounts over two hundred sections which he 
later studies, describes and draws. He is required to carry a con- 
siderable number of tissues through all the steps of preparation, 
including removal from the animal, fixation by several methods, 
hardening, dehydration, infiltration, embedding in celloidin and in 
paraffin, sectioning, including serial sectioning, staining in toto, in 
sections and on the slide and mounting. The rapid preparation with 
the freezing microtome and the special methods for blood examina- 
tion are used. 

The recitations supplement the laboratory work and aim to bring 
out those points which the student does not see in his sections. One 
recitation and six hours' laboratory work per week throughout the 
Freshman year. 

COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY. 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the more 
important characteristics of the classes of vertebrates, and also to 



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l66 THB MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

prepare for the experimental work in physiology. The student dis- 
sects, as carefully as the time will allow, representatives of the dif- 
ferent classes of vertebrates. The lectures and recitations deal with 
the modifications of the several systems of organs in the vertebrate 
series and are supplementary to assigned reading in a standard text- 
book. One lecture or recitation and five hours laboratory work per 
week, first half Freshman year. 

VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. 

This course endeavors to instruct the student in the fundamental 
facts of vertebrate development. The laboratory work deals with 
cleavage and gastrulation, followed by the study of the development 
of the chick to the end of the fourth day. Certain later steps in the 
development of the pig are then studied. In the recitations emphasis 
is laid upon the development of the human embryo. One recitation 
and five hours laboratory work per week, second half Freshman year. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR STEWART. 
DR. CLAUDE, C. GUTHRIE. 

The course includes two lectures, illustrated by diagrams and ex- 
periments, two conferences or quizzes, and eight hours laboratory 
work a week for each student throughout the second year. 

For the practical work on mammals, which is made a special feature 
of the course, the class is divided into sections of four men ; in exper- 
iments on frogs two men work together; in other experiments each 
man works for himself. 

SYNOPSIS OF LABORATORY WORK. 

Blood. Chemistry; coagulation; spectroscopic examination of 
haemoglobin and its derivatives ; other tests for blood-pigment ; glob- 
ulicides ; enumeration of the colored and white corpuscles and esti- 
mation of the hxmoglobin in human blood; specific gravity. 

Circulation. Circulation in a frog's web; heart tracings; action 
of mammalian heart; action of vagus and sympathetic nerves on 
heart; action of muscarin and atropia on heart; action of valves of 
heart; cardiographic, sphygmographic and plethysmographic tracings; 
blood-pressure tracings; effect of stimulation of nerves (vagus, 
sciatic, depressor) , of asphyxia, of supra-renal extract, of albumoses, 
of the position of the body, and of haemorrhage and transfusion on 
the blood-pressure; section and stimulation of the cervical sjrmpa- 
thetic; determination of the circulation time. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RBSERVK UNIVERSITY. 167 

Respiration. Respiratory tracings; effect of section and stimula- 
tion of nerves (vagi, sciatic, superior laryngeal) on respiration $ 
measurement of heat and carbon dioxide given off in respiration; 
influence of respiration on the blood-pressure ; influence of tempera- 
ture on the respiratory centre. 

Digestion and Absorption. Chemical and physiological properties 
of saliva, gastric juice, pancreatic juice and bile; effect of stimula- 
tion of the chorda tympani on the secretion of saliva; evacuation of 
stomach by tube or emetic to obtain normal chyme ; gastric fistula ; 
examination of faeces, •time required for digestion and absorption of 
various food substances, etc. 

Urine. Qualitative examination; quantitative determination of 
chlorides, phosphates, sulphates, urea, uric acid, total nitrogen, pro- 
teids, sugar. 

Metabolism. Glycogen ; experimental glycosuria, including phlor- 
hidzs in diabetes; variations in amount of urea with quantity of 
proteids in food : thyroidectomy. 

Muscle and Nerve. The various kinds of stimuli ; the curve of 
muscular contraction ; action of curare, veratria and supra-renal ex- 
tract on the muscle-curve ; influence of temperature, load and fatigue 
on the muscle-curve ; seat of exhaustion in fatigue ; superposition of 
stimuli ; genesis of tetanus ; velocity of the nerve impulse ; chemistry 
of muscle. 

Electrophysiology. Galvani's experiment; contraction without 
metals ; secondary contraction ; demarcation current and current of 
action ; electrotonus ; Pfluger's formula of contraction ; Ritter's tetan- 
us; positive and negative polarisation. 

Central Nervous System. Section and stimulation of n^rve-roots ; 
reflex action; action of strychnia; excision of cerebral hemispheres 
(in frog) ; stimulation of motor areas. 

Special Senses. Formation of retinal image ; change of curvature 
of lens in accommodation; determination of near and far points of 
vision ; mapping of the blind spot ; effect of light, atropia and stimu- 
lation of cervical sympathetic on the pupil; Kuhne's artificial eye; 
ophthalmoscopic examination of the eye; color mixing. 

PHARMAGOLCXjY and materia MEDICA. 

professor sollmann. 
dr. hatcher. 

The course comprises 34 hours of lectures and recitations, and 48 
hours of laboratory work in the last ten weeks of the second year; 



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l68 THK MEDICAL COLLBGK. [1902-1903 

and 70 hours of laboratory and 97 hours of lectures and recitations 
and 18 hours of conferences in the third year. 

In the second year are taught the preliminary subjects of pharma- 
cognosy, metrology and pharmacy, in as far as they are important for 
medical students ; introduction to prescription writing, flavoring and 
materia medica of flavors; incompatibilities and solubilities; and the 
locally ay:ting drugs. Outline lectures, illustrated by such experiments 
as can be profitably demonstrated to a class, are given. These are 
followed in the next lesson by recitations on the same topics. The 
laboratory work in this year is designed to familiarize the students 
with the chemical properties of important drugs, their incompatibili- 
ties, isolation and identification; action upon ferments, upon blood, 
etc.; chemical action of caustics; compounding of simple prescrip- 
tions, etc. 

The course in the third year comprises lectures and recitations on 
the action of drugs, their sjrmptomatology, toxicology, therapeutical 
uses, and materia medica. Whilst the presentation of these subjects 
is based as far as possible upon experimental data, care is taken to 
point out the practical application of the ascertained facts, the course 
being intended as a foundation to clinical therapeutics. For this 
reason, occasion is also taken to bring together and compare those 
drugs which act upon the same organ or disease. For the main part, 
however, the drugs are arranged into large groups, the principal 
member of each group being studied in detail, whilst the less impor- 
tant are introduced incidentally. The arrangement of lectures, dem- 
onstrations and recitations is as in the second year. From time to 
time there are given exercises in prescription-writing, intended to 
familiarize the students with the methods of administering the sub- 
stances which have been studied. The instruction in materia medica 
is confined to those facts which have a practical value to the medical 
student. An extensive collection of drugs is kept easily accessible. 

The laboratory work is designed to illustrate the actions of impor- 
tant drugs upon animals. The experiments are arranged by methods 
rather than by drugs, the practical work being kept entirely separate 
from the lecture course. It serves in this way partly as a review of 
the latter. The results of the experiments are recorded in detail, the 
records being assigned to students for the preparation of papers 
which are read and discussed before the class, as far as time permits. 



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1 902-1903] WKSTBRN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 69 

PATHOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR HOWARD. 
DRS. PARKER AND DOLLEY. 

Instruction in this department is given by lectures, laboratory work, 
and demonstrations of fresh and prepared specimens. The most 
important feature of this course is the laboratory work done by each 
student. 

Bacteriology. Dr. Perkins. Laboratory work in this course is 
given three half days a week from March i to the end of the first 
year. The subject is elucidated by informal lectures, demonstra- 
tions, and experiments on animals, as occasion requires. The stu- 
dent, after having prepared the various media required, is instructed 
in the principles of disinfection and sterilization, the bacteriological 
examination of air, water and soil, and the methods of cultivating, 
staining and studying bacteria. The pathogenic bacteria and various 
molds and yeasts are then studied. Altogether from thirty to thirty- 
five different micro-organisms are studied by each student. Students 
are trained in the employment of bacteriological methods in medical 
and surgical diagnosis, and those who prove themselves capable are 
permitted to pursue investigations along special lines, on subjects 
assigned them by the professor in charge. 

Pathological Histology. Prop. Howard and Dr. Parker. The 
course comprises nine hours a week of laboratory work for the first 
five months of the second year. It begins with the study of the 
various forms of tissue degeneration and necrosis. This is followed 
by the study of inflammation in the frog's mesentery and in sections 
of hardened tissue, showing all the various forms of inflammatory 
processes. The infectious granulomata are then taken up, and the 
forms and special characters of the reaction of the tissues to the spe- 
cific organisms of infectious diseases are demonstrated. The study 
of the various pathological processes is based upon their aetiology, 
and in addition to human tissues, the material from the experiments 
on animals in the bacteriological course is used for this purpose. The 
effects of bacterial and other toxin es upon the tissues is taught in the 
same manner. Tumors are next considered. Based upon the above 
as a ground work, the pathological histology of the various organs 
and systems is studied. The use of fresh frozen sections of material 
derived from autopsies, the operating room and animal experiments 
forms an important feature of the course. Each student receives and 
is required to stain, mount, carefully study and draw from two hun- 
dred and fifty to three hundred sections. 

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lyo THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

Demonstrations of Gross Pathological A> atomy. Prof. How- 
ard, AND Drs. Parker and Dolley. Demonstrations are made to 
second and third year students from the large amount of fresh mate- 
rial derived from autopsies and from the surgical and gynecological 
clinics. Students are required to handle and describe specimens and 
to make diagnoses from the gross appearances, the macroscopical 
diagnosis of tumors being an important feature. The hospital con- 
nections of the laboratory are such that students can be trained in 
making autopsies and in writing protocols of the lesions found. 

General Pathology. Prof. Howard. Two lectures a week are 
given to the second year class. In these lectures the various infec- 
tious diseases, immunity, the degeneration and regeneration of tissue, 
the aetiology of tumors, and the special pathology of the various 
organs and systems are considered. 

Advanced and Special Work. A special room, well lighted and 
equipped, is provided for physicians and advanced students who wish 
to undertake special work in pathological histology, experimental 
pathology and bacteriology. 

CLINICAL LABORATORY. 

dr. ladd. 

The new clinical laboratory at Lakeside Hospital is thoroughly 
equipped with all the necessary apparatus for making complete, 
examinations of the various secretions and excretions, normal and 
pathological; the blood, urine, sputum, gastric contents, faeces, etc. 

Microtome for frozen sections and celloidin work and the various 
necessary stain and reagents are at the disposal of the students, they 
being required to apply the methods of technique taught in the labo- 
ratory in the study of special cases assigned to them in the hospital 
wards. A large room of the clinical laboratory is devoted exclusively 
to the fourth year class, and the main lecture room is devoted entirely 
to the third year class, who are given systematic instruction through- 
out the session. The fourth year students are required to apply the 
knowledge thus gained in working up the cases assigned to them 
during the fourth year. Special rooms are equipped for the exami- 
nation of sputum and making chemical tests; also a dark room is 
fitted up for doing polaroscopic and haemoglobin work. A few rooms 
are available for the use of special workers, these rooms to be as- 
signed at the discretion of the director of the laboratory. Micro- 
scopes and other instruments are available for the work in this 
department. The total laboratory capacity contains 2,600 square feet. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I71 

CuNiCAL Microscopy. Work in this department will cover the 
third and fourth years. The third year work will comprise a sys- 
tematic course, consisting of two laboratory exercises a week 
throughout the term, on blood, sputum, gastric juice, urine, faeces and 
pathological exudates. 

The technique employed in doing paracentesis of the chest, abdo- 
men and spinal canal; in taking throat, blood, bladder and uterine 
cultures as well as the further examination of the products obtained, 
will be carefully outlined. 

The methods of preparing material obtained at the operating tabic 
for microscopical examination will be shown and each student re- 
quired to do such work before the completion of his course. The 
object of this course is not only to cover the ground outlined above, 
but to prepare the student for independent work. In the fourth year 
the students will work in small groups in the room assigned to them 
and especially equipped for their use. They will receive no system- 
atic instruction, but will work under the direction and control of the 
instructor. Their work will consist of the examination of urine, 
blood, sputum, gasfric juice, faeces, and purulent and other discharges 
from their ward and dispensary cases, as well as of tumors and other 
material removed at operations. This work is obligatory, is done in 
connection with the students' own clinical cases, and is therefore 
thoroughly practical. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

PROFESSOR DARBY. 

Three hours a week are devoted to Therapeutics during the third 
year. The teaching is done mainly by means of lectures and quizzes, 
designed to make the student familiar with all the resources of 
Therapeutics and enable him to make an intelligent and satisfactory 
use of them in his future work. Medicines are studied in groups 
based on their therapeutic affinities, and individually in their applica- 
tion to disease. Careful attention is paid to dossage, the time and 
mode of administration, influences and conditions which may modify 
their actions, the effect of toxic doses, the treatment of poisonings 
and of drug habits. Electrotherapy, Kinesithcrapy, including Mas- 
sage and Rest-Cure. Psychotherapy, including Hypnotism and Sug- 
gestion. Serotherapy, Hydrotherapy and Balneotherapy. Dietetics 
and Climatology are carefully studied in their relation to pathological 
conditions. The aim of the course is to give the student a thorough 
and practical knowledge of all the means and methods used in the 
"treatment and prevention of disease, which is the ultimate aim of 
all medical research." 



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172 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS* 

PROFESSOK HOOVER. 
DRS. OSBORN, MERRIAM, SEASON, MOOREHOUSE AND WAGNER. 

Physical diagnosis is taught in the second and third years. During 
the second year the student is taught to recognize and elicit all of the 
physical phenomena of the circulatory 'and respiratwy organs and 
abdominal viscera that are demonstrable by inspection, palpation and 
auscultation. Pathological cases are shown only as they are found 
necessary for the demonstration and explanation of physiological 
signs. At the end of the year each student is required to demon- 
strate the normal physical signs of the thorax and abdomen. During 
the third year physical diagnosis is taught from pathological cases. 
The students are required to demonstrate at every exercise, and are 
also given opportunity to practice in the dispensary and hospital 
wards. The final examination in this course is a practical one. Each 
student is required to examine a patient, describe the physical signs 
and make an eliminative physical diagnosis. 

THEORY AND PRACTICE OF MEDIONE. 

PROFESSOR LOWMAN. 

PROFESSOR SAWYER. 

DRS. OSBORN, MERRIAM, SEASON AND MOOREHOUSE. 

The teaching of medicine is done in the third and fourth years. 
Lectures, largely clinical, are given to both classes, and the largest 
possible number of students make direct observation of the patients 
presented. It is found that very often the whole class can individ- 
ually verify the conditions described by the lecturer, and this plan 
has proved of great advantage in the presentation of the cases. The 
third year class will receive two hours per week in text book work, 
in which internal medicine not provided for in special departments 
will be covered in recitation and discussion. The same class has 
three hours of clinics, and is assigned to the individual study of select 
dispensary cases. Qinical laboratory drill is made a decided feature 
of this year's work. In the fourth year the class is taught medicine 
by clinics, by drill in sections in the dispensary, by the assignment to 
ward cases, in connection with which the fullest use of the clinical 
laboratory will be insisted upon. Throughout the course thus out- 
lined, the endeavor is made to develop not only the knowledge of 
diseases and their diagnosis, but also to thoroughly consider the use 
of remedies. C^r^r^n]r> 

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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 173 

SURGERY. 

PROFESSOR ALLEN. 

PROFESSOR BUNTS. 

PROFESSOR CRILE. 

DRS. BECKER^ BRIGGS, HERRICK, GRIFFITHS^ LOWER^ AND BIRGE. 

Surgery is taught by means of lectures and demonstrations. During 
the second year one hour weekly is devoted to the systematic instruc- 
tion in the application of bandages, splints and in minor surgery. In 
addition to this the students are given practical drill, in sections, in 
the application of bandages and splints. During the third year the 
students receive two hours of lectures weekly upon the principles of 
surgery, and section work in Charity Hospital dispensary. A course 
of one hour a week is given in surgical diagnosis. The material from 
the dispensary of Lakeside Hospital is used for the latter course. 
There are at least four hours weekly devoted to public clinics, and 
there is instruction of one hour weekly during a period of six months, 
in genito-urinary surgery. In addition to this a laboratory course 
has been arranged for the purpose of instruction beside that given 
during the second year in the line of general pathology. In this 
course students are taught to examine blood, and pus, to make cul- 
tures, to innoculate animals, to cut sections and make diagnosis of 
tumors and to perform personally all the laboratory work incident to 
the diagnosis of surgical cases. This course occupies, in conjunction 
with a similar course in clinical medicine, from four to six hours 
weekly during the entire year. 

During the fourth year the student attends clinics six hours weekly. 
After January 1st, there is an additional clinic of one and a half 
hours weekly, in which instruction is given to sections of ten or 
twelve men. Optional clinics are given every Saturday afternoon 
from the beginning of the term until January ist, at the City Hospi- 
tal. A course is also given in operative surgery, utilizing all means 
necessary for the best development of instruction in this department. 
Throughout the fourth year, also, the student is given cases for 
examination and diagnosis, upon which complete reports are required. 
Provision is made in the clinical laboratory for the complete exami- 
nation of these cases by all laboratory methods. The student is 
required to examine the blood, sputum, urine, faeces, to make sections 
and diagnosis of tumors and investigate infections, and to make ex- 
haustive reports, which shall be compared with those made by the 
clinical staff of the various hospitals. In addition to this the class is 
divided into sections for daily work in the dispensaries. For the 
purposes of instruction the material is ample, clinics being given at 
Lakeside, Charity, St. Alexis and the City Hospitals. 



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174 'THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

OBSTETRICS. 

PROFESSOR POWELL. 
DRS. CLARK, THOMAS^ AND WOOLGAR. 

Instruction in this course begins with the third and continues 
through the fourth year, two lectures a week throughout each year. 
The plan includes didactic lectures, quizzes, practical demonstrations 
and bedside instruction. Lectures are illustrated freely by charts, 
diagrams, models and operations upon the manikin. Students are 
required to become familiar with the use of the various obstetric 
instruments. The Senior class is divided into small sections and 
given practical work outside of schedule hours. 

Each Senior student is expected to attend from three to five case? 
of labor under the supervision of the Professor of Obstetrics, or his 
assistant. The work of the class is chiefly practical. 

GYNECOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR ROB& 

PROFESSOR HUMISTON. 

DRS. THOMAS, SUNKLE, WEIR AND POVEY. 

Gynecology is taught by a weekly didactic lecture, lasting one 
hour, and by supplemental quizzes during the third year; through 
the fourth year two hours a week are devoted to clinical instruction. 
The patients admitted to the wards of the Lakeside, Charity and City 
Hospitals for laceration of the perinaeum and for vaginal, vesical, 
uterine, tubal and ovarian disease, will be shown either at the regular 
clinics in the amphitheatre or will be made the subjects of teaching 
at the bedside. Instruction will be given in the wards, so far as it is 
possible, upon the management of such cases during the period im- 
mediately following operation and during the period of convalescence. 
As a rule, each student will have an opportunity of performing some 
minor operation. 

The work in the dispensary at Lakeside and Charity Hospitals will 
include history-taking and the ordinary methods of examination, the 
diagnosis and treatment of cases. This instruction is given daily 
during the school year to the students of the fourth year. For this 
work the class is divided into sections, so that each student can 
receive individual attention. Students in turn will be permitted to 
examine patients, and suitable cases will be operated upon before the 
class. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 75 

DERMATOLOGY AND SYPHDLOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR CORLETT. 
DR. HOLE. 

Instruction in this department is given to the third and fourth year 
classes. Qinical lectures are given once a week to the third year 
students throughout the college year. It is the endeavor to cover 
the whole field of dermatology with these demonstrative lectures. 
When necessary lantern-slide plates and other illustrations are used 
to further elucidate the subject of diseases of the skin. During the 
course the class will be quizzed by the assistant in Dermatology. 

The Senior class is divided into sections and given practical in- 
struction in the clinics three times a week. Thus the common dis- 
eases of the skin, as well as many of the more rare forms, are studied 
and progress under treatment noted. Ample opportunity is given to 
apply dressings and each student is called upon to make diagnoses 
and outline courses of treatment under the immediate supervision of 
the instructor. Clinical material is abundant. 



DISEASES OF THE NOSE, THROAT AND EAR. 

DR. INGERSOLL. • 

DR. LINCOLN. 
DRS. WAUGH AND CHAMBERLAIN. 

Didactic lectures on these diseases are given once a week during 
the third year. Clinical instruction is given during the fourth year 
and consists in daily work in the dispensary of Lakeside Hospital. 
Each section of the class is in turn given personal instruction in the 
use of instruments for examination and operation and also in the 
diagnosis and treatment of the various cases. 

DISEASES OF CHILDREN. 

PROFESSOR GUSHING. 
DRS. THOMAS AND POPE. 

The instruction in this course, given in the fourth year, consists of 
a weekly clinical lecture and recitation, followed by a ward visit. 
Abundant illustrative material is obtained from the Lakeside Hospital 
dispensary and the children's ward. 



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176 THE MBDICAI, COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

OPHTHALMOLOGY* 

PROFESSOR MIIXIKIN. 
DRS. BRUNNER], HERRICK^ AND SHACKLETON. 

The method of instruction is largely clinical with didactic teaching 
interspersed. It is given to the Senior class. The class is divided 
into sections, each one being assigned in rotation to cases for exam- 
ination in the dark room. Each student will be given cases for spe- 
cial study, and is expected to make a report upon them before the 
class, and will be subject to quizzing by members of the class and the 
instructor. The aim is to teach the diagnosis and methods of treat- 
ment of the external diseases of the eye, and to give a working 
.knowledge of the uses of the ophthalmoscope. The eye department 
lias separate wards in Lakeside Hospital in which students have 
opportunities for seeing work at the bedside. The class will be 
divided into sections for instruction with the ophthalmoscope, and for 
daily work in the dispensary rooms during the year. This depart- 
ment has abundant facilities, appliances and material. A large "dark 
room" with ten lights, a Javal-Schiotz Ophthalmometer, a perimeter, 
test cases and ophthalmoscopes for practical ophthalmology are pro- 
vided. A Haab's magnet has recently been added to the equipment. 

NEUROLOGY. 

PROFESSOR UPSON. 
DRS. SPENCE AND HUTCHINS. 

Instruction in this branch of medicine is clinical and occupies one 
hour a week throughout the fourth year. In connection with the 
cases shown the class is instructed in the use of the different forms 
of electric current for diagnosis and treatment, and in other diagnos- 
tic methods. The material of the City Hospital is utilized from the 
beginning of the school year up to January i. Cases of nervous dis- 
eases in the hospital proper are shown, and the class is taken 
through the wards of the Department of the Insane and instruction 
given in the different forms of mental disturbance. During the 
remainder of the year material for demonstration is drawn from the 
Neurological Clinic of the Dispensary and from the wards of Lake- 
side Hospital. 

HYGIENE AND PREVENTIVE !«EDiaNE. 

PROFESSOR ASHMUN. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine are included in the fourth year, 
and will occupy two hours a week. In hygiene the course will in- 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 77 

elude consideration of heredity; normal development of individuals 
and races ; climatic and meteorological influences ; the essentials and 
accessories to life and health; effects of habits of life and occupa- 
tion; individual family and community sanitation. 

The course in Preventive Medicine is given by lectures, confer- 
ences, theses by students on topics assigned. It includes considera- 
tion of the pathology, natural history, channels and means of dissem- 
ination, together with methods of limiting the spread of infectious 
diseases, the duties and powers of public officers of health ; value and 
manner of keeping vital statistics ; the relation and duties of the phy- 
sician to the public in matters pertaining to the public health, etc. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE. 

Throughout the first half-year, one lecture a week is given to the 
fourth year class on the subject of Medicine in its relations to the 
existing laws, and to the various decisions, which are rendered from 
time to time in important medico-legal cases. Taking up the ques- 
tion of real and apparent death, homicide, wounds, survivorship, 
identity, the determination of stains, feigned diseases, life insurance, 
etc., and considering in brief the relationship existing between the 
law and the practice of medicine. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

Chemistry — Witthaus, Bartley, Prcscott and Johnson. 

Anatomy — Gray, Morris. 

Histology and Microscopical Anatomy — Bohm-Davidoff-Huber, or 
Szymonowicz. 

Comparative Anatomy — Wiedersheim. 

Embryology — Heisler. 

Bacteriology — Abbot, Sternberg, Lehmann and Neumann. 

Physiology — Stewart's Manual; for reference, Schafer's Physiol- 
ogy. 

Pathology — ^Ziegler. 

Pharmacology and Materia Medica — Sollmann. 

Therapeutics — Wood, Brunton, Bartholow, Shoemaker, Butler, 
Schmiedeberg. 

Medicine — Wood & Fritz, Strumpell, Osier. 

Surgery — ^American Text-book of Surgery, Koenig's Surgery, 
Warren's Surgical Pathology. 



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lyS THB MEDICAL COLLBGB. [1902-I903 

Gynecology — Diseases of Women (Dudley), An American Text- 
book of Gynecology (Baldy), A Text-book on Gynecology (Reed). 
Practical Gynecology (Montgomery), Hart and Barbour's Manual of 
Gynecology. Books of reference, Pozzi, Fritsch, Aseptic Surgical 
Technique (Robb). 

Obstetrics— J twtttf Reynolds, Davis, Hirst. 

Dermatology — Crocker, Hardway, Jackson, Morrow's System of 
Dermatology, Corlett's Acute Exanthemata. 

Neurology — Church and Peterson, Dercum, Dana. Books of refer- 
ence, Gowers, Berkley on Mental Diseases. 

Ophthalmology — ^American Text-book, De Schwcinitz, Norris and 
Oliver, Fuchs, Noyes. 

Nose, Ear and Throat — American Text-book, Kyle, Politzer, Bacon, 
Buck, Coakley, Bishop. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine — Stevenson and Murphy, Egbert, 
Abbot. 

Physical Diagnosis — Vierordt's Medical Diagnosis. 

Diseases of Children — Holt's Infancy and (Thildhood, Jacobi's 
Therapeutics of Infancy, Ashby and Wright. 

Medical Jurisprudence— Tzylor^s (A. S.) Medical Jurisprudence, 
Taylor's (A. N.) The Law in its Relation to Physicians. 



EXAMINATIONS^ i903. 

FISST YEAR CLASS. 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy — Tuesday, February 3d. 

Embryology — Saturday, May 23d. 

Histology — Monday, May 25th. 

Osteology — Tuesday, May 26th. 

Chemistry — ^Wednesday, May 27th. 

Bacteriology — Thursday, May 28th. 

SECOND YEAR CLASS. 

Pathological Histology — Friday, February 27th. 

Anatomy — Tuesday, May 26th. 

Physiology — Practical, Wednesday, May 27th, 8 to 11 a. m. ; i to 4 
p. m. Written and oral. Thursday, May 28th, 8 a. m. 

Minor Surgery — Saturday, May 23d. 

Pharmacology — Practical, Friday, May 15th, 9 a. m. to 12 m. Writ- 
ten and oral, Friday, May 22d, 9 a. m. to 12 m. 

Physical Diagnosis — Monday, May 25th. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 79 

THIRD YEAR CLASS. 

Therapeutics — Monday, May 25th. 

Pharmacology — Materia Medica, written and oral, 1:30 to 4:30 p. 
m., Tuesday, May 26th. Practical, Monday, January 17th, 1903, 1 130 
to 3 :30 p. m. 

Obstetrics — Thursday, May 28th. 

Medicine — Wednesday, June 3d. 

Surgery — Thursday, June 4th. 

Pathology — Friday, June 5th. 

Physical Diagnosis — Thursday, May 14th to 28th. 

Gynecology — Saturday, May 30th. 

Anatomy — Wednesday, May 27th. 

Ear, Nose and Throat — Wednesday, June 3d. 

Dermatology — Monday, June ist. 

Clinical Laboratory — Tuesday, June 2d. 

FOURTH YEAR CLASS. 

Neurology — Monday, May 25th. 

Obstetrics — Tuesday, May 26th, 10 a. m. 

Surgery — Tuesday, June 2d. 

Physical Diagnosis — Thursday, May 28th. 

Gynecology — Thursday, June 4th. 

Ophthalmology — Friday, May 22d. 

Medicine — Saturday, May 30th. 

Gynecology — Monday, June ist. 

Surgery — Wednesday, May 27th. 

Medicine — Wednesday, June 3d. 

Jurisprudence — Saturday, May 23d. 

Hygiene and Preventive Medicine — Friday, June 5th. 

Pediatrics — Tuesday, May 26th, 2 p. m. 



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l8o THE MEDICAL COIXEGE. [1902-1903 



GENERAL INFORMATION- 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The College session will open on October ist, each year, 
unless this date falls on Sunday, in which case the opening 
shall be on October 2nd. 

There will be a holiday vacation of two weeks, beginning 
on December 24th. There will also be a vacation of two days 
preceding Easter Sunday. No College exercises will be held 
on Thanksigiving Day, Washington's Birthday or Decora- 
tion Day. 

SITUATION OF BUILDINGS. 

The Medical College stands at the corner of Erie and St. 
Clair Sts., about five minutes' walk from the center of the 
city. 

The Lakeside Hospital fronts on Lake Street, comer of 
Muirson Street — ^five minutes' walk from the college. St. 
Vincent's Hospital (Charity) fronts on Perry Street, corner 
of Central Avenue. The Home of Maternity is on Wood- 
land and Longwood Avenues. The St. Alexis Hospital is 
located at the corner of Broadway and McBride Street, and 
is reached by the Broadway car line. The City Hospital 
fronts on Scranton Avenue, and is reached by either Jen- 
nings Avenue or Pearl Street and Brooklyn cars. The Med- 
ical Library building is at 586 Prospect Street. 

ENDOWMENTS. 

This College is indebted to the Perry-Payne Family for 
the valuable ground upon which its buildings have been 
erected, as well as for other generous assistance from time 
to time. In addition there are the following special funds : 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 181 

The John L. Woods Fund. 
The H. B. Hurlbut Fund. 
The John Huntington Fund. 
The John A. Vincent Fund. 
The H. Melville Hanna Fund. 
The Leonard Hanna Endowment for 
the Chair of Clinical Microscopy. 

It is also under a lasting bond of gratitude and obligation 
to other generous donors of funds for the erection of build- 
ings, and the endowment and equipment of laboratories and 
dispensaries, who have permanently increased its resources 
and advantages to students of medicine. 

THE H. M. HANNA RESEARCH FELLOWSHIP. 

This Fellowship has been founded by Mr. H. M. Hanna 
for encouragement of research in Physiology and Pathology, 
and is open to graduates of any medical school. 

The occupant of the post will be expected to devote him- 
self to original investigation in Physiology or Pathology in 
this college under the guidance of the Professor, who shall 
suggest a subject for research or aporove one submitted by 
the Fellow himself. All applicants must produce evidence 
of fitness for engaging in such work. 

The income of the Fellowship is about $600 a year. It is 
tenable, in the first instance, for one year, but a Fellow who 
has done exceptionally good work may be reappointed for a 
second term. 

LIBRARIES. 

The Free Public Library, 175,000 volumes; Case Library, 
50,000 volumes; Hatch Library, 50,000 volumes, and the 
library of the Cleveland Medical Library Association are 
accessible to students of this College, and, with the excep- 
tion of the Hatch Library, are within a few minutes' walk of 
the Medical College. By special arangement of the Faculty 



l82 THE MEDICAI. COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

members of the Senior class may have the reading privileges 
of the Medical Library Association's books and journals 
during the year. This Library now has on its shelves more 
than 10,000 bound volumes, and one hundred and fifty Med- 
ical Journals afe on file in the reading rooms. There are 
more than two hundred volumes of modern text-books and 
medical works. In addition there are small working libraries 
in the laboratories of the College itself. 

LABORATORIES. 

Chemistry. — A chemical laboratory building with over 
six thousand five hundred square feet of floor space, has 
been erected to the south of the main college building, and 
in connection with it. The laboratories are thqroughly 
equipped for all the details of the course, and each student 
has a separate desk assigned him with a general supply of 
apparatus. Extra and special apparatus is furnished upon 
requisition. A special laboratory has been furnished for 
the work of advanced students, and every effort made to 
make it as complete as possible, with facilities for original 
and special work. 

Anatomy. — The dissecting room is well lighted with 
electricity, heated and ventilated and provided with modern 
appliances. The anatomical rooms have about three thou- 
sand square feet of floor space. Anatomical material is pre- 
served at all seasons of the year. 

Histology and Embryology. — The laboratory is well 
lighted by a north and east exposure, with means for arti- 
ficial light on dark days. Enough Leitz microscopes are 
owned so that each student has one for his individual use, 
available at all times. Individual lockers are provided. The 
material for study is furnished without cost. There is a good 
equipment of microtomes, ovens, glassware, stains and 
reagents. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 183 

Bacteriology. — The work in bacteriology is carried on 
in the pathological laboratory. Students are required to 
provide their own material for drawings. Microscopes, cul- 
ture media and animals are provided without charge, and 
material for staining and mounting specimens, to be retained 
by students at cost. The laboratory has the benefit of excel- 
lent lighting with space for individual work. 

Pharmacology. — There is a large, well-lighted labora- 
tory of two thousand one hundred square feet, devoted 
exclusively to this subject and fitted up for animal and 
chemical work. Apparatus and material are furnished with- 
out extra charge. The laboratory is open for advanced work 
in this department. A special laboratory for research has 
been added. 

Physiology. — The teaching laboratories comprise three 
well-lighted rooms with an aggregate floor space of nearly 
four thousand square feet. The room for experimental 
physiology is fifty by thirty feet, the room for chemical 
physiology measures thirty-five by fifty feet, and the lecture 
room, devoted exclusively to physiology, is capable of ac- 
commodating one hundred and forty students. The equip- 
ment for teaching practical physiology permits more than 
forty students to work in a class at one time, some in the 
chemical and some in the experimental room. Several sepa- 
rate rooms are available for research. There is also a dark 
room and workshop. 

Pathology. — The pathological laboratory occupies the 
entire west third floor, two thousand four hundred square 
feet, and has in addition a special room for research work, 
a museum and a professor's room. The teaching laboratory 
rooni, two thousand three hundred square feet, is on the east 
fourth floor, and affords each student separate locker and 
ample table space. Apparatus, instruments and teaching 
material are provided without extra charge. 



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l84 THE MEDICAI. COLLEGE. [1902-I905 

Clinical Laboratory. — A clinical laboratory has been 
completed at Lakeside Hospital, of sufficient size to 
accommodate an entire class. This provides the stu- 
dents with greatly increased facilities for the examination 
of secretions and excretions, sputum, purulent and other 
infections, blood, urine, stomach contents, stools, etc., and 
permits them to make personal examinations of tumors' and 
other pathological specimens. This work is a part of the 
regular instruction in the third and fourth years and greatly 
increases the efficiency with which the clinical work of these 
years is performed. Microscopes and other instruments are 
available for the work in this department. 

MUSEUMS. 

Rooms in the College building are set apart for the pres- 
ervation of anatomical and pathological preparations, casts 
and specimens. Persons not connected with the College 
who have specimens they wish preserved can place them in 
these rooms, with the owners' name attached and such his- 
tories, descriptions or remarks as they choose to g^ve, re- 
specting them. A very complete museum of Materia Medica 
is kept accessible to the students. 

HOSPITALS. 

Lakeside Hospital. — The new Lakeside Hospital occu- 
pies a plot of ground four hundred feet long by three hun- 
dred and eighty feet deep, on the bank overlooking Lake 
Erie, about five minutes' walk from the College building. 
It affords accommodation for two hundred and fifty patients. 
The staflF is composed of members of the Faculty of this 
College. The hospital has an amphitheatre seating about 
two hundred students for the surgical classes, and a smaller 
one with a seating capacity of over one hundred for the 
medical classes. On the third floor of the dispensary build- 
ing are two lecture rooms, each capable of seating fifty to 

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1902-1903] WKSTBRN RKSKRVE UNIVERSITY. 185 

seventy-five students. There are eighteen resident assistants 
for the departments of surgery, gynecology, medicine, 
ophthalmology, children's diseases, pathology, etc. These 
positions are open to the graduates of this College, and 
aiFord great opportunities for practical work. 

There has been erected a pavilion for infectious and con- 
tagious diseases, having four small wards, with every facility 
for the proper care and study of these diseases. 

St. Vincent^s (Charity) Hospital. — ^This is one of 
the oldest and best known institutions in the city and state. 
It has between seventy-five and one hundred beds. The 
staff is selected by the faculty, and the clinical material of 
the hospital is utilized for instruction in this College. There 
are six hospital positions open each year to the graduates 
of this College only. 

This hospital has just added a complete new wing for the 
accommodation of female patients. This has added sixty 
beds, besides operating pavilion and recovery rooms, to the 
capacity of this institution. A complete dispensary depart- 
ment is added in the basement of this wing, with all facilities 
for the care of out-door patients. 

City Hospital. — ^This institution is under municipal 
control. It accommodates one hundred and fifty to one 
hundred and seventy-five patients continually in the adult 
department and has a new building for children, with one 
hundred beds, besides operating rooms, pathological labora- 
tory, etc. From September to January regular clinics in 
medicine, gynecology, surgery, neurology and cutaneous and 
venereal diseases are given here by members of this faculty. 
The insane department of this hospital affords material for 
clinical instruction in mental diseases. Frequent autopsies 
are held and abundant material for pathological demonstra- 
tions obtained. The resident staff is selected by competitive 
examination, and the students of this College are eligible. 



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l86 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

St. Ann's Maternity Hospital and Foundling 
Asylum. — ^During 1901 a long desired change was made at 
the St. Ann's Maternity Hospital and Foundling Asylum. 
The old institution located on Marion Street was vacated to 
supply more space to St. Vincent's Hospital. The Sever- 
ance homestead at the corner of Woodland and Longwood 
was purchased and remodeled and formally opened to carry 
on the work in a new location during the latter part of De- 
cember. It is to be hoped that the present year will witness 
the erection of a new building to supply the urgent demand 
for more room. 

St. Ann's Maternity Hospital affords abundant oppor- 
tunity for the study of the physiology, mechanism and man- 
agement of labor at the bedside. Graduates of our college 
are appointed as residents. 

CLINICAL FACILITIES. 

The clinical facilities of this College comprise, through- 
out the course, the two hundred and fifty beds at Lakeside 
Hospital, one hundred and forty beds of Charity Hospital, 
the Dispensaries at Lakeside and Charity Hospitals, one 
hiuidred beds -of St. Alexis Hospital, the Maternity and 
Children's Home, and two hundred and seventy-five beds 
of the City Hospital during four months of each year. 

RESIDENT PHYSICIANS. 

From twenty-five to thirty resident positions are open to 
the graduates of the College in the hospitals of the city. 
Of the class graduating in 1902, twenty-three men received 
hospital appointments. 

HOSPITAL SERVICE. 

LAKESIDE HOSPITAL STAFF. 

^fcdicinc—DRS. H. H. Powell, J. H. Lowman, H. S. Upson, E. 
F. Gushing. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 87 

Surgery — ^Dr. D. P. Allen; Dr. G. W. Crile, Associate. 
Ophthalmology— Dr. B. L. Milukin. 
Gynecology — Dr. H. Robb. 
Dermatology — Dr. W. T. Corlett. 
Pathology— Dr, W. T. Howard, Jr. 

charity hospital staff. 
Consulting Physicians— Drs. G. C. Ashmun, B. W. Holliday, J. 

H. LOWMAN. 

Consulting Surgeons — Drs. G. C E. Weber and D. P. Allen. 
Consulting Ophthalmologist — Dr. B. L. Millikin. 
Consulting Dermatologist— Dr. W. T. Corlett. 
Consulting Gynecologist — ^Dr. H. Robb. 

Visiting Physicians— Drs. J. H. Lee, J. E. Cook, J. P. Sawyer, T. 
A. Burke. 

Visiting Surgeons — Drs. F. E. Bunts and C. A. Hamann. 
Visiting Gynecologist— Dr. W. H. Humiston. 
Visiting Ophthalmologist — Dr. W. E. Bruner. 
Pathologist— Dr. W. T. Howard, Jr. 

home of maternity. 
Obstetrics — Dr. H. H. Powell. 

consulting staff at city hospital. 
Medicine — Drs. J. H. Lowman and J. E. Darby. 
Surgery— Drs. D. P. Allen and F. E. Bunts. 
Obstetrics— Dr. H. H. Powell. 
Neurology— Dr. H. L. Spence. 
Gynecology— Dk W. H. Humiston. 
Dermatology — ^Dr. W. T. Corlett. 
Pathology— Dr. W. T. Howard, Jr. 
Ophthalmology— Dr. W. E. Bruner. 
Laryngology— Dr. J. M. Ingersoll. 

visiting staff. 
Drs. C. F. Hoover and C. A. Hamann. 



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l88 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

DISPENSARIES. 

Free Dispensaries are maintained at Lakeside and Charity 
Hospitals with daily service except Sundays. These col- 
lei^e dispensaries were established on the Hurlbut and 
Huntington Funds and afford treatment to about ten thou- 
sand new cases annually. 

LAKESIDE HOSPITAL SERVICE. 

^ Medicine— Dn. J. H. Lowman, Director; Drs. E. H. Season^ G. 
W. Moorehouse, Physicians in Charge. 

Surgery — Dr. D. P. Allen, Director; Drs. H. A. Becker, Chas. 
R Briggs, and R. H. Birge, Surgeons in Charge. 

Obstetrics— Dr, H. H. Powell, Director; Dr. F. S. Clark, Obste- 
trician in Charge. 

Diseases of Children — Dr. E. F. Cushing, Director; Drs. J. J. 
Thomas, C. Pope, Physicians in Charge. 

Gynecology — Dr. H. Robb, Director; Dr. R. H. Sunkle, W. H. 
Weir and G. Povey, Gynecologists in Charge. 

Nervous Diseases— Dr. H. S. Upson, Director; Dr. H. L. Spenc^ 
Neurologist in Charge ; Dr. F. C. Hutchins, Assistant. 

Ophthalmology— Dr. B. L. Millikin, Director ; Dr. W. E. Bruner, 
Ophthalmologist in Charge; Drs. H. J. Herrick, Wm. E. Shakle- 
TON, Assistants. 

Dermatology and Syphilis— Dr. W. T. Corlett, Director and Phy- 
sician in Charge ; Dr. C. M. Hole, Assistant. 

Disease of Nose, Ear and Throat— Drs. J. M. Ingersoll and Wil- 
liam R. Lincoln, Surgeons in Charge; Drs. J. M. Waugh and Wm. 
B. Chamberlain, Assistants. 

charity hospital service. 

Medicine— Dr. J. P. Sawyer, Director; Drs. W. O. Osborne and 
W. H. Merriam, Physicians in Charge. 

Surgery — Dr. F. E. Bunts, Director; Drs. Fred C. Herrick and 
T. E. Griffiths, Surgeons in Charge. 

Gynecolos:y— Dr. W. H. Humiston, Director; O. T. Thomas, 
Gynecologist in Charge. 

Ophthalmology— Dr. Wm. E. Bruner, Director; C. C. Stuart, M. 
D., Assistant in Charge. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 189 

HOME OF MATERNITY. 

Obstetrics— Dk. H. H. Powell, Director; Dr. J. J. Thomas, Obste- 
trician in Charge ; Drs. Eugene O. Houck, Wm. J. Woolgar, Assist- 
ants. 

DISPENSARY APPOINTMENTS. 

Members of the third year class remaining in the city dur- 
ing the summer, may be appointed for practical work in the 
Dispensary, in sections, by applying to the Dean. 

EXPENSES. 

The fees are $125 a year. This amount includes payment 
for tuition and all laboratory expenses, except the price of 
anatomical material, breakage and use of oil immersion 
microscopes, and is due before October twentieth of each 
year. Students who prefer may pay $75 by October twen- 
tieth, and $55 by March fifteenth of the college year. No 
student shall be permitted to present himself for examina- 
tion in any branch who has not paid all dues and liabilities. 
Students who wish to pay for the entire four years' course 
by October twentieth of their first year, will be allowed a 
reduction of $50 ori the whole amount. A deposit of $2 is 
required from students in each of the laboratories at the 
outset, in addition to the tuition fee, to cover breakage. 
The unused balance of such deposit is returned at the end 
of the session. A rental of $5.00 per year will be charged 
for the use of oil immersion microscopes, the students hav- 
ing full use of these instruments during their entire year. 
Students who prefer may furnish their own microscopes. 

Students in Adelbert College taking work in the Medical 
Department will be charged a laboratory fee in each depart- 
ment, the total fees in no case to exceed the difference be- 
tween the fees of Adelbert College and the Medical College. 

Good board can be procured at from three to five dollars 
a week, and furnished rooms at from five to ten dollars a 
month. By forming "clubs" students are able to bring their 

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I90 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

living expenses considerably below these prices. The janitor 
at the College building keeps a list of boarding houses for 
the convenience of students. By an arrangement with Good- 
rich House, which stands within one block of the College, a 
gymnasium, with bathing accommodations, is available to 
the students at a very small cost. At the Y. M. C. A. build- 
ing, which is near, similar opportunities are affbrded. 

POST-GRADUATE AND SPECIAL INSTRUCTION. 

Courses of post-graduate and special instruction for phy- 
sicians and special students will be given in the various lab- 
oratories, commencing about June ist and lasting for six 
weeks. 

Chemistry. James A. Evans, B. S. A course in Chemistry in its 
relations to practical medical work will be given in the laboratory 
during a period of six weeks. Fee, $25.00. 

Physiology. Dr. Claude C. Guthrhs. A course of practical 
physiology, based upon the practical exercises in Stewart's Manual 
of Physiology. Six half days a week for six weeks. Fee, $20.00. A 
fee of $5.00 to defray the cost of animals is divided by each set of 
four. 

Pharmacology. Dr. R. A. Hatcher. This course will be iden- 
tical with that given in the pharmacological laboratory during the 
regular session. It comprises experiments on mammals and frogs, 
as well as chemical work. The fee for the mammal and frog work 
is $15.00, for the chemical work, $7.50; for both together, $20.00. 
Others than matriculated students of this school will be charged a 
laboratory fee of $3.00 for the mammal work, and $2.00 for the 
chemical work, in addition to the above. 

Pathological Anatomy. Dr. John A. Sipher. In this course 
both gross and histological pathological anatomy will be studied. 
General problems, such as degeneration and necrosis, inflammation, 
the infectious granulomota, and tumors will be considered first, after 
which the special pathological anatomy of the various organs will be 
studied. The laboratory is well supplied with material for the 
course, which will be entirely practical, the students doing their own 
staining and mounting. They will be given such further botanical 
training as they may desire. The class will meet six half days a 
week for six weeks. Fee, $30.00. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I9I 

Clinical Microscopy. Dr. L. W. Laod. This course will include 
the various methods of examining blood, sputum, urine, faeces, 
gastric contents, pathological exudates, and in general, the applica- 
tion of the microscope to the diagnosis and the other aspects of 
clinical medicine. The class will meet three times a week for a 
period of two hours each meeting, for six weeks. Fee, $30.00. 

For further information apply to the instructors in the 
various courses. 

Graduates in medicine may also arrange for courses of 
clinical instruction in medicine, surgery and the various 
specialties during the same period by applying to the Dean 
of the College, or to the men in charge of the various de- 
partments. 



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192 THE MEDICAI. COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

APPENDIX. 



CLASS EXAMINATIONS. 



VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY. 
(answer any five questions). 

1. (a) What is the time relation of ovulation, the destructive 
period of menstruation and impregnation in homo? (b) What is 
the relation of maternal and foetal circulations in the placenta? (c) 
Homologize the external genitalia of male and female in mammalia. 
Qd) How does the pancreas arise? 

2. (a) Describe with drawings the development of the eye. (b) 
Discuss the metameric relation of appendages in homo to the trunk 
as regards nerves and musculature. 

3. Trace the course of the mammalian citcalation in late foetal 
life, and state the changes which occur at birth, jmd, so far as you 
can, the direct causes of these changes. 

4. Given the indifferent stage of the urinogenital system of mam- 
mals, describe the changes by which the male and female types are 
differentiated from it, stating explicitly the homologous parts in the 
two sexes. 

5. Describe the origin of the respiratory system of amniota (ex- 
cept the larynx) and its relation to the digestive system. 

6. Describe the early formation of the central nervous system, 
the primary and secondary brain vesicles, and the parts of the adult 
organ which arise from each in amniota. 

CHEMISTRY. 

i^ What is Chemistry? Name fifteen of the elements and give the 
atomic weight and quantivalence of each. 

2. Give a general description of the manufacture of sulphuric 
acid; and how much acid can be obtained from one ton of gelma, 
which assays 98% Pf. S. 

3. Give the general analytical separation of the metals and the 
members belonging to each group. 4 

4. How would you proceed in a case of arsenical poisoning? 

5. What are some of the more important acids of phosphorus, 
giving the formula and molecular weight of each? 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I93 

6. What two classes of mercury salts are there and describe some 
of the most important salts of each? 

7. A volume of oxygen measures 1200 C. C. at 4® C. and at a 
higher temperature the volume was observed to be 1460 C. C. ; what 
was its final temperature? 

8. What are some of the most important salts of sodium? Give 
formulas, molecular weights and methods of preparation of each. 

9. What elements constitute the Halogen Group? Describe each 
of them. 

10. What are acids, bases and salts, and how much oxygen, by 
volume, measured at 20° C. and 720 m. m. pressure, can be obtained 
from 30 grains of potassium chlorate ? 

The examination in the Laboratory consisted in the analysis of 
three solutions, containing not less than four unknowns each. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. 

1. What is Organic Chemistry, and into what general groups are 
the organic compounds divided? Give illustrations of each. 

2. A certain organic compound was analyzed and analysis 
gave results as follows: 0=61.32%; H=5.09%; 0=23.37%; N 
=10.22%. 

The V. D.=68.5. 

3. What grouping of elements represent the following list of com- 
pounds, and give illustrations of each : Hydrocarbons, ethers, esters, 
ketones, aldehydides, acids, bases; primary, secondary, and tertiary 
alcohols ; phenolesfi hydrazones, azo, diazo, and amides. 

4. What is fermentation and how does it differ from putrefaction? 

5. What are the Carbonhydrates ? Give the general classification 
and exampks of each group. 

6. What are fats, and describe the process of saponification and 
the products formed? 

7. Give a list of the di-and triatomic phenoles. 

8. What is benzoic aldehyde and how can it be converted into the 
corresponding acid and alcohol ? Give the formula of each. 

9. How can benzole be obtained from carbon? Show the various 
chemical processes. 

10. What are some of the ptomaines belonging to the paraffine 
series, giving their formulas? What are some of the groups of color 
bases derived from the phenoles? 



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194 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE [1902-1903 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

The examination in this branch was oral and practical, a test tube 
containing two cultures was given for identification and description. 

ANATOMY. 

Examinations in anatomy are oral. 

HISTOLOGY AND MICROSCOPICAL ANATOMY. 

1. Identify the organs in the ten slides given you. (These were: 
Pancreas, urinary bladder, duodenum, prostate, cerebral cortex, 
oesophagus, suprarenal, pyloric stomach, uterus, liver.) 

2. Describe the microscopic anatomy of the organs represented by 
the two slides indicated. (These were uterus antl liver.) 

3. Describe in detail with drawings the macroscopic and micro- 
scopic structure of small intestine, and state the chief differences 
found in the colon. 

4. (a) Describe the structure of the spermatozoan of homo, and 
the chief stages in spermatogenesis. 

(b) Locate in the dorsal cord the chief regions of substantia grisea, 
including the areas of neurocytes, and the fibre tracts of the substantia 
alba. 

(c) Describe the structure of the epidermis in general body sur- 
face and on plantar, palmar or volar surface, or compare sudoriparous 
and sebaceous glands and name the more important modified glands 
of each type. 

5. Describe in detail with drawings the coats of the eye in a 
typical region of the pars optica retinae. 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

(WRITFEN BXAMINATION . 

1. State what you know of the place and mode of formation of 
the colored and colorless corpuscles of the blood. Describe a method 
of enumerating them. Under what circumstances do changes in their 
number occur in health? 

2. Describe the various methods of estimating the velocity of the 
blood. State how and explain why the velocity of the blood varies 
in different parts of the vascular system. 

3. Describe in detail the operation necessary for demonstrating the 
action of the chorda tympani. What are the effects of stimulating 
the nerve? What are the effects on the salivary glands of stimulating 
the cervical sympathetic? 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 95 

4. Give as full an account as you can of the digestion, absorption 
and metabolism of fat. 

5. How can the velocity of the nerve impulse be measured ? What 
are the proofs that an impulse artificially set up is conducted in 
both directrons along a nerve fibre? 

6. Mention the groups of fibres in the internal capsule, their origin, 
destination and function. What are the histological and physiological 
effects of destruction of the posterior limb of the left internal cap- 
sule? 

7. Describe the action of the various extrinsic muscles of the eye- • 
ball when they contract singly and in groups. What are the effects 
of paralysis of the third nerve? 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

(PRACTICAL EXAMINATION . 

Two of the following experiments were assigned to each student 
after entering the examination room. The candidate is supplied only 
with such apparatus or reagents as he may ask for. 

1. Determine the nature of the coloring matter in solutions A and 
B. (A was methaemoglobin ; B haemochromogen.) 

2. Take tracings to demonstrate the action of veratrin on the 
contraction of skeletal muscle. 

3. Determine by Hammerschlag's method the specific gravity of 
the specimens of blood A and B. (Sp. gr. of A was 1053; of B, 
1040.) 

4. Estimate the amount of urea in the specimen of urine provided. 

5. Determine what, if any, pathological substances are present in 
the specimen of urine provided. (It contained bile pigments and bile 
acids.) 

6. Demonstrate in the frog the phenomenon known as inhibition 
of the reflexes. 

7. Demonstrate on the animal provided the effect of albumoses on 
the blood pressure. 

8. Demonstrate the effect of stimulation of the central end of the 
sciatic nerve on the blood pressure. 

9. Obtain respiratory tracings from the animal provided. 

GROSS PATHOLOGICAL ANATOMY. 
The examination in this branch is oral. 



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196 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

GENERAL PATHOLOGY. 

An oral examination. The questions included the following sub- 
jects: The general principles of pathology, the etiology of infectious 
and non-infectious diseases, the portals of entrance of micro-organ- 
isms into the body, the bacterial flora of the body, the bacteria of 
wound infection, immunity, antitoxins, the etiology and pathological 
anatomy of typhoid fever, tuberculosis, diphtheria, syphilis, pneu- 
monia, arterio-sclerosis, the pathology of the circulation, etc. 

THERAPEUTICS. 

1. How do antipyretics control temperature and illustrate each 
class. 

2. Alcohol: (a) its changes, if any, in the body; (b) destiny; 

(c) its influence on digestion; (rf) circulation; (e) blood; (f) tissue 
change; {g) indications for use. 

3. Opium: (a) describe; {b) active principles ; (c) preparations; 

(d) dose of each; (e) action; (/) synergists as anodynes {g) as 
antiphlogistic; (h) as hypnotic. 

4. Symptoms and treatment of opium poisoning. 

5. Digitalis: (a) how and why is it a heart tonic; (6) a diuretic; 
(c) indications for use and preparations to be used in each case and 
why? 

6. Quinine: Illustrate its use; (a) as tonic; (&) as antiperiodic ; 
(c) as antipyretic; (d) as oxytocic 

7. Anaesthesia: (a) local; {b) general; (c) means and methods 
of producing; (d) sources of danger. 

8. Belladonna (a) active principles; (b) preparations and dose of 
each; (c) action; (d) indications for use; (e) symptoms and treat- 
ment of poisoning. 

9. Ergot: (a) action; (6) indications and contraindications for 
use in obstetrics. 

10. Outline the treatment of pneumonia. 

PHARMACOLOGY. 

(WRITTEN). 

1, Write a metric prescription for a case of cough with scanty 
mucus and considerable irritation. Write the names without abbre- 
viations. 

2. Describe the different ways in which diuretics may act. Give 
examples of each. 



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1 902-1903] , WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 1 97 

3. (Answer either a or b.) Describe the course of reasoning and 
the experiments which would be necessary to show 

(a) That a drug which strengthens the cardiac action also pro- 
duces a vaso constriction. 

(b) That a drug which stops the secretion of saliva does so by 
paralyzing the chorda tympani endings. 

4. State the different ways in which drugs may produce mydriasis, 
and give an example of each. 

5. Name one or more drugs which may be employed to secure : 

(a) Direct stimulation of the respiratory center. 

(b) Emesis through central action. 

(c) Stimulation of the vaso constrictor center. 

(d) Depression of the cough- reflex. 

(e) Paralysis of the vasomotor center. 

6. Write an essay of about 500 words, describing fully the pharma- 
cology, symptoms, antidotes, therapeutics and materia medica of any 
one of the following groups : Quinine, Atropin, Mineral Acids. 

7. Identify the 20 specimens. Give correct Latin name of the 
preparation and its dose. 

8. Examine the three prescriptions which are submitted to you for 
incompatibilities. 

PHARMACOLOGY. 
(practical examination). 

Each student is assigned a chemical experiment, and one on an 
animal. 

Chemical Experiments: (i) Effect of three solutions on a fer- 
ment; (2) separation of an alkaloid from chinchona dtcoction; (3) 
comparison of the strength of two preparations of nux vomica, by 
taste; (4) distinguishing between solutions of opium and chinchona 
(method furnished) ; (5) distinguishing between veratrin and quinine 
(method furnished). 

Frog Experiments: (i) Williams' apparatus; (2) effect of a solu- 
tion on muscle-curve; (3) demonstration of anesthetic action; (4) 
effect on blood vessels; (5) testing for veratrin, nicotin, caffein— on 
frogs. 

Mammal Experiments: Blood pressure and respiratory tracing 
for cocain and digitalis; respiratory tracing for nitroglycerin and 
hydrastinium. 



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198 THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

DERMATOLOGY. 

1. What is eczema? Give clinical varieties, and distinctive fea- 
tures of each. 

2. Outline the treatment of syphilis during its whole course. How 
long would you treat the disease? 

3. Give differentiation between variola and varicella. 

4. Give symptoms, pathology and treatment of herpes zoster. 

5. Give symptoms, etiology and treatment of scabies. How dif- 
ferentiate from prurigo? 

NOSE, THROAT AND EAR. 

1. Name the principal causes of nasal obstruction. Discuss the 
most common cause. 

2. Name the most common form of neoplasm (a) in the nose; 
(&) in the nasopharynx in children. Give the treatment in each case. 

3. Describe the methods of removing animate and inanimate bodies 
from the external auditory canal. 

1. Describe tuberculosis of larynx. 

2. Describe symptoms and treatment of acute folicular tonsillitis. 

3. Give treatment and symptojns of chronic pharyngitis. 

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS. 

Examination in physical diagnosis is oral and clinical. 

MEDICINE. 
DR. LOWMAN. 

1. Jaundice: (a) Definition; (b) Symptoms; (c) Distinction be- 
tween obstructive and toxic jaundice; (d) What is grave jaundice? 
(e) Causes of obstructive jaundice? (f) Test for bile in the urine 
and blood. 

2. Typhoid Fever: (a) What is the diagnostic value of the serum 
reaction? (b) What is the diagnostic value of the diazo reaction? (c) 
Describe the method of making the above tests; (rf) What is the 
value in diagnosis of iliac tenderness, chills, hemorrhage, white blood 
count, temperature? (e) What is the peculiar behavior of the tongue, 
abdomen, bowels, liver, pulse, skin, spleen in typhoid fever? (/) State 
immediate causes of death in typhoid fever., 

3. Pneumo-pyo-thorax : (a) Differential diagnosis; (b) Causes; 
(c) Treatment. 



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• I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. I99 

4. Mitral Stenosis : (a) What is the form of the heart as outlined 
by percussion in M.-S.? (b) What murmur is present and how k it 
caused? (c) What is the behavior of the heart as to rhythm and 
force? (d) What are some of the remote systemic effects? 

5. Rheumatism: (a) Name different forms; (b) Describe the 
course of acute articular rheumatism; (c) What are the chief dangers 
and complications? (rf) Treatment in full. 

MEDICAL JURISPRUDENCE 

1. What are the distinguishing characteristics between near and 
far gun shot and pistol wounds? 

2. What evidence have we, post-mortem, that respiration has 
actually occurred in a child recently bom? 

3. Given a body in which death has followed an incised wound of 
the throat, what points will suggest the nature of the wound, whether 
suicidal, homicidal, or accidental ? 

4. Give two methods of determining the height of a dead body 
from a single member, or part of such member. 

5. Give the methods of procedure in the modified guiacum test, 
and the agglutination test, for the detection of blood in a suspected 
stain. 

6. Give, in the order of their appearance, the signs by which we 
can determine the probable length of time which has elapsed since 
death occurred. 

SURGERY. 
DR. ALLEN. 

1. What symptoms indicate obstruction of the biliary tract? To 
what may they be due? What is the treatment? 

2. What are the symptoms of stone in the urinary bladder? How 
may they be removed? The relative merits of the various operations? 

3. Diagnosis and treatment of stricture of the urethra. 

4. Describe three methods of operation for hemorrhoids. 

5. Describe methods of treatment of talipes equinus. 

SURGERY. 
DRS. BUNTS AND CRILE. 

I. Fractures: (a) Define compound, simple, complicated; (b) 
give causes of delayed union; (c) give treatment of delayed union. 

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200 THK MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

2. Diagnosis of fracture of neck of femur: (a) within capsuje; 
(by without capsule. 

3. How would you locate fissure of Rolando on the skull? 

4. Give diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of acute osteomyelitis. 

5. Acute appendicitis: (a) Give differential diagn(^sis from 
acute cholecystitis, salpingitis and acute gastro enteritis; (6) give in- 
dications for operation. 

OPHTHALMOLOGY. 

1. Name the muscles which move the eye ball and describe their 
physiological action. What nerves supply these muscles, and what 
would be the symptoms if the sixth nerve was paralyzed? 

2. Name the varieties of conjunctivitis. Give the symptoms, 
pathology and precautions necessary in the treatment of granular 
lid^ and purulent conjunctivitis. 

3. Name the varieties of iritis, give the symptoms and treatment 
of acute plastic iritis. Differentiate between acute iritis and acute 
glaucoma. What drugs have special action in each disease? 

4. Give differential diagnosis of sympathetic irritation and inflam- 
mation. Give cause and full treatment of the latter. 

5. Define emmetropia, hypermetropia, myopia, mixed astigmatism. 
What kind of a glass should be used to correct the last named? 

GYNECOLOGY. 
DR. ROBit 

1. What is the normal position of the uterus and to what extent 
may its position vary within physiological limits? 

2. What are the different forms of endometritis? Discuss the 
causes, symptoms and treatment. 

4. What is meant by retroflexion and retroversion of the uterus? 
Give etiology, symptoms and treatment. 

5. Under what circumstances and how would you apply a pessary? 
Enumerate the different pessaries in common use. 

6. Mention the varieties of vaginitis, and the treatment. 

7. State the chief etiological factors which may be responsible in 
a case of pyosalpinx. 

8. Describe in detail the nature and symptoms of extra-uterine 
pregnancy. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 20I 

9. How would you treat a case of ruptured tubal pregnancy? 

10. What are the symptoms and physical signs of malignant dis- 
ease of the uterus and of the cervix? What treatment would you 
advise? How is the condition to be differentiated from myoma of 
the uterus? 

The examinations are partly oral and partly written. The method 
is to divide the ground covered during the year into about one hun- 
dred questions. The class is divided up into ten sections, each of 
which receives a different set of ten questions, so that as a conse- 
quence only two or three men will have precisely the same. 

DR. HUMISTON. 

1. What are the causes of dysmenorrhoea? 

2. What are the indications for curettement? 

3. What are the clinical evidences of carcinoma of servix uteri and 
how would you differentiate between a simple erosion and beginning 
carcinoma of the cervix? 

4. What is the normal position of the uterus, and by what means 
would you diagnose a retroflexion of the uterus? 

5. Give the treatment for ancute gonorrhoeal vaginitis. 

6. Give the clinical signs (objective and subjective) of ruptured 
tubal pregnancy. 

7. How would you differentiate retroflxeion of the uterus from a 
fibroid in the posterior wall of that organ? 

8. What is a pyo-salpinx and what are its etiologic factors? 

9. Name the cystic formations found in the ovary. 

10. Give the differentiation between a uterine fibroid and an ovar- 
ian cyst. 

OBSTETRICS. 

1. Give a diagram showing the general axis of the parturient 
canal. 

2. Give the diameters of the true pelvis, also the diameters of the 
false pelvis taken to determine deformities. 

3. Give the points of difference between the male and the female 
pelvis. 

4. Give the points of distinction between frequency and the follow- 
ing conditions: (a) pseudocyesis ; {b) ascites; (c) ovarian cystoma. 



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202 THB MEDICAL COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

5. Give the diagnosis of a breech from a face ; also the diagnosis of 
a foot from a hand. 

6. Describe the mechanism observed in the first position of the 
head. 

7. Outline the proper management of a normal case of labor with 
special reference to the avoidance of infection. 

8. Give the indications and the contra-indications for the following 
operations: (a) forceps; (b) version; (c) craniotomy. 

NEUROLOGY. 

1. What are the causes of facial paralysis? 

2. What diagnostic information is obtained from a knowledge of 
the reflexes? 

3. What are the symptoms of paresis? 

4. Of what aid is electricity in forming a prognosis? 

5. What are the applications of suggestive therapeutics? 

PREVENTIVE MEDICINE. 

1. Why is the preservation of health a rational means of prevent- 
ing disease? 

2. Give the known means by which the bacillus of t3rphoid fever 
may be disseminated? 

3. What prophylactic measures would you adopt to prevent the 
spread of typhoid fever from a given case? 

4. Why is it essential in efforts to prevent the spread of an in- 
fectious disease, that the stage of incubation should be estimated as 
accurately as possible? 

5. What is the duty of a physician who has made a diagnosis of 
an infectious disease, in a locality where health officers are estab- 
lished? 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 203 

THE FRANKLIN T. BACKUS 
LAW SCHOOL. 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT. 



OHE Franklin T. Backus Law- School of Western Re- 
serve University was founded in the year 1892. Its 
first class entered the school in September of that year. Oar- 
ing the first two years it was located in rented quarters at the 
corner of Euclid Avenue and Adelbert Street. In the fall 
of 1894 the school was removed to temporary quarters in 
Adelbert Hall, where it remained for two years. In 1896 
the stone building now occupied by the school was erected. 
It contains, in addition to large halls, four rooms of equal 
size, twenty-five by forty feet, inside measurement. One of 
these rooms is fitted up for a library and reading room, and 
the other three are used for recitation work. Each recita- 
tion room is furnished with individual tables so constructed 
as to enable the students to takes notes with as little incon- 
venience as possible. The basement is furnished with 
toilet, locker and smoking rooms. Each student is furn- 
ished a locker for the keeping of his coat, books, etc. The 
building is so constructed as to allow the erection of a large 
addition whenever the needs of the school shall require it. 

In 1892 the library numbered about five hundred volumes. 
Today it numbers thirteen thousand volumes and is one of 
the largest law school libraries west of New York. 

In 1892 nine lectures a week were given; now there are 
given fifty lectures a week, and the number of the members 
of the faculty has grown from five to seventeen. "^ 

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204 THE SCHOOL OF LAW. [1902-I903 

When the school was first opened candidates for a degree 
were required to have but little more than a common school 
education. Nearly all the law schools in the country, in- 
cluding some of the oldest and most prominent, demanded 
no more. In 1900 the requirements of candidates for a de- 
gree were raised to the requirements for entering college. 

In 1893 Mrs. Franklin T. Backus, of Cleveland, Ohio, 
provided an endowment for the school and the name of the 
school was then changed from the "Law School of Western 
Reserve University** to the "Franklin T. Backus Law 
School of Western Reserve University" in honor of a man 
who, during his life, was one of the leaders of the Ohio bar 
and who always took the deepest interest in all matters per- 
taining to legal education. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 205 

FACULTY. 



Charles F. Thwing, D. D., hh D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

fyesidenL 
Charles Elliott Pennewell, 1254 Willson Av. 

Professor of the Law of Real Property, 

Evan Henry Hopkins, A. B., lyL. B., 84 Miles Av. 

Professor of the Law of Contracts and Equity furisdidion^ 

Dean of the Faculty, 

Henry Clay White, A. M., 344 Harkness Av. 

Professor of the Law of Wills and Estates. 
Homer Hosea Johnson, A. M., LL. B., Overlook Road. 

Professor of Constitutional Law. 
Alexander Hadden, A. B., 1670 Lexington Av. 

Professor of the Law of Crimes^ Criminal Procedure, and Damages. 
Arthur Adelbert Stearns, A. M., 87 Oakdale St. 

Professor of the Law of Suretyship and Mortgage. 
James Lawrence, A. B., 709 Genesee Av. 

Professor of the Law of Public and Private Corporations. 
Alfred G. Carpenter, A. M., LL. B., 125 Streator Av. 

Professor of the Law of Pleading and Practice. 
Paul Howland, A. M., LL. B., 11 Granger St. 

Professor of the Law of Pleading and Partnership. 
Henry Bardwell Chapman, A. B., LL. B., East Cleveland. 

Projessor of the Law of Agency and Bills and Notes. 
Francis Rufus Herrick, A. B., 449 Russell Av. 

Professor of the Law of Torts. 
Frank Beverly Williams, A. M., LL. B., iii Crawford Road. 

Professor of the Law of Evidence y Trusts , and Personal Property. 
Frederick William Green, LL. B., Rice Av., Newburgh. 

Lecturer on Sales. 

Clayton King Fauver, Ph. B., LL. B., 727 Case Av. 

Lecturer on Torts and History of Procedure, ands Instructor 

in charge of Review Work. 

Rollin Abbott Wilbur, LL. B., 820 Fairmonnt St. 

Lecturer on Contracts and Carriers. 

Frances L. Trowbridge, 84 Miles Av. 

Librarian. 



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2o6 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 



[1902-I903 



STUDENTS. 



1899. 



THIRD YBAR CLASS. 

Walter Silas Adams, Cleveland 

A. B., Adelbcrt, 1900; Harvard University, 1900-01. 

William Amos, 

A. B., Tri-State Normal, 

William Hugus Chapman, 

Adelbert. 1807-9S. 

Harry Tracy Duncan, 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1901. 
Earl Washington Farwell, 



Defiance 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Millersburg 

A. B., Princeton, 1900; Harvard University, 1900-01. 
Walter Granger, Cleveland 

Volant College, 1899-1900. 
Andrew James Haggerty, Cleveland 

Adelbert, 1899-1900. 
Edgar A. Hahn, Cleveland 

Lewis Edwin Harvie, Jr., Danville^ Va. 

Danville Military Institute. 

Samuel Edmund Kramer, Cleveland 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

William John Laub, Akron 

Ph. B,, Adelbert, 1900. 
Joseph Timmons Micklethwait, Portsmouth 

Ohio University, 1887-1900. 

John Allen Neiding, Cleveland 

Irving Holland Randolph, Salem 

B. S., North-Bastern Ohio Normal, 1898. 
Raymond Terry Sawyer, Cleveland 

A. B., Kenyon, 1900. 

Ernest Schwartz, Cleveland 

Bartlett Carlton Shepherd, Painesville 

Ph. B., Adelbert. 1900. 

Lewis Daniel Slusser, Akron 

B. S., Mt. Union, 1896; Harvard University, 1900-01. 
Vernon Leland Stanford, Ravenna 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 
Liberty Bernard Ware, Cleveland 

David Ross Warnock, Urbana 

Urbana University. 1899. 

Benjamin Breckinridge Wickham, Norwalk 
A. B., Adelbert, 1896. 



3714 Euclid Av. 

2238 Euclid Av. 

II SackettSt. 

78 Fifth Av. 

820 Pairmount St. 

893 St. Clair St. 

241 Hodge Av. 

633 Scovill Av. 
Adelbert Hall. 

224 Quinby St. 

2278 Euclid Av. 

Adelbert Hall. 

186 Taylor St. 
Adelbert Hall. 

54 Streator Av. 

25 McKinstry St. 
Adelbert Hall. 

Adelbert Hall. 

217 Ohio Bldg. 

1430 Detroit St. 
2097 Euclid Av. 

153 Cornell St. 
Third Year, 22. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



207 



SBCOND YEAR CLASS. 



John Alvin Alburn, 


Youngstozvn 


Eldred Hall. 


A. B., Addbert. 1902. 






Max Leonard Bemsteen, 


Cleveland 


67 Fifth Av. 


Adelbert, 1899-1901. 






Clinton Lorrin Case, 


Greensburg 


995 Doan St. 


B. S., New South Lyme Institute, 1901. 




Allen Sidney Davis, 


Columbus 


131 Murray Hill Av. 


B. S., Denlson University, 1900. 






Fred Desberg, 


Cleveland 


1050 Central Av. 


David Edward Green, 


Renrock 


131 Murray Hill Av. 


B. S., Dcnison University, 1901. 






Ben Haber, 


Clevelafid 


8 Lewiston St. 


B. L., Adelbert, 1901. 






Theodore Hall, Jr., 


Ashtabula 


40 Knox St, 


A. B., Adelbert, 1901. 






Calvin Jenison Hinds, Jr., 


Girard, Pa. 


261 Van Ness Av. 


Morris William Kastriner, 


Cleveland 


731 Scovill Av. 


A. B., Adelbert, 1901. 






Joseph Harvey Kitchen, 


Cleveland 


858 Euclid Av. 


A. B., Yale, 1899. 






Henry Lustig, 


Cleveland 


2773 Broadway. 


Eugene Curie Mathivet, 


Cleveland 


98 Tilden Av. 


Adelbert, 1900-01. 






Walter Charles McClure, 


Wooster 


28 Nantucket St. 


A. B., Woostcr University, 1901. 






Harrington Simpson, 


Akron 


38 Quebec St. 


Edward P. Strong, 


Cleveland 


486 Lake St. 
Second Year, i6. 


FIRST YEAR CI,ASS. 




Clarence Armbruster, 


Cleveland 


1638 Willson Av. 


Edwin Clare Caldwell, 


Warren 


Adelbert Hall. 


A. B., Adelbert. 1902. 






Frank Amadeus Carabin, 


Monroeville 


117 Adelbert St. 


Edward Joseph Cherney, 


Cleveland 


57 Woodland Ct^ 


Denison, 1901-02. 






Norman Taylor Cl3me, 


Cleveland 


309 Franklin Av. 


Richard Emmet Collins, 


Cleveland 1734 Woodland Hills Av. 


Ph. B., Adelbeit, 1902. 






Harry Hamlet Emmons, 


Alliance 


16 Dunham PI. 


Frank Brown Evarts, 


Cleveland 


29 Bellflower Av. 


A. B., Adelbert, 1902. 






Reuben Alfred Ford, 


Chicago, IlL 


2132 Euclid Av. 


Kenyon, 1900-02. 







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208 



THE SCHOOL OF LAW. 



[1902-1903 



George El wood Hartshorn, Newark 

D. L., Denison University, 1902. 
William Harry Jackson, Cleveland 

Adelbert. 190102. 
Walter Albert Laughren, Cleveland 

Kline Fetterman Leet, Alliance 

Ph. B., Mt. Union. 1899. 
James Metzenbaum, Cleveland 

Roy Rybum Moifett, Cleveland 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1902. 
Charles Augustus Morris, 

A. B., Adelbert. 1902. 

Herman Joel Nord, 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1902. 
George Arthur Phillips, 

A. fi., Oberlin, i902. 
Carl Adolph Riemenschneider, 

Adelbert, 1901-02. 

Edward Henry Sensel, 

A. B., Adelbert, 1902. 

John William Smith, 

A. B., Ohio Weslcyan, 1902. 
Loren Edmunds Souers, 
Owen N. Wilcox, 

B. L., Adelbert, 1902. 
James Victor Wolcott, 
Lawrence Emanuel Yaugi, 

Mt. Union, 1899-1902. 

Henry Young, Norwalk 



117 Murray Hill A v. 

558 Bolton Av. 

1571 Woodland Av. 
86 Rosedale St. 

1 1 17 Case Av. 
715 North Logan Av. 

Cleveland 189 West Madison Av. 

adding s 116 Strcator Av. 

The Leighton. 

161 Beech wood St. 

124 Putnam St. 

626 Jennings Av. 



Chardon 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 
Cleveland 



New Philadelphia 155 Sawtell A v. 
Cleveland 59 Olive St. 

East Cleveland 72 Grasmere St. 
Bel oil 314 Dunham Av. 



148 Murray Hill A v. 
First Year, 26. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS. 



Andrew Melvin Abbott, 



Bowling Green 
Cor. Wade Park Av. & Marcy St. 



Milton Bejach, 


Cleveland 


72 Van Buren St. 


Grant Bennett, 


Cleveland 


987 Doan St. 


A. B., 0. N. U., 1887. 






Charles Joseph Brennan, 


Dayton 


134 Murray Hill Av. 


Ralph P. Buffington, 


Troy 


86 Rosedale Av. 


Charles Payne Burgoon, 


Fremont 


151 Cornell St. 


Homer Cliarles Campbell, 


Akron 


68 Bell Av. 


Adelbert, 189^1902. 






James Williams Carpenter, 


Cleveland 


46 Knox St. 


Adelbert, 1899-1902. 






Roy Col well Cool, 


Urbana 


109 Amesbury Av. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



209 



Theobald Oliver Dakin, Sabina 134 Murray Hill Av. 

B. S., Wilmington College, 1900. 

Eli Edwin Doster, Cleveland 117 Murray Hill Av. 

Denison University, 1898-1900. 

Staney Frank Dembowski, Cleveland 36 CoUey St. 

Walter Thomas Dunmore, Norwalk 151 Cornell St. 

A. B., Oberlin, 1899. 

David Franklin Felmly, Cuyahoga Falls 163 Oakdale St. 

Benjamin Fcniger, Cleveland 512 Orange St. 

University of Chicago, 1900-01. 

Edward Bailey Follctt, Marietta 158 Murray Hill Av. 

A. B., Marietta, 1900; Harvard University, 1900-01. 

Ernest True Hall, Lakewood 3218 Detroit St. 

Hugh Edmund Hawthorne, Cambridge 809 Fairmount St. 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

Alfred High High, Cortland 27 Wilbur St. 

A. B., Princeton, 1894, 

John Henry Hogg, Cleveland 2638 St. Clair St. 

Bradley Hull, Jr., Cleveland 340 Euclid Av. 

Adelbert, 1809-1902. 

William Kurzenberger, Cleveland 72 Noyes St. 

Roscoe Conkling McCulloch, Canton 148 Murray Hill A v. 

Ohio State University. 1899-1900; Wooster University, 1901-02. 

Adrian G. Newcomb, Berea Adelbert Hall. 

Baldwin University, 1807-1900. 

George Albert Palda, Cleveland 1655 Broadway. 

Ph. B., Adelbert, 1900. 

John Howard Price, East Cleveland 3475 Euclid Av. 

A. B., Mt. Union, 1900. 

Leon Lewis Robinson, Taylor 782 Doan St. 

Charles Scott Rose, Mt, Blanchard Adelbert Hall. 

Hugh Griffith Rose, Wellsville 142 Cornell St. 

Adelbert, 1899-1902. 
Joseph Frank Sawicki, Cleveland 348 Fleet St. 

St. Ignatius College, 180&-1900. 
Carl Hamilton Smith, Steubenville 1465 Cedar A v. 

A. B., Westminster College, 1900. 
Ralph Rensselaer Snow, East Cleveland 55 Belmore Road. 

A. B., Bucknell, 1894. 

Speciai, Students, 32. 
SUMMARY. 

Third Year 22 

Second Year 16 

First Year 26 

Special Students 31 

95 



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2IO THE SCHOOI. OF LAW. [1902-I903 



REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Each person entering the school, whether a candidate for 
a degree or not, must present a certificate of good moral 
character. 

Candidates for the degree of LL. B. must be collie grad- 
uates or matriculates, graduates of high schools of approved 
standing, or must pass the entrance examinations given by 
colleges of approved standing. 

Persons not candidates for a degree may be admitted to 
the school as special students at any time without examina- 
tion upon satisfying the Faculty that they are able to carry 
on the work to advantage. 



COURSE OF INSTRUCTION- 
FIRST Year. 

Contracts. Lectures and Langdell's Cases, embracing the 
topics of mutual assent, consideration, and conditional contracts. 
Two hours each week throughout the year. Professor Hopkins. 

Common Law Pleading. Lectures and Ames's Cases on Plead- 
ing, embracing demurrers, pleas by way of confession and avoidance, 
pleas by way of traverse, duplicity, departure, new assignment, and 
motions based on pleadings. Two hours each week during last half- 
year. Professor Rowland. 

Criminal Law. Lectures and Clark and Marshall's Criminal 
Law. Two hours each week. Professor Hadden. 

Property. L Lectures and Tiedeman on Real Property. Two 
hours each week. Professor Pennewell. 

Property IL Lectures and Vols. I and III, Gray's Cases on 
Property, embracing distinction between real and personal property, 
nature and acquisition of rights, suits for the recovery of personal 
property, acquisition of rights not under former owner, transfer of 
rights and possession. Introduction to real property, acquisition in- 
ter-vivoB, alluvion, statute of limitations, conveyance, dedication. 
Two hours each week. Professor Williams. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 211 

Torts. Lectures and Ames* and Smith's Cases, embracing tres- 
pass, disseisin and conversion, defamation, malicious prosecution, 
conspiracy, legal cause, negligence, contributory and imputed negli- 
gence, degrees of care, extra-hazardous occupations, liability from 
fire and explosives, deceit, merger, joint wrong-doers, and distinc- 
tion between tort and breach of contract. Three hours each week 
throughout the year. Professor Herrick and Mr. Fauver. 

History of Common Law Procedure. Lectures and selected 
readings from Pollock and Maitland's History of English Law, Bige- 
low's History of Procedure, Maitland's Domesday Book and Beyond, 
Inderwick's The King's Peace, Stubb's Constitutional History of 
England, Coke's Institutes, Blackstone's Commentaries, and Stephen 
on Pleading. Two hours- each week during the first-half of the first- 
half-year. Mr. Fauver. 

Second Year. 

Agency. Lectures and Wambaugh's Cases, embracing introduc- 
tory topics, the agent's power to subject his principal to liabilities, 
the agent's responsibility to strangers, parties to writings, undis- 
closed principal, the principal's duties to the agent, delegation by an 
agent, termination of agency, and ratification. Two hours each 
week. Professor Chapman. 

Bills and Notes. Lectures and Ames' Cases on Bills and 
Notes, embracing formal requisites, acceptance, indorsement, trans- 
fer, extinguishment, obligations of parties to bills and notes, dili- 
gence, bill or note in the nature of a specialty, checks, negotiable 
paper other than bills, notes and checks. Two hours each week. 
Professor Chapman. 

Equity Pleading. Cases and Lectures. Two hours each week 
during first half-year. Mr. Green. 

Evidence. Lectures and Thayer's Cases, embracing preliminary 
topics, leading principles and rules of exclusion, qualifications and 
exceptions to the rule against hearsay, real evidence, writings and 
witnesses. Two hours each week. Professor Williams. 

Code Pleading. Cases and Lectures. Two hours each week 
during last half-year. Professor Howland. 

Sales. Lectures and Williston's Cases, embracing subject mat- 
ter of sale, executed and executory sales, stoppage in transitu, fraud 
and related matters, warranty, and Statute of Frauds. Two hours 
each week. Mr. Green. 



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212 THE SCHOOL OF LAW. [1902-I903 

Wills and Estates. Lectures and Page on Wills. Two hours 
each week. Professor White. 

Trusts. Lectures and Ames's Cases, embracing voluntary 
trusts, language and formalities necessary to the creation of a trust, 
resulting trusts, oral trusts, constructive trusts, executed and exec- 
utory trusts. Nature of a cestuy que trust's interest in the trust 
property, and the interest of a trustee. Two hours each week. Pro- 
fessor Williams. 

Contracts. Lectures and Williston's Cases, embracing impos- 
sible contracts, illegal contracts, joint obligations, discharge of con- 
tracts and assignment of contract. Also, Keener's Cases on Quasi- 
Contracts, embracing nature of the obligation, failure of consider- 
ation, benefits conferred without request, benefits conferred at 
request but in the creation or performance of a contract, recovery of 
money paid under compulsion and waiver of tort. Two hours each 
week. Mr. Wilbur. 

Third Year. 

Constitutional Law. Lectures and Thayer's Cases, embracing 
constitution of government, making and changing written constitu- 
tions, the jurisdiction of the United States, citizenship, police power, 
eminent domain, taxation, ex post facto and retroactive laws, state 
laws impairing the obligation of contracts, regulation of commerce, 
money and war. Three hours each week. Professor Johnson. 

Equity Jurisdiction. Lectures and Ames's Cases on Equity 
Jurisdiction. Two hours each week. Professor Hopkins. 

Suretyship and Mortgages. Lectures and selected cases. Two 
hours each week. Professor Stearns. 

Damages. Lectures and Beale's Cases, embracing functions of 
court and jury in estimating damages, exemplary, liquidated and 
nominal damages, direct and consequental damages, avoidable con- 
sequences, counsel fees, certainty, compensation, damages for non- 
pecuniary injuries, values, interest, damages in certain actions of 
tort and on contracts. One hour each week during first half-year. 
Professor Hadden. 

Criminal Procedure. Lectures and Beale on Criminal Pro- 
cedure. One hour each week during second half-year. Professor 
Hadden. 

Partnership. Lectures and Ames's Cases, embracing the cre- 
ation of a partnership, quasi or nominal partners, partnership prop- 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 213 

erty and the interest of a partner therein, the separate property of a 
partner as affected by the partnership relation, the relation of debtor 
and creditor between a partnership and a partner, the relation of 
debtor and creditor between two firms having a common member, 
action between a partner and one or more of his co-partners, and 
power of a partner to act in behalf of the partnership. Two hours 
each week during firsl half-year. Professor Rowland. 

Corporations. Lectures and Elliott's Cases. Two hours each 
week. Professor Lawrence. 

Common Carriers. Lectures and McClain's Cases, embracing 
public callings, carriers of goods, and carriers of passengers. Two 
hours each week during first half-year. Mr. Wilbur. 

Conflict of Laws. Lectures and assigned cases. Two hours 
each week last half-year. ^Ir. Wilbur. 

Pleadings and Practice in Ohio, including the drawing of 
deeds, mortgages, wills, etc., as well as pleadings. Two hours each 
week. Professor Carpenter and Messrs. Fauver and Wilbur. 

Legal Ethics. Lectures. One hour each week for ten weeks. 
Professor Hopkins. 

Review of subjects embraced in examinations for admission to 
the Ohio Bar. Four hours each week. Mr. Fauver. 



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214 'THE SCHOOL OP LAW. [1902-I903 

GENERAL INFORMATION. 

TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The first half-year begins on the Tuesday after the six- 
teenth day of September, and continues, with a holiday 
recess of nine days, until the first Saturday in February. 
The second half-year begins on the Monday after the first 
Saturday in February, and continues, with an Easter recess 
of one week, until Commencement, which occurs on the 
Thursday after the eleventh day of June (or after the tenth 
in years in which February has twenty-nine days). No col- 
lege exercises are held on Thanksgiving day, Washington's 
birthday, and Decoration day. 

MOOT COURT WORK. 

The Junior Moot Court Association of Western Reserve 
Law School, composed of members of the junior class, holds 
court weekly, sitting as a justice of the peace court, one of 
the professors acting as justice, with members of the class 
as the other court officers, attorneys, litigants, etc. The term 
of court is three weeks and an entirely new set of officers 
acts for each term, giving all the members an opportunity of 
becoming familiar with the duties of each office. 

The cases are based upon actual facts and the trials are 
conducted in all respects like those in the regular courts. 

The third year course in pleading and practice is con- 
ducted in part as a moot court course. Cases are tried in the 
manner prevailing in the common pleas court. 

Special attention is paid to the several steps in the course 
of trial, such as summoning and impanelling jury, statement 
of case, examination of witnesses, taking of exceptions, 
making of motions, argument, preparation of charge to jury, 
verdict, judgment, motion for new trial, bill of exceptions 
and petition in error. 

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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 215 

EXAMINATIONS. 

Candidates for the degree of LL. B. must attend the school 
at least two years, and must pass satisfactory examinations 
in all the subjects of the first year and in enough courses of 
the second year to aggregate ten hours a week, and of 
the third year to aggregate eleven hours a week. If a stu- 
dent is absent a year he must take the examinations in the 
subjects of that year at the school with the class. 

At the beginning of the school year an examination on 
the subjects of the first year will be held for the benefit of 
such students as may desire to enter the second year class. 

LOCATION OF THE SCHOOL. 

The work of the school is carried on in a stone building 
of tasteful architecture erected for it on Adelbert Street op- 
posite the Adelbert College Campus. The building contains 
a library and reading room, several large lecture rooms and 
rooms where students can meet socially. Individual lockers 
and other appropriate conveniences are provided for the 
students. 

LIBRARIES. 

The Law School has a library containing a large collection 
of the leading text-books, an almost complete collection of 
the English Reports, and the Reports of the Courts of last 
resort of every state and territory together with the reports 
of the Supreme and Circuit Courts of the United States. 
Students also have the use of Hatch Library which is located 
near the school and contains fifty thousand volumes. They 
also have free access to the Cleveland Public Library of 
almost one hundred and fifty thousand volumes. The library 
facilities offered students are therefore abundant. The Law 
School Library is open daily from 8 a. m. until 5 130 p. m., 
and on four evenings each week from 5 130 p. m. to 9 130 p. m. 



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2l6 THE SCHOOL OF LAW. [1902-I903 

UNIVERSITY ADVANTAGES. 

Students of the Law School are admitted without extra 
charge to such classes in Adelbert College and the Graduate 
School as they are fitted to enter. They also have the 
privilege of attending many public lectures given at Adel- 
bert College, the College for Women, and Case School of 
Applied Science. 

EXPENSES. 

The fee for tuition is one hundred dollars a year. One- 
half of this fee is payable at the beginning of the university 
year, and the other half is payable at the beginning of the 
second half-year. These fees are to be paid to the Bursar 
within ten days of the opening of each half-year. For any 
part of either half-year the tuition fee is fifty dollars. No 
fees are charged for examination. When paid in advance 
the fee for the three years will be two hundred and fifty 
dollars. 

Rooms can be secured in the vicinity of the school for 
from $25 to $75 per year. Table board can be secured for 
from $2.75 to $4 a week. Text-books used in the classes 
cost from $17 to $30 a year, but second-hand books can 
usually be procured at a considerable saving. 

SCHOLARSHIPS. 

A limited number of scholarships may be awarded to 
meritorious students during the year 1902-3. 
For further information address the Dean, 

E. H.HOPKINS, 

Cleveland, O. 



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THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 



GENERAL STATEMENT. 



OHE Dental Department of Western Reserve University 
was organized by the Trustees and Medical Faculty 
of the University in the belief that Dental Surgery 
should be regarded as a branch of Medicine, and with the 
purpose of training students to practice it as a medical 
specialty. The dental students thereof continue to be in- 
structed in several branches of medicine with the medical 
students. It is obvious that $uch an education tends to 
broaden the mind and give a keener insight into the basal 
principles of dentistry. The public also recognizes the better 
qualifications of a medically educated dentist. 

The College is under the control of the University Trus- 
tees, and is thus in every sense a part of the University. 
Its Professors do not control the fees from students, nor do 
they accept fees for extra courses. The Dean of the College 
acts as Bursar for the department, to whom the fees are 
paid and by him transferred to the Treasurer of the Uni- 
versity. 

The College is active in its endeavors to place Dentistry 
upon a high plane. It therefore co-operates as a member 
with the National Association of Dental Faculties, the Na- 
tional Association of Dental Examiners, and the Institute 
of Dental Pedagogics, and conforms to all the rules of these 
Associ^itions. 

Attention is directed to the fact that there are no extra 
fees except as hereinafter indicated, but that the general fee 



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2l8 THE DENTAL COIXEGE. [1902-1903 

covers the expense of laboratory courses in chemistry, 
histology, physiology, dissection, and bacteriology. The 
matriculation fee is paid only once, and there is no diploma 
fee. The College furnishes many instruments for the free 
use of the students, such as vulcanizers, extracting forceps, 
etc., etc., thus saving considerable expense for evefy student 
during the course. 

The course is graded and admirably adapted to preparing 
students for the practice of dentistry. It requires four 
years to complete the course. The studies of the first, sec- 
ond and third years require seven months full attendance in 
each year. All of the technical work is performed in these 
years. The fourth year requires eight and one-half months' 
attendance and is devoted largely to clinical work. The 
Faculty have decided to require constant attendance each 
day in the clinics from 9:30 A. M. to 4:30 P. M. from each 
senior student. This gives an unusual amount of opportu- 
nity for practice, and is the outcome of a large and increas- 
ing amount of clinical material as well as the desire of the 
Faculty to give a thoroughly practical education. 

The city of Cleveland now numbers over 400,000 inhab- 
itants, and the Dental College is located in the center of the 
city. This situation insures a large amount of clinical ma- 
terial. 

Students have free access to Adelbert Library, the Public 
Library, and through the proper channels they can gain ad- 
mission to Case Library. The Young Men's Christian 
Association dining hall is open to all dental students. Ex- 
cellent boarding houses are to be found in the neighborhood. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 219 



FACULTY. 



Charles Franklin Thwing, D. D., LL. D., 55 Bellflower Av. 

President 

Henry Lovejoy Ambler, M. S., D. D. S , M. D., 176 Euclid Av. 

Professor of Operative Dentistry, History of Dentistry, 

and Oral Hygiene. 

Dean of the Faculty, 

Will Henry Whitslar, M. D., D. D. S., 700 Schoficld Bldg. 

Professor of Dental Anatomy and Pathology. 

Secretary and Executive Officer of the Faculty. 

George Henry Wilson, D. D. S., 701 Schofield Bldg. 

Professor of Prosthesis and Metallurgy. 
John William Van Doorn, D. D. S., 455 The Arcade. 

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics, 
George Neil Stewart, M. A., D. Sc, M. D., D. P. H., 

Professor of Physiology. Medical College. 

Carl a. Hamann, M. D., 282 Prospect St. 

Professor of Anatomy and Oral Surgery. 
Perry L. Hobbs, Ph. D., Medical College. 

Professor of Chemistry, 
Daniel Hendrix Zieoler, D. D. S., 726 Rose Bldg. 

Professor of Clinical Operative Dentistry. 
Frederick Clayton Waite, A. M., Ph. D. (Harv.) Medical College. 

Assistant Professor of Histology and Embryology. 
Roger Griswold Perkins, A. B., M. D., Medical College. 

Lecturer on Bacteriology. 
Frederick Augustus Henry, M. A., LL. B., Williamson Bldg. 

Lecturer on Dental furisprudence, 
Weston A. Valleau Price, D. D. S., M. E., 2238 Euclid Av. 

Lecturer on Electro-therapeutics and Dental Electric Appliances. 

Herman Clifford Kenyon, D. D. S., 677 The Arcade. 

Instructor of Prosthetic and Operative Technics and 

Lecturer on Dental Anatomy. 

Douglas Austin Wright, D. D. S., 269 Cedar Av. 

Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry. 



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220 THE DKNTAI, COLI.KGE. [1902-1903 

Jambs Freed Wark, D. D. S., 332 Cedar Av. 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry, 
Frank Lesi«ie Smith, D. D. S., Denver, Col. 

Instructor of Orthodontia, 
John Shei.i« Tiernky, M. D., Rose Bldg. 

Lecturer on Anatomy, 
Joseph Anson Coatbs, D. D. S., 45 Hough Av. 

Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. 
J. Charles McFate, A. B., 739 Superior St. 

Assistant in Histology, 
Shander Harry Solomonson, B. S., 1022 Case Av. 

Assistant in Histology, 
James A. Evans, B. S., Medical Coll^^. 

Assistant in Chemistry, 
Professor George H. Wii^son, 

Superintendent of Laboratories and Clinics, 

Miss K. G. Frankle, 

Clerk of Operative Clinic, 

Mrs. D. a. Wright, 

Clerk of Prosthetic Clinic, 

William Carson, 

fanitor. 



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STUDENTS. 



Arthur Andrew Bates, 
Charles Christian Bachman, 
Will Deville Bissell, 
Leroy Needham Bundy, 
John William Culver, 
Harry Guy Decker, 
George William Douttiel, 
Gerald Felix Doyle, 
Prank Arthur Dunn, 
Walter Hayes Dewey, 
Phillip Henry Pelger, 
Albert Kenyon Friend, 
Joseph Garold Foltz, 
Claude Cameron Gadsby, 
Albert Lorain Griffis, 
D wight Charles Hahn, 
Kdson Hill, 
Willis K. Hoch, 
Bdward John Kocmit, 
Bertram Ward Livingston, 
Harrison Deming Lowrey, 
Isidor Lymon, 
Clarence Elworthy Magee, 
Lloyd Andrew Mapes, 
Frank Sumner Manchester, 
Ralph Edward Miller, 
Kennedy Delyle Park, 
Robert Hartley Ralston, 
Henry Stephen Rogers, 
Frank Garfield Rummel, 
Orrin Franklin Sickman, 
Arthur Albert Smith, M. D., 
Herman Leiter Smith, 
Joseph Elmer Schultz, 
Howard Clinton Standen, 
Clarence Roy Thompson, 
Thomas Carry Van Pelt, 
Robert Lee Wilson, 
Kirkum Glenn Worrell, 
John Simon Windisch, M. D 
Newton John Worley, 



SBNIORS. 




Bayard 


19 Granger St. 


Cleveland 


14 Bailey St. 


Chicago, III, 


958 S. Logan Av. 


Cleveland 


399 Forest St. 


Rural Dale 


The Tavistock. 


Cleveland 


89 Handy St. 


Cleveland 


174 Lyman St. 


Cleveland 


951 Cedar Av. 


Cleveland 


207 Dunham Av. 


Cleveland 


123 White Av. 


New Springfield 


168 Dodge St. 


Cleveland 


1065 Pearl St. 


Canton 


407 Prospect St. 


Buffalo, N, y. 


70 Brownell St. 


Andover 


60 The Morris. 


Bayard 


^ 138 Dodge St. 


Richfield 


407 Prospect St. 


Belleview 


364 Bridge St 


Cleveland 


62 Petrie St. 


Savannah - 


160 Chestnut St. 


Mansfield 


41 Collins PI. 


New York City, 


190 Greenwood St. 


Stratford, Ont,, Can, 701 Superior St. 


Cortland 


156 Dodge St. 


Canton 


The Tavistock. 


Bayard 


19 Granger St. 


Painesville 


160 Dodge St. 


Newman 


84 White Av. 


Sandusky 


The Doan. 


Mansfield 


138 Dodge St. 


Burton City 


124 Handy St. 


Berea 


Berea. 


Trumansburgy N, V, 407 Prospect St. 


Akron 


124 Handy St. 


Cleveland 


168 Crawford Rd. 


Cleveland 


798 Republic St. 


E, Rochester 


300 Euclid Av. 


Cleveland 


Genesee Block. 


Chili, IlL 21 


Hollingsworth Ct. 


Cleveland 


23 Freeman St. 


Glenville 


The Martha. 




Seniors, 41. 


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222 



THE DKNTAL college. 



[1902-I903 



William Bell, 
Byron Hug6 Bowman, 
Arthur Ira Brown,' M. D., 
G. Humphrey Camp, 
Leslie Merle Christie, 
William Clarence Cooper, 
Will Eugene Culp, 
Harry Dixon, 

Andrews George Donaldson, 
Butler White Donaldson, 
Herbert Hamlin Dowd, 
Otto Prank Dusek, 
John William Frazier, 
James Martin Freer, 
Ralph Barclay Holeman, 
Raymond Edward Jackson, 
James Francis Kelley, M. D. 
Frank Paul Leonard, 
John Francis McDonagh, 
Robert Raymond McGeoige, 
Abram Ostrander, 
Willis Le Roy Powell, 
Norval Joseph Renouf, 
Don Arthur Richards, 
Laurin Lindenberger Smith, 
Wilbur Allen Smith, B. S., 
Ossip Solomonow Shube, D. 
Tyrell Strangways, 
J. Menzo Simpson, 
Carl Henry Wads worth, 
Edwin Wendell Walker, 
Thomas Watkins, 
Edward Arthur Womachke, 
Perry W. Workman, 



JUNIORS. 

MassilUm 

LinesviUe^ Pu, 

Cleveland 

Salem 

Columbus ^ Pa, 

Akron 

Cleveland 

Warren 

Scroggsfield 

Lorain 

Cleveland 

Cleveland 

Bridgeport 



188 Chestnut St. 

168 N. Perry St. 

225 Lawn St. 

863 Case Av. 

50 Cheshire St. 

32 Public Square. 

664 Castle Av. 

113 Chestnut St. 

48 Wallace St. 

Lorain. 

41 Kenwood St, 

123 Humboldt St. 

i68>^ Dodge St. 



Edward N. Allison, 
James Blaine Atchison, 
David Boyd Bebout, 
Garner Terry Baldwin, 
John Rogers Bently, 



Leamington^ Ont., Can. 508 Prospect St. 
Afill Village, Pa. 91 Huntington St. 

Grafton 593 Scovill Av. 

, Cleveland 19 Champa St. 

Bucyrus 593 Scovill Av. 

Cleveland 449 W. Madison A v. 
, New Galilee, Pa. 584 W. Madison Av. 

Brampton, Ont., Can. 48 Wallace. 

Oxbow, N. W. T. 508 Prospect St 

Kent Kent] 

Medina 1086 Superior St. 

Troy 168 N. Perry St. 

Nova 1 13 Chestnut St- 

D. S., Russia 632 Woodland Av. 

Bee/on, Ont., Can. 508 Prospect St. 
Dresden, Ont., Can. 968 Prospect St 

Cooperstown, N. Y, 508 Prospect St. 

Alliance 168 N. Perry St. 

Youngstown i68>^ Dodge St. 

Oxford Junction, la. 155 Swiss St. 

Danville 134 Sibley St. 

Juniors, 34. 
freshmen. 

Princeton, Pa. 811 Superior St. 

Salem 508 Prospect St. 

Mechanicstown 136 Huntington St. 

Clevfland 217 J4 Taylor St 

Toledo 536 Prospect St. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



223 



Hugh Ross Binkard, Urbana 127 Huntington St. 

Charles Avis Brown, South Newberry 523 Prospect St. 

Alex James Clark, Cornwall, Ont, 508 Prospect St. 

Carl Herbert Clark, Youngstozvn 19 Riverside Av. 

William Steen Deeley, Sandusky 508 Prospect St. 

James Burton Ellis, Beeton, Ont. 508 Prospect St. 

Lee Maro English, Auirim 593 Scovill Av. 

Don Berry Ford, Cleveland 165 Cedar Av. 

Nye White Goodman, Atwater 1055 First Av. 

Lee Everette Howk, Wellington 13 Ruggles St. 

William Heller, Orville 794 Superior St. 

Frank Henry Huff , Butler, Pa, 81 1 Superior St. 

Lewis H. Hutchins, Leamington, Ont, 508 Prospect St. 

Arthur Wiley Haines, Cleveland 349 Huron St. 

Don McKay Kent, Linesville,Pa. i2DellenbaughAv. 

Alfred Churchill Knapp, Elyria 45 Highland Av. 

C. Stuart Mygatt, Ashland 150 Chestnut St. 
Charles Hiram Maloney, B. E., Penn Line, Pa. 70 Brownell St. 

George Cubbison Mitchell, Grove City, Pa, 154 Cullison St. 

Charles Thomas Magner, Cleveland 443 Euclid Av. 

Clare K. Mattingly. Hinkley 805 Superior St. 

Milton Dodge Neff, Cleveland 45 Archwood Av. 

Edwin Deroger Phillips, Conneaut 805 Superior St. 

Fred Herman Rieske, Cleveland 417 Jennings Av. 

John Fred Risch, Akron 127 Huntington St. 
Geo. Alex Roy Ross, Melita, Manitoba, Can, 508 Prospect St. 

George William Smith, Cleveland 178 Herald St. 

Don Vincent Weedman, Nova 374 Huron St. 

Howard Garfield Weber, Canal Dover 57 Sibley St. 

Clarence Everett Webster, 374 Huron St. 

Harris Reid Cooley Wilson, Cleveland 74 Burt St. 
Merrill Ladrew Winger, A. B., Hayesville, Pa. 798 Republic St. 

Frank Zavodsky, Cleveland 9 Vergcnnes St. 

POST GRADUATE. 

Herman B. Rosenwasser, D. D. S., 722 Woodland A v. 

SUMMARY. 

Seniors 41 

Juniors 34 

Freshmen 38 

Post Graduate i 

Total 114 



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224 THE DKNTAL COLLBGB. [1902-I903 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION. 

Each candidate for admission must be at least eighteen 
years of age, and must furnish to the Secretary at the time 
of matriculating a certificate of good moral character. The 
rules for admission and graduation .are such as obtain in 
the National Association of Dental Faculties, of which the 
College is a member. 

The minimum preliminary education required of entrance 
is a certificate of entrance into the third year of a high school, 
or its equivalent. 

Those who are unable to provide certificates are subject 
to an examination given by an examiner appointed by the 
State School Commissioner. An examination which covers 
the branches required in the first two years of a high school 
will be given to those who do not present certificates. A 
list of the studies will be sent to any desiring to prepare 
for the entrance examination. 

This College does not receive women students. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING. 

Students from recognized dental colleges who present cer- 
tificates of attendance upon one full course of lectures of at 
least seven months, and give evidence satisfactory to the 
heads of the respective departments that they have a good 
knowledge of the work of the first year will be admitted to 
the second. Graduates of reputable medical colleges will 
also be admitted to the work of the second year and will be 
excused from- lectures and examinations upon general 
anatomy, chemistry, histology, physiology, pathology, ma- 
teria medica and therapeutics. They will be required, how- 
ever, to take the courses in operative and prosthetic technics, 
dental pathology and histology. 

Applicants for admission to advanced standing from 
European schools are required, like other applicants, to fur- 
nish properly attested evidence of study and of attendance 

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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 225 

upon lectures, and they must pass the intermediate examina- 
tions. It is required that students from foreign countries 
present certificates from a member of the Advisory Commit- 
tee located in the country from which they come. Students 
from recognized dental schools may enter the senior class 
only upon evidence of having completed work equivalent 
to that of the previous year's in this school. 

Special Notice. — According to a rule of the National As- 
sociation of Dental Faculties credit for a full term cannot be 
given to students who enter more than ten days after the 
opening of the session. But if any student is prevented by 
sickness from entering within the ten days, and if his sick- 
ness is properly certified to by a reputable practicing physi- 
cian, he can enter not later than twenty days from the open- 
ing 'of the session. Students are requested to be present on 
the opening day. 

Applications for admission may be sent any time to the 
Secretary, Dr. W. H. Whitslar, 700 Schofield Bldg., who 
will cheerfully answer any inquiries about the school. As 
chairs in the operatory and places in the laboratory are se- 
lected in the order of matriculation and payment of fees, it 
is advisable that students should have their names registered 
as early as possible. Names can be registered at any time 
for the following session. Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors 
of this college are not required to pay a marticulation fee. 

COURSE OF STUDY. 

The session for 1903-1904 begins on Thursday, October 
firstj and closes on Thursday, June 17. 

Special Notice. — Beginning with this session a four years' 
course of study will be instituted. This will be in conform- 
ity with the rules of the National Association of Dental 
Faculties. 

The students of the first, second and third year complete 
the required work in seven months. 

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226 THK DENTAL COLLEGE. [1902-I903 

The following: table shows the work required in each year 
and the number of hours a week in each subject. 

FIRST YEAR. 

HOURS PER WEEK. 

Chemistry { drbSry. 

Osteology 2. 

General and Dental Histology { ^Z^^^Sory. 

P-'hesis I.^SKtory. 

Dental Anatomy i. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Anatomy — Descriptive 4. 

Reginal Anatomy i. 

Physiology '. 2. 

Crown and Bridge Work i. 

Operative Technics I2}4. 

Prosthetic Technics 15. 

Prosthetic Clinics 15. 

Dissection 

Physics I . 

THIRD YEAR. 

Metallurgy i. 

Orthodontia Technics 12 J4 — 6 weeks. 

Bacteriology 9—6 weeks. 

Dental Pathology i. 

Embryology and Comparative Odontology 2. 

Materia Medica i. 

Operative Dentistry 2. 

Operative Clinics 21. 

Prosthetic Qinics 1254. 

FOURTH YEAR. 

Operative Dentistry .{ ^^ZnO^t 

Operative Clinics 21 

Materia-Medica and Therapeutics 

General Pathology 

Oral Surgery 

Anesthetics 

Jurisprudence 

Dental Electricity and Therapeutics 

Physical Diag^nosis 

Applied Physics 

Neurology 

Ceramics 

Dental History 

Oral Hygiene 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 227 

METHODS OF INSTRUCTION AND DESCRIPTION 
OF COURSES* 



The methods of instruction consist of lectures, recitations, demon- 
strations, clinics, and practical work in the chemical, physiological, 
histological, and bacteriological laboratories. Complete courses are 
given in the technic of operative and prosthetic dentistry, as well as 
in orthodontia and steel. Clinical material is abundant and in great 
variety. Anatomy, chemistry, physiology and histology are studied 
in the Medical College. With the general work in these subjects 
special instruction for dental students is interwoven. 

During the hours for clinics the demonstrators in charge devote 
their whole time to the work of instruction. It will be seen that this 
method gives each student constant personal attention. All practical 
work must be performed in the College, and every effort is made to 
prevent students from practicing dentistry illegally. Regular attend- 
ance at all the courses of instruction and clinics is required. No 
student is excused from the technic or practical courses. 

ANATOMY. 

PROFESSOR HAMANN, DR. TIERNEY. 

The course in anatomy consists of lectures upon descriptive and 
applied anatomy, together with demonstrations and recitations. Ill 
accordance with the needs of dental students especial attention is 
given to the anatomy of the head, neck and alimentary canal. In 
order to facilitate the work in osteology, students of the first year are 
provided with separate bones, which they are permitted to take home 
for purposes of study. For demonstrations upon the cadaver and 
anatomical preparations, the second-year class is divided into sections, 
in order that individual students may have every opportunity of 
becoming familiar with the various parts of the body, and of receiving 
direct personal instruction. Text-book, Gray's Anatomy. 

PRACTICAL ANATOMY. 

The advantages offered for the study of practical anatomy are very 
complete. The anatomical roojn is well lighted, and perfectly heated 
and ventilated. It has twenty-four tables, and is furnished with hot 
and cold water, elevator and every convenience for successfully con- 
ducting the work of dissection. Dissections are made under the 
immediate direction of the professor of anatomy. 



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228 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

PHYSIOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR STEWART. 

Two lectures a week are given to the students of the second year. 
The lectures are illustrated by experiments in the class-room and 
demonstrations in the laboratory. The properties of the circulating 
liquids of the body, blood and lymph, having been first described, the 
mechanical and physiological factors concerned in the maintenance 
of the circulation are studied in detail. The physical and chemical 
phenomena of respiration and the relation of the nervous system to 
the respiratory mechanism are next taken up. Then follows an 
account of digestion, including the secretion of the digestive juices 
and their action on the food substances, the movements of the stom- 
ach and intestines, and the influence of nerves on the functions of the 
alimentary canal. The absorption of the digested food into the blood- 
vessels and lacteals, the changes which the absorbed substances 
undergo in the body, and the channels by which the waste products 
are excreted form the next division of the subject. A general view 
is then taken of the statistics of nutrition and metabolism (including 
Animal Heat), from which the rules governing the constitution of 
dietaries are deduced. The general physiology of muscular and 
nervous tissues having been treated of, the physiological anatomy and 
functions of the brain and spinal cord are described at length. A 
brief account of reproduction and development completes the course. 

Care is taken to emphasize the special importance to the dental 
student of such subjects as the secretion of the saliva, the formation 
of salivary concretions, and the mechanism of mastication and of 
articulation. Text-book, Stewart's Manual of Physiology. 

HISTOLOGY. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR WAITE, MR. MCFATE, MR. SOLOMONSON. 

The course includes a study of the fundamental mammalian tissues, 
followed by a study of the finer anatomy of the principal organs. 
Especial attention is given to the structure of bone, teeth, salivary 
glands, and the structures connected with the mouth cavity. Each 
student stains and mounts the sections which he studies and these 
remain his property. The expense to each man for slides and mate- 
rial is about two dollars. A deposit of two dollars to cover breakage, 
which is returnable at the end of the course, is required. Two two- 
hour laboratory exercises and one recitation per week until February 
1st, Freshman year. This course will probably be somewhat longer 
in 1903-04. 



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1902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 229 

DENTAL EMBRYOLOGY AND HISTOLOGY. 

PROFESSOR WHITSLAR. 

The subject of histology is of so much importance to the dentist 
that notwithstanding the subject is thoroughly taught to the dental 
classes by the professor of histology in the medical department, the 
Faculty continue to have this instruction duplicated, in part, in the 
Dental College. In addition are some comparative studies of the 
teeth. 

The import of this course is to give the student an insight to the 
practical uses of this study, and to inspire further investigation. . 

CHEMISTRY. 

PROFESSOR HOBBS. 

Much care and attention have been devoted to the thorough ar- 
rangement and equipment of the chemical laboratory and lecture 
room according to modem methods. The course includes a series of 
illustrative lectures on inorganic and organic chemistry, showing 
their relationship to dental, medical and sanitary science, and labora- 
tory practice. The latter offers the student advantages in acquiring 
chemical manipulations and favors his acquaintance with the princi- 
ples of chemistry. Five hours a week throughout the year are given 
to the work. 

Special or advanced students will also be furnished the means for 
original work or research, under the guidance of the instructor. 
Text-book, Witthaus* Chemistry. 

OPERATIVE DENTISTRY. 

PROFESSOR AMBLER. 

In this department the teaching is partly accomplished by means of 
lectures and quizzes which constitute a systematic and progressive 
course, beginning with a concise history of ancient and modern den- 
tistry, followed by a careful presentation of the most useful 
methods, appliances and materials employed in filling teeth, together 
with the basal principles which make operative dentistry a positive 
science. The hygiene of the mouth, teeth, artificial dentures, crown, 
and bridge-work will also be considered. 

In the senior year, the operatory offers to the students an opportu- 
nity to become acquainted with the details of office practice ; here he 
can apply the art of filling teeth, and have some opportunity for 
observing the relative value of different methods and materials; 
being advanced from simple to complex operations so fast as his 



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230 THE DENTAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

proficiencj* will justify. Each senior is allowed to operate for twenty- 
one hours weekly; thus he can develop his brain and hand in acquir- 
ing thoughtful manipulative skill. 

Text-book: American Text Book of Operative Dentistry. Am- 
bler's Tin Foil and its Combinations for Filling Teeth. 

DENTAL ANATOMY-OPERATIVE TECHNICS. 

DR. KEN VON. 

One hour each week is given to dental anatomy in the Freshman 
year. The work is carried on principally by the recitation method 
and lessons are regularly assigned for each meeting of the class. 
The subject is thoroughly illustrated both by drawings and large 
models. Especial attention is given to pulp chambers and root 
canals, and their relation to the various surfaces of the teeth. 

The course in operative technics in the second year consists in 
lectures and technical training in the laboratory. The lectures cover 
the technical methods of treating the various condition's found in 
pulp chambers; instrumentation, classification and measurements of 
operating instruments; classification and forms of cavities; and fill- 
ing materials. r 

The technical training includes treating and filling root canals in 
extracted teeth, excavating a large number of typical cavities repre- 
senting each class in rubber tooth forms, filling these cavities with 
the various filling materials, and exercises in engine technic upon 
extracted teeth. 

Note. — The operations in the technic department require a great 
number of natural teeth, and as it is difficult to procure a sufficient 
number, it would be to the interest of every student to obtain as 
many as possible before he returns for the work of the second year. 

PROSTHESIS AND METALLURGY. 

PROFESSOR WILSON. 

Two lectures a week are given upon prosthesis, to the students of 
the first year, and two lectures a week upon crown and bridge-work 
and metallurgy, to the students of the second year. 

The aim is to make this department thoroughly practical, to eluci- 
date the mechanical and artistic principles as well as the science 
involved. 

The technic laboratories are conducted under the guidance of this 
chair. American Text Book of Prosthetic Dentistry, Essig's Metal- 
lurgy fourth edition. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 23 1 

TECHNIC LABORATORIES, 

PROFESSOR WILSON, AND DOCTORS KENYON AND WRIGHT. 

There are two dental laboratory class-rooms, one for students of 
the first, and one for those of the second year; each room is provided 
with sixty benches and with a platform furnished with complete 
laboratory appliances. There is also a dental laboratory furnished 
with lathes, plaster, and apparatus for molding and casting. There 
is a specially fitted forge room. Every effort is made to have the 
methods of instruction as practical as possible. Comprehensive and 
progressive technic courses are given in impressions — vulcanite, cel- 
luloid, cast metal, aluminum, gold, continuous gum (optional), crown 
and bridge-work, steel and orthodontia. 

Seventeen and one-half hours a week for nearly two years are 
devoted to this work. 

PATHOLOGY, 

PROFESSOR WHITSLAR. 

This course covers a description of general and special pathology. 
It consists of an investigation of the principles of pathologfical pro- 
cesses, their histological changes and effects upon the organism. 
Dental pathology is elucidated and the general subject treated so as 
to make th6 subject one of practical utility. The decay of teeth and 
inflammation of the dental pulp and pericementum receive special 
attention. Diseases of the mouth are also discussed. The lectures 
commence in the Junior year and are continued to the end of the 
Senior year. Text-books: Marshall's Injuries and Surgical Diseases 
of the Face, Mouth and Jaws; Burchard's or Barrett's Dental Path- 
ology. 

MATERIA MEDICA AND THERAPEUTICS. 

PROFESSOR VAN DOORN. 

An intelligent knowledge of the properties and application of med- 
icaments rs so important that dental students should be as well 
grounded in this as in anatomy and physiology. The course consists 
of a series of comprehensive lectures upon all important drugs, with 
especial illustrations of their use in dentistry. The methods of ad- 
ministration and application are described in detail. The aim is to 
make these lectures of great practical valu€. Text-book: Gorgas' 
Dental Medicine. 

ORAL SURGERY. 

PROFESSOR HAMANN. 

Instruction in this branch will be given by means of lectures, clin- 
ics, and recitations. The aim is to furnish the student an opportunity 
of acquiring a practical knowledge of this department of surgery. 



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232 THK DENTAL COLLEGE. [1902-1903 

The principles underlying the treatment of pathological conditions 
of the mouth and jaws will be considered. Wounds, fractures, 
tumors, ulcers and congenital defects are among the subjects to be 
discussed, especial attention being devoted to diagnosis. Dental 
students have access to the various hospitals. Marshall's Text Book 
on Diseases and Injuries of Jaw and Mouth. 

ANAESTHETICS. 

PROFESSORS HAMANN AND ZIEGLEX. 

The subject of anaesthetics is elucidated by special instruction. 
Professor Hamann describes and illustrates the uses of chloroform 
and ether in surgical operations about the mouth, and also the dan- 
gers that may arise. Professor Zi^gler presents the subject of anaes- 
thesia from nitrous oxide gas and its combinations with other ele- 
ments, also the uses of local anaesthetics. 

Realizing the danger of anaesthetics, great care is bestowed upon 
th« teaching of these subjects; so that no mistakes will be made. 
The clinics afford the students abundant experience in this college. 

BACTERIOLOGY. 

DR. ROGER G. PERKINS, A. B., M. D. 

The students will take up the various organisms which are found 
in the buccal cavity in health and disease, including those concerned 
in dental decay. The preliminary studies will deal with the chromo- 
genic organisms, until the students have acquired the necessary 
technique, when the bacteria peculiar to the mouth and those which 
use the mouth as a portal of entry in lesions of the buccal cavity or 
more general infections will be carefully investigated. 

Special instruction will be given as to the prefer methods of ster- 
ilization of instruments, and asepsis in dental surgery. Microscopi- 
cal sections of decayed teeth will be given out to the students, and 
stained to illustrate the invasion of the tissues by the bacteria of 
dental decay. 

ORTHODONTIA. 
DR. FRANK L. SMITH (Denver, Col.) 

The course in orthodontia consists of lectures, technic work and 
practical cases. 

The didactic instruction is given by Dr. Smith and is supplemented 
by the demonstrator who has direct care of the practical and technic 
work. The lectures are illustrated by lantern slides, models . and 
various appliances especially constructed for the purpose of instruc- 
tion. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 233 

The technic course is for the juniors and consists in the construc- 
tion of material and a technic apparatus which is to be considered in 
the final senior examination in this branch. The practical work is 
done by senior students and offers great advantages, for the clinical 
material is abundant. Various methods of correcting irregularities 
of the teeth are considered and their use and value explained. 

Junior students attend the regular course of lectures which are 
given to the senior students in this department 

JURISPRUDENCE. 

7. A. HSNRY^ Ji. A., LL. B. 

The legal responsibilities by dental practitioners and also the rela- 
tions of the public to the dentist are clearly explained by the pro- 
fessor of this department. A knowledge of the subject of dental law 
is required in the course of instruction, and an examination at its 
close is given. 

ELECTRiaTY. 

DS. PRICE. 

A thorough course of instruction is given in electro-physics and 
electro-chemistry, and the practical application of their principles in 
the processes employed in dentistry. It includes lectures, laboratory 
experiments and clinical demonstrations. Cataphoresis will be given 
special consideration and the various current controllers and millia- 
meters are studied by the students and thoroughly demonstrated clin- 
ically. The bleeching of teeth by means of electric currents with 
various agents, the treatment of pyorrhea alveolaris and aveolar 
abscess, and the use of the X Rays for locating unerupted teeth are 
elucidated. Instruction is also given in the construction and manage- 
ment of electric dental engines and motors, methods of controlling 
various kinds of currents, the galvanic effect and electrolytic products 
•f various filling materials in the mouth, etc. Students should be 
familiar with the general principles of electricity before commencing 
the course. Text-book : Meadowcraft's A. B.. C. of Electricity. 

DENTAL CERAMICS. 

PROFESSOR WILSON. 

A special course of instruction in dental ceramics is provided for 
those who desire to studv this subject, but it is not obligatory. The 
course includes all varieties of porcelain work that the dentist re- 
quires to use and is amply illustrated. Where students are able to 
provide materials of their own extra instruction is given free of 
charge. 



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234 '"'HE DENTAL CX)LI*EGE. [1902-1903 

CUNICS. 

The operative and prosthetic clinics provide all kinds of clinic 
material. The prosthetic dinic is open from 9 130 to 12 a. m., and the 
operative clinic is open from i to 4:30 p. m. In the first year the 
entire time is devoted to technic courses in prosthesis. In the sec- 
ond year technic courses are given in crown and bridge-work, also 
orthodontia. After these the student is assigned to practical cases of 
artificial dentures as well as operating in the mouth. It is necessary, 
however, to complete the operative technic course before cases are 
assigned in the operatory. In the third and fourth year the course is 
made as practical as possible. The morning clinic is devoted entirely 
to prosthetic work, crowns and bridges, and orthodontia. The after- 
noon clinic is devoted entirely to the filling of teeth, extracting, and the 
various surgical operations that can be performed in the college with- 
out hospital attendance. The extensive operations are performed in 
the hospital. Thus students are provided with an exceptionally large 
amount of actual clinical experience. The many clinical cases afford 
an excellent opportunity for the use of anaesthetics. In rotation the 
students are assigned to extracting and the use of anaesthetics under 
the immediate supervision of a skilled demonstrator. Every student 
thus gains experience that prepares him for actual practice. The 
location of the college in the heart of the city, where the street cars 
center, enables the college to have an unusual advantage in securing 
a large clinic. 

Students are required to attend all clinics daily and perform opera- 
tions faithfully. At the opening of the session each senior has a chair 
assigned to him. 

TEXT-BOOKS. 

First Year: Gray's Anatomy, Schaeffer's Histology, Witthaus' 
Chemistry, American Text-Book Prosthetic Dentistry, Broomell's 
Anatomy and Histology of the Teeth and Mouth. 

Second Year: Stewart's Physiology, Essig's Metallurgy, Burch- 
ard's or Barrett's Pathology. 

Third Year: Marshall's Injuries and Diseases of Face, Mouth 
and Jaws, Gorgas' Dental Medicine, American Text-Book Operative 
Dentistry, Ambler's Tin Foil and its Combinations for Filling Teeth, 
Meadowcraft's A. B. C. of Electricity. 

Books of Reference: Dictionary, Gould; American System of 
Dentistry; Garrettson's Oral Surgery; Week's Operative Technics; 
Evan's Crown and Bridge Work; Mitchell's Dental Chemistry; Mil- 
ler's Micro-organisms of the Mouth ; Eckley's Anatomy of the Head 
and Neck; Cryer's Internal Anatomy of the Face; Cigrand's His- 
tory of Dental Prosthesis. 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RBSBRVK UNIVERSITY. 235 

GENERAL INFORMATION 



TERMS AND VACATIONS. 

The College session will open on October ist, each year, 
unless this date falls on Sunday, in which case the opening 
shall be on October 2nd. 

There will be a holiday vacation of two weeks, beginning 
on December 20th. No College exercises will be held on 
Thanksgiving Day or Decoration Day. 

THE DENTAL BUILDING. 

When the College of Dentistry was established in 1892, 
rooms were assigned to it in the building erected by Mr. 
John L. Woods for the Medical College; but the work in 
both dentistry and medicine has been so much extended and 
the number of students in each department has so rapidly 
increased, that the Trustees of the University have provided 
separate accommodations for the Dental School in the new 
and handsome Bangor Building, situated next to the Young 
Men's Christian Association's building on Prospect Street. 
Already seven sessions have been held in the new building, 
and they have proved its facilities to be excellent. Each 
room has perfect light and ventilation. The laboratories, 
one for the Freshmen and one for the Juniors, with an ad- 
joining room for both classes, are arranged for an advanced 
system of teaching. There is also a clinical laboratory for 
the Seniors and Juniors. Each room contains a complete 
laboratory equipment. Many tools and instruments are pro- 
vided for the students without charge. The operating room 
contains forty chairs and is fully equipped. The surgical 
and extracting room contains a standing amphitheatre. The 
building has been planned to accommodate one hundred 
and fifty students. When this number is reached, admis- 
sion to the Freshman class will be by a suitable method of 
competition. It is advised that students matriculate early. 



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236 THB DBNTAL COI^LBGB. [1902-1903 

DENTAL MUSEUM AND LIBRARY. 
A Dental Museum and Library is being formed. It is 
earnestly requested of those who have specimens or litera- 
ture of any interest to dental students, that they make con- 
tributions. Each specimen and book receives proper care^ 
and credit is given the donor. 

DEGREE. 
The degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery is conferred upon 
all students not under twenty-one years of age, who have 
satisfactorily completed the required course of study, paid 
all required fees, passed all examinations, perfonned such 
practical operations in the operative and prosthetic depart- 
ments, as may be required, and conformed with such other 
regulations as the faculty may prescribe. Graduates of 
Dentistry of other institutions are required to attend one full 
course and comply with all the n^^lations to the senior year 
in order to receive a degree from Western Reserve Univer- 
sity. Candidates who attain a general average of ninety per 
cent, in all their examinations receive honorable mention. 

FEES AND OTHER EXPENSES. 

The fees are as follows: (i) Matriculation fee of five 
dollars. This is paid only once. (2) An annual fee of one 
hundred dollars, is payable at the opening of the term. 
These fees are not returnable. 

Students who cannot pay the whole amount on the open- 
ing day may pay fifty dollars. After January 10 of the 
college year there will be fifty-five dollars due, providing the 
whole amount is not paid on that date. (3) An annual ex- 
amination fee of ten dollars, due April i. 

Students who desire to pay for the entire four years'' 
course by December ist of the first year will be allowed a 
reduction of fifty dollars on the whole amount. There is 
no diploma fee. No fee is required for any of the laboratory 
courses or dissection. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 237 

EXAMINATIONS. 
No Student is permitted to present himself for examina- 
tion who has not paid all dues. A fee of ten dollars for 
examinations is required April ist. 

Students who have failed in any branches are given an 
opportunity for a second examination, but it shall not be 
later than December ist in the succeeding year. A student 
may register in the succeeding year but will not be allowed 
to continue in it after Decenrber ist if he is deficient in 
more than two branches. 

A fee of two dollars is required for a re-examination. A 
second re-examination can only be g^ven with the consent 
of the faculty. 

There are no scholarships or special prizes. 
Students are liable for breakage in the chemical and 
histological laboratories. An expense of about two dollars 
for miscroscopic slides is necessary in the first year, but they 
remain the property of the student. 

No student is permitted to enter the laboratories and op- 
eratory until he present a receipt for fees, and also is pro- 
vided with the necessary equipment of instruments and tools, 
books and instruments can be bought within a short distance 
of the college. 

The College fees are paid to the Dean. 

The expenses for each year, including fees, are as follows : 

FIRST YEAR. 

Matriculation (paid only once) $ 5 00 

Tuition 100 00 

Instruments 26 00 

Books 24 00 

Examination at close of term lo oo 

165 OOi 

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238 THE DBNTAI, COLLEGE. [1902-I905 

SECOND YEAR. 

Tuition $100 00 

Instruments, including engine, about 90 00 

Books II 00 

Examination at close of term 10 00 

211 00 

THIBD YEAR. 

Tuition $100 00 

Books 17 50 

Examination at close of term 10 00 



127 50 



FOURTH YEAR. 

Tuition $ioo 00 

Examination fee 10 00 

No Diploma Fee. 

no 00 

Good board may be had from $2.50 to $5.00 a week ; good 
accommodations for board and lodging, from $4.00 a week 
and upwards. Students applying to the Janitor, William 
Carson, at the College building, as soon as they reach the 
city, will *be directed to reliable boarding houses, of which 
he has a carefully prepared list 

SOOALLIFB. 

The College seeks to surround its students with the best 
influences, and the Faculty therefore encourages them to 
exert their talents in commendable directions. During the 
session of 1896-97 a flourishing dental society was organized 
jfor the purpose of placing serious responsibilities upon the 
students, and of inculcating true professional ideas. Each 



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I902-I903] WBSTKRN RBSERVE UNIVERSITY. 239 

year this society elects its own officers and the president is 
made Curator of the College Museum, which office he holds 
during his Senior year. A musical club is one of the inter- 
esting organizations to those musically inclined. Other so- 
cieties and organizations exist among the students. Many 
of the students become members of the Young Men's 
Christian Association, whose building is next door to the 
College, and thus have use of a fine g3minasium and other 
means of amusement and recreation. A special rate of 
membership is made to students. There is a branch associa- 
tion of the Y. M. C. A. formed among the dental students. 
They hold meetings weekly. 

For further information, address the Secretary of the 
Faculty, Dr. W. H. Whitslar, 700 Schofield Bldg., Cleve- 
land, Ohio, who will cheerfully answer all inquiries. 



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240 



THE DENTAL CX)IJ,EGE. 



[1902-1903 



GRADUATES- 



WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY DENTAL COLLEGE. 



1894. 



Anderson, C. A. H., M. D Cleveland. 

DeUrfae, G. O Perry. 



Mitchell, H.B Canton. 

Rigga,J. P. H Pittaburgh, Pa. 



1895. 



Acker, P. H Cleydand. 

Bleasdale, L. L.— (deceaaed) 

Bnchtel, A. P Akron. 

Bnrrowa,J. H Cleveland. 

Glas, J. W Parker'a Landing, Pa. 

Kennedy, G. A Kent. 

MoUen, D. E Cleveland. 

Parsons, P. O Cleveland. 

Roaenateel, J. J Cleveland. 



Sherman, W. W WUlonghby. 

Spargur, F. J Cleveland. 

Stevenson, D. R Hubbard, O. 

Suhr, R. A Cleveland. 

Vinez, L. S Louiaville, O. 

Wallace, R. D Scio, O. 

Waaaer, G. N Cleveland. 

Zoecklcr, H.J Pittsburgh, Pa. 



1896. 



Ebersole, W. G Cleveland. 

Haldy, W. O Cleveland. 

Pagan, P. H Cleveland. 

George, J. W B. Liverpool, O. 



Hurd, C. E Cleveland. 

Thomas, J. L Greenfield, O. 

VanMeter, J. S Gallon, O. 



1897. 



Anderson, F. S Richmond, Ind. 

Armstrong, L. S Cleveland. 

Baldwin, C. R Cleveland. 

Bcal,M.J Guy's MilU, Pa. 

Beal, W. L Mars, Pa. 

Blair, C. F Sandusky, O. 

Bolton, W.D 

Bosworth, L. L Cleveland. 

Davis, C. W Cleveland. 

Dixon, W. R Cleveland. 

Fairbanks, D. H Cleveland. 

Fink, C. A SmithviUe, W. Va. 

Grose, B. F Wellington,©. 

Higgins, A. L Bucyrus, O. 

Honeywell, W. C Scranton, Pa. 

King, H. M Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Ludwick, F. L Glenville O. 

Megginson, W. M Toledo. 

Miles, F.L Cleveland. 

* Moyer, W. H Montevidio, Minn. 

Moran, P. A Cleveland. 

Morrison, M. H Cleveland. 

Osborne, J. A Hudson, O. 

Parker, R. W Cleveland. 

Parsons, A. L Cleveland. 

Ramaley, M. C Cleveland. 

Spargur, W.P Wdlsville, N. Y. 

Stephan, W. J.— (deceaaed) 

Smith, W.P Cleveland. 

Saunders, B. B Blyria, O. 

Wallace, C.F Allegheny, Pa. 

West, F. L Cleveland. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



241 



1898. 



Chapman, P. P Cleveland. 

Dudgeon, F. O Clereland. 

Draime, C. S Canton. 

Bdson, C. R Cleveland. 

Elder. C. D.— (Deceased). 

Bnglander, I Cleveland. 

Fisher, A. C Syracuse, N. Y. 

Oillen, W. W Youngstown. 

Haight,P.T Oakland, la, 

Hervey, G. B Mt. Vernon. 

Johnson, T. B Cleveland. 

Keck, H. B Akron. 

Keliey, P. R Ashtabula, O. 

^Kenyon, H. C Cleveland. 



Maddock, P.E Blyria. 

Matthews, P. R Salem, O. 

McDm,J.W Cleveland. 

McGannon, J. A Dayton. 

McGannon, P.J Cleveland. 

Noland, P. P Big Plain. 

Quirk, B.B Detroit, Mich. 

♦Reeves, J. B OrweU. 

Renkert, O. W Akron. 

Rogers, E. B Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

Rybak,J.F Cleveland. 

Sprague, P. E Youngstown. 

Wallace, R. H Cleveland. 

Vincent, L,. C, Ph. B Ravenna. 



1899. 



Allison, G. B Akron. 

Andrews, R. W Pittsburgh. 

Apple, A. D Meadville, Pa. 

Atwater, A. L Sandusky. 

♦Auxtcr, L. D Oak Harbor. 

Baldwin, H. A Wadsworth. 

♦Barnes, V. E Cleveland. 

Bridgeman, G . . . New Martinsville, W. Va. 

Costcllo, W. E Cleveland. 

Baby, H. P Wooster. 

Finch, L. L Obcrlin. 

Gilmore, S. T Youngstown. 

Grossman, B Cleveland. 

Gunn, F.J Cleveland. 

Hatch, S.E Cleveland. 

Keliey, J. C Geneva. 



•Mistr,J Cleveland. 

♦Mottinger, C. C Akron. 

Nash, J. K Youngstown. 

Norton, E. L Madison. 

Olds, F. L Cleveland. 

•Rupert, J. A Meadville, Pa. 

Stevenson, P. W.— (deceased) 

Stewart, C. R London, Bng. 

Taylor, C. B Cleveland. 

VanDorsten, O.J Canton. 

Weaver, S. M Cleveland. 

Webber, J. B Medina. 

White, C.N Cleveland. 

♦Wright, D. A Cleveland. 

♦Zicgler, D. H Cleveland. 



1900. 



Bishop, P. L Cleveland. 

Borland, R. G Conneaut. 

Boylan, L. D .^ .Newton Falls. 

Bunn, J. D Salineville. 

Burkhart, W. R., M. D Cleveland. 

Clapp, H.M Utica,N. Y. 

Currie, R. E Eldred, Pa. 

Darrah, H. C Cleveland. 

Diffenbacher, W. F Pt. Clinton. 

Doyle, J. T Cleveland. 

Duffy, E. B Taunton, Mass. 

Dusek, J. I, Cleveland. 

Eggert, P. G Cleveland. 

Elder, P. B Bellevue, Pa. 

Fucnfstueck, G. T Wausan, Wis. 



Gilmore, J. I., M. A Youngstown. 

Haas, P. A Cleveland. 

Hall, W. C Lorain. 

Jacobs, D. R Youngstown. 

Jones, T.J Cleveland. 

Llndhorst, R. H Cleveland . 

Morris, W. A Cleveland. 

Nichols. W. A Medina. 

Osborne, A. O Cleveland. 

Schneider, O. J Cleveland. 

Smith, C. L Cambridge Springs, Pa. 

StcnU, P. L Shelby. 

Terry, T.H Cleveland. 

♦Tiffany, W.B Clyde. 

Wark, J. P Cleveland. 



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242 



THE DENTAI, COI^LEGE. 



[1902-1903 



190I 

Aldrich,L. D ..Cleveland. 

Belden, R. B Cleyeland. 

^Chamberlin, R. B Twinsburg. 

Chapin, W. F Clereland. 

Bndle, A. J Blyria. 

Pinch, P. W Rlchford, N. Y. 

Fletcher, C. B Geneva. 

Gillette, J. B Cleveland. 

•Gillie, W.J Cleveland. 

Gongler, C. V Inland. 

Henahan,J. P Cleveland. 

Henninger, D. H Akron. 

1902. 

Brewater, W. R Chagrin Palls. 

Carbon, O. L Ashtabula. 

Chambers, B. B Warren. 

•Coatea, J. A Cleveland. 

Davis, R. B Cleveland. 

DeArment, L. L Conneant Lrake 

Duff, A. If Lakeside. 

Fairbanks, J. W Yonngstown. 

Graff, W. B., M. D Cleveland. 

^Graham, H. D Mercer, Pa. 

Hawn, C. B Yonngstown. 

Irwin, G.H Calcutta. 

Kituteiner, R Cleveland. 

Leonard, R. N Bellevue. 

Leonard, W. M Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

*Bonorab]e Mention. 



Hitchcock, G. F Jefferson. 

Holmes, H. C Cleveland. 

Maxwell, A. W Cleveland. 

Payne, A Mantua. 

Rioe,S. W Cleveland. 

Rogers, G. C Cleveland. 

Shepherd, C. O.— (deceased) 

Sproul, W. A Plain Grove, Pa. 

Strong, H. F Cleveland. 

Wallace, A. B Mercer, Pa. 

Wasson, L. P Cleveland. 

Line, C. E Rochester, N. Y. 

McConkey, J. C Canton. 

McKerrall,J Cleveland. 

McLean, J. C CarletonPl., Ont., Can. 

Messecar , L. A Green Springs. 

Nicholson, A. W Sandusky. 

Patterson, T. G Norwalk. 

Plant, A. C Wheeling, W. Va. 

Rdsser, O. H Cleveland. 

Rosenwasser, H. B Cleveland. 

Sadler, R.B Cleveland. 

Saum, I. M Cleveland. 

Spieth, W. O Warren. 

Strong, O. F Carleton PI., Ont., Can. 

Wearstler, H. O Wadsworth. 

Wood, A. L Lorain. 



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1902-1903] WBSTISRN RBSERVK UNIVBRSITY. 243 



THE SUMMER SCHOOL, LECTURES 
TO TEACHERS* 



There is also held in June or July of each year a Sum- 
mer School. The first session occurred in June, 1902. 
Among the topics considered were : ' 

Growth and Heredity in their relations to Education. 

Race Pedagogy or the Education of Primitive Peoples. 

Motor Education. 

The Study of Nature. 

Supervision. 

School Management. 

The Philosophy of School Processes. 

The Meaning and Aim of Education. 

Among: the lecturers were : 

President G. Stanley Hall, Clark University. 
Miss Sarah L. Arnold, Dean of Simmons College, Boston. 
Professor M. V. O'Shea, University of Wisconsin. 
Superintendent Lewis H. Jones, Cleveland. 

The enrollment was one hundred and seventy. A sim- 
ilar school will be held in the summer of 1903. 

Courses of lectures for teachers are also offered in the 
University. A course in the current year, given by Pro- 
fessor W. H. Hulme on "The Historical Development of 
Engflish Literature to the Beginning of the Nineteenth 
Century" was taken up by seventy-two teachers from the 
public schools of Cleveland. A course by Professor Henry 
E. Bourne on "Aspects of European History Important to 
Teachers of American History" enrolls one hundred and 
two teachers. 



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GENERAL SUMMARY. 

TRUSTEES^ INSTRUCTORS AND OTHER OFFICERS. 

Trustees. 

Western Reserve University only 7 

Adelbert College only 7 

Members of Both Corporations 18 

— 32 
Advisory Councii, (College for Women) 29 

Corresponding Members 15 

-- 44 

Instructors. 

Professors 57 

Associate Professors 4 

Assistant Professors 5 

Lecturers 11 

Instructors 14 

Demonstrators 26 

Assistants 19 

Non-Resident Lecturers (1901-1902) 4 

— 140 

Librarians and Library Assistants 4 

Other Officers 9 

— 13 
Total 153 

STUDENTS. 

Adelbert College 212 

The College for Women 244 

The Graduate School 20 

The Medical College 95 

The Law School 95 

The Dental College 114 

Total 780 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



245 



APPENDIX. 

DEGREES CONFERRED AT COMMENCEMENT, 1902, 

ADEI.BERT COI^LEGE. 

BACHBI^ORS OP ARTS. 



John Alvin Album, 

[magna cum laude), 
Wilfred Henry Alburn, 

{magna cnm laude)^ 
Edwin Clare Caldwell, 
Claude Leroy Difford, 

{cum laude), 
Oarence Earl Drayer, 

{magna cum laude), 
Frank Brown Evarts, 

{mqgna cum laude)^ 
Harry Lindsley Findlay, 
Henry Leonard Mack, 
Ralph Woodward Mead, 



Charles Augustus Morris, 

{magna cum laude), 
Herbert Gans Muckley, 

{summa cum laudc), 
Walter Worthington Nims, 
Edward Peterka, 
William Harper Rider, 
Edward Henry Sensel, 

{magna cum laude)^ 
Miles Reuben Southworth, 

{magna cum laude), 
George Taylor, 
Lewis Blair Williams, 

{magna cum laude), 
Oliver Amos Wright. 



BACHBX^ORS OP I^STTBRS. 



Joseph Warren Conner, 
Daniel Robert Fairfax, 
Robert Thompson Gage, 
Raymond Hobart, 



George William Say well, 
{magna cum laude), 

Frederick William Uhlman, 

Owen N. Wilcox, 

{magna cum laude). 



BACHBI«ORS OP PHII^SOPHY. 



Richard Emmet Collins, 

{magna cum laude), 
John Fish, 

{cum laude) J 
Charles Samuel McKee, 
Roy Rybum Moffett, 
Herman Joel Nord, 
{cum laude), 
Harry Benton Parrott, 
Raymond Vincent Phelan^ 
James Douglas Pilcher, 



John Philander Rorabeck, 
Frank North Shankland, 

{magna cum laude), 
Edwin Wesley Suits, 

{magna cum laude). 
Homer Fordyce Swift, 
Philip Hyatt Tarr, 
James Washburn Waite, 
Oliver Arkenbuigh Weber, 
Arthur Garfield Wilcox. 



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246 APPENDIX. [1902-1903 

THB COI^WGB FOR WOMBN. 
BACHBl«ORS OP ARTS. 

Helen Anderson Allen, iZara Belle Rhoades, 

Gertrude Pearl Badger, Isabelle Dolores Roberts, 

Bertha Elizabeth Beck, Lucia Harriet Sanderson, 

Helen Olive Bouldon, Hannah Eva Selby, 

Evelyn Maude Collins, Mabel Katherine Thomas. 

BACHBIX>RS OF I«BTTBRS. 

Barbara Sigwalt Brassington, Orpha Maud Peters, 

Cordelia Elizabeth Oaflin, Thalia Maud Reese, 

Mabel Fay Clark, Harriet Marie Skeel, 

Mathilde Emma Junge, Margaret May Skeel, 

Martha Lueke, Ida Young, 

Susan Ray McKean, Cornelia Anna Zismer. 
May Jane Meacham, 

BACHEI/ORS OF PHILOSOPHY. 

Isabella Beaton, Effie McKinney, 

Charlotte Edwina Black, Rebecca Syville Markowitz, 

Arabella Swift Canfield, Katherine Marie O'Brien, 

Bessie Mildred Chandler Lila Pauline Robeson, 

Minnie Anna Creedon, Jeannette Eunice Sague, 

Sarah Smith Harbine, Carrie Belle Smith, 

Eva Minerva Hauxhurst, Grace Alice Taft, 

Mabel Ainslie Holland, Bessie Marian Templeton, 

Lura Claire Kurtz, Mabel Walker. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOI.. 

MASTBRS OP ARTS. 

Franklin Turner Jones, A. B., Frederick Jacob Menger, 

Daniel Acker Lehman, Ph. B., Ida Catherine Messer, B. L. 

THB MEDICAL COLLEGE. 

DOCTORS OB MBDICINB. 

Jacob B. Austin, Ph. B., Claude W. Lane, 

John W. Boss, A. B., John F. Lindsay, 

E. D. Brown, William J. Manning, 

Brady B. Buck, John Mohr, 



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I902-I903] WESTERN RESBRVK UNIVERSITY. 



247 



Mars W. Carpenter, 

Percy W. Cobb, B. S., 

Chris E. Corlett, 

Herbert E. Edwards, 

C. V. Garver, 

Arthur Leroy Garrison, 

Walter A. Haldy, 

Walter E. Hatch, 

James J. Hathaway, 

George R. Hays, 

Jesse E. Hunt, 

Nathaniel M. Jones, Jr., B. L , 

Emanuel Klaus, 

Max H. Klaus, 



William C. Park, 
Ben Peskind, B. S., 
John R. Philen, 
Carlos E. Pitkin, 
Henry V. Riewel, 
Clarence D. Selby, 
James A. Sherbondy, 
Parker F. Southwick, 
Alvin S. Storey, B. S., 
B. C. Tamutzer, ' 
Thomas J. Taylor, 
John H. Weber, Ph. B., 
B. W. Wilson, A. B., 
David Yohannon, A. B. 



THE LAW SCHOOL. 



BACHELORS OF JJLW. 



Max Emerson Brunswick, 
Fred Samuel Chamberlain, 
John Aldrich Chamberlain, A. 
Sigmund J. Deutsch, A. B., 
Edward John Hobday, A. B., 
Horatio Clark Gould, Ph. B., 
Earl Hibbard Jaynes, A. B., 
Manuel Levine, 
Walter Scott McAaron, 
James Edward Mathews, 



James Milton McCleary, 

Walter Edward Myers, B. S., 

Charles Pitch Ohl, B. S., 

James Orlando Orr, 

Lancelot Packer, 

Niles Abraham Sponseller, 

Mark Lawrence Thomsen, A. B., 

William Paul Trinter, 

Julian Woodworth Tyler, A. B., 

Harvey J. Webster. 



THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 
DOCTORS OF DENTAL SURGERY. 



William Roy Brewster, 
George Lynn Carbon, 
Elmer Elsworth Chambers, 
Joseph Anson Coates, 

{honorable mention ) . 
Ralph Edmund Davis, 
Lee Lamont De Arment, 
Alfred Lawrence Duff, 
John Wilson Fairbanks, 
William B. Graff, M. D., 



Clinton Edward Line, 
James Calvin McConkey, 
John McKerrall, 
James Scott McLean, 
Xyman Allen Messecar, 
Albert William Nicholson, 
Thomas Guy Patterson, 
Albert C. Plant, 
Otto Henry Reisser, 
Herman B. Rosenwasser, 



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248 APPBNDIX. [1902-I903 

Herman Douglas Graham, Ralph Edward Sadler, 

(honorable mention). Ira Maphis Samn, 

Charles Brigham Hawn, William Otto Spieth, 

George Hugh Irwin, Oscar Frederick Strong, 

Richard Kitzsteiner, Howard Oclydes Wearstler, 

Ralph Nosker Leonard, Archie Leon Wood. 
Walter Mitchell Leonard. 



HONORS AND PRIZES. 

ADELBKRT COLLEGE. 

Commencement Honors 

First //bffw— Herbert Gans Muckley. 
Second Honor— George William Saywell. 
Third Honor— Wilfred Henry Album. 

/unior Honors 

Equal Scholarship Honors to 
Robert Emmet Finley, Herbert Ernest Parker, 

Feist M. Strauss. 
Phi Beta Kappa Society 

Elected in June, 1901. 

John Alvin Album, Wilfred Henry Album, 

Richard Emmet Collins, Herbert Gans Muckley, 

George William Sa3rwell. 
Nominated for Membership, June, 1902. 

SENIORS. 
Owen N. Wilcox, Lewis Blair Williams, 

Miles Reuben Southworth, Prank Brown Evarts, 

Clarence Earl Drayer. 

JUNIORS. 

Robert Emmet Finley, Feist M. Strauss, 

Herbert Ernest Parker. 
The Two Year Honor in Chemistry to 

Clyde Lottridge Cummer, John Predric Oberlin. 

The Two Year Honor in German to 

John Adam Eisenhauer, Jr. 
The Two Year Honor in Greek to 

Carl Peter Paul Vitz. 



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1 902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 249 

The Tivo Year Honor in MathemaHcs to 

Kenneth Bthelbert Hodgman. 

THE HANDY PHII«OSOPHICAI« PRIZES 

First /Vt^^— Wilfred Henry Alburn. 
Second /Vt.2r^— Philip Hyatt Tarr. 
HARRIET PBI.TON PERKINS SCHOLARSHIP 
Feist M. Strauss. 

PRESIDENT'S PRIZES 

For the highest records for the Freshman Year in : 
English 

First Prize — Oliver Jones. 
Second Prize — ^Andrew Bracken White, 
French and German {^Modern Language Course) 

Andrew Bracken White. 
German ( Classical and Latin Scientific Courses) 

Gomer Abraham Cook. 
Greek 

Bainbridge Cowell. 
Latin 

Budd Noble Merrills. 
Mathematics 

First Prize—Andrew Bracken White. 
Second Prize — Budd Noble Merrills. 
Gymnc^um 

Homer Lynn Nearpass. 

Junior-Sophomore Oratorical Contest 

First Junior Prize — Bradley Hull, Jr. 

First Sophomore Prize — Maurice Griffin, Jr. 

Second Prize {irrespective 0/ class) — Burton W. Knisely. 

THE HOLDEN PRIZE 

For the best Essay by a Senior 

Lewis Blair Williams. 
Honorable Mention — Harry Benton Parrott. 
THE RUPERT HUGHES PRIZES 

For the best Poems 

First Prize — Robert Emmett Finley. 
Second Prize — ^Wilfred Henry Album. 

THE DEBATE PRIZE 

Divided equally between 

Edward John Hobday, 
Charles Augustus Morris, 
Herman Joel Nord. 
17 



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250 APPBNDIX. [1902-1903 

THB COLLEGB FOR WOMEN. 
PRBSIDBNT*S PRIZES 

Far Freshman Work in ike Gymnasium 

First— VAXbl Preedlander. 
Second— mi\h Mabel Hill, 

of the Preshman Class. 
THB HOLDBN PRIZB 

For the best Essay by a Junior or Senior 

Blanche Genevieve Cole, 

of the Junior Class. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATIONS. 



ADELBERT COLI^EGE- 
President, JxnxJB Chari,bs R. Grant, 1872. 
Vice Presidents, C. A. Gates, 1873. 
C. B. Hali,, 1873. 
Recording Secretary, John Dickbrman, 1891. 
Corresponding Secretary, Sherman Artbr, 1886. 
Necrologist, Rev. D. T. Thomas, 1885. 

VISITING COMMITTEE OF THE AI,UMNI. 

Rev. E. p. Ci,eavei^nd, 1878, W. E. Cushing, 1875, 
Rev. a. C. Lui>w)w, 1894. 

THE COLLEGE FOR WOMEN. 
President, Mary Hoover Cohacott, 1894. 
Vice President, Bsthbr Allen, 1900. 
Recording Secretary, Alice Drake, 1901. 
Corresponding Secretary, Margaret Thomas, 1901. 
Treasurer, Louise Bakbr, 1900. 

finance committee. 
Helen M. Smith, 1894, Grace B. Lottridge, 1897. 

THE MEDICAL COLLEGE. 
President, Dr. J. P. Sawyer, 1883. 
Vice Presidents, Dr. L. F. Switzer, 

Dr. J. S. Wood. 
Recording Secretary, Dr. G. C. Ashmun, 1873. 
Corresponding Secretary, Dr. W. O. Osborn, 1888. 
Treasurer, Dr. E. B. Rhodes. 



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I902-1903] WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 25 1 

THE I.AW SCHOOL. 
President, F. W. Grebn, 1896. 
Vice Presidents^ D. B. Woi^cott, 1899. 

W. E. White, 1901. 
Secretary, D. G. Jabgbr, 1900. 
Treasurer, J. L. Cannon, 1898. 

THE DENTAL COLLEGE. 
President, Robert D Wallace, D. D. S., 1895. 
Vice President, L. L. Bosworth, D. D. S., 1897. 
Secretary-TVeasurer, Varney E. Barnes, D. D. S., 1899. 



LOCAL ASSOCIATIONS. 

FOUNDBD 1902. 



NEW YORK ASSOCIATION. 

jyesident, Samuel E. Williamson, 1864. 
Vice President, Thomas Day Seymour. 1870. 
Secretary, Arthur C. McGiffert, 1882. 
Treasurer, Charles H. Scholey, 1895. 

WASHINGTON ASSOCIATION. 
f^esident, Robert W. Taylor, 1872. 
Secretary, Morris J. Hole, 1889. 

NORTHWEST ALUMNI CLUB, CHICAGO. 
President, Robert D. Scott, 1872. 
Secretary, H. W. Pierson. 
Treasurer, Alice McKini^ey, 1896. 

CINCINNATI ASSOCIATION. 
President, Henry M. Curtis, 1871. 
Vice President, Herbert S. Bigelow, 1894. 
Secretary, John E. Bruce, 1876. 

INDIANA ALUMNI CLUB. 
President, R. E. Houghton, Richmond. 
Secretary, James A. Robach, 1884. 

COLUMBUS ASSOCIATION. 
jyesident, Allen C. Barrows, 1861. 
Secretary, Caroline Hardy, 1901, 



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DIRECTORY. 



The names of instructors and officers are printed in italics. Badi name is followed by ao 

abbreviation indicating the department to which the person "belongs, viz: A, Adelbert 

College; D, Dental Department; G, Graduate Department; I#, Law School; M, Medical 
College; W, College for Women. 



Abbott, A. M.— L.Wade Park ftMarcy St 

Adams, W. S.— L 8714 Encltd At. 

Aikins, H. A.—W 40 Cornell St. 

Albl, C. J.— M 1406 Broadway 

Albright, C. B.— W..186 Mapledale At. 

Alburn, C. R. — A Eldred Hall 

Album, J. A.— L Eldred Hall 

Album, W. H. — O Eldred Hall 

Alexander, D. C. — ^A .... 66 Jennings At. 

AMp», D. P.—M 278 ProBpect St. 

Allen, F. E. — ^W Guilford House 

Allison, A. L. — A 92 Fourth At. 

Allison, E. N.— D 811 Superior St. 

AmhUr, H. L.— D 176 Euclid At. 

Anderson, M. E. — ^W .... Guilford House 

Andrews, E. R. — ^A Adelbert Hall 

Annin, E. O. — W Guilford House 

Armbruster, C. — L 1688 WlUson At. 

Armstrong, L. — ^W 962 WlUson At. 

Amos, W. T.— L 2288 Euclid At. 

Aahmun/a, C— M 794 Republic St. 

Atchison. J. B. — D 608 Prospect St. 

Bachman, C. C— D 14 Bailey St. 

Bailey, A. L.— W 98 East Lake St. 

Bailey, G. L.— A 290 Marcy At. 

Baldwin, G. T.—D 217% Taylor St. 

Ballantyne, M. L. — W... Guilford House 

Banker. N. S. — M 789 Superior St. 

Bard. II. L. — A 1341 Lorain St. 

Barden, J. P., Jr.— A 6 Cornell PI. 

Barnes, E. A. — A 116 Streator At. 

Barnett, G. F. — A.... 116 Streator At. 

Bates, A. A. — D 19 Granger St. 

Bauman, E. C. — W Belleflower At. 

Bauman, G. IP. — ^M.... .1279 Cedar At. 

Baxter, E. C. — ^A 163 Cornell St. 

Beaton, J. — G 462 Kinsman St. 



Bebout, D. B. — D. . 
Becker, U, A.— M. 



.136 Huntington St. 
. . . .Pearl and Clark 



Beltman, S. G.— W 26 Beech Bt. 



Bejach, M. — L 72 Van Buren St. 

Bell, W.— D 188 Chestnut tS. 

Bemls, A. H.— A 226 B. Prospect St 

Bennett, G. — ^L 987 Doan St. 

Bentley, J. B.— D 686 Prospect St. 

Berger, 6. S.— M 1141 St. Clair St. 

-Berkes. H. A. — ^A 62 Blberon St. 

Berman, S. L. — ^A. . . .836 Woodland At. 

Bemsteen, M. L.— L 67 Fifth At. 

BUI, 0. P.— A 868 Logan At. 

Blnkard, H. R. — D..127 Huntington St. 

Birge, R. H.— M 260 Euclid *At. 

Bishop, E. L. — W Haydn Hall 

Bishop, H. v.— A The Budld 

BIssell, W. D.— D 968 S. Logan At. 

Blssell, W. L.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

Blackburn, H. W. — ^A..116 Streator At. 

Bloomberg, J. — A 1682 Lorain St. 

Booga, J.— W 1267 Euclid At. 

Bolden, J. J. L.— M 26 Newton St. 

Bourland, B. P,—A 2662 Euclid At. 

Bourne, H. JS;.— W 144 Cornell St. 

Bowman, B. H. — D 168 N. Perry St. 

Boyle, T. A.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

Brennan, C. J. — L..184 Murray HIU At. 

Brett, J. H.— M 84 Ocean St. 

Bretz, O. — A 416 Cedar At. 

Briggs, C. B. — M New Amsterdam 

Briggs, W. D. — A 18 Adelbert Hall 

Brown, A. F. — ^D 226 Lawn St. 

Brown, C. A. — ^D 523 Prospect St. 

Brown, N. W. — ^M.. Suite 41, The Cary 

Brock, J. E.— W 149 Trombull St. 

Bruce G. A, — ^W Haydn Hall 

Bruchshaw, M. G. — ^W.86 Beechwood St. 
Bruckshaw, M. G. — W..36 Beechwood St. 
Bruner, IF. E. — M,.New England Bldg. 

Budde. B. K. — W 116 Spangler At. 

Budde, T. F. — W 116 Spangler At. 

Bufflngton, R. P. — L 86 Rosedale At. 

Bucksteln, F.— A 84 Paddock PI. 



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WESTERN RESBRVB UNIVERSITY. 



253 



Bundy. L. N.— D. 399 Forest St. 

Bunts, P, J&.— M 275 Prospect St. 

Burgoon, C. P.— L 151 Cornell St. 

Burroughs. P. N.— A Colllnwood 

Burroughs, S.--M 624 Euclid Av. 

Buschman, C. M.~W Guilford House 

Buschman, M. C— W Guilford House 

Byal, C. B.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

Cadle. T. P.— A West Mentor 

Caldwell, B. C— L Adelbert Hall 

Camp, C. H.— D 863 Case Av. 

Campbell, G. L.— W 59 Knox St. 

Campbell, H. C— A 68 Bell Av. 

Campbell, H. G.— W 998 Cedar Av. 

Campbell, B. S.— A.. 2209 Superior St. 

Canfleld, A. S.—G 631 Franklin St. 

Canfleld, H. H.— A.166 Murray Hill Av. 

Carabln, F. A.— L 117 Adelbert St. 

Carle, B. L.— A 805 Palrmount St. 

Cames, W. B.— A 201 Adelbert St. 

Carpenter, A. G.—L 125 Streator Av. 

Carpenter, J. W.— A 46 Knox St. 

Carpenter, B. F.— A,. . .126 Streator Av. 
Carsons, Wm.— Jntr. .190 Hamilton St. 

Case, C. J.— A 4I Cornell St. 

Case, C. L.— L 995 Doan St 

Cfermak, W. J.— A 1471 Clark Av. 

Chaifee, L. L.— W Guilford House 

Chaffee, S. L.— A 14 Adelbert Hall 

Chamberlain, P. A.—A 76 White Av. 

Chamherlatn, Wm. B.— M..276 Prospect 
Chamberlain, W. P. — ^M..24 Commodore 

Champ, S. M.— W 59 Bolton A v. 

Chandler, B. M.— G 894 Case A v. 

OhapmcM, H, B.— L East Cleveland 

Chapman, H. B. — W 810 Rose Bldg. 

Chapman, M. B. — W. .108 Marcelllne Av. 

Chapel, E. E.— A 92 Streator Av. 

Chapman, W. H.— L 11 Sackett St. 

Cheetham, A. M. — M.805 E. Madison Av. 

Cherdron, C. — M 110 Brie St. 

Cherney, B. J. — L 57 Woodland Ct. 

Chotek, L. A.— A 68 Cable St. 

Christie, L. M.— D 60 Cheshire St. 

Clague, L. M. — W 297 Marcy Av. 

Clark, A. J.— D 608 Prospect St. 

Clark, C.'H.— -D 19 Riverside Av. 

Clark, F. £r.— M..493 Colonial Arcade^ 

Clark, M, G.— W Guilford House 

Clemens, C. E. — W 1093 Prospect St. 

Cleveland, A. M. — W 392 Bolton Av. 



Cline. H. L.— A 201 Adelbert St 

Clyne, N. T.-— L 309 FrAnklln Av. 

Coates, J, A.—B 46 Hough Av. 

Coe, C. M.— A Glenvllle 

Coffleld, C. D.—A 601 Franklin Av. 

Cohn, M. T.— A 330 Genesee A v. 

Colt L. B.-— W 76 Adelbert St 

Cole, B. G. — W..216 Commonwealth Av. 

Collins, A. W. — Jntr 106 Cornell 8t 

Collins, B. B.--L..1734 Woodland Hills 

Collord, K. B. — W 189 Taylor St 

Comln, H, L.— A 168 Streator Av. 

Conant J. L. — ^A 1701 Dennlson Av. 

Conde, E. — ^W 33 Wellesley St 

Condon, Chas. — Asst 90 Broadway 

Connell, A. E. — M 16 Dunham PI. 

Converse, H. J.— W 309 Streator Av. 

Cook, W. H.— A 724 Republic St 

Cook, M.— W 304 Franklin A v. 

Cool, R. C.—L 109 Amesbury Av. 

Cooper, W. C— D 32 Public Square 

Corlett A. R.— A 116 Streator Av. 

Oorlett, W. F. — ^M 653 Euclid Av. 

Corrlgan, F. — ^A 66 Gorman Av. 

Counts, A. P.— A 13 Adelbert Hall 

Cowglll, M. H.— W 726 Republic St 

Cox, E. H.-~M 613 B. Prospect St 

Cox, H. L.— A 117 Murray Hill Av. 

Cramer, L. M. — W 861 Scran ton A v. 

Cranz, C— W Haydn Hall 

Crapnalb, A. — Engr 794 Doan St. 

Crwoford, 19.— Asst Llbr...61 Knox St 

CHle, Q. W.— M 169 Kensington Av. 

Crlsty, B, B.— W Haydn Hall 

Crum, A. P.— A 30 Hilbum Av. 

Culp, W. B.— D 664 Castle Av. 

Culver, J. W. — D The Tavistock 

Cummer, C. L. — A 396 Bolton Av. 

Curtis, M. If.— A 43 Adelbert St 

Cushing, 23. F. — M 1160 Euclid Av. 

CusMng, H, P. — A 260 Sibley St 

Cutts, C. H.— Asst 24 Melvln St. 

Dakln, T. O.— L 134 Murray HIU Av. 

Daniels, G. M. — W Haydn Hall 

Daniels, J. B.— W Haydn Hall 

Darby, J. E, — M Doan & Euclid 

Daugherty, J. B. — A The Brooklawn 

Davis, A. S.— L 131 Murray HIU Av. 

Davis, H. H.— A 467 Franklin Av. 

Davles, R. F. — ^W 841 Falrmount St 

Dawley, W. J.— A 201 Adelbert St. 



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254 



DIRJICTORY. 



[1902-190$ 



Day, F. E. — A 486 Dunham At. 

Day, M. E. C. — W 2100 Denlaon At. 

Day. M. F. — W Gallford Honae 

Decker, H. G.— D 89 Handy St. 

Deering, R, W. — W 41 Cornell St. 

Deeley, W. S.—D 608 Prospect St. 

De Fries, R. G.— A 8 Adelbert Hall 

Delahunt, T.—W 82 Hough PI. 

De Lancy, M. — W 806 Huron St. 

Dembowskl, S. F. — h 86 Colby St 

Desberg, F. — L 1060 Central At. 

Detchon, H. M. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Dewey, W. H.— D 128 White At. 

De Witt, S. A.— W..679 B. Prospect St 

Dickerman, J. — A 852 Doan St 

Dlfford, C. L.»M 49 Alum St 

Dllley, F. B.— M 006 Euclid At. 

Dixon, H. — ^D 113 Chestnut St. 

Doerlng, V. F.— W 1817 Willson At. 

Dollev, F.— M Charity Hospital 

Donaldson, A. O. — D 48 Wallace St 

Donaldson, B. W. — D Lorain 

Donaldson, J. B.— M..164 N. Perry St 

Doolittle, G. H.— A GleuTlUe 

Doster, A. M. — ^W 72 Merchants At. 

Doster, B. B.— L..117 Murray Hill At. 

Douttiel, G. W.— D 174 Lyman St 

Dowd, H. H. — D 41 Kenwood St 

Doyle, G. F. — ^D 961 Cedar At. 

Drake, A. D.— G 792 Republic St 

Dugan, D. L. — A 116 Streator At. 

Duncan, H. T.—L 78 Fifth At. 

Dunham, A. — ^W Guilford House 

Dunmore, W. T. — L 161 Cornell St. 

Dunn, F. A. — D 207 Dunham At. 

Dunning, E. L. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Dusek. O. F.— D 128 Humboldt St 

Dunsford, F. A. — ^W. .. .Guilford House 
Duty, A.— W 2677 Euclid At. 

Eastman, B. L. — ^W...161 ATondale At. 

Eberhart, M. C— W Haydn Hall 

Elsenbrey, A. B. — A 168 Cornell St 

Elsenhauer, J. A.— A.. 1488 Willson At. 

Ellenberger, A. — A Euclid Heights 

El let, L. V. — W Guilford House 

Ellis, J. B.— D 608 Prospect St 

Elliot R.— W 17 Grace At. 

Elliott R. W.— M 866 Stark At 

Elmer, A. E. — ^W 292 Dare St 

Emerson, O. P. — ^A 60 Wilbur St 

Emmons, H. H. — L 16 Dunham PI. 



Bnglander, L. — ^A 161 Cornell St 

English, L. M.— D 698 ScoTill At. 

Svant, J. A.~M Medical College 

BTSXts, F. B. — h 29 Belleflower At. 

Farwell, B. W. — L. . . .820 Fairmount St 

Fauver, (7. £. — ^L 727 Caae At. 

Felger, P. H.— D 168 Dodge St 

Felmly, D. F.— L 168 Oakdale St 

Fenlger, B. — h 612 Orange St 

Ferry, M. T. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Fife, R. JSr.— W 91 Mayfleld St 

Filius, G. T.— A 201 Adelbert St 

Flndlay, Wm. — Bngr....l49 Cornell St 

Findley, E. R.— A 161 Cornell St 

Flnley, R. E. — A 888 Doan St. 

Fish, J.— G 224 Stieator At. 

Fish, M.— W 224 Streator At. 

Fliedny, F.— W 160 Wellington At. 

Flower, A. — M....Brie As St Clair Sta. 
Flower, Mrs. — Jantr.Brle As St Clair Sts. 

Folts, J. G.— D 407 Prospect St 

Follett B. B.— L..168 Murray HUl At. 

Forbes, G. N.— A 6 Adelbert Hall 

Ford, D. B.— D 166 Cedar At. 

Ford, R. A.— L 2182 Budld At. 

Foicler, H, N.—W 49 Cornell St 

Fox, P.— A 14 Adelbert Hall 

Frankle, K, <?. — D 620 Woodland At. 

Frazier, J. W.— D 168 H Dodge St 

Freer, J. M. — D 608 Prospect St 

Freer, M.--W 1628 Cedar At. 

Freedlander, B. — ^W 168 Putnam St 

Friedman, M. — ^W...182 Hawthorne At. 

Friedman, S. S. — ^A 1081 Caae At. 

Friend, A. C. — ^W Guilford House 

Friend. A. K.— D 1066 Pearl St 

FrlU, R. F.— A 46 Fairchild St 

Fuller, A. L.— A. . . ^ 46 Wilbur St 

Furth, H. — W The Brooklawn 

Gadsby, C. C. — D 262 Prospect St 

Gaines, H. a— W 178 Bell At. 

Gammel, R. B. — A 418 Dunham At. 

Garman, C. C. — ^A 24 Streator At. 

Garman, C. P. — A 28 Adelbert Hall 

GarTer, B. B. — A.. 117 Murray Hill At. 

Gehlke, C. B.— A 40 Abram St 

Gerstenberger, H. J. — M. .118 Linden St. 

Geuder, C. C. — ^W 622 Kennard St 

Gibbons, C. B.— A Euclid HeighU 

Glfford, B. E. M.— W...107 Gaylord St 



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I902-I903] 



WBSTKRN RKSBRVB UNIVERSITY. 



255 



Gilchrist, H.— W 660 Franklin Av. 

GUlle, W. H.--A 117 Adelbert 8t. 

Glllln. G. M.— W 91 Qulncy St. 

GUlmer, B. — W Guilford House 

Gleason, A. G. — ^W 168 Cedar Ay. 

Glecson, J. A. — W....64 Kenwood At. 

Golden, H. G.— M 8426 Budld Ay. 

Goodhart, F. E.— W 1102 Case Ay. 

Goodman, I. J. — ^M. . .264 Columbus St. 

Goodman, N. W. — D 1056 First Ay. 

Gramlich, F. — ^A 219 Streator Ay. 

Granger, W. — L 898 St. Clair St. 

Gray, S. E.— W 199 Qulncy St. 

Green, D. B. — L 181 Murray HIU Ay. 

Oreen, F. TF.— L Rice Ay., Newburgh 

Greenman, C. M. — ^A 18 Wilbur St. 

Grlffls, A. L.~D 60 The Morris 

Qrimth9, T. ^.— M..1104 Woodland Ay. 

Grills, A. T.— M 811 Superior St. 

Greuner, H. — ^A 48 Knox St. 

Grnnd, H. L. — A 168 Cornell St. 

Gnelzow, E. W. — ^A 60 Leading St. 

Guise, H. L. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Gunn, J. J.— A 188 Dibble Ay. 

Guthrie, O. O.—U 129 Marcy Ay. 

Haber, B. — L 8 Lewlston St. 

Hodden, A. — L 1670 Lexington Ay. 

Hagan, A. C. — W 886 Wlllson Ay. 

Hagan, M. B. — W 886 Wlllson Ay. 

Haggerty, A. J. — L 24 Hodge Ay. 

Hahn, B. A.— L 688 ScoYill Ay. 

Hahn, D. C. — D 188 Dodge St. 

Haines, A. W. — D 849 Huron St. 

Hale, F. B. — A 92 Streator Ay. 

Hall, B. T.— L 8218 Detroit St. 

Hall, T., Jr.— L 40 Knox St. 

Hanuinn, O. A. — D Medical College 

Hamilton, G. K. — W Haydn Hall 

Hammond, A. P. — M 878 Pearl St 

Handerson, J. A. — ^W. .444 Dunham Ay. 

Hanlon, W. — W The Euclid 

Hard, F. G. — A 69 Vienna St. 

Having, H, A. — Treasr, . . .78 Cornell St. 

Harris, O.— A 16 Adelbert Hall 

Hartshorn, G. E.— L. ..117 Murray Hill 

HarYie, L. E.— L Adelbert Hall 

Harts, C. A. — W 987 Case Ay. 

Hassler, L. M.— W 89 Williams St. 

Hatcher, R. A.— M. .Brie ft St. Clair Sts. 

Hathaway, H. S. — A 88 Cornell St. 

Hauser, E. S. — W Haydn Hall 



Hawthorne, E. H. — ^L.809 Fairmount St. 

Haydn, H. O. — W 16 La Grange St. 

Haydn, H. M-^YT 262 Sibley St. 

Haydn, R. B. — W Guilford House 

Heath, H. H.— M Suite 41, The Cary 

Hepfinger, H. A. — ^A Wllloughby 

Helnmlller — ^A 89 Stein way Ay. ' 

Heller, W. — D 794 Superior St. 

Hennlng. H. S. — W Guilford House 

Henry, P, A. — D Williamson Bldg. 

Herr,.F. F. — G 1276 Scranton Ay. 

Herriok, J^. i?.— M 867 Brie St. 

Herriek, F. H.— A 48 Cutler St. 

Herrick, F. R.—h 449 Russell Ay. 

Herriek, H. J.— M 867 Brie St. 

Herrick, H. W.— A 8006 Budld Ave. 

Herter, J. M. — A 702 Denlson Ay. 

Hetael, H. M.— W Haydn Hall 

Heydenburk, I. — W Haydn Hall 

High, A. H.— L 27 Wilbur St. 

Hill. B.— D 407 Prospect St. 

HIU, E. M.—W 850 Russell Ay. 

HIU, W. C— M 24 Commodore St 

Hlnde, F. A.— W 76 Adelbert St 

Hinds, C. J., Jr.— L.. 261 Van Ness Ay. 

Hlrd, B. F.— A 44 Nantucket St 

Hlrd, M. A.~W Guilford House 

Hobart R. L.— M 868 St Clair St 

HohU, P. L.— D Medieal College 

Hobson, F. A.— W 128 Oakdale St 

Hoch, W. K.— D 864 Bridge St 

Hogg, J. M. — ^A 996 Doan St 

Hogg, J. H.— L 2688 St Clair St 

Hoffman, J. J. — ^A....1069 Central Ay. 

Hofman, J. A. — ^M 161 Putnam St. 

Hole, 0. if.— M Medical College 

Holeman, R. B. — D..91 Huntington St 
HoUiday, W. T.— A..80 Miles Park St 
Honecker, M. T. — W..482 Jennings Ay. 
Honeywell, S. M. — ^W..816 Genesee Ay. 

Hoover, O. F. — M 702 Rose Bldg. 

HooYer, M. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Hopkins, B, J7.— L 84 Miles Ay. 

Hopklnson, M. E. — W..288 Gordon Ay. 

Hopwood, A. — A 89 Harbor St 

Horn, C. M. — W 224 Slater Ay. 

Hosklns, F. C. — ^M. . . .900 Fairmount St 
Howard, W. T, — ^M...88 Dorchester Ay. 

Howk, L. E.— D 18 Ruggles St 

Howland, P. — L 841 Huron St 

Hubbell, E.— W 66 Arlington St 

Hubbell, F. M.— A 678 Franklin Ay. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



256 



DIRECTORY. 



[1 902-1 903 



Huchlns. L. H. — ^D 508 Prospect St. 

Huff, li'. H.— D 811 Superior St. 

Hulbert, A. B.— G Rome, O. 

Hulbert, W. 0.— A 189 Cornell St. 

Hull, B., Jr.— A 840 Euclid Av. 

Hulme, W, H.—W 48 Mayfleld St. 

Humiaton, W. H. — M 626 Rose Bldg. 

Hunt, A.—W 46 Nantucket St. 

Hurst, E. M. — ^W 2 Norwood Av. 

Hutchina, F ,0. — ^M 878 Jennings Ay. 

Ingalls, N. W.— M 

Ingeraoll, J. JC.— M 60 Budld Av. 

Irvine, M. S.— W..1007 E. Madison Av. 

Jackson, R. E. — D 693 ScovUl Av. 

Jackson, W. H. — L 658 Bolton A v. 

Jackson, V. M.— W..2900 Superior St. 

JacobI, C. E. — ^W 68 Beersford PI. 

James, O. B. — ^A 896 Hough Av. 

Janousek, E. A.— W 1772 Broadway 

Jenkins, A. A. — M 91 White Av. 

Jenks, P. R. — A Nottingham 

Jerome, H. G. — A 856 Cedar Av. 

Johnson, M. H. — L Overlook Road 

Johnson. J. T. — W 376 Doan St. 

Jones, B. M.— W.1148 Woodl'd Hills Av. 

Jones, E. T. — W 1685 Harvard St. 

Jones, F. E. — ^W 1686 Harvard St. 

Jones, H. E. — ^W 32 Courtland Av. 

Jones, M. D. — ^W Independence St. 

Jones, O. — A 2870 Elmwood St. 

Jones, V. P. — ^W 18 Ames Av. 

Jones, W.— A 26 V6 BIssell St. 

Kaechele, A. — ^A 78 Aaron St. 

Kaufman, L,--W 981 Case Av. 

Kastrlner, M. W.— L 731 ScovlU Av. 

Kelker, H. C— M 28 Cheshire St. 

Kelley, J. P. — D 19 Champa St 

Kelley, M. M.-— W 165 University St. 

Kelton, B. C. — W Guilford House 

Kendall, M. B. — W 1306 Cedar Av. 

Kennan, R. R. — ^W. Guilford House 

Kennerdell, T. R.— A. .88 Merchants Av. 

Kent, D. M. — D 12 Dellenbaugh Av. 

Kcnyon, H. C. — D 677 The Arcade 

Kenyon, S. C. — ^W Guilford House 

Klefer, L. R. — ^W Guilford House 

King, G. A.—W Haydn Hall 

King, M. H. — ^W Haydn Hall 

King, P. F. — M 117 Chestnut St. 



Kingsbury, C. H. — ^W. . . .94 Bertram St. 

Kitchen, J. H.— L 868 Euclid Ay. 

KIttrell. M.— W 123 Adelbert St 

Knapp, A. C. — D 46 Highland Av. 

Knight E. J. — ^W Guilford House 

Knlsely, W. B. — A 178 Streator Av. 

Knowlton, M. — W Guilford House 

Koblltz, E.— M 188 Kennard St 

Kocmlt. B. J. — D 62 Petrle St. 

Konlngslow, E. — W 882 Scovlll Av. 

Kramer, S. E. — L 224 Quinby St. 

Krauss, C. L. — W 1997 Superior St 

Krejcl, L. H. — W 290 Forest St 

Krlder, L. B.--W 428 Bolton Av. 

Krug, E. L.— W 61 Fourth Av. 

Kurzenberger, W. — L 72 Noyes St. 

Ladd, L. W.— M Colonial Flats 

Laisy, J. — M Syracuse, Neb. 

Landsberg, R. — ^W The BucUd 

Lang, F. A. H. — A 1388 Cedar Av. 

Laughren, W. A. — L.1671 Woodland Av. 
Lanphear, W. P. — ^A...782 Republic St 

Laub, W. J.— L 2278 Euclid Av. 

Laubscher, G. G. — ^A 184 Duane St 

Lawerence, B. J.^M 24 Collins Pi. 

Lcbwrenoe, J. — L 709 Genesee Av. 

Lawton, F. T.— A 59 Mayfleld St 

Layman, L. R. — W Guilford House 

Lea, F. W.— A 12 Adelbert Hall 

Lee, B. M.— W 71 TUden Av. 

Leet K. F.— L 86 Rosedale 

Lehmlller, R.— W..98 Murray Hill Av. 

Lembeck, F. R. — W 46 Streator Av. 

Lenhart, C. H. — M.. Suite 41, The Cary 

Leonard, F. P. — D 698 Scovlll Av. 

Leon, G. H. — W 300 Kennard St 

Lessick, F. A. — W 486 Glddlngs Av. 

Lewis, W. A.— M 28 Cheshire St 

Lincoln, W. R. — M....275 Prospect St 

Linn. F.—W 161 Courtland St 

Linn, L. R.— W 112 Dibble Av.- 

Livingston, B. W. — D..160 Chestnut St 

Lloyd. H. R.— A Wlckllffe 

Loomis, L. C. — A.... 1280 Wlllson Av. 
Lothrop, L. M. 8. — ^W. .1745 Harvard St 
Lotspletch, R. G. — A... 150 Murray Hill 

Lowe, R. C. — ^A 116 Streator Av. 

Lower, Wtn. B, — M....276 Prospect St 
Loioman, J. H, — ^M....441 Prospect St 

Lowrey, H. D.— D 41 Collins PI. 

Lucas, W. P.— M 99 Glen Park PI. 



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WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



257 



Luck, T. D. — W 829 Scranton Ay. 

Luehrs, N. M.— W 680 WiUion Ay. 

Lustlg, H. — L 2773 Broadway 

Lyman, M. E. — W Guilford House 

Lymon, T. — D 190 Greenwood St. 

McArthur, A. F.— A 208 Oakdale St. 

McClure, R. H..M 811 Superior St 

McClure, W. C— L 28 Nantucket St. 

McCullocb, R. C— L.148 Murray Hill Ay. 
McCune, F. K. — M. . . .24 Commodore St 
McCurdy, S. M.— H..168 N. Perry St 
McDonagh, J. F. — D.449 W. Madison Ay. 
McDowell, J. R. — M.Tbe Gary, Payne Ay. 

McFall, J. B. — W Guilford House 

McFate, J. O. — D 761 Superior St 

McFate, J. C. — M 789 Superior St. 

McGeorge, R. R. — D.584 W. Madison Ay. 

McKean, R. B. — W 40 Summit St 

McKelyey, E.— A 14 Adelbert Hall 

McKeon, J. 8.— A 161 Cornell St 

McKim, E. B.— W 100 Oakdale 

McMullin, B. B.— A 89 Cutler St 

McMurray, S. E. — ^W. . .Guilford House 

McMyler. H. T. — A WarrensylUe 

Mac£>onald, E. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Maclniyre, A. L. — ^W...186 Sawtell Ay. 

Magargee, G. W. — ^M 12 Wycombe PL 

Magee, C. E. — D 701 Superior St 

Magner, C. T.— D 448 Euclid Ay. 

Malin, W. C. — A Glenyille 

Maloney, C. H. — D 70 Brownell St 

Mancbester, F. S. — D Tbe Taylstock 

Mandel, M. M.— A..806 Huntington St 

Mann. R. L.— W 22 Cable St 

Mapes, L, A,— D 166 Dodge St 

Marble, E. A. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Marcb, F. O,— A 168 Cornell St 

Markowitz. R. S.— ^ 21 Vine St 

Martin, W. C. — A 84 MarYln Ay. 

Maraball, J. H.— A 187 Brandon St 

Marvin, W. T. — ^A 36 Knox St 

Matbews. J. B.— A..719 Garfield Bldg. 

MatblYet E. C— -L 98 Tilden Ay. 

Mattill, H. A. — A 20 Sanford St 

Mattingly, C. K. — ^D..806 Superior St. 

Merriam, W. H. — M 276 Prospect St 

Merrills, B. N.— A Adelbert Hall 

Messer, T. C. — G 244 Becker Ay. 

Metzenbaum, J. — L 1117 Case Ay. 

Meub, W. H. — A 187 Brandon St 

Meyer, A. W. — A 844 Logan Ay. 



Meyer, B, 8. — ^A 844 Logan Ay. 

Meyer, J. H. — ^A 844 Logan Ay. 

Michel, E. B. — ^W 1869 Superior St. 

Micklethwait, J. T.— L Adelbert Hall 

Miller, R. B^— D 19 Granger St 

Miller, W. T.— A 163 Cornell St 

MttUkin, B. L.— M 278 Prospect St 

Mills, V. G.— A Wllloughby. 

Mlnnlg, A.— A 2481 Euclid Ay. 

Miser, P. A. — W Guilford House 

Mitchell, G. C— D 164 Cullison St 

Mock, F. C.—A 848 Fairmount St. 

Moffett, R. R. — L 715 N. Logan ^y. 

Molony, M. C. — W The Pelton 

Monson, M. A. — W Guilford House 

Moore, E. L. — W 808 Bolton Ay. 

Moorefunue, G. W. — ^M. . .842 Logan Ay. 

Morgan, A. L.— W 2282 Willson Ay. 

Morley, B, W. — A 68 Ingleside Ay. 

Morris, C. A.— L. . .189 W. Madison Ay. 
Morris, M. A.-— W..189 W. Madison Ay. 

Morrow, W. — ^W 223 B. Prospect St. 

Morton, M. T. — W Guilford House 

Moss, B.— W 1266 E. Madison Ay. 

Muckley, H. G. — G..148 Hawthorne Ay. 

Mueller, A. — ^W 68 Chestnut St. 

Mumaw, E. M. — W..98 Murray Hill Ay. 

Myers, F. B.— W 1 Glen Park PI. 

Myers, R. Y. — A.... 874 Fairmount St. 
Mygatt, C. S. — D 160 Chestnut St 

Nearpass, H. L.— A 46 Falrchild St 

Neer, E. D.— A 117 Murray Hill Av. 

Neff, M. D.— D 46 Archwood Ay. 

Neldlng, J. A.— L 186 Taylor St 

Newcomb, A. G. — L Adelbert Hall 

Newton, N. B.— W..408 E. Prospect St 
NImmons, W. T.— A,117 Murray Hill Ay. 

Noland, H. J.— W 1166 Doan St 

Nord, H. J. — L 116 Streator Av 

Nutt A. P.— A 117 Murray Hill Av. 

Oakley. A. B.— W 800 Hough Ay. 

Oakley. L. E. — W 800 Hough Ay. 

Oberlin, J. F.—A 67 Cornell St 

O'Brien, J. W.— A 16 Adelbert Hall 

O'Connor, N. A. — ^M..224 Starkweather 

Ocfas, K. E.— M 181 Sayles St 

Odlln, F. T. — ^W Guilford House 

Oliver, T. Jff.— W 10 Adelbert Hall 

Opperman, A. E. — A.. 127 N. Perry St 
Oram, B. J. — G 1692 Superior St. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



258 



DIRBCTORY. 



[1902-1903 



Ortli, C— W 1088 Pearl Bt. 

Oeborne, C. N. — ^A 67 Iryington St. 

Osborne, R. M. — ^W S9 Knox St. 

Oshom, TF. O. — ^M....276 Proapect St 
Osgood, B. S. — G....46 Nantucket St. 

Osmond, J. D.— A 187 Oakdale St 

Ostrander, A. — D 48 Wallace 

Otis, E. M.^A 18 Adalbert Hall 

Palda, G. A.— L 1656 Broadway 

Palmie, A. H.—W 2788 Euclid At. 

Pankburst, C. T.— M 88 Superior St 

Park, K. D.— D 160 Dodge St 

Parks, P. K. — ^W ColUnwood 

Parker, C. M. — ^W OuUford Houae 

Parker, H. E.— A 767 Doan St 

Parker, H, P. — ^M Colonial Flats 

Parker, J. A.— A 147 Cornell St 

Parkin, Q. B.~A 46 Malcolm St 

Parmenter, B. H.^W..717 Bepabllc St 

Patterson, J. A.— A 220 Dare St 

Patton, B.— A 24 Adalbert Hall 

Paul, C. T.— Q Hiram 

Pay, G. O. — M The Deyonahlro 

Peabody. M. A.— W 16 Echo St 

Peck, B. M.--W Haydn Hall 

Peets, B. A. — ^W 62 Tennis At. 

Pelton, F. H. — ^A Adelbert Hall 

Permewell, 0, B, — ^L..1264 Wlllson At. 
Pennington, Q. L. — ^W....79 Hough At. 

PerMns, B, If.— W 121 Adelbert St 

Perkifu, R. 0.— M Bussell As Euclid 

Penrin, J, TF.— A 81 Cutler, St 

Peterka, B.— M 61 Goethe St 

Petraah, A. J. — ^A 1191 Broadway 

Petty, J. B. — ^A Baat CleTeland 

Pfelffer, F. E.— A 101 Halsey St 

Pfeiffer, U. J.—A 101 Halsey St 

Phillips, B. D. — ^D 806 Superior St 

Phillips, G. A.— L The Lelghton 

PhllUpson, P. H.-—G. Wlllson As Woodl'd 

Pierce, B. H. H.— A 101 Halsey St 

PUcher, J. D. — M 64 Aubumdale At. 

Platf^er, 8, B.— A 24 Cornell St. 

Pogue, C. W. — M 86 Blaine St 

Polhamns. W. B. — ^A...20 Tennessee St 

Pope, Oarlyle — ^M 866 Bose Bldg. 

Pope, P. M.— A 181 Murray Hill At. 

Post, B. M.— W 2211 Euclid At. 

Pottoin, L. £r.~A 822 Bosedale At. 

Powell, H, H, — ^M 467 Prospect St 

Powell, W. L. — D 608 Prospect St 



Povey, G. — ^M 698% Hough At. 

Prendergast, D. A. — ^M. . . .61 Burton St 
Prentice, N. B. — ^A....12 LakeTlew At. 

Price, J. H.— L 8476 Euclid At. 

Price, W, A. F.— D 2288 Euclid At. 

Proctor, B. B. — A 168 Cornell St. 

Proudfoot H. J.~W..2820 Spafford St 

Quay, J. — ^W 4060 Euclid At. 

Quayle, H. A.— A 290 Sibley St. 

Quayle, Z. G.— W 290 Sibley St 

Qulnby, M. C. — ^W Guilford House 

Balston, B. H. — ^D 84 White At. 

Band, H. A. — ^W 76 Adelbert St 

Bahdolph, I. H.— L Adelbert Hall 

Beece, E. J. — A 69 Beersford PI. 

Reiohman, F. — ^A 96 Mayfleld St 

BeeTe, F. A.— W 49 Wilbur PI. 

Bewouf, N. J. — D Kent 

Bichards, D. A. — ^D. .1086 Superior St. 
Blemenschnelder, C. A. — L.161 Beechw'd 

Bleske, F. H. — ^D 417 Jennings At. 

Blsch, J. F.— D 127 Huntington St 

Blsdon, C. — ^W Guilford House 

Biser, M. — Jntr 86 Mentor St 

Rltterspach, F. J.— M 24 Collins PI. 

Rohb, B,—U 702 Bose Bldg. 

RoberU, N. If.— W Guilford House 

Boberts, E. E. — ^W Guilford House 

Bobinson, L. L. — L 782 Doan St 

Bobison, W. L. — A 6 Hayward St. 

Bogera, H. S. — ^D The Doan 

Bosenfeld, B. M.— W..1829 Wlllson At. 
Bosenwasser, H. B. — ^D722 Woodland At. 

Bose, C. S.— L Adelbert Hall 

Rose, H. G.— A 142 Cornell St 

Boss, C. D.— W 249 Streator At. 

Boss, G. A. R— D 608 Prospect St 

Roth, G. B.— A 166 Murray Hill At. 

Budolph, J. F.— M 68 Mansion St 

Buggies, J. R— A 224 Streator At. 

Bummel, F. G. — ^D 188 Dodge St 

Bussell, E. — ^W 168 Lincoln At. 

Sabln, B. R— W 89 Tilden At. 

Sampliner, E. A. — W...821 Kennard St. 

Sampllner, W. E. — M 1108 Case At. 

Saunders. N. C— W 1266 Slater At. 

Sawicki, J. F.— L 848 Fleet St 

Sawyer, J. P.— M 626 Rose Bldg. 

Sawyer, B. T. — L 64 Streator At 



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WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



259 



Sayle, F. M.— M 1499 Cedar Av. 

Scanlon, B. J. — ^M 860 Woodland Av. 

Schleslnger, W. A.— M. .129 McBrtde St. 

Schneider, C. B. — ^W Haydn Hall 

Schuele, L. C— W 16 Jay St. 

Schultz» J. E.— D 124 Handy St. 

Sch warts, E. — L 26 McKinstry St. 

Schwegler, L. M.~W 68 Eaclid PI. 

Seagrave. P. W. — A 76 Adelbert St. 

Season, E. B, — M 2230 Euclid Av. 

Seesholtz, A. 6. — W Qullford HouM 

SellBkar, J. — M 18 Wageman St. 

Sellers, P. O.— W 69 Knox St. 

Selmlnski, H. — ^W 84 Princeton 

Semple, M. V. — ^A 60 Chapman At. 

Sensel, E. H. — L 124 Putnam St. 

Senseny, H. M. — A.... 148 Lincoln Ay. 

Senter, M. — ^W Qullford House 

Beveranoe, A. D. — ^W..1981 Euclid At. 
ahaekleton, Wm. B. — ^M.606 The Osbom 

Sharp, O. B.— A 45 Fairchlld St. 

Shepard, G. W. — ^M.. Lakeside Hospital 

Shepherd, B. C— L Adelbert Hall 

Sheph^d, H. D. — W. .. .Qullford House 

Sherman, A. — W 642 Franklin At. 

Shlrey, O. M.— H 171 Dodge St. 

ShreTe. C. G.— A 847 Stark St. 

Shrier, B. — W 980 Ce^ar At. 

Shube, J. S. — D 682 Woodland Av. 

Slckman, O. F.— D 124 Handy St. 

Sill, R. H.— M 192 Brie St. 

Silver, T. ^.— A 161 Cornell St. 

Simpson, H. — L 88 Quebec St. 

Simpson, J. M. — D 968 Prospect St. 

Singer, W. B.— A..166 Murray Hill At. 

Sipe, D. R.— A 117 Murray Hill At. 

Sipher, J. A.— M Suite 41, The Cary 

Slusser, L. D.— L Adelbert HaU 

Smith, A. A. — D Berea 

Smith, B. B.~W 1240 Cedar At 

Smith. C. H.— L 1466 Cedar At. 

amith, 0. J.— A 85 Adelbert St. 

Smith, F. L. — D DenTer. Col. 

Smith, G. W.— D 178 Herald St 

Smith, Harriet — W 87 Grasmere 

Smith, Helen — W 198 Oakdalc 

Smith, H. L. — D 407 Prospect St. 

Smith, J. W. — L 626 Jennings At. 

Smith, L. L.— D ^168 N. Perry St. 

Smith, R. Q. — ^W 40 Cheshire St. 

Smith, W. A.— D 118 Chestnut St. 

Smith, W. E. — A 692 Sterling At. 



Snow, B. R.— L 66 Belmore Rd. 

Solberg, O. B. — ^W 186 Steams St. 

Sollman, T.— M..Brie k St. Clair Sts. 
Solmonson, S. H. — D....1088 Case At. 
Solmonson, S. H. — M....1022 Case At. 

Souers, L. B. — ^L 165 Sawtell Av. 

Spenoe, B. L. — M. . .612 New Eng. Bldg. 

Spengler, O. L. — ^W. .^ 63 Fourth At. 

Spengler, B. M. — W. I 68 Fourth At. 

Spengler, W. D. — ^A 68 Fourth A v. 

Spicer, D. M. — ^M 789 Superior St. 

Spleth, L. C^A 1291 Willson Av. 

Spring, C. E. — M 789 Superior St. 

Standen, H. C. — ^D..168 Crawford Rd. 

Standford, V. L.— L 217 Ohio Bldg. 

Staral, J. A.— M 1261 Willson Av. 

SUamB, A. A, — L 87 Oakdale St. 

Stedman, F. H. — ^A 846 Orange St. 

Steer, H. A. — ^M 

Stevens, B. V. — ^W. .1198 B. Madison Av. 

StevenB, C. D, — W 28 Adelbert Hall 

Stevens, B. B. — A 2086 Broadway 

Stevens, F. A. — ^W 76 Adelbert St. 

Stevens, H. F. — W 2036 Broadway 

Stewart, C. C— M 12 Wycombe PL 

Siewouri, a, N,—U Medical College 

Stewart, J. H. — A.. 186 Murray Hill Av. 
Stewart, J. B. — M. . . .Suite 4, Sagamore 

Stickle, A. R.— A 151 Cornell St. 

Stllwell, L. R— W 87 Stanwood Rd. 

Stoney, F. L. — ^W 80 Bridge St. 

Stowe, L. F. — ^A 8 Quito St. 

Stuart, O. a— M 416 Rose Bldg. 

Strachan, W. M. — ^A....2428 Broadway 
Strankways, T. — D....508 Prospect St. 

Strauss, F. M. — ^A 1890 Superior St. 

Strelch, A. C. — G 2 Hodgson St. 

Strong, C. A.--A Adelbert Hall 

Strong, B. P.— L 486 Lake St. 

Suits. J. C. — ^W 60 Bertram St. 

Suliot, M. B.— W 186 Stearns St. 

Summers, H. C. — A... 1528 Superior St. 

Sunkle, R, H, — ^M Pearl and Clark 

Sutton, G. C. — ^A 491 Central Av. 

Swift, H. F.— M 789 Superior St. 

Talcott, W. B.— A. .Rosedale & Crawford 

Tarr, H. M.— M 198 Clinton St. 

Taylor, E. B. — W Guilford House 

Taylor, F. J.— W 78 Oakdale St. 

Taylor, T. J, — ^M....2163 Superior St. 
Thacher, M. A. — W 76 Adelbert St. 



Digitized by VjOOQ IC 



26o 



DIRBCTORY. 



[1902- 1903 



Thayer. M. H. — W Gailford House 

Thomas, C. W.— M.1394 Woodland Hills 

Thomas, B. H. — W 81 Norton St. 

Thomas, P. L. — ^W 88 Idlewood Av. 

Thomas, G. F. — A .Adelbert Hall 

Thomas, G. L. — W 2688 Warner Ed. 

Thomas, H. A. — W 27 Walker St. 

Thomas, H. A. — A. .184 Murray Hill At. 

Thomas, J. J.— M 166 Crawford Rd. 

Thomas, O. T. — M 86 Bdgwood PI. 

Thompson, C. R. — D 708 Republic St. 

Thompson, H. O. — Jn*r... 67 Cornell St. 
Thompson, J. E. — M..2 Livingstone St. 
Thwing, C, C— A..166 Murray Hill Av. 
Thwing, O, P. — Brest., .66 Bellflower A v. 

Tiemey, J. 8. — D .Rose Bldg. 

Tompkins, O. B. — W Haydn Hall 

Torrey, B. L. — W 4182 Euclid Av. 

Tower, O. F. — A 8 Nantucket St. 

Tracy, F. B. — W Euclid 

Truzal, F. T. — ^A 23 Kelton St. 

Truxal, G W.— A 28 Kelton St. 

Trowhridoe, F. L. — ^L 84 Miles Av. 

Tryon, S. B.— A Adelbert Hall 

Turney, J. M. — G Palnesvllle 

Tuttle. A. G. — ^A 868 Doan St 

Tuttle, P. L. — A Logan Av. 

Twlss, G. R.— G 66 Mayfleld St. 

Tyler, B. B.—M 61 Daisy Av. 

Upson, If. £(.— M New Bngland Bldg. 

Vail, H. D.— M 190 Helen St. 

Van Doom, J, W. — D 466 Arcade 

Van Epps, M. B. — W..016 S. Logan Av. 
Van Nostran, R. — ^W..204 Harkness Av. 

Van Pelt. T. C. — D 300 Euclid Av. 

Van Vllet, M. L.— W..373 Harkness Av. 
Van Voorhls, R. F.— A..117 Murray Hill 

VI las, G. E. — ^W 220 Kennard St. 

Vincent, J. A. — M 777 Superior St. 

Vltz, C. P. P.— A 45 Marvin Av. 

Wachner, S. C. — A Adelbert Hall 

Wadsworth, C. H.— D..608 Prospect St. 

Wagner, H, (?.— M 702 Rose Bldg. 

Waitc, F. O. — D 77 HUlbum Av. 

Walker, E. W.— D 168 N. Perry St. 

Wallace, A. E— W Guilford House 

Wallace, A. M. — W 28 Marlon* St. 

Wallace, C.*M.— A Wllloughby 

Wallace, N. F.—W 67 Tllden Av. 



Walsh, J. D. — ^W 69 Hower Av. 

Ward, B. G.— W Wllloughby 

Ward, W. P.— A 87 Kenll worth St. 

Ware, L. B.— L 1480 Derolt St. 

Wark, J, F.— D 332 Cedar Av. 

Warner, R. C. — A ...Adelbert Hall 

Warnock, D. R.— L 2097 Euclid Av. 

Watklns, T.— D 168% Dodge St. 

Watts, T. R.— A Adelbert Hall 

Waugh, J. M.--U 44 Knowles St. 

Weaver. R. B. — A 158 Cornell St. 

Weber, H. G.—D 67 Sibley St. 

Weber. O. A. — ^M 739 Superior St. 

Webster, C. B. — D 874 Huron St. 

Wedler, C. R,— M 1.160 Colfax St. 

Weedman, D. V. — ^D 374 Huron St, 

Wehr, C. J.— A 6 Adelbert Hall 

Welmer, B. O. — ^W..144 Hawthorne Av. 

Weir, W. H.— M 260 Euclid Av, 

Wels, K. — W 364 Marcelline Av. 

Wells, J. H.— -M 121 Lonsdale Av. 

Wenger, R. F.— M Lakeside HospiUl 

Wetherbee, A. H. — A 1 Cornell PI. 

Whelan, C— W 103 Kentucky St. 

White, A. B.— A 19 La Grange St. 

White, E.— W Euclid 

White, H, C— L 344 Harkness Av. 

White, H. L.— -W 306 Cedar Av. 

White. W. H. — M 24 Commodore St. 

Whitman, F. P.— A 79 Adelbert St.* 

WhiUlar, W. H. — D. .700 Schofield Bldg. 
Whltworth, E. C. — W . . 61 Gorman Av. 

Wlckham, B. B.— L 163 Cornell St. 

Wilbur, R. A. — ^L 820 Falrmount Av. 

Wilcox, A. G.— M 789 Superior St. 

Wilcox, O. N.— L 69 Olive St. 

WUliams, B, C— Llbr 71 Elderon 

WiUiams, F. B.— L 111 Crawford Rd. 

Williams, H. R.— A.166 Murray Hill Av. 

Williams, J. F. — A 158 Cornell St. 

Williams, L. B. — W 127 Streator Av. 

Williamson, C. C. — Prest. 8eo*y 

442 Rosedale Av. 

Wilson, G. H. — ^D..701 Schofield Bldg. 

Wilson, H. R. C— D 74 Burt St 

Wilson, R. L. — ^D Genesee Block 

Wlndlsch, J. S. — D 23 Freeman St. 

Winger, M. L.— D 798 Republic St. 

Winter, J. C. — A 1262 Scranton Av. 

WIstar, B.— W 1268 Cedar Av. 

Wittier. M. — ^W HaydiTHall 

Wolcott, J. V. — L 72 Grasmere St 



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1 902-1903] 



WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY. 



261 



Wolf, B. B.— A 629 Scoyill Ay. 

Wolren, R. L. — A.. 105 Murray Hill Av. 

Womaclike, B; A. — ^D 166 BwIsb St. 

Woodward, J. Q.~A 208 Adelbert St. 

Woodward, P.—W 96 Mayfleld Bd. 

Woolf. L. A.— M 1066 First Av. 

Woolfolk, B. A.— A. 166 Hurray Hill Ay. 
Woolffar, Wm, J. W. — ^M.1444 Cedar Ay. 

Workman, J. S.— M 134 Sibley St 

Workman, P. W.— D 184 SlWey St 

Worley, N. J.— D The Martha 

Worrell, K. Q.. .D. .21 Hollingaworth Ct. 

Worthlngton, B. — W 84 Cheshire St 

Wright, D. A.— D 262 Cedar Ay. 

Wright, G. S.— W 789 WlUaon Ay. 

Wright, H. M. — W Guilford House. 



Yaggi, H. K. — M 814 Dunham Ay. 

Yaggl, L. B. — L 314 Dunham Ay. 

Yeagle, M. C. — M 28 Parkwood Ay. 

Yoder, H. B.>-M 131 Sayles St 

Young, A. A. — A 46 Knox St. 

Young, H.— L 148 Murray Hill Ay. 

Young, J. — ^W 22 Melrose Ay. 

Young, L. H. — W 22 Melrose Ay. 

Young, S. A.— M 2370 Crosby St 

Young, T. C— M. . .1872 Woodland Hills 

ZaYodsky, F. — D 9 Vergennes St. 

Ziegler, D. H.— D Rose Bldg. 

Zlemer, W. O. — M 84 Woodbrldge St. 



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INDEX 



APPENDIX 245 

ADELBERT COLLEGE, 

Admission 86 

Aid to atudents 78 

Alumni Association 260 

Course of study 42-61 

Degrees 68 

Expenses 72 

Faculty 27 

Grades of scholarship 67 

Historical statement '.. 28 

Honors 60 

Laboratories and museums 68 

Libraries 62 

Physical training 66 

Prues ; 70 

Religious worship 62 

Requirements for admission 86 

Scholarship— see Aid. 

Students 80 

Terms and xacations 62 

CALENDAR 4 

COLLEGE FOR WOMEN, 

Admission 88 

Advisory council 77 

Aid to students 121 

Alumni association 260 

Course of study 92-112 

Degi-ees 1 14 

Dormitory 118 

Expenses 121 

Faculty 78 

General statement 75 

Laboratories 116 

Libraries 114 

Physical training 117 

Religious worship 120 

Scholarship— see Aid. 

Students 81 

Terms and xacations 118 

DENTAL DEPARTMENT, 

Admission 224 

Alumni association 250 

Building 285 

CUnics 234 

Courses of study 225 

Degree 236 

Expenses 236 

Faculty 219 

Generaa statement 217 

Libraries 62, 236 

Students 221 



DIRECTORY AND OFFICERS 2S2 

FACULTY 8 

GRADUATE DEPARTMENT, 

Courses of instruction 128-142 

Faculty 124 

General information 128-148 

Libraries 148 

Publication fund 145 

Students 128 

HISTORICAL STATEMENTS 

28,76,128, 146,208,217 

LAW SCHOOL. 

Admission 210 

Alumni association 251 

Courses of instruction 210 

De gree — s ee Examinations, 

Examinations 215 

Expenses 216 

Faculty 205 

Historical statement 208 

Libraries 62,215 

Location 216 

Moot courts 214 

Scholarships 216 

Students 206 

University advantages 216 

MEDICAL COLLEGE, 

Admission 157 

Alumni association .... 260 

CUnics 186 

Course of study 159-179 

Dispensaries 188 

Examinations 192 

Expenses 180 

Faculty 149 

General statement 146 

Hospital appointments 186 

Hospitals 184 

Laboratories 182 

Libraries 181 

Museums 184 

Schedule 161 

Students 154 

Text-books 177 

PUBLICATION FUND 72 

SENATE 7 

SUMMARY OF NUMBERS 244 

SUMMER SCHOOL 243 

TRUSTEES 6 

TRUSTEE COMMITTEES 7 



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Western Reserve University 



CATALOGUE 



1903 -1904 



CLEVELAND, OHIO 



CLBTBLAND, O 

PRESS OP WXMN ft JUD80N 

1904 



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CONTENTS. 

Gbnkrai« Statement 5 

Trustees 6 

Facxji^ty, Instructors and Officers 8 

Adei«bert Coi^leoe— Historical Statement 25 

Faculty and Instructors 29 

Students 32 

Requirements for Admission 38 

Courses of Study 44 

General Information 64 

Expenses 75 

The Coi^lege for Women— General Statement 77 

Faculty and Instructors 80 

Students 83 

Requirements for Admission 90 

Courses of Study 96 

General Information . * 117 

Expenses 125 

Graduate Department— General Statement 127 

Faculty and Instructors 128 

Students 130 

Courses of Study 132 

General Information 146 

Medicai, Coli^EGE— General Statement 149 

Faculty 152 

Students 157 

Requirements for Admission 161 

Courses of Study 165 

General Information 187 

Expenses 196 

Examination Papers 199 

The School OF Law — Historical Statement 211 

Faculty 213 

Students 215 

Admission, and Course of Instruction 220 

General Information 224 

Expenses . 226 

Dentai, Department— General Statement 227 

Faculty 229 

Students 231 

Admission and Course of Study 234 

General Information 245 

Expenses 246 

Library Schooi* 250 

Faculty 251 

Course of Study 252 

Expenses 262 

Summer Schooi, 263 

General Summary 264 

Appendices 265 

Directory 276 



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CALENDAR 



1903. 




21-22 Sept. 


Monday-Tuesday 


22 Sept. 


Tuesday 


26 Nov. 


Thursday 


24 Dec. 


Thursday 


, 1904. 




3 Jan. 


Sunday 


28 Jan. 


Thursday 


6 Feb. 


Saturday 


7 Feb. 


Sunday 


8 Feb. 


Monday 


22 Feb. 


Monday 


31 March 


Thursday 


6 April 


Wednesday 


30 May 


Monday 


2 June 


Thursday ' 


12 June 


Sunday 


13 June 


Monday 


14 June 


Tuesday 


15 June 


Wednesday 


15 June 


Wednesday < 


16 June 


Thursday < 


17-18 June 


Fri