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Full text of "Sewing machine gazette"

1 



Palmer's Patent Adjustable Ball Beariug^or Bicycles, 

Sole Makers —Palmer & Holland, Victoria Works, Aston Park, Birmingham. 




Vol. IXi No. 122. 



^m~^ 



JANUARY 1, 1681. f y ^ P( ' ) Price, withSupplement, 4d. 



DUNBAR, MCMASTER & CO., 

GILFORD, IRELAND, 

««TE,ic-jsi Manufacturers of all kinds of Linen Threads. 

Highest Medals were awarded Dunbar & Go's Thi*eads wherever exhibited 

FOR HAND OR MACHINE SEWING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

SUITABLE FOR ALL PURPOSES, SHOES, SOLE SEWING, TAILORS, &c. 

DUNBAR AND CO.'S THREADS ARE THE BEST. 




Samples and Prices on Application. 




RAWORTH'S 

COTTONS are REMAEKABLE 



EASEanp FREEDOM 




IN SEWING 



use RAW^RpS IB CO T TON^ ^ 

; CHAfet^ Siri^EET MILL5 LEICESTER 



/SPECIALLY ADAPTED for SEWING MACHINES. 

EQUALLY SUITABLE FOR HAND SEWING. 

Sold Retail by Machine Dealers, Drapers, Haberdashers, &c. 

Specially appointed Sole Manufacturer to the Queen. 



THE SEWIKG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1. 1881. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Singer Manufacturing Company v. Loog IQ'^S 

Protection and Free Trade ^5 

Law Intelligence ^" 

Leaders 28,29 

Harper's Patent Casters 3° 

Sewing Cottons ■ 3° 

Reviews 3'>32 

How to adjust the " White " 33 

Hints to Repairers 34 

Patents 35 

Laundry Gloss 3& 

The Courteous Collector 3^ 



!^; 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

Bicycle and Tricyle Manufacturers: 

Devey, Joseph & Co 4^ 

Harrington & Co 41 

HiUman, Herbert & Cooper 44 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 37 

Surrey Machinists Co 3^ 

Warman, Laxon & Co 42 

Bicycle Bearings and Fittings Manufacturers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 16 

Bown, W 9 

Devey, Joseph & Co 42 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 37 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Bicycle Saddle and Bag Manufacturers : 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 37 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Boot Machinery Manufacturers : 

Blake and Goodyear Company 45-5° 

Howe Machine Co. , Limited 17 

Button Hole Machines : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Company 10 

Gas Engine Makers : 

Andrew, J. E. H 5 

Crossley Brothers 18 

Kilting Machine Manufacturers : 

Holroyd, J..., 41 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Co 18 

Pianoforte Manufacturers : 

Ascherberg & Co 26 



Publications : 

Piatt on Life 2& 

Urquhart on the Sewing Machine 28 

Sewing Cotton Manufacturers : 

Alexander, R. F. and J. & Co. . , 8 

Carlile & Co 6 

Evans, Walter & Co 7 

Raworth, John T I 

Sewing Machine Attachment Makers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 16 

Bown, W 9 

Daville, R. S. & Co 5 

Manasse, Max 3^ 

Sewing Machine Manufacturers : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Co 

Gritzner & Co 

Holroyd. J 

Howe Machine Company, Limited 

Junker & Ruh 

Mothersill, R 

Raymond & Co. (P. Frank) 

Rennick, Kemsley & Co 

Singer Manufacturing Company I 

Thurlow, Charles 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Company, Limited 

Watson & Co 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co 

White .Sewing Machine Company I 

Sewing Machine and Bicycle Oil Makers: 

Ariston Oil Company 

Bishop's Cluster Company 

Daville & Co 

Sewing Machine Needles : 

The Park Wood Mills Company ". , ." i6 

Sewing Thread Manufacturers : 

Alexander, R. F. & J { 

Carlile & Co 6 

Dunbar, McMaster, & Co I 

Evans, Walter, & Co T 

Finlayson, Bousfield & Co 3< 

Marshall & Co ^^ 

Trade Protection Societies : 

Stubbs' Mercantile Offices 41 

Washing Machine Manufacturers : 

Holmes, Pearson, Midgley, & Co ; 

Twelvetrees, Harper 4, t 

Whitley & Co j 

Taylor & Wilson 5 

Taylor, F. D e 



10 

40 

\ 

2i 
2.13 

3« 

iS 

3f 
I] 




PATENT SINGLE-STROKE STAPLE PRESS. 

Sec'mea. ly Royal Letters Patent, No. 756, 2oth Feb., 1879. 

For Binamg Papers, PampUetg, &c„ sampling WooUens, Cottons, Silks, <Src., and for suspendin? 
Show Cards, &c., McGUl's Patent Staple Fasteners and Staple Suspending Eing-s wiU be found un- 
surpassed m adaptabdity, and the only articles for the purposes intended that can be applied auto- 
maticaUy McGiU s Patent Single-Stroke Staple Press automaticaUy inserts these Fastenera and 
Jimgs. A smgle stroke of the operator's hand upon the Plunger of the Press wiU instantaneously 
insert and clmch the Staple or Eing, in the articles to be bound or suspended. 

Also McGiU's Patent American Paper Fasteners, Binders, Suspending (• _ 

Rings and Braces, Picture Hang-ers, &c., cheaper and superior to any ^^le Susuend- 

other make. *ng Kiig. 

6s. per 1000 

EUEOPEAN AGENTS— 

P. W. LOTZ & Co., 20, Barbican, London, EC 

WHOLESALE ONLY. DISCOUNT TO EXPORTERS. staple Fastener. 

Illustrated Oatalogue and Price List on Application. 5s. per 1000, 





Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWINO MA.CH1NE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 3 

Sydney Exhibition. 



PRIZE 



MEDAL 




A WA RD S 

i88o. 



TAYLOR AND WILSON'S 



"HOME" WASHER 
"DOLLY" WASHER - 
WRINGING MACHINE 



FIRST PRIZE 

SECOND PRIZE 

FIRST PRIZE 




Price, £6:6:0. 




Price £3 : 10 : 0. 




Price, £3:5:0. 



Awarded upwards of 150 Gold and Silver Medals and First Prizes 

THE ANNUAL SALES EXCEED THOSE OF ANY OTHER WASHING MACHINE. 



Our Goods are all guaranteed to be made from the best materials, tborougbly seasoned, and are all fitted witb oiu 
well-known patents and appliances, wbicb cannot be supplied by any other maker. 



lllicstT'ated Catalogue free on applicaUon to 



TAYLOR & AVILSON, 

Atlas Works, Clayton-le-Moors, Accrington. 



THE SEWINa MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1, 1881. 



Clothes-Wrin§:ers ! Clothes-Wringers ! ! 



HARPER TWELVETREES' 

INDIA-RUBBER CLOTHES-WRINGERS, 

WITH COG-WHEELS, 
Strong Frames, Metal Bearings, Adjustable Claspers, and other great improyements, have 
maintained their supremacy for eighteen ^ears as the " Gem of Clothes-Wringers." They 
will fit tubs of every shape, and wring the largest as well as the smallest articles dry 
instantly without labour, dropping them into the basket nearly dry enough to iron or 
mangle. These well-known and much-prized Clothes- Wringers are specially adapted for 
the heavy, constant work of laundresses, and are immensely superior to the slightly-made 
delicate American Importations. 

Prices: 30s., 40s., 50s., or without Cogwheels, S5s., 30s., S5s. 

Harper Twelvetrees' Cheap Fifty-Shilling Mangle and Wringer, 24-inch Rollers, 
Wholesale Quotations, Post free, from 

HAEPER TWELYETREES, 

Laundry Machinist, 

80, Finsbury Pavement, Loudon, E.G. Works: Burdett Road, Bow, E. 




$■ 




CANADIAN SEWING MACHINES. 




£2 2s. Complete. 



. This Machine has obtained the highest re- 
■Sl pntation and an enormous sale, both under 
its true name (" Raymond's"), and also as 
the "Weir 55s. Machine," &c. — (See caution 
below). It is durable, rapid, exceedingly 
simple, neatj'not liable to get out of order, and warranted 
to sew from'the finest muslin to the heaviest material. 

CATJTION.— James G. Weir, who, for about eight 
years obtained these genuine Machines, is no longer sup- 
plied with them by the Inventor and Manufacturer, Mr. 
Charles Raymond. 



BEWARE OF ALL COTTNTEBFEITS. 




ALSO 



£4 4s. Complete. 

RAYMOND'S PATENT "Household" 
Lockstitch Machine has been designed ex- 
pressly for family use. It is exceedingly 
simple to learn and to manage, and warranted 
to sew every kind of family and household 
work Is fitted with the latest improve- 
ments — loose wheel, and (Registered) 
Automatic Bobbin Winder, 

Testimonials, Prospectuses, Samples of 
Work, and all particulars free on application 



Dressmakers, and Manufacturers. 



Raymond's No. 1 and 2 TREADLE MACHINES for Families, 

CHIEF DEPOT FOR EUROPE AND EXPORT: 

11, MOUNT PLEASANT, LIVERPOOL 

p. FRANK, AGENT. ESTABLISHED 1863. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtJRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE 



I=>EEI^IL.ESS 



CLOTHES WRINGER 



Is the leading Wringer of America. 



1^ 

H 
P4 



^ 







Tlie best, the cheapest, the most substantial and 
simple wooden frame Clothes Wringer made. 

Enquiries and Orders to be addressed to the Sole European 
Representatives, 

JOHN R. WHITLEY&CO., 

7, POULTRY, LONDON, E.G. ; 

AND 

8, PLACE VENDOME, PARIS. 

JL C3- EHSTT H "W-A-nsr TED. 

THE"BISSCHOP"GASEilGI 

Piston and Valve need no Lubricator. Will stai-t at a moment's notice. 

PowEK. Price. 

OneMan £25 

One-and-a-halt Man 30 

TwoMan 35 

FourMan 50 



w 

H 
W 

w 
<: 
< 

w 
m 

O 




O 



> 
H 



> 

H 

W 

a 



J. E. H. ANDREW, 
18. Waterloo Road, STOCKPORT. 



R. S. DAVILLE & CO., 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 

Sewing MacMne Attachments, 

FITTINGS, OIL, &c., 

IMPORTERS OF 

AMEEICM SEWma MACHmES, 

DOMESTIC MACHINERY, 

CLOCKS, NOVELTIES, 

HABDWABE, &c., &c. 

LISTS FORWARDED ON APPLICATION, 

46, WOOD STREET, 



WASHI NG-DAY R EFOBM 

HARPER TWELVETREES' 

RENOWNED "VILLA" 

£2 15s,, OE WITH 

MANGLER & WRINGER, £5 5s., 

Does the Fortnight's Family 
Wash in Four Hours, "without rub- 
bing OR BOILING, as certified by 
thousands of delighted purchasers 
It is easy to work, easily under- 
stood, strongly made, durable, doe- 
not injure the clothes, but really 
saves them ; and is the only "Wash 
ing Macliine in the world which 
renders Boiling unnecessary, and 
saves five or six hours of coppers 
firing each washing day. The Five- 
Guinea "Villa" Washer possesses 
tremendous washing power, and 
will wash 15 dozen collars and 
ladies' cuffs in five minutes ; 150 
pocket - handkerchiefs in five 
minutes ; 60 hotel table cloths in an 
hour; 10 dozen bedi'oom towels per 
hour ; 3^ dozen shirts per hour ; ij 
dozen sheets per hour, acd counter- 
panes, blankets, curtains, &c., in 
proportion. Such success is un 
paralleled! Illustrated Prospectuses 
and Export Quotations post freeo 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 

LAT'NDET EXGINEEE AND MACHINIST, 

FINSBURY PAVEMENT, LONDON, E.G. 




80. 



MORE 



AGENTS WANTED, 



Sole London Agent for Kenworthy's 
Washing Machine. 



"Paragon" 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, issi. 




SIX 



-CORD SOFT AND EXTRA QUALITY GLACE 



BEING OF VERY SUPERIOR QUALITY, ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED 




C. and Co. beg to direct attention to their 
celebrated CROCHET or TATTING COTTON, in 

Hanks or Balls. 

ESTABLIS>JED 1752. 





MAGIC STEAM LAUNDRY WASHER 



SECURED BY 
EOTAL 




LETTERS 
PATENT. 



handles •'onlylTSf't),?^' ^"^T' T'^'' .^^^h-boarde ; no turning or pushing machine 
SmSiton in rt:!^5„f i-t^'^P/f f ^"^ "P^"^'"" "^ JE6SE OviETON, Springfield Laundry, 
carrSriw^v ,Jr<.fl» f fl'f"- °^ "^'i'''' P^S^ ^» '-"The steam softens, and the condensed water 
carries away grease and stickmess, just as a belt of perspiration does iff a dirty forehead." 

>« . ^ . °°'^°'^^ OF WASHING DECIDEDLY IMPROVED. 

MAGIC LAUNDRY WASHER COMPANY 

S14, Lichfield Road, Aston, Birmingham. 



JlH. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTBNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



FOR SEWING 




IKCACHINES. 



TEADE MARK. 



WALTER EVANS & CO., 

BO -A. It'S-H E .A. 13 COTTOlSr OS/I A. 1>T X7 F uA. C T O K. "2", ID E R, B ' 



EVANS'S SUPERIOR SIX CORD SEWING COTTON, ON SPOOLS SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

ALSO 

Superior Six-Cord Crochet Cotton, on Spools, in Skeins, and in Balls, for Sewing, Knitting, and Crochet, which 

is especially recommended for all " first-class Crochet Work; " also for Guipure d'Art and Point Lace. 
Maltese Thread, in Balls, 'White, Black, and Colors 
Tatting Cotton, on Spools. 

Patent Glace Thread, in White, Black, and Colors, on Spools and Cards. 
Two AND Three Cord Sewings, on Spools, soft finish. 
Sewings, in Balls. 
Embroidering, Knitting, Mending, Cotton Cords, and Small Cords. 



1862. 

London Sshibition Prize Uedal, 
awarded " for very strong & 
most superior thread," 



1867. 

Paris Oniversal Eshibitloa 
Gold Uedal. 



1873. 

Vienna First Class Medal 
" for Progress." 



1878. 

Paris TTniveisal Exhibition, 
Silver Uedal. 



THE ARISTON OIL COMPANY, 

15, KIRBY STREET, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, E.G., 
MAKERS OF SPECIAL SEWING MACHINE AND BICYCLE OILS. 

Wholesale and tor Export. 

loLMES, PEARSON, MURTON & CO., 

MAIJUFACTUEEEB OF 

Washing, Wringing, and Mangling Machines, 

FRUn DRESSER, SUGAR CUTTER, CHAFF CUTTER, 

Morticing Machines and Circular Saw Benches 




MANUFACTORY : 

ROYAL IRON WORKS, 



Price List on Application, 

SPECIAL TERMS TO MERCHANTS AND THE TRADE. 

ALL GOODS CAREFULLY PACKED IN SMALL SPACE FOR EXPORT, 



THE ROYAL WASHER, strong and simple in-conatruotion. An ornament to every home, and the deUght of averr Trife. 
^ Price, £6 10s. Rollers 32 iuchei, with BraBS Caps, 



«»»»'«««— »»"" - 



o^he sewing machine Gazette and jotJRNAL op domestic appliances. 



Jak. 1, 1881. 



I 



B-Sr SI>EOI-A.3Li -A.ITOIIS^TlS/l:B]^TT'- 




Letters Patent Dated 17th April, 1838. 

R. F. & J. ALEXANDER & CO 

SEWING COTTON MANUFACTURERS 

TO HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY QUEEN VICTOBIA. 



MOLENDINAR WORKS, GLASGOW, 

AND 

OROFTHEAD WORKS, N E I LSTO N. 

LONDON WAEEHOUSE: 

No. 9, BOW LANE, CHEAPSIDE, E.G. 

Manufacture all kinds of Sewing Cotton on Reel, Ball, and Card, 

for Hand and Machine use. Also Knitting Cotton of a very superior 
quality. 

Trade Marks for 6, 4, 3, and 2 Cords—Soft and Glace Cottons. 



o.^oE M/f, 




■^i^fHt/fj^ 





SUN 

Best Quality. 



Moon 

Medium Quality. 



STAB 

Cheapest Quality. 



Made in all lengths, free from knots, and guaranteed full measure as marked. 

These Threads being favourite brands in almost all markets of the world, unprincipled 
and flagrant imitations are very numerous. 

Manufacturers, Merchants, and Consumers are warned against imitations, and requested 
to take special note of the Trade Marks as above. 

Prices of the various kinds, considering qualities, will be found very cheap. 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWINa MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE PATENT 



">EOLUS" BALL BEARINGS 



AEE 



UNIVERSALLY 



ADJUSTABLE, 



DUST PROOF, 



DURABLE, 




AND 

REQUIRE 

BUT SLIGHT 

LUBRICATION. 



EIBTITION. " SECmOH. FEONT VIEW. 

BACK WHEEL BEARINGS. 



See 

Testimonals 

and 

Reviews. 




See 

Testimonials 

and 

Reviews, 



SECTION. 



As a Proof of their Superiority over all others, 

Mr. H. L. CORTIS, Amateur Champion, 

Won the 25 and 50 MILES AMATEITE CHAMPIONSHIP RACES on a Bicycle fitted with " ^olus " Bearingi, 
BEATING EECOED TIME, and in a Five Mile Eace BEATING EECOED TIME in Three, Four, and Five MUes. 



In the SIX DAYS' EACE at LONDON, April last, rode the Unprecedented Distance of 220 MILES and ioom odd 
laps without dismounting from the Bicycle or once Oiling the Bearings. 



SOLE PROPRIETOR AND MAKER 



WILLIAM BOAVN. 

308, SUMMER LANE, BIRMINGHAM, 



ALSO MANUFACTUEEE OF 



Best Steel Balls, Bicycle Fittings, and Kequisites of every 
description and General Stamping in Iron and Steel. 

N.B,— Considerable reduction in price of the " ^olus " Bearings this Season. 



10 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTRNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 




TUB nSTE-W' 

AMERICAN 
BUTTON-HOLE, 
OVER-SEAMING 



AND 




SEWING MACHINES. 

MANUFACTURED BY THE 

AMERICAN BUTTON-HOLE, OVER-SEAMING AND SEWING 

MACHINE COMPANY, 

OP ' 

The New Hand, Treadle and Manufacturing Machines are 

SO LIGHT a child can run them, 

SO SIMPLE they require no care. 

SO STRONG they never wear out. 

Self Setting Needle. Self Threading Shuttle. No Holes to Thread. 

No Screw Driver necessary. 

THE SELF-THREADING SHUTTLE 



Is one of the chief attractions 

of the 

American Sewing Machine, 




And is considered by all who 
have used it to be one of the 
Most Valuable Improvements 
that has ever been introduced. 



The Shuttle and Bobbin can be taken out and replaced with great facility in one-fourth the time usually 
necessary with other Machines. The tensions are evenly adjusted without loss of time — the under tension being jelf- 
regulating, and no threading-up required in the Shuttle. 

Our Machines are unequalled for simplicity in construction, light running, durability, and do every kind and 
variety of work done on other Lock Stitch Machines with greater rapidity, ease, and perfection. Price from 
£4 4s. upv/ards. 

THE "NEW" BUTTON-HOLE AND OVER-SEAMING MACHINE is specially adapted for the use o 
Manufacturers of Boots (leather and lasting), Clothing, all kinds of Rubber Garments, Mantles, Cloaks, Dresses, &8 
of all materials. 

The Machine will make from four dozen to ten dozen button-holes per hour, and besides making a great saving ■ 
the cost of production, it secures a finish and uniformity to the work which is necessary to the fine and coarse grades 
of material. Price £12 10s. 

The highest medals have been awarded to the Machines made by this Company. 

Valuable and important improvements have been made to all our Machines during the past six months. 

Manufacturers, Merchants, Dealers, and others are invited to send samples of material in which button-holes 
are required, which will be returned post-free with Price Lists, Illustrated Catalogues, and Testimonials. 

AMMICAN BUTTON-HOLE, OVER-SEAMING & SEWING 

MACHINE COMPANY. 

SOLE AGENT FOR GREAT BRITAIN: 

Isaac L. Berridge, Gallowtreegate, Leicester. 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



11 




THE 

ONLY 
"QRAND 
PRIZE" 

FOE 

SEWING 
MACHINES 

AT THE 

PARIS 
EXHIBITION, 1878. 




R& W 

ROTARY-HOOK LOCK-STITCH TREADLE 

SEWINC mAC 

From <£6 10s. Hand Machines from <£4 4s. 




£8 10s. 
£10. 

£8 10s, 



The New-Straight Needle Machines, for which the " GEAND PEIZE" was awarded, are the 

No. 8. — The New Family and Light Manufacturing Machine. Strongly recommended Price £7 lOs. 

No. 6. — -A- Powerful Machine, capable of doing all grades of work from the finest to the thickest 
in the best possible manner, including all the various kinds of Leather work .... 

Also No. 6 Cylinder Machine for special classes of Boot work 

No. 7. — Similar to the No. 6 Machine, but especially suitable for Corset work, heavy Tailoring, 
Upholstery, &c , . - 

The "Well-known Original Family and Light Manufacturing Machines. 

Nos. 1&2 Prices, £6 lOs., £7 lOs. 

The New No. 8 Hand Machine, specially recommended. 

Is the best and most perfect Hand Machine j'et produced, and combines the utmost efficiency 
with elegance of appearance, rendericg it suitable to the lady's boudoir or fer travelling. 

Price, WITH COVEE, complete, £5 5s, 

INSTRUCTION GRATIS TO ALL (whether purchasers or not) at any of our offices, a 

good operators recommended to employers. 

Machine ON HIRE with OPTION OF PURCHASE from 2/6 per Week, or from 10/- per Month. 
EVERY MACHINE MADE BY WHEELER AND WILSON HAS THEIR TRADE MARK AFFIXED 

Illustrated Catalogues and other Particulars, Post Free. 



WHEELER & WILSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 






London, Chief Office, 21, Queen 

Victoria Street, E.G. 
London, 139, Regent Street, W. 

,, J 49, Newington Causeway, S.E. 
Liverpool, 73, Bold Street. 
Birmingham, Stevenson Place. 
Brighton, 163, North Street. 



Bristol, 50, Victoria Street. 
Plymouth, 187, Union Street. 
Cardiff, 17, S't. Mary Street. 
Nottingham, 16, Lister Gate. 
Newcastle, "West Grainger Street. 
Hull, 9, Savile Street. 
Manchester, 131, Market Street. 



Leeds, 41, Commercial Street. 
Sheffield, 126, Barker's Pool. 
York, 27, Coney Street. 
Bradford, 57. Tyrrel Street 
Edinburgh, 7. Frederick Street. 
Glasgow, 71, Union Street. 
Dublin, 1, Stephen's Green. 



Belfast, 63, High Street 
Cork, 32, Grand Parade. 
Norwich, 45, London Street, 
Exeter, London Inn Square. 
Torquay, 115, Union Strest. 
Taunton, 2, High Street. 
Stroud, 1, John Street. 



12 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMEbTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1, 188]. 



SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES. 



After being engaged in litigation for nine years, The Singer Manufacturing Company, in 
a Chancery Suit recently heard before Vice-Chancellor Sir James Bacon, have established their 
exclusive right to the use of the name " Singer," as applied to Sewing Machines. The Public 
are cautioned that " Singer" or " Singer's " Sewing Machines are only made by The Singer 
Manufacturing Company, who keep them on sale at their offices in all the towns of the 
United Kingdom. 

SINGERS SEWING MACHINES 



ARE 



UNEQUALLED 

because of their perfect 
adaptability to every class of 
sewing, from the finest mus 
lin to the thickest cloth. 



UNEQUALLED 

because of their cheapness 
and universal popularity. 
Price from £4 43. For cash, 
M. 



PRICE 

from 




ARE 



UNEQUALLED 

because they are within the 
reach of all. If unable to 
pay cash, a " Singer's " ma- 
chine can be had on hire at 
S/B per week with option 
of purchase and without any 
addition to the price. 



UNEQUALLED 

for portability, excellence, 
durability, and efllciency ; 
and are so simple that a child 
can work them. 

SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES, s/e 

HAND OR TREADLE. PER WEEK. 

BEWARE OF PERSONS, who, having no good trade repute of their own, use our 
name, " SINGER," to palm off counterfeit machines of inferior construction and manufacture. 

EVERY SINGER MACHINE has the Company's name printed on the Arm. and 
impressed upon the Brass Trade Mark Plate. 

TO AVOID DECEPTION, buy only at The Offices of the Singer Manufacturing 
Company (formerly I. M. Singer and Co.). 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURING OOMP 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



J 



SINGEE' S__SEWmG_M ACHIIsrES. 

CHIEF COUNTING HOUSE IN EUROPE:— 

89. FOSTER LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, 

AND 287 BRANCH OFFICES !N THE UNITED KINGDOM. 



JAii. 1, 1881. THE SEWIKG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 13 




THE SINBER ^ANUFAOTORI 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & CO.), 

SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES 



Chief Counting House in Europe ; 

39 FOSTER LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.G. 



LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES s 

i47, Oheapside, E.G. ; 132, Oxford Street, "W. ; 61, High Street, Camdec Town, N.W. ; 31 and 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. ; 149, Blue 
Anchor Road, Bermondsey, S.E (uow 149, Southwark Park Road) ; 278, Olapham Road, S.W. ; 144, Brompton Road, S.W. ; 269, Commercial 
Road, E. (comer of Bedford Street) ; 174, Hackney Road, E. (opposite Weymouth Terrace) ; 3, Castle Street, KiDgbland High Street, N, ; 
I, Surinam Terrace, Stratford, E. (between Swan and Bank) ; 1, Rathbone Street, Barking Road, Canning Town, E, • 7, Kew Koad, 
Richmond, S.W. ; 1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. ; 131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. ; Croydon, 4ii, North End. 



PROVINCIAL OFFICES: 



ENGLAND. 

iVccrington, 9, Peel-Btreet 
■Vldershot, Vietoria-road 
.Vlfreton, 68, King-street 
Ashford, 17, Marsh-street 
Ashton-u.-Lyne, 246. Stamfd-st. 
Aylesbury, Silver-street 
Bakewell, North Church- street. 
Banbury, Market Place 
B.irnslcy, Eldon-street 
Barrow-in-Furness, 11, Dalkeith- 

street 
Bath, 5, Quiet-street 
Batley, Commercial-street 
Boiiford, 36, Midland-road 
Bicester, Sheep-street 
Bi^pfloswade, Shortmead-street 
Binf^lpy, ir.iin-street. 
Birkenhead, 164, Grange-lane 
BiiTTiingham, 93, New-street 
Bishop Auckland, 29, South-rd. 
Bishop Stortford, "Wind Hill 
Blackburn, 54a, Church-street 
Blyth, "Woodbine-ter., Waterloo 
Bnlton, 52, Newport -street 
Boston, 3J, Market-place 
Bradford, 38, Mechanics* Instit. 
Braintree, 7, Fairfield -road 
Brentwood, 3, Crown -street 
Bi-ighton, 6, North. ,st., Quadrant 
Bristol, 18 & 19, High-street 
Bromley (Kent), 18, High-street 
Burnley, 110, St. James'-street 
Burton -on-Trent, 76, Guild-street 
Bury-St. -Edmunds, 7&, St. John-st. 
Cambridge, 17, Petty Cury 
Canterbury, 6, High-street 
Carlisle, Lome-bld^s., Bank-st. 
Chatham, 342, High-street 
Chcadle, High-Btrcet 
Chelmsford, High-street 
Cheltenham, 24, Pittville-street 
Chester, 68, Foregate-street 
Chesterfield, 1, Corporation-bldgs. 
Chichester, 54, East^street 
Chorley, 50, Clifford-street 
Cleckbeaton, 5, Crown-street 
Clitheroe, 39. "Wellgate 
Coahdlle, Station-^eet. 
Colchester, 32, St. Botolph-street 
Colne (Lancashire), 8, Arcade 
Congleton, 7, Mill-street 
Coventry, 12, Fleet-street (op. 

Bablue Church) 
Orewe, 67, Nantwich-poad 
Darlington, 10, Prebend-row 
t)artford, 18, High-strMt 



Deal, 124, Beach-street 
Denbigh, 3G. Park-street 
Deiby, 22, "Wardwick 
Dewsbury, Nelson-street (top of 

Daisy-hill) 
Doncaster, 23, Scot-lane 
Douglas (Isle of Man), 5, Strand- 
street 
Dover, 9, Priory-street 
Dovercourt, Harwich-road 

Dudley, 217, Wolverhampton-st, 

Durham, 3, Neville-street i 

Eastbourne, 46, Terminua-road 
(two doors from post office) 

Eccles, 31, Church-street 

Exeter, 19, Queen street 

Folkestone, Market-place 

Gloucester, 116, Westgate-street 

Grantham, 11, Wharf-road 

Gravesend, 20, Ntw-road 

Grimsby, 57, Preeman-stri>iC 

Guernser, 17, Smith-street 

Guildford, 161, High-street 

Halstead, 53, High-street 

Hanley, 48, Piccadilly 

Harrogate, 11, "WestmorelanA-st. 

Hastings, 4S, Robertson-street 

HecInnondwike,2, Market-street 

Hednesford, Station-street 

Hereford, 57, Commercial-street 

H( rtford, Forden House, Ware- 
road 

Hexham, 20, Market-place 

High Wycombe, 123, Oxford-rd. 

Hinckley, Castle-street 

Huddersfield, 8, New-street 

Hull, 61, Whitefriargate 

Huntingdon, High-street 

Ilkeston, 75, Bath-street 

Ipswich, 19, Butter-market 

Jersey, Ha, New-street 

Keighley, 2, Market-place 

Kendall, 8, Wildman-street 

Kiddesminster, Bull Ring 

Lancaster, 19, Brock-street (cor- 
ner of Penny-street) 

Leamington, 38, Windsor-street 

Leeds, 14, Boar-lane 

Leek, 27, Rusaell-street 

Leicester. 44. Granby-street 

Lewes, 164, High-street 

Liverpool, 21, Bold-street 

Longton (Staffs.), 12, Market-ter. 

Loughborough, 44, Market-place Saffron Walden. Chtireh-street 

Lowestoft, 123, High-street | Salisbury, 56, Fishorv^n-strcct 

Luton, 32, Park -street I^Salford, 4, Cross-,.ac.c- and 100, 

Lynn, 9, Norfolk-Btreet i Regent-road 

Uaiditcii^t 8, Eing-st^^^ I Bcexborongh, 30, Huncriaft-row 



Maldon, High-street . r 

(105, Market-street! 
Manchester J 132, Cheetham-hill 
( 438, Stretford-road 
Manningtree, Hi^h-street 
Mansfield, 32. Nottingham-street 
Market Drayton, Shropshire-st. 
Market Harboro', Church-street 
Melton Mowbray, Victoria House, 

Market-place 
Middlesboro', 59, Newport-road 
Morley, 4, Bradford-buildings, 

Chapel-hill 
Newark, 15, Kirkgate 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, 16, Grainger- 

street, W. 
Newcastle-under-Lyne, 34, Bridge- 
street ' 
Newport (Mon.), 28, High-street 
Newport (I of Wight). 91,Pyle-st. 
Newton Hpath, 622, Oldham-road 
Northampton, 3, Market-square 
Northwich, 17, Witton-street 
Norwich, 55, London-street 
Nottingham, 20, Wheelcrgate 
Oldham, 70, Yorkshire-street 
Opcnshaw, 37, Ashton-old-road 
Ormskirk, 58, Aughton-street 
Oswestry, Bailey-street 
Otley, 34, Kirkgate 
Oxford, 3, New-road 
Penrith, 8, Castlegjite 
Feterborooigh, 53, Narrow Bridge- 
street 
Plymouth, 3, Bank of England-pl. 
Pontofract, 11, New Market-hall 
Portsca, 165, Queen-street 
Preston, 147, Friar gate-street (op- 
posite Lune-strect 
Riimsgate, 31, West Cliff-road 
Rawtcnstatl, Bank-street 
Reading, 61. London-street 
Red Hill, High-street 

Retford, 3, Grove-street 
IfApley, Market-place 
lapon, 1, Bloasomgate 
Rochdale, 66, Yorkshire-street 
Romford, Market-place 
Roth-.'rham, 109. Main-street 
Rugby, Lawtord-road 
Runcorn, Hiirh-strcct 
Ryde (Isle of Wights 78, Union-st. 



Scotholme, Basford-road 
Sheffield, 37, Fargate 
Shipley, 19, Kirkgate 
Shrewsbury, 4, Market-street 
Sittingborne, 64. Iligh-strcet 
Southampton, 105, High-street 
Southend, Market-place 
Southport, 7, Union-street 
St. Helen's, 31, Market-place 
Stafford, 25, Gaol-road 
Stamford, Ironmonger-street 
South Stockton, 19, Mandale-road 
Stockport, 11, Bridge-street 
Stourbridge, 61 , Chxirch-street 
Stratford-on-Avon, 19. W^d-st. 
Stroud, 7, George-street 
Swadlincote, Station-street 
Swindon, 52, Regent-street 
Tamworth. 54, Church-street 
Taunton, Bridire-.street 
Torquay, 58, Fleet-Street 
Truro, 13, Vietoria-piace 
Tunbridge Wells, Vale-road 
Tunstall, 119, High-street 
Wakefield, 9, Kirkgate 
Walsall, 2, Bridge-Ptreet 
Warrington, 44, Hor.semarket-st. 
Watford,' Queen'.s-road 
Wednesbury, 67, Union-street 
Wellington, Church-street 
West Bromwich, 5, New-street 
Whitehaven. 70, King-street 
Wigan, 21, King-street 
Winchester, 27, St. Thomas-street 
Windsor, 64a, Peascod-street 
Winsford, Over-lane 
Wirksworth, North-end 
Wisbeach, 51, Market-place 
Wolverhampton, Queen-street 
Wor'-ester, 2, <t. Nicholns-street 
Wrexham, 7, Charles-street 
Yarmouth, Broad-Row 
York, 24, Coney-street 

WALES. 

Abergavenny, 19, M;aket- street 
Aberj'siwith, Market-hall 
Builth, High->trcct 
Cardiff, 5, Queen -street 
Cannitrthen, 7, Lammas-strcct 
Carnarvon, 5, Bridge-street 
Dulgelly, Market-hall 
Merthyr, I, Victoria-street 
Newtown. Market-liall 
Fontypool. Market-hall 
Pontypridd, Market-hall 
Svaxkaeor 103, Oxford -street 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, 225, Union-street 
Arbroath, 159, High-street 
Avr, 60, High-street 
Banff, 17, Strait-path 
Cupar-Fife, 61, Crossgate 
Dumbarton, 67, High-street 
Dumfries, 127, High-street 
Dundee, 128, Nethcrgate 
Dunfermline, 87, High-street 
Edinburgh, 74, Princes-street 
Elgin, 215, High-street 
Forfar, 28, Castle-street 
Galashiels, 62, High-street 
Glasgow, 39, Union-street 
Greenock, 8, West BlackhalLrt. 
Hamilton, 32, Cadzow-street 
Hawick, 3, Tower-knowe 
Inverness, 14, Union-street 
Kilmarnock. 83, King-stree* 
Kukcaldy, 69, Fligh-'^'reet 
Kirkwall (Orkney), Broad-street 
Montrose, 96, Murray-street 
Paisley, 101, High-street-cross 
Partick, 97, Dumbarton-road 
Perth, 64, St. Jolin-etreet 
Peterhead, Rose-street 
Stirling, 61, Murray-place 
Tain, Lamington-stnet 
Thurso, Princes-street 

IRELAND. 

Armagh, 2, Ogle-strcot 
Athlone, Church-street 
Ballina, Bridge-street 
Ballymena. 67 and 68, Church-st. 
Belfast, 3 and 4, Donegal-sq., N. 
Carlow, Tullow-street 
Coleraine, New-row 
Cork, 79, Grand-fiirade 
Drogheda, 97, (H- Oeorge's-street 
Dublin, 69, Grafton-street 
Ennis, Jail-street 
Enniskillen. P, High-street 
Fcrmoy, 1. King-street 
Galwav, Domnick- street 
Kilrusli, Moort-strcet 
Kingstown, 602 Lower Gerirge-rt 
Limerick, 31, 3 'atrick -street 
1,011'londeiTy, 1. Carlislc-road 
Muliiiigar, Greville-street 
Navan, Trim gate-street 
Newry, 18, Supar-isl.iNd 
Parso'nstown, 2, Si ffins 
Queenstown, Harbcur-row 
Sligo, 45, Knox-stnet 
Tralce. 40, Bridge-street 
Wiiterford, 124, Quoy 
WexXocd, Selaku-«tz«6^ 



14 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY. 



MANUFACTORY : 



Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. 



PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN OFFICE 



19, QUEEN VIGTOBIA ST., LO NDON, E.G. 

Importers and Manufacturers of the justly Celebrated 

WHITE SEWING MACHINES, 

THE POPULAR FAVORITE FOR NOISELESSNESS AND EASY 

TREADLE MOVEMENT. 

SUPERLATIVE 

Machines for I -r-jy i Every machine 
all work. J-i> Warranted for 

12 various mTT-i7TT) 5 years. Legal 
styles. |illrjlh,| guarantee 




ATTRIBUTES, 



IT IS THE FINEST FINISHED AND 

BEST MADE MACHINE IN THE 

WORLD. 

IT IS THE EASIEST-SELLING AND 

BEST- SATISFYING MACHINE 

EVER PRODUCED. 



The Peerless Hand 
Machine. 




Hi 
o 

CD 

CO 



O 



Cheapest and Best in the Market. 
Warranted for 3 years. 

LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGENTS. 



All Sewing Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this — the latest Improved and Best 
Silent Lock-Stitch Shuttle Sewing Machine— or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &c., to 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

19, Queen Victoria Street, London, E.G. 



— !. ...'...,.-,;i,iW.j^-j-,-, j,..;v 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWma MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



15 



Machines for Family use, for the Workshop, and 

for a Lady's Boudoir. 




Every Machine Adjusted and regulated before 
sending out. Satisfaction gtiaranteed. 



Our Al Family Machine. 



SPECIAL CHARACTERISTICS. 

The Simplicity of the Movement. 
A child can operate it. 
No fatigue to the Operator. 
Lost motion from constant use instantly 
_^ taken up. 

g Attachments for every kind of fancy 

work. 
Ruffler and Braider of the newest 

patents. 
Will do any kind of work on any 

material. 




No. 3.— The Popular Style. 

Extra Fine Cabinet AVork. 



The Peerless Hand Machine, best in the 

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No. 1— Plain style Treadle 6 10 

,, 2— Ditto, with Cabinet Cover 7 5 

,, 3 — Extra ditto, plated wheel & fine work 9 

,, 4 — Ditto, folding cover and drawers 10 

,, 5— Ditto, full Cabinet style, inlaid pearl 16 16 
,, 6 — Plain style, fancy cover and nest of 

drawers 8 

THE USUAL ATTACHMENTS 



RETAIL PRICE LIST. 



£ s. d. 

No.6| — Plain style, cabinet cover and drawers 7 10 
,, 7 — Extra style, cover, drop table and 

work box 9 

„ 8— A Superb Machine 10 

,, 9 — The Ladies' Companion 12 12 

,, 10 — A finely - finished Machine, artistic 

wood work 10 

^REE WITH EACH MACHINE. 




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AND 

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Cabinet Machine. 



LIBEE.AL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGENTS. 



The Ladies' Companion. 



All Sewing Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this — the latest Improved 
and Best Silent Lock-StitchShuttle Sewing Machine — or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &c., to 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY. 

19, Queen Victoria Street, London, E.G. 



16 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



TRADE 



MARK 




ANNUAL PRODUCTION, 
30,000 MACHINES. 



TRADE 



MARK 



PROPER IRION FOUNDRY. 

FIRST PRIZES AT DIFFERENT EXHIBITIONS. 




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Machine 

POR TRADE, 

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MACHINES 

FOR TRADE. 



TRADE 




MARK 



JUNKER & RUH, _ 

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THE LARGEST SEWING MACHINE 



WINK MACHINE 




Warehouse. 



Machine "Belt" iWa Oil 

Manufacturers. BtHh Manufacturers. 

Bishop's Cluster Company, Limited, 25, Hamsell St., London, E.C. 

SEWING AND MACHINE NEEDLES. 

ALL KINDS OF FANCY NEEDLES, KNITTING PINS, CROOHET HOOKS, THIMBLES, &c., 

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pric. Lists Free, 230, BRADFORD STREET, BIRMINGHAM. 




TNAOlT^d^ MARK 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 17 



PATENT SEWING MACHINES. 



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The Celebrated "TAYLOR FRICTION" Improved • • 

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The ditto Hand ditto 



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£4 14 


6 


£2 





4 4 





1 15 





5 5 





2 10 





2 2 





17 





6 10 





3 





5 5 





2 15 





4 4 





2 






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18 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AWD JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE 




n 




LOCK-STITCH, HAND OR FOOT, 



G MACHINES. 



First Prize /Medals, Honours & Awards, wherevex Exhibited. 



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IS THE 



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£8 8s. 

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Over 200 varieties of perfect Plaiting or Kilting, from 30s. complete. The 
only Machine Kilting and Basting at one operation. 

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lie, Queen Victoria Street, E.C, 
LONDON. % 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



10 



IMPORTANT CHANCERY SUIT 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURINa COMPANY v. LOOG. 



Judgment in the Coitrt of Appeal. 



The hearing of the appeal from the decision of Vice- 
Chancellor Bacon in this important cause, after hanging fire 
for more than twelve months, was at last set down for hearing 
on the 6th ult., but it was not till the morning of Dec. Tth 
that the case was actually reached, and the appearance of the 
Court when Sir Henry Jackson rose to open the pleadings on 
behalf of the appellant was very strikingly in contrast to the 
animated and almost excited aspect which the court below 
presented when the cause was first heard in July, 1879. 
There was no appearance of a crowd on any day of the present 
hearing, and very often not more than five or six representa- 
tives of the trade were present on either side. The absence of 
Mr. Geo. B. 'VVoodrufif's familiar face was especially noticeable. 
Like a wise man, be bad quitted our foggy shores a month or 
two before, to spend his Christmas amid the warmth and sun- 
shine of Australia. On the defendant's side of the house there 
were only some two or three veteran litigants present — men 
who have gone through this sort of thing before — as, for 
example, Messrs. Runoieman and Newton Wilson, who were 
daily in attendance, and manifested the most lively interest in 
the proceedings. But the majority of the members of the 
trade were not there. To the bnllt of them, no doubt, it 
was a foregone conclusion that, whichever way the judgment 
of the learned lords might tend, the only safe and profitable 
course open to the sewing machine trade to-day is to try 
and build up a name each man for himself, very wisely leaving 
other people's alone ; consequently they stayed away, leaving 
Mr. Loog to fight his battle out pretty much by himself. For 
the Singer Manufacturing Company there appeared Mr. Kay, 
Q.C. ; Mr. Benjamin, Q.O. ; Mr. Theodore Aston, Q.C. ; Mr. 
Hemming, Q.C; and Mr. Eigby; while for the defendant 
there appeared Sir Henry Jackson, Q.C. ; Mr. Webster, Q.C. ; 
and Mr. Everitt ; the learned judges being Lord Justice 
James, Lord Justice Cotton, and Lord Justice Lush, 

The arguments of counsel occupied a very considerable 
amount of time — several days in all, but as they were little 
more than a recapitulation of the remarks that had been 
addressed to the Vice-Chancellor on the first hearing, no useful 
purpose would be served by their reproduction here. It was 
pretty generally understood that, whichever way the decision 
of the Lords Justices might tend, the case would be carried to 
the House of Lords for fmal settlement, and as this duty has 
been cast on the plaintiffs, there is very little doubt that, with 
all convenient despatch, a hearing wiU be obtained before the 
Court of Final Appeal, when this vexed yet simple question 
wiU probably be decided for ever. The judgments of the 
Lords Justices were listened to with the utmost attention by 
those present, but the Court was at no time anything like half 
filled. 

Judgment. 

Lord Justice James said : — In this case of the Singer Manu- 
facturing Company v. Hermann Loog, it appears to me at the 
conclusion of many days spent in ^reading evidence and argu- 
ment, and comments made upon the evidence in this Court, 
and which many days are after all a very short time compai'ed 
with the very much greater number of days which were occu- 
pied in the Court below, that the case is a very short and very 



simple one, and I propose — as far as I am concerned — to deal 

with it very shortly. 

Upon the question of law which is involved in this case, 
there is to my mind no dispute whatever ; I have often endea- 
voured to express what I am going to express now, and pro- 
bably I have said it in the same words, because it is very 
difficult to find other words in which to express it — that is, 
what my view of the law is, and that is, that no man is 
entitled to represent his goods as being the goods of another 
man ; and no man is permitted to use any mark, sign or 
symbol, device, or other means whereby, without maldng a 
direct false representation himself to a purchaser who _pm-- 
ohases from him, he enables such purchaser to tell that lie, or 
to make that false representation to somebody else, who is 
the ultimate customer. That being the law, and that being — 
as it appears to me — a comprehensive statement of what the 
law is unon the question of trade mark or trade designation, I 
am of opinion that there is no such thing as a monopo y or a 
property in the nature of a copyright, or in the nature of a 
patent, in the use of any name. Whatever name is used to 
designate goods, anybody may use that name to designate 
goods, always subject to this, that he must not, as I said, 
make directly or through the medium of another person a false 
represe itation that his goods are the goods of another person. 
That I take to be the law. 

Now, applying that law to the facts of this case, I am of 
opinion that the label, which the defendant was, as I conceive, 
very well advised to discontinue the use of, and to submit to 
be enjoined from using ip future, was calculated to deceive, and 
was calculated to make a false representation as between some- 
body who did not know who the real manufacturer was, and 
his vendor, and that upon many grounds the label was of the 
same shape, of the same metal, of the same colour, placed in 
exactly the same position in which the Manufacturing Com- 
pany's label was put, and it did contain the word '' Smger," 
no doubt with other words annexed to it, which might very 
easily have become obliterated, or have become overlooked, 
and, therefore, in my opinion, it comes entirely within those 
cases in which it is calculated, and if calculated, must be 
assumed to have been intended to make that false representa- 
tion. 

But when I come to the other documents, really, after all I 
have heard, I am unable to see anything which could deceive 
any human being. Then, first of all, it is said we must not 
look at it as if we were looking at it ourselves, but consider 
that these things, to some extent at all events, and in the 
ultimate result, might get into the hands, and be the means, 
and be made the means, of deceiving the class of persons 
called tailors and seamstresses, and people of that kind, who 
are supposed to be peculiarly liable to be unwary and easilj 
taken in in such a matter as this. 

Now I cannot agree quite in that. I am myself of opinion 
that that class of persons in a matter of their own trade, in 
buying their own trade tools, or their own trade machines, 
are, I should think, as sharp, as acute, and as suspicious as 
anybody, and that they would be so careful in getting the i-eal 
article which they went to buy, that they would have their 



20 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMEbTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



intellect starpened to a great extent, so that they would be as 
ready to detect any sign of spuriousness as a bank clerk who 
has been in the habit of dealing with such matters would be 
to detect whether a sovereign is bad or not, or 
whether a bank note is a forgery. Whatever be the 
class of persons who buy these things, we must 
at all events imply that they are persons capable of 
reading and writing, or capable of reading at all events. 
How does it stand to begin with ? A Mr. Hermann Loog has 
got an ofBce or counting-house at 128, London- wall, London. 
It does not appear, and there is nothing in the evidence to 
show, that the shop has anything in its external appearance, 
by any name or any designation, which would induce people 
to go there to buy the machines of the plaintiff company. 
The defendant is the wholesale agent of manufacturers, and, 
so far as it appears to me from the evidence, he invites the 
public, to begin with, to come and deal with him, by using 
the circular, which I take to be the first thing. The circular 
says where he is, what he is, and what it is he is offering to 
the public. 

Now he says this in very large type, with a picture of the 
place of his manufactory. " The improved Wheeler Wilson 
and Singer systems, manufactured by the Sewing Machine 
Manufactimng Company, late Frister and Rossmann, Berlin." 
Well, stopping there, how is it possible for anybody who can 
read to suppose that a man who is offering an improved 
Wheeler Wilson or the Singer system manufactured by the 
Sewing Machine Manufacturing Company, late Frister and 
Eossmann, Berlin, was offering something of the plaintiffs, 
and the man who was buying under this circular was really 
induced to buy a thing supposing it was made by the plain- 
tiffs ? But then the thing goes on in the plainest terms to 
say, " We are competing with them ; we know they are good, 
but we are better." They say this first of all, their manufac- 
tory " is the only manufactory in Germany where sewing 
machines on the Wheeler Wilson and on the Singer system are 
produced on a really large scale. With the aid of the most 
complete and costly machinery, and all the newest improve- 
ments, every part of the machine is turned out in a style 
not to be surpassed." Then after a little they say, " Our 
two systems, namely, Wheeler Wilson and Singer, are those 
which are mostly in demand ; they both answer the same 
purposes, and it would be difficult to establish a dif- 
ference of their respective values ; and yet we find one 
prefers this system, one the other; indeed, we find that the 
prefeiential difference extends to whole districts, for while in 
some towns we can only sell Wheeler Wilson's, in others 
Singer's only are in favour, and thus it seems almost natural 
that every buyer gives preference to that system which 
happens to be particularly recommended to him. We, as 
manufacturers, can recommend both with equal confidence, and 
we can confidently assert that the finest muslin to the very 
thickest cloth will be worked with perfection on all our 
machines. We also refer to our instruction book given with 
every machine, and by means of which every one can do any 
kind of work without other assistance. We may still mention 
that our machines are all of one standard quality, and the 
difference in price only refers to more or less ornamental work. 
Our Wheeler Wilson machines, contrary to those of most of 
our competitors, are provided with rotating hook and feed- 
bar of best hardened steel, instead of cast iron. Our Singer 
machines are made with the loose wheel arrangement, which 
greatly economises the labour of spooling, and is a saving of 
quite 25 to 30 per cent, in the wear and tear of the machine ; 
they are also provided with feed points," and so on. "We 
can also supply with every Singer treadle machine an appliance 
by which it can at will be converted into a hand machine." 
Nobody who reads that, who'is capable of reading at all, or 
capable of entertaining an idea at all, whether a tailor or 
a seamstress, or any other person, could have the slightest 
doubt that they were in competition with the plaintiffs. I 
think I passed a sentence in which they say, "Ours are better 
than the so-called originals" — that they are competing with 
the maker. They say in so many words, " We enter into com- 
petition with all other makers of machines; you must come to 
us and see whether " ours are not the best. 
Well, that, as I understand, is the thing by which the world 



and the public are invited to come to them, by which anybody 
is invited to come to the counting-house of Mr. Loog. Well, 
anybody who comes there, or comes to him, knowing him to be 
the agent for the Manufacturing Company at Berlin, receives 
from him, apparently upon request as far as we know, or some 
application, a jrice list of the machines which they are selling, 
as it is stated. They perceive this pi-ice list of the Sewing 
Machine Manufacturing Company, late Frister and Bossmann, 
Limited, 128, London-wall, London, E.G., then a price list 
which is marked " private." That would be a private list in 
order that the ultimate customer should not see it. The 
meaning of the price list is that those are the prices to their 
own customers, the dealers, not to be shown to all the world, 
because their customers would not like the ultimate customers 
to know the price they are paying for the machines. This is 
the private wholesale price list, not intended to be communi- 
cated to the whole of the world, and therefore it is a private 
wholesale price list. It is supplied to those who apply to them 
as wholesale dealers, and who are going to sell them again; it 
is "Wheeler Wilson Improved System " and "Singer Improved 
System." Well, what is there in that from which anybody 
could suppioss (unless the word "Singer" is supposed to be 
enough to do it) that they are getting the article of the Singer 
Manufacturing Company ? I protest I am unable to see how, 
by this thing being put into anybody's hands, he could be 
deceived. The iirst person, beyond all question, could not be 
deceived. How could this enable anybody in the world to 
represent to a subsequent purchaser, " You want to have 
machines from the manufactory which has hitherto been 
supplied to you; now this shows you that we have got it." 
It is a very idle and very far-fetched supposition. What is the 
meaning of " Singer Improved System p" It is said that word 
could not be honestly put in, because there is no such thing as 
a " Singer Improved System ;" that the words could only be 
put in to introduce the word " Singer," that it is mere colour, 
and the word "Singer" was put in to produce the impression 
that what was meant was the manufactured article of the 
plaintiffs. The " Wheeler Wilson Improved System " and the 
" Singer Improved System " to my mind have a very 
intelligible meaning ; whether you call it a " system," 
or whether you call it a "principle," it has a 
very intelligible meaning to my mind. We have them 
all here. They are Singer Machines which are to have certain 
qualities .ind certain names, and there are different ones, three 
or four or five ; the three principal ones which they use, each 
one has some difference, but they are all on the same principle, 
part of the same system. The three constitute the "Singer 
Improved System," and the man says, I use the same system, 
and I have got the same machines exactly in point of 
arrangement and construction, and form ; and, in point of 
fact, I use the same system, and I have got them arranged in 
the same way. That disposes to my mind of that document. 

Well, the next document is the invoice about which so much 
has been said. First of all, the invoice is only given to a person 
who has first of all come in and bought an article. The 
invoice could be no false representation to a person who knows 
exactly what he has bought, and who is merely having a 
memorandum of that purchase. He takes away the invoice 
from him, which invoice again is headed with a beautiful 
picture of 'a manufactory, and three addresses, Paris, Brussels, 
and 128, London Wall ; and above that " Hermann Loog on 
account' of the Sewing Manufactory Co., late Frister & 
Rossmann, Limited." Then one of the things is called the 
" Square Treadle Machine " which is not the name of any one 
of the plaintiff's machines ; for I do not think they used the 
term " treadle " for any of theirs. It is called the " Singer 
Treadle Machine" — that is to say, as between them that is 
what it was. They do not say in so many words, " Our Smger 
Treadle Machine," or, " One of our Treadle Singer Machmes," 
or " Frister & Rossmann's Treadle Singer Machines ;" but that 
is not necessary because both parties knew exactly what they 
were dealing with, and one party gets an invoice with a receipt 
for the purchase money which he has given for the machine. 
There could be no deception. But it is suggested that this docu- 
mentcouldbe ormight be used to enable the man who has bought 
this— having this invoice— to say, " Now this is the machine 
which I bought from this company. This is the invoice which I 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWIKG MACHHSTE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



21 



got for that mactine, and look here, do not you see in this invoice 
it is called the ' Singer Treadle Machine ?' Can you doubt 
that this is one of the Singers that you want to get — that that 
is one of the machines of the Singer Manufactiiring Com- 
pany ?" That to my mind is far too remote. It is too wide a 
suggestion. Of course, if a man is minded to tell lies, he can 
tell them without being assisted, because really this document 
is not the sort of document which ever woidd be shown by a 
man who is selling a thing and charging three or four pounds, 
or whatever the price may be ; he would not be showing- a 
document by which it would appear that he only gave two or 
three pounds for it. That is intended to be kept as private as 
the price list, and would, in the ordinary course of business, be 
kept as private and as confidential as the price list between the 
first vendor and the second vendor. 

Then it is said this is strengthened by a purchaser from the 
defendant issuing a notice of this kind, which, it is said, they 
knew of, and that therefore they sanctioned this thing being 
done. I believe that is not one of the things which is charged 
in the pleadings, but this is " Hoyle, 22 and 24, Warwick- 
street, Fimlico." He advertises a treadle machine on the 
Wheeler and Wilson principle, and a treadle machine on the 
Singer principle, with a mahogany cabinet. Again, I say that 
is precisely telling anybody who chooses to read, that the thing 
is not a Singer machine, but something like a Singer machine — 
made in the same way, and possessing the same merits as the 
machines of the Singer Company. I am of opinion, therefore, 
that this case wholly fails, that there is no evidence whatever, 
except as regards the label, that the defendant has done any- 
thing which, either in itself directly or in the ultimate result 
indirectly, would make that a false representation which it is 
said is the foundation of all this kind of action. 

Now, a great quantity of the evidence on both sides went to 
one issu8 — as to whether there was such a thing as a " Singer 
principle," and whether there was such a thing as a "Singer 
system" — whether the name "Singer" did originally indicate 
the manufactory, or indicate the particular kind of thing. Well, 
a great deal of evidence went to show that of late years it has 
grown into being the name of the thing, and that was so 
through a series of wrongful acts of different persons. Now 
on that, the issue as to what extent the word " Singer" may 
or may not be used does not seem to me to arise in the present 
case between the Singer Manufacturing Company and Mr. 
Hermann Loog ; and therefore I decline to enter into that part 
of the case, or to intimate any opinion on that question. 

Lord Justice Cotton: The question we have to consider in 
the present case is this — whether the defendant has represented 
that the goods manufactured by him were manufactured by 
the plaintiffs, or whether he has done anything calculated so to 
represent. I quite agree it is unnecessary that a fraudu- 
lent intention in using the thing complained of should be 
established. If the natural consequence of those things — 
even in circumstances not known to him — is, that they will 
represent his goods to be those of another person, it is wrong- 
ful, and, as this Court says, a fraud in him to continue the use, 
after those circumstances are brought to his knowledge. Well 
now, we must consider whether he has represented, or done, 
that which is natuial, and in its natural sense reasonably cal- 
culated to give that misrepresentation, and we must consider 
what is relied upon. First, I will put otit of the question a 
great deal of argument, and that which really occupied the 
greater part of the time of the Court below, because the evi- 
dence was very much directed to that. The plaintiifs desired 
to get a judgment in this case from the Court here, and pos- 
sibly from the House of Lords, as to whether or no the name 
"Singer" could be held simpHciter, and by itself, to describe 
the machines made by them; whether, in fact, "Singer" 
was to be taken to be " as made by the Singer 
Manufacturing Company,'' or " made by the Singer 
Manufacturing Company." Although in one of the matters 
complained of in this case as having been done by the 
defendant, there is the expression "Singer" — which I will 
deal with presently ; in my oisinion that is not an issue which 
arises here, because I do not find in the acts complained of by 
the defendant— with the exception of the bill — that he does call 
his goods "Singers." Therefore, in my opinion, we are not 



called upon to express an opinion whether " Singer " has now 
arrived at the secondary meaning, " as made by the Singer 
Manufacturing Company," or whether it bears the meaning of 
" made ;" but in every case it must depend of course upon the 
context whether the word is to be read — as, in fact, "made 
by," or " as made by ; " and therefore it is impossible almost 
to lay down any general proposition as to the right to use that 
name which might not be calculated to mislead in some other 
case which may arise. I will only siy this — the label is out 
of the question, because the defendant has conceded — and I 
think perfectly rightly conceded — that he wag not justified in 
using that label. That concession has been attempted to be 
used by the plaintiffs as an admission of their right in all 
things. 

Now I say that it would be most unfortunate if we were 
induced to give to that concession the effect complained of as 
regards those things which are the other matters, because it 
is often said, and often said justly by the Court, when a defen- 
dant says, " This matter was to me of no consequence what- 
ever. I used it without any fraudulent intention, and without 
any desire to misrepresent or to gain fictitious credit." " Why 
did you not give it up at once ; you have gone on fighting to 
the last, and you cannot be heard to say, it is of no import- 
ance ? " Here, I think, the defendant was well advised to say, 
" I will give up that." Whether he was right or not in that 
I consider is of no importance ; but even if it was wrong to 
use the word " Singer," as he did on that label, that would in 
no way, in my opinion, rule or decide that he might not use 
even the same words that he there used on a document, 
such as a circular or bill, if he had done so. Wuy ? 
I perfectly agree that if there are words which in 
tei'ms mis - state and misrepresent the manufacturer of 
the goods, it is immaterial whether that is found on a label or 
on a circular, or on anything else; but where the words are not 
in terms on the statement the effect and meaning of the terms, 
and the effect, as combined with the label on which they are, 
may be very different when they are found on a label on the 
machine, and when they are found in a circular ; because if we 
find that the label is like that of a rival manufacturer, and is 
on the place on the machine where he indicated by whom the 
michine was made, the use of ambiguous words — if capable of 
of being construed to mean that this machine was made by 
somebody who was not the maker, when put in that place may 
well be taken, and naturally would be taken, to repi-esent that 
they were a description of the maker, and not a mere descrip- 
tion of the machine or the kind of machine. I pass that by, 
putting it aside for the present, although I will refer to it by- 
and-by for another purpose. The label, in my opinion, cannot be 
construed as an admission by the defendant that he was wrong 
in other things.because he has conceded he could not defend the 
use of that label with the word " Singer " upon it. Putting that 
aside for the moment, what are the things relied upon ? They 
are these — and I will take them in what I think their natural 
order; we have the circular; we have the price-list ; and we 
have the bill-heads. I will consider them separately ; although, 
as far as I can see, that is not really the burden which the 
defendant has to discharge; beciuse one can see that the cir- 
cular is sent round to those with whom he is dealing. When 
they offer to deal with him they get the price-list, and when 
they have dealt with him they get the bill. When we have to 
deal separately with the subsidiary use which might be made 
by the purchasers from him when they get these docu- 
ments, one must remember this — that here we have a 
wholesale dealer — that is to say, as I understand, one who, 
although selling single machines, would sell only to those in 
the trade — such as a man who is a retail dealer, or who he 
supposed was so, and who came to him in that 
character. That gets rid of a great deal of the argument, at 
least for the present purpose, as to the primary use of this and 
the argument in favour of the ignorant seamstress who might 
see this document. But when one comes to this, all that one 
finds in these documents is a representation — and that was 
most relied upon — that the improved Wheeler Wilson and 
Singer systems are manufactured by these persons, the Sewing 
Machine Manufacturing Company. I pass by that which was 
pressed upon US about the "Sewing Machine Manufacturing 



sa 



THE SEWING MACHliSTE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. i, l88i. 



Company." It can hardly be suggested that was an imitation 
of the name of the " Singer Manufacturing Company;" but 
here there is no statement whatever in terms that the machines 
are "Singer machines," except in combination with other 
words which show that they arc " Our Singer Machines," 
or " Singer Machines, competing with the original Singer 
machines.'' But it is said — and that was very much urged 
upon us- -that "Singer system" was in fact a statement that 
these were Singer machines without any qualification ; that 
is, machines made by the Singer Manufacturing Company. 

Is that a reasonable interpretation of those words ? In the 
first place, we have this. We have the Wheeler Wilson and 
Singer systems. A great deal of the argument addressed to 
us was that "Singer system" meant nothing, and that "a 
system" meant nothing; and that "Singer" must be put 
there in order to represent that the machines which were 
offered for sale were made by the Singer Manufacturing 
Company. But could it be contended that there were not 
two systems (whether that is the most accurate word or not 
is another question) represented, on the one hand, by the 
Wheeler Wilson, and, on the other, by the Singer. As I 
understand, even the witnesses for the plaintiffs pointed out 
differences of construction between the Wheeler Wilson and 
the Singer — that is to say, the machines made by Wheeler 
Wilson and the machines made by the Singer Manufacturing 
Company ; and when one sees that, it at once gets rid 
of a great deal of the argument in favour of the 
plaintiffs in the present case. But I am unwilling to 
leave it there. Assmning that "Singer system" stood 
alone, could it be said that " system " was so 
entirely fallacious, and so entirely a non-existing thing, that 
the references to " Singer " must be introduced there in the 
phrase "Singer system" for the purposes of deception ? I 
am not dealing now with the point whether " Singer machine" 
means " as made by the Singer Company," or " made by the 
Singer Company." But what we do find is this, that through 
a seiies of years (and I go no further back than 1865, for a 
reason I will explain presently), we do find in the specifica- 
tions, and we do find in the catalogue, and we do find in other 
things words such as these. In 1865 in a specification " the 
well known arrangement of the ' Singer ' machines ; " in 1866 
" the ordinary ' Singer ' machines," and then in 1872 " the class 
of machines called ' Wheeler Wilson ' and ' Singer,' " and then 
I think in a catalogue in the year 1875, we find what is known 
as " the ' Singer ' Sewing Machine." That points, not for the 
purpose of establishing as against the plaintiffs that there was 
a distinct system of mechanism in these, but that there was 
something which not only the public, but those who prepared 
these specifications, did describe, accurately or inaccarately, in 
those terms. 

Well, then, there is something more. It is said, and perfectly 
truly, that the case stands differently — that is to say, more 
favourably to the plaintiffs than it would have done if they had 
had for years this machine in its entirety protected by letters 
patent. There were no such letters patent which protected it. 
That must, I think, be taken as proved, but we do find that 
they on several occasions assumed to interfere with persons 
who were selling machines made like theirs, because they said, 
" You are violating our letters patent;" and that was to some 
extent acquiesced in, and in other cases it was contested and 
the patents were, so to speak, broken down. Taking all 
those things together, can we say that the reference to 
" Singer system" issoabsurdastoinduceustocometotheconclu- 
sion that "Singer" is here introduced in combination with 
" system " — not for the purpose of pointing oiit a particular 
construction or manufacture, or configuration of machine, but 
for something ehe. 

Now, I said I wordd come to 1865 for a particular reason. I 
omitted the reference to the specification of 1862 because that 
was not wanted for the purpose of enforcing what I said. 
Mr. Aston used it for the purpose of answering the argument 
that these patents, and the expressions in them, are to be 
received. He says, in 1862 we have a specification which 
speaks of "the well-known ' Singer' machine," or "the ordi- 
nary ' Singer ' machine ; " and he said ' ' the ordinary ' Singer ' 
machine " there referred to, as shown by the drawings, was one 
that had not that goose neck which is stated to be looked upon 



and regarded by persons as one of the indications of "the 
ordinary ' Singer ' machines" as contendedforby the defendant. 
But we have to consider, not what was the ordinary Singer 
system in the year 1862, not from the end of the 60's — at least, 
I think, it went back to 1864-65 — but what have been the three 
classes of machines well known in the market, and, as some 
witnesses say, the only machines known in the market. 
Certainly those best known, and those most piirchased, have 
been the three classes, the "Family," the "Medium," and 
" Manufacturing Singer " — substantially in the form and of the 
construction adopted in the present time; and, therefore, 
when we are considering what is the meaning of " Singer 
system" in this circular, published sometime not before 1877, 
I think we must look and see what was recognised and meant, 
and reasonably meant, by the " Singer system " — what the 
IDublic, who well knew these three classes of machine, at that 
time would consider as the statement of the " Singer system." 
I have gone into this probably at greater length than it 
deserves, because it turns on a very short point ; but the result, 
in my opinion, is that we cannot properly come to the conclu- 
S'on that "Singer System" was intended as a simple device 
to represent the things as Singer machines made by the Singer 
Company under the guise of speaking of Something which did 
not exist — viz., the "Singer System." I say it is impossible 
to suppose tha.t any purchaser from the defendant, a 
wholesale purchaser, could be deceived by the repre- 
sentations which are contained in that circular. I may 
then dispose of this as regards any others. If that was put 
into the hands of any other worker, male or female, in my 
opinion they would see nothing which could mislead them, or 
be constructed by them as a representation that those were 
" Singer Machines " made by the Singer Company, and not 
machines made in accordance with the system adopted by that 
company — that is, upon the system of construction, or what- 
ever it may be which was adopted by that company. Now 
we have something more. We have the price list. It was 
said that was oast broadcast about, and that is misleading. If 
that were so I see not how a price list, speaking of " Wheeler 
Wilson Improved System," and "Singer Improved System" 
can be a statement that those machines were Singer machines 
in the sense of being made by the Singer Company. And hei e 
one must observe, as possibly I ought to have observed before, 
with reference to that, that it has been conceded, and must bi 
conceded, that it was within the perfect right of the defendant 
to gain this benefit from the credit and advertisements of the 
Singer Company ; and that he might say, if he did not say so 
in a way calculated to mislead, "I make the machines exactly 
the same as those which were made by the Singer Company, 
and which are as good, or better than the machines manu- 
factured by the Singer Manufacturing Company." That he 
would have a perfect right to do ; and although no doubt by 
so doing he would gain a benefit from the credit and advertise- 
ments of the Singer Company, and from the course which 
they have adopted, he would be doing nothing which the 
plaintiffs could complain of as wrongful ; for he has a right to 
state that, although not to state that his machines are in fac t 
made by somebody else. Well, it is assumed these are scattered 
about, a.ud that there is something misleading in them ; but, 
as I pointed out to Mr. Aston in the argument, prima facie, 
and in the absence of evidence to the contrary, this is private 
and sent by the defendant to retail dealers, who buy from 
them, not that they may tell their customers what is in this, 
but that they may know on what terms the wholesale company 
are willing to supply them with these machines, and which 
would naturally, unless there is evidence to the contrary, be 
accompanied by that circular. 

Now we have another document, and that is one which I 
agree is most favourable to the plaintiffs. It is the invoice, 
and I must say it is the only document which gave me any 
doubt about the conduct of the defendant. This is the invoice, 
and there is "Singer Hand Machine, No. 14," as the property 
sold. Of course, that could not be deceptive to the person who 
bought from the plaintiffs ; but it was urged, and that was the 
only point on which I really doubted durmg the course of the 
argument, as to whether it might or might not be used as an 
instrument of deception by the purchasers from the plamtiffs 
when they were selling again. In my opinion, if a man does 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWnia MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtTENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



23 



that the natural consequence of which, although it does not 
deceive the person with whom he deals, and is, therefore, no 
misrepresentation by him, is to enable that other person to 
deceive and pass off his goods as somebody else's, for that he 
is answerable. But in that case he is confined, in the absence 
of evidence, to those things which ai'e the natural uses or the 
necessary uses, it might almost be said, viz., that of accom- 
panying the things sold. For instance, the corks of champagne 
bottles marked " Moet and Chandon," they must be in the 
bottles sold and must accompany the bottles. They must ac- 
company the thing to the retail buyer. And so must labels 
to be put on the bottles. The very reason for their existence 
is that they must be put on the bottles, and, if they are decep- 
tive and fraudulent, and can be used probably in that way, 
then the person who prepares them is answerable for it. They 
must not bo used if their natural and legitimate consequence is 
not to deceive the person to whom they are sold, but to enable 
the seller to pass off the goods as being goods of other persons. 
But here, in my opinion, that is not the natural or the neces- 
sary consequence of it. Here it is the invoice accompanying 
the goods sold to a person, who, as I have already stated, has 
not been deceived in buying from the wholesale dealer — that is, 
from the defendant ; and as the evidence is that it was kno-wn 
that the course was to deal in this way, I must take it that 
the natural consequence was, not that they should be shoAvn 
to the retail purchasers, and the defendant cannot be charged 
with any abuse of this, even if there would be an abuse. Of 
course if the use of the word " Singer " meant "as made " that 
would be out of the question, but 1 do not decide that ques- 
tion. But we have no evidence, according to the ordinary 
course of dealing-, this was naturally or probably so used as to 
deceive. I must say this, that at the time when this circular 
was used, it could not have been used for that purpose, nor 
could that have been the natural consequence. There was on 
the machine here described a label, and that label, if it said 
anything, said it was a " Singer Machine" — that is, made by 
the plaintiff company ; and in considering what was the natui-al 
use or object of those bdl-heads, one cannot but have regard 
to that fact, and you find that when pm-chasers from the de- 
fendant do advertise what they have to sell (it is put in by 
the plaintiffs, or I should not have referi-ed to it), they advertise 
it as the system, and not as made by the company, because we 
have that notice of the Wheeler Wilson principle and the 
Singer principle, and it was brought forward by the other 
side. 

That being so, in my opuiion we have no representation 
made or anything done which natirrally makes a representation 
to the buyers from the defendant that the goods which the 
defendant sold were made by the plaintiff company ; and in my 
opinion, therefore, except as regards the label, the case faUs. 
To that the defendant has submitted. 

Now I vnll say one word upon that. It was urged that, 
having regard to the admitted wrongful use of that label, we 
ought to uphold that everything else done was done 7nala 
animo, and was fradulent. In my opinion, that would be 
wrong. I should be prepared to hold that the label could not 
be used, but in my opinion it would be wrong to give to these 
documents and to the representations contained in them that 
which, in my opinion, they did not justify and naturally bear, 
simply because at the time the defendant was issuing these 
documents he had done something which, as against the 
plaintiffs, was wrongfid. We cannot, in my opinion, construe 
these documents in the absence of any fradident intent or uses 
of those documents by the reflected light of the use of that 
label. 

Now there is one other matter which I must mention 
before I conclude, and that is, the cases which have been 
referred to. I think if it had not been for the case in the 
House of Lords, this case would probably hardly have taken 
the time which it has done. There are two ways in which that 
case was m-ged upon us ; but the decision, in my opinion, has 
no bearing on this case. No doubt in moving that the matter 
should go back again for a new trial, the Lord Chancellor did 
intimate an opinion that a prima facie case had been made out 
by the plaintiffs to be answered. Some of the other Lords, 
Lord Blackburn, I think, rather differed from him. No new 
law was laid down in that case. AU that is said there is, that 



fraud in the act done was not material, if it was calculated to 
deceive, and I thmk the Lord Chancellor, Lord Cairns, said 
something in moving the judgment of the House very like 
what I have said, that if the natiu'al consequence of all the 
facts is to deceive, it becomes a wrong and a fraud if, after 
notice of those facts, a man continues and insists on going on 
with them ; therefore, no new law whatever, as far as I under- 
stand, was laid down by the House of Lords in that case. 

Well, that being so, we ought not, in my opinion — and I s ay 
it with the greatest respect for the House of Lords — to be 
influenced in arriving at a decision on the question of fact in 
this case because they, upon the evidence there and the docu- 
ments there, arrived at a conclusion, at least in the mind of 
one of the noble lords, in favour of the plaintiffs. The 
statement was a different one, and it was " Singer 
Machine" simpliciter, and the person who was using that 
was not a wholesale dealer only, but he was a retail dealer, 
and it was vnth reference to that, that a good many of the 
observations of the Lord Chancellor were addressed. There 
is nothing, in my opinion, in that case, or in the speeches 
made by the noble lords, which is in any way inconsistent or 
at variance with the decision at which we have now arrived, 
If there had been, I should of coui'se have bowed, whatever 
my opinion was, to the decision of the House of Lords. 

Then there was a case referred to in the Scotch Courts. 
There the evidence is in no way evidence against the defendant 
ill the present case, even if it were relevant to the issue to be 
tried. There the judges of the Court of Session laid down as 
law (though we should not be bomid in any way by their 
opinion), as far as I can see, nothing as law which is at all 
inconsistent with what we hold to be the law. The facts in 
that case differing, as they no doubt did, from the facts of 
this case, ought not to prejudice the defendant's case or in- 
fluence us any more than the facts there can be received by us 
any more than the facts there can be received by us as facts 
here in deciding this case. 

The decision, in my opinion, of the Vice-Chancellor, except 
as regards the label, cannot be supported. 

Lord Justice Lush : I am of the same opinion. The question 
before us is a very simple one, and it ought to have taken a 
much shorter time than it has. It has Leen so overladen and 
obscured by a mass of evidence, and by a line of argument 
entirely beside the mark, and it has required more than an 
ordinary effort to keep before the mind what the simple 
question is. We are not dealing with the validity of a patent. 
The plaintiffs, the Singer Manufacturing Company, have no 
monopoly in the manufacture of sewing machines, the patents 
which they had exjjired some years ago, and it is now open to 
all the world to make the identical machines which they make 
and to imitate theirs in every particular. Nov have they any 
right of property in the name of " Singer " in the sense in which 
they seek to use it — namely, in the sense that they can restrain 
every competitor from using the word '• Singer " as descriptive 
of the kind of machine, however he may qualify and explain it 
in connection with the use of the word. There is no such thing, 
to my mmd, as a property in a word in that sense. What they 
have a right to require is that which is common to every 
manufacturer — namely, that no competitor shall be at liberty to 
put off goods of his own manufacture as being goods of the 
manufacture of another. That is the right which they have, 
and no other; and the question here is, that which has 
been stated by each of my learned brethren ; has the defeni^- 
ant, in hia mode of carrying on his business, represented in 
any way to those who bought his machines, that thej' are 
buying the machines which are the manufacture of the Singer 
Manufacturing Company ? If he has, then he is guilty of a 
fraud towards the buyer, because upon that supposition he has 
misled the buyer, and consequently been guilty of a fraud 
towards the Singer Manufacturing Company ; because upon 
the same hypothesis he has deprived them of a customer. But 
if he has not, it does not signify that he has sold identically 
the same machine, or that he has put a name upon them 
which is the same name they use, if he takes care that he 
does not so use that name or word as to convey to the buyer 
the meaning that they have been manufactured by the other 
company. 

Now I put aside, as altogether now out of the case, the 



24 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. i, l88i. 



metal mark which the defendant once put upon these machines 
— not I believe upon all of them, but upon some of them. It 
very much resembled in shape, in coloiu', and in the position 
in which be placed it on the machine, the trade mark of the 
Singer Manufacturing Company. If that had been continued, 
I think there would have been a fair cause for complaint on 
the part of the company that persons might easily be misled, 
by the look of that piece of metal, into supposing that they 
were buying the Singer Manufacturing Company's machine. 
But in tJie early stage of this suit the defendant sur- 
rendered and abandoned that and undertook never to use 
it again. But the company was not content with that ; they 
went on in the endeavour to prevent his using that word 
" Singer " in any sense whatever in coimection with his sewing 
machines, and that is the question which we have now to 
decide before us. As I have said, the question is not whether 
he used the word " Singer," but whether in using that word 
as he did, he represented, or led the buyers to understand as 
reasona ble persons, that they were buying a machine which had 
been manufactured by the Singer Company. I can see no 
evidence whatever, apart from that piece of metal, which I 
treat as abandoned, because when the case came on for trial it 
was out of the question, and it is out of the question now, of 
any intention whatever on the part of the defendant to do 
that, or in anything which he issued calculated to lead the 
buyer to suppose he was buying the machine manufactured by 
this Company. His handbills say expressly that the machines 
are made by the German house, and that they are made upon 
the system . They make both what are called the ' ' "Wleeler 
Wilson system " and the " Singer system," which clearly tells 
those who buy from them that they are not buying machines 
made by Singer, but buying machines made like the Singer. 
His price list, which has already been observed upon, makes the 
same distinction; and, whenever he sells themachineshe delivers 
with the machine this pamphlet entitled "Directions for the use of 
Frister and Eossmann's shuttle machines on Singer's improved 
system." How can that possibly mislead any person into the 
supposition that he is buying any machine actually made by 
the Singer Company ? It expressly states the machines are 
made by Frister and Eossmann. That was the name of the 
German house whicti has since become incorporated in 
Germany and now has the name of the Sewing Machine 
Manufacturing Company. That is the name which the sub- 
sequent lists and directions bear. The name of the plaintiffs 
is the " Singer Manufacturing Company." This name of the 
defendant's company is entirely different ; and, moreover, it is 
always stated as being a German company situate at Berlin. 
So much for what he does. He takes off the plate from the 
machine and it is accompanied always with this book of direc- 
tions, which tells the buyer what he has got — namely, a 
machine made by the German company. I take the price list 
because he sells only wholesale, and the buyer knows at once 
he is purchasing a thing made upon the plan of the Wheeler 
Wilson and the Singer system, but made by the German com- 
pany. The invoice has already been observed upon by Lord 
Justice Cotton. That comes afterwards, and taking that 
altogether, it has the figure at the top of the German manu- 
factoi-y, and it has the words there which would plainly indi- 
cate to a person of common sense that he is buying a thing 
not made by Singer, but by somebody else. 

Then we come to the evidence of the sales in the particidar 
cases. There were only two sales proved, and they were sales 
to persons sent by the Singer Company to get evidence. They 
knew perfectly well what they were buying. They were not 
deceived. Nor is there any evidence that any single individual 
ever bought a machine from the Defendant upon the sup- 
position that he was buying one of the Singer's machines. 
Nay, further, it has been argued that althoguh those who 
immediately bought of him were not deceived, inasmuch as 
they bought for retail sellers, they might be enabled to repre- 
sent to their customers that they were Singer's machines. The 
answer to that is, if they did that they did what he never 
authorised them to do, because if they sold as they bought, 
they ought to have given with every one they sold to every 
customer this book of directions for use. That is supplied with 
every machine, and there is nothing on the machine itself, the 
plate being gone, which would lead anybody to suppose they 



were buying a machine of the Singer Manufacturing Company. 
That argument entirely fails. Moreover, there is not a tittle 
of evidence from beginning to end that any single buyer from 
any agent of theirs bought on the supposition he was buying a 
Singer sewing machine. Then to my mind the action entirely 
fails. Tbe learned Vice-Chancellor came to the conclusion, as 
a matter of inference from the evidence, that there 
had been such a misrepresentation that persons might be 
deceived who bought them into the supposition that 
they were buying Singer's machines. I can only 
say, that sitting as we do here to review that decision, and 
sitting here and exercising the functions of a jury, which the 
Vice-Chancellor did also — if I were in any doubt whether the 
Vice-Chancellor was right or wrong in that inference, I ought 
not to overrule it, because I hold that the Court of Appeal has 
no right to overrule the Judge on a question of fact, unless they 
are satisfied on the evidence that the inference of the Judge 
was wrong. Nor ought we to set aside the verdict of a jury 
unless we are satisfied the jury was wrong. It is not enough 
to say, if we were sitting on the jury we should come to a 
different conclusion. Therefore, taking that to be the principle 
on which we are acting, I come to the conclusion clearly in my 
own mind that the inference drawn by the learned Vice- 
Chancellor is entirely erroneous, and that the evidence in this 
case does not warrant the conclusion that anything which the 
defendant did connected with tbe sales of these machines 
was calculated to mislead the purchaser or anybody 
else into the supposition that he was buying a 
machine belonging to the Singer Company. As I have said 
before, the idea seems to have possessed the mind of the com- 
pany, and to a certain extent the minds of those who h'ive 
represented the company here, that the Singer Company had 
some special prerogative, either in the manufacture of Singer 
needles or sewing machines or in the name " Singer." I think 
that is an entire mistake. If any person sold a machine, 
simply calling it "the Singer machine," then another question 
would have arisen. Then would have arisen the question 
whether a buyer at this time would understand by that, that 
he was buying a machine of the manufacture of Singer, or 
whether when he was buying a machine the word " Singer" 
was descriptive of the kind of machine, so as to be likened to 
" Hansom " in the case of a hansom cab which has been often 
spoken of, and which is a very good illustration. No man 
speaking at the present day of a hansom cab speaks of it as 
a cab made by Mr. Hansom ; but be speaks of the kind of cab 
which bears that name ; and possibly the time has come when 
the Singer machine, if it were called a " Singer machine," 
might be now popularly imderstood to mean not a machine 
made by anybody of the name of Singer or the Singer com- 
pany, but a machine of the description and kind known as the 
"Singer machine." However, as I have said, that question 
does not arise, because the defendant never did sell any of his 
machines as the " Singer machines." 

I would only further observe that whenever that question 
Joes arise there is a great body of evidence before us now to 
show (I do not say it is altogether conclusive, but tending to 
show) that, at all events at the present time, the word 
" Singer " has become in popular use and acceptation a word of 
descriptim rather than a word denoting the maker. That, 
however, I pass by for the moment. It is enough to say that 
in this case that is not the question. The question is here, 
whether the defendant has misrepresented the machines of 
this company as machines made by Singer. For the reasons I 
have given, I think there is no evidence at all to justify us in 
finding that he has. 

Lord Justice James : Sir Henry Jackson, you will have to 
pay the costs up to the time of your putting in your answer. 

Sir Henry Jackson : Yt'S, my Lord. 

Lord Jus"tice James : And you will be entitled to have the 
costs which follow and subsequent to that date and the costs of 
the appeal. 

Sir Henry Jackson : If your Lordship pbases, I will accept 
that without endeavouring to apportion the costs. It is the 
whole costs up to the time of putting in the answer. 

Lord Justice James : Up to the time of the answer. 

Lord Justice Cotton : Up to and including the answer. 

Su- Hem-y Jackson : Up to and includuig the answer. One 



SSIS 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



25 



wiU be set off against the other. Yoiir lordship was good 
enough to say I might make a suggestion as to the form of the 
iniunction. Will yom- lordship look at Ime 19 on page 6 of 
our statement of defence, and youi- lordships will see the ample 
terms in which we submitted to be enjoined " agamst his usin,^ 
any label or brass plate upon or attached to any 
machine in which the words 'Singer Maohme ' or ' Smger 
Svstem,' or the word ' Singer,' either alone or m conjunction 
-ndth any other word or words is in any way used, or selhng or 
usino' any such machine with the word Smger on the above or 
othermse afBxed thereon or attached thereto." Of course, my 
lord I do not wish to recede from that submission for a moment, 
but 'l thiak it goes a little fm-tffer than what yoiu' lordships 
have imposed on us ; but I must leave that in your lordships 
hands. _ 

Lord Justice James : Eead it agam, if you please, it appears 

very ample. , . , ■, . 

Sir Hem-y Jackson: Yes, my lord; " agamst his usmg any 
label or brass plate upon or attached to any sewmg machine on 
which the words ' Singer machhie,' or ' Singer system, or the 
word ' Smger,' either alone or m conjunction mth any other 
word or words, is in any way used, or seUmg or using any such 
machhie with the word 'Smger' on the above, or otherwise 
affixed thereon or attached thereto." And then we submit to 
an account of profits. My learned friend in the Court below 
preferred to take the profits in the alternative of accounts. He 
elected to take profits. He cannot have both ; and I suppose he 
holds to that election stiU. I do not desire to withdraw from that, 
I am sui-e ; but I should very much like it to foUow the form m 
the answer for reasons which yom- lordships will quite appreciate. 

Lord Justice Lush : Would that be far enough. Sir Henry 
Jackson ? Supposing the word " Smger " is di-opped, but the 
word "shuttle" is given ? , ■, mi, i • 

Sir Hem-y Jackson : That is a trade-mark, my lord, ihat is 
then- registered trade-mark. We have not done that. It is 
not averred against us. It is not the practice of the Coiu-t to 
grant injunctions against anything which has not been done. 

Lord Justice James : The injunction is only as to usmg the 
label and otherwise representing your machines as bemg the 
machines of the plaintiff. ^ , , , 

Su- Hem-y Jackson : If your lordships had not put that on 
me we should be glad, because we are acquitted from havmg 
broken the plamtiffs' right in any way other than to the extent 
covered by this submission, and we should be very anxious not 
to have an injunction made agamst us which would imply that 
we have done anything more. 

Lord Justice James : I do not know that it would imply you 
had done anything more. Is it not the practice of the Co_m-t 
to hold that where you are restrained from one act— viz., usmg 
the label— that that act was wrongful ? 

Sir Henry Jackson : I should submit that your lordship is 
now taking it for the purpose of wording the injunction as 
thouo-h there had been an injunction in the terms submitted to 
and a fresh action instituted a moment afterwards. I take it 
that is the real position we are in. In the terms submitted to, 
we are cast; as regards all subsequent matters, we are 

acquitted. , , , . mi j.i 

Lord Justice James: Yes, I think that is so. Then the 

inj miction will be m the very words of the submission ? 

Sii- Henry Jackson : If yom- lordship pleases ; and an account 

of profits. „ „, 11 J 

Lord Justice James : And an account of profits on all goods 

sold mth that label upon them. 

Lord Justice Lush : And the costs of the appeal. 

Mr. Webster : The defendant will have the costs below. 

Lord Justice James : You ^vill have to pay the costs up to 
and including the answer, aud you will have all the costs m 
the Com-t below subsequent to that answer, and the whole costs 
of the appeal. 

Sii- Henry Jackson : The one wUl be set off against the other, 
and we will have our deposit retm-ned. 

Lord Justice James : Is there a deposit to be returned ? 

Sir Henry Jackson : Yes, my lord ; we were ordered to bi-ing 
in the deposit, that will be handed back. Of course yom- lord- 
ship remembers that it was agreed between us that the costs 



of the shorthand -writer's notes should be di-srided between us, 
and be costs in the appeal. That wiU be included. 

Lord Justice James : Yes ; you are to have the costs, includ- 
ing the costs of the shorthand writers. 

Sir Henry Jackson: If yom- lordship pleases. It was so 
sewing arranged. 



PROTECTION V. PEEE TRADE. 
In om- last issue we inserted an article on this subject 
from another American paper. The following, from the 
Sewing Machine Nezvs, takes another -view of the matter : — 

Durmg the Presidential campaign a good deal was said 
about the tariff, and a strenuous effort was made by certain 
political leaders to raise it into a prominent issue, but the 
attempt was a failure. Intelligent people, who understood the 
question, knew that any attempt at a wholesale abohshment 
of import duties aud the immediate establishment 
of free trade was utterly impracticable, and that no party, 
no matter of what political complexion, would dare to take 
such a step if placed in power. The question was used as a 
bugbear to frighten those who did not even know what the 
word tariff meant. Ignorance is always suspicious and sees 
danger in everything it does not understand. 

There is no doubt that this country -ivill m time follow the 
example of England and institute free trade, which is the true 
pohcy of commercial and manufactm-ing nations. But the step 
should be gradually taken. It is true that there are many 
branches of manufacturing industry which have not yet 
acquii-ed a robust growth and still require the care of govern- 
ment protection ; and it is also true that there are very many 
other branches of industry sheltered under the wing of the 
tariff laws which have long been out of their swaddling clothes 
and are perfectly able to take care of themselves in the teeth of 
the keenest foreign competition . Protection should b e withdrawn 
from these fully developed manufactures. To continue to enable 
them to exclude foreign goods from the market and thus main- 
tain a scale of high prices, is to confer pecuniary benefit upon 
a few persons at the expense of the generalpubUc, a policy 
altogether at variance mth the Republican spirit of American 
institutions. Class legislation, which confers exclusive privi- 
leges upon a set of individuals, will never be popular m the 
United States. It will not be many years before the govern- 
ment -wtU levy a tariff for revenue only. 

As far as the sewuig machine trade is concerned, it has every- 
thing to gain and nothing to di-ead from free trade. In some 
quarters the fear has been expressed that the raising of the 
present tariff would damage the trade by bringing in a deluge 
of cheap English and German machines. A little reflection 
ought to convince anyone that this fear is altogether un- 
grounded. In Great Britain sewmg machines of home manu- 
factm-e have been utterly unable to cope with the American 
articles, although the latter have always commanded a much 
higher price. So prejudiced is the British public in favour of 
the American article (the machines made by the Singer Com- 
pany at Glasgow are styled American) on account of their very 
great superiority, that the business of manufacturing and sell- 
ino- se-wing machines has shrimk to very insignificant propor- 
tions, and almost the entire trade has fallen into the hands of 
the Americans. Such being the case in foreign lands, is it not 
extremely unlikely that the people of the United States will 
withdraw then- patronage from superior articles of their own 
manufacture to bestow it upon trashy imported machines, 
even if they are sold for less money ? There are plenty of 
cheaply made and sold machines now upon the market, but 
they do not seem to have hm-t the sales of the superior and 
standard goods. It is not at all likely that if the import 
duties on sewmg machuies were taken off, that the English and 
Germans would gain even the slightest foothold for their cheap 
machines. 

E. ASCHERBERG & CO., 

QUEEN STREET, CHEAPSIDE, 



Agents for the 



LONDON. 
best German and French Pianos. 



26 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1, 1881. 



MR. PLATT'S PUBLICATIONS. 



LIFE— By JAMES PLATT. Author of 'Business,' 
' Money,' and ' Morality.' 

LIFE — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp. Price One 
Shilling. Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., StLitioners'-hall Court, 
London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing 
& Co.'s Bookstalls; and at every Booksellera. 

LIFE— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, W.C, 
win send a copy, post free, for Is. 

T IFE— Contents :— 

T IFE— Introduction. Is Life Worth Living ? 

J IFE— Life of the Futui^e, Cultm-e, Health. 

T IFE — Eecreation, Common Sense, Thrift. 

T IFE — Compulsory Thrift, Marriage, Happiness. 

T IFE — Eeligion, Future Life, Human Destiny. 

T IFE — Concluding Eemarks. 

LlY'Ei — Page 24 : — " Make Life a grander thing. Prove 
to men -what a glorious thing it is to exist, how enjoyable life might be, how 
sweet life is, even as it is— aye, we never know how sweet until we fear we are about 
to lose it. What a mockery ' Faith in God ' is when we reflect upon the melancholy 
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the noble sentiment, ' Not my will, but thine be done.' " 

LIp^E — Page 34 : — " Life is real, life should be earnest. 
To be enjoyed, we must have an ann, an object in life ; and to be happy, to 
enjoy life, the object must be one worthy the highest, purest, best part of our nature — 
men's character so strong and true that they can be relied up ; men that wear their 
lives out, not rust them out ; men who live to act, to produce what they consume. " 

LIFE — Page 45 : — " The more we think of life, the 
greater must be our reverence for the * Great Unknown.' Life will be very 
d-ffcrent once we get the people to realise as an indisputable truth that there is never 
anyUung wrong but what has been done by ourselves or others ; and ^that the wi'ong 
remains so long only as we refuse to put it right.' " 

LIFE— Page 102 : — ** Common sense denies that any 
happy cliance will do for a man what he is quite unable to do for himself. 
Our happiness consists in the use of our faculties, and a faith that our wages will be 
in proportion ^to our deserts. Success and failure are not dealt out like prizes and 
blanks In a lottery, by chance and indiscriminately ; but there is a reason for every 
success and failure. Indolence, chicanery, waste will cause the one ; while industry, 
honesty and thrift will ensure the other.' " 

LIFE— Page 173 :— " The more you think of life, the 
more you know of the Creator's way of governing the universe, the more 
you know of your own constitution and the happiness within your reach, the less will 
you believe that God meant man to bo born weeping, to live complaining, and to die 
disappointed.' " 

LIFE— PAGE 192 :— "We have life. What shall we do 
with it ? The world is like a vast manufactory, in which we hear incessantly 
the clash and whirring of a complex machinery. Shall we try and get the bottom of 
this? Yes, undoubtedly, earnestly, and fearlessly. Believe me you will thus get to 
learn that the law maker is behind his laws, and that, paradoxical as it may seem, 
while He hides himself behind them, He also reveals himself through them. There 
is no better way of understanding the Creator ; the laws are emanations of the all- 
beauteous mind ; they shadow forth the divinity that contrived them ; we find the 
more we study them, greater evidence that there is a Living God, a Father caring for 
and loving His children.'' 



M' 



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ihe rule of ' One above who sees all,' and whose laws are never infringed with 

impunity ; but that we have the power, if we but will so to do, to learn the wishes, 
and be hq.ppy by reverently obeying Him." 

lyi OEALITY— Business— Money— Life. 

OEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 

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ONEY — 208 pages crown 8vo, cloth limp, price One 

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jYI ONEY— Contents :— Preface, Money. 

IWr ONEY— The Origin of Money. What is Money ? 

IV/r ONEY— Currency : Gold Money, Silver Money. 

TWr ONEY— Bank Notes, Cheques, Bills of Exchange. 

1\/T ONEY— Bank Shares, Banking, Exchange, Interest. 

TV/r ONEY— Wealth, Capital, Panics. 

IWF ONEY — Individual Success, National Prosperity. 

lyr ONEY— Concluding Eemarks. 

MONEY.— Page 28:— "It is only by imderstanding 
onr monetary system that we can realise the power of 'credit.' Our com- 
mercial system is based upon faith ; cheques, bills, notes are mere bits of paper, and 
only promises to pay ; yet so great is the power of credit that transactions to the 
extent of over a hundred millions weekly are transacted through the Clearing-house. 
Gold is a mere pigmy, as a medium of exchange, to this giant ' paper,' based upon 
' credit.' Simply by system and faith, in conjunction with banking, this institution 
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aid of a single metallic coin — merely, by bookkeeping or transfer of cheques, the 
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"DUSINESS— Contents: Preface, Special Notice. 

BUSINESS— Business Qualities, Health, Education, 
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BUSINESS — Industry, Perseverance, Arrangement, 
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"DUSINESS— Calculation, Prudence, Tact. 
"D USINE SS— Truthfuhiess, Integrity. 
"DUSINESS— Money, and what to do with it. 
"DUSINESS— Bank Shares, Depression of Trade. 

BUSINESS— Free Trade and Reciprocity, Civil Service 
stores. 

"D USINESS — Co-operative Trading, Concluding Eemarks 

BUSINESS.— Page 7 : — " Commerce is guided by laws 
as inflexible as those of liealth or gravitation ; and the primary cause of 
failure in business may be traced as unerringly as the punishment that will surely 
follow the infringement of any other law of nature." 

BUSINESS.— Page 179—" From every pulpit and in 
every school throughout the kingdom the justification of double dealing and 
trickery upon the plea that it is impossible to get a living honestly by trade, or in any 
vocation, should be denounced in the most unmistakeable language as a libel on 
Providence, and the failure to succeed be attributed to its real cause — the man's 
ignorance of or incapacity for the business or profession he follows,'* 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES, 



27 




JONES AND CO. (LIMITED) v. PERN. 

This case was tried before a jury. Mi'. Wildey Wright 
appeared on behalf of plaintiffs, sewing-machine manufac- 
turers ; and Mr. Cooke, barrister, represented the defendant, 
the lessee of Norfolk House, Stepney-green. Plaintiffs sought 
to recover £32 15s. 5d., damages for being deprived of certain 
goods, for damage to the goods, and for ejectment from 
certain premises. Plaintiffs entered into an agreement with 
defendant to take a shop and part of the basement at Norfolk 
House, described as a large building devoted to model lodgings 
in the upper stories and to shops and basements in the lower 
portion. The basement was not ready when plaintiffs took 
possession, and it was arranged they should use a back room 
in the house until the basement was completed, and they 
accordingly placed their machines and other goods in that 
apartment, and continued to use it from June to September. 
On the 17th of the latter month defendant, as alleged, 
informed plaintiffs that the basement was ready, and requested 
them to remove their goods thither as he required the room for 
a new tenant. Plaintiffs alleged that the basment was not in 
a fit state, and objected to a partition which had been erected 
in it as an infringement of the agreement, and they refused to 
place their gocds there. On the morning of September 24th 
plaintiffs found the goods removed from the room and placed 
outside, with but slight covering, and when the defendant was 
communicated with he stated the removal was effected without 
his knowledge. Plaintiffs declined to take the goods, holding 
defendant responsible, and they remained there until October 
14th when the defendant had them removed to the basement. 
Several witnesses testified to the foregoing statement, the 
defence alleging that the action was brought in retaliation for 
an order obtained by Mr. Fern to compel them to pay him for 
certain work done in the shop. After a lengthened investiga- 
tion his Honour submitted the question to the jury, who found 
for the plaintiffs with £5 for damage to the goods, and £10 for 
breach of agieeineut. A discussion ensued between counsel as 
to the effect of the verdict, and it was eventually decided that 
plaintiffs were entitled to £27 for retention of the goods, that 
amount to be reduced to £15 if the goods are returned. At 
the request of Mr. Cooke his Honour made a note of counsel's 
objection to the verdict on the ground of want of evidence as 
to damage, value, and loss from detention. 

DAVIS'S EXCELSIOR KNIFE CLEANING MACHINE 
COMPANY (LIMITED) v. ARCHER. 

This was an application by the plaintiffs to restrain the 
defendant from affixing to a mincing and sausage machine 
the words, "Prize medal, Pai'is, 1878," or from representing 
or holdins; out to the public by means of cards, circulars, or 
otherwise that he was awarded such prize medal. It appeared 
that both parties had stalls at the Agricultural Hall, and that 
t'le defendant was the inventor of the machine in question, 
but at the time when the prize medal was gained was in the 
service of the plaintiffs, and manufactured machines for them. 
Mr. C. H. Turner was for the plaintiffs ; the defendant 
appeared in person. His lordship observed that the conduct 
of the defendant arose from no mala fides, but from some mis- 
apprehension, and it was arranged that upon the defendant 
giving an undertaking not to use the words in question there 
should be an end of the action, the plaintiffs paying their own 
costs. 

HAEPER TWELVETREES V. TAYLOR. 
This was an action to recover the price of a machine sold by 
plaintiffs, washing machine makers, to defendant, whose wile 
appeared and stated that her husband attended the Court on 



a previous occasion, but was now on his way to America, 
having left the day previous to the service of the summons. 
She denied that the money was owing. It was stated on the 
pait of plaintiff that the husband admitted the claim before 
he went away. His Honour adjourned the case for three 
months. 

THE SINGER SEWING MACHINE COMPANY v. 

THOMPSON. 
This was an action in the Bow Coimty Court, on Deo. 13, 
by the plaintiff company to recover of the defendant, a paivn- 
broker, of Jodi-ell-lane, Hackney, the sum of £13 15s., the 
value of two sewing machines and one stand, detained and 
converted to his own use. — Mr. Walpole, barri.ster, appeared 
for the plaintiffs ; and Mr. Parnell, solicitor, for the defendant. 
— -Plaintiff's case was that they lent a Mrs. StiUivan two 
sewing machines upon the usual agreement that she paid 2s. 6d. 
a week for each, and in the event of her paying that sum 
regularly imtil she had paid their value she became the o^vner 
of them ; but, on the other hand, if she neglected to pay the 
money, she forfeited any instalments she had paid, and the 
plaintiffs had a right to reclaim the machines. Upon the two 
machines she paid £5 9s. 6d. and then disappeared, taking 
both the machines ^vith her. Subsequent inquiries led to their 
iinding the machines in the defendant's possession, and Mi-. 
Baker, the manager of the plaintiff's Hackney establishment, 
went to the defendant and demanded the machines, but he said 
he had purchased them, and they were consequently his 
property. He was told under what terms the machines were 
let out, and defendant then said he gave £2 5s. for the ; wo 
machines, and if plaintiffs liked to give him £2 lOs. he would 
let them have them. — For the defence, Mr. Parnell said the 
machines were bought at a fair price, not from Mrs. Sidlivan, 
but another person, and he contended that he was entitled to 
keep them, notwithstanding the agreement between the 
plaintiffs and Mrs. Sulhvan. — His Honoui- said it did not 
matter who the defendant purchased the machines of, or what 
he gave for them. The plaintiffs had traced them into his 
possession, and they had a right to claim them as their proj)erty. 
— Judgment for the plaintiffs ; the money to be paid in a week 
unless the machines were delivered up within that time. 

DAVENPORT v. WILKINSON 

In the County Court at Northampton, Mr. Arthur Daven- 
port, silk mercer, Leek, Staffordshire, sued Messrs. J. and T. 
Wilkinson, sewing machine dealers at Wellingborough and 
Norwich, for £38 13s. 6d.— Mr. Palmer for the plaintiff, and 
Ml'. Hensman for the defendants. — The original order suppUed 
to Messrs. Wilkinson in March and May last was £53 8s. 6d. 
The plaintiff alleged that the goods were supplied at a month's 
credit, and the defendants claimed that two months' credit was 
given at a reduction of £5 per cent. — The defendants admitted 
that now the claim was due, but contended that at the time the 
action was entered it was premature. — The judge suggested 
that the matter should be settled out of Court ; and, after a 
consultation of counsel, it was settled by consent. 



The Franz & Pope Knitting Machine Co,, of Buoyrus, Ohio, 
has been in operation since 1870, during which time they have 
turned out 10,000 knitting machines. The company also turn 
out about £10,000 worth of socks a year, using 46 of their 
machines, each with a capacity of from three to seven dozen 
pairs per day, much depending upon the size of the leg-cover 
and the skill of the operator. All the knitting is done by 
steam, each machine being provided with a patent belt throw- 
off, which stops the machine at the point set. A regiment of 
the circle of little needles is then set, and by a few turns of a 
hand -wheel the heel and toe are knitted, and the sock is ready 
for the finishing touches. 

(PARIS) 

AT ORIGINAL PRICES 

SUPPLIED BY 

E. ASCHERBERG & CO. 



28 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1, 1881. 



MNiCK, mmi & CO., 

SOLE AGENTS IN EUROPE FOR 

Johnson, Clark Ss Co., 



OF NEW YOEK. 



THE "HOME SHUTTLE" 

still keeps its place as being tte best Hand Lock-Stich Sewing 
Machine in the world. It is exceedingly simple, uever out of 
order, and always presents a bright and attractive appearance. 




We have added the loose winding wheel and all latest 
improvements. 



THE BEST TREADLE MACHINE IS THE 

Light Running "Standard 

For Manufacturing and Family use. 



ff 




•1ri « 

a EH o 






Ii is a Model of Strength and Beauty. 

The most Elegantly Ornamented Machine in the world. Lasts a life- 
time, and NEVER gets OUT of ORDER. BSCELS ALL OTHERS 
IN THOROUGHNESS OF WORKMANSHIP. 

We wish to establish Agencies in all Towns, and will give exclusive 
territory to first-class houses, and furnish Machines at very low prices. 



RENNICK, KEMSLEY & CO., 

(Late Johnson, Clarh and Co.), 

Finsbnry Circus, LONDON, E.C. 



THOMAS WARWICK, 

MANUFACTUREK OP 

By Royai Letters Patent. i51vlvLl£i Ju.il 1 ililililljS 

Of every description. Wholesale and for Exportation. 




WARWICK'S PATENT POTENTIAL RIMS. 

SOLE MAKEE OP WOOLLET'S PATENT DUPLEX SPRING 
SADDLE. STAMPINGS OF ALL KINDS. 




C. D. Vesey, Esq., who won the late Tricycle Championship, used one 
of WOOLLEY'S PATENT SADDLES. He says : ■' I was highly 
delighted with it; never once during the 50 miles ride did I feel the 
slightest of the rougli roads.''^ 

Price List Free on application to the above, 

Aston New Town, Birmingham. 



60,000 Sold in Three Years. 

The Household Washing,' Wringing 
and Mangling Machines. 

Wholesale only from 

5, NEW STREET, BISHOPSGATE STREET. E.C. 

Just Published. 12nio. cloth limp, 2/-, or cloth 
boards, 2/6 (postage 2d). 

SEWING MACHINER Y, 

BEING 

A PRACTICAL MANUAL 

OF THE 

SEWING MACHINE, 

Comprising its History and Details of its Construction, with Full Tech- 
nical Directions for the adjusting of Sewing Machines. 
By J. W. TTE,aUHAE,T. 

CROSBY LOCKWOOD & Co., 7, Stationers' Hall Court, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 



€tie Iming %u\m ®i\t\\\ 



AND 



JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE Court of Appeal have confirmed the judgment of 
Vice-Chancellor Bacon in the cause of the Singer 
Manufacturing Co. v. Loog, to the following extent — 
the defendant is prohibited from " using any label or brass 
plate upon or attached to any sewing machine in which the 
words 'Singer Machine,' or 'Singer System,' or the word 



Sax. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MlCHlNE GAZETTE AND JOTTRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



29 



' Singer,' either alone or in conjunction witli any other word or 
words is in any way used, or selling or using any such machine 
with the word Singer on the above or otherwise affixed thereon 
or attached thereto ;" but they have given him liberty to use 
the word, if he pleases, in such other ways as may not deceive 
the public. It might occur to an ingenuous mind to enquire 
in what possible way one person can use the name of another 
in selling his goods vnthout deceiving the public, or why he 
should wish to use it at all unless his aim and intent was to 
deceive them. To such a mind the natural question would 
arise — why does Mr. Smith, if he is honest and fair in his 
dealings, want to call his goods by the name of Jones or 
RobiEson ? Why can't he say plainly " these are Smith's ; I 
make them and I call them by my own name, and not by that 
of my rival in trade, who also makes goods of a similar class " — 
this would be straightforward and intelligible, and, as we 
believe, would pay best in the long run. But for the moment 
we will leave this common-sense view of the matter and see 
how far the law, as laid down by the learned judges in the Court 
of Appeal, iidapts itself to the exigencies of ordinary commercial 
life. Lord Justice Cotton lays it down that a trader has a perfect 
right to gain what benefit he can from the credit and adver- 
tisements of others, and from the course of business which 
they have adopted, if he does not do so in a way calculated 
to mislead. Truly, there is much virtue in an if. According 
to the learned judge, A B may spend years of toil, and large 
sums of money building up a reputation for his goods at great 
cost ; he may advertise them to all the world, and create such 
a demand for them that the vei'y name by which he has 
designated them has become a household word ; he may 
jealously guard his legal rights by every means in his power, 
and yet it shall be perfectly open for C D to say, " I also 
manufacture these goods which have attained such a celebrated 
character for excellence of material and superiority of work- 
manship. I choose to call mine by the same name, because I 
believe the name will help to sell them, and because my rival 
has made this name famous by dint of an enormous outlay for 
advertisements, and by the strictest attention to the manufac- 
ture of his articles." This may be lawful, but simple-minded 
folk have only one name for persons who would so act. It 
certainly appears to our limited comprehension that Vice- 
chancellor Bacon was a great deal nearer the common-sense 
view of the subject when he said in his judgment: "I 
take it to be very old law that a man's trade mark is 
his property, and I do not know that his trade name 
differs in the character of property from his trade mark." 
Then again Lord Justice James declared that the word 
" system," as applied to sewing machines, has, to his mind, a 
very intelligible meaning, and that consequently Mr. Loog 
was justified in describing his machines as manufactured on 
the " Singer System." Vice-Chancellor Bacon says that 
' ' Nobody can say there is anything like an approach to 
any principle. There is a principle of the needle and shuttle 
which everybody can understand ; but after that there is no 
more principle than there is in a watch. The only principle 
in mechanics is to overcome the resistance by means of 
mechanical appUfinces. That is done by the needle and shuttle, 
and nothing more than that is done. The commonest brick- 
layer's scaffolding is just as much an invention or principle 
or system as that which was applied by the plaintiffs in this 
case," which certainly appears to us a great deal nearer the 
correct version. Again, Lord Justice James is of 
opinion that a seamstress in want of a sewing machine 
would be "as ready to detect any sign of spuriousness as a 
bank clerk who has been in the habit of dealing with such 



matters would be to detect whether a sovereign is bad or not, 
or whether a bank note is a forgery." Would Lord Justice 
James be surprised and shocked to learn that very many of the 
best machine hands can scarcely read or write; that they 
have to depend in the selection of a machine not upon its form 
and appearances, but chiefly upon what they are told at the 
time of purchase ? Putting a brass label upon the imitation 
machine, with the word Singer stamped thereon, is not half so 
calculated to deceive persons of this class as the bold statement 
of the person selling — " This is the thing you are asking for; 
this is a Singer machine." The words on the label they may 
or may not be able to decipher, but the words of the salesman 
they hear, and are influenced by ; and if these words are not 
true, or only partly true, then the axiom of the Poet Laureate 
comes in that " a lie which is half a truth is ever the worst of 
lies." It was probably an oversight, but we think the counsel 
for the plaintiff company did not attach sufficient importance 
to the evidence of those trade witnesses who were questioned 
at the trial as to what was the meaning conveyed to their 
minds by the name of the manufacturer when used to designate 
any particular machine. It will be remembered that several 
witnesses of this class were called on behalf of Mr. Loog, and 
when cross-examined by Mr. Aston they deposed as follows : — 
Mr. Edward Todd, a wholesale dealer of many year's standing 
says : " By the term Carver's machines I should understand 
machines made by Mr. Carver, and by Kimball and Morton's 
machines I, as a buyer, should understand machines made by 
Kimball and Morton." And again, Mr. John Chappie Blom- 
field says, after a very considerable amount of fencing about, 
" I should understand a Sellers and Allen machine to mean a 
machine made by Sellers and Allen; and a Bradbury machine 
would mean a machine made by Bradbury and Co. If I speak 
of Jones's machines or Bradbury's machines, or Sellers and 
Allen's machines, I mean sewing machines made by those 
respective iirms." It was rather hard work to bring all this 
out of the gentleman's mouth, because he could see where it 
was leading to. But it came out at last, and without doubt 
faithfully represents what the public mean when they 
ask for machines of any particular maker. Suppose the usher 
of the court were instructed to obtain some Try's chocolate 
for the luncheon of the Lords Justices, and he were to gravely 
inform them that he had bought them JFry's chocolate made 
by Cddbury or Epps, we fancy there would be an advertise- 
ment for a new usher without delay. There was, on the de- 
fendant's side, an prgument which used to be urged with the 
utmost emphasis and gravity, to the effect that, if the Singer 
Company obtained the injunction they sought, they would 
adopt such a course o£ arbitrary proceedings against all the 
other members of the trade that business could not be carried 
on at aU ; that they would frighten,and harass, and intimidate 
all their rivals in business, and endeavour to obtain a complete 
monopoly. It is eighteen months ago since Vice-Chancellor 
Bacon gave the judgment which was to place such tremendous 
power in their hands, and we should like to know who has 
been frightened or harassed, and whether, in fact, the trade 
has not been in a far healthier state than it had known for 
years. Piracy of trade reputations was no longer carried on 
with impunity, but every fair trader had a chance to make a 
reputation for himself with the belief that when he had so 
made it, it would be his own, and might become a legacy to 
his children. The Lords Justices having given their decision 
that some of the acts complained of were not illegal, although 
others confessedly were, nothing remains but to await the final 
verdict of the House of Lords, and all that the English sewing 
machine trade can do in the meantime is to prevent as much as 



30 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



possible their trade being ruined by unfair competition, and to 
keep what reputation they may have acquired by every means 
in their power. Our course, as the Editors of the Trade Journal, 
is a very plain and simple one, for, while according the utmost 
liberty of discussion to both sides of the question, provided 
that discussion be carried on in a courteous spii'it, we do not 
intend to recognise in any way the principle of describing the 
machines of one maker by the name of another, and by that 
determination we, as journalists, will stand or fall. 



We may fairly congratulate Mr. Hunting, the esteemed 
manager of the Wheeler and Wilson Manufacturing Company, 
upon his very narrow escape from service as a juror in the 
Crown Prosecutions now being tried in Dublin. Mr. 
Hunting's name was among the first list of names selected by 
ballot, and when that number was reduced to twenty-four he 
was still on the list. However, he does not figure among the 
twelve finally selected — and we think he has plenty of reason 
to be thankful — for a more disagreeable task than to waste a 
month of enforced attendance over an Irish State Trial we can 
scarcely conceive. 



HAEPEE'S PATENT CA8TEE. 
Amongst American novelties recently brought to our notice 
we may mention that of an improved caster, for which letters 
patent have recently been applied for by Mi-. J. M. Harper, 
of El Paso, "United States of America (as a communication to 
G. F. Redfem, of 4, South-street, Pinsbiiry), and which caster 
the inventor claims as supplying a long-felt want. It wUl be 
seen, by reference to the illustration, that the caster consists of 
a cup-like platform for receiving the leg of a stove, sewing 
machine, chair, table, or any other article with feet ; such 




platform having three radiating arms, each resting oh a small 
roller. The advantages claimed for this caster are that they 
can be used mider any article with legs, as above described, 
no matter how heavy, as well imder one with oidy three legs as 
one with four ; that one person can adjust them ; that they 
can be used for moving any heavy article. They are cheaper 
than any other, and are very durable. Samples of the casters 
may bo seen at the oifi.ce of Mr. G. F. Eedfem, 4, South-street, 
Finsbiiry, London, who, we are informed, is Mr. Harper's 
agent. 



WANTED, a few Copies of the February 
Number of the " Sewing Machine Gazette " 
for i88o. One Shilling per Copy will be 
given. — T, B., care of the Editor, " Sewing 
Machine Gazette," ii, Ave Maria Lane, 
E.G. 



SEWING MACHINE COTTONS. 

We have received from the Charles-street MUls, Leicester, 
various samples of Eaworth's celebrated cottons, and after a 
fair trial find them to be everything desirable. The nine-cord 
is the very best article of sewing cotton in the world. On 
samples of it being submitted to her Majesty, she was 
graciously pleased to confer upon Mr. Eaworth the title of 
" Manufaotui'er to the Queen ;" a copy of the authority we have 
seen. The six-cord soft cotton in white, black, and colours, is 
suitable for every kind of sewing machine, and unsurpassed in 
excellence. One of the specialities is an article in cotton for 
use instead of silk ; the consumer pays 2d. for a reel of sUk 
containing fifty yards, whUe this article can be bought on 
reels containing eighty yards at Id. each. It is specially 
adapted for use in all cases where sUk is used, to which it is 
superior in strength, dye, and finish ; it wHL retain its colour 
and wear as long as the fabric it is used upon. Mr. J. T. 
Eaworth is the inventor of the machine by which the cotton is 
so evenly and beautifully laid in rows upon the reels. This 
machine, the result of long study and great expense, having 
been completed, Mr. Eaworth sought no restrictive patent or 
other selfish monopoly, but allowed it to be freely used by his 
competitors and the trade generally, thus granting and 
seciuing a cosmopolitan advantage to every user of sewing 
cotton. 



THE HEBEELING EUNNING- STITCH SHIEEING 
MACHINE. 

This machine is better known in America than here. We 
have seen one at the offices of the Willcox and Gibbs Sewing 
Machine Company, Cheapside, and are decidedly of opinion 
that they have a " good thing to handle." It makes most 
effective and beautiful trimmings, suitable for the present 
fashion. It is claimed to be the only machine in the world 
which will sew a perfect running stitch in exact imitation of 
hand work, and will make 5,000 stiches per minute. In 
appearance, it is not unlike a sewing machine ; but upon 
examining its modus operandi, the difference between the two 
is quicldy discernible. This one machine can accomplish more 
work in a given time than twenty persons could do by hand. 
One or two needles can be used, make one row, or two parallel 
rows, at the desire of the operator. The motions are all rotary, 
running free and noiseless. As they make the regular hand 
runnuig- stitch, the threads can be drawn so as to make the 
shirring either full or scant. These machines are adapted to 
all grades of work, from heavy velvet to the most delicate 
tissues. 



AGEEEMENT FOEMS 

6d. per Doz., 3/6 per 100, 

POK THE 

roR 

SEWING MACHINES,W ASHING MACHINES 

BICYCLES, PIANOS, FURNITURE, &c., 

May always be had at the Office of the 

"Se^A^ing Machine Gazette," 
11, AVE MAEIA LANE, LONDON, E.G. 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AlfD JOUBNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



31 



REVIEWS. 

With the new year Mr. Piatt lias issued another of the series 
of books, which, commencing with "Business" in 1878, was 
followed by " Morality " in 1879, and by " Money " in 1880. 
We are inclined to think these essays improve as the series goes 
on, and that *" Life " is thus far the best book which Mr. Piatt 
has produced. 

One of the most surprising things to us is, however, the 
author who is at the head of a very large commercial undertaking 
which one would think must severely tax his energies — can find 
time to consult all the authorities referred to in this volume, 
and having consulted them, to reduce the result of his study to 
such a compact and interesting book as that before us. Mr. 
Piatt deals very exhaustively with the question which has been 
raised of late by a special school of thinkers, '■ Is life worth 
living?" only, unlike them, his answer is distinctly and un- 
hesitatingly in the affirmative. Thus in his introduction he 
deals with the matter in the following terms : — 

" Life not worth living ! To say it is to give the lie to all 
things in heaven and earth. It is an expression that annihilates 
all hope ; as if humanity, in death-like trance, were adjudged 
dead by those who felt its piilse. Why is it? Because, as the 
warrior of whom it had been asked, ' In what do you believe? ' 
promptly answered, ' In myself,' so the people of our day, when 
the question is put to their inner souls, when they ask them- 
selves this important question, when they have to reply to their 
inner consciences, ' In what do you believe ? ' answer, ' In 
nothing.' Their lives seem as a sad tale of 3'outh passed among 
the ' fragments of a broken world,' of a spring-time of life with 
all the desolateness of autumn ; human illusions lying around 
like fallen leaves ; the sunbeams no foretaste and pledge of 
summer's passionate warmth, but mere chilly harbingers of 
winter, as they struggle through the silent world — 

Bare, ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. 

Life not worth living ! Imagine yourself dying, not by a painful 
or lingering disease, but whilst in good health, say by drowning! 
how you will struggle then for your life ! how you will love it ; 
how sweet and warm and full and fresh it will seem ! how cold 
the river, and how undesirable a speedy release from the pomps 
and vanities of this wicked world ! And when, after all hope 
seems to have gone, you are saved, how n.iturall}' you utter — 
oh, so thankful for life then — ' Thank God ! thank God ! ' You 
may take it as an axiom that if men are sick of life, it is because 
they know and feel in their souls they have themselves to 
thank for it. The reflection does not add to the delights of a 
man's position when he is humbled to the dust. On the 
contrary, although he may realise the justice of the punishment, 
nothing ever can, nothing ever will, make ' biting the dust ' 
taste anything but dry, bitter, nauseating to the last degree. 
But such men realise better than others that ' life is worth 
living.' " 

As Mr. Piatt veiy clearly shows, much of the dissatisfaction 
with life as it comes from the folly and sin of those who do all 
they can to waste and spoil their lives rather than elevate and 
improve them. Thus he says, " Life intolerable, why P because 
people with one thousand a year would like to spend two — yet 
there are an immense number who find life enjoyable with only 
£100 or £150 a year. Happiness does not depend upon one's 
income. Poverty need not degenerate into ugliness or misery. 
Affection will brighten home with a rose bush planted here, a 
bunch of violets there, life sweetened with sympathy, so that in- 
dustry and thrift are encouraged, and the one ' home ' made 
much more enjoyable w4th £100 a year than the other with 
£1,000, if the £100 be blessed with a wife that is a real 'help 
mate ' and the £1,000 be cursed with one of that large and in- 
creasing class that only think of ' dress,' and whose whole talk 
is of the ' latest novelties,' the new things they have got since 
they saw you last, and who value the same by their cost ; 
home and wifely duties neglected, sacrificed to ' dress ' and 
■ visiting,' never happy unless out or entertaining at home. 
Marriage is one of the most important steps in a man or 
woman's life. The future of both will he so peaceful and joyful 
if perfect confidence exists in each heart ; so full of trouble and 

* " Life," by James Piatt. Simpkin, Marshall it Co., London. 



pain if deception be practised on either side, or an}' incompati- 
bility of temper or disposition has from selfish reason or to 
gratify a passing passion been overlooked. To marry when you 
cannot freely love and respect is to commit an act of dishonesty 
and injustice. Yet how few women really marry from love — 
how many because they are asked, and because their friends 
think the marriage is suitable. It is frightful punishment to 
lead a loveless life ; stdl more so, however, for man or woman 
to meet the right party when too late. One can understand 
the poor unfortunates thinking, ' Life is not worth living.' Life 
then becomes a perpetual punishment. ' Why were we ever 
born ? ' must be daily asked when too late. So it is with all 
wasted lives. Time, ghostlike, glides by us invisible ; unseen 
amid the glare and turmoil of the day ; but in the gloom and 
silence of the midnight hour he stands revealed, and with one 
hand points mockingly to the wasted, marred past, and with 
the other towards the future, he whispers in the lonely hour 
into our ears, the startling, fateful word, ' Eternity.' Be as 
hardened as you may, possessed of an iron will, time will 
conquer. The misery of hypochondriasis, of remorse, will 
inevitably master you ; you will lose the zest of life, and feel 
ever on the brink of a precipice, to the unknown depths of 
which you will have one day to descend. Lead a true hfe ; 
begin the work of repentance, of reparation, at once ; get free 
from your false position ; be honest and true to your higher 
nature ; strive once more to get a healthy turn of mind and 
bodj"^, a sure sign of which is a feeling of thankfulness that you 
exist, a freedom of morbid discontent, replaced by one of 
heartfelt thankfulness to the Author of all for your existence, 
an inward consciousness that ' life is worth living.' " 

This is very practical, earnest writing, and goes to the root 
of the matter. So many lives that began full of hope and 
promise have become withered and ruined by extravagance, by 
improvidence, and by idleness, that it makes one very sad at 
times and almost tempted to ask in a desponding mood, •' Ai'a 
such wasted lives as these at all wortli living? Had it not 
been better for such as these if they had never been born ? So 
helpless, so purposeless, so miserable, so lost ! " Mr. Piatt 
manages, however, to draw comfort even from this dark side of 
things, for he says — " Life will be very different once we get the 
people to realise as an indisputable truth that there is never 
anything wrong but what has been done by ourselves or others, 
and that the wrong remains so long only as we refuse to put it 
right. With such a thought to guide us, the future would cease 
to be dark. We should anticipate its diificulties, but never 
think of its perils. The only doubt a man should feel, is 
whether he is doing what is right, and trying to the utmost of 
his power to repair wrong ; and never to do that at one time 
which in another he will look back upon with loathing ; and so 
patiently and persistently struggle out of the fetters of 
humanity into the freedom and liberty of being a son of God, 
patiently and contentedly doing the work before him, with the 
divine insight to perceive that in every lowliest lesson of a life 
the soul expands and grows alive, and all are drawn nearer unto 
God. Do not be misled by those who argue that because " the 
larks do not make their own singing, therefore mortals do not 
make their own sighing.' We do, and must make great eftbrts 
to let in a joy that will slay the grief-monster. Exercise your 
power of thought, and you will soon realise that the suffering 
which puzzles so many of us often leads to valued good, and 
when properly understood you will find that suffering exists for 
reasons of the highest, purest, and kindest import, such as 
when understood must be absolutely satisfactorj' to the sufferers 
themselves. Man has the power to discover causes and to 
remove the iUs that flesh is hen- to. It is a grand birthright, 
this power, this free will." 

In the chapter entitled " Is life worth living ? " Mr. Piatt has 
a very beautiful passage descriptive of the pleasures of nature 
and natural scenery which we are sure our readers will thank us 
for drawing their attention to. We have taken the liberty to 
quote the entire passage : — 

" Life is very enjoyable in the early spring when the first 
heralds of the returning youth of the year meet us from all 
sides in the guise of odours — not yet those of flowers, but the 
more ethereal, if less sweet, scents of bud and grass, and even 
pure earth moisteued with the waters of heaven — those months 



s^ 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



JAN. 1, 1881. 



so glorious to ws because of the return of the sunshine we hare 
not had for some time ; AprO, with its sudden showers that 
turn every twiff into a jewelled sceptre, every branch glistening 
as if covered with diamonds ; the month when the birds pour 
their thrilling music from every bush and shrub and tree ; the 
month when Nature has sown every bankand hedgerow withmany- 
coloured wild flowers, and, lavish of her sweets, her beauties, 
her melodies, has, in the joy of her perennial youth, shared them 
freely with her lovers. How very beautiful the world is when 
the mind is at peace, and can appreciate a glorious evening in 
July or August ! What a luxury it is to walk along the beach, 
the sun setting in the distance, and the eyes fixed upon the sea, 
near the little coves with jutting headlands, the tint upon their 
slopes looking yellow beside the clear emerald of the sea be- 
yond the stony beach— in the distance there where the waves 
ride white-plumed in from the far-off blue ! The pleasure is 
intense after a walk out among the great loose stones of the 
beach, to seat oneself upon a huge boulder under some towering 
cliff", and gaze out to sea in a long, rapt gaze, watching every- 
thing around, determined to enjoy thoroughly what one sees, 
and not let the thoughts go farther as yet ; watching the sea, 
so beautiful as the foam splashes on its shining green, whilst 
further out the scattered rooks rise from the blue into which 
these shifting shades of green blend so beautifully, and you hear 
the billows break over them so softly, covering them with a 
high canopy of spray, which, dissolving instantly, like mist 
before the sun, leaves them decked with fairy waterfalls. It is 
great pleasure to sit and watch the sea, listening to the 
murmuring roll of the waves upon the beach, a sweet, dreamy 
music— that rhythmical undertone of the murmuring waves. 
Ah! if we would but use our eyes, scenes daily would remind 
us that Nature is God's handiwork, and the more we appreci- 
ate Nature in her full and rich perfection, the more comfort 
there will be for the soul in loving Him who made it." 

Coming to the practical matters of every day life, in which he 
deals with such matters as co-operation, interest, education, &c., 
Mr. Piatt is very severe upon Mr. Euskin and others of his 
school who have lately propounded such extraordinary theories 
about the rights and abuses of money. Mr. Piatt says : — " I 
see no hope of a better future until the rights of private property 
are sacred, not by the protection of law, but from a belief in the 
minds of the people that the man who earns and saves what he 
can, has as much a right to it as he has the right to breathe, to 
be in health, to be virtuous. It seems incredible that educated 
men like Mr. Kuskin, in their zeal to stigmatize interest of 
money, can go so far as to give it as their opinion that a loan of 
£100 is completely and justly repaid by twenty instalments of 
£5 each at any distance of time. So positive is Mr. Kuskin of 
his views being right that he boldly asserts that time makes no 
difference, that £5 in present money is r^-o more valuable than 
£5 to be paid ten years hence. What difference is there 
between Proudhon, who asserts that property is theft, those 
agitators who claim for tenants to pay what rent they think 
fair, or ' not any,' as ' rent ' is only another name for interest 
upon money that has been spent in the purchase of land, or in 
building of a house ; and Mr. Ruskin, who calls interest a fraud 
and immorality P Under the pretence of morality and benevo- 
lence, these men do a vast amount of mischief in stigmatizing 
as immoral a bargain made between two men who know their 
own wants and the value of the article they are borrowing. 
To say the action of borrowing is not a voluntary one is begging 
the question ; the great bulk of borrowing is by merchants and 
tradesmen who know the value of the loan ; men who would 
scorn to receive the loan as a charity ; men who wish to pay 
the banker his just equivalent. For these dreamers to insist 
that the borrower ought not to pay for the benefit received is an 
offence not only to the lender, the banker whose trade it thus 
wantonly and recklessly insults, but also to the borrower, the 
merchants and traders, whose application it strives, as do all 
these philanthropic schemes, to turn into the plea of a distressed 
unfortunate entitled to relief from the more fortunate. The 
only excuse for such opinions is that the authors of them 
entirely lose sight of the world as it is — the enormous amount 
of borrowing that goes on to-day — and the value of being able to 
borrow at so low a rate of interest." This is strong language, 
but, as we venture to think, not a jot more severe than juat. 



Practical questions of this kind can only be properly dealt with 
by practical men, and Mr. Ruskin — splendid genius though he 
be — IS at times one of the wildest of visionaries, especially when 
he ventures into the domain of finance. 

The chapter on marriage is fuU of most excellent suggestions. 
Take the following as an example : — " A true wife is her 
husband's second self in thought and sympathy and action; 
and those women who live with men, but never mingle their 
souls with theirs, may be their husbands' legalized encum- 
brances, but are not their wives. I am well aware there are 
wives who are the ' sunshine ' of the house, the loadstone that 
keeps the man earnestly at his duty, the magnet that with a 
' loving smile ' and evidences of careful thought for his comfort 
welcomes him home. I care not what station of life such couples 
occupy, they are rich in that great wealth of being happily 
mated. Contrast the picture with its opposite : the man 
struggling on as the bread-winner for wife and children day 
after day, year after year, simply from a sense of duty ; no 
loving smile greets him, no pleasant word, not a smile week 
after week, year after year, very little speech except to complain 
and grumble. Duty, or ambition, aye, and conscience, too, 
need be strong with such men to keep them to their life's 
work, and their lives free of sin. We often blame men (and 
women too) for lapsing into drunken habits or a vicious life. 
The cause might generally be traced to a couple not adapted 
for each other, but legally yoked together, and who, un- 
fortunately for themselves, do not make the best of a bad bargain. 
' Every wise woman buildeth her house, but a foolish woman 
overthroweth her house with her own hands.' " 

Or again, " It is the unhappy chance of many men, that, find- 
ing many inconveniences in the mountains of single life, they de- 
scend into the valleys of marriage to refresh their troubles, and 
there they enter into fetters, and are bound to sorrow by the cords 
of a woman's peevishness. Of the majority it may be truly said, 
' they marry in haste, and repent at their leisure ;' the one must fol- 
low the other. If we can get people to think more of what mar- 
riage is, so as to be ;nore careful and be resolved to feel their 
way, in iear of taking a leap in the dark, we shall be taking the 
first step to a general social progress. A married man is consi- 
dered more reliable, because he has given a hostage to society, 
as it were, for his good conduct ; but if we could ensure a more 
happy, contented married life, society might depend more se- 
curely upon its members. To have the married lives of our 
people a ' success,' is to ensure a happy future for our people. 
The struggle for existence makes us all look out for chance of 
profit ; but no one thinks it worth while to strive for a happy 
existence, because, as a rule, we start on the journey of life pre- 
disposed to think ' life ' is a curse, a burden to be borne, full of 
trial, and under that mistaken, nay, mischievous and erroneous 
idea, that ' God loveth best those whom He chasteneth the 
most.' Whereas it is really the contrary, ' God blesses those 
who do His wishes and obey His laws,' and in nothing is this 
more apparent than in the married life." 

Match-making mammas wiU do well to ponder the following. 
" We are told that ' a mother's highest duty is to secure a good 
position for her daughter ' — a most revolting dictum, and amazing 
to hear from any mother in relation to her child. Yet if the 
poor creature, as is too often the case, in their marriage without 
affection on either side, commits an act of imprudence — if she 
cannot be virtuous, when virtue is made so easy and so gilded, 
the mother and society are not blamed, but only the poor vic- 
tim who finds the human passions within her that her parents 
have ignored too strong for her to control. And the world 
seems astonished at such lapses, that men and women should 
not be content with their position and its compensations, forget- 
ting the pimishment that will inevitably follow from such an 
outrage of the Divine law." 

In the concluding chapters of the book, Mr. Piatt travels 
somewhat into the region of theological controversy, dealing 
with such vexed questions as original sin — future rewards and 
punishments and the like — he says that he expects many theo- 
logians wiU dissent from the views he expresses ; his object in 
dealing with these questions, he tells his readers, is *"o strengthen 
their belief in the existence of a Creator. Here is a statement 
which none wo think will object to. " The essential point is for 
mankind to understand that all misery arise* from man's ignor- 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtTENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



33 



ance or neglect of the laws of God. That therefore, instead of 
directing our attention for man's happiness so exclusively to 
thoughts of another world, it is our duty to better understand 
the world we live in, and that although the magnitude and extent 
of our social evils si Oja to render them unmanageable, what is 
really wanted is the earnest desire by our teachers to remove 
them. The first thing is to discern what is right and wise to do. 
Whether to punish for drink or forbid drink, or to establish 
clubs and supply cheaply cheerfulness and comfort to the masses, 
to tax liquors and cause them to be adulterated, and the per- 
nicious influence to madden those who take them and make 
them crave for more,| or leave the liquor traffic free as any 
other, and only interfere to punish those who poison wholesome 
drink ; to let the people grow up like pigs in our midst and then 
punish them for every misery that humanity suffers ; point out 
the remedy, and then build up a future very different from the 
present or past. You must have faith, you must make the people 
have faith, but once give them the right belief, faith must come, 
hope will help, we shall cheer and sustain each other ; and al- 
though it will take generations to undo the errors of the past, 
remember the contrast between the countless influences that have 
been working previously in the wrong direction, and the cumu- 
lative operation of each step in the right course ; and how every 
stronghold of error, folly, or vice overthrown, exposes, weakens, 
and undermines every other, and so press on ; never despair ; 
the goal in time must be reached, and the disordered constitu- 
tion, whether diseased, criminal, or defective, which now spreads 
and propagates so much moral mischief, shall have become ter- 
minative ; when a sounder system of education shall have pre- 
vented the too early awakening of natural desires, when more 
rational because higher and soberer notions of what is needful 
and desirable in social life, a lower standard of ex penditure 
wiser simplicity in living, shall have rendered the legitimate grati- 
fication of these desires more easy ; when little in comparison 
shall be needed for a happy home, and that little shall have be- 
come generally attainable by frugality, sobriety, and toil." 

We think we have given enough to make our readers desire 
for more. The book, all through, is carefully compiled, enter- 
taining, instructive, and full of suggestive thoughts. Mr. Piatt 
thus concludes : " Eeader, Au^revoir! Press on, impatient to 
perfect thyself, to be able to appreciate life's beauties, to feel 
that, however humbly, you are working with your Creator, omit- 
ting no means to make yourselfbetter acquainted with the divine 
government of the world, and utilizing your time and intelli- 
gence for the good of society — never despairing, because of the 
faith within, that you will be sure to receive the reward you 
have earned by the faithful use of the talents entrusted to you." 

We hope he may live to write many more books, equally 
valuable and entertaining. 



Under the title of * "Industrial Curiosities," Mr. A. H. Japp 
has collected a number of very interesting papers on subjects 
connected with commerce and manufactures which have ap- 
peared from time to time from his pen in " Good Words " and 
other periodicals. The industries with which this journal is more 
intimately connected come in for a good share of Mr. Japp's 
attention — thus we have chapters on " Needles," on the " Sew- 
ing Machine," on " Leather," and on " Indiarubber," to say 
nothing of chapters of more general interest, as, for example, 
" Clocks and Watches," the " Post Office," "Locks and Safes," 
"Through Traffic," &c., &c. 

The book bears evidence that a very large amount of time has 
been occupied in collecting the materials necessary for its com- 
pilation, and that the writer of it goes about the world with his 
eyes wide open. His chapter on " the Post Office " is especially 
interesting, and even amusing. His statement that in the year 
1877 nearly 28,500 letters were posted without addresses, does 
not say much for us as a nation of shopkeepers, neither does the 
fact that 757 of these letters contained an aggregate of 
£214 123. 5d. in cash and bank notes, and £9,088 lis. lid. in 



* " Industrial Curiosities — Glances here and there in the World of 
Labour." By Alexander Hay ^Japp, LL.D. : Marshall, Japp & Co., 
London. 



bills of exchange, cheques, &c., prove that we are not such care- 
ful people as we sometimes suppose ourselves to be. 

The chapters which deal with the leather industry are the re- 
sult of visits paid to some of the principal manufactories in 
Bermondsey, and will prove full of interest both to those in the 
trade and to the general public. The whole book is veiy interest- 
ing, well got up, and copiously illustrated. 



Those of our readers who have to do vnih either the manu- 
facture, sale, use, or repair of the sewing machine will find 
Mr. TJrquhart's little book* of very great value to them. 
This work is divided into two sections, and then subdivided 
into chapters. The book opens with a short history of the 
sewing machine, giving biographies of Elias Howe, junior, and 
Allen B. "Wilson, and then passes on to deal with the inventions 
of Mr. Gibbs. In Chapter II. we have given us the " elements 
of stiching mechanism," which is then followed by other 
chapters giving lengthy technical descriptions of shuttle 
machines, rotating-hook machines, and single thread machines. 
Some valuable information is also given in reference to the 
proportions of needles and thread. Section II. of this work 
gives directions for adjusting, testing, and timing the various 
types of sewing machinery, including Wheeler and Wilson, 
Singer, Grover and Baker, Little Wanzer, and Weir. In order 
that the technical directions and instructions may be more 
clearly understood, the book is illustrated throughout with 
explanatory diagrams. 

The author has not entered into or tried to answer the 
question. Who was the first inventor of the sewing machine ? 
but has been content to leave the past almost alone and deal 
with the machine in its present state. The book is undoubtedly 
practical, the author thoroughly understands his subject, and 
we can confidently say that it will bs the means of enabling 
many to understand hetter, and therefore work better, the 
machines they use. 



HOW TO ADJUST THE " WHITE." 

The following instructions for the adjustment of the 
" White" Sewing Machine have been furnished to us by the 
White Company, of 19, Queen Victoria-street, E.C., and may 
be relied on as accurate in every particular : — 

Aside from the adjustment of all its friction surfaces, there 
are but few parts of the " White " susceptible of adjustment. 
In case the machine should be taken apart to clean, or for any 
other purpose, we deem it advisable to mention the parts that 
might be replaced wrong by an inexperienced person. 

1st. The heart is attached to the needle-bar by means of 
two screws that admit of the heart being raised or lowered on 
the needle-bar. To ascertain the proper place on the needle- 
bar where the heart should be fastened, move the needle-bar 
until its lower end on the lower downward stroke will be seven- 
sixteenths of an inch from the needle-plate : when in that 
position, fasten the screws firmly against the needle-bar. 

N. B. — Great care should be taken while adjusting any screw 
not to apply more power than the screw is able to stand, as 
breaking off the head of a screw or stripping the thread causes 
great inconvenience. 

2nd. When the machine leaves the factory, the talce-up is 
in its proper place, and bears a mark just even with the top of 
the upper screw that holds the take-up to the face-plate. If, 
however, it should become necessary for an agent to order a 
take-up to replace one, there would be no mark on it, and in 
adjusting it should be set low enough on the face-plate to keep 
the thread from the point of the needle when sewing thin 
goods, but not so low as to allow the thread to lift the shuttle 
when sewing thick goods. 

3rd. To set the Feed Cam : First see that the needle is in 



* Sewing Machinery, by T, W. JUrquhart, |C.E. London : Crosby, 
Lockwood, and Co. 



34 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1. 1881. 



its proper place, viz., up as far as it wiU go, or so that the 
shuttle-point will pass about one-sixteenth of an inch above 
the ej'e of the needle; then turn the feed-cam on the shaft 
until it occupies a position whereby thick goods can be sewed 
with a long stitch and not allow the needle to pierce the goods 
whilst the garment is feeding through, as that would carry 
the needle back with the goods and cause it to strike on the 
throat-plate. 

Another Guide for Setting the Feed Cam : When the feed is 
set at a proper height, as also the needle, for ordinaiy sewing, 
turn the fly-wheel of the machine around until the needle on 
its forward downward stroke is ready to enter the hole in the 
needle-plate ; then the top of the feed should be exactly even 
with the needle-plate. 

4th. The shuttle-carrier is attached to the shuttle-lever-arm 
with a screw, and supported on either side by the rim of a slot 
milled in lever-arm. The carrier is adjustable to the right or 
left in the slot of the lever-arm, so as to allow the thread to 
pass freely between the shuttle and its carrier. This being 
the guide for setting the shuttle, care should be taken not to 
give the thread more room than is necessary, or it allows the 
shuttle to rattle. If, through any cause, a shuttle-lever-arm 
should become bent, a wrench can be used to adjust and 
straighten it so that the shuttle will not run so high as to hit 
the feed, or so low that the shuttle-carrier wUl rub on the 
bottom of the race. 

5th. To Set the Feed-Hook: Screw it to the feed-bar 
loosely ; then move it till its position will carry the feed to 
the rear of the feed slot in the needle-plate and not strilie ; 
then fasten screw firmly. 

6th. How to Adjust the Needle to or from the Shuttle. 
Loosen the lai'ge screws that hold face to arm, then the needle 
can be moved in any direction. The shuttle-point, together 
with the needle-hole, should be the guide for setting the 
needle. Now put in a No. 4 needle ; be sure it is straight 
and passes up and down true through the needle-hole ; then 
move the two small screws, taking care to serew them equally 
so that each will strike the face-plate at the same time, or in 
screwing up the lower large screw it will twist the face and 
perhaps cause it to bind) until the needle comes as near the 
shuttle as it can and not rub against it. The needle should 
pass central in the needle hole from front to rear, but a little 
nearer to the right than to the left of the hole, as it prevents 
the needle from glancing into the race and being caught by 
the shuttle-point. Thus having the needle in its proper posi- 
tion, fasten the large screws firmly at top and bottom of face- 
plate. 

7th. Keep the Machine well cleaned and oiled. If the 
"White" machine runs heavily, it is self-evident that it has 
become dirty or gummed up with poor oil. Clean it off by 
the use of spirits of turpentine or kerosene ; then wipe dry 
and apply only the best quality of sperm oil, and whenever 
you oil the machine, work it a little to distribute the oil, and 
then, after standing a few moments, take a cloth slightly 
moistened with oil and clean off the superfluous oil from the 
japanned parts of the machine, also from the needle-bar. The 
shuttle-race is provided with a lubricating cup filled with 
waste ; keep this waste slightly moistened with oil, which will 
keep the shuttle and race lubricated all that is necessary. 

Keep the inside parts of the machine thoroughly oiled, and 
especially oil the heart-cam and roller and pin. Turn the fly- 
wheel of the machine until the end of the heart-cam can be 
seen through the hole in the face-plate, then insert nozzle of 
the oil can and oil. 

8th. Breaking Thread and Skipping Stitches are most 
generally attributable to the use of needles of poor quality, 
which are bought and sold chiefly upon the merit of cheapness. 
We are particularly desirous to impress upon the minds of 
dealers that such needles are dear as a gift, because ninety- 
nine times out of an hundred you may be called upon to repair 
a machine, whereas there would have been no complaint if a 
genuine good needle had been in use. 



HINTS TO EEPAIEEES. 

(By "Cogwheel.") 

When repairing an American sewing machine of the old 
button-hole and plain description, if the machine is old, having 
been run eight years or so, all the parts should be taken out of 
the head. When taking down the machine keep an eye 
on the position of the cam as it relates to the shaft. 
First remove the cam-pins, next the feed bar, unscrew 
the shuttle eccentric, then pull out the shaft and 
the balance of the work underneath will come out 
without any difficulty. Take out the arm pin, needle arm bar, 
and presser bar. The machine being now taken apart, clean 
the grease and dirt from its different farts, and after they are 
cleaned, if you will examine you will find, if an old machine, 
the friction ring and the parts to which it is connected have 
become so much worn as to allow as much as a quarter of an 
inch lost motion to the shuttle carrier. This lost motion can be 
taken up by bulging the friction ring and upsetting the shuttle 
eccentric. Now examine the feed lift on the shaft. You will 
find it so much worn that it is not under the control of the feed 
bar eccentric, and the feed regulator has no control to regulate 
the length of the stitch. It would not pay you to put in a new 
shaft, or, in other words, the owner would not consent to pay 
for a new shaft in an old machine, therefore you will bo com- 
pelled to resort to drill bushing, which will answer all purposes. 



0. A. RICHARDS, 

BELL BUSK MILLS, via LEEDS. 




MANUFACTURER OF 

MACHINE SILKS & TWISTS, 

Specially adapted for Leather Work, and very Superior 
ill Strength, Evenness, and Elasticity. 

THE LENG TH 18 INDICATED ON EVERY REEL. 
Trade Mark : " A Bell in a Busli." 



London Offices : 

12, BR^AD STREET, CHEAPSIDE. 

E. ASCHERBERG & CO., 
QUEEN STREET, CHEAPSIDE, 

LonsriDOisr- 

IMPORTEK.S OF GERMAN AND FRENCH PIANOS. 



Jan. 1. 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLI iNCES. 



35 




The following list has been compiled expressly for the "Sewing 
Machine Gazette," hy G. P. Hedfbkn, Patent Agent, 4, South Street, 
Finsbury, London, and at Paris and Brussels. 

APPIilC AT IONS FOR LETTERS PATENT:— 

No. 4,658. E, Hughes, of Woolwich, Kent, for improvements in 
tri. jcles or velncipedes with three wheels. Dated 
November 12, 1880. 
„ 4,670. W. H. Dorman, of Stafford, for improvements in 
sewing machinery, chiefly designed for the manu- 
facture of boots and shoes. Dated November 12, 
1880. 
„ 4,697. W. H. Beck, of London, for improvements in ribbing 
attachments for knitting machines. Dated 
November 15, 1880. 
„ 4,700. J. Kew, of Camden Town, London, for improvements 

in pianofortes. Dated November 15,1880. 
J, 4,707. B. Barstow, of Horsham, Sussex, Architect, for 
improvements in velocipedes. Dated November 
16, 1880. 

„ 4,725. A. Capra, J. B. Rissone, and S. Detoma, all of 
Clerkenwell, London, for improvements in piano- 
fortes and mechanism combined therewith. Dated 
November 16, 1880. 

„ 4,732. T. Williams, of Gee-street, and W. Sangster, 
of Comptou-buildings, both in Goswell-road, 
London, for improvements in machinery or 
apparatus for forcing sausage meat and other 
substances into skins or other suitable receptacles. 
Dated November 17. 1880. 

„ 4,763. C. G. Hawkins, of Leighton-road, Forest Gate, Essex, 
for improvements in the construction of tricycles 
and other velocipedes, and in attachments and 
driving gear for the same. Dated November 18, 
1880. 

„ 4,767. H. Weatherill, of Manchester, for improvements in 
tricycles, bicycles, and other wheeled vehicles. 
Dated November 18, 1880. 

„ 4,797. C. A. Barlow — a communication from T. Wiget, of 
Arbon, and C. Wetter, of St. Gall, Switzerland, for 
cerlain improvements in machine embroidery, and 
in the process for manufacturing the same. Dated 
November 20, 1880. 

„ 4,799. Sir T. G. A. Parkyns, of Beckenham, Kent, for im- 
provements in the construction of velocipedes, and 
in the means of propelling the same, parts of which 
are applicable to other vehicles. Dated November 
20, 1880. 

„ 4,829. H. Hayward, of Gloucester, J. Day, and J. H. Gosling, 
both of Southsea, Hampshire, for improvements in 
bicycles, tricycles, and other velocipedes. Dated 
November 22, 1880. 

„ 4,836. C. Necker, and K. Horstmann, both of Berlin, for im- 
provements in whip-stitch sewing machines. 
Dated November 22, 1880. 

„ 4,873. T. J. Palmer, of Fulham, and C. P. Dietrich, Engineer, 
of Dalston, London, for improvements in bicycles 
and tricycles. Dated November 24, 1880. 

„ 4,878. J. Marshall, of Glasgow, for improvements in silent 
mincing machines. Dated November 24, 1^80. 

„ 4,888. A. G. CoUi igs, and P. Bryant, both of Wimbledon, for 
improvements in washing machines. Dated 
November 24, 1880. 

„ 4,923. L. Silvermann, of Kegency-street, London, and J. E. 
Cumming, Little Ilford, Essex, for improvements 
in sewing machines for working the same with one 
or two needles independently of each other, and 
using as an under cotton any size of a reel of cotton 
or any other matfirial without winding the cotton 
on small bobbins, and to produce a lockstitch. 
Dated November 26, 1880. 



„ 4,929. T. S. Lyon, of Percival-street, Clerkenwell, London, 
for improvements in knife-cleaning machines. 
Dated November 26, 1880. 
„ 4,948. W. H. Thompson, of Pinsbury-sciuare, and P. G. 
Henwood, of Budge-row, both in London, for im- 
provements in the arrangement and construction of 
velocipedes and similar vehicles or machines. 
Dated November 27, 1880. 
,, 4,964. J. C. Garrood, Engineer, of Fakenham, Norfolk, for 
improvements in velocipedes partly applicable to 
other machinery. Dated November 29, 1880. 
„ 4,970. A. Specht — a communicalion from P. Buschmann, of 
Harburg, Germany, for improvements in the 
mechanism or action of pianofurtes. Dated Nov. 
29, 1880. 
„ 4,975. J. Mitchell — a communication from J. Storey, of 
Brockville, Canada, for improvements in washing 
machines. Dated November 30, 1880. 
„ 4,976. W. Pox and G. Brown, both of Manchester, for im- 
provements in the manufacture of rollers for 
wringing and mangling machines and other pur- 
poses. Dated November 30, 1880. 
„ 4,978. A. N. Hopkins, of Birmingham, for an improved candle 

holder and save-all. Dated November 30, 1880. 
„ 5,010. A.J.Boult — acommunicationfromS. B. Eyder,of Eliza- 
beth, New Jersey, ITnited States, for improvements 
in the method and meansof removing dust from car- 
pets. Dated December 1, 1880. 
„ 5,021. T. Bradford, of High Holboru, London, for improvs- 
ments in or connected with the driving gear or 
actuating mechanism of mangles. Dated December 
2, 1880. 
„ 5,082. A. Kirby, of Bedford, for improvements in the construc- 
tion of velocipedes and apnaratus connected there- 
with. Dated December 6, "1880. 
„ 5,096. -J. A. Lamplugh, of Birmingham, for certain improve- 
ments in the mode of supporting the seat or saddle 
of bicycles, tricycles, and other similar vehicles. 
Dated December 7, 1880. 
„ 5,157. J. S. Cooke, of Gomersal, Yorkshire, for improvements 
in and appUoable to velocipedes. Dated Desember 
10, 1880. 
„ 5,187. J. Summersoales, of Keighley, Yorkshire, for improve- 
ments in wringing machines. Dated December 11, 
1880. 
„ 5,216. A. Munzinger, of Olten, Switzerland, for improvements 
in and connected with spinning machines. Dated 
December 13, 1880. 

Letters Patent have been issued for the following : — 

No. 2,088. T. McGrah, of Sheffield, and W. Bown, of Birmingham, 
for improvements in automatic thread winders 
adapted for sewing machines or other similar 
purposes, also for automatic attachments for sewing 
machine winders. Dated May 22, 1880. 

„ 2,164. C. E. Garrard, of Uxbridge, Middlesex, for improve- 
ments in and relating to velocipedes, applicable in 
part to other purposes. Dated May 27, 1880. 

„ 2,224. H. J. Haddan — a communication from N. S. C. 
Perkins, of Norwalk, Ohio, United States, for im- 
provements in velocipedes. Dated June 1, 1880. 

„ 2,290. L. Hardaker, of Leeds, for improvements in road 
vehicles or velocipedes. Dated June 7, 1880. 

„ 2,944. W. E. Partridge, of Birmingham, for improved 
apparatus for washing clothos, applicable also as a 
mixer or agitator iu various processes. Dated July 
17, 1880. 

„ 3,010. J. Creswell, of Loughborough, Leicestershire, for im- 
provements in apparatus employed in the manu- 
facture of knitted fabrics. Dated July 22, l8H0. 

„ 3,141. S. Pit — a communication from L. B. Miller, and P. 
Diehl, both of Elizabeth, New Jersey, United 
States, for improvements in thread cases and under 
tensions for sewing machines. Dated July 30, 1K^0. 

„ 3,744. M. Webb, of Adelphi-terrace, London, for improve- 
mentn in bicycles, tricycles, and other vehicles 
for self-propulsion, which improvements are also 
applicable to other purposes. Dated September 
14, 1830. 

PATENTS WHICH HAVE BECOME VOID :— 
„ 4,162. W. E. Lake — a communication from A. Lohmann, of 
Iserlohn, Germany, for improvements in smoothing 



36 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES, 



Jan. 1,1881. 



irons, and in heater for the same. Dated Novem- 
ber 7, 1879. 

4,177. A. Browne — a communication from F. and J. Benoist 
and M. J. C. Ponlain, all of Paris, for improve- 
ments in spinning machinery. Dated November 
8, 1877, 

4,180, W. E. Lake— a communication from E. Hutton, of 
Brooklyn, New York, United States, for improve- 
mf-nts in roller skates. Dated November 8, 1877. 

4,195. J. Morton, of Glasgow, for improvements in shuttles 
for sewing machines. Dated November 9, 1877. 

4,200. D. Harris, of Brooklyn, New York, United States, for 
improvements in button-hole linings, and the 
machinery for manufacturing the same. Dated 
November 9, 1877. 

4,261. H. E. Newton — a communication from T. S, Wiles, of 
Albany, New York, United States, for improve- 
ments in ii'oniug machines. Dated November 14, 
1877. 

4,267. P. Wirth — a communication from W. Henrioi, of 
Heidelberg, Germany, for an improved ironing 
machine. Dated November 14, 1877. 

4,276. H. Gnthrie, of Manchester, for improvements in sew- 
ing machines. Dated November 15th, 1877, 

4,338. L. Lindley, of Nottingham, for improvements in 
machinery or apparatus for dressing or stretching 
and ironing and finishing lace and other fabrics. 
Dated November 19th, 1877. 

4,545. E. T. Hughes — a comoiunication from Tunker and 
Euh, manufacturers, of Carlsrnhe, Germany, for 
improvements in sewing machines. Dated Decem- 
ber 1, 1877. 

4.564. J, E. Bertin, of Paris, manufacturer, for an improved 

sewing machine. Dated December 3, 1877. 

4.565. S. Louis — a communication from C, Dognin, L. Isaacs, 

and S, Haas, all of Paris, for improvements in 
means of driving light machines, such as those 

used for sewing, embroidering and the like. Dated 

December, 1877. 



Specifications Published During the Month. 
Postage Id, each extra. 



THE COURTEOUS COLLECTOE. 

The collector of instalment debts vrbo imagines that the 
most useful qualification be can bring to the successful prose- 
cution of his business is bis capacity for worrying creditors 
into payment, makes a great mistake. People cannot be driven 
into the payment of money — bullying only makes them more 
obstinate in their refusals, Mauy of the suits that find their 
way into the courts have been brought thither through the 
roughness of the collectors, whose manner has irritated people 
who would cheerfully, though with a little de ay, perhaps, have 
paid the money to more courteous men. Men of the world 
recognise the truth of the maxim that " the mild power 
subdues." A collector should be good-natured in his demeanour, 
bearing disappointment without too evident annoyance, and 
capable of leaving a good impression behind him as he departs 
with the cheerfully expressed hope that be will have better 
luck next time. With debtors who have tried his patience a 
little too often he should be moderate but firm in his re- 
monstrances. He should never make threats. In dealing with 
the class of incorrigibles he should never allow himself to be 
betrayed into anger, or, at least, into showing it. He can be 
as severe as he pleases without bluster. Wholesome truths, 
uttered in a calm voice, strike with much more force than when 
accompanied by anger and want of self-control. Courtesy, 
under any and all circumstances, should be a~ prominent charac- 
teristic of the sewing machine collector. It is a qualification 
that will greatly facilitate his somewhat arduous duties, and wiU 
make friends for himself, his employers, and the goods they 
sell. 



LAUNDRY GLOSS. 



No. 1,439, 
„ 1,529, 

„ 1,532. 

„ 1,555. 
„ 1,565, 
„ 1,583, 

„ 1,618. 

„ 1,654. 

„ 1,655. 

„ 1,673. 

„ 1,682. 

„ 1,714. 

„ 1,742. 
„ 1,831. 
„ 1,899. 

„ 1,932. 

„ 1,937. 

„ 2,034. 

„ 3,245'. 



W. B. Dick, mangles and wringing machines... 
J. Whiteford, machinery for washing, bleach- 
ing, dyeing, &c. 
H.Courteen. apparatus for cleaning and sharp- 
ening knives 
T. Coltmann, knitting machines... 
J. Goodman, bicycles 

J. Bell, portable or traversing washing, brush- 
ing, and scouring machine 
W. E. Lake, driving mechanism for sewing 

machines 
J. Camm, spinning 
E. M. Knight, knife cleaning machines 

E. C. P. Otto, bicycles, &c 

W. E. Lake, sewing machines for uniting 

hosiery 
J. Edwards, arrangements for working sewing 

machines 
P. W. Jones, bicycles, &c. 
W. A. Waddington, pianofortes 
J. Phipps and E, Blackshaw, machinery for 

washing clothes, &c, 
W. E. Lake, plaiting or kilting machines 

W. E. Lake, velocipedes 

W. Powles, perambulators 

J. Bradley, circular knitting machines ... 



4 

6 

6 

8 

2 

2 



4 



ASCHERBEEG PIANOS 

(DRESDEN) 

These Pianos combine the best qualities of all the 
roost renowed makers. 



For shirt-collars, wrists, and fronts, in order to give a glossy 
surface without striking through. 

Three hundred parts of water are boiled for fifteen to thirty 
minutes with three to five parts of cut marshmallow root. The 
liquid is then poured off, and, after the addition of twenty-four 
parts of borax, four parts of " anhydrous " soda, and one hun- 
dred parts powdered bleached shellac, the whole is heated 
again. After a short time the shellac dissolves to a muddy 
yellowish liquid, which, after cooling, is filtered through cotton. 

Dr. Geissler, one of the edito s of the Pliarin. t'entralh., 
makes the following remarks : " Althaea root, which a pharma- 
cist would probably not boil, is entirely superfluous in this 
varnish, and so is also the soda. I have, myself, made experi- 
ments to prepare such a varnish, and have found that it ii 
most simply and rapidly prepared by shaking a saturated 
solution of borax with powdered shellac, without heat. One 
part of shellac is soluble in two parts of a saturated solution of 
borax, after frequent shaking during two or three days. In 
three parts, however, it is easily soluble. The bleached shellac 
must be preserved under water, and must be dissolved immedi- 
ately after being powdered ; for, if it is allowed to be exposed 
to tlie air in a powdered condition for several days, it will 
either not dissolve at all, or only with great difficulty. If a 
higher temperature than 50 or 60 deg. C. is used in preparing 
the varnish, it is apt to assume a faint reddish colour, the cause 
of which I have vainly tried to ascertain. The finished varnish, 
however, heats very well. This varnish is a most excellent 
starch gloss. In fact, it is much more appropriate and service- 
able for this purpose than all other known commercial ' starch 
glosses,' " 

AUCHER PIANOS (Paris.) 

WESTERMAYER PIANOS (Berlin) 

LIPP PIANOS (Stuttgart.) 

RONISCH PIANOS (Dresden.) 



Agents: E. ASCHERBERG & Co., 

Queen Street, Cheapside, London. 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



37 



THOMAS SMITH & SONS, 



ESTABLISHED 1848. 




PATENTEES. 



THE ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 





EVEET PART SUPPLIED EST VAEIOTJS STAGES, 



From the Rough Stamping or Porgings to the 
Complete Finished Article. 

JSfone hut the very best Brands of Material used for the several purpose 
embracing LOW MOOR IROM, BEST BEST GUM, ^c., S^c. 

VERY SPECIAL IN ALL SUNDRIES AND APPLIANCES, 

INCLUDING ALL NEWEST DESIGNS AND PRINCIPLES IN 

SADDLES, VALISES, SPANNERS, LAMPS, 

61, HOLBORN VIADUCT, 

LONDON, E.G. 

Works :—Saltley Mill, Birmingham. 

DEALERS ARE INVITED TO APPLY FOR WHOLESALE TERMS 



33 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1.1881. 



villi a JM ull QE vII|| in Germany. 

Factory of Sewina: Machines and Se^wine: Machine Cabinets. 



o 






If) 

< 

H 



O -^ 






-a 

o 



o 






FIG. A, 
OPEN. 




2. 

5' 

ft 



3 
ft 

■-I 



CTCi 
O 



P 

3 
ft 

o 
•K 

CD 
ft 

■^ 

1/1 
o 

en 

3 
O 

r+ 
■-t 

PJ 

o 

CD 

r-t 
CD 
< 

CD 



CD 

n 

% 

5" 

CD 



CD 



n 

3; 

3' 

CD 
3 



TO SEAATIIsra- nN^J^OHIIiTEl r)E]^I_.E!I^S. 

LATEST NOVELTY. 



FIG. B, 
LOCKED. 



f^ommrm 



C^ PATENTED IN ENGLAND AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Delivered with complete treadle movement free in London at prices but little above those 
for usual iron stands with table and cover. 

Without or with our machines, either plain style or inlaid in mother-of" 
and highly ornamented in hand painting by specia 
artists. All machines with loose wheel 
and self-acting winder. 






pearl, 



^XIENSION 



Furnished 

for all systems of machines 

Very useful. More solid than ii'on stands. 

Honourable mention and highest rewards at numerous Exhibitions. 

Novel ! 
Cheap! 
Solid I 
Elegant ! 

SECOND 
HIGHEST 

Medal 

AT THE LATE 

Sydney 

International 

EXHIBTION 

1879. 

Wholesale Agents wanted throughout the United Kingdom. 





Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMEST IC APPLIANCES. 



39 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED. 




PARIS, 1878. 



London, 1851, 
For High Merit. 






Vienna 1878, 
^For Progress. 



GOLD MEDAL. 




London, 1862, 
For General Great Excellence. 



Philadelphia, 1873, 
For Superior Eicellence. 







Linen 
Thread 

MANUFACTURERS 




Shrewsbury, 
England. 




Linen Sewings-Machine Threads. Shoe Threads. 

Sole-Sewing Machine Threads, For Blake, Keats, Pearson & other Machines 
Wax Machine Threads, of Best Quality and Special New Quality. 

Saddlers' Threads. Harness Threads. 

Also, Hand Sewing Threads, {^''' 

Six-Cord Machine Twist, used in substitution for suk. 

Q-illing Twines. Macrame and other Lace Threads. 



for Tailors' work, Domestic use, Book- 
bindmg, Carpet Sewing, &c. 



io 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan: i. ISsi. 



BY ROYAL 




LETTERS PATENT. 



THE *^ DESIDERATUM" BICYCLE, 

{FOTl SE-A.SOI^T lSSO_) 

PATENT SELF-ADJUSTING STANLEY HEAD (which cannot get out 

of order). 
PATENT NON-CORROSIVE SPOKES. 
IMPROVED ADJUSTABLE ROLLER, or Ball Bearings. 
IMPROVED ADJUSTABLE STEP. 
IMPROVED DUSTPROOF CONED BEARINGS to Back Wheel & Pedals. 

"Few makes are now better known than the "Desideratum"; certainly we have received more inquiries 
concerning it than any other Machine, and although a large number of our readers must be mounted on this steed, we 
have never yet heard a single complaint regarding it. — " Vide Bicycles of the year 1878. 

PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS 

HARRINGTON & CO., 

STEWART STREET, WOLVERHAMPTON. 

Descriptive Price Lists on application. Agents wanted in Towns where not represen 

HOLROYD'S NEW PATENT 

KILTING MACHINE 

Sells at sight, and is acknowledged by the Trade in England and Abroad to be the best for all 
purposes, upwards of 8,000 having been sold in two years, and the still increasing demand 

testifies to its unequalled exeellence. 

THIS Machine, by its simplicity and constraction, will at once commend itself to 
Merchants and Manufacturers, and will supply that which has long been 
wanted, namely, a good, practical, and durable Machine at a reasonable price. 

It can be worked by hand, treadle, or steam power, and heated by gas or irons as 
desired ; and it runs so light that it can be worked by hand for any length of time 
without the shghtest fatigue. 

It will make any kind of kilt desired, from the narrowest to an inch wide, and any 
depth up to ten inches, and can be altered to different styles and widths immediately, 
and in a most simple manner. 

It is specially adapted for manufacturing and dress-making purposes, and by its 
lightness, rapidity, and correctness, together with the fact that it will work muslin, 
thick cloth, or felt with equal facihty, it cannot fail to be a great Saving, and of the 
greatest advantage. 

With the gas arrangement perfect combustion is secured, thereby avoiding any 
smoke or smell which is so unpleasant in most other machines, and being nickel 
plated all over does not rust. 

Price, comolete with gas arrangements and 4 heating irons, £3 3s. 

ELECTRO-PLATING BY STEAM POWER, AND DYNAMO ELCTRIC MACHINES, 

Combining aU the latest improvements in GILDING, BRONZING, &c., on rough or smooth surfaces, on any kind of metal goods. 

Special Terras offered to Manufacturers of articles suitable for plating. 




J. HOLROYD, Tomiinson St., Hulme, Manchester. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



41 




WRIGHT & CO., 

Sewing Machine Merchants k Manufacturers, 

27, SHOREDITCH, LONDON, E; 

ALSO AT 457 AND 502 KINGSLAND ROAD, LONDON, N. 

The TRADE and SHIPPERS supplied with every description of Sewing Machines 
upon the most Uberal terms. 

Hand Machines, from 18s. 

Treadle Machines with aU the most recent 
Improvements. 

LOCKSTITCH, ANY SYSTEM, WAEEANTED FROM 508. 



Agents wanted throughout Great Britain and the Colonies. 



Catalogues and Ter»is 2/_po/t A^plicah'on. 



'*THE COVENTRY TRIUMPH^' BICYCLES & TRICYCLES. 



WEST ORCHARD, COVENTRY, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT MANUFACTURERS. 

India jRxbber Tyred Bath Chair and Perambulator Wheels. Speciality Children's Bicycles and Tricycles 
Manufactures for this Season cannot be surpassed. Price Lists on Application. 



TOWER WORKS, PIPER'S ROW, WOLVERHAMPTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE ^^ EXPRESS^' BICYCLE, 

AND 

BICYCLE FITTINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 




LISTER & CO., 

MANNINGHAM MILL$. BRADFORD 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



? 



MACHINE SILKS AND TWISTS. 

BUTTON-HOLE SILJC TWISTS 

KNITTING AND EMBROIDERY SILKS, FILOSELLE, &c. 

Reco7nmended for Strength, Evenness and Pure Dye. Length indicated on each label gua>anteed. 
OlSTE TK,I-A.X. -V^ILIL, FI^O^VE a?I3:EIIt STJI>EE,IOR,ITTr. 
L. & Co.'s Knitting Silks Wash as Well as any produced. 



42 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIO APPLIANCES. Jan. 1. 1881. 



CHARLES J. THURLOW, 



M 
o 

< 

M 
CQ 










39, 



CHESTER STREET, HULME, 




SURREY MACHINIST COMPANY. 



Patent 
Double Sec- 
tion Hollow 
Bims,18B.6d 



'""^- .^^^vrni 




The 

Lightest 

and most 

rigid in the 

Market, 



The only machine made with a perfect 

SUSPENSION SPRING AND SADDLE. 

The Patent D.S.H.R. Eaeer is the liehtest and most rigid machine in the world 

List and Photo 4 Stamps. Illustrated List of Bicycle Fittings stamp. 

Special Terms to Shippers and Agents. 

S3, BXi-A.CK:i!.fl:jft.iT ST. XjOisrx>03^- 



WATSON & CO., 

OLDHAM, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBEATED 

Family and Medium Headline 

WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS. 

Also MANUFACTUBEES OF THE 

On the Wheeler and Wilson Principle. 
Special Terms to Merchants and Shippers. 



The only Preparation in the World 

LOUISE 

Universally Celebrated 
HOUSEHOLD 

MAGIG POLISH 



that will Clean and Polish Sewing 
Machines, Bicycles, Pianos, Fur- 
niture, Silver and Plated Wares, 
Fenders and Fire Irons, Brasses, 
Mirrors, and Patent Leather Boots. 
Manufactured hi/ 

ALTMAN & Co., Limited, 
Hamsell St., E.G. 

Entirely free from Mercury, Oil, 

or Acids. 

Price Is. Try it. Sj>ecial terms to 

.Uerchants and Exporters. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 
From 18/6 per dozen pairs. 




G. E. WRIGHT, 

WHOLESALE 

AGENT FOR SEWING MACHINES 

OF EVERY DESCBIPTION. 



Sole Agent for the " Little Europa" Lock- 

stitch Seivitig Machines, and Royal 

Itink Roller Skates. 

No. 1, NEW BROAD STREET, 

LONDON, E.G. 



ASCHEEBEEG PIANOS 

(DRESDEN) 

These pianos combine the best quaUties of all the most 
renowned makers. 

QUEEN STREET, CHFAPSIDE, 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



43 



ESTABLISHED 1836. 

STUBBS' MERCANTILE OFFICES 

TRADE AUXILIARY COMPANY, LIMITED. 




HEAD OFFICES: 



42, GRESHAM ST., LONDON, B.O: 

West End Branch, 53, Conduit Street, Regent St, W. 

CHIEF OFFICES: 



For IRELAND. 



BIRMINGHAM— a», Exchange Buildings, 
BRADFORD, Yorkahire—1 Booth Street, 
BRISTOL— 4, Bristol Chamberi. 
BRIGHTON— 23, Prince Albert Street. 
CORK— 70, South MaU 



For SCOTLAND. 



f GLASGOW— 21, St. Vincent Place. 
\ fiDINBURGH— 4, Cockburn Street. 



/DUBLIN— 21, CoUege Green. 
\ BELFAST— 55, Victoria Streci. 

DISTRICT OFFICES: 

GLOUCESTER— 6, CoUege Conrt. 

LEEDS— 1, East Parade. 

LIVKRPOOL— 71, Lord Street. 

MANCHESTER— 14, Brown Street. 
_._,„__ NEWCASTLE— 32, Grainger Street West. 

With, Agents and Correspondents throughout Vie Kingdom, on the Continent of Europe, and in the United States of 

America, and the British Colonies. 

BANKERS : 

LONDON— The Union Bank op London. 



NORWICH— Post Office Street. 
PORTSMOUTH— 85, High Street. 
SHEFFIELD— 85, Queen Street. 
SOUTHAMPTON— 150, High Street. 



BELFAST— The Noethern Banking Company. 
BIRMINGHAM— Lloyd's Banking Company. 
BRISTOL— The National Provincial Bank of England. 
DUBLIN— The National Bank. 



EDINBURGH— The National Bank op Scotland. 
GLASGOW— The British Linen Company. 
LIVERPOOL— The Bai«k of Liverpool. 

MANCHESTER— MAKCHESTEE AND SALFOED BANK. 



STUBBS' MERCANTILE OFFICES, 

With their various associated Agenoi-isa, form together a complete organisation for the protection of Bankers, Merchants. 
Manufacturers, Traders, and others, against risk and fraud in their various commercial transactions. 

Subscribers to these Offices can, by their Agency, recover debts due to them with promptitude. 
Stubbs' "Weekly Gazette" supplies information which is absolutely indispensable to Traders. 

TEItl^S or STJBSCItlT'TIOISr 

(Except for Sgeeial Service and Financial Departments, in which the Rates will be fixed by Agreement according to the 

eircumstances.) One, Two, Three, and Five Guineas, according to requirements. 

PROSPECTUSES GIVING FULL PAETICULABS ON APPLICATION. 



O J^.TJT I O IsT. 

There h no Office in London connected with Stubbs' Mercantile Offices (situate at the corner of 

King St., opposite Guildhall), except the West End Branch at 53, Conduit St., Regent St.' W. 



44 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1, 1881. 




Works :— O O V E N T R Y. 

London : 97, Cheapside. Leicester : 76, Welford Eoad. 



6 



MAKERS OP THE 






" Premier," " Flying Dutchman," & other Bicycles & Tricycles. 






PATENT DOUBLE 



BALL BEARINGS. 



HIUiAN HERBERT frCOOPER 
MAKERS. 

COOPER'S 

INEXTINQUISHABLE 

HUB LAMP. 

The only Lamp that does 
not go out on a rough road. 





IS" < = fe 



On the " D.H.F. PREMIER," fitted with our Patent Ball Bearings, was accomplished 
the greatest distance ever ridden in one week, viz. : — 1,405 MILES, and on the same Machine 
the greatest distance in one day is 262 MILES- 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE FREE. 



TEsa?i:M:oisriJ^i:j. ^ ^ 

Dear Siry, Leamington, October 14th, 1880. 

I lease send another large size " Cooper's Patent " Lamp, so that I maj get it to-morrow. It is the 
grandest thing in Lamps that I have ever seen or tried. — Tours truly, W. Tatteesfieid. 



All Communications to be addressed to the Works, COVENTRY. 



Jan. 1, 1881. THE SEWnSTG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. iB 

The Only Gold Medal for Bool and Shoe Machinery Awarded al I he 
Paris Exposilion was for Ihe Machinery of 

THE BLAKE & GOODYEAR 

BOOT AND $HOE MACHINERY CI 

LIMITED. 





A &EEAT VAEIETY OF MACHmEEI 

FOR 

HEEL NAILING AND TRIMMING, 

EDGE TRIMMING AND SETTING, 
HEEL BLOCKING, RAND AND WELT CUTTING. 

RAND TURNING, 

SELF-FEEDING EYELET MACHINES, 

Self -Feeding Punches, Double and Single Fitting Machines 

FOR PUTTING IN ELASTICS, 

STRAIGHT AND CIRCULAR READERS, 
And a great variety of other Machinery and Patented Tools. 



MANY OF OUR MACHINES MAY BE SEEN IN MOTION, 

AT NEWPORT PLACE, LEICESTER. 

Raw Hide Mallets & Hammers for Shoe Manufacturers & Machinists, 
ROLLERS, PRESSES, KNIVES, AND IRON OR WOOD LASTS. 



1, WOASHIF STREET, LONDON, E.C. 



46 THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jak. 1. 1881. 



BLAKE & GOODYEAR, LIMITED, 

The Only Gold Medal for Boot an d Shoe Machinery. 

SOLE LEATHER MACHINERY. 











Improved Kilburn Rand Splitter. 




Lift Cutting Machine. 




Star Splitting MacMne. 




Edge Levelling Machine. 




3land Turning Machine. 



1, WOESHIP STREET, FINSBURY, E.O, 



Jan. 1. 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtlKNAL OF DOMESTtC APPLlANCESb 



4? 



the ONLY GOLD MEDAL a t P ARIS for BO OT & SHOE M ACHINERl 

UPPER LEATHER MACHINERY. 




Lining or Kid Cutting Press. 



Upper Leather Splitting Machine. 



THE BLAEE & GOODYEAE BOOT MD SHOE MACHINERT CO., LIMITED 



THiE SEWING MACHINE GAZBTtE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Jan. 1. 1881. 



The only Gold Medal for Boot and Shoe Machinery Awarded at the Paris Exposition. 

BLAKE & GOODYEAR BO OT & SHOE MACH INERY CO., LIMITED. 

BOOT MAKING MACHINERY. 




Blake Sole-Sewing Machine 
(Terms, Without Royalty). 



The New Welt -Stitching 
Slachine. 





Blake Turn-Shoe Machine. 
















The iSlew Welt- 
Sewing Machine . 





Magnetic Lasting Machine. 



Tripp Rand Splitter, 



McKay Heel-Attaching and Paring Machine. 



■■■ 



Jak. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



49 



fHE BLAKE & GOODYEAR BOOT & (SHOE MACHINERY CO.. 

The Only Gold Medal for Boot and Shoe Machinery Awarded at the Paris Exposition 

BOOT FINISHING MACHINERY. 





Gilmore Leveller, 




Patent Edge Parer. 



Lainam Heel Parer. 



1, WORSHIP STREET. FIKSBrRY, LONDON E.G. 



50 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 





THE ONLY GOLD MEDAL 

FOR 

BOOT AND SHOE MACHINERY 

A. T THE FA.RIS e:x:fosi t I o 3sr . 

GOODYEAR'S PATENT STEETsPRINGS 

FOE 

LADIES' MD aEITLEMElf'S BOOTS MD SHOES. 

These Spring's give ease to the Foot, and elasticity to the Boot. 

Goodyear's Patent Steel Springs effectually prevent Corns and Bunions. 

See that your Boots have "Goodyear's Patent Steel Springs" stamped on the sole. 

TESTIMONIAL. 

London, October a9th, 1878. 
Uesirs. The Blake and Goodyear Boot and Shoe Machinery Co., Limited. 

Gentlemen, — Having used the Goodyear Patent Steel Springs for more than two years, I strongly recommend 
them to all my Patients. I give a pair to each one of them, advising them to wear the same, as they give ease to the foot 
and elasticity to the boot, causing the boot to conform more to the shape of the foot, thereby preventing bunioni 
and corns. 

Yours truly, 

I. ZACHARIE. Surgeon-Chiropodist. 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 80, Brook Street, Grosvenor Square. 

Goodyear's Steel Spring's Wholesale only of the 

BLAKE & GOODYEAR BOOT & SHOE MACHINERY CO., LIMITED, 

1, WORSHIP STREET, LONDON, E.G. 




Directions for using Goodyear' s Patent Steel Springs for Ladies' and Gentlemen' s Boots and Shoes. 

Place the flat end of the Spring well under the heel, pag or nail down through the holes into the insole at 
the heel only. 

Caution. — Do not place them too far forward. 

The above Diagram shows exactly where they should be placed. 

The BLAKE & GOODYEAR BOOT & SHOE MACHINERY 

COMPANY, LIMITED, 

I, WORSHIP STREET, FINSBURY, E.G. 



Jan. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOITENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



51 



STANDARD SCREW FASTENED. 

Has stood the Test of Time ! 
SOMETHING BETTER THAN WOOD 

HOW TO MEND 



STANDARD 

SCREW 

FASTENED 

BOOTS & SHOES 



Used exclusively by United States Government 7 Years. 
PEGS OR RIVETS FOR FASTENING SOLES OF BOOTS & SHOES. 

Retailers not accustomed to mending 

Standard Screw Fastened Boots try 

to rip off the partly worn sole as they do in 
mending riretted shoes. To show Retailers 
how to mend Standard Screw 
Fastened Shoes as readily and cheaply aa 
rivetted or sewed shoes, we illustrate by the 
cut how to take off the partly worn-out sole. 

First, put a last in the shoe as usual, 
then with a thin narrow chisel and a 
hammer, you will be surprised how easy it ia 
to cut off the screws and remove the out sole 
or tap. 

After the worn-out sole is taken off, the 
boot or shoe can be as easily repaired as any 
other kind. 

We recommend the Standard 

Screw because it is almost impossible to 
rip off soles fastened with it. We know 

the public want such Shoes, and Shoe- 
makers should lose no time in 
learning how to repair them 

After one trial in the way suggested, all 
difficulties in mending will vanish. 




TAKING 

OFF 

WORN-OUT 

SOLE. 

iDonsT'T :f'Oi?.c3-et the iTJ^nycE- 
STANDARD SCREW FASTENED BOOTS & SHOES. 
Buy NO OTHER kind. One Pair is worth Two Pairs Pegged or Rivetted, for Service and Comfort 

PARENTS, FARMERS, MECHANICS 

USE NO MORE PEGGED OR RIVETTED BOOTS & SHOES. 



"Wli^Z" ITOT? 



1st. The Pegs dry up. Rivets work up into the foot. 
2nd. Soles come oiF 



3rd. So many pegs or rivets are required to hold the sole on, that the 
upper is' greatly weakene<l, making it liable to break near the sole. 



4th. It is torture 
through the inner sole. 



walk on several hundred pegs or rivets sticking 




5th. Stockings worn out iu wearing a pair of pegged or rivetted shoes cost 
as much as the shoes. j l .j 

6th. Wood pegs and brass or iron rivets belong to a past age, and should 
not be used any longer. . .. ^ . , 

7th. There is something better, makes a shoe last twice as long, easy, 
smooth inside, tight, cannot rip or come apart, approved by the United States 
Government after 7 years' test ; millions of {pairs have been worn, and not one has 
failed. 



THE MOST REMARKABLE FACT OF 
THE AGE! 



WEAR NO MORE 
RIVETTED SHOES. 




WEAR THE STANDARD FASTENED 

STANDARD SCREW FASTENED BOOTS & SHOES. 

Are entirely different from all others and far better, The soles never come apart nor^Rip, 



A^S^%^^^^ OUT FOR 



M I T A T I O N S ! <^f^p^^ 
^ . .^.._ a .^ OUR TRADE MARK IS 1^° 5 MM | 
\^^^i IT SHOULD BE STAMPED ON THE SOLE OF EVERY PAIR V^f<^ 

BLAKE & GOODYEAR Boot and Sloe Machinery Company, Limited, 

1, "WOI^SSIIiF STIE^EET, LOlTIDOISr, E.O. 



62 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jan "1, 1881. 



Finlaysoii,Bonsflelil&Go.'s 



SOLE SEWING 
MACHINE THREADS 




CABLE LAID 
THREADS 



TAILOR'S THREADS 



MACHINE LINEN THREADS 



AND 



SHOE THREADS 



ARE 



CELEBRATED OVER THE WORLD, 

And acknowledged by the leading users to be the 

BEST LINEN THREADS EVEB MADE. 



^2^' N.B.— Finlayson, Bousfield, and ^^1^ 

Co., did not exhibit at the Paris 

Exhibition. 

Prices and Samples free on application to 

FLAX MILLS, 





1851; 



1865. 



JOHNSTONE,-" ClASGOW. 

Printed for the Proprietors, and Published by them at 11, Ave Maria Lane, in the City of London 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE 
AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 
JAN.l^^ 1881. 




THE ROTARY CUTTER.and SELF EOLDING ATTACHMENT, 

made for 
THE "WHITE" SEWING MACHINE, 
19, Queen Victoria Street, London, e.g. 



Jones & Ct/rnBiRrsoN, 



s, Lit'lcTri/hty Lane e c. 



/ 



«i 



Palmer's Patent Adjustable Ball Bearing for Bicycles, 

Sole Makers— Palmer & Holland, Victoria Works, Aston Park, Birmingham. 




Vol. IX. No. 123. 



FEBRUARY 1, 1881. 



Price, with Supplement, 4d. 



DUNBAR, MCMASTER & CO., 

GILFORD, IRELAND, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Linen Threads. 

Highest Medals were awarded Dunbar & Go's Threads wherever exhibited 

FOR HAND OR MACHINE SEWING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

SUITABLE FOR ALL PURPOSES, SHOES, SO LE SEWING, TAILORS, /fee. 

DUNBAR AND CO.'S THREADS ARE THE BEST. 

Samples and Prices on Application. 





RAWORTH'S 

COTTONS are EEM ARK ABLE 



EASEm.FREEDOM 



IN SEWING 




u s E R AWO RT m IB C T T Nl - 

CHARLES STREIET MILLS LEICESTER 



SPECIALLY ADAPTED for SEWING MACHINES. 

EQUALLY SUITABLE FOR HAND SEWING. 

Sold Retail by Machine Dealers, Drapers, Haberdashers, &c. 

Specially appointed Sole Manufacturer to the Queen. 



THE SEWIKG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Feb. 1, 1881. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Kitchen BoUer Explosions '9 

Correspondence 

Hutchinson's Fork Cleaner ^° 

Patents ^' 

Hints to Repairers ^^ 

American Patent Office Reports =3 

BicycUng in America -3 

Electricity as Power and Heat ^3 

Meeting of the Bicycle Union 24 

Nine Hours System of Foreign Competition 25 

"What constitutes Beauty in Drawing 25 

Electric Lighting ^° 

County Court Debtors 3 ' 

Mr. Mundella on Technical Education 3' 

Labour Market 3^ 

How to discourage Agents 33 

Readings for Mechanics 33 

The White Company 3+ 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

Bicycle and Tricyle Manufacturers: 

Devey, Joseph & Co 37 

Harrington &Co '3 

Hillman, Herbert & Cooper 12 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

Surrey Machinists Co 3° 

Warman, Laxon & Co 37 

Bicycle Bearings and Fittings Manufacturers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co '6 

Bo\vn, W 40 

Devey, Joseph & Co 37 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

AVarwick, Thomas 28 

Bicycle Saddle and Bag Manufacturers : 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Boot Machinery Manufacturers: 

Blake and Goodyear Conipany II 

Howe Machine Co., Limited 1 7 



Button Hole Machines : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Company 10 

Gas Engine Makers .• 

Andrew, J. E. H ly 

Crossley Brothers 18 

Kilting Machine Manufacturers: 

Holroyd, J... 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Co iS 



13 



Publications : 

Piatt on Life 3° 

Urquhart on the Sewing Machine 28 

Sewing Cotton Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 36 

Evans, Walter & Co 14 

Raworth, John T i 

Sewing Machine Attachment Makers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 8 

Bown, W 9 

Daville, R. S. & Co 17 

Manasse, Max 38 

Sewing Machine Manufacturers : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Co 10 

Gritzner & Co 7 

Holroyd, J 41 

Howe Machine Company, Limited 17 

Junker & Ruh 8 

MothersiU, R 9 

Raymond & Co. (P. Frank) 16 

Rennick, Kemsley & Co 28 

Singer Manufacturing Company 4, 5 

Thurlow, Charles 38 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Company, Limited 18 

Watson & Co 38 

Wheeler & A\'ilson Manufacturing Co 3 

Wliite Sewing Machine Company 6 

Wright Sc Co 9 

Sewing Machine and Bicycle Oil Makers: 

Ariston Oil Company ." 9 

Bishop's Cluster Company 16 

Daville & Co 5 

Sewing Machine Needles : 

The Park Wood Mills Company 8 . 

Sewing Thread Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 36 

Dunbar, McMaster, & Co i 

Evans, Walter, & Co 7 

Finlayson, Bousfield & Co 10 

Marshall & Co ii 

Trade Protection Societies : 

Stubbs' Mercantile Offices 43 . 

Washing Machine Manufacturers : 

Holmes, Pearson, Midgley, & Co 37 

Twelvetrees, Harper 16 

Whitley & Co 17 

Taylor & Wilson 15 

Taylor, F. D 36 




iyCoC3- ILL'S 

PATENT SINGLE-STROKE STAPLE PRESS. 

Secured by Royal Letters Patent, iVo. 756, 25th Feb., 1879. 

For Binding Papers, Pamphlets, &c., sampling Woollens, Cottons, Silks, &c., and for suspending 
Show Cards, &c., McGill's Patent Staple Fasteners and Staple Suspending Rings will be found un- 
surpassed in adaptability, and the only articles for the pm^poses intended that can be applied auto- 
matically. McGill's Patent Single-Stroke Staple Pi-ess automatically inserts these Fastenei-s and 
Rings. A single stroke of the operator's hand upon the Plunger of the Press will instantaneously 
insei-t and clinch the Staple or Ring, in the articles to be bound or suspended. 

Also IIcGill's Patent American Paper Pasteners, Binders, Suspending 
Kings and Braces, Picture Hangers, &c., clieaper and superior to any ytaple Suijpend- 

other make. ing Ring. 
6s. per 1000 

EUROPEAN AGENTS— 

F. W. LOTZ & Co., 20, Barbican, London, E.G. 

wholesale only. discount to exporters. 
Illustrated Catalogue and Price List on Application. 





staple Fastener. 
5s. per 1000. 



FBI. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 




THE 



"BRAND 
PRIZE" 

FOE 

SEWING 
MACHINES 



PARIS 
EXHIBITION, 1878. 




WHEELER & WILSON'S 



ROTARY-HOOK LOCK-STITCH TREADLE 



SEWINC mACHINES 

From £5 10s. Hand Machines from £4 4s. 



J 



The New-Straight Needle Machines, for which the " GEAND PEIZE " was awarded, are tha 

No. 8. — The New Family and Light Manufacturing Machine. Strongly recommended Price £7 lOs. 

No, 6. — -A. Powerful Machine, capable of doing all grades of work from the finest to the thickest 

in the best possible manner, including all the various kinds of Leather work .... ,, £8 lOSt 

Also No. 6 Cylinder Machine for special classes of Boot work ,, £10. 

No. 7. — Similar to the No. 6 Machine, but especially suitable for Corset work, heavy Tailoring, 

Upholstery, &c , - „ £8 lOs. 

The Well-known Original Family and Light Manufacturing Machines. 

NOS. 1 & 2 Prices, £6 lOs., £7 lOg. 

The New No. 8 Hand Machine, specially recommended. 

Ip 'he best and most perfect Hand Machine yet produced, and combines the utmost efficiency 
with elegance of appearance, rendering it suitable to the lady's bouddir or for travelling. 

Price, WITH COYEE, complete, £5 5a, 

INSTRUCTION GRATIS TO ALL (whether purchasers or not) at any of our oflacea, a 

good operators recommended to employers. 

Machine ON HIRE with OPTION OF PTJIICHASE from 2/6 per Week, or from 10/- per Month. ' 
EVERY MACHINE MADE BY WHEELER AND WILSON HAS THEIR TRADE MARK AFFIXED 

Illustrated Catalogues and other Particulars, Post Free. 



WHEELER &> WILSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 



liondon, Chief Office, 21, Queen 

Victoria Street, E.O. 
London, 139, Regent Street, W. 

„ 49, Newington CauBcway, S.B. 
Liverpool, 73, Bold Street. 
Birmingham, Stevenson Place. 
Brighton, 163, Nortli Street, 



Bristol, 50, Victoria Street. 
Plymouth, 187, Union Street. 
Cardiff, 17, St. Mary Street. 
Nottingham, 16, Lister Gate. 
Newcastle, West Grainger Street. 
Hull, 9, Savile Street. 
Manchester, 131, Market Street, 



Leeds, 41, Commercial Street. 
Sheffield, 126, Barker's Pool. 
York, 27, Coney Street. 
Bradford, 57. Tyrrel Street, 
Edinfeurgh, 7, Frederick Street. 
Glasgow, 71, Union Street. 
Dublin, 1, Stephen'! Greeu. 



Belfast, G3, High Street. 
Cork, 32, Grand Parade. 
Norwich, 45, London Street. 
Exeter, London Inn Square. 
Torquay, 115, Union Street. 
Taunton, 2, High Street. 
Stroud, 1, John Street. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES 



After being engaged in litigation for nine years, The Singer Manufacturing Company, in 
d Chancery Suit recently heard before Vice-Chancellor Sir James Bacon, have established their 
exclusive right to the use of the name " Singer," as applied to Sewing Machines. The Public 
are cautioned that " Singer" or " Singer's " Sewing Machines are only made by The Singer 
Manufacturing Company, who keep them on sale at their offices in all the tov/ns of the 
United Kingdom. 

SINGERS SEWING MACHINES 



ARE 

UNEQUALLED 

because of their perfect 
adaptability to every class of 
sewing, from the finest mus 
lin to the thickest cloth. 

UNEQUALLED 

because of their cheapness 
and universal popularity. 
Price from £4 48. For cash, 
£4. 



PRICE 
from 




ARE 



UNEQUALLED 

because they are within the 
reach of all. If unable to 
pay cash, a "Singer's" ma- 
chine can be had on hire at 
S/B per week with option 
of purchase and without any 
addition to the price. 

UNEQUALLED 

for portability, excellence, 
durability, and eflaciency ; 
and are so simple that a child 
can work them. 



SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES, ^7e 

HAND OR TREADLE, PEEWEEK. 

BEWARE OF PERSONS, who, having no good trade repute of their own, use our 
name, " SINGER," to palm off counterfeit machines of inferior construction and manufacture. 

EVERY SINGER MACHINE has the Company's name printed on the Arm, and 
impressed upen the Brass Trade Mark Plate. 

TO AVOID DECEPTION, buy only at The Offices of the Singer Manufacturing 
Company (formerly I. M. Singer and Co.). 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMP 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

SPTGEE' S SBWII^G MA CHIlSrES. 

CHIEF COUNTING HOUSE IN EUROPE:— 

89, FOSTER LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, 

AND 287 BRANCH OFFICES !N THE UNITED KINGDOM. 



Feb. 1, 1831. THE SEWING MACHLNE (jAZElTrB AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 5 

THE SINBER MANUFACTURINB COMPANY 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & CO.), 

SING ER'S SEWING MACH INES. 

Chief Counting House in Europe ; 

39 FOSTER LANE, CHEAP8IDE, LONDON, E.G. 



LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 

147, Oheapaide, E.G. ; 132, Oxford Street, "W. ; 61, High Street, Camdec Town, N."W. ; 31 and 33, Newington Oauseway, S.E. ; 149, Blue 
Ajichor Road, Bennondsey, S.E {now 149, Southwark Park Road) ; 278, Olapham Road, S.W. ; 144,Brompton Road, S.W. ; 269, Commercial 
Road, E. (comer of Bedford Street) ; 174, Hackney Road, E. (opposite "Weymouth Terrace) ; 3, Castle Street, Kingaland High Street, N. ; 
I, Surinam Terrace, Stratford, E. (between Swan and Bank) ; 1, Rathbone Street, Barking Road, Canning Town, E, • 7, Kew Road, 
Richmond, S.W.; 1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. ; 131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. ; Croydon, 4aj North End. 



PROVINCIAL OFFICES: 



ENGLAND. 

Accrington, 9, Peel-street 
lUdershot, Victoria-road 
Mfreton, 68, King-atreet 
Ashford, 17, Maj-eh-Btreet 
Ashton-u.-LyTie, 246. Stamfd-st. 
Aylecbury, SUver-street 
Bakewell, North Church -street. 
Banbury, Market Place 
Bamaley, Eldon-street 
Barrow -in -Fumess, 11, Dalkeith- 

street 
Bath, 5, Quiet-Btreet 
Batley, Commercial-street 
Bedford, 36, Midland-road 
Bicester, Sheep-street 
Biggleswade, Shortmead-street 
Bingley, Main-street. 
BiikerJiead, 164, Grange-lane 
Birmingham, 93, New-street 
Bishop Auckland, 29, South-rd. 
Bishop Stortford, "Wind HiU 
Blackburn, 54 a, Church -street 
Blyth, Woodbine-ter., "Waterloo 
Bolton, 52, Newport- street 
Boston, 3J, Market-place 
Bradford, 38, Mechanics' I-nstit. 
Braintree, 7, Fairfield-road 
Brentwood, 3, Crown-street 
Brighton, 6, North. ,8t., Quadrant 
Bristol, 18 & 19, High-street 
Bromley (Keat), 18, High-street 
Burnley, 110, St. James'-street 
Burton-on-Trent, 76, Guild-street 
Bury-St.-Edmund8,7&,St.John-st. 
Cambridge, 17, Petty Cury 
Canterbury, 6, High-street 
Carlisle, Lome-bldgs., Bank-st. 
Chatham, 342, High-street 
Cheadle, High-street 
Chelmsford, High-street 
Cheltenham, 24, Pittrille-street 
Chester, 68, Poregate-street 
Chesterfield, l,Corporation.bldg8, 
Chichester, 54, East-street 
Chorley, 50, Clifford-street 
Cleckheaton, 5, Crown-street 
Clitheroe, 39, Wellgate 
Coalville, Station-street. 
Colchester, 32, St. Botolph-street 
Colne (Lancashire), 8, Arcade 
Congleton, 7, Mill-street 
Coventry, 12, Fleet-street (op, 

Babla^e Church) 
Crewe, 67, Nantwich-roeid 
Darlington, 10, Prebend-row 
t>arUurd, 18, High-etrml 



Deal, 124, Beach-street 
Denbigh, S6. Park-street 
Derby, 22, Wardwick 
Dewsbury, Nelson-street (top of 

Daisy -lull) 
Doncaster, 23, Scot-lane 
Douglas (Isle of Man), 6, Strand- 
street 
Dover, 9, Priory-street 
Dovercourt, Harwich-road 
Dudley, 217, Wolverhampton-st. 
Durham, 3, Neville-street i 

Eastbourne, 46, Terminus-road 

(two doors from post office) 
■Rccles, 31, Church-street 
Exeter, 19, Queen street 
Folkestone, Market-place 
Gloucester, 116, Westgate-street 
Grantham, 11, Wharf-road 
Gravesend, 20, New-road 
Grimsby, 57, Freema-„-jcr£Hfc 
Guernsey, 17, Smith-street 
Guildford, 161, High-street 
Halstead, 63, High-street 
Hanley, 48, Piccadilly 
Harrogate, 11, Westmoreland-st. 
Hastings, 48, Robertson-street 
HeckmondwTke,2, Market-street 
Hednesford, Station- street 
Hereford, 57, Commercial-street 
Hertford, Fordea House, Ware- 
road 
Hexham, 20, Market-place 
High "Wycombe, 123, Oxford-rd. 
Hinckley, Castle-street 
Huddersfield, 8, New-street 
Hull, 61, "Whitefriargate 
Huntingdon, High-street 
Hkeston, 76, Bath-street 
Ipswich, 19, Butter-market 
Jersey, 14a, New-street 
Keighley, 2, Market-place 
Kendall, 3, "Wildman-street 
Kiddetminster, Bull Ring 
Lancaster, 19, Brock-street (cor- 
ner of Penny-street) 
Leamington, 38. "Windsor-street 
Leeds, 14, Boar-lane 
Leek, 27, Russell-street 
Leicester, 44, Granby-street 
Lewes, 164, High-street 
Liverpool, 21, Bold-street 
Longton (StafEs.), 12,Market-ter. 
Loughborough, 44, Market-place 
Lowestoft, 123, High-street i 

Luton, 32, Park-street ^ 
Lynn, 9, Norfolk-strpet 
Maidstor', B, King-st— '' 



Maldon, High-street 

il05, Ma^tet-street 
132, Cheeiham-hill 
438, Stretford-road 
Manningtree, High-street 
Mansfield, 32, Nottingham-street 
Market Drayton, Shropshire-st. 
Market Harboro', Church-street 
Melton Mowbray, Victoria House; 

Market-place 
Middlesboro*, 59, Newport-road 
Morley, 4, Bradford-buildings, 

Chapel-hiU 
Newark, 15, Kirkgate 
Newcastle-ou-Tyne, 16, Grainger- 

street, "W. 
Newcastle-under-Lyne, 34, Bridge- 
street I 
Newport (Mon.), 2B, High-street I 
Newport(I of Wiffht).91,Pyle-stJ 
Newton Heath, 622, Oldham-road' 
Northampton, 3, Market-square 
Northwich, 17, "Witton-street 
Norwich, 55, London-street 
Nottingham, 20, Wheelergate 
Oldham, 70, Yorkshire-street 
Openshaw, 37, Ashton-old-road 
Ormskirk, 58, Aughton-street 
Oswestry, Bailey-street 
Otley, 34, Kirkgate - 
Oxford, 3, New-road 
Penrith, 8, Castlegate 
Peterborough, 53, Narrow Bridge- 
street 
Plymouth, 3, Bank of England -pi. 
Pontefract, 11, New Market-hall 
Portsea, 165, Queen-street 
Preston, 147, Friargate-street (op- 

posi^e Lune-street 
Ramsgate, 31, "West Cliff-road 
Rawtenstall, Bank-street 
Reading, 61, London-street 
Red Hill, High-street 

Retford, 3, Grove-street 

Ripley, Market-place 

l.ipon, 1, Blossomgate 

Rochdale, 66, Yorkshire-street 

Romford, Market-place 

Rotherham, 109, Main-streat 

Rugby, Lawford-road 

Rimcom, High-street 

Ryde(IsleofWighti,78,Dnion-st. 

Saffron Walden, Church-street 

Salisbury, 56, Fisherion-street 
' Salford, 4, Cross-iaae. and 100, 
I Begent-road 
I Scarborongh, 30, Huniri.'^a-row 



Scotholme, Basford-road 
Sheffield, 37, Fargate 
Shipley, 19, Kirkgate 
Shrewsbury, 4, Market-street 
Sittingbome, 64, High-street 
Southampton, 105, High-street 
Southend, Market-place 
Southport, 7, Union-street 
St. Helen's, 31, Market-place 
Stafford, 25, Gaol-road 
Stamford, Ironmonger-street 
South Stockton, 19, Mandale-road 
Stockport, 11, Bridge-street 
Stourbridge, 61 , Chiu-ch-street 
Stratford-on-Avon, 19, Y.'^od-st. 
Stroud, 7, George-street 
Swadlincote, Station c'reet 
Swindon, 52, Regent-street 
Tamworth. 54, Church-street 
Taunton, Bridge-street 
Torquay, 58. Fleet-'^treet 
Truro, 13, Victoria-pface 
Tunbridge "Wells, Vale-road 
Tunstall, 119, High-street 
"Wakefield, 9, Kirkgate 
"Walsall, 2, Bridge-street 
"Warrington, 44, Horsemarkct-st, 
Watford, . Queen' s-road 
Wednesbury, 67, Union-street 
Wellington, Church-street 
West Bromwich, 5. New-street 
Whitehaven, 70, King-strtet 
Wigan, 21, King -street 
Winchester, 27, St. Thomas-street! 
Windsor, 64a, Peascod-street 
Winsford, Over-lane 
Wirksworth, North-end 
Wisbeach, 51, Market-place 
Wolverhampton, Queen-street 
Worcester, 2, St. Nicholas-street 
Wrexham, 7, Charles-sti'cet 
Yarmouth, Broad-Row 
"Tork, 24, Coney-street 

WALES. 

Abergavenny, 19, Market-street 
Abervstwith, Market-hall 
Builth, High-^treet 
Cardiff, 5, Queen-strewt 
Carmarthen, 7, Lammas-street 
Carnarvon, 5, Bridge-street 
Dolgelly, Market-hall 
Merthyr, 1, Victoria-street 
Newtown, Market-hall 
Pontypool, Market-hall "% 
Pontypridd, Marljet-hall 
Swoiisea, 103, Oxford-Street 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, 225, Union-street 
Arbroath, 159, High-street 
Ayr, 60, High-street 
Banff, 17, Strait-path 
Cupar-Fife, 61, Crossgate 
Dumbarton, 67, High-street 
Dumfries, 127, High-street 
Dundee, 128, Nethergate 
Dunfermline, 87, High-street 
Edinburgh, I'L Princes-street 
Elgin, 215, HJfeh-Btreet 
Forfar, 28, Castle-street 
Galashiels, 62, High-street 
Glasgow, 89, Union-street 
Greenock, 8. West Blackhall-rt, 
Hamilton, 32, Cadaow-street 
Hawick, 3, Tower-knowe 
Inverness, 14, Union-street 
Kilmarnock, 83, King-stree* 
Rirkcaldy, 69, High-'^reet 
Kirlrwall (Orkney), Broad-st~eel 
Montrose, 96, Murray-street 
Paisley, 101, High- street-cross 
Partick, 97, Dumbarton-road 
Perth, 64, St"; John-street 
Peterhead, Rose-street 
Stirling, SI, Murray-place 
Tain, Lamington-street 
Thurso, Princes-street 

IRELAND. 

Armagh, 2, Ogle-street 

Athlone, Church-street 

Ballina, Bridge-street 

Ballyraena, W and 68, Church-sl. 

Belfast, 3 and 4, Donegal-sq., N- 

Carlow, TuUow-street 

Coleraine, New-row 

Cork, 79, Grand-parade 

Drogheda, 97, St. George' s-slreel 

Dublin, 69, Grafton-street 

Ennis, Jail-street 

Enniskillen, 15, High-street 
I Fermoy, 1, King-street 
I Galway, Domnick-street 

KilrusK. Moore-street 

Kingstown, 65^ Lower Creorge -et 

Limerick, 31, Patrick -street 

Londonden'y. If Carlisle-road 

Mullingar, Greville-street 

Navan, Trimgate-srreet 

Newry, 18, SupBr-isIasd 

Parsonstown, 2, Seffins 

Quocnstown, Harbour-row 

Shiro, 45, Knox-street 

Tiralce. 40, Bridge-street 

Waterford, 124, Quay 

W eif ord, Selfikai-eljee^ 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Pbb. 1, 1831. 



THE WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY. 

MANUFACTORY : 

Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. 



PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN OFFICE : 



19, QUEEN VICTORIA ST., LO NDON, E.G. 

Manufacturers of the justly Celebrated 

WHITE SEWIMG MACHINES, 

THE POPULAR FAVORITES FOR NOISELESSNESS AND EASY 

TREADLE MOVEMENT. 

SUPERLATIVE 




Maoliines for I -tm 
all work. -iJM 

12 various mTTTiTpl 5 years. Legal 

styles. |iJtlriliv| guarantee 



Every machine 
Warranted for 



ATTRIBUTES. 



IT IS THE FINEST FINISHED AND 

BEST MADE MACHINE IN THE 

■WORLD. 

IT IS THE EASIEST-SELLING AND 

BEST- SATISFYING MACHINE 

EVER PRODUCED. 



The Peerless Hand 
Machine. 




Cheapest and Best in the Market. 
Warranted for 3 years. 

LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGENTS. 



All Sewing- Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this— the latest Improved and Best 
Silent Lock-Stitch Shuttle Sewing Machine— or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &c., to 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

19, Queen Victoria Street, Iiondou, E,C. 



^BB. 1. 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHHSTE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



GRIT 




Factory of Sewing Machines and Sewing Machine Cabinets. 



ermany. 



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FIG. A, 
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TO SE-wiisra- ivA^^omisrE de^leik/S. 

LATEST NOVELTY. 



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car PATENTED IN ENGLAND AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Delivered with complete treadle movement free iu London at prices but little above thosa 
for usual iron stands with table and cover. 

Without or with our machines, either plain style or inlaid in mother-of- 
pearl, and highly ornamented in hand painting by special 
artists. All machines with loose wheel 
and self-acting winder. 



OABim 






ojmm 



^^^ENSlOli 



TABLE. 



Furnished 

for all systems of machines, 

Very useful. More solid than iron stands. 

Honourable mention and highest rewards at numerous Exhibitions. 

Novel ! 
Cheap! 
Solid ! 
Elegant ! 

SECOND 
HIGHEST 

Medal 

AT THE LATE 

Sydney 

lutemational 

EXHIBITION 

1879. 

Wholesale Agents wanted throughout the United Kingdom. 





THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOME&TIC APPLIANCES. Feb. 1, l§8i. 



TRADE 



MARK 




ANNUAL PRODUCTION, 
30,000 MACHINES. 



TEADE 



MAKE 



PROPER IRION FOUNDRY, 

FIRST PRIZES AT DIFFERENT EXHIBITIONS. 



ORIGINAL RHENANIA, 

Unbivalled Splendid 
HAND 

SEWING 
MACHINE. 

ORIGINAL FIDELITAS, 

Best Family 

SEWING 
MACHINE. 





GROVER AND 
BAKER'S 

Sewing 
Machine 

FOR TRADE. 

ORIGINAL BADENIA, 
HEAVY STRONG 

SEWING 
MACHINES 

FOR TRADE. 



TBADE 




MAKE 



JUNKER & RUH, _ 

Sewing Machine Manufactory, 

^ CARLSRUHE (Germany). 




MAEK 



THE LARGEST 



THE LARGEST SEWING 



THE LARGEST SEWING MACHINE 



EWINS IfACHINE TITTIN6S 





IMaohine "Belt" ■ 1 1 Oil g Warehouse. 

Manufacturers, m? mm Manufacturers. 

Bisho p's Cluster Company, Limited, 25, Hamsell St., London, E.G. 

SEWING AND MACHINE NEEDLES. 

" ALL KINDS OF FANCY NEEDLES, KNITTING PINS, CROCHET HOOKS, THIMBLES, &c., 

THE PARK WOOD MILLS CO,, 

NEEDLE MANUPACTURERS, 

PHoe Lists Fr^, 230, BRADFORD STREET, BIRMINGHAM. 




taADK^A MAUI 



Feb. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



PATENT SEWING MACHINES. 



NETT CASH, ty the Half Doz. 



The Celebrated " TAYLOK FRICTION" Improved- • 

The "COMMERCIAL HOWE" Hand Machine 

The ditto ditto Treadle 

The " COMMERCIAL " CHAIN STITCH, formerly called 
"The Express." ... 

"TAYLOR'S PATENT," No. 3 (Treadle) 

The "COMMERCIAL FAMILY MACHINE S" 

The ditto Hand ditto 



RETAIL. 


WHOLESALE. 


£4 14 


6 


£2 





4 4 





1 15 





5 5 





2 10 





2 2 





17 





6 10 





3 





5 5 





2 15 





4 4 





2 






Mangles and Washing Machines at Ml Discount. Mothersill's Patent BICYCLES 

35 per cent, off List Prices. Lists of Prices on application free. 



R. MOTHERSILL, 4a, Lawrence Lane, Cheapside 

WRIGHT & CO., 

Sewing Machine Merchants Manufacturers, 

27, SHOREDITCH, LONDON, E; 

ALSO AT 457 AND 502 KINGSLAND ROAD, LONDON, N. 

The TRADE and SHIPPERS supplied with every description of Sewing Machines 
upon the most liberal terms. 

Hand Machines, from 18s. 

Treadle Machines with all the most recent 
Improvements . 

LOCKSTITCH, ANT SYSTEM, WAEEANTED FEOM 50?. 




Agents wanted througliout Great Britain and the Colonies. 

Catalogues and Terms u;pon Application. 



THE ARISTON OIL COMPANY, 

15, KIRBY STREET, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, E.G., 
MAKERS OF SPECIAL SEWING MACHINE AND BICYCLE OILS. 

Wholesale and lor Export. 



30 



TFE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Feb. 1, 1881. 



FiiiIapn,Bousfield& Go.'s 



MACHINE THREADS 



SOLE SEWING 
MACHINE THREADS 




CABLE LAID 

THREADS 



TAILOR'S THREADS 



MACHINE LINEN THREADS 



AND 



SHOE THREADS 



ARE 



CELEBRATED OVER THE WORLD, 

And acknowledg-ed by the leading users to be the 

BEST LINEN THREADS EVER MADE. 



LONDON; 




N,B. — Finlayson, Bonsfleld, and 
Co., did not exhibit at the Paris 



DUBLIN* 




Prices and Samples free on application to 

FLAX MILLS, 

JOHNSTONE/- GLASGOW. 



1851; 



1865. 



J 



Feb. 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



11 



The Only Gold Medal for Bool and Shoe Machinery /{warded at the 
Paris Exposilion was for the Machinery of 

THE BLAKE & GOODYEAE 

BOOT AND SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY, 

LIMITED. 




THE 



BLAKE SOLE SEWING MACHINE 

a ON TEEMS, WITH OR WITHOUT ROYALTY. 

A GREAT VARIETY OF MACHINERY 



FOR 




HEEL NAILING AND TRIMMING, 

EDGE TRIMMING AND SETTING, 

SELF FEEDING POUCHES, EAND AND WELT CUTTING, 

RAND TURNING, 
SELF-FEEDING EYELET MACHINES, 

STRAIGHT AND CIRCULAR READERS* 
And a great variety of other Machinery and Patented Tools. 



MANY OF OUR MACHINES MAY BE SEEN IN MOTION, 

4T NEWPORT PLACE, LEICESTER. 

Kaw Hide Mallets & Hammers for Shoe Manufacturers & Machinists, 
ROLLERS, PRESSES, KNIVES, AND IRON OR WOOD LASTS. 



1, WORSHIP STREET, LONDOM, E.C. 



12 



THE SEWING MACHINE OASSETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Fee. 1, 1881. 



HILLMAN, HERBERT, & COOPER, 

Works :— C O V E N T R Y. 

London : 97, Cheapside. Leicester : 76, Welford Koad. 




MAKERS OF THE 

• H 




99 



" Premier," " Flying Dutchman," & other Bicycles & Tricycles. 






^^ 




HIUMAN HERBERT ftCOOPEB 
MAKERS. 

COOPERS 

INEXTINGUISHABLE 

HUB LAMP. 

The only Lamp that does 
not go out on a rough road. 








PATENT DOUBLE 

BALL BEARINGS. 

On the " D.H.F. PREMIER," fitted with our Patent Ball Beanngs, was accomplished 
The greatest distance ever ridden in one week, viz. : — 1,405 MILES, and on the same Machine 
The greatest distance in one day is 262 MILES- 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE FREE. 

Please send another large size " Cooiaer's Patent " Lamp, so that I may get it to-morrow. It is the 
grandest thing in Lamps that I have ever seen or tried. — Yours truly, W. Tattekspield. 

Dear Sirs, Brighton, December 27th, .1880. 

We have much pleasure in testifying to the excellence of " Cooper's Patent Lamps," which give great 
satisfaction. Tours truly, H. Kevell Eetnolds, jun.. Dark Blue B.C., and L.B.C. 

E. K. Eevell Reynolds, Dark Blue B.C. 
L. B. Reynolds, L.B.C. 



AU Communications to be addressed to the Works, COVENTRY. 



E.FEB. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHIKE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



13 



BY ROYAL 




LETTERS PATENT. 



THE ^^DESIDERATUM" BICYCLE, 

(FOTl SB-A.S03Sr 1880.) 

. Px\TENT SELF-ADJUSTING STANLEY HEAD (which cannot get out 

of order). 
PATENT NON-CORROSIVE SPOKES. 
IMPROVED ADJUSTABLE ROLLER, or Ball Bearings. 
IMPROVED ADJUSTABLE STEP. 
IMPROVED DUSTPROOF CONED BEARINGS to Back Wheel & Fed 

"Few makes are now better known than the "Desideratum"; certainly we have received more inq 
<:oncerning it than any other Machine, and although a large number of our readers must be mounted on this Stee 
Aave never yet heard a single complaint regarding it. — " Vidk Bicycles of the year 1878. 

PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS 

HARRINGTON & CO., 

STEWART STREET, WOLVERHAMPTON. 

Descriptive Price Lists on application. Agents wanted in Towns where not represen 

HOLROYD'S NEW PATENT 
KILTING MACHINE 

Sells at sight, and is acknowledged by the Trade in England and Abroad to be the best for all 
purposes, upwards of 8,000 having been sold in two years, and the still increasing demand 

testifies to its unequalled excellence. 

THIS Machine, by its simplicity and construction, will at once commend itself to 
Merchants and Manufacturers, and %vill supply that which has long been 
wanted, namely, a good, practical, and durable Machine at a reasonable price. 

It can be worked by hand, treadle, or steam power, and heated by gas or irons as 
desired ; and it runs so hght that it can be worked by hand for any length of time 
without the slightest fatigue. 

It will make any land of kilt desired, from the narrowest to an inch wide, and any 
depth up to ten inches, and can be alteied to different styles and mdths immediately, 
and in a most simple manner. 

It is specially adapted for manufacturing and dress-making purposes, and by its 
lightness, rapidity, and correctness, together with the fact that it will work muslin, 
thick cloth, or felt with equal facility, it cannot fail to be a great saving, and of the 
greatest advantage. 

With the gas arrangement perfect combustion is secured, thereby avoiding any 
smoke or smell which is so unpleasant in most other machines, and being nickel 
plated all over does not rust. 

Price, complete with gas arrangements and 4 heating irons, £3 3s. 

ELECTRO-PLATING BY STEAM POWER, AND DYNAMO ELCTRIC MACHINES, 

Combining all the latest improvements in GILDING, BRONZING, &c., on rough or smooth surfaces, on any kind of metal goods. 

Special Terms oflered to Manufacturers of articles suitable for plating. 




J. HOLROYD, Tomiinson St., Hulme, Manchester. 



14, 



^tHE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AnD JOITENAL Of" DOMESTIC APPLlAiTCES. 



Feb. 1, I88i. 



FOR SEWING 




MACHINES. 



TRADE MAEK. 



ALTER EVANS & CO., 



BO A R'S-K E A. ID COTTOKT OVT ^ 3>T TJ F ^ O T O E, "ST, UERB-S-. 

EVANS'S SUPERIOR SIX CORD SEWING COTTON, ON SPOOLS SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

ALSO 

Superior Six-Cord Crochet Cotton, on Spools, in Skeins, and in Balls, for Sewing, Knitting, and Crochet, which 

IS especially recommended for all "first-class Crochet Work; " also for Guipure d'Art and Point Lace 
Maltese Thread, in Balls, White, Black, and Colors 
Tatting Cotton, on Spools. 

Patent Glace Thread, in White, Black, and Colors, on Spools and Cards. 
Two and Three Cord Sewings, on Spools, soft finish. 
Sewings, in Balls. 
Embroidering, Knitting, Mending, Cotton Cords, and Small Cords. 



1862. 

London Exhibition Prize Medal, 
awarded "for very strong * 
most superior thread.'.' 



1867. 

Paris Universal EzUbitioa 
Gold lUedal, 



1873. 

Vienna First Class ISIedal 
" for Progress." 



1878. ■ 

Paris Universal Exhibition, 
Silver Medal. 



LIAS HOWE SEWING MACHINES 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The Howe Machine Company, 

EXPEESSLT rOE BOOT & SHOE MAKEES, 

FOR 

SADDLE AND HARNESS MAKEBS, 

AND FOR 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Leather Goods, 

ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE CLOSING OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF BOOT TOPS. 



rioweringMaeliine (with patent vibrating attaclimelit.) 
A SPE CIAL MACHINE F Qr" ELAST ICS. 

Branch Offices and Agencies in every Town in the UnitecJ 

Kingdom. 

Price Lists and Samples of Work, FREE on application. 

EASY TERMS OF PURCHASE. 



The Howe Machine Company, Limited, 

46 & 48, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDON. 



t'lfi. 1, l88i. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APiPLIANCES. 



15 



Sjdnej Exhibition. 



PRIZE 
MEDAL 




AWA RDS 

1880. 



TAYLOR AND WILSON'S 



"HOME" WASHER 
"DOLLY" WASHER - 
WRINGING MACHINE 



FIRST PRIZE 

SECOND PRIZE 

FIRST PRIZE 




Price, £6:6:0. 




Price, £3 : 10 : 0. 




Price, £3 : 5 



Awarded upwards of 150 Gold and Silver Medals and First Prizes. 

THE ANNUAL &ALES EXCEED THOSE OF ANY OTHER WASHING MACHINE. 



Our Goods are all guaranteed to be made from the best materials, thoroughly seasoned, and are aU fitted witli oui 
well-known patents and appliances, which, cannot be supplied by any other maker. 



Illustrated Catalo§,ihe free on apjilication to 



TAYLOR & M^ILSON. 

Atlas Works, Clayton-le-Moors, Accrington. 



16 



THE SEWIlsra MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Feb. 1, 1881. 



Clothes-Wrina:ers ! Clothes-Wringers ! ! 



HARPER TWS3LVETREES' 

INDIA-RUBBER CLOTHES-WRINGERS, 




WITH COG-WHEELS, 

Strong Prames, Metal Bearings, Adjustable Claspers, and other great improvements, have 
maintained their supremacy for eighteen jeare as the '' Gem of Clothes-Wringers." They 
will fit tubs of every shape, and wring the largest as well as the smallest articles dry 
instantly without labour, dropping them into the basket nearly dry enough to iron or 
mangle. These well-known and much-prized Clothes- Wringers are specially adapted for 
the heavy, constant work of laundresses, and are immensely superior to the slightly-made 
delicate American Importations. 

Prices: 30s., 40s., 50s., or without Cogwheels, 25s., 30s., 35s. 

Harper Twelvetraes' Cheap Pifty-Shilling Mangle and Wringer, 24-inch Rollers. 
Wholesale Quotations, Post free, from 

HAEPER TWELYETREES, 

Laundry Machinist, 



80, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.G. Works: Burdett Road, Bow, E. 



CANADIAN SEWING MACHINES. 




£2 2s. Complete. 



■ This Machine has obtained the highest re- 
putation and an enormous sale, both under 
its true name (" Raymond's"), and also as 
the "Weir 55s. Machine," &c. — (See caution 
below). It is durable, rapid, exceedingly 
simple, neat, 'not liable to get out of order, and warranted 
to sew from'the finest muslin to the heaviest material. 

CAUTION. — James G. Weir, who, for about eight 
years obtained these genuine Machines, is no longer sup- 
plied with them by the Inventor and Manufacturer, Mr. 
Charles Raymond. 



BEWARE OF ALL COUNTERFEITS. 








ALSO 



£4 4s. Complete. 

RAYMOND'S PATENT "Household" 
Lockstitch Machine has been designed ex- 
pressly for family use. It is exceedingly 
simple to learn and to manage, and warranted 
to sew every kind of family and household 
work Is fitted with the latest improve- 
ments — loose wheel, and (Registered) 
Automatic Bobbin Winder. 

Testimonials, Prospectuses, Samples o 
Work, and all particulars free on applicatio 



Eaymoud's No. 1 and 2 TREADLE MACHINES for Families, Dressmakers, and Manufacturers. 



.A-CS-EISTTS ■Vi7■-A-I^Q■TED. 



CHIEF 



DEPOT 



FOR EUROPE AND EXPORT 



11, MOUNT PLEASANT, LIVERPOOL. 



p. FRANK, AGENT. 



ESTABLISHED 1863. 



. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



17 



CLOTHES WRINGER 

Is the leading Wringer of America 

M ^ 
ft 



a. 













The best, the cheapest, the most substantial and 
simple wooden frame Clothes Wringer made. 

Enquiries and Orders to be addressed to the Sole European 
Representatives, 

JOHN R. WHITLEY & CO., 

7, POULTRY, LONDON, E.G.; 
PLACE VENDOME, PARIS. 



0, 



JLO-IEllNrT 



■W" ^ ZSr T IB 3D - 



THE "BISSCHOP" GAS ENGINE. 

Piston and Valve need no Lnbrinilor. It ill start at a moment's notice. 

Power. Phice, 

OneMan ••■ £25 

One-and-a-half Man 3» 

TwoMan 35 

FourMan 59 



w 

H 
W 



W 
H 
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w 
in 

O 




o 



> 

H 
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> 

H 
W 

D 



J. E. H. AIS^DREW, 
18, Waterloo Road, STOCKPORT. 



R. S. DAVILLE & CO. 

WHOLESALE DEALERS IN 



) 



Sewing Machine Attachments, 

FITTINGS, OIL, &c., 

IMPORTERS OP 

AMEEICA]^ SEWIl^Q MACHmES, 

DOMESTIC MACHINERY, 

CLOCKS, NOVELTIES, 

HARDWARE, &c., &c. 

LISTS FORWARDED ON APPLICATION, 

46, WOOD STREET, 



WASHING-DAY REFORM 

HARPER TWELVETREES' 

RENOWNED "VILLA" 

£2 lOS,, OR -WITH 

MANGLER & WRINGER, £5 5s., 

Does the Fortnight's Family 
"Wash in Four Hoiurs, without rub- 
bing OE BoiLisG, as certified by 
thousands of delighted pixrchasers 
It is easy to "work, easily under 
stood, strong-ly made, dm-able, doe- 
not injui-e the clothes, but really 
saves them ; and is the only Wash- 
ing- IVIacliine in the world vrhich 
renders Boiling ujinecessary, and 
saves five or six hom-s of coppers 
firing each washing day. Tlie Five* 
Guinea "Villa" "Washer possessed 
tremendous wasliing power, and 
will wash 15 dozen coUai-s and 
ladies' cuffs in five minutes ; 150 
pocket - handkerchiefs in five 
minutes ; 60 hotel tAble cloths in an 
lioiu' ; 10 dozen bedroom towels per 
houi' ; Z\ dozen shirts per horn* ; li 
dozen sheets per hour, and counter- 
panes, blankets, ciu-tains, iSre., in 
proportion. Such success is im_ 
paralleled! Blusti-ated Prospectuses 
and Export Quotations post free of 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 

LArSDEY ElfGINEER AND MACHINIST, 

FINSBURY PAVEMENT, LONDON, E.G. 




80, 



MORE 



AQENTS WANTED. 



Sole London Agent for Kenworthy's 
WashiBg: MacMne. 



' Paragon " 



18 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1, 1881, 



An Engine which works without a Boiler or Steam. 

AVEKAGE ISONTHLY DSLIVERT (inoluding Continental) OVER 180 ENGINES. 




THE "OTTO" SILENT GAS ENGINE. 

IS EAPIDLT EEPLACING STEAM ENGINES EEOM 1 to 40 HOESE POWEE IND. 



WORKS & HEAD OFFICES: 

Great Marlbro' St., Gloster St., 
>« MAlfCHESTEE,. 



CROSSLEY BROTHERS, 



LONDON HOUSF.: 

116, Queen Victoria Street, E.O, 
LONDON. %» 



THE ' 



4 





LOCK-STITCH, HAND OR FOOT, 

SEWING MACHINES. 

First Prize l\/ledals, Honours & Awards, wherevex Exhibited. 



THE NEW " LITTLE WANZER."— Entirely reconstructed and improved. 
Nickel-plated, Loose Wheel, New Patent Shuttle, Take-up Lever and 
Spooler. £4 4s. 

WANZER "A," Simplicity Itself.— The most powerful yet light running 

Hand Machine, straight race. £4 4s, 

WANZER " C " Light Foot Family Macliiiie, entirely New, with every 
improvement up to 1879. £6 Os. 

WANZER " P " Family Machine, with Reversible Feed and Stitch 
Lever. £7 lOs. 

WANZER "E" Wheel Peed Machine, for heavy work of aU kinds- 
£8 8s. 

WANZER PLAITING, KILTIKG AND BASTING 
MACHINES, 

Over 200 varieties of perfect Plaiting or Kilting, from 303. complete. Tht 
only Machme Kilting and Basting at one operation. 



WANZER "^" 



IS THE 



Great Mechanical Success of the Age. 

It combines all the hnown advantages of other 

Machines. Mounted on Ornamental Iron Base, 

Four Guineas complete. 



The Wander Sewtng Machine Company, 

LIMITED, 

Chief Oface-4, GREAT PORTLAND ST.. 
OXFORD CIRCUS, LONDON, W. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES, 



19 



KITCHEN BOILER EXPLOSIONS. 

Deaths from the explosion of boilers in private houses have 
been so lamentably frequent during the present hard frost that 
they form an important feature of the public calamity. More 
serious, however, than the actual number of such accidents that 
have occurred is the danger which every house with a boiler in it 
runs from- day to day. Some thirty lives have been lost from 
this cause, and the reckoning is dreadful enough to contem- 
plate ; but many thousands are Living on with the very same 
peril of explosion present in their kitchens, and at any hour, 
by the wilfulness or stupidity or carelessness of a servant, or by 
the neglect of the plumber called in to see that all is going 
well, the boiler may burst, wrecking the kitchen and killing 
those in it, bringing down the floor above, and spreading ruin 
in an instant throughout the lower stoiies of the house. It is 
difBcult for householders and families to understand this. 
They are so accustomed to their boiler, the familiar feature of 
the kitchen range, that they can as little connect death and 
havoc with it as with the cat upon the hearth. If the cat were 
suddenly to develop into a man-eating tiger, to rush with a 
roar upon the kitchen-maid and fell her to the ground with a 
single blow of its paw, she would be greatly surprised. But 
even such behaviour as this would not astonish her more than 
the bursting of the boiler. In a general way she knows that 
boilers burst occasionally ; but then these are somebody else's 
boilers and not her own, and it does not seem to enter within 
her vision of the possible that the machine of which she herself 
has charge should suddenly some day go off with a bang, and 
blow her into atoms. So she listens blandly to all her master's 
explanations and exhortations, and promises obedience; but, 
the moment his back is turned, she proceeds to draw " just a 
little" water out of the familiar tap, to save herself the trouble 
of boiling a kettle, and, when going to bed, rakes out the 
kitchen tire, and lays it ready for the morning, so that her 
cold fingers next day may have as little to do as possible. In 
vain has her master tried to explain to her carefully that 
within the week a kitchen-maid in St. John's-wood has been 
killed by a boiler exploding which has been unduly emptied, 
or a cook at the East-end blown to pieces when relighting the 
fire, which had been allowed to go out too early overnight. 
She understood his warnings as referring to some very vague 
possibilities that might have happened in some remote period 
of time ; at all events, as to something that could never occur 
to herself. So she goes on her way complacent and self-satis- 
fied, until one day the kitchen requires a new boiler and a 
new cook. 

Though under such circumstances blame, no doubt, is to be 
attributed to the servants, much, nevertheless, depends upon 
the master and the mistress of the house. In the first place, 
the kitchen boiler can always be rendered hiirmless by empty- 
ing it, and by keeping it empty until warm weather sets in. 
Of course, in that case, the kitchen fire must be allowed to go 
out, and must not be re-lit, or the empty reservoir will split 
with the heat, and, though not dangerous to life, wUl be costly 
to the purse. It is not, however, in every household that the 
extinction of the fire can be borne, for, however amusing it 
may seem in theory to live picnic fashion all over the house 
for a few weeks, in practice the absence of the kitchen fire 
proves a very severe trial all round, both in point of comfort 
and temper. When, however, life and limb are concerned, 
even the inconvenience of a cold hearth are not considered by 
some to be too great a price for safety, and so, in spite of the 
unconcealed contempt of the cook, the disgust of the house- 
maid, and the consternation of the cat, the kitchen fire is 
allowed to die out, the boiler drained empty, and desolation 
formally takes possession where comfort used to sit enthroned. 
At this price safety may be absolutely assured ; but human 
nature is so constituted that, even for safety, such a procedure 
as the extinction of the kitchen fire will not generally approve 
itself. Next, in point of security, comes the device of keeping 
the cistern that supplies the boiler always filled, and taking 
care that no water is ever drawn from the boiler. By this 
means the heat of the boiler is kept as nearly as possible at 
its maximum, and the greatest resisting power is given to the 
steam. But even here there is a flaw for frost to work 
mischief in, for, unless care i? taken that the steam 



escape-pipe, wherever it may be, is thoroughly free, that 
all-important orifice may suddenly become caked with ice, and 
explosion naturally results. Or, again, it may happen that in 
the night hours, when the kitchen fire has gone out and the 
frost is at its hardest, the pipe somewhere or another will get 
frozen, the steam will gradually collect into ice, and the result 
to the boiler will be the same — immediate explosion. To this 
end builders often carefully work, for they will run the pipes, 
quite unconsciously, as near the outer air as possible, and 
subject them, therefore, to aU the freezing influences that 
they can, instead of carrying them warmly and safely up the 
cornets of the wall inside the house, where they would not 
only escape the perilous cold, but would be always under easy 
observation. It may be, too, that the waste-pipe from the 
bath-room upstairs debouches "upon the leads, and to take it 
out a hole has to be made in the outer waU. Alongside the 
waste-pipe runs the other, in which the hot water circulates 
between the boiler and the bath, and this also passes over the 
hole which has been made ; but it does not occur to the 
builder's men that a basketful of cement would be well spent 
in stopping up this hole, and so prevent the freezing blast from 
plajang full upon the hot-water pipes, upon whose heat the 
safety of the house depends. They leave the hole open, and, 
when the freezing blast does blow, the heat of the pipes and 
the cold of the air fight it out all through the long night by 
themselves, while the house, unconscious of the explosive force 
struggling for freedom, sleeps on. Next morning the plumber, 
called in to explain the mystery of cold water in the bath, 
announces to the astounded family that they have escaped 
disaster by a miracle. " The hot pipe, you see, did not manage 
to get quite froze through. Perhaps you weren't using so 
much hot water overnight as usual ; enyhow, the boiler's not 
busted, thank's to luck." 

Of such accidents as these — the successful defence of a hot- 
water pipe against the siege of a freezing wind, a bucket or 
two of hot water more or less drawn from the boiler overnight, 
an hour or two less of the Idtchen fire on a certain day, an 
intelligent bather suspecting the chill on the water — does the 
safety of life and limb depend in this frosty weather. It is 
well, therefore, to have warnings and advice of experienced 
men made as public as possible. The ordinary household 
boiler, says one of these, situated in the kitchen, and supplying 
water to a bath-room in the upper part of the house, is very 
much more dangerous than any locomotive or steam launch 
that was ever yet constructed. It is set up by builders who 
know nothing of dynamics, is carefully tucked up out of 
sight, so that it can never be tested or examined, and finally 
it seldom has any safety valve. The only wonder, therefore, is 
that these boilers do not explode more frequently than thej' do. 
They should be of copper, instead of, as is usual, iron, for 
copper when exploding only tears and splits, whUe iron bursts 
with terrific force. In frosty weather the pipes above get 
choked, and the steam is unable to force the hot water thioagh 
them, so it collects until the pressure becomes greater than tlie 
boiler can bear, and the boiler bm-sts. This is exactly what 
has happened in a score of houses in London already. Que 
incident of these catastrophes, however, deserves special notice, 
for it is unfortunately the case that most men and women, rather 
than trust to their owuiutelligeut judgments, place themselves in 
thehandsof plumber'smen,whoworksimply by the rideof thumb, 
and who, because they have done one thing in one house, do exactly 
the same in the next, though the circumstauces of the cases may 
be scientifically quite diff'erent. Such a workman as this came 
to a miserable end at a house in Blackheath. He was called in 
to see a boiler which had been standing empty for some days, 
and proceeded at once to light a fire. The master of the house 
warned the man of the danger of lighting the fire; but the 
unhappy plumber only replied that he " knew all about it, as 
he had put in the boUer when the house was built." It did 
not matter to him that when he put in the boiler and lighted 
the fire the last time it was midsummer, and not an unprece- 
dented frost. He only remembered that he had himself put the 
boiler in, and that to test it he had lit the kitchen fire. So he 
did exactly the same again. He filled the cast-iron bomb- 
shell with water and set it boiling, the steam was generated 
and tried to escape. But upstairs the frost had caught it. 
Both pipes were plugged up hard with ice, and the steam 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1. 188:. 



gradually gathered in terrible strength behind the grate ; and 
then, all of a sudden, while the wretched plumber was actually 
standing before the fatal fire, exploded with awful force, 
wounding him so severely that he died almost immediately. 
Householders, therefore, should remember that the advice 
of working men, let them be never sso familiar with pipes, 
is no guarantee of safety, and that they must in some measure 
rely also upon their own common sense. If thay wish to be 
absolutely safe they must empty their boilers ; but they can 
still be as safe as ordinary care can make human life under 
exceptional circumstances, if they will see that the boiler is 
kept regularly filled. If the pipes of the upper cistern are 
frozen so that no water reaches it from the main, they must 
see it kept partially filled by hand, and if the handle of the 
kitchen boiler can be taken off so much the better. Tempta- 
tion is thus removed from lazy or careless servants, and one 
more chance of safety is secured. Yet, after all, the great 
lesson conveyed by the epidemic of explosions is that valuable 
one recently taught by the outbreak of fever in certain London 
localities— more caution and self-reliance among householders. 
A glimmering of the great truth that they must see to the 
state of their drains before they take a house has begun to 
steal gradually over the public ; but they have now to remember 
also that they ought to acquaint themselves with the position 
and conditions of the kitchen boiler and its pipes. A drain 
plan will, before long, we hope, be a regular accompaniment 
of the lease engagement, and some day, perhaps, we may ex- 
pect also to see landlords compelled to place copper boilers 
where there are now iron ones, and to give them safety valve. 




KITCHEN BOILEE EXPLOSIONS. 

To Ihe EdiUr of tie Seiumg Machine Oazetie. 

SlE, — The usual list of killed and wounded from this cause 
has already far exceeded its average annual proportions. Why 
such a cumbrous and costly mode of heating baths is persisted 
in is difficult to tell, but it is probable that until the plumber 
is made liable to be brought up for manslaughter there will be 
no change. The average Briton is far too conservative to give 
up an old system for a better. There is not the slightest 
reason why a kitchen or bath boiler should ever explode if 
properly fixed, by a plumber who has the smallest amount of 
common sense. There are two simple ways by which an 
explosion can be totally prevented — one by fixing a dead 
weight safety valve which should be for convenience fixed when 
the apparatus is put up first. The other is to cut a hole in the 
hot water return pipe a little distance above the boiler, this 
hole being from ^ inch to 1 inch in diameter, and to solder 
over this a piece of sheet lead about l-32nd inch thick, 
just sufficient to safely stand the general water pressure, 
making in fact a weak place in the system of pipes 
which will be the first to give way. This hole must 
be cut in such a position that the pipe is certain to be 
warmed from the fire, and as near as possible to the 
boi'er. It must also be where, in case of the sheet lead being 
blown out the water will not be thrown into tne room, but into 
the fire so as to extinguish it. Any plumber should do this for a 
shilling or two, and although it is liable to make a mess it 
only does this when an explosion would occur in its absence. 
It is also easy to put an escape pipe through which the water 
could be led away to the outside of the building in case of 
accident. This thin lead safety disc might be made so as to fix 
in a brass socket and be easily replaced it' an accident did occur. 
The whole system of circulating boilers as at present fixed is 
Radically wrong, as, with few exceptions, the hot water is 



rarely to be got when wanted in any quantity, and the cost in 
fuel expended is utterly out of proportion to the useful result 
obtained. There are many simpler, cheaper, and more satisfac- 
tory arrangements which can be fixed at lessthan one-tenth the 
cost, and of all these the best is a galvanized iron or copper cylinder 
of about eight gallons capacity, with a tap, and a good gas 
heating burner underneath it, the cylinder having a loose lid 
and a water supply tap over it for filling as required. After some 
months' daily experience with this there is no doubt that it is far 
cheapertouse'thanthecirculatingboiler system, andfarmoreuse- 
fulfor general work. It has also the advantage of absolute safety 
under any possible condition. In case of a stoppage prevent- 
ing the use of the kitchen fire, the use of gas for cooking 
prevents the slightest difficulty or inconvenience. This has 
now attained such perfection that it is more than probable 
that a good gas cooking apparatus, even if got as a makeshift, 
will quickly find its proper place, and permanently supersede 
the fire for all work. It is generally considered that circulatuig 
boUers with a reserve cylinder are safe from explosion. This 
is a mistake, as a case where the cylinder burst and flooded a 
house has come under my notice within the last few days, and 
this is by no means the first accident of the kind which I have 
known. Thos. 'ElETCHEB, P.O.S. 

4, Museum-street, Warrington. 

I shall be glad to give any further information on this 
matter to those interested, but must desire that any letters 
shall be as concise as possible. 



HUTCHINSON'S PATENT FORK CLEANING MACHINE. 
This compact useful labour-saving machine is constructed to 
polish six silver or plated forks, either large or small, at one opera- 
tion, by means of two soft brushes (one beneath and the other 
above the forks), being made to travel horizontally with a soft 
and uniform pressm-e evenly distributed over the forks. The 
placing in of the forks is done in a most simple manner — the 
small handle at the end of the machine is tur-ned once from 
right to left, which operation brmgs out two little slides or 
ledges projecting sufficiently far enough under the extremities 
of the forks to allow them to be placed thereon, the handle is 
then turned back to its original position, and by this simple 
motion the slides are withdrawn, and the forks remain held 
from tip to tip, between flexible keys backed by springs ; the 




forks are thereby held in a secure and harmless manner, and 
without rigidity. The paste having been appHed and the 
large handle tm-ned a few times, the forks may be taken out 
with a most brilliant polish, without the slightest injury. The 
handle can be turned either way, it being immaterial which. 
We do not recommend this machine merely for the great 
amount of time and labour saved by it (which, nevertheless, is 
estimated at a greater proportion than six to one), but also for 
the preservation of forks, as it is well known that the prongs 
often sustain injury by the uneven pressure brought to bear 
iipon them when cleaned by hand. We think the maohme does 
its work admirably ; it is quick in action, economical in paste, 
and is certain to produce a brilliant polish. The manufacturers 
are Messrs. Hutohuison and Co., 51, Pann-street, Aldersgate- 
street, E.C, 



^- 



Pes. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



21 




The following List has been compiled, expressly for the " Shoe and 
Leather Trades' Chronicle," by G. F. Eedfeen, Patent Agent, i. South- 
street, Fimbury, London, and at Paris and Brussels. 

APPLICATIONS FOR LETTERS PATENT :— 

No. 5j318. F. Cutlan, of Cardiff, for improvements in heel-paring 
machines for boots and shoes, applicable also for 
burnishing. Dated December 18, 1880. 

J, 5328. T. B. Drybrough, of Edinburgh, for improyements in 
the construction of skates, and in boots or shoes 
to which skates are or may be applied. Dated 
December 20, 1830. 

„ 5,334. H. J. Haddon — a communication from B. F. Larrabee, 
of Boston, United States, for improvements in 
machinery for burnishing the heels of boots and 
shoes. Dated December 20, 1880. 

„ 3,341. G. W. Von Nawrocki — a communication from E. 
Fischer, of Kaltwasser, and M. E. Cohn, and 
Wolheim, of Berlin, both in Germany, for im- 
provements in the manufacture of imitation 
leather or leather cloth, and in apparatus therefor. 
Dated December 20, 1880. 

„ 5,359. L. F. de Cuigni&r and J. N. Long, both of Hoxton, 
London, for improvements ia boots and shoes. 
Dated December 21, 1880. 

„ 19. E. Harnett, of Aldershot, Hampshire, for improve- 
ments in boots. Dated January 3, 1881. 

„ 36. H. H. Lake — a communication from J. Hitchcock and 
D. C. Knowlton, both of Boston, United States, 
for improvements in the manufacture of wire nails 
for securing the soles of boots or shoes, and in 
machinery for forming and driving such nails. 
Dated January 4, 1881. 

„ 44. T. E. Hardy, of Battersea, London, for coriacine, or an 
improved artificial leather. Dated January 4, 1881. 

Letters Patent have been issued for the following : — 

No. 2,598. A. Balme and W Hall, both of Leeds, for improve- 
ments in machinery or apparatus employed for 
" lasting " boots and shoes. Dated June 5, 1880. 

„ 2,738. C. D. Abel — a communication from J. and C. Ballats- 
chano and H. Trenk, all of Berlin, for improve- 
ments in tanning hides and materials for that 
purpose. Dated July 5, 1880. 

„ 2,820. C. H. Pugh, of Birmingham, for improvements in 
studs or protectors for the soles and heels of boots 
and shoes and other coverings for the feet. Dated 
July e, 1880. 

„ 2,839. S. F. Cox, of Yattou, Somersetshire, for improvements 
in tanning hides and skins. Dated July 9, 1880. 

„ 3,534. F, Wirth — a communication from C. Heiuzerling, of 
Frankfort, Germany, for improvements in tanning 
or converting hides or skins into leather. Dated 
Au-ust 31, 1880. 

, 3,583. A. M. Clark — a communication from C. J. P. Desnos, 
of Paris, for an improved depilatory process for 
sheep and other skins and hides. Dated September 
3, 1880. 

„ 4,324. S. Haley, of Bromley, near Leeds, for improvements 
in machinery for " fluffing " and " whiting " leather 
skins. Dated October 23, 1880. 

PATENTS WHICH HAVE BECOME VOID :— 

„ 4,701. J. Keighley, of Blackpool, Lancashire, for improve- 
ments in the manufacture of soles for boots and 
shoes. Dated December 11, 1877. 



No. 4,770. G. Jackson, of Leicester, for improvements in the 
manufacture of boots and shoes. Dated December 
15, 1877. 

„ 1. W. E. Lake — a communication from J. Dalton and G. 

Simon, both of New York, United States, for im- 
provements in adjustable heels for boots and shoes. 
Dated January 1, 1878. 

„ 38. H. J. Haddan — a communication from B. F. Larrabee, 

of Lynn, Massachusetts, United States, for improve- 
ments in shoe heel and edge burnishing machinery. 
Dated January 3, 1878. 

Specifications Published During the Month. 
Postage \d. each extra. 



No. 



No. 



1,957. W. A. Barlow, appanatus for the production of 

boot heel irons, &c 8 

2,086. J. Bailey, shoe bi-ushing apparatus 4 

2,107. C. King, boots and shoes ... ... 2 

2,138. W. Clark, heel stiffener for boots and shoes ... 6 
2,158. B. Birnbaum, fastenings for leggings and 

gaiters, &c. ... 4 

2,352. J. W. Jones and E. K. Bridger, metal heels &c., 

of boots and shoes ... 6 

2,364. O. McG. Chamberlain, fastener for boots, shoes, 

&« ... 2 

2,377. W. E. Lake, waterproofing, strengthening, and 

preserving leather, hides, &c.... ... ... 4 

AMERICAN PATENTS. 
Issued and Dated Novemeee 30, 1880. 
234,869. C. H. Helms, Poughkeepsie, N.Y., sole-edge trim- 
Mass., 



234,912. 



lasting 



mer for boots and shoes. 
H. P. Falraeld, West Medford, 

machine. 
„ 234,960. C. E. Clark, Eochester, N.H., lasting jack. 
„ 235,000. W. Miller, Boston, Mass., metallic socket bushing 

for lasts. 
„ 235,050. S. W. Wardwell, jr.. Providence, E. I., manufacture 

of sewed articles of leather. 
„ 235,054. D. W. Gatrall, West Union, W.Va., combined boot 

jack and stand. 

Issued and Dated December 7, 1880. 

No. 235,131. J. W. Cubbage, Gallipolis, Ohio, leather scouring 

and wringing machine. 
„ 235,172. H. P. Eoberts, Jamestown, N.Y., leather skiving 

machine. 
„ 235,249. J. M. Jones, Wrexham, North Wales, England, 

leather fluffing or grounding machine. 
„ 235,262. J. Leycuras, Paris, Fiance, heel for boots and 

shoes. 
„ 235,271. T. McWaters, Washington, D.C., shoe and hame 

fastener. 



No, 



Issued and Dated December 14, 1880. 
235,377 



G. E. Peare, Lynn, Mass., boot and shoe sewing 
machine. 
G. D. Atkins, Erie, Pa., device for exhibiting 



235,402. 

235,442. A. C. Krueger, Chicago, 111., machine for treating 

raw hides. 
235,541. A. Leonard, jr., Plymouth, Mass., shank stiffner for 

boots and shoes. 
235,583. A. Teas, Newark, N.J., machine for cutting leather 

and pasteboard. 

Issued and Dated Dbobmbeh 21, 1880.- 
J. A. Ambler, Natick, Mass., mechanism for abrad- 
ing and polishing boot and shoe soles. (Re- 
issue.) 
J. A. Stockwell, Chicago, 111., toe protector for boots 
and shoes. (Re-issue-) 



No. 9,504. 



9,514. 



It is said that it is about as hard to hide your love as to hide 
a sneese; neither of them can be repressed. 

Conductor (declining a tract which was offered him with his 
fare) : Very much obliged, mum, but we ain't allowed to take 
any perq^uisites whatever mum. 



22 



THE SEWING- MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOITENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1, l88l. 



HINTS TO REPAIRERS. 

(By " Cog-vrlieel," in the Sewing Maehine News.) 
THE WHEELER & WILSON. 

Before removing the cloth-plate from the W. & W. No. 2, 
examine the needJe-arm to see if it is as tight as it should be 
in all joints connected with it, and whether the needle plays truly 
in the centre of the hole in the cloth plate. At the same time 
be careful to see that the needle plajs as near to the point of 
the rotary hook as possible without touching it. The four 
poults concerned in holding the needle-arm steady are : The 
screws in the eccentric under the cloth-plate ; the screws in 
the joint of the short lever ; and the two set-screws upon which 
the rook-shaft hangs. Take hold of the forward end of the 
needle-arm and try if it will shake up and down. If it is loose, 
ascertain at what point the correction must be made. It will 
not answer to do this by guess, because if any one point be 
tightened more than is required to steady the parts and keep 
them from rattling, the machine will run too heavily. Close 
them up carefully, untU no looseness in the needle-ai-m can be 
felt. 

After adjusting the set-screw in the hinge of the short lever 
as tightly as perfect freedom of motion in the hinge will admit 
of, we come to an adjustment of the short ^lever upon the 
rock-shaft, of vital importance to the perfect operation of the 
machine. To do this readily and with certainty, every teacher 
or adjuster should be provided with a gauge, by which to 
adjust the play of the needle-arm both upward and downward. 
TUs is governed entirely by the position of the short lever on 
the rook-shaft. 

New machines are generally set right in this respect, but 
old ones frequently need resetting. The gauge should have 
two points, defining respectively the exact limits of both the 
upward and downward play of the needle-arm. The upper 
and lower edges of the needle-yoke should be made to touch 
two points of the gauge as the latter stands upon the cloth- 
plate. The downward play must be exactly according to the 
gauge ; the upper may vary a little without material injury. 
In order to give the proper upward play to the needle-arm it 
is sometimes necessary to put a small bit of card paper between 
the upper edge of the rock-shaft and the short lever; but as 
this takes off part of its downward motion, it is necessary to 
slip the short lever a little higher up on the rook-shaft in order 
to restore this before tightening the screws. In tightening 
this screw care must be used to have the short lever exactly 
plumb and true. 

TIMING THE MACHINE. 

Timing the machine, as it is technically called, or, in popular 
language, harmonising its movements, like the tuning of a 
musical iiastrument, is of vital importance, and should always 
be done with the most scrupulous exactness. The needle-arm 
having been carefuUy adjusted by the gauge, and the needle 
properly set, you may first apply a test of the timing it has 
ah-eady received. This may be done by sewing two pieces of 
cotton cloth together, and carefully watching the loop as it is 
cast off the rotating hook. Sew an inch or two at an ordinary 
speed, and then slacken up to a very slow motion, so that you 
can stop at the very instant the loop falls over the cast-off. At 
that point look out for the eye of the needle. If it stands the 
thickness of your needle-wrench above the cloth you are sew- 
ing, it is right. If the eye is more than this above the cloth 
the time is said to be too fast ; that is, the loop falls oii too 
quickly, or before the needle has had time to reach its proper 
position. Loosen the screws in the pulley, and set the rotating 
hook a little back. 

Continue this test, and this correction — moving the hook 
forward or backward, as may be required — untU the proper 
adjustment is reached, 

THE LOOP-CHECKS. 
Their use is, as their name indicates, to check the motion of 
the large loop of the upper thread as it is being carried around 
the bobbin by the rotating hook, imtU the point of the hook 
enters another loop just then being formed at the needle : In 
order to check the motion of this large loop effectually, it is 
necessary that the loop-check shall rub gently against the 
periphery of the hook upon which the loop lies. The loop is 
thus held back an instant, while the hook moves on to take 



another loop from the needle. Provision is made for the release 
of the loop at the proper moment by a bevelled portion of the 
hook, which does not touch the loop-check and thus afford 
space for the thread to pass between that and the hook. If 
from any cause, such as the wearing of the loop-check, or from 
being moved out of its place, it fails to check the loop, the loop 
will be caught a second time by the hook, and the machuie will 
stop, or the thread will break with a jar that you can hear. 

When the thread breaks from this cause, yo^r may always 
know it by the jar, as well as by the break always occurring 
about two inches from the needle. To correct this, move the 
loop-check a little closer to the rotating hook, so that it wOl 
rub against it, and hold back the loop until the hook moves 
forward to the needle. 

The brush should never be pushed up so far as to bend the 
bristles out to the side of the hook. The loop should be free 
to pass on so soon as the beveled part of the hook begins to 
show itself above the brush. If the brush should hold on to 
the loop longer than this it will cause loose stitches or loops to 
appear on the under side of the work. By closely watching 
the action of the brush on the loop while a few stitches are 
being sewed it can readily be seen when the loop is held too 
long. The brush segment should be about a quarter of an inch 
from the bed-plate. 

In old machines the needle-hole in the cloth-plate is often 
found to be worn into a notch on the far side of the hole by 
the action of the thi-ead and needle. This notch is sometimes 
so deep as to catch and hold the loop of the thread and stop 
the work from feeding forward: Sometimes it only catches the 
loop occasionally, holding it long enough to permit its being 
drawn up, and then letting it go, thus causing loops at inter- 
vals along the sewing. This notch, and any other roughness 
about the needle-hole must be removed, or a new plate, or 
plate-slide, substituted. 

Have the tension in all its parts clean and free from oil. 
Examine the slide-ring, see that it is not too tight or too loose 
for the bobbin. 

If one or both of the rounded portions always found between 
the inlet and outlet bevels of new slide-rings are found on the 
old ones to be worn off, they had better be rejected, as no ad- 
justment of other parts, however perfect, will compensate for 
the want of a good slide-ring. 

THE "take-up" of SHTJTTLE MACHINE.S. 

To understand the "take-up," get a sewing machine in 
position, ready for use; then turn slowly and observe that as 
the needle descends the "take-up" holds the thread tight, 
until the eye is about to go through the cloth, and just as 
the eye is directly at the surface of the cloth, the " take-up " 
descends with the thread slack, and moves through the 
material down the long groove side of the needle. The loop 
forms and enlarges as the shuttle passes through, and the 
" take-up " draws up the slack thread. 

While the loop is forming, the check-lever or take-up is 
held down until the point of the shuttle approaches the 
needle. When the needle rises the " take-up " follows. 

If the " take-up " gives a slack thread before the point of 
the needle enters the goods, the stitch will be knotted and 
zig-zag. If the action of the "take-up" is not studied by 
beginners, it will be rather difficult for them to manage an old 
American Davis, or Grover and Baker. 

To adjust the Singer " take-up " properly, first pass a 
thread through the eye of the needle, then place under the 
needle, in proper position for sewing, a piece of cloth ; then 
let the needle descend untU the thread in its eye is directly at 
the upper surface of the cloth, and bring the rod in the needle- 
bar flush with the upper surf ace of the check -lever. Having 
learned the principle of the "take-up "on the Singer you will be 
able to understand that of all other shuttle machines. . 

CLEANING SEWING MACHINES. 

Kerosene oil or benzine are probably the best things known for 
the purpose of cleaning machines. When articles have become 
pitted by rust, however, these can, of course, only be removed' 
by mechanical means, such as scouring with fine powder or 
flour of emery or emery-cloth. 

POLISHING. 

The best method is performed by the use of crocus on a buff 



■i 



Fbb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



23 



wheel ; nothing can exceed the beauty imparted to steel by 
this process. There is no excuse for the repairers who do not 
get up a polishing machine. Polishing sticks are made by 
sticking emery-cloth to various sizes and shapes of sticks. To 
put emery on iron wheels, first give the wheel a good coating 
of oil and white lead, and when this gets dry, apply a mixture 
of glue and emery. 

EMEBT STBING3 AND POINTED STICKS. 

These]| are used for smoothing out needle-plates, thread- 
guides, f&c. Melt some good glue, dip any desired length or 
size of fishing cord in the glue, then lay it out on a board, 
cover it with emery powder, let it lay for twenty-four hours, 
then wipe off any loose emery. Pointed sticks go through the 
same process. Somo hammer the emery into the wood ; it is 
claimed that by this means it cuts better and lasts longer. 

POLISHING AND DRILLING MACHINES. 

Some repairers often wish for a polishing and drilling 
machine. Something that could be made without going to 
much expense. To make one at a small cost follow these 
instructions and it will also do the work of a lathe. 

Take an old Wheeler and Wilson No. 2, take out every 
piece excepting the rotating hook, shaft and spindle, block the 
bed-plate up about four inches, force on a six- inch wooden 
polishing wheel on the sjaindle, as far as the bed of the machine 
wUl admit, put on an inch washer, then make a chuck to 
screw up against the washer, and cut off the remauiing spindle. 
After that is done the rest will suggest itself. 

funk's method of EE-PLATING BEASS SLIDES, AND OTHER 
BEASS PORTIONS OF SEWING MACHINES. 

The article to be plated is first rubbed with fine emery cloth, 
then a second i-ubbing with muriate of zinc, so as to have it 
clean of spots. Then heat the article to melting point of tin, 
put on a small piece of block tin, and rub it around where you 
want it plated, v>^th an oiled swab. The plating appears as 
beautiful as if sUvered. It can be burnished just the same as 
sQver. 

The heating of the article can be done over an alcohol lamp 
or a gas jet. A charcoal fire is the best. 

SOLDERING. 

Where gas is not used have on hand an alcohol lamp. In 
using the lamp roll out the solder or beat in thin pieces, lay 
them on the place to be mended, and hold the article over the 
flame ; heat it sufficiently to melt the solder ; when it melts, it 
will spread wherever the acid or rosin is applied. Fine solder 
consists of ten parts of tin and one of lead. The flux used to 
make the solder adhere and flow is made by putting all the 
zinc in muriatic acid that it will cut. 



AMERICAN PATENT OFFICE REPORT 
FOR 1879. 

The annual report of the Commissioner of Patents for the 
year 1879 has just been issued. In glancing over the issued 
patents for sewing machines and accessories, we find the 
following, which does not include all. 

Sewing and embroidering machines, 3 ; se\ving machines, 33 ; 
button-hole sewing machines, 4 ; button-hole attachments for 
sewing machines, 8 ; sewing machines darning attachments, 4 ; 
sewing machines for double-ohain-stitoh, 1 ; sewing machines 
embroidering attachments, 1 ; sewing machines feeding device, 
4 ; sewing machines for embroidering, 2 ; sewing machine 
motor, 2 ; sewing machine needles, 3 ; sewing machine needle- 
bar, 21 ; sewing machine over-seaming attachment, 1 ; sewing- 
machine plaiting attachment, 1 ; sewing machines quilting 
attachment, 2 ; revolving shuttle sewing machine, 1 ; sewing 
machine i-ufiing attachments, 2 ; sewing machine shuttles, 3 ; 
sewing machine take-up device, 1 ; sewing machine treadles, 
6 ; sewing machine trimming attachments, 6 ; wax-thread 
sewing machine, 2 ; zigzag-stitch se^ving machine 1 ; tuck- 
markers, 2 ; tuckers, 3. Also nine re-issues, and two trade 
marks. In knitting machines and accessories, thirty-three 
were granted. The number of patents issued m that year was 
2,0771, of which 146 related to sewing machines and attach- 
ments. 



BICYCLING- IN AMERICA. 

" In the New York Herald are the folio-wing few Knes : — ' A 
party of English bicyclists propose to -visit the principal cities 
of the United States on their machines. If they come, great 
will be the rejoicing of the blacksmiths along the route. The 
boys should inform themselves about our roads before they buy 
their tickets.' 

" Respecting the above I should like to say a few words. 
America is not England, and whilst the bicyclist could travel hun- 
dreds of miles at a time in England, Scotland, or Wales, he 
could not travel ten miles straight on any road in America. 
There is no such thing as a good road for any distance through- 
out the United States. 

" In New York city he might be able to ride the great dis- 
tance of two Miles on a good road, that is, a road on which a 
bicycle coulA travel, but the streets in American cities generally 
are a disgrnse to civilisation ; and what can you expect of 
country places ? If a tricycle or bicycle can be made to go 
into deep ruts, and out again up steep hills, like the side of a 
house, two feet deep in mud, then let the cyclist midertake the 
joui-ney, not othersvise. Let the cyclist also remember that 
our cities are hundreds of miles apart. As regards the 
bicj'clist's personal comfort, let me strongly ad-vise him to 
bring the following -with him, as he never can see them here : 
Bread, butter, matches, and fusees. The stuff sold as bread is 
of a spongy substance, and a man could easily eat a loaf of it 
without kno-wing it. The butter is mostly made at Chicago of 
tallow, or rather suet. There is only one kind of light sold, 
and that is the match made out of a rough piece of wood, -with 
brimstone at the end, exactly the same as used in England 
twenty or thirty years ago, while fusees are unused here. 

"After you leave New York comfort is imknown. The 
bicyclist on his journey through the States -will hear as much, 
if not more, German spoken than English ; so he had better 
lay by a good stock of this language. During his journey he 
will meet "with the greatest kindness from the inhabitants ; the 
Americans are a most kind-hearted and thoughtfid people. He 
will see the most magnificent scenery if he goes from New 
York to the Wondrous city (Chicago), for instance. If he 
wants to see beautiful cities, he must visit New York, Chicago, 
Cincinnati, and Denver. He will then -view magnificent 
mansions, but bad streets. If he goes SVest he must not be 
afraid of being shot. This is a friendly way they have of 
greeting each other as you go westwards. He must not be 
struck at what he would consider cheek in England. -In 
America all are equal, and the English bicyclist may often 
come across a cow boy who is so well educated that he can 
speak, read, and -write four or five different languages. — Yours 
respectfully, " BlEMINGHAM TRAVELLER. 

" 558, West 36th Street, New York, January 6." 



ELECTRICITY AS POWER, LIGHT, AND HEAT. 

Under the auspices of the Cleveland Institute of Engineers, 
an address was delivered at Middlesbrough on Monday, the 
24th ult., by Mr. James N. Shoolbred, B.A., M.I.C.E. The 
illustrations used included a Siemens light, a Crompton lamp, 
a Gramme machine, and a number of Swan's lamps, for which 
the ciu-rent was supplied from a Gramme machine when not 
working the Crompton lamp. The transmission of power was 
illustrated by a saw-bench, driven by a Siemens machine, 
which received its power from another Siemens machine. There 
was also a small printing-press actuated in a similar way, the 
primary power being supplied by a steam-engine, kindly lent 
by the Middlesbrough Corporation. That part of the address 
referring to the smelting of ore in the Siemens furnace was 
keenly examined. It was pointed out that the operation of 
smelling in that way was performed in about a quarter of the 
time employed in other methods. One pound weight of 
broken files was melted in thirteen minutes. It was shown 
that as to the efficiency of the furnace its power was about 
on a par with that of the regenerator gas furnace in 
melting steel. For instance, to melt a ton of steel 
a crucible required 2;^ to 3 tons of Durham coke ; the regene- 
rator gas furnace required one ton of coal, and the open- 
hearth furnace required 12cwt. of the saaie. This was a direct 



24 



THE SEWING MA.OHINE GAZETTE AND JOXTENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb; 1, 188i. 



appeal to the interests of iron-masters, or rather steel pro- 
ducers, in Cleveland. Eeferring to Swan's (Newcastle) lamps, 
the lecturer explained that they produced incandescent lights. 
Other lamps worked with what was termed the voltaic arc, 
which was the highest development of the electric light, incan- 
descent light having a less intense effect. The difference 
between the two was such that the latter produced an equiva- 
lent of 150 candles per horse-power, and the former from 1,000 
to 1,200 candles hght per horse-power. Treating of carbons, 
the lecturer said there was an increasing number of makers, 
greater homogeneity in product, and a lowering of price ; but 
the chief probable improvement would be due to a combination 
of different size and quality, tending to a reduction in 
consumption and working expenses. General confidence 
had been established in this system of public light- 
ino-. Public companies would be set on foot for the 
distribution of these lights, while the legal impediments 
would be removed by application to Parliament from 
different parts of the country, when the Government might be 
expected to grant its permission. Local Corporations had no 
inherent power for such a purpose, as they had in the case of 
gas and water. The lecturer gave a scientific explanation of 
the electric light, including the means used for the generation 
and the utilisation of the magneto-electric current in the pro- 
duction of light. There has been a growing recognition of the 
fact that the magneto-electric current could be successfully 
and economically used in some circumstances in i,he reproduc- 
tion of motor-power by means of its introduction. One of 
the most important points in the address as affecting the 
Association of Engineers referred to the motor-power of 
electricity. It was shown that electricity could be transmitted 
in such a way as to utilise a sti-eam of water three or four 
miles from a given centre of operation by a current of elec- 
tricity ; also that in the case of a mine which was more or less 
inaccessible, power could be transmitted by the same means to 
the existing machinery. It was shown that at the Berlin 
Exhibition last year three or four tram-cars were run, contain- 
ing 15 to 20 passengers. Each was propelled at a rate of 15 
to 20 miles an hour up an incline. At the termination of the 
address there was an interesting discussion. — Mr. Harrison, 
agent for Mr. Siemens at Newcastle, referred to the Siemens 
lights used at Bolokow, Vaughan and Co.'s works, Eston. 
He said there were twelve at work, which cost Gi. per light 
per hour, including men's time, coal, oil, and waste. — 
Mr. Head, ironmaster, described his experience of Swan's 
light, as seen at Sir WilKam Armstrong's residence 
at Eothbury, Northumberland. They had reason to be 
proud of Mr. Swan, as a North countryman who had solved the 
problem of using the light domestically, without waiting for 
an American to do so. Sir W. Armstrong was the first person 
who had actually applied the new Hght for domestic purposes. 
Near his residence there was a stream running, which turned 
a turbine which drove a dynamo-electric machine at his resi- 
dence. There were 40 electric lamps, but only 37 of them were 
used at a time. Each lamp was in power equal to 37 candles, 
and could light all the lamps in two or three rooms, or throw 
the power all into one room. In the large library, reading at 
night by a single lamp was a simple matter, and the pictures 
just looked as in the daytime. The light was perfectly steady 
and harmless to the eyes. Mr. Head suggested the utilisation 
of gas in gas engines as a motor for an electric 
lighting power. It was certain that a great proportion 
of the gas used ordinarily was wasted in the form of 
heat not wanted. In this way such gas could be utilised. 
In the case of the Swan light there was a great loss in the 
burning by incandescent light from the subdivision of the 
same, but it conferred a great boon on the country. Mr. Head 
finally referred to the miner's lamp (Swan's) exhibited iii the 
hall, which he said was calculated, from its complete immunity 
from causing danger in a coal-mine, to revolutionise the coal 
trade. Mr . Shoolbred, miner, afterwards exxjlained that it was 
not free from danger, owing to the possibility of a fall of stone 
breaking the lamp and coil, and so causing an explosion. 



"John, what is that scar on your chin ?" That scar? 
Oh, that's a relic of barbarism." 



OPEN MEETING OE THE BICYCLE UNION. 

The objection to this Union as professing to do its business 
m a hole-and-corner way camiot now be raised, as the meetings 
henceforth will be open, and all the world may know what is 
mooted and what, decided at them. This is as it should be. The 
meeting of the executive took place last week at the Manchester 
Hotel, Aldersgate- street, when a moderate company of dele- 
gates and visitors were present, the following clubs being 
represented on the council : — Lombard, Cambridge University, 
London, Canonhury, Sevenoaks, Eye, Surrey, I Zingari, 
Belsize, Metropolitan, Druids, Pickwick, "Westminster, Arion, 
and Highbury. 

Mr. Scrutton (Cambridge University), took the chair, and 
after the hon. sec, Mr. R. T. Cook, had read the minutes of the 
previous meeting, the business of the evening proceeded as 
follows : — 

Mr. Beningfield moved the first resolution, which was : — 
" That all subscriptions paid between the 1st January and the 
30th April, in any year, shall constitute membership until the 
30th April in the ensuing year, but that clubs so paying their 
capitation shall make a retm-n of the number of their members 
on the 30th April in the year in which subscription is paid, and 
shall pay for any additional members according to Eule 3, sec. 
S." 'This was seconded by Mr. Godlee, and ultimately carried. 
The report of the executive to the council was ordered to be 
taken as read, and on the proposal of Mr. Enghsh, seconded by 
Mr. H. Turner, was adopted. 

Then followed the introduction of the French amateur 
question, in connection \vith which Mr. E. T. Cook proposed 
" That the CounoU of the Bicycle Union camiot recognise as an 
amateur bicychst any rider who has infringed their definition 
of an amateur whether in the United Kingdom or elsewhere ; " 
and "That in the event of any foreign bicycle association 
admitting the Bicycle Union definition of an amateur, and 
condoning their past offence in their country, the Bicycle Union 
will be prepared to condone the offence." Mr. Cook intimated 
that he had corresponded with several Frenchmen upon the 
subject, which was one requii'uig a speedy settlement, but 
apparently opinion differed widely upon the matter in different 
parts of ^France. In the North of France cyclists were willing 
to accede to the ruling of the Union, while in the south it 
seemed to be the pi-evalent opinion that a gentleman rider 
should be allowed to " melt his pots " and race for money to 
the tune of his out-of-pocket expenses and still remain an 
amateur. Mr. Beningfield, in seconding the resolution, pleaded 
very hard in favour of those Frenchmen having " forgiveness" 
allotted them who were ready and willing to beg for it. Mr. 
Griffin attempted to draw a similarity between the proposed 
action of the executive and those effected by the skating 
and swimming associations in the past. Mr. "WiUiams 
considered it would be derogatory in the eyes of the 
athletic world to allow foreign amateurs to compete 
agamst professionals. Mr. BlaokweU thought the example of 
the Skating Association in condoning past offences should be 
followed. The Chaii-man was afraid the Amateiu- Athletic 
Association woidd hardly agree to this. Mr. Goodman washed 
to know whether Frenchmen would not want to institute 
similar amateur-professional contests to those sanctioned by 
thp executive in England. Mr. Sargent considered that this 
opened up a very wide point, and without a doubt they would 
engage in these kinds of races. Mr. Trotter suggested that the 
French would have a right to do so as long as no prizes were 
given. The Chairman intimated that the necessary power for 
holding this kind of contest in France would be given, but only 
conditionally that it is not abused. The hon. sec, in replying 
ui^on the whole question, remarked that Frenchmen held an 
entirely wrong idea as to the meaning of the word amateur, 
and they thought it was used as some sort of a social dis- 
tinction, whereas; as a matter of fact, it was a simple line 
di-awn to designate those who raced for profit from those who 
raced without it. This he had explained in his last communi- 
cation to the authorities, and he hoped if his resolution wer-e 
passed that the whole thing would be amicably settled at the 
Union Velocixiedique Francaise to be held on February 5. The 
resolutions were carried, and a copy ordered to be sent to the 
Amateur Athletic Association. 

The following resolution was, after a lengthy discussion, 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



25 



duly passed : — " That the following clause be added to the 
definition of an amateur : ' Bicyclists are cautioned that pace- 
making wUl be considered as included in the term competing, 
clause f.' " The meeting was then called upon to consider the 
proposition of Mr. J. W. Beningfield, "That in the opinion of 
the council it would be for the benefit of bicyclists to have 
rmifonn regiilations for bicycle riding throughout the country, 
and that the executive be dii'ected to take such steps as they 
may deem best to obtain this result." Mr. Beningfield, in in- 
troducing this subject, explained that it was necessary for 
bicyclists to go to Parliament for the purpose of obtaining 
uniform bye-laws for the whole countiy. Great inconvenience 
was experienced by the riders passing through eight or ten 
counties, each having different road regulations. Every 
bicycUst, he contended, was willing to carry both lamp and 
bell, but there were certain little fidgety details which it was 
necessary to have expunged before long toirring could be 
engaged in with any amount of comfort. There was a 
chance of the Lords making certain alterations in the 
Highways Act, 1878, shortly, and then would be the 
time to reqmsition them in favour of improvements in 
the laws. Mr. English seconded the resolution. Mr. Goodon 
thought the best means of achieving anything like good results 
would be to try and gain the influence of the many members of 
Parliament who preside over bicycle clubs, &c. Mr. Eoimd 
hoped before the executive moved dii-eotly in the matter a 
really model set of bye-laws would be dra'vvn up and submitted 
to the whole body of bicyclists, not to have the thing settled 
without the general opiirion and consent of riders being first 
obtained. The resolution being put from the chair, was carried 
unanimously. Mr. Trotter then resigned his position on the 
executive, on account of not having the time to attend the 
meetmgs. The resignation being accepted Tvith regret, Mr. 
Sorutton was unanimously appointed to the vacancy. Mr. 
Blackwell put a question as to whether the executive intended 
to take any action with regard to the rise m railway charges. Mr. 
Beningfield midertook to bring it before the committee at their 
next sitting. A vote of thanks having been passed to the 
chairman, the meeting terminated. 



THE NINE HOURS' SYSTEM AND FOREIGN 
COMPETITION. 

A grievance often urged by manufacturers that the nresent 
system of short hours makes it impossible for them to compete 
with their foreign rivals, came once more up for discussion at 
the last meeting of the Derby Chamber of Commerce. The 
subject was introduced by Mr. Peters, who moved that the 
representatives of the Derby Chamber be requested to support 
the following resolution at tbe annual meeting of the Asso- 
ciated Chambers :—" That in the opinion of this Association 
the restrictions imposed by the Factory Act on the labour of 
women, young persons, and cbildren operate with such serious 
disadvantage on those manufactures in which such labour 
forms an important element, that some of these latter have 
become extinct, or nearly so, in this country ; and that the 
necessity for such restrictions is, at least, diminished by the 
compulsory enforcement of attendance at school. That a com- 
mittee be appointed, consisting of manufacturers in every im- 
portant branch of British industry, to inquire into and report 
on the efi'ect produced by the reduction of the week's work to 
fifty-four hours, and on the ability of British manufacturers 
to compete with their rivals in countries where much longer 
hours prevail." Mr. Peters said that his object in moving this 
resolution was to strike at the root of the existing evil and to 
open the eyes of the coimtry as to the true state of affairs. 
Under the present system they could not be expected to com- 
pete with foreign countries. Let them look at Bradford, where 
trade was crippled to a serious extent, and compare that 
state of things with the trade of France and Germany, in which 
countries the hands were working full time and overtime. In 
Germany they could afford to dye articles at a rate of J>5 per 
cent. cheaperthaninEngland, and that trade must inevitably be 
taken entirely out of this country if thtre were not some altera- 
tion in the hours of labour. In Germany they worked seventy- 
two hours a week, whilst in England they were only allowed 
to employ their hands fifty-four. He did'not want the working 



men to earn less wages, but he did say that nine hours a day 
was far too short a time. He hoped the Derby Chamber 
would support him, although he was afraid that in London it 
would have no chance of passing. Alderman Longdon said he 
seconded the resolution, adding that he could endorse all that 
Mr. Peters had said m moving it. It was their duty to show 
the working men that they were placing themselves in a false 
position, for the trade would slip through their fingers, and go 
into foreign countries. Hon. F. Strutt said he did not propose 
to move an amendment, but still he thought they could hardly 
extend the hours of labour. However, he thought it was a 
right thing to call attention to the fact that they had not 
free laboiu', for what with the Factory Act and what with the 
Education Act, they had to be exceedingly careful, or else they 
would infringe the law. Alderman Hobson said such an 
alteration as they contemplated did not necessarily mean that 
they were to keep to the same wages they now paid, and the 
working men would therefore benefit in competition ■\\'ith 
the present arrangement. The resolution was xdtimately 
carried. 



WHAT CONSTITUTES BEAUTY IN DRAWING ? 

Beautiful drawing consists in exactly expressing the form 
and the nature of the object to be drawn. If it is a leaf or a 
flower, the diawing should be light and delicate. If a branch 
or bough of a tree, it should be firm, and free, and springy ; 
if of rocks, it will be decided, perhaps hard ; if of the human 
form, it should be firm yet flexible ; if of drapery, it must 
possess a freedom, a loose quality, according to the nature of 
the material of which the drapery is composed ; if of the face 
and expression, then the utmost delicacy and refinement is 
necessary. So we see in the first place, how a good draughts- 
man suits the handling of his pencil, or his brush (for paint- 
ing is only drawing with a brush full of colour) to the nature 
of the object he is drawing; and hence we perceive that beauti- 
ful drawing is not a mechanical process, but a mental one. 
Bad drawing is merely mechanical ; a bad draughtsman takes 
no pains to distinguish the character of one thing from another ; 
there is no expression in his work ; it is clumsy, without 
thought, and of little value. In a recent lecture, Mr. G. A. 
Storey, A.R.A., pointed out that in Nature's drawing there is 
a meaning in every variation of her outlines — she seems to have 
to think about it a good deal — if she is drawing a bough of a 
tree, she makes it start away from the stem, with a bold curve 
outwards, and generally upwards, expressive of the strength 
that will be required to bear its burden of leaves and fruit, &c. ; 
and then, perhaps, it has to fight its way through other boughs 
and branches, and a sort of struggle for existence goes on, 
and yet in very good fellowship ; the different boughs turn 
aside, and aside again, to accommodate themselves to each 
other in a polite way, as if they were saying, "After 3'ou, sir," 
and so, by many gentle curves and delicate turns, and a running 
straight forward when they can get a chance, their whole 
idea and intention being to get as much light, and air, and 
moisture as possible. And thus Nature, from the very neces- 
sity of the thing, from its very fitness or adaptability to its 
purpose, founds her art of beautiful drawing. 

Mr. Euskin tells us that " Graceful curvature is distin- 
guished from ungracefid by two characters ; first, its modera- 
tion — that is to say, its close approach to straightness in some 
parts of its course — and secondly, by its never remaining equal 
in degree at diti'erent parts of its course." He further tells us 
— "that this variation is twofold in all good curves ; there is 
first a steady change throughout the whole line from less to 
more curvature or more to less, so that no part of the line is a 
segment of a circle, or can be draWTi by compasses in any way 
whatever." Thus one example is a bad curve, because part of 
a circle, and is therefore monotonous throughout ; another 
is a good curve, because it continually changes its 
direction as it proceeds. Now, in this Greek vase, we have 
an instance of how ingeniously man can adapt and mould 
the great truths of Nature to the purposes of art, and hero we 
have an epitome of good drawing. If we carefully study all 
the most beautiful forms of Nature — or let us for the moment 
call them the most pleasing — we shall find that their outlines, 
though varied and distinct, have certain qualities which are 



26 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOITRNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIAJlfCES. 



Ebb. 1, 1881. 



universal ; there is an emphasis more or less great in all 
beautiful curves, sometimes it is again but faintly eohoerl, but 
these characteristics are invariable throughout Nature in all 
her important works. 

But Nature is not content with drawing one beautiful line, 
she must draw another, also beautiful in itself, which shall, by 
its contrast, show off the beauty of the other one, and herein 
lies the great prevailing law of the Beautiful in art, that each 
part of a work is designed so as to advantage the rest, and it 
would be well if this could be carried out in life ; at all events, 
this is the great doctrme of true art. The straight line and 
the circle enter largely into the composition of beautiful 
designs, although it is said that they are not bcriutifulin them- 
selves, on account of their monotony. Bvit the straight line 
steadies every composilion of other lines, and gives value to 
beautiful curves, for it shows off their grace by contrast, 
and the circle is an exact foil to straightness, and wheji 
judiciously introduced, as in architecture, gives in its turn 
great value to the straight lines and square forms of a 
building. The fret patterns, which are favourite Greek orna- 
ments, show us the beauty of straight lines. Straight lines 
vary only in length, and this key pattern gives us that variety 
in a beautifully-proportioned figme. It pleases us on account 
of its unity and its variety (two of the great laws of the 
Beautiful), and because it brings out the one quality of infinity 
which straight lines possess, namel}', variation in length; and 
note that the frets are not square, but oblong, and therefore 
capable of a greater degree of variety; and this again is broken 
at intervals by a squai'e and a different pattern, sometimes 
containing a circle showing the value of contrast, which is 
another of the great laws of composition ; and note that, being 
on a round surface, each fret appears to decrease in length as 
we follow it round the vase, which again increases its beauty 
by gradation. If we study the celebrated Campanile at 
Florence, by Giotto, we shall see how exquisitely beautiful a 
design composed of straight lines may be made by an artist of 
taste. 



ELECTEIG LIGHTING. 
A new electric lamp has been brought out in Paris. It 
is a combmation of the Werdermann with a perforated 
carbon filled by an insulating medium. It is said to 
work well. — Arrangements have just been completed with 
the British Electric Light Company for the experimental 
lighting of certain important parts of the General Post 
Office, St. Martin's-le-Grand. The first series of the experi- 
ments will be conducted in the telegraph instrument galleries. 
"The Search for the Carbons" may possibly be the title of 
some future story of adventure. Eeference has already been 
made in our columns to Mr. Edison's difficulties in endeavour- 
ing to discover a sufficiently homogenous fibre for the incande- 
scent carbon loops of his electric lamp, and to the statements 
that the American inventor has despatched agents to Brazil, 
Japan, and elsewhere, to search for plants capable of 
yielding the required material. The Japan Mail 

states that the agent for that part of the globe had already 
made large collections in Japan, and was about to leave for 

China and more southern regions on the same business. 

The experiment of lighting the streets of Bristol has been pro- 
nounced a success. Six temporary lights were erected — one 
oijposite the Grand Hotel, one over the pump in Wine-street, 
one at the top of Corn- street, one opposite the Commercial 
Rooms, one in High-street, and one over the four lamps by 
Bristol Bridge. The engine with which the wires are connected 
is at the bottom of Broad-street. It is a gas engine of 12 
horse-power, but only half its force wlU be required to feed 
the six-light machine tried. The apparatus is what is known 

as the " 5 B " Brush dynamo machine. An arrangement has 

been made with the Brush Electric Light Company and the 
Sewers Commissioners to lay down the requisite wires in Vine- 
street, York-road, and along Stamford-street, near Waterloo- 
station, London, for Hghtiug those streets. 



A negro boy was driving a mule in Jamaica, when the 
animal suddenly stopped and refused to budge. " Wc'n't go, 
eh ? " said the boy. " Peel grand, do you ? I s'pose you forget 
your fadder was a jackass." 



EXTENSION OF THE FACTORY ACT. 
The Secretary of State has extended the special prohibi- 
tion contained in the factory act, to the eflfect that a child, 
young person, or woman shall not be allowed to take a meal, 
or to remain during the times allowed for meals, in the parts 
of the factories or workshops to which the section applies to 
the following among other places : — " Every part of a factory 
or workshop in which wool or hair is sorted or dusted, or in 
which rags are sorted, dusted, or ground. Every part of a 
textile factory in which part gassing is carried on. Every part 
of a printwork, bleachwork, or dyework in which part singeing 
is carried on. Every part of a factory or workshop in which 
jjart any of the following processes are carried on : — Grinding, 
glazing, or polishing on a wheel ; brass-casting ; dipping 
metals in aquafortis, or other acid solution, metal-bronzing, 
majolica painting on earthenware, catgut cleansing and pre- 
paring ; cutting, turning, polishing bones, ivory, pearl-shell, 
snail-shell." 



THE 

ECK BUILDING SOCIETY'S ANNUAL 
RECEIPTS EXCEED FOUR M ILLIONS. 

How to Purchase a House for 
Two Guineas per Month, 

With Immediate Possession and no Rent to pay. — Apply at 
the Office of the Birkbeck Building Society, 29 and 30, 
Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane. 

How to Purchase a Plot of Land 
for Five Shillings per Month, 

With Immediate Possession, either for Building or Gardening 
])urposes. Apply at the Office of the Birkbeck Fkeeiiold 
Land Society, 29 & 30, Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane. 

How to Invest your Money with 
Safety, 

Apply at the Office of the Birkbeck Bank, 29 and 30, 
Southampton Buildings, Chancery Lane. Deposits received 
at varying rates of interest for stated periods or repayable 
on demand. 

Current Accounts opened, and Interest allowed on the 
minimum monthly balances. English and Foreign Stocks and 
Shares purchased and sold, and Advances made thereon. 

Office Hours from 10 to 4 ; except on Saturdays, when the 
Bank closes at 2 o'clock. On Mondays the Bank is open until 
9 o'clock in the Evening. 

A Pamphlet with full particulars may he had on amplication. 

Francis Bavenscroft, Manager 



TO INVENTORS. GENERAL PATENT OFFICE 

Established 1830. 



G. F. R 



F E R 



(Successor to L. De Fontainemoreau iSf Co.), 
4, SOUTH STREET, FINSBURY, LONDON; 

ALSO AT 

Provisional Protection, £7; French Patent, £7; Belgian, £3- 

German, ^eiO lOs. j United States, £17 lOs. Designs and Trad* 

Marks Registe red. Cirpu lar gratis on applicatiou. 



Feb. 1. 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUKNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 27 



EXHIBITION 



OF 



Domestic Labour-Saving Appliances 

AND ALL ARTICLES INTENDED FOR THE PROMOTION OF 



TO BE HELD AT THE 



AGRICULTURAL HALL, LONDON, 

March 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17, 

18 81. 



This Exhibition will comprise all Appliances for Economising Domestic Labour, 
for the promotion of Domestic Thrift, and enhancing the hygienic comfort and pleasure 
of the Household, including all the latest inventions and novelties for Lighting, Warming, 
Ventilating, Cooking, Cleaning, Washing, Sewing, Gardening, and Recreation ; as for 
example : — 

Chandeliers, Lamps, Stoves, Grates, and Tubular Warming 
Arrangements. 

Water-closets, Sanitary Appliances, Disinfectants, Electric and 
Pneumatic Bells, Venetian Blinds, Encaustic Tiles, Venti- 
lators, &c. 

Mincing and Sausage-making Machinery, Filters, Dairy 
Utensils, Kitchen Ranges, Gas and Oil Cooking Stoves, &c., 
&c., Mineral and Vegetable Oils. 

V/ashing, V/ringing, Mangling, Boot, and Knife Cleaning 
Machinery, Emery Powders, Soap Extracts, Blackings,. 
Furniture and other Polishes. 

Toilet Requisites, Perfumery, Brushes, Soaps, Hair Washes, &c. 

Se^A^ing, Knitting, and Kilting Machinery^ Cottons, Threads^ 
Silks, Needles, &c. 

Furniture, Carpets, Kamptulicon, Cortieine, Oilcloths, &c. 

Conservatory, Green House and Garden Appliances, Lawn 
Mowers, Garden Seats, Garden Hose, &c. 

Stable Fittings and Appliances, Harness, Horse Groomers,, 
Clippers, Medicine, &c. 

Musical Instruments, Pianofortes, Organs, Musical Boxes, &c. 
Outdoor and Indoor Games — Cricket, Croquet, Lawn Tennis,, 
Table Billiards, Puzzles, &c., &c. 

Carriages, Bicycles, Tricycles, Perambulators, &e. 

Applications for Space, Plans, and general information maybe obtained from the Secretary. 
THOMAS BROOKS, Agricultural Hall, Islington, London, N. 



28 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



MNICE. KEMSLE7 



'J 

SOLE AGENTS IN EUROPE FOR 

Johnson, Clark & Co., 

OF NEW YORK. 

THE "HOME SHUTTLE" 

still keeps its place as beiag the best Hand Look-Stich Sewing 
Machine in the world. It is exceedingly simple, never out of 
order, and always presents a bright and attractive appearance. 




We have added the 



Si_i.hj. 



loose winding wheel and all latest 
improvements 



THE BEST TREADLE MACHINE IS THE 

Light Running ''Standard" 

For Manufacturing and Family, use. 




// zs a Model of Strength and Beauty. 

The most Elegantly Ornamented Machine in the world. Lasts a liEe- 
time. and NEVER gets OUT of ORDER. EXCELS ALL OTHERS 
IN THOROUGHNESS OP WORICMANSHIP. 

We wish to establish Agencies in all Towns, and will give exclusive 
territory to first-class houses, and furnish Machines at very low prices. 



RENNICK, KEMSLEY & CO., 

(Late Johnson, Clarlc and, Co.), 

Finsbury Circus, LONDON, E.G. 




THOMAS WARWICK, 

MANUPACTUREB OP 

Du Royal Letters Patent. SXCxGLSl JKlAT£i11ALS 

Of every description, Wholesale and for ExiDortation. 

WARWICK'S PATENT POTENTIAL RIMS. 



SOLE MAKER OF WOOLLET'S PATENT DUPLEX SPRING 
SADDLE. STAMPINGS OF ALL KINDS. 




C. D. Vesey, Esq., who won the late Tricycle Championship, used one 
of WOOLLBY'S PATENT SADDLES. He says : " I was highly 
delighted with it ; never oiice during the 50 miles ride did I feel the 
slightest of the rojigh Toads." 

Price List Free on ajijilication to the above, 

Aston New Towd, Birmingham. 

Just Published. 12mo. cloth limp, 2/-, or cloth 
boards, 2/6 (postage 2d). 



SEWING MACHINERY, 

BEING 

A PRACTICAL MANUAL 

OF THE 

SEWING MACHINE, 

Comprising its History and Details of its Construction, with Pull Tech- 
nical Directions for the adjusting of Sewing Machines. 

By J. W. TJRaUHABT. 



CROSBY LOCKWOOD & Co., 7, Stationers' Hall Court, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.G. 

AUCHER PIANOS (Paris.) 

WESTERMAYER PIANOS (Berlin) 

LIPP PIANOS (Stuttgart.) 

RONISCH PIANOS (Dresden.) 



Agents : E. ASCHERBERG & Co., 

Queen Street. Cheapside, London. 



€^t Iming M^t^mt §^tik 



AND 



JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



p«a^N exhibition Tvill be held at the Agrioultm-al Hall during 
^/t^ ten days iii the month of March, which ought to be 
*^^ full of interest to the readers of this journal. It is to 
be an Exhibition of Domestic Labour-saving Appliances and 
of all articles intended for the promotion of Household Thrift, 
and will include among other things Sewing, Knitting, and 
Kilting Machinery, "Washing, Wringing, Boot and Knife- 
cleaning Machinery, Musical Instruments, Bicycles, &c., &c. 



^^OUND FLOOff p^^ 



OF THE 



(g_ 



L O N D ON , 

arranged for the 

EXHIBITION OFDOMESTICLABOURSifflNGAPPLIANCES, 

March 7, 8,9,10,11,12, 14, I5,I6&I7, 

1881^ 

THOMAS BRgOKS, 

SeeretMry. 




Feb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



29 



Exhibitions similar in character to that now proposed have 
been held in the provinces, especially in Birmingham and 
Manchester. Of course they have been upon a comparatively 
limited scale — but from the reports that reach us from all 
quarters this forthcoming exhibition will be by far the most 
extensive thing of the kind that has ever been seen — and all the 
leading firms ui the trade will be represented. It will be very 
interesting to note the great advances that have been made of 
late years in the production of labour-saving appliances ; of 
course the invention and introduction of the sewing machine 
was in itself an important step in the right direc- 
tion, but advances equally great have also been 
made in other departments of household economy, as 
for example, in the laundry, the daily, and the kitchen, 
America has sent us over a goodly assortment of what are 
kno'ivn as "Yankee notions" — such as apple parers, egg 
beaters, lemon squeezers, &c., &c. — all of which have found a 
ready sale, all tending to the economy of manual labour, 
although there are many people who do not hesitate to say 
that even our present improvements do not go far enough, 
and that they would like to see a combined bed-making, 
pudding-mixing, floor- scrubbing machine in a blue gown and 
a mob cap that should take the place of the domestic 
servant all day, and be put away in a corner cupboard 
at night, but whether such an article is at all likely to be exhi- 
bited this year remains to be seen. The most important aspect 
of the exhibition to our readers is that it will help to educate 
the pubhc in the use of domestic labour-saving machuiery. 
We have no doubt that many ladies and gentlemen will see 
there for the first time articles that they did not even know to 
be in existence, and which they will purchase for use in their 
own households, thus giving a considerable impetus to the 
trade. The successful manufacture of washing, wringing, and 
dairy machinery has been confined chiefly to the English 
maker. The sightly, useful, and little nick-nacks that come 
from America are aU very well in their way, but for strong, 
useful laundi-y and kitchen machinery our home manufactm-ers 
are unrivalled. Thrift seems to be the great social question of 
the day. How to make a little money go a long way, and how 
to get through the work of ihe household efficiently in the 
shortest time, are questions which are seriously engaging the 
public mind. Such an exhibition as that we have referred to 
therefore comes very opportunely at the present moment, and 
it has our best wishes for its success. 



The New Tear appears to have opened very favourably for 
business generally, and the sewing machine trade in particular 
seems to be in a more flourishing condition than it has enjoyed 
for some time past. Of course the days of high prices and 
cash-down on the counter before the machine left the shop are 
gone, never likely to come back again, but there is stiU a large 
legitimate business to be done by those who have a good 
article to sell, and who will attend to their own business and 
not attempt to trade upon the reputation of other people. We 
have many times urged the expediency of se\ving machine 
dealers adding other articles of domestic utility to their busi- 
ness, but what these articles should be must depend very largely 
upon the locality ; in one place bicycles will do well, in others 
wringing and washing machines would be more advisable, but 
there are very few cases in which a sufficiently large trade can 
be done in sewing machines alone to enable the retailer to 
pick up a comfortable living. Our readers will do well to 
visit the exhibition referred to above, where it is probable they 
will find a large variety of articles suitable for introduction to 
their individual trades. 



TESTIMONIAL TO ME. GOMPEETZ. 

A very pleasant meetmg was held at Anderton's Hotel, 
Fleet-street, on the 30th December last, when a number of 
gentlemen were present to express their esteem for and 
sympathy with Mr. Walter Gompertz, of the Wheeler and 
Wilson Manufacturing Company, who it may be remembered 
was made the subject of an action for perjury, arising out of a 
case heard last autumn at the Worship-street police-court 
under which he was acquitted. The chair was taken by Thos. 
Perry, Esq. , manager of the Eoyal SmaU Arms Factory, vrith 
which Mr. Gompertz was connected for ten years previous to 
his entering the service of the Wheeler and Wilson Manufac- 
turing Company, fifteen year? ago. Richard Huntmg, Esq., 
general manager of the Wheeler and Wilson Manufacturing 
Company, made a very characteristic and sympathetic speech, 
testifying in the highest terms to the estimation in which Mr. 
Gompertz is held by the company. The chau-man presented 
him, on behalf of the meeting, \vith a handsome purse, the 
work of the daughter of one of the visitors present, containing 
£50 in gold. It was also announced that an illuminated 
addi'ess is in course of preparation and will be presented to him 
in due course. We are very glad Mr. Gompertz's friends and 
employers have testified in this pleasant way to Mr. Gompertz's 
worth. All those who know him were perfectly aware there 
was not the remotest foundation for the charge made against 
him, and that he was utteily incapable of anything of the sort. 
It was none the less a severe trial to him, and we hope the 
pleasant little gathering will have led him to feel that what- 
ever spiteful people may say, thos<! who know him best like him 
just as well as ever. 



Messrs. T. Wolstexceoft akd Co., the weU-known 
washing machine manufacturers, have removed from Black- 
friars-road to more commodious premises situate at 93, High 
Holborn, London, W.C. 



The firm which has traded as Thomas Rhodes, of 28, 
Crown-street, Halifax, has been dissolved. The business of 
sewing machine merchants will still be carried on as usual by 
Abraham and James Ehodes (who will pay all debts owing by 
the late firm) under the style of Thomas Rhodes as heretofore. 



Bicycle manufacturers are again getting busy. Coventry 
and Wolverhampton are in receipt of some good orders, and 
other towns where bicycles are made will speedily follow suit. 
The business of one of the well-known firms for which Wol- 
verhampton has long been noted, has just been removed to 
Coventry. The business of the late D. Rudge has been pur- 
chased by the Tangent Co., and will in future be carried on at 
Coventry by that firm. 



FArLTTRES IN THE UNITED STATES. — "Dunn's Report of 
Mercantile Failures " in the United States shows that there 
were 4,735 failures with 65,752,000 dels, liabilities in 1880, 
against 6,658 failures and 98,1-10,000 dols. liabilities in 1879. 
The report gives warning that the rapidity of expansion now 
noticeable is almost certain to result in disastrous specula- 
tions, and it advocates the passage of a bankruptcy law by 
Congress, 

CiTi AND Guilds op London Institute.— The spring 
term of the City Technical Science Classes commenced last 
Monday, at the Cowper-street Schools, in rooms rented from 
the Middle Class School Corporation, pending the erection of 
the City and Guilds Technioal College, Finsbm-y. 

A Technical School eok Peeston.— The trustees of the 
late Mr. E. K. Davis, Preston, who bequeathed over £300,000 
for establishment of public institutions in Preston, have deter- 
mined to establish a science and art school with technieal 
classes, which, it is estimated, will cost about £50,000. It is 
also understood that the trustees will found a free public 
library and museum. 



30 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1. 1881. 



R. PLATT'S PUBLICATIONS. 



uness. 



LIFE— By JAMES PLATT. Author of 'Business,' 
' Money,' and 'Morality.' 

LIFE — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp. Price One 
Shilling'. Messrs. Simpldn, JIarslia!! & Co., St;vtioners'-hall Court, 
London, E.G.; Messrs. W. H. Smith A Son's Kailway Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing 
&'Co.'s Bookstalls; and at every Booksellers. 

LIFE— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, W.C, 
will send a copy, post free, for Is, 

T IFE— Contents :— 

T IFE — Introduction. Is Life Worth Living 7 
T IFE— Life of the Futui-e, Cultui'e, Health. 
T IFE — Eecreation, Common Sense, Thrift. 
T IFE — Compulsory Thrift, Marriage, Happ: 
T IFE — Religion, Future Life, Human Destiny, 
T IFE — Concluding Remarks. 

LIFE — Page 24 : — ** Make Life a grander thing. Prove 
to men what a glorious thing it is to exist, how enjoyable life might be, how 
sweet life is, even as it is — aye, we never know how sweet until we fear we are about 
to lose it. What a mockery ' Faith in God ' is when we reflect upon the melancholy 
views the majority of orthodox people have of it, going through the journey as an 
ordeal to be borne as patiently and submissively as possible, altogether misconceiving 
the noble sentiment, ' Not my will, but thine be done.' " 

LIFE — Page 34 : — " Life is real, life should be earnest. 
To be enjoyed, we must have an aim, an object in life ; and to be happy, to 
enjoy life, the object must be one worthy the highest, purest, best part of our nature — 
men's character so strong and true that they can be relied up ; men that wear their 
lives out, not rust them out ; men who live to act, to produce what they consume. " 

LIFE— Page 45:— "The more we think of life, the 
greater must be our reverence for the * Great Unknown.' Life will be very 
different once we get the people to realise as an indisputable truth that there is never 
anything wrong but what lias been done by ourselves or others ; and that the wrong 
remains so long only as we refuse to put it right.' " 

LIFE — Page 102 : — ** Common sense denies that any 
happy chance will do for a man what he is quite unable to do for liimself. 
Our happiness consists in the use of our faculties, and a faith that our wages will be 
in proportion to our deserts.'. Success and failure are not dealt out like prizes and 
blanlcs in a lottery, by chance and indiscriminately ; but there is a reason for every 
success and failure. Indolence, chicanery, waste will cause the one ; while industry, 
honesty and thrift will ensure the other.' " 

LIFE— Page 173 :— " The more you think of life, the 
more you know of the Ci"cat',)c's way of governing the universe, the more 
you know of your own constitution and the happiness within your reach, the less will 
you believe that Gotl meant man to be born weeping, to live complaining, and to die 
disappointed.' " 

LIFE— PAGE 192 :— "We have Hfe. What shall we do 
with it ? The woiid is like a vast manufactory, in which we hear incessantly 
the clash and whirring of a complex machinery. Shall we try and get the bottom of 
this? Yes, undoubtedly, earnestly, and fearlessly. Believe me you will thus get to 
learn that the law maker is behind his laws, and that, paradoxical as it may seem, 
while He hides himself behind them. He also reveals himself through them. 'Hiere 
is no better way of understanding the Creator ; the laws are emanations of the all- 
beauteous mind ; they shadow forth the divinity that contrived them ; we find the 
more we study them, greater evidence that there is a Living God, a Father caring for 
and loving His children." 



MORALITY — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 
One Shilling. 

MOEALITY— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tioners' -haii Court, London, E.G. 5 Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway 
Bookstalls. 

MOEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy post free fur One Shilling. 

MOEALITY.— Page 202 :— " Make ..s feel we are under 
the rule of ' One above who sees all,' and whose laws are never infringed with 
impunity ; but that we have the power, if we but will so to do, to leara the wishes, 
and be happy by reverently obeying Him." 

jy/|ORALITY—Business— Money— Life. 

MOEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, "n-iU send copy of .iny one of those works post free for 13. 



V/T ONEY — 208 pages crown 8vo, cloth limp, price One 

MONEY— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Stationers'- 
hall Court, London, B.C. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway Book- 
stalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls ; and at every Bookseller's. 

MONEY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London,, 
W.C, will send a copy, post free, for Is. 

lyr ONEY— Contents :— Preface, Money. 
TV/r ONEY— The Origin of Money. What is Money ? 
\/T ONEY— CuiToncy : Gold Money, Silver Money. 
IWr ONEY— Bank Notes, Cheques, Bills of Exchange. 
ONEY — Bank Shares, Banking, Exchange, Interest.. 



ONEY— Wealth, Capital, Panics. 



M 
M 

"X/F ONEY — Lidividual Success, National Prosperity. 

M 
M 



ONEY — Concluding Remarks. 



ONEY. — Page 28: — *'It is only by understanding 

our monetary system that we can realise the power of 'credit.' Our com- 
mercial system is based upon faith ; cheques, bills, notes are mere bits of paper, and 
only promises to pay; yet so great is the power of credit that transactions to the' 
extent of over a hundred millions weekly are transacted through the Clearing-house. 
Gold is a mere pigmy, as a medium of exchange, to this giant ' paper,' based upon 
'credit.' Simply by system and faith, in conjunction with banking, this institution 
settles the exchanges, the buying and selling, to this enormous amonnt, without tlie^ 
aid of a single metallic coin — merely, by bookkeeping or transfer of cheques, the- 
debiting or crediting of A or B." 



BUSINESS- 
One Shilling 



■208 pages, crown Bvo, cloth limp, price 



BUSINESS— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tioners'-ball Court, London, E.C. ; Messrs. "W. H. Smith & Son's Railway 
Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls : and at every Bookseller's. 

BUSINESS— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London,, 
W.C, will send a copy, post I're, for is. 

IDUSINESS— Contents : Preface, Special Notice. 



BUSINESS— Business 
Observation. 

BUSINESS— Industry, 
Punctuality. 



Qualities, Health, Education,, 
Perseverance, Arrangement,. 



"DUSINESS— Calculation, Prudence, Tact. 
"DUSINESS-Truthfulness, Integrity. 
■DUSINESS— Money, and what to do with it. 



B 



USINESS— Bank Shares, Depression of Trade. 



BUSINESS— Free Trade and Eeciprocity, Civil Service- 
stores. 

"D USINE S S — Co-operative Trading, Concluding Eemarks. 

BUSINESS. — Page 7 : — " Commerce is guided by laws 
as inflexible as tliose of health or gravitation ; and the primary cause of" 
failure in business may be traced as unerringly as tlie punishment that will surely 
follow the infringement of any other law of nature." 

BUSINESS.— Page 179— " From every pulpit and m 
every school throughout the kingdom the justirication of double dealing and 
trickery upon the plea that it is impossible to get a living honestly by trade, or in any 
vocation, should be denounced in the most unniistakeable language as a libel on 
Providence, and the failure to succeed be attributed to its real cause— the maa'a 
ignorance of or incapacity for the business or profession he follows." 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



31 



COUNTY COURT DEBTORS. 

Men of business wlio are compelled to sue their debtors in the 
Coimty Coiu't have to suffer many inconveniences. The pro- 
ceedings are still both cumbrous and costly, and there is thus 
much delay and expense about what should be a very simple 
and straightforward affair. Since the Act of 1875 things have 
been better, for under that . statute judgment can be obtained 
in default of notice of defence without going through the 
needless form of proof, which is still necessary in other cases, 
even where the debtor does not appear. But this judgment is 
of little value to a creditor if the judge insists upon making an 
order for payment of the debt by small instalments, which will 
keep the matter hanging about for months, or even years. We 
believe that judges have no power to make these oi'ders, and 
would suggest to all plaintiffs who use the defaidt summons to 
claim their legal right to issue execution forthwith upon the 
judgment. This is the only way in which the money can be 
obtained, for if a defendant has time to make arrangements he 
will generally patch up a bill of sale to stop the bailiff, or file 
his petition in liquidation. As to these bailiffs also, there is 
much room for improvement. If, in an action in the High 
Court, the sheriff be instructed to levy, he is bound to do so at 
once, and is personally liable for any loss that may result from 
his delay or negligence. In the County Court this is not so, 
and the baUiffs practically do as they choose ; making a return 
where they like, and, in general, being responsible to nobody ; 
although by theii' conduct the creditor has failed to get his 
money. This is a point that greatly needs looking to, and we 
hope to see it considered in the Comity Court Bdl, of which 
notice has already been given in the House of Commons, as a 
judgment is of little or no value if it cannot both surely and 
speedily be carried into execution. 

Where debtors have no goods then the only other means open 
to the creditor of trying to get his money is the taking out of 
a summons for a committal. Now, we do not support the 
principle of imprisonment for debt, and camiot help thinking 
that it is in itself an evil, though very often, perhaps, a neces- 
sary evil. It seems strange that the Scotch should have decided 
to do ■\vithout it altogether, if it were really found to be 
beneficial ; but when we have had some experience of the way 
in which they manage, now that it is abolished, we shall be 
better able to judge. It is true that no debtor can be sent to 
gaol, either in the High Court, where the same law applies, or 
in the Coimty Court, unless the judge is first satisfied that he 
has, or has had since the judgment, the means of pajdng the 
debt as ordered. This is often inaccurately spoken of as a con- 
tempt of court, but it is not so. It may rather be ranked as a 
punishment for the quasi-criminal offence of not pajdng debts 
justly due when able. It proceeds upon the notion that the 
debtor, although he had means, has wilfully or negligently 
refused to discharge claims which a com-t of law has declared 
to be legal and binding. But, as every one knows, this principle 
is not very closely adhered to in the County Court, whatever 
may be the case in the High Court of Justice. Now, are 
debtors fairly placed upon the same level ? for, in the latter 
tribunal, they can get free of everj^thing by going into bank- 
ruptcy, while in the former they have no such chance of escape, 
and must live on with all their old debts hanging round their 
necks for ever. 

It is but rarely that a man of business gives credit upon the 
strength of imprisonment for debt. It may be done by certain 
classes of the smaller traders, but it may also be doubted 
whether such credit is not hurtful both to giver and receiver. 
Few people would regret the abolishment of imprisonment for 
debt, and still fewer would object to any rules which place its 
administration on a sounder and firmer basis. Some rules of 
this kind have just been issued, and their general tendency is 
to compel County Court Judges to be more careful of using 
the power which is legally placed in their hands. One of these 
regulations will oblige plaintiffs to apply for a judgment sum- 
mons soon after the defendant makes default, as if they wait 
for over fovu' months it will be necessary for them to show their 
debtor's means upon affidavit, before the summons will even 
be issued. This has doubtless been done to stop creditors from 
letting the instalments ordered mount up before they get their 
debtors sent to prison. It is clear that, in this way, the 
Judge's order as to instalments is to some extent evaded, and 



he is called upon to commit for payment of a larger sum than 
he had thought the debtor was really able to pay at one time. 
There is another rule that should prove a great convenience to 
both parties. It provides that where either the creditor or the 
debtor resides out of the district in which the siunmons will be 
heard they may send in an afiidavit to the Registrar of the 
Court setting forth any facts which they desire shoidd be placed 
before the Judge at the hearing. At present letters are often 
written, especially by debtors, for this purpose ; but the new 
plan is much better, for the affidavit would, of ooui-se, be the 
same thing as sworn verbal evidence, while it will save parties 
a long and tii-esome journey to the court. 

Other rules relate to the formaKties which are to be observed 
in the making an order of committal, and though too technical 
for our consideration, they will serve to render the judges 
more cautious in having proof of means before they send the 
debtors summoned before them to various terms of imprisonment. 
It has always seemed to us an important question whether 
some power of arresting a man's salary or wages, at the suit of 
the creditor, would not better serve the purpose than any 
system of imprisonment. It should, of course, be surrounded 
with every safeguard necessary, and should not be allowed to 
go below a certain sum, so that enough woidd be left for the 
reasonable sustenance of the debtor and his family. At present 
it is a common thing to hear evidence given of a man's salary 
or wages, and then to see him sent to gaol because he has not 
paid his creditor out of what he so received. There is a curious 
want of logic about such a proceeding, and it cex'tainly does 
seem an odd way of getting money out of a man to begin by 
preventing him from eaiTung any more. Would it not be 
better to allow the County Coui't Judge to order his employer 
to pay so much a week or a month to the plaintiff suing ? Of 
course, this could, and would, often be evaded by the debtor 
leaving his former sendee, but still, in many cases, it would be 
found very efficacious ; at all events, it would get rid of the 
present absurd result, that while the law is punishing a debtor 
for not paying, he is kept in prison at the public expense, and 
his wife and famUy come as paupers upon the parish, and 
have to be mamtained at the cost of the ratepayers generally. 

For many reasons it is probable that were there no such 
thing as imprisonment for debt, a healthier tone in business 
amongst those who now give credit, relying, though remotely, 
upon its operation, would result. It can, indeed, hardly be 
called successful, for the figures prove that about 90 per cent, 
of the debtors sent to gaol stay there the full term for which 
they were committed. This shows that one of two things 
must have happened ; either the man could pay but would not, 
in which case the committal was a failure ; or that he could 
not pay, and his incarceration was therefore an injustice. But, 
on the other hand, it must be admitted that the fear of im- 
prisonment does often bring debtors to book, and that, accord- 
ing to statistics, it is only a very small proportion of the total 
number of judgment summonses issued that end in an order of 
commitment. We are, of course, only concerned in consider- 
ing the best way for creditors quickly and cheaply to get in 
their debts. They must use the County Court, and if im- 
prisonment be really needful it should be maintained, but 
something better might, we beheve, be contrived, and 
especially where there is a salary or wages that could be 
paitially attached. 



MR. MUNDELLA ON TECHNICAL EDUCATION. 

During the past month the prizes and certificates gained by 
the students at the annual examinations of the City of London 
College, the Society of Arts, and the Government Department 
of Science and Art, were distributed at the College in Leadeii- 
hall-street by Mr. Mundella, M.P., the Lord Mayor being also 
present. Having distributed the prizes, Mr. Mundella said he 
knew something of the City of London, having had some asso- 
ciation with it for more than forty years, and he knew the 
kind of feeling of expectation and hope with which young men 
came from the country to establish some commercial relations 
with this great city. There was no city in the world that was 
so cosmopolitan. They found in it young men of all nations, 
and the business of all nations was transacted in it. When he 
was in the United Sta,tes he remembered an American citizen 



32 



■THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



claiming pre-eminence for tlie city of New York in that respect, 
but his answer was that everyone seemed engaged in transacting 
strictly American business, while in the City of London they trans- 
acted the business of the world. The result was that thousands 
of young men annually came to London, who were beset by 
trials and temptations on every side, and the young men who 
had passed before them that evening had done one thing, if 
nothing else — they had been engaged in useful and intellectual 
employment, which had kept them away from temptation. 
Every man should arm himself to fight the battle of life with 
the best weapons at his command. He was sorry to say that 
in England we had not armed our young men with the best 
weapons, and it was a noble conception on the part of the 
founders of this College to have established a University, as it 
were, for young men, who, while pursuing their daily avoca- 
tions, might take up languages, literature, physical science, 
and go on till they did what some of their predecessors had 
done ; for the institution was now represented in the Church, 
at the Bar, in the medical profession, in the higher walks of 
commerce, and even in Parliament. He would remind the 
students that they were not merely by these studies making 
themselves, so to speak, better fitted for earning higher 
salaries or for more important missions of trust in the 
commercial world, but were also doing for their minds what 
gymnastics did for their bodies. In a charming essay Sir John 
Lubbock told how Gibbon said that the mere acquisition of a 
taste for reading was of more value to him than all the 
treasures of the Indies, and that the love of reading had made 
Macaulay's life the happiest of lives. He found from the 
report that tbe institution had outgrown the space at its 
command, and that the council felt that with more space they 
could engage upon the work on which they had aheady entered 
and with considerable success — technical education. Address- 
ing the Lord Mayor, the right hon. gentleman observed that 
it was a matter of great rejoicing to him, having advocated 
the increase and improvement of technical education in 
England for the last sixteen years, that the Corporation of the 
City of London had during the past few months made a step 
in the right direction. They had voted £10,000 towards the 
new technical guilds to be established at South Kensington, 
and £2,000 a year for some years, and he saw that the great 
City guilds, whose names were identified with our British 
industries, and which had presided over their infancy, but had 
long ceased to have any connection with them but their name, 
had recently taken it in hand to imjarove the skill, industry, 
and force of the British workman. He, however, thought it 
was only right to say that the sum which had been raised, 
£50,000 for building and £5,000 for sustenance, was altogether 
inadequate, and if the City of London and the guilds of 
Loudon were to do auythiug w^orthy of their name and posi- 
tion, they must do fur more. The sum mentioned was not suffi- 
cient for the sustenance of the laboratory. A.single institu- 
tion in a German town had spent £GO,000 on the laboratory 
added to it last year. He knew second and third rate towns 
spread over the Continent of Europe which had spent in the 
last four or five years double the sum which was supposed to 
be sufficient to represent the great city of London. The Cor- 
poration could do no better work than to afiiliate this imstitu- 
tion to their new College. In England we had local and 
natural advantages surpassing those of any other country in 
the world — coal and iron lying side by side, our splendid 
geographical position, a larger and cheaper capital than that 
of any other nation, workmen bj tens and hundreds 
of thousands who had been accustomed to manipu- 
late every kind of material, and we also had our 
ancient prestige as the best manufacturers in the 
world ; but we had neglected two things — art training 
and science teaching in connection with our industries. 
He believed it was impossible to exaggerate the value of the 
service which the late Prince Consort rendered to British 
manufactures and commerce by his appreciation of the defects 
which were made apparent to us by the Exhibition of 1851. 
Comparing our past manufactures with the bea\itiful products 
of art we now made, our progress since 1851 seemed perfectly 
incredible, and he believed that our trade to-day must be many 
millions a year benefited by the application of art to our 
vai'ious industries. "We might also depend upon it that we had 



paid a very heavy toll for our ignorance of foreign languages. 
He desired to tell their civic visitors that now was the time for 
them to be useful, that we had too long omitted applying 
science to industry, and that our opponents and competitors 
had found out our weak places. He sincerely trusted that 
what he had said might be some stimulus to those who had it 
in their power to help on this great work, and that they would 
begin by helping this excellent institution. 



LABOUE MARKET. 



All outdoor trades have been suspended, owing to the 
weather, and the operatives have suffered severely during the 
last fortnight. Each artisan, however, out of work from no 
cause of his own is assisted from the trade funds to the extent 
of half the amount of his wages. The cloth market remains 
quiet, and, if anything, prices are declining. At Oldham the 
cotton manufacturers have conceded 5 per cent, to the spinners, 
minders, and card-room hands, but they have refused an 
advance to the twiners, as they assert that there is a loss in 
this branch of the business. The twiners have in consequence 
resolved to cease work until their claim is granted. The strike 
of engineers on the Wear has terminated by Is. additional 
being given to all who receive 32s. per week, and those under 
are to be raised 2s.- per week. The shipyards are all full of 
good orders, and there are scarcely any shipbuilders or boiler- 
makers out of work. The North of England iron trade report 
issued last week shows the average price of plates for the 
quarter ending Dec. 31 to be £6 4s. 4d., as compared with 
£6 8s. Id. for the September quarter ; this under the sliding 
scale reduces the wages of puddlers 3d. per ton, and 2J per 
cent, to all other mill hands till the end of April. This is a 
severe disappointment to the ironworkers of the North, as they 
were expecting an increase. The slate trade in North Wales 
is rather disturbed, owing to the large employers insisting that 
the quarrymen shall contract themselves out of the Employers' 
Liability Act. This the men refuse, and matters are serious in 
this branch of industr}'. Contrary to expectation, the dispute 
with the Lancashire coal miners has not been settled. It is 
assuming grave aspects, and alarming riots have taken place 
at Wigan and other districts. Now that the coalowners have 
withdrawn their resistance to the Employers' Liability Act, 
the wages question is tbe cause in dispute, and the miners are 
determined to have an advance of 10 per cent. The strike 
and the severe weather have had the eiFect of making a 
great demand on the coal trade in other districts, causing 
prices to run up enormously. In South Yorkshire the 
owners have, on these grounds, offered an advance of 2^ 
per cent., but the miners, by the advice of their council, 
demand 10 per cent. It is much to be regretted that the 
sliding scale cannot be adopted, as it would prevent the con- 
stant disputes now occurring. With a good board of arbitra- 
tion in each district coiisistiug of an equal number of masters 
and men, presided over by an able umpire, amicable relations 
would soon be restored, and the result woidd be beneficial alike 
to employers and employed. A Parliamentary paper just 
issued gives the number of trade unions registered under the 
Friendly Societies Act at twenty-six, the number of members 
being 207,503, and the yearly income £2-17,490. Only about 
half the trade unions are registered under the Act, as many of 
them are established for trade purposes only. 

Our Bristol correspondent writes : — Trade in Bristol and the 
West of England has not yet recovered from the extraordinary 
disarrangement of nearly all its branches by the recent severe 
weather, and but for the fact that many hundreds of men have 
been employed both in town and country in clearing the high- 
ways of the immense accumulations of snow, the distress 
amongst the working classes would be more widespread than 
it is at present. Although business itself is as dull as it was 
this time last year, there is a more hopeful tone throughout all 
the staple industries, with the exception of the building trade. 
In many ca.ses, where the home consumption is almost nil, 
improved exports are keeping the workmen very fairly 
employed, and this is especially the case in the cabinet 
manufactories, one of the largest firms in Bristol having this 
week received heavy orders for the Cape, while the demand 



Pbb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



33 



from South Wales is steadily improving. In the leather trade 
it has been the quietest January known for years.' Both tanners 
and boot and shoe manufacturers are, however, anticipating a 
more active time, now the weather has broken. Ironmongers are 
doing little, and in. the timber trade there is a large accumulation 
of stock. In South Wales, while the demand for coal has by 
no means decreased, the scarcity, owing to the irregular out- 
put, continues, and from many of the large coUeries it is still 
very difficult to get coal down to the ports of shipment. In 
the Forest of Dean also there has been another week of 
irregular working, but it is hoped that the coming week will 
once more see the pits in full activity. 

In Leicestershire the resumption of outdoor labour has 
greatly relieved the labour market. The staple industries, 
however, ai'e exceedingly depressed, and the outlook is any- 
tbing but hopeful. Clickers, pressmen, rivetters and finishers 
in the shoe trade are very short of work, nearly all the factories 
being closed half the week. Producing is also being curtailed 
to a serious extent at all the large spinning factories. 

The Midland hardware trades have again suffered severely 
from frost and snow, many manufacturers standing still for 
want of fuel, and in other cases the water supply has been 
very inadequate and irregular. The retail trade has been 
paralysed everywhere by the severe weathei', and travellers 
have reaped little advantage from their journeys at present. 
In the export department there is a little more life, on account 
of the Australian Colonies, India, and South America. The 
orders coming to hand are not large, but they are of a healthy 
character, indicating increased consumption and diminishing 
stocks. There is a marked improvement in the advices from 
the River Plate, and the capture of Lima by the Chilians has 
greatly benefited trade prospects on the Pacific seaboard. 
Nails, both cut and wrought, continue in very languid request, 
and prices all round are easy. Birmingham out-nailmakers 
complain greatly of the keenness of the competition at Leeds 
and Glasgow, where prices are unremunerative, but the fault 
lies in over-production. The hand-wrought nail trade is in a 
yet more depressed state, and the-eariungs of the operatives in 
this branch, it is stated, do not avei-age more than 4s. or 5s. 
weekly. Iron-founders are generally well engaged on heavy 
constructive works, piers, bridges, girders, &c. The malleable 
iron-foundry trade, which was very quiet daring the greater 
part of last year, has lately taken a turn for the better, and 
the prospects in this branch are considered favourable, more 
especially for the makers of machine castings. 



HOW TO DISCOUEAGE AGENTS. 

The average sewing machine agent, as well as the canvasser, 
has many deficiences to contend with at the hands of those 
who employ him. In most cases these deficiencies could be 
remedied if the manufacturers were not so short sighted in 
allowing work to go out of their factories which is far from 
perfect, and which redounds to their discredit. They are 
" penny wise and pound foolish ideas," which some adhere to 
in their endeavour to economise in production. 

The latest instance of this delusive idea is the fact that some 
of the sewing machine cabinet work which is being manufac- 
tured and sent out is notoriously bad, not lasting long enough 
to be shipped from the factory to the agent. Within a short 
time we have seen new sewing machines, wood work — i.e., table 
top — cracked six or eight inches ; and that, too, when received 
by the agent. We have also seen tables that have been 
plugged and nicely polished over, so as not to be noticed by 
the unpractised eye ; besides others that have had the seams 
filled and polished so that no one but an expert could detect 
the fraud. After such machines are sold new cracks will 
appear, as a matter of course, doing no good to a company who 
will send out such work, and demoralising the agent and 
canvasser. We cannot understand why any company of 
standard reputation will allow such miserable tables to be sent 
out — but such is the case. It would be much better if moi-e 
attention was paid to this line of the sewing machine trade 
than in denouncing agents for loss of trade. 

Those agents who have received and are receiving this class 



of work, complain bitterly of the injustice done them and their 
customers ; and also from the fact that the company expect 
them to keep well to the front in point of sales. As an agent 
said : " It discourages the canvasser as well as myself." When 
a machine is left on trial, or otherwise, a crack or seam loses 
the sale of that machine, or of another. It causes the proposed 
purchaser to look with distrust upon the entire machine— and 
justly, too. If one part is notoriously poor, what guarantee 
has the pvirchaser that the entire machine is not in keeping. ? 
None at all. We know, for a fact, that sales have been lost 
for no other reason than a cracked table ; and that, too, when 
it was new — or supposed to be. 

People will not believe that the mechanical parts are any 
better made than the table-top, when they discover an imper- 
fection there. liaise the standard of the wood work to that of 
the machine, and it will be money in the company's pocket, as 
well as in that of the agent. Sewiug-machiue agents cannot 
perform impossibilities ; and it is impossible to do a thriving 
business with cracked or plugged sewing-machine table-tops. 
It is a penurious policy, and should be discontinued at once. 
As it is, the agent is to blame in the eyes of the company, 
when really the fault is in the manufacture of such miserable 
class of wood work on the ground of economy. We hope to 
see a change for the better in this line of the trade ; other^vise 
the time will come when those who send out such imperfections 
will stand in the back-groimd, and all on account of a parsi- 
monious policy in expenditui-es. 



THE SIGWALT FACTOET. 



The factory of the Sigwalt Comjjany is situated at Ai-lington 
Heights, a distance of twenty-two miles from Chicago, and has 
always been admired as one of the best fitted up in the Western 
States. It consists of a main building and a wing ; the former 
being 37 by 100 feet, the latter 37 by 80. Both are very sub- 
stantially biult, of brick, and are two stories in height. The 
large floor room thus enclosed is filled with machinery of the 
most improved descrixJtion, additions to which are constantly 
being made by the company, whose enterprise wUl not allow 
them to fall behind the times in having the latest and best 
mechanical devices. The sewing machines called the " Sigwalt " 
are turned out in large quantities and shipped all over the 
country. Not only are sewing machines manufactru'ed ; another 
and very extensive portion of the business is the manufactui-e 
of seal presses, letter-presses, dating stamps, rubber stamps, 
and engraver's supplies ; and also the stands for all kinds of 
sevsdng machiaes. Adjoining the factory is a foundry, measm-- 
ing 65 by 85 feet. All of the buildings are lighted by gas 
made on the premises by one of BeiTy Brothers' combination 
machines. For facilities of shipment a side-track from the 
Chicago and North Western E. E. rims within a few feet 
of the main building, so that cars can be loaded and unloaded 
at the very doors. Large and oommodious offices are attached 
to the building, fitted with all necessary appliances for con- 
ducting the large and varied business of the Sigwalt Sewing 
Machine Company. 



BEADING FOE MECHANICS. 

There is no class in the community, says the Seiving Machine 
News, to whom a taste for reading may be more valuable than 
to our artisans. After a day of toil at the bench ©r lathe the 
companionship of a good book is both restful and in- 
spiring. ' He who will resort to it has ever at his command the 
most elevating thoughts, a solace for his worries and fatigues, 
and the best pi-eservative against mean and degrading associ- 
ations. No man, who has once tasted the difference, could 
possibly prefer the slang of the billiard hall, or the boozy dis- 
cussions of the rum shop to the " thoughts that breathe and 
words that burn " in the pages of Shakspeare and Scott, Irving 
and Longfellow. But our suggestion is not limited to this 
classic field, though it yields a i^recious harvest in dignity of 
sentiment and purity of language. Well directed reading is 
Hkewise the passport to every form of knowledge, and thereby 
the most powerful means through which earnest and aspiring 



a* 



fHE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENIl OP DOMESTIC APPLIAiS''CES. 



Feb. 1, 1&81. 



men can promote their own fortunes. At present, too, we 
iiave periodicals devoted to every great industry, and science is 
made familiar in countless volumes, so that a right royal road 
is open to the mechanic who would advance in his own 
specialty by utilising the methods and experience of others. 

Here is, indeed, a secret worth remembering — that the 
artisan can improve and simplify his pi-ocesses, have his 
resources enlarged, and his inventive faculty sharpened, by 
the silent intercourse at his own fireside with the best and 
ablest members of his craft. Such a reader will midoubtedly 
be more valuable to his employers than the self-complacent 
workman who fancies he knows enough, and has nothing to 
learn from books. The latter may perform sufficiently well 
his accustomed tasks, but he will rarely step ahead into the 
regions of invention, and in the higher elements of craftsman- 
ship he will be out-distanced by the shopmate whom he con- 
temns as a "book-worm." It behooves every mechanic, 
therefore, to cultivate a taste for useful reading, and especially 
those in the sewingmachinetrade, which is still so full of splendid 
possibilities. The aptitude for downright study, or technical 
researches, may not come all at once, but, except with very 
shallow minds, the drift of the reading habit is from that which 
is mere pastime to that which instructs, and finally to that 
which is most practical and progressive. 

And wherefore should not manufacturers encourage this 
taste F It is unquestionably their interest — and some would say, 
their duty — to promote the moral well-being and intelligence of 
their workmen. A provision of good books for them woiild 
measurably fufil this duty, but though we have heai'd of 
libraries for employes in other branches of trade, in some large 
commercial houses, and even on board ship for our stalwart 
sailors, we have yet to learn of the first in a sewing machine 
factory. We know it may be urged that manufacturing towns 
generally have good public libraries of which our workmen 
can avail themselves. But this is beside the issue where a free 
and convenient library would be better appreciated, and the- 
choice of books might subserve a special want. Surely some of 
our wealthy companies can alFord to lead the way in this 
admirable direction ? 

It is pleasant to note in this connection that Messrs. Brown 
and Sharpe, of Providence — than which no firm stands higher 
for the production of beautiful mechanism — have a flourishing 
library at their factory for the use of the employes. It now 
contains many hundred volumes both in general literatuie and 
technology, and so heartily have they been appreciated that 
the number is increased from time to time without any solicita- 
tion. The few simple rules under which it is managed, and 
which might serve in any other factory, may prompt into like 
beneficence some of the magnates of the sewing machine. 
They read as follows : — 

Sec. 1. Any person in the employ of the company is entitled 
to the use of one volume for two weeks. At the expiration of 
this time it may be renewed for one week. 

Sec. 2. If at the expiration of two weeks the volume is not 
returned, or renewed, or at the expiration of three weeks, it is 
not returned, a fine will be imposed of two cents for each 
day's detention. 

Sec. 3. If any person shall lose or deface a volume he shall 
be charged a sum equal to the value of the same. 

Sec. 4. No person taking books from the library can be per- 
mitted to loan them. 

Sec. 5. Books in the possession of persons leaving the 
employ of the comi^any, must be returned before se.ttlement is 
made. 

Sec. 6. The library will be under the charge of the time- 
keeper, who will deliver books at the regular periods as indi- 
,cated on the library bulletin. 

It may be added that this library is open for the issue of 
books every Friday afternoon at six o'clock — that is, when the 
day's work is over. About one-third of the workmen avail 
themselves of its advantages, the apprentices showing a pre- 
ference for fiction, biography, and history. The artisans 
engaged on special jobs often seek books applying directly to 
the work in hand. That's just where it pays. 



THE WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY. 

The foPowing was clipped, here and there, from the Cleve- 
land Leader, U.S.A. : — Four years ago last August, the White 
Sewing Machine was introduced to the people of this country. 
It has met with such favour that its sales now aggregate 
100,000 machines per annum, the works having a capacity of 
300 to 350 machines per day, and nearly 900 men are engaged 
in the various stages of its manufacture. The works on 
Canal-street have been enlarged by additions, from time to 
time, until the building now occupies a frontage of 432 by 291 
feet deep and five stories high. Within this vast building 
everything is life and activity, almost bewildering to one un- 
accustomed to such scenes. One room, at least 100x60 feet in 
dimensions, is filled entirely with milling machines. Another 
spacious department is devoted simply to drilling the holes in 
the various portions of the "head" of the machine. Still 
another, which contains over 25,000dols. worth of automatic 
machinery — wonderful in its perfection and the perfection of 
its results — is devoted to the manufacture of screws alone. 
One large department is devoted to tool-making, where the 
most skilfiil mechanics are employed in producing or keeping 
in order the tools u.'sed in the hundreds of machines throughout 
the establishment. In one department men exist in an atmos- 
phere of red hue, and charged with a strong odour of ammonia. 
It is the polishing-room, and long sprays of sparks leap from 
a hundred swiftly revolving emery wheels, as the metal is 
held firmly against them. The jjlating department is an in- 
teresting but not particularly pleasant locality, as the abundant 
supply of acid is not congenial to clothing ; the odour distuibs 
the lungs, and the powerful Brush electric machine brings 
our watches to a standstill or galvanises the works in a manner 
interesting to the philosophical but annoying to the practical 
mind. 

The active men of the company are the same as at the 
beginning, the officers being as follows : Thomas H. White, 
Xjresident ; S. E. Henderson, secretary ; H. W. White, 
treasurer ; other stockholders, R. C. White, Henry W. White, 
D'Arcy Porter, superintendent; G. W. Baker, mechanical 
expert. All interested in the company are active participants 
in the business ; and what is more important, and at the same 
time somewhat remarkable, they are all experienced sewing 
machine men — some having served the cause over twenty 
years. To that end they never allow an improvement of value 
to escape. They adopt whatever can make it better, and have 
a corps of skilful mechanics and originative geniuses con- 
stantly employed at the works, in an apartment by themselves, 
making improvements and devising new things. 

The business of this company has extended to all parts of the 
earth, Australia, South America, and Mexico being constant 
customers. An office was recently opened at No. 21, Queen 
Victoria-street, London, for the accomodation of the European 
trade, although direct shipments will be continued. 



AGREEMENT FOEMS 

ed. per Doz., 3/6 per 100, 

FOR THE 
FOB 

SEWING MACHINES,'W ASHING MACHINES 
BICYCLES, PIANOS, FURNITURE, &c., 

May always be had at the Office of the 

"Sewing Machine Gazette," 
11, AVE MARIA LANE, LONDON, E.G. 



^s^^^^i^iSsSSSm 



i?EB. 1,1881. THE SEWING MA.CH1NE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



3g 



THOMAS SMITH & SONS, 



ESTABLISHED 1848. 




PATENTEES. 



THE ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 





EVEEY PART SUPPLIED IN VAEIOUS STAGES, 



Prom the Rough Stamping or Forgings to the 
Complete Finished Article. 

Kone hut the very best Brands of Material used for the several purpose 
embracing LOW MOOR IROJ^, BEST BEST GUK, Sfc, S^c. 

VERY SPECIAL IN ALL SUNDRIES AND APPLIANCES, 

INCLUDING ALL NEWEST DESIGNS AND PRINCIPLES IN 

SADDLES, VALISES, SPANNERS, LAMPS, 
61, HOLBORN VIADUCT, 

LONDON, B.C. 

Works i—Saltley Mill, Birmingham. ^ 

DEALERS ARE INVITED TO APPLY FOR WHOLESALE TERMS 



m 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Fee, i, 1881. 




liffii iiiiiiifiiia 



CQ 



ISL 



11 



o 
o 

O 



O 

H 
O 

i2l 



Q 
O 

H 
O 



o 

H 
O 



SIX -CORD SOFT AND EXTRA QUALITY GLACE 

BEING OF VERY SUPERIOR QUALITY, ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED 




C. and Co. beg to direct attention to their 
celebrated CROCHET or TATTING COTTON, in 

Hanks or Balls. 



ESTABLISHED 1152. 






MAGIG STEAM LAUNDRY WASHER 



SECTJBED BY 
EOTAL 




LETTERS 
PATENT. 



The cheapest and most economical Washer introduced, avoiding all the wear oE linen 
caused by present modes. Things to be washed only requii'e to be soaked, soaped, steamed, and 
hand-rubbed once. 

No use of chemicals, soda, dollies, maids, wash-boards; no tnrning or pushing machine 
handles ; only one-half the soap need. See opinion of JESSE OVERTON, Springiield Laundry, 
Leammgton, in Queen of 17th of July, page 68 : — "The steam softens, and the condensed water 
carries away grease and stickiness, just as a belt of perspiration does off a dirty forehead." . 
COLOUR OF WASHINa DECIDEDLY IMPROVED. 



MAGIC LAUMDRY 



SHER COSVIPANY. 



214, Lichfield Eoad, Aston, Birmingham. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWma MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



37 




HOLMES, PEARSON, MURTON & CO., 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



Washing, Wringing, and Mangling Machines, 

FRUn DRESSER, SUGAR CUTTER, CHAFF CUTTER, 

Morticing Machines and Circular Saw Benches 

MANUFACTORY : 

ROYAL IRON WORKS, 



Price List on Application. 
SPECIAL TERMS TO MERCHANTS AND THE TRADE. 

ALL GOODS CAREFULLY PACKED IN SMALL SPACE FOR EXPORT. 



THE ROYAL WASHER strong and simple in construction. An ornament to every home, and the delight of ever» wife. 
Price, i.0 10s. Rollers 32 inches, with Brass Caps. 

"THE COVENTRY TRIUMPH '^ BICYCLES & TRICYCLES. 



WEST ORCHARD, COVENTRY, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT MANUFACTURERS. 

India .Bsibter Tyred Bath Oliair and Perambulator Wheels. Speciality Children's Bicycles and Ihleyola 
M!i,"iiufactures for this Season cannot be surpassed. Price Listg on Application. 



TOWER WORKS, PIPER'S ROW, WOLVERHAMPTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE ** EXPRESS'' BICYCLE, 



AND 



BICYCLE FITTINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

"W 11 O L E S j^ H. E J^ITHD ^ O E. E 2^ -p O K. T 7^ T I O IT. 




LISTER & CO 

MANNINGHAM MILLS, BRADFORD, 

MANUFACTURERS OF " ' 

MACHINE SILKS AND TWISTS 

BUTTON-HOLE SILK TWISTS 

KNITTING AND EMBROIDERY SILKS, FILOSELLE, &c. 

Recommended /or Strength, Evenness and Pure Dye. Length indicated on each label guaf anteed. 
OKTE TRI.A.I. -WriLL FItO-VE THEIH, SXTFER,IOE,IT-^- 
L. & Co.'s Knitting Silka Wash as Well as any produced, 



38 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Feb. 1, 1881. 



CHAELES J. THURLOW, 



CO 



fa 

° w 

U 
t-i 



< 
H 

m 




m 



ft 



03 
^ pi 



£ CO 
o CD 

I 5 



39, CHESTER STREET, HULME, 

MAKCHESTEB 




SURREY MACHINIST COMPANY. 




The 

Lightest 

and most 

rigid ill the 

Market. 



The only macliiue made with a perfect 

SUSPENSION SPRING AND SADDLE. 

The Patent D.S.H.R, Racer is the lie-htest and most rigid machine in the world 

List and Photo 4 Stamps. Illustrated List of Bicycle Fittings stamp. 

Special Terms to Shippers and Agents. 

SB, BXi-A-CE^nyc-A-isr st. Lon^nDOisr. 

INDIARUBBER BICYCLE and OAREIAGE TYRES of every dcscriptiou kept 
in stock, and supplied by return. Indiarubber Air Saddles, 7s. 6d.. post free 
All kinds of Bicycle requisites supplied in the roucfh or finish, llustrated Price 
List, 1 Stamp. Smith & Co., Indinrubber Manufacturers, 87. Blackman-st., London 



WATSON & CO., 

OLDHAM, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

Family and Medium Machine 

WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS. 

ALSO MANTJFACTUEEKS OF THE 

^iGTOi?.i.A. :M:.A.Gia:ii<rEi, 

On the Wheeler and Wilson Principle. 
Special Terms to Merchants and Shippers, 



The only Preparation in the World that will Clean and Polish Sewing 

Machines, Bicycles, Pianos, Fnr- 
niture. Silver and Plated Wares, 
Fenders and Fire Irons, Brasses, 
Mirrors, and Patent Leather Boots. 

Universally Celebrated aLTMAN & Co., Limited, 

Hamsell St., E.C. 

Entirely free from Mercury, Oil, 

or Acids. 

Price Is. Try it. Special terms to 

Merchants and Exporters. 



A LARGE STOCK OF 
From 18/6 per dozen pairs. 



LOUISE 



HOUSEHOLD 

MAGIC POLISH 




a. E. WRIG-HT, 



WHOLES.tLE 



AGENT FOR SEWING MACHINES 

OF E\'EHY DESCKIPTION. 



Sole Agent for the " Little Europa " Lock- 

stitch Seivinrj Machines, and Royal 

Bink Roller Skates. 

No. 1, NEW BROAD STREET, 

LONDON, E.C. 

WANTED, a few Copies of the February 
Number of the " Sewing Machine Gazette " 
for i88o. One Shilling per Copy will be 
given. — T. B., care of the Editor, " Sewing 
Machine Gazette," !i, Ave Maria Lane, 
E.C. 



Feb. X, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



39 



PRIZE MEDALS AWARDED. 




PARIS, 1878. 



London, 1851, 
For High Merit. 





GOLD MEDAL. 



London, 1862, 
For General Great Excellence. 





Vienna, 1878, 
For Progress- 




Philadelphia, 1876, 
For Superior Excellence. 





Linen 
Tliread 

MANUFACTURERS 



Shrewsbury, 
England. 



Iiinen Sewing'-Machine Threads. Shoe Threads. 

Sole- Sewing" Machine Threads, For Bkke, Keats, Pearson & other Machines 
Wax Machine Threads, of Best Quality and Special New Quality. 

Saddlers' Threads. Harness Threads. 

Also, Hand Sewing Threads, {""■ ^tlgTSpfSi^g,^! ''"''• 

Six-Cord Machine Twist, used in substitution for Silk. 

Gilling Twines. Macrame and other Lace Threads. 



40 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



FuB. 1, 1881. 



THE PATENT 



">EOLUS" BALL BEARINGS 



AEE 



mSTIYBRSALLT 

ADJUSTABLE, 

DUST PROOF, 

DURABLE, 




AND 

REQUIRE 

BUT SLiaHT 

LUBRICATION". 



ELETIT ON, 



FEONT VTEW- 



BACK WHEEL BEABINGS. 



See 

Testimonals 

and 

Reviews. 




See 

Testimonials 

and 

Reviews, 



ELEVATION. 



As a Proof of their Superiority over all others, 

Mr. H. L. CORTIS, Amateur Champion, 

Won the 25 and 50 MILES AMATETJE CHAMPIONSHIP RACES on a Bicycle fitted with " JEolus " Bearings, 
BEATING EECOED TIME, and in a Five Mile Eace BEATING EECOED TIME in Three, Four, and Five MUes. 



In the SIX DAYS' EACE at LONDON, April last, rode the Unprecedented Distance of 220 MILES and som« oii 
laps without dismounting from the Bicycle or once Oiling the Bearings. 



SOLE PROPRIETOR AND MAKER 



AVILLIAM BOAVN. 

308, SUMMER LANE, BIEMINGHAM, 



ALSO MANUFACTUEEE OF 



Best Steel Balls, Bicycle Fittings, and Requisites of every 
description and General Stamping in Iron and Steel. 

N.B, — Considerable reduction in price of the " ^olus " Bearings this Season. 



Printed for the Proprietors, and Published by th'='m at 11, Ave Maria Lane, in the City of Londou 



<X.)^:; 




Vol. IX. No. 124 



Price, witli Supplement, 4d. 



DUNBAR, MCMASTER & CO., 

GILFORD, IRELAND, 

Manufacturers of aU kinds of Linen Threads. 

Highest Medsls were awarded Dunbar & Go's Threads wherever exhibited 

FOR HAND OR MACHIHE SEWING OF ALL DE8CR1PTI0HS, 

„. , SUITABLE FOR ALL PURPOSES, SHOES, SOLE SEWING, TAILORS. &c 

DTOBAB AND CO.'S THREADS ABB THE BEST. 




Samples and Prices on Application. 




RAWORTH'S 

COTTONS are REMARKABLE 



FOR tAu LAND r 

USE RAWORTH'S 



FREEDOM 



IN SEWING 



COTTONS 




SPECIALLY ADAPTED for SEWING MACHINES. 

EQUALLY SUITABLE FOR HAND SEWING. 

Sold Retail by Machine Dealers. Drapers, Haberdashers, &c. 

Specially appointed Sole Manufacturer to the Queen. 



2 



THE SEWIKG MACHHSTE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Maech 1, 1881. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

New Inventions in Sewing and Domestic Machinery .... 19 and 20 

Trades in Cycles and Sewing Machines 21 

Electric Lighting for Domestic Purposes 21 

Circulating Pipes or Gas Heaters 22 

Exhibition List of Exhibitors 22 and 33 

Curious Industries in New York 23 

Leaders 26 and 27 

The World in a Hurry 3° 

Patents 3' 

WiU All Succeed ? 3^ 

Early Patents Relatingto Needles 33 

Death of Mr. Myron Perry 34 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

Bicycle and Tricyle Manufacturers: 

Devey, Joseph & Co 3^ 

Harrington & Co 3^ 

Hillman, Herbert & Cooper , 9 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

Surrey Machinists Co 36 

Warman, Laxon & Co 38 

Bicycle Bearings and Fittings Manufacturers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co '. 13 

Bown, W 10 

Devey, Joseph & Co 3^ 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

Warsvick, Thomas , 26 

Bicycle Saddle and Bag Manufacturers : 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

"Warwick, Thomas 26 

Boot Machinery Manufacturers : 

Blake and Goodyear Company 11 

Howe Machine Co., Limited 17 

Button Hole Machines: 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Company 10 

Gas Engine Makers .• 

Andrew, J. E. H. 37 

Crossley Brothers 18 

Kilting Machine Manufacturers : 

Hohoyd, J 15 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Co 18 



Publications : 

Piatt on Life 29 

Urquhart on the Sewing Machine 26 

Sewing Cotton Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 36 

Evans, Walter & Co 14 

Raworth, John T I 

Sewing Machine Attachment Makers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 13 

Bown, W 9 

Daville, R. S. & Co 37 

Manasse, Max 38 

Sewing Machine Manufacturers : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Co 10 

Gritzner & Co 6 

Hohoyd, J 41 

Howe Machine Company, Limited .•,,.... 16 

Junker & Ruh 13 

Mothersill, R 7 

Raymond & Co. (P. Frank) 7 

Rennick, Kerasley & Co 28 

Singer Manufacturing Company 4, 5 

Thurlow, Charles 36 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Company, Limited 18 

Watson & Co 36 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co 8 

Wliite Sewing Machine Company : 3 

Wright & Go 7 

Sewing Machine and Bicycle Oil Makers: 

Ariston Oil Company 9 

Bishop's Cluster Company 13 

Daville & Co 5 

Sewing Machine Needles : 

The Park Wood Mills Company 



13 

Sewing Thread Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 14 

Dunbar, McMaster, & Co i 

Evans, Walter, & Co 16 

Finlayson, Bousfield & Co. .'. 10 

Marshall & Co 11 

Trade Protection Societies : 

Stubbs' Mercantile Offices 12 

Washing Machine Manufacturers : 

Holmes, Pearson, Midgley, & Co 15 

Twelvetrees, Harper 37 

Theobald, E 38 

Whitley & Co 37 

Taylor & Wilson 14 

Taylor, F. D 36 



CO 



o 

l-H 

it 









l!!.d:oC3-IXjIj'S 



Secured by Boyal Letters Patent, No. 756, 2oth Feb., 1879. 



PRESS. 




For Binding- Papers, Pamphlets, &c., sampling- Woollens, Cottons, Silks, &c., and for suspending: 
ShowCaids, &c., McGill's Patent Staple Fasteners and Staple Suspending' Rings will be found un- 
surpassed in adaptability, and the only articles for the purposes intended that can be applied auto- 
matically. McGill's Patent Single-Stroke Staple Press automatically inserts these Fasteners and 
Hings. A single stroke of the operator's hand upon the Plunger of the Press will instantaneously 
insert and clinch the Staple or King, in the articles to be bound or suspended. 

Also HcGill's Patent American Paper Fasiteners, Binders, Suspending: _ 
Rings and Braces, Picture Hangers, &c., cheaper and superior to any staple Suspend- 
other make. ing Eing, 
" es. per 1000 

EUROPEAN AGENTS— 

A-y ,-^1 F. W. LOTZ & Co., 20, Barbican, London, EC 
,^#«" ^ 



wholesale only. discount to exporters. 
Illustrated Catalogue and Price List on Application. 




staple Fastener. 
SB. per lOOO* 



March 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY. 



MANUFACTORY : 



Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. 



PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN OFFICE 



19, QUEEN VICTORIA ST., L ONDON, E.G. 

Manufacturers of the justly Celebrated 

WHITE SEWING MACHINES, 

THE POPULAR FAVORITES FOR NOISELESSNESS AND EASY 

TREADLE MOVEMENT. 

SUPERLATIVE 




IN 



Machines for 

all work. 

12 various lrrTTT?TT)l 

styles. |lllLliv| 



Every machine 

Warranted for 

5 years. Legal 

guarantee. 



ATTRIBUTES, 



IT IS THE FINEST FINISHED AND 

BEST MADE MACHINE IN THE 

WORLD. 

IT IS THE EASIEST-SELLING- AND 

BEST- SATISFYING MACHINE 

EVER PRODUCED. 



The Peerless Hand 
Machine. 




Cheapest and Best in the Market. 
Warranted for^3 years. 

LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGENTS. 



All Sewing Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this— the latest Improved and Best 
Silent Lock-Stitch Shuttle Sewing Machine— or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &c., to 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

19, Queen Victoria Street, London, E.C, 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. March 1, 1881. 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

The largest Sewing Machine Mamifacturers in the World. 

Upwards of 538,609 of these CELEBRATED MACHINES were Sold In the year 1880, being 

at the rate of over 1,800 for every working day. 
TEE GREAT SJ.LE affords most convincing proof of their popularity and value, and is attributaUe 

to the reputation obtained for 

Excellence of Manufacture, Strength and Beauty of Stitch, 

AND rOE THEIE 

Perfect Adaptability to every Class of Sewing. 



PRICE 



from 



£4 4s. 



FOR CASH 

from 



^4 Os., 



May be had on "Hire, with option 
of Purchase," by paying 

2/6 




No Household should 
be >A^ithout one of the 

Family Machines, 
which are unequalled 

for all Domestic 

Se-wing. So simple, a 

child can work them. 

MANTJFACTTJRERS should see the 
Manufacturing Machines ! 

Are unsurpassed for the Factory or 
"Workshop ! 



CAUTION ! 

Beware of Imitations ! Attempts are made to palm them upon the unwary under the pretext 

of being on a " Singer Principle" or " System." 
To Avoid Deception buy only at the Offices of the Company. 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & Co.), 
Chief Counting-House in Burope-39, FOSTER LANE, E.G. 

3S3 Branch Oflaces in the United Kingdom. 

LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 
195, Holloway Road, N., 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N, 

51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. 



147, Cheapside, E.G. 

132, Oxford Street, W. 

31 & 33, Newington Causeway^ S.E. 

149, SoTitlawark Park Road, S.E. 

278, Clapliam Koad, S.W. 



144, Brompton Eoad, S.W. 
269, Commercial Eoad, E. 
174, Hackney Eoad, E. 
45, Broadway, Stratford, E. 
3, Ordnance Eow, Barking Eoad, 
Canning Town, E. 



6, High Street, Woolwich. 

7, Kew Eoad, Eichmond, S.W. 

1, Clarence Street, Kinggton, S.W. 
131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. 
4a, North End, Croydon, S.E. 




MAlics 1, l88i. tHE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 

THE SINSER MANUFAGTURI 

(Formerly I, M. SINGER & CO.), 

SINGER'S SEWING MACHINES 



Chief Counting House in Europe : 

39 FOSTER LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.G. 



LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES : 

147, Cheapside, E.G. ; 132, Oxford Street, W. ; 51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. ; 31 and 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. ; 149, Blue 
Anchor Road, Bermondsey, S.E (now 149, Southwark Park Road) ; 278, Clapham Road, S. W. ; 144, Brompton Road, S.W. ; 2G9, Commercial 
Road, E. (comer of Bedford Street) ; 174, Hackney Road, E. (opposite Weymouth Terrace) ; 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N. ; 
I, Surinam Terrace, Stratford, E. (between Swan and Bank) ; 1, Rathbone Street; Barking Road, Canning Town, E, ■ 7, Kew Road, 
Richmond, S.W.; 1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. ; 131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. ; Croydon, 4a, North End. 



PROVINCIAL OFFICES : 



ENGLAND. 

A-CCrington, 9, Peel-street 
Mdershot, Victoria^road 
fcifreton, 68, King-street 
Ashford, 17, Marsh-street 
Ashton-u.-Lyne, 246. Stamfd-st. 
Ayleebury, Silver-street 
Bakewell, North Church- street. 
Banbury, Market Place 
Bamsley, Eldon-street 
Barrow -in -Fumesa, II, Dalteith- 

street 
Bath, 5, Quiet-street 
Batley, Commercial-street 
Bedford, 36, Midland-road 
Bicester, Sheep-street 
Big:gleswade, Shortmead-street 
Bingley, Main-street. 
BirkenJicad, 164, Qrange-Iane 
Birrainpham, 93, New- street 
Bishop Auckland, 29, South-rd, 
Bishop Stortford, "Wind Hill 
Blackburn, .54a, Church -street 
Blyth, "Woodbine-tcr., "Waterloo 
Bolton, 52, Newport- street 
Boston, 3J, Market-place 
Bradford, 38, Mechanics' Instit. 
Uraintree, 7, Fairfield-road 
Urmtwood, 3, Crown-street 
Hri:;htoTi, 6, North. ,st., Quadrant 
Iliistol, i8 & 19, High-street 
Uromlcy (Kmt), 18, High-street 
Burnley, HO, St. James' -street 
Purton-on-Trent, 76, Guild-street 
Kury-St.-Edmunds,7&,St.John-st. 
Camhridge, 17, Petty Cury 
Canterbury, 6, High-street 
Carlisle, Lnme-bldgs., Bank-st. 
Chatham. 342, High-street 
Cheadle, High-street 
Chelmsford, High-street 
Ch^atenham, 24, Pittville-street 
Chester, 6R, Foregate-street 
Chosterfi'.'ld, 1. Corporation-bldgB. 
Chichester, 54, East^street 
niiorley, 50, Clifford-street 
Olcckheaton. 5, Crown-street 
Clitheroe, 1^9, Wellgate 
Conlvillc, Station-street. 
CMlchester, 32, St. Botolph-street 
Colne iLancayhire), 8, Arcade 
Congleton, 7, Mill-street 
Coventry,', 12, Fleet-street (op 

Bablate Church) 
Crewe, S?, Nantwich-road 
Darlington, 10, Prebend-row 
bartlordi 18, High-Btreut 



Deal, 124, Beach-street 
Denbigh, 36, Park-street 
Derby, 22, "Wardwick 
Dewsbury, Nelson-street (top of 

Daisy -hill) 
Doncaster, 23, Scot-lane 
Douglas (lale of Man), 6, Strand- 
street 
Dover, 9, Priory-street 
Dover court, Harwich -road 
Dudley, 217, "Wolverhampton- st. 
Durham, 3, Neville-street 
Eastbourne, 46, Terminus-road 

(two doors from post office) 
Kccles, 31, Church-street 
Exeter, 19, Queen street 
Folkestone, Market-place 
Gloucester, 116, "Westgate-street 
Grantham, 11, "Wharf -road 
Gravesend, 20, New-road 
Grimsby, 57, Freema4.-*tre^t 
Guernsey, 17, Smith-street 
Guildford, 161, High-street 
Halstead, 63, High-street 
Hanley, 48, Piccadilly 
Harrogate, 11, "Westmoreland-st.! 
Hastings, 48, Robertson-street 
Heckmondwlke, 2, Market-street 
Hednesford, Station- street 
Hereford, 57, Commercial -street 
Hertford, Forden House, Ware- 
road 
Hexham, 20, Market-place 
High "Wycombe, 123, Oxford-rd. 
Hinckley, Castle-street 
Huddersfield, 8, New-street 
Hull, 61, "Whitefriargate 
Huntingdon, High-street 
Ilkeston, 75, Bath-street 
Ipswich, 19, Butter -market 
Jersey, 14a, New-street 
Keighley, 2, Market-place 
Kendall, 3, "Wildman-street 
Kiddepminster, Bull Ring 
Lancaster, 19, Brock-street (cor- 
ner of Pcnny-stroet) 
Leamington, 38. "Windsor-street 
Leeis, 14, Boar-lane 
Leek, 27, Eussoll-street 
Leicester. 44, Granby-street 
L^wes, 164, High-street 
Liverpool, 21, Bold-street 
Longton (Staffs.). 12 Market-ter. 
Loughborough, 44, Market-place 
Lowestoft, 123, Hicrb -street | 

Luton, 32. Park- sLnx-t -» ' 

Lynn, 9, Norfolk-street i 

M»id»toBf , 8, King-8t»--'^ I 



Maldon, High-street , | 

1105, Ma' ket- street; 
132, Cheetham-hill' 
438, Stretford-road 
Manningtree, High-street 
Mansfield, 32, Nottingham-street 
Market Drayton, Shropshirc-st. 
Market Harboro', Church-street 
Melton Mowbray, Victoria House, 

Market-place 
Middlesboro', 59, Newport-road 
Morley, 4, Bradford-buildings, 

Cbapel-hill 
Newark, 15, Kirkgate 
Newcastle-on-'Pyne, 16, Qrainger- 

street, "W. 
Newcastle-under-Lyne, 34, Bridge^ 
street I 

Newport (Ttlon.), 28, High-street 
Newport (I of Wight), 91,Pyle-st. 
Newton Heath, 622, Oldham-road 
Northampton, 3, Market-square 
Northwich, 17, "Witton-strect 
Norwich, 55, London-street 
Nottingham, 20, WTieelergate 
Oldham, 70, Yorkshire-street 
Openshaw, 37, Ashton-old-road 
Ormskirk, 58, Aughton-street 
Oswestry, Bailey-street 
Otley, 34, Kirkgate 
Oxford, 3, New-road 
Penrith, 8, Castlcgate 
Peterborough, 53, Narrow Bridge- 
street 
Plymouth, 3, Bank of England-pl. 
Pontefract, 11, New Market-hall 
Portsea, 165, Queen-street 
Preston, 147, Friargate-iiiTeet (op- 
posite Lune-street 
Ramsgate, 31, "West Giff-road 
Rawtenstall, Bank-street 
Reading, 61, London-street 
Red Hill, High-street 

Retford, 3, Grove-street 
E.ipley, Market-place 
Lipon, 1, Blossomgate 
Rochdale, 66, Yorkshire-street 
Romford, Market-place 
Rotherhain, 109, Main-strertt 
Rugby, Lawford-road 
Runcorn, High-street 
Ryde (Isle of Wight\ 78, Union-st. 
Saffron Wahlen, Church-street 
Salisbury, 56, Fisherton- street 
Salford, 4, Cross-iane. and 100, 

Regent-road 
Scarborongh, 30, HunnisB-rov 



Scotholme, Basford-road 

Sheffield, 37, Parnate 
Shipley, 19, Kirkgate 
Shrewsbury, 4, Market-street 
Sittingbome, 64, High-street 
Southampton, 105, High-street 
Southend, Market-place 
Southport, 7, TJnion-street 
St. Helen's, 31, Market-place 
Stafford, 25, Gaol-road 
Stamford, Ironmonger-street 
South Stockton, 19, Mandale-road 
Stockport, U, Bridge-street 
Stourbridge, 61, Church-street 
Stratford-on-Avon, 19, W^od-st. 
Stroud, 7, George-street 
Swadlincote. Station "treet 
Swindon, 52, Regent-street 
Tamworth. 54. Church-street 
Taunton, Bridge-street 
Torquay, 58, Fleet-street 
TiTiro, 13, Victoria-p/ace 
Tunbridge "Wells, Vale-road 
Tunstall, 119, High-street 
"Wakefield, 9, Kirkgate 
"Walsall, 2, Bridge-street 
"Warrington, 44, Horsemarkct-st. 
"Watford,"^ Queen's-road 
Wednesbury, 67, "Union-street 
"Wellington, Chxu'ch -street 
West Bromwich, 5. New-street 
"Whitehaven. 70, King-street 
"Wigan, 21, King-street 
Winchester, 27, St. Thomas-street 
"Windsor, 64a, Peascod-street 
Winsford, Over-lane 
"Wirksworth, North-end 
"Wisbeach, 51, Market-place 
"Wolverhampton, Queen-street 
"Worcester, 2, St. Nicholas-street 
"Wrexham, 7, Charles-street 
Yarmouth, Broad-Row 
York, 24, Coney-street 

WALES. 

Abergavenny, 19, Market-street 
Abcrj'stwith, Market-hall 
Builth, High-street 
Cardiff, 5, Queen-sti'ewt 
Carmarthen, 7, Lammas-street 
Carnarvon, 5, Bridge-street 
Dolgelly, Market-hall 
Merthyr, 1, Victoria-sti*eet 
Newtown, Market-hall 
Pontypool, Market-hall ^ 
Pontypridd, Market- hall 
Swansea, 103, Oxford -street 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, 225, Union-street 
Arbroath, 159, High-street 
Ayr, 60, High-street 
Baiiff, 17, Strait-path 
Cui»ar-Fife, 61, Crossgate 
Dumbarton, 67, High-street 
Dumfries, 127, High-street 
Dundee, 128, Nothergate 
D'jnfermline, 87, High-street 
Edinburgh, 74, Princes-street 
Elgin, 215, High-street 
Forfar, 28, Castle-street ^ 
Galashiels, 62, High-street 
Glasgow, 39, TJnion-street 
Greenock, 8, "West Blackhall-st. 
Hamillon, 32, Cadzow-sti'eet 
Hawick, 3, Towcr-knowe 
Inverness, 14, Union-street 
Kilmarnock. 83, King-stree* 
Kirkcaldy, 09, High-=*rcet 
Kirkwall (Orkney), Broad-street 
Montrose, 96, Murray-sti'eet 
Paisley, 101, High-street-crosa 
Partick, 97, Dumbarton-road 
Perth, 64, St. John-street 
Peterhead, Rose-street 
Stirling, 61, Murray-place 
Tain, Lamington-street 
Thurso, Princes-street 

IRELAND. 

Armagh, 2, Ogle-street 
Athlone, Church-street 
Ballina, Bridge-street 
Ballymena, 67 and 68, Church-st. 
Belfast, 3 and 4, Donegal-sq., N. 
Carlow, Tullow-street 
Coleraine, New-row 
Cork, 79, Grand-parade 
Drogheda, 97, St. George'e-streeffi 
Dublin, 69, Grafton-street 
Ennis, Jail-street 
Enniskillen, 15, High-street 
Fermoy, 1, King-street 
Galway, Domnick-street 
Kih-ush, Moore-street 
Kingstown, 65^ Lower Groorge-at 
Linioriuk, 31, Patrick -street 
LondondeiTy, 1, Carlisle-road 
Mulliiigar, Greialle-street 
Navan, Ti'imgate-streot 
Newry, 18, Sugar-island 
Parsonstown, 2, Seffins 
Queenstown, Haibour-row 
Sligo, 45, Knox-street 
Tralee. 40, Bridge-street 
"Waterford, 124, Quay 
"Wexford, Selskar-ctareot 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Masch i, 1881. 



6RITZNER 




Factory of Sewing Machines and Sewing Machine Cabinets 



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TO SE'winsro ia^ohziitei r)B.A.rjEE,s. 

LATEST NOVELTY. 

Grr PATENTED IN ENGLAND AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 
_ - Delivered with complete treadle movement free in London at prices but little above thosQ 

''OMBlHATlOfl 



GUBINET 



Furnished 

for all systems of machines. 

Very useful. More solid than iron stands. 

Honourable mention and highest rewards at numerous Exhibitions, 

Novel I 
Cheap! 
Solid ! 
Elegant I 



SECOND 
HIGHEST 

Medal 

AT THE LATE 

Sydney 

International 
EXHIBITION 

1879. 



for usual iron stands with table and cover. 

Without or with our machines, either plain style or inlaid in mother-of- 
pearl, and highly ornamented in hand painting by special 
'~~~~"~~-^.._ artists. All machines with loose wheel 
'^ rrlln I'M MID iljn !"""-*——.-_ and self-aotlng winder. 



^GHm 



Bl^flSlON 





Wholesale Agents wanted throughout the United Kingdom. 



^i 



Maech 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



PATENT SEWING MACHINES. 



The Celebrated "TAYLOR FRICTION" Improved... 

The " COMMERCIAL HOWE " Hand Machine 

The ditto ditto Treadle 

The " COMMERCIAL" CHAIN STITCH formerly caUed 
"The Express" 

"TAYLOR'S PATENT," No. 3 (Treadle) 

The "COMMERCIAL FAMILY MACHINE S" 

The ditto Hand ditto 



NETT CASH, 

RETAIL. 


by the Half Doz. 
WHOLESALE. 


£4 14 


6 


£2 


4 4 





1 15 


5 5 





2 10 


2 2 





17 


610 





3 


5 5 





2 15 


4 4 





2 



Mangles and "Washing Machines at full Discount. Mothersill's Patent BICYCLES 
35 per cent, off List Prices. Lists of Prices free on application. 



R. MOTHERSILL, 4a, Lawrence Lane, Cheapside, 




WRIGHT & CO., 

SewingMaohine Merchants J Manufacturers , 

27, SHOREDITCH, LONDON. E; 

ALSO AT 457 AND 502 KIN6SLAND ROAD, LONDON, N. 

The TRADE and SHIPPERS supplied with every description of Sewing Machines 
upon the most liberal terms. 

Hand Machines, from 18s. 

Treadle Machines with aU the most recent 

Improvements. 

LOCKSTITCH, ANT SYSTEM, WAERA.NTED FEOM 60s. 
Agents wanted throughout Great Britain and tlie Coloniei. 

Catalogues and Terms upon Application, 



THE ARISTOT^ OIL COMPANY, 

15, KIRBY STREET, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, E.G. 
MAKERS OF SPECIAL SEWING MACHINE AND BICYCLE OILS. 

Wholesale and for Export. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mabch 1, 188i. 




THE 

ONLY 
'' eRAND 
PRIZE" 

FOE 

SEWING 
MACHINES 

AT THE 

PARIS 
EXHIBITION, 1878. 





ROTARY-HOOK LOCK-STITCH TREADLE 

SEWING mACHINES 

From £5 10s. Hand Machines from =£4 4s. 



f 



The New-Straight Needle Machines, for which the "GEAND PEIZE" was awarded, are the 

No. 8. — The New Family and Light Manufacturing Machine. Strongly recommended Price £7 lOs. 

No. 6. — ^ Powerful Machine, capable of doing all grades of work from the finest to the thickest 

in the best possible manner, including all the various kinds of Leather work . . , , „ £8 lOs. 

Also No. 6 Cylinder Machine for special classes of Boot work ,, £V0, 

No. 7. — Similar to the No. 6 Machine, but especially suitable for Corset work, heavy Tailoring, 

Upholstery, &c , . , £8 lOs, 

The Well-known Original Family and Light Manufacturing Machines. 

Nos. 1 & 2 Prices, £6 lOs., £7 10«- 

The New No. 8 Hand Machine, specially recommended. 

If *he best and most perfect Hand Machine yet produced, and combines the utmost efficiency 
with elegance of appearance, rendering it suitable to the lady's boudoir or fcr travelling. 

Price, WITH COVEE, complete, £6 gg, 

INSTRUCTION GEATIS TO ALL (whether purchasers or not) at any of our offlcps, a 

good operators recoramended to employers. 

Machine ON HIRE with OPTION OF PURCHASE from 2/6 per Week, or from 10/- per Month. 

"EVERY Machine made by wheeler and wilson has their trade mark affixed 

Illv^trated Catalogues and other Particulars, Post Free. 



THE WHEELER & WILSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



London, Chief Office, 21, Queen 

Victoria Street, B.C. 
London, 139, Regent Street, W. 

„ J 4i), Newington Causeway, S.E. 
Liverpool, 73, Bold Street. 
Birmingham, Stevenson Place, 
Brighton, 163, North Street. 



Bristol, 50, Victoria Street. 
Plymouth, 187, Union Street. 
Cardiff, 17, St. Mary Street. 
Nottingham 16, Lister Gate. 
Newcastle, West Grainger Street. 
Hull, 9, Savile Street. 
Manchester, 131, Market Street. 



Leeds, 41, Commercial Street. 
Sheffield, 126, Barker's Pool. 
Tork, 27, Coney Street. 
Bradford, 57, Tyrrel Street. 
Edinburgh, 7, Frederick Street. 
Glasgow, 71, Union Street. 
Dublin, 1, Stephen's Green. 



Belfast, 63, High Street. 
Cork, 32, Grand Parade. 
Norwich, 45, London Street. 
Exeter, London Inn Square. 
Torquay, 115, Union Stre»t. 
Taunton, 2, High Street. 
Stroud, 1, John Streeti 



Maech 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



HILLMAN, HERBERT, & COOPER 

Works :— O O V E N T R Y. 

London : 97, Cheapside. Leicester : 76, Welford Road. 



P 




MAKERS OF THE 



H 




9 



Premier," " Flying Dutchman," & other Bicycles & Tricycles. 






BlUHAH tIERBERT &.COOPEB 
MAKERS. 

COOPER'S 

INEXTINGUISHABLE 

HUB LAMP. 

The only Lamp that does 
not go out on a rough road. 





■5 " a ^-. 10 u 



■to 



PATENT DOUBLE 

BALL BEARINGS. 

On the " D.H.F. PREMIER," fitted with our Patent Ball Bearings, was accomplished 
The greatest distance ever ridden in one week, viz. :— 1,405 MILES, and on the same Machine 
The greatest distance in one day is 262 MILES- 

SEND FOR CATALO GUE FREE. 

TESTiDvnoisrij^XjS. 

Please send another large size "Cooper's Patent" Lamp, so that I may get it to-morrow. It is the 
grandest thing in Lamps that I have ever seen or tried. — Tours truly, W. Tatteesfieid. 
Dear Sirs Brighton, December 27th, 1880. 

We have much pleasure in testifying to the excellence of " Cooper's Patent Lamps," which give great 
satisfaction. Tours truly, H. Eevell Eetnolds, jun.. Dark Blue B.C., and L.B.C. 

E. K. Eevell Eetnolds, Dark Blue B.C. 
L. B. Eetnolds, L.B.C. 



All Communications to be addressed to the Works, COVENTRY. 



11 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Matich 1, 1881. 



THE PATENT 



"/EOLUS" BALL BEARINGS 



AEE 



UNIVEESALLT 



ADJUSTABLE, 



DUST PBOOF, 



DUEABLE, 




AND 

EEQUIRB 

BUT SLiaHT 

LUBEIOATIOIT. 



ElETATtON. 



,•> BEOTION. 



PEONT VIEW. 



BACK WHEEL BEARINGS. 



See 

Testimonals 

and 

Reviews. 




See 

Testimonials 

and 

Reviews, 



ELEVATION. 



BEOnON. 



As a Proof of their Superiority over all others, 

Mr, H. L. CORTIS, Amateur Champion, 

Won the 26 and 50 MILES AMATEUE CHAMPIONSHIP EAOES on a Bicycle fitted with " ^olus " Bearings, 
BEATING EECOED TIME, and in a Five Mile Eace BEATING EECOED TIME in Three, Four, and Five Miles. 



In the SIX DATS' EACE at LONDON, April last, rode the Unprecedented Distance of 220 MILES and som« odd 
laps without dismounting from the Bicycle or once Oiling the Bearings. 



SOLE PROPRIETOR AND MAKER 



AVILL^IAM BOAVN, 

308, SUMMER LANE, BIRMINGHAM, 



ALSO MANUFACTUREE OF 



Bestf^Steel Balls, Bicycle Fittings, and Eequisites of every 
description and General Stamping in Iron and Steel. 

N.B,— Considerable reduction in price of the " ^olus" Bearings this Season. 



MiBCH 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMEbTIC APPLIANCES. 11 

The Only Gold Medal for Boot and Shoe Machinery Awarded al the 
Paris Exposilion was for Ihe Machinery of 

THE BLAKE & GOODYEAR 

BOOT AND SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY, 

LIMITED. 





A aEEAT VAEIETT OF MACHIMEI 

FOR 

HEEL NAILING AND TRIMMING, 

EDGE TRIMMING AND SETTING, 
HEEL BLOCKING, RAND AND WELT CUTTJNG, 

RAND TURNING, 

SELF-FEEDING EYELET MACHINES, 

Self -Feeding Punches, Double and Single Fitting Machines 

FOR PUTTING IN ELASTICS, 

STRAIGHT AND CIRCULAR READERS, 
And a great variety of other Machiiiery and Patented Tools. 



MANY OF OUR MACHINES MAY BE SEEN IN MOTION, 

AT NEWPORT PLACE, LEICESTER. 

Baw Hide Mallets & Hammers for Shoe Manufacturers & Machinists, 
ROLLERS, PRESSES, KNIVES, AND IRON OR WOOD LASTS. 



1, WORSHIP S^TREET, LONDON, E.C. 



12 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. March 1, 1881. 



^ ESTABLISHED 1836. 

STUBBS' MERGAHTTILE OFFIOES 

TEADE AUXILIARY COMPANY, LIMITED. 




HEAD OFFICES: 



42, GEESHAM ST., LOI^DON, E.O 

West End Branch, 53, Conduit Street, Regent St., W. 



For IRELAND. 



BIRMINGHAM-JK), Exchange Buildings. 
BRADFORD, Yorkshire— 1 Booth Street. 
BRISTOL— 4, Bristol Chambers. 
BRIGHTON— 23, Prince Albert Street. 
CORK— 70, South Mall. 



OFFICES : 

For SCOTLAND. 



CHIEF 

(■DUBLIN— 21, College Green. 
\ BELFAST— 55, Victoria Stre,-»i. 

DISTRICT OFFICES: 

GLOUCESTBRr-6, College Court. 
LEEDS- 1, East Parade. 
LIVkRPOOL— 71, Lord Street. 
MANCHESTER— 14, BroTV-n Street. 
NEWCASTLE- 32, Grainger Street West. 

With Agents and Correspondents throughout the Kingdom, on the Continent of Europe, and in the United Status of 

America, and the British Colonies. 

BANKERS : 

LONDON— The Union Bank op London. 



f GLASGOW— 21, St. Vincent Place. 
(EDINBURGH— 4, Cockburn Street. 



NORWICH— Post Office Sti'eet. 
PORTSMOUTH -86, High Street. 
SHEFFIELD- 85, Queen Street. 
SOUTHAMPTON— 150, High Street. 



BELFAST- The Noethern Banking Company. 
BIRMINGHAM— Lloyd's Banking Company. 
BRISTOL— The National Peovincial Bank op England. 
DUBLIN— The National Bank. 



EDINBURGH— The NATIONAL BANK OP Scotland. 
GLASGOW— The British Linen Company. 
LIVERPOOL— The Bank op Liveepool. 
MANCHESTER- Manchester and Salford Bank. 



STUBBS' MERCANTILE OFFICES, 

With their various associated Agencisa, form together a complete organisation for the protection of Bankers, Merchants. 
Manufacturers, Traders, and others, against risk and fraud in their various commerciiil transactions. 

Subscribers to these Offices can, by their Agency, recover debts due to them with promptitude. 
Stubbs' "Weekly Gazette" supplies information which is absolutely indispensable to Traders. 

T£:e,i^s of stjescriftiokt 

(Except for Social Service and Financial Departments, in which the Bates will be fixed by Agreement according to the 

eircumstances.) One, Two, Thbee, and Five Guineas, according to requirements. 

PROSPECTUSES GIVING FULL PAETICULAKS ON APPLICATION. 



O J^ TJ T I 
There h no Office in London connected with Stubbs 



Mercantile Offices (situate at the corner of 
King St., opposite Guildhall), except the West End Branch at 53, Conduit St., Regent St., W. 



■■ill 



Maech 1, 18SI. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



13 



TEADE 



MARK 




ANNUAL PRODUCTION, 
30,000 MACHINES. 



TRADE 



MA1:K 



ORieiMAL RHFNANIA, 

UraiVAI.LED SPLENDID 

HAND 

SIDWING 
MACHINE. 

ORiGliiAL FIDELITAS, 
Best Family ^_ 

SLWING "^ 
rflACHINE. 



PROPER IRION FOUNDRY. 

riEST PBIZES AT DIFFERENT EXHIBITIONS. 





GROVER AND 
BAKER'S 

Sewing 
Machine 

FOR TRADE. 

ORIGINAL BAD'r^lA, 
HEAVY STRONG 

SEWING 
MACHINES 

rOK THAI E. 



TliADIO 



MAr.K 




JUNKER & RUH, _ 

Sewing Machine Manufactory, * 

CAIiLSEUHE (Germany). 




MAKK 




THE LARGEST 

iwi; 



THE LARGEST SEWING 



THE LARGEST SEWING MACHINE 



Machine "Belt" 
Manufacturers. 




Warehouse. 



Oil 
Manufacturers. 

Bishop's Cluster Company, Limited, 25, Hamsell St., London, B.C. 





SEWING AND MACHINE NEEDLES 

ALL KINDS OF FANCY NEEDLES, KNITTING PINS, CROCHET HOOKS, THIMBLES, j^c, 

THE PARK WOOD MILLS CO. 

NEEDLE MANUFACTURERS, 

Price Lists Free. 230, BRADFORD STREET, BIRMmGHAM. 



J 



14 



THE SfiWlNG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Maech 1, 1881. 



• 

O 

O g O fe 

H g H o 

H ^ H H 

O tn O H 

O g O o 

^ "^ W H 

•-^ p W PM 

W 03 O <1 

O S O P5 

m ' o 

M 



neoiL FOR MEHQ 










w ^ 1^ > 

"^ ^ ^ 






M 



Kj o Q Q 



"Si MiiiPiefi 



11, 



O H 

H O 

o • 

!2| 



o bj o 



O o 

H ° 
O 



SIX-CORD SOFT AND EXTRA QUALITY GLACE 

BEING OF VERY SUPERIOR QUALITY, ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED" 




C. and Co. beg to direct attention to their 
celebrated CROCHET or TATTING COTTON, in 

Hanks or Balls. 



ESTABLISHED 1759. 





MAGIG STEAM LAUNDRY WASHER 



SECUEED BY 
EOYAL 




LETTERS 
PATENT. 



The cheapest and most economical Washer introduced, avoiding all the wear oE linen 
caused by present modes. Things to be washed only require to be soaked, soaped, steamed, and 
hand-rubbed once, 

No nse of chemicals, soda, dollies, maids, wash-boards; no tnrning or pushing machine 
handles ; only one-half the soap used. See opinion of JESSE OvERTON, Springfield Laundry, 
Leammgton, in Queen of 17th of July, page 68 : — "The steam softens, and the condensed water 
carries away grease and stickiness, just as a belt of perspiration does off a dirty forehead," 
COLOUK OF WASHING DECIDEDLY IMPROVED. 

MAGIC LAUNDRY WASHER COMPANY, 

814, Lichfield Road, Aston, Birmingham. 



!Mabch 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP bOMESTlO APPLIANCES. 



15 



HOLROYD'S NEW PATENT 

KILTING MACHINE 

Sells at sight, and is acknowledged by the Trade in England and Abroad to be the best for all 
purposes, upwards of 8,000 having been sold in two years, and the still increasing demand 

testifies to its unequalled excellence. 

THIS ilachine, by its simplicity and constraction, will at once commend itself to 
Merchants and Manufacturers, and wUl supply that which has long been 
wanted, namely, a good, practical, and durable Machine at a reasonable price. 

It can be worked by hand, treadle, or steam power, and heated by gas or irons as 
desired ; and it runs so light that it can be worked by hand for any length of time 
without the slightest fatigue. 

It will make any kind of kUt desired, from the narrowest to an inch wide, and any 
depth up to ten inches, and can be altered to different styles and widths immediately, 
and in a most simple manner. 

It is specially adapted for manufacturing and dress-making purposes, and by its 
lightness, rapidity, and correctness, together with the fact that it will work muslin, 
thick cloth, or felt with equal facility, it cannot fail to be a great saving, and of the 
greatest advantage. 

With the gas arrangement perfect combustion is secured, thereby avoiding any 
smoke or smeU which is so unpleasant in most other machines, and being nickel 
plated all over does not rust. 

Price, complete with gas arrangements and 4 heating irons, £3 3s. 

ELECTRO-PLATING BY STEAM POWER, AND DYNAMO ELCTRIC MACHINES, 

Combining all the latest improvements in GILDING, BKONZING, &c., on rough or smooth surfaces, on any kind of metal goods. 

Special Terms offered to Manufacturers of articles suitable for plating. 




J. HOLROYD, Tomlinson St., Hulme, Manchester. 




HOLMES, PEARSON, MORTON & CO., 

MANUFACTUEEES OP 

Washing, Wringing, and Mangling Machines, 

FRUn DRESSER, SUGAR CUTTER, CHAFF CUTTER, 

Morticing Machines and Circular Saw Benches 



MANUFACTORY: 

ROYAL IRON WORKS, 

Price List on Application. 

SPECIAL TERMS TO MERCHANTS AND THE TRADE. 

ALL GOODS CAREFULLY PACKED IN SMALL SPACE FOR EXPORT. 



THE ROYAL WASHER, strong and simple in construction. An ornament to every home, and the delight of everv wife. 
Price, 32 inches, £5 10s. Rollers with BraSB Caps. 



16 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AN'D JOtJRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



MiECH 1, l88l. 



FOR SEWING 




MACHINES. 



TRADE MAEK. 



WALTER EVANS & CO., 

BO -A. m'S-ia: E .A. 3D COTT02S3- 3VrA.3SrXJFufiLC1'OR,-5r, IDERB-^ 

EVANS'S SUPERIOR SIX CORD SEWING COTTON, ON SPOOLS SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

ALSO 

SuPERioK Six-Cord Crochet Cotton, on Spools, in Skeins, and in Balls, for Sewing, Knitting, and Crochet, which 

IS especially recommended for all "first-class Crochet Work ; " also for Guipure d'Art and Point Lace 
Maltese Thread, in Balls, White, Black, and Colors 
Tatting Cotton, on Spools. 

Patent Glace Thread, in White, Black, and Colors, on Spools and Cards. 
Two and Three Cord Sewings, on Spools, soft finish. 
Sewings, in Balls. 
Embroidering, Knitting, Mending, Cotton Cords, and Small Cords. 



1862. 

London Exhibition Prize Medal, 
awarded "for very strong & 
most superior thread." 



1867. 

Paris Universal Exhibitioa 
Qold Medal. 



1873. 

Vienna First Class Medal 
" for Progress." 



1878. 

Paris Universal EzhibiUon, 
Silver MedaL 



LIAS HOWE SEWING MACHINES 




MANUFACTURED BY 

The Howe Machine Company, 

EXPEESSLT FOE BOOT & SHOE MAKEES, 

FOR 

SADDLE AND HA 7.MESS MAKERS, 

AND EC'S. 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Leather Goods, 

ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE CLOSING OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF BOOT TOPS. 



Flowering Machine (with patent vihrating attachment.) 
A SPE CIAL MACHINE f or" ELAST ICS. 

Branch Offices and Agencies in evevy Town in the United 

Kingdom. 

Price Lists and Samples oj fTor/c FREE on application. 

EASY TERMS OF "PU~RCHASE. 



The Howe Machine Oompanjr, Limited^ 

46 & 48, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDON. 



Maech 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUHNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



17 



CANADIAN SEWING MACHINES. 




£2 2s. Complete. 



This Machine lias obtained the highest re- 
putation and an enormous sale, both under 
its true name (" Raj'mond's"), and also as 
the "Weir 55s. Machine," &c. — (See caution 
below). It is durable, rapid, exceedingly 
simple, neat, not liable to get out of order, and warranted 
to sew from the finest muslin to the heaviest material. 

CATXTION. — Jamks &. Weir, who, for about eight 
years obtained these genuine Machines, is no longer sup- 
plied with them by the Inventor and Manufacturer, Mr. 
Charles Raymond. 

BEWARE OF ALL COUNTERFEITS. 




ALSO 



£4 4s. Complete. 

RAYMOND'S PATENT " Household " 
Lockstitch Machine has been designed ex- 
pressly for family use. It is e.xceedingly 
simple to learn and to manage, and warranted 
to sew every land of family and household 
work Is fitted with the latest improve- 
ments — loose wheel, and (Registered) 
Automatic Bobbin AVinder. 

Testimonials, Prospectuses, Samples o 
Work, and all particulars free on applicatio 



Raymoncrs No. 1 and 2 TREADLE MACHINES for Families, Dressmakers, and Manufacturers. 



^.O-EISTTS ■V^.A.l>a"TED. 



CHIEF DEPOT FOR EUROPE AND EXPORT: 

11, MOUNT PLEASANT, LIVERPOOL 

p. FRANK, AGENT. ESTABLISHED 1863. 



Clothes-Wrin2:ers ! Clothes-Wringers ! ! 



HARPER TWELVETREES' 

INDIA-RUBBER CLOTHES -WRINGERS, 

WITH COG-WHEELS, 

Strong Frames, Metal Bearings, Adjustable Claspers, and other great improvements, have 
maintained their supremacy for eighteen ^ears as the •■ Gem of Clothes-Wringers." They 
will fit tubs of every shape, and wring the largest as well as the smallest articles dry 
instantly without labour, droppmg them into the basket nearly dry enough to iron or 
mangle. These well-known and much-prized Clothes- Wringers are specially adapted for 
the heavy, constant work of laundresses, and are immensely superior to the slightly-made 
delicate American Importations. 

Prices: 30s., 40s., 50s., or without Cogwheels, 25s., 30s., 35s. 

Harper Twelvetrees' Cheap Fifty-Shilling Mangle and Wringer, 24-inoh R-^llers. 

. Wholesale Quotations, Pest free, from 

HARPER TWELYETREES, 

Laundry Machinist, 

80, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.G. Works: Burdett Road, Bow, E, 




18 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOXJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



March 1, 1881. 



An Engine which works without a Boiler or Steam. 

AVBRAOE MONTHLY DELIVEBT (including Continental) OVER 180 ENGINES. 




THE "OTTO" SILENT GAS ENGINE. 

IS EAPIDLT EEPLACING STEAM ENGINES FROM 1 to 40 HOESB POWEE IND. 



WORKS & HEAD OFFICES: 

Great Marlbro' St., aioster St., 
MANCHESTER. 



CROSSLEY^BROTHERS, 



LONDON HOUSE: 

116, Queen Victoria Street, E.G. 
LONDON. 



THE 'WANZER " 

LOCK-STITCH, HAND OR FOOT, 

SEWING MACHINES. 

First Prize Medals, Honours & Awards, -wlierevex Exhibited. 




THE NEW "LITTLE WANZER."— Entirely reconstructed and improved. 

Nickel-plated, Loose Wheel, New Patent Shuttle, Take-up Lever and 

Spooler. £4 4s. 
WANZER "A," Simplicity Itself.— The most powerful yet light running 

Hand Machine, straight race. £4 4s. 

WANZER "C" Light Foot Family Machine, entirely New, with every 

improvement up to 1879. £6 Os, 
WANZER " F " Family Machine, with Reversible Feed and Stitch 
Lever. £7 lOs. 

WANZER " E " Wheel Peed Machine, for heavy work of all kinds- 

£8 8s. 
WANZER PLAITING, KILTING AND BASTING 
MACHINES, 

Over 200 varieties of perfect Plaiting or Kilting, from 30s. complete. Tht 
only Machine Kilting and Basting at one operation. 



WANZER ''A'* 



The Wanzer Sewmg Machine Company ^ 

Great Mechanical Success of the Age. l i ifi i t e d , 

It combines all the hnown advantages of other Chief OflflCe— 4, GREAT PORTLAND ST., 
Uaehinea. Mounted on Ornamental Iron Base, r\'vrpr\-DT\ nfOnTia T r\-KXT\r\-KT TXT 

Pom Quineaa complete. \JjLt KJKD L»1±CU U O, UKJSi UU JN , W . 



] 



» 



March 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



19 



NEW INVENTIONS REFERRING 
TO SEWING AND DOMESTIC 
MACHINERY. 



IMPEOVEMENTS IN BICYCLES. 

The object of tliis invention is to faoiKtate the escape of 
bicycle riders from their bicycles when accidents occur, and to 
prevent their becoming entangled therewith m such cases, and 
also affording an easy mode of dismounting. This is effected 
by dispensing with the steering handle, as ordmarUy fitted, and 
su-bstituting a pair- of steering handles constructed as foUows : 
— To the lower end of the fork, which usually terminate with 
the hubs, add elongations downwards below tke radius of the 
cranks, and so as to clear the same. These elongations to the 
fork are then bent outwards to a sufficient distance to clear the 
cranks and pedals or stirrups. These elongations are then tm-ned 
ripwards, and terminate in suitable handles, one on each side of 
the rider. In case of an obstruction to the motion of the 
bicycle, or any other accident occiuTuig, the absence of the 
ordinary steering handle enables the lider to jumi3 off with 
facility and save himself from injury, as the rider's knees are 
free from impediment to his so doing. The elongations above 
mentioned may be constructed of solid metal, tubular metal, 
or any other suitable materials, and of one or several pieces, 
and suitably strengthened at the bends to insure the necessary 
stiffness. Provisional pi'otection for this invention has been 
obtamed by Mr. Joseph Goodman, 16, Hercules-biul dings, 
Lambeth-road, S.E. 

IMPROVEMENTS IN BICYCLES. 

This invention consists in improvements in the construction 
of bicycles, by means of which the machine can be propelled 
with perfect ease, at a rapid speed, and with increased safety 
to the rider as compared with such machines as ordinarily 
manufactured, whilst at the same time it possesses great 
simplicity of construction, and can be easily managed and 
controlled by the rider. The two wheels are formed of the 
same diameter, and, instead of being placed one in fi-ont of the 
other as is usually the case, they are arranged parallel to each 
other on the respective ends of an axle, the centre of which, 
that is to say, that portion which is situated between the 
wheels, is in the form of a hoop or loop. Prom the axle and 
between the wheels is suspended a frame, on which is mounted, 
at a point below the centres of the wheels, the saddle, which is 
so arranged as to admit of its being raised or lowered, in order 
to adjust it at the proper height from the ground to suit the 
length of the rider's legs. Brakes are arranged on each side of 
the lower part of the frame so that the rider, by actuating one 
or both by pressing thereon with his feet, can guide the 
machine or arrest the progress thereof, as desired ; when the 
pressure is removed the brakes are brought to their normal 
position, clear of the ground, by the action of springs. It will 
be readily understood from the above desciiption that the 
whole of the weight of the rider is suspended or bung below 
the centres of the wheels, whei-eby all danger of the machine 
being over-balanced is entirely avoided, and as the peiipheries 
of the wheels project beyond the body of the rider, they serve 
to protect him from injury in the event of the machine coming 
into contact with any obstacle. When the rider is seated on 
the saddle his body will pass through the before-mentioned 
hoop or loop of the axle, and, in that position, by lightly touch- 
ing the ground with his feet and moving his legs as when 
walking, at the same time pushing the hoop or loop with his 
hands, he can propel the machine with the greatest ease. In 
some cases the frame is extended above the axle, and a pulley 
or small wheel is mounted on the upper part of each side of 
such extended portion, and over the said wheels or pulleys are 
passed endless bands, cords, or chains, the same being also passed 
over wheels or pulleys connected to the centres of the wheels of 
the machine ; by means of this arrangement the rider can, with 
or without the assistance of his feet, as hereinbefore described, 
propel and steer the machine by simply pulling the said bands, 
cords, or chains with his hands. Letters patent have been 
granted for this invention to Mr. James Symes, of Dublin. 



AN IMPROVED MACHINE FOR CLEANING AND 
POLISHING TABLE KNIVES AND FORKS. 

The uiveutor, Mr. John Pinchbeck, of No. 11, Bridge-street, 
Westminster, who has obtained provisional protection, thus 
describes his invention : — I take a piece of wood of suitable 
size and thickness, into which I work a recess to receive a pad 
of vulcanised mdiarubber or other pliable substance. The 
recess not being so deep as the indiai'ubber is thick, allows it to 
f)roject or stana up about a sixteenth of an inch or so above 
the wood. On each side of this pad I place a steel flattened C 
sprmg, the lower limb of which is firmly fixed to the wood base 
aforesaid by means of bolts and nuts, and on the top limb of 
the said C spring, a bearing is fixed by means of screws. Each 
bearing forms part of the sides of a hopper into which the 
emery or other cleamng powder is placed. In these bearings 
revolve a spindle upon which a roUor of vulcanised indiarubber 
or other suitable substance is fixed, and at the extremity a 
crank handle by which motion is imparted to the roller. The 
C springs have the power to caiise the roller to bear hard upon 
the stationary pad between which the blade of the knife to be 
cleaned is inserted. Two adjustmg thumbscrews are ta^aped 
mto the upper limb of the C springs, the pomts of which rest 
on the lower limbs of the same, so that the necessary pressure 
may be regulated, whUe the flexibility of the springs allow the 
roUer to assume any angle to the fixed pad to allow for the 
unequal thickness of the blade. The emery or cleanuig powder 
falls through a narrow slit in the hopper on to the revolving 
roller, thus keeping it supphed with fresh powder. 

IMPROVEMENTS IN TRICYCLES. 

This invention relates, in the first place, to a mode of locking 
and guiding the steeruig wheel, so as to leave the arms at 
liberty to be used with the legs in drivmg the tricycle, and 
consists in the arrangement and combination of the paits, in 
the maimer hereinafter stated, whereby the steeling wheel can 
be locked or steadied, as requii-ed, by the pressure of the rider's 
back, and receive the necessary guiding from the action of 
either of his shoulders respectively. The locking or steadying 
of the steering wheel, as requii'ed, is effected by means of a 
stud or projection on a pivoted arm or lever, which stud is 
caused to fix the guide bar bj' the pressui'e of the back of the 
rider against the back-board, theieby acting on one end of the 
said arm or lever, and is withdrawn therefi'om (so as to liberate 
the guide bar) by the reaction of a spring against the opposite 
end'of the arm or lever on the removal of the pressure from the 
back-board. When the guide bar is thus liberated it is free to 
be acted upon by the pressure of either of the shoulders of 
the rider against a cross piece at the upper part of the back- 
board, so as to guide the steering wheel either to the right or 
left hand through the connection of the guide bar with the 
fork of the said wheel. By the arrangement of the parts, as 
above stated, when the shoulder of the rider is about to press 
on the transverse limb of the back-board, his b;ick natiu-ally 
assumes a position which takes the pressure off the vertical 
limb thereof, and liberates the end of the arm or lever con- 
nected therewith, the ojiposite end of the arm or lever being 
then acted upon by the spring so as to \vithdraw the locking 
stud from the guide bar, and leave it free to be acted upon, as 
requii-ed, for the purpose of guiding the tricycle. And when 
straight driving is again requii'ed, the steering wheel is locked 
by the pressure of the back on the vertical limb of the back- 
board causing the stud to press ag.ainst the guide bar. And 
this uivention consists, in the second jjlace, in the adaptation 
and application to tricycles of the parts and arrangements 
hereinafter stated. One wheel is rightly fixed in the usual 
way on the axle, which is double cranked, the other rotating 
with an ordinary box, but with the friction increased consider- 
ably by means of a ring of india rubber impinging on the 
collar of the spindle, and also on the hub, so that when not 
rotating at the same speed as the driving wheel the friction is 
great, but not so great as to interfere with tuining, but when 
rotating at miiform speed with the di-iving wheel, nearly half 
the driving power is communicated to it by the said ring of 
india rubber. The cranks are acted upon by rods connected to 
the lower ends of two oscillating bars, the centres of which are 
on each side of the fork of the small or steering wheel. These 
bars extend to the same length above and below their centres, 



20 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Maeoh 1, 1881. 



and huve the pedals fixed at the upper parts, so that the force 
of the legs is apjilied in a horizontal dii-ection, or nearly so. A 
handle is fixed to each connecting rod at a short distance 
from the crant in such a manner as to admit of the tricycle 
being worked hy the hands independently of the feet, or vice 
versa, and also to admit of the handles with their connections 
being used for the purposes of a break. Provisional protection 
only has been obtained for this invention to Mr. J. H. "Walsh, 
editor of The Field. 

LAMPS FOR SEWING MACHINES. 

This invention consists in enclosing the light in a metal 
covering containing upon one side of it a circular opening, in 
which may be placed a lens ; within this case or covering upon 
the opposite side of the light is placed a reflector of metnl or 
glass, pivotted so that it can be adjusted to any angle to 
throw the concentrated light which passes through the opening- 
containing the lens upon any object within focus. To adapt 
this lamp to sewing machine";, for which it will be 
found exceedingly useful for throwing tbe light directly upon 
the needle and work, the inventor uses by preference a bent 
arm, consisting at one end of a tubular piece, which fits over 
tbe spool cari-ier, and has attached to it a projecting bar to act 
as a substitute for the spool carrier on the machine. To the 
other end of this bent arm he attaches a carrier for the lamp, 
jointed to the arm, so as to allow of the lamp being placed in 
any required position. Or an arm or bracket can be used, vA'ith 
or without a cranij), to attach the lamp to the table or to any 
piece of furniture, or the lamp made to stand upon the table. 
Tbe inventor, Mr. E. Bourne, of Birmingham, obtained pro- 
visional protection only. 

THREAD HOLDER FOE SEWING MACHINES. 

The invention is an apj)lianoe to a sewing machine to be 
used in lieu of a bobbm and p)ui. The appliance is in the form 
of what is generally known as a Tyrolese-box, and may be 
made of sheet-metal, pasteboard, papier mach6, or other 
similar material or substance. On and around the cu-cum- 
feranco of the box or cylindrical tube, and midway of its 
length, a grove is formed to receive the eye of a wii'e clii^. 
The clip is formed with two arms, one arm being formed with 
an eye, into which the other arm of the clip is held when the 
appliance is attached to any convenient part of the sewing 
machine. The hivention protects the thread from dirt, the 
thread being enclosed and held by the box or cj^hndrical tube, 
from the interior of which the thread is imwound more readily 
and evenly than when imwound from off a bobbin. The 
inventor is Mr. Gustavo Touissia, of Paris, who has obtained 
provisional protection through Mr. H. G. Grant. 

IMPROVEMENTS IN PERAMBULATORS. 
This invention consists in the construction of parts of peram- 
bulators (being that class of vehicle emjjloyed for carrying 
perso'i?) so that uTie portion i.3 capable of being reversed, the 
object being to shelter its occupants during any severity of 
weather. The inventor describes his invention thus : — I con- 
struct the body pvoi^er of the vehicle somewhat as hitherto, 
and of any desired form to suit my requirement ; to this said 
body I permanently secure the handle; the seat, back, and 
sides, with heel board, which are independant of the body, I 
cause to rotate by means of a pin or pivot passing through, or 
in some case affixed upon the base or bottom of the vehicle, 
secured by a cotter pin or other suitable means. In order to 
facilitate the rotary movement of the said seat and parts which 
I may dLsignate a chair, I employ a circrdar bowl at or near 
the pivot, traversing the bottom, receiving the weight, and re- 
lieving the pin or pivot of undue strain. The inventor is Mr. 
Jauicti Lloyd, of Birmmgham, who has received provisional 
protection for the same. 



An English country editor was imprisoned for contempt 
because he put this head-line over a report of the proceedings 
of an election investigating committee : " Strange Conduct of 
Loyal Commissioners." A few American head-line fiends would 
drive Engla^nd frantic, 



MACHINISTS AND APPRENTICES. 

From our mechanical and other exchanges we hear frequent 
moans about the deficiency in manual skill of the new genera- 
tion of metal workers. The foreboding is even expressed that 
the supply of competent machinists must continue to fall off 
until American manufacturers have to yield the palm of excel- 
lence once more to Em-ope. This evil state of things is attri- 
buted mostly to the discontinuance of the old apprentice 
system, and it is specially urged that our sewing machine shops, 
gun factoi'ies, and the like — where a large number of pieces of 
one Idnd have to be made, and where cunning machinery takes 
the place of several manual processes — are responsible for the 
inefficiency of the average workman. The ground of this 
reproach is that var'.ety of experience is not afforded to the 
mechanic, and that he becomes a mere adjunct of the special 
tools employed. No way out of the difficulty is suggested, but 
we notice that a large manufactui'ing company in Massachu- 
setts — now engaged on sewing machines — has devised a plan 
three and four years apprenticeships, as if to do its part m 
averting the reign of incompetency. 

We really cannot share in the apprehensions of our friends 
as to the general decline of American handicraft. It seems to 
to us rather that there is here a misuse of terms. We should 
not expect, under present conditions, that all men who work in 
machine-shops shall be machinists. Custom may have encour- 
aged them to use the name themselves, but that does not make 
them so in fact. The multitude of our mechanical wants out- 
grow speedily the possibility of fabrication oidy by skilled 
craftsmen. The very immensity of our coimtry, relatively to 
popidation, made the urgency for devices that should replace 
or abridge the processes of manual toil. Hence have we deve- 
loped, without particular effortat training, an army of inven- 
tors who sm-passall the world besides in fei till ty. Hence, also, 
our system of production has divided mechanism into two 
broad classes — the gifted minority who work with intelligence, 
and the unprogressive crowd who merely contribute a kmd of 
skilled labour. The former are those to whom we intrust special 
tasks, wherein judgment, taste, and calcidation have their parts 
with dexterity. The latter have no more real title to be con- 
sidered machinists than a man has to be called agTiculturist 
whose experience is Umited to planting potatoes and hoeing 
corn. 

But we also centend that these two classes of workmen were 
as broadly distinct under the old system of apprenticeships as 
thej' are to-day. Of any group of a dozen boys in the machina 
shops of the past there was never more than a small proportion 
who came "out of their time" in the condition of genuine 
skilled craftsmanship. These were the youths who po.ssessed 
diUgence and ambition, who accepted the teachings of their 
seniors "with docility, and who studied the resources of their 
tools and mateiial in order to do creditably that which was 
given them to do. The remainder became "journeymen" 
merely by the lapse of years, for they settled down into vice- 
hands, lathe-hands and the like, almost as definitely, as if they 
had been apprenticed for no other purpose. And it is a fact 
to-day that even in the abused sewing machine shops, a boy 
who clisplays such merit as above outlined, will not be left to 
the drudgery of a single speical tool, but will be utilised in all 
directions imtil the circle of his experience shall embrace every 
process and every tool on the premises. There are very few 
foremen but delight to encourage such a lad, and if, in addi- 
tion to these opportunities, he has the faculty for study and 
reflection — without which no machinist ever amounted to any- 
thing — he can scarcely fail to become an accomplished work- 
man. Sbch a man will at any time be welcome in a general 
engine-works, railroad-shop, or other mechanical factory, and 
in a few years he would be as well able to take charge of a 
shop himself as the best apprentices of the seven years' routine. 
Meanwhile his familiarity with spec-al tools and their possi- 
bilities will have enlarged his conceptions, and fitted him better 
for the machine shop of the future, whereui the true machinist 
will be but the creator and guardian of so many automatic 
processes. 

In brief, though there are no indentures, the best residts of 
apprenticeship are attainable in almost any of our large 
factories to a boy of the right Idnd, and if his employers are 
not actually bound to consider him a pupilc it is certainly their 



March 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPWANOES. 



21 



interest, to develop wLat talent he has, while he retains 
himself that liberty of action and movement which 
is the sovereignty of Americans. Nor do we intend by 
these views to descry the experiments in apprenticeship now 
being tried. Whether by this means, or technical schools or 
any other agency, we sincerely wish the improvement of Ameri- 
can handicraft. AU we want is to have things called by their 
right names, and to make clear the part of our sewing machine 
factories in the mechanical training of workmen. They are not 
in the natiire of universities, but they are certainly not bad 
schools, and we opine very strongly that there is no school now 
extant in which the craft of Tubal Caia is completely taught. 
The day has gone by for ever when any machinist could make 
any and all machines in their entirety. 



TRADE IN CYCLES, SEWING MACHINES, &c. 

Few departments have imdergone greater development of 
late than that devoted to the production of velocipedes in the 
various forms of bicycles, tricycles, and quadricycles, for which 
the demand of late years appears to be practically milimited. 
Up to a comparatively recent period, bicycles were almost 
unkno%vn out of this country. Now, however, the demand for 
these machines is becoming as general and urgent abroad as it 
is at home, and from all parts of the Continent and South 
America, as well as from India and the Colonies, orders are 
arriving by nearly every mail in increased quantities, and for 
machines of a higher class. Although Coventry was the ori- 
ginal seat of the manufacture in this district, and some of the 
best machines produced are stdl obtained from the ' ' city of 
spires," the machinists of Bu-mingham have long been engaged 
in the manufacture of the parts and bearings or fiittings of 
bicycles, and it has been a comparatively easy matter for them, 
therefore, to commence the pi'oduction of complete machines. 
This transition or development of industry has been a good 
deal stimulated by the long depression of the sewing machine 
and other branches of a kindred character, which are most 
nearly allied to the bicycle manufacture, and in many cases 
works which were erected for the production of gmrs, sewing 
machines, clockworks, lathes, &c., are now devoted to various 
kinds of pedal locomotives. Among the principal local makers 
of these machines is the Royal Sewing Machine Company 
(Limited), of Small Heath, which was originally established, 
as the name indicates, for the exclusive manufacture of 
sewing machines. A large business is still done by the 
company in lock-stitch hand-machines, which appear to have 
quite superseded of late the old pedal- stitching machines, at 
all events for domestic use, but the most advancing department 
of the company's busmess is that devoted to the production of 
bicycles and tricycles, to which they are constantly adding, 
but their most popidar types are the " Royal Mail " bicycle, 
with patent acljustable handle. " ^olus " ball-bearings, 
which are aj^phcable to front or back wheels or pedals, arc 
manufactured here by Mi-. WiUiam Bown, of Summer-lane, 
who is also a large maker for the trade of general stampings in 
iron, and steel fittings and every requisite for the bicycle manu- 
facture, as well as roUer-skates on the Plimpton and other 
principles. The Cycle Company, of Charlotte-street, are also 
the makers of some popular and valuable patterns. Amongst 
the latest and most formidable competitors in this branch may 
be mentioned the Birmingham Small Ai-ms and Metal Com- 
pany (Limited), of Small Heath, who, having a costly plant, 
extensive premises, and a powerful staff of skdled machinists, 
possessunusual facilities for enteruigupon the trade. The company 
was established for the manufacture of military guns on the inter- 
changeable principle, but as most of the European Governments 
now make their own small amis, and even the British Government 
is compelled to keep the Enfield factory supplied with orders, 
there is not much scope for private enterprise in the manufac- 
ture of military rifles. The company have consequently turned 
theii' attention to bicycles, and have just placed in the market 
a somewhat novel machine, the " Otto," which, unlike other 
machines of its class, possesses two wheels of equal size, which 
are fixed parallel to one another, as in a tricycle, with the seat 
between them. The rider's feet rest iipon treadles fixed upon a 
double-throw crank, at either end of which are grooved pulleys, 



connected by means of endless driving-njietal bands with other 
pulleys incoi-porated with the hubs of th^ large wheels. By the 
simple turning of a handle the machine ian be mstantaneously 
turned in any requii'ed dnection, as the wheels both drive and 
sfeer, and there is a j)Owerful break to each wheel, so that the 
machine can be stopped in a few yards, even when travelling 
at a high speed. The " Otto " is available for ladies as well as 
gentlemen, and its use can be learned easily and without any 
risk of falls. Bicycles of the ordinary kind are in growing 
i-equest just now for various Continental markets, for the Cape, 
India, Austi-alia, and even the United States, where, in spite of 
the high tariff, it is apparently found cheaper to import than 
to manufacture. A considerable imi^rdse is likely to be given 
to the trade this spring by the wise resolution of the three rail- 
way companies who serve the Midlands to reduce the carriage 
rate from the 1st inst. by 50 per cent, on bicycles and 75 per 
cent, on tricycles. — Ironmonger. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTING FOE DOMESTIC PURPOSES. 
A few weeks ago an interesting exhibition of electric lighting 
took place, under the auspices of the British Electiic Light 
Company (Limited), in the large haU of the Palace Chambers, 
Bridge Street, Westminster, the object of the gathering being 
an inspection, with the aid of practical illustrations, of Mr. 
Lane Fox's system of lighting and apparatus applicable for 
domestic use. Tbe hall was pleasantly lighted by groups of 
small incandescent lights, altogether 15 in number, worked by 
a Gramme machine, and the system was explained minutely 
and with great perspicuity by Mr. Lane Fox, many questions 
being interposed and replied to during the progress of his 
remarks and experiments. The most important feature of Mr. 
Fox's system appears to be a combination of equable regulation 
with easy distribution, the construction and action of the lamp, 
which was submitted to minute examination, being a matter 
of detail to be worked out by experience and a union of prac- 
tical minds. In opposition to the prevalent notion, Mr. Fox 
maintained that electricity is, under his system, applicable for 
heating and cookuig no less than for illumination, and his 
sanguine view on this branch of the subject was fortified by 
the boiling of some water in a small vessel within two or three 
minutes, an attempt to make coffee having previously failed 
through a defect, as was stated, in the machine, which was 
newly-constructed. Cooking, too, as well as lighting, he con- 
tended, may be done far cheaper with the electric motor than 
with its now dominant rival, gas. The "Lane Fox" lamp, it 
may be added, is almost identical with that of the Edisou, 
Swan, and Maxim, having several important additions on the 
method of distribution and regulation, the result of many years' 
labour. 



SMOKE-ABATEMENT APPLIANCES. 

As several inquiries have been made, and as some doubt 
appears to exist on the part of many manufacturers, as to the 
intentions of the Fog and Smoke Committee, we are in a 
position to state that the projected exhibition at South Ken- 
sington has been postponed until the autumn. This course 
hae, in our opinion, been wisely decided upon fer more reasons 
than one. As the movement may rightly be termed a national 
one, it is indispensable that it should not be carried out in too 
hurried a manner. Already about 150 applications for space 
have reached the Committee, and so much interest has been 
shown in the question that a considerable number of additional 
applications are anticipated. It is now seen that the space 
originally placed at the disposal of the Committee by the Com- 
missioners of the Exhibition of 1851 is not suffioiently large for 
the intended purpose. The joint Committees of the National 
Health and Kyrle Societies, with Mr. Ernest Heart at their 
head, have therefore represented these facts to the Commis- 
sioners, who have courteously promised to provide them with 
the additional room nscessary. Had the exhibition boon held 
in the spring, as originally suggested, i t was felt that sirfficient 
time would not have been allowed to bring together such a 
collection as the Committee desired, and, as many manufac- 



22 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Maech 1, 1881. 



turers intimated their inability to prepax'e their intended 
exhibits iuso short a time, many valuable inventions would 
have been necessarily shut out. Again, the postponement will 
enable several foreign exhibitors to be present, who otherwise 
would have been excluded. Tha length of time that now inter- 
venes before the opening will also enable the promoters to 
introduce certain interesting features bearing upon the object 
they have in view, and we shall probably see several indepen- 
dent specimens of the houses of other countries and their 
.systems of heating illustrated. Gas, it is expected, will be 
largely represented, as bearing directly upon the system of 
smoke abatement, and all other descriptions of heating or 
cooking apparatus, whether virtually smoke-consuming, or 
tending to its diminution by the economisation of fuel. 
Furnace-bars and smoke consuming appliances for manufac- 
turing purposes will form a distinctive class, and fuel of various 
kinds wUl be admitted. It has also been decided to include 
improved ventUating aT)pliances, chimney-cowls, &c. The Duke 
of Westminster, the President of the National Health Associa- 
tion, has just given a donation of £50 towards the preliminary 
expenses. 



CIECULATING-PIPES OR GAS-HEATERS? 

Householders who luxuriate in the possession of a bath, and 
enjoy their plunge therein all the year round, may be pardoned 
if they have grown somewhat confused under the conflicting 
evidence latterly brought forward as to the drawbacks 
attendant upon the adoption of the ordinary methods of 
securing the hot water necessary in cold weather. During the 
present winter kitchen-boilers have exploded with such 
alarming frequency and with 6uch serious results, owhig in 
many instances to the stoppage of the circulating-pipes by 
ice, that thousands of persons have resolved to abandon that 
means af obtaining hot water in favour of some method which 
does not involve the use of a network of pipes or the employ- 
ment of cylinders, containers, and the like. The readiest 
alternative which has suggested itself to the majority of those 
who desire a change has undoubtedly been heating by gas, for 
doing which economically and efficiently many excellent con- 
trivances are placed before the public through the medium of 
the trade. Here, however, we are placed on the horns of a 
dilemma. Having resolved to avoid the dangers of bursting 
boilers and circulating pipes, the unfortunate householder 
is confronted with the far worse consequences which are 
alleged to have resulted in many recent instances from the 
use of gas-heaters. At Leicester a lady has been found dead 
in her bath; at Brighton a gentleman has died under similar 
circumstances ; and at Penge, near the Crystal Palace, another 
gentleman has just fallen a victim in the same way. The 
gentleman last referred to was Mr. Deacon, a solicitor. He 
entered his bath-room shortly before midnight on Monday 
week, and not being heard for a long time, the room was forcibly 
entered, when the unfortunate gentlemen, who was only 30 
years old, was foimd dead. At the inquest the medical evidence 
showed that deceased wa,s a healthy man, and that death had 
been caused by inhaling carbonic acid gas and carbonic oxide. 
' The atmospheric burners used for heating the water of baths 
similarly constructed to the one used by the deceased," said 
the surgeon, " were extremely dangerous. They threw off a 
considerable qaantity of poisonous fumes. Carbonic acid gas 
and carbonic oxide did not kill by suffocation, but by direct 
poison. The effect upon the brain was very similar to the 
inhalation of chloroform." During the last fortnight, the 
witness said, he had attended six persons who were similarly 
attacJied after using baths fitted in this way. Two servant girls 
had narrowly escaped with their lives. These are exceedingly 
serious statements to go forth to the public, who will naturally 
be prejudiced against the use of gas for heating bath supplies. 
They should, therefore, receive the immediate attention and 
investigation of all manufacturers of this class of fittings and 
appliances, with a view to something being said and done to 
reassure the minds of the public and of the trade, to the 
members of which householders naturally and properly resort 
for advice and assistance under the circumstances. This is 
equally necessary, whether the burners which have caused 



these accidents were common, unprotected, and unscientific 
rings, or better made and more skilfully-devised apparatus.^ 
The Ironmonger. 



EXHIBITION OF DOMESTIC LABOUR- 
SAYING APPLIANCES. 



LIST OF EXHIBITOES. 

Abseil, George, 157, Queen's-crescent, N.W. 

Adams, Robert, 7, Great Dover-street, S.E. 

Agate and Pritchard, 68, Gracechurch-street, E.G. 

Andrews, J. E. H., Stockport. 

Anglo-American Laundry Co., 51, 52, Fann-street, E.G. 

Ascherberg, E., and Co., 71, Queen-street, E.G. 

Ashby, Walter, Eotherhithe New-road, S.E. 

Association for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind, 
28, Berners-street, W. 

Bailey, Bros., 25, Chancery-lane, E.G. 

Barnard, Bradley, St. Paul's-road, N. 

Barnardo,Dr.,East-endJuveiiU.eMission, Stepney-causeway, B. 

Bateman, A. H., and Co., Limited, East Greenwich. 

Bateman, John, 104, Strand, W.C. 

Beauchamp, John, 205, Gray's Inn-road, W.C. 

Bell and Black, Limited, Stratford, E. 

BeH, John M., and Co., 491, Oxford-street, W.C. 

Besson, F. and Co., 195, Euston-road, N.W. 

Bevis, Henry, 140, Pentonville-road, N. 

Boyle, Robert, and Son, 64, Holborn-viaduot, E.G. 

Bradbury and Co., Limited, 14, Newgate-street, E.G. 

Branson's Extract of Coffee, Wurtemburg-street, Clap ham, 
S.W. 

British and Foreign Bible Society, 146, Queen Victoria-street, 
E.G. 

Brown, B. P. and Co., 18, Norman's Buildings. E.G. 

Browne and Co., 186, Piccadilly, W. 

Browne, Justin, 239, Euston-road, N.W. 

Brown and Green, Limited, 72, Bishopsgate -street Within, 
E.C. 

Burley, W., 34, Loudon Wall, E.C. 

Burroughs and Watts, 19, Soho-square, W. 

Camerer, Kuss and Co., 522, Oxford-street, W.C. 

Carter and Aynsley, 54, Bishopsgate street Without, E.C- 

Chadborn and Coldwell Manufacturing Company, 223, Upper 
Thames-street, E.C. 

Children's Home, Orphanage and Refuge, Bonner-road, Vic- 
toria Park, E. 

Ghorlton and Dugdale, 19, Blackfriars-street, Manchester. 

Corry, Soper and Fowler, Limited, 18, Finsbury-street, E.C. 

Cox and Co., 446, 447, Oxford-street. W.C. 

Crossley Brothers, Poultry, E.C. 

Davies,Mrs. G., 132, Albany-street, N.W. 

Davis, Alfred A., 46, Buckingham-road, N. 

Davis, Joseph and Co., 6, Kenuington Park-road, S.E. 

Davis, S., and Co., Blackman-street, Borough. 

Davis and Co., Limited, 62, Leadenhall-street, E.C. 

Drew and Gadman, High Holborn, W.C. 

Eagle Range and Foundry Company, Lozells, Birmingham. 

Edwards, Geo., 182, Kingsland-road, N. 

EUis and Co., 165, Fleet-street, E.C. 

Ewart and Son, 346, Euston-road, N.W. 

Fouoher, George, 29, Piccadilly, W. 

Gallais, E., 27, Maigaret-street, W. 

Gard and Co., Dunstable. 

Garvie and Co., 5, New-street, BishoiDsgate, E.G. 

Gent; T. J., and Co., Faraday Works, Leicester. 

Geyelin and Co., Belgrave House, Argyle- square, W.C. 

Gomer, R., 14, Junction-place, Amhurst-road, Hackney. 
Goody, Edward, 18, Cockspur-street, W. 

Green, Thomas, and Son, Limited, 54, 55, Blaokfriars-road, 

S.E. 
Griswold and Hainworth, Limited, 41, Charterhouse-square, 

E.G. 
Harris, S. and H., 57, Mansell-street, E. 



ai 



Maech 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



as 



Hart, D., and Co., Wenlook-street, City-road, E.G. 

Hancock, F. and C, 29, Oxford-street, Dudley. 

Hancock, J. S., and Co., 13, Cotterhill-road, Dalston-lane, E. 

Hatchman, W., and Co., 73, 74, "Wood-street, E.C. 

Herts, A. C, Oxford-street, W. 

Hieronimus, W., 77, 78, LeOQiird-street, Pinsbury, E.C. 

Highbury Sewing Machine Company, 33, HoUoway-road, N. 

Hilton, E., 10, Ganonbury-road, N. 

Hindley, E. S., Bourton, Dorset. 

Hodd, R., and Son, 30, 31, Hatton-garden, E.C. 

Hooper and Co., Centre-row, Covent-garden, W.O. 

Howe Machine Company, Limited, 46, 48, Queen Victoria- 
street, E.C. 

Hunt, Harry, 117, Newin.gton-green-road, N. 

Hutchisson and Co., 51, Fanu-street, E.C. 

Jeakes and Co., -51, Great Eussell-street, W.C, 

Jeyes Sanitary Compounds Company, Limited, 54w, Bishops- 
gate-street Within, E.C. 

Johnson, Clark and Co., 4, Pinsbury-oircus, B.C. 

Jolley, G-. H., 26a, Hosier-lane, E.C. 

Jones, Orlando and Co., 18, Billiter-street, E.C. 

Judd, H. L., and Co., 78, Fann-street, E.G. 

Keighley Timber and Saw Mills Company, Keighley. 

Kite, C, and Co., 117, Charlton-street, N.W. 

Kent, George, 199, 200, 201, High Holborn, W.C. 

Lance, George E., 16, Philpot-lane, E.C. 

Lehn, Otto, 36, Farrmgdon-street, E.C. 

Lyon, Arthur, 32, Windmill-street, E.C. 

Manby and Go., Augustus-street, Eegent's-park, N.W. 

Marx.'M., 11, Wansey-street, Walworth. 

Maughan, B. W., 41, Cheapside, E.C. 

Meyer, J., 19, Essex-road, N. 

Middleton, John T., 235, High Holborn, W.C. 

Miller, Herbert and Co., Limited, 73, 74, Wood-street, Cheap- 
side, E.C. 

Miller, S., 37, Tavistock-street, Govent-garden, W.C. 

Moser, W., and Co., 20, Eed Lion-square, W.C. 

Nettlefold and Sous, 54, High Holborn, W.O. 

Newton and Eskell, 329, High Holborn, W.C. 

Paul and Alexander, 53, Waterloo- street, Glasgow. 

Paul and Co., 10, Jewin-street, E.C. 

Portable Gas Apparatus Company, 47, Millbank-street, S.W, 

Portway, Charles, Halstead, Essex. 

Eae, C. S., Pickford-green, Coventry. 

Ransome, S. and E., and Co., 13, Esses-street, Strand, W.C 

Eennick. Kemsiey and Co., 4, Finsbury-oirous, E.C. 

Ritchie and Go., 23, St. Swithen's-lane, E.C. 

Robertson, D. and L.j 284, Sauchiehall-street, Glasgow. 

Rudolph, Alexander, 32, Catherine-street, W.C. 

Salayer and Co., 6, Middle-street, Long-lane, E.C. 

Salmond, David, The Soap Works, Bradford. 

Sanitary and Domestic Appliances Company, 10, Exchange 
Arcade, Deansgate, Manchester. 

Sanitary Engineering and Ventilating Co., 115, Victoria-street, 
S.W. 

Scott, W. and 0., and Co., Greenhead Oil and Soap Works, 
Glasgow. 

Seaton, Hugh, Peterborough. 

" Sewing Machine Gazette and Journal of Domestic Ap- 
pliances," 11, Ave Marie-lane, E.C. 

Silicated Carbon Filter Co., Church-road, Battersea. 

Simon, W., and Co., 8, Snow-hill, E.C 

Singer Manufacturing Co., Foster-lane, E.G. 

Smith, Edward, 3, Cheapside, E.C. 

Spencer, George, 52, Goswell-road, E.C. 

Spong and Co., 249, High Holborn, W.C. 

Squintani, C. G., and Co, 3, Ludgate Circus-buildings, E.C. 

Standard Manufacturing Company, Derby. 

Stephens, H. 0., 191, Aldorsgate-street, E.G. 

Stidolph, Thomas W., High-street, Dartford. 

Straker, W., 34, 36, 53, Ludgate-hill, E.C. 

Summerscales and Co., Keighley, Torks. 

Syrett, C. J., Alexandra Palace, N. 

Taylor, James M., 52, Tuilerie-street, Hackney, E. 

Tension Bicycle Company, Watson-street, Stoke Newington, N. 

Theobald, E., and Co., Portland House, Greenwich, S.E. 

Thomas and Taylor, 99, Fonthill-road, N., and Stockport. 



Trickett, John, Wicke, Sheffield. 
Twelvetrees, Harper, 83, Finsbm-y-pavement, E.C. 
Van Praag, Alexander, 9, Crown-street, Soho. 
Vaiiey and Wolfendsn, Keighley, Torks. 
Venables, Charles and Co., 187, 189, Essex-road, N. 
WagstaiF, J. G., Alma Iron Works, Dukinfleld. 
Wales, R., 112, Euston-road, N.W. 
Wanzer Machine Co., 4, Great Portland-street, W. 
Warner, B., Market-place, Devizes. 
Webber, Charles, OfFord-terrace, Barnsbury, N. 
Wheeler and Wilson Manufacturing Co., 21, Queen Victoria- 
street, E.C. 
Whight, George, and Co., 143, Holborn-bars, E.C. 
Willcox and Gibbs, 150, Cheapside, E.C. 
Wilson Engiaeering Co., 247, High Holborn, W.C. 
Wilson, Newton, and Go., 144, High Holborn, W.C. 
Winks, B. A., 402, Esses -road, N. 

Wolstenoroft, Thomas, and Co., 93, High Holborn, W.C. 
Wood and Parkinson, Throstle-grove, Stockport. 
Tale Lock Co., 3, Adelaide-street, W.C. 
Zimdars, G. E., 327, Gray's- inn-road, W.C. 



CURIOUS INDUSTRIES IN NEW TORK. 

In the course of iuquu-ies instituted in New Tork by the 
Superintendent of the Census, some singular industries "have 
been brought to light. In New Tork city and Brooklyn about 
3,000,000 XJairs of old shoes are thrown away every year. Old 
shoes used to be plentiful in the gutters in some parts, but they 
are now scarce. They are picked up and used, it appears, for 
three purposes. All those not completely worn out are patched, 
gieased, &c., and sold to men who deal in such wares. Some 
persons wear one shoe much more than the other, and those 
dealers find mates for the less worn shoes. Next, the shoes not 
worth patching are cut into pieces ; the good bits are used for 
patching other shoes, and the worthless bits are converted into 
Jamaica rum, by a process known only to the manufacturers. 
It is said they are boiled m pure spirits and allowed to stand 
for a few weeks, and that the product far surpasses .Jamaica 
rum made in the ordinary way. A manufacturer of tomato 
catsup, who gave the value of his manufactured product at 
18,000dols. and that of his raw material as nothing, stated that 
every year he sends clean tubs to the wholesale houses that can 
tomatoes, with the understanding that the women who trim 
and peel shall throw the skins into these tubs. Every 
day the tubs are removed, then' contents ground up, fermented, 
flavoured, and sold as tomato catsup. Another strange and 
certainly pernicious business is the manufacture on a large 
scale of cheap candies from white earth or tei'ra alba, mixed 
with a little sugar or glucose. Sometimes 75 per cent, of caudy 
is composed of this earth. What is called a fine brand of 
Castile soap is composed chiefly of the same white earth and 
grease. Once more, a considerable business is done in finishing 
in New Tork foreign goods imported in an unfinished condition. 
Thus heavy duties are saved, though they are sold as imported 
goods. 



Bleaching Ivoei foe Cutleet Ptjeposes.— Mr. A. H. 
Mason, discoursiug on the subject of peroxide of hydrogen 
before the Liverpool Chemists' Association recently, said": — 
" It is used in Sheffield to bleach the inferior ivory for knife- 
handles. The liquid is supplied by an ivory-dealer in Loudon, 
and it consists of an aqueous solution of peJioside of hvdro°-en, 
of which it contains 2.9 per cent, of rather crude H-'O'^. The 
mode of procedure is as follows : — Place, say, 2 quarts of the 
liquid in a stone pot, adding 4 oz. liq. ammon. fort. SSC, im- 
merse the handles, and put over a common shop-stove for 24 
to 36 hours ; the handles are then taken out and gradually 
di-ied in the air, not too quickly, or they would split. The 
deep colour of the ivory is removed, and a beautiful pearly 
white ivory results when polished. The ivory is previously- 
treated with a solution of common soda, to get rid of greasy 
mattfti and open the pores." 



24 THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOITENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Makch 1, 1881. 



EXHIBITION 



OF 



Domestic Labour-Saving Appliances 

AND ALL ARTICLES INTENDED FOR THE PROMOTION OF 

IDOIMIIESariG TSUE^HF-T 



TO BE HELD AT THE 



AGRICULTURAL HALL, LONDON, ' 

March 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 14, 15, 16, and 17, 

18 81. 



This Exhibition will comprise all Appliances for Economising Domestic Labour, 
for the promotion of Domestic Thrift, and enhancing the hygienic comfort and pleasure 
of the Household, including all the latest inventions and novelties for Lighting, Warming, 
Ventilating, Cooking, Cleaning, Washing, Sewing, Gardening, and Recreation ; as for 
example : — 

Chandeliers, Lamps, Stoves, Grates, and Tubular Warming 
Arrangements. 

Water-closets, Sanitary Appliances, Disinfectants, Electric and 
Pneumatic Bells, Venetian Blinds, Encaustic Tiles, Venti- 
lators, &c. 

Mincing and Sausage-making Machinery, Filters, Dairy 
Utensils, Kitchen Ranges, Gas and Oil Cooking Stoves, &c., 
&c.. Mineral and Vegetable Oils. 

V/ashing, V/ringing, Mangling, Boot, and Knife Cleaning 
Machinery, Emery Po^vders, Soap Extracts, Blackings, 
Furniture and other Polishes. 

Toilet Requisites, Perfumery, Brushes, Soaps, Hair V/ashes, &c. 

Sewing, Knitting, and Kilting Machinery^ Cottons, Threads, 
Silks, Needles, &c. 

Furniture, Carpets, Kamptulicon, Corticine, Oilcloths, &c. 

Conservatory, Green House and Garden Appliances, LaAvn 
Mowers, Garden Seats, Garden Hose, &e. 

Stable Fittings and Appliances, Harness, Horse Groomers, 
Clippers, Medicine, &c. 

Musical Instruments, Pianofortes, Organs, Musical Boxes, &e. 

Outdoor and Indoor Games — Cricket, Croquet, Law^n Tennis, 
Table Billiards, Puzzles, &c., &c. 

Carriages, Bicycles, Tricycles, Perambulators, &e. 



ADMISSION, ONE SHILLING, 



March 1, 188]. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



25 



MR. PLATT'S PUBLICATIONS. 



LIFE— By JAMES PLATT. Author of 'Business,' 
' Money,' and 'Sloralitj'.' 

LIFE — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth Hmp. Price One 
Shillins-. Messrs. Simpkin, JLirshall &, Co., Stalioners'-hall Court, 
London, B.C.; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Kailivay Bookstalls; Messrs. Willinj 
& Co.'s Bookstalls; and at every Booksellers. 

LIFE— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, W.G., 
will send a copy, post free, for Is, 

T IFE— Contents :— 

T IFE — Introduction. Is Life Worth Living ? 

T IFE— Life of the Future, Culture, Health. 

T IFE — Eecreation, Common Sense, Thrift. 

T IFE — Compulsory Thi-ift, Marriage, Happiness. 

T IFE — Religion, Future Life, Human Destiny. 

T IFE — Concluding Eemarks. 

LIFE — Page 24 : — ** Make Life a grander thing. Prove 
to men what a glorious thing it is to exist, how enjoyable life might be, how 
sweet life is, even as it is — aye, we never know how sweet until we fear we are about 
to lose it. What a mockery ' Faith m God ' is when we reflect upon the melancholy 
views the majority of orthodox people have of it, going through the journey as an 
ordeal to be borne as patiently and submissively as possible, altogether misconceiving 
the noble sentiment, ' Not my will, but thine be done." '* 

LIFE — Page 34 : — " Life is real, life should be earnest. 
To be enjoyed, we must have an aim, an object in life ; and to be happy, to 
enjoy life, the object must be one worthy the highest, purest, best part of our nature — 
men's character so strong and true that they can be relied up,; men that wear their 
lives out, not rust them out ; men who live to act, to produce what they consume. " 

LIFE — Page 45 : — " The more we think of life, the 
greater must be our reverence for the ' Great Unknown.' Life will be very 
different once we get the people to realise as an indisputable truth that tliere is never 
anything wrong but what has been done by ourselves or others ; and tliat tlio wrong 
remains so long only as we refuse to put it right.' " 

LIFE — Page 102 : — ** Common sense denies that any 
happy chance wilt do for a man what he is quite unaLiIe to do for himself. 
Our happiness consists in the use of our faculties, and a faith tliat our wages will be 
in proportion to our deserts. Success and failure are not dealt out like prizes and 
blanks in a lottery, by chance and indiscriminately ; but there is a reason for every 
success and failure, indolence, chicanery, waste will cause the one ; while industiy, 
honesty and thrift will ensure the other.' " 

LIFE— Page 173:— ** The more you think of life, the 
more you know of the Creator's way of governing the universe, the more 
you know of your own constitution and the happiness within your reach, the less will 
you believe that God meant man to be born weeping, to live complaining, and to die 
disappointed.' '' 

LIFE— PAGE 192 :— "We have life. What shall we do 
with it ? The world is like a vast manufactory, in which we hear incessantly 
the clash and whirring of a complex machinery. Shall we try and get the bottom of 
this? Yes, undoubtedly, earnestly, and fearlessly. Believe me you will thus get to 
learn that the law maker is behind his laws, and that, paradoxical as it may seem, 
while He hides himself behind them. He also reveals himself through them. Theic 
is no better way of understanding the Creator ; the laws are emanations of the all- 
beauteous mind ; they shadow forth the divinity that couti-ived them ; we tind the 
more we study them, greater evidence that there is a Living God, a Father caring for 
and loving His children." 



MOEALITY— 208 
One SbiUing. 



pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 



TV! OEALITY— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 

1« 9 tionerb'-liall Court, London, B.C. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway 
Bookstalls. 

MOEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy post free for One Shilling. 

MOEALITY.- Page 202 :— *' Make ,.s feel we are under 
the rule of * One above who sees all,' and whose laws are never infringed wi!h 
impunity ; but that we have the power, if we but will so to do, to learn the wiibei, 
and be happy by reverently obeying Him." 

ly/T OEALITY— Business— Money— Life. 

MOEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, Loudon, 
W.C, -will scud copy of aoy one of these works post free for Is. 



M 
M 



M 

M 
M 
M 
M 
M 



M 



ONEY — 208 pages crown 8vo, cloth limp, price One 

Sliilling. 

ONEY^Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Stationers'- 

hall Coiirt, London, E.C. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway Book- 
Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls ; and at every Bookseller's. 

ONEY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 

W.C., will send a copy, post free, for Is. 

ONEY— Contents :— Preface, Money. 

ONEY— The Origin of Money. What is Money ? 

ONEY — Cm-rency : Gold Money, Silver Money. 

ONEY — Bank Notes, Cheques, BiUs of Exchange. 

ONEY — Bank Shares, Banking, Exchange, Interest. 

ONEY— Wealth, Capital, Panics. 

ONEY — Individual Success, National Prosperity. 

ONEY — Concluding Eemarks. 



ONEY. — Page 28: — "It is only by understanding 

our monetary system that we can realise the power of 'credit,' Our com - 
mercial system is based upon faith ; cheqiies, bills, notes are mere bits of paper, and 
only promises to pay; yet so great is the power of credit tliat transactions to the 
extent of over a hundred millions weekly are transacted throu^^h the Clearing-house. 
Gold is a mere pigmy, as a medium of exchange, to this j,'iant ' paper,' based upon 
'credit.' Simply by system and faith, in conjunction witli banking, this institution 
settles the exchanges, the buying and selling, to this enormous amonut, without the 
aid of a single metallic coin — merely, by bookkeeping or transfer of cheques, the 
debiting or crediting of A or B." 



BUSINESS— 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 
One ShUling. 

BUSINESS— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tioners'-hall Court, London, E.C. ; Jlessrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway 

Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls : and at every Bookseller's. 

BUSINESS— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy, post fre, for is. 



B 



USINESS — Contents: Preface, Special Notice. 



BUSINESS— Business Qualities, Health, Education, 
Oljservation. 



BUSINESS— Industiy, 
Punctuality. 



Perseverance, Arrangement, 
Calculation, Prudence, Tact. 



■D USINESS- 

TDUSINESS-Truthfulness, Integrity. 

"D USINESS— Money, and what to do with it. 

O USINESS— Bank Shares, Depression of Trade. 

BUSINESS— Free Trade and Eeciprocity, Civil Service 
stores. 

"D USINESS— Co-operative Tradmg, Concluding Eemarks. 

BUSINESS. — Page 7 : — " Commerce is guided by laws 
as inflexible as those of health or gravitation ; and the primai'y cause of 
failure in business may he traced as unerringly as the punislunent that will surely 
follow the iiifrhigcmeut of any other law oi nature." 

BUSINESS.— Page 179— "From every pulpit and in 
every school throughout the kingdom the justification of double dealing and 
trickery upon the plea that it is impossible to get a living honestly by trade, or in any 
vocation, should be denounced in the most uninistakcable language as a libel on 
Providence, and the failure to succeed be attributed to its real ca'isc — the man's 
igaorauce of or iucapacity for the business or profession be follows," 



26 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



March 1,1881. 




SOLE AGENTS IN EUEOPE FOR 

Johnson, Clark & Co., 

OE NEW YORK. 

THE "HOME SHUTTLE" 

still keeps its place as being the best Hand Lock-Sticb Sewing 
Machine in the world. It is exceedingly simple, uever out of 
order, and always presents a bright and attractive appearance. 




We have added the loose winding wheel and all latest 
improvements. 

THE BEST TREADLE MACHINE IS THE 

Light Running "Standard " 

For Manufacturing and Family use. 

til CD a> 

^ a> tQ h- ! 

O „ H. 




5 o ffl 

■iipq 



2 B S 



B-?^ 



2 „ C- 



2 o 






// is a Model of Strength and Beauty. 



The mOBt Elegantly Ornamentecl Machine fn the world. Lasts a li Ee- 
time, and NEVER gets OUT of ORDER. EXCELS ALL OTHERS 
IN THOROUGHNESS OF WORKMANSHIP. i& 

"We wish to establish Agencies in all Towns, and will give exclusive 
territory to first-class houses, and furnish Machines at very low prices. 



RENNICK, KEMSLEY & CO., 

(Late. Johnson, Clark and, Co.), 

Fiusbury Circus, LONDON, E.G. 




THOMAS WARWICK 



! 



MAKUFACTUREK OP 



By Royal Lellers Patent. HivYl/JLii JfLilX Jl^Kil^XiO 

Of every description, AVholesale and for Exportation. 



WARWICK'S PATENT POTENTIAL RIMS. 



SOLE MAKEE OP "VTOOLLET'S PATENT DUPLEX SPRING 
SADDLE. STAMPINGS OP ALL KINDS. 




C. D. Vesey, Esq., who won the late Tricycle Championship, used one 
of WOOLLEY'S PATENT SADDLES. He says : ■• I was highly 
delighted with it ; never once during the 50 miles ride did I feel the 
dightest of the rough roads.^^ 

Price List Free on application to the above, 

Aston New Towa, Birmingliam. 

SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE 

CAN BE OBTAINED OF 

E. W. ALLEN, 

II, AVE MARIA LANE, 

LONDON, E.C. 
AT FOURPENCE PER COPYi 
Or it will be sent post free on receipt of 4/6 sent to 
the Publishers at the above address. 



Just Published. 12mo. cloth limp, 2/-, or cloth 
boai-ds, 2/6 (postage 2d). 

SEWING MACHINERY, 

EEINQ 

A PRACTICAL IVIANUAL 



SEWING 



:achine, 



Comprising its History and Details of its Construction, with Pull Tech- 
nical Directions for the adjusting of Sewing Machines.] 
By J. W. URaUHAKT. 

CROSBY LOCKWOOD & Co., 7, Stationers' Hall Court, Ludgate Hill, 
London, E.C. 



€\)t Inning Blnrljini^ fujftte 

AND 

JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE proposal to still further circumscribe the statute of 
limitation on debts not exceeding one hundred pounds 
to twelve months instead of six years is one which ig 
naturally exciting a considerable amount of attention in the 
commercial world. The tendency to limit terms of credit is, 



March 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



27 



■we are glad to say, decidedly on the increase. The good old- 
fashioned way of sending in tradesmen's accounts once a year, 
at Christmas, with an "account rendered" the following 
midsummer is rapidly dying out, and in fact only exists in the 
west-end of London, Bath, Cheltenham, Leamington, and a 
few other places of aristocratic resort ; but we are inclined to 
think that the proposed measure of reform goes a little too 
far. It is not at all uncommon for the creditor to lose sight 
of his debtor for twelve or eighteen months at a time. 
It would be surely a little too bad if a debtor could 
obtain a legal release from all his liabilities, provided he in no 
case owed a sum not exceeding one hundred pounds to each 
creditor, by the simple process of residing some twelve months 
on the Continent, We think that if two or three years were 
proposed it might prove to the advantage of all parties con- 
cerned. Indeed, ws are of opinion that any enactment which 
will give the trader a fair excuse for aifording credit to 
doubtful customers would be bailed as a boon by the trading 
classes. In fact Mr. Commissioner Kerr, whose opinion, with 
all his eccentricities, ought to carry some weight, has more 
than once expressed his opinion that the sooner all debts are 
rendered non recoverable by law, and everything is reduced to 
a system of absolute cash payment, the better. We don't 
expect our readers, who depend, so many of them, on the 
easy payment system, to endorse the views of tbe learned 
Commissioner, but we think they will none the less agree with 
us that the credit system is at best a necessary evil. 



We publish in another column a preliminary List of Exhibitors 
at the forthcoming Exhibition of Domestic Laboiu- Saving 
Machinery and Articles Intended for tbe Promotion of House- 
hold Thrift. It will be seen that the Industries represented by 
by this Journal have taken up the matter in earnest. All tbe 
leading houses in the Sewing and Domestic Machinery Trades 
will be represented, and we have reason to believe that some 
striking novelties will be on view in the various departments. 
Among other things, we hear of a new tricycle, which is likely 
to attract a considerable amount of attention. All the space 
has been let ; the arcade and approaches will be handsomely 
decorated ; two bands will play at intervals during the after- 
noon and evening ; and altogether it promises to be a most 
successful Exhibition. We strongly advise all of our readers 
who can possibly spare the time to spend a day at the Agri- 
cultural Hall. They will find plenty of amusement and 
instruction, and we may fairly congratulate the promoters 
upon the success which has attended their efforts. 



There have lately been some veiy important improvements 
in bicycles and tricycles. Almost every day some inventor 
lodges in the Patent Office an application for protection for 
some improvement or other. A novel feature is certainly the 
application of steam, and we believe a tricycle worked by a 
small steam engine will be shown in operation at the forth- 
coming Domestic Labour saving Appliances Exhibition. Not 
by any means a mean improvement is that recorded in another 
column, in which the handle is so constructed that the rider 
can jump ofE forwards when an accident is imminent. His 
knees are quite free, and he can thus avoid the approaching 
" cropper." We notice one inventor intends doing away with 
the small hind wheel, and making bicycles with two large 
wheels placed side by side; while there are many patents for 
improved cranks and ball bearings. Surely bicycles and 



tricycles wdll soon be perfect as it is possible for human beings 
to make them. We are glad to note that the tricycle is fast 
increasing in favour with both ladies and gentlemen. It was 
at one time, and is now, looked down upon by the male sex as 
somewhat effeminate; but still, it is the more substantial, 
sensible article of the two, and with steam-power nothing can 
beat it as a means of pleasant locomotion, most especially for 
long tours through the country. 



QUE ILLUSTEATED SUPPLEMENT. 

AVE give this month an illustration of Mr. A. Fuilong's shirt 
collar and cuff ironing and polishing machine ,^which will be 
seen in operation at the forthcoming Domestic L,abom- Saving 
Appliances Exhibition. Over 200 of these machines are in use 
in the United States, and they are \oi great value to large 
schools, public laundrys, and other large institutions. It will 
be seen by the iUustration that a steady and uniform pressui-e 
is exerted upon the work by the means of the spiral spring at 
the top, which is capable of bemg instantly increased or 
diminished by the use of the screw and wheel at the top, 
thereby insuring uniformity of finish without effort upon the 
part of the operator. The bed upon which rests the work is 
heated, thereby presenting two heated surfaces to the work, 
viz., the bed and iron, which is either heated by gas or in the 
ordinary way. The address of the manufacturer is 52, Fann- 
street, Aldersgate-street, E.G. 



An amendment of the Patent Law has been introduced into 
the House by Mr. Anderson, which, should it pass, will have 
the effect of considerably reducing the fees payable in taking 
out a patent, and will likewise simplify the process. 

A correspondent writes us from Ireland that the present 
ac'itation has left its taint on busiupss men, there being a strong 
fe^'elinc' in existence against Enghsb firms. Irish manufac- 
turers" our correspondent believes, would, for the most part, 
be very glad to close all commercial relations with those domg 
business°in England, if they were able. 

It is not generally known amongst machinists that all 
mineral oils, such as paraffin, whinh is commonly used by some, 
not only tends to wear away the " parts" of a machme, but is 
fatally destructive to any elastic, should it come in contact 
with the rubber. 

To prevent work -tools from rusting, apply with a brush a 
mLxture of benzine and white wax, prepared m the foUov/ing 
manner -—Carefully heat the benzine, and then place m it half 
its wei°-ht of white wax, leaving it until it is completely dis- 
solved.'' Linseed oil, applied in the same manner, is likewise 
said to be an ef&cient preservative. 

If the forecasts of those who are making a study of the effects 
of luminous paint are anything approaching what they antici- 
nate it is within the bounds of possibility that we may one day 
see our workshops and factories lighted by no other means 
than a coating of this substance on the walls and ceiling. An 
experiment of this character was made the other day, and, it is 
said, with the greatest success. 

The Commissioners of Sewers of the City of London are 
about to try the experiment oflighting by electricity some of 
the principal streets within their jurisdiction for a twelvemonth, 
and of testing three of the most accredited systems. The 
JabLjchkoff system will be applied to Southwark Bridge, Queen 
Victoria Street, and part of Queen Street; the Brush system 
to New Bridge Street, Ludgate Circus, Ludgate Hill, the 
north side of St Paul'sYard, and thence along Cheapside 
as far us King Street ; and the Siemens to the remainder of 
Cheapside the Poultry, KingStreet, GaildhaU Yard, Mansion 
House Street, King William Street, and London Bridge. 



28 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Maech 1, 1881. 



B-ST si»eoi-^Xj -A.i=i=oi3srT:]s^Bisra7. 




Letters Patent Dated 17th April, 1838. 

R.F.&J.ALEXANDER&CO 



SEWING COTTON MANUFACTURERS 

TO HER MOST GRACIOUS MAJESTY QUEEN VICTORIA. 



MOLENDINAR WORKS, GLASGOW, 

AND 



RKS, NEILS TON. 

LONDON WAREHOUSE: 

No. 9, BOW LANE, CHEAPSIDE, E.G. 



Manufacture all kinds of Sewing Cotton on Reel, Ball, and Card, 

for Hand and Machine use. Also Knitting Cotton of a very superior 
quality. 

Trade If arks for 6, 4, 3, and 2 Cords—Soft and Glace Cottons. 



■^'^fjulf'lr 




55i2|.«»;55j. 




SUN 

Best Quality. 



AJOOM 

Medium Quality. 




STAR 

Cheapest Quality. 



Made in all lengths, free from knots, and guaranteed full measure as marked. 

These Threads being favourite brands in almost all markets of the world, unprincipled 

and flagrant imitations are very numerous. 

Manufacturers, Merchants, and Consumers are warned against imitations, and requested 
to take special note of the Trade Marks as above. 

Prices of the various kinds, considering qualities, will be found very cheap. 



Mabch 1, 1881. THE SEWING M ACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUBNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 

T^ — nn 



29 



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30 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



March 1, 1881. 



THE WORLD IN A HUREY. 

Everybody now knows that it is absurd to talk about, and 
still more so to sigh for, " good old times." The Laureate has 
declared that "we are heirs of all the ages in the foremost 
files of time." He is doubtless right. To-day is older than 
yesterday ; and the further we look back the more of youthful 
national folly must we see. And yet there was a period when 
men and women were not always engaged in catching trains, 
in discounting their pleasures, in ante-dating bills of amuse- 
ment, or in rejoicing over instalments of intelligence flashed 
across their bewildered eyes as a kind of heliographic abstract 
of the good or bad news awaiting them. It is proverbial that 
men in all ages have made haste to be rich ; but there 
never was a period when the wheel of fortune, the whirligig 
of fashion, the red and black balls of speculation, and 
the teetotum of trade revolved with such rapidity as they do 
now. Falling stars, eccentric comets, and the secular accele- 
ration of the moon possess no greater interest for advanced 
astronomers than do the means, appliances, and aids, material 
and moral, to the enjoyment of life, the prosecution of trade, 
and general aggrandisement, with intensified speed, for all 
orders of the community. "Go-ahead!" is the motto of 
humanity, and steady progress has gone out of fashion. There 
was a time when wind and tide, waiting for no man, had 
matters very much their own way. A Nelson in pursuit of the 
enemy might be blown out of his course ; and the navies of 
commerce or war cumbered the seas in a helpless way. But 
the giant Steam has accomplished more than he who wore the 
famous "Seven-league Boots," dear to childhood; and a 
modem Puck, in the shape of Science, puts a girdle roundabout 
the earth in less than forty minutes. The electric telegraph, 
declining to follow the sun and keep company with the hours, 
outstrips time, and throws the best regulated chronometers 
into a state of agitation and doubt. Clocks are uniform in 
their records all over the land ; space, distance, and locality 
have lost distinction ; and events, as Hamlet's mother said of 
woes, tread upon each other's heels, so fast they follow. 
Schoolboys no longer creep like snails unwUlmgly to school, 
but are whirled thither by railway ; and lovers who would 
write a ballad to their mistress's eyebrows must prepare them- 
selves to do so while rattling along at sixty miles an hour. 
Observant students not only run and read, but ride and dine ; 
nay more, they journey in their beds, going to sleep in Aber- 
deen and wakiug up in London, with nothing more than a 
faint memory of a nightmare in the form of panting, puffing, 
snorting demons, with white, green, and red eyes, to disturb 
their minds. All the world is in a hurry, and people in the 
pursuit of pleasure or business, if not bustling from an arrival 
platform, are rushing, amidst the din of bells and the shouting 
of guards, into carriages on the departure side of the line ! 

Periodical literature comes out days in advance of its printed 
date, and Christmas books make their appearance long before 
the season of Advent. Almanacks for "the ensuing year" 
may be bought in September, and "Twelfth Night 
Characters " have scarcely disappeared before valentines 
gladden the hearts of amorous swains and delight the eyes of 
maidens in their teens. In such haste are they despatched 
that the Postmaster-General makes almost superfluous de- 
mands that they should be posted early; and the welcome 
" Good morrow to St. Valentine ! " has no sooner been uttered, 
than those who greeted the day prepare to speed the parting 
guest. Winter goods are " sold off at less than cost price," 
that " spring novelties " may be produced while yet the snow- 
drop is buried in the ground and frost holds the eaith in 
bondage. These in turn give place to "summer fashions" 
before the blossom is off the trees and the intrusive cuckoo 
arrives to occupy his place of usurpation. Fruits, fish, flowers, 
and vegetables are almost as plentiful out of the season as 
when they are legitimately "in," and nothing is orderly but 
irregularity in the arrival of produce from the uttermost parts 
of the earth. Only the unf orseen happens, and merchants seek 
to spring surprises upon our markets with greater earnestness and 
zeal than even characterises Mr. Gladstone's action in the 
political world. Steamboats are propelled at high pressure, 
and their skippers, in emulation of Mississippi captains, sit 
upon the safety valves of boilers ; barges, wont to float lazily 



on the surface of the Thames, are tugged furiously along ; and 
launches dart to and fro like fire-ilies, endangering the outriggers, 
which have surpassed the tardy skiff and wherry as surely as 
express trains have taken the place of slow coaches. There 
are dress rehearsals of pantomimes before Boxing Day arrives,, 
and private views of pictures in advance of the public exhibi- 
tion of them. The husbandman not only strives to make two- 
blades of grass grow where only one grew before, but deluges 
his land with patent manures, and adopts forcing processes 
that swift and sudden growth may reward his pains, and enable 
him to keep pace with rivals struggling to be first in gathering 
a harvest. Every possible effort is made to accelerate the 
speed of racehorses ; and pedestrians walk and run thousands 
of miles continuously day and night. Swimmers are not con- 
tent, like Leauder or Byron, with crossing from Sestos to 
Abydos, but remain in the water for a week at a time, and 
make voj'ages to sea which would have frightened ancient 
Britons in their coracles, and taxed the skill of Roman navi- 
gators in their stoutest galleys. Journals are printed from 
endless rolls of paper, and produced by processes which secure- 
almost simultaneous publication to hundreds of thousands ; 
and a perfect Niagara of news is poured over the land without 
intermission. Photography may be cari-ied on by night ; and 
a system of continuous floating hotels bridges the Atlantic, 
and virtually provides a ferry to the Antipodes. Short outs 
across continents by canals, and tunnels through mountain 
ranges tend to obliterate the lines of demarcation between- 
nations, and practically bring closer together the members of 
the great family of man. Locomotion goes on by sea and laud 
in the thickest fog, amidst the excitement of detonating 
signals, the clashing of monster gongs, and the sonorous roar- 
ing of gigantic horns ; and garments are made by steam-driven 
machinery. People cannot stop to run up and down stairs, 
but take to lifts. The blackest night, equally with the 
brightest day, knows^nothingof rest; "haste, haste, haste, post 
haste !" is no longer an exceptional cry, but an incessant com- 
mand. The telephone intensifiLS and extends the powers of 
hearing ; the lightning has been tamed- to obey domestic 
behests ; the pneumatic tube ' sucks up communications 
and parcels with the voracity of an octopus; and a 
network of exquisitely sensitive nerves binds together the 
whole human race. Flashing signals enable armies at a dis- 
tance to interchange intelligence with rapidity fleet as a glance 
of the mind ; and the correspondence of busmess, friendship, 
and love is carried on by means of stenography. Reporters 
for the Press habitually transfix thought as it flies, with 
nimbler fmgers than Gurney possessed in the zenith of his 
fame ; and so eager are orators that their speeches shoidd 
appear promptly in print, that they even have them set up in 
type before delivery, not to lose time in winning popular 
applause. State papers find their way into the public journals 
before they reach Parliament ; and magazine articles are in 
the hands of re-viewers before publication. In an astronomical 
sense the world may be mo-ving in its orbit and on 
its axis as it has done from the days when " the 
morning stars sang together for joy" to those of Galileo, and 
from his time to the present moment ; but the peoples of civili- 
sation who tread the great rotundity are r ushing about in hot 
haste and moving on with ever- accelerated strides. -No will- 
o'-the-wisp could rival their phantom-Uke swiftness of motion ; 
and, watching the inordinate fondness for rapidity of action in 
process of development, a cynic, pausing for breath amidst the 
giddy whu-1 around him , might almost be pardonedfor suggesting 
that, before long, death itself may come to be discounted by a 
world intent upon performing " happy despatch " in emulation 
of the suicides of China and Japan. 



It is believed that the English Post Office and the railway 
companies have at length come to an agreement with regard to 
the carriage of parcels. There is, therefore, no further 
obstacle in the way of the International Parcels Post which 
was arranged at the Paris Conference. The result wUl be, for 
instance, that a parcel not exceeding 6 lbs. in weight can be 
handed in at any English post-office and carried to any town, 
in Germany for Is. 8d. 



March 1, 1881. 



THE SEWINa MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



31 




The following list has been compiled expressly for the "Sewing 
Machine Gazette," by G. F. Eedfern, Patent Agent, 4, South Street, 
Finsbury, London, and at Paris and Brussels. 

APPLICATIONS FOR LETTERS PATENT : — 



No. 188. 

„ 192. 

„ 208. 

„ 231. 

„ 234. 

„ 259. 

„ 260. 

„ 263. 

„ 273. 

„ 282. 

„ 326. 



336. M 



„ 340. 

„ 356. 

„ 362. 

„ 367. 



J. C. Mewburs — a communication from E. Antoine, of 
Pourmies, France, for improvements in sewing 
machines. Dated January 14, 1881. 

J. Mounsey, spindle and flyer maker, for improvements 
in the construction of apparatus for spinning and 
doubling cotton and other fibrous materials. Dated 
January 14, 1881. 

E. W. Morrell, of Bradford, merchant, and J. Shaw, of 
Wakefield, both in Yorkshire, for improvements in 
machinery or apparatus for preparing, scouring, 
crabbing, steaming, tentering, drying, and finish- 
ing textile fabrics. Dated January 15, 1881. 

J. Watterworth, of Hull, perambulator maker, for im- 
provements in perambulators, bath chairs, and 
similar vehicles, partly applicable to Hansom cabs. 
Dated January 19, 1881. 

T. C. Fawcett, of Leeds, for improvements in machinery 
or apparatus for preparing and feeding fibrous 
substances on to scribbling, carding, or other 
machines. Dated January 19, 1881. 

G. Illston, of Birmingham, manufacturer, for improve- 
ments in tricycles and other velocipedes. Dated 
J.-inuary 20, 1881. 

J. Turner, of Coventry, Warwick, and J. A. Lamplugh 
and G. F. Brown, both of Birmingham, for certain 
improvements in the seats of tricycles, also applic- 
able to other analogous purposes. Dated January 
20, 1881. 

J. H. Smith, of Nottingham, for improvements in knit- 
ting machines and apparatus applicable thereto. 
Dated January 21, 1881. 

J. "Wetter — a communiaction from J. Byfield, of George- 
town, Ontario, Canada, for improvements in knit- 
ting machines. Dated January 21, 1881. 

E. E. Settle, of Coventry, Warwick, for improvements 
in or appertaining to velocipedes. Dated January 
22, 1881. 

K. H. Brandon — a communication from J. H. Morley, 
mechanical engineer, of Holyoke, Massachusetts, 
United States, for improvements in sewing ma- 
chines and button- feeding devices adapted to be 
used therewith. Dated January 25, 1881. 
Gandy, of Liverpool, for an improved mechanical 
motion for imparting intermittent rotary action, 
particularly applicable as a feeding gear for sew- 
ing machines, also applicable otherwise. Dated 
January 25, 1881. 

Bates — a communication from A. Wintgens, of 
Dahlhausen, Germany, for an improvement in 
mules for spinning. Dated January 26, 1881. 
Warwick, of Aston,|near Birmingham, manufacturer, 
for improvements in bicycles, tricycles, and other 
velocipedes. Dated January 26, 1881. 
H. Skipper, of Three Oak Lane, Horselydown, 
London, engineer, for an improved sausage filling 
machine. Dated January 27, 1881. 
H. Johnson — a communication from V. G. Jurian, 
of Lille, France, for improvements in apparatus 
for starting, stopping, and regulating the motion 
of sewing, embroidering, and other machines or 
apparatus. Dat«d January 27j 1881. 



W. 



J. 



No. 391. T. Tongue and T. E. Bladon, both of Birmingham, 
for improvements in bicycle, tricycle, and other 
lamps. Dated January 28, 1881. 

„ 399. E. Buckley, of Manchester, for improvements in the 
construction of apparatus employed for steaming 
textile fabrics. Dated January 29, 1881. 

„ 419. G. W. Von Nawrocki — a communication from E. Schrke 
and Messrs. Buldge and Hildebrandt, all of Berlin, 
for improvements in continuous roving, slubbing 
and spinning frames. Dated February 1, 1881. 

,, 428. H. M. Knight, of Surbiton, Surrey, for improvements in 
stocking and sock suspenders. Dated February 1, 
1881. 

„ 433. W. H. Bulpitt, of Birmingham, lamp manufacturer and 
tin plate worker, for improvements in hand lamps, 
bicycle and tricycle lamps, and other lamps. Dated 
February 1, 1881. 

„ 450. A. M. Clark — a communication from A. J. Hurtu, of 
Paris, for improvements in sewing machines. Dated 
February 2, 1881. 

„ 500. W. E. Gedge — a communication from E. Cornely, of 
Paris, for improvements in sewing and embroidering 
machines. Dated February 5, 1881. 

„ 512. J. White, of Coventry, Warwick, and G. Davies, of 
Manchester, for improvements in the construction 
of bicycles, tricycles, and other similar machines. 
Dated February 7, 1881. 

„ 531. W. S. Clark and E. Davenport, both of Manchester, for 
an improved clothier's pressing and ironing machine. 
Dated February 8, 1881. 

„ 533. W. Mickelwright, of Shepherd's Bush, and A. G. 
Gladwyn, of Hammersmith, both in London, for 
improvements in or applicable to bicycles, tricycles, 
and other similar machines. Dated February 8, 
1881. 

„ 543. H. H. Lake — a communication from A. K. Hebard, of 
Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States, for an 
improved method of, and devices for, stringing 
pianofortes. Dated February 8, 1881. 

„ 570, J. G. Dowd, of Brusna Mills House, King's County, 
Ireland, for a new or improved mode or method 
for facilitating the cutting out of ladies' and 
children's dresses or parts thereof, or othes portions 
of wearing apparel. Dated February 10, 1881. 

„ 589. N. Tupholme, of SheiEeld, for improvements in 
mangling or wringing machines, and in the stands 
and covers thereof. Dated February 10, 1881. 

Letters Patent have been issued for the following :— 
„ 3,411. W. Morgan-Brown — a communication from B. P. 

Shaw, of Lowell, Massachusetts, United States, for 

improvements in knitting machines. Dated Augast 

25, 1879. 
„ 3143. S. W. Pohlmann, of Halifax, Yorkshire, pianoforte 

manufacturer, for improvements in pianofortes. 

Dated July 30, 1880. 
„ 3,148. C. Cresswell, of Loughborough, Leicestershire, for 

improvements in knitting machines and apparatus 

applicable thereto. Dated July 31, 1880. 
„ 3,154. J. Hunt, of Bolton, Lancashire, for an improved knife 

cleaner. Dated July 81, 1880. 
„ 3,161. E. Wiseman, of Luton, Bedfordshire, sewing machine 

merchant, for improvements in sewing machines. 

Dated July 31, 1880. 
„ 3,360. H. Greenwood, of Leeds, machinist, for improvements 

in sewing machines. Dated August 19, 1883. 
„ 3,387. J., C, L., and M. Jefferson, all four of Bradford, 

Yorkshire, machine makers and ironfounders, for 

improvements in machinery for washing fibres and 

fabrics. Dated August 20, 1880. 
„ 3,458. W. Clark— a communication from A. Atkinson, of 

Winterset, Iowa, United States, for an improved 

combined clothes washer and wringer. Dated 

August 26, 1880. 
„ 3,478. N. K. Husberg, of Stockholm, Sweden, for improve- 
ments in the construction and working of bicycles 

and other velocipedes, applicable in part to other 

purposes. Dated August 27, 1880. 
„ 3,724. E. Howson, of Middlesborough-on-Tees, Yorkshire, 

engineer, for improvements in pianofortes. Dated 

September 13, 1880. 



32 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Maech 1, 1881. 



No. 4,670. W. H. Dorman, of Stafford, engineer, for improve- 
ments in sewing machinery, chiefly designed for 
the manufacture of boots and shoes. Dated 
November 12, 1880. 

„ 4,691. H. E. Osborne, A. P. Mathewson, and J. Guild, all of 
Dundee, North Britain, for improvements in or 
connected with spinning machinery. Dated 
November 13, 1880. 

„ ^VaS. A. Capra, J. B. Eissone, and S. Detoma, all of 
ClerkenweU, London, for improvements in piano- 
fortes and mechanism combined therewith. Dated 
November 16, 1880. 

„ 4,799. T. G. A. Parkyns, of Stapleton, Bectenham, Kent, 
improvements in the construction of velocipedes 
and in the means of propelling the same, parts of 
■which are applicable to other vehicles. Dated 
November 20, 1880. 

„ 5,046. J. H. Starley, of Coventry, Warwickshire, for im- 
provements in velocipedes. Dated December 20, 
1880. 

PATENTS WHICH HAVE BECOME VOID :— 

No. 128. W. R. Lake — a communication from S. C. Brown, of 
Philadelphia, United States, machinist, for im- 
provements in machinery for sewing straw braid. 
Dated January 10, 1880. 

„ 151. W. Carter, of Sneiuton, Nottinghamshire, for improve- 
ments in bicycles, tricycles, and similar machines. 
Dated January 12, 1878. 

„ 193. E. H. Hutchinson, of Blackburn, Lancashire, cotton 
manufacturer, for improvements in looms for 
weaving. Dated January 15, 1880. 

„ 217. W. Stead and J. Conlong, both of Eadcliffe Bridge, 
Lancashire, for improvements in drop-box looms 
for weaving. Dated January 17, 1880. 

„ 310. G. Downing — a communication from G. E. Hart, of 
Newark, New Jersey, United States, for improve- 
ments in embroidering attachments for sewing 
machines. Dated Janviary 23, 1878. 

„ 316. J. T. Townsend, of Nuneaton, Warwickshire, for im- 
provements in bicycles. Dated January 24, 1878. 
" „ 352. W. Holt, of Elton, near Bury, Lancashire, manufacturer, 
for improvements in weaving counterpanes or 
quilts for bedg. Dated January 28, 1878. 

„ 355. G. W. Von Nawroeki — a communication from H. Elbers, 
of Hanover, Germany, for improvements in appa- 
ratus for mangling or smoothing textile fabrics and 
articles of dress. Dated January 28, 1878. 

„ 416. J. Harrington, of Eyde, Isle of Wight, for improvements 
in bicycles, part of which improvements is applic- 
able to wheels for other vehicles. Dated January 
31, 1878. 

„ 420. J. and F. V. Eioher, both of Twickenham, Middlesex, 
for improvements in tricycles. Dated January 31, 
1878. 

„ 454. A. V. Newton — a communication from E. White, of 
Brooklyn, New York, United States, for an im- 
proved spring pressure attachment for sewing 
machines. Dated February 4, 1878. 

Specifications Published DnmNa the Month. 
Postage Id. each extra. 

a. d. 

No. 2,073. J. Dutton, driving mechanism for bicycles, &e... 6 

„ 2,076. T. G. A. Parkyns, velocipedes ... 2 

„ 2,407. H. G. Grant, thread-holder for sewing machines 2 
„ 2,430. W. E. Lake, sewing and plaiting or qiiilling 

machine 4 

„ 2,436. J. Lloyd, perambulators ... ... ... ... 2 

„ 2,450. E. Bowine, lamps for sewing machines ... ... 2 

„ 2,493. J. Lucas, bicycle lamp ... ... 6 

„ 2,507- M. H. Pearson, machines for sewing boots and 

shoes ... ... ... ... ... ... 2 

„ 2,515. M. H. Gerring and E. E. Eumsey, bicycles ... 2 
„ 2,540. T. Humber, T. E. Marriott, and F. Cooper, ad- 
justable double ball bearing for bicycles, &c. 2 
„ 2,580. W. L. Wise, apparatus for washing, rinsing, 

and drying linen, &c. ... ... ... ... 2 

„ 2,587. J. H. Walsh, tricycles 2 

„ 2,650. J. Symes, bicycles 4 

„ 2,707. J. Pinchbeck, machine for cleaning and polish- 
ing table knives and forks ,,, ... .,, S 



No. 2,786. 
„ 2,798. 
„ 3,021. 
,, 3 294. 



J. Turner, cranks for velocipedes 

J. Goodman, bicycles ... 

P. H. F. Engel, looks of knitting machines 
M. H. Pearson, sewing machines 



WILL ALL SUCCEED? 



Under this heading the New Yorh Seioing Machine Nevis 
gives the following : — 

Common sense should teach aU aspirants that it is 
a very difficult matter to drive out or even injure tlie 
prospects of old-established companies, no matter what new 
improvements may be theirs, as superior to those now in uss. 
It is not an easy matter to make the great public forget old 
and familiar names. Even should they succeed, it is visionary 
to suppose that the old-established concerns cannot meet 
them, and hold their own against newcomers — if they choose. 
New concerns should not forget that the odds are greatly 
against them, as the old companies have experience, and 
possibly better facilities to sustain their claims for public 
recognition. But then if a new concern has energy, pluck, 
endurance, and a goodly store of capital behind them, the 
chances are in their favour; otherwise, some of them will get 
badly hurt before they get out of it. This point should not 
be forgotten; every one in the sewing machine trade knows 
that mUlions have been sunk in the elForts to establish machines 
and reputation ; new beginners should make up their mind, 
that for a while — and perhaps a long time — their road will be 
up-hill ; but with pluck and capital they may succeed. 
Nevertheless, the chances are against them, and they must 
look well to their resources before they decide to enter the 
sewing machine arena. 

As we have before stated, too little attention is given to the 
bearings of the various existing sewing machine patents, by 
those who enter the field waiting till their 'company is 
organised before this matter is intelligently looked into. It 
is much easier and better to investigate these points before 
one has committed himself, than it is after the capital has been 
invested on the supposition that the coast was clear. In case 
it is not, then the trouble begins both in and out its corporate 
limits. It is an easy matter for an inventor to think that he 
has invented something new, when possibly it may have been 
in use for years in some other form, and covering the same 
points. The patent office is not infallible, so it is not best to 
put entire trust in that department ; but to rely upon the 
judgement of some experienced mechanical expert who knows 
more about a sewing machine in one day, than some of the 
patent experts know in a lifetime. When this matter is properly 
understood and acted upon, there will be no necessity for a 
forced back down at the nod of some prior patent. By fol- 
lowing this method of previous examination much cash will 
be saved. 

Is it not much better to spend a considerable sum of money 
in closely examining the sewing machine patents, that it is to 
go it blind, and eventually find one's self blocked by some 
prior patent? Common sense should teach mea this important 
fact ; but it seems there are, and always will be, some who do 
not desire to be enlightened on any suljject contrary to their 
wishes. 

In placing a new machine upon the market, much depends 
upon the men who have the arduous task upon their hands. 
Organisation is generally the stumbling-block which all must 
encounter, with varied success. A strong organisation, com- 
posed of men with sagacity and energy, will often succeed, 
when really a better class of wares would fail — all for the want 
of proper executive power at the head. Many are of the im- 
pression that if the machine is the best in the market it must 
succeed on its own merits. Such a fallacy has often been 
tried — and failed. The company organisation and executive 
ability is the true point as to whether a venture will prove 
successful or a failure. A weak organisation and a good 
machine is sure to bite the dust; while a poor machine and a 
strong organisation will, in all probability, prove a success in 
some form or other. 

As we remarked above, we should like to see them all 
successful ; but fear we shall not, judging from past ventures 
in the sewing machine line. Instances are not rare, where the 



Maecs 1, 1881. 



THE SKWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTTRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



33 



failure of this or that sewing machine venture can directly be 
attributed to the causes that we have pointed out. If those 
who are about to enter the field as competitors do not take the 
points herein mentioned into consideration, the chances are 
that they will see the time when they will wish they had kept 
their fingers out of the fire. There is not the money in sewing 
machines that there was previous to 1876, when prices were 
much higher than they are now. At present, even the older 
companies are compelled to look sharp after every expenditure, 
in order to enable them to pay respectable dividends. If they 
have to manage affairs sagaciously, in order to make both ends 
meet, how much greater the necessity for new concerns to go 
slow, and know every inch of ground they go over. 

As we said in our last issue, some half a dozen new machines 
are getting ready to make their appearance upon the market. 
It is not reasonable to suppose that all will prove successful^ 
as much as we would like to see it ; yet those who take time 
by the forelock, and look well into the patent question, and 
are generaled by executive men, will stand a fair chance of 
making a name ; while those who do not heed these two impor- 
tant points, but rely upon the goodness of their products for 
success, will in all probability make signal failures in their 
attempts to fight against facts which have so often been pointed 
out to them. 



EAELY PATENTS RELATING TO NEEDLES. 

Historical details are wanting as to the invention and pro- 
gress of the needle manufacture. Needles made of bone seem 
to have been in use from the earliest stages of prehistoric man. 
The high estimation in which needlework was held by the 
Hebrews and their contemporaries shows that needles must 
have been in every-day use at that time. In our country their 
manufacture was introduced about the middle of the sixteenth 
century; the secret of their production seems, however, to 
have died with the foreigner who introduced the industry into 
this kingdom. In the days of Qiieenf Elizabeth, a German re- 
introduced the manufacture, and about 1650 needle manu- 
factories were established at Long Credon, near Redditch, the 
latter district remaining even to this day the head-quarters of 
the English needle manufacture. 

This particular industry never owed much to patents, and 
there are consequently comparatively few entries relating to 
the subject. The first that we come across was granted in 
1755 to C. F. Weisenthal, a merchant carrying on business in 
London, for a double-pointed needle, the eye being in the 
centre, thus avoiding the necessity of turning the needle in 
doing embroidery work. This could hardly have been a new 
idea even then, and it has been patented abou'; half a dozen 
times since. 

Weisenthal's patent was, however, only for a new form of 
needle, without any reference to the mode of manufacture. 
The earliest grant of the latter kind is dated 177,5, and is in the 
name of William Sheward, of Redditch, " worsted needle 
manufacturer," for " needles with eyes upon a new and par- 
ticular construction." The needles being eyed and guttered, 
the inventor brings them m contact with "a small steel tool' 
drill, or rimer," carried in a lathe. The tool is kept revolv- 
ing, and " the eyes of the needles are then put upon or to the 
point of the said drill or rimer, in such manner and form, and 
continue there so long till the said tool, drUl or rimer hath 
worked in and about the eye of the needle, so as to take off and 
smooth all the edges from the eyes of such needles." Here we 
have the first attempt at making " drill-eyed " needles an ex- 
pression which does not, however, denote that the eyes are 
actually drilled out of the solid. It was stated that a Studley 
needle-maker introduced this method in 1793; but, as mio-ht 
have been expected, it failed, on account of the expense. She- 
ward seems to have subsequently removed to Biimino-ham, 
for in 1789 he had a patent, in which he is 
described as of that town, for a new and im- 
proved method of finishing the eye of a needle 
"in a way superior to any yet invented." His invention 
consisted in arranging upon a revolving shaft a number 
of steel discs, alternately roughed and smoothed, the former 
being larger in diameter than the latter. The needles being 



applied to the rough discs were rendered free from the 
"square edges that punches always leave in the eye of a 
needle, and the small wheels wall burnish or polish the cheeks 
and full parts about the heads and turn them off complete." 
The only information we have been able to gather respecting 
Sheward is that he at one time occupied a farm at Beoleyl 
near Redditch, and that he was also the inventor of a parti- 
cular form of horizontal windmill, the sails of which were 
inside a hollow drum. This was an idea which found parti- 
cular favour during the last centuiy. 

The next patent to be noticed is that granted in 1795 to 
William Bell, of Walsall, for making " all sorts of needles, 
bodldus, knitting-pins, fish-hooks, netting-needles, mesh- 
pins, and sail-needles." The method consisted in casting the 
articles in sand moulds, the metal used being partly refined 
by melting with charcoal-dust and lime or common salt, the 
mixture being frequently stirred with an iron rod. The in- 
ventor states that articles cast in this manner are capable of 
being tempered and hardened or softened in the usual way. 
However suitable the process may have been to the production 
of bodkins and such-like articles, it would be totally inap- 
plicable in the case of the finer kinds of needles. 

In 1812, John Scambler, a needle-maker, of Birmingham, 
introduced the " Patent Golden Needles," the chief pecu- 
liarity of which was that the eyes were gilt by being dipped 
in a solution of gold in aqua regia, a process which at best 
would give but a very unsatisfactory result. The needle had 
also a long point, the taper part commencing at about two- 
thirds the distance from the extremity. The eyes were square 
or round, instead of oval, and the needles were hardened by 
immersing in oil and water. 

It is often asserted that the needle-pointing machine is of 
German invention, but that is an entire mistake. The inven- 
tion is English, and the error may have arisen from the fact 
that needle-pointing machinery was fii'st used in a German 
manufactory, the unreasoning opposition of the workmen pre- 
venting its introduction here for many years. Pointing by 
hand is, however, now almost entirely obsolete at Redditch, 
foreign competition having compelled manufacturers to adopt 
the machine. The needle-pointing machine is much older 
than is generally supposed, the original patent having been 
granted in ] 833 — nearly half a century ago — to Daniel Ledsam 
and William Jones, of Birmingham. The machine ia question 
not only grinds the points of needles, but it cuts off the wire, 
the lengths being sufficient for two needles. The end of the 
wire, which is coiled on a drum, is passed through a set of 
straightening pegs, and then seized by a pair of pliers, which 
draw off a determinable length of wire from the coil. The 
amount thus drawn off at each pull of the pliers is governed 
by a crank and slotted aim, the bearmgs of which may be 
altered according to the " throw " required. The wire is then 
severed by means of a sliding cutter, and the part cut off held 
in a tube. Adjacent to the end of the tube there is a wheel 
with grooves in the periphery, each capable of holding a single 
needle. When a fresh length of wire is cut it pushes that 
previously severed, and which has been described as remaining 
in the guide tube, on to the groove in the wheel, the face of 
which is not broad enough to take the whole length of the 
needle, so that the ends overhang. A bar, bent to the 
curve of the wheel, keeps the needles from falling out of the 
grooves as the wheel revolves, and also serves to impart a 
rotatory movement to each needle by the friction between the 
wheel and bar, the friction being increased by covering both 
with wash-leather. In this position they are presented by the 
continued revolution of the wheel to the grindstone, which is 
hollowed out to correspond to the curvature of the former. 
A projecting guard-plate gently depresses the needles lo bring 
the points in more certain contact with the stone. The grind- 
stones, which are driven independently, and have special 
modes of adjustment, are two in number, one on either side 
of the wheel, so that both ends of the wire are sharpened. 
When the operation is complete the eyes are punched out, and 
the needles are finished in the usual way. We are not aware 
whether Ledsam and Junes's machine was ever used, but its 
main features have been reproduced in that now generally 
employed, which is, however, not entirely self-acting, the 



34 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mabch 1, 1881. 



rotation of the wires being imparted by the fingers of the 
grinder. 

A most important invention was patented in 1839 by Abel 
Morrall, a Studley needle-maker, for burnishing the eyes of 
needles by threading them upon a roughened steel wire 
stretched in a frame and caused to revolve, or to move back- 
wards and forwards. The needles are thus made to vibrate 
upon the wire in every direction, and the eyes effectually 
cleared from all roughness. This very valuable patent was 
shortly afterwards purchased by Messrs. Bartleet, of Eedditch, 
and the use of " string or cord," which the inventor thought 
might also serve as well as wire, was disclaimed by them in 
1841. An attempt was made by a league of twelve rival 
manufacturers to set the patent aside by a scire facias, but the 
proceedings were unsuccessful, and the patent was held to be 
valid. The effect of the introduction by Messrs. Bartleet of 
the oval-eyed needles perfected by this machine has doubtless 
been to cause the eyes of needles generally to be made larger 
than they formeily were, to the great convenience of the 
majority of persons who use them. Up to that time there were 
no means of making the eyes perfectly smooth, except in the 
case of round eyed needles, and even they were benefited by 
the use of the burnishing machine. But it is still a question 
if any needle is so good in use as one with a perfect round eye, 
carefully drilled, and then burnished by the best method 
known in the trade. 

In 1841, Luke Herbert, a consulting engineer and patent 
agent, then residing in Birmingham, took out a patent for a 
machine which was a palpable imitation of Morrall's. Herbert 
proposed to string the needles on a roughed wire, as in the 
former machine, but the needles were to be firmly held in a 
clamp whilst the wire was drawn backwards and forwards 
through the eyes. The plan failed in practice, as might have 
been foretold, for it did not produce the right kind of action 
upon the eye. — Furniture Gazette. 



DEATH OP ME. MTEON PEEEY. 

This gentleman, who died on the 3rd of January last, was 
well known and respected amongst the American sewing 
machine trade. We append the following account of this 
gentleman's career and death, which has appeared in the Neiv 
York Sewing Machine News : — 

A few mornings after Mr. Perry's death, which occurred on 
January 3rd, 1881, a clerk in one of our large stores was 
found in tears by his employer. Inquiring the cause, the 
answer was, "I have lost my best friend: Myron Perry is 
dead !" The general sentiment could not be better expressed 
than in this answer. To many men, in many lands, the tidmgs 
of his decease will be sad. 

Mr. Perry came of a good old Connecticut stock, being 
descended in a direct line from one of three brothers, who 
came from England about the year 1635. One settled in 
Ehode Island, another in Fairfield county, and the third, his 
ancestor, in Windham county. Conn. His mother was a 
Childs, daughter of Elias Childs, a distinguished man at the 
beginning of the century, as proprietor of a large estate at 
Woodstock, Conn., where he carried on extensive business of 
various kinds. In that town the subject of this sketch was 
born April 24th, 1828. 

His boyhood and youth were passed in that section, where 
he is still remembered with respectful interest by those who 
grew up with him, and watched the traits of disposition that 
made him what he was. His business life began in a store in 
Manchester when he was only thirteen years of age. He 
■. afterwards acted as clerk and bookkeeper in several stores and 
manufactories at Plymouth, Watertown, and Waterbury. In 
the year 1856 he became cashier of the Wheeler and Wilson 
Manufacturing Co., or rather of Nathaniel Wheeler, Alanson 
Warren, Geo. T. Woodruff, and Allen B. Wilson, origmal 
founders of that company, in whose service he died. In that 
position of responsibility and trust, he necessarily came in 
contact with manj' persons of all degrees in life — employers, 
agents, directors, stockholders, inventors, customers, manufac- 
turers, representatives of rival and hostile interests ; and from 



all that vast number, what man or woman ever named him but 
to praise ? 

To some, he was the faithful servant ; to others, the genial, 
generous friend ; to some, the warning finger and the helping 
hand. To others, a staff in trouble, and a cup bearer of com- 
fort, when comfort was most needed. To all, he was the 
honest, social and kindly man — the one to whom each went 
for a favour, sure that he would not refuse, unless duty sternly 
compelled ; and even then, so charitable and sympathetic was 
his nature, the chances were that he might be generous before 
he was just. 

No man was ever followed to his rest by a more sincere 
body of mourners. Eelatives there were but few. His elder 
brother, for many years the superintendent of the Wheeler 
and Wilson manufactory, and his son, also in the same em- 
ploy, represented about all of his immediate kin; his wife, 
whom all remember for many graces of person and heart, 
having died some five years since. 

But there were brothers there, though not of his name, and 
sisters too ; and more than one felt towards and looked up to 
him as to a father. There were companions who had shared 
with him the chances of early ventures, who had braved defeat 
and tasted success with him — managers of great enterprises in 
which he participated, his fellow worshippers for twenty years, 
and the young whom he had taught in the rudiments of their 
calling, and recommended and placed. To each came a pri- 
vate and particular, perhaps to some a secret, reason to 
remember him, and to feel a personal loss, not likely ever to 
be made good. But of the many incidents of which mention 
was made to his credit and in his praise, perhaps none would 
be more pleasing to him than the reference to his fondness for 
dumb animals, which was one of the marked traits in his 
character, as exemplified in his death. 

The qualities for which tie was appreciated are the ones by 
which he will be best remembered. First shoxild he mentioned 
his unswerving fidelity, at all times and in all places, to what- 
ever cause he espoused — whether in the more important con- 
cerns of business, the labour of kindness to friendship given, 
the deed of charity undertaken for the humble and lowly, or 
the disinterested tribute of attention and care to seme suffering 
animal. He knew neither weariness nor discouragement, 
until the task was ended which he had set himself to do. Dis- 
interestedness was as natural as the breath he drew. His 
quick sympathy enlisted him in every object that appealed to 
his high sense of justice, and called for a display of that moral 
courage which is the best test of nobility in a man. He never 
shrank from the expression of a conviction because it was not 
popular ; he never dallied with a folly because its victims 
stood in high places or wielded the influences of power among 
the rich and prosperous. 

Eminently was he a man of affairs, burdened beyond his 
strength with engrossing duties ; and yet he had an ear ever 
open to any call, coming in the name of those who had claim 
to his thought and care. He will be misssed as those are. 
missed whose place is not to be made good. His memory will 
be cherished as ever lives the thought of those whom to have 
known was an honour and pleasure. An honour, because, if 
a man is to be judged by the company he keeps, no more 
manly and honourable, straightforward and brave associate 
could be found. A pleasure, because to his lips sarcasm was a 
stranger. To his heart, malice, envy and hate were things 
unknown ; whUe the gentler graces and amenities of life 
found there a home so natural and cultured, so constant, that 
they shed about him the perpetual aroma of a Christian spirit, 
so utterly without pretence that it unconsciously attracted 
and endeared. 

In the death of Myron Perry, the Wheeler and Wilson Com- 
pany lose one of its most faithful co-workers, and the sewing 
machine fraternity one of its brightest ornaments. A man 
who was loved and respected by all who knew him. A genial 
soul, but positive in his business relations, and a man who 
knew how to treat those employed under him— as well as his 
equals. His memory wiU long be revered and cherished by 
the Wheeler and Wilson Company, and their employes. 
Eequiscat inpace. 



Maech 1, 188i. THE SEWING MlCSlNE GAZETTE AND JOtJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



35 



OMASS 






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ESTABLISHED 1848. 




PATENTEES. 



THE ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 





EVEET PART SUPPLIED IN VAEIOITS STAGES, 



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Kone hut the very best Brands of Material used for the several purpose 
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DEALERS ARE INVITED TO APPLY FOR WHOLESALE TERMS 



86 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



MAEOft 1, 1881. 



CHARLES J. THURLOW, 



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The Patent D S.H.E. Eacer is the lisMest aDd most rigid machine in the world 

List and Photo 4 Stamps. Illustrated List of Bicycle Fittings stamp. 

Special Terms to Shippers and Agents. 

sa, BX.A.c:K::ivi:^A-isr st- XiOJ^iPOisr. 



INDIARUBBEE BICYCLE and CAEKIAGE TYRES of ererj description kept 
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WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPEOVEMENTS. 

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ESTABLISHED 1851. 

BIRKBUGK BANK, 

SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS. CHANCERY LANE. 

Current Accounts opened according to the usual practice of 
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The Bank also receives money on Deposit at Three per cent, 
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The Bank undertakes for its Customers, free of charge, the 
custody of Deeds, Writings, and other Securities and Valua- . 
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Coupons ; and the purchase and sale of Stocks and Shares. 

Letters of Credit and Circular Notes issued. 

A Pamphlet, with full particulars, on application. 

FRANCIS EAVENSCROPT, Manager 
Zist March, 1880. 

THE 

BIRKBEGK BUILDING SOCIETY'S ANNUAL 
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Francis Ravenscroft, Manager. 
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TO INVENTORS. GENERAL PATENT OFFICE 

Established 1830. 



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Mabcs 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



37 



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Piston and Valve need no Lubricator. Tl ill ttart at a moment's notice. 

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J. E. H. ANDREW, 
18, Waterloo Road, STOCKPORT. 



TXiE 



P>EEPIXjBSS'= 



CLOTHES WRINGER 



Is the leading Wringer of America 



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CO 



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The best, the cheapest, the most substantial and 
simple wooden frame Clothes Wringer made. 

Enquiries and Orders to be addressed to the Sole European 
Representatives, 

JOHN R. WHITLEY & CO., 

7, POULTRY, LONDON, E.G.; 

AND 

8, PLACE VENDOME, PARIS. 

j(^ a- E3iTTS "W^IT T E ID . 



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P 
p. 

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CD 



OILS. 



IMPERIAL SEWESTG MACHINE, 

In 1 to 6 oz. Bottles. 
CETSTAL SPERM SEWINa MACHINE, 

In 1 to 2 oz. Bottles. 
BICYCLE LUBRICATING, 

In bulk or bottle to order. 
"SOLAR" BICYCLE LAMP OIL, 

In 4 and 10 oz. Bottles. 
MACHINERY OILS, 

As consigned by the drum or barrel. 

SEWING MACHINE TRADE SUP- 
PLIES— 

OIL CANS, SCREW-DRIVERS, NEEDLES, 
RUBBERS, BELTS, FITTINGS and PARTS. 

DOMESTIC MACHINERY- 

In all its branches. 

SOLE AGENTS for the HAMILTON MANUFAC- 
TURING Co. 

Manufacturers of the "WALKER WASHER" and 
DOMINION WRINGER. 

IMPORTERS of AMERICAN KNITTING 
MACHINES, NOVELTIES, and HARDWARE. 



Lists oe Samples on Application to 

R. S. DAVILLE & CO., 

46, WOOD STREET, LIVERPOOL. 

WASHI NG-DAY R EFORM 

HARPER TWELVETREES' 

RENOWNED "VILLA" 

£2 15s,, OR WITH 

MANGLER & WRINGER, £5 5s., 

Does the Fortniglit's FaDiily 
"Wash in Four Hours, without rub- 
bing OR BOILING, as certified by 
thousands of delighted purchasers 
It is easy to work, easily under 
stood, strongly made, durable, doe- 
not injure the clothes, but really 
saves them ; and is the only Wash* 
ing Machine in the world which 
renders Boiling unnecessary, and 
saves five or sL-t hours of copper 
firing each washing day. The Five- 
Guinea "Villa" Washer possesses 
tremendous washing power, and 
will wash 15 dozen collars and 
ladies' cuffs in five minutes ; 150 
pocket - haudkercliiefs in five 
minutes ; 60 hotel table cloths in an 
hour; 10 dozen bedroom towels per 
horn- ; Z\ dozen shii-ts per hour ; 1^ 
dozen sheets per hour, and counter- 
panes, blankets, cmi;ains, &c., in 
proportion. Such success ia un- 
pai-alleled! Illustrated Pi'OspectuseS 
and Export Quotations post free o* 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 

LAl'SDRT EXGIXEEE AND MACHINIST, 

80, FINSBURY PAVEMENT, LONDON, E.G. 




MORE 



AGENTS WANTED. 



Sole London Agent for Kenworthy's "Paragon" 
Washing Machine. 



38 THE SEWING is^. iIINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Maech 1. 1881. 

THEOBALD'S HYDRAULIC SELF-ACTING WASHER, 

(PATENT). (RETAIL 10/6 EACH). 

This new Washer positively surpasses all others. It acts on an entirely new principle, doing away with all knocking about, pounding, 
squeezing, brushing or rubbing. The effect is simply marvellous, and must be seen to believed. 

The Machine is simply stood in an ordinary copper or wash boiler, the clothes packed around it, the water made to boil, and it then, by 
a weU-known hydraulic principle, rushes up the Machine and is sucked through the clothes at the rate of 8 to lo gallons per minute. Illustration 
and full particulars free. 

Agents wanted everywhere. Liberal discount and such terms that there is no risk whatever. 



PORTLAND HOUSE, 3, SOUTH STREET, GREENWICH, LONDON, S.E. 

'^TH Elf TEY TEIUMPH '' BICYCLES & TRICYCLES. 

WEST ORCHARD, COVENTRY, 

ESALE AND EXPORT MANUFACTURERS. 

India i Bath Chair and Perambulator Wheels. Speciality Children's Bicycles and TWoycles 

actures for this Season cannot be surpassed. Price Lists on Application. 



TOWER WORKS, PIPER'S ROW. WOLVERHAMPTON, 

MANUFACTUIIEES OF THE '* EXPRESS '' BICYCLE, 

AND 

BICYCLE FITTINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



BY ROYAL ^^mllWv LETTERS PATENT. 




THE -DESIDERATUM" BICYCLE, 

PATENT SELF-ADJUSTING STANLEY HEAD (which cannot get out 

of order). 
PATENT NON-CORROSIVE SPOKES. 
IMPROVED ADJUSTABLE ROLLER, or Ball Bearings. 
IMPROVED ADJUSTABLE STEP. 
IMPROVED DUSTPROOF CONED BEARINGS to Back Wheel & Fed 

"Few makes are now better known than the "Desideratum"; certainly we have received more inq 
«:oncerning it than any other Machine, and although a large number of our readers must be mounted on this stee 
Aave never yel heard a single complaint regarding it.—" Vide Bicycles of the year 1878. 

PATENTEES AND MANUFACTURERS 

HARRINGTON & CO., 

STEWART STREET, WOLVERHAMPTON. 

Descriptive Price Lists on application. Agents wanted in Towns where not represen 



MiLRCH 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 




CO 



IN BROWNE 



H 












H ^. 



ft 




CD 



Having had a long practical experience in the Manufacture of the 




Expressly for Exportation to extreme climates, has succeeded in producing an Instrument which combines 
English durability and soundness, with first-class quality of tone. 





JUSTIN BROWNT! can refer to customers whom he has supplied in New Zealand, Costa Rica, Peru, Calcutta, &c., all of whom have 
eKpr<ts8&i the (greatest satisfaction, and renewed their orders. His prices will be found to be extremely low in proportiou to the quality 
of Pianos, and in comparison with those of other Houses where the same degree of soundness and durability ia studied, the reason of the 
difference being that in their case, selling as they do retail, there are heavy expenses for Show Rooms, Advertising, &c., which as a 
Wholesale Manufacturer he does not incur ; having only Factory expenses, u.© -^an offer an equally good instrument at a much lower figure* 

CATALOGOES OF DESIGNS AND PRSGES SENT FREE. 



JUSTIN BROWNE, 

PIANOFORTE MANUFAGTUREIt 



237 & 239. EUSTON ROAT), LONDON, ENGLAND. 






40 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUKNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Mabch 1, 1881. 



Fiiilayson,Boiisfiel(l& Go.'s 



WAX 
MACHINE THREADS 



SOLE SEWING 
MACHINE THREADS 




GABLE LAID 
THREADS 



TAILOR'S THREADS 



MACHINE LINEN THREADS 



AND 



SHOE THREADS 



AKE 



CELEBRATED OVER THE WORLD, 

And acknowledged by the leading users to be the 

BEST LINEN THREADS EVER MADE. 



LONDON; N.B.^FMaysoii, Bousfleld, and ^^^ 

Co., did not exhibit at the Paris 

Exhibition. 

Prices and Samples free on application to 

FLAX MILLS, 





1851; 



1865. 



JOHNSTONE,— ClASGOW. 

Friatsd for the Fropri«ton, and Published by them at 11, Ats Maria Laae. in the City of Lsndon 



^ 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE 
AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTie APPLIANCES. 
MARCH H^ 1881. 




FURLONG'S 

PAT ENT 

SHIRT COLLAR & CUFF IROOTNG & POLISHING 

MACHINE. 



Jo^cs t- CurtfsejtrsoAf^ 



.% l/rn£ 7?fM/ryZAM£. 



I» 



^ .l^'t/ 




Vol. IX. No, 125. 



APRIL 1. 1881 



Price, with Supplement, 4d. 



DUNBARTM^M ASTER & CO., 

^"^ GILFORD, IRELAND, 

f^^tn^m Manufacturers of all kinds of Linen Threads. 

Highest Medals were awarded Dunbar & Go's Threads wherever exhibited 

FOR HAND OR IVACHINE SEWING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

SUITABLE FOR ALL PURPOSES, SHOES, SOLE SEWING, TAILORS, &c. 

DUNBAR AND CO.'S THREADS ARE THE BEST. 

Samples and Prices on Application. 





HOLMES, PEARSON, MIDGLEY & CO., 

MANUFACTUREHtl OV 

Washing, Wringing, and Mangling Machines, 

FRl/17 DRESSER, SUGAR CUTTER, CHAFF CUTTER, 

Morticing Machines and Circular Saw Benches 



MANUFACTORY : 

ROYAL IRON WORKS, 

• Price List on Application. 
SPECIAL TERMS TO .MERCHANTS AND THE TRADE. 
ALL GOODS CAREFULLY PACKED IN SMALL SPACE FOR EXPORT. 



THE ROYAL WASHER, strong and simple in conBtruction. An ornament to every home, and the delight of everv wife. 
Price, 'J-2 inches, £o 1"6. Rollers with Brass Caps. 



THE SEWIKG MACHINE eAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Apbil 1, J 881. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Domestic Labour-Saving Machinery Exhibition 19 to 26 

Leaders 28 and 29 

Press Notices on the Exhibition of Domestic Labour-Saving 

Appliances, 181 1 31 to 36 

The Bickford Automatic Family Knitter 36 

Law '. 3b to 38 

Patents :.8 



I 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

Bicycle and Tricyle Manufacturers: 

Devey, Joseph & Co 41 

Harrington & Co 38 

HUlman, Herbert & Cooper 16 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 30 

Surrey Machinists Co 40 

Warman, Laxon & Co 41 

Bicycle Bearings and Fittings Manufacturers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 10 

Bown, W 44 

Devey, Joseph & Co 38 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 30 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Bicycle Saddle and Bag Manufacturers : 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Boot Machinery Manufacturers: 

Blalce and Goodyear Company 11 

Howe Machine Co., Limited 17 

Button Hole Machines : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Company 10 

Fork Cleaning Machine : 

Hutchinson 81 Co 2" 

Gas Engine Makers .■ 

Andrew, J. E. H ~cj 

Crossley Brothers i S 

Kilting Machine Manufacturers : 

Holroyd, J n 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Co 18 

Publications : 

Urquhart on the Sewing Machine 26 

Sewing Cotton Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 36 

Evans, Walter & Co 14 

Raworth, John T i 

Sewing Machine Attachment Makers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co. 13 

Bown, W q 

Daville, R. S. & Co '.'.....'.'.'.'.[['.'. 37 

Manasse, Max .0 

Sewing Machine Manufacturers : 

Gritzner & Co y 

Holroyd, J ji 

Howe Machine Company, Limited 8 

Junker &: Ruh 10 

Mothersill, R ....'.....'. 41 



Raymond & Co. (P. Frank) „ 

Rennick, Kemsley & Co .*.'!.'.!.'.'.'.'. 25 

Singer Manufacturing Company ... " i c 

Tburlow, Chiirles .'.".'.'.'.'.'.'.'.' .'.".'.','.'.".' 40 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Company, Limited ....!!.*.".'.'..!! 18 

Watson Si Co 1 1 .q 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co .'...!!.'.'!!!! 6 

White Sewing Machine Company . j 

Wright, G. E .....!.'.!'.'.'.'.'..'.'.'!".".'.'■" 



40- 



Sewing Machine and Bicycle Oil Makers: 



Ariston Oil Company „ 



Bishop's Cluster Company 
Daville & Co 



10 
39 



Sewing Machine Needles : 

The Park Wood Mills Company ,0 

Sewing Thread Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co j, 

Dunbar, McMaster, & Co !!!!!!. !.'!!'.'..'. i 

Evans, Walter, & Co !'.!!,'.".".' '8 

■■ ■ I2r 



Finlavson, Bousfield & Co. 
Marshall & Co. 



Trade PROTECTroN Societies : 
Stubbs' Mercantile Offices . . 



Washing M.achine Manufacturers : 

Holmes, Pearson, Midgley, & Co , 

Twelvetrees, Harper ' ' " -J j'«, •,„ 

Theobald, E ] " '. I? 

Wolstencroft & Co ",' t, 

Whitley & Co ■•••-.'! 1 ..'.".'.!!!.'!! ! 

Ta\lor & AVilson \ 

Taylor, F. D 



27 
39' 

13 



SCALE OF CHAEGES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS. 

One Page ^4 per insertion 

Half „ 2 2 

One Third Page 18 

Quarter „ 12 

One Sixth „ 15 „ 

One Eighth „ 12 

The above Scale of Charges will be snbject to a discount 
of 10 per cent, upon Six and 20 per cent, upon Twelve 
insertions. 

Seven Lines and under 2 6 

For every additional 6 

j^dverti semen ts of Assistants Wanting Situations (not 
exceeding 18 words) inserted at a nominal charge of Is,. 




APL! 



\ri 



im: o a- X Xj Xj ' s 

PATENT SIWSLESTeeKE „.„... 

Secwred by Royal Letters Patent, No. 756, 25tt Feb., 1879. 

MOW Cards, &c., McGill 3 Patent Staple Fasteners and .staple Suspendinff Eina-s wUl be found mt 
SrUv "'^^f^:v±^TP^', ""l'' T'''"' '"'S"" 1""P"»^ in'te.id.d^thatSau be a^lM a, ",- 
S, A =,S ^f.„?f'^f''fi,*'°'''''"f' V^" "'"P'^ 3^''-«'"^ autumatioaUy inserts these Fasteners and 
Emgs. A ^/"£«=tr°l^e of the operator's hand upon the Plunger of the Press will instantaneonslv 
inseit and clinch the Staple or Ring, m the articles to be bound or suspended. 

Also McGill's Patent American Paper Pa?teners, Binders, Suspending « a 

Einffs and Braces, Picture Hangers, &c., cheaper and superior to any 5„„ie s„.nend. 

other make. ^'^^1 eS^ 
___ 6s. per 1000- 

eueopean agent.?— 

F. W. LOTZ & Co., 20, Barbican, London, E.G. 

■wholesale only. discount to expoetees. 
Illustrated Catalogue and Price List on Application. 





staple Fastener. 
5s. per 1000.. 



ApBit. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY. 



MANUFACTORY : 



Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. 



PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN OFFICE 



19, QUEEN VICTORIA ST., L ONDON, E.G. 

Manufacturers of the justly Celebrated 

WHITE SEWING MACHINES, 

THE POPULAR FAVORITES FOR NOISELESSNESS AND EASY 

TREADLE MOVEMENT. 

SUPERLATIVE 




Machines for 

all work. 

12 various 

styles. 



IN 



Every machine 
"Warranted for 



TTTl^TP I ^ years. Legal 
in£;iix| guarantee. 



AHRIBUTES, 



IT IS THE FINEST FINISHED AND 

BEST MADE MACHINE IN THE 

WORLD. 

IT IS THE EASIEST-SELLING AND 

BEST- SATISFYING MACHINE 

EVER PRODUCED. 



The Peerless Hand 
Machine. 







CO 



O 



Cheapest and Best in the Market. 
Warranted for 3 years. 

LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGEjNTS. 



All Sewing Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this — the latest Improved and Best 
Silent Lock-Stitch Shuttle Sewing Machine — or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &:c., to 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

19, Queen Victoria Street, Loudon, E.G. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881. 



THE SINGER MANUFAGMI 



MPANY, 



The largest Sewing Machine Manufacturers in the World. 

Upwards of 538,609 of these CELEBRATED MACHINES were Sold in the year 1880, being 

at the rate of over 1,800 for every working day. 

THE GREAT SALE affords most convincing proof of their popularity and value, and is atiributable 

to the reputation obtained for 

Excellence of Manufacture, Strength and Beauty of Stitch, 

AND FOE THEIR 

Perfect Adaptability to every Class of Sewing. 



PRICE 



fi:om 



£4 4s. 



FOR CASH 

&om 



£4 Os., 



May be had on "Hire, with option 
of Purchase," by paying 

2/6 




No Household should 
be -without one of the 

Family Machines, 
which are unequalled 

for all Domestic 

Sev/ing. So simple, a 

child can v/ork them. 

SIANTTFACTTTRERS should see the 
Manufacturing machines ! 

Are unsurpassed for the Factory or 
Workshop ! 



CAUTION ! 

Beware of Imitations ! Attempts are made to palm them upon the unwary under the pretext 

of being on a " Singer Principle" or " System." 
To Avoid Deception buy only at the Oiifices of the Company. 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & Co.), 
Chief Coxmting-House in Europe-39, FOSTER LANE, E.G. 

823 Branch Ofiaces in the United Kingdom. 

LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 
195, Holloway Road, N., 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N., 

51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. 



14?, Cheapside, E.G. 

132, Oxford Street, W. 

31 & 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. 

149, Southwark Park Eoad. S.E. 

878, Clapham Eoad, S,W. 



144, Brompton Eoad, S.W. 
269, Commercial Eoad, E. 
174, Hackney Eoad, E. 
45, Broadway, Stratford, E. 
3, Ordnance Eow, Barking Eoad, 
Canning Town, E. 



6, High Street, Woolwich. 

7, Kew Eoad, Eichmond, S.W. 

1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. 
131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. 
4a, North End, Croydon, S.E. 



April 1, 1881. 



THE SEWINa MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE SINGE 




COMPANY 



(Formerly I. M. SINGER & CO.), 

IMZ^l^sTTJIPJ^CTTJiE^EI^S OIF* 

SING ER'S SEWING MACH INES. 

Chief Counting House in Europe ; 

39 FOSTER LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.G. 



LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 

147, Oheapside, E.O. ; 132, Oxford Street, W. ; 51, High Street, Camaec Town, N.W. ; 31 and 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. ; 149, Blue 
Anchor Road, Bennondsey, S.E (now 149, Southwark Park Road) ; 27S, Clapham Road, S.AV. ; H4,Brompton Road, S.W. ; 269, Commercial 
Road, E. {comer of Bedford Street) ; 174, Hackney Road, E. (opposite Weymouth Terrace) ; 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N. ; 
1, Surinam Terrace, Stratford, E. (between Swan and Bank) ; 1, Rathboue Street. BarkiD^ Road, Canning Town, E. • 7, Kew Road, 
Richmond, S.W.; 1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. ; 131, South Street, Creenwich, S.E. ; Croydon, 4a, North End. 



PROVINCIAL OFFICES: 



ENGLANB. 

A.ccriiig:ton, 9, Peel-street 
iVldershot, Victoria-road 
A-lfreton, 68, King-street 
Ashford, 17, Marsh-street 
Ashton-u.-Lyne, 246. Stamfd-st. 
Aylecbury, Silver-street 
Bakewell, North Church- street. 
Banbury, Market Place 
Bamsley, Eldon-street 
Barrow- in -Fumess, 11, Dalkeith- 

street 
Bath, 5, Quiet-street 
Batlcy, Commerci^-street 
Bedford, 36, Midland-road 
Bicester, Sheep-street 
Biggleswade, Shortmead-street 
Bingley, Main-street. 
Birkenhead, 164, Grange-lane 
Birmingham, 93, New-street 
Bi<;hop Auckland, 29, South-rd. 
Bishop Stortford, "Wind Hill 
Blackburn, 54a, Church-street 
Blyth, "Woodbine-ter., "Waterloo 
Bolton, 52, Newport -street 
Boston, 3J, Market-place 
Bradford, 38, Mechanics* Instit. 
Briiintree, 7, Fairfield-road 
Brentwood, 3, Crown-street 
Briahton, 6, North. ,st., Quadrant 
Bristol, 18 & 19, High-street 
Bromley (Keut), 18. High-street 
Burnley, lUI, St. James'-street 
Burton-on-Trent, 76. Guild-street 
Bury -St. -Edmunds, 7 0, St. John-st. 
Cambridge, 17, Petty Cury 
Canterbury, 6, High-street 
Carlisle, Lome-bldgs., Bank-st. 
Chatham, 342, High-street 
Cheadle, High-street 
Chelmsford, High-street 
Chfltenham, 24, Pittville-street 
Chester. 68, Foregate-street 
Chesterfield, 1, Corporation-bldga. 
Chichester, 54, East-street 
Chorlcy, 50, Clifford -street 
CMfckheaton, 5, Crown-street 
Clitheroe, ?-0, Wellgate 
Cunlville, Station-street. 
C-lchester, 32, St. Botolph-street 
Cfilne 'Lancashire), 8, Arcade 
Congleton, 7. Mill-street 
CovrsCry, 1 2, Fleet-street (op. 

Bablake Ohurch) 
Crewe, 67, Nantwich-road 
Darlington, 10, Prebcni-row 
bartlord, 18, High-stre4l 



Deal, 124, Beach-street 
Denbigh, 36. Park-street 
Derby, 22, Wardwick 
Dewsbury, Nelson-street (top of 

Daisy-hill) 
Doncaster, 23, Scot-lane 
Douglas {Isle of Man), 5, Strand- 
street 
Dover, 9, Priory-street 
Dovercourt, Harwich*-road 
Dudley, 217, "Wolverhampton-at. 
Durham, 3, Neville-street i 

Eastbourne, 46, Terminus-road 

(two doors from post office} 
■Rcclee, 31, Church-street 
Exeter, 19, Queen street 
Folkestone, Market-place 
Gloucester, 116, Westgate-street 
Grantham, 11, "Wharf-road 
Gravesend, 20, New-road 
Grimsby, 57, Freemac-^tre^it 
Guernsey, 17, Smith-street 
Guildford, 161, High-street 
Halstead, 53, High-street 
Hanley, 48, Piccadilly 
Harrogate, 11, "Westmoreland-st. 
Hastings, 48, Robertson-street 
Heckmondwike, 2, Market-street 
Hednesford, Station- street 
Hereford, 57, Commercial-street 
Ht rtford, Forden House, "Ware- 
road 
Hexham, 20, Market-place 
High "Wycombe, 123, Oxford-rd. 
Hinckley, Castle-street 
Huddersfield, 8, New-street 
Hull, 61, "WTiitefriargate 
Huntingdon, High-street 
Ilkeston, 75, Bath-street 
Ipswich, 19, Butter-market 
Jersey, 14a, New-street 
Keighley, 2, Market-place 
Kendall, 3, Wildman-street 



Maldon, High-street | 

(105, Ma'ket-street| 
Manchester J 132, Cheerham-hill; 
( 438, Stretford-road 
Manningtree, Hiu-h-street 
Mansfield, 32, Nottingham-street 
Market Drayton, Shropshire-st. 
Market Harboro', Church-street 
Melton Mowbray, Victoria House, 

Market-place 
MidiUesboro', 59, Newport-road 
Morley, 4, Bradford-buildings, 

Chapel-hill 
Newark, 15, Kirkgate 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, 16, Grainger- 

street, "W. 
Newcastle-under-Lyne, 34, Bridge-' 
street I 

Newport (Mon.), 28, High-street I 
Newport(I of "Wight).91,Pyle-st.l 
Newton Heath, 622, Oldham-road 
Northampton, 3, Market -square 
Northwich, 17, "Witton-street 
Norwich, 55, London-street 
Nottingham, 20, "Wheelergate 
Oldham, 70, Yorkshire-street 
Openshaw, 37, Ashton-old-road 
Ormskirk, 58, Aughton-street 
Oswestry, Bailey-street 
Otley, 34, Kirkgate 
Oxford, 3, New-road 
Penrith, 8, Castlegate 
Peterborough, 53, Narrow Bridge- 
street 
PlSTnouth, 3, Bank of Fngland-pl, 
Pontefract, 11, Now Market-hall 
Portsea, 165, Queen-street 
Preston, 147, Friargate-s'creet (op- 

posi'ie Lune-street 
Ramsgate, 31, West Cliff-road 
Rawtenstail, Bank -street 
Reading, 61. London-street 
Red Hill, High-street 



ICidderminster, Rull Ring 

Lancaster, 19, Brock-street (cor- Retford, 3. Grove-street 

ner of Penny-stroet) ( Ripley, Market-place 

Leamington, 38. "Windsor-street | I.ipon, 1, Blossomgate 



Leeds, 14, Boar-lane 
Leek, 27, Russell-street 
Leicester. 44. Granby-street 
Lewes, 1G4, High-street 
Liverpool, 21, Bold-street 
Longtoa (Staffs.). 12. Market-ter 



Rochdale, 66, Yorkshire-street 
Romford, Market-place 
Rotherham, 109, Main-street 
Rugby, Lawford-road 
Runcorn, Hish-strcet 
Ryde (Isle of Wights 78, TJnion-st. 



Loughborough, 44, Market-place Saffron Walden. Church-street 
Lowestoft, 123, Hit:h-street ■ Salisbury, 56, Fish'?rvjn-strcet 

Luton, 32. Park-street ^ ' Salford, 4, Cross-.ar.c and 100, 

Lynn. 9, Norfolk-street i Regent-road 

Maiditoy , 8, King-st*-"*) i Scarborongh, 30, Huntrisj-row 



Scotholme, Basford-road 
Sheffield, 37, Fargate 
Shipley, 19, Kirkcate 
Shrewsbury, 4, Market-street 
Sittingborue, 64. Hitrh-street 
Southampton, 105, Ifigh-street 
Southend, Market-place 
Southport, 7, Union-street 
St. Helen's, 31, Market-place 
Stafford, 25, Gaol-road 
Stamford, Ironmonger-strfct 
South Stockton, 19, Mandale-road 
Stockport, 11, Bridge-street 
Stourbridge, 6' - Church-street 
Stratford-on-Avon. 19, "V^-'^od-st. 
Stroud, 7, George-street 
Swadlincote, Station c'reet 
Swindon, 52. Regent-street 
Tamworth. 54. Church-street 
Taunton, Bridge-street 
Torquay, 58, Fleet-Street 
Truro, 13, Vietoria-place 
Tunbridge "Wells, Vale-road 
Tunstall, 119, High-sti'cet 
"Wakelield, 9, Kirkgate 
"Walsall, 2, Bridge-street 
"Warrington, 44, Horsemarket-st. 
Watford , ', Queen' s-r oad 
Wednesbury, 67, "Union- street 
Wellington, Church-street 
West Bromwich, 5, New-street 
Whitehaven, 70, King-street 
Wigan, 21, King-street 
Winchester, 27, St. Thomas-street' 
Windsor, 64a, Peascod-street 
Winsford, Over-lane 
Wirksworth. North-end 
Wisbeach, 51, Market-place 
Wolverhampton, Queen-street 
Worcester, 2, St. Nicholas-street 
Wrexham, 7, Charles-street 
Yarmouth, Broad-Row 
"Tork, 24, Coney-street 

WALES. 

Abergavenny, 19, Market-street 
Aberystwith, Market-hall 
Builth, irigh-,-treet 
Cardiff, 5, Queen-stret<t 
Carmarthen, 7, Lammas-street 
Carnarvon, 5, Bridge-street 
Dolgclly, Market-hall 
Mertliyr, I, Victoria-street 
Ni,wtown. Market-hall 
Puntvjvool. Market-hall 
Pontypridd. Market- hall 
&waxLsca, 103, Oxford-street 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, 225, Union-street 
Arbroath, 159, High-street 
Avr, 60, High-street 
Banff, 17. Strait-path 
Cupar-Fife, 61, Crossgate 
Dumbarton, 67, High-street 
Dumfries, 127, High-street 
Dundee, 128, Nethergate 
Dunfermline, 87, High-street 
Edinburgh, 74, Prince s-strpot 
Elirin, 215, High-street 
Forfar, 28, Castle-street f 
Gala^shiels, 62, High-street 
Glasgow, 39, Union-street 
Greenock, 8, West Blackball -ft 
Hamilton, 32, Cadzow-street 
Hawick, 3, Tower-knowe 
Inverness, 14, Union-street 
Kilmarnock, 83, King-stree* 
Kirkcaldy, 69, IIigh-'*rcet 
Kirkwall (Orkney), Broad-stree*. 
Montrose, 96, Murray-street 
Paisley, 101, High-street-crosa 
Partick, 97, Dumbai ton-road 
Perth, G4, St. John-street 
Peterhead, Rose-street 
Stirling, 61, Murray-place 
Tain, Lamington-strcet 
Thurso, Princes-street 
IRELAND. 
Armagh, 2, Ogle-street 
Athlone, Church-street 
Ballina, Bridge-street 
Ballymena, 67 and 68, Church-rt. 
Belfast, 3 and 4, Donegal-sq., N. 
Carlow, Tullow-street 
Coleraine, New-row 
Cork. 79, Grand-parade 
Drogheda, 97, St. Qeorge's-Btree( 
Dublin, 69, Graf ton-street 
Ennis, Jail-street 
Enniskillen, 1% High-street 
Fermoy, 1, King-street 
Galway, Domnick-street 
KilnisK. Moore-strcet 
Kingstown, 65^ Lower Cre-3rge.«t 
Limerick, 31, Patrick-street 
Londonderry, 1. Carlisle-road 
MuUingar, Gre\'illc-street 
Navan, Trimgate-street 
Newry, 18, Sugar-island 
Parsonstown, 2, Seffins 
Quecnstown, Harbour-row 
S]igi>, 45, Knox-street 
Tralee. 40. Bridge-street 
Waterford, 124, Quay 
Wexford, SelEkar-«ttMt. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881. 



' 




THE 

ONLy 
"GRAND 



SEWING 
MACHINES 

AT THE LATE 

PARIS EXHIBITION. 





NEW ROTARY-HOOK LOCK-STITCH 

SEWING MACHINES, 

Light, Medium, or Powerful, from ^85 5s. 

The New-Straight Needle Machines, for whicli the "GKAND PEIZE" was awarded, are the 

No. 8. — The New Family and Light Manufacturing Machine. Strongly recommended Price £7 lOs. 

No. 6. — A Powerful Machine, capable of doing all grades of work, from the finest to the 

thickest, in the best possible manner, including all the various kinds of Leather work „ 
Also No. 6 Cylinder Machine for special classes of Boot work „ 

IfO. 7. — Similar to the No. 6 Machine, but especially suitable for Corset work, heavy Tailoring, 

Upholstery, &c , ,, 

The "Well-known Original Family and. Light Manufacturing Machines. 

Nos. 1 & 3 • •■• • .Prices, £6 lOs., £7 lOs. 

The New No. 8 Hand Machine, specially recommended. 

Is the best and most perfect Haad Machine yet produced, and combines the utmost efficiency 
with elegance of appearance, rendering it suitable to the lady's boudoir or for travelling. 

Price, WITH COVEE, complete, £5 6s. 

MACHINE ON HIRE WITH OPTION OF PURCHASE. 



£8 10s. 
£10. 

£8 10s. 



EVERY MACHINE MADE BY WHEELER AND WILSON HAS THEIR TRADE MARK AFFIXED. 

Illustrated Catalogues and other particulars^ Poet Free, 



THE WHEELER & WILSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 



London, Chief OfBce, 21, Qusen 

Victoria Street, E.G. 
London, 139, Regent Street, W. 

,, 49, Newington Causeway, S.E. 
Liverpool, 61, Bold Street. 
Birmingham, Stephenson Place. 
BrightdB, 163, North Street. 
Bristol. 50, Victoria Street. 



Bath, 28, Waloot Street. 
Plymouth, 187, Union Street. 
Cardiff, 17, St. Mary Street. 
Nottingham, 16, Lister Gate. 
Newcastle, Wast Grainger Street. 
Middlesborough, 55, Newport 

Eoad. 
Hull, 9, Savile Street. 



Manchester, 131, Market Stfeet. 
Leeds, 41, Commercial Street. 
Sheffield, 126, Barker's Pool. 
York, 27, Coney Street. 
Bradford, 67, Tyrrel Street. 
Edinburgh, 7, Frederick Street. 
Glasgow, 71, Union Street. 
DubUn, 1, Stephen's Green. 



Belfast, 63, High Street. 
Cork, 32, Grand Parade. 
Norwich, 45, London Street, 
Exeter, London Inn Square. 
Torquay, 115, Union Street, 
Taunton, 2, High Street. 
Stroud, 1, John Street. 



itaiL 1, 1881 



THE SEWma MACHliSTE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 




Factory of Sewing Machines and Sewing Machine Cabinets. 



ermany. 



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TO SE^sATIiLTG- nyL^A-OHIIIsrE r)E.A.LEi^S, 



T 



C3- PATENTED IN ENGLAND AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 



TT CD — 
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i-t O 



Fig. B. 
LOCKED 

Chair and 
Sewing Ma- 
chine within 



Furnished 



^ Delivered with complete treadle movement free in Loudon at prices but Httle above thoso 

I Tf/lBi "~~ .. ^ for usual iron stands with table and cover. 

I I lUN ft A Hlhlrf " — •*— — ^- Without or with our machines, either plain style or inlaid in mother of- 
'■ ^HUlnh i PiiVF' tSr -»—_.___peafl, and highly ornamented in hard painting by special 

' — " W/IOC WlTU fiSlei ~-~-.»..„_^ artistB. All n-,a hiues with loose wheel 

for aU systems of machines —- ^ ZL^Zmj Mff A/OrniTTTTr— 

Very useful. More solid than iron stands. ""■"" — ........^^^^^'WlU/lf I /{qIP 

Honourable mention and highest rewards at numerous Exhibitions. _ 

Novel I 
Cheap ! 
Solid r 
Elegant! 

SECOND 
HIGHEST 

Medal 

AT THE LATE 

Sydney 

International 

EXHIBITION 

1879. 

Wholesale Agents wanted throughout the United Kingdom. 





TflE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Apbil 1, ISsi. 




HOWE SEWING MACHINES 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Howe MacMne Company, 

EXPEESSLT rOE BOOT & SHOE MAKEES, 

FOR 

SADDLE AND HAENESS MAKEES, 

AND FOR 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Leather Goods, 

ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED POR THE CLOSING OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF BOOT TOPS. 



TloweringMacliine (with patent vibrat ing attachment.) 
A SPE CIAL MACHINE FO R ELAST ICS. 

I Brancli Offices and Agencies in every Town in the United 

Kingdom. 

Price Lists and Samples oj Work. FREE on application. 

EASY TERMS OF PURCHASE. 



The Howe Machine Company, 

46 & 48, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDON. 



FOR SEWING 




MACHINES. 



TSADE UABE. 



WALTER EVANS & CO., 



EVANS'S SUPERIOR SIX CORD SEWING COTTON, ON SPOOLS SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

ALSO 

Superior Six-Cord Crochet Cotton, on Spools, in Skeins, and in Balls, for Sewing, Knitting, and Crochet, which 

is especially recommended for all "first-class Crochet Work; " also for Guipure d'Art and Point Lace. 
Maltese Thread, in Balls, White, Black, and Colors 
Tatting Cotton, on Spools. 

Patent Glace Thread, in White, Black, and Cotors, on Spools and Cards. 
Two and Three Cord Sewings, on Spools, soft finish. 
Sewings, in Balls. 
Embroidering, Knitting, Mending, Cotton Cords, and Small Gords. 



1862. 

London Ezbibitioll Prize Medal, 
awarded " for very strong * 
most inperior tliread." 



1867. 

Paris Universal £xhil)itiou 
Gold Kedal. 



1873. 

Vienna First Class Medal 
" for Frogreas." 



1878. 

Paris tTniversal Ezhlbltloo, 
Silver Modal. 



Apeil 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



HOLROYD'S NEW PATENT 

KILTING MACHINE 

Sells at sight, and is acknowledged by the Trade in England and Abroad to be the best for all 
purposes, upwards of 8,000 having been sold in two years, and the still increasing demand 

testifies to its unequalled exeeUence. 

THIS Machine, by its simplicity and constraction, will at once commend itself to 
Merchants and Manufacturers, and will supply that which has long been 
wanted, namely, a good, practical, and durable Machine at a reasonable price. 

It can be worked by hand, treadle, or steam power, and heated by gas or irons as 
desired ; and it runs so light that it can be worked by hand for any length of time 
without the slightest fatigue. 

It will make any kind of kilt desired, from the narrowest to an inch wide, and any 
depth up to ten inches, and can be altered to different styles and widths immediately, 
and in a most simple manner. 

It is specially adapted for manufacturing and dress-making purposes, and by its 
lightness, rapidity, and correctness, together with the fact that it will work muslin, 
thick cloth, or felt with equal faciUty, it cannot fail to be a great saving, and of the 
greatest advantage. 

With the gas arrangement perfect combustion is secured, thereby avoiding any 
smoke or smell which is so unpleasant in most other machines, and being nickel 
plated all over does not rust. 

Price, complete with gas arrangements and 4 heating irons, £3 3s. 

ELECTRO-PLATING BY STEAM POWER, AND DYNAMO ELECTRIC MACHINES, 

Combining all the latest improvements in GILDING, BBONZING, &c., on rough or smooth surfaces, on any kind of metal goods. 

Special Terms oifered to Manufacturers of articles suitable for plating. 

J. HOLROYD, Tomlinson St., Hulme, Manchester. 




CANADIAN SEWING MACHINES. 




£2 2s. Complete. 



This Machine has obtained the highest re- 
putation and an enormous sale, both under 
its true name ("Raymond's"), and also as 
the "Weir 55s. Machine," &c. — (See caution 
below). It is durable, rapid, exceedingly 
simple, neat, not liable to get out of order, and warranted 
to sew from the finest muslin to the heaviest material. 

CAUTION. — James G. Weir, who, for about eight 
years obtained these genuine Machines, is no longer sup- 
pUed with them by the Inventor and Manufacturer, Mr. 
Charles Raymond. 



BEWARE OF ALL COUNTERFEITS. 




ALSO 



£4 4s. Complete. 

RAYMOND'S PATENT "Household" 
Lockstitch Machine has been designed ex- 
pressly for family use. It is exceedingly 
simple to learn and to manage, and warranted 
to sew every kind of family and household 
work Is fitted with the latest improve- 
ment;, — loose wheel, and (Registered) 
Automatic Bobbin Winder. 

Testimonials, Prospectuses, Samples of 
Work, and all particulars free on application 



Raymond's No. 1 and 2 TREADLE MACHINES for Families, Dressmakers, and Manufacturers, 



-A-OEItTTS ■S^-A.3SrTEID. 



CHIEF DEPOT FOR EUROPE AND EXPORT: 

11, MOUNT PLEASANT, LIVERPOOL, 

p. FRANK, AGENT. ESTABLISHED 1863. 



10 



tba.de 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



ApBiL 1, 1881. 



MAEK 




ANNUAL PRODUCTION, 
30,000 MACHINES. 

PROPER IRION FOUNDRY. 

riBST PRIZES AT DIFFEKENT EXHIBITIONS. 



TEADE 



ORIGINAL RHENANIA, 

Cneivalled Splendid 
HAND 

SEWING 
MACHINE. 

ORIGINAL FIDELITAS, 

Best Family 

SEWING 
MACHINE 



TBADE 





MAEK 



SYSTEM, 
GROVER& BAKER 

No. 19. 

Sewing 
Machine 

FOR TRADE, 



ORIGINAL BADENIA, 
HEAVY STRONG 



m. SEWING 
■MACHINES 



FOR TRADE. 



MAEK 



^^^^^ Sewing Mac 

^(ElfFf^ CARLSEU 



JUNKER 

Sewing Machine Manufactory, 

lUHE (Germany). 



f TRADE 



THE LARGEST 




M,\EK 




II 



THE LARGEST SEWING 




THE LARGEST SEWING MACHINE 




Warehouse. 



[Machine "Belt" 1 W g Oil 
Manufacturers. Afg^ Manufacturers. 

Bishop's Cluster Company, Limited, 25, Hamsell St., London, E.G. 

SEWING AND MACHINE NEEDLES. 

ALL KINDS OF FANCY NEEDLES, KNITTING PINS, CROCHET HOOKS, THIMBLES, &c., 

THE PARK WOOD MILLS CO., 

NEEDLE MANUFACTURERS, 

PHce Lists li^ee. 230, BRADFORD STREET, BIRMI:N^GHAM. 




Apeil 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



11 



The Only Gold Medal for Boot and Shoe Machinefy Awarded at the 
Paris Exposition was for the Machinery of 

THE BLAKE & GOODYEAR 




LIMITED, 




A &EEAT VAEIETY OF MACHmEEI 



FOR 

HEEL NAILING AND TRIMMING, 

• EDGE TRIMMING AND SETTING 
HEEL BLOCKING, RAND AND WELT CUTTING, 

RAND TURNING, 

SELF-FEEDING EYELET MACHINES, 

Self- Feeding Punches, Double and Single Fitting Machines 

FOR PUTTING IN ELASTICS, 

STRAIGHT AND CIRCULAR READERS, 
And a great variety of other Machinery and Patented Tools. 



MANY OF OUR MACHINES MAY BE SEEN IN MOTION. 

AT NEWPORT PLACE, LEICESTER. 

Raw Hide Mallets «& Hammers for Shoe Manufacturers & Machinists, 
ROLLERS, PRESSES, KNIVES A^^D IRON OR WOOD LASTS. 



IP Sl^REET, LONBON, E.a 



12 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Apeil 1, 1881. 




CABLE LAID 
THREADS 



TAILOR'S THREADS 



MACHINE LINEN THREADS 



AND 



SHOE THREADS 



ARE 



CELEBRATED OVER THE WORLD, 

And acknowledged by the leading- users to be the 

BEST LINEN THREADS E¥ER MA0I 



LONDON; N.B.— Finlayson, Bousfield, and ^^ 

Co., did not exhibit at the Paris 

Exhibition. 




1851; 



JO 





Prices and Samples free on application to 

FLAX MILLS, 

LASG 




NBAE 



J 




AfBiL 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHnJE GAZETTE AND JOtTRNAL OF DOMEjsTIC APPLIANCES. 



13 



/lEDAL FOR MERIT 





MCDtL per) HEQl 



ESTABXISBLED 17 5 2 









^ ^--^^^^^\,^ 




x-.«&-<«^-^ 



""^^gsr- 




,J "^ 



CQ 



iwiii iiffii piiiPiif iiiii 
PlISL 



SI > Si td 

H< Q Q Q 

O td O 

Oh h 

O H *^ H 

H O O O 

H 12« H Szi 

O • H » 

t?! O 



SIX -CORD SOFT AND EXTRA QUALITY GLACE 

BEING OF VERY SUPERIOR QUALITY, ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED 



3f 




C. and Co. beg to direct attention to their 
celebrated CROCHET or TATTING COTTON, in 

Hanks or Balls. 



EST A B LI 9 ""-D 1759. 





MAGIC STEAM LAUNDRY 



SECUEED BY 
KOTAL 




LETTERS 
PATENT. 



The cheapest and moat economical Washer introduced, avoiding all the wear of linen 
cansed by present modes. Things to be washed only requii'e to be soaked, soaped, steamed, and 
hand-rubbed once. 

No use of chemicals, soda, dollies, maids, wash-boards; no turning or pushing mnchiuG 
handles; only one-half the soap used. See opinion of JESSE OVEilTON, Spriiii^field Laundry, 
Leammgton, in Queen of 17th of July, page 68 : — "The steam softens, and the condensed water 
carries away grease and stickiness, just as a belt of perspiration does off a dirty forehead." 
COLOUR OF WASHING DECIDEDLY IMPROVED. 

MAGIC LAUNDRY WASHER COMPANY, 

S14, Lichfield Hoad, Aston, Biriningliam. 



14 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOIJRNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Apeil 1, 1881. 



Sjdnej Exhibition. 



PRIZE 
MEDAL 




A WA RD S 

i88o. 



TAYLOR AND WILSON'S 



"HOME" WASHER 
"DOLLY" WASHER - 
WRINGING MACHINE 



FIRST PRIZE 

SECOND PRIZE 

FIRST PRIZE 




Price, £6:6:0. 




Price £3 : 10 : 0. 




Price, £3:5:0. 



Awarded upwards of 153 Gold and Silver Medals and First Frizes. 

THE ANNUAL SCALES EXCEED THOSE OF ANY OTHER WASHING MACHINE. 



Our Goods are all guaranteed to be made fi-om tlie best materials, tborougbly seasoned, and are all fitted with om 
well-known patents and appliances, wliicli cannot be supplied by any other maker. 



Illustrated Catalogue free on application to 



TAYLOR 




AVILSON. 



Atlas Works, Clayton-le-Moors, Accring'ton. 



April 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACSlNE GAZETTE AND JOTTENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 15 




ESTABLISHED 1836. 

S' MERCAI^TILE OFFIOES 

TRADE AUXILIARY COMPANY, LIMITED. 




HEAD OFFICES: 



42, GRESHAM ST., L0:N^D0N, E.C! 

West End Branch, 53, Conduit Street, Regent St., W. 



CHIEF 



For IRELAND. 



(■DUBLIN— 21, College Green. 
( BELFAST— 55, Victoria Strefi. 



OFFICES 

For SCOTLAND. 



f GLASGOW— 21, St. Vincent Place. 
( EDINBURGH— 4, Cockburr. Street. 



NORWICH— Post Office Street. 
PORTSMOUTH-85, High Street. 
SHEFFIELD— 86, Queen Street. 
SOUTHAMPTON— 150, High Street. 



DISTRICT OFFICES : 

GLOUCESTER— 6, CoUege Conit. 
LEEDS— 1, Eas* Parade. 
LIVI- BPOOL— 71, Lord Street. 
MANCHESTER- 14, Brown Street. 
NEWCASTLE— 32, Grainger Street West. 
With Agents and Correspondents throughout the Khigdom, on the Continent of Europe, and in the United Statiis of 

America, and the British Colonies. 

BANKERS : 

LONDON— The Union Bank op London. 



BIRMINGHAM-.2&, Exchange Buildings, 
BRA DFOBD, Yorkshire— 1 Booth Street, 
BRISTOL— 4, Bristol Chambers. 
BRIGHTON— 23, Prince Albert Street. 
CORK— 70, South Mall. 



BELFAST— The Northern Banking Company. 
BIRMINGHAM— Lloyd's Banking Company. 
BRISTOL— The National Provincial Bank op England. 
DUBLIN— Thk National Bank. 



EDINBURGH— The NATIONAL BANK OP SCOTLAND. 

GLASGOW— The British Linen Company. 
LIVERPOOL— The Bank op Liverpool. 
MANCHESTER— Manchester and Salford Bane. 



STUBBS' MERCANTILE OFFICES, 

With their various associated Agenci-a, form together a complete organisation for the protection of Bankers, Merchants. 
Manufacturers, Traders, and others, against risk and fraud in their various commercial transactions. 

Subscribers to these Offices can, by their Agency, recover debts due to them with promptitude. 
Stubbs' "Weekly Gazette" supplies information which is absolutely indispensable to Traders. 

T£3R,3VCS OF SXTBSCRIFTIOKr 

(Except for pneciid Service .and Financial Departments, in which the Eates will be (ixed by Agreement according to the 
circumstances.) One, Two, Three, and FrvE Guineas, according to requirements. 
PROSPECTUSES GIVING PULL PARTICULAKS ON APPLICATION. 



O ^TJT I O IT. 

There It no Office in London connected with Stubbs' Mercantile Offices (situate at the corner of 

King St., opposite Guildhall), except the West End Branch at 53, Conduit St., Regent St., W- 



16 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtlENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. ApbiL 1, 1881 




London : 97, Clieapside. Leicester : 76, Welford Road. 



MAKERS OF THE 






" Premier," " Flying Dutchman," & other Bicycles & Tricycles. 






PATENT DOUBLE 

BALL BEARINGS. 



BlUHAN HERBERT &CQaPCft 
MAKERS. 

COOPER'S 

INEXTINGUISHABLE 

HTTB LAMP. 

The only Lamp that does 
not go out on a rough road. 








^"cS 



On the "D.H F. PREMIER," fitted with our Patent Ball Bearings, was accomplished 
The greatest distance ever ridden in one week, viz. : — 1,405 MILES, and on the same Machine 
The greatest distance in one day is 262 MILES- 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE FREE. 



Please send anotlier large size "Cooper's Patent" Lamp, so that I may get it to-morrow. It is the 
grandest thing in Lamps that I have ever seen or tried. — ^Tours truly, W. Tatteesfield. 

Dear Sirs, Brighton, December 27th, 1880. 

We have much pleasure in testifying to the excellence of " Cooper's Patent Lamps," which give great 
satisfaction. Tours truly, H. Kevell Eetnolds, jun., Dark Blue B.C., and L.B.C. 

E. K. Eetell Ebtnolds, Dark Blue B.C. 
L. B. Eeynolds, L.B.C. 



All Communications to be addressed to the Works, COVENTRY. 



Apbii. 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



17 




TIN 




OWNE 



GO 






< 




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h-j 


H 


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Having had a long practical experience in the Manufacture of the 




Expressly for Exportation to extreme climates, has succeeded in producing an Instrument which combines 
English durability and soundness, with first-class quality of tone. 





JUSTIN BROW NT; can refer to customers whom he has supplied in New Zealand, Costa Rica, Peru, Calcutta, &c., all of whom have 
expr-issei the f leatest satisfaction, and renewed their orders. His prices will be found to be extremely low in proportion to (he quality 
of Pianos, and in comparison with those of other Houses where the same degree of soundness and dnrabUity is studied, the reason of the 
difference being- that in their case, selling as they do retail, there are heavy expenses for Show Rooms, Advertising, dice, which as a 
Wholesale Manufacturer he does not incur ; having only Factory expenses, ite lan offer an equally good instrument at a much lower figxire. 

CATALOGUES OF DESIGNS A^^D PRICES SENT FREE. 



JUSTIN BROWNE, 

lANOFORTE 



237 & S39, EUSTON ROAD, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



IS 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTIENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Apeil 1. 1881. 



An Engine which works without a Boiler or Steam. 

AVERAGE BEONTHIiY DiKIiIVEKY (includine' Continental) OVER 180 ENGINESt 




THE "OTTO" SILENT GAS ENGINE. 

IS EAPIDLT REPLACING STEAM ENaiNES PEOM 1 to 40 HOESE POWEE IND. 



WORKS & HEAD OFFICES: 

Great llarlbro' St., Gloster St., 
MANCHESIEa. 



CROSSLET.BROTHERS, 



LONDON HOUSE: 

U0, Queen 'Viotoria Street, E.O, 
LONDON. 




n 



LOCK-STITCH, HAND OR FOOT, 



i 1^ ^<^i 



First Prize Medals, Honours & Awards, whereve." Exhibited. 



THE NEW " LITTLE WANZER."— Entirely reconstructed and improved. 
Nickel-plated, Loose Wheel, New Patent Shuttle, Take-up Lever and 
Spooler. £4 4s. 

WANZER "A," Simplicity Itself.— The most powerful yet light running 
Hand Machine, straight race. £4 4s. 

WANZER "C" Light Foot Family Machine, entirely New, with every 

improvement up to 1879. £6 Os. 

WANZER " F " Family Machine, with Reversible Feed and Stitcb 
Lever. £7 lOs. 

WANZER "E" Wheel Feed Machine, for heavy work of all kinds 
£8 8s. 

WANZER PLAITING, KILTIKG AND BASTING 

MACHINES, 

Over 200 varieties of perfect Plaiting or Kilting, from 30s. complete. T/u 
only Machine Kilting and Basting at one operation. 



WANZER ''A" 



IS THE 



Great Mechanical Success of ttie Age. 

It combines all the known advantages of other 

Machines. Mounted on Ornamental Iron Base, 

Four Quineas complete. 



The Wanzer Sewi/ig Machine Company j 

L I Xd: I T E D , 

Chief Ofiace— 4, GREAT PORTLAND ST., 
OXFORD CIRCUS, LONDON, W. 



April 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIiNOES. 



19 




IG 







Held at the Agricultural Hall, London, March 7th to 26th, 1881. 




EYOND all doubt this Exhibition has proved a 

success. It has been well attended by visitors 

of all classes, my lord and my lady arriving 

in their carriage and pair have visited the 

Exhibition in the afternoons ; while in the 

evening the woriing-classes have thronged 

there in great numbeis to learn domestic 

economy and household thrift. The spacious 

Agricultural Hall was well filled with stalls, and 

presented a very sttractive appearance. The centre 

piece was the exhibits of 

MR. GEORGE KENT, High Holborn, W.C. 

This was a square substantial erection of knife-cleaners 
and other domestic articles, such as Kent's patent ventilated 
ice safes, ventilated refrigerators, hotel safes, churns, jelly 
strainers, mincing machines, bread cutters, potato mashers 
and bread graters, marmalade cutters, whisks and mixing 
machines, egg beaters and egg mixers, apple parers, vegetable 
cutters, portable filters, bread makers, cinder sifter and dust 
bins, carpet sweepers, washing machines, &c., &c. Their 
combined cinder sifter and dust bin separates the ashes from 
the cinders without the least dust or dirt escaping, while the 
cinders are actually deposited in a coal scuttle. We noticed 
their family ice safe ; it occupies small space, and the top of 
it can be used as a sideboard. Through the glass door of one 
of these safes we saw, in a perfect state of preservation, a 
shoulder of mutton, and various kinds of vegetables, which we 
were informed had been ttiere nine months. We must compli- 
ment Mr. G. Kent on the admirable arrangement of his stand, 
which was seen to equal advantage from any point of view, 
and high over which was conspicuously placed the well-known 
word " Kent." Having thus said a few words about the 
centre-piece, we shall proceed to describe the exhibits in the 
order of trades rather than that in which the visitor found 
them in the Hall. Amongst the exhibitors of sewing machines 
were 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 

Foster Lane, Cheapside, E.G. 

This firm, who occupied a good position near the Islington 
entrance, made one of the most interesting exhibits in the 
show. We first noticed their button-hole machine. In 
working this machine the garment is held ilrmly and 
securely in its place by means of an improved steel clamp 
tittid with expandmg jaws, operated on by means of a steel 
eccentric. The hole is cut by an improved contrivance in form 
of a hammer, having the knife or cutter fixed in the head, 
and flttbd with a limb passing through the bed of the machine, 
and connecting, by means of a hook, to a horizontal shaft 
beneath the table, the shaft being furnished with a cam for 
raising the cutting brass to meet the knife on its down stroke. 
The shaft is also furnished with two n-on handles, firmly fixtd 
to it ; by griping the handles firmly and raising them four 
inches, the hammer descends with great force, and perforates 
the garment. The looper, or under needle, is also very much 
improved, it being jointed to the lever so as to enable the 
operator to thread up the more quickly and readily. This 
luachiue was admired by hundreds of interested visitors, and 



pronounced by them to be a masterpiece of mechanical 
ingenuity and skill in point of finish, &c. 

They also exhibited the new arm machine, suitable for the 
leather trade, more especially for the making and repairing of 
boots and shoes, Gladstone bags, &c. This machine is 
another specimen of mechanical ingenuity and skill in its 
highest perfection viz., simplicity of construction, evenly 
balanced working parts, combined with elegance and dura- 
bility. The shuttle spool is round, and about the size of a 
sixpence. The shuttle is constructed on the self-acting 
principle, the tension being regulated by means of a small 
screw on the upper side or sui-faoe, thereby enabling the 
operator to adjust it without taking it out of the machine. It 
has a long arm with a very small end, the needle hole being 
planted very near the edge. The needle plate is held firmly in 
its place by means of a spring pin or bolt, operated on by the 
thumb of the worker. Another important feature is the 
needle bar action. The top, or needle bar, lever is operated 
on by means of a cam, firmly fixed to the horizontal shaft, 
and supported between two check plates just in front of the 
cam ; consequently the action is uniform throughout, having 
no stroke or loose play to mar tha beauty of the stitch, which 
is simply perfection. The cam is also furnished with two 
speed grooves — fast and slow. The needle bar is extra stuut 
and well supported. The shuttle lever is operated on by 
means of a cam and rock lever fitted inside the arm of the 
machine. The machine works well, no matter in what direc- 
tion the goods are made to travel, either to, from, to the right 
or left of the operator. 

Their oscillat5ng spool machine was also exhibited. It is the 
simplest and lightest running michine in the market. The 
general action throughouD is oscillatmg; the freedom and ease 
in working of this machine is truly remarkable, I,5U0 stitches 
per minute can le readily given cut without undue exertion on 
the part of the operator. The adjustment of thread, both top 
and bottom, is on the self-threading principle, thereby efifecting 
a great saving in time. There are two sizes of this machine, 
family and medium, the former for the manufacture of light 
goods, the medium, fitted with roll-presser, for leather ; both 
sizes have special positive takes }ip, and form a pretty pearl- 
1 ke stitch. 

Another machine exhibited was the Singer fancy or 
embroidery stitch machine, which is a veiy remarkable novelty. 
This machine is designed to form eight difTt-rent stitches by 
simply removing a cam and replacing it by another ; it is 
very useful in ornamenting children's goods, smoking caps, 
&c., &o., and by a judicious blending of colou:ed silk a very 
pretty and novel effect may be produced. This machine had a 
host of admirers. 

Their small arm machine, family size, which they showed, is 
designed to supply shirt, cap, underwear manufactuieis 
and others, is simjjle in construction, strong in its various 
parts, and is what is known as a top feed machine. 

Amongst their exhibits was their new medium braiding 
machine. The special fralure in this machine is a clutch 
action, fitted with two levers lieneath the table, operated ou by 
the knees of the worker ; a slight pressure to the left stops 
the feed with the neeille in the goods, thereby enabling the 
operator to turn shaip angles without removing her hands 
fromthe work. This machine is designed for the use of mantle 
and juvenile suit manufacturers. A machine for producing 
an imitation cord on silk, cloth, felt, &c., was exhibited for the 



20 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881 



use of manufacturers of mantles, costumes, skirts, &c. This 
machine Las been in great demand, especially in London, in 
the above branches, and has been highly successful. 

We cannot speak too highly of their special patented self- 
acting spool winder. This very ingenious device is simply 
perfection, the cotton passing from the spool through a self- 
threading guide or eyelet, the bobbin put in its place, and the 
cotton secured with two or three turns round a thumb. The 
machine is then started, and the cotton is evenly laid on by 
means of a travelling tension, the ooUs being kept in uniform 
position by means of a presser plate; when the spool contains 
sufficient cotton the winder throws itself out of gear and stops. 
These spools are more evenly wound than reels of cotton, and 
contain 60 yards of No. 50 cotton. The last thing we noticed 
was their self-threading shuttle. In this patented improve- 
ment the holes drilled in former shuttles are entirely done 
away with. It is fitted on the inner side with a spring or 
guide, and the shuttle so shaped as to enable the operator to 
lay the cotton in its place instantly, even in the darkest of 
work rooms. 

Also on their stand was a frilling and pleating attachment. 
This is worked by means of a ratchet and spring pawl operating 
on a cam, and taking its action from the upper part of the 
needle-bar, and easily fixed in position by the lower face-plate 
screw, it is made adjustable so as to produce pleating of various 
widths ; it works well, and can be highly recommended. 

THE HOWE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 46 and 
48, Queen Victoria-street. 

First amongst their exhibits we noticed the Letter " A," for 
family use, and a simi ar machine, pearled and sUver plated. 
They also exhibited their Letter "B" machine, with step or 
four motion feed, for mantle and light tailoring work ; the 
same with wheel feed for boot making and general leather 
work; their Letter " C," with step feed, which is adapted for 
heavy cloth , but which will work on the finest materials ; and 
the same machine, with wheel feed, for the manufacture of 
men's boots, and for sewing the heavier kinds of leather. We 
also saw the Letter " D," for heavy work, which can be used 
either as an arm or platform machine, and the same with wax 
thread cylinder for leather work — harness and saddler's use. 
They also exhibited their Letter " E " universal feed and arm 
machine, for making and repairing boots ; their Letter "F," 
light tailoring work; their Letter " G," new single thread 
hand machine; and their Letter " H " hand shuttle machine, 
which equals any for beauty and perfection of stitch. 
Bicycles, kilting machines, and wiinging machines were 
among their exhibits. Some excellent specimens of work done 
on these machines were also exbibited. 

THE WHEELER AND WILSON MANUFACTURING 
CO., 21, Queen Victoria-street, E.C. 

A very creditable exhibit was made by this firm. They 
exhibited a number of sewing machines for family, leather, 
cloth, and ornamental flowering purposes. Some splendid 
specimens of ornamental fancy sketching were to be seen at 
their stall, which attracted much attention from the " fair 
sex." Also to be seen at their stall was a set of steam power 
attachment for sewing machines. 

THE WANZEE MACHINE CO. (LIMITED), 4, Great 
Portland-street, W. 

A number of improved machines were exhibited by this 
film, which are fitted on many kinds of stands and tables. 
That which attracted most attention on their stand was the 
Wanzer patent kilter and baster. This machine is noiseless 
in its action. The Wanzer 6-inch plaiter for families or 
dressmakers, and the Fricker patent for shirt and trimming 
manufacturers, were alsoexhibited. The ensemble of this stall 
was very pretty and attractive. 

MESSRS. EENNICK, KEMSLEY, AND CO., 
4, Finsbury-circus, E.C. 

The light running Stanard sewing machine was exhibited 
by this firm. This machine has a device whereby the bobbin 
can be wound withovit running the machine, which saves un- 



necessary wear of the machine, and the trouble of unthreading 
and removing work and attachments while the bobbin is being 
filled, a self-setting needle which cannot be set wrong, an auto- 
matic tension which, when once properly regulated, will rarely 
need to be changed, and as a general rule, the whole range of 
family sewing can be done without any change of tension what- 
ever; this result is obtained by nicely adjusted springs that 
will accommodate themselves to the size of the thread used, 
plenty of room underneath the arm, a dial for regulating the 
length of stitch, which enables the operator to readily ascer- 
tain the length of stitch without testing previous to com- 
mencing work, a spring tension shuttle, holding a bobbin that 
carries a large amount of thread, perfect adjustability in all 
parts, so that "lost motion" from long usage can be easily 
taken up. The feed has great power, and never fails to 
perform its duty, will feed the lightest and heaviest goods with 
equal precision, and will cross seams and hard places without 
changing length of stitch or missing stitches. The self-acting 
" take-up " permits the operator to use with equal facility the 
finest to the coarsest thread manufactured, including linen or 
silk thread, without chafing or breaking. This machine is 
adapted for hemming, felling, binding, cording, braiding, 
seaming, quilting, tucking, darning, fringing, rulBing, gather- 
ing, hem-stitching, &c., &c., from the lightest muslins to the 
heaviest cloths. It is remarkably simple, easy running (almost 
noiseless), most elegantly oimamented ; all the parts are made 
of the very best material, and case hardened. It is adapted 
for the use of tailors, dressmakers, seamstresses, manufacturers 
of clothing, shirts, skirts, corsets, ladies' boots, umbrellas, &c. 
Th3y also exhibited the " Home Companion " and the" Home " 
machine. 

THE WILCOX AND GIBBS SEWING MACHINE CO., 
150, Cheapside, E.C. 

This firm exhibited their hand machines and treadle 
machines, old style and " automatic." They also showed their 
silent machines, with self-acting tension, on walnut table, 
with cover to lock complete ; and the same machine with 
extra leaf to table and side drawers. Three straw-hat 
machines were shown on their stand ; also the shirring or 
running machine, which attracted much attention. They also 
exhibited a Cornely embroidery machine and a Cornely cording 
machine. 

MESSRS. S. DAVIS AND CO., 15, Blackman-street, S.E. 
On this stall was to be found a variety of sewing, washiug, 
wringing, mangling, and knife-cleaning machines; also 
bicycles, tricycles, perambulators, and Baker's patent box 
mangles. Thus it will be seen Messrs. Davis are moving with 
the times, and adding all kinds of domestic inventions to their 
original sewing machine business. 

MESSES. NEWTON, WILSON AND CO., 144, High 
Holborn, W.C. 

The Wilson Stylus, or Fountain Pencil Pen, which writes 
with ink, but has the freedom of a lead pencil, was very largely 
sold and exhibited by this firm. On their stand was also the 
Horograph or clockwork pen, for producing facsimile copies 
of writing or drawing. This firm also exhibited the Princess 
of Wales' sewing machine with all its latest improvements, and 
several kinds of kilting and washing machines. 

BEADBURY and CO., LIMITED, Oldham, 

Exhibited the new " Wilson " oscillating shuttle sevnng 
machine, as made solely by them for the European market, 
and patented 1878 and 1879. A marvellous combination of 
simplicity, rapidity and noiselessness, very strong and light 
runrdng. Also Bradbury and Co.'s improved family and 
medium machines with patent shuttle and winder, double feed 
and superior finish. Bradbury and Co.'s world-renowned A I 
elastic machines, for repairing boots, &c., the " Shoemaker's 
friend." Bradbury and Co.'s Wellington and family S hand 
machines, with evei-y improvement. Bradbury and Co.'s 
new patent Wellington kilting machine, kilts 10 in. wide, 
rotary action. 



AfBIL 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OE DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



21 



MESSRS. THOMAS and TAYLOR, Stockport. 

Messrs. Thomas and Taylor, of Stockport, and 99, Fonthill- 
road, N., exbibited their steam laundry machinery, which will 
be of especial interest to those who are anxious to provide the 
facilities requisite for the wasbinjj in large establishments, 
such as hotels, hospitals, boarding schools and the like. And, 
in the first place, it must be explained that thei-e is not the 
remotest risk to life or limb by the use of these steam power 
machines. The whole of the gearing is safely enclosed in a 
look-up box, and is only accessible, therefore, to the person in 
charge, thus doing away with any cause whatever for fear 
fi-om the inadvertence of children or inexperienced persons. 
Every householder, of whatever profession or trade, or what- 
ever his position may be, can now be fitted up with perfect 
washing and wringing machines, without any alteration of 
premises. The machine, engine, and boiler are all self-con- 
tained, requu'e no brick or stone work, and are so simple that 
setting the machine to work is as easy as lighting an ordinary 
boiler fire. Farmers and others, having already steam or 
horse power on their premises, can have this power transmitted 
into the laundry or dairy, to drive the washing machine or 
churn, in a perfectly simple form, and without any danger or 
unsightliness. This is an important consideration in these days 
of strikes and dear labour, as with the patent machine the 
whole of the washing, wringing, and mangling can be done in 
a few hours. The waste steam, whei-e an engine is the driving 
power, is utilised in boiling the water and clotLies, after 
passing through the cylinder, thus effecting a considerable 
saving of fuel. 

MESSRS. WOLSTENCROFT and COMPAJSTY, 93, High 
Holborn, W.C. 

This firm exhibited their " Empire " washing machine. We 
particularly noticed this machine, which did its work in an 
expeditious and yet careful manner. They also showed the 
" Premier " washer, and a large selection of knife cleaners, 
sausage and mincing machines, egg-beaters, family weighing 
machines, and a general assortment of domestic machinery. 

MESSRS. WOOD and PARKINSON, laundry engineers and 
machinists, Throstle-grove Mill, Stockport. 

Messrs. Wood anl Parkinson exhibited several kinds of 
washing, wringing, and mangling machines. We noticed 
most especially their patent float washing machine, which will 
certainly diminish the amount of wear that clothes are subject 
to whilst being washed. 

MESSRS. THOMAS GREEN and SON, LIMITED, 54 and 5-5, 
Blackfriars-road, S.E. 

This firm occupied a very large space for the exhibition of 
their " Silens Messor " lawn mower, Green's patent washing, 
wringing, and mangling machine, a patent sausage chopping 
machine, garden rollers, and other articles. The patent 
" Silens Messor " lawn mowers ara among the best extant; 




motion of the tub, and the vacuum " posser " or plunger, 
which acts without injuring any article. No. 5, Green's 
patent steam power sausage chopping machine, 26-in. block, 
new pattern, will chop SUUlbs. in 60 minutes. This machine is 
specially designed for chopping lartre quantities of meat at one 
operation, is simple in its arrangements, strong in its construc- 
tion, and occupies comparatively little space. The hand garden 
roller is made in two parts, bored and faced at the joints so 
that it revolves and turns freely, and rounded at the outer 
edges so as not to leave unsightly marks on the lawn or road. 

THE HOUSEHOLD WASHING AND MANGLING 
MACHINE COMPANY, 5, New-street, Bishopgate-street, E.G., 

Exhibited washers and mangles m&de chiefly by Messrs. 
Summerscales and Sons, of Keighley. 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 80, Finsbury-pavement, E.G. 

The patent " Villa " washer with wringer was exhibited on 
this stand, for doing a fortnight's family wash in four hours, 
without rubbing or boiling ; it is simple, strong, and durable ; 



' SILENS ME6S0E LAWN MOWER. 



they have been submitted to numerous practical teats in public 
competition, and in all cases have carried off eveiy prize that 
has been given. Their washing machines are efficient and 
expeditious ; they save much time, labour, and material, and 
are easy to work. Their principal features are the revolving 




occupies small ground space (24 inches square), has tremendous 
washing power, notwithstanding it can be worked and managed 
by a girl fourteen years old. 

MR. J. CLEMENTS, 51, Great Rvissell-street, Bloomsbury, 
London, W.C., 

Exhibited Clements's patent self-acting reversing rotatory 
washing machine, working by steam ; also Clements's patent 
centrifugal hdyro- extractor or wringing machine, and Jeakes's 
patent smokeless slow combustion grate (once feeding lasts all 
day). 

MESSRS. JOHN M. BELL and CO., 494, Oxford-street, W.C. 
This firm exhibited the well-known "Home" washer, the 
new patent "Dolly " washer, an improved laundry stove, and 
laundry requisites. 

THE HIGHBURY SEWING MACHINE CO. 
This firm exhibited a number of washing, sowing, and other 
machines ; also bicycles and tricycles. They occupied a good 
space, and made a good show. 

MESSRS. RYAN and RYAN, 9 and 11, Imperial Arcade, 

Ludgate-hill, London, E.G., 
Exhibited American washing machines, wringers and manglers, 
and domestic novelties. 

MR. A. LYON, 32, Windmill- street, Finsbury, E.G., 

Exhibited a number of mincing machines, cucumber cutters, 
bread-cutting machines, &c. ; also a machine for s'lelling green 
peas, which opens and shells from three to six po Is at the same 
time. 

MESSRS. SPONG and CO., 249, High Holborn, W.C. 
This firm exhibited knife-cleaners, mincing, and aiusage 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881. 



machines ; also a patent hair cutter for cutting your own 
children's hair, a fountain washing machine, a patent water 
tap filter, carpet sweeper, and other articles for domestic use, 
altogether making a very creditable and interesting display. 

THE CYCLE COMPAJSIY, 51, New Kent-road, S.E., 

Showed self-acting washers, reversible perambulators, and a 
curtain tightner called the " Bimples," which is a cheap and 
effective article for fastening muslin to window curtains, 
always beeping them perfectly straight without injury to tape 
or curtain. 

MESSRS. NETTLEFOLD & SONS, 54, HighHolborn, W.C., 

Showed the " Coventry lawn mower," " the Coventry Zephyr" 
bicycles and tricycles, horticultural tools, and other garden im- 
plements. 

MESSRS. HUTCHINSON, 51, Pann-street, Aldersgate- 
street, E.C. 

This firm exhibited tkeir patent fork cleaning machine. This 
machine saves great labour ; it cleans six forks at once, and is 
a most valuable acquisition to the pantry of hotels, public 
schools, &o. The machine is very simple in its action and not 
liable to get out of order. 

THE CHADBOEN AND COLDWELL MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY, 223, Upper Thames-street, E.G., 

Exhibited their well-known patent "Excelsior" lawn mowers, 
tubular garden seats, garden rollers, water barrows, &c., &c. 

THE SANITARY AND DOMESTIC APPLIANCES COM- 
PANY, 10, Exchange-arca.de, Deansgate, Manchester. 

This fimr exhibited a collection of filtering machines, Field- 
ing's patent Victoria gas heating smoothing iron, gas stovesi 
gas burners, metal fires, and other domestic inventions. We 
thought the Victoria " iron " the greatest novelty. It is shaped 
to fit on any ordinary gas burner, the flame going into a hollow 
in the iron. It heats in that manner very much quicker than 
if placed in front of or on a fire, and, of course, it will not 
black the articles which it irons. 

MESSRS. ELLIS and CO., 164, Fleet-street, E.G., 

We noticed a very capital Turkish bath for home use, the 
" Facile " bicycle, and a good patent knife-cleaner. 

MESSRS. C. KITE and CO., 117, Charlton-street, N.W. 

Exhibited patent roof ventilators, drain ventilators, the Albert 
chimney cap, &c., &o. 

ROBERT BOYLE and SON, Holborn Viaduct, London, 

Showed Boyle's patent self-acting air-pump ventilators, for 
the extraction of the foul air from buildings of every descrip- 
tion without draughts or currents. They have no mechanical 
motion, cannot get out of order, require no attention, and can 
be constructed to harmonise with every style of architecture. 
They are also applicable for the ventilation of soil pipes, drains, 
and sewers. 

MR. G. FOUCHER, 29, Piccadilly, W. 

Mr. Foucher exhibited a new mechanical contrivance for 
playing on a piano any music which is placed on it. The 
music is ic strips a yard or so long and perforated with holes. 

MESSRS. GARD and CO., Dunstable. 

Of course this firm exhibited their well-known plate cloths. 
On their stand we noticed the " Common-sense Washer." 
With their soap dustaud this machine, the dirtiest clothes can 
be made perfectly clean and white (after only boiling them) at 
the rate of six night-dresses, or an equivalent quantity of other 
clothes, in ten minutes, without their being touched by the 
hands, except to remove them from the copper, and turn them 
over occasionally in the tub while washing. 

We noticed also the patent self-acting meat juice extractor. 
Most nurses and housekeepers believe they can make real beef 
tea, but in reality the article produced is gravy soup, because 
the only nutritions portion of the meat is the albumen, and 
this is rendered solid and quite indigestible. 



MESSRS. BROWN AND GREEN, LIMITED, 72, Bishops- 
gate-street, E.G. 

This well-known firm exhibited their "Gem" portable 
cooking stoves. These stoves require no brickwork ; they 
will bum coal, coke, or wood, the ovens and hot plates being 
quickly heated with a remarkably small quantity of fuel. 
Brown and Green's medal kitcheners and celebrated ventilating 
and slow combustion stoves were also exhibited. We particu- 
larly noticed their No. 13 range. This strong, substantial 
range is specially designed to meet the reauirements of large 
cooking establishments — giving an urlimited supply of hot 
water for baths, culinary purposes, &o. Besides the great 
capacity of the ovens, the whole of the top forms a hot plate 
for boiling and stewing. Being portable, it can be placed in 
position ready for use in a few hours. If additional cooking 
be at any time required, two may be used, placed either 
alongside, or back to back. 

MR. HARRY HUNT, 117, Newington Green-road, N. 

The celebrated "Crown Jewel" American base burner 
anthracite coal stove was exhibited from the works of the 
Detroit Slove Company. If the stove is placed in the passage 
or entrance hall of a house it will thoroughly heat it through- 
out for a few pence per day. It is also admirably adapted for 
heating churches, school rooms, railway waiting rooms, public 
halls, assembly rooms, institutions, &c. Over 60,000 are now 
in use in America. This stove only requires to be filled twice 
in twenty-four hours with anthracite coal, the temperature 
required can be regulated in a very short time by the dampers, 
and the rate of combustion observed through the mica of the 
doors. One ton of anthracite coal, burnt in this stove, gives 
more heat than three tons of biturrinous coal burnt in grates. 
The consumption of the smallest- sized stove for twenty-four 
hours is 281bs. of anthracite coal, value threepence, which will 
maintain a temperature throughout a moderate-sized house, 
from 55deg. to 65deg. Fahr. In remote districts, far removed 
from ordinary traffic, furnace coke has been broken to ordinary 
nut size, and used with very good effect in this stove. By 
giving the dimensions of the space to be heated [i.e., cubical 
contents), the number of the stove required and price, with 
illustrated circulars, testimonials, Press opinions, and other 
infoimation, will be supplied by Mr. Hunt. 

MR. HELLIER, 61, Duke-street, Grosvenor-square, 
London, W. 

On this stand was to be seen the instantaneous water heater, 
which will heat from one to six pints per minute to 150 deg. 
Fahrenheit, according to the size of the machine. 

THE WILSON ENGINEERING COMPANY, LIMITED, 
217, High Holborn, W.G. 

The ranges which were exhibited are made in sizes from 
18 inches up to 5 feet 6 inches. They are portable, require no 
brick setting whatever, each having a single smoke pipe, which 
may be carried into any chimney; they cannot get out of 
order. They have larger sized boilers and ai-e of greater 
weight and durability than any hitherto manufactured. Fire 
bricks are not used in the fii'e box. This invention is designed 
upon a principle to accomplish the objects desired. The 
improvements chiefly consist in efi'ecting with highly heated 
air the combustion of the smallest practical quantity of fuel, 
with the utilisation of that heretofore wasted in smoke ; in 
giving a greater distribution of heat and in minimising the 
deposit of soot. 

MR. JOHN BATEMAN, 104, Strand, London, W.C., 

Showed Bateman's "patent metal fire," a large red hot fire pro- 
duced twenty seconds after striking the match. This portable 
fire or stove requires no chimney or setting. It is lighted 
instantaneously ; has neither smoke nor smell ; can be stood 
anywhere without fear of injury. The heat it gives is tre- 
mendous, exceeding that of a coal fire, its consumption costing 
only about threepence a day. The cold air rushes to the 
stove, and being warmed, radiates through the red-hot metal, 
and is thoroughly diflfused through the room or building in 
which it is contained, keeping every part at the same tempera- 



April 1, 1881. 



THE SEWtNG MACHlKTE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



2^ 



tui-e. In the summer this stove vd\l be found very useful for 
cooking purposes, giving a great heat, which can be modified, 
and being both economical and clean. 

THE EAGLE RANGE AND FOUNDRY CO., 168, Fleet- 
street, B.C. 

We noticed their patent Eagle range. This range requires 
no brickwork flues, it being sent out complete and ready for 
use ; works with either a close or open fLre ; the fire can bo 
made any size that is required ; roasts weU either in front of 
the fii'e or in the oven ; the ovens can be heated either from the 
top or bottom flues, so that a perfect pastry baking oven or 
meat roaster is obtained. 

Mr. PORTA WAY, Halstead. 

The principle of slow combustion in close stoves was first 
made popular by Dr. Arnott, between 40 and 50 years ago, 
since which time more or less elaborate attempts have beeu 
made to improve upon his aystem with varying degrees of 
success, but it is not going too far to say that, until recently, 
there have not been better stoves than his produced at equal 
prices : better stoves have been produced, but at proportion- 
ately larger cost ; and the market was not supplied with a 
good serviceable and cheap slow combustion close stove until 
the " Tortoise " was introduced in 1877. 

The very strong hold it has taken on the public, and its 
almost universal adoption by the trade of ironmongers, who 
are always on the look out for any speciality which is both 
good and reasonable in price, is a great evidence of the value 
of the invention ; but another proof is, the many spurious 
imitations which, during the past two years, have been intro- 
duced on the market, and in some cases represented as the 
" Tortoise." 

The stoves are really nothing more or less than fire-clay 
baskets surrounded by wrought and cast iron coverings, 
whereby all the advantages of a firebrick stove are obtained 




^IMEAUl-T 



without any of the inconveniences of having a brittle outer 
casing constantly exposed to accident. The fire never comes 
in contact with the iron, consequently the heat is always 
wholesome and sweet. The position of the flue nozzle ensures 
that the products of combustion, sulphur, gas, &c., pass away 
as soon as produced, there being no space-chamber for the 
accumulation of same, and the feed door is so placed that when 
opened it increases the natural draught of the flue, and the 
gases, &c., are driven up the flue with even greater force than 
when the door is closed, consequently it is impossible for any 
sulphur to escape into the apartment. The combustion is 
controlled most efficiently and easily by a sliding door, by the 
adjusting of which the smallest size stove may be made to 
burn for six to ten hours, and the largest from 24 to 48 hours 
without attention. 

MESSRS. BROWNE & Co., 186, PiccadiUy, W. 

The firm exhibited duplex gas burners, sanitary stoves, gas 
cooking stoves, duplex and other lamps, &c. 



JAMES M. TATLOE, 52, Tuilerie-street, Haekney-road, 
Iiondon, E. 

The " Eclipse " chimney-top and ventilator was shown on 
this stand. It is guaranteed to be eifectivein operation, whilst 
moderate in price and ornamental in form. It can be fixed 
anywhere, either as a chimney-top or as a ventilating shaft. 
Being applicable to churches, chapels, all kinds of public 
buildings, and private dwelling-houses, it is equally suitable 
for the palace of the peer or for the col tag; of the peasant. 

J. L. HANCOCK. 15, Cottrill-road, Dalston-lane, E. 

Mr. Hancock exhibited bis scientific bread-making machine. 
By this machine the whole process of bread-making is done 
without the dough being touched by the hands. We tasted 
some of his bread, which was light and of excellent quality. 

DAVIS' EXCELSIOR KNIFE-CLEANING MACHINE 
COMPANY, LIMITED, Leadenhall-street, E.C. 

Knife -cleaning machines to clean from two to nine knives, 
mincing and sausage machines, coffee grinding mills, and other 
domestic articles, were exhibited on this stand. 

MESSRS. H. L. JUDD and COMPANY, 78, Fami-street, 
London, E.C, 

Showed blind furniture, folding tables, carpet sweepers, velo- 
cijjedes, and various other domestic appliances. 

MR. ALEXANDER RUDOLPH, 52, Catheiine-street, 
Strand, 

Exhibited the handy knife cleaning machine, a model American 
knitting apparatus, and a model electric lamp, automatic 
action, burns ten hours without attention. 

MESSRS. EWART and SON, 346, Euston-road, 

Showed the "Swift" washer, the "Crown" boiler, and the 
"Empress" patent chimney-pot, the latter an effectual cure 
for smoky chimneys. 

THE PATENT GAS APPARATUS COMPANY, 47, Mill- 
bank-street, S.W,, 

Exhibited their machines which have been working for the 
past seven years for producing fine light in country mansionsi 

ANGLO-AMERICAN LAUNDRY SUPPLY COMPANY, 

A. B. Furlong, 50 and 52, Fann-street, Aldersgate-street, E.G. 
Mr. Furlong exhibited a shirt collar and cuff ironing and 
polishing machine, which we illustrated in this journal last 
month. 

MR. JOSHUA GEO. WAGSTAPF, Alma Iron Works, 
Dukinfield, Manchester, 

Exhibited Wagstail's patent upright tubular saddle and conical 
cylindrical boilers, for heating conservatories, forcing- pits, 
churches, chapels, schools, halls, &c., by means of hot-water 
circulating pipes in such a manner as to effect a great saving 
in fuel. 

MESSRS. CORRY, SOPER, FOWLER and Co., LIMITED, 

18, Finsbury-street, E.C, and Shad Thames, S.E., London, 
Exhibited a very attractive stand of artificial wreaths, flowers, 
grasses, &c. 

MR. C WRIGHT, Park-street, N., 

Showed potato peelers, knife cleaners, mincing machines, 
cinder sifters, and carpet sweepers. 

MESSRS. AGATE and PRTTCHARD, 68, Gracechurch- 
street, E.C, and 183, Church-street, Stoke Newington. 

Some excellent overstrung pianos were exhibited by thii 
firm. Their grand piano was used for the concerts given 
during the Exhibition. 

MR. JUSTIN BROWNE, 237, Euston-road, N.W. 

Mr. Browne showed several of his excellent, well made 
pianos. His Class 5 ebony and gold pianoforte was much 
admired. > 



24 



i'HE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881. 



MESSES. 0. VENABLES and Co., Essex-road, N., 

Showed a good stand of pianos, on several of wliicli Miss Lucy 
Thomas performed at intervals during the day. 

MESSES. GEOEGE WEIGHT and CO., 143, Holborn Bars. 
This firm exhibited a musical cahinetto which plays every 
description of music. This instrument lequires no knowledge 
on the part of the player. They also showed the " Duchess " 
sewing machine, the " Prima Donna," the " New Excelsior," 
the " Family," and other sewinof machines. 

THE STAND AED MANUPACTUEING CO., Derby, 
Exhibited the " Standard ' tree pruner, which is an implement 




having two long arms, to enable the gardener to prune trees, 
vines, &c., without the aid of a ladder. 

JACOBS and CO., 179, Aldersgate-street, E.C., 
Showed knife-cleaners, coffee percolators, and other domestic 
articles. 

MESSES. W. P. BRANSON & Co., 104, Wurtemberg-street, 
Clapham. 

This fii-m exhibited Branson's Extract of Coffee. By the use 
of this extract a splendid cup of coffee may be made instantane- 
ously, and at any moment, by mixing one or two spoonfuls of 
the extract with boiling water, with positively a better result 
than can be obtained by making coffee in the ordinary way. 

THE STAE PLATE AND UNIVEESAL POLISHING 
POWDER COMPANY, 49, Eann - street. Barbican, 
London, E.C. 

The Star plate polishing powder, exhibited on this stand, is 
ft mineral preparation, entirely free from acids, mercury, or 
any injurious matter, and is also perfectly free from grit or 
any rough substance, and will not scratch or mark the smoothest 
Surface. It wOI impart an instantaneous, brilliant, and 
lasting polish, as is applicable for cleaning and polishing gold, 
silver, and electro-plated goods, for polishing brass, copper, 
tin, &c., also for looking-glasses and plate glass. 

MES. E. H. JOLLET, 2, Eue T'Kint, Brussels. 

Mrs. Jolley exhibited ice machine, ice safes, butchers' 
safes, &c., &c. 

MESSES. INWOOD & EAWLINGS, London -road, 
St. Albans, 

Showed the " Cyprus " carriage, " Cee-spring " gig, "Alex- 
andra " cart, a " Clerical" cart, and other carriages. 

MR. E. A. WINKS, 402, Essex-road, N., 

Exhibited brass bedsteads, spring mattresses, drawing»room 
suites, and other furniture. 

MESSES. JOSEPH DAVIS and CO., Fitzroy Works, 6, Ken- 
nington Park-road, London, S.E,, 

Exhibited a splendid collection of barometers, thermometers, 
■creamometer tubes, lactometers, hydrometers, and other scien- 
tific articlest 



ME. H. MAT, Bride-street, Barnsbury, N., 

Showed May's improved extract of soap, for washing, clean- 
ing, and cleansing purposes of all kinds, no matter how 
dirty or greasy the article may be, especially useful for washing 
the hands, being a great purifier, lathers freely. No soap is 
required if this extract alone is used. Also May's washing 
powder for softening hard water, and for all laundry purposes ; 
may be used for the finest laces or curtains to the coarsest 
towel, and is a great labour and time-saver. 

MR. C. C. TIMDAES, 327, Gray's-inn-road, 

Showed pneumatic bells, indicators, door catches, despatch 
tubes, and speaking tubes. 

MR. B. WARNER, Market-place, Devizes. 

We saw on this stand a patent coal vase, so constructed as 
to prevent the miscarriage of its contents. The weight of 
coal acting by means of the handle as lever upon the lid, 
keeps it firmly closed during transit. 

MESSES. R. HOOD and SON, Minerva Works, 30 and 31, 
Hatton-garden, E.C, 

Showed theLady Helijpatent'knife cleaner, which was awarded 
a prize medal at Sydney, 1880. This machine thoroughly 
clctins all kinds of table cutlery, including carvers and steel 
foi-ks, on the new principle, between revolving indiarubber 
rollers, by which much labour is saved and the wear and tear 
reduced to a minimum. 

The Perfection patent knife cleaner, which was also shown, 
is on the same principle as the Lady Help, but with a slightly 
different arrangement of the indiarubber rollers, rendering the 
cleaning an even more easy operation. These machines are 
suitable for large and small households, hotels, restaurants, 
ships, &c., and four knives per minute can be easUy and con- 
tinuously cleaned by any ordinary servant. 

ME. B. W. MAUGHAN, 41, Cheapside, E.C. 

A large and attractive show of Maughan's patent Geysers 
(or instantaneous water-heaters) and baths of all sizes and 
descriptions was made by this exhibitor. 

ME. N. C. HEETS, 8, Oxford-street, W., 

Exhibited the universal carpet sweeper, which is a very valu- 
able machine which performs its work without making dust. 
On the stand of 

MESSES. CHOELTON and DUGDALE, 19, Blaokfriars- 
street, Manchester. 

This firm showed the "Excelsior" spring mattress, the 
" Matlock " couch, and a patent pillow divider, for preventing 
one sleeper from inhaling the breath of another. On this 
stand we also noticed the " Sun Light" heating and cooking 
stoves. 

MESSES. BUEEOITGHES and WATTS, Soho-square, W. 

Perhaps the most handsome exhibit was that of this firm, 
who showed their well-known billiard tables and biUiard-room 
furniture. 

ME. EDWAED GOODDY, 18, Cockspur-street, Pall 
MaU, S.W., 

Showed the Duke of Edinburgh patent trousers press for pre- 
venting bagginess at the knees. 

ME. E. T. THEOBALD, Portland House, Greenwich, 

Exhibited a collection of patent hydraulic washers, opera, field, 
and marine glasses, microscopes and teleacopes, model steam 
engines, magic lanterns and slides, and stereoscopes. 

MESSES, GEiSWOLD and HAINWOETH, LIMITED, 41, 

Charterhouse-square. 

Stocking knitting machines, with ribbon attachments, and 
samples of socks and stockings and other hosiery made by 
these machines, formed one of the most attractive exhibits of 
the show. Messrs. Griswold had several smart young girls 
working and explaining their machines. 



Apeil 1, 1881. 



THE SEWESTG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OP DOMEbTIC APPLIANCES. 



25 



THE SILICATED CARBON FILTER COMPANY, Churcli- 

road, Battersea. 

A good collection of domestic filters was made by this firm. 
We particularly noticed the silicated carbon table filters, 
which received the certificate of merit from the Sanitary Insti- 
tute of Great Britain, 1880. 

BRADLEY BARNARD, 107, St. Paul's-road, Highbury, N., 
Exhibited patent folding hammock bassinettes ; also a patent 
folding camp table, and other domestic articles. 

MESSRS. F. and C. HANCOCK:, 29, Oxford-Street, Dudley, 
Showed machines for washing, cooling, and salting butter 
from the churn ; also for washing salt and rancidity from tub 
butter for daily use, and for mashing potatoes into ornamental 
form for table, and also for pressing the juice from fruit. 

MESSRS. CAMEEBR CUSS and Co., 522, Oxford-street, W. 

A good collection of musical cuckoo clocks, singing bird clocks, 
trumpeter clocks, chiming clocks, early English clocks, quail 
and cuckoo clocks, calendar clocks, patent 8-day alarum clocks, 
artist figure clocks, moving musicians clocks, military clocks, 
&c., &c., 

MR. GEORGE E. PROUT, 57, Eden-grove, HoUoway, N. 
On this stand we noticed " The Housekeeper's Friend," an 
article which will ensure the safe bolting of the street door at 
night. 

THE TENSION BICYCLE CO., Watson-street, Stoke New- 
ington-green, N., 

Showed the patent "Tension" bicycle, and also the new 
patented " Arrow " tricycle, with the new hill-climbing gear. 

MR. E. HILTON, 10, Canonbury-road, N., 

Showed an American patent ventilated refrigerator, for cooling 
without ice ; also apple and potato parers, knife cleaners, egg 
poachers, &o. 

THE PATENT GAS BUENER COMPANY, Peckham, S.E., 
Exhibited a collection of sanitary gas burners, warming stoves, 
and kindred articles. 

ME. JOHN J. GENT and CO., Leicester, 

Showed pneumatic, electric, and other bolls for domestic use 
and for the alarming of burglars. 

MR. ROBERT ADAMS, 7, Great Dover-street, S.E., 

Showed a new arrangement of fanlights for greenhouses, 
Venetian blinds, and other articles. 

ME, GEO. ABSELL, 157, Queen's- orescent, Loudon, N.W., 
Exhibited AbselFs patent change giving machine. This 
machine does away with the public display of silver for change, 
inasmuch as, being contained in a locked box, it can only be 
obtained by means of its equivalent in gold. Foreign gold, of 
less value than 20s. or 10s. respectively, bad money, and even 
light English coin, if necessary, are rejected by the apparatus ; 
whilst as a preventative of theft and the avoidance of disputes, 
the machine is perfect. Its merits can be summed up in the 
one fact that, unless an English gold coin is placed in the 
receptacle, change cannot be extracted, whilst, if that be done, 
the amount of silver is instantly discharged. 

MESSRS. CARTER and AYNSLEY, 54, Bishopsgate-street 
Without, E.C., 

Showed a patent lowering, raising, and burglar-proof sash 
appliance. The special feature in this apparatus is, that whilst 
the movement of a sash so fitted, by any other means, is 
absolutely impossible, its use even with large and heavy 
windows calls for only a very slight eifort on the part C'f the 
operator, viz., the simple turiiing of a winch or handle, which 
can be easily effected by a lady or even an invalid. Bankers 
and others requiring gTeat security cannot fail to perceive the 
advantage of this. 



MR. WILLIAM BURLEY, 34, London-wall, London, E.G., 

showed Young's patent cord fasteners. These are the cUmax 
of simplicity for Venetian blinds and all purposes where cords 
or ropes are nsed, costing no more than plate hooks and 
superior to check actions, and can be fitted by any person, 
without taking down the blinds. There were also shown patent 
adjustable rack pulleys, springs warranted made from best 
piano steel wire, thoroughly reliable, and require no attention. 
Also roller blind fittings, improved, with guard to prevent cord 
slipping over the pulley, more durable and efiicient than 
spring roller blinds ; Chase's patent acme button fasteners ; 
and Day's patent climax ball valves and water waste preventers 
were also shown. 

Southwood's patent railway and carriage umbrella rack, 
patented in Great Britain, France, Belgium, Germany, United 
States, &c., attracted much attention. It is for affixing to the 
doors of railway carriages, broughams, and all vehicles. The 
invention is an indispensable conveniencd, requii'es no attention, 
occupies very little space, and effectually disposes of the most 
objectionable encumbrance of a wet umbrella. It also forms a 
cheap stand for umbrellas, &c., to be fitted on the back of 
street doors. 

MESSRS. W. HATCHMAN and CO., 73 and 74, Wood- 
street, E.G., 

Exhibited the combination box-couch-tent (registered), three 
in one. A unique invention for camping out and all out-door 
amusements. This tent, which possesses the special qualifica- 
tions of extreme lightness, great strength, and elegant 
appearance, is well adapted for all climates ; is made of a 
strong coloured striped tent cloth ; is 12ft. in diameter ; can 
be easily put up and taken down ; and can be so packed as to 
be contained in a small box, which, when opened and extended, 
forms a full-length couch. We also noticed Jackson's patent 
camp furniture, comprising a most comfortable bedstead, 6ft. 
by 2ft. 2in., complete, very light, portable, and yet strong; 
also one table, one washing-stand or dressing table, and two 
seats, in best polished mahogany, which is patronised by 
the officers of H.M.'s Service. The whole can be put together 
in a few minutes, and forms the most useful and compact suite 
of tent furniture which has ever been invented. It is packed 
in a case 2ft. 6in. by 1ft. (outside measure), every portion of 
which and contents being utilised in forming the above. They 
are put together without the use of any tools whatever, the 
parts are all numbered and fitted with brass slots, so that, 
with ordinary care, a mistake in fitting is absolutely impos- 
sible. It is used by officers, volunteers, travellers, rowing men, 
explorers, hunters, sportsmen, colonists, hospitals, &c., &c. ; 
and in private houses for spare rooms, or as extra bed-room 
furniture. 

THE STEAM TRICYCLE. 

This machine, which attracted much attention, can be pro- 
pelled either by the ordinary pedal motion, by steam alone, or 
Ijy both combined. Here and there a case may occur where a 
rider may prefer to sit and do nothing — such as an artist 
seeking scenery for the exercise of his pencil, and naturally 
desiring to keep a perfectly steady hand ; the travelling amateur 
photographer, the counti y gentleman traversing his estate, the 
lady going out on her round of afternoon calls, &c. ; but the 
majority undoubtedly would prefer to have a hand in the 
business — or rather a foot — and to work as usual, assisted by 
the steam or other motive power. Sufficient speed, it may be 
accepted, can already be obtained for real safety in road riding 
and for pleasure; but the practicable distances could be enor- 
mously increased by a reduction of the physical effort now 
necessary. An average speed of 10 miles an hour could not be 
maintained by an ordinary rider on a tricycle for more than, 
say, half a day, but a very indifferent rider with mechanical 
assistance could keep it up all day and night too, if he wished, 
without undue strain. In the machine now under considera- 
tion steam is employed as afi'ording assistance in propulsion. 
A pair of neat little horizontal double-action steam engines 
are placed on the top of the boiler, which is of peculiar con- 
struction, and practically automatic in. its action. The crank 
shaft drives at one end a small circulating pump, which re- 



26 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES, 



Apeil 1, 1881. 



introduces into the boiler the condensed steam previously used. 
The waste is so little as to be practically nil. At the other 
there is a small spiked wheel, carrying an endless chain, which 
■works on to a larger spiked wheel on the axle of the driving 
wheel. The engine thus runs at a somewhat high speed, far 
in excess of the driving wheel. The liquid fuel being 
lighted under the boiler, in three or four minutes there is 
enough steam generated to propel the niachine. By turning 
one tap a start takes place, and absolutely continuous action 
results for many hours, provided no insurmountable obstacle, 
Buch as a brick or too steep a hill, intervenes. A safety 
valve prevents danger from too much steam. In stopping, 
both steam and fuel are turned off, and the simplicity of the 
■whole arrangement is such, that a very few minutes suffice to 
learn the management. There is no appearance of steam, no 
puif, no noise, no smoke. The expense of the liquid fuel is 
slight, and there is really little limit to the extension of dri'ving 
power, &c. 

The particular machine exhibited carries out several ideas of 
the inventor (Sir Thomas Parkyns), and may or may not com- 
mend itself to the eyes of those who are used to the elegant, 
light designs now popular ; but the principle of propulsion, or 
assisted propulsion, can be applied to almost any known make 
of tricycle, and the details can always be a matter of individual 
taste. It is more than probable that important modifications 
■will be introduced, but none the less will the credit belong to 
Sir Thomas Parkyns of having invented, made, and success- 
fully used the first steam-propelled tricycle — a machine pos- 
sessing the power of going 10 miles an hour on good level 
I'oad, being perfectly noiseless and without visible means of 
propulsion, easy to attend to and understand, cheap to keep, 
not likely to want the doctor, and which may prove to be the 
father of a long line of vehicles destined in the future to carry 
not only the seeker after amiisement and health, but the artist, 
the photographer, the messenger, the commercial traveller (in 
parts yet untouched by the railway), the rural postman, the 
inspector of police, the baker and the butchar boy, et hoe genus 
omne. 

Messrs. S. and H. HAREIS, Man sell-street, London, 

Exhibited the following articles : — The ebonite waterproof 
blacking for boots and shoes. Requires no brushing, gives a 
fine polish, not affected by damp or rain, non-injurious to the 
leather, being entirely free from acid. Japan lustre blacking, 
specially manufactured to suit warm climates, and celebrated 
for its brilliancy. Military waterproof pouch blacking. British 
polishing paste : this composition, in which there is nothing 
corrosive or injurious, gives a fine polish to brass, copper, tin, 
pewter, Britannia metal, plate, coach glasses, and windows. 
Plate powder, white and black, for silver harness mountings 
and all kinds of silver plate. Furniture polish : this article 
preserves and beautifies mahogany, stained wood and all 
furniture that requires a polish, and retains its beauty for 
a considerable time by only an occasional rub with a soft dry 
cloth or brush. Furniture cream : This article preserves and 
beautifies mahogany, stained wood, papier mache, and all 
furniture that requires a polish, and retains its beauty for a 
considerable time by only an occasional rub with soft dry 
cloth or brush. Brunswick black : Beautifies and preserves 
stoves, chimney corners, all kinds of iron work, tin, wood, &o., 
and is found particularly useful where the articles named are 
exposed to weather, and preserves from rust. Jet black oil 
for harness : For producing a jet black, and noui-ishing the 
leather — specially adapted for cart and farm harness. Real 
cirrriers' dubbing — black or yellow : For softening the upper 
leather of boots or shoes and making them pliable and durable 
— also applicable for harness, carriage heads, &c. Harris's 
waterproof harness composition. Harris's urn powder, for 
cleansing and preserving the brown on tea-urns. Steel powder, 
for cleaning and polishing bright stoves, fenders, fire irons, 
sewing machines, bicycles, and all fine steel articles. 

ME. CHAELES H. SOUTHALL, Armley, Leeds. 
One of Southall's automatic boot cleaners, working by steam, 
was tusily employed putting a shine on several of the under- 
standings of her Majesty's subjects. It is possible and customary 
to brush off the dirt, put on blacking, and polish without once 



stopping the machine. "When worked by power it wUl stop 
automatically, and ring a bell to call attention. Thus a person 
may stand by and watch only while his boots are beautifully 
polished, or one man may attend to at least six machines ; and 
by this means get through the work with great rapidity. The 
machines never get out of order, and can be used immediately 
without instruction ; they are made to clean either one or two 
boots at one and the same time. A man may get up of a 
morning, put his boots on the machine, start a water or gas 
engine by simply turnmg a tap, and in less than one minute 
finds his boots beautifully cleaned. The action is precisely 
like that of the human arm. An ordinarj flat brush moves 
backward and forward with rapidity, whilst every part to be 
polished is presented alternately ; and in a surprisingly short 
space ot time a most brilliant polish obtained. Children's 
boots, so difficult to hold by hand, are polished as easily and 
brightly as any other kind. In cleaning boots by hand the 
linings often get soiled by the hands of the operator, and t'lese 
dirty the stockings of the wearer ; this cannot occur when 
boots are cleaned by this machine, because they are held on a 
clean wooden expanding last, made to suit all sizes and sorts. 
A child can clean all the boots of the largest family without 
fatigue, and far better than the strongest man can do them by 
hand. 

ME. J. E. H. ANDEEW, 20, Waterloo-road, Stockport. 

The "Bisschop" patent gas engine, which formed one of 
the greatest novelties of the late Paris Exhibition, was shown 
by this exhibitor. It is most economical and simple, requiring 
scarcely any attention. There is no danger of explosion ; it 
makes little noise, and in most cases may be placed in the 
upper storey of a house. It is very strong and easily 
managed. The piston and slide valve do not require oil or 
grease, which enables it to run night and day without super- 
vision. This engine needs no other fixing than simply being 
placed on the ground, and no separate meter is requisite. It 
requires no water. It will be found of the greatest utility for 
any machines requiring but small motive power, and is 
invaluable as a substitute for manual or foot power. 

ME. G. EDWAEDS, 182, Kingsland-road, N. 

Mr. Edwards exhibited a very attractive stand of billiard 
tables and bagatelle boards. 

CROSSLEY BROTHERS, Poultry, E.G. 

This firm exhibited one 2-horse patent "Otto" silent gas 
engine. These engines are worked by igniting gas under com- 
pressure with air in the cylinder. The consumption of gas 
for a half-horse power gas engine is about 1 1 feet per hour. 
The average cost is Id. per hour per horse-power. These 
engines are made in various sizes, from ^-horse to 9-hfrse 
power, and used for pumping, chaff- cutting, corn mills, 
sawing, hoisting, printing, electric lighting machines, sewing 
machines, washing and other laundry machines, lathes, sugar 
and coffee mills, corn-crushers, sausage-machines, &c., &c. 

MESSRS. B. F. BEOWN and CO., 20, Norman's-buildingg, 
St. Luke's, London, 

Exhibited their well-known satin polish for boots and shoes. 
Ladies' shoes which have become red and rough by wearing are 
restored by an application of Brown's polish to their original 
colour and lustre, and they will not soil the skirts when wet. 
It is put on with a sponge attached to the wire and cork in each 
bottle. It requires no brushing, and does not harden or crack 
the leather. They also showed the " American magic bronze " 
for use on boots and shoes, ornaments, picture frames, iron, 
and fancy work, and also the Heaton button fastener. The 
saving in time by the rapid and secure way in which buttons 
can be fixed on with this fastener and instrument is consider- 
able. A trial by those who have not as yet used them will not 
fail to give entire satisfaction. 

We have endeavoured to give as comprehensive a description 
of the exhibits as possible. We have said nothing about the 
variou.s charitable institutions who showed their work and 
workers as our readers will find several accounts of them in 
other columns under the heading " opinions of the press," 



Afbil 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



27 



"EMPIRE" WASHER. 



THE BEST AND CHEAPEST MACHINE FOE, FAMILY USE 
YET OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. 



-jp:rxc:es. 



No. 1. 
„ 2. 



£1 10 
2 2 
2 10 



Liberal Disc-mnt to the Trade. For Illustrated List apply to Makers. 

T. WOLSTENCROFT & Co., 
93, nia-s: s:oxjBoi^i:sr, LonsriDOisr. 




HUTCH /SON'S PATENT FORK CLEANING MACHINE, 




Adapted for Hotels, Clnbs. Restaurants, and Private Houses. It is 
constructed to polish SIX FORKS AT A TIME, and renders an even 
and brilliant polish without injury, by the simple method of a rotary 
handle which can be turned any way. 

N.B. — This Machine is the greatest preventative of damage tt> 
which the prongs are exposed when cleaned by hand. 

HUTCHISON'S PLATE POWDER, 

As used in the Patent Fork Cleaning Machine. For cleaning and 
brilliantly polishing all kinds of Plate, Plated Articles, Metal, Tin, 
Pewter, Looking Glasses, (to. To be had at Oil and Colour Ware- 
houses, and of Ironmongers and Storekeepers. 

Prices, in Tin Canisters, Jib., 6d. ; 1-lb., 1 ; 2-lb., 1/9. 
Liberal terms to Shippers and Merchants. 



Length, 23 inches ; width, 12 inches ; height, 9 in. MCSSrS. HUTCHISON & CO., 

MANUFACTORY: 51, FANN STREET, ALDERSGATE STREET, LONDON, E.C. 

Harper Twelvetrees' "Fountain" Washer 

RETAIL PRICE, IDs. 6d. 

Is entire!}' SELF-ACTING ; no rubbing, labour, or attention required ; no handles, wheels, pounders, or brushes. A current of boiling snds is 
passed through and through the clothes, which are thus waslitd and beautifully bleached at the same time ; the result is really astonishing. Hundreds 
of thousands of busy mothers require this wonderful labour-saving Machine. Full Particulars and Wholesale Price to Agents on application to 

HAEPEE TWELVETEEES, 

Patentee and Manufacturer, 80, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.G. 

HARPER TWELVETREES' 

INDIA-RUBBER CLOTHES - WRINGERS, 

WITH COG-WHEELS, 

Strong Frames, Metal Bearings, Adjustable Claspers, and other great improvements, have 
maintained their supremacy for eighteen years as the " Gem of Clothes-Wringers." They 
will fit tubs of every shape, and wring the largest as well as the smallest articles dry 
instantly without labour, dropping them into the basket nearly dry enough to iron or 
mangle. These well-known and much-prized Clothes- Wringers are specially adapted for 
the heavy, constant work of laundresses, and are immensely superior to the slightly-mids 
delicate American Importations. 

Prices: 308., 40s., 50s., or without Cogwheels, 25s., 30s., 35s. 

Harper Twelvetrees' Cheap Fifty-Shilling Mangle and Wringer, 2-t-inch BMleri. 

Harper Twelvetrees' Magic Prize Washing Machine, 21s. 

Wholesale Quotations, Post free, from 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 

Laundry Machinist, 

80, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.C. Works: Burdett Road, Bow, E.- 




28 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Apeil 1, 1881 





SOLE AGENTS IN EUEOPE FOR 

Johnson, Clark & Co., 

OP NEW YORK. 



THE "HOME SHUTTLE" 

still keeps its place as being the best Hand Lock-Sticb Sewing 
Machine in the world. It is exceedingly simple, lever out of 
order, and always presents a bright and attractive uppearance. 




"We have added the loose winding wheel and all latest 
improvemeuts. 

THE BEST TREADLE MACHINE IS THE 

L/ghf Running "'Standard'' 

For Manufacturing and Family use. 




// is a Model of Strength and Beauty. 

The most Elegantly Ornamented Machine in the world. Lasts a li fe- 
■time, and NEVER gets OUT of ORDER. EXCELS ALL OTHERS 
IN THOROUGHNESS OP WORKMANSHIP. 

We wish to establish Agencies in all Towns, and will give exclusive 
territory to first-class houses, and furnish Machines at very low prices. 



RENNICK, KEMSLEY & CO., 

(Late Johnson, Clarh and, Co.), 

finsbury Circus, LOIDON, E.C. 




THOMAS WARWICK, 



MANUFACTUKEK OP 

B,n.,.uL.u.:P.^.n,. BICYCLE MATERIALS 

Of every description, Wholesale and for Exportation. 

WARWICK'S PATENT POTENTIAL RIMS. 

SOLE MAKER OP WOOLLEY'S PATENT DUPLEX SPEING 
SADDLE. STAMPINGS OP ALL KINDS. 




C. D. Vesey, Esq., who won the late Tricycle Championship, used one 
of WOOLLEY'S PATENT SADDLES! He says : '• I was highly 
delighted with it ; never once during the .50 miles ride did I feel the 
slightest of the rough roads.^^ 



Price List Free on application to the above, 

Aston New Town, Birmingham. 

Just Published. 12mo. cloth limp, 2/-, or cloth 
boards, 2/6 (postage 2d). 



A PRACTICAL IVIANUAL 

OF THH 

SEWING MACHINE, 

Comprising its History and Details of its Construction, with Full Tech- 
nical Directions for the adjusting of Sewing Machines. 

By J. "W. URaUHABT. 



CROSBY LOCKWOOD & Co., 7, Stationers' Hall Court, Ludgate Hill, 
London, B.C. 



SEWING MACHINE BUSINESS.— WANTED, by Advertisfcr 
(age 29), a Situation as Manager of Branch Depot, or CaB- 
vasser and Collector. Seven years experience ; most part as 
manager. Thoroughly acquainted with the hire system. At 
liberty April 30 next. — Apply, Sewing Machines, 29, Churchgate- 
street, Bury St. Edmunds. 



\)t leruiiig JEartiine (iiiiette 



AND 



JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



THE First Annual Exhibition of Domestic Labour-Saving 
Appliances at the Agricultural Hall, a full report of 
wbicb appears in another column, was undoubtedly :a 
great success. The large hall was quite filled witb exhibitB, 
and remained open tor a week beyond tbe appointed time by 
tbe general wish of the exhibitors, who all appear to have 
done a good stroke of business ; indeed, the Hall was .at all 
times — with the exception of the two first days— quite 
fiUed with a highly respectable company of., visitors, 



April 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



29 



and it is already announced that the second annual exhi- 
bition will be held at the same place, opening on May 
1, 1882. We are very glad to note the success of this 
exhibition, because it speaks well for the interests of all in the 
trade, as a larger demand for labour-saving appliances of all 
kinds is sure to be stimulated by such gatherings. Visitors go, 
probably, in many cases, from mere motives of curiosity ; but 
they see some article Hkely to be usefid in their household, and 
a new want is at once both created and satisfied— of 
course to the advantage of the exhibitors. This, of com'se, is a 
mere trade view of the matter, but there are other aspects of 
the question that are worthy of consideration. Novelties of all 
kinds are brought together, iuventioa is stimulated, and 
improvements are made in existing machinery which would 
otherwise not have been thought of. We are, therefore, glad 
that this first exhibition hMS been so successful, and we hope 
the second will be — or ought to be — another step further in the 
right direction. 



Mr. Hermann Looa has turned poet : finding all other trades 
fail, he has taken to verse. He rhymes "heard" to "dirt," 
and "pale" to "hell " — his lines are all sorts of lengths, and 
his sense is past finding out. Take the following as a speci- 
men : — 

" The lynx's lurking eye, 
The fox's cunning spy, 
The tiger's bloody inclinations. 
The ciocodile's all possible abominations, 
Killing and whining all in a breath." 
Courteous and patient reader, we have quoted this rubbish 
verbatim et literatim, from a poem, just sent out to the Sewing 
Machine Trade generally, and bearing Mr. Loog's initials. 

What on enrth the man means no sane mortal can tell, but 
this abominable mass of nonsense is supposed to be in some 
way or other intended as a fitting description of one of the 
most esteemed members of the Sewing Machine Trade in this 
country, and it is part of a pamphlet which Mr. Loog has 
thought fit to publish upon a recent decision in the Law 
Courts in the case of Wright v. the Wheeler and Wilson Manu- 
facturing Company. 

Of the exquisite delicacy of diction and refinement of style 
which marks all Mr. Loog's lucubrations either in prose or 
poetry it is surely unnecessary to remark ; he is a heaven-born 
genius, and of no man is the axiom more true than of him, nascitu-r 
nonfit; in fact, a second Hermann Loog could not be made at 
any price — natureproducedhimby amostheroiceflfort — and "the 
force of nature can no further go." The fact is, that Mr. 
Loog's temporary success in the Court of Appeal the other 
day appears to have sent him off in the direction of Colney 
Hatch instead of Portugal-street as heretofore. He may rest 
assured, however, that the important issue raised in the suit 
instituted against him by the Singer Company is not yet 
finally determined, and the judgment of the law loids 
will be awaited with confidence by all those who wish 
well to the success of the English sewing machine trade 
as distinct from German and other pii-ated imitations. 
The tirade of abuse which in Mr. Loog's pamphlet is directed 
against Mr. Hunting— the esteemed and courteous manager of 
the Wheeler tnd Wilson Company, will only gain for its writer 
an increased measure of pity in the minds of all those who clearly 
understand the issues recently raised in the trade. Mr. Loo", 
at the end of his pamphlet, questions the accuracy of a report 
in this journal of a meeting recently held for the purpose of 
presenting Mr. Gorapertz with a testimonial. We simply say 
that it was a meeting of gentlemen, and therefore it is not in 
the least surprising that Mr. Loog knew nothing about it. 



OUR ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT. 
We illustrate this month the New Arm Machine, just 
introduced by the Singer Manufacturing Company, Foster- 
lane, Cheapside. The machine is admirably adapted for the 
leather trade, being most especially suited for the making and 
repairing of boots and shoes, Gladstone bags, &c. For a full 
descrii^tion of this machine we refer our readers to oui report 
on another page of this Journal of the stand of the Singer 
Munufacturiug Company at the Labour-saving Appliance 
Exhibition. 



At Stand No. 250, at the late Domestic Exhibition, was shown 
a patent automatic button-hole attachment for sewing machines, 
making 200 perfect button-holes per hour, and which attracted 
considerable attention. It is the invention of Messrs. Felton 
and Hickman. We will give full particulars in our next issue. 



THE BOARD OP TRADE RETURNS. 
The Board of Trade Returns for March, and for the fii'st 
quarter of the year, are more favoui'able than could have been 
expected after the complaints lately heard from various busi- 
ness centres. The value of the exports last month was 
£19,131,038 against £18,852,050 in March, 1880, and 
£16,170,518 in March, 1879. This increase is mainly due to 
the large shipments of cotton manufactures to Tui-key and the 
East, as iron and steel and many other commodities show a 
considerable falling off. The foUoAving are the principal 
items that have improved : Apparel, arms and ammunition, 
bags and sacks, chemicals, cotton yam, cotton manufactures — 
20 per cent, in qliautity — earthenware, haberdashery, hard- 
ware, lead, leather, linen yarn, jute yam, ju*e manufactures, 
machinery, sUk j'ani, silk manufactures, refined sugar, and 
woollen and worsted manufactures. The decrease is chiefly, 
as already stated, in iron and steel, the qiiantity of which 
exported last month was only 290,198 tons against 387,305 
tons in March, 1880 ; but in addition the following 
have diminished — coal, alkali, linen manufactures, oU, tele- 
graphic wire, tin, wool, and woollen yarn. The declared value 
of the inaports was £36,842,336, against £37,638,944 in 
March, 1880, and £29,840,600 in March. 1879. A consider- 
able increase is shown in cotton, but a decrease in wool. 
Grain and provisions generally have largely augmented, while 
wine, tobacco, and sugar haye been imported in smaller 
quantities. 



ART NEEDLEWORK. 

The exhibition of art needlework opened a few days ago at 
the London School of Art Needlework iu Exhibition-road, 
South Kensington. It is chiefly rich in ancient English work, 
including that distinctive stitch which marks the "opusAngli- 
canum," properly so-calh'd. Very interesting and curiouB 
devices are to be seen here, the life-work in their day of some 
such artists as that gentlewoman buried in Westminster Abbeyj 
on whose headstone it is in all humility recorded that "she 
was an excellenc needlewoman." The Dean and Chapter of 
Worcester have sent fr.igments of red silk embroidered 
in gold thread with effigits of crowned and sceptred kings 
in convoluting scroll, from the coflin of Bishop de Blois, 
chief of that diocese early in the 13th century. The 
fragments have been disentombed, and, as the floruit 
of the bishop is from 1218 to 1236, there can be no 
doubt of their antiquity. Similarly authentic testimony to the 
early progress of the art is borne by the fragments of woven 
materials, some shining with gold thread, dug from the tomb 
in Worcester Cathedral, of Wulter de CantUupe, who died in 
the second half of the 13th century. Mr. Cyril Flower has lent 
a chasuble of the 14tli century. The rector of Dunstable con- 
tributes a gorgeous pall of red velvet and cloth of gold, which 
dates from the loth century, and is wonderfully preserved, having 
been walled up to save it from the destructive zeal of Puritan 
days. When it was in use it was hired by pai-ishioners for first- 
class f unerplsat the rate of 6d. a day. Many other fine examples 
were exhibited, as also some excellent modern work. 



30 



THE SEWIN& MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtTENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. April 1,1881. 



ryi 





s 







ESTABLISHED 1848. 




PATENTEES. 



THE ORIGINAL MANUFACTUREHS OF 





EVERT "PART SUPPLIED IN VARIOrS STAGES, 

From the Rough Stamping or Forgings to the 
Complete Finished Article. 

JVone hut the very hest Brands of Material used for the several purpose 
embracing LOW MOOR lEOJ^, BEST BEST GUM, S^c., ^c. 

VERY SPECIAL IN ALL SUNDRIES AND APPLIANCES.. 

INCLUDING ALL NEWEST DESIGNS AND PRINCIPLES IN 

SADDLES, VALISES. SPANNERS, LAMPS, 

BELLS, cSco., <ScO- 

61, HOLBORN VIADUCT, 

LONDON, E.G. 

, Works :--Saltley Mill, Birmingham. 

DEALERS ARE INVITED TO APPLY FOR WHOLESALE TERMS 



April 1. 1881. THE SEWING MA CHINE GAZEI'TE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



81 



PRESS NOTICES ON THE EXHIBITION OE DOMESTIC LABOUR. 

SAVING APPLIANCES, 1881. 



From amongst the numerous notices of this Exhibition we give the following, which are a fair 
representation of the whole : 



. The TMJies, March 14th, 1881. 

An exhibition of domestic labour-saving machinery and of 
articles intended to increase comfort and promote thrift in the 
household has been opened in the Agricultural Hall, Islington. 
Without entering into detail, it may be said that housekeepers 
of every class will find something to interest them. For the 
garden there are tools -with which large fruit trees may be 
pruned without the aid of a ladder, and novel foldmg tents 
in which a family might sit comfortably, and which pack, 
framework and all, into a box the size of those containing a 
croquet set, the box, too, being made to serve the purpose of 
a table when the tent is in ^^se. For the kitchen there are 
many patent cooking stoves and ranges, a new arrangement for 
doing away with the dangerous kitchen boiler, smokeless fuel, 
cooking utensils of American manufacture, very light and said 
to be heat-proof and incorrodible. There are inventions of 
many kiuds for saving the work of the cook, the housemaid, 
and the laundrymaid, specimens of furniture of novel design 
for general use and for the invalid, and contrivances for in- 
suring ventilation and sanitation. Of things which do not 
strictly come within the object of the exhibition there are 
many, ranging from microscopes to bicycles, the principal 
novelty being a steam tricycle. Three stalls which should not 
be overlooked are those occupied by the blind woodcutters and 
brush and basket makers under the care of the Association for 
Promoting the Welfare of the Blind, and by children from the 
Children's Home and Training School for Christian Workers, 
and from Dr. Barnardo's Home. 

Daily News, March 11, 1881. 

Until the 19th inst. an exhibition of domestic labour-saving 
machinery and other household appliauces will remain 
open at the Agricultural Hall, Islington. During that 
period the public will have an opportunity of inspect- 
ing many of the latest improvements in billiard tables, 
sewing machines, knife and fork cleaners, washing, drying, 
and wringing machines, cooking apparatus, and so forth. 
There is also a remarkable engine on view, which hardly comes 
within the category of domestic aj^paratus, inasmuch as it is 
an aid to ti'avel. The steam tiioyole is an ingenious device for 
using petroleum as fuel for creating the motive power steam, 
and is reported to carry a sufficiency thereof for a day's 
journey at the rate of nine or ten miles per hour. Another 
important application of machinery is that which enables 
children to do almost men's work as carpenters and shoe- 
makers. Dr. Barnardo has three score or more boys at work 
at tailoring, shoeraaking, brushmaking, carpentering, and 
wood chopping, and the Children's Home in Bonner-road is 
also represented by a large contingent engaged in printing, 
folding, and some other of the trades already enumerated. 
The children of the Heme in Bonner-road are also trained to 
sing and play on various musical instruments by the organist 
and bandmaster, Mr. E. Heath Mills, and give concerts during 
the exhibition. Even more interesting than the child- workei-s 
are the blind folk from the Association for Promoting the 
General Welfare of the Blind, now having its head-quarters in 
Berners-street. At the large stall occupied by the Association 
a number of blind people may be seen at work daily, and to 
tiose who have not seen them enjoying a bonfire and letting 



ofif fireworks the spectacle of blind brushmakers and basket- 
makers is touching indeed. The patient man sitting on the 
ground and making a basket diligently and skilfully admits 
that he can do more at Berners-street when he has everything 
around him, and knows every inch of the ground ; but he 
plaits away swiftly, despite his change of locality. L;ke the 
basketmaker, the brushmakers keep so steadily at work that 
it is difficult to realise that they are entirely deficient in the 
most valuable sense of all. A couple of women are standing 
up and plaiting sash lines, a work in which they seem quite 
proficient, and at the end of a stall sits a man chopping up 
firewood at a great pace, as if reckless of fingers, which, he 
declares, are not in the slightest danger. There is great 
" dash" about the poor blind man who walks to and from his 
work with a confidence and sjieed which astonish even those 
accustomed to the ways of blind folk generally. The valuable 
association under whose care these poor people are working 
has not yet sent to the Agricultural Hall its deservedly favourite 
pupd^a blind deaf mute, who works at brushmaking, but it 
is understood that he may be expected in a few days. A 
bright light by day and evening at the Agricultural Hall 
detracts somewhat from the strangeness which affects the 
visitor to a blind institution just after dusk, when he finds 
people setting type, reading, and working at various trades 
while he can hardly find his way about ; but the scene at 
Islington is nevertheless of a curiously interesting and moving 
character. 

The Standard, March 11, 1881. 
There is now open at the Agricultural Hall, Islington, an 
exhibition of what is termed " Labour Saving Appliances," 
and all articles for the promotion of household thrift. Up- 
wards of 200 exhibitors from all parts of the country hold 
stalls. It would be impossible, save in the form of a catalogue, 
to go through the different departments of labour here shown 
to perfection. Apart, however, from the mere utilitarian 
objects of the exhibition, the show is highly interesting from 
a humanitarian point of view ; for in the midst arc assembled 
representatives of three of the most praiseworthy charitable 
institutions in London. The first to attract attention is the 
temporary work-room of that Association for the Welfare of 
the Blind, founded by Miss Gilbert, blind daughter of the late 
Bishop of Chichester, the home of which is 28, Berners-street, 
Oxford-street. There are not many who will pass these work- 
shops and witness the cheerful labourers who have worked all 
their days in darkness, without feelings of sorrow and thanks- 
giving. Then there are the boys of Dr. Barnardo's Homes at 
their various handicrafts ; and there are 50 boys and girls 
from the Rev. T. B. Stephenson's Children's Home, Bonner- 
road, who, when properly instructed in various trades, have 
occupations found for them at home, or emigrate to fields 
abroad where there is more scope for the e.\ercise of their 
industry and ability. The two schools have bands of their 
own, which perform at intervals, doing much thereby to dis- 
tract the attention of the visitors from the monotony of 
mechanical sounds. 

Baily dironicle, March 10, 1881. 
An exhibition has been opened at the Agricultural Hall, 
Isliugton, of a great variety of articles more or less connected 
with the promoti»n of household thrift, which is the avowed 



32 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881. 



object of the originators of the show. It is quite true that 
within recent years domestic economy as well as the great enter- 
prises of life have been much assisted by mechanical helps to the 
performance of labour, and the great object of an exhibition 
bearing such a broad designation as the one referred to must 
be to bring into something like orderly array a collection of 
appliances with many of which, perhaps, numbers of people 
would not otherwise have an opportunity of becoming 
acquainted. Sewing machines, washing and wringing 
machines, chopping and grinding machines, knife cleaners, 
and such like familiar instruments are well represented ; and 
also pianos, billiard tables, tents, furniture, lawn mowers, and 
even coals, the latter being the kind known as the anthracite 
coal. A novelty which was at the Pai'is Exhibition is an 
automatic boot cleaner, the brushes being plied by machinery, 
the motive power of which may be supplied either by steam or 
hand, while there is a stocking-knitting machine. There is 
also, too, a valuable tree pruner — a sharp scissors-like appli- 
ance on the top of a rod — by means of which a stout branch in 
a twinkling may be cut as a knife cuts cheese ; and there is an 
exhibit of a reversible perambulator, in which the seat may be 
turned in any direction. An instance is afforded of the 
strides that are being made in tbe introduction of steam-power 
by a large steam washing machine, which is alongside an 
immense kitchen range. A steam tricycle illustrates the ap- 
plication of steam to this form of vehicle. The tricycle, it is 
explained, can be propelled by the ordinary pedal motion, by 
steam alone, or by both combined, and it is easily worked 
without any ajipearance of the employment of steam. Some 
boy and girl inmates of Dr. Barnardo's Home and the 
Children's Refuge, Bonner-road, Victoria Park, are to be seen 
at work as tailors, carpenters, shoemakers, wood choppers, &c., 
while some blind men and women from the Institution of the 
Association for the Welfare of the Blind show the skill that the 
sightless may attain in chopping firewood, and making 
brushes, baskets, and other articles of domestic use. The ex- 
hibition remains open for several days. 

The Morning Post, March 11th, 1881. 

The historian of the future who shall write the history of the 
I9th century will chronicle this second half of it as a period of 
exhibitions. Amongst these have been several valuable 
leviathan gatherings, but none are likely to be of so much 
practical value as exhibitions of specialities, such as that of 
domesticsaving apparatus now on viewin the AgriculturalHall, 
Islington. Here we have machinery displayed for cutting and 
buttering slices of bread, for crumbling bread, for mincing 
meat for sausages, &c. ; for peeling potatoes, slicing cucum- 
bers, cutting up vegetables of all kinds for soups or stews; 
stoves and ranges for cooking with gas, wood, common coal, 
anthracite, steam, &c. We have various modes of jireparing 
tea and coffee, among which latter Bi-an son's extract of coffee 
merits mention, as daily at the exhibition some hundreds taste 
it and pronounce it excellent. Again, we have various kmds 
of improved gas burners showj, and lamps of all styles and 
kinds. Newly-invented plans for raising and securing window 
sashes and doors may be inspected, window blinds, curtains, 
shades, &o. Stains for wood, imitatioiis of marble, window 
blinds, screens, ornamental furniture, crockery, and other 
domestic utensils are exhibited; and the inquiring householder 
can inspect a bewildering variety of washing and wringing, 
sewing and kilting machines, cinder sifters, and other tiseful 
implements. Among these are machines for knife cleaning, 
fork cleaning, and one for ironing shirts. Household soaps 
and sanitary soaps and other appliances and preparations are 
exhibited, as well as specially-pvepared salt for preserving 
meat, eggs, &c., and medicaments for rheumatic and other 
affections. Frost-proof joints for water pipes are shown, and 
as additions to home comforts, clocks, watches, and musical 
instruments have a place. One machine, which created much 
interest, is for playing the piano. The tune is cut on cards 
somewhat in the mode of preparing patterns for a Jacquard 
loom, and the performer merely turns a handle, the perfora- 
tions in the card allowing of the motions needed to strike the 
proper keys. As a portion of the house, or, at least, as being of 
it, if not in it, the garden is not forgotten, and lawn mowers, 
garden seats, ladders, garden pumps, &c., are displayed for 



the benefit of those who have some ground to deal with ; and 
as means for the preservation of health we have gymnastic 
apparatus and a host of bicycles and tricycles, which may be 
tried in the gallery, where a capital course has been arranged. 
On the grouud floor is shown a tricycle driven by a very 
pretty little steam-engine. Burroughes and Watts and^ other 
makers contribute an assortment of billiard-tables, and there 
are not wanting soma elegant articles of ornamental furni- 
ture. 

Among the most interesting displays of the exhibition are 
the stalls occupied by the boys of Dr. Barnardo's Homes, Mr. 
Stephenson's Children's Home, Bonner-road, and the Associa- 
tion for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind, Berners- 
street. At the first named a number of boys are engaged in 
carpentry work, brushmaking, tailoring, shoemaking, and 
printing. At tbe second similar operations are carried on, and 
at the third several of the blind, male and female, are occu- 
pied in basketmaking, brushmaking, mat and blind making, 
and other work suited for them. At all these stands the 
visitor cannot fail to note the air of cheerfulness and content 
apparent on the countenances of the workers, and around 
them are goodly displays of their work, testifying to their own 
abilities and to the care exercised in their instruction. Among 
the blind workers is a man who has the misfortune to be also 
deaf and dumb ; nevertheless he is a good basketmaker. 

The account of the exhibition would be wanting without a 
special reference to the catalogue, which affords abundant 
information, and has been very carefully compiled. Prefixed to 
it are several interesting and instructive essays on subjects 
connected with the exhibition, as well as a plan of the Agri- 
cultural Hall, with the numbers of the stalls marked on it. 
The whole has been capitally got up by Messrs. Charles 
Messent and Son. The exhibition will remain open till the 
17th inst., and will be found well worth a visit. 

The Echo, March 9th, 1881. 

An exhibition has been opened at the Agricultural Hall of 
domestic labour-saving machinery and of articles intended for 
the promotion of household thrift. Even in the very arcade 
leading to the Hall the visitor may form a jjretty shrewd guess, 
by the show of elegant garden lounges and tents, &c., tastily- 
arranged on either side by the Panklibanon Company (56, 
Baker-street), that there is something more interesting on view 
inside than rows of cart-horses or pigs specially cleaned for 
the occasion. Nor would he probably be much disappointed, 
for scattered round the immense hall, or rather ranged in well 
ordered rows, are specimens of almost everyone of those im- 
provements — as admirable in their way as the inventions of the 
steam-engine, the telegraph, or the printing press — which 
together have made such a change in our domestic life during 
the present century. How great the contrast between the 
domestic life of to-day and of a hundred years ago is admirably 
described by a "Lady of the old school," whose somewhat 
comical sketch graces the opening pages of the catalogue. 
Nothing, perhaps, would astonish the Mrs. Jill of that period 
more that a sight of the modern sewing machine or clothes 
washer. Concerning the former nothing more need be said 
than that the well-known firms were well represented, a new 
Wilson oscillating shuttle machme, by the way, being exhibited 
by Messrs Bradbury and Co. (14, Newgate-street), and that a 
full-length portrait of Howe, the ill-used inventor of the 
sewing machine, smiled down from one of the stalls on the 
busy scene below. Of the numerous patent washers the 
cheapest seemed to be the "Dolly," a combined washing, 
wringing, and mangling machine, warranted to wash sixty 
collars or twenty towels in three, and five shirts or one blanket 
in five minutes, just introduced by Messrs. J. M. Bell and Co., 
494, Oxford-street, and the price of which is considerably under 
£4. The " Home " washer, exhibited by the same firm, a more 
expensive machine, is said to have won over 150 first prizes 
since 1868, and never to have been beaten once. Close by are 
some very pietty crystal and majolica fountains, aquariums, 
and fern eases, exhibited by Messrs. Kessel and Son, 11, South- 
wark-street. Borough, and suitable for front windows and for 
side-board or table decorations, the price of the cheapest 
aquarium — £1 — bringing it withia the reach of almost every- 
one, A stroll round the building will soon reveal the improve? 



April 1, 1881 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



33 



ments effected iu the arts of lighting, warmiiig, or ventilating 
our houses. Some of the best of the heating stoves on view, 
perhaps, are those exhibited by Messrs. Wright and Butler, of 
Birmingham, whose patent portable "Eclipse," "Premier," 
and " Cheerful " petroleum stoves are said to warm a room 
without any of those injurious effects so often resulting from 
the use of gas. In the " Cheerful" stove the flame is reflected 
through glass, and as it, as well as the others, requires no 
chimney or flue, and burns all night without attention, it is in 
much request for invalids. The same firm exhibits a combined 
heating and cooking oil stove, which gained the highest award 
at the Cape Exhibition in 1877. Billiard tables and pianos 
for the drawing-room, knife-cleaners for the kitchen, lawn- 
mowers, hammocks, and tents for the garden, and carriuges 
and bicycles for out doors — all were on exhibition; and the 
thrifty householder who intends furnishing his house could not 
do better befoi'e purchasing than pay a visit to the Agricultural 
Hall. Besides looking at the stalls, the visitor may see basket 
and mat-making and other trades carried on by blind opera- 
tives iu the centre of the building, and may hear sweet music 
discoursed by bands from Dr. Bamardo's Boys' Home, Stepney- 
causeway, and from Mr. Stephenson's Children's Home, 
Bonner-road. 

Illustrated London News, March 11th, 1881. 

At the Agricidtural Hall, Islington, there is an excellent ex- 
hibition of domestic labour-saving appliances and articles for 
the promotion of household thrift. A deeply interesting 
spectacle is to be witnessed. Blind men and women from the 
Institution for the Welfare of the Blind, in Berners-street, are 
there chopping fire-wood, making brushes, brooms, baskets, 
sash-lines, &c. This institution was founded by Miss Gilbert, 
the blind daughter of the late Bishop of Chichester. 

Btyiwldi's, March I3th, 1881. 

Not the least interesting stall at the exhibition of "Domestic 
Labour Saving Machinery," together with articles intended 
for the promotion of household thrift, is that remarkable enclo- 
sure where are to be found, diligently worldng, a number of 
clever blind mechanics. These industrials are from the Institu- 
tion of the Association for the Welfare of the Blind, the head- 
quarters of which are 28, Berners-street, Oxford-street. 
Earnest groups may be seen throughout the day watching 
those evidently cheerful and certainly active workpeople. They 
carry on various trades, the most startling of which is, perhaps, 
that of chopping and bundling fire-wood. The chopper goes 
startlingly near the fingers of the operators, who are certainly 
the least concerned of all present at the appearance of danger 
which results from the combination of the staring unseeing 
eyes and the gleaming instrument. The most valuable pro- 
duct, however, offered for sale at this attractive stall is the 
hand-plaited sash-line, manufactured by women, and which is 
warranted to last quite six times as long as the ordinary ma- 
terial. Brush-making is another occupation very successfully 
followed by these good people whom it were almost erroneous 
to call afflicted, they are so cheerful and even happy. There 
are several very pleasant and even touching industries carried 
on at this exposition. In one directiou the spectator mai ks Dr. 
Barnardo's destitute children hard at work making boots — and 
very good ones, too — brushes, and other articles, while a col- 
lection of young carpenters flourish their planes and saws very 
dexterously. In another direction some of the inmates of an 
orphanage for boys are making well-sewn clothes. But 
throughout the exhibition now taking place at Islington, and 
which remains open during Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and 
Thursday of next week, no point excels in attraction that 
occupied by the pleasant blind folk. The institution entirely 
depends upon the demand there is for the articles manufao- 
tui'ed, and it is therefore pleasant to know that it has this year 
again obtained a large Government contract for 40,000 brushes. 
Last year the institution received Mr. Eichardson Gardner's 
bequest of £10,000, and with that and the permanent T)remi.ses 
fund there is a hope that whtn the Berners-street lease lapses 
much larger premises may be secured, and a larger number of 
blind people employed than can at present be provided for. 
The "blind" work is as good and as cheap as that made and 
sold by the sharpest sighted people, and customers therefore 



will not lose by their patronage, while the sightless will gain 
by it. The institution was founded by Miss Gilbert, who has 
a very active lieutenant in Miss Frances Martin. The spectator, 
indeed, leaves this sightless stall at the Agricultural Hall with 
a vivid sense of how little many of us comparatively do with 
bcjth eyes quite active, while these patient, cheerful souls, with 
the help of their good friends, are able to do so much, and con- 
tribute their share to the work of that society from which 
they are shut out by reason of their terrible affliction. The 
institution must have the best wishes, and should have the 
active support, however little, of all who delight in seeing 
affliction cheerfully met and industry applied where at first 
sight there is so little promise of that success which has 
followed the formation of the Bemer's-street Association for 
the Welfare of the Blind. 

The Citizen, March 12, 1881. 

During the present week an interesting exhibition of labour- 
saving appliances suited to household use, together with a 
varied array of other machines, has been held at the Agri- 
cultural Hall, Islington, and will continue open during next 
week. The stands afford[a striking lesson of the great strides 
which are being made in the directiiju of superseding ordinary 
domestic labour by clever mechanical inventions. The attrac- 
tions of the exhibition are heightened by the interesting 
operations of men and women from the Institution of the 
Association for the Welfare of the Blind, 28, Berners-street, 
founded by Miss Gilbert, the blind daughter of the late Bishop 
of Chichester. These clever workers are to be seen making 
brushes, baskets, sash-lines, and chopping firewood, in which, 
consideritig their physical disability, they are marvellously 
expert. The boys and girls from Dr. Barnardo's Home are also 
watched with interest, as they give practical lessons in 
carpentering, tiiiloring, shoemakiug, and other industrial 
pursuits, in which they find friendly rivals in the inmates of 
the Children's Refuge, Bonner-road, Victoria Park. Nor are 
more artistic attractions wanting iu the Hall, as each evenincr 
the proceedings are relieved by pianoforte recitals, while the 
brass band of tbo Home, of which the Eev. T. B. Stephenson 
is the principal, daily give selections in really telling style, 
and to the general delight of the visitors. 

The Critic, March 2nd, 1881. 

A very interesting exhibition will be opened on Monday 
next at the Agricultural Hall. Domestic labour-saving appli- 
ances and all articles intended for the promotion of domestic 
thrift. A special feature of this exhibition will be articles 
made by the blind. How the greatest of human afflictions 
can be to a certain extent alleviated, and lives of darkness 
rendered useful and in many instances enjoyable, will be illus- 
trated by the little workers iu the beneficent institutions foi 
ameliorating the condition of the blind. 

Hacliney and Kin/jslaiid Gazette, March I4th. 

An exhibition which possesses attractions for not only those 
more intimately acquainted with household duties, but also for 
those who delight in novelties and can appreciate the inven- 
tive genius of their fellow man, is now on view in the Agri- 
cultural Hall, Islington, and although (as with other exhibitions 
held here), the " show" is not entirely confined to that which 
its name implies, viz., " Domestic labour saving exhibition," 
still the extraneous exhibits tend rather to enhance than to 
detract from the scene. As time advances genius develops, 
the consequeuce being that so many surprises have already 
been given in the mechanical world that one is prepared to go 
to such an exhibition quite ready to look upon previously con- 
sidered impossibilities or unthought of mechanisms with com- 
parative quiet, always, of com-se, giving honour to the men 
whose brains solved the various problems. 

With such an enormous number of extiibits our space forbids 
but a casual glance, but, taking the stalls promiscuously, we 
come to one which demonstrates that heat can be produced by 
burning air, and which will be admitted to be a very inex- 
pensive fuel, whilst further on a nursery gymnasium, fitted 
with all conceivable appliances for developing the infantine 
biceps, is seen. Then we come to what is ind ed a labour- 
saving appliance in the form of a clever piece of mechanism 



34 



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Afeil 1, iSSl. 



to clean boots, the evolutions of the machine as it twists and 
turns the boots either in removing the dirt, blacking, or polish- 
ing, being interesting in the extreme. Knife cleaners are in 
abundance, but " something new" is shown in a capital con- 
trivance for cleaning forks. Then we come to patent bedsteads 
which do almost everything but give a guarantee against the 
baby crying or pate' being awakened, whilst again we see a 
novel contrivance for pruning trees without the aid of ladders 
or the extremely hard work of using the hand knife. All the 
large makers are represented in the many kinds of sewing, 
knitting, &c., machines; whilst patent ventilator, cork garden 
ornament, washer and wringer, curtain tightener, and numerous 
other manufacturers are also " placed." 

Perhaps the features of the show are the demonstrations of 
various kinds of labour by the inmates of Dr. Barnardo's and 
the Eev. T. B. Stephenson's Boys' Homes and the Berners- 
street Asylum for the Blind. The lads of the Homes were 
busily engaged in carpentering, shoemaking, tailoring, print- 
ing, wood sawing and chopping, brush making, boot cleaning, 
&o., all of which of course is immeasurably better for their 
present and future welfare than wandering half-famished 
and insufficiently clothed about our streets and serving an 
apprenticeship to crime which, as a rule, proves most disastrous 
to them. The operations of the blind persons were also 
watched with interest, and their precision of workmanship 
subject for wondering comment. 

Freemason's Chrm:icle, March 12, 1881. 

On Monday, at the Agricultural Hall, Islington, was opened 
what must certainly be described as a novelty in the way of 
exhibitions, and, as it will remain open till this day week, we 
think our readers will be interested if they visit the Hall. 
They will there see collected together every variety of imple- 
ment in every-day domestic use. Theie will be found the 
latest and most approved inventions in sewing machines, 
washing machines, knife-cleaners, heating and cooking stoves, 
and in every imaginable kind of domestic appliance. There 
are likewise included many displays of articles in constant use 
among all classes of householders, such, for instance, as the 
mats, baskets, &c., which are the handiwork of blind opera- 
tives — this particular collection being placed in the centre of 
the building. There are, too, others which find favour with 
residents in suburban districts, such as lawn-mowers and 
tents, together with bicycles for the athlete, and carriages, 
and, above all, billiard tables for the weakhy. One stall, in 
particular, attracted our attention, that of Bro. Edwards, of 
the Kingsland-road, who, by the way, is on the eve of moving 
into larger and more commodious premises in the same neigh- 
bourhood, so rapid has been the increase in his business 
during the last few years. Bro. Edwards exhibits three well- 
made billiard tables, besides bagatelle and other tables and 
apparatus of a cognate character. All these, with the balls, 
cues, &c., &c., are a credit to the establishment by which they 
are manufactured. Our attention was especially attracted by 
an oak cabinet, so constructed as to support a roller marking 
board for billiards, and a pool marking board for twelve 
players, having slate in centre, and a pool money till with 
glass front ; while at the same time in the drawers, &c., &c., is 
provided ample accommodation for wines, cigars, &c., &c. 
This cabinet combines most admirably the useful with the 
ornamental, and no better specimen of Bro. Edvpards's manu- 
facture could, we think, have been shown. We were also much 
pleased with the group of pianos sent by Mr. Justin Browne, 
of 237 and 239, Euston-road. They were handsome in 
appearance, and the tone left nothing to be desired. More- 
over, they have the further advantage of being comparatively 
modest in price. 

The Ironmonger, March 12, 1881. 

On Monday an exhibition of domestic labour saving appli- 
ances was opened at the Agricultural Hall. The exhibition 
has bean carried out under the auspices of Mr. Messent, a 
gentleman well known in connection with certain undertakings, 
and the name he has selected is well calculated to draw the 
general public to it in large numbers, and as it is to remain 
open until the evening of the 17th, there will be plenty of time, 
let us hope, for promoter and exhibitors to recoup themselves. 



Turning lo the exhibits, we are bound to say they consist, to a 
large extent, of those that we are accustomed to see, more or 
less, at every exhibition held in this building, and there are 
many articles shown in which our readers would feel no 
interest from a trade point of view. Amongst the. general 
exhibits, Mr. George Kent, of Holborn, held theplace d^honneur, 
whichisnow tacitly admitted to be the centre of the hall. Here 
is built up a massy square, edifice composed mainly of his cele- 
brated knife machines, of which some dozens are used in the 
erection, interspersed with all kinds of domestic labour saving 
utensils, with which Mr. Kent's name is now associated, and 
which naturally attracts considerable attention. In this line 
of business, though, of course, on a much smaller scale, we 
have the exhibits of Messrs. Spong and Co. ; Ellis, Fleet- 
stx-eet, who, in addition, sent his portable Turkish bath aad 
"Facile" bicycle, which we described on a recent occasion; 
Lyon, Windmill-street, Piusbury ; Davis and Co. ; and Messrs. 
Hood and Son, Hatton-garden, who have an independent 
tasteful enction, with an excellent assoi'tment of the "Lady- 
help," "Despatch," and "Perfection" machines. 

Washing machinery is rather extensively exhibited, although 
we miss the name of Bradford and Co. amongst them. The 
largest display is that of Thomas and Taylor, of Stockport, 
Manchester, and London, who exhibit their well-known 
" Eccentric " washing machines, both for steam and hand 
power, with wringers, mangles, &c., of various sizes, also the 
Eoyal prize " Eccentric '' churn and other dairy utensils. 

The Household Washing and Mangling Machine Company, 
Devonshire-street, E.G., have an assortment of the machines 
bearing this name; J. M. Bell and Co., Oxford-street, W.C., 
are present with the " Home " washer and accessories ; the 
Anglo-American Laundry Supply Company, Fann-street, 
Aldersgate-street, show the "Agitator" washing machinery, 
and their patent shirt, collar, and cuff ironing and polishing 
machines, heated by gas ; Thomas Green and Son, Leeds, and 
Blackfriars-road, have their patent washing machines, for both 
steam and hand power, mangles, wringers, &c. ; Harper 
Twelvetrees, with " Villa" washer, "Cottage" mangles, &c. ; 
and Wilding, on Messrs. Ewart and Sons' stand, with his 
" Swift" washer. 

Messrs. Wood and Parkinson, of Stockport, who have secured 
the services of Mr. Forty, well known as the late representa- 
tive of Mr. Wilding, the patentee of the "Swift" washer, 
make a good display Avith their " Duplex " and other mangles, 
wiingers, wash-tubs, &c., together with their "Segment" 
washer. This little utensil has recently received an important 
improvement, having had another roller added to the movable 
quadrant, and the metal ends lengthened in the form of drop- 
pieces or ears, which allow the water to run down them into 
the tub, and entirely prevent splashing. Bennett and Hodg- 
son's " Float " washer is also exhibited by the firm, and a 
hexagon churn, in which the screws securing the lid are 
pivoted on a circular base, and as soon as the nut is loosened 
by one or two turns, can be turned over and the lid removed 
without the necessity of taking them off entirely. 

Messrs. Brown and Co., Piccadilly, show the Leeds gas- 
cookers of Messrs. Beverley and Wylde, and other small gas- 
stoves ; Mr. Harry Hunt, of Newington-green, makes an 
attractive display with the " Crown Jewel " heating-stoves 
that have i-eoeived previous notice at our hands, and Norton's 
celebrated " Stanllyd " vein anthracite coal, for which he is 
the sole London agent ; Ritchie and Co., St. Swithm's-lane, 
with a large assortment of their patent lighting, heating, and 
ventilating stoves for gas and oil ; Mr. Charles Portway, 
Halstead, Essex, " Tortoise " slow combustion stoves ; Brown 
and Green, Luton, and Bishopsgate-street, " Gem " cooking 
stoves and ranges, ventilating and slow-combustion stoves ; 
the Wilson Engineermg Company, High Holboin, with their 
patent ranges ; and D. and T. Robertson, Sauohiehall-street, 
Glasgow, and 120, Cheapside, patent ranges and Robertson's 
patent Napierian coffee machines. 

The Eagle Range and Foundry Company, of Lozells, 
Birmingham, and 168, Fleet-street, London, have their usual 
assortment of cooking-ranges and a new square slow-combus- 
tion stove with fire-brick casing. They also show a new 
large-sized portable griller, which can be placed in front of an 
ordinary fireplace, an ordinary smoke-pipe conveying the pro- 



ApfiiL 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



35 



ducts of the fire to the chimney. Tbis is easily taken to pieces 
and made removable should it not be required in summer. We 
understand Messrs. Spiers and Pond ai-e adopting these for 
many of their country station refreshment-rooms. Messrs. 
Chorlton and Dugdale, of Manchester, exhibit specimens of 
their patent "Sunlight" cooking-stove, to which they have 
added an improved hot-water apparatus. The ordinary 
boiler, usually connected with a cooking- stove, is here dis- 
pensed with, bul in its place, and fixed at any convenient part 
of the kitchen, is a cylinder boiler, and from this is run a coil 
which passes through the stove, and is again attached to the 
cylinder on the other side, forming the in and out let pipe; 
there is also a draw-off pipe for supplying hob water to the 
kitchen, &c. Above the cylinder the ai-rangements for supply 
from the cistern are the same as in other heating apparatus. 
The chief advantage this plan appears to give is complete 
immunity from risk of expl'jsion, for so long as the pipes above 
are not frozen, the cylinder must be always full, and when 
freezing takes place, and all the water is drawn from it, no 
danger can accrue, for the cylinder being away from the fire 
wUl quickly become cool, and the fresh water, whenever 
thawing takes place, comes into a cold reservoir instead of to 
a heated boiler, the coil, to prevent danger from cold water 
passing through heated pipes, being removable in a few 
minutes. Should no other objection interpose, this idea 
appears to point to the discontinuance of boilers in our ordi- 
nary kitchen ranges. The firm also exhibit their patent 
" Excelsior " spring mattress and chairs in varied forms. 

Of gas-engines there are two makers present, Mr. J. E. H. 
Andrew, of Stockport, and Messrs. Crossley Brothers, Man- 
chester, whose machines are too well known to need description 
here. Instantaneous water-heaters are exhibited by Mr. Wm. 
HeUier, Duke-stieet, Grosvenof-square ; by Messrs. Ewart and 
Son, of Euston-road, whose " Crown " heater has been altered 
to enable a smoke-pipe to be added to it, to carry off the 
products from the gas, and by Mr. B. W. Maughan, of Cheap- 
side, with his " Geyser." 

Of ventilating apparatus we have Messrs. Eobert Boyle and 
Co., who, as usual, show to advantage, having an assortment 
of their self-acting air-pump ventilators for various purposes, 
including soil-pipes, drains, and sewers, and models and plans 
of their impruved system for ventilating steamships and public 
works by means of boiler- furnaces ; Messrs. Kite and Co., 
Chalton-street, Euston-road, who, among other things, have a 
little structure showing the roof of a stable or cowhouse with 
their louvre and valve ventilator ; J. M. Taylor, Tuilerie- 
street, Hackney-road, " Eclipse " chimney-top and ventilator ; 
and Messrs. Ewart and Son, with their " Empress" ventilator. 
Electric bells in their varied modes of appliance are shown by 
Messrs. Gent and Co., Leicester, and Mr. Zimdars, of Gray's- 
inn-road. Mr. Humphreys, of Albert-gate, Knightsbridge, 
shows a good specimen of his portable iron houses. Messrs. 
Nettlefold and Son, High Holborn, make an excellent display 
of agricultural and h(/rticultural tools, their wooden coal- 
vases, '• Coventry " lawn-mowers, &c., and the Standard 
Manufacturing Company, Derby, are present with their 
"Standard" tree-pruner, which has before been mentioned in 
our pages. 

The Silioated Carbon Filter Company have a handsome 
stand, on which are displayed their numerous filters; David 
Hart and Co., Wenlock-street, City-road, have a good assort- 
ment of weighing machines ; Mr. Hindley, Bourton, Dorset, 
shows a variety of his well-known horizontal and vertical 
engines ; Mr. Wagstaff, of Dukinfield, Manchester, shows his 
upright tubular saddle-boilers, which appear to be made on 
economic principles ; and Messrs. Davis and Co, , Kennington- 
park-road, have a varied assortment of barometers, thermo- 
meters, lactometers, saccharometers, levels, microscopes, &o. 
Messrs. Stott and Co., Oldham, are present with their patent 
gas-governor, and a new burner-governor, which is said to be 
very effective, and which, with an electro-gilt holder for the 
globe, IS sold at a very low price. The Peckham Gas Burner 
Oempany also show a variety of gas-burners, gas box-irons, 
cooking-stoves, &c. Mr. Robert Adams, Great Dover-street, 
has a well-filled stand of his specialties, including his patent 
fanlights, compensating hinges, new patent safety wmdow, 
which can be instantly changed from vsrtical sliding to swing- 



ing sashes, new Venetian bHnd-holder, &c. The Keighley 
Timber and Saw MiUs Company show their patent sashes, and 
Carter and Aynsley, of Bishopsgate- street, have Melville's 
patent sashes on view. The two last-named appliances have 
been fully described in our columns on a former occasion. 

Building and Engineering Times, March 12th, 1881. 

On Monday last the series of metropolitan exhibitions for 
the present yjar fairly commenced with the opening of the 
above in the spacious hall at Islington, and as tbis is the 
first of its kind which has been held there, the promoters may 
be congratulated on the considerable measure of success which 
has attended their efforts to bring together the latest novelties 
in the way of labour-saving machinery and articles intended 
for the promotion of household thrift. The catalogue is a 
creditable production, and it contains the descriptive matter 
dealing with the entries of 193 exhibitors. In some prefatory 
remarks allusiou is made to the comparatively short period 
which intervened between the issue of the prospectus and the 
inauguration of the uudei taking, a reasonable hope being 
expressed that with longer notice the next exhibiton of this 
particular class will be eveu more successful than the present 
one. Up to the 19th inst. residents in London and our country 
cousins will have the opportunity of judging how far modern 
manufacturers have simplified the processes connected with 
the various requirements of domestic life. Time and labour 
have grown to be of greater value in the hurry and rush of 
nineteenth century existence, and the readiest means of con- 
serving both has been the stimulus to a host of inventors. 

Before passing on to a description of the principal exhibits 
which will have a special interest to our readers, some remarks 
seem to be called for on the part which philanthropic feeling 
is doing to provide suitable and remunerative employment 
for the othervirise destitute and afflicted classes. Among the 
many objects of interest at this comprehensive display, is the 
work which is being done before the onlookers by male and 
female blind operatives under the auspices of the Association 
for Promoting the General Welfare of the Blind, a society 
which enjoys the patronage of Her Majesty, half the bench 
of bishops, the Premier, and of course that of the present 
Postmaster-General. The chairman of the executive committee. 
Admiral Sir Edward Sotherby, K.C.B., informs us that this 
admirable institution owes its origiu to Miss Gilbert, daughter 
of the late Bishop of Chichester ; and this lady, who is her- 
self blind, founded the association for the purpose of teaching 
various trades to the adult blind, with the ultimate object of 
employing them in the workshops of the association and at 
their own homes. Eighty-seven men and women are thus pro- 
vided with remunerative labour, and some of them may be 
seen here engaged in the manufacture of brushes, baskets, 
sash-iines, fancy woodwork, &o., all of which are being turned 
out in such a way as to intensify the natural sympathy which 
all must feel for those who work in a kingdom of darkness. 
Funds, we understand, are needed to extend the society's 
operations. Visitors will turn from this sphere of active 
labour, to where numerous boys and girls from Dr. Barnardo's 
Homes for Friendless and Destitute Children are busily em- 
ployed in useful industries ; and close by again, some of the 
boys from the Children's Home at Bonner-road, Victoria- 
park, are to be seen at various pursuits under qualified in- 
structors. Several of these boys — who, by the way, are 
apprenticed to the different trades for four years— were working 
at a carpentei-'s bench on the occasion of our visit, and the 
specimens of carpentry in course of construction would do 
credit to any joiner's shop. The united brass bands of these 
institutions perform selections of popular music throughout 
the day, under the baton of Mr. R. H. Mills, giving proof of 
careful training. Enough has been thus said in a general way 
to show that the Exhibition is well worth a visit. 

Bazaar and Mart. 

On Monday last the first London exhibition of domestic 
labour-saving appliances opened at the Agricultural Hall, 
Islington, and brought together numerous exhibits, ranging 
from buttons and bell-pulls to steam and gas engines. Although 
the show opened at ten in the morning it was some hours 
' before the whole of the entries were placed in their positions, 



36 



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April 1, ISSl. 



and up tu eight o'clock p.m. tlie ball presented anything but 
a finished appearance, and as a general catalogue was unob- 
tainable, we are unable to enter upon a detailed description. 
The whole of the exhibits are on the ground floor, thus adding 
to the comfort of visitors, the galleries being reserved as a 
trying ground for bicycles and tricycles. Stands in the centre 
of the hall are devoted to tailoring, bootmaking, brushmaking, 
carpentering, and woodchopping, carried on by boys of one or 
other of the Boys' Homes, while a place is also set apart for 
girls, who are taught the book sewing and folding. Some of 
the boots and brushes made by the boys presented a very 
finished appearance. The Association for the General Welfare 
of the Blind have also a stand, where the operat'ves work at 
basket-making, &c. 

The Warehouseman and Draper, March 19, 18S1. 

This exhibition, which opened on the 7th, is to be continued 
yet another week. We must therefore take it for granted 
that the promoters are congratulating each other on tbe 
success attending their eff'orts to interest the general public 
.by a display of domestic labour-saving machinery. We believe 
that knife cleaners, boot cleaners, sewing and knitting 
machines, and washing and mangling machines, may be legiti- 
mately included in this category, but as for all the other 
exhibits, we fail to see the analogy — take, for instance, chairs, 
garden seats, stoves, bedsteads, mattresses, show cases, cor- 
sets, waxwork, cradles, lamps, and clocks. It must not be 
understood, however, that we are taking exception either to 
the introduction of goods that are not labour-saving, or to 
the poor blind folk who are actually engaged with their hands 
in the manufacture of baskets, brushes, sash-lines, fancy wood- 
work, &c., for visitors appear to be equally entertained with 
these, also with the boys and girls from Dr. Barnardo's Homes 
for Destitute Children, and the boys from the Children's Home 
at Victoria Park ; they are all engaged in the duties that have 
been taught them at their respective schools. Indeed, the 
crowd is always the thickest around the workshops of the 
working community, whether of the blind or of the little 
carpenters, tailors, shoemakers, printers, &c. ; and, let us add, 
they turn out their work in a very creditable way. The united 
brass bands, too, of these institutions constantly enliven the 
time by playing a selection of popular music. 



THE BICKFORD AUTOMATIC FAMILY KNITTER. 

It is intended to be eminently and emphatically a family knittic g 
machine, designed to meet completely a known and long-felt 
domestic want. Its practical utility in the manufacture of sub- 
stantial hosiery, in which it stands without a rival, is, of course, 
its chief recommendation. But this is only one of the multiplied 
uses to which it may be applied. There is scarcely an article of 
fancy apparel or household adornment that cannot be made 
upon it with perfect facility and ease. The taste and ingenuity 
of the operator is the only limit to the variety of style and 
quality of the work it may be put to do. There is scarcely 
any kind of female industry which in so large a degree com- 
bines reoieation with work, pleasure with profit, occupation for 
the mind without wearmess of the body, and utilises the small 
intervals of time that otherwise would be spent in idleness, as 
the peculiarly domestic employment of knitting. The frugal 
and industrious matron will busy herself at odd times and spare 
moments at nimbly plying the needles in making stockings, 
mittens, and other articles of wearing apparel for the comfort 
of the family ; while the lady of wealth will occupy her leisure 
in the more elaborate fancy crochet work, and find amuse- 
ment in devising some new form of stitch to apply to novel 
articles for ornamental use. 

The old methods, however, are too slow for real economy, 
and the necessity has arisen for a more rapid method of pro- 
ducing useful and ornamental knit-work by mechanical means, 
which will, in an equal degree, combine pleasure and profit 
without weariness. This result is completely attained in the 
improved and perfected Bickford Knitting Machines. 

Th« machine now manufactured by this company exhibits 



the very finest workmanship, and is designed to meet every 
want of the household. 

It is so arranged that the work is easily and quickly set up, 
and will make any stitch, plain or fancy, that can possibly be 
knit by hand. It will also narrow or widen (knitting a flat 
web of any width with selvedge on each edge) to form any 
shape or garment required (including stockings and socks of 
every size and material, with heel and toe complete,) iismg 
from seventy-two to two hundred needles. 

Thus the following articles, with scores of others, may be 
readily produced upon it : Socks, scookings, mittens, leggings, 
wristlets, gloves, scarfs, tidies, frmges, slippers, sashes, capes, 
drawers, undershirts, skirts, trimmings, tuftings, toilet and 
lamp mats, skating caps, smoking caps, cushion and ottoman 
covers, suspenders, looped trimmings, carriage and door mats, 
muffs and collars, table and piano covers, hoods, ladies', gentle- 
men's, and children's underwear of every kind, and many other 
articles, with either close or open work, of various sizes, with 
either coarse or fine yam of wool, cotton, linen, or silk. 

Any of the above articles may be beautifully varied in an 
infinite variety of designs in form, colour and stitch,, according 
to the capacity, skill and taste of the operator. Stockings and 
other articles knit on this machine can be made in any desired 
size or shape, and do not require to be stretched and moulded 
on " forms," as in the case with goods made on poor imitation 
machines. 

As the yarn is not strained at all in knitting it may be 
raveled out and knit over again, fifty times if desired. 

A great advantage of this machine is, that cylinders of 
various grades of fineness will fit the same machine, adapting 
it to all kinds of work, from the coarsest to the finest, thus 
obviating the necessity of buying two or more entire machines 
to work on very fine or coarse yarn. They also have a new 
device for taking up slack yarn, in knittmg heels and toes and 
all work where one knits backford and forward, which is self- 
acting, in connection with the spring take-up. 

The machine knits socks in two ways. By one method the 
toe is formed first complete ; the foot and heel next complete ; 
then the leg is knit, making a sock " complete," except to bind 
ofi' the top. No heel or toe to close. By the other method the 
leg is knit first, the top .being bound off or finished in setting 
it up, the heel is turned and completed, the foot and toe knit, 
and when it comes from the machine has to be closed one-half 
of the diameter of the foot. Double heels can be knit to all 
socks if wanted. 

The agents for England for this machine are Messrs. E. S. 
Daville and Co., 46, Wood-street, Liverpool. 




EMBEZZLING THE MONEY OF A SEWING MACHINE 
MANUFACTUEER. 

John Sharman, commission agent, Overstone-road, North- 
ampton, was charged on remand recently with fraudulently and 
feloniously embezzling several sums of money, amounting to 
£15 17s. 6d., received by him on account of his employers, 
Messrs. J. and T. Wilkinson, sewing machine dealers, Wel- 
lingborough, about six months since. — Mr. Andrew prosecuted. 
Mr. 0. C. Becke defended the prisoner. — Mr. Andrew said the 
prisoner would be indicted on two charges — the first for having 
embezzled three sums to the amount of £13 18s., and further as 
the clerk and servant of the firm for having falsified his 
accounts. The prisoner went into the employ of the firm at 
Wellingborough about three years previously. It appeared 
that twelve months last Christmas prisoner was detected as 
having applied several sums ©f money to his own use, and was 
to have been discharged, but owing to his pleading, it was 



April 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



37 



agreed that he should have the charge of the depot at North- 
ampton, the amount of his defalcations to be deducted from 
hia commission. Accordingly Sharman was sent to North- 
ampton. The agreement which was signed was somewhat 
Taried. He was to receive 10s. regularly as salary, and he was 
also to collect money from sales which had been effected, and 
to make weekly balance sheets. On account of a man named 
Richardson the prisoner received £o 8s. He then made false 
entries, and only returned £3 10s. On account of a Mr. 
Harrison the amount of £6 10s. had been received by prisoner, 
and he had only accounted for 10s. ; and in the case of Miss 
Smith he received £7 and only accounted for £1. Last 
Christmas Mr. Wilkinson took stock, and on examining the 
ledger he found that a Mr. Eyre had had goods debited to 
him to the amount of £11 6s. 4d., whereas Eyre only owed £7. 
Mr. Andrew said that that was done because the goods were 
not in the shop, and consequently prisoner had to book the 
goods sold to some one to make up the balance of his stock. 
Prisoner had received from March to January the sum of 
£60 8s. 7d. on account of sales and commission, and the salary 
due to him of £28 7s. 6d. was to be dec'ucted from his previous 
defalcations. — John Wilkinson, a partner in the firm of 
Wilkinson and Co., said the agreement produced was that 
signed by the prisoner, and by it he was to act as manager, 
clerk, and traveller, and to receive commission and salary. The 
commission tbe prisoner had received was 7h per cent, on 
machines and os. per cent, on silks. The salary amounted 
to 10s. per week, with house, coal and gas. Prisoner was to 
give the whole of his time to the work of the firm. Prisoner 
had to keep a cash book, ledger, and a machine ledger, and 
had to make a balance-sheet, which was to be sent to Wel- 
lingborough every seven days, with the amount of cash re- 
ceived and goods sold. In the cash book there was an account 
to the name of Thomas Eichardson. There was £1 paid on 
June 19, 1880. On July 22, 1880, Mr. Richardson paid another 
£2, and on December 2 another 10s. was debited to Richard- 
son. All the entries were in prisoner's handwriting. In the 
ledger £3 10s. was credited to Eichardson. In his weekly 
balance-sheet prisoner had given credit to Richardson for £3 
10s., and that was the whole of the money he had credited 
Eichardson with. In the cash book there was also 10s. entered 
as received from Robert Harrison. Two sums of 5s. and one 
of 10s. were entered in the books as being paid by Miss Smith. 
In the silk ledger the name of Mr. Eyre, of Long Buokby, to 
the date of January, 1881, appeared, and he was charged with 
31bs. of 18 yellow silk at £3 ; 31bs. of 20 black £2 16s., 3 
dozen of thread 9s., and repairing machine l5s. The counter- 
foil cheque book agreed with the entries. To the account 
of Frederick Muscott, Long Buckby, to January 12, was 
entered 21bs. of 18 yellow silk £2, 21ds. of black silk, ^1 I7s. 4d.; 
three dozen of 12 thread 9s. ; making a total of £4 6s. 4d. To 
the account of William Muscott, of Long Buckby, was 
entered lib. of 18 yellow silk, £1 ; 31bs. of 20 black silk, 
£2 6s. Od. ; three dozen of thread, 9s., making a total of 
£4 5s. ; and all the amounts described agreed with the 
duplicate cheque book. The prisoner came to manage 
their business in Northampton in March last, having 
been transferred from Wellingborough. — By Mr. Becke : 
There was a sum of abovit £28 17s. 6d. outstanding to 
prisoner for commission on machines sold, he having 10s. for 
commission on every boot machine and 5s. on every hand 
machine. He could not tell how many machines the prisoner 
had sold since his engagement. — (Prisoner: 248). — The 
pi-isoner had not sold anything like that number. In his 
(witness's) ledger the prisoner was debited with every machine, 
but onlv as manager. All machmes sent to the prisoner were 
invoiced direct to him, and the invoicf s entered into a book. 
They were really debited and credited to the Northampton 
depot. Witness visited Northampton frequently, and could look 
at the books whenever he pleased. The cash was sent to witness 
by carrier. When they took stock at Christmas they found a 
deficiency, and that the prisoner had had more goods than 
rendered in his balance-sheet. He did not then enter into an 
arrangement with the prisoner to pay the deficiency off in 
10s. a week. The prisoner offered to do that, but he did 
not accept it. An agi-eement in writing, to the effect that 
such an arrangement should be carried out, was prepared 



by their solicitor, Mr. Heygate, at Wellingborough, but was 
never signed. The prisoner and witness went to the sohcitor's 
oifioe to have the agreement prepared about the middle of 
February. One of the terms of that agreement was not that he 
was not to talk about the matter. The prisoner did not refuse 
to sign the agreement because witness had been talking about 
the matter. The prisoner did not meet him according to pro- 
mise to sign the agreement, and as he had not signed and 
went away he applied for a warrant for his apprehension. — 
Re-examined : When the agreement was talked about he had 
no idea that the amount of defalcations was so large as it was. 
The letter produced, dated March 16th (the day the prisoner 
surrendered), was in the prisoner's handwriting, and asked the 
firm to deal leniently with him for the sake of his wife. — ■ 
Thomas Eichardson, living at 4, Ecton-street, Northapmton, 
said that he purchased, on the 19th June last, a sevnng 
machine from the prisoner for £7. Witness paid £1 down, 
and the I'eisainiler, £5 6s. (14s. having been allowed as dis- 
count), on the 22nd day of July. He received the receipt 
produced from the prisoner. Witness denied paying prisoner 
the various sums which were entered to him by pi-isoner on 
the 22nd July and on the 2nd December. — Frederick Barham 
said he acted as collector and canvasser to Messrs. Wilkinson. 
He had a conversation with prisoner having reference to the 
machine purchased by Eichardson, in consequence of beiug 
instructed by Messrs. Wilkinson to collect and examine all the 
prisoner's books. He asked prisoner where the machine in 
question was, and he said it was not at Ecton-street, but at 
Ecton. He subsequently went to Ecton-street and found the 
machine and a bill showing that the machine was paid for. — 
Robert Harrison, rivetter, Bath-street, said he jiurchased a 
machine from the prisoner in August last, and the receipt pro- 
duced was the one given him by the prisoner. The price was 
to be £6 10s. A few days afterwards he paid the £6 at the 
request of the prisoner, and on October 2 the remaining 10s. — 
Adela Smith, Clark's-yard, St. George-st., Northampton, said 
she bought a machine of the prisoner on the 29th September 
last, for which she produced the receipt. The price was £7, 
but she paid £6 lOs. for it on the 16th Oct., receiving the other 
lOs. as discount. She did not pay him any sum of £1 8.=. on 
the 28th October, or two sums of os. on the 18th November. — 
James Eyre, boot manufacturer. Long Buckby, deposed that 
he did not purchase any silk or thread from the prisoner as 
entered in the book on tbe 5th January, to the amount of 
£6 5s. He did owe 14s. 6d. at that time to the firm, which he 
had since paid to Mr. Bavbam, the collector. He did not 
receive any invoices of the silk or thread stated to have been 
sold to him, but he did receive an invoice of the 14s. 6d. 
which was owing for the repair of a machine. — By Mr. Adkius: 
There were other persons by the name of Eyre at Long Buckby, 
but not in the shoe trade. — John Muscott, shoemaker. Long 
Buckby, said he did not have silk and thread to the value of 
£4 OS. supplied to him from the firm in January last. He had 
traded with the firm for two years. There was a Wm. Muscott 
living at Long Buckby. — Frederick Muscott, shoemaker, Long 
Buckby, said he did not purchase silk and thread from the 
prisoner in January last to the amount of £4 6s. 4d., and no 
invoice had been sent to him for such goods. — This was the 
case for the prosecution, and Mr. Becke, in defence, said he 
could not disguise from himself that there was sufficient evi- 
dence to warrant the Bench in sending the case to another 
tribunal, and, therefore, he would not address the Bench. He 
would, however, ask the Bench to consider the question of 
bail. There was, he said, a strong reason why bail should be 
granted, as the case was one of matters of account, and he 
would want to be out to give the necessary instructions for his 
defence. Another point m the prisoner's favour was that he 
voluntarily surrendered himself, and that showed that he 
wished to court the fullest enquiry, and, if guilty, not to 
escape his punishment. — Mr. Andrew said he did not wish to 
oppose bail, but, if granted, he thought, after looking at the 
character of the offence, it should be of a substantial character. 
— The prisoner was then cummitted to take his trial at the 
next Quaiter Sessions, bail being granted the prisoner in his 
own recognizances of £200, and sureties of £100 and £50. 
The father of the prisoner became surety for £100 and the 
second surety was not forthcoming at the rising of the Court, 



38 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Aprjl ], ibSI. 



WEIGHT V. WHEELER AND WILSON MANUFAC- 
TURING COMPANY. 

This was an action to recover damages for malicious pro- 
secution and false imprisonment. Tlie defendants pleaded 
reasonable and probable cause. 

Mr. Edward Clarke, Q.C., and Mr. Woolf appeared for the 
plaintift'; and Mr. Waddy, Q.C., and Mr. Corrie Grant repre- 
sented the defendants. 

The plaintiff, Mr. Alfred Stafford Wright, carries on business 
in Shoreditoh High-street, as a seller of sewing machines, sup- 
plied by different firms, and the defendants are well-known 
sewing machine manufacturers and patentees of the Wheeler 
and Wilson sewing machii.es, possessing a manufactory in 
Germany and a shop in Regent-street. It appeared that a 
Mrs. Ann Oliver obtained a sewing machine from the plaintiff, 
with an allegation that it was a Wheeler and Wilson machine. 
Finding subsequently that it was not a machine manufactured 
by the defendants, she took out a summons on March II, 1880, 
against the plaintiff, for obtaining £6 10s. from her by mis- 
representation as to the character of the machine. The 
plaintiff alleged that the defendants instigated and supported 
the prosecution. At the hearing of the charge at the Middlesex 
Sessions, on April 19, evidence was given to the effect that 
although the machine was not manufactured by the defendants 
it was one known in the trade as a Wheeler and Wilson 
machine. The judge interposed and granted a certificate of 
acquittal, and the plaintiff brought the present action to 
recover a sum of £48, as expenses for his defence, in addition 
to other items. 

The jury gave a verdict for the plaintiff with £150 damages, 
and judgment was given accordingly. 




The following list has heen compiled expressly for the "Sewing 
Machine Gazette," by G. P. Redfeen, Patent Agent, 4, South Street, 
Finsbury, London, and at Paris and Brussels. 

APPLICATIONS FOR LETTERS PATENT :— 

No. 531. W. S. Clark and E. Davenport, both of Manchester, 
for an improved clothiers' pressing and ironing 
machine. Dated February S, 1881. 

„ 533. W. Mickelwright, of Shepherd's Bush, and A. G. 
Gladwyn, of Hammersmith, both in London, foi 
improvements in or applicable to bicycles, tricycles, 
and other similar machines. Dated February 8, 
1881. 

„ 594. H. G. H. Berkeley, of Oxford - terrace, Hyde Park, 
London, Student-at-Law, for improvements in 
bicycle and other velocipedes. Dated February 11, 
1881. 

„ 604. J. H. Gosling, of Southsea, Hampshire, for improve- 
ments in bicycles, tricycles, and other velocipedes. 
Dated February 11, 1881. 

„ 638. J. H. Palmer, of Aston-juxta-Birmingham, Machinist, 
for improvements in bicycle and other vehicles. 
Dated February 15, 1881. 

„ 650. A. M. Clark — a communication from C. Coupland and 
J. H. Tingue, both of Seymour, Connecticut, 
United States, for improvements in looms for 
weaving. Dated February 15, 1881. 

„ 66'^. H. J. Svvindley, of Kensington, London, Civil Engineer, 
for improvements in bicycles and other velocipedes. 
Dated February 16, 1881. 

„ 671. A. Kirby, of Bedford, for improvements in the con- 



struction of velocipedes and apparatus connected 
therewith. Dated February 16, 1881. 

677. A. Anderson and G. Browning, both of Glasgow, for 
improvements in sewing machines. Dated February 
16, 1881. 

679. J. Harrington, of Norman's-buildings, Old-street, St. 
Luke's, London, for improvements in tricycles and 
bicycles. Dated February 16, 1881. 

703. J. H. Smith, of Nottingham, for improvements in 
knitting machines and apparatus applicable there- 
to. Dated February 18, 1881. 

729. G. G. M.Vernum, of Birmingham, Mechanical Engineer, 
for improvements in bicycles and tricycles, and 
other velocipedes. Dated February 19, 1881. 

753. G. W. Ash, of Southsea, Hampshire, for improvements 

in or applicable to bicycUs. Dated February 22, 
1881. 

754. G. Singer, of Coventry, Warwickshire, and A. W. 

Metcalfe, of Clifton, Gloucestershire, Engineering 
Student, for improvements in bicycles and other 
velocipedes. Dated February 22, 1881. 

756. J. Booth, of Ovenden, near Halifax, Yorkshire, 
Manufacturer, for improvements in the manufac- 
ture of knitted or looped fabrics, and in machinery 
or apparatus employed therein. Dated February 
2i, 1881. 

758. C. Heap, of Rochdale, Lancashire, Fuller, for improve- 
ments in or applicable to machines for tentering or 
drying fabrics. Dated February 23, 1881. 

763. J. Buckley, and J. C. Buckley, both of Leeds, for 

improvements in apparatus for pressing, smoothing, 
and finishing garments or parts of garments, also for 
pressing woollen or other woven or felted fabrics. 
Dated February 23, 1881. 

764. W. A. Carr, of Manchester, Manufacturer, for im- 

provements in dobbies used in looms for weaving, 
applicable wholly or in part to shuttle changing 
motions. Dated February 23, 1881. 

779. J. P. Cox, of Nottingham, Bleacher and Lace 
Finisher, for improvements in steam presses for 
the finishing of lace and other manufactured 
goods where a light finish is required. Dated 
February 24, 1881. 

825. W. Chffe, Machine Maker, and F. E. Ainley, Sciibbling 
Engineer, both of Golcar, near Huddersfield, 
Yorkshire, for an improved method of and appa- 
ratus for feeding wool and other fibres to scribbling 
and carding machinery. Dated February 26, 
1881. 

830. H. Kinder, of Leicester, for improvements in tricycles. 
Dated February 26, 1881. 

837. F. Caldwell, of Loughborough, Leicestershire, for im- 
provements in machinery and apparatus to be 
employed in the manufacture of knitted fabrics. 
Dated February 28, 1881. 

848. H. H. Lake— a communication from J. M. Fair, of 
Buffalo, New York, United States, for iinprove- 
ments in the construction of sewing machinery, 
which improvements are partly applicable for other 
purposes. Dated February 28, 1881. 

856. W. Mather, of Manchester, Engineer, for improve- 
ments in machinery loi stentering, stretching, 
and drying textile fabrics. Dated March 1, 1881. 

860. L. Appleton, of Brecknock-crescent, London, Account- 
ant, for improvements in machinery or apparatus 
for cleaning knives. Dated March 1, 1881. 

878. W. Smith, H. Smith, and S. Stell, all of Keigbley, 
Yorkshire, Commission Wool Combers, for im- 
provements in machinery or apparatus for combing 
wool and other fibrous substances. Dated March 
1, 1881. 

888. J. Smith, of Thornliebank, Renfrew, North Britain, 
Engineer, for improvements in apparatus for 
drying woven fabrics and other warps. Dated 
March 2, 1881. 

891. T. Humber, T. E. Marriott, and F. Cooper, all of 
Beeston, Nottinghamshire, for improvements in 
the construction ot wheels for bicycles and other 
vehicles. Dated March 2, 1881. 

911, J. and C. B. Challis, both of Sidney-road, Homerton, 
London, for improvements in or relating to veloci- 



April 1, 1831. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



39 



pedes, applicable in part to other purposes. Dated 
March 3, 1881. 

„ 920. J. F. M. Pollock, of Leeds, for improvements in press- 
ing and ironing machines. Dated March 3, 18-<1. 

„ 929. J. Hopwood, of Heaton Norris, Laocashire, for improve- 
ments in the constiuction of velocipedes. Dated 
March 4, 1881. 
931. W. Trafford, of Leet, Staffordshire, Silk Manufacturer, 
for improvements in machinery for spinning, 
Tveio^hing', sortingr, sizing, doubling, twibtiuty, 
thro^ring, stretching, and reeling into skeins silk 
or other fibrous materials. Dated March 4. 1881. 

„ 948. W. A. Barlow— a communication from W. v. Krause, 
of Neusalz-on-the-Oder, Germany, for a new or 
improved meat chopping or mixing machine. 
Dated March 5, 1881. 

„ 959. E. Whitehall, of Nottingham, for improvements in 
machinery and apparatus to be employed in pro- 
ducing knitted and crocheted fabrics. Dated 
March 7, 1881. 

„ 972. C. G. Hawkins, of Leyton-ioad, Forest-gate, London, for 
improvements in tricycles and othar velocipedes. 
D.^ted March 7, 1881. 

,, 1,001. K. C. Fletcher, of Tarleton Eectory. near Preston, 
Lancashire, Clerk in Holy Orders, for improve- 
ments in velocipedes. Dated March 9, 1881. 

„ 1,020, J. B. hobeitsoD, of Lurgan, Armagh, Ireland, for im- 
provements in sewing machines. Dated March 9, 
1881. 

Lietters Patent have been issued for the following' : — 

„ 3,347. W. E. Bull, of Angellroad — partly a communication 
from H. F. Kimber, of St. John's-road, both in 
London, for improved hpp-jiatus for carrying 
luggage on a bicycle or similar vehicle. Dated 
August 18, 1880. 

„ 3,507. T. Pearson and J. Taylor, both of Bolton, Lancashire, 
for an improved construction of bobbin and siiuttle 
tongue for shuttles. Dated August 30, 1880. 

„ 3,524. J. Beresford, of Altrincham, Cheshire, for an improved 
conbination of machinery and apparatus for 
cleansing and polishing silver or other metal, and 
knives, forks, and other articles of domestic use, 
applicable also a.= a motor for operating, minciog, 
grinding, and other similar machines. Dated 
August 31, 1880. 

„ 3,589. B. Berry, Meclianir', and Samuel Sowden Freeman, 
Spinner, both of Bradford, Yorkshire, for improve- 
ments in spinniog and in apparatus connected 
thtrewith. Dated September 3, 1880. 

„ 3,715. S. Chatwood, of Cannon-street, London, Safe and Lock 
Engineer, for improvements in Iricycles and like 
vehicles. Dated September 11, 1880. 

„ 3,774. F. W. Schwarzbach, of Naumburgh-on-the-Gaale, 
Prussia, lor an improved self-acting net-die for 
knitting machines. Dated September 17, 1880. 

„ 3,798. W. Jennings, Spinner, and T. Whitaker, Manager, 
both of Bradford, Tork^hire, for im^iri>vement< in 
spinning machinery. Dated September 18, 18»-0. 

„ 4,036. H. J. Haddan, a communication Irom J. Keith, of 
Rhode Island, United Stales, for improveinents in 
sewing-machines. Dated October 5, 1880. 

„ 4,037. L. Avis, ot Covtntry, Warwickshii-e, for improvements 
in velocipedes. Dated October 5, 1880. 

„ 4,560. K. Curtis, Machine Maker, and W. H. Rhodes Fore- 
man, both of Manchester, for impioveiiients in 
machinery for preparing and spinning cotton and 
other fibrous materials. Dated November 6, 1880. 

„ 5,192. J. C. Fell, of Ashton-under-Ljne, Lancashue, 
Machinist, for impiovements in spinning machinery. 
Dated December 11, 1880. 

„ 5,262. A. Storer — a communication from L. BoUmann and 
J. Bollman, both of Penzing, Austria, for improve- 
ments in apparatus for overhead sewing. Dated 
December 14, 1880. 

PATENTS WHICH HAVE BECOME VOID :— 

No. 639. F. A. Fitton, of Manchester, Spindle and Flyer Maker, 
tor improvements in spindles and flyers Ubed in 
machines for preparing, spinning and duubliuc 
Dated February 15, 1878. " 



No. 716. T. Bayliss, J. Thomas, J. Slaughter, and J. Elliott, all 
of Coventry, Warwickshire, for certain improve- 
ments in bicycles and other manumotive machines. 
Dated Febiu'ry 21, 1878. 

„ 758. H. and C. IK. Williams, both of Ashton-under-Lyne,. 
Lancash're, lor impiovements in heald knitting 
machines. Dated Febiuary 23, 1878. 

„ 7 75. P. A. Kautz. Engineer, of Hamburg, Germany, foe 
improvements in sewing machines. Dated Feb- 
ruary 25, 1878. 

„ 860. Q. D. Scott, of Derby, and G. H. Phillott. of Chelten- 
ham, Glouce.'-ter.ihire, for imprC'vements in veloci- 
pedes, especially applicable to that description of 
velociped) s known as bicycles. Dated March 2, 
1878. 

,. 602. G. Griffiths, of Birmingham, for improvements in sew- 
ing machines, shuttles, and reels. Dated February 
18, 1874. 

„ 728. J. Hancock, of Nottingham, for improvements in the 
manufacture of kniited fabrics, and in machinery 
employed therein. Dated February 26, 1874. 

,, 795. N. Sa'.amou— a commiinica'ion from H. Lippman and 
W. Lind, both of Hamburg, Germany, for im- 
provements in pevviug machines, part of which 
improvements is applicable to the driving of other 
machinery. Dated March 4, 1874. 

Spbcikcationk Published DuKiNa thk Month. 



So. 2,088. 


„ 2,591 


„ 2,689 


,. 2,781. 


„ 2.859. 


„ 2,900. 


„ 3,000. 


„ 3,<il5. 


„ 3 061. 


„ 3.068. 


„ 3,102. 


„ 3,105. 


„ 3,109. 


„ 3.118. 


„ 3,158. 


„ 3,161. 


„ 3,194. 



Postage Id. each extra. 

T. McG/ah and W. Bown, automatic thread 

winders for sewing machines, &c. 
H. J. Lawson, velocipedes, &c. ... 
G. Leidman and C. Bei ger, velocipedes, &c. ... 

E. Taylor, driving and reversing gear for wash- 
ing, wringing, and mangling machines 

F. H. P. Engel, sewing machines 
T. Fletcher, sewing mai;hines 

H. J Haddan, circular knitting machines 
H. J. Haddan, machinery for spinning ... 
S. Chatwood, tvicycles, io. 

W. M. Lett, bicycles 

T. Williams, jun., apparatus for cutting and 

mincing sausage meat, &o. 
J. Bnnner, bicycles, tricjcles, &c. 
E. Clements, wringing machines 
H. J. H iddan, sewing machines ... 
H. H. Lake, knitting machines ... 
E. Wiseman, sewing machines ... 
W. Robinson, pianofortes .. 



s. d. 






6 





6 





6 





6 





6 





4 





6 





8 





2 





2 





6 





3 





6 





2 





2 





6 





2. 



Postage and Receipt Stamps. — The statement that Mr. 
Gladstone has recently promised to make one stamp do duty for 
postages and receipts has caused some correspondence in the 
daily papers with reference to the real originator of the idea, 
which is claimed fur an official in the Post Office depart- 
ment. This may be so ; but, practically, every collector of 
postage stamps (and there are many) knows that the 
interchangeable stamp has long been in use in soma 
of our West Indian Colonies, and that fiscal stamps have been 
occasionally used for postal purposes in India, Hong Kong, 
and Queensland. The same custom has prevailed for some 
time in South America (notably in Venezuela) and elsewhere. 
While the Government are about to study the public con- 
venience in allowing the use of the one stamp for both 
purposes, we suggest that they might with advantage withdraw 
the issue of separate stamps for telegrams. The inconvenience 
of having distinct stau.ps for payment of telegrams is 
even greater than that <if having a separate receipt stamp, 
since the latter is of uniform value, while the charges for 
telegrams are as various as those for letters. — Colonies and 
India. 

On the meeting of two friends the following colloquy 
ensued: — "Where have you been?" "To my tailor, and I 
had hard work making him accept a little money." "yott 
aatonidh me ! Why ?" " Because he wanted more." 



1 



40 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Apbil 1, 1881. 



CHARLES J. THURLOW, 



Ha 

h t-l 

: « 

03 




P. 
4:1 



o 

CO 
IS 

,d 
cS 
l-l 



39, CHESTER STREET, HULME, 

MANCHESTER 




SURREY MACHINIST COMPANY. 



Patent 
louWe Sec- 
tion Hollow 
Sims,18a.6d 
per pair. 




The 

Lightest 

and most 

rigid in the 

Market. 



The only machine made with a perfect 

SUSPENSION SPRING AND SADDLE. 

The Patent P.S.H.E. Eaccr is tlie lie-htcst mid most ripd machine in the world 

List and Photo 4 Stamps. Illustrated List of Bicjcle Fittings stamp. 

Special Terms to Shippers and Agents. 

ijOn^riDOisr. 



S8, SX,-A-CIC3^.A-n5r ST. 



INBTAEUBBFR BICYCLE and OAERIAGE TYRES of every description kept 
in stock, and supplied by return. Indiaruhber Air Saddles, 78. 6d.. post free 
All kinds of Bicycle requisites supplied in the rough or finish, llustrated Price 
List, 1 Stamp. Smith & Co., Indiaruljbcr Manufacturers, 87. Blackman-st., London 



WATSON & CO., 

OLDHAM, 

MANTJFACTUIIERS OF THE CELEBRATED 

Family and Medium IVIaciiine 

WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPROVEMENTS. 

ALSO MAJSrUFACTUBERS OP THE 

On the Wheeler and Wilson Principle. 
Special Terms to Merchants and Shippers, 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

ROLLER RINK SKATES, 

From 6/- per pair. 




G. E. WRIGHT, 

WHOLESALE 

AGENT FOR SEWING MACHINES 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



Sole Agent for the " Little Europa " Lock- 
stitch Sewing Machines, mid Royal 
Rink Roller Skates. 

No. 1, NEW BROAD STREET, 

LONDON, E.G. 



Lock- Stitch 



Sewing 



Machines from 27/- eiach. 



TO INVENTORS. GENERAL PATENT OFFICE 

Established 1830. 



F. REDFERN, 

(Successor to L. De Fontainemoreau If Co.), 
4, SOUTH STREET, FINSBXJBY, LONDONj 

ALSO AT 

:e>jl.:eix 3 j^istid b:b,tjs sexjS. 

Provisional Protection, £7; French Patent, £'!;■ Belgian, j68; 

German, ^610 lOs.j United States, £17 lOs. Designs and Tiadfi 

Marks Regi'stered. Circular gratis on application. 



Apbil 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 41 



THEOBALD'S HYDRAULIC SELF-ACTING WASHER, 

(PATENT). (RETAIL 10/6 EACH). 

This new Washer positively surpasses all otliers. It acts on an entirely new principle, doing away with all knocking about, pounding, 
squeezing, brushing or rubbing. The effect is simply marvellous, and must be seen to believed. j • i, k 

The Machine is simply stood in an ordinary copper or wash boiler, the clothes packed around it, the water made to boil, and it then, by 
a well-known hydraulic principle, rushes up the Machine and is sucked through the clothes at the rate of 8 to lo gallons per minute. Illustration 
and full particulars free. 

Agents wanted everywhere. Liberal discDunt and such terms that there is no risk whatever. 



PORTLAND HOUSE, 3, SOUTH STREET, GREENWICH, LONDON, S.E. 



TH ENTRY TRIUMPH " BICYCLES & TRICYCLES. 



WEST ORCHARD, COVENTRY, 

ESALE AND EXPORT MANUFACTURERS. 

"India 3 Bath Chair and Perambulator Wheels. Speciality Children's Bicycles and Tricycle 

actures for this Season cannot be surpassed. Price Lists on Application. 



TOWER WORKS, PIPER'S ROW, WOLVERHAMPTON, 

MANUFACTURERS OF THE '* EXPRESS" BICYCLE, 

AND 

BICYCLE FITTINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

"WHOHi ES J^LE J^lSriD ^(D:R "B2C"POK.T.A.TI0 2sr- 



PATENT SEWING MACHINES. 



The Celebrated "TAYLOR FRICTION" Improved... 

The ELS A HAND LOCK STITCH Machine 

The " COMMERCIAL" CHAIN STITCH formerly caUed 
"The Express" 

"TAYLOR'S PATENT," No. 3 (Treadle) 

The " COMMERCIAL FAMILY MACHINE" [$] 

The ditto Hand ditto 



NETT CASH, 
RETAIL. 


by the Half Doz. 
WHOLESALE. 


£4 14 6 


£2 


3 10 


1 17 


2 2 


17 6 


6 10 


3 


5 5 


2 15 


4 4 


2 



Mangles and Washing Machines at full Discount. Mothersill's Patent BICYCLES 
3373 per cent, oif List Prices. Lists of Prices free on application. 



R. IWOTHERSILL, 4a, Lawrence Lane, Cheapside. 

Sole Agent for England of Tucker and Avery's Anti-Friction Bicycle and Tricycle Bearings, 

operated entirely withont lxjbricants. 



42 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENALi OE DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Apbil 1, I8&1. 



THE"BISSCHOP"GASESyGINE. 

Piston and Valve need no Lvbi'icafor, TT III nfirrf at a vwment's notice. 

Power. Price. 

OneMan «25 

One-and-a-half Man 39 

TwoMan 86 » 

Four Man 50 






W 

< 

< 
P^ 
W 

O 




o 



> 

m 



> 

H 
W 
O 



J. E. H. ANDREW, 
18. Waterloo Road, STOCKPORT. 



CLOTHES WRINGER 

"^3 the leading Wringer of America. 





111 f«(^<f> 



cp 
H 



S3 



The best, the cheapest, the most substantial and 
simple wooden frame Clothes Wringer made. 

Enquiries and Orders to be addressed to the Sole European 
Representatives, 

JOHN R. WHITLEY & CO., 

7, POULTRY, LONDON, E.G.; 
8, PLACE VENDOME, PARIS. 



OILS. 



IMPEEIAL SEWING MACHINE, 

In 1 to 6" oz. Bottles. 
CRYSTAL SPEEM SEWING MACHINE, 

In 1 to 2 oz. Bottles. 
BICYCLE LUBRICATING, 

In bult or bottle to order. 
"SOLAR" BICYCLE LAMP OIL, 

lu 4 and 10 oz. Bottles. 
MACHINERY OILS, 

As consigned to us by the drum or barrel. 

SEWING MACHINE TRADE SUP- 
PLIES— 

OIL CANS, SCREW-DRIVERS, NEEDLES, 
RUBBERS, BELTS, FITTINGS and PARTS. 

DOMESTIC MACHINERY— 

In all its branches. 
SOLK AGENTS for the HAMILTON MANUFAC- 
TURING Co. Manufacturers of the "WALKER 

WASHER" and DOMINION WRINGER. 
IMPORTERS of AMERICAN KNITTING 

MACHINES,NOVELTIES, and HARDWARE. 
SOLE AGEN I S for the BICKFORD KNITTING 

MACHINE Co. 



Lists oe Samples on Application to 

. S. DAVILLE & CO., 

46, WOOD STREET, LIVERPOOL. 



WASHI NG-DAY R EFORM 

HARPER TWELVETREES' 

RENOWNED "VILLA" 

£2 loS,, OE WITH 

IVIANGLER & WRINGER, £5 5s., 

Does the! Fortnight's Family- 
Wash in Four Hours, Tvithout sub- 
BiNOr OK BOILING, as Certified by 
thousands of delighted purchaser* 
It is easy to -work, easily under 
stood, strongly made, duiuble, doe- 
not injme the clothes, but really 
saves them ; and is the only Wash- 
ing Machine in the world which 
renders Boiling unnecesaaiy, and 
saves five or six hours of coppers 
firing each washing day. The Five. 
Guinea "A''illa" Washer possesses- 
tremendous washing power, and 
■will waslx 15 dozen coUai-s and 
ladies' cufi's in five minutes ; 150 
pocket - handkerchiefs in Svq 
minutes ; 60 hotel table cloths in an 
hour; 10 dozen bedroom towels pcp 
hour ; 3 i dozen shiits per hour ; J i 
dozen sheets per horn-, and counter- 
panes, blankets, cuitains, &c., in 
proportion. Such success is un- 
paralleled! niustrated Pi-ospectuse* 
and Expoi-t Quotations postfreeof 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 

lArNIUiT EXGIKEEK AKD MACHINIST, 

80, FINSBUEY PAVEMENT, LONLON, E.G. 




MORE ACiBINiTS WAfslTED. 

Sole London Agent for Kenworthy's "Paragon' 
Washirg Machine. 



APBII 1. 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



43 



MR. PLATT'S PUBLICATIONS. 



LIFE— By JAMES PLATT. Author of 'Business,' 
* Money,' and * Morality.* 

LIFE — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp. Price One 
Shilling. Messrs. Simpkin, Marsliall & Co., St.itioners'-hall Court, 
Ix>ndon, B.C.; Messrs. W. H. Smiths Son's Railway Bookstalls; Messrs. Willing 
A Co.*3 Bookstalls ; and at every Booksellers. 

LIFE— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, W.C., 
will send a copy, post free, for It. 

T IFE— Contents :— 

T IFE — Introduction. Is Life Worth Living ? 

T IFE— Life of the Future, Culture, Health, 

T IFE — Kecreation, Common Sense, Thrift. 

T IFE — Compulsory Thrift, Man-iage, Happiness. 

T IFE — Eeligion, Future Life, Human Destiny. 

T IFE — Concluding Remarks. 

LIFE — Page 24 : — ** Make Life a grander thing. Prove 
to men what a glorious tiling it is to exist, how enjoyable life might be, how 
sweet life is, even as it is — aye, we never know how sweet until we fear we are about 
to lose it^ What a mockery * Faith in God ' is whefi we reflect upon the melancholy 
views the majority ot orthodox people have of it, going through the journey as au 
ordeal to be borne as ra.Menlly and submissively as possible, altogether misconceiving 
the noble sentiment, ' Not my will, but thine be done.' " 

LIFE — Page 34 : — " Life is real, life should be earnest. 
To be enjoyed, we must have an aim, an object in life ; and to be liajipy, to 
«Djoy life, the object must be one worthy the highest, purest, best part of our nature — 
men's cliaracter so strong and true that they can be relied up ; men tliat wear their 
lives out, not rust them out ; men who live to act, to produce what they consume. " 

LIFE— Page 45 : — " The more we think of life, the 
greater must be our reverence for the 'Great Unknown.* Life will be very 
different once we get the people to realise as an indisputable truth that there is never 
•nytJiing wroQg bat what lias been done by ourselves or others ; and that the wrong 
remains so long only as we refuse to put it right.' " 

LIFE — Page 102: — "Common sense denies that any 
happy chance will do for a man what he is quit« unable to do for himself. 
Oar happiness consists in the use of our faculties, and a faith that our wages will l>e 
in proportion to our deserts. Success and failure are not dealt out like prizes and 
blanks in a lottery, by chance and indiscriminately ; but there is a reason for every 
success and failure. Indolence, chicanery, waste will cause the one ; while industry, 
honesty and thrift will ensure the other.' " 

LIFE— Page 173 :— " The more you think of life, the 
more you know of the Creator's way of governing the universe, the more 
you know of your own constitution and the happiness within your reach, the less will 
you believe tliat God meant man to bo born weeping, to live complaining, and to die 
disappointed.' " 

LIFE— PAGE 192 :— "We have life. What shall we do 
with it ? The world is like a vast manufactory, in which we hear incessantly 
the clash and whirring of a complex machinery. Shall we try and get the bottom of 
this? Yes, undoubtedly, earnestly, and fearlessly. Boliovo nic you will thus get to 
learn that the law maker is behind his laws, and that, paradoxici.! as it may seem, 
while He hides himself behind them. He also reveals biniself through them. There 
is no better way of understanding the Creator; the law, are emanations of the all- 
beauteo'is mind ; Ihey shadow forth the divinity thai contrived them; we find the 
more we study them, greater evidence that there is a Living God, a Father caring for 
and loving His children." 



MORALITY — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 
One Shilling. 

]\/1 OEALITY— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 

^ ' t ioners'-hail Court, London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway 
BooksfciUs. 

]\/IORALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 

XtJL W.C, will send acopy post free fur One Shilling. 

MORALITY.— Page 202 : — " Make ,..-i feel we are under 
the rule of ' One above who sees all,* and whose laws are never infi-Ingcd with 
Impunity ; but that we have the power, if we but will so to do, to learn the wi:>he3, 
and be happy by reverently obeying Him." 

iVI OEALITY— Business— Money— Life. 

MORALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C., will sead copy of any one of these works post free for le. 



M 



/[ ONEY — 208 pages crown 8vo, cloth limp, price Ona- 

'1 Shilling. 

MONEY — Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Stationers'- 
hall C'lnrt, London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. rf. Smith & Son's Railway Boole- 
stalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls; and at every Bookseller's. 

MONEY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London> 
W.C,, will send a copy, post free, for Is. 

TV/r ONEY— Contents :— Preface, Money. 

A/l ONEY— The Origin of Money. What is Money ? 

ONEY — Cm-rency : Gold Money, Silver Money. 

ONEY — Bank Notes, Cheques, Bills of Exchange. , 

ONEY — Bank Shares, Banking, Exchange, Interest. 

ONEY— Wealth, Capital, Panics. 

ONEY — Individual Success, National Prosperity. 

ONEY — Concluding Remarks. 



M 

M 
M 
M 
M 

M 



MONEY.— Page 28:— *'It is only by understanding 
our monetary system that we can realise the power of 'credit.* Our com- 
mercial system is based upon feith ; cheques, bills, notes are mere bits of paper, and 
only promises to pay ; yet so great is the power of credit that transactions to the 
extent of over a hundred millions weekly are transactetl through the Cleat-ing-house. 
Gold is a mere pigmy, as a medium of exchange, to this giant ' paper,* based upon 
*credit.' Simply hy system and laiih, in conjunction with banking, this institution 
settles the exchanges, the buying and selling, to this enormous amunnt, without tUa 
aid of a single metallic coin — merely, by boolikeepiDg or transfer of cheques, th» 
debiting or crediting of A or B." 

BUSINESS— 208 pages, cro-wn 8vo, cloth Hmp, price 
One Shilling. 

BUSINESS— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tioners'-hall Court, London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway- 
Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls : and at every liookseller's. 

BUSINESS— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London,. 
W.C., will send a copy, post ft-e, for Is. 

"DUSINESS— Contents : Preface, Special Notice. 

BUSINESS — Business Qualities, Health, Education,. 
Observ.ation. 

BUSINESS- Industry, 
Punctuality. 



B 



Perseverance, Arrangement,. 
USINESS— Calculation, Prudence, Tact. 



"DUSINE SS— Truthfulness, Integrity. 



B 



U SINE SS— Money, and what to do with it. 



•nUSINESS— Bank Shares, Depression of Trade. 

BUSINESS— Free Trade and Reciprocity, Civil Service- 
Stores. 

13 USINESS — Co-o}ici;itive Trading, Conchtiling liemarks. 

BUSINESS. — Page 7 : — *' Commerce is guided by L-xws- 
as inflexible as those of health or graviiaiion ; and the primary cause ot 
failure in business may be Iraecd as unerrii;gly as the punishment that will surely 
foUuw the infiingonieut of any uiher law of riatui-e." 

BUSINESS.— Page 179— " From evei-y pulpit nnd in 
every school tliroughrut the kingdom the ju'-iiiiialion of double dealing ;irid 
trieUery upon the plea that it i.s imi-ossilite to get a living honestly by trade, or in any 
vocation, should be dtii'Vinecd in the most unn.istakcuble language as a libel on 
Providence, and tlie failure to sncceed be attributed to its real cause — the man's 
ignorance of or incapacity for the business or piol'ession he follows." 



44 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



April 1, 1881. 



ii 



THE PATENT 

>€OLUS" BALL BEA 



AEE 



TTN-IVEBSALLT 

ADJUSTABLE, 

DUST PROOF, 

DURABLE, 












o 
(A 




AND 

REQUIRE 

BUT SLIGHT 

LUBRICATION. 



EXEVAT'ON. 



FEONT VLEW- 



BACK WHEEL BEARINGS. 



See 

Testimonals 

and 

Reviews. 




See 

Testimonials 

and 

Reviews. 



EIBVATION. 



As a Proof of their Superiority over all others, 

Mr. H. L. CORTIS, Amateur Champion, 

Won the 25 and 50 MILES AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP EAOES on a Bicycle fitted with "^olus " Bearings, 
BEATING EECOED TIME, and in a Five Mile Eace BEATING EECOED TIME in Three, Four, and Five Miles. 



In the SIX DATS' EACE at LONDON, April last, rode the Unprecedented Distance of 220 MILES and some odd 
laps without di^muun.ing from the Bicycle or once Oiling the Bearings. 



SOLE PROPRIETOR AND MAKER 



AVILLIAM BOAVN, 

308, SUMMER LANE, BIRMINGHAM, 



ALSO MANUFACTUEEE OF 



Best Steel Balls, Bicycle Fittings, and Kequisites of every 
description and General Stamping in Iron and Steel. 

N.B. Considerable reduction in price of the " ^olus " Bearing-s this Season. 



Printed for the Proprietors, and Published by them at 11, Ave Maria Lane, in the City of London. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE 

AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 

APRIL 1ST 1881. 




NEW ARM 1VL\CHINE , 

made bv tlie 

SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

ChiefOffice. 39, Foster Lane, LONDON, e.g. 



o^-vf;? rf ComaemTf^/i/i 



.6. //TTlsTmNfTY U.£.C. 



f 



The Household Washing, Wringing, 
and Mangling Machines. 



60,000 SOLD IN THREE YEARS. 
GARVIE & Co.. 

5, New St., Bishopsgate St., E.G. 




Vol. IX. No. 126. 



MAY 1. 1881. 



Price, with Supplement, 4d. 



DUNBAR, MCMASTER & CO., 

"^ GILFORD, IRELAND, 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Linen Threads. 

{lEL^'^^ri/M// Highest Medals were awarded Dunbar & Go's Threads wherever exhibited 

FOR HAND OR MACHINE SEWING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

SUITABLE FOR ALL PURPOSES, SHOES, SOLE SEWING, TAILORS, fic. 

DUNBAR AND CO.'S THREADS ARE THE BEST. 

Samples and Prices on Application. 




PATENTED IN THE UNITED STATES 
AND THROUGHOUT EUEOPE. 



THE JEBERLING RUNNING STITOH SEWING MACHINE. 

] THE NEW MACHINE 

FOR 

GAUGING, GATHERING, AND TUCKING, 

INDISPENSABLE TO 

Dressmakers, Mi/liners, Costume, Mantle, 
and Underclothing Manufacturers, &c. 




__ SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE PAMPHLETS TO 

"AGENTS WANTED." 

THE HEBERLING SEWING MACHINE CO., 46, CANNON STREET, LONDON, E.C. 



THE SEWIKG MACHrNE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Page. 
KovELTiES IN Domestic Appliances : — 

The Royal Pneumatic Fire Engine 19 

The Biconic Knife Cleaner 19 

The Save-All Cinder Sifter 19 

Steil's B' ot Cleaning Machine 20 

The Duplex Gas Stove 20 

The Rex Knife Cleaner 20 

Fielding's Gas Fire Lighter 21 

The Ascension Table Filter 21 

The Otto Bicycle 22 

Electricity for Domestic Purposes 22 

Improvements in Washing Machines 22 

The Altona Exhibition 22 

The Howe Machine Co.'s Works 23 

Trade Name Nihilism 24 

The Howe Tricycle 25 

The Canvasser's Dream 26 

Patents 27 

Leaders 28 

The Heberling Running-Stitch Machine 29 

Law 30 

Gazette 31 

The Drummer 31 

Prokter's Door Mat 32 

The Zeromotor 32 

Invention of the Stocking Loom 33 

Tricycling by Steam 33 

Boot Cleaning Machinery 34 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

Bicycle and Tricyle Manufacturers: 

Devey, Joseph & Co 41 

Harrington & Co 38 

Hillman, Herbert & Cooper 16 

Nelson, Wright & Co 43 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 30 

Surrey Machinists Co 40 

Warraan, Laxon & Co 41 

Bicycle Bearings and Fittings Manufacturers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 10 

Bown, W 44 

Devey, Joseph & Co 38 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 30 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Bicycle Saddle and Bag Manufacturers : 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 35 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Boot Machinery Manufacturers: 

Blake and Goodyear Company 11 

Howe Machine Co., Limited 8 

Button Hole Machines : 

American B.H.O. and Sewing Machine Company 

Fork Cleaning Machine : 

Hutchinson 8c Co 



Gas Engine Makers .• 
Andrew, J. E. H. . . , 
Crossley Brothers . . . 



27 



Kilting Machine Manufacturers : 

Holroyd, J 9 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Co 18 

Daville & Co 17 

Sewing Cotton Manufacturers : 

Carlile &Co 16 

Evans, W.ilter & Co 14 

Raworth, John T i 

Sewing Machine Attachment Makers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 13 

Bown, W 9 

DaviUe, R. S. & Co 37 

Manasse, Max 40 

Sewing Machine Manufacturers : 

Gritzner & Co 7 

Holroyd, J 9 

Howe Machine Company, Limited 8 

Junker & Ruh 11 

Mothersill, R 9 

Raymond & Co. (P. Frank) 8 

Rennick, Kemsley & Co 28 

Singer Manufacturing Company 4, 5 

Thurlow, Charles , 40 

W^anzer Sewing JIachine Company, Limited j8 

Watson & Co 40 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co ,..,.,, 3 

White Sewing Machine Company 6 

Wright, G. E 40 

Sewing Machine and Bicycle Oil Makers: 

Bishop's Cluster Company 10 

DaviDe & Co 17 

Sewing Machine Needles : 

The Park Wood Mills Company , , 10 

Sewing Thread Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 16 

Dunbar, McMaster, & Co ^ 

Finlayson, Bousfield & Co 44 

Teade Protection Societies : 

Stubbs' Mercantile Offices 13 

Washing Machine Manufacturers : 

Da\'ille & Co 17 

Garrie and Co i 

Holmes, Pearson, & Midgley 11 

Twelvetrees, Harper 12& 17 

Theobald, E 12 

Wolstencroft & Co 16 

Whitley & Co 17 

Taylor & Wilson 10 

Taylor, F. D 12 

SCALE OF CHARGES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS. 

One Page £4- 

Half „ 

One Third Page 1 

Quarter „ 



One Sixth 
One Eighth 



14, 





per 


insertion 


2 2 







>> 


1 8 







tj 


1 2 







» 


15 







» 


12 







9> 



THE AEISTON OIL COMPANY, 

15, KIRBY STREET, HATTON GARDEN, LONDON, E.G. 
MAKERS OP SPECIAL SEWING MACHINE AND BICYCLE OILS. 

Wholesale and for Export. 



Mat 1. 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 




THE 

ONLY 
"GRAND 
PRIZE" 

FOR 

SEWING 
MACHINES 

AT THE LATE 

PARIS EXHIBITION. 




WHEELER AND WILSON'S 

NEW ROTARY-HOOK LOCK-STITCH 

SEWING MACHINES, 

Light, Medium, or Powerful, from ^5 5s. 

The New-Straight Needle Machines, for which the "GEAISTD PEIZE" was awarded, are the 

No. 8.— The New Family and Light Manufacturing Machine. Stronglj recommended Price £7 lOs. 

Uo. 6. — A Powerful Machine, capable of doing all grades of work, from the finest to the 
thickest, in the best possible manner, including all the various kinds of Leather work , 
Also No. 6 Cylinder Machine for special classes of Boot work , 

No. 7. — Similar to the No. 6 Machine, but especially suitable for Corset work, heavy Tailoring, 
Upholstery, &c , 

The Well-known Original Family and Light Manufacturing Machines. 

Nos. 1 & 2 Prices, £6 10s., £7 10s. 

The New No. 8 Hand Machine, specially recommended. 

Is the best and most perfect Haad Machine yet produced, and combines the utmost efBciency 
with elegance of appearance, rendering it suitable to the lady's boudoir or for travelling. 

Price, WITH COVER, complete, £5 5s. 

MACHINE ON HIRE WITH OPTION OF PURCHASE. 



£8 10s. 
£10. 

£8 10s. 



EVERY MACHINE MADE BY WHEELER AND WILSON HAS THEIR TRADE MARK AFFIXED. 

Illustrated Catalogues and other particulars, Post Free. 



THE WHEELER & WILSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 



L»ndon, Chief Office, 21, Queen 

Victoria Street, E.G. 
London, 139, Regent Street, W. 

49, Newington Causeway, b.Ji. 
Liverpool, 61, Bold Street. 
Birmingham, Stephenson Place. 
Bright(i«, 163, North Street. 
Bristol, 50, Victoria Street. 



Bath, 28, Walcot Street. 
Plymouth, 187, Union Street. 
Cardiff, 17, St. Mary Street. 
Nottingham, 16, Lister Gate. 
Newcastle, West Grainger Street. 
Middleshorough, 55, Newport 

Koad. 
Hull, 9, Sa?ile Street. 



Manchester. 131, Market Street. 
Leeds, 41, Commercial Street. 
Sheffield, 12C, Barker's Pool. 
York, 27, Coney Street. 
Bradford, 57, Tyrrel Street. 
Edinljurgh, 7, Frederick Street. 
Glasgow, 71, Union Street. 
Dublin, 1, Stephen's Green. 



Belfast, 63, High Street. 
Cork, .32, Grand Parade. 
Norwich, 45, London Street. 
Exeter, London Inn Square. 
Torquay, 115, Union Street. 
Taunton, 2, High Street. 
Stroud, 1, John Street, 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES, 



Mat 1, 1861. 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

The largest Sewing Machine Manufacturers in the World. 

Upwards of 538,609 of these CELEBRATED MACHINES were Sold in the year i88o, being 

at the rate of over i,8oo for every working day. 

TEE GBEdT SALE affords most convincing proof of their popularity and value, and is attributable 

to the reputation obtained for 

Excellence of Manufacture, Strength and Beauty of Stitch; 

AND rOE THEIR 

Perfect Adaptability to every Class of Sewing. 



PRICE 



from 



£4 4s. 



FOR CASH 

from 

£4: Os. 

May be had on "Hire, with option 
of Purchase," by paying 

2/6 




No Household should 
be without one of the 

Family Machines, 
which are unequalled 

for all Domestic 

Sewing. So simple, a 

child can work them. 

MANUFACTTJBERS should see tli* 
lyianufaoturing ISXachines ! 

Are unsurpassed for the Factory or 
Workshop ! 



CAUTION! 

Beware of Imitations ! Attempts are made to palm them upon the unwary under the pretext 

of being on a " Singer Principle" or " System." 
To Avoid Deception buy only at the Offices of the Company. 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & Co.), 
Chief Counting-House in Europe-39, FOSTER LANE, E.G. 

323 Branch Offices in the XTnited Kingdom. 

LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 
195, Holloway Road, N., 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N., 

51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. 



147, Cheapside, E.G. 

132, Oxford Street, W. 

31 & 33, Newingtou Causeway, S.E. 

149, South (cark Park Eoad, S.E. 

S78, Clapham Eoad, S,W. 



144, Brompton Eoad, S.W. 
269, Commercial Eoad, E. 
174, Hackney Eoad, E. 
45, Broadway, Stratford, E. 
3, Ordnance Eow, Barking Eoad, 
Canning Towp, E, 



6, High Street, Woolwich. 

7, Kew Eoad, Eichmond, S.W. 

1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. 
131, South Street, Greenwich, S,E, 
4a, North End, Croydon, S,E. 



Mat 1, 188i THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 




THE SING 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & CO.), 

SING ER'S SEWING MACH INES. 

Chief Counting House in Europe ; 

39 FOSTER LANE, CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.C. 



LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 

147, Oheapside, B.C. ; 132, Oxford Street, W. ; 51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. ; 31 and 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. ; 149, Blue 
Anchor Road, Bennondeey, S.E (now 149, Southwark Park Road) ; 278, Clapham Road, S.W. ; 144, Brompton Road, S.W. ; 269, Commercial 
Road, E. (comer of Bedford Street) ; 174, Hackney Road, E. (opposite Weymouth Terrace) ; 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N. ; 
1, Surinam Terrace, Stratford, E. (between Swan and Bank) ; 1, Rathbone Street. Barking Road, Canning Town, E, • 7, Kew Road, 
Richmond, S.W. ; 1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. ; 131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. ; Croydon, -lii. North End. 



PROVINCIAL OFFICES; 



ENGLAND. 

(Vccrington, 9, Peel-street 
Mdershot, Victoria-road 
Mfreton, 68, King-street 
AsMord, 17, Marsh-street 
Ashton-u.-LjTie, 246. Stamfd-st. 
Aylecbury, Silver-street 
Bakewell, North Church -street. 
Banbury, Market Place 
Bamsley, Eldon-street 
Barrow- in -FumesH, 11, Dalbeitb- 

street 
Bath, 5, Quiet-street 
Batley, Commercial-street 
Bedford, 36, Midland-road 
Bicester, Sheep-street 
Bicprleswade^ Shortmead-street 
Bingley, Main-street, 
Birkenhead, 164, Grange-lane 
Birmingham, 93, New-street 
Bishop Auckland, 29, South-rd. 
Bishop Stortford, Wind Hill 
Blackburn, 54a, Church-street 
Blyth, "Woodbine-ter., 'Waterloo 
Bolton, 52, Newport-street 
Boston, 3J, Market-place 
Bradford, 38, Mechanics' fostit. 
Braintree, 7, Fairfield-road 
Brentwood, 3, Crown-street 
Brighton, 6, North. ,st,, Quadrant 
Bristol, 18 & 19, High-street 
Bromley (Ketit), 18, High-street 
Burnley, HO, St. James' -street 
Burton-on-Trent, 76, Guild-street 
Bury-St .-Edmunds, 78 , St . John-st. 
Cambridge, 17, Petty Cury 
Cunterbury, 6, High-street 
Carlisle, Lome-bldgs., Bank-st. 
Chatham, 342, High-street 
Cheadlc, High-street 
Chelmsford, High-street 
Cheltenham, 24, Pittville-street 
Chester, 68, Foregate-street 
Chesterfield, l,Corporation-bldgp, 
Chichester, 54, East-street 
Chorley, 50, Clifford-street 
Cleckheaton, 5, Crown-street 
Clitheroe, 39, "Wellgate 
Coalville, Station- street. 
Colchester, 32, St. Botolph-street 
Colne (Lanca.'shire), 8, Arcade 
Congleton, 7, Mill-street 
Coventry, 1 2, Fleet-street (oj 

Bablake Ohurch) 
Crewe, 87, Nantwich-road 
Darlingtoi], 10, Prebend-row 
bartford, 18^ High-strMt 



Deal, 124, Beach-street 
Denbigh, 36. Park-street 
Derby, 22, "Wardwick 
Dews'bury, Nelson-street (top of 

Daisy-hill) 
Doncaster, 23, Scot-lane 
Douglas (Isle of Man), 6, Strand- 
street 
Dover, 9, Priory-street 
Dovercourt, Harwich-road 
Dudley, 217, "Wolverhampton-st. 
Durham, 3, Neville-street 
Eastbourne, 46, Terminus-road 

(two doors from post office) 
■Rccles, 31, Church-street 
Exeter, 19, Queen street 
Folkestone, Market-place 
Gloucester, 116, "Westgate-street 
Grantham, 11, "WTiarf-road 
Gravesend, 20, New-road 
Grimsby, 57, Freema'.--jtre^t 
Guernsey, 17, Smith-street 
Guildford, 161. High-street 
Halstead, 53, High-street 
Hanley, 48, Piccadilly 
Harrogate, U, "Westmoreland-st. 
Hastings, 48, Robertson-street 
Heclanondwike,2, Market-street 
Hednesford, Station-street 
Hereford, 57, Commercial-street 
Hertford, Forden House, "Ware- 
road 
Hexham, 20, Market-place 
High "Wycombe, 123, Osford-rd. 
Hinckley, Castle-street 
Huddersfield, 8, New-street 
Hull, 61, "Whitefriargate 
Huntingdon, High-street 
Ilkeston, 75, Bath-street 
Ipswich, 19, Butter-market 
Jersey, 14a, New-street 
Keighley, 2, Market-place 
Kendall, 3, "Wildman-street 
Kiddenninster, Bull Ring 
Lancaster, 19, Brock-street (cor- 
ner of Penny-street) 
Leamington, 38. "Windsor-street 
Leed-s, 14, Boar-lane 
Leek, 27, Russell-street 
Leicester, 44, Granby-street 
Lewes, 164, High-street 
Liverpool, 21, Bold-street 
Longton (Staffs.), 12, Market-ter. 
Loughborou;rh, 44. Market-place 
Lowestoft, 123, High-street i 

Luton, 32, Park-street a 
Lynn, 9, Norfolk-street 
Mftid»toir, 8, King-st'^n 



Maldon, High-street | 

!105, Market-street, 
132, Cheetham-hill! 
438, Stretford-road 
Manningtree, Hit^h-street 
Mansfield, 32, Nottingham-street 
Market Drayton. Shropshirc-st. 
Market Harboro', Church-street 
Melton Mowbray, Victoria House,' 

Market-place 
Middlesboro', 59, Newport-road 
Morley, 4, Bradford-buildings, 

Chapel-hill 
Newark, 15, Kirkgate 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, 16, Grainger- 

street, W. 
Newcastle-under-Lyne, 34, Bridge- 
street 
Newport (Mon.), 28, High-street 
Newport(I ofWight), 91,PyIe-st. 
Newton Heath, 622, Oldham-road 
Northampton, 3, Market-square 
Northwich, 17, Witton-street 
Norwich, 55, London-street 
Nottingham, 20, "Wheeler gate 
Oldham, 70, Yorkshire-street 
Openshaw, 37, Ashton-old-road 
Ormskirk, 58, Aughton-street 
Oswestry, Bailey-street 
Otley, 34, Kirkgate 
Oxford, 3, New-road 
Penrith, 8, Castlegate 
Peterborough, 53, Narrow Bridge- 
street 
Plymouth, 3, Bank of England-pl. 
Pontefract, U, New Market-hall 
Portsea, 165, Queen-street 
Preston, 147, Friargate-street (op- 

posi^e Lune-street 
Ram.sgate, 31, West ClifE-road 
Rawtenstall, Bank -street 
Reading, 61, London-street 
Red Hill, High-street 

Retford, 3, Grove-street 
Bipley, Market-place 
Lipon, 1, Blossomgate 
Rochdale, 66, Yorkshire-street 
Romford, Market-place 
Rotherham, 109, Main-street' 
Rugby, Lawford-road 
Runcorn, Hiprh-street 
Ryde (Isleof Wight\ 78. Union-st, 
Saffron Walden. Church-street 
Salisbury, 56, Fish'^rvjn-street 

' Salford, 4. Cross-^ane. and 100, 

I Regent>-road 

I Scarborongh, 30, TTuntri.ss-row 



Scotholme, Basford-road 
Sheffield, 37, Fargate 
Shipley, 19, Kirkgate 
Shrewsbury, 4, Market-street 
Sittingborne, 64, High-street 
Southampton, 105, High-street 
Southend, Market-place 
Southport, 7, Union-street 
St. Helen's, 31, Market-place 
Stafford, 25, Gaol-road 
Stamford, Ironmonger-street 
South Stockton, 19, Mandale-road 
Stockport, 11, Bridge-street 
Stourbridge, 6'..Church-street 
Stratford-on-Avon, 19, W^od-st, 
Stroud, 7, George-street 
Swadlincote. Station c^reet 
Swindon, 52, Regent-street 
Taraworth. 54. Church-street 
Taunton, Bridge-street 
Torquay, 58, Fleet-^^treet 
Truro, 13, Victoria-place 
Tunbridge "Wells, Vale-road 
Tunstall, 119, High-street 
"Wakefield, 9, Kirkgate 
"Walsall, 2, Bridge-street 
"Warrington, 44, Horsemarket-st. 
"Watford, „Queen's-road 
Wednesbury, 67, Union-street 
"Wellington, Church-street 
West Bromwich, 5. New-street 
■Whitehaven. 70, King-street 
"Wignn, 21, King-street 
Winchester, 27, St. Thomas-street' 
Windsor. 64a, Peascod-street 
Winsford, Over-lane 
Wii-ksworth, North-end 
"Wisbeach, 51. Market-place 
"Wolverhampton, Queen-street 
"Worcester, 2, ^t. Nicholas-street 
"Wrexham, 7, Charles- street 
Yarmouth, Broad-Row 
York, 24, Coney-street 

WALES. 

Abergavenny, 19, Market-street 
Aberystwith, Market-hall 
Builth, High-.-treet 
Cardiff, 5, Queen-strewt 
Carmarthen, 7, Lammas-street 
Carnarvon, 5, Bridge-street 
Dol-elly, Market-hall 
Merlliyr, 1. Victoria-street 
Ni.'Wltiwii, Market-hall 
Poutvpool. Market-hall 
Pontypridd, Market-hall 
Swansea, 103, Oxford-street 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, 225, Union-street 
Arbroath, 159, High-street 
Ayr, 60. High-street 
Banff, 17, Strait-path 
Cupar-Fife, 61, Crossgate 
Dumbarton, 67, High-street 
Dumfries, 127, High-street 
Dundee, 128, Nethergate 
Dunfermline, 87, High-street 
Edinburgh, 74, Princes-street 
Elgin, 215, High-street 
Forfar, 28, Castle-street f 
Galashiels, 62, High-street 
Glasgow, 89, Union-street 
Greenock, 8. West Blackhall-it. 
Hamilton, 32, Cadzow-street 
Hawick, 3, Tower-knowe 
Inverness, 14, Union-street 
Kilmarnock, 83, King-stree* 
Kirkcaldy, 69, High-'^^reet 
Kirkwall (Orkney), Broad-street 
JInntrose, 96. Murray-street 
Pai.-;lcy, 101, High-street-cross 
Partiok, 97, Dumbarton-road 
Perth, 64, St. John-street 
Peterhead, Bose-street 
Stirling, 61, Murray-place 
Tain, Lamington-street 
Thurso, Princes-street 

IRELAND. 

Armagh, 2, Ogle-street 

Athlone, Church-street 

Ballina, Bridge-street 

Ballymena, 67 and 68, Church-st. 

Belfast, 3 and 4, Donegal-sq., N. 

Carlow, TuUow-street 

Coleraine, New-row 

Cork, 79, Grand-parade 

Drogheda, 97, St. Qeorge's-streel 

Dublin, 69, Grafton-street 

Ennis, Jail-street 

Enniskillen. 15, High-street 

Fermoy, 1, King-street 

Galway, Domnick- street 

Kilrusn. Moorc-street 
I Kingstown, 65i Lower Creorge-** 
I Limerick, 31, Patriek-stre^rt 
I Londonderry, 1, Carlisle-road 

MuUiugar, Greville-street 
I Navan, Trimgate-strcet 
I Newry. 18, Sugar-island 
I Par.'Jonstown, 2, St^fflns 

Quccnstown, Harbour-row 

Sligo, 45, Knox-street 

Tralee. 40, Bridge-street 

"Waterford, 124, Quay 

"Wexford, Sel&kar-etz'eeta 



THE SEWiNG machine GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE WHITE SEWIHIi MACHIN E COMPANV. 

MANUFACTORY : 

Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. 

PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN OFFICE : 

19, QUEEN VICTORIA ST., L ONDON, E.G. 

Manufacturers of the justly Celebrated 

WHITE SEWmG MACHINES, 

. THE POPULAR FAVORITES FOR NOISELESSNESS AND EASY 

TREADLE MOVEMENT. 

SUPERLATIVE 




Machines for I ji^ I Every machine 
all work. ii> Warranted for 

12 various riiTr-pT-n 5 years. Legal 
styles. llUmill guarantee. 

AHRIBUTES. 

IT IS THE FINEST FINISHED AND 

BEST MADE MACHINE IN THE 

WORLD. 

IT IS THE EASIEST-SELLINO AND 

BEST- SATISFYING MACHINE 

EVER PRODUCED. 



The Peerless Hand 
Machine. 




llgilBi^uSSW'^'-, 



Cheapest and Best in the Market. 
Warranted for 3 years. 

LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGENTS. 



All Sewing- Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this — the latest Improved and Best 
Silent Lock-Stitch Shuttle Sewing Machine— or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &c., to 



WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

19, Queen Victoria Street, Loudon, E,C. 



irvr i, 1881. 



THE SEmNa MA.CH1NE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLlAiTCES, 




At DURLACHj 



Factory of Sewing Machines and Sewing Machine Cabinets. 



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Withdrawn, 



TO SEJ'VSriITa- j^A.A.OH:i:N"E IDE^LEi^S. 



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05- PATENTED IN ENGLAND AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 

Delivered with complete treadle movement free iu London at prices but little above those 
for usual iron stands with table and cover. 

Without or with our machines, either plain stjle or inlai.l in mother of- 

pe;irl, and highly ornamented in hard painting by special 

artists. All ma' hints with loose wheel 

ud self-acting winder. 



('ABim 



0ASE,WIJH 



Furnished 

for all systems of machines. 

Very useful. More solid than iron stands. 

Honourable mention and highest rewards at numerous Exhibitions. 

Novel ! 
Cheap! 
Solid ! 

Elegant! 

SECOND 
IIIGHESl 

Medal 

AT THE LATE 

Sydney 

International 

EXHIBITION 

1879. 



!!^fision 





iiolesale Agentswantedthroughout the United Kingdom. 



THE SEWING ifiACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES; 



Mat 1, i88l. 



CANADIAN SEWING MACHINES. 




£2 2s. Complete. 



'• This Machine has obtained the highest re- 
patation and an enormous sale, both under 
its true name ("Raymond's"), and also as 
the "Weir 55s. Machine," &c. — (See caution 
bslow). It is durable, rapid, exceedingly 
simple, neat, not liable to get out of order, and warranted 
to sew from the finest muslin to the heaviest material. 

CAUTION. — James G. Weir, who, for about eight 
years obtained these genuine Machines, is no longer sup- 
plied with them by the Inventor and Manufacturer, Mr. 
Charles Raymond. 



BEWARE OF ALL COtTNTERFEITS. 




ALSO 



£4 4s. Complete. 

RAYMOND'S PATENT " Household " 
Lockstitch Machine has been designed ex- 
pressly for family use. It is exceedingly 
simple to learn and to manage, and warranted 
to sew every kind of family and household 
work Is fitted with the latest improve- 
ments — loose wheel, and ^Registered) 
Automatic Bobbin Winder, 

Testimonials, Prospectuses, Samples of 
Work, and all particulars free on application 



Raymond's No. 1 and 2 TREADLE MACHINES for Families, Dressmakers, and Manufacturers 



A-O-ElsTTS -V^-A-itTTED. 



CHIEF DEPOT FOR EUROPE AND EXPORT: 

11, MOUNT PLEASANT, LIVERPOOL 

p. FRANK, AGENT. ESTABLISHED 1863. 

THE ELIAS HOWE SEWING MACHINES 




MANUFACTURED BY 



The Howe Machine Company, 

EXPEESSLY FOE BOOT & SHOE MAKEES, 

FOR 

SADDLE AND HARNESS MAKERS, 

AND FOR 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Leather Goods, 

ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED POR THE CLOSING OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF BOOT TOPS. 



Flowering Machine (witli patent vibrating attachment.) 

A SPECIAL MACHINE FOR ELAST ICS. 

Branch Offices and Agencies in every Town in the United 

Kingdom. 

Price Lists and Samples oj tror/c FREE on application. 

EASY TERMS OF PlTr CHASE. 



The Howe Machine Company, Limited^ 

46 & 48, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDON. 



May 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



HOLROYD'S NEW PATENT 

KILTING MACHINE 

Sells at sight, and is acknowledged by the Trade in England and Abroad to be the best for all 
purposes, upwards of 8,000 having been sold in two years, and the still increasing demand 

testifies to its unequalled excellence. 

THIS Machine, by its simplicity and construction, will at once commend itself to 
Merchants and Manufacturers, and will supply that which has long been 
wanted, namely, a good, practical, and durable Machine at a reasonable price. 

It can be worked by hand, treadle, or steam power, and heated by gas or irons as 
desired ; and it runs so light that it can be worked by hand for any length of time 
without the shghtest fatigue. 

It will make any kind of kilt desired, from the narrowest to an inch wide, and any 
depth up to ten inches, and can be altered to different styles and widths immediately, 
and in a most simple manner. 

It is specially adapted for manufacturing and dress-making purposes, and by its 
lightness, rapidity, and correctness, together with the fact that it will work muslin, 
thick cloth, or felt with equal faciUty, it cannot faU to be a great saving, and of the 
greatest advantage. 

With the gas arrangement perfect combustion is secured, thereby avoiding any 
smoke or smell which is so unpleasant in most other machines, and being nickel 
plated all over does not rust. 

Price, complete with gas arrangements and 4 heating irons, £3 3s. 

ELECTRO-PLATNIG BY STEAM POWER, AND DYNAMO ELECTRIC MACHINES, 

Combining all the latest improvements in GILiDING, BRONZING, &c., on rough or smooth surfaces, on any kind of metal goods. 

Special Terms offered to Manufacturers of articles suitable for plating. 




J. HOLROYD, Tomlinson St., Hulme, Manchester. 



PATENT SEWING MACHINES. 



NETT CASH, by the Half Doz. 

RETAIL. WHOLESALE. 



The Celebrated "TAYLOR FRICTION" Improved... 

The ELS A HAND LOCK STITCH Machine 

The " COMMERCIAL" CHAIN STITCH formerly called 
"The Express" 

"TAYLOR'S PATENT," No. 3 (Treadle) 

The " COMMERCIAL FAMILY MACHINE' 

The ditto Hand ditto 



[S] 



£4 14 


6 


£2 





3 10 





1 7 


6 


2 2 





17 


6 


610 





3 





5 5 





2 15 





4 4 





2 






Mangles and Washing Machines at full Discount. Mothersill's Patent BICYCLES 
3373 per cent, off List Prices. Lists of Prices free on application. 



R. MOTHERSILL, 4a, Lawrence Lane, Cheapside. 

Sole Agent for England of Tucker and Avery's Anti-Friction Bicycle and Tricycle Bearings, 

operated entirely without lubricants. 



10 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Mat 1, 1881. 



Sydney Exhibition. 



PRIZE 
MEDAL 




AWARDS 
i88o. 



TAYLOR AND WILSON'S 



"HOME" WASHER 
"DOLLY" WASHER - 
WRINGING MACHINE 



FIRST PRIZE 

SECOND PRIZE 

FIRST PRIZE 




h-^-^i 





Price, £6:6:0. 




Price. £3 : 10 : 0. 




Price, £3:5:0. 



Awarded upwards of 150 Gold and Silver Medals and First Prizes. 

THE ANNUAL &ALES EXCEED THOSE OF ANY OTHER WASHING MACHINE. 



Our Goods are all guaranteed to be made from tlie best materials, tborougUy seasoned, and are all fitted with oiu 
well-known patents and appliances, wliicJi cannot be supplied by any other maker. 



Illustrated Catalogue free on application to 



TAYLOR & M^ILSON, 

Atlas Works, Clayton-le-Moors, Accring'ton. 



Mat 1, 1S81. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JODENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



11 



TBiDG 



MARK 




ANNUAL PRODUCTION, 
30,000 MACHINES. 



TRADE 



MABK 



PROPER IRION FOUNDRY. 

FIRST PRIZES AT DIFFERENT EXHIBITIONS. 



ORIGINAL RHENANIA, 

Dnkivalled Splendid 
HAND 

SEWING 
MACHINE. 

ORIGINAL FIDELITAS, 

Best Family 

SEWING 
MACHINE. 





SYSTEM, 
GROVER& BAKER 

No. 19. 

Sewing 
Machine 

FOR TRADE, 

ORIGINAL BADENIA, 
HEAVY STRONG 

SEWING 
MACHINES 

FOR TRADE. 



TBADE 



maek 




JUNKER & RUH, 

Se^wing Machine Manufactory, 

CARLSRUHB (Germany). 



TEADE 




MAEK 




HOLMES, PEARSON, & MIDGLEY, 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



ir .^ ^mSSi 



Washing, Wringing, and Mangling Machines, 

FRUn DRESSER, SUGAR CUTTER, CHAFF CUTTER, 

Morticing Machines and Circular Saw Benches 

MANUFACTORY : 

ROYAL IRON WORKS, 



Price List on ApplicciMon. 

SPECIAL TERMS TO MERCHANTS AND THE TRADE. 

ALL GOODS CAREFULLY PACKED IN SMALL SPACE FOR EXPORT. 



THE ROYAL WASHER, strong and simple in construction. An ornament to every home, and the delight of everv wife. 
Price, 22 inches £5 lOs., ^Rollers with Brass Cape. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, i881. 



Harper Twelvetrees' "Fountain" Washer 

RETAIL PRICE, 10s. 6d. 

Is entirely SELF-ACTING ; no rubbing, labour, or attention required ; no handles, wheels, pounders, or brushes. A current of boiling suds is 
passed through and through the clothes, which are thus washed and beautifully bleached at the same time ; the result is really astonishing. Hundreds 
of thousands of busy mothers require this wonderful labour-saving Machine. Full Particulars and Wholesale Price to Agents on application to 

HAEPEE TWELYETEEES, 

Patentee and Manufacturer, 80, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.G. 

HAEPEH TWELVETRSSS' 

INDIA-RUBBER CLOTHES - WRINGERS, 

WITH COG-WHEELS, 

ttrong Frames, Metal Bearings, Adjustable Claspers, and other great improvements, have 
maintained their supremacy for eighteen years as the "Gem of Clothes-Wringers." They 
TV ill fit tubs of every shape, and wring the largest as well as the smallest articles dry 
inslantly vrithout labour, dropping them into the basket nearly dry enough to ii'on or 
mangle. These well-known and much-prized Clothes-Wringers arc specially adapted for 
the heavy, constant work of laundresses, and are immensely superior to the slightly-made 
delicate American Importations. 

Prices: 30s., 40s., 50s., or witliout Cogwheels, 25s., 30s., 35s. 

Harper Twelvetrees' Cheap Fifty-Shilling Mangle and Wringer, 24-inch R?llers. 

Harper Twelvetrees' Magic Prize Washing Machine, 21s. 

Wholesale Quotations, Post free, from 

HARPER TWELYETREES, 

Laundry Machinist, 

Works: Burdett Road, Bow, E. 




80, Finsbury Pavement, London, E.G. 



THEOBALD'S HYDRAULIC SELF-ACTING WASHER, 

(PATENT) (RETAIL 10/6 EACH). 

This new Washer positively surpasses all olh rs. It acts on an entirely new principle, doing away with all knocking about, pounding, 
squeezing, brushing or rubbing. The effect is simply maivellous, and must be seen to believed. 

The Machine is simply stood in an ordinary ccppcr or wash boiler, the clothes packed around it, the water made to boU, and it then, by 
a well-known hydraulic principle, rushes up tlie jNtocliine a. id is sucked through the clothes at the rate of 8 to 10 gallons per minute. Illustration 
and full particulars free. 

Agents wanted everywhere. Liberal discount and such terms that there is no risk whatever. 



PORTLAND HOUSE, 3, SOUTH STREET, GREENWICH, LONDON, S.E. 




'i^y^yj^^iffs^c fr//M 



MAGIO STEAM LAUNDRY WASHER 



SECURED BY 
EOYAL 




LETTERS 
PATENT. 



The cheapest and most economical Washer introduced, avoiding all the wear of linen 
caused by present modes. , Things to be washed only require to be soaked, soaped, steamed, and 
hand-rubbed once, 

No use of chemicals, soda, dollies, maids, wash-boards ; no turning or pushing machine 
handles ; only one-half the soap used. See opinion of JESSE OvERTON, Springfield Laundry, 
Leammgton, in Queen of 17th of .Tuly, page G8 : — "The steam softens, and the condensed water 
carries away grease and stickiness, just as a belt of perspiration does off a dirty forehead." 
COLOUK OP WASHING DECIDEDLY IMPROVED. 

I\^AGIC LAUS^DRY WASHER COMPANY, 

214, Lichfield Road, Aston, Birmingham. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWIVG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



13 



R. PLATT'S PUBLICATIONS. 



LIFE— By JAIIES PLATT. Author of 'Business,' 
' Money,' and 'Morality.' 

LIFE — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp. Price One 
Shilling-. Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., StationerS'-hall Court, 
London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway Bookstalls ? Messrs. Willmg 
& Co.'s Bookstalls ; and at every Booksellers. 

LIFE— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, W.C, 
will send a copy, post fi-ee, for 13. 

T IFE— Contents :— 

T IFE — Introduction. Is Life Worth Living ? 

T IFE— Life of the Futui-e, Ciiltui-e, Health. 

T IFE — Eecreation, Common Sense, Thrift, 

T IFE — Compulsory Thrift, Mamage, Happiness. 

T IFE — Eeligion, Future Life, Human Destiny. 

T IFE — Concluding Eemarks. 

LIFE — Page 24 : — '* Make Life a grander thing. Prove 
to men what a glorious thing it is to exist, how enjoyable life might be, how 
sweet life is, even as it is — aye, we never know how sweet until we fear we are about 
to lose it. What a mockeiy ' Faith in God ' is when we reflect upon the melancholy 
views the majority of orthodox people have of it, going through the journey as an 
ordeal to be borne as patiently and submissively as possible, altogether misconceiving 
the noble sentiment, ' Not my will, but tliine be done.' '* 

LIFE — Page 34 : — " Life is real, Hfe should be earnest. 
To be enjoyed, we must have an aim, an object in life ; and to be happy, to 
enjoy life, the object must be ene worthy the highest, purest, best part of our nature — 
men's character so strong and true that they can be relied up ; men that wear their 
lives out, not rust them out ; men who live to act, to produce what they consume. " 

LIFE— Page 45:— "The more we think of life, the 
greater must be our reverence for the ' Great Unknown.' Life will be very 
different once we get the people to realise as an indisputable truth that there is never 
anything wrong but what lias been done by oui-selves or others ; and _that the wrong 
remains so long only as we refuse to put it riglit.' " 

LIFE — Page 102 : — ** Common sense denies that any 
happy chance will do for a man what he is quite unable to do for himself. 
Our happiness consists in the use of our faculties, and a faith that our wages will be 
in proportion to our deserts. Success and failure are not dealt out like prizes and 
blanks in a lotte^-y, by chance and indiscriminately ; but there is a reason for every 
success and failure. Indolence, chicaneiy, waste will cause the one ; while industry, 
honesty and thrift will ensure the other.' " 

LIFE— Page 173 :— " The more you think of life, the 
more you know of the Creator's way of governing the universe, the more 
you know of your own constitution and the happiness within your reach, the less will 
you believe that God meant man to be born weeping, to live complaining, and to die 
disappointed.' " 

LIFE— PAGE 192 :— "We have life. What shall we do 
with it ! The world is like a vast manufactory. In which we hear incessantly 
the clash and whirring of a complex machinery. Shall we try and get the bottom of 
this? Yes, undoubtedly, earnestly, and fearlessly. Believe me you will thus get to 
learn that the law maker is behind his laws, and that, paradoxical as it may seem, 
■while He hides himself behind them. He also reveals himself through them. There 
Is no better way of understanding the Creator ; the laws are emanations of the all- 
beauteous mind ; they shadow forth the divinity that contrived them; we find the 
more we study thera, greater evidence that there is a Living God, a Father caring for 
and loving His children." 

MOEALITY — 208 pages, crown Bvo, cloth limp, price 
One Shilling. 

MOEALITY— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tioners'-hall Court, London, E.G.; Messrs. W, H. Smith & Son's Railway 
Bookstalls. 

MOEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy post free for One Shilling. 

MOEALITY.— Page 202 :— *' Make aS feel we are under 
the rule of ' One above who sees all,' and whose laws are never infringed with 
Impunity ; but that we have the power, if we but will so to do, to learn the wi&hc;^, 
and be happy by reverently obeying Him." 

jYI OEALITY—Busmess— Money— Life. 

MOEALITY— Ml-. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, Loudon, 
W.C, trill send copy of anjr one of these works post free for U. 



ONEY — 208 pages crown 8vo, cloth limp, price One 

Shilling. 

ONEY — Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Stationers'- 

hall Cnurt, London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway Book- 
stalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls; and at every Bookseller's. 

ONEY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 

W.C., will send a copy, post free, for is. 



M 
M 

stalls ; 

M 

lyr ONEY— Contents :— Preface, Money. 

TV/r ONEY— The Origin of Money. What is Money ? 

"|\/r ONEY— Currency : Gold Money, Silver Money. 

lyj ONEY— Bank Notes, Cheques, BiUs of Exchange. 

l\/r ONEY — Bank Shares, Banking, Exchange, Interest. 

lyr ONEY— "Wealth, Capital, Panics. 

TWr ONEY — Individiial Success, National Prosperity. 

IV/T ONEY— Concluding Eemarks. 

MONEY.— Page 28:— "It is only by understanding 
our monetary system that we can realise the power of 'credit.' Our com 
mercial system is based upon faith ; cheques, bills, notes are mere bits of paper, and 
only promises to pay ; yet so great is the power of credit that transactions to the 
extent of over a hundred millions weekly are transacted through the Clearing-house. 
Gold is a mere pigmy, as a medium of exchange, to this giant ' paper,* based upon 
* credit.' Simply by system and faith, in conjunction with banking, this institution 
settles the exchanges, the buying and selling, to this enormous aniunnt, without the 
aid of a single metallic coin — merely, by bookkeeping or ti-ansfer of cheques, the 
debiting or crediting of A or B." 

BUSINESS — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 
One Shilling. 

BUSINESS— Messrs. Shnpkm, MarshaU & Co., Sta- 
tioners' -haii Court, London, E.C. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway 
Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls : and at every Bookseller's. 



USINESS— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 

W.C, will send a copy, post fre, for Is. 



B 

"DUSINESS— Contents : Preface, Special Notice. 

BUSINESS — Business Quahties, Health, Education, 
Observation. 

BUSINESS — Industry, Perseverance, Arrangement, 
Punctuality. 

"DUSINESS— Calculation, Prudence, Tact. 
"DUSINESS— Truthfuhiess, Integrity. 
BUSINESS— Money, and what to do with it. 
"DUSINESS— Bank Shares, Depression of Trade. 

BUSINESS— Free Trade and Keciprocity, Civil Service 
stores. 

"D USINE SS — Co-operative Trading, Concluding Eemarks. 

BUSINESS.— Page 7 :— " Commerce is guided by laws 
as inflexible as those of health or gravitalion ; and the primary cause of 
lailure in business may be traced as unerringly as the punishment that will surely 
follow the infringement of any other law of nature." 

BUSINESS.— Page 179— " From every pulpit and in 
every school throughout the kingdom the jnstiGcation of double dealing and 
trickery upon the plea that it is impossible to get a living honestly by trade, or in any 
voetition, should be denounced in the most unmistakeable language as a libel on 
Providence, and the failure to succeed be attributed to its real ia.-^5& — the moa's 
ignorance of or iucapacity for the business or profession he follows." 



14 



TriB SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



May i, 188i. 



ESTABLISHED 1836. 

STUBBS' MERCANTILE OFFICES 

TRADE AUXILIARY COMPANY, LIMITED. 




HEAD OFFICES: 



42, GRESHAM ST., LONDON, E.O: 

West End Branch, 53, Conduit Street, Regent St., W. 



CHIEF 



For IRELAND. 



("DUBLIN— 21, College Green. 
(BELFAST— 66, Victoria Streesi. 



OFFICES : 

For SCOTLAND. 



/GLASGOW— 21, St. Vincent Place. 
(EDINBURGH— 4, Cookbuin Street. 



BIRMINGHAM—TO, Exchange Buildings, 
BRADFORD, Yorkahire— 1 Booth Street, 
BRISTOL— 4, Bristol Chambers. 
BRIGHTON— 23, Prince Albert Street. 
CORK— 70, South MaU. 



NORWICH— Post Office Street. 
PORTSMOUTH— 85, High Street. 
SHEFFIELD— 86, Queen Street. 
SOUTHAMPTON— 160, High Street. 



DISTRICT OFFICES: 

GLOUCESTER— 6, College Court. 
LEEDS— 1, East Parade. 
LIVERPOOL— 71, Lord Street. 
MANCHESTER— 14, Brown Street. 
NEWCASTLE— 32, Grainger Street West. 

With Agents and Cort^spondents throughout the Kingdom, on the Continent of Europe, and in the United 8tc^ of 

America, and the British Colonies. 

BANKERS : 

LONDON— The Union Bank of London. 
BELFAST— The NoeTSern Banking Company. 
BIRMINGHAM— Lloyd's Banking Company. 
BRISTOL— The National Provincial Bauk of England. 
DUBLIN— THE National Bank. 



EDINBURGH— The NATIONAL BANK OF SCOTLAND. 

GLASGOW— THE Beitish Linen Company. 
LIVERPOOL— The Bakk of Liverpool. 
MANCHESTER— Manchester and Salfoed Bane. 



STUBBS' MERCANTILE OFFICES, 

With their various associated Agenci«3, form together a complete organisation for the protection of Bankers, Merchants, 
Manufacturers, Traders, and others, against risk and fraud in their various commercial transactions. 

Subscribers to these Oflices can, by their Agency, recover debts due to them with promptitude. 
Stubbs' "Weekly Gazette" supplies information which is absolutely indispensable to Traders. 

T£3E,3Vi:S OF SXJBSCRIPTIOnST 

(Except for Stt^oial Service and Financial Departments, in which the Bates will be fixed by Agreement according to the 

circumstances.) One, Two, Three, and Five Guineas, aocording to requirements. 

PEOSPBCTUSES GIVINa FULL PABTICULAES ON APPLICATION. 



o-A. rri' I o IT. 

There h no Office in London connected with Stubbs' Mercantile Offices (situate at the corner of 
King St., opposite Guildhall), except the West End Branch at 53, Conduit St., Regent St., W. 



Mat i, 188i. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



15 



JUSTIN BROWNE 







H 

Pi 



a 




CO 



era 

I — 

CI3 



H 



in 



Having had a long practical experience in the Manufacture of the 




Expressly for Exportation to extreme climates, has succeeded in producing an Instrument which combines 
English durability and soundness, with first-class quality of tone. 





JUSTIN BROWN'S can refer to customers whom lie lias supplied in New Zealand, Costa Rica, Peru, Calcutta, &o., all of whom have 
eKpr«88ed the greatest satisfaction, and renewed their orders. His prices will be found to be extremely low in proportion to the quality 
of Pianos, and in comparison with those of other Houses where the same degree of soundness and durability is studied, the reason of tha 
difference being that in their case, selling as they do retail, there are heavy expenses for Show Rooms, Advertising, &o., which as a 
Wholesale Manufacturer he does not incur; having only Factory expenses, ae ;an offer an equally good instrument at a much lower fig^e. 

CATALOGUES OF DESIGNS AND PRICES SENT FREE. 



JUSTIN BROWNE, 

PIANOFORTE MANUFACTURER, 

237 & 239. ETJSTON ROAP, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



le 



O^HE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPtlANCES- 



Mat 1, 188i. 




SIX -CORD SOFT AND EXTRA QUALITY GLACE 

BEING OF VERY SUPERIOR QUALITY, ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED 




C. and Co. beg to direct attention to their ^"^ 
celebrated CROCHET or TATTING COTTON, in 

Hanks or Balls. 



£SrABL/9"^D 1752. 




"EMPIRE" WASHER. 

THE BEST AND CHEAPEST MACHINE FOR FAMILY USE 
YET OFFERED TO THE PUBLIC. 



No. 1. 



I'leiCES. 



£1 10 
2 2 
2 10 O 



Liberal Discount to the Trade. For Illustrated List apply to Makers, .^ 

T. WOLSTENCROFT & Co., 
93, siia-s: siOLBoi^nsr 




XjOnsrx^ojsr. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



17 



THE "BISSCHOP" GAS ENGINE. 

Pisto7i and Valve need no Liihrlcatof. Will start at a moment's notice. 

PowEn. Price. 

OneMan £25 

One-and^a-half Man 39 

TwoMan 35 

Four Man 50' 



w 

H 



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< 
< 

w 
o 




:2j 
o 



> 

H 



> 

H 

W 

D 



J. E. H. ANDREW, 
18. Waterloo Road, STOCKPORT. 



THE 



I^EBI^LESS 



CLOTHES WRINGER 

Is the leading Wringer of America. 














CO 

O Hi 



s 



a 



g' 






g 










H 

P 



Ph 
W 

EH 

The best, the cheapest, the most substantial and 
simple wooden frame Clothes Wringer made. 

Enquiries and Orders to be addressed to tlie Sole European 
Representatives, 

JOHN R. WHITLEY&CO., 

7, POULTRY, LONDON, E.G. ; 

AND 

8, PLACE VENDOME, PARIS. 



OILS. 



IMPEEIAL SEWING MACHESTE, 

In 1 to 6 oz. Bottles. 
CETSTAL SPERM SEWING MACHINE, 

In 1 to 2 oz. Bottles. 
BICYCLE LUBEICATING, 

In bulk or bottle to order. 
" SOLAE " BICYCLE LAMP OIL, 

In 4 and 10 oz. Bottles. 
MACHINEEY OILS, 

As consigned to us by the drum or barrel. 

SEWING MACHINE TRADE SUP- 
PLIES— 

OIL CANS, SCEEW-DEIVEES, NEEDLES, 
ETJBBEES, BELTS, FITTINGS and PAETS. 

DOMESTIC MACHINERY— 

In all its branches. 
SOLE AGENTS for the HAMILTON MANUFAC- 
TUEING Co. Manufacturers of the " WALKEE 

WASHER" and DOMINION WRINGEE. 
IMPOETEES of AMEEICAN KNITTING 

MACHINES, NOVELTIES, and HAEDWAEE. 
SOLE AGENTS for the BICKFORD KNITTING 

MACHINE Co. 



Lists or Samples on Application to 

R. S. DAVILLE & CO., 

46, WOOD STREET, LIVERPOOL. 

WASHI NG-DAY R EFORM 

HARPER TWELVETREES' 

RENOWNED "VILLA" 

£2 15s., OR WITH 

MANGLER & WRINGER, £5 5s., 




Does the Fortnight's JFamily 
Wash in Pom- Hoiirs, without Rru- 
BiNG OR BOILING, as Certified hy 
thousands of delig-hted pui-chasers 
It is easy to work, easily iinder 
stood, strongly made, durable, doe- 
not injuie the clothes, but really 
saves them ; and is the only "Wash 
ing Machine in tht world which 
renders Boiling unnecessai-y, and 
saves five or six horn's of copperg 
fii'ing each washing day. The Five 
Guinea "Villa" Washer possesses 
tremendous washing power, and 
will wash 15 dozen collars and 
ladies' cuffs in five minutes ; 150 
pocket - handkerchiefs in fiv^ 
minutes ; 60 hotel table cloths in an 
houi' ; 10 dozen bedroom towels pe,- 
hour ; 3^ dozen shii-ts per hour ; 1^ 
dozen slieets per hour, and counter- 
panes, blankets, curtains, &c., in 
proportion. Such success is un- 
paralleled! Illustrated Pi-ospectuses 



80, 



and Export Quotations post free ot 

HARPER TWELVETREES, 

LAUNDEY ENGINEER AND MACHINIST, 

FINSBURY PAVEMENT, LONDON, E.G. 



MORE AQENTS WANTED, 



Sole London Agent for Kenworthy's "Paragon" 
Washing Machine. 



18 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



.0 Engine which works without a Boiler or Steam. 

AVERAGE KONTHLY DELIVERY (includinif Continental) OVER 180 ENGINES. 




THE "OTTO" SILENT GAS ENGINE. 

IS RAPIDLY EEPLACING STEAM ENGINES FEOM 1 to 40 HOESE POWEE IND. 



WORKS & HEAD OFFICES: 

Great Marlbro' St., Gloster St., 
MANCHESTER 



CROSSLEYoBROTHERS, 



LONDON HOUSE: 

116, a-ueen Victoria Street, E.O. 
LONDON. 



THE ' 



i 





n 



LOCK-STITCH, HAND OR FOOT, 

SEWING MACHINES. 

First Prise Medals, Honours & Awards, wherevex Exhibited. 



THE NEW "LITTLE WANZER."— Entirely reconstructed and improved. 
Nickel-plated, Loose Wheel, New Patent Shuttle, Take-up Lever and 
Spooler. £4 4s. 

WANZER "A," Simplicity Itself.— The most powerful yet light running 

Hand Machine, strai^'ht race. £4 4s. 

WANZER " C " Light Foot Family Machine, entirely New, with evety 

improvement up to 1879. £6 Os. 

WANZER " F " Family Machine, with Reversible Feed and Stitch 
Lever. £7 lOs. 

WANZER "E" Wheel Feed Machine, for heavy work of all kind» 

£8 8s. 
WANZEH PLAITING, KILTIKG AND BASTING 

MACHINES, 

Over 200 varieties of perfect Plaiting or Kilting, from 30s. complete. The 

only Machi7ie Kilting and Basting at one operation. 



WANZER "^" 

IS THE 

Great Mechanical Success of the Age. 

It comhines all the known advantages of other 

Machines. Mounted on Ornamental Iron Base, 

Four Quineas complete. 



The \Nanzer Sewuig Machine Company^ 

L I X*I I T E D , 

Chief Office— 4, GREAT PORTLAND ST., 
OXFORD CIRCUS, LONDON, W. 



Mat 1. 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



19 



PELTIES ItiDOIEST 




IT is our mtentiou to devote a few pages of this journal 
every month for the purpose of describing and illustrating 
any novelties in domestic appliances that may economise 
labour. Each month brings with it something new in domestic 
appliances, as in the dress fashions of the fair sex, only the 
former are useful, while the latter are generally only orna- 
mental. We shall make it our special duty to inspect all such 
articles as they are manufactured and record them under our 
heading, "Novelties in domestic labour-saving appliances." 

THE "BICONIC" KNIFE CLEANER. 

This article consists of two cones, which are covered with 
vulcanised iudiarubber, and between which the knife is worked, 
the cutting edge downwards. A few turns are given to tlie 
handle while the knife is passed to and fro, one or two move- 
ments being sulficient to produce a brilliant polish. The 
inventor asserts that this machine will not blunt the knives, 
loosen the handles, or grind the backs thin. The receptacles 




on the top of the machine aie for the pow iei to be placed in. 
Although only one knife can be cleaned at a time, the rapidity 
is so great as to be as quick, or even quicker, than many other 
knife cleaners, in which so much time is consumed in arrani^ing 
and adjusting. It will also polish carving forks, and its 
action is so simple that a child could manage it. The manu- 
facturer is Mr. H. S. Crump, of the Albion lion Works, 
Gloucester. 

THE "SAVE-ALL" CINDER SIFTER. 

This little article is made in two parts, the top or hopper 
for cinders, the bottom bar for the ashes or dust. As will be 
seen by the illustration, it is made to fit underneath a kitchen 
range; it thus catches the cinders and dirt as they drop from 
the fire. As it fits up close behind, the ashes screen the dust, 




and ashes cannot therefore fly about, and the hearth is cjn- 
sequently much tidier than it otherwise would be. The r.-tail 
prices of this article are from 2s. 6d.— that being a 12-inch 
size — to 48., 18-inch size. It is manufactured by Messrs. 
Verity Brothers, of Call-lane, Leeds, under Banks' patent 
(5212). 



THE ROYAL PNEUMATIC FIRE ENGINE. 

A most necessary and useful domestic apparatus has just 
been patented and brought out by Messrs. Sponq and Co., of 
249, High Holborn, W.C. We append an illustration of the 
Royal Pneumatic Portable Fire Engine, a description of which 
will doubtless interest our readers. There is no doubt that 
one of the most fearful calamities that can befaU a house or 
homestead is a sudden outbreak of fire. The most destructive 
fires often arise from small beginnings, which, if checked in 
time, would prevent much destruction of property, and even of 
life. Every one knows this, but few take the trouble to make 
the slightest provision against it, and when a fire does occur, 
having nothing to fall back upon, most people get into a panic, 
lose ;ill self-control, rush to the windows, or else send or run 
for the firemen, who often cannot arrive till the fire has gained 
the mastery ; in the meantime a comfortable home has become 
an utter ruin. Much may be done to prevent such calamities 
by the use of the simple, eflfective, powerful, and Portable 
Pneumatic Fire Engine introduced by Messrs. Spong and Co. 
We think no house may be said to be furnished without one or 
more of these Portable Pneumatic Fire Engines. Messrs. 
Spong and Co. were not ready with them for show at the late 
Domestic and Building Trades' Exhibitions at the Agi-iouUural 
Hall, Islington, but propose shortly to have a public practical 
display of its no^vers, of which due notice will be given. 

The Portabb Pneumatic Fire Engine is worked by com- 
pressed ail- and water only, and is the only portable fire engine 




worked without chemicals. It can be charged in three or four 
minutes by any one without expense, may be kept always 
ready for unmediate use, and cannot get out of order. It may 
be carried by handles, or on the back, to any part of a house 
or buUding. As it can be charged by the operator up to a 
pressure of SOlbs. or lOOlbs. to the square inch— shown by a 
pressure-gauge fixed to each engine, which anyone may under- 
stand—a stream of water can be thrown with great force from 
60 to 80 feet, and will extinguish a fierce fire, in its first stage, 
in one minute. It is perfectly safe, every engine being tested 



20 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



up to doulde the pressure reqiiirBci. It is always certain in its 
action, which cl^emiual engines are not, as frequently tie 
chemicals fail to operate when required ; and it is much cheaper 
than engines worked by chemical^, as they .-ire utterly useless 
without a supply of "charges," which cost from os. to 8s. 
each, and can only be procured from the vendors, whereas air 
and water is always at hand. It is, therefore, the simplest and 
most economical portable fire engine in u&e, and i ef ute.- 
the erroneous notion, common in many people's minds, that 
water in small quantities must be charged with offensive an ; 
destructive chemicals before it can extinguish fire. No fire iu 
its early stage can live against a comparatively small stream ff 
water if driven with sufficient force against it. The engines 
hold about six ga Ions of water each, and it is a 
fact that one gallon thrown upon a fire in its early stage b>' 
this engine will do more than ten thousand gallons applied h\ 
other means after the fire has obtained the mastery. It may 
be well to add that this engine may be used with or without 
chemicals ; but we do not think that, in. any case, they arc 
necessary. The price is £6 6s. retail, liberal terms, we arc 
informed, being given to all shippers of and dealers in domestic 
appliances, 

STEEL'S BOOT CLEANING MACHINE. 
The latest domestic labour-saving appliance, we think, i^ 
Steel's Boot Cleaning Machine. There are one or two machines 
we believe, already made, but they have not the wonderful 
rapidity which characterises this one. When writing of tlii-s 
one cannot help thinking of our old friend, Sam AVeller, at th. 
White Hart Hotel. The wooden log in number .six, the pai 
of Hessians in thirteen, the two pair of halves in the com 
mercial, the painted tops in the snuggery inside the bar, 11m 
Wellingtons a good deal worn, and the ladies' shoes in numbci 
five would have been very quickly blackened and shined, an 
"Boots" would have lad no need to have made such reply, 
when hurried bv the servant girl, as, " Ask number twent> 
two whether he'll have 'em now, or wait till he gets 'em J"" 
The "Artful Dodger" would have appreciated one of the.-. 




when, to use his language, he was "japanning his trotter 
cases." Our engraving above repr( sents the machine, which 
is very simple io its action, and can be easily worked by a boy 
or girl without any previous instructions. The easy motion 
of the machine is obtained from one uuifoim airangement of 
the crauks, and the labour in working is so slight that th>- 
operator does not tiro. The weight of the machine is about 
601bs. When working the machine the brushes must revolve 
towards the operjitur. The blacking used must be of a creamy 
consistency ; and when th" polishing or dirt removing is in 
hand, the blacking feedi-r should be disconnected. The appli- 
cation of a small quantity of oil is essential to tie smooth 



working of the centres and bearings, but care should be 
observed to prevent any grease coining iu contact with the 
brushes. Full particulars can be obtained at the Boot and 
Shoe Cleauini; Machine Company, 4, Halkin-street West, 
Belgrave-square, S.W. 

THE DUPLEX GAS STOVE. 

We do not expect that Messrs. John Wright and Co., of 
Essex Works, Bu'mingham, the manufacturers of the Duplex 
Stove, will claim that it is as wonderful an invention as that 




compact cooking apparatus owned by the " single gentleman " 
of the " Old Curiosity Shop," but it is certainly, in its way, a 
novelty. It is a stove fitted with a tin pan and gridiron ; it 




will boil a kettle on the top, and it has a copper reflector, so 
that when the cooking utensils are removed it forms a heating 
stove, as will be seen by the illustrations. 

THE EEX KNIFE CLEANER. 

Aryong the most appreciated of all domestic labour-saving 
apjiliances, the knife cleaning machine holds a first rank. 
These cannot, however, be said to be articles for the mUliou 
simply on account of the price. We have nothing to say 
against the beautiful machines of Kent, of Davis, of Spong, 




and others, only that the cost prevents their sale to the more 
humble buyer, so that a low-priced machine is wanted. We 
think this want is now supplied. Messrs. Hirst Bros, of Selby, 
and 5, Caetle-street, London, E.C., are sole manufacturers and 
patentees of " The Rex Knife Cleaner" — a very useful little 



Mat 1, l88ll- 



THE SEWING- MACH.NE 6AZETTE AND JOUENAl, OF DOMESTt J APPLIANCES. 



21 



machine, ■which retails at the low price of 'is. 6d. Our illus- 
tration will give a good idea of this knife cleaner. Its advan- 
tages are that it is not liable to get out of order, is verj' 
simple in its operation, and polishes both sides of the knife at 
onetime -with so little labonr a child can use it. with esse. It 
is already being supplied in large quantities to the lea ling 
dealers in domestic appliances throughout Great Britian. 

FILDING'S PATENT GAS FIRE LIGHTER. 
This fire ligbter is hooked on to the bars, and is, therefore, 
safe, as it cannot be dragged away from the fire. It niakes 
neither smoke nor smell, and it is claimed that it will light 
twenty fires for one penny. To use this fire lighter, it is 
necessary to get sufficient indiarubber tubing to reach from the 
firegrate to the nearest gas-bracket ; slip one end of the tube 
over the nozzle of the fire ligh'er, and the other e-id on to the 
gas-bracket, turn the gas fidl on, and allow sufficient time foi- 
the accumulated air to escape, hold a light to the end of the 




lighter, from which will at once issue a dark blue flame ; but 
should the flame be white the gas must be turned off at once, 
and re-lit, or it will make a disagreeable smell, which the dark 
blue flame will prevent. Then make a hole at the bottom of 
the coals with the poker to receive the flame, which will in six 
or eight minutes thoroughly light all the coal it touches. The 
lighter should be himg upon one of the bottom bars with its 
end in amongst the coals, which should be in small pieces so as 
more readily to take fire. Care must be taken not to double 
the tube, as this -will diminish the supply of gas. 

THE ASCENSION TABLE FILTER. 

The Silicated Carbon Filter Company, of Battersea, S.W., 
have just introduced the New Ascension Filter, as shown in 
our illustrations. The blocks in the filters are movable, and 





can be taken out, when, with the aid of a piece of indiarubber 
tube, they can be converted into pocket filters, the small india- 
rubber peg at the top being placed hi the socket-hole at the 
bottom. The water passus through the carbon in the direc- 
tions sho-wn by the arrows in the illustrations. When cleansing 
the filters, the small indiarubber peg should bo removed and 
placed in the socket at the bottom ; the carbon should be 



strongly blo-wn in from the top, and scrubbed -with a brush 
md boiling water. All the parts are kept in stock by the 
■ompany, and therefore new carbon media can be sipplied 




.vithuut the filters being returned to the makers. We have 
tested the filter we have before us, and find it perfect in its 
action. 

J. RICHARDS' PLASTIC METAL. 

This metal requires no casting furnace, no crucibles, or 
apparatus of any kind. Is used chiefly for pasting purposes, 
'ind is a vei-y useful metal in locomotive, engineering, and 
fitting shops generally. It has a great affinity for other metals, 
ai)d adheres so firmly to brass, gun metal, cast iron, wrought 
iron, steel, &c., that when once pasted on, no abrasive force is 
sufficient to move it. As soon as it has cooled down, it sets as 
hard as the best gun-metal, wears equal to it, is 25 per cent, 
lighter, and applied to a locomotive, stands the test of a 50,000 
miles run with ease. 

Owing to its anti-attrition properties, the saving in lubri- 
cating oils, &c., has been variously stated by those who have 
used the plastic metal, at from 15 to 20 per cent. By its use, 
bearings in any metal, and of any dimensions, can be re-faced 
to their original sizes ; thus saving much time and expense in 
re-melting, re-fitting, &c. The journals of spindles, axles, and 
shafts, whether of cast or of wrought iron when worn down, 
can be pasted up to their origmal diameters, and glands of all 
sizes can be tinned and filled up, perfectly sound. The plastic 
metal, if properly applied, will never break awaj' from iron, or 
any other metal. Brass bushes, axle-box bearings, &c., may 
be dispensed with, by casting all such articles entirely of 
plastic metal, in properly chilled moulds, which -will then 
j.equire no boring or turning. 

It is of great use in the foundry, for running in and filling 
up holes, or flaws of any kind, rendering all articles so treated, 
perfectly sound. It does not contain either lead or spelter, 
consequently its contraction in cooling is very trifling. It 
fuses at about 350 deg. Fahrenheit, can he melted in an iron 
pot or ladle over a small fire, and does not deteriorate by re- 
melting. 

We would direct the attention of owners of machinery to 
this metal, for, by keeping a supply of the plastic metal ready 
to hand, a worn bearing can be removed, pasted up, and 
replaced, on the spot, in a few houis, thereby ensuring a per- 
fect fit, and saving the expense of re-casting, and loss of time 
entailed by a long journey to a foundrj . 

It can be had in ingots of 14 lbs. weight, or in strips, from 
the manufacturers, J. Richards Plastic Metal Co., 95, Charlotte- 
street, Birmingham. 



22 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



"lAT 1, 1881 



THE OTTO SAFETY BICYCLE. 

As will be seen by the illustration, it is very different to 
tbe ordinary bicycle. In this machine tlie rider sits between 
two wheels in rear of and slightly above tbe centre, with feet 
resting upon treadles fixed on a double th'ow crank. At 
either end of this crank are grooved pulleys, connected by 
means of endless driving metal bands with other pulleys which 
form part of the hubs of the large wheels. It can be turned 
in any direction by simply turning a handle on the side to 
which it is desired to go, g.nd the wheels both drive and steer. 
The crank can, at any time, be immedia'ely placed in such a 
poaitim as enables the rider to utilise his power to the greatest 
advantage. There is a most powerful break to each wheel, 
and the machine can be stopped in a few yards when travelling 
at a high speed, or held motionless on the steepest hill. The 
mode of construction renders it equally available for ladies 
and gentlemen of all ages, whilst by elevating or depressing 
the seat it is adjusted to suit riders of various heights. It can 
be mounted and dismounted without any trouble whatever, 
and can be driven forwards or backwards by merely reversing 




the action of the feet. It is about 3ft. 2in. wide, and can 
describe a circle of 5ft. Sin. diameter. Roads which would be 
impracticable to other machines can be traversed with com- 
parative ease and safety, and with much less risk of accident 
from stones or other obstacles. For town work this machine 
has no equal. In power of steeling, stopjjing, and reversing, 
together with the fact of the rider being able to maintain his 
seat and start at any moment, combine to make it perfect in 
this respect. The Otto Safety Bicycle must commend itself to 
ladies, who will now have all the advantages of this mode of 
travelling, hitheito enjoyed by gentlemen only — to riders of 
other machines, uniting, as it does, easy riding with speed, 
comfort, and elegant appearance — to the clergy, medical pro- 
fession, travellers, and tourists, as affording unequalled means 
of safe and rapid locomotion ; and to all classes, both young 
and old. We can certiinly say it is the safest and most com- 
fortable bicycle that it was ever our lot to try. The manu- 
facturers are the Otto Safety Bicycle Company, 118, Newgate- 
street, E.G. 



ELECTRICITY FOR DOMESTIC PURPOSES. 

On the 4th ult. a paper " On the Application of Electricity 
to Lighting and Heating for Domestic Purposes " was read 
before the Society of Telegraph Engineers and Electricians at 
Westminster by St. George Lane Pox, Esq. Professor Forster 
occupied the chair. Mr. Fox regarded it as certain that before 
long electricity would be applied to many and various domestic 
purposes, especially those of lighting and heating. He con- 
tended that electric lamps could be woi'ked in indefinitely 
large numbers from central stations with a proportionate cost 
of working, and this referred equally to any other applica- 
tions of electricity. He described his lamp (by means of which 



■the room was lighted), showing that the light resulted from 
the incandescence of continuous refractory conductors of high 
electrical resistance, mounted in vacuum. He remarked that 
the light was not at all what the public usually understood by 
the electric light, the brilliancy not being very intense, but the 
colour being pleasantly soft, altogether different from the 
blueish white of an electric arc light. The causa of the un- 
steadiness of "arc," namely, the variable resistance, was, he 
said, not present, and the light was as absolutely steady as it 
was possible for any light to be. The cost of manufacturing 
each lamp would not exceed a shilling. In a properly con- 
structed and exhausted lamp the carbon filaments would not 
deteriorate, provided their temperature was not raised above 
the point at which one-tenth of a square inch of radiating 
surface would yield a light of lo-candle power. The system 
of distribution was somewha*-, similar to that of gas, main con- 
ductors passing fr. m central stations and branching in various 
directions, and i lectricity being forced into these conductors, 
so as to maintain theni at a constant electrical pressure above 
the earth. The pressure of the mains being always the same, 
the amount of light given would always be equal. The 
regulators and other appurtenances connected with this 
system were also explained. The lecturer further contended 
that electricity would be at least as cheap as gas for heating 
purposes. 



IMPEOVEMENTS IN WASHING MACHINES. 

Mr. Frederick Mann, of Bedford, has obtained provisional 
protection for an improved washing machine. His idea is to 
cause a constant automatic circulation of the water through 
the clothes that are being washed. The machine is simple in 
construction, and can be used in any ordinary copper or boiler. 
The inventor uses a dome of copper or other metal of about the 
same diameter as the bottom of the boiler in which the apparatus 
is to be used. From the centre of the dome is fixed a pipe of 
about one and a half inches in diameter, and long- enough to 
reach to within an inch or so of the top of the boiler in which 
the apparatus is being used. In the top of this pipe there are 
several openings or spouts through which the water constantly 
flows when the apparatus is at work. 



INTERNATIONAL INDUSTRIAL EXHIBITION. 

An International Exhibition of power and work machinery 
for small industries will be held in Altona next August. The 
arrangement of this International Exhibition has been fixed 
as follows : — Department I. for power machinery, subdivided 
as follows: Class I., for gas power machinery; Class II., 
water power machinery; Class III., steam power machinery ; 
Class IV., hot air power machinery; and Class V., dynamic 
electric hydrocarbon power machinery ; whilst Class VI. has 
been set aside for models and drawings of power machines. 
Department II. for work machinery, implements, and tools, 
is subdivided into the following classes : Machines for the 
manipulation of wood, for joiners, turners, carpenters, &c. ; 
machines for the working of iron, for smiths, locksmiths, &o. ; 
machines for the manipulation of tin and pewter ware; 
machines for brass founders, tin founders, &c. ; machines for 
watchmakers, goldsmiths, mechanicians, &c. ; machines for 
working in leather ; sewing machines ; looms ; stocking looms ; 
machines for cloth shearers ; winding and twisting machines ; 
hemp dressmg and hackling machines and rope making 
machines ; machines for hat making ; machines for brush 
making; colour grinding machines; pottery and glass ware 
machines; stone working machines; horn work machines; 
machines for millers, bakers, and confectioners ; machines for 
printers, lithographers, photographers, &o. ; machines for 
ijookbinders, &c. ; machines for cigar makers ; machines for 
butchers ; machines for the manufacture of ice, mineral 
waters, &c. ; machines for the manufacture of screws, naOs, 
pins, needles, &c. ; and coupling apparatus, as far as necessary 
for work machines. Department III. comprises roiscellaneous 
articles, as also objects manufactured by the machines and 
implements exhibited in Departments I. and II., such as — 
Specimens of wood and iron work, tin and pewter ware, 
textile fabrics, printing, bookbinding, fancy leather goods, 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



23 



&c., &c. Department. IV. is set aside for dairy machines and 
utensils, suoh as churns, cheese vats, and presses, &c. ; whilst 
Department V. is devoted to a grio isltural machines and imple- 
ments. The title " International ' ' will not have been given 
to this exhibition without cause, for, being held in the closest 
proximity to Hamburg, the chief commercial town of the Con- 
tinent, manufacturers will undoubtedly exhibit on a l.irge 
scale, in order te draw the attention of Hamburg export 
houses to the adapt ibility of their wares for shipment to all 
parts of the world. His Excellency the Minister of State, 
von Botticher, has consented to act as president of this Inter- 
national Exhibition. 



THE HOWE MACHINE COMPANY'S WOEKS AT 
GLASGOW. 

(From the Ironmongfr.) 

The invention and progress of the sewing machine un- 
doubtedly forms one of the most interastiug chapters in the 
industrial progress of the world. No species of machinery 
has become more universally applicable, and the possibilities of 
its future development are co-extensive with those of civilisa- 
tion itself. It has never been disputed that the invention of 
the sewing machine belongs to America. Nor will it be denied 
that to the late Elias Howe belongs the conspicuous distinction 
of being the first to construct a machine that could be regarded 
as a practical success. 

To the early history of the sewing machine it is not essential 
to our present purpose that we ,'hould refer at length. But 
we cannot refrain from recalling thB circumstances that, when 
Elias Howe completed his machine in 1846, he could find no 
one in America willing to adopt it. He therefore resolved to 
offer it to England, and in October of the year named his 
brother, Mr. A. B. Howe, took a passage in a sailing vessel, 
along with one of the machines, for London. Mr. A. B. Howe 
submitted the machine to Mr. William Thomas, who had a 
shop in Oheapside, and employed a large number of persons in 
the manufacture of corsets, umbrellas, carpet bags, and shoes. 
The machine having met with the approval of Mr. Thomas, 
that gentleman purchased, for £250, the right to use as many 
of them as he desired. Mr. Thomas took out a patent for 
England, and during the existence of the patent every sewing 
machine made or imported into England had to pay to him a 
tribute of £10. It was not until the year 1850 that the 
sewing machine was adopted in New York. It was six 
years later before the regular manufacture can be said to 
have been fuUy entered upon ; but, once fairly started, the 
industry developed with amazing rapidity. 

For more than a dozen years, the manufacture of the sewing 
machine was practically confined to the United States, the 
factories of which had accordingly to supply not merely the 
large home demand, but the ever-increasing orders that came 
pouring in from Great Britain and the nations of the Continent. 
It was seen that the trade of the eastern hemisphere wouldby- 
aud-bye assume gigantic proportions, audit also became apparent 
that there were certain valuable advantages that would attend 
the establishment of the manufacture in this country. It was 
about the beginning of the last decade that the Howe Machine 
Company opened their first Scotch factory in Love-loan, Glas- 
gow, and the writer of this article had the pleasure, through 
the courtesy of Mr. F. M. Tower, the energetic manager, 
and a director of The Howe Machine Company (Limited), 
of inspecting the machinery and the different jirocesses 
through which the machines passed on their way towards 
completion. The factory at that time was an interesting sight, 
but it very soon was found to be much too small for the 
quickly-extending busijiess of the company. This will be 
readily understood when it is stated that the company's 
sales of machines in Europe rose from about 20,000 in 
1871 to upwards of 41,000 in 1873, this being altogether 
independent of the output in the latter year of over 153,000 
machines from the same company's manufiictory at Bridgeport, 
Connecticut, U.S.A. A much larger factory having become a 
necessity in Glasgow, Mr. Tower purchased in March, 1872, a 
large area of land off London-road, in the east end of the city. 
Old buildings that stood upon the ground were cleared away, 



and the erection of the works was pushed forward with such 
rapidity that in May, 1873, they were so far cotripleted that 
the mauufactui'e was commenced, the old premises in Love- 
loan being shortly afterwards abandoned. In less than thi'ee 
years thereafter we find the new works producing close upon 
68,000 machines per annum. Since that time the production 
has gone on steadily advancing, and Mr. Tower is now able to 
turn out at least 130,000 machines per annum. Before pro- 
ceeding to give a brief description of the factory, we may state 
that the sewing machine irdustry is now entitled to be ranked 
among the staple trades of Glasgow. Besides the machines 
that are sold by the different companies at home, the foreign 
trade is very extensive, as maybe judged from the fact that 
the value of the weekly exports of these machines from the 
Clyde frequently exceeds £10,000. The exports to France and 
Spain are vei-y large, and the Mediterranean ports receive the 
machines in great numbers. 

The new Glasgow factory occupies a commanding site 
between Avenue, Fielden, and Barrowfleld streets, the ground 
extending to 6. 135 square yards, with seven different sets of 
buildings. The principal building is in Avenue-street, to 
which it has a frontage of 390 feet. It is 40 feet in width, and 
consists of four storeys and attics, the ceilings of each flat 
being 11 feet from the floors. The building in Fielden-street 
is 265 feet in length by 30 feet broad, and three stories in 
height. At the corner of Avenue and Fielden streets the 
principal office, with entrance to the works, is 55i feet in 
length and 40 feet deep, and is connected with the chief 
building in Avenue-street. The smiths' shop, which is situated 
at the corner of Fielden and Barrowfield streets, is 8Si- feet by 
60 feet, and contains 14 stamping macbiues, besides the 
requisite forging-furuaces. The annealing and case-hardening 
shop, in Barrowfield-street, is 8lt feet in length by 38 feet in 
width, and 16 feet in height. This shop contains 15 furnaces. 
The japanning and ornamenting building is four storeys high, 
81 feet long, and 45 feet wide, the lower storey being fireproof 
and having seven drying-ovens. The inspecting and st^re 
house is 68^ feet in length and 40 feet in depth, and also has 
four storeys, the whole of which, together with the roof, being 
fireproof. The entire frontage of the factory is 1,059 feet. 

The machinery runs with marvellous smoothness, and it need 
scarcely be said that it does its work with perfect exactness, 
all the parts of the machines, however delicate, being made 
interchangeable. 

The different machines manufactured by the company are 
distinguished by letters — A, B, C, and so on. The " Family " 
or letter " A " is constructed with a walnut table and stand, 
and has accessories for hemming, frilling, tucking, braiding, 
and quilting, which suits it for performing every kmd of work 
required in the family . It may be said to be the most com- 
plete and perfect of all the machines. A hand-appliance may 
Ije had with this machine if required, so that it can be worked 
by hand or foot, or both. This machine is rendered very 
elegant by being pearled and silver plated, with an ornamented 
bordered table-top. Tbe letter " B" manufacturing machines 
are made either with step-feed for linen goods and cloth-work, 
or %vith wheel-feed for boot-closing and flowering. This 
machine has all the advantages of the " Family " one, but is, 
of course, larger and stronger. That with the feed-step is 
used by seamstresses, mantle and corset makers, and for 
upholstery and tailoring work ; while the wheel-feed is. 
employed in boot-closing and general leather-work, and pro- 
duces a very complete stitch. The letter " C " manufacturing 
machines are also either with step or wheel feed> 
Tbe step-feed are especially adapted for tailors, whole- 
sale outfitters, aud for all kinds of heavy cloth- 
work. They have an extra large shuttle and long arm, 
giving abundance of room for the heavier work, and they 
sew equally well with fine cotton and with the heaviest thread 
on canvas. With the wheel-feed this machine is used for 
men's boots and the heavier grades of leather work. The letter 
" D," or waxed-thread cylinder machine, is held in reputation 
for all kinds of heavy leather work, heavy uppers, harness and 
saddlers' work. It bas two feed-wheels, one on each side of 
the needle-hole, enabling the operator to sew close to either the 
right or left side of the material. The letter " E," or " Uni- 
versal ' ' feed and arm machine, is used for bootmaking and 



24 



THE SEWIN& MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



repairing ; the letter ' ' F," for tailoring and outfitting work ; 
tbe letter " G " is a new single-thread machine ; and the letter 
" H," hand shuttle machine, was prodviced in order to meet the 
wishes of ladies desiring one eqnally adapted for use at home 
or when travelling or visiting. The company make a series of 
useful cases and boxes for the machines, and they are also the 
mianufacturers of a superior kind of bicycles, kilting machines, 
and wringers. As indicated above, the business of the eastern 
hemisphere is now in the hands of the Howe Machine Com- 
pany (Limited), 46 & 48, Queen Victoria Street, London, and 
Avenue Street, Bridgeton, Glasgow, of which Mr. N. P. 
Stockwell is the managing director. 



TRADE NAME NIHILISM. 

(By "Wakder, in the Sewing Macldne News.) 

The meaner type of communist is simply a man who, having 
neither the property nor the skill, patience, or energy to 
acquire it, wishes to compel more able and successful men to 
shave with him the fruits of their talent or labour. His creed 
is that by doing the race the honour of existing he has 
established his right to share in all good things, whether he 
earns them or not. To him the success of others is " monopoly," 
and, so far as they are concerned, " property is robbery ;" and 
upon such premises rests the argument which justifies Nihilism 
with all its resultant horrors. 

Now, surely, there is no property which belongs to a man 
so completely and unquestionably as the name he bears. 
Often with this for his sole birthright and heritage he enters 
into the battle of life, and by tbe brilliant efforts of genius or 
the patient persistence of faithful hard work records against 
his name a history of success which makes it precious 
for ever. And when a man enters into business, spends years 
of skill and study in introducing, making, or dealing in some 
special article, and by his expenditure of money, thought, or 
labour, earns and builds up a reputation in connection with 
that article, and educates the public to ask for his product or 
brand, so that, in fact, his name is taken as a guarantee of 
quality or excellence, the wisdom of all civiHsed nations, as 
embodied in their laws, has said that the reputation so earned 
and the name so connected with his product belong to him. 
This is the essence of trade name law, and a failure to declare 
and enforce it must put a premium on unfair dealing, dis- 
courage the honourable and enterprising manufacturer or 
trade.snian, and strike a blow at the rights of property. 
Writing another man's name for the purpose of obtaining 
money is punished as forgery. Is the money he has earned or 
inherited more precious or more his own than his reputation ? 

Unfortunately, however, our statesmen and law-givers are 
sometimes tempted to seek the approval of the communistic 
element by joining in the unreasoning cry against " monopoly," 
and a nice, cheap bid for this kind of popularity is "Down 
with patent monopoly." Doubtless bad monopolies have 
existed and still exist, but are there no distinctions ? The 
wisdom of our forefather's framed a patent law which gave the 
easier protection and the highest reward to the American 
inventor, and from that day to this America's supremacy in 
the field of invention and in the field of mechanics has never 
been questioned. American machinery and the discoveries of 
America's inventors have conquered the wilderness, and tc-day 
aid the Western farmer, no less than the Eastern manufacturer, 
and in the competition with foreign products. Despite some 
minor abuses nothing in all our legislation has done more 
towards fostering the genius and accelerating the progress of 
our nation than the patent laws of America. 

And yet a learned gentleman, holding the most honourable 
position of Justice of the Circuit Court of the United States, 
makes a decision indicating in effect that the penalty of for- 
feiture of trade-name attaches to the possession of a patent, 
and stigmatising with the odious epithet of " monopoly " a 
trade-name under which a world-wide reputation has been 
honestly earned and honourably maintained. 

A decisi(m so nearly touching the rights and reputation of 
every honourable manufacturer, should surely be based on a 
careful study, no less of the facts than of the law ; and yet a 
brief history will show that the learned Judge's conclusions 



are not supported by the facts, while his notion of the law maj' 
safely be left in the hands of the United States Supreme Court 
to Thich the plaintiff has appealed. 

In 1850, when from popular prejudice in favour of hand 
work, a sewing machine could hardly be sold, the firm of 
I. M. Singer and Co. commenced business. In 186"} the 
partners of that firm, with some of their employes, formed a 
joint stock corporation. In 1874 the location of the Singer 
Manufacturing Company was changed from New York to 
New Jersey. In each case the full title, including good-will 
and trade-name, was passed by regular and duly recorded 
assignments. The co-partners of Singer and Co., i.e., I. M. 
Singer and Edward Clark, were chief share-holders in the 
New York Corporation, and to-day Singer's heirs hold stock, 
while Edward Clark is president of the Singer Manufacturing 
Company, of New Jersey. 

Therefore, from 1850 to the present day, the business of 
making and selling various styles of sewing machines under 
the name of Singer machines, has been continuously carried 
on by what was practically the same concern. During all 
these years nothing that business energy, mechanicrl skill, and 
liberal expenditure could effect towards improving the quality 
and establishing the reputation of their product — the Singer 
Sewing Machines — was left undone ; and the result is that the 
name Singer, applied to a sewing machine, became, at once, a 
recommendation to public favour and a guarantee of standard 
excellence. 

Now, an ex-employ6 of this concern undertakes to use the 
word Singer — the distinctive word in their corporate title, the 
personal name of the original maker, and the trade-name 
under which all their products have been sold — and he goes on 
to advertise and sell as Singer machines the products of 
another party, made in imitation, or rather in fac-simile, of a 
popular style of the genuine Singer machines. It is taken for 
granted by the Court that this one — out of the score of styles 
of Singer sewing machines— made and sold by Singer and his 
associates, represents the alleged Singer system or principle. 
Then the Court in effect says, that because the efforts of Singer 
and 'his associates have especially identified the form and 
shape of this style with bis name in the public inind,_ therefore 
every one could use that form and shape and call it by that 
name unless prevented by patent. Or, in other words, by his 
efforts to build up a reputation for himself in connection with 
a certain article of peculiar construction and appearance, he 
made public property of both his reputation and his name as 
well as the distinctive peculiarities of that article. Certainly 
a heavy penalty for successful enterprise. 

But the Court further explains that because certain patents 
under which the Company were licensed, have expired ; and 
because this work of building up a business and reputation was 
partially done while those patents were in force, all right to 
the reputation so earned must perish with the death of the 
patent. As the language of the decision is apt to mislead 
those not fully posted on the point, we may state that neither 
this form nor the peculiar and distinctive mechanical con- 
struction of the machine in suit were ever patented. 

A horizontal main driving shaft receiving motion from a 
band- wheel at one end, communicating motion to the needle 
through a roller and " heart cam " at the other, and connected 
by beveled gears to the top of an upright shaft, the lower end 
of which drives a transverse shuttle by means of a crank and 
connecting rod, first appeared in the Singer A machine in 1859. 
Neither I. M. Singer nor the Singer Manufacturing Company 
ever patented any part of this combination, and, so far as they 
are concerned, it was open to the public from 1859 to 1877, 
when the last of the " Combination " patents expired. This 
machine, like all others, was subject to the patents of Wdson 
and Bachelder, owned by the "Combination," and on that 
slender thread tbe decision must hang. A mere license, cover- 
ing a minor portion of the mechanism in a machine, is there- 
fore sufficiently a " patent " to bring down upon its unlucky 
possessor the penalty of forfeiture of trade-name. 

And now to what does this decision tend? If the good 
name and reputation of every energetic and honourable manu- 
facturer or dealer who dares to own a patent or take a license, 
must lie at the mercy of the first imitator who wants to get 
tbe good will of a business without earning or buying it ; if 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOME&TIC APPLIANCES. 



25 



such a bligbt must fiiU upon all industries dependent oi 
patented or licensed ai tides; if there shall be hereafter ni» 
premium on the intellect of tlie inventor, and no reward for 
the skill or honour of the producers, will not the NihilisI 
rejoii:e and be exceeding glad ? For surely, if we cannot put a 
penalty on the superior intellect, skill or industry of others, 
the next best thing is to deprive them of their just rewards ; 
and if he cannot seize or destroy their material wealth, will he 
not hail with joy the fall of that outgrowth of civilisation, the 
property of an honourable man in his good name and business 
reputation ? 



THE "HOWE" BICYCLES AND TRICYCLES. 

During the last season the " Howe " Bicycle obtained good 
repute as a first-class machine, so much so that the deman 1 
for them this season is greater than the supply, though 
the company possess unusual facilities for turning out 
quantifies, as Tnay be readily imagined from, the description 
given in another column of their works at Glasgow. 

The "Howe" Tricycle, of which we give an illustration, is 
designed on the best mechanical pri:iciples, and possesses all the 
latest improvement?, and, like thf "Howe" bicycle, is made 




only of one quality, and that of the very I'est materials. The 
spokes, handles, bearingfs, &o., are all strongly nickel- plated, 
which add very much to the light iind elegaut appearance of 
the machine. Among the improvements are the simple but 
perfect brake, the easy steering appliin.e, the dust-proof 
oilers, the adjustable seat, with place under cushion for spanner 
and oil Clin. The "Howe" tricycles aie among the best that 
are manufactured, and we recommend shippers aud others to 
see them before filling up indents for A I m;ichines. 



Repairing Sewing Machines.— All old machines, to be 
put in first class order, should be taken down and cleaned 
before attempting any repairs, bushing or adjusting. When 
a sewing machine is taken apart and cleaned you will see at a 
glance what is needed, and the parts can be handled so much 
bet;ter than when they are covered with grease and gum. Let 
me ask why some repairers fail to give satisfaction on the old 
worn sewing machine ? The answer is this : they look, they 
try this and that, remove one of the parts, ex])erimeut for 
hours trying everything, in the end leaving the n.achine in 
the same condition as when brought to them. The point of 
difficulty is simply this — they do not fully comprehend its 
principles, and they expect, by trying this and that, something 
they do may just hit the thing and arignt the cause of the 
tr.aible. In such cases, take down the machine, chan it, take 
up the lost motion, and put the machine together propei ly. 
and you will find it will do the work as it should be done. Of 
course it is not expected of the repairer to take down all 
machines for slight repairs. 



THE CANVASSER'S DREAM.* 

The roadway was dusty, the sun shining strong, 

As weary, the canvasser plodded along ; 

His jaded old pony seemed ready to drop, 

But stOl kept on going, too tired to stop. 

" O, selling machines," said the man to himself, 

"Is no easy way to accumulate pelf 

In those days, at least, when the prices are low, 

The payments uncertain, and business slow. 

O, had I but lived in that dark, middle age. 

When the sewing machine was unknown to tha sage, 

Arid the secret I owned how to make and to use. 

What trades I could drive, ladies couldn't refuse, 

I'd sell for cash only — no ragged edge leases 

Would btilge out my pockets, but solid gold pieces I " 

The thought was so pleasant, such balm to his mind, 

He dropped the lines, noddmg, and going it blind. 

He slept, tired mortal, and di-eampt a sweet dream. 

Of di-iving his team by a Middle-age stream; 

Before him arose, to his wondrous delight, 

A Middle-age castle, with banners bedight. 

" Aha ! " he exclaimed, with a smile on his phiz, 

" A prospect that promises excellent biz ! " 

He whipped up his team, pulling up at the moat, 

Looked wistfully round for abridge or a boat, 

Then, not seeing either, he gave a great shout. 

Awaking the warden, and bringing him out. 

" Od's blood, stop yom- jaw, or you'll jump like a louse ! 

What's that — Have we got a machine in the house ! " 

A parley took place, the cigars were produced. 

Which the draw to let down that warder induced. 

" What taffy is this, A machine that will sew ! 

O, give us a rest — that's a horse that won't go ! 

But if, in good sooth, such contrivance you bring, 

The damsels are ijraying for just such a thing. 

This castle, you ought to know, is the King's Palace, 

And next week is the wedding of sweet Princess Alice." 

Then he called a bidl-pup the intruder to guard, 

(A canvasser's curse is a dog in the yard,) 

He locked the great gate, he went up the great stair, 

And blew on his bugle a terrible blare, 

The chamberlain came, and the news he was told : 

" He's a churl, a humbug ; Mr. Warder, you're sold, 

Slit his tongue with your dirk ; but hold till I see 

If his Majesty chooses to join in the spree." 

His Majesty sat in the banqueting room, 

With a keg of fr sh lager moist'ning his gloom ; 

He heard the wild tale with a scowl of disdain, 

Took a swig at the lager, and said " It was plain 

The man was a varlet ; " a royal oath swore, 

" The sewing machine man should welter in gore." 

" O welter yom-self ! " cried the Queen, who had heard, 

" Not a hair of his head shall even be stii-red, 

Methinks in this matter I've something to say : 

I've been sewing aU night and sewing all day. 

My ladies then- fingers have worn to the bone, 

Making over old gowns that I have outgro\vn. 

For that slattern Alice — Not much, my old boss I 

Bring the caitiff right up ; I guess I am boss ! " 

That settled the matter ; the caitiff was brought ; 

His machine on his back, then Alice was sought ; 

The ladies were called from cellar and attic. 

The father confessor, fat and rheumatic ; 

'I all soMieis with halberts — a martial array — 

Wiih several policemen sworn in for the day ; 

Cross-bowmen ferocious, and impudent pages. 

And a mob of outsiders, all sexes and ages. 

They all gathered around to inspect the new comer. 

Some called him a wizard, some called him a bummer ; 

Some thought him a quack that 1 ad newly arisen. 

Some swore they had seen him at work in state's prison, 

The machine was, they said, a thing diabolic. 

And plainly ini ended to bring- on the colic ; 

*From the Sewing Machine Advance, 



36 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



May 1, 1883. 



An engine of torture, anotherHamented, 
Which Edison, doubtless, had lately invented ; 
WhUe one supercilious, conceited young flunkey 
Vowed 'twas a hand-organ — lacking the monkey, 
They turned the wheel, and they worked on the treadle. 
With the spooler and presser-foot others would meddle ; 
The ladies were even more curious, indeed, tUl 
They saw the eye in the wrong end of the needle. 
When they all gave a laugh, and joined in conclusion 
It couldn't be aught but a snare and delusion. 

" Scurvy knave," (the monarch [thus sweetly addressed 

him. 
As soon as the father had freshly confessed him,) 
' ' I am told by my minions you claim to possess 
Some device of the devil, to sew up a dress 
In much quicker time than our ladies can do it ; 
By Jinks you must prove it, or else you shall rue it ! 
But I'm just to a fault, and I would not condemn 
Any liar unheard that runs loose among men. 
And though times have been hard, and business so lax is, 
My subjects have naught I can grab for the taxes ; 
Though my soldiers won't fight, except for back wages. 
Nor merchants been captured for ages and ages — 
Yet stU] — though you see I can hardly afford it. 
Make good your boast, and you'll be richly rewarded. 
I will give you my daughter — her beauty the dower. 
If you fad — you shall swing from the Donjon tower! 
And, madam and ladies, take needles m fingers, 
T'will go pretty rough with the female that luigers, 
Give the rascal as much Flemish cloth as he chooses, 
Bnd divide 'mongst yourselves as much as he uses, 
Look sharp ! Should he beat you, as I am a sinner, 
I'll chop off your heads, every one, after dinner. 
Pass the beer ! my throat is so dry I would wet it ; 
You have heard the decree — and don't you forget it ! " 

Our canvasser thought the conditions were rough. 
But his cheek never blenched, 'twas uncommonly tough. 
At the King's pretty daughter he threw a sly wink. 
Took the cloth that she gave him, and then took a diink ; 
Threaded up the machine with skill that was subtle. 
The bearings oiled well, not forgetting the shuttle ; 
Then spit on his hands, and got everything steady. 
Took his seat, made a bow, and shouted out " Ready ! " 

" Go ! " cried the Kmg, and away they go — 

My ! what a circle that was to sew. 

Fifty hand needles shot to and foi th. 

The canvasser worked for all it was worth. 

The seam that he sewed flew out so quick. 

It made the crowd look awfully sick ; 

It fell from the table, it reached the floor. 

And crept along to the open door, 

Down the big stairs it squirmed and ran. 

To the yard, and scared the black-and-tan. 

The women worked on in sheer despair. 

But a howl of anguish filled the air, 

It wormed its way to the bolted gates. 

Then up the walls and over the slates. 

And down through the chimney's winding flue. 

Its rapidly lengthening train it drew ; 

Again in the banquet hall appeared. 

Where the specials now were badly " skeered ' ; 

The women sbrieked, the pages shouted. 

The soldiers all were wildly routed, 

Their captaui retreated up the stairs. 

The father confessor conned his prayers ; 

Still the machine kept sewing, sewing ; 

Still the long seam kept growmg, growii g ; 

The Queen in fits broke her Grecian bend, 

And the Kmg's red hair stood up on end ; 

The canvasser, smding, stitched away, 

And mildly asked could he have his pay ? 

" By my haUdom now, if my head is level," 

Cried the monarch, " you are the very devil." 

He yelled for the guard to come and seize him. 

But they daren't come near the devil, to please him. 



He yelled for the priest, but, in wild amazement, 

The father had jumped through the latticed casement. 

Then, howling with terror, he rose to his feet, 

And went for that canvasser smiling so sweet, 

And hurled him headlong, by pants and by throat, 

Through the window and down to the slimy moat. 

When the canvasser woke he was in a muddle. 

And found himself clambering out of a puddle ; 

His nag, while he slumbered, had made for the clover 

That skirted the ditch, and so tumbled him over. 

Then he thought of his dream, as he sadly stood there, 

And scraped the soft mud from his carotty hair ; 

And he sighed, " If such conducts as these is permitted 

In the age called the Middle, I'm glad that I quit it ! 

Give me back, give me back the old long-wmded leases, 

I'll not hanker, you bet, for such solid gold pieces ! " 




The folloviing list has !<ee» compiled expressly for the "Sewing 
Machine Gazette," hy G. P. Redfebn, Patent Agent, 4, South Street, 
Fiiishury, London, and at Paris and Brussels. 

APPLICATIONS FOR LETTERS PATENT :- 

No. 1,075. D. Butterfield, of Keigbley, Yorkshire, Iron and 
Brass Founder, for improvements in the construc- 
tion and manufacture of caps employed in spin- 
ninsr. Dated March 12, 18S1. 

,, 1,106. W. J. Ford, of Humlerston, Leioestershii-e, for im- 
provements in the combination of stop meehaBism 
with circular knitting machines. Dated March 
14., 1881, 

,, 1,103. G. W. von Nawrocki — a communication from E. 
Sehrke and Messrs. Biildge and Hildebrandt, all 
of Berlin, for improvements in cop spindles and 
appliances connected therewith for continuous 
spinning machines. Dated March 15, 1881. 

,, 1,1G4. B. Hunt — a communication from J. Bond, junior, a^d 
C. M. Swaine, both of PMladelphia, Peausylvania, 
United States, for certain improvements in lock- 
stitch sewing machines. Dated March 17, 1881. 

„ 1,169. W. B. Lake — a communication from C. H. Veeder, of 
Plattsburg, New York. United States, for improve- 
ments in the saddles of bicycles or similar vehicles, 
and in supporting and adjusting devices for the 
same. Dated March 17, 1881. 

„ 1,180. T. F. Burgess, of Dundee, Forfar, North Britain, for 
improvements in and relating to needles and 
needle slides or b.irs for sewing majhines. Dated 
March 18, 1881. 

,, 1,187. J. I. Warman, of Coventry, for an improvement in or 
relating to tricycles, which may be applied to other 
velocipedes. Dated March 18, 1881. 

„ 1,211. H. Mills — a commuuication from D. Mills, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, United States, for improve- 
ments in biitton-h'jle sewing machines. Dated 
March 19, 1881. 

„ 1,219. T. Tongue and T. E. Bladon, both of Birmint;ham, 
for improvements in bicycle and tricycle lamps 
and other lamps. Dated March 19, 1881. 

„ 3,234. J. Sontligate, of Shoe-lane, Fleet-street, London, and 
W. Smith and E. Liddell, of Ipswich, Suffolk, for 
improvements in propulsion of bicycles and 
triey. les. ' Dated March 21, 1881. 

„ l,23ii. D. Frazer, of Newry, ArmagL, Ireland, for improve- 
ments in flyers for spinning and winding machinery. 
Dated March 21, 1881. 

„ 1,364. W. E. Lake— a communication from G. B. Scuri, of 
Tuiin, Italy, for an improved velocipede. Dated 
March 22, 1881. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



2? 



No. 1,313. J. Harrington, of Norman's Buildings, St. Luke's, 
London, for improvements in bicycles and tricycles. 
Dated March 24, 1881. 

„ 1,318. C. T. Bastand, of Albany-road, Camberwell, London, 
for improvements in sewing machines. Dated 
March 24, 1881. 

„ 1,385. J. Clayton, of Bradford, Bobbin Manufacturer, for 
improvements in bobbins employed in drawing, 
finishing, and roving frames. Dated March 29, 
1881. 

„ 1,431. W. Morgan-Brown — a communication from H. 
Sohwerer, of Werdova, Saxony, for improvements 
in knitting machinery. Dated April 1, 1881. 

„ 1,467. S. C. Straker, of Bishopsgate-avenue, London, Manu- 
facturing Stationer, for an improved apparatus for 
registering the distance travelled by bicycles, tri- 
cycles, and other carriages, or the number of revo- 
lutions made by machinery. Dated April 4, 1881. 

Letters Patent have been issued for the following : — 



No. 3,848. 

„ 3,897. 
„ 3,910. 
„ 3,966. 

„ 4,018. J, 



., 4,088. 
„ 4,108. 



E, 



H 



„ 4,114. G. 

„ 4,137. G. 

„ 4,430. S. 

„ 4,706. 

„ 4.767. 

„ 4,797. 0. 

„ 5,432. J. 

41. J. 

„ 419. G, 



H. Mills — a communication from D. Mills, of Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania, United States, for improve- 
ments in sewing machines chiefly designed for 
leather work. Dated September 22, 1880. 

E, Clements, of Great Kussell-street, London, for im- 
provements in washing machines and apparatus 
combined therewith. Dated September 25, 1880. 

H. Woodward, of Eegent's Park, London, for a new 
or improved combined knife-cleaning and sharpen- 
ing machine. Dated September 27, 1880. 

P. Wolfi — a communication from A. Hellig, of Little 
Ferry, New Jersey, United States, for improve- 
ments in pianofortes and other stringed musical 
instruments. Dated September 30, 1880. 
M. Smith, of West Bromwich, Staffordshire, for 
improvements in and relating to exercising appa- 
ratus analogous to bicycle or velocipede riding, and 
for recording or registering the equivalent to the 
mileage or distance performed. Dated October 4, 
1880. 

H. Charsley, of Oxford, for improvements in or 
connected with tricycles. Dated October 8, 1880. 
Mitchell, of Openshaw, near Manchester, Mill 
Manager, and J. Mitchell, of Southport, both in 
Lancashire, Draper, for improvements in pickers 
and stoppers for looms. Dated October 9, 1880. 
W. Hawkesley, of Sheffield, and W. Lumb, of 
Wakefield, Yorkshire, Crabber, for improvements 
in machinery for crabbing, squeezing, and finishing 
woven and knitted fabrics. Dated October 9, 1880. 
Illston, of Birmingham, Manufacturer, for im- 
provements in or additions to sewing-machines. 
Dated October 12, 1880. 

Keats, of Leeds, Machinist, and A. Keats, of 
Worship-street, London, for improvements in 
sewing machines. Dated October 29, 1880. 
Thacker, of Nottingham, for improvements in the 
manufacture of certain kinds of cloth in circular 
knitting machines and in such machines, and in the 
arrangements of parts thereof. Dated November 
15, 1880. 

. Weatherill, of Cheetham, Manchester, commercial 
traveller, for improvements in bicycles, tricycles, 
and other wheeled vehicles. Dated November 19, 
1880. 

A. Barlow — a communication from J. Wiget, of 
Arbon, and C. Wetter, of St. Gall, both in 
Switzerland, for certain improvements in machine 
embroidery, and in the process for manufacturing 
the same. Dated November 20, 1880. 
Harrington, of Norman's Buildings, St. Luke's, 
London, for improvements in tricycles, part of 
which is applicable to bicycle and other bearings. 
Dated December 24, 1880. 

and H. Kiddier, of Nottingham, Hosiery Machine 
Makers, for improvements in knitting-machinery. 
Dated January 4, 1881. 
, W. von Nawrocki — a communication from K. 
Schrke, and Messrs. Biildge and Hildebrandt, all of 
Berlin, for improvements in continuous roving, 
slubbing, and spinning frames. Dated February 
1, 1881. 



PATENTS WHrCH HAVE BECOME VOID :— 

No. 979. E. J. Eae, of Hampstead, London, for improvements in 
velocipedes, partly applicable to other vehicles, 
and to machines. Dated March 11, 1878. 

„ 1,007. W. E. Lake — a communication from J. E. Folk, of 
Brooklyn, New York, United States, Merchant, for 
improvements in sewing machines. Dated March 
13, 1878. 

„ 1,034. R. Curtis, Machine Maker, and W. H. Rhodes and J. 
Wain, Foremen, all of Manchester, for improve- 
ments in machinery for creparing, spinning, and 
doubling. Dated March 15, 1878. 

„ 1,058. W. Fairweather, of Manchester, Engineer, for im- 
provements in sewing-machines. Dated March 

18. 1878. 

„ 1,090. W. Heath, of Crabb's Cross, near Redditch, Worcester- 
shire, Manufacturer, for improvements in machinery 
for smoothing and polishing the eyes of needles, 
the thread holes of shuttles, and other parts of 
sewing-machines, and the barbs of hooks used 
therewith, and of crochet-hooks. Dated March 

19, 1878. 
1,137. J. Harrington, of Ryde, Isle of Wight, for improve- 
ments in bicycles and tricycles. Dated March 
21, 1878. 

1,149. E. Simpson, of Mansfield, Nottinghamshire, for im- 
provements in the construction of bicycles and 
other velocipedes. Dated March 22, 1878. 

1,199. J. H. Smith, of 436, Euscon-road, London, for im- 
provements in velocipedes. Dated March 26, 1878. 

1,022. W. Storer, of Nottingham, Engineer, for improvements 
in machinery and apparatus for washing, scouring, 
wringing, and mangling. Dated March 24, 1874. 

1,042. G. Davies, Consulting Engineer, and W. Lees, Sewing- 
Machinist, both of Manchester, for improvements 
in fringing fabrics, and in the construction of 
apparatus therefor, part of which improvements is 
applicable also to the manufacture of fringe, and 
part to ordinary sewing-machines. Dated March 
25, 1874. 

Specifications PnBLisHED Ddrinq the Month. 



No. 2,944. 

„ 2,966. 

„ 3 008. 

„ 8,076. 

„ 3,141. 

„ 3,143. 

„ 3,148. 

„ 3,215. 

„ 3,252. 

„ 3,286. 

„ 3,299. 

„ 3,304. 

„ 3,334. 

„ 3,347. 

„ 3,458. 

„ 3,524. 



Postage Id. each extra. 

W. E. Partridge, apparatus for washing 

clothes, &c. ... ... ... 

J. H. Johnson, sewing machines, &o. 

W. E. Lake, knitting machines 

E. and L. J. Crossley and W. Sutliffe, spinning, 
&c. ... ... 

S. Pitt, thread cases and under tensions for 

sewing machines 
H. W. Pohlmann, pianofortes 

C. Cresswell, knitting machinee, &c 

W. Goode, machinery for bleaching, scouring, 

and cleaning 
J. Clough, spinning or drawing machinery 
J. H. Johnson, spinning machinery 
J. Booth, machinery for spinning fibres 

F. Mann, washing machines 

A. Storer, apparatus for overhead sewing 

W. R. Bull, apparatus for carrying luggage on 

bicycles, &c ... 

W. Clark, combined clothes washer and wringer 
J. Beresford, machinery for polishing silver, 
knives, forks, &c. 



s. d. 

6 

8 

8 

6 

6 

6 

1 4 



6 



" A Newspaper Pbopeietob " has written to the Times to 
say that the Government, in permitting postage stamps to be 
uced for receipt stamps must be prepared for a great loss of 
revenue. It would not require a great amount of ingenuity to 
convert imperfectly defaced stamps, taken from envelopes, 
into passable receipt stamps. Every day a person who has 
much correspondence would find among his letters a certain 
number the stamps of which have been defaced so slightly that, 
if the stamps are used afterwards for receipts the defacing 
marks could be concealed under the writing, which must be 
put on a receipt stamp. There are a great many mean and 
dishonest persons in tbe world, but surely this is an imaginary 
danger ! 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



mmi, mm & go., 

SOLE AGENTS IN EUROPE FOR 

Johnson, Clark & Co., 



OF NEW YORK. 



THE "HOME SHUTTLE" 

still keeps its place as being the best Hand Lock-Stich Sewing 
Machine in the world. It is exceedingly simple, never out of 
order, and always presents a bright and attractive appearance. 




We have added the loose winding wheel and all latest 
improvements. 

THE BEST TREADLE MACHINE IS THE 

Light Running "Standard" 

For Manufacturing and Family use. 




li is a Model of Strength and Beauty. 

The most Elegantly Ornamented Machine in the world. Lasts a life- 
time, and NEVER gets OUT of ORDER. EXCELS ALL OTHERS 
IN THOROUGHNESS OP WORKMANSHIP. 

We wish to establish Agencies in all Towns, and will give exclusive 
territory to first-class houses, and furnish Machines at very low prices. 



RENNICK, KEMSLEY & CO., 

(Late, Johnson, Clark and Co.), 

Finsbnry Circus, LONDON, EC. 



THOMAS WARWICK, 

MAKUFACTUEEK OP 

By Royal Letters Patent. BICYCLK MATKRIALS 

Of every description. Wholesale and for Exportation. 




WARWICK'S PATENT POTENTIAL RIMS. 



SOLE MAKER OP WOOLLET'S PATENT DUPLEX SPRING 
SADDLE. STAMPINGS OP ALL KINDS. 




C. D. Vesey, Esq., who won the late Tricycle Championship, used one 
of WOOLLEY'S PATENT SADDLES. He says : " I was highly 
delighted with it ; never once during the 50 miles ride did I feel the 
slightest of the Tough Toads.^' 

Price List Free on application to the above, 

Aston New Town, Birmingham. 



AND 

JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



WE have heard the inquiries put several times recently — 
" Where is the British Sewing Machine Trade 
Association ? and what is it doing ? " These inquiries, 
we observe, generally proceed from a few people who have 
been stupid enough to expect that the gentlemen who formed 
that Association would lend some amount of support to the 
advocates of that very questionable system of business, which 
proposes to disregard one of the commonest rights alike of 
individuals and trading corporations, namely, the right to their 
own fairly earned trade reputation. To such inquiriei we 
would simply reply, that the Sewing Machine Trade Associa- 
tion never has had the remotest intention of lending any aid 
whatever to the extent even of a single sixpence to assist in 
the development of such apoUcy as we have lately seen pursued 
by certain continental houses having agencies in this country. 
We speak from a personal and intimate knowledge of the views 
of the large majority of those who compose the Association, 
when we say that they view with utter disfavour the system 
of business which such houses are attempting to introduce 
into this country, and that they would withdraw their connec- 
tion from the Association should such a policy ever find favour 
in its midst. The Association was formed for the protection 
and development of the English sewing machine trade, not for 
its spoliation and degradation. Its leading members are gen- 
tlemen who have their own trade name and trade repute to 
take care of and protect from petty larceny, and they have not 
yet come to believe in a policy of piracy and false pretence. 
Whenever any question shall arise affecting the interests of the 
English trade, it will be found that the Association is quite 
equal to protecting the interests of its members, but these 
interests never have been, and never can be, identical with 
those who filch a trade name with as little compunction as a 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtTENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Sd 



rogue displays when lie steals linen off a hedge, or a purse 
from the pocket. 



There is an opening in connection with the Sewing Machine 
Trade which has been on offer for some time past, and which 
promises considerable scope to any person possessed of more 
brains than conscience, the post in question being the Editor- 
ship of a new journal to represent the interests of that happUy 
small section of the Trade who still persist in using other 
people's names to designate their goods by. These eccentric 
folks consider themselves illused because no existing Trade 
Organ will allow them to ventilate their very peculiar notions 
of mumn and temn —either by way of advertisement or other- 
wise — and they resolved, we believe, nearly a twelvemonth 
ago to run anew Journal, which should support their want of 
principle, and enlighten the Trade upon their entirely new 
code of mercantile morals. The hour for doing this they feel 
has come, and all they now need is the man and the money. 
It will, of course, reqmre a very fair amount of the latter, for 
nobody expects that such a venture coald ever, by any chance, 
pay its own expenses. The game has been tried once and 
again, but never with any other result than a heavy financial 
loss ; but the chief want of all is the man. He must be able to 
prove that the abolition of the eighth Commandment would, 
on the whole, be a boon to society, and that honesty is the 
worst of all possible policies. He must be an adept at showing 
how nearly a rogue may touch the confines of legal fraud 
without actually over-stepping the boundary line which leads 
to the criminal dock and the felon's prison. He must forget 
that there can be such things as honour and rectitude in cem- 
mercial transactions, and he must expect to be bidlied and 
brow-beaten if he attempts to express a single opinion contrary 
to the views of the persons in whose interests he engages to 
write. Such are the needful qualifications. The berth is 
open — the salary is moderate — the duties easy, if the candidate 
is utterly devoid of common honesty. Where is the man who 
will accept the post ? 



We would direct the attention of our readers to an interesting 
article by "Warder" in the Sewing Machine iVcit's, entitled 
" Trade Name Nihilism," which we have thought worthy a 
place in ourcolumns.andwhioh willbefoundiuanotherpage. It 
has been written auent Judge Treat's decision in the recent 
case Singer Manufacturiug Co. v. Stannage, a suit for the 
alledged violation of plaintiffs' trade mark. The bill was dis- 
missed at plaintiffs' cost, but an appeal was immediately taken 
by the plaintiffs' counsel to the Supreme Court of the United 
States, and as the case holds some analogy to one yet unde- 
cided in the English Law Courts, the result will be looked 
forward to with much interest. 



We are sorry to note the failure of so large a firm as Messrs. 
Thomas and Taylor, of Stockport. The washing machine trade 
has been comparatively free from these disasters, at least so far 
as the wholesale manufactui-ers are concerned. For further 
particulars we refer our readers to our "law" columns in 
another page of the joimaal. 



EXHIBITION OP DOMESTIC LABOUR-SAVING 

APPLIANCES. 

At the close of the above Exhibition it was resolved by the 

exhibitors to show their esteem for the General Manager, Mr. 

Charles Messent, and their sense of his courtesy and energy, 

by presenting him with a testimonial. 

A committee was accordingly formed for the purpose, and 



on the 14ih ult. a deputation, consisting of five of the principal 
exhibitors, waited upon Mr. Messent, and, in the name of the 
rest, presented him with a valuable gold watch and chain. The 
watch bore the following inscription : — 

" Presented to Charles Messent, Esq., General Manager of 
the Domestic Machinery Exhibition, Agricultural Hall, March, 
1881, by the exhibitors, as a mart of their esteem." 

The Treasurer, in making the presentation, referred to the 
successful issue of the Exhibition, and to the large amount of 
satisfaction felt by the exhibitors, to which Mr. Messent 
responded in suitable terms. 



OUR ILLUSTRATED SUPPLEMENT. 



THE HEBERLING RUNNING STITCH GUAGING 

MACHINE. 
This machine, of which we gave a short notice in our 
January issue, is manufactured by the Heberlmg Eunniug 
Stitch Sewing Machine Company., of Mount Pleasant, Ohio, 
U.S.A., and whose chief office and depot in Europe now is 
•46, Cannon-street, London, E.C., which is close by Cheapside 
and Queen Yictoiia-street, where all the leading sewing 
machine companies have their depots. The trimmings now so 
much in vogue and known as the "Mother Hubbard" style, 
for dresses, costumes, mantles, and waterproof ulstei's for 
ladies, can be produced by this little machine, with an 
elegance and precision far surpassing anything that can be 
done by hand, at the rate of 2,500 stitches per minute, or 
5,000 when both needles are use ; consequently it will do as 
much work in the same time as twenty persons can by hand. 
The principal movable parts of the machine are pinion-bar, 
plate pinion, needle-wheel, needle-wheel stud, plate-pinion 
stud (which is fastened with a set-screw under the plate), 
pinion-bar set-screw, cloth-spreader, cloth-spreader set-screw 
and thimble cotnecting with noedle-wheel stud and guage. 
As with the assistance of this machine the most beautiful 
gauging, gathering, and tucking can be made on material 
varying from heavy velvets to the most delicate sEk tissues, 
with regularity and speed, the agent will at once see that one 
at least will be indispensable in every dressmaker's workroom, 
whilst manufacturers of costumes, mantles, and underclothing, 
to which it is peculiarly adapted, will go in for quantities upon 
seeing what it will accompHsh. In size the Heberling 
Running Stitch Guaging Machine is somewhat smaller than 
an ordinary sewing machine, with length of arm sutficient for 
all purposes ; and can be readily attached to any table, and 
worked either by hand or foot. The machines are handsome 
in appearance, finely finished, and tastefully ornamented ; all 
briglit parts are nickel-plated. The company have received 
numerous testimonials as to the merits of the machine in 
practical use, all speaking very highly. One lady says : — 
" Permit me to say from experience that I regard the Heberling 
Quaging Machuie as mdispensablo to every milliner and dress- 
maker. It does the work well and thoroughly, and at great 
saving of time and labour. It is calculated to meet a great 
want in the trade, and I can cordially recommend it." And 
a firm of large manufacturers write: — "We are using your 
Guaging Machine in our factory ; it supplies over a hundred 
hands with their guaging, thus greatly reducing the cost of 
our goods." We understand that machines are being ordered 
every day by West-End and City houses, and are giving 
eveiy satisfaction. It is well perhaps to mention that all the 
parts of the Hebei'ling Machine, including the needles, are 
covered by the patents granted in the United States, Gie.it 
Britain, and throughout Europe. 



30 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 




ALLEGED THEFT OP A SEWING MACHINE. 

At the Sunderland Borough Police-court, on the 5th of 
April, Peter Wilson Cochrane, said to be a private detective 
in the employment of the North-Eastern Eadway Company, 
was charged by Henry Charles Askwith with stealing a sewing 
machine, value £5. — Mr. Bell appeared for the prosecutor, and 
Mr. Crow, jun., for the prisoner. — Mr. Bell said though the 
prosecution had been perfectly justified in taking these steps, 
he did not now propose to offer any evidence. — The Bench said 
they were not satisfied, as a warrant had been issued for the 
apprehension of one of the witnesses (Williams). They ex- 
pressed a wish to hear the evidence. — From the statement of 
Mr. Bell, it appeared that the prosecutor carries on business at 
Newcastle as the proprietor of a sewing machine depot, and 
has a branch establishment in Nile-street, Sunderland, of 
which John Young, 46, Tatham-street, is the manager. On 
the 15th March last, the prisoner went to the shop in Nile- 
street, and was supplied with a sewing machine and some oil- 
cloth and other things. The conditions upon which he was 
supplied were that a premium should be paid down, and that 
the articles should remain in the hirer's possession at his own 
address until the whole of the purchase money was paid, and 
that until the whole of the money was paid the hirer should 
only be considered bailee of the articles. The prisoner signed 
these conditions, and the machine was supplied him at his 
residence at No. 3, Hartley-street. On the following day the 
prisoner came to the shop and said the machine suited his wife 
very well. In consequence of what the manager, Mr. Young, 
heard, he went to the prisoner's house on the following 
Monday, when a week's payment would be due, but could not 
gain admission. Several times during the week when met by 
Young, the prisoner said he would call and pay the instalment, 
but he did not do so. On the Friday, the manager found the 
machine in the house of a person named Herring, and on the 
Monday morning it was in the house of Williams. In the 
meantime, the prisoner had told the manager that he would 
deny ever having had the machine. — Cross-examined by Mr. 
Ci'ow : The witness Young said the prisoner was not drunk 
when supplied with the machine, though they had a glass of 
beer each. Prisoner did not then tell him that he was changing 
his place of residence, but he had since told witness that he 
had gone to reside in Moor-street. Since the agreement was 
signed, witness had asked the prisoner to sign a stamped agree- 
ment, but he had refused to sign it, saying he would call at 
the shop and do so. — Mr. Crow said he wished to show that 
this was a case for the county court, and not for the police- 
court. — By Mr. BeU : It would not be necessary for a person 
changing from Hartley-street to Moor-street to go through 
the street where the machine was found. — John Williams, 
machine broker, St. Mark's-street, MiUfield, deposed that the 
defendant said to him on the 17th March last that he had a 
sewing machine, and that he was very hard up. He was very 
much the worse for drink at the time — in fact, he was pretty 
well drunk. That would be before nme o'clock in the morning. 
Witness thought defendant was too much the worse for liquor 
to have anything to do with him, so he left him, remarking 
that he would see him at the Prospect Hotel, where he was 
then going. Detective Elliott was passing at the time. He 
afterwards saw defendant at the public-house, and as he said 
he was very hard up, he advanced him SOs. on the machine, 
and took away the machine in a cab. He would have taken 
OS. profit on it if the machine had been for sale. Mr. Askwith 
came a week after and wanted the machine, and he said he 
could have it for X2 5s. Witness wanted his expenses out of 
it. He ultimately gave the defendant an order to take the 
machine away. Cross-examined : He could not say exactly 



whether the SOs. which he gave the defendant was a loan on 
the machine, or whether it was a purchase. Of course if he 
had not come for the machine, he would have sold it. He often 
did business that way. — George Herring deposed that he was 
at the Prospect Hotel, Hartley-street, when defendant and 
last witness were there. Williams offered to lend SOs. on the 
machine. The machine was not sold so far as he was aware. — 
Defendant pleaded not guilty, and Mr. Crow said he did not 
intend to call any witnesses for the defence. — The Bench com- 
mitted him to take his trial at the next Sessions at Durham. 
— The Mayor said the Bench could not but express their cen- 
sure on Mr. Askwith for having tried to compound this felony. 
Under no circumstances should he have done so, and they were 
astonished that for one moment he should have allowed this 
case to be passed over without being tried. They hoped if he 
had anything of this kind in future he would let the law take 
its course. — Mr. Grow asked the Bench to allow bail, and they 
agreed to accept the defendant's own recognisances for £50 
and two sureties of £15 each. 



INFRINGEMENT OF PATENT OF A CRIMPING 
MACHINE. 

Hill v. Toombs. * 

The Master of the Rolls had before him on the 12th ult. an 
action for an injunction to i-estrain infringement of a patent 
for a crimping or trimming machine for the manufacture of 
articles of ladies' dresses. The plaintiff invented his machine 
in 1878, and on applying for a patent found that a portion of 
the process had been invented and patented previously. He 
therefore altered his specification and obtained a patent. Of 
late he discovered that his patent was greatly infringed. The 
defence was that the plaintiff's patent was bad, that it was a 
combination of ah'eady known processes, and that the plaintiff 
claimed not for a combination, but for an invention. — Mr. 
Aston, Q.C., Mr. Webster, Q.C., and Mr. Carpmael were counsel 
for the plaintiff; and Mr. Horace Davey, Q.C., Mr. Lawson, 
and Mr. Chadwick Ely for the defendant. — His Lordship held 
that the objection was fatal, and gave judgment for the 
defendant. 



In ee Thomas, Tayloe, and Fielding. — In this case an 
application was made to file a petition in liquidation, and 
expedition was necessary. — The debtors, who traded as 
" Thomas and Taylor," were laundry and dairy engineers and 
machine makers at Fonthill-road, Finsbury Park, and at 
Manchester and other places in the North, and estimated their 
liabilities at £11,500, but the assets at present could not be 
ascertained. — Mr. Biddle stated that he had to apply to the 
court for leave to file a petition, in consequence of objection, 
raised in the liquidation department. Though the debtors 
traded at Finsbury Park, they were in business at Manchester, 
Salford, and other places. His firm had been instructed to 
file a petition in the London Court of Bankruptcy, and that 
morning the documents, which had been prepared at Man- 
chester, arrived in town. When taken to be filed, the 
Liquidation office declined to accept the same, as there was no 
ewdence whether the parties had or had not had prior bank- 
ruptcy or liquidation , and as the practice was strict on the 
matter a special application to the court was necessary. — Mr. 
Registrar Mui-ray asked whether an understanding would be 
given to file the necessary evidence. — Mr. Biddle undertook to 
give the required undertaking. In answer to the court, he 
said he did not know of a prior petition ; and to search the 
files would occupy some time, and the present proceedings 
would be rendered nugatory. — His Honour acceded to the 
request, and ordered the petition to be filed. 



Heney Bate, Sewing Machine Dealee, Stoke-on-Teent. 

A meeting of the creditors of Henry Bate was held on the 
26th March, at the ofBce of his solicitor, Mr. Wilson, Stoke- 
on-Trent. The unsecured liabilities were stated to be 
£626 8s. 6d., and the secured £25, the assets amounting to 
£60 18s. 2d. An offer of Is. in the pound was rejected, and 
liquidation was resolved upon, Mr. Stubbs was appointed 
trustee, with a committee of inspection, and Mr. WUson was 



iiAT 1, i88i. THE SEWli^G MACHINE GAZETTE ANJD JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES, 



31 



requested to register. Among the creditors are : — Beardmore, 
J., Stoke-on-Trent, £6 ; Bishops' Cluster Company, London, 
£6 6s.; Bostock, T., Burslem, £17; Brassington and Cooke, 
Manchester, £13 14s. lOd. ; Chatterley Iron Company, £7 6s. ; 
Cooke, E. and Co., London, £13 6s. ; Cresswell, W. H., Stoke- 
on-Trent, £140 ; Harrison, "W., Manchester, £28 14s.; Howe 
Machine Company, £59 18s. ; Littleton, Hon. C. J., Penk- 
ridge, £100 ; Leadley, G., Stoke-on-Trent, £19 Is. ; Manchester 
and Liverpool Bank, £8 ; Medina, E., Stoke-on-Trent, £8 ; 
Morris, C, Manchester, £5; Oldaore, T., Stoke-on-Trent, £8 ; 
Sellers and Allen, London, £32 6s. ; Stubbs, T., Fenton, £25 ; 
Taylor and Wilson, Accrington, £7 10s. ; Union Bank of 
Manchester, £28 ; Varley and Wolfenden, Keighley, £11 15s. 5d. ; 
Wade, P., Stoke-on-Trent, £5; Wright and Son, £5 12s. 8d ; 
Weston Coyney Colliery Company, £5 7s. 




Liquidations by Arrangement. 

Large, Edward, Saltley, near Birmingham, and Cato-street, North, 
Birmingham, bedstead manufacturer (separate creditors). 
March 22. 

Lookwood, .Tohn, Wakefieid-road, Dewsbury, late sewing machine 
agent. March 22. 

Talbot, John, Cato-street, North, Birmingham, bedstead manu- 
facturer (separate creditors). March 22. 

Gibson, Eobert George, late Hull, ironmonger. March 26. 

Graham, Joseph, Eagle House, Curwen-street, Workington, iron- 
monger. April 2. 

Grant, Thomas Charles, High-street, Watford, ironmonger. 
March 24. 

Boe, William, Westgate-road, Newcastle, ironmonger. April 21. 

Bills of Sals. 
Appleton, Cornelius Lyde, Shepton Mallett, Somerset, iron- 
monger ; .£200. In favour of Abraham Collins. Filed March 25. 
Harrison, Thomas, 5, St. Nicholas-street, Lancaster, ironmonger ; 

^646, &c. In favour of National Mercantile Bank. Filed 

March 30. 
Smith, William Edward, deceased (by Maria Parrott Smith, his 

widow, and another). Bridge-street, Isleworth, ironmonger ; 

je250, absolute sale. In favour of George E. Smith. Filed 

March 31. 
Ward, Sophia, 122, Dale-street, Liverpool, ironmonger ; ^673, &c. 

In favour of Liverpool Investment, &c., Co. Piled April 8. 
George, William, 67, High-street, Poplar, ironmonger: .£35, &c. 

In favour of Isaac Cohen. Filed April 13. 
Part, Thomas Richardson, 94, Standishgate and 4, Mill-gate, 

Wigan, Lancashire, ironmonger ; ^6165, &c. In favour of Woolf 

Levy. Piled April 11. 
Griffiths, Wiliam, 22, Stanley-street, Holyhead, Anglesey, iron- 
monger; ^70, &c. In favour of Thomas K. Jones. Filed 

April 22. 
Smith, WUliam, 15, Middle-street, Brighton, ironmonger, gasfitter, 

&c. ; JB64, &c. In favour of Moses PhQlipps. Filed April 21 . 

County Court JuiSoments. 

Birtwistle, Kenyon, 30, Canal-street, Clayton-le-Moors, Lancashire, 

machine dealer .£13 17s. March 10. 
Birtwistle, Hilton, 16, Ellis-street, Burnley, Lanorshire, machine 

dealer; .£13 17s. March 10. 
Kneale, George, 320 & 322, Mill-street, Liverpool, ironmonger; 

ill 10s. March 8. 
Allen, J., 10, West Bridge, Leicester, ironmonger; ^filO 5s. 2d. 

March 12. 
Smith, John, 36, Clifton-street, Eoath, Cardiff, ironmonger; 

X42 3s. 5d. March 14. 
Ward, B., Ill, Newingtou Butts, ironmonger; jEll 13s. March 16. 
Barr«tt, Wm., Barrow, Lancashire, ironmonger; ^621 12s. 

March 18. 



Crosskey and Son, Market-street, Lichfield, ^Staffs., ironmonger ; 

£20 5s. lid. March 12. 
Farrant, James, 50, Artillery-place, Woolwich, ironmonger ; 

il2 5s. 7d. March 23. 
Greene, Andrew B., 7, Moorgate-street Station-buildings, iron- 
monger ; ill 7s. 6(3. March 29. 
Perks, William, trading as Wm. Perks and Co., Ingleby-street, 

Spring-hill, Birmingham, bedstead manufacturer; j622 10s. 7d. 

March 15. 

Dissolutions of Partnership. 
Bowers and Cook, Wolverhampton, manufacturers of bicycles. 

March 28. Debts by Thomas Bowers. 
Hillary and Co., Teal-street, Mape-street, Bethnal Green, washing 

machine manufacturers. February 19. 
Holmes, J. L. and Son, Sutton, ironmongers. March 17. Debts 

by Arthur Eundell Holmes. 
Hope and Harrison, Gloucester, ironmongers. March 10. 
Luke, John and Co., Dartmouth, ironmongers. March 18. Debts 

by W. B. Luke. 
Miller, Bros., Old-street, Shoreditch, fixture and mangle dealers. 

March 25. 



THE DEUMMEE, OR AMERICAN COMMERCIAL 
TRAVELLER. 

There are few, indeed, outside of the commercial world, who 
are intimately acquainted with the seemingly brilliant life of 
the average travelling salesman, and none without practical 
experience can realise the most essential qualities necessary for 
success on the road. Notwithstanding, the general impression 
prevails that any one, with ordinary business capabilities, 
may readily become a successful drummer. That this idea is 
wholly incompatible can be seen from the fact that not only 
must a drummer be an excellent judge of human nature, at 
the same time possessed of much ready wit and a smooth 
tongue, but above all, great discretion in knowing when and 
how to use them. 

In engaging a representative for the road, the utmost care 
is exercised in selecting a man who can fulfUl the foUowiag 
requirements : neatness, honesty, sobriety, perseverance, 
patience, and besides, what is of greater importance, amiable 
under all circumstances. In fact, as near perfection as it is 
possible for a human being to attain. Hence the limited 
number, among the great army of drummers, who are in any 
way competent to represent a firm on the road and assume 
the responsibilities. 

The average drummer, and more especially the young men, 
are careless and extravagant, and even regarded by many as 
being privileged characters, devoid of principle, whose only 
ambition, and, in fact, sole occupation, consists in sitting in a 
large arm chair in front of some hotel, with a cigar in his 
mouth, and winking at the pretty girls. 

Whatever faults the drummer possesses can be attributed to 
the influence of temptation such a calling affords. A man con- 
tinually travelling has no home life, and everywhere he makes 
himself at home. Many imagine the life of a drummer a 
pleasant one. True, there is a certain charm in going from 
place to place and coming in contact with various kinds of 
people. Many incidents are encountered, and travelling 
abounds with adventures. After a few years of roaming, 
however, the charms disappear. All that was interesting or 
amusing begins to wane, and the drummer's life grows mono- 
tonous. It is then that he appreciates the comforts of a per- 
manent home, and only pursues travelling in order to satisfy 
his appetite and passions. 

The drummer seldom waits for an introduction, and when 
one drummer meets another they exchange cards, and, provid- 
ing they are not in the same line, become f liends. As a rule, 
the drummer is a jovial, good-natured, entertaining fellow, 
but, withal, he frequently suffers abuse and humiliation at the 
hands of uncivil merchants, who take delight in treating him 
with indifference, and even contempt, informing him in the 
most abrupt manner that "mercantile tramps" are not wel- 
come, and a few go so far as to announce their meanness on a 
placard hung up in some conspicuous place. The experienced 
drummer gives not the slightest notice to such rebuffs, for he 
holds that forbearance is the sublimest courage, and tenacity 
the greatest virtue. 

Not long since business called me to Council Blaffs, Iowa, 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



May i, 1881. 



where I never had occasion to stop before. On entering the 
store of a prominent merchant, I was infoimeJ by one of the 
clerks that the pi-oprietor sat in the rear, perusing a paper. I 
advanced towards him, and on seeing me he deliberately arose, 
adjusted his eye-glasses, scrutinised me from head to foot, 
sat down again, and ^es^lmed reading. I approached, wished 
him a good morning, and expressed my surprise at his conduct. 

" I know you were a drummer," was the reply. 
• "Pardon me, kind sir; a commercial tourist, if you please." 

" Well, what do you intend to bore me with ? " 

" Sir, I am a stranger in a sti'ange city. I am the represen- 
tative of one of the largest and most extensive drug manufac- 
turers in America, and have taken the liberty to call in hopes 
of being welcomed to your beautiful city, and also to make a 
few inquiries regarding several parties who desire to purchase 
our wares, but if my presence is annoying I beg a thousand 
pardons for the intrusion." 

" My young friend, give me your hand, and forgive me ; but 
really these drummers (commercial tourists, if you please) 
have so provoked me of late that I swore they ought to be 
exterminated. Pray be seated, and if I can atone for my 
rudeness by being of any service to you, I shall consider it an 
bonour. Do you anticipate remaining in Council Bluffs over 
Sunday ? If so, I should be most happy to have you visit me, 
and I will endeavour to make it as pleasant as possible for 

" I regret exceedingly to decline your kind invitation, but I 
am booked for Omaha, where letters await me." 

" Oh, but I insist upon your remaining, and will have your 
letters attended to. Come, now, what do you say?" 

" Well, I will consent on one condition, and that is if you 
will promise to purchase a bill of shirts from me." 

" But you informed me that you were selling drugs." 

" Pardon me, I will explain. I did not think my line were 
drugs vmtil arriving in the ciity, when I learned to my sorrow 
that the merchants had just returned from market and had 
purchased their stocks, and that shirts were indeed a drug. 
Now, sir, you can be of service to me by walking to the hotel 
to inspect our new-fangled, self-ventUating, concave and con- 
vex, double seam, re-inforced — — " 

" Stop, young man ; I have been in business during the past 
twenty years, and this is the first time I have been taken in. 
I will go to the hotel with you and purchase a bill of goods, 
although I am overstocked. Come and take a drink." 



PROCKTEE'S METALLIC DOOR MAT. 

This invention resembles in appearance the ordinary Tubular 
Indiarubber Mat, but it possesses the advantages of greater 
solidity, durability, and strength, Being formed of iron, 
thickly coated with zinc, it is extremely durable, is not affectei 
by exposure to wet, and will not warp or lose its original 
shape. For churches, chapels, hotels, shops, schools, country 
houses, public and other buildings, it is invaluable. The dirt 
removed from the boot falls into the cellular spaces, and on 
lifting the mat it can be readily swept away. The manufac- 
turer is Ml-. W. Prockter, ironmonger, Launceston, Cornwall. 



THE ZEEOMOTOE. 



_ Prof. Gamgee has made a discovery, which is to revolu- 
tionize all the accepted theories in connection with motive 
power. Mr. Isherwood, the chief engineer of the United 
Staffs Navy, has recommended his department to give Mr. 
Gamgee the opportunity to try his new motor in the Wash- 
ington Navy-yard, and the engineeiing world on this side of 
the Atlantic is awaiting the result with some degree of 
ititerest, not to say impatience. It is well known that liquid 
ammonia is vaporised imder pressure at the average tempera- 
ture of the air in warm climates, and, in vaporising, it, of 
course, acts somewhat in the same way as steam, and may be 
used to propel a piston in a cylinder. Consequently it can be 
utilised as a motive power ; but, until Prof. Gamgee promul- 
gated his views, no one dreamt that it could be used without 
the aid of fuel as a motor for war vessels and other ships that 



are now propelled by steam. Full details of the discovery are 
withheld, but the fact that the Chief Engineer of the United 
States Navy has lent the weight of his name to the scheme 
gives it a certain importance, and those who would unhesita- 
tingly denounce it as a resuscitation of the perpetual motion 
snare are awaiting further particulars before they condemn the 
new " zeromotor." The practical test, however, -vvill effectually 
determine its value. 



THE INVENTION OP THE STOCKING LOOM. 

When the crude state which every branch of the mechanical 
arts was in previous to the sixteenth century is taken into 
consideration, it may be claimed for William Lee's invention 
of the stocking loom that it was one of the most extraordinary 
examples of mechanical ingenuity that has ever been achieved. 

In every other process of weaving various threads are made 
either to intersect or to twist round each other, in order to bind 
or connect them together to form the web, but in stocking 
weaving, in its simple form, only one thread is used, and it 
is by this alone that a sei'ies of loops are made, in such a 
manner as to intersect each other, and thereby form the 
looped fabric which is the distinguishing feature of this system 
of weaving. 

Eespectnig the life of William Lee, many conflicting accounts 
are given. It appears that he was born at Woodborough, in 
Nottinghamshire, but as the parish register only commences 
in 1547, it does not contain an account of his baptism. 

In 1833 Dr. Ure, assisted by Mr. Pelkin and other gentle- 
men of Nottingham, made a thorough inquiry respecting the 
history of the Lee family, and all information that could be 
obtained about Lee and his invention. Unfortunately nothing 
of importance was added to what was already known ; but the 
Doctor gave his opinion that the following is the more 
probable statement of the case : — 

"It is an ancient tradition around Woodborough, his birth- 
place, that Lee in youth was enamored of a mistress of the 
knitting craft, who bad become rich by employing young 
women at this highly-prized and lucrative industry. By 
studying fondly the dexterous movements of the lady's hands, 
he became himself an adept, and had imagined a scheme of 
artificial fingers for knitting many loops at once. Whether 
this feminine accomplishment excited jealousy or detracted 
fi'om his manly attractions is not said ; but his suit was 
received with coldness, and then rejected with scorn. Eevenge 
prompted him to realise the idea which love first inspired, and 
to give days and nights to the work. Tbis ere long he 
brought to such perfection that it has since remained with- 
out essential improvement, the most remarkable stride in 
modern invention. He thus taught his mistress that the love 
of a man of genius is not to be slighted with impunity." 

After many failures in obtaining a patent, Lee went to 
France, taking his machines with him, but he died in Paris in 
1610, before establishing his business. Daring his illness, Mr. 
James Lee, a brother of William, who was at that time at 
Eouen, where it was intended to carry on the manufacture, 
went to Paris, but he found on his arrival that his brother was 
dead and buried. On his return to Eouen he ,with seven of 
the workmen who had gone with them from England, returned 
to London, taking with them the machines they had brought. 
These machines were set up in Old-street-square, and became 
the foundation of the London Hosiery Manufacture. The 
machines were sold, and Mr. James Lee went to Nottingham, 
for the purpose of making more. He found out one of his 
brother's old apprentices, named Aston, who was at the time 
in business as a miller. They joined in partnership, and began 
making new frames in 1620. 

From this period the business rapidly extended, and in 1657 
the Company of Stocking Weavers, or " Frame Work Knitters," 
obtained their charter. London, Godalming, and Notting- 
hamshire were tne chief seats of the trade. Some slight im- 
provements had been made in the construction of the machine 
from the time of Aston's, but it was not before the middle of 
the next century that various additions were made to the 
frame by means of which considerable changes were made in 
the fabrics produced. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



33 



TRICYCLING BY STEAM. 
Bi AN Occasional Cokeespondent.) 

" Go and see the steam tricycle at the Agricultural Hall." 
Such was the advertisement in glaring red letters that met 
one's eye on most of the omnibuses some few weeks back. I 
went one morning early, and by chance found in the gallery 
the inventor, Sir Thomas Parkyns, enjoying the soothing weed 
and silently contemplating his machine. 

"This machine," said Sir Thomas, "I invented for the 
purpose of conveying myself and my photographer's apparatus 
from place to place." 

I said, " I thought the machinery should not be in so con- 
spicuous a place ; besides it was rather in the way." 

"Don't you be too much in a hurry," said Sir Thomas. " I 
have heard hundreds make the same remark. I did not make 
this machine for the public, but for myself. If I put the 
engine under the seat where would my photographer's 
apparatus go ?" 

These few words of conversation between myself and the 
baronet will suffice to explain that which has puzzled all who 
have seen the machine — why the engine was not put under the 
seat instead of in front on the left hand side. The tricycle to 
be made for the public will be of lighter construction than the 
one exhibited and working with an oscillating cylinder to 
each large wheel, and will retail at £45. 

The following is the description of the patent in the in- 
ventor's own words : — 

I alter and enlarge the frame work of the ordinary tricycle 
by placing the third or hind wheel a little further to the rear ; 
and in order to transfer the strain of this hind wheel to the 
middle of the same I place a forked rod, the fork of which I 
attach to the axle of the said hind wheel, and the other end I 
attach to the frame of the tricycle, and in the space so made 
available between the seat of the rider and the hind wheel I 
place a tubular boiler for the purpose of generating steam for 
driving the steam engine. This boiler is adapted for burning 
liquid fuel, such as paraffin, rock oil, or other volatile oils in 
the following manner : — I place on or near to the boiler a tank 
containing the liquid fuel, from the bottom of which tank a 
pipe is carried underneath the boiler, and is then sent back in 
a ZD shape and closed at the end. The top side of the lower 
half of the 3 tube is perforated with small holes to allow of the 
escape of the gases which are generated in the upper half of 
the 3 tube by the heat of the burning liquid fuel and gases 
escaping through the perforations in the lower half. A tap on 
the pipe near to the liquid fuel tank regulates the glow of the 
the liquid. In some cases I pi'efer to volatilise the liquid fuel 
by placing a small burner mider the tank instead of using 
the 3 tube, and I then conduct the inflammable gases which 
are generated in the tank under the boiler, and alluw them to 
escape through small holes in the pipe, where they burn, and 
thus generate steam in the boiler. The steam from the 
boiler is expanded in one or more steam cyliuder.s, the piston 
rods of which are connected either direct to the axle of the 
large central wheel, or if preferred by means of gearing or 
straps in the manner well understood by engineers. lu certain 
cases I fit a surface condenser to the engine, composed of small 
thin tubes. The boiler and engine are covered in by a light 
wooden or metallic case, and over the top may be placed a 
light box or locker, in which may be carried .any tools, or 
stores, or wearing apparel. It is obvious that the; above 
apparatus for propulsion is readily applicable to all other 
descriptions of vehicles. 

Before we see the steam tricycle common in our streets, 
lawyers will have to decide whether it shall be legal to ride one 
or nut. The inventor h;is been served with six summonses for 
riding his machine in the open street. The magistrates of 
Greenwich fined him Is. in each case, giving him leave to 
appeal to a superior court, which it is certain be will do. 



" YoTT must cultivate decision of character and learn to say 
'No,' " said a father to his son. Soon after, when his mother 
told him to shovel dowm some coal, the boy said " No " with 
an emphasis which showed a remembrance of the lesson. 



APPARATUS FOR CLEANING, BLACKING, AND 

POLISHING BOOTS AND SHOES, &c. 

Mr. Thomas Lever, of Nelson, near Burnley, Lancaster, has 
obtained provisional protection only for " Improvements in 
apparatus for cleaning, blacking, and polishing boots, .shoes, 
and other articles." This is a simple machine which will 
effectually clean and polish boots and shoes. The inventor 
thus describes his invention : — 

On a suitable frame or stand I employ three sets of circrJar 
grooved or hollow brushes carried on suitable spindles; the 
brushes are carried at the one end of their spindles by cranks 
or arms, at their other ends by wheels or discs. The bodies of 
the brushes I make preferably of iudia rubber, in which are 
fixed the bristles ; the spindles of each brush are made 
telescopic, that is to say, to slide into each other, so that by 
means of shafts with right and left hand threads, worm and 
worm wheels, the brushes can be expanded or contracted at the 
will of the attendant, according to the sizes of the bootsorshoes 
to be cleaned. The middle brush being the blacking brush it 
has a suitable receptacle for the blacking, and a number of 
teats at intervals to distribute the blacking. The supply o£ 
blacking can be stopped or regulated by a shield inside the 
centre brush, which cuts off the communication with the teats. 
The machine may be worked either by treadle, hand, or motive 
power, and by means of a number of pulleys and bands. The 
brushes revolve at a great velocity; the cranks also slowly 
revolve and carry the brushes and spindles around with them, 
and bring chem into operation successively, or as required. 

The action is as follows : — The boots are placed upon the 
hands of the attendant, and held under and in contact with 
the first brush, which brashes off the dirt from the front part 
of the boots or shoes; the boots are then placed between the 
first and second brushes, so that the second bru^h blacks the 
fronts of the boots, whilst the first brush cleans off the dirt 
from the heels or hind parts of the boots; the boots are then 
placed between the second and third brushes ; third brush 
comes into operation and polishes the front part of the boots, 
whilst the second brush is blacking the back parts of the 
boots; are then placed over or behind the third brush, which 
polishes their back parts. The whole operation of thoroughly 
cleaning a pan- of boots with this apparatus taking but one 
minute. 

Any class of boots may be cleaned with this apparatus, and 
any poition of the boots as required. 



Melbourne International Exhibition. — Messrs. S. 
Thomas and Sorts, British Needle Mills, Redditch, have re- 
ceived the first award at this exhibition for sewing machine 
needles. Messrs. H. Mil ward and Sons have been awarded 
first class awards respectively for needles, fish-hooks, packing 
needles, and surgeons' needles. They were also awarded a 
second-class for salmon flies. Messrs. W. Woodfield and Sons, 
Easemore Works, were also awarded a second order of merit 
for serving needles. Mr. Chas. A. Rickards, sewing silk manu- 
facturer, of Bell Busk MUl, has been awarded the first order 
of merit for twist and reel sUk. 

Shopkeepers and others will please take notice that a 
fargerv of Bank of England £o notes has been discovered at 
ShefBeld. The note is dated " May 19, 1880." _ The engraving 
is wonderfully perfect, even to the microscopic marks, which 
are known only to the initiated. The fraud is apparent from 
the absence of the water-mark. Otherwise the note would 
easily deceive. 

SO NEAR, AND YET SO FAR. 

The boy stood on the gallei'y floor 

At the naughty female show ; 
And oast his longing glances o'er 

Bald-headed sin below. 

" I'm too far back," he sadly said, 

Yet dared not forward go. 
For he saw his aged father's head 

First in the foremost row. 



$4, 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP D0ME8TIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat ],1881. 



APPARATUS FO±i CLEANING AND POLISHING BOOTS 

AND SHOES. 

Mr. 0. Mattison, of Hamraersmith, has obtained provisional 
protection only for improvements in machinery or apparatus for 
cleaningand polishing boots and shoes. This invention has for 
its object the construction of simple and effective apparatus for 
polishing boots and shoes in an economical and effective 
manner. It consists in a stand or platform fitted with a hinged 
last or lasts, which can be adjustable in their sizes, or various 
sizes can be placed in position. The boot or shoe to be cleaned 
is placed on this platform with the last inside, and held in posi- 
tion by a cramp or otherwise. By throwing back the last on 
its hinge the foot with the boot on can be placed on the plat- 
form and the cleaning then performed. A lever is arranged 
swivelling on a centre underneath the platform and furnished 
with removable curved brushes, the distance between which can 
be adjusted to suit the size of the boot or shoe to be cleaned. 
One of these brushes operates on each side of the boot or shoe 
by ha,ving a reciprocating movement (analogous to hand 
brushing) imparted to it by a pin crank, or other device, from 
the main shaft. This shaft actuates by mitre, friction wheels, 
or their equivalent, a rotating brush pivoted on a horizontal 
axis which cleans the "upper" or front part of the boot or 
shoe. A standard carrying a driving wheel is fitted to the 
stand, and this wheel actuates the main shaft by an endless 
belt or other device, the relative sizes of the pulleys being 
advantageously three to one. The various brushes can be 
made removable to allow of the different operations of brush- 
ing, blacking, and polishing, and one may use a rotary black- 
ing brush to be held by a handle and operated by a flexible 
shaft from the main axle, so as to be applied to every part of 
the boot or shoe on the last or stand. To assist in polishing 
more quickly, the inventor can arrange a smaU fan actuated 
from the main shaft, which can be heated by a small lamp, or 
otherwise, and furnished with a pipe and mouthpiece, so that 
warm air can be blown on the boot or shoe after the blacking 
is put on. This will materially shorten the time of polishing 
when large numbers of boots have to be polished. The speed 
of the fan and quantity of air is readily adjustable, and the 
fan or the sets of brushes are arranged to be thrown in and 
out of gear as required. 



Domestic Economy Congeess. — A meeting of the general 
committee of ladies of the above congress was held at the 
Society of Arts on the 27th ult., Sir H. Cole, K.C.B., in the 
chair. Tmong those present were : The Countess of Airlie, 
the "Viscountess Haberton, Ladv Charlotte Schreiber, Lady 
Blanche Hozier, Lady Cole, Mrs. Cotton, Mrs. Ployer, Mrs. 
Grenfell, Mrs. HoUond, Mrs. Lecky, Mrs. Mann, Mrs. Peploe, 
Miss Cole, Miss Hooper, and Miss Pay Lankester. Lord A. 
Churchill, Major-General Cotton, C.S.I., the Rev. J. Paun- 
thorpe, and the Eev. N. Price, members of the executive com- 
mittee, were also present. Nine candidates were elected 
members of the congress. The committee discussed the 
details for the opening of the congress by a conversazione at 
the Royal Albert Hall towards the end of June. 



BICYCLE GOSSIP. 

(By an Idlee,) 

The favourable change in the weather which has occurred 
dui ing the past month has made glad the heart of 
most bicycle manufacturers, for they are now busy exe- 
cuting orders, while retailers of these articles are experiencing 
a good steady trade. Coventry, Wolverhampton, and many 
other towns are now turning out great quantities of these iron 
steeds for both home and export trade. 

At Coventry the other day, I learnt that Messrs. Warman, 
Laxon, and Co., who, by the bye, have taken into partnership 
Mr. Aslatt, have, with a view of increasing their business, 
taken possession of some good premises known as the Albion 
Mills. I wish them success in their enterprise. Messrs. 
Hillman, Herbert, and Cooper are, I hear, making a new 
tricycle which will shortly be placed on the market. This 
machine will drive both wheels; steer in front, turn on the 
front, and at the same time be very light in construction. I 
was sorry to learn that Mr. James Starley, of Starley Bros, 
is very ill. I believe he is shortly to undergo an operation. 
All who know him will wish him safely through it. When 
down the East of Loudon the other day, I noticed a new firm 
of bicycle manufacturers had suddenly sprung into existence. 
What class of machine they make I cannot say, but I shall soon 
go and play Paul Pry. What about the steam tricycle P How 
will the lawyers decide this important question ? Will Sir 
Thomas Parkyns have to be preceded with a man and a red 
flag like a steam roller ? I hope the judges will have had a 
good breakfast or luncheon, for on that depends entirely the 
state of their temper, and on their temper the decision of the 
case. 



Me. G. Baddeley, sewing machine agent, of 25, Church- 
road, West Brighton, writes as for the addresses of a few good 
wholesale perambulator manufacturers. We leave the trade 
to answer him. 

Mr. C. W. Senatje (who has the European agency for the 
Heberling running stitch sewing machine) represents also 
almost every description of American manufactures. Shippers 
and large buyers wiU do well to inspect the varied stock of 
samples at the warehouse, 46, Cannon-street, E.G., which 
include specialties in agricultural implements, machinery, 
axes and edge tools, carriages and materials, ship chandlery, 
boots and shoes, shoe pegs, nails and tools, woodenware, 
clocks, sewing machines, lampware, cigars and tobacco, safes 
and pumps, patent medicines, chairs and furniture, glassware, 
India rubber goods, stationery, jewellery, druggists' sundries, 
canned goods, toys and novelties, kerosene and other oils. 

" Uncle, what is the hardest lesson you ever had to learn ?" 
asked a young lady -of a veteran statesman known for his 
strong prejudices. "That the man who differs from me not 
only in opinions but in principle may be as sincere and honest 
as I am," was the reply. 

" Ma," said a little boy, looking up from an illustrated 
paper, "I wish I was a little South Africa boy." "Why, 
Georgie ?" asked his ma. " Why, 'cause their mothers don't 
wear slippers," he feelingly replied. 



HUTCHISON'S PATENT FORK CLEANING MACHINE, 




Adapted for Hotels, Clubs, Restaurants, and Private Houses, It is 
constructed to polish SIX FORKS AT A TIME, and renders an even 
and brilliant polish without injury, by the simple method of a rotary 
handle which can be turned any way. 

N.B.— This Machine is the greatest preventative of damage to 
which the prongs are exposed when cleaned by hand. 

HUTCHISON'S PLATE POWDER, 

As used in the Patent Pork Cleaning Machine. For cleaning and 
brilliantly polishing all kinds of Plate, Plated Articles, Metal, Tin, 
Pewter, Looking Glasses, &c. To be had at Oil and Colour Ware- 
houses, and of Ironmongers and Storekeepers. 

Prices, in Tin Canisters, J-lb., 6d. ; 1-lb., 1/; 2-11)., 1/9. 
Liberal terms to Shippers and Merchants. 



Length, -23 inches; width, 12 inches; height, 9 in. MOSSrS. HUTCHISON & CO., 

MANUFACTORY: 51, FANN STREET, ALDERSGATE STREET, LONDON, E.G. 



; 



Vay 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



35 



THOMAS SMITH & SONS, 



ESTABLISHED 1848. 




PATENTEES. 



THE ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 





EVEEY PAET SUPPLIED IN VAEIOUS STAGES, 



Prom the Rough Stamping or Forgings to the 
Complete Finished Article. 

J^one but the very best Brands of Material used for the several purpose 
embracing LOW MOOR IBOJV, BEST BEST GUK, 8fc., ^c. 

VERY SPECIAL IN ALL SUNDRIES AND APPLIANCES, 

INCLUDING ALL NEWEST DESIGNS AND PEINCIPLES IN 

SADDLES, VALISES, SPANNERS, UMPS, 

BELLS, tScc, <Sz;C. 

61, HOLBORN VIADUCT, 

LONDON, E.G. 

, Works :—Saltley Mill, Birmingham. 

DEALERS ARE INVITED TO APPLY FOE WHOLESALE TEEMS 



THE SEWIMG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



ILLMAN, HERBERT, & COOPER, 

Works :— O O V E N T R T. 

London : 97, Cheapside. Leicester : 76, Welford Road. 



MAKERS OP THE 





1? 



99 



" Premier," " Flying Dutchman," & other Bicycles & Tricycles. 






PATENT DOUBLE 

BALL BEARINGS. 



BlUMAH HERBERT &COOPU 
MAKERa. 

COOPERS 

INEXTINGUISHABLE 

HUB LAMP. 

The only Lamp that does 
not go out on a rough road. 





On the "D.H.F. PREMIER," fitted with our Patent Ball Bearings, was accomplished 
The greatest distance ever ridden in one week, viz. : — 1,405 MILES, and on the same Machine 
The greatest distance in one day is 262 MILES- 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE FREE. 

TESTIIMZOlSri^LS. 

Please send another large size " Cooper's Patent " Lamp, so that I may get it to-morrow. It is the 
grandest thing in Lamps that I have ever seen or tried. — Yours truly, W. Tatteespield. 

Dear Sirs, Brighton, December 27th, 1880. 

We have much pleasure in testifying to the excellence of " Cooper's Patent Lamps," which give great 
satisfaction. Yours truly, H. Eevell Retnolds, jun., Dark Blue B.C., and L.B.C. 

E. K. Eevell Eetnolds, Dark Blue B.C. 
L. B. Eetnolds, L.B.C. 



All Oommunications to be addressed to the Works, COVENTRY. 



Mat 1, 188i. 



THE SfiWiNG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JotjRNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Si 



THE PATENT 

">EOLUS" BALL BEARINGS 



AEE 



UNIVERSALLY 

ADJUSTABLE, 

DUST PROOF, 

DURABLE, 




AND 

REQUIRE 

BUT SLIGHT 

LUBRICATION. 



ELETATION. 



FEONT VIEW. 



BACK WHEEL BEARINGS. 



See 

Testimonals 

and 

Reviews. 




See 

Testimonials 

and 

Reviews, 



EtEVATION. 



As a Proof of their Superiority over all others, 

Mr. H. L. C O R T I S , Amateur Champion, 

Won the 25 and 50 MILES AMATEUE CHAMPIONSHIP RACES on a Bicycle fitted with " ^olus " Bearings, 
BEATING EECOED TIME, and in a Five Mile Eace BEATING EECORD TIME in Three, Four, and Five Miles. 

In the SIX DAYS' EACE at LONDON, April last, rode the Unprecedented Distance of 220 MILES and some odd 
laps Tfithout dismounting from the Bicycle or once Oiling the Bearings. 



SOLE PROPRIETOR AND MAKER 



AVILLIAM BO^VN, 

308, SUMMER LANE, BIRMINGHAM, 



ALSO MANUFACTUREE OF 



Best Steel Balls, Bicycle Fittings, and Requisites of every 
description and General Stamping in Iron and Steel. 

N.B.— Considerable reduction in price of the " /Eolus " Bearings this Season. 



3S 



THE SEWINO MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



May 1, I88i. 



" The Coventry Triumph " Bicycles & Tricycles. 
WARMAN, LAXON & CO., 

WEST ORCHARD, COVENTRY, 

WHOLESALE AND EXPORT MANUFACTURERS. 

India Rubber Tyred Bath Chair and Perambulator Wheels. Speciality Children's Bicycles and 
Tricycles. Manufactures for this Season cannot be surpassed. Price Lists on Application. 



TOWER WORKS, PIPER'S ROW, WOLVERHAMPTON, 

MANUFACTUEERS OF THE ^^ EXPRESS'' BICYCLE, 



AND 



BICYCLE FITTINGS OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 



THE LARGEST 



THE LARGEST SEWING 



THE LARGEST SEWING MACHINE 



EWIN6 lUTAGHINE TITTINfiS 




Warehouse. 



i Machine "Belt" § W 1 Oil 

Manufacturers. Af J& Manufacturers. 

Bishop's Cluster Company, Limited, 25, Hamsell St., London, E.G. 





SEWING AND MACHINE NEEDLES. 

ALL KINDS OF FANCY NEEDLES, KNITTING PINS, CROCHET HOOKS, THIMBLES, &Cm 

THE PARK WOOD MILLS CO., 

NEEDLE MANUFACTURERS, 

PHce usts Free. 230, BRADFORD STREET, BIRMINGHAM, 



INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 

Of Power and Work Machinery, Implements and Tools for small industries ; Macliines and Implements 
for the Dairy, and Agricultural Machinery, to be held in 

.i^ I_. T O IsT ^A^, 3srE^ii 13: ^^ IM: IB TJ Pe, G- , 
From August 18th till October 17tli, 1881. 

Applications should be sent in at once. For Prospectuses, apply to the Commissioners at their OfiB.ce, 

116, KONIGSTRASSE, ALTONA. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



39 



CHARLES J. THURLOW, 



M 






m 




a P 



39, CHESTER STREET, HULME, 

MANCHESTER 



LXJ 


■to 


if) 


CO 
CO . 




2 ^ 


MAN 

ERLI 


<-r> 

1 i 


s 


m 
X 




|J 


-=c 


'^ 1 






o 






a a ^^\ 



SURREY MACHINIST COMPANY. 



Patent 
Double Sec- 
tion Hollow 
Bims, 18s.6d 
per pair. 




The 

Lightest 

and most 

rigid in the 

Market. 



a^ »], 



The only machine made with a perfect 



SUSPENSION SPRING AND SADDLE. 

The Patent D.S.H.R. Racer is the litrhtest and most rigid machine in the world 

List and Photo 4 Stamps. Illustrated List of Bicycle Fittings stamp. 

Special Terms to Shippers and Agents. 

3S, BX j-A^CJCI^A.]^ ST- Xj03srX)QI<r- 

INDIARUBBER BICYCLE and CARRIAGE TYRES of every description kept 
in Btock, and supplied by return. Indiarubber Air Saddles, 7s. 6d.. post free 
All kinds of Bicycle requisites supplied in the rough or finish. Uustrated Price 
List, 1 Stam|i. Suite k Co., Indiarubber Manufacturers, 87, Blackman-st., London 



WATSON & CO., 

OLDHAM, 

MAmiFACTTJEERS OE THE CELEBRATED 

Family and Medium l\/laGliine 

WITH ALL THE LATEST IMPEOVEMENTS. 

Also JIASTJFACTITREES OF THE 

Ou tlie Wheeler aud Wilson Principle. 
Special Terms to Merchants and Shippers, 



A LARGE STOCK OF 

ROLLER RINK SKATES, 

From 6/- per pair. ' 




iXPRESS 

G. E. WRIGHT, 

WHOLESALE 

AGENT FOR SEWING MACHINES 

OF EVERY DESCKIPTION. 



Sole Agent for the " Little Europa " Lock- 
stitch Sewing 2Iachines, and Boyal 
Rink Roller Skates. 

No. 1, NEW BROAD STREET, 

LONDON, E.G. 

Lock- Stitch Sewing Machines from 27/- each. 



TO INVENTORS, GENERAL PATENT OFFICE 

Established 1830. 



G. F. REDFERN, 

(Successor to L. De Fontainemoreau Sf Co.), 
4, SOUTH STREET, FINSBXJBY, LONDON; 



Provisional Protection, £7; French Patent, £7; Belgian, .£8; 

German, £10 10.^.; United States, X17 10s. Designs and Trade 

Marks Kegi'st«red. Circular gratis on appUoatioa- 



40 THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUHNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. Mat 1, 1881. 

The Only Gold Medal for Boot and Shoe Machinery Awarded at the 
Paris Exposition was for the Machinery of 

THE BLAKE & GOODYEAR 

BOOT ANO SHOE MACHINERY COMPANY, 

LIMITED. 





I A GEEAT VAEIETY OF MACHiraRH 

FOR 

HEEL NAILING AND TRIMMING, 

EDGE TRIMMING AND SETTING, 
HEEL BLOCKING, RAND AND WELT CUTTING. 

RAND TURNING, i 
SELF-FEEDING EYELET MACHINES, 

Self -Feeding Punches, Double and Single Fitting Machines 

FOR PUTTING IN ELASTICS, 

STRAIGHT AND CIRCULAR READERS, 
And a great variety of other Machinery and Patented Tools. 

MANY OF OUR MACHINES MAY BE SEEN IN MOTION, 

4T NEWPORT PLACE, LEICESTER. 

Raw Hide Mallets & Hammers for Shoe Manufacturers & Machinists, 
ROLLERS, PRESSES, KNIVES. AND IRON OR WOOD LASTS. 



i 



1, WQRSHIF STREET, LONDON, E.C. 



Mat 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 41 



B"'^" SI'EOI.A.X^ .A.I=:POI3NrT3ivd:B3SrT. 




Letters Patent Dated 17th April, 1838. 

R.F.&J.ALEXANDER&CO., 

SEWING COTTON MANUFACTURERS 

TO HER MOST GRACIOUS MA.IESTY QUEEN VICTORIA. 



MOLENDINAR WORKS, GLASGOW, 

AND 

CROFTHEAD WORKS, NEILSTON. 

LONDON WAREHOUSE: 

No. 9, BOW LANE, CHEAPSIDE, E.C. 



Manufacture all kinds of Sewing Cotton on Reel, Ball, and Card, 

for Hand and Machine use. Also Knitting Cotton of a very superior 
quality. 

Trade Marks for 6, 4, 3, and 2 Cords—Soft and Glace Cottons. 

<^f\'^1?>^ ^S^''"^* ^*^'^^V''*''''4: 






SiiN AlooN STAR 

Best duality. Medium Quality. Cheapest Quality. 

Made in all lengths, free from knots, and guaranteed full measure as marked. 

These Threads being favourite brands in almost all markets of the world, unprincipled 
and flagrant imitations are very numerous. 

Manufacturers, Merchants, and Consuniers are warned against imitations, and requested 
to take special note of the Trade Marks as above. 

Prices of the various kinds, considering qualities, will be found very cheap. 



42 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 




THE ONLY GOLD MEOAL AT THE PARIS EXHIBITION 



FOR 




BOOT & SHOE MACHINERY, 

BLAKE AND GOODYEAE 

T & SHOE MACHINERY CO., LIMITED. 



BO 



THE NUBIAN BLACKING 

All Boot and Shoe Manufacturers, Saddlers, Harness Makers, and Bag Manufacturers 

should keep the Nubian Blacking. 



The NUBIAN BLACKINa 

"s perfectly Waterproof. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 
will not rub off, or soil ladies' 
skirts. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 
need only be applied once a week. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 
gives a polish equal to patent 
leather. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 
will not crack. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 

will polish belts, travelling bags, 
harness, and all leather goods. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 
keeps the leather soft and 
pliable. 




The NUBIAN BLACKING 
is free from acid, which abounds 
more or less in all other Black- 
ings. 

The NUBIAN BLACKING 
is an entirely new Article to th» 
trade, is Waterproof, preserveii 
the Leather, and gives a high 
polish to the boot, and does not 
rub off; can be easily applied 
by a Lady or Gentleman ; does 
not require to be used oftener 
than once a week. Must not be 
brushed with, an ordinary Shoe 
Brush. Each Bottle has a wire 
and sponge jUached to the cork. 



None Genuine mihont tTie words 

"NUBIAN BLACKING" 

across the LobsX. 



TRADE MARK. 



AGENTS ARE BEING APPOINTED IN EVERY TOWN. 

WHOLESALE DEPOTS : 

8, SNOW HILL, and 1, WORSHIP STREET, 
FINSBURY, LONDON, E.G. 



■p^ 



Mat 1. 1881. THE jSEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



43 



The Coventry Special Bicycles, Tricycles, Perambulators, &c. 



^ 



^^,m *»*^*W Pe.^^^^ 



VERY ELEGANT, 

VERY LIGHT, 

THE MOST HANDSOME 

CARRIAGE MADE. 




W/l 



Sing'le, .£5 5s, 
Double, <£5 15s. 



Fitted with Bicycle Wheels. 

The most perfect Perambulator 
ever introduced. 



SEND FOR FULL DESCRIPTIVE LIST OF ALL KINDS OF PERAMBULATORS. 
LIBERAL TERMS TO THE TRADE. 



Price .£13 13s. 



THE "COVENTRY" SPECIAL TRICYCLES. 

(No. 1.) (No. 3.) 

Price .£13 13s. 

LIGHT, ELEGANT, the 

EASY TO DRIVE. Qq^^^^^j gpedal 

BICYCLES, 

£14 10s., £10 10s., 

£7 15s., and £6. 




Send for full descriptive List post free. 



Liberal Terms for Cash to the 
Trade. 




NELSON, WRIGHT & CO., COVENTRY. 



-44 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Mat 1, 1881. 



Finlayson, Bonsfleld k Go.'s 



MACHINE THREADS 



SOLE SEWING 
MACHINE THREADS 




CABLE LAID 
fHREADS 



TAILOR'S THREADS 



MACHINE LINEN THREADS 



AND 



SHOE THREADS 



ARE 



CELEBRATED OVER THE WORLD, 

And acknowledged by the leading users to be the 

BEST LINEN THREADS EVER MADE, 



LONDON; N.B.— Fmlaysoii, Bonsfleld, and ^^h!^ 
Co., did not exhibit at the Paris 
Exhibition. 




Prices and Samples free on application to 

FLAX MILLS, 

JOHNSTONE/- GLASGOW. 



1851; 




Printed for th? Proprietors, and Published by them at 11, Ave Miria Laae, in the City of London. 



SUPPLEMENT TO THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE 
AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 
MAYl^^ 1881. 




RTOMNG STITCH OATOING MACHINE, 

Patented &inatuitaeturecl hy 

THE HEBERLING SEWING MACHINE CO.,U.S.A. 

Chief Office & Depot in Europe. 

46, Cannon Street, London, e.g. 



<Mf£'s <s- CiT/fse^Tso/f^ 



/6. Lirrce TpiN/rr Ihn£, e. c. 



The Household Washing, Wringing, """oS™™ 



and Mangling Machines. 



5, New St., Bishopsgate St., E.C. 




Vol IX. No. 127. 



JUNE 1. 188L 



Price, with Supplement, 4d. 



DUNBAR, MCMASTER & CO., 

GILFORD, IRELAND, 

Manufecturers of all kinds of Linen Threads. 

Highest Medals were awarded Dunbar & Go's Threads wherever exhibited 

FOR HAND OR MACHINE SEWING OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS, 

SUITABLE FOR ALL PURPOSES, SHOES, SOLE SE WING, TAILORS. &c. 

DUNBAR AND CO.'S THREADS ARE THE BEST. 

Samples and Prices on Application. 




THE HEEEHLING imiM STITCH MM HAGHINE. 



PATENTED IN THE UNITED STATES 
AND THROUGHOUT EUROPE. 




THE NEW MACHINE 

FOR 

GAUGING, GATHERING, AND TUCKING, 

INDISPENSABLE TO 

Dressmakers, Milliners, Costume, Mantle, 
and Underclothing Manufacturers, &c. 



WBITE FOR CATALOGUE & SAMPLS CP WORK TO 

" AGENTS WANTED." 

THE HEbERLING SEWING MACHINE CO., 46, GANNON STREET, LONDON, E.G. 



I HE SEWIKG MACHINB GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



JtTKB 1. 1881. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 

Page. 

The Favourite Tricycle for 1881 17 

Velocipedes, &c 17 

The New French Tariff 17 

An Improved Knife Cleaner l8 

Sewing Machines J8 

The Centaur Bicycles and Tricycles 19 

The " Eureka " Parlour Rowing Machine 20 

The " Meteor " Sociable Tricycle 20 

Refrigerators 21 

The " Queen " Bicycles and Tricycles zi 

New Takeabout Bicycle and Hand Bag 21 

Boys' and Girls' Tricycles 21 

The World on Wheels 22 

American Bicycles 23 

Sanitary Hints to Operators on Sewing Machines 24 

Patents 25 

Awards at Melbourne Exhibition 26 

Wheels for Bicycles 27 

Apparatus for Cleansing and Polishing Boots 27 

Leaders 28 — 29 

Bells for Bicycles 29 

Gazette • 30 

Stormy Creditors' Meeting 30 



LIST OF ADVERTISERS. 

Bicycle and Tricyle Manufacturers: 

Centaur Co. > 14 

Devey, Joseph & Co 3' 

Hosier and Co 27 

Harrington & Co 

Hillman, Herbert & Cooper 3^ 

Sihith, Thomas & Sons IS 

Surrey Machinists Co 34 

Timm«& Co 13 

Warman, Laxon & Co 31 

Bicycle Bearings and Fittings Manufacturers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 31 

Sown, W 40 

Devey, Joseph & Co 31 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 15 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Bicycle Saddle and Bag Manufacturers : 

Smith, Thomas & Sons 15 

Warwick, Thomas 28 

Boot Machinery Manufacturers : 

Blake and Goodyear Company 35 

Howe Machine Co. , Limited 8 

Fork Cleaning Machine: 

Hutchinson & Co. 



Gas Engine Makers .- 

Andrew, J. E. H 33 

Crossley Brothers 16 

Kilting Machine Manufacturers : 

Holroyd, J 9 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Co 16 

Daville & Co 33 



Sewing Cotton Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co 13 

Evans, Walter & Co , 

Raworth, John T 

Sewing Machine Attachment JIakers : 

Bishop's Cluster Co 31 

Bown, W 39 

Da\ille, R. S. & Co 33 

Manasse, Max 34 

Sewing Machine Manufacturers : 

Gritzner & Co 7 

Holroyd, J 9 

Howe Machine Company, Limited 8 

Junker & Ruh 38 

Mothersill, R g 

Raymond & Co. (P. Frank) 8 

Rennick, Kemsley & Co 28 

Singer Manufacturing Company 4, 5 

Thurlow, Charles 34 

Wanzer Sewing Machine Company, Limited 16 

Watson & Co 34 

Wheeler & Wilson Manufacturing Co 3 

AVhite Sewing Machine Company ^ . . . 6 

Wright, G. E 34 

Sewing Machine and Bicycle Oil Makers: 

Bishop's Cluster Company 31 

Daville & Co 33 

Sewing Machine Needles : 

The Park Wood Mills Company 31 

Sewing Thread Manufacturers : 

Carlile & Co t^ 

Dunbar, McMaster, & Co i 

Finlaysbn, Bousfield &Co 11 

Trade Protection Societies : 

Stubbs' Mercantile Offices • 

Washing Machine Manufacturers : 

Daville & Co 33 

Garrie and Co -, i 

Holmes, Pearson, & Midgley 3J 

Twelvetrees, Harper 33 & 37 

Theobald, E. 37 

Wolstencroft & Co 31 

Whitley & Co 33 

Taylor & Wilson 10 

Taylor.F.D 37 

SCALE OP CHARGES FOR ADVERTISEMENTS. 

One Page ^£4 per insertion 

Half „ 2 2 

OneThirdPage 18 „ 

Quarter „ 1 2 „ 

One Sixth „ 15 

One Eighth „ 12 „ 



HUTCHISON'S PATENT FORK CLEANING MACHINE, 

Adapted for Hotels, Clubs, Restaurants, and Private Houses. It it 
constructed to polish SIX FORKS AT A TIME, and renders an even 
and brilliant polish without injury, by the simple method of a rotary 
handle which can be turned any way. 

N.B. — This Machine is the greatest preventative of damage to 
which the prongs are exposed when cleaned by hand. 

HUTCHISON'S PLATE POWDER, 

As used in the Patent Fork Gleaning Machine, For cleaning and 
brilliantly polishing all kinds of Plate, Plated Articles, Metal, Tui, 
Pewter, Looking Glasses, <feo. To be had at Oil and Colour Ware 
houses, and of Ironmongers and Storekeepers. 

Prices, in Tin Canisters, J-lb., 6d.; 1-lb., 1/; 2-lb., 1'9. 
Liberal terms to Shippers and Merchants. 




Length, 23 inches ; width, 12 inches ; height, 9 in. MGSSrS. HUTCHISON & OO., 

MANUFACTORY: 51, FANN STREET, ALDERSGATE STREET, LONDON, E.C, 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUKNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 




THE 

ONLY 
"GRAND 
PRIZE" 

FOB, 

SEWING- 
MACHINES 

AT THE LATE 

PARIS EXHIBITION. 




WHEELER AND WILSON'S 

NEW ROTARY-HOOK LOCK-STITCH 

SEWING MACHINES, 

Light, Medium, or Powerful, from *85 5s. 

The New-Straight Needle Machines, for wliicli the " GRAND PEIZE " was awarded, are the 

" ' No. 8. — The New Family and Light Manufacturing Machine. Strongly recommended Price £7 lOs. 

No. 6. — A Powerful Machine, capable of doing all grades of work, from the finest to the 

thickest, in the best possible manner, including all the various kinds of Leather work „ 
Also No. 6 Cylinder Machine for special classes of Boot work „ 

No. 7. — Similar to the No. 6 Machine, but especially suitable for Corset work, heavy Tailoring, 

Upholstery, &c „ 

The Well-known Original Family and Light Manufacturing Machines. 

Nos. 1 «fe 2 Prices, £6 lOs., £7 10s. 

The New No. 8 Hand Machine, specially recommended. 

Is the best and most perfect Hand Machine yet produced, and combines the utmost efficiency 
with elegance of appearance, rendering it suitable to the lady's boudoir or for travelling. 

Price, WITH COVEE, complete, £5 5s. 

MACHINE ON HIRE WITH OPTION OF PURCHASE. 



£8 10s. 
£10. 

£8 10s. 



EVERY MACHINE MADE BY WHEELER AND WILSON HAS THEIR TRADE MARK AFFIXED. 

Illustrated Catalogues and other particulars, Post Free. 



THE WHEELER & WILSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY. 



London. Chief Office, 21, Queen 

Victoria Street, E.G. 
London, 139, Kegent Street, W. 

„ 49, Newington Causeway, S.E. 
Liverpool, 61, Bold Street. 
Birmingham, Stephenson Place. 
Brighton, 163, North Street. 
Bristol, 50, Victoria Street. 



Bath, 28, Walcot Street. 
Plymouth, 187, Union Street. 
Cardifif, 17, St. Mary Street. 
Nottingham, 16, Lister Gate. 
Newcastle, West Grainger Street. 
Middlesborough, 55, Newport 

Koad. 
HuU, 9, Savile Street. 



Manchester, 131, Market Street. 
Leeds, 41, Commercial Street. 
Sheffield, 126, Barker's Pool. 
York, 27, Coney Street. 
Bradford, 67, Tyrrel Street. 
Edinburgh, 7, Frederick Street. 
Glasgow, 71, Union Street. 
Dublin, 1, Stephen's Green. 



Belfast, 63, High Street. 
Cork, 32, Grand Parade. 
Norwich, 45, London Street. 
Exeter, London Inn Square. 
Torquay, 115, Union Street. 
Taunton, 2, High Street. 
Stroud, 1, John Street. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jtjne 1, 1881. 



THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 

The largest Sewing Machine Manufacturers in the World. 



Upwards of 538,609 of these CELEBRATED MACHINES were Sold in the year i88o, being 

at the rate of over i,8oo for every working day. 

THE GREAT SALE affords most convincing proof of their popidaritfy and value, and is attributable 

to the reputation obtained for 

Excellence of Manufacture, Strength and Beauty of Stitch, 

AND FOE THEIK 

Perfect Adaptability to every Class of Sewing. 



PRICE 



from 



£4 4s. 



FOR CASH 

fJrom 

£4 Os. 

May be had on "Hire, with option 
of Purchase," by paying 

2/6 




No Household should 
be -without one of the 

Family Machines, 
which are unequalled 

for all Domestic 

Sewing. So simple, a 

child can work them. 

HANUFACTXJBEBS should see tb« 
Manufacturing: SlacMnesI 

Are unsurpassed for the Factory or 
Workshop ! 



CAUTION! 

Beware of Imitations ! Attempts are made to palm them upon the unwary under the pretext 

of being on a " Singer Principle" or " System." 
To Avoid Deception buy only at the Offices of the Company. 

THE SINGER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & Co.), 
Chief Counting-House in Europe-39, FOSTER LANE, E.G. 

323 Branch Offices in the United Kingdom. 

LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 
195, Holloway Road, tJ., 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N., 

51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. 



li*?, Cheapside, E.G. 

132, Oxford Street, W. 

31 & 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. 

149, SoTitliwark Park Eoad, S.E. 

S78. Clapham Eoad, S.W. 



144, Brompton Eoad, S.W. 
269, Comuieroial Eoad, E. 
174, Hackney Eoad, E. 
45, Broadway, Stratford, E. 
3, Ordnance Eow, Barking Eoad, 
Canning Town, E. 



6, High Street, Woolwich. 

7, Kew Eoad, Eichmond, S.W. 

1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. 
131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. 
4a, North End, Croydon, S.E. 



JcKB 1, 1881. THE SEWiNG MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. S 

THE SINBER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

(Formerly I. M. SINGER & CO.), 

SING ER'S SEWING MACH INES. 

Chief Counting House in Europe ; 

39 FOSTER LANE. CHEAPSIDE, LONDON, E.G. 



LONDON DISTRICT OFFICES: 

H7, Oheapside, E.O. ; 132, Oxford Street, W. ; 51, High Street, Camden Town, N.W. ; 31 and 33, Newington Causeway, S.E. ; 149, Blue 
Anchor Road, Bermondsey, S.E (now 149, Southwark Park Road) ; 278, Clapham Road, S."W. ; 144, Brompton Road, S.W. ; 269, Commercial 
Road, E. (comer of Bedford Street) ; 174, Hackney Road, E. (opposite Weymouth Terrace) ; 3, Castle Street, Kingsland High Street, N. ; 
1, Surinam Terrace, Stratford, E. (between Swan and Bank) ; 1, Rathbone Street, Barking Road, Canning Town, E, • 7, Kew Road, 
Richmond, S.W.; 1, Clarence Street, Kingston, S.W. ; 131, South Street, Greenwich, S.E. ; Croydon, 4a, North End. 



PROVINCIAL OFFICES: 



ENaiAND. 

A.ccrington, 9, Peel-street 
ildershot, Victoria-road 
fclfreton, 68, King-street 
Ashford, 17, Marsh-street 
Ashton-u.-Iiyne, 246. Stamfd-st. 
Aylesbury, Silver-street 
Bakewell, North Church -street. 
Banbury, Market Place 
Bamsley, Eldon-Etreet 
Barrow-in-Furness- J I, IV^eith- 

street 
Bath, 5, Quiet-street 
Batley, Commercial-street 
Bedford, 36, Midland-road 
Bicester, Sheep-street 
Biggleswade^ Shortmead-street 
Bingley, Mam-street. 
Birkenhead, 164, Grange-lane 
Birmingham, 93, New-street 
Bishop Auckland, 29, 9outh-rd. 
Bishop Btortford, Wind Hill 
Blackburn, 54a, Church-street 
Blyth, "Woodbine-ter., "Waterloo 
Bolton, 52, Newport -street 
Boston, 3J, Market-place 
Bradford, 38, Mechanics' lastit. 
Braintree, 7, Fairfield-road 
Brentwood, 3, Crown-street 
Brighton, 6, North. ,st., Quadrant 
Bristol, 18 & 19, High-street 
Bromley (Keot), 18, High-street 
Burnley, llO, St. James'-street 
Burton-on-Trent, 76, Giuld-street 
Bury-St .-Edmunds, 78 3t . John-st. 
Cambridge, 17, Petty Cury 
Canterbury, 6, High-street 
Carlisle, Lome-bldgs., Bank-st. 
Chatham, 342, High-street 
Cheadle, High-street 
Chelmsford, High-street 
Cheltenham, 24, Pittville-street 
Chester, 68, Foregate-street 
Chesterfield, 1, Corporation-bldg*. 
Chichester, 54, East-street 
Chorley, 50, ClifFord-street 
Cleckheaton, 5, Crown-street 
Clitheroe, 89, Wellgate 
Coalville, Station-street. 
Colchester, 32, St. Botolph-street 
Colne (Lancashire), 8, Arcade 
Congleton, 7, Mill-street 
Coventry," 12, Fleet-street (oj 

Bablake Church) 
Crewe, 87, Nantwich-road 
barlington, 10, Prebend-row ' > 
itartford, 18, High-strMt 



Deal, 124, Beach-strset 
Denbigh, 36. Park-street 
Derby, 22, Wardwick 
Dewsbury, Nelson-street (top of 

Daisy -hill) 
Doncaster, 23, Scot-lane 
Douglas (Isle of Man)i 5, Strand- 
street I 
Dover, 9, Priory-street 
Dovercourt, Harwich-road 
Dudley, 217, "Wolverhampton-st. 
Durham, 3, Neville-street | 
Eastbourne, 46, Terminus-road 

(two doors from post office) 
Kccles, 31, Church-street | 

Exeter, 19, Queen street I 

Folkestone, Market-place 
Gloucester, 116, Westgate-street . 
Grantham, 11, Wharf-road 
Gravesend, 20, New-road 
Grimsby, 57, Freemacx-itre^t 
Guernsey, 17, Smith-strefrir 
Guildford, 161, High-street 
Halstead, 63, High-street 
Hanley, 48, Piccadilly 
Harrogate, 11, Westpioreland-st. 
Hastings, 48, Robertson-street 
Heekmondwxke,2, Market-street 
Hednesford, Station- street 
Hereford, 57, Commercial-street 
Hertford, Forden House, Ware- 
road 
Hexham, 20, Market-place 
High Wycombe, 123, Osford-rd. 
Hinckley, Castle-street 
Huddersfield, 8, New-street 
Hull, 61, Whitefriargate 
Huntingdon, High-street 
Ilkeston, 75, Bath-street 
Ipswich, 19, Butter-market 
Jersey, 14a, New-street 
Keighley, 2, Market-place 
Kendall, 3, Wildman-street 
Kiddepminster, Bull Ring 
Lancaster, 19, Brock-street (cor- 
ner of Penny-street) 
Leamington, 38. Windsor-street 
Leeds, 14, Boar-lane 
Leek, 27, Russell-street 
Leicester. 44, Granby-street 
Lewes, 164, Hifjh-street 
Liverpool. 21, Bold-street 
Longton (Stafis.), 12, Market-ter 
Loughboroueh, 44, Market-place 
Lowestoft, 123, High-street 
Luton, 32, Park-street 
Lynn, 9, Norfolk-street 
Maiditonf , 8, Kiug-st-' ■^ 



Maldon, High-street i 

f 105, Market-street'; 
Manchester j 132, Cheetbam-hiU| 
( 438, Stretford-road 
Manningtree, High-street 
Mansfield, 32, Nottingham-street 
Market Drayton, Shropshirc-st. 
Market Harboro', Church-street 
Melton Mowbray, Victoria House, 

Market-place 
Middlesboro', 59, Newport-road 
Morley, 4, Bradford-buildings, 

Chapel-hill 
Newark, 15, Kirkgate 
Newcastle-on-Tyne, 16, Grainger- 

street, W. 
Newcastle-under-Lyne, 34, Bridge-' 
street ' 

Newport (Mon.), 28, High-street 
Newport (I of Wight).91,PylG-st. 
Newton Heath, 622, Oldham-road 
Northampton, 3, Market-square 
Northwich, 17, Witton-street 
Norwich, 55, London-street 
Nottingham, 20, Wheelergate 
Oldham, 70, Yorkshire-street 
Openshaw, 37, Asbton-old-road 
Ormskirk, 58, Aughton-street 
Oswestry, Baiky-street 
Otley, 31, Kirkgate 
Oxford, 3, New-road 
Penrith, 8, Castlegate 
Peterborough, 53, Narrow Bridge- 
street 
Plymouth, 3, Bank of England-pl. 
Pontefract, 11, New Market-hall 
Portsea, 165, Queen-street 
Preston, 147, Friargate-street (op- 
posite Lune-street 
Ramsgate, 31, West Cliff-road 
Rawtenstall, Bank-street 
Reading, 61. London-street 
Red Hill, High-street 

Retford, 3, Grove-street 

Ripley, Market-place 

Lipon, 1, BlosBomgate 

Rochdale, 66, Yorkshire-street 

Romford, Market-place 

Rotherham, 109, Main-streflt 

Rugby, Lawford-road 

Runcorn, High-street 

Ryde (Isleof Wightl, 78, ITnion-st. 

Saffron Walden, Church-street 
I Salisbury, 56, Fisherwin-street 
' Salford, 4, Cross-vaae. and 100, 
1 Rcgcnt-road 
I Scarborongh, 30, HunirisiJ-row 



Scotholme, Basford-road 
Sheffield, 37, Fargate 
Shipley, 19,Kirkc;ate 
Shrewsbury, 4, Market-street 
Sittingborne, 64, High-street 
Southaiupton, 105, High-street 
Southend, Market-place 
Southport, 7, Union-street 
St. Helen's, 31, Market-place 
Stafford, 25, Gaol-road 
Stamford, Ironmonger-street 
South Stockton, 19, Mandale-road 
Stockport, 11, Bridge-street 
Stourbridge, 6'.-Church-street 
Stratford-on-Avon, 19. W^od-st. 
Stroud, 7, George-street 
Swadlincote, Station ttreet 
Swindon, 52, Regent-street 
Tamworth. 54, Church-street 
Taunton, Bridge-street 
Torquay, 58, Fieet-';treet 
Truro, 13, Vietoria-place 
Tunbridge Wells, Vale-road 
Tunstall, 119, Hiph-stieet 
Wakefield, 9, Kirkgate 
Walsall, 2, Bridge-street 
Warrington, 44, Horsemarket-st, 
Watford,lQueen*s-road 
Wednesbury, 67, Union-street 
Wellington, Church-street 
West Bromwich, 5. New-street 
Whitehaven, 70, King-street 
Wigan, 21, King-street 
Winchester, 27, St. Thomas-street 
Windsor, 64a, Peascod-street 
Winsford, Over -lane 
Wirksworth, North-end 
Wisbeach, 51, Market-place 
Wolverhampton, Queen-street 
Worcester, 2, St. Nicholas-street 
Wrexham, 7, Charles- street 
Yarmouth, Broad-Row 
York, 24, Coney-street 

WALES. 

Abergavenny, 19, Market-street 
Aberysiwith, Market-hall 
Builth, High-street 
Cardiff, 5, Queen-strewt 
Carmarthen, 7, Lammas-street 
Carnarvon, 5, Bridge-street 
Dolgelly, Market-hall 
Merthyr, 1, Victoria-street 
Newtown, Moa-kat-hall 
Pontypool, Market-hall 
Pontypridd, Market-hall 
Swansea, 103, Oxford-street 



SCOTLAND. 

Aberdeen, 225, Union-street 
Arbroath, 159, High-street 
Avr, GO, High-street 
Banff, 17. Strait-path 
Cupar-Fife, 61, Crossgate 
Dumbarton, 67, High-street 
Dumfries, 127, High-street 
Dundee, 128, Ncthergate 
Dunfermline, 87, High-street 
Edinburgh, 74, Princes-street 
Elgin, 215, High -street 
Forfar, 28, Cnstle-street •' 
Galashiels, 62, High-street 
Glasgow, 39, Union-street 
Greenock, 8, West Blackhall-rt. 
Hamilton, 32, Cadzow-street 
Hawick, 3, Tower-knowe 
InvexTioss, 14, Union-street 
Kilmarnock, 83, King-stree* 
Kirkcaldy, 69, lligh-'^trcet 
Kirkwall (Orkney), Broad-street 
Montrose, 96, Murray-street 
Paisley, 101, High-street-crosa 
Partick, 97, Dumbarton-road 
Perth, 64, St. John-street 
Peterhead, Rose-street 
Stirling, 61, Murray-place 
Tain, Lamingtou-street 
Thurso, Princes-street 

IRELAND. 

Armagh, 2, Ogle-street 
Athlone, Church-street 
Ballina, Bridge-street 
Ballymena, 67 and 68, Chxu-ch-st. 
Belfast, 3 and 4, Donegal-sq., N. 
Carlow, Tullow-street 
Coleraine, New-row 
Cork, 79, Grand-parade 
Drogbeda, 97, St. George's-street 
Dublin, 69, Graf ton-street 
Ennis, Jail-street 
Enniskillen, 15, High-street 
Fermoy, 1, King-street 
Galwav, Domnick-street 
Kilrus/". Mooiif-street 
Kingstown, 65* Lower Cr&Drga-«( 
Limerick, 31, Patrick -street 
Londonderry, 1. Carlisle-road 
Mullinpar, Greville-street 
Navan, Trinigate-streei' * 

Newry, 18, Sugar-island 
Parsonstown, 2, Seffiils 
Queenstown, Harbour-roTi 
Sligo, 45, Knox-street 
Tralce. 40, Bridge-street 
Waterford, 124, Quay 
Wexford, Selskar-ctrvet, 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAillETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. JtJNB 1, 1881. 



THE WHITE SEWING MAGH 



MPANir. 



MANUFACTORY 



Cleveland, Ohio, United States of America. 



PRINCIPAL EUROPEAN OFFICE : 



19, QUEEN VICTORIA ST.. L ONDON, E.G. 

Manufacturers of the justly Celebrated 

WHITE SEWING MACHINES, 

THE POPULAR FAVORITES FOR NOISELESSNESS AND EASY 

TREADLE MOVEMENT. 

SUPERLATIVE 

Uachines for I -rTV I E'^ery machine 
all work. IJN Warranted for 

IS various mTTr'T-p^ys^.rs. Legal 
styles. |lilrjllt| guarantee. 

AHRIBUTES. 

IT IS THE FINEST FINISHED AND 

BEST HADE MACHINE IN THE 

WORLD. 

IT IS THE EASIEST-SELLING AND 

BEST- SATISFYING MACHINE 

EVER PRODUCED. 




The Peerless Hand 
Machine. 




Cheapest and Best in the Market. 
Warranted for 3 years. 

LIBERAL TERMS TO RESPONSIBLE 
DEALERS AND AGENTS. 



All Sewing Machine Agents, Dealers, and Operators are invited to call and inspect this— the latest Improved and Best 
Silent Lock-Stitch Shuttle Sewing Machine— or send for Pamphlets, Circulars, &c., to 

WHITE SEWING MACHINE COMPANY, 

19, Queen Victoria Street, London, E.C. 



JtWB 1, 1881. THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtTENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



GSITZN 




Factory of Sewang Machines and Sewing Machine Cabinets 



At DURLACH, 

ermany. 



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a 



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TO SE^WIIsTO n^^OHZiaSTE JDE^LEiOB. 



g^ PATENTED IN ENGLAND AND OTHER COUNTRIES. 



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chine within' 



mimioH 



Delivered with complete treadle movement free in London at prices but little above thoB« 
for usual iron stands with table and cover. 

Without or with our machines, cither plain style or inlaid in mother of- 

pcarl, and highly ornamented in hand painting by special 

artists. All machines with loose wheel 

and self-acting winder. 



GABim 



^ WIW 



Furnished 

for all systems of machines. 

Very useful. More solid than iron stands. 

Honourable mention and highest rewards at numerous Sxhibitions. 

Novel 1 
Cheap ! 
Solid ! 
Elegant ! 

SECOND 
HIGHEST 

Medal 

AT THE LATE 

Sydney 

International 

EXHIBITION 

1879. 



Bl^SION 



mE. 





Wholesale Agents wanted throughout the United Kingdom. 



The sewing machhste gazette and jouenal op domestic appliances. 



June 1, 1881. 



CANADIAN SEWING MACHINES. 




£2 2s. Complete. 



» This Machine has obtained the highest re- 
p.itation and an enormous sale, both under 
iti true name ("Raymond's"), and also as 
the "Weir 55s. Machine," &c. — (See caution 
b'low). It is durable, rapid, exceedingly 
simple, neat, not Uable to get out of order, and warranted 
to sew from the finest muslin to the heaviest material. 

CAUTION.— James G. Weir, who, for about eight 
years obtained these genuine Machines, is no longer sup- 
plied with them by the Inventor and Manufacturer, Mr. 
Charles Raymond. 



BEWARE OF AliL COUNTERFEITS. 




ALSO 



£4 4s. Complete. 

RAYMOND'S PATENT "Household" 
Lockstitch Machine has been designed ex- 
pressly for family use. It is exceedingly 
simple to learn and to manage, and warranted 
to sew every kind of family and household 
work Is fitted with the latest iraprove- 
menti — loose wheel, and CRegistered) 
Automatic Bobbin Winder 

Testimonials, Prospectuses, Samples of 
Work, and all particulars free on application 



Raymond's No. 1 and 2 TREADLE MACHINES for Families, Dressmakers, and Manufacturers- 



.A.a-E3SrTS -vrt-jA-i^ted. 



CHIEF DEPOT FOR EUROPE AND EXPORT: 

11, MOUNT PLEASANT, LIVERPOOL. 

p. FRANK, AGENT. ESTABLISHED 1863. 

THE ELIAS HOWE SEWING MACHINES 

MANUFACTURED BY 

The Howe Machine Company, 

EXPEESSLT rOE BOOT & SHOE MAKEES, 




FOR 

SADDLE AND HARNESS MAKERS, 

AND FOR 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Leather Goods, 

ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE CLOSING OF EVERY 
DESCRIPTION OF BOOT TOPS. 



Plowering Machine (with patent vibrating attachment.) 
A SPECIAL MACHINE FOR ELAST ICS. 

Branch Offices and Agencies in every Town in the United 

Kingdom. 

Price Lists and Samples oj Worn FREE on application. 

EASY TERMS OF PURCHASE. 



The Howe Machine Company, Limited, 

46 & 48, QUEEN VICTORIA STREET, LONDON. 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



HOLROYD'S NEW PATENT 

KILTING MACHINE 

Sells at sight, and is acknowledged by the Trade in England and Abroad to be the best for all 
purposes, upwards of 8,000 having been sold in two years, and the still increasing demand 

testifies to its unequalled excellence. 

THIS Machine, by its simplicity and constraction, will at once commend itself to 
Merchants and Manufacturers, and will supply that which has long been 
wanted, namely, a good, practical, and durable Machine at a reasonable price. 

It can be worked by hand, treadle, or steam power, and heated by gas or irons as 
desired ; and it runs so light that it can be worked by hand for any length of time 
without the slightest fatigue. 

It will make any kind of Idlt desired, from the narrowest to an inch wide, and any 
depth up to ten inches, and can be altered to different styles and widths immediately, 
and in a most simple manner. 

It is specially adapted for manufacturing and dress-making purposes, and by its 
lightness, rapidity, and correctness, together with the fact that it will work muslin, 
thick cloth, or felt \vith equal facility, it cannot faU to be a great saving, and of the 
greatest advantage. 

With the gas arrangement perfect combustion is secured, thereby avoiding any 
smoke or smell which is so unpleasant in most other machines, and being nickel 
plated all over does not rust. 

Price, complete with gas arrangements and 4 heating irons, £3 3s. 

ELEGTRO-PLATNIG BY STEAM POWER, AND DYNAMO ELECTRIC MACHINES, 

Combining all the latest improvements in GILDING, BRONZING, &c., on rough or smooth surfaces, on any kind of metal goocfe. 

Special Terms offered to Manufacturers of articles suitable for plating. 




J. HOLROYD, Tomiinson St., Hulme, Manchester. 



PATENT SEWING MACHINES. 



NETT CASH, by the Half Doz. 

RETAIL. WHOLESALE, 



The Celebrated "TAYLOR FRICTION" Improved... 

The ELS A HAND LOCK STITCH Machine 

The " COMMERCIAL" CHAIN STITCH formerly called 
"The Express" 

"TAYLOR'S PATENT," No. 3 (Treadle) 

The " COMMERCIAL FAMILY MACHINE" [$] 

The ditto Hand ditto 



£4 14 


6 


£2 





3 10 





1 7 


6 


2 2 





17 


6 


610 





3 





5 5 





2 15 





4 4 





2 






Mangles and Washing Machines at full Discount. Mothersill's Patent BICYCLES 

33Y3 per cent, off List Prices. Lists of Prices free on application. 



R. MOTHERSILL, 4a, Lawrence Lane, Cheapside. 

Sole Agent for England of Tucker and Avery's Anti-Friction Bicycle and Tricycle Bearings, 

operated entirely without lubricants. 



10 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. June 1, 1881. 



Sjdnej Exhibition, 



PRIZE 



MEDAL 




AWA RDS 



i88o. 



TAYLOR AND WILSON'S 



"HOME" WASHER 
"DOLLY" WASHER - 
WRINGING MACHINE 



FIRST PRIZE 

SECOND PRIZE 

FIRST PRIZE 




Price, £6:6:0. 




Price. £3 : 10 : 0. 




Price, £3:5:0. 



Awarded upwards of 150 Gold and Silver Medals and First Frizes. 

THE ANNUAL SALES EXCEED THOSE OF ANY OTHER WASHING MACHINE. 



Our Goods are all guaranteed to be made from the best materials, thorouglily seasoned, and are all fitted with oui 
well-known patents and appliances, which cannot be supplied by any other maker. 



Illustrated Catalogue free on application to 



TAYLOR & AA^ILSON, 

Atlas Works, Clayton-le-Moors, Accrington, 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES.| 



11 



Fiiilayson,Boasfielil&Go.'s 



MACHINE THREADS 



80LE SEWING 
MACHINE THREADS 




CABLE LAID 
THREADS 



TAILOR'S THREADS 



HIACHINE LINEN THREADS 



AND 



SHOE THREADS 



ARE 



CELEBRATED OVER THE WORLD, 

And acknowledged by the leading users to be the 

BEST LINEN THREADS EVER MADE. 



'-Q^QN; N.B.— Finlayson, Bousfield, and ^^ 
Co., did not exhibit at the Paris 
Exhibition. 




Prices and Samples free on application to 




1851; 



1865. 



FLAX MILLS, 

JOHNSTONE/- GLASGOW. 



9 



12 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jttnb 1. 1881. 



MR. PLATT'S PUBLICATIONS. 



LIFE— By JAMES PLATT. Author of 'Business,' 
' Money,' and * Morality.' 

LIFE — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp. Price One 
Shilling. Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Stationers'-hall Court, 
London, E.G.; Messrs. W. H. Smith <fc Son's Railway Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing 
& Co.'s Bookstalls ; and at every Booksellers. 

LIFE— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, W.C, 
■ will send a copy, post fi'ee, for Xs* 

T IFE— Contents :— 

T IFE — Introduction. Is Life Worth Living ? 

T IFE— Life of the Future, Culture, Health. 

T IFE — Eecreation, Common Sense, Thrift. 

T IFE — Compulsory Thiift, Marriage, Happiness, 

T IFE — Eeligion, Future Life, Human Destiny. 

T IFE — Concluding Remarks. 

LIFE — Page 24 : — " Make Life a grander thing. Prove 
to men what a glorious thing it is to exist, how enjoyable life might be, how 
sweet life is, even as it is — aye, we never know how sweet until we fear we are about 
to lose it. What a mockery * Faith in God ' is whec we reQect upon the melancholy 
views the majority of orthodox people have of it, going through the journey as an 
ordeal to be borne as patiently and submissively as possible, altogether misconceiving 
the noble sentiment, ' Not my will, but thine be done." " 

LIFE — Page 34 : — " Life is real, life should be earnest. 
To be enjoyed, we must have an aim, an object in life ; and to be happy, to 
enjoy life, the object must be one worthy the highest, purest, best part of our nature — 
men's character so strong and true that they can be relied up.; men that wear their 
lives out, not rust them out ; men who live to act, to produce what they consume. " 

LIFE— Page 45 :— " The more we think of life, the 
greater must be our reverence for the ' Great Unknown.' Life will be very 
different once wo get the people to realise as an indisputable truth that there is never 
anything wrong but what has been done by ourselves or others ; and ,that the wrong 
remains so long only as we refuse to put it riglit.* " 

LIFE — Page 102 : — '* Common sense denies that any 
happy chance will do for a man what he la quite unable to do for himself. 
Our happiness consists in the use of our faculties, and a faith that our wages will be 
in proportion to our deserts. V; Success and failure are not dealt out like prizes and 
blanks In a lottery, by chance and indiscriminately; but there is a reason for every 
•uccess and failure. Indolence, chicanery, waste will cause the one ; while industry, 
honesty and thrift will ensure the other.* " 

LIFE— Page 173:— •* The more you think of life, the 
more you know of the Creator's way of governing the universe, the more 
you know of your own constitution and the happiness within your reach, the less will 
you believe that God meant man to bo bom weeping, to live complaining, and to die 
disappointed.' '' ^ 

LIFE— PAGE 192 :— "We have life. What shall we do 
with it ? The world is like a vast manufactory, in which we hear incessantly 
the clash and whirring of a complex machinery. Shall we try and get the bottom of 
this? Yes, undoubtedly, earnestly, and fearlessly. Believe me you will thus get to 
learn that the law maker is behind his laws, and that, paradoxical as it may seem, 
while He hides himself behind them. He also reveals himself through them. Tliere 
Is no better way of understanding the Creator ; the laws are emanations of the all- 
beauteo'is mind ; they shadow forth the divinity that contrived them ; we find the 
more we study them, greater evidence that there is a Living God, ^ Father caring for 
and lovUig His children.'' 

MGEAIjITY — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 
One ShUling. 

MOEALITY— Messrs. Simpkin. Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tioners'-hall Court, London, E.G.; Messrs. W, H. Smith & Son's Railway 
stalls. 

MOEALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy post free for One Shilling. 

MOEALITY.— Page 202 :— " Make us feel we are under 
the rule of * One above who sees all,* and whose laws are never infringed with 
Impunity ; but that we have the power, if we but will so to do, to leara the wiahes, 
and be happy by reverently obeying Him." 

|l/r OEALITY— Business— Money— Life. 

MORALITY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, vUlsend copy of any one of feae works post free for Is. 



MONEY— 208 pages crown 8vo, cloth limp, prifti- On* 
Shilling. 

MONEY — Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Stationers'- 
haU Court, London, B.C. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Son's Railway Book- 
stalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Booltstalls ; and at every Bookseller's. 

MONEY— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy, post free, for Is. 

A/T ONEY— Contents :— Preface, Money. 

TV/T ONEY— The Origin of Money. What is Money ? 

TV/T ONEY— Currency : Gold Money, Silver Money, 

ly/r ONEY— Bank Notes, Cheques, Bills of Exchange. , 

■jV/r ONEY — Bank Shares, Banking, Exchange, Literest. 

TV/T ONEY— Wealth, Capital, Panics, 

A/T ONEY — Lidividual Success, National Prosperity. 

A/T ONEY— Concluding Eemarka. 

MONEY.— Page 28: — "It is only by understanding 
our monetary system that we can realise the power of 'credit.' Our com- 
mercial system Is hascd upon f&ith ; cheques, bills, notes are mere bits of paper, and 
only promises to pay ; yet so great is the power of credit that transactions to tho 
extent of over a hundred millions weekly are transacted tlirough the Clearing-house. 
Gold is a mere pigmy, as a medium of exchange, to this giant ' paper,' baied upon 
'credit.' Simply by system and faith, in conjunction with banking, this institutloa 
settles the exchanges, the buying and selling, to this enormous amonut, without tho 
aid of a single metallic coin — merely, by bookkeeping or transfer of cheques, tho 
debiting or crediting of A or B." 

BUSINESS — 208 pages, crown 8vo, cloth limp, price 
One Shilling. 

BUSINESS— Messrs. Simpkin, Marshall & Co., Sta- 
tloners'-hall Court, London, E.G. ; Messrs. W. H. Smith & Sou's Railway 
Bookstalls ; Messrs. Willing & Co.'s Bookstalls : and at every Bookseller's. 

BUSINESS— Mr. Piatt, 77, St. Martin's Lane, London, 
W.C, will send a copy, post ft-e, for Is. 

■nUBINESS— Contents : Preface, Special Notice. 

BUSINESS — Business Qualities, Eealth, Education, 
Observation. 

BUSINESS — Industry, PerseTerance, Arrangement, 
Punctuality. 

"DUSINESS— Calculation, Prudence, Tact. 
"DUSINESS— Truthfuhiess, Integrity. 
"DUSINESS— Money, and what to do with it. 
"DUSINESS— Bank Shares, Depression of Trade. 

BUSINESS— Free Trade and Reciprocity, Civil Service 
stores. 

"D U SINES S — Co-operative Trading, Concluding Eemarks. 

BUSINESS. — Page 7 : — " Commerce is guided by laws 
as inflexible as those of health or gravitation ; and tho primary cause o)f 
failure in business may be traced as unerringly as the punishment that will surely 
follow the infringement of any other law of nature." 

BUSINESS.— Page 179— " From every pulpit and in 
every school throughout the kingdom the justification of double dealing and 
trickery upon the plea that it is impossible to get a living honestly by trade, oi- In any 
vocation, should be denounced in the most unmlstakeable language as a libel on 
Providence, and the failure to succeed be attributed to its real cause — the niatt'i 
ignorance of or incapacity for the business or profession he follows," 



JrNB 1, 1881 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



13 




SIX -CORD SOFT AND EXTRA QUALITY GLACE 

BEING OF VERV SUPERIOR QUALITY, ARE SPECIALLY ADAPTED 

,11 




C. and Co, beg to direct attention to their 
celebrated CROCHET or TATTING COTTON, in 

Hanks or Balls. 



ESTABLI?"^D 1759. 




No. S FEBFEOTIOir. Jackson's Pat«nt. 
12 Ulles an Hour Obtainable. 




E«peoially suited to Ladles. Price £16. 
Easy, Safe and Graceful^ 



TIM MS & CO., 

EAST STREET WORKS, 

COVENTRY. 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

TRICYCLES AND 
BICYCLES, 

BATH CHAIR 

AND 

PERAMBULATOR WHEELS. 

niuitrattd Lists on application, 



Favourite Botary Action. 




Compact and Neat. 
Price £14 14s. 



14 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jdne i, 1881. 



Edinburgh Bicycle & Tricycle Exhibition, Dec, 1880 

^A^here the Latest and Most Improved Machines for the Present 

Season "were Exhibited. 

THE ONLY 

SILVER MEDALS 





FOR 

BEST ROADSTER BICYCLE AND BEST ROADSTER TRICYCLE 

\Vere awarded to the " CENTAUR " COMPANY COVENTRY, 

THE TEST BEING 

EXCELLENCE of WORKMANSHIP, INGENIOUS CONSTRUCTION, and EASE of PROPULSION. 



Full Descriptive Catalogues of the "Centaur " Bicycle and Tricycles, with Testimonials, Post Free on 

Application- 

LIBERAL DISCOUNT TO SHIPPERS AND THE TRADE. ■ RELIABLE AGENTS WANTED. 




J. & H. BERMINGHAIVI, LEEK, 

urcT ./rArrrr.TJ^^ ORIGINAL MAKERS 'oF ' 

^ESTMACHINE SILK AND BOOTMAKERS' HAND-MADE SEWING SILKS, 

^.^:=-r^ HAVE INVENTED AND ARE NOW MAKING A -=-^ 

.si^^k: be-a-id Ti^i3vr:iS/i:i2srO/ 

FOR THE BOOT TOPS AND FANCY LEATHER WORK. 

Samples can be had direct on application to 

J. & H. BERMINGHAM, 

COMPTON MILLS; LEEK, STAFFORDSHIRE. 





Joke 1, 1881. THE SEWlNa MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



15 



OMASS 






SONS, 



ESTABLISHED 1848. 




PATENTEES. 



THE ORIGINAL MANUFACTURERS OF 





EVEET PART SUPPLIED IN VAEIOTJS STAGES, 



Prom the Rough Stamping or Forgings to the 
Com.plete Finished Article. 

Xone hut the very test Brands of Material used for the several purpose 
embracing LOW MOOR IROK, BEST BEST GUM, Sfc., S^c. 

VERY SPECIAL IN ALL SUNDRIES AND APPLIANCES, 

F 

INCLUDING ALL NEWEST DESIGNS AND PRINCIPLES IN 

SADDLES, VALISES, SPANNERS, LAMPS, 
61, HOLBORN VIADUCT, 

LONDON, E.G. 

, Works :~Saltley Mill, Birmingham. , 

IIEALEES ARE INVITED TO APPLY FOE WHOLESALE TERMS 



Ifis 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOTJRNAX OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. June 1, 1881. 




WANZER "y4" 



IS THE 



Great Mechanical Success of the Age. 

It combines all the hiown advantages of other 

Machines. Mounted on Ornamental Iron Base, 

Four Guineas complete. 



n 



LOOZ-BTITCH, HAND OR FOOT 

SEWING MACHINES. 

First Prize Medals, Honours & Awards, wherevex Exhibited. 

THE NEW "LITTLE WANZEE. "-Entirely reconstructed and improved, 
s'oolir £4 4 ' ^"^ ^'"^°' ^^"''^^' Taie-up Lever and 

WANZER "A," Simplicity Itself.-The most powerful yet Ughtrunnine 
Hand Machine, straight race. £4 4g. is ""g 

WANZER " C " Light Foot Family Maclline, entirely New, with every 
improvement up to 1879. £6 Os. ^'"jr 

WANZER "P '' Family Machine, wiA Reversible Feed and Stitcb 
Lever. £7 IQs. 

WANZER " E " Wheel Feed Machine, for heavy work of aU kinds 
£8 8Si 

WANZER PLAITING, KILTING AND BASTING 
MACHINES, 

Over 200 varieties of perfect Plaiting or Kilting, from 30s. complete. Th* 

only Machine Kiltmg and Baslmg at one operation. 

The Wanzer Sewing Machine Company^ 

L I Id I T E D , 

Chief Office— 4, GREAT PORTLAND ST., 
OXFORD CIRCUS, LONDON, W. 



An Engine which works without a Boiler or Steam. 

, AVEBAGE MONTHLT DBLIVBRY (Including- Continental) OVER 180 ENGINES. 




THE "OTTO" SILENT GAS ENGINE. 

IS EAPIDLT REPLACING STEAM ENGINES FROM 1 to 40 HORSE POWER IND. 



WORKS & HEAD OFFICES: 

©reat Marlbro' St., Gloster St., 

MANCHESTER. 



CR08SLEY.BR0THERS, 



LONDON HOUSE: , 

116, Queen Victoria Street, E.O, ' 
LONDON. '* 



JUNB 1, 188], 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



17 



THE "FAVORITE" TRICYCLE FOR 1881. 

This Tricycle is manufactured by Messrs. Ti m ms & Co., of 
Coventry. In it the rider sits between the equal sized wheels, 
the third or steering wheel being behind. The front wheels 
are fitted with their new adjustable bearings, adjusted in a 
siirilar manner to the steering wheel, which reduces the friction 
to a minimum, and does away with all side shake which is a 
great annoyance when the wheels are on parallel axles. The 
bearings of the driving crank are parallel, and arranged to 
work in a slide for the adjustment of the driving chain. The 
material and build of the machine is the same as in 1880, 
except the bearings ; each machine is fitted with adjustable 
cushioned seat, rubber pedals, oil-can, spanner, and lamp 
brackets; all small parts being highly polished, other parts 
neatly painted in two colors. The price (retail) up to 40-in. is 
£14 14s. Another favorite tricycle manufactured by the firm 
is the " Coventry Perfection," which differs entirely in con- 
struction from any other tricycle, being so arranged that all 
wheels run on their respective axles which is very beneficial to 
the rider, as no action of the legs is required in descending 
declines, both pedals remaining stationary and forming the 
foot-rests, the machine is propelled at the will of the riders by 
means of small levers working in a circle of ratchet teeth, 
which are enclosed in the hubbs of both driving wheels, the 
front wheel is fitted in a fork which works in a socket similar 
to that of a bicycle, and runs on hardened steel cones which 
are adjustable, the guiding handle is on the right hand side of 
the machine and works the steering rod l>y means of a rack 
and pinion, the brake is very powerful and applied by a handle 
on the left hand side, by the downward pressure of the brake 
handle a strong sted band is drawn tightly round the flange 
of the hubb, thus enabhng the rider to pull up the machine on 
a decline in a few yards. The seat is mounted on two light 
and elastic steel springs anii can be adjusted »vi detached, the 
pi-dals are of India mbber and connected to the driving cranks 
of machine by two tubular rods with screws ■vorking up their 
centres, for the purpose of lengihening or shortening the throw 
to suit different lengths of leg — when this is required to be 
done take out the bolt that holds the end of the treadle levers 
to connecting rod and lower the screws equally, and then place 
back the bult, this will throw the pedals nearer the seat to suit 
a shorter person, the body of the machine is constructed of 
steel tubes, light, strong and rigid, the wheels are made with 
lock-nutted spokes, but the direct spoke wheels can be fitted 
it' preferred, the connection from front wheel to back of frame 
is of weldless steel tube, carried low and fitted with neat step 
for convenience in mounting. These machines are well adapted 
either for ladies or gentlemen, the levers working direct from 
the centre beneath seat, the dress is not soiled or raised when 
ridden by a lady as in other tricycles, and there is no danger 
of the dress being caught and torn as is the case with tricycles 
driven by a chain ; the seat may be brought forward so as to 
place the rider more erect and give better command over the 
machine. 



YELOCIPEDES, &c. 

Mr. Henry John Lawson, of Coventry, engineer, has received 
provisional protection only for " Improvements in velocipedes, 
and in the application of motive power thereto, such improve- 
ments being also applicable to tram cars, traction engines, anrt 
other road locomotives." The inventor thus describes his 
inveution : — 

My invention consists of certain improvements in velocipedes 
which are partly or completely propelled by motors, and 
macliinery connected therewith, having for their principal 
object the ciinstruction and arrangement of these machines in 
such a manner that the carriage of an engine, or motor for self 
propul.-iop, with its nece.'-siry accompanying niachiuery, may 
be rendered practicable with less inconvenience to the rider 
(from the extra weight, bulk, and strain, when the engine is 
not working, and has to be propelled solely by his efforts), by 
the application and use of compressed gas for fuel and motive 
purposes. My invention further consists of the appHoation, 
construction, and arrangement of a gas engine, combined with 
certain alterations in the various details of the velocipede por- 
tion, whereby loss of power, friction, and weight, are reduced, 



while strength is at the same time added to such portions of 
the machine as the framing wheels, &c., for sustaining the in- 
creased strain. The engine is bolted down to a jjlatform, which 
is suspended to the frame by iron stays. It is vertically 
arranged, and the crank has two toothed wheels fitted suitably 
upon it for changing the speed, the teeth ruaning into those 
of corresponding wheels upon cranked shaft carrying the large 
wheel of tricycle. At the will of the rider these toothed wheels 
may be slid into or out of position, so that the machine may 
be propelled either with or independently of the engine power. 
In the rear of the machine a reservoir of welded iron is situated, 
supported upon iron stays bolted to the frame of tricycle for 
containing compressed gas at a high pressure, but one opening 
answers both for the egress and entrance of the gas, which has 
first a valve or bos of buUetts through which the gas passes to 
the furnaces or cylinder, and then is connected to an air pump 
which serves both to exhaust and compress the gas. This is 
performed by the engine itself, the heating being done by gas 
from an ordinary main should there be no pressure in the 
reservoir. In the case of the tngine being worked by gases, 
or a mixture of gas and atmosphere, the same arrangement 
applies for the starting of the compression suitable burners 
being constructed. The jet which carries the light to cylinder 
is suspended elastically to absorb the jar. In the act of com- 
pression the piston of pump is connected with the driving 
shaft by a connecting rod and toothed wheel, which may be 
thrown out of gear at pleasure. The tank is fitted both with 
pressure and vacuum gauges, and the pump has a series of 
taps for connecting either the exhaust or force valve with inlet. 
In other details the usual methods of working with a mixture 
of air and gas are followed, but by the application to veloci- 
pedes of this system of using the combustion of compressed 
gas for fuel and motive purposes a great advantage is gained 
over the use of coal and other fuel and its inconvenient car- 
riage. The piston is forced up by the iijnition and explosion 
of the gas, and thus propels the machine by acting upou the 
driving axle in the way and manner described, or by an action 
similar to the well-known silent feed clutch, ratchets, &c., as 
now used in velocipedes. 



THE NEW FRENCH TARIFF. 

A return has just been published showing, in a compara- 
tive tabular form, the alterations proposed under the new 
general French Tariff. The return is preceded by the following 
official desci'iption of the effects of the proposed alterations : — 

The changes made in the new French general tariff, as com- 
pared with the present conventional tariff, are, broadly speak- 
ing, of two kinds, namely — 1. Increase of about 24 per cent, 
in the duties now levied specifically on many important articles 
or British produce and manufacture; and 2. Conveision into 
specific duties of the ad valorem rates hitherto cliarg. d, also 
with an increase in many articles of 24 per cent. Wiih regard 
to the increased duty, it will be noticed that 24 per cent, equals 
the amount of the two additional tenths {declines de guerre) 
which have been levied under the general tariff, plus the 4 per 
cent, additional imj^osed in 1873 ; and it was stated in the 
Government '" Expose des Motifs," in the introduction of the 
new Tariff Bill in 1878, that this increase was chiefly intended 
to give a margin for reduction in negotiating treaties. Besides 
these two distinct changes, there have been a few decreases of 
specific duties, which are, however, more than balanced by in- 
creases larger than the prescribed 24 per cent., and several new 
duties have been imp'.sed. The conversion of the ad valorem 
rates has ntcessarily led to many more separate classes of goods 
br-ing enumerated, and even with these elaborations the inci- 
dence of the new duties must he very unequal on the cheapest 
and dearest articles which come into the same category for 
duty. As regards particular articles which are imported into 
Prance from the United Kingdom in any quantity, an increase 
in the duty on bed feathers and down may be noticed, and a 
duty on lobsters. Sponges unprepared are to pay less, and 
prepared more than formerly. Rice has been freed from duty. 
On stone and slate we find new or increased rates on most des- 
criptions. In metals, on the other hand, there are several de- 
ductions under steel rails and plates, brown hot-rolled, but the 



18 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



June 1, 1881. 



duties on iron and steel — 2f. per 100 kilos, on pig-iron, and 6f. 
on iron and steel rails — still represents a very heavy ad valorem 
tax on these articles. The duties on minor chemicals have been 
mostly converted from ad valorem to specific rates, apparently 
raising them in several instances ; and in the various sodas, 
the rates, which were before specific, have been increased by 
about 24 per cent. As regards some colours, specific duties 
have been substituted for ad valorem, and there are a few new 
duties. Scented soap is now taxed double the former rate, and 
the duties on other perfumery are also increased. Starch pays 
four times as much as the old duty. 

Turning to beverages, the duty on all spirits has been doubled 
and that on beer has been increased as compensation for hops 
being more heavily taxed. 

As regards earthenware and china, the ad valorem duties 
have been converted into specific rates, with a greater number 
of subdivisions, and the same thing has been dose in glass and 
glasswares, where the increase is apparent in the few cases in 
which the foruier duties are specific. 

Coining next to yams and textiles, a new classification in 
linen yams x-enders comparison difficult, but the additional 
duty is lesss than 24 per cent, in the lowest numbers, and as 
much as 50 to 100 per cent, in the highest numbers. Jute 
yams show nearly the exact 24 per cent, increase, and cotton 
yams also, except those dyed with Turkey red, the extra tax 
on which has been much raised. The change in the classifica- 
tion of cotton thread has further increased the duties in some 
cases considerably. In woollen yarn a distinction has been 
made between combed and carded yarns, which make the 
changes work unequally. Thus, in combed yarns the increase 
in almost all cases is about 24 per cent. , but carded yams show 
a few decreases, and, on the other hand, the increases, in many 
cases, amount to nearly 90 per cent. Similarly the duties on 
flax and hemp tissues exhibit irregular alterations, the increased 
duty on linens, unbleached, being from 24 per cent, to 50 p?r 
cent. Table linens, &c., are now taxed specifically instead of 
ad valorem, and it is the same with linen, lace, hosiery, &c., 
and with mixed jute tissues. A further change has been intro- 
duced as to linen tissues by counting the weft as well as the 
warp in classification, and dividing the total by two. The 
duties on cotton tissues have been doubled as regards the 
lighter fabrics, and a new classification is introduced. Cotton- 
velvets and cords show large increases, while specific duties 
have replaced the ad valorem rates of 15 per cent, in printed 
cottons, &c. The same change is made in pure and mixed 
woollen tissues, the ten per cent, ad valorem duty being con- 
verted in all cases. Lastly, in regard to tissues, those of silk 
and waste silk show the prescribed increase of 24 per cent. 

Fancy paper is now taxed treble the former amount. In 
skins and leather the usual conversions have been made, except 
in the few articles already subject to specific duties, where the 
24 per cent, increase has been eff'ected. In gold and silver 
wares the 5 per cent, duties have been converted. In iron 
wares and machinery the rates are almost identical, except two 
reductions in steel springs and pieces of steel, and increases in 
sewing needles. Breech-loading fowling-pieces are separated 
from muzzle-loaders, and pay 50 per cent, more, and rough 
gun- barrels are charged 200 per cent, more than under the 
treaty tariff. The duties of 10 per cent, ad valorem on furni- 
ture have been converted into specific, and the same change 
has been effected with basket wares, musical instruments, and 
carriages, and these alterations have necessitated a larger 
number of subdivisions being introduced to cover the specific 
rates. Large increases have been made in the duties on straw 
plaits and on straw hats, the change in the latter being from 
lOf. to 250f. per 100 kilos. Conversion of the ad ■yaZorei?!. duties 
of 10 per cent, have been made in felt hats, corks, fans, combs, 
bi'ushes, umbrellas, &c. 



AF IMPROVED KNIFE CLEANEE. 

Mr. John Hunt, of Bolton, Lancashire, has obtained letters 
patent for an improved knife cleaner. This machine consists 
in a frame or casting with open sides, and with two or more 
vertical gi-ooves in each end ; in each of these grooves are 
placed two strips of india rubljer or other yielding material, 



which strips extend across the frame, and are held in position 
by a plate or cap which is secured by screws and winged nuts, 
and presses the bottom strips against the base plate or bottom 
of the frame ; between these pair, of strips a cavity is left, 
which is filled with emery or other polishing powder, and a 
hopper or opening is formed in the plate or cap which holds 
the strip of india rubber in position, through which emery is 
supplied to the cavity or cavities. Spiral springs are placed 
under the winged nuts to give an adjustable pressure to the 
strips of india rubber. The edges of these strips arebevilled to 
allow the knife to enter readily. The knife is pushed in 
between the strips of india rubber and through the cavity or 
cavities containing the emery, and is thoroughly cleaned by 
pushing it backwards or forwai'ds a few times. Use a clamp 
or screws to fix the knife cleaner in its place. 



SEWING MACHINES. 



Provisional protection only has been obtained by Mr. 
Edward Ward, of Wells-street, Oxford-street, London, for 
" Improvements in sewing machines." 

This invention has for its object improvements in sewing 
machines, and consists : — 

Firstly, in so arranging the machine that when not in use 
the handle and platform, or work plate, may be caused to lie 
within the area of the base plate, instead of projecting beyond 
as has generally been the case hitherto, thereby enabling the 
machine to pack closer and greatly facilitating transport. For 
this purpose he divides the work-plate or platform into two or 
more sections, one of such sections being a fixture, as at pre- 
sent, and he hinges the moveable portion or portions to the 
fixed part, so that the moveable portion or portions may be 
turned down when desired, and he mounts beneath the fixed 
portion one or more turn buttons or swivelled brackets, which 
act in conjunction with an incline or inclines on the moveable 
portion or portions, and may be turned into position when 
required to support the moveable portion or portions and thus 
complete the work-plate or platform, or other means may be 
employed to support the moveable portions of the work-plate 
or platform in petition. He hinges the handle to the hand 
wheel and forms the butt of the handle with two flats thereon 
to act in combination with a spring, so that the handle will 
either stand at right angles to the hand wheel ready for work, 
or will lie down thereon for transport, no portion thereof 
requiring to be detached from the machine. The invention 
relates, secondly, to means for facilitating the threading of the 
machine. For this purpose he mounts on the arm of the 
machine, at the back of or near to the tension discs, two horns 
which are twisted into the form of thread carriers with open 
loops or eyes ; and he forms the top of the needle bar and the 
other thread carrier or carriers with a diagonal saw cut leading 
to the eye thereof, and he also forms the loop or staple through 
which the thread passes to and from the spring take-up and 
the eye of the take-up itself open at one point. He limits the 
extent of motion of the take-up by means of a guide in which 
it travels, such guide and the loop or staple being formed in 
one piece and held in position by a screw. By these means 
the thread, instead of being threaded through the carriers in 
the manner of threading a needle, may be readily slipped into 
place at any portion of its length. The invention relates, 
thirdly, to means for facilitating the threading of the shuttle, 
and for regulating the tension of the shuttle thread. For this 
purpose he hinges the shuttle bar to the shuttle at one end, 
and extends the other end nearly around the interior of the 
shuttle, so that the bar and its extension form a frame, which 
may be turned outward on the hinge when it is desired to 
remove the bobbin or to thread the shuttle, but which at other 
times lies within the shuttle, and acts to retain the bobbin in 
place. The upper extension of the frame has tension holes 
formed therein, and the upper part of the shuttle is also formed 
with a tension hole, and such tension holes have slits or saw 
cuts leading thereto, those in the frame leading in froin the 
opposite side to that in the shuttle, by which means the thread 
may be readily slipped into position without the trouble of 
threading in the ordinary manner, and cannot possibly work 
out therefrom. 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtJBNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



19 



THE CENTAUR BICYCLES AND 
TRICYCLES. 

Since giving a notice of some of the manufactures of tte 
manufactures of the Centaur Bicycle and Tricycle Co., Coventry, 
we note that in December last, at the Edinhurgh Bicycle and 
Tricycle Exhibition, they were awarded the only silver medals 
for best roadster bicycles and tricycles, the test being excellence 
of workmanship, ingenious construction, and ease of propulsion. 
The chief improvements that they have inti'oduced for this 
season are the adjustable dust-proof ball pedals, the improved 
handle bracket and bearing attachment to the double fluted 
hollow fork, the adjustable step, the adjustable and detachable 
toe rests, the adjustable and detachable foot rests, the adjust- 
able hind wheel ball bearing, the improved adjustable dust- 
proof taper beaiing for hind wheel, the improved steering 
apparatus, the improved grasp front wheel break, and numerous 
other minor improvements. 




THE CENTATJB "CONVERTIBLE" TEICYCLE 

Is constructed so that it wUl divide in the centre to pass 
through an ordinary doorway, and in 3-J minutes can be con- 
verted into a single machine if requii-ed. For this purpose, an 
extra wheel and connections are supplied. The above illustra- 
tion (engraved from a photo) represents the machine in its 
double form ; the one below, as it appears when converted into 
a single machine. 




TECE "convertible" (fOR ONE BIDEr). 

In a former number we have given a detailed description of 
this machine ; since then makers have given a more efficient 



brake power, and simplified the method of disoonnectiou and 
conversion. 




THE SPECI.Uy "CENTAUR" TEICYCLE 



Is consti-ucted with automatic gear to transmit equal power to 
both driving wheels. In the arrangement of frame, di-iving- 
shaft, seat, bearings, and driving motion, it is similar to the 
" Convertible." The only difference is, that where the latter in 
its single form has three imequal wheels, the " Special Centaur " 
has two equal and one small wheel. A special feature in the 
construction of this machine is the position of the diiving shaft. 
This, instead of being placed forward, is carried dii-ectly imder 
the back of the frame. This arrangement stiffens the frame at 
a point at which the lateral strain is the greatest, allows the 
bearings to be secured more firmly to the solid coiuiection at 
the comers — and what is more important, the seat can be evenly 
balanced (centrally) between the two driving wheels, without 
any danger of the machine tilting backwards, thus dispensing 
with the elaborate provisions many makers have to adopt to 
guard against accidents of this kind, and which in this machine 
are not required. This machine is suitable for a lady or gen- 
tleman. The price to the pubKc is £18 10s. 




THE 



' CENTAUR ADJUSTABLE DUST-PROOF BALL BEARINGS, 
APPLIED TO BOTH BICYCLES AND TRICYCLES. 



AS 



Each contains ten steel balls, hardened, and perfectly round. 
These run in two parallel grooves, recessed partly in the axle 
and partly in the box of the bearing. By a simple airange- 
ment the balls are kejit in separate positions, and at eqii.'tl 
distances, whereby the longitudinal friction, as in i-oller bear- 
ings, is avoided. 

As a proof that both the friction and resistance are leduced 



20 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



June 1, 1881. 






to a minimum by tte application of these bearings, a wheel 
after being used for a short time, ■will spin from seven to ten 
minutes, and will then oscillate for two or three minutes after- 
wards. In appearance they are neat and compact, and as the 
friction is so small, the wear in twelve months is scarcely per- 
ceptible. When the balls begin to work too freely in the 
grooves, the boxes containing the balls can be adjusted by 
tildng off the bottom cap and slightly reducing the connectmg 
flange. The thickness of a sheet of note paper filed off will 
compensate for six months' wear. 

The Company's Double-fluted HoUow-fork (D.F.H.F.) Bi- 
cycle, to which the silver medal was awarded at Edinburgh, is 
a grand machine. It is fitted with adjustable ball bearings to 
driving wheel, improved taper, dustproof and adjustable bear- 
ings to hind wheel ; black or grey horn handles ; gunmetal 
hubbs, with 4J flanges ; best patent moulded (red) tyres ; 
patent weldless steel tube backbone and forks ; the special 
crescent section steel felloes ; and " Centaur " patent detachable 
cranks, the weight (50-inoh roadster) being but 401bs. The 
special feature of the machine being the forks, which are not 
brazed to a solid head, but extend from the handle to the bear- 
ings, thus forming not only the most rigid, but the most 
symmetrical hollow-fork at present in use. These machines 
are made either as roadsters or racers, and can be supphed to 
the public from £11. 

The Centaur Co. also make "The Centaur Compressible," 
a tricycle that may be compressed in a few seconds from 40in. 
to 30in., to allow it to pass through an ordinary doorway. 
School tricycles from £6 10s., child's bicycles from £3 12s. 6d. 
The Centaur Co., Coventry, are also sole manufacturers of 
Harrison's Patent Rowing Apparatus and Family Gymnasium, 
which may afford harmonious and simidtaneous exercise to the 
whole body. It is rowing in the room with the advantages of 
rowing on the water, the tension bands affording a capital 
illustration of the "resistance of water." The sliding seat and 
every detail of rowing are observed, and all the benefits of the 
exercise realised. A slight change converts the machine into a 
health lift, and to fifteen other different exercises, thus forming 
a complete gymnasium. Price of apparatus, in case complete, 
£2 2s. 



THE "EUREKA" PARLOUR ROWING MACHINE. 

This novelty attracted much attention at a recent exhibition 
at the Agricultural Hull, London ; a young gentleman attired 
as a waterman was giving practical illustrations of " how to 
row on land," the machine of which we give an illustration. 




THE "eureka" KOWING MACHINE 

Is very remarkable — a whole gymnasium in itself, for in 
dumb-bell exercise, club swinging, weight lifting, running or 
walking, all of which have their beneficial effects, there yet 
remains the fact that they are only useful in developing one 
set of muscles, or but a portion of the systeai. In rowing, 
however, the legs, loms, trunk, arms, hands, the digestive 
organs and the lungs, are made to perform their regular and 
legitimate functions simultaneously, and the danger of 
building up one part of the system at the expense of another 
thereby avoided, and to the recognition of these facts is ascribed 
the popularity of aquatic sports here and abroad. But it is 
not always convenient for large numbers of our people to in- 
dulge in this healthful pastime ; the e.Kpense of owning and 
keeping a boat, the difficulty of reaching an acceptable place 
for rowing, no less than the dangers incident to inexperienced 
oarsmen upon the water, are drawbacks which ^can be only 



met by the substitution of a machine giving all the advantages 
without the disagreeable accessories ; to this end several 
machines have been introduced, but the "Eureka" Parlour 
Rowing Machine gives an esact and perfect imitation of 
rowing, and can also be used in many waj's, as a health-lift, a 
chest expander, weight-lift, or single or double scull exercise 
machine. It retails complete at £3, and may be had wholesale 
of Messrs. E. I. Horsman and Co., 4, Ham sell-street, London, 
E.G. 



THE "METEOit" SOCIABLE TRICYCLE. 

From Messrs. Starky and Sutton, Coventry, we have received 
a pamphlet of some eight or ten pages, containing some 
hundreds of interesting testimonials in favour of their "Meteor" 
bicycles. These machines, which are constructed to meet the 
demand for a light yet strong carriage that can be easily 
driven and steered, and suitable either for lady or gentleman. 
It weighs only 6olbs., a boy of eight years can drive it with 
ease, while it will as easily carry a man weighing 25 stone. 
The machine can be turned in a radius of five feet. The great 
sensitivensss experienced in most tricycles, in the displacement 
of obstacles, or in descending hills, is entirely removed by the 
application of a new hind wheel brake, which, by a thin con- 
necting rod, is applied in a similar way to the grip brake of 
the bicycle, leaving the handle (usually so very sensitive) per- 
fectly rigid, giving the rider immense propelling power and a 




feeling of safety very indispensable to timid riders. It is 
fitted with Messrs. Starkey and Sutton's patent universal bear- 
ing, a comfortably cushioned adjustable seat, lamp holder, best 
rubber tyres, lock-nutted wheels, and is propelled by the rotary 
or bicycle action, with multiplied gear, lay means of which, 
although only 40 in. front wheels are used in the ordinary 
size, the same speed is obtained as from 50 in. ditto. Made 
any width, from 2 feet 6 inches to 3 feet 6 inches (ordinary 
width from stock 3 feet 3 inches), or by unscrewing a nut one 
of the side wheels can instantly be removed, reducing the 
wiih from 3 feet 2 inches to 2 feet 6 inches. The retail price 
is £16. 

The " Meteor " Sociable," of which we give an illustration, 
is built on the same lines, and, like the " Meteor " tricycle, open 
in front, is as readily mounted and dismounted, and is fitted 
with new registered adjustable seats. The retail price is £21. 
It is well named, the " Sociable," and any two friends may 
have a happy time, jogging along on a fine day on a road not 
dusty. The "Meteor" Sociable is bound to become a great 
favourite. 



Stamped Halfpenny Newspaper Wrappers.— Stamped 
halfpenny newspaper wrappers of a better quality than thoLe 
hitherto in use, which will be discontinued when the present 
stocks are sold off, will be issued for sale to the public on 
June I. They may be purchased singly or in any number, 
according to the undermenrioned scale of prices, viz, : — One 
for f d., two for IJd., three for Ifd., four for 2id., five for 3d., 
six for 3Jd., and so on. The public can also obtain these 
wrappers uncut in quarter reams, containing 120 sheets of 14 
wrappers on each sheet, by making special application for 
them at the post-office at which they wish to obtain them. The 
price for the quarter-ream is £3 I8s. 



i 



Jdnb 1, i881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



REPEIGERATOES. 

In large establishments, for butchers, poulterers, pork- 
butchers, hotels, cafes, cheesemongers,^ public-houses, co- 
operative stores, provision dealers, &c., a good refrigerator is 
an absolute necessity, especiallj' during the warm months of 
summer. Among the exhibits at the late domestic appliance 
exhibition we noticed the 




VEMTILATED DRT AIR SHAFT REI-RIGERATOE 

Manufactured by Madame Jolley, 2, Eue T'Kint, Brussels, and 
26a, Hosier-lane, London, E.G. We give an illustration of 
one of these " Meat Safes." They are made in American pitch 
pine and varnished ready for use. As the price does not ex- 
ceed that of common ice-boxes, dealers will find a ready sale 
for them. The retail price of No. 1 size, 2ft. 4in. by 1ft. lOin. 
by 4-ft. high, being but £7. They can be used with ice, water, 
or any kind of freezing mixtures. The refrigerators may be 
had in any size from the No. 1 named above to one Oft. 6in. 
high by 6ft. wide and 3ft. 4in. deep at £30. 



THE "QUEEN" BICYCLES AND TEICYCLES. 

The Queen Bicycle and Tricycle Company, of Coventry, have 
introduced well-made, but low-priced machines to the Coventry 
market with considerable success. A speciality of this company 
is their Bicycle and Tricycle Cabinets, that for the bicycle con- 
tains over one hundred and thirty separate pieces. The back- 




■'DUCHESS " PATENT. 

bone, neck and back fork are already drawn, bent, tapered, 
and welded together. The head is turned and fitted up with 
centre screw, lock, nut, &c. The forks are welded to it, and 
the bearing also, the hubs are turned and drilled, and bored 
for the spokes, bearmgs, &c. The bearings are finished, turned, 
bored and screwed together, The rims are rolled into shape, 



brazed, and di-illed for the si^okes. The entii-e cost of the lot, 
includmg cabuiet, is £4 4s. A good discount even on these 
low prices are allowed to agents, who may either sell them as 




they are to the amateur mechanic, or make them up into 
bicycles himself, and thus really be the " maker." 

The "Duchesse" Tricycle Cabinet is priced at £5 .5s., and 
may be readily put together, forming a machuie of whicb we 
give an engraving. 



NEW TAKEABOUT BICYCLE AND HAND BAG. 

Mr. "W. J. Spurrier, of 119, Newhall-sti-eet, Birmingham, 
patentee and manufactnier, finding the Takeabout introduced 
by him last season so very successfid, has introduced a novelty 
in bags which fits on to the backbone of the bicycle on an 



■^f* 




entirely original plan, but well below the saddle, so as not to 
interfere with the mounting. As our readers are perhaps 
aware, the great merits of these Takeabouts are that the size 
can be adjusted to the parcel to be carried, that they are per- 
fectly waterproof, light and cool. The retail price is 
from 3s. 6d. 



BOYS' AND GIELS' TEICYCLES. 

The illustration herewith represents one of the Juvenile 
Tricycles manufactured by Messrs. Warman, Laxon and Aslatt, 




of Coventry, and as the jirii'e is very low, considering tlie 
guarantee given by the makers—" that it is built of the best 



22 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



June 1, 1881. 



materials, and warranted to stand any amount of rough usage " 
■ — are most important items when boys are the riders, we 
are of opinion that the trade could not have better machines 
to handle, the testimonials that this firm have received 
respecting them being most satisfactory. In this tricycle the 
seat is arranged to rise and fall to accommodate the length of 
the leg, and the seat springs are easy and affective. The retail 
prices are from oSs. for 22-inch wheels, and 65s. for 26-inch 
wheals. 



THE WORLD ON WHEELS. 

We have arrived by slow stages at the exact moment in the 
year when the woild is on wheels. One day it may be too 
cold, too cheerless, or too threatening to stir away from home 
an J shelter; the next it may be too sultry and fatiguing to 
face the glare and the dust. The time for loitering in the 
backwaters of the Thames, for attaching the lazy hammock to 
the ancestral trees, for watching cricket matches under some 
comfortable shade of greenery, for taking a tui-n at lawn 
tennis, and enjoying an interval of conversation, for idling on 
warm Sunday afternoons in secluded gardens, the days of 
claret cup and ice and borage, for pic-nics and pleasuringa 
innumerable, will come surely enough, if all be well. But just 
at this instant moment of the year it seems natural, nay 
imperative, to take our pleasures upon wheels. The great 
Derby festival of next week requires a rehearsal. The country 
is in flower, the fields a mingled glory of green and gold, the 
may scenting the country lanes, the chestnuts in blossom, the 
distant landscape with no haze of heat, standing out sharp 
and defined in the bright sunlight, the dust driven away by 
the recent rains, the breeze just persuasive enough to be 
pleasant but too kindly to be cold ; and so it happened that 
the great meet of bycyclists at Hampton Court gave expression 
to a universal feeling and an excuse for a drive into the country. 
At this time of the year it seems imperative that everyone who 
has a horse should use it, and, having it not, should stretch a 
point and hire one. To miss such a spring is positively 
churlish. So the coaching clubs and the members of the four- 
in-hand look out their best teams ; they must practice for the 
Hyde Park meet, just as the humble owner of the trap must 
get ready for Epsom, and such a Saturday and Sunday as we 
have just enjoyed is devoted irresistibly to getting away from 
London and making the most of the sudden spell of fine 
weather. The great city is happily situated for such exhi- 
larating excursions. On all sides there are temptations for 
straying far afield. Riverside clubs and distant hotels enclosed 
in gardens, subui'ban houses and dinners near the fresh air, are 
sought out at this time, and, in finding them by road, we can 
peep at the pleasures of secluded life surrounded by trees and 
floweriug orchards, miniature arbours, and quiet lawns. For 
the rest, so long as the law is permitted to remain what it is 
and the doors of the country inns are not sulkily closed 
in oiu- faces, there are little tea gardens and bowling- 
greens, roadside pulic-houses, and picturesque rendezvous that 
appear to be abominable in the eyes of the total abstainer, but 
cannot make men much the worse for their convenience, 
seeing that they take him and his wife and his children away 
from the dust and dirt of the crowded city to the myriad 
humanising influences of nature as seen now in her purity and 
at her best. 

The bycicle is after all the horse of the poor man, and by 
this invention the country has been brought nearer and nearer 
to the dwellers in town. There was a special fitness on such 
a day to open the season, and the sun certainly smiled on the 
active young fellows, who are accustomed to put a girdle round 
the districts most favoui'ed by freshness and scenic charm. 
Naturally, this great army of athleticism turned its face in the 
direction of Surrey. Away they went by this road and that in 
detachments and squadrons, isolated and in pairs, as soon as 
work was over on Saturday, to the meeting point m the neigh- 
bourhood of Bushey Park. The streets seemed to be alive with 
bycicles, and everywhere was heard a jingling and jangling 
of bells. Away went the swift and silent army from counting- 
house and shop, desk and dep6t, one column by the King's- 
road, Chelsea, the other swiftly heading towards Eulham and 



Putney direct by Brompton. The clouds had all cleared away, 
and the breeze freshened as the afternoon advanced. The 
bycicles outraced everything. Whenever there is anything to 
see — and that is seldom enough — there are plenty of people to 
witness it. Faces smUed over the suburban garden walls, the 
streets were lined with spectators, everyone seemed to be out 
and about when it was rumoured that this great force of two 
thousand bicycles was to career round the statue of Diana that 
stands in the circular lake at the head of the chesnut avenua 
in Bushey Park, within a stone's throw of the old red palace 
at Hampton Coui-t. Special omnibuses ran down from London 
to the Park at cheap fares ; huge cJiars-a-hancs — such as the 
wUd excursionists use in modern Paris — were put on the road ; 
carriages, flys, and traps of every possible description met the 
holiday-makers at the railway stations and drove off in the 
direction of Putney HUl, and the driving clubs did not fail 
to be represented by some splendid teams. When, for instance, 
was any f(jrm of sport neglected by Lord Londesborough — 
from a cricket match to a boat-race, a polo game to a bycicle 
gathering — and, as may be supposed, his lordship's drag, 
driven by himself, was one of the very first to pass into Bushey 
Park by tbe Greyhound Gates, and to take up a station in the 
long string of carriages in the pretty chesnut avenue. The 
bicyclists, however, gave every one the slip. Away they went, 
clearing Putney town, with its old houses festooned with 
clustering flowers and rising out of hedges of double may, away 
over Wimbledon Common, where the golden gorse was in 
bloom, into the hollow where the nightmgales sing when the 
evening comes, heading along the white hard road to the hUl 
top with its distant Surrey view, on by roadside inns and 
baiting places to Kingston Vale, and so through Norbiton to 
Kingston town. But there was no time to lose. The river on 
such a day was comparatively deserted, every one was on the 
road, and at Hampton Wick the stream of vehicles divided, 
half to the Palace end and half to the Teddington corner of 
Bushey Park. The world has surely never seen such a con- 
gregation of bicycles. All were in their Sunday best and wore 
the smartest of uniforms. On working days there may be 
dusty jackets and travel-stained boots, collai'less necks and 
more workmanlike clothes, but not to-day. It is a wheel past 
to show tbat athletes can be neat and fastidious if they choose ; 
and in truth the fastidiousness expressed in white kid gloves 
and bouquets of gardenia and stephanotis might have astonish'ed 
the athletes of another age had not the day's experiment been 
prolific in many an example of orderly discipline and distinct 
courage. Every combination of colour that fashion, taste, and 
ingenuity could invent was expressed in the badge worn on 
tbe arm of each captain of the 141 home and provincial clubs 
that obeyed the summons of the marshals of this extraordinary 
scene. There were stripes diagonal and horizontal, every 
shape and cut of shooting or patrol jacket, every kind of cap, 
from the semi-military helmet to the yachting cloth-picked 
cap ; there were caps with gold braid and silver braid, devices 
of every sort of metal on breast or forehead, gloves of dogskin, 
buckskin, or kid, with gauntlets and without ; there were 
bicycles with brakes and pedometers, with every dodge and 
apphance that existing science can suggest; but all with the 
regulation lamp swinging to and fro, and with the everlasting 
jingle of the bells. 

It had been arranged to mass upon Hampton Green, and, 
on the start being given, to proceed on to and through Hampton 
to Lee Hampton, turn to the right to Teddington, thence 
straight up the chesnut avenue to Bushey Park, taking tbe 
left of the Diana Fountain, through the Park gates, and then 
straight by the Boyal paddocks, to dismiss at Hampton Wick. 
This programme was adhered to pretty accurately, and certainly 
the best and most picturesque pliiuoe to see the procession was 
in the immediate vicinity of the round lake, that reminds the 
spectator so much of Versailles, with the advantage of seeing 
all on the side of our English park. It would have beei; 
impossible to select a more enchanting evening. The low 
light gave colour to the scene, the water was as clear as a 
mirror, on which the wbjte-flowered trees were reflected ; all 
was fresh and bright and green and pleasant, and the police, 
aided by the stewards, had no difficulty in subduing the traffic 
or organising the patient and uncomplaining crowd. A pro- 
cession that moves, comparatively speaking, at a spail's pace. 



JtTNE 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOtTRNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



23 



consisting of one hundred and forty-one clubs, upwards of 
sixteen hundred club bicyclists, four hundred unattached 
machinists, be they bicycle or tricycle, and that takes an hour 
in passing, is not altogether exhilarating, though it may be 
strange. It passed in silence like a ghostly army, the gentle 
pressure of the indiarubber tires being scarcely audible, and 
the tinkling bells very faint. What struck the spectator most 
was the singularly anxious and eager expression that each face 
bore as the bicyclist wheeled silently along. It was a curious 
study for a physiognomist, and really a remarkable fact how 
utterly the sense of pleasure or enjoyment seemed to have been 
momentarily postponed. We have heard oi that narrow limit 
between safety and danger which consists of ' ' hanging on by 
the eyelids," and here the endeavour to do so was photographed 
on each individual face. A desire to keep a strict mechanical 
order, to obey the rules of dressing and discipline, to show well 
in pubhc, and maintain a certain military precision in obedience 
to the captain's command, may no doubt have been the cause 
of considerable anxiety and enforced emulation, but certainly 
no regiment of infantry or cavalry that marched past a saluting 
post with the eyes of Queen, generals, or the nation itself upon 
them, no swimmer that ever atteccpted to reach a distant shore 
bore such a strained and concentrated expression as was 
depicted on all these two theusand sad faces, excepting of 
course the defiantly laughing tricyolists who were secure from 
danger and laughed trepidation to scorn. 

Doubtless there was considerable cause for anxiety. To 
make a slip on such an occasion not only meant immediate 
grief to the unlucky bicyclist but impending sorrow to scores 
of others. To get a tumble is inconvenient, though not neces- 
sarily dangerous, but to know if you tumble you will probably 
have a hundred bicycles piled upon your prostrate body is not 
a pleasant reflection. The one might mean contusion, but the 
other something far more serious. The afternoon did not pass 
over without several of these untoward accidents. From some 
cause or other, a stone, a rut, a ridge, or a false turn, a bicycle 
came down with its rider, and in less than a second the on- 
coming detachment fell like a pack of cards. One tumble 
brought on half-a-dozen more, but, thanks to the care of the 
stewards in separating the squads and in quickly picking up 
the fallen, no bad accidents occurred so far as we could see. 
Now and then the victim would looked stuimed and dazed, but 
the sense of emulation conquered, he mounted again, and sped 
away to jo;n his lost companions. Another cause for this 
intense anxiety of expression, particularly noticeable under 
the chesnut trees, was the unwelcome attention of myriads of 
midges, who seemed to take a delight in stinging and annoying 
the bicyclist, whose hands were hopelessly occupied and could 
not be detached. A man who is so intent on his work as these 
were may necessarily look grave ; but if, in addition to his 
desire to avoid a fall, he is stung in the face and neck by insects 
which he cannot assault, the expression becomes positively 
comical. But these were the only drawbacks to a delightful 
afternoon. BicycHng never became so important a fact as 
when two thousand votaries from all parts of the country swept 
by the astonished spectators who had assembled under the old 
trees of Bushey Park. Isolated it is a pleasant social amuse- 
ment; congregated it presents an enormous army that has 
shown itself amenable to order, authority, and excellent 
organization. — Daily Telegraph. 



AMERICAN BICYCLES. 



In a recent number of The Bazaar Mr. H. Hewitt Grifiin 
contributes the following, a continuation of his series of in- 
teresting notes upon Bicycles of the Year. 

" The Standard Columbia (The Pope Manufactm-ing Com- 
pany, Offices and Show Rooms, 597, Washington-street, 
Boston, Massachusetts; Factory, IIartford,|Connecticut, United 
States America ; London Agents, S. Withers and Co., 73, 
Gheapside, E.C.). — A short time since we spoke of a threatened 
invasion of this country by the American bicycle manufactures. 
The event has come to pass, and English makers are bearded 
in their own den by American built machines being offered for 
sale in London. A word as to the past history of the bicycle 
in the States. With true Yankee 'cuteness, the principle of 



the first machines was patented by P. W. Mackenzie in 1862, 
and the most probable origin was in the ' Cantering Propeller,' 
a child's rocking horse, in which the swaying of the wooden 
steeds acted on cranks, attached to wheels, and so propelled 
the machine. At the first signs of the modern bicycle (bone- 
shakers of a veiy crude form) being introduced, Mr. Mackenzie 
(in 186-i) confirmed his patent, and claimed the sole right to 
use the crank action ; a few years later, in 1868-9, he was 
opposed by Messrs. Willy and Smith; other claimants also 
entered the field, and there was, for some time, an all-round 
(legal) fight. The Messrs. Pope, a little later, hit upon the 
happy expedient of buying up the various claims, and thus 
consolidating the opposing forces, whose joint ideas wers 
merged into the Pope Manufacturing Company, which, there- 
fore, possesses a monopoly of the vast American market. 
Several have disputed the right to so rich a field of trade, but 
in every case the Pope Manufacturing Company have won the 
day, and, not only have they the sole right to make, but tbey 
also can stop anyone from selling or importing machines. 
Amongst others, an injunction was obtained against Dave 
Stanton, our ex-champion, who, when ' starring' in America, 
tried to introduce several English machines. 

For the benefit of readers interested in patents, we give a 
list of those held by the Company : — 





No. 


Date. 


JMajie. 


1 


41.310 


19th Jan., 1864 


T. Mackenzie 


•> 


43.651 


26th July, 1864 


G. A. & A. B. Woodward 


3 


46.705 


7th March, 1865 


H. A. Reynolds 


4 


54,207 


24th AprU, 1866 


H. A. Reynolds 


5 


59,915 


20th Nov., 1866 


Pierre Lallement 


6 


69.403 


1st Oct., 1867 


J. G. BuzzeU 


7 


80.425 


28th July, 1868 


H. A. Reynolds 


8 


86,831 


9th Feb., 1869 


Hanlon Brothers 


*9 


8.297 


18th Jan., 1870 


Hanlou Brothers 


no 


3.319 


2nd March, 1869 


S. W. Smith 


n 


87.900 


16th March, 1869 


Calvin Witty 


12 


98.920 


18th Jan., 1870 


J. G. BuzzeU 


*I3 


7.818 


31st July, 1877 


Montpelier Manufacturing 

Co. 
Richardsan and M'Kse 


#14 


7.972 


27th Nov., 1877 


*lo 


8.252 


28th May, 1878 


H. A. Reynolds 



Those marked * are re-issues. The above list embraces aU 
patents relating to the application of the foot crank to the 
front wheel of a velocipede. We alluded to several of these in 
one of our earlier articles (in The Bazaar of 21st April, 1875), 
when we were reviewing the history of the bicycle. 

On hearmg that a machine had arrived, we lost no time in 
mspecting it at Messrs. Withers'. If the Americans were 
before us in the early days, they must have subsided into a 
Rip Van Winkle sleep for the past few years, for the Special 
Columbia seems an exact reproduction of the Excelsior (Bayliss 
and Thomas) of three to four years ago, and is evidently built 
on the lines of one that reached the States about that time. 

Taking the wheels, first, we find V iron rims, rather coarse 
rubber, and fifty-two spokes, looknutted into large iron hubs, 
6-in. wide by 4i deep, which are but very slightly recessed. 
For bearings, single row ball bearings, unadjustable, are usedj 
they are knuckle- jointed to the solid forks ; the wheel seems 
to run very freely. The cranks are a good shape, and detach- 
able ; the pedals (ordinary rubber) have a slight novelty, as, 
in place of the usual nut at the end, a small brass cap unscrews, 
when another screw inside has to be undone before the pedal 
can be removed from the pin. Considering that most of our 
makers at home are only just finding out, after our repeatedly 
drawing attention to it, the great importance of the width of 
" tread," it is net sm-prising that oiir American cousins are, as 
yet, ignorant of it. In the 'S.C'we found it to be no less 
thau loh-ia. to 16-in. from centre to centre of pedals, fully 3-in. 
more than there is any need for ; the axle alone is 11-in. The 
forks are taken right up to the handle, and the lower bridge, 
which forms the support for the bottom centre of the open 
head, is, together with the upper cross piece and boss, which 
carry the handles slightly in front, made in one solid forging, 
and therefore immensely strong. This allows of long (over 5-in-) 
centres and increased steadmess. The handle bar is 6-in. high 
by 22-in. long, and a good front break is fitted, the hand lever 



24 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



Jtine 1, 1881. 



of which might be a little longer. The nut over the centres is 
kept well down ; it holds a neat nickel plate, on which is 
'engraved a list of the Company's patents. The backbone, or 
"perch," as it is termed by the makers, is tubtilar, and joins 
the well spreading rear (solid) forks. Cones are put to the 
back wheel, but they are adjusted in. a handy manner by means 
of a milled edge, which can be turned by the fingers. An 
ordinary spring is bolted to the neck in front of the centres, 
thus throwing the rider's weight near the middle of the spring ; 
the taU slides into a simple clip. A good-sized step completes 
the machine. 

The Pope Manufacturing Company have made a plucky 
move by catering for English custom, but, save in the case of 
an eccentric rider, who for the sake of novelty would get an 
S.C, we are sure they need not look to this country for an 
extension of business ; if they had produced the present machine 
in 1877 it would have merited praise, but it is quite out of date 
in 1881. We should strongly advise the Pope Manufacturing 
Company to import a Humber, Matchless, Eudge, Rucker, 
Invincible, and one or two more of our standard makes, and 
after duly studying their details of construction, they may be 
able to realise what a bicycle ought to be. Thereisnoreasonwhy 
American riders should be a generation, in cyclistic time, behind 
their English fellow wheel-men. In fairness we must state 
that the Standard Columbia is a fine strong machine and well 
made in all parts ; a 52-in. weighs -IS-lbs., and costs 102 dols. 
5()c., or, in English, £20 10s. ; without ball bearings, 92 dols. 
50c., or £18 lOs. It is worth calling at Messrs. Withers' to 
inspect it, as being the first modern American bicycle exhibited 
for sale in England." 



SANITANT HINTS TO OPEEATOES ON SEWING 
MACHINES. 

The majority of sewing machine operators are not rich in 
money ; their health and skill are their capital. While their 
employment is confining and fatiguing, and therefore to a 
certain extent unhealthy, it is often made still more unwhole- 
some by careless habits. Many who are very scrupulous in 
keeping the written commandments, thougbtlesBly neglect and 
break the laws of their own bodies, thus sowing the seeds of 
diseases that they are too apt to ascribe to the continued sewing 
of seams. A few suggestions by way of caution will greatly 
aid needle workers in sustaining the fatigue of their occupation 
without sustaining therefrom any loss of health. 

When sitting at the sewing machine the body should be held 
as nearly as possible in an erect position, so as to give the chest 
organs full play. Most operators stoop forward more than is 
necessaiy, in view of the fact that the work can be done just as 
well and with less fatigue in an erect than in a stooping posture. 
The parts of the body are better balanced upon the spine, and 
the muscles are more evenly brought into play. Besides, the 
upright position is much more graceful, a fact that we shoidd 
think no lady operator would care to lose sight of. 

The eyes are the most delicate of all the organs, and should 
therefore be the most carefully guarded. Weak eyes may be 
stramed by too long attention to fine work. They should 
never be used in a dim light, especially at twilight. After 
sunset the darkness steals on us so gradually that, before we 
are aware, the eyes have been strained in accommodating them- 
selves to the lessening light. Bright objects are especially 
trying to the sight. Cross lights should be guarded against. 
The light shordd fall upon the work from above the kvel of the 
eyes, or from some point where it wUl not shine directly into 
the eyes. Beware of using the eyes if they are inflamed or un- 
usually weak. 

Food is the fuel of the body and should be carefully selected 
as regards both quantity and quality. Nourishment and ease 
of digestion should be prime considerations in selecting. Fat 
and greases should be avoided. Pickles, spices, and condiments 
generally, if used in any but very small quantities, and but 
seldom at that, are injurious. Meats are stimulating ; they 
should be roast or broiled, and taken in small quantities, 
except by those who take frequent and active exercise in the 



open air, which is not the lot of sewing machine operators. 
Farinaceous foods and fruits are wholesome. Mere stimulants, 
especially spirits, should be, as a general thing, avoided, 
except in cases of unusual depression or sickness, when they 
maysometimes be beneficial. Regularity of meals is almost 
as important as the quality of their iugredients. Food should 
be well masticated and time allowed for proper digestion. 

Fresh air, sunlight and moderate exercise, together with 
proper food, are the great preservatives of health. No mere 
medicines can approach them as restoratives. The oxygen in 
the air renovates the blood, and it should be as pure and copious 
as nature furnishes and the lungs can use. Close or crowded 
rooms are sure to breed disease, sooner or later. Air once 
exhaled is not fit for use again until it is purified. The ex- 
halations from lungs are as foul as any of the bodily excretions ; 
and did people fully realise it our stomachs would revolt at 
reinhaling them. Their nauseousness has been fully revealed 
by the use of the microscope, which has done so much to 
advance anatomical and pathological science. 

Exercise of the body is a necessary condition of its health. 
Hand needle-workers have especial need of exercise. The 
machine worker uses more^muscles, and more vigorously ; but 
the strained muscles should be relaxed, and those unused to be 
brought into play by suitable exercise. Dancing is not the 
proper exercise for one who has used the lower limbs all day 
upon the machine. There is nothing unhealthful in the motion 
required to operate the machine, but overwork, from constant 
daily use, will often bring about the most serious results. 

Cleanliness is next to godliness. To say nothing of the 
delicacy or decency of the thing, bathing or frequent washing 
conduce greatly to health. Exhalation through the pores of 
the skin amount to several ounces daily, and should be removed 
by thorough cleansing with soap and water. Besides, a bath 
is very refreshing and invigorating. Clean clothes and sur- 
roundings are equally important. 

Sleep is as necessary as food or exercise, and proper attention 
to these helps to sound and refreshing sleep. It is impossible 
to fix arbitrarily the number of hours for sleep. Some persona 
require more, some less. The object of sleep is to recuperate 
the exhausted force of brain and muscle. To prepare the 
system for refreshing sleep, the mind and stomach should be 
free from labor. No meal should be eaten for three or four 
hours before retiring, nor the mind taxed to violent action, 
especially of a depressing kind. 

The bedroom should not be very small, and should be airy, 
with good ventilation. The hours for retiring and rising 
should be early and regular. It is not well to accustom one's 
self to read in bed ; and the use of drugs to induce sleep should 
be totally avoided. If there should be sleeplessness the remedy 
should be sought in proper food and exercise. 

Cheerfulness is a positively virtuous disposition ; it requires 
great care in its cultivation and maintenance, and produces 
wholesome efi'ect upon its possessor and others. No one has a 
moral right to be sour and cross, or to look gloomy or moody. 
A cheerful countenance sheds a glow all around. It is like 
sunlight. It must, to be genuine, have a basis of right thinking, 
feeling and living; it is utterly incompatiable with envy, 
anger, hatred, jealousy, or the like. Worry wears more than 
work. 

Recreation, it should be borne in mind, is an important 
duty, inasmuch as it greatly tends to mental and physical 
refreshment, and should be carefully provided for. But let it 
be borne in mind, always, that dissipation is not recreation. 

With these few hints we commend the subject of sanitary 
precaution to the earnest consideration of those whose vocation 
it is to constantly operate sewing machines. — Sewing Machine 
News. 



The Wool Exhibition at the Crystal Palace promises to be 
numerously attended, and offers every indication of success. 
There will be over 200 exhibitors, many of them coming from 
various parts of Australia, the Continent, and South America. 
Every kind of fabric into the composition of which wool enters 
will be represented. The exhibition wUl commence in June, 
and remain open until October. 



i! 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



25 




The following list Tias heen compiled expressly for the "Sewing 
Machine Gasette," by G. P. Eedfern, Patent Agent, 4, South Street, 
Finshury, London, and at Paris and Brussels. 

APPLICATIONS FOR LETTERS PATENT :— 

No. 1,502. G. C. Taylor, of Huddersfield, for iuaproved means of 
preparing wai'ps for weaving and in the methods or 
processes of and apparatus employed in such pre- 
paration. Dated April 6, 1881. 

„ 1,548. J. W. Ramsden, of Leeds, for improyements in sewing 
machines. Dated April 8, 1881. 

„ 1,503. J. C. Garrood, of Fakenham, Norfolk, for improve- 
ments in velocipedes partly applicable to other 
machinery. Dated April 11, 1881. 

„ 1,578. J. Leadbeater and A. Leadbeater, both of Morley, 
near Leeds, for improvements in the method of and 
apparatus for feeding wool and other fibres to 
scribbling and carding machinery. Dated April 
11, 1881. 

„ 1,583. J. H. Johnson — a communication from C. H. Willcox, 
of New York, and J. E. A. Gibbs, of Steele's 
Tavern, Rockingham, Virginia, both in United 
States, for improvements in sewing machines. 
Dated April 12, 1881. 

„ 1,594. R. O. Rowland, of Manchester, for improvements in 
bicycles and tricycles, applicable also to other 
similar vehicles. Dated April 12, 1881. 

„ 1,615. J.G.Wilson — a communication from A.M. Leslie, of 
Chicago, Illinois, and the Teller Manufacturing- 
Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, both in United 
States, for improvements in sewing machines. 
Dated April 13, 1881. 

„ 1,617. F. Heyrich and F. Quenstedt, both of Berlin, Germany, 
for improvements in or connected with sewing 
machines. Dated April 13, 1881. 

, 1,655. A. M. Clark — a communication from A. G. Jennings, 
of Brooklyn, New York, United Stiites, for im- 
provements in cotton gius. Dated April 14, 1881. 

„ 1,657. W. Thacker, of Nottingham, for improvemer.ts in the 
manufacture of fabrics in knitting and other 
machinery employed in the manufacture of knitted 
or looped fabrics, and in machinery or apparatus 
employed therein. Dated April 14, 1881. 

„ 1,661. W. Hillman, of Coventry, for improvements in veloci- 
pedes. Dated April 14, 1881. 

„ 1,663. L. Silverman, of Westminster, London, and J. R. 
Cumming, of Uford, Essex, for improvements in 
sewing machines. Dated April 14, 1881. 

„ 1,664. W. H. Bliss, of Addington-terrace, Forest Hill, 
London, for improvements in tricycles, bicycles, 
and other velocipedes. Dated April 14, 1881. 

„ 1,689. J. Erskine, of Strabane, Tyrone, Ireland, for an im- 
provement in spinning and twisting frames. Dated 
April 19, 1881. 

„ 1,691. A. Whf.rton, of Snettisham, Norfolk, for an improved 
tricycle. Dated April 19, 18S1. 
1,772. J. H. and L. Wilson, both of Cornholme, Todmorden, 
Lancashire, Bobbin Wanufaeturers, for improve- 
ments in and applicable to the bobbins and tubes 
used in spinning and doubling machinery. Dated 
April 25, 1881. 

„ 1,774. T. Townsend, of Coventry, for improvements in the 
driving gear of tricycles. Dated April 25, 1881. 

„ 1,813. H. S. H. Shaw, of Bristol, Lecturer at University 
College, for a combined brake and speed indicator 
for bicycles or velocipedes. Dated April 27, 1881. 

„ 1,814. W. Morgan-Brown— a communication from J. Reece, 
of Boston, Massachusetts, United States, for im- 
provements in button-hole sewing machines. 
Dated April 27, 1881. 



No. 1,824. T. Banister and S. Lees, both of Rochdale, Lanca- 
shii-e, for improvements in the construction of 
tricycles, part of which invention is also applicable 
for transmitting motion on other machines. Dated 
April 27, 1881. 

„ 1,860. J. Harrington, of Norman's-buildings, St. Luke's, 
Loodon, for improvements in tricycles and other 
velocipedes. Dated April 29, 1881. 

„ 1,864. J. E. Hatch, of Camberwell, London, for improve- 
ments in velocipedes. Dated April 29, 1881. 

„ 1,871. A. G. Meeze, of Redhill, Surrey, and N. Salamon, of 
Holboru Viaduct, London, Sewing Machine Factor, 
for improvements in the construction and fittings 
of velocipedes. Dated Ajinl 30, 1881. 

„ 1,875. G. Bernhardt, of Radcliffe, Lancashire, Spinner and 
manufacturer, for improvements in machinery or 
arrangements for winding and reeling yarns or 
threads, partly applicable to bobbins or pirns and 
shuttles used therewith. Dated May 2, 1881. 

„ 1,81G. A. Cooper, of Clerkenwell, London, Commercial Tra- 
veller, for improved apparatus to be used in the 
washing of clothes, fabrics, materials, and other 
articles, applicable also as a circulator or mixer in 
brewing, chemical, and other processes. Dated 
May 2, 1881. 

„ 1,949. E. A. Brydges — a communication from E. G. Wege, of 
Apolda, Germany, for improvements in knitting 
machines or stocking frames. Dated May 4, 1881. 



Letters 
No. 2,220. 

„ 4,144. 
„ 4,171. 

„ 4,257. 
„ 4,313. 

„ 4,318. 

„ 4,330. 



4,432. 
4,498. 



A. 



W. 



E 



„ 4,525. 

„ 4,543. 

„ 4,653. 

„ 4,658. 

„ 4,763. C. 

„ 4,948. W 



Patent have been issued for the following : — 

R. Green, of Birmingham, Machinist and Bicycle 
Manufacturer, for improvements for bearings in 
bicycles, tricycles, and other velocipedes, and for 
wheel carriages. Dated June 1, 1880. 
J. Boult — a communication from S. S. Puller, of 
Stratford, Ontario, Canada, for improvements in 
scutching machines. Dated October 12, 1880. 
A. Barlow — a communication from C. Pfeiffir and 
H. Offroy, both of Paris, for improvements in 
drawing frames for cotton and other analogous 
textile materials. Dated October 13, 1880. 
C. F. Otto, of Peckham, London, for improve- 
ments in velocipedes. Dated October 19, 1880. 

J. Warwick, of Manchester, Sewing Machine Manu- 
facturer, for improvements in sewing machines. 
Dated October 22, 1880. 

J. F. R. Wood, of Newcastle-street, Farringdon-street, 
London, tor improvements in or applicable to 
bicycles. Dated October 22, 1880. 

W. R. Late — a Cummnnieation from C. H. Chapman, 
ef Shirley, Massachusetts, United States, for im- 
provements in and relating to spinning machine 
spindles and parts connected therewith, and in 
means for manufacturing such spindles. Dated 
October 23, 1880'. 

W. HiDman, of Coventry, for improvements in veloci- 
pedes. Dated October 29, 1 880. 

E. Steel, Manufacturer, C. H. Binns, Collector, A. 
Steinmetz, junior. Stone Cutter, C. A. Spring, 
Manufacturer, and W. A. Nichols, Attorney-at- 
Law, all of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United 
States, for sewing machine and other treadles. 
Dated November 3, 1880. 

A. Heaven, of Manchester, for improvements in em- 
broidering by machinery, and in ornamenting 
fabrics. Dated November 4. 18S0. 

W. Martin and J. Hind, both of Nottingham, for im- 
provements in jacquard needles or cross wires. 
Dated November 5, 1880. 

T. Pritchard, jun., of Coventry, for improvements in 
and relating to velocipedes. 

E. Hughes, of Woolwich, Solicitor, for improvements 
in tricycle^ or velocipedes with three wheels. 
Dated November 12, 18«0. 

G. Hawkins, of Leighton-road, Forest G.ate, 
London, for improvements in the construction of 
tricycles and other velocipedes, and in attachments 
and driving gear for the same. Dated November 
18, 18S0. 

H. Thompson, of Finsbury-square, and F. G. 
Henwood, of Budge-row, both in London, for im- 
provements in the arrangement and construction 



26 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUBNAL OP D0ME8TIC APPLIANCES. 



Jtjnb 1,1881. 



of velocipedes and similar vehicles or machines. 
Dated November 27, 1880. 
No. 5,285. J. Steele, of Birmingham, Manufacturer, for improve- 
ments in tricycles, parts of which improvements 
may also be applied to other velocipedes. Dated 
December 16, 1880. 

„ 5,511. J. Starley, of Coventry, Mechanician, for improve- 
ments in velocipedes. Dated December 16, 1880. 
„ 35. W. WooUey, of Birmingham, Saddler, for improve- 
ments in bicycles and other velocipedes. Dated 
January 4, 1881. 

„ 450. A. M. Clark — a communication from A. J. Hurtu, of 
Paris, for improvements in sewing machines. 
Dated February 2, 1881. 

„ 512. J. White, of Coventry, and G. Davies, of Manchester, 
for improvements in the construction of bicycles, 
tricycles, and other similar machines. Dated 
February 7, 1881. 

„ 677. A. Anderson, and G. Browning, both of Glasgow, 
North Britain, for improvements in sewing 
machines. Dated February 16, 1881. 
725. W., W. J., and C. H. Haynes, all of Salford, Lanca- 
shire, for improvements in and material for cover- 
ing the rollers used in preparing and spinning 
cotton. Dated February 19, 1881. 

„ 830. H. Kinder, of Leicester, for improvements in tricycles. 
Dated February 26, 1881. 

.,, 837. F. Caldwell, of Loughborough, Leicestershire, for 
improvements in machinery and apparatus to be 
employed in the manufactiire of knitted fabrics. 
Dated February 28, 1881. 

PATENTS WHICH HAVE BECOME VOID :— 



No. 1,215. 



„ 1,234. W 



„ 1,274. 

„ 1,289. 

„ 1,325. 

„ 1,397. 

,. 1,401. 



" 


1,404. 


» 


1,409. 


i, 


1,415. 


f> 


1,435. 


>i 


1,475. 


" 


1,495. 


" 


1,574. 


>» 


1,599. 



W. E. Lake — a communication from J. H. Moule, of 
Paris, for improvements in sewing machines, chiefly 
designed for use in the manufacture of boots and 
shoes. Dated March 27, 1878. 

E. Gedge — a communication from F. David, of 
St. Etienne, France, for an improved process by 
which terry or ribbed velvets may be manufactured 
by the aid of a needle-carrying shuttle. Dated 
March 29,1878. 

W. Bown, of Birmingham, manufacturer, for certain 
improvements in springs for gloves and other 
purposes, and the means used for securing springs 
to gloves or other articles. Dated April 1, 1878. 

T. Simis, merchant and manufacturer, of Hamburg, 
Germany, for improvements in curtains. Dated 
April 1,1878. 

J. Nadal, of Southampton-row, London, engineer, for 
an improved clasp, or dress-holder. Dated April 
4, 1878. 

W. E. Lake— a comunication from M. P. Carpenter, 
of New York, United States, for improvements in 
sewing machines, chiefly designed for straw braid- 
work. Dated April 8, 1878. 

B. A. Dobson, machine maker, and J. Macqueen, both 
of Bolton, Lancashire, for certain improvements in 
machines for spinning and doubling. Dated April 
8, 1878. 

E. J. Watts and J. Memmott, both of Sheffield, for 
improvements in the manufacture of scissors. 
Dated April 8, 1878. 

J. Law, of Birmingham, gunsmith, and T. Law, of 
Wolverhampton, gunsmith, for improvements in 
velocipedes. Dated April 9, 1878. 

F. Bramley, of Mile End, London, for improvements 
in knife-cleaning machines. Dated April 9, 1878. 

T. Singleton, of Darwen, Lancashire, for improve- 
ments in sewing machines. Dated April 10, 1878. 

W. E. Lake — a communication from J. A. Davis, of 
Boston, Massachusetts, United States, for improve- 
ments in sewirg machines. Dated April 12, 1878. 

W. and T. Pearson, both of Manchester, Spinners and 
Manufacturers, for improvements in the manufac- 
ture of valences for beds, windows, and other pur- 
poses. Dated April 15, 1881. 

C. M. Sombart — a communication from E. Loeper, of 
Magdeburg, Germany, for improvements in button- 
working machines. Dated April 18,1878. 

W. Champness, of Manchester, for improvements in 
the manufacture of corsets. Dated April 20, 1878. 



1,712. 



No .1,655. J. M. Palmer, of Cambridge, and C. A. Shaw, of 
Salem, both in Massachusetts, United States, for 
improvements in loom shuttles. Dated April 24, 
1878. 
C. Greenwood and A. B. Crossley, both of Halifax, for 
improvents in the construction of rollers for wash- 
ing and wringing machines. Dated April 29, 1878. 
1,385. J. J. Clarke, of Birmingham, Manufacturer, for im- 
provements in the manufacture of fasteners for 
corsets and other similar fasteners. Dated April 
22, 1874. 

Specifications Published During the Month. • 
Postage Id. each extra. 

J. Hunt, knife cleaner ... 

H. Greenwood, sewing machines 

B. A. Dobson, carding engines 

N. K. Hushberg, bicycles, &o 

T. Pearson and J. Taylor, bobbin and shuttle 
tongue for shuttles 

B. Berry and S. S. Freeman, spinning, &c. 

C. D. Abel, bicycles and tricycles 

T. Humber, T. E. Marriott, and F. Cooper, 

wheels for bicycles, &c... 

W. Clayton, taking up motions for looms 

E. Ward, sewing machines 

T. Spivey, jacquard machinery for weaving ... 

H. L. Wilson and J. Clegg, springs for washing, 
wringing, and mangling machines ... 

G. Toung, ring frames for spinning and 
doubling cotton... 

T. Chadwick, T. Sugden, and C. Shaw, sewing 
machines... 

E. Howson, pianofortes ... ... 

W. Webster, sewing machines for stitching 
sacks, bags, &c.... ... ... 

A. C. Henderson, boxes for cotton balls of 
sewing machines 

W. Webb, bicycles, tricycles, &o... 

E. Wilkinson, carding and preparing wool. Sec. 

E. Tatham and J. Taft, machinery for opening, 
cleaning, scutching, and breaking up cotton, 
&c... ... ... ... ... ,... 

W. Jennings and T. Whittaker, spinning ma- 
chinery ... ... ... 

J. White, bells for bicycles, &c 

H. Mills, sewing machines for leather work, 
&c 

W. Morgan-Brown, machinery for sewing books 

C. F. Wood, velocipedes, &c 

H. Woodward, combined knife-cleaning and 
sharpening machine .. 

J. H. Lawson, velocipedes, &c. ... 

J. Eloe, spindle bearings of textile machinery... 

A. G. SalamoE, mounting the saddles of velo- 
cipedes ... 

H. J. Haddan, sewing machines ... 



No. 3,154 
„ 3,360. 
„ 3,368. 
„ 3,478. 
„ 3,507. 


„ 3,589 
„ 3,598 
„ 3,604. 


„ 3,634. 
„ 3,662. 
„ 3,684. 
„ 3,688 


„ 3,699 


„ 3,716 


„ 3,724 
„ 3,725 


„ 3,732 


„ 3,744 
„ 3,749 
„ 3,787 



s. 


d. 





4 





3 





6 





6 





6 





6 





6 





2 





6 





2 





4 





4 





2 





8 





6 





6 





4 





6 





6 



8,798. 

3,843. 

3,848. 

3,890. 
3,i-92. 
3,910. 

3,910. 

3,945. 
3,968. 

4,036. 



2 

6 
2 

10 
8 
8 



2 
6 



INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION 1880-1881 AT 
MELBOUENE, AUSTEALIA. 

AWARDS TO SEWING MACHINE COMPANIES. 

Family Hand 

Machine. Machine. 

New Davies 1 st. 1st. 

Wheeler and Wilson 2nd. 2nd, 

Standard, Johnson, Clark and Co. . , 2nd. 2nd. 

Jones, British 2nd. 2nd. 

Wertheim, Grerman 3rd. 3rd. 

Bradbury, British 3rd. 3rd. 

Greinard and Co., German Singer. . . . 4th. 4th. 

Northmann do. 4th. 4th. 

W. Cramer do 5th. 5th. 

The Singer and Howe Companies withdrew. 



JUNB 1. 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



27 



WHEELS FOR BICYCLES, &c. 

Provisional protection only has been received by Messrs. 
Thomas Humber, Thomas Eushforth Marriott, and Frederick 
Cooper, of Beeston, Nottingham, bicycle manufacturer, for 
"improvements in the coDStruction of wheels for bicycles and 
other vehicles." 

Their invention consists of improvements in the construction 
of cellular wheel rims for bicycles and other vehicles, and in 
attaching the spokes to such rims. CeUular rims are usually 
constructed of one or two plates of thin metal, put together or 
formed into a single cell and of various sectional forms. This 
mode of construction may be described as the " single cell " 
principle. Such rims, although stronger and more rigid than 
ordinary rims, as loag as they keep their shape, yet when they 
are subjected to sudden strains the shape of the cellulftr rim 
may become altered and distorted from its original sectional 
form, such alteration or distortion causing weakness ; and, 
moreover, one of the plates, or a portion of the plate, may also, 
in consequence of such distortion split or break away, or 
become sheared from the other poi-tion, the soui-ce of weakness 
and want of rigidity being in consequence of and arising from 
the possibility of change of shape of the single cell construction. 
In addition to the foregoing remarks it may also be mentioned 
that by the usual mode of attaching the spokes to the " single 
cell "rim the tension of the spoke is exerted in a manner 
which tends to cause rupture or breaking apart of the plate or 
plates forming the single cell rim. Now the improvements 
consist, first, in so constructing and arranging the several 
parts that the change of sectional form and shape is prevented, 
and thereby the strength and rigidity is greatly increased ; 
and, secondly, in attaching the spokes to the rims in such a 
manner that such attachment also adds to the strength of the 
rim by forcibly drawii:g the plates together, and thus impart- 
ing an additional security against bending or rupture of the 
rim. They carry out the first part of their invention by form- 
ing the cellular rims of three plates of metal, two of such 
plates forming what we may term the shell of the rim, and the 
third plate being suitably formed in various symmetrical ways, 
so as to abut against and suitably support the two outside 
plates of the rim. The two outer outer plates are placed 
together, and the edges of one of such plate overlaps the other 
of such plates, while the third plate is so confined between the 
two that it acts as a strut and stay to prevent change of form, 
and thereby prevent any alteration of sectional form of such 
rim when subjected to the strains which arise in the ordinary 
working of bicycles. It will thus be seen that they increase the 
number of cells, and by the multiple cell system the rigidity 
and strength of the rim is greatly increased. They carry out 
the second part of their invention by attaching the spokes to 
that part of the shell of the rim which is farthest from the 
axle (the spokes passing through holes in the two other plates), 
and thereby causing the powerfiil tensional strain of the spokes 
to act centripetally upon the rim. By this mode of constrac- 
tion the ordinary tensional force of the spokes is utilised in 
forcibly holding the several plates of the rim together, and 
thereby rendering the separation of the plates forming the 
rim an impossibility. The outer ends of the spokes may have 
rivet heads formed upon them, and such rivet heads rest in 
countersunk holes in the plates farthest from the the axle, so 
as to form an even, smooth, and regular groove for the india- 
rubber tire of bicycle wheels. In applying their improve- 
ments to wheels of other vehicles they either provide for an 
india-rubber or other elastic tire or not, as may be required, 
and suitably arrange the form according to such requirements 
and the weight and character of the vehicles to which their 
improved wheels may be applied. 



APPARATUS FOR CLEANSING AND POLISHING 
BOOTS. 

Mr. T. G. S. McCarthy, of Knightsbridge, and Mr. Alfred 
Shakespeare, of Nassau-street, London, have obtained a 
patent for a new boot blackening apparatus. The inventors 
describe their inventions as follows : " The first part of our 
invention refers to a machine for cleaning boots and shoes 
whilst on the feet of the wearer. A beU shaped brush, having 



the brush or polishing surface in the hollow interior part, is 
mounted so as to revolve on a pin or axis supported in bearings 
at the base or lower part of a frame. Upon the brush axis a 
pulley is mounted and receives motion by means of a strap, a 
band passing over a driving pulley mounted upon an axis at 
the upper part of the frame of the machine. Motion is given 
to the driving pulley and brush by a crank handle or treadle. 
The foot with the boot or shoe thereon is placed in the bell 
shaped brush whilst the machine is in motion, whereby the 
same is readily cleaned. Two of such bell shaped brushes may 
be mounted if desired upon the same axis, one being used for 
removing the dirt and the other for polishing. 

The bell shaped brush and its driving pulley can be mounted 
on the top or a frame of table, and- set in motion by a treadle 
or crank handle, so that boots, shoes, or other articles may be 
cleaned and polished by hand. Another part of our improve- 
ments relates to the construction and arrangement of a machine 
to be placed in the hall or entrance to a building for cleaning 
and polishing boots and shoes whilst on the foot of the wearer. 
The machine consists of a standard or frame which carries a 
driving pulley at the upper part actuated by a treadle or crank 
handle. The pulley givesmotion toanotherpulleynearthe base, 
a crank pin on the pulley giving a reciprocating motion by means 
of a connecting rod to a series of brushes forming an ablong 
box, in which the foot is placed and supported whilst the 
brushes are in action to clean and polish a boot or shoe upon 
the foot of the wearer. The series of brushes may consist of 
two straight ones moving to and fro so as to clean and polish 
the sides of the boot or shoe, and two curved or semi- circular 
ones (each of the latter being mounted on a pin or axis, upon 
which they partially rotate) for operating upon the heel or toe 
of the boot or shoe. These brushes are connected together, so 
that as the crank and connecting rod give motion to one it 
imparts motion to the others connected with it; The number, 
form, and arrangement of these bmshes may be varied. An- 
other very simple form of instrument or apparatus for cleaning 
a boot or shoe on the foot of the wearer, for the use of the shoe 
black brigade or others, consists of two straight double faced 
brushes connected together by a strap or elastic band to be 
passed round the heel of the boot or shoe, the other ends of 
the brushes having handles by which the user pulls them 
backwards and forwards see-saw fashion over the surface of 
the boot or shoe. When the dirt is removed the surfaces of 
the brush are reversed so as to effect the polishing. The boot 
or shoe may be mounted upon a last and fixed to a table or 
otherwise whilst the above described brush is applied thereto. 
According to another part of our improvements ordinary shoe 
or other brushes may be fixed in a f r'ame by a set screw or 
otherwise. A to and fro reciprocating motion is given to the 
frame by a connecting rod and crank pin upon a pulley actuated 
by a strap or band lathe fashion, or it may be actuated by a 
crank handle by hand. The boots, shoes, knives, forks, spoons, 
or other articles to be cleaned or polished are placed on a table 
or fixed in a suitable holder whilst the brush or polishing 
surface is operating thereon. 



Messrs. Beemiin and Roberts, of 6, King-street, Cheapside, 
have been appointed sole agents for the United Kingdom for 
the Remington Type-Avriter. 

W. HOSIER & CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

The Coventry 'Star,' 'Special,' and 
'Champion' Bicycles & Tricycles, 

Also Perambulators with Bicycle Wheels. 

Largest Dealers in the World in New and Second-hand 
Machines. 

SMITHFORD STREET, COVENTRY. 



28 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



June 1, 1881 



SOLE AGENTS IN EUEOPE FOR 

Johnson, Clark & Co., 



OF NEW TORE. 



THE "HOME SHUTTLE" 

still keeps its place as being the best Hand Lock-Stich Sewing 
Machine in the world. It is exceedingly simple, aever out of 
order, and always presents a bright and attractive appearance. 




We have added the loose winding wheel and all latest 
improvements. 

THE BEST TREADLE MACHINE IS THE 

Light Running "Standard" 

For Manufacturing and Family use. 




It z's a Model of Strength and Beauty. 

The most Elegantly Ornamented Machine in the world. Lasts a life- 
time, and NE¥BR gets OUT of ORDER. EXCELS ALL OTHERS 
IN TFOROUGHNESS OP WORKMANSHIP. 

We wish to establish Agencies in all Towns, and will give exclusive 
territory to first-class houses, and furnish Machines at very low prices. 



RENNICK, KEMSLEY & CO., 

(Late Johnson, Clark and Co.), 

Finsbnry Circus, LONDON, EC. 




THOMAS WARWICK, 

MANTJFACTUEEE OP 

Dgrwyal Letters Palenl. SICYGLl] MATSRIALS 

Of every description, Wholesale and for Exportation. 

WARWICK'S PATENT POTENTIAL RIMS. 

SOLE MAKEE OP WOOLLEY'S PATENT DUPLEX SPEINa 
SADDLE. STAMPINGS OF ALL KINDS. 




C. D. Vesey, Esq., who won the late Tricycle Championship, used one 
of WOOLLEY'S PATENT SADDLES. He says : " I was highly 
delighted with it ; never once during the 50 miles ride did I feel the 
slightest of the rotigh roads." 

Price List Free on application to the above, 

Aston New Town, Birmingham. 



^t Iming M^tljm §mik 

AND 

JOURNAL OF DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



WE certainly hope that such facts as were revealed at a 
creditors meeting held at the Guildhall Tavern on 
the 30th ult. are of unusual occurrence in the 
sewing machine trade. The meeting in question was con- 
vened to receive a statement of the affairs of Mr. Harry 
Thomas trading as Smith and Co. at 30, Edgware-road, who 
has recently filed a petition for liquidation. A report of the 
proceedings ■ivill be found in another column. It will be seen 
that some very strong language was used, and to all appearance 
the transactions of Thomas with one of his creditors — namely, 
Mr. Grimwade — were of such a character as to call for a good 
deal of explanation. According to the debtor's statement, 
which, by the way, Mr. Grimwade did not in any way con- 
tradict, he had been in the habit of borrowing money from, 
and signing accommodation bills for, Grimwade, and had in 
several instances paid him more than one hundred per cent, 
per annum for advances. Thomas says that for a loan of £45 
for three months he had more than once paid Grimwade £15 
by way of interest, a statement which was received with sur- 
prise and something very like indignation by those who heard 
it. They properly thought that Thomas had been vei-y foolish, 
but they also thought and said that Grimwade's conduct had 
been exceedingly reprehensible. For a struggling debtor who is 
trying his best to put off the evil day, and who like a drowning 
man catches at any straw that will keep his head above water 
a little longer one may feel something like pity, but for a 
wholesale house to attempt to bolster up an insolvent customer 
and suck his blood to the tune of one hundred and thirty 
cent.. per annum there can be no excuse, and when a gentle- 
man in the body of the meeting characterised these transac- 
tions as a fraud upon the body of creditors, .we venture to 
think he was not very far wrong. Circumstances may perhaps 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOURNAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



29 



arise now and then which may justify a needy man in borrow- 
ing money on an emergency at twenty, or even twenty-five, 
per cent., but the calling of the wholesale vendor and the 
loan office keeper ought even then not to be followed by the 
same individual. But when, as in this case, the debtor kept 
np his payments to one creditor by borrowing money of him at 
a ruinous interest, we say plainly he did so to the wrong and 
detriment of everybody else who was giving him credit, and 
Mr. Grim wade must have known, when he was taking 
Thomas's cheque of £15 for the renewal of a £45 bill for three 
months, that such extortionate interest could only be forth- 
coming by a squandering of the assets, which belonged, not 
to Mr. G-ritnwade, but to the whole body of Thomas's creditors. 
It was clearly Mr. Grimwade's duty to have made Thomas 
bankrupt long ago, and not to have taken other people's 
money from him in iisury at more than cent, per cent. "We 
have never heard of such transactions in our whole experience 
before, and we earnestly hope we never may again. 



Mb. Geoege Sawyer, the genial manager of the White 
Sewing Machine Company, was the recipient of a very pleasant 
testimonial of esteem from the employes of the company at 
the London office. It will be remembered that the company 
has only been in its English premises but seven or eight 
months, but during that time the feeling of personal friend- 
ship for the head of the house has become quite general even 
among all the new employes which have been added to the 
staff to facilitate the rapidly growing business. On a recent 
date the fitst anniversay of the manager's natal day spent in 
England, he was presented by Mi-. Beed, on behalf of aU his 
associates in business, with a vei-y elaborately finished and 
jewelled pencil-case, and who in a neat speech conveyed the 
idea that there was a hope that it might be freely used to 
figure out the large business which aU hoped must accrue to 
the company from the energetic work of its manager. 



Boot Blacking Machines, or as tke language of the Patent 
Office hath it, " Apparatus for cleaning and polishing boots 
and other coverings of the feet," are fast increasing in number. 
The first machine invented was Southall's, which came before 
the public about four years ago. Since then there have been 
no less than twelve patents taken out for " apparatus " with 
which to clean the understandings of her Majesty's subjects. 
Messrs. Kent and Co. and Messrs. Bradford and Co. each sell 
a different boot blacking machine, another is sold by the Boot 
and Shoe Cleaning Company, of Halkin-street-west. In our 
last issue we described three, and in this issue are particulars 
of more such articles. Some of these machines, like the London 
Shoe Black Brigade, clean your boots while on your feet, 
others prefer to have them off, and some even need a supply 
of lasts to enable them to perform the operation. How many 
more machines are we to have for "' japanning our trotter 
cases ?" Is not a baker's dozen sufficient, or are some of them 
Tjetter in theory than practise ? 



OUR ILLUSTEATED SUPPLEMENT. 

Messrs. Fenby and Eraser, of Neville Iron Works, Leeds, 
have just introduced to the shoe manufacturing trade some 
sole and heel cutting machinery. We illustrate as this month's 
Supplement DenneU's Patent Sole and Heel Press. The 
action of this press is very simple, and it is very economical, 
there being no waste in cutting. The machine is very rapid 



in its action, will use any ordinary slip through sole knife, 
and will do the work of four ordinary presses. The press, as 
shown in our illustration, is adapted for steam-power, but 
manufacturers not having such power can have a treadle 
appliance fitted at a small cost. Several large firms have 
already purchased these machines for their factories, including 
Messrs. Stead, Simpson, and Nephews, and Messrs. Snow and 
Bennett, of Leicester; Messrs. Dereham Bros., Bristol; 
Messrs. Hewlett and White, Norwich ; and Messrs. Scales and 
Salter, Leeds. 



ANSWERS TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

The following are the directions for using Richard's Plastic 
Metal : — Melt the ingots in an iron pot, or ladle, over a slow 
fire, then run ths metal into thin strips like tinmen's solder. 
The bearing, or other article, having been thoroughly cleansed 
from oil and grease, should be heated hot enough (about 450 
deg. Fahrenheit) to melt the Plastic Metal, then having first 
sprinkled a little gi'Oimd sal-ammoniac upon the part to be 
re-faced, take a strip of the Plastic Metal and rub it on until a 
thin coating is formed, the metal may then be pasted on, layer 
upon layer, with a plumber's soldering iron, until the required 
thickness is obtained ; or, it may be run on out of a ladle, 
having first made a core of dry sand, or iron plate, to the 
required radius of the bearing. When "pasting up" upon 
Plastic Metal first apply a little spirits of salts to the surface 
of the old Plastic Metal. Brass bushes, axle box bearings, 
&c., maybe dispensed with, by casting aU such articles entirely 
of Plastic Metal, in properly chilled moulds, which will then 
require no boring or turning. Glands of all sizes can be tinned 
and filled up perfectly soimd. 



BELLS FOE BICYCLES, &c. 

Provisional protection only has been obtained by Joseph 
White, of Coventry, watch manufacturer, for "An Improve- 
ment or Improvements in or relating to Bells for Bicycles and 
other purposes." The object of this invention, which relates 
to improvements in or relating to warning bells for bicycles 
and other velocipedes, the same being also applicable for other 
similar uses, is to provide an automatic bell of a simple con- 
struction, which can be caused to ring or cease ringing at the 
pleasure of the rider. The improved bell is constructed with 
a toothed wheel mounted upon a pillar or post rising from a 
base or plate, and actuated by a pinion on a shaft passing 
through the plate, below which it is fitted with a roller having 
a convex or straight bevil contact edge at the bottom. The 
complete bell is fixed on any ordinary front wheel break, so 
that the contact edge of the said roller can be brought against 
the revolving wheel of the velocipede, causing a rotation of 
the said toothed wheel, by means of which the tongue or 
hammer is actuated and the bell sounded. The roller is carried 
by a tube, a slot in which engages with a pin projecting from 
the shaft and imparts rotation thereto, and the tube is encircled 
by a helical spring, and by means of this arrangement the roller 
is allowed sufficient play and is enabled to adjust itself to the 
actuating wheel of the velocipede, or other machine, so as to 
avoid doing damage to the bell by the springing of the wheel 
or any other part of the machine. The principal feature of 
the invention is the working of the beU at pleasure from the 
actuating wheel of bicycles, or other velocipedes, or other 
machines. 



A SottOLK man, aged seventy-nine, has given up smoking. 
He heard last week that it was injurious to health. 

In the North of England tricycles are becoming extremely 
popular, and in Hull a club has been formed. The Mayor has 
been invited to occupy the position of president. Captain 
Scoping is the vice-president. 



30 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP DOMESTIC APPLIANCES. 



JUNH 1, 1881. 







Liquidations by Akrangement. 

Dii, Joseph, High Wycombe, ironmonger. April 28. 

Gray, Eobert Owen, Berwick-upon-Tweed, ii-onmonger. April 27. 

Kirk, John,. Bradshaw-gate and Clarence-street, Bolton, iron- 
monger. April 28. 

Mullins, James, Covered Market, Leeds, ironmonger. April 28. 

Taylor, Edward, Ponthill-road, Finsbury Park, Loudon, SaHord, 
Lancashire, and Shaw-heath, Stockport, Cheshire, laundry and 
dairy engineer and machine maker (separate creditors). 
April 26. 

Thomas, William Edward, Edward Taylor, and James Fielding, 
trading as Thomas and Taylor, Fonthill-road, Finsbury Park, 
London, Chapel-street, Salford, Lancashire and Cheshire, late 
Market-street, Manchester, laundry and dairy engineers and 
machine makers. April 23. 

Thomas, William Edward, Fonthill-road, Finsbury Park, London, 
Salford, Lancashire, and Hall-street, Stockport, laundry and 
dairy engineer and machine maker (separate creditors). 
April 26. 

Smith, Henry Moreton, St. Anne's Well-road, Nottingham, iron- 
monger and general furniture dealer. May 11. 

Thomas, Harry, trading as Smith and Co., Edgwai'e-road and 
Queen Victoria-street, late Charles-street, Soho, sewing machine 
agent. May 12. 

Hughes, George, trading as George Hughes and Son, Llandilo, 
Ironmonger. May 6. 

Wilcock, John, Market-place, Clitheroe, Lancashire, ironmonger, 
whitesmith, and tin-plate worker. May 4. 

Bills of Sale. 

Pallister, William, Easington-lane, Durham, sewing machine 
agent ; £7 10s. In favour of Mark Fryde. Filed April 10. 

Midgley, William, 111, Kmg's-cross-road, ironmonger ; ^58, &c. 
In favour of Thomas Fairhead. Filed May 2. 

Bowers, Thomas, 58, Walsall-street, Wolverhampton, bicycle 
manufacturer ; £7 5s., &o. In favour of Joseph Harris. Filed 
May 11. 

Bryant, James Sutton, Criohlade, Wilts, ironmonger ; ^692 6s. 3d. 
In favour of Uriah Bryant. Filed May 18. 

Crossley, Henry, Woodhouse, near W hiteha ven, Cumberland, iron- 
monger's assistant. In favour of Elizabeth BeUman. Filed 
May 16. 

Kaison, Henry William, 11, 13, and 15, E,oohester-row, West- 
minster, ironmonger, stove manufacturer, &c. ; .£65, &c. In 
favour of National Advance Co. Filed May 16. 

Eamsay, Charles, 75, New Brandling-street, Monkwearmouth, 
near Sunderland, Durham, machine proprietor ; JE22 10s. In 
favour of Mark Fryde. Filed May 18. 

Eaynbird, George, Arden-street, Earlsden, near Coventry, trading 
as Kelsey and Co., in Courk 4, Well-street, Coventry, sewing 
machine manufacturer; £48. In favour of District Advance 
Co. Filed May 17. 

Eudd, William, Clown, Dej-byshire, machine owner; ^£163 193. 3d. 
In favour of Helen Holeywell. Filed May 19. 

COUNTT COTTKT JUDGMENTS. 

Hopkinson, W., and Co., 27, Eye-lane, Peckham, sewing machine 

dealers ; £22 10s. 9d. March 31. 
Portsmouth, A., Basingstoke, Hants, ironmonger; £14, lis. 6d. 

March 29. 
Jones, J. W., 32, Hereford-road, Westbourne-grove, ironmonger ; 

£11 53. 2d. April 7. 
Eobinson, A. K., Woodhouse-lane, Leeds, ironmonger. 
Webb, Thomas, Westgate-bridge, Gloucester, machinist. 
Webb, W., Westgate-bridge, Gloucester, machinist; £17 13s. lOd. 

April 1. 
Webster, Henry, 62, New-street, Burton, Staffs, ironmonger ; 

£10 3s. April 13. 



Dissolutions of Paetnekship. 

Evans and Williams, Llanidloes, ironmongers. April 2. Debts 
by Evan Williams. 

Frost, J. P., and Co., Lord-street and Great George-street, Liver- 
pool, general house furnishers. December 31. As regards 
Henry Eagles. 

Haggard, Son, and Bunby, Eotherham and Mexboro', ironmongers. 
December 31. Debts by William George Haggard. 

King and Co., Hull, iron merchants and ironmongers. Decem- 
ber 31. 

Oliver and Arundel, Bromley-street, Ashley-lane, Manchester, 
machinists. May 5. Debts by Henry Birkly Arundel. 

Palmer and Holland, Aston, Birmingham, bicycle manufacturers, 
November 23. Debts by John Henry Palmer. 



STORMY CREDITOES MEETING. 

A meeting of the creditors of the estate of Harry Thomas, 
trading as Smitli and Co., sewing machine dealer, 30, Edgware- 
road, was held atthe Guildhall Tavern, on the 30th ult. There 
was a large attendance of creditors. Mr. Herbert Pricker, of 
the Wanzer Machine Co., took the chair. There was a con- 
siderable amount of discussion arising out of the proofs 
tendered against tbe estate, objections being taken to several 
of them by Mr. Young, the solicitor to the debtor, especially 
to those made upon bills of exchange drawn upon the debtor 
by Grimwade and Co., of Queen Victoria-street, E.G. The 
statement of affairs showed : Creditors fully secured, 
£193 8s. lOd. ; creditors unsecured, £2,116 6s. lOd. ; claims 
payable in full, £24 IOg. ; the assets consisting of stock in 
trade, £73 ; cash in hand, £1 5s. ; furniture and iiktures, £57 ; 
book debts, nil. These assets being subject to a reduction of 
£33 8s. lOd. in respect of an execution which 
had been levied by a judgment creditor who had levied 
but was restrained from selling the stock till af £er the first 
meeting. Among the list of unsecured creditors were — 

The Wanzer Machine Co. . . 

Gresham and Craven, Manchester 

Ashwoi-th and Sons, Bolton 

Pace and Sons, Redditch . . 

S. Thomas and Son, Redditch 

The Howe Machine Co. 

Wheeler and Wilson 

Edward Todd 

Chas. Messent and Son 

Grimwade and Co. . . 

Cassell, Petter and Co. 
The rest of the liabilities being chiefly for cash lent. 

Mr. Young stated that a private meeting had been called 
some months ago, when the debtor was able to offer a com- 
position of 4s. in the £ ; but the proceedings fell through in 
consequence of the impossibility of arriving at anything 
like a satisfactory adjustment of the debt alleged to be due to 
Messrs. Grimwade and Co., and that in consequence the 
estate had been frittered away, and there was nothing left 
for division among the creditors. Much indignation was 
expressed at the way Mr. Grimwade had wasted the estate and 
at the ruinous interest he had charged for cash advanced to 
the debtor, amounting in many cases to cent, per cent., and 
one creditor in particular denounced his conduct as fraudulent, 
and distinctly characterised him as a swindler. A long dis- 
cussion followed with reference to some bills signed by the 
debtor for Mr. Grimwade's accommodation which he could not 
get discounted and promised to destroy, but had failed to do 
so. After a long discussion, in which strong language was 
freely used, the meeting separated without having passed any 
resolution except the usual vote of thanks to the Chairman. 



.. £97 


8 





r , . 193 


4 





.. 13 


16 


6 


. . 41 


16 


4 


.. 35 


12 


4 


.. - 57 


16 


2 


9 


10 


11 


.. .. 26 


19 





. . 22 


2 





. . 480 








. . 14 


8 


6 



We understand that Messrs. B. P. Brown and Co. have received 
the highest award at the Melbourne Exhibition for their Satin 
Polish and other specialities. The firm have already gained 
the highest award at Philadelphia, 1876 ; the Gold Medal at 
Berlin, 1877 ; and the highest award and only medal at Paris 
in 1878. 



June 1, 1881. 



THE SEWING MACHINE GAZETTE AND JOUENAL OP D