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THE 



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MAGAZINE^ 



OF 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

RICHMONDj VA. 



VOL. XIII— No. 1. 



JULY. 1906 



Ealered at the Postoffice at Richmond, Va., as Second-class Matter. 



WM. ELLIS JONES, PRINTER. Digitized by GoOglc 



I307 E. Franklin St 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 



ARCHER ANDERSON, CHAS. V. MEREDITH, 
E. W, JAMES, E. V. VALENTINE, 

Rev. W. MEADE CLARK, 



EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE, 

WILLIAM G. STANARD. 



CONTENTS. 

1. The Early Westward Movement of Virginia, 

1722-1734 1 

2. Virginia Militia in the Revolution 16 

3. Virginia and the Cherokees 20 

4. Virginia Legislative Papers 36 

5. The Corbin Papers 51 

6. Virginia Gleanings in England 53 

7. The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Va., 

1707-1750 65 

8. How James Buchanan Was Made President 81 

9. Letter from John Paul Jones to Joseph Hewes ... 87 

10. Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries.... 91 

11. Genealogy 100 

Brent and Brooke Families. 



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THE 



VIRGINIA MAGAZINE 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 




Published Quarterly by 

THE VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

FOR 

THE YEAR ENDING JUNE, 1906. 



VOLUME XIII, 



Richmond, Va: 

HOUSE OF THE SOCIETY, 

No. 707 East Franklin St. 



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PUBLICATION COMMITTEE, 

ARCHER ANDERSON. 
C V. MEREDITH, 
E. V. VALENTINE. 
EDWARD WILSON JAMES, 
Rev. W. MEADE CLARK. 



Editor of the Magazine. 
WILLIAM G. STANARD. 



WM. ELLIS JONES. PRINTER, 
RICHMOND, VA. 



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Table of Contents. 



Book Reviews 329, 447 

Buchanan, James, How made President. Reminiscences of John 
A. Parker 81 

Carriage Owners in Gloucester County, Va., 1784. Communicated 
by Edward Wilson James, Norfolk, Va . . 313 

Corbin Papers, The 51 

Council and General Court Records, Notes from 389 

Fredericksburg, Va., Gazette. 1787-1803, Memoranda from 425 

Genealogy— Brooke 100, 223, 445 

Brent 105, 219, 318, 435 

Mallory 216, 324, 44r 

Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries 91, 209, 425 

History in its Relation to Literature. An Address before the 
Annual Meeting of the Virginia Historical Society by Prof. W. 
P. Trent, Columbia University 473 

Hungars Church, Northampton County, Va. By Thos. B. Robert- 
son. Eastville, Va 315 

Illustrations — General Roger Elliott, 96a; Effigies of John Brent 
and Wife, iioa; Cossington Rectory, 112a: Cossington Lodge, 
112a; Wickins, near Charing. Kent, 222a; Hungars Church, 
314a; Charing Church, Kent, 322a; Hutton Conyers, Yorkshire, 324a 

Jones, John Paul, Letter to Joseph Hewes 87 

King William Parish, Vestry Book of, 1707- 1750. Translated from 
the French and Edited by Prof. R. H. Fife, Wesleyan Univer- 
sity 65, 175, 265 

Logg*8 Town, Treaty of, 1752 143 



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IV TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Meade, Richard Kidder, letter of 409 

Rovolutionary Army Orders, for a main army under Washington, 
1778-1779 337 

Virginia in 1639-40. From English Public Record Office 375 

Virginia Gleanings in England. By Lothrop Withington, of Lon- 
don, England, and H.T. Waters, of Massachusetts, 55, 191, 303, 402 

Virginia and the Catawbas and Cherokees, A Treaty Between, 1756, 225 

Virginia and the Cherokees, &c.. The Treaties of, 1768 and 1770. . . 20 

Virginia, Early Westward Movement of, 1722-34. Council Orders. 
Edited by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C. i, 113, 281, 351 

Virginia Legislative Papers, 1774-75 36, 411 

Virginia Militia in the Revolution 16, 206 

Yeardley, Governor Sir George, and Council, Commission to, 
March 14, 1625-6 298 



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THE 

Virginia Magazine 

OF 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 



Vol. XIII. JULY, 1905. No. i. 



THE EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF 
VIRGINIA, 1722-1734. 



As Snowx BY THE Proceedings of the Colonial Council. 



Edited and Annotated by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C. 



Nov. 5, 1724. 

On reading this day at the Board Sundry Depositions taken 
before the Justices of Spotsylvania County against a Saponie 
Indian named Sawnie lately returned from Canada, whereby 
it appears that the said Indian did behave himself very inso- 
lently threatening the Inhabitants with a speedy Incursion of 
the French Indians,^ and the said Indian being examined in 



*It is probable that the Indians concerned in this affair belonged to 

*» Five Naions. Certain tribes living in Canada were largely under 

influence of this confederacy, but it does not seem possible that 

• would be permitted to penetrate so far to the south through terri- 

entirely within the jurisdiction of the Inxiuois. 

this date the Saponi Indians were living at Fort Christanna, 

». vick county, Va. Their original habitat was on the Yadkin river 

cstern North Carolina, near the base of the Blue Ridge. They were 

4* v-en from this place about the year 1703 by the Iroquois. (Byrd, 



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2 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Council did acknowledge that he was taken by the French In- 
dians, and carried into Canada about two years ago. That 
he had been with the said French Indians in an -Incursion on 
the people of New England but that last Summer he was per- 
mitted to go to Albany in company with some of the said 
French Indians, from whence 4)y the Favour of Capt. Collins 
[and] the Officers of the Fort there, he had liberty to return 
to Virginia; and the said Indian alledg'd whatever he said 
at Germanna in the County of Spotsylvania was spoken whilst 
he was in Drink. And being examined if he brought any mes- 
sage from the French Indians to the Saponies or any other of 
the Tributarys or if he intended to return to Canada as he 
had formerly given out, he deny'd both, But forasmuch as 
it appears to this Board that the said Indian hath by his 
speeches & actions given just cause of Suspicion of his ill In- 
tentions It is Ord*^ that he be committed to prison there to 
remain until farther Orders unless the Great Men of his Na- 
tion shall engage for his good behavior, and that he shall not 
depart out of this Government or hold correspondence with 
any Foreign Indians. And the Interpreter is directed to sig- 
nify to the Saponie Nation the Terms upon W^** they may 
have the said Indian delivered to them. 



May 4th, 1725. 

The Governor communicating to the Council the advices he 
has received that on the 26th of last month divers Indians 
plundered the Quarters of Mr. John Taliaferro near the great 



History of the Dividing Line, 1728, p. 8.) About 1740 they removed 
from Virginia to Pennsylvania and settled at Shamokin, which is the 
present site of Sunbury. (Mooney, The Sioiian Tribes of the East, 
Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution, 1894, PP- 50- 
51.) They were finally adopted by the Cayuga tribe and removed to 
New York. The Saponi were described as "the honestest and bravest 
Indians Virginia ever knew." A later Council Order seems to indicate 
that at least a portion of the tribe went south and joined the Catawbas. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 3 

mountains" in Spotsylvania County and committed divers other 
outrages to the persons & goods of sundry of the Inhabitants 
there and particularly some of the Guns belonging to and 
mark'd with the name of Spotsylvania County and that one 
John a Nottoway Indian was amongst the said Indians, It 
is ordered that it be referred to Colo. Harrison to make en- 
quiry which of the Nottoway Indians or other Tributaries 
have been out ahunting about that time and to give order for 
a search to be made for the Guns and other goods so car- 
ried away, & if he finds any of the said Tributaries have been 
concerned therein that he cause them to be secured & sent to 
W™burg in order to their being punished. And ior the bet- 
ter securing the Inhabitants from the like insult for the fu- 
ture, It is ordered that a Warrant be prepared for the Gov- 
ernor's signing, impowering & requiring the commanding Offi- 
cer of the Militia in Spotsylvania County, on notice given to 
him of the insolencies offered by any Indians to order out 

^This Order throws a clear light upon conditions which prevailed 
in Piedmont Virginia only fifty years prior to the commencement of 
the Revolution, and strikingly illustrates the slow westward movement 
of the Colony during that period. One hundred and eighteen years 
had elapsed since the founding of Jamestown, and the country at the 
base of the Blue Ridge was still open to Indian incursions. 

The tradition has lingered in Madison county that the first Germans 
who settled there in 1724-2$ occasionally suffered from Indian depre- 
dations, and it is said that the last person killed by them in that locality 
resided near the present site of New Hope church. (Slaughter, History 
of St. Mark's Parish, p. 46.) 

John Taliaferro, here mentioned, belonged to the well-known Virginia 
family of that name. He was, as has been seen, one of the first justices 
of Spotsylvania. His will was probated in that count>' Aug. 7, I744» 
and to his son Lawrence he devised 1,200 acres on the Robinson river; 
and here probably the Indian outrages mentioned in this Order oc- 
curred. (Spotsylvania County Records, New York, 1905, Vol. I., p. 7.) 

Colonel Nathaniel Harrison is doubtless the person referred to in 
this Order. He was a member of the Governor's Council, accompanied 
Governor Spotswood to New York when the Treaty of Albany (1722) 
with the Five Nations was concluded, and is mentioned in the act 
establishing Brunswick county. 



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4 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

parties of the Militia to seize and apprehend all such as shall 
be found ranging in those parts whither (whether) they be 
Tributaries or foeign Indians And in case any such be of the 
five Nations and have not such a passport as is prescribed by 
the late articles of peace that the said Commanding Officer 
cause every such Indian to be conveyed to W"*®burg there to 
be proceeded against according to the late Act of Assembly 
for inforcing the Treaties made with foreign Indians, And 
in case any such Indian shall resist, the Officers of the Militia 
to .whom such resistance shall be offered are to subdue them 
bv force. 



November sth, 1725. 

Whereas by Orders of their Excellencies the Lords Justices 
his Mat'^ pleasure hath been signified to allow any person 
desiring the same' one thousand acres of land in the counties 
of Brunswick & Spotsylvania^ free from the purchase of 
Rights or payment of Quitt Rents for the term of seven 
years, to be computed from the first of May 1721, The Gov- 
ernor with the advice of the Council is pleased to order that 
the Surveyors of the said counties be, and are hereby impow- 
ered to receive Entries from any person not having taken the 
benefit of the like indulgence before, any quantity of land, 
not exceeding a Thousand acres to be granted by patent with- 
out purchase of Rights, but if any one shall be desirous of a 
greater quantity in either of those counties, the said Survey- 

^Notwithstanding the encouragement given to persons intending to 
settle in the frontier counties of Brunswick and Spotsylvania, their 
development was slow. As we have seen, the first term of the Bruns- 
wick county court was not held until 1732, on account of the sparseness 
of population. Spotsylvania developed more rapidly, chiefly because 
it was pierced by the Rappahannock and its tributaries, and the move- 
ment of population from Tidewater went up the valley of that river to 
the fertile lands of the Piedmont section. Even with these advantages, 
its progress was slow. In the first decade of its history only 316 deeds 
were admitted to record. {Spotsylvania County Records, New York, 
1905. pp. 88-121.) 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 5 

ors are not to receive Entries for the same without the iisuall 
license from this Board, and producing Rights for the whol-i 
quantity so entitled for. 



A form of the patents to be granted for lands in the coun- 
ties of I>runswick & Spotsylvania without Rights or payment 
of Quitt Rents was this day laid before the Board and ap- 
proved. 



Feb. I, 1726. 

On reading at the Board a letter from his ExcelK^ Will"* 
Burnet, Esq., Governor of New York together with a tran- 
script of the late conference between him and the Sachims of 
the five Nations touching a complaint made from hence of a 
murder committed by some of their Nation on one of the 
Inhabitants of this Colony last summer at which conference 
the said Sachims acknowledged that the said murder was 
committed by some of their people in conjunction with some 
French Indians and Tuscaruroes who they pretend were in 
pursuit of certam Indian enemies^ who fled towards the house 



*The Treaty of Albany was not entirely effectual in protecting the 
tributar\' Indians of Virginia and did not end the long warfare between 
the southern Indians and the Iroquois. It also seems to have left un- 
settled in the minds of the Six Nations their claim to the country west 
of the Blue Ridge, and in 1744 a conference was held with them at 
Lancaster, Pa. The conference convened on June 22, and was attended 
by Governor Thomas, of Pennsylvania, Hon. Edmund Jennings, and 
Philip Thomas, Esq., of Maryland, and the Uonorables Thomas Lee 
and William Beverley, of Virginia. The Six Ncitions were represented 
by a number of deputies. 

The Indians strongly asserted their ownership of all the territory in 
Virginia west of the Blue Ridge, and when the Virginia Commissioners 
demanded to know by what right this claim was made, one of the 
Indian chiefs replied : "We have the right of Conquest — a right too 
dearly purchased and which cost us too much Blood to give up without 
any reason at all, as you say we have done at .\lbany. All the World 
knows we conquered the Several Nations living on Susquehanna Cohon- 
goranta, and at the back of the Great Mountains." He mentioned four 
tribes which they had conquered in that territory, and gave their Indian 



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6 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of the person murthered, and that thereupon the Indians in 
firing killed the said person by mistake, and hoped that tliis 
Government would excuse it. The Council taking the same 
in consideration are of opinion that the Treaty of peace made 

names. In reply, the Virginia Commissioners asserted that if such was 
the case the Five Nations had never occupied the country and had laid 
no claim to it until about eight years before (1736), and that when the 
whites commenced to settle there "that part was altogether deserted and 
free for any people to enter upon." 

The Indians finally relinquished their claim to that great section of 
country in Virginia between the Blue Ridge and the Ohio river. The 
consideration which they received was 400 pounds, one half of which 
was paid in goods and the remainder in gold. The Indians also com- 
plained because they had been obliged to remove their trail to the 
south through the Valley of Virginia so much further to the west, and 
stated that it was then at the foot of the "Great Mountains" (Allegha- 
nies), and asked that they be allowed to use "the road which was last 
made (the wagon road), and to this the Virginia Commissioners 
assented. (For Treaty of Lancaster, see Minutes of the Provincial 
Council of Pennsylvania, Harrisburg, 1851, Vol. IV., pp. 698-737.) 

The great war trail of the Five Nations to the south started at Tioga, 
in western New York, and, descending the north branch of the Sus- 
quehanna, passed through Pennsylvania, Maryland, and the Valley of 
Virginia. (Morgan, League of the Iroquois, Rochester, New York, 
185 1, p. 438; work rare, copy in Congressional Library.) The road 
selected by them at the Lancaster conference is shown on Fry and 
Jefferson's map of Virginia (1751), and was called "The Great Road 
from the Yadkin river thro' Virginia to Philadelphia, distant 435 
miles," and in territory now embraced within the limits of Rockingham 
county, it bears this legend, "Indian Road by the Treaty of Lancaster." 
This road crossed into Virginia from Maryland at Williams Ferry 
(now Williamsport, Md.), and passed through Winchester and Staun- 
ton. At the latter place it turned westward and skirted the North 
mountains in present Rockbridge county. James river was crossed at 
Looney's Ferry, and then the rpute was to the south diagonally across 
the upper Valley, passing near the present site of Roanoke, Va. The 
Blue Ridge was crossed through the water gap of the Staunton or 
Roaiioke river, and the road then turned to the southwest and ended 
at the Yadkin river. 

The same map also shows a section in old Hampshire county, Va., 
marked "Indian Road," some miles to the westward of the south branch 
of the Potomac, but its course is not delineated. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 7 

with the said Northern Indians will be rendered altogether 
ineffectual if such excuses as this shall be accepted for the 
murder of his Maj*^ subjects, since these Indians may* always 
find the like pretence for coming into this Government con- 
trary to the express words of the Treaty, and that therefore 
it is fit that the Governor of New York be desired to inter- 
pose his authority with the said Indians for obliging them to 
deliver up the person or persons guilty of the said murder in 
order to be punished as the crime deserves, and it is ordered 
that a letter be prepared accordingly. 



Nov. 2, 1726. 
Sundry patents for land were read and granted as follows: 

Thomas Chew 1600 acres above the little mountains in 
Spotsylvania County. 



Whereas divers murders have been lately committed on the 
Frontiers of this Colony wherein the Nottoway Indians" are 
greatly suspected to have been the actors and the said Indians 
by their late behaviour rendering it highly necessary that a 
strict watch be kept on their motions to prevent the like mis- 
chiefs for the future, this board have therefore thought fit to 
order that none of the said Indians do hereafter depart out 
of the bounds of the lands appropriated for them without a 
pass from Nathan^ Harrison, Esq^. who is hereby impowered 

^The home of the Nottoway Indians was in southeastern Virginia on 
the Nottoway and Black Water rivers. (Mooney, p. 7.) In 1744 they 
were much reduced in numbers by sickness and other casualties, and 
the General Assembly passed an act authorizing the sale of their lands 
on the south side of the Nottoway river in Isle of Wight county, Va. 
At that time their possessions had been reduced to a tract of land six 
miles square. The Nansemond Indians are mentioned in the same act, 
and 300 acres of land belonging to them in the county which bears their 
name were directed to be sold. This latter tract was described as being 
adjacent to "Buck-Horn swamp." The recitals in the act indicate that 
these ancient tribes were rapidly nearing extinction in 1744. (Hening's 
Statutes, Vol. V., pp. 270-273.) 



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8 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

to grant such passes from time to time to such number and 
with such Hmitations of time and place as he shall judge fit, 
and he is hereby further authorized & empowered to appoint 
a proper person to repair once a week or as often as it shall 
be thought convenient to the Nottoway Town, & there examine 
whether any of the said Indians be absent from thence without 
such pass as is herein before directed, and also to enquire 
whether the said Indians are gone & if those that have passes 
do keep within the bounds prescribed therein ; of all which the 
person so appointed is to make a true report to the end that 
if any murders shall be hereafter committed by any of that 
Nation, the same may be better detected & punished. 



Feb. 1 6, 1727. 

Whereas some doubt hath been made whether the exemp- 
tion from purchasing Rights granted by his late Mat^ to the 
persons taking up lands in the counties of Brunswick antl 
Spotsylvania doth extend to lands which shall be surveyed 
but not patented before the first of ^lay next. It is the opin- 
ion of this Board that the said exemption doth extend to 
all lands actually surveyed in the said counties before the first 
day of May next, tho' patents shall not be passed for the same 
and the Surveyors of the said counties are to cause the said 
surveys to be returned into the Secretary's office with all con- 
venient speed. 



Oct. 17, 1727. 

Whereas the Board is informed that the Inhabitants of this 
Colony near Roanoak had lately been infested with a company 
of the Cattawba Indians" who had committed sev* Robberies 

°The original home of the Catawba Indians was on the river which 
bears their name, close to the boundary line between North and South 
Girolina. Their largest village was in the present county of York in 
the latter State. (Mooney, pp. 70-71.) They seem to have been "the 
bravest and most enterprising of all the southern tribes, sometimes 
going as far north as Pennsylvania to wage war with the Five Nations. 

Kerclieval makes frequent reference to this tribe as participants in 
battles fought with the northern Indians in the Valley of Virginia 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 9 

upon them, and that they expected they would return soon with 
a more considerable number and do more mischief, not only 
to the English Inhabitants, but to the Tributary Indians ; and 
that there was some reason from their insolent behavior of late, 
to apprehend they designed to take possession of Christiana 
Fort in which there are several Cattawbas at this time, and 
that they will do other acts of Hostility, Colonel Harrison is 



prior to the coming of the whites. However, he gives no dates; the 
localities are not fixed with exactness; his accounts rest entirely upon 
tradition, and most of them are vague in one respect or another. (Ker- 
cheval, History of the \' alley, 2nd ed., 1850, pp 29-34.) He invariably 
states that the northern Indians engaged in this warfare were Dela- 
wares, but the Council Orders and authorities cited in these notes make 
it certain that they belonged to the Five Nations. He says that the 
battle of Hanging Rocks was fought by the Catawbas and the Dela- 
wares. but Schnell, the Moravian missionary, who passed the spot in 
1749 states that the Mohaicks and Catawbas were the opposing tribes 
in that engagement, {rirginia Magazine, Vol. XI., p. 118.) 

A preceding note shows that the Five Nations exercised jurisdiction 
over all that portion of Virginia lying to the westward of the Blue 
Ridge, and that their war trail to the south passed through this section. 
The Iroquois were not always successful in their forays against the 
southern tribes. In a letter from William Keith, then Governor of 
Pennsylvania, dated July 19, 1720, addressed to the Governor of New 
York concerning Indian affairs, the following passage occurs: "For the 
southern Indians being at last provoked beyond measure, came out this 
spring to meet the Mighty Warriors of your Five Nations, and pursued 
them with slaughter almost as far as the Potomeck river." (Minutes 
of the Provineial Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. III., pp. 99-100.) This 
battle is probably one of the traditional engagements mentioned by 
Kercheval. 

In a leter dated Jan. 25, i7i9-*20. Governor Spotswood addressed a 
vigorous remonstrance to the President of the Council of New York 
concerning the conduct of the Five Nations, stating that they had 
assisted the Tuscaroras in Virginia in \y\2-i^\ that in 1717 a large body 
of them passed to the south on the east side of the Blue Ridge, and 
proceeding to the Catawba country, had fallen upon those Indians, cap- 
turing a large number of them. The letter also declares that the settlers 
on the frontiers of Virginia were suffering great annoyance at the hands 
of the Five Nations, and if the Governor of New York did not restrain 
them, the Virginians would do so, even if an Indian war resulted. 
(Minutes of the Provincial Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. III., pp. 82- 

89.) 



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10 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

desired to take such measures as he shall think most expe- 
dient for protecting the Frontiers against the Invasions of 
those Indians. 



Oct. 22, 1729. 

An order of his ]\Iaj^*^ in his privy council bearing date 
the 1st of feb*"-^ 1728 Whereby his Majesty is graciously 
pleased to Order & direct that fifty nine thousand seven hun- 
dred and eighty-six acres of I^nd in Spotsylvania County held 
by Coll. Alex^ Spotswood by a defective Title be regranted to 
him by Patent upon his procuring Rights for the same & de- 
claring his Majesties pleasure that the same Exemption from 
payment of quit Rents be extended to the said Lands as was 
granted by his late Majesty to the Patentees of a thousand 
acres of Land in the same county whereupon it being propos'd 
to the consideracon of the Board how far other persons hav- 
ing large Tracts of Land in the afs'd county for w'ch no Rights 
were paid or produced at the time of the Grant ought to be 
charged agreeable to his Majestie's Intentions it is resolved 
and ordered That Coll. Spotswood ought to produce Rights & 
pay Quit rents for the full Quantity of Land men'cond in the 
above Order of his Maj>' in Council the S^ Quit rents to be 
accounted from the first day of May 1728 & that the same 
be demanded accordingly. 

That for all the other large Tracts of Land taken up in the 
said county & not within the benefit of his late Majesties 
Bounty an Immediate Demand be made of the Rights for the 
same which ought to have been & were not paid at the time of 
the Grant excepting always such of the said Lands as have 
been since lapsed & granted to other patentees when his Majes- 
ty hath been satisfied for the rights thereof. 

That in like manner where the first Patentees have continued 
hitherto in possession of their several Tracts the Quit Rents 
for the same be demanded from the first day of May 1728 
but forasmuch as the S*^ Patentees have been already recom- 
mended to his Majesties favour in relacon to the Arrears ac- 
crued before the first dav of Mav It is resolved that the De- 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. U 

mand of the Arrears be Suspended until his Majesties pleas- 
ure be known. 



Whereas the Catawbow Indians have by some of the Indian 
traders signified their Desire to enter into a Treaty^ of Friend- 
ship with this Government. 

Its the Opinion of this Board that the S^ Indians be en- 
couraged in their good Inclination and for that purpose be in- 
vited to repair hither at the next General Court. But in case 
the S*^ Treaty take effect it is insisted that the said Cattawbaw 
Indians shall undertake for the peaceable behaviour of the 
Sapony Indians who have lately deserted their settlement in 
this Colony & Joined themselves to the S*^ Cattawbaw Indians: 



Oct. 2Sth, 1729. 

On reading at this [Board a] LVe from Coll. Montgomery 
Governor of New York with a Transcript of a conference held 
the 21'* July last between the Commissioners for Indian affairs 
at Albany and some of the Chiefs of the Oneidas,® wherein the 

^It is not definitely known whether the Treaty contemplated by this 
Order was concluded, but at a later period the Catawbas became 
the firm friends of the Virginia Government. They aided the colonies 
in the war against the Tuscaroras (1711-13) and participated on the 
English side in the French and Indian War. During the Revolution 
they stood with the Whigs of South Carolina in their great struggle 
against British invasion and occupation. (Mooney, p. 72.) 

*The inveterate hostility between the Cataw^ba Indians and the Five 
Nations was indirectly the cause of an encounter between the white 
settlers of the upper Valley and the latter tribes, which for a time 
threatened to involve the western border of Virginia in an Indian war. 
The Treaty of Lancaster settled the Indian claim to the country west 
of the Blue Ridge and amicably adjusted the still more serious question 
of peace or war with the Iroquoian League. In December, 1742, a party 
of Indians belonging to this confederacy were on their way south to 
engage the Catawbas, when a battle between them and the white settlers 
took place in the present county of Rockbridge, then Augusta, near 
Balcony Falls, on the north branch of the James river. The true his- 
tory of this fight is of considerable historical importance, because it 
was the first battle of which there is record between the whites and 



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12 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

S*^ Indians complain that a considerable number of their Nation 
have been lately killed & taken prisoners by the Virginia In- 
dians & designing repara'con. But it appearing to this Board 
by several late accounts brought by the Indian Traders that 

Indians in all the vast territory then belonging to Virginia west of the 
Blue Ridge. Waddell gives an interesting account of this engagement, 
based on a letter written in 1808 by Judge Samuel McDowell, son of 
Captain John McDowell, who was killed in the action. He states, how- 
ever, upon the authority of Judge McDowell, that the Indians engaged 
were Dela wares, which was not the case. (Waddell, Annals of Augusta 
County, 2nd cd.. 1902, pp. 46-47.) There is in existence a copy of a 
letter written on the same day of the engagement, which sheds new 
light upon the affair. This letter seems to have escaped the notice of 
qll historians of the Virginia Valley. The following is a literal copy: 

"Augusta County, 18 Dec, 1742. 
Hon'd sir 

A parcel of Indians appeared in hostlie manner among us, killing 
and carrying off horses, etc. Captain John Buchanan and Captain John 
McDowell came up with them this day and sent a man with a signal of 
peace to them, which man they killed on the spot and fired on our men 
which was returned with bravery, in about 45 minutes the Indians fled 
leaving eight or ten of iheir men dead on the spot, and eleven of our 
men are dead, amongst which is Captain McDowell. We have sundry 
wounded. Last night I had an account of the Indians' behaviour and 
immidiatly traveled towards them with a party of men and came up 
within two or three hours after the battle was over. I have summoned 
all the men in our county together in order to prevent them from doing 
any further damage and (but by God's assistance) to repell them force 
by force. We hear of many Indians on our frontiers. I beg your 
Honour's Directions and Assistance both as to ammunition and men. 
The particulars of the battle and motions of the enemy I have not now 
time to write you. 

I am, Yr Honour's M* Obed* Serv*. 

James Patton. 
P. S. 

There are some white men supposed to be French amongst the In- 
dians. Our people are uneasy but full of spirits and hope their behavior 
will show it for the future, not being any way daunted by what has 
happened. 

To the Honot>l<? Will'm Gooch Esq»", &c»." 

(Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the State of New 
y^ork, Albany, i855» Vol. VI., pp. 230-31.) 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 13 

the attack defeat given to the said Oneyedo was by the Catta- 
baw Indians on above Towns the said Oneydes had made a 
secret attack and in the retreat were fallen upon by the Cat- 
tabaw Indians without the Intervention of anv of the Indians 



Until the discovery of this letter it was not known that Captain 
Buchanan commanded one of the companies engaged in this battle. 
Governor Gooch at once communicated with Lieutenant Governor 
Clarke of New York, by letter dated Jan. 3, 1742-3, and Col. Patton's 
letter as given above was transmitted as an enclosure. Governor Gooch 
solicited the good offices of Governor Clarke in bringing the perpetra- 
ors of this outrage to justice, and the interpreter to the Commissioners 
of Indian Affairs of New York, was at once sent to the Six Nations. 
He obtained no satisfaction, the Indians claiming that the whites had 
been the aggressors. They also stated that there was one half-breed 
in the party, but no white men. The Six Nations were restless at the 
time, and the authorities of New York were apprehensive of the result. 
{Documents Relative to the Colonial History of New York, Vol. VI., 
pp. 230-242.) 

In the meantime Governor Gooch had also communicated with Gov- 
ernor Thomas of Pennsylvania, who undertook to act as mediator in 
order to avert an Indian war. Conrad Weiser, the celebrated inter- 
preter and Indian agent of Pennsylvania, was sent to the Six Nations. 
His Report to the Governor of Pennsylvania, and Journal of his visit 
to the Iroquois, give a complete account of this affair from the Indian 
standpoint. Among other things, he took the testimony of an Indian 
who participated in the battle. This Indian stated, in substance, that 
the party consisted of twenty-two Onondaga and seven Oneida Indians. 
They passed peaceably through Pennsylvania where they were civilly 
treated, but the people of Virginia received them in a different spirit, 
refused to issue them a passport, and would not give them anything to 
eat. He also stated that game was scarce, and they would have starved 
if they had not killed a hog occasionally, which they did at Jonontore 
(Shenandoah). They were several times interrupted by the whites on 
their way up the Valley, but avoided difficulties with them, being on 
their way south to fight the Catawbas. They had rested two nights 
and one day near the place where the fight occurred, and then resumed 
their march to the south, when a great number of white men on horses 
assailed them. Two Indian boys in the rear were fired upon, but not 
injured. The Indian captain, whose name was Jonnhaty (as given by 
Weiser), told his men not to fire, because the whites carried a white 
flag. The latter, however,, fired again, killing fwo Indians on the spot. 
Their captain then told them to fight for their lives, which they did at 
close quarters with hatchets. The Indian claimed that the whites were 
worsted in the engagement, losing ten killed. He admitted an Indian 



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li VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of this Colony. It is ordered that the same be signified to 
the Governor of New York to prevent any Misunderstand- 
ing with the Six Nations. But forasmuch as the Oneydes 
seem principally concerned to recover their prisoners out of 
the hands of the Cattabaws, It is ordered that a Message be 
sent to the Cattabaws to desire that the S*^ Prisoners be del'd 
up to this Government, as the surest means for their obtaining 
a Peace with the Six Nations in which this Govemm't will 
Employ this Mediation. 



Apr. 29, 1730. 

Whereas his Majesty by order in his privy Council bearing 
date the 19^** Nov*" MDCCXXIX having been graciously 
pleased to declare & order that the remission of Rights which 
by Order in Council on the 6*^ of Aug* MDCCXXIII was 
granted to the two new counties of Brunswick & Spotsilvania for 
seven years be understood to extend to all grants of Land in the 
County of Spotsilvania not exceeding 6000 Acres including 
therein the 1000 Acres allowed by the afs'd Order in Council 
& that the Grantees be permitted to hold the same upon con- 
dition that they do pay the seven years Quit Rents now in Ar- 
rear but that whoever shall be desirous to hold more than six 
thousand Acres shall be obliged to pay both the same Rights 
& Quit Rents for ever(y) acre exceeding that Number, as 
Lands in any other part of Virg* are liable to, & It is Ordered 
that the officers of his Majesties Revenue demand as well the 
Quit Rents now in Arrears as the Money due for the Rights 

loss of only two killed and five wounded. He also stated that ten of 
them went up the river to the mountains and were pursued by the 
whites to the Potomac, narrowly escaping with their lives. The engage- 
ment, he said, was fought near the river called "Galudoghson," which 
was evidently the Iroquoian name for the north branch of the James. 
Upon full investigation of the affair, Governor Thomas reached the 
conclusion that the whites were the aggressors, and so informed Gov- 
ernor Gooch, who waived the point and gave the Six Nations one 
hundred pounds by way of reparation. The matter was finally adjusted 
by the Treaty of Lancaster. (For Report and Journal of Conrad 
Weiser, see Minutes of the Provincial Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. 
IV., Harrisburg, 1851, pp. 640-646, 660-669.) 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 15 

of all Tracts of I^nd exceeding the Quantity of six thousand 
acres held by any one Patentee in the S^ county pursuant to 
his Majesties Pleasure signified on the above recited Order and 
it is further Ordered that the former Order of this Board for 
Demanding the money due for Rights for the S^ Tracts of 
Land be as it is hereby revok'd and that all Bonds given in the 
Secretary's Office for paym't of the Rights for any Tracts of 
Land not exceeding the quantity of six thousand Acres be 
vacated. 



On reading at this Board a report from R* Hicks* & Daniel 

•In July, 1712, Robert Hix, of Surry, and John Evans, David Crawley, 
Richard Jones, and Nathaniel Urven, of Prince George county, Va., 
received a license from Governor Spotswood to trade with the "Western 
Indians." They gave a penal bond of three hundred pounds not to 
trade with the Tuscaroras or any other Indians in league or alliance 
with them. (Calendar of Virginia State Papers, Vol. I., p. 155.) In his 
letter of Jan. 25, 1719-20, to the Governor of New York, Governor 
Spotswood stated that during the Tuscarora War (1711-1713) two 
hundred of the New York Indians had set upon and robbed a caravan 
of Virginia Indian traders as they were going south, killing one of 
them and nearly all of their horses. At the Treatj- of Albany (1722) 
the Deputies of the Five Nations admitted that they had robbed "that 
honest man. Captain Hicks," and promised to make reparation. 

Because of the numerous references made to the Iroquois in these 
notes, a brief statement concerning their history is deemed appropriate. 

Mr. Mooney states, on page 21 of his learned essay, that this great 
Confederacy was formed about 1570, quoting J. N. B. Hewitt as au- 
thority. The League originally consisted of five tribes — the Mohawk, 
Seneca, Cayuga, Oneida, and Onondaga ; hence their name, The Five 
Nations. They came in contact with the Virginia colonists at an early 
period. Col. Henry Coursey, representing Maryland and Virginia, first 
met them at Albany in 1677, but the agreement then made was not 
strictly observed by the Iroquois. In 1679, Col. William Kendall, as 
agent of Virginia, held a conference with them at the same place. This 
was followed by another conference also at Albany in 1684, in which 
Lord Howard of Effingham, then Governor of Virginia, participated. 
(Colden, History of the Five Nations, New York, ed. 1902, Vol. I., pp. 
24-25, 31-32, 34-51.) The Treaty of 1722 has been mentioned, and this 
was followed by the Lancaster conference of 1744. Negotiations were 
also held with these tribes by the Virginia Government at the begin- 
ning of the French and Indian War. 

In 1720 Governor Hunter, of New York, estimated the warriors of 



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16 \aRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Hicks who at the instance of the Governor of New York were 
sent to the Cattabaw Indians to demand the liberty of certain 
Prisoners of the five Nations taken by them It appearing to 
the Board that the S^ Rob^ & Daniel have diligently p-formed 
the service req*d of them. It is therefore Ordered that there 
be p'd to each of them out of his Majesties Revenue of 2 S p 
hhd the sum of thirteen pounds Curr^ Money for their 
Trouble in the S^ Service. 



On the application of the Sheriffs of the counties of Han- 
over & Spotsilvania for a more suitable allowance to enable 
them to collect & make convenient the Quit Rent of tob.- aris- 
ing in these counties many of the Plantations lying some sixty 
& eighty miles distant from Water Carriage It is ordered that 
they be allowed 30 p Cent on all the Tobo they receive. 

(to de continued) 



VIRGINIA MILITIA IN THE REVOLUTION. 



(continued) 



Rogers, David, for pay, &c., of West Augusta ]\Iilitia, P. 
Acco't, 5,995. 6. II. 

July 12. Randolph, Thomas. PaymasV to the Amelia Min't 
Batt n for pay, &c., P. Acco't, bal'd, 261. 2. 7. 

SepV I. Rives, Capt. George, for pay, &c., of his Comp'y 
of Sussex Militia, in. 10. 5. 

9. Royston, Capt. Peter, for Ditto Charles City Ditto, 96. 
15. II. 

the Five Nations at 2,000. {New York Documents, Vol. VI., p. 557) 
They were unquestionably the strongest family in every respect among 
the North American Indians. Governor Clinton, of New York, called 
them 'The Romans of the West." 



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VIRGINIA MILITIA IN THE REVOLUTION. 17 

1 6. Rogers, Capt. Peter, for Waggon hire with & bacon 
furnished his Comp'y of Halifax Ditto, 12. 19. — . 

18. Richardson, Thomas, for pay as Adjutant to the 7th 
Bat'n of Ditto, 6. 6. 6. 

19. Raines, Capt. John, for pay, &c., of his Comp'y of 
Prince George Ditto, 75. 14. 7. 

25. Riddick, Capt. Demsey, for Ditto Nansemond Ditto 
43. 12. 9. 

Oct'r 3. Rogers, Capt, Peter, for Ditto Halifax Ditto, bal'ce, 
263. II. 10. 

16. Ranson, Thomas, Ensign, for pay of a Guard of Glou- 
cester Ditto, P. Acco't, 4. 17. 6. 

Nov'r 4. Randolph, Richard, for Flour, &c., furnished the 
Prince Edward Ditto, P. Acco't, 8. 13. 4. 

7. Riddick, Willis, for sundry Persons for Provisions, &c., 
furn't Militia, P. Acco't, 67. 8. io>^. 

14. Rice, Thomas, for a Rifle furnished Capt. Charles Al- 
len's Comp'y ditto, 4. — . — . 

19. Roberts. William, for Provisions furnished the Cul- 
peper Ditto, P. Acco't, 46. 15. — . 

Dec'r 10. Rogers, Peter, for waggonage to Halifax Militia, 
&c., P. Acco't, 33. 5. — . 

26. Reade, John, for ferriages to sundry Nansemond Mi- 
litia, P. Acco't, 4. 12. 6. 

31. Robinson, Capt. William, for pay of his Comp'y Prin- 
cess Anne Militia, P. Acco't, 35. i. 11. 

1778. 

Jan'y 8. Rumbottom, James, for pay as Drummer in Capt. 
John Slaughter's Comp'y, i. 10. — . 

15. Rubsaman, Jacob, for Salt furnished the Montgomery 
Militia, P. Acco't, 12. — . — . 

21. Rogers, Capt. John, for pay, &c., of his Comp'y of 
Northumberl'd Ditto, P. Acco't, 36. 18. i. 

Feb'y 5. Riddick, Capt. Josiah, for Do. Nansemond Ditto, 
P. Acco't, loi. II. 8. 

April 21. Rucker, Capt. Ephraim, Pay, &c., of his Comp'y 
in Culpeper to 5 Sep'r last, 49. 3. 5. 



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18 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

May 6. Roberts, Samuel, for damage done his Gun, i. — . 

23. Royster, Capt. Peter, for Rations for self and Officers, 
2. 17. 4. 

June 12. Rodgers, John, Oats, Pasturage, &c., 2. 6. 3. 

22. Roberts, Major William, Culpeper Militia, 6. 12. — . 

25. Rolleson, John, for 10 Diets to Gloster Militia, i. 10. — . 

July 9. Riddick, Capt. Robt. M., for Pay of his Nansemond 
Militia, 40. 5. 4. 

Riddick, Henry, for riding Express to order Do. out to 
Princess Ann, i. 10. — . 

August 10. Redman, Stuart, Pay of himself and Guard 
Westmoreland Militia, 2. 10. — . 

12. Rust, James, Horse hire, &c., & Jno. Ballandine, &c., 

1. 10. — . 

Octo'r 17. Roberts, James, for Beef to Pittsylvania Militia, 
19. — . — . 

20. Robins, Thos., for a Gun Halifax Minute Men, 2. — . — . 

22. Robinson, Estate of John, for lead to Bedford Militia, 
-. 7. 6. 

Robins, Major Jno., for Pay & Rations, 16 Days Northamp- 
ton Militia, P. Cert., 12. 10. 8. 

29. Roam, Colo. Thomas, for Pay as Colo, of the Essex 
Militia, P. Acco't, Sworn to, 2. 5. — . 

NovV 3. Ransdell, John, for a Gun, Fauquier Minute Men, 

2. 15. — . 

10. Rucker, Capt. Ephraim, for Pay of 2 Militia men, P. 
Roll, I. 9. 4. 

16. Rentfro, Capt. William, for Pay of his Compi'y Botte- 
tourt Militia, 434. 12. 8. 

16. Renfro, Joseph, for horse hire for Do. Do., 6. 16. 6. 

25. Ruddell, Capt. Isaac, for Pay of his CompV of Wash- 
ington Militia sent under Colo. G. R. Clark to the Illinois P. 
Pay Roll, & Cert., 883. 9. 4. 

DecV 10. Ruger, Jacob, for Bacon furnished Henry Militia, 
P. Cert's, 26. 17. 6. 

Rowland, Mich'l, for provisions furnish'd Do., P. Do., 22. 
13. 6. 



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VIRGINIA MILITIA IN THE REVOLUTION. 19 

Rowland, Capt. Thomas, for Pay of his Comp'y, Bottetourt 
Do., P. Pay Roll, 56. 4. 9. 

16. Do. Do. for Rations, om*d in Do. Do., 4. 8. — . 

Rentfro, Capt. William, for Rations omitted in his Pay Roil 
1 6th NovV, 59. — . — . 

1776. 

S. 

DecV 26. Sizemore, John, for one Rifle, sold Capt. James 
Anderson for his Min*t Comp'y, 4. — . — . 

Swepson, Richard, for his Rations & Waggon hire to Capt. 
Lucas's Militia, Do. 11. 10. — . 

Jan'y i. Shackelford, Richard, Messenger to the Commit- 
tee of Richmond County, 12. — . — . 

Smith, William, for Wood furnished the Garrison at Ports- 
mouth, 25. — . — . 

Starr, Elizabeth, for Nursing at the Hospital at Portsmoutli, 
7. 8. -. \ 

Smith, William, for Plank fo^Ji«Fort at Portsmouth, 113. 

19. y2. ^- ■ 

3. Scott, Joseph, for Rugs for Josiah Parker's Min't Comp'y 
and Waggon hire, 38. 13. 4. 

16. Sparling, Lawrence, & Comply for Kettles & Axes for 
the Nansemond Militia, 6. 9. — . 

17. Southall, Turner, for 7 Guns & provisions for the Hen- 
rico Militia, 44. 11. 4>4- 

18. Stewart & Mohun, for Iron Work at the Fort at Ports- 
mouth, 71. 13. — . 

20. Do. & Brown for Expences going to examine Gun 
Carriages at York, i. 4. — . 

(TO BE continued) 



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20 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES, &c. 



The Treaties of 1768 and 1770. 



From Documents in the British Public Record Office 



[In the Virginia State Library is a small manuscript vol- 
ume, bought at the sale of the Barlow Collection, which con- 
tains a number of certified copies of papers in the old State Pa- 
per Office, relating to the treaties by which Virginia acquired 
land from the Cherokees. 

Much information bearing on these treaties, and the de- 
sire of the Virginia people to obtain a legal title to the lands 
to the West and Southwest, has already been given in this 
magazine. See IX, 360-364 (where the text of the Treaty 
of Lochaber, 1770, is given) ; X, 13, 14; XII, 225-240; 353- 
357, the action of the Assembly on the subject in 1769 and 
1770), and 357-364 (the letter of the Committee of Corres- 
pondence in support of the proposed increase of territory). 
The papers now published give additional details.] 



John Stuart^ to President Blair. 

Copy of a letter from Mr. Stuart, Superintendent, to Mr. 
President Blair: 

State Paper Office, America, Vol. 189. 

Hard Labour, 17th Oct., 1768. 

Sir, — I have the honor of acquainting you that in obedience 
to His Majesty's commands, on the 13th Curr* I met at this 
place all the principal chiefs of the Upper and lower Cherokee 
Nations, and on the fourteenth, by his Majesty's Royal Au- 
thority concluded a Treaty with said Indians, ratifying the 
cessions of land lying within the Provinces of South Carolina, 
North Carolina and Virginia by them to His Majesty and his 

^For a note on John Stuart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for 
the Southern Department, see IX, 360. 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 21 

heirs for ever; and confirming the boundary Line markM 
by the JLords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, accord- 
ing to the several agreements entered into with said Indians. 
The line now ultimately confirmed and ratified by said Treaty 
was as follows : 

From a place called Towahihie on the Northern Bank of 
Savannah River a North 50 Degrees East course in a strait 
Line to a place called Dervisses corner or yellow water, from 
Dervisses Comer or yellow water a North 50 Degrees East 
Course in a Strait line to the Southern Bank of Reedy River, 
at a place called Waughoe or Elm Tree, where the line behind 
S** Carolina terminates. From a place called Waughoe or 
Elm Tree, on the Southern Bank of Reedy River a North 
Course in a strait line to a mountain called Tryon Mountain, 
where the great ridge of mountains becomes impervious. 
From Tryon Mountain in a strait line to Chiswell's Mine^ on 
the Eastern Bank of the Great Conhoway River about a N. 
B. E. course, and from Colonel Chiswell's Mine on the East- 
ern Bank of the great Conhoway in a strait line about a North 
course to the confluence of the Great Conhoway with the 
Ohio. As soon as possible after my return to Charlestown 
I shall send you extracts of my conferences and an Authentick 
Copy of the above-mentioned Treaty, concluded with said 
Chiefs. I acquainted the Chiefs that I expected their Depu- 
ties would set out immediately from this place with my Deputy 
to meet your Commissioners at Colonel Chis well's Mine; in 
order to finish marking the Boundary line as agreed upon; 
but they objected and desired that service might be deferred 
till the spring of next year; the reasons they urged for this 
delay are as follows: That when they appointed the loth of 
November for the time of meeting your commissioners to 
proceed upon that very important service, they understood 
that they had no more to mark than from the mountains, 
where the line behind North Carolina ends, to Chiswell's Mine 
on the Conhoway, as they considered the River from thence 
to its confluence with the Ohio as a natural Boundary; but 
as the line is to run in a strait course almost due North from 

'Now Austinville, Wythe county. 



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22 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

the Mine to the mouth of the river, the advanced season of 
the year will render that service impracticable before the 
Spring, as the Line now ultimately agreed upon runs through 
a large extent of mountainous country uninhabited, where in 
the winter the cold will be extremely intense and there will 
be no shelter for men or food for horses at that season. These 
reasons appeared to me so good and just that I was obliged 
to acquiesce in them, and I send this letter by express to pre- 
vent as much as possible any disappointment that might re- 
sult from this alteration. I hope you will receive it in time 
to prevent your Commissioners setting out. The Chiefs have 
appointed the loth of May next for meeting your Commis- 
sioners at Chiswell's Mine, which I hope will prove agreeable, 
and their seasons for altering their time satisfactory to you 
I reproached the Cherokees severely with the murther of five 
emigrants from your Province, who were going to the Mis- 
sissippi, which was committed in summer last. They con- 
fess'd it, and said the perpetrators were a party of Chilhowic 
people, who urged in their own defence that their relations 
had been killed in Augusta County in your Province in 1765, 
for which they had never received any satisfaction, although 
repeated promises had been made, either of putting the guilty 
persons to death, or making a compensation in goods from 
your province, which they believed because I had confirmed 
them. That they nevertheless were disappointed, and being 
tired with waiting, took that satisfaction which they cou'd 
not obtain from our justice. All the warriors declared that 
they disapproved of the action, but that the Chilhowie peo- 
ple were authorised by the custom of their country to act as 
they did, and their plea of never having received any satis- 
faction was undeniable, that in any other instance nothing 
shou'd prevent their executing strict justice on offenders ac- 
cording to Treaties. It is not only extremely disagreeable to 
myself, but very detrimental to His Majesty's service to be 
obliged to fail in any promise I make to Indians. The com- 
pensation of 500 Indian dressed Deer-skins value in goods for 
every person murdered, which on the faith of Governor Fau- 
quier's repeated letters I engaged they should receive early 
in the spring, was extremely moderate, and this you will ac- 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 23 

knowledge if you compare it with the sum expended by the 
Province of Pennsylvania on a late similar occasion; and T 
must confess that this disappointment will render me ex- 
tremely cautious in making promises on any future occasion. 
I am to meet the Chiefs of the Upper and Lower Creek 
Nations at Silver Bluff, on Savannah River, the ist Novem- 
ber to ratify the cessions to His Majesty in the two Floridas 
and Georgia, and expect to be at Charlestown by the time the 
bearer can return there. I have the honor of being very re- 
spectfully, sir, 

Your most obedient and very humble servant, 

John Stuart. 

P. S. — I have agreed to pay the bearer, Samuel Stainacre 
[Stalnacre?] 22 pistoles. 

The Hon^»<^ John Blair, Esq''^ 

[Endorsed] 

Mr. Stuart to Mr. Pres* Blair, In Lord Botetourt (No. 4) of ^ 
10 Xov^ 1768. 

I hereby certify that this is a true copy of the document de- 
posited in Her Ma jesty*s' State Paper Office, London. 

RoBT. Lemon, Chief Clerk. 
L. S: State Paper OfUce, 20th July, 1841. 



Treaty of Fort Stanwix.^ 
State Paper Office, America, Vol. 189. 
Deed with the Indians dated, 5th November, 1768. 

[Duplicate] 

To all to whom these presents shall come or may concern, 
we, the Sachems and Chiefs of the Six United Nations, and 



^By this treaty the Six Nations ceded lands as far south as the 
Cherokee (Tennessee) river. Though, of course, this treaty is well 
known, it has been thought that it would be well to include it when 
printing the other papers of this collection. 



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24 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of the Shawanese, Delawares, Mingoes of Ohio, and other de- 
pendant Tribes on behalf of Ourselves and the rest of our 
several Nations, the Chiefs and Warriors of whom are now 
here convened by Sir William Johnson, Baronet His Majesty's 
Superintendant of our affairs, send Greeting. Whereas, His 
Majesty was graciously pleased to propose to us in the year 
1765 that a Boundary Line should be fixed between the Eng- 
lish and us, to ascertain and establish our limits, and prevent 
those intrusions and incroachments of which we had so long 
and loudly complained, and to put a stop to the many frau- 
dulent advantages which had been so often -taken of us in 
land affairs, which boundary appearing to us as a wise and 
good measure, we did then agree to a part of a Line and prom- 
ised to settle the whole finally, whensoever Sir William John- 
son should be fully empowered to treat with us for that pur- 
pose. And whereas, his said Majesty has at length given 
Sir William Johnson orders, Sir William Johnson has con- 
vened the Qiiefs and Warriors of our respective nations, who 
are the true and absolute Proprietors of the lands in question, 
and who are here now to a very considerable number, and 
whereas many uneasinesses and doubts have arisen amongst 
us which have given rise to an apprehension that the Line may 
not be strictly observed on the part of the English, in which 
case matters may be worse than before, which apprehension, 
together with the dependant state of some of our tribes and 
other circumstances, which retarded the settlement and became 
the subject of some debate. Sir William Johnson has at length 
so far satisfied us upon, as to induce us to come to an agree- 
ment concerning the Line, which is now brought to conclu- 
sion, the whole being fully explained to us in a large Assembly 
of our people before Sir William Johnson and in the presence 
of His Excellency the Governor of New Jersey, the Commis- 
sioners for the Provinces of Virginia and Pennsylvania, and 
sundry other gentlemen, by which line, so agreed upon, a 
considerable tract of country along several provinces is by 
us ceeded to His said Majesty, which we are induced to, and 
do hereby ratify and confirm to His said Majesty from the 
expectation and confidence we place in his royal goodness, 
that he will graciously comply with our humble requests as 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 26 

the same is expressed in the speech of the several Nattons 
addressed to His Majesty thro* Sir William Johnson on Tues- 
day, the first day of the present month of November, wherein 
we have declared our expectations of the continuance of His 
Majesty's favor, and our desire that our ancient engagements 
be observed and our affairs attended to, by the officer who 
has the management thereof, enabling him to discharge all 
these matters properly for our interest. That the lands occu- 
pied by the Mohocks around their villages, as well as by any 
other Nation affected by this our cession, may effectually re- 
main to them and to their posterity, and that any engagements 
regarding Property which they may now be under may be 
prosecuted and our present grants deemed valid on our parts, 
with the several other humble requests contained in our said 
speech. And whereas at the settling of the said line it ap- 
peared that the Line described by His Majesty's order was 
not extended to the Northward of Oswegy, or the Southard 
of Great Kanawha River. We have agreed to and continued 
the line to the Northward, on a supposition that it was omit- 
ted by reason of our not having come to any determination 
concerning its course, at the Congress held in 1765 and in as 
much as the line to the Northward became the most neces- 
sary of any for preventing encroachments at our very towns 
and residences, and we have given this Line more favourably 
to Pennsylvania for the reasons and considerations mentioned 
in the Treaty. We have likewise continued it South to Chero- 
kee River, because the same is and we do declare it to be our 
true bounds with the Southern Indians, and that we have an 
undoubted right to the country as far South as that River; 
which makes our cession to His Majesty much more advan- 
tageous than that proposed. Now, therefore, know ye that 
we, the Sachems and Chiefs afore mentioned, native Indians 
and Proprietors of the Lands herein after described, for and 
in behalf of ourselves and the whole of our confederacy for 
the consideration herein before mentioned, and also for and in 
consideration of a valuable present of the several articles in 
use and among Indians, which, together with a large sum 
of money, amount in the whole to the sum of Ten thousand 
four hundred and sixty pounds seven shillings and three pence 



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26 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Sterling to us now delivered and paid by Sir William John- 
son Baronet, His Majesty's sole agent and Superintendan* 
of Indian affairs for the Northern Department of America, 
in the name and on behalf of Our Sovereign Lord George 
the third by the Grace of God of Great Britain, France and 
Ireland King, defender of the Faith, the receipt whereof we 
do hereby acknowledge. We, the said Indians, have for us 
our heirs and successors granted, bargained, sold, released 
and confirmed, and by these presents do grant, bargain, sell, 
release and confirm unto our said Sovereign Lord, King 
George the Third, All that Tract of Land situate in North 
America at the Back of the British Settlements, bounded by 
a Line which we have now agreed upon, and we do hereby 
establish as the Boundary between us and the British Colo- 
nies in America Beginning at the mouth of the Cherokee or 
Hozohege River, where it emptys into the River Ohio and run- 
ning from thence upwards along the South side of the said 
River to Kittanning, which is above Fort Pitt ; from thence, 
by a direct line, to the nearest Fork of the West Branch of 
Susquehannah, thence thro' the Alegany Mountains along the 
South side of the said West Branch till it comes opposite to 
the Mouth of a creek caird Tradgton, thence across the West 
Branch and along the South side of that creek, and along 
the North side of Burnett's hills to a creek called Arvondal, 
thence down the same to the East Branch of Susquehannah, 
and across the same, and up the east side of that River to 
Oswegy, from thence east to Delaware River, and up that 
River to opposite where Tianadhera falls into Susquehannah. 
Thence to Tianaderha and up the west side thereof and the 
west side of its West Branch to the head thereof ; and thence 
by a direct line to Canada Creek where it emptys into the 
Wood Creek at the West end of the carrying place beyond 
Fort Stanwix, and extended Eastward from every part of 
the said Line as far as the Lands formerly purchased, so as 
to comprehend the whole of the lands between the said Line 
and the purchased lands or Settlements, except what is within 
the Province of Pennsylvania, together with the hereditaments 
and appurtenances to the same belonging or appurtaining, 
in the fullest and most ample manner, and all the Estate, 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 27 

Right, Title, Interest, Property, Possession, Benefit, claim and 
Demand, either in Law or Equity of each and every of us, 
of, in or to the same or any part thereof. To have and to 
hold the whole Lands and Premisses hereby granted, bar 
gained, sold, released and confirmed as aforesaid with the 
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging under 
the reservations made in the Treaty, unto our said Sovereign 
J^ovdy King George the Third, his heirs and successors, to 
and for his and their own proper use and behoof for ever. 

In witness weherof, we, the chiefs of the Confederacy, 
have hereunto set our Marks and seals at Fort Stanwix the 
5th day of Nov', 1768, in the 9th year of His Majesty's reign. 

Signed, sealed and deliver'd in presence of — 

Tevanhasire, or 

Abraham, [L. S.] Mohock. 

CoNAQUiESO, [L. S.] Onida. 

Sesquaressura, [L. S.] Tuscarora. 
Blunt, or 

Chenughiata, [L. S.] Ohandago. 

Tegaya, [L. S.] Cayuga. 

GosTRAx, [L. S.] Seneca. 

William Franklin, 

Govr. N. Jersey. 
Frederick Smith, 

Chief Justice N. Jersey. 
Thos. Walker, 

Commr. from Virginia. 
Richard Peters, 
James Tilghman, 

Of the Council of Pennsylva. 

[Indorsed] 
Treaty at Fort Stanwix In Lord Botetourt's Dup. (No. 6) 
of 24 Dec', 1768. 

I hereby certify that this a true Copy of the Original de- 
posited in Her Majesty's State Paper Office, London. 

RoBT. Lemon, Chief Clerk. 

L. S: State Paper Oifie, 20th July, 1841. 



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28 virginia historical magazine. 

Instructions from Lord Botetourt to Col. Lewis and 
Dr. Walker.* 

State Paper Office, America, Vol. 189. 

[Duplicate] 

Williamsburg, Dec. 20, 1768. 
Gentlemen, 

As it has been the opinion of His Majesty's Council 
upon reading and considering the papers you have laid before 
them relative to the Treaty lately held with the six Nations at 
Fort Stanwix( that you should immediately proceed to Mr. 
Stuart, Superintendant of the Southern District to acquaint 
him with the result thereof, and to represent to him the ne- 
cessity of a fresh plan of operation with respect to the Boun- 
dary to be fixed between the Cherokee Indians and His 
Majesty's Colony of Virginia ; it has been thought proper that 
I shou'd give some orders and Instructions for the regulation 
of your conduct in this important affair. 

You will consider that the principal object of your journey 
is to convince Mr. Stuart that the Line he proposes to run 
from Chiswell's mine to the mouth of the Great Konhaway, 
will so much contract the limits of this Colony, as to make it 
extremely prejudicial to His Majesty's Service, as well as in- 
jurious to the people who have been encouraged to settle to 
the Westward of his propos'd Boundary. You will observe 
to him that it appears from one of Sir William Johnson's 
letters to Mr. President Blair, dated the 23rd of April last, 
that he, Sir William, had orders to consult the Governors 
upon such points as might affect their several provinces, and 
it presumable that Mr. Stuart's orders were agreeable to Sir 
William's, tho' no consultation with the Governor of this 
Colony hath been had upon this subject, nor any opportunity 
allow'd to Virginia to shew their strong objections to this 
very limited Boundary. If Virginia had been consulted upon 



••Andrew Lewis, then of Botetourt county, and Dr. Thomas Walker, 
(1715-1794), of Albemarle county. Their careers are well known. 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CREROKEES. 29 

this Line there wou'd have been an opportunity of shewing 
that the Cherokees have no just title to the Lands between 
the supposed Line and the Mouth of the Cherokee River, 
which in fact were claimed and have been sold to His 
Majesty by the Northern Nations at the late Treaty at Fort 
Stanwix. You will observe that what Land the Council have 
chiefly in view from this Negotiation with Mr .Stuart is to 
get the period of meeting the Cherokees upon this business., 
still further protracted, so that we may have time fully to 
state this whole matter to His Majesty and His Ministers, 
in order to get the Boundary extended to the Cherokee River. 

Shou'd Mr. Stuart object that he is not furnish'd with 
money as Sir William Johnson was, you may assure him that 
it is a part of my plan to implore His Majesty's ministers to 
endeavor to assist us in that same manner, and that I am not 
without hopes of success. 

You are likewise to acquaint Mr. Stuart that in consequence 
of the promise made by this Government, of 4,500 lbs. of 
dressed deer skins in goods intended as a compensation for 
those Cherokees who lost their lives in Augusta County, 
those goods were actually purchased and sent off to be deliv- 
ered to them at the Congress appointed to be held at Chis- 
weirs Mines in November last; but that as upon examina- 
tion several of them are found to be much damaged and im- 
paired in their value, you are to accept of Mr. Cameron's 
proposal signified to Mr. President Blair in his letter of the 
9th of June, and are to have the proper goods to that amount 
bought of the gentleman who has offered to deliver them at 
Sequch, at an advance which Mr. Cameron thought reason- 
able. 

You are at the same time to procure a sufficient quantity 
of Wampum for Belts, &c., to be given to the Indians. As [ 
know you to be perfectly acquainted with the business you arc 
going upon, will trouble you with no further Instructions, 
but refer to your judgment and discretion to do the best as 
occasion shall offer. I have not the least doubt but that you 
will give me the earliest intelligence of your Success during 



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30 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

the course of this very material transaction. Have the honor 
to be, Gentlemen, 

Your very obedient, humble servant, 

( Signed ) Botetourt. 

Williamsburg, Dec. 20th, 1768. 

instructions to Col. Lewis & Dr. Walker. 

[Indorsed] 

Instructions to Commissioners — Duplicate, In Lord Bote- 
tourt's Dup. (No. 6), of 24 Dec^ 1768. 

I hereby certify that this is a true copy of the Original de- 
posited in Her Majesty's State Paper Office, London. 

RoBT. Lemon, Chief Clerk. 

L. S: State Paper Office, 20 July, 1841. 



Report of Col. Lewis and Dr. Walker to Lord Botetourt, 
2 February, 1769. 

State Paper Office, America, Vol. 189. 

My Lord, 

On receiving your Excellency's Instructions, we began 
our journey to Charles Town, in South Carolina ; on the fifth 
day of January we waited on His Excellency William Tryon, 
Esq*", at Brunswick, by whom we were kindly received and 
promised all the assistance in his power; on the next day we 
went to Fort Johnson, near the mouth of Cape Fear, on the 
8th Governor Tryon wrote us that some Cherokee Indians 
were at Brunswick. Judd's Friend and Salue or the young 
Warrior of Estatoe, were two of them, and that they would 
that day be at Fort Johnson. His Excellency was kind 
enough to come with them. On their arrival we informed 
them we were going to their father, John Stuart, Esq^, on 
business relative to the interest of their Nation, and should be 
glad of their Company, and they readily agreed to go with 
us. On the 9th the vessell we had engaged was ready to sail, 
and we embarked with the two Cherokee Chiefs, two Squas 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 31 

and an Interpreter. On the eleventh we waited on Mr. Stuart, 
delivered your Lordship's letter and fully informed him of 
our business. In answer Mr. Stuart told us that the Boun- 
dary between the Cherokees and Virginia was fully settled 
and ratified in Great Britain, and that any proposal of that 
kind would be very alarming to them, but after some time 
agreed* we might mention it to them, which we did on the 
thirteenth of January. The Indian Qiiefs appeared much 
pleased and agreed to wait on Mr. Stuart with us, and in his 
presence Judds Friend spoke as follows: 

"Father, on an invitation from Governor Tryon we left 
our Country some time since; as soon as he saw us he told 
us of those our two elder Brothers, Col. Lewis and Doctor 
Walker, from Virginia, who had matters of importance to 
mention to us that equally concerned our people as well as 
theirs. This news gave us great joy, and we lost no time in 
waiting on them, and with great pleasure took a passage with 
them in order to wait on you, on the business which so much 
concem'd us, as well as their People, and to convince you 
that we like their talk ; we now take them by the hand, giving 
them a hearty welcome and present them with this string of 
Wampum." 

"Father, they tell us that by running the Line lately men- 
tioned as a Boimdary between our people and Virginia, a great 
number of their people will fall within the bounds of our 
Country, which would greatly distress those our poor Di oth- 
ers, which is far from our intention ; and to convice you that 
we are on all occasions willing to testify our brotherly affec- 
tion towards them, we are heartily willing to join in such 
negociations as may be thought necessary and most expedient 
for fixing a new Boundary that may include all those people 
settled on our lands in the bounds of Virginia, and we now 
give them, in presence of you, our Father, this string of Wam- 
pum as an assurance those people shall remain in peaceable 
possession of those lands until a treaty is held for fixing a 
new Boundary between them and our People." 

Gives a string of Wampum. 

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82 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

We then delivered the following Talk to the Warriors to 
be by them communicated to their Nation : 

To the Chiefs of the Cherokees — Brothers: 

"On the 20th day of December last, being in Williams- 
burg, we received instructions from Lord Botetourt, our Gov- 
ernor, a great and good man, whom the Great King George 
has sent to preside over his Colony of Virginia, directing us 
to wait on your Father, John Stuart, Esq', Superintendant of 
Indian Aflfairs, in order to have a plan agreed on for fixing 
a new Boundary between your people and his Majesty's sub- 
jects in the Colony of Virginia. On our way to this place, 
to our great joy, we met with our good Brothers, Juds Friend 
and the Warrior of Estitoe, who with, gr^at readiness took 
a passage with us from Governor Tryon's to this place, where 
we had the happiness of waiting on your Father, Mr. Stuart, 
and with joint application represented to him the necessity of 
taking such measures as may eflfectually prevent any misun- 
derstanding that might arise between His Majesty's subjects 
of the Colony of Vii*ginia, and our Brothers the Cherokees. 
untill a full Treaty be opened and held for the fixing a new 
Boundary that may give equal justice and satisfaction to the 
parties concerned, and that His Majesty's subjects now set- 
tled on the lands between Chiswell's Mine and the Great 
Island of Holstons River remain in peaceable possession of 
said lands untill a line is run between them and our good 
brothers, the Cherokees, who will receive full satisfaction for 
such lands as you our brothers shall convey to our Great 
King for the use of his subjects. Your Father, Mr. Stuart's 
message to you on this head makes it needless for us to say 
any more on this subject. He will let you, at a proper time, 
know both the time and place where this great work shall be 
brought into execution. We have the pleasure to inform 
you that Vour two great Warriors now present have heartily 
concurred with us in every measure, and make no doubt of 
such measures giving great satisfaction to the whole Nation." 

Gave a string of Wampum. 

Jan^ i6th. 



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VIRGINIA A-ND THE CHEROKEES. 33 

In answer to which Judds Friend and the Warrior of 
Estitoe spoke as follows: 

Father and our Brothers from Virginia: 

"We have heard y«ur Talks which we think very good, 
and shall with all convenient speed return to our Nation, and 
when our Chiefs are assembled shall lay those talks before 
them. 

"Brothers, we are sorry to have it to say that for some 
time bad blood and evil actions prevailed amongst us, which 
occasioned a stroke from our Elder Brothers, but now I have 
the satisfaction of telling you that our hearts are good and 
strait, and you may depend on their continuing so, and that 
you may depend the more on what we say, we take oflf those 
black beads from the end of this string, that nothing may re- 
main but what is pure and white, we now put the black beads 
in your hands, which we call the remains of our Evil thoughts, 
and desire you may now cast them away that they may never 
be had in remembrance more. 

"Brothers, we shall with great pleasure comply with the 
request you have made with regard to the Lands you have 
mentioned, and shall wait with impatience for a general meet- 
ing, that we may have opportunity of convincing our Elder 
Brothers of our friendly disposition towards the;n, by giving 
up those Lands, as they may be of real use to them ; for to us 
it is but little or none as we never hunt there, the deer do not 
live in them mountains, and you in the meantime may depend 
that your i^ople shall enjoy peaceable possession untill we 
make a title to the Great King. 

Brothers, we hope the measures now taken will be product- 
ive of many advantages to our people as well as yours, who 
by living so much nearer to us will have it in their power to 
supply us with goods, for we are often imposed on greatly, 
as we have no trade at present, but from this Province, and 
we hope you our Brothers will signify to your Governor, who 
we believe to be that great and good man you mention, our 
great desire to have a trade with Virginia : that after this 
business is happily finished, which we make no doubt of on 
the part of our Nation, we may enjoy a friendly intercourse 



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34 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

and an advantageous trade with our Brothers, the Inhabi- 
tants of Virginia. 

'^Brothers, we have often joined you in war against your 
enemies and you may always depened on our assistance on 
any future occasion." 

Gives a string of Wampum. 

After we had given Mr. Stuart our reasons for thinking it 
absolutely necessary that a new Boundary should be agreed 
on, he desired us to commit those reasons in writing and sign 
them, which we did in the following words: 

Sir, — His Excellency, the Right Honorable Norborne de 
Lord Botetourt, Governor in Chief of the Colony of Virginia, 
and the King's Council of that Dominion, having ordered 
us to wait on you and assist in settling a Boundary between 
that Colony and the Cherokee Indians, we beg leave to inform 
you that the Line proposed to be marked from Chiswell's 
Mines to the confluence of the Great Kanawha with the 
Ohio ,would be a great disadvantage to the Crown of Great 
Britain, and would injure many subjects of Britain that now 
inhabit that part of the Frontier and have in making that 
settlement comply'd with every known rule of Government 
and the laws of that Colony. 

Lands were first granted on the waters of the Mississipy 
by Sir William Gooch, Governor of Virginia, and the Council 
about the year 1746, in consequence of instructions from Eng- 
land, and many familys settled on the lands so granted. In 
the year 1752 the Legislature of Virginia passed an act'' enti- 
tled "An Act to encourage the settlers on the Waters of the 
Mississipy," by that act they were exempted from the pay- 
ment of taxes for ten years. To this Act his late Majesty of 
glorious memory gave his assent. 

The next year another act" was passed, by which five years' 
indulgence was added, and in that or the succeeding year 
Robert Dinwiddie, Esq^ Governor of Virginia at that time, 
received instructions from King George the Second, to grant 

"See Hening, VI, 258. 
•See Hening, VI, 355. 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 35 

lands on those Waters exempt from the payment of the usual 
right money, and free from Quit rents, for ten years. 

Under these encouragements was that part of the Colony 
settled, whilst the inhabitants were settling on those lands, the 
Cherokee Indians were frequently at their habitations, and 
never that we or either of us ever heard made the least com- 
plaint of our settling, or laid any claim to the Lands we set- 
tled, until Nov', 1763, after the King's proclamation issued in 
that year. 

The six United Nations did claim the lands that were set- 
tled on the Branches of the rivers Kanhawa and Managahaly, 
and were paid a proper consideration for them at Lancaster^ 
in 1744, when they executed a deed of Cession to His late 
Majesty. 

We flatter ourselves that the above is sufficient to convince 
you of the justice and legality of making those settlements. 

The Boundary Line that has been proposed would include 
many of the inhabitants before mentioned within the limits of 
the Cherokee Hunting Grounds. For all such lands and im- 
provements the justice of the crown would be a sufficient in- 
ducement to make some satisfaction to the owners, which 
would be an expence to the Crown, and Injure the Inhabi- 
tants much, and totally ruin many of them ; and the evil would 
be increased by the loss of the Quit rents annually paid for 
those lands, and would also give the Cherokees a large tract 
of Country that was never claimed by them, and now is the 
property of the Crown, as Sir William Johnson actually pur- 
chased it of the six United Nations of Indians, at a very con- 
siderable expence, and took a deed of Cession from them at 
Fort Stanwix, near the head of the Mohocks River on the 5th 
day of November last. 

The Interest of the Crown and inhabitants of Virginia will 
be the most served by fixing the Boundary with the Chero- 
kees in 36 Degrees 30 minutes North Latitude, that Boun- 
dary being already marked by proper Authority as far as 



^Thc text of the treaty of Lancaster, July 2, 1744, is printed in 
R. C. M Page's Page Family, 201-204. 



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36 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Steep Rock Creek,® a branch of the Cherokee river, and is 
the proper division between Lord Granvill's Propriatory and 
the dominion of Virginia, and includes but a small part of 
the lands now claimed by the Cherokees, they having often 
disclaimed the lands lying between the Ohio and a Ridge 
of Mountains called Steep Ridge that divides the waters of 
Cumberland River from those of the Cherokee River. 

This Boundary will give room to extend our settlements 
for ten or twelve years, will raise a considerable sum by the 
Rights, much increase the Quit rents, and enable the inhabi- 
tants of Virginia to live without the manufacturing such mate- 
rials as they raise. 

And'w Lewis^ 
Thos. Walker. 

Feb'y 2, 1769. 

[Indorsed] 

Report from Commissioner's. Duplicate, In Lord Botetourt's 
(Xo. 8), Dup. of II Feb., 1769. 

I hereby certify that this is a true copy of the document 
deposited in Her Majesty's State Paper Office, London. 

RoBT. Lemon^ Chief Clerk. 

L. S: State Paper Office, 20 July, 1841. 

(to be concluded) 



VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 



From Originals in Virginia State Archives. 



(continued) ^ 

Petition in Regard to Boundary Line of Henrico and 

Hanover. 

May 23, 1774. 
To the Honorable the Speaker and Gentlemen of the House ot 
Burgesses : 

Your Petitioners Humbly shew that they are deeply inter- 
ested in the bounds of their Lands on Chicahominy Swamp. 

8N0W the Laurel Fork, of Holston river. 

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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 



87 



Therefore, we pray that if it shall be the Opinion of this 
Honourable House that it is reasonable that the said Boun- 
daries shall be ascertained by Commissioners that such com- 
missioners may be chosen from Chesterfield, King William 
or some distant County, >yho are in no way in affinity or con- 
nected with any of the Proprietors of Lands on the said 
Swamp, and your Petitioners in duty Bound shall Pray, &c. 

Edward Curd, Daniel Price, 

James Cocke, guardian for John Binford, 



William & John Cocke, 

Thomas Harwood, 

Jo. Pleasants, 

Martin Burton, Guardian for 

William Sterling Smith, 

Jacob Pleasants, 

Thos. Watkins, Sr., 

Neare bottom Bridge, 
Thomas Watkins, Jr., 
Miles Selden, 
Joseph Lewis', 
Julius Allen, 
Anthony Mathews. 
Wm. Gathright, Sr., 
John Gathright, 
Jacob Ferriss, 
Miles Gathright, Jr., 
William Carter, 
John Paris, 
John Carter, 

[Endorsed] 

20 May, 1774. referred to the Committee of Propositions 
and Grievances. 



Edward Finch, 

James Bradley, 

Joseph Bradley, 

Gideon Bradley, 

James Eppes, 

John Bradlev, by 

Jas. Eppes, his Guardian, 

Dancey Bradley, by Do., 

Gideon Christian, 

Joseph Gathright, 

Caleb Stone, 

Thomas Owen, 

William Owen, 

Nelson Anderson, Jun'r., 

Geddes Winston, 

Ralph Crutchfield, 

Nat. Wilkinson, 

Robert Spears, 

Nath. Whitlock. 



Petition in Regard to the Boundary Line of Henrico 
AND Hanover, 

May 23, 1774. 
To the Honorable the Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of 
Burgesses : 

The Petition of sundry Persons possessed of Lands adjoin- 
ing Chickahominy Swamp Humbly sheweth, 



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88 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

That your Petitioners have been informed that a petition will 
be laid before this Honourable House praying that certain 
Commissioners may be appointed to ascertain the main run 
of the said Swamp being the dividing Line between your Pe- 
titioners Lands. 

That Divers disputes and controversies on different parts of 
the said Swamp, where there are several runs, have already 
been determined and the main run ascertained by the ordi- 
nary course of Law or by arbitrators. 

That your Petitioners apprehend that if Commisisoners 
should be appointed agreeable to the prayer of the Petition 
aforesaid that many of your Petitioners may be deprived of 
their just Titles under the determination aforesaid, or at least 
be obliged to Litigate the said disputes again at a Time when 
the Most Antient and principle Witnesses are Dead. 

That there is not the least Probability of there ever being a 
dispute with regard to the Main run of the said Swamp be- 
tween a large majority of the Proprietors of the Lands ad- 
joining thereto. 

That your Petitioners Humbly conceive and apprehend that 
the new mode of ascertaining controverted bounds of Lands 
in Chickahominy Swamp is concerted by some Persons who 
are dissatisfyed with the determination of the County Courts 
or Arbitrations made by their consents. 

That your Petitioners apprehend that they will be Taxed 
with a General unjust and unnecessary Expense, should the 
new mode of proceedings Petitioned for take place. 

That your Petitioners apprehend that good and salutar>' 
Law now subsists in this Colony for ascertaining the Bounds 
of every Person's Land by going round the same by way of 
Procession once in four years. 

Therefore, your Petitioners Humbly pray, . . shall here- 

after arrive relative to the Bounds of their Lands that the 

said disputes may be settled and determined by their 

and your Petitioners in Duty Bound shall pray, &c. 

Geddis Winston, John Carter, 

William Owen, William Christian, 



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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 



89 



Ben. Timberlake, 
Thomas Owens, 
James Cocke, Guardian for 
Wm. and John Cocke, 
Thomas Harwood, 
Martin Burton, Guardian for Thomas Bowles, 
William Starlin Smith; Joseph Sheppard, 
Thos. Watkins, Sr., near Bot 
tom's Bridge; 



His 
Charles Hudson (X) Blunt, 

Mark. 
Thomas Mann, 
John Winn, 



Thomas Watkins, 
Daniel Price, 
Miles Selden, 
James Royall, 

His 
Elijah (X) Liggon, 

Mark. 
Ralph Crutchfield, 
Margaret Puryear, 
John Harlow, 
David Bowles, 
Nathl Holman, 
William Ford, 
Susanna Puryear, 

Her 
Mary (X) Bowles, 

Mark. 
Joseph Lewis, 
Anthony Matthews, 
Anne Gathright, 
Wm. Gathright, , 
John Gathright, 
Jacob Ferriss, , 
William Carter, 
John Bowles, 
Miles Gathright, Jr., 
John Paris, 



His 
David (X) Wilkinson, 

Mark. 
John Bin ford, 
Edward Finch, 
Her 
Elizabeth (X) Bradley, 

Mark. 
James Bradley, 
Joseph Bradley, 
Gideon Bradley, 
James Eppes, 
John Bradley, by Jas. Eppes, 

his Guardian, 
Dancy Bradley, by Jas. Eppes, 

his Guardian, 
Gideon Christian, 
William Leonard, Sr., 
William Sheppard, 
Benja. Sheppard, 
Mary Bowles, 
John Christian, 
Richmond Terrell, 
Nathaniel Raglen 
William Raglen, by Rob't 
Crump, their G. 
Thomas Bowles, 
Caleb Stone, 
Nath'l Wilkinson. 



23 May, 1774. 
and Grievances. 



[Endorsed] 
Referred to the Committee on Propositions 
(Reasonable.) » (A True Copy.) 



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40 virginia historical magazine. 

Presbyterian Protest Against a Proposed Toleration 

ACT.^ 

June 5, 1774. 

To the Honorable the Speaker and the Gentlemen of the House 
of Burgesses : 

The Petition of the Presbytery of Hanover in behalf of 
themselves and all the Presbyterians in Virginia in particu- 
lar and all Protestant Dissenters in general, Humbly Sheweth : 

That upon application^ made by the rev'd Mr. James Ander- 
son in behalf of the Synod of Philadelphia The Honorable 
Governor Gooch with the advice of the Council did in the 
year 1738 or about that time for the encouragement of all 
Presbyterians who might incline to settle in the Colony Grant 
an Instrument of writing under the Seal of the Colony con- 
taining the most ample assurance that they should enjoy the 
full and free exercise of their Religion and all the other privi- 
ledges of good subjects. Relying upon this express Stipula- 
tion as well as upon the Justice and catholic Spirit of the 
whole Legislative body, several thousand families of Presby- 
terians have removed from the Northern provinces into the 
frontiers of this Colony ; exposed themselves to a cruel and 
savage enemy, and all the other toils and dangers of settling 
a New Country and soon became a Barrier to the former in- 
habitants who were settled in the same commodious parts of 
the Colony. Ever since that time we have been considered 
and treated upon an equal footing with out fellow-subjects 
nor have our ministers or people been restricted in their re- 
ligious priviledges by any law of the Colcfny. Your humble 
petitioners futther shew that with gratitude they acknowledge 

*As this proposed act never became a law, it is not printed in the 
Statutes at Large, nor is a copy known to exist. Its provisions can, 
however, be ascertained from the protest here printed. For action 
of the Presbyterians in regard to this act, see Foote's Sketches of Vir- 
ginia, 319-322. 

2For the petition of the Synod of Philadelphia and the answer of 
Governor Gooch, dated May 28, 1738, see Footes Sketches of Virginia, 
103-105. 



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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 41 

the Catholic design of our late honorable Assembly to secure 
by law the religious liberties of all protestant Dissenters in 
the Colony; accordingly they did in the year 1772 prepare 
and print a Toleration Bill ; but as the subject was deeply in- 
teresting it was generously left open for Amendment. But 
notwithstanding we are fully persuaded of the Catholic and 
generous design of our late representatives, yet we arc deep- 
ly sensible that some things in the above named printed Bil! 
will be very gievious and burdensome to us if passed into a law. 
Therefore we humbly and earnestly pray that the said Bill 
may not be established without such alterations and amend- 
ments as will render it more agreeable to the principles of 
impartial liberty and sound policy which we presume were the 
valuable ends for which it was first intended. Therefore we 
humbly beg leave while we are making the prayer of our peti- 
tion in a more particular way to lay before the honourable 
house in the most respectful manner, a few remarks upon the 
Bill. 

The preamble is agreeable to what we desire only we pray 
that the preamble and every other part of the Bill may be so 
expressed as will be most likely to obtain the royal assent. 

We are also willing that all our Clergymen should be re- 
quired to take the oath of allegiance, &c. usually taken by civil 
officers and to declare their beliefs of the Holy Scriptures. 

Likewise as is required in the said Bill we shall willingly 
have all our Churches and stated places for public worship 
registered if this honourable house shall think proper to grant 
it. But every minister of the Gospel is under indispensable 
obligations to follow the Example of our blessed Saviour 
"who went about doing good" and the example of his apos- 
tles who not only **taught in the Temple but in every house 
where they came they ceased not to teach and preach Jesus 
Christ;*' From which and their constant practice of travel- 
ling into every quarter of the World we humbly trust that 
it will appear to this Assembly that we cannot consistent with 
the duties of our office wholly confine our ministrations to 
any place or number of places and to be limitted by law would 
be the more grevious because in many parts of the Colony 
even where the majority of the inhabitants are Presbyterians 



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42 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

it is not and perhaps it may not in any short time be easy to 
determine where it would be the most expedient to fix upon 
a stated place for public worship ; and indeed where we have 
houses for worship already built generally the bounds of our 
Congregations are so very extensive that many of our people 
especially women, children and servants are not able to at- 
tend by reason of the distance which makes it our duty as 
faithful ministers of Christ to dcJuble our diligence and fre- 
quently to Lecture and Catechise in the remote corners of our 
Congregations: This restriction would also be very grevious 
to us in many other respects ; we only beg leave to add that 
the number of Presbyterians in this province is now very great 
and the number of Clergymen but Small, therefore we are 
obliged frequently to itenerate and preach through various 
parts of the Colony, that our people may have an opportunity 
to worship God and receive the Sacraments in the way agree- 
able to their own consciences. As to our having meetings for 
public worship in the night it is not a frequent practice among 
our churches; yet sometimes we find it expedient to attend 
night meetings that a neighborhood may hear a sermon or a lec- 
ture, or to be catechised without being much interrupted 
in their daily labour: And so long as our fellow-subjects 
are permitted to meet together by day or by night for the 
purposes of business or diversion we hope we shall not be 
restrained from meeting together as opportunity serves us upon 
business of all others the most important especially if it be 
considered that the Apostles held frequent societies by night, 
and once St. Paul continued his speech till midnight: ac- 
cordingly it is well known that in city and collegiate churches 
evening prayers and lectures have long been esteemed law- 
ful and profitable exercises and to any bad influence this prac- 
tice may have upon servants or any others it is sufficient to say 
that there is nothing in our principles or way of worship that 
tend to promote a spirit of disobedience or disorder but much 
to the contrary, and if any person shall be detected in doing or 
teaching anything criminal in this respect we presume he is 
liable to punishment by a law already in being, therefore we 
pray that no dissenting minister qualified according to law 



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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 43 

may be subjected to any penalty for preaching or teaching at 
any time or in any place in this Colony. 

We confess it is easy for us to keep open doors in time 
of divine service except in case of storm or other inclem- 
ency of the weather ; yet we would humbly represent that such 
a requirement implies a suspicion of our Loyalty and will fix 
a stigma upon us to after ages such as we presume our hon- 
ourable representatives will not judge that we have anyhow 
incurred; therefore we pray that this Clause may also be re- 
moved from the Bill. 

And as to baptizing or receiving servants into our com- 
munion we have always anxiously desired to do it with the 
permission of their Masters; but when a servant appears to 
be a true penitent and makes profession of his faith in Christ 
upon his desire it is our indispensable duty to admit him into 
our church and if he has never been baptized we are to bap- 
tize him according to the command of Christ; "Go ye there- 
fore and teach all nations baptizing them in the name of the 
Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost : teaching them 
to observe all things whatsoever I have commanded you and 
I am with you always even unto the end of the world. Amen." 
And we are so confidently persuaded of the liberal sentiments 
of this house that in obeying the laws of Christ we shall never 
be reduced to the necessity of disobeying the Laws of our 
Country. 

And we also having abundant reason to hope that we shall 
be indulged in every other thing that may appear reason- 
able; your Petitioners further pray, 

For liberty and protection in the discharge of all the func- 
tions and duty of our office as ministers of the Gospel ; and 
that the penalties to be inflicted on those who may disturb 
any of our congregations in the time of divine service or mis- 
use the Preacher be the same as on those who disturb the con- 
gregation or misuse the preachers of the Church of England ; 
and that the dissenting clerg>% as well as the Clergy of the 
established Church, be excused from all burdensome offices; 
all which we conceive is granted in the English Toleration Act. 
And we pray for that freedom in speaking and writing upon 
religious subjects which is allowed by law to every member 



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44 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of the British Empire in civil affairs and which has long been 
so friendly to the Cause of Liberty. And also we pray for 
a right by law to hold estates and enjoy donations and lega- 
cies for the support of our Churches and schools for the in- 
struction of our youth. Though this is not expressed in the 
English Act of Toleration, yet the greatest Lawyers in Eng- 
land have pled, and the best judges have determined that it 
is manifestly implied. 

Finally we pray that nothing in the Act of Toleration may 
be so expressed as to render us Suspicious or odious to our 
Countrymen with whom we desire to live in peace and friend- 
ship: but that all misdemeanors committed by dissenters may 
be punished by laws equally binding upon all our fellow sub- 
jects without any regard to their religious Tenets Or if any 
non-compliance with the Conditions of the Act of Tolera- 
tion shall be judged to deserve punishment, We pray that the 
crime may be accurately defined and the penalty ascertained 
by the Legislature; and that neither be left to the discretion 
of any magistrate or court what ever. May it please this 
Honourable Assembly There are some other things which 
we omit, because they are less essential to the rights of con- 
science and the interest of our Church ; we trust that we pe- 
tition for nothing but what justice says ought to be ours; 
for as ample priviledges as any of our fellow subjects enjoy. 

"To have and enjoy the full and free exercise of our Re- 
ligion without molestation or danger of incurring any pen- 
alty whatsoever." We are petitioning in favor of a church 
that is neither contemptible nor obscure; It prevails in every 
province to the Northward of Maryland and its advocates in 
all the more Southern provinces are numerous and respecta- 
ble; The greatest Monarch in the North of Europe adorns 
it; It is the established religion of the populous and wealthy 
states of Holland ; It prevails in the wise and happy Cantons 
in Switzerland: and it is the profession of Geneva a State 
among the foremost of those who at the Reformation eman- 
cipated themselves from the Slavery of Rome: And some of 
the first geniuses and writers in every branch of Literature 
were sons of our Church. 

The subject is of such solemn importance to us that corn- 



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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 45 

paratively speaking our lives and our liberties are but of lit- 
tle value; and the population of the Country and the honour 
of the legislature as well as the interest of American liberty 
are certainly most deeply concerned in the matter ; Therefore 
we would willingly lay before this Honourable House a more 
extensive view of our Reasons in favor of an unlimited im- 
partial Toleration : but fearing we should transgress upon the 
patience of the house we conclude with praying that the alwise 
just, and merciful God would direct you in this, and all your 
other important determinations. 
Signed by order of Presbytery. 

David Rice,^ Moderator, 

• Caleb Wallce/ Clk. 

At a session of the Presbytery In Amherst County, Nov. 1 1 , 
1774. 



Deposition of Adam Wallace in Regard to John Bowyer ' 

Sept. id, 1774. 
The Deposition of Adam Wallace of full age being first 

^David Rice, one of the most eminent ministers of the Presbyterian 
Church, was born in Hanover county. Va.. December 20, 1733, and 
died June 18. 1816. He was educated at Nassau Hall, and entered 
the ministry in 1762, serving congregations in Hanover, 1762-66: 
and in the last year accepted a call to the congregations in Bedford 
county. Concord, and Peaks of Otter. In 1782 he visited Kentucky, 
and was the first Presbyterian minister within its bounds. In 1783 
he received a call to Kentucky and speedily removed thither. His most 
useful labors there, religious and civil, are well known, and have gained 
him the title of "Patriarch of Presbyterianism in Kentucky." He mar- 
ried Mary, daughter of Rev. Samuel Blair, and reared a family of 
eleven children. See Foote, 78-87. 

*Caleh Wallace, a native of Charlotte county, graduated at Prince- 
ton in 1770, and in 1774 became minister of Cub Creek and Little 
Falling River congregations, in Virginia. In 1779 he removed to 
Botetourt, and in 1783 emigrated to Kentucky. He abandoned the 
ministry for the law. in which he became eminent, and was a judge 
of the Supreme Court of Kentucky. Like his colleague, David Rice, 
he was a man of marked ability. 

*John Bowyer was long a very prominent man in Botetourt coun- 
ty, which he represented in the House of Burgesses, 1769-75, in all 



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46 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

sworn on the Holy Evangelist deposeth & saith that some time 
in June Last soon after Jno. Bowyer had Returned from the 
Assembly ys. Deponnent was at the House of the sd. Bowyer 
& on Conversation Relating to orders just before given by 
Colo. Andw. Lewis to the Captains of some Companies near 
him to have certain numbers of men in Readiness in Case of 
further hostilities, The sd. Bowyer said yt. Colo. Lewis had 
no orders for what he was Doing & that it was only to get 
his Land Surveyed that Colo. Lewis was doing it out of his 
own head, that the men would get no pay & that ye would be 
Cursed Fools for going, as there was no penalty for Refusing 
& that there should have been no such draught made in his 
Company had he been at whom.' 

This deponent further saith that some Time afterwards he 
was at the House of the sd. Bowyer again & in Conversation 
Relating to some orders for sending out men in Defence of 
the Fronteers the sd. Boyer further said that he had seen Colo. 
Lewis' orders & that he had no such orders as that, & that 
the sd. Bowyer further said that the Governor had no Right 
to give any such orders without the Assembly J this deponent 
further saith that he believes the sd. Bowyer urged such ar- 
guments with many others, & is sensible it was a great Hurt 
to the Raising of men & further saith not. 

Signed: Adam Wallace. 

At Mr. Adam Wallace's Request taken before me loth 
Sept. 1774, at ye Levels of Greenbryer. 

John Murray. 
(A Copy) 

the Revolutionary conventions, and in the State Legislature. He had 
evidently gotten into trouble by throwing obstacles in the way of 
raising troops during "Dunmore's War." His expression of opin- 
ion that the Governor had no right to give orders for raising troops ^ 
without the Assembly's assent, was significant of the feeling of the 
time. 



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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 47 

; 
Freeholders of Louisa Co. to Their Representatives In 
Convention. — In Regard to Gaming. 

Louisa, March 17th, 1775 

To the Gentlemen the Convention appointed to meet at Rich- 
mond the 20th March. 

Gentlemen, — We the Freeholders of this County having deep- 
ly at heart the common cause do cheerfully engage to undergoe 
any hardships or self-denial consequent to our faithful and 
steady adherence to the Continental resolves : we hope this like- 
wise is the general determination of our Country, but as there 
are some who have wantonly violated their most sacred engage- 
ments (as we understand it) from no higher temptation than 
that of an Idle divertion directly contrary to the Eighth re- 
solve of the said Continental Congress ; vindicating their con- 
duct by an insult on common sense (to wit) that Gaming for 
small sums is not Gaming, they at once open the Door to all 
that Excess, injustice, fraud, deception, and Idleness that al- 
most constantly attend that pernicious practice, or at least 
set evil examples that we think ought to be suppressed in 
their first appearance as the General Congress plainly intend. 
We desire, therefore, to lay this matter before you. Gentlemen, 
whose business it is (we apprehend) to Superintend in some 
measure the conduct of Committees as well as individuals of 
this Province or be that as it may your Judgement in this 
affair would be justly regarded had the Eighth Resolve been 
faithfully adhered to. We doubt not those Idle hankerers 
after that so baleful a practice would by this time have been 
employing their time and Tallents in some useful way 

Chas. Barret, John Watson, 

FredTc Harris, Richd. Anderson, 

Wm. Pettus, Thos. King, 

David Terrel, Will Lewis, 

Grco. Lumsden, Humphrey Parish, 

Micajah Davis, Chas. Dickenson, 

Richd. Phillips, Geo. Holland, 

Richd. Bloxsom, Peter Shelton, 



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48 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Jno. Ragland, Sackville King, 

Thos. Johnson, Junr., Robt. Barret, Jr., 

Joseph Greyson, Joseph Holt, 

Ben. Timberlake, Geo. Meriwether, 

Wm. Johnson, Thos. B. Smith, 

WilHam Garnett, Wm. Meriwether, 

Anderson Thomson, Nicho. Meriwether, 

William Smith, Wm. Hodges, 

Jno. Fox, Joseph Shelton, 

Thomas Adams, William Shelton. 
Wm. White, 



Deposition of Dr. William Pasteur." In Regard to thk 

Removal of Powder^ from the Williamsburg 

Magazine. 

1775- 

The Depon. of Dr. Wm. Pasteur being first duly sworn saith 

On Friday morning the 22nd of April last, going up Town I 

was informed by Mr. Richd. Carleton that .the Powder was 

removed from the Magazine by Capt. Collins with a body of 

*Dr. William Pasteur, of Huguenot descent, was a prominent phy- 
sician and surgeon of Williamsburg. He married Elizabeth, daugh- 
ter of President William Stith, of William and Mary College. 

^The removal of the powder from the magazine at Williamsburg 
by Governor Dunmore's orders, may be considered the beginning of 
the Revolution in Virginia. For an account of this affair and of the 
consequent excitement in Virginia, see Campbell's History of Vir- 
ginia, 607-614; the Bland Papers, XXHI, XXIV; and Henrys Life 
of Patrick Henry, I 276-291. The old brick magazine, "The Powder- 
horn,'' now the property of the Association for the Preservation of 
Virginia Antiquities, still remains in Williamsburg, a carefully pre- 
served memorial. 

The Virgihia Gazette (Dixon and Hunter), April 22, 1775, con- 
tains the address of the Common Hall of Williamsburg to the Gov- 
ernor, and his reply; that of the 29th (supplement) contains "A Se- 
rious Admonition to the Inhabitants of Williamsburg," signed 
"Civis," evidently by Peyton Randolph or some one of the more con- 
servative party. May 6th has an account of the removal of arms 
from the magazine by the people. On May 13th the resolution of the 
Fredericksburg meeting and of the Hanover Committee are printed. 
All refer to the removal of the powder. 



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VIRGINIA LEGISLATIVE PAPERS. 49 

Marines before day that morning soon after which I was 
summoned to meet the Corporation at the Hall; going there 
I observed a great commotion among the Inhabitants & soon 
afterwards there were many of them under arms & rendez- 
vou'd at the Hall with many others unarmed. The Hall then 
met, and there were present most of the inhabitants. The 
Corporation then addressed the Govr. to return the powder 
to ye Magazine & rec'd his answer published in the Virginia 
Gazett; this they mentioned to the people on their return to 
the Hall; requested them to be peaceable & disperse which 
they accordingly did. That during this Convention I saw Capt. 
Foy, Cap. Montague & Cap. Collins pass through the main 
street unmolested; I saw no further commotion that day; 
Next morning being call'd to the Pallace to visit a Patient I 
accidently met with his Excellency the Governor who intro- 
duced a conversation relative to what had pass'd the day be- 
fore & seemed exceedingly exasperated at the People's having 
being under Arms when I observed to his Excellency that 
this was "done in a hurry & confusion, & that most of them 
sccm'd convinced it was wrong, his Lordship then proceeded 
to make use of several rash expressions & said that tho' he did 
not think himself in danger, yet he understood some injury 
or insult was intended to be offered to Capt. Foy & Collins, 
which he should consider as done to himself, as these gentle- 
men acted entirely by his particular directions, & then swore 
by the living God, & many such like expressions that if a 
grain of powder was burnt at Capt. Foy or Capt. Collins, or 
that if any injury or insult was offered himself or either of 
them, he would declare freedom to the slaves & reduce the 
City of Wmsburg to ashes. He then mentioned seting up the 
Royal Standard but did not say he wou'd actually do it, but 

says he bclicv'd if he did he should have people & all the 

Slaves on the side of Government, that he had once fought 
for Virginians and that by God he wou'd let them see he 
cou'd fight agamst them & declared that in a short time he 
could depopulate the whole Country. This he desired me to 
communicate to the Speaker & Gentlemen of the Town & to 
do it immediately, that there was not an hour to spare, adding 
that if Innes & George Nicholas® continued to go at large 

'James Innes and George Nicholas must have been especially prom- 



4 



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50 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

what he had say'd wou'd from some misconduct of theirs be 
certainly carr>''d into execution. This I immediately com- 
municated to the Speaker & several other Gentlemen of the 
Town, and it soon became publicly known in consequence of 
which, as I believe, two of the principle Gentlemen of the 
City sent their Wifes and Children into the Country, & soon 
after this we were informed by an express from Fredericksburg 
that the people in that part of the Country were in motion 
towards the City; and next morning being at the Pallace to 
visit a patient I accidentlly met with his Excellency again, 
who declared to me that if a large body of People (a place 
about thirty miles from town), that he wou'd immediately en- 
large his plan and carry it into execution, but said that he 
should not regard a small number of men, adding that he then 
had two Hundred muskets loaded in the Pallace; His Ex- 
cellency more than once did say he should not carry these plans 
into Execution unless he was attacked. But, This Depont. 
further saith that to the best of his knowledge at the time 
Lady Dunmore & Family removed from W'burg" oh board 
the Fowey man of War, the inhabitants were very peaceful, 

Resolved, That his Excellency's menacing Declarations, and 
have tended greatly to irritate the minds & excite Commotions 
Among the People. 

(to be continued) 



inent in their denunciation of the Governor's conduct. The first a 
son of Rev. Robert Innes, A. M. (Aberdeen), rector of Dr>'sdale 
Parish, Caroline county, Va., was a man of ability and eloquence, and 
of impetuous temper. He was commissioned Lieutenant-Colonel 15th 
Virginia Regiment in 1776, and saw much active service during the 
war. On November 23, 1786, he was elected by the Legislature, At- 
torney-General of Virginia. It is stated that Washington offered 
him the position of Attorney-General of the United States. He died 
in Philadelphia, and was buried there August 3, 1798. 

George Nicholas was son of Robert Carter Nicholas, Treasurer of 
Virginia, and died in Kentucky in 1799. He was appointed Captain 
2d Virginia October 24, 1775, and rose to be Lieutenant-Colonel nth 
Virginia ; was a prominent member of the Virginia Legislature and 
Convention of 1788. In 1790 he removed to Kentucky and was largely 
instrumental in framing the Constitution of that State. 



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THE CORBIN PAPERS. 51 

THE CORBIN PAPERS. 



[Through the kind permission of the late Mrs. S. Wellford 
Corbin, of "Farley V'ale," King George county, Va., we were 
permitted to make .copies of a number of old documents which 
have been preserved by the family. Richard Corbin, of "Lane- 
ville," King and Queen county, was the last royal Receiver 
General of Virginia.] 

Commissary William Robinson.^ 
[Endorsed] 
King's Warrant. 
William Robinson, iioo Per Annum out of Virginia Quit 
Rents as Commissary. 

Ent. 
Ent. in the Office of the Auditor General of the Plantations 
20th November, 1765. 

Rbt. Cholmondeley. 

Ent. in y^ Aud" Office in Virginia, Appil 11, 1766. 

John Blair, D. Aud^ 
George R. 

Whereas, it hath been humbly represented unto Us on behalf 
of William Robinson, Minister of the Gospel, now residing in 
Our Colony of Virginia, that he was by an appointment from 
Doctor Sherlock, formerly Bishop of London, bearing date the 
eighteenth of April, 1761, constituted Commissary for exer- 
cising Spiritual and Ecclesiastical Jurisdiction within the said 
Colony in the room of Thomas Dawson then lately deceased, 
and that a yearly Salary of One hundred Pounds had been al- 
lowed and paid out of the Quit Rents in the said Colony as 

UVilliam Robinson, son of Christopher Robinson, of "Hewick," 
Middlesex county, Va., matriculated April 2. 1737, at the age of twenty, 
at Oriel College, Oxford, and received his B. A. degree in 1740. He 
states in a paper, which has been printed, that after taking his degree, 
he was chosen to one of "Dr. Robinson, Bishop of London's exhibi- 
tions (who was my great uncle)." He was ordained in 1743, and 
became minister of Stratton-Major, King and Queen county, in 1744, 
continuing to be so until his death in 1767 or 1768. See Meade's Old 
Churches and Families of Virginia, I, 377-37^- 



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52 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

well to the said Thomas Dawson as to several of his predeces- 
sors in the said Office in respect thereof, And We have been 
humbly besought to allow a like yearly Salary unto the said 
William Robinson during his continuance in the said Office 
whereunto We are graciously pleased to condescend and agree. 
Our Will and Pleasure therefore is. And We do hereby Direct, 
Authorize and Command that out of any Monies which from 
time to time shall be in your hands of Our Revenue of Quit 
Rents arising in Our said Colony of Virginia, You do pay 
unto the said William Robinson such sums of Money as are 
already due, or from time to time hereafter quarterly or oth- 
erwise shall become due unto him for and upon the yearly 
Salary of One hundred Pounds, which We hereby Give and 
Grant unto him in respect of his said Office, the said yearly 
Salary to commence from the said Eighteenth day of April, 
1 761, and to be payable and paid for ar^d during such time 
as he shall continue to execute the said Office of Commissary, 
Or until We shall signify Our Pleasure to the contrary. And 
this, together with the acquittance or Acquittances of the said 
William Robinson, shall be as well to you for making such 
Payments as to the Auditor General for allowing thereof upon 
your Accounts a sufficient Warrant. Given at Our Court at 
Saint James's this nth day of NovV, 1765, In the sixth Year 
of Our Reign. 



Lord Dunmore' to Richard Corbin. 
[Endorsed] 
Lord Dunmore rec'd SepV, 1775. 
[Addressed] 
To Mr. Robert Prentis at W burg. 

Sir, 

Do be so good as to forward the inclosed as directed, and 

you will much oblige Sir yours, 

Dunmore. 
[Endorsement on Enclosure] 

Rec^d 7th SepV. R. P. 

^On June 2, 1775, Lord Dunmore left Williamsburg and took refuge 
on a British man-of-war. Until about mid-summer, 1776, he, with a 
fleet under his command, was cruising on the Virginia coast, and en- 
gaged in hostilities with the Virginians. 



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THE CORBIN PAPERS. 5S 

[Addressed] 
To the Hon^^ Richard Corbin, EsqV, at Laneville. 
Off Norfolk On board the William, 

7ber 5th, 1775. 
Dear Sir, 

A few days ago I received yours of the i6th Ulto. inform- 
ing me that notwithstanding your private Business required 
your presence at Home, yet you did not choose to go, fearing 
it might not be agreeable to some of your Countrymen in 
their present moode of thinking, but that you had requested 
your friend to mention your situation to the Convention at 
Richmond, & that you find it is agreeable to them that you 
should go home; I am sure if that is the Case, and you are 
still of opinion that your private Business requires your pres- 
ence, I know of nothing that need detain you a single moment 
here, on the contrary I think if there is but a chance that your 
going can be of the smallest service to this your native land, 
nothing aught to prevent you, and if my concurrence is neces- 
sary, you have it with all my heart, and from my Soul wishing 
that you could be the means of reconciling these very unfor- 
tunate differences, between two Countries whose mutual ad- 
vantage it is to be firmly united, and wishing most sincerely 
that on your return you may find this at present unhappy 
and most wretchedly deluded Country, in the full exercise of 
its late happy constitution & Government, which I know is 
your sincere wish, & must be of every real well wisher to His 
Country, but can be of none more than of your 

Most Ob* & very H^^« ServS 

DUNMORE. 

To Col. Corbin. 



VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



Communicated by Mr. Lothrop Withincton, 30 Little Russell street, 

W. C, London (including "Gleanings" by Mr. H. F. Waters, 

not before printed.) 

(continued) 
Daniel Lluellin of Chelmsford, Essex, planter. Will 6 
February 1663 | 4 ; proved 1 1 March 1663 | 4. Lands, tene- 



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^4 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

ments, hereditaments in Charles county in upper part of James 
River, in Virginia, to wife Anne for life, then to son Daniel 
Llewellin. Ditto as to goods, but to daughter Martha Jones his 
sister two seasoned servantes. Also to son Daniell Lluellin best 
suite, cloake, coate and hatt, second best hatt with silver hat- 
band, all Linnen, and my sayle skinn Trunck. To friend Mary 
Elsing of Chelmsford, spinster, for care, one of best white ruggs 
and my new peece of Dowlas, saving sufficient for a winding 
sheet to bury mee. To Mary Deerington of Chelmsford, widow 
one of worst white ruggs. To daughter Margaret Cruse 40s. 
for ring and to her husband ditto. To son in law Robert Hal- 
lom ditto. To master Chr. Salter living in Wine Court without 
Bishopgate and Anne his wife ids. each for gloves. Goods 
sent over this spring and summer to be sold for debts due. 
Rest to son Daniel. Executors: Thomas Vervell of Roxwell, 
Essex, gent, James Jauncy of Cateaton Streete, London, Mer- 
chant. Giles Sussex of Thames Street, London, Hottpresser, 
and Master William Walker of Colchest:, Essex, Shopkeeper. 
To be buried in parish church of Chelmsford neare the Read- 
ing deske and friend Doctor John Michelson to preach. Wit- 
nesses: Robert Lloyd, Tim Code senior, scrivenor. 

Bruce, 31. 

[Daniel Lluellin, or Llewellyn, of Chelmsford, Essex, England, came 
to Virginia in or before 1642, and settled near Shirley, in Charles 
City county. On August 7, 1642, he patented 856 acres, bounded by 
the land of Mrs. Heyman, the upper branches of Turkey Island 
Creek, the lands of Mr. Aston and Joseph Royall, and the river. 
Robert Hallome was a head right. Later he received several other 
grants in the same neighborhood. Daniel Llewellyn was a justice 
of the peace for Charles City, a captain of militia, and member of 
the House of Burgesses for Henrico county at the sessions of March, 
i642-*3, and October, 1644, and for Charles City at the sessions of 
October, 1646, November, 1652, March, i654-'5, March, i655-'6, and 
December, 1656. He married Anne, widow of Robert Hallam, or 
Hoi lam. 

The patent of 1642 was re-granted in 1666 to Daniel Llewellin, "son 
and heir of the aforesaid Captain Daniel Llewellin." The son, accord- 
ing to the records of Henrico county, was born in 1647, and, in 1677, 
calls himself the "son-in-law" of Captain John Stith. The daughter, 
Margaret Cruse, may have been the wife of Captain James Crews, of 
Hfenrico, who was hung for his participation in Bacon's Rebellion, 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 55 

though Crews was unmarried at the time of his death. See this maga- 
zine, IV, 122-123. 

Robert Hallam was living at the Neck of Land (in the upper parts) 
in February, 1623, and at the census of i624-'5 was aged twenty-three, 
and is stated to have come to Virginia in the Bonaventure in August, 
1620. The census includes him as one of the servants in the "muster** 
of Luke Boyse at Neck of Land, Charles City. That the term "ser- 
vant" did not always mean, as used in this census, a menial, is shown 
by the fact that on June 7, 1636, Robert Hallam had a grant of 1,000 
acres in Henrico adjoining the land of Edward Osborne, and lying 
on the river "right over against a creek called the fallen creek" [Fall- 
ing Creek, Chesterfield county], Hallam had a re-grant of this land 
on November i, 1637, and on May 6, 1638, there was granted to Anne 
Hollam, widow, and to the heirs of Robert Hollam, deceased, 1,000 
acres in Henrico, lying on the river, extending towards Bremo and 
Turkey Island, and adjoining the lands of Mr. Richard Cocke and 
John Price — the said tract being due to them by sale from Arthur 
Bayly, merchant. 

In the William and Mary Quarterly, VIII, 237-245, are printed a 
number of letters (copied from an old Charles City record book), 
dated in i655-'7f and addressed to Daniel Llewellin, the elder, by va- 
rious relations in England. 

These letters show the Hallams to have been of Essex, England. 
One of the correspondents was William Hallam, of Burnham, Essex, 
Salter, a brother of Robert Hallam, the elder, of Virginia. Another 
brother was Thomas Hallam, dead in 1656, who had a son, Thomas 
Hallam, Salter, of London, who made a voyage to Virginia in 1657. 
Margaret, widow of Thomas Hallam, Sr., married William Mason, 
another of the correspondents. Robert Hallam, Jr., of Virginia, was 
living with the Masons. They speak highly of his character and 
appearance, and state that he had been bound to one Wood, a pros- 
perous tailor, who had married Ann, daughter of Thomas Hallam, 
deceased. Samuel Woodward, of Charles City, who died in 1680, 
married Sarah, daughter of Robert Hallam, and had a son, Samuel, 
who was living in Boston, Mass., in 1705. There is recorded in Henrico 
a deed dated June, 1691, from John Gundey, of Gloucester, and his 
wife, Anne, daughter of Mr. Robert Hallam, conveying to Captain 
William Randolph a tract of land at Turkey Island. Daniel Llewellin's 
daughter, Martha Jones, may have been ancestress of the family in 
Amelia, Prince George, &c., in which Llewellin was frequently a 
Christian name.] . . !" 

John Howett of Elixabeth Cittie in Virginia in parts beyond 
the seas, Planter, bound on a voyage to Virginia. Will 6 Sep- 
tember 1654; proved 28 July 1659. To wife Elizabeth Howett 
if living and vnmarried contrary to now report from Virginia 



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66 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

one third of my estate of Tobacco etc. To brother and all kin- 
dred IS each. Rest to- friend Mr. Thomas Howett, Citizen and 
cooper of London, executor. Witnesses : Robert Earle, scriv- 
enor, Prior Henrv Fancin. 

Pell, 425. 

William Thomas. Will 2 January 1655 | 6; proved 19 Oc- 
tober 1660. To wife Judith Thomas three parts of estate, but 
if she deparf her lile, which God forbid, to her sister Francis 
Henshaw the third, and another third to Thomas Jones here in 
Virginia, and last third to Sarah Jones late wife of Richard 
Jones ; and to said Sarah the fourth part given to wife, but if 
Sarah depart life while she stayeth in Virginia or in twelve 
months, then her fourth part to Thomas Bigge, etc. To god- 
child Mr. Garrett Farrellchild two cowes and three sowes. To 
Thomas Bigge one Cowe and Suite of Broadcloth. Thomas 
Jones to dispose of estate till order from Proprietors and send 
home good Tobacco this year. Executrix: my wife. Over- 
seers: the Court. Estate to be sold at Cry. Witnesses: Ben 
Sidway, John Richards. 

Nabbs, 195. 

[Benjamin Sidway, of Surry county, married Mary, widow of Ben- 
jamin Harrison, first of the name. By order of court, Capt. Benja- 
min Sidway sold on January 16, 1652, a tract of land belonging to 
Peter, "orphan of Benjamin Harrison." Captain Sidway was appointed 
a justice of Surry in 1652. The will of Mrs. Mary Sidway was dated 
March i, i686-'7, and proved May 29, 1688. Her principal legatees 
were her sons, Benjamin Harrison and Thomas Sidway. Thos. Sid- 
way, by his will, proved December 3, 1695, left most of his estate to 
his wife, Jean. He apparently had no children.] 

Richard Kempe of Kich-neck [Rich-Neck] in Colonie of 

Virginia, Esquire. 

Berkeley, 455. 

[Richard Kemp, Secretary of State of Virginia. He seems to have 
been a brother of Sir Robert Kemp, of Gissing, Bart.] 

[Printed in full in Va. His. Magazine, II, I74-I75- The 
official copying clerks at Somerset House work as mere ma- 
chines and have a most annoying way of omitting the proper 
references to the verbatim wills which they copy from the 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 57 

old registers, for which venerable records they have not the 
least reverence, covering them with their own scrawls to mark 
oflF their hack jobs. Worse than this, lately several precious 
old illuminations in the manuscript have been slashed out of 
the fine old Elizabethan register, Langley, of the Prerogative 
Court of Canterbury. — L. W.] 

John Bly. Will 3 January 1662 | 3; proved 16 May 1664. 
Release £40 I was to have at my mother's death. Release £80 
and £50 in hands of Master Richard Booth, Merchant, to be 
shared as by order left in hands of brother Giles Bly. Release 
brother William of £20. Desire £3 to be paid for silk rugge 
I received from Richard West of money in hands of Brother 
Giles, and release him the rest. To wife produce of 50 Hogs- 
head of Tobacco shipped home for England in the Fredericks 
as also shipped upon said joynt Cargoe. Desire shipped 
this present year for England, if Tobacco may be pro- 
cured, 220 Hogshead, and my Third conveyed to wife in such 
goods she shall desire. To wife Goods and Household stuff I 
brought over this yeare to furnish my house and desire her 
father to make satisfaction to her of £120 for goods I bought 
for her this yeare in England. To wife all Rings and Watches, 
Deskes, and Trunckes and Chests, only one large chest to Mas- 
ter William Bough Junior, and one middle sized ditto to brother 
George Hunt, and in case he desires to returne to England, at 
his returne to be paid by wife the produce of 10 hogshead of 
Tobacco. Produce of 60 Hogsheads, whereof 40 are to shipp 
home this yeare by the Frederick, to be divided to my Mother, 
Brothers, and Sisters, and other 20 when they arrive in Eng- 
land. Goods amounting to £26 left last yeare in hands of father 
in law Abraham Wood, Esquire, besides other things, to be re- 
turned to wife if she desires. To Master Christopher Branch, 
senior, for writing my will one good Hogshead of Tobacco. 
To Christopher Branch, junior, for care in sickness ditto in 
such goods as he like of this yeare. To wife all Tobacco re- 
ceived by bills and bonds. Executrix: wife Mary Bly, to be 
advised by her father. Executor in England: brother Giles 
Bly, to be advised by Richard Booth, merchant. Witnesses: 
Thomas Branch, John Gardner. Proved 23 March 1662 | 3 



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58 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

before the Governor and councill. Test : Fra : Kirkham, copia 
vera F. K., Gierke to Hon^ Governor and councill of Virga. 
Hen. Randolph, Not. Pub. Proved by Giles Bly as to goods 
in England. Bruce, 46. 

[A John Blyth received a grant from the Virginia Company in 1623. 

William Baugh, Sr., was justice of Henrico 1656, 1669, &c. He 
was born not later than 161 2, and died in 1687, when his will was 
proved in Henrico. He has many descendants. His son, William 
Baugh, Jr., died before him. See this magazine VII, 424, for a note 
on Baugh. In addition to the grants there mentioned, the following 
should be included (i) Assignment, June 13, 1636, of a patent to 
John Baugh, of Varina, planter: (2) John Baugh, gent., 250 acres on 
Appomattock river, adjoining the land lately belonging to Mr. Abra- 
ham Pearcey, May 11, 1638; (3) John Baugh, gent., of 100 acres in 
Bermodo Hundred, in Henrico county, 80 acres, part thereof, bounded 
on the north by the land lately belonging to John Arundel, S. E. by 
the Bay of Appomattock, W. S. W. by Powell's Creek and N. E. by 
Conecock Path ; 4 acres bounded on the N. N. E. by James River, 
E. S. E. by the land of James Usher, S. S. E. by the land of Michaell 
Maysters, W. N. W. by the land of William Sharp; 16 acres lying 
in Bermodo Hundred Neck, bounded on the south by the land of 
Joseph Royall, N. N. E. by the swamp, and N. W. by the land of 
Michaell Maysters, July 24, 1645; re-grant August 6, 1650; (4) Col. 
Robert Pitt, and Mr. William Baugh, 1,800 acres in Isle of Wight 
on a branch of Blackwater Swamp, February 18, 1664; (5) Col. Robert 
Pitt, Captain Joseph Bridger, and Mr. William Baugh, 3,000 acres 
in Isle of Wight, including 1,200 acres of the land formerly granted 
to Pitt and Baugh, March 21, 1664. 

Abraham Wood, member of the Council and Major-General of 
Militia. See this magazine. III, 252. 

The Branches were descendants of Christopher Branch, of Kings- 
land," Henrico, Burgess 1639. For a notice of a part of this very nu- 
merous family see the Richmond Critic. 

Francis Kirkman was long Clerk of the Council. It may be men- 
tioned, by the way, that the editors of the first volume of the Calendar 
of Virginia State Papers read his signature "Fra." as "Ira." 

Henry Randolph, a half brother of the poet, Thomas Randolph, 
came to Virginia in 1642, and was Clerk of the House of Burgesses 
from 1660 to his death in 1673. He was uncle of William Randolph, 
of "Turkey Island." See this magazine, III, 261 ; XI, 58, and IVilliam 
and Mary Quarterly, October, 1895. In March, 1661-2, the Assembly 
appointed Henry Randolph notary public for the colony (Hening, II, 
136), and he is stated to have held the office until his death. He was 
succeeded by Thomas Ludwell, and he in turn by Robert Beverley 
(Hening, II, 456, 457).] 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 59 

Robert Bristow of the parish of Gabriel Fenchurch, Lon- 
don, Merchant. Will 20 September 1700; proved 29 Novem- 
ber 1707. To be interred in the family burying ground in Tab- 
ernacle Alley belonging to the parish of Gabriell Fenchurch or 
in burying ground in or near Bunhill Feilds: To poore of 
Brinstead, County Southampton, where I was born, iio; to 
poore of Micheldever in said county £5. Executors to pay to 
loving wife in case she survive and not otherwise £4000 as by 
marriage agreement as in recognizance in Court of Common 
Pleas at Westminster 24 November 1680 in lieu of her third 
as a Freeman's Widow of London ; also to wife a necklace of 
pearls, diamond ring, and gold watch presented her before 
marriage. To my daughter-in-law Catherine Bristow, widow 
of my dear son Robert Bristow lately deceased, iiooo in 
trust for my granddaughter Avarilla Madgwick, wife of Wil- 
liam Madgwick of London, Merchant, or to Avarilla's chil- 
dren if she die, and said Avarilla to release personal estate for 
pretence to custom of London, etc. To my granddaughter 
Katherine Baily £500 at 21, and in case of her father Arthur 
Baily EsqV pay to said Avarilla Madgwick £500 and discharge 
her real estate of £500 part of £1000 payable in right of her 
mother his late wife, then to said Katherine Baily £500 more, 
she to release as other granddaughter is directed to. To Wil- 
liam Blanchard and John Blanchard, sons of my sister Jane 
Blanchard, £20 each. Release to John Stevens son of sister 
Alice Alice [sic] Stephens two bonds of £95. To Ann Blanch- 
ard, Widow, relict of nephew Thomas Blanchard, £20. To 
my six granddaughters the daughters of my said son Robert 
Bristow deceased, viz: Katherine, Avarilla, Elizabeth, Anne, 
Frances, and Rebecca Bristow £1000 each at 21, etc. To 
granddaughter Katherine Bristow £100 more at 21 or mar- 
riage. To grandson William Bristow all my land in the par- 
ish of St. Mary Overeys in the Burrough of Southwark pur- 
chased of Mr. John Lorain, being the Talbott Inn and other 
houses leased at £240 per annum, and in default of issue of 
said William Bristow to my grandson John Bristow, then to 
my grandson Robert Bristow. To grandson John Bristow, 
youngest son of said son Robert Bristow, lands at Brittlewcll 
in Hundred of Rocheford, Essex, lately purchased of Thomas 



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60 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Werg, EsqV, being the Moiety of Mannor of Earls Hall and 
Lordshipp of Brittlewell and Farm lett to William Ferrys, and 
Rectory lett to Thomas Short, all of ii8o per annum, other 
Moiety whereof belongs to Mr. John Chambers, and also 
1 20 acres in parish of East Wood Bury, Hundred of Roche- 
ford, of annual value of £30, in default of issue of John, to 
grandsons William and Robert. To my grandson Robert 
lands and all money and debts owing to me in Virginia, in de- 
fault of issue the same to my grandson William Bristow, in 
default, to my grandson John Bristow. To my daughter-in- 
law Katherine Bristow, the said William Madgwick, and Ben- 
jamin Woolley of Mortlack Gent all the lands in the hundred 
of Rocheford, Essex, which I purchased of the Right Hon- 
oble Daniel Earle of Nottingham, in trust for my grandson 
Robert Bristow with remainder as aforesaid. My daughter- 
in-law Katherine Bristow to be executrix until she marry or 
the said Robert, William, and John Bristow are 21, then they 
to be executors with granddaughter Katherine Bristow. Resi- 
due of estate other than in Virginia to 6 granddaughters chil- 
dren of son Robert Bristow. If any except Robert claim un- 
der custom of London, legacies to be void. If Robert claim, 
said claim to be charged out of his legacy. To my wife and 
daughter-in-law i20 each for mourning. To my said son-in- 
law Arthur Baily and said William Madgwick iio ditto. To 
each of my servants £5 ditto. Codicil, 3 April, 1707. Whereas 
I have bought the Mannor of Havering in Parish of Home- 
church, Essex, and several Farms in Essex from John Woolley. 
merchant, to my daughter-in-law Katherine Bristow and Law- 
rence Hatsell of London, Scrivener, in trust for the nine chil- 
dren of my said daughter-in-law, the same, to be sold and the 
money to be equally divided among the said nine children of 
my said daughter Bristow by Mr. Robert Bristow, my son. 
her Husband, deceased. Witnesses to both will and codicil. 
Edward Northey, William Lang, Ja: Gibbon. Proved 21 
March 1743] 4 by John Bristow, Esquire, one of the grand- 
sons and surviving executors, reserving to other surviving 
executors William Bristow and Katherine Bristow, grant to 
Katherine Bristow Widow expiring by reason of said John 
Bristow attaining age of 21. Poley, 275. 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 61 

[In Burke's Landed Gentry, edition of 1847, is a pedigree of the 
family to which the testator belonged. It states that Robert Bristow. 
Esq., second son of Robert Bristow, Esq., of Ayot, St. Lawrence, 
Hertfordshire, was born in 1643, and settled in Virginia, about 1660 
(as stated in Byshes Visitation of Herts., 1669). In Virginia he pur- 
chased in 1663, and following years, various estates in the counties 
of Lancaster, Gloucester and Prince William (which was then Staf- 
ford). He married in Virginia, Avarilla, daughter of Major Curtis. 
Returning to England about 1680, he became a merchant in London, 
and acquired a considerable fortune, and purchased estates in Lon- 
don and elsewhere. His only son, Robert Bristow, Esq., associated 
with him in business, was also very successful, and bought property 
in Sussex and Essex. He was M. P. for Winchelsea in the Parlia- 
ments of 1698 and 170a. The family seems to have been one of con- 
siderable wealth and social standing. 

This account is borne out by our records. Robert Bristow received 
the following grants: (i) One thousand acres on Fleet's Bay, Lan- 
caster county, formerly granted to Humphrey Tabb by patent, March 
22, 1654, and by Thomas Tabb, son and heir of the said Humphrey, 
assigned to Philip Mallory, and by said Mallory assigned to Bristow 
and Edmund Welsh, who sold his share to Bristow, September 29, 
1663; (2) 398 acres in Gloucester, on North River, in Mockjack Bay, 
and adjoining the lands of Harris, Thomas Morris, Major Curtis, and 
Mr. Richard Young — 288 acres, part thereof was formerly granted 
to Mrs. Avarilla Curtis April 4, 1661 (being part of a grant of 410 
acres), and by the said Avarilla assigned to "the said Mr. Bristow's 
husband'' (evidently "Mr. Bristow, her husband," is meant) ; Octo- 
ber 2$, 1665; (3) 184 acres in Gloucester, on Ware River, adjoining 
his own land and that of Harris, May 7, 1666. After his return to 
England he became a partner with Brent and others, about 1689 in the 
purchase of 30,000 acres in Stafford, now in Prince William, called 
Brent Town or Brenton. Bristow Station, well known during the 
Civil War, doubtless derives its name from the Bristow estate in 
Prince William, which remained in the possession of the family until 
the Revolution, when it was confiscated. 

Robert Bristow evidently returned to England about 1677. In the 
report of the Bacon's Rebellion Commissioners on the sufferers in 
that insurrection, made October 15, 1677, they say: "Major Robert 
Bristow, a Gentleman of a good estate and an' Eminent sufferer in 
his stock, Provision, Armes, Ammunition, Mr'chts (k>ods & consid- 
erable Quantitys 01 Strong Liquors, as also in his person by being 
kept a prisoner until Bacon's death and after, he hath had a general 
knowledge of most passages relating to the late unhappy Troubles, 
and is able not only to justify most Particulars of our Narrative, But 
also is a person very fitt & necessary to be examined to divers par- 
ticulars in the generall & personall Grievances. Being a man of good 
understanding in the Virginia affaires and one of Integrity and mod- 



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62 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

eracion, soe that wee could wish hee might bee sent where there shall 
bee occasion & use of him in any of the aforesaid affaires being now 
an Inhabitant in Tower Street, London, Agt. Barking Church." 

Robert Bristow married Avarilla, daughter of Major Thomas Curtis, 
of Gloucester, and Avarilla, his wife. They also had a daughter, 
Sarah Curtis, born in Ware Parish, Gloucester, August i6, 1657, 
who married, first, William Halfhide, and secondly, Richard Perrott, 
of Middlesex county.] 

Francis Hough of St. Peters the Poor, London, merchant. 
Will (nuncupative) 25 July 1648; proved 27 July 1648. Eld- 
est son William to be sent over to Virginia. To mother Mrs. 
Christian Stockwood £150, and sister Mrs. Elizabeth Stock- 
wood £50. To children William, John, Jane, and Anne Hough, 
all Tobaccos, money, goods, etc. in England, Virginia, or else- 
where. Estate of Tobacco due in Virginia to be received by 
friend Mr. Richard Preston. Profits of severall plantations 
in Virginia to be divided to four children till eldest son Wil- 
liam is 21 and fit to manage same, then plantations to two sons 
William and John. Eldest son William Hough to be edu- 
cated, bred up, and made fitt to be sent over to Virginia to 
manage those plantations for best use of himself and his 
brother John Hough, and younger son John Hough to be like- 
wise educated in England for managing such affairs as shall 
be transported from eldest son out of Virginia to said young- 
est son in England. Witnesses': Thomas Billiard, gent, 
Thomas Potter, Grocer, Ann Hill, and others. Administra- 
tion to Anne Cooke, grandmother of William, John, Jane, and 
Ann Hough, children of Francis Hough deceased, during mi- 
nority. Administration 6 September 1667 to John Hough, 
Jane Hough als Andrewes, and Anne Ferrick als Hough, chil- 
dren of deceased, former grant to Anne Cooke having expired. 

Essex, 117. 

[Francis Hough, or Huff, as it was sometimes spelt phonetically, 
came to Virginia in the Sivan in 1620, and at the census of i624-'5, 
when he was twenty years old, was living at Elizabeth City. He 
assigned a patent for 50 acres in Elizabeth City in 1632. On Janu- 
ary 3, 1633, he conveyed to Henry Coleman, of Elizabeth City, 60 
acres there, formerly granted to Christopher Windmill, deceased, and 
due Hough as marrying his widow. On November 12, 1635, lie pat- 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 63 

ented 800 acres at the first creek on the south side of Nansemond 
River, and extending to the mouth of the river. December 26, 1636, 
he made a bill of sale for rights for 300 acres to Humphrey Swan. 
On May 17, 1637, he obtained tour patents, aggregating 1,500 acres, 
in Nansemond or Upper New Norfolk (see this magazine, VI, i8p). 
He was a member of the House of Burgesses for Nutmeg Quarter 
February, i632-'3, and in October, 1645, during the Indian War, was a 
member of the "Council of War** for the "Associated Counties" of 
Isle of Wight and Upper and Lower Norfolk. There is an entry in 
the Lower Norfolk records, March 4, i647-'8, of certain bills, &c., 
delivered to Mr. Francis Hough "by God's p'vidence bound for Eng- 
land."] 

Francis Rockett, late of Parish of Goochland, county of 
Henrico, province of Virginia, now of St. John Wapping, Lon- 
don. Will 6 June 1748; proved 21 April 1749. To William 
Fettiplace of St. John aforesaid, victualler, executor, my tract 
of land in Goochland adjoining to Inskatt Creek, county Hen- 
rico, Virginia, in America, with all Houses, Furniture, Wood 
Undressed. Witnesses: Frans Seede, Will: Skeets. 

Lisle, 120. 

[From this family, "Rocketts," the port of Richmond, derives its 
name.] 

Philip Chesley, county York, Virginia. Will 18 De- 
cember 1674: proved 10 May 1675. To brother Mr. Dan- 
iel Wilde I2S for mourning ring. Ditto to sister Margaret 
Wilde, brother Alexander Walker, sister Walker, cozen Fran- 
cis Mitton, Fitz William Lawrence, Robert Bee, and Eliza- 
beth Bee. To Esquire Ballard my scale ringe. To Daniel 
Parke Esq. one mourning ring of 20s. To cozen Hugh Har- 
dy one hogshead of Tobacco. To Mr. William Dingley, cozen 
Mathew White, Mr. Jno. Wilde, cozen Henry Wilde, cozen 
John Hardy, cozen Edward Highings, cozen John Highings. 
and to every person whose surname is Chesley Inhabiting in 
Welford in Gloucestershire, each one hogshead of Tobacco 
year after demise. To two persons whose surname is Aple- 
white livin<r in \'pham in Gloucestershire ditto each. To 
poore of Welford £10. To wife Margaret Chesley all person- 
al estate. To nephew Philip Chesley Plantation in Xew Kent 



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64 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

County with servants, cattle, and household goods. To 
nephew William Chesley ditto at Queenes Creek. Nephews 
Philipp and William to be sent for vp to London apd put to 
Schoole to learne to write and cast up Accompts. Four years 
and after sent over to Virginia to be disposed at discretion 
of executrix during her life. Cozen Richard Turner to be 
sent home for London, his passage paid and a suite of Ap- 
parell given him att London and 20s. to beare expenses into 
Gloucestershire. My negro Joseph to serve eleven years and 
noe longer. Executrix wife Margaret Chesley. Witnesses: 
Daniel Parke, Fitz William Laurence, Anthony Hatch. 

Dycer, 44. 



[Captain Philip Chesley, of Queen's Creek, York county, who prob- 
ably emigrated from Welford, Gloucestershire, was a church warden 
of Bruton Parish in 1674. His will is of record in York county. He 
obtained the following grants: (i) Four hundred acres on the east 
side of Chickahominy River, in James City county, adjoining the 
lands of Mr. Robert Holt, Mr. Felgate and James Crockett, on Little 
Neck Creek, June 7, 1650; (2) Robert Wild and Philip Chesley, 100 
acres in York count>-, in Hampton Parish, beginning at the Mill 
Swamp, at the head of Queen's Creek, October 11, 1653; (3) Philip 
Chesley and Nicholas Meriwether, 1,000 acres on the northeast side 
of Skiminoe Swamp, adjoining the land of Wild and Chesley and the 
Rickahock Path, June 7, 1655; (4) Philip Chesley and Daniel Wilde 
750 acres in York, on the southwest side of York River, and on 
Skiminoe Swamp, adjoining Rickahock Path, June 10, 1654. 

In 1610 Lord Delaware appointed Mr. Robert Wild a clerk of the 
store at Jamestown. His property was appraised in York county, No- 
vember 24, 1647. In 1655 Robert and Daniel Wild were living in York 
county, and the former died before 1662, leaving land in York county 
to the other. Daniel Wild was sworn J. P. April 24, 1660, and married 
Margaret (died February 12, 1675), widow of William Stephens, 
cooper, and had an only child, Margaret, who married Captain John 
Martin, of Stepney, mariner. Philip Chesley married Daniel Wild's 
sister, Margaret (IVilliam and Mary Quarterly, IV, 4). 

Thomas Ballard and Daniel Parke were members of the Council.] 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 66 

THE VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM 
PARISH, VA., 1707-1750. 

(continued) 

This day, September i, 1731, Jean Levilain* took the oatli 
of vestryman in the usual manner in the presence of the ves- 
try named below: Gille Alaigre, Estiene Chastain, Pierre 
Louys Soblet, Antoine Rapine, Jean Jaque Dupui, Andre 
Amonet, Guillaume Salle, Pierre Faure. 

September i, 1731. The same day Mes. Antoine Rapine 
(and) Abraham Salle conjointly rendered their account for 
the year 1729. There is due to Mr. Rapine fourteen bushels 
and one-half of wheat. 

The same day the accounts of Mr. Rapine and of Isaac 
Salle for the year 1730 were examined in full vestry. There 
is shown to be owing forty-five bushels of wheat and sixty- 
seven bushels of maize. 

Jean Chastain. 

The Sr. Antoine Rapine paid to the carpenter, Francois 
James, the sum of nine thousand nine hundred and forty-seven 
pounds of tobacco, in part payment for the church. 

Mr. Marye received seventy- four bushels of wheat and 
eighty-five bushels of maize on the amount due him, which 
amounts to seventeen pounds, seventeen shillings, threepence. 
There is (now) due him fifteen pounds, nine shillings, nine- 
pence. 

Jean Chastain. 

This day the levy for the parish of King William for the 
present year, 1731, was made, at forty pounds of tobacco and 
a bushel of wheat and a bushel of maize per head. Present, 

the vestry named above. 

Jean Chastain. 

This day the Sr. Guillieaume Salle took the oath of church 
warden in the presence of the vestry above named. 

Jean Chastain. 

*Not the same one whbse resignation was accepted by the vestry 

on August 19, above. There were two Jean Levilains in the parish, 

probably father and son, as their names are usually bracketed to- 
gether in the tax-lists. 



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66 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

January i, 1731I2. The vestry assembled. Present: Es- 
tiene Chastain, Gile Alaigre, Antoine Rapine, Jean Dupre, 
Jean Jaque Dupui, Guilleaume Salle, Andre Amonet, Jean Levi- 
lain, Jean Pierre Bonduran and Estiene Malet were appointed 
to procession^ the land above the creek of Mr. Joni; Jean 
Pierre Billiebo, Nicolas Soulie between the two creeks; Jean 
Bernard, Jacob Trabue the other side of the creek below. 

November 22, 1731. Antoine Rapine paid to Mr. Maton 
forty bushels of wheat for the year 1730 of the balance due 
him. 

Jean Chastain. 



2The first mention in the register of "processioning" or "perambu- 
lating," a method of formally fixing the boundaries of the various 
land-holders in the parish. By an Act of Assembly of March, 1661-2, 
it was decreed that "within twelve months after this act, all the 
inhabitants of every neck and tract of land adjoining shall goe in pro- 
cession and see that the mark-trees of every mann*s land in these 
precincts be renewed," and that the same course be taken once every 
four years. Henings, Statutes at Large, II, 102. The same act pro- 
vides "that each county court shall appoint and order the vestries of 
each parish to divide the parishes into soe many precincts as they 
shall think necessary for the neighbors to joyne and see each others 
markes renewed," and fixes the period between Easter and Whitsuntide 
for the processioning. In an act of October, 1705, the above act was 
renewed, and the county courts were directed to order the vestries 
to appoint two intelligent and honest freeholders in each prednct to 
sec such processioning performed. These freeholders were required 
to make report, which should be duly registered and certified to by 
the church wardens. The period for processioning was by this act 
fixed from the last day of September to the last day of March, and 
the time was to be announced in advance by the committee. Bound- 
aries three times processioned were to count as unalterably fixed. 
Cf. Hening, III, 325. The last-mentioned act went into effect in 
1708; but there is no notice of processioning in the present register 
until the entry above. In the following pages committees arc ap- 
pointed to procession on the following dates: March 29, 1735; Au- 
gust 20, 1739; June 24, 1747. The custom was one of those brought 
over from England; and it is of interest to note that according to 
Rapalje and Lawrence, American and English Law Dictionary, II, 
this manner of impressing boundaries still exists in some parts of 
North Carolina and Tennessee. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 



67 



List of Tithables of the Parish of King Wiluam for 
THE Year 1731. 



rd, [ 



Jean Chastain, | 

Charo, black, J 

Jacob Amonet, | ^ 

Charlc Amonet, j 

Andre Amonet, i 

Jean Faure, i 

Jean Bernard, ) ^ 

Antoine Bernard, J 

Nicolas Soulie, 1 

Jean Ducre, ) 

Mathieu Age, i 

Jean Pierre Bonduran, ") 

Jean Bonduran, r 3 

Pierre Bonduran, ) 

Pierre Bibret, | ^ 

Jaque Faure, ) 

Pierre Brousse, 

Francoi Allierd, 

Andre Goodin 

Thommas Deekens, 

Roberd Peen, 

Pierre Martin, 

Jaque Houk, 

Jacque Scott, 

Nicolas Scotelar, 

Edouard Scott, 

Jean Quantain, 

Dilsi, Debora, 

Thommas, 

Cooper, 

Dick, 

Brichis, 

Robin. 

Pierre Louy Soblet, 

Pierre Soblett, 

To. Grifin, . 

Mark Gotrig,. 

Francoi Dupui, I 

David Bernard, i 



)• 



1 



1 



Pierre SaUe, 

Jacque Brean, 

Daniel Pero, 

Estiene Malet, 

W. Batom, 

J. Ma. fil., 

Estiene Chastain, 

Estiene Calvet, 

Estiene Farsi, 

Linbo, 

Dick, 

Panpi, 

Mai, 

Sara, 

Antoine Benin, ' 

Joseph Benin, 

Billi, 

Cofe, 

Jini> 

W. Salle, ^ 

Gorge, I 

Gini, j 

Betti, J 

Barbara Dutoi, 

Jo, 

Peg, black, 

Jean Harris, 1 

W. Harris, j 

Barthelemi Dupui 

Pierre Dupui, 

Jean Jacue Dupui, ) 

Dick, black, j 

Pierre Faure, 

Jean Chapman, 

Anne David, 

Manuck, 

Dick, 

Dina, 

David Lesueur, 



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68 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



Jean Loucadou, 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, Sara, 

Jean Peen, "^ 

Isaac Gk)ri, > 

Antoine Calvert, ) 

Pierre Bocar, 

Judith Giuodan, Betti, 

Jaque Teler 

Pierre Chastain, 

Jean Mouni, 

Piter, 

Maria, 

Jideon Chanbon, 

Monoc, 

Betti, 

Jaque Soblet, | 

Gouard Borgars, J 



Jean Vilain, 

Jean Vilain, 

Antoine Vilain, 

Piter, 

Siser, 

Marie, 

Antoine Rapine, 

Dick, 

Sara, 

Kett, 



1 



1 Pierre Guerand, 

2 Glaude Rouviere, 
Jame, 

3 Jem, 
Robin, Frenc, 

1 Hand, 

2 Mall, 
Hanry Belly, 
William Story, 

5 James Holman (tithables) ) 
Jque Judith, J 

Jean Dupre, tithables, 
Gille Allaigre, tithables, 

3 Daniel Faure, tithables, 
Edouerd Brayer, 

^ Elie Sasin, 

Jacob Trabu, 

Antoine Trabu, 

Jean Martin, 
, Jaque Martin, 

Richard Dine, 

Jean Dekey, 

Jean Bottes, 

Magdelaine Salle, Bob, ) 
. Agar, j 

^ Thomas Prouet, ) 

Nicolas Duerai. j 

Thomas Brian, 



April 22, 1732. The vestry assembled. Present: Estiene 
Chastain, Antoine Rapine, Jeane Le vilain, Gillieaume Salle, 
Jean Jaque Dupui, Andre Amonet, Pierre Louys Soblet. The 
vestry discharged Glaude Gori from all future charge of the 
parish of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Monsieur Rapine rendered his account for 
the year 1730, and is quit of the same. Done in the presence 
of the vestry as above. 

Jean Chastain. 

July 31, 1732. The vestry assembled. Present: Antoine 
Rapine, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Faure, P. Louys Soblet, Jean 
Jaques Dupuy, Guileaume Salle, Andre Amonnet. Mr. Es- 
tiene Chastain was appointed to go and present to Mr. the 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 69 

Governor a petition to fix the boundary of our parish of King 
William. He was promised four shillings per day. 

Jean Chastain, Clerk. 

August 28, 1732. The vestry assembled. Present: Jean 
Jaque Dupui, Guillieaume Salle, Estiene Chastain, Antoine 
Rapine, Pierre Gaure, Louys Soblet, Andre Amonet. The 
vestry gave full power to Mr. Marye to write to the gentle- 
men of the Society for the twenty pounds which it had the 
kindness to give to us in the last letter which we have received, 
dated November 24, 1729. 

The same day the church wardens, Guilieaume Salle (and) 
Jean Jaque Dupi, rendered account of the maize. There is 
due to them two bushels of maize, and they are discharged of 
the wheat, saving errors in the account. 

Jean Chastain. 

September 30, 1732. The vestry assembled. Present: Es- 
tiene Chastain, Gile Alaigre, Pierre Faure, Jean Dupre, Pierre 
Louys Soblet, Andre Amonet, Guileaume Salle, Jean Jaque 
Dupui. The church wardens rendered their account of the 
tobacco. They still owe six hundred and seventy-seven pounds 

of tobacco. 

Jean Chastain. 

The vestry, as above, made the levy for the present year of 

a bushel and a half of wheat and a bushel and a half of maize 

per tithable. 

Jean Chastain. 

The Sieurs Pierre Faure and Andre Amonet took the oath 
of church warden in the presence of the vestry named above. 

Jean Chastain. 



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70 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



List of Tithables of the Parish of King William for 
THE Year 1732. 



Andre Amonet, 




I 


Peter Dupui, 


I 


Charlc Amonet, 


I 


Peter Louys Soblet, ' 




Jean Chastain & Charo, 2 


Peter Soblet, 




Thommas Dickins, 




John Grifin, 


4 


Peter Martain, 




Luci, 




Willeam Giles, 




John Peter Bilbo, 
Sara, 


/y 


Nicolas Scotte, 


7 


^ 


James Scott, 




Gedeon Chanbon, 

Manac, 

Bet, 




James Houk, 




3 


Maria, 






James Bryant, 


I 


John Quantain, 


I 


Willeam Salle, ^ 






James Smith, 


I 


George, 






William Stanford, 


I 


Betti, 




4 


James Robinson, 


I 


Gini, 






Rene Chastain, ) 
Betti, j 




Edward Scott, ] 




2 


Dick, 






John Bernard, ^ 




Robin, 


' 


6 


Antoine Bernard, > 


3 


Cooper, 


Nicolas Scott, ) 




Dilcey, 






Moyse Forquera(?), ) 
David Bernar, j 


2 


Toni, 








Thimote Eley, 


I 


John Watt, j 
JimierWatt, j 





Estiene Malet, 




A 


Edward Peen, 




Tohn Harris, ) 




Tohn Mansfield, 


4 


Will Harris, [ 


3 


Dick, J 




Fillis, 3 




Tames Soblet, 


I 


William Bottum, 


I 


Peter Faure, 


I 


Antoine Rapine, 




John Faure, 


I 


Dick, 


4 


Nicolas Dueray, 


I 


Sara, 


Estiene Chastain, 




Kat, J 




Linbo, 




Antoine Calvet, 1 


■7 


Dick, 




John Peen, } 




Panpi, 
Tack, 


8 


John Dupre, 


3 


Giles Allaigre, 


4 


Moll, 




Daniel Faure, 


2 


Sara, 




John Faure, 




Jene, 




Isaac Robinson, 




Nicolas Soulie, 
Sam, 3 


/9 


Edward Bryar, 




2 


Elie Sasin, 




Antoine Benin, *\ 

Will, 

Cofe, 

Jene, J 




Antoine Trabue, 




A 


Jacob Trabu, 


2 


4 


John Dakar, 


2 




John Martain, 


2 








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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 



71 



\ 



Thommas Portur, 

Peter Loucadou, 

John Loucadou, 

Joseph, 

Peg, 3 

John Levilain, ^ 

.Antoine Vilain, I 

Peter, )- 

Sisar, | 

Marie, J 

Peter David 

Dik, 

Manuel, i 

Daina, J 

David Lesueur, | 

Joseph Brian, ) 

Barthelemi Dupui, 

Tohn James Dupui, 

Dick, 

Peter Dep, 

Panetie, 

John Pierre Panetie, 



\ 



2 

I 
2 



Jacque Martain, 
Richard Dine, 



5 Magdelaine Salle, her 
tithable Bob, 
John Villain, 
John Adman, 



58 



70- 



January 31, 1732I3. The vestry having assembled, it gave 
full power to Monsieur Allaigre to ask of Major Alwes his 
opinion regarding the tobacco which we are to pay to the 
carpenter, viz: whether he shall pay thirty per hundred; and 
he was directed to pay a guinea for his opinion. Present : An- 
dre Amonet, Pierre Faure, Gile Alaigre, Antoine Rapine, 
Pierre Louys Soblet, Jean Jaque Dupui, Guillaume Salle. 

Jean Chastain. 

March 8. 1732I3. The vestry assembled. Present: Pierre 
Faure, Andre Amonet, Antoine Rapine, Guilieaume Salle, 
Jean Jaque Dupui, Louis Soblet. It was agreed to give 
Claude Gori two barrels of wheat and two barrels of maize 
for cleaning the church, commencing March 11, 1732I33. 

March 17, 1732I3. The vestry assembled. Present: Pi- 



♦Gerk Chastain's figures are wrong. The sum should be 67. 



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72 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

erre Fore, Louis Soblet, Anthoine Rapine, Jean Jaques Dupuy, 
Jean Dupre, Andre Amonet, Giles Allegre, Jean Levillain, 
Guilleaume Salle, Jean Chastain. Accounts were settled witli 
Capn. Francis James,* and there appears due him from the 
parish for. having built the church 5286 pounds of tobacco, in 
accordance with which, as well as for 650 lbs. due to Capn. 
Rapine, etc., a levy was made of 40 pounds per tithable, if 
sufficient,* or 52 otherwise. 

Antoine Rapine rendered his account of the tobacco for the 
year 1730. There remains due him 160 lbs. of tobacco.*^ 

Jean Levilain asked his discharge. The vestry granted it 
to him. 

Jean Chastain. 

November 23, 1734." Antoine Rapine received the tobacco 
due him by the parish at the hands of Pierre Faure and An. 

Amonet. 

Antoine Rapine. 

The vestry appointed as members David Lesueur and Jean 
Pierre Bonduran to fill the vacant places. 

Jean Chastain. 

June 16, 1733. David Lesueur took the oath as vestryman 
for the church of the parish of King William, in the pres- 

'The contract made with Captain James is noted above under Oc- 
tober 24, 1730. Cf. Va. Magazine of Hist, and Biog., XII, 4, p. 380. 
In accordance with this contract, the full amount, 21,600 pounds, 
was to be paid in three years from date. See below under date of 
June 16, 1733. 

*de 40 livres par tithables convenient ou bien 52 autrement. 

•^11 se trouve redevable de 106 lb de tabac. Littre, Sachs, and other 
lexicographers give redevable only in an active sense; but that it is 
used passively in the above passage, is confirmed by the receipt whidi 
follows. Elsewhere in the register it seems to have the same mean- 
ing, and is doubtless a provincialism, or perhaps another evidence 
of the degeneracy of the colonial French current in Manakintown 
at this time. 

«This receipt is written in at the bottom of the register, and is not 
in chronological order. There is a tendency on the part of . Gerk 
Chastain to let the receipt follow immediately on the entry showing 
the obligation. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 73 

ence of the vestry, as follows: Pierre Faure, Andre Chums 
Amonet, Estiene Chastain, Antoine Rapine, Pierre Louys Sob- 
let, Guilieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupui, Jean Chastain. 

Guillieaume Salle and Jean Dupuy paid the tobacco which 
they owed to the parish for their administration of the year 

1731. 

Jean Chastain. 

The vestry the same day settled accounts with Captain 
Jamse. In accordance with the account which we made with 
him, we have paid him twenty thousand, nine hundred and 
eighty-one pounds of tobacco, and we owe six hundred and 
nineteen pounds. 

Jean Chastain. 

August II, 1733. The vestry assembled. Present: Pierre 
Faure, Andre Amonet, Estiene Chastain, Antoine Rapine. 
Jean Dupre, Guillieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Pierre Louis 
Soblet, David Leseur. Isaac Paranto having asked to be re- 
lieved from the charges of the parish, the vestry granted it 
to him. 

. The same day Gile Allaigre tendered his resignation. The 
vestry accepted it. 

Jean Chastain. 

Augfust 18, 1733. Pierre Gueran took the oath as vestry- 
man for the church of the parish of King William. Present : 
Pierre Faure, Andre Amonet, Estiene Chastain, Antoine Ra- 
pine, Guilieaume Salle, Pierre Louy Soblet, Jean Jaque Dupuy, 
David Lesueur. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Pierre Louis Soblet tendered his resignation. 

The vestry accepted it. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Pierre Faure and Andre Amonet rendered ac- 
count of their administration for the year 1732, They gave 
their note for the amount due in arrear. 

Jean Chastain. 

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74 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

The same day Estiene Chastain and Jean Chastain were 
elected church wardens by a plurality of votes. 

February 4, 1731 | 2.^ The vestry agreed with Cp. Franc 
Jamse to make the flooring for the vestry and shutters for the 
windows of the church for five pounds, payable in wheat at 
three shillings per bushel, delivered at Waric, in maize at 
eighteen pence per bushel, delivered at Mr. Rapine's place. 

August 27, 1733. The vestry assembled. Present: Estiene 
Chastain, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Antoine Rapine, Pierre Faure, 
Guilleaume Salle, Andre Amonet, David Lesueur, Pierre Gue- 
rand. We settled accounts with Monsieur Marye, the minis- 
ter. The parish remains due him six pounds, thirteen shill- 
ings, ninepence. 

Jean Chastain. 

August 27, 1733. The same day the vestry made a levy of 
a bushel of wheat per tithable and a bushel of maize, payable 
to the church wardens. 

June 16, 1738. Pierre Faure and Andre Amonnet have set- 
tled their note for the arrearage in their year as church ward- 
ens, the year 1732. 

Jean Chastain. 

Present : 

David Lesueur/ 

EsTiENNE Malet, ^^^^^^ Wardens, 

Rane Chastain, 

Anthony Bennin, 

GuiLLAUME Salle, 

EsTiENNE Chastain, 

Jean Pierre Bilbou, 

Pierre Guerrant, 

John Dupuy. 

^This entry, as will be noted, is a supplementary contract with Cap- 
tain James, and stands here out of its chronological position. Cf. the 
contract for the building, dated October 30, 1730. 



8The signatures are personal. 



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vestry book of king william parish. 75 

List of Tithables of the Parish of King William fo« 
THE Year 1733. 



Barthelemi Dupuy, 1 

Pierre Dupuy, i 

Jean Jaque Dupuy, Dik, 2 

Antoine Rapine, Dik, Ket, 3 
Nicolas Soulie, Sem, Robin, 

Mai, • 4 

Pierre Gueran, Antoine 

Trabu, 2 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, Seri, 2 
Pierre Faure, Pierre Bioret, 2 
Jaque Soblet, i 

Andre Amonet, i 

Jaque Faure, 1 

Jean Faure, i 

Jean Jaque Florinoirs, his 
blacks, 3 

Jeame Le Vieux, Jeame 

Franc* 
Jean Edmen. Henri Colins, 2 
David Thomas, i 

Thomas Porter, Jo. Peg, 3 
Charle Vemion, i 

Pierre Louy Soblet, Grifin, 

Lousi, 3 

Estiene Farsi, Sem, 
Jean Pierre Bonduran, 
Jean Bonduran, \ 3 

Pierre Bonduran, 
James Holl, i 

Willeam Higgins, i 

Tohn Higgin, i 

Willeam Smith, 1 

Estiene Chastain, Limbo, 
Dik, Panpi, Jac, Mall, 8 
Seri, Gini, 
Thomas Bradli, i 

Pierre Loucadou, I 

Rene Chastain, Jek, Betti, 3 
Jean Harris, Willeam 
Harris. Willeam Bot- 
tom, Fillis, 4 



] 



tie, [ 

Panetie, ) 



lin, I 



Pierre Dep, 
Estiene Panetie, 
Jean Pierre Panetie, 
Jean Pcen, William Peen, 
Thomas Dikeens, 
Jamse Houk, 
Nicolas, 
Scotar, 

Jean Martain, 
Pierre Martain, 
Daniel, 
Mall, Agar, 
Elie Sasin, 
Edward Scott, 
Joseph Scott, 
Tam, 
Brichis, 
Pop, 
Couper, 
Dilso, 
'^eh. 

Jean Levilain, ^ 
irilain, j 



Antoine Levilain, 



} 



J 



Sizer, 
Marie, 
Xanni, 

Estiene Cavet, 
Estiene Calvet, 

Dik, 
Pierre Soblet, 
Nicolas Dueray, 
Jamse Jons, 
Jamse Robinson. 
Guillieaume Salle, 1 
lean Qiimo, 
Gorge, 
Betti, Gini, 
Jean Bemar, Antoin Ber- 

nar, 
David Bernar, 
Pierre David, Dik, Manoni, 



•The number of tithables is left blank in the register. 



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76 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



Pierre Salle, Jaque, black, 


2 


Dina, 


4 


Antoine Benin, Joseph 




David Lesueur, Joseph 




Benin, Cofe, Billi, Gini, 


5 


Brian, 


2 


Gile Allaigre, Chico, Be- 




' aque Brian, 


I 


lander. 


3 


Jaque Martain, Betti, 


2 


Jeane Dupre, Pierre For- 




Joseph Tharanton, 


I 


queran, Tobi, Nanni, 


4 


: )aniel Peraud, Job, 


2 


Jacob Trabu, London, 


2 


, ean Chastain, Charo, 


2 


Edward Bryer, 


I 


Gideon Chambon, 




John Wett, Wott, 


2 


Monoc, 


3 


Daniel Faure, Pierre Peru, 


2 


Betti, 3 




Jean Faure, Moyse Forque- 


r^ 


William Stanford, 


J 


ran, 
Isaac Robinson, 


I 




144* 


Jean Levilain, 


I 






Charle Amonet, Bob, 


2 


Samuel Weaver, 


1 


Jean Deker, Jean Chapmen, 


2 







June I, 1734. The vestry assembled. Present: Estiene 
Chastain, Antoine Rapine, David Lesueur, Pierre Faure, Jean 
Jaque Dupuy, Andre Amonet, Guillieaume Salle, Pierre Gue- 
ran, Jean Chastain. An agreement was made with Monsieur 
Marye^® to give him twenty shillings per sermon, one of which 
is to be preached every two weeks, payable in wheat at three 
shillings per bushel (or) in maize at eighteen pence per bushel, 
delivered partly at his place and partly at Warwick. 

Jean Chastain. 

The vestry in session chose as church wardens David Le- 
sueur and Pierre Gueran, they having taken the usual oath. 

Jean Chastain. 

August 3, 1734. The vestry assembled and agreed with 
Mr. Stephen Woodson to do the ferrying across the river for 
the Parish of King William one year, commencing to-day. He 
binds himself to transfer the people on foot, on horseback, 
(and) laden horses from the break of day to dusk; we bind 
ourselves to pay him six pounds, half in wheat and half in 

♦Chastain's system of arithmetic is again unintelligible, as the figures 
add up 150. 

^^A renewal of the contract of August 16, 1730. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 77 

maize, delivered with the church wardens, the wheat at three 
shillings per bushel, the maize at eighteen pence per bushel. 
He is to have the maize at the end of next April and the 
wheat at the end of September of the year 1735. He is to 
transfer the minister on account of the parish as a part of the 
contract.^^ 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day it was decreed that all of the acts passed with 
respect to the parish of King William, as well as all of the 
laws of Virginia, be procured and kept in the vestry. 

Jean Chastain. 

September 20, 1734. The vestry assembled. Present: Da- 
vid Lesueur, Pierre Gueran, Estiene Chastain, Antoine Ra- 
pine, Guilieaume Salle, Andre Amonet, Jean Jaque Dupuy. 
We settled accounts with Mr. Marye. We remain due him 
two pounds, nineteen shillings. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the levy was made for the present year, 1734, 
of one bushel of wheat and a bushel and one-half of maize 
per head. 

Jean Chastain. 

List of the Parish of King William for the Year 1734. 



Capt. Antoine Rapine, 


5 


Thomas Dikens. 


3 


Samuel Birch, 


I 


Benjamin Haris, 


I 


Pierre Dep. 


3 


Jean Haris, 


3 


Estiene Chastain, 


7 


Edward Scott, 


/ 


Barthelemi Dupuy. 


I 


Temse Petev, 


I 


lean Jaque Dupuy, 


2 


Pitar Salle.' 


2 


Pierre Dupuy, 


I 


John James Florinoir. 


tith- 


Pierre Lx)uys Soblet, 


4 


ables. 


3 


Tean Pierre Billiebo, 


2 


Thomas Bradley, 


1 


Thomas Porter. 


3 


David Thomas, 


I 



"A former contract of July 23, 1731, with Jean Okebey fixes the 
amount to be paid for ferriage at five pounds, and does not include 
free transfer for the minister. The free transportation of the min- 
ister and' his household comes up later as a matter of dispute with 
Reverend -Gavain. Cf. entry below, December 3, 1736. 



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78 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



Isaac Gori, 


I 


Pierre Loucadou, 


Jean Levilain, signer, 


5 


Jean Bonduran, j., 


Pierre Faure, 


I 


Jaque Faure, Pierre Bio- 


Jean Faure, 


I 


ret, 


Jean Chastain, 


2 


Jean Pierre Bonduran, 


Andre Amonet, 


I 


Estiene Calvet, 


Anne David, her tithableSj 


• 4 


Estiene Farsi, 


Antoine Benain, 


4 


John Edmonns, 


Joseph Benain, 


I 


John Hamilton, 


Daniel Perault, 


3 


Jaque Soblet, 


David Lesueur, 


3 


. oseph Bingley, 


Jaque Brian, 


I 


^ean Morises, 


Jean Bernard, 


I 


^ ean Dupre, 


\Rene Chastain, » 


4 


Ldward Bryar, 


David Bernard, 


2 


Giles Allaigre, 


Guillieaume Salle, 


6 


Daniel Faure, 


Guilleaume Stenford, 


I 


Jean Faure, 


Pierre Gueran, 


3 


Isaac Robinson, 


Gedeon Chambon, 


3 


Elie Sassain, 


Charle Vemion, 


I 


Jacob Trabu, 


Nicolas Soulie, 


4 


Jean Martain, 


Jaque Robinson, 





Magdelaine Salle, 


John Witt, 


3 


Jean Willeamson, 


Samuel Wever, 


I 


Jean Vilain, 


Estiene Malet, 


3 





I 

2 
I 
O 

1 
I 
I 

4 
1 

3 
I 

2 
I 
I 
2 



. November 23, J 734. The vestry assembled. Present: Da- 
vid Lesueur, Pierre Guerand, Antoine Rapine, Pierre Faure, 
Guilieaume Salle, Andre Amonet. Antoine Benin took the 
oath of vestryman. 

Jean Chastain. 

March 15, 1734-5. The vestry assembled. Present: David 

Lesueur, Pierre Gueran, Estiene Chastain, Antoine Rapine, 

Antoine Benin, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Andre Amonet, Guilieaume 

Salle. Jean Pierre Bilbo took the oath of vestryman for the 

parish of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Estiene Chastain and Jean Chastain submit- 
ted their account. They owe twenty-seven bushels and one- 
half of wheat and seventeen bushels of maize for the year 

1733. 

Jean Chastain. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 79 

March 29, 1735. The glebe was rented by the church war- 
dens, David Lcsueur and Pierre Guerant. Louys Soblet rent- 
ed it until next Christmas for three bushels of wheat, payable 
to the church wardens. 

Jean Chastain. 

The vestry assembled. Present: David Lesueur, Pierre 
Gueran, Antoine Rapine, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Guillieaume 
Salle, Andre Ammonet, Jean Pierre Bilbo. The vestry ap- 
pointed Jacob Trabu and Edoward Bryer to procession the 
g^oimd beyond the creek below, and between the two creeks 
Thomas Porter and Louys Soblet, and above the creek Jean 
Harris and Daniel Pero. 

Jean Chastain. 

August 9, 1735. The vestry assembled. Present: David 
Lesueur, Pierre Gueran, Antoine Rapine, Estiene Chastain, 
Guilieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Antoine Benin, Jean 
Pierre Bilbo, Pierre Faure. Antoine Bening and Jean Pierre 

Bilbo took the oath of church wardens. 

Jean Chastain. 



The same day David Lesueur and Pierre Gueran rendered 

account of their administration for the year 1734. They re 

main owing twenty-two bushels and one-half of wheat, and 

twenty-two bushels and one peck of maize, and two pounds 

and four shillings in money. 

Jean Chastain. 

September 20, 1735. The vestry assembled. Present: An- 
toine Benin, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Antoine Rapine, Guilieaume 
Salle. Pierre Gueran, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Andre Amonet. The 
levy for the present year, 1735, is one bushel of wheat per 

tithable. 

Jean Chastain. 



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80 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



List of Tithables of the Parish of King William fo:< 
THE Year 1735. 



Edward Scott, ^| 

Edward Miller, 

Cooper, 

Dick, 

Pope, 

Gloster, 

Friday, 

Dilcy, 

Tob, negro, 

John Edmond, Bess, 2 

Anthoiny. Mathieu Oge, 2 

James Robinson, o 

Rene Chastain, Jack, Nicl 

Scottar, 3 

William Salle, 1 
John Chimon, j 
John Below, ! ^ 

Gorg, f 

Betti, j 

Gini, J 

Gideon Chambon, Monock, 

Betti, Gorg, 3 

Robert Ellis, 1 

Louys Soblet, Lousi, 2 

Charle Vernion, i 

Jean Levilain, 
Antoine Levilain, 
Marie, j 

Nafii, J 

Estiene Chastain, 
Limbo, 
Dick, 
Pampi, 
Jack, 
Sara, 
Gini, 

Andre Amonet, 
Estiene Panetie, 
Jean Panetie, 
Pierre Loucadou 
Jean Chastain, Charo, 2 

Charles Amonet, i 



nlam, I 



]■■ 



David Lesueur, Joseph 

Brian, i 

Jaque Brian, I 
Cp. Holman's Wott, Cain, 

negro, 2 

Barthelemi Dupuy, i 

Jean Dupuy, Dick, 2 

Pierre Dupuy, i 
Pierre Faure, Pierre Faure, 

Jean Faure, i 

Thomas Porter, Joe, Peg, 3 

Joseph Benin, i 

Antoine Benin, ^ 

Billi, I 

Cofe, J. 5 

Jinc, I 

Hanna, J 

Williem Harris, i 

Nicolas Soulie, Robin, Sam, 

Mol, 4 

Pierre Gueran, 
Antoine Trabu, 
Gorg, 
Tom, J 

Antoine Rapine, ^ 
Dick, I 

Piter, y 5 

Kate, I 

Jinc, J 

Christopher Charlton, 1 

Piter Soblet, i 

David Tommas, i 

Joseph Bingli, i 

Estiene Far si, Sam j 

Estiene Calvet, i 

Jean Martain, jun.. Jack, 

Filis, 3 

Janne Dupre, tithables, 4 
Jean Faure, Pierre Peru, 2 
Daniel Faure, i 

Jean Moriset, i 



(to be concluded in next number) 



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ELECTION OF PRESIDENT BUCHANAN. 81 



HOW JAMES BUCHANAN WAS MADE PRESI- 
DENT, AND BY WHOM. 



The Kansas-Nebraska Bill. 



Reminiscences of John A. Parker, of Virginia. 



Introduction. 

The document printed below was found among the private 
papers of the late Col. John A. Parker of Virginia. For ac- 
cess to these papers, for permission to publish the one here 
presented, and for the facts of Col. Parker's life here men- 
tioned. I am indebted to the kindness of Col. Parker's only 
surviving daughter, Mrs. R. E. Wynne. 

Col. Parker was born in Westmoreland County, Virginia. 
20th February, 1804. For nearly forty years he was officially 
connected with the Federal Government. He appears to have 
had unusual opportunities for obtaining information relating 
to certain important phases of ante bell urn politics. 

In his unpublished "Autobiography," Col. Parker says: 

"In a life, long, eventful, and troubled, it was my good 
fortune to become personally acquainted, with very many dis- 
tinguished men, occupying the highest offices in the country. 
I will mention a few, viz, Genl. Jackson, Mr. Van Buren, 
James K. Polk, James Buchanan, and last but equally distin- 
guished, Thomas Ritchie. I think I may add Jefferson Davis. 
With the first three, I was personally well acquainted; and 
towards Mr. Buchanan, I had confidential relations from 184/ 
to the day of his death, with a short interval when he changed 
his 'Kansas Policy*, and which, / told him at his own table. 
would hasten the disruption which the 'signs' so plainly indi- 
cated. This was in 1858. . ."^ 

In 1835 Col. Parker was sent by President Jackson to 

^''Autobiography of John A. Parker, so far only, as his public life is 
concerned. Written at the request of friends; and among them, that 
Reverend John Goode [?]. Xot written to be published during my life, 
if ever."— Parker MSS. 



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82 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Texas on a secret mission connected with the independence of 
that country. In 1851 he was Librarian of the House of Rep- 
resentatives of the United States.^ 

After the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Bill in 1854 the 
Virginia delegation in Congress urged the appointment of 
Col. Parker as Governor of the Territory of Kansas.* 

In 185s Col. Parker was Secretary of the Judiciary Com- 
mittee of the House which then had charge of the investiga- 

2C0I. Parker was removed from the office of Librarian, 6 Dec. 1853, 
by John W. Forney, Clerk of the House, in whom the appointment o^ 
Librarian was then vested. The removal seems to have occasioned 
considerable agitation among the Virginia Congressional delegation. 
An unsucessful attempt was made to take from the Clerk tlie power 
of appointment, and to have the Librarian appointed by the House. The 
proposition was defeated by only four votes. See the Richmond En- 
quirer, December 9, 16, and 20, 1853. Also the Congressional Globe, 
33d Congress, ist Session, Vol. 28, pt. L, pp. 22, 34, 35, 40. 

5" As soon as that Bill passed, the Southern members in Con- 
gress, desired President Pierce, to appoint to office Southern men, in 
'Kansas', and Northern men in Nebraska. It was thought slavery might 
be established in Kansas, but would not be, in Nebraska. While this 
policy was being, urged on the President, the Virginia Delegation, in 
Congress, and a portion of the delegations from other Southern States, 
without consulting me, presented to the President, a written request 
that he should appoint me Governor of 'Kansas'. (This, was supple- 
mented by an appeal made, by Mr. Ritchie, then, on his death-bed; 
and he sent for the President, and requested him, to call on him. The 
President kindly did so and be made the appeal. Three days after, he 
died.) 

"The President, held, this 'Policy' under advisement, for some time, 
and was inclined, as were the several members of his Cabinet, to adopt 
it. But, unfortunately, for him, and perhaps, for the peace of the 
country, he had given his confidence to [two words here illegi- 
ble] John W. Forney, who had gained an influence over him, greater 
than that of any member of his Cabinet, and it was this, which caused 
the President to adopt the policy he did, viz., of sending Northern men 
to 'Kansas', and Southern men to 'Nebraska'. Forney succeeded in 
having the notorious *Reeder' appointed 'Governor', one of the worst 
possible appointments he could have made. He, Reeder, soon plunged 
the teritory into trouble and turmoil, bloodshed and anarchy, which 
continued for years, and came very near causing civil war in the 
U. S., and which did hasten it in 1861 " Parker MSS. 



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ELECTION or PRESIDENT BUCHANAN. 83 

tion of certain frauds consummated by one Gardiner and 
others under the Mexican treaty. 

In 1856 Parker was appointed Register of the Land Office 
of Nebraska. The cause of his resignation is alluded to in 
the document printed below. In i860 Parker was appointed 
Consul at Honolulu. From this post, he was, at his own re- 
quest, released in 1862. 

About this time Col. Parker and Mr. Thomas Green, a son- 
in-law of Thomas Ritchie, were appointed agents for the State 
of Virginia to procure a settlement from the Federal Gov- 
ernment for money loaned by the State to the Federal Gov- 
ernment for the purpose of erecting public buildings, and 
also for money loaned in the war of 181 2. In the settlement 
of these claims, which were not finally adjusted until after 
his death in 1894, Col. Parker was engaged for several years.* 

P. O. Ray, 
The Pennsylvania State College. 

Reminiscences of J. A. Parker. 

How James Buchanan, was made President of the U. S; 
and by whom ; Reminiscences ; of J. A. Parker, of Va. 

For years and up to 1852 I held Confidential Relations to- 
wards James Buchanan of Penna. At that time, both Sena- 
tors, and every Member of Congress in Va. was opposed to 
him on acct. of his protective tariff Views. There was not a 
single paper in the State advocating his election to the Presi- 
dencv. 

It was in FebV, 1852, in the City of Washington and at the 
House of Hon. Wm. R. King a Senator from Alabama,* n 
few of the confidential friends of Mr. Buchanan met; and a 
campaign for Mr. Buchanan agreed on, in order to carry the 



*A recent letter from Mrs. Wynne is authority for these last state- 
ments. ,Mrs. Wynne also states that her father, although over ninety 
years of age at the time of his death, was to the very last a man of mo.st 
remarkable memory. 

•Elected Vice-President on the ticket with Franklin Pierce in 185J 
Sec **Some Papers of Franklin Pierce" V Edmund Burke to Frank- 
lin Pierce. American Historical Rciiciv X, 114. 



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84 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Southern States, and especially Virginia. It was decided to 
press him for the Nomination in Baltimore in May — ^and prin- 
cipally on the ground, that in his letter of 184/ to the "Har- 
vest Hand'' in Penna he was the first Northern man of any 
party, who had taken Strong Ground against the "Wilmot 
Proviso" — a measure very unpopular in the South. His let- 
ter too, was in other respects pro Slavery; These questions 
it was thought — ^and afterwards proven, would over ride all 
Others, and in the Canvass, the objections to Mr. Buchanan, 
on the Tariff question would be forgiven. [?] 

The first movement was to be made in Virginia. There 
was but one prominent man in Virginia, who could be per- 
suaded to Lead — and that man was Henry A. Wise. He was 
the devoted friend of Com. Stockton, and it was supposed, 
wished to see him nominated. He, however, was induced to 
Lead (I will not say hoWy but the secret history is known to 
me, and in Writing). 

The Canvas, resulted in giving the vote of Va. in the Bal- 
timore Convention to Mr Buchanan on ^2 ballots. This Vote 
in 1852, was the ground work, of Mr. Buchanan's Nomina- 
tion, (and election) at Cincinnatti in 1856, 

This, was one of the most remarkable, events in the politi- 
cal history of the U. S. — that, of State's being carried, 
against the entire delegation, and without a single paper to 
sustain the candidate — and yet, it is now history. 

As soon as Mr B. was elected, he sent for Wise to visit 
him at 'Wheatland*^ and offered him a Cabinet appointment; 
This was declined — (He, Wise, then being Gov of Va) — 
He Mr B — then requested Gov Wise to aid him in making 
up his Cabinet, which he did. 

On 24th March 1857 — only 20 days after he was inaugp:!- 
rated he wrote to me, — his letter is now before me — and 
said — 

'*I should now, not be President of the U. S. but for the 
action of Gov. Wise, and yourself in 1852 ; — without Virginia, 
I could not have been. nominated, or elected." 



•Near Lancaster, Pa. 



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ELECTION OF PRESIDENT BUCHANAN. 85 

But, Gov Wise, and myself soon had cause to regret, our 
l>art, in electing Mr. Buchanan — we soon discovered, he had 
placed his Administration in the hands of the Original 'Nul- 
lifiers' — and we became satisfied his policy would lead to Se- 
cession — We, and the Richmond Enquirer, had for years 
worked against Nullification — the Parent of Secession — in 
Vain we as his Original friends protested against his policy; 
we warned him of the inevitable result ; In One of his letters, 
(which is preserved) he said: 

'7/ the personal Liberty Lazvs of the North, are not re- 
pealed, the South will have a right to secede, and ought to 
secede," 

Soon after this, Mr. Buchanan's, sudden change of his 
'Kansas* policy, satisfied us, he had passed the ^Rubicon' — 
and this led to the Open Breach, between Gov Wise and 
President Buchanan — (but the strange spectacle was ex- 
hibited, of the President of the U. S. waging a Warfare, 
against his Original friends) J 



'Parker's account of how his own former friendly relations with 

Buchanan were restored is as follows: *' The alienation continued 

until i860. I often visited Washington in 1858 and '59. I did not 
call on the President. In i860, I received a letter from Genl. Cass, 
Secretary of State, in which he said, 'The President requests me to 
say 'he wishes you to come to Washington, and he wishes to talk 
over matters of the past, the Present and the future; and to dine 
with him on the day you reach Washington.' 

**I did not hasten to Washington ; but, in about ten days I did go — 
and at 12 o'clock on the day, I arrived, I called — it was his custom to 
have the door thrown open at 12 o'clock — to admit all callers — I in- 
tended to afford him, an opportunity to renew, if he thought proper, his 
invitation to dine with him; As soon as he saw me in the crowd, he 
beckoned me to come to him, and said, 'You must dine with me to-day 
at 4 o'clock.' On my arrival I found only Genl. Cass, and Mr. Cobb, 
Secretary of the Treasury, present. After dinner, the President in- 
vited Genl. Cass, Mr. Cobb, and myself into his private room, where 
we remained until ten. Of course, it is not my intention, nor 
would it be proper for me (I being the only living person) to say 
w^hat was said, or what took place, on that occasion — I can, however, 
properly say, that the past, present, and . future matters were very 
freely and fully discussed, respecting public men and measures, and 
es]>ecially The Impending Crisis' — Our former relations were restored ; 



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86 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Within 24 hours after this change, I resigned an important 
office, which had been given me by President Pierce (a) 

[Note in margin.] (a) ''Register of the Land Office, Oma- 
ha, N. T." 

The Original "Kansas Nebraska Bill" and President Buch- 
anan's Action, led to Secession, and its awful Consequences. 

"The Kansas- Nebraska'' Bill. 

Only two persons are now living who know the Real Au- 
thors of that Bill — its history and purposes. Judge Douglas, 
was the reputed Author — ^and its patron, and the American 
people, even now, think he was the Author; I know he was 
not, — and / know how and zvhy he became its active patron. 

The true history of that Bill, is written, it has never, yet 
been published, but may be beiove I die — or afterwards, and 
also these sketches, which will be found among my papers, 
with my correspondence, to sustain, and fully Verify, every 
statement I have made. * * * [Marginal note omitted.] 

[Marginal note to the note omitted:] (a) Many of the 
facts, * * * are known to President Davis — He was Sec'y 
of War, at the time the "Kansas -Nebraska Bill passed, and 
may recollect some conferences, he held, with Judge Caskie,* 
and me. 

In after Times — I wish my own action to be made known 

to such as may feel any interest in it. 

John A. Parker. 

Tappahannock, Va., 28th March 1877. 

Upon the back of this document are the following endorse- 
ments : 

[In Parker's handwriting:] 

Sketches, &c, Buchanan and His Administration, 

The Kansas-Nebraska Bill — From personal knowledge 

Bv John A, Parker, of Va. 



and I allude now to the incident, to show how we again came *to 

smoke the calumet' " Parker MSS. 

sProhably John S. Caskie, Representative from Virginia from 1851 
to 1859, and member of the Judiciary Committee. Died, 1869. 



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LETTER OF JOHN PAUL JONES. 87 

|^=* Please return this to J. A. Parker Tappk, Va. 

Read & returned as requested above. 

Jefferson Davis. 
22d Oct. 1883. 



John A. Parker Esq.: Much obliged for the opportunity 
of reading the enclosed. 

John Sherman.. . 
Nov IS, '79. 



LETTER FROM JOHN PAUL JONES' TO JOSEPH 
HEWES, May 19, 1776. 



[The original of the following letter, which is referred to 
in Sherburne's Paul Jones (p. 14, &c.), but, it is believed, 
never printed in full, is included in the very valuable collection 
of MSS. now preserved in the former home of Governor John- 
ston, at Edenton, N. C. We are indebted to Mrs. John G. 
Wood, of Edenton, and Judge W. J. Leake, of Richmond, for 
the copy used. 

Paul Jones had just returned from the cruise to the Baha- 
mas, in which he served as first lieutenant of the Alfred. On 

^It is worth noting that, while there is no doubt that John Paul 
Jones lived for a time at Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania county, Virginia, 
his name never appears in the records of the town or county. By 
deed dated Aug. 16, 1770, Thos. Blanton and wife sold to William 
Paul, for ii20 currency, lot 258 in the town of Fredericksburg. The 
will of Wm. Paul was dated March 22, 1772, and proved in Spotsyl- 
vania Dec. 16, 1774. He left his whole estate, which consisted chiefly 
of his house and lot, to his sister, Mary Young, and her eldest chil- 
dren, in Abigton, in the parish of Kirthbeen, in the Stewarty of Galla- 
say. North Britain. He appointed Wm. Templeman and Isaac Heslup 
executors; but, they refusing, John Atkinson, who had been one of the 
witnesses to the will, was appointed. The house owned by Wm. Paul 
is believed still to be standing on lot 258, but there is on record no 
conveyance of the lot from Paul's representatives. See "John Paul 
Jones as a Citizen of Virginia," this magazine, VH, 286. 



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88 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

the loth of May he had been ordered to the command of the 
Providence, and arrived at New York on the i8th.] 

On Board the Sloop Providence, 

N. York, May 19th, 1776. 
Sir, 

I had the honor of writing you the History of our Cruise 
in the Fleet from the Capes of Delaware 'till our arrival at N. 
London the 14th ulto. inclosing an inventory of all the stores 
taken at N. Providence, &c. — the letter contained a particular 
account of the action with the Glascow in an Extract from 
the Alfred's Log Book — it also contained some free thoughts 
on Certain Characters in the Fleet — it was inclosed to Mr. 
Sproat and by ill luck fell into hands not the most agreeable 
on its way to the Post Office from which circumstances I much 
fear it hath miscarried — for I have just now parted from 
Captn. Lenox and tho' he is late from Philadelphia he hath 
no account of any letters from me to his uncle Mr. Sproat. 
I now inclose you the minutes of two Court Martials held on 
board the Alfred, the Evidences at large excepted — the min- 
utes have not yet been seen in print — in Consequence of the 
last Trial I was ordered to take the Command of this Vessel 
the loth Cur. I arrived here yesterday afternoon in 36 hours 
from Rhode Island with a return of upward of 100 men be- 
sides Officers which Genl. Washington lent to the Fleet at N 
London. — I left the A. Doria & Cabot at Rhode Island ready 
to sail together on a four weeks' Cruise. — What will become 
of the Alfred and Columbus heaven only knows — the seamen 
have been so very sickly since the Fleet returned to the Con- 
tinent that it will be Impossible to man them without others 
can be entered. — I have landed Genl. Washington's Soldiers 
and shall now apply to shippingmen if any can be obtained but 
it appears that the seamen almost to a man had entered into 
the army before the Fleet was set on Foot, and I am well in- 
formed that there are four or five thousand seamen in the 
Land Service. 

The unfortunate Engagement with the Glascow seems to 
be a general reflection on the Officers of the Fleet — but a lit- 
tle reflection will set the matter in a true light — for no Offi- 



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LETTER OF JOHN PAUL JONES. 89 

cer who acts under the eye of a Superior and who doth not 
stand charged by that Superior for Cowardice or misconduct 
can [be] blamed on any occasion whatever. — For my own part 
I wish a General Enquiry might be made respecting the abili- 
ties of officers in all Stations — and then the Country woulJ 
not be Cheated. 

I may be wrong but in my opinion a Captain of the Navy 
ought to be a man of Strong & well connected sense with a 
tolerable Education, a Gentleman as well as a seaman both in 
Theory and Practice — for, want of learning and rude ungen- 
tle manners are by no means the Characteristick of an Officer. 
I have been led into this subject on feeling myself hurt as an 
Individual by the Censures that have been indiscriminately 
thrown out — for altho* my station confined me to the Alfred's 
lower Gun Deck where I commanded during the action & 
tho' the Commodore's letter which hath been published says — 
"all the Officers in the Alfred behaved well" — yet still the Pub- 
lic blames me among others for not taking the Enemy. 

I declined the Command of this Sloop at Philadelphia — nor 
should I now have accepted it had it not been for the Rude 
unhappy Temper of my late Commander — I now reflect with 
Pleasure that I had Philosophy sufficient to avoid Quarreling 
with him — and that I even obtained his blessing at Parting — 
may he soon become of an affable even disposition, and may 
he find pleasure in communicating Happiness around him. 

There is little Confidence to be placed in reports otherwise 
the Lieutenants of the Fleet might have reason to be uncasier 
when they are told that the several Committees have orders 
to appoint all the Officers for the New Ships except only the 
Captains. — I cannot think they will be so far overlooked who 
have at first stept forth and shown at least a willingness — nor 
can I suppose that my own Conduct will in the Esteem of the 
Congress subject me to be superseded in favor of a younger 
Officer especially one who is said not to understand Naviga- 
tion. — I mean the Lieutenant of the Cabot — who was put in 
Comm'd of the Fly at Reedy Island after I had declined it — I 
was then told that no new Commissions would be given — and I 
considered her as a paltry message Boat fit to be commanded 
by a midshipman — but on my appointment to the Providence 



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90 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

I was indeed astonished to find my seniority Questioned — ^the 
Commodore told me he must refer to the Congress— -I have 
reed, no new Commission. — I wish the matter in dispute may 
first be cleared up. I will cheerfully abide by whatever you 
may think is right — at the same time I am ready at any time 
to have my pretensions enquired into by men who are Judges. 

When I applied for a Lieutenancy I hoped in that rank to 
gain much useful knowledge from men of more experience 
than myself — I was however mistaken for instead of gaining 
information I was. obliged to inform others. I formed an 
Exercise and trained the men so well to the Great Guns in the 
Alfred that they went thro' the motions of Broad Sides and 
Rounds as Exactly as Soldiers generally perform the Manual 
Exercises 

When I get what men are to be had here — I am ordered 
back to Providence for further Instructions — the Sloop must 
be hove down — ^and considerably repaired and refitted before 
she can proceed properly on any Cruise. I should esteem my- 
self happy in being sent for to Philadelphia to act under the 
more immediate direction of Congress especially one of the 
new Ships. — I must rely on your Interest herein. 

The largest and I think by far the best of the Frigates was 
launched the day after I left Providence — ^but from what I 
can hear neither of them will equal th^ Philadelphia ships. — 
I left the Columbus heaving down and the Alfred hauling to 
the wharf. — I send this by the Commodore's Steward who hath 
leave to visit his wife at Phila. and will call on you on his 
return in a day or two. I expect that he will overtake mc 
here if I succeed in getting men — if not he will follow me to 
Rhode Island and Providence. — May I hope for the honor of 
a letter from you by his hands — it will most singularly oblige 
me and greatly add to the favor already Conferred on 

Sir 

your much obliged 
and very humble Servant 

John P. Jones. 

N. B. — If you have not reed, my last I will send a copy if 
desired. 

The Hon'ble Joseph Hewes, Esquire, Philadelphia. 

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NOTES AND QUERIES. 91 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL NOTES 
AND QUERIES. 



Kennon Record. 

The family record of the Kennons is as follows: 

Lewis Kennon, son of Charles Kennon and his wife, Mary Howell 
(Lewis), was born in Halifax county, Va., 14th day of June, 1784. 

Eliza Wyatt Winslow was born in Orange county, Va., 6th May, 
1790. 

Married to Lewis Kennon 23d January, 1816. Died 23d September, 
1824. 

(After her death.) — Dr. Lewis Kennon to Mary Chadwick, loth of 
Jan. 1828, by Rev. Sam'l Davis, Burke county, Ga. 

Children to Lewis Kennon and his wife, "Eliza" : 

Charles Henry Kennon, born 8th March, 1817, Saturday, P. M. Dead. 

Charles Henry Kennon, born 24th May, 1818, Sunday, i o'clock. 

(The latter was my father who, to inherit large properties entailed, 
took and retained the name of Winslow, his mother's maiden name. ) 

(My father married Maria Louisa Walter, daughter Jeremiah Wal- 
ter and Elizabeth Wilmot, of Charleston, S. C.) 

Children of Dr. Lewis Kennon and wife, Mary : Elizabeth W. Ken- 
non, bom September 20, 1778; Mildred L. Kennon, bom May 18, 1781 ; 
Lewis Kennon, born June 14, 1784; Charles H. Kennon, born August 
3, 1786; Nancy Kennon, born December 16, 1790; Mary B. Kennon, 
bom April 3, 1795; Patsy, born Nov. 16, 1796; Lucy Kennon, bom 
May 26, 1798; Richard Kennon, bom May 28, 1800; William Hozvell 
Kennon, born March 14, 1802; Rebekah Kennon, born October 28, 
1804; Eliza Kennon, born May 7, 1806; Erasmiss Kennon, born Janu- 
ary 31, 1810; Sally Kennon, born November 20, 1811. 

Children of Henry Kennon Winslow and Maria Louisa Walter: 
Randolph Bowling Winslow, Elizabeth Winslow. 

William Poe Winslow married Annie L. Ludlow, New Orleans, Jan- 
uary 31, 1880. Several children. He died New Orleans, May 8, 1899. 

Elizabeth W. Kennon Winslow married Henry Darpit, April 25, 1881. 

Children of Henry Darpit and E. W. K. Winslow ; Bush, born Feb- 
ruary 4, 1882; Henry, born July 31, 1884; Walter, bom July 24, 1886; 
Myrtle Dorothy, born December 11, 1893. 

, New Orleans, La. 



New Taylor Genealogy. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ward Doremus, of No. 2 E. 15th St., New York City, 
(assisted by her cousin, Dr. T. Madison Taylor), proposes to publish 
a new and accurate geneaology of the Taylors, carrying it back in 
England, from James Taylor, of Carlisle, the first immigrant to Virginia. 



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02 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

She has already some important new data ; but requests correspondence 
with any and all who can and will assist her. 
She is a granddaughter of Gen. James Taylor, of Newport, Kentucky. 



Revolutioxary Diary Etc., of Eppa Fielding. 

Copy of love letter written by Eppa Fielding, a soldier of the Revo- 
lution, while stationed at Richmond, to his sweetheart, Mary Bar>'e, 
of Northumberland county, who later became his wife. His diary 
kept 1782-1783, is now owned by their grandson, William Eppa Field- 
ing, Esq., of Arkansas. 

Richmond, March 2, 1782. 
Most adorable of thy Sex — 

It is with pleasure & the greatest Sattisfaction that I em- 
brace this happy oppertunity of unfolding my burthened mind to you 
whose gracious Smiles Can at once dispell my Gloom of darkness, bless 
my mournful hours with the hope of future hapi^iess. I am to my no 
.Small Sattisfaction Stationed at this place where I expect to Continue 
the Remainder of my time, but oh when I Consider that amidst my 
unequal ed misfortunes I have the happiness of being where I Can with 
Safety write her who is the only object, of my sincerest wish, but oh 
when I consider the misfortune of my ncgligeant Stars that So long 
forbids me the enjoyment of your Sweet Company I fear lest time or 
absence may lessen me in your esteem which would break the truest 
heart that ever lov'd & bury my unhappy Memory in the deep recesses 

of the unsearchable Grave — But enough of this. Why should 

I accuse you of what I have Not the least reason to believe. But my 
dearest Jewell Lett fortune frown as it will & all the powers of nature 
Combine Against us only prove time Constant, & all the powers of 
earth & hell Can never frustrate our careful Desighns. 

I expect to be down Next fall in order to cclebate the long wished 
for nuptials, which will Constitue me the most happy mortal alive & 
till the arrival of that happy moment I remain with the utmost rever- 
ence & esteem your devoted adorer till Death shall (put) a final period 
to my unhappy life, or kind providence shall Dispell my Gloom of 
Darkness and turn my midnight night into the brightest day in the 
enjoyment of your Sweet Company. 

Eppa Fielding. 

John Dennic .Fielding, a son of Eppa Fielding, and Mary, his wife, 
was born November the i6th, in the year 1785. 

Diary of Eppa Fielding, of Lancaster County. 

[This itinerary illustrates the march of the reinforcements sent from 
Virginia to Greene, and the activity of the Southern army at the close 
of the war.] 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 93 



Manchester, April ye i, 1782. 

Marching orders came to me to go to three Diflferent places in that 
day the i to Comberland C. house, the 2 to richmond, the 3 to Peters- 
burg wich I obayd. The 10 of April I marched to the Suthard, the 14 

I Crost Notoway the 17; crost Meherrin the 19; crost ronoke to 
hallifax in North Carolina; left Hallifax the 28, and to Tare river, the 
I of May, which is 50 miles. Ine 2 crost little river and Dury's, 12 
miles; and the 3 to widow Rogers' ferry 8 miles on Muse river. The 
6 crost Muse and Crabbtree to Colo. Lain's at Wake Court, 10 miles; 
the 7 to Jones, 15 miles;" the 8 to Cape fair river, 17 miles; the 9 crost 
Cape fair to Augis Mcdugle's, 3 miles ; the loth to Widow Con ers, 8 
miles; the 1 1 to Coloms 6 miles; the 12 old Bcllo, 15 miles; the 13 to 
cross Creek, 4 miles; the 16 to John Toolsey, 12 miles; the 17 to John 
Patterson, 21 miles ; the 18 crost drowning creek at Cole's bridge 

21 miles; the 19 to Hailey's ferry on Pedee. 12 miles; the 
20 to old Pegees', 10 miles in South Carolina. The 22 to Capt. Pledges', 
15 miles, the 2^ crost pede at Culp s ferry, and to Mr. Williams, 15 miles ; 
the 25 to John Michaels, 15 miles ; the 26 to old berches on pede, 17 
miles; the 28 to widow Ports on pede, 17 miles; the 29 crost Lynches 
Creek, and to Major Jameses, 10 miles ; the 30 to Robin Dick's, 8 miles ; 
the 31 to kingtree on black river, 13 miles. June thei, to Colo. Stark's. 
on Sante, 17 miles, the 3 to Canter's, 9 miles ; the 4 crost Sante at Mur- 
ry's ferry, and to Gilliard's, 12 miles; the 5 to Mr. Burdose, 10 miles: 
the 7 crost Sante at Murry's ferry, to Colo. Stark's, 12 miles; the 
26 crost Sante at Murry's, and to Awkir, 3 miles; the 27 to General 
Mutres', 12 miles; the 28 Mr. Right's, 18 miles; the 29 to Bender's, 
12 miles; the 30 to Governor Mattheses', 12 miles. July the 5, we were 
all put in the Infantry; the 12 to Mr. butler's. 3 miles; the 31 to mumps 
Corner to * * * bro. and to Mr. White's, 60 miles. The i August, 
crost Sante at Murry's ferry, to Colo. Stark's. 5 miles ; the 2nd crost 
Murry ferrie to Colo. Markum's. 7 miles ; the 3 to the governor's place, 
40 miles; the 16 joined our regt. and marched to Summer's place. 4 
miles, the 17 to Latson's. The 11 of September, to Latson * * * . The 
14 of November, to button hall, 10 miles; the 18 to Macfcrson's, 8 miles. 
The II of December crost Bacon's bridge to Rite's place. 12 miles; the 
14 to Charles Town, 19 miles ; the 16 to Rite's place, 19 miles ; the 18 
crost Bacon's Bridge to the Cowpens, 10 miles ; the 19 to Wilkerson's 
Place, T5 miles; the 30 to Jackson bunier, 7 miles. Jan. i, 1783, to Ashe- 
pie ferr\', 8 miles ; the 2 Salt Cetcher ferry, 18 miles : the 3 to Waxsaws. 

22 miles ; the 5 to Mr. haywood's, 3 miles. Our command February the 

4 to * ♦ * Shose, 15 miles; the 5 to Capt. Kirkley. 37 miles; the 6 to 
Mr. Robberson's. 23 miles; the 7 to Golfin's, 20 miles; the 8 to Hardy, 
8 miles ; the 9 crost Savana River at Valley home ferry and to aGust>'. 

5 miles; Hardises. 6 miles; the 12 to Collenses, 25 miles. The 13 we 
received an Express to go out to the Congeree, and got to Mr. Buck- 



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94 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



son's, 26 miles ; the 14 crost the Salt Cetcher river at Williamses ford, 
and to Pickinszes, 25 miles; the 15 to the widdow Mimucker, 23 miles; 
the 16 crost the Salt Cetcher at Orrin Bridge, and crost the Congeree 
at one Cosrd's ferry to the widow Lezeais. * * ♦ * * * ♦ 

July the 20, crost Swift Creek and fishing Creek, and to Hallifax, 
40 miles; the 21 crost Ronoke and Meherrin at Tickses ford, and to 
Tickes, 20 miles ; the 22 to widow Lameces, 10 miles. 

[On one page is a notice of repair work of saddles done for the 
"3 Regt. L. D." The only names of the soldiers given are Col. White, 
Henry Boyers, Charles Erskin and Jasper Huse.] 



Ward. — Wanted the ancestry of Samuel Ward, born August 20, 1721, 
or in 1724. Died at Morris Plains, N. J., April 15, 1799. Reared by 
an elder brother on the South Branch of the Potomac river, Virginia, 
where the family went about 1735, and occupied a free farm offered by 
Governor Gouch. Having secured no title in due form, they were sub- 
sequently obliged to vacate the farm by Lord Fairfax, and Samuel 

removed to New. Jersey, and married first, Elizabeth ; second, 

Mary Shipman, and had a large family. 

C. D. Ward, 

702 St. Nicholas avenue. New York City. 



The House of Burgesses, 1691. 

April 17, 1691. Journal of the House of Burgesses of Virginia 
Thomas Milner elected Speaker, and Peter Beverley, Clerk. 



List of Burgesses. 



William Randolph, 
Francis Eps, 

Henrico County. 
Henry Batt, 
Robert Bowling, 

Charles City County. 
Henry Hartwell, 

James City. 
Henry Bray, 
William Lewis, 

James City County. 
Tho. Barber, 
Jos. Ring, 

York County. 
Lawrence Smith, 
John Smith, 

Gloucester County. 
Arthur Allen, 



Geo. Mason, 
Martin Scarlett, 

Stafford County. 
Charles Scarborough, 
William Anderson, 

Accomack County. 
John Robins, 
Tho. Harmanson, 

Northampton County. 
Anthony Lawson, 
John Sandiford, 

Lower Norfolk County. 
Chr. Robinson, 
William Churchill, 

Middlesex County. 
Robert Carter, 
William Ball, 

Lancaster County. 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 95 

Francis Mason, Richard Kenner, 

Surrey County. Peter Prestly, 
Arthur Smith, Northumberland County. 

Henry Applewhite, William Hardidge, 

Isle of Wight County. Lawrence Washington, 
Tho. Milner, Westmoreland County. 

John Brassier, William Wilson, 

Nancymond County. Tho. Allonby, 
Richard Whitaker, Elizabeth City County. 

Miles Cary, Henry Aubrey, 

Warwick County. John Stone, 
John West, Rappahannock County. 

William Leigh, 

New Kent County. 

The Clerk Sworn. 

April 20. Major Arthur Allen having scruples about being sworn, 
the fact was reported to the Lieutenant-Governor. , 

A new writ ordered for selection of a burgess in place of Mr. Arthur 
Allen. 

April 27. Benjamin Harrison sworn, being returned in place of Major 
Arthur Allen. 

Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, America and West In- 
dies, 1689- 1692. Edited by the Hon. J. W. Fortescue. London: Eyre& 
Spottiswoode. 1901. [pp. 412-413.] 

This list is not included in the Colonial Virginia Register, as it was 
not accessible when that was compiled. 



General Roger Elliot, Half Brother to Gox-ernor Alexander 
Spotswood. 

[The Virginia family of Spotswood owned for several generations 
a fine portrait of a man in armor, said, traditionally, to be a General 
Elliott, half brother to Governor Spotswood. This portrait, together 
with those of Governor and Mrs. Spotswood was presented by the 
late Mr. John R. Spotswood to the State of Virginia, and is now one 
of the most interesting pictures in the State Gallery. Nothing was 
known of General Elliott until quite recently, when a descendant, Miss 
Edith Eliot, of Camberley, England, kindly furnished the information 
given below. William Elliott, Esq., of York Buildings, who is men- 
tioned, appears to have been associated with Governor Spotswood in 
his iron ventures. This William Elliot had a son, Charles Elliott, who 
was Attorney General of North Carolina, and died in 1756. (See IV m. 
& Mary Quarterly, II, 101-105). The "cousin," John Graham, named 
in the will, came to Virginia as an agent for Spotswood, and was at 
one time a professor at William and Mary College.] 



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96 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



Will of Roger Elliott. 

This is the last will and testament of me, Roger Elliott, of Barnes, 
in the County of Surrey, Esq re., made this 7th day of March, in the 12th 
year of the reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne, by the grace of God of 
Great Britain, rVance and Ireland, Queen, defender of the Faith, Anno 
Domini, 1713. First. I resign my soul to Almighty God, stedfastly 
believing through the merits of my Saviour, Jesus Christ, to obtain par- 
don of all my sins, and I desire to be buried privately, as my executors 
herein after named, shall think fitt and, whereas, I have intemarried 
with Charlott, the daughter of Mr. William Elliott, and have already 
made provision and Settlement for her in case she shall happen to 
survive me, of two hundred pounds per annum in annuities ; now, I do 
hereby further give unto my said wife all my goods, plate and furniture 
of and in my house or tenement, I now live in, at Barnes, in the Said 
County of Surry, with all her rings, watches, Jewells and other things 
whatsoever there. 

Item. I give to my son, Granvile Elliott and to his heirs for ever 
all that my aforesaid messuage or tenement gardens and lands lying 
in Barnes Aforesaid, with the Appertenantes which said messuage and 
premises being copyholds, I have duly surrendered to the use of my 
will. 

Item. I give and bequeath to my brother, Alexander Spottswood, in 
case my said children shall dye before they come to their ages of one 
and twenty years, or unmarried, all the profitts of my reall and per- 
sonall Estate for and during the terme of his naturall life, and no 
longer, and from and after my said Brother Spottswood's decease. I 
give and devise all my real and personall Estate wheresoever and what- 
soever to my very loving Father-in-law, Mr. William Elliott, in York 
Buildings, and to his heirs, executors and administrators for ever. 

I give to my cousin John Grahme, twenty pounds to buy him mourn- 
ing. 

Item. I give to my sister, Margaret Andrews, the summe of three 
hundred pounds, and to my brother, Alexander Spottswood, the sum 
of five hundred pounds. 

In witness whereof, I have hereunto sett my hand & seal the day and 
year first above written ; and then published and declare the same to 
be my last will and testament. 

R. Elliott. 

Signed, Sealed, published and declared in the presence of us, 

Edward D'Auvergne. 
Rich'd Bowles, 
N. Traytox. 

At London, March the Seventh, one thousand, seven hundred and 
Thirteen years, I having made my will this day, and calling to remem- 



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(IKNEkAL ROC.KK KLLIOTT, 

HALF HkOTHKK (JP GOVERNOR ALKXANDKR SPOTSNVOOD. 

(From the portrait In the VIrjjInIa Siate Librtio'.) 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 97 

brance that there is a sum of money due by me to my brother, Col. 
Alexander Spots wood, Governor of Virginia, near to, but not exceeding 
two htmdred pounds, I do hereby acknowledge the debt, seeing there 
is no other note. Bond or vouchers for it, and wills and allows the «ame 
should be paid him over and above what Legacy, &c, he may be en- 
titled to by my aforesaid will. In witness, whereof, I have signed this 
day and place above written. 

This will was probated at Somerset House, London, i6 November, 
1 714, and copied by Edithe Eliot from the original. 

The seal was copied, in the first instance, by the Richmond Herald 
of Arms, College of Arms, London. 

Edithe Eliot. 

Extracts from the History of the 2nd Queen's Regiment. 
By Col. John Davis, F. S. A. 

Tangier Regt. of Foot. 

1681. Considerable disturbances appear to have taken place amongst 
the officers at the latter end of the year, and after reporting these dis- 
turbances. Col. Kirk was ordered to cashier two Ensigns, who had 
fought a duel (Ensigns Pitt and Elliott), John Leily was appointed to 
succeed Elliot as Ensign in Sir. James Leslie's Company. 

1682. Ensign Elliot, who had been discharged from the service of 
the garrison, in consequence of a quarrel, proceeded home this month, 
with a letter from the governor, recommending him to the King's notice 
to be preferred to the first colours that should fall here (i. e., the 
Ensign's commission vacant), as he had since his fault made satisfac- 
tion by serving as a private soldier in the same company with credit 
and distinction. 

(Governor Colonel Percy Kirk.) 

Officers on ist October, 1682. 

Ensign Roger Elliot in Colonel Kirk's Regiment. 

P. 251. R. Elliot Ensign in Sir. James Leslie's Co'y. 

[R. Elliot's connection with Tangier s is easily explained as Robert 
Spotswood, his step-father is given in Col. Dalton's Commission Lists 
as "Chirurgeon to the garrison.] 

Extracts from English Army Lists and Commission Registers. 

By Col. Dalton. 

Vol. L The Tangier Regt of Foot. 

[From the list in Col. Davis' History of the 2nd Queen's Regt., Vol. 
I, p. 228, extracted from the Dartmouth MSS.) Ensign Roger Elliot 

Robert Spotswood, Chirurgeon to Tangier Garrison, 3rd Son of Sir 
Robert Spottiswoode, Knt., Secretary for Scotland. 

T 



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98 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Vol. II. The Earl of Bath's Regt. of Foot. 

November 1687. Lieutenant Roger Elliot, ist. 

Adjutant Roger Elliot. 

Note 9. — Roger Elliot was wounded at the Battle of Steinkirk. 

Captain of the Grenadier Company in this regiment i March, 1690. 

Major in do. 21 December, 1692. 

Vol. III. Roger Elliot, promoted major 21 Dec, 1692. Appointed 

Col. of a newly raised Regt. of Foot, 5 March, 1703. Served in Spain, 
and was promoted Brigadier, i Jan., 1707. 

Governor of Gibraltar 24 Dec, 1707. 

Major-General i Jan., 17 10. 

Vol. V. Colonel Roger Eliot's newly raised Regt. of Foot 

Capt. Roger Elliot note. 

Served as Ensign in the Tangier Regt. of Foot (the 2nd Queen's) ; 
appointed ist Lieut, of Grenadiers in the Earl of Bath's Regt. of Foot 
Capt. of Grenadiers 1690. Wounded at the Battle of Steinkerk; major 
21 Dec, 1692. Brigr. General i Jan., 1707. Appointed governor of 
Gibraltar, 24 December, 1707. Major G,eneral, i Jan., 1710. 

Elliot (i) = Catherine Mercer = (2) Robert Spots wood 

I I 

Roger Elliot, Alexander Spotswood, 
Governor of Gibralter. Governor of Virginia. 

William Elliot, of Wells. 



Roger Elliot, md., 3d March, 1710, Eleanor, md. Sir Gilbert Eliott, 

Charlotte. of Stobbs., from whom de- 

I scended George Augustus El- 

I iott. first Lord Heathfield, 

Granville Elliot, b. 1712, died Sind De/ender cf G\bra\ter. 

1759, was on service in Germany, 

Count of the Holy Roman Empire, Major-General in British 
Service, Lieutenant-General in Elector Palatine's Service, Lieutenant- 
General in Service of the State«5, General of the Netherlands; md. 
Elizabeth, daughter of William Duckett de Hartham, in Wilts. 

Francis Percival Eliot, of Elmhurst Hall, Staffordshire, b. 1755, died 
i8r8. Captain T 4th Foot : Major Staffs. Yeo. Cav'y ; Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Staffs. Militia; md. Anne, daughter of John Breynton, D. D., of 
Montgomeryshire. 

1st. William Granville Eliot, of Valebrook, Ore.. Surrey, Lieutenant- 
Colonel R. H. Artillery; 2d. Francis Breynton Eliot, Captain 40th 
Reg't; 3d. Edward John Eliot. Captain 27th Reg't : 4th. George Au- 
gustus Eliot, 62d and 103d Reg't; 5th. Lionel Duckett Eliot; 6th. 
George Augustus Eliot, R. N.; 7th. Charles Turberville Eliot The 
third son, Edward John Eliot, md. Margaret James. 

Third son, Henry Augustus Eliot, Principal Bank of England, md. 
Mary Louisa Sarah Nash. 

I 

I. Roger Elliot; 2. Granville Elliot; 3. Frank Percival Eliot; 4. Ed- 
ward John Eliot; 5. Henry Augustus Eliot; 6. Edithe Eliot. 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 99 

Major-General Roger Elliot died 15th May, 1714, and was buried in 
Barnes Parish Church, 23d May, 1714. His death is referred to in 
Musgravt^s Obituary, Helps to History, Le Neve's Monumenta Angli- 



The William Elliot, of York Building, you mention is William Elliot, 
of Wells, grandfather of ist Lord Heathfield, and Waggaman is his 
son-in-law. 

Account of Major General Roger Elliot, given by his son Gran- 
ville, in the draft of a memorial concerning his transfer from the 
Dutch to the English Service: 

"is the Son of Major General Elliott, Governor of Gibraltar, and 
*'Colonel of a Regt of foot in Queen Anne's Reign; his father besides 
'^having an unblemished and distinguished character in his military 
"capacity , was remarkable for his Whig Principles, and the strongest 
"attachment to the Protestant Succession in the House of Hanover. 
"An action by which he particularly distinguished himself was the 
"Defence of Tongres in the year 1703, with only two Battalions for 48 
"hours against the whole French army; in this action he was shot 
"through the Body, and had a Regt. raised for him the winter after. 
"When the Duke of Marborough was turned out. Major General Elliott 
"lost his Government and his Regt. for the sake of his avowed princi- 
"pies. His son was carefully bred up in those same principles, and has 
"ever stedfastly adhered to them." 

Rapin's History, Vol. HI, p. 613, says: "The two English regiments 
of Elliot & Portmore made a gallant defence of Tongres in May, 1703, 
but had to surrender to the French." 



John Grame. — Miss Eliot would be much obliged for any information 
concerning Mr. John Grame, cousin of Governor Alexander Spots- 
wood, especially about his seal and will. 

Elmhurst, Camberley, Surrey, England. 



Edward Randolph. — Historical Register: containing An Impartial Re- 
lation of All Translations, Foreign and Domestic, with a Chronologi- 
cal Diary of All Remarkable Occurrences in Birth's, Marriages, and 
Deaths, &c. 

Vol. 14. — For the year 1729. 
London : Printed and Sold by R. Nutt, in the Old Bailey, near Lud- 

gate. 

Page 20— 1729— Mar. 15. 

"Captain Edward Randolph, a Virginia Merchant, of London, elected 

Elder Brother of Trinity House, in the Room of Capt. John Merrj' — 

Deceased." 

[This was Edward, son of the first Wm. Randolph, of Turkey Island.] 



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100 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

GENEALOGY. 



THE BROOKE FAMILY OF VIRGINIA. 
(By Prof. St. George Tucker Brooke, Morgan town, W. Va.) 
(continued) 
Will of John Brooke, 1788. 
Will of John Brooke (Essex County Records). 
In the name of God. This is the last will and Testament of John 
Brooke, Gent. After recommending my soul to God, I give and De- 
vise in manner following. I give to my beloved wife one-third part 
of my whole estate During her natural life. Item. I give to my 
son'* Wm. Thornton Brooke, all my lands in Essex to him and his 
heirs forever, and in case of his death without such heir, then to 
daughter Ann Brooke to her and her heirs forever. Item. My will 
is that all my slaves and personal Estate be equally divided between 
my two children* William Thornton Brooke and Ann Brooke, at the 
time my said Daughter, Anne Brooke, shall come of age or marry, 
and in case my two children* Wm. Thornton Brooke and Ann 
Brooke should die without issue, I give my whole estate to be equally 
divided between my three half brothers, Robert Spottswood, William 
and Thomas Hipkins, to them and their heirs forever. I appoint Wil- 
liam Thornton, John Rose and Edmund Brooke my Executors and 
guardians to my children. In testimony whereof I have hereunto 
set my hand this 28th Day of June, 1787. 

John Brooke. 
Test: James Nevison. 
Wm. Waring. 

At a Court continued and held for Essex Co. at Tappahannock on 
the 22nd Day of April, 1788. This last Will and Testament of John 
Brooke, dec'd, was offered to proof by Wm. Thornton, one of the 
Executors therein named, who qualified to the same as the Law directs, 
and was proved by the oath of Wm. Waring, one of the witnesses 
thereto, which is ordered to be certified. 

Test: John Smith, D. Clk. 

And at a Court held for the said Co. at the place aforesaid, on 
the i6th day of June, 1788. This last will and testament of John 
Brooke, dec'd, was further proved by the Oath of James Nevison, 
another of the witnesses thereto, which is ordered to be recorded. 

Test: Hancock Lee, Clk. 
Truly recorded. 

Test: John Smith, D. Clk. 

• The italics are ours. (St. G. T. B.) 



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GENEALOGY. 101 

A division of the slaves belonging to the estate of William Brooke, 
dcc'd, between Mr. Richard Hipkins in right of his wife, and John 
Brooke, heir at law. Lot No. i to heir at law. Lot No. 2 to Mrs, 
Hipkins. January 25, 1771. 

These old wills would be competent evidence in any court of law 
or equity because they "came from the proper custpdy," and "are old 
enough to prove themselves," and, ante litem motam, were "acted 
upon;" the actual fact being that they are links whereby the Brooke 
Bank estate has passed from William Brooke I (1734), to his great- 
great grandson, William Hill Brooke, who died about 1896, aged about 
75 years. 



Lineal Descendants of William Brooke I, and of His Wife, Sarah 
(Taliaferro) Brooke. * 

n. Sarah (i), died unmarried, 1767; posthumous son H. William (2), 
m. Ann Benger, dau. Elliot Benger and Dorothea Bryan, sister of 
Lady Spots wood; issue. 

in. John Brooke (i), m. Lucy, dau. of Col. Francis Thornton, of 
King George Co., and of his wife, Sarah Fitzhugh, III. William (2), 
d. in infancy. 

HL John Brooke (i) and his wife, Lucy Thornton, had issue, IV. 
William Thornton Brooke (i) and IV. Ann Brooke (2). 

IV. William Thornton Brooke (i), m. Maria Whiting Baylor, and 
had issue, V. Lucy Thornton Garnett Brooke (i), m. ist. Col. G. B. 
Cooke, had two children, both died, m. 2nd John Williams, of Nor- 
folk, Va., no issue; V. Alexander Tunstall Brooke (2), d. s. p.; V. 
Eliza (3), d. y. ; V. Robert Baylor Brooke (4), and V. a 2nd Robert 
Baylor Brooke (5), both died in childhood; V. William Hill 
Brooke (6), m. ist Clarissa Jane Lawrence, dau. John Lawrence and 
Hannah Starling, his wife; issue. VI. John Lawrence Brooke (i), m. 
Maria Garnett, no issue; VI. William Thornton Brooke (2), m. Lina 
F. Abemathy (issue, VII. Annie Wilson (i), m. Robert Hill Steger) 
Vn. Gara (2), VII, Fannie (3) VIL Bayham (4). VII, Mildred (5), 
VII. Betsy Thornton (6), VI. Lucy Garnett Brooke (3), m. George 
William Catlett (issue, VII. William Brooked), and VII. Lucy 
Brooke Catlett (2),). VI. Ella Brooke (4), m. James Hillhouse Perry, 
U. S. N., (issue VII. John Stone Perry (i),) VI. Alexander Tunstall 
Brooke (5), m. Harriet Thornton Catlett, no issue; VI. Roderick Bay- 
ham Brooke (6), m. Ella Constantia Harrison (issue, VII. Wliliam 
Hill Thornton Brooke (i), and VII. Amelia Brooke (2),) ; VI. Vir- 
ginia (7), m. Joseph Page Anderson (issue, VII. Margaret (i) ; VII. 
Virginia (2); VH. Alice (3); VIL Walter (4); VL Robert 
Brooke (8), d. s. p.; VI. Mary Baylor Brooke (9) ; VI. Alice 
Brooke (10), m. Thomas Branch Jackson, no issue. 

*Tbe Roman numerals indicate the generations from William Brooke I, and the small 
nomerals indicate the parties that were brothers and sisters. 



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102 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

V. William Hill Brooke m. 2nd Lucy Beverley Catlett, issue; VI. 
Ellen Bankhead (ii), m. Henry Latane Fauntleroy (issue, VH. Wil- 
liam Brooke (i), and VH. Harriet Tunstall Fauntleroy (2),) VI. Har- 
riet Catlett Brooke (12) m. Robert Bruce Fauntleroy (issue, VH, 
Stuart (i) ; VH. Clifton (2) ; VH. Ella Perry (3) ; VH. Lucille (4) 
Beverley (4) ; VIL Virginius (5) ) and VH., an infant (6) ; VL An- 
nie (13), youngest child of Wm. Hill Brooke and his 2nd. wife, Lucy 
Catlett. 



Will of Humphrey Brooke. 

Third son of Robert Brooke, Jr., "Knight of Golden Horseshoe." 
In the name of God. Amen. Humphrey Brooke being very Sick And 
Weak, but of Perfect Sence and memory, thanks be to god, do Con- 
stitute and ordain this my last Will and Testament in manner and 
form following: Imprimis. I recommend my soul to Almighty God 
in hopes of a General Resurrection and my Body to the Earth to be 
decently Buried by my Executor hereafter named, and as to what 
Worldly Estate wherewith it hath Pleased God to Bless me, after the 
Payment of my Just Debts and Funeral Expenses, I dispose thereof 
as foUoweth, viz: — 

Imprimus, I give and bequeath unto my loving Brother Richard 
Brooke (i), and his heirs forever all my land in Culpeper County, and 
all my other Estate both real and Personal whercT'er it may be found, 
to him and his heirs forever. 

Item, my will is that my Loving brother, Richard Brooke, be my 
Executor of this my last Will and Testament. 

In Witness whereof I have set my hand and seal this eleventh day 

of May, 1758. 

Humphrey Brooke, (L. S.) 

Signed, Sealed & Delivered in Presence of us : 
Hay Talliaferro, Thos. Catlett, 
Catherine Rose, Elizabeth Talliaferro, 

His 
Thos. (X) Whitlenton. 
Mark. 

At a Court held for the County of Culpeper on Thursday, the 17th 
Day of February, 1763. 

This last Will and Testament of Humphrey Brooke, Dec'd, was ex- 
hibited to the Court by Richard Brooke, the only Executor therein 
named, and was partly proved by the oath of Hay Talliferro, one of 
the witnesses thereto, and ordered to be certified. And at a Court 
continued and held for the same County on Friday, the i8th day of 
March, 1763, This said Will was fully proved by the oath of Eliza- 



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GENEALOGY. 103 

bcth Talliferro, Witness thereto, and ordered to be Recorded, and 
on the motion of the said Executor Certificate is granted him for 
obtaining a Probat thereof in Due form, he having sworn to the same 
and given Bond and Security According to Law, and it is ordered that 
Robert Brooke, Gent. (2), Brother & heir at Law of the said Decedent 
be summoned to contest the validity of the said Will, if to him it 
seems expedient. 

Test: Roger Dixon, CI. Cur. 

A copy, — Test: W. E. Coons, Clerk. 



Will of Robin Brooke (Robert Brooke IV), son of Robert Brooke 
III, and grandson of Robert Brooke, Jr., "Knight of the Golden Horse- 
shoe." 

1778. 

I, Robin Brooke, of the County of Essex, and Commonwealth of 
Virginia, seriously considering the uncertainty of human life do whilst 
in a sound state of body and mind make this my last will and testa- 
ment. I most humbly recommend my soul to (the) extensive mercy 
of that Eternal Supreme and Intelligent Being who gave it me, most 
earnestly at the same time deprecating his justice, hoping through the 
merits of Jesus Christ to participate of the joys of heaven. 

Imprimis. My will is that all my just debts be paid and discharged, 
and in token of that filial affection which I owe to my beloved father, 
Mr. Robert Brooke (a) and mother, Mrs. Mary Brooke (b), I give 
and bequeath to each a gold ring of five guineas value. 

Item. I give and bequeath to my brothers, Humphrey (c) and Ed- 
mund Brooke (d), each one gold ring of 3 guineas value. 

Item. I give and bequeath to each of my sisters, viz: Mary (e), 
Catherine (f), Susannah (g), Sarah (h), and Elizabeth Brooke (i), 
one bracelet of 3 guineas value. And as to my estate which I am 
seized of, interested in or entitled to, of every kind and nature what- 
soever, I lend the same to my beloved wife, Mrs. Lydia Bushrod 

(i). This was Richard Brooke, of "Smitbfield,'' fourth and youngest son of Robert 
Brooke, Jr., " Knight of the Golden Horseshoe.' ' 

(2). Of course, this Robert Brooke was the oldgsi brother "of the said decedent," or 
he would not have been "the heir at law." By the common law if a man died intestate 
and without children, his oldest brother was heir at law, even though his father was still 
living ; but this Humphrey's father died in 1744. This will proves conclusively that this 
Humphrey died either a bachelor or a widower without children or other /»«^a/ descend 
ants, because (i) bis brother Robert would not have been ** the heir at law " if Humphrey 
bad left /iw^a/ descendants, and (2) we are not to suppose that he would have left all of 
*' his estate, both real and personal, whereaver found, to my loving brother, Richard 
Brooke," without mentioning wife or children, if he had had a wife or children. See this 
magazine October, 1902, p. 197. 

Not improbably it was this Humphey Brooke, not Humphrey-, of Fauquier, who was 
living in Williamsburg in 1752, when he subscribed for a copy of Mercer's Code of Vir* 
ginia. See this magazine, January, 1902, p. 316. lb. July, 1902, p. 90. 



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104 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Brooke (j), during her widowhood, and in case she should marry 
again then 1 give or lend her only what the law allows. 

Item. At my wife's death or in case she should marry, I give, devise 
and bequeath all my estate of every kind and nature to the male heir 
of my body (k) ; and in case of none such, or he should die under age 
or without issue, I give, devise and bequeath the personal part of my 
estate to the female heir of my body, and the real part thereof to my 
beloved father, Mr. Robert Brooke, and in case of no such female heir 
of my body, then I give all and every part of my estate whatsoever to 
my beloved father, Mr. Robert Brooke, his heirs and assigns forever, 
and appointing him, my said father, Robert Beverley, Esquire, and 
Dr. John Brockenbrough executors of this my last will and testament. 
I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 30th day of Sept., in the year 
of our Lord One Thousand Seven hundred and seventy-eight. 

Signed and sealed in presence of 

Robert Brooke. (Seal). 

At a Court held for Essex County at Tapp'a on the 20th day Sep- 
tember, 1779, This instrument of writing purporting (to be) the last 
will and testament of Robert Brooke Jun'r (1) dec'd was proved to be 
the handwriting of the said decedent by Robert Beverley, John Mat- 
thews and Richard Rouzee, and being sworn to by Robert Brooke 
3en'r, one of the executors therein named, is admitted to record. 

Test: Hancock Lee, Cl'k. 
A Copy — Test: H. Southworth, Clerk. 



Notes to the Will of Robin Brooke. 

(a) Robert Brooke IIL See his will. 

(b) She was the daughter of William Fauntleroy, of Richmond 
county. See his will. 

(c) He was Humphrey Booth Brooke. See this mag. Oct., 1902, 
p. 197. 

(d) See this mag. July, 1904, p. 108. 

(e) Mary married Maj. Daniel B. Duval, of Revolutionary fame, 
of Naylor's Hole, Essex county. 

(f) Catherine married Peter Francisco, of Revolutionary fame, of 
Buckingham county. 

(g) Susannah married James Vass, late of Fores, Scotland, 
(h) Sarah married Jesse Michaux. 

(i) Elizabeth married Micou. 

(j) See the will of Robert Brooke HL 

(k) The testator evidently did not know that two years earlier, 
Oct. 7, 1776, Jefferson's statute had abolished estates tail. 

(1) The Italics are the Clerk's, who made the certified copy of this 
will. 



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GENEALOGY. 106 

THE BRENT FAMILY. 

Compiled by W. B. Chilton, Washington, D. C. 

(continued) 

Which Robert de Brent 5 Edw. I (1277) attended that King into Gas- 
cony, as he did in most of his expeditions into Scotland, being then a 
Knight. 25 Edw. I (1297) he was a knight of the shire for Somerset at 
the parliament then held at Westminster. He died about 2 Edw. H 
(1309) Isabella his wife, daughter of Simon de Montacute, surviving 
him. He was the first of the family that used a seal of his arms, vis: a 
wivern, as it is now borne, and has generally been used by his descend- 
ants. He was the father of another Robert, who was also a knight and a 
great benefactor to the abbey of Glastonbury. He married Garicia 
daughter and heir of Sir Adam de la Ford, of Ford, in the parish of 
Bawdrip, by whom he had the manor of Ford, and other lands in this 
county, Wilts, Hants, and Essex. He had by her a son of his own 
name, who succeeded him at Cossington, and also another son called 
John, who, setting himself at Charing, in Kent, on some lands which 
were Sir Adam de la Ford's, became the progenitor of a family which 
continued there with great dignity for many generations, and at last 
by some heir female had their possessions in the time of Queen Eliza- 
beth transferred to the family of Deering.^ 

Besides these sons, he had two daughters, Havysia, the wife of Hugh 
de Popham, and Joan, wife of Thomas Deneband. He was buried 
on the north side of the choir of the abbey church of Glastonbury. 

Robert de Brent, son of the last mentioned Robert, married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of William Deniband, and died 25 Edw. Ill (1357), 
being then succeeded by John Brent, who married Joan, daughter and 
heir of John le Eyre, of Middlezoy, by whom he had a manor in that 
parish held of the Lady Stury by the service of half a knight's fee, and 
several other lands in this neighborhood. 

John Brent, of Cossington, son of John, i Henry V (1413), was 
twice married; his first wife was Ida, daughter of Sir John Beau- 
champ, of Lillisdon, knt., by whom he had issue Sir Robert Brent, his 
successor in the estate of Cossington, and Joan, first married to 
Thomas Horsey, of Horsey, Esq., and afterwards to Thomas Trethekc. 
of Tretheke, in the county of Cornwall, Esq. To his second wife he 
married Joan, the daughter of Sir Robert Latimer, knt., by whom he 
had a son called John. 

Sir Robert Brent, his son by his former wife, and heir to this es- 
tate, married Jane, daughter of John Harewell, of Wotton, in the 
county of Warwick, who survived him and had this manor for her 

I Weevers, funeral monuments, go, 19 (sic). 



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106 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

dower, which was, after her death, together with the rest of the 
estate, entered upon by Joan, his sister and heir by the whole blood, 
to the exclusion of John, son of John Brent by the second marriage. 
But this Joan being in a state of insanity, the fines that were levied 
in her name were not sufficient to bar the heir male, who, after several 
suits at law, and at length an arbitration by John Hody (afterwards 
chief justice of the King's Bench) lo Henry VI (1440), was ad- 
judged the right heir, by virtue of two entails made in the time of 
Edw. II, and Ric. II (1307; 1377), and soon after this manor was 
again entailed to this John Brent and the heirs of their body forever. 

The eldest son of this John Brent was called Robert, and married 
Margaret, daughter of Hugh Malet, of Currypool, by whom he had 
another John, who added to his estate the manors of Goodwin's 
Bower and West Bagborough, which he purchased of Thomas God- 
wyn, as also (from his wife Maud, the daughter and co-heir of Sir 
Walter Pouncefoot) the manor of Compton-Pouncefoot, and Pounce- 
foot Hill, all which descended to JVilliam Brent, their eldest son, 
under age. 

Which William had livery of his lands granted him 15 Henry VIII 
(1524), although he was not then twenty-one years old. He married 
a daughter of Lord Stourton, by whom he had one son, Richard, who 
died 23 Eliz. (1558), and was succeeded by Anne, his only daughter 
and heir, married to Lord Thomas Poulett, son of the Marquis of 
Winchester, and was mother of Elizabeth, wife of Giles Hoby, Esq., 
which two ladies sold and squandered away all the patrimony of this 
ancient family. The manor of Cossington, with Ford, and part of 
Godwin's Bower, was purchased by John Brent, the heir male of the 
family, viz., son of Stephen, son of John, second son of John Brent 
and Maud Pouncefoot. Which John, by that marriage, was an officer 
under William Warham, Archbishop of Canterbury, and afterwards 
under the treasurer of Calais. It appears by papers found at Cos- 
sington that, upon the dissolution of the religious houses, he was 
employed by the commissioners to take account of the lands and muni- 
ments of such of them as were within this county, particularly of the 
abbey of Clive, to which he seems to have been steward. This John 
was twice married; his first wife was a daughter and co-heir of 
Thomas Godwyn; his second was Mary, granddaughter and sole heir 
of Thomas Culpeper, of the city of London. He died in 1557, and 
was buried at Bexley, in the county of Kent. 

Stephen Brent, son of John^ was a lawyer, and lived at Dorchester, 
in a house that was his mother's, in whose right he had several other 
lands in that county and in Kent, all which were sold by his son John, 
upon his purchase of this manor of Cossington, an estate in which 
he seems to have taken great delight. This John died here in 1610, 

I Second son of John Brent and Maude Pouncefoot. 



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GENEALOGY. 107 

leaving behind him a son of his own name, who was seventy-eight 
years in possession of this manor, and died A. D., 1692; but though 
twice married, left no children. His first wife was Winifred, daughter 
of Sir John Arundel, of Lanheron, in Cornwall, and his second was 
Mary, daughter of Sir Henry Ludlow, knt. On his death one Hodges, 
a poor man, then living near Highgate, was by Virdict found to be 
grandson of Anne, daughter of Stephen, and real heir to the estate, 
which he sold soon after to Mr. Robert West, of the Inner Temple, 
who had assisted him in the discovery of his title to this inheritance. 
Whence the manor of Cossington came to Sir John Gresham, bart., 
who sold it to Benjamin Allen, Esq., the present possessor. 

The living of Cossington is rectorial, in the deanery of Pawlett, and 
was in 1292 valued at ten marks. The Rev. Charles Hobbs is pat- 
ron and incumbent 

The church, which is dedicated to St Mary, is of one pace, with a 
tower at the west end, containing a clock and five bells. 

In the chancel floor is a brass plate, whereon are engraved the 
effigies of John Brent, Esq., who died Aug. 22, 1524, and Maud, his 
wife, with an inscription to their memory; and on the north wall 
another inscription to John, son of John Brent, Esq., who died Jan. 
24, 1691, aged 80 years. 

From the History and Antiquities of the County of Somerset, by 
John Collinson, London. 1791. Vol. Ill, p. 434-7. 

(P. C. C. Bennett, 8.) 



Will of Robert Brent, Esquire, and Lord of Cosvngton, Dated 27 
August, 1500; Fronted 7 Non-ember, 1508. 

I desire to be buried in the chancel of the Church of the Blessed 
Mary of Cosyngton. 

I bequeath to the fabric of the Church of Bath and Wells 20s. 

To the glazing of the window in the tower of the parish church of 
Cosyngton, 40s. 

I will that Joan, my sister, have food and clothing from John, my 
son and heir, while she lives. 

I give to the prior of Byrkyll 2od. 

To the friars Minor of Bridgewater, 6s., 8d. 

To the poor of the Blessed Margaret next Taunton, 2od. 

To Alexander Hody, now rector of Byschford, 6s., 8d. 

To Richard Mylcome, rector of Cosyngton, 6s., 8d. 

To John, my son and heir, my chest. 

Residuary Legatees and Executors: Joan, my wife, and John, my 
son. Witnesses: Richard Mylcome, John Nett, Jr., and John Joce. 

I also bequeath to Dom. George Nawll, chaplain of Ford, 2od. 

To John, the Hermit of St. Thomas on Powldom. 8d. 

Proved: 7 November, 1508, by the oath of John, the son, to whom 



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108 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

admon. was granted, power being reserved of making the like grant 
to Joan, the widow and relict. 

Note: The foregoing will is that of Robert Brent, who married 
Margaret, daughter of Hugh Malet, of Currypool. Joan, mentioned 
in the will, must have been a second wife. Both Collinson and the 
Brent genealogy mention Margaret as the name of this Robert Brent's 
wife; but Collinson, under the head of Currypool, states that Joan 
Malet married Robert Brent, and that her sister, Margaret, married 
John Crewkem. Possibly Robert Brent married first Margaret, the 
widow of Crewkern, and second Joan, her sister. 

(P. C C Bodfelde, 26.) 

The Will of John Brent, Dated 20 Aug., 1524. 

I bequeath my body to be buried in the chancel of the church of 
our lady of Cos>Tigton, by Mawd, late my wife. 

To the church of St. Andrew, in Wells, los. 

To the church of Cosyngton, to buy a tenor bell, 2oli. 

To the church of Bawdrepe, Puryton and Wullauyngton, 6s., 8d 
apiece, and to the two chantry priests of Wullauyngton, Sir Nicholas 
Neele and Sir John Pople, 6s., 8d. 

To the Friars of Briggewater and Yevilchester, 6s., 8d. severally. 

To the Spetilhouses of Taunton, Brewton, Lamport and Bath, 3s., 
4d. severally. 

To all my servants, men and women, dwelling with me in my house- 
hold, on the day of my death, a year's wages. 

To Richard Brent, my son, 200 marks. 

To Barbara, my daughter, 200 marks. 

To Thomasyn, my daughter, 200 marks. 

If any of my children die within the age of 16 years not married, 
the portion of the child so dying shall be divided among the survi- 
vors. If all my children thus die, their portions shall be put into lands, 
to found a perpetual chantry in the church of Cosington, and my will 
is, if it could be done, that the chantry of the Forde should be parcel 
of the perpetuity in Cosyngton church. The residue of my goods I 
give to William Brent and Richard Brent, my sons, to be equally di- 
vided among them by the advice of Bawdon Mallett, William Vowell, 
John Poxwell, clerk, and Sir Thomas Keove; and I make my said 
sons my ex'ors, and Sir John Poxwell, parson of Cosyngton, and Sir 
Thomas Keove, one of the chantry preests of Wullavvmgton, their 
coadjutors. 

To my sister, Agnes, a nun at Shaftsbury, I give 61i., 13s., 4^- 

To my cousin, Mary Paulett, an ambling horse named Symon. 



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GENEALOGY. 109 

Witnesses: John Powlett; John Pokiswell, clerk, Thomas Kcwe, 
William Broke, Richard Pery and John Mors. 
Proved IS Oct., 1524, by Richard Feld, proctor for the ex'ors. 

(P. C. C. Rudd, 22.) 

The Will of Giles Brent, of Honesbrooke, in the Parish of Wym- 
BORNE Mynster, Co. Dorset, Gent., Dated 3 June, 12 James I. 

I give to the parish church of Wymborne Mynster 20s. 

To the poor, 20s. 

I give the use of my farm of Hunnesbrooke to my wife Anne for 
21 years; and to my said wife and to Thomas, Giles, Edward, Pene- 
lope and Dorothy Brent, my children, all my goods equally among 
them. 

To Grace Brent, my daughter, a feather bed and bolster. 

I will that my son, John, shall pay to Giles, Penelope and Dorothy 
Brent, 2oli. by the year out of the farm of Burford, for the time of 
the lease of 21 years. 

Ex'ors: my wife Anne, and son Thomas. 

Overseers: my friends Edward Woodes and Thomas Thornehill, 
gent. 

The mark of Giles Brent: Witnesses: Edward Wood, John Brent. 
Proved 4 March, i6i4-'5, by Thomas Brent, executor, with power re- 
served, &c. 

Note — Giles Brent, the maker of the foregoing will, was the son of 
Richard Brent, and the grandson of John Brent and Maud Pounce- 
foot. 

(P. C. C Grey, 109.) 

The Noncupative Will of John Brent, of Hennvbrooke, in the 

Parish of Wimborne Minster, Co. Dorset, Gent., Made 

About 26 January, i 650-1. 

He declared he would give to his daughter, Mary Brent, 200/f., hav- 
ing given her that sum in a will he had lately cancelled. The rest 
of his estate, as also the lease of his tenements in Hennybrook, which 
was to be holden after his decease by the life of one Ann Hardy, he 
gave to his wife, Katherine Brent, for the benefit of herself and chil- 
dren. 

Made in the presence of divers good and credible witnesses 10 June, 
1651, commission issued to Katherine Brent, the relict of deceased, 
to administer according to the above will. 

Note — ^John Brent, making the foregoing will, was probably the son 
of Giles Brent, maker of the will immediately preceding. 

(P. C. C. Administration Act Book 1611-14, folio 152.) 

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110 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

John Brent. 

II June, 1614. Commission issued to Thomas Parsons, one of the 
creditors of John Brent, late of Cosyngton, Co. Somerset, deceased, 
to administer the goods, &c., of the said deceased. 

(P. C. C. Arundel, 39.) 

The Will of Stephen Brent, of Dorchester, Co. Dorset, Dated 

31 May, 1580. 

I bequeath my body to be buried, if I happen to die in Dorset, by 
my father-in-law, Christopher Hole, and Dorothy, his wife. 

I give to the church of St. Peter, in Dorsettshire, 6s., 8d., and to the 
churches of Holy Trinity & Allhallows there, 3s., 4d. each. 

To John Coxe, my man, 40s. 

To my brother Gyles, my signet that I do use to wear. 

To my brother John, 20s. 

If my mother be living at my death, I give her 3/1., to buy a gown 
with. 

To my daughter, Grace, towards her preferment in marriage, ioo/»., 
and the gilt cup my father-in-law did use to drink in, at her mar- 
riage or age of 20. 

To my daughter, Anne, loo/i., and the great white silver cup I 
do use to drink in. And if my farm of Haydon or Islington fall into 
my wife's hands before they be married, my request is she give them 
each lOo/i. more. 

Whereas, I have bought a tenement in Bere Regis unto my son, 
John, and daughter, Anne, jointly, and a tenement in Horsey, Co. 
Somerset, to my daughters, Grace and Anne. I will my daughter 
Anne shall not claim the moiety thereof until after their several 
deaths. 

I give to my wife my lease of the farm of Haydon, for life, the resi- 
due to my son, John. 

To my son, John, my great best standing cup of silver gilt, at his 
age of 21. 

The residue of my goods I give to my wife, Margaret, and son, 
John, whom I make my executors; and I appoint as overseers of my 
will, my uncle, William H.vmerford, clerk, Thomas Tubervile and 
George Tyllen, Esquires, and my brother, Gyles Brent, gent. 

Per me, Stephen Brent. 

Witnessed per me, Guilielmum Hemerfordum, Richard Eare, by me, 
Roger Baxley. 

Proved Oct. 31, 1580, by Margaret Brent, the relict, with power 
reserved, &c. 

(P. C. C. Admon Act Book, 1692. February R, 32.) 



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EFFIGIES IK COSSINGTON CHURCH. 

JOHN HkE^rT and hts wifk maude, 
(Frona nibblDge ftuai the bmsaea,) 



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GENEALOGY. Ill 



John Brent^ Esquire. 



On the nth day a commission was issued to Mary Brent, Widow, 
relict of John Brent, late of Cossington, in the County of Somerset 
Esquire, deceased, to have and administer the goods, credits and chat- 
tels of the said deceased, well, etc. 

Inscription Surrounding Memorial Brasses on Tomb of John Brent 
AND His Wife ..of Cossington ..St. Mary's Church 
"Here Under Thys Stone Lyeth the Bodys of John Brent, 
Esq'r, Late Lord of this Maner of Cosyngton, and Mawdb 

His Wyfe — ^the Eldest Daught and Hayre of Syr Water Pansfote, 

Our Lord God McCCCC, on Whose Soules and all Crysten 

Solves Jhu Ha\'e Mercy." 

Inscription in Cossington Church to the Memory of John Brent, 
Who Died January 24, 1691. 

"In memory of / John Brent, Esqr., was this monument erected. . 
He was Lord of this Manner of Cosington 78 years / and from 
the ace of 14 was marked to Winifed, Daw'ter of John Arundel, 
Esqr., of Clanhern, in Cornell ..He lived with her 12 years / .. 
After her death marked Mary, dau'ter of Sir Henry Ludlow, Knt., 

of Maiden Braley In ye county of Will'ts. He li\^ed with 

her /44 years and departed this life Jan. ye 24TH, 1691. Aged 80.'* 

The memorial to John Brent, who died 24 January, 1691, is on the 
south wall, not the north wall, as stated by CoIIinson. There are two 
shields in the tablet; in the first, gules a wivem; in the second, sable, 
6 martels, three, two and one argent impaling argent a chevron be- 
tween three animals (horses?), heads erased sable. 

In the parish register is recorded in Latin the burial of John Brent, 
Armiger, January 24, 169 1. 

Cossington is situated about five miles north of Bridgewater, ad- 
joining Chilton on the west, and derives its name from the moors 
whereon it is situated, "Cors," in the British language, signifying a 
marsh or moorish place, and "ton** in Saxon, a small town or en- 
closure. It is a compact village, most of the houses, which are about 
thirty in number, standing near the church. The poor are chiefly em- 
ployed in cutting turf on the moors for sale. The cottages are in 
many cases almost hidden from view by the fine old trees. One, a 
venerable patriarch of the forest, is surrounded by a low circular wall. 
There is a tradition that from its branches many of the unfortunate 
adherents of Monmouth were hanged. 

Cossington manor is a fine old house, and must have been built 
about the end of the eleventh centur>', as services were held in it before 
the church was built. The house stands behind the church, which is 



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112 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

distant only a few feet, and is part of the manor. Mr. Edward Brod- 
erip is the present Lord of the Manor, and Mr. F. Couper Townson, 
the Rector of the parish. The interior of the church and of the manor 
house have been modernized. The Rectory is on the opposite sid: 
of the road, and here resided for many years John Somervillc Brod- 
erip, whose wife was the gifted authoress, Fanny Hood, only daughter 
of the writer of the "Song of the Shirt" and the "Bridge of Sighs." 

The following additional notes are also taken from Collinson's His- 
tory of Somerset: 

Laverton. Against the fourth wall is a handsome monument of 
stone "To the memory of John, eldest son of John Yerbury, of Frome, 
in this County, Gent, by Mary, his wife, daughter and co-heiress of 
John 6 rent, of Winborne, in the County of Dorset, Esqr. He mar- 
ried Joan Ralins, of this place, and died July i, 1691, aged 25." Arms 
of Yerbury and Brent (the Wivern). 

CurrypooL Hugh Malet, son of Baldwin Malet, by Anne Lysse, was 
Lord of CurrvT)ool. His daughter, Joan, married Robert Brent. 
Another daughter, Margaret, married John Crewkern. 

Stoke Courcy. Margaret, daughter of William de Courcy, 2 Henry 
HI (1218), and widow of Baldwin de Redvers, married Falk de Brent, 

a Norman by birth The said Falk de Brent, the builder 

of this castle, was sentenced, 9 Henry HI (1225), to abjure the realm 
forever, but died soon after. 

Among list of those to whom lands were granted at the time of the 
Norman Conquest was Odo Fitz-Gamclin. 

William Malet was a Baron in the time of Henry H. 
Among the principal possessors of land in Somerset in the time of 
Edward I (1272-1307) : 

William de Vernai, 
William de Popham, 
Hugh de Popham, 
Robert de Brent. 

(to be continued) 



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THE RECTORY, COSSINGTON. 




COSSINGTON LODGE. 



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V ^ 



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PUBUCATIONS OF THE VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



''G>Uections of the Virginia Historical Society. New Series. Edited 
by R. A. Brock, Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society, 
(Seal) Richmond, Va. Published by the Society.'' Eleven annual 
volumes, uniform. 8vo., cloth, issued 1882-92, carefully indexed, as 
follows: 

The Ofiidal Letters of Alexander Spotswood, Lieutenant-Governor of 
the Colony of Virginia, 1710- 1722. Now first printed from the manu- 
script in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, with an 
introduction and notes. • Vols. I and IL 

Two Volnmcs. Portrait and Arms, pp xxi>i79 and vii-368. 8 00 

The Official Records of Robert Dinwiddle, Lieutenant-Governor of the 
Colony of Virginia, 1751-1758. Now first pnnted from the manu- 
script in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, with an 
introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two volames. pp. lzix-538 and xviii-768. Portraits, /ac-simile of letters of presentation 
from W. W. Corcoran, cnt ot Mace of Borough of Norfolk, Va., and reproduction of the 
Map of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, engraved iSor Jefferson's Notes 
•a Virginia, itS;. < 60 

Documents, Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration 
to Virginia and to the Settlement at Manakin Town, with an Appen- 
dix of Genealogies, presenting data of the Fontaine, Maury, Dupuy, 
Trabue, Marye, Chastaine, Cocke and other Families. 
Pages xxi-247. Contains /ac-ssmile of plan of "King William's Town." t M 

Miscellaneous Papers, 1672-1865. Now first printed from the manuscript 
in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society. Comprising 
Charter of the Royal African Co., 1672; Report on the Huguenot • 

Settlement 1700; Papers of George Gilmer of 'Ten Park," 1775-78; 
Orderly Book of Capt George Stubblefield, 1776; Career of the 
Iron-clad Virginia, 1862; Memorial of Johnson's Island, 1862-4; Beale's 
Cav. Brigade Parole, 1865. 
Pages ▼iii-374. t W 

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Virginia Company of London, 1619- 
1624, Prepared from the Records in the Library of Congress by 
Conway Robinson, \i-ith an introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two volames. Pages xlvii-ai8 and 500. The introduction contains a valuable criUcal 

•Bsay on the sources of information for the student of Virginia History. ft OO 

The History of the Virginia Federal Convention of 1788, with some ac- 
count of the Eminent Virginians of that era who were members of 
the Body, by Hugh Blair Grigsby, LL. D., with a Biographical 
Sketch of the Author and illustrative notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two vohimcs. Pages xxvii-jTs aiid-4ii. 5 00 

Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society at the Annual Meeting 
held December 21-23, 1891, with Historical Papers read on the oc- 
casion and others. 
Pages xiz-386. Contains papers on the Virginia Committee of Correspondence and the 
Can for the First Coagrr^i; Historical ElcmenU in Virginia Bdocation and Utermry 
Eflbrt ; Notes 00 Recent Work fai Soathem History; Andent Epitaphs and Descriptions 
in York and James Citj Cwmtica, Washington's First Election to Uie House of Bnigcases; 
Smithfield Church, built in i^, Mdmond's FhM Academf ; FacU from the Accomac 
Coonty Rtcofdt, Rdatfang to Bacon's RebdUoo ; Thomas Hansford, lint If artyr to Amcri- 
caa Liberty ; Journal of Captain Charies Lewis in Washington's Expedition against the 
Pknnch in 1735: Ordcriy Books of Ifi^orWaLHcntli ^, and Capt. Robcft Gamble, 1779^ j 

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CATALOGUE OF THE MANUSCRIPTS in the Collection of the Virsinia Hittorical Society 
mad also of Some Printed Papers. Compiled by order of the Executive Committee. Sapplemeot to 
the ytr^ftMia MagaMm4 ^ History and Biography, Richmond : Wm. EUii Jones, Printer. 190X. 

Paper, lao pp. Price, |i.oo. Sent free to members and subscribers on receipt of 10 cents lor post- 
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AN ABRIDGMENT OF THE LAWS OF VIRGINIA. Compiled in 1694. Fran the origiM 
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An edition of 500 copies, reprinted from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biograpl^, Price, 
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Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. 

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Edited to October 
ist, 1898, by Philip A. Bruce, and since that date by William G. Stanard, 
Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society, (Seal). Pub- 
lished Quarterly by the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va. 
House of the Society, No. 707 Elast Franklin St. 

VOLUMB I— OcUVO, pp. 484-viii-XXVi-XXXli. 

Contains cut of the Society's Building, accounu of the proceedini^ and transactions ol 
the Society for the year 1893, and many exceedingly valuable, original historical documents 
and papers which have never before appeared in print. Among others may be mentioned, 
Discourse of the London Company on its administration of Virginia atibirs, 1607-1624; 
Abstracts of Colonial Patents in the Register of the Virginia Land Office, beginning in 1634, 
with full genealogical notes and an extended Genealogy of the Claiborne Family ; The 
Mutiny in Virginia in 1635 ; Samuel Matthew's Letter and Sir John Harvey's Declaration ; 
Speech of Governor Berkeley and Declaration of the Assembly with reference to the change 
•of Government in England snd the passage of the First Navigation Act of 1651 ; Petition 
<«f the Planters of Virginia and Maryland in opposition to the Navigation Act of x66i 
'peon's Rebellion, 1676; His three proclamations, Letters of Sherwood and LudMrell, Pro- 
posals of Smith and Ludwell, and Thomas Bacon's Petition ; Letters of William Fitzhugh 
(1650-1701), a Leading Lawyer and Planter of Virginia, with a genealogical account of the 
Fitzhughs in England ; Lists of Public Officers in the various Counties in Virginia late in 
the 17th and early in the i8th centuries ; Roster of Soldiers in the French and Indian Wars 
nnder Colonel Washmgton ; Officers, Seamen and Marines in the Virginia Navy of the 
Revolution ; Roll of the 4th Virginia Regiment in the Revolution ; Diary of Captain John 
Davis of the Pennsylvania Line in the Vorktown Campaign ; General George Rogers 
Clark,— Ron of the Illinois and Crockett's RegimenU and the Expedition to Vincennes;. 
Department of " Historical Notes and Queries," containing contributions by Hon. Wm. 
Wirt Henry, and many other items of value ; Department of " Book Reviews ; " A full 
Index. h •• 

VOLUMB II— OcUVO, pp. 483-ii-XXiv. 

Contains a full account of the proceedings and transactions of the Society for the 
year 1894, and the folk>wing list of articles copied from the original documents : Report 
of Governor and Council on the Condition of AffiiUrs in Virginia in x6a6 ; AbstracU of Col- 
onial Patents in the Register of the Virginia Land Office, with full genealogical notes and 
extended eneaIo«ies of the Fleet, Robins and Thoroughgood Families; Reports of Griev- 
ances by the Counties of Virginia after the suppression of Bacon's Insurrection ; A fbll hit- 
lory of the First Legislative Assembly ever held in America (that in 1619 at Jamestown), 
written by Hon. Wm. Wirt Henry ; The conduding list of Virginia Sokliers engaged in 
the French and Indian Wars ; The opening lists of the Virginia Officers and Men in the 
Continental Line, compiled fix>m official sources ; A valuable account of the Indian Wan 
in AugnsU County, by Mr. Joseph A. Waddell, with the lists of the killed and wounded ; 
Instructions to Governor Veardley in 1618 and i6a6, and to Governor Berkeley in 1641 ; Let> 
ters of William Fitzhugh continued, with fuU genealogical notes; The WiU of WiUiam 
Fitzhugh; A complete List of Public Officers in Virginia in 1703 and 1714; Valuable ac- 
count of Horse Racing in Virginia, by Mr. Wm. G. Stanard ; The first instalment of an 
article on Robert Beverley and his DcscendanU; Wills of Richard Kemp and Rev. John 
Lawrence, both bearing the date of the xTth century ; Short Biographies of all the members 
of the Virginia Hiatorical'Sodety who died in the course of 1894 i An elaborate Genealogy 
of the Floumoy Family, throwing light on the Huguenot Emigration ; Department of^His- 

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torical Notes and Queries, containing many valuable short historical papers and also Gene- 
alogical cootributioos, among which the Carr and Landon Genealogies are of special 
interest ; Department of Book Reviews, containing critical articles by well known historical 
■cbolars. Volume II, like Volume I, has been thoroughly indexed. 6 00 

VoLiTMB III— OcUvo, pp. 46o-ii-zzviii. 

Contains a full account of the proceedings of the Society for the year 1895, and the follow- 
ing list of articles copied from original documents : Letters of William Fitzhugh con- 
tinned; Instructions to Berkeley, 1663; Virginia under Governors Harvey and Gooch; 
Causes of Discontent leading to the Insurrection of 1666 under Bacon ; Will of Benjamin 
Harrison the Elder; Culpeper's Report on Virginia in 1683 ; Defense of Col. Edward Hill ; 
A series of Colonial letters written by William Byrd, Jr., Thomas Ludwell, Robert Carter, 
Richard Lee, and Sir John Randolph ; Decisions of the General Court of Virginia, i6a6- 
161B, first insuhnent ; Indictment of Governor Nicholson by the leading members of his 
Council; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, extending to 1635, with full genealogical 
notes; A History of Robert Beverley and his Descendants, with interesting Wills and new 
matter obtained from England ; Genealogies of the Floumoy, Cocke, Carr, Todd and Chap- 
pdl Families ; Voluminous Historical Notes and Queries of extraordinary original value, 
relating to a great variety of subjects ; Department of Book Reviews, containing articles 
from the pens of well known historical scholars. Volume III, like the preceding Volumes, 
has a fuU index. 6 00 

VoLUMB IV— Octavo, pp 493-i-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of Contents : A Marriage Agreement between John 
Cnstis and bis wife ; A Perswasive to Towns and Cohabitation by Rev. Francis Mackemie 
170s; Abstracu of Virginia Land Patents for 1635-6; Army Supplies in the Revolution, 
Series of original letters by Judge Innes; Attacks by the Dutch on Virginia Fleet, 1667 ; 
loundary Line Proceedings, for Virginia and North Carolina 1710.; Charges against Spots- 
wood by House of Burgess 17 19 ; Council Proceedings, 1716-1717; Decisions of Virginia 
General Court, i6a6-38 Continued ; Defence of Colonel Edward Hill Continued Depositions 
of Revolutionary Soldiers from County records ; Early SpoUylvania Marriage Licenses; 
Genealogy— Cocke, Floumoy, Trabue, Jones, and Rootes Families; Historical Notes and 
Queries ; A iiill list of House of Burgesses, 1766 to 1775 ; Instructions to Governor Francis 
Nicholson ; Letter and Proclamation of Argall ; Letters of William Fitzhugh ; Narrative of 
Bacon's Rebellion by the English Commissioners ; full abstracts of Northampton County 
Records in 17th Century ; Ordeal of Touch in Colonial Virginia ; Patent of Auditor and 
Snrveyor-General ; Prince George County Records with much information as to its &milies ; 
Proceedings of Visitors of William and Mary College, 1716; A list of Shareholders in Lon- 
don Company, 1783 ; also of Slave Owners in Spotsylvania County, 1783 ; Virginia Tobacco 
In Russia in 17th Century. Volume IV has a full index. 6 00 

VoLims V— Octavo, pp. 47»-i-xxiii. 

ConUins the following general list of Contenu : AbstracU of Virginia Land Patents, 
1636; and Patents and Grants, 1769; Rappahannock and Isle of Wight Wills. 17th Century ; 
Government of Virginia, 1666 ; Bacon's Men in Surry ; and List of Persons Suffering by the 
Rebellion; Boundary Line Proceedings, 17 10; Carter Papers; Case of Anthony Penton; 
Colooial and Revolutionary Letters, Miscellaneous ; Eariy Episcopacy in Accomac ; Depo- 
ritions of Continental Soldiers ; Families of Lower Norfolk and Princess Anne Counties ; 
Genealogy of the (^ke, Godwin, Walke, Moseley, Markham, 'Carr, Hughes, Winston, 
Calvert, Parker and Brockenbrough Families; General Court Decisions, 1640, 1641, 1666; 
Memoranda Relating to the House of Burgesses, 1685-91 ; Journal of John Barnwell in Yam- 
wswrr War ; Letters of Lafayette in Vorktown Campaign ; Letters of William Fitzhugh ; 
Letters to Thomas Adams, X769>7i ; Public Officers, 1781 ; Northampton County Records, 
17th Century: List, Oath and Duties of Viewers of Tobacco Crop, 1639: Petition of John 
Mercer Respecting Marboro Town ; Price Listo and Diary of Colonel Fleming, 1788-98 ; 
Abstract of Title to Greenspring ; Tithables of Lancaster Conn y, 17th Century ; The Me- 
herrin Indians; The Trial of Criminal Cases in i8th Century. Volume V has a full index < 6 00 

VoLiTMB VI— Octavo, pp. 4y3-iv-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents: The Aca^lians in Virginia; 
Letters to Thomas Adams ; Journal of John Barnwell ; Vindication of Sir William Berk- 
eley ; Will of Mrs. Mary Willing Byrd ; Inventory of Robert Carter ; Virginia Society of 
the Cincianati ; Epitaphs at Brandon ; Trustees of Hampden-Sidney College ; Jacobitism in 
Virginia; AbstimcUof Virginia Land Patents; Letters of La&yette; A New Clue to the 
Lee Ancestry; Letters of General Henry Lee; Sir Thomas Smythe's Reply to Bargravc; 
Vlfginia ia 160, 1603-4, and 177 1 ; Virginia Borrowing from Spain ; The Viivinia Company 
and th« House of Commons ; Virginia Militia In the Revolution ; Washington's Capitn- 
lat Port Necessity; Election of Washington (Poll List), 1758; Burning of William 
Mary College, 1705; Reminiscences of Western Virginia, 1770-90, &c., &c., &c, 



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VoLUMX VII— Octavo, pp. 476-iv-xlx. 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents: An Additional Chapter to 
Waddeirs History of Augusta County ; Augusta County Marriage Licenses, 1749-73 ; In- 
ventory of Estate of Hon. Robert Carter: Extracts from Register of Famham F^suish, 
Richmond County, Va.; Trustees of Hampden-Sidney College ; Indians of Southern Vir- 
ginia, 1650-17x1 ; John Paul Jones, as a Citizen of Virginia ; Abstracts of Virginia Land 
Patento ; The Case of Captain John Martin ; Papers Relating to the Administration of 
Governor Nicholson and to the Founding of William and Mary College ; Richmond During 
the War of i8ia ; Virginia Census of 1624-5 : Virginia in 1624-30— Abstracts and Copies 
rom the English Public Records ; Virginia Game and Field Sports, 1759: Virginia Militia 
in the Revolution ; Unpublished Letters of Washington ; Wills, Genealogies, Notes and 
Queries, &c., with a fuU index. $ M 

VOLUMB VIII— Octavo, pp. 48x-iv-xxvii. 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents : The Indians of Southern Vir- 
ginia ; The Virginia and North Carolina Boundary Line, 1711 ; Inventory of Lord Pairfiui ; 
Letters from Mrs. Ralph Izard to Mrs. Wm. Lee ; Virginia in 1631-35, from English Public 
Records : Papers Relating to the Administration of Governor Nicholson and to the Found- 
ing of William and Mary College ; Notes from the Council and General Court Records, 1641- 
77 ; Unpublished Letters of Jefierson ; Extracts from Virginia County Records ; Letters of 
Harrison Gray and Harrison Gray, Jr.; Members of the House of Burgesses, Lists ; Militia 
Companies of Augusta county, 1742 ; Petitions of Virginia Towns for Establishment of 
Branches of the United States Bank, 1791 ; Virginia Newspaperi in Public Libraries ; Life 
of General Joseph Martin ; Register of St. Paul's Parish, King George county ; Proceedings 
of the House of Burgesses, i6-«2-i66i ; Delegates from Kanawha ; Tercentenary of James- 
town ; Virginia Militia in the Revolution ; Wills, EpiUphs, Genealogies, Notes and Queries, 
Book Reviews, £cc., with a full index. ft M 

VoLUMB JX— Octavo, pp. 480-iv-xx. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents : Virginia Newspapers in Pub- 
lic Libraries: Papers Relating to the Administration of Governor Nicholson and the 
Pounding of William and Mary College : Virginia in 1636-38, from the English Public Re- 
cord Office ; Notes from the Council and General Court Records, 1641-1678 ; Virginia As- 
sembly of 1641 ; Selections from the Campbell Papers : Virginia Militia in the Revolution ; 
Will of William Byrd, 3d: Eastern Shore History: Letters of William Byrd, ad: Henry 
County, Virginia, Records ; Diary of a Prisoner of War at Quebec ; Sainsbury's Aostracts 
and the Colonial History of Virginia: Abridgment of the Laws of Virginia, 1604; The 
Germans of the Valley; Virginia Legislative Documents: John Brown Letters; History of 
the Battle of Point Pleasant ; Wills, Genealogies, Notes and Queries, Book Reviews, &c., 
with a full index. ft M 

Volume X— Octavo, pp. 480-xvl-x. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents: Virginia Legislative Docu- 
ments: John Brown Letters; The Germans of the Valley; Abridgment of Virginia Laws, 
1694; Eastern Shore History; Extracts from Records of Heory County, Vs.; Batttle of Point 
Pleasant; Ferrar Papers, from Magdalene College, Cambridge; Pioneer Days in Alleghany 
County; Tithables or Norihampton County, 1666; Virginia Newspapers in Public Libraries; 
Slave Owners of Westmoreland County, 1782; Virginia in 1630- '38, from English Public 
Record Office; Virginia Gleanings in England (wills, &c.); Virginia Militia in the Revolu- 
tion; Virginia Committee of Correspondence. i7S9-'6i7: Virginia Finances, i776-*90; Vir- 
^nia Colonial Records; Books in Colonial Virginia: WIUs. Genealogies, Notes and Queries, 
Book Reviews, Ac., with several illustrations and fac-simli«s and afuU index. ft M 

VoLUMB XI— Octavo, pp. 490-iv-xxv. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents: Proceedings of Va. Committee 
of Correspondence, 1759-64; John Brown Letters; Surrender of Virginia in 1651-2; Ferrar 
Papers at Magdalene College, Cambridge; Virp^lnia in 1638-39 from the English Public 
Records* Some Colonial Virginia Records; Virginia Gleanings in England (wills); Isle of 
Wight County Records; Virginia Militia in tM Revolution; Records of Henry County, 
Vs.; Moravian Diaries of Travels Through Virginia, 1743, Ac; Virginians Governors of 
Other States; The "Chesapeake War; '^Orderly Book of James Newell, Pt. Pleasant 
Campaign, 1774; The Site of Old "Tames Towne,*' 1607-08: Council and (^neral Court 
Records, 1640-41; Vestry Book of King WilUam Parish (Huguenot), 1707-50; Jamestown 
and the A. P. V. A.; Prosecution of Baptist Ministers 1771:73: Wills, Genealogies, Notes 
and Queries, Book Revievrs, Ac, with several illustrations, facsimiles, and map, and a full 
inde£: , ftM 

VoLUMB XII— Octavo, pp. 487-iv-xxxil. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents : Proceedings of the Virginia 
Committee of Correspondence. 1759-70; Vestry Book of King William Parish (Hujsuenot). 
1707-1750; The Site of Old "James Towne," 1607-1698; Moravian Diaries of^Travel 
Through Virginia, 1747. Ac; Virginia Gleanings in England (wills); Extracts from Vlr^ 
' ginia County Records; Letters otjefferson, &c., in McHenry Papers; Virginia Militia in 
toe Revolution; The Eariy Westward Movement of Virginia, 1722-34, as shown by the 
Virginia Council Journals; Virginia in 1639, abstracts and copies from English Public 
Record Office; Virginia Legislative Papers. 1774; Address of Council, 171^ and Resolu- 
tions of Burgesses, 1712; Wills, C^enealogies. Notes and Queries, Book Reviews, with sev^ 
eral illustrations, plans, &c similes, &c., and a full Index. ft M 



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The Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary. 

CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV. ^^q^^ 

Land and Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1778 i 

St. Paul's Cburcb, Norfolk, 1848 8 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 9 

Slave Owners, P. A. Co., 1779 26 

Norfolk Academy. 1848 39 

Tbe Cburcb in Lower Norfolk County 33 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1850 34 

Soap and Candles, 1767 35 

Witcbcraft in Virginia * 36 

Price of Sugar, 1787 36 

Scbools 36 

Tbe Marchant Family 39 

Princess Anne County Marriages. ^ 40 

A Valuable Relic 46 

Tbe Owners of Watches, Princess Anne County, 1859 47 

Tbe Norfolk and Richmond Steam Boat, 1816. » 49 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 54 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1780 64 

Miss Serena Holden and Her School 69 

Trinity Cburcb, Portsmouth 72 

A List of White Persons and Houses in Princess Anne in March, 1785 75 

Undertakers Bill, 1809 *. 75 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, i860 76 

Billiards 77 

Tbe Church in Cower Norfolk County 78 

Marriages Performed by Rev. Smith Sherwood 89 

Marriages Performed by Rev. H. J. Chandler 93 

Miss Serena Holden and Her School 96 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 100 

Duelling 106 

Norfolk Schools, 1795 106 

The Church in Lower Norfolk County 109 

Store Bill, 1753 113 

Property Owners, Princess Anne County, 1782 1 14 

Large Families in P. A. Co 146 

Princess Anne Marriages 147 

Tbe Norfolk Academy, 1840. 150 

Free and Slave, Norfolk County, 1782 163 

Carriage Owners, Princess Anne County, 1852 166 

Miss Serena Holden and Her School 169 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 170 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1840 174 

Store Bill* 1807 182 

Tbe Church in Lower Norfolk County 183 

Rev. George Halson 184 

An Invitation from General Arnold 186 

BaiHmore: Press of tbe Friedenwald Company, 1904. 

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oct.i904*tyr. 

Medical College of Virginia, 

KSTABLMHED 1888. 

DEPARTMENTS OP MEDICINE, DENTISTRY ft PHARMACY 

THE SIXTY-EIGHTH SESSION WILL 
COMMENCE SEPTEMBER 26, 1905 

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Clinical Instruction in the Memorial Hospital. City Free 
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FOR CATALOGUE, ADDRESS 

CHRISTOPHER TOMPKINS. M. D., Dean, 
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apl.<SUy.06. 

FENLAND NOTES AND QUERIES, 

Edited by REV. W. D. SWEETING, M.A.. 

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A Quarterly Journal devoted to the Antiquities, Geolog:y, Natural 
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Nearly eyenr great fortune began 
with a dollar I why don't yon begin 
to-day and place the first rung in 
fortune's ladder by laying away a 
dollar in the safo ooflbrs of our Bank 
and let It be a magnet to draw more 
dollars in. We pay 8 per cent, on 
deposits. 

Our ** banking-by-mail" system 
is a oonyenience to many. Drop us 
a postal. We shaU be glad tc tell 
you about it. 

Planters National Bank, 

Savings Dep^tf 

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Capital, Sttfplut and Profits. 

$1,125,000.00. 



ANTIQUE©. 

J", in. BIO-GhS, 

515 EAST MAIN STREET, - RICHMOND, VA. 

Largest collection of Original Old Pieces in the State. Antique 
Furniture, Old Brass, Cut Glass, Copper Plate, Old China, Engravings, 
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OUR ANCESTORS. 



THE HISTORY OF FAMILIES OF PITTSYL- 
VANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 



Pittsylvania County is the largest county in the State of Virginia, 
and was once even larger, embracing: the territory now known as the 
counties of Patrick and Henry. Being incorporated in 1767, Pittsyl- 
vania has had an interesting history otits own for 138 years, covering 
the turbulent times of the Revolution. 

The records and will books of the county are very complete and 
thorough, and in a perfect state of preservation, giving a list of all offi- 
cers in the early magisterial courts; many rosters of officers and soldiers 
of the Revolution and Civil Wars and numbers of declarations of the 
Revolutionary soldiers. 

From this county have gone many pioneers of iron nerve, who 
settled the vast South and West, and the descendants of these men 
would find the records of this county of untold interest. 

I am in a position to furnish copies of and data from these records 
at a nominal price, and would be pleased to correspond with any one 
desiring information concerning them. 

Mrs. NATHANIEL E. CLEMENT, 
Member of Virginia Historical Society, 

Chatham, Pittsylvania County, Va. 



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tratSt mnt\ maiiusarl|Hii of hbtmicaJ lvalue or unportAtice, parttctilarly 
such 9S cnaf xhmw Itj^ht tipon the polillai], social or rd^ous Kfe of 
tile peopte of Vtn^nb. 

. Ilu! Society will beoooie Uie cusiadiafi of such tirtid^ of tills diar- 
«c(er as ilw i^os^^mat^ majr from itny cause be tinwilUiig id i^We, and 
io the cate of lamily papers or oiber inaniifcripts wbjch il m^iy be 
undesirable to publish, it will, upon requesu keep Ibcm cooiidcntiaL 

i^ A brge J^f pt^pf iaft Itas been secu/ed add placed in the 
Sodcty's bftilcHng, in which all mantiscnpt^ mtd papers or value are 
cardittly preserved bf ihc Librarian. 

In the vid^f udes of war, and ibc repeaii^ removals to whirb the 
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and tlic $ei$ broken* Odd volumes from the ccitlecticm^ of lis mc;ni<^ 
bers and well wtiiHf'is mfll ihcrerore be fmlefuUy received* 

It is especially desimbfe id secure as complete a collection as po^i- 
bte of early Virf^niii newspapers r petiodicaki and almanacs. 

Any book \tt f^impbleC wntten by a native or nsrident i»r VirginiHt 
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The S&ckiy rtqu€Sis gifU ^fph&Mgf'^h& (caSimt si^} ^oidp&r- 

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THE 






;VIRGINIA MAGAZINE 



OF 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 




FUBUSHKD QUARTERLV BY THE 

VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

RICHMOND, VA, 



vol, XIII— No 8. OOTOeeR. l©Oe. 



^gf«d M ills romolttcic ai IUoMwmI, V«.« m &wsfm<i^iM% B^Stwt^ 



WM. EUiS JONES^ PRlKTKli, •Digitized by Google 

wff PL truifvXiP ffT. 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 



ARCHER ANDERSON, CHAS, V. MEREDITH, 
W. JAMES, E. V. VALENTINE, 

Rev, W, MEADE CLARK. 



eOlTOR OF THE MAOA.ZINE. 

WILLIAM G. STANARD. 



CONTENTS. 

1, Tbt Earl J Westward MoTcmeiit of Virginm, 

1721J-1734..„.„ ,,,..,„, „..^.,... 1 13 

2* Virgitiia ntifl the Cba-okee*,* ^..f.»^^...*.. 139 

3. The Treaty of Lancaster ,,. ,„,.„,„„..„,.. 141- 

4. Tbc Treaty of Loj^'s Town.,,.- .«, ,*. 14s^) 

5. The Vcstiy Book of Kiog WilUara Pariah, Va., 

1707-1750 .......^ .,•,.,.. 17S 

6* Vtrgiiiia Gleanings in Eagland.. ..«..^«oi.........^.. 101 

7. Vtrgtnia Militta in the Rcvolntion....... ,......«.,^ 200 

8, Historical and Genealogical Not^^s and Qncrics.,*. 209 
0, Genealogy .. ., • 216 

The MdUory. Wreot and Brooke Families 



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TH E 

Virginia Magazine 

OF 

HISTORY AND BIOGllAPHY. 



•3 



Vol. Xlll. OCTOBER, 1905. No. 2. 



THE EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF 
VIRGINIA, 1722-1734. 



As Shown by the Proceedings of the Colonial Council. 



Edited and Annotated by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C. 



(continued) 



June 17. 1730. 

Several T'etitions bein^ this Day offered to the Board 

ror leave to take up land on the River Sherando, on the 

North West side of the Great Mountains\ Rob't Carter. 

Iisqr.. a^'ent for the Proprietors of the Northern Neck, moved 



'This and the three succeeding Orders entered on the same day, may 
lie fairly considered as fixing the date when the settlement of the 
Valley of Virginia commenced. The first legislative recognition of the 
country beyond the Blue Ridge appears to have been in 1705, when 
the General Assembly of Virginia passed an act for free and open 
trade with the Indians, and, among other provisos, it was enacted that 
any person who should make discovery of "any town or nation of 
Indians, situated or inhabiting to the westward of or between the 
Appalatian Mountains." should have for the space of fourteen years 
the style right to trade with them. ( Hening's Statutes, Vol. Ill, pp. 
468-469.) The language here used, "between the Appalatian Moun- 
tains," shows with certainty that the general topography of the Valley 
was known as early as 1705. and consequently Governor Spotswood and 
his party were not the first while men to enter or look upon that 



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114 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

that it might be entered that he, in behalf of the S** Proprietors, 
Claimed the land on the S** River Sherrimdo as belonging to 
the S^ Proprietors & within the Limits of their grant, & that 
it belonged solely to the Proprietors to grant the S** Lands W*'** 

region. The main incidents of Spotswood's expedition across the 
Blue Ridge are well known, and do not require lengthy mention here. 
The party left Germanna, then in Essex, but now in Orange county, 
August 29, 1 716. and returned to that place September 10, 1716. They 
crossed the mountains through Swift Run Gap, and stopped at the 
Shenandoah, in the vicinity of present Elkton, Rockingham county, 
Virginia. 

This expedition is notable because it was the first organized effort 
made by any of the colonies to extend the frontier line beyond the 
Appalachian mountains. Governor Spotswood desired to check the 
rising power of the French in the West, and also to discover the 
sources of the Virginia rivers. He likewise wished to establish friendly 
relations with the Indians to the westward. (Spotswood, Official Let- 
ters, Vol. III. p. 295.) The only account of this expedition known to 
be in existence is contained in the Journal of John Fontaine, which 
appears in the work entitled Memoirs of a Huguenot Family, reprinted 
in Slaughter's History of St. Mark's Parish, pp. 39-41. It can be fairly 
claimed that the history of our western explorations commenced when 
Governor Spotswood and his party crossed the Blue Ridge mountains. 
Upon this expedition was founded the organization popularly known as 
"The Knights of the Golden Horse Shoe," which will be mentioned in 
a subsequent note. 

The next evidence known to exist concerning the exploration of the 
Valley is contained in the petition of Robert Lewis. William L>nn, 
Robert Brooke. Jr., James Mills, William Lewis and Beverly Robinson, 
bearing date in the year 1727, and addressed to the Governor and 
Council, praying for 50,000 acres of land on the Cow Pasture and James 
rivers, "lying among the Great North Mountains." (Calendar of Vir- 
ginia State Papers, Vol. I, p. 214.) This land was situated within the 
limits of present Bath county, Va. 

William Lynn, named in this petition, was a brother-in-law of John 
Lewis, the pioneer settler of Augusta county, who probably went to 
that locality upon information derived from his relative. He was a 
physician, resided in l'>edericksburg, Va., and his will was recorded 
in Spotsylvania county March 7, 1758. (Spotsylvania County Records, 
New York, 1905, pp. 16-17.) 

The next reference is also to be found in the Calendar, Vol. I, p. 215. 
On October 28, 1728, Colonel Robert Carter tiled a caveat against the 
issuing of a patent for 10.000 acres of land to Larkin Chew and others. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 115 

Mo'con at his request is entred & then the Board proceeded 
to the hearing of the S** Peticons. 



On reading at this Board the Peticon of John Van Meter* 
setting forth that he is desirous to take up a Tract of Land in 
this Colony on the West side of the great Mountains for the 
Settlement of himself & eleven children, & also that divers of 
his Rela'cons & friends living in the Government of New York 
are also desirous to remove with their families & Effects to 
Settle in the same place if a sufficient Quantity of Land may 

"lying on both sides of Happy Creek, joining on the Great Mountains/* 
etc. This stream flows out of Chester's Gap in the Blue Ridge and 
enters the Shenandoah immediately below Front Royal, Va. 

This protest sounded the first note in the long dispute between 
Lord Fairfax and the Crown with reference to the southern boundary 
of the Northern Neck. This controversy, which began in 1736, was 
finally settled favorably to Fairfax in 17^5. The Rapidan was declared 
to be the true southern boundary of his grant in Eastern Virginia, and 
the head spring of the Conway river, in present Madison county, was 
fixed as the starting point when the Bhie Ridge was reached. The line 
was then run a due northwest course to the head spring of the Potomac. 
It crossed the main Valley of Virginia about two miles south of New 
Market, in present Shenandoah county. This vast domain contained 
nearly 6,000,000 acres of the most fertile lands in the colony, and was 
the largest landed estate ever owned by a resident of this country. 

Colonel Robert Carter, mentioned in this Order, was familiarly 
known as "King Carter," because of his great possessions. He was the 
agent for many years of the Fairfax estate, and in this way acquired 
holdings in Virginia second only to his principal. He filled with great 
credit nearly every important office in the colony, was a member of the 
Council, and as president of that body acted as Governor during the 
interregnum which followed the death of Governor Drj'sdale in 1727. 
(Hcning's Statutes, Vol. IV, p. 5; List of Governors; preface.) His 
history is so well known that only a passing notice of his career is 
required here. He died in 1732, perhaps the foremost man of his day 
in Virginia, and many of his posterity have been highly distinguished. 

2John Van Meter, here mentioned, was a native of Holland, and set- 
tled in or near Rsopus, now Kingston, X. Y., prior to 1700. It is related 
by Kercheval that he was an Indian trader and visited the Valley of 
Virginia with a company of Delaware Indians, who were on their way 
south to fight the Catawbas. The time is said to have been some years 
previous to the first white settlement, possibly about 1725. The northern 



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116 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

be assigned them for that purpose, & praying that ten thou- 
sand acres of Land lying in the fork of Sherrando River, 
including the places called by the name of Cedar Lick & Stony 
Lick, and running up between the branches of the S'* River 
to compleat that Quantity, & twenty thousand acres of the 
land not already taken up by Robert Carter & Mann Page, 
Esqrs., or any other lying in the fork between the S** River 
Sherrando and the River Cahongaroota, & extending thence 
to Opeckon & uj) the South Branch thereof, may be assigned 
for the Habitacon & Settlem't of himself, his family & friends. 
The Governor, with the advice of the Council, is pleased to 
give leave to the S'' John Van Meter to take up the S^ first 
men'coned Tract of ten thousand acres for the Settlem't of 
himself & his family, and that as soon as the petitioner shall 

Indians, who were probably a raiding party of the Five Nations, were 
defeated with great loss near present Franklin, Pendleton county. West 
Virginia, and Van Meter barely escaped with his life. The beauty and 
fertility of the country so impressed him that he advised his sons to 
secure lands on the South Branch of the Potomac. (Kercheval History 
of the J 'alley, 2nd. ed.. 1850, p. 46.) However, the natural objects men- 
tioned in this and the succeeding Order show that the Van Meters 
first took up lands in the main Valley of Virginia, near Winchester. The 
family finally removed to the South Branch of the Potomac and settled 
in the present counties of Hampshire and Hardy, W. Va. (See JVest 
I'irginia Historical Magazine, Vol. HI. pp. 45-55.) Subsequent Orders 
show that this grant was assigned to Jost Hite and his partners in 1731. 

The first step to secure land in the Valley of Virginia by due process 
of law seems to have been taken by Colonel Robert Carter. On April 
20, 1743, William Beverly wrote to Lord Fairfax, who was then in 
England, desiring to secure a grant of land on the Shenandoah river. 
In describing this land Beverly refers to a tree bearing the initials and 
date, "R. C 17-29" He also stated that the land was in the immediate 
vicinity of Colonel Carter's grant, and the foregoing initials and date 
may be accepted as fixing the time when the first legal survey west of 
the Blue Ridge was made, and. in the broad sense of the term, it con- 
stitutes Colonel Robert Carter the pioneer of the Valley settlements. 
{William and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. Ill, pp. 232-233.) 

A map in the Library of Congress, entitled ''The Courses of the 
Rivers Rappahannock and Futoxvmack, as surveyed according to Order, 
in the years 1736 & 173?!' shows Colonel Carter's 50,000 acres on the 
west bank of the main Shenandoah river. The grant was in the form 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 117 

bring on the last men'coned Tract, twenty Families to inhabit, 
or that this Board is satisfied so many are ready to remove, 
thither Leave be, & it is hereby, granted him for surveying the 
last men'coned Tract of twenty thousand acres within the Lim- 
its above described in so many several Dividends as the pet' & 
his S** partners shall think fit, and it is further ordered that no 
p'son be permitted to enter for or take up any part of the 
afs^ I^nd, in the meantime provided the s** Van Meter, his 
family & the said twenty other Families of his Rela'cons and 
Friends, do settle thereon within the space of two Years, ac- 
cording to his proposal. 

of a parallelogram. Its courses were from a starting point on the North 
Branch of the Shenandoah about midway between present Riverton 
and Strasburg, and the line ran nearly due northwest, then northeast, 
then southeast, then southwest to the beginning. The southeast line 
reached the Shenandoah about opposite Williams' Gap in the Blue 
Ridge, then went up the river to Riverton, and followed the North 
Branch to the point of departure. This was without doubt the land 
sur\'eyed for Colonel Carter in 1729. Colonel Page's land (quantity 
not given) is shown on the same map. It was also on the west bank 
of the Shenandoah immediately below Colonel Carter's tract. The 
courses are practically the same, except that the northeast line ended 
at the Potomac a few miles above the site of present Harpers* Ferry. 

The land books of the Northern Neck, now in the land office at 
Richmond, show a grant to Landon and George Carter, sons of Colonel 
Robert Carter, dated September 22, 1730, for 50,212 acres, and this 
was the land above described. These two grants lay principally in the 
present counties of Frederick, Jefferson and Clarke. Tn this section, 
the Carters, Burwells, Pages, and related families, have lived for gen- 
erations with credit to their family names, upon lands acquired by 
their ancestors in the very infancy of the Valley. 

Mann Page, Esq., resided at Rosewell, Gloucester county, Va., and 
was influential in the affairs of the colony. The family to which he 
belonged has contributed largely to the history of Virginia. The land 
which he owned in the Valley was called "Page-Land," in 1744, and the 
tract then contained 8,007 acres. He also owned large tracts in Prince 
William, Spotsylvania, and other counties. (Hening's Statutes, Vol. 
V, pp. 277-284.) He died in 1730, leaving a large personal estate in 
addition to his lands. For full information relative to this distinguished 
family, see Genealogy of the Page Family iti Virginia, by Richard Chan- 
ning Moore Page, M. D. 



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118 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Isaac Vannieter, of the Province of West Jersey, having bv 
his petition to this Board set forth that he & divers other 
German Families are desirous to settle themselves on the 
West side of the Great Mountains in this colony, he, the 
Petitioner, has been to view the Lands in those parts, & has 
discovered a place where such settlement may conveniently 
be made, & not yet taken up or possessed by any of the Eng- 
lish Inhabitants, & praying that ten thousand acres of Land 
lying between the Lands surveyed for Robert Carter, Esqr.. 
the fork of the Sherundo* River & the River Opeckon in as 
many Several Tracts or Dividends as shall be necessary For 
the accommodacon & Settlement of ten Families (including 

^This river gives name to the Valley of the Shenandoah, which is 
the richest and most picturesque section of the great Virginia Valley. 
The earliest mention of this stream is contained in the Journal of John 
Fontaine, who accompanied Governor Spotswood on the expedition of 
1 716. It seems to be certain that this expedition reached the Shenan- 
doah in the vicinity of present Elkton, Rockingham county, Va. Fon- 
taine says, "We crossed the river, which we called Euphrates.'* (Slaugh- 
ter, History of St. Mark's Parish, p. 41.) The next mention of the 
river is found in the act establishing Spotsylvania and Brunswick coun- 
ties, and there it is referred to simply as "the river on the northwest 
side of the high mountains," meaning the Blue Ridge. (Hening, Vol. 
IV, p. 77.) Fortunately, its beautiful Indian name in the end prevailed 
to serve as a reminder of an almost forgotten race. 

The Council Orders, which appear in this issue, give for the first time 
to the Shenandoah names which approach the proper form of the word. 
Sherendo, Shenando and Sherundo are clearly variants of the same 
name. In June, 1730, Robert Beverly, William Beverly and John Corrie 
filed a petition to take up 50,000 acres of land lying upon "Shenando 
River." (Calendar of Virginia State Papers. Vol. I, p. 216.) In the 
Northern Neck grant of September 22, 1730, to Colonel Robert Carter 
and Mann Page. Esq., for 50.212 acres, the river is called "Chanandoah 
Creek." The early deeds in Orange county, Va., give the river various 
names — Gerando, Gerundo, etc. These variations were doubtless due 
to the inability of the early pioneers to understand the Indian pro- 
nunciation. Shenandoah, as stated above, is an Indian name, and the 
evidence indicates that it was so called by the Oneida tribe of the Five 
Nations. There died at Oneida Castle, in western New York, March 
II, 1816, a celebrated Indian chief, whose name was Shenandoa. His 
reputed age was no years. His name was also spelled Skenandoah, the 
letter k in this spelling probably being a misprint. (Schoolcraft, Arch- 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 119 

his own), which he proposes to bring on the s** Land. The 
Governor, with the advice of the Council, is pleas'd to order 
as it is hereby Ordered that the s^ Isaac V'anmeter, for himself 
& his Partners, have Leave to take up the s** Quantity of ten 
thousand acres of Land within the Limits above described, & 
that if he brings the above number of Families to dwell there 
within two years Patents be granted him & them for the same 
in Such Several Tracts & Dividends as they shall think Fit, & 
in the meantime that the same be reserved Free from the entry 
of any other p'son. 

ires of ."Iborigitial Knowledge, Philadelphia, i860. Vol. VI, p. 136; 
Idem, Vol. V, p. 517) 

Various meanings have been given to Shenandoah. The old tradi- 
tion among those who have lived upon and near the stream is that it 
signifies, in the Indian tongue, "Daughter of the Stars." A recent 
writer gives it a more poetic version, "Shining Daughter of the Spark- 
ling Stars." and advances the theory that perhaps the name was in- 
vented to account for the somewhat mythical Senedo tribe which 
Kercheval and others relate h'ved in the lower Valley. This writer aUo 
states that the nan^eis a corruption of the Iroquoian word "Tyonondoa," 
which means literally, "In that place there is a high range of moun- 
tains." (Fowke, Archaeological Investigations in James and Potomac 
J 'alleys. Bureau of American Ethnology, Smithsonian Institution, 1894, 
pp. 72-73.) It is the judgment of the writer, who is a native of the 
section in question, that the author last quoted is mistaken in all of his 
conclusions, except that Shenandoah is an Iroquoian name. Whatever 
its signification may be, the fact remains that it bears the name of an 
Oneida chieftain. Probably the river was not named for this particular 
individual, but that it is a word contained in the language of his tribe 
is beyond controversy, and better evidence of its origin cannot l^^ 
oflfered. 

The relationship of Isaac to John Van Meter is not definitely known, 
but the latter is believed to have been the father. The family removed 
from Ulster copnty, N. Y., to Salim. N. J., in 1714, but John Van 
Meter is believed to have returned 10 New York before undertaking 
his venture in Virginia, mentioned in the preceding note. (IVest Vir- 
ginia Historical Magazine, Vol. Ill, pp. 48-50.) A subsequent Council 
Order shows that the Van Meter lands were assigned to Jost Hite and 
his associates. (See, also, Re^'ised Code of Virginia, 1818, Vol. II, p. 
346.) The Van Meter grants lay between Cedar Creek and Winchester, 
within the limits of present Frederick county, Va. 



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120 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Whereas Jacob Stover*, a Native of Switzerland, hath by his 
Peticon made humble Suit to this Board for Leave to take up 
ten thousand acres of Land on the West Side [of J the great 
Mountains, and on the Second fork of Sherundo River, on 
both sides of the Branches thereof, for the settlement of him- 



*This Order introduces to history one of the most unique characters 
connected with the early settlement of the Shenandoah Valley, and for 
the first time the place of his nativity is disclosed. Jacob Stover was, 
in one sense, an enterprising man, but his land transactions were 
tainted with fraud, and as a consequence a problem has been left to 
history concerning the place of the first actual settlement by the whites 
in this section, which can only b^ solved by the closest research. 

The lands mentioned in this Order were actually granted to him 
by two deeds bearing date December 15, 1733, each for 5,000 acres. 
This fact is disclosed by the deeds themselves, which are recorded in 
the land office at Richmond. One tract was situated on the Shenandoah 
about four miles below the present site of Port Republic, and embraced 
the fine estates owned in more recent years by the Weaver, Strayer, 
and Lewis families. By deed dated June 25, 1740, Jacob Stover con- 
veyed 3,100 acres of this land to Christopher Francisco, the elder, oC 
Lancaster county, Pa., who was likewise a native of Switzerland. Deeds 
from Francisco to Thomas Lewis and Gabriel Jones, recorded at 
Staunton, Va., fix the location of the upper grant to Stover beyond dis- 
pute. The location of the lower grant is still uncertain, but the proba- 
bilities seem to be that it was in the present county of Page, on Hawks- 
bill creek, near the present town of Luray. 

The Indian name of this locality was Massanutton, and here, the 
weight of evidence indicates, was made the first permanent white settle- 
ment in the Valley of Virginia. The question is involved, but may be 
stated as follows: The grants to Stover were finally made under the 
head-right act, which gave fifty acres of land for each person imported 
into the colony. This is evidenced by the fact that in each of the grants 
to him the names of 100 persons are given, comprised in five family 
names, which makes twenty persons in each family. With possibly two 
exceptions, these names were fictitious, and Stover was clearly guilty 
of fraud in this transaction. The persons named were not settled upon 
the land, and it is related that he gave human names to his cows, dogs, 
and hogs, in order to comply with the law. (Kercheval, History of the 
Valley, 2nd ed., 1850, pp. 41-42.) In the Calendar, Vol. I, pp. 219-220, 
appears the petition of Adam Mueller (Miller) and other Germans rela- 
tive to certain lands which they had purchased "about four years past," 
from one Jacob Stover, for which they had paid "upwards of 400 
pounds," and the land was "known by the name of Massanutting.'* 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 121 

self & divers Germans & Swiss Families, his Associates, whom 
he proposes to bring thither to dwell in two years space. It 
is Ordered by the Governour, with the advice of the Council, 
that ten thousand acres of Land lying within the bounds above 

The petition recites that they had purchased this land in good faith 
from Stover, believing his title to be valid; that they were not privy 
to any fraud perpetrated by him in securing the land which was then 
being claimed by William Beverly, Gent., who was suing Stover in the 
General Court to recover it. The latter was described as being "very 
poor and daily expected to run away." The petitioners alleged the 
foregoing facts as equitaWe reasons why their purchase from Stover 
should be confirmed to them. They came from Lancaster county, Pa., 
and their names, with the exception of Miller's, are incorrectly given 
in the Calendar, soijie being represented as illegible. The original peti- 
tion is still in existence, on file in the State Library at Richmond. A 
recent examination of this paper shows the names of the petitioners 
to have been Adam Mueller (Miller), Abram Strickler, Mathias Selzer, 
Philip Lang (Long), Paul Lung (Long), Michael Rinehart, Hans 
(John) Rood, and Michael Kaufman. Unfortunately, the petition is 
not dated, although the Calendar assigns to it the year 1733. 

Bearing in mind the averment in the petition that these pioneers had 
settled at "Massanutting" about four years prior to the actual date of 
the paper, external evidence must be sought to fix its date, anjd conse- 
quently the year when their settlement was made. On pp. 217-218 of 
the Calendar (Vol. I), is a letter from William Beverly to some person 
whose name is not given, but probably his attorney. This letter is 
dated April 30, 1732, and states that he desires to obtain an Order of 
Council "for 15,000 acres of* land lying on both sides of ye main river 
of Shenandoah, to include an old field known by ye name of Massanut- 
ting Town." Beverly stated that he did not wish to supplant any one 
else, and requested that the Council office be searched to ascertain if 
there was an Order in force granting this land to other persons. He 
also stated that "ye northern men are fond of buying land there,*' 
because they could get it cheaper than in Pennsylvania, which averment 
is positive proof that immigrants from that colony were settling on the 
South Branch 6i the Shenandoah in the Page Valley, prior to April 
30, 1732, the date of Beverly's letter. 

A Council Order bearing date May 5, 1732, which will appear in 
chronological sequence, shows that to William Beverly, Gent, was 
granted "fifteen thousand acres on the North West Side of Sherundo 
River, including a place called Massanutting Town, provided the same 
do not interfere with any of the Tracts already granted in that part 
of the Colony." Another Council Order, bearing date December 12, 



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122 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Described be assigned the Petitioner to be laid of [f] in Such 
Tracts as he shall think Fit for the accomodacon of himself 
& his Partners, provided that one Family for each Thousand 
acres do come to inhabit there within the time proposed, And 



1733, shows that a caveat filed by William Beverly against Jacob Stover 
concerning lands, was dismissed, and grants were ordered to be issued 
to the latter, which was done December 15, 1733, as above stated. From 
the foregoing statement of facts, the conclusions inevitably follow that 
the land bought by these Germans was identical with the lands men- 
tioned in Beverly's letter of April 30, 1732, and that granted to him by 
Council Order of May 5, 1732. which both of these Orders located at 
Massanutton, where the petitioners lived ; that it was the same land 
mentioned in the Order of December 12, 1733, dismissing Beverly's 
caveat against Stover and granting the latter two tracts of 5,000 acres 
each on the Shenandoah ; that the petition of the Germans must have 
been filed before the termination of these legal proceedings, which gives 
the petition date some time in 1733; and finally, that they had settled 
at Massanutton about four years prior to the latter date, which would 
place them there in 1729 or 1730, most probably the latter year, when 
the Council Order for 10,000 acres to Stover was passed. 

There is, however, some evidence which points to a later date for 
the Massanutton settlement, and it will be stated in order that future 
investigators may be in full possession of all the facts. The original 
papers in the chancery cause of Stone vs. Stover are on file in the old 
records of Orange County Court. This suit was brought by Ludowick 
Stone against Jacob Stover April 25. 1737, and the bill recites that some 
time in or about the year 1734^ the complainant and his partners, then 
residing in Pennsylvania, had purchased 5,000 acres of land from the 
defendant, who conveyed 4,000 acres of the tract, but refused to execute 
a conveyance of the remaining 1,000 acres to Philip Lung (Long), 
according to agreement ; that Stover had executed his bond in the penal 
sum of 500 pounds to convey the full quantity of land, but while com- 
plainant was absent in Pennsylvania the defendant had persuaded Abram 
Strickler, in whose possession the bond had been left, to surrender the 
same, and Stover then refused to carry out his contract, and Stone 
commenced the suit for specific performance. Stover answered various 
interrogatories propounded in the bill. He set up several defenses, but 
admitted all the material allegations. He gave the names of Stone*s 
partners as follows: Abram Strickler, Mathias Selzer, Frederick Stone, 
John Brupecker {Brubaker), and John Stickly. He also stated that 
the consideration to be paid for the land was 230 pounds, and the 
quantity which they were to receive was 3. too acres. This suit was 
dismissed June 23, 1737. A counter suit was brought by Stover against 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 123 

in the meantime that no P'son be permitted to enter for or take 
the same other than the Pef^ & his Associates. 



Sundry Peticons for takmg up Wast Lands were read & 
granted as follows, (Viz.): 

To Wm. Beverly" 12,000 acres of Land in Spotsilvania 

Stone and his associates, the papers of which could not be found. It 
was dismissed March 23. 1738. The land records of Orange county. 
Va., show that by four deeds, bearing date December 15, 1735, Stover 
had conveyed to all the foregoing parties, except Stickly, 3,100 acres of 
land, which fact sustains, to that extent, his answer. 

These particulars are stated at length in order to differentiate the 
colonists who filed their petition in 1733 from Stone and his associates. 
The lands of both colonies lay in the Massanutton district, a term 
applied to the entire Page Valley, but the difference in the names of 
the persons composing the two colonies seems sufficient to prove that 
they were not one and the same, when considered in connection with 
the difference in price paid by them for their lands. Of the eight peti- 
tioners of 1733, the names of only three appear in the papers of Stone 
vs. Stover — Abram Strickler, Mathias Selzcr, and Philip Long. Both 
colonies came from Lancaster county. Pa., and the connection between 
them was probably close. But all the facts stated above lead to the 
conclusion that the petitioners of 1733 made their settlement on the 
Shenandoah in the neighborhood of present Luray in the summer of 
1730, and therefore was the first permanent white settlement west of 
the Blue Ridge. 

Jacob Stover died in Orange county, Va., in 1741, his son Jacob 
qualifying as his administrator. The Christian name of his wife was 
Ruth. A recital in a deed from him to Peter Bowman in 1736, recorded 
at Orange, Va., shows that he was living at that time on the South 
Branch of the Shenandoah. 

"William Beverly, mentioned in this Order, was actively engaged in 
the early development of the Shenandoah Valley. He was a native of 
Essex county, Va., the son of Robert Beverly, the Virginia Historian, 
and occupied a prominent position in the public affairs of the colony. 
In 1736 he received, with others, a grant of 118,000 acres of land in the 
present county of Augusta, then Orange. The city of Staunton is 
situated within the bounds of Beverly's Manor, as the grant was termed. 
A letter written by Colonel Beverly, August 8, 1737, to Captain James 
Patton at Kircubright, Scotland, shows that they were then endeavor- 
ing to induce immigrants from the north of Ireland, and, if necessary, 
from Pennsylvania, to settle on these Valley lands. Tn this they were 



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124 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

County, on Fox River Cannon's Rivers, by the Branches of 
Elk River, red Oak Mountains & foot of the great Moun- 
taine. 



July 9, 1730. 

On reading at this Board a memorial of Coll. Spotswood. 
late Lieut. Governor of Virginia, setting forth that in the 
year 1722, at the Instance of both Houses of Assembly, he 
undertook a Journev of upwards of twelve hundred Miles to 
treat with the Northern Indians* at Albany [and] at Conestogo 
that upon his representing to the House of Burgesses how 

highly successful, and to them is largely due the fact that the present 
counties of Augusta and Rockbridge were peopled by the Scotch-Irish 
race. (William and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. Ill, p. 226.) Many 
of Beverly's deeds to, these early settlers are recorded at Orange, Va., 
the first being to John Lewis for 2,071 acres. It bears date February 20, 
1738. (Peyton History of Augusta county, 1882, p. 327.) Colonel 
Lewis, however, had settled near the present site of Staunton in 1732. 

The land mentioned in this Order was situated in the present county 
of Culpeper, then a part of Spotsylvania. Cannon's river was an early 
name for the Rappahannock, and is so called on maps of the Northern 
Neck, 1736-37, referred to in a previous note. 

•This Order has reference to the Treaty of Albany (1722), 
of which mention was made in the April number of the maga- 
zine. A subsequent Order shows that the Governor's just claim for 
expenses was finally paid, and also discloses the fact that he was 
superseded in his office by Governor Drysdale while absent on this 
important mission. The negotiation of this treaty seems to have been 
his last official act. It was among the most notable of his many bene- 
ficial achievements for the colony, because it ended the ancient warfare 
between the Five Nations and the tributary Indians of Virginia, al- 
though it failed to stop the strife of more than a century between the 
former tribes and the Catawbas, as has been shown. 

While at Albany, Governor Spotswood determined to conclude a 
treaty at Conestoga with the Indians, subject to the jurisdiction of 
Pennsylvania, and made preparations to do so. Governor Hamilton of 
that colony, who was also present at Albany, communicated Governor 
Spotswood's purpose to his Council, which passed a resolution declaring 
the proposed conference to be undesirable. (Minutes of the Provincial 
Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. Ill, p. 202.) This accounts for the 
language of the Order, "At Albany [and at] Conestoga." 

The report of the proceedings at the Treaty of Albany shows that 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 125 

the King's Revenue, given for the support of the Govern- 
m*t, was that year so burthened with Extraordinary charges 
that it would hardly be able to bear the Expense of the in- 
tended Treaty without some assistance from them, they gave 
one Thousand pounds for that service, which sum fell short 
of the Expenses more than six hundred pounds, & which ex- 
ceedings Governour Drysdale promised to lay before the next 
assembly, but nothing being done in that behalf, he applyed 
by a peticon in England for a reimbursement of the s* ex- 
penses, but was answered that he should nrst apply to the 
Governm't here for the same that before hs arrival in this 
colony his atty. had given in that Claim to the House of Bur- 
gesses, that the House had thereupon came to a Resolution 
which doth not regret the charge, but only declares that they 
have already paid as far as they had engaged to assist the Reve- 
nue & adding divers Reasons why he conceived his said claim 



Governor Spotswood closed the conference by making an address to 
the Indian deputies of the Six Nations. The following is the literal lan- 
guage used by the reporter of the proceedings, italics included : "Then 
the Governor told them he must take particular notice of their Speaker 
& gave him a golden Horse Shoe, which he wore at his Breast, & bid 
the Interpreter tell him there was an inscription upon [it] which Signi- 
fied that it would help to pass over the mountains, and that when any 
of their people should come to Virginia with a pass they should bring 
it with them." (Documents Relative to the Colonial History of the 
State of Neiv York, Albany, 1855, Vol. V, p. 677.) 

The foregoing was delivered at Albany on Septeml>er 12, 1722, and 
is the positive evidence of Governor Spotswood himself that such an 
organization as the "Knights of the Golden Horse Shoe" was formed 
to commemorate the expedition of 1716. The language used also proves 
that history and tradition have rightly handed down the motto of the 
"Horse Shoe Knights," *'Sic juvat transcendere monies"— Thus it is a 
pleasure to cross the mountains. (Hugh Jones, Present State of Vir- 
ginia, London, 1724, p. 14; quoted by Fiske in Old Virginia And Her 
Seighbors, Vol. II, p. 386.) 

Governor Spotswood was addressed by the Five Nations, at Albany, 
as "Assarigoe," the name given to the Governors of Virginia by the 
Iroquois. It was first applied to Lord Howard of Effingham at the 
Albany Conference of 1684. and signified a cutlass or scimetar. (AVit- 
York Documents, Vol. V, p. 670.) 



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126 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

to be a Debt which this Governni't ought in Honour & Justice 
to see discharged, the Council took the s** Memorial into con- 
sideracon, and are thereupon of Opinion that tho' it is reason- 
able that Coll. Spotswood should be paid all necessary Dis- 
bursements expended by him for the service of the Govern- 
ment, yet the Services mencon'd in his said Memorial having 
been performed Eight years ago, and no Demand for the 
charges thereof made till now, it is fit to wait for Directions 
from great Britain before any Determinacon thereof here & 
to that purpose that the Governour be pleas'd to represent 
the Case to the Lords Commissioners of his Majesty's Treas- 
ury & Lords Commissioners of Trade & plantacons & to trans- 
mit a copy of Coll. Spots wood's Memorial, and of the account 
exhibited by him to the House of Burgesses, requiring their 
Lordships directions thereon. 



Oct. 28, 1730. 

Whether his Majesty, by order of his Privy Council, bear- 
ing date the 19th day of Xov'r, 1729, was graciously pleas'd 
to declare his pleasure that the remission of Rights formerly 
granted to the [patentees] of Lands in the counties of Bruns- 
wick & Spotsilvania should be extended to all [other tracts of] 
Land not exceeding six thousand acres in the said county of 
Spotsilvania; [and whereas] divers P'sons entitled to his 
Majesty's bounty have purchased the Rig/^ts [to the tracts of] 
lands granted them by Patent, & have n^vv made application 
for repayment of tlie same. It is Ordered that for all Tracts 
of Lands taken up under the Encouragement of Remission of 
Rights for (from) the first day of May, 1721, to the first of 
May, 1728, and for which Rights have been purchased by hi;> 
Majesty's Receiver Gen'l, the like number of Rights be re- 
turned to the said Patentees, so as the quantity of Land for 
which the same are to be return'd not do exceed six thousand 
acres and the officers of his Majesties Revenue are hereby 
empower 'd to deliver out- Rights accordingly to such P'sons 
as are eiititul'd thereto. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. Vzl 

Alexander Ross & Morgan Bryan^ of the province of Pen- 
silvania, having by their petition to this board set forth that 
they & divers other Families of the s* Province, amounting to 
one hundred, are desirous to remove from thence & settle 
themselves in the [this?] Government, & praying that 100,000 
acres of land lying on the West and North side of the River 
Opeckon, and extending thence to a mountain called the North 
Mountain & along the River Cohangaruton & on any part of 
the River Sherundo not already granted to any other P'son, 
may be granted them in as many Tracts or Dividends as shall 
be necessary for the accomodacon of the afs^ Number of fam- 
ilies. The Governour, with the advice of the Council, is 
pleased to order as it is hereby Ordered that the said Alex- 
ander Ross & Morgan Bryan, the Petitioners in behalf at 
— 1 

'Alexander Ross and Morgan Bryan founded upon this grant a 
colony of Friends, which flourished for many years in Frederick 
county, Va. Ross, the leader in that movement, was a native of Ireland, 
and came to America about the beginning of the i8th century, first 
settling in Chester county, Pa., but later his home was in Cecil county, 
Md. In 1732 he sold his possessions there and removed to the present 
county of Frederick, Va., with Josiah Ballenger, James Wright, Evan 
Thomas, and others. They formed Hopewell Monthly Meeting, which 
church is five miles north of Winchester, on the Opequon river. The 
records of Nottingham Monthly Meeting, which church is in the present 
county of Cecil, Md., indicate that the Hopewell congregation was 
formed in 1734. and therefore was probably the first church organiza- 
tion of any denomination in the Valley of Virginia. 

Of Morgan Bryan little is definitely known. He obtained several 
grants of land in the vicinity of Winchester, which bear date November 
i^. 1735- The Council Order upon which these grants issued is recited 
as bearing date April 23, 1735, and indicates that the present Order had 
l>een renewed, probably because Ross and Bryan had not been able to 
settle the requisite number of families upon the land within the required 
time. The Virginia land records at Richmond contain the names of 
many Friends who obtained grants in the neighborhood of Winchester 
at this period. All of these grants bear the same date, November 12, 
1735. The writer is indebted to Mr. Kirk Brown, of Baltimore, Md., for 
valuable information concerning the settlement of Friends in Frederick 
county. (See also his article entitled "Early Settlement of Friends in 
the Valley of Virginia," li'est Virginia Historical Magacine, Vol. Ill, 
PP- 55-59 ) 



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128 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

themselves and their partners have liberty to take up the said 
quantity of 100,000 acres of Land within the Limits above de- 
scribed, and that upon the above number of families coming 
to dwell there within two years Patents shall be granted them 
in such manner as they shall agre to divide the same, and 
in the mean time it is Ordered that the said lands be reserved 
free for [from] the Entring of any other P'son. 



Upon presenting the aforemencond Petition R^ Carter, Esqr , 
agent for the proprietor of the Northern Neck, desired that it 
might be here Entred that he, in behalf of the said Proprietor, 
claimed the said land now peticoned for as within th^ limits 
of the said proprietor's Grant*. 



Nov. 4, 1730. 

Whereas divers p'sons have taken out patents for great 
Tracts of Land in Spotsilvania County, for which they pur- 
chased no Rights, but gave bond for the payment thereof 
when his Majesty's pleasure should be known, and his Ma- 
jesty having now signified his pleasure for omitting the Rights 



^This Order shows that Colonel Robert Carter was vigilant in guard- 
ing the interests of Lord Fairfax, whose lands were being rapidly 
granted by the Crown. 

In this connection the fact is worthy of historical preservation that 
the first organized efforts to colonize the Valley of Virginia were 
largely made by men of English .descent, whose homes were in Tide- 
water Virginia, near Chesapeake Bay. Colonel Carter lived in Lan- 
caster; Mann Page in Gloucester; William Beverly in Essex; John 
Robinson in Essex; and Joseph Smith in King and Queen. This list 
could be extended and made to include nearly every man bearing an 
English name who was granted lands in the Valley of Virginia during 
the period covered by these Council Orders. It is true that the actual 
settlement of the country was made by men who belonged either to the 
German or the Scotch-Irish race, and they were the people who laid 
the foundations of organized society there and suffered the privations 
and perils of frontier life, and to them must be accorded the credit of a 
great accomplishment. In doing so, however, it should not be forgotten 
that the leaders in the movement were Tidewater Virginians whose 
keen foresight led them across the still vacant lands of Piedmont Vir- 
ginia to the richer country beyond the Blue Ridge. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 129 

[due Upon grant not exceeding] 6,000 acres, to each Patentee, 
It is therefore Ordered that the Officers of his Majesty's Reve- 
nue do demand of the several Patentees holding larg [er] 
quantities than six thousand Acres, the money due to his 
Majesty for the Rights of such surplus Land, &, upon refusal 
of such payment, to cause their Bonds to be put in Suit. 



Upon peticon of William Beverley, Joseph Smith & Joseph 
Clapham, Gent. : leave is granted them to take up twenty thou- 
sand acres of Land upon Cohohgaratoon [Potomac river], be- 
ginning at the Mouth of Conecachigh [Conacocheague] River, 
and up both sides thereof along the Bank of Conhongaratoon' 
to include that quantity. 



On the Peticon of Aug. More [Moore] & John Robinson. 
Gent,*® leave is granted them to take up thirty thousand acres 

"Cohongoronta was the Iroquian name for the Potomac river west 
of the Blue Ridge. The word is spelled in various ways by different 
authorities, but the above is given in the official proceedings of the 
Treaty of Lancaster and may be accepted as authoritative. 

The map entitled "The Courses of the River Rappahannock and Pato- 
mac in Virginia, etc., in jy$6 & 1737," to which reference has been made, 
shows two Shawnee villages on this stream, both marked "Deserted." 
One was opposite the mouth of the South Branch of the Potomac; the 
other about fifteen miles further up the main stream, and both were 
on the northern bank. "The Waggon Road to Philadelphia" is also 
shown, apparently crossing the Potomac at Williamsport, Md., and this 
was probably the Yadkin river road to Philadelphia, mentioned in the 
last issue of the magazine. This is the earliest reference to a road in 
the Valley of Virginia, and it is probable that the great tide of German 
and Scotch-Irish immigration, which was then sweeping into Virginia 
from Pennsylvania, crossed the Potomac at the site of present Wil- 
liamsport, Md.. 

'^The wording of this order indicates that the boundary line between 
Maryland and Virginia was not clearly defined at this period. The 
lands embraced in this grant were certainly north of the Potomac, 
because the Antietam and Conacocheague flow into that stream from 
the Maryland side. A subsequent Order shows that a doubt existed 
2 



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130 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of Land upon the River Cohong^ratoon, beginning at the 
mouth of Andirton [Antietam] River, & extending to within 
three Miles of the mouth of Conecakigh River. 



Joseph Smith, Gent., having peticoned for twenty thousand 
acres of Land lying on the North side of the River Opeckon. 
It is Ordered that the s* Peticon be refer'd until tJie return 
of Alexander Ross & Morgan Bryan & their Partners from 
Pensilvania, in order to discover whether the Lands men- 
coned in the s** peticon interfere with the Land granted to 
them. 



June lo, 1 73 1. 

On reading at this Board the peticon of Will" Beverly, of 
the County of Essex, Gent. : Joseph Smith, of the County of 
King & Queen, Gent., Joseph Clapham, Tho* Watkins & Simon 
Jeffries setting forth that they are desirous to take up & seat 



in the minds of the Virginia Council as to the propriety of grantin«r 
lands north of the Potomac. Disputes have arisen from time to time 
between the two States concerning the boundary line as defined by the 
Potomac, but these controversies occurred at a much later tifne and do 
not concern the history of this period. 

John Robinson, Gent, mentioned in this Order, was doubtless Hon. 
John Robinson, a member of the Virpinia Council, President of that 
body for a time after the retirement of Governor Gooch, and as such 
Acting Governor of Virginia. His son, Beverly Robinson, married 
Susanna Phillips, of New York, one of the ladies to whom tradition 
assigns the honor of having refused the hand of General Washington. 
By his wife, Beverly Robinson acquired a great estate in New York, 
and removed to that colony. At the beginning of the Revolution he 
was inclined to the popular cause, but the importunity of friends over- 
ruled his better judgment and he finally cast his fortunes with the 
Crown. He raised The Loyal American Regiment and saw much active 
service. His five sons were also officers in the British service. Two 
of his cousins, Christopher and Robert Robinson, of Virginia, also 
served as officers in his regiment. All of them were gallant and meri- 
torious soldiers, and they constitute the most distinguished family 
group of Loyalists in the Revolution. (Sabine, Loyalists of the Ameri- 
can Revolution, Boston, 1864, Vol. II, pp. 221-229.) 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 131 

a large Tract of Land beyond the Mountains within this Do- 
minion, upon the same Terms & Conditions as Lands have 
been granted to John & Isaac Van Meter, Morgan Bryan & 
others, and praying a grant of twenty thousand acres of Land 
lying Westerly of the blew [Blue] Ridge of Mountains in 
the main fork of Opeckon" & up the Northern Branch in fork 
thereof to its head, & from thence to Conai als, the lost River, 
& up the Southerly side thereof for the Northerly bounds of 
the s^ Tract, & for the Southerly bounds to run up the south- 
em branch of the said fork of Opeckon to the head thereof, 
and from thence to Cedar Creek, which issues out of the North- 
em branch or fork of Sherundo River, thence up the South - 
em side of the said Creek & the most Southerly Branches 
thereof to its head, & from thence westernly to a branch of the 
afs* River Canai. or the lost River. It is Ordered that the 
pet" have leave to take up the afs* quantity of twenty thousand 
acfes of Land within the bounds above described, not being 



^'Tt is difficult to locate with exactness the lands mentioned 
in this Order, because the descriptions are somewhat vague. 
However, it is certain that the grant was partfy in the southwestern 
portion of present Frederick and the northwestern portion of 
present Shenandoah counties. The headquarters of Cedar and Stony 
creeks approach closely in that section, and this fact makes the identifi- 
cation almost certain. The boundary lines also carry this grant across 
the North Mountains to the headwaters of Capon river. "Conai," or 
Lost river, here mentioned, is the upper course of present Capon 
river, which in early times was called Cacapchon, doubtless an Indian 
name. It rises in Hardy county. W. Va.. and flows in a northeasterly 
direction. The present name is derived from the fact that in one por- 
tion of its course it flows under a mountain for a distance of three 
miles. Washington sur\'eyed lands on this stream in 1748-1750. and his 
field notes show a sectional view of Lost river flowing under the 
mountain. (Washington's Journal of My Journey Over the Mountains, 
1747-48, Albany, N. Y., 1894, facing p. 73.) 

In Mr. Mooney's valuable work, which has been frequently quoted 
in these notes, reference is made, on page 22, to the tribes which the 
Iroquois declared at the Treaty of Lancaster (1744) they had conquered 
in the country west of the Blue Ridge, and suggests in an interrogative 
way that one of them, the Cahnowas-Ronow, may have been the Conoy 
Indians. The name Conai, or Canai, as given in these notes, suggests 
that possibly this stream may have perpetuated for a time the name 



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132 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

already granted to any other person. Upon condicon, neverthe- 
less, that the pet" do within two years from the Date of the 
P*sent Order bringing twenty families to inhabit the said 
Tract or otherwise, this P'sent grant to be void, and it is 
further Ordered that as soon as the pet" shall have settled the 
said Land with twenty Families a Patent be granted to them 
for the same upon the like Reservacon of Quit Rents & con- 
dition of seating and planting as other Lands held of his Ma- 
jesty within this Dominion. 



June lo, 1731. 
On the petition of John Fishback. Jacob Holtzclow." Henry 

and place of residence of a tribe once identified with Appalachian Vir- 
ginia. 

In 1763 the Conoy Indians were living with the Iroquois in western 
New York. Sir William Johnson, of New York, in a letter to Arthur 
Lee, Esq.. of Virginia, dated February 28, 1771, gives some interesting 
statistics of the Iroquois and western Indians. He places in one group 
four tribes, among them the Conoys. The aggregate strength of these 
four tribes was then only 200 souls, and he says they were "a people 
removed from the southward and settled on and about the Susque- 
hanna on lands allotted to the Six Nations." (Stone, Life of Sir Wil- 
liam Johnson, Bari., Albany, 1865, Vol. II, p. 487.) 

i2John Fishback and Jacob Holtzclaw were members of the first 
colony which settled at Germanna in 1714. (Genealogy of the Kemper 
Family, Chicago, 1899, pp. 5-53.) The other persons named in this 
Order were probably members of the colony of 1717, who went to the 
Robinson river section in 1724-1725. John Fishback. by his will dated 
March 11. 1733, and probated in Prince William county, Va.. March iq, 
1734, devised to his son. Frederick Fishback. 120 acres of land **on the. 
southeast side of thanadore. on Curter line." This will was written by 
a German, whose knowledge of English seems to have been imperfect, 
and in the quotation given "thanadore" means Shenandoah, and 
"Curter" is intended for Carter. The ownership by John Fishback of 
land on the Shenandoah adjoining the Carter grant, fixes the location 
">f this tract in the vicinity of Front Royal, at which place the North 
and South branches of that stream unite. The recital in the Order that 
the tract was "above the Land of Jacob Sover and his Partners," 13 
clearly an error, and belozv is intended. 1. c'.. down the river from the 
lower grant of 5.000 acres to Jacob Stover, which a previous note shows 
was in the vicinity of present Luray, Va. What steps, if any, were 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 188 

Settler, Jacob Senzaback, Peter Reid, Michael Shower, John 
\'andehouse, George Wolf, Wm. Carpenter & John Richlu in 
behalf of themselves and other German Protestants for leave 
to take up fifty thousand acres of Land on the Westerly side 
of the great Mountains. It is Of-dered that Leave be granted 
the pet" to take up the said Quantity of Land on the East side 
the second fork of the River Sherundo & running up that 
fork & crossing the Neck of the s** fork above the Land of 
Jacob Stover & his Partners upon Condicon that the Peti- 
tioners do within two years from this date bring fifty Fam- 
ilies to inhabit the s^ land. Otherwise, this present Grant to 
be void, and if, upon their performing the s** Condicon, Pat- 
ents be granted them for the S"* Land, under the same Condi- 
cons of Cultivation & planting and paym't of Quit Rents as 
the I^nds held of his Majesty within this Dominion. 



Oct. 21, 1731. 
On the peticon of Rob't McKay & Joost Heyd^**, of the 



taken to colonize this land, are not known to the writer. The next 
succeeding Order seems to indicate that the grant was assigned to 
McKay and Hite, but John Fishback was still owning land on the 
Shenandoah in 1734, as shown above. McKay and Hitc also seem to 
have had designs upon both of Stover's grants previously mentioned, 
but did not obtain them. However, Stover may have been one of the 
*'German Protestants'* mentioned in this Order, whose names are not 
recited. 

*2This Order contains the first mention of Jost Hite, who 
was among the earliest settlers in the Valley of Virginia. Frequent 
mention will be made of him in the course of these notes. Upon the 
authority of Kercheval, who wrote more than a hundred years after 
the date of this Order, the claim has been persistently made that Hite 
was the first white settler in the Valley of Virginia. (Kercheval, p. 41.) 
That such was not the case is clearly demonstrated by the naturaliza- 
tion papers of Adam Miller, who settled on the Shenandoah in 1726 or 
1727. Oyiliiam and Mary College Quarterly, Vol. IX, p. 132.) 

According to Kercheval, Hite came to the Valley in 1732, and settled 
on the Opequon, about five miles south of Winchester. In 1748 he was 
living on Cedar creek, in the vicinity of Strasburg. {Virginia Maga- 
cine. Vol. XI, p. 288.) His entire family, including sons-in-law, came 
with him to Virginia. They were active in developing the country, and 



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134 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Province of Pensilvania, setting forth that they & divers other 
Families to the number of one hundred are desirous to re- 
move from thence & Seat themselves on the back of the great 
Mountains within this Colony, & praying that one hundred 
thousand acres of Land lying between the Line of the Land 
granted to John Vanmeter, Jacob Stover, John Fishback &, 
others may be assigned them, and that the Residue of the s*^ 
hundred thousand acres may be assigned upon & including the 
several Branches of Sherundo River, above the Land of the 
said Stover & Fishback and his Partners. The Governor, 
with the advice of the Council, is pleas'd to order, as it is 
hereby Ordered, that the pet™, in behalf of themselves & their 
Partners, have leave to take up the S** Quantity of 100,000 
acres of Land within the Limits above described, & that upon 
the above Number of Families coming to dwell there within 
two Years, Patents shall be granted them in such manner 
as they shall agree to divide the same. 



November 2, 1731. 

Whereas by his Majesties Instructions to the Governour of 
this Dominion a Mapp of this Colony hath been required to 
be prepared & transmitted to his Majesty for the better com- 
plying with his Majesty's Commands. It is resolved that John 
Robinson, Esqr., be, & he is hereby, appointed to have the 
Direction and Care of preparing a General Map" of this Col- 



brought in many families from Pennsylvania. The lands which he 
acquired in the lower Valley became the subject of long litigation 
between him and Lord Fairfax, which was not ended until after the 
close of the Revolution. Jost Hite was born in Strasburg, Germany, 
and probably called the town of that name in present Shenandoah 
county for his native city. He died in 1760, and has left a numerous 
and highly respectable posterity. (See IVest Virginia Historical Maga- 
zine, Vol III, pp. fjg-iig.) 

^^It is a distinct loss to history that no copy of this map, 
if prepared, is known to be in existence. The maps cited in pre- 
vious notes, showing the Northern Neck grant, seem to l)e all which arc 
in any degree contemporaneous with this period. The Fry and Jeffer- 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 135 

ony from the Sea to the utmost extent thereof now inhabited, 
& that as Soon as conveniently may be he lay before this 
Board a Scheme for the better accomplishing this Work, to- 
gether with a Computacon of the Expence thereof. 



Nov. 4, 1 73 1. 

Whereas John Robinson, Esqr., is appointed to have the 
Care & Direction of Surveying & preparing a Gen* Mapp of 
this Colony, It is Ordered that for his Trouble therein he be 
allowed the Salary of one hundred & fifty pounds Sterl. P. 
Annum, to commence from the 25th of 8**^ [ ?] last, & that the 
same be paid out of his Majesty's Revenue of 2 s. p. hhd. 



Dec. 15, 1731. 

Sundry Peticons for Land were read & granted as follows : 
To Charles Chriswell" 5,000 [acres] on the branches of the 

Robinson & adjoining to the Land taken up by the Germafis 

in Spotsilvania County. 



April 18, 1732. 

On reading at this Board a Lr'e [letter] from Rip Van Dam. 
Esqr., President of his Majesty's Province of New York^*, de- 

son Map of r75i is the best colonial map of Virginia. The reader is 
referred to Phillips* Virginia Cartography, Smithsonian Institution, 
1896, for further information relative to the ancient maps of Virginia, 
most of which are to be found in the Library of Congress. 

i*This was probably Charles Chi swell, a resident of Hanover county, 
Va., in 1727. (Calendar of Virginia State Papers, Vol. I, p. 210.) 

He probably owned the iron works in Spotsylvania county, mentioned 
by Schnell, the Moravian missionary, in his diary of 1743-1744. (Vir- 
ginia Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 379, note.) 

The land here mentioned lay in the present county of Madison, and 
the Order shows that the Germans who built Hebron Church had estab- 
lished themselves on the Robinson river prior to 1731. 

i»Upon the death of Colonel Montgomery, Lieutenant-Governor of 



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136 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

siring the Concurrence of this Governm't on representing to 
his Majesty the Encroachments made by the french from 
Canada in building a Fort at Crown Point, on Corlaer's Lake, 
within the Limits of the s** Province & within three days* 
journey of Albany, the Council did thereupon request the 
Goveniour to write to Mr. Leheup to be assisting to the Agent 
of New York in any Application which shall be thought proper 
to be made to his Majesty for removing the French from their 
said settlem't at Crown Point, & preventing for the future any 
Encroachm*** on his Majesty's Dominion on this Continent. 



Apl. 22, 1732. 

\^'hereas, in pursuance of the Act of Assembly, for erecting 
the County of Brunswick a Court house for the said county, is 
now built & by the increase of Inhabitants the said County 
judged is a Capacity to have . Magistrates of its own, It is or- 
dered that a Commission of the Peace be prepared for the s** 
Cjounty, & that Henry Fox, tjenry Embry, John Wall, John 
Irby, George Walton, R** Burch, Nathaniel Edwards, W*" 
Wynn, Charles King & William Machlin, Gent., be appointed 
Justices for the said County, and the said Rd. Burch is ap- 
pointed Sheriff for the sd. County for the ensuing Year. 



Ordered that a Writ issue for erecting [electing] two Bur- 
gesses for the said County of Brunswick to serve in the next 
Session of Assembly appointed to meet the 15th of next Month. 



New York, who has been previously mentioned in these orders, Rip 
Van Dam, Esq., as President of the Council, became Acting Governor 
of that colony for a brief period. He was a prominent merchant of 
New York City. (Stone, Life of Sir William Johnson, Bart., Vol. II, 
pp. 34-35.) 

"Corlaer's Lake" was Lake Champlain, so-called by the French and 
Iroquois Indians from the name of an individual who was drowned 
in its waters. The Five Nations also applied this name to the Governors 
of New York. (Colden, History of the Five Nations, ed. 1902, Vol. 
I, pp. 17, 29.) This order is significant in showing that at this early 
date a community of interest was recognized as existing between the 
northern colony of New York and the southern colony of Virginia. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 187 

May 5, 1732. 

Divers of the Sapony Indians being returned into this Colony 
from the Cattabaws this day attended the Gov^ & in behalf of 
their nation, desir'd that they may have leave to Settle again 
under the protection of this Governm't intimating also that the 
Saraw Indians*^ are willing to Cohabit with them, and it is 
thereupon resolv'd That Leave be granted the s** Sapony In- 
dians to return into this Colony with such of the Saraws as 
shall think fit to incorporate with them & to seat themselves 
on any Lands they shall chuse, not being already granted to 
any of his Majesty's subjects, either on the River Roanoke or 
Appomattox, & that upon their notifying to the Governor the 
place they shall chuse, a Tract of Land be laid out for them 
equal to that they formerly held at Christiana. [Fort Chris- 
tanna.l 



The following peticons for leave to take up ungranted Lands 
this day read & granted as follows, (viz.) : 

To John Robinson, Esqr., 20,000 acres on Monocassie, on 
the North Side Cohongaratoon River, if the Sd. Lands appear 
to be within the Bounds of this Colony^*. 

i^Mooncy, in his Siouan Tribes of the East, pp. 56-61, gives an inter- 
esting account of the Sara Indians, whose history begins in 1540, when 
their town or village, Xuala, was visited by De Soto. This place is 
given various names by different authors, but it is positively identified 
as Sara, and was probably the principal town of that tribe. In the 
year mentioned above their habitat was near the present boundary 
line between North and South Carolina, southeast of Asheville. These 
Indians were also visited by John Lederer in 1669- 1670. After this 
date they made several removals. At that time they lived on the Dan 
river, in present Rockingham county, N. C. Troubles with neigh- 
boring tribes and with the colonists of North and South Carolina, 
finally compelled them to seek protection under the Virginia govern- 
ment. Mr. Mooney states that in 1726, and even as late as 1751, they 
were still at variance with the Iroquois. In 1768 the remnant of the 
tribe, some fifty or sixty in number, were living with the Catawbas. 

^•This order expresses the doubt mentioned in a previous note, con- 
cerning the right of the Council to grant lands on the north side of the 



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138 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

"To W™ Beverley, Gent., 15,000 acres on the North west Side 
of Sherundo River, including a place called the Massanutting 
Town, provided the same do not interfere with any of the 
Tracts already granted in that part of the Colony. 

To Francis Willis. Gent., John Lewis & Francis Kirkley, 
10,000 acres in Spotsilvania County, at Sherundo, beginning 
on the North River, about a mile below Swift Creek,* running 
up & down each side of the River, to compleat that quantity. 

To Francis Willis, John Lewis, Gent., & Francis Kirkley, 
10,000 acres at Sherundo, in Spotsilvania County, beginning 
at the mouth of Hawk's Bill, on the South River, & running 
up the River & on each side thereof to include that quantity. 



Potomac. The Monococy was in Maryland territory, and clearly the 
land mentioned here could not be granted by the Virginia Council. 

'This is the land upon which the first settlement in the Virginia 
Valley was made. The conditional terms of the order indicate that 
the Council was not entirely certain as to the propriety of its action, 
and the litigation between William Beverly and Jacob Stover, men- 
tioned in a preceding note, followed as a natural consequence. 

■''John Lewis and Francis Willis, named in this and the succeeding 
order, were residents of Gloucester county, Va. The former resided 
at "Warner Hall," and in 1751 was a member of the Council. Francis 
Kirkley was a resident of Spotsylvania county, Va. The name was also 
spelled Kirtley, which is its modern form. 

The location of the first grant cannot be determined definitely at 
this time, but it was probably within the limits of present Shenandoah 
county, Va. The tract mentioned in the next order was in the present 
county of Page, below Luray, and evidently near the lower grant of 
5,000 acres owned by Jacob Stover, and purchased from him by the 
petitioners of 1733, mentioned in a previous note. The rich lands along 
the South Branch of the Shenandoah were being rapidly acquired in 
1732, and the conclusion follows that they were occupied without delay 
by actual settlers. 

(TO BE continued) 



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VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES. 139 

VIRGINIA AND THE CHEROKEES, &c. 



The Treaties of 1768 and 1770. 



From Documents in the British Public Record Office. 



(Concluded.) 
Lord Hillsborough* to Lord Bottetourt. 

Your Lordships despatches Nos. 34, 35, 36 and 37 have been 
received and laid before the King ; and the Journals of the 
Council and House of Burgesses, together with the Acts passed 
in the last Sessionf of Assembly, having been by His Majesty's 
command trasmitted to the Board of Trade, I am persuaded 
their Lordships will not fail to take every step that shall be pro- 
per in consequence thereof, and to lay before His Majesty such 
of the laws as shall appear to require the royal confirmation, 
either from their having clauses suspending their execution, or 
from any other circumstances that shall make such confirmation 
necessary. 

I have long seen and lamented how greatly Assemblies in 
America have been influenced in their proceedings and delibera- 
tions by the private correspondence of persons here in England, 
who seem to have no other view but to promote distress to the 
Mother country, by all possible means, and there is little doubt 
that both the Association for non- importation and the petition 
of the House of Burgesses on the subject of Revenue Laws, and 
the regulation of the Courts of Admiralty, have been encouraged 
by advice of this sort; but I am at a loss to guess by what spe- 
cies of reasoning it is that the House of Burgesses of Virginia 
can, in these cases reconcile an implicit submission to the dic- 
tates of turbulent individuals with their own dignity and with a 
conduct that seems in every other respect to have no other ob- 
ject than the public welfare. 

I am convinced upon the fullest consideration that the ex- 

♦ Willis Hill (1718-1793), Earl of Hillsborough, was Secretary of State 
for the Colonies 1768-1772, and was principal Secretary of State for the 
American department during the Revolution. 

t This was the session which began May 21, 1770. Some of the pro- 
ceedings have been printed in this Magazine, XII, 353-357. 



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140 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

tension of the Boundary line* as proposed in the address of the 
House of Burgesses to you in December last, would never have 
been consented to by the Cherokees, or if their consent could 
have been obtained, that settlement so hr to the Westward 
would not only have been inconsistent with the true principles of 
policy, but would also have been the j^^round of continual jeal- 
ousy and disputes, and therefore it was very pleasing to me to 
find that the House had receded from its claim and closed with 
the proposal contained in my letter to you of the 13th May 1769. 

It would have been very fortunate if this service could have 
been completed for the sum originally estimated, and that your 
Lordship had not been under the necessity of adopting so unu- 
sual a measure as that of drawing upon His Majesty's quit-Rents 
for the sum of ;^400, which Mr. Stuart thought fit to add to his 
estimate. The King, however, acquiesces in the motives which 
have induced your Lordship to take the step, fully confiding 
that proper care will be taken that it shall not be drawn into pre- 
cedent. 

I am very happy that the answer I gave to Gen*l Mackay 
on the subject of his recommendation of Mr. Wormleyt is ap- 
proved by your Lordship. I agree with you in opinion that 
his distant residence from the Seat of Government is a good 
ground of objection to his being of the Council, and I shall not 
fail to communicate to the Board of Trade what your Lordship 
proposes in regard to Mr. Diggs ;I but I do not apprehend that 
an appointment of that gentleman can take place until a vacan- 
cy happens, when I have no doubt that your recommendation 
will have its due weight. 

I am, &c. Hillsborough. 

[Endorsed.] 
**Draft to Lord Bottetourt, 
** Whitehall, Oct. 3rd, 1770. [''No. 37.*'] 

* This was the extension of the Virginia line to the Cherokee, or Ten- 
nessee Kiver, advocated by the House of Burgesses. 

t This was doubtless Ralph Wormdcy, Sr., of ** Rosegill," Middlesex 
County. He was never in the Council, though his son Ralph Worme- 
ley, jr., was appointed a member of that body in 1771. 

t Probably Dudley Digges, of York County. He was never a member 
of the Colonial Council, but was elected to the first State Council in 
1776. 



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THE TREATY OF LANCASTER, I744. 141 

I hereby certify that this is a true copy of the document 
deposited in Her Majesty's State Paper Office, London. 

RoBT. Lemon, Chief Clerk. 
L. S. State Paper Office, 20, July, 1841. 



THE TREATY OF LANCASTER, 1744. 



(From Copy in Collections of the Virginia Historical Society.) 



[Though the text of this treaty is well known, it is thought 
best not to omit it here. See note on the treaty, Va, Mag, of Hist, 
& Biography, XIII, 5-6. In Page's Page Family (1893), is print- 
ed (201-204) a copy, withybr similes of the marks of the chiefs, 
derived from a copy on parchment formerly in the possession of 
Dr. Thomas Walker. See Penn, Mag. of Hist. & Biog., Vols. 
I and II, for the journal of William Black, Secretary of the Vir- 
ginia Commission. This journal was edited and annotated by 
Mr. R. A. Brock, Corresponding Secretary of Virginia Histori- 
cal Society.] 

To all people to whom these presents shall come Conasa- 
tugo, Tachanoontia, Joneehat, Caxhayion, Torachdadon, Nee- 
rohanyah, and Roiirrawarkto, Sachims or Chiefs of ye nation of 
the Onondagoes, Saquihsonyunt, Gashraddodon,Hurasaly-akon, 
Rowamhohiso, Ocoghquah, Seayenties, Sachims or Chiefs of 
ye nation of ye Cahugas, Sw^d^my alias Shirketiney, Onishu- 
dagua, Onothkallydaroy, alias Watsatuha, Tohashwaroiororow, 
Arnighosh-harvand Tiorkaasoy, Sachims or Chiefs of the nation 
of the Tuscaroras, Tansauegos, and Tanikiuntus Sachims or 
Chiefs of ye nation of the Senekers send greeting — Whereas the 
Six united Nations of Indians laying Claim io some Lands in the 
Colony of Virginia signified their willingness to enter into a 
treaty concerning the Same— Whereupon Thomas Lee, Esq., a 
Member in Ordinary of his Majesty's honourable Council of State 
and one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of Judicature in 
that Colony and William Beverly, Esq., Colonel and County 
Lieutenant of the County of Orange and one of the representa- 
tives of the people in the House of Burgesses of that Colony 
were deputed by the Governor of the said Colony as Commis- 



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H2 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

sioners lo treat with the said Six Nations or their Deputies 
Sachims or Chiefs, as well of and concerning their said Claim^ 
as to renew their Covenant Chain between the said Colony and 
the said Six Nations, and the said Commissioners having met at 
Lancaster in Lancaster County and province of Pennsylvania 
and as a foundation for a stricter Amity and peace at this junc- 
ture, agreed with the said Sachims or Chiefs of the said six Na- 
tions for a Disclaimer and Renunciation of all their Claim or 
pretence of Right whatsoever of the said six nations and an ac- 
knowledgement of the Right of our Sovereign the King of 
Great Britain to all the Land in the said Colony of Virginia. 
Now know ye that for and in consideration of the Sum of four 
hundred pounds Current money of Pennsylvania, paid and de- 
livered to the above named Sachims or Chiefs partly in Goods 
& partly in Gold Money by the said Commissioners, they the 
said Sachims or Chiefs on behalf of the said Six Nations Do here- 
by renounce and disclaim not only all the Right of the said Six 
Nations but also recognize and acknowledge the Right and Ti- 
tle of our Sovereign the King of Great Britain to all the Land 
within the said Colony as it is now or hereafter may be peopled 
and bounded by his said Majesty our Sovereign Lord the King 
his Heirs and Successors. In witness whereof the said Sachims 
or Chiefs for themselves and on behalf of the people of the Six 
Nations aforesaid have hereunto set their hands & Seals this 
Second day of July in the i8th year of the reign of our Sover- 
eign Lord George the Second King of Great Britain and in the 
year of our Lord 1744. 

Signed by all the above named Chiefs. 

Signed Sealed and Delivered 
in the presence of Edm'd Jennings. 

At a General Court held at the Capitol Oct. 25th, 1744, 
This Deed Poll was proved by ye Oaths of Edm'd Jennings, 
Esq., Philip Ludwell Lee, Esq. and William Black, three wit- 
nesses thereto and by the Court ordered to be recorded. 
Test. 

(Signed) Ben Waller, CI. Ct. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, I752. 143 

THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN,* 1752. 



Commission, Instructions, &c., Journal of Virginia 
Commissioners, and Text of Treaty. 



(From Contemporary Copies in the Collection of the Virginia Historical 

Society. ) 



[Endorsed.] Instructions from the Hon. Robt. Dinwiddie 
to Colo. Fry,^ Mr. Lomax,^ and Colo. Patton/ dated April, 
1752, T. M. C. 

Commission from Governor Dinwiddie. 

Robert Dinwiddie. Esqr., his Majesty's Lieutenant Gover- 
nor, Vice Admiral and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony, 
and Dominion of Virginia. 



^The object of the treaty of LogKStown, on the Ohio, was to obtain 
from the Six Nations a confirmation of the treaty of Lancaster, made 
in 1744; to facilitate the operation of the Ohio Company by securing 
the good will of the Indians occupying or claiming the lands granted 
to the Company, and to obtain the assistance of the tribes in the con- 
test with France, which was seen to be near at hand. 

To pave the way for the treaty, the celebrated pioneer, Christopher 
Gist, agent for the Ohio Company, between October, 1750, and June, 
1751. made a long trip down the Ohio, to Muskingum. Pequa, on the 
Wabash, the Shawnee town near the mouth of the Scioto, and then 
through Kentucky and across the Kanawha to his home on the Yad- 
kin, During this trip he. together with George Croghan, and Andrew 
Montour, secured the promise of the Shawnees, Miamis, etc., to meet 
the Virginia Commissioners for a treaty at Loggstown. (See a sum- 
mary of Gist's journey, derived from his journal, in The Northwest 
Under Three Flails, by Charles Moore, pp. 75-80.) 

The commissioners on the part of Virginia were Colonel Joshua 
Fry, of Albemarle county; Lunsford Lomax, of Caroline, and Colonel 
James Patton, of Augusta. For various letters, instructions, &c., in 
regard to this treaty, see Dittividdic Papers, Va. Historical Society Col- 
lections. Mr. Brock, the editor of the Dinwiddie Papers, states, in 
a note, that Colonel Patton kept a journal of the proceedings of the 
commissioners, which has been lost. Perhaps the journal printed here 
is the one kept by Patton. 



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144 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

To all whom these present Letters shall come or in any 
Manner relate, sends greeting: 

Whereas, his Majesty has been graciously pleased to make 
a Present of extraordinary Value to the northern Indians in 

The treaty of Loggstown is reported in the Minutes of the Provincial 
Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. V, pp. 532-539- George Croghan and 
Andrew Montour represented Pennsylvania, and the former reported 
to Governor Hamilton by letter, dated June lo. 1752. 

Ther^ have been various opinions as to the position of Loggstown, 
but Mr. Thwaites (the highest authority) says that *it was just below 
the present Economy, Pa., on the north side of the Ohio, eighteen miles 
below Pittsburg. (Border Warfare j 413.) 

In Lewis Evans's map, 1755, Loggstown is shown to be on the north 
sire of the Ohio. (The Northwest Under Three Flags, p. 80.) 

A valuable contribution to the history of Indian land titles and 
cessions is contained in The Indian Boundary Line, by Prof. Max 
Farrand, Am. Hist. Reviezv, for July 1905. The map accompanying 
this paper is especially useful. See also Indian Land Cessions, by 
Thomas & Royce. i8th Report, Bureau of American Ethnolojry. 

2Joshua Fry was. according to an old tradition in the family in Vir- 
ginia, born in Somersetshire, Eng., and educated at Oxford. This is 
firmed by Foster's Alumni Oxonienses, which states that Joshua Fry 
son of Joseph, of Crewkerne, Somersetshire, pleb., matriculated at 
Wadham College, March 31. 1718, at the age of 18. From the style 
given the father, it is evident that he was of that yeoman rank from 
which such great numbers of Americans descend. Soon after leaving 
Oxford, he seems to have emigrated to Essex county, Virginia. In 
1728- '9, he was master of the grammar school of William and Mary 
College, Williamsburg, and was later Professor of Mathematics in the 
college. In 1738. together with Robert Brooke and William Mayo, two 
prominent surveyors, he offered to the legislature proposals for pre- . 
paring a map of Virginia. Later he carried out his design, working 
in partnership with Peter Jefferson, father of the President. Fry and 
Jefferson's Map of Virginia is well known. In i745-'46-'47-'48-*49-'52-*53 
and February. 1754. he represented Albemarle county in the House 
of Burgesses. On March 28. 1745, he was appointed coimty lieutenant 
of Albemarle; in 1749, was one of the commissioners on the part of 
the Crown for marking the boundaries of the Northern Neck; in 1749, 
one of Virginia commissioners for running the line between 
that colony and North Carolina; was a commissioner at Loggstown, 
and was commissioned colonel, commanding the Virginia regiment sent 
against the French in 1754. He died in service on May 31, and was 
buried near Wills's creek, now Cumberland creek. See Memoir of 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, 1752. 145 

Amity with us, and it has been agreed between this Govern- 
ment and those Indians to have the said Present delivered at 
Logg's Town in May next, and then and there to enter into a 
Treaty for polishing and strengthning the Chain of Friend- 
ship subsisting between us, and Whereas, for the Conducting 

Colonel Joshua Fry, &c., by Rev. P. Slaughter, D. D., and note in 
Dinwiddie Papers, I, 7-8. 

•Lunsford Lomax, of *' Portobago,*' Caroline county, represented that 
county in the House of Burgesses in i742-*44-'45-'46-*47-*48-'49-'S2-'S3; 
Feby., '54 ; Aug. '54 ; Oct., '54 ; May, '55, and Oct., '55. He was a grandson 
of Rev. John Lomax, M. A., Emmanuel College, Cambridge, a Puritan, 
who was rector of Wooler, Northumberland, and was ejected under 
the Act of 1662 for non-conformity. A family Bible, containing a 
rcord, very unusual for the length of time covered and for the com- 
pleteness of the entries, is in the possession of the Virginia family. 
The record begins with Rev. John Lomax, and is continued in the 
line of his son, John, who came to Virginia about 1700. This son, 
John, was born June 7, 1667, and married, June i, 1703, Elizabeth, only 
child (by this marriage), of Hon. Ralph Wormeley, and his wife, 
Catherine Lunsford, only daughter of Sir Thomas Lunsford, the cele- 
brated Cavalier officer, who had emigrated to Virginia. This marriage 
of the son of an ejected Puritan minister with the granddaughter of 
one who was represented (with much exaggeration) by the Parlia- 
mentary writers as the extreme type of the lawless and dissolute cava- 
lier, is an interesting example of how different strains of blood and 
schools of politics united in America. 

Lunsford Lomax, of the text, was born Nov. 5. 1705, and died June 
10, 1772. He married twice: First, in 1729, Mary Edwards, and, second, 
in 1742. Judith Micou. 

^Colonel James Patton, a native of Newton Limaddy, Ireland, was 
!)om in 1692, and is stated to have been in early life an officer in the 
Royal Navy. Later, for many years, he was master of a merchant 
vessel, and made many voyages to Virginia, bringing in immigrants. 
He was largely interested in investments in Virginia lands, in part- 
nership with William Beverley. In the IVf* and Mary Quarterly, III. 
226-227, are two letters, dated 1737, from Be-erley to Patton, at Kircu- 
hright, Scotland. Colonel Patton finally retl'-ed from the sea and set- 
tled in Augusta, where, on May 27, 1742, he was commissioned Colonel 
of militia; was County Lieutenant and representative in the House of 
Burgesses in Aug., 1754; Oct., '54, and Mav, 1755. In July, 1755. Colo- 
nel Patton was killed by Indians at Draper s Meadows, near the present 
Blacksburg. See Waddell's Annals of Augusta County, Virginia, and 
Dinwiddie Papers, I, 18. 
s 



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146 * VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZIN^. 

SO good a Work it has been judged necessary to make Choice 
of some Persons of Distinction, Prudence, and Capacity: 

Know Ye that I reposing special Trust and Confidence in 
the Experience, Integrity, and Abilities of Joshua Fry, Esqr., 
Colonel and County Lieutenant of the County of Albemarle, 
and one of the Representatives of the People in the House of 
Burgesses of this Colony and Dominion of Virginia; and of 
Lunsford Lomax, Esqr., another of the Representatives of the 
said People ; and of James Patton, Esqr., Colonel and County 
Lieutenant of the County of Augusta, have by Virtue of the 
Powers and Authorities with which I am invested by his 
Majesty, and by and with the Advice and Consent of his 
Majesty's Council of State, nominated, made, constituted and 
deputed and by these Presents signed with my Hand, do nomi- 
nate, make, constitute and depute the said Joshua Fry, Luns- 
ford Lomax, and James Patton, Commissioners in Behalf of 
this his Majesty's Colony and Dominion to meet the said 
Indians or such Sachims or other Persons as shall be deputed 
by them for that Purpose and with them to treat concerning 
the premises giving and granting to them the said Joshua Fry, 
Lunsford Lomax, and James Patton, full Power and Authority 
to repair from thence to Logg's Town or to any other Place 
where the said Meeting or Treaty with the said Indians shall 
be appointed and there in Behalf of his Majesty and this 
Colony and Dominion to deliver to the said Indians, or such 
Sachims, or other Persons whom the said Indians shall for 
that Purpose send and depute, his Majesty's Present, and with 
them to treat and confirm a solid and lasting good Understand- 
ing between us. Also giving and granting to the said Com- 
missioners Power and Authority to treat, agree, promise 
stipulate and do, what they shall judge best and necessary for 
and concerning the premises in as full and ample Form and 
Manner and with like Force and Effect as I could or might 
do if I was personally present, hereby promising in his Ma- 
jesty's Name to have and to hold as ratified and accepted 
v/hatsoever shall be transacted and concluded by Virtue of 
these Presents ; for the greater Strength and Credit of which 
T have hereunto set my Hand and caused the great Seal of this 
Colonv and Dominion to be affixed. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGONS TOWN, I752. 147 

Given at Williamsburg in Virginia, this Day of April, in the 
26**» Year of his Majesty's Reign, Annoq Domini, 1752. 

Instructions to the Commissioners. 

Instructions for Joshua Fry, Lunsford Lomax, and James 
Patton, Esqrs., appointed Commissioners to treat between this 
Colony and Dominion of Virginia on the one Part, and the 
six united Nations of Indians on the other Part, given at the 

Council Chamber in the City of Williamsburg this Day 

of April, in the 25th Year of his Majesty's Reign, Annoque 
Domini 1752. 

Article ye ist. Whereas this Government is under an En- 
gagement made by the President to the Sachims or great Men 
of the six Nations of Indians to have the Present ordered by 
his Majesty to be delivered to the said Indians at Loggs Town 
about the Time of the full Moon in May next, and as you are 
judged to be proper Persons to attend at the Delivery of the 
Cioods, and to convey to the Indians such Matters as are 
necessary upon this Occasion, You are therefore to hold your- 
selves in Readiness to begin your Tourney, so as to reach the 
Place of Meeting in good Time. And as a Contract is already 
made with Col° Cresup'^ for the Carriage of the Goods, it must 
be your Care that they are well secured from any Damage that 
may happen by Rain or otherwise on the Road, and that they 
are got up in Time for the Meeting, as a Disappointment of 
this last Sort might be of bad Consequence. 

2d. After acquainting them with the Present you have 
brought from their and our Father, the great King, on the 
other Side the great Watern, which you are to use all con- 
venient Opportunities to enlarge upon (as it is certainly of 
more \'alue than any Present they have hitherto received 
from us) your next business will be (as some Doubts have 
arisen about the Treaty of Lancaster, and Surmises have been 

*The well-known Colonel Thomas Crcsap. of Maryland. See Din- 
'iciddir Faf>irs. J, 10. Crcsap had been in the employment of the Ohio 
Company, and was well acquainted with the Indians and the routes 
to the Ohio. 



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. 148 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

spread as if the six Nations thought themselves imposed upon 
by it) to have that Treaty explained, and his Majesty's Title 
to all the Lands expressed and intended to be acknowledged 
by the said Treaty to be fully confirmed. And in Order to' 
render this Part of your Business the more easy, I have taken 
Care to procure Conrad Weiser to be present, who acted as 
an Interpreter at Lancaster, and was a Witness to the Instru- 
ment, and I hope that by his Assistance you will be able to 
convince them that there was no Deceit used nor any Advan- 
tage taken of them, and that to deceive or overreach is far 
below the Dignity and Justice of our great King, nor wou'd 
he suffer such Things to be done by those in Authority under 
him. 

3d. You are in your Conferences with the Indians to give 
them to understand that this Present is made to them, not only 
in Consequence of a Promise made to them in Writing by the 
Commissioners of this Colony, after signing the Treaty of 
Lancaster, to move the Governor and Council of Virginia to 
represent their Case to his Majesty to the End that he might 
extend his further Grace and Favour to the said Indians ; but 
also to secure a quiet and peaceable Possession to his Majesty's 
Subjects of this Colony of all the Lands recognized by the 
said Treaty, particularly those on the Ohio. And as there i-* 
good Reason to conclude that the principal Occasion of the 
Indians' Dislike to that Settlement has been the Article in 
the Grant whi.ch obliges the Company" to build a Fort, which 
• has been exaggerated much by our Enemies, and by our Rivals 
in Trade ; in Order to obviate this Difficulty, you are to repre- 
sent to them, as the Truth is, that at the Time of the Com- 
pany's Application to his Majesty for that Grant, the English 
were engaged in a bloody War with the French that they 
judged such a Place of Defence for their Goods and People 
necessary to secure them from the Attacks of our common 
Enemy in a Place so remote from our other Settlements, but 

«The Ohio Company, to which the English government, by order of 
Council, dated March 16, 1749, granted 500,000 acres west of the Alle- 
ghanies. See Va. Mag. of Hist, and Biog., XII, 162-163. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG*S TOWN, 1 752. 149 

that the Reasons for erecting that Fort having sometime 
ceased, by the Peace concluded with the French, the Company 
is now soliciting to be excused from that Article of building 
the Fort, as they can now rest themselves and their Effects 
upon the Friendship and Aftection of their good Brothers, the 
six Nations, and as they proix)se to make their Trade so Ad- 
vantageous to their Brethren as shall increase that Friendship 
and Affection. When you are engaged on this Subject, the 
Opportunity will be favourable to inquire into the matter of 
several Forts, I am informed, are lately built by the ffrencTT 
to the Southward of Lake Erie. You arc to dive into the 
Cause why they, our friends & brothers, should permit them 
to erect Forts so near them, and yet when we only talk of such 
a thing they are ready to quarrel with us about it; this is 
treating us with jealousy & suspicion, as if we intended to 
do an injury to them from our Forts, and placing a great 
confidence in the fair promises of ye French, time will convince 
them, if argument cannot, of their mistake in this part of 
their Conduct. 

4th. It is not improbable that you may meet with some diffi- 
culties from the bad impressions the Indians may have rec' 
from the Pennsylvania Traders, of this Settlement on the Ohio. 
You must endeavour to wipe off such by the foregoing argu- 
ment and by such others as your own discretion, the occasion 
& the present disposition of the Indians may furnish you with, 
assuring them that the chief point in view is to carry on a 
Trade to the mutual benefit of them & the inhabitants of this 
Colony, and to make such a settlement, as may preserve them, 
our brethren and ourselves from any Injuries from the Frencli 
in case of a future War. 

Sth. The advantages of cultivating a friendship with the 
Six Nations of Indians, and to render it lasting, is of the ut- 
most consequence to our back Settlements : and one means lo 
effect this, will be to procure a person well known to, and 
esteemed by them, acquamted with their Customs and man- 
ners, as well as skilled in their Language, to be kept in the 
constant Service of this Government. If, therefore, you can 
find such a person of good Character, & who is not too closely 



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150 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

attached to the Interest of our Rivals in the Indian Trades, he 
may depend on our Countenance and encouragement; for the 
present I have engaged Mr. Andrew Muntour^ to assist Mr. 
Weiser* as Interpreter. 

6th. It will be of Service to his Majesty and therefore 
proper for you to be informed, how far the french Settlements 
extend either to the North or South, at what period of time 
such Settlements have been made of what Numbers and 
Strength they may be. And you are to endeavour to make 
yourselves acquainted with the Arts made use of by the French 
to alienate the affections of the Indians from the English. 

You are to exhort them not to be drawn away by deceitful 
empty Speeches, the peculiar Talent of that cunning people. 
But in every attempt that shall be made to shake their Duty 
to our common Father, let them consider what real Acts of 
Friendship have been done them by the English, and what by 
the French. Let them weigh these things well in their minds, 
& then determine who best deserves their Esteem and regard, 
for it is not by vain 'unmean* Words that true friendship is to 
be discovered, but by its Effects. 

7th. You are in the strongest terms to insist upon their 
delivering up the murderer of the poor Woman, as they said 
last fall that they knew who he was, and would do their ut- 
most to have him at this meeting. It is a piece of Justice due 
to this Country, which we are bound by every Tye of Duty to 
require. Our Duty to our great King for the Loss of a Subject 
requires it, but, above all, the great Father and Maker of us 
all, who inhabits ye Skies, he requires it, for it is one of his 
earliest Commands that, "whoso shedeth man's blood, by man 
Shall his blood be shed." You are to acquaint them, that I 

^Andrew Montour, of Pennsylvania, a half-breed, son of an Oneida 
chief, who had been long familiar with the Indians, and was well known 
as an interpreter. He was one of the representatives of Pennsylvania 
at the treaty. See Dinividdic Papers, I, 17. 

^Conrad Weiser, of Pennsylvania, a native of Germany, long a promi- 
nent man in the western part of his colony, and well-known as an in- 
terpreter. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, I752. 151 

expect they will convey this Criminal into the settled part of 
this Government, and deliver him into the hands of some 
magistrate, whom you are to name to them, and give that 
Magistrate previous notice, that by his Warrant he is to co- 
mand the Sheriff of the O^ to bring him under a proper Guard 
to the public Goal. 

8th. This & many other cruelties and robberies comitted 
by stragling parties of the Six Nations on our people, have 
proceeded from their neglect of former Treaties, by which they 
are obliged to obtain a pass from a Magistrate to be appointed, 
which pass is to be signed by our Justices as they go thro* our 
Country ; and they are to behave orderly & peaceably and as 
Brethren ; and when in want of provisions, they are to apply 
to a Justice of peace, who is to supply them with necessaries 
for their Journey. Instead of this, their behaviour has been 
quite the reverse. They have come without passes, so that, 
not knowing their names, we are often unable to fix their 
Crimes on the proper persons. They have entered our peo- 
ple's houses by force, have not only taken what provisions they 
pleased, but, when opposed in their fury, they have proceeded 
to steal, to kill our Cattle & horses, and even our Inhabitants 
themselves. What can such irregularities as these tend to, but 
the total destruction of the Chain of friendship which has been 
for many ages preserved between us. and which is so much for 
the interest of both to keep bright & unsullied. I am sensible 
that the wise men among them would disdain to be guilty of 
such base behaviour, 'tis their hot-headed young men, but 
hope and expect from their Sachims. that they will take such 
Measures for the future as shall prevent these just Causes of 
complaint against any of our Brethren. If they will not, I 
shall be obliged to do something for the safety of our own 
people, and put a Stop to them by the power we have in our 
own hands, and punishing such offenders ourselves. 

9th. As the Instructions of the Indians in the principles of 
the christian Religion hath been the Subject of the prayers. & 
utmost endeavours of many pious men ; and as the charitable 
Institution of the School at Brafferton^ hath not produced the 

•The BraflFerton was the Indian school of William and Mary College, 



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152 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Effect that was hoped for from it, by reason of the difficutty 
of prevailing on the Indians to send their Children so far from 
their parents, for the sake of a religious Education, the happy 
Consequences of which their natural ferocity will hardly per- 
mit them to be made sensible of. I would have you talk fully 
to them on this head, and if you find their prejudice against 
trusting their Children, so far from them too strong to be 
overcome, you must sound their inclinations another way, and 
learn if they would receive and entertain a teacher among 
them, if this Government would send one, to instruct them in 
our Language & Religion, the Benefits and advantages of 
which. they are as capable of partaking of as we, if they desire 
them with a straight & willing mind. 

TwiGHTWEE Indians to Governor Dinwiddie. 
From the Twightwee^® Town, June ye 21 st, 1752. 
Our good Brother of Virginia : 

This comes by our Brother, Thomas Burney, who was witli 

founded and sustained by a legacy of the Hon. Robert Boyle. The 
sum bequeathed was invested in the purchase of an estate in Yorkshire 
named Brafferton. Hence the name of the school and of the old brick 
building still standing on the college grounds. 

i<>The Twightwecs or Miami s were a numerous people, made up 
of many tribes, each having a chief, and one of these chiefs was 
selected to rule the entire nation. Formerly they had lived on the* 
Wabash^ but latterly they had removed to the Miami, and lived at 
the Twightwi town or Piqua. The town is shown on Evans's map. 
At this time the Twightwis were on friendly terms with the Six 
Nations, whose powerful rivals they ordinarily were. 

On June 21, 1752, the Twightwi fort at Piqua was attacked, under 
orders from the French authorities in Canada, by 150 Ottawas and 
Objibways, who are said by some authorities to have been com- 
.manded by Charles Langlade, afterwards a famous French partisan 
officer. Eight English traders and a few Indians were in the town, 
which was speedily taken, with the loss of 14 Miamis. Old Britain, 
the Miami chief was boiled and eaten, the trading house was plun- 
dered and five traders captured and carried to Canada. Evans's 
map has opposite the site of the town : "The Eng. Twichtwi T., taken 
in 1752 by the French.'' (N. W. Under Three Flags, pp. 82, 83 and 
authorities cited.) 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG*S TOWN, 1 752. 153 

US in the last unhappy Battle we had with our Enemies, the 
French and French Indians, who engaged our Fort at a Time 
when all our Warriors and briskest Men were out a hunting. 
They had two hundred and forty fighting Men, appeared sud- 
denly and took us on Surprize, when they had sent us Warn- ' 
pum. and a fine French Coat in Token of Peace and good Will, 
just to deceive and draw our People out a Hunting, and 
then fall on us, as a more weak and defenseless Part, being 
only twenty Men able to bear Arms, and nine of them were our 
Brothers, the English, who helped us much; but their Stores 
and Houses being on the outside of our Fort, our Enemies 
plimdered them, and took six of our Brothers, the English's 
Goods, and to our great Loss, their Powder and Lead, and 
kiird one of them English, & scalped him. They kill'd our 
great Pianckosha King, whom we call'd old Brittain, for his 
great Love to his Brothers, the English. Brother, we send 
you by our Brother Bumey one Scalp and a Belt of Wampum, 
to let you know we are more concerned for the Loss of our 
King, and our Brothers that were taken & kill'd than for our- 
selves, altho' in great Distress for Want of Arms and Ammu- 
nition, for we must look on ourselves as lost, if our Brothers, 
the English, do not stand by us, and give us Powder and Lead 
and Arms. To confirm what we say and to assure you that 
we will ever continue true Friends and Allies to our Brothers, 
the English, we send you this Scalp and Belt of Wampum. 

P. S. — There were but two French men appeared among the 
Indians in Time of Battle, altho' we understood there were 
thirty French men within two Miles of us, all the Time of 
Action, who were ready to receive their Share of the Plunder. 

A letter from Governor Dinwiddie to Cresap and Trent, Febru- 
ary 10, 1753, expresses his regret that some of the Twightwees had 
gone over to the French, and his behcf that if Bumey (Thos. Burney, 
who had lived among the Twightwees as a blacksmith) had gone 
directly to them with a supply of ammunition, as the Governor had 
expected, the defection would not have occurred. In a note to this 
letter, there is quoted a note on a map ( in Kalm's Travels in America) 
in relation to a village on the Great Miami: "The English Twich- 
twi, or Pique, taken, 1752." 



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154 virginia historical magazine. 

Virginia Commissioners to Governor Dinwiddie. 

To the Hon'ble Robert Dinwiddie, Esqr., his Majesty's Lieut. 
Govenor and Commander in Chief of Virginia : 
In Obedience to your Honour's Commission, we proceeded 
to Loggstown with his Majesty's Present to the Indians of 
the six Nations & their Allies, and held a Treaty with Them. 
An Account of our Transactions in that Affair is containM 
in the following Sheets, which we humbly begg Leave to lay 
before y' Honour, and are your Honour's most dutiful and 
most humble Servants. 

Joshua Fry, 
lunsford lomax, 
James Patton. 

Journal of the Virginia Commissioners. 

An Account of the Treatv held between the Government of 
Virginia & the six united Nations of Indians on the River 
Ohio, in the Year of our Lord 1752. 

The Commissioners being on their Way with the King's 
Present were met on Thursday, the 28th of May, about three 
Miles from Shonassims Town, on Ohio, by seven or eight of 
the Delawar Indians on Horse-back; when they came near, all. 
as well English as Indians, dismounted, and the Indians havino: 
filled and lighted their long Pipes or Calumets, first smoak'd 
and then handed them to the Commissioners and others in 
their Company, who all smoak'd. After the Ceremony had 
been repeated two or three Times, the Chief of the Indians 
made a short Speech to welcome the Commissioners, which, 
being answered, they all mounted and the Indians led the Way. 

About two hundred Paces from the Town, the Commis- 
sioners with their Company halted, the Indians going on to 
join their own People,* and then they began the Salute by 
fireing their Peices, which was returned by the English and 
this was repeated two or three Times. 

The Commissioners then proceeded to the River Bank, a 
little above the Town, where they pitched their Camp, and 
set up the King's Coulours, which had been carried before 
them. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG*S TOWN, 1 752. 155 

At this Time the Delawars had no King, but were headed 
by two Brothers named Shingas and the Beaver" who were 
dressed after the English Fashion, had silver Breast Plates and 
a great deal of Wampum about them. 

At a Council held at Shenapin Town, 
Fryday, the 29th of May. 

Present : 

Joshua Fry, Lunsford Lomax, James Patton. Commissioners. 

Mr. Christopher Gist. Agent for the Ohio Company. 

The Chiefs of the Delawar Indians. 

Mr. Andrew Montour. Interpreter. 

The Speaker of the Indians, addressing himself to the Com 
missioners, said: 

Brethren, you have come a long Journey and have sweated 
a great Deal. We wipe off your Sweat with tliis String of 
Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Brethren, you are come a long Way, & we are glad to see 
you : we hope you will open y'' Hearts to us, & speak clearly. 
and that you may be enabled to do it, we clear your Voices 
with this String of Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Brethren, you are come from far, and have heard many 
Stories & false Reports about us, your Brethren. We hope 
that you will not keep them in your Mind, and that you will 
disregard them, we give you this String of Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Brethren, we desire you will consider our Brethren that live 



i^Shingas was a famous village chief, a terror to the frontier set- 
tlements of Pennsylvania. A brother, and later the successor of King 
Beaver, his camp was at the mouth of Beaver creek, which empties 
into the Ohio twenty-six miles below "the forks" (site of Pittsburg). 
Withcrs's Chronicles of Border Warfare, Thwaites* note, p. 45. As will 
be seen, however, from one of the speeches of the Half King. Shingas 
is stated to have lived at the "fork of the Mohongalio" (Pittsburg). 



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156 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

towards the Sun sitting, & that you will give them your best 
Advice, upon which we give you this String of Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Then Mr. Christopher Gist^- and Mr. Andrew Montour de- 
livered to the Commissioners a String of Wampum from the 
Council at Loggs Town to let them know that they were glad 
to hear of their being on the Road, and to assure them that 
they might come in Safety to Loggs Town. 

The Commissioners not having any Wampum strung, with- 
out which Answers cou'd not be returned, acquainted the In- 
dians that they wou'd answer their Speeches in the Afternoon, 
on which the Council broke up. 

May the 29th, in the Afternoon. 

The same Persons being met, the Commissioners spoke as 
f olloweth : 

Brethren, the Chiefs of the Delawars: 

We have had a long & difficult Journey hither to see our 
Brethren, but that has been sufficiently made Amends for by 
the kind Reception you have given us ; we assure you we are 
glad to meet you here in Council, and present you with this 
String of Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Brethren, in your second Speech, you clear'd our Voices, 
that we might speak our Minds to you, in Answer to which 
we inform you, that the great King, our Father, has sent by 
us a Present of Goods to his Children, the Indians, the largest 
he has ever given them, which we are to deliver at Loggs 
Town, whither we are going. 

It is the Desire of our Father, that you & we, his Children, 
shou'd be strongly united together as one People, and that it 
is our Inclination so to be Join'd, we confirm to you by this 
String of Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Brethren, in Answer to your third Speech, we let you know 

i^Christopher Gist, agent for the Ohio Company, who had done much 
exploring and surveying along the Ohio. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG's TOWN, 1 752. 157 

that we did hear many Stories in our Way hither, rais'd by 
idle and wicked People to occasion a Difference between us, 
but we did not believe them, and now we are satisfied that they 
were false. 

If any others shou'd be spread we shall wholly disregard 
them, and we hope that you will do the like, and that our 
good Agreement may always continue, we give you this String 
of Wampum. 

gave a String. 

Brethren, we heartily wish well to our Brethren, who live 
towards the Sun setting, and shall be always ready to assist 
them with our best Advice whenever we shall be informed of 
their Circumstances, which in the Course of the Treaty to be 
held at Loggs Town, we suppose we may be. We present 
you with this String of Wampum. 

Saturday. May the 30th. 

The Goods being put on Board four large Canoes lashed 
together, the Commissioners & others went on Board also to 
go down the River, with Colours flying. When they came 
opposite to the Delewar Town, they were saluted by the Dis- 
charge of fire Arms, both from the Town & opposite Shore, 
where Queen Alliguippe lives, and the Compliment was re- 
turned from the Canoes. 

The Company then went on Shore to wait on the Queen, 
who welcomed them & presented them with a String of Wam- 
pum to clear their Way to Loggs Town, she presented them 
also with a fine Dish of Fish to carry with them, and had 
some Victuals set, which they all eat of. The Commissioners 
then presented the Queen with a brass Kettle, Tobacco and 
some other Trifles, and took their Leave. 

The Weather being very wet, the Commissioners went on 
Shore to a Trader's House, secured their Goods in the Canoes 
by covering them in the best Manner they cou'd, and lay there 
that Night. 

Sunday, May the 31st. 

They set off with the Canoes and arriv'd at Loggs Town, 
where they were saluted by the Fireing of small Arms, both 



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158 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

from the Indians and English Traders residing there, and the 
Commissioners were met by the Chiefs of the Indians on the 
Shore and welcomed. 

Monday, June the ist. 

The Chiefs of the Indians then at Loggs Town having met 
in their Council House, by a Message acquainted the Com- 
missioners that they had something to say to them. They went 
to the Place, and they and the other Company being seated, «i 
Chief of the six Nations stood up, & addressing himself to 
the Commissioners, spoke as followeth : 

Brethren, you have come a long & blind way; If We had 
been certain which Way you were coming, we shou'd have 
met you at some Distance from the Town, but now we bid 
you welcome, and we open your Eyes with this String of 
Wampum, which we give you in the Name of the six united 
Nations. 

gave a String. 

Brethren of Virginia and Pensyvania, I desire that you 
will hearken to what I am going to say, that you may open 
your Hearts and speak freely unto us. 

We don't doubt but you have many Things in your Mind 
which may trouble you, notwithstanding which, we hope we 
may continue in Friendship. On which we give you those 
Strings of Wampum. 

Gave two Strings. 

The Commissioners let them know, they wou'd give them an 
Answer in a few Hours. 

Sometime after all being met in the Council House. Mr. 
George Croghan^*' by Direction of the Governor of Pennsyl- 



I'^Georgc Croghan, of Pennsylvania, a native of Ireland, who settled 
near Harrisbiirg, and was an Indian trader as early as 1746. Having 
acquired the confidence of the Indians and a knowledge of their lan- 
guages, he became agent for the colony among them. He was an 
officer during the l''rench and Indian war, and in 1756, was appointed 
by Sir William Johnson deputy Indian agent for the Pennsylvania an<l 
Ohio Indians. He long rendered valuable service in negotiations with 
them. By deed, dated at Fort Pitt, July 10, 1775, he purchased from 
the Six Nations six million acres on the Ohio, which, by another deed, 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, I752, 159 

vania, made a Speech to the Indians, letting them know that it 
was his Desire they shou'd receive their Brethren of Virginia 
kindly, and presented them with a String of Wampum. 
The Commissioners then spoke as followeth : 

Brethren, you sent a String of Wampum, which we met on 
the Road, by which you acquainted us that you heard of our 
Coming to visit you, and welcomed us so far on our Journey 
yesterday we arrived at this Place, & this Morning you took 
an Opportunity with a Strihg of Wampum to bid us welcome 
to Your Town, & to open our Eyes that we may see the Sun 
clearly & look upon you as Brothers who are willing to receive 
us. This we take very kindly, and we assure you of our hearty 
Inclinations to live in Friendship with you ; to confirm this wc 
present you with a String of Wampum. 

Gave a String. 

Brethren, in your second Speech to us & our Brethren of 
Pensyl vania this Day, you delivered us two Strings of Wam- 
pum, to clear our Hearts from any Impression that mav have 
been made on them, by flying Report or ill News, and that we 
might speak our Minds freely. 

Brethren, we assure you of our Willingness to remove all 
Misunderstanding out of our Hearts & Breasts which might 
impede or hinder the Friendship subsisting between us. 

Now, Brethren, we are to acquaint you, that we are sent 
hither, by the King of Great Britain, our Father, who, not 
forgetting his Children on this Side the great Waters, has 
ordered us to deliver you a large Parcel of Goods in his Name, 
which we have brought with us. But as we understand you 
have sent for some of your Chiefs, whom you shortly expect. 



dated July 30. 1777, he transferred to Thomas Walker and eight 
other Virginians. Copies of these deeds are printed (from copies for- 
merly in the possession of Dr. Thomas Walker) in Page's Paf^e Family 
{ 1R93), pp. 206-200. There is on record in the County Court of Augus- 
ta, at Staunton, Va.. a long deed from the Indians, confirming a 
former conveyance to Croghan and reciting the goods which were 
given or to he given them l»y him. Among the numerous items 
is one of many dozen jews-harps. George Croghan died in Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1782. 



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160 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

we will wait with Patience till they come, and then faithfully 
deliver you the Good & open our Hearts to you. In Assurance 
of hich we present you with this String of Wampum. 

Gave a String. 

To which the Speaker replied, I am glad that you have the 
Consideration, to wait for the coming of our chief Men. 

On Thursday, June the 4th, Thonariss, called by the Eng- 
lish the half King" with a Sachim deputed by the Onondago 
Council, and others, came down the River with English Colours 
flying, to Loggs Town, and the following Days they were em- 
ployed in their own Business till the loth, when a Council was 
appointed for treating with the Commissioners of Virginia, & 
the Present was set out before the Door where they lodged. 
Arbours being made for the Council to sit round about. All 
being met, the Commissioners, addressing themselves to the 
Indians, said: 

Sachims & Warriors of the six united Nations, our Friends 
and Brethren : 

We are Glad to meet you at this Place to enlarge the Coun- 
cil Fire already kindled here, by our Brethren of Pensylvania, 
to brighten the Chain & to renew our Friendship, that it mav 
last as long as the Sun, the Moon & the Stars shall give Light, 
to confirm which we give you a String of Wampum. 

Gave a String. 

Brethren, at the Treaty of Lancaster, in the Year 1744, be- 
tween the Government of Virginia, Maryland, & Pensylvania, 
you made a Deed reco^i^iihing the King's Right to all the Lands 
in \"irginia, as far as it was then peopled, or hereafter should 
be peopled, or bounded by the King, our Father, for which 
you received the Consideration agreed on. 

At the same Time Conasetego'^ desj*-ed that the Commis- 

'♦Thonariso, or Tanacharison, a Seneca chief, who, at the beginning 
of the war with France, was a warm friend and ally of the 
English. He was with Washington in the fight at the Meadows, and 
died October 4. 1754. 

"Conasetego, one of the chiefs who had signed the treaty of Lan- 
caster. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, I752. 161 

sioners wou'd recommend you for the King's further Favour, 
when the Settlements should encrease much further back. 
This the Commissioners promised, and confirmed it by a writ- 
ing under their Hands & Seals. In Consequence of which 
Promise, a Present was sent you from the King by Conrad 
Wieser, which Mr. Wieser since informed us that he delivered 
you, at a Council held here in the Year 1748. Now the King, 
our Father, to show the Love he bears to Justice, as well as 
his Affection to his Children, has sent a large Present of 
Groods, to be divided among you and your Allies, which is here 
ready to be deliver'd to you, and we desire that you will con- 
firm the Treaty of Lancaster. 

Brethren, it is the Design of the King, our Father, at present, 
to make a Settlement of P>ritish Subjects on the South East 
Side of Ohio, that we may be united as one People, by the 
strongest Ties of Neighbourhood as well as Friendship, & by 
these Means be able to withstand the Insults of our Enemies, 
be they of what Kind soever. 

From such a Settlement greater Advantages will arise to 
you, than you can at present conceive, our People will be able 
to supply you with (ioods much Cheaper than can at this Time 
l^e afforded; they will be a ready Help in Case you shou'd 
he attacked, and some good Men among them will be ap- 
pointed, with Authority to punish & restrain the many Injuries 
& Abuses too frequently committed here, by disorderly white 
People. 

Brethren, be assured that the King, our Father, by purchas- 
ing your T^nds, had never any Intention of takein^i^ them from 
you, but that we might live t(^gether as one People, & kce*^ 
them from the French, who wou'd be bad Neighbours. 

He is not like the French King, who calls himself your 
Father. & endeavoured about three Years ago with an armed 
Force to take Possession of your Country, by setting up In- 
scriptions on Trees, and at the Mouths of Creeks on this River, 
by which he claims the Lands, tho' at the Time of their Com- 
ing & for many Years before, a Number of your Brethren, the 
English, were residing in this Town, & at seveial ^ther Places 
on this River. 



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162 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

You Will remember how he scattered the Shawness, so that 
they are since dispersed all over the Face of the Earth ; and he 
now threatens to cut off the Twightwees. This is to weaken 
you that he may cut you off also, which he durst not Attempt 
while you are united. 

On the Contrary, the King, your Father, will lay his Hand 
on your Heads, under which Protection you will always re- 
main safe. 

Brethren, the great King, our Father, recommends a strict 
Union between us, you, & our Brethren towards the Sun 
setting, which will make us strong & formidable, as a Division 
may have a contrary Effect. We are directed to send a small 
Present to the Twightwees as an Earnest of the Regard which 
the Governor of Virginia has for them, with an Assurance of 
his further Friendship, when ever they shall stand in Need. 
Brethren : 

We earnestly exhort you not to be drawn away by the 
empty, deceitful Speeches of ye french, the peculiar Talent of 
that cunning people, but in all their attempts to shake your 
Duty to our common Father, think on what real Acts of friend- 
ship have been done by the English, and what by them ; weigh 
these Things in your Minds, and then determine who best cl 
serves your Esteem and regard, for it is not by vain, unmean- 
ning Words true friendship is to be discovered. That what 
we have said may have the deeper impression on you & have 
its full force we present you with this Belt of Wampum. 

Gave a Belt. 

Brethren, It is many years ago that the English first came 
over the great Water to visit you ; on our first coming you took 
hold of our Ships and tied them to your strongest Trees, ever 
since which we have remained together in friendship ; we have 
assisted you when you have been attacked by the French, by 
which you have been able to withstand them, and you have 
remained our good Friends & Allies, for tho' at some times 
the Qiain of friendship may have contracted some Rust, it 
has been easily rubbed off, and the Chain has been restored 
to its brightness. This, we hope, will always be the Case, and 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG*S TOWN, 1 752. 163 

that our friendship may continue to the latest posterity we 
g^ve you this String of Wampum. 

Gave a String. 
Brethren : 

We are sorry for the occasion that requires us to com- 
plain to you of an Injury done us by one of your people who 
murdered a poor Woman on the new River. Murder is a great 
Crime, and by the Consent of all Nations, has been usually 
punished with death; this is ye usage among the English, 
whether one of our own people has been killed, or one of our 
Brethren, the Indians, and it is one of the earliest commands 
of the great father and maker of us all, who inhabits the 
skies, that whoso shedeth Man's Blood, by man his Blood 
shall be shed. 

We understand that you know the Man that is accused of 
the Murder, and we hope you will give him up to be tried 
by our Law. You may be assured that he will have a fair 
trial, and if he is not guilty, he will be sent back unhurt. 

We must inform you that the Governor of Virginia expects 
that you will deliver the person supposed to be guilty up to 
some Magistrate in Virginia, whom we shall name to you 
that he may send him to W°''burg for his trial. 

This procedure is not only proper, as it is a compliance with 
the law of God, and of Nations, but it is necessary to warn all 
hot-headed men who are not guided by reason to forbear from 
such wicked Actions, by which their Brethren suffer. 
Brethren : 

We desire for the future that you will observe the Treaty 
of Lancaster, and whenever your people travel through Vir- 
ginia, that they will take such passes as are directed by that 
Treaty. By these passes, signed by Magistrates, the Men will 
be known, which will be some restraint on them as to their 
behaviour. It will be proper, also, that a man of prudence & 
discretion should head such a party that one among them, if 
possible, should speak English, and that by no means any 
French or french Indians be suffered to go with them. 

We might have mentioned many other Irregularities, but 
we have forborne, in hopes that for the future you will give 



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164 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

your people such orders as will prevent our having any further 
occasion to complain. To inforcc what we have said and to 
induce you to do us justice, we present you with this Belt of 
Wampum, 
gave a Belt. 

The Commissioners then spoke to the Allies of the Six Na- 
tions, who were present, having first advised with the half 
King, and being joined by him in the Speeches in the name 
of the Six Nations. 

Brethren, the Delawares, we thank you for the kind recep- 
tion you gave us when we came to Shenapins, which we shall 
never forget. We advise and exhort you to beware of french 
Councils, & that you will adhere to a strict friendship with 
us, the Six Nations, and your Brethren who live towards the 
Sun setting, which will strengthen us all, and be a sure de- 
fence against our Enemies. To confirm you in this mind, w-e 
present you with this Belt of Wampum, 
gave a Belt. 

Brethren, the shawness, your Nation has suffered much 
by French Devices by which you have been dispers'd. We 
exhort you that remain, that you keep firm hold of the great 
Chain of Friendship between us, the six Nations & their Allies, 
which is the likeliest Method to retrieve your Loss, and again 
' to make you an happy People. We present you with this 
Belt of Wampum. 
Gave a Belt. 

Brethren, the Windots, your Nation is divided, & Part is 
under the Direction of the French ; we think it wou'd be good 
Policy in you that are in our Interest, to endeavor to bring 
over your Brethren. But if this can't be done, you ought to 
take all the Care in your Power, that they do not, under the 
Colour & Name of Friendship, come into our Country & hurt 
our Inhabitants ; or, if they do, that you will endeavor to 
secure them on their Return & give them up : to prevent any 
Misunderstanding, w^e present you with this Belt of Wampum. 
Gave a Belt. 

After the Speeches had been spoke, & interpreted; The 
Commissioners, in his Majesty's Name, delivered the Present 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, 1 752. 165 

of Goods to the half King & the other Chiefs of the Indian?, 
who thankfully received them, & appointed some of their Men 
to make a Division of them, which they did, without the least 
Noise or Disorder, on the Spot, among the several Nations; 
whose representatives respectively took Charge of their Parts, 
to be subdivided when they carried them Home. 

The half King then, with a ten rowed Belt, of Wampum in 
his Hand, directing his Speech to Eghnisara, which is Mr. 
Montour's indian Name, said: 

Child, remember that you are one of our own People, and 
have transacted a great Deal of Business among us before ; 
you were emplo}ed by our brethren of Pensylvania and Vir- 
ginia ; you are Interpreter between us and our Brethren, which 
we are well pleased at, for we are sure our Business will go on 
well & Justice be done on both Sides. But you are not Inter- 
preter only ; for ) ou are one of our Council, have an equal 
Right with us to all these Lands, & may transact any publick 
Business in behalf of us, the six Nations, as well as any of 
us, for we look upon you as much as we do upon any of the 
chief Counsellors ; and to confirm what we have said, we pre- 
sent you with this Belt of Wampum. 

Gave a Belt. 

Then addressing himself to the Comnu'ssioners of Virginia, 
and all the Indians present, with a String of Wampum in his 
Hand, he spoke as follows: 

Brethren, it is a great while since our brother, the Buck 
(meaning Mr. George Croghan) has been doing Business 
between us, & our Brother of Pensylvania. but we understood 
he does not intend to do any more, so I now inform you that 
he is approved of by our Council at Onondago, for we sent to 
them to let them know how he has helped us in our Councils 
here ; and to let you & him know that he is one of our People 
and shall help us still & be one our Council, I deliver him this 
String of Wampum. 

Gave a Belt. 

He next spoke to the Shawness, and told them he took the 
Hatchet from them, & tied them with black Strings of Wam- 
pum, to hinder them from going to War against the Chero- 



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166 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

kees ; he said they had struck their own Body & did not know 
what they were doing ; had they not some of their own People 
whom they wou'd get back, and wou'd it not .be better to be 
at Peace, to bring them back? He charged them not to go 
again to strike their own People, & he said that he hoped that 
the Governors of Virginia and Pensylvania wou'd interest 
themselves in making a Peace. 

Gave a black String of Wampum. 

Then turning to the Delewars, he said, you went to the 
Windots & delivered them a Speech & a Belt of Wampum, to 
make a Peace between you and the Cherokees, & after you 
came back, you let your young Men go to War against the 
Cherokees, which was very wrong after you had delivered the 
Speech, which I myself, being present, heard. 

I take the Hatchet from you ; you belong to me, & I think 
you arc to be ruled by me, & I, joining with your Brethren 
of Virginia, order you to go to war no more. 

Gave a Belt of Wampum. 

Taking a belt of Wampum in his Hand, he proceeded as 
followeth : 

Brethren, the Governors of Virginia & Pensylvania, some 
Years ago we made a Complaint to our Brother of Pensylvania, 
that his Traders brought out too much of spirituous Liquors 
among us, & desired that there might not come such Quan- 
tities, and hoped he wou'd order his Traders to sell their Goods 
& Liquors at cheaper Rates. 

In Answer to our request, Conrad Wieser delivered us this 
Belt of Wampum, & told us that we must pay but five Buck- 
skins for a Cagg, & if the Traders wou'd not take that, we 
shou'd have it for Nothing. 

Since which Time there has been double the Quantity 
brought out yearly & sold as formerly, & we have made our 
C'omplaints since to try to stop such large Quantities from 
being brought, but as there has been no Notice taken to pre- 
vent it, we believe Mr. Wieser spoke only from his mouth, & 
not from his Heart, and without the Governor's Authority, so 
we think proper to return the Belt. 

He gave the Belt to Mr. Croghan. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, I752. 167 

Thursday, June nth. 
Present : 

Joshua Fry, Lunsford Lomax, James Patton, Commissioners. 

Mr. Christopher Gist, Agent for the Ohio Company. 

The Chiefs of the six Nations. 

Mr. Andrew Montour, Interpreter. 

The Commissioners of Virginia delivered to the six Na- 
tions a String of Wampum & Suit of Indian Clothing, to wipe 
away their Tears for the Loss of one of their Chiefs, who 
lately came down from the Head of Ohio to Loggs Town, & 
died there. 

Afterwards the half King spoke to the Delawars. Nephews, 
you received a Speech last Year from your Brother, the Gov- 
ernor of Pensylvania, and from us, desiring you to choose one 
of your wisest Counsellors t present him to us, for a King, as 
you have done it, we let you know that it is our Right to give 
you a King, and we think proper to give you Shingas for 
your King, whom you must look upon as your Chief, & witli 
whom all publick Business must be transacted between you 
& your Brethren, the English. 

On which the half King put a laced Hat on the Head of the 
Beaver, who stood Proxy for his Brother Shingas, & pre- 
sented him also with a rich Jacket & a suit of English Colours, 
which had been delivered to the Half King, by the Commis- 
sioners for that Purpose. 

The Commissioners, addressing themselves to the Shawness, 
acquainted them that they understood that their chief King 
Cockawichy, who had been a good Friend to the English, was 
lying bed-rid, and that to show the Regard they had for his 
past Services, they took this Opportunity to acknowledge it, by 
presenting him with a Suit of Indian Clothing. 

Then the half King spoke as follows: 

Brother the Governor of Virginia, You acquainted us yes- 
terday with the King's Right to all Lands in Virginia as far 
as it is settled, & back from thence to the Sun setting, when- 
ever he shall think fit to extend his Settlements. You pro- 
duced a Copy of the Deed, made by the Onondago Council at 



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168 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

the Treaty of Lancaster, & desired tliat your Brethren of Ohio 
might likewise confirm that Deed. 

Brother, the Governor of Virginia, We are well acquainted 
that our chief Council, at the Treaty of Lancaster, confirmed a 
Deed to you for a Quantity of Land in Virginia which you 
have a Right to, & likewise our Brother Onas has a right to 
a Parcel of Land in Pensylvania. We are glad you have ac- 
quainted us with the Right to those Lands, & we -assure you 
we are willing to confirm any Thing our Council has done in 
Regard to the Land, but we never understood, before you told 
us Yesterday, that the Lands then sold were to extend further 
to the Sun setting than the Hill on the other Side of the Alle- 
gany Hill, so that we can't give you a further Answer now. 

Brother, you acquainted us yesterday that the French were 
a designing People, which we now see & know that they de- 
sign to cheat us out of our Lands ; you told us that the King 
of England designed to settle some Lands on the South East 
Side of Ohio, that it might be better in our Brethren's Power 
to help us, if w-e were in Need, than it is at Present at the 
great Distance they live from us : we are sure the French de- 
sign nothing else but Mischief, for they have struck our 
Friends, the Twightwees. We therefore desire our Brethren 
of Virginia may build a strong House, at the Fork of the 
Mohongalio, to keep such Goods, Powder, Lead & necessaries 
as shall be w^anting, and as soon as you please : and as we have 
given our Cousins, the Delawars, a King, who lives there, we 
desire you will look upon him as a Chief of that Nation. 

Gave a large String of Wampum. 

Brethren, your Brothers that live on the Ohio are all War- 
riors & hunters, & likew^ise your Brothers, the Traders, ai^c 
not all wise Men : there has been Reason for many Complaints 
for some Time past, but we will not complain of our Brethren, 
the Traders, for we love them, & can't live without them, but 
w-e hope you will take care to send none among us but good 
Men, sure you know them that are fit, & we hope you will 
advise them how to behave, & we will take all the Care we 
can of our young Men, that they shall behave better than 
thev have done. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG's TOWN, I752. 169 

We well remember when first we saw our Brethren, the 
English, & we remember the first Council we had with them, & 
we shall do all we can to keep the Chain of Friendship from 
Rust. 

This Evening the Commissioners had a private Conference 
with the half King, on the Subject of the strong House, for it 
had been alleged, that the Expression implied a Settlement of 
People, as well as an House. The Question being asked 
whether he meant it in that Sense or not. He answered in the 
Negative. 

The Commissioners then told him that a Trade cou'd never 
be carried on with them to their Advantage, unless we had a 
Settlement of People near to raise Provision & make them 
plenty & cheap, for whilst the Traders were obliged to bring 
theirs from Pensylvania, or purchase of those who brought 
them for sale, they were oblig'd to lay a greater Advance on 
their Goods to answer that Charge. & that if at any Time they 
themselves shou'd stand in need of Assistance against an 
Enemy, it would be easier for their Brethren, the English, to 
send ]\Ien than to support them afterwards with Provisions. 

Fryday, the 12th of June. 

The half King & the deputy from the Onondago Council, 
with a String of Wampum, informed the Commissioners that 
one Fraizer a Smith, in the Town of Wivvango. threatened to 
remove; that they did not desire he should leave, them, but, if 
he did, they wished another might be sent to them, & they 
said they had not a sufficient Number of Traders there to 
supply them with Goods. 

To which the Commissioners replied that they wou'd repre- 
sent their Case to the Governor of Virginia, & hoped they 
wou'd be supplied according to their Desire. 

The same Day the Chiefs of the Shawnese. with a String 
of Wampum, thanked the Commissioners for their good Ad- 
vice. They acknowledged that they had been led astray by 
the French, & had suffered for it, & said that they wou'd take 
Care not to be deceived by the French again, but would keep 



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170 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

fast hold to the Chain of Friendship between the English, the 
six Nations & themselves. 

The Commissioners thanked them for their Attachment to 
the English, & desired their Compliments might be made to the 
young King of the Shawnese, who was generously gone to 
the Assistance of the Pitts ; they sent him also a laced Hat and 
a rich Jacket. 

A little before the Treaty began, a Trader's Man about fort}' 
Miles above Loggs Town, cut an Indian of the six Nations 
dangerously across the Wrist with a Knife, & took his Gun 
from him, which much exasperated the Indian, & he threatened 
to revenge it on some of the Traders. To pacify him the 
Commissioners gave him a Gun, & Mr. George Croghan a 
thousand of Wampum to pay for the Cure, on which the In- 
dian returned thanks for the Care his Brethren had taken, & 
assured them they had removed all Anger from his Breast, and 
that he wou'd think no more of what had happened. 

Saturday, June the 13th. 
Present : 

Joshua Fry, Lunsford Lomax, James Patton, Commissioners. 

Mr. Christopher Gist, Agent for the Ohio Company. 

The Chiefs of the six Nations. 

Mr. Andrew Montour, Interpreter. 

Thonarison, speaking to the Commissioners, said: 

Brethren, you told us you sent a Present of Goods in the 
Year 1748, which you say Conrad Wieser delivered at this 
Town ; he may have told you so, but we assure you we never 
heard of it from him ; it is true he did deliver us Goods then, 
but we understood him they were from our Brother Onas** 
he never made mention of the great King, our Father, nor 
of our Brother Assaragos" 

i<*Onas. the Indian name for the Governor of Pennsylvania. 
^^Assaregos, or Assaregoa, the Indian name for the Governor of 
Virginia. 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG's TOWN, I752, 171 

Then, directing his Speech to the Governor of Virginia, he 
said: 

Brother, you complained to us that some of our People had 
murdered a Woman in Virginia ; it is true there has been such 
a Thing done & Brother we know the Man that did it; he is 
one of our six Nations, although he has lived some time among 
the French. We cannot make an Excuse for so barbarous a 
Murder, but we assure you he did it without our Knowledge, & 
we beleive the evil Spirit tempted him to do it ; we will let the 
Onondago Council know what has been done, & we believe 
they will try to get him, & make a satisfaction for the Crime 
committed. 

Gave a String of black & white Wampum. 

Brother, we have heard what you said in Regard to the 
King's Design of making a Settlement of his People on the 
Waters of the River Ohio; you likewise told us you had a 
Deed for those Lands signed by our Council at the Treaty of 
Lancaster ; we assure you of our Willingness to agree to what 
our Council does or has done, but we have not the full Power 
in our Hands here on Ohio. 

We must acquaint our Council at Onondago of the Affair, 
and whatsoever they bid us do, we will do. 

In Regard to our Request of Building a strong House at the 
Mouth of Mohongalio, you told us it wou'd require a Settle- 
ment to support it with provisions & necessaries. It is true, 
but we will take Care that there shall tie no Scarcity of that 
Kind, untill we can give you a full Answer; Although in all 
our Wars we don't consider Provisions, for we live on one 
another; but we know it is different with our Brethren, the 
English. 

Gave three Strings of white Wampum.. 

The Commissioners having drawn an Instrument of writ- 
ing for confirming the Deed made at Lancaster, & containing 
a Promise that the Indians wou*d not molest our Settlements 
on the South East Side of Ohio, desired Mr. Montour to con- 
fer with his Brethren, the other Sachems, in private, on the 
Subject, to urge the Necessity of such a Settlement & the 



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172 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

great Advantage it wou'd be to them, as to their Trade or their 
Security. 

On which they retir'd for half an Hour, & then return'd, & 
Mr. Montour said they were satisfied in the Matter & were 
willing to sign & seal the Writing, which was done & witnessed 
by the Gentlemen then present. 

The half King spoke as followeth : 

Brethren, the Governors of Virginia & Pensylvania, you ex- 
pressed your Regard for our Friends & Allies, the Twightwees, 
& have considerecl their Necessities at present, we return you 
our Thanks for your Care of them ; we will join with you, & 
desire you will deliver them this Belt and let them know from 
us, that we desire them not to forget what they did in Pen- 
sylvania when they were down four Years ago and Joined in 
Friendship with our Brethren, the English : we desire they may 
hold fast by the Chain of Friendship, & not listen to any but 
their Brethren, the English. & us, the six Nations, Delawars & 
Shawnese, as we will stand by them ; we expect they will 
come down & confirm the Friendship they have engaged in 
with the English. 

He delivered the Belt, to be sent to the Shawnese. 

The Commissioners then opened the Road to \'irginia with 
a Belt of Wampum, & the following Speech : 

Brethren, we have travelled through a long & dark Way to 
meet you at this Council: we have now compleated our Busi- 
ness with Pleasure & Satisfaction, both to you & us, & as we 
are now returning back, we do in the name of the great King, 
Your Father, as also in the Name of your Brother, the Gov- 
ernor of X'irginia. remove all Obstacles out of the way, & make 
clear the Road that you may at any time send Messengers >o 
us on any Occasion, and we shall always be ready to receive 
them kindly, and look upon you as our Brethren : and in Token 
of our Sincerity of our Hearts, we present you with this Belt 
of Wampum. 

Gave the Belt. 

The Commissioners added: 

Brethren, at the Treaty of Lancaster, the Commissioners 



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THE TREATY OF LOGG'S TOWN, I752. 173 

informed you of a large House built among us for the edu- 
cating of Indian Children, & desired that you would send some 
of Yours ; we now make you the same Offer, but if you think 
it too far to send your Children, we desire to know whether 
it wou*d be agreeable to you that Teachers shou'd be sent 
among you. 

The Advantage of an Etiglish Education are greater than 
can be imagined by those who are unacquainted with it. By it 
we know in that Part of the World from whence we came; 
how Nations for some thousands of Years back have arose, 
grown powerful, or decayed ; how they have removed from one 
Place to another; what Battles have been fought; what great 
Men have lived, & how the\ have acted, either in Council or 
in War. 

In this Part of the World we know from the first Time the 
Spaniards came to it, how cruelly they used the Indians, then 
whollv ignorant of fire Arms. And we know the Actions of 
the French against you & others. There are many Benefits 
arising from a good Education, which wou'd be too long to be 
mentioned, but the greatest of all is, that by it we are ac- 
auainted with the Will of the great God, the Creator of the 
World and Father of us all, who inhabits the Skies, by which 
the better People among us regulate their Lives, & hope after 
Death to live with him forever. 

Gave a String of Wampum. 

To which the half King, after a short Pause, answered : 

Brethren, we heard of the Offer which was made us yt 
Lancaster, & we thank you for that which you make us now, 
but we can give you no Answer before we have consulted the 
Onondago Council about it. 

A Copy of the Instrument of writing before mentioned. 

Whereas, at the Treaty of Lancaster, in the County of Lan- 
caster & Province of Pensylvania, held between the Govern- 
ment of Virginia & the six united Nations of Indians, in the 
Year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred & sevcnty-foi'.r 
[sic, but forty-four is of cause meant] ; the Hon'ble Thoma;^ 
Lee and William Beverly, Esqrs., being Commissioners, a Deed 



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174 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

recognizing & acknowledging the Right & Title of his Majesty 
our sovereign Lord, the King of great Britain, to all the Lands 
within the Colony of Virginia, as it was then or hereafter, 
might be peopled & bounded by his Majesty, our sovereign 
Lord, the King, his Heirs & Successors, was signed, sealed 
& delivered by the Sachems & Chiefs of the six united Nations, 
then present, as may more fully appear by the s* Deed, refer- 
ence thereunto being had : We, Conogariera, Cheseago, Cown- 
sagret, Enguisara, Togrondoaro, Thonorison, Sachems & 
Chiefs of the s* united Nations, now met in Council at Loggs 
Town, do hereby signify our Consent & Confirmation of said 
Deed in as full & ample a Manner as if the same was here re- 
cited. And whereas his Majesty has a present Design of 
making a Settlement or Settlements of British Subjects on 
the southern or eastern Parts of the River Ohio, called other- 
wise the Allagany. We in Council (Joshua Fry, Lunsford Lo- 
max, & James Patton, being Commissioners on behalf of his 
Majesty) do give our consent thereto, & do further promise 
that the said Settlement or Settlements shall be unmolested by 
us, and that we will, as far as in our power, assist and Protect 
the British Subjects there inhabiting. 

In Witness whereof we have hereunto put our hands and 
Seals this thirteenth day of June, in the Year of our Lord 
1752. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 



175 



THE VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM 
PARISH, VA., 1707-1750. 

(continued) 
Antoine Bernard, i Isaac Robinson, 



Edward Brayer, 

Thomas Dikins, 

Henry Bely, 

Tom, 

London, 

Gini, 

Matt, 

Maria, 

Jacob Trabu, London, 

Thomas Martain, 

Marque, 

Betti, 

Jaque. 

Elie Sasin, 

John Williamson, 

Jean Vilain, j., 

Magfdelaine Salle's Bob, 

Pierre Dep., 



Pierre Salle, Jimi, 2 

David Bernard, i 

Jean Bernard, i 

Jaque Faure, Pierre Bioret, 2 
Jean Bonduran, Pierre Bon- 

duran, 2 

John Harris, Patrick, Fil- 

lis, 3. 

Daniel Pero, Stiphin Reno, 

Joe, 3 

John James Florinoir, '^ 
John Worley, I 

Sesar, I" 4 

Yemma, I 

Suky, J 

Samuel Wever, i 

Jaque Soblet, i 

Jaque Desasi, i 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, Sara, 2 
Isaac Gori, i 

Wm. Stanford, i 

Pierre David, Dick, Manue, 

Dina, 4 



February 7, 1735-6. The vestry assembled. Present: An- 
toine Benin, Jean Pierre Billiebo, Estiene Chastain, Pierre 
Faure, Jean Jaque Dupuy; Guillieaume Salle, Pierre Gueran, 
Andre Amonet, David Lesueur. Received of David Lesueur 
one pound six shillings in money. 

Jeax Chastain. 

July 25, 1736. The vestry assembled at the close of the 
preaching. Present: Antoine Benin. Jean Jaque Bilbo, Esti- 
ene Chastain, Antoine Rapine, Pierre Faure, David Lesueur, 
Guilieaume Salle, Pierre Gueran, Andre Amonet. We agreed 
with Mr. Gavin to preach 26 sermons per year in our church, 
he binding himself to preach seventeen on Sunday and the 
rest in the week, at twenty shillings per sermon, payable in 
wheat at three shillings per bushel or in maize at eighteen 



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176 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

pence per bushel, delivered partly below and partly at his 
place.*^ 

Jean Chastain. 

List of Tithables of the Parish of King William for 
THE Year 1736. 



Willeam Stanford, 


I 


Antoine Rapine, 


7 


Thomas Dickens, 


10 


Jean Jaque Florinoir, 


3 


Estiene Calvet, 


4 


Mathieu Oge, 


3 


Barthelemi and Pierre Du- 




Jaque Faure, 


I 


puy. 


2 


Pierre Depp, 


3 


Andre Amonnet, 


I 


Cp. Jaque Holman, 


2 


Jean Levilain, signor, 


5 


Daniel Pero, 


4 


David Leseiir, constable^^ 




Christophe Charlton, 


I 


Pierre David, 


6 


Jaque Brian, 


2 


Thomas Porter, 


4. 


Estiene Malet, 


4 


Antoine Benin, 


7 


^lathieu Jordin, 


I 


Jean Porter, 


3 


John Haris, 


I 


Pierre Bilbo, 


2 


Benjamin Haris, 


r 


Thomas Bradley, 


I 


Samuel Wever, 


I 


Guilieaume Salle. 


5 


Eduard Scott, 


7 


Edw. Tanner and Edw. 




Ralph Flipin, 


2 


Tanner, jun.. 


2 


^Ma^rdelaine Salle's tithables 


I 


Jean and Pierre Bonduran 


2 


Jean Levilain, 


I 


Pierre Salle. 


2 


Moyse Eorqueran, 


I 



*2Mr. Marye was transferred to St. George's Parish, Spottsylvanta 
county, in October, 1735, cf. note to entry of August 16, 1730. above, 
and Rev. Anthony Gavain seems to have entered at once into his 
labors. Mr. Gavain's first engagement in the parish is, however, 
brief, as he becomes dissatisfied with the way in which his contract is 
being fulfilled, and retires in favor of Mr. Brooke in December, 1736. 
The agreement with him is renewed in 1739, 1740, 1741 and 1743-44, 
when he appears for the last time in this register. 

Mr. (iavain received the Bishop of London's blessing in May, I735t 
and departed for the Virginia colony in that year. Cf. a letter from 
him in Perry's Papers Relating to the Church in Virginia, pp. 360-61, 
dated from St. James' Parish, Goochland, Aug. 5, 1738. Beyond this 
reference, which I owe to Mr. \V. G. Stanard, of the Virginia Historical 
Society, and the record of pne baptism performed by Mr. Gavain in 
King William Parish in 1739 (Brock. Uugcnot Emigration, p. 99), I 
have not been able to find out any facts concerning him. 

^^ionctable. The present list contains the only mention of such 
officers in the register. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 177 

Antoine Chareron, i Jaque Martain, 3 

Pierre Louys Soblet, 2 Jacob Trabue, 2 

Pierre Soblet, i Jean Willeamson, i 

The Widow Soulie's tith- Elie Sasin, i 

ables, 3 Edward Bryer, i 

Rene Chastain, 3 Isaac Robinson, i 

Pierre Faure, 2 Jean Moriset, i 

Antoine Bernar, i Jean Thomas, 2 

David Thomas, i The Widow Dupre, 2 

Pierre Loucadou, i The Widow Martain, 2 

Jean Jaque Dupuy, 2 The Widow Dupuy, i 

Kstiene Farsi, 3 Daniel Faure, 2 

Estiene Chastain, 6 Jean Faure, i 

Patrick Gilbliet, I Wm. Lansdon, 2 

Willeam Ashfield, i Jean Smith, I 

Joseph Bingli, 4 Jaque Robinson, constable, 

Jean Chastain, 2 Jaque Soblet, i 

Gedeon Chambon, 4 Pierre Gueran, 7 

The vestry assembled August 3, 1736. Present: Antoine 
Benain, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Antoine Rapine, Pierre Faure, 
wheat and a bushel and a half of maize per tithable. 

Jean Chastain, 

The vestry assembled December 3, 1736. Present: Jean 
Pierre Bilbo, Antoine Rapine, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Faure, 
David Lesueur, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Pierre Gueran, Antoine 
Benin. Monr. Gavin having encountered difficulties regard- 
ing his payment, he stands by his first agreement. He had not 
been granted ferriage for his servants nor the glebe. 

Jean Chastain, 

This day, June 4, 1737, the vestry agreed with Mr Brook** 
to preach six sermons per year, and we are to pay him two 

i*Rev. Zachariah Brooke, the first minister of St. Paul's Parish, 
in Hanover county. Cf. Meade, I, 469. He had already found time 
although in charge of a phenomenally large parish, to perform bap- 
tisms in King William Parish in 1727. The contract with him is re- 
newed for twelve sermons per year in 1738; but in the following year 
Mr. Gavain takes his place. Mr. Brooke likewise performed baptisms 
in the parish in 1737 and 1738. Cf. the register of baptisms in 
Brock, Huguenot Emigation to Virginia. 



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178 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

pounds per sermon in wheat at three shillings a bushel, in 
maize at eighteen pence a bushel, delivered at the falls' mill. 
He commenced on this arrangement to-day. 

Jean Chastain^ 

September 13, 1737. The vestry assembled. Present: An- 
toine Benin, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Faure, 
Guillieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupui, Pierre Gueran, Andre 
Amonnet. The vestry employed Antoine Chareron to carry 
a letter to Mr. Lapierre, in order to know if he can come^ and 
to bring us the answer to it. The vestry assigned him three 
pounds, ten shillings, payable, three pounds in wheat and in 
maize, and ten shillings in money. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the assessment was made of one bushel of 
Wheat and one bushel of maize per head. 

Jean Chastain. 

September 23, 1737. Estiene Malet and Rene Chastain 
took the oath of vestrymen for the Parish of King William. 
Present: Antoine Benain, Jean Pierre Bilbo, David Lesueur, 
Estiene Chastain, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Andre Amonnet, Es- 
tiene Malet, Guillieaume Salle, Rene Chastain, Pierre Gue- 



ran. 



Jean Chastain. 



The same day Estiene Malet and Rene Chastain took the 
oath as church wardens. 

Jean Chastain. 

The church wardens are to make a contract with a doctor 

to cure Isaac Gori, and in case he recovers, he is to repay 

the parish. 

Jean Chastain. 

April 21, 1738. The vestry assembled. Present: Estiene 
Malet, Rene Chastain, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Faure, An- 
toine Benin, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Guilieaume Salle, David Le- 
sueur, Andre Amonnet, Pierre Gueran, Jean Jaque Dupuy. It 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 



179 



was agreed with Mr. Brook to pay him twenty-six shillings 
per sermon. He is to preach twelve times per year, commenc- 
ing to-day. He is to be paid in wheat at three shillings per 
bushel, delivered at his place, in maize at eighteen pence per 
bushel, delivered at his place. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day it was decreed by the vestry that Estieni; 
Mallet bind himself to furnish Isaac Gori with food and lodg- 
ing and bed and washing for a year ; and in case of death, he 
shall be paid in proportion as is agree, viz: six (pounds) per 
year, payable half in wheat, half in maize, at three shillings for 
the wheat, the maize at eighteen pence. 

Jean Chastain. 

List of Tithables of the Parish of King William fok 
THE Year 1737. 

Jean Chastain, 
Andre Amonnet, 
Jean Bernard, 
Rene Chastain, 
Pierre Martain, 
Daniel Perault, 
Jean Porter, 
Estiene Malet, 
Estiene Farsi, 
Jean Levilain, s., 
Thos. Gadsi, 
Jean Trutin, 
Guilieaume Salle, 
Barthelemi Dupuy, 
Pierre Dupuy, 
Pierre Faure. 
Antoine Benin, 
Jean Dilion, 
David Leseuer. 
Jaque Brian, 
Estiene Panetie, 



2 


Jaque Faure, 


2 


1 


Edward Tanner, 


I 


I 


Joseph Bonduran, 


I 


I 


Jaque Robinson, 


I 


6 


Thomas Honi, 


I 


4 


Joseph Bingli, 


4 


3 


Edward Scott, 


9 


3 


Pierre Soblet. 


I 


2 


Jean Harris, 


4 


5 


Richard Stones, 


I 


4 


Samuel Wever, 


I 


I 


Thomas Porter, 


2 


7 


l^dward Sarp^ent, 


I 


I 


Benjamin, Haris, 


I 


I 


Pierre Gueran, 


6 


3 


Cholmen's Wott, 


I 


7 


Jean Jaque Florinoir, 


3 


I 


Christophe Charlton, 


I 


I 


Thomas Dikins, 


8 


2 


Charle Amonnet, 


I 


I 


The Widow Salle, 


T 



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180 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



Jean Panetie, 


I 


Jean Levilain, j., 


I 


Jean Bottler, 


5 


Richard Dine, 


2 


Pierre Loucadou, 


I 


Moise Forqueran, 


I 


Jean Biblo, 


2 


The Widow Dupre, 


I 


Mathieu Oge, 


3 


Jaque Martain, 


3 


Pierre David, 


7 


Jacob Trabue, 


3 


The Widow Soulie. 


3 


Jean Williamson, 


. I 


Thomas Bradli, 


I 


Elie Sassin, 


I 


Pierre Salle, 


2 


Edward Bryer, 


I 


Jean Bonduran, 


I 


Isaac Robinson, 


2 


Pierre Bonduran, 


I 


Jean Morisset, 


I 


Pierre Louis Soblet, 


2 


Jean Thomas, 


2 


Antoine Chareron, 


I 


Charle Pene, 


2 


David Tomas, 


I 


The Widow Martain, 


2 


Estiene Chastain. 


6 






Jean Jaque Dupuy, 


2 




170 



July 15, 1738. The vestry assembled. Present: Estiene 
Malet, Rene Chastain, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Gueran, An- 
toine Benin, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Guilieaume Salle, Jean Jaque 
Dupuy were elected church wardens, having already taken the 
oath prescribed by law. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Estiene Mallet and Rene Chastain rendered 
their account of their administration for the year 1737. They 
gave their note for the amount which they owe. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Antoine Benin and Jean Pierre Bilbo were 
discharged of their administration for the years 1735 ^^^ 
1736. They gave their note for the money. 

Jean Chastain. 

The vestry assembled. Present: Guilieaume Salle, Jan 
Jaque Dupuy, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Faure, Andre Amon- 
net, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Pierre Gueran, David Lesueur, Estiene 
Malet. The levy for the present year, 1738, amounts to one 
bushel of wheat and a half-bushel of maize per head. 

Jean Chastain. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 



181 



June II, 1739. .The vestry assembled. Present: Jean 
Jaque Dupuy, Guilieaume Salle, Andre Amonnet, Jean Pierre 
Bilbo, Pierre Faure, Rene Chastain, Jean Levilain, le June, 
and Jean Bernar took the oath of vestrymen for the Parish 
of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

List of Tithables of the Parish of King William for 
THE Year 1738. 



Barthelimi Dupuy, 


I 


Edward Tanner, jun.. 


I 


Pierre Dupuy, 


I 


Anne David, 


6 


Pierre Gueran, 


5 


Jaque Soblet, 


2 


Rene Chastain. 


3 


Pierre Louys Soblet, 


4 


Jean Chastain, 


3 


Charle Beler, 


2 


Thomas Godsi, 


4 


Willeam Banton, 


I 


Jcame Th. Dilion, 


I 


Thomas Elsoan, 


I 


David Thomas, 


I 


Anne Scott, 


7 


Jean Pierre Bilbo, 


2 


Estiene Malet, 


2 


Thomas Porter, 


4 


Jean Levilain. sig.. 


5 


John Porter, 


2 


Jean Jaque Florinoir, 


4 


Antoine Benin, 


5 


Roberd Craghad, 


I 


Daniel Pero, 


4 


Samuel Wever, 


I 


Pierre Martain, 


6 


Jean Harris, 


4 


Jean Jaque Dupuy, 


2 


Estiene Chastain, 


6 


Pierre Dep, 


2 


Jean Bottler, 


3 


Estiene Farsi, 


2 


Jaque Gase, 


I 


Matthieu Age, 


3 


Cp. Holmen, 


I 


Richar Dudleey, 


I 


Binjamen Haris, 


2 


Joseph Bingly, 


3 


Thomas Dikins, 


I 


Jaque Brian, 


2 


Willeam Ashfild, 


I 


David Lesueur, 


I 


Charles Peen, 


2 


Andre Amonnet, 


I 


The Widow Martain, 


2 


Guilieaume Salle, 


4 


Jean Moriset 


I 


Estiene Panetie, 


I 


Isaac Robinson, 


2 


Francoise Soulie, 


4 


Edward Brayer, 


I 


Jaque Faure, 


2 


Elie Sasain, 


I 


Jean Bonduran, 


I 


Jonathan. 


I 



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182 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



The Widow Bonduran, 


3 


Jean Willeamson, 


I 


Thomas Bradli, 


I 


Jacob Trabu, 


3 


Jean Bernar, 


I 


Jaque Hood, 


I 


Pierre Salle, 


2 


Jaque Martain, 


4 


Rober Davidson, 


I 


The Widow Dupre, 


I 


Jaque Robinson, 


2 


Moyse Forqueran, 


I 


Pierre Faure, 


3 


Richard Dine. 


2 


Jean Carner, 


I 


Jaque Lester, 


I 


Pierre Soblet, 


I 


Jean Levilain, 


I 


Antoine Trabue, 


I 


Charle Amonnet, 


I 




— 


The Widow Salle, 


I 




88 


Thomas Richison, 
John Thomas, 


2 



1/8 

April 7, 1739. The vestry assembled. Present: Guillieaume 
Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Estiene Chastain, Pierre Faure, Es- 
tiene Malet, David Lesueur, Rene Qiastain, Andre Amonnet, 
Jeane Pierre Bilbo. The vestry gave full power to the church 
wardens to prosecute Pierre Martain for the money which 
Mr. Rapine was owing to the parish of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

August 20, 1739. The vestry assembled. Present: Guil- 
lieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, David Lesueur, Pierre Gue- 
rant, Andre Amonnet, Estiene Malet, Jean Bernar, Jean Jaque 
Bilbo. The vestry appointed Charle Peen and Edward Bryer 
to procession the land from the line of Jacob Trabu to the line 
of Charle Peene ; Jacob Trabu and Richard Deen from Jacob 
Trabu to the creek below ; and Pr. Louys Soblet and Thomas 
Porter from the creek below to the creek above, the old line 
of the ten thousand acres; and Edward Kamton and Estiene 
Farsi from the first line along the branch to Mr. Dutoy on 
both sides ; and above the creek Pierre Martain and Jean Har- 
ris. 

Jean Chastain. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 183 

The same day Jean Bemar and Andre Amonnet took the 
oath of church wardens in the accustomed manner. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Guilieaume Salle and Jean Jaque Dupuy ren- 
dered their account for the year 1738 in the presence of the 
vestrymen named above. The parish owes them three bushels 
and one-half of wheat. 

Jean Chastain. 

The late Mr. Chastain" left by will to the poor of the parish 
of King Willam five pounds, of which the church wardens, 
Guilieaume Salle and Jean Jaque Dupuy, have paid out three 
pounds, one shilling and sixpence. 

Jean Chastain. 

Estiene Malet has received a guinea from Mr. Chastain; 
from Antoine Benin and from Jean Pierre Bilbo one pound 
eighteen shillings, which was due the parish ; from Jean Pape- 
ham, four pounds, six shillings and one penny ; and Rene Chas- 
tain has received fourteen shillings from David Lesueur, which 
was due the parish. 

September i, 1739. The vestry assembled at the close of 
the preaching. Present: Andre Amonet, Jean Bernar, Jean 
Jaque Dupuy, Guilliaume Salle, Pierre Ffaure, Jean Pierre Bil- 
bos, Estienne Mallet, Pierre Guerrant, Rane Chastain, David 
Le Sueur, Jean Levilain. We agreed with the Reverend Mr. 
Gavin to preach in our church seventeen sermons for one year, 
including four in French. He is to give us one Sunday notice 
before coming to preach to us ; but in case he fail of preach- 
ing the day appointed, one sermon shall be subtracted from 
the seventeen sermons for each time that he shall fail. For 
which we oblige ourselves to pay to him at the hands of Mon- 
sieur Andre Amonnet two barrels of maize and two bushels 

"Probably Etienne Chastain, who a]>pears for the last time in the 
tax-list of 1737. He and his wife were among those who arrived in the 
colony in the first ship-load of French emigrants, 1701. Cf. Brock. 
p. 45. His wife died in 1725, aged 52 or 53. 



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184 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of wheat for each sermon that he shall preach to us, and tiie 
said Monsieur Gavin binds himself to preach to us on Sunday 
from the month of April to the month of September. The 
maize above is to be paid after Christmas Day. 

Ant. Gavin, Minister. 
• . Andre Amonnet, 

, Jean Bernard. 

Stephen Mallet," 

GuiLLAUME Salle, 

Rane Chastain, 

Pierre Guerrant, 

Pierre Faure, 

John Dupuy, 

Jean Pierre Bilbou, 

Jean Leuilain. 

David Le Sueur. 

September 8, 1739. The vestry assembled. Present: An- 
dre Amonnet, Jean Bernar, Estiene Mallet, Guillieaume Salle, 
Pierre Gueran, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Jean 
Levilain. The levy for the present year is one bushel of 
wheat and one bushel of maize per tithable, and those who 
shall pay eight pence in silver shall be quit of half a bushel 
of wheat. The eight pence in money arc for the suit at Wil- 
liamsburg between Thomas Dikins and the parish, and for the 
moulding.^^ 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day it was agreed to give Jean Chastain six 
pounds, the grain to be accepted as in the first contract. 

Jean Chastain. 

November 17, 1739. The vestry assembled. Present: An- 

i^The signatures are personal. 

^^pour le prosse de williambourg entre Thomas Dikins et la paroisse 
et pour le godron. The above translation is simply a guess. Godron 
has a number of uses, signifying, in the main, boss-work or a fluted 
decoration. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WFLLIAM PARISH. 185 

dre Amonnet, Jean Bernar, David Lesueur, GuilHeaume Salle, 
Jean Jacque Dupuy, Estiene Malet, Jean Levilain, Rene Chas- 
tain, Pierre Gueran. The vestry received the moulding, which 
Guileaume Salle bought in order to decorate" the church, 
amounting to twelve shillings in money. 

The exj^mses of Elstiene Malet and Rene Chastain, on ac- 
count of the suit of Dikins, amount to seven pounds and one 
penny, for which we have made the levy of one bushel of wheat 
and a bushel of maize, likewise in order to defray the ex- 
penses of the parish ; and those who shall pay the eight pence 
in silver shall be quit of a half-bushel of wheat, according to 
the levy made Sept. 8, 1739. 

March i, 1739 | 40. The vestry assembled. Present: An- 
dre Amonnet, Jean Bernard, Pierre Faure, David Lesueur," 
Jean Jaque Dupuy, GuilHeaume Salle, Pierre Gueran, Jean 
Pierre Bilbo, Rene Chastain. The vestry gives full power to 
the church wardens to prosecute Pierre Martain for the to- 
bacco that Mr. Rapine has received from the parish. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the vestry gave full power to the church 
warden to prosecute Estiene Panetie for the levy of the parish 
of King William, for not being listed in our parish above men- 
tioned. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day it was decreed by a plurality of votes to reit 
the ferry for a year. 

Jean Chastain. 

March 8, 1740. The vestry assembled. Present: Andre 
Amonnet, Jean Bernard, David Lesueur, GuilHeaume Salle, 
Rene Chastain, Estiene Mallet, Pierre Gueran. The church 
wardens rented the ferry for a year for five pounds and one- 
half, payable in wheat and maize, viz.: half in wheat and half 

^•le godron . . . pour godroner leglise. 



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186 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

in maize, the wheat at three shillings and the maize at eighteen 
pence. The grain is to be fetched from the church wardens. 

Jean Chastain. 

October 6, 1740. The vestry assembled. Present: Andre 
Amonnet, Jean Bernar, David Lesueur, Jean Jaque Dupuy, 
Pierre Gueran, Guillieaume Salle, Jean Pierre Billiebo, Jean 
Levilain. David Lesueur and Jean Chastain were elected 
church wardens by a plurality of votees for the present year. 

Jean Chastatn. 

The same day an agreement was made with the Reverend 
Mr. Gavain to give him twelve bushels and one-half of maize 
per sermon and a bushel of wheat, to preach ten times per 
year, the wheat and the maize to be fetched from the church 
wardens. Four sermons in French. 

Ant. Gavin. 

And he promises to preach Sundays from April i to Septem- 
ber I. 

Ant. Gavin/* 

David Le Sueur, ) ^, , ,,. , 
Jean Chastain. } ^Intrch Wardens. 

Pierre Guerrant. 
Jean Vilen, 
Jean Jaque Dupuy, 
Guillaume Salle, 
Andre Amonnet. 
Jean Pierre Bilbout. 

November 12, 1740. The vestry assembled. Present: 
David Lesueur, Jean Chastain, Andrew Amonnet, Jean Ber- 
nar, Guillieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Rene Chastain, Jean 
Pierre Bilbo. Andre Amonnet and Jean Bernar rendered 
their account, and they owe the parish one pound, thirteen 
shillings, sixpence, and two bushels and a half of maize. 

Jean Chastain. 

i»The signatures are personal. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 187 

The levy for the present yeai^ is a bushel and a half of maize 
and a half-bushel of wheat per head, in order to defray the 
expenses of the parish of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

October 19, 1741. The vestry assembled. Present: David 
Lesueur, Jean Chastain, Andre Amonnet, Rene Chastain, Jean 
Jaque Dupuy, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Pierre Faure, Guillieaume 
Salle, Jean Bernar. Pierre Gueran and Jean Villain were 
elected by a plurality of votes church wardens. 

October 23, 1741. The said Sieurs Pierre Gueran and Jean 
Levilain took the oath and the test according to the usage of 
the Anglican church. Present: Pierre Gueran, Jean Levilain, 
David Lesueur, Jean J. Dupuy, Rene Chastain, Pierre Faure, 
Pierre Bilbo, Jean Bernar, Pierre Faure, Andre Amonnet. 

Jean Chastain. 

I have pledged myself to the French vestry to preach 17 
sermons, four in French ; and if I fail any time, I will make 
good after my year is finished, so that my year shall be com- 
pleted when I shall have preached the 17 sermons. October 
23, 1741. According to my contract made the past year. 

Witnesses: » Ant. Gavin. 

Jean Vilen,"* 1 /-u u ixr j 

• Pierre Guerrant, } Church Wardens. 

David Le Sueur, 

Jean Chastain, 

Rene Chastain, 

Andre Amonnet, 

Jean Bernar, 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, 

Pierre Faure, 

Jean J. Dupuy, 

The same day David Lesueur and Jean Chastain rendered 

*>The signatures are personal. 



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188 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

their account. They remain owing forty-five bushels of maize 
and a peck and a half-bushel of wheat, for which we have 
given our note. 

Jean Chastain. 

The levy for the present year is one bushel of maize and a 

half-bushel of wheat per head. 

Jean Chastain," 
John James Dupuy. 
Pierre Guerrant, 

] Jean Vilen, 

Andre Amonnet, 
Jean Bernar, 
David Le Sueur, 
Rane Chastain, 
Jean Pierre Bilbo, 
Pierre Faure, 

July lo, 1742. The vestry assembled. Present: Pierre 
Guerrant, Jean Levilain, Jean Jaque Dupuis, Andre Amonnet, 
Guilliaume Salle» Estienne Mallet, Rane Chastain and David 
Lesueur. Estienne Mallet and Rane Chastain rendered accomit 
for the suit against Thos. Dickins, and they are quit by the 
payment of nine shillings, ninepence, which is the amount re- 
maining due Monsieur Guilliaume Salle, of which the said 
Salle acknowledges payment. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the vestry decreed that Sieur Andre Amon- 
net sell for money, the tobacco which has been recovered from 
Pierre Martain, amounting to 520 pounds of tobacco, and that 
he rendered account for the same to the church wardens. 

Jean Chastain. 
Pierre Guerrant,^* 

Jean Vilain, 

Estienne Mallet, 

2iThe signatures are personal. 
22The signatures are personal. 



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vestry book of king william parish. 189 

Jean, Jacques Dupuy, 
Rane Chastain, 
GuiLLAUME Salle, 
Andre Amonnet, 
David Le Sueur, 

October 30, 1742. Pierre Faure asked his discharge, and 
it was granted to him, in the presence of the vestry named 
below : Pierre Gueran, Jean Levilain, David Lesueur, Estiene 
Malet, Andre Amonnet, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Jean Bemar, Rene 
Chastain, Guilieaume Salle, Jean Pierre Bilbo. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Daniel Pero took the oath of vestryman for 
the parish of King William in the presence of the vestrymen 
named above. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Estiene Mallet and Jean Pierre Bilbo took the 
oath of church wardens for the present year. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day. The levy for the parish of King William is 
a bushel of maize and a half-bushel of wheat per tithable. In 
the presence of the vestrymen named above. 



Stephen Mallet, *■ 
Jean Pierr Bilbo, 
Rane Chastain, 
GuiLLAUME Salle, 
David Le Sueur, 
Andre Amonnet, 
Jean Jacques Dupuy, 
Pierre Guerrant, 
Jean Vilain, 
Daniel Pero. 
Jean J. Dupuy. 



Jean Chastain. 



•The signatures are personal. 



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190 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

April i6, 1743. The vestry assembled. Present: Estiene 
Mallet, Jean Pierre Bilbo, David Lesueur, Andre Amonnet, 
Jean Jaque Dupui, Guillieaume Salle, Jean Levilain, Rene 
Chastain. The vestry deputed Estiene Mallet and Guillieaume 
Salle to go to speak with the Governor in order (to urge 
him) to maintain the parish. 

Jean Chastain. 

September 12, 1743. Jean Jaque Dupuy and Guilleaume 
Salle were installed as church wardens. Present: Estiene 
Mallet, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Andre Amonnet, Daniel Pero, 
Jean Vilain, David Lesueur, Jean Chastain. 

The same day Estiene Malet and Jean Pierre Bilbo rendered 
their account for the year 1742. Estiene Mallet is qiiit of all 
and there is owing to Jean Pierre Bilbo 8 shillings. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day, Andre Amonet and Jean Bernar are quit 
of all. 

Jean Chastain. 

January 7, 1743 | 4. The vestry assembled. Present: Guil- 
ieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Andre Amonnet, Pierre 
Gueran, Rene Chastain, David Lesueur, Jean Vilain, Daniel 
Pero, Jean Pierre Bilbo. The vestry agreed with the Rever- 
end Mr. Gavain to preach twelve sermons for the present year, 
two of which have been preached, at twenty shillings per ser- 
mon; that is, he shall preach twelve sermons from December 
17 passed to December 17 next, 1744. And the vestrymen 
bind themselves to pay him the twenty shillings according as 
they and Gavin shall agree together, and Gavin binds him- 
self to preach Sundays from April to September. 

Ant. Gavin, Minister,^* 
GuiLLAUMK Sallp:. 

[N. B. Though it was expected that the King William vestry book 
would be concluded in this number of this Magazinej; but it has been 
found impossible to do so. The concluding portion will be printed in 
January.] 

(to be continued) 



2*Signatures personal. 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 191 



VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



G>ininunicated by Mr. Lothrop Withington, 30 Little Russell street, 
W. C, London (including "Gleanings" by Mr. H. F. Waters, 
not before printed.) 
(continued) 
Theodore Gultston^ of St. Martyn Ludgate Hill Doctor 
of Medicine. Will April 26 1632; Proved i June 1632. 
To my father William Gultston and my mother Elizabeth 
his wife, i20 each. To my sister Elizabeth Allen widow. 
£20. To hiis wife Ellen's two sisters. i20 each. To my sis- 
ter Dorothy Hill £10. To my brother Nathaniel Gulstori, 

£20. To my sister, Martha, £10. To Whitworth, 

grocer. Old Bayley, £10. For a lecture of Physicke, Col- 
lege of Physicians, London, £20 yearly. To be distributed 
amongst my kindred, £500. To my cosin Ellis Sotherton, 
£20, his wife. Rachel, 20s each to buy rings. To my sis- 
ter Stubbes, £5. To Stephen Barkham, £20. To 

Abraham Allen, my sister's son, £10. To John Toomes Apo- 
thecary, £10. To my friends Drs. Yonge, Gettaker, Na- 
thaniel Sute, Mr, Foxley, Ministers, £3 each. To Samp- 
son Kerrill, son of William Kerrill, deceased, £5. To Eliza- 
beth Ayres, my maid servant, £5. To the parson, curate an. I 
lecturer of St. Martyns, £5 each. To the parson for a fu- 
neral sermon, £4. To the poor of Said Parish, £20. Lease I 
hold or Deane and Chapter of St. Paul's to the 6 younger* sons 
& daughters of my Brother John, after my wife's death. Exe- 
cutrix wife Ellen. Overseers: Ellis Sotherton and Stephen 
Basleham. To my wife Ellen, my rectory of Bardwell, Suf- 
folk ; after her decease to my nephew Richard Gurton. Lands 
in Warwickshire, one-fifth to my godson, Theodor Gurton, 
the remainder to my brother John's children. Witnesses: 
Jenkyn Griffith, Thomas Ilodgkin, To St. Paul's Cathedral, 

£20. 

Audley, 64. 

[Dr. Theodore Gulston was a celebrated London physician, and a 



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192 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

prominent member of the Virginia Company. He was bom in 1572, 
studied at Merton College, Oxford, where he took his doctor's degree, 
April 30, 1610, was fellow (Dec. 29, 161 ij and Censor of the College of 
Physicians, and practised with great success . in London. In 1616 he 
frequently entertained Sir Thomas Dale and Uttomakin, Powhatan's 
counsellor, who had been sent to England. On June 14, 1619, Dr. Gulston 
was appointed on the committee of the Virginia Company in regard to 
the college. On Dec. 15, 1619, he bought ten shares of land in Vir- 
ginia from various persons. He was made one of the King's Council 
for the Company in England, on July 8, 1620, and in July 1621, he re- 
commended Dr. Pott for appointment as physician-general of Virginia. 
Dr. Gulston was distinguished as a Greek and Latin scholar, and trans- 
lated several works from Greek into Latin. He married Helen, daugh- 
ter of George Sotherton. a merchant-tailor and M. P. of London, and 
died May 4, 1623. See Brown's Genesis and First Republic. ] 

William Parke. Will 13 November 1633; proved 18 
August 1634. To my youngest son Daniel Parke, £100. To 
my wife Sarah Parke, £150. If my wife marry again, her 
husband give security on behalf of my eldest son William to 
Francis Columbell of London and Nathaniel Fulden of Lon- 
don. To James Stone of London, Merchant, 50s. To 
Daniel Bourche, Purser of the good ship Blessinge, 25s. 
To Adam Thorowgood of Virginia, gent., 50s worth of 
commodities. Executor : my son William Parke. Witnesses : 
James Stone, Thomas Rey, John Felgate, Daniell Boulcher. 

Seager, 75. 

[Neither the will nor the probate act gives the residence of the testa- 
tor, though the latter states that he died beyond seas. There is good 
reasoh to believe that he died in Virginia, and that he was the father 
of Daniel Parke, the elder, ot that colony, whose will will appear later 
in this series. That the family of William Parke was in Virginia is shown 
by the fact that many years after his death, the land due for the emigra- 
tion of members of his family to the Colony was taken up. Under a 
patent, dated 1655, for land in York County, appear the names of Wil- 
liam Parke, Mrs. Sarah Parke, and William Parke, Jr., as head-rights. 
William Parke was witness to a deed in York County, in 1652, to Dan- 
iel Parke. Daniel Parke, Sr., was bom, according to a deposition 
about 1628. 

The epitaph of Daniel Parke, Sr., and the will of his son, Daniel 
Parke, Jr., state that the family was of Essex, England. Morant*s Es- 
sex II, 309, gives an account of a family of Parke, resident in that coun- 
ty, from the time of Edward III, to that of Charles I, and the Visitation 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 193 

of Essex 1634 {Harleian Society) has a pedigk-ee of four generations of 
the lamily; but though the name William appears he does not seem to 
be identical with the testator above. ] 

John Thompson of Surrey County, James River, Virginia. 
Will 27 January 1698/99; proved 16 March 1698/99. To my 
sister Katherine Paine, wife of Robert Paine, £50. To my 
sister Elizabeth Catlet, wife of William Catlet, £50. To my 
Brother William Thompson, iioo when 21. To my Brother 
Samuel Thompson, all rt\^ lands. Slaves, etc., failing him to 
my Brother William. To my friends Thomas Haistwell, 
Coll. Harry Hartwell, Major Arthur Allen, and Captain 
Francis Clements, a Ring to each of them. All the rest to 
my Brother Samuel Thompson. Executor: Samuel Thomp- 
son. Executors in triist: Thomas Haistwell and Coll. Henry 
Hartwell. Witnesses: John Burgis, Anne Bradley, Wm. Sto- 
rey, Notary. 

Pett, 50. 

[The first of the testators family of whom anything is known, was 
Rev. William Thomson, or Thompson, who became minister of South- 
wark Parish, Surry county, Virginia, in or shortly before 1662. It is 
possible that he was a son of Rev. William Thompson, one of the three 
pastors who were sent about 1642 or 1643 from New England to minis- 
ter to the Virginia dissenters; but who soon returned home and died at 
Braintree. Mass., Dec. 10, 1666, aged 68. There was (a high authority 
states), a William Thompson, of New London, who is believed to have 
been a son of the New England minister. Rev. William Thompson, of 
Surry county, Va., bought property in New London. 

On August J 6, 1675 the County Court of Surry put on record that 
**On ye parte of Mr. William Thompson now after 13 years experience, 
wee report him an Orthodox faithfuU & painfull minist'rof a quiett, so- 
ber & Exemplary Life & Conversation becoming his function unre- 
proachable." On August r, 1661, William Thompson, of Surry coun- 
ty, minister God's word, gave a general power of attorney to George 
Jordan. There is a deed, dated November i, 1673, from William Thomp- 
son. Clerk, and Katherine, his wife. In or before 1690 he became 
minister of Washington parish, Westmoreland county. There is record- 
ed in Surry a deed dated August 4. 1690 from William Thompson, of 
Wcstm»>reland county, for 150 acres, and appointing his sons, Samue' 
and John Thompson, of Surry, his attorneys. Also, in Surry, another 
deed, dated Dec. 2, 1690, from William Thompson, Clerk, of Westmore- 
land county, conveying to Bagge, 150 acres in Surry, which had 

6 



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194 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

been granted to said Thompson, April 20, 1684. Katherine, wife of 
William Thompson, Clerk, of the parish of Washington, Westmore- 
land, joins in a deed, April 19, 1690. These items enable us to fill gaps 
in the lists of ministers of Southwark and Washington. Mr. Thomp- 
son is not mentioned in Meade's Old Churches. 

Rev. William Thompson and Katherine, his wife, had issue : (1 ) 
John, (2.) Samuel, (3,) William. (4. ) Katherine married Robert Payne, (5,) 
Elizabeth, married William or Robert Catlett. 

John Thompson, the testator above, was born, according to a deposi- 
tion, about 1661. He was a member of the House of Burgesses, for Surry, 
at the Sessions of March 1692-3, April 1695, April 1696 and September 1696. 
He married Elizabeth, widow, first of John Salway, of Surry, (whose 
will dated April 10, 1678, left her his whole estate with reversion to his 
next of kin in England, ) and second, of Joseph Maiden of Surry. Surry 
Records. 

There are two wills of John Thompson in record of Surry. The ear- 
liest was dated August 2nd, 1698, and proved Nov. 7, 1699. He gave 
his brother Samuel Thompson ^^50 sterling, and brother William 
Thompson ^"50 sterling. To wife the labor of his slaves during her 
life — after her death they go to his brothers. If brother Samuel should 
desire to return and live in Surry, he was to have the plantation called 
Gilberts, on condition that he paid testator's executrix 20 shillings per 
annum during her life. To his two brothers and Mr. Robert Paine and Mr. 
Robert [jjV] Catlett 25 shillings each for a rinj. To wife, all estate 
given her by the will of Mr. John Salway. Remainder of estate to wife, 
Elizabeth, and she appointed executrix. 

It is evident that soon after the date of the will just given, Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Thompson died, and that her husband went at once to England. 
The will which is given in the text was proved and recorded in Sur- 
ry, May 14, 1702. It begins : "I, John Thomson, of James River, in 
Virginia, merchant, at present in London, very sick." 

Samuel Thbmpson, another son of Rev. William Thompson, was a 
member of the House of Burgesses for Surry, at the sessions of 
August 1701, May 1702, June 1702, August I7i5and April 1718 .In March, 
1682, Mr. Samuel Tliompson had married Mary, daughter and heire.ss 
of Major William Marriott, of Surry. {Surry Records.) The will of 
Samuel Tliompson was dated Sept. 20, 1720, and proved in Surry May 
17, 1 72 1. Legatees: brother William Thompson, nephew Samuel 
Thompson, cousins, [nephew,] William Moseley, cousin Samuel Thomp- 
son, cousins Katherine, VVilliam and John Thompson, William and 
Mary Moseley — to William Marriott, *'my seal ring, that was my wife's 
father's ring," cousin Robert Payne, wife Mary, and brother William 
Thompson, executors. 

William Thompson, the third son vnamed above) of Rev. William 
Thompson, was born according to a deposition about 1662. He died 
in 1 73 1 or 1732, and by will recorded in Surry bequeathed his property 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 195 

to his children, Samuel, John, Katharine and Hannah, and grand-chil- 
dren, Samuel and Mary.] 

Robert Throckmorton, of Paxton Parva, County Hunt- 
ingdon. Will I March 1698/99; proved 3 May, 1699. 

Pett, 83. 

[Robert Throckmorton was a son of John Throckmorton, formerly of 
Ellington, Huntingdonshire, England, and afterwards of Virginia. Rob- 
bert, the testator, was bon) in Virginia, in 1662 ; but returned to Eng- 
land and died at Paxton Parva, Hunts., March 9, 1698-9. A picture of 
his tomb in the church there, and a copy of the inscription are given in 
the number of this Magazine, cited above. The Virginia Throckmor- 
tons descended from his brothers, Albion and Gabriel, who remained 
in the Colony. For Throckmorton genealogy, documents, Ac, see 
Wiiiiam <3f Mary Qufirterty II, 241 ; III, 46,142,240,280; IV, 128, 202 ; 
V, 54 and Virginia Magazine of History and Biography V, Nos. 4, and 
VIl, numbers 1 and 3. Mr. C. Wickliffe Throckmorton of 503 5th Avenue, 
New York City, is preparing an elaborate history of the Thockmortons 
of England and America.] 

[Abstracts of this will are printed in Virginia Magazine of 
History and Biography, VIIT, 85, 86, and Wm. & Maty 
Quarterly, III, 48.] 

Peter Efford. Will 24 August 1665; proved 2 October 
1665. To my daughter and son Nicholas Efford, all my real 
and personal estate here, or in the plantation of Virginia. To 
them all my tobiacco in custody of Mr. John Curell of Ab- 
church Lane and Mr. Jonathan Smith in Bow I^ane. To my 
son Nicholas, and Sarah my daughter, £100, equally between 
them; if they die, to my kinsman Mr. Tirrell, Prebend of 
Winsor. John Weldon, minister of Newington, and Albertus 
Skinner, gent., executors, to give me as decent a burial as my 
distemper will permit. Witnesses : William Cocke, Joane V.a- 
ker, Joane Wooding. 

Hyde, 113. 

[Peter Efford resided in York county, Va., where his will was proved 
Oct. and, 1666. On Feb. 10, 1660 "Mr Peter Efford" had a grant of 900 
acres in the counties of James City and York, lying between Powhatan 
Swamp [which extends to James River] and Queen's Creek [running 
into York River,] adioining the land of Bradshaw, Vardy, "Mr. Kemp, 
Esq." and Richard Ford— 400 acres of said land bought by Efford from 



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196 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

John Barker, the assignee of John Bromfield, the assignee of Captain 
John Shepard, and Lucy, his wife, the assignees of Captain David Maun- 
sell, under whose name and that of Lucy Webster, the original patent 
of looo acres, was granted January 9, 1640, and re-granted to the said 
Shepard, March 20, 1650, and the other 500 acres due said Efford for 
the transportation of 10 persons into the Colony. 

Sarah Efford, his only surviving child, married Samuel Weldon, J. P. 
for James City county, who was doubtless a son or brother of Rev. John 
Weldon mentioned in the will. In 1692-3 Mrs. Sarah Weldon *'widow 
of Major Samuel Weldon," brought an action of ejectment by Poynes 
Weldon, her attorney. Her husband. Major Samuel Weldon, of Lon- 
don, came to Virginia in 1675 as factor for Philip Foster, of London, 
merchant, and settled in James City county. The family of Weldon 
was long a resident in Virginia and North Carolina. Samuel Weldon. 
of James City county, married in 1725, Elizabeth, daughter of Daniel 
Allen, and widow of Robert Cobbs, of York county. He removed to 
Chesterfield county, and his will names his children (under age.) Dan- 
iel. Benjamin, (who received' lands in Goochland,) Samuel, Elizabeth 
and Priscilla, son-in law Roderick Easley, wife's daughters Sarah 
Jones and Martha Richardson, and her grand-children, Allen. Willie and 
Charlotte Jones, (Mrs. Weldon had by her marriage with Robert Cobbs, 
two daughters, Sarah, who married Robert Jones. Jr., of Sussex coun- 
ty, Va., who emigrated to North Carolina, and was Attorney General 
of that colony, and Martha, who married Dudley Richardson. Mrs. 
Jones was the mother of the distinguished Allen and Willie Jones.) 

Benjamin Weldon, of Southampton county, Va., in his will dated 
August 5, 1755, and proved Feb. 9, 1756, names his brothers Daniel and 
Samuel Weldon, sisters Elizabeth and Priscilla, and cousins Allen, Wil- 
lie and Martha Jones, and appoints Robert Jones and Gray Briggs, ex- 
ecutors. 

In 1749 Daniel Weldon was one of the North Carolina Commissioners 
to run the boundary line with Virginia, and Samuel Weldon, was mem- 
ber of the North Carolina Convention of 1776. The city of Weldon, N. 
C. is named after the family. (See IPi/iiam & Mary Quarterly II, lai.) 

Efford was a family name in theChannell Islands— Guernsey and Jer- 
sey. See Foster's Alumni Oxonienses.'\ 

William Guy, Citizen and Haberdasher of London. Will 
14 November 1665; proved 29 November, 1665. To be bur- 
ied in the parish churchyard of St. Mildred, Breadstreete, 
London. To my brother, Robert Guy, 40s. to buy him a 
rin^, and £6. To my said brother Robert's eldest daughter 
by his first wife, £50. To my said Brother's son William Gu3% 
£50, and to his son John Guy, £50. To my sister Sarah Tarl- 
ton, £100. To my daughter in law Elizabeth Nowell, £20. 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 197 

To Joseph Drewe, my accompt and £20. To my friend Roger 
Martin, £$. To my friend John Martin the elder, £5. To 
my kinswoman Abigail How, £5. To Elizabeth Biscoe, £5. 
To my sister Ann Fisher's two daughters, Sarah and Martha 
Fisher, £20 each. To my friend William Browne, Ribbon 
weaver in Shoreditch, £5. To my cousin John Gate, at pres- 
ent in Virginia, £40. To my friend William Allen of Lon- 
don, Merchant, and Anthony Field, my executors, £20 each, 
and, if any be left, £50 to my sister Sarah Tarlton. the rest 
amongst the children of brother Robert Guy and sister Anne 
Fisher. Witnesses: Wm. Blanchard, John Martin, junior. 
Wilbeard Watts, Anne Martin. 

Hyde, 140. 

Sparks Martin of Withy Bush House, County Pem- 
broke. Esqr. Will 12 September 1786: proved 3 August 
1787. All my manor of Pendergast, with all Royalties. Pro- 
fits, etc., from lands in County Pembroke. Haverfordwest, 
County Middlesex. City of Bristol, or elsewhere in Great 
Britain, to my sister Elizabeth Phelps for life, subject to 
charges made upon certain of my estates through the will of 
my late wife Martha Martin, to be held in trust by Right 
Honble. Richard (Phillips) Lord Milford of Kingdom of Ire- 
land and the Right Honble. William (Edwards) Lord 
Kensington of Kingdom of Ireland, to preserve to her 
use the said estates, and after her, to her son Thomas 
Phelps, and his eldest son in succession, failing 
him, to John Phelps, second son of my said sister 
Elizabeth, and his heirs, failing him, to my brother Henry 
Martin, who went to Virginia, in America, many years ago, 
and his eldest son in succession, failing him, to my Brother 
John Martin, who also went to Virginia many years ago. 
Whoever inherits to take the arms and name of Martin. To 
my housekeeper Mary Probert, £100 a year for life. To 
Elizabeth Probert her sister, £5 a year for life. To Marth.a 
Jones, £5 a year for life. Executrix: Elizabeth Phelps. 
Witnes.ses: Thos. Ormes, junior, Hannah Wills, Joseph Wills, 
all of Charles Square, Hoxton. 

Major, 170. 



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198 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

[In the printed Journal of the Virginia House of Delegates covering 
the period, is an entry of a petition received January 12, 1784, from 
James, Lord Clifden, and Edmund Perry, Esq., Speaker of the House of 
Commons of Ireland, in behalf of certain persons interested under the 
will of Col. John Martin, deceased, in a certain estate which was escheat- 
ed, and also a petition of George Martin to the same effect. The peti- 
tions are not now among the legislative files for 1784 in the Virginia 
State archives, and it is probable that they were withdrawn for use at a 
later session. Unfortunately there are no printed journals accessible 
for a number of years after, so that it is impossible to learn anything 
more in regard to the petitions. 

James Ager, of county Kilkenny, Ireland, (created Baron Clifden in 1776 
and Viscount in 1781), married March 20, 1760, Lucia, eldest daughter of 
John Martin, Esq., (she died July 26, 1802), and widow of Henry Boyle, 
youngest son of Henry, first Earl of Shannon ; and Edmund Sexton Per- 
r\' or Pery (1719-1806), Speaker of the Irish House of Commons, 1771- 
1785, and created Viscount Pery in 1785, married in 1756, Patty young- 
est daughter of John Martin, Esq. What was the relation between these 
ladies and Col. John Martin, of Virginia, does not appear, though it is 
evident that it was on their account that the Virginia Legislature was pe 
titioned. As Sparkes Martin made two Irishmen his trustees, it seems 
probable that his brother, John Martin, was the Col. John Martin, of 
Virginia. 

Col. Martin, of Virginia, was a member of the House of Bu!*gesses 
or Caroline county, at the sessions of November 1738 and May 1740, 
and for King William county, at the sessions of Feb. 1752, Nov. 1753. 
Feb. 1754, Aug. 1754, On. 17.S4, May 1755, Aug. 1755, Oct. 1755 and 
March 1756. He died during the last session. 

All the records of King William have been destroyed, and all those 
of Caroline except the court proceedings, ("Order books"), but from the 
latter a few notes can be gleaned. John Martin was J. P. for Caroline 
in 1732. On Nov. 10, 1738, John Martin, Jr., qualified as an attorney. 
On Oct. 17, 1752 was recorded a deed from John and George Martin, of 
the city of Bristol, merchants, (by John Martin, gent, of Virginia, their 
attorney), to Thomas Turner, gent. 

In the Virginia Gazette, Jan. 27, 1750-51 (Cited in the William & 
Mary Quarterly XII, 741 is an advertisement signed by John and Sam- 
uel Martin, of King William county, announcing the proposed sale of 
the house and land, where Col. John Martin lately lived in Caroline 
county, containing 2700 acres, and in the same paper for Dec. 8-15. 1738, 
is advertised a reward for the return of a silver pint cup, fluted on both 
sides, which had been stolen from Col. John Martin, of Caroline county. 
It had engraved on it his coat of arms, "a chevron between three half 
moons " 

At "Clifton," Caroline county, is a tomb with the following epitaph, 
{W. and M. Q., XI, 146). 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 199 

** Interred beneath this Stone, 

lyes the Body of Mrs. 

Martha Martin, wife of Col. 

John Martin, of Caroline 

County, and daughter of 

Lewis Burwell, Esq., of Gloss- 

ter county, who departed this 

life the 27th of May 1738, in 

the 36th year of her age & left 

three sons & four daughters." 

It is evident that, at the time of the Revolution some or all of Col. 
Martin's sons were residents of Great Britain, or were Tories. In the 
Virginia Council Journal 1777-7S is an order in regard to the estates in 
Goochland counties, of heirs of Lewis B. (doubtless Lewis Burwell,) and 
Samuel Martin, who were British subjects.] 

John Handford of Ludlowe, County Salop, Esqre. Will 
17 September i66q; proved 24 January 1669I70. To my 
son John Handford, gent., my manor of Shobden, and the 
avowson of said Parish in County Hereford. All my estates 
in Ledicott, nether Shobdon, East Hampton, Ap Hampton, 
Hill Hampton als Newton Byton. and Betgatt, sold by one 
Barnecombc Wissmore by indenture inrolled in Chancery, 
dated the 7 June. 1658, or, however. I doe enjoy the same, to 
his heirs male, and after, to the females, failing his issue, to 
Tobias Handford, gent., now living in Virginia, one of the 
sons of Hugh Handford, late of London, deceased, and then 
to his eldest sons in succession, and for want of such issue, 
the tithes of Shobdon for an augumentation to the minister, 
and the property to maintain a preaching minister, and the 
rest, in case my said son and the said Tobias die without issue, 
to Walter Handford of Wollashall, County Worcester, Gent., 
and his heirs male in succession, failing him, to the right 
heirs of me the said John Handford. To my son all my 
bookes of Divinity, History, etc., except those my wife uses 
as her own. To the minister who preaches my funeral ser- 
mon. 40s. To Sir Walter Williams of Upton Bishopp. Coim- 
ty Hereford, Bart., Sir John Winford of Ashley, County 
Worcester, Knt., the Lady Winford. his wife (my wife's sis- 
ter), and to Mrs. Mary Williams, another of my wife's sisters, 
and to her kinswoman Mrs. Eleanor Williams, £5 each. To 



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200 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

every servant living with me at my death, 40s each. All the 
rest not bequeathed I give to my wife. Executors : Sir Wal- 
ter Williams, Bart., Sir John Winford, and my wife. My 
son to be left at school till he can enter one of the Honourable 
Societies of the Inns of Court to study Law. To the poor 
of Ludlow, £3. Witnesses: Richard Wright, Jo. Edwardesi 
Henry Browne, John Browne. 

Penn, 6. 

[The testator evidently belonged to a family seated at Wallashall, in 
the parish of Nafford, Worcestershire, but which had representatives 
in other parts of England. In Nash's IVorces^frshire, II, i8o-i82« is an 
account of the family at Wallashall. Thomas Hanford or Handford 
(stated to be descended in the 8th generation from Sir John Hanford, of 
Cheshire), named Margaret, daughter and co-heiress of William Hig- 
ford. of Nafford, and had issue : I, Margaret, married Thomas Copley, 
of Norton : 2, John married Anne, daughter of Richard Rake : 3, Cath- 
erine married Whittington, of Norgrave. John and Anne (Rake) 

Hanford were the parents of Francis Hanford, (living Ump. Charles I), 
who married Elizabeth, daughter of Walter Gifford, of Chillington. and 
was the father of Walter Hanford, who married Frances, daughter of 
Sir Henry Compton, Knight of the Bath. Walter and Frances (Comp- 
ton) Hanford had issue : i, Compton who married ist — Chaumont and 
had no issue, and 2d— Slingsby : 2. Edward, who was the father of 
Charles Hanford, of Rid Marley. Compton and — (Slingsby) Hanford 
had issue : i. Edward married Elizabeth Hurst, of Haverhill, Essex ; 
2, Charles : 3. Elizabeth. Edward and Elizabeth (Hurst) Hanford had 
issue : i. James : 2. Edward : 3. Charles : 4 Eleanor. The name ap- 
pears to have been spelt, indifferently, Hansford, Hanford or Handford. 
Sir Humphrey Hansford or Handford, of London, was an active mem- 
ber of the Virginia Company, and John Hansford, of London, merchant 
tailor, was also a member. See Brown's Genesis. 

Tobias Hansford, named in the will, lived in Gloucester county, Va. 
On Jan. 8, 1666, Tobias //ans/ord hstd a grant of 324 acres, in Ware Par- 
ish, Gloucester, beginning at a point at the mouth of Deep Creek, in 
Mockjack Bay, and running down the bay and then along Christopher 
Robins's land to the mouth of Finches' Creek. On the same date "Mr. 
Tobias Handford" had a grant of 324 acres in Gloucester, on the East- 
ern side of Wolf Creek, beginning at the mouth thereof— a marsh divi • 
ding this land from that of Col. Augustine Warner, &c. — 150 acres, part 
thereof, was granted to Col. John Walker, Esq., by patent dated March 
15, i65i,and 174 acres, the remainder, taken up. On Oct. 24, 1673, 
Philip Ludwell, Tobias Handford and Richard Whitehead renewed a 
grant of 20,000 acres in New Kent county, on the southside of Mattapo- 
ny river — due for the importation of 400 persons into the Colony.] 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 201 

MoTTRAM Wright of Milend, St. Dunstan's, Stepney, 
County Middlesex, Merchant. Will 8 October 1700; proved 
10 October 1700. To my daughter Frances Wright, iioo 
and 700 acres of land on north side of Rappahamack Creeke, 
in Virginia. To my son Mottrom Wright, i6oo and all my 
lands, etc., in Virginia (except the said 7000 acres), and 6 ne- 
groes. To my cousin John Wright of Puttomack River, in 
\'irginia, £$0 of England. To each and every other of my 
children born of the body of my wife Ruth Wright, 20s. 
apiece and noe more. The rest and residue to my two chil- 
dren Frances and Mottrom ; if they die, to go to my cousin 
John Wright. My son Mottrom to be brought up in the 
Church of England. Executor: Mottrom Wright. Over- 
seer: Captain John Pyrvis. Witnesses: J. Sharpe, A. M., 
James Berouth, Hannah Bradley, Thomas Quilter, N. P. 

Noel, 189. 

[The testator was a party to one of the very few legal separations of 
husband and wife which appear in the early records of Virginia. 

The family of Wright was, like so, many others in Virginia, of Lon- 
don origin. Richard Wright, of London, a merchant or master of a 
ship in the Virginia trade, is recorded as carrying tobacco from Virgin- 
ia to Holland in 1653. This is of record in Northumberland county, a 
contract, dated May 29, 1656, between Richard Wright, of London — 
* 'being homeward bound,*' to transport 60 hogsheads of tobacco. A 
little later Wright settled in Virginia, and was a justice of Northumber- 
land in 1659. He married Ann, daughter of Col. John Mottram, of Nor- 
thumberland county, Tshe afterwards married David Fox ) and died in 
1663. His will is preserved in a much mutilated record book in Nor- 
thumberland. He gives his wife Anne, one half his land Machodoc and 
Potomac rivers— * 'that is the half that joins my brother Spencer (Nicho- 
las Spencer, Esq., of Cople parish, Westmoreland county, Va., and for- 
merly of Cople, Bedfordshire, England, Governor of Virginia, &c., who 
had married Frances, daughter of Col. John Mottram), with reversion 
at her death to his son Francis Wright. To wife two negroes (named.) 
All of the English servants, negroes, not otherwise bequeathed, and 
rest of personal estate in Virginia and Maryland, to be divided into 
three equal parts, of which wife is to have one part and his three chil- 
dren the other two parts. To son. Mottram Wright, all his land on Elk 
Run, Maryland. To my *** land lying ♦♦.—♦♦ Francis **.—♦♦ for dis- 
charging education all my money in England •*. To daughter ** land 
in the freshes of Potomac. To my brother*** land at ♦*. To my broth- 
er Nicholas Spencer, and sister Mrs. Frances Spencer, and brother John 



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202 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Mottram, each a ring. Brothers Spencer and Mottram, overseers. Cou- 
sin Mathew Merriton, of London, merchant, an overseer in England, 
dated Aug. i6,and proved in Northumberland, Dec. lo, 1663. The inven- 
tory of the personal estate of Mr. Richard Wright was recorded March 
10, 1663-4, and was appraised at 23,334 lbs. tobacco. 

Before March 12, 1684, Mottram Wright, the testator above, and the 
son of Richard Wright, whdse will has been given, married Ruth, daugh- 
ter of Robert Griggs, a well-to-do planter of Northumberland county, 
and widow of John Mottram, Jr., who was uncle to Mottram Wright. 
An uncle's widow was within the prohibited degrees of affinity, and it 
seems strange that such a marriage should have been solemnized under 
English jurisdiction, but such the records show, was certainly the case. 
After at least ten years of marriage, and after giving birth to children, 
Mrs. Wright appears to have become horrified at the sinfulness of her 
union, and secured a separation. There is on record in Lancaster coun- 
ty, a bond dated Oct. 12, 1694, reciting that Mottram Wright married 
Ruth Mottram, widow of Major John Mottram, who was the said Mot- 
tram Wright's mother's brother, "which marriage was incestious and 
unlawful," and had been the occasion of the said Ruth's departing from 
her husband 'choosing rather to lead her life in banishment from her 
friends, country and estate, than continue any longer in that sinful mar- 
riage," therefore said Mottram Wright agrees that said Ruth shall live 
separately and apart, and to pay her a suitable alimony, and that the 
daughter be had in marriage with her shall be put to school where he 
shall think fit. There is on record in Lancaster, the marriage contract, 
dated Dec. 11, 1701, between Robert Gibson and Mrs. Ruth Wright, 
widow of Mottram Wright. 

Of course such a marriage as that between Wright and Mrs. Mottram 
would now be legal. 

Mottram Wright, Ir. died without issue, and most of his father's estate 
passed to the daughter, Frances, who married Joseph Belfield, of Rich- 
mond county. Mottram Wright's will (above) was also recorded in 
in Lancaster to July, 1701.I 

Henry Woodhouse of parish of Linhaven, County of 
Lower Norfolk, Virginia. Will 29 January i686|7; proved 
24 July 1688. To my eldest son Henry Woodhouse, my 
plantation I now live on, being 500 acres. To my second son 
Horatio Woodhouse, my plantation called Moyes land. If 
the survey of my land run into Noyes neck, he to have it. To 
my son John Woodhouse, my land next to land of Richard 
Bonney whereon Richard Dobbs dwells. To my two sons 
Horatio and John, my land I bot of Mr. William Bassnett, 
Senior, lying in woods byjohn Swell's lands. To my son Hen- 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 208 

ry Woodhouse, my two Negroes, Roger and Sarah by name. 
Wiien my children Horatio and John are at age, and my 
daughters Elizabeth and Luce i6, the rest of negroes to be di- 
vided among them. To my daughter Mary the wife of William 
More, Negro woman called Kate, 2,000 lbs. of Tobacco, iio, 
and 3 silver spoons. To my daughter Sarah, wife of Earon 
More, iio, 2,000 lbs. of Tobacco, and 3 silver spoons, 
the money being due from Mr. Thomas Minnford. 
All the rest between Henry, Horatio, John, Elizabeth 
and Luce. Executor: Son Henry, he to plant an afple or 
chard in the next two years. Witnesses: William Cornick, 
Mala Thruston. 

Exton. 102. 

[Henry Woodhouse, the testator, was son of Henry Woodhouse, of 
Lower Norfolk county, Va., who died in 1655, and grandson of Capt. 
Henry Woodhouse, Governor of the Bermudas 1623-26. The last named 
was second son of Sir Henry Woodhouse. of Waxham, Norfolk, 
England. For accounts of the Woodhouse family, and will of Henry 
Woodhouse, who died 1655. ^ well as that of Rev. Horatio Wood- 
house, Rector of Collingtree, Northamptonshire, England, who was 
also a son of Governor Woodhouse, and who died in 1697, See H^i/- 
Ham<5f Sfary Quarterly I, 227-232, II, 262-264, V, 41-44, and Vols. I-IV. 
Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary. The name is still promi- 
nently represented in Princess Anne county, a part of old Lower Nor- 
folk.] 

Thomas Blagrave of Westminnster, gent. Will 14 May 
1686. proved 4 December 1688. To my wife Margaret 
Blagrave, my house and land in Teddington, County Middle- 
sex. To my kinsman Thomas Blagrave, £40. To my kins- 
man Ambrose Searle, iio. To my kinsman John Goodwin, 
£20, and forgive what he owes me. To my kinswoman Anne 
Williams, in Virginia, £5. . To my Kinsman Henry John- 
son, £5. To my Kinsman John Blagrave, my brother An- 
thony Blagrave's youngest sonne. £5. To the poor which shall 
be near at my interment, 20s. All the rest to my beloved wife 
Margaret Blagrave, whom I make executrix. Witnesses: 
John Clayton, Elias Silvester, Tho. Jennings. 

Exton, 106. 



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201 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

[There have, apparently, been several families of Blagrave, or Bla- 
grove, in Virginia. A. Henry Blagrave, was a justice of Lunenburg 
county, prior to the Revolution, and Rev. Benjamin Blagrove, son of 
John, of Oxford, England, //^^., matriculated at St. Mary Hall, Oxford, 
Oct. 15, 1764, at ihe age of 18, came to Virginia in 1772, (Foster's Aiutn- 
fit Oxonien%es, and Fothergill's Emigrant Ministers). He became 
Minister of Southwark parish, Surry ; tof>k the American side during the 
Revolution, and was a memberoftheSurry Committee of Safety in 1776. 

John Blagrave, son of Anthony B'agrave, of Berks, Wrw.,who ma- 
triculated at Magdalen College, Feb. i, 1731-2, aged 19, may have been 
the nephew John, named in the will] 

Edward Dewai.l of Warrasquoyke, servant to Symon 
Cornocke of the same. Will 11 November 1636; proved 23 
November 1640 ["Edward Dewell, of Warwicke Squeake, in 
Virginia, defunct," in sentence.]. To Symon Coornocke of War- 
rasquoyke, in Virginia, one Messuage being an Hoast-house 
or Inne in a Towne called Redding, County Berks, England, 
in the parish of Saint Maries, in Minstrell Streete, now or 
late in the tenure of Richard Marcombe. my uncle, as tenant 
to mee, given to me by my father George Dewell in his life 
time being the signe of the Rose, and also all houses and 
money left me by my mother, Joane Duell. Executor : Symon 
Cornocke. Witnesses: John Army, Nicholas Spackman, Wil- 
liam Clappum. Sentence, same date, for will in cause between 
executor Simon Curnocke and brother Humphry Dewell, 
claiming to be administrator. 

Coventry, 139. 

[This will gives an unusual, though not unique instance, of a servant 
owning lands or houses.] 

Elizabeth Draper of London. Widow. Will 17 August, 
1625 ; proved 3 September 1625. To my son Vincent Draper, 
in lieu of his child's pte.. ii50. To my grandchild Darcis 
Draper, daughter of said Vincent, £150 when 18 or day of 
marriage, her Aunt Sara Symons to have the education of 
her. If she die, one-half to her father and the other half to 
her said aunt. To my grandchildren Elizabeth and Mary 
Peirsey, daughters of my sonne-in-law Abraham Peirsey, 
merchaunte, resident in Virginia. £100 apiece when 18 or mar- 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 205 

riage; if they die, the money to be divided between the said 
Vincent and Sara. To Abraham Peirsiey a ring of value of 
30s. To my son in law Thurston Symons, one Ringe value 
30s. To Mrs. Cowley, my cosen, 30s. to make her a Ringe. 
To my god-daughter Elizabeth Cowley, one Ring with eight 
Dyamond Stones in it. To my daughter Elizabeth Peirsey one 
dyamond Ringe. To Alary Peirsey one Dyamond Ringe set 
after the Duch fashion. To Darkis Draper, one Opell Ringe 
with sixe Opelle stones of several colours in yt. To my cosen 
Smythson, 20s., and to his wife, 20s., and his daughter Eliza- 
beth, 20s. To the poore of St. Clements neare Candlewicke 
streete, in London, wherein I nowe dwell, 50s. To John Pen*- 
sye, 13s, ^d. To Mr. Price, Clarke of St. Clements paryshe. 
20s. To Netherwood, the sexton of same p'sh., los. To Kath- 
erin Ruter, my mayde servant, 50s. To Robert Mincharde, 
Scrivener, 13s., 4d. All the rest to my executors in trust for 
my daughter Sara Simmons, her husband and Thurstone 
Symons not to have any claim (he, notwithstanding his pre- 
tensions of giving up his vile and lewd courses, having 
wronged me). Executors: my lovinge Cozens Mr. Richard 
Berisford, marchante of London, that sometime dwelt uppon 

Newe Fyshstreet Hill, London, and Warriner, mer- 

chante. dwelling in Mark Lane, in London. Mem, of Scriv- 
ener, Robert Mincharde, that the said testatrix did order me 
to draw up her will in the aforesaid manner in the presence of 
Katherin Ruter. 

Clarke, 93. 

[Abraham Persey orPiersey, who dieH in 1628, was a member of the 
Council, and was reputed to be the wealthiest man of his day in Virg:in- 
ia. He married twice, his first wife, evidently the daughter of Mrs. Dra- 
per, was the mother of his two children. Elizabeth and Mary. His 
will was printed in full in Neill's Virginia Caroiorium, 404-406, and an 
abstract from the P. C. C, gjiven in the Magazine XII, 177-178. See 
also this Magazine I, 187-188 ] 



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206 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



VIRGINIA MILITIA IN THE REVOLUTION. 



(continued.) 



1777. 

Jan'y 20. Smith, Owen, for a Gun, by Capt. Lew. Jones's 
Certificate, 3. — . — . 

31. Smiths Savage & Comply, for Gunpowder, as P. 
Acco't, 1792. 10. — . 

Feb'y 3. Shermer, Robert, for one Rifle furnish' d Capt. 
Bates's Comp'y Cherokee Exp'n, 4. 15. — . 

Sheald, Daniel, for Do. Do. Do., 16. 10. — . 

4. Straughan, Reubin, for 17 days service and rations as 
Q'r-Master Serg't to 2d Battalion to Oct. 7, incl., 2. 8. i>4. 

10. Sharp, Rich'd, for 2 Muskets P. Turner Southall's Cer- 
tificate, 9. — . — . 

19. Sutton, Ebenezer, for horse hire to an Express from 
Fort Pitt, 4. 7. 6. 

Mar. 7. Seward, Capt. William C, for pay & Rations of his 
Comp'y Surry Militia to 8th inst., iii. 4. 4. 

17. Stephen & Hunter, for 3 Waggons furnished from Octo. 
I to Mar. 12 and returning, 262. 10. — . 

Skinner, John, for Wood furnished the Militia at Hampton, 

4- 5. — • 

22. Smith, William, for Cart hire, 9. — . — . Do., Do., for 
Wood framing & Plank, 72. — , ii>i>. 

Smith, John, for his Wages Sc Negro hire at Portsmouth, 
22. 4. — . 

Scott, John, for 5)^2 days work at Fort Stephen, i. 2. — . 
Ditto for 33 J^ do. on Gun Carriages, 6. 14. — . 

Scott, Tenant, for 25 do. for self & 177,' j of five Negroes at 
Fort Stephen, 43. 15. — . 

Sikes, Caleb, for 19 Do., Do., 3. 16. — . 

Stewart 8c Mohun, for Smith's Work to the 3d of February, 
112. I. — . 

April I. Syme, Col. John, for provision furnished Capt. 
Johnson's Comp'y Militia, 6. 10. 10. 



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VIRGINIA MILITIA IN THE REVOLUTION. 207 

4. Smith, William, for one Gun delivered Col. John Wilson, 
4. — . — . 

8. Smith, Capt. Thomas, for pay & rations of his Comp'y 
Cherok. Exped'n, &c., 203, i. i. 

22. Simmonds, Capt. John, for pay & rations of his Comp*y 
Militia to Mar. 31, 164. 3. 5. 

23. Southall, James, for 85 diets furnished Capt. Lewis's 
Comp*y N. Kent Militia, 2. 2. 6. 

24. Sykes, Jesse, for Work done on Fort Stephen. P. cert., 
16. 16. — . 

28. Smith, John, for his Wages & Negro hire to the 26th 
instant, 19. 19. 10. 

Shipp, John, for Hiccory for Ax helves & Handspikes fur- 
nished P. Acco't. II. 3. 8. 

Stewart & Mohun, for Smith's Work for Gun Carriages, &c., 
to Ap'l 26th inst., 68. 13. 9. ' 

Stroud, William, for 7 days Work getting Timber for Gun 
Carriages, Portsm'th, i. 15. — . 

May 10. Stewart, Charles, for a Gun furnished the Louisa 
Militia, 3. — . — . 

13. Smith, Capt. William, for pay, &c., of the Gloster Do., 
P. Acco't, 79. 19. 2. 

15. Sale, Capt John, for Waggonage & Provisions to his 
Comp'y, 76. 19. 8. 

16. Shackleford, William, for a Gun for Capt. Jas. Turner's 
Min't Do., 2. 15. — . 

Smith, James, for 3 Tomahawks, &c., furnished Ditto, 

-. 13. 6. 

17. Stoval, Thomas, for a Gun paid P. Carrington, 2. 15. — . 
20. Scott, John, his Estate for 2 houses for Barracks for 

Min't men, &c., to Dec. 3d last, 8. 6. 8. 

22. Simpson,, Southy, for pay lead, &c., as P. Acco't, 
II. 14. — . 

Ditto for sundry Persons, Provisions, &c., P. Acco't, 62. 

13- —• 

24. Scruggs, Valentine, for 1 Gun furnished Capt. Ballows 
Min't Comp'v, 3. 15. — . 

26. Severe, Valentine, for 51 days pay as a Spy against the 
Cherokees (n- 5s, 12. 15. — . 



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208 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

27. Stone, Stephen, for i Gun delivered Capt. John 
Winston, 2. 15. — . 

30. Sullens, John, for bal. due for Waggon hire on Cherokee 
Exped'n, P. Acco't, 6. 3. — . 

June 2. Smith, Arthur, for Waggon hire to the troops at 
Portsmouth, 28. — . — . 

9. Smith, John, for self and others for sundry Work, &c., 
on the Fort at Portsmouth, P. Acco*t, 99. 11. 9. 

Southail, Capt. James, for pay & rations of his Comply on 
duty in Feb'y last, 37. 9. 4. 

13. Simms, John, for a Gun furnished Capt. Charles Dab- 
ney*s Min't Comply, 2. — . — . 

Shoat. Edward, for a Rifle furnished Capt. Perkins's Comp'y, 
Cherokee Expedition, 6. — . — . 

17. Southail, Capt. James, for 360 rations omitted in pay 
roll, 9. 12. — . 

18. Strode, John, for one Gun & Bayonet furnished Capt. 
Walter Towles Min't Comp'y, 6. — . — . 

25. Selden, William, for 140 large Pine Trees furnished for 
the Battery at Hampton, 70. — . — . 

27. Smith, William, for carriage of Bacon & horse hire & 
procuring Provisions P. Acco't, — . 17. — . 

July 9. Smith, John, for pay of self & sundry Workmen 
at Portsmouth, P. Acco't, 141. 9. 6. 

Aug'st 2. Sinclair, Alexander, for sundries furnished Capt. 
Bowyer's Comp'y Cherokee Exp'n, 5. 15. 6. 

5. Stewart, John & Elias Wingate, for 9 days each work'g 
on Gun Carriages at 4s, 3. 12. — . 

23. Seawell, Joseph, for victualling Capts. Hubard's and 
Row's Comp'y of Militia, P. Acco't, 7. i. 6. 

26. Sandifer, John, for victualing 46 of the Warwick Militia, 
&c., P. Acco't, 20. 2. — . 

Sept'r 1. Smith, Capt. Lawrence, for pay, &c., of Sussex 
Militia, P. Acco't, S'^, 7. 3. 

Shields, Capt. James, for pay of his Comp'y of York Militia, 
P. Acco't, 42. 12. 5. 

(TO BE CONTINUED.) 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 209 

HISTORICAL AND GENEALOGICAL NOTES 
AND QUERIES. 



[The editor of the Magazine is indebted to President McCabe for an 
acquaintance with Mr. Austen Leigh's investigations into the history of 
Eton. That a number of Virginu boys were at that famous college has 
not been before known. The following appears in Foster's Alumni Ox- 
onienses in regard to Lewis Bur well the younger who is referred to be- 
low: **Burwell, Lewis, s. Lewis, of Virginia, America, arm. Balliol 
Coll. matric 30 March, 1765, aged 18." This Lewis Burwell represented 
Gloucester county in the House of Burgesses and Conventions. The 
letters copied below were printed in Thti Eton ColUfre Chronicle. '\ 

AMERICANS AT ETON IN COLONIAL DAYS. 
To the Editor of the Eton College Chronicle: 

Dear Sir,— It may not be generally known that it was a no un- 
common practice in the i8th century for Americans to send their sons 
to England for their education. Some of these boys naturally found 
their way to Eton, but in the almost complete absence of any records 
here, the difficulty is to discover their names. A few however can be 
rescued from various sources, thus the Eton Parish Register records the 
death of Beverley Randolph, 'scholar from Virginia,' who was buried 
at Eton, 29 April, 1763. Again the registers of some of the colleges at 
Cambridge gives us other names. At Caius and at St. John's a carefull 
register was kept of every student's birth-place and school. Thus we 
find at St fohn's, Paul Trapier from South Carolina, and William Ot- 
teley, described as *from America,' both at Eton under Dr. Barnard: 
and at Caius College, Louis Burwell. of Virginia, who was seven years at 
Eton under Drs. Bland and George; Thomas Lynch from South Caro- 
lina, at Eton under Dr. Barnard ; and William Huger from South Caro- 
lina, at Eton under Dr. Foster. 

Through the kindness of my friend Colonel McCabe of Richmond, 
Virginia, I have been supplied with details about all the above names 
with the exception of Otteley. Colonel McCabe tells me that the in- 
formation may be absolutely relied on as it has been given him for 
Randolph and Burwell by Mr. G. W. Stanard, Corresponding Secretary 
of the Virginia Historical Society; and for Lynch, Huger and Trapier, 
by Mr. A. S. Salley, Junr., Corresponding Secretary of the South Caro- 
lina Historical Society, 

N. B. — The matter within square brackets is added from the registers 
in Caius and St. John's College. 

Randolph, Beverley, was a son of either Beverley or John, sons of Sir 
John Randolph, Knt., Speaker of the Virginia House of Burgesses. 

Burwell, Lewis, son of Nathaniel, was afterwards of Caius College, 

7 



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210 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Cambridge. He was President of the Council of Virginia and Acting 
Governor, 1750-51. This Lewis Burwell, of Eton and Caius, was 
certainly the father of the Lewis Burwell of Balliol, Oxford. 

Lynchf Thomas, son of Thomas Lynch, Esq., of Prince George's 
Parish, Winyah, South Carolina; [b. Aug. 5lh, 1749; school, Eton 4 years 
under Mr. Barnard, age 18, admitted fellow Commoner at Caius Coll. 
Cambridge, May i8th, 1767; admitted at Middle Temple, 1767]; Captain 
Continental Army, 1775-1776 ; Member of Congress, 1776-7777 ; signed 
the Declaration ol Independence; was lost at sea, 1779. 

////^^^^T, Francis [«<?/ William] son of Daniel Huger, Esq., of Lime- 
rick plantation, St. John's Parish, Berkeley County. South Carolina ; 
[b. June 19th, 1751 ; educated 4 years under Mr. Wilton; then at Eton 
2 years under Mr. Foster; age 18 ; admitted Fellow Commoner at Caius 
Coll. Cambridge, March 26th, 1768]; Captain in Continental Army; 
d. Aug. 1800. 

Trapier, Paul, son of Paul Trapier, gent, of Prince George's Parish, 
Winyah, South Carolina ; [school Eton (Dr. Barnard); admitted Pen- 
sionerat St. John's, Cambridge, Mar. 2olh, 1766, aet. 18; Student of Inner 
Temple, Feby. 17, 1767]; m Klizabeth Foissin, 1771 ; Captain of State 
Artillery, 1776. 

Etonians have taken part in many great events, but it will probably 
be news to most of us that one of the signers of the Declaration of In- 
dependence was educated here. 

Yours faithfully, 

Eton College, R. A. Austen Leigh. 

March 22, 1905. 

Dear .Sir,— I hope this subject is of sufficient interest to warrant 
another leUer. Through the courtesy of the Corresponding Secretaries 
of the Virginia and Maryland Historical Societies, I am now enabled to 
supply a further list of Americans who came to Eton in the eighteenth 
century. 

BurweU, James [entered Eton, Sept 30, 1760] (if a Virginian), of the 
same family as Lewis Burwell, and was son of Nathaniel Bacon Burwell 
{E. C. C No. 1086). 

Dulany, Daniel [entered Eton, Ju'y 10, 1762], son of Hon. Daniel 
Dulany (the younger) and Rebecca Tasker his wife, was born in Annap- 
olis, Province of Maryland, about 1750 or 1751, and in July 1761 was 
taken to England by his father to be educated. He lived for many years 
in Downing Street, London, and at Patcliam or Patching, Su.sse.x. Mr. 
Dulany never returned to America but once after he was taken to Eng- 
land to be educated, and that was in 17.S5, when he paid a visit to his 
only brotlier. Col. Benjamin Tasker Dulany, of Fairfax Co., V^irginia, 
U. S. A. General George Washington in his diary thus writes, "Thursday, 
Dec. 22, 1785, at Mount Vernon, went a foxhunting with the gentlemen 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 211 

who came here yesterday, Daniel Dulany, Jr., Benjamin Dulany, Samuel 
Hanson, Thos. Hanson, Philip Alexander, together with Ferdinando 
Washington and a Mr. Shaw." He died in 1824, and was buried, as 
was also his mother (aet. 98) at the Parish Church of Palcham or 
Patching. Mr. Dulany 's father, the Hon. Daniel Dulany (the younger), 
was one of the ablest lawers in the Province of Maryland, and being 
a loyalist had his large estate in Maryland confiscated in 1781, and this 
was one of the reasons why his eldest son, Daniel Dulany (3rd) chose 
England as his home instead of returning to live in America. 

FUzhufrh, George Lee Mason [entered Eton, May 22, 1758], son of 
Colonel William Kitzhugh of Rousby Hall, Calvert County, Mainland, 
who was a native of Virginia. G. L. M. F. was born in Stafford County, 
Virginia, Aug. 18, 1748, and died 1836. 

Qrymes, Philip and John [entered Eton, Sept. 19, 1760]. sons of Hon. 
Philip Grymes, Escj., of Brandon, Middlesex Co., Virginia, Receiver- 
General of the Colony and Member of the Council. They had an elder 
brother John, who died June 20, 1740, in London, and was hurried in 
the Temple yard, 
(i ) Grymes, Philip Ludwell, was a member of the Colonial and State 
Legislatures, and in 1803 was appointed to the Virginia Council of 
State. He was of Brandon, and died May 18, 1805. 
(2) Grytnes, John Randolph; b. about 1746; d. about 1820. Took the 
Loyalist side, and joined Lord Dunmore, the last English Governor 
of V^irginia, who was making an attempt to regain his place by 
force. Lord Dunmore was much elated at the accession of Grymes, 
and wrote to Lord George Germaine that he was a great acquisition, 
was of the first family in Virginia, a gentleman of fortune, amiable 
character, strict honour, brave, active and able. Grymes is said to 
have served with credit as a major in the Queen's Rangers under 
Simcoe till 1778, when he resigned and went to England, where he 
married and lived for a number of years. He was an officer in the 
corps of American Loyalists raised when it was expected that 
Napoleon would invade England. 
Lee, Philip Thomas fat Eton from 1753 to 1756, and afterwards at 
Christ's College, Cambridge], the second son of Richard Lee and Grace 
Ashton his wife, died Nov. 28th, 1788, at Blenheim, his father's seat on 
the Potomac. He married a Miss Russell, of England. He was of the 
same family as General R. E. Lee. 

Randolph, William, probably a brother of Beverley R., see E. C C. 
No. 1086 [they b9th entered Eton, June 28, 1762]. 

Spotswood, Alexander and John [both entered, Eton, Jan. 8, 1760], 
sons of John Spotswood of Newport, Spotsylvania Co., Virginia, and 
grandsons of Major-Gen. Ale.xander Spotswood, Governor of Virginia. 
The last-named served under Marlborough and was wounded at Blen- 
heim. These boys were at Eton from 1760-64. Alexander became a 



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212 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

brigadier-general, and John a captain in the American army during the 
Revolution. 

Tilghman, Richard [entered Eton, July lo, 1762] (b. Dec. 17th, 1746, 
d. Nov. 24th, 1796), son of James and Anna Tilghman. was educated in 
England, returned home and studied law under Daniel Dulany. At 
the soKcitation of his relative, Sir Philip Frances, the reputed author of 
the letters of Junius, he went to Bengal, India, via England. In respect 
to his political sentiments and proclivities he was permitted to depart 
in June 1776, in company with Gov. Robert Eden, in the British sloop- 
of- war **Fowey," Captain Montague. He died on the second voyage 
from India. 

]^ormeley^ Ralph [entered Eton, Sept. 12, 1757], son of Ralph Wor 
meley of Rosegill, Middlesex Co., Virginia. He inherited and lived 
on that estate. He was born in 1744 and died Jan. 19, 1806. In a letter 
which has been preserved Mr. Wormeley speaks of Robert Darcy Hil- 
liard of Winestead as his contemporary at Eton, and at Trinity Hall, 
Cambridge. His portrait in cap and gown is preserved, and also another 
portrait in a group of four, either at Eton or Cambridge. He was ap- 
pointed in 1 77 1 a member of the Colonial Council, and his loyal sym- 
pathies were so strongly shown at the beginning of the American 
Revolution that he was confined for a year or two to one of his father's 
estates, and compelled to give heavy bond. After the Revolution he 
lived quietly at Rosegill and was noted as a book-collector. His great- 
grandfather, Ralph Wormeley, Esq., also of Rosegill, and Secretary o! 
State of Virginia, was one of the first natives of the colony at Oxford. 
He entered Oriel College, July 14, 1665. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. A. Austen Leigh. 

Eton College, July 18, 1905. 



Notes from the Records of Goochland County. 

At a Ct. held May 21, 1728 

A Commission from Hon. Wm. Gooch, Lt. Gov. & Commander-in- 
chief, to Thos. Randolph, John Fleming, Wm. Mayo, John Woodson, 
Daniel Stoner, Renee Laforee, Tarlton Fleming, Alien Howard & Edw'd 
Scot, gent, to be justices of the peace & Tarlton Fleming & Allen How- 
ard gent, administered the oaths. 

Henry Wood produces a commission from Hon. John Carter, Esq. 
Sec'ty of this Colony to be Clerk of this County. 

Daniel Stoner, gent, produces a commission from Wm. Gooch, Esq., 
to be Sheriff of this County. 

Wm. Mayo, gent, produces a commission from Hon. Peter Beverley. 
Esq. Surveyor General of this Colony to be surveyor of this County. 

On motion of Daniel Stoner, gent, sheriff, his protest against the 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 213 

county for all damages that shall happen unto him for want of a prison, 
is entered. 

June i8, 1728. 

Thos. Prosser presented a commission as deputy attorney for this 
County. 

Sept. 18, 1728. 

Levy : 1132 tithables @ 26 lbs [tobacco] per poll. Richard Randolph 
and John Boiling, Jr., paid for services as burgesses. 

May 20, 1729. 
Was read a new commission of the peace adding George Paine, 
William Cabbell and James Holman, gent, to the Court. 
May 20, 1729— Daniel Stoner produced commission as shenff. 

Oct. I, 1729, 
Levy : 1 165 tithables @ 29 lbs. per poll. 
Oct. 21, 1729. 
Thos. Prosser, deputy King's attorney, allowed 1000 lbs. tobacco an- 
nually for his services. 

Jan. 19, 1729. 

Negro tried for felony (housebreaking) and acquitted, but as some 
of the stolen goods were found in his possession and he not accounting 
for them was ordered to receive 39 lashes. 

Jan. 9, 1739. 

Stephen Hughes, a Quaker, made affirmation. 
July 18, 1730. 
[Contempt of Court.] 

John Fleming, Wm. Mayo, Allen Howard, George Payne, and Wil- 
liam Cabbell, justices, present. 

* 'Thomas Prosser, attorney for Luke Wiles vs. Stephen Hughesi 
asking several questions of the Defendant before any witnesses were 
sworn in the Cause, and being told bv the Court that he ought not to 
proceed in that manner, but that he ought to suffer the witnesses first 
to be sworn, and then to ask leave of such questions as he proposed 
might be asked them, and thereupon the said Thomas Prosser saying that 
if he could not be suffered to speak for his Client he should think injus- 
tice done his Client and that he would ask what questions he pleased 
in behalf of his Client, it is the opinion of the Court the said Thomas 
Prosser enter into bond with good and sufficient Security for jiis good 
behaviour, which he refusing to give, it is ordered that the Sheriff" take 
into his custody ^he said Thomas Prosser and him safely keep in the 
goal of this County, untill he enter into bond with good and sufficient 
Security in the sum of fifty pounds Current money conditional for his 
good behaviour for one year and a day. 



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214 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Upon Thomas Prosser's being committed to prison pursuant to the 
former order, the Jury who were sworn in the Cause between Luke 
Wiles Pit. and Stephen Hughes, Defend't, proceedings to try the same, 
are informed by the Clerk that after he had rec'd the declaration at the 
request of Thomas Prosser aforesaid he delivered it to him, and there- 
upon the Sherif being sent the Goal to demand of him the said declar- 
ation, and his answer to the sherif being that if he had it he would keep 
it, the Clerk is thereupon ordered to go to the Goal and demand of 
him the said declaration, and upon the return of the Clerk, he reports 
to the Court that the said Thomas Prosser's answer to him was that he 
was a prisoner and would not unbundle his papers to look for any 
declaration, and thereupon the Sherif is ordered to bring the said 
Thomas Prosser into Court, who upon his appearance and his being 
asked to deliver to the Clerk the said declaration, [said] that he did 
not know if he had it or not and would not trouble himself to 
look for it, but that he was a prisoner and would answer ever>'thing he 
should do as such and that he would justihe his whole behaviour so 
long as he was worth a penny, upon Consideration of the premises he 
is guilty of a breach of his behaviour and it is thereupon ordered that he 
be fined to our Sovereign Lord the King in the Sum of five pounds 
sterling money and that the sherif keep him in the Goal of this County 
untill he pay the said fine with costs. 



Thomas Prosser being together with his papers ordered to be 
brought into Court that the declaration mentioned in the former order 
may be searched for, the Sherif makes return that he defends himself in 
the Goal with his naked s\*ord. and refuses to come before the Court or 
to suffer his papers to be brought into Court, whereupon it is ordered 
that the Sherif summon a sufficient Guard to keep him in the Goal with- 
out victuals or drink until he deliver up his sword and such other 
offensive weapons as shall be found on him, and also his papers that 
search may be made for the said declaration and if the said declaration 
s not found that the Sherif shall keep him in irons until the next Court. 

Sept. 15, 1730, 
Prosser was released on giving bond for good behaviour, and was 
refused an appeal 

May 17, 1730, 

Was published a proclamation from Governor Gooch for preventing the 
unlawful meetings and combinations of negro and other slaves. 
Also one for |:)roroguing the General Assembly. 

[Pav.ments for Printed Laws ] 
"On Mr. William Parks's letter to the Court it is ordered that there 
be levied for him eight hundred pounds of tobacco cask and conveni- 
ences at the next levy for which the said Parks is to furnish twelve 



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NOTES AND QUERIES. 215 

copys of the laws of the last Session of the Assembly for the use of the 
Justices." [This entry is under date May 17, 1730.] 



Great Storm at Norfolk, 1785. 

Bahimore, August 30, 1785. 
We are just informed from Norfolk, in Virginia, that on Saturday, 
August 14th, they had there a dreadful Gust of Thunder, Hail. Wind 
and Rain. The Wind was so strong as to blow several Vessels from 
their moorings ashore ; happily none were lost. Three small vessels 
were overset, and it was with difficulty that the people were saved. 
Several Chimnies were blown down, and the Roof and Gable End of a 
large Brick House belonging to Captain Archer, blown off. The Hail 
was so violent as to break numbers of Windows, and some of the Stones 
measured Two and a Half Inches in circumference. 

{From the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Adertiser.) 



Freshet in James River, 1786. 

Richmond, June 8. 1786. 
From the quantity of water which has fallen within this fortnight 
passed caused one of the highest freshes that has been known for these 
14 years, which has done considerable damage to all the crops upon the 
low grounds lying upon this river for many miles down it. 

{From the Maryland Journal and Baltimore Advertiser.) 



Town Officers of pETERsnuRo, 1786. 

Petersburg, September 14, 1786. 
On Thursday last were elected out of the twelve Gentlemen chosen 
the day before, by the freeholders and inhabitants of this town, to com- 
pose the Corporation thereof, Dr. John Shore, Mayor ; Robert Boiling, 
Elsq., Recorder, and Thomas G. Peachy, Samuel Davies, Christopher 
McConnico, and Alexander McNabb, Esquires. Aldermen. 

{From the Virginia Gazette and Petersburg Intelligencer.) 



St. John's Dav, Rich.mond. 1791. 

Richmond, Dec. 23, 1791. 
On Tuesday next being the Anniversary of the Festival of St. John 
the Evangelist, the two Lodges, Nos. 10 and 19, intend to unite upon 
this occasion at the Masonic Hall—From thence * * [part missing] will 
be performed, and a charity sermon preached by the Rev. John 
Buchanan, and a Collection made for the benefit of the poor of this 
metropolis. — A band of instrumental music is to be provided to accom- 
pany the Richmond Choir, who will sing several Anthems in parts. 
{From the Virginia Gazette and Weekly Advertiser. ) 



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216 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



GENEALOGY. 



THE MALLORY FAMILY. 



Arms : Mallory of Studley : Or, a Hon rampant, gules, tail forked, col- 
lared ar. Impaling, Zouch : gu. fifteen 
bezants, 5, 4, j, 2, i, a canton erm, crest : a 
nag's head, couped, gu, 
(also J or, a lion rampant, gules, collared ar. 
crest : a nag^s head, gu, 
Thos. Mallory, Dean of Chester : Or, a lion rampant, gules, in dexter 

chief a crescent, of the second, for dif- 
ference (From **A Cheshire Ordinary of 
Arms, I629," {Cheshire Sheaf, Vol. II.) 

That the compiler is enabled to present a corrected and thoroughly 
authenticated account of this ancient family, begining with the lords of 
the manors of Hutton-Conyers and Studley-Royal in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, and coming down to the present generation in America, is due to 
the kindness of Lieutenant Colonel John S. Mallory, U. S. A., in allow- 
ing his large collection of family history to be used, and to the fortu- 
nate discovery, by Mr. Lothrop Withington, of the will of Rev. Philip 
Mallory. 

Various English genealogical writers have thought it probable that 
the Mallorys of Hutton-Conyers and Studley descended from the fami- 
ly of the name seated from a very early date at Kirkby-Mallory and 
Walton-on-the Wolds, Leicestershire. In Nichols's History of Leicester- 
shire, Vol. 4, part 2, p. 761, &c., is an account of the Kirkby-Mallory 
family beginning in the time of King Stephen, and ending in an heiress 
who died in 1482. The Mallorys of Walton-on-the-Wolds sprang from 
the Kirkby-Mallory family, and the estate was owned by a John Mallo- 
ry temp. Edward III. The arms of the Leicestershire families were the 
same as of that in Yorkshire. Old glass in several churches in Leices- 
tershire show them to have been : or, a lion rampant, queue furchee 
gules. Nichols cites from Le Neve's MSS a statement that the Yorkshire 
Mallorys branched from the Leicestershire family in the time of Ed- 
ward II. There is no positive evidence that this is so, but from the 
similarity of arms, a strong probability. 

When the account of the Yorkshire Mallorys is begun conjecture 
ceases and practically every link in'the line of descent, through a period 
of five hundred years, is thoroughly authenticated. 

The best account of the Yorkshire Mallorys is in a Genealogical and 
Biographical Memoir of the Lords of Studley in Yorkshire, by John 
Richard Walbran, Ripon, 1S41, reprinted in Vol. LXVII, Surtees 
Society Publications, 1878. James Raine, the Secretary of the Surtees 
Society, and editor of the volume after Mr. Walbran's death, states 



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GENEALOGY. 217 

that he has not hesitated to make great changes in the text, when re- 
quired by the results of later investigations. The work will be largely 
quoted here. 

The pedigree is also contained in the Visttaiion of Yorkshire^ ^5^3-4* 
Harleian Society, 1581. 

Walbran begins his account by tracing the descent of the manor of 
Studley until it came to the Mallorys. 

Richard le Aleman was lord of Studley in 1 180 and the manor passed 
through several generations of his family until, by an heiress, it went 
to the family of Le Gras, and from them, in the same manner, to Isa- 
bel, wife of Sir Richard Tempest, Kt, second son of Richard Tempest, 
of Bracewell. She died in 1421, and the property descended to her son. 
Sir William Tempest of Studley, Knight, who was upwards of thirty 
years of age at the time of his mother's death. He was knighted be- 
fore 1409, and married Eleanor, only daughter and heiress of Sir Wil- 
liam Washington, of Washington, in the couniy of Durham, by Marga- 
ret, his wife, daughter and heiress of fohn Morvill. They (William and 
Eleanor), were cousins, being related to each other in the 3rd and 4th 
degrees, but their marriage was legalized by dispensation from the 
Archbishop of York, Oct. 20, 1409, long after they had been married 
and children bom to them {TesL Ebor. Ill, 319). She died Jan. 2, 1451, 
and was found seised of half of the manor of Washington {,Inq. p, m, 
24th Jan. XIV, Neville. 1451) 

William Tempest, of Studley, esq, their eldest son and heir, lived 
but a short time after inheriting the estate. He died Jan. 4, 1444 {Inq. 
p, m. 1446^ in 36 Col, 4, p. i6g). The name of his wife is not record- 
ed. He left one son, John, then two years old, who died soon after- 
wards, and two daughters, who became his co-heirs. 

I. Isabel, married Richard Norton, of Norton Conyers, esq. 

II. Dionisia. married William Mallory, of Hutton Conyers, esq., and 
was thirty-six years of age, Oct 24th, 1451. 

William Mallory, Esq., who thus became lord of Studley, jure 
uxoriSf was the representative of an ancient well-allied family. They 
became possessed of Hutton Conyers, Yorkshire, by the marriage of 
Sir Christopher Mallory (son of Sir Thomas and a daughter of Lord 
Zouch) with Joan, daughter and heiress of Robert Conyers, of that 
place, whose ancestor, Robert Conyers — the representative of the elder 
branch of Conyers, of Sackburn —possessed it in 1246, as appears by his 
grant of land there to the church of St. Peter, at York, in that year. 

Sir Christopher* Mallory had issue Sir William', of Hutton, who by 
his wife Katherine, daughter and co-heiress of Ralph Nunwick, of Nun- 
wick, had William*) Mallory, who by his marriage with Joan, daughter 
of Sir William Plumpton, of Plumpton, near Knaresborough, had Wil- 
liam* Mallory, before mentioned, who married Dionisia Tempest, of 
Studley. 

After the family had acquired Studley, it does not appear that they 



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218 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

abandoned the manor house at Hutton, but frequented it occasionally 
until the end of the Sixteenth century, about which time the present 
building, now used as a farm house, seems to have been erected. A 
picturesque gable on the north side, and richly ornamented ceiling (the 
lion of the Mallory arms is displayed in the compartments) in a neglect- 
ed apartment in the southeast wing remain of this date. Large por- 
tions of the rest of the building have been altered in subsequent repairs, 
and seem to confirm the tradition that the house was set upon in the 
Civil warsby a troopof Parhamentarians in the absence of the owner, 
Sir Jonn Mallory, who from his zeal in the Royal cause, must indeed 
have been particularly obnoxiou> to them. Several cannon balls and 
some weapons of war have been found in the fields around. There are 
also some remains of a rampari of earth, running at right angles on the 
north and west sides of the garden, which may have formed part of the 
agger of the moat to the original structure. The mansion is shaded by 
a goodly show of great sycamores, which give it a pleasing air of so- 
lemnity, and seem still to assert its claim to a rank above that of an 
ordinary iarm house. 

On Oct. 25. 1458, Archbishop Booth granted an oratory for three 
years to William Mallory, esq., Dionisia, his wife, and their children 
{/^e£^. 204 a ) which privilege was renewed to them for the same period 
on Nov. 17, 1467 Kf^eg. S7 a-) This was ihe beginning of the Chapel of 
the Blessed Virgin at Studley. 
The will of Mr. Mallory is preserved at York. 

"In Dei nomine Amen. Ego Willelmus Malliore senior, Armiger. 
Sepel iendumin eccles. S. Petri Ripon Coram altare B. Mariae. Op- 
timum animae nomine mortiiam. Lego Johannae filiae meae dere adititi- 
bus de Hoton juxta Ripon, etOver Dedinsall c marcas. Ad maritagi- 
um Margaretae filiae mea c.c. marcas. Volo Henricus Malliore, Cristo- 
forus Malliore, Georgius Malliore et Ricardus Malliore, filii mei habeant, 
terras, protermino vitae suae, ad valieram xl marcarum, in villis de Lyn- 
ton in Craven, Brompton, Coppidhawk, Grantley, VVynkysley, Wode- 
house, and Hytson Flygham in com. Westom, quae sunt de jure & he- 
reditate Dionisiae uxoris mei dicti VVillelmi. Do et lego monasterio 
S. Roberti & fratribus suis pro uno obitu pro anima mea VI s. VIII d. 
Resdiuum lego Dionsiae uxori meae, Cristofero et Johannae sorori ejus 
quos facis executoris. Dat. I May mcccclxii. Prob. 25 Ap. 1475 {Reg. 
Test. Ebor. IV, 125. 

William* Mallory had by the heiress of Tempest: I.John* (of whom 
later), II. William; III. Thomas; IV. Christopher. On Jan. 15. 
14S5-6, there is a license for Chr. Mallory and Isabel Malthouse, 
of Ripon, to be married in the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin there, 
without asking the bans. ( Test. EborWl, 350). In 1473 a Chr. Mau- 
lore, gent became a member of the Corpus Christi Guild at York, 
V.Richard. In 1506-7 the will of Richard Mallory was proved by 



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GENEALOGY. 219 

George Mallory, esq , his brother and executor {Ripon Chapter Act 
Book. 329). In 1475 a Richard Mallory, gent, became a member 
of the Corpus Christi Guild at York. VI. Henry, VII. Margaret, 
named Sir John Constable, of Halsham, Knight, and died without 
issue. In 1498 admon. of the effects of Lady Margaret Constable 
was granted to George and Richard Mallory {Reg. Test. Ebor. III> 
333) : VIII. Jane; IX. Isabel; X. Elizabeth; XI. Joan; XII. Eleanor. 

Sir John* Mallory, of Studley, and Hutton Conyers, Knight, the 
eldest son and heir, married Isabel, daughter of Lawrence Hamerton, 

of Hamerton, in Craven, (Yorkshire), and widow of Radclifte, of 

Lancanshire ; although placed by the herald, Glover, in his V^isitation, 
as eldest son and his brother William as second, it appears doubtful 
whether the latter was not in reality the elder, for in 1475, William Mal- 
lory, son and heir of Sir William Mallory and Dionisia Tempest, held 
livery of half the manor of Washington (Surtees froui Hot. Booth, anno 
18**), and that he also died without issue, whereby the inheritance de- 
volved on his nephew, Sir William, son of ^ir John— for in I497, Sir 
William Mallory had license to giant his moiety of the manor and the 
will, tohU son William Mallory {Idem from Rot. Fo.r anno 3.) 

Sir John Mallory's will is not preserved ; but it is evident that he was 
the founder of the Chantry of St. Wilfred, in Ripon minister, at which 
were commemorated th^ souls of Sir John Mallory, and Elizabeth, his 
wife, Sir William Mallory, and Joan, his wife, and those of their chil- ♦ 
dren ; Richard Ratcliffe and Agnes, his wife, Sir Richard Hamerton, 
and Elizabeth his wife, and John Holm. Chaplain ( Ripon Chapter Act* 
320-1. 

In 1535 among the disbursments for St. Wilfred's Chantry there is a 
payment of 200 for theobit of Sir John Mallory, KnL, the founder ( Vator 
Eccl. Henry VIII. V. 252.) 

The Chantry of Sl John, the Evangelist, in Ripon Minister, was found- 
ed about the year 1487, by Eliz widow of Sir John Mallory, {Ripon 
Chapter Acts, 282.) 

(TO BE CONTINUED.) 



THE BRENT FAMILY. 

Compiled by W. B. Chilton, Washington, D. C 

(continued.) 

The Brents of Kent. 



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220 



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GENEALOGY. 223 



THE BROOKE FAMILY OF VIRGINIA. 

(By Prof. St. George Tucker Brooke, Morgantown, W. Va.) 

(continued) 

The will of Robert Brooke, oldest son of Robert Brooke, Jr., the 
Knight of the Golden Horse Shoe. See this Magazine for April, 1902, 
P- 436. 

January the 28th, Ann. Dom., One Thousand Seven Hundred and 
Eighty Five, I Robert Brooke, gentleman, of the county of Essex, and 
Parish of St Ann's, seriously considering the uncertainty of human life, 
and being desirous of disposing of my worldly affairs, as justice and 
equily seem to direct, do, while in perfect health and memory, God be 
praised, make and ordain, this my last will and testament, in manner 
and form following, viz : (i) 

First, I most humbly recommend my soul to the extensive mercy of 
that eternal supreme intelligent being who gave it me, hoping and as- 
suredly believing, through the merits of Jesus Christ, my Savior, to be 
made partaker of life everlasting ; and my body to the earth whereof 
that is made. Item, I give, devise and bequeathe to my son, Humphrey 
Booth Brooke (2) and his heirs forever, the capital messuage wherein 1 
now live, and all other houses within the curtilage of the same, with 
one moity of the tract of land whereon 1 now live, to be laid off^ in quan- 
tity and quality, so as the other moiety may partake of equal advanta- 
ges and benefits with the same, and in case he should die before my- 
self; 1 give, devise and bequeath the same to my son, Edmund Brooke, 
and his heirs forever. Item. 1 give, devise, and bequeath to my son, 
Edmund Brooke (3) and his heirs the reversion of the m<?^suage, or tene- 
ment called by the name of Newfoundland, wherein Mrs. Lydia Bush- 
rod Brooke (4) now lives, by virtue of a settlement of the same for her 
natural life, with the other moiety of the tract of land whereon I now 
live, to be laid off as aforesaid ; and if he should die before myself, to 
my son, Humphrey Booth Brooke, in such manner as the other moiety 
is above limited, to be, and remain to my son Edmund Brooke, and 
his heirs forever. 1 give, devise, and bequeath to each of my daugh- 
ters, Mary (5), Catherine (6), Susannah (7), Sarah (8). and Elizabeth 
Brooke 19), after my debts and legacies are paid, an equal portion of 
my slaves, to be divided by commissioners, to be appointed by the 
Court or the Executors of my will. Item. I give and beijueath to my 
grand-daughter Anne Pettitt Brooke, a bracelet of three gumeas value. 
Item. I give and bequeath the residue of my estate of every kind & 
nature whatsoever, to be equally divided between my sons Humphrey 
and Edmund Brooke, who I ordain and make my Executors. And do 
renounce and revoke all former wills, and publish this to be my last 
will and testament. In witness whereof I have hereunto put my hand, 



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224 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

this day and year first above written by me. Interlined before publi- 
cation. R. Brooke. 
Witness to the publishing hereot : 

John Scrosby, 

Edward Voss ( lo). 

Edwards Matthews. 

Merriday Brown, 

John Matthews. 

At a Court held for Essex County, at Tappahannock, on the i8th day 
of January 1790, this last will and testament of Robert Brooke, dec'd, 
being presented in Court by Humphrey Brooke and Edmund Brooke, 
the execu*^ors herein named, and was proved by Merriday Brown, one 
of the witnesses hereunto, and also by the oath of the said executors, 
and is ordered to be certified ; and a certificate is granted to the said 
Humphrey Brooke and Edmund Brooke, in order to their obtaining 
probate hereof in due form. Test : John P. Lee. 

And at a Court held for the said county at the place aforesaid on the 
20th day of September 1790 this last will and testament of Robert 
Brooke deceased was further proved by the oath of Edwards Matthews, 
another of the witnesses thereto and ordered to be recorded. 

Test : John P. Lee, D. Clk. 

A Copy, Test : A. Southworth, Clerk. 

Notes to the Foregoing Will. 
(i) His wife was Mary Fauntleroy, daughter of William Fauntleroy, of 
Richmond County. It is noteworthy that he does not mention her in 
his will although she certainly survived him. 

(2) Humphrey Booth Brooke, like his father and grandfather, was a sur- 
veyor. His wife was Sally . He and his family moved from Essex 

and nothing is known by this writer of this Lost Tribe of the House ol 
Brooke. 

(3) Edmund Brooke married Harriet Whiting. 

(4) She w^s the widow of the testator's son, Robert Brooke IV. 

(5) Mary married Major Daniel Duval, of the Revolutionary Army 
and of Nailors Hole, Essex ; issue Maria Brooke Duval, married Wil- 
liam French, of North Carolina, issue James Strother Fiench. 

(6) Catherine, born Feb. 14th, 1762, died October 23rd, 1821, married 
Peter Francisco, b ?, died January i6th, 1831 (date of marriage un- 
known), of the Revolutionary army and of Buckingham County ; issue, 
( i) Susan Brooke Francisco, married Col. Edward Pescud and (2) 
Catherine Brooke Francisco married Dandridge Spotswood, 3rd son of 
Capt. John Spots wood, of "Orange Grove," Orange County, Va., and 
of his wife Sally, daughter of Col. John Rowzie, of Essex. 

(Ill) Peter Francisco, physician, never married. 

(TO BE CONTINTED. ) 



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PUBLICATIONS OF THE VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



" Collections of the Virginia Historical Society. New Series. Edited 
by R. A. Brock, Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society, 
(Seal) Richmond, Va. Published by the Society.'' Eleven annual 
Yolumes, uniform. 8vo., cloth, issued 1882-92, carefully indexed, as 
follows : 

The Official Letters of Alexander Spotswood, Lieutenant-Governor of 
the Colony of Virginia, 17 10- 1722. Now first printed from the manu- 
script in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, with an 
introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two Volumes. Portrait ana Arms, pp xxi-179 and vii-568. K 00 

The Oflficial Records of Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant-Governor of the 
Colony of Virginia, 1751-1758. Now first printed from the manu- 
script in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, with an 
introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two volumes, pp. lxix-528 and xviii-768. Portraits, facsimile of letters of presentation 
Iran W. W. Corcoran, cut ot Mace of Borough of Norfolk, Va., and reproduction of the 
Map of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, engraved for Jeflferson's Notes 
•a Virginia, 1787. 5 5 

Documents. Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration 
to Virginia and to the Settlement at Manakin Town, with an Appen- 
dix of Genealogies, presenting data of the Fontaine, Maury, Dupuy, 
Trabue, Marye. Chastaine, Cocke and other Families. 
Piqpes xxi-247. Contains /ac-xiMf/^ of plan of "King William's Town." t hO 

Miscellaneous Papers, 1 672-1865. Now first printed from the manuscript 
in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society. Comprising 
Charter of the Royal African Co., 1672; Report on the Huguenot 
Settlement 1700; Papers of George Gilmer of "Pen Park," 1775-78; 
Orderly Book of Capt. George Stubblefield, 1776; Career of the 
Iron-clad Virginia, 1862; Memorial of Johnson's Island, 1862-4; Beale's 
Cav. Brigade Parole, 1865. 
Fages viii-374. 2 50 

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Virginia Company of London, 1619- 
1624, Prepared from the Records in the Library of Congress by 
Conway Robinson, with an introduction and notes. Vols. I and IL 
Two volumes. Pages xlvii-aiS and 300. The introduction contains a valuable critical 

mm!f oa the sources of information for the student of Virginia History. 6 00 

The History of the Virginia Federal Convention of 1788, with some ac- 
count of the Eminent Virginians of that era who were members of 
the Body, by Hugh Blair Grigsby. LL. D , with a Biographical 
Sketch of the Author and illustrative notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two volumes. Pages xxvii-37a and 411. ."i 00 

Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society at the Annual Meeting 
held December 21-22, 1891, with Historical Papers read on the oc- 
casion and others. 
Piqpes xix-586. Contains papers on the Virginia Committee of Correspondence and the 
Can for the First Congress; Historical Elements in Virginia Education and Literary 
Efibft ; Notes on Recent Work in Southern History ; Ancient Epitaphs and Descriptions 
ia York and James City Counties, Washington's First Election to the House of Burgesses: 
Sfliitbfield Church, built In 1653, Richmond's First Academy ; FacU from the Accomac 
Comity Records, Relating to Bacon's Rebellion ; Thomas Hansford, first Martyr to Ameri- 
CSB Uberty ; Joamal of Captain Charles Lewis in Washington's Expedition against the 
FtCBch io 1755; Orderly Books of Major Wm. Heatl> ''77, and Capt. Robert Gamble, 1779, 
lad Memoir of General John Cropper. r^ Of^WTp' 

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The full set of these publications can be obtained for $3 1 .00, or the separate 
publications, at the prices named. 

CATALOGUE OF THE MANUSCRIPTS in the Collection of the Virginia Historical Society 
and also of Some Printed Papers. Compiled by order of the Executive Committee. Supplement to 
the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Richmond : Wm. Ellis Jones, Printer. 1901. 

Paper, 120 pp. Price, |i.oo. Sent free to members and subscribers on receipt of 10 cents'for post* 
age, &c. 

AN ABRIDGMENT OF THE LAWS OF VIRGINIA. Compiled in 1694. From the origina 
manuscripts in the collection of the Virginia Historical Society. 80 pp., paper. Richmond, 190^ 

An edition of 300 copies, reprinted from the Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. Price, 
li.oo. 

Discount allowed to booksellers. 

Virginia Magazhje of History and Biography. 

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, Edited to October 
I St, 1898, by Philip A. Bruce, and since that date by William G. Stanard, 
Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society, (Seal). Pub- 
lished Quarterly by the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va. 
House of the Society, No. 707 East Franklin St. 

Volume I — Octavo, pp. 484-viii-xxvi-xxxii. 

Contains cut of the Society's Building, accounts of the proceedings and transactions of 
the Society for the year 1893, and many exceedingly valuable, original historical docnments 
and papers which have never before appeared in print. Among others may be mentioned, 
Discourse of the London Company on its administration of Virginia affairs, 1607-1624; 
Abstracts of Colonial Patents in the Register of the Virginia Land Office, beginning in 1624, 
with full genealogical notes and an extended Genealogy of the Claiborne Family ; The 
Mutiny in Virginia in 1635 ; Samuel Matthew's Letter and Sir John Harvey's Declaration ; 
Speech of Governor Berkeley and Declaration of the Assembly with reference to the change 
of Government in England and the passage of the First Navigation Act of 1651 ; Petition 
of the Planters of Virginia and Maryland in opposition to the Navigation Act of 1661 
Bacon's Rebellion, 1676; His three proclamations, Letters of Sherwood and Ludwell, Pro- 
posals of Smith and Ludwell, and Thomas Bacon's Petition ; Letters of William Fitzhugh 
(1650-1701), a Leading Lawyer and Planter of Virgmia, with a genenlogical account of the 
Fitzhughs in England ; Lists of Public Officers in the various Counties in Virginia late in 
the 17th and early in the i8th centuries ; Roster of Soldiers in the French and Indian Wan 
under Colonel Washington ; Officers, Seamen and Marines in the Virginia Navy of the 
Revolution ; Roll of the 4th Virginia Regiment in the Revolution ; Diary of Captain John 
Davis of the Pennsylvania Line in the Yorktown Campaign ; General George Rc^^er* 
Clark, — Roll of the Illinois and Crockett's Regiments and the Expedition to Vincennet ; 
Department of " Historical Notes and Queries." containing contributions by Hon. Wm. 
Wirt Henry, and many other items of value ; Department of " Book Reviews ; " A full 
Index. S M 

Volume II— Octavo, pp. 482-ii-xxiv. 

Contains a full account of the proceedings and transactions of the Society for the 
year 1894, and the following list of articles copied from the original documents : Report 
of Governor and Council on the Ccmdition of Affairs in Virginia in i6a6 ; Abstracts of Col- 
onial Patents in the Register of the Virginia Land Office, with full genealogical notes and 
extended enealofiries of the Fleet. Robins and Thoroughgood Families ; ReporU of Griev- 
ances by the Counties of Virginia after the suppression of Bacon's Insurrection ; A full his- 
tory of the First Legislative Assembly ever held in America (that in 1619 at Jamestown), 
written by Hon. Wm. Wirt Henry ; The concluding list of Virgmia Soldiers engaged in 
the French and Indian Wars ; The opening lists of the Virginia Officers and Men in the 
Continental Line, compiled from official sources ; A valuable account of the Indian Wan 
in Augusta County, by Mr. Joseph A. Waddetl, with the lists of the killed and wounded ; 
Instructions to Governor Yeardley in 1618 and 1626, and to Governor Berkeley in 1641 ; Let- 
ters of William Fitzhugh continued, with full genealogical notes; The Will of William 
Fitzhugh; A completr List of Public Officers in Virginia in 170a and 1714; Valuable ac- 
count of Horse Racing in Virginia, by Mr. Wm. G. Stanard ; The first instalment of an 
article on Robert Beverley and his Descendants ; Wills of Richard Kemp and Rev. John 
Lawrence, both bearing the date of the 17th century; Short Biographies of all the memhert 
of the Virginia Historical Society who died in the course of 1894; An elaborate Genealogy 
of the Floumoy Family, throwing light on the Huguenot Emigration ; Department of His- 



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torical Notes and Queries, containing many valuable short historical papers and also Gene- 
mtogical contributions, among which the Carr and Landon Genealogies are of special 
interest ; Department of Book Reviews, containing criiical articles by well known historical 
scholars. Volume il, like Volume I, has been thoroughly indexed. 5 00 

VoLUMB III— Octavo, pp. 460-ii-xxviii. 

Contains a full account of the proceedings of the Society for the year 1895, and the follow- 
ing list of articles copied from original documents : Letters of William Fitzhugh con- 
tinued; Instructions to Berkeley, 1662; Virginia under Governors Harvey and Gooch; 
Causes of Discontent leading to the Insurrection of 1666 under Bacon ; Will of Benjamin 
Harrison the Elder; Culpeper's Report on Virginia in 1683; Defense of Col. Edward Hill ; 
A series of Colonial letters written by William Byrd, Jr., Thomas Ludwell, Robert Carter, 
Richard Lee, and Sir John Randolph ; Decisions of the General Court of Virginia, 1626- 
i6a8, first instalment ; Indictment of Governor Nicholson by the leading members of his 
Council; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, extending to 1635, with full genealogical 
notes; A History of Roberi Beverley and his Descendants, with interesting Wills and new 
matter obtained from England ; Genealogies of the Floumoy, Cocke, Carr, Todd and Chap- 
pell Families ; Voluminous Historical Notes and Queries of extraordinary original value, 
relating to a great variety of subjects ; Department of Book Reviews, containing articles 
£nmi the pens of well known historical scholars. Volume III, like the preceding Volumes, 
has a full index. fi 00 

VoLUMB IV— Octavo, pp 492-i-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of Contents : A Marriage Agreement between John 
Cnstis and his wife ; A Perswasive to Tovms and Cohabitation by Rev. Francis Mackemie 
1705; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents for 1635-6; Army Supplies in the Revolution, 
Series of original letters by Judge Innes; Attacks by the Dutch on Virginia Fleet, 1667 ; 
Boondary Line Proceedings, for Virginia and North Carolina 1710; Charges against Spots- 
wood by House of Burgess 17 19 ; Council Proceedings. 1716-1717; Decisions of Virginia 
General Court, 1626-38 Continued ; Defence of Colonel Edward Hill Continued Depositions 
of Revolutionary Soldiers from County records ; Early Spotsylvania Marriage Licenses: 
Genealogy— Cocke, Floumoy, Trabue, Jones, and Rootes Families ; Historical Notes and 
Queries ; A full list of House of Burgesses, 1766 to 1775; Instructions to Governor Francis 
Nicliolson : Letter and Proclamation of Argall ; Letters of William Fitzhugh ; Narrative of 
Bacon's Rebellion by the English Commissioners ; full abstracts of Northampton County 
Records in 17th Century ; Ordeal of Touch in Colonial Virginia : Patent of Auditor and 
Sorveyor-General ; Prince George County Records with much information as to its families ; 
Proceedings of Visitors of William and Mary College, 1716; A list of Shareholders in Lon- 
don Company, 1783 ; also of Slave Owners in Spotsylvania County, 1783 ; Virginia Tobacco 
in Russia in 17th Century. Volume IV has a full index. 6 00 

VoLUMB V— OcUvo, pp. 472-i-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of ContenU: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patenu, 
1636; and Patents and Grants, 1769; Rappahannock and Isle of Wight Wills, 17th Century ; 
Government of Virginia, 1666 ; Bacon's Men in Surry ; and List of Persons Suffering by the 
R^Mllion; Boundary Line Proceedings, 1710; Carier Papers; Case of Anthony Penton; 
Colonial and Revolutionary Letters, Miscellaneous ; Early Episcopacy in Accomac ; Depo- 
sitions of Continental Soldiers; Families of Lower Norfolk and Princess Anne Counties; 
Genealogy of the Cocke, Godwin, Walke, Moseley, Markham, Carr, Hughes, Winston, 
Calvert, Parker and Brock enbrough Families; General Court Decisions, 1640, 1641, 1666; 
Memoranda Relating to the House of Burgesses, 1685-91 ; Journal of John Barnwell in Yam- 
msttrr War; Letters of Lafayette in Yorktown Campaign ; Letters of William Fitzhugh ; 
Letters to Thomas Adams, 1769-71 ; Public Officers, 1781 ; Northampton County Records, 
17th Century ; List, Oath and Duties of Viewers of Tobacco Crop, 1639 ; Petition of John 
Mercer Respecting Marboro Town; Price Lists and Diary of Colonel Fleming, 1788-98; 
Abstract of Title to Greenspring ; Tithables of Lancaster Coun y, 17th Century ; The Me- 
herrin Indians: The Trial of Criminal Cases in i8th Century. Volume V has a full index 6 00 

VoLUMB VI— OcUvo, pp. 4/3-iv-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents: The Acadians in Virginia; 
Letters to Thomas Adams ; Journal of John Barnwell ; Vindication of Sir William Berk- 
eley ; Will of Mrs. Mary Willing Byrd ; Inventory of Robert Carter ; Virginia Society of 
the Cincinnati ; Epitaphs at Brandon ; Trustees of Hampden-Sidney College ; Jacobitism in 
Virgtnla ; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents ; Letters of Lafayette ; A New Clue to the 
Lee Ancestry i Letters of General Henry Lee ; Sir Thomas Smythe's Reply to Bargrave ; 
Yirginim in 1623, i622-4, and 1771 ; Virginia Borrowing from Spain ; The Virginia Company 
and the House of Commons ; Virginia Militia in the Revolution ; Washington's Capitu- 
lation at Fort Necessity; Election of Washington (Poll List), 1758; Burning of William 
and Mary College, 1705; Reminiscences of Western Virginia, 1770-90, &c., &c., &c., with 
tallfaidex 6 00 



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JOHN F. GLENN. Cashier. GEO. H. KEESEE, Asst. Cashier. 

oct.i904-iyr. 

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326 College Street, Richmond, Va. 

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FENLAND NOTES AND QUERIES, 

Edited by REV. W. D. SWEETING. M.A.. 
Holy Trinity Vicarage. Rotherhithe. London, S. E. 
A Quarterly Journal devoted to the Antiquities, Geology, Natural 
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THE HISTORY OF FAMILIES OF PITTSYL- 
VANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 



Pittsylvania County is the largest county in the State of Virginia, 
and was once even larger, embracing the territory now known as the 
counties of Patrick and Henry. Being incorporated in 1767, Pittsyl- 
vania has had an interesting history of its own for 138 years, covering 
the turbulent times of the Revolution. 

The records and will books of the county are very complete and 
thorough, and in a perfect state of preservation, giving a list of all offi- 
cers in the early magisterial courts; many rosters of officers and soldiers 
of the Revolution and Civil Wars and numbers of declarations of the 
Revolutionary soldiers. 

From this county have gone many pioneers of iron nerve, who 
settled the vast South and West, and the descendants of these men 
would find the records of this county of untold interest. 

I am in a position to furnish copies of and data from these records 
at a nominal price, and would be pleased to correspond with any one 
desiring information concerning them. 

Mrs. NATHANIEL E. CLEMENT, 
Member of Virginia Historical Society, 

Chatham, Pittsylvania County, Va. 



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In the vici^tude:! of war, and the repeated removals to vbicb the 
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bers and well' wishers will therefore be gratefully received. 

It i$ especially dcmmble to secure as complete a collectton as possi- 
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Any book or pamphlet wriuen by a native or resident of Virginia, 
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THE 



VIRGINIA MAGAZINE 



OF 



HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 

RICHMOND, VA. 



VOL. XIII— No. a. JANUARY. 10O6. 



Entered at the Postoffice at Richmond, Va., as Second-class Matter. 



WM. ELLIS JONES. PRINTER, Digitized by GoOglc 



iao7 E. Franklin St. 



PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 



ARCHER ANDERSON, CHAS. V. MEREDITH, 
E. W. JAMES. E. V. VALENTINE, 

Rev. W. MEADE CLARK. 



EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE, 

WILLIAM G. STANARD. 



CONTENTS. 

1. A Treaty Between Virginia and the Catawbas 

and Cherokees, 1756 225 

2. The Vestry Book of King William Parish, Va., 

1707-1750 265 

3. The Early Westward Movement of Virginia, 

1722-1734 281 

4. Commission to Governor Yeardley and Council, 

March 14, 1^25-6 298 

5. Virginia Gleanings in England 303 

6. Carriage Owners, Gloucester County, 1784 313 

7. Hungars Church, Northampton County, Va 315 

8. Genealogy 318 

The Brent and Mallory Families. 

9. Book Reviews 329 



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THE 

Virginia Magazine 

OF 

HISTORY AND BJOGIIAPHY. 



Vol. XIII. JANUARY, 1906. No. 3. 



A TREATY 

Between Virginia and the Catawbas and 
Cherokees, 1756. 



[In the collection of the Virginia Historical Society is a pamph- 
let (S^xiof^ inches) containing 25 pages, which was printed in 
Williamsburg in 1756, and which contains accounts of treaties 
made in that year with the Catawba and Cherokee Indians. A 
reduced fac simile of the title page of this rare work is given on 
the next page. 

This, which is stated to be an official publication, gives an 
introductory account, Governor Dinwiddle's letter to the com- 
missioners, their commission and "instructions, his speeches to 
the two tribes, the proceedings and texts of the two treaties, 
the Governor's message to the House of Burgesses and the res- 
olution adopted by that body. All of these are copied here in 
full, for though the Governor's speeches and instructions are 
printed in the Official Records of Robert Dinwiddle^ (Virginia 
Historical Society Collections), II. 298-305. it is not deemed 
proper to break the continuity of this record by omitting them 
here. 

The sole object of the treaty was, of course, to secure the aid 
of the two nations of Indians against the French.] 



* Commonly cited as the Dinwiddle Papers. 



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TREATY 

HELD WITH THE 

CJTATTBA and CHEROKEE INDIANS, 

AT THE 

Catawba-Town <7/;// Bro a d-Ri ve R, 

IN THE 

Months of February and March 1756. 

By Virtue of a Commlflion granted by the Honorable 
ROBERT DINWIDDIE, Efquire, HisMajefty'* 
Lieutenant-Governor, and Commander in Chief of the Colony 
and Dominion of V I R G I N I A, to the Honorable 
Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Efquires, Members of 
His Majefty's Council of the (aid Colony. 

Publijhed by Order 0/ /-fe G O V E R N O R. 




•WILLIAMSBURG: Printed by W. Hunter. Kdcclvi. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 227 



INTRODUCTION. 

His Honor the Governor* having received several undoubted 
Assurances of the sincere and hearty Dispositions of the Cataw- 
bat and CherokeeJ Indians towards His Britannic Majesty's Sub- 
jects in general, and this Colony in particular, and considered 
the great Importance of securing those warlike Nations to our 

* From the beginning of his administration Governor Dinwiddie 
realized the necessity of retaining the friendship and securing the active 
assistance of the Southern Indians. The Dinwiddie Papers contains a 
great amount of information in regard to his negotiations with them, 
and the relations of the Cherokees and Catawbas to the colonies in 
general and to Virginia in particular. 

In February, 1754, Abraham Smith, an interpreter and militia officer 
of Augusta county (for whom see Boogher's Gleanings of Virginia 
History, p. 333, &c.), went on a mission from the Governor to the Chero- 
kees and Catawbas, asking that a force be sent to join General Braddock 
(Dinwiddie Papers, I, 60, 6r, 99, &c.), and Governor Glen, of South 
Carolina, was also asked to use his influence with them. The Indians 
promised aid, but did not keep their promise. Dinwiddie accounted 
for this failure by the presence of French emisaries among the Chero- 
kees, and by the fact that Governor Glen was negotiating with their 
chiefs for a meeting with himself. 

t The Catawbas occupying the country between the Yadkin and 
Catawba rivers, on each side of the boundary line between North and 
South Carolina, numbered at this time only about 400 warriors, and 
even this number was composed of the remnants of more than twenty 
different tribes. The Catawbas, who could muster 1,500 warriors in 
1682, had been reduced by disease (small-pox chiefly) and constant and 
bitter warfare with the Iroquois, Cherokees, Shawneseand other nations, 
to but a small and feeble tribe. Peace had been made some time be- 
fore with the Cherokees, and the Broad river fixed as the boundary of 
the two tribes (Mooney's Siouan Tribes of the East, p. 69), and the 
struggle with the Iroquois was ended by the conference at Albany in 
175 1 ; but the Western tribes still continued their attacks. 

The principal village of the Catawbas was on the western side of the 
Catawba river, in what is now York county, S. C, opposite the mouth 
of Sugar creek. This was probably the ** Catawba Town " of the treaty. 
The tribe remained steadfast friends to the English colonists. 

For the Catawbas, see Siouan Tribes of the East, by James Mooney, 
Bureau of Ethnology, Washington. 1894, pp. 67-74. 
X The great nation of the Cherokees had at one time, it was supposed. 



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228 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Interest at this perilous Juncture, when the French are laboring 
to seduce them from their Fidelity to us. was pleased to propose 
in Council the sixth of November last, That proper Commission- 
ers should be sent as soon as possible to those Indians with an 
handsome Present, and to conclude a firm and permanent League 
with them. Whereupon the Council seeing that no better Use 
could be made of Part of the Money His Majesty had been gra- 
ciously pleased to advance and send to his Honor for the gene- 
ral Service, unanimously agreed thereto. And Peter Randolph 
and William Byrd, Esquires, being nominated and approved of 
as Gentlemen perfectly well qualified to conduct and carry into 
Execution the proposed Treaties ; they, in Consequence thereof 
having received his Honor's Letter, with his Commission, and 
Instructions, and Speeches to the Chiefs of the said Nations, 
started immediately on their Journey, and concluded the Trea- 
ties and Engagements, which are presented to the Public in the 
following pages. 

A Letter from the Governor to Peter Randolph* and 
William BYRD,t Esquires. 

Williamsburg, December 23d, 1755. 
Gentlemen 

*' Inclosed you have your Commission, my two Speeches to 

been able to raise 6,000 warriors, but in 1738 the small-pox reduced 
their numbers one-half within a single year. About 1756 it was believed 
that their warriors numbered about 2,300. They were "settled nearly 
in an east and west course, about 140 miles in length from the lower 
towns where Fort Prince George stands, to the late unfortunate Fort 
Loudon," on the Tennessee river, about thirty miles above the site of 
Knoxville, and claimed a wide extent of territory in South-west Vir- 
ginia, the present West Virginia, Kentucky and Tennessee. See The 
Cherokee Nation of Indians, by ChaHes C. Royce, Fifth Annual Report 
of the Bureau of Ethnology. Mr. Royce appears, however, not to have 
read the Dinwiddie Papers, to have been ignorant of the treaty here 
printed, and is entirely.mistaken when he says (p. 145) that Fort Loudon 
was built by South Carolina. 

* Col. Peter Randolph, of ** Chats worth," Henrico county, Virginia, 
was a son of William Randolph, of '* Turkey Island." He was a mem- 
ber of the House of Burgesses for Henrico in 1749, a"d was appointed 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 229 

the Catawbas and Cherokees, with some Instructions for you 
which are but short, as I have a great Dependence on your 
known Capacity and Understanding ; I think proper to give you 
a few Hints which may be of Service in your Negotiations with 
those People. — You will first meet with the King and great Men 
of the Catawbas ; after the Council is met and Ceremonies o 
Reception over, you. are first to read your Commission, after 
that (as the Custom of the Indians is) you are to tell them their 
Brother, the Governor of Virginia, is going to speak to them : 
then read my Speech ; as they are tedious in their Councils they 
probably will require some Time to answer it. You are to take 
all possible Care to convince them of our Regard and Love for 
them ; let your Treaty with them be offensive and defensive, 
which must be committed to Writing, and signed by all the Chiefs 
present, and the Counter- Part by you in Behalf of this Colony. 
Endeavour to get them to mention the Number of Warriors they 
may agree to supply us with, and the Place they will march them 
into our Country, when we may have Occasion for their Assis- 
tance, and by what Message we are to give them Notice to come 
in to join our Forces, that we may provide for their Reception. 
If they should intimate any Expectations of being paid for the 



to the Council in 1750; was County-Lieutenant of Henrico, and was 
Surveyor-General of the Customs for the Middle District of North 
America. He married Lucy, daughter of Robert Boiling, of "Boiling- 
brook," and died in 1767. One of his sons, Beverley Randolph, was 
Governor of Virginia, 1788-91 ; another, Robert Randolph, of**Eastem 
View," Fautiuier county, was a Captain of Cavalry in the Revolution, 
and was ancestor of the Rt. Rev. A. M. Randolph. Bishop of ihe Diocese 
of Southern V^irginia, and a daughter. Anne, who married William 
Fttzhugh, of" Chatham," was ancestor of Mrs. General R. K. Lee. Col. 
Peter Randolph's will is given in VV^aters's G leant figs, I, 513-514. 

t Col. William Byrd, of "Westover," third of the name, was the only son 
of the well-known founder of Richmond, and author of the "Weslover 
Manuscripts." He inherited the greatest estate in Virginia, but wasted 
most of it. In his will (which was printed in this magazine IX, 80) he 
bitterly repents his folly. He was appointed to the Council in 1754, 
was Colonel of the Second Virginia Regiment in the P'rench and Indian 
War. During the Revolutionary struggle hissxmpaihy was with Eng- 
land, though he took no active part, on account of failing health. He 
died at ' Westover," January ist, 1777, aged 48. 



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230 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Men they may send in to our Assistance, you may come into such 
Terms as you may think reasonable ; but if they do not mention 
any Thing of that Nature, you may assure them of being prop- 
erly taken Care of. — Do all you can to raise their Resentment 
against the French and their Indians, and that they may discour- 
age and hinder their coming into their Nation, 

The Catawbas, I hear, have long complained of being so much 
confined by the English settling on their Land, that they wanted 
to sell their Land, and go further to the Westward ; if they men- 
tion any Thing of this, you may assure them I shall do every Thing 
in my Power with the Neighbouring Governors for their Service. 
You will have Occasion to go thro' the forementioned Ceremo- 
nies, &c., with the Cherokees ; but you are to consider them as 
a much more numerous Nation, and their Lands very extensive ; 
The French have been endeavouring for many Years to bring 
them over to their Interest, and to build Forts in the upper Cher- 
okee Country, but I hope they have not as yet built them ; if 
they have, endeavour to prevail with the Indians to destroy them, 
and by no Means to allow them any Settlement in their Nation ; 
and if possible, to hinder any of the French or their Indians, 
having any Consultations with them, unless they bring a Certifi- 
cate or Message by one of the Six Nations or their Brothers the 
English, otherways they will endeavour to deceive them. Per- 
suade them to take great Care of the Passes over the Mountains 
to the Upper Cherokees to prevent any Surprize. — Make an 
Excuse for not sending them some Arms, let them know they 
were not to be had here, but we will endeavour to provide some 
for them, you will find the Traders* from South-Carolina, will do 
all they can to harrass * * your Treaty. There is one Smith 
a Native of this Country, and a Trader from Charles-Town, he 
bears a good Character, you may send for him, he probably will 
be of Service to you. Be sure to return the Cherokees hearty 
Thanks for the Men they sent in with Mr. Paris to our Assistance 
against the Shawnese.t 

♦ Governor Dinwiddie accused the South Carolina traders of trying 
to persuade the Indians to ^o on hunting trips, that they might have 
skins and furs to sell to them, rather than send their warriors to the 
aid of the Virginians. 

t These men were 130 in number, and came to Virginia under the 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 231 

As many Things may occur in the Course of your Negotia- 
tions, that I cannot foresee your own good Sense must be your 
Puide, and I accordingly refer it entirely to you. The Attorney- 
General brings you the £^50 you wrote for. 1 am greatly disap- 
pointed in Wampum, having wrote to Col. Hunter to bring me a 
Quantity * * he is not returned ; I think you wrote me Col. 
Eaton would supply you, he would let you know the Quantity 
necessary. 

Inclose you have Invoice of Goods for a Present, packed up 
and directed for each Nation ; and I hope, if the Weather per- 
mits, to send them from this on Monday or Tuesday next, for 
Petersburg. The ten Pieces of Dutch Blanketing, from Mr. 
Turnbull, are for the Cherokees, and if there be any Thing want- 
ing ,have it from him, and desire him to send me the Account. 
— As the Cherokees are, by Report ten to one of the Catawbas, 
I have proportioned the Powder and Lead accordingly, which 
you may alter if you see proper. — Two Cherokee Boys, who 
were taken Prisoners by the Northern-Indians, were retaken by 
a Company of our Rangers ; I ordered them back to their Na- 
tion, pray enquire about then 

Since writing the above, I have a Letter from Mr. Dobbs, 
Governor of North-Carolina, he appoints two Commissioners 
to go to the Catawbas and Cherokees : he proposes their meet- 
ing you at a Place, I think he calls it Salisbury which he says is 
near the Indian Road, which Rout he supposes you will take. 
I wrote him, I believed you would set out from this the 4th or 
6th of January. 

If I have omitted any Thing as Hints for your Conduct, please 
send me word and I shall answer you — That you may have your 
Health, Success in your Negotiations, and a safe Return is the 
sincere Wish of Gentlemen, 

Your affectionate humble Servant, 

Robert Dinvviddie. 
To the Hon. Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 



charge of Richard Pearls, or Paris, a trader who lived on the Holston. 
These Cherokees took part in the abortive expedition against the Shaw- 
nese in February and March. 1756. 



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232 virginia historical magazine. 

Robert Dinwiddie, Esquire, His Majesty's Lieutenant- 
Governor AND Commander-in-Chief of the Colony 
AND Dominion of Virginia. 

To the Honorable Peter Randolph, Esquire, one of his Majes- 
ty's Council, Lieutenant of the County of Henrico, and Surveyor- 
General of His Majesty's Customs; and William Byrd, Enquire, 
one of his Majesty's Council, and Lieutenant of the County of 
Lunenburg. 

By Virtue of the Power and Authority invested in me, as His 
Majesty's Lieutenant-Governor, andConimander-in-Chief of this 
Dominion, I hereby nominate and appoint you, the said Peter 
Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, Commissioners to the 
Catawba and Cherokee Nations of Indians ; hereby giving you 
full Power and Authority to conclude and setde a firm Treaty 
of Peace and Friendship with both those Nations, they, being 
our old Friends and Allies. 

Given under my Hand, and caused the Great Seal of this 
Colony to be affixed thereto at Williamsburg this Twenty Third 
Day of December, One Thousand Seven Hundred and Fifty Five. 

Robert Dinwiddie. 



Instructions, for Peter Randolph and William Byrd, 
Esquires, appointed Commissioners to treat on Behalf 
OF the Colony and Dominion of Virginia, with the 
Catawbas and Cherokees. 

I. You shall hold yourselves in Readiness to set forward to 
the Place of Treaty pursuant to your Commission in order to 
arrive at the Catawba and Cherokee Nations of Indians with all 
due Speed, and being there arrived, you shall with all proper 
Dispatch convene the Chiefs of the said Nations, and having 
adjusted the necessary Forms and Ceremonies, you are at the 
first general and public Conference to acquaint the Indians, thkt 
you are come purposely to assure them of the kind and friendly 
Dispositions of the Inhabitants of this Colony towards them, as 
well as of the Care that has been taken on their Part, to preserve 
the most perfect Harmony, and good Understanding with their 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 233 

ancient Friends of those Nations in particular, and in general, 
with all others with whom they have ever made Friendship 
and Alliance. You are then to compliment them on their steady 
Adherence, and to desire of them to concur with you in estab- 
lishing and Confirming for all future Time, our unmovable friend- 
ship with their Brethren whom you represent. 

2. You are then to present my Speech to them, and proceed 
to acquaint them with the Present you are charged with for them, 
and to enlarge on the Kindness and Friendship * * towards 
them ; and this will lead you to magnify the Grandeur and Muni- 
ficence of the King, after which you are in the most affecting 
Manner to present the Present as directed. 

3. Having thus and by whatever other Means the Time and 
Circumstances suggest, introduced yourselves to the Favor of 
the Indians, you are to animate them against the unjust Disturb- 
ances given to the Peace of Mankind by the restless and * * 
thirst of Dominion, which is ever actuating the French to covet 
and encroach upon the Possessions of not only the English, but 
all the Indian Nations in America. To this End you will acquaint 
them with their Breach of Faith, and the unprovoked Rapines 
and Murders committed by them on the Frontier Inhabitants of 
the Colonies in Time of Tranquility and Peace ; and let them 
know that they have prevailed on the Delawares and Shawnese, 
to do Mischief when they pretended to be our Friends. After 
having duly represented these Perfidies and Violences, you are 
to acquaint them that the Six Nations have joined us against the 
French, and to desire their Assistance, and to agree on some 
Distinction or Signal whereby the Catawbas and Cherokees may 
be distinguished from other Indians, when they come into our 
Inhabitants, and to know what Number of Men they will furnish, 
and when. 

4. You are to inform yourselves particularly, what Indian 
Nations they can bring into our Alliance, and what Settlements 
the French have made in their Neighborhood, their Extent, 
Strength, and at what Period of Time they were made. And 
you are to endeavor to make yourselves acquainted with the Arts 
made Use of by the French to alienate the affections of Indians 
from the English. You are to exhort them not to be drawn 
away by deceitful empty Speeches, the peculiar Talent of that 



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334 VIHGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

cunning People, nor to suffer them on any Pretence whatsoever, 
to erect any Fort in their Country. But in every Attempt that 
shall be made to shake their Duty to our common Father, let 
them consider what real Acts of Friendship have been done 
them by the English, and what by the French ; let them weigh 
these Things well in their Minds, and then determine who best 
deserves their Esteem and Regard, for it is not by vain unmean- 
ing Words that true Friendship is to be discovered, but by its 
Effects. 

5. Whatever Treaty you shall enter into with either of these 
Nations, you are to take special Care to have it signed by all the 
Sachems or Chiefs who shall be present at it. 

6. If any Thing incidentally occur in the Negotiations, not 
particularly .taken Notice of by these Instructions, you are to 
conduct yourselves in such M inner, as , the Nature and Ex- 
pediency of the Subject Matter, Time and Place may require, 
according to the best of your Discretion. 

I wish you Success in your Negotiations, an agreeable Journey, 
and a safe Return. And I am Gentlemen, 

Your most humble Servant, 

Robert Dinwiddie. 



Robert Dinwiddie, Esquire, His Majesty's Lieutenant- 
Governor AND Commander-in-Chief of the Colony 
AND Dominion of Virginia. 

To the King, Sachems, and Warriors, of the Catawba Nation. 

Wishing you Health and Prosperity. 
Brothers and Friends, 

This will be delivered you by the Honorable Peter Randolph 
and William Byrd, Esquires, two of His Majesty's Council of 
this Dominion, who will shake Hands with you, and are come 
this long and tedious Journey to assure you of our real Friend- 
ship and Love for you ; they have my Commission to treat with 
you, and to brighten and Strengthen the Chain of Friendship 
that has so long subsisted between you and your Brothers the 
English, and am in great Hopes the Treaty you are to make with 
the above Gentlemen in Behalf of this Dominion in particular, 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 236 

and all the English Inhabitants on this Continent, will continue as 
long as the Sun gives Light. 

The French, by their Emissaries are endeavouring all in their 
Power to gain over the friendly Indians to their Interest, I there- 
fore advise you to be on your Guard against their invidious 
Insinuations, for their Speeches consist of Falsehoods and unjust 
Reports. The Six Nations have taken up the Hatchet against 
the French and their Indians, and joined our Forces to drive 
the French from the Lands they have unjustly invaded, have 
lately given them a remarkable Defeat,* killed many of their Peo- 
ple and taken * * of their great Officers Prisoners ; and I 
hope next Year they will be able to confine them to the barren 
Lands of Canada. 

Lately many of the French joined with the Shawnese came 
into our Country, * * and murdered many of our Breth- 
ren ; Our Friends and Brothers the Cherokees, knowing the 
Truth thereof, immediately took up the Hatchet against the 
French and Shawnese and sent into our Country a Number of 
their Warriors to protect our Frontiers, and to war against those 
perfidious People. — And I hope Brothers you will also take up 
the Hajtchet, against the French and their Indians ; and as I have 
great Reason to expect many of the Cherokee Warriors on any 
Occasion, to go to War against your Enemies and ours, I there- 
fore hope you will also assist with a Number of your brave War- 
riors. 

The Commissioners will also deliver you a Present sent from 
our Father the Great King, and this Dominion, to assure you of 
our Sincerity to continue in true Friendship with the Catawbas. 
Whatever the Commissiouers tell you, you are to believe as 
spoke by myself, and I am in hopes you will conclude with them 
a Treaty of Peace and Friendship which may continue as long as 
the Rivers run and Trees grow, which will be confirmed by me, 
and transmitted to our Father the other Side of the great Water. 
May you live long, and that we may always act with true Friend- 
ship, for each other, is my sincere Wish. 



* This refers to the battle at Lake George in September, 1755, in 
which the provincial forces, and their allies of the Six Nations, under 
Major-General William Johnson, totally defeated the French under 
Baron Diskau. 



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236 VIRGINIA HISrORICA MAGAZINE. 

Given at Williamsburg, under my Hand and the Great Seal o 
this Colony, this Twenty-Third Day of December, One Thous- 
and Seven Hundred and Fifty-Five. 

Robert Dinwiddie 

In Confirmation of the above I give you a Belt of Wampum. 



Robert Dinwiddie, Esquire, His Majesty's Lieutenant- 
Governor, AND Commander-in-Chief of the Colony 
AND Dominion of Virginia. 

To the Emperor, Old- Hop,* and the other Sachems, and War- 
riors, of the great Nation of the Cherokees. 
Wishing Health and Prosperity. 

This will be delivered you by the Honorable Peter Randolph 
and William Byrd, Esquires, two of His Majesty's Council, who 
will take you by the Hand ; they have undertaken this long 
Journey to assure you of the real Love and Friendship your 
Brothers of this Dominion have for you ; they have my Com- 
mission to enter into a Treaty of Peace with you, to brighten 
and strengthen the Chain of Friendship that has so long sub- 
sisted between your Brothers the English, and the brave Chero- 
kees, I desire you will receive what they say to you, as if spoke 
to you by myself. 

I am in hopes the Treaty now proposed to be made with the 
above Gentlemen in Behalf of this Dominion in particular, and 
all your Brothers on this Continent, will continue as long as the 
Sun and Moon give Light. The French by their Emissaries are 
endeavouring to poisen the Minds of our Friendly Indians, and 
to withdraw them from their Brothers the English ; I advise you 



* Old Hop was one of the principal chiefs of the Cherokees. Gov- 
ernor Dinwiddie, in a letter to Richard Pearis, August 2, 1754 (Din- 
widdie Papers, I, 267), states that he had always thought that the ** Em- 
peror " was their chief man ; but that now he had learned that Old Hop 
was even a greater man he would treat him with due respect. He 
remained on friendly terms with the English during the whole of Dinwid- 
die's administration. His son was at the head of a delegation of Chero- 
kees who had a consultation with Dinwiddie in Williamsburg on 
September 5, 1775, and the speech of the Cherokee, together with the 
Governor's reply, are printed in the Dinwiddie Papers, II, 187-189. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 237 

to be on your Guard against them, their Speeches are made up 
of Falsehoods and unjust Reports, let none of them remain 
among you, and by no Means allow them to build any Forts on 
the River Hogohegee, in the Upper Cherokee Country, for their 
Intentions are with evil Design against you and your Brothers 
the English. — The Six Nations have taken up the Hatchet 
against the French and their Indians, and joined our Forces to 
the Northward with a great Number of their Warriors ; and in 
a Batde with the French, we killed a great Number of their Men, 
and took several of their chief Officers Prisoners, obtaining a 
compleat Victory over them ; and I hope on Occasion you will 
be ready and willing to give us your Assistance. 

The Treaty now proposed to be made shall be confirmed by 
me, and transmitted to our Father the King of Great-Britain, 
&c. the other Side of the great Water. The Commissioners 
will deliver you some Powder, Lead, and other Goods, from 
your Father and your Brothers of this Dominion, to convince 
you of our sincere Friendship to your Nation. 

That you may remain an happy people, and that true Love 
may subsist between you and your Brothers the English, till the 
End of Time, is my sincere Wish. 

Given at Williamsburg, under my Hand and the Great-Seal 
of this Colony, this Twenty Third Day of December, One 
Thousand Seven Hundred Fifty Five. 

Robert Dinvviddie. 

In Confirmation of the above I give you a Belt of Wampum. 



A Treaty &c. At the Catawba-Tovvn, the 2oth 
OF February, 1756. 

Present. 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 

Commissioners for Virginia. 

Thomas Adams,* Esquire, Secretary. 

•Thomas Adams (1730-1787) was a member of the United States 
Congress, 1778, and of the State Senate. His home at this time was 
in Henrico county. See fVm. and Mary Quarterly^ V, 159-164. 



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238 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Heigler,* King of the Catawbas, and all the Sachems and 

Warriors of that Nation* 

William Giles, Interpreter. 

The Commissioners having first produced their Deputation, 

and the same being read and interpreted, they spoke as follow- 

eth: 

Brethren, King, Sachems, and Warriors, of the Great Catawba 
Nation. 
**Our common Father, the Great King of England, has been 
pleased to direct your Brother, the Governor of Virginia, to send 
Commissioners hither,to assure you of his Affection, and to pre- 
sent you with as many Goods in Token thereof as it was conve- 
nient to send so far, at this Season of the Year. It was his 
Pleasure to appoint us to that charge, and at the same Time', to 
direct us to deliver you a Speech in his Name, with a Belt of 
Wampum, which we are now ready to do, and hope you will be 
attentive thereto.*' 

To which King Heigler answered. 

'*We shall always listen to every Thing that comes from our 
Brothers of Virginia with great Attention, and are now prepared 
to hear whatever you may be directed to say to us in the Name 
of the Governor of that Colony.'* 

The Secretary then proceeded to read the Governor's Speech, 
which was Interpreted. 

(See the Governor's Speech, Page ii)t 

Upon which the Indians gave the Yo-hah. 

Then the Commissioners spoke as follows. 
Brothers and Friends, 

**You have heard his Honor the Governor of Virginia's 
Speech, wherein he has confirmed what we just now told you, 
that we are sent here to represent him and the Colony under his 
Command, in order to brighten the Chain, and strengthen 
the Friendship, which has subsisted between you and them, since 
a much earlier Time than our oldest Men can remember. It is 
not Brethren in Behalf of Virginia alone, that we have come so 



♦In 1762 King Heigler was killed near his own village by a small 
party of Shawnese (Siouan Tribes ^ (Sfc.^ p. 72). 
t This refers to the page \\\ the pamphlet. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1 756. 239 

br to tell you, how highly we value and commend your steady 
Friendship to the great King George, and his Children in Vir- 
ginia, but of all his Subjects in America, who have ever held 
you in high Esteem, having always found you our fairhfull Friends 
and make no Doubt but that you will continue such to all future 
Time : To convince you of our great Dependence upon your 
unshaken Love, we present you with this String of Wampum.*' 

** You cannot be Strangers, brave Catawbas, to the late 
unjustifiable Steps taken by the French, that crafty Enemy of all 
Mankind, to debauch the Principles and poison the Minds of not 
only the Indians, but of all other Nations, who are in Alliance 
with the great King our Father. They are a People, Brothers, 
whose Thirst of Power is such that nothing but an intire Reduc- 
tion of the whole World to their Subjection, can satisfy their 
boundless Ambition. By their dark Measures, and deceitfuU 
Practices, they have so unhappily succeeded, as to prevail on the 
Shawnese and Delaware Indians to make Incursions on the Fron 
tiers of Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, to murder in the 
most inhuman Manner, defenceless Husbandmen at their Labor, 
weak Women in their Beds with their tender Infants at their 
Breasts, resting secure in their own Innocence in time of a set- 
tled Peace. And thus those Nations continue still to act in open 
Violation of a solemn Treaty concluded on at Loggs-Town,* about 
three Years past, between our Commissioners and their Chiefs. 

*• Our Friends the Six Nations concerned for the Misfortunes 
of their Brethren, and enraged that the French and their Indians 
pay so little Regard to their Engagements, have taken up the 
Hatchet against them, and joined General Johnson last Fall, on 
Lake St. Sacrament, where alter a bloody Battle, it pleased the 
Great God, to bless our Arms with V^ictory, and to enable our Men 
to destroy the greatest Part of their Enemies, to captivate their 
General, and slay many of their commanding Officers. To con- 
firm the Truth of what we have told you, we give you this String 
of Wampum. 

** We are desired by the Governor of Virginia, to inform you 



* The Journal of the Virginia Commissioners in the treaty at Logg's 
Town, together with other documents in regard to it, were printed in 
this Magazine, XIII, i43-'74' 



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240 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

That we now stand in need of your Assistance ; and from the 
many Instances of your Friendship, we hope you will join our 
Forces with such a Number of Warriors, as you think you may 
with Safety to yourselves spare, whenever there may be Occa- 
sion for them, of which you shall have due Notice. 

** Your Compliance with this Request will give us our Oppor- 
tunity of representing to the King your Father, your Readiness 
to defend His Dominions, on this Side of the great Water. And 
that you may be encouraged to march against the Enemy with 
greater Steadiness, we promise you that your Men shall be sup- 
plied with Arms, Ammunition, and every Thing necessary for 
War. To confirm the Truth of what we have said, and en- 
force our Request, we give you this Belt of Wampum.** 

Upon which the Indians gave the usual Cry of Approbation. 

King Heigler, then repeated the Substance of what had been 
said, and that there shall be no Mistakes, desired the Interpre- 
ter to attend him and his Chiefs in a Council that Evening, and 
at the same Time told the Commissioners that he proposed to 
give them an Answer in the Morning. 



Febuary 21st, 1756. 
Present. 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 
Commissioners. 
Thomas Adams, Esquire, Secretary. 
Heigler, King of the Catawbas, and all the Sachems and 
Warriors of that Nation. 
William Giles, Interpreter. 
King Heigler spoke as follows, 
Brothers and Friends, 

" At the Request of my Brother, the Governor of Virginia, I 
made him a Visit last Year. After much Talk with him, which 
I have treasured up in my Breast, and hope he has done the same 
he told me that he did not then want my Assistance, but desired 
that I would hold my Warriors in Readiness, not doubting, but 
that he should have Occasion for them soon. It was at the 
repeated Request of the Northern Governors, that we concluded 
a Peace with their Indians, which we have hitherto strictly ob- 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1 756. 241 

served. But as the Shawnese and Delawares, have broke the 
Chain of Friendship, between them and our Brethern the English, 
we think ourselves bound in Gratitude to declare them our Ene- 
mies, and shall immediately take up the Hatchet against them, 
and you may be assured, never lay it down 'till we have suffi- 
ciently revenged the Blood of our Friends. We have always 
been supplied, with Cloaths, Guns and Ammunition, by the 
Great King, on the other Side of the Water, and have the most 
greatfull Remembrance of his Kindness to us, which has link'd 
us to his Interest with a Chain stronger than Iron. Our War- 
riors delight in War, and our young Men are equally pleased 
that they have an Opportunity of going to Battle It is my Reso- 
lution to lead them on whenever the Governor of Virginia thinks 
proper. 

** We are in perfect Amity with the Cherokees, Cowetaws and 
and Chickasaws. The Cherokees have ever been our Friends, 
and as they are a numerous Nation, we acknowledge them to be 
our elder Brother. 

** We hope they will shew a good Example by sending a great 
Number of their Warriors to join us and our Brethern of Vir- 
ginia against the French and their Indian Allies.** 
Gave a Belt of Wampum. 

King Heigler, then desired his Warriors to speak for them- 
selves, upon which Prenchee Uraw spoke as foUoweth, 
Friends and Brothers. 

** I am a young Man, and have not yet distinguished myself in 
War but I am not a litde pleased, that I have an Opportunity of 
d4)ing it. If I should be so fortunate as to do any Thing that 
deserves Commendation, I shall have the Thanks of the Great 
King George, and my Brethern the English. But whether I am 
successful or not, my Endeavours shall be such as to convince 
them of the Integrity of my Intentions.*' 

Chippapaw, then rose up and spoke as follows. 

Brothers, 

** You have put a bright Hatchet in our Hands, which we 
have accepted and hold fast. You have also directed us where to 
strike it. I am determined, either to dye it in the Blood of our 
Enemies, or to lose m;^ Life in the Attempt. 



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242 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Hixa-Uraw, then spoke to the following Purpose, 
Brothers, 

* * I have listened attentively to what the King and Warriors 
have said. Their Readiness in complying with your Request, 
has given me great Pleasure, aud as I have * * as well as 
they, I shall not stay at Home, if they are able to support me." 

The other Warriors present said that the King and those who . 
had already spoken, had expressed their Sentiments, and that 
they were ready whenever they were called on, to hazard their 
Lives in defence of their Brethern the English. 

The Commissioners immediately made the following Reply. 
Brethern, 

** Your Answer has given us great Satisfaction, and we doubt 
not, but that, by your future Actions, you will approve your- 
selves to be that brave People your Brethern the English, have 
ever esteemed you. 

'* We have Instructions from our Governor, to desire that you 
will inform us, the Number of Men you can send to our Assis- 
tance, by which Means he will be the better Judge of our 
Strengh. 

Our Enemies the French will undoubtedly exert themselves to 
carry their Schemes into Execution, and therefore it is the more 
necessary we should act with Vigor and Unanimity. That there 
may be no Missapprehensions, we have prepared our Instrument 
of Writing, containing Six Articles, to be signed by us in Behalf 
of the Colony we represent, and by your King and Sachems in 
Behalf of your Nation. We shall leave them with you for your 
Consideration, and when they have been interpreted to you, and 
you have in Council consulted your People, we hope they will 
meet with your Approbation. 

"We have left a Blank for the Number of Men with which 
you are to supply us, which, we flatter^ourselves, will be so great, 
as to be of real Service to us, and demonstrate your Zeal for our 
common Defence. 

"The Goods, we have before-mentioned to you, are now 
exposed your Views, and whenever it is agreeable to you, you 
may proceed to divide them among you." 

The Commissioners then withdrew, and the King and Sachems 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1756. 248 

after a short Consultation, desired them to return, and after being 
again seated, King Heigler spoke as follows. 

Brethren, 

•* We have had the Articles proposed to us under our Consider- 
ation, and we entirely approve of them. A great Number of 
our Warriors being now in the Woods, we can only venture to 
assure you of Forty Men, altho' it is more than probable that we 
shall send. double that Number. But that we may preserve the 
Reputation of a steady, faithful People, we will engage for noth- 
ing more than we can with the greatest Certainty comply with. 
We have seen the Goods and accept them as a Token of your 
Affection, which we hope you will deservedly continue to us so 
long as the World exists." 

The Articles were then again read, and signed by the Com- 
missioners, the King, and Warriors of the Catawba Nation 
respectively. After which the Indians expressed great Satisfac- 
tion, and the Commissioners calling for Wine and Punch, drank. 
Health to the Great King George and the Catawba Nation, which 
put an End to the Treaty. 

A Copy of the Articles. 
Be it known to all those to whom these Presents shall come. 
That the Honorable Robert Dinwiddie, Esquire, Lieutenant- 
Governor, and Commander-in-Chief, of the Colony and Domin- 
ion of Virginia, and Arataswa King, Chupahaw, Prenchee-Uraw, 
Hixa-Uraw, Tannasee, Yeaputkee, and Tooksesey, Sachems and 
Warriors of the brave Nation of Catawba Indians, laying noth- 
ing more tp Heart, than by new Ties, to strengthen the good 
Correspondence established between the Subjects of the King of 
Great Baltain, residing in North -America, and their Brothers 
and faithful Allies the Catawbas, and to prevent, by Measures 
taken in Time, the Accidents that may excite a War, or cause a 
Disunion : The Honorable Peter Randolph, Esquire, one of His 
Majesty's Council, Lieutenant of the County of Henrico, and Sur- 
veyor-General of His Majesty's Customs, and the Honorable 
William Byrd, Esquire, one of His Majesty's Council, and Lieu- 
tenant of the County of Lunenburg, on the Part and Behalf of the 
said Robert Dinwiddie, Esquire, and the said Colony of Virginia, 



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244 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

and the said Arataswa King, Chupahaw, Prenchee-Uraw, Hixa- 
Uraw, Tannasee, Yeaputkee, and Tooksesey, Sachems and 
Warriors on the Part and Behalf of the Catawba Nation, having 
full Power to treat, accord, and conclude the following Articles: 

I. That the ancient Alliance between the English and Cataw- 
bas be renewed, and the old Chain brightened. 

II. That if the French King shall at any Time wage War 
against the King of England, the Catawbas shall wage War with 
all their Power against the French King, and all his Indian 
Allies. 

III. That the Catawbas shall march into Virginia, Forty or 
more able Warriors, within Forty Days from the Date of these 
Presents, to such Fort or Place as the Governor of Virginia 
shall direct. 

IV. That the Men who shall be employed in the Service of the 
English, in the Colony of Virginia, as Warriors, be found and 
provided with all necessary Cloaths, Victuals, Arms and Am- 
munition. 

V. That neither the Catawbas nor Virginians, shall protect 
the disobedient Subjects of the other, or entertain Rebels, trait- 
ors or F'ugitives, but within Twenty Days after due Requisition 
made, shall deliver them up. 

VI. That if any Subjects belonging to the King of Great- 
Britain, residing in Virginia, or any Indian belonging to the 
Catawba Nation,* shall offend against this Treaty, they shall be 
punished, without the Treaty being any Way thereby infringed. 

Done and signed at the Catawba-Town, the 21st Day of Feb- 
ruary, 1756. 

Peter Randolph. [L. S.] 

William Byrd. [L. S.] 

Arataswa (mark) or Heigler. [L. S.] 

Chupahaw. (mark) [L. S.] 

Prenchee-Uraw. (mark) [L. S.] 

Hixa-Uraw. (mark) [L. S.] 

Tannasee. (mark) [L. S.] 

Yeaputkee. (mark) [L. S.] 

Tooksesey. (mark) [L. S.] 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 245 

Broad-River, March I3.th, 1756. 

Present. 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 

Commissioners for Virginia. 

Thomas Adams, Esquire, Secretary. 

The Sachems and Warriors of the Cherokees. 

Richard Smith, Abraham Smith and Daniel Carrol, 

Interpreters. 

The Little-Carpenter**spoke as follows. 
Friends and Brothers, 

**The Waters are high, and as we are numerous, and there 
are no Canoes to carry us over the River, we shall be obliged to 
you to come over to us. We should not presume to expect this 
Favor, but that you may pass the River in one Canoe, and our 
People are all desirous of being present at the Treaty. We are 
impatient to return Home, and therefore, altho we are much fa- 
tigued, hope you will join with us in expediting the Business as 
fast as possible.'* 

To which the Commissioners replied, 

** Your Request is very »'easonable, and therefore we shall chear- 
fully comply with it. We are pleased to find you disposed to 
enter on Business immediately, and we shall be ready to speak 
to you To-morrow at Twelve o' Clock." 



March 14th, 1756, 
Present 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 

Commissioners. 

Thomas Adams Esquire Secretary. 

The Sachems and Warriors of the Cherokees. 

Richard Smith, Abraham Smith, and Daniel Carrol, 

Interpreters. 

* AttakullakuUa,.'* King or Emperor" of the Cherokees, also called 
The Little Carpenter. About 1738 he was chosen vice-king under 
Oconostota. He wa<5, at the time of the treaty a staunch friend of the 
English. After the massacre at Fort Loudon he rescued Captain Stuart 
and conducted him safely to the frontiers of Virginia. 



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246 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

The Commissioners spoke as follows, 

Brethern, Sachems and Warriors of the great and powerful 
Nation of Cherokees. 

**The Governor of Virginia, having by his Commission under 
the Great-Seal of that Colony, deputed us to visit you our Breth- 
ern, in order to consult you on some Affairs, in which our Inter- 
ests are mutually concerned ; we heartily bid you welcome. We 
have waited a long Time for your coming, but we presume, from 
the remote Situation of many of your Towns, that your Sachems 
could not be convened sooner, and therefore we the more chear- 
fully acquiesce under the many Inconveniences we have been 
subjected to thro* your Delay. You could not have given us a 
greater Evidence of your Esteem, than by your meeting us so 
much lower down than the Place you first appointed ; the Bad- 
ness of the Roads, which are almost impassable for Waggons and 
the Scarcity of Corn having made our Journey both tedious and 
expensive. We are first to deliver you a Speech, in the Name 
of our Governor, with a Belt of Wampum, which we hope you'll 
hear with Attention, and that it will have that Influence with you 
which he expects." 

The Secretary then read the Governor's Speech, which was 
interpreted. 

( See the Governor's Speech, Page * * ) 

Upon which the Indians gave the Yo-hah. 

Then the Commissioners spoke as follows, 

'* As you are now acquainted with the Intention of our under- 
taking this long and fatiguing Journey, permit us to a.ssure you 
of our Readiness to concur in brightening and strengthening the 
Chain of Friendship which has hitherto remained unviolated, and 
which we on our Parts shall endeavor to preserve unshaken, so 
long as the Sun and Moon shall endure. 
Brethern, 

Your Fidelity and steady Adherence to the Interest of the 
English, of which the sending of your Warriors to the Assistance 
of your Brethern the Virginians in a recent instance, have had such 
an happy Influence upon the King your Father, that He, always 
disposed to reward his dutiful Children, has ordered a Present of 
Goods to be sent to you. And in Obedience to his Majesty's 
Commands, we were immediately dispatched with them, and 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 247 

they are now ready for your Acceptance. We are sorry to tell 
you, that altho* your Brother the Governor of Virginia, spared 
no Pains in purchasing the most suitable Goods for you, yet he 
could by no Means procure a sufficient Number of such fire 
Arms, as would be acceptable to you. We have however his 
Permission to assure you, that you shall be supplied with them 
hereafter. — In Confirmation whereof we give you this String of 
Wampum. 
Bret hern, 

' 'You have undoubtedly heard that many skulking Parties of 
Indians, prompted thereto by our treacherous and most perfidi- 
ous Enemies, the French, have made Incursions upon our Fron- 
tiers, murdering and captivating all the Men, Women and 
Children, who were so unhappy as to fall into their Way. The 
Indians principally concerned in this * * are the Shawnese 
and Delawares, who delighting in Blood and not observing the 
most solemn Treaties, at which they have always had a large 
Share of the Royal Bounty have by the Cunning and Artifice of 
the French, been withdrawn from their Allegiance to the Great 
King, the Father of us all, and prevailed on to fake up the mur- 
derous Hatchet against his Children. Thus the French, contrary 
to the Law of Nature and Nations, are for ever pushing on our 
own Allies to destroy us, and what may we not all expect, if we 
do not vigorously unite to frustrate their wicked Designs. The 
Frontier Inhabitants of the Northern Colonies have been as yet 
the only Victims of their * *, but be assured, Brethern, that 
unless you take the necessary Steps to prevent it, you will like- 
wise be involved in the same Calamity. That we may never be 
again exposed to the Treachery and Deceit of those cruel Sav- 
ages, we have resolved to cut them off from the Race of Mankind, 
and we do in Behalf of the People we represent, return you our 
Sincere and unfeigned Thanks for your kind and friendly Assis- 
tance in the Execution of that Design. 

Brethren, 

**The French, who have nothing less in View than universal 
Monarchy, and are for ever encroaching upon the Lands of not 
only the English, but of all the Indian Nations in America, have 
built Forts upon our Lands ; And the better to support their 



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248 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

ambitious Views, they have used every Artifice in their Power 
to^win the Six Nations to their Interest. But they detesting their 
perfidious Practices, and being by dear-bought Experience con- 
vinced, how little their Promises are to be regarded, would not 
be deluded by their fallacious Speeches, but taking up the 
Hatchet against them and their Indians, joined our Forces to the 
Northward with a great Number of their Warriors, where our 
Army under the Command of General Johnson, obtained a com- 
plete Victory over them. In Testimony whereof, we give you 
this Belt of Wampum. 
Brethren, 

** Remember how this cruel People usurped the Land of the 
Nochess,* and chased them from their Country. Forget not also 
their Endeavours to destroy the Chickasaws, who having timely 
Noticejof their evil Intentions, gave them a brave Repulse. You 
must have heard of the many Attempts they have made to cut 
off the Six Nations, but they diligently pursuing the most prudent 
Measures for their Security, have hitherto avoided the fatal Blow. 
We could enumerate a thousand Instances of their Cruelty, and 
defy them to point out a single Instance of ours : No, Brethern ; 
on the contrary, many Nations of Indians reduced by War, and 
unable to withstand the Torrent of their Enemies, have fled to 
us for Refuge, and have always found a secure Retreat among us. 
Brethren, 

*' The American Colonies no longer able to bear the Insults of 
the French, are resolved to unite in revenging the Injuries they 
have received from that perfidious Nation. And we have the 
most sanguine Hopes, that you, fired with Indignation at their 
repeated Acts of Barbarity, and animated with that Spirit, for 
which the Cherokees have been ever remarkable, will not suffer 
the Blood of your Brothers the English, who are always ready 

♦ The Natchez, who lived originally about the site of the present city 
of the name, became involved in a war with the French in 1729, which 
resulted in their complete destruction as a tribe in the following year. 
The remnant fled in various directions, and at the time of this treaty 
many of them were living among the Cherokees {Siouan Tribes^ &c,^ 
83-84). A reference, therefore, to their misfortunes could be made to 
the Cherokees with peculiar effectiveness. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1 756. 249 

to sacrifice their Lives and Fortunes in your Defence, to remain 
unavenged. Wherefore, we invite you to follow the Example 
of the Six Nations, by joining not only your own Force with 
ours, but likewise by calling on all the Nations either in Alliance 
with you, or depending on you, to assist us. By which Means 
you will manifest your Duty to the King your Father, and your 
Love to your Brethren. For that Purpose you shall be fur- 
nished with Arms and Ammunition, Cloathing and Provision. 
In Confirmation whereof, and to enforce our Request, we present 
you with this Belt of Wampum. 

Which was received with the usual Cry of Approbation. 
Brethren, 

** We have heard, that the French have been endeavouring by 
their false Reports and cunning Insinuations, to alienate your 
Affections from the English, but we have too great Confidence in 
your Integrity, to suspect that you can be influenced by their 
deceitful and empty Speeches: And we flatter ourselves that you 
will on all Occasions, give us the best and earliest Intelligence, 
of any Designs that may be formed to our Disadvatage. By 
such generous and candid Behaviour, you will not only establish 
a Friendship with us upon a lasting and permanent Foundation, 
but also merit the Esteem of the King your Father, who never 
fails to feed his dutiful Children when they are hungry, and 
cloath them when they are naked. — In Pledge of the Truth of 
what we have spoken, and of our Inclination to live and die with 
you, we give you this Belt of Wampum. 

Which was received with the usual Cry of Approbation. 
Brethren, 

**It gives us Concern to hear that you should suspect your 
Friend, Richard Smith, of endeavouring to prevail on us, to 
leave Part of the Goods designed for you at the Catawbas, by 
insinuating that you were not a People worthy of a large Pres- 
ent. We assure you that the Report is without the least Foun- 
dation, and that if he had attempted to lesson you in our Esteem, 
we should have treated him with the greatest Disdain. Your Bre- 
thren of Virginia, truly sensible of your inviolable Attachment to 
the Interest of the English, have taken every Opportunity of giv- 
ing you Demonstrations of their Affection. The Present indeed is 



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250 VIRGINIA HISTORICA MAGAZINE. 

not SO large as we could wish, for the* Reason already mentioned 
that the most material Articles, were not to be had in our Col- 
ony. To remove these Jealousies for the future we would fain 
have you send some of your Boys to Virginia, where we have a 
School* erected for their Education. We promise you that all 
due Care shall be taken of them, both with Respect to their 
Cloaths and Learning. When they have come to be Men, they 
will be acquainted with the Manners and Customs of us both, 
and our Children will naturally place such Confidnnce in them as 
to employ them in settling any Disputes that may hereafter arise. 
In Token of the Sincerity of our Intentions, and of our great 
Desire, that you should accept of our Invitation, we give you 
this Belt of Wampum. 

Which was received with the usual Cry of Approbation. 

CulloughcuUa, repeating to the Interpreter what had been 
said, desired to know if he had understood him right : which 
when the Interpreter answered in the Affirmative, he addressed 
himself to the Commissioners, telling them that they would de- 
liberately consider every Thing that had been said to them, and 
return them an Answer To-morrow. 



March 15th, 1756. 

Present 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd Esquires, 

Commissioners. 

Thomas Adams, Esquire, Secretary. 

The Sachems and Warriors of the Cherokees. 

Richard Smith, Abraham Smith, Daniel Carrol, 

Interpreters. 

Culloughculla's Answer to the Commissioners* Speech 

delivered yesterday. 
Brothers, 

*'This Day is appointed from above, for our Meeting, and I 
rejoice in seeing our eldest Brothers the Virginians here ; and 
that we may give you the earliest Assurance of our Affection 
for you, I present you with this String of Wampum. I have 



♦The Indian School of William and Mary College, generally known 
as the Brafferton. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1756. 251 

been in England, and have seen the Great King, you have so 
often had Occasion to mention. He then acknowledged the 
Cherokees to be his Children, as well as the English, and desired 
that we might continue Brethren for ever. I shall always remem- 
ber my Father's Command, and shall, whenever I have an Oppor- 
tunity, give the strongest Demonstrations of my Readiness to 
obey them. It gives me the greatest Concern to hear of the 
horrid Murders committed by the Indians on the Frontier Inhab- 
itants of Virginia, and our Endeavours shall not be wanting, to 
prevent such Massacres for the future ; altho* I must tell you that 
all our People, who, by their Situation, can be most useful on 
this Occasion, live in the upper Towns, who are as much exposed 
to the Incursions of the French and Indians, as your Frontier 
Inhabitants ; and unless we have a Fort built for the Protection 
of our Wives and Children, in the Absence of our Warriors, it 
will not be safe for us to leave them. We have had frequent 
Promises from the Governor of South-Carolina, to build us a 
Fort ; and it was stipulated at a Treaty* held at Saludy last Sum- 
mer, when we signed a Release for our Lands to the Great King 
George : But we do not find, that that Governor has yet made 
the least Preparations towards performing his Engagement. 
Wherefore, we are sorry to tell you, that we don't much rely on 
him. The King, our Father told me, that we should mutually 
assist each other, and therefore, as we are unacquainted with the 
manner of building Forts, and had not the necessary Materials, 
we thought ourselves justifiable in making our Application to 
Governor Glen, who, I must again repeat it. has forfeited his 
Word. I have a Hatchet ready, but we hope our Friends will 
not expect us to take it up, 'til we have a Place of Safety for our 
Wives and Children. When they are secured, we will immedi- 
ately send a great Number of Warriors to be employed by your 
Governor, where he shall think proper. I have given a true 
State of the Condition of, our Country, and desire you will make 

• The treaty with Governor Glen of South Carolina, concluded at 
Saluda, S. C, November 24, 1755, by which the Cherokees ceded the 
lands within the present limits of Abbeville, Edgefield, Laurens, Union, 
Spartanburg, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Richland and York, South 
Carolina. (Royce, The Cherokee Nation of Indians.) 



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252 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

a true Representation of our Situation to your Governor, and at 
the same Time tell him. that if no Steps are taken for our Secur- 
ity, the French will extinguish the Friendly Fire between us : If 
he should have any Message to send us hereafter, or should think 
it expedient to send Commissioners again to us, we desire they 
may come the Northward Path, it being the nearest. As it is a 
very dangerous Way, we need not recommend it to him to send 
a strong Guard. Our Governor is old and infirm, and can by 
no Means cross the Mountains, to meet you on the Southern 
Path, but I am instructed to tell you, that he will on any Oc- 
casion meet you at Stalnacker's,*and he hopes that the Governor 



* Samuel Stalnaker, probably one of the numerous German emigrants 
from Pennsylvania to the western part of Virginia, was at one time the 
latter colony's most western inhabitant. 

Dr. Thomas Walker, in his journal {Fiison Club PubHcations, No. 13, 
pp. 41, 42), states that in April, 1748, he met Stalnaker, then on his way 
to the Cherokees between the Reedy Creek settlement and the Holston 
river» Stalnaker was already an experienced trader and hunter, and is 
believed to have told VV^alker of Cumberland Gap at that time. On 
March 23, 1750 Dr. Walker and his associates, on their w^y to Kentucky, 
again met Stalnaker (who had just come to the p ace to settle) on the 
Middle Fork of Holston, and helped him to build his house. This was 
then the last settlement in Virginia to the westward. On Fry and 
Jefferson's Map^ 1751, this settlement is located on the Middle Fork of 
Holston, on the north side, a few miles above iis junction with the 
South Fork. This was no doubt the place where the Cherokees 
wished to meet any future conmiissioners from Virginia. 

On June 78, 1755, Samuel Stalnaker, **of Holston," was captured by 
the Shawnese, and his son Adam and a Mrs. Stalnaker killed by the 
same party (Waddell's Annah of Augusta, p. 154.) The statement of 
Withers i^Border War/are^ new edition, p. 343) that the elder Stalnaker 
was never actually in the hands of the Indians, but escaped by hard riding, 
is contradicted by the "Preston List," cited by Waddell, and by several 
letters from Governor Dinwiddle, of various dates in June and July, 
1756, in which it is stated that one Stalnaker, an inhabitant of Augusta 
county, had been captured by the Shawnese, but had escaped and had 
reported on the number of French and Indians he had seen. {Dinwid- 
die Papers, II, 447, 448, 451.) 

In September, 1756, the Governor wrote to Col. Clement Read, 
County-Lieutenant of Lunenburg, directing him to give Stalnaker /*ioo 
to qualify him to raise his company and to build a little fort at Draper's 
Meadows (now Smithfield, Montgomery county). The settlement here 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1756. 253 

of Virginia, will not refuse him a Meeting there. To convince 
you of our Attachment to your Interest, and to enforce our Re- 
quest, we give you this String of Wampum. 
Brothers, 

**It gives us Concern to find, that for so many Years our 
Brethren of Virginia, have declined a Trade with us. The King 
our Father, when I was in England, assured me that we should 
constantly be supplied with Goods : but we have hitherto found 

was, at the time, the first west of the Alleghany d'vide, and the first 
on Wood's, or New River. 

The garrison was probably not long retained here, as Dinwiddie, 
writing to Major Lewis, December 17, 1756, says that he does not 
think that Stalnaker should complain at the reduction of the number of 
fort<, but thinks it would be well to appoint him a lieutenant in a fort, 
"being well acquainted with the woods, and a good Pilot or Guide upon 
occasion." {Dinwiddie Papers, II. 567.) 

Stalnaker was present at a council of war held at Staunton, July 29, 
1756, to determine the location of forts to be built on the frontier 
(Summers's History of Southwest Virginia, pp. 66, 67^. Mr. Summers 
thinks that it was at his request that stockade forts were built at 
Dunkard's Bottom, on New River, and at Davis's Bottom, on the head 
waters of the Middle Fork of Holston. It was intended that Captain 
Stalnaker should take part in an expedition against the Shawnese 
which was in preparation in the beginning of 1757, but the campaign 
wa*i abandoned. 

About 1768 or '69, J. F D. Smyth, the English traveller, visited South- 
west Virginia, and found Stalnaker living at his old home on the 
Middle Fork of Holston. He says that after crossing that stream three 
times during the day, '* at night we came to Sialnaker's, where a few 
people, indeed all the inhabitants, had also erected a kind of wretched 
stockade fort for protection against the Indians ; but they had all left 
it a few days before our arrival and returned to their respective 
homes. We remained for two days at the old Dutchman's house, for 
rest and refreshment for ourselves and horses, ♦ * » and also to 
make inquiry concerning our future route "to Kentucky. The old 
pioneer, still wise in all the learning of the wilderness, was able to 
describe to Smyth, as he had many years before to Walker, a new 
route to Kentucky, which had recently been discovered, and which was 
a nearer way than that commonly used. 

This seems to be the last notice of the sturdy frontiersman who 
played no unimportant part in the advancement of Virginia towards 
the west 



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264 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

it Otherwise. We tell you this, in hopes that when your Gov- 
ernor knows it, he will give proper Encouragement to some of 
his People to open a Trade with us. You perceive the Naked- 
ness of our People, and are very sensible, that we are unable to 
make any Thing but Bows and Arrows for our Defence ; they 
are but bad Weapons, compared with Guns which kill at a great 
Distance. The French supply their Indians with the best of 
Fire-Arms, and in that they have the advantage of us : and 
therefore we again repeat our Request to you, to begin a Trade 
with us, which we hope will be to our mutual Advantage. — To 
enforce our Request we present you with these Skins. 
Brethren, 

* * Our Governor gave us a particular Charge to let you know 
our Wants, and at the same Time to assure you, that the Path 
shall be cleared for your Traders, in such a Manner, as that it 
shall never wear out. He also directed us to desire that you 
will transmit this Treaty to the Great King on the other Side the 
Water, who, we doubt not is quite ignorant of our Circum- 
stances, and will relieve us as soon as he is acquainted with them. 

To remind you of this Request we give you these Skins. 

Cunnetalogo, then rose up and spoke as follows, 

'* I am sent a Messenger by the Governor of our Nation, with 
this Belt of Wampum, to acquaint you of his Infirmities, and 
that he could not possibly cross the Mountains, but that if the 
Governor of Virginia, should hereafter think proper to have a 
Meeting, with him, he could very conveniently come to Stal- 
naker's. He also desired me to inform you that he thought 
himself in great Danger, and that he could not possibly send out 
any Warriors to your Assistance, *til he had a place of Security, 
in their Absence, for their Wives and Children ; he therefore 
hopes the Men will be sent immediately to erect a Fort. I am 
also directed to acquaint you, that the Trade we have with Caro- 
lina, is not sufficient to supply us with Necessaries, which you 
may judge from our Nakedness. I do in our Governor's Name 
entreat you, to represent our Condition to your Governor, who, 
we make no doubt, when he is informed of our Poverty, from 
the Mouths of Men he can rely on, will send Traders to us. We 
will open the Path and keep it clear. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1 756. 255 

Gave a Belt of Wampum. 

The Commissioners desired the Interpreter to tell them, that 
they would consider on what they had severally said, and give 
them an Answer To-morrow. 



March i6th, 1756. 
Present. 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 

Commissioners. 

Thomas Adams, Elsquire, Secertary. 

The Sachems and Warriors of the Cherokees. 

Richard Smith, Abraham Smith, Daniel Carrol, 

Interpreters. 

The Commissioners spoke as follows, 
Brethren, 

** We are much pleased at the Satisfaction you expressed 
Yesterday of seeing and talking with your Brethren of Virginia. 
But at the same Time it gave us no small Concern, to hear from 
the Mouth of one of your greatest Warriors, who, we presume, 
spoke the Sentiments of you all, that you are not in a Condition 
to assist us. You reminded us of our mutual Obligation to assist 
each otiier in Case* of a War with the French, which we ac- 
knowledge. And the Treaties for that Purpose gave us the 
strongest Assurance that you would when called upon to join our 
Forces on the Ohio, with at least Five Hundred of your Warriors, 
which we hoped mij^ht be well spared, as your Nation is very 
numerous. You tell us that your Towns situated on the upper 
Side of the Mountains, are equally exposed with our Frontier 
Inhabitants to the Incursions of the French, but as we have 
always heard, that there were only a few Men employed in build- 
ing the Fort you mention, and those at a great Distance from 
you, we had no Reason to apprehend you to be in immcdiae 
Danger. However, as you thmk otherwise, we must allow, that 
Self Defence ought to be first provided for, and therefore, to 
remove all Objections, we, in Behalf of the Colony of Virginia, 
do engage, that thev shall contribute their Proportion of the 
Expence of building a strong Fort for your Protection, provided, 
that you in Behalf of your Nations, will contract to supply us 



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256 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

with a large Number of your Warriors, when that is completed ; 
to be marched into any Part of our Colony, upon the first Notice. 
And in the mean Time, if you can supply us with only Two 
Hundred Men, you will have the greater Pretensions to the 
Protection of the King your Father. We are the more solicitous 
for your Assistance at this Juncture, as there are many Indians 
in the French Service, whose Method and Manner of Fighting, 
you are much better acquainted with, than our People. 

** We shall faithfully represent, every Thing you have said to 
us to the Governor of Virginia, who will transmit this Treaty to 
the King your Father, and not only use his good Offices with 
His Majesty in your Behalf, but also his Influence on the Inhab- 
itants of that Colony, to engage them to be Adventurers in a 
Trade with you. 

•* We have great Hopes, that another Meeting will be quite 
unnecessary, as we are now invested with a full Power of con- 
cluding a Treaty with you, and you may be assured, our Engage- 
ments will be punctually performed. If our Proposals meet with 
your Approbation, it is necessary that we should enter into an 
Obligation to perform our respective Parts, and we shall prepare 
a Writing for that purpose, and send it to you this Evening for 
your Perusal. 

"When you have considered it and consulted your People, 
you will then acquaint us with your Thoughts of it, for which 
Purpose we will attend you early in the Morning, and shall then 
hope to finish our Business.*' 

Culloughculla answered, that they were very desirous of bring- 
ing the Treaty to a Conclusion,- and that they would take the 
Articles as soon as they were prepared under their immediate 
Consideration, and be ready to give a final Answer in the Morn- 
ing. 



March 17th, 1756. 

Present 

The Honorable Peter Randolph and William Byrd, Esquires, 

Commissioners for Virginia. 

Thomas Adams, Esquire, Secretary, 

The Sachems and Warriors of the Cherokees. 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1 756. 257 

Richard Smith, Abraham Smith, Daniel Carrol, 
Interpreters. 

Culloughculla spoke as follows, ' 

**The Writing you sent us last Night has been interpreted to 
us. and having duly considered it, we approve of every Thing 
contained therein, and are now ready on our Part to sign it. 
We will engage to assist you with Four Hundred Men at least, 
as soon as the Fort is completed, and we are not without Hopes; 
but that we shall then be able to send you double that Number.*' 

The Commissioners immediately signed it in Behalf of Vir- 
ginia, and the Sachems in Behalf of their Nation ; after which 
the Sachems by the Invitation of the Commissioners dined with 
them, when the Commissioners drank ' The King's Health, the 
Royal Family, and Success to the Cherokee Nation/ and the 
Indians returning the Compliment, drank ' His Majesty, the 
Royal Family, and Prosperity to their Brethren the English.* 
The Indians then retired to their Camp, taking first leave of the 
Commissioners and those present and expressing themselves 
well pleased with every Thing that had been done. 



A Copy of the Articles. 

Be it known to all those to whom these Presents shall come 
That the Honorable Robert Dinwiddie, Esquire Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor, and Commander-in-Chief of the Colony and Dominion of 
Virginia, and Ammoscosettee, Emperor, Otterle, Culloughculla, 
Counnerculogo, Onconago, WuUonowa, Occonnistoto,*Chuchu, 



♦ Oconostota, head king of the Cherokees, and one of their most 
noted warriors. He visited England in 1730. Though he is generally 
stated to have been elected head king of his nation about 1738, it is 
evident from the references to the "Governor" which appear in the 
text, that Oconostota was not at this time the supreme head of the 
nation. 

For a time he was friendly to the English, but when the breach 
occurred he was the chief leader of the Cherokees in their attacks on 
Forts Prince George and Loudon and along the entire frontier. He was 
defeated and reduced to submission, but again in 1776, took the lead in 
the plan by which the Indians, in alliance with the English forces, were 
t 



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258 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Ukiyourough, Ammoloyonker, Kealkirustkee, Telletchee, Chu- 
noyounkkee, Sachems and Warriors of the great and powerful 
Nation of the Cherokee Indians, laying nothing more to Heart, 
than by new Ties, to strengthen the good Correspondence estab- 
lished between the Subjects of the King of Great- Britain, resid- 
ing in North-America, and their Brothers and faithful Allies the 
Cherokees, and to prevent by Measures taken in Time, the 
Accidents that may excite a War, or cause a Disunion : The 
Honorable Peter Randolph, Esquire; one of His Majesty's Coun- 
cil, Lieutenant of the County of Henrico, and Surveyor-General 
of His Majesty's Customs, and the Honorable William Byrd, 
Esquire, one of His Majesty's Council, and Lieutenant of the 
County of Lunenburg, on the Part and Behalf of the said Robert 
Dinwiddie, Esquire, and the said Colony of Virginia, and the 
said Ammoscosettee, Emperor, and Otterle-Culloughculla, Coun- 
nerculogo, Onconago, Wullonowa, Occonistoto, Chuchu, Uki- 
you rough, Ammotoyoukee, Kealkirustkee, Telletchee, Chuno- 
younkkee, Sachems and Warriors on the Part and Behalf of the 
Cherokee Nation, having full Power, do treat, accord, and con- 
clude the following Articles. 

L That the ancient Alliance be renewed, and the old Chain, 
brightened between the English and Cherokees. 

II, That if the French King shall at any Time wage War 
against the King of England, the Cherokees shall wage War 
with all their Power against the French King, and all his Allies. 

III. That Virginia shall assist in contributing their Proportion 
towards the building a strong Fort,* in such Part of the Cherokee 



to attack the Southern States. This attack was everywhere defeated, 
and Oconostota was dethroned by his own people. He was living as 
late as 1809, a drunken vagabond, who would wail for hours over his 
departed greatness. 

♦Immediately after the passage of the resolution of the Assembly 
Governor Dinwiddie took active measures to have the fort built. On 
April 24, 1756, he sent Major Andrew Lewis instructions to enlist 60 
men, including as many who could use saw and ax as possible, to 
purchase 100 beeves to drive along with his party for food, and to pro- 
ceed with all possible expedition to Chotte (Choto) in the Cherokee 
country. On his arrival he was to call a meeting of the chiefs and 
consult them as to the best place for the fort and also to obtain from 



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jTHE INDIAN TREATY OF 1756. 259 

Country as the Sachems and Warriors of that Nation shall direct, 
for their Protection. 

IV. That as soon as the said Fort shall be built, the Cherokees 
shall within Forty Days Notice, march into Virginia, Four Hun- 
dred able Warriors to such Fort or Place, as the Governor of that 



them a number of young men to assist as laborers. Whpn the fort was 
finihhed he was, if it should be thought proper, to have some cannon 
mounted on it, and leave a garrison. The Governor expected assist- 
ance from South Carolina, but none was received. 

Lewis carried out his instructions promptly, and after consultation 
with the Cherokees, built a fort on the south side of the Tennessee 
river, about thirty miles above the site of Knoxville, which he 
named Fort Loudon, in honor of the English commander-in-chief in 
North America. There was already another Fort Loudon at Winches- 
ter. The fort among the Cherokees was considered to be one hundred 
miles from the nearest white settlement. 

By September 20, 1756, most of the force under Lewis had returned • 
under the command of his subordinate, Captain Samuel Overton ; but 
Major Lewis remained behind to bring in the expected quota of 
Cherokee warriors. By August 26, however, the Governor had heard 
of the completion of the fort, and wrote on that date that it had been 
built by Virginia entirely to the satisfaction of the Cherokees and 
without the least assistance from South Carolina. {Dinwiddie Papers^ 

II, 490.) 

Major Lewis had to return without the expected aid, and though 
the Virginia Assembly voted ^2,000 for a garrison of 50 men to be 
placed in Fort Loudon on the Tennessee, it is not certain that the fort 
was ever garrisoned by Virginians. A little later the Earl of Loudon 
placed in it two hundred English troops under Captains Demere and 
Stuart. The number of settlers around Fort Loudon increased and by 
1760 there was a considerable village there. When war between the 
Cherokees and the whites began the Indians invested Fort Loudon, 
which from its remote situation was in great danger. The govern- 
ment of Virginia sent out a force of six hundred men under Col. 
William Byrd to relieve the fort ; but he was greatly hampered by lack 
of supplies, and for this and other unknown reasons, his advance was 
very slow. On reaching the Long Island of Holston he built a fort and 
spent here the winter of 1760, and though while here he was joined by 
five hundred North Carolinians under Col. Hugh Waddell, no vigorous 
effort seems to have been made to relieve Fort Loudon. At last 
reduced to starvation the fort surrendered, the Indians engaging to 
allow the garrison to go, unmolested, to Fort Prince George. On the 



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260 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Place shall order or appoint, to be employed in the Service of 
the said Colony as Soldiers, in defending the Inhabitants thereof 
against the Encroachments of the Frtnch and Indians in their 
Alliance. * 

first night, however, after the English troops had left the fort they were 
attacked by the Indians and almost to a man were killed or captured. 
This was the bloody end of Fort Loudon. (See Dinwiddie Papers, II, 
389. 39 ». 393. 403, 433, 445. 485, 486, 493, 509, 533, 537, 539, and 
Summers*s History of Southwest Virginia, citing Haywood, 68 75.) 

*The armed assistance of the Souihern Indians, for which Governor 
Dinwiddie struggled so hard, was probably on the whole of but little 
real benefit, and in the -end resulted in the bloody outbreak of the 
Cherokees. In August, 1756, the Governor was expecting that Lewis 
would bring in at least 150 Cherokee warriors, and a little later it was 
thought that 400 would come ; but agents of the French Indians 
went to the tribe, and for a lime their allegiance to the English was so 
much shaken that when Maior Lewis returned but seven men came 
with him. The Governor was very indignant at the ill-fnith of his Indian 
allies, but on November sent another messenger with letters to various 
chiefs, especially to Outacite " the Man Killer," who had shown himself 
very friendly to Lewis. {Dinwiddie Papers, II, 348, 349, 353 ) 

In the spring of 1757, the vacillating Indians again determined to 
assist the English, and before April 6th, 300 Cherokees, Catawbas, 
Tuscaroras and Nottoways were in Virginia. In May it is stated that 
they numbered 400 warriors. They went northward towards Win- 
chester by way of Bedford C. H., and on their way committed many 
outrages. The Governor mentions that they ravished one person, and 
scalped a Chickasaw in the yard of Col. Clement Read of Lunenburg 
county. He thanked Col. Read for quieting the people's resentment 
and took steps to prevent further violence on the part of the Indians. 

When the Indians reached Winchester the Governor directed that 
theyshouM go with parties of the English " a scalping.'* **A barba- 
rous method of war," says Dinwiddie, ''introduced by the French, 
which we are obliged to follow in our own Defence." 

They were very fickle and uncertain in their movements. In June a 
party of 30 Cherokees under Outacite, instead of going to Winchester, 
as was desired, came down to Williamsburg, and had to receive many 
presents before they could be induced to go to the front. In the same 
month 220 Catawbas, Tuscaroras and Nottoways, who had been in 
service but a short time, returned home, coming by Williamsburg on 
their way. They left 180 Cherokees still with the Virginia forces 
(Dinwiddie /^/^rj. II, 6^5, 609, 641, etc ), and these, who may have 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF 1756. 261 

V. That if the French shall at any Time, directly or indirectly 
make use of any Means, either by coming into the Nation them- 
selves, or sending their Indians with Belts of Wampum, or by 
any other Way whatsoever, endeavour to prevail on the Chero- 
kees to infringe this Treaty, the Cherokees shall forthwith dis- 
patch a Messenger, in whom they can confide, to the Governor of 
Virginia, to acquaint him with the same, and the particular 
Measures so taken. 

VI. That if the Cherokees at any Time shall know, or be in- 
formed of, any Schemes that the French or their Indians may 
plan, to the Prejudice of the English, they shall give immediate 
Intelligence thereof to the Governor of Virginia. 

VII. That the Warriors which shall be employed in the Ser- 
vice of the English, in the Colony of Virginia, be found and 
provided at the Expence of that Colony, with all necessary 
Cloaths, Victuals, Arms and Ammunition. 

VIII. That neither the Cherokees nor Virginians, shall protect 
the disobedient Subjects of the other, or entertain Rebels, Trai- 
tors or Fugitives, but within Twenty Days after due Requisition 
made, shall deliver them up. 

IX. That the Cherokees shall not suffer or permit the 
French to build any Fort or Fortification, on any of their Lands 
on the Waters of the Mississippi or elsewhere, that may annoy 
the English, if in their Power to prevent it 

X. That if any Subject belonging to the King of Great- Britain, 
rc-siding in ^'irginia, or any Cherokee belonging to the Cherokee 
Nation, shall ofliend against this Treaty, they shall be punished, 

' without the Treaty being any Way therefore infringed,. 

Done and signed at Broad- River, in the Province of North- 



been reinforced later, took part in Forbes's capture of Fort Duquesne in 
1759, and were soon afterward dismissed and returned home. On their 
way they committed various outrages on the frontier inhabitants, 
who retaliated by killing tw<flveor fourteen of them and taking others 
prisoners. This aroused the deep resentment of the Cherokees, who 
immediately took up arms against the settlers all along the southern 
border. Their capture of Fort Loudon has been told. 



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262 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Carolina, this Seventeenth Day of March, in the XXIXth Year 
of His Majesty's Reign, Anno. Dom. 1756. 

Peter Randolph [L. S. 

William Byrd [L. S. 

Ammoscosette, (mark) [L. S. 

Chuchu, (mark) [L. S. 

Otterle-Culloughculla, (mark) [L. S. 

Counnerculogo, (mark) [L. S. 

Oncohago, (mark) [L. S. 

Wullonowa, (mark) [L. S. 

Occonistoto, (mark) [L. S. 

Ukiyourough, (mark) [L. S. 

Ammotoyouker, (mark) [L. S. 

Kealkirustkee, (mark) [L. S. 

Telletche'e, (mark) [L. S. 

Chunoyounkkee, (mark) [L. S. 



His Honor the Governor was pleased the 12th of April. 1756. 
to send the following Message to the 

House of Burgesses. . 

Mr. Speaker, and Gentlemen of the House of Burgesses, 

** I have thought it proper to communicate to your House, my 
Commission and Instructions to Peter Randolph and William 
Byrd, Esquires, appointed Commissioners, to treat on Behalf of 
this Government with the Catawbas and Cherokees, with my 
Letter to those Gentlemen, containing some Observations which I 
judge might be of Service in their Negociations with those People, 
and my two Speeches to the Catawbas and Cherokees. And to 
give you all the Satisfaction I am at present capable of, I send you 
the joint Letter of the Commissioners to me, dated the 17th of 
last Month. The Treaty I have not yet received, nor expect it 
before their Return. 

The said Letter from the Commissioners signified they had 
that Day concluded their Business with the Cherokees, who 
would by no Means consent to part with any of their Warriors 



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THE INDIAN TREATY OF I756. 263 

*til they had a Fort built, for the Protection of their Women and 
Children in their Absence, but engaged as soon as it was com- 
pleated to send Four Hundred of their Warriors to our Assis- 
tance. That their Sachems would engage for no more, but at 
the same Time assured them, they might probably send at least 
a Thousand which there was little Reason to doubt of, as they 
appear to have particular Regard for Virginia. That it was the 
Opinion of Mr. Smith, who is well acquainted with their Situa- 
tion, that if we should neglect to build the Fort this Summer, 
they will be under a Necessity of joining the French ; wherefore, 
they (the Commissioners) had stipulated and promised in Behalf 
of this Colony, that a Fort should be actually erected in the 
Cherokee Country with all possible Expedition. 

Upon this the House of Burgesses came to the following 
Resolutions, viz. 

Resolved, That a Fort be erected in the Country of the Cher- 
okees. 

Resolved, That an humble Address be made to the Governor 
to desire that his Honor will be pleased to pay for erecting the 
said Fort out of the money, which His Majesty was pleased to 
send to him for the Use of this Colony now remaining in his 
Hands. 

To which the Governor sent the following Answer. 
Mr. Speaker, and Gentleman of the House of Burgesses, 

**In Answer to your Resolve, I am to acquaint you, That 
since the Conversation between your Committee and myself, 
concerning the Application of the Ballance remaining in my 
Hands of the Money His Majesty was graciously pleased to send 
for the Protection of the Colony, I have disbursed several large 
Sums in the Purchase of Beeves, and other Necessaries for the 
Forces; however, I will engage to furnish Eight Hundred 
Pounds towards that necessary Work, the erecting a Fort you 
have resolved on in the Cherokee Country. But I should be 
glad you would appoint some proper Pesrons tJ make an Esti- 
mate of the Expence of the Undertaking, that a suitable Pro- 
vision may be made to go on with the Work with Dispatch and 
Regularity. 



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264 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

The House of Burgesses after that Message, came to the 
following Resolution. 

Resolved, That an humble Address be made to the Governor, 
to desire that his Honor will be pleased to appoint Major Andrew 
Lewis,* and Captain Samuel Overton f to manage and overlook 
the Building a Fort in the Cherokee Country, and to Assure 
his Honor that this House will make good any Deficiency that 
the Sum his Honor has been pleased to say he would pay to- 
wards erecting the said Fort, shall fall short, so as the same do 
not exceed Two Thousand Pounds in the whole. 

To which his Honor answered, *'He was well satisfied with 
the Resolution of their House, and should appoint Major Lewis, 
to oversee the Construction of the said Fort." 

And in Consequence thereof, the Governor was pleased to 
order Major Lewis, to march immediately with Sixty Men, Tools, 
Utensils, and Provisions to Choto, in the Cherokee Country, 
for that Service. 

FINIS. 

Correction.— The date 1775 in the note on page 236 of ihis Maga- 
zine should be 1755. 



*For Andrew Lewis, one of the most distinguished Virginians of 
his lime, and accounts of the Lewis family, see Peyton's History of 
Augusta County ; VVaddell's Annals of Augusta County ; Withers's 
Chronictes of Border Warfare, Thwaite's edition; Summers's History 
of Southwest Virginia ; The West Virginia Historical Magazine, II, 
19; IV, 81, 94, 109, 116, 136, 142. 

t Captain Samuel Overton, of Hanover county, was an active and 
efficient officer throughout ihe French and Indian War. It was in 
connection with a sermon preached August 17, 1755, before his company 
of Hanover volunteers, sai<i to have been the first raised in Virginia 
after Braddock's defeat, that Kev. Samuel Davies made the famous 
reference to Washington. It is shown by various papers among the 
Virginia French and Indian War land bounty vouchers, that he com- 
manded a company of rangers in 1755 and 1756, and he appears to have 
later been a captain of Virginia regulars. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 265 

THE VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM 
PARISH, VA., 1707-1750. 
(continued) 
January 21, 1743. The vestry assembled: Present GuiHeaume 
Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Etiene Malet, Andre Amonnet, Jean 
Pierre Bilbo, David Lesueur, Jean Vilain, Daniel Pero. The 
vestry made the allotment in tobacco for discharging the ex- 
penses of the parish of King William. For the Reverend 
Monsieur Gavain, twelve pounds in money, amounting to 1997 
lbs. of tobacco ; for the Clerk, eight months' arrears, 666 lbs., 
and for a year's salary, 1,000 lbs.; for the sexton, 250 lbs., 
and for the coclecte (collecteV^ 234 lbs. The church war- 
dens shall levy eighteen pounds of tobacco per tithable, the 
whole amounting to four thousand one hundred and forty- 
seven pounds. 

Jean Jacques Dupuy,** 
GuiLLAUME Salle, 
EsTiNNE Mallet, 
Andre Amonnet, 
Jean Vileain, 
Daniel Perro, 
David Le Sueur, 

The same day David Lesueur and Jean Chastain settled their 
note, which they owe to the parish, and they are quit for the 
year 1740. 

GuiLLAUME Salle," 
Jean Jaque Dupuy, . 
EsTiENNE Mallet, 
Andre Amonnet, 
Jean Vilain, 
Jean Pierre Bilbo, 
Daniel Pereaud. 

The year of the clerk commences Christmas, 1743. 

Jean Chastain. 

••A collection for the poor of the parish is probably meant. 
"•Signatures personal. ^rsignatures personal. 



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266 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

October i, 1744. The vestry assembled. Present: Jean 
Jaque Dupuy, Andre Amonnet, David Lesueur, Pierre Gueran, 
Jean Levilain, Jean Bernar, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Pierre Faure. 
The vestry appointed Jean Jaque Dupuy and Jean Levilian to 
go to Wmbourg to bear a petition to the Governor and to the 
Council to maintain our parish. 

Jean Chastain. 

November 17, 1744. The vestry assembled. Present: Jean 
Jaque Dupuy, Guilieaume Salle, David Lesueur, Jeai^ Levilian, 
Jean Pierre Bilbo, Daniel Perro, Jacob Trabu, took the oath 
and the test of vestryman for the parish of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

January 19, 1744I5. Pierre David took the oath of vestry- 
man for the parish of King William, in the presence of the 
vestry named below: Jean Jaque Dupuy, Guilieaume Salle, 
David Lesueur, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Jacob Trabu, Pierre Gue- 
ran, Jean Villain, Andre Amonnet, Daniel Perro. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Daniel Perro and Jean Chastain were named 
Church Wardens by the vestry present for the present year, 
and took the usual oath. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the Sieurs Jean Jaque Dupuy and Guilieaume 
Salle rendered account of their administration for the year, 
1744. They are quit of all. 

Jean Chastain. 

Daniel Pero,** 

Jacob Trabue, 

Peter David, 

Andre Amonnet, 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, 

Pierre Guerrant, 

Jean Vilean, 

David Lesueur. 

"Signatures personal. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 267 

The same day, January 19, 1744IS. The levy for the present 
year was made. The levy amounts to fifteen pounds of tobacco 
per head, viz : one thousand pounds for a minister, one thou- 
sand for the clerk, two hundred and fifty for the sexton, for the 
poor, six hundred, for the expenses of the parish, two hundred 
and fifty, amounting to 3,500. 

Jean Chastain. 

Novmber 2, 1745. The vestry assembled. Present: David 
Lesueur, Andre Amonnet, Guiliaume Salle, Pierre Gueran, 
Daniel Pero, Pierre David, Jean Pierre Bilbo. The vestrymen 
took the oath prescribed by the canon law in the usual manner. 

The same day Andre Amonnet and Pierre David took the 
oath of church wardens. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Daniel Perro and Jean Chastain rendered 
their account for their administration for the year 1744. 
They owe two hundred and fifty pounds of tobacco. 



Jean Chastain^ 
Church Wardens. 



Peter David,^** 
Andre Amonnet, 
David Le Sueur, 
GuiLLAUME Salle, 
Pierre Guerrant, 
Jean Pierre Bilbo, 
Daniel Perot. 

November 2, 1745. The vestry having assembled, the assess- 
ment was made, amounting to sixteen pounds of tobacco per 
head. The whole amounts to 3,840. 

Jean Chastain. 
Andre Amonnet, f ^-t « -,ir j 
Peter David. \ Churchwardens. 

GiLLAUME Salle,'® 
Jean Pierre Bilbo, 
David Le Sueur, 
Daniel Perot. 

"Signatures personal. "^Signatures personal. 



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Church Wardens. 



268 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

April I, 1746. The vestry assembled according t^ the cus- 
tom prescribed by law.** 

Jean Chastain. 
Andre Amonnet,^^ ) 
Peter David. j 

David Le Sueur, 
Jacob Trabue, 
GuiLLAUME Salle, 
Pierre Guerrant, 

December i, 1746. The vestry assembled. Present: Andre 
Amonnet, Pierre David, David Lesueur, Guilaume Salle, Jacob 
Trabu, Daniel Perro, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Pierre Guerran, Jean 
Chastain. 

The same day Pierre Gueran and David Lesueur were 
named as church wardens for the present year, 1746, in the 
presence of the vestrymen above mentioned, and they took the 
oath prescribed by law. 

December i, 1746. Andre Amonnet and Pierre David ren- 
dered their account of their administration for the year 1745, 
in the presence of the vestrymen named above. They owe 
eighty-two pounds of tobacco, payable to the church wardens 
of the present year. 

The same day, by order of the vestry named above, the glebe 
will be let from the creek to the highroad on the river, under 
such conditions as the church wardens shall find proper. 

The same day Andre Amonnet asked his discharge, and it . 
was granted him. 

Pierre Guerrant/' ) ^^ l Txr j 
David Le Sueur, } ^^'''''^ Wardens. 

Daniel Perot, 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, 

GuiLLAUME Salle, 

Jacob Trabu, 

Jean Chastain. 

•*No business seems to have been transacted. 

•"Signatures personal. "Signatures personal. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 269 

March 7, 1746I7. The vestry assembled. Present: David 
Lesueur, Pierre Gueran, Guilieaume Salle, Jean Jaque Dupuy, 
Jacob Trabu, Daniel Perro, Jean Pierre Bilbo. Isaac Dutoy 
took the oath of vestryman for the parish of King William. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day it was agreed that the service shall be half in 
English and half in French. 

Jean Chastain. 

March 7, 1746I7. Daniel Pero and Jean Chastain settled 
their account for two hundred and fifty pounds of tobacco, 
which they owed on their administration of the year 1745. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the levy was made for the present year, 
1746I7, of sixteen pounds of tobacco per head ; viz. : 

For the minister i ,000 

For the clerk .1,000 

For the sexton 150 

John Chendler, for the poor girl 150 

For Jaque Brian, for burying a poor man 150 

For Samuel Wever, for Judith Lahane 50 

For Monfor, poor (man) 200 

For Mr. Gueret, pauper 300 

For a Bible for the church 400 



David Le Sueur, ) ^, 1 ^ir t 
Pierre GuERRANT. / Churchwardens. 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, 
GuiLLAUME Salle, 
John J. Dupuy, 
Jacob Trabue, 
Daniel Pero, 
Isaac Dutoy. 



3400 
Jean Chastain. 



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270 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

June 24, 1747. The vestry assembled. Present: David 
Lesueur, Pierre Gueran, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Daniel Perro, 
Jean Pierre Bilbo, Guilieaume Salle, Isaac Dutoy, Jacob Trabu. 
The vestry appointed Pierre David and Charle Amonnet to 
run the lines from the creek below to the county line; and 
between the two creeks, Benjamin Haris and Isaac Dutoy for 
the first five thousand acres ; and from the creek above to the 
line above, Wm. Harris and James Holman ; from the road of 
Frenc Jamse to Etiene Malet, Jean Jaque Dupuy and Etiene 
Malet ; and from the creek to the road of Frenc Jamse as far 
as the branch of Dutoy, and from the branch of Dutoy to the 
creek below, Jean Panetie and Pierre Depe, and from the creek 
above to the road of Frenc Jamse up to the branch of Dutoy.** 

Jean Chastain. 

Pierre David and Charle Amonnet, the first Monday of No- 
vember ; 

Benjamin Haris and Isaac Dutoy, the second Monday; 

Wm. Haris and Jamse Holman, the third Monday ; 

Thomas Smith and Jean Bonduran, the fourth Monday ; 

J. Jamse Dupuy, Steve Malet, the first Monday of Decem- 
ber; 

Jean Panetie and Pierre Dep, the second Monday. 

February 6, I747|8. The vestry assembled. Present: David 
Lesueur, Pierre Guerand, Jean Jaque Dupuy, Jean Pierre 
Bilbo, Isaac Dutoy, Estiene Malet. Abraham Salle took the 
oath of church warden of the church of the parish of King 
William, and took the oath of loyalty and signed the test. 
Jean Jaque Dupuy and Estiene Malet took the oath of loyalty 

and took the test. 

Estiene Malet, 
John James Dupuy, 
Abraham Salle. 



"The passage is altogether innocent of punctuation, and consequently 
far from c'ear. It is evident that this is another of the * * procession- 
ings," the last mentioned in the Register. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 271 

The same day Jacob Trabu received his discharge, as he is 
no longer willing to conform to the canon of the Anglican 
church, and he is no longer vestryman of the parish of King 
William." 

The same day Mr. Jean Harris took the oath of loyalty and 

took the test. The same day he took the oath as vestryman 

of the church of the parish of King William and signed the 

test. 

John Harris. 

The same day Isaac Dutoy and Estiene Malet took the oath 
of church wardens of the parish of King William for the pres- 
ent year. 

Jean Chastain, 

EsTiENNE Malet, 
Isaac Dutoy. 

February 13, 1747I8. The vestry assembled. Present: Isaac 
Dutoy, Pierre Gueran, David Lesueur, Daniel Perro, John 
Harris, Jean Pierre Bilbo. Samuel Florinoir took the oath of 

loyalty and signed the test. 

Samuel Flournoy. 

The same day Samuel Florinoir took the oath of vestryman 
of the parish of King William in the presence of the vestry 
above named. 

The vestry made an agreement with Samuel Wever to ser^e 
as sexton at two hundred and fifty pounds of tobacco per year, 
commencing February 13, 1747I8. 

The vestry assembled February 24, 1747. Present: Isaac 
Dutoy, Estiene Mallet, David Lesueur, Pierre Guerand, Guil- 
lieaume Salle, Daniel Perro, Samuel Florinoir. The church 
wardens, David Lesueur and Pierre Gueran, rendered account 
of their administration for the year 1746. They are quit of all 



"The only mention of doctrinal defection on the part of a member 
of the parish, if, indeed, we may assign Trabue's defection to this cause. 



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272 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

that they have received, both as regards what was levied and 
what was g^ven into their hands during the said year. 

Jean Chastain. 
Isaac Dutoy, 
Stephen Mallet. 
Church Wardens. 

The same day the levy was made for the parish of King 
William. It amounts to twenty-five pounds of tobacco per 
head, viz.: 

For the minister i,6oo 

For the clerk * i,ooo 

For the sexton 250 

For Monfor3« 300 

For Judith I^hon^^ 1,000 

.For Sarah Chandler,^^ for arrears 500 

For Sarah Chandler to the month of October 1,200 

For Mary Goin,^° for one week lOO 

5,950 

The tithables of Gooch'" ; 205 

The tithables of Enrico 42 

247 
The church wardens have in their hands 718 lbs. of tobacco, 

carried over from the -year 1746. 

Jean Chastain. 

David Le Sueur. Stephen Mallet^ 

Samuel Flournoy, Isaac Dutoy. 

GuiLLAUME Salle, Church Wardens. 
Pierre Guerrant. 

March 10, 1747. The vestry assembled. Present: Isaac 
Dutoy, Estiene Mallet, John Harris, David Lesueur, Guilie- 

"A pauper, of. entry of March 7, 1746-7. 

"Probably for maintaining the poor of the parish, or herself a pauper 

"Goochland, Henrico. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 



273 



aume Salle, Jean Pierre Bilbo, Pierre Gueran. The vestry 

assembled to receive the returns of the processioners named 

below: Isaac Dutoy, Benjamin Harris, Estienne Mallet, Jean 

Jaque Dupuy, \Vm. Harris and James Holeman, Pierre David 

and Charles Amonnet. 

Jean Chastain. 

Isaac Dutoy, 
Stephen Mallet. 
Church Wardens. 

John Harris, 

David Le Sueur, 

Pierre Guerrant, 

Jean Pierre Bilbo, 

GuiLLiAUME Salle. 

November lo, 1748. Samuel Florinoir and Abraham Salle 
took the oath of church wardens in the presence of the vestry- 
men named below : Isaac Dutoy, Estiene Mallet, Pierre Gueran, 
Daniel Perrg. 

Abram. Salle, 
Saml. Flournoy. 

Church Wardens. 
Stephen Mallet, 
Isaac Dutoy, 
Peter Guerrant, 
Daniel Paro, 
John Chastain. 

The same day the lev}' was made for the present year, 
amounting to twenty pounds of tobacco per head, viz. : 

For the minister, one thousand, three ( ?) hundred. 

For the clerk, one thousand. 

For Benton, one thousand for Sara Chandler. 

For Peter Dep, one hundred and sixty pounds. 

For the sexton, two hundred and fifty pounds. 

For arrears, two hundred and sixteen pounds for Isaac 
Dutoy. 

The number of parishoners amounts to 250. 



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274 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

The same day the above-mentioned Isaac Dutoy and Estiene 
Mallet rendered their account for their administration for the 
year 1747, in the presence of the vestrymen. 

Abram. Salle, 
Samuel Flournoy. 

••I promise to pay unto the Church Wardens of King Wil- 
liam parish four pounds, two shill, and two pence, current 
mony, for value reed, of the parish. 

Wittnis my hand this loth day of Dec, 1748. 

Stephen Mallet. 

Pierre Depp has taken Monfor for another year for one 
hundred and sixty pounds of tobacco, commencing February 
24, 1749. 

Jean Chastain. 

Isaac Dutoy has made a bargain with Wm. Banton for Sar i 
Chandler at 1,000 lb. of tobacco for a year, commencing No- 
vember I, 1748. 

Jean Chastain. 

Abraham Salle and Samuel Florinoir put Elizabeth Rober 
out of the parish November 21.* 

Jean Chastain. 

*®The vestry assembled. Present : Abraham 



'•The original of the receipt is in English, a proof of the growing 
disuse of F'rench among the parishoners. Clerk Chastain's P'rench is 
ragged enough, and Mr. Mallet, although a vestryman and a man of 
dignity in the parish, no longer ventures to write the tongue of his fathers. 

* Some light is thrown on this drastic action of the church wardens by 
the following entry in the Register of Baptisms in King William Parish; 
Brock, p. 10 1 : 

**The 14th June, 1741, was born Jesse, reputed son of John Harris and 
of Elizabef Roberd; had for godfather, John Bemar and Jean Chastain; 
for godmother, Charlote Judith Chastain." 

^The date is obliterated from the top of the page. Possibly it is 
December 9, 1749, certainly some time in that year. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 275 

Salle, Samuel Florinoir, Estene Malet, Jean Chastain. Joseph 
Bonduran, Jean Bonduran, Jean Chastain j. took the oath of 
vestrymen for the parish of King William. 

John Bondurant, 
Joseph Bondurant, 
John Chastain, Jun." 

The same day Joseph Bondurant and Jean Chastain took 
the oath of church wardens for the present year. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the church wardens, Samuel Florinoir and 
Abraham Salle, rendered their account. They owe 281 lbs. of 
tobacco, for which they have given their note. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day the levy for the present year, 1749, was made. 
It amounts to 16 lbs. of tobacco per tithable. 



Jean Chastain. 



1,600 for the minister. 
1,000 for the clerk. 
1,000 for Sara Chendler. 

300 for Sara Lahene. 

150 for Peru. 

250 for the sexton. 



4,300 

I 

February 3, 1749I50. The vestry assembled. Present: 
Samuel Florinoir, Guillicaume Salle, Es'iiene Mallet, Isaac 
Dutoy, David Lesueur, Daniel Perro, Jean Chastain. ' Jean 



*'The following quaint memorandum is pinned over the foregoing entry: 
'* Rec'd of the Church Wardens of King William Parish £^ s. 4 for the 
Church Bible for the Yous of John Harris. 

December 9, 1749. Sam'l Floumoy. " 



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276 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Bonduran, Joseph Bonduran, Jean Chastain took the oath of 
vestrymen for the parish of King William and took the test. 

Jean Chastain and Joseph Bonduran took the oath of church 
wardens for the present year. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Estiene Mallet settled his note, which was 
due for four pounds, two shillings, two pence. 

The same day the levy for the present year was made of 
sixteen pounds of tobacco per head, viz. : 

For the minister i,6oo 

For Sara Chandler i,ooo 

For the clerk i,ooo 

For the poor 300 

For Peru 150 

For the sexton 250 

4,300 

By note inspetcur {?) 140 

By the note of the church wardens for the year 1749 281 

The number of tithables for the year 1749 266 

*^The proceedings of December 9 are cancelled. The vestry 
agreed that the service is to be two-thirds in English. 

Jean Chastain. 
Joseph Bondurant, 
John Chastain. 

Church Wardens. 
William Salle, 
David Le Sueur, 
Stephen Mallet, 
John Bondurant, 
Daniel Paro, 
Isaac Dutoy, 
Samuel Flournoy. 

♦n'he entry referred to is not recorded in this Register. The conces- 
sion to the everincreasing number of English-speaking parishioners is 
apparent. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 277 

December 28, 1750. This day Captain Porter and Charles 
Clarck took the oath of vestrymen for the parish of King Wil- 
liam in the presence of Joseph Bondurant, Jean Chastain, Isaac 
Dutoy, David Lesueur, Samuel Floumoir, Jean Bonduran, 
Daniel Perro. 

Jean Chastain. 

The same day Charle Clarck and Jean Bonduran took the 
oath of church wardens and took the test, in the presence of 
the vestrymen named above. 

Jean Chastain. 

Joseph Bonduran and Jean Chastain rendered their account 
of their administration for the year 1749. They owe 86 lbs. 
of tobacco. 

The same day the levy was made for the present year. It 
amounts to twenty-two pounds of tobacco per head, viz.: 

For the minister, two thousand, four hundred. 

For the clerk, one thousand pounds. 

For Sara Chandler, one thousand pounds. 

For the sexton, two hundred and fifty pounds. 

For Sara Ocquebe, three hundred pounds. 

For repairing the church, five hundred and eighty-four. 

Chas. Clerke^ 
John Bondurant. 
Church Wardens. 

John Chastain, 

David Le Sueur, 

Saml. Flournoy, 

Jos. Bondurant, 

Isaac Dutoy, 

Thos. Porter, 

Jean Chastain, Junior, 

Daniel Perrow. 

Daniel Pero asked his discharge and the vestry granted his 
request. 

Jean Chastain. 



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278 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

*»List of land which each holds in the parish of King Wil- 
liam and adjacent thereto : 

Tobit la Fitt, acres I33 

Estiene Bocard 093 

Mathieux Agee 220 

Pierre Louy Soblet 133 

Pierre Faure 107 

Estiene Reynaud 133 

Charle Perot 133 

Antoine Rapine . . . .^ 122 

Estiene Malet 123 

Danielle Meban, Jatob Capon 046 

Tobit la Fitt 075 

Nicolas Soullie I33 

Pierre Soblet 089 

Anthoine Maton 165 

Jean Jouanis 840 

Madame Timson 168 

Pierre David, jun ..." 066 

Jean Farcis, 040 

Estien Chastain 981 

Pierre Dutoy 461 

Jean Pierre Bilbo 162 

Isaac Parenteaux 044 

Jacob Capon 034 

Danielle Guerand 059 

Glaud Goris 050 

Pierre Chastain 65. 

Gedeon Chan 

Pierre Dep 076 

Pierre Sabatiee 088 

"This list is on the last remaining leaf in the book. It bears no date, 
but its date may be approximately deduced as follows: Anthoine Trabue, 
whose name appears in the list, died January, 1723-4 (Brock, p. iii), 
thus affording a terminus ad quern for the list. The hand-writing appears 
to be that of Jacques Soblet, whose clerkship begins in 1722. It is pro- 
bable therefore that the list belongs to 1722 or the preceding year. 



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VESTRY BOOK OF KING WILLIAM PARISH. 279 

Bartelmis Dupuy 208 

Pierre Dupuy 068 

Anthoine Givodan 128 

Jacob Amonet 274 

Pierre David, signor 088 

Jean Chastain ' 090 

Abraham Soblet 088 

Jean le Vilin 200 

Francois Fleurinoy 133 

Danielle Croom 052 

Jean le Grand 051 

Anthoine Trabue 268 

Abraham Sallee 477 

Jhon Levingston 170 

Jean Martin 1200 

Jean Pierre Perut 122 

Jean Forquerent 170 

Moyse Levereaux 117 

Adam Vigne 025 

Elisabeth Sasine 172 

Jean Spulaigre 275 

Sum total of land 490 

**List of the lands which each inhabitant of the parish of 
King William owned in the year 1727I8: 

Pierre Chastain 1063 

Gedeon Chanbon 0033 

Glaude Gori 0050 

Pierre Dep 0076 

Daniel Guerand oo59 

Joseph Bingley 0047 

Tobie Lafite 0208 

. Jean Pierre Billebo 0044 

**The list is on a loose sheet torn from the back of the Register. On 
the establishment of the parish in 1 700-1 each family was allowed 133 
acres, cf. Calendar of State Papers of Virginia, I, 189, quoted by Brock, 
page 68. In a majority of cases the amount of land held seems to have 
been reduced or increased by purchase in the decades following. 



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280 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Estiene Chastain 0909 

Barbary Dutoy 0061 

Estiene Malet 0125 

Jacob Capon 0047 

Susane Kerner ^^77 

Nicolas Soulie oi33 

Antoine Rapine 01 33 

M. Joannis (figures erased) 0909 

Rager Prat 0133 

Pierre Faure 0107 

Pierre Champagne 0090 

Louis Soblet 0133 

Matieu Age 021 1 

Pierre Bocar 0091 

Daniel Pero 0133 

Pierre Calvet * 0444 

Pierre Soblet 0088 

Pierre David, s 0088 

Jaque Soblet 0088 

Pierre David, j 0066 

Jean Legrand 0050 

Jorge Merhbenc 0402 

Pierre Sabatie oo83 

Jacob Amonet 0270 

Jean Chastain 00.0 

Jean Levilain 0200 

Thomas Givodan 0128 

Isaac Salle oo55 

Guilaume Salle OQ57 

M. Timson 0168 

M. Tillitt 0582 

Antoine Trabu 0186 

Jean Pierre Bilbo 01 19 

M. . . Alaigre 0180 

M. Amonet 0182 

Daniel Faure 0296 

. . . . d Moriset oi.^O 

Jean Loucadou 0103 

Daniel Guerand 0133 

Ed wd. Bryers 0092 

Elie Sasain 0104 

(concluded, ) 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 281 



THE EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF 
VIRGINIA, 1722-1734. 



As Shown by the Proceedings of the Colonial Council. 



Edited and Annotated by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C. 



(continued.) 



June 7, 1732. 

On reading at the Board a Letter from the Right Hon** the 
Lords Commissioners for executing the Office of Ld. high 
Treasurer of great Britain bearing date the 29th day of Fcb'^ 
last & directed to the Governor & Council directing them to 
examine the Demand of Coll. Alexander Spotswood late Lieut. 
Governor of this Dominion for the sum of six hundred pounds 
for defraying the Charges he was at in a journey to treat with 
the Indians at Albany & Conestogo* & to report to their L* 
ships what may be just & reasonable to allow in Satisfacon for 
the same — It is ordered that a Copy of their Lord ships said 
L're be forthwith sent to Col" Spotswood & that he be desir'd 
as soon as convenient may be to lay before this Board the Accot 
of his Expenses & such Vouchers as he hath for proof thereof 
to the End this Board may be the better enabled to make a 
Suitable Report thereupon. 

June 14, 1732. 

Ordered that Mr. Drury Stith Surveyor ot the County of 
Brunswickf Cause the line of the s** County to be run & mark'd 



♦In April, 1721, Sir William Keith, Governor of Pennsylvania, visited 
Governor Spotswood at Williamsburg, and while there filed with him a 
memorial in reference to Indian affairs. {Minutes of the Provincial 
Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. Ill, pp. 1 16-117.) No doubt this visit 
was instrumental in bringing about the Albany Conference of 1722. 

t Preceding orders and notes have shown that the territory embraced 
in original Brunswick county developed more slowly than Spotsylvania. 

The immigration which came to Virginiathrough the Capes naturally 



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2S2 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

from that part of Bush river where he formerly left of to the 
nearest place on Appomattox River as the Boundary between 
that County & the County of Prince George, 

went up the tidal streams, while the Scotch-Irish and Germans from 
Pennsylvania followed the valleys between the Blue Ridge and Alle- 
ghany Mountains in their migrations southward. The Roanoke Valley 
enjoyed none of these advantages of location, and its fertile lands re- 
mained vacant in large measure until nearly the middle of the eigh- 
teenth century. Colonel William Byrd conceived the idea of settling a 
colony of Swiss and other foreign Protestants on the Roanoke, and in 
I735» obtained a Council order for 100,000 acres of land for that purpose. 
( CaUndar of Virginia State Papers, Vol. I, p. 223. ) He also pub- 
lished, in 1737, a German book entitled Neu-Ge/undnes Eden in Vir» 
ginia [New-Found Eden in Virginia], which describes the advantages 
of soil and climate enjoyed by the section, in question. {Virginia 
Magazine, Vol. XI, p. 381, note.) His enterprise was not successful, 
and this portion of Virginia was left to develop gradually as the count- 
ies on the east became more thickly settled. It was a frontier line, which 
receded gradually with the natural increase of population in southeast- 
ern Virginia. Its early annals are devoid of special interest. Fort 
Christanna, and the Indian school established there by Governor Spots- 
wood, passed out of existence when he retired from office. The Tus- 
carora Indians, who fled into the Roanoke Valley after their defeat in 
North Carohna, soon removed to New York, and the tributary Indians 
who remained were so decayed in all respects that no serious troubles 
ever occurred between them and the whites. The first settlers were 
almost entirely of English descent, but later a considerable number of 
Scotch-Irish Presbyterians came and settled principally in present Bed- 
ford county. {Virginia Magazine, Vol. XII, pp. 417-421.) The set- 
tlers in this section were chiefly small farmei^ and planners. Few great 
estates, like those in Tidewater and the valleys of the James and Rap- 
pahannock, were acquired, but the population was industrious, intelli- 
gent and law-abiding. They were active in defense of the frontiers 
during the French and Indian War. (Boogher, Gleanings of Virginia 
History, Washington, 1903, pp. 58-110.) During the Revolution they 
were highly patriotic under the leadership of Patrick Henry, who resided 
then in territory once a part of old Brunswick county. 

The boundaries of Brunswick were never defined with certainty by 
the General Assembly, and the extent of its original territory can only 
be determined by legislative acts establishing new counties. In 1734, a 
portion of its territory lying north of the Nottoway river was cut off, 
and, with a part of Prince George county, formed into the county of 
Amelia. Lunenburg followed in 1745, and then came Halifax (1752); 



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early westward movement of virginia. 283 

June 15, 1732. 

Joost Held* in behalf of himself & partners having entered 
a Caveat to stop the granting a Patent to William Russell for 
Land in the Western Side of the River Sherundo granted by 
Order of this Board in June 1730, to John Vanmeter. It is 
ordered that the pretencons of the Several parties be heard 
before this Board on the second day of the next general Court 
& in the Mocon of the s** Wm. Russell leave is granted him to 
take Deposicons of witnesses in the province of West Jersey to 
be made use of at the time of hearing he giving the said John 
Vanmeter & Joost Heid timely notice when & where he will 
take the Examinacon of the s* Witnesses. 



June 16, 1732. 
Coll*. Spotswood this day attended the Board & pursuant to 

Prince Edward and Bedford (1753 ^ Mecklenburg and Charlotte (1764); 
and Pittsylvania (1766). The organization of these counties from terri- 
tory once a part of Brunswick, gradually carried the frontier line to the 
Blue Ridge, beyond which the original county never extended. The 
country west of the mountains fell within the imperial boundaries of 
Augusta when what county was created in 1738. 

♦This Order indicates that Jost Hite had probably reached the Valley 
of Virginia with his family at the dale of its entry, and Kercheval's 
statement that he came in the summer of 1732, seems to be confirmed. 
(History of the Valley^ 2nd ed., 1850, p. 4f.) It is also evidence that 
Hite's diflSculties concerning lands commenced immediately upon his 
arrival in the Valley. Subsequent Orders show that his controversy 
with William Russell was speedily settled in his favor, but the liti- 
gation with Lord Fairfax, which begun in 1736, was not decided until 
1786. {Revised Code of Virginia, 18 19, Vol. II, pp. 346-47-) The 
decision was finally in favor of Hite and those claiming under him. In 
this controversy the right of the case was undoubtedly with Hite. 
While the lands in dispute unquestionably fell within the boundaries of 
the Northern Neck as fixed by the commission of 1745, yet Lord Fair- 
fax, in accepting the Rapidan as the southern boundary of his grant, 
agreed that all crown grants made prior to that date should be con- 
firmed. This agreement was not kept, and his litigation with Hite 
served, in considerable measure, to arrest the development of the 
lower Valley. 

William Russell, mentioned in this Order, was, as a subsequent order 



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284 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

the Directions the Rt. hon** the 1/ Com'" of his Majesty's Treas- 
ury delivered in the accot of his Disbursments on the Treaty 
with the Northern Indians at Albany in the year 1722. He 
also laid before the Board several Extracts of the Minutes of 
Council Sc Assembly whereby he was requested to take the 
Trouble of presiding in the Negotiacon of the s** Treaty & pro- 
ducing some Vouchers to shew the greatness of the Expence 
submitted to the Consideracon of this Board whether it was 
possible to Keep a particular account of every sum disbursed 
considering the Variety of the Expence Whereupon the Board 
taking the same into consideracon & being Sensible that the 
keeping regular Vouchers for every article expanded in that st- r- 
vice was impracticable from the Nature of the Thing thought 
fit to propose that Coll. Spotswood should make oath to what 
he believes in his Conscience that Journey & Service cost over 
& above the one Thousand pounds given by the Gen'. Assembly 
and accordingly the said Coll. Spotswood made Oath that he 
verily believed the expence of the s** Journey & Treaty at 
Albany did not cost him less than the sixteen hundred Pounds 
charged in his Accot The Governour <!fe Council came to the 
following Resolution: 

That inasmuch as it appears that the said Journey to Albany 

will show, one of the earliest adveniurers in the Valley of Virginia. 
He was a native of England and is said to have come over with Gov- 
ernor Spotswood in 17 10. It is also staled that he accompanied the 
Governor across the Blue Ridge in 1716, and 1 onsequently was a 
*' Horse Shoe Knight." In 1722, he was a resident of King and Queen, 
and in that \ear purchased land in Spotsylvania county. He died in 
Culpeper county, October i8th, 1759, aged seventy-two years. (See 
IVilliam Russell and )m Descendants^ Lexington, Ky., pp. 1-3 ; Spot- 
sylvania County Records, New York, 1905. p. 93.) Colonel William 
Russell of the Virginia line in the Revolution, was his eldest son, and 
Russell county, Va.. was named for him. 

The object in taking the depositions here mentioned is not under- 
stood. Possibly Russell was trying to prove that Van Meter had not 
brought the requisite number of families to settle upon the land con- 
ditionally granted to him by Council Order of June 17th, 1730. As 
shown in the last issue of the Magazine, the Van Meters came to Vir- 
ginia from Salem, West Jersey, which town is now the county seat of 
present Salem county, New Jersey. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 285 

was undertaken by Coll. Spotsvvood at the joint Request of the 
Council & House of Burgesses met in Assembly and that it is 
generally acknowledged that his presence at the s* Treaty was of 
Singular service for the establishing that Peace with the Indians 
which ever since has kept the Frontiers of this Colony in quiet 
it is highly reasonable his Expences on that Service should be 
paid what appears to amount to six hundred pounds Virginia 
Currency at that time fifteen P. Cent less in Value that Sterl. 

But in regard he hath lain so long out of his Money & hath 
been put to the trouble & expense of divers Journies to Solicit 
the payment thereof first from the Gen' Assembly and after- 
wards from this Board it is fit he should be repaid in Sterl. as 
much as the S** Expences Amount to And whereas it also ap- 
pears that during Coll. Spotswoods Absence on the service afs* 
he was superseded in his Governm* by the Arrival of Coll. 
Drysdale it seems unjust that he should serve this Governm* in 
so important a Negotiacon at his own expence when the Com*^" 
that attended him had a honourable allowance from the time of 
their Departure till their return and therefore it seems reason- 
able that Coll. Spotswood on whose Conduct the Success of 
that Treaty chiefly depended should at least have double the 
allowance given to the first Commissioners chosen out of his 
Majesty's Council which was six & Twenty shillings P. Diem & 
that a Report pursuant hereto be prepared to be signed by the 
Gov"" & Council & transmitted to the Lords Commissioners of 
the Treasury & to assure their Lorhships that if upon the whole - 
They Shall be of opinion that Coll. Spotswood ought to be 
paid out of his Majesty's revenues the s** Sum of six hundred 
pounds the Ballance of his Disbursments together with the 
aforemencon'd Gratificacons for his personal Trouble & Services 
this Board will readily order the Paym^ thereof upon the first 
significacon of their Lordships Pleasure. 



July I, 1732. 

A Report to the Lords of the Treasury in return to Coll. 
Spotswoods Services & Disbursments being prepared pursuant 



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286 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

to the Resolucon of the Board of the i6*^ of last month was this 
day Sign'd by the Governour in Council. 



Oct. 20, 1732. 

Whereas upon the Complaint of the Saponie* Islands IStC; 
but evidently Indians is meant] the great Men of the Nottoways 
were ordered to attend here to justifie themselves & their 
Nacon of the murder of some of the Saponie Nacon with which 
they are charged & have neglected to appear, It is Ordered 
that the Comanding officer of the Militia of the County of 
Surry do forthwith cause the s^. Nottoway Great Men to be 
seiz'd & brought under a guard to Williamsburgh in order to 
their Exam* con. 



Oct. 27, 1732. 

On hearing this day at the Board the matter in dispute on the 
Caveat of Joost Heyd Assignee of John & Isaac Van meter t 
for stopping a Patent sued out by W". Russell for land on 
Sherundo River, It is ordered that the s*. Joost Heyd have a 
Grant of all that Tract of Land included in the Entries of John 
& Isaac Van meter which lyes on the lower side of the first 

♦ It has been shown in the course of these notes that the Saponi In- 
dians were driven from their original home on the Yadkin River in North 
Carolina by constant attacks of the Five Nations. At this date they 
were settled near Fort Christanna. (Mooney, Siouan Tribes of the 
East, p. 43.) The building of this fort was commenced in August, 1714. 
(Spotswood, Official Letters^ Vol. II, p. 212.) 

The Nottoway Indians were of the same stock as the Iroquois, and a 
subsequent Order shows their close intimacy with those tribes. 

tThis land lay in the southern portion of present Frederick county, 
Va. The Carter grant adjoined it on the east. The Valley Railroad 
and Valley Turnpike pass through it, and the North Branch of the 
Shenandoah constitutes its southern boundary. **Cape Leanock" was 
evidently the Indian name for that river and here appears for the first 
time. The correct spelling would probably have made it a word of one 
syllable, like Cacapehon, now Capon river. 

This Order brings us to a period when actual settlers were coming 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 287 

Western Branch of Sherundo otherwise called Cape Leanock & 
the Branches thereof including the Land between that & the 
Mountains next to Opeckon & extending from Sherundo river 
along the lines of the Land taken up by Robt. Carter Esq', 
dec'd to the s^ Mountains & thence Westerly as far as will in- 
clude the Quantity of 20,000 acres granted to the s^. John & 
Isaac Van meter & that if the s* W". Russell will take up the 
quantity of land he pretends to claim by virtue of his entries & 
Surveys he be permitted to make a new Entry for the same be- 



into the Shenandoah Valley in considerable numbers, and a brief notice 
concerning them is indispensable to a proper understanding of Virginia's 
first great extension toward the west. The earliest settlers in the Valley 
of Virginia were Germans, not Dutch in the sense of being Hollanders, 
a misnomer which still clings to them. They came almost entirely from 
the upper valley of the Rhine and sprung from the purest strains of the 
Teutonic race. Their homes were chiefly in the lower Palatinate, an 
old principality of Germany, and the adjacent states of Mainz, Treves, 
Baden, Alsace, Lorraine, and Wurtemberg. Coming from this section, 
they were called Palatines, a term finally applied to all German imi- 
jrrants to this country during the colonial period. Two wars waged by 
Louis XIV of France caused an exodus from the Palatinate and ad- 
jacent districts. The first, known as the War of the Grand Alliance, 
had no other object in view than to annex Alsace and Lorraine to 
France. This war commenced in 1686, and the devastation of the 
Palatinate by the French armies has no parallel in modern history. 

The second was the War of the Spanish Succession — France against 
all Germany. In these great conflicts the Palatinate was made a desert, 
and its people became wanderers in every country of Europe not con- 
trolled by Louis XIV. Not even the Hugenots of France suffered a 
greater martyrdom than the Germans of the Palatinate. 

They sought an asylum in America, and in 17 10, four thousand came 
to New York. Their experience in that colony was not satisfactory^ 
and they then turned to Pennsylvania. Commencing in 1717, they began 
to arrive in large numbers, landing at Philadelphia. They first settled 
in Lancaster and adjoining counties, and many of them then removed to 
Virginia in 1730-32. Among them was also a small element of Swiss. 
These Germans were almost unanimously Protestants, chiefly of the 
Lutheran and German Reformed denominations. They were a literate 
people upon their arrival in America, and their descendants have so 
continued. The Peaked Mountain church record shows that an agree- 
ment to build a union church by the Lutheran and Reformed Congrega- 
tions at McGaheysville, Rockingham county, Va., in 1768, was signed 



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283 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

ginningf over against the mouth of Happy Creek, & running up 
the Western side of the s**. Western branch but not to cross the 
same so as to interfere with the grant hereby made to the s*. 
Joost Heid But for as much as during the dispute between him 
& the s**. Russell he hath been interrupted in seating the s*" Land 
according to the Condicon on which the same was granted to 
the s**. Van meter further time is allowed him till the next Gen- 
eral Court for complying with the sd. Condicon & he is accord- 
ingly hereby directed to have the number of Families on the sd. 
Land by that time in pain of forfeiting this p'sent Grant. 



On the peticon of W". Russell leave is granted him to survey 
20,000 Acres of Land in lieu of the 19.000 formerly Surveyed 

by forty-eight men, of whom forty-four wrote their names. ( Uri/iiatn 
and Mary Col/e^e Quarterly, Vol. XIII, pp. 248-49.) During the French 
and Indian War, these early Germans in the Valley were active par- 
ticipants. (Boogher, Gleanings of Virtrinia History, pp. 30-58). In the 
Revolution they chiefly composed the 8th Virginia, or "German Regi- 
ment," commanded by Muhlenberg, and many of them also served in 
the 7th Virginia Regiment, Daniel Morgan's celebrated " Rifle Corps." 
The Valley Germans are popularly supposed to be without military 
spirit, but it can be truthfully said of them that in the War of the Revo- 
lution they participated in nearly every engagement of importance, from 
Boston Heights to Yorktown. 

The d^iscendants of these pioneer Germans have always been the 
governing element in the lower Valley, and they stiM hold leadership in 
that section. For several generations the German language was almost 
exclusively spokert, and this, together with different customs, tended to 
isolate them from eastern colonial Virginia. They have, however been 
gradually blending with English Virginia, and to-day their diff*erent 
origin is in a large degree denoted only by the surnames which they 
bear. The German Baptist Brethren, familiarly known as Dunkards, 
were not among the pioneer Germans of the Valley in any numbers. 
Nearly all of this prosperous element of Virginia came to the State 
after the Revolution, between the years 1790 and 1800, and their history 
does not fall within the scope of this work. For accounts of tlie de- 
struction of the Palatinate, see Macaulay*s History of England, Menzel's 
History of Germany, and Cobb's Story of the Palatines. In Rupp's Col- 
lection of Thirty Thousand German Natnes, &c., will be found the names 
of nearly all the early German settlers of the Valley. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 289 

lor him lying on both sides of Sherundo River above Happy 
Creek & in the fork of the sd. River* joining^ upon the land of 
Joost Heid & others interested in the Entry of John Van meter 
as the same is this day ascertained by the Board. 



On the peticon of Alex' Ross & others his partners t for a 

*The land embraced in this Order was situated at the junction of the 
North and South branches of ihe Shenandoah. Present Riverton and 
Front Royal are within its boundaries. The descriptions given show 
that the tract covered territory lying directly within the fork of the two 
rivers. 

The Council Orders show that this general locality was much favored 
by the earliest seekers of land in the Valley. The fertile soil and the 
easy passes through the Blue Ridge in this section doubtless furnished 
the reason. The gaps in this immediate section still bear the names 
givrii to them by the early settlers — Chester's, Manassas Ashby's, and 
Williams' Gaps. An important Indian trail passed through one of them, 
probably Chester's Gap. Reference is made in an Act of 1732 to **The 
Indian Thoroughfare of the Blue Ridge Mountains," in Prince William 
county. (Hening, Vol. IV, p. 367; Kercheval, p. 33.) 

t The persons engaged in this enterprise were known among the 
Society of Friends as Alexander Ross and Company. It has been shown 
that Ross was a resident of Cecil county, Md., at the time of his re- 
moval to the Valley. • Josiah Ballinger, James Wright, Evan Thomas, 
and others in the colony, came either from Pennsylvania or the Elk 
River section in Maryland. Ballinger and Wright originally resided at 
Salem, West Jersey. About the year 1725 they removed to the upper 
part of old Prince George county, Maryland, and settled near the Mo- 
nocacy, and thence removed to the lands mentioned in prior Council 
Orders, near Winchester. Permission wafe obtained from the Quarterly 
Meeting of Chester, Pennsylvania, to build a meeting-hou>e in Virginia, 
and Hopewell congregation was formed. About the year 1733 Amos 
Janney, of Bucks county, Pa., and other Friends, settled in present Loudon 
and Fairfax counties, where they built, in 1741, a meeting-house called 
Fairfax, probably at or near the site of present Fairfax Court House- 
In 1733 Richard Beesonand others settled on and near Tuscarora Creek, 
a branch of the Opequon, where a meeting-house, called Providence, 
was erected. (Smith's History of the Province of Pennsylvania , printed 
in Hazard's Res^ister of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1831, Vol. VII, pp. 
134 35) The records seem to demonstrate that the Quakers, or Friends^ 
were the religious pioneers in forming congregations and building 
churches in the Valley of Virginia. 



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290 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Grant of 20,000 acres of Land joining on the So. Side of the 
Line of the Province of Pensilvania & on the west Side of the 
Boundary of my Lord Baltimore's Grant for the province of 
Maryland & joining to the Lands lately entr'd for by John 
Robinson Esq' It is ordered that the Entry of the petitioner for 
the sd. Tract be received & that if upon Settling the Boundries 
of Pensilvania & Maryland the Said Land shall appear to be 
within this Government the Pet', be prefer' d to a Grant thereof 



Ordered That the surveying the several Grants made to John 
Robinson E^q', Augustine Moore Sc John Robinson Jun' Gent, 
for Land on Conicathigah [Conacocheague] & Audeltank [Antie- 
tam] be Suspended until the Bounds of the province of Maryland 
be first settled. 



Oct. 28, 1732. 

The great Men of the Nottoway & Sapony Indians this day 
attending the Governor in Council upon the Complaint of the 
said Sapony Indians against the Nottovv.iys for divers Murders 
committed on their people since their return into this Govern- 
ment & more particularly for joining with divers foreign Indians 
in an attack* made on the said Sapony Indians at their Fort in 
the month of August last Contrary to the express Orders sent 
them by the Governour &, it appearing to the Board by the 



* This Order is positive evidence that the Six Nations were not ob- 
serving the treaty stipulations agreed upon at Albany in 1722, which 
restricted them to the territory west of the BUie Kidge in their travels 
through Virginia, and bound them, U{)on pain of death, not to molest 
the tributary Indians of the colony, among whom were the Saponi. 

The Nottoway town was at this lime is Kle of VVi>*hl county, on the 
Black Water river. It was visited in 1728, by Colonel William Byrd, 
who gives an amusing account of his entertainnitfnt tlierc. He states 
that they then numbered two hundred souls and were about the only 
Indians of any ccmsequence remaining in Virginia. {B\rd, History of 
the Dividing Lin^, 1728-29. p. 74. Richmond, Va., i}:'66.) In 1722, ihe 
Nottoways were living in Surry county. Va., and then numbered about 
one hundred warriors. They were described as being "of late a thriv- 
ing and increasing people." {\\ii\^v\y, Histoiy of I'ir/^iuia, L(>ndon, 
1722, p. 184; reprint, 1855.) 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 291 

Testimony of Mary Tatum that one Jenning [?] a Nottoway In- 
dian on his return from the Sapony Fort owned at her House 
that he & others of that Nation had been that day fighting with 
the Saponies and it also appearing that the said Nottoways have 
at their Town four Prisoners of the Saponie Nation taken from 
the plantacon of Coll. R^ Mountford [Munford]. It is ordered 
that the said Nottoway Indians for their Contempt in disobey- 
ing the Orders of the Governour be fined in the Sum of ten 
pounds, to be paid to the Saponies or the Value thereof in 
Goods, being the Compensation they agree to accept for the 
loss they have sustained by means of the said Nottoway Indians 
and that the same be accordingly paid before the fifteenth day 
of April next, and it's further Ordered that the sd. Jenning [?] & 
two other of the great Men of the Nottoway Indians be com- 
mitted to the publick Goal & there detained until the Sapony 
Prisoners be delivered up to their Na'con and for the better 
preserving the Peace between the sd. Nations for the future It 
is ordered that Neither of the sd. Nottoway or Sapony Indians 
do presume hereafter to disturb or molest one another in their 
Hunting and if either of them shall offend herein the Indians 
found guilty of being the first Aggressours shall be transported 
out of this Colony and if any murder shall be committed by 
either of the sd. Nations on the other that Nation whose Indians 
shall comit the same shall be answerable for such muder unless 
they deliver up the P'sons concern' d therein to be tried & pun- 
ished according to Law and whereas the Nottoway Indians 
frequently entertain at their Town parties of the Tuscarooro's 
inhabiting in No. Carolina & under Colour thereof do receive 
among them divers of The Six Nac'ons under the Governm't 
of New York who by their Treaties of peace are bound not to 
pass through any part of this Country to the Eastward of the 
great Mountains or to the Northward of Roanoke River with- 
out a Passport from the Governour of New York and then not 
exceeding ten in one Company the said Nottoway Indians are 
for the future to forbear entertaining at their Towns or giving 
encouragement to their Coming in this Colony any of the said 
foreign Indians on pain of being made accountable for any 
mischief or Injury the sd. Tuskarooro's or other foreign Indians 
shall do either to his Majesties Subjects or to the Saponies and 



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292 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

on the other hand the Sapony Indians are to be accountable for 
any Injury or mischief which Shall be done to his Majesty's 
Subjects or to the Nottoways by any of the Cattabaw Indians 
their Confederates who shall resort to their Town. 

Which Orders & Injunctions aforemenconed being com'uni- 
cated & fully explained to the s** Nottoway & Sapony Indians 
where by their respective g^reat Men severally agreed & sub- 
mitted to and it is Ordered that Copies hereof be delivered to 
the Interpreters of the said several Nations to be by them com- 
municate to all the Indians at their respective Towns. 



Dec. 15, 1732. 

Whereas Information was this day given to the Board that 

the Tuscarooro Indians in Conjunction with divers Indians of 

the Six Nations * under the Governm't of New York are now 

amongst the Frontier plantacons iii the County of Brunswick 

♦The Tuscarora Indians mentioned in this Order consisted of that 
portion of the tribe which remained neutral in the war of 1711-13. 
The hostiles were defeated with overwhelming loss in March, 1713, at 
Snow Hill, Greene county, North Carolina, by the South Carolina 
forces under Colonel James Moore. (Fiske, Old Virgima and Her 
Neighbors, Vol. II, p. 304.) It is well known that the defeated rem- 
nant fled into Virginia, and after remaining there a short time removed 
to New York and became the Sixth Nation of the Iroquoian confed- 
eracy. The date of their migration is not drfinitely known, but it was 
probably in the spring or summer of 17 14. An Order of the New York 
Council passed June 15th, 1713, recites that the Tuscarora Indians being 
then at war with her Majesty's subjects in Carolina and the Flatheads 
(Catawbas), should not be allowed to settle in New York until peace 
had been declared. {Collections Neiv York Historical Society, .869, 
Vol. II, p. 463.) 

In a letter to the Commissioners of Trade, dated July 21st, 1714, 
Governor Spotswood speaks of the peace which then existed with the 
Indians, and this would indicate that the Tuscaroras were allowed to 
join the Five Nations in 17 14. (Spotswood, Official Letters, Vol. II, p. 
70.) These Indians were a source of anxiety to Governor Spotswood 
during nearly the whole of his official career. Visits of the Five Na- 
tions to the Tuscarora town in Bertie county, North Carolina, and their 
attacks upon the tributary Indians settled in the vicinity of Fort Chris - 
tanna, were undoubtedly the impelling reasons for the Treaty of Albany 
in 1722. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 293 

lying in wait to cut off the Sapony Indians for paventing [pre- 
venting] the Mischiefs w*"* may happen as well to the Inhabitants 
on the sd. Frontier as to the sd. Saponee Indians living under the 
•protection of this Government. It is the opinion of this Board 
& accordingly Ordered that the Commanding Officers of the 
Militia in the Several Frontier Counties give immediate Orders 
to take up & secure all such of the Northern Indians as shall be 
found on the North side Roanoke river & East sides the great 
Mountains within the Limits of this Colony not having passports 
from the Governour of New York conformable to the Treaty 
made with them in year 1722, & all Tuscarooro Indians living 
within the province of North Carolina who shall be found within 
the Bounds of Virginia without Lisence to cause them & every 
of them to be Conveyed under a Guard to W°"Burg there to be 
proceeded ag* according to the Directions of the act of Assembly 
in that Case made & provided. 



May 4, 1733. 

A Warrant under his Sign Manual dated the 25th of Jan'' 
last <S: countersigned by the Lords Com" of his Majestys Treas- 
ury was this day read in Council directing of the payment of the 
Sum of nine hundred thirty-six pounds twelve shillings to Coll. 
Alex' Spotswood * out of the revenue of two shillings p hhd in 



* This Order records the payment to (iovernor Spotswood of a debt 
justly due him for eleven years. Payment was doubtles-i delayed by the 
sami influences which secured his removal from oftice. Upon his re- 
tirement he devoted himself to the management of his large estate, 
particularly the iron mines and fuMiaces. On July i8th, 1722, he pur- 
chased from William Beverley his interest in 15,000 acres of whdt was 
known as the " Ironmine land." The deed recites that Alexander 
Spotswood, Robert Beverley, of King and Queen, and Thomas Jones, of 
VVilliamsburg, merchant, had entered into a copartnership for the pur- 
pose of melting and casting iron. This copartnership was formed prior 
to February 20th, 1719, when the patent for the "Ironmine land" was 
secured. < Spotsylvania County Records, New York, 1905, p. 89.) The 
recitals in a deed dated December 21st, 1725, show that Governor Spots- 
wood was then residing in London, and a deed dated February 26th, 
1728, indirates that he was still in England. A deed dated November 6th 



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294 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

full of all demands for his Expenses & Service in Negotiating a 
Treaty with the Indians at Albany in the year 1722. And it is 
accordingly ordered that a Warrant be prepared for the Gov- 
ernor's Signing for the Payment of the af 'sd Sum pursuant to 
his Majestys pleasure in that behalf 



June 13, 1733. 

The Indians of the Sapony & Nottoway Nations this day 
attended the Gov' in Council & represented that in Order to put 
an end to the Hostilities * between them they had entred into 
Terns of peace & amity in which the Tuscarooro Indians were 
willing to be included & it was this day agreed between them 
that the great Men of the Sapony & Nottoway Nations meet at 
the Tuscarooro Town & there conclude a peace amongst them- 
selves & at the request of the Saponies Leave is granted them 
to incorporate with the Tuscarooro' s if they see fit upon this 
Condicon that neither of the said Nacons do presume to hunt 
upon any patented Lands within this Government nor come 
amongst the Inhabitants in any greater number than three in a 
Company, and Leave is also granted the said Saponies to re- 
main where they now are until the Corn be gathered in and then 
if they do not cohabit with the Tuscarooro' s that they remove 
to some place without the Inhabitants between Roanoke & Ap- 



1732, shows that he had then returned to Virginia. {Idem, pp. 97, 106, 
123.) Recalled to the service of the King and made Major-General in 
the Brili-ih army, he died June 7th, 1740, at Annapolis, Md., upon the 
eve of his departure as Commander-in-Chief of the expedition against 
Carthagena. He will live in the history of V^irginia as the best of her 
colonial governors. His short journey from Germanna to the Shenan- 
doah was the first march in "The Winning of the West." 

♦Council Order of May 5, 1732, in reference to the Saponi Indians, 
fixes the date of their return to V^irginia. They were again seeking 
protection agaui'it their ancient enemy, the Iroquois. It was shown in 
the July number of the Magazine that they finally made peace with the 
Six Nations, and removed fir^t to Pennsylvania, in 1740. and thence to 
New York about 1753. Their removal to Pennsylvania, was probably 
coincident with the transfer from North Carolina to New York of that 
portion of ihe Tuscarora nation which remained for a time in North 
Carolina after the conclusion of hostilities. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 295 

poniatox rivers where a sufficient Tract of Land shall be assijjn'd 
them according to the former directions of this Board and it is 
ordered that M' R' Hix do attend the sd. Saponies in their pres- 
ent Treaty with the Tiiscarooro's & report to this Board the 
Condicons of the peace concluded between them. 



Oct. 17, 1733. 

On hearing this day in Council the petition of divers of the 
Inhabitants of St. Georges Parish in the County of Spotsylvania, 
complaining that the Vestry of the said Parish have ordered two 
new Churches to be built neither of which are any way con- 
venient to the upper Inhabitants of the said Parish, and on Con- 
sidering what was in behalf of the Vestry, it appearing to the 
Board that no Complaint was offered to [by?] any of the Inhab- 
itants until after the said Churches were begun to be built and 
that the same is now so far proceeded in that the work cannot 
be interrupted without putting the Parish to a very great & con- 
siderable Charge. It is the opinion of this Board That the 
saide Petition be rejected but nevertheless that the said Vestry 
according to the Proposal this day made in their behalf do with 
all Convenient Speed cause a Chappel of Ease to be built for 
the use of the upper Inhabitants of the said Parish as shall be 
found most suitable for that purpose. 



Dec. 12, 1733. 
William Beverly Gent, having entered a Caveat* for stopping 



♦This Order fixes the date of the Massanutton settlement, discussed 
in note 4, p. 120, of the October number of the Magazine. It shows the 
end of the litigation between William Beverly and Jacob Stover, indenti- 
fies the land in dispute, and demonstrates that 1733 was the year in which 
the petition was filed. The petitioners had settled there about four 
years prior to that date, and therefore must have come in 1729 or 1730, 
in all probability the latter year. 

As the place of the first permanent settlement made by white men 
west of the Blue Ridge in Virginia, the location of Massanutton is of 
more than local historical importance. Some uncertainty has surrounded 
the question of its exact location, but these doubts have been resolved. 



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296 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

a Patent sued out by Jacob Stover for a Tract of Land lying on 
both sides Sherrando River, and in the second Fork thereof. 
On hearing the Parties by their Council It is the Opinion of 



The southwestern boundary was about three miles northeast of present 
Elkton, Rockingham county, Virginia. This is demonstrated by the 
following facts: By patent dated Dec. 13, 1738, and recorded in the 
land oflice at Richmond, Va., Jacob Stover was granted 800 acres of 
land lying on the south (southeast) side of the Shenandoah river, ihen 
in Orange county, **adjoinmg another tract of the said Stover contain- 
ing 5,000 acres." By deed dated Oct. 21, 1741, recorded at Orange, 
Va., Jacob Stover sold to Joseph Bloodworth a tract of land *' contain- 
ing by estimation 820 acres, be the same more or less," lying in Orange 
county on the east (southeast) side of the Shenandoah river adjoining 
*• Stovers pattent [5/V]." In this deed the point of departure is given 
as being between Hawksbill Run and Elk Run. The latter stream 
flows into the Shenandoah immediately at Elkton ; the former about 
one and one-half miles to the southwest. By deed dated March 9, 1741, 
and recorded at Orange, Va., Joseph Bloodworth sold to Adam Miller 
the same tract of land "containing by estimation 820 acres, be the same 
more or less," lying on the east (southeast) side of the Shenandoah. 
The same point of departure is given as above, and the closing lines 
touch the cources of "Stover's pattent [Sic].'* It will be observed 
that Bloodworth sold to Miller before acquiring title from Stover. By 
deed dated Sept. 27, 1764, and recorded at Staunton, Va., Adam Miller 
conveyed 280 acres of land to his son-in law, Jacob Bear, "being the 
same plantation on which said Adam Miller now lives, and which he pur- 
chased from Joseph Bloodworth, and he from Jacob Stover, and is part 
of a greater tract of 820 acres." The Bear family still reside upon this 
land, which includes the well-known Bear Lithia Spring. Here Adam 
Miller, the first of the Valley pioneers, lived and died. 

These deeds are positive evidence that one of Stover's 5,000 acre 
grants commenced about three miles northeast of present Elkton. The 
location of the other grant is positively known to have been immedi- 
ately below present Port Republic, as shown in the last issue of the 
Magazine, and therefore can be eliminated from this discussion. The 
courses and distances of the grant under discussion do not extend far 
back from the river on either side, and being surveyed in a narrow 
strip, 5,000 acres, approximately eight square miles, could easily have 
been extended down the river a distance of twelve miles, or perhaps 
further, and this, it seems, was the case. The northeastern boundary 
of Massanutlon seems to have been in the neighborhood of Newport, a 
village in present Page county, distant about twelve miles from Bear 
Lithia Spring, the southwestern boundary of Stover's lower grant 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 297 

this Board and accordingly Ordered That a Patent be granted 
the said Sfover For ye Tract of Land in dispute, pursuant to 
the grant thereof made to him in the Year 1730, and that the 
said Caveat be set aside. 



Gottschalk, the Moravian missionary, described it in 1748 as *' a narrow, 
small, and oblong district." ( Virgima Magazine, Vol. XII, p. 229) 

The Fairfax Line crossed the Page Valley at Newport. Before tlie 
organization of Rockingham county in 1778, the county of Augusta ex- 
tended down the Shenandoah to this point. North and east of the 
Fairfax Line was original Frederick county. In 1746, the estate of 
Abram Strickler, one of the petitioners, of 1733, was appraised in 
Augusta county, and that of Michael Rinehart, another petitioner, in 
1749. (Waddell, Annals of Augusta County, 2nd ed., pp. 78, 80.) In 
addition, Mathias Seizor, still another petitioner, was appointed a mem- 
ber of the county court of Augusta in 1751. (Summers, History of 
Southwest Virginia, p. 821.) On the 26th, of June, 1740, Abram Strick- 
ler and others presented a petition to the County Court of Orange for a 
public road from Smith's Creek over the " Buffiloe Mountains" to the 
mouth of ** Massanutten" and thence over the Blue Ridge to Mr. 
Thornton's mill. Petition granted, and Abram Strickler and Philip 
Lung (Long), another of the petitioners, were ordered to lay off and 
supervise the construction of the road. Massanutton Creek flows out 
of that range of mountains into the Shenandoah in the vicinity of 
Newport. 

These court records are cited to show that all, or nearly all, of the 
petitioners of 1733, resided in territory which became a part of Augusta 
when that county was organized, and therefore south of the Fairfax 
Line. The court orders fix the location of Massanutton on the Shenan- 
doah between Bear Lithia Springs on the southwest and Newport, 
Page county, Va., on the northeast. The ** Buffalo Mountains " appear 
for the first time in this petition, and this was probably the name given 
to the Massanutton range by the first settlers. The road in question is 
probably that which crosses the mountains from New Market to Luray. 
The two grants of 5,000 acres each, dated December i.sth, 1733, were 
the first crown patents issued for lands in Virginia lying west of the 
Blue Ridge. 

In 1733 ^his interesting colony numbered fifty-one persons, and nine 
plantations had been cleared. They state that a few persons had pre- 
ceded them in that locahty, and this must refer to Adam Miller and his 
family, who were frequently visited by the Indians. (Palmer, Calendar 
of Virginia State Papers, Vol. I, pp. 219-20.) 



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298 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



COMMISSION TO GOVERNOR YEARDLEY AND 
COUNCIL. MARCH 14, 1625-6. 



(From Copy in Robinson MSS, Virginia Historical Society.) 



[This is a renewal by Charles I of the commission as Governor 
pro tern,, issued by James I on September 18, 1625. On April 
19, 1 6x6. Yeardley was commissioned Governor-in-Chief. For 
instructions bearing the latter date, see this Magazine H, 393- 
396.] 

Charles, by the Grace of God &c. To our trusty & well be- 
loved Sir George Yeardley knight, Francis West Esqr., John 
Harvey Esqr., George Sandis Esqr., John Pott Doctor of phi- 
sick, Roger Smith Esqr., Ralph Hamor Esqr., Samuel Mathews 
Esqr., Abraham Percey Esq., William Claybourne Rsqr., Wil- 
liam Tucker Esqr., Jabes Whitakers Esq., Edward Blaney R^^q. 
& William Farrer Esqr. Greeting Whereas our late Royal! 
father King James of happy memory deceased by his Commis- 
sion under his great Seal of England bearing date the six & 
twentieth day of August in the two & twentieth year of his reign 
of England France & Ireland & of Scotland the eighth and fif- 
tieth for the better ordering manageing & governing of the 
affairs of the Colony & plantation in Virginia & of the persons 
then there inhabiting and that thereafter should be & inhabite 
there untill some other settled & constant course might be re- 
solved of & established by himself Did nominate and assigne Sir 
Francis Wyatt Knight to be the then present Governor & him 
& you the said George Yardley, Francis West and divers others 
in the said Commission particularly mentioned to be the then 
present Councel of& for the said Colony & plantation in Virginia 
with diverse priviledges & authorities in the said Commission 
Expressed & set down as in & by the same may more at large 
appeare And whereas our said late Royall father upon informa- 
tion that George Wyatt, Esqr., father of the said Sir Francis 
Wyatt was then lately deccrased in the realme of Ireland by rea- 



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COMMISSION TO GOVERNOR YEARDLEY. 299 

son whereof happily the s'd Sir Francis might desire to return 
into England about his own private occasions which our said 
father notwithstanding the great & weighty importance of his 
affairs in that country was graiiously inclined to yeild unto if 
himself should so desire & his occasions so require And yet for 
that in the absence The s*d Sir Francis Wyatt (if no other Gov- 
ernor should be appointed for him) many inconveniences might 
happen which in a business of such consequence were necessary 
to be provided for by another Commission under this great seal 
of England bearing date eighteenth day of September in the 
said two & twentieth year of his Highness Reign of England 
France & Ireland & of Scotland the eight ^ fiftieth Did give & 
grant unto the said Sir Francis Wyatt free liberty licence & au- 
thority at his own will and pleasure when he shall so think fitt to 
return & take his voyage for towards and into this realme of 
England for the performance & execution of his own private 
affairs And .to the end that the service in the first recited Com- 
mission Expressed might not in the meantime be neglected our 
said late fathers will & pleasure was & he did by the said last 
mentioned Commission nominate & appoint you the s'd Sir 
George Yardley in the absence of the s'd Sir Francis Wyatt or 
upon his search if it should so happen to be the then present 
Government you the s'd Francis West in the s'd former Com- 
mission mentioned to be the then present councel of & for the 
s'd Colony & plantation in Virginia giving & by the s'd latter 
Commission granting unto you & them & the greater number 
of you & them respectively full power and authority to perform 
Si execute the places powers & authorities incident to a Governor 
& Councel in Virginia respectively according to the tenour effect 
& true meaning of the s'd former recited Commissioner in that 
behalf to them & you directed together with diverse priviledges 
Si authorities in the said last mentioned Commission expressed 
as in & by the same may more at large appear. Now know ye 
that we lake into our princejy consideration the care & provi- 
dence of our s'd late Royall father having respect to the good 
of that plantation so happily begun which we conceive to be a 
business of that consequence w'ch we ought to encourage & by 
all good means to bring to perfection we being forced by many 



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300 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Other urgent oceasions in respect to our late access to the crown 
continue the same means that formerly was thought fitt for the 
maintenance of the s'd Colony & plantation untill we should find 
some more convenient means upon mature advice to give more 
ample directions for the same & reposing assured trust & confi- 
dence in the understanding care fidelity experience & circum- 
spection of you the s*d Sir George Yardley, Francis West, 
John Harvey, George Sandis, John Pott, Roger Smith, Ralph 
Hamer, Samuel Mathews, Abraham Percey, William Clayborne, 
William Tucker, Jabes Whitakers, Edward Blaney & William 
Farrer have nominated & assigned & by these presents Do nom- 
inate & assigne you the s'd Sir George Yeardley to be present 
Governor & you the s'd John Harvey & the rest before men- 
tioned to be present Councel of and for the 's'd colony & plan- 
tation in Virginia giving & by these presents granting unto you 
& the greater number 6f you respectively full power & authority 
to perform & execute the places power & authorities incident to 
a Governor & Councel of Virginia or in any of the Isles ports 
havens creeks or territories thereof either in time of peace or war 
& to order & direct the affairs touching or concerning that col- 
ony or plantation in those forrain parts only & to execute & 
perform all and every Other matters & things concerning that 
plantation as fully & amply as any Governor & Councel resident 
thereat any time within the space of five years now last past h?.d 
or might perform or execute. And because by the directions of 
Industrious & well Experienced men the limits & bounds of the 
said plantation may be augmented & the trade & commerce of 
the maintenance of the inhabitants there from time to time re- 
siding much advanced. 

Our will Sc pleasure is & we do by these presents give & grant 
unto you the s'd George Yardley and the rest of you hereinbe- 
fore mentioned or any four or more of you (whereof the Gov- 
ernor for that time being we will shall be always one) full power 
& authority to grant one or more Commission or Commissions 
unto any our subjects thereunto addressing themselves for the 
discovery of the s'd Country & ports bounds limits & extent 
thereof & also for the finding out what trades shall be most nec- 
essary to be undertaken for the benefit & advantage of the s*d 



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COMMISSION TO GOVERNOR YEARDLEY. 301 

Colony & plantation & the good of the people inhabitiug or 
which shall inhabite there both by sea & land And further upon 
all occasions as you or any four or more of you (whereof the 
Gov'r for the time being to be always one) shall see fitt to send 
out forces for the subduing of the Indians & savages of the s*d 
country & likewise to make war & peace with them in all such 
cases as it may stand with the safety of the ,i*d colony & our 
honor keeping allways sufficient forces for the holding of the 
places there now enjoyed And if it shall happen the said Sir 
George Yeardley to dye then our will & pleasure is & we do by 
these presents nominate & assign you the s'd John Harvey upon 
the death of the s*d Sir George Yeardley to be our present Gov- 
ernor & you the s'd Francis West & tlie rest of our s'd Com'rs 
to be our present councel of the s'd Colony & plantation in Vir- 
ginia giving and granting unto you or the greater number of 
you respectively full power & authority to execute the places 
powers & authorities of a Gov'r & Council in Virginia respec- 
tively as aforesaid And if it shall happen the s'd John Harvey 
likewise to dye or in case the s'd Sir George Yeardley his uriirent 
occasions (allowed by four or more of our s'd councel there") 
shall call him thence at any time then our will & pleasure is & 
we do hereby give & grant unto you the s'd Francis West & 
the rest of the Com'rs before named or the greater number of 
you full power Sc authority in the absence of the s'd John 
Harvey to elect nominate & assign one of our councel afores'd 
to be the present Governor for the s'd colony & plantation in 
Virginia & so to do from time to time as often as the case shall be 
required And we do by these presents nominate & assign such 
person by you or the greater number of you so from time to 
time to be elected & chosen to be the present Governor Sc , 
you the rest of our s'd Com'rs to be our present councel for 
the s'd colony Si plantation of Virginia giving & by these pres- 
ents granting unto you & the greater number of you respectively 
full power & authority to execute & perform the places powers 
& authorities of a Gov'r and councel for Virginia respectively in 
manner & form afores'd. Nevertheless our will and pleasure is 
that ye & every of you proceed herein according to such instruc- 
tions as are in these presents contained or as ye or such of you 



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302 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

as have heretofore of our councel there have received or accord- 
ing to such instructions as you shall hereafter receive from us or 
our Com'rs here to that purpose appointed or to be appointed. 

And our further will & pleasure is & we do hereby give fall 
power & authority unto & do will & command that you the s*d 
Sir George Yardley & John Harvey or either of you who have 
already been of the councel in those parts for the plantation 
there And have already taken your oaths before our privy coun- 
cel in England shall administer under the s'd Francis West, John 
Pott, William Tucker, Jabes Whitakers, Edward Blaney & Wil- 
liam Farrer & every of them the like oath upon the holy Evan- 
gelist as ye or either of you have already taken as counsellor of 
or for the s'd Colony or plantation willing & requiring you to be 
diligent & attendant in the execution of this our service & com- 
mandm't & also willing and commanding all other our loving 
subjects there to be directed & governed by you or the greater 
number of you in all things according to the intentions & true 
meaning of these presents & for as much as the affairs of state 
of the s'd Colony & plantation may necessarily require some 
person of Quality & Trust to be employed as Secretary for the 
writing & answering such letters as shall be from time to time 
directed to or sent from the said Governor & Councel of the 
Colony aforesaid Our will 8c pleasure is Sc we do by these pres- 
ents nominate & assign you the s'd William Clay borne to be our 
Secretary of state of & for the s'd Colony & plantation of Vir- 
ginia residing in those parts giving & by these presents granting 
unto you the said William Clayborne full power & authority to 
do execute & perform all & every thing <& things w'tsoever to 
the s'd office of Secretary of Slate of tS: for the s'd Colony & 
plantation of Virginia incident Sc appertaining And Lastly our 
will & pleasure is that this our Commission shall continue in 
force untill such time as we by some other writing under signet 
privy seal or great seal of England shall signify our pleasure to 
the contrary. In witness whereof &c. witness ourself at West- 
minster the fourteenth day of March Anno Regni Regis Caroli 
Aug't et primo. 

t^ IPSUM Regem. 

March 14, 1625-6. 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 303 



VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 



Communicated by Mr. LothropWithington, 30 Little Russell street, 

VV. C, London (including ** Gleanings" by Mr. H. F. Waters, 

not before printed.) 

(CONTLNUED) 

Richard Barnabe, London, Marchant, bound on a voyaj^e 
by God's grace to the East Indyes with good shipp or vessell 
named the Mary of London of the burden of One Thousand 
Tunnes or thereabouts. Will 19 January 1630 | i; proved 11 
July 1636. To be buried neere late wief in church of St. Kath- 
erine Coleman, London. All to daughters Elizabeth Barnabe 
and Mary Barnabe, executrixes. Overseers: brothers in lawe 
Mr. John Boulteel, Clarke, and George Rookes, Marchant, 
goodes to remayne in their hands till daughters are 21; if either 
die, or refuse said [sic] Samuell Fortrc to join with surviver or 
Refuser, and if Samuel Kortre die or refuse, then my brother in 
lawe Samuel Gatre vncle of my children to ioyne etc. etc. 
Whereas ;{^6oo given by will of Mrs. Anne Gatree late of Lon- 
don, widdow, etc. dated 5 December 1627 given to said daugh- 
ter Elizabeth and Mary and due tome if they die before marriage 
or 21, whereof ;{^200 is in charge of Mr. John Fortree, ;^200 in 
hands of said Samuel Fortree and ^200 in hands of said John 
Boulteel, three of executors of will of said Anne Gatree: To 
Loving brother John Barnabe resident in X'ir^iiiia and Planter 
there ;^ioo, and my brother James Barnabe resident in Virginia 
j^^ioo, to be paid to them if living, or if dead to their sons and 
daughters. If none be living, then to children of said brother 
in law George Rookes, Merchant. To sister Elizabeth Rookes 
;^30. and to her seven children ^70, viz. George Rookes the 
younger ^20 and residue of ^^50 to others, at 21 to sons, and to 
daughters at 21 or marriage. To sister Martha Hjnnabe, some- 
time wief of John .Sargenson, vintner, deceased /30, and, to her 
sonn William Sargenson ^^20 at 21, or if he die, tu children oi 
John Boultell. To si.ster Katherine Clarke £t,o, and to her son 
Robert at 21 and daughter Katherine at 21 or marriage ^10 
each etc. To Anne Barnabe, daughter of uncle John Barnabe, 



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304 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

novve wief of Edwards, Merchant, ;^50, and if dead, to her 

children. To sometyme servant Elizabeth Rivers als Marsh 
j{^20. Residue of ;^6oo, viz: jC^3o to Masters and Wardens of 
Company of Drapers of London (whereof I am a brother) to 
pay ;{^io, yearly, viz: ;^5 for some godly and vertuous Preacher to 
preach five sermons yearly in church of St. Katherine Colman 
neere billeter lane, London, whereof one sermon on New Yeares 
day at 20s per sermon and I2d weekely upon Sabbath day in 
bread to poore of parish of St. Katherine Colman and 20s a 
year on New Yeares daye and to Sexton at same time 3s. for 
ever; and to poore of St. Martin in Vintry in London los upon 
New Yeares day forever; and to poore of Lambeth ditto, for the 
love I beare said parishes and places for that my late deare wife 
and her mother and my Chrisome Child lye interred in same 
parish church of St. Katherine Colman, and for that two of my 
children lye interred in parish church of St. Martin in the Vin- 
try, and three of my children lye interred in parish church of 
Lambeth. As to ;^ioo left to my children by their aunt Jane 
Cuthbert due to me in case they dye, ^^50 in hands of said 
James Fortrie and /50 in hands of said John Boulteel, I give to 
sister Mrs. Mary Boulteel /^^o, to god daughter Elizabeth Boul- 
teel ;^5o at 21 or marriage, and John Boulteel the younger, god 
son of my late dear wife Ann Barnabe, ^20 at 21, and if they die, 
to the other children of John Boulteel. To cousin Mary, wife of 
John Chaundler, ;^io. To good wife Vale of Hadley neere Bar- 
nett, sometymes nurse of my daughter Mary, ;^6-i3s-4d if lyving. 
To Nurse Abbott, widdowe, dwelling in the parish of Creechurch 
neere Algate, ;{^3-6s-8d. Rest to twoe brethren John Barnabe 
and James Barnabe, yf lyving, and yf dead, to their children yf 
lyving; yf dead, then to children of my said brother George 
Rookes. If daughters Elizabeth and Mary die, said Samuel 
Fortrie, John Boulteel senior, and George Rookes to be execu- 
tors. Witnesses: James Merrifield, William Taylor, Robert Min- 
chard Not. Pub. "Appendix to will made in England by me 
Richard Barnaby, Merchant. In good shipp Hart now bound 
for England, viz: To friend Captain Richard Swanley one Japan 
Cutter and one paire of Buffe gloves. To friend Thomas Rob- 
inssonne merchant one Capp wrought with silke and gold and 
one cappof lynnen with needle worke purles. To nephe George 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 305 

Rookes imbroidered girdle with silver buckles. To apprentice 
Willm Curtis his freedome and liberty, also i cloth sute, i peece 
of white damaske, 3 little batting bands, i paire of shoes and i 
paire of slippers. To Samuell Lathorppe now Chirurgeon of 
the shipp Hart i woollen cloth cote and i silver spoone. To 
William Pearce chirurgeon's mate i cloth sute, i pewter. seringe 
with a silver pipe. To Richard Foster, Barber, i pare of Bayes 
Breeches, i pare of cloth stockings, i pare of shoes, and i pare 
of slippers. To Henry Hayman one red woollen capp. To 
George Swanley one cloth capp with gold lace. To John Swan- 
ley The Practis of Piety. * Rest for daughters Elizabeth Barnabe 
and Mary Barnabe in trust to Samuell Fortrie and John Boulteel. 
Overseers: Captain Richard Swanley and Mr. Thomas Robin- 
sonne. 24 April 1635. Witness: James Mathew, purser's mate. 
Administration to sister Elizabeth Rookes als Barnabe during 
minority of Elizabeth Barnabe and Mary Barnabe. 

Pile, 84. 

[The census of Virginia, 1624-5, gives the *' Muster *' of John Barnabe, 
at Elizabeth City. It includes himself, aged 21, who came in the Lon^ 
don Marchant'm 1620 (Notten*s Emigrants, p. 247.) — Ed.] 

George Ruggles of the University of Cambridge, Master 
of Artes. Will 6 September 1621; proved 3 November 1622. 
To the the poor of the towneof Lavenham, County of Suffolke, 
where I was borne, 20 markes. To the poor of Parish where I 
shall be buried ^^5. To him that .shall preache at my buriall £^. 
To the two prisons in Cambridge ^^5 between them. To the 
Chappie of Clarehall 20 marks to buy a silver bason to be used 
at the Communion for the collection of the Poore. '* Item. I 
further give and bequeath unto Clarehall in Cambridge aforesaid 
one hundred pounds to be Payed within one yeare nexte after 
my decease to the intent that it may alwaies remayne in parte of 
their stocke to be imployed for the better makinge of provision 
at the best handes for the benefitt of the said Colledge and the 
students in it And that at their Audits or accompte once a yeare 
I will that the one hundred poundes be alwaies brought in and 
tituled by the name of George Ruggles one hundred Poundes." 
To Clarehall Library all my books whatsoever the Master and fel- 
lowes shall think fittinge. The rest of my books to the children 



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306 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

of Mr. Toddy Pallyvicine. All my papers and paper books to 
be burned. To my sisters Mary Dardes and Sara Liminall, 
both living in the City of Westchester, ;^ioo each. To all my 
sister's children ^^lo each. I give and bequeath ;^ioo towards 
bringing up the Infideirs Children in Virginia in Christian Re- 
ligion, to be disposed of by the Virginia Company. To Mrs. 
Jane Pallavycine, wife of said Toby, plate to value of ;^io. To 
my loving Aunt Mrs. Alice Vigoris of Ipswich, to Mr. Henry 
Coppinger the elder of Lavenham, to Mr. William Greenhalt 
sometyme my schoolmaster, 40s. each for ringes, To my friends 
of Clarehall, Augistine Linsell. D. D., Th-^mas Winston, Doctor 
of Physicke, Thomas Parke, D. D., Mr. William Lake, Mr. 
Thomas Pa»-kinson, Mr. Nicholas Ferrer, Mr. Samuell Linsell, 
and Mr. Jam.es Harley, 40s. each for ringes. To my friends Mr. 
Edward Mannesty, Mr. John Sherman the elder of Cambridge, 
and Clement his wife, and their son Mr. John Sherman the 
younger, and to Mr. Thomas Sherman thelder, 40s. apiece for 
rings. To Mr. John Crane and Mr. Thomas Wake, both of 
Cambridge, to Mr. William Parker of Sproughton neare Ispwich, 
and to Mr. Thomas Lake of London 40s. each to make them 
ringes. To Mr. William Bryarte of London Merchant 40s. To 
my friend Myles Goulsborrow and his heires 20 nobles. To 
John Briggs. some timesmy poor scholar. ^3. To Sir Edmond 
Varney. Knighte, dwelling in Buckinghamshire, an especiall 
friend of Mr. Toby Pallavicine, Plate to the value of ^5. All 
the rest to Mr. Toby Pallavicine and his heirs. Executor: Sir 
Edmond Varney. Witnesses: Tho. Abbott, Scr. East Smith - 
field, Co. Middx, John Johnson, Tho. Boden, servant to said 
Scr. 

Savile, loi. 

[ George Ruggle or Ruggles, son of Thomas Ruirgle, of Suffolk, was 
born November 13, 1575, and entert-d St John's College, Cambridgo, in 
his fourteenth year. He received his A. M from Trinity in 1597, and in 
1598 became a Fellow of Clare Hall. In, 1614, during a visit of King 
James to the University, a Latin comedy by Rnggle was performed l-y 
the students, and received great applause from the Kirg. In 1619 he 
retired from the University, and Secretary Ferrar, of the Virginia Com- 
pany, states that from that time until his death his labors were almost 
entirely given to the Company and to the cause of English colonization. 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 307 

He was thout^ht to be the author of a treatise on planting which the 
Company sent to Virg;inia for the Councillors to read. He died in 1622, 
and in his will bequeathed £100 for the education of Indian children in 
Virginia. A Life of George Ruggle^ by J. S. Hawkins, was published 
in London in 1787. — Ed.] 

George Hawker of the Parish of St. Martains Ludgate, 
London, Combemaker. Will 20 November 1657; proved 15 
January 1657-8. To my mother Ann Hawker 5s. To my sister 
Ann Knight 5s. To my brother Edward Hawker living in 
Virginia is. All these legacies to be paid within one month 
of my decease by my executrix, my loving wife Martha, to whom 
I bequeath all the remainder of my estate, my debts and funeral 
expenses being paid. Witnesses : William Trigge & Fran : 
Bartlett Scr. att Holborne Conduitte, Grace Davenish. 

VVootton, 3. 

Cornelius Wattes, of St. Cuthbertes in the City of Wells, 
in the County, of Somersett, Vintener. Will 3 January 1 640-1, 
proved 2 October 1640. To be buried in the Churchyard of St. 
Cuthberts. To John Davis of Shipton Mallet and his wife one 
Arrisoe Coverlett and a blew Rugg and twoe siluer wine boles 
and 40s. a piece to buy each of them a ring. To Margarett 
Davies, daughter of said John Davies, 40s. To William Watts, 
which is now in Virginia, my house next below the Ashe-in-the- 
well and ;^io. If he dothe not returne again, my son Edward 
Watts to have the house but not the money. To the Church of 
St. Cuthberts los. To the people of Thalmeshouse of Bp. 
Bubwith's and Bp. Stil their foundations los. All the rest to my 
wife Ann Watts and Edward Watts my son and Anne Watts my 
daughter whom I make executors. Witnesses: Richard Deane, 
Clarke, Willm Sherman, John Oldford. 

Coventry, 129. 

[ VVilliani Watts and Richard Davis" patented, Iuly3o, 1638, seventy- 
five acres on Queens Creek, adjoininjj: the lands of Robert Booth and 
Lieutenant Popeley ; due as follows : Fifty acres for the adventure of 
said Walts and wife, the second year, to Charles River, and twenty-five 
acres for the adventure, the second year, of the said Davis to Charles 
River. 

The •* adventure" refers to the bounty in land offered those who 



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308 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

would settle on Charles (now York) river, then a frontier of the Colony. 
See grant to John Chew, July 6, 1636, reciting an order of Council of 
October 8, 1630 (th if, Magazine V, 341-342). Queens Creek flows into 
York River not far from Williamsburg. — Ed.] 

Richard Phillips of the City of Bristol, Marriner. being 
bound to Sea. Will 3 January 1703-4 proved 20 December 1704. 
One half of my goods and personal estate to the children of my 
uncle John Phillips in Virginia equally between them, and the 
other half to Hannah Cockayne, Spinster, daughter of Thomas 
Cockayne of the said City, victualler. Executor : Jeoffry Peniell 
of said City, Linnendrapen, Witnesses ; Margaret Lewis, J. 
Freke. 

Ash, 239. 

[ There was a John Phillips, of Lancaster county, who may have been 
the uncle referred to. On January f, 1652, he was made Clerk of the 
county, and at the same time, commissioned Sheriff, "because the 
county was then in its infancy, and could not afford a subsistence." 
The County Court was held in his house in August, 165:3. No doubt, 
the records of Lancaster county could give more details in regard to 
him, and as to his children, if he left any. The records of this old county 
are quite complete, and the files of vellum bound books is unbroken ; 
but the county authorities deserve severe condemnation for leaving these 
most valuable records in a room with a brick floor and without fire, 
where it is so damp that they have very perceptibly faded within the past 
few years. 

John Phillips, referred to, had the following grants : 

( I ) John Phillips, 240 acres on the north of Rappahannock, adjoining 
the land of George Eaton, March 2, 1652 ; (2) John Phillips, 100 acres 
in the county of Lancaster on Powells Creek, March 3, 1652 ; (3) Mrs. 
John Phillips, 400 acres in the county of Lancaster on the north of Rap- 
pahannock at the head of a dividend, form-rlv surveyed for Captain Dan- 
iel Gookins, by ** the side of a mountain" [this probably means a 
hill], and on the west bank of Cassatawomen river, July 13, 1653 ; (4) 
John Phillips, 250 acres in Lancaster north of Rappahannock, fuly 13, 
1653 ; (5) John Phillips, 100 acres in Lancaster north of Rappahannock, 
adjoining his own land and that of Kvan Griftith, July 13, 1653 • i^) John 
Phillips, 200 acres in Lancaster on south of Rappahannock, and on 
** Barham or Burnham Creek or Sunderland," lying at the head of a 
dividend of 200 acres in the possession of Edward Boswell, and adjoin- 
ing the land of Evan Davy and Den. Conier, September 3, 1653 *. (7) 
John Phillips, 200 acres in Lancaster, south of Rappahannock at the 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IN ENGLAND. 309 

head of 300 acres surveyed for Mr. David Fox, and adjoining the land of 
Thomas Browne, Oliver Carvrr and Mr. Richard Parrett, September 2, 
1652 ; (8) John Phillips and John Batt*?, 500 acres on the north side of 
the freshes of Rappahannock in Lancaster county, about 14 miles above 
the " NanzemunTowne," adjoining 100 acres surveyed for John Weyre, 
September 7, 1654 ; (9) John Phillips, 300 acres on a branch of Occu- 
pason Cretrk and on a creek called VVassanasson, said land formerly 
granted by patent to Richard Colem.\n, January 11, 1652, and by him re- 
linquished and now granted to Phillips, June 14, 1655; (10) Thomas 
Meads and John Phillips, rooo acres on the south side of the freshes of 
Rappahannock, opposite a tract of 1400 acres surveyed for Richard 
Coleman, September 7, 1654; (11) John Weyre, John Gillet. Andrew 
Gilson and John Phillips, 4000 acres on the south side of the freshes of 
Rappahannock, about twelve miles above Nanzemun town, and on 
\Ve>re*s creek, September 7, 1654; (12) Sarah Pnillipsand Lr. Col. Moore 
Fauntleroy, 250 acres in Lancaster on the north of Rappahannock, due 
them by virtue of letters of administration on the estate of Mr. John 
Phillips, deceased and formerly granted to him July 13, 1653, now re- 
granted January 5, 1656.— Ed.] 

Edward Chandler of Ware, County Hertford, Draper. 
Wills May 1650 ; proved 24 April 1657. To my wife Elizabeth 
Chandler my houses in Ware, one wherein I now life, the one 
purchased of Will Beecke of London, Linnen Draper, the other 
of John Geates, Bricklayer, of Hunsden, for life, and after her 
decease to my son Edward Chandler, failing him, to my son 
John, failing him to my son Noah. To my said wife houses in 
Hartford and Buchery Green, lately purchased of Will Beeke 
and John Brett, Linen Draper, of London, and after her deathe 
to my son Edward. To my son John Chandler house in Drad 
Lane in tenure of Edward Gillett, bought of William Burchett 
and Thomasine his wife, and ;/^20. To my son Noah the Barne 
and garden in Drad lane, which I bought of Mr. Will Love, 
and two closes in Annoell March, bought of Elizabeth Challis, 
widow, sometime the wife of Nicholas Slater. To my daughter 
Susan Chandler j^8o. To my daughter Mary Holly 40s. To my 
son Danial Chandler ;^io to be paid him or sent over in com- 
modities to Virginia and to my daughter Sara Chandler, now in 
Virginia, ;{^5. To my youngest daughter Rebecca ;/^30. To my 
daughter Martha j^20. Household stuff to my wife for life, and 
after her decease to my children, Susan, Martha, Rebecca, 



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310 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Edward, Job, and Noah. To my son Edward all debts owing 
me, the wares in my shops at Hartford and Ware, my maults in 
the Mault Lought and barley Lought, and all my money in the 
house except £60 which my wife is to have, and he to pay her 
;^2o of the payment of ;^8o to my daughter Susan. Executors : 
Elizabeth my wife and Edwarde my sonne. Witnesses : William 
Love, Mary Randall. 

Grey, 63. 

John Seward of Bristoll, Merchant ( being bound to sea ). 
Will 16 September 1650; proved 23 May 1651. To my youngest 
daughter Rebecca Seward ;^300. To my second daughter Mary 
Seward ;^250. To my eldest daughter Sarah Seward ^250, 
and to my wife's daughter ( by her former husband) Brigitt 
Eyton ;^50. all when 21 or married. To my eldest son John 
Seward ;/^2oo when 21. To my son James Seward ;{^25o when 
21. If any die, their shares to go to survivors. My farm in 
Butcombe, county Somerset, to my wife during widowhood, and 
after her decease to my son John, he to pay ;^20 yearly to my 
son James. The house I now dwell in situate in parish of St. 
Leonard, Bristol, bought of Mr. John Griffith of Winterbourne, 
clerke, to my wife, and after her decease to my son James. 
Lands at Bevington and Baddington, County Somerset, held by 
lease from Mr. Bamfield, to my said daughter Sara. My plan- 
tation called Levenecke (1350 acres), Isle of Wight County, Vir- 
ginia, to my son John. My Plantation called Blackwater in said 
County (1600 acres) to my son James. All horses, servants, mer- 
chandize in Virginia to my said two sons. To the poor of St. 
Thomas in Bristol 50s. To the poor of Redcliffe 50s. All the rest 
to my executrix, my wife. Overseers : William Carey of London, 
mch't., Francis Yeoman of Bristow, gent Walter Stephens the 
younger of Bristoll, Mercer. Witnesses : Francis Yeoman, Not. 
Public, Matthew Wolfe, Den. Long, John Hellier. 

Grey, 98. 

[See this Magazine X, 406.! 

Edward PoRTEOUS. Will 23 February 16934: proved 24 
October 1700. To the poor of Petsoe Parish where I now live 
£S. To Mary Cox and her children all the debt her deceased 



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VIRGINIA GLEANINGS IX ENGLAND. 311 

husband owed me and ;^4 more. To George Major, Senior, £s- 
To James Murr two cowes, to his sister Rachell two cowes and £^. 
To the poor of Newbottle parish in Scotland where my fathers 
estate is /^S to be remitted to my friend Mr. James Fowlis in 
London, and by him to be sent to my sisters for distribution. 
To William Allen one cow. To John Gardner and his wife one 
cow, and to Nathaniel Mills a cow and a calfe. To Mr. Thomas 
Buckner and his wife ;^io. To Mr. David Alexander and his 
wife ;^io. To my sister Mary, wife of Mr. Thomas Lowny, ;^2o. 
To my sister Isabell £2^. To my sister Elizabeth ;^20. To 
my sister Christian ^{^25. To my wife my horse Jack, silver 
Tankard, and Caudle Cupp, and household stuff, and the time 
that my Eng^lish Servant Betty hath to serve, and my negfro girl 
Cumbo. My estate not to be valued, but my wife to have one 
third, the rest to my son Robert. My property and estate in 
Virginia to my son Robert and his heirs, /^iC^ out of ;^20 that 
was my Brother John's to be sent to Mr. James Fowlis for the 
use of my said sisters; if he is dead, to Jeffery Jefferies, to whom 
I give 20s. My fathers estate in Newbottle, Scotland, incum- 
bered with debt and in the arangement of my brother in law 
Thomas Lowny, said estate to be redeemed for my son Robert. 
The produce of my plantations to be sent to England every 
year. Executor: Captain John Smith, to whom ^^9 and 20s. to 
his Lady. Witnesses: Sarah Buckner, Richard Bradshaw. 

Noel, 107. 

[ Edward Porteus was living: in Gloucester Co inty, Virginia, in 16S1, 
where he was a vestryman of Petsworth (comm')nly called Petsoe) parish. 
In 1693 the Governor included him in a list of " gentlemen of estate and 
standing suitable for appointment to the Council," wliich he sent to 
England. Edward Porteus was, however, not one of those appointed. 
He married the *' Relirt of Robert Lee," who left ^7 to the poor of the 
parish. "Violet Banks, on York River and Poropotank Creek, is the 
modern name of the house of Hdward Porteus, the emigrant. It is an 
old square brick building, two stories and a half, with four rooms to the 
floor. Though abandoned, it still reJains the fine panelling and interior 
carving of the long past." {U'i//iam and Man' Quarterly, III, 58-59.^ 
His tomb, on which the inscription is not entirely legible, remains at 
this place. It is : 



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312 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

'* Here lies the Body of Edward Porteus 
ofPetsworih Parish, Gloucester County, 
Merchant, Departed this life the * * * 
169* in the ♦*^* Year of his Age, 
leaving only Sir Robert to 
Succeed him." 

(William and Mary Quarterly^ III, 28.) 

The son Robert Porteus, born 1679, died Augusts, 1758, lived at "New 
Bottle," now called ** Concord," in Gloucester. Hodgson, in his life of 
Bishop Porteus, says that the Bishbp had **a singular picture which, 
though not in the best style of coloring, was yet thought valuable by 
Sir Joshua Reynolds as a specimen of the extent to which the art of 
paintings had at that time reached in America, and he himself very 
highly praised it as exhibiting a faithful and interesting representation of 
his father's residence." 

Robert Porteus was appointed to the Council in 1713, and remained a 
member of that body until he removtd to England sometime between 
1725 and 1730. He settled in the city of York, and afterwards at Ripon. 
To the latter place he was probably led by the fact that his wife was 
Elizabeth (died Januar>' 20, 1754, aged 80, buried at St. Martins, Coney 
street, York), daughter of Edmund Jenings of " Ripon Hall," Virginia, 
and formerly of kipon, Yorkshire. 

In Ripon Cathedral, on the wall of the south aisle of the choir, is a 
mural tablet with the following inscription : 

"Near this Place 

Are detx)sited the Remains 

Of Robert Porteus, Esquire, 

A Native of Virginia, and a Member of His Majesty's Council, 

Or Upper House of Legislature in that Province, 

From thence he removed to England, 

And resided first at York, afterwards at this Town, 

Where he died August 8, 1758, 

Aged 79 years." 

Robert Porteus was the father of Beilby Porteus, born at York May 8, 
1 73 1, died May 14, 1808, successively Bishop of Chester and London. 

Ed.] 

(to be continued) 



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CARRIAGE OWNERS, GLOUCESTER COUNTY. 313 



CARRIAGE OWNERS, GLOUCESTER 
COUNTY, 1784. 



Communicated by Edward Wilson James. 
[From ** List of taxable property within the District of Mor- 
gan Tomkies, Commissioner in the county of Gloucester, the 
year 1794.'* **Copy C. Pryor, D. C. C.** The chair had two 
wheels, the post chaise, phaeton and stage wagon four wheels 
each.] 

Ambrose Anderson, i Chair. 

Matt Anderson, Post Chaise and i Chair. 

John Avery, Est., i Chair. 

Susan Bentley, i Chair. 

James Baytop, i Post Chaise. 

Will Brooking, i Chair. 

Lewis Bur well. Post Chaise. 

John Boswell, Chair. 

Thomas Boswell, Chair. 

Thomas Booth, Post Chaise. ' 

William Booth, Chair. 

William Camp Jr., Chair. 

John Catlett, Stage Waggon. 

Thomas Cooke, Stage Wagon. 

Joseph Cluverius, Stage Wagon. 

Samuel Cary, Chair, Stage Wagon. 

James Collier, Chair, Stage Wagon. 

William Duvall, Chair. 

Ann Debnam, Chair. 

John Eanse, Chair. 

John Ellis, Post Chaise. 

James Fontaine, Post Chaise. 

Stephen Fields, Chair. 

John Fox, Phaeton. 

Ann Fost. Post Chaise. 

Christopher Garland, Chair. 

Hannah Hobday, Chair. 

Wm. Hall, Post Chaise. 



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314 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Francis Hall, Chair. 
John Hughes, Chair. 
Jasper Hughes, Chair. 
Nicholas Hewlett, Chair. 
John Jones, Chair. 
Matthew Kemp, Chair. 
John Kemp, Chair. 
Benj'n Keiningham, Chair. 
James Lewis, Est., Post Chaise. 
Addesson Lewis, i Phaeton — i Chair. 
Warner Lewis, i Coachee — i Chair. 
Richard Leigh, Chair. 
Wm. Marshall, Post Chaise. 
James Mitchell, Chair. 
Jno. Nicholson, Chair. 
John Page, i Coach — i Chair. 
Mann Page, Phaeton. 
Christo'r Pryor, Phaeton. 
Will Robins, Stage Wagon. 
Will Robins, Jr., Chair. 
Ann Ranson, Chair. 
John Sea well, i Post Chaise — i Chair. 
Will Thornton, Chair. 
Morgan Tc»mkies, Stage Wagon. 
Robert Thruston, Chair. 
Charles Tomkies, Chair. 
Philip Tabb, Coachchee — Chair. 
. War. Throckmorton, Est., Post Chaise. 
James Wiatt, Jr., Chair. 
Wm. E. Wiatt, Phaeton. 
James Wiatt, Chair. 
Thomas Wright, Chair. 
Nat Wallington, Chair. 
Francis Whiting, Chair. 
Thomas J. Whiting, i Post Chaise — i Chair. 
Thomas Whiting, Stage Wagon. 
Francis Willis, Coach — Chair. 
Peter B. Whiting, Post Chaise— Chair. 



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HUNGARS CHURCH. 315 



HUNGARS CHURCH, NORTHAMPTON 
COUNTY, VA. 

Surrounded and concealed by a body of pine woods in the 
midst of an ancient grove of sycamores some seven miles north 
of Eastville is old Hungars Episcopal Church. It is beautifully 
located on the north side of Hungars creek at the head of navi- 
gation for small craft, and near by is the old village of Bridge- 
town at which in the early years of the settlement the courts 
were held4 

Hungars Church is one of the oldest church edifices in the 
State, and has been in use for over two hundred years, for the 
tradition is that it was built about 1690 to '95, and there are 
evidences that this is the actual fact, though the exact record is 
unfortunately lost.' 

Hungars parish was made soon after the county was estab- 
lished and the first minister was Rev. Wm. Cotton, and the first 
vestry was appointed in 1635. The following is the order made 
at that time : 

'*At a court holden in Accawmacke the 14th day of Sept. 
1635 j'* (Northampton being then called Accomack.) 

'* At this court Mr. VVm. Cotton, minister, presented an order 
of the court from James Citty, for the building of a Parsonage 
house upon the Glebe land which is by this board referred to be 
ordered by the vestry and because there have heretofore been 
no formal vestry nor vestrymen appointed, we have from this, 
present day appointed to be vestrynien these whose names are 
underwritten : 

Wm. Cotton minister, Capt. Thomas Graves, Mr. Obedience 
Robins, Mr. John Howe, Mr. Wm. Stone, Mr. Burdett, Mr. 
Wm. Andrews, Mr. John Wilkins, Mr. Alex. Mountjoy, Mr. 
Edw. Drew, Mr. Wm. Beniman, Mr. Stephen Charlton. 

And further we do order that the first meeting of the syd. 
vestrymen shall be upon the feast day of St. Michael the Arch- 
Angel, being the 29th day of September." 



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316 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

In accordance with that order of the court the vestry meeting 
was held and record entered of the same as follows: 

**A vestry heald, 29th day of Sept. 1635. 
Present 

Capt. Thomas Graves, Mr. John Howe, Mr. Edward Drew- 
Mr. Obedience Robins, Mr. Alex. Mountjoy, Mr. Wm. Burdett, 
Mr. Wm. Andrews, Mr. Wm. Stone. Mr. Wm. Beniman.*' 

At this meeting an order was made providing for building the 
parsonage house. 

At one time there were two parishes, the upper or Hungars, 
and the lower. In 1691 the parishes were united as will be noted 
in the order following, entered in the old records in the clerk's 
office : 

*'Atta council held att James City, Apr. the 21st. 1691. 

Present 

The Rt. Hono'ble Francis Nicholson Esq. Lt. Gov. &. coun- 
cil. 

*' Major John Robins and Mr. Thomas Harmonson, Burgesses 
of the County of Northampton, on behalf of the County, by 
their petition setting forth that the said county is one of the 
smallest in the colony, doth consist of a small number of titha- 
bles, and is divided in two parishes, by reason whereof the Inhab- 
itatns of both parishes are soe burdened that they are not able 
decently to maintain a minister in each parish and therefore 
prayed the said parishes might be joyned in one and goe by the 
name of Hungars parish, not being desirous to infringe any gift 
given to Hungars parish, and more especially one by the last 
will of Stephen Charlton, which parishes soe joined will not only 
be satisfactory to the inhabitants but make them capable to build 
a decent church and maintain an able divine; On consideration 
whereof Itt is the opinion of this board and accordingly ordered 
that the whole County of Northampton be from hence- forth one 
parish and goe by the name of Hungars Parish, and that the 
same shall be noe prejudice to the gift of the aforesaid Charlton 
to the said parish of Hungars and it is further ordered that the 
Inhabitants of the sd. parish shall meet at such time and place 



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HUNGARS CHURCH. 317 

as the court of the said county shall appoint and make choice 
of a vestry according to law. Cop. vera, test, W. Edwards, 
cl. cou.** 

Then, in acordance with the appointment of the court, at a 
meeting of the inhabitants of the said county of Northampton, 
at the court house thereof the 22nd day of June, 1691, the fol- 
lowing vestrymen were elected : 

Major John Robins, Capt. Custis. Capt. Foxcroft, John Shep- 
heard, Benj. Stratton, Priece Davis, Benjamin Nottingham, John 
Powell, Jacob Johnson, Thomas Eyre. John Stoakley, Michael 
Dickson. It was evidently soon after this step was taken that 
the Hungars church building was erected. 

The church in lower Northampton was perhaps older than 
Hungars. It was situated in what is locally known as the Ma- 
gothy Bay section and on the old Arlington estate. Unfortu- 
nately it was allowed to go to decay and in 1824 the walls and 
some of the material was sold. Nothing but the foundation is 
now left to mark the spot. The communion set, now used in 
Christ Church, Eastville, was a '* gift of John Custis of W"burgh 
to the lower church of Hungars Parish, 741,'* according to the 
inscription. The plate now used in Christ Church is inscribed 
**Ex dono Francis Nicholson," Lt. Gov. 1690-2, and again 
later. 

Christ Church, Eastville, was erected as near as can be stated 
in 1826 or 7. 

Old Hungars Church became untenable in 1 850 so as to be unfit 
for holding services. 

It was repaired in 1851 and reduced somewhat in size but 
practically unchanged in general appearances from its original 
style. It is an interesting landmark that has stood like a beacon 
light to many generations. 

Thos. B. Robertson. 

Eastville, Va. 



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318 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 



GENEALOGY. 



THE BRENT FAMILY. 

Compiled by \V. B. Chilton, Washington, D. C. 

(continued.) 

The Brent Family of Charing. 

It will be noticed in the foregoing account, that Sir Robert de Brent 
who married Claricia, daughter and heir of Sir Adam de la Ford, had 
a second son John, who settled at Charing in Kent, and was the ances- 
tor of a family which continued there for many generations. 

The account given of this branch of the family in Hasted's history of 
Kent is quoted in full in the following pages, and a few wills and records 
of administrations have been inserted : 

The History of Kent. 

(1367.)* 

Wickifis is a manor in the Southern part of this parish, adjoining to 
Wesiwelly in which part of the lands of it lie. It was originally the 
patrimony of the family of Brent* and was their most antient seat. 
RobertDrent, the first of this name mentioned in their pedigree, lived in 
the reign of K. Edward II, and is styled of Charing ^ as were his several 
descendants afterwards,! ""e of whom, llit/iatn, son of Hugh 
Brent, married y////fl«a, relict of Thomas PauHsherst^ of this parish, by 
whom he inherited the Manor of Pevington, and other estates near this 
place. t He died anno 27 Henry VI, leaving issue a Son Hugh Brent^ 
who WHS of Charing^ and had issue four Sons, of whom Wit/iam Brent, 
Esq. the eldest, inherited this Manor, and resided at it ; and Robert, the 
.second Son of U i/sborough, an ancestor of the Brents uf that place. 



♦Weover says. p. 294. They were branched out of the anlient slock of Brent in the 
CO. of Somrrst'l . of whom Sir /\oht'tt df lUnit was a Bartm of I*'ArliauietU in the reign 
of K. Kdward 1,(12721. When the church here was hurned in i.v^o, the windows and 
gravestones, in which this family was noticed were mostly defaced ; but on the outside 
of the behry. the w^rer, being the arms of Huiih lirrnt, Esq., yet remains. 

tPhilipott, p. loi, says that Jn/tn.Si^u of Rohrrt Bttrnt. Son of the above Kobert, 
paid aid in the 20th year of K. ICdward HI f 1327), for hi^ lands here ; hut I find no men- 
tion of it in the Book of Aid. 

JShe was the daughter of John Gabion of the co. of Kssex, by his wife At/wbilia, 
daughter of John Ptvingion, of Pninuton and heir to her two brothers 



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GENEALOGY. 819 

*At length his great-grand son Thofnas Brent^ Esq., succeeding to 
this Manor, resided at it till the 12th year of Q. Elizabeth, when becom- 
ing heir to Wilshorou^h, by the devise of his kinsman Robert Brent, of 
that place, who died without issue, he removed thither, where he died 
•likewise without issue in 1612, and was buried there. By his last will 
he bequeathed his manor or tenement called IVickins Device and Cap- 
<ron8 in Charing and Westwelh and all the lands and appurtenances 
.thereto belonging, to his nephew Christopher Dering^ of Charing who 
then occupied them. He was the fifth and youngest son of John Dering 
of Surrenden- Dering, Esq ; by Margaret, sister of the above-mentioned 
Thomas Brent* and married Mildred, daughter of Francis Swann, of 
Wye, gent, by whom he had several children, of whom the eldest, 
John Dering, was of X^ickins gent, as was his eldest son Christopher 
Dering, gent. 

Wills. 

( P. C. C. Vox 32.) (Latin ) 

The will of William Brent of Charrynge, dated 21 December, 1495. 

I bequeath my body to be buried in the parish church of SS. Peter 
and Paul of Charrying, next the tomb of Roger Rey, if there be room. 

I be<ieath to the high altar there, for my tithes forgotten 5s; and i2d. 
each to each of the lights in the church, 

To my daughter Anne, wife of Edmund Millys, 13s. 4d. 

To John, Edward, William and Margaret, children of the said Ed- 
mund and Anne, 68. 8d. apiece. 

To Elizabeth Wombwell, my daughter 138. 4d. ; to John Wombwell, 
son of John Wombwell and the said Elizabeth 6s. 8d. 



^John was the third Son whose will is in the Prerog. off. Cant, proved anno 1501, by 
which he ordered his body to be buried in the new chapel of St. Mary in this church, in 
which no burial had then been ; rind Thomas the fourth Son, was L. L. D. lyiiiiatn Brent 
the eldest brother made his last will an. 10 Hen. Vll. (1505); he left his widow Amy sur- 
viving, whose will, proved anno 1516, is in the Prerog. off. Cant, by which it seems she 
was buried in the chapel of our Lady, of her own Edification, in this church. 1 heir son 
Thomas possessed this manor and resided here. He died anno 20 Henry VII, (1505) as 
did their son John about the 2nd and 3rd year of Philip and Mary, (1556) leaving by Anne 
his wife. dau. anci coheir of Thomas Berkeley, two sons and two daughters, viz. William 
who died without issue, and Thomas, who succeeded to this Manor ; Margaret, married 
first to John Dt^ring;, of Surrenden- Dering , Esq ; remarried to More, and Amy, to IV il- 
Ham Crispe, Lieut, of Dover Cast'e. John Brent, Esq : above- mentioiictl, feasted K. 
Henry VIII, in this house, as he passed this way towards his then intended siege of Bul- 
ierin, Weever, p. 29s, who further says, that the hall-window of this seat was full stored 
with the badges of K. luiward IV, in everj <juarry of glass. 

*Aft/honv Dering, Estj. the second son of John Dering, Esq. by Margaret Brent, 
was likewise of Charing, where he possessed lands l)y the device of Thomas Brent, of 
Willesborough, Es<i ; who died in 161 2. His eldest son Finch Dering. of Charing^ after- 
wards died fKJSsessed of them in 1625, and was succce<led by his eldest son Mr. Brent 
Dering, who (1625-49), lived here in the reign of K. Charles I. 

From The History- of Kent, by Edward Hasted-Canterbury 1790 Vol. Ill, p. 214. 



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320 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

To Margaret, my daughter, 4oli. to her marriage. 

I will that my Chaplain, William Fitz James, shall continue to cele- 
brate for my soul. 

Also that my exors shall provide 10s. yearly out of a meadow called 
Broktonysmede, to be received by the occupants of my mansion in 
Charryng, to keep my anniversary in the church of Charryng. 

The residue of my goods I give to Anne my wife, to Thomas Brent 
L. L. D., and John Brent my brothers, and William Brent my nephew, 
whom I ordain my exors. 

Witnesses: Robert Rowe, my brother, Roger Pende, and John 
Duke. 

Proved 19th Feb. 1495-6 by master Thomas Brent and John Brent, 
with power reserved, &c. 

The last will of the said William Brent. ( Ibid. fol. 34.) 

I bequeath all my lands, <&c. in Charrying, Perevington, Smerden, 
Boughton. Materbe, Challoke, Kenyngton, Wyllysbergh, Henxsell 
Lymme,Wy & Boughton Allhof! to John, Lord Fyneux. Thos. Brent, 
clerk, John Nethersole. Christopher Elenden, John Anger, John Duke 
and Roger Pende. in trust to the uses of my will. 

I give my dwelling house in Charing to my wife Anne till my son 
John comes to the age of 22 ; & then he shall suffer his mother to have 
all the chambers my Lady.Moile had with the parlours under the same. 
If my son John die, before that age, then my son Thomas shall do the 
same ; and if Thomas die, then my son Roger. 

The manor and advowson of Perevington shall remain to my son 
Thomas after my wife's death ; and the manor of Rippell Wicheley and 
Halsicke to my son Roger. 

Note. — This Wlliam Brent was the second son of William Brent and 
Juliana relict of Thomas Paunsherst. 



(P. C. C. Doggett 2.) (Latin) 
The will of Robert Brent 
Dated 30 Oct. 1491 Proved a Dec. 1491. 

I bequeath my body to be buried in the church of S. Thomas the 
Martyr of Aeon London. 

I give to the parish church of Alyngton* one missal, one portuous 
and one vestment provided the Rector and parishioners pray for my 
soul. 

I will that all my ^oods now in the castle of Alyngton shall be divided 



♦From Villarc Cantianum-Phillipot-AIlington in the Hundred of Larkfield was in 
possession of the family of Brent in the beginning of the reign of Edward IV (1461). In 
the eight year of Henry VII (1493)1 John Brent passed the manor and castle of Allington 
to Sir Henry Wiat. 



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GENEALOGY. 321 

into three equal parts, whereof I give one part to my wife, and one part 
to my executors, to dispose for my soul and the third for the payment 
of my debts. I will that my son shall have my lands at Willesbrugh 
charged with an annuity of 20 marks to my wife. 

I will that my daughter Ellen shall have one manor called" le More " 
with the lands thereto adjacent. 

Item, that Hylham and all the lands I bought of Elys shall remain to 
my son William Brent that he may pay my debts if my other goods do 
not suffice, and that he may help his sister Ellen. 

I will that a priest shall celebrate for the soul of Margaret Brownyng 
at Chyltham for half a year; and that her daughter Joan Elys shall have 
the lands called Hookes, unless my son can make some other arrange- 
ments with her. 

The residue of my goods I bequeath to my executors Robert Rowe 
& my son William Brent ; and I make Thomas Brent, clerk, overseer 
of this my will. 

Proved 2 December 1491 by the executors named. 

Note.— Robert Brent the maker of the foregoing will, was the son 
of Hugh Brent and the nephew of Wm. Brent, the maker of the will 
immediately preceding:. 

(P. C. C. Blamyr.v)* 

The will of Agnes Drakes, widow, late the wife of Richard Drakes. 
Dated in the feast of St. I^wrence, 1500. 

I bequeath my body to be buried in the chapel of St. Anne in the 
parish church of St. Aunteyn in London, beside the sepulture of Richard 
Brent, my ist husband. 

I give to the high altars of St. Bartholomew the Little in London, and 
of the parish church of Bekynham in Kent, 20s. each 

To each of the 4 orders of friars in London los. each. 

I will an honest priest shall sing for the soul of Richard Drakes, my 
late husband, for 20 years, according to his will, and for the souls of 
Richard Brent, my first husband, and my father and mother, in the church 
of St. Antenye aforesaid. I will that there will be given to the poor in 
alma in conveying my body to London, 4.//. 

I give to Edmund Brogreve, priest, my brother 10//. 

To the house of friars of Hicchon. 6li 138. 4d. 

To Frier John Plumer of the same house 408. 

To Agnes Plumer, mother of the said John, 20s. 

To Ann Brogreve, daughter of William Brogreve, 40s. 

To Sir William Derrant, frior of the said place of Hicchen 208. 



• ThU will is probably that of the widow of one of the Brents of Charing. Her hus- 
band, Richard Brent, is not named, however, in the published accounts. 
7 



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322 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

To Nicholas Brogreve, and Alice Brogreve, my sister, all my manors, 
lands and tenements, that be freehold by deed or copy-hold in the town 
of Hicchon, VValden, Preston, Poletts, Ikilford, and VVymondlev, in the 
counties of Hertford and Bedford, to hold to them and their heirs, to 
be divided equally between the said Nicholas and his sister, to whom I 
give the residue of my goods, to pray for my soul, making them my 
exors & Master Thomas Brent, doctor in the law, my supervisor. 

Witnesses: — John Garter, Richard Dawes, Thomas Lorkyn, John 
Aldey and Richard Aldey. 

Proved 24 Sept. 1501 by the exors named. 

The following interesting description of Charing Church is transcribed 
from a paper by John Sayer, Esq., of Pett Place, Charing. 

[ Large parts of this account have been necessarily omitled from con- 
siderations of space.] 

Charing Chtrch. 
By John Sayer of Pett Place Esq. 

The name of this parish used to be pronounced Char-ing. or the Mar- 
ket Place. When had Charing first a church.^ None is mentioned in 
Domesday Book, but 1 think there must have been a chunrh here prior 
to the Norman Conquest and long prior to any distinguishable portion 
of the present edifice. A reference to the church of Charing, with its 
chapel (meaning Egerton) is found in the Taxation of Pope Nicholas 
A. D. 1291. 

In the Parish Church the oldest visible marks of date will be found 
in two lancet windows ; one in the nortli wall of the nave, and another 
(with a slightly diflferent heading 1 in the north wall of the clianctl. 
There are also remains, now covered vviih pLister, of an early English 
string-course, running just below the window sills, along the north and 
south wails of the nave and round the n )rth transept. 

Guessing from the dnte of these remains, the earliest portion of the 
present church may have been erected between A. D. 1220 and A. D. 
1250, built perhaps when Henry III was King, and when Stephen 
Langton, as Archbishop of Canterbury, resided from time to time in 
the adjoining Manor House. 

The transepts appear to be of a little later •''.ate, although the string 
course before mentioned wis four! in the n.)rth tnnsept; but the 
labels above the windows there are in character transitional, between 
Early English and Decorated. The south transept has been much 
altered. 

In tlie chancL-l are three Sedilia of varying height, for the priest, dea- 
con, and sub-deacon; here, perhaps occupied by the Archbishop, his 
chaplain and cross bearer. 

The present sedilia are for the most part a modern restoration by Mr. 



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GENEALOGY. 323 

Christian, Sir Stephen Glynne, in 1854, called them "three plain rude 
sedelia mis-shapen and obtuse. 

The windows of the church vary much in character, and indicate in a 
marked manner the people's progressive desire for more light ; increas- 
ing from the narrow Early English lancet to the Perpendicular window 
of unusually large size, to be seen on the north side of the nave below 
the transept. 

On the south side of the nave is a Decorated reticulated window of 
great size, which is very remarkable of its kind. It is square headed, 
and is itself nearly a perfect square. The design is ingenious and the 
effect good, I believe it to be pure Decorated of about A. D. 1350. In 
the north transept there are also reticulated windows, probably of the 
same datt;. 

The chapel known as the Wicken Chapel, on the south side of the 
chancel, deserves particular attention. This is the chapel of St. Mary, 
built by Amy Brent, the widow of VVm. Brent, who lived in an interest- 
ing old house in this parish called Wickens. She died in the year 1516, 
and by her will directed that she should be buried "in the chapel of 
Our I^dy of her own edification." John Brent, the brother of Amy 
Brent's husband, by his will, proved in 1501, likewise ordered his body 
to be buried in the new Chapel of St. Mary, in which no burial then 
had been ; so that as to the Wickens chancel there is no question as to 
the date of the building being circa A. D. 1499. 

Attention should next be directed to the tower, with its fine arch 
opening into the nave ; a singularly well proportioned example of what 
have been called Kentish towers, and having angle buttresses of a re- 
markable character, the face of each buttress being formed anglewise. 
The porch plainly appears to have been built at the same time as the 
tower ; both being of good ragstone masonry and of Perpendicular 
work. Weever, writing about the year 1592, said : **On the outside of 
the belfry do remain carved in stone the badge of Edward IV (being a 
rose within the sun beams), and a wivern. being the arms of Hugh 
Brent, who in the reign of Edward IV, was the principal founder of this 
belfry, which was before of wood." 

The tower has a fine west doorway, no doubt intended as the proces- 
sional entry for the Archbishop and his attendants ; the porch having 
been built for the use of the people, to supersede an older and loftier 
doorway, traces of which may be seen above the inner porch door. 

Within the porch are the remains of the stoup for holy water, with 
a hooded covering, and outside, between the porch and the tower is a 
niche intended doubtless for an image or statue, of which however, 
there is no vestige. For the fine roofs in both nave and chancel, of dis- 
tinctive Elizabethan character, the church is indebted to those parish- 
ioners who witnessed the great fire, which happened in the year 1590 ; 
respecting which Robert Honywood of Pett, a lineal ancestor of the 



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324 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

present owner of Rett Place, who is the writer of this paper, made at 
the tlie time following nute in his diary ; " mem.: The parish church of 
Charing was burnt upon Tuesday the 4th of Augnst, 1590, and the bells 
in the steeple melted with the extremity of the flre : nothing of the 
church was left but the bare walls, except the floor over the porch and 
the floor ovf r the turret, where the weather-cock doth stand. The fire 
chanced by means of a birdinx-piece discharged by one Mr. Dios, 
which fired in the shingles ; the day being very hot an»i the same 
shingles very dry." 

(TO BE CONTINUED.) 



THK MALLORV FAMILY. 
(co.vtinued) 

On account of several errors in printing in the will of William Mallory 
given in the October Magazine, page 218, it is reprinted here. 

** In Dei nomine Amen. Ego VVillelmus Malliore senior, armiger 
Sepeliendum in eccles. S. Petri Ripon coram altare B. Mariae. Opti- 
mum animae nominie mortuarii*. Lego [ohannae Filiae meae de reddi- 
titibus provenientibus de Hoton iuxta Ripon, et Over Dedinsall C 
Marcas. Ad maritagium Magaretae filiae mea, C Marcas. Volo quod 
Henricus Malliore Christolorus Malliore, Georgius Malliore and Ricar- 
dus Malliore, filii mei, habeant terras pro termino vitae suae ad valen- 
cii\m X L marcarum, in villis de Lynton in Craven Brompton Coppid- 
hewyk, Granteley, Wynkysley Wodehouse and Hylton Flyghan in com. 
Westm. quae sunt de jure & hereditate Dionisiae uxoris mei dicti Wil- 
lelmi Malliore. Do et lego monasterio S. Roberti & fratribus suis 
pro uno obitu pro anima mea vjs. viij. d. Residuum lego Dionisiae 
uxori meae, Christofero Malliore and Johannae sorori ejus, quos facio 
executores. Dat 1 May MCCCCLXX ij. Prob 25 April 1475. (Reg. 
Test, Ebor. IV 125.") 



Sir John had issue: 

L William', 11. Robert^ HI. John'. 



(•) popular antiquities of great britain. hazlitt— vol. ii, 
Pages 199-200 

MORTl'ARIKS. 

The payment o{ mortuaries is of ^reat antiquity. It was anciently done by leading or 
driving a horse or cow, &c., before the corpse of the deceased at his funeral. It was con* 
sidtred as a gift left by a man at his death, by way of recompense for all failures in the pay> 
ment of tithes and oblations, and called a corse present. It is mentioned in the National 
Council of Ensham about the year 1006. (Collier's " Ecelesiast. Histor>'," Vol. I, p. 487.) 

Mortuaries were called by our Saxon Ancestors Soul j/ro/, or paymeftt. (Sec a cari- 
ous account of them m Dugdale's *' Hist, of Warwickshire," ist edit., p. 679. Sec also, 
Cowel's "Interpreter in vocr," and Selden's '* History of Tithes," p. 287,) " Offeringtx 
at Hutialles " are in a list of " Grosse Poyntes of Poperie, evident to all Men," in ** A 
Parte of a Register, condemned," &c. [circa 1593.] 



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GENEALOGY. 325 

Sir William' Mallory, of Studleyand Hutton, eldest son and heir, 
married Joan, daughter of Sir John Constable, of Halsham, by Lora his 
wife, daughter of Henry, Lord Fitzhugh, to whom he left !)y will in 1473 
the large sum of 500 marks towards her marriage. {Test. Ebor. iii, 279.) 
It appears that, in 1475, William Mallory, son and heir of Sir John Mal- 
lory, knL, and heir of William Mallory, his grandfather, did service to 
the Chapter of Ripon for his lands at Ripon and Hutton Conyers {Ripon 
Chapter Act Book, 246-7.) In 1497 Sir William, his wife, and John his 
son, became members of the Corpus Christi Guild at York. (From the 
evidence as 10 the manor of Washington, already quoted, it appears 
that Sir William had a son William, but Glover, who seems to have 
perused the family papers, assigns him but one son.) 

•• Inq. p. m. Sir Wm. Malory knt,. 4th Nov. 15th Hen. VII [1499] m* 
61., taken at York Cast e, 4th Nov. Was seized of the manors of Stud- 
ley and HuUon and being so seized, he granted by his Charter the same 
to Sir Stephtrn Hamerton, knt.. and his heirs to fulfil his last will. The 
said manor of Studley is held for Thomas, Archbishop of York, by 
fealty and rent of 20., and is worth annually, ultra reprisasj twenty 
marks. The manor of Hutton is held of the Bishop of Durham, by 
fealty only, and is worth, ultra reprisas^ ^20. He died 2d July, 14th 
Hen. VII [1498] and John Malory is his next heir, aged 26 years and 
more." 

Sir John** .Mallory, of Studley and Huion, knt., §on and heir, was 
four times married First, to .Margaret, daughter of Edmund Thwaittsof 
Lund on the Wolds, who mentions her in his will ( Test Ebor IV, 177) 
P2sq. Secondly, to Margaret, daughter of Sir Hugh Hastings, of Fen- 
wick, CO. York, to whom her father bequeathed, in 1482, 3(X) marks for 
her marriage {Test Ebor. Ill, 274). Sir John Mallory's third wife was 
Elizabeth, daughter of Reade, of Burkshall in Oxfordshire. The 
license for him to marry her in the chapel of the Blessed Virgin at 
Studley, is dated Nov. 24th 15 15 \^ Test Ebor. Ill, 368). His fourth wife 
was Anne, daughter of Sir Richard York, Mayor of the Staple at Calais 
and a rich merchant at York. The license for them to marry, addressed 
to the curate of Bra>ton, near Selby, is dated Nov. 29th 1521 {Test 
Ebor. Ill, 372). In 1554 Lady Anne Mallory, in compliment to her 
father, was made Iree of the city of York. 

Sir John Mallory died in 1527-8, and on his decease the following in- 
quisition was taken : 

*' Inq. p. m. Sir John Malory, taken at Howden,2oth Oct., 20th Hen. 
VIII. He was seized in his demsene as of fee, on the day when he died, 
of the manors of Studley Magna and Hutton Conyers, as also of 100 
acres of arable land, 30 acres of meadow, 50 acres of pasture and 30 
acres of wood, in .Studley Magna and Hutton ; also of 10 messuages, 
20 acres of arable land, 10 acres of meadow, 100 of moor and 30 of wood 
and 1 2d free rent in Grantley, also of 8 burgages in Ripon, Studley, and 



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326 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Crantley, and burgages in Ripon held of the Archbishop of York. Hut- 
ton held of the manor of Northallerton. The premises in Studley and 
Grantley worth /■45.12.8 per ann., and those in Hutton Conyers /"40. 
They say also that John Byrtby, of Ripon, Chaplain, was seized in de- 
mesne as of fee of a close called Bright Close, in Hutton Conyers, also 
of two water corn mills there to the use of one Wm. Mallory, Junior, son 
and heir of John Mallory, knt., and of his heirs, and that so seized of 
the i2th of Feb. nth Edw. IV(i47i-2),he granted the same to the said 
William Mallory, Junior, Johanna then his wife, and the heirs male of 
the said William and Johanna. They also say that John Darneton, late 
abbot of Fountains, Mr. Wm. Potman, late provost of Beverley, John 
Constable, of Halsham, knt., Stephen Hamerton, knt., and Brian Rowth, 
esq., were seized in their demesne as of fee of a close called la Bright 
in Hutton Conyers and of the New Close there, and of a messuage and 
a bovate of arable land there &c., to the use of Wm. Malory, knt., and 
being so seized, by indenture dated 20th Dec. 22d Edward IV ( 1482) 
they conveyed the same premises to Wm. Malory and Johanna his wife 
and their heirs another settlement of the moiety of the manor of Nun- 
wick. Other trustees enfeoffed by Sir John, of the manor of Lynton in 
Craven, namely Sir George and Anthony Darcy, Roger Lassells, and 
Richard Norton, esqrs., to the use of Ann York, daughter of Richard 
York, knt, for her life, in satisfaction of dower on any part of the in- 
heritance of the said Sir John. The date of the feofft is not given. Sir 
John died 23 Mirch 19 Henry VIII (i527-S)and William Malory, esq., 
his son and next heir is now 30 years old and upward." 

Sir John^ Mallory had issue : 

(By ist M.) I. William* 

(By 2d M. ) II. Christopher.® of Tickhill, who married and had an 
only son Sampson, who was buried at Ripon, Aug.* 17, 1600. The will 
of Sampson'*^ Mallorie, of Ripon Parks, gentleman, was dated i March, 
1599-1600, and proved Sept. 27, 1600, He died without issue. 

III. Joan', wife of Thomas Slingsby, of Scriven, esq , who was buried 
in Knaresborough Church, Sept. 26, 1581. 

(By 4th M.) IV. George^ of Tickhill Castle, esq. His will was 
dated Nov. 28, 1580, and proved Feb 16, 1580-81. He married Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Hugh Wyrrall, of Leversal, and died without issue. 

Sir William* Mallory, of Studley and Hutton, knt., eldest .<ion 
and heir. He married Jane, daughter of Sir John Norton, of Norton 
Conyers, knt., by Margaret, daughter of Sir Roger Ward, of Givendale, 
and had issue by her two sons and seven daughters. He was buried at 
Ripon. (?) 

* Inq, p. m. Wm. Mallory, knt.. taken at York Castle 24th Sept., ist 
Edward VI (1547)- He was seized on the day he died in his demesne 
as of fee of the manor of Studley Ma^na as held of the king as of his 
manor of Ripon by fealty at rent of 38s., and worth per. ann. £40, 



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GENEALOGY. 327 

Also of lo messuages, a cottage and divers lands and tenements in 
Grantley and Winksley held of ihe manor of Ripon by fealty only, and 
worth per ann. £S. 18.6; also of 6 messuages and of divtrs closes, 
lands, meadows and pastures held of the King's Manor of Ripon by 
tealty only, and worth ^^5; also one burgage in Ripon held in socage and 
worth 26s. 8d per ann. The manor of Hutton Conyers and divers lands 
there, together with 2 messuages and lands at Brompton are held of the 
Hishop of Durham, as of his manor of Northallerton, by knight's ser- 
vice and are worth yearly /"ro. Also of Manor of Linton in Craven, 5 
cottages and divers lands held of the King as of his manor of SpofTorth 
by knight's service, viz: by 12th part of one knight's fee, and worth 
per ann. ;i"i2.8. For his lifetime he was seized also of a moiety of the 
manor of Nunwick and ot divers lands there held of the King as of his 
manor of Ripon by service of 6 parts of one knight's fee. and worth 
;^?c, and by writing dated 8th June, 33d Hen. VIII (IS^O he granted 
the said }4 manor and premises in Nunwick to VV^m. Mallory, his son, 
for the term of his life. S;iid \Vm. Mallory [the father] died 27th April 
I Kdward VI (1547) and Chr. Mallory, his son and heir, is now aged 22 
years and more." 

Sir VVillam Mallory left issue: 

I. Christopher'^ eldest son and heir, married Margery, daughter of 
Sir Christopher Danby, of Thrope Perrow, by Elizabeth, daughter of 
Richard, Lord Latimer; but had no issue. He died young, 23d March 
^553-4, his brother William Mallory, esq., being found by his /fig. post 
Mortum to be his next of kin, then being 23 years of age and more. 

II. William''^ heir to his brother. 

IIL Margaret married John Conyers, of Katon onUsk, mother of 
Christopher Conyers, who married a sister of the celebrated Cardinal 
Allen. 

IV. Catherine, wife of Sir George Radcliffe, of Cartington and Dils- 
ton in Northumberland , Lord of Dervventwater and Lord warden of the 
East Marches towards Scotland. He died 31st May, 1588. 

V. Anne, wife of Sir William Ingilby, of Ripley, knt. treasurer of 
Qerwick-on-Tweed. There is a portrait of him at Ripley Castle, where 
he is represented in Armour, richly inlaid with gold, a small ruff around 
his neck, short hair and whiskers, and a beard aftei" the fashon of the 
day. Lady Ingilby was interred at Ripley, Feb. 20, 1587-8. Her hus- 
band died on the 23d of Febuar>'. 1577-8. 

VI. Elizabeth, married first Sir Robert Stapleton, of Wighhill, knt., 
who died in 1557, and secondly, Marniaduke, second son of Thomas 
Slingstby, of Scriven. esq. 

VI I. Dorothy married the celebrated Sir George Bowes, of Streatlam 
in the county of Durham who so vigorously withstood the Earls of 
Northumberland and Westmoreland in the rebellion of 1569; and gar- 
risoned and held out Barnard Castle against their united forces for ten 



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328 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

days. He was, by special Commission, appointed marshall north of the 
Trent, and he certainly executed the office with dreadful sternness and 
severity. The marriage articles of Sir George and his wife are dated 
7th Oct., 2oth, Henry VIII (1529.) By her(who washis first wife)he had 
Sir William Bowes, ambassador to Scotland and treasurer of Berwick. 
VIII. P'rances, wife of Ninian Staveley, of Ripon Parks, esq. 
IX. Joan, second wife of Nicholas Rudston, of Hayton. esq. 

Sir Willia.m'" Mallory, of Studley and Hutton, heir to his brother 
Christopher. During the Rising of the North in 1569, he took the side 
of the Crown, giving news and advice to the Earl of Sussex. In the 
following year he was appointed High Steward ot Ripon, an office which 
he seems to have held during the rest of his life {Calendar of State 
Papers^ Elizabeth.) In 1585 Sir William was M. P. for Yorkshire. He 
was High Sheriff of the county in 1592, and was exceedingly zealous in 
the suppression of Popery {Troubles 0/ Our Catholic For ('fathers, 3d 
series, pp. 46, 69, 83, 92). In 1575 the Commissioners at York for Ec- 
clesiastical Causes requested him and Mr. Ralph Tunstall "to pull 
downe the golden tabernacle at Rippon breast lowe and the same to be 
employed in repairing the Channcell." In 1577 he, with Mr. Wandes- 
ford and Mr. Lister, was directed to see that the churchwardens of 
Ripon did their duty. The Reformation had made scant progress in 
the Ripon district, and Sir William was very keen in advancing it. He 
was an exceedingly active and able person. He married Ursula, daugh- 
ter of (leorge Gale, esq., of York, master of the Mint there, and sometime 
Lord Mayor of that city. By will, dated 1536, George Gale gave to 
his daughter and her husband the ^£"20, which he had lent to Christopher 
Mallory, Sir William's brother. In the following year Dame Mary 
Gale bequeathed to her daughter Mallory her " tablett of golde," 
and to her goddaughter Jane Mallory her " flowre of golde wythe the 
stone in yt, and wythe a iytle chyne ot golde." ( Yorke Registry.) 

The following are some extracts from Sir Williams' will which was 
proved at York : 

"15 June, 28 Elizabeth (1586), W^illiam Mallory of Hutton Conyers, 
knight. To George Mallory my sonne one anuitie of £\% out of my 
mannor of W^lshington, Co. Durlseme. To Thomas Mallory my sonne 
one anuitie of /*I9 out of the same. To Charles my sonne one anuitie 
of /"17 out of my lands at Hutton Conyers. To Robert Mallory 
my sonne one anuitie of £\1 out of the same. To Francis Mall- 
ory my sonne one anuitie of /"17 out of my lands at Great Stodeley. 
To Anne Mallory my daughter ^300. To Dorothie Mallory my 
daughter twelve score pounds. To Julian Mallory my daughter 
/"300, whereof she hath already paid unto her ^50, to remain with 
her mother until she be 20, if she marry without her mother's con- 
sent she to have but 200 markes, and the other 100 markes to be 
paid to Elizabeth Mallory my youngest daughter. To John Mallorie 



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BOOK REVIEWS. 829 

my Sonne and heir my lease of the tythe of Raynton, Aisentil and 
Newby, paying j^io a year to Elizabeth my youngest daughter for 
ten years, and for her further advancement I rest in the mercy of God 
and her mother's goodness. My wife to have the occupacion of all 
my plate, and after her death it to remaine to John my sonne if he 
be living, if not to William Mallorie his sonne. The residue to Dame 
Ursula my wife andj ohn my sonne, the ex'rs. Prob. 5 April, 1603, and 
adm. to John, Dame Ursula being dead. (/^e^. Test. Ebor, XXIX, 3.) 

Sir William was buried at Ripon 22nd March, 1602-3. 

His issue was very numerous. 

(to be continued.) 



BOOK REVIEWS. 



The History of North America. Volume XVII. The Rise of the 
New South. By Philip Alexander Bruce, late Corresponding 
Secretary of the Virginia Historical Society, Author of. The Planta- 
tion Negro as a Freeman, Economic History of Virginia in the 
Seventeenth Century; School History of the United States &c., &c. 
Printed for Subscribers only by George Barrie & Sons, Philadelphia 
[^905], PP- XX, 491, illustrated. 

"The Rise of the New South," is a theme for which Mr. Philip A. 
Bruce has peculiar fitness as regards temper, training and identification 
with the forces entering into his subject. Reared in the South, some- 
time Secretary of the Virginia Historical Seciety, author of "The Eco- 
nomic History of Virginia," a man of broad experience, liberal views 
and sane judgment, he can speak with authority upon the recent trend 
of Southern issues. To a fine historical sense he adds the practical 
sagacity of a statesman. His admirable book is destined to exert vital 
nfluence upon present-day thought, proving a mine of information as 
to economic, social and political conditions in the South since 1876. 
While his volume throbs with sympathy with the Southern people in 
their tragic and heroic history, it breathes a constructive spirit that must 
needs energize all the progressive forces now at work in Southern life. 

Mr. Bruce instances seven facts of supreme importance, in which he 
finds the kernel of all that the Southern people have accomplished 
since the abolition of slavery. These are the subdivision of lands; the 
diversification of agriculture; the growth of manufactures; the extension 
and consolidation of railroads; the spread of education; the more rapid 



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330 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

expansion of the white than the black population; and finally the restric- 
tion of the suffrage. 

The chapters which Mr. Bruce devotes to literature, social life and 
politics in the South are extremely interesting and instructive. While 
the volume is too encyclopedic for me to indicate even in outline its 
value to the students of conditions in this section, it is proper to point 
out the signal ability shown in the discussion of education and its place 
in the complex of progressive forces in the South. 

" In public instruction, offered without cost to every individual in the 
community, of whatever color or condition in life, is to be discovered 
the firmest ground of hope for the moral and intellectual improvement 
of the Southern people, as well as for the wisest use by them of the 
varied natural advantages which Providence has bestowed upon their 
region of country almost without stint. There are many persons in the 
Southern States to-day who have fully grasped the relation that public 
education is to bear to the general development of these States in the 
future. * ♦ * One of the most promising features of its contempo- 
rary growth is the number of men of great capacity who are giving the 
full force of their talents and training to the cause of Southern Educa_ 
tion, with the keenest sense of the exalted character of their profession 
and with the justest appreciation of its relation to the general progress 
of the South. * * * It is on these teachers chiefly that, for many 
years to come, the masses must rely for that general advancement in 
information which will enable them to form a correct judgment in decid- 
ing all questions affecting their nearest interests. It is not going too far 
to say that, as a body, the teachers in the different Southern institutions 
are the most important agents for the general improvement of the whole 
community to be found in that part of the Union." 

He declares that these men have looked beyond the ordinary objects 

of general education to the supreme object of restoring through it the 

Southern States? to their former commanding power and influence in the 

Union. 

S. C. Mitchell, Richmond College. 

JOITRNALS OF THE HoUSE OF BURGESSES OF ViRGINLV, I773-I776, 

laclulinjj the Records of the Committee of Correspondence, Ed- 
ited by John Pendleton Kennedy [Colonial Seal of Virginia]. Rich- 
mond, Virginia. M. C. M. V, 500 copies printed from type. Pub- 
lished by authority of the Library Board of the Virginia State 
Library, pp. xxiii, 301, with index. 

All who are interested in the history of Virginia, and, indeed, of the 
American Colonies, will give a hearty welcome to this beautiful book, 
with which the State of Virginia resumes the publication of its records. 

It is published by the authority of the State Library Board, and excel- 
lently edited by Mr. John Pendleton, Kennedy, State Librarian. To Mr- 



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BOOK REVIEWS. 331 

Kennedy is also due the unusually handsome way in which the book is 
made. It is probably the best example of such work ever produced in 
Virginia. 

After careful consideration, the Library Board and the Librarian de- 
termined to begin their publication of the records with a series of re- 
prints and original publications of the Journal of the House of Burgesses. 

No other class of sources of Virginia history has been so much in 
demand by students or so difficult to reach as our legislative records of 
the Colonial period. The decision of the Board in making this selection 
was eminently wise. 

After the same mature consideration it was determined to begin pub- 
lication with the latest journals, as most important, and work backwards, 
obtaining from the English Record Office copies of Manuscript journals 
which do not exist here. 

The period covered by the present publication, 1773-76, was so criti- 
ical a one and so filled with important events, that there are but few 
pages of this volume which do not have value to the historian. 

The journals of the sessions included in this volume have never be- 
fore been printed in full. In the preface the editor refers to three dif- 
ferent publications of the journals as a whole or in part ; but there is 
one which he appears to have overlooked. In the American Archives^ 
4th Series, Vol. I. 350-352, is an extract from the proceedings of the 
Session of May, 1774, aud Vol. II, 1185-1272, appears to contain the 
whole of the journals from the beginning of the session of June to the 
end of the Assembly in May, 1776. 

The preface contains much matter of value and interest, including 
several unpublished proclamations and letters of Dunmore, derived from 
the Bancroft-Transcripts and other sources in the Library of Congress, 
The annotations are well done and very properly (in the publication o' 
a document of this kind and in this manner) only made when necessary 
information is to be supplied. 

The index is a very good one, and ihe only amendment that can be 
suggested is that hereafter there shall be (as is the case in the publi- 
cation of the Maryland Archives), a separate index showing the 
history of bills and resolutions. The volume includes the proceedings 
and correspondence of the Virginia Committee of Correspondence for 
the years named. 

As illustration, there appears a fac-simile of the last page of the 
Journal of the last Colonial legislature with its emphatic Finis, and en- 
gravings of the rare Council book-plate and of several Virginia seals- 

In manner and matter, in this their initial volume, the Board and the 
Librarian have produced a book of high value, and have made a mos 
p!V>pitious beginning of a work, which has been so long anxiously looked 
forward to by historical students. 
The Library has recently obtained from England copies of the jour- 



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332 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

nals of 1766 aud 1767 which had been entirely lost sight of, and were 
not only not to be found in America, but were not known to be in the 
British Public Record Office. 

A second volume of Journals will he publishtd in the same beautiful 
shape, about March, 1906. 

Documentary Historv of Dunmore's War, 1774. Ccmpiled from 
the Draper Manuscripts in the Library of the Wisconsin Historical 
Society and published at the charge of the VXisconsin Society of the 
the Sons of the American Revolution. Edited by Reuben Gold 
Thwaites, L. L. D., Secretary of the Society, and Louise Phelps 
Kellogg, Ph. D., Editorial Assistant on the Society's Staff. 
[Seal of the Society]. Madison, Wisconsin Historical Society, 1905. 
pp. xxviii, 472. 

The editors say in their valuable introductory '* Lord Dunmore's War 
was in a sense a focal point in Western history. Here were gathered in 
either wing of the army the men who by dint of daring enterprise had 
made their way to the frontier, and had carried American institutions 
across the Appalachian barrier * * * From Point Pleasant and 
Camp Charlotte they scattered far and wide to fight ihe coming battle 
for independence * ♦ * The victory at Point Pleasant opened an 
ever lengthening pathway to Western Settlement. Thenceforward new 
vigor was infused into the two chief forces of the future century — 
American expansion and American Nationalism." 

These words emphasize correctly the great importance of the cam- 
paign made by the Virginians against the Western Indians in 1774 and 
known as '* Dunmore's W^ar." 

There has been hardly any important era of our history concerning 
which documentary information has been more lacking than that of this 
campaign of 1774. 

There has been published a considerable amount of matter in regard 
to the battle of Point Pleasant, but as regards the war as a whole, and 
the operations of the force under Dunmore in particular, we have had 
vague and unreliable accounts. 

All the remaining documentary history of the period is, practically in 
the Draper Collection, and when the Wisconsin Society t^ons of the 
American Revolution ollered to defray the cost of publication of a vol- 
ume made up from the Historical Society's Collections, they did a most 
patriotic and praiseworthy act, which it is hoped will be emulated by 
other organizations or by individuals. 

The editors state that the volume now published contains only about 
half of the material in regard to Dunmore's War which is in the Draper 
Collection. It is greatly to be hoped that the rest of the papers on the 
subject will appear in print at no distant date. 



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BOOK REVIEW. 333 

It is needless to say that the editing is learned and illuminating, or to 
lay further stress on the obvions importance of this work. 

Thb Woods-McAfee Memorial Containing an Account of 
John Woods and James McAfee of Ireland and Their De- 
scendants In A.MERICA. Copiously illustrated with maps drawn 
expres^Iy for this work and embellished with one hundred and fifty 
handsomely engraved portraits, scenes, etc. By Rev. Neander M. 
Woods, D. p., LL. D.. with an Introduction by Hon. Reuben T. 
Durrett A. M. LL. D.,'of Louisville Ky., President of the Filson 
Club. In which, besides considerable new matter bearing on Vir- 
ginia and Kentucky history, will be found mention of the families 
of Adams, Alexander, Arm.strong, Bebee, Boone, Borden, Bowyer, 
Bruce, Buchanan, Butler, Caperton, Campbell, Clark, Coates, Craw- 
ford, Curry, Daingerfield, Daviess, Dedman, Duncan, Dunn, Durrett, 
Forsyih, Foster, Gachet, Gooch, Goodloe, Goodwin, Guthrie, Hale, 
Haines, Henderson, Johnston, Lapsley, Macfarlane, Macgowen, 
McGoffin, McAfee, McDowell, McKamey, Phillips, Reed, Ricken- 
baugh, Rogers, Royster, Shelby, Sampson, Speed, Suddarth, Tay- 
lor, Todd, Thompson, Warner, Wade, Walker, Wallace, White, 
Williamson, Woods, Word, Wylie, Young and five hundred others 
as will be seen by the index. Also some hitherto unpublished docu- 
ments which constitute a valuable contribution to the pioneer His- 
tory of Virginia and Kentucky. Louisville, Ky. Journal Job Printing 
Co., 1905. pp. xiii, 507. 
Of all the Scotch-Irish genealogies which have been recently so much 
to the fore, this volume is easily the largest and most elaborate. Its 
size and contents are well indicated by the title, and the work of prep- 
aration and compilation seems to have been done with the care and 
thoroughness which should characterize such a work. 

It treats primarily of Michael Woods, a native of the north of Ireland 
who in 1734. settled close under the Blue Ridge, in Albemarle County, 
Virginia; and of James McAfee, also a Scotch-Irishman, who about 
1746, settled on Catawba Creek, then in Augusta, and now in Roanoke 
County, and of their descendants. No pains have been spared to obtain 
as far as possible, the minutest details of the life of the pioneers, who 
were winning the great West, and the various lines of their descendants. 
as well as of the Wallaces, descended from Michael Woods' sister are 
traced with the same fullne.ss and care. 

Valuable as the book is, considered as a genealogy, it is of greater 
value as a contribution to the history of the settlement of the Western 
frontier of Virginia, and of Kentucky. In 17^4, Michael Woods was the 
most western resident of what is now Albemarle County. This alone 
makes him of interest. The especial claim of the McAfees to eminence in 
pioneering history is given in full in the Chapter entitled "Tour of the 



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334 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

McAfee Company to Kentucky in the Summer of 1773, and what it 
meant for the actual settlement of Kentucky." The McAfees appear to 
have attempted the first permanent settlement in " The Dark and Bloody 
Ground." 

The illustrations from photographs are especially interesting. 

They include views of Wood's (now Jarman's) Gap ; the farm of 
Michael Woods on James River in Botetourt Co.; Cumberland Gap, 
Waseoto Gap, Ky.; McAfee's Spring on Salt River, Ky.; a sketch of 
Boone's Trace, near Pineville, Ky.; Kentucky River at the mouth of 
Drennon's Creek ; Cumberland Mountain near Cumberland Gap, view 
on the Cumberland river, Kentucky river at its mouth, and other places 
of note in the early westward movement, and along the route to Ken- 
tucky. 

A very important and unique feature of The Woods -McAfee Mem- 
orial, is the series of maps, specially drawn for the purpose to illustrate 
the settlement of the Western portion of Virginia, and early routes to the 
West. These are (i) Vicinity of Charlottesville. Va., showing sites of 
houses of settlers between that place and the Blue Ridge; (2) Map of 
Kentucky, &c., to illustrate the homeward route of the McAfee Com- 
pany in August, 1773, and also the routes of the Walker (1750), Gist 
(1751) and Boone's Trace; (3) Route of the McAfee Company, July- 
Aug., 1773, from Botetourt Co., Va,, to Central Kentucky; (4) Map of 
Long Hunters Road. &c., of the Wilderness Road and Boone's Trace ; 
(5) Portions of Mercer and adjoining counties in Kentucky, illustrating 
the route of the McAfee Company; (6) Map of *'The Parting of the 
Ways," near Draper's Meadow, Va., with various old roads and trails, 
houses, &c.; (7) Map of Southwestern Virginia, Southeastern Kentucky 
and Northeastern Tennessee, illustrating various expeditions, routes, 
&c., and the settlement of the West, 1750- 1800. These maps greatly 
facilitate the study of the history of the frontier. 

Dr. Woods and his collaborators have made a valuable addition to 
liistory and genealogy. 

Sons of the Descendants of Samlel (Converse, Jr., of Thomp- 
son Parish, Killingly, Conn. Major James Converse, Woburn, 
.Mass ; Hon. Denman Allen, M. C, of .Vlilton and Burlington, Vt. • 
Captain Jonathan Bixby, Sr., of Killingly, Conn. Compiled and 
Edited by Charles Allen Converse, 2 vols. Eben Pumam, Pub- 
lisher, Boston, Mass., pp. xix, 961. Copiously illustrated. 

Rarely has there been published a work on American genealogy as 
sumptuous and beautiful as this. And what is of much higher impor- 
tance the genealogical work contained in these two handsome volumes 
shows evidence of the greatest skill and thoroughness. No time nor 
money was evidently spared in obtaining all possible information in 
regard to the families treated in this book. 



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BOOK REVIEWS. 335 

It is of much more present importance than a book of ordinary 
jfenealogical reference, comprising a dull array of names and dates ; 
for the illustrations of American patriotism in it are authoritatively 
drawn from actual experience, and are saliently, vitally such as should 
be pondered in these changeful, eventful times. Its study is educative. 
Its encyclopedic information is of elementary significance for that stu- 
dent of American history who would know, and properly estimate, the 
spirit of true American life. 

Its editoiial construction is dommated by thorough literary culture, 
judgment, orderliness, and the possession of a terse, vigorous, attrac- 
tive pen. Scattered through its text are pertinent drawings and 
portraits. In the regard of rine book craftsmanship it is a model. 
Whatever person or library that possesses its rare volumes of nearly a 
thousand pages is to be congratulated. 

In the Appendix valuable sketches are given of a large number of New 
England families connected with the branch of the family to which the 
author belongs, including the families of Edgecombe, Hawkes, Smead, 
Bates, Belden, VVaite, Nash, Stone, Coleman, Porter, Field, Baldwin, 
Prentis, Rogers, Griswold, Wolcott, Gilbert, Lord, Stanton, Underwood, 
Bishop, Perkins, Bixby, and numerous quotations from early records 
and from authentic printed sources concerning the militar>' and civil 
services of nitrmbers of these families, aie incorporated in these sketches. 
So great has been the intermarriage of old New England families that 
in these j)ages many of the readers of this book will undoubtedly firjd 
details concerning maternal ancestors, even if the entire line of descent 
does not appear. This section of the book makes it of the utmost value 
as a general reference work of New England genealogy. Similar ances- 
tral records are inter^•persed throughout the book, whenever informa- 
tion regarJing maternal ancestry of members of the family was received. 
The general index contains approximately 6,5sX) references to individ- 
uals, and the index to marriages over 2,000 names of persons married 
to Converses. 

'In some instances special research was carrie<l on in England to 
obtain the information desired. This was so in the case of the Con- 
verse family, the Edgecombe and Stanton families, and in minor 
degree of others. 

In addition to New England people many Southerners are represented. 

The Anckstry op Rosalie Morris Ioiinson, daughter of George 
Calvert Murris and Elizabeth Kuhn, his wife. Compiled by R. 
Winder Johnson. 1905. Printtrd for private circulation only by 
Ferris & Leach, pp. 294. 

This volume, which is alike an admirable example of careful and 
thorough genealogical work and handsome book-making, is a memorial 



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336 VIRGINIA HISTORCIAL MAGAZINE. 

to the late wife of the compiler. Mrs. Johnson was descended from 
numerous families who from personal worth and public service have 
ranked among America's best. 

Brown, of Northampton county, Virginia ; Carrington of Barbadoes; 
Calvert, of Maryland; the distinguished Pennsylvania families of Franks, 
Hamilton, Moore, Morris, Shippen, and Willing are a few of the numer- 
ous names treated of. As will be seen from this list, there is much 
matter of special interest to Virginians. 

Researches have been made in England, Belgium, Holland, Germany, 
the West Indies and the United States to obtain the results set forth. 

A large number of letters, diaries, etc., give an unusual amount of 
human interest to the various genealogical narratives. 

History of Nathaniel Evans and his Descendants By James 
Daniel Evans of the Philadelphia Bar ;/. p. n. d. [1905] pp. viii, 98, 
IV. Illustrated with portraits, arms, etc. 

This is a carefully prepared account of Nathaniel Evans, a Welshman, 
who settled in South Carolina about 1736, and of his descendants, who 
have included a number of people of prominence. 

There are also notices, of greater or less extent, of the South Caro- 
lina families of Godbold. Gregg, McCoUum, Gary, Witherspoon, etc., 
and of various Virginia families connected with that of Evans. 

The book is handsomely pnnted and well illustrated, and is an excel- 
lent example of family history. The index is full. 

The only criticism to be made in regard to this volume, and one that 
might include many others, is the practice of illustrating with engrav- 
ings of coats of arms where there is no positive proof that the families 
ever used or were entitled to them. 



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PROCEEDINGS 



Virginia Historical Society 



AT ITS 



ANNUAL MEETING 



HELD IN THE 



Y. M. C. A. HALL, JANUARY 4th, 1906 



J '^wu, 



WITH THE 



LIST OF OFFICERS AND MEMBERS OF THE SOCIETY. 



RICHMOND: 

WM. ELLIS JONES, BOOK AND JOB PRINTER. 
1906. 



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PROCEEDINGS 



OF THE 



Virginia Historical Society 



IN 



Annual Meeting heid January ^, igo6. 



The annual meeting was held in the Young Men's Christian 
Association Hall — a large audience being present. 

President W. Gordon McCabe called the meeting to order at 
8.15 P. M., and stated that in order to expedite business, unless 
there was objection, he would appoint a Nominating Committee, 
who would be asked to retire in consultation at once, and to 
report after the address of the evening. 

He appointed as members of this committee, Messrs. Robert B. 
Munford, Jr., Wm. Ellis Jones and W. Clayton Torrence. 

The President then read the annual report. 

The President's Report. 

To the Members of the Virginia Historical Society : 

I have the honor to submit the following report, giving 
in detail the work of the Society and presenting a precise 
statement of its condition as to its finances, membership and 
property for the year ending November 12th, 1905 — which 
report has been carefully e.xamined, verified and unanimously 
approved by your Executive Committee. 



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IV VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Membership. 



During the current year, the increase in membership has 
been most gratifying, our rolls showing 753 members as 
against 729 at the time of the last annual report. The usual 
average of accessions to membership (from 60 to 65) has been 
more than maintained, while our losses through resignation, 
death and dropping for persistent non-payment of dues have 
fallen from 66 to 47. 

This encouraging result amply vindicates the drastic ac- 
tion taken by your Executive Committee last year in purging 
the rolls of such delinquents as persisted after repeated warnings 
in ignoring the courteous reminders of indebtedness sent them 
by the Secretary. 

But while the great majority of our members have paid 
their dues with commendable promptness, there are still some 
who, through culpapble carelessness or lack of a becoming 
sense of obligation, remain deaf to all appeals. 

The Society, as was pointed out in the last report, is 
almost entirely dependent for support upon the annual dues of 
its members, its expenses for maintaining the SocietyHouse, for 
publication, salaries, etc., necessarily heavy, yet these delin- 
quents, knowing all this, go on complacently receiving the 
valuable publications of the Society, which, they must be quite 
aware, are being paid for by their more conscientious fellow- 
members. 

The Excutive Committee has therefore decided to give 
these few delinquents until the 15th of January, 1906, to pay 
up their dues, and in the event of their failure to do so to drop 
them from the rolls. 

Members can, of course, resign at any time, but they must 
bear in mind that dues run up to the date of resignation. Such 
is the invariable rule in all reputable societies of a kindred 
nature. It may be pertinent to mention here, as indicative of 
the constantly increasing interest felt in the aims and purposes 
of the Society, that of our new members twenty-two sent in 
their applications during the last two months. 

It is the pleasing duty of your Committee to state that 
the finances of the Society are in a tlioroughly sound and satis- 



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PROCEEDINGS. V 

factory condition, as will be seen from the subjoined report of 
our accurate and zealous Treasurer. 

Treasurer's Report. 

Balance on hand November 12, 1904 $ 264 48 

Receipts. 

Annual dues 13,052.28 

Life members 100 00 

Magazines (sales) 197 28 

Publications (sales) 79 10 

Interest 228 00 

Advtfrtisements (in Magazine) 1 12 25 

Gift of Byam K. Stevens, Esq 50 00 

Miscellaneous sources 1 2 00 

3.830 91 

4,095 39 
Expenditures 

General expenses {360 45 

Stationery, binding, and new books 55 45 

Postage — express and stamps 94 72 

Insurance . . 60 00 

Printing Magazine, etc 1.035 10 

Salaries 1,650 00 

Wages 240 00 

Permanent fund 455 60 

3.951 32 

Balance in bank November 1 1, 1905 { 144 07 

The Treasurer holds, in addition, on account of the ** Per- 
manent Fund " 3 % bank certificate 455 60 

Virginia 3 % Century bond 100 00 

Mortgage, running 3 years at 5% from May 4, 1904 4,500 00 

I5.055 60 

It is gratifying to note that our '* Permanent Fund " 
has now passed the $5,000 mark, and worthy of mention that with 
the exception of $50, given this year by our staunch and gen- 
erous friend, Byam K. Stevens, Esq., of New York, and of 
$100 given several years ago by the '* Daughters of the Amer- 
ican Revolution," no part of our endowment has been derived 
from donations. The interest from this "Permanent Fund" 
is used for the current expenses of the Society. 



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VI VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

The receipts for the current year, as will be seen on com- 
paring the above statement with that last submitted, have been 
less than in 1904. This has been due in chief measure to the 
unusually large loss of members from death in 1904, the effects 
of which show, for the first time, in decreased annual dues of this 
Report. Another reason is to be found in the fact that during 
a limited period of the last year your Committee, with the view of 
adding to the ** Permanent Fund," offered special inducements 
to secure ** Life Members. " In accordance with the * * bye-laws *' 
of the Society, all fees from Life Membership are turned over to the 
*' Permanent Fund," and thus this Fund was increased by these 
fees several hundred dollars above the normal, which corres- 
pondingly swelled the receipts for 1904. The difference in re- 
ceipts between this year and last is however materially counter- 
balanced by the decrease in expenditures, our disbursements 
for 1905 being $267.42 less than in 1904. 

Additions to the Library. 

The acqui.iitions made by the Library during the year consist 
of 1,173 books and pamphlets. Among the donors of books 
and objects of historical interest, to whom the Society owes 
grateful acknowledgement, may be mentioned: Messrs Philip L. 
Schuyler, Chiis. H. Hart, Dunbar Rowland, C. Ellis Stevens, 
Prof J. A. C. Chandler, Maryus Jones, Edward Wilson James, 
Howard R. Bayne, William Wallace Tooker, Byam K. Stevens, 
John Cropper, Ro. B. Munford, Jr., Heth Lorton, W. R. Gerard, 
W. G. Stanard, John F. Mayer, Burrows Bros. Co., Hon. Arm- 
stead C. Gordon, Judge W. J. Leake. Lt. Col. Jno. P. Nicholson, 
Maj. General Wm. Birney, Mrs Julia M. Pratt, Mrs. Margaret 
E. Crenshaw, Mrs. C. Hodges, {nee Crenshaw), Mrs. Frank W. 
Chamberlayne, Mrs. Phillips, Mrs J. B. Newton, Mrs. J. Jack- 
son. Mrs. James Pleasants, Miss Minnie Baughman and Miss 
Grace V. Bicknell. 

Of special interest and value have been the donations of Mrs. 
James Pleasants and Mr. Ro. B. Munford, Jr., both of Rich- 
mond, of Edward Wilson James, Esq., of Norfolk, and of Mrs. 
Margaret C Hodges of German town. Penn. 

Mrs. Pleasants has given us a very large number of the 
older English and American Magazines and Reviews, thusenab- 



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PROCEEDINGS. Vll 

ling US in several instances to complete our sets; and has also 
donated an almost complete set of Skinner's rare ** American 
Turf Register," besides many other interesting books and 
pamphlets. 

Messrs. James and Munford have also given substantial 
proof of their keen interest in the Society by donations of valu- 
able books, while Mrs. Hodges has given us (through Mr. C. A. 
Robinson) two bound volumes of the very rare *' Richmond 
Argus" (newspaper) for 1809 and 1810. 

As during the preceding year, the work of arranging col- 
lecting and binding our pamphlets and collection of serial 
publications issued by various historical, antiquarian and geneal- 
ogical societies, has gone steadily forward, and complete sets of 
these, arranged in order in a separate room of the Society 
House and thus easily accessible, now constitute a collection of 
documents of the highest moment to historical students and 
antiquarians. In addition to the bound volunies of this collec- 
tion, we have 97 binding-cases containing pamphlets which have 
been deemed worthy of preservation. 

The Library has been open to members and visitors from 
9 A. M. to 5 P. M. every day throughout the year (save on 
Sundays and legal holidays), and has been used by a large 
number of readers and students, who are always welcomed 
heartily to the Society House by our courteous Secretary and 
his assistant. 

During the past year, our expert copyist, having finished the 
transcripts of the somewhat confused " Executive Journals " of 
the Colonial Councils from 1738 to 1763, and having arranged 
them chronologically for future publication, has made substantial 
progress in transcribing five Revolutionary *' Order Books," 
belonging to our MS collection. These ** Order Books," often 
in the handwriting of illiterate "Orderly Sergeants," have 
been in many cases most difficult to decipher, but our copyist is 
an expert and the work is being done in very satisfactory and 
intelligent fashion. 

It is pertinent, just here, to make mention of the auspi- 
cious beginning of the publication of the "Journals of the House 
of Burgesses," under the direction of the State Library Board. 
The volume for 1773-75 has been issued under the editorship of 



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Vlll VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

John P. Kennedy, Elsq., State Librarian, and is not only most 
attractive to the bibliophile as a beautiful piece of book-making, 
but reflects the highest credit on its editor for the taste, learning 
and discretion displayed in the annotations. 

The hope expressed in the last annual report that the 
''Minutes of the General Court and Council of Virginia, 
1623-1632," as well as the many valuable unpublished letters 
and proclamations of that period relating to Virginia, now in the 
Congressional Library at Washington, might soon be issued 
by the Government in book form, is, we are glad to say, destined 
to be speedily realized. 

**The Minutes of the London Company" will appear first, 
to be followed soon by the priceless documents named above, 
supplemented by contemporaneous records taken from Eng- 
lish sources. 

Your Committee begs again to call the attention of the 
members of the Society and of our Senators and Representatives 
in Congress to the bill which will be offered at this session of 
the national legislature, providing for the establishment of a 
** United States Record Commission," similar to the commis- 
sions long established in England, France and other European 
countries, having for its aim the systematic investigation of 
foreign and state archives and cognate records dealing with the 
early exploration, colonization and subsequent development of 
our country — these investigations to be ultimately published by 
the Government in such shape as to be easily accessible to 
historical studenfs. The importance of such a commission was 
dwelt upon in our last annual report and is too obvious to need 
further argument. 

Gifts and Loans. 

Among gifts and loans, other than those of books and 
pamphlets, the following are worthy of special mention : 

Mrs. Frank W. Chamberlayne, of Richmond, has made 
a loan of the oil portrait of William Dandridge. It cannot, at 
present, be definitively stated whether the portrait is that of 
Captain William Dandridge, R. N., or of his son, who bore the 
same name, but the probabilities are that it is of the former. 
The same lady has also loaned the Society a handsome sword, 



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PROCEEDINGS. IX 

bearing on its blade the date '* April, 1738." This sword was 
presented to Captain William Dandridge by His Grace, John, 
Duke of Montague, who was First Lord of the Admirality at the 
time that William Dandridge was a Captain in the Royal Navy. 

One of the greatest attractions of the Society House is the 
large collection of original portraits of the Boiling family, kindly 
loaned by Richard Boiling, Esq., of this city. To this collection, 
the same public-spirited gentleman has this year added the 
portrait in oils of Elizabeth Boiling, wife of William Gay, Esq: 

Our sister organization, the Wisconsin Historical Society, 
has generously sent us two large sets of photographs of the 
Virginia Senate, and House of Delegates of the Session of 1857- 
58. These are of much greater moment than may appear at 
first sight, for among them are the "presentments," not extant 
elsewhere, of not a few of the chief actors in the great drama 
of the War between the States. 

Judge W. J. Leake has given the Society two MS books 
of decidedly unique value, one — the memorandum-book of 
Duncan Rose, merchant in Petersburg, Virginia, 1770—71, giv- 
ing the prices of all sorts of commodities -the other, the diary 
of a peddler, who journeyed on foot through Virginia in 1807 and 
1808. 

Mrs. Phillips sends us as a loan a most interesting relic — 
a certificate as to good character and reputable standing, given to 
Antoine Trabue, ancestor of a well-known Huguenot family of 
that name in this State, by Jean Combe, his pastor at Montauban, 
France, in 1688. 

It is not improbable that many such certificates were given 
by French pastors to members of their flocks about to emigrate 
after the ** Revocation" in 1685, but, so far as we know, this is 
the only one extant — at least in this State. 

Noteworthy also are the gifts of a photograph of ** Eastern 
Shore Chapel," Princess Anne Co., Virginia, (built 1754), from 
Edward Wilson James, Esq., a member of this Committee — of 
two clay roofing-tiles of colonial date and make, taken from the 
ruins of *' Warner Hall," in Gloucester, and presented by A. C. 
Withers, Esq., of that county through St. George T. C. 
Bryan, Sr., Esq. ;ofa cannon-ball from a Revolutionary battle-field, 
given by Mrs. Julia Snead of Fork Union, Virginia; of a very 



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X VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

quaint round travellings-trunk of about the year 1800, from Wil- 
liam L. Sheppard, Esq.; of a photogragti of Hayes-Barton, 
Devon, England, birth place of Sir Walter Raleigh, from W'lU 
liam G. Stanard, Esq. ; of a framed collection of photographs of 
Brington church, Northamptonshire, England, of the Washing- 
ton tombs in the church (with copies of the epitaphs), and of the 
Washington house at Brington, the gift of Miss Katherine 
Stiles ; of a large number of Confederate treasury-notes 
of various denominations from Capt. Jno. F. Mayer, who 
has also given a large contemporary lithograph of "Libby 
Prison" during the war; of several interesting MSS from Robert 
B. Munford, Jr., Esq.; of an engraved portrait of "James," a 
negro, who for loyal services during the Revolution was given 
his freedom by the State of Virginia. Accompanying this en- 
graving is SL /aC'Stmt/e of General Lafayette's certificate as to the 
high character of the colored patriot — both of them the gift of 
Mrs. J. Jackson of Macon, Georgia; of a photograph of the 
original portrait of George Sandys at Omsbersley Court, Eng- 
land, presented by Messrs. Burrows Brothers of Cleveland, Ohio; 
and of several articles of minor historical interest donated by 
George A. Barksdale, Esq., Dr. J. L. Miller and others. 

To all of these generous patrons, the Society desires to make 
its most grateful acknowledgments. 

It may be stated here that the collection of portraits, prints 
and photographs and the cab^inets of relics in the Society House 
have been, as heretofore, constantly drawn upon by artists en- 
gaged in illustrating historical works. 

Publication Committee. 

The Magazine has steadily adhered to its settled policy of 
printing only original "first-hand" documents. In the very 
rare cases where deviation has been made, it has been done for 
some reason, that, after careful consideration, has been deemed 
of sufficient weight to warrant the exception. As many of you 
are aware, this purpose, to publish only original material bear- 
ing on the history of Virginia, has characterized the conduct of 
the Society from its establishment more than seventy years ago, 
and has given to its publications a value that has amply vindi- 
cated the course pursued. 



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PROCEEDINGS. XI 

Some of its earlier work consisted in having hitherto unpub- 
lished documents printed in the pages of the "Southern Liter- 
ary Messenger," at that time one of the most conspicuous mag- 
azines in our periodical literature. Then followed from 1848 to 
1853 (inclusive) its own publication, The Virginia Historical 
Register, edited with marked ability by that scholarly antiqua- 
rian, William Maxwell, Esq. , and made up in chief measure of orig- 
inal colonial papers. These six volumes of the Register are now 
regarded as of "first-hand** authority and importance, as many 
of the originals of the documents printed have been lost or de- 
stroyed by fire. From 1854 to i860, at intervals, appeared, as 
successor to the Register, the Virginia Reporter, which com- 
prises among much matter of prime moment, Grigsby's Vir- 
ginia Convention of i82g-^^o. Of course, nothing was. done 
during the four years of war, nor for some years after, owing to 
the poverty of our people. But from 1882 to 1892 the Society 
published eleven volumes of its Collections, which compelled 
the attention of historical students at home and abroad, and 
confirmed the Society's place in the first rank of kindred organi- 
zations. 

Since that time, our Magazine, which has printed nearly 4,000 
pages of hitherto unpublished historical documents, has worthily 
carried out, under the able editorship of our Secretary, the pur- 
poses of the founders of the Society, and to-day we may claim, 
without undue immodesty, ranks with the foremost periodicals 
of its kind either at home or abroad. 

The conclusive proof of the value of the documentary matter 
thus published is found in the significant fact, that no historical 
work, treating in whole or in part of Virginia history, that has 
appeared within the last fifty years, fails to quote and make 
generous use of the material made accessible to students solely 
through the publications of the Society. 

Your Committee has requested one o\ its members to write 
a detailed history of the Society and this gentleman has con- 
sented to do so. 

During the current year, the work of the Magazine has related 
largely to a subject, which the historians of the colony have 
either ignored through lack of precise data, or at best barely 
touched upon, yet a matter of prime importance — namely, the 



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Xll VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

persistent determination of the colonists to extend their West- 
ern frontier despite the measures taken by the home government 
to restrict expansion in that direction. 

The *' Proceedings of the Virginia Committee of Correspon- 
dence," completed during the year, deals at considerable length 
and in most interesting fashion with these strenous efforts made 
by the colonists during 1769-71, to push their boundaries to the 
Southwest and to confirm that extension by permanent settle- 
ments. 

The completion during the year of the " Diaries of the Morav- 
ian Missionaries," describing the ministerial visits of these godly 
men through the western portion of Virginia from 1747 to 1753, 
demands renewed expression of high commendation for the 
erudite labors of Rev. W. J. Hinke, of Philadelphia, and 
Charles E. Kemper, Esq., of Washington, D. C, who, in con- 
junction, translated these " Diaries" from tl)e German originals 
at Bethlehem, Pa. 

Admirably translated and annotated with scholarly precision^ 
these " Diaries." the earliest contemporary records of travel 
through the Valley region, not only emphasize the great impor- 
tance of the German element in the settlement of Virginia, but 
constitute a veritable mine of information Tor all students of the 
early history of our Western border. 

In the April (1905) number of the Magazine began the pub- 
lication of every entry in the "Council Journals, 1721-3^" re- 
ferring to the Western portion of the colony and to colonial re- 
lations with the Indians. 

These extracts are edited by Charles E.Kemper, Esq., with a 
wealth of intimate local knowledge and an enthusiasm for his 
subject, which could only be found in one born and bred "a 
Virginian of the Valley." 

These entries will, it is expected, be concluded in the April 
number for 1906, and, when finished, must prove the definitive 
foundation for any full and accurate history of that great section 
of the Commonwealth. 

We have also published a series of papers, copied from the 
originals in the British Public Records Ofllice, dealing with the 
relations between Virginia and the Cherokees in 1769, together 
with the very interesting Journal of the "Virginia Commission- 



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PROCEEDINGS. XUl 

ers,'* who represented the colony in the preliminary negotia- 
tions with the Six Nations and in the resulting treaty made with 
them at Logg's Town in 1752. 

In our forthcoming January number, will be concluded the 
translation of the ** Vestry-Book of King William Parish" (the 
Huguenot settlement on the James), 1 709-1 750. 

Admirably translated from the quaint French of the time and 
annotated with apposite learning by Prof. R. H. Fife, of Wes- 
leyan University, Connecticut, a member of the Society, this 
Vestry-Book will be carefully indexed by the accomplished 
translator and issued by the Society during the coming year in an 
edition limited to 200 copies. 

Lothrop Withington, Esq., of London, to whom the Society 
already owes a heavy debt of gratitude for repeated services, 
has continued his very valuable "Gleanings" from English 
wills, derived from his own personal investigations and those of 
Henry F. Waters, Esq., of Boston, Mass. 

These abstracts of such wills as in any way refer to Virginia 
and Virginia colonists, have already afforded a notable fund of 
precise information touching the social condition of the early 
settlers and regarding the localities in the ** old country " from 
which they emigrated, and are of prime importance, not merely 
to the trained genealogist, but to the social and economic his- 
torian as well. 

Even the general reader may gather some suggestive results 
from a casual perusal of them. Taking at random a hundred in- 
dividuals, whose British homes are given as well as the social 
class to which they or their kinsmen belonged, we find, of this 
number 44 Londoners, i Scotchman, 4 Irishmen, while the re- 
maining 51 are from 26 different towns and counties in England. 

As regards social status, we find one of noble birth, 22 be- 
longing to the gentry, 10 clergymen, 10 merchants. 29 divided 
among various business avocations and handicrafts, and the 
remaining 28 undistinguishable. 

It is not, of course, to be understood that this proportion will 
hold good for the whole body of Virginia colonists, for, apait 
from the fact that more wills of Londoners are recorded in the 
Prerogative Court of Canterbury (the chief source of these 
** Gleanings") than are likely to be found elsewhere, it must be 



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XIV VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

borne in mind that the poorer classes made no wills, and that 
naturally the names of small yeoman, mechanics, laborers and 
servants are not to be found among probate records. 

There has been much other matter of substantial value and 
interest published in the Magazine — notably the ** Legislative 
Papers," of which two instalments were printed during the 
year. These papers consist of documents of all sorts — letters, 
petitions, reports and intercepted communications, which were 
sent directly to the Virginia legislature, or conmiunicated to 
that body by the Governor, 

We have caused careful copies to be made from the originals 
in the State Archives, containing a great amount of valuable 
matter for the years 1 774-1 776 (inclusive), and propose to con- 
tinue the series throughout the coming year. 

The mention of the State Archives makes this an opportune 
place to acknowledge the unvarying courtesy and consideration 
shown to the officers of the Society and especially to our copyist 
by the State Librarian, John P. Kennedy, Esq., and his staff. 

Another important |)ublication projected for 1906 is the printing 
in full in the Magazine of the "Journals of the Executive Coun- 
cil of Virginia." covering (though not cjinpletely) the period 
from 1738 to 1763. The only remaining records of these sessions 
of the Council (as Executive'i originally consisted of a number of 
small volumes, in sheets and unbound, but which were finally 
bound up at some indeterminate period since the Revolution in 
several large volumes, not observing, however, the proper 
sequence, and. through carelessness or ignorance on the part 
of their custodians, including papers dealing with extraneous 
subjects. 

Some of the.se ' 'Journals' ' are only rough drafts of minutes with 
omissions, while others are full and fair records of the proceedings 
of the Council. 

Accurate copies have been made of all these, and the trans- 
cripts, arranged in chronological sequence, will be published in 
full. 

The chief .significance of the earliest of these is that they con- 
stitute a continuation of the history of the Westward extension 
of the colony, taking up the subject, after a gap of four years, 
where the serir»s of extracts, now being published, leaves it off 



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PROCEEDINGS. XV 

Later on, they deal with the war between England and Spain 
and the part taken by Virginia in the expedition under Vernon 
against Carthagena — then with what used to be styled *'King 
George's War," followed by the minutes relating to the '* French 
and Indian War." 

As will be seen from this brief risume, these "Journals" 
cover a very important period in our history, yet they have 
never been published. They will, of course, be carefully anno- 
tated and edited. Charles E. Kemper, Esq., having kindly con- 
sented to elucidate by notes all references to the Western bor- 
der and to the Indians. 

A long and important article in the January (1906) number 
of the Magazine will be practically unpublished matter, though, 
in fact, a reprint of a very rare pamphlet belonging to the 
Society's collections. 

This pamphlet, printed at Williamsburg by order of Governor 
Dinwiddle, gives a very full account (including instructions, 
letters, journals and treaty -texts) of the treaties made between 
the colony and the Catawbas and Cherokees in 1756, the object 
of that treaty being, of course, to secure to the colonists the aid 
of these tribes against the French and their Indian allies. The 
extreme rarity and importance of the pamphlet have seemed 
to the " Publication Committee" to justify its being reprinted. 

Of other original matter of importance awaiting publication 
in due time in the Magazine, mention may be made of the 
following : (i) Abstracts and copies of records relating to Vir- 
ginia, made from the originals in the British Public Records 
Office ; (2) the *' Randolph MSS," containing most valuable 
17th century material ; (3) copies of early Virginia records from 
the originals in the Congressional Library ; (4) a collection of 
proclamations of the later colonial Governors, transcribed from 
the State Archives ; (5) the Corbin, Ludwell, Campbell, Massie 
and Lee MSS., all belonging to the Society's collections. 

Still another set of documents, that will appeal to patriotic 
interest everywhere, is a series of small MS. volumi^s containing 
brigade and regimental orders issued to the main army under 
Washington at Valley F'orge and elsewhere during the cam- 
paigns of 1778 and 1779. These order-books, which were given 
to the Society many years ago by the heirs of Col. Charles 



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XVI VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Dabney of the Virginia Line, and which afford a vivid and. at 
times, a somewhat startling picture of the life of the Revolution- 
ary soldier, and of the discipline or, rather, lack of discipline, 
prevailing at the time in the Continental army, we propose to 
begin publishing during the coming year. 

The few students who have given them close examination are 
unanimous in pronouncing them of the highest historical pith 
and interest. 

Deaths. 

The following members have died during the past year 
(1905): 

Life Members. 

Hon'l Benjamin Blake Minor, L L. D., of Richmond, Va. 

Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., of Boston, Mass. 

Annual Members. 

R. H. Cunningham, Henders')n, Kentucky. 

G. F. Edwards, Portsmouth, Virginia 

Major-General Fitzhugh Lee, Norfolk, Virginia. 

Mrs. Thos. L. Moore, Richmond, Virginia. 

Major, E. T. D. Mvers, Richmond, Virginia. 

J. A Patteson. New York City. 

W. B. Saunders, Philadelphia, Penn. 

Prof. Charles W. Shields, Princeton University, N. J. 

Alexander Tunstall, M. D., Norfolk, Virginia. 

In the death of the Honorable Benj. Blake Minor, we mourn 
the loss of the last surviver of the devoted little band of schol- 
ars and antiquarians, who in 1847 re-organized this Society, 
then in a moribund condition, and who by unremitting zeal and 
energy restored it to its former high position among kindred 
associations. 

Sprung of a long line of colonial and Revolutionary patriots, 
his loyalty to his state wa^ m irked by that note of personal de- 
votion that chiracterlzed the men and women of Virginia of 
his generation. 

Educated in chief measure at the University of Virginia, 
wh^re he graduated in a number of "schools." and at William 



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PROCEEDINGS. XVll 

and Mary College, where, before he was of age, he took his 
degree in law under Judge Beverly Tucker, he begun in 1840 
the pratice of law. But his love of letters was greater than that 
for the ** jealous mistress" he had chosen, and in 1843 he pur- 
chased The Southern Literary Messenger, which he edited for 
more than four years. This responsible position he finally re- 
linquished for educational work, in which he had become greatly 
interested and, after filling various positions in that field, was 
elected in i860 President of the University of Missouri. There 
his tenure of office was brief, the Federal military authorities 
closing that institution in March, 1862, because of the pro- 
nounced '* Southern Sympathies" of the President and Fac- 
ulty. 

Again Prof. Minor went back to school work, meanwhile a 
chieving marked success throughout the South and West as a 
popular lecturer t)n scientific and Biblical subjects. 

While practicing law. Prof. Minor "edited a new and complete 
edition of the Reports of Chancellor George Wythe (prefixing 
to it a memoir of that illustrious jurist), and, later on, brought 
out a new edition of Hening and Munford's Reports of the 
Decisions of the Supreme Court of Virginia. 

His contributions to magazines and to the daily and weekly 
press are too numerous for detailed notice here. 

Suffice it to say, in passing, that, possessed of an easy and 
graceful style and endowed with a retentive memory, that made 
instantly available a great wealth of reminiscences of the 
famous men of his earlier days, he contributed many articles of 
notable interest to various periodicals. 

Happily, he lived to see the appearance in book form of the 
darling of his old age — a history of The Southeryi Literary Mes- 
senger , 1 834-1 864, which forms a valuable commentary touch- 
ing the contributors and contributions to that famous old period- 
ical. His face and figure were long familiar on our streets, and 
many of us shall miss his cheery bearing and alacrity of move- 
ment, which were so conspicuous even after he had passed the 
span allotted by the Psalmist. 

To the last, his wiis an optimism that no vicissitudes of for- 
tune had been able to break, and though by reason of strength 
his days were fourscore, their strength was yet not labor and 



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XVlll VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

sorrow, but rather a placid, yet very real, interest in the affairs 
of life, and a serene enjoyment of what Cicero terms the 
*' pleasures of old age." 

He died in this city on the ist day of August, 1905, mourned 
by a large circle of friends and kindred. 

By order of the President, a beautiful wreath was placed upon 
his coffin in the name of the Society, and the Executive Com- 
mittee attended his funeral in a body. 

The death of Robert C. Winthrop, Jr., of Boston, snaps yet 
another of the many ties that bind the two great Commonwealths 
of Massachusetts and Virginia. 

Inheriting his distinguished father's affection and admiration 
for the Old Dominion, and nourished in the best traditions of 
the early days of the Republic, he was ever a staunch friend 
of the Society, and always evinced the liveliest interest in its 
purposes to perpetuate the names and virtues of the great Vir- 
ginians, who bore so great a part in founding the new nation, 
and in shaping its destinies. 

In the hearts of resident members of the .Society, grief is still 
fresh and poignant for the loss of two of our most distinguished 
fellow- members — one. Major Edmund T. D. Myers, a man of 
acute intellect, large acquirement and varied learning, whose 
high civic virtues, spotless integrity and scrupulous administration 
of the great trusts confided to him, commanded the admiration 
and confidence of the general public, while his many accom- 
plishments, ready wit and kindly sympathies claimed the affec- 
tion and regard of all who enjoyed the privilege of his personal 
friendship. The other, Major-General Fitzhugh Lee, was in 
every relation of life, public and private, worthy of the noble 
stock from which he sprung. Whether in field or forum, 
whether as the dashing beau sabreiir of the thrice glorious 
*'Army of Northern Virginia," or as Governor of this Com- 
monwealth, he ever " stood four square to all the winds that 
blew," and, having endeared himself to North and South alike 
by his splendid courage, decisive vigor and lovable personality, 
died at last mourned by a nation. 

Though trained to the profession of arms, and by instinct and 
tradition a soldier first of all, to whom the gaudiiim certaminis 
seemed the very breath of life, yet when peace came and grave 



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PROCEEDINGS. XIX 

civic trusts were confided to him, first by his mother-state as 
her Chief Executive, and later on by a re-united country as her 
diplomatic representative, he proved himself a sagacious and 
well-poised statesman, who knew how to keep himself well in 
hand, and in most critical events, bore himself with equa- 
ble prudence and serene dignity. His wit was keen and 
the lambent play of his humor illumined all that it touched, 
yet even when he was in the most exuberant spirits, one marked 
the saving grace of underlying common-sense, which was indeed 
the dominant note in his character, and which enabled him to 
penetrate intuitively to the very core of the most perplexing 
problems. 

To the general public throughout the whole country, he 
became a popular hero — to his Iriends and to the men who fol- 
lowed him through the dust and sweat of battle, he was 
always simply •*dear old Fitz." 

These simple words tell the whole story of his brilliant valor, 
his soldierly frankness, his generosity, simplicity and winning 
camaraderie. 

Those who witnessed the imposing pageant of his obsequies 
here in Richmond and who saw through misty eyes scores upon 
scores of bronzed and bearded veterans shaken with a passion 
of sobs, as they followed all that was mortal of their old leader to 
his last resting-place, could not doubt that a man who could 
compel such passionate grief, had knit these men to him by ties 
as beautiful and tender as they were stern and heroic. 

He came of a great race, the very pride and glory of our 
**01d Dominion" from Colonial days, a race that found its 
consummate flower in the foremost captain of our time, and it is 
his noblest epitaph to say simply and soberly that he wore 
worthily, and shed no mean lustre on, the historic name he bore. 

Miscellaneous. 

At the October meeting of the Executive Committee, Mr. 
Edward V. Valentine introduced a proposition to encourage the 
study of our county history and the investigation of county 
records, with a view to securing accurate data, that would serve 
for a series of county histories, which, all agree, are greatly 
needed. The matter was discussed at length and favorably, 



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XX VIRGINIA HISrORJCAL SOCIETY. 

the Committee deeming it probable that, if an annual prize of 
money were offered for monographs treating of county history, 
or some great event in county history, based in chief measure 
on original investigations of county records, the desired result 
would be attained. 

Messrs. Valentine, McCabe, and James having offered to fur- 
nish tbe necessary funds to test the experiment for the first three 
years, a resolution was offered and unanimously adopted, estab- 
lishing such annual prize in the Society's name, to be open to 
the competition of all students of Universities and Colleges in 
Virginia, and to be awarded only for original work based on 
direct investigation of county records, 

At the November meeting of the Committee, a sub-committee 
was appointed consisting of Messrs. Valentine, McCabe, Mitchell 
and James, with instructions to fornrulate details of the scheme, 
and to report back to the full Committee. 

The limits of this Annual Report preclude anything but the 
barest mention of the actual and prospective improvements at 
Jamestown. 

The great work that has engaged our sister society, '*The 
Association for the Preservation of Virginia Antiquities," has 
been accomplished. The sea-wall, designed to protect that 
historic site from the ravages of encroaching tides, and 
constructed under the supervision of our colleague on the Com- 
mittee, Samuel H. Yonge, Esq., U. S. Engineer in charge, has 
been practically finished, and will long remain an enduring 
monument to the devoted patriotism of these Virginia women. 
Plans have been perfected for a building to be erected by the 
''National Society of Colonial Dames." It will be a reproduc- 
tion, as nearly as possible, of the old church, whose ruined 
foundations have been uncovered by the excavations of recent 
years. These ruins will not be disturbed, but will be enclosed 
within the walls of the new structure. The floor of the new 
building is to consist of a granolithic pavement, and an iron 
railing, running around a.id inside the old foundations, will 
amply protect them. The " National Society of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution " has also made an appropriation for 
a building, which will probably be a reproduction of Raleigh's 
birth-place, Hayes-Barton in Devon, than which no more appro- 



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PROCEEDINGS. XXI 

priate model could be found. The building is to be at once a 
monument to the first permanent settlement in America and to 
the father of English colonization in the New World. 

The government of the United States has also appropriated 
$50,000 for a monument tp be erected somewhere on the island, 
but no site has as yet been chosen and no plans formulated. 

Plans are now under discussion for a monument to Pocahon- 
tas, the witchery of whose romantic devotion still casts its 
magic spell over gentle and simple alike, white the Episcopal 
** Diocese of Southern Virginia* 'proposes to erect, prior to the 
Tercentennial, a fitting memorial to the Rev. Robert Hunt, the 
first clergyman who ministered to the original settlers. 

By a wise amendment to the constitution of our Society, 
passed a few years ago, the President of the Society having 
served three consecutive terms of one year each, is not eligible 
to re-election until after an interim. 

Your retiring President, deeply sensible of the great honor 
thrice accorded him by your generous partiality, now desires to 
tender his most grateful acknowledgedments to the officers of 
the Society, to his faithful colleagues of the Executive Com- 
mittee, and to his fellow- members in general for the loyal and 
generous support they have given him during his whole tenure 
of office. 

He will ever count it the chief honor of his life that he has 
been thus long the executive head of a Society, that has done so 
much to perpetuate the glories of our mother state, and that from 
the time of John Marshall, its first President, down through 
more than seventy years, has borne upon its rolls the names of 
so many illustrious "Virginia Worthies." 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

W. Gordon McCabe, 

President. 

On the conclusion of the report, which was received with 
applause. President McCabe introduced Professor William Peter- 
field Trent, of Columbia University, who was to deliver the 
annual address. 

Professor Trent's address was on ''History as Literature — a 
plea for its more attractive presentation." It was a very valua- 
ble and scholarly paper, and was heard with great interest. 



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XXU VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

At the conclusion of Professor Trent's address a vote of thanks 
was tendered to him by the Society. 

The President then called for the report of the Nominating 
Committee, and Mr. Robert B. Munford Jr., Chairman of that 
Committee, made the following report: 

Report of Nominating Committee. 
Mr, President, Ladies and Gentlemen : 

Your committee being regretfully reminded that the pres- 
ent President of the Society, who has so ably directed its affairs 
for the past three years, is not eligible under the Constitution, 
for re-election at this meeting, we take pleasure in nominating 
as his successor Mr. Joseph Bryan, who has heretofore filled 
this office with signal success. 

The complete list of nominations submitted for such action 
as you may deem proper is as follows : 

President — ^Joseph Bryan. 

Vice-Presidents — Archer Anderson, Edward V. Valentine, 
Lyon G. Tyler. 

Corresponding Secretary and Libraian — William G. Stanard. 

Recording Secretary — David C. Richardson. 

Treasurer — Robert T. Brooke. 

Executive Committee — W. Gordon McCabe, C. V. Meredith, 
B. B. Munford, Edward W. James. Chas. W. Kent, W. Meade 
Clark, A. C. Gordon. S. S. P. Patteson, S. C. Mitchell, J. P. 
McGuire, S. H. Yonge, W. J. Leake. 

The officers nominated were unaminously elected. 

It was moved that the President vacate the chair, which was 
then occupied by Mr. D. C. Richardson. 

A motion was made, which was adopted by unanimous vote, 
thanking the retiring President for the zeal and ability with 
which he had filled his office for the past three years. 

The President resuming the chair made his acknowledge- 
ment in a few graceful words for the vote of thanks. 

There being no further business the meeting adjourned. 



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OFFICERS AND MEMBERS 



Virginia Historical Society, 

JANUARY, 1G06. 



President. 
Joseph Bryan, Richmond. Va. 

Vice- Presidents, 
Archer Anderson, Richmond, Va. 
Edward V. Valentine, Richmond, Va. 
Lyon G. Tyler, Williamsburg, Va. 

Corresponding Secretary and Librarian, 
William G. Stanard, Richmond, Va. 

Recordinj^ Secretary. 
David C. Richardson, Richmond, Va. 

Treasurer. 
Robert T. Brooke, Richmond, Va. 

Executive Committee. 

W.Gordon McCABE,Richmond,Va. A. C. Gordon, Staunton, Va. 
C. V. Meredith, Richmond. Va. S. S. P. Patteson, Richmond, Va. 
B. B. MuNFORD, Richmond, Va. S. C. Mitchell, Richmond, Va. 
Edw. Wilson James, Norfolk, Va. J P. McGuirk, Richmond, Va. 
Chas. W. Kent, University of \^a. S. H. Yonge, Richmond, Va. 
W. Meade Clark. Richmond, Va. W. J. Leake, Richmond, Va. 

and ex-officio, the President, Vice-Presidents, Se^^retaries, 
and Treasurer. 



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THE LIST OF MEMBERS. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Arber, Prof. Edward, BirmiiiKham, Ens:. 
Brown. Alexander, Norwood, Va. 
Gilbeil, Hon. J. W , New York. N. Y. 



Robertson, Captain Harrison Charlottes- 
ville, Va. 
Sportiird. Hon. A. R., Washington, D. C. 



Jones, Rev. John Wm., D. D., Richmond, Stewart, Mrs. John, Brook Hill, Va. 



V;i 
Keane, Prof. A. H., London, England. 



Whitsitt, Rev. W. H., D. D.. Richmond. Va. 



CORRESPO^NDING MEMBERS. 



Atrill, Chas. H., London, Eng'd. 
Bacon. H. F., Bury St. Edmund, Eng'd. 
Banks, Chas. b , M. D., Chelsea, Mass. 
Barber, E. A,, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Bryant, H. VV., Portland, Maine. 
Campeau, Hon., F. R. E., Ottawa, Canada. 
Carrington, Gen. H. B., New York, N. Y. 
Champiin, J. D., Jr., New York, N. Y. 
Craig, Isaac, Alleghany, Pa. 
Darling, Gen. C. VV., Ulica, N. Y. 
Drake, Col. S. A., Kennebunkport, Me. 
Fernow, Berthold, Washington, D. C. 
Green, Hon. S. A., M. D , Boston, Mass. 



Hart, Chas. H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hay den. Rev. H. E . Wilkes- Barre, Pa. 
Hoes, Rev. R. R., Washington, D. C. 
Judah, George F., Spanish Town, Jamaica. 
Nicholson, Col. J. P., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Phillimore, W. P. VV., London, Eng'd. 
Richemond, .Mons. Meschinel De, La Ro- 

chelle, France. 
Ro8e,Josiah, London, England. 
Ross, Hon. D. A., Quebec. Canada. 
Thwing, E. P., Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Wright, W. H. K., Plymouth, England. 



LIFE membh:rs. 



Adams, Wm. Newton, New York, N. Y. 
Alexander, H. M., New York, N. Y. 
Andrews, A. B , Raleigh. N. C. 
Andiews, O., Baltimore, Md. 
Bain, George M. Jr., Norfolk. Va. 
Barksdale, George A.. Richmond, V^a. 
Barksdale, R., .M. D., Petersburg, Va. 
Blackwell, Henr>, New York, N. Y. 
Brooks, P. C , Boston, Mass 
Bryan, Joseph, Richmond, Va. 
Bryan. Jonathan, Richmond, Va. 
Br>an. Robert C, Richmond, Va. 
Bryan, St George, Richmond, Va. 
Bryan, J Stewart, Richmond, Va. 
Byrd, George H., New York, N. Y. 
Cabell, J. Alston, Richmond, Va. 
Childers, Col. Gracey, Clarksville, Tenn. 
Cox. Mrs. Wm. Rufiin, Richmond, Va. 
Clement, Capt. H. C, U. S. A , Dallas, 
Texas. 



Clements, Mrs. Helen I., Saint I^uis, Mo. 
Cleburne, C. J., M. D., United States 

Navy. 
Conway. M. D., New York, N, Y. 
Cottrell, James L., Richmond, Va. 
Deats, H. E., Flemington. N. J. 
Downman, R. H , New Orleans, La. 
Garnett, Judge T. S., Norfolk, Va. 
Gary. J. A., Baltimore, Md. 
Gibbs. Mrs. \Mrginia B., Newport, R. I. 
Grafflin, John C, Baltimore, Md. 
Grandy, C. Wiley, Norfolk, Va. 
Gratz, Simon. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grigsby, H. C, Smithville, Va. 
Hearst, Mrs. Phoebe A., Pleasanton, Cal. 
Hughes, R. M., Norfolk, Va. 
Huntington, Archer M., Baychesler, N. Y. 
Ingalls, M. E., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Jones, Wm. Ellis, Richmond, Va. 
Keith, Charles P.. Philadelphia. Pa. 



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LIST OF MEMBERS. 



XXV 



Kinsolving, Walter O., Austin, Texas. 

Langhome, J. C, SUlem, Va. 

I..ee, Edmund, J., M D., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lee, General G. VV. C. Burks, Va. 

Lee, W. H., St. Louis Mo. 

Leigh, C. J , New York, N. Y. 

Logan, General T. M.. Howardsville, Va. 

Low, Hon. Seth, New York, N. Y. 

Mason. Wm. Peyton, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Miller, Dr. J. L., Ashland, Ky. 

McCormick, Cyrus Hall, Chicago, 111. 

Richardson, D. C, Richmond, Va. 

Rives, Hon. Geo. Lockhart. New York,N.Y. 

Robinson, Morgan P., Richmond, Va. 

Sheppard, Wm. L., Richmond, Va. 



StevenM Byam K., New York, N. Y. 

Stubbs. Wm. C, New Orleans, La. 

Talcolt, Col. T. M. R., Bon Air, Va. 

Tray lor, R. L., Memphis, Tenn. 

Van de Vyver, Rt. Rev. A., D. D., Rich- 
mond. Va. 

Waterman, W. H.. New Bedford, Mas.s. 

Webb, W. Seward, New York, N. Y. 

Whitehead, J. B.. Norfolk, Va. 

Wickham. Henr>' T., Richmond, Va. 

Williams, A. D., Richmond. Va. 

Williams, Thomas C, Richmond, Va. 

Winslow, H. M., Harriman, Tenn. 

Woodson, Capl. R. S., U. S. A., Fort Clark, 
Texas. 



ANNUAL MEMBERS. 



Abney, John R., Shinnecock Hills, Long 

Island. N Y. 
Adams, Gilmer S., Louisville, Ky. 
Adams, Walter, Frammgham. Mass. 
Addison E. B.. Richmond. Va. 
Adkins, S. B., Richmond. Va. 
Aguilar de, Mrs. F. B , St. Louis, Mo. 
Alexander, L. D., New York, N. Y. 
Alger, General Russell A . Detroit, Mich. 
Ambler, Ben. Mason. Parkersburg^ W. Va. 
Anderson, Colonel Archer. Richmond, Va. 
Anderson, B. R., M. D., Colorado Springs, 

Col. 
Anderson, Davis C, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Anderson, Edward L , Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Anderson, W. A., Richmond, Va. 
Andrews, Wm. H., Jr.. Columbus, Ohio. 
Atkinson. J. B.. Earlington, Ky. 
Atkinson, Thomas, Richmond, Va. 
Austin-Leigh, Richard A.. London, 

England. 
Avery, Dr. Elroy M., Cleveland, Ohio. 
Axtell, Decatur, Richmond. Va. 

fiagby. Mrs. Parke C, Richmond, Va. 
Baker. Colonel R. H.. Norfolk, Va. 
Baker. Mrs. R. M.. Hampton. Va. 
Banta, Theodore M.. New York, N. Y. 
Barbour, John S.. Culpeper, Va. 
Barr, H. D . Anniston, Ala. 
Barton, R. T , Winchester, Va. 
Battle. Prof. K. P., Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Bayne. Howard R., New York, N. Y. 
Beall, Mrs. H. A.. Parkesburg, Pa. 
Belmont, August, NcwYork, N. Y. 



Belt, Mrs. Eliz. Talbot, Millen, Ga. 

Best. Frank E., Chicago. 111. 

Billups, Celey, Norfolk, Va. 

Blackford, Prof.'L. M., Alexandria, Va. 

Blackstock, Ira B., Springfield, 111. 

Blair, Miss Louisa Coleman. Richmond, Va. 

Bland, Robert L., Weston, W. Va. 

Blow, Capt. W. W., U. S. A.', Monterey, 

Cal. 
Boisseau, P. H., Danville. Va. 
Boisseau, Sterling, Richmond. Va. 
Boiling, Stanhope. Richmond, Va. 
Bondurant. Dr. Eugene D., Mobile, Ala. 
Boyd, Mrs. Fred. W., Waukesha, Wis. 
Boykin, Colonel F. M., Richmond, Va. 
Boyle, Mrs. J. A., Davenport, Iowa. 
Branch. Major John P.. Richmond, Va. 
Brent, F. C, Pensacola, Florida. 
Brent, Frank P., Accomac county, Va. 
Brent, Mrs. Henry M., Lima. Peru. 
Bients, Judge Thomas H., Wallawalla, 

Washington. 
Brittain, Louis H., Englewood, N.J. 
Brodhead, Lucas, Versailles. Ky. 
Brockelt, Mrs. Albert D.. Alexandria, Va. 
Brooke, Richard N., Washington, D. C. 
Brooke, Robert T., Richmond, Va. 
Brooke, S. S., Roanoke, Va. 
Brooke, Prof. St. George T., Morgantown, 

W. Va. 
Brooks, Dr. Swepson J., Harrison, N. Y. 
Broun. Major T. L., Charleston, W. Va. 
Brown. Prof. W. G., Columbia. Mo. 
Bruce, Philip Alexander, Clarkton. Va. 
Bryan, Mrs. Joseph, Richmond, Va. 



*This list also includes subscribers to the Magazine. 



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XXVI 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Bryant, C. B., Martinsville. Va. 
Buchanan, Mrs. Lylle, Louisville, Ky. 
Bnchanan, Wra. I.. Lon<l<>n, I£iik. 
Budlong, Mrs. M. J., HartKml, Conn. 
Bulord, Commander M. B., U. S. N., Watch 

Hill. R. I. 
Bukey, Mrs. John Spencer, Vienna, Va. 
Bullard, Mrs. B. T., Savannah, Ga. 
Bullitt, W. C, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Burgis, Richard F., El Paso, Texas. 
Burruss, Mrs. Nathaniel, Norfolk, Va. 
Burwell, D. S., Norfolk, Va. 
Butler, Hugh, Denver, Col. 
Byrd, S. M., Eastman, Ga. 

California S. R., Los Angeles. Cal. 
Callahan, G. C, Philadelphia. Pa. 
Cameron, Alexander. Richmond, Va. 
Cameron, Col. Benehan, Stagville. N. C. 
Camp, Mrs. Francis M. G., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Cannon, G. Randolph, Richmond, Va. 
Capps, W. L., U. S. N.. Washington, D. C. 
Cargill, Mrs. S. R., Mason City, 111. 
Carne, Rev. R. L., Fort Monroe. Va. 
Carpenter, Franklin R., Denver, Col. 
Carter. Frank, Asheville. N. C. 
Cary, Wilson Miles, Baltimore, Md. 
Casey, Prof. Joseph T.. New York, N. Y. 
Chalmers, J. F., Richmond, Va. 
Chandler, Prof. J. A C, New York, N. Y. 
Chandler, Walter T., Chicago, Ills. 
Chauncy, Mrs. Agnes. Narberth. Pa. 
Chew, Philemon St. Louis, Mo. 
Chilton. H. P.. New York. N. Y. 
Chilton, Robert S., Toronto, Can. 
Chilton, W. B.. Washington, D C. 
Christian, Judge Geo. L., Richmond, Va. 
Christian. Walter, Richmond, Va. 
Clark, Mrs J. M., Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Clark, M. IL, Clarksville. Tenn. 
Clark, Rev. W. M., Richmond, Va. 
Clarke, P. N., Louisville. Ky. 
Clement, Mrs. N. E.. Chatham, Va. 
Clyde, W. P . New York, N. Y. 
Cocke, Charles P., New Orleans. La. 
Cocke, Dr. W. Irby, Port Washington, N. Y. 
Coe Brothers, Springfield, III. 
Coke, Captain John A., Richmond, Va. 
Cole, J. Edward, Norfolk, Va. 
Coleman, Charles W., Washington, D. C. 
Coles, Mrs. T. B.. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Colston, F M., Baltimore. Md. 
Colston, Edward. Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Conrad, Major Holmes. Winchester, Va. 
Constant, S. V.. New York, N. Y. 
Cooke, H. P., Richmond, Va. 
Cooke, Dr. G. Wythe, Washington, D. C. 



Cooke, John H., Richmond, Va. 
Coolidge, Archibald C, Cambridge, Mass. 
Corbin, Richard W.. Paris, France. 
Corning, John Herbert, Washington, D. C. 
Coutanl, Dr.R. S , Tarrytown, N. Y. 
Cox. Mrs. L. B.. Chicago, 111 
Craighill, Gen. W. P , U. S. A., Charles- 
town, W. Va. 
Crenshaw, M. Millson. Washington, D. C. 
Crenshaw, S. Dabney, Richmond, Va. 
Crocker, Major J. F.. Portsmouth, Va. 
Cropper, John, Washington, D. C. 
Crozer, Wm. A., New York, N. Y. 
Crump, Beverly T., Richmond. Va. 
Cullingworth, J. N., Richmond, Va. 
Cumming, Dr. Hugh S.. Angel Island, Cal. 
Cutshaw, Colonel W. E., Richmond, Va. 

Dabney, Prof. R H.. University of Va. 
Dandridgc. Miss Mary E., Cincinnati, O. 
Danforth, Elliott, New York. N. Y. 
Dangerfield, Elliott, New York, N. Y. 
Daniel, Hon. John W.. Lynchburg, Va. 
Daspit, Mrs. Harry, New Orleans, La. 
Daugherty, Wm. G., Baltimore, Md. 
Daughters A. R., Auburn, Ala. 
Daughters A. R , Washington, D. C. 
Davenport, G. A , Richmond, Va. 
Davies, W. G., New York. N. Y. 
Davis, Frederick L., Washington. D. C. 
Denham, Edward, New Bedford, Mass. 
Dickinson, Colonel A. G., New York, N. V. 
Dimmock. Capt. M. J.. Ric4imond, Va. 
Dismukes, Elisha P.. Columbus, Ga. 
Dobie. Louis T.. Richmond, Va. 
Dold. Dr. Wm. E , New York. N. Y. 
Donally, Mrs Miriam W., Charleston, W.Va. 
Donigan, Mrs. R. W., Louisville, Ky. 
Doran, J. J . Philadelphia, Pa. 
Doremus. Mrs. C. A.. New York, N. Y. 
Doyle, John A.. Pendarreii.Crickhowell.Eng. 
Draper. Mrs. James R., Oxford, Ala. 
Duke.JudgeR.T.W.,Jr , Charlottesville, Va. 
Dulaney, Col. R H.. Loudoun Co., Va. 
Dunlop, Boutwell, Washington. D. C. 
Dunn, John, M. D., Richmond, Va. 
Dupont, Col. H. A., Winterthur, Del. 
Dupuy, Rev. B. H., Davis, W. Va. 
Durrett, Colonel R. T , Louisville, Ky. 

Easley, J. C, Richmond, Va. 
East, John P., New York, N. Y. 
Eaton, George G., Washington, D. C. 
Edwards, Thos H., West Point, Va. 
Eggloston, J. D., Worsham. Va. 
Elkins. Hon. S. B., Elkins, W. Va. 
Ellinger, William, Fox Island, Va. 



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LIST OF MEMBERS. 



XXVll 



Ellis, Powhatan, Richmond, Va. 
Ely, Mrs. Jno H., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
English. Mrs. W. E., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Eppes. Miss Emily H., City Point, Va. 
Evans, J. D., Philadelphia. Pa. 
Eustace, Wm. Corcoran, Leesburg, Va. 

Farragut, Loyall, New York, New 
York. 

Farrar, B. J., Nashville, Tenn. 

Farrar, Edgar H., New Orleans, La. 

Feild. W. P , Little Rock, Ark. 

Ferrell, Mrs. Chas. C, Anson, Texas. 

Ficklen, Carter B., Havana, Cuba. 

Fife, Prof. R. H., Middletown, Conn. 

Fitzhugh, Gen. Chas. L., Alleghany, Pa. 

Fleet. Col. A. F..Supt. Culver Military' Acad- 
emy, Culver, Indiana. 

Fleming. R. I.. Washington, D. C. 

Folsom, Albert A., Brookline, Mass. 

Fontaine, W. W., Austin. Tex. 

Ford, VVorthington C, Washington, D. C. 

Fountain, General S. \V., U. S. A., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Fox, W. F. Richmond. Va. 

Franklin. James, Jr , Lynchburg. Va. 

French, Jno. Herndon, New York, N. Y. 

Fuller, Chief Justice Melville W., Wash- 
ington, D. C. 

Fulton, J. H., Wytheville, Vh. 

Gaines, C. Carrington, Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 
Gaines. R. H., New York, N. Y. 
Gaines, Maj. R. V., Mossingford, Va. 
Gantt, Judge J. B., Jefferson City, Mo. 
Garland, Spotswood, Wilmington. Del. 
George, Major J. P., Richmond, Va. 
Gibson. Rt. Rev. Robt. A., Richmond, Va. 
Gillis, H. A., Richmond, Va. 
Glover, Chas. C, Georgetown. D. C. 
Good. D. Sayler, Roanoke, Va. 
Goodwin, Rev. W. A. R., Williamsburg, 

Va. 
Goodwyn. Mrs. W. S., Emporia, Va. 
Gordon, Armstead C, Staunton, Va. 
Gordon Mrs. W. W., Richmond. Va. 
Gray, Henr>' W., Jr., Boston. Mass. 
Gray. W. F., Richmond. Va. 
Green, B. W.. M. D.. Charlottesville, Va. 
Greenway. G. C. M. D., Hot Springs. Ark. 
Grinnan, Judge Daniel. Richmond, Va. 
Guillardeu, W. L., New York, N. Y. 
Gummey, Charles F.. Jr.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Gunnell, Mrs. Allen T . Colorado Springs. 

Hagner, Judge A. B.. Washington, D. C. 
Hagan, John C , Richmond, Va. 



Hall. Charles H., M. D . Macon, Ga. 
Hamilton. Peter J., Mobile, Ala. 
Hamilton. S. M., Washington. D. C. 
Harris, John T.. Jr., Harrisonburg, Va. 
Harrison, Francis Burton, New York, N. Y. 
Harrison, Geo. T., M. D.. New York. N. Y. 
Harrison. Robert L.. New York, N. Y. 
Harrison, W. Preston, Chicago, III. 
Harvie, Miss Anne F., Richmond, Va. 
Hawes. S. H , Richmond, Va. 
Heffelfinger, Jacob, Hampton, Va. 
Henley, Mrs. Charles F., Mountainville, 

Tenn. 
Hemming, Mrs. C. C, Colorado Spgs., Col. 
Herbert, Colonel A . Alexandria. Va. 
Herndon, Flugene G., Germantown, Pa. 
Herndon, J. W., Alexandria, Va. 
Higgins, Mrs. D. F , Joliet, 111. 
Hill. W. M.. Richmond. Va. 
Hitt. Isaac R.. Washington, D. C. 
Hitt, Hon R. R.. Washington, D. C. 
Hobson. Henr>' W., Jr . Denver, Col. 
Hoen, E. A., Richmond, Va. 
Holt, R. O., Washington. D. C. 
Hord, Rev. A. H , Germantown. Pa. 
Horton, Mrs. H. C, Franklin, Tenn. 
Howard. Major McH.. Baltimore, Md. 
Howell, M. B. Nashville. Tenn. 
Huffmaster. J. T., Galveston, Texas. 
Hughes. Charles J., Jr., Denver, Co!. 
Hughes, A. S., Denver, Col. 
Hume, Frank, Washington, D. C. 
Hunnewell, J. F.. Charlestown. Mass. 
Hunt, Gaillard, Washington, D. C. 
Hunt. George W. P., Globe, Arizona. 
Hunter, James W., Norfolk. Va. 
Hunter, Major John. Jr.. Richmond, Va. 
Hunter, Mrs. Robert W , Alexandria, Va. 
Hurt, George A , Atlanta. Ga. 
Hutcheson. Mrs. J. C. Houston. Texas. 
Hutchins, W. S., Washington, D. C. 
Hutchinson, Francis M., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Hutzler, H. S.. Richmond. Va. 

Irving, A. D., Irvington, N. Y. 

Jacoby, H. F., New York, N. Y. 
James, Edward Wilson. Norfolk, Va. 
Jarman. Prof. J. L , Farmville, Va. 
Jeffress. T. F . Richmond. Va. 
Jeffrey , Miss Mary Lee, Marion, Va. 
Jeffries, Miss Susie A., Janesville, Wis. 
Jenkins, Edward Austin, Baltimore, Md. 
Jenkins, Luther H.. Richmond. Va. 
Jewett, W. K.. Colorado Spgs., Colorado. 
Johnson, B. F., Washington. D. C. 
Johnson, Capt. Wm. R., Crescent, W. Va. 



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XXVlll 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Johnston, Christopher, M. D , Baltimore, 
Md. 

Johnston, Dr. Geo. Ben., Richmond, Va. 

Johnston, Miss Mary, Richmond, Va. 

Johne, Adrian H.. New York, N. Y. 

Tones, Rev. J. William, Richmond, Va. 

Jones, W. Strother. Red Bank, N. J. 

Jones, Wm. L., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Jordan. Scott, Chicago, 111. 

Judkins, Mr«. W. D., Lausanne, Switzer- 
land. 

Keach, Mrs. O. A., Wichita, Kas. 
Keeling, Judge J. M., Norfolk, Va. 
Keim, Mrs. Betty L., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Keith, Albert G., Cambridge, Mass. 
Kelley, James, New York, N. Y. 
Kemper, Charles E., Washington, D. C. 
Kemper, Dr. G. W. H.. Muncie, Ind. 
Kemper, Willis M , Cincinnati Ohio. 
Kennedy, Mrs. S D.^ Warrenton, Va. 
Kent, Prof. C W., University of Va. 
Kidd, J. B., Richmond, Va. 
Kilby, Judge Wilbur J.. Suffolk, Va. 
Knabe. William. Baltimore, Md. 

Lambert, Mrs. W. H., Cermantown, Pa. 
La Monte. Geo. M., Bound Brook. N. J. 
Lancaster, R. A., Jr , Richmond, Va. 
Larus,John R., Baltimore, Md. 
Lassiter, Major F. R., Petersburg, Va. 
Lathrop. Bryan, Chicago. III. 
Lea, Mrs. Overton, Nashville, Tenn. 
Leach, J. Granville, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Leach, James A., Richmond. Va. 
Leake, Judge Wm. Josiah, Richmond, Va. 
Lee, Rev. Baker P., Lexington, Ky. 
Lee, Richard Bland, Jr., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Lee. Captain R. K., West Point. Va. 
Lee, R. E., ]r , Fairfax county, Va. 
Leib. Mrs Lida C. G., San Jos^, Cal. 
Le Grand. Mrs. j. H , Tyler, Tex. 
Leigh, Egbert G.. Jr , Richmond. Va. 
Letcher, S. Houston, Lexington, Va. 
Lincoln, Solomon, Boston. Mass. 
Livezey. John G , Newport News. Va. 
Lodge, Hon. H. C, Nahant, Mass. 
Logan, John S., St. Joseph. Mo. 
Logan. Walter S . New York, N. Y. 
Lomax, E. L , Omaha, Neb. 
Lorton, Heth, New York, N. Y. 
Loyall, Captain B. P.. Norfolk. Va. 
Lyon, Mrs. George A., Richmond, Va. 
Lyster, Mrs. H. F. L., Detroit. Mich. 

Maddox, E. L., Grand Rapids, Mich. 
Maddux, L. O., Cincinnatti, Ohio. 



Maffit, Mrs. John N.. New York, N. Y. 

Malone, Prof. T. H., Nashville, Tenn. 

Mallory, Lt.-Col. J. S., U. S. A , Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Markham, George D., St. Louis, Mo. 

Marshall, Thos. S , Salem, 111. 

.Matthews, Albert, Boston, Mass. 

Matthews. Dr. J. C, Griffin, Ga. 

Maury Colonel R. L., Richmond, \^a. 

Maxwell, John W. C. San Francisco. Cal. 

Mayo, E. C, Richmond, Va. 

Mayo, P. H., Richmond, Va. 

Mayo, Rev. Robt. A., West River, Md. 

Maynard, Mrs. John F., Utica, N. Y. 

Mcntz, Mrs. J. E , Philadelphia, Pa. 

Meredith. Charles V , Richmond. Va. 

Merrick, Dr. T. D., Richmond, Va. 

Merrill. Mrs. Lida W., Terre Haute, Ind. 

Meyers, Barton. Norfolk, Va. 

Meysenburg, Mrs. D. C, St. Louis, Mo. 

Miller, Rudolph P , New York. N. Y. 

Mitchell, Kirk wood. Richmond, Va. 

Mitchell, Prof. S. C, Richmond, Va. 

Moore. Josiah S., Richmond, Va. 

Moore, Warner. " 

Morehead, C. R., El Paso, Texas. 

Morgan, Dr. James D., Washington. D. C. 

Morrison, Mrs. Portia Lee. Farmville, Va. 

Morton, Dr. Daniel, St. Joseph, Mo. 

Morgan, Dr. D, H., U. S. N. 

Munford. B. B.. Richmond. Va. 

Munford, R. B., Jr . Richmond, Va. 

McAllister, J . T.. Hot Springs. Va. 

McBryde, Dr. J. M., Blacksburg, Va. 

McCabe, Capt W. Gordon, Richmond, Va. 

McCarty, Allen. Kansas City, Mo. 

McGuire, Mis. Frank H., Richmond, Va. 

McGuire.J. P. 

Mcllwaine, Prof. H. R., Hampden-Sidney 
College, Va. 

Mcllwaine. W. B., Petersburg, Va. 

McLcllan. Mrs. Aurora P., Athens, Ala. 

McLemore, Mrs. Elizabeth Pope, Memphis. 
Tenn. 

Munsell's Sons. J , Allenhurst, N. J. 

Nash, H. M.. M. D.. Norfolk, Va. 

Nay lor, Hugh E.. Front Royal, Va. 

Neardenwold, Mrs. Ida G.. Honolulu, H. I. 

Nelson, Rev. James, D. D., Womans' Col- 
lege, Richmond, Va. 

NichoUs, Rt. Rev. W. F., San Francisco, 
Cal. 

Noblit, J. H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 

Nolting, W. Otto, Richmond. Va. 

Ogden, Robt. C., New York. 



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LIST OF MEMBERS. 



XXIX 



Old, Major. W. W.. Norfolk. Va. 
Oliver. Dr. A. S., Elberton, Ga 
Otter. John B., Louisville, Ky. 
Owen, Thomas M., Montgomery, Ala. 

Page, Mrs. Mann, Elizabeth. N.J. 
Page. S. Davis. Philadelphia. Pa. 
Page. L. W., Washington. D. C. 
Page, Rose well, Richmond, Va. 
Page. Thomas Nelson, Washington. D. C. 
Palmer, Col. William H., Richmond, Va 
Parish, Robert L. Covington, Va. 
Parker, Col. John, Browsholme Hall, 

Clelhiroe, Lancashire, Eng. 
Parker, Mrs. H. H , Portland, Oregon. 
Parker, W S. R. Beaumont, Texas. 
Patterson. James A , Philadelphia, Pa. 
Patteson, S. S. P . Richmond, Va. 
Patteson, J. A.. New York. N. Y 
Pegram, John Combe, Providence, R. I. 
Penn, Mrs. James G., Danville. Va. 
Pennington, William C. Baltimore, Md. 
Pescud, Peter F., New Orleans, La. 
Peterkin, Mrs. George W., Parkersburg, 

W. Va. 
Pettus, William J., M. D., U. S. Marine 

Hospital Service, Washington. D, C. 
Phifer. Robert S.. Richmond Va. 
Ph'niry, Mrs Billups. Athens. Ga. 
Pickett, Thomas E., M. D., Maysville, Ky. 
Pinckard, W. P., Birmingham, Ala. 
Pittman, Mrs. H. D., St. Louis, Mo. 
Pitts, A. D., Selma, Ala. 
Poindexter, Charles E , Jefferson ville, Ind. 
Pollard, Henr>- R , Richmond. Va. 
Potwin, Mrs. Eliza Lewis. Evanslon, 111. 
Powell, J. E.. Washington, D. C 
Prentiss. Judge R. R., Suffolk. Va. 
Price, Judge John W.. Bristol Va. 
Price. Theodore H., New York, N. Y. 
Pritchett, Carr W , Independence, Mo. 
Pr\-or. Gen. Roger A . New York, N. Y. 
Pugh, A. H., Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Pullen, Charles L , New Orle <ns. La. 
Pulliam, D L., Manchester, Va. 
Purcell, Col. J. B., Richmond, Va. 

Raines, Judge C. W., Austin, Texas. 
Raines, Dr. Thomas H , Savannah. Ga. 
Ramsay, Mrs. Wm. .McC, Westover. Va 
Randolph, Beverley S , Berkeley Springs, 

W. Va. 
Randolph, Rt. Rev. A. M., D. D., Norfolk, 

Va. 
Randolph, G. A., Warrensburg. Ills 
Randolph, Dr. John, Arvonia, Va. 



Raymond. C. H., New York, N. Y. 
Read, Samuel R., Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Reinhkrt, J. W., Netherwood, N. J. 
Rennolds, Robert G.. Richmond, Va. 
Reeves, Mrs. W. E.. Newton, Iowa. 
Reynal-Upham, W. H.. Exmouth, Eng. 
Richardson, Albert Levin. Baltimore Md. 
Ridenour, Miss Emma B., Indianapolis, 

Ind. 
Ridgeley, Mrs. Jane M., Springfield. Ills. 
Rivers, Flournoy, Pulaski. Tenn. 
Rive*}, Mrs. VV. C, Washington. D. C. 
Rixey, Surgeon-General P. M , U. S. N., 

Washington, D. C. 
RoBards. Col John Lewis, Hannibal, Mo. 
Robertson, Mrs. Fred. S , Manchester, Va. 
Robertson. Thos. B., Eastville, Va. 
Robins. William B., Richmond. Va. 
Rockwell, .Mrs. Eckley. West Philadelphia, 

Pa. 
Roller. Gen. John E., Harrisonburg. Va. 
Roosevelt, Hon. Theodore, President ot 

the United States, Washington. D. C. 
Roper, Bartlett, 9>en.^ Petersburg, Va. 
Rowland, Miss Kate Mason, Georgetown, 

D. C. 
Ruggles. Mrs. Va. Cabell, Wauwatosa, Wis. 
Ryan. Thos. F., New York, N. Y. 

Sands, Conway R., Richmond, Va. 

Savage, N. R., Richmond. Va. 

Schindel, Mrs. D.J. Bvard, Fort Leaven- 
worth. Kansas. 

Schouler, Prof. James. Boston, N^ass. 

Scott. Mrs. .Matthew. Bloomington, Ills. 

Serimgeour. Mrs. Josephine N., Galveston, 
Texas. 

Shelby, Mrs. *5usan H.. Lexington. Ky. 

Shepherd, John, Chicago, Ills. 

Shippen, Mrs. Rebecca Lloyd. Baltimore, 
Md. 

Sitterding. Fritz. Richmond, Va. 

Slaughter, A. D , Chicago, 111. 

Smith. Mrs. K, P., Austin, Texas. 

Smith. Miss Frances M., Flast Oakland, 
Cal. 

Smith. Willis B., Richmond. Va. 

Smith. Mrs. Rosa Wright. Fort Hancock, 
N. Y. 

Smith. Lieutenant Commander R. C, V. 
S. N.. Washington. D C. 

Snowden. W. H.. Arcturus, Va. 

Spears. Harry D., New York. N Y. 

Spencer. Mrs. Samuel. Washington, D. C. 

Spencer, J. H., Martinsville. Va. 

Spots wood. Mrs. W. F., Petersburg, V^a. • 



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XXX 



VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



Stanard, W. G., Richmond, Va. 
Steiger, E., New York, N. Y. 
Stewart, Miss Annie C, Brook Hill, Va. 
Stewart, Miss E. Hope, '* 

Stewart, Miss Norma, " 

Stewart, Miss Lucy W., " 

Stewart, Rev. J. Calvin, Richmond, Va. 
Stewart, J. A., Louisville, Ky. 
Stimson, Mrs. Daniel M., New York. 
Stokes, Mrs. T. D., Elk Hill, Va. 
Stone, Rev. A. E., D. D., Peabody, Kansas 
Stone, Mrs. Mary F., Washington, D. C. 
Straler, Mrs. Charles G., Louisville, Ky. 
Stratton, Miss Mabel Ladd, Richmond, Va, 
Stringfellow, Maj. Chas S , Richmond,Va. 
Strother, Hon. P. W., Pearisburg. Va. 
Sturdevant, Col. R., Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
Summers. L P , Abingdon, Va. 
Sydenstricker, Edgar, Lynchburg. Va. 

Taber, Dr. George E., Richmond, Va. 
Taliaferro, Mrs. Richard P., Ware Neck, 

Va. 
Tandy, Mrs. L. M. B., Columbus. Mo. 
Tarvin, Mrs. J. P , Covington, Ky. 
Taylor, Dr. P ielding L., New York, N. Y. 
Taylor. W. E., Norfolk. Va. 
Terhune, Mrs. E. T., Pamplin Lake, N. J. 
Theus, Mrs. W. R. Jackson. Tenn. 
Thomas. Douglas H., Baltimore, Md. 
Thomis, Mrs. John B. Baltimore, Md. 
Thomas, John L., Washington, D. C. 
Thomas, R. S., Smithfield, Va. 
Thornton, G. B, Jr., Memphis, Tenn. 
Thornton, Mrs. Champe F., Richmond, Va. 
Throckmorton, C.Wickliffe, New York. N.Y 
ThrustoM, R. C. Ballard. Louisville, Ky. 
Todd, George D., Louisville, Ky. 
Torrencc, W. Clayton. Fredericksburg, Va 
Travers, S. W.. Richmond, Va. 
Tree, J. B.. 

Tucker, J. D.. South Boston, Va. 
Tunstall, Richard B.. Norfolk, Va. 
Tyler, vlrs. A. M., Richmond. Va. 
Tyler, Prof. Lyon G., Williamsburg, Va. 

Underwood, Gen. John C, Covington, Ky. 
Upshur, Rear Admiral John H., U. S. N., 

Washington, D. C. 
Upshur, r. T , Nassawaddox, Va. 

Valentine, B. B., Richmond, Va. 
Valentine, E. P., 
Valentine, K. V., " 

Valentine, G, G., Richmond, Va. 
Valentine, M S.,Jr., " 



Vermillion, John, Norfolk, Va 
Vinal, Alvin A., Accord, Mass. 
Vinsonhaler,^Judge D. M., Omaha, Neb. 

Waddell, J. A., Staunton, Va. - 
Waddey, Everett, Richmond, Va. 
Waggener, B. P , Atchinson, Kan. 
Walke, Cornelius. New York. N. Y. 
Walke, Mrs. Frank Anthony, Norfolk, Va. 
Walker. G. A., Richmond, Va. 
Walker, J. G., Richmond, Va. 
Walker, L. S., Woodstock, Va. 
Ward, Colonel John H., Louisville, Ky. 
Warren, L. R., Richmond. Va. 
Washington, Joseph E.,Wessyngton, Tenn. 
Washington, W. De H., New York. 
Waters, Arnold Elzey, Baltimore, Md. 
Watts, Judge Legh R.. Portsmouth, Va. 
Wayland, J. W., Bridgewater, Va. 
Weddell. A. W., Washington, D. C. 
Wellford. Judge B. R., Richmond. Va. 
Welch, Charles A., Boston, Mass. 
White, J. B., Kansas City, Mo. 
White, Miles, Jr., Baltimore, Md. 
White, W. T., Waco. Texas. 
Whitner. Charles F.. Atlanta, Ga. 
Whitsitt, Rev. W. H., D. D. Richmond, 

Va. 
Whiltet, Robert, Richmond, Va. 
Whilty.J. H., 

Willard, .Mrs. Joseph E.. Fairfax Co., Va. 
Williams, Mrs. F. L.. Bristol, R. I. 
Williams, Henry, Baltimore, Md. 
Williams, John G., Orange, Va. 
Williams. J. P., Savannah, Ga. 
.Williams. John Skelton. Richmond, Va. 
Williams, Mrs. Robt K., Norfolk, Va. 
Williams, S. D., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Williamson, D A., Covington, Va. 
Williamson, J. T., Culhoky, Tenn. 
Willis, Mrs S. A., Lichfield, Conn. 
Wilson, H. Allen, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Winston, James B., Glen Allen, Va. 
Wingo. Chas. E.. Richmond, Va. 
Wise, Mrs. Barton H., Richmond, Va. 
Wise, Prof. Henry A., Baltimore. Md. 
Wise, John C. M. D., U. S. N., Wash- 

iiigtt>n. n. C. 
Wise. Keai -Admiral Wm. C. U. S. N., 

Fort Monroe Va. 
Withers, Alfred D., Roane's. Va. 
Withers, H. C, Austin. Texas. 
Withington, Lothrop. London, Eng. 
Woodhull. Mrs. Oliver J., San Antonio, 

Texas. 
Woodhouse, Miss Adelaide, Nimrao Va 



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LIST OF MEMBERS. 



XXXI 



Woodhouse, J. Paul, Nimmo, Va. Yonge, Samuel H., Richmond, Va. 

Woods, Hon. Micajah, Charlottesville, Va. Young, Hon. B. H., Louisville, Ky. 

VVrenn, John H., Chicago. III. Young, Mrs. E. Alice, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Wright, Mrs. Selden S., San Francisco, 

Cal, Zimmer, W. L , Petersburg, Va. 

Wysor, Hairy B., Muncie, Indiana. Zimmer, W. L., Jr., Petersburg, Va. 



LIBRARIES — Annual Members. 



American Geographical Society, New York, 
N. Y. 

Boston Public Library, Boston, Mass. 
Brooklyn Public Library, Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Brooklyn Library, Montague St., Brooklyn, 

N. Y. 
Brown University Library, Providence,R I. 

Carnegie Library, Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Carnegie Free Libary. Alleghany, Pa. 
Carnegie Library, Atlanta, Ga. 
Carnegie Free Library, Nashville, Tenn. 
Central Library, Syracuse. N. Y. 
Chicago Public Library, Chicago, 111. 
Chicago University Library, Chicago, Ills. 
Cincinnati Public Library, Cincinnati, O. 
Cleveland, Ohio, Public Library. 
Cornell University Library, Ithaca, N. Y. 



Maine State Library-, Augusta, Me. 
Marietta College, Marietta, O. 
Massachusetts State Library, Boston, Mass. 
Mechanics Benevolent Association Library, 

Petersburg, Va. 
Mercantile Association Library, New York, 

N. Y 
Milwaukee Public Library, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Minneapolis Athenaeum Library, Minne- 

apolis, Minn. 

Navy Department Library, Washington, 

D. C. 
Nebraska University Library, Lincoln, 

Neb. 
Newberry Library', Chicago, 111. 
New Hampshire State Library, Concord, 

N. H. 
Norfolk Public Library, Norfolk, Va. 



Department of Archives and History, 

Jackson, Miss 
Detroit Public Library, Detroit, Mich. 



Oberlin College Library, Oberlln, Ohio. 
Ohio State Library, Columbus, O. 
Omaha Public Library, Omaha, Neb. 



Grosvenor Pub, Library, BuflTalo, N. Y. 

Hampton N. and A. Institute Library, 

Hampton, Va. 
Harvard University Library, Cambridge, 

.Mass. 
Hearst Free Library, Anaconda, Mon. 

Illinois Society S A. R., Chicago, Ills. 
Indiana Slate Library. Indianapolis, Ind. 
Iowa, Historical Dept. of, Des Moines, I. 

Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, 

Mo. 
Kansas Historical Society, Topeka, Kan. 



Parliament Library*. Ottawa, Canada. 

Peabody Institute, Baltimore, Md. 

Pennsylvania State Library, Harrisburg, 
Pa. 

Pennsvlvania State College, State College, 
Pa. 

Peoria Public Library, Peoria, III. 

Pequot Library, Soulhport, Conn. 

Philadc'lphia Institute Free Library, Chest- 
nut and iSih Sts.. Phildelphia, Pa. 

Philadel|>hia Law Association Library, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pratt Free Library. Baltimore, Md, 

Princeton University Library, Princeton. 
N.J. 



Lexington, Ky., Public Library. Randolph-Macon College Library, Ash- 
Library of Congress, Washington, D C. land, Va. 

Long Island Historical Society Library, Randolph- Macon Womaiis College. Col- 
Brooklyn, N. Y. lege Park, Va. 
Los Angeles, Cal., Public Library. 



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XXXll VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, University of Minnesota Library, Minne- 

Louisville, Ky. apolis, Minn. 

Springfield City Library Asso'n, Spring- University of Virginia Library, Charlottes- 
field, Mass. ville, Va. 

State Department Library, Washington, University of West Virginia Library, Mor- 

D. C. gantown, W. Va. 

Vanderbilt University Library, Nashville, 

Stanford University Library, Cal. Tenn. 

St. Louis Mercantile Library, St. Louis, Virginia State Library, Richmond, Va. 

Mo. Virginia Military Institute Library, Lex- 
ington, Va. 

Syracuse Public Library, Syracuse, N. Y. Virginia Polytechnic Institute Library, 

Toronto Public Librar>', Toronto, Canada. Blacksburg, Va. 

Trinity College, Durham, N. C. 

Trinity College Librar>', Hartford, Conn. 

Tulane University Library, New Orleans, West Virginia Historical Society Library, 

La. Charleston, W. Va. 

War Department Library, Washington, D. C. 

Union Theological Seminary Librar>', Wheeling Public Library, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Richmond, Va. Worcester Free Public Library, Worcester, 

University of California Library, Berkeley, Mass. 

Cal. Wyoming Historical and Geolosical Soci- 

University of Indiana Library, Blooming- ety, Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
ton. Ind. 

University of Michigan Library, Ann Ar- 
bor Mich. Yale University Library, New Haven, Con. 

LIBRARIES— Life Members. 

Astor Library, New York, N. Y. Library Company, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Boston Athenaeum Library, Boston. Mass. New York State Library, Albany, N. Y. 

California State Library, Sacramento, Cal. Richmond College Library, Richmond, Va. 

Columbia College Library, New York, Washington and Lee University Library, 
N. Y. Lexington, Va. 



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PUBLICATIONS OF THE VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 



IsTETTT- SERIES. 
"Collections of the Virginia Historical Society. New Series. Edited 
by R. A. Brock, Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society, 
(Seal) Richmond, Va. Published by the Society.** Eleven annual 
Tolumes, uniform. 8vo., cloth, issued 1882-92, carefully indexed, as 
follows : 

The Official Letters of Alexander Spotswood, Lieutenant-Governor of 
the Colony of Virginia, 17 10- 1722. Now first printed from the manu- 
script in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, with an 
introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two Volumes. Portrait and Arms, pp xxi-179 and vii-368. 8 00 

The Official Records of Robert Dinwiddie, Lieutenant-Governor of the 
Colony of Virginia, 1751-1758. Now first pnnted from the manu- 
script in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society, with an 
introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 

Two volumes, pp. lxix-538 and xviH-768. Portraits, fac-stmile of letters of presentation 
from W. W. Corcoran, cut ot Mace of Borough of Norfolk, Va., and reproduction of the 
Map of Virginia, Maryland, Delaware and Pennsylvania, engraved for Jefferson's Notes 
on Virginia, 1787. 6 6 

Documents, Chiefly Unpublished, Relating to the Huguenot Emigration 
to Virginia and to the Settlement at Manakin Town, with an Appen- 
dix of Genealogies, presenting data of the Fontaine, Maury, Dupuy, 
Trabue, Marye. Chastaine, Cocke and other Families. 
Pages xxi-247. Contains/ar-jtrntT^of plan of "King William's Town." 2 60 

Miscellaneous Papers, 1 672-1 865. Now first printed from the manuscript 
in the Collections of the Virginia Historical Society. Comprising 
Charter of the Royal African Co., 1672; Report on the Huguenot 
Settlement 1700; Papers of George Gilmer of "Pen Park," 1775-78; 
Orderly Book of Capt. George Stubblefield, 1776; Career of the 
Iron-clad Virginia, 1862; Memorial of Johnson's Island, 1862-4; Beale's 
Cav. Brigade Parole, 1865. 
Pages viii-374. a W 

Abstract of the Proceedings of the Virginia Company of London, 1619- 
1624, Prepared from the Records in the Library of Congress by 
Conway Robinson, with an introduction and notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two volumes. Pages xlvii-218 and 500. The introduction contains a valuable critical 

CMAy on the sources of information for the student of Virginia History. 6 OO 

The History of the Virginia Federal Convention of 1788, with some ac- 
count of the Eminent Virginians of that era who were members of 
the Body, by Hugh Blair Grigsby. LL. D., with a Biographical 
Sketch of the Author and illustrative notes. Vols. I and II. 
Two volumes. Pages xxvii-372 and 411. 6 00 

Proceedings of the Virginia Historical Society at the Annual Meeting 
held December 21-22, 1891, with Historical Papers read on the oc- 
casion and others. 
Pages xix-386. Contains papers on the Virginia Committee of Correspondence and the 
Can for the First Congress; Historical Elements in Virginia Education and Literary 
Eflbrt; Notes on Recent Work in Southern History; Ancient Epitaphs and Descriptions 
in York and James City Counties, Washington's First Election to the House of Burgesses; 
Snithfield Churchy built in 1632, Richmond's First Academy ; Facts from the Accomac 
CottDty Records, Relating to Bacon's Rebellion ; Thomas Hansford, first Martyr to Ameri- 
can Lft>erty ; Journal of Captain Charles Lewis in Washington's Expedition against the 
French in 1755; Orderly Books of Major Wm. Heatb ^77, and Capt. Robert Gamble, 1779,^ 
■ad Memoir of General John Cropper. ^.^^^^^ ^^ 



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The full set of these publications can be obtained for $3 1 .OO, or the separate 
publications, at the prices named. 

CATALOGUE OF THE MANUSCRIPTS in the Collection of the Virginia Historical Society 
and also of Sonic Printed Papers. Compiled by order of the Executive Committee. Supplement lo 
the Virgifiia Magazine of History and Biography. Richmond : Wm. Ellis Jones, Printer. 1901. 

Paper, 120 pp. Price, |i. 00. Sent free to members and subscribers on receipt of 10 cents for post- 
age, &c. 

AN ABRIDGMENT OF THE LAWS OF VIRGINL\. Compiled in 1694. From the origiaa 
manuscripts in the collection of the V^irginia H slorical Society. So pp., paper. Richmond, 1903. 

An edition of 300 copies, reprinted from the / 'irginia Magazine of Histoty and Biography, Price, 
$1.00. 

Discount allowed to booksellers. 

Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. 

The Virginia Magazine of History' and Biography, Edited to October 
ist, 1898, by Philip A. Bruce, and since that date by William G. Stanard, 
Corresponding Secretary and Librarian of the Society, (Seal). Pub- 
lished Quarterly by the Virginia Historical Society, Richmond, Va. 
House of the Society^ No. 707 East Franklin St. 

VoLUMK I — Octavo, pp. 484-viii-xxvi-xxxii. 

Coniains cut of the Society's Building:, accounts of the proceedings and transactions ol 
the Society for the year 1893, and many exceedingly valuable, original historical documents 
and papers which have never before appeared in print. Among others may be mentioned. 
Discourse of the London Company on its administration of Virginia affairs, 1607-1624; 
Abstracts of Colonial Patents in the Register of the Virginia Land Ofiice, beginning in 1624, 
with full genealogical notes and an extended Genealogy of the Claiborne Family ; The 
Mutiny in Virginia in 1635: Samuel Matthew's Letter and Sir John Harvey's Declaration; 
Speech of Governor Berkeley and Decluratipn of the Assembly with reference to the change 
of Government in England and the passage of the First Navigation Act of 1651 ; Petition 
of the Planters of Virginia and Mar>land in opposition to the Navigation Act of 1661 
Bacon's Rebellion, 1676; His three proclamations, Letters of Sherwood and Ludwell, Pro- 
posals of Smith and Ludwell, and Thomas Bacon's Petition ; Letters of William Fitzhugh 
(1650-1701), a Leading Lawyer and Planter of Virgmia, with a genealogical account of the 
Fitzhughs in England ; Lists of Public Officers in the various Counties in Virginia late in 
the 17th and early in the i8th centuries ; Roster of Soldiers in the French and Indian Wars 
onder Colonel Washington ; Officers. Seamen and Marines in the Virginia Navy of the 
Revolution ; Roll %yi the 4th Virginia Regiment in the Revolution ; Diary of Captain John 
Davis of the Pennsylvania Line in the Vorktown Campaign ; General George Rogers 
Clark,— Roll of the Illinois and Crockett's Regiments and the Expedition to Vincennes ; 
Department of '* Historical Notes and Queries/' containing contributions by Hon. Wm. 
Wirt Henr>', and many other items of value; Department of "Book Reviews;" A full 
Index. ft •• 

Volume II— Octavo, pp. 482-ii-xxiv. 

Contains a full account of the proceedings and transactions of the Society for the 
year 1894, and the following list of articles copied from the original documents : Report 
of Governor and Council on the Condition of Affairs in Virginia in 1626; Abstracts of Col- 
onial Patents in the Register of the Virgmia Land Office, with full genealogical notes and 
extended enealogies of the Fleet. Robins and Thoroughgood Families; Reports of Griev- 
ances by the Counties of Virginia afler the suppression of Bacon's Insurrection ; A full his- 
tory of the First Legislative Assembly ever held in America (that in 1619 at Jamestown), 
written by Hon. Wm. Wirt Henr>- ; The concluding list of Virgmia Soldiers engaged in 
the French and Indian Wars ; The opening lists of the Virginia Officers and Men in the 
Continental Line, compiled from official sources ; A valuable account of the Indian Wars 
in Augusta County, by Mr. Joseph A. Waddell, with the lists of the killed and wounded ; 
Instructions to Governor Yeardley in 1618 and i6a6, and to Governor Berkeley in 1641 ; Let- 
ters of William Fitzhugh continued, with full genealogical notes; The Will of William 
Fitzhugh : A complete List of Public Officers in Virginia in 1702 and 1714 ; Valuable ac- 
count of Horse Racing in Virginia, by Mr. Wm. G. SUnard ; The first instalment of an 
article on Robert Beverley and his Descendants ; Wills of Richard kemp and Rev. John 
Lawrence, both bearing the date of the 17th century ; Short Biographies of all the memheri 
of the Virginia Historical Society who died in the course of 1894 ; An elaborate Genealogy 
of the Flournoy Family, throwing light on the Huguenot Emigration ; Department of His- 

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3 

torical Notes and Queries, containing many valuable short historical papers and also Gene- 
alogical contributions, among which the Carr and Landon Genealogies are of special 
interest ; Department of Book Reviews, containing critical articles by well known historical 
scholars. Volume II, like Volume I, has been thoroughly indexed. 5 00 

Volume III — Octavo, pp. 46o-ii<xxviii. 

Contains a full account of the proceedings of the Society for the year 1895, and the follow- 
ing list of articles copied from original documents : Letters of William Fitzhugh con- 
tinued; Instructions to Berkeley, 1662: Virginia under Governors Harvey and Gooch : 
Causes of Discontent leading to the Insurrection of 1666 under Bacon ; Will of Benjamin 
Harrison the Elder ; Culpeper's Report on Virginia in 1683 ; Defense of Col. Kdward Hill ; 
A series of Colonial letters written by William Byrd, Jr., Thomas Ludwell, Robert Carter, 
Richard Lee, and Sir John Randolph ; Decisions of the General Court of Virginia, 1626- 
1628, first instalment: Indictment of Governor Nicholson by the leading members of his 
Council; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, extending to 1635, with full genealogical 
notes; A History of Robert Beverley and his Descendants, with interesting Wills and new 
matter obtained from England ; Genealogies of the Flournoy, Cocke, Carr, Todd and Chap- 
pell Families : Voluminous Historical Notes and Queries of extraordinary original value, 
relating to a great variety of subjects ; Department of Book Reviews, containing articles 
from the pens of well known historical scholars. Volume III, like the preceding Volumes, 
has a full index. 5 00 

VOLUMB IV— Octavo, pp 492-i-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of Contents: A Marriage Agreement between John 
Custis and his wife ; A Perswasive to Towns and Cohabitation by Rev. Francis Mackemicr 
1705; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents for 1635-6; Army Supplies in the Revolution. 
Series of original letters by Judge Innes; Attacks by the Dutch on Virginia Fleet, 1667 : 
Boundary Line Proceedings, for V'irginia and North Carolina 1710; Charges against Spots- 
wood by House of Burgess 17 19 ; Council Proceedings, 1716-1717; Decisions of Virginia 
General Court, 1626-2S Continued ; Defence of Colonel Edward Hill Contitiued Depositions 
of Revolutionary Soldiers from County records ; Early Spotsylvania Marriage Licenses: 
Genealogy — Cocke, Flournoy, Trabue, Jones, and Rootes Families: Historical Notes ami 
Queries ; A full list of House of Burgesses, 1766 to 1775; Instructions to Governor Francis 
Nicholson; Letter and Proclamation of Argall; Letters of William Fitzhugh ; Narrative of 
Bacon's Rebellion by the English Commissioners ; full abstracts of Northampton County 
Records in i7lh Century ; Ordeal of Touch in Colonial Virginia; Patent of Auditor an. I 
Surveyor-General ; Prince George County Records with much information as to its families ; 
Proceedings of Visitors of William and Mary Collegt;, 1716; A list of Shareholders in Lon- 
don Company, 1783 ; also of Slave Owners in Spotsylvania County, 17S3 ; Virginia Tobacco 
in Russia in 17th Century. Volume IV has a full index. 5 00 

VoLUMS V — Octavo, pp. 472-i-xxiii. 

Contains the following general lisi of Contents: Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents, 
1636; and Patents and Grants, 1769; Rappahannock and Isle of Wight Wills. 17th Century ; 
Government of Virginia, 1666; Bacon's Men in Surry ; and List of Persons Suffering by the 
Rebellion; Boundary Line Proceedings, 1710; Carter Papers; Case of Anthony Pen ton ; 
Colonial and Revolutionary Letters, Miscellaneous; Early Episcopacy in Accomac ; Depo- 
sitions of Continental Soldiers; Families of Lower Norfolk and Princess Anne Counties: 
Genealogy of the Cocke, Godwin, Waike, Moseley. Markham, Carr, Hughes, Winston, 
Calvert, Parker and Brockenbrough Families; General Court Decisions, 1640, 1641, 1666; 
Memoranda Relating to the House of Burgesses, 1685-91 ; Journal of John Barnwell in Vani- 
maasee War; Letters of Lafayette in Yorktown Campaign ; Letters of William Fitzhugh ; 
Letters to Thomas Adams, 1769-71 ; Public Officers, 1 78 1 ; Northampton County Records, 
17th Centur>'; List, Oath and Duties of Viewers of Tobacco Crop, 1639; Petition of Jobu 
Mercer Respecting Marboro Town; Price Lists and Diary of Colonel Fleming, 1788-98: 
• Abstract of Title to Greenspring ; Tithables of Lancaster Coun y, I7lh Century; The Me- 
lierrin Indians: The Trial of Criminal Cases in i8th Century. Volume V has a full index 5 00 

VoLUMB VI— Octavo, pp. 4/3-iv-xxiii. 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents: The Aca'iians in Virginia; 
Letters to Thomas Adams ; Journal of John Barnwell ; Vindication ol Sir William Berk- 
eley; Will of Mrs. Mary Willing Byrd; Inventory of Robert Carter; Virginia Society t»f 
the Cincinnati ; Epitaphs at Brandon ; Trustees of Hampden-Sidney College ; Jacobitism in 
Virginia; Abstracts of Virginia Land Patents; Letters of Lafayette; A New Clue to the 
Lee Ancestry i Letters of General Henry Lee ; Sir Thomas Smythe's Reply to Bargrave : 
Virsinia in 1633, 1623-4, and 1771 ; Virginia Borrowing from Spain ; The Virginia Company 
and the Honse of Commons ; Virginia Militia in the Revolution ; Washington's Capitu- 
latioa at Fort Necessity; Election of Washmgton (Poll List), 1758: Burning of William 
and Mary College, 1705; Reminiscences of Western Virginia, 1770-90, &c., &c., &c., with 
f«U index 5 00 



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Volume VII — Octavo, pp. 476-iv-xix. 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents : An Additional Chapter to 
Waddell's Histor>' of Augusta County ; Augusta County Marriage Licenses, 1749-73 ; In- 
ventory of Estate of Hon. Robert Carter: Extracts from Register of Farnham Parish, 
Richmond County, Va.; Trustees of Hampden-Sidney College ; Indians of Southern Vir- 
ginia, 1650-171 1 ; John Paul Jones, as a Citizen of Virginia ; Abstracts of Virginia Land 
Patents ; The Case of Captain John Martin ; Papers Relating to the Administration of 
Governor Nicholson and to the Founding of William and Mary College ; Richmond During 
the War of 1812; Virginia Census of 1624-5: Virginia in 1624-30— Abstracts and Copies 
rom the English Public Records; Virginia Game and Field Sports, 1739; Virginia Militia 
in the Revolution ; Unpublished Letters of Washington ; Wills, Genealogies, Notes and 
Queries, &c., with a full index. ft 00 

Volume VIII— Octavo, pp. 481 -iv-xxvii. , 

Contains the following general list of principal Contents : The Indians of Southern Vir- 
ginia; The Virginia and North Carolina Boundary Line, 1711 ; Inventory of Lord Fairfax; 
Letters from Mrs. Ralph Izard to Mrs. Wm. Lee; Virginia in 1631-35, from English Public 
Records ; Papers Relating to the Administration of Governor Nicholson and to the Found- 
ing of William and Mar>' College ; Notes from the Council and General Court Records, 1641- 
77; Unpublished Letters of Jefferson ; Extracts from Virginia County Records ; Letters 0/ 
Harrison Gray and Harrison Gray, Jr.; Members of the House of Burgesses, Lists; Militia 
Companies of Augusta county, 1742; Petitions of Virginia Towns for Establishment of 
Branches of the United States Bank, 1791 ; Virginia Newspapers in Public Libraries; Life 
of General Joseph Martin ; Register of St. Paul's Parish, King George county ; Proceedings 
of the House of Burgesses, 1^^2-1661 ; Delegates Irom Kanawha ; Ter-Centcnar>' of James- 
town ; Virginia Militia in the Revolution ; Wills, Epitaphs, Genealogies, Notes and Queries, 
Book Reviews, otc, with a full index. ft 00 

Volume TX— Octavo, pp. 480-iv-xx. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents : Virginia Newspapers in Pub- 
lic Libraries; Papers Relating to the Administration of Governor Nicholson and the 
Founding of William and Mary College ; Virginia in 1636-38, from the English Public Re- 
cord Office; Notes from the Council and General Court Records, 16^1-1678; Virginia As- 
sembly of 1641 ; Selections from the Campbell Papters; Virginia Militia in the Revolution; 
Will of William Byrd, 3d: Eastern Shore History; Letters of William Byrd, 2d; Henry 
County, Virginia, Records ; Diary of a Prisoner of War at Quebec ; Sainsbury's Abstracts 
and the Colonial History of Virginia; Abridgment of the Laws of Virginia, 1694; The 
Germans of the Valley; Virginia Legislative Documents : John Brown Letters; History of 
the Battle of Point Pleasant ; Wills, Genealogies, Notes aud Queries, Book Reviews, ike., 
with a full index. ft 00 

Volume X— Octavo, pp. 480-xvi-x. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents: Virginia Legislative Docu- 
ments; John Brown Letters; The Germans of the Valley; Abridgment of Virginia I^ws, 
1694; Eastern Shore Histor>'; Extracts from Records of Henry County, Va ; Batttle of Point 
Pleasant; Ferrar Papers, from Magdalene College. Cambridge; Pioneer Days in Alleghany 
County; Tithables of Northampton County, 1666; Vir|?iiiia Newspapers in Public Libraries; 
Slave Owners of Westmoreland County, 1782; Virginia in 1636- '38, from English Public 
Record Office; Virginia Gleanings in England (wills, &c.); Virginia Militia in the Revolu- 
tion; Virginia Committee of Correspondence, i759-'67: Virginia Finances, i776-'qo; Vir- 
ginia Colonial Records; Books in Colonial Virginia; Wills, Genealogies, Notes and Queries, 
00k Reviews, Ac, with several illustrations and fac-similes and a full index. ft 00 

Volume XI— Octavo, pp. 490-iv-xxv. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents: Proceediiif^ of Va. Committee 
of Correspondence, 1759-64; John Brown Letters: Surrender of Virginia in 1651-2; Ferrar 
Papers at Magdalene College. Cambridge; Virginia in 1638-39 from the English Public 
Records; Some Colonial Virginia Records; Virginia Gleanings in England (wills)* Isle of 
Wight County Records; Virginia Militia in the Revolution; Records of Henr>- County, 
Va.; Moravian Diaries of Travels Through Virginia, 1743. &c ; Virginians Governors of 
Other States; The " Chesapeake War: " Orderiy Book of James Newell, Pt. Pleasant 
Campaign, 1774; The Site of Old "James Towne,'" 1607-98; Council and General Court 
Records, 1640-41; Vestry Book of King William Parish (Huguenot), 1707-50; Jame.stown 
and the A. P. V. A.; Prosecution of Baptist Ministers 1771-73; Wills, Genealogies, Notes 
and Queries, Book Reviews, Ac, with several illustrations, fac-similes, and map, and a full 
index. ft 00 

Volume XII— Octavo, pp. 487-iv-xxxii. 

Contains the following general table of principal Contents : Proceedings of the Virginia 
Committee of Corresponocnce. 1759-70; Vestry Book of King William Parish (Huguenot). 
1707-1750; The Site of Old "James Towne," 1607-1698; Moravian Diaries of Travel 
Through Virginia. 1747 Ac; Virginia Gleanings in England (wills); Extracts from Vir- 
ginia County Records; Letters ofJefTerson, Ac, in McHenry Papers; Virginia Militia in 
the Revolution: The Early Westward Movement of Virginia, 1722-34, as shown by the 
Virginia Council Journals; Virginia in 1639 abstracts and copies from English Public 
Record Office; Virginia Legislative Papers 1774; Address of Council, 171^, and Resolu- 
tions of Burgesses, 1712; Wills, Genealogies Notes and Queries. Book Reviews, with sev- 
eral illustrations, plans, fac similes, Ac, and a full index. ft 00 

Discount allowed to booksellers. 



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The Lower Norfolk County Virginia Antiquary. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME IV. p^cE, 

Land and Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1778 i 

St. Paul's Church, Norfolk, 1848 8 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 9 

Slave Owners, P. A. Co., 1779 26 

Norfolk Academy, 1848 29 

The Church in Lower Norfolk County 32 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1850 34 

Soap and Candles, 1767 35 

Witchcraft in Virginia 36 

Price of Sugar, 1787 .-. 36 

Schools 36 

The Marchant Family 39 

Princess Anne County Marria)s:es 40 

A Valuable Relic 46 

The Owners of Watches, Princess Anne County, 1859 47 

The Norfolk and Richmon(tf team Boat, 18 16 49 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 54 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1780 64 

Miss Serena Holden and Her School 69 

Trinity Church, Portsmouth 72 

A List of White Persons and Houses in Princess Anne in March, 1785 75 

Undertakers Bill, 1809 75 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, i860 76 

Billiards 77 

The Church in Lower Norfolk County 78 

M^irriages Performed by Rev. Smith Sherwood 89 

Marriages Performed by Rev. H. J. Chandler 93 

Miss Serena Holden and Her School 96 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 100 

Duelling , 106 

Norfolk Schools, 1795 106 

The Church in Lower Norfolk County 109 

Store Bill, 1753 113 

Property Owners, Princess Anne County, 1782 1 14 

Large Families in P. A. Co 146 

Princess Anne Marriages 147 

The Norfolk Academy, 1840 150 

Free and Slave, Norfolk County, 1782 163 

Carriage Owners, Princess Anne County, 1852 166 

Miss Serena Holden and Her School 169 

Abstracts from Norfolk County Marriage Bonds 170 

Slave Owners, Princess Anne County, 1840 174 

Store Bill, 1807 182 

The Church in Lower Norfolk County 183 

Rev. George HaI#on 184 

An Invitation from General Arnold 186 

Baltimore: Press of the Friedenwald Company, 1904. 

Circulation Private. ap.i904-i)T. 






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JOHN F. GLENN, Cashier. GEO. H. KEESEE, Asst. Cashier. 
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FOR CATALOGUE, ADDRESS 

CHRISTOPHER TOMPKINS, M. D., Dean, 
326 College Street, Richmond, Va. 

apl.<ftjy.05 

FENLAND NOTES AND QUERIES, 

Edited by REV. W. D. SWEETING. M.A., 

Holy Trinity Vicarage, Rotherhithe, London, S. E. 

A Quarterly Journal devoted to the Antiquities, Geology, Natural 
Features, Parochial Records, Family History, Legends and Traditions. 
Folk Lore, Curious Customs, etc., of the Fenland, in the Counties of 
Huntingdon, Cambridge. Lincoln, Northampton, Norfolk and Suffolk. 
Price IS. 6d. per quarter, by post, is. 8d. A year's subscription, if paid in 
advance, 6s — post free. Vols. 1,11, 111 and IV now ready, neatly bound, 
leather back, cloth sides, gilt top. lettered, 15s. each. 

Peterborough : Geo. C. Caster, Market Place. 

London: Simpkin Marshall & Co., Ld.; and Elliot Stock. 



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Largest collection of Original Old Pieces in the State. Antique 
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OUR ANCESTORS. 

THE HISTORY OF FAMILIES OF PITTSYL- 
VANIA COUNTY, VIRGINIA. 



Pittsylvania County is the largest county in the State of Virginia, 
and was once even larger, embracing the territory now known as the 
counties of Patrick and Henry. Being incorporated in 1767, Pittsyl- 
vania has had an interesting history of its own for 138 years, covering 
the turbulent times of the Revolution. 

The records and will books of the county are very complete and 
thorough, and in a perfect state of preservation, giving a list of all offi- 
cers in the early magisterial courts; many rpsters of officers and soldiers 
of the Revolution and Civil Wars and numbers of declarations of the 
Revolutionary soldiers. 

From this county have gone many pioneers of iron nerve, who 
settled the vast South and West, and the descendants of these men 
would find the records of this county of untold interest. 

I am in a position to furnish copies of and data from these records 
at a nominal price, and would be pleased to correspond with any one 
desiring information concerning them. 

Mrs. NATHANIEL E. CLEMENT, 
Member of Virginia Historical Society, 

Chatham, Pittsylvania County, Va. 



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Correspondence and lists of books solicited from 
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The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography. 

The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, which is issued 
quarterly by the Virginia Historical Society, will accept for publica- 
tion a limited number of advertisements of a suitable character. 

The special attention of Schools, Colleges and Booksellers are 
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of advertising them. 

WILLIAM G. STANARD, Editor, 

707 E, Franklin^ Richmond^ Va, 



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Mentbem art rcqu«Hted to solidt coritril)utiaiis of books, itiaps, pof* 
uai tH, nod maniiscripts ol hbtoricaJ value or importaoce, parUciilarly 
idcb as mv^y throw U^bt upon the poUllcal, social or relJKicMis life cif 
ihe people af Virc^iJiia. 

*rhc Sockiy w^ become tb€ custodian of Audi artkle& ot \hm ctmr* 
^trr as the poescssotv may from any caitse be unwUluig lo give, nod 
in die case of faintly papers or other mantiacrtpts wbkh it may be 
tint]eftirab]e to puliliiihr it will, upoa request, keep them co<ifidenH»l. 

M^A Urgxi Jire finra/ safe has been seaircd and placed in the 
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In the vlci^itiidcit of war, aod the repealed removals to which the 
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It i$ evpecialty desirable to secure as complete a collection as possi- 
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Any t>ook or paujplilct wtitiefi by a naJive or resident of Virginia, 
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or Virginians, will be accepted and prederved. 

TAe S&ci^ly requests ^fts 9/ pk^ipgmphs {i^a^mel si^e) c/ ^M fi^^* 
iraiis q/ Virginians^ or pk&fagrapks, driumngs^ &c.^ &f Conis pf 
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$5.00 per Annum. Single No. $1.50 

THE 

VIRGINIA MAGAZINE 

OF 

HISTORY AND BIOGRAPHY. 




PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY THE 

VIRGINIA HISTORICAL SOCIETY, 
RICHMOND, VA. 



VOL. XIII— No. 4. AHRIL, 1G06. 



Entered at the Postotlice at Richmond, Va., as Second-dasa Matter. 

VVM. ELLIS JONES. PRINTER, ^'^'^'^^"^ ^^ 
1307 R* Franklin St. 



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PUBLICATION COMMITTEE. 



ARCHER ANDERSON, CHAS. V. MEREDITH, 
E. W. JAMES, E. V. VALENTINE, 

Rev. W. MEADE CLARK. 



EDITOR OF THE MAGAZINE, 

WILLIAM G. STANARD. 



CONTENTS. 

1. 1 Revolutionary Army Orders, for the Main Army 

under Washington, 1778-1779 337 

2. The Early Westward Movement of Virginia, 

1722-34 351 

3. Virginia in 1639-40, From the English Public 

Record Office 375 

4. Council and General Court Records 389 

5. Virginia Gleanings in England 402 

6. Meade, R. K., Letter of 409 

7. Virginia I^egislative Papi^rrA, 1774-75 411 

8. Historical and Genealogical Notes and Queries 425 

9. Fredericksburg Virginia Gazette, 1787-1803. 

Memoranda from 425 

10. Genealogy 441 

The Brent, Brooke and Mallory* Families. 

11. Book Reviews 447 

12. History in its Relation to Literature. An Ad- 

dress Before the Annual Meeting of the Vir- 
ginia Historical Society. By Prof. W. P. Trent. 451 



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THE 

Virginia Magazine 

OF 

HISTORY AND BJOGI^PHY. 



Vol. XIIL APRIL, 1906. No. 4. 

REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ORDERS 
For the Main Army under Washington. 1778-1779. 



(From Originals in the Collection of the Virginia Historical Society.) 



[Among the manuscript collections of the Virginia Historical 
Society are five small volumes somewhat worn and faded, and 
frequently the writing is difficult to read. 

These books were presented to the Society many years ago 
by the heirs of Col. Charles Dabney, amongr whose papers they 
were found. 

Charles Dabney was Lieutenant Colonel of the Second Vir- 
ginia Regiment, and is on the roll as such on June 17th, 1778. 
He subsequently served as Colonel of a Virginia State Regi- 
ment from 1778 to 1781. These orders — none of which have 
ever been printed — cover the operations of the main army under 
General Washington nearly throughout the momentous years 
1778 and 1779. 

From the writing and spelling it is evident that most of them 
have been copied in the books by persons of very limited educa- 
tion, who have apparently, as far as spelling is concerned, not 
transcribed the orders correctly. From other sources it is known 
that many of the persons who issued these orders were better ac- 
quainted with the ordinary rules of spelling than those who made 



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338 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

the copies now preserved. It appears from the dates given on 
the fly leaf of the first volume, that several months in the early 
part of 1778 are missing from the record.] 



Revolutionary Order Book — Headquarters, Jan. 1778 
TO Headquarters, June 3, 1778. 

May 3 1778.* 

Brigadier to morrow Maxwell* F. O. Colo Wesson' & Maj' 

Brigade Major Bannester* 

The Inspector from Larnards* 

For Detachment Cololonel Hall & Major Sumner. 

In future no Guard in Camp is to be suffered to remain on 
Duty more than 48 hours without being releived. On Monday 
next the several Brigades will begin their exercise at Six o' Clock 
and Continue till 8 O* Clock in the morning and from 5 to 6 
O'clock in the afternoon the men for Guard not to attend the 
exercise. The Medicine Chests from L* Sterlings' Devision to 
be sent to the Yellow Springs immediately to be Refilled by the 
Apothecary Gen' — The Paymaster of the Marqus' and Gen* 
Wains Devision are to Call on the P. M. Gen' for a months Pay 
next Monday. Poors', Glovers* the Barren De Calbs on Tues- 
day, Weedens*" Muhlenburgs the Artillery & Maxwells on 

* At the date upon which these orders begin the American Army un- 
der General Washington was still stationed at Valley Forge where it 
had passed its famous winter. 

On June 18th the British Forces evacuated Philadelphia. 

* Brigadier William Maxwell of New Jersey. 
•Col. James Wesson of Massachusetts. 

* Probably Captain Seth Banister of Massachusetts. 

* Brigadier General Ebenezer Lamed of Massachusetts. 

•Maj. Gen. William Alexander, commonly called from the Scottish 
title claimed by him Lord Sterling. 
^ Marquis de la Fayette. 
® Brigadier General Enoch Poor of New Jersey. 

* Brigadier General John Glover of Massachusetts. 
^® Brigadier General George Weedon of Virginia. 



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REVOLUTIONARY ARMY RECORDS. 339 

Wednesday, late Conways, Varnoms" & Mclntoshes" on Thurs- 
day. 

for Guard ... ^ic * * 

W. Command . . * * * 

Muhlenburgs * * * 



May 4 1778. 

A Brigade Court Martial whereof Major * * * is Presi- 
dent to set to morrow at the President's Quarters at 10 O* Clock 
for the Tryal of all the Prisoners in the Brigade. G. O. Bri- 
gadier Gen* to morrow Waine F. O. Col** Martin Maj' Hust. 
Brigade Major Haskell." The Inspector from Pattersons." 

The Sub & Brigade Inspectors are to be pointedly exact in 
pursueing the writen instructions of the Inspector General — 
that the strictest uniformity may be observed throughout the 
whole army they are not to practice a single manoeuver without 
his directions nor any method different from it any alteration or 
innovation will again plunge the army into that contrarity and 
confusion from which it is indeavouring to amend. The hours 
of exercise are also to be exactly attended to by each Brigade 
for which — that no difference may arrise in account of watches, 
* * * attention is to be added to the Order of the ist April 
last, for * * * them by that of the Adjutant Gen* . 

The Commander in Chief requests the Brigadiers & Officers 
Commanding Brigades will see that these Orders are strictly 
complyed with, hopeing we shall not slip the golden oppertunity 
which now presents its self of disciplineing the army and that 
each Brigade will vie with each other in arriveing at the highest 
and earliest pitch of excellency. For the sake of decency the 
Gen* hopes that the Commanding Officers of Regiments will 
order their necessaries to be hid with boughs or hurdles — the last 
tho more troublesome at first will allways serve as they can easyly 



" Brigadier General James M. Varnum of Rhode Island. 
" Brigadier General Lachlan Mcintosh of Georgia. 
" Major Elnathan Haskell of Massachusetts. 
** Brig. General John Paterson of Massachusetts. 



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340 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

be removed — stricter attention is Requested to the Order 15th 
last March respecting hides. 





C 


S 


S 


c 


P 


for Guard 


I. 


- 


I. 


I. 


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Weeks Comm* 


. 


I. 


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0. 


2 


Muhlenburgs 


. 


- 


- 


I. 


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Court Martial 


2. 


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- 


- 


- 




3- 


2. 


I. 


2. 


17 



Head Quarters May 5 1778. 

Brigadier to morrow Poor F. O. Colo^ Nagle" & Maj' Gilman. 

Brigade Major Seely" Inspector from VVeedons Brigade. 

Aaron Ogden" Esq' is appointed Brigade Major in General 
* * * Brigade and is to be obeyed and Respected as such. 

Mr. Davis Bevan is appointed by the Quarter Master 

superinting the Artificers and to Deliver out boards plank &c 
in future. Therefore, when boards or planks are wanting or 
Artificers are necessary to do any Jobs in the army, an Order 
signed by a General Officer or Officers Commanding Brigades 
or Brigade Quarter Masters and derected to Mr. Bevan at 
Sullivans Bridge will be duly attended to. If their are any 
Comb makers in the Army the Brigadiers and Officers Com- 
manding Brigades are desired to make a return of them to the 
Adjutant General. A Flag goes into Philadelphia next fry- 
day. At a Gen* Court Martial whereof Col* Tyler was 
President at the Gulph Mills May 2, '78, Jn* Maneld 
a Soldier in Colonel Henry Jackson's** Regiment Tryed 
for desertion from his Post whilst on Gentry and unanimously 
found guilty of a Breach of Article the i" Section 6 & Article 
the 6 Section 13 of the articles of war and unanimously Sentenced 
to be hanged by the neck till he is Dead. At a Brigade Court 



"Col. Geo. Nagel of Pennsylvania. 
*• Major Isaac Seeley of Pennsylvania. 
" Aaron Ogden of New Jersey. 

"Col. Henry Jackson of Massachusetts. The Virginia Historical 
Society possesses many of his letters and other papers. 



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REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ORDERS. 341 

Martial whereof Colonel Becker was President Ap* 24, '78 
Thomas Hartnel a soldier in the 2 Pennsylvania Regiment tryed 
for deserting to the Enimy found Guilty and unanimously Sen- 
tanced to be hanged by the neck till he is Dead, his Excellency 
the Commander in Chief approves the foregoing Sentences. 
The General Court Martial whereof Colonel Tyler was Presidant 
is disolved. • 

S C P 

for Guard . . . . i. - 6 

W Command ... 3 

Muhlenburgs . i. i. 10 

2. I. 19 

After General Orders 



Mav 5 1778. 

* It haveing pleased the almighty Ruler of the Universe Propi- 
tiously to defend the Cause of the United American States and 
finally by Raising us up a powerfuU friend amongst the Princes 
of the Earth to establish our Liberties & Independance upon 
lasting foundations — it becomes us to set apart a day for great- 
fully acknowledging the Divine Goodness, & Celebrating the 
important event which we owe to his benign interposition 
— the several Brigades are to assemble for that purpose at 
9 O'clock tomorrow morning when their Chaplains will Com- 
municate the Inteligence contained in the Pennsylvania Gazette 
of the 2 Instant, and offer a thanks given and deliver a discourse 
suitable to the occasion — at half after ten o'Clock a Cannon will 
be fired which is to be a signal for the men to be under arras. 
The Brigade Inspectors will then inspect their dress and arms, 
form the Battilions according to the instructions given them, and 
announce to the Commanding officer of Brigade that the Bat- 
tilions are formed — the Brigadier or Commandants will then 
appoint the Field Officers to Command the Battilions after which 
Battilions will be ordered to load and Ground their arms — at 



♦On February 6, 1778, France made treaties of friendship and com- 
merce and of defensive alliance with the United States, and in March 
formally communicated to England her treaties with America. 



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842 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

half after eleven a second Cannon will be fired as a signal for 
the march, upon which the several Brigades will begin their 
march, by wheeling to the Right by Platoons, and proceed by 
the nearest way to the left of their ground in the new Position, 
this will be pointed out by the Brigade Inspectors, a third signal 
will be given upon which their will be a discharge of 13 Ginnon, 
when the 13th * * a runing fire of the Infantry will begin 
on the right of * * * , & Continuing thro out the whole 
frunt line — it will then be taken up on the left of 2d line and . 
Continue to the Right — upon a signal Given the whole army 
will Huzza long live the King of France. The Artillery then 
begin again and fires 13 Rounds this will be succeeded by a second 
General discharge of Musketry in runing fire — Huzza and long 
live the Friendly Europion Powers — then the last discharge of 
13 Pieces of Artillery will be given, followed by a General run- 
ing fire & Huzza to the American States, their will be no exer- 
cise in the morning and the dayly guards will not Parade till 
after the Feu de Joye is finished — when the Brigade Majors will 
march them out to the Grand Parade, the Adjutants then tell 
off their Battalions with 8 Platoons and the Commanding Officers 
re-conduct them to their Camps marching from the left. Maj' 
Gen* Lord Sterling will Command on the Right — the Marquis 
De La Fayette on the left — and Baron De Calb the 2d Line- 
each Major General will Conduct the first Brigade of his Com- 
mand to its Ground. The other Brigades will be conducted by 
their Commanding officers in seperate Columns, the post of 
each Brigade will be pointed out by the Baron Stubins** Aids. 
Maj' Walker will attend L* Sterling, Maj' Duponso the Marquis 

De La Fayette & Linfant, the Baron De Calb — the line 

is to be formed Interval of a foot between the Files. 

Each man is to have a Jill of Rum, the Quarter Masters of the 
several Brigades are to apply to Adjutant General for an Order 
on the Commissary of Military Stores for the number of Blank 
Cartridges that may be wanted. 



" Baron Von Steuben. 



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REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ORDER^. 848 

Head Quarters Valley Forge May 6 1778. 
S S C P 
Detail for Guard . . i. i. - 5 

Muhlenburgs . . . ^ - i. 9 

I. 1. I. 14 



Head Quarters May 7th 1778. 

Brigadier to morrow Muhlenburg — F. O. Colo Farmer** & 
Maj' Varnom. 

Brigade Major Tynechie Inspector from Muhlenburgs. 

Brigadier Maxwell Colo Broadhead" Colo* Bruger L* Col* 
Sherman" L* Colo Haskell Maj' Hopkins & Major Porter. 

The Detachment to be on the Grand parade this evening at 4 
O'clock — 12 Captains 24 subs 24 Serjeants, 24 Corporals, 4 
Drums & fifes & 576 Privates to be paraded this afternoon pre- 
paired for a weeks Command — two light field pieces are to be 
attached to this Command, Colo Vanskykers Regiment will 
mount the Piquet at Cuckolds town till further orders. 

W" Barber" Fsq' is appointed A. D. C. to Maj' Gen* Lord 

Sterling Vice Williams resigned and is to be respected 

accordingly. 

The Hono Congress have been pleased by a resolution of the 
3 February last to require all officers as well Civell as Military 
holding Commissions under them to take and subscribe the fol- 
lowing Oath or Affirmation according to the Circumstances of 
the Parties: 

I do acknowledge the united States of America to be free In- 
dependant & Soverign States and declair the people thereof 
owe no allegiance or obediance to George the 3d of Great 
Britain, and I renounce refuse and abjure any allegiance to 
him and I do swear (or Affirm) that I will to the utmost of my 
power support maintain and defend the said United States 

^ Probably Col. Lewis Farmer of Pennsylvania. 
" Col. Daniel Broadhead of Pennsylvania. 
"Lt. Col. Isaac Sherman of Connecticut. 
"Maj. Wm. Barber of New Jersey. 



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844 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

against the said King George the 3d his heirs and successors 
and his and their abettors assistants and adherants and will serve 

the said United State in the office of which I now hold 

with fidelity, according to my best skill and understanding. 

Sworn to before me at . 

In order to accomplish this very interesting and essential 
work as early as possible. The following Officers are to ad- 
minister the oath and give Certificates to Officers of the Division 
or Brigade and Corps set against their names, including the 
Staff— Maj' Gen* L* Sterling, Marquis De La Fayette, to those 
of Woodfords"* and Scotts** Brigades. Baron De Calb to those 
of Glovers and Learnards Brigades, Brig' Mcintosh to those of 
the North Carolina Brigades, Brig' Gen* Maxwell to those of his 
own Brigade, Brigadier General Knox to those of the Artillery 
in Camp and Officers of Military Stores, Brigadier Gen* Poor to 
those of his own Brigade, Brigadier Gen* Varnum to those of 
his own and Huntingtons Brigades, Brig' Gen' Patterson to 
those of his own brigade. Brig' Waine to those of the ist & 2d 
Pensylvania brigades, Brigadier Muhlenburg to those of his 
own and Weedons brigades. Printed copies of the oath will be 
immediately lodged in the hands of the Major and Brigadier 
Generals to facilitate the business, the Gen* administering the 
oaths will keep a duplicate of the same and to grant Certificates 
when it is made — in the beginning of the oath, the Names, Rank 
and Corps of the party makeing it are to be inserted, the duplicate 
of the oath and Certificate is to be returned to head Quarters by 
the Generals who will also keep those respecting the officers of 
each Regiment by themselves, that an arraingment of the whole 
may be made with greater ease and accuracy. Major General 
Green is to administer the same oath and grant the same Certifi- 
cate to the officers of his department. The Commissary of Pro- 
visions both Issuing and purchaseing and to the Commissary of 
Forage and his deputies, besides which he is to administer to 
the said Officers respectively the following oath and to grant 

duplicate Certificates, I do swear (or Affirm) that 

I will faithfully truly and impartially execute the Office of 

** Brigadier General William Woodford of Virginia. 
" Brigadier General Charles Scott of Virginia. 



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REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ORDERS. 346 

to which I am appointed and render a true account when their- 
unto required of all publick monies by me received or expended 
and of all Stores and other Effects to me intrusted which belongs 
to the united States, and will in all respects discharge the trust 
reposed in me with Justice and integrity to the best of my skill 

and understanding. Sworn to by me this day of 1778. 

The Commander in Chief takes occation to proclaim Pardon 
to all prisoners whatsoever, now in confinement wether in the 
Provost or any other Place: this he is induced to do from a 
desire that the influence of our prosperity may be as extencive 
as possible and from an unwillingness of those who merit punish- 
ment rather than favour shoud be excluded from the benefit of 
an event so interesting to mankind as that which has lately 
happened in the affaii*s of America. He hopes the indulgence 
will not be abused but will excite gratitude in all those who are 
objects of it, and produce a change of Conduct and an abhor- 
rence of every Practice inconsistant with the duty they owe 
their Country. The Commander in Chief takes perticular pleas- 
ure in acquainting the army that their Conduct Yesterday af- 
forded him the highest satisfaction, the exactness and order 
with which their movements were performed is a pleasing evi- 
dence of the progress they are making in Military improvements, 
and an earnest of the perfectness to which they will shortly 
arrive with a Continuance of that laudible Zeal and emulation 
which so happily prevails. The General at the same time pre- 
sents his thanks to Baron Stuben and the Gentlemen acting 
under him for the Indefatigable exertions of the dutys of their 
office, the good effect of which are allready so apparent, and for 
the care, activity & propriety manifested in conducting the 
Bussiness of yesterday. 

Head Quarters Vally Forge May 8 1778. 
Brigadier Gen* to morrow Patterson, F. O. L*. 
Colonel Syme & Major Pauling. 
Brigade Major Marvin. 
Inspector from Maxwell. 

S C P 
For Guard . . . . i. - 5 

Gen* Muhlenburgs . . i. i. 9 



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346 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Head Quarters Vally Forge May 9 1778. 

Brigadier to Morrow Waine F. O. Colonel. 

Selia & L' CoP Gray. 

Brigade Major Johnson. 

Inspector from late Con ways. 

The hours appointed for the exercise of the Troops having 
been changed makes it necessary to alter the hours appointed for 
the Drumers to practice which will for the future be from 5 to 6 
in the morning & from 4 to 5 in the afternoon, any Drumer that 
shall be found practiceing at any other time than the above 
mentioned shall be severely punished. 

The Adjutants of the several Regiments are to pay perticular 
attention to this order as they will bfe answerable for the execu- 
tion of it. The use of the drums are as signals to the army and 
if every Drumer is allowed to beat at their pleasure the inten- 
tion is intirely distroyed as it will be impossibe to distinguish 
wheter thay are beating for their own pleasure or for a signal 
for the Troops. 

The Congress has been pleased to appoint Baron Stuben In- 
spector General with the rank of Major General and the Com- 
mander in Chief being invested with power to appoint the In- 
spector and Brigade Inspectors he Continues in Office those 
who have allready bin nominated and appointed — The languid 
progress of the essential works of defence which have bin 
traced by the Engineers gives the Commander in Chief real 
concern — The calls upon those officers who superintend them to 
use their utmost exertions to have them Completed without loss 
of time — At a General Court Martial whereof Colo* Febeger 
was Presidant May 5 78 Robert Anderson late Waggon Master 
in the Marquis Division Tryed for selling a Riffle marked U. S. 
found guilty and sentanced to redeem the Riffle and return it to 
the first Pensylvania Regiment to which the person who lately 
had it in possession belonged, approved and ordered to take 
place. At the same Court L* McDonold of the 3d Pensylvania 
Regiment Tryed for absenting himself from his Reg* without 
the concent of his Commanding Officer — upon mature Concider- 
ation of the Charge and Evidences the Court are of opinion 
that the Prisoners Justifycation is sufficiant & acquit him of the 



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REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ORDERS. 347 

the Charge exhibited against him — The Commander in Chief 
confirms the opinion of the Court & orders L' McDonold to be 
released from his arrest. 

S C P 

for Guard i. - 5 • 

Gen* Muhlenburg . . . .-1.9 

I. I 14 



Head Quarters Vally Forge May 10 1778. 

Brigadier to morrow Poor. 

F. O. L* Colonel Starr* & Maj' Nicholas. 

Brigade Major Minnis" 

Inspector from Huntingtons" Brigade. 

C S 

for Guard . . , - i. 

W Command with 2 days Pro' - 

W Command . . - - 

Gen* Muhlenburg . - - 



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I. 3. 4. 21 



D. O. May 10 1778. 

The Gentlemen Officers of Gen' Greens division are re- 
quested to attend at Gen* Muhlenburgs Quarters to morrow and 
the day after in the forenoon to take the oath as proscribed by 
a Resolve of Congress and the General Orders of the 7 Instant. 

Peter Muhlenburg Brigadier 
Commadant. 



Head Quarters May 11 1778. 
Brig' to morrow Mcintosh, F. O, Colo* 

"•Lt Col. Josiah Starr of Connecticut. 

^ Probably Callowhill Minnis of Va. 

•Brig. General Jabez Huntington of Connecticut. 



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348 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Parker* & L' Colo* Nevell** 

Brig. Major Claybourn. 

The Inspector from Varnoms Brigade. 

A Court of Inquiry to set to morrow morning at 9 O* Clock 
at Gen* Varnoms hutt to take into Consideration a Complaint 
exhibited by Colonel Green** against Colonel Steward Bng' 
Gen' Varnom is appointed Presidant Colonels Grayson" & Biga- 
low^ L* Colonels Wisingfield & Brily and Major Ward will at- 
tend as members. 

The Gen' Officers are desired to attend at head Quarters to 
morrow at 11 O' Clock A. M. that they may take the oath ap- 
pointed by Congress in the Resolution of 3* of Feb*y last, and 
was published in Gen' Orders of the 7 instant. At a Gen' C. M. 
whereof Colonel Febiger was President Ap' 28 1778 Capt Thomas 
Lucas'* of Colonel Malcolmns Regiment Tryed for assuming the 
Rank of Captain when a Lieutenant 2°**'^ for discharging an 
Enlisted Soldier and also for receiving a sum of money for so 
doing thirdly for returning the said Soldier deserted in the 
Muster Roll after discharging of him found Guilty of the Charges 
exhibited against him being Breaches of Article the 5. 18 Sec- 
tion & 2d Article of the 3d Section also of the 5 Article and 5 
Section of the Articles of war and sentanced to be discharged 
the Service — Also L* Barron of Colonel Wigglesworths" Regi- 
ment Tryed for strikeing L' Page & 2°^*'' for un Gentlemanlike 
behaviour, found Guilty of the Charges exhibited against him 
and Sentanced to be Cashiered and rendered incapable of ever 
serving in the United States in a Military Capacity The Com- 
mander in Chief approves the sentance & orders it to take place 
immediately. At the same Court Capt Morrison"* of the ist 
Jersey Regiment tryed for selling as substitutes Men who were 

» Probably Col. Richard Parker of Va. 

•^Lt. Col. John Neville of Va. 

»» Col. John Green of Va. 

" Col. William Grayson of Va. 

^ Col. Timorthy Bigelow of Massachuetts, 

•• Capt. Thomas Lucas of New York. 

** Col. Edward Wigglesworth of Massachusetts. 

*• Isaac Morrison of New Jersey. 



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REVOLUTIONARY ARMY ORDERS. 349 

deemed incapable by an express Law of the State of being such 
& for selling Soldiers as substitutes who were before inlisted for 
the common bounty, upon Consideration of the Charges and 
evidence the Court are unanimously of opinion that Captain 
Morrison is Guilty but as he does not appear to have been actu- 
ated by self interested, as his actions which are most centured 
have arose from a desire of promoting the good of the Service 
the Court determins that he does not merit censure. The 
Gen* Confirms the Sentence, at the same time he cannot forbare 
remarking that the practice of selling Soldiers as substitutes is 
an abuse of the highest nature & pregnant with the most perni- 
cious consequences tho their is every Reason to hope in the 
present Instance that it did not proceed from selfish Pecuniary 
motives yet it is in its self of so daingerous attendancy and so 
inconsistent with every Rules of propriety that he cannot but 
merit the severest reprimand Captain Morrison is releaved from 
his arrest. At the same Court by adjournment Ap' 29, 78 Ad- 
jutant Thomson of the 9 Pensy' Regiment tryed for refusing to 
come when sent for by Major Nicholas & 2d for treating Major 
Nicholas after comeing to him with ill language acquited of the 
first Charge but found Guilty of the second & Sentenced to be 
privately reprimanded by the Officer Commanding the Brigade. 
The General remits the Sentance from a Consideration that the 
Conduct observed towards Mr. Thomson must exceedingly 
wound his fealings and excited him to a warmth of expression 
for which he was Censured. Adjutant Thomson is released from 
his arrest. 

S C P 
for Guard . . . . i. o. 5 

Week Command ... - - 2 

In Guards . . . . - i. 9 

I. I. 16 



Head Quarters May 12, 1778 
Brigadier to Morrow Muhlenburg 
F. O. L* Co' Bedlam & Major Murphey 
Brig* Major McCormack 
Inspector from Mclntoshes Brigade 
The Court Martial whereof Colo' Febeger was President is 



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350 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

disolved & another Ordered to set to morrow at the usual place 
whereof Colon* Bowman" is appointed President a Captain from 
each Brigade is to attend as members. Elnathan Haskell 
Esquire is appointed Brigade Major in Gen* Pattersons Brigade 
Vice Major McClure and is to be obeyed as such. 

S S C P 

Detail for Guard . . - - - 5 
Weeks Command . . - - - 3 
In Guards . . . - - i. 9 

Head Quarters May 13 1778. 
Brigadier Gen to morrow Patterson. 
F. O. Colonel Gibson" & L* Colonel Ball" 
Brig* Major McKinney. 
The Inspector from Woodfords Brigade. 
Taken up the 11 May two Stray Horses one 14 hands high 
a light Gray the other a dark Bay about 12 hands high the one 
6 or 7 Years old the other 9 or 10 the owners are desired to 
prove their property, pay Charges and fetch them away from 
Anthony Richards Charles Town Chester County. 





S 


S 


c 


p 


Detail for Guard 


I. 


I. 


I. 


5 


fortnights Command . 




I. 


0. 


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In Guards 


. 


I. 


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fatigue 


. 


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17 


Quarter Guards . 


. 


- 


I. 


6 



I. 4- 3- 38 
R. O. May 14 1778. 
A Regimental Court Martial to set to day for the Tryal of all 
the Prisoners that may be brought before them 
Capt Crump President 
Members 
V Campbell L* Rudder 

L' Piper L' Best 

(TO BE CONTINUED.) 



"Col. Abraham Bowman of Virginia. 

" George and John Gibson were Colonels in Revolution from Vir- 
ginia. 
'*Lt. Col. Burgess Ball of Virginia. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 851 



THE EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF 
VIRGINIA, 1722.1734. 



As Shown by the Proceedings of the Colonial Council. 



Edited and Annotated by Charles E. Kemper, Washington, D. C 



(concluded. ) 



April 23. 1734. 

On reading a Petition from the Inhabitants on the North 
West side of the Blue Ridge of Mountains, praying that some 
person may be appointed as Magistrates* to determine Differ- 

*This ofder evidences the further advance of civilization in Vir- 
ginia toward the West. The administration of justice had now be- 
come necessary, and Fredericksburg, to which place the county seat ot 
Spotsylvania was removed in 1732, was at least eighty-five miles dis- 
tant from the Opequon settlement, with the Blue Ridge between 
them. The prayer of these petitioners was soon granted. In August, 
1734, the county of Orange was formed from Spotsylvania. East of the 
Blue Ridge it included territory embraced in present Orange, Culpep- 
er, Rappahannock, Madison and Green, while on the west it extended 
to "the utmost limits of Virginia." (Hening, Vol. IV., pp. 450-51.) 

This was probably the greatest political subdivision of territory 
ever created by legislative enactment of the Anglo-Saxon race. It 
included all the territory then belonging to Virginia west of the Blue 
Ridge, which comprised all of present West Virginia, and the States of 
Kentucky, Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. Its jurisdiction was real as far 
as the white settlements then extended westward. 

The first Justices compo.sing the County Court of Orange were 
Augustine Smith, Goodrich Lightfoot, John Taliaferro. Thomas Chew, 
Robert Slaughter, Abraham Field, Robert Green, James Barbour, John 
Finlason, Richard Mauldin, Samuel Ball. Francis Slaughter, Zachary 
Taylor, John Lightfoot, James Petlow, Robert Eastham, Benjamin Cave, 
Charles Curtis, Joist Hite, Morgan Morgan, Benjamin Burden, John 
Smith and George Hobson. The five justices last named are the same 
persons mentioned in this Order, and all of them resided in the vicinity 
of present Winchester. No person living within the limits of present 
Augusta county appears in this list, which indicates that in 1734 nearly 



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352 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

ences and punish Offenders in regard the Petitioners live fer 
remote from any of the established Counties within the Colony, 
It is the Opinion of the Council that Joost Hyte. [Jost Hite] 
Morgan Morgan, John Smith, Benjamin Bourden [Borden] 
and George Hobson be appointed Justices within the Limits 
aforesaid, and that they be added to the Com'n of Spotsylvania 
until there be a sufficient Number of Inhabitants on the North- 
west side of the said Mountains to make a County of itself, 
But that the Persons above named be not Obliged to give their 
attendance as Justices of the Court of the County of Spotsylva- 
nia. 

A Petition of the Inhabitants on Shenando River in behalf of 
themselves and others intending to settle there praying that an 
address may be made to His Majesty to remit to the s'd In- 
habitants the Quit Rents* of their Lands for a Term not exceed- 



all of the inhabitants of the Virginia Valley resided in the present 
county of Frederick. 

The westward movement of Virginia was now commencing in earn- 
est, although it must be borne in mind that the country west of the 
Blue Ridge was still an almost unbroken wilderness. 

♦In the act establishing Orange County, the inhabitants of the Valley 
were exempted from all taxes and parish levies for the space of three 
years. (Hening, Vol. IV, pp. 450451). Of Vincent Pearse and 
William Allen there is no definite information, except that the 
former was one of the early settlers in the vicinity of Winchester. 
Charles Chiswell was mentioned in the October number of the Maga- 
zine, p. 135, note 15. 

The land embraced in this Order appears to have been located far 
up the Valley of the Potomac, probably in the vicinity of present Cum- 
berland, Md. The long dispute between Pennsylvania and Virginia 
relative to the boundary of the former colony is here foreshadowed. 
The details of this controversy are well known. In 1779 George 
Bryan, John Ewing and David Rittenhouse, representing Pennsylva- 
nia, and Rev. James Madison and Robert Andrews, representing Vir- 
ginia, were appointed to settle the question. The line between 
Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania was agreed upon August 31, 
1779, conditionally ratified by Virginia June 23, 1780, and by Pennsyl- 
vania September 23, 1780. April i, 1784, the agreement as ratified by 
Virginia was nccepted by Pennsylvania and the question finally settled. 
(.See Craig's Controversy beliveen Pennsylvania and Virginia^ etc., 
Pittsburg, 1843). The territory in dispute embraced the present city 
of Pittsburg, then Fort Pitt, and was supposed by the Virginia Gov- 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 363 

ing twelve years as an Encouragement for the more speedy 
peoplingthat remote place of this Dominion; and Also a Peti- 
tion of Vincent Pearse, William Allen & Charles Chiswell Gent, 
in behalf of themselves & others praying a grant of Sixty 
Thousand Acres of Land on the West side of the River Co- 
hingorooton [Cahongoronta] and bounding northerly on the 
East 7 West Lines of the Proprietors of Pennsylvania, were 
severally read at the Board, and thereupon it was resolved that 
application be made to His Majesty for removing all obstruc- 
tions to the settlement of that part of the county & for grant- 
ing such Temporary Exemptions and Encouragements to such 
of His Majesty's Subjects and foreign Protestants as shall come 
to inhabit there, as His Majesty shall judge most proper for the 
speedy Settlement of that Frontier, And further consideration 
of the said last mentioned Petition is postponed. 

April 30, 1734. 
On reading a Letter from Mr. Robert Brooke, Surveyor of 
the Lands on Shenando [Shenandoah] River. It is Ordered 
That the said Robert Brooke do prepare a Map* of the Lands 



eminent to be within the limits of Augusta county. Sessions of the 
Augusta County Court were held at Fort Pitt in 1775 and 1776 by ad- 
journment from Staunton, Va. For names of Justices composing tljis 
court and its proceedings, see Annals of Carnegie Museum^ Vol. I. pp. 
525-68, 1902. 

*No copy of this map is known to be in existence, although Council 
Order ot June 13, 1734, shows that it was prepared. The only contem- 
poraneous maps of this period extant are the Courses of the Rivers 
Rappahannock and Potowmack, etc., f7s6-/7J7y2ir\<\ The Survey of the 
Northern Neck of Virginia^ etc., 1736-1737. Copies of these maps are 
in the Library of Congress. They are both anonymous, but Phillips, 
in his Virginia Cartography, states that the former was probably 
prepared by the surveyors of Lord Fairfax, and the latter by Col. 
William Mayo. In the United Coast Survey Office there is a manuscript 
map prepared by Robert. Brooke, showing the Potomac river from the 
mouth of the Shenandoah to Chapawamsick Creek, surveyed in 1737. 
The maps first above mentioned, correctly show the general topogra- 
phy of the country and illustrate the fact that the Piedmont section of 
the Northern Neck and the Shenandoah Valley then constituted the 
western verge of civilization in the colony. The settlements in the 
upper part of the Valley are not shown, doubtless because they were 
not within the controverted bounds of the Northern Neck. 



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364 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

lying on the said River and attend the Board with the same at 
the next Court of Oyer and Terminer for the better Explaining 
what is contained in the said Letter. 



. June 12, 1734. 

Joost Hite having made proof of the Seating the Lands 
Conveyed to him by John & Isaac Vanmader [Van Meter] on 
the western side of Sherrando [Shenandoah] River by bring- 
ing thereon to Dwell one Family for each 1000 Acres and also 
part of the Land granted him and Robert Mackay and others 
thereunto adjoining, It is ordered that patents* be granted to 
the Several Masters of Families residing there for the Quanti- 
ties of Land Surveyed for them respectively pursuant to the 
Condition on which the s'd Land was First taken up and the 
Surveys now returned into the office. 

On hearing this Day at the Board the matter in dispute Be- 
tween Henry Willis Gent, and William Russellf touching a 

*An examination of the land records at Richmond shows that the 
patents here mentioned were not issued by the Colonial government. 
It has been observed that, commencing with the Council Orders to 
John Van Meter and Jacob Stover in 1730, Colonel Robert Carter, as 
agent of Lord Fairfax, had filed protests against these grants of land 
in the lower valley, claiming that they were within the Northern Neck. 
The Council was put upon notice to this effect as early as 1728, when 
Colonel Carter filed a caveat against the grant to Larkin Chew and 
others tor lands in the vicinity of Front Royal. ( Virginia Magazine^ 
Vol. XllI, pp. 1 14-115). In 1733 Lord Fairfax addressed a petition to 
the King, setting up his claims to the lands in controversy, and an 
Order was made in Council restraining the Virginia Government from 
perfecting these grants until the boundaries of the Northern Neck 
could be definitely ascertained and settled. {Revised Code of Vir- 
ginia^ 1819, Vol. II , pp. 344-46). This Order is evidence that in 1734 
forty families were settled on and near the Opequon in the vicinity of 
Winchester, and the colony must then have numbered about two 
hundred and fifty souls. 

tit is almost certain that this was the land taken up by Larkin Chew 
and others prior to October 18, 1728, mentioned in previous note. This 
efiort of William Russell and Larkin Chew was the first attempt made 
by civilized man to acquire land in the Valley of Virginia. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 356 

Tract of Land Lying in Spotsylvania County on the East side 
of Sherrando River first taken up by the said Russell and divers 
other his partners in the year 1728. It is ordered that unless 
the said Russell do at the next Court of oyer and Terminer to 
be held in the month of December produce proper assignments 
from the persons who were first petitioners for the said Land 
and perfect his Survey of the 10,000 acres granted him in 
Spotsylvania County as a part of the 20,000 acres formerly 
allowed for him to Survey on Sherrando River and be ready 
then to take out his patent for the same he be excluded 
from all benefit of his Former Grant so far as Relates to the 
Land on the East side Sherrando River and that the same be 
granted to the said Henry Willis and it is further ordered that 
the Survey shall not Extend above ten miles up the River 
from the beginning at the Mouth of Happy Creek. 

On hearing this Day the matter in dispute between Robert 
Mackay Joost Hite* and others their partners and William 
Russell touching the right to Certain Lands on Sherrando River 



*The subsequent history of this grant is involved in the long litiga- 
tion between Jost Hite and Lord Fairfax, of which frequent mention 
has been made in these notes. By the year 1736 Hite and his partners 
had succeeded in settling fifty-four families upon this tract, when Fair- 
fax entered a caveat against the issuing of patents to them, and, in addi- 
tion, the restraining Order of 1733 mentioned in a previous note was 
still in force. When the dispute between Fairfax and the Crown was 
ended, in 1745, Hite and his associates claimed their patents, insisting 
that the Council Orders for their lands should be construed as grants 
within the meaning of the Act of 1748, which recited the boundary line 
controversy and confirmed the grantees of the Crown in possession of 
their lands. This Fairfax resisted, claiming that the only titles con- 
firmed by that Act were those cases in which patents had actually been 
issued by the Crown. Hite and company then instituted a chancery 
suit against Fairfax, in 1749. In October, 1771, a decree was entered in 
favor of the plaintiffs, from which Fairfax appealed to the King in 
Council, but the Revolution ended the appeal. The case was finally 
decided by the Virginia courts in 1786 in favor of Hite and his associ- 
ates. {Revised Code of Virginia^ 1819, Vol. II, pp. 344-47.) The 
papers in this cause are said to have contained a full account of the cir- 
cumstances attending the settlement of the country around Winchester, 
but they were unfortunately destroyed with all other records of the 
General Court when Richmond was evacuated in 1865. 



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356 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Claimed By the said Russell and Included within a Grant to the 
said Mackay and Hite for 100,000 acres. It is ordered that Mr. 
Rob't Brooke do Survey the Ten Thousand acres of Land 
Granted the said Russell in the Fork of Sherrando so as the 
said Survey do not Extend to the said Robert Mackay*s pres- 
ent Settlem* then one mile nor above Ten miles along the River 
from his beginning place at the mouth of the Fork, and if within 
these bounds he cannot have the aforesaid Quantity of Ten 
Thousand acres that then the Survey be Extended back in a 
Streight Course from the River towards the North Branch to 
Compleat the same. 

and forasmuch as during the Dispute Between the said partys 
the Settlement of that Tract Granted to Mackey and Hite hath 
been obstructed Further time is hereby allowed them & their 
partners until Christmas 1735 to Comply with the Terms of their 
Grant and in the mean time they may proceed to Survey the 
same. 

On the Petition of Henry Willis Gent, leave is granted him 
to take up 10,000 Acres of Land in Spotsylvania County Begin- 
ning at the mouth of Happy Creek* on the Line of the Land of 
William Russell and Running Northerly between Sherrando 
River and the mountains to Compleat that Quantity. 

On the petition of William Beverly and Robert Brooke leave 
is granted them to take up 4000 acres of Land in Spotsylvania 
Countyt joining to the Land of Charles Burgess Deceased and 
the great Mountains. 

Whereas a barbarous Murder was sometime since committed 
in Spotsylvania County by some of the Northern IndiansJ and 
there being just Cause to suspect that the same was done by the 

♦This land lay on the east bank of the Shenandoah. Its southern 
boundary was at present Front Royal, and it extended down the river 
into the present county of Clarke. 

fThis land lay in the Little Fork of the Rappahannock, in the pres- 
ent county of Culpeper, Charles Burgess was a resident of Lancaster 
County, Va., and in August, 1734, the General Assembly passed an Act 
concerning the settlement of his estate, which refers to land owned by 
him in the Little Fork. ^Hening, Vol. IV, pp. 451-53) 

% Governor Gooch had anticipated this action of the Council by send - 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 867 

Nation of the Coonays [Conoys] under the Government of 
Pennsylvania The Governor is requested to write to the Gov- 



ing a letter to Hon. Patrick Gordon, then Governor of Pennsylvania, 
which bears date July 13, 1733, and states in substance that a man and 
his wife had been murdered and scalped in Spotsylvania County, Va., 
in April of that year, by the Conay (Coney) Indians. The murdered 
persons evidently lived east of the Blue Bidge, because the Governor 
stated that the Indians had shown the scalps to "the inhabitants at the 
back of the Great Mountains.** He also stated that these Indians 
lived in Pennsylvania under the protection of the Six Nations. Gov- 
ernor Gordon replied by letter dated August 10. 1734. He expressed 
regret and promised to do all in his power to bring the Indians to jus- 
tice. He also expressed the opinion that the murder had been com- 
mitted in April, 1732, a year prior to the date fixed by Governor Gooch. 
The Pennsylvanians, he ^id, called these Indians Ganawese. {Min- 
utes of the Provincial Council 0/ Pennsy/vania^ Vol. Ill, pp. 564-65.) In 
1 701, the Ganawese, or Conoy, Indians were, with other tribes, parties 
to an agreement with William Penn. They were described as ** inhabit- 
ing in and about the northern part of the Potomac.'* (Proud's History 
of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, 1798, Vol. I, p. 429.) The residence of 
this tribe upon the upper waters of the Potomac makes the suggestion 
more certain that the Conai (Conoy), now Lost River, derived its 
ancient name from them. ( Virginia Magazine, Vol. XIII, p. 131.) 

Further investigation conclusively establishes the fact that there were 
no permanent Indian settlements in the Valley of Virginia when the 
whites came, except the Shawnee town at Winchester, and the Tusca- 
rora settlement on the creek of that name in present Berkeley County, 
West Virginia. After the return of Governor Keith, of Pennsylvania, 
from his visit to Williamsburg in the spring of 1721, noticed in the last 
issue of the Magazine, he held a conference with the Conestoga Indians 
at their town on July 6, 1721. In addressing them he said: "But the 
Governor of Virginia expects that you will not hunt within the Great 
Mountains on the other [south] side of the Potomac River, being it is a 
small tract of land which he keeps for the Virginia Indians to hunt in.*' 
^Minutes of the Provincial Council of Pennsylvania, Vol. Ill, p. 122 ) 
There is also earlier evidence of the same fact. At the Albany con- 
ference of 1684, Lord Howard of Effingham, then Governor of Vir- 
ginia, in addressing the Five Nations stipulated with them as follows: 
"That you do not hinder or molest our friendly Indians from hunting 
in our Mountains, it having been their country and none of yours.** 
(Golden, History of the Five Nations^ London, 1755, Vol. I, p. 37, re- 
print, 1902.) It thus seems certain that the Iroquois had conquered the 
four tribes living west of the Blue Ridge prior to 1684. ( Virginia Mag- 
azine, Vol. XIII, pp. 5-6, note.) In this conference Lord Howard 



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358 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

ernor of that Province to Enquire into the Truth of the Fact 
and to use his authority for delivering up the murderers that 
they may be punished for the said Crime. 



June 13, 1734. 

Ordered That there be paid to Major Robert Brooke for his 
Trouble in preparing a Map of the Lands of the West Side 
Sherrando River and attending to inform this Board of the 
Settlements* made thereon, the Sum of Ten Guineas out of his 
Majesty's Revenue of 2 p. Hogshead &c. 



June 14, 1734. 
[Granted] To Richard Randolph.! John Boiling & William 

charged, and the Five Nations admitted, that they had for a number of 
years past committed outrages upon the white and Indian inhabitants 
living at the heads of the Virginia rivers. The authorities quoted 
establish the fact historically that the Valley of Virginia was an 
Indian hunting ground for many years prior to the coming of the whites 
in 1730-32. If any such tribe as the Senedos, mentioned by Kercheval 
and other writers as living on the North Branch of the Shenandoah, 
ever existed, they were certainly exterminated by the Iroquois before 
1722. At the Treaty of Albany (1722), Governor Spotswood expressly 
named each Indian tribe then living in Virginia, and the Senedos were 
not among them. 

*This map, if in existence, would be of the greatest value to the his- 
tory of Virginia west of the Blue Ridge. Evidently it was prepared, 
and doubtless located each settlement then made beyond the moun- 
tains. As stated in a previous note, the map prepared in 1736-1737 by 
Robert Brooke simply shows the general topography of the Northern 
Neck. 

tThis was evidently Richard Randolph, of Curls, son of William Ran- 
dolph, of Turkey Island, founder of that distinguished family in Vir- 
ginia. He married Miss Boiling, a sister of John Boiling here men- 
tioned. (Meade, Old Churches, Ministers and Families of Virginia^ 
Vol. I, pp. 138-39, note). William Kennon resided at ** Conjuror's 
Neck", on the Appomattox River. His sister Mary married John Boil- 
ing, of Cobbs, who was probably the person of that name mentioned in 
this Order. ( William and Mary College Quarterly^ Vol. IV, pp. 132-33). 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 859 

Kennon 10,000 acres in Brunswick County beginning five miles 
below the great Swamp on little Roanoak running ten miles up 
the said River including the Land on both sides the said River 
to be laid out in one or more tracts. 



Sept. 5, 1734. 

A Letter * from Patrick Gordon Esq'. Governor of the Province 
of Pennsylvania and dated the Tenth Instant was read Signify- 
ing that the Conai [Conoy] Indians had in Conference with him 
denyed their being in any way concerned in the Murther Com- 
mitted in Spotsylvania County and its ordered that further En- 
quiry be made into the Circumstances and time of the said Murder. 



The Cherokee Indians J having sent to the Governor by Wil- 
liam Bellew an Indian Trader a Copy of the agreements Con- 
cluded by the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Their Deputys 
with a Message desiring Leave to trade here, It is the opinion of 
the Council that it is for the Public Service and benefit of the 
Colony to preserve the Friendship of the said Indians and there- 
fore that all due Encouragement be given them to continue to 
Trade with this Colony. 

Sept. 2£, 1734. 
For Reasons appearing to this Board It is this Day Ordered 

♦ This Order should be read in connection with note 9. 

t The Cherokees were the strongest of the southern Indian tribes. 
They occupied the mountain regions of North and South Carolina, 
Georgia and east Tennessee. In Virginia they claimed the southwest- 
cm portion of the Valley as far north as the Peaks of Otter. This tribe 
is identified as the Rechahecrian, or Rickohockan, Indians, who came 
down from the mountains in 1654 or 1656 and defeated the Virginians 
and Pamunkeys in the greatest Indian battle ever fought in the colony. 
This engagement occurred in the immediate vicinity of present Rich- 
mond, Va. (Mooney, TAe Siouan Tribes of the East, pp. 8, 28). In 
1721 the Cherokees numbered 3,800 warriors; were a warlike nation, 
and lived in the Appalachian Mountains. {North Carolina Colonial 
Records, Vol. II, p. 422). The later history of this tribe is too well 
known to require further mention here. 



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860 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

by the Governor in Council that the time Limitted to William 
Russell by an order of Council the 21st Day of Jun^ last to Sur- 
vey Lands on the Eastern Side Sherrando River be extended 
to the fifteenth Day of April next. 



Oct. 28, 1734. 

On Reading at the Board the petition of John Tayloe and 
Thomas Lee Esq", and William Beverly Gent, praying a Grant 
for 60000 acres of Land on the West Side the great Mountains on 
Sherrando [Shenandoah] River beginning on Jacob Stover's 
upper Tract* upon the Condition of Seating thereon one Familie 

*Jacob Stover's upper tract lay on the Shenandoah immediately be- 
low the present village of Port Republic, Rockingham county, Va., and 
therefore the land granted by this Order embraced territory to the south 
and west of that place. 

The will of Robert Brooke, Jr., "Knight of the Golden Horse Shoe," 
dated April 15, 1736, states that he had been employed to survey this 
tract, and had already partially completed his task. He and William 
Russell were each to receive twelve thousand acres of the grant. The 
will also indicates that a supplemental Order concerning this tract had 
been passed April 23, 1735. ( Virginia Magazine, Vol. IX, pp. 436-37). 
Near Port Republic is "Madison Hall," the birthplace of Rev. James 
Madison, first Bishop of the Episcopal Church in Virginia. The present 
owner of this place is Dr. Albert S. Kemper. John Madison, father of 
the Bishop, removed from Orange County to the Valley before the 
organization of Augusta, of which latter county he was the first clerk. 
In 1755 he built a fort at " Madison Hall ** for protection against the In- 
dians. (Waddell, -/l««a/.y 0/ Augusta Counfy, 2nd ed., 1902, pp. na- 
na). 

In many respects this is one of the most important Orders of the 

series, because the Virginia Council now commenced to deal with ter- 
ritory lying in the present county of Augusta. It also completes a series 
of large grants lying along the Shenandoah and extending up that stream 
from Front Royal to Port Republic. None of the previous Orders in- 
dicate any grants prior to this date in the main Valley of Virginia west 
of the Massanutton range and south of present Frederick County. The 
grants to Jacob Stover in 1730; John Fishback and his associates in 
173 1, and Francis Willis and William Beverly in 1732, all of which 
were on the South Branch of the Shenandoah, conclusively show that 
the tread of settlement up the Valley of Virginia was along that stream 
between the Massanutton range and the Blue Ridge. Unfortunately, no 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 361 

for each Thousand acres within two years It is ordered that 
Leave be granted the petitioners to Survey and Patent said 

contemporaneous history of these settlements is known to exist, but the 
conclusion must follow that the grantees of these lands made every effort 
to comply with the conditions imposed to settle one family upon each 
thousand acres within two years. It therefore follows that by the year 
1736 the section between Port Republic and Front Royal was, in a limited 
degree, an inhabited country. 

At the date of this Order the present county of Augusta was in its 
very infancy, but was soon to be settled by the Scotch-Irish. John 
Lewis was the first of that race to locate in the upper Valley. He came 
in 1732, and his home was on the present New Hope road about two 
miles east of Staunton. Within six years from the coming of Col. Lewis 
he was joined by many other Scotch-Irish families. All of these early 
settlers took title to their lands from William Beverly, who acquired, on 
Sept. 7, 1736, a grant of 118,491 acres, including the site of present 
Staunton and surrounding country. This tract was known as " Beverly's 
Manor.** (Waddell, Annals of Augusta County y p. 29). 

By the year 1734 the westward movement of Virginia began to assume 
definite shape and purpose. The few settlements, however, were widely 
separated and large areas of country entirely destitute of inhabitants. 
** The Moravian Diaries of Travel through Virginia,** which have ap- 
peared in recent issues of this Magazine, show how sparsely the country 
was settled in the years 1743, 1748, and 1751. The country abounded in 
game, and the buffalo, elk, deer, and bear were to be found everywhere 
in the Valley of Virginia. Wolves were so numerous that in 1742 the 
inhabitants of present Augusta County petitioned the General Assembly 
to levy a tax to be used in hiring persons to destroy these animals, and 
in 1745 legislation of a similar nature was enacted for the benefit of 
present Frederick County. (Heniug, Vol. V, pp. 187-89, 373-75). Al- 
though destitute of Indian inhabitants, the Valley was still a great highway 
through which the contending tribes of north and south passed and re- 
passed in their perpetual wars. After the year 1734 the westward ex- 
tension of Virginia begins to fall within the domain of written history, 
but at this period the white man had just established himself in the 
Valley of Virginia. It has been seen how liberal was the policy of the 
Colonial Government in granting lands, provided actual settlers were 
brought to live upon them. Within twelve years (1722-1734; the frontier 
line had advanced from the head of Tidewater to the Alleghanies, a 
distance of about one hundred miles in a straight line. The times con- 
sidered, this was a great accomplishment. The Blue Ridge, regarded 
for more than a century by the early inhabitants of the colony as an in- 
surmountable barrier, had been crossed, and lands lying beyond the 



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362 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Quantity of 6oocx> acres of Land lying above the said Stover's 
upper Tract upon the Terms proposed by them on giving Bond 
to his Majesties the usual purchase of Rights for so much there- 
of as Shall not be so Seated by them within the Time before 
mentioned. 



ADDITIONS. 

[The Council Order here printed is believed with certainty to 
be the first record made in Virginia concerning the German 
colonists who settled at Germanna in 1714. The hitherto un- 
published extracts from the court records of Spotsylvania County, 
Virginia, which follow, also furnish for the first time positive 
evidence as to the persons who composed the colony of 17 14, 
as well as the later colony of 17 17. Germanna was founded by 
Governor Spotswood, who led the westward movement of Vir- 
ginia in the early years of the i8th century, and therefore it is 
deemed peculiarly appropriate to conclude with this material, 
which was not discovered until after the series had been com- 
menced. — Editor]. 

[Order of the Virginia Executive Council]. 

April 28, 17 14. 

The Governor acquainting the Council that Sundry Germans 
to the number of forty two men women & children who were 
invited hither by the Baron de Graffinreid* are now arrived, 

first ridges of the AUeghanies acquired. To explore, settle, and civilize 
the country beyond the latter mountains was the next task of the men 
of the Valley of Virginia, and how well and quickly the work was done 
constitutes one of the most fascinating chapters in our national history. 

*This order positively confirms the conclusions reached by several 
writers in lecent years concerning the German Reformed colony of 
17 14, the first to settle at Germanna, and fully identifies it as the colony 
whose arrival was expected by Governor Spotswood in the spring of 
that year. The evidence is now complete that it was the same colony 
which Baron De Graffenreid met in London in the summer of 17 13, and 
which, accordiug to his autobiography, sailed to Virginia in the spring 
of 1714. It also proves conclusively that these colonists came directly 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 368 

but that the said Baron not beinj? here to take care of this Settle- 
ment, The Governor therefore proposed to settle them, above 
the falls of Rappahannock River to serve as a Barrier to the In- 
habitants of that part of the Country against the Incursion of the 
Indians and desiring the opinion of the Council whether in con- 
sideration of their usefulness for that purpose the Charge of 
building them a Fort, clearing a road to their settlement & 

from Germany, and were not a remnant of the Newbern colony, as con- 
jectured by Dr. Shraghter in his History of SL Mark*s Parish, 

Further record evidence concerning this colony is to be found in 
Spotswood*s Official Letters, Vol. II, (indexed under German Pro- 
testants, etc.), and the Genealogy of the Kemper Famify, by Willis M. 
Kemper, Esq., of Cincinnati, Ohio. In his sketch entitled **The First 
German Reformed Colony in Virginia, 1714-1750," Rev. William J. 
Hinke, of Philadelphia, Pa., has admirably summed up the history of 
this colony, based upon documentary evidence gathered from many 
sources. The documents here printed simply place beyond contro- 
versy the conclusions reached by these two writers. For Prof. Hinke's 
valuable article, see foumal of the Presbyterian Historical Society, 
Philadelphia, Pa., Vol. II, 1903, pp. 7-17, 98-110, 140-150. For further 
reference to the colony of 17 14, see Virginia Magazine of History and 
Biography, Vol. XI, pp. 231-34, 241-42, 375-78; Vol. XII, pp. 74-75- 

The history of Germanna is of importance because the colonists of 
1714 were the first organized body of Germans who came as permanent 
settlers to Virginia, and were the pioneers of that sturdy element which 
has done so much to develop the western part of the State. Germanna 
was the first county seat of Spotsylvania in 1722, and continued as such 
until 1732. It was originally in old Essex County, but is now in the 
eastern portion of present Orange County, on the south bank of the 
Rapidan, about thirty miles above Fredericksburg. For at least seven 
years Germanna was an armed fort on the extreme western frontier of 
Virginia, as it then existed. 

This Council Order shows that the first employment of these colo- 
nists consisted in guarding the frontiers in that section of Virginia. 
Commencing in 1684, and continued by various Acts of Assembly, 
rangers were appointed to scout and patrol the upper parts of James, 
York, Rappahannock and Potomac rivers, as safeguards against Indian 
incursions. (Hening, Vol. Ill, pp. 17-21). The act under which the 
colonists of 17 14 were designated as rangers was passed in November, 
17 1 1, and provided that each company should consist of a lieutenant and 
eleven men— just the number of adults in the colony. {Idem^ Vol. IV, 
pp. 9-12). 



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364 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

carrying thither two pieces of Canon & some ammunition may 
not properly be defrayed by the publick. 

It is the unanimous opinion of this Board that the S"* Settle- 
ment, tending so much to the Security of that part of the Front- 
iers, It is reasonable that the expense proposed by the Gover- 
nor in making thereof should be defrayed at the publick charge 
of the Government, and that a quantity of powder & ball be de- 
livered for their use out of her Majesties Magazine. And be- 
cause the S"* Germans arriving so late cannot possibly this year 
cultivate any ground for thepr] Subsistance, much less be able 
to pay the publick Levies of the Government, It is the opinion 
of this Board that they be put under the denomination of Rangers 
to exempt them from that charge, And for the better enabling 
the S*. Germans to supply by hunting the want of other pro- 
visions, It is also ordered that all other persons be restrained 
from hunting on any unpatented Lands near the Settlement. 



[Extracts from the Court Records of Spotsylvania County, 
Virginia. In these Orders the present forms of surnames, and 
in some cases the full Christian names, are shown in square 
brackets. The original forms of surnames are given in notes. 
It will be observed that the English clerk who made the en- 
tries distorted some of these German names almost beyond 
recognition. — Editor.] 

At a Court held per adjournment from yesterday the 7th 
day of July Anno Dom. 1724. 

In the action of debt* brought by Coll. Alexander Spots- 

*Council Order of April 23, 1724, relates to the petition of Zerichias 
Fleshman and George Utz, representing themselves **and fourteen 
other high-Germans,'* then being sued by Col. Spotswood on account 
of their transportation charges to Virginia They resided at that time 
near Germanna. ( Virginia Magazine, History and Biography, Vol. 

XII, pp. 350-51). 

The names of eighteen defendants are given in this group of Court 
Orders, but two of them (Ballenger and Holt) are clearly not German 
names. The names of the remaining sixteen defendants positively in- 
dicate their German origin. The original forms of the surnames of this 
group are as follows: Paulitz, Jeager, Blankenbecker, Klohr, Koch, 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 365 

wood pit. against Philip Paulitz defend' t. The defndt. failing 
to appear and answer the same, order is granted against him 
& the Sheriff. 

Scheibli, Schmidt, Meyer, Kaffer, Fleischman, Utz. Bryol is perhaps 
Briel, and Auburge is given in a subsequent Order as Ausbergur. Of 
these defendants, three stated when proving their importations that 
they came to Virginia in 1717, and four others that they came "about 
nine years since," i. e., prior to May 2, 1727. It is therefore safe to 
affirm that all these defendants came in 1717. Four others (Christopher 
Zimmerman, Jacob Bryol, Andrew Kerker, and Christopher Pavlur, or 
Parlur) do not appear in this list, although the importation Orders show 
that they came in 17 17. This was probably because their obligations to 
Colonel Spotswood had been discharged. These four persons, added 
to the sixteen defendants named, make twenty families, which accounts 
in full for the colony of 17 17. 

A third colony, numbering forty families, came to Germanna or its 
immediate vicinity in 1719 or 1721, as evidenced by the importation 
Orders of John Broil, (2d), and William Carpenter. These two colonies 
were of the Evangelical Lutheran faith, and probably in the year 1726 
removed to the Robinson River section, in the present Madison County, 
Va,, where they built Hebron Church in 1740. 

Other certified Court Orders from Spotsylvania show that Mr. Henry 
Conyers was attorney for the Germans, and Col. William Robinson for 
Col. Spotswood. These Orders. also show that on July 6, 1725, upon 
petition of Michael Cook, Henry Snyder and other Germans, leave was 
granted them to clear a road from the ferry at Germanna to Smith's 
Island up the Rapidan. This indicates that these Germans were then 
living in the neighborhood of Germanna. 

Octobers, 1725, William Beverly, Gent., was allowed one day's at- 
tendance (sixty pounds of tobacco) in the action against Conrad Aus- 
burg, *'as one that lives in another county "—probably Stafford. 

Nov. I, 1726, on petition of the Germans, Franris Kirkleyand George 
James were ordered ''to lay out and make the most convenient way for 
ye Germans' Mountain Road," and Michael Holt was appointed over- 
seer. This, in all probability, was the year of their removal from Ger- 
manna, the term ** Mountain Road" meaning the way to their settle- 
ment near the base of the Blue Ridge. 

August 2, 1727, Mr. Robert Spotswood asked the Court to remove 
Michael Holt as surveyor of the ''Mountain Road", which was done, 
and Michael Clore appointed in his place. 

July 2, 1728, Michael Clore and George Outz (Utz), on behalf of them- 
selves and "several other of the German inhabitants of this county at 
Smith's Island," asked leave to clear a road from said island into the 



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366 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

Ditto against Conrad Auburge [?], the same order, he not 
appearing. 

Ditto, against Nicholas Jeager [Yager], he not appearing the 
same order is granted. 

Ditto, against Balthaser Blanker bucker [Blankenbaker], the 
same order granted, he not appearing. 

Ditto, against Michael Clore, continued by consent of each 
partie. 

main road from *'Germania Ferry to the Mountain run.*' Petition granted, 
and Michael Clore appointed overseer. 

June 3, 1729, Michael Clore's petition was presented to have a road 
cleared from Mr. John Lightfoot's plantation uito the Germanna road. 
Granted, and Conrad Ausbergur and others were ordered to assist 
Clore, with Christopher Zimmerman as overseer. 

August 5, 1729, Michael Holt and others obtained permission to clear 
a road from the island in the first fork of White Oak Run, "for to roll 
their tobacco.** 

March 3, 1729, Michael Cook was appointed to ** serve as Constable 
for the Germans above the Crooked Run in the fork of the Robinson 
and so to the North River in this County.** 

June I, 1725, Robert Turner, one of the Germans who proved his im- 
portation as of the year 1720, was appointed a Constable. 

Other Orders relating to roads in old Spotsylvania County were en- 
tered at this period, showing the trend of settlement up the valley of the 
Rapidan. Feb. 2, 1730, an Order was entered extending a road from 
John Christopher's to a point in the fork of Robinson River, and thence 
to the foot of NeaFs Mountain. Finally, on May i, 1733, Isaac Norman 
was discharged as overseer of the road from the '* Mountain Tract to 
Jonas Jenkins at the Great Mountain," and John Naul ordered to serve 
in his stead. No doubt this road was soon extended across the Blue 
Ridge by way of Swift Run Gap. 

These Germans were visited by Gottschalk, the Moravian missionary, 
in 1748, who states that most of them came from Wurtemberg, Ger- 
many. ( Virginia Magazine of History and Biography^ Vol. XI, pp. 
230-31). The contemporaneous documentary history of these Germans 
is brief and fragmentary, but Prof Hinke presents it clearly in his sketch 
of the German Reformed colony of 17 14, cited in a previous note. The 
removal of the Lutheran colonists to the Robinson River in 1726, was 
the second advance of Virginia to the west during the period covered 
by these Council Orders. The frontier line was now at the eastern base 
of the Blue Ridge, and preceding Orders and notes have shown its ex- 
tension beyond these mountains. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 367 

Ditto, against Michael Cook, continued by consent of each 
partie. 

Ditto, against Andrew Ballenger, there being no appear- 
ance of either party: ordered that the suit be dismissed. 

Ditto, against George Sheible: at ye defendants motion 
Oyer is granted. 

Ditto, against John Bryol [Broil], the defendants failing to 
appear & answer, order is granted against ye Sheriff and de- 
fendant. 

Ditto, against Michael Smith, the same order granted. 

Ditto, against George Mayer [Meyer], the same order. 

Ditto, against Michael Kaifer [Kaffer]: the same order. 

Ditto, against Mathias Blan ker bucker [Blankenbaker] : the 
same order. 

Ditto, against Michael Holt : the plaintiff not appearing to 
prosecute, ordered that the said suit be dismissed. 

Ditto, against Gyracus [Zerichias] Fleshman; continued by 
consent of each party. 

Ditto, against Nicholas Blankerbucker [Blankenbaker] is con- 
tinued by consent. 

Ditto, against Hendrick Snider [Snyder] : the defendt. fail- 
ing to appear & answer: order is granted against him and the 
Sheriff. 

Ditto, against George Utz: the plaintiff failing to appear and 
prosecute, ordered that the said suit be dismissed. 
A true copy 

Teste: T. A. Harris, Clerk. 

[Jan. loth, 1906]. 

At a Court held for Spotsylvania County on Tuesday the 7th 
day of April 1724. (Will Book A, p. 69). 
Jacob Holxrow [Holtzclaw],* in order to prove his right to 

*The original German forms of the surnames of the 1714 colonists 
are: Holzklau, Kemper, Martin, Spielmann, Fischbach, Hoffmann, 
Kuntz, Richter, Brumbach, Weber, and Heide. Of these names, Kemper 
and Martin alone remain unchanged in all respects. These colonists 
were invited by Baron De Graffenreid to come to Virginia for the ex- 
press purpose of developing Governor Spotswood's iron properties. 



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363 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

take up land according to the Royal Charter, made oath that 

Their original homes were in the old principality of Nassau Siegen, 
Germany, now a part of Westphalia, and they resided in the city of 
Siegen, the town of Muesen, and adjacent places. Although residents 
of Stafford County, they doubtless proved their importations at Ger- 
manna because of their acquaintance with Governor Spotswood. 

Colonel Spotswood made the positive claim to Colonel William Byrd 
in 1732 that he had built the first blast furnace in North America, and 
that in New England and Pennsylvania they had relied altogether upon 
"bloomeries" until his example made them attempt greater things. 
(Byrd, History of the Dividing Line^ Vol. II, p. 60). T\i^ Fry and 
Jefferson Map (1751 ) shows *' Tubal '* on the south bank of the Rappa- 
hannock about ten miles northwest of Fredericksburg. This was the 
furnace built by the colony of 17 14, and here comparatively modem 
methods in the manufacture of iron in this country were introduced. 

These colonists remained at Germanna until the ]^ear 1721, when they 
acquired lands in the Northern Neck and removed about twenty miles 
northward from Germanna, locating in old Stafford County. That sec- 
tion of Stafford fell into Prince William in 1730, and later (1759) into 
present Fauquier County. Their new home, called Germantown, was 
on Licking Run about eight miles south of present Warrenton, Va. 
Midland Station, on the Southern Railroad, is near this ancient settle- 
ment, which, in 1721, marked the farthest westward advance of civiliza- 
tion in Virginia. The importance of the preceding Council Order, and 
the Court Orders relating to the colonists of 1714, consists in the fact 
that these documents settle every doubt which has been raised with 
reference to the time when and place from which they came. The 
Court Orders also furnish for the first time positive evidence with 
reference to the names of all the persons who composed this colony. 
One of them, Jacob Holtzclaw, was naturalized July 11, 1722, and his 
papers state that he was a native of Nassau-Siegen. {Spotsylvania 
County Records, 1905, p. 96). These colonists were visited in 1748 by 
Gottschalk and Spangenberg, missionaries of the Moravian Church, 
who relate in their diaries that these people were natives of Nassau- 
Siegen. ( Virginia Magazine of History and Biography^ Vol. XI, pp. 
232-33, 241). On p. 231 of the Magazine quoted above, the Christian 
name of John Kemper's wife (ancestress of the writer) is given as Ells- 
beth. This is an error. Her name was Alice Kathrina, as shown by 
the Court Order of her husband proving their importation. The writings 
of Willis M. Kemper, Esq., and Rev. William J. Hinke, referred to in a 
previous note, embody all the known history of Germanna and German- 
town. To the latter, the writer is much indebted for valuable assist- 
ance in properly rendering the German names which appear in these 
Orders. 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 869 

he cam^ into this country in the month of Aprill 17 14 and that 
he brought with him Margaret his wife, and John^ and Henry 
his two sons, and that this is the first time of proving their said 
importation, whereupon certificates is ordered to be granted 
them of right to take up two hundred acres of land. 

John Camper [Kemper], in order to prove his right to take 
up land according to the Royal Charter; made oath that he 
came into this country in the month of Aprill, 17 14, and that 
he brought with him Alice Kathrina his wife, and that this is 
the first time of proving their said importation, whereupon 
certificate is ordered to be granted them of right to take up one 
hundred acres of land. 

Johannas [John Joseph] Martin in order to prove his right to 
take up land according to the Royal Charter: made oath that 
he came into this Country in the month of Aprill 17 14, and 
that he brought with him Maria Kathrina his wife, and that 
this is the first time of proving their said importation, where- 
upon certificate is ordered to be granted them of right to take 
up one hundred acres of land. 



At a Court held per adjournment from yesterday the 2nd. 
day of June, 1724, for Spotsylvania County. (Will Book A, pp. 

3-4). 

John Spellman [Spillman] in order to prove his right to take 
up land according to the Royal Charter : made oath that he 
came into this colony to dwell in the year 17 14 and that he 
brought with him his wife Mary; and that this is the first time 
of proving their said importation, whereupon certificate is order- 
ed to be granted them of right to take up one hundred acres of 
land. 

Hamon Fitshback [Herman Fishback] in order to prove his 
right to take up land according to the Royal Charter; made 
oath that he came into this Colony to dwell in the year 1714: 
and that he brought with him Kathrina his wife, and that this is 
the first time of proving their said importation : whereupon cer- 
tificate is ordered to be granted them of right to take up one 
hundred acres of land. 



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370 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

John Huffman [John Henry Hoffman].' the same order for 
himself and Kathrina his wife. 

Joseph Guntz [Coons], the same order for himself and Kath- 
erina his wife, and his son John Annalis Isic] and Kathrina his 
daughter. 

John Fitshback [Fishback], the same order for himself and 
Agnes his wife. 

Jacob Rickart [Rector], the same order for himself and Eliza- 
beth his wife & his son John. 

Milchert [Melchior] Brumback,|the'same order for himself and 
his wife Elizabeth. 

Dillman Weaver, the same order for himself and Ann Weaver 
his mother. 

Lekewin [Likewise ?] Peter Hitt, the same order for himself 
and Elizabeth his wife. 

These certificates were not issued until May 30th. 1729. 
A true copy, 

Teste: T. A. Harris, Clerk. 

[Jan. 10, 1906]. 

[On the same day the following Germans also proved their 
importations, recorded in Will Book A, pp. 68-69] • 

John Broil in order to prove his right to take up land accord- 
ing to the Royal Charter made oath yt. he came into this Coun- 
try in the month of November 1719: and that this is the first 
time of proving his said importation; whereupon certificate is 
ordered to be granted him of right to take up fifty acres of 
land. 

Frederick Cobbler in order to prove his right to take up land 
according to the Royal Charter: made oath that he came into 
this country in the month of January 1718. and he brought with 
him Barbara his wife: and that this is the first time of proving 
their said importation; whereupon certificate is ordered to be 
granted them of right to take up one hundred acres of land. 



At a Court held for Spotsylvania County on Thursday the 
fifth day of April Anno Dom. 1726. (Order Book 1724 to 1730, 
pp. 107-108). 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 371 

On petition of Christopher Zimerman in order to prove his 
right to take up land according to the Royal Charter, made 
oath that he came into this country in the year of our Lord on« 
thousand seven hundred and seventeen, and that he brought 
Elizabeth his wife and John and Andrew his children with him, 
& that this is the first time of his proving their said importation, 
whereupon certificate is ordered to be granted them of right to 
take up one hundred acres of land. 

On petition of Henry Snyder in order to prove his right to 
take up land according to the Royal Charter, made oath that he 
came into this country in the year of Our Lord one thousand 
seven hundred and seventeen, and that he brought Dorathy his 
wife with him, and that this is the first time of his proving their 
said importation, whereupon certificate is ordered to be granted 
them of right to take up one hundred acres of land. 

On petition of Mathew [Michael] Smith in order to prove his 
right to take up land according to the Royal Charter, made 
oath that he came into this country in the year one thousand 
seven hundred and seventeen, and brought with him Kathrina 
his wife, and that this is the first time of proving their said im- 
portation, whereupon certificate is ordered to be granted them 
of right to take up one hundred acres of land. 

Michael Cock [Cook] in order to prove his right to take up 
land according to the Royal Charter made oath that he came 
into this country in the year one thousand seven hundred and 
seventeen, and brought his wife Mary with him, and that this is 
the first time of proving their said importation, whereupon cer- 
tificate is ordered to be granted them to take up one hundred 
acres of land. 

Andrew Kerker in order to prove his right to take up land 
according to the Royal Charter, made oath that he came into 
this country in the year of our Lord 1717, and brought Marga- 
rita his wife and Barbara his daughter with him and that this is 
the first time of his proving their said importation, whereupon 
certificate is ordered to be granted them of right to take up one 
hundred & fifty acres of land. 



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372 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

William Carpenter* in order to prove his right to take up 
land according to the Royal Charter, made oath that he came 
into this country in the year of our Lord 1721, and brought 
Elizabeth his wife with him, and that this is the first time of his 
proving their said importation, whereupon certificate is ordered 
to be granted them of right to take up 100 acres of land. 

Christopher Pavlur, or Parlur in order to prove his right to 
take up land according to the Royal Charter, made oath that 
he came into this country in the year 17 17, and brought his 
wife Pauera with him, and that this is the first time of his proving 
their said importation, whereupon certificate is ordered to be 
granted them of right to take up 100 acres of land. 



At a court held for Spotsylvania County on Tuesday ye second 
day of May 1727. (Order Book 1724 to 1730, p. 142). 

On petition of Jacob Bryol [Broil] in order to prove his right 
to take up land according to the Royal Charter, made oath that 
he came into this country about nine years since wi[th] Capt. 
Scott, and that this is the first time of his proving his said im- 
portation, whereupon certificate is ordered to be granted him of 
right to take up fifty acres of land. 

On petition of John Bryoll [Broil] in order to prove his right 
to take up land according to his Maj*ties Royal Charter, made 
oath that he came into this country about nine years since wi[th] 
Capt. Scott, and that he brought Ursley his wife and two chil- 
dren named Conrad and Elizabeth with him and that this is the 
first time of his proving the said importations, whereupon certifi- 
cate is ordered to be granted them of right to take up two hun- 
dred acres of land. 

♦Carpenter is the English translation of Zimmerman. In 1733 and 
1734. Michael Cook, Michael Smith, Michael Clore, Andrew Kercher 
and George Utz, whose names appear in these Orders, were church 
wardens of Hebron church. The name, Hans Zeuche, also appears in 
this connection in 1734. {Orange County Records; Wills; 1735-1743, 
pp. 54-57). 



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EARLY WESTWARD MOVEMENT OF VIRGINIA. 378 

On petition of Nicholas Yeager in order to prove his right to 
take up land according "^o his Maj'ties Royal Charter, made 
oath that he came into this country about nine years since wi[th] 
Capt. Scott, and that he brought Mary his wife and two children 
Adam and Mary with him, and that this is the first time of 
proving the said importation, whereupon certificate is ordered 
to be granted him of right to take up two hundred acres of 
land. 

Philip Paulitz in order to prove his right to take up land ac- 
cording to his Maj'ties Royal Charter made oath that he came 
into this country about nine years since wi[th] Capt. Scott, and 
that he brought with him Rose his wife and two children named 
Margaret and Katherina, and that this is the first time of his 
proving the said importation, whereupon certificate is ordered 
to be granted him of right to take up two hundred acres of 
land. 



At a Court held and continued for Spotsylvania County No- 
vember 8th, 1727. (Order Book 1724 to 1730, p. 214). 

On petition of Robert Turner, a German, in order to prove 
his right to take up land according to his Majesties Royal 
Charter, made oath that he came into this Colony in the year 
one thousand seven hundred and twenty and that he brought 
his wife named Mary and his children named Christopher, 
Christianna. Kathrina, Mary & Parva, and that this is the first 
time of proving the said importation, thereupon certificate is 
ordered to be granted him of right to take up three hundred 
and fifty acres of land. 



CORRECTIONS. 

In the April number, 1905, of the Magazine, on pp. 338 and 
345 (notes), for Colonial History of New York, read Docu- 
ments Relative to the Colonial History of New York, In the 
same number, p. 344, the date of map cited should read 1758. 

On p. 119, October number, 1905, in Revised Code of Vir- 



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874 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

ginia, for 1818, read 1819 (note). In the same number, p. 124, 
for Governor Hamilton, read Goverrfor Keith. In the same 
number, p. 133, a statement is made from which an unfavorable 
inference may be drawn relative to Jost Hite and Robert McKay. 
This note was based upon a copy of the Council Order to which 
it relates, from which an entire line had been inadvertently 
omitted and the sense preserved. This line was sdbsequently 
inserted after the note had been written, but consideration was 
not given to its effect upon the note. It is but just to say that 
the fullest investigation leads to the conclusion that Hite was 
eminently fair in all of his land transactions, while himself suffer- 
ing much injustice at the hands of Lord Fairfax. 

In the January number of the Magazine, p. 286, in the note 
concerning "Cape Leanock" river, it was intended to say that 
the correct spelling would have made it read one word instead 
of two. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. 

It is again desired to express grateful acknowledgment to 
William G. Stanard, Esq., Editor of the Magazine, for valuable 
advice and assistance, often sought and always promptly and 
kindly given, especially with reference to the land records at 
Richmond. To John A. Garber, Esq., a native Virginian re- 
siding in Washington, sincere thanks are extended for valuable 
aid in preparing the material for publication, which task he also 
performed in connection with the * 'Moravian Diaries of Travel 
through Virginia," recently published in the Magazine. Thanks 
are also extended to T. A. Harris, Esq. , Clerk of Spotsylvania 
County, Virginia, for prompt and intelligent investigations of his 
records. 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-40. 375 



VIRGINIA IN 1639.40. 



Wyatt's Second Administration. 



(Abstracts by W. N. Sainsbury, and copies in the McDonald and De 
Jarnette Papers, Virginia State Library.) 



(continued.) 



Report on Sir Thomas Gates's Estate. 
(Abstract.) 

July 30. 1639. 

Report of the Sub Committee for Foreign Plantations to the 
Lords of the Privy Council, on petition of Edmund Dawber 
administrator of the estate of Sir Thomas Gates* deceased. 
That similar letters to those written by their Lordships 30th Nov' 
1632 to the Earls of Dorset and of Danby on behalf of Marga- 
ret Dawber and Elizabeth Gates, daughters and orphans of Sir 
Thomas Gates, and of Margaret relict of his eldest son for re- 
covery of the estate left them by Sir Thomas Gates then de- 
ceased of which estate pet^ hath since taken forth letters of ad- 
ministration in right of said Orphans be now granted on behalf 
of Pet' and directed to the Gov' and Council of Virginia for the 
time being for the full recovery unto the Pet' of the whole estate 
belonging to said Sir Thomas Gates within the Government of 
Virginia — Signed by Sir Will Becker Abrah. Williams, Sir Fran- 
cis Wyatt and Geo. Sandys. 

{Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 31.) 



The long explanatory and defensive letter from Governor 
Harvey and his Council printed in this Magazine III, 21-34, 
should be dated 1639. 

♦See Brown's Genesis, II, 894-896. 



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376 virginia historical magazine. 

Francis Wyatt Jr., at Cambridge. 
(Abstract.) 

Westminster Palace, Aug. 7, 1639. 
The King to the provosts of King's College Cambridge and of 
Eton College and to the electors there, Recommends Francis 
Wyatt a Scholar of Eton College and son of Sir Francis Wyatt 
Governor of Virginia to be chosen & admitted at this election 
to the first or second place in King's College Cambridge — Signed 
by the King. 

(^Domestic Correspond: Charles I, Vol. 427, No. 28,) 



Report on Petition of Rev. Anthony Panton. 

(Abstract.) 

Aug. 10, 1639. 

Report of the Sub-Committee for Foreign Plantations to the 
Lords of the Privy Council on petition of Anthony Panton* 
rector of York & Cheskayack in Virginia against Richard Kemp 
Secretary of that Colony. Have heard pet" witness & the sen- 
tence given against him and examined what relations have been 
sent over from the Gov' and Council of Virginia concerning 
this business. That pet' is an able Preacher and conformable to 
the church of England, diligent in his calling and without scan- 
dal in his life that he is sentenced to a fine of ;^5oo to the king- 
public Submission to [in?] all the parishes in the Colony — dis- 
abilities ever to claim or possess anything in it & banishment 
firom it on pain of death — the informations are charges of muti- 
nous speeches & disobedience to Sir John Harvey & scandals 
against Rich. Kemp who framed said informations also a charge 
of counterfeiting and publishing a ridiculous letter from the 
Archbishop of Canterbury all of which pet' denies — Cannot find 
out any proofs but rather that ten months before said sentence 
pet' was presented by Sir John Harvey to a benefice, tho* he is 
accused of mutinous behaviour during the whole six or seven 

♦ Rev. Anthony Panton minister of York had incurred the displeasure 
of Secretary Kemp and been banished from Virginia. See this Ma|^a- 
zine, V, 123-128, XI, 170-172. 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-4XX 377 

years of his residence ' * which seems to us very strange. ' ' The 
whole matter should be referred to the New Governor going 
thither but Sir John Harvey and Kemp not to assist & the 
former sentence suspended. 3 pp. 
(^Colonial Papers t Vol. 10, No. 32.) 



Petition of Anthony Panton. 
(Abstract.) 

1639 ? (see August 10.) 

Petition of Anthony Panton, rector of York and Cheskiack 
in Virginia to. the Lords of the Privy Council. Upon report 
from the Commissioners for Foreign Plantations their Lord- 
ships directed letters to Sir Francis Wyatt the now Governor 
and the council concerning an injurious sentence against pet" to 
rehear said case and suspend that part touching pet" banish- 
ment. For as much as he doubts not but at the rehearing to 
manifest his innocence & integrity and is informed that Sir John 
Harvey who hath pet" goods & estate in his hands hath already 
wasted part, so that he fears it will be all irrecoverably con- 
sumed before his cause be ended. Prays that directions may be 
given to deliver same into the hands of Sir Francis Wyatt, that 
if pet' be found innocent he may be restored to his cure. Un- 
derwritten is a mem. 

The Lord's first letter was dated Aug. 11, 1639. 

{Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 33.) 



Petition of Howard Horsey in Regard to Quit Rents. 

(Abstract.) 

Sept. 20, 1639. 

Petition of Howard Horsey to the King. An annual rent of 
I2d upon every fifty acres in Virginia reserved to the King has 
never been paid and the Receiver General is lately dead without 
giving any account of his service in regard to his great charges 
& trouble because of the wildness of the plantation. 

The rent being a badge of sovereignty which ought not to be 
omiitted, and the pet' settled there having great experience and 



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378 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

able to raise the rent to a good value, prays for a grant of the 
office of Receiver General and a lease for 14 years or the nomi- 
nation of two lives, at a reasonable rate,- for which pet' will pay 
a yearly rent to be estimated with power to compound for 
arrears and survey all lands granted by patent or order of Court. 
With reference to the Lord Keeper, Lord Treasurer, Earl of 
Dorset & Lord Cottington to report on the whole business. 
Whitehall, 1639, Sept. 2. 

(^Domestic Charles / Vol. 403, p. 43.) 



Petition of Ship Owners. 
(Abstract.) 

Sept.? 1639. 

Petition of the Merchants Masters and Owners of the William 
& Sara, the Charles, the George, and the Charity of London 
to the Lords of the Privy Council. That said ships came from 
Virginia about April and May last with great quantities of to- 
bacco & other commodities to the port of London for which 
pet" paid his Maj. great sums of money for custom — are now 
ready to go with said ships to Virginia with passengers & pro- 
visions for supply of their plantations there but cannot be per- 
mitted to clear their ships without order from their Lordships. 
Prays that orders be given to the officers of his Maj. Custom^ 
to suffer pet" to clear said ships together with the passengers & 
provisions and that said passengers be examined & take the 
oaths of allegiance & supremacy at gravesend as hath been 
usual. 

{Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 37.) 



[Inclosures in Above.] 

List of provisions on board the William & Sara, the George 
the Charity and the Charles — with 100 passengers on each ship 
(not named). 

License from the Privy Council to the officers of his Maj^ 
Customs within the Ports of London and Gravesend for the 
ships above named with the passengers and provisions to pass 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-40. 879 

on in their intended voyage without hinderance or molestation 
provided that all the said passengers first take the oaths of al- 
legiance and supremacy 1639 Sept 15. Draft with corrections. 
(^Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, Nos. 37, I, II.) 



Petition OF Vassall &c., Merchants. 
(Abstract.) 

Petition of Samuel Vassall,* William Felgate and Maurice 
Thompson of London Merchants to the Lords of the Privy 
Council, Have freighted the Anne & the James of London, for 
a yoyage to St. Christopher's & Virginia, heretofore stayed by 
a general stay in the Thames and afterwards in regard of the 
urgent necessity of supply in said Plantations released. But 
driven by contrary winds into Plymouth they are there again 
detained to the great damage of pet" having already lost three 
months by the said stays and contrary winds — Pray in regard of 
their excessive charge having on board about two hundred 
passengers besides Mariners, for a warrant for release of said 
ships. 

(^Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 44.) 



Tobacco Planting Restricted. 
(Abstract.) 
Mem : that Instructions were sent for the restraining the ex- 
cessive planting of tobacco and that for the two next ensuing 

♦ Samuel Vassall, an eminent merchant was M. P. for London 1640-60, 
and was one of the original patentees of Massachusetts lands. He was 
son of John Vassall of London, who fitted out at his own expense & 
Commanded two ships against the Spanish Armada. Samuel Vassairs 
brother William resided at Barbadoes, where he died in 1657. William 
Vassall had a son Col. John, who had many interests in Virginia, espec- 
ially in Rappahannock County, and his daughter Anna, married Nicholas 
Ware, whose administration was printed in this Magazine, XII, 303. 
See Walters' % Gleanings, II, 13 10-1322. 

For William Felgate see this Magazine, II, 181-182, and for Maurice 
Thompson, I, 188-189. 



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380 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

years there should not be planted above twelve hundred thous- 
and weight per annumn for the advancement of the price 
thereof, 

(^Minute, Colonial Correspondence ^ Vol. I, No. 20, p. i.) 



Petition of Ralph Wyatt. 

(Abstract.) 

1639? 

Petition of Ralph Wyatt to the King. Served in his Maj. 
service in the troop of horse in the Isle of Rhe where " he lost 
much blood'* besides the consumption of his means for which 
he hath had no recompense sufficient to discharge the costs of 
surgery. 

Forasmuch as pet' had married the widow of Capt Wm. 
Button to whom by virtue of a letter from the Lords of the 
Council certain land was assigned in Virginia by orders of Court 
there amounting to 7000 acres and now in the podsession of pet' 
Prays the confirmation there of to him under the Great Seal in 
right of his wife whose estate hath been greatly impoverished 
by seeking the said land, there being nothing left her by said 
Button but the hopes of enjoying it for ;^t5oo disbursed by her. 

{Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 45.) 



Order of Privy Council in Regard to Horses to be 
Sent to Virginia. 

(Abstract.) 

Jan. 1639-40. 

The Lords of the Privy Council to the Governor & Council 
of Virginia. An order was made at the Quarter Court held at 
James City 26 March 1639 allowing Thomas Stegg* artd Jeremy 
Blackman to furnish Virginia with horses, mares and such like 
beasts of carriage and to export from thence the like number of 
neat cattle. Recommend the same to the now Governor and 

♦ Thomas Stegg, a London Merchant, who frequently resided in Vir- 
ginia See this Magazine, VI, 300. His will and that of his sdn Thomas 
Stegg, are given in trailers' s Gleanings, 101-102. 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-40. 381 

Council and if they see no cause to alter it to confirm said 
order. 

Drafts with Corrections. 

(^Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 57.) 



Governor Wyatt* to . 

(Copy.) 
Indorsed Virginia. 

A letter from Mr. Francis Wyatt dat. 25 March, 1640, rec*d 
at Whitehall, the 5th of June, 1640. 
Sir: 

Since my arrival in Virginia wee have beene (in a manner) 
wholly taken up about the regulation of tobaccof the excessive 
planting whereof hath beene so greate an hindrance to the 
growth of this Colony. By reason of the vast quantities made 
this yeare we have been forced to a strict way of destroying the 
bad and halfe the goode which was propounded to us & desired 
by the principal merchants about London as the only means to 
raise the price and though the physicke seems sharp yet I 
hope it will bring the body of the Colony to a sound constitution 
of health then ever it enjoyed before. We have represented in 
our petition to their L**^ the necessary reasons for it in opposi- 

♦ Sir Francis Wyatt*s second administration as Governor of Virginia , 
extended from November, 1639 to February, 1641-3, when he was suc- 
ceeded by Sir William Berkeley. For notices of Governor Wyatt and 
the Wyatt family see this Magazine, III, 177-180; VII, 46-48; and U'illiam 
6f Mary Quarterly II, 152; III. 35*74; VI. 257; X, 59; XI, 35-45, 111-116. 
Sir Francis Wyatt was greatly liked in Virginia, and after Harvey's un- 
popular administration he was especially welcome. 

t At the session of Assembly beginning Jan. 6, 1639-40, a determined 
effort was made to improve the character of Virginia tobacco. The 
amount to be planted was restricted and elaborate provisions made for 
inspections. In Hening I, 224-225, brief abstracts of the various tobacco 
laws are given, but the Robinson MSS, Va. Historical Society Col- 
lection, contains the full text of the acts of this session. A list of the 
numerous * 'viewers'* (inspectors) appointed and the portions of the act 
which prescribe their duties and the oath to be taken, were printed in 
this Magazine, V, 1 19-123, 274-277. 



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382 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

tion to any refractory person that may question the act, and I 
hope we shall find your Honor one Patron to joine in protect- 
ing us against any causeles complaint conseming it, and that it 
Will be judged as Service acceptable to his Maj**** and their 
L'P**'. I am farther in my owne particular to move your Honor 
that whereas it pleased his Maj*^ to grant to S' John Harvey my 
predesessor the Fines & Amerceaments and other the like 
profitts wh. the Governors here have usually enjoyed to their 
own use without accompt for their better support in the many and 
great charges incident to the place I am become an humble 
Suitor to his majesty that he will be pleased to grant the like 
gracious Letters of Privie Seale to me, and I shall humbly be- 
seech your Honor to prefer and recommend My Suite to his 
Maj'** hoping that I shall not be denied to enjoy the advantages 
incident to my place thereby to take off from the charge as fully 
as my predecessor who held the Government ten yeares enjoyed 
them. 

The experience of your Honores many favores embolden me 
their favre and oblige me to remaine Your Honours most 
ready to do you iiumble service. 

Francis Wiat. 

March 25th, 1640. 

(^Colonial X, No. 62.) 



Richard Kemp to . 

(Copy.) 

March 20, 1639. 

Right ho*''^ 

Since ye late change by ye arrivall of new Gov' was Sir 
Francis Wiate, They of the old Commission have bene perse- 
cuted with much malice, the weight whereofe hath hitherto prin- 
cipallye fallen upon S' John Harvey whose estate is wholly 
sequestred att p" sent and att the next Court now approaching 
will assuredly be swept away. His present intendments are to 
repaire for England this yeare, but it is questionable whether ye 
passage will be free and open for him, perhaps fearing some 
new trouble to themselves. 

I am an humble supplyant to yo' Hono' to move his Maj**' for 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-40. 383 

his gratious license to me to see England ye next yeare, with 
power to depute some other during ye tyme of my absence w'** 
deputacon I would conferr upon Mr. Georg Read with helpe to 
assist him for ye execucon thereofe. 

I will enable myself in ye meane tyme to give his Ma"* as 
perfect Accompt of his Revenue here and of all other perquisites 
to him w"** other matters much inducing to his service. 

Thus humbly resting. 

Your hono" humbly devoted, 

Rich Kemp. 
James Cittie this in March, 1639. 

{State Papers y Colonial, Vol. 10, No. 61. 



Richard Kemp to Secretary Windebanke. 
(Copy.) 

[April 24, 1640.] 
Rt Hona**"* 

I am to my much griefe assured by the order of their Ld"*" 
and others of your Honors of his Majties Most bono*"* privie 
Councill transmitted hither this yeare to the new governor & 
councell for the rehearing of a cause & examining of the grounds 
of a sentence passed in October 1638 against one Mr. Anthony 
Panton a minister how much I suffer by the misinformation of 
the said Mr. Panton tp that most honorable Board touching that 
matter as if by my unjust pracetyses & malicious complaints 
and not anie guilt in him had procured the act of banishment 
against him. But the greatest of my miseries is that I am tra- 
duced by him to have spoken irreverently and to the dishonor 
of my Lord Archbishop of Canterbury his Grace w** he preten- 
deth to her [hear] to this effect & with this circumstance. 

That upon his demand of an appeal I should ask him to 
whom & yt upon his saying that he would appeal to the King 
& my Lord of Canterbury I should answer I thought where I 
should have you from hence to Canterbury & from Canterbury to 
Roame, to which are words never uttered by me, neither did I 
ever harbour Anie disrespect in my breast towards his Grace. 

I am sensible witfi what disadvantage I now plead, the accu- 



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384 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

sation having been urged in my absence and assisted with credit 
by mediation and friendshipp noe defence being neare for me 
in which point alone my innocence hath betrayed mee. 

I am an humble suppliant to your Honor to acquaint my 
Lord Archbyshopp his Grace with this Certificate from the then 
Gov' & the whole counsell then present & resident in the 
Collony excepting one who is since dead as also with this testi- 
monie under the hand of the Clark of the Court then present 
who is ready to depose the same. 

To which purpose I could procure the oathes of all or most 
who were then in presence whose qualitie deserves creditt, But y't 
I cannot send authentique Certificates of them as the termes now 
stand with mee, And I humbly crave that some circumstances 
may be heard for mee, for at that time Mr. Panton was knowne 
to mee to have much offended especiall manner against his Grace 
by Counterfeiting a Letter from his Grace as also by other 
words of Scandall towards him wh. were certified upon oath 
from the Govornor & Counsell which Letter since the last ar- 
rivall of the said Mr. Panton to ye Colony he hath affirmed his 
Lordship did acknowledge was sent from him as will bee proved 
upon oath against him by one Capt. Richard Townshend now in 
England and who hath deposed the same already here. Though 
(as I understand) hee did (with what cunninge I cannot device) 
wrest that matter to my injurye. I will not trouble your Honor 
with any thing further at this time in ye cause concerning Mr. 
Panton wh. will bee transmitted at large very shortly. 

But I humbly desire your Honor to represent to my Lord 
Archbishop his Grace these proofs & instance of my clearness 
& innocense in any disrespect towards him to whom I humbly 
bend with all reverence & humility which I had personally before 
this time done were I not detained here (I confess) with faire 
pretence of the necessitie of my attendance to ye service, but 
I may assure myself out of no other end than that my absence 
might prejudice my cause neither did I expect any other 
measure from this new change of government or ye persons 
trusted therein the ground of whose enmitie toward mee I shall 
not be ashamed in time & place to deliver which was the motive 
to my humble Suite the last >eare to your Honor for his Maj*** 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-40. 386 

Letter to License my repaire for England wherein I againe 
humbly implore your Honour favor to his Maj***. 

I present these lines by the hands of one Mr. Christopher 
Higgison* a near^ kinsman to the Lord Bishop of Ely to whom 
I have sent a copy of the Certificates from the late Govornor & 
Councill and this gentleman hath promised to do me all right in 
the reporting of my cause to his Lo^' which he is the better 
enabled to do in respect Mr. Panton's enormities are so well 
known to him; Thus resting in all submission. 

Your Honour humbly to serve you 

Rich: Kemp. 
James Cittie, this 24th of April, 1640. 

{Colonial X, No. 64, III.) 

[Indorsed] W. Indos. The duplicate of my letter to Mr. Sec- 
retary Windebanke, Virginia, 24th April, 1640. 



Richard Kemp to Robert Reade. 
(Abstract.) 

James City, April 24, 1640. 
Richard Kemp Secretary of Virginia to Robert Reade. Has 
sent inclosed copies of his letters to Sec. Windebank and Lord 
Baltemore and craves his good assistence to this gentleman. 
Mr. Higgenson a near kinsman to my Lord of Ely whose 
strength he hopes will be added to his cause. 

Is extremely injured and shall suffer without guilt unless his 
friends now assist him in his absence being bandied between the 
Sub-committee and the new Governor & Council here who aim 
at his ruin — Beseeches his endeavours and pains herein. 
{Colonial Papers, Vol, lo, No. 64.) 
[Indorsed] rec. 28 June by Mr. Higgenson. 



* Christopher Higginson lived in lames City Co., and was a brother 
of Humphrey Higginson, member of the Virginia Council. Christopher 
Higginson died in 1673. Bishop Wren was at that time the incumbent 
of the see of Ely. 



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386 virginia historical magazine. 

Richard Kemp to Lord Baltimore. 

(Inclosure in Above.) 

(Abstract.) 

Richard Kemp to Lord Baltemore account of the case as con- 
cerns himself and one Panton a Minister who was last year 
banished the Colony by Sir John Harvey and the rest of the 
then Council. Panton on his arrival in England found Capts. 
West, Mathews, and the rest of that faction ready to abet him 
in any complaint against us and to colour his foul offences — 
their malice found out a way to Kemp's ruin by charging^ Kemp 
with saying in reply to Panton' s speech that he should appeal 
to the King and my Lord of Canterbury — **oh! I thought 
where I should have you first to Canterbury and then to Rome." 
Humbly beseeches his Lordships interest with Sec. Windebank 
to acquaint my Lord of Canterbury with the circumstances to 
clear Kemp, for he und^erstands his Lordship is much incensed 
against Kemp. Hopes to be in England before the case comes 
before the Sub-committees if he can get away by stealth* Sir 
John sleeps away care and complies with his enemies to his 
further misfortune. 2 pp. 

(^Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 64, L) 



Certificate of Governor Harvey & Council in 
Regard to Kemp. 
(Abstract Inclosure.) 
Certificate of the Governer and Council of Virginia. That 
Richard Kemp, Secretary of the Colony, preferred by their 
special order a bill of information on behalf of his Maj. against 
one Anthony Panton, clerk, touching several rebellions muti- 
nous & riotous words and actions done & spoken by Panton in 
contempt of the Govern' and authority established by his Maj; 
in this Colony. And that Panton being upon eviction banished 
the Colony hath reported that Kemp should have said when 



* Kemp finally escaped from Virginia by stealth. A ship owner or 
master was summoned before the Virginia Council to answer for assisting 
Richard Kemp to depart secretly out of the country. 



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VIRGINIA IN 1639-40. 387 

Panton craved to be admitted to appeal '*You will appeal first to 
Canterbury and then to Rome.** 

That no such words or anything to that sense or purpose 
were spoken at that time by Kemp, for Panton did in plain and 
direct words appeal for England and Kemp's reply was — That 
he did not conceive it fitting for it would be a means to dis- 
people the King's Colony if all the witnesses against Panton 
were sent along with him. And Panton excepting in general 
terms against all the witnesses, Kemp replied: Here is no 
competent judge for you nor no competent witness against you, 
as you allege. I think you will at least appeal for Rome as the 
fittest place for such an Incendiary, no mention being of his 
Grace of Canterbury. That said imputation of words is most 
malicious and scandalous savoring of revenge and deserving of 
exemplary punish'. Panton has been many years a turbulent 
wrestler with authority <& hath heretofore been banished the 
Colony. 

2 pp. signed by Harvey Browne 8c Brocas, 29th Oct., 1639. 

(^Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 64 II.) 



George Reade to Robert Reade. 
(Abstract.) 

James City, April 24, 1640. 
George Reade to his brother Robert Reade Secretary to Sec. 
Windebank Prays his brother to pay Capt. Peirce * 'which God 
knows I am not able to do." If his brother knew his necessities 
is sure he would not blame him. Hopes he has received money 
to supply him with two servants which may well be transported 
hither for ;^io a man with bedding clothes and all things fitting 
for servants by whose labours and his own endeavours he hopes 
of a subsistence without any further trouble to his brother. Sec- 
retary Kemp intends to go for England to clear himself of those 
vile aspersions which Panton hath endeavoured to fix upon him 
** which my conscience tells me he is innocent of." Kemp being 
gone he has no friend left here for Sir John, by the time his 
creditors have done with him will have little for himself. Both 
Evans and Peirce stay in the country this year and if the money 
be not paid shall look to be prosecuted by them both, for he ex- 



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388 VIRGINIA HISTORICAL MAGAZINE. 

pects no favor at all from this new change of Government. In- 
dorsed **rec. 28 June by Mr. Higgenson." 
(^Colonial Papers, Vol. 10, No. 66.) 



Sir John Harvey* to Secretary Windebanke. 

(Copy.) 
Right Hon^'^ 

I am soe narrowly watched that I have scarce time of privacye 
for these few lines w*** doe humble crave of you to acquainte his 
Maj*' how much I groan under the oppression of my prevayling 
enemies by whome the King's honor hath so much sufltered and 
who are now advanced to be my judges and have soe far al- 
ready proceeded against me as to teare from me my estate by 
an unusual way of inviting my creditors to clamor and not so 
content but I am denyed my passage for England notwithstand- 
ing my many infirmities & weaknesses of Body doe crave advice 
& helps beyond the skill & judgment which this place can give. 

These with many others which I have not time to put into 
writing are the motives of my earnest & humble Suite to your 
Honor to move his Maj"** for his Royall Warrant and mandate 
for my repay re to England where I shall at the feete of his sacred 
Maj*' give account of his service and of my sufferings therein. 

Humbly resting your Honors. 

Humblest Servant, 

John Harvey. 
Poynt Comfort, this 6th of May, 1640. 
State Papers y CoL, Vol. 10, No. 67. 

[Endorsed] 6 May, 1640, Sir John Harvey from Virginia by- 
Mr. Kemp, Sec'r., these 30 June. 

[Directed] to Right Hono'ble Sir Francis Windebank, Kn't 
Principle Seer, to his Maj'ty these humble p'sent. 

* This is the last of the numerous letters, petitions, &c., from Sir John 
Harvey, which appear in the records relating to Virginia. In this 
melancholy fashion he disappears from our history. Most of our his- 
torians have shown Harvey's character and administration in a very bad 
light; but no one should form a final opinion without studying the very 
learned and able editorial note to Kemp's letter of May 17, 1635, in the 
Aspinwall Papers, Mass, Historical Society Collections, 4th Series, Vol. 

IX, 131-149. 



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COUNCIL AND GENERAL COURT RECORDS. 389 



NOTES FROM COUNCIL AND GENERAL 
COURT RECORDS. 



By the late Conway Robinson, Esq. 



[See. this Magazine, Vol. VIII, 64-65, In addition to the 
publications of these notes there cited. See also the same Vol., 
65-73» 162-170, 236-244, 407-412; IX, 44-49. 186-188, 306-309; 
XI, 277-284. Certain entries copied by Mr. Robinson in this 
section 'of his notes have been printed in Hening, I, pp. 145, 
146, 551, 552, and are omitted here.] 1 630-1 640. 

Sept. 14, 1630. Capt. Mathews to have sole trade in the bay 
a year for building ye fort at pt. Comfort and after that the 
Gov*r and Council to have ye benefit thereof. 

8**' 8, 1630. Capt. Jno. West & Capt. Utie Seat in Chiskiaclc 
on pamunkey River & have 600 acres apiece for it. 

Dec. 7, 1630. Q'ter Court levy ioo,ooq lbs. Tobo. on titha. 
persons for ye fort at pt. Comfort and app'd Com'rs of ye peace. 

Feb. 23, 1630. Perjury punished by pillory & loss of ears. 

24. Order to proceed in the salt work at Accomack. 

March 12, 1630. Land given to undertakers saw mills. 

Ap'l 26, 1631. An Inquest in the body of Wm. Stogdill 
found felo de se. 

Ap*l 27, 1630. A fine of a house and garden, ack'd 8**' 6, 
1631. Ord'rs of Court under Signett. Three men layed neck 
and heels during divine Service for nicknaming houses abusing 
men & their wives & night walking & if they do so again serve 
Colony I year, ist time, 2 yrs; 2d, 3 years, 3d time and so 
forward. 

6 8***', 1631. A Councellor failing to attend Q'ter Court to 
be fined 40 s. to the Gov'r. 

Secretaries fees being in Tobo. when 12 p. ct. are now altered 
to mony at that rate because Tobo. is fai'en. 

Secretary to take up for his place 600 acres of Land as near 
as he can to James City.