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Full text of "Report"

Mvft-VVi'iliii'.Wi 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

University of Toronto 



http://www.archive.org/details/report191200brit 



01 



ANNUAL REPORT 



MINISTER OF MINES 



FOR THE 



YEAR ENDING 31st DECEMBER, 
1912, 



BEINO AN ACCOUNT OF 



MINING OPERATIONS FOR GOLD, COAL, ETC., 



PROVINCE OF BRITISH] [COLUMBIA. 




THE GOVERNMENT OF 
THE PROVING*. OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

PRINTED BY 
AUTHORITY OF THE LEGISLATIVE ASSEMBLY. 



VICTORIA, B.C. : 
Printed by Wn mam II. Cm.i.i.n. Printer to the King's Must Excellent Majesty. 

1013. 



ROYAL ONTARIO MUSEOil 

GEOLOGY anThHIERAMW 

6,2, Z 



TN 

19 






10225 • 



c 

ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



MINISTER OF MINES, 



1912. 



2 



To His Honour Thomas \Y. Paterson, 

Lieutenant-Governor of the Province of British Columbia. 

May it please Your Honour: 

The Annual Report of the Provincial Mineralogist upon the Milling Industry of the 
Province for the year 1912 is herewith respectfully submitted. 

RICHARD McBRIDE, 

Minister of Mines. 
Minister of Mines' Office, 

April 21st, 1913. 



4 




T 



REPORT OF THE BUREAU OF MINES 



WILLIAM FLEET ROBERTSON, PROVINCIAL MINERALOGIST. 



To the Uonourable Sir Richard MeBride, K.C.M.G., 
Minister of Mines. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith my Animal Report on the Mining Industry 
of the Province for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The statistical tables give the total mineral output of the Province to date, anil show in 
considerable detail the actual mineral production of the past year, as based on smelter or mill 
returns ; also, a summary of the production of each of the last four years, thus illustrating by 
comparison the progress made in productive mining during this period. 

To facilitate comparison with information previously given, 1 have retained, as closely as 
«as possible, the general form already established for such tables and for the Report. 

I have the honour to be, 
Sir, 
Your obedient servant, 

WILLIAJM FL EET R( >BERTSON, 

Provincial Min eralog ist. 
Bureau of Mines, Victoria, II. C, 

April 21st, WIS. 



MINERAL PRODUCTION OP BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



METHOD OF COMPUTING PRODUCTION. 

In assembling the output of the lode mines in the following tables, the established custom 
of this Bureau has been adhered to, viz. : The output of a mine for the year is considered that 
amount of ore for which the smelter or mill returns have been received during the year. This 
system does not give the exact amount mined during the year, hut rather the amount credited 
to the mine on the company's books during such year. 

For ore shipped in December the smelter returns are not likely to lie received until 
February in the new year, or later, and have, consequently, to be carried over to the credit of 
such new year. This plan, however, will be found very approximate for each year, and 
ultimately correct, as ore not credited in one year is credited in the next. 

In the lode mines tables, the amount of the shipments has been obtained from certified 
returns received from the various mines, as provided fur in the ''Inspection of Metalliferous 
Mines Act, 1897." In calculating the value of the products, the average prices for the year in 
the New York Metal Market have been used as a basis. For silver 95 per cent., for lead 90 
per cent., and for zinc 85 per cent, of such market prices have been taken. Treatment and 
other charges have not been deducted, except that in copper the amount of metal actually 
recovered has been taken, thus covering loss in slags. 



TABLE I. — Total Production for all Years up to and including 1912. 

Gold, placer $ 72,194,603 

Gold, lode 70,859,022 

Silver 33,863,940 

Lead 27,520,753 

I upper 73. 723, 562 

Coal and coke 132,871,155 

Building-stone, bricks, etc 17,576,084 

Other metals, zinc, etc 1 ,528,403 

Total $430,137,522 

TABLE II. — Production for each Year from 1852 to 1912 (inclusive). 

1852 to 1892 (inclusive) $ 81,090,069 

1893 3,588,413 

1894 4,225,717 

1895 5,643,042 

1896 7,507,956 

1897 10,455,268 

1898 10,906,861 

1899 12,393,131 

1900 16,344,751 

1901 20,086,78(1 

1902 17,486,550 

1903 17,495,954 

1004 18,977,359 

L905 22.461,325 

1906 24,980,546 

1007 25,882,560 

1908 23,851,277 

1900 24,443,025 

1910 26,377,066 

1911 23,499.072 

1912 32,440,800 

Total $430, 137,522 



K 8 



liEI'OItT <'F TI1K MlNISTEK OF Ml.NES. 



1913 



Table 111. gives a statement in detail of the quantities and value of the different mineral 
products for the years 1910, 1911, and 1912. It has been impossible as ye1 to collect complete 
statistics regarding building-stone, lime, bricks, tiles, and other miscellaneous products, but 
such figures as it has been possible to secure are given in some detail in Table V. 

TABLE III. 
Qi iNTiTiES and Value or Mineral Products for 1910, 1911, and 1912. 



( told, placer 

ii lode 

Silver 

Lead 

i opper 

Zinc 

Coal .... 

Coke 

Miscellaneous pro 
[ducts 



( 'ustomarj 

Measure. 



I lunces 

n 

Pounds 

a .... 

Tons.LV.Mii Hi. 



1910. 



1,'ii.inl II J 



iv,:. Tin 

2,450,241 

34,658,746 

38,243,934 

1,184,192 

2,800,046 

218,029 



Value. 



540 
533, 
245, 
386, 
871, 
192. 
800, 
308, 




<KKI 

380 
016 
350 

512 

47:i 
H'.l 
174 

nun 



826 377,066 



1911. 



228,617 

1,892,364 

26,872,397 

36,927,658 

2,634,544 

2,193,062 

66,005 



Quantity. Value. 



L912. 



i 426, 

4,725,513 
958 

1,069,521 

4,571,644 

129,092 

T.tlTo.717 

396,030 

3,547,262 

823,499,072 



ntity. 


Value. 




s 


257,496 

3,132,108 

44,871,454 

51,456,537 

5,358,280 

2, Ill's, sol 

264,333 


5,322,442 
1,810,045 
1,805,627 
8,408 il3 
316,139 
00 814 
1,58 
3,435 722 








Mi ',800 



• TABLE IV. 

Output of Mixekai, I'kudfct.s in I mstkh'ts and Divisions. 



Names. 




Divisions. 






Disi 






1910. 


1911. 


1912. 


1910. 


1911. 


L912. 


Cariboo District 








.- 21 


s 180,000 


68,000 


Cariboo Mining 1 division 


8 218,000 
6,000 

15, 


- 136,000 
34,000 
10,000 


f ISO 

80,00(1 

s 










Omineca ,, 


6,121,832 
5,088,186 






( IaSSIAR 1 lISTRII r . . 


293,442 
2, i ; 
1,343,912 




East Kooti sai 1 >istrict 








5,723,004 


West Kooti sai i iistru i 


18,058 

845,106 

B76.002 

2,966,096 

82,924 


75,768 
798,989 

2,891,866 
68,024 


371,760 
1,951,315 

:.sl. 7i in 

45,729 


65,255 


Sloi 8 1 it V ./ 








Xels. in „ 








Trail < Ireek „ 
















21,109 


8 - 6,406 


Osoyoos, Grand Forks & Green 


6,442,063 


1,763,817 

81 1,386 

12,906 


7,903,006 

7 is,: 

64,500 


Similkameen, Nicola, Vernon 
















1.11.1. ET 1 IISTRII C 




7,635,890 


10,579,086 




i lo 1ST 1 Iistrii ft Nanaimo, Alber- 
ni, Clayoquot, Quatsino, Vic- 
toria, Vancouver) 








11,095,556 














$26,3. 


• '9,072 


$32,440 800 



3 Geo. 5. 



Mineral PftODrenox. 



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K 10 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



TABLE VI.— Placer Gold. 

Table \ I. contains the yearly production of placer gold to date, as determined by the 

returns, sent in bj the banks and express • ipanies, of gold transmitted by them to the 

mints, atHl from returns sent in by the Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders. To these 

yearly a lints one-third was added up to the year l s 7>: from then to 1895 and from l s '.»^ 

to 1909, one-fifth ; and since then om tenth, which proportions are considered to represent, 
approximately the amouni of i_r ■ • 1 » I sold of which there is qo record. This placer gold contains 
from 10 to 25 per cent, silver, bul the silver value lias not been separated from the totals, as 
it would be insignificant. 

Yiii.n of Placer Gold per Yeah i" Date. 



1858 S 705,000 

1859 1,615,070 

1860 2,228,543 

1861 2,666,118 

1862 ... 2,651 9 
1863 3,913,563 

. .. 3,735,850 

1865 3,491,205 

1866 2,662,106 

1867 .... 2,480,868 

1868 3,372,972 

1869 . . 1,774,978 

1S7U 1,336,956 

1871 .... 1,799,440 



1872 ....$ 1,610,972 

1873 ... 1,305,749 

1874 .... 1,844,618 
1875. .. . 2,474,004 
1876 .... 1,786,648 
ls77 .... 1,608,182 
1878 1,275,204 



1879 
1880 
1881 

1883 

Iss4 
1885 



1,290 
1,013,827 
l,046.7:i7 
954,085 
794,252 
736,165 
713,738 



1886 

IssT 

Isss 

1889 

1890 

1891... 

1892 

1893 

1894 

1895 

1896 

1897 

L898 



3,651 
69 

616,731 
588,923 
(90,435 
429,811 
399,526 
356,131 
4i 1.5. .5 Hi 
181 

544,026 
513,520 
643,346 



1900 . . 3 1,278,724 

1901 ... 970,100 

1902 1,073,140 
1,060,420 

1904 1,115,300 



1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
Hill 
1912 



1899 ... 1,344 



969,300 
948,400 
828,000 
647,000 
477,000 
540,000 
42i;.ihhi 

555,500 



I ital $72,194,603 



TABLE Vll. Production of Lode Mines.* 



ps 


1 lOLD. 


SlI.VEK. 


Leah. 


COPPKB. 


Total 




<)/. 


Value. 


Oz. 


Value. 


Pounds. 

204,800 
674,500 
165,100 
-V. 
.Vi7. 
808,420 
2,135,023 
5,662,523 
16,475,464 
24.199.977 
38,841,135 
31 69 

21,862,436 
63,358,621 
51,582,906 
22,536,381 
Is 089,283 
36,646,244 
56,580,703 
52,408,217 
47.7 

43.195,733 
44,3 
34,6 • 
26,872,397 
14,871,454 

685,6 - 


Value. 

>■ 9,216 

6.49S 

Nil. 

Xil. 

33,064 

78,996 

169,875 

532,265 

721,384 

1,390,517 

1,077,581 

878,870 

2,691,887 

2,002,733 

824,832 

689,744 

1,421,874 

2,399,022 

2,667,578 

2.291.4.5s 

1,632,799 

1,709,259 

1,386,350 

1,069,521 

1. si 1.5. 6-27 


Pounds. 


Value. 


Vai 


1887 


17,690 

79,780 

53,192 

70,427 

4,500 

77,160 

227,000 

746,379 

1,496,522 

3,135,343 

.5.472.971 

4,292,401 

2,939,413 

s.i:.-, 

5,151,333 
3,917,917 
2,996,204 
3,222,481 
3,439,417 
2,990,262 
2,745,448 
2,631,389 
2,532,742 
2,450,241 
1,892,364 
3,132,108 

59,675 


$ 17,331 

7.5.1 Hit! 

47. s7." 

7::. 94s 

4,000 

66,93.5 

195,000 

470,219 

977,229 

2,100,689 

3,272,836 

2,375,841 

1,663,708 

2,309,200 

2,884,745 

1,941,328 

1,521,472 

1,719,516 

1.971. sis 

1,897,320 
1,70 

1,321,483 
1,239,270 

l,24.5.i m; 

1,8 






$ 26,547 

1 n 1 s | ;-; 

54,371 
73,948 

4 (HK> 


Isss 










1889 






1890 










1891 










189? 










99.999 

297,400 


1893 


1,170 
6,252 
39,264 
62.259 
106,141 
110,061 
138,315 
167,153 
210,384 
236,491 
232,831 
322 042 
238^660 
224,027 
196,179 
255,582 
238,224 
2H7.7U1 
228,617 
257,496 

3,438,849 


1,404 
125,014 
785,271 
1,244,180 
2,122,820 
2,201,217 
2,857,573 
3,453,381 
4,348,603 
4,888,269 
1,812,616 
1,589,608 
4,933,102 
4,63 
1,055,020 

B > SSl 1 

4,924,090 
5,533,380 
4,725,513 
5,322,442 






1894 
1895 
1S96 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 

1 91 IS 

1909 

1910 
1911 
L912 


324,680 
952,840 
3,818,556 
5,32 • 

7.271.67s 
7,722,591 

9.997.1 ism 

27,603,746 
29,636,057 
34,359,921 
35,710,128 
37. 692.2.51 
12,990,488 
40,832,720 
17,274,614 
45,597,245 

- 
36,927,656 
51,456,537 


S 11 

47.1.42 

190,926 
- 

874,781 
1,351.453 
1,611 - 
4,441 

3.446.67:! 
4,547,535 
4.57- 
5,876,222 
- -- 

-...541 

6,24 

5,918,522 
I 871,512 

4.571.644 

8,408,513 


781,342 
2,342,397 
4.2.57.179 
7.11.52.431 
6,529,420 
1,604 
10,01 

13,683,044 
11,101,102 
11,571,367 
12,30! 
15,130,164 

17.4s». lirj 

16,2 

14.477.411 

1.5.791.141 

13,03 

11.324.971 

17,34 


Tol 


70,859,022 


33,81 


27. .5JU.7.5.5 


73,723,562 


■2a5.96T.277 



1 In addition to the above, there waa mined in 1910 xinc-on --.ilued at $19-2. ITS— which 

makes the tol mol lodemii ! naaminedzii 

- i 1912 there 

no! lode min 1 the total to. 

date «206,«H 



3 Geo. 5 



Mineral Production. 



K 11 



TABLE VIII. — Coal and Coke Production per Year to Date. 

Coal. 



Year. Tons (2,240 lb). Value. 

1836-77 965,808 $ 3,278,948 

1878 170,846 

1879 241,301 

1880 267,595 



1 



1881 228,357. 

1882 282,139. 

1883 213,299. 

1884 394,070. 

1885 265,596. 

1886 326,636. 

1887 413,360. 

1888 489,301. 

1889 579,830. 

1890 678,140. 

1891 1,029,097. 

1892...' 826,335 2 

1893 978,294 2 

1894 1,012,953 3 

1895 939,654 2 

1896 896,222 2 

1897 

1898 

1899 

1900 



882,854 

1,135,865 3, 

1,306,324 3 

1,439,595 4, 

1901 1,460,331 4, 

1902 1,397,394 4, 

1903 1,168,194 3, 

1904 1,253,628 3, 

1905 1,384,312 4, 

1906 1,517,303 4, 

1907 .' 1,800,067 6, 

1908 1,677,849 5, 

1909 2,006,476 7, 

1910 2,800,046 9 

1911 2,193,062 7, 

1912 2,628,804 9, 



512 
723 
802 
685 
846 
639 
L82 
796 
979 
240 
467 
739 
034 
087 
479 
934 
038 
818 
688 
648 
407 
918 
318 
380. 
192 
504 
760. 
152 
551 
300 
872 
022. 
800. 
675, 
200 



Total 37,250,937 tons. 

Coke. 

1895-97 19,396 

1898 (estimated) 35,000 

1899 34,251 

1900 85,149 

1901 127,081 



$118,687 



1902. 
1903. 
1904. 
1 905 
1906. 



128,015. 

165,543. 

238,428. 

271,785. 

199,227. 

1907 222,913 



1908 

1909. 

1910. 

1911. 

1912. 



247,399. 
258,703. 
218,029. 
66,005. 
264,333. 



| 96 

175 

171 

425 

635 

640 

827 

1,192 

1,358 

996 

1,337 

1,484 

1,552 

1,308 

396 

1,585 



538 
903 
785 
071 
417 
897 
210 
788 
908 
080 
903 
490 
420 
291 
005 
882 
859 
962 
666 
562 
595 
972 
785 
993 
182 
582 
884 
936 
909 
235 
472 
666 
161 
717 
814 



488 

980 
000 
255 
745 
405 
075 
715 
140 
925 
135 
478 
394 
218 
174 
030 
998 



Total 2,581,247 tons. 



$14,183,667 



K 12 



Report of the Minister of .Mixes. 



1913 



TABLE IX. Pi: rcnou in Detail of the 





Vr.AR 




i ■ . >. 




■KR. 






Value. 


Ounces. 


Value. 


Ounces. 










1 




3 




* 




1909 
1910 

1912 

1910 
1911 

1912 

1909 

1911 

1912 




U.OOo 
10,900 
6,800 

9.000 

600 

300 

1,700 

2,500 
400 


180.000 
50.000 
8.000 












































































































1910 
1911 

1912 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 


9 

4 

3-249 


11.250 

14.500 
400 
450 


2i0,000 
8,000 
9.00C 










Liard, Stiki jlotte, 


261 
197 




4,216 

5,868 


1,343 




4.072 


3,391 




1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1911 

1912 

1911 

1912 

I 

1910 

1912 

1910 

1911 

1912 

ll'09 
1910 
1911 

1912 

1910 
1911 

1912 

1UI0 

1911 

1912 
1909 
1910 
181 1 
1912 

1912 
1909 

1912 

1909 

1811 

1912 


115,762 
29.910 

20.400 

97,698 
• 
671 

32.741 

■ 

103.629 
36,814 

• 
52.323 
237,656 

243870 

971 

451 

1,461,533 
1,701,113 

1,989.034 

12 
1.257 

443 


150 

: 

100 


3,000 
2.000 






• 

376.918 

■ 
243 

7,405 






















217.821 


















124 
















4.279 








Ainsworth I»i\ ision 






198 

17,640 

17.513 
115,153 

132 073 
89 

104.849 


3,349 
1,468 

- 
1.653 
1,964 

4,092 

361.994 

2,729.949 
15,130 

1,178 

1.840 

. 
2,167,229 


301.755 

1.657.105 

- 

76,774 

164.182 

■ 

87.530 
43.536 

389.341 








118,397 

174.384 

- 
490.150 








957.641 




100 
50 

£0 


1.000 


37.142 

94.881 
39.157 








44,630 
44,602 




50 
ICO 

225 

5U 

50 

60 

50 

100 

100 

100 

100 

500 
350 

250 


1,000 

4.500 
1,000 
1,000 

1.000 

2:000 
2.000 
2.000 


50.584 


(Grand Porks, Greenwood and <>soyoos 
l'i\ isioDS.) 

Similkameen, Nicola, and Ver 


54,752 
25.159 


225.000 


















Vale. Ashcroft and Eamloopa Divisions. 


















1 








174 












LiUooet and Clinton Divig 


5.000 


71 




























(Nanatmo, Alberni, Clajoquot, Quat- 

Victoria 1 'i\ : 


212 375 
2,057,713 

2.688,632 


50 


1.000 

477,000 

555.500 


6.360 

2.497 


115,111 

51.613 

5 328 442 


• 
98.468 

■ 
3132108 


- - 
23,934 

• 

56.905 


Totals 


1909 


23,850 

27.775 


28! .496 


1.239,270 

■ 
1310 045 



:? Geo. 5 



Production of Metalliferous Mines. 



K 13 



Met 



ALL.FF.ROUS MlNES, ETC., FOR 1909, 1910, 1911, AND 1912. 



Lead. 



l'ounds. 



I '. .11 l.i: 



1,695 

•238,578 

41.512 

'■27,004,528 
'23,874,562 
17,158,069 
18,238.238 
18,7-24 
66,010 



2,249.237 

10,298,343 

2,558,353 

289,009 1 

4,863.894 

4,976,199 

6,406,358 

6,705,671 i 

16,944,811 

1,097,069 

1,215,844 

1,928,836 

2,293,000 

3,316 

6,9461 

8,3'lll 

11,396 

976,601 
463,295 
614,314 
229,366 



68 
9,495 
1,670 

1,039,674 

964.983 

682,891 

733,907 

721 

2,640 

90,509 

396,486 

102,334 

11,502 

195,723 

191,584 

256,264 

266,882 

681,859 

42,237 

49,834 

76,768 

92.270 

128 

278 

330 

459 

37,599 

18,532 

20,470 

9,230 



21,667 
35,584 
29,719 



99 



1 ,423 
1,183 



44,396,346 
34,058, 74(1 
26.872,397 
44.871.454 



4,291 
"19,151 
133,360 

88,403 



186,572 
231,936 

26.257 

3,509,909 
3,677,746 
3 4*'9 7"2 
2,539.900 



1,709,259 
1,386,360 
1,069,521 
1.805.627 



40,603,042 
31,354,985 
22,327,359 

33,372.199 



1,178 
162,723 



1,160,071 
3.078,000 

in.'.".'-, VI 

15.429.778 

45,597, 245 
88,348,934 

36.927,656 
51.453.537 



Zisc. 



Pounds. 



Totals for Divisions. 



1909. 



657 
'2,371 
' 17,310 

' 14,446 



24,21 
29,514 

4.291 
455,686 
465,733 
424,597 
415,045 



142,643 
2,083,896 



220,000 



12,000 



15,01111 



200,730 



33,768 



1,340,585 



8,416 

250,000 
96,869 



2,100,296 
2,634,544 
5,215,637 



150,000 
96,614 
129,09-2 
307,723 



1,125 



S67.340 



218,000 



15,000 



8,807 



1,217,792 



318,058 



5,270,275 
3.993.9H8 
2,764,12' 
5,453,351 



150 
18,907 



150,577 
392,087 

1,301,04'.! 

2.521.380 



5,918,522 
4, H7 1,51 2 
4.571,644 
8.408.513 



704,737 



584,965 



2,875,084 



137,633 



7,501,046 



1.000 



4,184,192 
2,631,514 
5.358.280 



2,000 



16,676 



1,354,462 



400,000 
192,473 
129,092 
316.139 



15,868,14 



136,000 



34,000 



228,776 



39,666 



853,122 



;,n,70- 



'i'otalh m'k 
Districts. 



1912. 



233.000 



180,000 



50.000 



i.000 



290.000 



32,579 



953.728 



322.579 



1.056.932 



103.204 



371.760 



6,114.277 



845,106 



876,00'J 



2,966,096 



82,924 



6,442,063 



2,155 



9,832 



1,982,132 



798,989 



481,266 



2,881,366 



1,951.315 



554.433 



3,196,037 



58,024 



4,746,617 



1,01111 



21,156 



f,40; 



1,533,947 



15,268,731 



11,880,0(13 



40.729 



7.846.580 



2,000 



2.000 



5.000 



2,630.898 



7.850,580 



5.000 



' 2,630.898 



18.218 266 



18.218.266 



K 14 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



l'Jirj 



TABLE X —Showing Mineral Production of British Columbia. 



1891 


KM 


VS& 


1893 


lt-rt 


IK* 


UK 


UB7 


;..-j 


r-j 


1300 


">" 


1502 


1KB 


.■<■■, 


nx 


WW 


: fl 


. i£ J 


'.<:. 


I'jIO 


n] 


19121 
















































$34,000,000 
33,500,000 
33,000,000 
32,500,000 
32,000,000 
31,500,000 
31,000,000 
30,500,000 
30,000,000 
29,500,000 
00,000 
28,500,000 
28,000,000 
27,500,000 
27,000,000 
26,500,000 
26,000,000 
25,500,000 
25,000,000 
24,500,000 
24,000,000 
23,500,000 
23,000,000 
'11,000 
22,000,000 
21.500,000 
21,000,000 
20,500,000 
20,000,000 
19,500,000 
19,000,000 
18,500,000 
18,000,000 
17,500,000 
17,000,000 
16,500,000 
16,000,000 

i '...'lo.ooo 

15,000,000 
14,500,000 
14,000,000 
1,000 
13,000,000 
12,500,000 
12,000,000 
',000 
11,000,000 
10,500,000 
10,000,000 
9,500,000 
9,000,000 
8,500,000 
8,000,000 

7,000,000 
6,500,000 
6,000,000 
5,500,000 
5,000,000 
4,500,000 
4,000,000 
3,500,000 
' 3,000,000 
2,500,000 
2,000,000 
1,500,000 
1,000,000 
500,000 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































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T A BLE 

SHOWING MINERAL PRODUCTION 

OF 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 


Si? 


iisj 


UW 


1tf1 1863 


1863 


1864 


1865 


1866 1 1867 


1868 


1869 


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9,800,000 
9,700,000 
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9,400,000 
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g zoo 00c 

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9.000.000 

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8.800,000 
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8,600.000 
8,500,000 
8,400,000 
8,300.000 
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7,700,000 
7,600,000 

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OOO. v\V 



3 Ceo. 5 



Progress of Mining. 



K 15 



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K 16 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



PROGRESS OF MINING. 



The year 1!>1l' has proved exceedingly favourable to mining in the Province, and the 
mineral production made therein has Keen the greatest in the history of its mining. 

The gross value of the mineral production for 1912 was §32,4 10,800, an increase over that 
of the year 1911 of $8,941,728, or aboul 33.3 percent. 

The greatest output formerly made was in L910, amounting to $26,377,066, which is 
exceeded by the production of 1912 by $6,063,73 I. or 23 per cent., thus showing l>v comparison, 
even with what had been the "record year," how much the mineral production has increased 
during the past year. 

The gradual increase in production during the past twenty-three years, and its fluctuations, 
are graphically shown in Table X. on page fourteen of this Report. 

The tonnage of ore mined in the lode mines . >t" the Province during the year 1912 "as 
also greater than ever before, amounting to 2,688,532 tons, exceeding thi e I tonnage 

formerly mined in any year — 1910 — by 4-72,104 tons, equivalent to 21.3 per cent, increase. 

As compared with the year 1911, the tonnage mined this year shows an increase of 
1*17,777 tons, or about 52 per cent. 

The tonnage mined in 1912 was produced by the various districts in about the following 
proportions: Boundary. 7 4. HO per cent. ; Rossland. !>.07 per cent. ; The Cos D t] ct, i 
percent.; Slocan District, 5.07 percent.; Nelson, 1.94 per cent.; East Kootenay, 1.87 per 
cent. : and all other parts of Province combined, 0.02 per cent. 

The following table shows the number of mines which shipped ore during the year 1912, 
the districts in which they are situated, and the tonnage produced in each district, together 
with the number of men employed, both above ground and underground : 

Table showing Distribution of Shipping Mines in 1912. 





Tons of 

Ore 
shipped. 


No. of 

Mines 

shipping. 


No. of 
Mines 
shipping 
over 100 
Tons in 
1912. 


Men kmployed iv these Mines. 




Below. 


Above. 


Total. 


Cassiar : 

Ailm, Skeena, Queen Charlotte, 

East Khmtkn iv i 


3,249 

•29,910 
20,400 

32,741 
103 

52,323 
243,870 

451 

1,989,084 


2 

3 

1 

8 

26 
15 

9 

8 

11 


2 

3 

1 

5 

11 

11 

5 

1 

9 


25 

103 

14 

105 
303 
186 
529 

21 

635 


Is 

28 
15 

59 
162 
108 
173 

10 

210 


43 
131 


Windermere-Golden 

West Kootenai : 

Slocan an.i Slocan City 

BOI NDAXY : 

Grand Forks, Greenwood, and 


'J'J 

164 

46:. 

2! '4 

702 

31 

845 






Similkaraeen Vernon 






























212 - 


3 






446 


■ 


Total 


-.532 


86 


51 


2,173 


1,229 


3.402 





3 Geo. 5 



Progress of Mixing. 



K 17 



In explanation of the table it should be said that, in its preparation, a mine employing 
twelve men for four months' is credited in the table with four men for twelve mouths, so that 
the total given is less than the actual number of individuals who worked in the mines during 
the year. 

Table showing Non-shippinc Mines and Men employed. 



District. 


Number of Mines. 


Me> 


EMPLOYED. 


Working. 


Idle. 


Total. 


Below. 


Above. 


Total. 


Coast and Cassiar 


5 
2 

8 

18 

8 


6 

8 
11 
3 
4 
1 
18 

51 


11 
2 

iH 

29 

11 

4 

1 

20 

2 


64 
5 
55 
96 
39 


47 
1! 
20 
18 
16 


Ill 
16 




75 
114 


Nelson 


55 








2 
2 

45 








Boundary 


30 
11 


17 
6 

135 


47 


Lillooet 


17 


Total 


96 


300 


435 



STATISTICAL TABLES. 

Referring to the preceding tables of the mineral production of the Province, the following 
is a summary of their contents : — 

Table I. shows the total gross value of each mineral product mined in the Province up 
to the end of 1912, aggregating 8430,137,522. From this table it will be seen that coal- 
mining has produced more than any other separate class of mining, a total of $132,871,155 ; 
followed next in importance this year by copper at $73,723,562, thus relegating to third place, 
placer gold at $72,194,603, and lode gold at $70,859,022 to fourth place. 

The metal gold, obtained from both placer and lode mining, amounts to a value (if 
$143,053,625, the greatest amount derived from any one mineral, the next important being 
coal, the total gross value of which, combined with that of coke, is $132,871,155, followed by 
copper at $73,723,562, silver at $33,863,940, and lead at $27,520,753. 

Table II. shows the value of the total production of the mines of the Province for each 
year from 1893 to 1912 (inclusive), during which period the output has increased about 
tenfold, and reached a production, for the year 1912, valued at $32,440,800, which is about 
three times what it was in 1898. The year 1912 shows a gross production of $8,941,728 
greater than the previous year, and $6,063,734, or 23 per cent., greater than the year 1910, 
which had previously been the record year. The value of the total products of the mines of 
the Province up to the end of 1912 is S 130, 137,522. 

Table III. gives the quantities in the customary units of measure, and the values, of the 
various metals or minerals which go to make up the total of the mineral production of the 
Province, and also, for the purposes of comparison, similar data for the two preceding years. 

The table shows that there has been this year an increase in the production of placer gold 
of some $129,500, and at the same time an increase in the output of lode gold of $596,929, 
making a total increase of $726, 129 in the production of the metal. 



K 18 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 



The amount of silver produced this year was 3,132,108 oz., having a gross value of 
$1,810,045, an increase in the number of ounces produced of 1,239,744, due to a greatly 
increased production in the Slocan, Nelson, and Boundary Districts. The gross value of the 
silver product this year shows an increase over that of last year of $851,752, which is partly 
ace- ted for by a higher market price of silver during this year. 

The table shows an output of lead in 1912 amounting to 14,871,454 tt»., valued al 
$1,805,627, which is an increase over the production of the preceding yearof 17,999,057 lb. of 

lead. 

The production of copper this year was 51,456,537 ft)., valued al $8,408,513, an increase 
in amount of 14,528,881 Hi., or about 39 per cent. The value of the producl was greaterthan 
thai of the preceding year by $3,836,869 an increase of 82 per cent. 

Table IV. Shows the proportions of the total mineral productions made in each of the 
various districts into which the Province is di\ ided. 

It will be noted thai this year again the Coasl District has the honour of first place on 
the list, followed, in order of importance, by the Boundary and Wesl Kootenay Districts. 
The Coast and East Kootenay Districts owe a considerable percentage of their output to tin- 
coal mines situated within their limits, whereas, in the other district-, thi production is almost 
entirely from metal-mining. 

The ( 'oast District also derives a ]art;e proportion of its production from misccll.n 
products, such as building materials, and due to the larger cities therein: this year this 
amounted to $3,010,818, as shown in Table V. 

In this table, this year again, the value of zinc has been distributed to the districts 
producing it, which has occasioned SOme changes m this table as compared with the l'.IO'.l 

Report, thus making it differ from the column in a previous report. 

Taiii.i: V. is a new ta hie, introduced last year, and is an endeavour to show in sonic detail 

the production of those products, such as building materials, previously summarized under 
miscellaneous products. Much difficulty has been found in obtaining reliable figures regarding 

these products, and in many eases they have had to be estimated ; hut while the figures are 
not as complete as desired, they are at least approximate, ami show what an important branch 

of mineral production this has become. 

Table VI. gives the statistical record of the placer mines of the Province from L858 to 
1912, and shows a total production of $72,194,603. The output for 1912 was $555,500, an 

increase, as compared with the previous year, of about 30. 1 per cent. 

Tabli VII. relates entirely to the lode mines of the Province, and shows the quantities 
and value of the various metals produced each year since the beginning in 1887, of such 
mining in the Province. The gross value of the product of these mines to date is $205,967,277, 
or, including the zinc production of L910, 1911, and 1912, $206,604,981. The production of 
1912, including zinc, was $17,662,766, an increase over the previous year of $6,208,703, or 
al ' 54.2 per cent, the reasons for which have already been given. 

Table VIII. contains the statistics of production of the coal mines of the l'ro\ ii.ee. The 
total amount of coal mined to the end of 1912 is 37,250,937 tons (of 2,240 lb.), worth 
$118,687,488. of this, there was produced iii L912 some 2,628,804 tons, valuedal $9,200,81 I. 
an increase of 135,742 tons m quantity and of $1,525,097 in value over the preceding year. 

In these figures of coal production, the coal used in making coke is not included, as such coal 

iccounted for in the figures of output of coke. The amount of coal used iii making coke in 
1912 was 396,905 tons, from which was made 264,333 tons of coke, having a value of 
$1,585,998, an mi ; i the preceding year of 198,328 tons, or about 300 per cent., with 



3 Geo. 5 Progress of Mining. K 19 

an increase in value of $1,189,968. While only 264,333 tons of coke was actually made, 267,564 
was actually sold ; 3,322 tons being taken from the stocks at the mines, and 91 tons was used 
under the company's boilers. The total value of the output of the collieries of the Province 
in 1912 was $10,786,812. 

The average selling prices taken this year in the calculation of value of product are the 
same as those used last year ; that for coal being $3.50 and for coke $6 per ton of 2,240 11). 
The prices used in calculations prior to 1907 were $3 and $5 respectively. 

More detailed statistics as to the coal production of the Province and of the separate 
districts are given elsewhere in this Report. 

Table IX. gives the details of production of the metalliferous mines of the Province for 
the years 1909, 1910, 1911, and 1912, and the districts in which such productions were made, 
.showing the tonnage of ore mined in each district, with its metallic contents and its market 
value. 

The total tonnage of ore mined in the Province during the year 1912 was 2,688.532 tons, 
having a gross value of $18,218,266. 

The following table shows the percentages of such tonnage and values derived from the 
various districts of the Province : — 

Boundary District 74.00 per cent, of tonnage. 

Trail Creek Mining Division . 9.07 n n 

Coast District 8.03 

Slocan District 5.07 .. 

Nelson Mining Division 1.94 i, " 

East Kootenay District 1.87 n n 

Other Divisions .02 n n 

100.00 

In reports previous to 1910 there has been included in this table the "miscellaneous 
products," and in 1910 these were shown distributed to the various districts; the great increase 
of these products in the past few years has rendered it advisable that this table be reserved 
exclusively for metalliferous products, and so a new table (No. V.) has been introduced, giving 
in some detail the output of the miscellaneous products. 

In making comparisons of this table with similar tables in previous reports, the fact that 
■''miscellaneous" has been removed will have to lie borne in mind. 

Table X. presents in graphic form the facts shown in figures in the tables, and 
demonstrates to the eye the rapid growth of lode-mining in the Province, and also the 
fluctuations to which it has been subject. 

It will be seen that, although coal-mining has been a constantly increasing industry 
during this whole period of twenty-three years, lode-mining did not begin, practically, until 
L894, since when it has risen with remarkable rapidity, though not without interruption, 
until it reached, in 1906, the $17,000,000 line, and the total production in 1910 reached the 
§26,000,000 line, and this year it has reached the s32,000,000 line. 

Table XI. compares graphically the output of certain mineral products in British 

Columbia with that of the combined output of similar products in all the other Provinces of 
the Dominion, and shows that in 1912, British Columbia produced, in the minerals shown an 
amount equal to over 57 per cent, of all the other Canadian Provinces combined 



K 20 Report of THE MINISTER or Minks. 1913 



( OAL. 

The collieries of the Province made in L912 a gross production of 3,025,709 tons i 2,2 10 ft.) 
of coal, an increase over the preceding year of 727,991 tons equivalent to an increase of 31.5 
per cent. 

While this comparison is true, it must in fairness be stated that the production for 191 i 
was much below normal, due to the labour troubles in the Last Kootenay coalfield, whereby 
the collieries of that district wen- closed for the last eight months of the year. 

It might be better, therefore, to make comparison with the year 1910, in which the coal 
production was by far the greatest in the history of coal-mining in the Proi ince, and during 
which the gross coal production was 3,139,235 tons, or only 113,526 tons greater than this 

Had it not heen for labour troubles in the mines of the Canadian Collieries, on Vancouver 
Island, during the latter part of 1912, whereby that company's output "as reduced to a point 
150,000 tons lower than the preceding year, there is little doubt but that L912 would have 
been the record year to date, instead of occupying, as it does, only second place; but, with the 
exception noted, it is greatly in advance of any other year. 

The greater part of this production is still mined by three companies the Crow's Nest 
Pass Coal Company of Mast Kootenay, the Canadian Collieries and the Western Fuel Company 
of Vancouver Island, which mined, collectively, 75 per cent, of the gross output, their respective 
production representing 31.5 per cent., 24.5 per cent., and 19 per rent, of such total. 

Of the other collieries: In the Coast District, on Vancouver Island, the Pacific Coast 
Coal mines. Limited, produced 151,589 tons, and the Vancou\ er Naiiaimo Coal Company 

88,253 tons ; and in the Nicola Valley section of the district, the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke 

Company mined 142,973 tons, the Inland Coal and Coke I 'ompany 31,300 tons, the Princeton 
Coal and Land Company 28,17 I tons, the Dial id Vale < foal Company 3,310 tons, while the 

I luted Empire Coal Company made a start, producing some 500 tons of coal. 

In the Easl Kootenay District, in addition to tin- Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, which 
produced 950,71 "i tons, the Hosmer Mines. Limited, produced 188,243 tons and the Corbin 

Coal and Coke Company 122,263 tons. 

In addition to those companies actually shipping, several other c panics have been 

installing plant and have approached the shipping stage, mention of which will he made 
elsew here in this Report. 

The collieries of the Coast District, including the Nicola Valley field, are to he credited 
this year with about 58.3 per cent, of the total coal output. 

The gross output of the collieries for the past year was. as already stated, 3,025,709 tons, 
in addition to which some 17;809 tons of coal was taken from stock, making the l'Ioss amount 
il distributed 3,043,518 tons. 

< >f this gross amount, there was sold for consumption in Canada. 1,263, l'.'7 tons : sold for 

consumption in the United States. 858,981 tons; while 108,157 tons was exported to other 
countries, making the total coal sales for the year 2,230,565 tons of 2,240 tt>. 

In addition to the coal sold, there was used in the manufacture of coke 396,905 tolls, all 

in the Easl Kootenay field ; and used under companies' boilers, etc.. 240,304 tons; while 
17">. 7 I I tons was lost in washing and screening. 

Then- was no oke made this year in the Coast District, although s.,ine 4,266 tons 
was sold from stock, the total coke production having heen made by the Crow's Nest Pass 
Coal Company, and Hosmer Mines. Limited, in the East Kootenay Held. when-, from 

tons of coal, 264,333 tons of coke was manufactured "' which 91 tons was used under the 
companies' boilers. 



:3 Geo. 5 



Progress of. Mining. 



K 21 



The coke sales of the Province for the past year amounted to 267,564 tons, of which 
3,322 tons was drawn from stock. 

The following table indicates the markets in which the coal and coke output of the 
Province was sold : — 



Coal. 


Coast 
District. 


Crowsnest 
Pass District. 


Total 
for Province. 


Sold for consumption in Canada (Tons — 2,240 tt>. ) 


1,032,351 
307,233 
108,157 


231,076 
551,742 


1,263,427 
858,981 
108,157 






Cokk. 


1,447,747 
4,266 


782,818 

213,041 
50,257 


2,230,565 

217,307 
50,257 










Total coke sales 


4,266 


263,298 


267,564 



Collieries of Coast District. 

The Coast collieries mined 1,764,497 tons of coal in 1912, to which was added 16,894 tons 
taken from stock, making 1,781,391 tons distributed from these collieries in 1912. This 
amount was distributed thus: — 

Sold as coal in Canada 1,032,351 tons. 

United States 307,239 „ 

'i other countries 108,157 n 

Total sold as coal 1,447,747 tons. 

Used under companies' boilers, etc 157,900 n 

Used in making coke 

Lost in washing 175,744 u 

1,781,391 
Minus coal taken from stock 16,894 n 

Gross output 1,764,497 n 

The total coal sales of the Coast collieries for the year show, as compared with the sales 
of the previous year, a decrease of 233,695 tons, equivalent to 13.9 per cent. 

The consumption of coal in that part of British Columbia served by the Coast collieries — 
partly due to the introduction of California oil-fuel — shows this year a decrease of 246,289 
tons, or about 19 per cent, from the preceding year ; the amount exported to the United States 
was 56,755 tons less, but the amount exported to other countries was increased by 69,349 tons. 

Only one company in the Coast District — the Canadian Collieries, Limited — has ever 
made coke, and this year the ovens have not been in operation, although the company sold 
4,266 tons of coke from stock, and still has 2,370 tons in stock. 

The coke sold was entirely for consumption in British Columbia, no export sales having 
been made. 

On Vancouver Island, four companies produced coal this year — the Canadian Collieries, 
Limited, the Western Fuel Company, the Pacific Coast Coal Mines, and the Vancouver-Nanaimo 
Coal Company ; the majority of these companies each operate two, or more, collieries. The 
combined output of the Island collieries was 1,558,240 tons. 



K 22 Report of the .Minister of Minks. lf(i:> 



In the Nicola and Princeton valleys of the Coast District, the Nicola Valley Coal and 
< loke < lompany produced I 1:2,973 tons of coal; the Princeton Colliery, 28, 174 tons; the In bun I 
Coal and Coke Syndicate (formerly Coal llill Syndicate), 31,300 tons; the Diamond Vale 
Colliery, 3,310 tons; and the United Empire, 500 tons. 

The total output of this portion of the district was 20(i,L'"i7 tons. The Pacific < 

Colliery Company of Nicola, ami the Columbia Coal ami Coke Company of Coalmont, on the 
Tulameen river, each mined coal in development work, hut have nut as yet entered tin' market 
as producers. 

East Kootenav Coalfield. 

In the East Kootenay coalfield, the "hi agreement as to wages, etc., which had existed 
between the operators ami the employees, expired on March .".1st. 1911, ami considerable 
difficulty was experienced in arranging a new one, the negotiations occupying nearly eight 
months, during "which time the collieries of this section of British Columbia ami also "t the 
adjoining portion of Alberta were shut down. The new agreement was. however, eventually 
signed, ami holds binding until March, 1915. 

Regular work began again about the first of the year, and the mines have been in 
operation all of the year 1912. 

There were three companies operating in this district the Crow's Nest Pass Coal 
Company, operating two separate collieries, the combined output of which was 950,706 tons; 
the Corbin Coke and Coal Company, which made an output of 122,263 ton and the Hosmer 
Mines, Limited, which produced 188,243 tons of coal, making a gross output tor the district 
for 1912 of 1,261,212 tons of coal. This gross output is nearly three times as great as the 

output of the previous year, when, however, the mines only worked for four months, and is 
within 100,000 tons of tl itput of L910. 

In addition to the coal mined, 915 tons was taken from stock, making the amount of coal 
distributed from the collieries 1,262,127 tons. 

Of this gross tonnage, 396,905 tons was used in the manufacture of coke, of which there 

was produced 264,333 tons (2,240 lbs.). 

In addition to the coke sold this year and the 91 tons used under the Companies' boilers, 
'til tons was added to stock, making the coke production for this year 264,333 ton-, as 
compared with 66,005 tons in 1911. 

Comparisons of the coal, or coke, output of this district during L912 with the previous 

year are, however, misleading, as the mines were only worked for four months of that year. 
hut the production is nearly up to that of 1910. 

The following table shows the distribution made of the coal of this district :--- 

Sold as coal in Canada 231,076 tons. 

Sold as coal in United States 551,742 " 

Total sold as coal 782,818 tons. 

(Jsed by the company in making coke 396,905 

i ed by the company under boilers S 'J. t < ' t •< 

1,262,127 tons. 
Minus coal taken from stock 915 't 

Gross output 1,261,212 tons. 



3 Geo. 5 Progress of Mining. K 23 



GOLD. 

The production of placer gold during the past year was worth about 

Placer Gold. $555,500 as nearly as can be ascertained ; great difficulty is found in 

obtaining reliable figures, since the work is, in many cases, carried out by 

individuals or unorganized groups of men who keep no books, frequently paying wages, or for 

supplies, in gold-dust, which, being readily transported, is scattered, and the tax imposed 

thereon by law is thus evaded. 

The production of 1911 was the lowest recorded in seventeen years, or since 1894, but this 
year's output shows a decided improvement — an increase, as compared with 1911, of §129,500 — 
and is, in fact, the greatest production of placer gold since 1908. 

As was noted in 1911, the water conditions during the latter part of the season were such 
as to prevent the usual "clean-ups," and it is probable that much gold, then uncollected, has 
been recovered this season, which would partly account for this year's higher production ; all of 
which goes to illustrate how dependent the industry is on the weather conditions. 

The known and available placer deposits are undoubtedly becoming exhausted, and, until 
new camps shall have been discovered, the placer-gold output may be expected to continue 
diminishing. 

There have been reported discoveries of new placer fields in Cassiar the past season, but 
as yet their value has not been tested by actual workings. 

Practically all the placer gold was obtained in the Atlin and Cariboo Districts — the former 
being credited with a production of 6290,000 and the latter with $238,000, leaving but a small 
balance for the remainder of the Province. 

The value of the gold produced from lode-mining in the Province during 

Gold from Lode- the year 1912 was $5,322,442, an increase, as compared with the previous 

mining. year, of 8596,929, or about 12.6 per cent. Increases in lode-gold production 

have been made this year in the Boundary, due to an increased tonnage of 

ore mined, and in the Rossland camp, due to the higher assay value of the ore treated ; the 

Nelson Mining Division about held its own this year, but there has been a decreased production 

in the Coast District. 

The following are the values of the gold product of the three most important camps : 
Rossland, $2,729,949 ; Boundary, $2,167,229 ; and Nelson, $361,994. About 75 per cent, of 
the gold production of the Province is obtained from the smelting of copper-bearing ores, the 
remainder from stamp-milling. 

The only large stamp-mill in operation in the Province is at the Nickel Plate mine at Hedlcy, 
in the Osoyoos Mining Division, which, this past year, milled some 70,456 tons of ore having 
a value of about $775,000. There are smaller stamp-mills operating at the Poormau, Quean, 
Motherlode, and other mines in the Nelson Division. 

SILVER. 

The total amount of silver produced in the Province during the year 1912 was 3,132, 1 US 
oz., valued at $1,810,045, an increase in amount, as compared with the previous year, of 
l.i':i9,744 oz., and in value of $851,752. 

The year 1911 showed an unduly low production of silver owing to the labour troubles 
at the collieries shutting off the coke-supply and so closing down the smelters, so it is fairer 
to make a comparison with earlier years. The silver output of 1912 is the greatest we h.n e 
had since 1905, and exceeds that of 1910 — a normal year — by 681,867 oz. in quantity and by 
$565,029 in value. 



K 24 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 



A very large proportion of the silver produced in the Province is found associated with 
lead-bearing ores, chiefly in the Slocan District, where a few mines are still handicapped by 
lack dt' transportation facilities owing to forest fires having destroyed the Kaslo & Slocan 

Hallway anil, in some instances, the plants i>t' the mines. 

The St. Eugene mine in Hast Kootenay, formerly a large producer of silver and lead, lias 
temporarily at least, run out of the ore-shoot, and made a \ cry inucli decreased output, which 
was. however, partly compensated tor Ijv the reopening, by the Consolidated (' pany, of the 

Sullivan mines. 

The Slocan District —including the Ainsworth, Slocan. Slocan City, and Trout Lake 

Mining Divisions produced about (il per cent, of the total Provincial output of silver this 

year, and the Fort Steele Minin g Division al t 12 per cent., all from argentiferous galena. 

The remainder is chiefly derived from the smelting of copper ores carrying silver. 



LEA I >. 
The lead production of the Province for the year 1912 was 14,871,454 lb. of lead, having 

a market value of $1,805,627, showing, as c pared with the previous year, an increase in 

amount of 17,999,057 Ih Of lead, or 67 per cent., and an increase in \al f *~,'M\, l<l(i, or H* H 

per cent. 

This amount of lead represents the amount of metallic lead actually Recovered, and paid 
for, by the smelters, and tallies very closely with their receipts. 

Owing to the large accumulation of stock at the smelter and to certain losses in slags 
throughout the year, the lead-refinery during this year only produced 35,252,000 lb. of 

finished product. 

Instead of taking account of "loss in slags," we have followed, as Ins Keen our habit, the 
practice of the smelters of deducting Id per cent, from the market price of the metal, in 
calculating the value. 

The average market price of this metal for the year 1912 was a little higher than for the 
pre\ i. .us year. 

The causes militating against the output of silver even more seriously affected the 
production ..f lead . hut it is expected that this trouble will he largely remedied by next year. 

The lead production is this year, as usual, derived chiefly from the Fort Steele Mining 
Division, as is shown in the following table: — 

Fort Steele MLD. produced 18,238,238 lb. lead 10.64 per cent, of total 

Ainsworth .. 1,863,894 .. 10.83 

Slocan ,. 16,944,811 ., 37.75 

Nelson „ -J. -J!):?. 000 .. 5.10 

Trout Like .. 229,366 .■ 0.50 

All others „ 2,302,145 m 5.18 



14,871,454 .on 



COPPER. 

The amount of copper produced in the Province in 1912, smelted during the year, was 
51,456,537 lb. fine copper, valued 'at the average New York market price for copper at 




Cement- workS) 1'ortlnml Cemcnl nml Construction Co., under Construction tit 

I tn inliiTtoii, Sim n it'll \ rm. 




Cement- works miilcr < on Nt ruction nt l-Zant Princeton. 



:3 Geo. 5 Progress of Mining. K 25 

$8,408,513. These figures represent the amount of copper actually recovered, as nearly as it 
is possible to ascertain ; the amount of copper really in the ores mined would be approximately 
25 per cent, greater. 

This is the largest production of copper ever made in the Province, exceeding the 
previous "banner year" — 1908 — by 4,181,923 lt>. 

As compared with the year 191.1, there is this year an increased production in amount of 
14,528,881 It.., or nearly 31 per cent., and in value of $3,836,869, or 84 per cent. 

The following table shows the production of the various districts for the years 1909, 
1910, 1911, and 1912:— 

1909. 1910. 1911. 1912. 

Boundary District. .40,603,042 11.. 31,354,985 ft. 22,327,359 ft. 33,372,199 11.. = 64.76 ° 

Rossland „ . . 3,509,909 „ 3,577,745 ,. 3,429,702 „ 2,539,900 „ 5.03 ,, 

Coast & Cassiar „ .. 1,297,722 „ 3,078,090,, 11,017,872,, 15,518,181.. 30.16,, 

Yale-Kamloops ,, 1,178 n 152,723 .. .... 

Nelson ' „ . . 186,572 „ 231,936 „ 26,257 „ 0.05 „ 



45,597,245 „ 38,243,934 „ 36,927,656 „ 51,456,537 „ 100.00 ., 

The average assays of the copper-ores of the various camps, based upon the copper 
recovered, were as follows : — 

Boundary, 0.87 per cent.; Coast, 3.625 per cent.; and Rossland, 0.521 per cent. 



ZINC. 

The total quantity of zinc produced in 1912 was 5,358,280 ft., valued at 1316,139, the 
New York price, less 15 per cent., being taken as the basis of valuation. 

This comparatively small production was made chiefly by the Lucky Jim mine, in the 
Slocan District — the only mine in the Province mining ore primarily for its zinc-contents — 
materially assisted by the Van-Roi, Standard, and to a lesser extent by the Noble Five mines, 
all in the Slocan, and by the Monarch mine, near Field, in the Golden Mining Division, all of 
which produced zinc-concentrates as a by-product from the treatment of silver-lead ores. 

This output is considerably less than it was estimated would be produced, which is 
accounted for by the fact that a couple of the largest producers did not market, before the 
close of the year, more than about half of the product actually made during the year. 

The various processes designed to separate the values of the lead-zinc-silver ores of the 
Slocan, which have been within the past few years experimented with, have not as yet reached 
a stage of commercial application. 

OTHER MINERALS. 

Although, undoubtedly, there are in the Province numerous iron- 
iron-ore. deposits of very considerable size and exceptionally free from injurious 
elements, none of these have been utilized, as there is no market for iron- 
ore, and consequently little development- work has been done. 

In the Coast District the iron-ores are all magnetites, as far as have been developed in 
any quantity, and, although these sometimes contain sulphur, as pyrite, they are singularly free 
from other impurities. 



K 26 Report of the .Minister of Minks. L913 

So far as is at present known, then' is no body of hematite or other ore of iron, u 
would be desirable to mix with the magnetites for blast furnace smelting. 

This fact, together with the present price of coke on the Coast, of from $7 to -~ a ton, 
with little likelihood of its being less while the price of coal continues so high, does not seem 
to justify the expectation of an jron-smelting industry here until these conditions are altered. 

Whether it will be found possible to sum 'It the iron ores of the Coast with anthracite coal 
from the recently discovered coalfields of the upper Skeena river, it is too early t<> predict, 
until the general character of the fuel is more clearly demonstrated and proper transportation 
facilities to the Coast have been provided. 

As tn the electro thermic smelting of such iron-ores into commercial pig iron, the pi 
has not as yet been sufficiently perfected, although it is looked upon as one of the possibilities 
of the future. 

Considerable interest lias been manifested during the pa I yi ir in the magnetiti 
deposits of Texada and Vancouver islands, as well as other points on the (nasi, with a view- 
to their commercial utilization. 

There have been reports of the intended installation of an iron-smelting plant on the 
( oast, lmt nothing at all conclusive has yet become public. 

While platinum is found in many of the alluvial gold-workings "Inn- 
Platinum, it i -at i he saved as a by product, the sa\ ing of it, in a small way, is at ten. led 

with so much trouble that it has been practically neglected ami no 
appreciable production made. 

During the past year a great ileal of excitement was created in the Province by reports 
of tin finding by A. G. French, of platinum in commercial quantity in certain dykes 
near Nelson. 

These reports were based upon statements, credited to A.Gordon French, that he had 

personally determined platinum, and metals of that group, and found them to exist in 
commercial quantities in dykes in the Granite- Poor man mine and other localities adjacent 

to Nelson. 

Certain local assayers and a Philadelphia firm claimed to have confirmed Mr. French's 
statement 

The wide publicity given to these statements hy the press, and otherwise, occasioned the 

staking of numerous claims on dykes in that vicinity. 

The importance of the discovery, if true, was recognized by this Bureau, and steps were 
taken to try to confirm it. 

In the fall of l'.Ml' the Provincial Mineralogist, assisted by an Inspector of Mines. 

sampled a number of these dykes, while samples "f other dykes were obtained from the 
i. Minis. These samples were all duly pulped at the Government Laboratory, and identical 

samples sent to sonic half do/en of the host know n expert chemists , ,t Canada, the United 

States, and England, to he assayed for metals of the Platinum group. 

The results received from these chemists, with one exception, have been decidedly negat 
and this Bureau is not able to confirm the existence of platinum or any metals of that group 
in the \ icinity of Nelson. 

The details of investigations made arc given elsewhere in this Report. 



3 Geo. 5 Progress of Mining. K 27 



BUILDING MATERIALS. 

The growth of cities, with the necessity for fireproof building material, has created an 
industry that promises to rival any other branch of mineral production. 

The past year, although the statistical returns are not as complete as desired, a production 
of about $3,435,722 is accounted for, the details of which production are given in Table V., 
on page 9. 

Excellent building-stone of various sorts is found in abundance in 

Building-stone, almost every part of the Province, but the fact of its widespread distribution 

has, however, been somewhat against the establishment of large quarrying 

industries, as a sufficient local supply could always be obtained, and, except within reach of 

the larger cities, few regularly equipped quarries have been opened. 

On the Coast, chiefly between Vancouver Island and the Mainland, there are several 
well-equipped quarries taking out granite, sandstone, and andesite, all of excellent quality. 
These quarries supply the stone building material of the Coast cities, and also export to the 
United States. 

A detailed description of the more important quarries was given in the report of this 
Bureau for 1904. 

In the interior of the Province, the Canadian Marble & Granite 

Marble. Company opened a marble-quarry on the line of the Lardo-Trout Lake 

Railway, about eight miles from Lardo. This company has, so far, shipped 

only the rough blocks of the marble which were elsewhere sawn into slabs, etc., but during 

the past year the company lias been engaged in erecting dressing-works, which are not yet in 

running order. The product shipped from the quarry has been small. 

A coarsely crystalline whitish marble, not suitable for cutting into slabs, has been quarried 
on the shore of Kootenay lake, and used for building purposes in Nelson and elsewhere. 

The Nootka Marble Quarries, on Nootka sound, on the west coast of Vancouver Island, 
that were opened in 1908, have not made any important shipments. The quarry has not 
been operated since July, 1909. 

The production of red brick during the past year amounts in value to 
Red Brick. 8304,500. The demand, however, keeps well ahead of even the supply, 

particularly in the Coast cities, so that approximately half the brick used in 
Vancouver is imported. The plants in the vicinity of Vancouver, besides being increased in 
size, are being equipped with more modern appliances and should be able to meet outside 
competition. The price of common brick ranged from $8 to 811 per thousand, according to 
quality and demand. 

The only company producing firebrick in the Province is the Clayburn 

Firebrick. Company, Limited, with a plant at Clayburn, where the beds of clay are of 

the age of the coal-measures. This company made approximately 2.S00 M. 

firebrick, worth about $56,000, and 4,000 M. front or face brick, worth about $100,000. 

Besides this the company made a large number of common brick, tiles, drain-pipes, etc. 

The British Columbia Pottery ( lompany at Victoria West manufactures 

Pottery, Drain- drain and sewer pipe, chimney-tiles, etc., the chief item in their sales account 

pipe, and Tile, being drain and sewer pipe. The output for the year approached $130,000. 

The company derives its clay partly from the coal-mines of the Canadian 

Collieries, Limited, at Comox, and partly from a shale-quarry recently opened up on tin- west 

coast of Vancouver Island. 



K 28 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 



The manufacture of lime is conducted in a small way at a large 

Lime. number of points in the Province, but only on the Coast has any attempl 

been made at more extensive operations, [n the neighbourhood of Vicl 

on Esquimalt harbour, Raymond & Sons have three kilns in operation, and there are kilns 

on Saanicb Arm. <>n Texada Island In addition t<> the old plant at Marble bay a new and 

extensive plant has been erected at Blubber haw The limestone being used is of exceptional 

purity, hut in s : instances the limestone beds are cul by igneous dykes which have to be 

rejected, and this somewhat increases the costs of quarrying. 

The only company manufacturing cement in the Province is the 

Portland Cement. Vancouver Portland Cement Company, with works a1 Tod inlet, on the 
Saanicb arm, about twelve miles from Victoria. The capacity of these 

works at present is from 2,000 to 2,500 barrels a day, and this past year the company 

manufactured over 520,000 hands of cement, valued in the neighbour!) I of $800,000. The 

raw materials, limestone and elav, are quarried on the company's property adjoining the works. 
The company has doubled the capacity of the plant, installing electric power to take the place 
of, or supplement, the steam plant, ami introducing many labour-saving appliances. 

The Portland Cement and Construction Company has been installing a large plant at the 
head of the Saanicb arm, but production has not vet been begun. 

Another company has elected buildings and is putting in plant at Easi Princeton, 
Similkameen, 

It is understood that a company has secured land and suitable deposits in the vicinity of 
Prince Rupert, and that the construction of a large plant will be begun in the near future. 

Concrete construction has become SO extensive on the Coast that 
Crushed Rock C panics have been formed to supply suitable material for such work. 

and Gravel. Near Vancouver harbour four companies have opened quarries in a 

granite rock, and have erected crushing and tzing plants and bins for the 

manufacture of crushed rock for concrete-making and for road-making in Vancouver. The 

output of these stone quarrying and crushing plants, in the vicinity of Vancouver alone. 

amounted last year to $275,000. 

Near Vancouver and Victoria, companies have been formed for supplying washed sand 
and gravel, properly screened to size : at least some of those companies have installed a system 
of mining the gravel by hydraulic streams ami the carrying of the product to the screens by 

the water used. The value of the sand and gravel produced for Use in these two cities 

amounted during the past year to over $382,310. 



3 Geo. 5 Bureau of Mines. K 29 



BUREAU OF MINES. 



Work of the Year. 

The work of the Bureau of Mines increases, of necessity, year by year, and this growing 
activity is due to the following causes : The extension of the mining area of the Province, 
with the proportional increase in the number of mines; the increasing desire of the outside 
public for the free information which the Bureau supplies with regard to the various mining 
districts and camps, and the appreciation by the prospector of the fact that he may obtain, 
gratis, a determination of any rock or mineral which he may send to the Bureau. 

The routine work of the office, and the preparation and publication of the Report for the 
year just ended, followed by the examination in the field of as many of the mines and mining 
districts as the season would permit, together with the work of the Laboratory and instruction 
of students, fully occupied the staff for the year. The staff of the Bureau consists of the 
Provincial Mineralogist, the Provincial Assayer, and an assistant in the Laboratory, with a 
clerical assistant in the office. 

After the report for the preceding year had been issued, the Provincial 

Provincial Mineralogist, with assistants, held an examination at Victoriaof candidates 

Mineralogist. tor Certificates of Competency as Assayers, which lasted a week, after which 

he was fully occupied with necessary office- work until the season was 

sufficiently advanced for field-work. 

In February, 1912, the Provincial Mineralogist attended, at Vancouver, a meeting of the 
Western Branch of the Canadian Mining Institute. 

The meeting dealt particularly with the coal resources of the Province, and a number of 
valuable papers were read. 

An explosion having occurred on March 9th, 1912, at Merritt, in the mine of the Diamond 
Vale Colliery Company, the Provincial Mineralogist was instructed by the Honourable the 
Minister of Mines to proceed to the scene of the disaster, and, in company with the Chief 
Inspector, to make an examination of the mine and to investigate as to the origin of tin- 
explosion. 

This examination, together with the attendance and giving evidence at the Coroner's 
inquest, occupied until March I'.'ird. 

The report of the investigation is given later in this Report. 

In July the Provincial Mineralogist with a small party proceeded by Canadian Pacific 
Railway steamer from Victoria to Wrangel, Alaska, at the mouth of the Stikine river, 
where, after some delay, a gasolene-launch was obtained and tile party transported up the 
Stikine river to Telegraph Creek, a distance of about 160 miles. 

At this point horses were obtained and a trip was made into the Dease Lake district — 
the scene of the Cassiar placer-gold excitement of the early 70s — and here the Operating 
placer-mining properties on Dease and Hubert creeks were examined. 



K 30 Report or the .Minister of .Minks. 1913 



Returning to Telegraph Creek, a fresh start was made this time having for its destine 
the coalfield surrounding the headwaters of the Skeena, Stikine, and Nass rivers, and known 
publicly as the Groundhog coalfield, so called since Groundhog mountain, over which the trail 
from Hazelton passes, lies at the southern end of the field. 

After a rather hurried examination of the field the party caught a returning pack-train 
to Hazelton, which was reached about the middle of September, and a return made to Victoi 
by way of Prince Rupert. 

Accounts of these trips will be found in the body of this Report. 

At the request of the Honourable the Minister of Mine the Provincial Mineralogist, on 
October 1st, proceeded to Nelson to investigate the reported finding of metals of the Platinum 
group in certain dykes in that vicinity. 

A Dumber of samples of these dykes were taken personally, and in addition further 

samples were obtained from the owners of properties on which it had been reported these 

precious metals were to he found. 

The method of assay employed hv Mr. French, and by which he had claimed to ohtain 

results showing an appreciable amount of tin platinum metals in these dykes, was obtained 

from him, and the actual manipulation of tins method hv Mr. French and assistants, lasting 

several days, was witnessed. 

Returning to Victoria on October 22nd, the samples obtained at Nelson were very carefully 
pulped nndcr the personal supervision of the w titer, when a number of duplicate pulps, together 
with copies of the method of assaying employed by Mr. French, were sent to several of the 
most reputable and expert chemists in Canada. England, and the United States, for the 
determinati »f the platinum group metals in these samples. 

The results obtained by these chemists tire given in this Report under the heading of the 
Nelson Mining I >i\ ision. 

In December the Board of Examiners for Assayers met in the Government Laboratory 
and held an examination of candidates for Certificates of Competency .as Assayers 
examination occupied a week. 

The l'ro\ incial Mineralogist has to record with much regrel the retirement from the public 
service of Herberl Carmichael, who resigned on December .'list, 1912, in order to attend 
to liis personal affairs. 

Mr. Carmichael had occupied the position of ( lovemment Analyst since 1891, of ( }overn- 
ineni Assaver since 1 892, and acted for a number of years past as Assistant Mineralogist, 
reporting as such, on a number of the mining camps in British Columbia, more particularly 

in the ( 'oast I district. 

In the retirement of Mr. Carmichael the Bureau of Mines loses the services of a re 

than usually expert chemist and assayer, together with a fund ol unwritten data and infor- 
mation which it will he very difficult to replace. 



ASSAS OFFICE. 

The following is a summary of the work of the Assay Office of the Bureau of Mine- for 
the year 1912, as reported by the Provincial Assayer. Herberl Carmichael: 

During 1911 the Laboratories and Mineral Exhibit Building were moved back to Superior 

street, and were opened again for business on January 1st, 1912. 



3 Geo. 5 Bureau of Mines. K 31 



During the year 1912 there were made bv the staff in the Government Assay Office 1,964- 
assays or quantitative determinations ; of these, a large number were for the Bureau of Mines 
•or for the other departments, for which no fees were received. The fees collected by the office 
were as follows : — 

Fees for assaying $970 00 

ii melting and assaying gold-dust and bullion 78 00 

ii assayer's examinations 255 00 



Total cash receipts 81,303 00 

Determinations and examinations made for other Government 

departments for which no fees were collected 300 00 

Value of assaying done $1,603 00 

The value of gold melted during the year 1912 was $10,217 in 39 lots, as against $9,853 
in 32 lots in 1911. 

Considerable time was spent in an investigation of a process for the separation of zinc and 
lead in the galena-blend ores of the Slocan Mining Division. This work necessitated a large 
number of quantitative determinations and other work. Towards the close of the year the time 
of the Laboratory was occupied largely in the investigation of minerals which it was claimed 
contained platinum. 

The results of these tests (given elsewhere) showed conclusively that little or no platinum 
existed in such ores. 

Some years ago, in this Province, nickel was erroneously reported from numerous places. 
It was found that the assavers let a part of the iron in solution pass through the filter-paper, 
then precipitated it and supposed it to be nickel, when if it had been properly precipitated and 
filtered off in the first place it would have left nothing to be precipitated later. 

In the separation of gold, silver, and platinum, it has been the practice with many local 
assayers to dissolve the total metals, get out the gold and silver, and if there was any loss 
•call it platinum, or to weigh up part of the gold as platinum. Such methods have cost the 
unfortunate investor many thousands of dollars. 

In addition to the above quantitative work, a large number of 

Free qualitative determinations, or tests, were made in connection with the 

Determinations, identification and classification of rocks or minerals sent to the Bureau for 

a report ; of these no count was kept, nor were any tees charged, as it is 

the established custom of the Bureau to examine and test qualitatively, without charge, 

samples of minerals sent in from any part of the Province, and to give a report on the same. 

This has been done for the purpose of encouraging the search for new or rare minerals and 

ores, and to assist prospectors and others in the discovery of new mining districts, by enabling 

them to have determined, free of cost, the nature and probable value of any rock they may find. 

In making these free determinations, the Bureau asks that the locality from which the sample 

was obtained be given by the sender. 



EXAMINATION FOB ASSAYEBS. 

Report of Herbert Carmichael, Secretary of Board of Examiners. 

I have the honour, as Secretary, to submit the Annual Report of the Board of Examiners 
for Certificates of Competency and Licence to Practise Assaying in British Columbia, as 
established under the "Bureau of Mines Act Amendment Act, 1899." 



K 32 



Report op the Minister of Minks. 



1913 



An examination was held at the laboratory of the Trail smelter on February 5th and 
following days, at which two candidates came up for examination and one passed. 

An examination was also held at Victoria, in the Governmenl Laboratory, on April 29th 
and the following days. Three candidates came up for examination and all passed. 

Another examination was held at the Government Laboratory, Victoria, on December l.'ith. 
Three candidates came up for examination ; two passed and one failed. 

Other meetings of the Hoard of Examiners were laid during the year, and tin' Hoard 
recommended thai four licences to practise assaying I"- granted without examination under 
subsection (2), section 2, of the Act, In accordance with these recommendations, certificates 
have been duly issued by the Honourable the Minister of Mines. 

List of Assayers not. dim; Provincial Certificates ok Efficiency onder the 

•• P.riiEAu of Mines Act Amkniimi.m Act, 1899." 



(Only the holders of such, certificates may practise assaying in British Columbia.) 

Under section S, subsection ( 1 ). 



A}'res, 1). A Movie. 

Austin, John W Hazelton. 

Backus, Geo. 8 Britannia Beach. 

Baker, C. S. H (ireenwood. 

Barke, A. C 

Belt, Sam'l Krwin 

Bernard, Pierre Monte Chrieto, Wash, 

Bishop, Walter Grand Forks. 

Buchanan, James Trail. 

Buehman, A. C Trail. 

Campbell, Colin New Denver. 

Carniichael, Norman Clifton, Arizona. 

Church, George 15 

Cobeldick, W. M Scotland. 

Collinson, H Stewart. 

Comrie, George H 

Craufurd, A. J. F Rossland. 

Crerar, George 

Cruickshank, G Trail. 

Day, At heist an Dawson. 

Dedolph, Ed Ottawa, (Int. 

Doekrill, Walter R. ...... . . Chemainus. 

Dunn, ( r. W Rossland. 

Farquhar.J. 1'. Vancouver. 

Fingland, John .1 Kaslo. 

Grosvenor, F. E Vancouver. 

Hamilton, Win. J Grand Forks. 

Hantiav, W. II Rossland. 

Hart. P. E 

Hawkins, Francis Silverton. 

Hawes, K. B Ladysmith. 

Hook, A. Harry Greene 1. 

II"' ter, < '. s Prince Rupert. 

Irwin, Geo. V. Vancouver. 

John, D Haileybury, "hit. 

Kiddie, Geo. R. Observatory Inlet. 

King, R Greenw I 

Kitto, ( reoffrey 1! \ ictoria. 

Langley, A. S Crofton. 

Lee, Fred. E Trail. 

Leo, (ieo. M Grand Forks. 

Ley, Richard X Vancouver. 

Lindsay, W. W Rossland 

Longworth, F. ■! Boyds, Wash. 

1. likens, I. F s, . :l tl [e. 



Martin, S. J Hazelton. 

Marsh, Richard Republic. Wash. 

Marshall, 11. .lakes Vancouver. 

Marshall, William S Ladysmith. 

Miles, Arthur 11 

Mitchell, Charles T Copper ClirT, (int. 

Mc( 'oi mirk, Alan F Ruth, Nevada. 

MacDonald, Alex. C Vancouver. 

Nt> 1, oils, Frank .... Norway. 

O'Sullivan. John Vancouver. 

Parker, Robt. H 

Parsenow, W. I. Victoria. 

Perkins. Walter G Basin, Montana. 

I'irkanl. T. D Vancouver. 

Pirrie, Noble W Vancouver, 

Kiel i an mi I, Leigh Duncan, B.C. 

Robertson, T. R 

Rodgers, Ch. U Vancouver. 

Rombauer, A. 1! Butte, Mont. 

Schroeder, I mi. A 

Segsworth, Walter Toronto, Ont. 

Sharpe, Beit X 

Sun. ( 'harles John England. 

Snyder, Blanchard M 

Si. \ on, Win. ( lordon 

So wo i. .lames W Portland Canal. 

Stimmel, B A Trail. 

Sundberg, Gustave Mexico city. 

Tally, Robert V. Spokane, wash. 

Thomas, Percival W 

Trethrw a\ . John II 

Turner, If. A 

Vance, John F. C. I'. Vancouver. 

Van A_new . Prank Siberia. 

\ lughan-Williams, V. I... .California. 

Wales. Roland T 

Watson, Win. J Ladysmith. 

W i 1' h, -l ' ul hberl Butte, Mont. 

Well-., Ben T Lad} smith. 

West. Ceo. G Vancouver. 

Whittaker, Delbert F. Vii i 

WiddowBon, F. Walter Nel 

Williams. W. A ( trand Forks. 

William^. Eliot H 

Wimberly, S. 11 Nevada. C.S A 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 33 



Under section ;?, subsection (S). 



Archer, Allan 

Brennan, Charles Victor . . . .Bingham, Utah. 

Browne, R. J Rossland. 

Browne, P. J Nelson. 

Bryant, Cecil M •Vancouver. 

Blaylock, Selwyn G Trail. 

Burwash, N. A 

Cartwright, Cosmo T Ottawa. 

Cavers, Thomas \V 

Clothier, George A Stewart. 

Cole, Arthur A Cobalt, Ont. 

Cole, G. E Rossland. 

Cole, L. Heber Ottawa, Ont. 

Conway, E. J 

Ccmlthard, R. W Blairmore, Alta. 

( li iwans, Frederick 

1 lawson, V. E ....... .' Trail. 

Dixon, Howard A Toronto, Ont. 

Eardlev-U ilniot, V. L Rossland. 

Galbraith, M. T 

Gilman, Ellis P Vancouver. 

i 1 1 aen, J. T. Raoul Blairmore, Alta. 

Guess, George A Toronto, Ont. 

Gwillim, J. C Kingston, Ontario. 

Heal, John H 

Hilliarv. G. M Idaho, U.S.A. 

Holdich, Augustus H England. 

Johnston, William Steele. . . . Lachine, Que. 

Kaye, Alexander Vancouver. 

Kendall, George Vancouver. 

Kilburn. Geo. H 

Lathe, Frank E Grand Forks. 

Lay, Douglas Silverton. 

Lewis, Francis B South Africa. 

Merrit, Charles P 

Murphy, C. J 

Under section 

Carmichael, Herbert Victoria. 

(Provincial Assayer. ) 

Harris, Henry Tasmania. 

Hedley, Robt. R Vancouver. 

Kiddie, Thos Vancouver. 

Sutton, \V. J Victoria. 



Musgrave, William N Mexico City. 

Mussen, Horace W Siberia. 

McArthur, Reginald E 

McDiarmid, S. S 

McGinnis, Win, C Queen Charlotte Islands. 

McKay, Robt. B Vancouver. 

McLellan, John Queen Charlotte Islands. 

MoMurtry, Gordon 

McNab, J. A Thompson, Nevada. 

McPhee, W. B 

McVicar, John Edmonton, Alta. 

Maclennan, F. W 

Newton, W. E Silverton. 

Outhett, Christopher Kamloops. 

Pemberton, W. P. D Victoria. 

Reid, J. A Greenwood. 

Ritchie, A. B Nelson. 

Rose, J. H 

Scott, Oswald Norman 

Shannon, S 

Sharpe, (LP Midland, Ont. 

Shorey, I'. M Trail. 

Sloan, David Three Forks. 

Stevens, F. G Mexico. 

Sullivan, Michael H Trail. 

Sutherland, T. Fraser 

Swinney, Leslie A. E 

Thomson, H. Nellis Anaconda. Montana. 

Thomson, Robt. W 

Watson, A. A Olalla. 

Watson, Henry 

Workman, Ch. W 

Wright, Richard Rossland. 

Wvnne. Lewellyn C 

Yuill, H H 

g, subsection (3). 

McKillop, Alexander Vancouver. 

Pellew-Harvey, Wm London, England. 

Robertson, Win. F Victoria. 

(Provincial Mineralogist. ) 
Marshall, Dr. T. R ....London, England. 



Previously issued under the "Bureau of Mixes Act, 1897," section 12. 
Pindcr, W. J Thompson, James B Vancouver. 



EXAMINATIONS FOR COAL-MINE OFFICIALS. 

The "Coal-mines Regulation Act," as now consolidated and amended, provides that all 
officers of a coal-mining company having any direct charge of work underground shall hold 
Government Certificates of Competency, which arc to lie obtained only after passing an 
examination before a duly qualified Board, appointed for the purpose of holding such 
examinations, and known as the Managers' Board. 

The certificates granted on the recommendation of such Board and the requirements shall 
be as follows : — 

" In no case shall a certificate of competency he granted to any candidate until he shall 
satisfy the Board of Examiners — 

"(a.) If a candidate for a manager, that he is a British subject and has had at least 
five years' experience in and about the practical workings of a coal-mine, and is 



K :>4 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



at least twenty-five years of age ; or, if he has taken a degree in scientific and 
mining training, including a course in coal-mining at a university or mining 
school approved liv the Minister of Mines, that he has had a I iur years' 

experience in and about the practical working of a coal mine: 
"(6.) [f a candidate, for overman, that he has had at least five years' experience in 
and about the practical working of a coal mine, and is at least twenty-three 

years of age : 

"(c.) [f a candidate for shiftboss, fireboss, or shotlighter, that he lias had at least 
three years' experience in and aboul the practical working of a coal-mine, is the 
holder of a certificate of competency as a coal-miner, and is at least twenty-three 
rears of age : 

••(</.) A candidate for a certificate of competency as manager, overman, shifi 

fireboss, or shotlighter shall produce a certificate from a duly qualified medical 
practitioner or St. John's or other recognized ambulance society, showing that 
he has taken a course in ambulance work fitting him, the said candidate, to give 
first aid to men injured in coaJ mining operations. 

" For the purposes of this section the experience demanded by such section shall !»• of 
such character as the Board shall consider of practical value in qualifying the candidate for 
the position to which such class of certificate app 

■■ Experience had in a mine outside of the Province may be accepted should the Board 
consider such of equal value." 

Any certificate is considered as including that of any lower class. 



EXAMINATION FOE MINERS 

[n addition to the examinations and certificates already specified as coming under the 
Managers' Board, the Act further provides that every coal-miner shall l>e the holder of a 
certificate of competency as such. By "miner" is meant "a person employed underground in 

any coal mine to Cut, shear, break, Or loosen eoal from the solid, whether by hand or 

machinery." 

Examinations for a miners' certificate are held each month at each colliery by a Board of 
Examiners, known as the Miners' Hoard, and consisting of an examiner appointed by the 
o\\ ners, an examiner elected by the miners ,,f that colliery, and an examiner a]. pointed by the 

i nment. 



BOARD OF EXAMINERS FOB ("\I.MI\T. OFFICIAL 

First-, Second-, am> Third-class Certificates. 

Report of Secretary of Board, I'ully Boy< 

I beg t.i submit th.' Annual Report covering the transactions, of the above Board for the 
year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The hoard consists of Thos. I!. Stockett, of Nanaimo, Chairman; George Williams, of 
Nanaimo. Vice Chairman : Tully Boyce, of Nanaimo, Secretary ; Thomas Graham, of Victoria, 
Chief [nsp ctoi • Mine- : Andrew Bryden, of Merritt ; and David G. Wilson, of Hosmer. 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 35 



The meetings are held in the office of the Board at Nanainio. Examinations were held 
for First-, Second-, and Third-class Certificates at Nanainio, Cumberland, Merritt, and Fernie* 
on May 7th, 8th, and 9th, 1912. 

The total number of candidates at this examination was 95, as follows: For first-class, 
18, of whom 4 passed, 14 failed ; for second-class there were 20, of whom 14 passed, 6 failed ; 
for third-class, 57, of whom 31 passed, 26 failed. 

Another examination for First-, Second-, and Third-class Certificates was held at 
Nanaimo, Cumberland, Merritt, and Ferine, on October 29th, 30th, and 31st, 1912. 

At this examination the total number of candidates was 47, as follows: For first-class 
there were 9 candidates, of whom 6 passed, 3 failed; for second-class there were 14 
candidates, of whom 9 passed, 5 failed; for third-class there were 24, of whom 21 passed, 3 
failed. 

The fullest information as to the standard of efficiency required and copies of previous 
questions in printed form may be had by applying to the Secretary at Nanaimo. 

1 append hereto a list of the candidates who successfully passed the examinations in the 
various classes, and have taken out their certificates. 

The following persons have only partly complied with the requirements of the Act, and 
are consequently not as yet entitled to Certificates of Competency : — 

Fhst-c/ass Candidates. 



Name. 


Date. 


No. 




November, 1912 









Second-class Candidates 



Name. 



John B. Wyllie 
Daniel Russell .... 
John Gardner. . . . 
Watkin Williams . 
John H. Brownrigg 



Date. 



August, 1905 

November, 1907 

July, 190N 

September, 1910 

June, 1911 



No. 



Third-class Candidates. 



Henry McMillan 

Jabez Ashman 

E. 0. Saville 

Thomas Brown 

Frank J. 0. Dollimere . 

Eddy Limb 

Robert Walker 

Thomas Eeeleston 

Peter Carr 



Name. 



Date. 



May, 


1905 


February, 


1907 


October, 


19(17 


July, 


1908 


May, 


19(19 




191 1 




1912 


„ 


1912 


November, 


1912 



No. 



K 36 



Kl POET OF THE MINISTER OF MlNES. 



L913 



List of Candidates to whom Certificates were isscf.d at the Examinations held 

on IIav 7th, 8th, \m> 9th, lnd on October 29th, 30th, and .'(1st, 1912, 

at Nanaimo, Cumberland, Merritt, and Fernie. 

First cl iss • ' vndid vtes. 



Name. 



John Howard Cunningham 

Ernest Miard 

Henry Leighton 

William Sliaw 

Edward Willey 

Andrew Anderson Millar 

James I lickson 

Francis i Hover 

William John Mazey 

Second-class i didati 




May 9th, 1912 
October 31st, 1912 



No. 



X IME. 


Date. 


No 




May 9th, L912 

er 31st, 1912 

tr 
It 

" 

it 


B iH 








i; i 13 




1) in 




I: : 15 




l: l 16 




B 1 IT 








B14JI 








1 1 1 5 1 




i; 152 




1! 153 




B 154 




B 155 
B !56 




l; 157 




B 158 




B 159 




B161 

B H, j 




B 163 







Third i i kss ' ujdi d 



Name 


1) 


ITK. 


No. 


. ■ H 1 ■ m i : 1 1 - - 


May 9th, 

it 


1912 








James Steele . . 


i 162 








i i>;i 




i (65 






( 166 






C 467 






I -4I.N 






1 4'.'l 






C 170 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 37 



Third-class Candidates. — Concluded. 



Name. 


Date. 


No. 




May 9th, 1912 
October 31st, 1912 


C471 




C 472 




C 473 




C474 
C 475 




C 476 


John Bell 


C 477 




C 478 


Walter Pattison Clark 


C479 
C 480 




C481 
C 483 




C 484 




C 485 




C 486 


Wallace Starr 

William Shaw Rankin 

Alexander McFagen 

Thomas James Wood 


C488 
C4S9 
C 490 
C491 
C 492 


Edward McMillan 


C 493 




C 494 




C 495 




C 496 


Robert Oakes 

James White 


C498 
C 499 


Alexander Rowan 


( ' ,"i(i(i 


James Maltman 


C 501 




C 50"' 


Robert Potter 


C 503 


James Wardrop 


C 504 


James Gemmell 


C 505 


Edward Royle 


( ' 5116 




( ' ;,i 17 


Edward Griffoth 


C 508 


John Thompson 


C 509 




C 510 


George Elmes 


C 511 







K :;s 



Repobt of the Minister of Mines. 



I'M:; 



Registered List of Holders of Certificates of Competency as 

Coal-mine Officials. 



First-class Certificates.- Service Certificates issued under Section 39, "Coal 

Minds Regulation A< t, 1877." 

John Bryden, Victoria. Archibald Dick, Government [nspector of Mines. 

Edward <i. I'rior. .lames Dunsmuir, Victoria. 

Tl as A. Buckley. .lames Cairns, Comox, Parmer. 

First-class Certificates of Competence issued onder "Coal Mines 

Regulation Act, L897. 



Name. 



Shepherd, Francis H . . . 

Honobin, William 

Little, Francis 1) 

Martell, Joshua 

( 'handler, William 

Priest, Elijah 

Mel Iregor, James 

Handle. Joseph 

Matthews, John 

Norton, Richard Henry 

Bryden, Andrew 

Russell, Thomas 

Sharp, Alexander 

Kef ley, John 

Wall," William H 

:i. Tli as 

Wilson, David 

Smith, Frank B 

Ilrad-haw, < leorge B . . . 

Simps William <I . . . . 

I [argreaves, -lames 

I M'linian, Robert < ■ . . . . 

Browitl . Benjamin 

Stockett . Tl ias, Jr . 

in, Ri iberl 

Cunliffe, John 

Evans, Daniel 

MoEvoy, .lames 

W il on, \. II 

Simister, • Iharles 

Bud e, Thomas 

Mills, Thomas 

Pallida, Alexander 

Richards, James A . ... 

Mel. ran. Donald 

Wilkinson, ( Seo 

\\ right, II. B 

I 01 ill I, II. W 

Koaf, .1. Richardson . . . 

John, John 

Manley, II. I 



Date. 



March 
May 



December 

January 



I 

April 
( ictober 
March 
May 



June 



February 
August 



January 



5th, 

1st. 

I-', 

1st, 
21st, 

Jlst, 

18th, 

Isth, 

Nth. 

26th, 
30th, 
20th, 
27th, 

4th, 

noil,. 

Until, 

unth . 

30th, 

12th, 

12th, 

5th, 

."ah, 

3rd, 

3rd, 

3rd, 

17th, 

17th. 
17th. 
17th. 
17th, 
17th. 
17th, 
21st, 
21st, 

■Jlst. 

21st, 

•Jlst. 
2Ht, 



|ss| 
ISS-J 



1883 

isss 
lss!l 

1891 

I sil- 
ls', ii ; 

I si 111 

1IKH 



1902 



1905 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 39 



First-class Ckrtificates issued under "Coal Mines Regulation Act Further 

Amendment Act, 1904." 



Name. 



H 



July 
May 
June 

May 

November 

May 

June 

May 

October 

November 



Tune 



Baxter, Andrew 

Biggs, J. G 

Bonar, Robert . . , 

Bridge, Edward 

Caufield, B 

Church, James A 

Crowder, James 

Cunningham, John Howard 

Derbyshire, James 

Davidson, W. A 

Davies, David 

Devlin, Henry 

Dixon, James 

Elliott, Daniel 

Emmerson, Joseph 

Evans, Evan 

Fairfoull, Robert 

Foy, Joseph 

France, Thos 

Fraser, Norman 

Freeman, H. N 

I ialloway, C. F. J 

< Hover, Francis 

( ; ra ham , Charles 

Graham, Thomas 

Gray, James 

Heathcote, Elijah 

Henderson, Robert 

Holden, James May 1st, 

Howells, Nathaniel October 28th, 

June 10th, 

November 9th, 
July 22nd, 

November 0th, 



Date. 



June 10th, 

July 22nd, 

October 28th, 



22nd, 

1st, 

10th, 

10th, 

9th, 

9th, 

1st, 

10th, 

1st, 

31st, 

9th, 

9th, 

9th, 

10th, 

10th, 

November 22nd, 

March 4th, 

May 1st, 

July 22nd, 

October 31st, 

November 14th, 

9th, 

27th, 

March 4th, 

November 27th, 



Humphries, Clifford 

Jackson, Thos. R 

James, William. . 

Keith, Thomas 

Kelloek, George jjune 10th 

Kinsman, A. D September 10th 



July 

May 



Knox, T. K 

Lancaster, W 

Leighton, Henry 

Lockhart, Wm 

Macauley, D. A 

McCulloch, J 

Mci ruickie, Thomas 

McMillan, J. H 

McVicar, Samuel 

Ma/.ey, William John... 
Miard Henrv Ernest .... 

Millar, John K 

Miller, Andrew Anderson 
Montgomery, John W . . . 

Mordy, Thomas 

Musgrave. J. T , Octobe 

Newton, John July 



Peacock, Frank David 

Powell, J. W 

Saville, Luther 

Shanks, John 

Shaw, Alex 

Shaw, William 

Shenton, T. J 

Shone, Samuel 

Sloan, Hugh 

Smith, A. E . . 
Smith, Joseph 



27 th, 

22nd, 

9th, 

1st, 

June 10th, 

September 10th, 

July 22nd, 

September 10th, 

May 1st, 

October 31st, 

May 9th, 

November 22nd . 

October 31st, 

May 1st, 

September 10th, 

28th, 

22nd, 

28th, 

10th, 

22nd, 

1st, 



Spicer, J. E lOctobe 



October 
June 
July 
May 
November 14th, 
May 9th, 

September 10th, 
May 1st, 

November 27th, 
October 28th, 
July 22nd, 



1911 
1908 
1911 
I ill IS 
1909 
1911 

1912 

I :n 17 
1909 
1911 
1909 
1912 
1907 



28th, 



1911 

1906 
1905 
1909 
1908 
1912 
1905 
1907 
1909 
1905 
1909 

1911 

1907 
1908 
1907 
1911 
1910 
1909 
1908 
1912 
1909 
1911 
1910 
1908 
1910 
1909 
1912 

1906 
1912 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1908 
1911 

1908 
1909 
1905 
1912 
1910 
1909 

1911 

Mills 
1911 



K 40 



Report of the Minister ok Minis. 



L913 



First-class Certificates issued under "Coal Mines Ki.i.i i.viha A. i l'i either 
Amendment Act, L904." Concluded. 



Name. 



Sprustoa, T. A . . . 
Stevens, L. C . . . . 

Sli-M ill , I!. T. . . . 

Straohan, Robert . 

Si rang, James 

Thomas, J. D 

Thome, B. L 

Wallbank, J 

Willey, Edward 
Williams, Thos. U 
Wylie, John 



1 1 i 



November 27th, 
,, 27th, 

March 1th, 

June 10th, 

Si pi ember 10th, 

,r lOth, 

Hill,. 

31st, 
November 22nd, 
July 22nd, 



1909 

1910 
1905 
1911 
[910 



1912 

190S 



Second class Ceri ifu \n:s of Si 



X ami;. 



( lorkhill, Thomas 

Morton, T. R 

Lee, John S 

Millar, J. K 

McClimenl , .John 

.Martin. David 

Hunt, John . 

Walker, David 

Short, Richard 

Powell, William Baden 

Sharp, James 

Bryden, Alexander. . . 



1 1 i i i 



March 4th, 
4th. 
4th, 
4th, 
4th. 
4th. 
4th, 
n 4th, 

111,. 

„ 4th, 

,, 18th, 

„ 4th. 



1905. 



, . . . No. 


B 7 


B 8 


b a 


i; in 


B 11 


11 12 


B 13 


B 14 


B 15 


B 16 


i; it 


B is 



Second-class Certificates of Competence issi i.n dnder "< oai Mines Regi lation 
A,!' Further Amendment Act, IS 



Namk. 



Adamson, Robert . . 
Anderson, Robert . . 
Barclay, indrew 

Bastian, John 

Bevis, Nathaniel . . . 

Biggs, J 

Biggs, John (i 

lii i Thomas 

Bridge, Edward . . . 

Ih'ow ii. 1 tavid 

Brown, James L. . . 
Brown, John I ' 
Brown, John Todd 

Brown, R. J 

Bushell, J. I' 

( 'ai roll, Henry . . . . 
Cautield, Bernard . 

( 'aw t horn,'. I 

( ihurchill, -i 

("on, l, ions, Win . . . 

Cook, Joseph 

Courtney, A. W. . . . 




inher 

July 

November 

September 

\1 ,., 

N ilior 

mber 
1 1, tober 

\|.,y 

May 
July 
i Ictober 
May 
July 

September 
July 
i Ictober 



10th, 
10tl . 
29th, 
2nd, 

Kith. 

1st, 

2nd, 
27th, 
23rd, 

loth. 

-'Ml,. 

23rd, 

nth, 
28th, 

1st, 
22nd, 
23rd, 

1-t. 
2-2nd, 
lnth. 
22nd, 
28th, 



1910 

I'.m.-, 
H.H'7 
1910 
L909 

I in i7 

Hum 
1908 
1910 

1911 
1906 
mi'.' 
inn 

9 

[908 
1906 
1909 
I90H 
1910 
1908 

1911 



Cei No 



I: 120 
B 119 

i; i'.-. 
B 42 

r. 123 

i: hi 

B HI 

l; 96 
B 33 

B Ion 

B 136 

i; 39 

li 1.-1(1 

B 134 

I'. s. 



It 
li 

B 

i: 



62 
30 
93 
65 



B li.". 
B 64 
B 138 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 41 



Second-class Certificates op Competency issued under "Coal Mines Regulation 
Act Further Amendment Act, 1904." — Continued. 



Name. 



Cox, Richard 

Crawford, David 

Cunlifi'e, T 

Daniels, David 

Derbyshire, James 

Davies, Stephen 

Devlin, Henry 

Dewar, Alexander 

Dunsmuir, John 

Dykes, J. \V 

Eccleston, Wm 

Evans, Evan 

Fairfoull, R 

Finlayson, James 

Foster, W. R 

France, Thos 

Francis, Enoch 

Francis, James 

Freeman, Henry N 

Garbett, Richard 

Garman, Morris Wilbur . . 

Gillespie, Hugh 

Gillespie, John 

Gillespie, John M 

Graham, Chas 

Gray, David 

Henderson, Robert 

Horrocks, Abner G 

Howells, N 

Hudson, George 

Hughes, John C 

Hutton, John 

Jackson, Thos. R 

James, David 

Jarrett, Fred 

Javnes, Frank 

John, Howell 

-.Johnson, Moses 

Jones, William 

Jones, William T 

Jordon, Thos 

Kirkwood, John Robertson 

Knowles, James E 

Lancaster, William 

Lane, Joseph 

Lee, Robert John ......... 

Littler, Matthew 

Lockhart, William 

Lvuk, George 

Manifold, Albert 

Massey, H 

Mather, Thomas 

Mattishaw, S. K 

Matusky, A 

Mayer, Ralph Waldo 

Mazay, W.J 

Merry field, William 

Miard, Hy. E 

Middleton, Robert 

Monks, James 

Morgan, John 

Morris, John 

Morton, Robert W 

Mnsgrave, J 

Myers, Peter 




May 



November 

October 

September 

November 
October 
November 
May 

'/ 
March 
May 
July 
November 

May 
July 

November 
October 



July 

( Ictober 

June 

March 

May 

July 

June 

November 

September 

May 

March 

November 

May 

September 



May 

July 

November 
Oct ober 

November 

May 

September 

October 



June 

May 

November 

June 

October 

May 

November 

July 

September 

July 

November 

July 

n 
May 



0th, 
1st, 
1st, 

2nd, 
23rd, 

1 0th, 

2nd, 
31st, 
14th, 

1st, 

1st, 

11th, 

1st, 

29th, 

27th, 

14th, 

1st, 

22nd, 

2nd, 

31st, 

31st, 

29th, 

23rd, 

10th, 

4th, 

1st, 

22nd, 

lllth, 

27th, 

10th, 

10th, 

9th, 

4th, 

2nd, 

1st, 

10th, 

10th, 

1st, 

Q9th, 

22nd, 

27th, 

31st, 

28th, 

2nd, 

9th, 

10th, 

31st, 

23rd, 

10th, 

9th, 

27th, 

10th, 

28th, 

1st, 

9th, 

27 th, 

22nd, 

loth, 

22nd, 

2nd, 

2nd, 

22nd, 

22nd, 

1st, 

9th, 



1912 
1909 

1907 
1906 
1910 
1907 
1912 
1905 
1909 

1905 
1909 
1905 
1909 
1905 
1909 
1908 
1907 
1912 

1905 
1901) 
1911 
1905 
1909 
1 90S 
1911 
1909 
1910 

1912 

1905 
19(17 
I9H9 
1910 

1909 
1905 
1908 
1909 
1912 
1911 
1907 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1906 
1911 
1912 
1909 
1911 

1909 
1912 
1909 
1908 
1910 
1908 
1907 

1908 

1909 
1912 



Cer. No. 



B 143 
B 88 
B 78 
B 53 
B 32 
B 113 
B 44 
B 162 
B 26 



B 
B 
B 
B 
B 



77 
87 
2 
83 
21 



B 102 
B 27 
B 86 
B 63 
B 45 
B 161 
B 155 
B 24 
B 36 
B 126 
B I 
B 76 
B 60 
B 130 
B 97 
B 121 
B 109 
B 154 
B 5 
B 58 
B 84 
B 1 1 1 
B 122 
B 75 
B 20 
B 66 
B 104 
B 160 
B 137 
B 50 
B 142 
B 110 
B 157 
B 34 
B 128 
B 145 
B 99 
B 127 
B 135 
B 91 
B 144 
11 101 
B 61 
B 107 

B 72 



55 
43 
67 
59 
90 



B 149 



K 42 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



Second-class Certificates op Competency issues onder "Coax Minks Regulation 
Act Fuhtheb Amendment Act, 1904." — Concluded. 



Name. 




Me] lonald, J. A 

McFegan W 

M :< • u vev, Martin . . . 
Mc( iuckie, Thomas M . 

MoKelvie, J 

McKendrick, And 

McKinnell, David 

McMillan. 1) 

MiXav, Carmichae] . . . 
MePhei >n, Ja Dies E 

Neen, Joseph 

Nellist, I lavid 

Newton, John 

New ton, Win 

'i Bi ien, ( !harles 

< i'I'.i ien, George 

' K ingti >n, John 

Parkinson, T 

Parnham, ( lharles. . - . 

Quinn, John 

Rankin, Geo 

Raynes, M. T 

Reid, Thomas 

ll.nl. Win 

Renny, .lames. 

Richards, Thomas . . . 
el . . . . 

• I"ll!l 

3, Ebenezer . . . . 
Robinson, William. . . 

Rogei ,George 

Raper, William 

Russell, John 

Saville, Luther 

Shanks. David 

Shaw. Alex 

Somerville, Alex 

Spruston, Thus. A 

rd, Matthew 

i. .1 \1 



October Jstli, 

November 27th, 

October 31 si. 

23rd, 

May 1st, 

September loth, 
her 23rd. 



June 

May 

July 

June 

March 

October 



lmh. 

22nd, 
LOth, 

4th. 
23rd, 



mber 10th, 



May 



9th, 
1st, 

1st. 

2nd, 
9th, 



November 
May 

May 

mber 27th, 
October 28th, 
July 29th, 

• 

mber 2nd, 
Mav 

July 29th, 

10th, 
July 22nd, 

Mav 

9th, 

November 2nd, 

2nd, 

■ • 

July 

March 



.'ilst. 

29th, 

4th. 



November 2nd, 



irt, Jacob . . 
Stockwell, William 

Thomas 
Thomas, J. B 
Thomas, Joseph D . 
Thompson, J 
Touhej . Jan 

I 
Vanhulli 



10th, 
1st, 

2nd, 
31st, 
27th, 
23rd, 






J 



Watson, Adam < ■ 
Webber, John Prank 

\\ esnedge, W 

White. John 

Whitebouse, William. 
Wilson, Thomas . ... 

Wilson, W 

w : hington, -loseph 



June 
May 

\ ember 

November 

ber 

mber 10th, 

Mav 9th, 

July 22nd, 

•:il>er 2nd, 

1st, 

November 14th, 

March 4th, 

rnlicr 27th. 

2nd, 



July 
May 



31s( 

22...1. 

22nd, 

1st, 



Cer. No. 



inn 
1909 
1912 
19(16 
1909 
1910 
1906 
1911 
1912 
1908 
1911 
1905 
1906 
mho 
1912 
1909 
1907 
1909 
1907 
1912 
1909 
1911 
1905 
1911 

1912 
1905 
1910 
1908 
1909 
1912 
1907 

1912 
1905 

1907 
1911 
1909 
1912 
1907 
1912 
1909 
1906 
1910 
1912 
1908 
1907 
1909 

1909 
1907 
1912 
1908 

1909 



li 133 
B 106 
B 156 
B 35 
B 92 
B 112 
B 37 
B 125 
B 151 
B 73 
B 129 
B 6 
B 31 
B 116 
B 148 
B 82 
B 52 

B so 
B 49 
B i 16 
B 103 
1! 139 
B 23 
B 132 
B 14ii 
B r.7 
B 152 
B 29 
B 117 

B 79 

B 141 
B 47 
.M 
159 

19 

4 
46 
B 131 

B 95 
B 153 
B 56 
B 158 

B I".", 
B 38 

II 114 
B 147 

l: 71 



B 

K 
B 
B 

I: 



B 

i: 
B 
II 
II 
B 



S9 

28 
3 

IS 

is 



II 163 
II 74 
B 70 
f; B5 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 43 



Third-class Certificates issued under "Coal Mines Regulation Act Furtheb 

Amendment Act, 1904." 



Name. 



Adanison, Robert . 
Aleen, Alexander.. 

Almond, Alex 

Almond, W 

Anderson, John . . . 
Archibald, Thomas 

Bann, Thomas 

Baggaley, .1 




May 

October 



Barker, Robert 

Barlow. B. R 

Barnes, B. J 

Bauld, VVm 

Baxter, Robert 

Beeton, D. H 

Bell, John 

Bennie, John ... 

Beveridge, Wm 

Biggs, John 

Biggs, Thomas 

Birchell, Richard 

Blair, James 

Blewett, Ernest 

Bradley, William 

Bridge, Edward 

Briscoe, F 

Brown, David 

Brown, James 

Brown, James 

Brown, John 

Brown, Robert 

Brown, Robert I) 

Brown, Robert S 

Browni igg, .1. H 

Bullen, Thomas 

Bushell, Jas. P 

Cairnes, Andrew 

Calverly, Joseph 

Camamile, Hollis . 

Catchpole, Charles 

Caufield, J 

Challoncr, Arthur 

Cheethani, Ben 

< Ihester, John 

Clark, Lewis 

Clark, Walter Pattison 
Clarkstone, Win. W . . . 

Cleaves, Walter 

Clifford, William 

Commons, William 

Cooke, Joseph 

Coulthard, James 

Crawford, David 

Cunningham, G. F 

CunlirTe, Thos 

Dando, John 

Davidson, Hugh 

Davies, Evan Thomas . . 

Davis, W T illiam 

Derbyshire, A 

Dewar, Alex 

Devlin, Edward 

Dingsdale, Oeo 

Doherty, J.J 

Done}', John 

Donnaehie, John 



July 

October 



July 
June 
May 

June 

October 

May 



June 



1st, 

28th, 
1st, 
22nd, 
28th, 
28th, 
31st, 
22nd, 
10th, 
1st, 
1st, 
10th, 
28th, 
1st, 
9bh 
Kith, 
10th, 
4th, 
28th, 
1st, 
31st, 
22nd, 
22nd, 
29th, 
22nd, 
November 1st, 
September 10th, 
June 10th, 

September 10th, 
October 28th, 
June lOLh, 

10th, 
July 22nd, 

September Kith, 
October 1st, 

June loth, 

September 10th, 
October 28th, 
July 29th, 

May 1st. 



March 
October 



July 



October 
July 

I li-tober 

June 

May 

October 

May 

July 



March 

June 

March 

November 

October 

May 

M ay 



lune 



28th 

22nd, 

28th, 

10th, 

9th, 

28th, 

9th, 

22nd, 

22nd, 

4th, 

10th, 

4th, 

11th, 

1st, 

9th, 

9th, 

9th, 

1st, 
loth, 



September 10th, 



October 

May 

March 

June 



23rd, 

28th, 

1st, 

4th, 

10th, 



Cer. No. 



11109 
1911 
1907 
1908 
1911 

1912 
1908 
1911 
1909 

1911 

1909 
1912 
1911 

1905 
1911 

1907 
1912 
1908 

1905 
1908 

1909 
1910 
1911 
1910 
1911 



190S 

1910 

1907! 

191 1 1 

1910 

1911 

1 905 

1909 

1911 

19118 

191] 

1912 
1911 
1912 

1908 

1905 

1911 
1905 

1907 
1912 
1912 

1909 
1911 
19IO 
1900 
1911 
1909 
1905 
1911 



C 323 
(J 430 
C 252 
C286 
C437 
C454 
C494 
C300 
C415 
<J 337 
( ! 346 
422 
(J 450 
C 338 
C477 
C411 
C396 
C210 
C449 
C266 
C502 
C298 
(' 291 
C223 
(' 309 
C 348 
('.'{114 
(.' 412 
C 392 
C 451 
( ' 423 
(' HIS 

( ! 276 
C 379 
C 204 
( ' 420 
C 375 
C443 
C 227 
C321 
C 433 
C311 
C 440 
( ' 41 15 
C480 
C431 
C 475 
C313 
(' 304 
('209 
C407 
(' 208 
C229 
( ' 265 

(' 105 
( ! 404 
( ' 403 
( ' 339 
(' 401 
( ' 309 
('241 
(' 459 
( ' 340 
C2J1 
C 425 



K 41 



Report of the Minister of Mines 



1913 



Third class Certificates issued under "Com, .Minks Regulation Am Further 
Amendment Am, 1904." — Continued. 



N 1MB. 


I>\ i 


1**11 

1906 
urn 
1907 
1912 
1908 
1910 
1911 

1912 
1907 
1905 
1909 

1910 
1912 

1011 

1912 
1908 

I'll 2 

1908 
lull 
1912 
1910 
1912 
1910 

1910 
1911 
1012 
1908 
1910 
1905 
1911 
1909 

10i is 

1911 
1905 

1912 
1911 
1907 
1908 
1905 
1910 

10- is 
10ii7 
1912 
1905 
1012 
1909 
1910 
loll 
1909 
1906 
lon7 
1909 
1910 
1905 


Oer. No. 


1 > 1 nil. Hubert 

Douglas, 1). 1! 


i Ictober 

June 
t Ictober 

.July 

i Ictober 

Novembet 

July 
Septembe 

May 

July 
May 

July 

Septembei 
May 

Septembei 


23rd, 

llllll. 

1st, 
31st, 
22nd, 
10th, 
28th, 
28th, 
28th, 
31st, 

l-t. 
1 4th, 

■27th. 
•Jl'.hI. 
10th, 
:;ut. 
- 

9th, 

9th, 

•22nd. 

31st, 

9th, 

1st, 

22nd, 

31st, 

10th, 

9th, 

1st, 

10th, 

Mill,. 

9th, 

22nd, 

Huh. 

4th, 

10th, 

1st, 

22nd, 

Kith, 

14th. 
27th. 
31st, 

1st, 
22nd, 

4th, 

10th, 

22nd, 

let, 

9th, 

4th, 

27th. 

Huh. 
loth, 
27th. 
23rd, 

l-t. 

1st, 
loth, 
29th, 


C 155 




t mo 




C248 

(' .".11 




1 374 






Kitzpatrick, T. .1 


i 152 


Kuril, All. n 


. 145 


Fowler, Robert 


i 195 






Freeman, II. G 










t ■ 282 




i ::77 












C 474 




c 292 




| 167 




. -,. is 




C 460 




t 343 
. 307 


Hamilton, John 


1411 






Harwood, Fred 






• 

i ' 320 


Henney, Jonathan 


Septembei 

June 

May 

July 

Septembei 

March 

June 

M i\ 

July 

May 

June 

November 

October 
June 
i Ictober 
July 

Septembei 
July 

i Ictobi i 

May 

March 

May 

Novembei 
Septembei 

June 

N"uvenil>er 

October 

" 

\1 IV 

Septembei 
Julv 


1 ' 424 


Hem \ , James 


C 171 


Hilley, Fred. .". 


c 290 


Hilton, a. G 

Hodson, R. 11 


C 376 

(' 216 




c inc. 


Horrocks, \. <i 


( ' 324 




c :-; l -2 


BCowells, Nathaniel 


C 316 




(' 394 


Hut. Ins. in, Ben 


(' 232 


Hutchison, F 


• 


. John 


c 507 


[rvine, David 


C 4l:i 


Jarretl , Fred. -1 






-'77 






Jenkins, John 


i • :;. is 


Johnston, Roberl 




Jones, W. T 


(' 221 






Joyce, W 


i 361 










hTJrkeberg, 11 s 






i 243 
C 254 






1 iewis, Benj. J 


- 




- 



3 Geo. .5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 45 



Third-class Certificates issued under "Uoal Mines Regulation Act Further 
Amendment Act, 1904." — Continued. 



Name. 




Littler, John 

Littler, Matthew . . 

Littler. Robert 

Livingstone, Alex 

Loxton, George 

Loxtoti, John 

Lynch, Stewart 

Mjtekie. John 

Makin, J. Win 

Mat. ne, Patrick 

Maltman, .lames . 

Mansfield, A 

Manson, T. H 

Marsh, John 

Martin, .lames 

Mason, .1 

Massey, Henry 

Mather. Thomas 

Mattishaw, Samuel K - 
Matusky, Andrew. 

Mawson, J. T 

Meek. Matthew 

Merrifield, Georg« . . . . 
Merrifield, William . . . 

Miles, John 

Millar. Peter 

Mitchell, O 

Mitchell, Henry 

M< inks, James 

Moore, < leorge 

Moore, J 

Moreland, Thomas..., 

Morgan, John 

Morris, I lavid 

Myers, Peter 

Me Alpine, John 

McBroom, Al 

McCulloch; James 

McDonald, John 

McKagen, Alexander . 

McFegan, VV 

McGarry, M 

Met oirkii-, Thomas. . . 
McKelvie, J 

McKcllzle, Peter, . . , 
MeKinley, John 

McLaughlin, James . . 

McLaehlan, Alex 

McLean, M. 1) 

McLellan, William . . . 
McLeod, James ... 

McMillan, I) 

McMillan, Edward . . . 
McNay, Oarmichael. . . 
McNeill, Adam T.. . 

McNeill, Robert 

Neen, Joseph 

Nelson, Horatio 

Neilson, William .... 
Nicholson. James .... 

Ninimo, James 

Oakes, Robert 

O'Brien, ( ,'harles 

Orr, Alexander 

Oswald, (leo. L 



June 



( ). tober 
June 



October 
June 

September 
( Ictober 

May 

July 

October 

June 

July 

Max 

July 

October 



November 

May 

October 

it 
June 

September 
May 

September 
November 
October 
May 
July 

May 

October 

March 

July 

May 

i lei ober 

May 



July 

n 
June 
October 
May 
June 

September 
March 
July 

September 
October 
July 



September 
November 

October 
May 



October 
November 
October 
Septembei 



loth 
10th 
10th 
28th 

10th 
10th 
28th 

loth 
loth 

1st 

31st 

1st 

22nd 

1st 

10th 

22nd 

1st, 

22nd 

23rd 

1st 

27th 

9th 

2:ir,l 

23rd 

loth 

loth 

1st 
10th 
14th 
23rd 

1st 

22nd 

211th 

!lth 

2Mb 

4th 

2nd 

1st, 

28th 
9th 

1st 
1st 

29th 

22nd 

10th 

28th 

9th 

loth 

10th 

4th 

22nd 

10th, 

.'{1st 

22nd 

•22nd 

loth 

27th 

1st 

9th 

ilth 

9th 

31st 

27th 

28th 

loth 



1911 



P.MO 
1907 
1012 
1909 

lllos 
1007 

1911 

loos 

1000 
PHIS 
19(10 
1907 

1000 
1912 
1900 

1911 
1910 

P. 100 

1910 
1905 
1906 

1909 
PUIS 

1905 

1012 
Pill 

Pin,", 

loos 
p. 100 
ion 
1912 
Pino 

loo:, 

P. II IS 

PHI 

11112 

1910 
1905 

Pills 

linn 

I II 1 2 
1903 

1910 
1000 

1907 

1012 



1012 
10011 
1911 

1010 



Cer. No. 



410 
(J 417 
(J 418 
C 436 

( ! 42S 
C416 
C 432 
C 121 

( ' 385 

C 247 

1 ' .-,1 I I 
C :«(> 
C2S0 
('270 
C 398 
297 
C317 
(.' 293 
( ' 237 
( ' 259 
( 1 359 
C 4S4 
C 239 
( ' 2: Hi 
C 414 

( ! :;ss 
( ! 322 
C 366 

I ' 2:; t 

( ' 242 
C U.S.". 
(' 2011 
( : 224 
472 
140 
("217 
( ' 2N7 
C 315- 
(' 44S 
C 41 Ml 

319 
C 326 
C 226 

( 1 285 
I ' 427 
C 442 

c is:, 

(' 4 111 

( ' 389 
C219 

( ' 2110 
( 1 363 
( • 493 
C306. 
C 2s 1 
( ' :>S7 
C 352 
O 263 
C48I 
(' Hill 
O 4111 
(' 41IS 
(•.•{40 
(' 4:0 
C 370- 



K 40 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



1913 



Third-class Certificates issued under "Coal Mines Regulation Act Further 
Amendmeni Ait, 1 90+." — Continued. 



Name. 




Owen, T 

Parker, L 

Parkinson, T 

Pearson, Jonathan 

Perry, .Tames 

Philips.'!' 

Pickup, A 

Piot W 

Plank, Samuel 

Potter, Robert 

Price, Walter 

Puckey, Wm. I: 

Quinn, .lames 

Quinn, John 

I ' (ill Mil. |I 

Rankin, George 

Rankin, Wm. Shaw 

Ratclifte, Tl las 

Raynor, Fred 

Reid, Robert 

Reid, Wm 

Reilly, Thomas 

Renny, Jas 

Mull. mis. James 

Richards, Samuel 

Richardson, J. II 

Rigby, John 

Roberts, E 

Robinson, M. . 

K >per, William 

Kowan, Alexander 

Rowbottom, Thomas 

Royle, Edward 

Russell. Robert 

Rntledge, Edwin 

Scott, Henry 

Shanks, David 

Sharp, Janiea 

Sharpies, J. T 

Shearer, L 

Shenfield, W 

Shipley. John W 

Sim. iter. Joseph 

Slioitlnali, .1 

Simister, J. II 

Simistei , W 

Skelton, Thos 

Smith, A. E 

.Smith, Joseph 

Smith, Thos. .1 

Smith. Thomas 

Spark , Edward (C 314 issued in lieu of 255 destroyed by Fernie fire) . 

Spencer, < '• 

Sprusten, I! L 

Spruston, Thomas A . . 

Stafford, \l 



U allace 

Steele, .lames 

Steele, Waller 

Stewart, .lanes \l . 
Stockwell, William 
I 

St fane. Win 

Suik, i ieorge 

Taylor, I lharlea M 



t !er. No. 



M.n 



July 

May 

Mai eh 

Noven 

July 

May 

N< rt ember 

i Ictober 

September 

1 1. tobei 

July 

May 

* 

September 

. lulv 

No\ ember 



July 

Max 



July 



July 



September 

\la\ 

Bepti 
May 

November 
i October 

M.i\ 

v . ember 

\la\ 

.* 

mber 
March 
( Ictober 
May 
i Ictober 
May 

v ember 
March 
September 

May 



June 



May 
March 



I • 
l-i. 
22nd, 
9th, 

4th. 

27th, 
22nd, 

I 
14th. 

3 I 9t . 

1 0th, 

1 0th, 

28th, 

28th, 

22nd, 

22ud, 

9th, 

1st, 

1st, 

Kith. 

10th, 

22nd, 

27th. 

1st. 

28th, 
29th, 

1st. 
1st. 

22nd, 

.'list. 
:;ist. 
31st, 
27th. 
22nd, 
22nd, 
Knh. 
1st, 
10th, 

1st. 

27th. 
28th, 

1st. 

1st, 

27th, 
1st, 
1st, 

10th, 

4th. 

1st. 

9th, 

1st. 

1st, 

27th. 

4th. 
10th, 

9th, 

9th, 
28t i, 
23rd, 
23rd, 
Kith, 
Kith, 

1st. 

4Ui, 



1909 

I in IS 

1912 
1905 
1909 
1908 
1909 

I I n 15 
1912 
1910 

1911 

I III is 

1912 
1907 

1910 

Kill 
I'.lus 

1909 
1907 
1906 

Kill 
1905 

l:i is 
1912 



1909 
1908 

1910 

1910 
1909 

Kill 
1907 
1909 



1910 
1905 
1907 
1912 
1907 
1909 

1905 
1910 
1912 

KIM 

KMKi 

1911 

1909 
1905 



C 347 

('.•{41 
i ' 289 
( ' 47.. 
C215 
( ' 356 
(' 310 

333 
i 233 
t ' ;,i 13 
(' 371 

i 368 
('441 

1 429 
< ' 279 
( ' 275 
c 489 
( ' 253 
( 257 
' s : 
C 103 

i 354 
( ' 249 
C244 
i 158 
( ' 225 
C327 
t 332 
C274 

i 5 

C 192 
(' 506 
C351 
(' 302 
C294 
( 372 
( ' 325 

( 330 
i 357 
C 156 

i '•Jill 

< 334 
C344 

i 207 
C271 

t 486 
( ' 255 

(' 355 

C -Jin; 

• 

C iss 

( ' 4112 
i ' 439 
C240 
t ' 238 
c 4tm 
( ' 395 
C318 
C213 



3 Geo. 5 



Bureau of Mines. 



K 47 



Third-class Certificates issued under "Coal Mines Regulation Act Further 
Amendment Act, 1904." — Concluded. 



N wn:. 



Taylor, J. T 

Taylor, Leroy 

Thomas, Thomas 

Thomas, John B 

Thomas, Joseph 

Thomas, Warriett 

Thompson, Thomas 

Thompson, John 

Thompson, Joseph 

Thomson, Duncan 

Tully, Thomas 

Tune, Elijah 

Walker, Jas. Alexander 

Wallace, Fred . 

Warburton, Ernest Leonard. 

Wardrop, James 

Walkins. William 

Watson, Adam G 

Watson, George 

Watson, William 

Webb, Herbert 

Weeks, John 

White James 

While, John 

Whitehouse, Wm 

Wilcoek, J 

Wilkinson. Edward 

Williams, John 8am 

Williams, Watkin 

Wilson, Robinson 

Wilson, Thomas 

Wilson, William 

Winstanley, H 

Wintle. Thomas A 

Wood, Thos. James 

Worthington, J 



October 
September 

November 

March 

October 



March 
May 

October 

June 

October 

May 

March 

July 

October 

March 
October 



June 

July 

October 
June 



October 

July 

October 
July 



28th, 

loth, 
10th, 

1411,, 

4th, 

1st. 

1st, 

31st, 

1st, 

4th. 

'.Illi. 

0th, 

31st, 

1st, 

loth. 

31st, 

llth, 

4th, 

22nd, 

22nd, 

28th, 

4th, 

31st, 

22nd, 

loth. 

22nd, 

2sth, 

10th, 

22nd, 

loth. 

1st. 

1st. 

22nd, 

29 th, 

31st, 

22nd, 





Cer. No. 


191] 


C447 


1910 


C 381 


„ 


C 365 


1905 


C 231 


„ 


220 


1907 


C 273 


„ 


C 2117 


1912 


C 509 


1907 


C 209 


L905 


C218 


1912 


C 168 


„ 


(' 470 


„ 


C490 


1907 


C 200 


1911 


C 399 


1912 


C504 


„ 


( ' 4 S3 


lOOo 


(.'212 


190S 


( ' 288 


1! II 111 


C246 


1911 


t ' 457 


1905 


C214 


1912 


( ' 499 


1906 


I ' 245 


1911 


(' 402 


1908 


C 308 


1911 


( ' 438 


„ 


C404 


190S 


C 301 


1911 


C397 


1907 


I ' 272 


„ 


(.' 202 


1908 


C283 


1905 


C 222 


1912 


491 


190S 


C295 



K 48 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



L913 



COAL-MINES OFFICIALS. 

Third-class Certificates issued under "Coal Mines Regulation Act Farther Amendment Act, 
1904-," sec. 38, subsec. (2), in exchange for Certificate's issued under the "Coal Mines 
Regulation Act Amendment Act, 1901." 



Name. 



Adam, Robert 

Addison, Thos 

Aii ken, James 

Alexander, Win . . . . 

Allsop, Hum 

An jlnii\ ole, Alex . . - 
Barclay, Andrew . . . 

Barclaj . .lames 

Barclay, John 

Berr Jami 

Bickle, Tho 

Bi Henrj .' 

Black, John S 

1 Sow ie, James 

I Iriscoe, Edward. . . . 

i lampbell, Han 

i larr, Jos. E 

I ',h ii.ll. Harry 

i !larks< in, Alexa ndei 
Colli ihaw , John . . . . 

i li imb, John 

i ier, Win 

i i urtnej , A. W. . . . 
i i a a ford, Prank . . . 

Daniels, I >:> \ i.l 

I i.n idson, David. . . . 
1 1 1 \ idson, John . . . . 

De\ 1 1 1 1. I [enry 

Dobbie, John 

y , James 

I >ll II. I II . 'I'll, illi 1 

Dunlap, Henry 

1 luiiii. Geo 

Dunsmuir, John . . . . 

Eccleston, Wm 

IS, ['. \ an 

Evans, W. 11 

1 in, David 

Farmer, Bernard . . . 
Farquharson, John. . 
l-'unlli \ s< in, James . . 

Fulton, Hugh T . 

G Bdw rd . . . . 

< iilchrist, Wm 

1 ■ lespii Hugh ... . 

( HUespie, John 

i id, Alfred 

( liven. Francis 

Han Hen, Jas .... 

Il.ii mis, ni. Wm 

Hawort h, • leo 

Hi cott, John 

Hutchison, Archie . . 

John, Da\ i'l 

Johns ' leo 

Johnson, Wm. R . . . 

Kerr, Wm 

Lander, Frank 

I. in, Hi mi . Hei 

I .'V. is, I 1 1" 

Lockhart, Wm . . . . 
Malpass, James 



Date. 



Oct. 

Dec. 

Oct. 

Feb. 

Oct. 

March 

April 

April 

April 

Feb. 

\|n il 
April 
May 
Oct. 

Oct. 

March 

April 

Feb. 

Ma i i'Ii 

March 

Nov. 

April 

April 

April 

\l .ii , h 

Oct. 

Nov. 

March 

Aug. 

X ov. 

Dei . 

March 
March 
March 
March 

Api il 
Jan. 

\]n i! 
June 

\ ,n il 

.\la\ 

March 
April 

April 
April 

June 

Mar ih 
Jan. 

Nov. 

May 

March 

March 

Jan. 

Jan. 

Oct. 

Jan. 

Nov. 



1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1905 
I III 14 
HUM 
L905 
1905 
I in 1 1 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1905 
1 in 1 1 
1905 
1904 
1905 

I IH 14 

1905 
1904 
1904 
I III 14 
L905 
l in i.i 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1906 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1905 
1905 
1905 
1904 

I III 14 

1906 

I '.Ii 14 
I '|| 1 1 

1905 
1905 
1905 
1905 

1 in 1 1 
1904 

1905 
1905 
L905 
1904 
1905 

reo4 



Certifi 

rate NO. 



42 
52 

ll 
72 



i 34 

(' Ml 

(' 111 

< ' 21 1 

cm 

C 7ii 
C 37 

C llll 

C His 
(' 116 
i 129 
C 93 



C 

r 
r 
C 
C 

c 

(' 

C 7 
C 12 
C 106 

C s; 
C 41 
(' 126 
( • 111 
i 128 
C 51 
C 56 



mi 

si I 

7s 
711 



C 109 

I' 17 
(' 25 
en 15 
C Ms 
C 85 
C 8 
c .", 
(' 112 
C 38 
C 122 
c 65 

(' ss 

i 62 
«' 123 
( m 
C 124 

C 7.'. 

C in 
C ill 
i 63 



Name 



35 



C 113 



M.ii -ilin, John 

ill, Howard . . 

Mai I Inv. I . I lias 

Miard, Harry E .... 

Mi. 1. 11. -inn. I: 

M " Thos 

Miller, Tho . K . . 
McKenzie, John B. . 
McKinnell, David . . 
McKinnon, Arch'd . 
McMillai i 
McMurtrie, John . . . 
Moore, Wm. 11 . 

M " ris, John 

Myl 'A Itei 

\;i ii. [saac 

Win 

H.lMll 

Nelson, James 

. John 

Jas. P 

, Geo 

Pengi ll\ . Hi 



Perry, .lames 

Price - 1 i 

Win 

I'.ei.l. 'I'll. is 

Reid, James 

Reid, Wm 

I-, Thos 

Etc John 

B 

Ryan, John 

Sandi re, John W. . . 

Shenton, Th. 

Shepherd, Henry . . . 

Smii li, Ralph 

Smith. Geo 

Somen ille, Alex. . . . 

i has. F 

Jas 

stewari. Duncan H. 

Stewart, John 

- ■ ■ D .1 W. . 

[dart, Jacob 
St radian, Root 

James 

i John .. .. 

Tunstall, James 

Vans, Robl 

Vater, i lharles 

Walkem, Tho 

Webber, < lhas 

Webber, Charles F. . 
Wli . . . 
Wilson, Austin. . . . 
Wilson, Thos 

Yarrow, Geo 






May 

April 

March 

Feb. 

Feb. 

April .'(, 
March 29, 
March 29, 

June 17, 

April 
June 
Oct. 

Apnl 
April 
Oct 

April 

Feb. 

March 15, 
June 13, 
Oct. 16, 
Nov. s, 
March 29, 
Nov. :!, 
March 23, 



3, 

6, 
27, 

3, 
U, 

in. 
21, 
1-', 



15, 
27, 
3, 
30, 
28, 

25, 
13, 



Dec. 

April 
Api il 

Jan. 

April 
July 
June 
March 

March I'll. 
Man 1. -I. 
Feb. 9, 
March 29, 
March 28, 
April 3, 
May 
Feb. 
April 
April 

June 15, 

April 
Dec. 

May 

Feb. 7. 

April -27. 

I - ' 

Nov. 3, 



16, 
21, 



12, 

6, 
Hi. 
13, 
13, 
29, 



1904 
1905 
1904 
I Hi 15 
1905 
1904 
1905 
L904 
1905 
1905 

1905 

I III 14 
1905 
I in 14 
1904 
nun 
1904 
I in 1 1 
1905 
1905 
1904 
1905 
llll 14 
1905 
1904 
1905 
1804 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1905 
ll" i7 
1904 
1905 
1904 
1 '.H 14 

1905 

I in 15 

llll 14 

1905 
1905 

I'.HM 

1904 
1904 
1905 

1IH14 

1904 
1905 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1904 
1!HM 
1905 
1 91 15 
1 in 1 1 
1905 
11KJ4 



Hi. No. 



C 21 
C 127 

i 9 



76 

71 
31 

74 



I in 
C 99 
i 102 

C 96 
i | pi 

C 100 
C 120 

C 4:i 

C in 
C .'in 
i 103 
c 66 

C s| 

C 27 

(' 125 

C 50 



95 

17 

1 



i 54 

I 14 
(' llll 
(' Kin 
i 59 
i 107 
i 30 
C 26 
C 77 

' s| 

3 

C if-' 

| i 

(' H>4 

i 23 

C 7.i 

(' 15 

(' 10 

C '.'7 

(' 121 

C 66 

C 55 

c 32 

c 33 
C 117 

i 67 

i 11 




i n. tine »»*' a ra ml Trunk Pncifle It > . — a( •* .":s Mile." 




. 



mWt 




< i 





B.C. Bureau. of 



1'iiNi'i' River — »i " ."»:*» MM** " of (inunl Trunk I'm-i li<*. 



3 Geo. 5 Cariboo District. K 49 



CARIBOO DISTRICT. 



CARIBOO MINING DIVISION. 
Report by C. W. Grain, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report on the progress of the mining industry 
in -the Cariboo Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 191 "2. 

The conditions in this district remain very much the same as they have been for the last 
three or four years ; not exactly at a standstill, yet not progressing. This is owing, I think, 
solely to the transportation problem. Outside capitalists will not invest as long as freight 
charges are so high on machinery and merchandise. The district is still anxiously awaiting 
the coming of railways, on the arrival of which I confidently look for a renewal of the 
investment of capital in Cariboo. 

Although there has not been any extensive development in this Division, there has been 
a considerable amount of work performed, both by companies and by individuals ; but on the 
whole there has not been as much activity as I had expected, on account of investors waiting to 
see in what direction proposed railways are going before they really open out on any large scale. 

As regards weather conditions, the last two seasons have been very dry (for this country) 
and comparatively small snowfalls, which, consequently, made a shortage in the water-supply, 
and a shortage of water is disastrous to the really successful working of our hydraulic mines ; 
hydi-aulicking being the method by which the greater part of the gold yield of this district is 
at present produced. The output of all the working properties depends solely on the amount 
of gravel moved, and a dry season makes an appreciable difference in the amount of the 
output — in fact, regulates it. The last two winters have been poor as regards the snowfall, 
and when the snow did start to melt, it went very fast. The summers having been exception- 
ally dry, the piping seasons have been short, and, consequently, the output small. 

This year, as near as I can gather, the Division has produced in the neighbourhood of 
$200,000, somewhat better than last year, and though it may be said that the district is not 
progressing very much in the way of output, it evidently appears as a good investment to a 
considerable number, as the actual mining receipts show an increase over those of last year by 
nearly $3,000, and the records of placer claims and placer leases issued also show an increase. 
In this district there are now 390 placer leases in good standing and thirty-two record placer 
claims, of which there have been taken up this year fifty-four leases and twelve record claims. 

Williams Creek and Tributaries. 

The only mines really working on this celebrated old creek and its tributaries are the 
mines worked and owned by John Hopp, namely : The Forest Rose on Williams creek, the 
Mucho Oro and Wyoming claims on Stouts gulch, and the Lowhee mine on Lowhee creek. 

At the Forest Hose the piping season was spent in hydraulic-king out a channel for the 

new sluice-flume, and setting the same, as the work progressed, with a view to running oil' the 

upper gravels directly into Williams creek, thus saving what remains of the old dump for the 

lower gravels. As most of this new channel was made through old workings, very little 

pay-gravel was encountered ; therefore, one may say that last season's work was chiefly 

const ruction- work. 
4 



K 50 Report oe the Minister of Mimes. 191-3 



Considering the shortness of the season, good work was put in on the M-ucho Oro on 
Stouts gulch. In places very rich gravel was struck, clearly proving that this claim is in no 
way worked nut, and that it only requires abundant water to make a very good showing; 
every year. 

On the Lowhee property work was carried on as in other years, and a large quantity of 
gravel moved with very good results. The Lowhee dam proved very satisfactory and of great 
benefit, the extra amount of water thus obtained for ground-sluicing purposes being found a 
great help. 

At Mosquito creek a very satisfactory season's work was put in on the -I'nAama claim. 
Owing to rearrangement of the plant, this claim was worked with a considerably smaller force 
of men, hut the gravel struck was as i_ r > •• •< 1 as in former years. This claim gave a very g.»wl 
account of itself. 

The West Canadian Deep Leads, Limited, continued its work on the three compartment 

shaft to reach hed rock, presumably at a depth of 260 feet. All last summer this company 
had considerable difficulty with the pumps, and as water was encountered in large quantities, 

the result was that a great deal of time was lost. L understand that this winter it is the 

intention of tin- management to get in considerable new machinery during the sleighing season j 

there is a] talk of putting in a large drain-tunnel. It is hoped that the company will work 
again next spring, and finally get some return for the very large amount of money it has 
expended. 

Lightning Creek and Tributaries. 

On the property of the Lightning Creek Gold Gravels and Drainage Company, Limited, 
at Wingdam, lam pleased to be able to state that work has been resumed ami that some 
twenty-five or thirty men are now employed. It will he remembered that this company is 

sinking shafts with the object of working out the hed-roek gravels which in the early days 
were found to be very rich. 

The Lightning Creek Hydraulic- Mining Company continued work on the Lightning 
1 ' property near the old town of Van Winkle, which ground was formerly known as the 

South Wales ground. The company employed a large force all summer, and, although troubled 
with lack of dump, managed to move a considerable amount of graveL It was, however, not 
looking for big results this year, as considerable old-time workings had to Ik- removed before 
pay-gravel could 1m- reached. 

The Venture Company on Peters creek did not work this year owing to failure to procure 
the necessary additional capital required to install a plant for the economical working of the 

property. 

The Wormwold Creek Mining Company and the Four Leaf Closer Mining Company did 
little except COnstruction-work on their properties. 

On the Ogden Gold Mining Company's property on Lightning creek, which consisl 
four leases, 1 understand several test shafts have been sunk at an expenditure I - or 

$6,000, with satisfactory results. 

On Summit creek very little work was done this past season, but 1 understand from the 

manager of the Summit Creek Hydraulic Mining Company, which owns several leases on the 

creek, that work will be carried on next year and a considerable amount of money spent on 

development-work. 

On Sugar creek the Cooper Creek Mining Company did satisfactory work, but the season 
was short and quite a time was spent in road-work and getting in the pipe. 



3 Geo. 5 Cariboo District. K 51 



On Mustang creek a number of leases have been staked, and I look for a good amount of 
capital being spent there during the next season. 

Hydraulicking operations were carried on on China creek, Nugget gulch, and on the old 
Waverly property, with practically the same results as in past years, but on all. these properties 
the season was short. 

LoDE-MINING. 

With regard to mineral or lode mining, really very little has been done in this district 
during the past year, the owners of mineral claims doing little more than the necessary 
assessment-work, some with very good results, but, naturally, none of them care to spend more 
than what is absolutely necessary to hold their claims until the transportation problem is 
solved. 

The old B.C. Quartz Mine was baled out, R. R. Hedley superintending the work. 

Dredging. 

With reference to dredging, this has not, as yet, been a commercial success in this 
district, but I would state that several leases have been taken up on the Fraser and Quesnel 
rivers. So far I have not heard of work having been started. 

On Pleasant valley, T. Dickson, late superintendent of the Alder Creek (U.S.A.) 
Dredging Company, spent considerable time and money testing ground with a boring-machine, 
with the idea, if the ground proved suitable, of installing a dredging outfit on the ground, and 
I gather that he obtained very encouraging results. 

Office Statistics — Cariboo Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued to individuals 403 

ii ii companies 9 

Placer claims recorded 12 

ii re-recorded 22 

Miners' leave of absence 22 

Certificates of work issued 110 

Mining leases issued 54 

Water licences issued 14 

Conveyances and other documents recorded 81 

General Revenue Receipts. 

Free miners' certificates $ 2,882 20 

Mining receipts, general 1 2,790 90 

Leaves of absence 52 50 

Land sales 104,534 69 

Land revenue 548 00 

Water revenue 1,343 27 

Revenue tax 828 00 

Real-property tax 3,325 43 

Personal-property tax 1,264 86 

Wild-land tax 100,102 06 

Income-tax 93 93 

Licences, marriage 70 00 

liquor 1,955 00 

trade 552 00 

game 100 00 

Law-stamps 105 80 

J.P. Court fines 552 50 

Miscellaneous receipts 557 04 

Mineral-tax 814 00 

Total §232,472 18 



K 52 Report ok the Minister of Mines. 1913 



CARIBOO MINING DIVISION. 

NOTES ON THE MICA CLAIMS IX THE VICINITY OF TETE JAUNB I ACHE, B.C. 
By Herbert Carmichael, Provincial Assayer. 

Before leaving Victoria very little reliable information could be obtained as to the - 
location of the mica properties, but it was certain that the easiest way to reach Tete Jaune 
Cache was via the Canadian Pacific Railway to Edmonton, and from that point westward over 
the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. 

Regular trains were running from Edmonton to Fitzhugh, near the eastern boundary of 
British Columbia, and from then- to Mile 53 on the Grand Trunk Pacific survey, more or 
less regular work-trains wen- conveying the contractors, workmen, and supplies. 

The starting-point of the railway survey is at the boundary between the Provinces of 
British Columbia and Alberta, the mile mileage reading westward. 

\t the time this section of the country was visited September 27th, 1912 Mile 53 
was the contractors' headquarters, rail-head being about half a mile farther west. From 
information obtained at Mile 53, it was found that all the important mica claims were then far 
above snow-line, the majority of them being at an altitude of over 8,000 feet. It was snowing 
on the mountain-tops and no one could be secured to act as guide to the claims, and, even if 

they could have been reached, they would have been Covered with two or more feet of snow 
and nothing could have been seen. 

Some information was obtained at Mile 53 from parties who had been over the mica 
properties, and it is believed to be fairly reliable. 

A small creek named Sand creek flows from the west and empties into the Fraser river, 
one mile west of Tete Jaune Cache. This creek was visited and the sand was found to be 
exceedingly micaceous; in fact, all the surface wash of this section is highly impregnated with 

mica. Ascending Sand creek in a southwesterly direction, it was found that the creek had 
cut deeply through the surface wash, leaving precipitous banks, and. at seven miles from the 
Fraser river, flows through a rocky canyon, with the McLennan range and Mica mountain to 
tli' south. 

At about 1,000 feet elevation above the creek, on the south side, some claims have been 
staked, hut the mica is reported to he of poor quality. 

Rising abruptly from Sand creek is the McLennan range, which is a high mountain-ridge 
running south-west and north-east, having peaks 8,500 feet high, or o,. r >00 feet above the 
Fraser riser; a continuation of this range to the east is called Mica mountain. Some of the 
best mica show bags are reported to be on this mountain at an altitude of 8,300 feet. 

The claims have been located on a series of pegmatite dykes, from 1" to ."." feet wide, in 

which mica has been formed in small pockets. The Sand Creek ami Smith groups of claims 

have been staked on these dykes and opened up by a fe\f shots. Mica sheets 8 \ in inches 
square hai e been taken out. 

Southeast of the McLennan range and one mile and a half distant i~ \ __ Head 

mountain, where twelve mica claims have been taken up on a pegmatite dyke, 30 feet wide 
and fairly well exposed by a series of open-cuts ; plates 8 \ 1" \ ■"> inches of clear muscovite 

mica are reported to have been obtained. The altitude of the claim is over 8,000 I 

A few miles southeast of Nigger Head mountain is Cranberry lake, in which Canoe 

river takes its rise, (lowing south-east to the Columbia river. Occurrences of mica are 
reported from the headwaters of Canoe river. 



3 Geo. 5 Cariboo District. K 53 



Opposite the McLennan range and three miles north of Sand creek on a range of 
mountains, the Kelly group of mica claims has been recorded, but no information could be 

obtained about them. 

It would appear that the pegmatite dykes referred to occur over a fairly wide area in 
this section of the Province, and now that the building of the Grand Trunk Pacific and 
Canadian Northern Railways has removed the most serious of the transportation problems, 
it is likely that an impetus will be given to prospecting for mica and that shipping mines will 
be recorded in the near future. 



QUESNEL MINING DIVISION. 
Report by E. C. Lunn, Mixing Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report on mining operations in the Quesnel 
Mining Division of the Cariboo District for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The revenue derived from mining shows a slight increase over that of last year, but, owing 
to most of the properties being in a state of development, there has been no large output. 

Referring to the Quesnel Hydraulic Gold Mining Company, I notice that the report on 
this property has already been supplied by the Provincial Mineralogist in last year's Report, 
and, as it is a very full one, I am unable to add anything thereto. 

The Morehead Mining Company, located on Morehead creek, with S. M. Pletch as 
manager, and Andrew Nesbitt as engineer, is putting in an hydraulic plant that will handle 
4.000 yards of gravel a day. During the past season a tunnel has been run in on the channel 
with satisfactory results, allowing the installation of the above-mentioned plant. Material 
and supplies for the work of the coming season are now on the road, and operations will begin 
about April 15th. The Morehead Mining Company has its head office in Calgary, and the head 
office for the Province is at Quesnel Forks. Building will commence early in the year, and 
probably a crew of from twenty to thirty men will be employed for the entire season. 

I am indebted to Thomas Graham for the following details of the Keithley Creek and 
Quesnel Forks section : — 

The past year has witnessed a most encouraging revival of the mining industry. On the 
Quesnel river at Seven-mile creek the Water Tight Dipper Dredge and Mining Company, 
erected a camp and put in a sawmill, the first steps in the construction of the big dredge, and 
from information received I understand a considerable amount of work will be done this 
season. 

On Spanish creek, a tributary of the North fork of the Quesnel river, John Hopp equipped 
a property formerly held by the Guggenheims, and hydraulicked with a crew of twenty men ; 
it was late in the season before operations commenced, but the results were most encouraging. 
There serins to be a strong probability that this property will yield handsomely in the future. 
On Snow shoe creek the Luce hydraulic was operated with a crew of eight men with satisfactory 
results. 

On Barr creek Mr. Hebson hydraulicked with a small crew. 

On Marten creek Mr. Smith operated with a No. 2 Giant. 

On Keithlev, Goose, and Four-mile creeks considerable prospecting-work in gravels was 
accomplished. 



K 54 Report of the Minister of Mines. 191:} 



Tho country drained by Keithley creek and its tributaries lias not vet attracted the 
attention of capitalists. The gravels in this section are undoubtedly richer than those of the 
Quesnel River district, and should attract the attention of large operators when transportation 
is rendered easier. 

Lode-mining. 

Interest in quartz-mining is being aroused. On Yanks ledge, on Snowshoe creek, Mr. 
llelisnn and associates have a tunnel in 10 feet : this ledge averages in width i) feet, and yields 
gold freely by panning. 

Frank Cannon has driven 90 feet on his copper ledge on the Quesnel river, near Twenty- 
mile creek, and is reported to have an excellent showing of copper ore in the face of the tunnel. 

At the head of Quesnel lake some prospecting work has been done on the Big Galena 
ledge, seventeen claims have been staked on this ledge; most of these have been bonded to 
the representatives of Chicago capitalists. One of the owners reports that one prospect-shaft 
"discloses a width of 20 feet of solid galena" (the writer feels some doubt as to the accuracy 
of this report, although it «iis made most emphatically). There is no doubt that the Quesnel 
Lake and Cariboo Lake regions are well worth the attention of the quartz, prospector. 

The Horsefly River Cold Dredge and Mining Company, head office in Vancouver, was 

liydraulicking at Harpers Camp for a short time at the close of the season, but the work 
was, to a great extent preparatory, so no great result was looked for. In all probability the 
coining season will see a considerable amount of work in this camp. From the foregoing facts 
it will readily be seen that, with the transportation facilities which are assured in the near 
future, the Quesnel Mining Division has great opportunities for the prospector. 

Office Statistics — Quesnel Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 117 

ii ir (company) 1 

'i ii (special) 2 

Certificates of work 2 

Placer claims recorded L9 

Mineral claims recorded 57 

Bills of sale, transfers, etc 70 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 55 



CASSIAR DISTRICT. 



ATLIN MINING DIVISION. 

Report of J. A. Fhaser, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my report on mining operations in the Atlin Mining Division 
of Cassiar District for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

Although there were not quite as many people in the district as during the season of 
1911, and the scarcity of water was even more marked than during that season, I am pleased 
to be able to report an increased output as well as an increase in the aggregate revenue 
collected throughout the district during the year 1912. 

Had the water-supply been at all fair, or nearly adequate, there would undoubtedly have 
been a considerably greater increase in the amount of gold recovered, but the light snowfall 
of the previous year and the meagre rainfall during the summer left even such a reservoir as 
.Surprise lake inadequate to supply the quantity required by the operators dependent upon it. 
and other sources of supply were in like manner found wanting. 

Nothing was done this year towards increasing the water-supply by storage, or the 
diversion of outlying streams, and each dry season will doubtless provide its share of similarly 
disappointing experiences until some method of conservation, whereby increased supply can be 
assured, is adopted or provided. 

McKee Creek. 

On this creek the Pittsburg-British Gold Company, under the management of George 
Adams, commenced operations on May 18th, and, with a force varying from four to eighteen 
men (an average of thirteen), continued hydraulicking until October 20th, when the absolute 
failure of the water-supply compelled them to close down. 

This company was handicapped by the great shortage of water and by repeated " sloughs 
from high banks, of somewhat peculiar formation ; but, notwithstanding all these, nearly 
5,000 square yards of bed-rock was uncovered and a satisfactory amount of gold recovered 
therefrom: sufficient, at any rate, to show a more substantial balance of receipts over 
expenditure than had hitherto been shown, and to encourage the owners to expect greater and 
better returns next season. 

Some prospecting was done on outlying portions of this company's holdings with a 
Keystone driller, but the results apparently did not disclose any new pay-streaks. 

There were no individual mining operations on the creek. 

Pine Creek. 

On Pine creek the North Columbia Gold Mining Company, under the management of 
J. M. Ruffher, operated hvdraulically, as in the past two years, upon its own leasehold 
properties, and upon those of the Atlin Consolidated Mining Company adjacent on the north 
bank of the creek. With a force varying from forty-five to sixty-five men (an average of 
fifty-five), a large area of bed-rock, over 50,000 square yards, was uncovered with gratifying 
results, particularly on the north side, where the best returns ever realized here from this 
method of operations were obtained. 



K 56 REPOET OF THE MINISTER OF Mikes. 1913 



The general shortage of water affected even these operations, for, although Surprise lake. 
with its superficial area of nearly seventeen square miles, was the supply reservoir, it did not 
supply sufficient water to enable them to flush ou1 the channel of Pine creek, and so dispose 
of a portion of the " tailings," as in former years ; and still they closed down earlier than in 
previous seasons, practically for want of water. The period of operation extended over six 
i 'lis. and from twelve to fourteen large-sized monitors were used throughout the season. 

A sad casualty occurred in connection with these operations in midsummer, when Al. < 
Radford, cue of the foremen, was caught by a falling hank of gravel, ami s,, seriously injured 
that he diiil a te« days later. This accident was the more regrettable, because it appeal 
have been entirely due to Ins own temerity in continuing to pipe up against the hank after he 
hail Keen warned to leave, and all the other men in the pit had dune SO. 

The following is a statement of work dune on these properties received from the mar 
Mr. Etuffner: — 

"In response to your request tor information tor your annual report, 1 beg to submit the 
following : — 

'•The North Columbia Gold Mining Company operated, as usual, its own ground through 

No. 1 pit, where two lines of pipe are installed, each being .'ID inches in diameter at the upper 
i nil and tapering to i' 1 inches. There are five No. •) monitors in the pit. each usually with a 
7-inch nozzle: and on the dump, usually a No. 6 and a No. 1 machine. Here also is used a 

5-foot flume and block riffles ; the average amount of water, including the 'bank-head,' used 
was about 4. 000 miners' inches. A small Sullivan air-compressor is very successfully utilized 
for operating three hand-stopping drills for drilling the largest boulders and the great amount 
of glacial clay encountered in this pit; this clay is in large 'slabs' and has to be reduced 
before being run through the sluices ; these drills save a great amount of powder, which is an 
important item to be considered in mining in the Atlin District, as the White Pass and Yukon 
Railway Company's freight rate is excessive, not considering the original cost of the powder 
and the 1,000-mile ocean haul. The amount of material moved was 310,000 cubic yards and 

16,525 square yards of bed-rock stripped: average depth of hanks. Ill feet 6 inches. The 

possible running-time was L85 day- and actual running-time was lot days. 

" A'o. 2 or -I.C I'll. The same company operates this pit under Lease iv the Pine 

Creek Power Company, Limited, of it- ' lay ' agreement with the Atlin Consolidated Mining 
• lompany, a Guggenheim interest. < Operations are carried on through two main lines of pipe. 
•"><> and 28 inches respectively at their upper ends and tapering to 24 incites at pit. Usually 

four No. li and three No. I monitors are operated in the pit. anil one No. 6 ami two No. I 

machines are used stacking tailings and keeping open the tail-race. A ».'. f..,,t flume with 
angle-iron riffles is used. Owing to the unusually ' flat ' bed-rock many of the boulders have 
to be reduced, requiring a heavy consumption of 75-pei>cent. dynamite. The amounl 
material moved during the season was 197,600 cubic yards: square yards -nipped. 30,805, or 
6.36 acre-; average depth of hanks, l!i feet ■"■ inches. Total production was $72,440.95; 
average value per cubic yard, 36.7 cents: and per square yard of bed-rock, $2.35. About 

3,800 miners' inches of water was used. The possible running-time was 178 days and actual 

time 139 day-. Both pits arc equipped with a generator for lighting. 

"Operations were considerably hampered by a general shortage in the water-supply. At 
no time during the season did the supply afford a flushing-head for the clearing of tailings 

from the creek bed. This considerably reduced the duty of the miner-' inch of water Used in 
each pit. 




Town <i 1' Tclegrn pit < ircek on Stfkine River* 




\ l>n iiili.iinl T«H II llf CtlCIHiril SHI. Iim> lllviT. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 57 

" The height of the water above the sill at the Surprise Lake dam at the close of the 
season of 1911 was 4 feet 10 inches, giving us this reserve amount with which to start 
operations this season, together with the small winter accumulation. At the close of this 
season it was 1 foot 11 inches. This will not afford us sufficient water with which to operate 
in both pits at the commencement of next season unless a winter thaw or early spring rains 
augment the supply. 

" The number of men employed during the season ranged from forty-five to sixty-five, 
averaging about fifty-five." 

The Pine Creek Flume Company, Limited, under the management of C. L. Queen, 
operated with a small force of men upon its lease holdings, adjacent to those operated by Mr. 
Rutfher on the north bank of Pine creek. He reports having erected nearly 1,200 feet of 
flume, built about 1,850 feet of ditch, and a dam 180 feet long, together with other dead-work. 
He operated a small hydraulic plant and moved about 6,000 cubic yards of gravel, securing 
the water therefor from Moose lake and some small lakes adjacent thereto. 

Several individual miners operated on Pine creek, principally resluicing old " tailings," and, 
while they did not report results, I have reason to believe they were quite satisfactory. About 
seventy men all told were engaged in mining operations on this creek. 

Spruce Creek. 

On this creek about eighty men were engaged in mining during the season, with very 
good results. 

The Spruce Creek Power Company, Limited, pursuing the policy adopted last year, did 
not operate this season, so that there was no hydraulic mining on this creek this year. 

On the Gladstone lease James McCloskey pursued his drifting operations, with very 
satisfactory results. During the winter months a dump was put out, although open sluicing 
was carried on throughout the greater part of the winter as well. The average force employed 
comprised about twenty men, working day and night during the summer months. Over 
l'_',000 cubic yards of gravel was thus removed and sluiced, from which over $60,000 in gold 
was recovered. Considerable new plant was installed during the season, including 800 feet of 
water-supply flume, steel rails, cars, etc. Operations were suspended towards the end of 
October, and it is his intention to resume about May 1st, 1913. 

On the Poker lease Isaac Matthews had a number of men employed on "lays," and the 
returns reported were very good indeed, considering the amount of dead-work which had to be 
performed before " pay " was encountered. A few men are working on this property this 
winter. 

On the Peterboro lease drifting operations are being prosecuted by Messrs. Gould, Morse, 
et a/., but only dead- work has been done up to date ; good results are confidently anticipated. 

Individual mining was being carried on at various points along the creek, with indifferenl 
results. A number of claims and one lease were relocated in the vicinity of Blue canyon, 
and an effort will be made next season to relocate the pay-streak which was being followed in 
the early days by the miners then on the creek. 

J. M. Ruffher, by means of an Empire drill, disclosed the existence of a deep channel in 
the neighbourhood of the Columbia canyon, but his appliance did not enable him at that time 
to go deep enough to find bed-rock and ascertain what values, if any, are therein. 

From thirty to forty men are drifting on this creek this winter. 



K 58 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

Birch Creek. 

About the same number of men was engaged in mining on this creek this season as 
last — viz., from fourteen to seventeen and with even better results than formerly while the 
water supply lasted ; but, unfortunately, the shortage, so keenly felt throughout the district, 
was apparent on tins creek also, and was primarily responsible f< >r a slightly decreased output. 
During the early part of the season the plant, flumes, etc., were reinstalled, and by the middle 
of June were in very efficient working order, and a banner output was confidently expected ; 
but the season, which is reported as "the divest on record" on the creek, prevented the 
expected and desirable consummation. 

As it was, however, over 52,000 square feel of bed-rock was cleaned by the hydraulic 

operations, and the yield therefrom was quite up to the best in past seasons. 

The above operations were conducted as in former years, under the management of 
II. Peploe Fearse. 

The individual operations on the upper portion of the creek did very well indeed while 
tiic water lasted, and had a successful season notwithstanding all handicaps. 

There is nothing doing on this creek tins winter. 

Boi LDEH < iREEK. 

(Ill this creek oiilv about ten men were operating during the open season, and with 

possibly one exception they appeared satisfied with results. 

The Societe Miniere de la Columbie Britannique does not appear to have recovered from 

the confusion created by the sudden death last year of its manager, T. Obalski. Iii any event, 
no one appears to have been appointed to succeed him. 

There are at least seven men mining on this creek this winter. 

Rubv Cheek. 

The Placer Gold Mines Company, under the management of T. M. Daulton, continued 
the development-work commenced three years ago, which consisted principally in hydraulicking 
an open-cut or channel up-stream until bed-rock should he met on a working grade. * Operations 
were commenced this season on April 8th, and continued with a force of from thirteen to 
seventeen men (an average of fourteen) until October 5th, during which period the open-cut 
was extended up-stream about 340 feet, with a width of to feet and an average depth 

of !•"> feet until bed-rock (and "pay") was encountered. About 65,000 cubit- yards of 
gravel was handled, but were it not for the shortage of water, which was experienced through 
the w hole season, the amount of material removed would doubtless have been much greater 

and the results correspondingly better. 

As it was. the amount of gold recovered during the last two weeks' operation appears to 

have been very satisfactory anil was an earnest of what may 1 \pected from now on. The 

ground is undoubtedly rich, and this company can hardly fail to realize the reward due its 

perseverance and outlay. 

Wright Creek. 

From four to seven men were mining on this creek from Ma\ 3rd to October 10th, but 

owing to the scarcity of water not more than four men were working during tile latter part of 
the season. ( 'onsiderahle dead work was done and a bed rock flume 960 feet long was installed. 
but the amount of gravel moved was not as great as in former vears. nor were the returns 

encouraging. Still, with a persistence worthy of much better results and compensation, the 
owners intend pursuing the evanescent pay-streak which they confidently believe to !»• there. 

somewhere, during the coming season, and it is surely to be hoped they may find it. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 59 



Otter Creek. 

On the upper portion of this creek J. E. Moran, with a force of four men, commenced 
operations on April 25th, but owing to the scarcity of water only three men were working 
during the latter part of the season. The returns were about the same as in former seasons 
in proportion to the amount of gravel moved, and over $1 per square yard of bed-rock 
uncovered was secured. The banks were about 30 feet deep. Operations were closed down 
October 28th. 

On the lower part of Otter creek the Maluin Syndicate, under the management of W. H. 
Brethour, continued the development-work commenced two years ago, and, with a considerable 
force, running from ten to thirty men, was engaged throughout the season installing pipe-lines 
and hydraulicking out a foundation for ditch and pipe-line and to reach bed-rock. During 
the season nearly 6,000 feet of new hydraulic pipe, running from 16 to 32 inches diameter, 
was installed at a cost of nearly $16,000, and, altogether, an expenditure of about .$35,000 
was reported in addition to that reported for previous seasons. This installation, when 
completed will be extensive and well equipped, and will doubtless give a good account of itself 
when mining is once more permanently undertaken. 

Wilson Creek. 

Only a small number of men operated on this creek during the season, but, although the 
number was less than last season, the output was a little larger, indicating better returns for 
the labour expended. There does not appear to be anything doing on that creek this winter 

O'Donnell River. 

On this stream Robert McKee, as manager for the Canadian- Alaska Exploration Company, 
continued sinking the shaft commenced last season, but, finding the inflow of water still 
greater than his pumps could cope with, notwithstanding the installation of larger pumps than 
were used last year, he abandoned that method and procured the use of a Keystone driller, 
with which he struck bed-rock at a depth of 94 feet from the surface and reported finding 
good values thereon. 

As the depth to bed-rock was thus found to be much greater than was anticipated, 
operations were suspended early in the season to enable the manager to consult with his 
principals as to the best method of operation to be pursued under the altered conditions. 
Considerable excitement was occasioned in the fall and early winter by the reputed discovery 
on this stream of a rich pay-streak, situated on a bench at a height of from 30 to 50 feet above 
stream-level ; but, although there were several stampedes to the place and considerable ground 
has been located, no new discovery of " pay," nor even a continuance of the original pay -streak, 
has been reported up to the date of this writing, so that it is difficult to determine what 
importance, if any, to attach to the matter. 

I may say that some of the prospecting already done seems to have demonstrated the 
existence of two or three old channels (so called), which appear to contain " wash-gravel " and 
some gold, but whether in paying quantities or not has not yet been determined. 

There are several small outfits prospecting in that vicinity this winter, and probably 
about twenty men are so engaged either on O'Donnell or its tributaries. 

Lincoln Creek. 

The parties holding the leases on this creek (under bond) commenced operations on April 
1 3th with a force of seven men, and operated until July 30th, when, owing to the difficulty 
experienced in reaching bed-rock, it was determined to close down and to procure a Keystone 



K 60 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



driller with which to continue prospecting next season, it being almost impracticable to 
transport such a piece of machinery to the creek economically except during winter, when it 

can lie taken in over the snow and ice. 

During the period of operation considerable engineering-work was performed in the way 
ot procuring levels and water grades, cutting trails, and establishing good camp buildings. 

A dan i was also built and the .reel, diverted through a channel excavated 250 x 6 \ 3 feet, 

and a tunnel was driven 120 t'eet upstream and well timbered. 

In .(line an Empire drill was procured, with which two holes were sunk, one til! feet and 

the other 28 feet. In the former, although bed-rock was not reached, gold was "panned" 

from the last twelve feet. In the latter a stratum of clay was encountered through which the 
drill would not penetrate, hence the determination to procure a Keystone driller. 

Davenport Creek. 

On this creek which flows into Gladys Lake and through that system to Teslin lake, two 
or three men have been prospecting for over a year, and. while they have done a good deal of 
work tunnelling and sinking without striking bed rock, they have found good coarse gold in 
considerable quantities, and are encouraged to continue. There appears to he a fair supply of 

water in the creek and g 1 sluicing grades. 

Burdette Creek. 

This is a tributary of O'Donnell river lying to the west of Wilson creek and running 

parallel with it. About midsummer a "discovery" was claimed and allowed on this creek, 
and a number of claims wen- located above and below " discovery," on some of which work 

was carried on until the end of September. 

I have not learned that any phenomenal values were secured : next season better results 
may he hoped for. In October "discoveries" were claimed by and allowed to some Indians 

on four creeks, locally known as Silver, Trout, Johnson, and Moosehorn creeks, which lie to 
the south of and empty into White Swan river, which in turn empties into Teslin lake at its 

extreme southerly end. 

The discoverers claim to have found gold from th.' " grass-roots " down, but do not 
pretend to have done much prospecting. Quite a number of Indians have located claims on 
those creeks, and apparently have done a fairly profitable business locating for and transferring 
to whites. A. number of miners from Atlin ami vicinity have gone out there, hut at present 

writing no reports have been received from them.* 

Some desultory prospecting was done on other streams throughout the district during the 
season, hut nothing of importance has been reported, hut a new impetus has been given to 
prospecting and further discoveries may he reported at any time. 

Mini r vi. Claims. 

Still another season has passed without much active development having been done on 

mineral locations throughout the district, except upon the Engineer and /.'.■;< M'Chree groups, 

situated on Taku arm. More attention is being paid to procuring Crown grants for claims 
than formerly, which in itself is an evidence of confidence and progress. 



Note by Provincial Mineralogist. A private letter received from a prospectoi who had gone in 
to tliis "new find" from Telegraph Creek confirms the report a- given to the Gold Commissioner — in that 
the Indians piu.lu.vd coarse gold which they claimed to have ohtained here : that the Indians have stake. 1 
on nearly every creek, and are holding their stakings for sale rather than to work them. This prospector 
ling in himself again in the spring, hat says there is no Ltement other than the Indians' — to 

justify any excitement, or, guarantee that there is gold in paying quantities. It would he well 

i i await this sea <on's prospecting vv oi k before forming any definite estimate of \ .due of the Indians' stories. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K (il 



On the Engineer group a force of about thirty men was employed during the summer by 
Captain James Alexander in surface prospecting, the results of which seem to prove the 
existence of a much larger area of richly mineralized ground than was formerly suspected, and, 
although I have not learned that much was done to prove values by sinking on the ledges, it 
was very apparent that the owners were much encouraged by the results obtained. 

The small stamp-mill which is located on the property was kept in operation during the 
season also, and very good returns secured. I understand a shipment of high-grade ore was 
shipped to one of the Coast smelters, but I have not learned what the returns were. 

On the Ben M'Chree group a force of from ten to nineteen men (an average of 16) was 
employed from April 15th to October 8th building roads and trails, erecting buildings, 
preparing the ground, and procuring the necessary timber for the installation of an aerial 
tramway, the machinery for which was landed at the mine early in the season. 

A crew of men was also engaged throughout the season stripping and breaking out rock 
for sacking and shipping purposes, and it is claimed that a large quantity of very promising 
rock is thus ready for shipment as soon as the installation of the tramway is completed. 

The above-mentioned operations were conducted under the general superintendence of 
O. H. Partridge, who, with the Hon. Maurice Egerton, represents the owners of the property. 

Should the values prove up to expectation, the quantity of rock in sight appears to 
indicate the possession by these operators of a property capable of being developed into a 
mine. 

Those gentlemen have also acquired title to a large number of claims on White Moose 
mountain, and have intimated that they intend prosecuting the active development of same 
this coming season. 

Whilst those operators are actively prosecuting development, which entails heavy expense, 
they complain bitterly of the excessive cost of transportation of all kinds of supplies and 
material into the camp, stating that, whilst they were promised a reduction of 10 per cent. 
upon former rates by the White Pass it Yukon route, they have actually been charged an 
advance of 10 per cent, or more over last season's rates, which in themselves were considered 
almost prohibitory. 

Klehini — Rainy Hollow. 

I regret to report another season having passed without any material development or 
change in the situation in this part of the district, owing to the failure of the parties who 
were endeavouring to exploit it to accomplish anything material or satisfactory. Such 
development-work as was necessary to protect the titles was performed, but not much else ; 
this applies to the quartz generally throughout the district. Much attention, however, has 
been directed to the Rainy Hollow section by would-be investors, and some better results may 
lie hoped for in the near future, although, as stated in previous reports, no material change 
need be expected until some sort of rail communication with tide-water is provided.* 

General. — Nothing has been done during the year towards developing the deposits of coal 
and hydo-magnesite located in the district. 



*Note bY Provincial Mineralogist. — A description of the Rainy Hollow camp, written by Mr. 
Bryant, a mining engineer, and formerly in charge of Tyee Copper Company mines on Vancouver Island. 
appeared in a recent issue of the Mining Magazine, published in London. 



K 62 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Office Statistics— Atl in Minim; Division. 

Free miners' certificates (individual) .">■_'.". 

n ii (companies) 7 

ii M (special) 2 

Placer records 177 

n re-records (representing 290 claims) 279 

Leaves of absence (representing 222 claims) 82 

Groupings 10 

Permissions ■> 

Bills of sale (placer) 160 

ii (hydraulic) 47 

ii (mineral) 38 

Mineral records 138 

Certificates of work 130 

Filings 11 

Certificates of improvements 14 

( Yo« n grants issued 15 

Certificates of improvements (advertised, not yet issued) 2 

Gold reported (companies)— 10,507 oz. Value $163, 108 00 

(individuals) 5,701 „ 90,999 00 



Totals 16,208 .1 5254,407 00 



Royalty paid by companies 3,017 10 

ii ii individuals 1,579 20 



Totals §4,596 30 

Revenue collected during 1912. 

Land sales 8 10 00 

Water revenue (annual rentals) v;| ]i> 

Free miners' certificates (individuals) 2,283 50 

ii ii (companies) 700 00 

(special) 30 00 

Mining receipts (lease rentals) 5,840 00 

n (lease deposits) , 1,240 00 

ii (other sources) 3.107 20 

Leaves of absence 555 00 

Licences (liquor) 655 00 

(trade) 165 00 

Fines and forfeitures 1,289 05 

Etegisl IV fees I i ii I 

Law stamps 8 20 

Revenue tax 669 00 

" Taxation Act " — 

le al property tax 3,155 

Personal property tax 16 45 

Wild land tax. .' 23 55 

Income tax L 1 1 55 

Mineral-tax 4,596 30 

Tax on imworked Crown-granted mineral claims 969 00 

1 merest 75 



Total $26,20 - 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 63 

STIKINE AND LIARD MINING DIVISIONS. 
Report of J. Cartmel, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining operations in the Stikine 
and Liard Mining Divisions of Cassiar District for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

There were more men employed in mining this season than last, and while, with the 
exception of the hydraulic on Thibert creek, no gold was reported as having been recovered 
from any of the operations, I believe some small amounts were obtained. 

Quite a number of placer leases have been staked and applied for during the season, 
however, and, judging from the preparations which are being made to develop these, I consider 
the outlook for the coming season rather favourable. 

Placer. 

On Thibert creek the Boulder Creek Mining Company constructed one and one-half miles 
of flume, 30 x 30 inches, connecting with their old flume from Berry creek of about the same 
length. This flume is calculated to carry 1,000 inches of water, and at the pressure-box gives 
a head of about 285 vertical feet. They commenced piping July 21st, and in spite of being 
hampered for a considerable time by lack of room while opening up the new pit, succeeded in 
moving a considerable quantity of gravel before ceasing operations about the middle of 
October. Notwithstanding the comparative shallowness of the ground, they were unfortunate 
in encountering a slide of mud and gravel (to which this ground seems peculiarly subject), 
which at the last moment partly filled the pit and covered one of the pipe-lines, forcing them 
to remove this pipe and the monitor it served, which was also endangered. This circumstance, 
happening just as they were about to clean up a large portion of the bed-rock which had taken 
considerable time to uncover, caused the temporary loss of all the gold thereon, and in 
consequence the season's output was much less than was expected. The results that were 
secured, however, were such as to warrant the prediction that barring accidents, this property 
will next season make far and away the best showing in its history. The conditions obtaining 
are practically ideal, the ground containing very few boulders and being easy to sluice, water 
plentiful, pressure adequate, and dump all that could be desired, the bed-rock of the old 
channel at the new workings being over 100 feet above the present creek-bed, and, if the 
precaution is taken to pipe off the overburden of loose material in the early part of the season, 
I see no necessity for any further trouble from the heretofore inevitable mud-slides. 

A series of assays of the black sand concentrates, made on the ground by a competent 
assayer, showed good values in platinum, averaging, I believe, about 2 oz. of that metal per 
ton of concentrates, and if adequate measures are taken for saving the black sand a substantial 
addition to the output from this source would doubtless result. 

On Little Deloire creek, a tributary of Thibert, no mining was done until late in the fall, 
when several leases were staked, and at least seven men are engaged in drifting there this 
winter. 

On Mosquito creek, another tributaiy of Thibert, two men worked all summer with a 
"shooter "or automatic gate, but so far have been unable to reach bed-rock. They have, 
however, secured very encouraging prospects in the gravel, and if bed-rock proves to be 
proportionately richer, this creek should become an important producer. 

On Dease creek a little desultory mining was done during the summer, and in some 
instances, I learn, good results, in proportion to the amount of work done, were obtained. On 
the White Horse lease, at the mouth (if this creek, no work was done during the summer, as it 



K G4 Report ok the Minister of Mixes. 1 f ) 1 :> 



was proved last winter to lie impossible to prospecl the ground by mean- of shafts ami pumps, 
owing to its proximity to and slighl elevation above Dease lake. Negotiations were therefore 

entered into by the owner with s - Eastern mining-men with a view to having the ground 

tested with a drill, and 1 am pleased to state that, as a result of these negotiations, an Empire 

drill was brought tip the Stikine river late in the fall in charge of \V. M. Ogilvie, who ha 

had considerable experience with dredges in the Yukon. This drilling outfit has been taken 

in to Dease lake by dog-team, and, if the results of the operations justify it (which it is 
confidently expeeted they will), a large electric dredge will he installed on this ground in the 
near future. 

Several creek and bench leases have also heen staked near the mouth of 1 lease .reek by 
J. A. Doffelmyer, who also came up the Stikine late in the season, and who states that the 

prospects he litis been able to secure on the ground warrant his advocating to his principals 
the installation of a complete hydraulic plant on the property as soon as may he possible. 

At this point it seems to me pertinent to point out the tact that unless some sort of road, 
at least Suitable for V\ inter use, is constructed from Telegraph < 'reek to the- head of 1 lease lake. 

it will he almost an insuperable, or tit least an excessively expensive, undertaking to transport 
heavy machinery of the kind above referred to in to Dease lake: and until some such road is 

Constructed I feel constrained to say that in my opinion the known rich placer deposits of the 
I >ease Lake and McDame Creek Sections, and, in fact, the whole Ulterior portion of the 

district, will receive hut scant attention from capital. 

On McDame creek very little work was done this season, and there are not more than 

live white men wintering there. Nothing, 1 regret to say, litis heen don i the Radford 

group of leases, owing to the untimely death of Mr. Radford List summer tit Atlin. However, 
several new leases have heen staked on the creek, and one at least of these new stakers has 
expressed Ins intention to bring in machinery next spring to work his ground. 

Mineral. 

Quite a number more mineral claims have heen located this year than last. Imt \cry little 
work has heen recorded. 

The lskut Mining Company had its thirteen claims surveyed, which surveys wen- recorded 
i certificate of work, and the nine claims will doubtless now be Crown-granted, as they are 

entitled to he. 

Coal. 

Coal claims continue to he staked in that portion of the Groundhog section lying within 

this district, hut. tis there is practically no duct communication between Telegraph Creek 
and Groundhog, I am unable to say what developments are transpiring there. In any event, 
this will doubtless he fully covered by the report of the Provincial Mineralogist, who last 
summer visited that section, going in by way of Telegraph Creek. 

Offici Statistics -Stikine and Liabd Mining Divis 

lh \ enue collected from free miners' certificates % 178 75 

" mining receipts, general 2,384 40 

" 11 other sources L.' . 7 * 1 7 'i'.' 

Total - ;:, 84 




C'ninii of Moulder Creek Mining Co. — Thiliert Creek. 




Opening Hydraulic I'll, Iluiililer (reck Mining Co. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 65 

NOTES ON A TRIP TO DEASE LAKE AND TO THE GROUNDHOG COALFIELD. 

By Wm. Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist. 

During the past year various reports had been received as to the existence of a very 
extensive coalfield lying immediately to the north of Groundhog mountain and occupying the 
height of land around the headwaters of the Skeena, Stikine, and Nass rivers. 

The particulars of this coalfield, as far as they could be obtained from the preliminary 
reports of the locators and others, were fully set out in the Report of this Department for the 
year 1911. 

The importance of a coalfield such as was predicted by these reports was of such moment 
to the development of the Province that the Provincial Mineralogist was instructed to visit 
the field during the summer of 1912 and to report upon the results actually obtained by 
development. 

The route which had so far been used into the field was from Hazelton, but, as it was 
almost impossible, in July, to obtain horses at this point, it was decided that it was best to go 
in by way of Telegraph Creek, on the Stikine river, a supply-point about equally distant from 
the scene of operations. 

The Provincial Mineralogist and party left Victoria on July 5th, travelling northward on 
the C.P.R. steamer "Princess Sophia," and arrived at Wrangell, Alaska, on the 9th. 

Wrangell is a small town located on an island a few miles off the mouth of the Stikine 
river, and it is from here that all river-boats start to run up the river, which is navigable for 
this class of boat as far up as Telegraph Creek, a distance of approximately 180 miles. 

The Stikine river is a very swift stream and rather difficult of navigation, except at 
certain limited periods of the season, when the depth of water is most favourable. 

In addition to the difficulties met with on the river proper, the entrance into the river 
from the sea is greatly hindered by shoal water and a shifting channel, as, at the mouth, the 
river has formed a large delta, through which the water finds its way into the sea by various 
channels ; these constantly shift their location over an area several miles in extent, and no 
one of the streams can be permanently used as the boat-channel. 

It has been the custom of the Hudson Bay Company for years past to take each season, 
one of its river-steamers from the Skeena river while that river was in high water and to send 
it up to the Stikine to make a few trips to Telegraph Creek — usually in June — with possibly 
a couple of additional trips in the fall, for the convenience of big-game hunters going into the 
northern country. 

The spasmodic trips of these steamers were the only means of transportation — except by 
canoe — afforded the northern country for many years past, and has undoubtedly been one 
reason for the retarded development of the district. 

The conditions were so intolerable that, a couple of years ago, private parties in Wrangell 
and Telegraph Creek put on a small boat, run by a gasolene-engine, to carry freight and 
passengers. 

In 1912 this small boat was replaced by a larger one propelled by twin tunnel-screws, 
driven by a pair of gasolene-engines. This boat, the " Nahlin," made a few trips in the early 
part of the season of 1912, but by July something happened to the engines and the boat was 
unable to get up as far as Telegraph Creek, although it made two trips as far up the river 
as the mouth of the Clearwater, where the cargoes were cached. 
5 



K 66 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



When the Provincial Mineralogist reached Wrangell, it was found that the Hudson's Bay 
steamer was off for the season, and that the gasolene-boat, the " Nahlin." had inet with Bome 
mishap on the river, so that it was uncertain when she could be expected to return to 
Telegraph Creek. It was, consequently, found necessary to hire a locally owned gasolene- 
launch to make the trip. The launch engaged was the "Black Fox," a flat bottomed boat 
about 30 feet long, propelled by a tunnel screw, driven by a gasolene-engine. The boat was 

"h ■ -made," designed after the model of the river-boats used for poling by hand- a model 

that proved to be extremely good for the service intended, in swift water, and having a speed 
of fifteen miles an hour. 

Enough provisions were taken on at Wrangell to carry the party to Telegraph Creek, on 
which small amount of food the Canadian Customs collected duty, although it was impossible 
to buy food at any place, en route, in Canada. 

July 11th. The party left Wrangell at 12 noon on .Tidy 11th, arriving at the " Alaska — 
British Columbia Boundary" at 7..'!0 p.m., and here the night had to be spent and the 

Customs regulations complied with. 

The boat was too small to provide sleeping accomodations aboard and a camp ashore 

would have had to be made, but, through the courtesy of the Customs officer, the party was 
allowed to sleep on the floor of the Customs house. The river SO far traversed Bowed smoothly 
by a number of channels, through a narrow valley bordered by steeply rising mountains th i' 
were covered by glaciers extending down to the river-level, producing wonderfully fine scenery, 
but no land fit for cultivation and very little timber of any importance. 

The R.N.W. Mounted Police had al one time established a post a1 this boundary, and 
had built the several log buildings still standing and in use. This post had been supplied with 
horses, although there was no possibility of building trails leading anywhere ; the horses had 
to be brought there and taken away by boat. 

July 12th. At 6 a.m. Captain Kalkins had the party aboard and the boat under way, 
keeping up continuous travel until 8 p.m., some fourteen hours, in which time the river was 
ascended a distance of fifty two miles, when camp was made at Kalkins s cabin, near the fool 
of Flood glacier. All meals were cooked cm board over an oil-stove, while in motion. The 
boat averaged a speed through the water of at least twelve miles an hour, and the' progress 
up-stream was a little less than four mile's an hour, indicating a velocity of stream current of 
at least eight miles an hour. 

A large river (the Iskut) enters the Stikine from the east at a point a few miles above 

the boundary its source being one 1 hundred miles or so to the north-east, near the headwaters 
of the N'ass. 

For a number of years a good deal of prospecting has been going on on the watershed of 

the [skut, from winch very promising samples of copper and lead ores, carrying fair values in 

precious metals, have been obtained. 

A number of these claims, held by Mr. Busby, of Canadian Customs. Mr. Bronson, of 
Wrangell, and associates, have had considerable work done on them and were, this past season, 

Surveyed, preparatory to applications being made for Crow n grants. 

iparl from the mineral possibilities, the district passed through presents little of value; 
the river valley is narrow, the mountains bare and precipitous and covered with glaciers which 
reach down in many places to the river-level, leaving little or, sometimes, no bottom land. 
There are a few small patches containing fair-sized timber, but the total area is unimportant. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 67 



Saturday, July 13th. After a night spent on the ground under a shed, the swarms of 
mosquitoes rendered an early start the next morning highly desirable, and the " Black Fox " 
was again under way at 4.10 a m., headed up against the swift current, arriving at the mouth 
of the Scud river at 5.30 a.m., where a stop of some twenty minutes was made preparatory to 
entering a particularly swift part of the river. 

On the east side of the river at this point, almost covered by a sandbar, lies the wreck of 
the Hudson Bay Company's steamer " Beaver," one of the numerous vessels plying on the 
Stikine in the days of the Cassiar gold excitement. Here the gasolene-power boat, the 
" Nahlin," passed down the river on her way to Wrangell, having been able to ascend the river 
only as far as the mouth of the Clearwater, where she had been obliged to cache her cargo. 

.At noon the "Little Canyon" was reached, through which the " Black Fox " made her 
way in the short time of twenty-five minutes. The canyon is a cleft in the granite rocks, in 
places not over 50 feet wide, with perpendicular walls towering from 100 to 300 feet above 
the water-level, most of the way, a distance of three-quarters of a mile. 

Through this " sluiceway " the water rushes furiously, a deep stream and fortunately free 
from rocks or boulders. The current is so swift as to be quite unnavigable if it were not that 
a skilful pilot can take advantage of the various eddies and boils formed by the whirlpools 
that occur most of the way, rendering it extremely dangerous for canoes, as huge drift-logs 
are often sucked under in one place to come bobbing up again, on end, some distance below. 

When several steamers navigated the river it was found necessary to maintain a signalman 
and semaphore near the middle of the canyon, so that two boats should not be in the canyon 
at the same time, as there is no room to pass. 

The difficulties of ascending this canyon in a rowboat or canoe seemed unsurmountable, 
as the current is too swift for paddling, too deep for poling, while the perpendicular rock 
cliffs render tracking out of the question ; yet it is frequently accomplished at all seasons by 
using boat-hooks and holding on by the fissures in the cliffs, which requires great skill and 
strength. Above the canyon for some miles the water is smooth, and possibly a little less 
swift than the average for the river. 

The Kloochman canyon and Grand rapids were surmounted during the afternoon without 
much difficulty, thanks to the great power and seaworthy qualities of our little boat, the 
" Black Fox." 

At about 8 p.m., nearly sixteen hours after starting from Kalkins's cabin, of which time 
about fourteen hours were occupied in continuous travel, Kirk's ranch on the east side of the 
river was reached. The distance travelled that day was about fifty-seven miles, which would 
indicate an adverse current of about nine miles an hour. 

Kirk's ranch is about thirty-five miles below Telegraph Creek, and it was only a couple 
of miles below this point that any land suitable for agriculture was seen. The main river-valley 
had, until this point was reached, been flanked by strep rocky hills, leaving little bottom land ; 
such land as there was being gravel-deposits with little surface soil. 

Kirk has, however, a flat, estimated at 100 acres of very good silt soil, of which he has 
some 4 or 5 acres under cultivation, and grows, most successfully, potatoes, beets, turnips, and 
other root-crops, also cabbages, rhubarb, lettuce, etc., while hay, grain, and small fruits seem 
to do very well — the best evidence possible as to the suitability of the climate for agriculture. 

Here the mountains of the Coast range were left behind and the interior plateau entered. 



K 08 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

July 14th. By 5.15 the tent, which had to be put up the previous night, »a^ down and 
the dunnage aboard the "Black Fox," and a start made for the remaining run of thirtj 
miles to Telegraph Creek. 

All. .in |n ...I,,, the deserted town of Glenora was reached, where fifteen or twenty houses 
marked the spot which had been for a time about 1898 the head of navigation and 
administrative centre of the district, and from which point it had hern expected the Cassiar 
Central Railway would start for the Northern Interior. A few miles of partly completed 
railway grade marks the beginning of the work, which was, however, never continued. 

A short distance below tl Id town is an old Hudson Bay Company's Post and the 

Cassiar Central Railway Company's storehouses, all of which were abandoned when the 
railway was discontinued, and at present there is not a single ml abitant in the old town, the 
portion of the population remaining in the country having moved up to Telegraph Creek, some 

twelve miles farther upstream and at the present head of navigation. 

Just above Glenora there are a couple of troublesome rapids, shallow and swift, which 
necessitated the party walking around, a distance of about three miles. 

A wagon-road exists from Glenora to Telegraph Creek, a distance of twelve miles; this 

road does not follow the river, hut had to be constructed s e distance hack to avoid the 

gulches and cliffs along the river-front. 

Telegraph Creek \vi bed at 2. '■'<<* p.m. on the 11th. after a trip of 1 To miles from 

Wrangell, occupying a little over three day-.' expired time, or forty-eight hours absolute 
running-time — a very Creditable run for a boat of amateur home manufacture, and much 

fa ter than has been act plished by any other than the large stern-wheel steamers. The 

round trip consumed about 250 gallons of gasolene, from which item alone it may he calcul 

that the trip is expensive. The asual fare up the river on the regular steamer is $20 a head. 

Telegraph ( Ireek is a small tow n, although important in the district, consisting of a double 
row of lions, s and stores straggling along the river-front, built on a steep side hill which has 
to be terraced for both roads and houses. 

The resident white population will probably not exceed fifty persons, with about double 
as many civilized Indians and half-breeds, for the most part engaged, directly or indirectly. 

with the Indian trading of the Interior, carried on from this point by the Hudson Bay 

Company and EEyland & Belfry. Each of these firms has a store here, as well as a number of 

iding-posts on I >ease lake and down the l.iard river : there is also a small independent Store 

run by an e\ Hudson Bay officer. 

The town also contains two hotels, one run by each of the large trading firms with only 

one liquor licence a post office, telegraph otlire. church, and a cottage hospital, and is the 
seat of the Provincial Government Agent and Cold Commissioner. 

[n addition to Indian trading, the town is the suppbj point for the few placer-mining 
operations in existence at the lower end of Dease lake, and it is the supply and starting point 
for hunting parties in quest of big game, for which the Cassiai District is world famed. 

\ is the fate of all placer-gold mining camps, its glory soon fades, and in a short time 

its past history outshines its present performance. Such b the fate of the < assiar 

District. Early finds of placer gold caused a rush into the country in the early '70's, hut 
within a few years the richer placers seem t,, have 1 n'eii worked out, until to-day there are only 
one c pany anil some half dozen individuals, or partnerships, carrying on active operations. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 69 



The intervening period of forty years has so obscured the knowledge of these early 
discoveries that it seems desirable to reproduce from the early reports of this Department 
some of the authoritative statements then made. 

The Provincial Department of Mines was established under the " Minister of Mines Act, 
1874," and the first report issued was for that year. 

In July, 1874, the Gold Commissioner, Mr. Sullivan, reported from Laketon, where he 
was then already established, that " the present estimate of the mining population of this 
section is about 1,000 men" ; and on October 14th of that year, he writes as to the "proper 
estimate of the amount of gold taken out of the Cassiar mines this year, I think the general 
computation to be about 81,000,000 in value." From this it is evident the excitement was 
then well under way in 1874. 

As to the date and origin of the discovery of gold in this district, the following may be 
quoted from the 1875 Report : — 

" Fair prospects of gold had been from time to time discovered on the banks and bars 
of the Stikine river, and several parties had been formed for the purpose of visiting and 
endeavouring to establish that part of the Province as a goldfield. But no definite results 
followed the endeavours made in this direction from the seaboard ; it was reserved for an 
explorer entering British Columbia through the portals of the Rocky mountains to discover 
this important tract of country, and it is to the intrepidity and perseverance of Mr. Thibert 
that attention is now called. 

" Leaving Minnesota in June, 1869, with one companion and a small supply of necessaries, 
chiefly consisting of ammunition, Mr. Thibert started on a long and perilous journey, intending 
to pass two or three winters in trapping in the North-west Territory, and finally to penetrate 
through the Rocky mountains and British Columbia to the Pacific. They passed their first 
winter at Great Slave lake; during 1870 they resumed hunting and prospecting, and passed 
the winter about seventy-five miles up the Mackenzie river. 

"During 1871 they passed through the Rocky mountains and wintered on the Ure or 
Deloire river at an old Hudson Bay fort ; by this time their supplies had run very short, only 
a small supply of ammunition and tobacco remaining. In this dreary, solitary, and inhospit- 
able region, they suffered tremendous hardships, being entirely dependent on their guns for the 
means of living. 

" In the course of this year they met with another intrepid traveller, the well-known 
McCullough, who wintered with them. Up to this time they had heard or knew nothing 
about Dease river. By following the course of the Deloire river during 1872 they reached 
Dease Lake, where they parted with Mr. McCullough. The first gold struck by the party 
was in a place known as Devil's Portage, where the river crosses the Rocky mountains. On 
reaching Dease lake in 1872, they passed three weeks in fishing and hunting, and then proceeded 
down to the Stikine as far as Buck's Bar, McCullough proceeding to Victoria, while they 
wintered there ; being the fourth year they had wintered alone, far from the habitation of 
man. On the 14th of February, 1873, they started for Dease lake, prospecting the creeks that 
empty into it, and shortly struck rich prospects, as much as 2 oz. of rough gold a day, on 
Thibert's creek, at a depth of from 1 to 3 feet, working with a rocker; the gold was found on 
slate bed-rock, in what in mining parlance is known as ' black rock.' Here they remained 
and worked three claims during the season. In July some more men, thirteen in all, arrived. 

"Toward the fall some twenty men arrived, all wintering on Thibert's creek. 



K 70 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



" Having left on a prospecting tour, they discovered paying ground on Dease creek, and 

William Moore stalled work there at Mr. Thibert's instance. 

" Thibert's creek, as will be seen from the sketch map of Cassiar accompanying this Report, 
enters the lake close to the exit of 1 tease river. It is from twenty-five to thirty miles in length, 
and almost 50 feel wide, with occasional ilats covered with deciduous trees. 

••The must Important work has been done on Rath's Bar or flat, about 1 .', miles up the 
creek. 

"Tunnels have been started in the hillsides, and are being worked on the head of Thibert's 

creek, the results of which are not yet apparent. 

"During the years 1874-5, prospecting «as carried on in the vicinity of Dease creek in 
every direction, and up the Deloire river, resulting in the discovery of McDame's creek, Trout 
creek, Quartz creek, and Sayyea creek, all of which have keen more or less successfully worked. 

" During these years over 1,000 men have visited this locality ; and although the season 

is very short, the estimate of gold produced is a little short of two millions of dollars. 

"The area of the goldfield of Cassiar, thus far developed, comprises a tract of country of 

at least 300 miles square. 

" It is almost impossible to forego the conclusion that for the discovery of this most 
important gold region the Province is almost entirely indehted to the intrepidity and persever- 
ance of Mr. Thibert." 

The following tabic shows, in detail, the output of the district to date, as taken from the 

tal tula tod statistics contained in the reports of the Department, as being the an its estimated 

by the Gold Commissioner as recovered during each year. From these figures it appears that 
the district has produced some 84,S'J0,73O, or, in round figures, So.OOO.OOO of ■;< ,ld to date 

In looking through the old reports, it was noted that the tabulated statements used in 
compilation of these figures vary, in a number of cases — between the years IS 75 and 1S80 — from 
the output of that year as given by the Gold Commissioner in the body of his report, which 
latter figures were quoted by Dr. Dawson in the Canadian Geological Survey Report, 1887, 
p. 78b, which accounts for the difference in these two summaries. 

The total difference in amount — up to the year 1887 — shows the figures in the bodies of 
the reports to be $569,774 higher than in the tabulated statistics: which is the nearer correct 
cannot be determined, but both are only estimates. 



3 Geo. 5 



Cassur District. 



K 71 



The following table illustrates the sudden rise and the gradual decadence of the gold 
yield of Cassiar : — 

Output op Cassiar Placer-gold Fields From Early Reports. 



Year. 


Dease Creek. 


Thibert Creek. 


McDanie Creek. 


Miscellaneous. 


Total. 












j (1,000,000 


1874 . 










1875 

1876 


$350,000 
160,300 
81,300 
62,800 
56,000 
60,900 
37,500 
29,000 
14,000 
10,000 
12,350 
21,500 
18,430 
13,600 
11,200 


$150,000 

139,720 

173,700 

65,600 

71,000 

57,900 

28.100 

39,600 

29,000 

30,000 

12,600 

14,200 

10,000 

6,725 

10,800 


$300,000 

163,700 

92,130 

101,320 

113,200 

120,000 

100,000 

72,700 

65.000 

53,600 

19,000 

22,200 

23,775 

19,000 

28,410 


$ 31,920 

75,000 

165,000 

15,000 

33,300 

41,500 

11,000 

8,000 

6,650 

5,800 

3,000 

4,000 

4,500 


831,920 
463,720 


1877 . . 


347,130 


1878 ... 


304,720 


1879 . . . 


343,200 


1880 

1881 


253,800 
198,900 


1882 


182,800 


1883 


119,000 


1884 .. . 


101,600 


1885 


50,600 


1886 

1887 


63,700 
55,205 


1888 


43,325 


1889 


54,910 






1891 . 


20,000 
8,000 
5,900 
8,000 
8,050 


20,000 
5,900 
3,809 
3,700 
3,700 






40,000 


1892 


8,500 
8,776 
8,750 
9,650 


6,550 
4,450 
2,250 
1,175 


28,950 


1893 . . . 


22,935 


1894 . . . 


22,700 


1895 


22,575 




21,000 












37,060 












32,300 












19,380 












15,000 


1901 . 










22,800 












16,000 


1903 . 










35,000 












1 1 ,500 


1905 .. 










25,000 


1906 . 










44,000 


1907 . 










25,000 












9,000 


1909 










9,000 


1910 










8,000 


1911 . 










6,000 












9,000 
















$4,896,730 



*No returns were received for this year 

Of late years the output has been made chiefly by the hydraulic companies working on 
Thibert creek, with a few individuals on Thibert and Dease creeks, very little work having 
been done of late in the McDame Creek section of the district. Even the Chinese, who had 
maintained a small production, have left, the last — some very old men — having been brought 
out this year by their countrymen on the Coast. 

Arriving at Telegraph Creek on Sunday, July 14th, the 15th was spent in the purchase 
and packing of supplies and the arranging of camp outfit, preparatory to starting for the 
Dease Lake district. 

July 16th was spent in Telegraph Creek waiting for the pack-train which had been 
delayed a day on the trail by wet weather. 

July 17th the party left Telegraph Creek at 11 a.m. with nine horses and an Indian 
packer, camping that night at the bridge across the Tahltan river, near its junction with the 
Stikine and a mile above the Indian village of Tahltan, which is the headquarters for most of 
the Indians in the district. 



K 72 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Prom Telegraph Creek, at an altitude of 540 feet, the trail rises by a series of switchbacks 
to a bench some 300 feet higher, composed of glacial gravel, flanked to the north-wesl by 
hills of volcanic rocks— basalts, lava, etc. — which formation is in evidence as far as the Tuva 

river, forming the Great Canyon of tlieStikine fiver, which renders the river quite unna\ igable 

and forces the trail on to the hillsides, among precipitous cliffs, at an elevation of about l.oon 
feet. 

In this volcanic formation there is no area that could be used for agriculture, save a few 

depressions and isolated patches near the river where some soil has been deposited ; oo timber 
of commercial value was seen along the line of the trail. 

The basalt cliffs forming the sides of the canyon are — at the mouth of the Tahltan from 
200 to 300 feet high — perpendicular inmost places and evidencing successive flows of lava, 
apparently coming from an easterly direction, frequently overlying beds of gravel, apparently 
of [ire-glacial age, in the channels of old rivers. Photographs of these basalt flows accompany 
this report, and reproductions have been made from l>r. <:. M. 1 'arson's sketches of them, as 

given in the Geological Survey Report, 1SS7 S, p. 71b. 

The following are Dr. Dawson's geological nods along the trail from Telegraph Creek to 
Dease lake, from the same report : — 

"Respecting the older rocks which characterize the greater part of the country between 

Telegraph Creek and Dease lake, few details were noted, and no approach to a general section 
was obtained, as they arc not usually exposed except along the bases of the mountains, which 
are, as a rule, at some distance from the route of travel. They may be described as consisting 

of grey and greenish-grey quartzites and grauwackes, with a large proportion of altered 
volcanic materials, generally feldspathic, hut passing into diabases and becoming in some cases 
more or less schistose. Hocks originally of volcanic origin notably preponderate in the \ icinitv 
of Telegraph Creek, while near Dease lake they are less abundant, and at about two miles 
from the lake, on the trail, massive grey fine-grained limestone occurs, in exposures which are 
nearly continuous for about a mile. None of'the mountains in sight on either side of the 
valley are distinctly granitic, and rocks of this character were observed only in one locality, 
when- they occupy a relatively small area. 

" At about two miles along the trail to the south-west of the Tahltan. a dark, blackish green, 
highly crystalline hornblende rock occurs in considerable mass, and is much broken and shattered 

by a grey porphyritic and hornblendic granite, which appears to be of later date, and which 

may have a width of about two miles on the trail. In the bed of the Tooya river, rocks 
differing in appearance from any seen elsewhere on this trail were found. They are reddish 

and purplish in colour, fine-grained, and in some beds slightly porphyritic, and appear to be 

chiefly feldspathic in < iposition. One of these is identical with a rock met within the 

lower pari of the bedded series, a short distance above 'Grand Rapid,' on the Stikine. No 

fossils were found in the limestones above alluded to, and the rocks, as a whole, ean at pi ■ 

only be classed as Paleozoic, though showing many points in common with those of the Cache 
Creek group of southern British Columbia, which is believed to be, in great part at lea 
( larboniferous age 

"The pre-glacial age of the basaltic rocks is shown, as already noted, by their relation to 

the terraces of the valley, and also by the occurrence upon them of large granitic boulders, the 

transport of which musl be attributed to glacial action. This is seen particularly in some 
places between Telegraph Creek and the Tahltan. The basaltic rocks, at the period of their 

eruption, have tilled the old river-valley, and may very probably have at one time dom 

continuously from below Glenora to the Tooya. or perhaps considerably farther. There is no 




.In ii cti on of Stikine :■ ml Tali I tan Rivers. 




Swimming Pack-train acrou Stikine at Telegraph Creel 



3 Geo. 5 



Cassiar District. 



K 73 



reason to suppose that the basalts were erupted from a single volcanic centre, and indeed the 
existence of basaltic dykes cutting the older rocks at Telegraph Creek would appear to lead to an 
opposite conclusion. Subsequent to the period of basaltic eruption, the river, still flowing in 
the same great valley, has cut down through the basalts in several places, exposing sections of 
the gravel-deposits of the ancient river. The new channel thus formed is not, however, 




i7n?ir.';'i 'i:, l ,iiiiv i)ii'!itij 1 i^ii | '.';;ii'i- l 




FIOi 3, — SECTION SHOWING OLD RIVER-CHANNEL CAPPED BY BASALTS. EAST BANK 
8TIKINE RIVER BELOW TAHL-TAN. 






.M* 



//> 



Si ^ 



!f/mtLi. 



A 







FIG. 4. — SECTI0.N" snOWIN'G OLD RIVEK-CIIANNEL FILLED WITH BASALT. MOUTH 

OF TAHL-TAN. 




I' 



g?M'l hV|i.f ir. 

'I'll 'ii#. ; ;^L l i, III 
MT(V'>S. : '.'rfr |i "" 1 i, 



I 1 n ii'ilH 



JJiiiiiiii! 




FIG. 5. — SECTION SHOWING RELATIONS OF BASALTS AND GRAVELS. STIK1NE RIVER, 
EAST BANK, ABOVE TAHL-TAN. 



a. Old basal rocks. 

b. Old gravels. 

c. Superposed basalt flows. 

d. Basaltic filling of a later gorge. 



K 74 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



coincident with the old, but cuts across it at several points, and above Telegraph Creek the 
excavation of the new bed has been carried to a depth estimated at from |u to 70 feet below 
the earlier one. 

"A few miles below (ilenora. where the basalt filling of the old v ; s 1 1 • ■ \- has been CUl 

across, it seems, however, that the old river-bed is beluw the present water-level, indicating, ill 
connection with the previous observation, that the grade of the original river was greater than 
that of the present. 

" Direct lv opposite the mouth of the Tahltan river, On the left bank of the Stikine, a good 
section of the old river bed i i *- posed, in the truncated end of a point which forms a spin- of 
the plateau to the south, the basalts filling it like a threat Lngoi and resting, at the bottom, 

on the old gravels, at the sides, directly on the rocky banks of the old channel. 

" The angle between the Tahltan and the Stikine, on the upper side, has already been 
referred to in connection n ith the peculiarly disturbed character of the basalt layer bv « Inch 
it is capped. Beneath the basalt at this place is a great thickness (apparently not much less 
than 100 feet) of well-rounded gravel and boulders. It is probable that this deposit does not 

reach to the water-level, but its disintegrated material has formed a slope which conceals any 
basis of old rocks which may be beneath it. The eruption of basalt has, moreover, not been 
confined to a single period, hut must have occurred at several different times separated by 

rather wide intervals. The occurrence in some places of three or more superposed Mows shows 
this to have been the case, but a still more striking proof .if the same fact is found in a section 
observed from a distance, on the left bank of the Stikine above tin Tahltan. At this place a 

thick and apparently extensive deposit of gravels has been covered bv three superposed basaltic 

Mows. Through these, a narrow vertical sided canyon has been cut bv some tributary stream, 
which has even excavated a portion of the gravels beneath the lowest basalt. A fourth 
basaltic flow hits then occurred, which has completely tilled the canyon and partly overflowed 

on the surface of the highest of the three earlier basaltic layers. 

"Though the basalts of Tertiary age actually seen by me an- confined to the Stikine 

valley, it is highly probable that further explorations will prove their iurrence in other 

valleys, and possibly also the existence of similar rocks, in the form of plateaux of some si/e. 
in the region east of the Coast ranges. 

" The basaltic formation of tin- part of the Stikine lias been described in some detail, 
on account of the importance which it possesses in respect to the distribution of gold. The 
gold along the Stikine was said by the miners to be 'spotted,' or irregular, in its occurrence, 
but the greater part of the 'heavy' gold was found just along that portion of the stream now 
characterized bv tin' basalts, and it appears even possible to trace a connection between the 
richer bars which have been worked and those places in which the present river has cut 
through or followed the old basalt -protected channel. This bein^' the case, it seems very 
desirable that the old channel should be fully prospected, which 1 cannot learn has ever 
been attempted. If gold should be found in it in paying quantity, it might easily be worked, 

and would give rise to a considerable renewal of activity in mining. It is not known to what 
extent similar conditions may occur up the Tahltan valley, where also remunerative l>ars were 

worked some years ago." 

At the mouth of the Tahltan quite a number of Indians were found drying salmon; these 
fish apparently come up the Stikine in large numbers; the greater part of the run is reported 

to go up the Scud tributary, but a large number get up to the mouth of the Tahltan. and 
farther up the Stikine, as far as the mouth <<i the Tuva ; further progress is. however, blocked 
by falls, etc., in these rivers. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 75 

July 18th, From the Tahltan bridge the trail mounts rapidly to the top of a basalt 
bench, 400 feet high, between the Tahltan and the Stikine rivers, along which it was followei 1 
for a couple of miles over the bare basalt blocks, dropping again to the level of the river at 
Ward's, a ranch on a piece of interval land on the bank of the Stikine. 

At Ward's a considerable acreage was under cultivation, very successfully, good crops of 
hay, oats, and the ordinary vegetables being seen ; irrigation is, however, required, the water 
being obtained from a small creek. 

From Ward's the trail climbs to a plateau, about 1,000 feet higher, along which it runs 
for about five miles, on very even ground well suited for agriculture, only to drop 1,000 feet 
again, by a steep zigzag trail, into the valley of the Tuya river, which was crossed on a 
bridge — now very much in need of renewal — when another climb of 1,000 feet had to be made 
by another zigzag trail cut out of a clay hillside — quite safe in dry weather, but impossible for 
horses in wet weather. 

About three miles after crossing the Tuya, Wilson's ranch was reached, a piece of wild 
hay meadow, from which a crop of hay is obtained without any assistance to nature. 

At Wilson's the main trail was left, an Indian branch trail, or switch trail, being followed 
to a small lake to the south, where feed for the horses was found, no feed being obtainable on 
this part of the main trail. 

The distance travelled this day was only ten miles, but the effort caused by the Ward and 
Tuya hills, combined with exceptionally hot weather, constituted a full day's work for horses 
and men, while the clouds of mosquitoes at the camping-place did not make for rest or sleep. 

Coal has been found in thick seams on the Tuya river about 25 miles up from its mouth, 
according to the report of R. D. Featherstonhaugh (published in the Report of this Depart- 
ment for 1904, p.p. 97, 98), from which it appears that the coal is a lignite, but, from the 
analyses of samples submitted to this Department, it is a lignite of exceedingly good quality, 
and may eventually be found of commercial importance to the district. 

July 19th proved to be a fine morning and an early start was attempted, to be frustrated 
by a couple of the pack-horses which had strayed from the bunch. The pack-train was, 
however, in motion by 7.30, and at 1.30 Caribou camp was reached, after travelling for 
seventeen miles along a plateau, at an elevation of 2,000 feet, on a trail good enough for a 
wagon-road, but the day was so hot that man and beast nearly collapsed. 

July 20th. In anticipation of another hot day, the camp was broken up by 4 a.m., and 
the pack-train on the way by 6.20, arriving at Beaver camp, on the Tanzilla river, some twenty 
miles from Dease lake, at 12.15, after travelling seventeen miles over a very good and 
comparatively even trail, which, at a very small cost, could be made into a wagon-road. 

The extremely hot weather of the previous day proved to be the precursor of a heavy 
thunderstorm which broke at 9 a.m. and lasted for an hour, rendering travel much more pleasant. 

July 21st. — Camp was moved from Beaver camp to eight miles from Dease lake, a 
distance of twelve miles. 

July 22nd. The writer's pack-train arrived at Dease lake about 11 a.m., where Mr. 
Smith, Hyland <fe Belfry's agent at Porter's Landing, was found awaiting the party with a 
30-foot scow manned by an Indian and a Chinaman ; but, as the pack-train with cargo for the 
lower posts had not arrived, the scow could not start. It took until 4 p.m. to get this freight 
on board, and during this time a headwind had sprung up, so that three hours' hard rowing 
only propelled the scow down the lake about three miles, when camp had to be made on the 
east shore of the lake. The pack-train was left at the head of the lake in charge of the cook, 
John McDonald, and the Indian packer, Lewdecker. 



K 76 Report of the Minister of Mines. I!»i:» 



The length of the trail was estimated, as stated, at about seventy-seven miles. A party 
ut' surveyors under I'". Casey was at work mi tin- trail, surveying its length fur the Provincial 
Government I'm' the purpose of laying out a wagon-road, or rather, of so altering the trail 
Location (hat it might eventually be converted into a wagon-road. By this actual survey the 

amended road would he 75.2 miles in length, and quite feasible to build at a reasonable cost. 

The necessity of this road is urged to open up the district and to admit of supplies for the 

existing mining operations and for prospecting of really promising localities, being 1 ight in 

at rates which would not be nearly as prohibitive as at present. 

It is of interest to read the late Dr. G. M. Dawson's description of the route of tin- 
proposed wagon-road, as given by him in the 1887 Report of the Geological Survey, as the 
conditions and requirements do not seem to have changed in the intervening twenty five years. 
The following is Dr. Dawson's description : — 

" 1 >oase lake is the central point of theCassiar District, and though, as shown by statistics 
subsequently quoted, the yield of gold has greatly fallen oft' since the palmy days of its first 

discovery, it is very probable that further placer mines of value may vet be found in this 
region (of which a great part still remains to be carefully prospected), and there is every reason 
to believe thai quartz-mining and other industries will before long he developed on a consider 
able scale. Even at the present moment this district is more easily accessible than thai of 
Cariboo, and when a wagon-road shall have been built from the head of navigation on the 

Stikine to Dease lake, it should be easy to lay down g Is at tin: latter point at very 

reasonable rates. 

"The construction of a wagon-road, with moderately favourable grades, between Telegraph 
Creek and Dease lake would not be very difficult or expensive. The first ascent from Telegraph 
('reek is steep, hut might easily be overcome. Between eight and ten mile- from Telegraph 
('reek, or for a distance of about two miles, the road would have to follow a rough hillside, 

above the canyon, where some blasting and grading would be required. The descent to the 
Tahltan would entail some heavy side hill cutting iii rock and earth and a bridge would be 

necessary. The ascent and crossing of the 'lava bed' would entail about a mile of rough work 
on the opposite side of the Tahltan, and should the line of the present trail he followed, a loiej 
and steep ascent, with grading in gravel and clay, would be required at Ward's, and again in 

descending to and ascending from the Tooya valley, hut no rock work would be necessary. It 

Seems quite probable, however, that a better route might be found for a load, at a lower level, 
from Ward's to the mouth of the Tooya, m following along the side of the main valley. In 

either case a good bridge would be required at the Tooya. Beyond this, all the way to Dease 

lake, no further serious obstacle is met with. Portions of the route are clayey and swampy, 
and to render t hese easily passal ile, from eight to ten miles , ,f corduroy in all would be required, 
for which suitable material could be obtained near by in all cases. 

" Should the construction of a railway be contemplated, the difficulties to be surmounted 

would he greater in proportion, particularly between Telegraph Creek and the Tahltan, where 

the line would have to follow the side i it' the canyon, which is wry rough and rocky. Beyond 

this point, so far as the valley could he seen from the trail, it presents no very serious impedi 
inetits. Below Telegraph Creek, to Glenora, or a little farther, a railway would involve some 

moderately Ilea \ \ side hill work ; but farther down the Stikine, to the sea. it might follow the 
river flats at a nearly uniform Level. The greatest difficulty to be apprehended on this part of 
the hue would he that likely to arise in winter ti . mi the very heavy snowfall on that pari of 

the river below the Lit! le < lanyon. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 77 



"It may be pointed out in this connection that the survey of the Stikine and of the valley- 
leading by the Tanzilla to Dease lake shows that the route is an exceedingly direct one to 
Dease lake, and that, taken in conjunction with the valleys of the Dease and Liard livers, it 
affords almost an air-line from the Pacific coast to the great Mackenzie river. 

" The present rates for goods from Wrangell to Dease lake are about as follows : Wrangell 
to Telegraph Creek by steamer, 2^ cents per pound ; thence to Dease lake by pack animals, 
6 cents ; thence by lake to Laketon, f to 1 cent.: total, about 9 -J cents per pound, or $195 per 
ton. The result of such high prices is to discourage prospecting in the district and seriously 
to retard its further development." 

The time at present occupied by a pack-train from Telegraph Creek to Dease lake is ten 
days for the round trip — six days going in loaded and four days returning light ; the packing 
season is from June to October. 

July 23rd. It was hoped, by making an early start, to get the scow down the lake 
before the wind of the daytime should sgring up, so camp was broken and the party under way 
by 6 a.m., but after two hours' hard work, of both crew and passengers, only about two miles 
was made, and it became necessary to wait behind a sheltering point of land until the wind 
subsided. At 8 p.m. the headwind having slackened, a start was again made, and at 2 a.m., 
after six hours' steady rowing, the old townsite of Laketon was reached, and the party camped 
in an old warehouse, a relic of the palmy days long past. 

July 24th. The morning was spent at Laketon, leaving in the afternoon for Porter's 
Landing, at the lower end of the lake, which was reached about 5 p.m. At 7 p.m. the writer and 
his assistant started to walk the eight miles to the camp of the Boulder Creek Mining Company, 
on Thibert creek, where the manager, Warburton Pike, hospitably provided for the party. 

The Boulder Creek Mining Company is the natural successor of the 
Boulder Creek Thibert Creek Mining Company, and later of the Berry Creek Mining 
Mining Company. Company, having succeeded to the leases and water rights of these companies. 
The active operations of the Thibert Creek Mining Company were begun in 
1900, under the charge of Alexander Hamfield, practically the whole of that season being 
spent in getting the hydraulic plant on the ground and making ready to start the next season. 
In 1901 two pits were opened on the high, or old river, channel of Thibert creek, at the 
mouth of Berry creek. This old channel is traceable for some miles above, and also below, 
Berry creek, on the. right bank of Thibert, at a height of from 50 to 100 feet above the present 
river-channel. 

The equipment and history of the operation of this plant are given in the Reports of this 
Department for 1901, 1902, and 1903. By 1904 it had become apparent that, under the 
conditions of working, although a fair amount of gold was recovered — somewhere about 
$80,000 — the plant could not be run at a profit with the amount of water available, about 
450 miners' inches, consequently, in the early part of 1904, Mr. Hamfield, originally the 
manager and later the lessor of the Thibert Creek Company's properties, with certain associates, 
formed a new company, the Berry Creek Mining Company, to take over the Thibert Creek 
Company's leases and rights. 

Under this reorganization, it was arranged to increase the water-supply to 1,000 miners' 
inches, which was done, the water being eventually gathered from upper Dease and French 
creeks and turned into Berry creek to augment the supply from that creek. 

The operations of this Company were continued during the years 1901, 1905, 1906, and 
1907, during which time the ground was found to run from 10 to 20 cents a cubic yard, and 
good profits from the operations seemed certain each year, only to be wiped out by mud slides, 
which repeatedly buried the hydraulic pit. 



K 78 Report of the Minister of Minks. 1913 



This old pit has now been abandoned ow ing to these slides. It was opened up for a length 
of about 1,100 net along Thibert creek, with a width in places of 250 feet, the dirt face being, 
at the highest point, about 200 feet above the pit, from the top of which the hill continued to 
rise for man} hundreds of feet higher, at a slope of about l'o degrees, being chiefly composed 
.it' clay, with no solid rim-rock in sight ; it was really the repeated sliding of this hillside 
into the pit that necessitated its final abandonment. The bed-rock is a shale or slate on edge, 
cut by a number of soft white dykes. The deposit next to the bed-rock is a coarse gravel, 

e posed of granite, greenstone, jasper, porphyry, and a dark-blue rock, with very tew large 

boulders. 

The gold is fairly coarse and Hat and is valued at about S16 an ounce. The dump vva- 
into Thibert creek, about 30 feet lower than the bed rock of the hydraulic pit. 

The water-supply is from Berry creek augmented as previously described and is brought 

in from a ] ling reservoir, formed by a small dam on the creek, by one and a half mill 

flume to the pressure-box of the old pit. 

Thepresent holder of the property is the Boulder Creek Mining Company, an Rnglish 
c pany, which has leased the property for four years with an option of purchase. 

This c pany has taken over the whole of the ten leases ami plant, and was engaged 

during the summer of 1912 in opening up a new pit, 1,000 feet below the mouth of Boulder 
Creek and about one and a half miles below the old pit, on the same side of the river, to which 
point the flume has been extended. The water was turned through it by tin- middle of June. 

Work was immediately begun on opening tip a pit on the same old, or high, channel 

previously worked, and where in the early days of the camp successful surface operations had 
been carried on. 

This pit is about 75 feet above Thibert creek, with fragments of "hat appears to he rim 
rock bet ween it and the creek, while to the inner side there i- also outcropping a ridjje of what 
appears to be the other rim-rock, and which, if such proves to be the ease, should effectively 
guard this new pit from such troubles as were encountered in the old pit. 

The. s up work was being carried on with one o inch monitor under a hydraulic 

head of 300 feet. By the end of July the work had only hesjun to yet into proper shape, and 
it is doubtful if it will have advanced far enough to permit of any satisfactory '-clean up" this 
year. 

A mining engineer, who was on the ground for an English company during the opening 

up of the pit, is reported by the manager to have taken a sectional sample down the fa 

the bank, amounting to 100 cubic yards of gravel, which was subsequently hand-sluiced and 
yielded $68 in gold, equivalent to 68 cents a cubic yard. While it is not expected that the 
whole deposit will be up to this sample, the result was certainly very encouraging. 

As has been mentioned in the former reports, crude platinum is found associated with 
the gold in this deposit, and as soon a- matters can be adjusted an arrangement will be 
ilished for tin- commercial separation of platinum as a by-product. 

From the results obtained in former years in the 'working of this same high channel at 
the old pit, it would seem that the new pit. offering as it does, so many features tending to 
cheaper and safer working, has every prospect of turning out a commercial success. 

As has already been noticed, the high channel of the creek is traceable 
Other Companies for some distance above ami below the holdings of the Boulder Creek 
on Thibert Creek. Company. This channel at some distance above Berry creek, appear- to 

cut into the hill, coming out on Berry creek just above it- junction with 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 79 



Thibert creek ; where the channel leaves Thibert creek it has recently been prospected by 
several drifts, in which results are reported to have been obtained, which justify more extended 
operations. During the 1912 season no work was done here. 

On Little Deloire creek, a tributary of Thibert, entering it from the south, about two and 
a half miles up from Dease lake, the Mitchell Bros, have been at work for some years, and 
have made at least a partially successful season. 

They formerly had sunk a shaft 28 feet in the rim-rock and then drifted out into the 
channel, where they report to have found good gold values ; they had difficulty, however, in 
holding the roof and were eventually flooded out. 

In 1912 they were engaged in "booming" the old bed of the creek by accumulating the 
water in a reservoir, from which, by a most ingenious device, it was automatically discharged 
in a rush whenever the reservoir became full. About 1,700 feet of the creek had been sluiced, 
but it was not learned how much gold had been cleaned up. 

It was reported that a miner named Bush had been at work a mile higher up the creek, 
and another named Dickson two miles up, at the end of the canyon, and that they had both 
struck coarse gold. Neither of these men were, however, at work when the creek was visited 

The output of gold formerly made from Dease, and other creeks, has already been given 
in tabular form and from this it will be seen that the mining operations in the early 
days were both extensive and profitable. 

According to the old records, the bed of Thibert creek paid, before it was worked out, 
for a distance of about 6 miles from its mouth, yielding, when at its best, from s?<S to 850 a 
day to the hand. 

McDame Cheek District. 

At the present time it could not be learned that any one is mining in the McDame Creek 
section, even the Chinese having left. 

The operations of the Bosella Mining Company on Rosella creek came to a halt upon the 
sudden death some years ago of J. H. Haskins, the then manager and moving spirit in the 
company, since when nothing has been done with the hydraulic plant which has been brought 
on to the ground but never erected. 

July 28th was spent at Porter's Landing, to which a return had been made the previous 
evening, no boat being available that day to go up the lake. 

Porter's Lmding now consists of a Hudson Bay Company's store and one run by Hyland 
it Belfry, each in charge of a white man, who, with the addition of a few Indians and half- 
breeds, constitute the resident population of the once rather lively town. Its present 
importance is chiefly as the supply-point for the Hydraulic Company on Thibert creek, and the 
starting-point and headquarters for the scows and crews of Indians engaged in summer in 
transporting supplies for the two trading companies to their posts on the Liard river. 

July 29th. The writer and a number of others left Porter's Landing at 10 a.m. on 
Sunday for the upper end of the lake in Hyland & Belfry's scow. A couple of hours were 
spent in Laketon, and the upper end of the lake was eventually reached at 9 a.m. July 30th. 

The old town of Laketon is now deserted, its sole resident population consisting of an 
Indian packer and his family, with one white prospector, who uses one of the old Government 
buildings as his headquarters, and a couple of miners who have cabins a short distance up 
Dease creek. 



K 80 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Dease Cheek. 

According to l>r. G. M. Dawson, who visited the creek in 1887, the lied of Dease creek 
was then nearly worked out, having been gone over several times; it paid well, from .-'s i...-'..n 
a dav to the hand, for a distance of six miles up from the flats, with a few good isolated 
claims higher up. 

In 1912 there were two men working on the creek : I'yan was working a claim on the 
north side of the creek immediately above the canyon at the head of the tlats and about half a 
mile from the lake, where he was r unnin g a tunnel from the creek level into what appears to 
be a slide from the hillside at a point where the ..Id, or high, channel cuts into the hill, coming 
out on the flats lying to the north of the present creek. 

The tunnel-workings exhibit quite a number of large rounded boulders, with some gravel 
wash, hut there is also a large percentage of angular rock fragments, not water-worn and clay. 

A sample of the iron-sulphides obtained liv Ryan in his sluice boxes was taken for assay, 
and was found to contain t.8 oz. of gold — about $96 to the ton. The sample was 
afterwards tested for platinum, but none could be detected, although this metal is known to 
exist in the next creek — Thibert creek. 

Ryan was making wages, although probably not very much more; the gold was fairly 
coarse and flat. 

A miner named Johnson was said to be working in a small way some six miles up 
the creek, but as it was reported that he was not having any great success, lii claim were not 
visited. 

On tlie flats about a quarter of a mile from the lake and immediately below the gorge by 
which the creek enters the flats. Messrs. llvland and Fowler have a lease on which they have 

sunk a shaft down to a depth of :_".i feet, without reaching bed rock. The property was worked 

in L91 1, and an attempt was made to handle the water with an old steam plant, but without 
success, and they were forced to abandon this shaft, and are preparing to sink another whin 
it is expected that the flow of water will not be so gnat. 

Tt is reported that gold in fair quantity was found at IS feet down, but no work was 
done on that streak other than the sinking of the shaft through it. The wash from this shaft 
also contained much slide-matter a ng the gravel and a few large bould 

It seemed to the Writer as if the old high channel, which had been found on side or 

other of the creek coming (low u the valley, had. at the i-uivmi referred to, cut into the hillside 
to tlie north of the present creek and continued towards the lake through the low bench land 
King to the north of the flats, and that it is quite possible that these benches mav still be 

found to be worth prospecting. 

The present stream had cut through the rim lock to the smith, forming the canyon and 
emptying over the flats into the lake, which probably then stood at a much higher level than 
at present. 

July 30th. The seen with the party aboard arrived at the head of the lake about '.' a.m.: 
the pack train had to ]„■ gathered together, •■mil the return by trail to Telegraph Creek started 

at 2.30 p.m., fifteen miles being travelled before camp was made. Telegraph Creek was reached 
on August 2nd. 

August 3rd to 5th was spent at Telegraph Creek waiting till the llvland pack-train 
returned with the additional horses and men required for the long jonrnev to the GrOUD.db.Og 

coalfield. 




l:.-i ki-ioii — on Deasc Lake — I. i aril >1 ining Division. 




Uy nn's — Placer Drlft-mln< — Deawe Creek, nea p Laketon. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 81 



Quartz-mining. 

With the exception of the claims already mentioned which are being prospected on the 
Iskut river, there is no " quartz-mining " being done in the district ; in fact, with the present 
lack of transportation facilities there is no incentive to prospect for lode mines. 

In the days of the Cassiar Central Railway's explorations, about 1897, a number of 
mineral claims were located near the Dea.se river, but these were never developed. Various 
parties have brought in samples of copper-ore and argentiferous galena of such character as 
to give hope that prospecting would develop these minerals in such quantities as might justify 
mining when railway facilities are provided, but so far no definite information is available. 

TRIP FROM TELEGRAPH CREEK TO GROUNDHOG. 

It was found that it would be impracticable to take horses from Telegraph Creek through 
the Groundhog to Hazelton and ensure their return to the former place before winter set in, 
the round trip being some 600 miles, with high summits to pass. So it was arranged that the 
Telegraph Creek pack-train should take the writer and party as far as Groundhog mountain, 
returning light to Telegraph Creek. After looking over the coalfield the Provincial Mineralogist 
would be taken out to Hazelton by a Hazelton pack-train that was bringing in supplies to the 
coalfield and returning light to Hazelton. 

August 6th. The party left Telegraph Creek on the afternoon of August 6th, the horses 
having been swum across the Stikine river in the morning, there being no bridge or ferry, 
one of which is sadly needed, as the river is very dangerous in high water ; all supplies and 
pack-train equipment had to be taken across in canoes. 

The trail leaves the Stikine valley a short distance below Telegraph Creek, mounting 
rapidly to an elevation of about 2,750 feet, and soon descending into the valley of the 
Mestua (or 1st South fork), which is here a deep canyon. 

Camp was made at the first available feed for horses, about seven miles from the Stikine. 
The hills and benches passed over from the Stikine valley are composed of volcanic ash-beds 
and basalts, the valleys being covered with their residual matter, chiefly sand, not suited to 
agriculture. The hills are sparsely covered with grass, which affords summer feed for horses. 

August 7th. The pack-train was in motion from 7.30 until 2 p.m., during which time 
si 'me fifteen miles were travelled in an easterly direction, and camp finally made at the upper end 
of Bulkley lake, or Destline lake, which empties into the 2nd South fork (or Klastline river) 
of the Stikine river. Bulkley lake is about three and one-half miles long by about a mile 
wide, unimportant in itself, but, at both ends, particularly at the easterly end or outlet, 
there are great areas of fine wild hay meadows ; to this point the Telegraph Creek pack-trains 
are annually driven after the packing season, to be turned out to feed until about January 1st, 
after which they are taken to the home ranch to be fed on cut hay for the remainder of the 
winter. The plateau in which the lake is situated is at an elevation of about 2,900 feet, and 
contains quite a number of square miles suitable for raising hay and possibly oats. The soil 
is a very fair sandy loam, but the elevation is against its settlement for general farming. To 
the south-east of the line of travel this day there lies a range of hills of volcanic origin, several 

showing distinctly that they are c posed of successive volcanic flows. These hills are locally 

called the "Craters," and they are credited with being the point of origin of the basalt and 
lava Bows which have filled up the valleys of the Stikine and its tributaries near that point, 
a suppositi.ii i which certainly seems quite probable. 
G 



K 82 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Augusl -ili. The trail followed was along the northern side of Bulkley !;ik» (or Destline 
lake, as it is called by the Indians) to its outlet. From this point the Government trail 
follows down the left bank of Destline creek to the 2nd South fork, or Klastlim here 

the Governmenl has built a bridge), then up the right bank of the latter. 

This Government trail from the lake is little used either by the Indians or whites, except 
when the river is in such high water as to render it utnfordable some miles higher up at 
the ford. 

The writer's party crossed Destline creek a mile or so below the lake, circling the 
meadows at the outlet, and bearing off to the south-easl to strike the Klastline some ten or 
twelve miles above the bridge. This trail leads along a number of swamps and meadows until. 
as it nears the river, it rises on to the " Lava Beds," a hue plateau some miles wide covered 
with sheets and hlocks of lava ami devoid of vegetation except tor a tew small trees growing 
in the cracks of the lava. 

After crossing tl Lava Beds"the trail plunges quickly down into the valley of the 

Klastline at an elevation of 2,300 feet, following it up for a distance of two miles to the ford. 
a crossing in use since early days. 

Here a canoe is kept for the convenience of travellers in more than ordinarily high water ; 

the canoe belongs to an old Indian woman in Tahltan, and it is cust ary with all travellers 

who use it to pay to the Indian Agent at Telegraph Creek, for her. a certain sum of money. 
from -1 i" -•', for the us,- of the canoe, and it is creditable to the men travelling in the 
country to say that this payment is seldom evaded, and to the Indians that they keep the 
canoe in repair, a form of practical charity thai might, with profit, be emulated by more 
ci\ ilized districts. 

A siu'n on a blazed tree at this camp, marked " R.N.W.M.P.," stated that the "distance 
from Edmonton 1,350 miles" by the route taken by the Mounted Police. 

August 9th. It had rained incessantly all night and continued so hard in the i ning 

that camp would not ordinarily have been moved, but the river began to rise raj. idly, and it 
was seen that if the river was to he forded it would have to he crossed at once, so the horses 
were rounded up and a start made at 1 p.m. and the crossing safely made. 

A prospector named Watson, travelling in the same direction, packing his supplies on 
two dogs, was picked up here and helped across the river. 

The north side of the ri\ er was followed up for some nine miles, when camp was made in 

a "brule°' that afforded some slight teed for the horses. After fording the river the Government 
trail was again picked up and followed. It was very had. badly located and badly made 
indicating little effort or time to make even a passable pretense at trail-building. In extenua- 
tion, however, it must lie said that the length of trails expected to he looked after by the 

trail-gang is absurdly great for the force employed, and so remote from headquarters that the 
time is taken up in simply clearing out trails, without any attempt at improvement. 

August 10th was spent in camp. Tt rained without ceasing all day. so hard that a 
had to he rigged over the cooking-fire to prevent its being quenched. 

August llth. The rain of the day before continued, but feed for 1 el to 

he had. Camp was broken in the rain at noon and a march of nine miles made up to the si 

of the Klastline and to tin' divide, at an elevation of 'J, '.mil feet, between the waters of this 

stream and a fork of the Iskut which heads here. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 8.3 

The Klastline heads in a couple of small lakes in a deep canyon, the sides of which are of 
basalt, as is the whole country in this vicinity. 

Around the headwaters of the Iskut there is considerable land suitable for summer 
grazing, but at an elevation of 2,900 feet. 

Camp was made on the rocky edge of a beaver meadow, the first possible food obtainable 
for the horses. 

August 12th. An early start was frustrated by "lost horses " and the pack-train was 
only in motion by 9.30. The trail led over a plateau at an elevation of about 2,900 feet, 
grass-covered for the most part, bordered by small timber and composed of gravel-wash, formed 
in rounded hillocks, and pot-holes, indicating glacial action and quite obscuring any rock in 
place. 

About noon descent was made to a fork of the Iskut river flowing easterly, which was 
followed down to its junction with another fork flowing westerly; this latter fork was followed 
up to its source on a large plateau, or watershed, between this fork and the Klappan river. 
This plateau is known locally as the " Klappan summit " of the trail, and is a favourite 
rendezvous for big-game hunters and for the Indians in the hunting season. It is at an 
elevation of about 4,000 feet, above which the mountains rise for about from 1,000 to 2,000 
feet higher. Level table-lands on the summits extend for some miles to the north, but drop 
off to the south more quickly to a couple of large lakes on the headwaters of the Iskut river. 

August 13th. Camp was not moved this day, as feed for the horses was very good, and 
they needed it. It was also desirable to allow the Klappan river, which had to be crossed on 
next day's march, to subside after the heavy rains. 

August 14th. After travelling for a couple of miles across this flat summit-land at an 
elevation of 4,000 feet, the trail was followed down a gravel-covered side-hill to the Klappan 
river at an elevation of 2,700 feet, arriving there at noon after travelling about nine miles. 

The river was found to be high and swift, so the horses had to be swum across first, and 
the party and equipment taken across in a small canoe which is kept there for ferrying 
purposes. The crossing of the river occupied over two hours, after which camp was made on 
the right 1 ank of the river at the ford. 

August 1 5th. On the right bank of the Klappan river a part of the old Ashcroft trail 
was found. This old trail was used in the old days of the Cassiar excitement to bring cattle 
to Dease lake. The stakes and cutting of an old survey-line were also found ; this was a 
survey from Dease lake to Hazelton made by John S. O'Dwyer in 1899 for the Department of 
Railways and Canals of the Dominion Government. 

It was noted that the wash in the creeks flowing from the north contained a good deal of 
slate rock, indicating that a formation of sedimentary rocks, probably the Cretaceous coal- 
bearing formation, existed at no very great distance to the north, although the formation in the 
vicinity of the trail was of volcanic origin. 

After travelling for 12 miles, camp was made a few miles below the mouth of the Little 
Klappan, an easterly fork of the main Klappan, which heads with the »Spatsizi and Skeena 
rivers : whereas the southerly fork, or main Klappan, heads with a fork of the Nass river. 

The valley of the main Klappan, travelled through, is about a mile wide, and contains a 
considerable area of land suited to agriculture, while the side-hills are covered with spruce and 
hemlock of fair size, 



K 84 Report of the Minister of Minks. L913 



August 16th. The trail followed the main Klappan up to the mouth of the Little Klappan, 
where if branched off to the left, with rather an obscure turnout, and followed up the latter 

fork through a valley almost half a mile wide with some good hottom laud, hut with mount 

rising steeply on either side ; the source of the Klappan is about thirty-five mile- from this fork. 

After seven hours' travelling, in which only fourteen miles were covered, camp was made 
at the forks of the Little Klappan some eight miles up from tin- main stream, on the site of 
O'Dwyer's old camp No. 21. 

August 17th. The old trail from this point follows up the righl bank of the Little 
Klappan, crossing the stream somewhere below, hut the Indians guiding the party, for some 
reason, considered it host to follow up the branch to its source on a summit at an elevation of 
+,900 feet, after which a very rapid descent had to be made to the Little Klappan, striking it 
again about fifteen miles above the folks where it had been left. A reason given for this change 
of route was better feed for the horses, hut it is suspected that the presence of innumerable 
ground-hogs (hoary marmots), to which as food the Indians are very partial and of which they 
killed a number on the summit referred to. had something to do with the choice of route. 

The distance from the folks of the river to the summit at the source of the fork (Tsertia 

creek) wasaboul fourteen miles and occupied seven anda half hours over a very indistinct trail, 
climbing to a height entirely unnecessary. To any one following this route the trail up tin- 
Little Klappan is recommended as better. 

Camp was made on this summit, from which the snow had hut lately incited, and. 

consequently, where it was difficult to find a dry place to set up the tents and have firewood 

w ilhin reach. 

The formation of the mountains here consisted of shales, conglomerates, and sandstone 

very much broken and disturbed with oumerous igneous intrusions, and of an average elevation 

of 7. ni III feet, the whole indicating thai the coal formation had been entered this day, hut that 
it was in too broken a slate to here give hope for workable coal. No coal could be seen in tin- 
wash of any of t lie creeks. 

August 18th. A couple of hours' journey brought the part] from the summit by a very 

steep trail down to the valley of the Little Klappan, fifteen miles above when- it had been left 

the previous morning, and at an elevatii f 3,900 feet. 

This valley was followed up some eleven miles, when camp was made on a knoll (elevation 
I. .".oil feet i. where the river takes a sharp turn to the south, about sixteen miles having been 

lied since morning. 

This camping-ground is a famou rendezvous for the Indians bunting in the district, and 

is known as tin- " Indian < Irav ova id.'' from the fact that a number of Indians have been buried 

there; the Indians keep a lot of whip -a wed lumber here to make coffins in case ucy. 

The fugitive Indian Gun-a-noot uses this as a headquarters, and buried one of the w en of 

his family here last season. 

As soon as this part of (he valley of the Little Klappan was entered it was noted to be 
in the coal formal ion. an exposure of over I'.onn feet thickness of shale, etc.. being seen. The 

valley appears to be a denuded anticlinal, from which the measures dip east and west with 
i emingly much regularity. 

Coal was observed On Eaglenest creek some distance up. and Boat found in the creek, 
but no exposure of a seam could be found in the creek complete enough to permit of any 

i : urements, 



3 Geo. 5 



Cassiar District. 



K 



The samples of coal taken from here must be regarded more as specimens, since it cannot 
be stated what thickness or character of seam they are from. The following (A) is an analysis 
of the coal — a piece selected by the writer — not a general sample ; while B (Mallock's Sample 
No. 9) is on a " picked sample " from the same locality : — 



Sample. 


Moisture. 


Vol. Comb. M. 


Fixed Carbon. 


Ash. 


Total. 


A 

B 


5.00 

4.14 


9.00 
8.43 


79.40 

80.27 


6.60 

7.16 


100.00 
100.00 



In the vicinity of the Graveyard a number of coal-stakings were observed which bore 
on the posts the name of R. K. Lindsay, of Vancouver. It has since been learned that 
his Lot No. 20 covers the ground the Indian graves are on, and that he has staked here about 
100 square miles of land, which, it has been reported, has since been turned over to Alvo von 
Alvensleben and associates. 

As will be seen from the itinerary given, this part of the field is within ten easy drives 
of a pack-train from Telegraph Creek, from which point it seems probable that supplies will in 
the future be drawn. 

At the " Indian Graveyard " the Little Klappan river, which below this point had flowed 
in a general north-west direction, takes an abrupt bend and flows in a north-east course 
between high hills, but the valley of the lower part of the river continues in a south-east 
direction, opening into a great, nearly flat, swampy plateau, several miles wide, flanked with 
gradually rising hills, which extends through to the Spatsizi river, and in which Trail creek, a 
tributary of the last-mentioned river, takes its rise, a couple of miles to the eastward of the 
Graveyard. This wide, low summit is at an elevation of about 4,200 feet above sea-level and 
forms a natural pass over on to the watershed of the Spatsizi river, which in turn heads in a 
similar flat summit meadow with the Kluakaz, or West fork of the Skeena, upon which most 
of the first of the coal claims were staked, thus forming a continuous and easy route for 
subsequent railway connection between the separate portions of the field. 

The country all about here is distinctly in the coal-bearing formation ; the portion lying 
under the plateau mentioned, at the head of Trail creek, and both to the north and south 
seems less disturbed and broken than do many other parts, giving hope that the coal- 
measures here may be found in more workable condition. 

From the nature of the formation, however, it was not to be expected that coal-outcrops 
would be easily found, and prospecting here will have to be done by sinking or boring. 

On the hill lying to the south-east of the Little Klappan, above the Graveyard and to the 
south-west of the plateau, or valley of Trail creek, the stakes of a group of claims, staked by 
Messrs. Pike, Bond, Beauclerk, and Simpson, were found. 

There here appears to have been a fault, down-throwing to the west, in which is exposed 
a section of the measures at an elevation of 5,000 feet. 

The strata, as exposed, show a heavy bed of sandstone underlain by a bed of 

conglomerate from 2 to 4 feet thick, again underlain by a bed of 25 feet of clay-shale 

showing fossil leaves; below this is a bed of shale carrying coal, samples of which gave 
analyses similar to those just quoted. 



K 86 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The disintegration of the measures here prevented the size or nature of the seam from 
being seen, as no work had been (loin- on n. so thai 11 can only be reported that coal of fair 
quality exists here. The measures hare a strike of north east and south west, with a dip of 
ahout 15 degrees to the south-east. 

As far as could be ohserved without an actual survey, the same ground appears to be 
covered by the stakings of both Messrs. Pike and Lindsay. Other stakes in the one vicinity 

bear the names of (1. I!. Hughes and <!. I!. Griffiths. 

August 20th. Leaving the Graveyard al 8.20 a.m., a very indistinct trail was followed 
eastward along the marshy plateau — which was crossed with some difficulty — to the hill lying 

to the south-east, when Trail creek was followed up to its source on this hill. Towards its 

top, at an elevation of 5,400 feet, the hill is bare and seemed to be composed of shales and 
sandstones lying at low angles. The wash and debris showed numerous fragments of coal, but 
at no place could any coal exposures be seen, nor could any workings be found. 

The summit of this hill is a great elevated plateau, at about ."..huh feel elevation, 
extending for some miles to the south; the measures here showing little disturbance, 
although farther south the strata seemed to be broken by numerous faults, the peaks presenting 

sharp escarpments. 

This undisturbed ground appeared to extend towards thi- west, nearly as far as the Little 
Klappan. beyond which the formation is broken and irregular. 

To the eastward it extends well towards the Spatsizi River valley, which valley seems to 

have followed a line of fracture along the crest of an anticlinal fold in the measures. 

Crossing this elevated plateau for four or five miles, the trail leads down Tenas, or llankin, 
creels to the Spatsizi river. The river at this part was at an altitude of 1.1IIU feet and 
flowing northerly in a valley three-quarters of a mile wide. 

The hills to the north-west appeared to be less broken than those to the southeast. 

although deeply cut by transverse valleys. < >n both sides of the valley the measures seemed to 

dip away from it, at angles of about 50 degrees, the strike of the measures being approximately 

parallel with the valley. 

The lulls to the north-west rise to a height of about I'.oOO feet above the valley, the 

highest measures visible being two or three heavy beds of conglomerate with beds of reddish 
shale, the lower portion of the hills being masked by slide matter. 

After travelling fifteen miles from the Graveyard, camp was made on the wide, tlat divide 
forming the watershed between the Spatsizi. Sowing northerly, and at Kluakaz. Bowing 
south-easterly. 

August L'lst. The valley of the Kluakaz was followed down this day for about thirteen 
miles farther, and it presented a very similar appearance to the portion passed through the 
previous day. The strata, as exhibited in tin- hills to the west, continued to l>e regular, 

perhaps even flatter than seen the day before : the hills to the eastward had become less steep, 

so much SO thai the lay of the strata was not visible from the valley. 

August 22nd. After following the same valley down some eight miles 

B.C. Anthracite farther, the first evidence of prospecting-work was encountered ; this proved 

Coal Synd. to be the workings of the B.C. Anthracite Coal Syndicate, known as the 

Campbell-Johnston camp, at Biernes creek. The camp had not been 

occupied during the season of 1912, and there was no one who could point out all tin- 
openings made, so it is quite possible some may have been overlooked. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 87 



Biernes creek is a large stream flowing from the west in a narrow valley ; the washing of 
the stream had exposed in its banks two or three coal-seams, all dipping at moderate angles to 
the east or under the valley of the Kluakaz. 

On the left bank of the creek three tunnels were found which had been driven in on as 
many seams of coal, and, apparently, from one of these, an incline had been sunk for some 
distance on the seam. Unfortunately, the timbering of these openings had been insufficient, 
so that all had, more or less, caved in, preventing a full view of any of the seams, which were, 
however, estimated to be about 6 feet thick. 

Where the coal could be seen in place in the seam, it was found to be in thin layers, with 
partings of shale or dirt, the seam as a whole being too " dirty " to be worked commercially. 

As the tunnels had been driven in on the coal-seams, the dumps may be assumed to 
represent a fair sample of the seam as it would have to be mined. The dumps, it is true, had 
lain exposed to the weather, for at least a year, partly accounting for the condition of their 
contents, which had gone to powder, the coal being in grains and the shale partings into clay. 
No lumps of coal could be found in the dumps, except such as contained an undue proportion 
of iron-sulphide, and were therefore valueless. 

On the right-hand side of the creek, a little farther up, another tunnel was found, the 
approach to which consisted of an open-cut made in the surface clay, and, as the sides of this 
had been unsupported by timber, they had slid in to such an extent as to form a dam which 
backed the water up into the tunnel to a depth of over 3 feet, thus rendering access to the 
interior of the tunnel impracticable. The coal from this seam had evidently been kept on a 
separate dump and was found to have disintegrated, as did that on the dumps on the opposite 
side of the creek. 

Another tunnel had been driven in on a seam outcropping on the bank of the river at 
the camp, apparently an overlying seam ; the timbering of this also had given way and it was 
inaccessible. There was a pile of coal on this dump which had likewise disintegrated, with 
the exception of a few lumps, and these were full of quartz stringers. No satisfactory samples 
could be obtained of the coal in place, and no general samples of the dump were taken, as an 
assay was not required to show it was too dirty for commercial use, even had its physical 
conditions permitted. 

The trip from Biernes creek to McEvoy flats, a distance of about twelve miles, was made 
during the afternoon ; the trail was found to be almost impassable, but fortunately it has since 
received attention from the Government road-gang. 

Camp was made on the north edge of the McEvoy flats — a large flat, usually affording 
very good horse-feed for even a large pack-train ; at this season it was about eaten off by 
the numerous pack-trains from Hazelton, which usually rested here a few days before starting 
on their return trip. 

August 23rd. The pack-train which had brought the party from Telegraph Creek was 
here turned back, and, it was subsequently learned, made its way back to Telegraph Creek in 
nine days. 

It was found that the B.C. Anthracite Coal Company had established a camp on the 
south side of the flats, below Courrier creek, as headquarters for the exploration parties in the 
Held. This camp was in charge of H. F. Glassey, who kindly volunteered his services to 
guide the writer to the various prospecting workings in the vicinity, which offer was gladly 
accepted and proved of great assistance. 



K 88 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1918 



McEvoy Hats, a1 t be mouth of Courrier creek, was the headquarters of 

Western Develop- the Western Development Company in the field, from which point all the 

ment Company, prospecting of the various properties was done. This company has acquired 

sixteen claims of one mile square each, and all of these have been duly sur- 
veyed. Theseclaims were the first staked in thefield — in 1903 and 1904 — and havenaturally been 
better explored than some of the more recent stakings; the company, however, was quite 
unrepresented in the field during the season of 1912. The geology of this pari of the held has 
been described in the printed rep.. its .,t' (i. S. Mallock, of the Geological Survey; of .las. 
McEvoy, etc., and need not be entered into hen, attention being routine. 1 to the result- of 
the development work done. 

A great deal of the prospecting development work done by the company ..insisted of 
Open-strippingS and trenches to expose the coal seams, and, as these had been standing for two 
years at least, they were all found to have now so caved in as to give no indication of what 
had been found ; consequently, the effective development was confined to the tunnels, which, 
fortunately, had been sufficiently timbered and were found to be standing. 

Trail Creek 7V?m«/.— The first workings found were on Trail creek, a quarter of a mile 
up from its junction with Courrier creek. About 30 feet above the level of the creek a tunnel 
has been driven in on a coal-seam for a distance of about 50 feet in a general X. tiO K. direction. 
The strike of the seam was about south-east and north-west, with a very moderate dip to the 
measures — about 15 degrees. The tunnel was Tx" feet, run in entirely on the seam. Coal 
still showed in the roof, so the full thickness of the top coal was n..t easily measured, but it is 
about •_' I inches. 

The following is a section of the seam as exposed in the tunnel : Ft. In. 

Top coal about 2 

1 hrt-parting '■'• 

Dirty coal. 10 

Dirt-parting 3 

Coal + 

Dirt-parting n -' 

Coal, hard. 1 

.. soft 8 

I hit parting 3 

Coal 2 



i 



9 



A general Sample of the seam was taken down the face exposed at the inner end of the 
tunnel : from this sample was excluded, as far as possible, all partings of Over 1 inch ; all the 
smaller partings were included. This sample gave upon analysis the following: — 

Moisture 2.5 per cent. 

Vol. matter 6. 1 •■ 

I .1 carbon 42.6 

Ash 48.8 i, 

100.00 .. 

The coal was much shattered, w ith a large number of small seamlets of quartz showing in 
the fracture planes ; the seam also contained some Sulphur-balls. 

The coal dump made from this tunnel had been exposed to the weather for probably two 
years, and was found to have crumbled to sand : the few solid lumps still remaining contained 
a \ isible amount of iron-sulpl 




<<»nl formation ell Offing in Mountains oti I pper Skeena, 







^■^ii-rtffV 



.«■» 






Spatslsl Hirer — near Trail Creek — looking North. 



3 Geo. 5 



Cassiar District. 



K 89 



Another tunnel was found on Abraham creek, in a draw about three-quarters of a mile to 
the north-west of Courrier creek ; this tunnel had been driven in for about 20 feet on a coal- 
seam 6 feet thick, having a strike of about east and west, dipping to north at an angle of cS 
degrees, and with a fairly good roof of sandy shale or sandstone. 

The following is a section of the seam in the tunnel : — 

Roof — sandstone. Ft. In. 

Dirty coal 6 

Shattered coal 2 

Dirt-parting 3 

Hard coal 1 6 

Shattered coal 1 9 

6 

Two general samples of the coal-face of this seam were obtained — the first (A) sampled by 
the writer, leaving out all partings over 1 inch ; the other (B) taken some days later by a 
visiting engineer, in the presence of the writer, and in which all partings over § inch were 
excluded. 

Analyses. 



Sample. 


Moisture. 


Vol. Matter. 


Fixed Carbon. 


Ash. 


Total. 


A 

B 


2.5 
3.0 


8.1 
6.6 


62.3 
66.0 


27.1 
24.4 


100.0 
100.0 



The dirt-partings in these seams were not, as then exposed, a hard shale, but soft clay and 
sand ; whether they were hard when first exposed to the air could not be learned. 

The appearance of the coal in this tunnel was the best seen in the camp by the writer, 
but, nevertheless, the coal on the dump had disintegrated, under the influence of the weather, 
to a sand, not even a lump of clean hard coal being obtainable as a specimen. 

It had been reported that there were a couple of tunnels on Discovery creek, but none of 
the men in the camp had ever seen these, and the writer could not find them ; as no employee 
of the company was in the field, the search had to be abandoned. 

These tunnels were afterwards found by G. W. Evans, an engineer employed by another 
company, who said he found them some miles up the creek while examining the field at a later 
date, and that the coal in these was cleaner and firmer than in the other tunnels and did not 
disintegrate as badly, much of it being still in good condition. 

The following analysis is given by G. S. Mallock, of the Geological Survey : — 



Sample. 


Moisture. 


Vol. Comb. M. 


Fixed Carbon. 


Ash. 


Total. 


No. 1 Lower tunnel Dis- 
covery creek 


2.88 


7.64 


78.84 


10.64 


100.00 



This company owns a large number of coal-areas in the field, and has 
B.C. Anthracite this past summer been earnestly and legitimately engaged, at a very heavy 
Coal Company, expense, in determining by substantial development-work and expert 
examination just what value the various properties have. 



K 90 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



I'M:; 



The heart iest development-work lias been carried on at what is known as •'.Jackson's camp, 1 
situated on the northern flank of Groundhog mountain, on Trail creek, a small stream flowing 
into Courrier creek. 

At this poinl the company had elected two substantial log buildings a cook-house and 
bunk-house and lias established a force of four coal-miners, as well as some outside men. 
under the charge of Arthur Challoner, a certificated mine foreman. 

This force was expected to be kept at work developing at a depth the coal seams described 
later, and the results of this deeper developmenl will be looked for with much interest. 

No. I or Godfrey Tunnel. — This tunnel is located on Trail creek, about three-quarters of a 
mile from its mouth and at an elevation of 3,250 feet. The tunnel had been driven in for 12 
feet from the portal, but at this distance was just getting 0u1 of the wash and into the solid 
coal seam, so that the cual face could nut be expected thus t<> be as good as it would probably 
prove farther in. 

As it was seen, the cual in the face consisted of layers of coal with dirt-partingS, the latter 
so frequent that the seam at this point was scarcely up to an economic fuel. 

Two samples were taken of the coal seam as exposed in this tunnel, viz. A. a genera] 
ample of the face of the tunnel, and B, a sample of the lump coal free from all partings. The 
following are the analyses : — 



Sample. 


Moisture. 


Vol. Comb. M. 


Fixed Carbon. 


Ash. 


Total. 


A 

B 


2.7 

2.3. 


5.6 
5.1 


53.4 

71.1 


38.3 
21.5 


WO. u 
100.0 



The coal from these tunnels had but recently been mined, and showed a fair percentage 

of lumps on the dump ; as it had not been exposed to the winter's action, it cannot be stated 
whether it would withstand the action of weather any better than that on the dumps of the 

i it her properties. 

These coal-seams all show extreme pressure and the coal is much shattered, containing 
numerous small veinlets of quartz, which doubtless account partly tor the high ash content of 
the samples. 

No. .' Tunnel is. near the bunk-house, and had been driven in for L20 feet on the strike 
of a coal seam dipping at about JO decrees : the level course of the tunnel had brought it very 
near the surface of the ground ill a small draw, so the work had been Stopped. 

The seam exposed is about 7 feet thick, with some very fair-looking firm coal, but contains 

a number of dirt-partings throughout the scam, which would render the coal as mined very 

dirty. 

No general sample of the coal-face was taken, hut one obtained of the lump coal from the 
tunnel assayed as follows : — 



Moisture. 


imb. Main r. 


Fixed Carbon. 


Ash. 


Total. 


3.4 


5.4 


70.8 


21 1. 4 


100.0 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District K 91 



No. S Tunnel has been driven in for about 160 feet and appears to be on a seam which 
overlies No. 2 seam, and which also dips on an angle of about 20 degrees, with shale roof. 
The coal-seam is from 6 to 7 feet thick, but towards the inner end of the tunnel it pinches to 
about 2 feet thick, although at the face the roof was rising, so that probably the normal 
thickness would soon return. 

No sample was taken of this seam, which appeared very similar to the two others sampled. 

Besides these tunnels sampled and described at Jackson camp, the company had done 
other work partly as follows : — 

Head of Jackson creek, at the timber-line, there had been two tunnels driven in, each for 
about 20 feet — the first on an 8i-foot seam dipping at an angle of 85 degrees, and the second 
on"a 5-foot seam dipping at 20 degrees. 

The coal is reported as of the same character as that in Jackson camp, and carried the 
usual sulphur-balls and dirt-partings. 

On Brewer creek, the first left-hand branch of Courrier creek, about two and a half miles 
up from McEvoy flats, two tunnels had been driven in a short distance on two seams, about 
i\ feet thick, and dipping respectively at 20 and 75 degrees. The coal here was of about the 
same character as in the other workings. 

The company had also developed a couple of coal-seams on the 2nd fork of Courrier creek, 
each about 4J feet thick, dipping respectively at 20 degrees and nearly flat. 

Telfer Creek. 

On Telfer creek the B.C. Anthracite Coal Company was found to have done an amount 
of preliminary development with a force of men under Seth Godfrey. 

This work consisted in opening up the outcrops of the various seams, and the running of 
short tunnels on them ; this work was done primarily to render the seams visible for the 
inspection of G. W. Evans, a coal-mining geologist who was engaged in making a report on 
the properties of the company. 

Here within the distance of 400 yards, and a vertical height of 200 feet, some six 
coal-seams have been exposed in the left side of the creek. 

No. 1 Tunnel. — The lowest or No. 1 tunnel is at an altitude of about 3,825 feet, and 
has been run in for three sets of timbers on a coal-seam, but had not been driven far enough 
to strike solid coal ; that showing was very much crushed and shattered and, as exposed, very 
dirty. The thickness of this seam was not demonstrated exactly, but it was of a workable 
thickness. The dip of all these seams is into the hill in a N. 65° E. direction, at angles 
approximating 25 degrees. 

No. 2 Tunnel is some 200 yards farther up the hill, and has to be driven in for about 20 
feet, disclosing a 5-foot coal-seam, which was very much shattered and quite " dirty." 

No. 8 Tunnel, still higher up, has touched a coal-seam, but has to be driven farther to 
show what the seam amounted to. 

No. 4 Tunnel had been driven in for 15 feet, and had disclosed a coal-seam 6 feet thick, 
in which the coal appeared more hard and compact than in the other seams, but in which the 
small dirt-partings were so prevalent as to make the seam dirty. The coal already on the 
dump showed the same tendency to disintegrate as in the camp generally. 

No. 5 Tunnel has only been driven in for 10 feet, and shows a 5-foot coal seam, of which 
about 18 inches was fairly clean, but the remainder was quite dirty. 



K 92 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



X<i. >'i Tiinml was not through the slide-matter, bul the indications were that it would 
disclose a coal seam. 

Langlois Creek. 

The B.C. Anthracite Coal Company had also a party of men working at the head of 
Langlois creek, on the flank of Table mountain, at an altitude of AMun feet tar alxjvi- 
timber-line. This work was more of an exploratory nature than to develop any known scam. 

The formation on the surface on the top of the mountain was locally so broken as to give 

little idea of where the COaJ seams, lure exposed, might he found at a level where it was 

possible to work. 

A tunnel had been run for about 1 '2 feet on a seam dipping to the south east at about 
.'iO degrees, which showed 20 inches of fairly hard coal ; the remainder of the seam is very 
soft and dirty. 

Another opening at the same elevation showed about 4 feet of fairly hard coal, about the 
same in character as the i mi een elsewhere. 

Another seam — at an altitude of 5,200 feet- which is claimed to be a 17-foot seam. 

showed in present development about •"> feet of fairly hard coal ; the work had not progressed 
far enough to show up the whole seam. This coal was fairly hard and solid, hut very dirty. 

SUMMARY. 

The coal hearing formation, as far as at present indicated by prospecting, covers an area 
extending ahout seventy-five miles in a north-west and south-east direction, witli a width of 
about forty miles. This area includes the headwaters of branches of the Skeena, Stikine, and 

Nass rivers, which here head together at an altitude above sea-level of ahout 3,800 feet, above 

which the mountains, also composed of the coal measures, rise from 1,000 to 3,000 feet higher. 

The presence of coal seams has heen indicated by prospecting over a large proportion of 
this area, hut Only in the southern end of tin' field, where the earlier discoveries were made, 
had there heen any serious attempt made to prove by development the nature and extl I 

the seams. 

Speaking generally, the only important development-work done, as tar as I was able to 
ibserve or learn, has heen on the Skeena watershed in the vicinity of Biernes, Courtier, and 

Trail creeks. 

I would estimate- the total area of the coal lands already as in the vicinity of 2,000 square 

miles, hut I am not at present able to submil figures other than an estimate. Of this | 

area. I would further estimate that about 20 per cent, of it lies on the Nass watershed, ahout 
It* per cent, on the Stikine. and Id per cent, on the Skeena watershed. 

The whole coalfield appears to have heen subjected to a severe geological thrust, acting in 
uth-west and northeast direction, which crumpled and folded the coal-measures, thereby 
developing a series of roughly parallel mountain ranges, with intervening valleys, running in a 
north-west and south-east direction. 

Where this folding happened to break the strata most severely, the greatest amoui 
subsequent denudation and disintegration would naturally occur, and, since it is largely to this 

denudation that the exposures of the coal seams arc due, it is altogether probable that the 
exposures and developments so far made are in the /ones of greatest disturbance, so that, 
consequently, it may reasonably be hoped that a more detailed study and examination of the 

field will result in the discovery of beds of coal which have not heen subjected to such great 

strains, and where the coal will he found more compact than in the localities so far developed. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 93 



It was on the Skeena watershed that the earlier stakings were made, and here, as might 
he expected, has systematic prospecting first taken place. Here the numerous locations have 
been gradually segregated into large holdings, the owners of which appear to have adopted the 
wise plan of so far pooling their interests as to form a joint development syndicate — The B.C. 
Amalgamated Anthracite Coal Company — (on what financial basis I am not fully informed) for 
the purpose of having the whole area of their holdings jointly examined and reported upon by 
competent coal-mining engineers. 

The syndicate operations in the field were under the management of Amos Godfrey, who, 
with a considerable force of men, with the necessary pack animals, was busily engaged all 
season in uncovering and bringing to view coal exposures and outcrops on the various properties, 
and. preparing them for the inspection of two parties of coal experts respectively under the 
leadership of G. W. Evans, of Seattle, and G. Grossman, of Vancouver. 

This expert examination and the preparing for it occupied the syndicate's attention all 
season, to the exclusion of any very extensive development operations, and upon the reports < if 
these experts largely will depend the future activities in this part of the coalfield. 

Outside the work just mentioned, the only other important development-work being done 
in the field this past season was at Jackson camp on Trail creek, on the northern slope of 
Groundhog mountain, where, under the charge of competent coal-mine officials, the owners have 
established a permanent camp, and have kept a force of fiom four to eight men employed all 
season driving in a series of adit tunnels on the coal-seams outcropping some 400 to 500 feet 
above the level of the Skeena valley at this point. 

In September arrangements were completed and sufficient supplies in to keep a force of 
from six to eight men employed here all winter in doing more extended and deeper development- 
work under the charge of Arthur Challoner. 

On the mountain to the east of the Skeena river, opposite the mouth of Courrier creek, 
another winter camp was being constructed, where another party of about four men under the 
charge of Seth Godfrey will be similarly occupied all winter. 

With the exception of a party from the Geological Survey of Canada under G. S. Mallock, 
and a Provincial Government survey party under J. H. Taylor, B.C.L.S., these were the only 
parties at work in the field this past season. 

The property of the Western Development Company, known as the McEvoy locations, 
was not represented in the field this year by any one, and it was with great difficulty that their 
various development tunnels, made in previous years, were found. Some of these tunnels had 
caved in, while the various test-pits and trenchings were invariably found partly filled with 
earth, so that little could be learned from them. 

The B.C. Anthracite Coal Syndicate properties near Biernes creek, forming what is locally 
known as "Johnston's camp," were also unrepresented this season. 

A number of tunnels driven, in a previous year on coal-croppings, were examined, but 
in every instance it was found that, owing to insufficient timbering, these tunnels were so 
Completely caved in as to render entrance into them impossible, SO that the results obtained 
therein had to be gauged by the contents of the dump. 

At the two properties last mentioned, the dumps have lain outside for one or two winters, 
and it was found that the coal and shah; taken from the tunnels, and forming the dumps, had 
to such an extent disintegrated as to render the coal unmarketable. 



K 94 Report of the Minister of Mines. 191 .') 

The scams vary in thickness from .'! to 8 feet, w ith some possibly thicker, and arc com] i 

of alternating layers of coal with bands of what probably would be found, when under sufficient 
cover, to be shale, but which, as exposed to the atmosphere, have disintegrated into an earthy 
sandy clay. These layers of coal each have a thickness of from <> to 18 inches, and possibly •_' 1 
inches, while the "shale" partings vary from J to 3 or I inches in thickness. 

The coal, so far developed, is found to be very much shattered, and the cleavage planes 
are filled with foreign matter, such as quartz, calcite, etc., brought in in solution. 

A number of the seams exhibit the presence of a large amount of iron, occurring as 
sulphides, probably arsenical, judging from the white efflorescence left on the faces of the coal. 

The seams as exposed, speaking generally, are decidedly "dirty" and will run high in 
ash ; how far this can he corrected by washing can only he determined hv experiment. This 
washing process has frequently to be resorted to with anthracite coals. 

Perhaps, for the reasons already stated, that the developments so far have hecn in the 

zones of greatest movement, the coal as exposed was found to be too friable and subject to 
disintegration to have a high commercial value. 

That these conditions may change when greater depth is obtained and in more favourable 
localities is the present hope, which the work in hand for this coming winter will go a long way 
towards settling, and without which it is not advisable to pass any final judgment on the 
character of the coal, for the outcrop of even the best-proved seam is never very attractive. 

The value of the field from a commercial \ iow point will not lie determined until the result 
of this winter's work is known, and possibly it may he necessary to do some extensive boring 
in the flatter-lying and more undisturbed localities before final results are obtained. 

Up to the present time till access to the held litis hecn from Hazclton, following the 

" Telegraph Trail " to between the 5th and 6th Cabins; thence following the old Ashcroft 

trail, used in the '70's, up Slowmaldo creek to its source and over Groundhog mountain, at an 

altitude of 5,700 feet, dropping again to the valley of the Skeena at an altitude of :i,ono feet. 

The contract rate for packing over this trail this past season was 20 cents a pound, but 
owing to the character .and condition of the trail the packers did not make wages, even at this 
rate. A new trail, along a better route, which might be gradually converted into a wagon-road, 

is urgently needed. 



OTHER REPORTS ON THE FIELD IN 1912. 

The Report for 1 'Jli 1 of (!. 8. Mallock, of t \n Canadian Geological Survey, who has spent 
the past two seasons in the Groundhog coalfield, has not yet hecn issued, but the following 
is from the " Press Bulletin" issued by the Geological Survey in February, 1913, a summary 

of the work done during the season of 1912 : 

"G. S. Mallock continued his examination of the Groundhog mountain coalfield and 

determined the southern, eastern, and northern boundaries of the area in w Inch coal he.iritc_' 

strata occur. The southern boundary is situated near latitude 56 50', the eastern follows the 
Duti fork of the Skeena to Shawni Lake, thence to the valley of the Kluatantan, from which 
it passes over a flat divide to the Kluayetz fork of the Stikine, and thence over another divide 
i" the Little Klappan river. The northern boundary i^ approximately latitude 57 
Information given by prospectors leads one to believe tint the western boundary runs up the 
East fork of the Nass river and over a divide to the main fork of the Klappan. The dimensions 



.3 Geo. 5 



Cassiar District. 



K 95 



of the field are thereby roughly forty -five miles by thirty, but in parts of this area the coal- 
bearing rocks have been removed by erosion. While many new outcrops of coal were discovered 
this year, no marked improvement in quality was noted, quartz or calcite veinlets being present 
in nearly all the seams, and nigger-heads and numerous thin bands of bone occurring in many 
of them. A closer examination of the structure proved the existence of many more faults than 
were recognized last year. 

" Following is a report of the proximate analyses made in the laboratory of the Mines 
Branch, by fast coking, of nine samples of fuel from the undermentioned localities in the 
Groundhog mountain coal-field, and one (No. 10) from the Sustut basin, B.C. Collected by 
G. S. Mallock, Geological Survey : — 

""No. 1 — Lower tunnel, Discovery creek. 
" No. 2 — Top showing on Anthracite creek. 

"No. 3 — Two miles north-east of Groundhog summit ; seam 6 feet. 
" No. 4 — Summit of Jackson mountain ; seam 3 feet. 
" No. 5 — Little Klappan river ; seam 9 J feet. 
" No. 6 — McDonald creek ; seam 6 feet. 

" No. 7 — Creek north of McDonald creek (Blume creek) ; seam 9 feet. 
"No. 8 — Picked sample from seam on the Kluakaz branch of the Skeena river, above 
Langlois creek. 

" No. 9 — Picked sample from a 3-foot seam on mountain north of Indian Graveyard camp, 
on Little Klappan river. 

" No. 10 — Mountain north of junction of Bear and Sustut rivers, Sustut basin. Latitude 
56° 15', longitude 126° approx. 

''Proximate Analyses of Samples of Coal from Groundhog Basin. 





1. 


2. 


3. 


4. 


5. 


6. 


7. 


8. 


9. 


10. 




2.88 

7.64 

78.84 

10.64 


6.09 
13.70 
65.52 
14.69 


10.52 

22.15 
40.81 
26.52 


10.16 

23.73 
45.79 
20.32 


4.48 

9.98 

63.48 

22.06 


5.02 

6.38 

66.95 

21.65 


6.85 
13.76 
58.08 
21.31 


3.24 

7.67 

68.92 

20.17 


4.14 

8.43 

80.27 

7.16 


5.40 


Vol. combustible 

Ash 


23.32 
57.48 
13.80 








100.00 


100.00 


1IKI.IMI 


100. 00 


100.00 


100.00 


II HI. 1)11 


100.00 


100. 00 


100 . 00 



G. W. EVANS'S REPORT. 

Geo. Watkins Evans, of Seattle, was one of the two coal-mining engineers engaged by the 
B.C. Anthracite Coal Mining Company to examine a portion of the coal-field, the southern 
portion being covered by his examination. 

The reports made were, of course, private ;rnd the property of the employers, who have 
not seen fit to supply the Department with copies, so that the results of these examina 
tions cannot be given. 

Mr. Evans, however, read a paper before the Canadian Mining Institute at a meeting held 
in Nanaimo in March of this year, entitled " Some Notes on the Groundhog Coalfield, " from 
which the following extracts have been made : — 



K 96 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



"Topography. 

" The elevations in the field range from aboul 3,000 to 7,200 feel above Bea leveL To the 
cast of the field proper is a range of rugged mountains made up of a series of thickly bedded 
conglomerates, and cm the west another range of rugged peaks of sandstone and shales with 
some beds of conglomerates. 

" In places the lulls show the effects of glacial erosion ami are considerably rounded, 
while in other places there are many sharp clifEs the scars of fault-planes. 

" From a. railroad point of view the topography is not severe, tor railroads can he huilt to 

almost any point without any insurmountable difficulty. From a scenic point of ri&* thi 
district is beautiful. 

" Geology. 

" The geological age of this Held is Lower Cretaceous, and is of the same age as the 
anthracite field of AJberta and the bituminous coalfield of eastern British Columbia at the 
Crowsnest pass. The Groundhog field is hounded on the cast by the Palaeozoic metamorphics 

and on the w est hv the Post Cambrian intrusives. 

" In my examination of the held I separated the geological column into four subdivisions 

and have called them the Conglomerate, Trail Creek. Teller, and Table Mountain series. The 

( longlomerate being the lowermost and the Table Mountain -erics the uppermost. 

" The subdivision is arbitrary so far as the Trail Creek and Telfer series are concerned, 

and I have endeavoured to separate the coal hearing strata int.. the DOn-COmmerciaJ and 

i mercial classifications respectively, I must necessarily refrain from discussing tl ,- positions 

of these scries, for it is of interest only to those for whom I examined the field. 

"These data are confidential ami for that reason I will omit details. All you Care to know- 
is something of the character of the coal and the probable extent of the known commercial 
area : \'ou arc not interested in knowing where it occurs. 

" As stated above, [have separated the geological column into four parts, and thi 
describe briefly below. 

"Beginning with 'he Lower or Conglomerate series, we tin, I that this series is made up 
of many beds of conglomerate, some of the beds being from 150 to 200 feet thick, and the 
particles are the size of hen's r;^. 

"The next scries upward in the column is the Trail Creek series. I have Selected the 

lower 2,800 feel of the coal-bearing strata as representing this series. It is made up of beds 

of sandstone, shale, and coal, and bony beds, with several beds of carbonaceous shale. 

'• There are many outcrops of coal in the area in which this series outcrops, hut nearly all 

are too high in ash to he of much commercial value. Samples had previously been made of 

coal taken from some of these beds, hut surely they did not represent the product as it would 
he in actual minin g operations, hut were, ill all probability, picked samples. 

" In the samples ti,-,t | selected, 1 took what in my judgment would go into the mine-car 

in the event that any of these beds ari' mined. The sampling was fail' and made in the most 

approved manner, but the resulting analyses showed that most of the beds were too Inch in 
ash to be considered commercially valuable, in view of other better beds known to exist in 

other parts of the field. Had sonic of the outcrops contained coal sufficiently clean, the 
crushed condition of the coal ami the highly disturbed strata would he a severe handicap for 
the economic working of great portions of the area. The area has not been entirely pros],, 
and it is not impossible that later he, Is of economic value might hi' found. 




*t/& 



i of Minra 



'•«' "ii>'c < ...i t n. i ii — viio.ii i» - ( 'on lor I tons of st rata. 




ii ron mill OS < 0:1 i (..- i.i — snow! nu hi* inline Of Itleasu re«. 



3 Geo. 5 Cassiar District. K 97 



"The Telfer series, which overlies the Trail Creek series and which represents the upper 
1,150 feet of the coal-bearing strata, is made up of beds of sandstone, shale, coal, and bony 
beds. 

•' As stated above, this series represents what in my judgment should be regarded as the. 
commercially valuable portion of the coal bearing series. There are two or more beds in this 
series that are indeed very promising. The following analyses were made from a fair sample 
taken from one of these outcrops : Moisture, 2.62 ; volatile matter, 6.96 ; fixed carbon, 84.49 : 
ash, 5.9.3 ; sulphur, 5.75 ; and 13,814 B.T.U. 

"The coal in this bed at the outcrop is firm and bright and will produce a very large 
percentage of lump coal. The coal will stand handling, and taken as a whole the bed promises 
to be a most excellent one. The walls are firm and will make splendid bottom and roof for 
actual mining operations. The coal in the bed is 5 feet 4 inches thick, with but one parting. 

"In the properties I examined, an area of probably twenty-five square miles is underlain 
with this series ; and it is highly probable that the series extends to the northwestward out of 
the area I examined. 

" The Table mountain series overlies the Telfer series, I believe unconformably. This 
series is over 1,500 feet thick. The only effect it will have on the underlying strata is where 
it becomes so. thick that it will be too great an overburden for practical operations of some of 
the lower beds in the Telfer series. 

" Geological Structure. 

"The entire region is thrown into a series of folds, with their axes lying in a north-west, 
Mjuth-east direction. The courses of the streams are controlled more or less by the directions 
of the folds. 

"The axes of the folds plunge to the north- west from a point near the mouth of the 
Klua-tan-tan (Moss) river, and it appears that they plunge to the south-east from a point 
north-west of the mouth of Bierne creek. In this event the Groundhog field occupies, as it 
were, a huge elongated basin, which is made up of a series of synclines and anticlines, with 
the former predominating and thus forming a synclinorium. The series is eroded in many 
places, leaving only the synclines, and the resulting field represents the remainder of a very 
much larger area of coal-bearing strata. 

"The folding and faulting are much more severe in the Conglomerate series and become 
less severe as the top of the column is reached. In the lower beds there is evidence of severe 
compression, and in many instances slaty cleavage has developed. 

" Even though coal-beds commercially clean be later found in the Trail Creek series, the 
severe compression, with its resulting folding and faulting, will be troublesome and expensive ; 
in fact, too expensive to be able to compete with the less folded areas. 

"Many of the folds I observed, and in fact nearly all of them, were overturned, with their 
axes dipping to the south-west. 

"Tonnage. 

"I have seen from time to time tonnage estimates of this field. I have seen no 
explanation as to how these estimates have been arrived at, and so far have seen nothing 
better than a wild guess. Personally, 1 have calculated tonnage of portions of the field where 
1 have been able to work nut tin- geology with some degree of accuracy, but these are little 
better than good guesses : to my mind, to calculate a tonnage estimate for the entire field 
is a waste of time and misleading. 



K 98 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



191.S 



" Metamorphism to Anthracite. 

"The coal-beds of this district arc of the same age as the bituminous beds of thet Srowsnest 
Pass field. The change from bituminous to anthracite has been caused by the extreme 

c pression accompanied by highly heated waters. These were the agents thai caused the 

change in this field. Evidence of the extreme pressure is ti> be found in the numerous and 
c implex folds now to be seen, and the pres ince of hen d water is to be had in the numerous 
stringers of quartz and calcite now seen in many of the coal beds, and also in most of the 
joint planes of the rocks. 

"Summarizing, we have about the following: There an- some coal-beds in the Groundhog 
coal-field that contain excellent coal ; in fact, so far as I have seen, the best domestic coal to 

be found on the Coast. Such a coal will find a market for a reasonable yearly tonnage. 

Mining i Iitions in portions of the field «ill hi' such thai coal can he mined at a reasonable 

cost, while iii other parts the cost will he prohibitive. Transportation to the tidewater can 
lie provided along feasible routes, and transportation charges will probably he within reason, 
considering this grade of coal. It is reasonable to believe that within tic- Skeena, Klappan, 
and Nass watersheds there will he found a sufficient amount of high grade coal which can be 

mined at a reasonable profit to warrant building a railroad into this part of the country. 

" In conclusion, I might add that, in my judgment, ibis field will not compare with the 

Pennsylvania field, either in quantity of coal or in mining costs, and I take this opportunity 

to make this statement for the reason that my name was coupled with an article recently 
which made this statement. However, I do regard the field as a valuable asset to the 
Province of British Columbia, and one that should be exploited along sane lines, with 
prudence, and not by wild and extravagant statements which never do any good, but only 
pave the way for a great deal of harm. The thing to do is to get at the facts and stick to 
them. 

"Awi.VSKS ok SdMli of Till'. (llilil'XIlllui; CoAL-HKI>S. 



Number. 


Moisture. 


Vol. CM. 


Fixed Carbon. 


Ash. 


Sulphur. 


B.T.U. 


1 


4.42 


6.58 


58.96 


30 ot 


1.61 


9 930 


2 


4 el 


13.08 


:,7 71 


25.20 


2 42 


9,600 


3 


2.71 


>; 09 


07.42 


23.78 


3.05 


12,650 


4 


2.97 


5 , 59 


65.60 


25 S4 


1.90 


11,520 


5 


2.45 


,-( si; 


63.96 


29.73 


1 93 


10,280 


li 


3 . 55 


4 02 


;o 68 


21.75 


o 99 


11,980 


7 


3.75 


5 71 


li.",. 13 


34.36 


1 57 


9,600 


8 


4 .".li 


25 


47.7:t 


11 52 


o 99 


7.SIMI 


9 


:i.77 


t 27 


57 . 7.". 


::i 21 


o 60 


9.580 


in 


5 95 


13.32 


40.67 


:u.06 


o II 


9,360 


11 


3.20 


7.02 


49 43 


40.35 


0.99 


7 860 


12 


1.17 


(i or, 


76.20 


16 58 


o 72 


12.215 


13 


1 el 
1.17 


9 39 
0.54 


07.89 

s:i . :i7 


22 lis 
s 92 






1 i 


o 71 


13,2 - 


15 


2.39 
4.12 

:, 95 


7.90 
7 43 

s on 


78 . 54 

82 60 

82 on 


10.18 

- 
i n:, 


O Hi 
10 




Hi 




17 




is 


2 62 


6.96 


si 49 




5 75 


13,814 


19 


5.75 

1 15 
1.40 


7.34 
s 75 
6.06 


75.26 

7'.i 25 
To lis 


1 1 115 
7 . 55 

21.86 






20 






21 


1.60 


H,7ss 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 99 



SKEENA DISTRICT. 



SKEENA AND BELLA COOLA MINING DIVISIONS. 
Report by J. McMullin, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report as Gold Commissioner for the 
Skeena and Bella Coola Mining Divisions for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

Observatory Inlet. 

At Granby bay the Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company has under 
(hi ist ruction a large smelter, which will be well on the way towards completion by the end of 
1913. The confidence of this company in the mineral resources of the surrounding country is 
shown by its extensive investments. This has acted as a stimulus to others interested in 
mining, with the result that the country at the head of Alice arm was prospected over, and 
has been most favourably reported upon. There are several groups of claims in this locality 
upon which from two to five years' assessment-work has been done, and the results have been 
eminently satisfactory. With better access to these properties, increased shipping facilities, 
and a smelter close at hand, it should be but a short time until they become shipping mines. 

Coast. 

Considerable prospecting has taken place during the past season on the coast and the 
islands adjacent thereto. Several deposits of iron have been located, and assessment-work has 
been done on a number of claims in the vicinity of Kumeoleon inlet. In the neighbourhood of 
Swanson bay, Kiekane inlet, and Khutze inlet, more interest has been shown than in any 
previous season, some very fine samples of bornite having been taken out. 

Messrs. Martin it Shannon, who have large holdings in this locality, have done extensive 
development^work, which has warranted them in Crown-granting over thirty of their claims. 

During the past season, operations on Princess Royal island have resulted encouragingly, 
.and it is the intention of the companies operating there to do more extensive work next season. 

Office Statistics — Skeena and Bella Coola Mining Divisions. 

Free miners' certificates 445 

Mining claims recorded 303 

Certificates of work 3(3 1 

Bills of sale and agreements 98 

Certificates of improvements 22 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $2,348 25 

Mining receipts 4,360 75 

$6,709 00 



K 100 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



SKEENA MINING DIVISION. 

MINERAL CLAIMS ON PRINCESS ROYAL ISLAND, B.C. 

Retort by H. Carmichael, Provincial Assayer. 

Princess Royal island lies on the coast of British Columbia, 180 miles Qorth of Vancouver 
Island. The island is of considerable size, being sixty miles long by twenty miles wide. It 

is very mountainous, lint is intersected by lakes and numerous channels which afford good 
waterways. 

One of the fiords, called Surf inlet, runs twelve miles in from the 1'acitic ocean, forming 
a safe channel for sea going vessels : at the head of the inlet Cougar lake empties with a fall of 
.'50 feet into the sea. 

Cougar lake is one of a chain of lakes which, with short portages, gives easy access to a 
large section of the island. 

The mining claims visited were the D.L.S. group and the Princess Royal group. These 
claims are on either side of a small stream Mowing out of Paradise lake, and are reached by a 
short portage from Surf inlet to Cougar lake, a row of two miles along the lake, then a pottage 
of a mile from Cougar lake to Bear lake, then a row of three miles up Bear lake to Paradise 
creek. 

The main tunnel of the D.L.S. group is situated on the north-west 
D.L.S. Group. side of the creek about a mile and a quarter from Bear lake, and at an 
altitude of approximately 800 feet above the lake or S50 feet above ill' 
sea-level : there is a good trail from the lake to the mine. 

The property is held by the Surf Inlet Gold Mines, Limited, 206, Bank of Ottawa 
Building, Vancouver, B.C. ; A. B. Clabon, Secretary. 

The company owns nine claims located on the strike of a quartz vein occurring in grain!. 
country rock and running diagonally into a mountain-ridge. 

Bhiff Claim. — The principal work has been done on the Bluff claim. A small creek on 
the side hill cuts through and exposes a quartz vein dipping south-west into the mountain at 

an angle of 32 degrees. The vein has been followed by a tunnel in a northerly direction for 
a distance of 500 feet. 

At L'H feet in, a short crosscut was run to the right, cutting through the foot-wall, which 
is well-defined with gangue-matter : the tunnel then swings slightly to the left, following the 
vein, but turning again to the right, so that the general direction is about N. ."!(> YV. At L35 
feel in. the tunnel cuts through a diabase dyke 7 feet thick, which, however, does not displace 
the vein : 25 feet farther in a crosscut 12 feet long was run to the hanging wall, and a winze 

18 feel deep was sunk on the dip of the vein. Up to this point the vein filling is quartz, with 

iron pyrites scattered through it, and also a little arsenical pyrites. 

For the next 50 feet, the tunnel is entirely in vein matter, showing a fair amount of Ore 
on both sides in a short crosscut of 5 feet run to the right to the foot wall. 

At L'.'io feet in. the vein pinches, but again swells out. and a good Ore-shoOl was struck at 

300 feet, from this point a long crosscut is being run to the left at a deflection angle of 10 

degrees to cut a vein lying to the west of the "main vein," and on which some work has been 

don,.. This crosscut had been run 243 feet, all in a granitoid rock, but at the face the ground 

was becoming brecciated and it seemed likely that the zone of disturbance, carrying the 

■• west \ I'in." was being entered. 



3 Geo. 5 



Skeena District. 



K 101 



D.L.S. Cftou* 9 ) P/?//rc£ss Royal Island 

OwA/£D3rS(//?r//vi£:T GoldM/ne^ L™ 

•Sketch Shotv/nj Re/af/vG 
Pos/fio/i of Cla/ms one/ Sa/f Water. 



fhrae/t'se Joke 




K 102 Repobt of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The main tunnel has been continued from where the crosscut branches off in the same 
north-westerly direction ; for 50 feei it follows the fool wall, when- a fair grade of ore was 
taken oul ; at tins point a short drift of L2 feel was made bo the left and is all in a fair grade 
of ore. The hanging wall is there followed for a farther 50 feet, when a drift was run to the 
left for 20 feei ; this drift to the face is all in ore. The tunnel keeps the same general 
direction for another 50 feet, but the ground is more broken and the foot-wall is nol well 
denned, what appears to be a horse coming in. At the time the property was visited the 
face of the main tunnel \\as in 500 feet; at this point, while the ore was showing, it was 
more broken and the vein seemed to swing more to the right ; later information would confirm 
this, as the tunnel lias been driven farther to the right and is reported to be in solid ore. 

From the face a short drift has been run to the left, but, except for a few stringers, was 
in country-rock. 

A trail goes along the hillside to the north, rising above tin- tunnel ; this leads to a gulch 
where a strong outcrop of a quartz vein is seen dipping int.. the hill and having the same 
general strike as the vein in the tunnel, so that thou is every reason to suppose it is tin- same 
\ .in. 

At 280 h-i-t north of tin- tunnel mouth and 171 trot above it. an inclined shaft had been 
sunk on the outcrop of vein, having a dip of 32 degrees to tin- north west ; the shaft was 

reported t" I»' down 50 feet, with ore at tho bott an. I an upraise run to the hanging-wall, 

which it cut through, giving the vein a width of Is feet : hut this could not he examined as 
there was several feet of water in it. 

This vein is well defined and has the same dip and general character as seen ill main vein 
ill the tunnel. It is the intention of the management to run an upraise from the main tunnel 
to connect w ith this shaft. 

What is known as the " west vein " outcrops in the creek 300 feet to the northwest of 
the portal of the main tunnel and 1 1.'! feet above it. 

A drift from the gulch was run in on the vein for •">!> feet, show in" jjcmhI ore. from which 

high values were obtained. As working was difficult from the adit on the gulch, a short drift 

was run through a shoulder of rock to the hillside, and this is the working entrance. 

At •_'■"> feet in from the gulch a drift was run to the left for 300 feet ; this is for the most 
part in a quartz breccia with good ore showing in the face. From the intersection of the right 

drift the tunnel has been driven in a northerly direction for I 11 feet, mostly in country-rock 

with a little quartz. The tunnel then swings to the left, running nearly north east for .".' I I 

at 7 feet from the turn a stringer of iron-pyrites 111 to 18 inches wide was cut : this yielded 

fairly high assays in gold, otherwise the tunnel is in country-rock. At .'!<> feet from the turn 
to the left; the tunnel cut into a well-defined quartz vein dipping at li» degrees to the north- 
west. A drift at right angles follows the foot wall of the \ein northeasterly for .'!< I feet, for 

which distance the vein is well denned and the face in ore. the samples taken giving g 1 

values. The mineralization consists ,,f iron-pyrites, with a little arsenical pyrites, in quartz 

gangue. This is the vein that the long crosscut tunnel from the main vein is expected to 
intersect. 

Summary. — The property contains two or more well-defined quartz veins which have been 

proven by underground work for considerable distances. It is fairly easy of access, and the 
treatment of t lie ore p resents no serious difficulty. Tlie\alue of the property depends then 

on the averagt assay of the ore. and this has not yet been determined with any degree of 
accuracy. 



3 Geo. 5 S keen a District. K 103 

Assays run all the way from £3, in rather lean-looking quartz, to 880 in solid pyrites. 
Samples of the ore, which seemed about the average, assayed in the Government Laboratory, 
yielded $8 to $9 to the ton in gold and silver. 

These claims lie to the south of the D.L.S. group, across a narrow 

Princess Royal valley, through which a small stream flows south-westerly, draining Paradise 

Group. lake : the claims are reached by a good trail from Bear lake. A considerable 

amount of work has been done on two quartz veins, and, as these veins lie 

in the same general direction as the veins on the D.L.S. group, it is probable that they are a 

continuation of the D.L.S. veins, or at least are on the same line of fracture which runs fchrougn 

the granitic country-rock. 

•There were a number of mine buildings on the property, but, as no work has been done 
for several years, the houses are in a state of ruin and the underground ladders are in many 
cases unsafe. 

The fissured zone runs directly up the steep mountain-side on to the southern slope, when- 
other prospect claims have been staked. 

Work has been done at many points on the claims, prospecting the outcrops of quartz 
veins by small shafts, drifts, and surface workings, but the greatest expenditure has been 
incurred in running a long tunnel on a small quartz vein the outcrop of which is seen on the 
surface. 

The portal of the tunnel is at an elevation of -100 feet, and the tunnel runs nearly straight 
in a south-easterly direction for 1,030 feet ; for its entire distance the tunnel follows a quartz 
\ein which varies in width from a few inches to 3 feet. At 100 feet in, a drift has been run 
to the left for 50 feet, on an offshoot from the main vein. The vein starts with a width of 4 
feet, but narrows to 6 inches of white quartz at the face ; the mineralization is pyrite which 
gave 0.5 oz. gold in selected samples. 

At 160 feet in, an upraise had been driven to connect with a shaft sunk from the surface 
about 60 feet above : short drifts have been run and stoping done at this point, showing me 
width of the vein to be from 2 to 3 feet. 

There are four more short raises from the tunnel and two winzes ; the latter were full of 
water, and it was not feasible to examine the former owing to the condition of the ladders. 

The vein is well defined for the entire length of the tunnel and varies in thickness from a 
few inches to over 4 feet : the mineralization is pyrite ; the best ore is where the vein is widest, 
the narrow portion being barren white quartz. Samples of the best ore ran over an ounce in 
gold, with a little silver, but it would take careful sampling to determine the average value of 
the vein. 



PORTLAND CANAL MINING DIVISION. 
Report by John Conway, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my annual report for the Portland Canal Mining 
Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The most important feature of the year's development was the commencement in October 
of a drainage-tunnel on Glacier creek by the Portland Canal Tunnels, Limited. The site of 
the tunnel is immediately above the concentrator of the Portland Canal Mining Company, and 

is to be driven a distance of about •_'.<.>< •<) feet. This it is expected will tap, at depth, the main 



K 104 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 



fissured /our, upon which are located some of the most important mineral properties in the 
camp, such as those of the Portland Canal Mining Company, 'Stewart Mining and Develop- 
ment Company, Glacier Creek Mining Company, Portland Wonder Mining Company, "O.K." 
and the group of claims owned by the Pacific Coast Exploration Company. 

The tunnel will be of a sufficient size and capacity to amply fulfil the objects of it-- 

construction, which maybe briefly summarized as being the accommodation of all probable 

future traffic, and the providing of drainage, ventilation, and the most economical means of 
development for all properties in the main fissured /.one. 

The Red Cliff" Mining Company shipped 1,249 tons of copper-gold ore to the Tacoma 

smelter, but the returns did not warrant further shipments under existing transportation 

facilities and the mine closed down the beginning of October. 

On Salmon river, three companies viz., the Salmon-Bear River Mining Company, 
Cascade Palls Mining Company, and Indian Mines, Limited continued operations during the 

greater part of the year, but in each case with only a small force of men. 

A number of placer leases have been staked during the past s,; 1S on on Hear river, 

extending south from the mouth of Hitter creek twelve leases have been granted. The 
ground is all flat river-bar, no benches, having a width of approximately half a mile. Th,. 
river-channel winds from side to side of the valley and is liable to change its location at anj 

run of high water. Considerable work was done by the lessees on one of tin- claim-, to 

ascertain, if possible, whether the ground would show sufficient values to warrant testing it by 

the usual drilling methods. To this end some fifteen pits were sunk to a depth of from t to 8 
t'eet, and two shafts to a depth of '_'."> feet ami Is feet respectively. Five of these holes were 
sunk as close to the present channel as possible, and fair prospects found in each case from the 
surface, w bile samples taken from the bottoms of the holes are said to have ranged from 23 

I'm to $6 per yard. The other holes were sunk farther back fr the river, on higher 

ground, and each sunk to a depth of about 8 feet : there were a-fe\\ tine colours to ;i depth of 
about fl feet, while samples panned from the bottoms gave from Hd cents to .-'."> per yard. 
Still farther hack from the river and in fairly heavy timber a shaft was sunk I'.'! feet. The 
upper portion of this panned a few line colours from the surface until the water was struck, 
when about a yard of gravel was hoisted before the water drove the men out. A sample 
taken from this and carefully panned. I am told, gave $14 to the yard. Another shaft was 
sunk 18 feet, when water was encountered ; bailing ami a small hand-pump made DO 
impression on it. so the work had to be abandoned until water conditions were more favour- 
able. These shafts will be sunk this winter during low water in the river if the drainage 

through the gravel is small enough to permit. 

It is reasonable to suppose that the gold on Bear river has been brought down by Hitter 
creek. A discovery claim was staked on the South fork of Hitter creek in April. 1912, by 
I. Anderson and I-'. (J. Hanford, which was immediately followed by the staking of the 
whole of Bitter creek. The only work done was by Anderson and Hanford, who, after 

staking and prospecting the ground with fair results, put in ti' 1 feet of sluice-boxes. To obtain 

a sluice-head they used 300 feet of :• inch canvas hose to carry the water from farther up the 
creek. 

They sluiced for about a month under difficult conditions, the snow being about ! 
deep and the water low on the start, and were Compelled to quit on account of the high water. 

During the ith thej took out slim in fairly coarse gold. Work having then to be abandoned, 

a layover was granted until September loth. 




Prim*!*** lto>]il Ishiml Surf luli't. 




'rincewi Royal [aland — Tunnel of Surf ini«'t < - «»l «l Mine*, I. id. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 105 



On resuming work in the fall, it was thought best to attempt to reach bed-rock, and with 
this end in view a shaft was started on a bench some 25 feet above and 75 feet back from the 
creek-bed. This was sunk 35 feet, when water was encountered in such quantities that it would 
necessitate pumping machinery ; consequently the work was stopped. The gravel is uniform, 
with only an occasional boulder large enough to need bulldozing. It prospected a few colours 
to the pan all the way down, with a marked improvement in the bottom where the water was 
struck. 

It was then decided to try to get some depth in the creek-bed. A wing-dam was thrown 
in and the water diverted to another channel. They then ran an open-cut for a distance of 75 
feet, obtaining a depth at the face of about 6 feet, and a further 3 feet was sunk to water. 
Contrary to expectations, this creek-bed gravel only prospected a few very fine colours to the 
pan. Another shaft is now being sunk farther down the creek. 

There was a large falling-off in the number of prospectors in the camp as compared with 
the season of 1911, but assessment-work on claims held by individuals has been well kept up, 
and in most cases with gratifying results. 

Maple Bay. 

On the Comstock group a series of open-cuts and stripping was recorded. 

Application for certificate of improvements has been made on the Princess group, owned 

by Collison it Noble. 

Georgia River. 

On the John D. group the shaft was sunk a further 15 feet and a drift of G feet made ; 

at this depth a vein of free-milling gold was encountered, a picked sample of which gave high 

values of gold per ton. 

Marmot River. 

The Wire Gold group, consisting of nine claims, was recorded in November by G. "W. 
Bruggy and associates. This group is situated on the north side of the river, less than two 
miles from tide-water ; the ledge, which is free milling, is about 6 feet in width, runs in a 
northerly direction, and can be traced on the surface for three claim-lengths. The gold is in 
white quartz lying between porphyry walls ; surface assays gave good gold values. A tunnel 
lias been driven on the lead for a distance of 40 feet ; the ore at the face carries high silver 
values, in galena, as well as the streak of 30 inches which is free milling. Work has been 
closed down for the winter and operations will be resumed as early as possible in the spring. 

On the Golden Star group a series of open-cuts and 17 feet of tunnel has been recorded. 

Salmon River. 

The Salmon-Bear River Mining Company recommenced operations early in the spring, and, 
owing to a new discovery made soon after resuming, the company gave all its attention to the 
opening-up of the new ore-body, the character of which is a high-grade silver-lead carrying good 
gold values. The nature of the work consists of a number of open-cuts across the vein, which, 
in some instances, is 25 feet in width, exposing the vein down the trend for several hundred 
feet. A tunnel was driven in on the vein to intersect the ore-shoot exposed on the surface, 
and the ore was encountered at a depth of 200 feet. A crosscut has been run at this level in 
feet across the ore-body. The company is at present making plans for development on a larger 
scale in the coming spring. 

The Indian Mines, Limited, owns a group of four claims situated on the west side of 
Cascade creek, about three miles above its confluence with the Salmon river, and about fifteen 
miles up the Salmon River valley from tide-water. It is now easily reached by an excellent 



K 106 Report of the Minister of Mines. l!ti:i 



horse-trail constructed during the past season by the Government. Supplies can now be 
delivered a1 the property for 1 cents a pound, as against 12 cents a pound a year ago. The 
first twelve miles of this trail is practically level, the elevation at "Twelve-mile" being ■'<-'■'• 
feel above sea level, and offers do difficulties to the construction of a wagon road or a rail mail. 
The property is heavily timbered and ample water power can be developed for any mining or 
milliiiL; operations. 

The vein has been traced on the surface for over 1,000 feet and is well defined. I > appears 
to cross, diagonally, a wide diorite dyke which intrudes the predominating greenstone schists. 
Two open cuts have been made across the vein, showing it to be from 18 to 20 feet in width. 
The higher cut exposes almut s t'eet of solid galena, t he remaining 1 2 feet being quartz heavily 
mineralized with galena and iron. 

Another cut, 300 t'eet south, across the face of the hlulV. shows the Vein to he 18 feet wide, 

12 feet of which carries gold, silver, and lead. 

A tunnel is being driven to get under these surface showings. It is no" in 200 feet, and 
will have gained a depth of 150 feel when under the galena show bag. The vein was encountered 

at I Id feet from the mouth of the tunnel, showing from 1' to I feet of Ore assaying "ell in gold, 

silver, and lead. This was drifted on for 20 feet, when a shattered portion of the vein 

entered and continued in for 111 feet, in which there were little or no values. In the last .',11 
feet the \ein has become "ell defined, and a crosscut at the face, not yet to the foot "all. sh,,"s 

it to he over 15 feet in width, of which there is 6 feet on the hanging-wall of good milling 
As the tunnel has to be driven about 125 feet yet to get under the big surface showing, the 
present indications are encouraging. 

Another tunnel has heen started farther dow n the hill (about 150 feet vertically), ami 

driven in some K) feet as an open-cut. This is following a well-defined hanging wall, next to 
which is a fairly soft filling carrying no values. This, however, is cutting out, and the face of 
the tunnel shows 2 feet of ore carrying gold, silver, and lead. (Report furnished by • '. A. 
Clothier, B.Sc., superintendent.) 

The Cascade Falls Mining Company continued development during the year with a force 
of three men : the work consisted of a series of open cuts, stripping, and other surface work. 

<)n the Finland Girl group of four claims the wm-k recorded was six open-cuts, totalling 

'.HI fee! in length, and 44 feet of tunnel. 

Luc/,;/ Swede group of four claims, series of open cuts and •"><! feet of tunnel. 
Cosmopolitan group of five claims, series of Open cuts and 1 * > feet of tunnel. 
Big Missouri i;roup, series of open-cuts. 

Yellowstone group, series of open cuts and surface stripping. 
Flossie group of eijjht claims, twelve open-cuts iii rock and In t'eet of tunnel. 
The Hercules Mines. Limited, recorded 22 feet of tunnel on the Martha Ellen group. 

On the Ladybird group of four claims, owned by I!. Cameron and associates, a series of 
open cuts has heen recorded : the work done has shown up a lead of high grade galena carrying 
high silver values. This property has been bonded to H. E. Cassels, of New York, ami the 

tirst payment made. 

Beak River. 

The Red Reef group, consisting of Red Reef Wos. /, .', ■•'. ',. '. 6, .'. and Red Reef Fraction, 

is situated on the east side of the mouth of Bear river and within ! niile of the Stewart 

to" nsite. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 107 

During the summer of 1910 sufficient work, consisting of surface work and two short 
tunnels, was done on Red Reef No. 1, to obtain Crown grants on Nos. 1, 2, 3, 4, |and the 
fraction, but owing to litigation little work was done in 1911. 

Work was recommenced in July, 1912, and the first month was spent in open-cutting the 
large mineralized zone on Red Reef No. 6. Later a pack-trail was built to the property and 
a cross-cut tunnel was commenced on Red Reef No. 3 ; this has been driven for a distance of 
225 feet ; the ore being encountered at 200 feet ; a drift from the main tunnel has been run 
50 feet to the north to tap a small vein running in an easterly and westerly direction ; a tunnel, 
to tap the ore at 100 feet lower than the main tunnel, is now in 45 feet and is being extended 
for an additional 100 feet. Some 500 feet to the south of the main workings an independent 
40-foot drift has been driven on the zone. 

The ore is a white quartz, with pvrrhotite, chalcopyrite, and small values in gold and 
silver. The mineralized zone, which appears to be not less than 100 feet wide, runs the whole 
length of the property and is heavily impregnated with mineral throughout. The zone is 
crosscut by several veins carrying fairly good-grade ore. 

The property is owned and operated by H. E. Newton, of Victoria, and from six to 
thirteen men have been employed on the property continuously since July, 1912. 

The Portland Bear River Mining Company recorded a series of eleven open-cuts in rock 
and a large amount of surface stripping on the Bear River group, and 91 feet of tunnel on the 
Rul/y Fr. group. 

On the Victor group of three claims 30 feet of tunnel and two open-cuts were recorded. 

The Mountain Chief group, situated on the west side of Bear River, owned by Win. 
Forrest and associates, was located in August, 1911 ; the work done consists of a series of 
open-cuts. There are several veins on the property, all of which carry high gold and silver 
values. 

On the Franklin group the work recorded was 1 8 feet of tunnel and open-cuts. 

On the A. A. group 30 feet of tunnel and open-cut work was recorded. 

Red Cliff Mining Company's superintendent reports as follows : — 

Total amount of new work for the year represents 4,205 feet. Out of this, the 400-foot 
level claims 1,240 feet, consisting of crosscuts, drifts, and 100 feet of chute-raising ; this latter 
work for the purpose of facilitating stoping. Much of this work has been in ore varying in 
quality, but, taking the high grade with the low, could all be smelted profitably, provided 
any reasonable economic smelting conditions were available. On this level we have im« 
exposed ore-shoots with a length of over 250 feet and an average width of 20 feet, although 
in places over 50 feet wide; by far the greatest tonnage yet exposed in the mine is on this 
level ; here the ore-bodies appear to be merging into one big body, while on the levels above 
they are widely separated. 

On the 300-foot level there are 800 feet of drifts and crosscuts ; all this is new work, 
having been opened up during the year. There are two distinct ore-bodies exposed on this 
level, one through which the old raise passes, and on that account it has not had much done 
to it, and the other 100 feet on the north side of the same raise : the latter we were drifting 
on when machines were laid off. Situated as it is directly over the 400-foot ore, it is no doubt 
part of the same ore-body. 

On the 200-foot level, the 300 feet of new work comprises chute raises into the No. I 
ore-body and drifts and crosscuts opening tip the No. 2 ore-body. 



K 108 Report of the Minister or Mines. 191:5 



The 100-foot level has hai 1 an increase of new work amounting to 1,160 feet, consisting 
.it' .in extension of the main tunnel smith westerly of " B " and Mcl'hee's drift north-westerly, 

Crosscuts from these drifts north-easterly, anil a drift on the No. 2 ore hod y connecting " B" 
and McPhee's drifts. It was from this ore body thai niurh of the ore was extracted for 
shipment. Anew tunnel NO feet long was driven from a point 120 feel in the old tunnel, 
with an outlet of 7") feet farther to the south of the old portal : this was to take the place of 
the old outlet, which is all in ore and must eventually he stoped out, rendering it useless as a 
working-tunnel. The new tunnel is in a much better position, being away from the course of 
snow slides. 

Upper tunnel : tOO feet of tunnelling anil crOSSCUtting has been done in this level for the 
purpose of locating the southerly ore hody and more accurately determining its strike and dip. 
It accomplished its object, hut developments were not as satisfactory as anticipated ; for when 
finding the ore at this depth, although of excellent quality, there was not SO much of it as was 

expected, judged from the promising outcrops I" 1 ' feet above; possibly where intercepted it 

had pinched and may yet open out again much larger on the levels below : to prove this, work 

was being done on the 100-foot level. 

Other work consists of a new main raise, run from the 100-foot to the 100-foot level : the 

last portion of this, between the L'OO foot and ] 00-foot levels, was timbered and is used as a 

manway, skipway, and ore-chute, a new hoist having been installed on the 100-foot level to 
handle mining material through this raise. 

<>n the Waterloo claim a very large ore-body has been stripped and shots put into it at 

intervals across L'OO feet, proving (as far as surface work can prove) this to be a very lame 

low-grade proposition and a very valuable asset to the company, provided that a cheapei 
method of transportation and smelting is secured: a few hundred feet southeast of where 

work has been done on this showing is situated the large body of iron sulphide ore carrying 

exceptionally high values in gold. 

When shipments were being made, o.OOO tons of ore was broken, 1,249 tons have been 
shipped, 1,500 tons remain in the stopes, anil 2,239 tons were put on the ore-flumps, as the 
value of the latter, without sorting, was too low to ship under present smelting conditions, and 
sorting was out of the question without sorting facilities. 

The work of the past year has proven the permanency of the A'.,/ Cliff ore bodies, as on 
the 100 foot, the lowest in the mine there is much more ore in sight than on any other level, 
and the values with depth are holding their own. (Report furnished by II. Neil Smith. 

superintendent.) 

Glacier Creek. 

On the Evening Sun group, owned by Rush A: Ba:, r L. r . ll"i feet of tunnel has been driven 
during the past season ; 7 tons of No. 1 ore was sacked ready for shipment, but Owing to the 

heavy fall of snow it was found impossible to gel horses t.. the property. 

On the O.K. mine the tunnel has been extended a further 50 feet by the owner, .1. 

l'errault. 

On the Portland group, formerly the property of the Portland Wonder Mining Company, 
hut now owned by the Mount (Hailstone Mining Company, )•"> feet of tunnel was recorded. 

On the Florence and Leadville claims, owned by .1. A. Harper, v " feel of tunnel was 

recorded. 

On the Ruth and Francis group, <>1 feet of tunnel has been recorded by the owners. 
Nesbitt .V Archie. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 10!> 

On the Lake View group, owned by McKay ifc Bibeau, the work recorded was 22 feet of 
tunnel, 15 feet of shaft, and open-cuts. 

The drainage-tunnel of the Portland Canal Tunnels, Limited, was commenced in the 
beginning of October ; the size is 7 x 7 feet in the clear, and it is now in a distance of 120 feet. 
The company has a force of twenty men employed and is working two machines, the com- 
pressor of the Portland Canal Mining Company supplying compressed air. 

Bitter Creek. 

On the Old Chum group the work recorded was 30 feet of tunnel and four open-cuts. 

On the War Eagle group the work recorded was 30 feet of tunnel. 

American Creek. 

The group of nine claims formerly owned by the Northern Terminus Mines, Limited, was 
purchased at a sheriff's sale last June by Neil McL. Curran, acting as agent for the Pacific 
Coast Exploration Company, Limited. The development-work under the new management is 
335 feet of tunnel and drifts and a shaft sunk to a depth of 50 feet. This property has closed 
down for the winter months, but operations will be resumed as soon as possible in the spring. 

On the Lipton group, owned by Wm. Spurck, the work recorded was 34 feet of tunnel. 

On the Bonanza group, consisting of four claims, a considerable amount of development- 
work has been done during the past season under- the superintendency of T. J. Vaughan Rhys, 
M.E.; a number of open-cuts in rock and 75 feet of trenching have been recorded. 

Office Statistics — Portland Canal Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates (individual) 280 

it it (company) 9 

ii ii (special) 1 

Mineral claims recorded 178 

Placer claims recorded 22 

Certificates of work issued 512 

Bill of sale, etc., recorded 77 

Filings ■ ■ • ■ 39 

Certificates of improvements recorded 27 

Placer leases granted 12 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $2,195.25 

Mining receipts, general 3,759.75 

Other sources 1,422.50 



Total $7,377.50 



QUEEN CHARLOTTE MINING DIVISION. 

Report of E. M. Sandilands, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining operations in the Queen 
Charlotte Mining Division for the year 1912. 

The head office of Gold Commissioner was moved from Jedway to Queen Charlotte City, 
on Skidegate inlet, and a new office opened here on May 1 5th last. 



K 110 Report of the Minister of Mines. 191.'} 



Mining in general has been very quiet this past year, there being very few inquiries for 
copper properties, in spite of the high price of metals. Very little prospecting lias been done, 
and assessments only have been kept up on claims having the most promising showings, No 

ore was shipped from tliis Division this past year. 

Coixison Bat. 

No work of any account has been done this jiast year in this locality. The MkoI Ticket 
group had the assessment done, hut nothing moie. Several other claims had from two to three 
years 1 w ork done on them. 

Iki,o\ Bay. 

At the Ikeda mines no work was done, with the exception of assessments on unCrown- 
granted claims. The main group of claims has been Crown granted. 

Harriet II irboi h (-1 r.i>\\ u ). 

On Cupper island, in Skincuttle inlet, owned by A. Ileino. a force of ahoiit ten men was 

regularly employed ; the chief work being the sinking of a shaft. Ore of a good grade "as 

encountered in the bottom of the shaft and shipments are expected shortly. An air drill and 
compressor have heen installed and new buildings have heen erected. 

On George island, adjoining the above mentioned island, W. II. Campbell has some good 
showings of high grade ore and has a few tons ready for shipment. 

Nothing but the usual assessment has been done on the Copper Queen group, owned by 
• I. S. McMillan. 

Huston Im.f.t. 

Thompson & McKinnon have done considerable work on their property at the head of 

Huston inlet, called the Ivan group. A tunnel has 1 n driven in some 70 feet, with a large 

showing of fairly good-grade ore. 

On the Hercules group H. McEachern and other, have done considerable work and have 
encountered some good showings of ehaleopyrito. 

Lockeport. 

E. M. Morgan and associates have had three groups of claims under working bond the 
past year -namely, the Montana group, owned by Andrews 4 Dunn; the McGuire group, owned 
by F. C. Elliott and ..tiers ; and the Apex group, owned by Harris, Bell & Davies. < >n each 
of these groups from eight to ten men have been continuously employed, doing development- 
work, etc., and, up to the time of writing, with fairly good success. 

No work, with the exception of the assessments, has been done on the Swede group this 
year. There is a rumour of this property changing hands and of work starting up again on it. 

Tabu. 
A working bond has been taken on Qowing & Jones's claims in Tasu, and at present a 

.small force of men is at work testing the property with a view to more extensive development. 
The parties having the option are Seattle people. 

I I MSH1 w \ I vi.kt. 

I he Queen Charlotte Mining and Development Company, which owns the Homestake 
group in Cumshewa inlet, has operated continuously this past year, employing on an av< 

ahout twelve men. Tin- company has driven some 600 feet of tunnel, put up 170 feet of raise. 

sunk some 50 feet, and built half a mil.- ..f wagon road from the mine to the beach. The best 

Of the ore is being sacked and will he shipped later on ; the ore carries high gold values. 
Extensive operations arc expected the coming summer. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 111 

On Louise island, on the opposite side of the inlet, some work has been done on a group 
of claims having a large showing of high-grade iron-ore, and a drill is expected to be installed 
on the property shortly. 

Two core-drills have been in operation the past summer drilling for coal, one on Yakoun 
river, under the management of W. L. Barton, and owned by the Graham Island Collieries, and 
another owned by the Graham Island Coal and Timber Company and under the management 
of F. C. Greene. Speedy progress has been delayed by the difficulties in getting in supplies 
and machinery.* 

Boring for oil still continues at Otard bay, on the west coast of Graham island ; McPhail 
<k Stewart having charge of the operations. These people have had many difficulties to 
contend with in the way of getting in machinery and supplies, and deserve great credit for 
the manner they have continued the boring under such hard circumstances. The Government 
has built and improved the present trail from Naden harbour to the west coast. 

Office Statistics — Queen Charlotte Mining Division. 

Claims recorded (quartz) 90 

Certificates of work issued 159 

Certificates of improvements 47 

Bills of sale 33 

Free miners' certificates issued 126 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $ 690 23 

Mining receipts 2,070 80 

Other sources 2,783 00 

Total % 5,544 05 

* Note by Provincial Mineralogist. — C. H. Clapp, of the Canadian Geological Survey, spent two 
weeks this past season on the island examining the coal formation. The following extract from the " Press 
Bulletin" issued by the Survey refers to his work there : "It was found that the Cretaceous coals, while 
of excellent quality, occur in much smaller basins than was previous^ thought, and that the basins are 
deformed, and involved with later igneous rocks, which occur chiefly as dykes and sills or laccoliths and 
possibly as flows. However, considering the excellent quality of the coal, many of the basins are well 
worth further prospecting." 

The Graham Island Coal and Timber Company has moved its drills as near to the outcrops at Camp 
Wilson as the property admits, and will endeavour to pick up the coal-seam there and trace it farther. 



OMINECA MINING DIVISION. 
Report by W. Allison, Gold Commissioner. (Office at Hazelton.) 

I have the honour, as Gold Commissioner, to submit the annual report for the Omineca 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

With the advent of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway into Hazelton in the fall, and the 
c msci|iieiit lowering of freight rates, considerable outside interest has been manifested, and 
preparations for development-work on a larger scale have been made by owners hitherto 
content with doing merely the necessary assessment- work. 

A new era in the development of the district commenced with the shipping by the 
American Boy mine last month of the first car-load of ore, while a further 250 tons is now at 
the station awaiting shipment. 



K 112 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Glkn Mountain. 

This silver-lead property has been actively developed during the pas! 

Silver Standard year with very gratifying result--, and about ten car-loads of ore have 

Group.* recently been hauled to the station for shipment. The main, or No. 2, 

shaft lias been sunk to a depth nt' 262 feei and drifts were started at the 

150-foot level, where the ore shows a width of 9 feet, and a station is being cut at the 250-foot 

level. A compressor has been installed and drills will he m operation early in L913. 

About •'!■"><• feet east of the No. 2 shaft surface prospecting opened up a tine showing of 

ore, and a crosscut will he driven from the 250-foot level of the No. 2 shaft to tin- new vein 
known as No. .'!. 

Some 100 feet east of No. 3, a strong \ein I No. 4) was found showing very rich ore. hut 
little work was done on this. 

On No. I vein, 300 feet west of No. J vein, considerable surface work was done during 
the summer, and a large and continuous ledge of quartz carrying more or less ore uncovered. 

Assays of picked samples taken while the ore was being taken out of the shaft during Sinking 
show values of from $100 to $G00 per ton of 2,000 B>. 

The property is well equipped and the owners plan to do extensive development-work as 
rapidly as possible, while extracting the ore in sight. 

Canadian King Group. — Little has been done on this group during the past year, hut 
considerable work is planned for the coming year on the reins known to exist. 

Surprise Group is a northerly extension of the Silver Standard group. Surface work on 
this property has disclosed live parallel veins, all of which carry more or less galena. In June, 

after considerable work in stripping the outcrops, a crosscut tunnel was started w ith the object 
ill view of cutting all five- veins. This tunnel is now in 450 feet and is being vigorously 
extended. 

Some twenty new- locations have been made on this mountain. 

Nine-mile Mountain. 

The many evidences of mineralization all over this mountain and tin- g 1 surface 

showings, in places, still attract a great deal of attention; new locations to the number of 

sixty six being recorded during the year. 

The trail along Two mile creek to the north side of the mountain has been converted into 
a good wagon-road foi a distance of six miles. 

Owned by the Harris Mines. Limited. Tins property has Keen under 

American Boy steady development (hiring the past year and has now reached the shipping 

Group. stage. The shaft on the No. I vein has been deepened from .")7 feet to the 

ls."> foot level. There is ore all the way down, varying in width from 18 

inches to 5 feet, the average values being about $45 to the ton. From the I 1 1 > foot level a drift 

lias been started to the north and will he continued until it reaches a shoot of on- which shows 

on tin- surface, TO feet north of the shaft. This shoot of ore is 10 feet in length, and a general 

sample of 2 feet 6 inches of ore gave returns as follows; Cokl. O.OS oz. : silver, l'.l-.o >>/..: 

lead, 31.7 per cent. 

No. 'J vein was opened up by crosscut tunnel 3-40 feet in length, which tapped the vein at 
a vertical depth of 110 feet; some 80 feet of drifting was done, the vein being mineralized 

throughout and of an average width of 3 feet. Drifting will In- resumed later to locate the 

ore si t. 



"See alio notes by Provincial Mineralogist following the report. 




i.r iin.i: Mt. — Trail over Summit In Midsummer. 




Camp nt HfcESvoy Klnl*— (• rou nil lion Cob Hie hi. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 113 



No. 3 vein has been developed by the inclined shaft on the vein being deepened from 27 
feet to the 185-foot level. Drifting at this level has exposed some nice ore at different points, 
the vein being about 2 feet in width in the face of the drift. 

No. 4 vein has been stripped and a fine shoot of high-grade ore exposed. 

About 200 tons of ore has been taken out in the course of development, and a car-load of 
25 tons of sorted ore has recently been shipped to the Trail smelter, returns from which have 
not yet been received. 

Silver Cup Mines, Limited. — This property has remained idle during 1912, but, in view 
of the reduced cost of supplies consequent on the advent of the railway and the extension of 
the Nine-mile wagon-road, arrangements have been made for a resumption of work during the 
coming year. 

Owned by the Hazelton Nine-mile Mining Company, Limited. Work 
Lead King on these claims has been confined to a 40-foot shaft and a drift 30 feet long. 
Group. It is unfortunate that the finances of the company have not permitted of a 

more vigorous development of this promising property. 

Silver Cup Extension Group. — During the year a 34-foot tunnel has been driven and 
several open-cuts made. 

Silver Pick Group. — The tunnel on this property has been extended and the vein further 
opened up by means of rock-cuts and surface stripping. 

The usual annual assessment-work has been recorded on a great number of claims, many 
of which show promise, but these are too numerous for individual mention. 

ROCHER DeBOULE MOUNTAIN. 

The very encouraging developments taking place on the claims owned by the Rocher 
Deboule Copper Company, Limited, have induced very close prospecting on this mountain, 
and many new locations have been made both on the Juniper Creek side and at the headwaters 
of Mission and Mud creeks, the fissures having been traced over the divide. Some promising 
claims were also staked on the Skeena side of the mountain, so that the mineralized area is 
now proved to extend for several miles in all directions from Juniper basin, where the original 
discoveries were made in 1910. 

Owned by the Rocher Deboule' Copper Company, Limited. There are 
Juniper Group, four veins on this property on which work has been done. No. 1, the lowest 
on the mountain, being at an altitude of 4,780 feet, and No. 4, the highest, 
5, GOO feet. Vein No. 1 is really two adjacent veins, the first of which seems to be a replace- 
ment of the granite by chalcopyrite ; considerable quartz is also in the vein, which in the 
crosscut is 8 feet wide. 

The second vein lies directly on the hanging-wall side of the first ; it is apparently a fissure 
rilled with quartz carrying grey copper, galena, and zinc-blende. A crosscut tunnel 185 feet 
long was driven to tap this vein, which was then drifted on both east and west, and a raise of 
61 feet put up. The crosscut exposed 8 feet of low-grade copper (1} per cent.) and 4 inches 
of grey copper. The raise was connected with the Trimble drift above, where chalcopyrite 
shows for a length of 35 feet. 

On veins Nos. 2 and 3 comparatively little has been done. 

Vein No. 4 is a very strong fissure cutting the formation for several miles. Strike, 
S. 75 W. ; dip, 65 degrees to the north, or into the hill. It is on this vein that attention 
has chiefly been bestowed. 



K 114 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The main workings consist of a short shaft, a tunnel, and a long drift. At station No. 2, 

2 feet of ore was rut, assaying about 12 per cent, copper and $10 in gold. This ore continued 
for 47 feet between stations Nos. 2 and 3. A raise was driven from station No. 2, 27 feet to 
the surface, showing good ore all the way and averaging 2 feet wide; 200 feet east of this 
point a surface cut was made on the vein, showing -'i feet of excellent ore containing some 
native copper : assays of this ore are nut available. 

The winze from the Pemberton tunnel was started on (i feet of ore, which gradually 
widened in 20 feet to !) feet 4 inches, then pinching to 4 feet at the bottom, -'S7 fret deep. 

The raise connecting with this winze shows the ore to pinch to a few inches, ami then widen 
to 2 feet ii inches at the elill' t unnel level, 102 feet perpendicularly lower. The ore assays 
high in copper, with good values in gold and silver. The exact length of this ore shoot has 
not yet been determined. 

Between stations Nos. 7 anil 10, 25 feet (if ore was found 3 feet wide. From hereon the 
vein showed ore at various times, hul no regular ore shoot was found until ,!0 feet past station 
Xo. 11. The ore here is 5 feet (> inches wide, and with 35 feet of drifting still holds g 1. 

Assays an- not vet to hand, but it carries considerable copper. This is 11.'! feet perpendicularly 

below the collar of the shaft, or about 125 feet on the vein. 

The shaft was started on 5 feet of ore, which widened to (i feet at the bottom, '■'<'' feet 
deep. The entire shaft averages well in copper, with good values in gold and silver. A total 
of 1,359 feet of development-work has been ace plished. 

Highland Boy Group. — These claims adjoin the Juniper group to the north, and have 
been prospected by means of open cuts and surface Stripping. The property has just been 
taken over by a newly organized company — the Butte-Rocher l>el>oiile Copper Company. 
Limited and active development-work will he undertaken in the spring. The fissures on the 
Juniper group have been traced through this property, which has excellent surface show ings. 

Great Ohio Group. — This property adjoins the Juniper group to the cast, and was located 
by the same prospectors. Development has been chiefly confined to open cuts and extensive 
stripping, the main fissure having been proved for over :i,ooo feet, tl ■(• exposed giving 

promise. 

Amargo&a Group. — Adjoining the Great Ohio group, the big fissure vein from which. 
striking perpendicularly through the mountain, passes through two of the claims in this group. 

There are two other veins known on this property from 4 feet to It feet wide, the lower 
disclosing chalcopyrite assaying 2 per cent, copper. 

Copper Hill Group. Some nice ore has been exposed on this group, the work consisting 

of 10 feet of tunnel, some ten large open cuts, and several hundred feet of stripping. 

On the Mission creek side of the mountain tin .', /• group and Fngenika group were 

only located during the summer. 

Seine 1 16 urw locations on Rocher IChoule mountain were recorded during 11*12. 

Hudson \'>\\ Mountain. 

This promising district has, hitherto, been greatly retarded owing to the difficulty 
transportation, hut with the assurance of the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway running intoTelkwa 

early in the spring of 1913, greater activity may he looked for. 

Coronado Group. A crew of six men was engaged on this property for some time, and, 
as a result, the showings have considerably improved. A 50-foot tunnel opened up a 1-foot 
vein of galena ore of exceptionally high grade. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 115 

Hudson Bay Mountain Mining Company, Limited. — This company is driving a long 
crosscut tunnel, which, when completed, will give a depth of several hundred feet. 

Assessment-work was recorded on the following groups, in addition to numerous individual 
claims : Silver Creek, Empire, Victory, Dominion Day, Extension, Moonshine, Buck/torn, 
White Swan, Humming-Bird, Last Chance, Iron King, Anaurus, Suprise, Groundhog, and 
Cascade. 

New locations to the number of fifty-one were recorded. 

Babine Range. 

Prospecting was very active in this section, forty-eight new locations being recorded. The 
better-known properties, however, are still awaiting more favourable transportation facilities, 
and nothing beyond the necessary assessment-work has been attempted. 

Telkwa. 

There are many properties tributary to this point which are being slowly developed, and 
<ju the Morice river a new discovery was made of some large bodies of zinc-ore, carrying some 
values in silver and copper. 

KlTSALAS AND Zy.MOETZ PiIVER. 

The claims in this district are still mainly in the hands of prospectors and very little 

serious development-work has been attempted, although surface showings are in many cases 

•of a highly encouraging nature. 

Placer-minino. • 

The Cassiar Hydraulic Mining Company, Limited, has installed on Gold creek, Kitsalas, 
a complete hydraulic plant, consisting of a 40-inch Sampson turbine water-wheel, Worthington 
pump, flumes, penstock, etc., and a 12-inch pipe-line tarrying water to the "giants." The 
plant has been tested and found entirely satisfactory and will be operated during the coming 
season. 

In the Omineca River district there has been very marked activity, thirty -eight new leases 
being taken up and many transfers taking place, the tendency being for the consolidation of 
leases in financially strong hands, owing to the necessity of installing heavy machinery. 

Coal. 

Of the numerous evidences of coal in this district the only proven deposits of a coking 
quality are on Coal creek, at the headwaters of Zymoetz (Copper) river, where seventy-five 
.sections are owned by the Copper River Coal Claims, Limited. 

On the seam known as the "Main," coal is exposed in a tunnel on the east side of Balsam 
creek, in which 5 feet 10 inches of steam-coal was recently reported. Further work, however, 
has shown an additional 4 feet 3 inches of coal above what was supposed to be the roof. This 
addition to the seam is evidently persistent, as it has been exposed at two points in the tunnel. 

The "Six-foot" seam, which outcrops on both sides of Coal creek, has now been defined 
mi both sides of Balsam creek by means of a drift 172 feet from Coal creek, and a tunnel on 
the west side of Balsam creek. It is a clean, coking-coal. 

On the No. 1 seam, two 45-foot levels have been driven, showing 3 feet of first-class 
coking-coal, with an exceedingly low percentage of ash. 

Samples of coal from all the seams on the property have been analysed and not a single 
sample returned more than 1 per cent, of sulphur. 

Exploration-work, as far as tunnels are concerned, has practically reached its limit, and 
further prospecting to test the acreage and the continuity of the seams will be done by drills. 



K 116 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 



* Anthracite Coal, — The interest aroused in the Groundhog anthracite coalfield Las been 
maintained, and considerable work and further prospecting has been done. In addition, BOme 
of the holdings have had the benefit of expert examination and report. 

The B.C. Anthracite Coal, Limited, ran some seventeen tunnels on their claim-, varying 
t'n.m 20 to 250 feet in length. 

On the Murdoff & Williams claims, the Lindsay group, Canadian Mining Operators, 
and Laidlaw's claims, men were employed in stripping and making open cuts and other 
accessary work of an exploratory character. 

The Western Development Company, Limited, and the B.C. Anthracite Syndicate were 

not working this past season. 

Office Statistics — Omineca Minim; Division. 

Free miners" certificates (individual) 1,023 

ii ii (special) C 

H ii (companies) 6 

Mineral claims recorded 678 

( lertificates of work issued 658 

Placer claims recorded 4 

Agreements and transfers 203 

Placer mining leases granted 38 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates . . . ." $ 5,391 7, r > 

Mining receipts, general 8,638 TO 

Total $14,030 45 

"See report of Provincial Mineralogist on pages 81 el si </. 



OMINECA MINING DIVISION'. 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist. 

Passing through lla/.elton on the return from Groundhog, tin- 
Silver Standard Provincial Mineralogist rode oui to the Silver Standard to observe tin- 
Mine, development since his last visit to it, as described on pages 99 el seq. of 

1911 Report. The property is about live miles from the old town of 
Hazelton and about six miles from the nearest point on the (band Trunk Pacific Railway. 
The property is held by Stewart, Welch, McLeod, and associates, and the work was being done 
under the direction of W. S. Raskins, formerly of Rossland. 

The shaft, which in 1911 was down 25 feet, had been continued, in September, L912, to a 

depth of 200 feet, and was equipped with small hoisting engine and boiler, and w ith a pump in 

the shaft. The shaft is (! x 10 feet in section and dips at an angle of about (>0 decrees into 
the hill : drifts each way had been broken away at the 150-fooI level, but bad not been driven 
any distance. 

The vein, carrying ore, continues for the full depth of the shaft, except for a few feel at 

the bottom, where the vein seems to have taken a flatter dip, and, as the shaft was continued 

at the regular angle, the vein disappears into the hanging-wall, where no doubt it will !«• found 
to be continuous. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 117 



The vein has thus been developed to the depth of the shaft, in which its thickness varies 
from 2 to 6 feet, averaging about 4 feet, but the lateral dimension of the ore-shoot has not yet 
been proved ; on the surface this is only shown to be from 30 to 35 feet, so that drifts will 
have to be run before ore can be claimed to be " blocked out." 

The vein is very well mineralized with galena and zinc-blende ; the extent of the 
mineralization may be indicated by the statement that from the shaft-sinking there has been 
produced from 300 to 350 tons of first-class ore which would run somewhere about 30 per cent, 
lead, 20 per cent, zinc, 1 25 oz. silver, and from $3 to $5 in gold ; in addition to this, there is 
about 70 tons of second-class ore and some 200 tons of third-class ore, which, it is calculated, 
would concentrate about 5 into 1. 

While these shaft-workings have developed a very promising body of ore, the management, 
in its recent prospecting in the vicinity of the shaft, has uncovered another vein — a new 
discovery — running parallel to the shaft-rim, but some 80 feet vertically higher and 
outcropping 3G0 feet farther up the hill. 

This new discovery had only been prospected by a series of trenches down to, or 
extending for a few feet into, bed-rock. These workings, although very superficial, have 
shown up an exceedingly promising ore-shoot, which, from indications, seems probable to quite 
eclipse the shaft and vein. 

These development workings have demonstrated, with a reasonable certainty, a continuous 
ore-shoot from 200 to 250 feet long on the surface, with a well-defined streak of nearly solid 
galena, and zinc-blende with much grey copper, for this entire length, and also a further 
thickness of vein of from 2 to 3 feet of quartz and ore of unknown grade. 

The "streak of solid ore" is good enough for the present, averaging from 18 to 20 inches 
in width and running from 200 to 300 oz. in silver to the ton on samples obtained along its 
outcrop. 

Probably at no point had this ore been absolutely demonstrated for a depth greater than 
• i or 4 feet, yet its promise was so good that its further development will be watched with 
great interest. 

It is understood that this new discovery will be developed by driving a crosscut tunnel, 
about 360 feet long, from the 150-foot level on the shaft-workings. 



PEACE RIVER MINING DIVISION. 
Notes by Provincial Mineralogist. 

There has been no report received this year from the Mining Recorder of the Peace River 
Mining Division, which is probably accounted for by the fact that mail from this district has 
to be brought out by dog-teams in the winter, and is at best wry uncertain. 

The Peace River Mining Division embraces a triangular piece of territory lying to the easl 
of the Rocky Mountain range and west of the 120th meridian, so that geologically it is related 
more closely to the great plains of Alberta than to the remainder of British Columbia. 

With possibly the exception of its western border, its geological conditions do not promise 
much prospect of producing metalliferous deposits, since any formation likely to produce metals 
is deeply covered with deposits of the shales and sandstones of the Cretaceous coal-bearing 
formation, and these in many places by still younger formations. 



K 118 Report of the Minister of Mines. 191.* 



The Peace river itself carries a small amount of placer gold, which appears to have been 

carried l>v it through the Rocky mountains from their western side, as it is not known that any 
of the tributaries east of the mountains carry gold. 

As was pointed out by the writer in a former report, the gold thus found is in a very fine 

state of division, and has not vet been found in such a state of concentration that it could be 

profitably worked by other than mechanical means. 

It seems probable, bowever, that some of the bars and shoals in this river may eventually 
be successfully worked by dredging, to which class of work the total absence of large boulders 
and clay in the river -benches particularly lends itself. 

As has already been said, a large portion of the area in question is covered by the 
Cretaceous formation, which is the formation in which, both in Alberta and British Columbia, 
all the commercial coal has been found. 

In the Peace River Mining Division these measures have for many years been known to 
contain in parts deposits of coal of exceedingly good quality, which, until the probability of a 
railway within a reasonable time was assured, did not offer much inducement to development. 

At this time, however, it does seem possible that a t'vw years will see railways constructed 
into the district, when coal-deposits will be of great importance to the development of the 
district. 

With such facts in mind, this Department, last summer, engaged the services of C, F. J. 
Galloway, B.Sc., of Vancouver, a minim,' engineer, and a British Columbia certificated coal 
mine manager, to visit the field, to examine such development as hail already taken place, and 
to report. Mr. Galloway's report is appended hereto, ami. as the route is little known, the 
itinerary of his trip to and from the field is also given, W bile maps prepared by him accompany 

the report. 



REPORT ON THE COAL-MEASURES up THE PEACE KIVKR CANYON. 
By C. F. J. (Jali.oway, B.Sc., October, 1912. 

Itinerary ok Trip. 

Acting under instructions received from the Provincial Mineralogist, the writer, early in 
■Inly, consulted with Robt. Green in Victoria, and Neil Gething in Vancouver, two of the 

gentlemen interested in the Peace River coal lands, as to the examination of that property, 
the means of transportation, etc., and was very strongly advised to take with him Geo. 

Henderson, of Slocan City, 01 f the partners, and. rather than employ Indians from Fort 

i leorge 01 McLeod lake, who are becoming more unsatisfactory and exorbitant in their demands 
every year, to send for (Jus Amundsen, a Norwegian living at Stuart lake, who is familiar 

with the Peace river and with the coal exposures. Telegrams were sent to these gentlemen, 

who were fortunately both able to < e; Mr. Henderson proceeding at once to Vancouver, 

and Mr. Amundsen arranging to join the party at McLeod lake. 

July I 1th. The writer, accompanied by Mr. Henderson, left Vancouver by CI'. II. train 

at '.) a.m., reaching Ashcrofl at 5.30 p.m. 

July loth. Left Ashcroft per B.X. auto-sta;;e for Soda Creek at S a.m. The auto _ 
great trouble, finally breaking the shaft one mile from the 70 Mile House. A new shaft was 
wired for from Ashcroft, which arrived on a special auto at midnight. 

July Mith. After a new shaft was put in the journey was resumed at 't. .'10 a.m.. S 
Creek being reached at 9.40 p.m.. after considerable further trouble from heated bearings. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 119 

July 17th and 18th. Left Soda Creek at 3 a.m. on steamer "B.X.," reaching .South Fort 
George at 2.30 p.m. on the 18th. 

July 19th and 20th. Efforts were made to find an Indian to pilot the party up the 
Fraser river as far as Giscome portage, a distance of forty miles, but without success, nearly 
all the local Indians being at work in connection with the construction of the Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway. 

Owing to the recent fall in the river, the B.X. Company's steamer " B.C. Express " was 
not going up as far as Giscome again until the river rose, but, hearing that it was going to 
take an excursion up as far as Willow river on Sunday, the 21st, the writer bought a canoe 
and the greater part of the supplies for the trip, and made arrangements to go up on tin- 
excursion. 

Jul v 2 1st. Travelled as far as Willow river on the steamer " B.C. Express," arriving 
there at 2.15 p.m. At 3.15 Mr. Henderson and the writer started lining the canoe up the left 
siil.' of the river. Camp was made at 6.15 about four miles up. 

July 22nd. Continued lining up-stream. Crossed to the right (north-west ) bank at the 
foot of Giscome rapids, and lined up through the rapids, making about nine miles by 6.30 p.m. 

July 23rd. Giscome was reached at 10 a.m., but, on account of the flies, the team on 
the portage was only being worked at night, and it was 6 p.m. when a start was made, the 
canoe, loaded with the dunnage, being hauled across the seven and a half miles on a specially 
constructed rig. Summit lake, the headwaters of the Peace river, 300 feet above the level of 
the Fraser, was reached at 9.10 p.m. 

July 24th. Traversed the eastern arm of Summit lake, about six miles, to the outlet into 
Crooked river, which stream was followed down for about twenty-five miles. For the greater 
part of this distance the river is from 100 to 300 feet wide, the water being quite dead, 
suggesting the broads of Norfolk, and forming an ideal natural canal. 

In a few places it narrows down and the stream is rapid, but very small, occasionally 
being reduced to a width of 5 or 6 feet. In these parts it runs over gravel and boulders, 
which in many places have been taken out of the channel in order to enable canoes to pass in 
low water. 

Tin- country on either side is timbered with small spruce and poplar, the wide flat valley 
being bounded bv low hills. 

A thick growth of alder and willow lines the river-banks, making it very picturesque in 
places, and testifying to the richness of the soil, which is in general a sandy loam, sometimes 
of a dark colour, interst ratified with frequent beds of clay. 

July 25th. As Davis lake is approached the river becomes more crooked than ever, 
forming innumerable loops from side to side of the valley, which is here from four to five miles 
wide. In places the river spreads out into a number of sloughs, the water being so dead that 
it is very difficult to tell where the channel is. 

At 3.15 Davis lake was reached, and traversed, a distance of six miles, by 5.15. It is 
from one to three miles wide, several deep bays rendering the task of finding the outlet by no 
means an easy one. At 5.15 p.m. camp was made on the left bank about a mile below the 
lake. 

July 26th. Below Davis lake the river is slightly less crooked than before, but otherwise 
very similar. Where the side of the valley is approached in a loop, the higher ground is seen 
to be timbered with spruce and some fir. At 2 p.m. Keary lake was reached. This lake is 



K 120 Report of the Minister ok .Minks. 1918 

about four miles long and from one to two miles wide, gradually tapering down to a width of 
from 200 to -'i00 feet, which continues for about fifteen miles farther, after which the river 

narrows down to 100 feet. Camped at <!. 15 p.m. on the right hank. 

July 27th. In order to make MeLe.nl Lake Post hv the ev cuing, an early start was 
made at (i.iio a.m. For about ten miles the river continues broad-like, with occasional narrow 
places and riffles. The hanks are getting higher, being here from In to 20 feet high, still 
thickly grown with willow and alder. On the higher ground cot ton wood, spruce, and fir are seen. 

At 8.45 a.m. McLood lake was reached and the left side followed, crossing from point to 
point. This lake is about sixteen miles long and from one to six miles wide. When a wind 
springs up it is liable to become sufficiently rough in a few minutes to swamp a canoe, SO that 
care has to be taken in crossing tin- open stretches. 

At .">..'><) p.m. McLeod I^ake Post (sometimes erroneously called Fort McLeod) was reached 
after a hard day's paddling. There (Jus Amundsen was found camped, having been there 

since the 21st. 

The writer was greatly impressed with the transportation possibilities of this route, 
which, with the expenditure of a comparatively small sum of money, would make a magnificent 
waterway from Summit lake t" McLeod, a distance in a straight line of about fifty-five miles. 
hut by water of over 100. By dredging certain portions, aggregating perhaps ten miles i u all, 
and widening a few places, a lake and canal route would be formed over which large scows 
could be hauled by stern-wheel steamers with equal ease in either direction. By cutting 
canals across the narrow necks of land in some of the "loops" the distance could he greatly 
reduced. There appears, moreover, to he no very great difficulty in the way of making tin- 
Pack, Parsnip, and upper Peace rivers navigable throughout, thus establishing a continuous 
waterway for the whole length of the present canoe route from Summit lake to tin- I' 
River canyon, a distance of some 300 miles, the greater part of which traverses what will 
undoubtedly before many years become a very rich farming country. 

July 28th, being Sunday, was spent in overhauling supplies and baking a quantity of 
bread. 

\ canoe belonging to Mr. Gething was found at the Post, and as it was larger than tin- 
one brought from Fort George it was decided to continue the journey in it. There were r,.. 

natives available in the place who would have been of any use on the trip, and the writer had 

cause to congratulate himself on having secured the services of Mr. Amundsen, who proved 
invaluable throughout. 

Although McLeod is one of the worst places in the Province for mosquitoes and black 

lie . i hen- were scarcely any at this time, on account of the unusually dry season. The same 

applied all through the northern country, the rivers all being exceptionally low on the same 
account. 

July L'Oth. There was a slight frost during the night, hut the | and other 

ih]es grown at the Hudson's Bay Post wen- not affected. 

A start was made down the Pack river at 8.50 a.m. As the details of tin- country seen 

from the river from here on have been described in W. Fleet Robertson's report on his trip 
through northern British Columbia and the Peace River country in the British Columbia 

Minister of Mines' Report for 1906, further details will hi- reduced to a minimum here. 

Owing to the very low state of the water it was necessary for both the writer's companions 

to wade at several places and help the canoe over the riffles. Except at these points, it was 

still a ease of continuous paddling all the way to the Parsnip river, which was reached at 
5 p.m., camp being made a mile farther down at '1 p.m. 



a Geo. 5 Skeenw District. K 121 



July 30th. The Parsnip river was, even at the low stage of the water, flowing at a rate 
of from four to five miles an hour in most places, so that from here on considerably better speed 
was made without the necessity of paddling so hard or so incessantly as before. 

The valley is fifteen to twenty miles wide, there being in many places flat benches from 
half a mile to two miles in width about 15 or 20 feet above the level of the river, underlain by 
a sandy loam, with beds of clay through it at intervals. 

At 5.30 p.m. camp was made below the mouth of Nation river, a distance of about forty 
miles having been covered. 

July 31st. Farther down the current becomes slacker, the river being wider, but by 
assiduous paddling a distance of forty miles was made, camp being pitched on the right bank 
at G.20 p.m. Wild hay was growing in great profusion at this place, with some oats through 
it. Mount Selwyn could be seen in the distance. 

August 1st. The lower part of the Parsnip is very tortuous, at one place a neck of land 
a couple of hundred yards wide separating points on the river five miles apart. 

The mouth of the Finlay was reached at 1 1 a.m. Several pre-emptions have been stakerl 
in this neighbourhood, where there is a large amount of good flat bottom land. 

At midday Finlay rapids were reached, and, the water being too low to allow of the canoe 
being run down, it was necessary to haul it over the rocks past the two worst points. Camp 
was made about eight miles farther down at the foot of Mount Selwyn at 5 p.m. 

August 2nd. A portion of the morning was devoted to a visit to the Mount Selwyn 
" mine," where some work had been done on a mass of auriferous quartzite some years ago, but 
without any success. 

A quantity of provisions was set aside for the use of the writer's two companions on their 
return trip and left in a cache on the north side of the river, and a start was made about 12.30 
down the river through the magnificent scenery of the Rocky mountains. These are not 
nearly so rugged here as in the passes farther south, the peaks having been rounded off by 
glacial action. A halt was made on the right bank about a mile above Parle Pas rapids at 
5 p.m., and the party walked down to examine the rapids, afterwards crossing over and camping 
on the left bank at 6.20 p.m 

August 3rd. All the most valuable portions of the dunnage were portaged past the rapids, 
and the canoe lined down the left shore, where there is a good but rough channel. 

A short distance below these rapids the sandstone of the Cretaceous coal formation appears, 
and continues intermittently all the way down to the canyon of the Peace river. The valley 
is from one to two miles wide, the river winding from side to side, cutting a channel through 
the glacial drift with which the valley is filled, one, two, and in places three terraces having 
been formed. 

On the south side the land is mostly covered with small spruce interspersed with some 
eottonwood on the lower ground. The left bank is generally bare, having only scattered 
patches <>f timber, and would form good sheep-grazing land. 

The mountains come to an end in the vicinity of Parle Pas rapids, and from there mi to 
the canyon the valley lies between rounded foot-hills from 1,000 to 2,000 feet in height above 
the river-levei. 

Ottertail river, which comes in from the north about three miles below the rapids, has a 
line wide valley suitable for agriculture. The stream is very dead over this stretch, numerous 
eddies considerably retarding progress. After a hard day's paddling the head of the canyon 
was reached and camp made on the left shore at 8 p.m. 



K 122 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



A.ugus1 nli (Sunday). The morning was spent in washing and overhauling the dunnage 
[n the afternoon a walk was taken to a point about tun miles down the canyon. It was 
decided to leave the Imlk of the dunnage at this camp while spending tun or three days on the 
north side of the river, and, after returning here to cross the river above the canyon and spend 

a similar period on Gething creek, again returning to this camp ; then to make a trip to Eight- 
mile ( 'nek and return here once more in on lei- to cross over the portage to Hudson Hope and 

do the lest of the examination from that end. 

August 5th. A cache was made and the hulk of the things raised into it. The party 

then started eastwards along a trail cut out the previous summer by the surveyors, reaching 

their main camping-ground, about four miles down, at 1 I. to a.m. ( 'amp was made here, and 

m the afternoon the party descended into the canyon and travelled down in it for about two 
miles. Owing to the very low water it was possible to walk along the bottom of the canyon 
past many places which are usually quite inaccessible, ami the writer was thus enabled to take 

complete sections over considerable portions of this distance, interrupted Only where rock- 
slides or other disturbing features covered the measures. 

August 6th. Starting at 7. •">!). the party travelled down the canyon to the point reached 
the pro\ ious daw and continued for about a mile and a halt fart her. having, however, to take 
to the cliff, climbing 200 or 300 feet on several occasions. An intermittent section was thus 
obtained. 

Finally a point was reached which it was impossible to get round, and after returning a 
quarter of a mile an ascent was made out of the canyon and on to the hill behind, a height of 
7 in feet. From here the mouth of Johnson creek was seen in the distance. 

August 7th. Starting at 6.45, a trip was made up the river, descending into the canyon 
a quarter of a mile above the camp and following it up to a point opposite the mouth of 
Gething creek, beyond which further progress was impossible. Returning, the bottom of the 

canyon was followed down to the point at which the descent had been made into it on the 
previous days, thus making an almost complete traverse of the canyon from the mouth of 
Gething creek for about five miles down-stream. 

In the afternoon the party returned to the camp at the head of the canyon, meeting there 

a Mr. Gregory who has a number of pack-horses. From him it was learned that the Hudson's 

Bay Company's Steamer was expected to make its last trip up to Hudson Hope about the 
loth, and, as the writer was pressed for time, it was decided to abandon the intended trip to 
Eight mile creek, ami, after examining the Gething creek exposures, to cross over the portage 

on the 1 1th, leaving four days for the trip to Johnson creek. 

August 8th. Crossing the river half a mile above the head of the canyon, the party 

proceeded hv the somewhat circuitous trail to the North fork of Gething creek, which was 
struck about a mile above its continence with the main fork. Camp was made at this point, 

and in the afternoon the creek was followed up for a mile, and s ,■ coal-exposures seen, but 

none of .iiiy great thickness. 

August 9th. It rained from ."> a.m. until midday, thoroughly wetting the brush, and no 
examinations could he made in the morning; hut in the afternoon the creek was followed 

down to a point about •'!<»(> yards below the forks, or half a mile from the Peace river. 

For the greater part of this distance Gething creek was in canyon, progress being 

rendered all the more difficult on account of the frequent falls, and it was necessary on one 

occasion to climb to a height of 300 feet out of the canyon, descending into it some distance 
farther down. Beyond the point reached progress was impossible, the canyon being 

precipitous On both sides. A coal seam •'! feet 8 inches in thickness (G 12) was seen at the 

lowest point reached. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 123 



August 10th. Returned to the camp at the canyon-head in the morning. During the 
afternoon the writer made a further examination of the rocks in the immediate neighbourhood. 

August 11th. Crossed over the trail to Hudson Hope, a distance of about fourteen miles, 
the dunnage being carried by two of Mr. Gregory's pack-horses. This trail runs in an easterly 
direction, passing to the north of Bull's Head mountain over a neck of land 700 feet higher 
than the river at the upper end of the portage, and nearly 1,000 feet above it at Hudson Hope. 
The river makes a detour to the south of Bull's Head mountain through the canyon. In the 
evening the party crossed to the right bank of the river and made camp. 

August 12th. It rained all night, the brush being very wet in the morning. Mr. 
Gregory's partner, Mr. Miller, with a pack-horse and a saddle-horse, accompanied the party. 
Owing to the considerable amount of muskeg on the trail the load was later on divided 
between the two horses. 

In this neighbourhood the valley is from two to four miles wide, covered with a luxuriant 
growth of grass, and lightly timbered in patches with small poplar, giving it a park-like and 
very beautiful appearance. 

Coal creek, a branch of Johnson creek, was reached at 4.30 p.m. and camp made. 

August 13th. Followed Coal creek and Johnson creek down to the mouth of the latter. 
Although the distance was only about four miles, the time occupied was considerable, the 
party having to climb bluff's 250 to 350 feet high on several occasions, it being impossible to 
follow the creek-bed all the way. The last half-mile is in a wide, flat valley, with no 
rock-exposures. 

The principal coal-exposures occur on these creeks, but proved to be considerably smaller 
than the writer had been led to expect, there being only four seams over 3 feet thick, the 
thickest being barely 4 feet. In the expectation of coming to a number of larger seams, the 
writer omitted to take a sample of one of these (J 13), which is to be regretted, as this seam 
proved to be of importance for purposes of correlating this section with that on Moose 
Bar creek. 

The greater thickness attributed to the seams was no doubt due to the fact that bands of 
dark shale (often indistinguishable from coal except on a freshly broken surface) had been 
included in the estimated thickness. The measures, while exceptionally free from disturbances, 
are very irregular as regards the continuity of individual beds. 

August 14th. Leaving camp at 7.30, the mouth of Johnson creek was reached about 
11 a.m., and the shore of the Peace river followed up for about a mile and a half, to a point 
opposite the lowest point reached on the opposite shore from above. Returning to the mouth 
of Moose Bar creek, that stream was followed up for about half a mile to a fall which barred 
further progress. An almost complete section was obtained on this creek, corresponding in 
part to that obtained in the neighbouring portion of the Peace River canyon. 

Returning to the mouth of Johnson creek, the Peace river was followed down for a mile. 
This portion of the river is wide and open, no rock-exposure being visible from the mouth of 
Moose Bar creek for several miles down, except a small patch of highly tilted sandstone a 
third of a mile below Johnson creek. Similar uptilting of the measures is seen on Grant 
mountain across the river, and on the hill to the cast of Johnson creek. Finally camp was 
reached at i).45 p.m. 

The possibilities of Johnson creek for water-power development are worthy of notice, there 
being over 200 feet head between the forks and Peace river, the quantity of water at the 
forks being at this low stage of the water something like 2,000 cubic feet per minute, or about 
1,300 miners' inches. Gething creek is of considerably more importance in this respect. 



K 124 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

August 15th. Returned to Hudson Hope, camping again on the south bank of the river. 

August 16th. Travelled up a creek opposite Hudson Hope for about three miles, 
examining the measures. No coal was seen, these measures being in the Lowest portion of the 

coal-bearing formation (Dunvegan series). The exposures seen were, however, intermittent, 
and the possibility of coal occurring in this portion of the series is not excluded. 

August 17th. Travelled up a trail on the north side of the canyon for six miles, then 
struck across and descended into the canyon at a point about five miles in a straight line from 
Hudson Hope, and followed the river up for a mile and a half, passing the mouth of Deep 
creek on the opposite side. Returning, the canyon was followed for two miles down before 
Striking inland to the trail. In this part of the canyon the measures consist of the dark- 
lirown, earthy, Fort St. John shales, which continue in the bottom of the canyon for some 

distance above the mouth of Deep creek before they disappear under the coal-measures. 
August 18th, being Sunday, was devoted to rest and washing. 

August 19th. The morning was devoted to a general inspection of the neighbourhood 
and a visit to Mr. Miller's ranch. The few ranchers who have made any serious attempt at 
cultivation have had great success in raising potatoes and other vegetables. 

In the afternoon two Indians arrived in a canoe with the mail from Fort St. John, and 
as they had no news of the steamer, the writer arranged to travel down with them to that 

place, leaving his two companions to return up the Peace as arranged. Starting at 8 p.m., 

five miles were travelled that night and camp made on the left bank at 9.15 p.m. 

August 20th. Starting at 7 a.m., Fort St. John was reached at 5.45 p.m., the Indians 

doing scarcely any paddling, allowing the canoe to drift with the stream, which was running 

at an average rate of about four miles an hour. 

August -1st to 24th. All the local Indians being out bunting and the mail-carrier not 
being available, the writer waited for four days in the hope of the Hudson's Bay Company's 

steamer turning up, it being expected daily. 

One settler, . I. Wood, has taken up land here, having cleared some lo acres ready for 

cultivation next year. This year he has raised g I crops of oats, potatoes, turnips, beets. 

etc, on the ground attached to the police station. Vegetables bave been raised for a number 
of years by Mr. Beatton, the Hudson's Bay Company's factor, who even has some healthy- 
looking tobacco plants in his garden. Wild hay is regularly harvested on the plateau Too feet 

above the level of the river. 

The steamer not having appeared by the 24th, and knowing that t Lss the stage at 

Peace River Crossing on the 29th would entail another week's delay, the writer was finally 

enabled, through the g I oiliccs of Mr. Godsell, manager for I lev i lion Freres, to secure a young 

[ndian who was willing to accompany him as far as Dunvegan, and a canoe was purchased 

for -'I >. 

August 25th to L'Tth. For two days and a half the writer travelled downstream with 
the Indian, Vi hea, who could not speak a word of English, and who could not be impressed 
with tin' idea that time was of any value, and that there was any sense in paddling down 

in. Finally at 1 p.m. on the 27th Dunvegan was reached. About 500 settlers are in 
this neighbourhood this summer, all on the plateau land, not visible from the old settlement. 
which is in a bollow, only 50 feet above the level of the river. From here on navigation is 

perfectly easy, and the writer accordingly proceeded alone at I p.m., camping on the left bank 
fifteen miles down at 7.30 p.m. • 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 125 

August 28th. Starting at 7 a.m., the writer travelled down the river, reaching the 
beginning of the Shaftesbury Settlement at 3 p.m. The fields of ripe grain looked very 
promising. Peace River Crossing was reached at 8 p.m. 

August 29th to 31st. The stage leaving on the 29th for Grouard was full up, but a 
passage was secured in another rig leaving on the same morning. Travelling with the same 
team all the way, progress was slow, the road being very bad for the last forty miles. Grouard 
was reached by both vehicles on the morning of the 31st. This is already quite a busy little 
settlement, on the east shore of Buffalo bay, near the western extremity of Lesser Slave lake. 

September 1st. Leaving Grouard at 9 a.m. on the Northern Transportation Company's 
paddle-steamer, Sawridge, at the eastern end of the lake, was reached by night, the steamer 
tying' up there. 

September 2nd. Starting down Lesser Slave river in the morning, Saulter's Landing was 
reached at noon. From here on the river is not navigable for a distance of sixteen miles, to 
within a mile of its confluence with the Athabaska river. A portage was made over this 
distance by wagons during the afternoon. 

September 3rd. Travelling on the Northern Transportation Company's stern-wheeler 
" Northland Echo," Athabaska Landing was reached at 1 p.m. Here it was learnt that the 
railway from Edmonton, which had been out of commission for the last three weeks on account 
of the track sinking in the muskeg (tying up all freight and accounting for the delay of the 
Hudson Bay Co.'s steamer on the Peace river), had been put in order and taken over from 
the contractors by the Canadian Northern Railway Company the day before, and that the 
first passenger-train had left Edmonton that morning and would return the following day. It 
arrived about 8 p.m. 

September 4th to 9th. Travelled in to Edmonton on the first passenger-train on the 4th, 
and reached Vancouver on the morning of the 9th, having stayed over two days on private 
business on the way. 

THE COAL-MEASURES OF PEACE RIVER CANYON. . 

Report or C. F. J. Galloway, B.Sc. 

Geological Age. 

The Cretaceous rocks of the Peace river have been divided by Dr. Dawson* into four 
subdivisions, each well marked lithologically, as follows : — 

(1.) Upper sandstones and shales, with lignite coals (Wapiti River sandstones); 
(2.) Upper dark shales (Smoky River shales); 

(3.) Lower sandstones and shales, with lignite and true coals (Dunvegan sandstones) ; 
(4.) Lower dark shales (Fort St. John shales). 

In the comparative table accompanying his report, he places the Fort St. John shales 
opposite the Benton group of Nebraska and the Rocky mountains, and the upper shales (A), 
of Queen Charlotte islands. The Smoky River shales he considered as undoubtedly corre- 
sponding to the Pierre group, and the productive coal-measures of Nanaimo and Comox. 

The Dunvegan sandstones, which are the productive measures in this region, are thus 
seen to be older than those of Nanaimo and Comox, and more recent than those of Queen 
Charlotte; islands and the Crowsnest fields. 



*Can. Geol. Survey, Rep. Prog., 1879-80, p. 115b. 



K 126 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



191. S 



I JOJ 9 A/OiA/rwo C 




:? Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 127 



Extent and General Structure of the Coalfield. 

Descending the Peace river through the Rocky mountains, measures of Palseozoic age 
are passed through, greatly disturbed in the process of mountain-making, several great over- 
thrust faults occurring. 

A few miles below Parle Pas rapids, where the mountains proper end and the foot-hills 
commence, the sandstones and shales of the Dunvegan series come in, and, although the 
valley itself is almost everywhere covered with glacial and alluvial deposits, the sandstones are 
seen at frequent intervals in the steep faces of the hills on either side, all the way down to the 
canyon of the Mountain of Rocks, a distance in a straight line of about thirty miles, but over 
forty by river. 

For about half this distance they dip to the south-west at angles of from 15 to 25 degrees. 
In the neighbourhood of Twenty-mile creek an anticline crosses the valley, the measures 
appearing horizontally for a short distance, and then dipping at small angles to the north-east 
almost to the head of the canyon. 

At this point a chain of high hills comes in from the north-west, barring the progress of 
the river. These hills consist of the Palaeozoic limestones, etc., tilted at a high angle to the 
south-west, the most prominent being Bull's Head mountain, a dome rising to a height of 
about 2,000 feet above the level of the surrounding country, a little to the south of the 
general line of the Peace river, which here makes a large detour to the south, flowing round 
the flank of this mountain, having cut a deep canyon in doing so. 

To the south and south-west of Bull's Head mountain the coal-measures have been tilted 
up, showing a south-westerly dip of from 10 to 25 degrees through the upper part of the canyon. 

Where the river crosses the axis of uplift, the coal-measures have undergone greater 
disturbance ; in Grant mountain, a southerly spur from Bull's Head mountain, they are tilted 
at an angle of 45 to 50 degrees south-westerly. Beyond this the river is more open for some 
miles, the hillsides being generally densely wooded, and exposures are few. 

A few miles farther west the sandstones are again seen, now dipping to the north-east at 
moderate angles. Continuing down the river, they gradually flatten out, showing a very slight 
southerly dip throughout the lower part of the canyon, to within about four miles of Hudson 
Hope, beyond which the sandstones disappear, and the underlying Fort St. John shales occupy 
the walls of the canyon and the banks of the river beyond the end of the canyon at Hudson 
Hope for a distance of about sixty miles. 

Beyond the mouth of the North Pine river the coal-measures again come in, and continue 
with a slight easterly dip all the way down to Dunvegan, but no coal has yet been observed in 
this portion. 

The extension of the measures back from the river is undoubtedly very considerable in 
either direction. Coal has, for many years, been known on the South Pine river, and locations 
have been staked for coal-prospecting licences along the whole course of that river from the 
boundary of the Dominion Block to the neighbourhood of the Pine River pass. Coal has been 
discovered on this river at least as far east as the forks.* 

On the North Pine river coal is also reported outside of the Dominion Block, so that, if 
the measures are continuous between these points, this gives the field an extension of at least 
seventy-five miles north and south, without the limit being established in either direction. 



*Can. (Jeol. Survey, Rep. Prog., 1875-6, p. 53. 



K 128 



Report of the Ministkk of Mines. 



1913-- 



<)n tin- upper pari lit' tin' IVui'i' tin' rnal formation extends, as lias already been described, 
for about forty miles in an east-and-west direction, from just below Parle l'as rapids nearly as 
far as Hudson Hope, and, whether this portion is continuous with either of those mentioned 
tn the north and smith or not, it is reasonable to expect thai it lias considerable extension to 

the north west and south-east. 

It would obviously be impossible to form any estimate of the area actually underlain by 
coal-measures without exploring a very considerable amount of territory. 

Character of Measures. 
The lowest beds seen at the head of the canyon consist of grey and brown sandstones. 
with beds of grey and dark, almost black, shale. One coal seam, 1 foot . G inches thick, was 
seen in this part of the series on the right hank of the river, half a mile above the head of the 
canyon. 



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3 Geo. 5 Skeena District. K 129 



In the lowest beds visible are included some irregular beds and patches of fine 
conglomerate, containing pebbles up to half an inch in diameter of quartz, feldspar, slate, 
jasper, etc. This was the only conglomerate seen in these measures, and indicates that at this 
point the measures of the Dunvegan series were deposited unconformably on the older measures i 
without the Fort St, John shales being present. 

Following the canyon down towards the mouth of Gething creek, about 600 feet of 
measures are passed through, consisting of similar brown and grey sandstones in beds of from 
10 to 50 feet thick, alternating with beds of dark-grey sandy shale from 2 to 120 feet in 
thickness. This portion of the canyon is for the greater part inaccessible, being in places 200 
feet deep. 

About a mile above the mouth of Gething creek a number of dark seams are seen in the 
distance, which are no doubt coal, and probably represent some of the seams seen on Johnson 
Creek. 

The next supervening 600 to 700 feet of measures are well exposed in the south-east 
running portion of the canyon, and consist of coarse grey and yellow sandstone, many beds of 
sandy shale of all grades between true sandstone and shale, a number of beds of pure shale, 
and many thin seams of coal. Some of the beds of sandstone have a very strong yellow 
colouration from iron-oxide, and can often be traced by this over considerable distances. 

Occasional massive sandstones occur, up to 20 feet in thickness, in the upper portion of 
these measures, but, as a rule, the sandstones are well bedded, frequently showing ripple 
markings and occasionally false bedding. 

Traces of fossils are frequent, fragments of wood, leaves, etc., but none in sufficiently good 
preservation to be of use for purposes of identification. 

All the coal-seams seen, with the exception of the one already referred to, occur in this 
portion of the measures, and include a large number of thin seams and a few thicker ones, the 
latter being chiefly in the lower part of this subdivision, exposed on Johnson creek. 

On Gething creek, just below the forks, a fault, with a westerly down-throw, appears ; the 
extent of its throw has not yet been determined, individual beds not having been correlated 
on either side. It is probable, however, that the beds on the west side of the fault are the 
highest seen. 

The coal-seam, G -1, on the west of the fault has a certain resemblance to G 12 on the 
east, and if these are the same, the fault must have a throw of about 300 feet. It is possible, 
however, that G 12 is higher in the series, occupying perhaps a position intermediate between 
G 10 and G 11, in which case the throw of the fault will be 50 or 60 feet. 

Continuing down the canyon towards Hudson Hope, the underlying Fort St. John shales 
present a totally different appearance from the coal-measures, being dark brown in colour and 
containing no beds of sandstone. 

Thickness of Measures. 

On Grant mountain the Cretaceous rocks are seen tilted at an angle of 45 to 50 degrees 
for a distance of half a mile, proving a thickness of at least 1,500 feet below the coal-bearing 
horizon described. This, no doubt, includes a considerable portion of the Fort St. John shales 
as well as the lower portion of the Dunvegan series. 

We have seen that at the upper end of the canyon there is a thickness of at least 6(10 feet 
of measures in the Dunvegan series below the known coal-bearing zone, which may be said to 
commence on the river a mile above the uth of Gething creek. 



K 130 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



From this point up to the seam, G L2, is a thickness of about Ton t"< ■< 1 of n«J liearing 
measures. As the actual position of the higher measures exposed on Gething creek is not 

known, the thickness ahove (ill 1 cannot yet lie determined. In the lower canyon of (it-thing 

creek, where the seam is seen, there is about 200 feel of similar measures seen ahove it. 

On the Johnson creek section the seam. .1 13, being probably identical with -M 2 on 
.Moose Bar creek, may be expected to occupy a position between P !_i and P lo in tic Peace 
River canyon, being thus about 420 feet below G 1 l'. 

From J 13 down to .1 20 is about 280 feet, making the latter Too feet below <; 12, and 

therefore about the horizon of the dark bands seen in the canyon a mile above the mouth of 
< re1 lung creek. 

The measures for several hundred feet below this, as already described, are inaccessible 

in the upper part of the canyon, and not exposed in the lower, so that it is quite possible that 
coal-seams may occur in this portion aKo, the Too feet described being only that portion in 
which coal seams have been obser\ed. 

We have, then, in addition to the Ton feet of coal bearing measures, a minimum thickness 

of 200 feet of similar measures above and (iOO below, making a total of 1,500 feet for that 
portion of the Dunvegan series which can be observed. It is probable that the actual 
thickness of this series is at least 2,000 feet in this part of the tield. 

Coal-seams. 

< >n the Gething Creek section twelve seams wire observed, but of these only five, G I. 

<i 5, <J T, (1 8, and (1 1l\ are over 2 feet in thickness, the last being the only one over 3 Fi I ' 
having the following section: — 

Sandstone roof. Ft. In. 

Shale T 

Coal (dull) 1 4 

ii (bright) 1 4 Total coal, 3 ft. 8 in. 

Parting (shale) 1 

Coal (bright) 1 

Sandstone floor. 

A seam which is probably G 12 is seen in the cliff on the south side of the Peace River 
canyon from a point opposite the islands for a distance of marly two miles, where it finally 

disappears at the top of the cliff. Several dark seams, probably of coal, one of which is of 

considerable thickness, are seen above it, but as that part of the canyon is inaccessible they 

Could not be examined. 

The analyses from G 12 show it to be of remarkably high quality (Samples T and 8), the 
dull coal from the top bench being the best, and basing only L'. 1 per cent, of ash. 

This seam, although not very thick, will, on account of its good roof and floor, its freedom 

from admixture with shale, and particularly on account of its high quality, prove a st 

valuable one. 

In the Peace River canyon there are numerous seams exposed, no less than thirty four 

having been counted, after eliminating all which are probably repetitions of those already 

seen. Of these, however, the greater number are very thin, only twelve being 0V6I a foot. 

and three over 2 feet in thickness. 

Of these, P 1 asures 2 feet 11 inches in one place, and P 16 was estimated at ."■ feet in 

Section 1". where it was inaccessible, but measured only 2 feet .'! inches in Sections 11 and 12. 

The seam PI, which is 280 to 300 feet below ( ', 1 _'. is of even higher quality I Sample 6), 
possessing also a strong roof and floor. 



3 Geo. 5 



Skeena District. 



K 131 



Moose Bar Creek 



16 



IS 



P2T t 



*/3 i- 



M*. c? 



P29 £ 



1 I 



P30 i- 
P31 *f 



P32. r 
P33 ".' 






18 



Jm ft 





(7J s- 
jg "i- 

ZtK - 

•^ y 

,/a .• 
*•• 

"J* '£ 

r 
»<■ 

Jlt"i; 

± - 

in- 




20 










?RI 






























75 








22 




H 












H 





2/ 



■ r, s r- 




jx 7 1- 




<T3 ~ 




IQtf 

J4* r 




i*0' 









SIS % 




Tf*% 


B 



17 



Jt7 ii-' 


BS 






J3.0 T 


iiji 



oic^ iso y>« t btto*. J tO 



K 132 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



L913 



In the Moose liar Creek section a number of thin scams occur, corresponding to those 

seen in the lower part of the canyon section (Section 15). Above these four « seams were 

seen, only one of which, M 2, is of any importance. It lias the following section : — 



Sandstone roof. 
Shale 

Coal (dull) . . 
Shale 

Coal (dull) . .. 

Sandstone . . . 

Coal 

Sandstone . . . . 

Coal 

Shale 

Coal (bright) 
Sandstone . . . 
Coal (bright | 
Shale 

O.al (bright). 
Hard shale floor. 



Ft. Ii 



3j 



Rider (M 1). Total coal, 1 ft. in. 



3 
2 

7 
I! 
I 

6 
3 

1 



M 



Total coal, 2 ft. 8i ill 



The analyses from this seam (Samples 17 and IS) are not so satisfactory, hut theexcessive 
ash, particularly in Sample 18, is no doubt due to an admixture of shale in the sample. If 
the seam was stripped for a distance of a few feet and fresh samples taken from the clean 
surface, much better results would undoubtedly be obtained. In places there is a band of 
shale, from \ to 1 inch in thickness, in the middle of the lower bench of coal, and it would In- 
hard to separate this altogether from the coal in working, so that this cannot be regarded as a 
very clean seam. 

Passing across to the section on Johnson creek, we find twenty scams exposed, of which 
nine are over 1 foot, four over 2 feet, and three, .1 1 .'i, J 14, and J 16, over 3 feel in thickness. 

Of these latter, however, it is just possible that .1 I •'! and J 14 maybe identical, both 
corresponding to M 2. The sections of J 13 and M 2 are very similar, each having a small 
rider of dull coal above it, and the correspondence of these two is highly probable. In the 
case of J II. however, the similarity is much less, and its analysis would almost exclude the 

possibility of its being correlated with M '_'. Unfortunately no sample-- were taken of 3 13. 
The sections of the principal seams seen on Johnson creek are as follow- : — 

./ !.' and J IS. 



Ft. 



Shaly sandstone. 

Shale 1 

Coal (.lull) 

Shale 1 

Sandstone 

Coal (dull) 

Shale 2 

Coal (bright) 2 

Shale 

Coal (bright) 1 

Sandstone 

shal,' Qoor. 



In. 


I(l"| 




' Rider (J 12). Total coal. 1 ft. 4 in. 

6 J 

6 

•j'.l 13. Total coal. 3 ft. 3 in. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeena District K 133 



J 14. 

Sandstone. Ft. In. 

Grey shale 1 6 

Hard shale - 

White sandstone 4 

Hard grey shale 1 6 

Coal 1 8) 

Sandstone to 2 [Total coal, 3 ft. 11 in. 

Coal 2 3j 

Sandstone floor. 

J 15 and J 16. 

Sandstone. Ft. In. 

Coal 1 3 Rider (J 15). 

Sandstone 1 6 

Shale 3 

Coal (hard) 2 

Shale 1 

Coal 2 'J 16. Total coal, 3 ft. 4 in. 

Shale 1 "I 

Coal 8 J 

Shaly sandstone floor. 

J JO. 

Sandstone roof. Ft. In. 

Coal 2 31 

Coal 6 -Total coal, 2 ft. 9 in. 

Shale 4 in. to 1 OJ 

Sandstone floor. 

Tn cases where a seam is visible over a considerable distance, the thicknesses of the 
individual benches of coal and shale is very variable, the shale sandstone partings in 
the seams being frequently of a lenticular nature, increasing within a distance of a few feet 
from 1 inch to over 1 foot in thickness, and diminishing again as rapidly. The sections given 
represent, as nearly as could be observed, average conditions. 

The analyses of these seams (Samples 10 to 14) show considerable variation in quality; 
J 14 shows a higher proportion of volatile matter than any of the other seams except G 1 
(Sample 9). Only the lower bench of J 14, however, shows any coking qualities. The lower 
bench of J 16 is also described as coking fairly well. 

Several of the samples from the Johnson Creek seams show fairly high ash, although not 
by any means excessive in comparison with other coals worked in this country. It is, more- 
over, to be expected that clean samples, taken from a fresh face, free from surface impurities, 
will show better results in this respect. 

From the foregoing it appears that among the multitude of seams exposed there are only 
five outcrops yet known in which the thickness is greater than 3 feet, viz., G 12, M 2, J 13, J 
14, and J 15, and of these it is probable that M 2 and J 13 are the same. 

The canyons of the Peace and its tributary creeks afford unequalled opportunities for 
examining the measures, but, in spite of this, it is obvious that the amount of strata within 
the known coal-bearing zone which have not yet been examined, owing to their being nowhere 
exposed, or only in inaccessible places, is very great, and there is every reason to believe that 
many more seams exist besides those described, among which there may well be a number oi 
large]- ones. 

Coal-outcrops are also reported on Eight-mile creek, seven or eight miles from its mouth. 
These are probably the same measures as those seen in the canyon. 



K 134 



Report of the Minister ok Minks. 



1913 



GETHIN& CREEK (Noi-thForK) 



30 



31 



2B 



CIO i 
C 9 ■'. 



28 



26 



37 






"Wt 



32 



23 



24 



25 















HV 








C 3 . 
















CJ^ 


MM 






i 


— 






4 , 




| 

































CI* ;S 



J----" 



"With the exception of the fault mentioned on Gething creek and a few minor rolls, the 
strata are remarkably free from disturbance, in spite of the uplift caused by the elevation of 

Bull's Head i ntain and the range of which it forms part. 

To the south and west of the canyon a large area of practically horizontal, undisturbed 
measures may confidently be expected, and. as the highest measures seen were coal bearing, it 
is likely that coal will underlie a great deal of this area at uo very great depth Owing to 
tin inaccessible nature of much of the country, the only really satisfactory way to prove the 
measures will be by diamond-drilling. • 

Quality of Coal. 

The accompanying analyses (see Appendix) have been made by 11. Carmichael, Govt in 
incut Analyst for the Province of British Columbia, the Split Volatile Ratios according to 
Dowling's classification having been added l>v the writer. 

The samples, with the exception of Nos. 9, 10, and 11, all come under the head of "high 
carbon bituminous." those three being " bituminous." 

These analyses show the coal to lie of very high grade. While not Comparable with tin- 
best Welsh Admiralty steam coal, it is equal to a high grade of steam-coal from that field, and 
compares favourably with the best West Virginia coals, being altogether of an exceptional 

quality for western America. 



3 Geo. 5 Skeexa District. K 135 

There are, it is true, other fields in the West in which coal of all grades from bituminous 
to anthracite occur, but as a rule the high quality of these coals is due to local disturbances, 
and are generally in very disturbed regions, and frequently exceedingly dirty. 

In this field, on the other hand, the regularity of the measures and their freedom from 
disturbance is remarkable, and the low ash-content in most of the samples, taken as they all 
were from outcrops, shows the exceptionally clean nature of these seams. 

Only three of the samples showed any coking quality, and these only fair, so that great 
expectations are not to be based upon the prospects of this field for coke-making purposes, 
although it is by no means impossible that fair-sized seams will be found which will yield a 
good coke, especially in retort ovens. • 

The top benches of the seams P 13 and G 12, and the riders (probably identical) M 1 and 
J 12, consist of coal of a peculiar dull, stony appearance, resembling carbonaceous shale. The 
analyses show this to be coal of a very good quality, that in the upper bench of G 12 (Sample 7) 
only having 2.1 per cent, of ash. 

Transportation. 

The canyon forms an impassable barrier to navigation on the Peace river, there being a 
fall of 250 feet in a distance of rather more than twenty miles. There are no large falls, but 
an almost continuous succession of rapids. In places, as at Moose Bar, the stream is wide and 
smooth for some distance, but the rapids above and below render any idea of navigation 
impossible. 

On the lower part of the river no vessel can travel for more than a very short distance 
above Hudson Hope. In order to ship the coal by river, it will therefore be necessary to 
construct a railway or tramway to a point in that neighbourhood, a distance of about twelve 
miles from the coal-exposures on Johnson creek. 

Scows can be taken down the river as far as Vermilion Falls, a distance of over 600 miles. 
The coal can therefore be distributed throughout the Peace River country very cheaply. 

Several railways are now- heading for this country, and within the next few years there 
will be a number of points on the Peace river in direct railway communication with the 
outside. There will no doubt before long be a line in the immediate neighbourhood of the 
canyon, possibly crossing the river in the vicinity of the mouth of Johnson creek, so that, 
remote as this field now is from the outside world, it will be so for very little longer. 

Market. 

The principal market for this coal will undoubtedly be on the Prairies. The rich Peace 
River district itself, now almost uninhabited, will, with the advent of the various railways now 
under construction or being surveyed, develop very rapidly. Timber is not very plentiful, 
large portions consisting of prairie land, and there will therefore be a considerable market for 
coal in that country itself. 

The high quality of the coal will enable it to compete far afield for railway consumption, 
to say nothing of the steam navigation on the Peace, Athabaska, and other great rivers and 
lakes of the Mackenzie basin. 



K 136 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



APPENDIX. 

Analyses of Peace Riveb Coals. 
By H. Carmichael, British Cow mma Government Analyst. 



Sample 

No. 



3 

4 

5 
6 

7 

8 
!) 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 



Seam. 



P 8, top bench 

P s, bottom bench. . 

P 5 (Section 6) 

P 13, top bench (dull 

coal) 

P It; (Section 11). . . 

P 1 (Section 1) 

r, 12, top bench (dull 

coal ) 

(! 12, lower benches. 

G 1 (Section 25) 

J 14, top bench .... 
.1 14, bottom bench. 
.1 16, top bench. . . . 
J 16, bottom bench. 

J 20 

1» :u 

M 1 (.lull coal) 

M 2, top bench 

M 2, lower benches. 



Thickness. 



Ft. In. 

I 10 

7 

1 9 



1 





3 

11 



o 
8 
3 

8 
8 
9 
8 
10 
It 



Hygro. 

Water. 



2.0 

1 7 
2.0 

2 9 

3.0 
2.2 

2.9 
2.8 
5.3 
2.7 
1.8 
1.6 
1.0 
1.1 
1.3 
in 
3.0 
1.7 



Vol. 

Comb. 

Mat, 



20.2 

17.7 
19.7 

16.9 
16.6 
15.6 

15.6 

16.9 
19.1 
20.9 
23.9 
15.9 
21.4 
Kill 
18.6 
14.5 
18.0 
16.3 



Fixed 

Carbon. 



72.2 
78.9 

75. 7 

71.4 
78.0 
80.6 

70 1 
77 2 
69 II 
67.6 
67 8 
77 .4 
73.7 
73.1 
77.4 
70.6 
73.6 
53.7 



Ash. 



5.6 
1.7 
2.6 

8.8 
2.4 
16 

2.1 
3.1 

6.6 

8.8 
6.5 
5 I 
3.9 
9.8 
2.7 

13.0 
5.4 

28. 3 



Sul- Coking 
phur. Quality. 



None 



Fair 

Fair 
None 

Fan- 
None 



Split 

Vol. 

Ratio. 



II si I 
8.31 
7.22 

7.03 
7.63 

8 M 

s 15 
7.61 
5.29 
5.93 
5 so 
8.93 
7.21 
8.91 
SIS 

9.43 

li vs 
6.28 



Cal. 
Value 
B.T.U. 







- 






IVjut River Coftl Held — Sea m .P I <» — John son < 'reek. 




I'eni'O Hlvrr < on I He Id — N«*nni .1 I -I— John no n Creek. 



3 Geo. 5 



South-East Kootenay District. 



K 137 



SOUTH-EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 



FORT STEELE MINING DIVISION. 
Report by A. C. Nelson, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit a report on the progress of mining in the Fort Steele Mining 
Division for the year 1912. 

The following table shows approximately the number of mineral claims held during each 
year since 1899 : — 



Year. 


Held under Crown 
Urant or Certi- 
ficate of Improve- 
ment. 


Certificate 
of Work. 


New 
Locations. 


1899 

1900 


37 
71 
104 
117 
142 
167 
189 
241 
254 
264 
280 
294 
307 
316 


718 
704 
642 
451 
335 
260 
193 


729 
470 


1901 




1902 


253 


1903 


200 


1904 

1905 


169 
1X1 


1906 


235 1 60 


1907 

1908 


160 
150 
154 
161 
167 
143 


115 
100 


1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 


116 

179 

96 

145 



The North Star group, on Mark creek, has remained shut down since 1910, and it is 
probable that it will not be opened up again until some economic metljod of reducing low-grade 
refractory ores has been successfully demonstrated ; this also applies to the Stemwinder group, 
an adjoining property. 

The Sullivan group, on the east side of Mark creek, has been worked steadily during the 
year and has shipped over 30,000 tons, besides initiating new development-work and the 
installation of water-power from Mark creek. 

The St. Eugene group, on east side of Moyie lake, lias still a force of some thirty men, 
shipping a few car-loads of ore and prospecting generally. 

The owners of the Aurora group, after considerable prospecting during 1912, have been 
unable to locate any large body of ore and have closed down temporarily, but will probably 
i 'pen up again. 

The Society Girl group, on east side of Moyie lake, has been steadily going ahead, shipping 
a small quantity of ore, but not yet in the list of regular shippers. 

Some little interest in mining has appeared, particularly with regard to the Perry Creek 
and St. Mary districts. The former with its free-gold quartz may create some little develop 
ment, as the whole of the creek above "Old Town " is located. 



K 138 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



St. Mary district with its copper and galena would interest capital bu1 for its I ransportal ion 
disabilities. Even a wagon-road would help to develop this, section, for, although a certain 
amount of development is being done on various properties, systematic work cannot be 
attempted with advantage until the pack-trail is superseded. 

Officio Statistics -Fort Steele Mining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded 1 l"> 

Placer claims recorded or re-recorded 2 

( 'ertificates of work 143 

Certificates 6f improvements issued 10 

Conveyances and other documents of title 23 

Partnership agreements 1 

Gold Commissioner's permits :; 

Documents filed 9 

Affidavits filed ^.'n 

Records of water grants and permits 

Mining leases issued •"> 

Mining leases in force 37 

Free miners' certificates (ordinary) 224 

.i i c i '.i 1 1 \- ) .'! 

ii n (special ) 3 

( Irown grants issued 9 

1l' {•> II in . 
Free miners' certificates $1,255 50 

Mining receipts 1,389 00 



3 Geo. 5 North-East Kootenay District. K 139 



NORTH-EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 



GOLDEN MINING DIVISION 

H. C. Ratson, Gold Commissioner. (Office at Golden.) 

NOTES BY PROVINCIAL MINERALOGIST. 

No report has been received this year from the Gold Commissioner of this Division, 
probably due to the fact that there was a change of officials during the latter part of the year. 

The Canadian Pacific Railway has been actively engaged during the year in building a 
branch railway south from Golden, up the valley of the Columbia river, to connect, eventually, 
with the line now being built northward from the Crowsnest branch of the same railway, 
starting near Fort Steele. 

When this shall be completed, it will afford transportation facilities, now lacking, and 
enable the mining properties in the southern end of this Division and in the Windermere 
Division to do effective work ; some of these properties are very promising. 

There is only one producing mine in the Division, the Monarch, which is situated near 
Field, on the main line of the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

The following description of this property appeared in the, Chicago 
Monarch. Mining World, and was written by Newton W. Emmens, a mining engineer 

of Vancouver : — 
" The Monarch is one of the oldest mines in British Columbia, having been discovered in 
1885, since which time it has changed hands several times. Owing to the lack of proper 
milling facilities it was never successfully operated until the present owners, the Mt. Stephen 
Mining Syndicate, acquired it and by whom it is now being operated at a profit. 

"The formation in which the ore occurs is a band of bluish limestone in the Cathedral 
formation, which has been classified as belonging to the middle Cambrian geologic era. This 
rock is fissured vertically in a number of places, and it is along one of these that the 
ore-body, now being worked, occurs. The limestone on either side of this fissure is brecciated, 
the fragments being cemented together and sometimes replaced with calcite, argentiferous 
galena, and sphalerite. This ore-bearing limestone varies from 15 to 30 feet in thickness, and 
in addition to the low-grade ore, which has to be concentrated, contains bunches and masses 
of solid ore, often containing a large tonnage, assaying 5 oz. silver, 67 per cent, lead, and 10 
per cent. zinc. No exploration-work has been done in the limestone immediately overlying 
the ore-bearing stratum, but as it is of a similar nature and is cut by the same series of fissures, 
it is probable that ore would be discovered if systematically prospected with a diamond-drill, 
which would be the cheapest and most expeditious method in that formation. 

"In order to facilitate the mining of the ore and render the workings safe of access at all 
times of the year, the present owners abandoned the old trail across the talus slope and drove 
an adit into the mountain (near its base, and where it would be protected by standing timber), 
212 feet vertically above, and 1,000 feet distant from the mill, which is situated alongside the 
Canadian Pacific railroad-track. This adit was driven into the mountain for a distance of 



K 140 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



-310 feet, where a raise, at an angle of 65 degrees, 475 feel long, was made coming ou1 at bhe 
top of a cliff ; from here another adit was driven 210 feet into the mountain, and from the 
end of it a raise was made at an angle of 55 degrees, 190 feet long, connecting with the main 
workings of the mine. These raises and adits are being used as routes of transportation for 
the ore from the mine to the mill. 

"At the portal of the lower adit is located the upper terminal of a 2-bucket Kiblet aerial 
train, eapable of handling 200 tons a day, the lower terminal being at the mill. 

"The concentrating plant is housed in a building 1 40 x 1" feet, situated on a flat at the 
base of the mountain and close to the main line of the Canadian Pacific railroad, from which 
a spur track 350 feet long has been built. The engine and boiler room is an extension, 20 \ 50 
feet, to the main mill building. 

"The milling plant consists of an 8 x 12 Blake crusher, a set of 21 x 10 rough ing-rolls, 
two trommels, one 4-compartment and two 3-compartment Hart/, jigs, three No. 2 Deister 
Concentrators, one Mo. 3 Deister slime-table, and two Wiltlev concentrators, one dewatering 
and settling box, two hydraulic classifiers, and two elevators. 

"Power is furnished for a good portion of the year by a 4-foot Pelton wheel operating 
under a head of 280 feet, which generates 140 horse-power. The water is taken from 
Thompson creek, a stream flowing between Cathedral mountain and Mount Stephen, and is 
carried in a 12-inch wood-stave pipe-line 1,70(5 feet long to the wheel in the mill. In the 
winter, when the water in this creek is low, power is supplied by a 100-horse-power boiler 
driving a 13 x 18 slide-valve engine under a steam-pressure of 121 ll>. 

"Compressed air for operating the drills in the mine is supplied by I « o bell driven singli 
stage' compressors, one having an air-cylinder 12 x 12. and tin other one of 1 1 x 15 inches, 
having a combined capacity of 560 cubic feet of free air a minute. 

" Light for the main winkings, the mill and camp buildings, is supplied by a belt-driven 
10-kw. 1 10-volt D.C. generator. 

" The mill was c pleted and operations commenced in May, 1 91 2, and up to December 

•'list of that year had treated 20,000 tons of ore, from which was produced 1,854 tons of lead 
concentrates and 185 tons of zinc-concentrates. 

"Of the lead-concentrates, 1,1 14 tons was shipped to the smelter al Trail, and the balance 

of 710 tons to the smelter at Kingston. Ontario. The gross metallic contents of these 

concentrates was 7,808 oz. silver and 2,521,576 tt». of lead, which, after taking oil' smelter 

deductions for furnace losses, gave a net yield of 7,406 OZ. silver and 2,249,236 He of lead. 

"The zinc-COncentrateS were shipped to the zinc smelters at l!artletts\ ille, < >kla.. U.S. 
(there being, as yet, no zinc smelting plant in Canada ). and yielded 1 t2,6 13 II ■. of metallic zinc. 

" The exact figures as to the cost of mining, tramming, and milling have uol yet been 

worked out, but it will be under $2 per ton of crude ore treated. In this cos! is included all 
development and administration charges. 

"Some improvements are now being made in the mill, a 1 luntington mill is being installed 
for regrinding the middlings, and additional jigs and concentrators are being added, bv the 

aid of which not only will the capacity of the plant be materially increased, but a cleaner 

producl and higher percentage of saving made, more especially in connection with the zinc- 
concentrates, which have hitherto been somewhat high in lead and lime tenure." 



3 Geo. 5 North-East Kootenay District. K 141 



WINDERMERE MINING DIVISION. 

Report of Geo. F. Stalker, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining operations in the Windermere 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The mining operations in this district show very little increase over the past year in so 
far as development-work is concerned, which was limited, as in the year 1911, to a few 
properties, and, with four or five exceptions, amounted only to the necessary assessment- work. 

Greater attention was paid to this district during the year 1912 by prospectors and mining- 
men .generally than has been the case for some years. The increase in the locations of new 
properties and the interest taken in the older ones goes to prove that, with the completion of 
the Kootenay Central Railway, which is now not far distant, many of the developed properties 
will resume work and commence shipping ore ; also a great number of other properties will be 
developed and placed on the shipping list. 

Office Statistics — Windermere Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 60 

Locations recorded 75 

Certificates of work recorded 28 

Bills of sale recorded 11 

Revenue $4,154.35 



K 142 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



NORTH-WEST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 



Report of Robert Gordon, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report on the progress of mining within 
the Revelstoke and Lardeau Mining Divisions for the year ending Dei-ember .'51st, 1912. 

Mining conditions have not improved any during the past year, the entire district being 
at a standstill. 

In the Incomappleux River country the town of Camborne is almost deserted, and very little 
interest seems to be taken in this once prosperous rami). Lack of transportation facilities is 
assigned as the cause of the present depression, as a number of the properties have been shown 
to give values indicating the possibility of working on a paying basis, even with the present 
unsatisfactory facilities. There is, however, no capital in the camp with which to develop the 
mines, and the inducements arc not great enough to bring any outside capita] to this particular 
part of the country. 

Assessment-work is being kept up by the holders of a number of properties, and the claims 
will no doubt prove their values in due time. 

I n the Big Bend section conditions have been in the same unsatisfactory state. Absolutely 
nothing has been done by the holders of the placer leases, the same cause being here assigned — 
namely, lack of transportation facilities and excessive cost of getting in a plant. 

Some of these properties have, however, recently been restaked, and with an infusion of 
new blood into the industry it is hoped that the placer-mining industry will revive. 



REVELSTOKE MINING DIVISION. 
Report of W. E. McLauciimx, Minim; Kkcordkh. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report of in i 1 1 lJiir operations in the Revelstoke 
Mining Division for the year ending December .'list, l!tl"_\ 

The past season has been quiet in the Revelstoke Mining Division, and but tittle more 
than assessment-work has been done on the various properties. The great requisite of this 
Division is transportation facilities in order to render productive mining possible. 

Office Statistics Revestoke Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 124 

Claims recorded (mineral) 1(5 

ii (placer) 3 

Assessment wort done (mineral) 19 

Payments instead of work 

Agreements and powers of attorney 32 



3 Geo. 5 North- West Kootenay District. K 143 



NOTES ON BIG BEND DISTRICT. 
By J. A. Watson. 

In accordance with instructions received through the Deputy Minister of Mines, I left 
Victoria on the night of September 11th, and reached Revelstoke at 1.30 a.m. on the morning 
of the 13th. Being aware before leaving Victoria that the steamer going up the Columbia on 
Friday, the 13th, would probably be the last of the season, owing to the low water in the 
river, I went at once on board the steamer, which started at daylight, and the journey of 
forty-five miles north to Downie creek, the present end of steamboat connection, was made by 
3 p.m. ; a record time of thirty-nine hours from Victoria. The weather conditions being good, 
and as the country to be covered was fairly extensive and the season late, I deemed it expedient 
to examine first the country forming the northern boundary of this mining district. 
Accordingly, securing a couple of horses at Downie creek and the services of one man, progress 
was quickly made to Mica creek. A cursory examination of the country lying along the 
summit which divides the headwaters and basins of Mica and Yellow creeks, botli feeding into 
the Columbia river, revealed a continuous area of schistose formation lying at an angle of 
25 degrees. Cutting this formation there occur several quartz-dykes. In these dykes the 
present development showed a certain amount of mica which appeared to be of a merchantable 
quality, samples of which I brought down, and the deposit seemed to offer sufficient inducement 
for further development. Mica creek proper is not at right angles to the Columbia river, 
as shown on the map, but at quite an acute angle, heading in the south-east and flowing 
north-west. 

This country is practically above the balsam-timber line and offers every facility for being 

prospected, being open, with many rock-exposures. Leaving this portion of the country and 

journeying southward, a hurried visit was paid to the old gold diggings on Smith creek, French 

' creek, and McCulloch creek. These camps were visited by Mr. Carmichael in 1905, since 

when very little actual work has been done. 

The records show that in the early days of placer-gold mining in this section, considerable 
amounts of gold were obtained on several of these creeks by the miners, working as they did 
under the heavy disadvantages of the absolute lack of all railway accommodation and having 
to bring all supplies up the Columbia river from Marcus, in the State of Washington. Under 
such conditions only the richer ground could be worked, the season being short and supplies 
very costly. 

The ingenuity displayed by these pioneers in the construction of plants, some of which 
still exist, is an object-lesson as to what may be accomplished with scanty appliances. Under 
such conditions, it is scarcely to be supposed that all the profitable workings were exhausted, 
and subsequent work, at a much later date, has shown that there are still placer deposits here 
which offer fair inducements to development under the improved conditions now existing. 

Work to-day will have to be done on a larger scale and with improved machinery, before 
the installation of which the ground requires very careful prospecting, with an actual 
determination of the values to lie found on bed-rock. 

Such work is under way, although nut in a very energetic manner at the present time, 
and, from indications, it would seem not improbable that the near future may see the instal- 
lation of a series of plants having a fair chance of making a successful issue. 



K 144 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The lack of cheap transportation facilities north of the C an adi a n 

Lode-mining. Pacific Railway at Revelstoke, while a serious handicap to placer-mining, 

is absolutely prohibitive of all lode-mining. The contacl of the lime and 

schist belts seems to offer a very good ehanee for mineral deposition. That some such deposits 
exist has been indicated by Mr. Carmichael in the Report of 1905, bul it would appear that 
very little change or betterment lias taken place since that date, either in developing the 

existing properties or in the discovery of additional showings of pr ise. There is an 

abundance of surfaa tcroppings showing good mineral and much lluat ore of ,t_ r I grade, but 

development seems to await the arrival of cheaper methods of transportation, and whether 
this will ever he accorded without some serious development being done to show its justification 
is a matter of doubt. 

The district is worth prospecting and is worthy of development, hut the preliminary ste) s 
must hi' accomplished by local energy and money before outside capital can rationally he risked 
to do the more extensive and expensive developments necessary to make a mine. 

Mr. Carmichael described the principal properties iii the district in the report mentioned, 

and the conditions have changed little since then ; hut the following brief notes on a few of 
the properties as found this past season may he of interest : — 

The Standard group has had s e additional work done at the lowest 

Standard Group, workings, where the tunnel has been continued some 60 feet at a deviation 
to the left of approximately 25 degrees; an active continuation of this 
wi.uld appear to be well judged, or, as an alternative plan, the mineralization belt might be 
reached from the other side of the mountain. 

The Keystone property is one upon which the work done, as yet 
Keystone. insufficiently demonstrative, is worthy of continuance. The Keystone group 

is located in one of the hasins in which the Keystone creek rises and Sows 
into the Columbia river a few miles south of tlie mouth of Downie creek. The lime zone, 
freely mineralized, has on this property been penetrated by two tunnels, the upper running 
through the belt in a distance of 40 feet, though not following the dip, the lower showing doing 
the same. A shaft on a slight incline was then sunk some distance and abandoned, as the 
ventilation was faulty ; the lower tunnel was driven in about 90 feet. 

One or two other properties in the neighbourhood wire not reached ..wing to the lateness 
of the season and a prevalence of snow-storms. 

The zones or belts met with are wide and continuous on the surface, with some mineral. 

I ill t there is not sufficient work done as vet to know whether at depth satisfactory values exist. 

( 'aincs creek was then visited, and tlie claims mentioned by Ml. Carmichael ill his 1905 

Report seen, so that any further development might he observed and noted. The work done 

since t hat time aim. mil: I.. 

On the./, and L. about 50 feet more drifting, with the vein and both foot and hanging 
wall sai isfactory. 

On tlie Annie M. the incline shaft has heen carried down another 75 feet, and the vein i- 
14 inches wide where work stopped. 

< »n the claim 98 a tunnel has heen run in !K> feet. ah., a drift made to the right of - _ »< ' feet. 
An incline shaft has also heen sunk for 120 feet, which cuts the vein diagonally, the lattei 
being ->^ inches wide at the foot of the shaft. The strength and continuation of this vein, ami 

the regularity of both walls, appear encouraging; the work was well and substantially done. 



K^ 








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1 


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liiicklcy Lake — on Telegrra i» !■ < 'reek — Hazelton Trail. 




Dhim' Lake — looking North from Head of Lake, 



3 Geo. 5 North-West Kootenay District. K 145 



LARDEAU MINING DIVISION. 
Report of B. E. Drew, Mining Recorder. 

I beg to submit herewith a short report on the mining situation in the Lardeau Mining 
Division for the year 1912. 

I regret to say that there has been a falling-ofi' in most of the items of office revenue as 
compared with 1911. 

The various properties which in the past have either shipped or milled ore have been idle 
the whole year. 

Towards the end of the season — in fact, after the snow had appeared — several of the well- 
known properties were visited and examined by a well-known geologist who does not wish his 
name published. He appeared SO well pleased with the showings on four groups of claims 
that he agreed to take them under bond, and to commence development-work on June 1st 
next. It is hoped that the result of these operations will establish that our leads, like those in 
the Slocan, are permanent at depth, which would do much to re-establish the confidence once 
reposed in this Division. 

Office Statistics — Lardeau Mining Division. 

Free miners' cirtificates issued 42 

Certificates of work 42 

Payments in lieu of work 1 

Locations recorded 13 

Agreements and transfers recorded 4 



10 



K 146 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



SLOCAN DISTRICT. 



AINSWORTH, SLOCAN, SLOCAN CITY, AND TRoCT LAKE 
MINING DIVISIONS. 

Report by E. E. Chipman, Gold Commissioner. 

I beg to submit the annual report for the Ainsworth, SI. .can, Slocan City, and Trout 
Lake Mining Divisions for the year 1912. 

The mines working in the above-named Mining Divisions have fully met the expectation 
of the preceding year,- and the feeling in all the parts of the Slocan District is of the most 
optimistic nature. The construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway has been completed 
from Three Forks to Bear lake, and the Lucky Jim and Humbler-Cariboo minis have now no 
difficulty in transporting their ores from the mines to their respective reducing-points. The 
old Kaslo & Slocan Railway has been standardized from Bear lake to Whitewater, and 
preparations are now being made early in the spring to standardize the old road from 
Whitewater to KLootenay lake at Kaslo, a distance of seventeen miles. The completion of this 
link will connect the Crowsnest route of the Canadian Pacific Railway via Kootenay lake to 
Nakusp, on the main line via Arrowhead to the Coast. When this connection is completed, 
all the mines on the old Kaslo & Slocan Railway will have better facilities for the shipn 
of their ores than ever before, and mines on the South fork of Kaslo creek, which have been 
practically shut off from railroad transportation since the disastrous forest fires of 1910 wiped 
the usefulness of the Kaslo & Slocan from existence, will now be enabled to resume operation. 



AINSWORTH MINING DIVISION. 

The most marked improvement in this Division was at the old Ainsworth mining camp. 
Many of the old properties in the vicinity of Ainsworth have been acquired by the Consolidated 

Mining Company <>f Canada, and the mines under this management have been steady shippers 
the past season. 

At the .V". / mine an average of forty-five men has been employed, twenty of whom were 
surfacemen. About 600 tons of silver-ore has been mined; two miles of tramway has been 

built ; new bunk and boarding houses have been erected and a boiler plant put in : I 
of development, consisting of shafts, drifts, and raises, has been made. 

At the Higldand mine the average number of men employed was thirty-eight, of whom 
ten "en- surfacemen, [n development, 600 feet of drifts was run, and a 5 drill compressor 

plant was installed on Cedar creek. 

At the Maestro mine six men were employed on development : 200 feet of drifting was 
done, and a shaft was sunk a depth of '■' |l feet. ' ro the /' ■ two men were employed during 
the season stripping and exposing the ledge. In addition to this work, the Consolidated 
Mining and Smelting Company has performed the annual assessment work on a number of its 

other acquired mineral claims. 



3 Geo. 5 Slocan District. K 147 



The Silver Hoard Mining Company of Spokane has employed ten men continually on the 
Dellie ; has completed 400 feet of drifting and sunk a shaft to the depth of 100 feet ; a new 
bunk-house, shaft-houses, assay office, and two dwelling-houses were built ; a horse-whim and 
gasolene sawmill were installed ; a mile of wagon-road was constructed to connect with the 
No. 1 road ; and 250 tons of high-grade silver-ore was shipped. 

The Crown Mining Company of Spokane employed an average of three men since early in 
the spring of 1912 on the Crown mine ; accomplished 150 feet of development-work, and built 
a new and commodious bunk-house. The Crown group consists of four claims upon which the 
annual assessment-work has been performed. 

The Florence Mining Company of Spokane employed an average of ten men on 
■development-work ; sunk a shaft to the depth of 80 feet ; did 200 feet of drifting and shipped 
about 60 tons of ore ; built a new shaft-house, cook-house, several dwelling-houses, and two 
miles of road to connect with the Government road on the lake-shore. 

A. D. Wheeler has done considerable work on the Gallagher mine, but the particulars 
are not available. 

At the Bluebell mine, Riondel, development was resumed at the beginning of the year 
after a period of idleness of nearly two years. The property was equipped for working from 
below the adit level, whence nearly all its ore must come hereafter, and on July 1st hoisting 
was begun through a new shaft, the top of which is sufficiently above the adit level to permit 
the ore to be crushed at the new rock-houses and be trammed directly into the top of the mill, 
instead of being elevated from the adit level as heretofore. 

Actual productive operation began on July 1st and continued to the close of the year, at 
a gradually increasing rate, so that finally the tonnage milled amounts to well over 200 tons a 
•day- 
Development of the lower ground is being continued actively, and so soon as it is made 
ready for stoping, the management anticipates raising and treating 300 tons a day. 

At the close of the year this property employed, all told, about ninety-five men. 

Woodbury Creek. 

The King Solomon Mines Company has done some work on its properties, but shipped no 
ore. 

Hammil Creek. 

Considerable development-work was done by a Spokane company on the St. Patrick claim 
late in the fall, but, outside of this, only assessment-work was performed on the various claims, 
which were fully represented. 

Duncan River. 

The only real development-work done on the river was on the Red Elephant group on 
Hall creek, which is said to have shown marked improvement, and assessment-work was 
performed on a few of the other claims. 

Cascade Creek. 

Considerable development-work was done on two groups of claims on this creek, one 
group near Clue lake and the other about seven miles farther down the creek, but no 
particulars of results are at hand. On Cooper and Meadow creeks assessment-wi irk lias been 
fully kept up, but details of results are not available. 



K 148 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 



South Fouk of Kasi.o Creek. 

On account of lack of railroad transportation, only assessment-work has been performed, 

but this has been fully kept up. 

Kaslo Creek North. 

The Eureka mine has worked steadily during the year, employing eight men in develop- 
ment-work ; 350 feet of crosscut tunnels and drifts has been made, and the company inti 
to prosecute the work continuously th< ming year. 

The Utica mine has employed thirty-five men during the year, the pay-roll amounting to 
$25,200. The development consisted of building a water-power dam; MOO feet of wooden 
pipe-line laid, giving 300 feet of head and generating 2(10 horsepower; a telephone-line has 
been put in; the mine has been developed by extending the lower tunnel 500 feet, and new 
bunk-houses have been erected ; 664 tons of ore has been shipped, running 150 oz. silver and 
15 per cent. lead. 

The Deep Mine, Limited. — On account of lark of transportation, work ceased at this mine 
at the end of February, 1912. During January, 1912, 246 feet of drifting was done Not 
that transportation, through the standardization of the Kaslo & Slocan by the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, is assured, work has been started again, and will be carried on throughout the 
winter with a crew of about twenty-five men. No ore has been shipped. 

Whitewater. — Operated by J. L. Retallack & Co. During the year an average of about 

twenty-five men has been employed, and 1,517 feet of development was dune, and something 
over 1,012 tons of hand-picked ore has been shipped. 

Production of ore has ceased for the winter, and about fifteen men will he employed 
throughout the winter on development. 

Office Statistics — Aixsworth Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates (personal) 203 

ii ii (company) 1 

H ii (special) 2 

New claims recorded 124 

Transfers 54 

I 'ertificates of work •"> 12 

Pre-emptions 6 

Certificates of purchase 17 

Certificates of improvements (land, 5 ; mines, 26) 31 



SLOCAN MINING DIVISION. 
Report hv Am. is McIxxes, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to sulnuit herou iih the annual report on the milling operations in the 
Slocan Mining Division for the year ending December .'list. 191 2. 

The vear 1912 has been marked by a very considerable advancement and progress in the 
development of the several properties in the different camps in this Division. 

The Standard Silver Lead mines is on Four-mile creek, mar Silverton ; this property has 
made good progress during the year, and is paying a monthly dividend to the stockholders of 

"00 for the last ten months. The management is contemplating running the mill two 
shifts. The principal owners are Ceorge II. Aylard. of Victoria, and John A. Finch, of 
Spokane. 



3 Geo. 5 Slocan District. K 149 



The Standard shipped about 4,200 tons of first-class crude ore, and the mill product from 
nearly 33,000 tons of second-class ore — namely, 5,200 tons of silver-lead and 3,300 tons of 
silver-zinc concentrates; the metal contents of all products shipped were — silver, 746,000 oz. ; 
lead, 11,792,000 lb.; and zinc, 1,300,000 lb. Large bodies of good ore were opened in the mine. 

The Van-Roi mines, also on Four-mile creek, about five miles from Silverton, employs 150 
men, and worked continuously during the year, shipping at the average rate of six cars of lead 
and three of zinc concentrates each month ; the lead-ores carry about 175 oz. of silver to the 
ton ; development-work is also being kept well ahead. 

The Van-Roi milled about 57,000 tons of ore, shipping products of which were nearly 
2,200 tons of silver-lead and 2,200 tons of silver-zinc concentrates; metals produced 
were— silver, 543,000 oz. ; lead, 2,000,000 lb. ; and zinc, 2,000,000 lb. Several new and 
valuable ore-bodies were discovered in this mine. 

The Silverton Mines, Limited. — This property, consisting of the Hewitt and Loma Boone 
mineral claims, is partly owned by and is operated by Monty Davys. They had the misfortune 
of losing the concentrating plant, or mill, early this year, it being destroyed by fire, but they 
at once made preparations to start a new mill, which is now nearly finished. The mine is 
showing up well and will be feeding the mill in a-few weeks. 

Owing to the destruction by fire of the Wakefield concentrator, the Silverton Mines, 
Limited, which had been using it, was unable to continue the production of much ore, but the 
erection and equipinent of a new mill was undertaken, and arrangements made to use in this 
a flotation process, as auxiliary to water-concentration. The Silverton Mines, Limited, found 
the south vein of No. 4 level of the Hevritt-Loma Doone mine, and made ready to commence 
driving Nos. 8 and 9 levels to cut both the main and south veins at a total depth from the 
apex of between 1,600 and 1,700 feet. 

The Rambler-Cariboo, situated in McGuigan basin, owned mostly in Spokane, has worked 
steadily all year and shipped considerable clean ore. They have also built a fine concentrating 
plant down on the new spur which the Canadian Pacific Railway built from Three Forks to 
Bear lake ; the mill has been running only a week. 

The opening of the Rambler-Cariboo mine on several levels down to the 1,400-foot, 
inclusive, was pushed on, most work having been done in the deep. An aerial tramway was 
constructed between the mine and the new mill on Seaton creek; the mill equipment was 
added to, a capacity of 75 tons in two shifts being provided for. Railway transportation was 
arranged for by making a spur to the mill, at which operations were commenced late in the 
year. The company shipped some 1,200 tons of ore, containing 108,000 oz. silver and 
1,021,000 It), of lead. 

The Lucky Jim shipped 2,100 tons zinc-ore since the railroad reached the mine early this 
spring. 

About Sandon, shipment of ore was made from both the Ruth- Hope and Richmond- Eureka 
groups ; a deep-level adit was driven to cut the big vein on the Slocan Star, and similar 
important underground work well advanced on the old Payne property. In the vicinity of 
Cody, shipment of high-grade silver-zinc ore from the Deadman mine of the Noble Five group 
was commenced ; the long raise was completed from the extension of the Last Chance No. 3 
adit up to the old workings of the Surprise, and shoots of good ore opened on the lowest two 
new levels ; and more development-work was done on the Reco, Sunset, Colonial, Noonday, 
and Mountain Con. Near Three Forks, the McAllister, Lone Bachelor, Cinderella, and 
Silver Ridye were worked, and above Alamo the Idaho-Alamo mines were further developed 
with good prospects of again becoming important producers. 



K 150 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

The Apex, situated near New Denver, is operated by Anthony Becker, and is shipping 

regularly ; it is a dry ore. 

There are many other smaller properties in the course of development in the camp, but 
are not yet far enough advanced to be reported. 

Office Statistics — Slocan Minim; Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 140 

Claims recorded II 

Certificates of work recorded . . 143 

Transfers 15 

Revenue collected $4,785.10 



SLOCAN CITY MINING DIVISION. 
Report of Howard Parker, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit my report for the Slocan City Mining Division for the year 
ending December 31st, 1912. 

While the ore shipments last year were not so large as in former years, it is \ cry gratifying 
to know that the great amount of development-work done has opened up considerable bodies 
of high-grade silver-lead ore. 

The Eastmont, situated at Ten-mile creek, has had ten to fifteen men employed during 
the year chiefly at development-work ; a large body of ore was encountered during the month 
of November, and preparations are now being made for shipping on an extensive ml, 

The Meteor, on Springer creek, shipped 50 tons of ore besides doing development-work : 

the ore yields about 8200 per ton. 

The Black Prince shipped some 52 tons during the year. 

The Lily B, operated by the Hobson Mining Company, has extensively developed its 
property, and although no ore was shipped during the year, it is believed that a considerable 
quantity could be shipped at any time. The ore is high-grade silver-lead. 

The Hamilton group, owned liv Gillette & Co., has done a further L25 feet of tunnelling, 
and is now hauling ore for shipment to the Trail smelter. This ore assays high in silver and gold. 

The Kilo, situated on Lemon creek, was closed down for a number of years, but was 
reopened about three months ago. Seventeen men are now employed at the mill and in the 
mine. The ore is gold-bearing quartz ; loo tons taken from the dump and treated at the mill 
yielded $13.25 a ton in gold. In the month of December the mill was operating for eleven 
days, and the ore treated (from the mine) yielded a gold brick valued at SI, son. 

It is believed that the good showing made by the Kilo will give considerable impetus to 
the gold-mining industry at Demon creek ; properties which are now idle arc expected to be 
working in the spring. 

Office Statistics Slocan (in Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates (ordinary) 90 

ii ii (company) 2 

Certificates of work recorded 129 

Locations recorded 11 

Conveyances recorded 12 

Certificates of improvement recorded 5 



3 Geo. 5 Slogan District. K 151 



TROUT LAKE MINING DIVISION. 
Report of F. Mummery, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith my report of the progress of the mining industry 
in the Trout Lake Division for the year 1912. 

The discovery of a large body of silver-lead ore in the Ajax mine and the shipment of 
high-grade ores from the Lucky Boy, Horseshoe, and Nettie L. have done much to restore 
confidence in the mining industry in the Trout Lake District. 

Silver Cup. — Shipments of ore totalled 320 tons, containing 44 oz. gold, 23,500 oz. silver, 
and 156,000 lb. lead. Development consisted of raises, 46 feet; drifts, 423 feet; total, 460 
feet. An average of seventeen men was employed. 

Ajax. — This property, situated on Nettie L. mountain, and one of the Nettie L. group, 
owned by the Ferguson Mines, Limited, has lain idle for years. Last June Superintendent 
Merry put two men to work. Shortly after, they cut what is probably a large body of silver- 
lead ore of a shipping grade. Up to the present time they have drifted a total of 1 25 feet, 
of which 65 feet is on the ore, which shows an average width of 5 feet. During the month of 
December 85 tons was shipped, and shipments will be continued until the close of navigation 
on Trout lake ; eight men were employed in December. 

Nettie L. — This property was under lease to Daney & Co. during the latter part of the 
year. Sinking, 53 feet; drifting, 73 feet; men employed, 6; ore shipped, 31 tons. 

Horse Shoe. — Owned by Craig <fe Hillman, situated on Trout creek, about three miles west 
of Trout lake. Drifting, 47 feet ; sinking, 73 feet ; men employed, 3 ; 5 tons of ore shipped, 
giving returns of .f 130 a ton. 

L.B. — Owned by the Chestnut Hill Mining Company, of Philadelphia. Work done 
consisted of surface prospecting and stoping ore ; 28 tons of high-grade ore was shipped, a 
portion of which gave values of over 300 oz. ; from four to eight men employed. 

Fidelity. — Situated about three miles north-west of Gerrard ; has been under lease to 
Lamphere & Co. They have been rawhiding ore during the month of December, but will not 
ship until after the New Year. 

Canadian Boy. — This group, owned by Kirkpatrick, Daney, and others, is situated at 
Seven-mile, on the South fork of the Lardeau, and has a flne showing of silver-lead ore, 
averaging about 90 oz. in silver a ton. 

C.B. — Work during 1912 consisted in sinking 32 feet and drifting 37 feet. There is a 
quantity of sacked ore on the dump, but no attempt will be made to ship at present. 

Broadview Group. — Situated on Great Northern mountain, three miles north of Ferguson. 
Four men employed ; 168 feet of tunnel; a new vein was cut in the tunnel, but I have not 
been able to obtain particulars. 

Office Statistics — Trout Lake Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates (ordinary) 79 

" h (company) 2 

Bills of sale, agreements, etc., recorded 23 

Certificates of improvements recorded 7 

Certificates of work issued 150 

Mineral claims recorded 46 



K 152 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



NELSON DISTRICT. 



NELSON MINING DIVISION. 

Repobt op W. F. Teetzel, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annua] report on the Nelson Mining 1 )i\ i>i<>n for the 
year ending December 31st, 1912. 

General I! em oiks. 

The ore product ion for the Nelson District was hoa\ in- in 1912 than it has been for s< ■ 

years. This was due to the operation of the mill at the Mother Lode mine on Sheep creek for 
five months, the steady operation at full capacity of the Queen 20-stamp mill, and increased 
shipments from the Emerald, the beginning of shipments by the 11.11., and the renewal of 
shipments by the Queen Victoria and Yankee Girl mines. 

The developments in the mining industry for the year have been of very greal importance 

to the district, and the year 1913 should be a banner one. The purchase of the controlling 
interest in the Silver King by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, 
and the immediately following resumption of work at that property, cannot help but greatly 
improve conditions in the district. Another factor of importance is the entrance of the 
British Columbia Copper Company into the district, by the purchase of the Queen Victoria 
copper-mine at Beasley, and the taking of a lease and bond on the Eureka copper-mine on 

Granite mountain. Neither of these properties are prospects, but are de\eloped mines, and 
the operation of them by this strong company means a great increase in the ore production of 
the district. 

During 1!)1'_' about 37,000 tons of gold-ore was milled by the stamp mills, and 16.000 

tons of ore or concentrates shipped to the smelter or concentrated, bringing the total ore 
production for the district well up to the 53,000-ton mark. 

A bon I 300 men were employed in the mines during the year. 

Eagle Creek. 
The property of the Eureka Copper Mines, Limited, was bonded to the Brit ish ( lolumbia 

Copper Company in July last. At that time' there was about 3,000 feel of di velo] -nt work 

done, and four shoots of ore opened up, in virgin ground, at a depth of 250 feet, besides 

considerable ore in the old workings. Since then two new ore-shoots have been found. A 

winze sunk from the tunnel le\el on our of tin ore shoots, for over 50 feet, shows about - feet 

of "it limning from 5 to 15 per cent, copper and from 30 to 90 oz. of silver. A raise from 

tin- level has opened up II feet of en i With the exception of th -e iii the winze, 

the ore is nearly all carbonates. The average of 1,000 tons shipped in 1907 and 1910 was 5 
per cent, copper, o. 1 7 oz. of gold, and 1.3 oz. of silver. Wherever, as yet, the sulphides have 
been found the values are higher. A road, with a good grade, and an aerial tramway have 
been surveyed to the property, and construction work will be started in the spring. The 
property will become a steady shipper toward the end of the summer. A lower crosscut tunnel 

will probably be run as soon as ship Qts are started. 




I*jirk-t rjiiii iTossi iiu KlnM li n«' II i v«*r. 




Norl Imtii l'ni>>|M'('liir — p:i<-kiim Su ppl jrw on DogTt*< 



3 Geo. 5 Nelsox District. K li 



Granite- Poorman. — At the Granite-Poorman the stamp-mill has not been operated at its 
full capacity this year, owing to numerous dykes faulting the ore, making the mining of a 
sufficient tonnage to keep the mill running a difficult proceeding. Since the lead crossed 
under the creek, it has run fairly well with the surface, at no great depth. In the tunnel 
level, where the ground is hard, there is a long and continuous ore-shoot, very well mineralized 
and having a width of, on the average, from 1 to 3 feet. The ground below the tunnel level 
should not be so badly faulted, as the dykes that exist there should be showing in the 
workings on the Poorman vein. It is the intention of the company to drive a lower crosscut 
tunnel this year to tap the lead lower down, and drift under this ore-shoot. 

Bbasley. 

• Queen Victoria. — The Queen Victoria was purchased by the British Columbia Copper 
Company on November 1st. There is about 40,000 tons of low-grade ore, carrying an excess 
of lime, opened up at present, that can be mined at a profit with copper at the present price. 
The mine is equipped with a power-line, transformers, a motor, and air-compressor, 2-bucket 
aerial tramway to the railroad, ore bunkers, and a full equipment of machine-drills, tools, etc. 
It is expected that shipments of from 60 to 100 tons a day will be made to the company's 
smelter at Greenwood during the year. Over 1,000 tons was shipped in November and 
December. 

Molly Gibson. — The Molly Gibson, on Kokanee creek, mined about 12,000 tons of ore 
and shipped 2,419 tons of ore and concentrates to the Trail smelter during the year. Since 
the acquisition of this property by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, 
an aerial tramway four and a half miles long has been installed, to convey the ore and 
concentrates from the mill over the worst part of the road to the lake, as well as to haul up 
mine supplies ; the mill has been remodelled ; a new power plant with an additional 
air-compressor has been installed, by using the waste water from the mill-wheels over again 
lower down, and a steady policy of development carried out at the mine. An SOO-foot 
crosscut tunnel to give an additional depth of 240 feet was completed during the year, and a 
raise is being run from this to Xo. 5 level. Some drifting on the lower level showed that the 
ore continued downward to that level, in about the same quantity and quality as in the bottom 
of the level above. Surface work during the year revealed the existence, over a distance of 
2,000 feet, of surface showings similar to those under which are the present workings. "When 
sufficient development has been done this mine should be a heavy producer for some years 
to come. 

Venus. — A. H. Gracey has taken a lease and bond on the Venus, and drove a lower 
crosscut to the vein, on which drifting is now being done. A good showing of ore in the 
bottom of the tunnel above, carrying good values in gold, has already been encountered in the 
drift. 

Silver King. — The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company this fall purchased a 
75-per-cent. interest in the Silver King Company, and immediately started to rebuild the mine 
plant which had been destroyed by fire. At present about forty men are employed. The 
aerial tramway will be put in shape and shipments started before spring if possible. There 
are large bodies opened up of a lower grade of ore than that formerly shipped, on which a 
good profit can now be made, as well as considerable ore of the class formerly shipped. The 
mine will probably be a heavy producer in the near future, and its operation once more 
means much to the district. 

Perrier. — At the Perrier a small mill is being constructed to mill the free-gold ore of this 
property, and a small tonnage may he looked for during the year. The owners have a nice 
little lead, but have been hampered by lack of capital. 



K 154 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 



Ymie District. 

Wilcox. The Wilcox mine, on "Wild Horse creek, aboul seven miles from Ymir, has 
developed steadily during the year. A considerable tonnage of free-milling ore has been 
opened up; developmenl "ill be continued until a sufficient tonnage is in sight so that the mill, 
when once started again, will he able to run steadily at full capacity. The properl 
equipped with an electric-power plant, air-compressor, hoist, two aerial tramways, a 10-stamp 
mill with concentrating-tables, and suitable mine buildings. 

Yankee Girl. The Yankee Girl resumed shipments this fall, shipping to the Trail smelter 
700 tons of ore, carrying about $15 in gold. The ore-shoot at present opened up is about 
160 feet long and from 2 to •'! feel in width: the best ore is steel-galena. There are very 

large liodies of low-grade sulphides opened up, hut their value or full extent has not a 

been determined. The mine is equipped with a 2-bucket tramway to the wagon-road, at a 
point about a mile and a quarter from the Great Northern Railway station at Ymir, a 
power plant and a .".-drill compressor, and the necessary mine buildings. About twenty men 

are employed at present. 

Dundee. — The Dundee adjoins the Yankee Girl. A tunnel is being driven on the lead at 
present to catch an ore-shoot opened up in the old shaft, at a depth of about 900 feet below 
the collar of the shaft, which is down over 200 feet. The point driven for should he reached 
this summer. 

Jennie Belle or Ymir Mint.— Some high-grade ore carrying SlOO to the ton in gold, silver, 
and lead was opened up in a prospect -shaft last year, and a crosscut tunnel to give 50 feet 
depth is being run to get under this ore. 

Mmj Blossom,. — Some high-grade gold-silver-lead ore has been opened on the Mny Blossom. 

A drift on the lead is being run at present, and the ore encountered is being sacked ready for 
shipment in the spring. A small tonnage of high-grade ore may be looked for from the 
property as soon as development has been carried sufficiently ahead. 

Bi- Metallic. — The purchase of this property by a subsidiary company of the Hobson Silver 

Lead Company was completed this summer. About 300 feet of develo] Tit-work was done 

(hiring the year. 

Sheep Creek District. 

Lost Cabin. — At the Lost Cabin, on Hall creek, about 300 feet of development-work was 

during the summer. 

Queen. — The Queen 20 stamp mill was operated steadily during the year, except for minor 
shut-downs, caused by accidents to the flume-line. The tonnage produced was the heaviest 
yet from the property, being in the neighbourhood of 11,300 tons ; beside- the gold saved by 

amalgamation, 565 tons of concentrates was shipped to the Trail smelter. The ore was all 
obtained from No. 6 level from drifting and from the ore shoot at the shaft. The mine is 

worked on the shrinkage system, and about one-third of the ore from this ore-shoot is at present 

broken in the stope. The ore shoot found on No. 5 level across the creek was encountered 

on (To. 6, and drifted on for a distance of 200 feet, and still shows strong in the fao Foi 

150 feet the drift was carried the full width of the ore, which is from | ■_' to 11 feet. From 
th.i, on the drift will be carried single width until the end of the ..re shoot is reached, when 
it will be w idened out. While running two machines in the face, enough ore was taken out to 

keep the mill running. A raise is being run to No. 5. Some changes to the mill are contem- 
plated in the near future, to further increase the saving effected, which at present is not as 
good as it should be. 



3 Geo. 5 Nelson District. K 155 



Koolenay Belle. — Nothing was done at the Kootenai/ Belle this year, in spite of the 
splendid showing of ore opened up by the development-work already done. 

Vancouver. — A small shipment of 1 7 tons of high-grade ore was made from the Vancouver 
Fraction adjoining the Queen. Humphreys A 1 Fisher, the owners, are driving a short crosscut 
tunnel this winter. 

Dominion Mountain. 

Golden Belle and Clyde-Belt. — At the Golden Belle work was discontinued this spring and 
the property was sold by Sheriff's sale. Nothing was done at the Clyde-Belt. 

Mother Lode. — After many annoying delays the new mill at the Mother Lode was put into< 
commission, and ran at full capacity for the last five months of the year. The mill is equipped 
with 10 stamps, crushing to 12 mesh, a 5- x 20-foot tube-mill, amalgamation-plates, and a 
complete Merril cyaniding plant. The average daily tonnage treated is close to 70 tons. The 
saving effected is stated to be over 98 per cent, of the gold values. Over 13,440 tons was put 
through in the five months, and a good profit is said to have been made. A steady year's run 
of the mill would add greatly to the gold production of the district. 

A very promising lead is being opened up over the summit from Sheep creek, on the 
Cultus Creek side ; the ore is galena and carbonate, carrying good values in gold and some 
silver. It is owned and is being develoded by the owners, the Laib Brothers, by whom it was 
located. 

Nugget. — The Nugget has been closed down for most of the year, notwithstanding the 
considerable tonnage of ore opened up in the mine. It is expected that another crosscut tunnel 
will be run shortly. 

Silver Lead. — On Fawn creek, below the Nugget in the granite-lime belt, Macleod and 
MacColeman uncovered a large surface showing of silver-lead ore. They ran 60 feet of a cross- 
cut, but did not reach the main ore-shoot. 

Hudson Bay. — The Hudson Bay shipped 742 tons of silver-lead-carbonate ore to the Trail 
smelter this year. A large body of this ore is opened up, and shipments will be continued 
steadily. Eight miners keep four 4-horse teams hauling 7 tons to the load busy hauling the 
ore to Salmo. In addition to the lead-carbonates, there is a heavy tonnage of zinc-carbonates 
opened up. 

Aspen. — About a mile and a half farther up Peer creek is the Aspen group, at which a 
crosscut tunnel is being driven to get under a surface showing of dry silver-ore at a depth of 
50 feet. 

Emerald. — An air-compressor was installed at the Emerald this year, and a crosscut 
tunnel driven to obtain more depth. The vein is rather flat, and a raise is being run from this 
crosscut to catch the ore, but is not yet up high enough. The ore is a low-grade silver-lead 
ore, and 1,560 tons was shipped to the smelter at Trail this year. 

Silver Dollar. — The Silver Dollar is under lease and bond to the Consolidated Mining 
and Smelting Company of Canada. The mine is just on the outskirts of the town of Salmo. 
The ore is a silver-lead ore running high in zinc. A boiler and a small hoist were installed 
this summer, and a shaft is being sunk which at present is down about 100 feet. 

Erie Pistkict. 

Arlington. — The Arlington mine at Erie shipped 762 tons of gold-ore to the Trail smelter 
during the year. The Hastings B.C. Syndicate leased the property to William Barker at the 
end of May, and he is at present operating it. 



K 156 Report of the Minister of Mikes. 1913 



Second Relief. — The Second Relief on the North fork of the Sal i river, fourteen miles 

from Kric, has been operated steadily for the last live months of the year. There is considerable 
ore opened up at present, and a pinlial.il it v thai the om ners will be able to operate the mill 

steadily for some time. Over 3,500 tons of ore was treated at the mill this year, and '.»7 tons 

of concentrates shipped to the Trail smelter, besides the gold recovered by amalgamation. 
The property is equipped with a 10 -stamp mill using water-power, a II -drill air-compn 
machine drills, and suitable mine building . 

Office Statistics -Nelson Minim; Division. 

Free miners' certificates (ordinary) 620 

.i a (special) 3 

Claims recorded (mineral) 351 

M (placer) i 

Assessments recorded 

Transfers and other documents of title recorded 135 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $3,22 I 25 

Mining receipts. 3,731 



NELSON MINING DIVISION. 

PLATINUM AT NELSON. 
Notes by Provincial Mineralogist. 

A further endeavour was made this year by the Department to give official confirmation 
to the reported finding of platinum in certain dykes near Nelson, B.C., as much local interest 
had been manifested in the subject. 

With this objeel in \ ie« the writer was instructed to obtain samples of the dykes; these 

samples he took personally, assisted by an Inspector of Mines, in the presence of the parties 
interested and from places indicated by them : in addition to these samplings, further samples 

were banded in by owners from portions of dykes which they thought contained platinum. 

The matter had, however. resolved itself into, not a question of sampling, hut of the 
assaying of the samples, and this the Department decided to refer direct to some of the 
best known anil impartial assayers in Canada. England, and the United States, whose results are 

given, without any further comment, in the following report made by the writer to the 
Honourable the Minister of Mines in February, 1913: — 

Sic, 1 beg to report as follows regarding my investigations into the alleged finding of 

platinum, and metals of that group, in certain dykes in the vicinity of Nelson. 

Last year I had a number of samples sent to me; these I seni to several eminent chemists 

for a-say. all of whom reported that they were unable to detect even a trace of platinum, or 

metals of that group, in the sampli 

These results were published, in detail, in the Report of this Department for lull ipaire 
165, i ( seq. I. 

On October 1st, L912, 1 proceeded to Nelson at your request— 4» obtain other samples 
from the same and other localities, so that our samples would represent a wider n - 



3 Geo. 5 Nelson District. K 157 



I made you a detailed report of my trip to Nelson, under date of December 18th, 1912, 
which may be briefly summarized as follows : — 

I personally took the following samples, with the assistance of James McGregor, Inspector 
of Mines, and in the presence of the parties interested : — 

No. 7201 — Devlin dvke, general sample, upper and softer portion of dyke. 

No. 7202 — Devlin dyke, general sample, lower and harder portion of dyke. 

No. 7203 — Patenaude dyke, general sample, across dyke. 

No. 7204 — Patenaude dvke, special sample of 2 feet next to contact. 

No. 7205 — Beelzebub dyke, Granite- Poor man mine, general sample. 

No. 7206 — Beelzebub dyke, Granite-Poorman mine, special sample of foot-wall. 

No. 7207 — Greenhorn dyke, Granite-Poorman mine, general sample. 

No. 7208 — Granite dyke, Granite-Poorman mine, general sample. (It was from this 

dyke that the 50 tons milled was taken.) 
No. 7209 — Hardscrabble tunnel, No. 1 chute, general sample of dyke. 

In addition to the samplings made by me personally, the following samples were supplied 
to me : — 

No. 7211 — Monaghan dyke, general sample, sampled by owner. 

No. 7212 — Monaghan dyke, general sample, 2 feet next hanging- wall, sampled by 
owner. 

No. 7269 — McQuarrie & Robertson dyke, samples supplied by owners. 

No. 7215 — Sample given by Thomas Gough, manager Granite mine, to the Provincial 
Mineralogist, and said to be a sample from " concentrates " made on 
Wilfley table, in 1911, during a run through the Granite mill of 50 tons 
dyke-matter, taken from same dyke as was sample No. 7208. 

As the ratio of "concentrates" to the ton of ore is unknown, this 
sample would not determine the amount of metal in the dyke, and was 
taken only to determine whether there was any platinum present even in 
ore so concentrated. 

It was A. G. French who was primarily responsible for the alleged discovery of platinum, 
and I found in an interview I had with him that lie claimed that the metals of the Platinum 
group " were so elusive that no ordinary assayer, even the best, could find them upon assay, 
but that he (Mr. French) by his great experience had found a method of assaying that would 
show them." 

I obtained from Mr. French a description of his method of assaying, which I had typed, 
and submitted a copy to him for correction ; this was returned, with slight corrections, and 
initialled by him. 

To show me the manipulation of his method of assay, Mr. French had some samples run 
through in my presence ; those on dyke-matter were, however, abandoned, but a sample of 
" concentrates " was run through to the end. 

The samples, reagents, and operators were of Mr. French's selection, which was, however, 
unimportant, as it was only the mamipidatwn I was there to see, and the result was of no 
consequence, as of course I could not certify to the results without control of the operations. 

Upon my return to Victoria, I had the samples I had obtained divided, each into several 
identical samples. 



K 158 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Then- has never been any question as to the samples or sampling the whole question 
has been as to the assaying of the samples : so. to obtain the best expert determination on this 
point, I sent sets of four samples, each set identical, to a number of the most expert chemists, 
asking that they be "tested, with the greatest possible care, for metals of the Platinum group, 
for even a trace, and if found, then in what quantities." 

With each of these sets of samples I sent a ropy of Mr. French's method of assaying. 
Sets of samples were sent to the following parties, each set being identical and comprising 
Xos. 7203, 7205, 7211, and 7215:— 

Canadian Government Bureau of Mines, Ottawa, courtesy of Dr. Eugene Haanel; 
this laboratory does all the chemical work of the Bureau of Minis and of the 
Geological Survey of Canada. 
Johnson, Matthey & Co., London, England, Assayers to the Royal Mint, one of the 

first authorities in England on platinum-assaying. 
Dr. Frederic P. Dewey, Washington, J>.C. Chief Assayer to the U.S. Mint and 
the greatest authority in America on detection of minute quantities of platinum, 
the author of uumerous papers on this special subject. (These were sent 
through the U.S. Geological Survey, whose courtesy and Dr. Dewey's is hereby 
acknowledged. ) 
Ledoux A: Co., of New York, one of the best-known assaying firms in America. 
Consolidated Mining and Smelting Co. 's laboratory at Trail, whose chemists have 

become expert in this matter. 
British Columbia Government Laboratory, Mr Carmichael and Mr. Wbittaker 

working independently, making two sets of assays. 
The S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Company, manufacturers of platinum goods, 
New York. 
With the notable exception of the S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Company (which 
will be remarked on later), each and every one of these experts to whom the question had been 
Submitted reported that they were unable to find even a trace of any metal of the Platinum 
group. 

The following are extracts from some of the letters accompanying the certificates of 
assay : — 

Johnson, Matthey ,v Co. : "Our results are again of an absolutely negative character, ami 

we can affirm that the samples contain neither platinum nor metals of the Platinum group." 

1 ir. I >ewey reports : — 

■•Washington. D.C., January 21st, 1913. 
" The Director of the Mint. 

"Sir, None of the samples from the Provincial Mineralogist of British Columbia, 
forwarded to us by the United States Geological Survey, show any platinum. 

•■ No unusual occurrence was observed during the assay, but no special test could be made 
for Canadium." 

"(Signed, i Fredi bi< P I »i »i:v, 

Assayer, Bureau of lite Mini." 
Ledoux & Co.: "In examining these samples we have used assay charges four times as 
large as usual, and the results an in every case; we can assure you that none of these 

samples contain even a trace of platinum or any other member.- of the Platinum group. 

" We have assayed these samples by the method descril>ed as A. < iordon French's method, 

a sketch of which accompanied your letter." 



3 Geo. 5 Nelson District. K 159 

Mr. Carmichael and Mr. Whittaker, in addition to the four samples mentioned, also assayed 
•each and every one of the samples brought from Nelson. 

Mr. Carmichael, Provincial Assayer, reports as follows : — 

" These assays were made with the greatest care, both by the assistant assayer (Mr. 
Whittaker) and myself personally, and I must now report that in no case were we able to find 
•even a trace of platinum or any of the metals of the Platinum group. 

" The samples were tested both by Mr. French's method and by the generally accepted 
methods, and, as a result, I am certain they do not contain any of the Platinum group metals 
within the limits stated — that is, not as much as one-thousandth part of an ounce to the ton. 

" To test whether there was even an ' infinitesimally minute quantity ' of platinum present, 
•as is frequently found in the gold of this Coast, we ran through the furnace, by Mr. French's 
method, 60 charges of 20 grammes each of sample No. 7215, 'concentrates,' equal to 1,200 
grammes of material, combining all the buttons into one in the final cupellation. 

"We next took 42 charges of 1 A T (29.166 grammes), making 1,225 grammes of 
material) which we ran through by the regularly adopted methods, joining all the beads 
into one on the final cupellation. These two beads were treated separately, and any 
possible platinum condensed into a solution of about 0.05 c.c. in volume, and each of these 
solutions tested qualitatively, by potassium iodide, showed the presence of platinum ' in 
infinitely small quantity ' , as near as it is possible to estimate, I should say the platinum 
present amounted to about sixteen (16) cents' worth of platinum in 10,000 tons of ore, an 
.amount quite negligible and only discernible upon treating a great amount of material — more 
than 1,220 grammes. 

"I have carefully looked into the method of assay as proposed by Mr. French, and have 
experimented with it, and I fail to find any merit in it, either from a chemical or practical 
viewpoint. 

"(Signed.) Herbert Carmichael, 

B.C. Government Assayer and Analyst." 

The S. S. White Dental Manufacturing Company's assayers — as already noted — report that 
they find platinum and gold in each of the four samples sent them, as follows : — 

Sample. 

No. 7203 — Platinum, 0.033 oz. ; gold, 0.035 oz. per ton. No other precious metals present- 
No. 7205— Platinum, 0.088 oz. ; gold, 0.108 oz. per ton. » „ 
No. 7211 — Platinum, 0.042 oz. ; gold, trace. u n 
No. 7215 — Platinum, 0.119 oz. ; gold, 1.136 oz. per ton. n n 

The company, as such, has a high commercial standing, but of the skill or experience of 
the assayers employed by the company I have no means of judging. The company, however, 
is engaged in the manufacture on a large scale of platinum goods, and its laboratory is naturally 
an adjunct to its manufacturing business, so that it is quite possible, and even probable, that 
its laboratory — and even utensils — were so saturated with platinum, as dust and otherwise, as 
to render any samples treated there open to grave suspicion of contamination and the results 
subject to question. 

The firm does not do assaying or chemical analysis as a business — although in this case it 
was paid for these assays — and has no public rating as analysts. My only reason for sending 
samples to this firm was the fact that a number of persons in Nelson had received from it 
returns of platinum in these dykes, and it was largely due to these assays that local credence 
was given to the alleged discovery, and that this "platinum excitement " was started. 



K 1(30 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Some years ago we had an experience with another firm of platinum manufacturers near 
New York — who reported, to prospectors, high platinum results in ore, which subsequent 
investigations provednotto be founded on fact ; this was accounted for by contamination in 
the laboratory of the platinum-works, the probability of which, in such ;i laboratory, is known 
to any assayer of experience. In fact, it is usual to exclude all bullion-assaying from the n 

ill which assays of ore are made. 

Tn making this investigation I have simply obtained the samples and Mr. French's method 
of assaying. These I have submitted Eor the best expert advice obtainable, and in making tins 

report to you of the result of the investigation, I do not need to express any opinion of my 
own. I merely give you the verdict of the experts employed, which may be summarized as 

follows : — 

Seven of the most expert assurers in England, the United States, and Canada including 
the ( ii ■olo^ieal Surveys of the two latter countries report that not even a trace of platinum is 

present. 

The laboratory of a firm of platinum manufacturers reports from 0.033 to 0.088 oz. of 
platinum per ton in dyke samples and 0.119 oz. per ton in the •■concentrates." 

Any comment on the above results appears to me to be unnecessary. 



ARROW LAKE MINING DIVISION. 

Report of Walter Scott, Minim. Ki:c>u;i»bb. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on the Arrow Lake Mining l>i\isi.>n for 
the year ending Decemher -'ilst, 1912. 

On the Millie Mack group, situated in the vicinity of Burton, H. E. Foster, the owner, 

had a force of men doing development-work upon the property this summer. 

On the Big Ledge, situated on Bald mountain, on the west branch of Pingston creek. 
no extra development-work has heeli done this season, further than the annual assessment- work. 
Upon this property there is a large showing of zinc-ore. 

Office Statistics Arrow Lake Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 27 

( lertificates of work recorded 19 

M nieral claims recorded 2 

Bills of sale recorded - 

Cash paid in lieu of work 8100 00 




KlapiKin River — Tributary of Stikine — above t li*- Ford. 




n ill an Graveyard — bead of l.itile Klappan a 



3 Geo. 5 Rossland District. K 161 



ROSSLAND DISTRICT. 



TRAIL CREEK MINING DIVISION. 
Report of H. R. Townsend, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the report of mining operations in the Trail Creek Mining 
Division (luring the year 1912. 

The Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and the Le Roi 
No. 2, Limited, were the principal operators, and the properties operated by them are 
situated on Red mountain. There has been considerable prospecting and development-work 
carried on, however, in what is locally known as the "South Belt." 

'The Centre Star Group. — This group is owned and operated by the Consolidated Mining 
and Smelting Company of Canada, Limited, and comprises the following claims : Centre Star, 
War Eay/e, Iron Mask, Mugwump, Idaho, Enterprise, Virginia, Bed Mountain, Stewart 
Fraction, Pilgrim, City oj Spokane, Iron Horse, Monte Christo, Butte Fraction, and Bulla 
Fraction. The number of men employed was 110, of whom 338 were underground and 102 
on surface. The net weight of ore produced was 160,199 tons, having an assay content of 
'J(i,771 oz. of gold, 49,130 oz. of silver, and 1,741,384 It), of copper. The development-work 
for the year consisted of 6,209.5 feet of drifting, 3,003.5 feet of crosscutting, 1,131 feet of 
raises, and 9,696.2 feet of diamond-drilling. 

The Be Boi Group. — This group is also owned and operated by the Consolidated Mining 
and Smelting Company of Canada, and consists of the Be Boi, Pack Train, Black Bear, Bub// 
Fraction, Pearl Fraction, Durham, and Treadwell . One hundred and ten men were employed, 
eighty-eight being underground and twenty-two on surface. The net weight of ore produced 
was 47,373 tons, having an assay content of 20,468 oz. gold, 21,152 oz. silver, and 936,470 11). 
of copper. The development-work consisted of: drifts, 2,679 feet; crosscuts, 1,162.5 feet; 
raises, 518 feet; and diamond-drilling, 10,562.5 feet. 

The Be Boi No. 2 Group. — This group consists of the Annie, Annie Fraction, Josie, 
No. 1, and Poormau. The total area of these claims is only 65.32 acres. The number of men 
employed during the year was from 125 to 130. The gross tonnage, of ore mined was 35,898 
tons, 18,758 tons of which was shipped for treatment, and 17,140 tons of second-class ore was 
milled on the premises ; from the ore shipped, 12,776 oz. gold, 11,673 oz. silver, and 487,894 lt>. 
of copper was obtained, while the ore that was milled yielded 1,770 oz. gold, 1,062 oz. silver, 
and 36,227 It), of copper. The approximate value of all being S372,000. 

Blue Bird. — This property is owned and operated by the Rosalia Mining Company, 
Limited, and is one of the " South Belt properties. The shaft has been continued to a depth 
of 350 feet and the bottom is all in ore. The ore shows an increase in copper values with 
depth. Five men were employed, and operations were suspended when the snow set in, hut 
are to be resumed in the spring. Lack of capital prevents a more rapid development. About 
86 tons of ore was shipped to the smelter, 
ll 



K li;2 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Richmond. This is also a South Belt property located near the Blue Bird. The work 
done has been for the purpose of proving the property, and has given sufficient promise to 
warrant the formation of a company and the installation of machinery, for which the necessary 
buildings and preparations are now being made. 

Phoenix. Another of the South Bell claims being worked under tease by M. Trewhella. 
Several cars of ore right from the surface have been shipped to the smelter, with satisfactory 
results. 

l.X.L. — This is one of the old claims of the camp situated on O.K. untain. and has 

been operated under lease by \\ T. Evans. Nothing has been done since April, but work is 
to be resumed in the spring as soon as the snow goes. 

ful(u,d Empire. Situated on Grenville mountain near the western boundary of the 
Mining Division, and owned and operated by the lnl.mil Mining Company, Limited. The 
work for the year has been experimental, I'.L'nil tons of ore lieini; milled on the ground and I-'! 
tons of concentrates shipped to the Trail smelter. 

Office Statistics— Trail Creek Mining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded 44 

Certificates of work 32 

Certificates of improvement 1 

Bills of sale It 

Free miners' certificates (company) 8 

ii ii (special) "J 

.I H (individual) 1"_'7 



8 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 163 



BOUNDARY DISTRICT. 



Notes by Wm. Fleet Robertson, Provincial Minehaloihst. 

The Boundary District, the mines of which together produce more copper than those of 
any other part of Canada, led in 1912 in British Columbia in respect of both the quantity of 
ore mined and the total value of metals produced. The ore-output of the district for 1912 
was 1,989,084 tons — nearly 2,000,000 tons. The ore-output of the mines in the Greenwood 
and Grand Forks Divisions was 1,918,628 tons, as compared with 1,187,000 tons in 1911, and 
1,654,000 tons in 1910. (It will be remembered that the strike at the Crowsncst collieries 
adversely affected production in 1911.) It has been customary to include the production of 
Osoyoos Division with that of the others above mentioned, but, leaving that out for the 
present, the recovered output of metals from Greenwood and Grand Forks Divisions in 1912 
is as follows : Gold, 67,442 oz. ; silver, 389,341 oz. ; and copper, 33,372,199 ft. For statistical 
purposes there will be added 37,407 oz. of gold from the Hedley Gold Mining Company's mines 
in Osoyoos Division. The total value of the output (including $773,203 from Hedley) was 
approximately $7,846,580, which constitutes a record for the year as compared with that of 
metalliferous minerals from other districts in the Province. It will not, however, be as high 
as the Coast District for total value of all mineral production, for there coal and structural 
materials reached a total value in 1912 of $8,084,738, in addition to $3,010,818 for metallic 
minerals. 

GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION. 

The British Columbia Copper Company, Limited, also had an active 

B.C. Copper Co. and successful year. The company's chief sources of ore-supply are its 

Mother Lode mine, near Greenwood, and the Kawltide mine, near Phoenix. 

The latter is owned by the New Dominion Copper Company, but since the British Columbia 

Copper Company possesses a controlling interest in the New Dominion Company, and works 

its mines, the several properties may be referred to as if owned by the same company. 

Official returns show that of a total of 665,289 tons of ore received at the company's 
smelter from its mines in the Boundary District, the Mother Lode sent 385,646, the Rawhide 
261,453, the Wellington Camp group 10,354, the Emma 7,431, and the Athelstan 405 tons. 
The Queen Victoria in the Nelson Division shipped to the company's smelter about 1,000 tons, 
while some 33,000 tons was received from the Lone Star and Napoleon mines, the last two 
being situated south of the International Boundary-line, in the adjoining State of Washington. 
Leaving out of account the metals in ores from the United States and Nelson Mining Division, 
the recoveries were, approximately : Gold, 21,818 oz. ; silver, 113,903 oz. ; copper, 10,941,701 ft. 
The assay value of the ores was considerably higher. 

At the Mother Lode mine the year's work consisted chiefly of drilling in advance of 
breaking down pillars anil benches of ore, and this drilling was kept far ahead of ore-breaking 
requirements, preparatory to blasting with electric-fired charges. The method followed was 
to drill and load from 1,500 to 2,500 holes, averaging about 12 feet in depth, and connect 
them up in groups of twenty-five to a group. All were provided with electric fuses and fired 



K 164 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



simultaneously. Each of these blasts broke down thousands of tons of ore, in some cases 
enough to last for shipping during several months. Fire so badly damaged the power plant 

at the Emma on February -7th thai no work has since been done in that mine. The 
Wellington group mines were worked until June, but not since; it is planned to do much 
exploratory work on this property next season. As there is a large quantity of ore available 
in the company's Lone Star mine, the ore of which is very siliceous, concentration tests were 
made to determine tin- best way to eliminate the excess of silica, and this problem is no'w 

in a fair way toward being solved. 

The only one of the New Dominion Copper Company's mines that was operated on a 
large scale in 1912 was the Rawhide, situated near Phoenix. Development work consisted of 

- ■ 2,650 feet of raises and drifts. Included in the new work was a branch of the lower 

tunnel, connecting with the ore-shipping bins; the total of ore shipped has already been 

stated. An electric haulage system was put in, to take the place of hauling with horses. 

Early in July the company's general manager, Edward G. Warren, met with an automobile 

accident, which resulted fatally. He was succeeded by Frederic Kefler as acting general 
manager, until late in the vear, when Oscar Laehmund was appointed general manager. 

The following is the report of tin- acting general manager to his directors for the fiscal 
year of thirteen months ending December -'-list, 1912 : the end of the fiscal year was changed 

during the year to correspond to the calendar year, hence this statement is for thirteen 
months : 

" For the fiscal year of thirteen months ending I (ecember -"'1st. 1912, the following review 

of the company's operations is herewith submitted : — 

"Shipments were made from the company's mines as follows ; 

Mother L<«!i' 1 10,686 tons. 

Wellington < 'amp 9,935 

Lone Sl<ir and Washington 2,101 n 

Napoleon 17,118 " 

Qui ,n Victoria I .' 180 n 

Total 440,!)i>0 „ 

••Motif)- Loth- Mine. —The transverse-stope method of mining has been followed through 

out the year, and has proved most successful in extracting the maximum quantity of Ore at a 
minimum of cost. The tonnage shipped is the greatest for any (.tie year in the history of the 
mine, and the cost of crushed ore f.O.b. cars at the mine has hccii the lowest namely. 56.58 

cents per ton. 'The drilling of new ground has heeii kept well ahead of requirements, there 

hem- at the close of the year 5,000 holes, aggrc-at in- lio.UOO lineal feet, in readiness to blast. 

" The ore reserves have nol been materially increased during the year, and the averagi 

grade of the ore mined has remained below the normal grade of former years. 

" The mining plant has been maintained in good condition, and the laige tonnage has 
been exi railed « it hout serious accidents of any sort to either men or machinery. 

•• Wellington Camp. The ore developed here was mined out during the first seven months 

of the fiscal \ear. and in June the mine was closed for the time being. There is a large area 
of unprospected territory included within the company's holdings in this camp, hut owing to 

extensive prospecting in other localities it was thought best to postpone further operations at 
the II'. 'lington until a later date: 



:3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 165 



" The Lone Star and Washington Mine. — This mine was operated in June, July, and 
August only, as, on account of the refractory nature of the ore, but little could be smelted 
directly. Working tests on large lots of the ore, using ordinary water-concentration methods, 
did not prove sufficiently successful to warrant the erection of a concentration plant. We are, 
however, making tests on other lines, which so far have proved satisfactory, and lead to the 
expectation that the problem of successful concentration and elimination of the refractory 
constituents of the ore will shortly be solved. The 300,000 tons of developed ore on this 
property, comprised within less than 7 per cent, of its area, together with its comparatively 
high grade, make the ultimate solution of the problem of treatment a most important matter. 

" Napoleon Mine. — The 17,118 tons of sulphide flux shipped during the year were of 
better grade, both as to gold and sulphur contents, than for a number of years. Mining and 
tramway costs were reduced to an average of $1,588 per ton. The ore shipped was offset by 
new ore developed, leaving the ore reserves unchanged. These reserves are sufficient to serve 
all needs for many years to come. The machinery, plant, and aerial tramway have been 
maintained in good condition. 

" Napoleon Mill. — Through delays in l'eceipt of machinery and by reason of further altera- 
tions found necessary in the mill, it was late in September before all the problems relating to 
the treatment of the ore were finally and successfully solved. The ore milled was 6,483 tons. 
On account of the increased expense of mining and milling oxide-ore in the winter season, 
when in the open quarry-work it becomes mixed with snow and freezes into masses not readily 
handled, it was decided to close the mill until the spring of 1913, after which a steady and 
successful season's run should be had. 

" The Queen Victoria Mine. — This property is nine miles west of Nelson, B.C., and was 
purchased in November, 1912. The ore is an altered limestone, similar in self-fluxing properties 
tn the Boundary ores, but carries a higher percentage of copper. The mine is equipped with 
an electric-driven compressor plant, and is connected with the Canadian Pacific Bailway by 
an aerial tramway. 

" The months of November and December were occupied mainly in getting the mine into 
general working shape, and in opening up new ground for stoping ; 1 ,080 tons were shipped 
in December. 

"Smelter. — The smelter ran steadily throughout the year, handling a larger tonnage than 
fur any equal period in its history. During the first two and a half months, until a sufficient 
supply of coke was secured for the entire plant, only two furnaces were operated. The total 
tons smelted for the thirteen months of the fiscal year were 740,589, as compared with a total 
tonnage of 608,945 for the twelve months of the fiscal year of 1911. The sources of the ore 
smelted were : — 

B.C. Copper Company's ores 443,022 tons. 

Custom ores 284,575 M 

Converter slags 1 2,992 n 

Total 740,589 „ 

"The coke consumed was 103,154 tons. 

"The converter slags included : — 

B.C. Copper Company's ores 914 tons. 

Custom ores 4, 104 n 

Clay 1,205 „ 

6,223 „ 



K 1G(J 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



] 9 1 3 



"There were produced 11,259,140 It), of blister-copper, containing: — 
25,862.681 o/. of gold. 

142,025.06 oz. of silver. 
11,146,81 1.01) lb. of fine copper. 

"No material additions were made to the plant during the year, the machinery as a whole 
being maintained in its normal condition. 

"It is planned to use basic instead of acid linings for the converters should this be found 
practicable without material additions to the plant. Through decreased costs for clay and 
elimination of labour in relining converters, it is probable that a decided reduction in the cost 
of converting can be effected. 

"Prospecting Operations. — During the year, twenty-three groups of mining claims in 
British Columbia and in the adjacent parts of the United States were examined by our 
engineers. This work resulted in the bonding of the Eureka Copper Mining Company's 
property, near Nelson, B.C., and of a group of mining claims on Copper mountain, near 
Princeton, B.C., known collectively as the Princess group. On these two properties exploration 
is being vigorously pushed by both band-work and by diamond-drilling, with generally 
favourable results to date. Much exploration was also done in Voigt's Cam]) on Copper 
mountain with fairly successful results. The bond on this camp was allowed to lapse, hut 
negotiations are now in progress for renewal. Amongst the groups examined are three othei> 
of much promise, which it is planned to explore during the coming season. 

"Operating Ccsts. — The yield in copper, gold, and silver for the past year is less per ton 
than for any year in the history of the plant; the costs per ton for Ore handling, etc.. are lower 
than for any year. On account of the low yield in the cost of producing copper per pound is 
L2.85 cents, notwithstanding the very low handling costs. 

" The following table gives a comparison of the principal items for the past five years ■ 



- 


190S. 


1909. 


1910. 


Hill. 


1912. 


Yield of copper per tun of B.C. Copper 












Company's copper- bearing ores. . . . 


17. S tb. 


17.7 m. 


18.0 11.. 


16.4 It.. 


13.6 1b. 


Yield of gold and silver per ton of 














$0.!.s;, 


§1.03 


$1.23 


$1,133 


SO. 762 


Average price realized for copper. . . . 


.13504 


.1308 


,1277s 


. 1233 


16664 


Costs of producing, refining, and 












marketing per pound of fine copper, 












after crediting expenditure witb 














.09996 


.09829 


.09048 


.11635 


.12855 


Costs per ton of handling ore, includ- 












ing all charges from ore in place to 












sale of the contained metals 


$2,632 


S2.683 


$2,730 


$2,882 


$2 4596 



" Attached hereto are the official auditor's statements of accounts for the fiscal year, duly 
Certified, comprising : Balance sheet as at December .Hist, 1012: l'mtit and Loss Account for 

the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

" In concluding this report, the writer- wishes to hear testimony to the uniformly loyal 
support and excellent work of all tlic.sc> in charge of the various departments of the company, 
whose collective work has enabled the company to attain the results set forth in the statement 
of the auditors." 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 107 



The Old Ironsides, Knob Hill, Gold Drop, etc., mines, owned and 

Granby Mines, operated by the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power 

Company, are for the most part situated in the Greenwood Mining 

Division, but as the head office and smelting-works of the company are located at Grand 

Forks, in the Grand Forks Mining Division, these properties have, for convenience, been 

described under that head. 

Other Mines. — Little or nothing was done in 1912 by the Consolidated Company at its 
mines in the Boundary District — the Phmnix Amalgamated group and the No. 7. A small 
shipment of ore was made from the Elkhom, near Greenwood, and tunnel-driving was continued 
on the Argo. The Jewel stamp-mill was operated during the last quarter of the year and some 
$15,000 worth of precious metals recovered. Development of coal-measures in the Kettle 
River valley near Midway was continued. There was but little mining done in the country 
along the West fork of Kettle river, but now that a railway has been constructed to that part 
of the Boundary District several small high-grade mines there should be worked. 



GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION. 
Report of W. R. Dewdney, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining operations in the Greenwood 
Mining Division for the year 1912. 

Oscar Lachmund, general manager of the British Columbia Copper 
B.C. Copper Co. Company, Limited, kindly furnished me with the following summary of the 
company's operations during the year : — 

Ore Shipments. 

Mother Lode 385,81 1 tons. 

Wellington 9,714 n 

Emma 4,729 n 

Rawhide 261,953 „ 

Athelstan 44 h 

Jack Pot Fraction 897 h 

Ore Smelted. 

Canadian 666,480 tons. 

Foreign 32,865 „ 

699,345 it 
Metallic Content of Ores. 

Gold 24,979 oz. 

Silver 140,217 n 

Copper 10,969,809 It). 

The ore treated at the Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, and Power Company's 
smelter at Grand Forks amounted to about 1,365,804 tons, and the total production of metals 
was valued at §5,010,703. Most of the ore treated is shipped from mines situated in the 
Greenwood Mining Division. 

The development at the company's Phoenix mines comprised : drifting, 5,444 feet ; 
raising, 5,370 feet; and sinking, 256 feet; 12,698 feet of diamond-drilling was also 
accomplished. 



K 168 Report of the Minister of Minks. L913 

Placer mining. 

Two locations were made on Rock creek during the year. I have do information that 
;mv gold «as recovered 

Eleven placer-mining leases situated on the North and South forks of Lock creek were 
granted this year. Considerable work was done on W. (.'. Fry's lease on the North fork, and 
up-to-date machinery was used, l>ut with not very good results. 

( o m. minim;. 

I am indebted to A. E. Watts, president of the Boundary Mining and Exploration 
Company's coal properties at Midway, B.C., for the following information concerning their 
development-work : — 

•• We have during the past few months employed ten to twelve men in <lri\ ing a tunnel on 

a vein of eoal which varies from 1 to it feet in thickness ; tin- length of the tunnel is over 500 
feet, although it has only gained a depth of [00 to 150 feet ; the eoal. being near the sin I 

contains considerable slate mixed with it. We are non making preparations to sink a slope 

on the vein for the purpose of demonstrating the area of the vein we are now developing. In 
addition to the two tunnels mentioned, we have also sunk a three-compartment shaft 7 x 16 
feet in size and about .so feet deep; this shaft is still in surface waste, hut engineers estimate 
that we shall reach the coal-measures with this shaft at a depth of about 1 li< > feet. This work 
has been done on Lots 122 and li.17, which are owned in fee simple by this company that is 

to say. it is Crown-granted land — and all the workings are close beside the railway-track ; 
consequently, we have good shipping facilities, while the close proximity to three smelters 
provides great markets. 

Office Statistics Greenwood Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 266 

Locations 108 

Certificates of work 208 

Filings 13 

Transfers, agreements, etc •"'" 

Certificates of improvement B 

Crown grants 1 - 

Placer locations 2 

Placer leases 11 



GRAND FOLKS MINING DIVISION. 

Notes b? Wm. Fleet Robertson, Provincial Minerai tsT. 

Granby Consolidated. — The Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting, 

Granby M.S. and Power Company, Limited, in 1912 mined and smelted 1,250,689 tons 

and P. Co. of ore from its own mines in Phoenix camp. This compares with 606,000 

tons in 1911 and l,0"o,000 tons in 11)10. It is claimed that as much new 

ore was developed during the company's last fiscal year as was -hipped to its smelter, and that 

there is still in the mines between n,o()0,000 and 7,000,000 ton- of minable ore "estimated in 
sight." Development-work in the company's mines was carried on as usual ; the total for the 
year was rather more than 1 1,000 lineal feet of drifts, crosscuts, and raises. Diamond-drilling 
runs to about [,000 feet a month when in full operation, and the cost ,,f this is put down as 
adding to development costs about 1 1 cents, bringing mining costs up to about 78 cent- a ton 




tttle Klnppjiii River — looking ilown townrcts its tinniii 




m 






. . . 

.... -. 






Mttle Klai»|itin River — looklns np to Graveyard Camp* 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 169 



of ore mined. Much of the drilling is done in new territory outside of the sphere of present 
mining operations, with the object of rinding new ore-bodies. In the early summer of 1911 a 
map was prepared of an area to be systematically drilled, and the positions of drill-holes 
determined upon. Drilling has since been steadily prosecuted, the intention being to continue 
this work until the whole area has been explored. 

At the company's big smelting-works at Grand Forks, an important change made was in 
the method of disposal of the slag — from hauling it out to the dump molten in trains of slag- 
pots, to granulating and elevating, by belt-conveyors, to a height of 100 feet, thus forming a 
new dump on top of the old one. The new system has been successfully developed, and late 
in 1912 a second set of trestles and belt-conveyors was put in for use in case of interruption of 
that used throughout the year. The smooth and successful working of the company's blast- 
furnace operations will be indicated by mention of the fact that all the eight furnaces were 
run continuously from June 5th to November 9th, a period of 156 days, this constituting a 
record run for the whole battery at the works. Apart from this, there was very little interrup- 
tion to the running of the furnaces or the converting plant at anytime throughout the year. 

The official returns from the company for the calendar year 1912 show that there was 
mined and smelted 1,250,689 tons of ore, of which the " assay- value " contents was : Gold, 
51,145 oz. ; silver, 343,251 oz. ; and copper, 31,156,708 lb.; while the contents actually 
"recovered" by the smelting operations was: Gold, 44,579 oz. ; silver, 271,070 oz. ; and 
copper, 22,409, 900 lb. 

The company employed during the year a daily average of 482 men about the company's 
mines, of which 374 were employed "underground " or mining, and 108 were employed on the 
surface. 

In his report for the company's fiscal year ended June 30th, 1912, the superintendent 
of the smelter included the following information : " Average smelting cost for the year was 
$1,256, as against$1.172 for 1911 and $1,187 for 1910." (Note.— Tonnage of ore smelted was : 
To June 30th, 1912, 739,519tons; 1911, 984,346 tons; 1910, 1,183,624 tons.) "The last 
five months, leaving out the months when high-priced (Pennsylvania) coke was used, show 
fairly well, being $1.20. The ores were more siliceous this year than last, and slags were 
higher in silica. The copper loss was less than in any previous year. . . . Smelting and 
converting the last five months were $1,264, being 0.024 cents less than 1911, and the lowest 
yearly costs the Granby Company has ever made. Average cost of smelting and converting 
was $1.34, and loss of copper in slags was 4.2 lb." It should be remembered that labour 
troubles at the collieries caused a suspension of smelting for between four and five months in 
the latter part of 1911, so that several weeks of 1912 passed before conditions became normal. 

The following extracts are from the annual report of the directors for the fiscal year 
ending June 30th, 1912:— 

"TREASURER'S REPORT. 

" Following is a summary of the year's business : — 

" Produced. 

" 13,231,121 lb. of copper fine, sold at average price of $ 0.1558 

225,305 oz. of silver fine, sold at average price of ... . 0.5906 

33,932 oz. of gold fine, sold at average price of 20.00 

The total amount realized equals $2,874,759 55 



K 170 Report of the Minister of Mines. 191J 



" Costs. 

" Working expenses at mines and smelter, 
freight, refining, selling, and general 

expenses $2,128,21] 03 

Foreign (ire purchased • 163, 1 69 5 I 

$2,291,380 57 

Cost per ton, including all expenses $ i 90 
15 cents per ton added account 

expenses of close down. 

Cost per pound of copper after 

deducting value of gold and 

silver 0.1 1 1 

Net profit for year ending June 30th, L912 $ 583,378 98 

Surplus carried over from last year 2,533,304 '.'7 



s:i.l n;,i;s:; <».-, 

Loss allowed for depreciation 600,562 •">'•> 



Net surplus, June 30th, 1912 $2,5 16,121 56 

There has been expended on new construc- 
tion and equipment at the mine and 
smelter $48,266 92 

Mine development during the year. . . . 6,365 lineal feet. 

Diamond-drill development (>,.'S1 1 n 

Granby ore smelted 721,719 dry tons. 

Foreign ore smelted 17,800 m 

Plant was in operation 7 months. 24 days. 

Plant was closed down + n 6 n 

"Assets and Liabilities (Jink 30th, 191 l'). 

"Assets. 

•■Cost of lands, real estate, machinery, buildings, dwellings, 

and equipment, less depreciation allowed £1 .">.osi,0o."> ;;i 

Stocks and bonds 519,332 85 

Hidden Creek Copper Company investment 979,4(il 19 

Fuel and store supplies 161,191 IS 

Cash and copper 791,789 38 



$17,535,779 9 1 



"Liabilities. 

< lapital stock 815,000,000 00 

In the treasury 1. 185 i" 1 



Issued shares. . . . 149,985.15 w sl00 $] 1,998,515 00 

Dividends held for liquidator * 1,603 93 

Accounts payable 19,539 15 

Surplus ..." 21,1 I". 38 

2,516,121 56 



$17,535,779 94 
<;. W. WoosTSK, Treasurer" 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 171 



REPORT OF MINE SUPERINTENDENT. 

"Phoenix, B.C., July 1st, 1912. 
" Jay P. Graves, 

General Manager, Spokane, Waslnnylon. 

" Dear Sir, — The following is a report on the mining operations in Phoenix during the 

past year : — 

" Shipments. 

"Owing to the shut-down between August 12th and December 20th, 1911, the shipments 
show a falling-ofi' from previous years. Altogether 723,024 tons were shipped. 

• " The following table shows the total shipments to date and their origin : — 

Above No. 3 tunnel 4,731,637 tons 

Victoria shaft 2,362,303 „ 

Gold Drop 881,254 .. 

Total 7,975,194 ,. 

" Development-work. 

" This was not carried on during the close-down. 

"Diamond-drilling for the year amounted to 6,311 feet, and the total to date is now 
61,145 feet. 

"The average cost per ton, including development, was 77.1 cents. During the last six 
months, the period during which the mine was steadily operated, the cost was 74.4 cents. 

" Recovery. 

Copper 1.25 per cent. 

Silver 0.29 oz. 

Gold 0.043 „ 

" Between the unavoidable inclusion of a certain amount of waste in the ore as it leaves 
the mine and the losses at the smelter, the above recovery has been the best that could be 
obtained. In the future, unless some higher grade of ore is developed or better recoveries 
made at the smelter, we will be unable to make any improvement. 

" Ore in Siyht. 

"Ore estimates in the Ironsides mine are now calculated entirely from transverse vertical 
sections. These are taken every 100 feet. This is close enough so that no important 
irregularities in the ore-bodies are overlooked. Sections have been brought up to date, a 
tonnage estimate has been placed on all outlying ore-bodies not previously estimated, and the 
result shows a tonnage in the mine of 6,433,418 tons, as against 6,420,267 tons shown on last 
year's report. The 'ore in sight' summary for July 1st, 1912, is shown in the following 
table :— 

Gold Drop. Ironsides. Total. 

Ore developed 1,188,000 13,220,612 14,408,612 

Mine has produced and shipped. . 881,254 7,093,940 7,975,194 

Eemaining developed ore 306,746 6,126,672 6,433,418 

" Respectfully submitted. 

"C. M. Campbell, 

Assistant Superintendent." 



K 172 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



REPORT OK SMELTIXO SI PKKl NTKX1 >K.\T. 

" New Construction. 

" During the past year we have changed our haulage of slag ; where formerly we hauled 

and dumped the slag hot, we now granulate the slag, carrying it by water to bins centrally 

located, where it is dewatered and then conveyed up an incline l 1111 feet above present dump 

by conveyor-belts and stacked. The first rust of this installation was $44,256.41. 

" Rhist-t'uriinr, I), jiiirtmri)/. 

•■ Last year, it will be rememhered, we finished the year with Eastern coke, which cost 
$10.55 per ton Grand Forks. This year we ran on Eastern coke during July and up until 
August I till, when we closed down owing to excessive cuke cost, and stayed closed until tin- 
coal strike was settled in the Crowsnest. We Mew the furnaces in again December L'lst. 

having been down four months and seven days, [n July, August, and part of December and 
January cuke was charged to us at Eastern pries, making costs heavy, while for the rest of 
the year we used Crow's Nest coke. This gives us an average of T.n'.i furnaces operated for 
237 operating days, or L58 furnaces for the full year. 
"The Furnace Department smelted: — 

< rranby ore 721,719 tons, 

Fi .reign ore 17,800 " 

Converter slag and matte 28,361 « 

Flue-dust 1,422 

Average per cent, of coke used per ton of ore l.'i.Of) per cent. 

"From tonnage standpoint, operations were had: tonnage for the year being ".'19,519 
tons ore, against 984,346 tons 1911 and 1,183,624 tons 1910. 

" Average smelting cost for the year was 81.2-~><>, as against 81. 172 of 1911 and $1,187 
for L910. The last five months, leaving out the months when high-priced coke was used, 
show fairly well, being $1.20. Everything in this department is in good repair and capable 
of being operated to full capacity, as is being done at this writing. 

" The ores were more siliceous this year than last, and slags were higher in silica. The 
copper loss was less than any year previous. 

" Converting Department. 

" In this department we have very materially reduced our costs, so that the latter months 
show very well. July, August, December, and January are high on account of small tonnage, 
high priced coke, and getting the basic process well under way. 1 can say that we are now 

well established in the practice and it is a success. Costs i n this department were $0,084 pel- 
ton ore. The last five months show 0.0637 per ton ore. This shows well when compared 

with last year's. We produced 13,226,360 ft. copper in 1912, as against 17,858,860 lli. iii 

1911. This department handled 19,500 tons of 3.'?. 9 per cent, matte. 

" This department is in good repair and machines an- in good shape. Operating only 
237 days out of the year makes it look bail for tons smelted and pounds copper converl 
and on account of high-priced coke. costs were high for three of these months. This has been 
partially offset by cleaner slags, better recoveries, and that the prevailing price of copper has 
been fairly high. 

'• Smelting and converting the last five months were $1,264, being 0.024 cents less than 
1911 and the best yearly costs Granby ever made. Average cost of smelting and converting 

was $1.34, and loss of copper in slags was 1.2 lb. 

"Everything was satisfactory in regard to the handling of material by the railroads. 
"There was no difficulty with labour and plenty of men are offered for work. 

"Respectfully submitted. 

•• W. A. Williams, Superintendent." 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 173 



The following report upon the company's operations at Gran by bay, on Observatory 
inlet, in the Skeena Mining Division, will be of interest : — 

"An vox, B.C., September 10th, 1912. 
"J. P. Graven, Esq., 

General Manager, The Granby Consolidated Mining, 
Smelting, and Power Comjtany, Limited, 
Spokane, Wash. 

"Dear Sir, — I beg to hand you the following report on the Hidden Creek Copper 
Company's mine at Anyox, B.C. : — 

"Up to September 1st, 1912, the total amount of development-work accomplished has 
amounted to — 

Cuts 2,255 feet. 

Drifts 8,071 

Baises 1,051 

Diamond-drill 23,590.5 „ 

Total .■',5,507.5 „ 

" The greater part of the above work has been done above the .'585-foot level, and has 
developed so far, in round numbers, 5,000,000 tons of ore which will carry 228,000,000 lt>. of 
copper and 20 cents per ton gold and silver. 

" It is not the object of this report to go into any detail regarding the nature of the 
ore-deposit, the natural advantages for mining and smelting at Anyox, the transportation 
facilities, etc., as all these points have been placed before you by others in former reports, far 
better than I could do it. 

"The work for the past vear has been carried on without serious accident : the men are 
well housed, healthy, and contented, and everything is in excellent shape to continue work 
economically during the winter months. 

" No. 1 Ore-body is opening up remarkably well at depth, especially on the east side of the 
main tunnel .'585-foot level. The diamond-drilling on the west side of the tunnel is showing 
up fully as well as could be expected considering results obtained previously in down holes 
between levels 530 and 385. At present we are driving hole No. 80, which starts in drift 
No. 10, level 530, and goes down at an angle of 15 degrees to the west. This hole has now 
reached below the 385-foot level and has an average value of over 3 per cent, copper. 

" During the winter months I advise running drifts No. 10 and No. 20, 385-foot level, 
and crosscutting the ore-body every 100 feet by diamond-drill. The main tunnel should also 
be continued to ore-body No. 2. 

" No. 2 Ore-body. — The work done in this ore-body has been extremely gratifying. 
Levels 530, 630, and 700 are all opening up ore in large quantities and of much better value 
than was anticipated. 

"Hole No. 07, driven from 4o drift, 530 level, crosscuts the ore-body and at the same 
time goes down at a dip of 30 degrees, thus reaching the 385-foot level. Tin? hole averaged 
3.5 per cent, copper for a distance of 350 feet. 

"I advise continuing work during the winter on all three of the above levels, but it is 
most essential to get tunnel 385 driven into this ore-body and get it connected with level 530 
by a large raise, thus securing good ventilation. 



K 174 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



"During the past few months we ha ve done considerable work at the foot of Mammoth 
bluff hy trenches and short tunnels. Evidentlj a large amount of the ore-body has been worn 
away in years past, so that at the present tone there is an enormous quantity of broken ore 

deposited at the toot of the bluff. This ore is in boulders varying a good deal in size, hut 

fairly well broken up. We have penetrated the mass of boulders in two places for over 60 

Eee1 and exposed them for a distance of over 300 feet. Samples have been taken in many 
places, and the assav returns indicate a grade of about 2 per cent, copper. We intend to 

clear the mountain side of trees, and then wash away the soil and dirt ami handle the boulders 

by means of steam-shovels. The ore standing in the bluff itself can he handled in the 

same way. 

" During the coming winter 1 think we should spend in the neighbourhood of s1l\<1(mi a 
month oil mining. A less expenditure than this would not be in proportion to the necessary 
overhead charge. At present we are using three diamond drills. 1 advise cutting this down 
to one drill, which will do about L,000 feet of drilling per month. About $2,000 of the above 
amount should he spent in preparing ore-pockets, etc., for shipping ore. The remainder 
should be spent on the different levels as recommended under the discussion of ore-body 

No. 1 and No. 2. 

" Sampling. The sampling of diamond-drill cores has been done in 5-foot sections by 
taking approximately every other inch of core in each section as an assav sample. The 
remaining core is marked and stored in a house prepared for that purpose. 

"Drifts have been sampled by taking a powder-box of ore from each car as it leaves the 
mine. In this way a drift sample of "> feet is composed of from sixteen to twenty pov\ der boxes 
of ore or about 350 Hi. 

"I am pleased with the way the property is looking, and T trust 1 have placed the 
situation before you in a satisfactory manner. 

" Yours respectfully, 

"O. I',. Smith, 

Superintendent of Mines." 



GRAND FORKS MINING DIVISION. 

Report of s. R. Ai.mi.no. Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining in the Grand Forks Mining 
I livision for the year 191 l'. 

'I'lic output of ore in the Boundary District for L912 overreached all previous records, 

and apparently will leave hut little room for increase in the future unless more capacity is 

forthcoming for the handling, over 2,000,000 tons having been treated at the smelters, and. 

approximately, between L'.'i.OOO.OOO and l> I, III II ),()()( I II.. of blister-copper produced from that 

tonnage. 

The increase in the ore tonn.iL'e "\ r the previous year was over SOO.OOO tons, and the 
increase, for the same period, of blister copper was sonic 1 l.ol>0,000 ft). 

Work in the different camps, outside those where the Granby and British Columbia 

Copper Companies are working, has not been of more import than to keep the claims that 
have not been Crown granted alive. 



:5 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 175 



As L. B. Reynolds, in a review for the Xe/sou Daily News, covers the ground of the Granby 
Mining, Smelting, and Power Company, Limited, in that portion relating to the Boundary 
ore-output, I cannot do better than reproduce it here. 

In that report Mr. Reynolds says : — 

''The profits made by the Granby Company last vear will total close 

Granby CMS. to $ 1,250,000, after all deductions, such as depreciation, deficit caused by 

and P. Co. shut-down in 1911, etc., have been made. The gross working profit is 

stated to have been 81,600,000, the actual cost of mining and smelter 

treatment by the company to have been $2.38 a ton, and the cost of copper production 9.15 

cents a pound. The cost in 1911 was given as .f2.90 a ton and 12A cents a pound of 

copper. The costs of the company are depending greatly on the output, as tonnage decreased 

them very rapidly. Last year the enormous tonnage, 1,250,689 tons, treated, the largest in 

the company's history, has brought the cost down to the lowest yet obtained. The cost of a 

pound of copper is figured by deducting from the total costs the value of the silver and gold 

contained in the ores. The shipments of blister-copper were 22,650,024 lb., containing 44,579 oz. 

of gold and 271,070 oz. of silver. 

"The high average price of copper has greatly increased the profits over those of last year. 
and although they are not as high as in 1906 and probably 1907, when copper was at its 
highest price, they are still very satisfactory. No dividends will be declared, however, as the 
company is building for the future, against that time when the ore reserves at the Phoenix 
mines will become exhausted, by the development and equipment of the Hidden Creek Mining 
Company's property on the Coast. It owns 80 per cent, of the stock of this company, which 
was purchased for 8400,000. All this year's and last year's profits will go to the erection of a 
smelter at Granby bay and development of more ore reserves in the mine. No more dividends 
will be paid till this plant is in operation, and then, with a favourable copper market, the 
payment of dividends may be looked for on a larger scale than heretofore. 

•• Dividends paid. — The dividends paid by the company to date are : — 

1903 8 133,630 30 

1905 339,991 00 

1906 1,620,000 00 

1907 1,315,000 00 

1908 540,000 00 

1909 270,000 00 

1910 248,48100 

Total 84,027,1 1 1 30 

"The output for the year was 1,263,331 tons, 214,000 tons of which came from the Gold 
Drop at Phoenix, and the rest, except for a few thousand tons of Customs ore, from the Granby 
mine at Phoenix. 

"The development at the company's Phoenix mines last year comprised drifting and 
crosscutting 5,681 feet, raising 5,492 feet, and sinking 256 feet, making 11,429 feet of narrow 
work. Diamond-drill holes to the extent of 12,397 feet were also run during the year. As 
no changes have been made at the mines this year, the description of them as given in last 
year's annual review is reproduced below. 

" The company operates what appears to be two distinct sets of ore-bodies. The oldest 
and largest of these are on the Knob Hill and Old Ironsides claims, while the latter is half a 
mile to the east on the (.'old Drop and adjoining claims. 



K 176 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



"The ground above the No. 1 tunnel was worked by open-cuts, steam-shovels being 
employed. After nearly 1,000,000 tuns bad been taken out a fire destroyed the crusher. It 
was rebuilt at No. 2, KK) feet lower, iii such a way thai the ore drops from it directly into the 

railroad cars, or, if none are available, through to No. •'! tunnel. All ore below No. .'! tunnel 

is hoisted from the Victoria shaft, the levels helou licinu' the L'00, .',00. and loo. No. 2 tunnel 

and the Victoria shaft are seined 1 >v the Canadian Pacific Railway, while No. :'• tunnel and 
the Victoria shaft are served by the Great Northern Railway. 

" Three Thousand Tims daily. — There are really four distinct mines with separate crews, 
rolling-stock, bins, crushers, etc., the Gold Drop making the fourth. The idea of this is that. 

in case of any accident to any part of the mine or to either of the railroads, the output from 
three of the outlets can he kept up and the smelter assured of a steady Supply. The average 
output is a trifle o\ er 3,000 tons a day. 

"System of Mining. Ill the upper levels the ore bodies had a pitch of (ill decrees, hut in 

the lower workings seem to flatten off. They are in places so wide that the crosscuts crossing 

them are (iOO feet lone;. I n opening up a level parallel drifts about 75 feel apart are opened 

up on the strike. At about 15-foot intervals raises are carried up vertically for three rounds. 

when they are continued at 45 degrees. The first of these is carried through to the level 
above for ventilation. When No. 2 is up about 30 feet, Stoping is started until the two are 
connected and the same process continue 1. In this way tin- stopes are left w ith a network of 
pillars. These pillars are then mined by starting above and putting in long holes, using a 
tripod and blasting out a funnel shaped hole called a ' glory-hole.' This is widened out until 
the sides get too flat for the ore to run. Other raises then can be brought up from a parallel 

drift underneath and the process repeated. Sufficient pillars are always left to suppori the 

roof till all the ore is mined out. While mining the ore these pillars are drilled full of le.les. 

When all the other ore is mined cait but them, these holes are all shot together and the pillars 
brought down in this way. 

" The ore from the stopes is never touched with a shovel and the only shovelling done is 
that required in running the drift and starting the raises. 

"The rock is hard and practically the only timbering done is for the chutes. The ore is 

hauled iii 1 0-ton steel cars by electric locomotives of T"> horse-powei on a 3-fool gauge track 

with 30-D) rails, capable of handling 150 tons per hour at each of the outlets. 

"All of the latter cars used in shaft-workings are wooden ones of 5 tons capacity, with a 

specially constructed side-dump that permits of their being dumped at the pocket while the 
train is running at full speed and causing no delay. 

" In the Gold Drop all the ore is dropped fchjOUgh a 300 foot raise to the Curlew tunnel. 

w here it is hauled to the crusher bins, soil feet distant, in the ■"> ton capacity side dump » 1' □ 

ears by an electric locomotive. 

"At the Victoria shaft the hoisting is done by a 251 ' borse power electric hoist from three 
pockets, One for ore and one for waste on the 100, and one for ore in the 200. These are 

connected by raises with the upper level, which greatly increases their capacity. 

"The shaft is of three compartments, having a t \ 6-foot manway and two skipways 

each ■ > \ li feet m the clear. The skips are balanced and hold almost •"> tons, and 2,000 tons 
can be hoisted in eigbl hours. 

"The skips dump 60 feet above the collar of the shaft into fcwO bins , ,f 500 tons capacity 

each. From these it passes through a 12 s 36-inch Blake crusher, driven by a 150-horse-power 

induction motor. From the crusher the ore is fed on a 250-foot conveyor-belt 12 inches wide. 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 1' 



travelling 250 feet a minute, with a capacity of 200 tons an hour. This delivers the ore to 
four bins of 700 tons capacity. Two of these are served by the Canadian Pacific Railway 
and two by the Great Northern Railway. Nine hundred tons can be loaded into the cars an 
hour. 

" Compressed air is supplied by two 60-drill Rand compressors, run by a 700-horse-power 
motor. 

" Largest Smelter in Empire. — The smelter is the largest in the British Empire and the 
second largest ia the world. The only important change to be made was the installation of 
an additional unit of the slag-disposal system and the connecting-up of all the furnaces to the 
system. This additional unit was put in to take care of the slag while moving or repairing 
the other one, thus avoiding anv possibility of the necessity of closing down the furnaces in 
case of accident. 

" Tremendously Improved Conditions. — A comparison of the methods of 1902 and those 
of to-day show that at the Ironsides 280 men then mined 1,000 tons a day, while at present 
387 men turn out over 3.000 tons a day. The costs are stated to be 81.77 in 1901 and 82.50 
in 1910 a ton of ore mined and smelted. 

" The ore is hauled by the railroads to the smelter, twenty-four miles distant, in 53-ton 
steel cars. These cars discharge into three sets of parallel ore-bins 760 feet long, of 5,000 tons 
capacity each. One in ten cars is put through a sample mill, and the ore is found to run so 
steady in value that 20 cents is the greatest variation in 30,000-ton lots noted. 

" From these bins the ore is drawn with coke into charge cars run by electric motors of 
30 horse-power, each train carrying 4 tons a load and handling 750 to 900 tons in twenty- 
four hours. There are four of these trains feeding the eight furnaces, which have a total 
capacity of from 3,000 to 3,400 tons a day when all are in operation. The cars run right 
into the furnace from the end and dump on both sides at once. The slag, heretofore, was 
hauled away in cars. 

"During the first three years' operations at the plant the system of granulation was 
adopted, but, owing to the loose slag taking up so much room and running into the Kettle river, 
was abandoned and the slag was taken from the settlers at the furnace in a molten condition. 
Since that time it has been allowed to run into huge pots, containing 6 tons each, which were 
hauled by donkey-engines to the dump, and while still in molten condition was dumped. 

" By dumping the slag hot the (Iranhy has secured a yard over a mile in length and 
varying in width from 100 to 500 feet, and as the haul from the works to the dump has 
become so long and making this method so expensive, the company last year decided to again 
adopt the granulation system, only using a much more improved method of handling the slag. 

" The new system, which was given its initial trial run in January, can now be said to 
have passed the experimental stage, although since the commencement of operations several 
minor difficulties have had to be surmounted. 

"Slag Granulated. — The slag is allowed to run from the settlers, which are located 
at the outlet of the furnace, into flues where a steady stream of cold water granulates it 
and carries it down a main flume or launder to a series of bins, where it is dewatered. 
These bins are located several feet below the level of the present dump. After a bin has been 
tilled, the stream of water carrying the slag is turned into another bin by means of gates in 
the main flume. A chute at the bottom of the bin already filled with slag is then opened and 
it is allowed to run on to an endless belt. This belt, which is 21 inches wide and .', inch in 
thickness, is carried on an incline trestle 500 feet long to an elevation of 120 feet above the 
12 



K 178 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



present dump or level of the furnace outlet. At the higher level of this incline trestle is 
located a cross-angle trestle 100 feet in length and equipped limilarly to the main trestle. 
The main belt is driven by a 75 horse power motor, .-is is also the cross angle belt, but il is the 
intention of the company to first fill up the space between the present dump and the incline 
trestle before placing the second unit in commission. Upon the upper side of the trestle on 
which the belt runs when carrying its load are located steel rollers 6 feel apart. These rollers 

are i -shaped, making the upper side of the belt concave, thus enabling it to carry a full 

load of slag without spilling. The slag can be dumped at any point along the trestle by 
means of a travelling hopper, through which the belt passes. This hopper clean the belt of 

all slag by means of brushes, and allows it to settle to the present dump. 

"The trestles at present constructed are only the first units in a series, which m the 
course of time will carry the slag to all parts of the dump, the present incline conveyor being 

used as a means of elevating the slag. It is officially stated that with the new system the 
Granby wil] have dumping-room for the waste material from 5,000,000 tons of ore, which 
means that the question of the disposal of the slag from their eight furnaces Mill not require 
any attention on the part of the company for- the next five years. 

"The installation of one unit of the new system cost the Granby in the neighbour] I 

of $80,000, but it will mean a large saving to the company in the cost of treating their Low- 
grade ores, doing away, as it will, with a miniature railway system and a large army of 
employees now necessary to carry on the work. 

"The equipment for the new system was built by the Stephens Adamson Company, and 

the success with which it meets with the requirements of the Granby is being watched with 
considerable interest by a number of smelting concerns, as the idea in connection with smelting 
operations is something entirely new." 

Office Statistics — Grand Forks Minim. Division. 

Locations '>' 

Certificates of work 154 

Transfers 25 

Notices of work 22 

Certificates of improvements 17 



OSOYOOS minim; DIVISION. 
Report of Ronald Hewat, Mining Recorder, Fairvibw, B.C. 

1 have the honour to submit herewith the annual report of the mining operations in the 
Osoyoos Mining Division for the year 1912 

The mining operations iii this district during the past year- have been confined chiefly to 
Medley and Krugor mountain. The mining operations in Camp Medley are as follows 

Camp Bedley. 

The year 1912 was in many respects a most notable one for Camp 

Nickel Plate. Medlev, and while, as before, the record of achievement is practically 

confined to the one producing group, Vet there were important features 
C acted with the year's work which were of tar greater significance in Outlining the future 



3 Geo. 5 



Boundary District. 



K 179 



of the other properties in the camp than ever before. As for the producing group, the Nickel 
Plate group, owned by the Hedley Gold Mining Company, it was both a record year and a 
year of smashing records all along the line. Those results put in the fewest possible words 
were : higher dividends to shareholders than ever before, the total for the year being 30 per 
cent, on the capital outstanding ; the tonnage of ore mined and milled was greater ; the amount 
of bullion produced was greater ; the mill accomplished a higher duty per stamp ; the extrac- 
tion was higher ; and, more important than all of them, the development done showed up a 
larger ore reserve than ever before. Every foot of development done during the year on the 
Nickel Plate itself was in ore. 

Ore Tonnage. — The tonnage for the year is thus summarized in the company's annual 
report to shareholders : — 



Date. 



.lauuary . . . 
February . . . 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August .... 
.September . . 

October 

November. . . 
December . . . 

Totals 



Tons milled. 



5,701 
5,010 
6,263 
5,326 
5,636 
6,027 
6,110 
5,900 
6,108 
6,101 
6,003 
6,270 



70,455 Av, 



Assay Value. 



$10 70 
9 49 

11 60 
Hi .V. 
10 64 

10 13 
9 97 

12 11 
16 38 

11 69 
11 57 

9 ii7 



$11 19 



Recovery at 
Mill." 



856,298 64 
45,513 84 
711,077 84 
54,683 93 
57,778 52 
58,200 96 
58,750 33 
66,7211 19 
96,055 85 
66,637 58 
64,487 36 
52,928 10 



$748,133 14 



Expenditure. 



$29,669 72 

27,431 75 
30,712 89 
29,427 62 
26,711 00 
28,042 22 
27,801 91 
28,627 97 
31,054 73 
28,399 43 
35,654 20 
38,719 65 



Profits. 



8362,253 14 



$26,628 92 

is, 1 182 09 
39.364 95 
25,256 31 
31,067 52 
30,15s 74 
30,948 42 
38,092 22 
65,001 12 
38,238 10 
28,833 16 
14,208 45 



'.$385,880 00 



-Including $9,834.69 interest earned on funds of this company during 1912. 

Mine Development. — The development for the year underground and on the surface is 
dealt with in the report of the general superintendent, who deals also with the Windfall 
purchase and improvements in the plant : — 

"Hedley, B.C., January 1st, 1913. 
" To the President and Stockholders, 

Hedley Gold Mining Company : 

"Gentlemen, — For the year 1912 your mill has treated 70,455 tons of ore, having an 
average value of SI 1.19 to the ton, or a total. value of $788,715.05. 

" The gold won is $748,133.14 (an extraction of 95 per cent.). The profits were as shown 
on the treasurer's statement. 

" Owing to the increase in tonnage, which used practically all the power available, we 
have been able to do but little development- work on the company's properties, excepting the 
Nickel Plate, where stoping and development-work in the ore-body has been carried on between 
the No. 3 and No. 4 tunnel levels, and the ore won has proven to be of a higher grade than 
estimated last year. 

"The usual reserve tonnage of 10,000 tons of broken ore has been maintained. 

" Mining below the No. 4 tunnel level has been very satisfactory and has proven that the 
ore-body, as indicated last year by diamond-drill, is a valuable addition to the reserves. An 
incline shaft (No. 5) has been sunk on the ore for 420 feet, three levels opened, and a fourth 



K 180 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



started. Drifting and sinking proves this ore to be about 16 feet between walls and of an 

average value of $14 per ton. At the collar of the incline the length of the me chute is 130 
feet, at the 100-foot level it has been drifted on for 180 feet, and on No. 3 level for 80 feel : 
these drifts are in good ore all the way, and. together with the bottom of the incline, all the 
faces are in ore. This incline is in good shape to ship from, with ore pockets in each level and 
plenty of good ground for stoping. 

"A section of the ground under the Nickel Plate ore-beds has been proven by diamond 
drill; also a section of the company's property lying to the north ; but, owing to delayed 
negotiations for an option on the Windfall group of mining claims, which adjoins the Iron 
Duke (one of the company's original claims), we did not start drilling on this ground until 
July. By October seven holes were put down, three of which showed good values. The las! 
two holes were discontinued before they entered the 'on- /one ' owing to the severe cold weather 
freezing the long water-pipe lines. These holes would have aided considerably in making an 
estimate of the reserve tonnage; however, we have no hesitation in stating that the minimum 
quantity of reserve ore, as shown by development and diamond-drill, available in the Nickel 
Plate and Iron Duke claims, is 413,000 tons, and that this ore will average al least $11.35 
per ton. 

■• While the ground mentioned above was being tested, an option was held for the purchase 
of the Windfall group, comprising five claims, i.e.. Windfall, Morning, Winchester Fractional, 
Big Horn, and Czar, which property adjoins the Iron Duke, and on < tetober 30th the purchase 
of these properties was consummated. The terms of the option would not allow time to pro 
the ground, as it would be necessary to drill each hole 500 feet, al least, before striking the 
ore-bearing sedimentary beds; but from indications in the hole drilled nearest the option 
property and the high values in the remainder of the holes, we consider these claims valuable. 

"To mine the new ore-bodies, as well as the other ore hoi lies below the No. I tunnel level 
in the Nickel Plate mine, we have received instructions to sink and have started another incline 
shaft, to be known as the ' Dickson incline.' 

"The intention is to sink this to 3,000 feet in depth. It is located so as to he under all 
the known ore-bodies, will have payable ore above it continuously for 1. Midfeet, and the 
probability is that this will be extended next year. 

" The Sunnyside No. 4 incline has been extended Kin feet and is in promising country. 
Development-work in the Silverplate showed up some good ore, but it is apparently cut off 
by a large diorite-dyke. Both these properties are in a good formation with favourable 

conditions. 

"The cost per ton for mining and milling for the year lias been reduced •">.", cents and the 
total cost 73 cents, although we have been paying a higher rate of wages, and the following 

additions, improvements, etc., have all been charged to ' operating expenses,' i.e.: Removing 

the old and installing the new 150 horse power boiler (together with cost of new bailer) : new 
diamond drill ; new hoist ; improvements to the flume : rearranging the machinery on the 
tramway ; general improvements at the mill ; together with all mine development. 

" Four mill has been kept in first class repair and is doing good work : the water th ■ is 

also in hitter shape than last year; changes have been made on the tramway, so that its 
operation is more satisfactory. 

"Altogether we consider the past year most prosperous, and expect to seethe ore reserves 

increase during 191.5. 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 181 



" Development — 

Mine, Nickel Plate — Sinking 420 feet. 

ii ii Drifting 510 m 

ii n Raising 110 n 

ii Silverplate. — Drifting 140 n 

ii Sunnyside No. Jf.. — Sinking 160 n 

Total 1,340 M 

Diamond-drilling 6,380 n 

" Respectfully submitted. 

"Gomer P. Jones, 

General Superintendent." 

Dividends and Profits:. — The amount disbursed during the year was $360,000, which 
amounted to 30 per cent, on the outstanding capital stock. As will be seen from the report 
of tonnage, the profits for the year were $385,880, which left a margin to carry to surplus, 
and as the undivided profits at the beginning of the year were $200,961.34, it will be seen 
that this surplus was added to in 1912, and is now at the beginning of 1913 $226,841.34. 

The Windfall Purchase. — This was really the most important and significant event of the 
year for the camp. Its importance lies in the fact that it proves the fallacy of the contention 
urged by former managers that the Nickel Plate deposit did not extend beyond the bounds of 
the Nickel Plate claim, and that the monzonite core of which Climax bluff is composed does 
not necessarily cut off the ore-body which has already given such important results in the 
production of about $4,600,000 in gold bullion up to the end of 1912. 

Other Properties. 

In the early part of the year the litigation between the owners and 
Kingston Group, the Redeemable Investment Company, which was believed to have hindered 
development-work, had been cleared away sufficiently to permit work being 
done, and it was carried on during the winter with a small force of men under the direction 
of A. Creelman. Something over 40 feet of sinking was done and the work closely sampled, 
and excellent results were obtained, which demonstrated the error which had been made in 
previous development in straying away from the ore-body instead of holding tenaciously to the 
pay-streak, no matter where it might lead. The funds available for work, however, appear to 
have been trivial, and as the payments to the owners were not kept up, the latter gave notice 
to the public that the deal was off and the property had reverted to them. 

The affairs of this property, which have been in more or less confusion 
The Golden Zone, for several years past, received another twist or two to add to the general 
tangle when Charles H. Brookes obtained an option from some source or 
other, although no one seems to know where the authority came from, to give the option, as 
the property was covered with judgments for former debts contracted. At all events, an 
option which had been variously described as an option and a sale outright took place, and a 
new company called the Gold Plate Mines Company was formed. This concern provided 
several thousand dollars to develop the property, and the direction of the work was left to 
Mr. Brookes, who was very rarely on the property, and who saw fit to have nearly all the 
money that was spent put into surface work, and when the money was spent and more debts 
contracted, for which there was no more money left to pay, not a whit more was known as to 
the value of the property than when they began. Further claims and judgments were filed 
against the group and another chapter added to the folly of amateurism in mining. 



K 182 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



This group, situated on the watershed between Sixteen mile and 
The Oregon Eighteen-mile creeks, had considerable development-work done during tin- 
Group, early part of 'the year and encouraging results were obtained, 'linn i 

strong probability that more will be done during 1913. 

This group of claims, situated on Independence mountain, about six 
The Apex Group, miles east of the Xickel I'/aO', saw much development during the year 
under a bond from the owners, who reside in New York. The parties who 
held the bond were T. D. Pickard, L. W. Shatford, M.L.A., and M. K. Rodgers. Most, or all. 
of the work was done bv contract, and it Comprised something over 200 feet of driving, besides 
other work. Mr. Pickard supervised the work on occasional trips from Vancouver, but the 
bond was allowed to lapse about the end of the year after something over >'•">, 000 had been 
expended in exploratory work. The high price which the bond called for was said to be a 
determining factor in causing the holders to let it drop. 

Apart from the foregoing, nothing was done on the other claims in the camp except the 
annual assessments, and, as many of the claims have been Crown-granted, only a limited 
amount of annual assessment-work is required. 

In regard to amount of development-work done by the Dividend-Lake View Consolidated 
Gold Mining Company on its properties on Kruger mountain, I have the pleasure to report as 
follows : — 

Since August 1st, 1912, it has expended $13,500 for machinery and its installation, 
wagon-roads, and mining and operating expenses. In brief, the amount distributed is as 

follows : — 

40-horse-power engine and compressor with machine drills $3,800 00 

Installation, buildings for machinery, etc 700 00 

Wagon-roads 500 00 

Mining and operating expenses 8,500 00 

Total ' 813,500 00 

In the latter part of November the company shipped two cars of ore 
Lake View from the dump, that had been taken out in development J this was only a 
Property. small part of the dump, and was shipped fco the smelter to find by actual 

test what was the value of the ore. The actual value of this ore was a little 

better than $8 a ton, about equally divided between gold and copper. 

The company began stoping on this property by the "glory-hole"' 
Dividend system early in December, and has shipped eight ears of ore to the Granby 

Property. smelter at Grand Forks, B.C. This ore carried gross values of aboul 

a ton, and the commercial value, as yet, is all in gold. 

The present size of the glory-hole is about 20 feet long east and west by 15 feet wide 
north and south, and has an average depth at this time of about 20 feet. 

The company dosed down on January L 5th on account of the extremely unfavourable 

weather conditions, and just before closing down it encountered some very fine ore which 
assayed s pi a ton in gold. 

The company will resume mining operations as soon as the frost i-. out of the ground 
in the spring and the roads settled. 



3 Geo. 5 Boundary District. K 183 



The ore is hauled to Oroville, Wash., a station on the Great Northern Railway, and is 
shipped from there to the Granby smelter. The hauling is done with a 5-ton auto-truck. 
After the company has done a little more road-work in the spring it intends to attach a 
10-ton trailer to the truck ; it then expects to average one car a day for shipment. 

Placer Development. 

In addition to what is being done here in lode-mining, there has been an attempt to revive 
interest in placer-mining in the bed of the Similkameen river. J. D. McDonald, of Vancouver, 
who is reputed to be acting in behalf of English and American investors who are interested in 
gold-dredges elsewhere, did considerable panning in the bed of the stream, and considerable 
river-bed and bench ground was staked for placer-mining. The pannings were reported to 
have been very encouraging. The ground staked by these parties covers several miles up and 
down the river on both sides of the International Boundary, and at Chopaka they had a Key- 
stone drill at work for several weeks. Another man named Corwin also staked several miles 
of the river in the vicinity of Ashnola creek for Edward Mahon, of Vancouver. 

Office Statistics — Osovoos Mininc, Division. 

Locations records 45 

Certificates of work 113 

Free miners' certificates 126 

Certificates of improvements 7 

Conveyances 11 

Placer-mining leases 3 



VERNON MINING DIVISION. 
Report of L. Norris, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report on mining operations in the Vernon 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The mining situation in this district remains practically unchanged since my report of 
last year. 

Office Statistics — Vernon Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates . 183 

Mineral claims 45 

Placer claims 2 

Certificates of work 23 

Conveyances 2 

Coal licences (renewals) G 



K LS4. Report of the Minister of Mines. 1 9 1 -i 



YALE DISTRICT. 



K AM LOOPS MINIMI DIVISION. 
Report of E. T. W. Pearse, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on the Kamloops Mining Division for the 
year ending December 31st, 1912. 

In the Kamloops Mining Division nothing fresh has developed. Assessment has been 
faithfully kept up and several Crown grants have been applied for, but money does not seem 
to be forthcoming to introduce the smelting facilities which are so badly required. 

Several reports of the different camps should have been appended hereto, bul for Mum- 
unaccountable reason they have been withheld so long that I cannot further delay this report 
by waiting for them. 

A slight excitement was caused during the autumn by the discovery of placer gold on 
Louis creek. Only a few months' work was done on the claims and a regular clean-up was 

not made on any of them, so that I cannot give results, except in a general way to state that 
the claim-holders were every one of them satisfied with the prospects. The whole creek from 
the surface down seems to be impregnated with gold, which, however, is of so line a nature 
that considerable difficulty will be experienced to make sure that the whole return has l>een 
secured. I have strongly advised all claim-holders to save the black sand, a sample of which 
was sent for assay by one of them; the result of this, as I say, is not known to me. One 
lease was staked on Dixon creek and the initial work on this produced a very satisfactory 
result ; the owner, after removing a few boulders, took out a pocket containing about | oz. of 
rather coarse gold, many pieces of which would be worth from 25 to 30 cents. 

Coal-mining operations seemed to have been suspended entirely this season for some reason 
unknown to me. 

Seymour Aim Camp. 

Hugh Sinclair writes me as follows: — 

"In reply to your request for a report on our claims in Seymour arm, 1 might say that we 
have done the usual assessment and have proved the continuity of the copper vein the full 
length of our four claims, the vein-matter being 300 feet wide a1 the end of the Copper Kim/, 

and apparently that width throughout, but we have not yet done enough work to exactly 
prove it. The ore is of the same grade throughout. 

"I might say that this vein continues through McLeod A- t'o.'s four claims and into Bass 

and his partners' claim, beyond McLeod's, making a total Length of 13,500 feet of good-grade 
copper-ore. Where we found it to he 300 feet wide is where we join McLeod's claims." 

Office Statistics -Kamloops Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 148 

( tertificates of work 1 1 •"> 

Records (mineral) 119 

n (placer) 11 

Hills of sale IS 

( 'eit Lficates of Lmproi ement " 

Total receipts ' $3,282 1" 



3 Geo. 5 Yale District. K 185 

ASHCROFT MINING DIVISION. 

Report of H. P. Christie, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit the annual mining report and office statistics for the Ashcroft 
Division during the year 1912. 

The situation generally remains unchanged, although there has been for some months 
nunc than the usual activity in Highland valley, and it is expected there will be some extensive 
development-work done during the coming year. 

Highland valley is situated about twenty-seven miles south-east of Ashcroft, approximately 
half-way between Ashcroft and Nicola, on the height of land forming the watershed, and is 
accessible at the present time only by the wagon-road between these two towns, which runs 
through the camp. 

In 1907 the Provincial Mineralogist examined a number of properties in this camp, the 
notes of his inspection appearing in the Report for that year on pages 131 el seq., from which 
it would appear that several of the claims in the camp contained copper-ore of workable 
grade, with a little gold and silver. 

■Since that time work has been carried on each year, to a small extent, on most of the 
claims, sufficient to cover the annual assessment requirements ; the lack of transportation 
facilities, however, would prevent any shipment of ore, as the ore is not of high enough value 
to stand wagon-haulage to the railway, while the development of the camp is not as yet 
sufficient to justify any plans for a railway. 

There is enough ore showing on several of the claims to induce their further development 
and to stimulate more extended prospecting in the localitv. 

The gypsum-deposits, located on the bank of the Thompson river opposite the Canadian 
Pacific Railway station at Spatsum, a few miles west of Ashcroft, have been acquired by a 
strong company with headquarters in Vancouver, and it is understood that, in the near future, 
steps will be taken to ensure the utilization of the mineral which seems to occur here in large 
quantity and of unusual puritv, although the development necessary to prove these points is sadly 
lacking, the present owners seeming content at having tied up the property. The location of 
the deposit on a hill rising up from the river-bank is such as to permit of very simple and cheap 
transportation of the mineral by aerial tramway directly from the deposit to across the river 
on to land adjacent to the Canadian Pacific Railway tracks. 

Office Statistics — Ashcroft Mining Division. 

New locations recorded 112 

Certificates of work recorded ■ • • ■ 57 

Conveyances recorded 15 

Free miners' certificates 96 



K 186 Report of the Minister of Minks. 1 9 1 :> 



YALE MIX IXC DIVISION*. 

Report of L. A. Bonn, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report and statistics for the year ending 
I ><'<tii i lx •]• ."{ 1 st, 1912. 

Placer-mining. 

Little or no general work has been clone in this class of mining. 

The Siwash Creek Mines, Limited, has been working steadily on its group of creels leases, 
and will, within a month, be in a position to know whether the large expenditure will bring 
its reward or not. The following is contributed by the managing director of tin' company: — 

"I may say that during the year 1912, with a crew of about twelve men, we have 
steadily prosecuted the plan originally laid down for the development of our property. 
Beginning at a point above the falls upon the lower lease, we ran an open rock-cut and tunnel 
of capacious size for about 450 feet, and at a depth of about ■''•") feet below the gravel surface 
we are now entering into the bed of the channel of the creek above. This must shortly bring 
us into contact with the bed-rock of the original channel, and as there are abundant indicat ions 
of the richness of this basin, we expect to secure rich returns. Besides the tree gold in these 
gravels, there are large deposits of black sand carrying gold and platinum values* in 
combination." 

A. W. McLelan, who has a bar lease near Reefers, had three or four men at work for a 
considerable period, but I have no report of the result obtained. 

Considerable prospecting was done on Hills Bar creek by "Win. Livingstone, Alexander 

Munro, and others. Indications were sufficiently inviting for Messrs. Livingstone and Munro 
to take up half-mile leases, which they intend working the coming season. 

Three leases were granted on the North fork of Siwash creek and three on the South fork. 
Those on the South fork are a continuation of the original property of the Siwash Creek 
Mines, limited, and have been acquired by the company. 

Seven creek leases were also granted on Little Kmorv creek ; the development of these 
seems to depend on the result obtained at Siwash creek, as a number of the same people are 
interested. 

A bar lease covering Boston bar was granted to Robt. Hamilton, of Vancouver, but 1 
have not heard of any development having been done. 

Five dredging leases covering 22' miles of the bed of the Fraser river "ere granted 

during the year. A dredge is being built at New Westminster to work the lease granted to 
Finlay .Mcintosh covering the five miles west from the mouth of the CoquihaUa river. This 
dredge is a combination shovel and dipper and has not heretofore been tried on the Fraser : 
I am informed that this pattern of dredge has worked very successfully in the Yukon. 

Messrs. Bock, Tcmplin, and Wood, of Seattle, have five miles of the bed of the Fraser 

east from the mouth of the CoquihaUa and have made a considerable expenditure ; they have 
installed a plant on a new plan in the bed of the river below Strawberry island, consisting 

of a Weeks two-line scraper-dredge of 1-yard capacity, which digs under water by the 
control of these two lines, which are operated from a donkey-engine on shore ; one line hauls 
the scraper out into the river and the other brings the load ashore, where the materia] is 
dumped into a hopper and fed into sluice boxes for separation. They have not yet begun 



3 Geo. 5 Yale District. K 187 

operations, hence the results from this plan are still to be determined, but, as the scraper has 
been proven a success in sand and gravel digging, it is hoped that it will give satisfaction 
here. If the plan is a success, other similar plants will be installed on the ground covered by 
the lease, and also on the five miles between Five-mile creek and Spuzzum creek, which is 
controlled by the same parties. 

The Hills Bar Gold Dredging Company, Limited, started in last spring to build a dredge. 
They built the scow on the river-bank here, but the machinery has not yet been placed in it ; 
a dredge of the caisson type is proposed. Their lease covers some of the most promising 
dredging-ground on the river, for it was on Hills, and other neighbouring bars, that such rich 
returns were had in early days. 

• The fifth dredging lease is for two and a half miles west from North Bend, and w;is 
granted to Robt. Hamilton at the same time as his bar lease. It is the intention to work the 
two leases in conjunction. 

Quartz-mining. 

The Mining Division is still suffering from the evil effects of the Steamboat Mountain 
fiasco, and it is therefore hard to interest capital in the promising prospects in other parts, tin- 
whole Division being more or less judged by a small part. Assessment-work on the most 
promising prospects has been done and quite a number of new locations made, but beyond 
that little has been accomplished. 

Chas. Camsell deals very fully with the Skagit Valley area in the Summary Report 
of the Canadian Geological Survey for 1911, commencing at page 115. 

Of the Jumbo group, situated on Silver creek near Hope, Mr. Camsell says, on page 111 : — 

" A group of three mining claims known as the Jumbo group is situated on the west side 
of Silver creek, about four miles south-west of Hope. The claims lie in a steep narrow gorge 
at an elevation of about 1,100 feet above the sea. The country-rock is massive grano-diorite, 
in places sheared and traversed by fissures. The ore-deposits lie in the fissure-veins and have 
a width averaging about 8 inches. They contain dull-coloured arsenopyrite and a little 
chaleopyrite in a gangue of quartz, and carrying gold as the principal valuable metal. The 
value of the ore in the fissures ranges from $10 to $60 to the ton. The claims are developed 
by three tunnels of varying length and several 'open-cuts.' These claims and adjoining 
locations are now owned by the Aufeas Gold Mines, Limited, which has recently made 
successful arrangements for financing the development of the property. The company intends 
building a wagon-road from the Interprovincial highway at the mouth of Wardle creek to the 
camp, and proceeding with the construction of permanent camp buildings, including cook- 
house, bunk-houses, storehouses for supplies and tools, the laying of pipes to supply the camps 
with water, and the clearing of the right-of-way for an aerial tram. As soon as the road and 
camp are ready for use, work on the lower tunnel will begin and will continue until the vein 
is struck." 

With reference to the Siwash Creek area, I can do no better than quote from the 
summary and conclusions arrived at by A. M. Bateman, a member of Mr. Camsell's party. 
This area practically includes the district between Siwash creek and Spuzzum on the east bank 
of the Fraser. Mr. Bateman says, on page 125 of the report : — 

" The rocks underlying the area consist of a metamorphosed sedimentary scries represented 
by slates, garnet-schists, mica-schists, siliceous-schists, quartzites, and thin bands of crystalline 
limestone. This series is intruded by the Coast Range granitic batholith and its accompanying 
acid and basic dykes. A small remnant of volcanic tuff overlying the granitic rock is exposed 



K 188 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



in one locality. Glacial deposits are found along the borders of the stream. The gold, without 
exception, is associated with porphyry-dykes, and occurs in the porphyry itself, or in quartz 

veins alone, or adjoining the contact of the porphyry with slate. The gold is thus seen to be 
genetically dependent on the dykes, and the great number and wide distribution of these 
dykes makes it a promising field for prospecting. Some of the gold deposits have rich surface 
showings, but are usually ' pockety,' and the gold appears to have undergone considerable 
surface enrichment. Large superficial areas may contain a sufficient number of rich stringers 
and pockets to be worked commercially, while the others would only justify inexpensive mining 
methods." 

Considerable development-work has been done since the visit of the Geological Survey 
party, especially on the Mt. Baker & Yale Mining Company's group of Crown-granted mineral 
claims, and on a number of the Hidden Creek and Anderson River locations. Great confidence 
is expressed by the owners of the claims in this area, and with the early completion of the 
Canadian Northern Railway, they will be in a position for economical development. 

Office Statistics — Yale Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 1 83 

Locations recorded 1 2 I 

Leases granted 20 

Bills of sale, powers of attorney, options, etc., recorded 56 

Certificates of work issued 1 32 

Filings . 17 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates § 1,158 75 

Mining receipts .">, 1 7<i 55 

Other sources 13,471 50 



Total Sis, KM m> 



NICOLA MINING DIVISION. 

Report of W. N. Rolfe, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report and statistics of the Nicola 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

With regard to the metalliferous mines of the district, the necessary assessment work has 
been well kept up, as holders of mineral claims are imbued with the hope that the very near 
future will see railway facilities provided, thereby enabling ore shipments to be made for 
treatment at the smelters, which is impossible under existing circumstances, except at 
prohibitive rates. 

In the vicinity of Merritt, the Inland Coal and Coke Company. Limited, has been 
working steadily in developing the property, with very gratifying results. While several new 
seams of coal have been exposed, the work has been almost entirely confined to opening up and 
blocking out a large reserve on the No, '■>, and this work has, as was confidently anticipated, 

demonstrated the continuity of the seam, which is capped with a remarkable sandst • 

formation. Much satisfaction is expressed that the excellent quality of the coal is maintained 
in the new workings, as also at the noticeable freedom from deleterious gases. 



3 Geo. 5 Yale District. K 189 



After a considerable period of delay and expense, railway connection with the property 
was obtained during the latter part of August, since when the output has been constantly 
increasing. The intention is announced, however, of vigorously pursuing a policy of develop- 
ment on the No. 3, as also to open up the No. 5 seam; then, with the aid of additional 
machinery and plant, the management is sanguine that the output will be largely expanded. 
The total output of coal mined during the year has exceeded 30,000 tons, the bulk of this 
going to the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. 

The operating of the property at night has been greatly facilitated during the year by 
the installation of an electric-lighting plant. 

. Xico/a Valley Coal and Coke Company, Limited. — The operations conducted for winning 
coal at this property resulted in an output of 142,973 tons (2,240 lb.) during 1912, which is 
less than that of the previous year. No additional plant has been installed, and development 
in the way of new work has been restricted to the opening-up of a new 5-foot seam, situated 
above the No. 4, and known as No. 6, but no coal from this seam, so far, has been brought to 
the surface. * 

Office Statistics — Nicola Mining Division. 

Locations recorded 57 

Free miners' certificates issued 80 

M ii ii (special) 1 

Certificates of work 80 

Certificates of improvement 

Hills of sale 4 



1 Further details of coal-mines in this district will be found under the heading of " Coal." 



SIMILKAMEEN mining division. 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist. 

Voigt's Camp. — The British Columbia Copper Company did much development- work on 
two groups of mineral claims, held under option of purchase, situated about ten miles south of 
Princeton. The larger group, known as Voigt's, contains fifty-five claims ; the smaller includes 
eight claims having individual owners. Development-work was commenced in October, 1911, 
and carried on continuously until December, 1912. Six diamond-drills were used and many 
thousand feet of drilling was done on the Voigt group, and, in addition, about 1,500 feet of 
underground hand-work and several thousand feet of surface trenching. Work was stopped in 
December, but no information was then made public as to the company's intentions — whether 
or not it would make the large payment falling due under the bond. Some 700 feet of under- 
ground development and 1,500 feet of diamond-drilling was done on claims in the "upper 
camp," which adjoins the Voigt group on the south ; the first payment under the bond on these 
claims has been made. 

The ore met with in this camp varies, as a whole, from heavy haematite containing copper 
and iron sulphides with gold and silver, which ore is base, to ore containing a high percentage 
of silica with similar economic minerals. The geological features of the camp have not yet 
been thoroughly worked out, but as a rule the tendency of mineralization is along fracture zones 
extending in a general direction from the south-west towards the north-east, the surface 
mineralization being extensive. Details concerning the ore-bodies, however, have not yet been 
made known. 



K 190 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Princeton Coal Company. — The Princeton Coal and Land Company, operating a coal-mine 
at Princeton, completed its new coal-handling plant, which, though not a large one, is one of 

the most complete and efficient in the Province. When additional railway transportation 
facilities, now being provided, shall be available, a much-increased output from this company's 
colliery is looked for. 

A very small quantity of coal was mined at a place a few miles east of Princeton. At 
the Columbia Coal and Coke Company's Coalmont propertv, situated between < iranite creek 
and Collins gulch, back from Tulameen river, a commencement was made to mine coal. Some 
"),S00 tons was taken out, and, the railway having been extended from Princeton to Coalmont, 
a distance of about fifteen miles, a small .shipment was made. Development of the coal 
measures on this property is being continued. 

Further particulars as to these coal-mines will be found in this Report under the heading 
Of "Coal." 



SIMILKAMKKX MINIXC DIVISION. 
Report of Hugh Hunter, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to forward the annual mining report on the Similkameen Mining 
Division for the year 19 1 l'. 

On Co]. per mountain the British Columbia Copper Mining Company has been operating 
on the Youjt properties, which it has under bond, and. as far as T learn, is well pleased with 
the claims it has tested; it is at present negotiating \\ itli Mr. Voigt for the purchase of them. 

The company has also bonded other properties on the mountain, and on some has made 
t'te first payment. 

The company, through its agent, has announced that it is there to stay. 

On Roche river three claims have been bonded to a Chicago company, and first payment 
of purchase price made. 

In Summit camp, situated at the head of Tulameen river, a number of claims have been 
bonded by Spokane parties, and considerable work lias been done there during the past year. 
The difficulty of getting supplies into the camp has somewhat retarded the development-work. 

I look for great activity in this camp during the coming summer. 
In other sections of the district assessment work has been pel formed. 

Office Statistics — Similkameen Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates 297 

Special .'■ 

Local ion records 322 

Certificates of work 304 

Conveyances (mineral claims) 28 

Placer leases 6 

I 'i i mits 7 

Pew ers of attorney 5 

Conveyances (placer) It' 

Lea\es of absence 2 



:3 Geo. 5 Lillooet Distbict. K 191 



LILLOOET DISTRICT. 



LILLOOET MINING DIVISION. 
Report of C. Phair, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on the progress of mining in Lillooet 
Mining Division during the year 1912. 

Mineral Claims. 

The past year's development was very similar to the previous year's. About the same 
number of men were employed in the different mines. All the companies are pleased with the 
result of the year's development. As was anticipated, a good deal of prospecting was done, 
resulting in 14* mineral claims being added to the list. 

The mines were worked continuously during the year by the Coronation 

Coronation Mines. Mines, Limited, of Victoria, with an average force of ten men under the 

management of C. L. Copp ; 800 feet of crosscutting, drifting, and upraising 

has been done, but the 10-stamp mill on the property was not operated. In the beginning of 

the season considerable ground-sluicing was done, proving the veins to have great continuity. 

On the Countless, crosscut tunnels were extended to the vein, giving a depth of 250 feet. 

On the Little Joe, the lower tunnel, No. 4, was driven to the vein and some very good ore 
was found. A raise has been put through, connecting with the old workings, giving the depth 
of 360 feet. At the end of the year they had drifted 200 feet on the vein. 

The Lome Amalgamated Mines Company, Limited, has been developing 

Lome its claims during the season with a force of seven men. A tunnel was run 

Amalgamated. 200 feet on the lower level with the object of tapping the vein at a greater 

depth, and for conveying the ore to the mill more economically. A discovery 

<>f two more veins on the property was made by ground-sluicing. The 5-stamp mill was run 

for a short time, crushing 111 tons of ore, which yielded 81,120. 

Pioneer. — A tunnel about 200 feet has been driven on this claim to crosscut the vein. 

D. C. Paxton, manager of the Wayside group, states: "During the 
Wayside. past season a tunnel 120 feet was driven, and tin 1 - tall the vein system 

previously worked was opened up at a level of 140 feet above Bridge river : 
this elevation being apparently the height of a long-continued wash of the ancient river. 

"On the Commodore claim, a 10-foot vein was opened, having a porphyry capping, which, 
being an inset to the vein, the present width will continue. The veins in the diorite on Upper 
Bridge River district are easily opened, as they can be driven on direct, and the elevation along 
the river being about 1,200 feet, it eliminates the expense of crosscutting or sinking for a long 
time. Arrangements are being made to work the property extensively the coming season." 

Besides the assessment-work on 1 59 claims, considerable work was done on some of the 
older claims, especially on the Marconi, Wireless Xo. 1, and Wireless No. .?, by Messrs. 
Fergus-ion and Walker, the owners. These claims are situated at Bridge river. 



K 192 Report of the Minister ok Mines. 1913 



There was also a good deal of work done on the Empire, Empire, Xo. 1, and Empire No. '. 
situated at McGillivray creek, by the McGillivray Mountain Mines, Limited. 

Placer-mining. 

There is oo improvement in placer-mining. None of the leases have been developed 
during the year. 

Eldorado creek, recently discovered, is not sufficiently rich to pay individual miners, so it 
is now being acquired under leases. 

Office Statistics Lili et Fining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded II- 

Placer claims recorded 22 

Certificates of work recorded 159 

Conveyances recorded 17 

Mining and dredging leases in force 33 

Free miners' certificates issued IS? 

Revervue. 

Free miners' certificates $1,027 50 

Mining receipts, general 3,584 65 

Tax — Crown-granted mineral claims 103 50 

Mineral-tax 34 36 

$5,050 ol 



CLINTON MINING DIVISION. 

Report of F. C. Campbell, Cold Commissioner. 

T have the honour to submit the annual report for the Clinton Mining Division of f 
Lillooet District for the vear ending December 31st, L912. 

In this connection, I regret to say that conditions remain practically the same as at the 
close of the previous vear. No development or activity can be reported ; the office statistics 
remain practically the same. 

During (lie year the Canada Gold Dredging Company, Limited, secured dredging leases 
covering the bed of the Fraser river for a distance of sixty miles, extending from Black point 
to the mouth of the Chilcotin river ; consequently, we may hope to see a dredge operating in 

tins section in the near future. 

Office Statistics -Clinton Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates (individual) 70 

Mineral claims recorded 73 

( 'ertilieates of work issued II 

( lonveyances, etc., recorded 34 

I >redging leases issued 11 



3 Geo. 5 Alberni District. K 193 



VANCOUVER ISLAND AND COAST. 



ALBERNI DISTRICT. 



ALBERNI MINING DIVISION. 

John Kirkup, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining in the Alberni Mining Division 
(luring the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The mining operations in this district during the past year were confined to annual 
assessment-work only, with the exception of the Big Interior group, on which sufficient work 
was done to enable the owners thereof to obtain certificates of improvement on the group, 
consisting of eight claims. 

The property known as the Big Interior has been taken up by an English company, the 
Ptarmigan Mines, of which H. H. Johnston, Victoria, is the local representative, and who 
sampled the property last fall ; his assays ran high enough in copper to induce him to arrange 
to put a force of men at development-work this coming season. He is to establish a camp at 
the mouth of Bear river, in Bedwell sound, from which the easiest approach to the property is 
obtained. 

The iron-ore properties on either side of Barkley sound have not had any work done on 
them this past year, nor have the copper properties on the north side of Alberni canal, near 
its mouth. 

The development of the coal-seam near the Alberni townsite has for the present been 
suspended. 

Office Statistics — Alberni Mining Division. 

Mineral claims recorded 33 

Certificates of work 46 

Money paid in lieu of work ... 3 

Certificates of improvement 1 .'! 

Bills of sale, etc., recorded 11 

Free miners' certificates (individual) 49 



CLAYOQUOT MINING DIVISION. 

Report of Wm. Simpson, Deputy Mining Recorder, 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on mining operations in the Clayoquot 
Mining Division for the year ending December .'51st, 1912. 

A greater interest in mining matters is the feature of this year, and receipts show a 
marked increase over last year. 
13 



K 194 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 



Assessment work recorded was as follows: — 

Copper King No. 8 (P. Sullivan)— tunnelling, 5 s 7 feet ; stripping, about 20 feet. 

Roosevelt (P. Wollan) — open cut, 16 x 6 x t feet. 

Walter (P. Wollan) — open-cut, 22 feet wide by I to 6 feet wide. 

Prince Alfred (P. Wollan)— tunnel, 11) s6x4 feet. 

Golden Gate (John Chesterman)— tunnel, 10 feet wide by 6 feet high. 

Lucky Jim and Archibald (A. Woller and T. I). A. Purves)— removing hanging-wall, 
exposing vein, removing about 2 tons ore fco adjacent ledge. 

Bear River (Fred Drinkwater) open-cut, (i x 1 x 20 feet. 

Copper (W. Lindsay) — clearing out shaft and tunnel, stripping copper and iron showing, 
and other prospecting-work. 

Tangent (G. A. Drinkwater) open-cut, stripping 20 feet wide, I feet deep by I feet face, 
and other prospecting-work. 

New ('row (G. W. Drinkwater) clearing out tunnel and stripping showings of magnetic 
iron and other prospecting-work. 

Mickey (Fred Drinkwater) -open-cut, 7 feet in and about 9 feet face, clearing up broken- 
down ore-shaft, and other prospecting-work. 

Kallappa. — This group has been taken over by a Vancouver syndicate, who has had 
about six men working it for the last six months under the managership of Fred Meloehe. 

The following notes regarding the Kallappa group have been kindly supplied by Mr. 

( 'art « right : — 

"For your annual report you might like some notes of work done on Kallappa group on 
Meares Island. 

" Claims included in group consist of Kallappa, Golden Gate, Sninik Fraction, Jack oj 
Clubs, llomntsa, and Syontl. 

"Owned by John Chesterman et al., Tofino, B.C., under bond to C. E. Cartwright, civil 
engineer, 601-8 Rogers Building, Vancouver, acting for a Vancouver syndicate. 

"Work under the bond commenced about the end of May, I 91 2, since which date an 

average of five miners, under Foreman Fred Meloehe, has been continuously en paired. 

••Work done during 1912 consisted of 325 feet of drifting on vein ; survey of four of the 

claims. The construction of a watron road, al t .">,iioo feet lonu', from workings to wharf site 

has been commenced. With work done previously there is now a total of oinfeet drifting 

done and I l(» feet crOSSCUtting. 

"The ore is arsenical iron pyrites and pyrrhotite carrying values in gold and silver, with 

COpper values in some of the ore. 

"Frank E. Leach, of Cartwright, Mathesoc & Co., Vancouver, B.C., is the manager. We 

hope to be able to make some shipments during L913." 

Office Statistics Clatoquot Minim; Division. 

Free miners' certificates 25 

Certificates of work recorded 19 

Mineral claims recorded 18 

Powers of attorney, transfers 6 

Permission to relocate 4 

Relocations 4 

Other receipts 6 



3 Geo. 5 Alberni District. K 195 



Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $ 107 75 

Mining receipts, general 1,431 30 



$1,539 05 

Payments in lieu of assessment-work was made on the following : Island Belle Nos. 1 
and 2, Iron King, Pete, Ivanhoe, Double Standard, Gordon, Ilollinger, Rose, Mamie, Maggie, 
•Sadie. 



CLAYOQUOT MINING DIVISION. 
Notes by H. Carmichael, Provincial Assayer. 

This group of mineral claims is situated on the left bank of Elk river 
Rose Marie about four miles from the mouth. The property was reported on by the 
Group. Provincial Assayer in 1899. A quartz vein outcrops on the steep mountain- 

side, but is covered at the bottom by an extensive rock-slide ; the vein, 
which shows from 15 to 21 inches wide on the surface, had been prospected by the original 
owners by a series of open-cuts extending to the top of the mountain, at an elevation of 1,000 
feet, and on to the top for 100 or 200 feet ; these owners also erected a small crushing plant 
and concentrator. 

Owing to a dispute as to title, and other reasons, the property lay for a long time without 
further development, but recently other parties started a tunnel several hundred feet up the 
mountain, where the vein showed the best ore. 

This tunnel has been driven directly into the hillside on the strike of the vein for a 
distance of 307 feet ; the vein is clearly defined throughout the entire length and has an 
average width of 18 inches. 

The mineralization is pyrite and arsenopyrite, with a few specks of chalcopyrite showing 
here and there. A sample taken recently by a mining engineer, and said to represent a fair 
average of the ore in the tunnel, gave a value of $12 a ton, nearly all in gold. 

Owned by Hanbury & Bowes, Victoria. This property is situated on 

Leora Mineral the left bank of the Elk river about two miles from the mouth; the mine 

Claim. cabin is 300 or 100 yards back from the river. The mountains rise abruptly 

from the narrow valley of Elk river ; at many points the slopes are 

precipitous. A small creek flowing into Elk river has exposed a quartz vein a foot wide 

mineralized with arsenical pyritas. To prospect this vein a tunnel has been driven 210 feet 

east (magnetic) following the strike of the vein, which runs into the mountain-side. The 

tunnel, for some distance, is in a shattered zone of diabase showing much slicken-siding and 

with a caleite filling, carrying a little arsenical pyrites along a well-defined hanging-wall. 

At 75 feet from the tunnel portal a winze has been sunk 40 feet at an incline of 60 degrees. 
At the bottom of the winze there is 60 feet of drifting on the vein, which swells at one point 
to 2 feet wide, but at the face is only 6 inches. 

After passing the winze there is no distinct quartz vein, but there is a distinct parting on 
the hanging-wall side. This may be the hanging-wall of the fissure or only a parting in the 
filling. The face shows pyrite and arsenopyrite, principally in caleite, with a little quartz and 
slicken-sided country-rock. The principal value is in gold ; 8 tons of the best ore gave a 
smelter return of $110. 



K 196 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 



QUATSINO MINING DIVISION. 
Report of 0. A. Sherberg, Minim; Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report on the mining operations in tlie Quatsino 
Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

On twenty-seven of the mineral claims situated at Elk lake, located last year, assessment- 
work was performed, and the owners seem to be well pleased with the result, as they say that 
showings are fully as u;< « >< 1 as expected. 

Tliese claims are denned as follows : Tlie Old Spurt group of eight claims : the Shamrock 
group of three claims ; the Bine Bird group of four claims ; the Idaho group of three claims ; 
the Merry Widow group of six claims ; the Young Sport No. S and the Young Sport No. 4- 

Young Sport No. 1 — cash paid in lieu of work, *100. 

On the Teeta Hirer group, owned by the Teeta River Mining Company, the tunnel started 
last year on the Quatsino King claim was extended by 1" feet. 

The B.C. Pottery Company, under management of John L. Hangi, has shipped during the 
year 2,981 tons of shale from its property, situated at Kyuquol sound, the A. T. Monteith and 
Sockeye mineral claims, but the value of the shale is not known here. The company has had 

seven men steadily employed during the year, and, beside the mining done, lias built a new 

wharf. 

Cash in lieu of work. $100, was paid for the Reno and Montezuma mineral claims, situate 

near Law □ point. 

( >n other claims work was carried on. and certificates of work were recorded for eighty-six 
claims. 

On tlie coal claims, situated on the West ar f Quatsino sound, owned by the Quatsino 

Coal Syndicate, development was carried on until the first part of November, when the work 
was closed down for the winter. 

Office Statistics — Quatsino Mining DmsiON. 

Free miners' certificates 56 

Milling claims recorded i- 

Certiticates of work recorded . 86 

Certificate of improvement 1 

Kills of sale, etc.. recorded 9 



3 Geo. 5 Nanaimo District. K 197 



NANAIMO DISTRICT. 



NANAIMO MINING DIVISION. 
Report of George Thomson, Gold Commissioner. 

I have the honour to submit herewith the annual report on the mining operations ■ in the 
Nanaimo Mining Division for the year ending December 31st, 1912. 

The past year has been very dull on Texada island. The only mine 
Marble Bay. really working during the first half of the year was the Marble Hay, shipping- 
its usual complement to the smelter. The rich lenses of bornite have been 
worked on the 1,300-foot level and on several of the upper levels ; the shipping of ore stopped 
in the fall of the year. The company decided to sink the shaft down to the 1,100-foot, hence 
all workmen were laid off, and the sinking is now progressing and nearing completion ; the 
mine is expected to be ready for opening up again shortly. The ore, I am informed, is richer 
at 1,400 feet than it was in the upper levels. 

The Little Billie company is also sinking the shaft, and has opened 

Little Billie. up thereby some highly encouraging lenses of ore; there seems to be a 

promising outlook ahead. As soon as the required depth is obtained, levels 

will be driven on the vein and stoping begun, preparatory to resuming shipments. A streak of 

rich ore was found of late which, if continuous, will fully warrant the expenditure entailed. 

The Rose and Belle seems to be at a standstill, as the ore, if any, is evidently not fulfilling 
the sanguine expectations of its initiatory stage. 

The owners of the Dickens are now drifting to see if they can reach stronger veins of 
greater magnitude. Some tons of very interesting ore has been found. 

The Cornell is again being opened up for operation, with fairly good showings. 

The Raven has been closed down for some time. 

The Cap Sheaf company has done considerable work on its property during the past year, 
and hopes to be able, ere long, to report the discovery of good commercial ore. 

The Sentinel group has been worked more or less during the year, and while there are 
some nice samples of silver-lead ore, the vein proper has not yet been struck. 

The Malaspina mines has done nothing beyond a little prospecting on the property ; the 
steam plant being idle. 

The Mammoth tunnel, 7x9 feet, has not been pushed ahead much during the year, but 
it is expected that 1913 will see this work going ahead. 

The iron-mines are still idle. The lack of works capable of handling iron-ore is probably 
the chief reason of the mines being idle. 

Carter & Suns' new vein at the high-water mark is looking remarkably fine as depth is 
reached. It is now about 15 feet deep, with a good pile of ore on the dump ; the shipping 
facilities are at the collar of the shaft. 

Considerable development-work has been done throughout the Division. 

Office Statistics — Nanaimo Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates (individual) 101 

ip ii (company) . 2 

Mineral claims recorded 195 

Certificates of work recorded 248 

Certificates of improvements recorded 18 

Transfers and agreements recorded CI 



K 198 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



VICTORIA DISTRICT. 



VICTORIA MINING DIVISION. 
Report of Herbert Stanton, Gold Commissioner. 

There is very little lode or placer milling going on at present in the Victoria Mining 
Division, but there is quite a large output of other economic mineral products. 

Lode-mining. 

Tn the vicinity of Port Renfrew, on the south-west coast of the Island, a large number of 
claims have been staked on deposits of magnetic iron-ore ; a number of these properties have 
been reported upon by the Provincial Assayer in the 1902 Report of this Department, since 
when others have been staked. 

From these reports it appears that there is a large tonnage of iron-ore of very good 
quality, but, as there is at present no market for iron-ore on the Coast, there has of late been 
little active development going on, the owners contenting themselves with doing the necessary 
assessment-work preparatory to Crown-granting the properties. Most of the claims staked 
have been kept in good standing. 

The properties on Sooke peninsula, on which occur considerable bodies of cupper-ore of 
good quality, are, for the most part, Crown-granted, and no active development-work has been 
done on them for some years. 

These properties were examined by the engineer of an Eastern mining company last fall. 
and it is possible they may lie act mlv operated this coming season, as the Tyee Smelting 
Company has announced it is to start up its smelter at Ladvsmith, which will create a demand 
for copper-ores. 

On the west coast prospecting for coal and oil has been carried on for the past two or 
three years, but so far without proving anything. 

Cement. 

The only Portland-cement plant in actual operation is situated in the Victoria Mining 
division at Tod inlet, on the Saanich arm, about twelve miles from Victoria. 

The plant is owned and operated by the Vancouver Portland Cement Company — R. P. 

Butchart, President ; ollice, Hoard of Trade Building, Victoria. 

The raw materials for making the cement — clay and limestone — are mined on the 
company's property adjacent to the plant. The capacity of the plant is from J, 000 to J, 5(1(1 
barrels of cement a day ; the output made during the past year was about 520,000 barrels of 

cement, having a value of approximately -MMMii id. 

The plant is thoroughly equipped, and is operated largely by electric power transmitted 
from the B.C. Electric Company's power plant at Coldstream. 

Another large cement plant is now being constructed at the upper end of Saanich inlet 
by the Portland Cement and Construction Company — an English Company — which ought to 
he producing within a year. 



3 Geo. 5 Victoria District. K 199 

The Rosebank Lime Company — W. F. McTavish, manager, Esquimalt — manufactures 
lime at the west side of Esquimalt harbour, employing about twelve men and producing this 
year about 55,000 barrels of lime, valued at about $55,000. 

The Vancouver-Victoria Lime and Brick Company, at Atkins Siding, produced some 
lime and made about 3,500 M. lime-silica brick, valued at about $25,000. 

The B.C. Pottery Company, Ltd., manufactured clay products, chiefly sewer-pipe, having 
a value of approximately $130,000. 

In this Division there was made this last year, at the yards near Victoria and on Sidney 
island, approximately 15,000 M. red brick, having a total value of nearly $140,000. 

. The Producers Rock and Gravel Company, Limited, mined at Albert head about $17,000 
worth of crushed trap-rock ; $132,000 of gravel; $57,000 of sand — all of which was used in 
making concrete. 

Office Statistics — Victoria Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 564 

Special certificates issued 10 

Mineral claims recorded 50 

Placer claims recorded ... 3 

Certificates of work recorded 44 

Certificate of improvement 1 

Conveyances recorded 8 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates $5,499 95 

Mining receipts, general 2,505 80 

Total $8,005 75 



NEW WESTMINSTER MINING DIVISION. 
Report of Irvinc, Wintemute, Mining Recorder. 

I have the honour to submit the following report of mining operations in the New 
Westminster Mining Division for the year 1912. : — 

The mineral claims recorded during the year were distributed as follows : — 

Howe Sound and vicinity 41 

Britannia and vicinity 24 

Capilano, Lynn, and Seymour creeks 14 

North arm, Burrard inlet 17 

Squamish 12 

Sechelt peninsula 3 

Jervis inlet 2 

Pitt lake 56 

Stave lake and vicinity 4 

Whonnock 1 

Chilliwack and vicinity 43 



Total 217 

On August 1st, 1912, a large portion of the New Westminster Mining Division was 
formed into a new and separate Mining Division — the "Vancouver Mining Division," with 
the Mining Recording Office at Vancouver. 



K 200 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 



[n consequence of this, the New Westminster ofHce statistics show a decreased revenue 
and less business dune than in the previous year, due to the fact thai a great part of the 
business formerly done here is now transacted at the Vancouver Mining Recording Office. 

Office Statistics— New Westminster Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 1,75] 

Quartz claims recorded 217 

Certificates of work recorded 172 

Certificates of improvement recorded 1 '- 1 

Conveyances recorded "7 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates. 812,177 56 

Mining receipts 3,217 55 

Total L5.395 11 



VANCOTJVEB MINING division 
Report of J. Mahony, Minim; Recorder. 

1 have the honour to submit the following report of mining operations in the Vancouver 
Mining Division, from August 1st to Decern her 31st, 1912: 

On August 1st, 1912, a large portion of the New Westminster Mining Division was 
formed into a new and separate Mining Division known as the " Vancouver Mining I Hvision," 
with its Mining Recording Office at Vancouver. 

The claims recorded in the Vancouver Mining Division during tin above short period are 
located in I lie following vicinities: — 

Britannia mountain and \ alley 28 

South valley '•' 

West side of Howe sound 

North a nil of Hurra rd inlet and Indian river 7 

Nelson island 3 

Lynn and Seymour creeks 8 

Pemberton trail 

Ilolh hurii mountain 5 

( Vow n mountain 8 

Salmon arm 3 

Porteau '• 

Total 117 

This 1 >i\ ision bai ing been established in August last, the returns are not in proportion t" 
what they would he for tin' year, as the majority of licences were i>Mied before May .".1st, and 

most of the claims located in the earlier part of the year. 

The Britannia Mining and Smelting Company, Limited, of Britannia Beach, is the only 

company shipping ore in this district at the present time. It has made great strides m its 

operations, and l o than trebled last year's output. At present it has between 650 and 7"" 

men employed at its works. An auxiliary steam plant has been installed at the Beach, and it 

has built a large number of cottages for its employees' use. In the early part of this year the 

c pany established an up-to-date hospital, ami keeps a trained nurse in attendance. A 

store is now in course i if construction, and the company's aim is to have everything needed on 
the ground for its employees' benefit. 



3 Geo. 5 Victoria District. K 201 



The following is a note by the Provincial Mineralogist : — 

" Britannia Mines. — The extent to which the Britannia Mining and Smelting Company 
has enlarged its mining and concentrating operations, and the present and steadily increasing 
importance of the copper-mining industry this company has established on its property on and 
near Howe sound, are not generally known in the Province. Between 600 and 700 men have 
been continuously employed for some time past, and the extensive development and construction 
works in hand, and to be undertaken as soon as can be done with advantage, assure the 
retention of fully that number at work for some time to come. Outlining briefly what is being 
done, it may be mentioned that, while the mines are being developed and ore extracted on a 
larger scale than in past years, the work of driving a 5,000-foot adit is also in progress, with 
3,000 feet already driven and a daily advance of about 15 feet being made. As this tunnel is 
being driven on a level 1,200 feet below the bottom of the lowest present mine-workings, it 
will, if ore be found to continue down to that depth (which will give a total of fully 2,200 feet), 
make accessible for stoping an enormous quantity of ore. Mine equipment on a commensurate 
scale, hydro-electric development of 5,000 horse-power, construction of railway from the mouth 
of the adit tunnel to Britannia Beach and other additional facilities for transportation, and the 
installation of a modern and effective system of ore-concentration, are included in the progres- 
sive programme adopted and being energetically carried out. It is understood that the 
' flotation process ' of the Minerals Separation, Limited, for the recovery of copperminerals has 
been adopted here, and that a large treatment-capacity is being arranged for, with the old 
concentrating-mill being altered to suit the new conditions and for use pending the erection 
and equipment of a new mill. The company mined about 193,000 tons of ore in 1912, as 
against rather more than 100,000 tons in 1911, and recovered between 11,000,000 and 
15,000,000 lb. of copper and between 70,000 and 80,000 oz. of silver." 

On the West fork of Lynn creek the Lynn Creek Zinc Mines, Limited (Non-Personal 
Liability), has acquired a group of claims, which are situated on the ridge extending eastward 
from Crown mountain, seven miles by road and trail from the end of the Lynn Valley car-line, 
and about ten miles in an air-line from the city of Vancouver. On these claims, three parallel 
ore-zones, known as the East, West, and Fleming, respectively, have been discovered, as well 
as some cross-veins, on all of which work has been done during the year. 

T am indebted to Newton W. Emmens, mining engineer, of Vancouver, who is in charge 
of the work, for the following information regarding this property : — 

"The formation in which the ore-deposits of the Lynn creek area occur consists of highly 
altered volcanic and sedimentary rocks of the Pateozoic era, metamorphosed by the intrusive 
action of the Coast Bange granitic uplift into crystalline lime-stones, calcareous epidotic rocks, 
epidote schists, garnetites, quartzites, etc., with a considerable development of such secondary 
minerals as actinolite, garnet, epidote, pyrite, magnetite, and graphite. The intrusive action of 
this uplift nnt only altered the overlying rocks, but crushed and shattered them, especially along 
their bedding-planes, affording avenues for the circulation of magmatic waters and other 
mineralizing solutions, which accompanied, and followed, this geologic disturbance. 

" The ore-bodies occur along these zones of crushing in the altered Paheozoic rocks, not 
only near their contact with the granitic intrusive, but also at some distance therefrom, anil 
along some of the east and west faults which cut the formation in several places. 

" The most important ore-deposit so far opened up on the Lynn Creek Zinc Mines property 
is known as the 'East ore-body,' and occurs along a zone of crushing between a limestone 
hanging and a quartzite foot wall. The ore-body consists of zinc-blende in a gangue of 
calcareous epidote rock, with some quartz, and has a course of N. 10" to 20° W. (mag.), with 
a steep westerly dip. On the Kemptville Extension claim it is exposed in the bluff, forming 



K 202 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



the east side of Zinc canyon, and has been opened by surface cuts and an adit crosscut, in 
which the ore has been proved to have a width of 20 feet, much of winch assavs from I 1 * to 
45 per cent, in zinc, and the balance from 8.26 to 16.72 per cent. zinc. From this crosscut a 
drive has been made north along the course of the ore for a distance of 22 feet, carrying the 
quartzite as the foot or east side of the drive. This work is in ore all the way, average 
samples of which assay from 10.5 to 13.8 per cent, zinc, these samples being taken in the 
regular course of the work without any of the waste being sorted out, as would be the case in 
mining the ore. Two hundred and twenty feet north of this crosscut the continuation of the 
ore-deposit has been proved by diamond-drilling, and is sixteen feet wide at that place, as- 
shown by the core. Still farther north, near the boundary between the KemplrilU Extension 
and Evening Star claims, and at an elevation of .'{DO feet above the crosscut above mentioned 
a shoot of ore, carrying galena, has been opened up by means of surface cuts and an adit 
dii\ en on its course for a distance of 60 feet. This shoot, which is known as the 'Pearson 
shoot, is over 6 feet wide, and average samples taken at various times during the progress of 
the drive assayed from 5 to 15 ounces in silver a ton ; 15 to 30 per cent, in zinc ; .'So to l'i 
per cent, lead, with traces of gold. 

"Near the north boundary of the Evening Star claim, the 'East ore-body' has been 
opened by a series of cuts made at right angles to the strike of the ore, and proving its 
continuity for a distance of over 400 feet along its course, and to have a width of from 1 2 to over 
30 feet (the face of some of the longer cuts still being in ore)! Average samples of ore taken 
from these cuts assayed from 0.4 to 0.5 oz. silver to a ton ; 21.5 to 37 per cent, zinc, and traces 
of gold. In the Cooper cut, which is made in the steep slope of the ridge, the ore i- well 
exposed in the face, with a width of 12 feet between walls at right angles to its strike, and is 
L,220 feet vertically above, and 2,100 feet north-westerly from the adit crosscut in Zinc 
canyon, previously spoken of. 

"The ' West ' ore-body parallels in strike the ' East,' and outcrops near the foot of the 
bluff forming the west wall of Zinc canyon, and on the west side of the limestone which forms 
the hanging-wall of the ' East ere 1mm ly. The ' West ' ore-body has been opened by stripping 
and cuts along its strike for a distance of over 100 feet, near the western boundary of the 
Kemptville Extension claim, and by a crosscut driven in from the floor of Zinc canyon. The 
width of the ore varies from 1 to 5 feet and averages about 2S per cent, in zinc contents. 
The dip of this ore-body is to the east, and there is good reason to believe that it will make 
junction with the ' East' ore-body at depth. 

"The 'Fleming' ore-body follows a line of faulting and crushing which is exposed in 
Fleming canyon, 1,500 feet east of Zinc canyon; it has been opened by a cut on the west side 
of the canyon near the boundary line between the Kemptville Extension and Morning Star 
claims, where it is 7 feet wide, samples from which assay 3 oz. silver to the ton and 35.5 per 
cut. zinc. The strike of the ore-deposit is X. 60 W. (mag.), with an almost vertical dip. The 
ore follows up the bed of Fleming canyon, the gradient of which is very steep, w lure it is e\|M>sed 
in a few places (which are bare of rocky debris), and outcrops again in a bluff forming the east 
wall of the canyon, near its head, [,800 feet north west of and 1,000 feet above the cut previously 
mentioned. At this outcrop some open-cut work has been done, exposing over l (l feet of Ore 
containing galena and zinc blende in a calcareous cpidote gangue, samples from which assayed 
from 0.02 to 0.05 Oz. gold; 20 to 25 oz. silver to the ton : 9 to 12 per cent, lead ; and 12 to 
22 per cent. zinc. 

•'Of the cross-veins, which have a strike of S. 70° E. (mag. i. work has only been done on 
two of them, one on the Kemptville Extension and one on the Evening Star claims. The ore 
in these veins is from a few inches to as much as 10 feet in width where the faults inti I 
/ones of crushing, and is of a gcMMl grade. 



3 Geo. 5 Victoria District. K 203 



"During the year 1912 there was 619 feet of work done on the property, consisting of 
59 feet of cross-cuts, 91 feet of drives, and 469 feet of surface cuts of an average depth of 
8 feet, and, in addition, 411 feet of diamond-drilling." 

The Latona Mining Syndicate, whose claims are on Gambier island, most of which were 
recorded during 1912, has had a lot of development- work done on its property. 

The balance of work done in this district has been recorded to keep the claims in good 
standing. 

Office Statistics — Vancouver Mining Division. 

Free miners' certificates issued 261 

Quartz claims recorded 127 

Certificates of work issued 106 

Receipts issued for money in lieu of work 22 

Certificates of improvement issued 23 

Conveyances recorded 55 

Abandonments recorded 16 

Notices filed 12 

Crown grants applied for 16 

Revenue. 

Free miners' certificates issued $1,419 90 

Mining receipts 3,274 95 

Total $4,694 85 



K 204 Report of the Minister ok Mines. 1913 



INSPECTION OF MINES. 



Report op Thomas Graham, Chief Inspei 

I have the honour fco submit my first annual report as Chief Inspector of Coal and 
Mi balliferous .Mines. 

The reports of the District [nspectors, covering the production of coal and coke, the 
number of persons employed, and lists of accidents and prosecutions, also a brief resume of 
the mines in their several inspectorates, are hereto appended. 

Personnel and Organization of Inspection Staff. 

The personnel of the inspection staff consists of a Chief Inspector and six District 
Inspectors, namely : — 

Thomas Graham, Chief Inspector, Victoria ; 
Thomas Morgan, Nanaimo : 
• lames McGregor, Nelson ; 
Evan Evans, Fernie ; 
Robert Strachan, Merritt : 
John Newton, Nanaimo ; 
Thomas II. Williams, Fernie. 
At the beginning of the year 1912 the headquarters of the Chief Inspector was moved 

from Nanaimo to Victoria, and an office Opened in the Mines Department at the Parliament 

Buildings, bringing the entire Inspection Service more in touch with the Department, 

eliminating much duplication of correspondence, enabling the Chief Inspector to get more in 
the field, and dispensing with the services of one stenographer. 

A reorganization of the Inspection Districts was also effected; Inspector John Newton 
was moved from Cumberland to Nanaimo. Inspector Robert Strachan from Hosmer to Fernie, 
and Inspector Evan Evans from Cranbrooh to Fernie. This was deemed necessary to facilitate 
consultation and co-operation of the Inspectors at Nanaimo and Fernie, enabling their Itinerary 
to be so arranged that one or other of the Inspectors would always he at these import 
centres, and also to minimize the travelling expenses of the staff. 

During the year, one Inspector was added to the staff in the person of Thomas II. 
Williams, with headquarters at Fernie, Inspector Robert Strachan of that place being moved 
to the Nicola Princeton District, with headquarters at Merritt. 

In addition to the regular monthly inspection of the District Inspectors, I have personally 

\isited and inspected everj operating coal mine in the Province at some time during the year. 

Occidents in Coal minks. 

Notwithstanding the above frequent and systematic inspection, the number of fatal 
accidents is again very high and leaves much r n for improvement. 

The returns show twenty-two accidents, which caused twenty-eight deaths: this is an 

increase in deaths of twelve over 191 1 and equals the number reported in L910. 

There were 7,130 persons employed in anil around the coalmines, making the fatal 

accidents per 1,000 persons employed •"■.!'.">, while in 1911 the rate was 2.32. The fatal 

accidents per 1. i persons employed for the ten-year period averagi : "7 

The tonnage produced in 1912 was 3,025,709 tons, being 727,991 tons greater than in 191 1. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 20-> 



The following table shows the collieries at which these fatal accidents occurred : — 

Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, Cumberland 4 

Western Fuel Company, Nanaimo 3 

Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company, Middlesboro 1 

Diamond Vale Collieries, Limited, Merritt 7 

Crow's Nest Pass Coal and Coke Company, Coal creek 7 

Crow's Nest Pass Coal and Coke Company, Michel 2 

Hosmer Mines, Limited, Hosmer 1 

Corbin Coal and Coke Company, Limited, Corbin 3 

Total 28 

The following table shows the various causes of the fatal accidents and their percentage 
on the whole : — 

Cause. No. Per <;ent. 

Falls of roof-rock 6 21.43 

Falls of coal 3 10.72 

Mine-cars and haulage 9 32.14 

Explosion of gas 7 25.00 

Explosion of powder 1 3.57 

Hit with piece of coal from a shot 1 3.57 

Heart-disease accelerated by fright 1 3.57 

28 

It will thus be seen that, again, falls of roof-rock and coal and mine haulage account for 
the greater number of fatal accidents — namely, 18, or 64.28 per cent, of the whole. 

Seventy-five per cent, of these eighteen accidents were avoidable, and were due either to 
negligence of the persons injured or to lack of proper discipline on the part of officials ; and 
here there is hope for reduction in the future through the co-operation of the inspection 
staff, the mine officials, and the mine employees. 

Legislation, be it ever so stringent, or inspection, however efficient, will not prevent this 
class of accident ; here so much depends upon the personal element that only the united and 
co-operative effort of every person in the industry, from the Inspector and manager to the 
trapper-boy, can hope to reduce this class of accident to a minimum. 

Accidents of this nature will always occur so long as we continue to produce coal, but 
the unforeseen and unavoidable accidents will be only too numerous without adding those due 
to negligence or lack of discipline. 

I would therefore urge the co-operative aid of the underground officials, especially fire- 
bosses and shotlighters, who are daily coming in contact with each and every employee in the 
mine, as well as the aid of each individual employee in reducing this class of accident. 

My personal experience as a miner and as a mine official has proven that the average 
mine-worker is only too prone to forget that first and great consideration, that all coal-mines 
are dangerous, and that danger lurks in every corner ; they become inured to the dangers 
surrounding them to such an extent that all more or less fail to be as careful as they might be, 
and daily overlook with indifference many little violations of well-known rules or prudent 
precautions on the part of fellow-workers, that finally culminate in a fatal accident of the type 
that may well be written in the class of avoidable. Only an ever-present consciousness of 
danger on the part of every mine-worker will bring about that vigilance that is necessary to 
prevent these accidents. 



K 206 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



An explosion of gas caused seven deaths, or 25 per rent, of the whole ; this was the most 

serious accident of the year, and occurred in No. -'5 slope of the I>ia n<l Vale Collieries at 

Merritl a1 8. l."> a.m. on March 7th, 1912, through the ignition of lire-damp in Nos. 1 ■'> and 1 1 
breasts off No. 1 East level. 

An investigation of this accident was made on behalf of the Diamond Vale Collieries by 
.lames Ashworth, and on behalf of the Government by William Fleet Robertson, Provincial 
Mineralogist, and by the writer, all of whom agree as to the place and cause of the accident. 

The reports of Mr. Robertson and the writer, as submitted to the Honourable the Minister 

of Mines, are hereto attached. 

Of the three miscellaneous fatal accidents, one was caused by an explosion of powder, and 
was due to one of those vagaries so common to high explosives, and which bo frequently fail to 
be accounted for. The explosion occurred while the powder was being inserted in the hole, no 
detonating-cap being in the powder. 

One was caused by a piece of coal flying from a shot, and was due to lack of warning to 
the persons working in an adjoining stall, towards which a crosscut was being driven, and in 
which crosscut a shot was being fired, the shot blowing through and killing a man at work on 
the other side. In this case a charge of manslaughter was brought against the official firing 
the shot, the case being dismissed. 

The other was due to heart-disease, accelerated by shock or fright. 

Under instructions from the Minister of Mines, 1 was delegated to attend the Fourth 
Annual Convention of the Mine Inspectors' Institute of the United States, held at Columbus, 
Ohio, June 17th to 21st, 1912 ; also to visit the United States Bureau of Mines Testing Station 
at Pittsburg, Pa., for the purpose of ascertaining the methods employed in testing permitted 
explosives and noting their action in the presence of known quantities of gas and coal-dust : 
and also to visit some of the representative coal-mines in the States of Pennsylvania and 
Illinois, with a view to comparing the general discipline enforced and the efforts put forth by 
the individual operators in those States to safeguard and protect the lives of their employees, 
with the general discipline enforced and the efforts put forth by the various companies in our 
own l'i'o\ ince. 

Appended hereto is the report as submitted to the Honourable the Minister of Mines. 

Mine-rescue Work. 

It affords me much pleasure to be able to report much progress in this important branch 
of the work in 1912. 

The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, built a very commodious and well arrai 

station at both its Extension and Cumberland Collieries. 

The following companies added to their equipment, as follows: — 

Western Fuel Company, Nanaimo— Four 2 hour and three 1-hour Fluess apparatus. 
C.N.P. Coal and Coke Company, Limited, Fernie Six 2-hour Dracger and two 

'.'hour Fluess apparatus. 
Columbia Coal and Coke Company, Coalmont Three 2-hour Draeger apparatus. 
Princeton Coal and Land Company, Princeton -One 2-hour Draeger apparatus. 
Diamond Vale Collieries, Merritt — Three '-hour Draeger apparatus. 
Inland Coal and Coke Company, Merritt — Three .1 hour Draeger apparatus. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 207 

In addition to this, the Provincial Government purchased two 2-hour 1911 mouth- 
breathing type Draeger apparatus, and sufficient material to convert the fourteen 1910 model 
helmet type apparatus — already owned by the Province — into the 1911 model mouth-breathing 
type, and two (2) ambulance stretchers equipped with oxygen-feed, to enable injured men being 
•carried through a zone of irrespirable gases. 

The number of oxygen apparatus in the Province at the end of the year is eighty-eight ; 
of these, forty-nine are 2-hour Draeger apparatus ; thirty i-hour Draeger apparatus ; six 2-hour 
Fluess (Proto) type and three 1-hour Fluess (Salvator) type apparatus. This gives one 
apparatus for every eighty-one persons employed in the coal-mining industry. 

The Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, Fernie, very generously donated to the 
Provincial Government a site for a mine-rescue station at a central place, easily accessible bv 
road or railway in the city of Fernie. A very commodious and well-appointed station has been 
erected on this site, and was opened on November 1st, with George O'Brien as instructor and 
•caretaker, under the supervision of the District Mine Inspectors, who have their office in the 
station. The number of applications received for training speaks well for the interest taken 
in the rescue-work. 

A site was purchased in the city of Nanaimo, upon which a station is now under 
construction. 

Pending the completion of this station, the apparatus, equipment, and stores owned by the 
Government are, through the courtesy of the Western Fuel Company, housed at their mine- 
rescue station. 

John I). Stewart, who has been appointed instructor for the Government station, is now 
with the aid and instruction of Joseph Pearson, of the Western Fuel Company's station, 
converting the Government's 1910 model apparatus into the 1911 or latest model. 

Much progress in training has been made by several of the local companies, some of whom 
issue diplomas to their employees who take a course of training. 

On May 10th last, the writer, on the invitation of the Western Fuel Company, had the 
honour and pleasure of presenting forty-one employees of that company with certificates of 
competency in mine-rescue work. This company has issued sixty-three certificates of competency 
since the opening of its station. 

In November last, Inspector Strachan had the honour and pleasure of presenting fourteen 
employees of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company with certificates of competency earned 
at that company's station. 

First Aid to the Injured. 

Previous to 1912, instruction in ambulance and first-aid work was carried on at most (rf 
the collieries in the Province, through the colliery doctors, chiefly to enable intending applicants 
for certificates of competency under the " Coal-mines Regulation Act " to qualify under the 
provisions of that Act, but with no fixed standard of remuneration for efficiency. It is there- 
fore pleasing to note that the St. John's Ambulance Association has established centres in most 
of the coal-mining communities, and from now on there will be a fixed standard of examination 
and uniformity of training throughout the Province. 

With the aid of the St. John's Ambulance Association, I hope to see much rivalry in the 
various mining centres during the coming year. 

While on official business at Merritt during the month of March, 1912, I received an 
invitation to attend a meeting of the Nicola Valley Mutual Improvement Association. 



K 208 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

The members of this organization were employees of tlie Nicola Valley Coal and Coke 
Company, Middlesboro, and held weekly meetings in the club-room owned by the employees 
.it Middlesboro. [ts aims and objects arc mutual improvement of its members through the 
reading and discussion of papers on mining subjects. 

A very pleasant evening was spmi in the reading and discussion of a paper entitled 
" Mine Accidents and how to prevent them-"; much interest was evinced in the paper, the 
discussion of which brought out much that was helpful to students of this subject. I was 

informed that the interest was w ell sustained during the winter, the average attendance being 

thirty members. 

A similar association has been formed at Nanaimo and is meeting with much success. 

It is to be hoped that re of these associations will he formed in other mining communi 

not only for the educational advantages to he obtained by participation in these discussions. 
but for the quickening of the powers of observation, revealing to the acute eye many of the 
conditions and phenomena within the mine, the details of which escape the notice of a large 
majority of those employed in the industry. 

Metalliferous-mine Act i dents. 

There were seven separate fatal accidents, causing the loss of eight lives, during the veai 

1912. The number of fatalities in 1911 was seventeen. 

The fatal accidents per 1,000 persons employed was 2.11, as compared with 5.24 for the 

year I'M I . 

The production of the metalliferous mines for 1912 is the largest recorded in the history 

of the industry in the Province, and it is worthy of note that the fatal accidents per 1,000 
persons employed is the smallest recorded in the nine years during which such records h 

been kept, the smallest previous year being 1905, when the rate was 3.89. 

Of these eight fatal accidents, two were due to picking into missed holes or unexploded 
powder; one from going back on a delayed shot ; three from falling into chutes; one from 
suffocation from powder-gas; one from a shaft accident, caught with cage 

Notwithstanding the great care exercised by officials and employees in the use of 
explosives, this class of accident again claim-- three lives. 

Falling into chutes is another prolific source of accident in our metalliferous mines, and 
a class that may well be termed avoidable. 

One very noticeable feature of this year's accidents is that there were no fatalities from 

falls of ground ; when we consider that many of the Largest producing mines are worked on 
the large open stope system, with do timbering, it speaks volumes for the supervision and care 

of the officials and employees, and suggests to us that with a fraction of the amount of care 
which must base been devoted to this work bestowed on thi' open chute-,, we might eliminate 
the chute accidents entirely. 

The results in the metalliferous mines tor tin- year are -very encouraging, and whilst the 

death-rate of 2.11 per 1,000 persons employed is even higher this year than tin- results 

obtained in some of the European countries, it is nearer the idea] to which we aim. and which 
can only be obtained by a cheerful compliance with the rules laid down to maintain discipline 
on the part of the employee, ami eternal vigilance upon the part of the mine otlieials and 
Inspectors. The CO-operation of all will enable us to place British Columbia in the column of 
mine statistics that will compare favourably with that of any other mining country. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 209 

TRIP OF INSPECTION TO EASTERN STATES. 

Victoria, B.C., July 31st, 1912. 

The Honourable Sir Richard McBride, K.C.M.G., 
Minister of Mines, Victoria, B.C. 

Sir, — Having been delegated by you to attend the Fourth Annual Convention of the 
Mine Inspectors' Institute of the United States of America, held at Columbus, Ohio, June 17th 
to 21st, 1912; to visit the U.S. Bureau of Mines Testing Station at Pittsburg, Pa., for the 
purpose of ascertaining the methods employed in testing permitted explosives and noting their 
action in the presence of known quantities of gas and coal-dust ; also to visit some of the 
representative bituminous-coal mines in the Pittsburg region and one in the State of Illinois, 
1 have the honour to submit to you this report covering such observations. 

The Convention of the Mine Inspectors' Institute was duly called to order in the Great 
Southern Hotel, Columbus, Ohio, on the morning of June 18th, by addresses of welcome from 
Mr. Long, representing Governor Judson Harmon, of Ohio, who was unavoidably absent from 
the city ; the Honourable George J. Karb, Mayor of the city of Columbus, and Mr. Bassett, 
representing the Chamber of Commerce. 

John Laing, President of the Mine Inspectors' Institute, then delivered his annual address 
and the various committees were appointed, after which the Convention adjourned until 2 p.m. 
After hearing the reports of the Secretary and Treasurer, the Convention got down to serious 
business. 

A very able address was delivered by Dr. Joseph M. Holmes, Chief Director of the U.S. 
Bureau of Mines, Washington, D.C., on work for the prevention of mine accidents. This 
address brought out a general discussion on mine accidents and compensation for such, which 
proved very instructive to all. Much interest is being aroused on the subject of compensation 
to workmen in the United States, and I was called on for information on the workings of the 
British Columbia " Workmen's Compensation Act," which I explained to the best of my 
ability. The general consensus of opinion was that compensation for injury should be a tax 
on the industry, and constructed along lines where it would take the place of the "Employers' 
Liability Act,'' being so administered that whatever amount was fixed would find its way to 
those entitled to the compensation and not be dissipated in litigation. 

The evening session brought out an excellent address by Thomas Moses, Superintendent 
of the Bunsen Coal Company of Danville, Illinois, and a former Mine Inspector of that State, 
on " Workmen's Compensation and Mine Discipline." Another splendid address was delivered 
by Dr. Clarence Hall, Explosives Engineer of the United States Testing Station, Pittsburg, 
Pa., on "Testing of Explosives and Detonating-caps," which proved very interesting and 
instructive. J. W. Paul, Engineer in charge of the Rescue-work of the U.S. Bureau of 
Mines at Pittsburg, delivered an address on "Mine Inspection." An exceedingly able and 
instructive address was given by Mr. Jeffrey, of the Jeffrey Manufacturing Company of 
Columbus, Ohio, on "Methods of Organizing Workmen and their Efficiency," including a 
description of a hospital at their plant which treated 12,000 cases in the year 191 1. 

The members of the Institute subsequently had the pleasure of visiting this factory as the 
guests of the Jeffrey Manufacturing Company, and witnessed the construction and manufacture 
of coal-cutting machines, electric locomotives, mine-fans, and, in fact, every kind of conveying 
and handling machinery known to the coal business, and also paid a visit to the hospital already 
mentioned. A surgeon and a trained nurse were tin hand, and every accident to an employee, 
14 



K 210 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



mi matter how trivial, was treated in this hospital. The functions of the hospital are not t.i 
provide accommodation for sick or injured employees, but solely for rendering first aid or 
treating wounds received whilst at work, and for looking afterthe health of the employees 
generally. This company does not lay any claims to philanthropy in this work, claiming that 
it is a business proposition pure and simple, and a good investment, not only in reducing 
compensation claims, but in obtaining a maximum efficiency from their employees. 

Wednesday Morning's Session. 

Karl F. Schoew, [nspector from West Virginia, read a paper entitled "Quality and 

Quantity of Mine Air." This very able paper brought forth an extended discussion On what 
constituted a gaseous mine and the relative merits of the various means of humidifying the 
mine atmosphere; its effects on the different strata forming roof and floor ; its effects on mine 
timber, on workmen under varying temperatures and condition--, and its effects on arresting or 
propagating explosions. This discussion lasted the entire day. and was finally closed to 
facilitate business and permit the programme of the Convention being carried out. A multitude 
of ideas were advanced, many being diametrically opposed to each other, and proving conclusively 
that no fixed rule or method can be laid down for determining the amount of humidity or means 
of applying it that will suit the ever-varying conditions which are met with in coal-mining in 
i he different coalfields. 

The members of the Institute were the guests of the city of Columbus on an automobile 

tour of the city, a visit to their water-filtration plant and to their garbage disposal plant, which 
proved very interesting and instructive. 

Thursday's Session. 

Thursday's session brought out a paper by Dr. J. J. Rutledge, Engineer of the ] 3 
Bureau of Mines, entitled " A Suggestion in regard to Coal mine Inspection," in which it was 
was proposed to cut out the personal elements and apply a method of inspection based on a 
percentage basis, of so many marks being deducted for certain specified deficiencies, or, in the 

words of the author, "reducing the inspection to a mathematical basis." This suggestion, 
while theoretically ideal, was deemed practically impossible. 

A thoroughly practical and very able paper, entitled -'Need for Better Discipline and 
Co-operation in Mining," was read by Charles II Nesbit, Chief Inspectorfor Alabama, and 
embraced a great many ideas which this Department has been trying for some time to inculcate — 
namely, the cooperation of the Government officials with the mine officials, and last, but not 
least, the miners themselves, in the humanitarian work of reducing mine accidei 

P. J. Moore, of the Anthracite Inspection stall'. Carbondale, Pa., read a practical paper 
entitled " Accidents from Falls of Roof and Coal in Anthracite Mines," which proved to be a 
very able paper. 

Friday's Si ssion. 

Friday's session was devoted to business. The constitution of the Institute was amended 
to permit Inspectors from Canada to become members, and Robert Strachan, Inspector at 
Merritt. and the writer were elected to membership in the Institute. 

The ballot being spread, it was found that the following named gentlemen were elected to 
office for the next year: President. Thomas K. Adams, Pennsylvania; 1st Vice-President. 
D. J. Roderick, Pennsylvania; 2nd Vice-President, Edward Flynn. Alabama: 3rd Vice- 
President, D. C. Rotting, Washington : Treasurer. K. T. Rhys, Iowa : Secretary. .1. W. Paul, 
Pennsylvania; Editor, J. T. Beard. Xew York. 

Birmingham, Alabama, was" chosen as the next place of meeting. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 211 



A very successful meeting was then adjourned. 

The same evening I proceeded to Pittsburg, and on Saturday, through the courtesy of 
Dr. Hall, of the Bureau of Mines, I was shown over the Testing Station of the United States 
Government at Pittsburg. Owing to lack of funds very little work was being done, but the 
description of the various tests to which the various explosives are submitted, and the 
machinery employed, proved highly educational and most interesting. 

That explosives used in coal-mining have been the cause of many — if not most — of the 
disastrous explosions which have occurred in the coal-mines of this and other countries, there 
can be little doubt. Any explosives intended for use in a coal-mine should be of such a nature 
as not to readily ignite explosive mixtures of gas or coal-dust. The loss of many thousands of 
lives -in coal-mine disasters has stimulated, to a marked extent, research in regard to the 
preparation of explosives suitable for use in coal-mining. It has been found that every known 
explosive, if fired in a sufficiently large charge, will ignite an explosive gas mixture, but 
explosives have been found to differ widely in regard to the amount that can be fired without 
causing ignition. 

Somewhat less than 1 oz. of ordinary black powder will readily cause the ignition of 
explosive gas mixtures, while certain other explosives in quantities as great as 2i lb., under 
conditions exactly similar to those used in testing the black powder with repeated trials, have 
invariably failed to cause ignition of the explosive mixtures. 

It is to furnish information to the mining companies of explosives that will pass certain 
tests that tin 1 U.S. Bureau of Mines has established the Testing Station at Pittsburg. 

The various powders furnished by the manufacturers are submitted to certain tests, and 
in the event of their passing the test they are placed on the " permissible list " for use in coal- 
mines. The powders are first submitted to analysis to determine the chemical composition of 
the explosive ; they are then subjected to a series of tests. 

The first test is the Ballastic Pendulum, which is used to determine the relative weights 
of the different explosives that when fired will produce equal deflections of the pendulum. 

The Ballastic test being purely comparative, a standard explosive has to be selected with 
which to make comparisons. The standard explosive selected for this purpose is a dynamite 
of the following composition : Nitro-glycerine, 40 per cent. ; sodium-nitrate, 44 per cent. ; wood- 
pulp, 15 per cent. ; calcium-carbonate, 1 per cent. 

The quantity of this dynamite used in a standard charge is | It) (227 grams), and is fired 
with a No. G detonator. The Ballastic apparatus consists of two parts — the cannon in which 
the charge is fired, and the pendulum, which receives the impact of the products of the 
explosion and of the stemming, the quantity of stemming used being always 1 lb. except for 
slow-burning explosives, when 2 lb. is used. The cannon is similar in dimensions and 
construction with the one used in the dust and gas gallery and with the one used in making 
the flame tests ; it is fastened to a truck which runs on a track. The cannon is so placed that 
the axis of its bore is in line with that of the mortar or pendulum. 

The pendulum consists of a 12-inch U.S. Army mortar, weighing 31,600 11)., and is hung 
between two concrete walls by steel rods passed through two cast-steel saddles and fitted over 
a steel beam resting on the concrete walls, the beam being fitted with nickel-steel knife-edges 
set in grooves to keep the edges covered with oil and protected from the weather. The extent 
of deflection of the pendulum when the charge is fired from the cannon is determined by an 
automatic recording device. 



K 212 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The cannon is loaded with a carefully weighed charge in which an electric detonator has 
been inserted and tamped, and the cannon is moved forward to within ,',. inch of the muzzle 
of the mortar and the charge exploded. Three trials of the standard explosive is made and 
the average swing noted ; tentative trials of the explosive under test are then made until the 
charge gives a swing approximately to that of the average swing of the standard explosive. 
The results are then confirmed by three trial rounds of the explosive under test ; if the average 
swing of these three rounds is within 0.2 ituli of tie- average swing produced by the standard 
explosive, and if the three swings do not vary over 5 per cent., the trial is accepted as 
satisfactory. The weight of the explosive which will produce a swing exactly equal to that 
effected by the standard charge is then determined, and this unit charge is used in the tests 
to be made in the gas and dust gallery. 

The gas and dust gallery consists of a cylinder 100 feet long ami 6 feel in diameter, and 
is built of boiler-plate in fifteen section-;, each section ha\ ing a relief door to pro\ ide a vent for 
the escaping gases, and each section is fitted with a plate glass window to observe th.- progress 
of the flame. The gallery, or certain sections of it. can lie filled with gases in known propor- 
tions to the air contained. The explosives an- Bred f r a cannon embedded in concrel 

the end of the gallery, into a mixture of air containing known percentages of gas and known 
quantities of coal-dust. 

The results are noted from a gallery some disti <■ away, in which i- the electric-firing 

device, the gas-meter for determining the quantity of gas in the tunnel, etc All explosives 

arc subjeci to five tests. 

Test 1. — Ten shots, each with a charge equal to .', ]t>. 10-per-cent. dynamite a- determined 

by the Ballastic Pendulum, are tired in their original wrapper, tamped with I Hi. of dry fireclay, 
at a gallery temperature of 77 Fahr., into a mixture of gas and air containing S per cent, of 
methane and ethane. If all ten shots fail to ignite the mixture, the explosive is considered to 

bave passed the test. 

Test .'. Ten shots, each with a charge equal to J. 1!.. I" per cent, dynamite as determined 
by the Ballastic Pendulum, are tired in their original wrappers, tamped with 1 B>. of dry tin 

clay, at a gallery temperature of 77 Fahr. into a mixture of gas and air containing 1 percent. 

methane and ethane and 20 ft>. of bituminous-coal dust. L00-mesh fine, from the Pittsburg 

lied, 1 s |h. of which is placed on shelves laterally arranged along the fn m 21 ' feet of the gallery, 

and 20 It), placed near the inlet of the mixing system in such a manner that all or part of the 
dust will In. suspended in the first seetion of the gallery. An explosive is considered to have 
passed this test if all ten shots fail to ignite the mixture. 

Test •.'. Ten shots, each with a charg [ual to .', If. 10 per cent, dynamite as determined 

by the Ballastic Pendulum, are fired in their original wrapper, with 1 Ik of dry fireclay 

stemming, at a gallery temperature of 77 Fahr.. into Mi th. of bituminous-coal dust. 100-mesh 

tine, from the Pittsburg bed, 20 tt>. of which is distributed uniformly on a horse placed in 
front of the cannon, and 20 B). placed on shelves in sections 1. ■', and 6 of the tube. An 
explosive is considered to have passed this test if all the ten shots fail to ignite the mixture. 

Test ',. A limit charge is determined within 25 grams by firing charges in their original 

wrappers, uiistenmied. at a gallery temperature of 77 Fahr., into a mixture of gas and sir 

containing 4 per cent, of methane and ethane and 20 ft. of bituminous coal dust. 100-mesh 
tine, from the Pittsburg bed. arranged in the same manlier as in T- -i No. J. The limit 

charge is repeated five times under the same conditions before being established. 

Test 5. — Same as Test I. except that l' percent, of methane and ethane is used instead of 

I per cent., and that one shot is tired instead of five. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 213 



The powder is then tested for rate of detonation. The rate of detonation is measured 
through a cartridge file 42 inches in length ; in making the test the separate cartridges of the 
explosive have the paper cut from their ends to avoid the dampening effects of its folds, are 
placed end to end in a sheet-iron tube 42 inches long and either 1| or 2 inches in diameter, 
depending upon the diameter of the cartridges to be tested. Two copper wires leading from a 
Mettegang recorder are passed one meter (3.28 feet) apart through the cartridge file and 
securely fastened. The charge thus arranged is suspended horizontally in a pit and exploded 
by an electric detonator placed in one end of the cartridge file ; the drum of the Mettegang 
recorder is rotated at the desired speed and the electric detonator is fired by an electric-firing 
device placed near the recorder. As the wire that passes through the cartridge files is broken, 
spots are formed on the smoke-covered drum of the recorder, the distance between the spots at 
a constant speed being proportional to the elapsed time between the breaking of the wires. 
When the peripheral speed of the drum is 43 meters (141 feet) per second, the smallest time 
interval which it is possible to record is T.TTnx.tnny P ar * °^ a second, but with a distance between 
wires equal to 1 meter (3.28 feet), such refinement is unnecessary. 

The rate of detonation, which is expressed in meters per second, is computed from the 
speed of the drum and the distance between the spark-points. 

The flame test is used to record by photography the relative lengths and duration of the 
flame produced by the different explosives when they are detonated or fired under certain con- 
ditions. The test is based on the belief that the greater the length of flame that an explosive 
emits and the longer the duration of the flame, the more frequent are the chances that such a 
flame, when shot into a mine atmosphere, will ignite explosive mixtures of gas and air, or gas, 
coal-dust, and air. 

In order that the lengths and durations of different flames may be compared, they must 
be measured from a common base-line ; this measurement is accomplished by causing the . 
explosion to take place at a certain fixed point, and then, by means of a camera, observing the 
flame at such a point that its apex is included in the field of view. 

The principal features of the photographic device are : a rotating drum to which the 
sensitized photographic film is attached ; a 220-volt motor regulated by a rheostat, by means 
of which the drum is revolved ; a lens by which the rays of light from the flame are focused 
on the film ; a semicircular shield in which a slit has been cut, which is placed in front of the 
lens ; a shutter which excludes the light from the photographic box at all times except when 
the photograph is being taken ; and a light-tight box in which all of these parts, except the 
motor, are enclosed. 

The speed at which the motor revolves is ascertained by means of a tachometer which is 
calibrated to read directly in meters per second. 

The impact-machine is used to determine the sensitiveness of explosives to explosion 
when they are struck with a known mass of steel moving at a known velocity, while the 
explosive tested rests on a steel surface. The charge used is 0.02 grams, which is placed on 
the steel surface and the hammer raised to a known elevation ; the hammer is allowed to fall ; 
if no explosion occurs, the weight, or hammer, is raised to successive heights until an explosion 
occurs. 

The Bichel pressure-gauge is employed to determine the maximum that an explosive will 
exert if exploded or detonated in a space that it fills completely — as in a shot-hole in a mine. 
This apparatus also affords &. means for the collection and examination, by chemical and 
physical methods, of the gases, liquid and solid products of the chemical reaction that takes 
place when the different explosives are fired within it. 



K 214 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The Trauzl lead block measures the comparative disruptive power of an explosive when 
fired under moderate confinement. In making the test, equal weights of different explosi\< •>. 
arc confined in boreholes of definite dimensions by means of a tixed cjuantitv of stemming, and 
when thus confined are exploded bv means of similar detonators. In this test, care is taken 
to have each factor alike, except the characters of the explosives which are being compared. 

The measure of the test is the volume hy which the cavity of the block is increased 

because of bhe pressure exerted by the explosion under the different quantities and firmness of 
the stemming. 

These are the principal tests to which the explosives submitted are subjected before being 
placed on the " permissible list " of explosives for use in coal-nun. 

The Bureau also has on hand a number of oxygen rescue apparatus of every type and 
make, and with which parties enter the gallery after explosions of gas and dust or gas, thus 
obtaining practice in similar conditions of atmosphere to those which prevail after an explosion 

in a mine. 

There is also an apparatus for testing safety lamps in known percentage of gas at known 
velocities; a device for testing electric and gasolene haulage motors in known percentages of 
gas and air, and a great many other devices that my limited time forbade me observing. 

On Monday, through the court esv of Mr. Sleederburg, manager of the Pittsburgh I 
Company, Mr. Harry Lewis, civil engineer, kindly conducted me through the Willock mil 
the above company. This mine is on the famous Pittsburg lied, a coal of very high quality, 
about five feet in thickness; the shaft is about 50 feet in depth, the mode of working being 
pillar and stall, the coal being cut by machinery. The roof requires little timber: the seam 
is almost flat and very free from faults, and is what might be termed an ideal seam of coal 
very little gas is given oil' and open lights are used i \ where. 

On the afternoon of this day we drove from Willocks to I'.ruceton. and there visited the 
United States Government's experimental mine. Owing to lack of appropriations no 
experimental work was going on at the time of my visit, and for the same reason four of the 

Government mine-rescue cars had been called in and were at I'.ruceton. The Superintendents 
of these cars were driving the main headings of the experimental mine. We went to thl I 
of these headings and were shown the various chambers in the concrete work for holding the 
instruments by which the Government hopes to record the velocities and pressures of the 
explosions during experiments. 

The following day, again under the guidance of Mr. Lewis, we visited the Banning No. 
'2 mine of the Pittsburgh Coal Company, situated at W'illset Junction on the Pittsburgh, Lake 
Shore & Erie Railroad. This mine adjoins the Da it mine, where a disastrous explosion 
occurred in December, 1907, in which L'.'iS men lost their lives. This is a drift mine on 
the Wynesburg seam, which is about 8 feel thick, and was selected for examination because of 
its well-known gaseous nature. This seam is free from faults, outside of a few clay horsebacks, 
which are trifling in extent. The seams are almost flat, very regular, with a splendid roof 
requiring very little timber. The mine is ventilated by a Capell fan producing about JtO.nnn 
cubic feet of air a minute. The return currents showed no indications of gas on the Wolf 
safety lamp. Haulage was done by endless rope and electric motors. The seam was an ideal 

one to work, and the conditions of the mine in general reflected great credit on the manag 
Mr. KcK ington. 

No rescue apparatus was kept at these individual mines, tin- Pittsburgh Coal Company 
having a central station at some .other pert i en of the field. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 215 

Leaving Pittsburg the same night, I proceeded to Springfield, Illinois, where, through 
the courtesy of Mr. Martin Bolt, the Secretary of the State Mining Board for the State of 
Illinois, and District Inspector Thomas P. Back, I was taken through the Divernon mine of 
the Madison Coal Company at Divernon. 

This is a shaft mine between 300 and 400 feet in depth, and is on No. 7 seam of the 
Illinois series. The coal is 8 feet in thickness and is worked pillar and stall in panel system. 
The roof is one of the best I have ever seen in a coal-mine, the shaft-bottom being 20 feet in 
width, with no support of any kind to the roof. The roadways are thus wide and high and 
very little timber used. The seam is flat and regular, coal all mined by machines, and haulage 
done by electric motors. This is truly an ideal mining condition. Concrete is used around 
the shaft-bottom, stables, and fire-stations very extensively. A few sets of Draeger oxygen 
apparatus are kept at this mine, but no station for training, the men going to the State station 
at Springfield for such training. 

I next visited the State Rescue Station in Springfield, where Mr. Richard Xewsam, 
manager of the Illinois Rescue Station, very kindly showed me through the station. This 
station is a large one, with not only work-room, smoke-room, and observation-room, but 
contains reading-room, dining-room, kitchen, bath-room, and accommodation for sleeping and 
boarding of the men who come to take a course in the rescue-work. 

The general appearance of the station was neat and attractive, and generally well-kept, 
but the care of the apparatus leaves room for some improvement, not only at this station, but 
at the station of the U.S. Government at Pittsburg and on the U.S. mine-rescue cars. 

Summary. 

The meeting of the Inspectors' Institute, in papers read, addresses delivered, and general 
debate on these, brought out a large and varied amount of information that can only be 
obtained by the meeting together of so many men whose aims and objects are similar, although 
working under varied and different conditions, not only of the mines and field in their 
respective inspectorates, but under laws differing as widely as their conditions. Yet, withal, 
the exchange of opinions and views and the mutual intercourse must of necessity stimulate 
and enthuse every one who was present to greater effort to attain the ideal we are all seeking. 

The work which the U.S. Government is carrying out through the Bureau of Mines under 
the very able directorship of Dr. Joseph M. Holmes must be of incalculable benefit to the 
mining industry of the United States, and our own Federal Government might well imitate 
this great work for the benefit of the mining industry in Canada : through the research-work 
carried on by this Bureau, many of the inexplicable things confronting the practical manager 
and miner are made plain and intelligible, and they are thus enabled to better understand 
and safeguard themselves in their daily operations. 

The general discipline and individual efforts put forth by the various companies for the 
purpose of minimizing accidents were not in advance of those put forth by the more 
progressive coal companies in this Province. 

Geologically, nature has been kinder to them than to us, the seams being nearly all flat 
and uniformly free from faults and disturbances, while ours are contorted and dislocated in 
every conceivable form, thus accounting for the high percentage of accidents from haulage and 
mine-cars in this Province. 

A driver with one mule, in either the Pittsburg region or the Illinois field, will pull from 
100 to 125 tons of coal a day, while here, under our much disturbed conditions, a driver with 
one mule will gather only from 25 to 30 tons per day. as this up-hill and down-dale condition 
makes necessary much spragging of mine-cars which is the large factor in mine-car accidents 
with us. 



K 216 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 



My observations of the mine-rescue apparatus of the U.S. Government at their Pittsburg 
station and in their rescue-cars, also the apparatus in the station < >t" the State of Illinois, 
convinced me that their apparatus was not so well taken care of as the apparatus in the several 

stations in this Province. 

Notwithstanding the splendid research-work of the Bureau of Mines re explosives suitable 
for use in coal -mines, and the generally accepted idea ot' the dangers attending the use of 
ordinary black powder in blasting coal, much of this powder is still used in the production of 

eoal in the United States. 

The use of exhaust-steam for the humidifying of mine atmospheres and allaying dust is 
much used in certain fields in the United States ; its use is only applicable under certain 

conditions — namely, where the roof material is of a nature which is not affected by the steam, 
and in non-gaseOUS mines where the blower fan is used. This method could nol be used with 

an exhaust system of ventilation, which is necessary in a gaseous mine ; the exhaust steam in 
the atmosphere would render the haulage-roads unworkable, and would create an c\il which 
was greater than that which we were trying to allay. 

Exhaust-steam used in the form of radiators in the mine intake, raising the temperature 
of the intake air to Id degrees above the normal mine atmosphere, and then humidifying the 
air by means of a series of sprays, appeals to one as a system which would Overcome the 
objections to the exhaust-steam in the air, and could be used either under the blowing or 
exhaust type of fan, and generally is much favoured. 

I have to thank, for courtesy extended, the Deputy Minister of Mini's; Provincial 
Mineralogist and E. Jacobs for letters of introduction; the inspection staff of Ohio; Dr. 
Holmes and staff of the U.S. Bureau of Mines; Harry E. Metcalf and Harry .1. Lewis, of 
Pittsburg; Martin Bolt anil Thomas P. Back, of the Illinois Inspection Department. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Thomas Graham, 

Chit f fns/i, ctor of Mines. 



REPORT ON EXPLOSION, DIAMOND VALE COLLIERY, NICOLA COALFIELD. 

REPORT OF \VM. FLEET ROBERTSON, PROVINCIAL MINERALOGIST. 

Victoria, B.C., Mini, 29th, 1912. 

Tin- //iiiimi ralilt' Minislir of Mins, 
Victoria, B.C. 

Dear Sir,— In accordance with instructions received from the Deputy Minister, i 
proceeded on the 13th instant to Merritt, arriving I here on the 1 tth, to investigate, with the 
Chief Inspector of Mines, the explosion which had occurred there on the Tth instant in the 

No. •"> Colliery of the Diamond Vale Coal Company, whereby seven men were killed. 

1 remained in Merritt for the inquest, and, according to instructions. gave m y evid 

at the inquest, practically confirming that given by the Chief Inspector. 

The Diamond Vale Colliery Company holds a large area of coal lands extending from the 

Coldwater river, and the lands of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company, across the flats 
to the Nicola river, a distance of about two miles in a straight line. 




Diamond Vale Colliers — Noi 3 Slope ami Tipple. 




I > ii ml Vale Collier? — Hbowl " - l-'a n as llinnvn by Explosion* 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 217 



The first prospeeting-work of the Diamond Vale Company was done in about 1901 and 
1 902, when it attempted to sink a couple of shafts through the surface gravels near the Cold- 
water river; these endeavours were, however, unsuccessful owing to the amount of water 
circulating through the gravels. 

The next development was started on the other side of the property near the Nicola river 
and adjacent to the tracks of the Canadian Pacific Railway, between Merritt and Nicola. Here 
the coal was found outcropping on a rolling hill about 100 feet above the railway and dipping 
to the south, into the hill, at an angle of from 30 to 40 degrees ; the thickness of the seam 
being from 4 to 5 feet of coal, with, contained in the seam, a couple of sandstone partings of 4 
or 5 inches thick. 

' The roof and pavement of the seam are both composed of unusually hard sandstone, which 
forms a splendid roof to the workings and requires very little timbering. Immediately above 
the coal there is usually from 6 to 10 inches of sandy shale below the regular sandstone roof. 

The roof -stone is frequently cross-fissured, which often permits of the dropping-down of 
blocks of the sandstone roof, unless these detached pieces are caught in time by suitable timbers. 

The density and character of the roof render it exceedingly improbable that gas would be 
contained therein or be liberated when a fall of roof occurs, which deduction is borne out by 
the testimony of the manager, Benjamin Browitt, at the inquest, that gas was not liberated by 
such falls of roof 

The coal is bituminous, of good quality, and fairly hard and firm, having an analysis of 
about : Moisture, 1.4 ; V.C.M., 31.9 ; fixed carbon, 61.4 ; ash, 5.3. Ratio of V.C.M. to F.C., 

1.92. 

The present development of this No. 3 Colliery consists of a slope and counter-slope driven 
down on the pitch of the seam, the former being now down over 500 feet at an angle of between 
35 and 40 degrees. 

From the slope, at a distance of about 300 feet down, a level has been driven to the east 
for about 700 feet — known as the No. 1 East level. At about 350 feet down the slope a 
[eve] has been run off to the west for about 550 feet — known as No. 1 West level. 

The method of working the coal from these levels has been by putting up to the rise a 
series of double stalls each 36 feet wide, with a pillar of coal of 36 feet left between. 

These double stalls are opened from the level by a pair of chutes, each about 1 2 feet wide, 
leaving a solid pillar of coal of 12 feet between them ; this pillar remains intact for a distance 
from the level of from 20 to 25 feet, when the chutes are connected forming the stall, which 
thereafter is carried up for the full width of 36 feet, a pack-wall, composed of the parting stone 
and waste, being carried up the middle of the stall all the way ; this parting wall serving as a 
permanent brattice or partition, the air circulating up one side of it and down the other. 
Crosscuts arc run between the stalls at a distance of from 30 to 40 feet above the level. 

From the No. 1 West level there was already up a counter-slope and four double stalls, 
while a further pair of chutes had been started which would soon have been united to form 
another double stall. 

From the No. 1 East level, besides the counter-slope, there were seven rooms driven up ; 
the first three rooms were up their full distance, about 300 feet, and were stopped, as they had 
reached surface coal. These stalls are numbered from the slope outward, by the chutes ; 
chutes Nos. 1 and 2 leading to first stall, chutes Nos. 2 and 3 to second stall, and so forth. 



K 218 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

Tt was shown there was no survey or plan of the mine since June, 1910, which was so long 
ago as to be now of no significance. The blue print accompanying this report was prepared by 
the draughtsmen of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company from dimensions and figures 
supplied, after the explosion, by Benjamin Browitt, manager, and Mr. Browitt turned it m t<> 
the Coroner's inquest as a true representation of the mine al this date. 

Upon this plan, at the Hast level, the place where each dead body was found is marked 
by an X and a number, while a corresponding number in a circle shows the working place of 
each man. Every man in No. 1 East, or stall off from it, was killed, numbering seven men. 
Their names were as fellows : (1) John Hogg, pusher; (2) Henry Grimes, fireboss ; (3) John 

Templetiin, miner; ill .John Pattie, miner: (5) Frank Kallia. miner (Kelly On plan); (6) 
William Baxter, miner; (7) William Hurd, miner. 

In the West level workings there were eleven men. who escaped uninjured with the 

exception of two, who happened to be at the junction of the level and slope, and these were 
somewhat burned, but not dangerously. 

The explosion had very little effect on this side of the mine, in some eases not even hlow in;; 
out the naked lights. 

The intake air was brought down the slope and split, a part going to each side, so that 

each level was on a separate split of fresh air, and. since the explosion had little effect on tin- 
west side, and no li\es wire lost there, and all the damage was done on the east side, therefore 
this examination was confined to the east side of the mine and to the slope. 

The mine had been opened up primarily to prospect the ground only, rather than as a 
producing colliery, although tin- coal taken out in development-work was sold to assist in 
paying expenses. 

These conditions had existed tor a year or two. and apparently continued up to N'o\ ember 

of 1911, up to which time the amount of coal mined had been about 200 tons a month, and 
the number of men employed underground less than ten. 

In December, however, the general shortage of coal in the Province caused a demand :•• 

which this company responded, and in December the output was raisi tons for that 

month and was tin- same for January, while for February it rose to 1,200 tons and the number 

of men employed underground increased to twenty. 

The surface equipment of the mine consisted of a very fair ami efficient tipple, a locomo- 
tive-firebox boiler, carrying steam to 100 H>. pressure, housed in a rough temporary shed. 

This boiler supplied steam to a small friction-clutch hoist, standing in the open, to one 
side of the line of the slope, which was used for hoisting and was evidently capable of hoisting 

a trip of three loaded car-. 

Steam was also supplied to a ventilating fan — a rather dilapidated self-contained machine, 

to which, before the explosion, then- had been attached a direct-connected vertical engine 

This fan, from the Inspectors' reports, was, under existing conditions, capable of producing 
ilation of from 7,000 to 10,000 cubic feet of air. dependiug upon how fast it was run. quite 
sufficient for the mine, if the air-current were properly conducted thiough the workings. 

This fan was set in the upcast air-tunnel, its outlet opening being about •'! square feet ill 
area, the remainder of the tunnel being, consequently, boarded up. 

The position in which the fan was set was in direct violation of General Rule 1 of the 

"Coal-mines Regulation Act. 1911," which came into force on Match 1st. 1911 : hut tic ' 

had been so placed before this Act came into force, and the former Act did not contain any 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 219 



such provision as to placing the fan to one side of the line of the tunnel or shaft, although it 
had always been regarded as good raining practice so to do. 

As the property had, until December last, only been operated as prospecting workings, it 
does not appear that the Inspectors, since the coming into force of the 1911 Act, had ever 
made a direct demand on the management to alter the position of the fan. 

In my opinion, the position of the fan, although contrary to the Act, was in no sense a 
contributory cause to the accident, nor in this case was it responsible for any greater loss of 
life, as all the victims were killed practically instantly. 

The mine was in charge of Benjamin Browitt, who was the holder of a first-class 
certificate as manager. As far as the Act requires, the mine, before December last, might 
have been under the charge of a holder of a third-class certificate, and, since December, of a 
holder of a second-class certificate, so that, as far as a certificate was concerned, Mr. Browitt 
was fully qualified, and no other certificated official would have been required had Mr. Browitt 
personally attended to the duties of the position, since he might have acted as overman or 
fireboss. 

It appears, however, that Mr. Browitt did not personally attend to the duties of fireboss, 
but engaged a man — Harry Grimes — who was one of those killed and who did not hold any 
British Columbia certificate, to perform the duties of fireboss, and that, for about a year back, 
Mr. Grimes had each morning examined the mine, under terms of General Rules -t or 5, and 
passed the workmen into the mine each morning at 8 a.m., entering his report in the "book 
kept at the mine for that purpose.'' 

These reports seem to have been regularly made, with the exception of an interval from 
February 5th, 1912, when the old book was filled, until March 2nd, when a new book was 
provided by Mr. Browitt ; for this period there are no written reports, but it would appear, 
however, from the evidence, that the daily examinations were regularly made by Grimes and 
the men each day passed into their work. 

Evidence at the inquest, however, showed that Grimes only got to the mine at 7 a.m., 
and that between that time and 8 o'clock, when the men came on shift, he was supposed, 
under the terms of General Rules 4 and 5, to examine, with a locked safety-larnp, " every 
working-place in the mine and the roadways leading thereto." This, in my opinion, after 
examining the mine, was a physical impossibility for any one to do in the time. It was said, 
though not brought out under oath, at the inquest, that Grimes held Old Country certificates 
of competency, and the evidence of the miners who survived was that he appeared to be 
sufficiently experienced and competent and did perform the required duties. 

There was only one regular shift working in the mine — from i-i a.m. to I p.m. — although 
a couple of men were employed on the afternoon shift — from 4 p.m. until midnight — in 
sinking the slope deeper. There was an engineer on the morning shift and another on the 
afternoon shift on the surface, during which time the fan was at least nominally in operation, 
but the fan was regularly shut down from midnight till 7 o'clock in the morning. 

The shutting-down of the fan for seven or more hours immediately preceding the oncoming 
lit' the morning shift — the shift on which the explosion took place — was, in my opinion, a very 
important factor in causing the explosion, if it was not the direct cause of the explosion, by 
allowing an accumulation of gas in Nos. 1 3 and 1 4 chutes. 

The explosion took place about 9.45 a.m. on the morning of March 7th, 1912. 



K 220 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Couksk of Ventilating Air-current. 

The ventilating air-current came down the slope and the split for the East level, travelled 
along that level to No. 14 chute, ahoul L50 feel from the face of the level. 

it then went up No. 1 1 stall, then by a CTOSSCUl at the top of No. I 1. some •">" feet from 

the level, to No. 13 chute, down which it followed to the level, along which it was conducted, 
behind bratticing-cloth, to the bottom of No. I l' chute. Thence it followed up No. L2 and 
down No. 11 to a crosscut some .'In to |(i feel from the level, hv which it crossed to No. 10; 
thence up the even-numbered chutes and down the odd numbered chutes until it finally reached 

the slope-counter by a crosscut some .'10 or I 1 ' feet above the level, and thence to the fan. 

The bottoms of all the chutes were nominally stopped, but, as coal bad to come down 
through these stoppings and men and timber go through, there was undoubtedly such a heavy 
leakage of air that but a small portion of the ventilating-current got as far along tin' tunnel 
as No. 14 chute. 

Each of these stalls thus formed an inverted (J, at an angle of about In degrees, down 
which any light explosive gas formed had to be pulled down, a matter difficult at anytime 
and calling for a current of air of considerable velocity; whereas a series of crosscuts across 
the heads of the rooms, each only 36 feet long and in coal, would have allowed any gas to go 
by its own lighter weight along these and into the return airway of counter slope ; any dust 
produced in the chutes following the same course. 

The force of this procedure is so manifest, when looking at a plan of the mine, that it 
must have been apparent to any mine manager who had ever seen a plan of the mine, and I 
must assume that Mr. Browitt would have recognized this had he ever had a plan or sketch 
of the mine made. The plan herewith was only made after tin' explosion, and tin- mine-plan 
prior to this was practically non-existent, despite section SO of the Act, which demands that 
plans shall be kept up to within three months of date. 

The neglect on the part of the management in not keeping a proper mine plan, in my 
opinion, was a contributory cause of the accident. 

Evidence ok Gas being present in Mine. 

The fireboss's report-book shows that gas was reported upon on several occasions ill 
various stalls on both the Kast and West levels within the last six months, and there was 
evidence given at the Inquest of two Or three men having been slightly burned by ignited gas. 
although it does not appear that the gas occurred in any great quantity, and with proper 
ventilation would have been harmless. 

On the morning of the accident (the 7th inst.) the fireboss was killed before he got 

out of the mine, so there is no entry in the report hook, but the evidence of the survivors 
is to the effect that Grimes chalked on a board at the entrance of No. 1 Kast level that 
all places on the West level were "clear,'' and that he told the men of the Kast level that 
all their places were " clear " and in order, with the exception of 1'attia and K a Ilia, who worked 

in chutes Nos. 13 and II respectively. These men he told to wait and that he would go in 
with them, and he provided them each with safety-lamps, the inference being, according to 

mining customs, that then' was standing gas in their places. 

That gas was liable to occur there is evidenced by tin- fact that, since the explosion, these 

two chutes have been standing full of gas to a point some feet below the crosscut, and the 

manager has been Unable to move it out. 

The mine was worked entirely by open lights- the company having in its possession only 

two safety lamps, and these were used, evidently, only for gas testing purposes 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 221 



These two safety-lamps were found, after the explosion, hanging on nails, about 7 feet up 
chutes 13 and 14 respectively, in such a position as to preclude the possibility of their having 
been, immediately prior, in use either for testing purposes or for light. 

These lamps (Wolf) were found to be in perfect order and uninjured, although in the 
hottest part of the explosion. 

Initial Point of the Explosion. 

The initial point of the explosion was, without doubt, in rooms Nos. 1 3 or 1 4, East level 
(these two are practically one place), as indicated by the condition of the mine afterwards, and 
I am inclined to believe, from contributory evidence, that it originated in chute 13, as I have 
stated further on in this report. 

Evidences of Direction of Intensity of Force. 

The evidences are that there was no great intensity of force, but rather that it was a 
small explosion in Nos. 13 and 14 of gas very much below its maximum explosive point and 
much diluted by air, which, travelling outwards, met with an amount of dust in suspension in 
the atmosphere in chutes Nos. 9, 7, and 6, the only chutes where coal was being slid down, on 
an angle of 40 degrees to the level below. 

The level itself was decidedly wet underfoot, whereas the freshly mined coal in the stalls 
produced considerable dust, and the fact that the chutes were all nearly empty would cause 
the coal mined to slide down the chutes with great velocity, so causing an unusual and 
unnecessary amount of dust. 

The stoppings at the bottoms of all the chutes were found on the level, which would 
indicate a major force occurring above the levels, but this evidence is not conclusive, as the 
stoppings were flimsy structures of props and 1-inch boards, above which were piled waste and 
muck : and on an angle as steep as 40 degrees, should a force, in any direction, disturb the 
stoppings, the weight of the material piled above them would have brought everything down on 
to the level. 

Along the level, several props, so situated as not to be affected by anything sliding down 
the chutes, were found to have been moved towards the mouth of the level ; this was particu- 
larly noticeable as approaching No. 13 chute from No. 8 chute. 

The roof of the level is so good that very few props were required, particularly near the 
mouth. 

At the mouth of the East level, a loaded car and a man — J. Hogg — who was cleaning a 
switch there, were blown aeross the slope and rolled down it. 

In the slope, the overcast from the west side to the return airway, a flimsy structure of 
boards, was completely demolished, while at the mouth of the upcast, at the surface, the fan 
and stopping were blown outwards, but with comparatively little force. 

These latter occurrences indicate only the pressure outwards from the east side of the 
mine, but do not locate where in that side the explosion took place. 

In the East level, the bratticing-cloth, which had extended from the foot of No. 12 chute 
to the foot of No. 13. was afterwards found in the level between chutes Nos. 1(1 and 11 
showing conclusively a force from No. 13 outwards and probably from 13 and 14 downwards 
on to the level. 

This is considered strong evidence of an explosion in 13 and 14. and. as there was only 

one explosion, it must have originated there. 



K 222 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

The four bodies found in the level were all found flat, face downwards and head outwards, 
with hands above their heads, except (5) Kallia. who had been crawling over some debris. 

It was found that each of the bodies was on top of the debris from the chutes and 
stoppings, and it was therefore evident the men lived Long enough to run some distance 

the explosion, which therefore could not have been very severe. 

The bodies were all more or less burned, but Pattie's was more extensively burned than 

the rest. 

The doctor's evidence was fco the effect that all these men were killed by carbon-monoxide 
poisoning, but I believe he came to this conclusion not from pathological tests. 

Where Evidences of Heating or Coking was found. 

Coking of dust on the posts was found some 40 feet in on the level past chute 1 I. This 
dust analysed as follows: — 



Moisture 


2.5 


F.C 


16.7 


Ash 


37.8 



Having a ratio of V.C.M. to F.C. of 3.6 

The normal analysis of coal from here was on a clear piece of coal : — 

Moisture 1.4 

V.C.M 31.9 

Fixed carbon 61.4 

Ash 5.3 



Ratio 1.92 

The analysis of the fine dirt and coal from the bottom of the chutes here was: — 

Moisture 2.3 

V.C.M 28.2 

f.c tai 

Ash 21.4 



Having a ratio of V.C.M. to F.C. of L.705 

There was some coking at the head of chutes Nbs. 13 and 14 and <>n props, evidenced 

by analyses : — 

No. 6. No. 7. 

Moisture 1.9 2.2 

Ash 28.5 23. \ 

V.C.M 22.3 20.6 

F.C 17.3 53.8 



Ratio 2.12 2.56 

The most intense coking seen in the mine was in chute 9, about 100 feet from the top, 

where it extended from top to bottom of props, diminishing in quantity both up and down the 
chute. Analyses of coked dust from pests here gave: — 

Moisture 2.0 

V.C.M 21.1 

F.C 58,6 

Ash 18.0 

Ratio - 2.74 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 223 



Theory as to Cause of Explosion. 

From the facts I was personally able to see and from the sworn evidence at the inquest, 
I have formed the following theory as to the cause of the explosion, as being, in my opinion, 
the most probable : — 

Through the stopping of the fan for eight hours prior to the oncoming of the morning 
shift on March 7th, explosive gas had accumulated in the upper parts of chutes 13 and 14. 

The miners Pattie and Kallia had been warned of it ; they were given safety-lamps to 
test for it, which they probably did and found gas there ; they hung their safety-lamps part 
way up the chutes, and the evidence shows that they each had that morning loaded two car- 
loads of coal from the level at the bottom of their places. 

About twenty-five minutes before the explosion, the fireboss Grimes told Henry Hogg, 
the rope-rider on the slope, who so testified, to tell the engineer to " speed up the fan " — to 
thereby cause a greater ventilating-current. 

A few minutes before the explosion — so the same witness said — he saw Pattie and Grimes 
at the mouth of No. 1 East level. "Pattie was roaring for cars," and Grimes ordered an 
empty trip to be run into the East level. 

The fan had been speeded up, which, by the increased air-current, would bring the gas 
standing at the head of Nos. 13 and 1+ chutes down No. 13 to the level, behind the brattieing, 
on its way out. About this time Pattie was on his way back to his place. He and every one 
else in the mine were using naked lights. Pattie entered his place by passing under the 
brattice with his naked light, and would be just about in time to meet the gas being swept 
out of Nos. 13 and 14 by the increased air-current and would surely ignite it, causing an 
explosion, not violent, but enough to burn them all. 

The fire would follow along the return airway, the air in which would contain gas just 
previously carried out from Nos. 13 and 14, leaving little or no evidence of heat until it 
arrived at chute No. 9, the first chute, on its way, where any one had been working that 
morning, and which would therefore have dust in suspension in the air. 

The evidence is that Templeton, who worked here, had loaded coal that morning and had 
just come down out of his place to the level — probably for timber, as his roof was faulty. 

The gas flame — or light explosion — meeting the dust in chute 9 would be greatly 
augmented, creating a second explosion there, which would account for a very heavy fall of 
roof-rock, completely across the face of chutes 9 and 10, which took place after the 
explosion. 

This revived and augmented explosion would pass on through chutes 8 and 7, but leave 
no trace there, as there was probably no dust in suspension, since Baxter (6) was not up his 
stall and had not loaded out any cars of coal that morning. 

Continuing to chutes 6 and 5, it would again meet with some dust in suspension, since 
Hurd (7) was working there and had sent out two car-loads of coal that morning ; this woulrl 
again augment the explosion, causing a sudden expansion which destroyed the pack-wall 
between chutes 6 and 5, as was found to be the case, and also leave evidence of heat in the 
place. 

The augmented explosions in chutes 5 and 6 and 8 and 9 would account for the stoppings 
at the foot of the chutes being blown on to the levels. 



K 224 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The original explosion in chutes 13 and 1 1 would expand also into the dead end of tin- 
level, and through being so heated would, in its back-lash, be apt to form a coating of dust OH 

the props there, which was found to be the case. 

The above theory seems to be intact, since it accounts for all the known facts as to where 
evidences of heat was found, etc., and is not in conflict with any fact known to me. 

T am, sir, 

Yours truly, 

W. F. Robertson, 

Provincial Mineralogist. 



REPORT OF THOMAS GRAHAM, CHIEF INSPEI TOR OF MINKS. 

Victoria, B.C., April 23rd, 1912. 
The Honourable Minister of Mines, 

Victoria, B.C. 

Dear Sir, — T have the honour to submit to you my report of the explosion which 
occurred in No. 3 slope of the Diamond Vale Collieries, Limited. Merritt, B.C., on March 

7th, lUll'. and in which seven men were killed. 

Leaving Victoria February 1 1th, on an inspection tour of the coal-mines in the Crowsnesl 

pass, I was in Corbin, the most easterly coal inining town in the Province, on .March 7th and 
8th. On Friday, the 8th, at 3 p.m., 1 received a telegram from Mr. Tolmie, Deputy Win 
of Mines, informing me that an explosion had occurred in the No. •"> slope. Diamond 
Colliery. 

I left Corbin that evening, making connections at McGillivray with the (MM;, eastbound 
train for Calgary, Alta., and thence by the CP.lt. main line to Spence's Bridge and Merritt. 
where T arrived on Sunday night. March 10th, this being twenty four hours earlier than I 
could have arrived by either of the Western route-. 

On arrival at Merritt, 1 found Inspector Morgan had reached there on the night of the 

8th, to do which it had been necessary for him to cross the Gulf of Georgia in a gasolene- 
Launch, a trip that a much younger man might have hesitated to undertake, and reflects great 
credit on this official. 

'I 'lie mine is owned and operated 1 >v the 1 1 ia mo! id Vale Collieries. Limited, and is situated 

on the Nicola Valley branch of the C.P.R., one and a quarter miles east of Merritt. 

The coal is bituminous, of fairly good quality, being firm, and having an analysis as 
follows: Moisture, 1.4; V.C.M., 31.9 : F.C., 61.4 : Ash. 5.3. Ratio of V.C.M. to F.C., 1.92. 

The roof ami floor being a hard, sandy shale, it required very little timber, the roof-shale 
'. feet in thickness, sometimes from fissures or slicken-sides, dropping from the main 

sandstones, which formed the main overlying strata. 

The mine is opened by a pair of slopes driven on the coal seam : the course of the slopes 
is s. o W., and to the full dip, which varies from 30 to 50 degrees, the main slope being 

(low u 500 feet. 

I'r a point 300 feet down this slope a level has been drive to the east, and is 

known as the No. 1 East level, and from a point l<»i feet down a level has been driven '•'■ 

known as No. l West level. The counter-slope was only connected as far as No. 1 Bast level, 

cond lift being carried up from farther down the -lope, but was not connected up to the 

No. 1 East level. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 225 



The mode of working this seam, which is about 4.5 to 5 feet thick, with two bands of 
sandstone each 6 inches in thickness, was by double breasts, turned off the levels to the rise, 
36 feet wide, with 36-foot pillar between. These breasts had two openings off the level, 10 
feet wide, and were carried up the pitch 25 feet, and then connected, making the 36-foot 
breast, thus leaving a centre pillar along the level ; from this centre pillar a pack-wall of the 
refuse from the seam was carried up the centre of each double breast, and formed a permanent 
brattice, the coal being sent down each side of this pack-wall to the gangway or level below. 
A line of crosscuts was run between the breasts about 40 feet from the level, there being no 
counter-level. 

From the No. 1 East level inside the counter-slope there were seven double breasts, the 
level extending about 150 feet beyond the last chute No. 14. 

From the No. 1 West level inside the counter there were four double breasts and two necks 
being driven to make a fifth double breast. These, with the counter-slope, formed all the 
workings that were operated on the morning shift, the main slope being worked on the after- 
noon shift. 

On the East level the first two breasts were up to the crop coal and so were finished ; the 
others were being worked, two men in a breast, and all were numbered, by the chutes, from 
the slope inbye. 

From the West level and counter-slope eight men escaped uninjured and two were burned, 
although not seriously. All the men working in No. 1 East level were killed. The position 
where each body was found is marked, on the blue-print attached, by an X and a number, while 
a circle, with a corresponding number inside, marks the place where each man worked. This 
plan' was made after the explosion from measurements furnished by Benjamin Browitt, manager, 
to Mr. Daniels, the draughtsman of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company. No survey 
of the mine had been made since June, 1910, and this blue-print is only a representation of 
the mine at the time of the explosion, and as such was turned in by the management at the 
Coroner's inquest. 

The names of the men killed were: (1) John Hogg, pusher; (2) Henry J. Grimes, fire 
boss; (3) John Templeton, miner; (4) John Pattie, miner; (5) Frank Kallia, miner; (6) 
William Baxter, miner; (7) William Hurd, miner. 

The explosion had no effect on the West level, further than to knock down the canvas 
brattice at the mouth of the level, where Harry Hogg, rope-rider, and Ralph Kilestro, pusher 
(the two men who were burned), were at tin- time of the explosion : this section can therefore 
be entirely eliminated when taking into consideration the point of origin of the explosion 
and its effects. 

The surface equipment consisted of a tipple, small, but sufficient for the work being done ; 
a small locomol i\ c firebox boiler, carrying 100 lb. steam pressure, which furnished steam to run 
a small hoist, used to raise the coal from tin- slope ; a pump at No. 1 West level, and a small 
fan, which had originally been driven direct, but is now being run by a belt from a small 
vertical engine. Both fan and engine were set inside the mouth of the return airway ; the fan 
was exhausting and the mouth of the drift was boarded up, leaving an opening for the 
fan-discharge of about !> square feet. 

The capacity of this fan, according to the reports of the Inspectors, was from 7,000 to 
in, ikiO cubic feet of air a minute, varying with the speed at which the fan was run, this quantity 
of air being ample for the requirements of the mine, provided it was properly conducted. 
15 



K 226 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 

The position of the fan was not in accordance with the terms of General Rule I of the 

"Coal-mines Regulation Act, 1911." However, tliis fan had 1 a so placed before the coming 

into force of the provision requiring the fan to be placed to one side of the line of the airway 

or shaft, although it never has been regarded as good mining practice to place a fan as this 
One was placed. 

As the operations had heen practically only exploratory, no demand had been made on the 
management to change the location of the fan ; but its position, although not in accord with 

the Act, was in no way contributory to the explosion, and, although blown from its position 
by the explosion, it in no way was responsible for any additional loss of life, as the victims 

were all killed practically instantly. 

The mine had heen opened here for the purpose of proving the continuity of the seam and 
to supply the necessary information for an intelligent opening of the field. 

The operations had been conducted in a haphazard manner for two or three years, 
sometimes working and sometimes being practically closed down, the number of men employed 
fluctuating with the varying ideas of the management. 

In December, 1911, the tonnage was increased to 800 tons; in January of this year it 
was also 800 tons, and in February reached 1,200 tons and about twenty men were employed. 
On the morning of the explosion seventeen men were employed underground. 

The mine was under the management of Benjamin Browitt, who was registered as the 
holder of a first-class certificate, according to section '■'< t (c) of the "Coal-mines Regulation Act." 
Previous to December, 1911, this mine might legally have been operated under a man with a 
third-class certificate, and since that date by a person holding a second-class certificate. Mr. 
Browitt's certificate thus qualified him to perform all the duties at this mine, and no other 
certificated persons were required, provided Mr. Browitt had personally made the examinations 
required by General Rules -4 and 5 of the "Coal-mines Regulation Act." 

It would appeal' from the evidence given at the inquest, and from the tireboss's report-books 
of inspection kept at the mine, that Mr. Browitt had not personally made these examinations, 
but had delegated these duties to Henry J. Grimes, who was one of the victims of the explosion, 
and who was not the holder of a certificate of competency, under the "Coal-mines Regulation 
Act," entitling him to perform such duties. 

From November 10th, 1910, until the explosion, Henry J. Grimes had acted in the 
capacity of Sreboss, entering his reports daily in the book kept at the mine for that purpose. 

These reports were made regularly, with the exception of from February 5th, 1912, to 
March 2nd, 1912. It would appear that the book used prior to February 5th was tilled on 
that date, and evidently a new one had not been furnished until March 2nd, 1912. However, 
from the evidence at the inquest, Grimes had made bis examinations and passed in the men 
each morning by verbal report. No report appears on the book for March 7th, the morning 
of the explosion, but evidence at the inquest showed that Grimes bad reported the No. 1 West 
level as dear-, this report being on a board at the entrance to No. 1 East level : the evidence 
further showed that when the men working in the No. 1 West level went to work. Clinics was 
still engaged in making his examination of No. 1 East level, the men of the East level 
remaining on the siding until he reported. 

The morning shift worked from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., and, from evidence given at the inquest, 
(! rimes usually went into the mine at 7 a.m., and between this time and 8 a.m., when the work 
started, be was supposed to examine "every working-place in the mine and the roadways 
leading thereto," in terms of General Rides I and 5. This, from my knowledge of the mine 
and the labour involved climbing the chutes, I believe could not be done in the time above stated. 






3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 227 



As already stated, only the main slope was worked on the afternoon shift, and after 
midnight no one worked in or about the mine, hence the fan was not operated from midnight 
until 7 a.m. This closing-down of the ventilating apparatus for from seven to eight hours 
previous to the principal shift going on, no doubt played an important part in the accumulation 
ci the gas in Nos. 13 and 14 chutes, where the explosion occurred. 

The ventilating-air came down the main slope and was split into two currents at No. 
1 East level ; one current ventilated the main slope and No. 1 West level, crossing the main 
slope by an overcast near the top of the slope to the East side counter-slope, where the fan was 
placed ; the other current ventilated the East level, travelling along the level to No. 14 chute, 
the last working-place on the level, thence it passed up No. 14 chute and down No. 13 chute. 
There being no crosscut between No. 1 3 chute and No. 1 2 chute, the air-current was carried 
from No. 1 3 chute to No. 1 2 chute by means of brattice-cloth on the main level ; it then 
Ascended No. 1 2 chute, descended No. 1 1 chute, and passed through a crosscut, about 40 feet 
above the level, to No. 10 chute; thence up No. 10 chute, down No. 9 chute, and through a 
crosscut to No. 8 chute, continuing up the even-numbered chutes and down the odd-numbered 
chutes, and through crosscuts near the bottom of each chute until it reached the East counter- 
slope, and thence to the fan. The bottoms of the counter-slope and chutes 1, 2, 3, and 4 had 
board and dirt stoppings just above the level, whilst the chutes being worked were closed at the 
bottom by brattice-cloth only, to permit the descent of coal in the chutes and the passing 
through of men and material, a mode of ventilation which permitted a great deal of leakage 
and impaired the ventilation necessary for the use of the inside, or development places. 
Through failure to drive a line of crosscuts from the counter-slope across the faces of the breasts, 
the advantages of ascensional ventilation were lost, and the difficult method was used of 
•dragging the lighter gases down through each of these breasts at an angle of 40 degrees. 

The failure of the manager to see this can only be attributed to the lack of a thorough 
knowledge of the workings of his mine, and especially to the lack of a mine-plan. 

As stated before, the plan of the mine had not been brought up to date since June, 1910, 
notwithstanding section 84 of the "Coal-mines Regulation Act," which provides for the plan 
being not more than three months from date. 

From the evidence given at the Coroner's inquest, it would appear that there was no fixed 
speed at which the fan should run, and while it was not conclusively proven that the fan was 
slowed down by the demands of the hoist for steam, it was admitted that there was not sufficient 
steam to run the hoist and the pump at the same time ; but we have the evidence of Harry Hogg, 
that he was instructed, on the morning of the explosion, to ask the engineer-in-charge to speed 
up the fan, and, as the engineer only started work at 7 a.m., it would be safe to assume that 
considerable time elapsed before sufficient steam was got up to drive the fan at its normal 
working-speed ; therefore the ventilatiug-current must have been a variable quantity. 

An examination of the fireboss's report-books shows that gas had been reported, on several 
occasions, at various points in the mine, and, from evidence obtained at the inquest, several men 
had been slightly burned by ignitions of gas. No notice of these accidents had been sent to 
the Inspectors or to the Department of Mines, as required by section 63 (a) of the " Coal-mines 
Regulation Act." While the mine was thus known to make gas, it did not make it in any 
large quantity, and the amount of ventilation available in the mine, if properly conducted, 
should have rendered this gas harmless. 

The mine was worked with open lights, only two (Wolf) safety-lamps being on the 
premises, and these being presumably used for examination purposes only. 



K 228 Report of the Minister of Mines. 19i:> 



As already stated, the fireboss's report-book contains no report for the morning of the- 
explosion, but, from the evidence of a survivor, Harry Hogg, rope rider, we learn tb.it 

Crimes passed in all the men on the Hast level except Pattie and Kallia ; these men worked 
in Nos. 13 and It chutes, anil were instructed by Fireboss •■rimes to wait and that lie would 

go in with them. This, together with the fact that the only two safety lamps iii the mine 

were, after the explosion, found hanging, one in No. 13 and one in No. 1 I. would indicate that, 
to the knowledge of Fireboss Grimes, gas was present in these chutes on the morning "i the 
explosion. This is further substantiated by the fact that for two weeks after the explosion 

these places contained considerable gas, and that with the ventilating-current available tin 
management had failed to move it. 

We also have from the evidence of .lames < reator, W ho w orked in the counter slope below 

No. 1 East level, that a few minutes before the explosion he had come from his working pi' 
to thi' siding on No. 1 East level, where he had seen Grimes, had asked him for a safety lamp 
and had been informed that they were both in use, but that he (Grimes) would get him one in 
about an hour ; showing that Grimes expected to have the gas out of Nos. 13 and 14 chutes by 

that time. 

There is no evidence of extreme force at anv point in the mine . tin fan a small dilapidated 

affair was ved about 25 feet : the overcast, a flimsy board one. situated about ! I down 

the main slope, was blown out ; and, at the siding on the entrance to No 1 Easl level, a loaded 

car and a man, John Hogg, were blown across the slope, the man's body being found - • \~> 

feet below No. 1 East level, while the car was found lot) feet below the same li ■..-! : the 
stoppings at bottoms of the counter-slope and the various chutes were all out, but whether 
they were blown down On to the level, or otherwise, is far from being clear, as these stoppings, 
built of 1-inch boards backed up with refuse, and being on a pitch of PI degrees, once moved in 
any direction, the material behind would slide to the level by the force of gravity. The level 

was thus re or less tilled with debris from the stoppings and tin- broken down centre pack 

walls in the various breasts. 

Those props, which through their location were not disturbed by material sliding down 
these chutes, were leaning towards the mouth of the level; the brattice clot h which conducted 
the air on the level from No. 13 to No. 12 chute was found on the level between chutes V 
1<I and 1 1 ; just inside of No. 1 2 chute, the lower portion of a sweater and a coal were found. 

while the upper portion of this sweater was found hanging on a prop at No. 13 chute: these 
evidences of force all pointed to the explosion having originated in Nov. 13 and 11 chutes. 

In the chutes above the level it was hard to determine the direction of forces, as some of 

these chutes were swept clear, but whether from the force of the explosi • by the downward 

rush of the material from the broken pack walls, is not quite clear, although the latter seems 

the more likely cause. The pack walls in Nos. 5 and li chutes were c pletely demolished for 

75 or Inn feet from the face. 

The bodies on the level were all found Hat. face down and with the head outward, except 

that of Kallia. who was crouched up on his knees, his hands over his head, but with his head 

outwards like the others. There can lie little doubt but that all four men found on the level 
bad moved after the explosion, as ,\ ideiiced b\ their bodies being found on top of the refuse 
winch had come down the chutes. Three of these four men. from evidence given at the 

inquest, had their noses broken, presumably in their rush to gel out having run into the chutes 

w liieii projected into the level ; all four were badly burned on the hands, arms. face. neck, and 

upper body, Pattie being more severely burned than the others. The body of Baxter, who 

worked in No. 7 chute, showed no evidence of burns; this body was found 75 feet from the 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 220 

bottom of the chute and about 100 feet from the face, where he had evidently been at work 
when the explosion occurred, as his cap, much torn, was found behind a prop at the face. 
A severe bruise was found on the side of his head, and his jaw was broken, he probably 
having been blown against the prop where his cap was found, the blow rendering him 
unconscious, when he fell down the chute to the point where his body was found. 

Hurd's body was found 12 feet from the face of No. 6 chute, the head in the crosscut and 
the feet projecting out towards the chute ; the body had been thrown with some force, having 
broken a small prop, which was bent around the body ; the left leg was broken, the bone 
protruding through the flesh ; three deep cuts, each about 1 inch long, on the left side of 
the face, and the body was badly burned down to the knees. A few feet farther down the 
chute his coat was found, and in the pocket was his watch, which had stopped at 9.51. The 
paper which had been wrapped around his lunch was hanging on a nail and was not burned, 
while the coat was severely singed. 

Hogg's body, as already stated, was found on the main slope, and was much broken up. 
His neck, collar-bone, and thigh and lower leg were broken ; there was a severe wound on the 
left arm and also on the back of the head ; the body was not so severely burned as the others. 

Baxter, Hurd, and Hogg were no doubt killed instantly. The doctor's evidence was that 
they all died from carbon-monoxide poisoning ; no tests of the blood had been made by the 
doctor. 

The level was quite wet ; especially was this so at the inner end, where the roof and sides 
were quite damp. Evidences of coking of dust were found on the level about 40 feet inside of 
No. 14 chute, in Nos. 13 and 14 chutes, and in No. 9 chute. 

Analysis of the dust from the level inside No. 14 chute was as follows : — 

(A.) 

Moisture 2.5%. 

V.C.M 13.0,, 

F.C 46 . 7 „ 

Ash 37.8 ,, 

100.0 „ 
Ratio V.C.M. to F.C 3.6 

The analysis of fine coal taken from the bottom of one of the chutes was : — 

Moisture 2 . 3 %. 

• V.C.M 28 . 2 „ 

F.C 48.1 n 

Ash 21.4,, 

100.0 „ 
Ratio V.C.M. to F.C 1 . 705 

The normal analysis of a piece of coal taken oil' the level was : — 

Moisture 1 • 4 %. 

V.C.M 31.9,, 

F.C 61.4,, 

Ash 5.3 „ 

100.0 „ 
Ratio V.C.M. to P.C 1.92 



K 230 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

Analyses of dust taken from Nos. 13 and 14 chutes were as follows; 

(B.) 

No. 1. No. 2. 

Moisture 1.9% 2.2%. 

V.C.M 22.3 20.6 .. 

F.C 47.3 53.8 .i 

Ash 28.5 .i 23.4 ii 



100.0 n 100.0 ■• 

Ratio of V.C.M. to F.C 2.12 2.56 

Analysis of dust taken from No. 9 chute, 100 feet from the face, was as follows : 

(C.) 

Moisture 2.0 . 

V.C.M -11 'i 

F.C 58 . 6 H 

Ash 18.0 ., 

100.0 .1 
Ratio V.C.M. to F.C 2. 74 

The evidences of coking were not many nor severe; a little on the level, 10 feel inside 

No. 14 chute, which disappeared before reaching the face of the level: then in Nos. L3 and 1 1 
chutes, from a few feet above the level to the face. The most extensive evidence of '"Lin- 
was found in No. 9 chute about 100 feet from the face, and about a similar distance above the 
crosscut to No. 8 chute; just above the crosscut was found the Hist evidence of coke, at the top of 
the props ; in ascending the chute the coking kept coming down on the props until, about 100 
feet above the crosscut, there was evidence of coke from the roof to the floor. This condition 
continued for about 15 or 20 feet, when above that, the coking kept getting higher »n the props, 
and entirely disappeared about 50 feet from the face. This showed the meeting of two forces 
here, which halted the Maine long enough to cause the coking. 

At the face of this breast, the sandy shales overlying the coal had caved to the main 
sandstone, the cave being in a few large rocks which extended across the whole tare :;>i feet, 
and was probably 15 to 16 feet wide and from L'.o to 3 feet thick. 

On March (ith, the day before the explosion, the roof in this place was reported as 
sounding heavy ; but from the evidence of David Cook, who winked in No. 1" chute, but who 
was not in the mine on the day of the explosion, sufficient props had been sel to secure the 
roof before quitting-time that day. 

No evidence of coking was found from here on until the main slope was reached, at the 
mouth of No. 1 West level, where liarrv Hogg and Ralph Kilestro were burned. 

From my examination of the mine, the tracing of the line of forces in the mine, and the 
evidence obtained at the inquest. 1 am led to the conclusion that the explosion originated in 
Xos. 1 ,'i and 1 4 chutes. 

From the evidence taken at the tnquesi we learn that no powder of any kind was used in 
the mine except in the main slope, which was only worked on the afternoon shift. 

We also learn from the evidence of Harry Hogg thai Fireboss (Jrimes passed in all the 
men of the East level except Pattie and Kallia : these men he told to wait a minute or two 
and he would go in with them ; from this and the fact that the only two safety-lamps in the 

mine were afterwards found, one in No. 13 and one in No. 1 I chute, we may reasonably 
assume that there was an accumulation of Lias in these places that morning. Therefore, 
assuming gas in Nos. 1.'! and 14 chutes, we come to the theory of how and when it was ignited. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Mines. K 231 



The accumulation of gas in these chutes was no doubt due to the stoppage of the fan for 
seven or eight hours previous to the oncoming shift. It having been established already that 
Grimes knew of the presence of this gas, as also did Pattie and Kallia, they had evidently 
gone up the chutes to a point 8 or 10 feet above the level where the safety-lamps hung, and, 
finding it impossible to go farther, hung the lamps there and started to load coal, which must 
have been on the level from the previous day, each having loaded two cars of coal that 
morning. Fireboss Grimes had gone out the level and ordered the rope-rider, Harry Hogg, to 
tell the engineer to "speed up the fan," evidently to increase the ventilation. 

About fifteen minutes before the explosion the rope-rider passed No. 1 East level, on 
the way to No. 1 West level, and Pattie was on the siding calling for cars. Grimes told the 
rope-rider to hurry up and put an empty trip into No. 1 East. 

The fan having been speeded up, the increased ventilation had started to move the gas in 
Nos. 13 and 14 chutes ; this gas would be brought down No. 13 chute and travel behind the 
brattice to No. 1 2 chute. About this time Pattie had returned from the siding and, passing under 
the brattice at the bottom of his chute, No. 13, ignited the gas which had been set in motion 
by the increased air-current. From the fact that the safety-lamp was found up the chute after 
the explosion, and that Pattie had been out at the siding, it is reasonable to assume that he 
had his open light with him. There being little evidence of great force and very little damage 
to the mine, I would assume there was not a large body of gas, and what gas was there was at 
its least explosive point. It might be termed more of an ignition than an explosion, the 
(lame being augmented and supported wherever it found fresh coal-dust in suspension, as 
evidenced by the coking in No. 9 chute, where Templeton had loaded coal that morning, and 
inside No. 14 chute, where Kallia loaded coal; also at No. 1 West level, due no doubt to the 
fresh dust thrown into the air from the upsetting of the loaded car, which was thrown across 
the slope from No. 1 East level, and rolled 150 feet down the main slope. 

The evidence of coke on the props in the East level was due to the back-lash of the flame 
in the dead end of the level just inside No. 14 chute. 

The severe coking found in No. 9 chute can be explained as follows : The pressure on the 
level at the mouths of these two chutes being equal, the heated gases expanded into them, 
seeking relief ; that part going up No. 9 chute found relief at the crosscut to No 8 chute, thus 
decreasing the velocity at which it was travelling, and permitting that part which travelled up 
No. 10 chute, and which was augmented by the gases from No. 11, to travel faster, and 
rounded the face of the room, met the forces travelling up No. 9 side of the chute, and thus 
halted them sufficiently long to create the coking from roof to floor which exists here. 

Whilst no coking was found in Nos. 5 and 6 chutes, there were evidences of heat, as the 
body of Hurd was severely burned ; all over the face of this breast there was a heavy deposit 
of very fluffy dust, or perhaps it might more appropriately be called soot ; as already explained, 
the pack-wall in this breast was demolished for from 75 to 100 feet from the face, showing this 
explosion had here again been augmented by the dust in suspension in this place, Hurd having 
loaded coal that morning. 

In his description of the explosion to the Coroner's jury, James Ashworth seemed to 
attribute the accumulation of gas in Nos. 13 and 14 chutes to the cave in Nos. 9 and 10 
chutes, and which would, by contraction of the air-course, reduce the quantity of air passing 
in the mine. 

There is no direct evidence to prove that the cave occurred in Nos. 9 and 10 chutes before 
the explosion ; in fact, all the evidence we have tends to disprove such assumption. 

Harry Hogg, the rope-rider, testified that Grimes reported all places in the East level 
clear, except Nos. 13 and 14 chutes, and the fact that he went in with these men, and that 



K 2:52 Report of the Minister of Minks. 191:? 



the only two safety-lamps in the mine were, after the explosion occurred, found in these two 
places, and thai the explosion originated in these two chutes (which is concurred in by Mr. 
Ashworth), would go to show that the gas was already in these places when < rrimes examined 
and reported Nos. 9 and 10 chutes clear. Then, again, the absolutely clean condition of the 
rocks in this cave from dust, in contradistinction to the faces of other breasts, would also 
prove that the cave occurred after the explosion, and also that there was still sufficient area 
over the caved portion to carry all the air thai was in circulation in the mine. 

There is one other point — in which Mr. Ashworth dues not agree with me namely, that 
Pattie ignited the gas in No. l.'i chute. Mr. Ashworth seems to think that Pattie had not 
time to return from the siding at the mouth of No. 1 Last level after being seen thereby 
Harry Hogg, rope-rider, and therefore attributes the ignition to Kallia in No. 1 I chute. 

It makes no material difference in the theory as to whether this gas was ignited in the 
No. 13 side by Pattie, or on the No. 14 side of this chute by Kallia, which was to all practical 
purposes one and the same place. Nevertheless, the evidence as submitted at the inquesl does 
not substantiate the theory that Pattie had no time to return from the siding to No. 13 chute 
after being seen there by Harry Hogg. 

Hogg testifies that he passed No. 1 East level fifteen or 1 wenty minutes before the explosion, 
and then saw Grimes, fireboss ; Pattie, miner ; and his brother. John Hogg, pusher, on the 
siding. He did not see James Geator, nor did Geator see Harry Hogg, and yet < reator testified 
that he came up the slope 100 feet or more on a 10 degree pitch, and interviewed ( rrimes n the 
question of a safety-lamp for his place. Geator, on being informed he could not get a afetj 
lamp, returned down the slope, and had just commenced to put on his clothes when the 
explosion occurred. (leator testified that he did not sec Pattie on the siding, .so that Pat tic 
must have gone into his place previous to Geator's arrival there; yet, after his ((ieatoi i 
conversation with Grimes, Grimes reached No. 6 chute (225 feet from siding), where his body 
was found, which would certainly indicate that Pattie had ample time to reach No. 13 chute, 
which was only 225 feet farther in the level. 

Rescue-work. 

The work of rescuing those alive in the mine and the recovery of the bodies of those killed 
was begun as soon as practicable. 

The operations of the Diamond Vale Company being on a small scale, there was not any 

I Iraeger oxj gen apparatus, so a locomotive was requisitioned, and the 1 traeger apparatus of the 
Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company, Limited, and the Government Draeger apparatus were 

rushed to the mine as soon as possible, reaching there about forty or forty-live minutes after 
the explosion. 

When the rescue party reached the mine, all the men who had been working in the other 
parts of the mine, not affected by the explosion, had reached the surface. 

i harles Graham, David Brown, and Thomas Archibald, superintendent, overman, and 
fireboss respectively of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke C pany, Limited, donned the twe- 

liour helmets and went down tin- slope. In going down the slope, Brown fell and injured his 

apparatus, which he exchanged with Archibald, the latter returning to the surface with the 
injured apparatus. 

Graham and llrown proceeded into No. 1 Last level as far as No. S chute and discovered 

the bodies of Grimes and Templeton : they returned to the slope, and, finding the ventilation 

fair, they discarded their helmets and proceeded, with help, to bring out the bodies. Later 
on these men were assisted hy Andrew McKendrick. Robert P.l'owii, and Peter M\ er-. of 

the statf of the Nic..!a Valley Coal and Coke Company ; Andrew Bryden, superintendent of 



.3 Geo. 5 Inspection ok Mixes. K 233 



the Inland Coal and Coke Company ; Howell .John, superintendent of the Pacific Coast 
Colliery, Limited ; and many willing hands. Soon the bodies of the men on the level were 
taken out, and the more difficult work of ascending the chutes for the bodies of Baxter and 
Hurd was undertaken. This proved a very difficult task, with the chutes swept of props and 
with a slippery Moor, on a pitch of 40 degrees ; the task of ascending here, with the additional 
weight of the oxygen apparatus, proved too much for the party. 

Owing to the smallness of the mine and the close proximity of the base to the work, the 
half -hour apparatus was used, when, with its lighter weight, some progress was made, and a rope 
was made fast to a prop about 50 feet from the face of No. 5 chute. 

The remaining distance to the face proved too much for the majority of the part}', several 
heing overcome with the gases, and the party, being convinced no one could be alive in the 
chutes, retired for the night. The next morning the work was taken up again under the 
leadership of Superintendents Bryden and Graham, and, after a very trying day's work, the 
bodies of Hurd and Baxter were brought to the surface, about 5 p.m. the day following the 
explosion. 

Here, again, the lack of a plan of the mine proved a great hindrance to the rescue party, 
as, owing to the absence of the manager, Mr. Browitt, who was unable to report on the morning 
of the 8th, no one in the rescue party knew the mine. Having difficulty in getting ventilation, 
the party concluded that by putting a stopping in the crosscut between Nos. 5 and 4 chutes 
they would thus drive the air up to the upper crosscuts ; after spending some hours at this 
work, it was discovered that there were no crosscuts farther up the pitch, and the stopping had 
thus cut off the ventilation entirely from that section of the mine. 

Considering the difficulties encountered on the pitch and the lack of knowledge of the 
mine, great credit is due every member of the rescue party for the spirit displayed and the 
work accomplished. The fact that no oxygen apparatus was at hand immediately after the 
explosion was not responsible for the loss of any life, as I am of the opinion that had the party 
been all ready and fully equipped to enter the mine as soon as the explosion occurred, it 
could not have saved one life, as all the victims were undoubtedly dead in a very few 
moments. 

The general methods employed around the mine were not in accord with good mining 
practice ; the lack of a line of crosscuts across the face of the breasts off the East level ; the 
lack of a counter-level ; the practice of closing down the fan seven or eight hours in every 
twenty-four; the variable speed at which the fan was run, and the poorly conducted air, all 
point to this conclusion. 

These, together with the fact that the manager, who was the only person qualified to 
make the examinations under General Rules Nos. 4 and 5, had delegated these duties to 
another person who was not qualified so to act ; that lie failed to see that a bunk was furnished 
in which the above-appointed person might record his examinations, in terms of General 
Rules Nos. 4 and 5, all show a deplorable want of discipline and of general supervision in the 
management of the mine. 

In conclusion, let me say that the use of a few safety-lamps on the morning of the 
explosion would have prevented this disaster, and again we arc reminded of the danger 
attached to the use of mixed lights in a mine containing explosive gas ; 1 may add that the 
time is not far distant when every coal-mine, whether gaseous or non-gaseous, should and will 
be worked exclusively by safety-lamps. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Thomas Graham, 

Chief Inspector of Mines. 



K 234 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



1 
t 





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3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Metalliferous Mines. K 235 






INSPECTION OF METALLIFEROUS MINES. 

WEST KOOTENAY AND BOUNDARY DISTRICTS. 

Report by James McGregor, Inspector. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report as Inspector of Mines for West Kootenay 
District for the year 1912. 

Slocan District. 

The Slocan District continued to increase in importance during the year ; in addition to 
the several large development schemes which were launched last year, and which have been 
operated continuously during the year with encouraging results, several others of equal 
importance have been started this year. 

Most of these developing projects consist of large tunnels to cut the ledges at considerable 
depth ; some of them have attained great length and depth, with every prospect of becoming 
in the near future equally as valuable as the properties which operated with such success in 
the same localities some years ago ; in fact, some of the long tunnels are being bored with the 
intention of cutting the continuations of the old ledges. 

Upon inspection of the operating mines, I found them well ventilated and carefully 
timbered. The manner of handling of the small amount of powder necessary in this district 
has been discouraging, two serious accidents having occurred from unexploded powder, one 
from gelignite, and one from gelatine. 

It is difficult to become absolutely satisfied where the fault, if any, exists, as there are so 
many ways it can occur : I especially mention this knowing it will receive your consideration. 

Sheep Creek Camp, Ymir District. 

The shipping mines in this district remain the same in number as last year ; the developing 
of new properties is still very active, as is also the prospecting, with encouraging results, of 
new finds. 

I have invariably found, upon inspection, the mines in a safe and sanitary condition, well 
ventilated and timbered, and the thawing of explosives being done in conformity with the Act. 

Rossland Camp. 

The mines of this camp are the deepest in the Province, and, I may say, in the Dominion ; 
the Centre Star shaft is the deepest being 2,400 feet, others nearly equalling it. These great 
depths require powerful equipment in machinery, ropes, cages, or skips, which, I have always 
found upon inspection, are kept in good and safe condition. 

These mines are all timbered by what is known as the square-set system ; consequently a 
great quantity of timber is required, all of which is framed on the surface by machinery. Upon 
inspection, I have found great care exercised in placing the timbers in position underground. 

The hard nature of the ores and associated rocks in this district necessitate the use of large 
quantities of a very high explosive, and I have found, upon all occasions when making inspec- 
tions, especial care being exercised in the thawing, transportation, and handling of the explosive 
underground. 



K 236 Report of the Minister of Mixes. 1913 



The ventilation is good, all the operating mines I >t -i i i^r connected underground to each 
other in many places; the travelling-ways and ladder-ways I have always found in good 
condition, ami the Acl in every respect observed. 

Lardeau District. 

In this district there lias not been any increase in the number of shipping mines during 
the year; prospecting ami developing have been more active than usual, with every sign of 
becoming very prosperous in the near future. 

A [NSWOKTH I ►ISTBICT. 

The number of shipping mines in this district has greatly increased during the year, 
much activity prevailing, with the prospect for the future very bright. 

Upon inspection of the mines in operation in this district, some of them having been 

closed for years, I have found every care being taken in reopening them: the ventilation, 

timbering, and travelling-ways are in good, safe condition, and the Act in all other respects 

equally well observed. 

Xi:r.so\ I liSTEH t. 

There has been a marked improvement in this district during the year, by an increase in 
the number of shipping mines, also by much greater activity in developing and prospecting; 
altogether the future looks very bright for this locality. 

Upon inspection. T found the mines in a safe condition, the Inspection Act being care- 
fully observed in every respect. With regard to ventilation, timbering, and handling 
explosives, I found care being exercised. 

Ymik District. 

Development has been the principal work carried on in this district during the year; the 
number of shipping mines has not increased during the year, but very satisfactory results 
have been obtained from the development which has been in progress. 

Upon inspection of the mines which came under the "Metalliferous -Mine-- Inspection 
Act," I found them in a safe condition. 

Boundary District. 

The minis of tins district have been operated continuously during tin- year, most of them 
making an increased output. The system of mining that has been followed, known as the 

pillar and open-stope system, makes it possible to dispense with timbers in the stopes ; the 

large tonnage produced at the mines of this district necessitates the consumption of a great 

amount of powder for breaking th vs in such large quantities. 

Some idea of the system can be gathered when the average machine, drilling fourteen 
hours, in underground stopes during the twenty four hours, breaks on an average 11(1 tons a 
day. 

In the B.C. Copper Company Moth r Lock mine in this district a somewhat unique system 

has been adopted underground, where as many as 2,400 holes, averaging II feet in depth. 
requiring aboul II tons of powder to charge them, have been blasted at one time. These 

blasts re ved all the pillars, bridges, and sill Boors between the HU foot level and the 

level, breaking as much as 17"), 000 tons of ore at one blast. 

Upon inspection, I have found the mines of this district in a fairly safe condition, the 
Act being conformed with in every re-; 

Appended will be found a list of the accidents which occurred during the year in this 
district. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Metalliferous Mines. K 237 

EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Evan Evans, Inspector. 

The only metalliferous mines in this district being actually worked during the past year 
were the St. Eugene and Sullivan, both operated by the Consolidated Mining and Smelting 
Company of Canada, with a small force employed at the Society Girl. 

Fortunately no accidents occurred in these mines during the past year, so Mr. Evans has. 
not made any report. 



SIMILKAMEEN INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Report of Robert Strachan, Inspector. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report, as Inspector of Metalliferous Mines for 
the Similkameen District, for the year ending 1912. 

The only metalliferous mine in this district in operation during the present year was the 
Nickel Plate, belonging to the Hedley Gold Mining Company, Limited, Hedley, B.C. The 
mine is situated almost at the top of the Nickel Plate mountain, about 4,000 feet above the 
i iwn of Hedley, where the mill is situated. G. P. Jones, general manager ; Wm. Sampson, 
mine manager ; Wallis Knowles, engineer. 

The ore is gold-bearing and is mined by a "pillar and chamber" system, commencing 
on the foot-wall and working upwards, using the broken ore as a floor for the miners t<> 
stand on. 

The rock is so strong that timber is rarely used, except in the tunnel entrances, and 
chambers as large as 260 feet wide, 400 feet long, and 30 feet high, without any support, are 
sometimes to be seen. 

In leaving the roof of these chambers, great care is taken to bar or blast down all the 
loose rock, and it certainly indicates with what thoroughness this is done that we have so few 
accidents to report from falls of roof. 

The property has been developed by tunnels driven through the country-rock until they 
reach the ore-body ; No. 4 tunnel is the lowest of these, and all the ore below this is expected 
to be reached by winzes from this level, the ore being drawn from the chutes and hoisted to an 
ore-bin at No. 4 level. 

The ore from this bin and from the pillars above is loaded into small ears holding 2 tons; 
these cars, in trips of ten, are drawn by electric motor to the ore-bin at the top of the gravity- 
tramway. 

This gravity-tram is operated in two stages; in the first stage, the ore, which is loaded 
into skips carrying 5 tons, is lowered down 4,000 feel ; during part of this distance an auxiliary 
compressed-air locomotive assists the loaded skip. At the Central station the skip is trans- 
ferred by means of a fast rope, the empty from the lower tramway being held by this fas! rope, 
while the lower tramway rope is fastened to the loaded skip ; the top tramway rope is then 
taken oft' and fastened to the empty skip, which continues its journey to the top, the loaded 
skip proceeding to the bottom. An automatic dumping arrangement permits of the skip 
unloading into an ore-bin, from which the ore is taken as required for the mill. 



K 238 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



The incline has a three-rail track with a passing in the centre, and is equipped with both 
electric hells and telephone. In running the incline, by an ingenious arrangement of weights, 
the engineer takes the brakes off to allow the tram to run : should an accident arise to the 
engineer or should he neglect his duty, the breaks immediately take effect and stop the skip. 

All the ore mined goes to. the mill ; there is practically no waste, and no sorting is done 
either at the mine or the mill ; the average daily output is about 200 tons, and, by a judicious 
mixing of different grades, the average value is kept fairly constant, which allows of the treat 
ment of much Low-grade ore, which it would be unprofitable to treat alone 

The power plant, which is operated by water during the greater part of the year, is ids., 
fitted so that steam can be used when required, and consists of one 360-kw. 2,200-volt 
Westinghouse generator driven by a 400-horse-power IVIton-typc water-wheel; a 500 horse 
power Goldie-McCulloch Corliss condensing-engine, so placed that it can operate the generator 
in the event of the water-power failing. 

One two-stage, cross-compound, steam-condensing Corliss-gear Kami compressor, capacity 
about 3,000 cubic feel of free air a minute, compressed to 1-5 lb. : this compressor is also 
provided with a 26-foot Pelton water-wheel, and only uses steam when the water fails. 

As an auxiliary is a 100-kw. generator driven by a water-wheel for Lighting purposes ; also 
an 18- x 24-inch straight-line Rand compressor. The boiler plant consists of three 15o horse 
power, two 100-horse-power return-tubular boilers, and one 100-horse-power Mumford boiler 
used for heating purposes at 10 H>. pressure. 

During my inspection of this mine T have always found the " Inspection of Metalliferous 
Mines Act'' being strictly complied with, and it seems to me that great care is taken to 
protect the workmen. 

Special rules are provided, in addition to the Mines Act, and these rules must be read 
before a workman is engaged. 

In spite of all precautions, 1 regret to have to report three accidents, two of which were 
fatal; the first accident, causing the death of two miners, was reported to James McUreLtor, 
Inspector of Mines, Nelson, who at that time covered this district. The second occurred to a 
drill-helper wlio was descending the slope; he left the side where a handrail was provided and. 
in crossing over, slipped on the ice and rolled down the slope, receiving serious injuries. The 
third accident was the result of the use of explosives, and had the special rules Keen carried 
.out the accident should not have occurred. 

A list of these accidents is attached. 



COAST INSPECTION' DISTRICT. 
Thomas Morgan and John Newton, Inspectors. 

The only metalliferous mines of any size being worked in the Coast Inspection District 
are the Britannia, on Howe Sound, employing upward of Too nun ,md mining 193,000 tons 
of ore a year; the Marble Bay, employing seventy men and mining 17,870 tons of ore; and 
the Little Billie, employing twenty-two men and mining 1,970 tons of ore. 

From none of these has any accident been reported this past year, the only accident 
reported by Mr. Newton being a slight accident to a timberman in the Reliance Minim; 
Company's property at Yananda, Texada island. 



3 Geo. 5 Inspection of Metalliferous Mines K 239 

Report of Thomas Morgan. 

I have the honour to submit my report of the metalliferous mines in my district during 
the year 1912. 

i[arble Bay Mine, Te.rada Island. — This mine is operated by the Taeoma Steel Company. 
The shaft is sunk 1,350 feet, with levels turned oft' at regular intervals, and all the levels are 
connected by a downcast slope, making a good ventilation. A good supply of fresh air is 
circulating through this mine, caused bv all the slopes being connected from the surface to the 
bottom of the shaft. This slope has a good ladder-way protected by handrails. The bottom 
level in this mine is called the 1,350-foot level, and is in operation with several more level 
workings. 

'Machinery installed : Two boilers, 100 and 85 horse-power; one Canadian Rand 
compressor, 10-drill ; five Lidgerwood hoists, three below and two on top; one electric 
7-kw. dynamo. 

Little Billie Mine, Texada Island. — This shaft is down 170 feet. A good ventilation is 
circulating all through the workings. There is a good ladder-way, well protected. The mine 
was in good condition. Two levels were turned <>rl' from the bottom of the shaft, East and 
West. There w-as only the West level working when I was there. Fogle, superintendent. 

Britannia Mine. — This mine is situated up Howe Sound, but twenty-eight miles from 
Vancouver. It is four miles up the mountain from Britannia Beach, at an altitude of 4,200 
feet above the sea-level. 

The ore is brought down to the Beach by an aerial tramway for four miles to the crusher 
at the Beach. When I last visited this mine I found the condition good, and well timbered 
where it was necessary. The ventilation was good, caused by open portals being connected 
with the open surface. A good ladder-way is connected from the lower level to the tup level. 
All the ore runs down one large chute from the top level to the bottom, and is hauled out by 
a 3-ton electric motor to the tramway bins, and from there conveyed to the beach by the 
aerial tramway. There are six levels in operation and quite a lot of men employed. 

Machinery installed : One Canadian Rand stage compressor, 2,400 cubic feet capacity, 
driven by a Pelton wheel ; two 200-kw. A.C. generators, 6,600 volts, driven by a Pelton wheel ; 
two No. 6 Champion crushers, conveyor-belts, etc., driven by electric motor ; 6 x 6 hoist, 
double-cylinder, driven by compressed air ; one continuous-cable haulage system, driven by 
electric motor; one timber-elevator, 6x6, double cylinder; also an 8-inch air-line conveying 
the compressed air from the Beach to the mine, a distance of four miles. J. W. I). Moodie, 
general manager, and Wm. A. Wvllie, mine manager. 



K 240 



Report of the Minister ok Minks. 



19! 3 



LIST OF ACCIDENTS IN METALLIFEROUS MINKS, 1912. 
Report by James McGregor, Inspector, West Kootenay. 



No. 


Mine. 


Date. 


Name. 


t Occupation. 


1 >i tails. 


1 


Granby, Phoenix 


Jan. 


27 


Tim Baldwin. . 


Mucker- 

| boss 


killed mi Burface bj allowing muck 
to drag him into chute. 


2 


Josie, Rossland 


Feb. 


1 


J. Stefanich. . . 


Cage-tender. 


Killed in shaft by cage. 


3 

4 


Granby, Phoenix 

Rawhide, Phoenix 


Feb. 
Feb. 


7 
29 


S. 11. ( 'uniiiiin 
[get- 
Edward 

[Julsrud 


Miner 

Chuteman. . . 


Killed by falling into ore-poi kel 

Foot crushed on surface dump by 

car, necessitating amputation. 


5 
6 


l'lue Bull, Ainsworth. . . 


Apr. 


2 
16 


Manns 

| M< Shane 
Steve Aline li! 


Miner 


Suffocated by powder-gas in a raise 

Hilled by falling from bench into 
chute. 


- 






~ 






Foot crushed by falling rock in ■• 

Exploded powder in muck while pick- 
ing; eyes severely injured. 


8 


Lucky Jim, Slocaii 


Sep. 


s 


Isaac LauriUa. 


• 


9 


Lucky Jim, Slocan 


Sep. 


8 Alex. Norquist 


„ ... 


Slightly injured in same accident. 


10 


I'.i\ ue, Slocan 


Oct. 


17 


<:. W. Clark. . 


Foreman. . 


Exploded powder in muck while pick- 
ing : losl oni eye and injured. 


11 


Payne, Slocan. . . ... 


Oct. 


17 Einil Johnston. 


Shoveller . . . 


Same accident, injured about face and 
eyes. 


12 


Payne, Slocan 


Oct. 


17 Mike Mai lick. . 




■ i idenl slightly injured about 
face. 


13 


No, 1 . Ainsworth .... 


Oct. 


I!' 


James Currie. 


Miner . .. 


Drilled into a hole which had 
blasted, and exploded same; powdei 
still contained therein. 


14 


No. 1 , Ainsworth . . . . 


Oct. 


19 


1 'at nek 

|Mci iei hiii 










and e\ es. 


15 


Molly ( iibson 


Oct. 


20 


: us 

[Satermoen 




Right ankle broken when he jumpel 

from ladder. 



Repori n\ Robert Strachan, [nspector, Similkameen District. 



16 


Nickel Plate, 


i Isoyoos 
[M.D. 


Jan. 


18 


A. McAllister. 


Miner 


1'ieked into missed hole, which 
ploded and killed him. 


17 
18 


Nickel Plate, 
Nickel Plate, 


( lsi.\ i H is 

\l D 
( Isoyoos 

[M.D. 
( Isoyoos 

[M.D. 


Jan. 
May 


is 
14 


Urn. ( toward. . 
J, ll.u dman 


rer. . . - 


Killed in same accident. 

Fell down slope; seriously injured. 


19 


Nickel Plate, 


Jul\ 


13 


.1. Roddick. . . . 


i 


Returned to pi . ,-, and n .- 
killed by blast. 



Report bi John Newton, Enspei tor. 



20 Reliam e June '■> A. McPhi 



Timberman. . Slightly injured on forehead. 



3 Geo. 5 



Inspection of-Metalliferous Mines. 



K 241 



Tabulated List of Accidents in Metalliferous Mines, 1912. 



A 

B 

C 
D 

E 
F 

a 

H 

I 
J 

K 
L 
M 



Cause of Accident. 



Blasting . 

Defective powder 

Drilling into old holes containing powder . . 

Powder in muck 

Shafts and cages, accidents connected with . 

Falling down shafts or winzes . 

Falling down chutes 

Mine-cars 

Rock falling in stopes, levels, etc 

Rock falling down chutes or openings 

Timbering 

Miscellaneous, underground . . 

Miscellaneous, surface 

Totals 



Extent of In. 


tTRY. 


Fatal. 


Serious. 


Slight. 


1 






2 


1 


1 




2 


3 


1 


1 




2 




1 

1 


1 


1 




1 


1 




8 


6 


6 



Total. 



1 

1 
2 
o 

20 



Accidents for each 100,000 tons ore mined . 
Accidents for each 1,000 men employed . . . 



0.296 


0.222 


0.222 


2.10 


1.58 


1.5S 



0.740 
5.26 



16 



K 242 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



1913 



COAL-MINING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA. 



By Wm. Fleet Robertson, Provincial Mineralogist. 

The year 1912 proved to be, as far as statistics of production will show, one of the most 
successful in the history of coal-mining in the Province. 

During this year the total gross production of coal made in the Province was 3,ui'.").7"'.i 
tons (2,240 lb.) of coal, which is only some 113,526 tons short of that of 1910, which is still 
the " record year " in coal-mining. 

Had it not been for the labour troubles, occurring in the later months of 1912, at the 
mines of the Canadian Collieries on Vancouver Island, wherehv that company's output was 
reduced to a point 150,000 tons lower than the preceding year, there is little doubt but that 
1912 would have been the record year to date, instead of occupying, as it does, only second 
place ; vet, with the exception noted, it is greatly in advance of any other year. 

The total sales of coal made in 1912 was 2,230,565 tons (2,240 lb.), of which 1.L'<;:;.427 
tons was sold in Canada, practically British Columbia: 858,981 tons was exported to the 
United .States, including Alaska ; while 108,157 ton-, was exported to other countries. 

The coke sales of the Province for the year was 267,564 tons (2.240 lb.), of which 217,307 
tons was sold in British Columbia and 50,257 tons exported to the United States. 

The following table shows, for the past six years, the output and the per capita production 
of the various districts : — 



Year. 



1907 



1'ins 



1909 



1910 



1911 



191-2 



District. 



East Kootenay District 

Coast District 

Whole Province 



Gross Tons of 

Coal mined 
during Year. 



Easl Kootenay District 

Coast District 

Whole Province 

F.ast Kootenay District 

Coast District 

Wlmle Province 

East Kootenay District 

( east District 

Whole Province 

East Kootenay District 

('east District 

Whole Province 

East Kootenay District! 

Coast District 

Whole Province 



876,731 
1,342,877 

•-'.'J 19. BOS 

883,20.-, 
1,226,182 
2,109,387 

923,865 

l,47li. 73."> 
2,400,600 

1,365,119 

1.774,116 
3,139,235 

142,057 
1,865,661 
2,297,718 

1,261,212 

1.7H4. 497 
3,025,709 



T , lv Tons of Coal 

Total Jno. , 

r t, , mined per 

ot hmplovees .-, , r 
. r . ii- - Emplovee 

at Colherv. , ', ■ 

for l ear. 



2.290 

3.769 

6,059 

2,524 

3.549 
6,073 

2,427 

3,991 
6,418 

3. 1 1 1 
4.ti47 
7,758 

2,197 
4,676 
6,873 

2,410 

4,720 
7,130 



3S3 
356 

366 

350 

345 
347 

380 

370 
374 

439 
382 

41H 

•201 
397 
334 

523 

374 
424 



Tons of Coal 
Xumberof Men mined per 

employed Underground 
Underground. Employee 
for Year. 



1,527 
2,862 

4,389 

1,746 

L'.tist; 
4.432 

1.737 
2,976 
4,713 

2.374 
3,529 
5,903 

1,585 
3,627 

5.212 

1,780 
3,495 
5,275 



574 
469 
506 

506 
456 
476 

532 
496 
509 

575 
50-2 
532 

272 
511 
44o 

708 

504 

574 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 243 



While no figures can be given as to the actual cost of mining in the different fields, the 
per capita production of these fields is of interest, as having a bearing upon the working costs 
and as indicating the mining facilities existing and the improvement made in these conditions 
from year to year. 

It will be seen from the above table that the production per capita has steadily and 
materially increased during the past three years. This increased effectiveness of the labour 
employed is largely due to better methods, better equipment, and greater volume of output. 

The figures given for 1911 are the actual statistics for that year, but they are in a way 
misleading for comparison with other years as regards the per capita production of the whole 
Province and of the East Kootenay field, since during that year the collieries of this latter 
field closed for eight months owing to labour troubles, while in the Coast District they represent 
a full year's work. 

In the Coast District the effectiveness of the employee, both total and underground, has 
not altered very materially in the last three years, and is considerably lower than in the East 
Kootenay District. 

In the East Kootenay field the effectiveness of the total employees has increased from 439 
tons in 1910 to 523 tons in 1912, while the per capita output of the underground employee 
has similarly increased from 575 tons to 708 tons, a very remarkable and encouraging 
improvement. 

The coalfields of the Province which are at present producing may be divided into two 
main divisions — those of the East Kootenay District and those of the Coast District. 

These fields from their geographic positions — the one at the extreme eastern boundary 
of the Province, and the other at the extreme western edge — are in no way competitors in the 
market, their markets being quite separate and ruled by completely different conditions. 

The market of the East Kootenay field is provided primarily by the railways of the 
south-eastern part of the Province and of the northern parts of the adjoining States of 
Montana and Washington, approximately two-thirds of the coal sold as such being exported 
to those States, while the other third went to supply the demands of the south-eastern part of 
the Province — its domestic needs, its railways, steamboats, mines, and smelters. 

Coke, a product of the coal-mines, is sold in the same markets, with the difference that 
the local consumption — chiefly by the smelters of Trail and the Boundary District — takes over 
80 per cent, of the product, while 20 per cent, is exported to the States mentioned. 

As regards the marketing conditions in this field, the East Kootenay collieries are, 
however, brought into direct competition with the collieries of Alberta just over the Provincial 
boundary-line, all these collieries being in the same coalfield, with practically the same grade 
of coal and working under similar conditions. 

This competition has kept the price obtainable for coal at from $2.25 to $2.50 a ton, with 
little probability of any material increase in price, owing to the facility with which new 
collieries can be opened up and the very large reserve areas of coal limits in that district ; a 
description of these reserves was given in the Report of this Bureau for the year 1909. 

The Coast District may be subdivided into two fields — the Nicola-Princeton field and the 
Vancouver Island field — in which the markets differ considerably. 

In the former field the consumption is chiefly by the local railways, while a small amount 
finds its way to Vancouver, even under the handicap of what seems to be an excessively high 
freight charge. 



K 244 Report of the Minister of Mines. L913 

The Vancouver Island coal market is provided by the domestic and manufacturing 

requirements of the Coast cities, and of the ocean-going steamers calling at these ports. 

The demand for coal from the larger coasting steamers and from the railways has in the 
past couple of years diminished, as the Canadian Pacific Railway main line engines are nearly 
all burning California crude oil, and a huge coasting steamer burning coal is now an 
exception. 

Notwithstanding the heavy consumption of crude oil, the coal sales have remained about 
constant, approximately 70 per cent, of the coal sold being tor use in British Columbia, 20 
per cent, exported to the United States, and 10 per cent, to other countries, chiefly Mexico. 

In the Coast District the demand for export coal has been so great and constant, 
particularly on the seaboard, and the prices obtainable so satisfactory to the shippers, th.it 
it has permitted of the domestic price being kept at a figure so high as to admit of the 
importation from California of fuel oil as a competitive fuel, where conditions permit of 
its use. 

It would appear, therefore, that the present price of coal on the seaboard, of from $4 to 
$ L.50 a ton f.o.b., it is not liable to decrease for some time. 

As in former years, the greater proportion of this product was made by three larger 
companies — the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, with two collieries in East Kootenay, and 
by the Western Fuel Company, of Nanaimo, and the Canadian Collieries, Limited, formerly 
the Wellington Colliery Company, these last two operating on Vancouver Island. 

In addition to these larger shippers, vi-rv appreciable shipments have been made by the 
Hosmer Mines, Limited, and the Corbin Coal and Coke Company, in East ELootenay : by the 

Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company, the Dian I Vale Collieries, and the Inland I 

ami Coke Company, all of the Nicola Valley; by the Princeton Coal and Land Company, of 
Princeton; and by the Pacific Coast Coal Mines. Limited, and Vancouver A: Nanaimo Coal 
Mining Company, both operating on Vancouver Island, near Nanai 

The details of the shipments made by each of these companies will be found in reports 
of the Inspectors of the various districts. 

During the year 1912 about 56.65 per cent, of the coal, sold as such, by the collieries of 
the Province was consumed in British Columbia: about :1 s . 51 per cent, was exported to the 
United States, including Alaska ; and L84 percent, was exported to other countries, chiefly 

to Mexico. Of the coke sold, about 81.23 per cent, was consumed ill British Columbia, and 
the remaining IS. 77 per cent, was exported to the Tinted States. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 245 



The distribution of this output of coal and coke is shown in the following table : — 
Coal and Coke produced, exported, etc., by Province during Year 1912. 



Sai.ks and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 11).) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




1,263,427 
858,981 
108,157 




217,307 
50,257 














2,230,565 












267,564 




175,744 
396,905 
240,304 














u under colliery boilers, etc 




91 




812,953 
3,043,518 










91 




66,380 
48,571 






267,655 




7,510 

4,188 








17,809 








3,322 












3,025,709 




264,333 



Coal (used as such) 2,628,804 tons = $9,200,814. Coke, 264,333 tons = §1,585,998. 
Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 

310 
2,503 

.-,67 

1,593 

1,197 

221 

55 

62 

85 

537 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 




199 

2,503 

567 

926 

610 

147 

55 

46 

8S 

137 




Ill 










Miners' helpers 












667 

587 

74 




























16 
















400 


















1,855 




7,130 




Totals . . 


5,275 

















COLLIERIES OF THE COAST DISTRICT. 

The gross output of the Coast collieries, including the Nicola valley, for the year 1912 
was 1,764,497 tons (of 2,240 ft.) of coal actually mined, while some 16,894 tons was taken from 
"stock," making the actual consumption of coal 1,781,391 tons. 



K 246 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



Of this gross consumption, 1,447,747 tons was sold as coal, 157,900 tons was consumed 
by the producing companies as fuel, and 175,744 tons was lost in washing ; no coal was used 
in making coke. Although no coke was produced, 4,266 was taken from stock and sold. 

Formerly, in 1902, the Coast collieries exported to the United States 75 per cent, of their 
coal ; in 1910 they exported there only 24.5 per cent, of their product, 71.3 per cent, of the 
output being consumed in Canada. In 1911, 76.1 per cent, of the coal sold \v;is for consump- 
tion in Canada, 21.6 per cent, was exported to the United States, and 2.3 per cent, to other 
countries. 

In 1912, 71.25 per cent, was sold for consumption in Canada, 21.25 per cent, exported to 
the United States, and 7.47 per cent, to other countries. 

The following table gives an aggregate summary of the output of the Coast collieries for 
the year 1912' and shows the dispositions made of such product : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tous of 2,2401b.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




1,032,351 
307,239 
108,157 




4,266 
















1,447,747 












4,266 




175,744 














157,900 










333,644 














64,564 
47,670 


6,636 

2,370 






1,781,391 








16,894 








4,266 












1,764,497 













Number op Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 




131 

1,626 

412 

707 




77 




208 
1,626 

412 
1 ,0.50 

511 

174 
55 
62 
85 

537 

4,720 
























343 

337 

52 








174 






Boys 12-2 










55 

46 

85 

137 












16 


















400 
1,225 













Totals 1 3.495 



















3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 247 



The following tables show the output of coal, and the disposition made of it, in the 
subdivisions of the Coast District : — 

Coal-output, etc., 1912, Vancouver Island Sub-District. 



Sales and Output tor Yeas. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of •2,240 It.. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


846,098 
303,673 
108,157 
























1,257,928 












Lost in washing 


171,733 














145,389 










317,122 
1,575,050 














63,949 
47,139 
















16,810 






















1,558,240 













Coal-output, etc., 1912, Nicola-Princeton, Sub-District. 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 ft. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


186,253 
3,566 


























189,819 














4,011 








12,511 








16,522 














615 
531 








206,341 










84 






















206,257 













K 248 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1918 



COLLIERIES OF THE EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 

The gross output of the collieries of the East Kootenay District for the year L912 was 
1,261,212 tons (2,240 it).) of coal actually mined, which, with 915 tons taken from stuck, made 
the actual consumption of coal 1,262,127 tons. Of this gross consumption of coal, 782,818 
tons was si ili 1 as coal, 82,404 ton-, was consumed as fuel by the producing companies, while 
396,905 tons was converted into coke, producing 264,333 tons, of which 91 tuns was used 
under the companies' boilers, while 944 tons was added to stuck, making the coke sales for 
the vear 263,389 tons. 

The East Kootenay collieries exported to the United States about 70.5 per cent, of tin- 
coal sold and about li. 1 per cent, of the coke. 

The following table gives an aggregate summary of the output of the East Kootenay 

collieries for the year 1912, and shows the dispositions made of such product : — 



Sales and Output for 5 


< k>AL. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,2401b.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




231,076 
5.-.1.74-2 




213,041 
50,257 


















782,818 










263,298 




39ii,! 105 
82,404 








91 






479,309 








874 
1,818 


91 




1,816 

901 




Stocks on hand first of year 

a last of year 


1,262,127 


263,389 






+915 










•944 




1.261,212 


264,333 











Ximukk of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above 


' ND. 


Totals, 


( II CRACTER OF L U'.oru. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


A\. rage 
YV 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Avei . 
Dailj 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


CS 

S77 
155 
219 
436 
25 


% 


34 


§ 


102 

s77 
1 55 
543 
686 

17 























324 
250 

■>■> 


















































1.7S0 




631 ) 




2.410 

























3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining- K 249 



COAL POTENTIALITIES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

In addition to the coal-mines actually producing and whose outputs are included in the 
foregoing tables, there are a number of important fields which have not as yet reached the 
producing stage — some of these partly developed and equipped, and others only prospected. 

That these fields contain a large reserve of coal there is absolutely no doubt, and many of 
them will be developed and producing as soon as the market demands it and the transportation 
facilities can be provided. 

The great unworked and only partly developed coal-seams in the Rocky Mountains coal- 
field lying to the north of the field now being exploited was fully described by the writer in 
the 1909 Report, since when no great amount of development-work has been done. Very 
successful development has been going on in the Flathead valley. 

Near Princeton, in addition to the colliery of the Princeton Coal and Lmd Company, 
which shipped some 21,386 tons of very good lignitic coal, a new colliery has begun shipping — 
the United Empire — making a start this year by shipping 500 tons. 

In the same section the Columbia Coal and Coke Company has continued development all 
year with a force of seventy men, but has not as yet begun shipping. 

In the Nicola valley the Pacific Coast Coal and Coke Company has continued development 
with a small force, and, although not shipping, reports indicate that the development has been 
successful in proving seams of good coal. 

The coalfield of the Peace River valley is described elsewhere in the Report by Mr. 
( lalloway, which indicates that, although the seams are thin, the coal is of exceptionally good 
quality. 

The Groundhog coal field was visited by the writer during the summer, an account of 
which will be found on page 81 et seq. of this Report. The extent of the coalfield proved to 
be all that was claimed, but the quality of the seams as exposed in the openings seen in the 
southern end of the field was very disappointing. The field has only been tested in one part, 
and it seems quite probable that further prospecting will develop cleaner seams of coal ; the 
number and thickness of the seams is all that could be desired. 

The coalfields on the Bulkley, Telkwa, and Zymoetz rivers, near the line of Grand Trunk 
Pacific Railway east of Hazelton, have all been undergoing development, but it is as yet 
premature to say how important they may prove to be. 

On the southern end of Graham island, on Skidegate inlet, a colliery (the British Pacific) 
has been partly equipped, but so far the output has been unimportant. 

In the interior of Graham island to the east of the coal-outcrops at Camps Robertson and 
Wilson, systematic boring has been in progress all year, but without demonstrating workable 
coal. It would appear that the coal-measures had been laid down on a very uneven floor of 
igneous rock, many of the bosses of which were higher than the depth of the coal-deposit, so 
that they are now found protruding through ; it was on one of these bosses that the first bore- 
holes happened to be put down. The work is to be continued this year in other spots. 

Drilling has been going on in the northern part of the island near Masset, but no word lias 
been received of commercial coal-seams having been proved. 

But slight development has been done on the coal-area near Bear lake, in the Cariboo 
District. 



K 250 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

On Vancouver Island the coalfield on Quatsino sound has been undergoing development 
in a small way, with as yet no definite results. 

The large producing companies have all been quietly doing extensive development-work — 

the Canadian Collieries, near Campbell river and south of Cumberland, and it is underst 1 

much of this has been satisfactory, but details are not available for publication 

The Western Fuel Company has been engaged in opening a new shaft — the Reserve 
shaft — which will develop a new and very extensive seam of coal. Two shafts, each In x 26 
inside of timbers and 350 feet apart, are being sunk ; no expense or trouble which would tend 
to increase the safety or economy of future work is being spared in opening up this new 
colliery — a policy for which the present management has already acquired an enviable 
reputation. 

The Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Limited, has continued the development of its Suquaah 
Colliery, and has this year mined about 4,500 tons of coal 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 251 



INSPECTION OF COAL-MINES, 1912. 



VANCOUVER ISLAND AND COAST DISTRICT. 

This district, comprising as it does, the coalfields of Vancouver Island and the Coast, as 
well as those of the Nicola and Similkameen valleys, has been subdivided, for inspection 
purposes, into three Inspection Districts, each under the charge of a District Inspector, as 
follows : — 

NANAIMO INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Thomas Morgan, Inspector (Office, Nanaimo). 

The collieries operating and producing coal during the year in this Inspection District, 
including the new mines that have been started, were : — 

Nanaimo : The Western Fuel Company — No. 1 shaft, Protection shaft, and No. 4 shaft, 
Northfield mine, and sinking shafts at Reserve Colliery. 

Extension : The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited (formerly the Wellington 
Colliery Company) — Nos. 1, 2, and 3 mines, all worked from what is known as the No. 1 
tunnel, and No. 4 mine, worked by a shaft. 

Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Limited — Fiddick Colliery, South Wellington, Cranberry 
District, Nos. 1 and 2 slopes, and the new shafts at the Morden mine. 

Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Company, Limited — New East Wellington Colliery, 
Mountain District, Nanaimo, No. 1 slope. 

COMOX INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

John Newton, Inspector (Office, Nanaimo). 

The collieries operating and producing coal during the year in this Inspection District, 
including the new mines that have been started, were : — 

Cumberland : The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited — Nos. 4 and 7 slopes, and 
Nos. 5 and 6 shafts, and two new shafts at No. 8. 

Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Limited, Suquash Colliery, Nos. 1 and 2 slopes, and shaft. 

NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Robert Strachan, Inspector (Office, Merritt). 

The collieries operating during the year in this Inspection District, including the new 
mines, that have been started, were : — 

Nicola Valley : The Middlesboro Colliery of the Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company, 
Merritt — Nos. 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 mines. 

Inland Coal and Coke Syndicate, Merritt — One shaft and slopes. 

Diamond Vale Colliery Company, Merritt — No. 3 mine. 

Pacific Coast Colliery Company, Merritt — No. 1 slope and No. 1 shaft, adjoining the 
Middlesboro Colliery. 



K 252 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



Princeton : Princeton Coal and Land (' pany s Princeton Colliery. 

United Empire Mining Company — One adit tunnel. 

Coalmont : Columbia Coal and Coke Company, Limited developing only. 

I'lie headquarters of the Inspectors of both the Nanaimo and Comox Inspection Districts 
i-. at Nanaimo, which permits of one of the Inspectors being constantly at headquarters while 
the other is making inspections ; it also permits of the shifting of inspection duties bo that 
each Inspector knows both districts. 



NANAIMO INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Report op Thom\s Morgan, Inspector. 

1 have the honour to herewith submit my annual report for the collieries in my Inspection 

District for the year ending o 1 st December. l'.Ui', together with a list of all accident-- and the 
colliery returns. 

The Western Fuel Company. 

Head Office — San Francisco, Cal. 

Capital. $1,500,000. 
Officers. 
John L. Howard, President or Chairman, 
Jas. B. Smith, Vice-President or Vice-Chairman, 
D. C. Norcross, Secretary, 
Joseph L. Schmidt, Treasurer, 
Thomas R. Stockett, General Manager. 
Thomas McGuckie, Mine Manager, 
The above company has operated the following collieries at Nanaimo during the past 
year, viz.: No. 1 or Esplanade shaft, Nanaimo; Protection Island mine. No. 4 Northfield 
mine, and the Douglas slope. 

The following returns shou the combined output of all the company's mines for the past 
year :— 

Returns from Western Fuel Company's Mines for Year 1912. 



Address. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal. 
San Francisco, Cal 
Nanaimo, B.C. 
Nanaimo, C.C. 



Sales and Output for Year. 


1 "AI.. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lb.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


a export to United States 


241,331 
177,933 
92,846 






















512,110 






















• 687 










6S.t -" 
580,797 
















5,411 

1.411 
























4,000 
576,797 



































3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 253 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
W T age. 


Supervision and clerical assistance .... 


25 
435 

29 
451 

79 

52 




22 




47 
435 

29 
473 
161 

75 












Miners' helpers 












22 
82 
23 






Mechanics and skilled labour . 






























131 




131 




Indians 


























1,071 




280 




1.351 





No. 1 Shaft, Esplanade, Nanaimo. 

Thomas McGuckie, Manager ; John Hunt, Overman. 

No. 1 shaft mine of the Western Fuel Company is located on the south end of the 
Esplanade, in the city of Nanaimo. It has been in operation for thirty years past, and has 
many years of productive capacity ahead. The present operations are at a depth of 600 to 
1,200 feet below the surface, with a large portion of the workings under the sea. The 
hoisting-shaft is 18 feet in diameter and 640 feet deep, with an air-shaft 13 feet in diameter 
and the same depth. There is also a hoisting and ventilating shaft located on Protection 
island which has a depth of 650 feet, and also a hoisting and ventilating shaft on Newcastle 
island, 347 feet deep. Both of these shafts are connected with and are part of No. 1 mine. 
Mining is being carried on in both the Newcastle and Douglas seams. 

The company has one of the most modern rescue-stations on the Pacific slope, fully 
equipped with apparatus ; during the year sixty-three certificates of competency have been 
issued. 

Rescue Apparatus on Hand. — Four 2-hour Draeger apparatus, four 2-hour Proto apparatus. 
three 1-hour apparatus, twelve storage-tanks, one oxygen stretcher. In addition to this, the 
Government has stored in the company's station four 2-hour Draeger apparatus fitted up with 
1912 type helmet, four J -hour Draeger apparatus fitted up with 1912 type helmet, pulmotor, 
oxygen-tanks, electric lamps, and a fully equipped rescue device. 

A contract has been let by the Government, for the construction of a new rescue-station, 
which, when completed, will be the most modern and up-to-date rescue-station on the 
Pacific slope. 

Newcastle Seam. — This seam is operated from No. 1 North level and is penetrated at 
three different points — namely, Nob. 1, 2, and 3 slopes. These slopes are sunk to a length of 
3,000 feet and cover a large underground area. 

Xiis. 2 and 3 slopes are connected with one another, and No. 1 will be connected within 
two months, making one continuous face. No. 2 slope alone has over one mile of working- 
face, reaching from what is called the upper portion of the Big Incline section, below Protection 
shaft. Half of the output from these slopes comes from No. 2 slope. The coal varies from 3 
to 3i feet in thickness and is of a very hard nature. 



K. 254 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 

This seam is worked on the long-wall system ; mining-machines of the " pick quick " (or 
Bar machine) and puncher types are used and are well adapted to this scam. The Bar 
machine alone undercuts from 300 to 370 lineal feet, 6 feet deep in the eight hours. The 
haulage is done by electric motors of the trolley type. 

During the year the ventilation system of the north side has been greatly improved. The 
main haulage being entirely on the intake air. The ventilation in the long-wall workings has 
been greatly improved by driving an upcast shaft through tin- rock to the I' team, 

which greatly reduces the "drag " on the air. 

Protection Shaft. 

This shaft is used for lowering and hoisting all the men working on the north side of the 
No. 1 mine. A 2,500 cubic feet of air a minute compressor is installed for the purpose of 
supplying air for the cutting-machines and winches. The air is conveyed by a 7-inch air-line 
connecting with one of the same size from No. 1 shaft, making a complete circuit, so that if 
anything goes wrong with one compressor the mine does not suffer to any extent. 

Pillars are being extracted in this mine for the purpose of supplying fuel for generating 
power for the machinery on the surface. 

The ventilation of the mine is produced by a Guibal rope-driven force-fan, running se\ enty- 
t wo revolutions a minute and producing 90,000 cubic feet of air a minute, with a 1^-inch 
water-gauge ; size of fan, 9 x 18 feet, using 100 horse-power. 

There is also an emergency exhaust-fan situated at the Newcastle shaft, in ease of 
accident ; this fan is always ready for use. 

On my last inspection there was 70,000 cubic feet of air passing into this No. 1 level, 
divided into three splits. 

No. 1 Slope. — There was 14,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing in this slope for the 
use of fifty-six men and six mules, or an average of nearly 190 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. No explosive gas found. The timbering and roadways were in good order. 

Xo. 2 Slope. — There was 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this slope, di\ ided 
into two splits. 

North Side Split. — There was 12,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for 
the use of fifty men and eight mules, or an average of 162 cubic feet of air a minute for each 
unit employ ed. 

South Side Split. — There was 12,250 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for 
the use of fifty men and seven mules, or an average of 172 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. No explosive gas found in this slope. The timbering and roadways were in 
good order. 

.V... •-' Slope. — There was 15,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this slope for the 
use of thirty-seven men and six mules, or an average of 272 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. Xo explosive gas found. The timbering and roadways wire in good order. 

Douglas Seam. 

The workings on the Douglas seam forms the deepest workings of the No. 1 mine, and 
is reached by the Main and Diagonal slopes operated by main-and-tail ami endless-rope 
systems. 

During the past year the main and tail haulage was extended east a distance of 2.000 
feet, and a new haulage-way is under construction to further extend this .system northward to 
the Main slope, which will greatly increase the productive capacity of the south side and 
enable the present Diagonal slope to be used as the main return airway of the south side. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 255 



The portion of the main return airway paralleling the Main slope is being retimbered 
with steel "timbers" made of 56-lb. rails. If the experiment is successful, it will be continued 
so as to take in all the main air-courses. 

On the surface, a second Sirocco fan has been installed and is used alternately with the 
original Sirocco fan ; both are kept under steam so as to be ready for any emergency. These fans 
are 90 inches in diameter, of the double type, and are in every way modernly equipped for efficient 
work. The Protection head-frame was renewed by an entire new structure during the year. 

This mine worked 301 days during the year, producing 434,522 tons, all of which was 
produced on the single-shift system of operating. Approximately 43 per cent, of the produc- 
tion was from the Douglas seam and 57 per cent, from the Newcastle seam. 

The ventilation of this slope is produced by a Sirocco fan, rope-driven, ratio 3A to 1, size 
90 inches, running 250 revolutions, producing 195,000 cubic feet of air a minute, with a 
4-inch water-gauge ; 225 horse-power. 

When I made my last inspection there was 70,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing 
down the Diagonal slope, divided into three splits. 

No. 1 Split. — There was 13,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of twenty-five men and five horses, or an average of 325 cubic feet of air for the use of 
each unit employed. No explosive gas found. The timbering and roadways were in good order. 

No. 2 Split. — There was 13,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of thirty -seven men and five horses, or an average of 251 cubic feet of air a minute for 
each unit employed. No explosive gas found. The timbering and roadways were in good order. 

No. 3 Split. — There was 15,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of fifty-seven men and twelve horses, or an average of 161 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. No explosive gas was found. The timbering and roadways were in good condition. 

Certificated Officials, No. 1 Shaft. — T. McGuckie, manager ; J. Hunt and T. Jackson, 
overmen ; R. Adam, J. Stubbard, E. Courtenay, J. Weeks, W. Johnson, T. Miles, R. W. Morton, 
E. Frances, W. Neave, J. Graham, J. Hamilton, and G. Bradshaw, firemen ; J. Perry, J. Reid, 
J. Price, M. Woodburn, J. W. Jemson, D. John, J. Wallbank, and F. Green, shotlighters. 

The following are the official returns from the No. 1 shaft and Protection Island collieries 
for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Optput for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lt>.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


224,5X9 

100,399 

73,380 
























398,374 






















39,728 










39,728 














4,941 
1,3I>1 








438, 102 














3,580 






















434,522 











K 256 



Report of the Minister oe Mines. 



1913 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Dailj 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


A\ .-i . I'.''' 

Dailj 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


15 
262 

24 
305 

63 

38 


$ 

3.30 - 7.00 

2.86 
2.86 - 3.30 
2.86 - 3.57 
1.10 - 2.45 


13 


9 




28 
262 

24 
320 
121 

55 


.- 






15 

58 
17 


2.75 

3.IK) - 4.50 

.50 - 1.65 








Boys 












S3 


1.50 ■ 1.S8 


83 














707 















186 




803 











Mine worked 301 days during the year. 

NoRTHFIELD MlNE, NaNAIMO CoLLIERV. 

J. \Y. Montgomery, Manager. 

Thus. Reid, Overman; Wm. Roper, John Sullivan, Thos. Parkinson, George Farrow, Robert 

Russell, Jack White, Archie Mc Broom, -'as. Richard, anil Ld. Devlin, 
Firemen and Shotlighters. 

This mine has worked continuously during the year and is an importanl producer, as 
shown by the returns. The workings are in the Upper and Lower rims, and have good coal 
all over. The travelling road into the mine is by a slope from the surface, with an easy gradi . 
which is lighted nearly all the way down by electricity, as is also the slope. The hoisting i~ 
done through a shaft 60 feet deep, from the bottom of which a slope extends aboul a mile. 

passing under Exit passage and Newcastle island, to where the coal is being mined. Tin al 

is hauled up the slope by an endless-rope system to the shaft bottom, where LI is hoisted to 
the surface; the workings of this slope are designated Etightor Left levels; to the righ< of the 

slope there were Xos. 2 and 3 levels, lint now there is only No. •">. as No. L' level is finished : 

to the left, where there were Nds. •">, 1. 5, and (i levels, now there are only Nos. ■'•. I. and o ; 
these are all working at the present time. The mining in this Lower seam is all long-wall, 

and it also is in the top Upper seam. The coal is from 30 to Id inches thick in the Lower 
seam and from 5 to 7 feet thick in the Upper seam, and is of very g I quality. < >n my visit 

to the mine on December 2nd and 3rd, I found the conditions good, well timbered, and cogged. 

For the use of fifty live men and five mules in No. 3 Right level, there was 11.500 cubic 

of air a minute ; for the use of fifty two men and live mules in No. 3 1 1 1 1 level, there was 

10,000 cubic feet a minute; for the use of sixty-eighl men and eight mules in Nos. i and 5 

Left levels, there was 13,000 cubic hit a minute ; for the use of seventeen men and two nudes 
in the Top seam, there was 5,000 cubic feel a minute. Total air around the workings was 
:;'.!, .".()() culiie feet a minute; total air at the fan shaft in the return was 60,000 cubic feet a 

minute, leaving 20,500 cubic hit for leakage through doors, stoppings, and old worku 

Fan makes lln revolutions a minute, with a 2-inch water-gauge. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 257 



The following are the official returns of the Northfield Colliery for the year ending the 
31st December, 1912 :— 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 tt>. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




16,694 
77,534 
19,397 


























113,625 






















28,323 










28,323 














470 
50 








141,948 














420 




















Output of colliery for year 


141,528 





Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed . 

8 


Average 
Daily- 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Whites — Miners 


8 

156 

5 

141 

16 

14 


$ 





16 

156 

5 

147 

36 

20 


$ 


3 30 - 5.50 

2.86 
2.86 - 3.30 
2.86 - 3.57 
1.1(1 - 2.20 












6 
20 

6 


2.75 
3.00 - 4.00 
1.00 - 2.25 




Mechanics and skilled labour .... 




Boys 










38 


1.50 - 1.88 


38 


























Totals 


340 




78 




418 





Mine worked 300 days in the year. 

Douglas Mine of the Western Fuel Company. 
George Bradshaw, Manager ; John White, Fireman. 

This mine is a slope-opening in the Newcastle seam, and is located on Chase river, just 
south of the city of Nanaimo. It was started March 1st, 1911. This slope was down 1,700 
feet, and the counter-slope was down 1,G00 feet; size of the slope is 11 x 6 feet, and the 
counter-slope is the same. Motive power for ventilation is a fire-grate, but a fan of the 
Sirocco type has been installed, and is ready to start at any moment if necessary. The roof 
in this slope is good hard rock. The slopes are well timbered from the top to the bottom 
with sets. For the use of nine men, there was 11,760 cubic feet of air a minute going down 
the slope at the time of my inspection. 

IT 



K 258 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



The mine was worked in a small way during the first four months of the year, when it 
was temporarily abandoned. 

The following are the official returns from the Douglas mil f the Western Fuel 

Company for the year 1912 : — 



Sales am> Output: fob Year. 


Coal. 1 Iokje. 


(Tons of 2,240 1b.) 


Tons. 


Tons. Tons. 


Tons. 




18 














63 


in 
























036 






636 




















747 



















^ taken from ) ° J 










747 











Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Abo\ i: Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Laboi k. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em 

ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Nil era- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wag',-. 




17 


$ 


1 


$ 


3 

17 




4 50 
















5 


2.86- 3 30 


1 

4 


3.00-4.00 


i 

































10 


1.50 


10 














24 




115 




40 























Mine worked seventy-six days during January, February, and March, and during April 
was temporarily abandoned. 

I! ESEE\ i: Mink. 

This is a new shaft mine being opened by the Western Fuel Company in the Cranberry 
District near the centre of a 2,500-acre virgin coalfield in Nanaimo and Cranberry Districts, 
the main shaft being Located about 1,700 feet east of Nanaimo river. 

The first sod was turned in duly. L910. The mine is being opened by two shafts (Main 
and Auxiliary), which are to be Sunk to the Douglas seam, a depth of approximately I." )< >< > 

feet. The shafts are •">"> n feel apart and are rectangular in shape, each being 1" \ 26 I 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 259 



inside of timbers, and divided into three compartments, two hoisting and an air compartment 
10 x 10 feet. On December 31st, 1912, the Main shaft was down 820 feet and the Auxiliary 
shaft was down 528 feet ; if nothing interferes, it is expected the coal will be struck in the 
Main shaft early in March, 1913. 

Both shafts are being equipped on the most modern and approved system and are being 
sunk with the latest appliances, the shafts being lighted with electric lights and ventilated 
with small exhaust Sirocco fans direct-driven with upright engines. The temporary hoisting- 
engines have been replaced by modern hoisting-engines of Scotch make, equipped with Corliss 
valves and all the latest improvements for controlling the hoisting and preventing overwinding. 
The engine at the Main shaft has cylinders 30 x 60 inches and two drums 14 feet in diameter ; 
the engine at the Auxiliary shaft has cylinders 24 x 54 inches, with two drums 12 feet in 
diameter. Both engines are set in heavy concrete foundations and are enclosed in substantial 
and well-lighted iron-clad houses. The power-house contains a Canadian Rand compressor of 
2,500 cubic feet capacity, and provision has been made for a duplicate compressor when 
required. Two electric-lighting plants have also been installed, one of the steam-turbine type. 

The boiler-house contains two 84-inch x 16-foot return-tubular boilers of British Columbia 
manufacture, and provision has been made for installing four additional boilers of same type, 
two of which will be installed during March. 

The machine and blacksmith shop has been equipped with modern tools, and also a drill- 
sharpener for sharpening the drills used in shaft-sinking. 

An office and supply building has been erected, and later on a safety-lamp building will 
be erected. In addition to these buildings, there is a wash-house equipped with hot- and cold- 
water baths and showers and a dry-room and change-room for the use of the shaft-sinkers. 

Provision has been made for the installation of a double 90-inch Sirocco fan, the fan being 
now en route, and will be ready for use before the two shafts are connected underground. 

The permanent head-frames for both shafts and the tipple building, with yard-tracks, 
will be erected during the early spring and summer. 

The railway connecting this mine with the shipping wharves of the company on Nanaimo 
harbour is completed up Nanaimo river, at which point a two-span Howe-truss bridge is being 
erected and will be ready for use early in February. 

Both the surface and underground plans call for equipping and developing the mine on 
the most modern lines, and with an ultimate capacity of 1,500 to 2,000 tons a day. It is 
expected the production will be from 500 to 1,000 tons a day by the end of 1913, and the 
maximum capacity will .be reached during 1914. 



K 260 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd. 
Head Office — Victoria, B.C. 



Capital, $15,000,000. 

Officers. 
Sir William Mackenzie, President, 
A. D. McRae, Vice-President, 
R. P. Ormsby, Secretary, 
A. J. Mitchell, Treasurer, 
C. F. Compton, Asst. Secretary, 
W. L. Coulson, General Manager, 



Address. 
Toronto, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C. 
Toronto, Ont. 
I'm onto, Ont. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. 



The Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, during the year L911 acquired all the 
holdings of the Wellington Collieries Company, Limited, and has been operating the following 
mines during the past two years under the general management of W. L. Coulson : — 

The Extension Colliery, in the Cranberry District (Extension); J. H. Cunningham, 
manager. 

The Union Colliery, in Comox District; R. Henderson, J. H. McMillan, T. A. Spruston, 
managers at the several mines. 

Note. — This latter colliery is in the Inspection District of Inspector Newton, in whose 
report will be found a description of the property and the details of production. 

The following table shows the combined output of all this company's collieries during the 
past year : — 

Returns prom Canadian Collieries Mines foe Year 1912. 



Sales and Cttpct for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 ft.) 


Tons. 


Tuns. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




426,493 

102,818 

15,311 




4,266 












544,622 














4,266 




164,854 

.VI. 174 














219,028 














24,953 
2,872 






763,650 


6.636 
2,370 










22,081 










4,266 










741,569 


Nil. 











3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 261 



Number op Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 




47 




22 




69 

680 

319 

209 

193 

76 

55 

62 

85 

331 

2,079 




680 
319 








Miners' helpers 














149 

140 

17 














Boys 59 

Japanese miners | 55 










16 








85 
137 








Totals 




194 
538 












1.541 

















EXTENSION COLLIERY. 
J. H. Cunningham, Manager. 

The general supervision of all the mines of this colliery are entrusted to J. H. Cunningham, 
who has an overman in charge of each separate mine. 

No. 1 or Tunnel Mine. 

Robert Bonar, Overman ; Evan John, Wra, Gilchrist, John Davidson, 
David Morrison, and James Strang, Firemen and Shotlighters. 

Most of the mining done at this colliery is "pillar and stall " and the extraction of pillars. 
There is a little long- wall work in the 1st level, left of the slope, the work being all to the dip 
of the tunnel level. There are three levels to the right and to the left of the slope. I may 
say that I visited this mine every month and found all in good order, well timbered and 
cogged, and the ventilation good. This mine has not been worked since September 18th last, 
owing to labour trouble, but the firemen are in the mine all the time, and the fan is kept going 
right along. On my last inspection, when the men were in the mine, in September, there was 
15,000 cubic feet of air a minute going through the district for the use of forty-five men and 
four mules ; on December 18th there was 12,250 cubic feet going through to keep them clear ; 
the total air at the fan-shaft was 22,000 cubic feet, with a water-gauge of f inch. 

No. 2 Mine, Extension. 

Wm. James, Overman ; Hugh Fulton, David Davidson, Arthur Smith, Harry Mitchell, 

Samuel McLochlan, Wm. Simpson, Wm. Clifford, David Gordon, Wm. Bradley, 

Thos. Strang, Wm. Cosier, and James Nimmo, Firemen and Shotlighters. 

No. 1 District, or Old Slope. — This mine is entered by a rock tunnel about a mile long. 
There are two slopes in this mine sunk from the motor-road, by which the coal is gathered 
together to make a trip for the motor to take out of the tunnel to the tipple. The Old No. 2 
slope comes out on the hill above the tunnel, and the men and mules can go out that way if 



K 262 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



necessary. The ventilating-fan is on the hill near the slope over this airway. This No. 2 
slope goes down past the inside end of the tunnel to the basin of the coalfield from which the 
coal is being taken. The mining is done by pillar and stall and by extraction of pillars; there 
was also a little long-wall done in the mine when it was working, but the mine has not worked 
since September 18th ; a few men are working in No. 2 West level, oft" the Old slope, to take 
some coal out to feed the boilers for running the fan. On my visit to this mine on December 
1 7th, there was 8,400 cubic feet of air a minute for the use i if eight nun and one mule in No. 2 
West level ; at the mouth of the Old slope there was 16,000 cubic feet a minute K°i')g down : 
on the left side of the Old slope there was 14,000 cubic feet a minute goini; through to keep the 
mine clear. No work was going on. 

No. .3 District of No. 2 Mine, or No. 4 Motor Level, East District. — It is nearly all pillar- 
and-stall work in this district, with a little narrow work up No. 21 incline ; all the balanoe is 
long-wall. At present there is no work going on here, but the air is kept circulating around 
the workings. On December 17th there was 14,000 cubic feet a minute goint,' through the 
district; the total air at the fan-shaft was 80,000 cubic feet, with a 2-inch water-gauge. 

No. 3 Mine, Extension. 

David McKinnel, Overman; Jamas Glen, John Boss, Wm. Bauld, James Nelson, 

George Smith, John Barclay, Dan Campbell, ami Pat Malone, 

Firemen and Shotlighters. 

This mine is the continuation of No. 4 West level from the rock tunnel. The method of 
working in the mine is the pillar and stall and the extraction of pillars. All working to the 
rise of No. 4 level is extraction of pillars. There is a lot of pillar coal in this district, and 
the coal varies in thickness from about 5 to 12 feet. There are two connections upwards from 
this mine to the surface, from No 4 North level. The Old slope goes right through to tin- 
surface and is the airway to the fan. The ventilation was good all through the district. For 
the use of twenty-five men and three horses, there was 1(5,000 cubic feet a minute going 
through the High Line district ; there was 14,000 cubic feet a minute circulating for the use 
of forty-five men and six mules in the Slope district when the mine was working in September, 
but the mine has not worked since September 18th owing to labour trouble. The total air at 
the fan shaft was ")7,000 cubic feet, with a water-gauge of 1 : , ! inches. 

No. 4 Mine, Extension. 

Thos. Mills, Overman : John McMurtrie, Tom Mordy, Wm. Reid, James Glenn, 
and 1 >an Fagan, Firemen and Shotlighters. 

This mine has not been working since August 1st. when the company closed the mine 
down for some reason. The hoisting shaft is down 290 feet ; it used to be both downcast and 
upcast, but the upcast shaft has been finished and the fan moved to that shaft, which is now 
used for the upcast : it is 290 feet deep and is S \ l(i feet. This mine i- about one and one-half 
miles to the south from the Extension tunnel. It was extended quite a bit during the year, 
and was kept in good order all through. On my %isit to the mine on August 1st. I found the 

workings in g 1 order, well timbered all through, and the ventilation good. Pol the use of 

thirty-four men and three mules on the east side, then' was 12,000 cubic feet a minute; for 
the use of twenty-four men and one mule on the west side, there was 14,000 cubic feet a 
minute : for the slope, not working, there was 13,750 cubic feet a minute. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 263 



The following are the official returns of the Extension Colliery for the year ending the 
31st December, 1912 :— 



Sales and Output foe Ykar. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lb. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


.Sold for consumption in Canada 

/> export to United States 


157,473 
45,141 


















202,614 














.50.608 
13,918 














64,526 
267,140 












Stocks on hand first of year 


1,465 
91 










1,374 

265,766 



























Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 



Character of Labour. 



Supervision and clerical assistance .... 
Whites — Miners 

Miners' helpers 

Labourers 

Mechanics and skilled labour. 

Boys 

Japanese 

Chinese 

Indians 



Underground. 



No em- 

ployed. 



4 
375 

258 



15 
38 



Totals. 



698 



Average 
Daily 

Wage. 



4.00 - 6.00 
3.50 - 5.00 
2.75 - 3.30 



2.75 - 3.02 
1.10 - 2 20 



1.60 • 1.65 



Above Ground. 



Totals. 



No. em- 
ployed. 



14 



/ 

48 

5 

4 

86 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



No. em- 
ployed. 



3.50 ■ 6.00 



164 



2.75 - 3.02 
2.75 - 4 40 
1.10 - 2.20 

1.50 
1.35 - 1.75 



18 
375 

258 

63 

43 

4 

94 



Average 
Daily 
Wage. 



862 



Name of seams or pits — Wellington, Nos. 1, 2, 3, and 4. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same— One tunnel connecting 
Nos. 1, 2, and 3 mines : No. 4 shaft situated one mile south of the tunnel. 



Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Limited. 

Bead Office— Victoria, B.C. 

Capital, §2,000,000. 



Officers. 
C. C. Michener, President, 
Luther D. Wishart, Vice-President, 
J. F. Mosby, Secretary, 
G. R. Hughes, Treasurer, 
George Wilkinson, Superintendent, 

Value of plant, $424,226. 



Address. 
Victoria, B.C. 
New York. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Victoria, B.C. 
Nanaimo, B.C. 



K 264 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



This is a recently organized company and includes in its holdings the Fiddick Colliery of 
the former South Wellington Mines, Limited, and certain property at Suquasb, on the east 
coast of Vancouver Island, near Malcolm island, where the company lias, within the past two 
years, opened up a new colliery, which is now producing coal. The output of coal made by 
the company from these two collieries combined during the year 1912 is shown in the following 
table : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 It).) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tens. 


Tons. 




111,504 
6,992 


























118,496 














li.STli 
17,384 















24,263 

142,759 














33,185 

42,01.3 






„ last of year 

Difference added to stock during year 


8,830 
151,589 

















Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily Wage. 


No. era- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance . 


12 

112 

45 

43 

30 

9 




t 




19 

112 
45 
60 
66 
13 




















17 
36 


















4 
















50 




50 



























Totals 


251 


114 




365 















FIDDICK CoLLIEKY. SOUTH WELLINGTON. 

George Wilkinson, General Manager; Harry Devlin. Mine Manager. 

South Wellington Mine, Nos. 1 and - Slopes. 

This mine is situated about four miles south of Nanaimo, in Cranberry District, and is 
worked from two slopes. No. 1 on the Fiddick Estate and No. 2 on the Richardson Estate. 
No. 1 slope is now down 2,550 feet and No. 2 slope about 1,300 feet. Coal is being mined in 
No. 1 slope from Nos. 2 and 3 North levels, and from Nos. 1 and 2 South levels and No. 2 
North. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 265 



The method of working is pillar and stall, but in some places where the coal is thin it i^ 
mined on the long-wall system. The coal averages from 3 feet to 28 feet in thickness. The 
ventilation is produced by a Sheldon single entry reversible fan 9i feet in diameter, driven by 
a 9i x 14 steam-engine, direct-connected, and is capable of producing 85,000 cubic feet of air 
a minute, with a lj-inch water-gauge. 

The coal is hauled from the two slopes by a double-drum, friction haulage-engine. The 
slopes are electric-lighted, with a 16-candle power lamp every 25 feet. The coal from the two 
slopes is emptied into the same tipple, which is capable of handling 1,500 tons a day. The cars 
are dumped by a Phillips crossover dump. The tracks are so arranged that handling of the 
cars are nearly automatic, requiring very little labour. The power for the mine is generated 
by three 100-horse-power return-tubular boilers. 

The power-house contains one Canadian Rand straight-line air-compressor, capacity 480 
cubic feet of air a minute ; one Norwalk air-compressor, simple steam compound, with 
a capacity of 707 cubic feet of air a minute ; the first unit of a cross-compound Rand 
air-compressor, total capacity 21,000, present capacity 850 cubic feet a minute. These 
compressors furnish power for winches and pumps underground. The power-house also 
contains an electric unit, a 50-kw. generator A.C., with 25 horse-power D.C. exciter attached ; 
these are driven by a steam-engine 9x16 inches. 

In connection with the mine there is a large stable with accommodation for thirty horses ; 
all the horses are brought out of the mine at the end of each shift. 

At the mine there are fifteen dwelling-houses and a boarding-house, also offices, a store 
and supply-house. In connection with the mine there is seven miles of standard-gauge rail- 
road by which the coal is conveyed to Boat harbour, the shipping point. Two locomotives and 
thirty Hart-Otis 40-ton capacity and twenty-five hopper-bottomed 30-ton capacity cars are in 
use. At Boat harbour bunkers of 4,000 tons capacity are erected. The loading is done with 
a rubber coaveyor-belt with a capacity of 750 tons an hour. 

The following are the official returns of the Fiddick Colliery for the year ending the 31st 
December, 1912: — 



Sales and Oitput for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 1b.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sulci for consumption in Canada 


108,479 
6,991 
























Total sales 


■ 


115,470 






Lost in washing 


6,879 
16,699 
















23,578 














33,185 
41,234 






Stocks on hand first of year 

» last of year 

Difference added to stock during the year 


139,048 










8,049 














147,097 













K 266 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



I9i:s 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character ok Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


A\ erage. 
Daily 
\\ age. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


10 

102 


$ 


5 


$ 


IS 

102 


* 


3.30 - 6.00 




3.30 - 6.00 










Labourers 

■"Mechanics and skilled labour. . . . 
Boys 


41 
30 

9 


2.25 - 2.85 
2. 85 - 3.30 
1.25 - 2.25 


19 
4 


2.75-3.60 

1.00 


41 
49 
13 


2.25 - 2.85 
2.75 - 3.6d 
1.00 - 2.25 








40 


1.50 - 1.7.5 


40 


1.50 - 1.75 
















68 








Totals . . 


192 






21 id 













*Note. — Skilled labour underground includes timbermen, trackmen, bratticemen, pumpmen, pipemen : 
above ground, machinists, blacksmiths, engineers, railroad train crew, washery and loading stall', lampnim, 
stablemen: supervision and clerical assistance includes mine manager, overmen, firebosses, shotlightei 
and clerical staff; labourers includes drivers, pushers, rope-riders, etc. 

Name of seams or pits — Douglas seam ; No. 1 slope (Fiddiek) ; X». 2 slope (Richardson). 

I >escription of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — Two slopes, two levels, 
and one shaft 10 x 12, making five outlets to surface. Coal has been mined this year in 
No. 1 slope from Nos. 3 and 4 West levels, Nos. 1, 2, and 3 North levels, and Xos. 1 and 
2 South levels. The coal averages from 3 to 28 feet in thickness. Coal has been mined 
this year in No. 2 slope from Xos. 4, 5, and (i [South levels and from No. '-' North level. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — At this mine the plant consists of three return- 
tubular boilers, 100 horse-power each: three air-compressors (1 Canadian Hand, capacity 
500 cubic feet a minute; one Norwalk, 707 cubic feet a minute; the first unit of a 
Canadian Rand cross-compound, SOU feet a minute) : one 50-kw. A.C. generator, with 
2:i-h"rse-] lower l>.C. exciter attached, and '.) x 11 steam engine for driving same; two 
Fairbanks-Morse pumps for supplying water to boilers, 7 x 5 12 duplex: Cockrane 

teed water beater and purifier; one thoroughly equipped tipple, Capacity 1 ,51 10 Ton-, a day: 
one thoroughly equipped machine-shop : double drum hoist ing engine for hauling coal from 
slopes, 200-horse-power ; one Sheldon fan capable of producing 85,000 feet of air. with 
1.1 inches of water-gauge; one mine-rescue station containing two 2 hour apparatus and 
"no |-hour apparatus, with necessary sup] 'lies and equipment for recharging. Under 
ground plant consists of two winches 6| \ 8, two 5 x 7, one 5 x 8, anil one 'J x 11 inches. 
Pumps, one 300-gallon electric-turbine pump: one liOU-gallon Cameron piston-pump: two 
Fairbanks-Morse pumps, duplex, one 5] x .'>.' x 5 and one 7 x 5 x 7 : and three small 
duplex pumps, one 3x2x5 and two t \ 3 x (i : 250 mine-ears, and approximately ten 
miles of narrow-gauge track in mine. 



3 Geo. 5 Coalmining. K 267 

MORDEN COLLIERY, SOUTH WELLINGTON. 

Morden Mine, Nos. 3 and 4 Shafts. 
Joseph Foy, Overman, 

This is a new mine being opened up by the same company on Section 11, Range 8, 
Cranberry District, two miles east of South Wellington. Two shafts are being sunk, the 
main shaft 9 x 16 and the air-shaft 9x12 on the clear; these shafts were started in March. 
The hoisting-shaft is now down about 550 feet and the air-shaft about 450 feet. Coal is 
expected to be reached by the end of the year. The shafts are timbered solid with 6x12 
sized lumber, with 10 x 12 bearing sets; buntons are put in with 6-foot centres. The 
hoisting is accomplished by buckets of 1-ton capacity. Doors are used in the shaft which 
automatically close after the loaded bucket passes through, so that nothing can fall down the 
shaft. After the bucket reaches the surface it is swung clear of the shaft by the bull chain 
and dumped down a chute into the railroad-cars. 

Canadian Rand rock-drills are used for drilling, " Little Giants " 3 \ cylinders and 
"New Shippers" 3^ cylinders. Power is furnished for these by an Ingersoll straight-line 
compressor. 

Steam is furnished by two 100-horse-power return-tubular boilers. The hoisting is done 
by two engines, one 16 x 32 direct-acting, with 5-foot drum ; the other a 10 x 18 geared hoist, 
4-foot drum. 

The plant is electric-lighted and cluster lights are suspended in the shaft just above the 
sinkers, which makes ideal conditions. The blasting is done by electricity, primers being used. 
The shots are fired from the power-house after all men are out of the shafts. 

This mine will be equipped with the most modern machinery, to handle an output of 1,500 
tons a day of nine hours. 

No. 1 Mine of P.C.C. 

H. Devlin, Manager ; J. Ovington, Overman ; A. Manifold, M. Stafford, and 

R. Rallison, Firemen. 

The company has built a small rescue-station with a fully equipped rescue apparatus 
consisting of four 2-hour Draeger oxygen apparatus, and has a fully trained staff of workmen 
ready in case of an emergency. The ventilation is produced by a reversible Sheldon fan 
making 150 revolutions a minute, with a |-inch water-gauge, producing 50,000 cubic feet of 
air a minute. 

When I made my last examination there was 27,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing 
into this mine, divided into two splits. 

No. 1 Split. — There was 9,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this section of the 
mine for the use of eighteen men and one horse, or an average of nearly 300 cubic feet of air 
a minute. Xo explosive gas found in this mine. The timbering and roadways were in good 
order. 

No. 2 Split. — There was 1 2,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of seventeen men and two horses, or an average of 521 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. 



K 2G8 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



No. 2 Mine. 

J. Neen, J. Black, and F. Hilley, Firemen; G. Moore, and A. Bryden, Shotlighters. 

I examined all parts of this mine and found the following conditions : There was 27,500 
cubic feet of air a minute passing into this mine for the use of forty-four men and six moles, 
or an average of 490 cubic feet for each unit employed. Xo explosive gas found in this mini-. 
The timbering and roadways were in good condition. 

This mine is only being opened up and no output has yet been made. 

Number of Hands km ployed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 

Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 

Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


1 
45 


$ 


1 


3 


2 
45 
























14 

15 




14 

15 












































10 




10 
















4ti 


--- 


40 








Total 




86 











Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and numl>er of same — Two shafts in course 
of being sunk — hoisting-shaft, 9 x 16 in the clear ; air-shaft 9 x 12 in the clear. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Two return-tubular boilers, 100 horse-po\v.-r 
each; two hoisting-engines for hoisting rock out of shafts: two IngersoU Rand air- 
compressors for furnishing air for rock-drills ; live rock-drills; two Cameron sinking 
pumps; one boiler-feed pump. 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 269 



The Vaneouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co., Ltd. 

Head Office — Vancouver, B.C. 

Capital, $1,000,000. 
Officers. Address. 

Alvo. V. Alvensleben, President, 744 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

H. W. Maynard, Vice-President, 98 Powell Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

Willibald Imhoff, Secretary-Treasurer, 744 Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C. 
H. N. Freeman, Superintendent, P.O. Box 283, Nanaimo, B.C. 

Value of plant, $500,000. 



NEW EAST WELLINGTON COLLIERY. 

Harry N. Freeman, Manager ; J. Dixon, Overman ; W. H. Moore, R. Reid, and J. Saunders, 

Firebosses ; N. Bevis, J. E, Knowles, J. Bennie, W. Reid, I. Nash, and 

J. Nicholson, Shotlighters. 

This mine is situated about two miles from Nanaimo and is known as the Old Wellington 
seam. The mine is opened from the surface by two slopes running N. 70° E. and pitching 
about 35 degrees, and is down a distance of 1,400 feet. At this point two main headings are 
turned off N. 65° E., and one up a distance of 1,400 feet. Levels are turned off these headings 
every 200 feet, the coal ranging from 4 to 8 feet in thickness. 

The stalls in this section are worked on the pillar-and-stall system, with 20-foot stalls and 
GO x 1 20-foot pillars. On the north side the coal varies 1 to 4 feet and is worked on the long- 
wall system, a very satisfactory method. The coal is of a very hard nature and free from 
impurities. All coal is hand-mined ; 30-per-cent. giant powder is used. All shots are fired by 
batteries. 

The hoisting plant consists of a direct-haulage 10 x 12 Washington hoist. The coal is 
screened over a Marcus screen. The power plant consists of two return-tubular boilers, 68 
horse-power; anew 100 horse-power boiler is being installed ; a Canadian Rand compressor, 
capacity of 750 feet of free air. 

This mine is connected by two miles of railway to a shipping point situated on Newcastle 
townsite; the railway also connects with the E. & N. Railway. 

The coal is dumped into bunkers having a capacity of 1,000 tons, from which it is conveyed 
to ships by a self-acting incline. 

The ventilation of this mine is produced by a Sheldon fan, 4x9, driven by a 10 x 12 
Sheldon engine, producing 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute, with a 2i-inch water-gauge. 

When I made my last inspection there was 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into 
this mine, divided into two splits. 

Ho. 1 Split. — There was 7,500 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of thirty men and one mule, or an average of 237 cubic feet of air for each unit employed. 
No. explosive gas found in the mine. The timbering and roadways were in good order. 

No. 2 Split. — There was 18,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split fur the 
use of fifty men and six mules, or an average of 26 1 cubic feet of air tor each unit employed. 



K 270 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



The following arc the official returns from the New East "Wellington Colliery for tin- 
year 1912:— 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lb.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




f.ii, 77o 
15,930 
















.::::::::: 










82,700 






















5,112 










5,112 








400 

841 








S7.S1-J 




fi last of year 








441 






















88,253 











Number of Hands employed, Daily Wares paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


A \ erage 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


8 
loo 


% 

3.57 
5.00 


5 


$ 


13 
100 


% 




5.00 












1 
2 


2 86 

3.30 
1.50 






50 

7 
■j 


■■ 86 


Mechanics ami skilled labour .... 
Boys 


6 


3.50 


3.40 
1.50 














15 


1.65 15 


1 65 
























Totals 


161 


3.25 


26 


2 . 57 


187 


2.90 







Name of seams or pits — New East Wellington mine. Nanaimo, B.C., working the < Md 

Wellington scam. 
Description of scams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., anil number of same — The mine is entered 

by a slope, the bottom of which touches the seam, and from here the workings start. 

There are two haulage-roads, one running almost due east and one west from the slope 

bottom. 
Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Tramways run down tin- length of the slope 

and iii and about the various crosscuts and haulage-roads in the mine. The mine is 

operated hv steam, and there is one small dynamo used for lighting the surface works, 

down the slope, and about the vicinity of the slope-bottom. The mine is ventilated 
, mechanically. 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mixixg. K 271 



Oyster Harbour Collieries (Limited), (N.P.L.). 

Some prospecting has been done at Oyster Harbour, about four miles from Ladysmith, 
by the side of the E. & N. Railway, by putting down a shaft about 110 feet. It has been 
standing about five months and nothing done since. E. P. White was looking after the 
sinking. 



NORTHERN DISTRICT OF VANCOUVER ISLAND. 
Report of John Newton, Inspector. 

I beg to submit my report as Inspector of Mines for the Northern District of Vancouver 
Island for the year 1912. 

Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Ltd.* 

These mines were formerly operated by the Wellington Colliery Company, but were taken 
over by the Canadian Collieries (Dunsmuir), Limited, in the middle of 1910. 

The mines are situate in the Comox District, about sixty miles from Nanaimo. A railway 
about twelve miles in length connects the different mines to a shipping point at Union Bay, 
over which the whole coal output is conveyed. 

Since this company took possession of these mines, a large outlay of capital has been 
invested to bring them up to a higher standard of efficiencv. 

This company is operating in Cumberland mines known as Nos. 1, 5, 6, and 7, situated 
about twelve miles from Union Bay. 

A railway operating between these points is nearly all laid with 80-tt). steel rails to meet 
the requirements of a heavy rolling stock, consisting of 150 steel cars, each having a capacity 
of 50 tons. 

A new piece of railway is being constructed, leaving the main line about five miles from 
Union Bay, at a point called Roys beach, striking along the beach around to Nos. 7 and * 
mines, thereby cutting off the heavy grade. By the construction of this branch road the 
company will be able to haul heavier trains, as the grade will be considerably reduced. 

The company has, during the past year, made considerable progress in the installation of 
their hydro-electric power plant at Puntledge river, which is expected to be in operation about 
April 1st, 1913. All the dams are built and nearly all the machinery is on the ground, 
transmission-poles are erected from the power-station, and wires strung to the different mines. 
When completed, all the power used for operating these mines and railways will be furnished 
by electric power. 

These mines have been operating continually up to September lGth, 1912, when. 
unfortunately, labour troubles arose between the company and the workmen, the miners 
(•inning out on strike on that date, and at the present time are still out. 

All the mines are being operated at the present with a reduced staff of workmen, only 
one shift working. 

The company has erected at No. 6 mine a new rescue-station, 40 x 21 feet, with smoke, 
dressing and work rooms, while a room for teaching "first aid" is attached. Four 2-hour 
Draeger rescue apparatus are on hand, with oxygen-tanks and a fully trained staff of workmen, 
in case of emergencies. 



*See also page '20i >. 



K 272 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



COMOX COLLIERY. 

No. 1 Mink. 

R. Henderson, Manager: C. Parnham, Overman: H. Sloan, W. James, J. Dando, 
A. McLaughlan, W. Jones, 8. Horwood, and T. Bickle, Firemen. 

This mine is situated about one and one-half miles from Cumberland and about thirteen 
miles from the shipping point. During the present year a new Sullivan fan of the 1912 type 
has been installed, which started August 4th, 1912, making 180 revolutions and producing 
98,000 cubic feet of air a minute, with .'U -inch water-gauge, driven by direct-coupled engine 
18 x 18, generating 130 horse-power and giving 64 per cent, efficiency. 

During the year a gob fire started in No. 11 West level, which caused all the sections 
west of the Main slope to be sealed off. 

Owing to existing conditions in this mine, safety-lamps of the Wolf type' and permitted 
explosives have been exclusively used. 

The coal-seams are reached by two slopes, Nos. 1 and 2; a direct haulage-system being 

in use. 

Xn. J Slope. 

This slope is down a distance of 7,000 feet, running due north. A diagonal slope of 
l.UIIH feet from the entrance of the mine, running X. i5 E., is down a distance of 2,000 feet, 
where levels are turned off east and west — Xos. 15, L6, 17. L8, and 19 West levels, and Nos. 
16, 17, is. and 19 East levels. Chinamen and Japanese dips are all extracting pillars; the 
other levels are worked on the pillar-and-stall system, all in good coal ranging from 5 to 5J 
Ei et in thickness, of good hard coal, with a band of rock running through the centre ranging 
from 1" to 12 inches in thickness, and having a fairly good clay roof. 

The ventilation is produced by a reversible Sullivan fan making 180 revolutions a 

minute. 

During my inspection in December there was 28,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing 

into this slope for the use of fifty men and nine mules, or a total average of 363 cubic feet of 

air a minute for each unit employed. Explosive gas was found in No. 33 stall, No. 15 Wi I 

level; No. I stall, No. 18 East level; and a small gas-cap in the -laps and Chinamen 

pillars; all the rest of the mine was free of gas. The timbering and roadways were in s 

condition. 

Xo. ..' Slope. 

This slope branches off No. 1 slope a short distance from the mouth of the tunnel, running 

X. 45 E., and is down a distance of 8,000 feet, forming the deepest workings of the mine. 
The slope has been standing during the present year. 

Levels are turned off east and west of this slope, namely : Nos. 15, 16, 17. 18, and 19 on 

the east side, and Xos. 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. and 18 on the west side. No. 15 on the east side 
Ncis. 13, 1 1, 15, and 16 on the "est side are extracting pillars. The other levels are in . 

coal ranging from t.l to 5 feet in thickness, with a band of rock from 12 to 15 inches in 
thickness. The roof is of a friable fireclay, which, coming down with the coal, makes it very 

dangerous tor the miners and hard to keep the coal clean; SO percent, of the accidents in 
this mine are caused by this overlaying strata. All the levels are worked on the pillar and stall 
system: all shots are tired by electric battery, and Only Monabel powder is used. 




Itcs.iir SihiiuI M ill illcslio rn Col I !<»!•> \iroln V:iI1i-> . 




itcNcuc Stiiiini — Pacific Ca&xi Coal MftieHi 



3 Geo. 5 ■ Coal-mining. K 273 



During my inspection in December I examined all parts of the above slope and found the 
following conditions : There was 44,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this slope, 
divided into two splits. 

East Side Split. — I found 12,500 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of forty men and seven mules, or an average of 204 cubic feet of air for each unit employed. 
Explosive gas was found in No. 8 stall and a little in the face of No. 18 East level ; all the 
rest of the mine was clear of gas. The timbering and roadways were in good order. 

West Side Split. — In this split I found 11,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this 
split for the use of fifty -three men and six mules, or an average of 155 cubic feet of air a 
minute for each unit employed. No standing gas found, but I got a gas-cap \ inch long in 
Nos. .13 and 14 pillars. The timbering and roadways are in good order. 

There was 98,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing out at the fan-shaft. At No. 6 level 
in the main intake there was 44,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing, and at No. 17 level 
there was 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing, making the total leakage loss between 
these two points 14,000 cubic feet of air a minute. 

No. 5 Mine. 

J. H. McMillan, Manager of Nos. 5 and 6 Mines ; J. Gillespie, Overman of No. 5 ; 
D. McKinnell and J. Brown, Firemen. 

This seam is reached by a shaft at a distance of 600 feet. Only the Upper seam is 
working at the present time, at a distance of 300 feet above the Lower seam. The Lower seam 
has been abandoned, allowing it to fill with water, the pump and rails having been taken out. 

This seam is connected by a travelling-road with No. 6 mine, each having a separate intake 
and return, and being divided by double doors. This shaft acts both as an intake and return, 
being divided by a strong midwall between the hoisting and upcast shafts. 

Nos. 1 and 2 inclines are in operation " to the rise " of the seam, and Nos. 1 and 2 slopes 
" to the dip " of the seam. The Main level is standing, having run up against a fault, and 
operations in this level have been abandoned. 

This mine is worked on the pillar-and-stall system. The coal is of a very hard nature, and, 
i iwing to impurities between the coal, it is very hard to keep clean, the rock breaking up when 
the coal is shot down ; 30-per-cent. Giant powder is being used, and the shots are fired by 
electric battery. The coal ranges from 'i\ to 4 feet in thickness ; the No. 1 incline and dips 
are in solid coal. 

This mine is ventilated by a Guibal fan running 120 revolutions a minute, with a water- 
gauge of 1 inch, producing 42,000 cubic feet of air a minute; the engine-cylinders are 14 x IS 
inches. 

In December, when I mack' my inspection, there was 30,000 cubic feet of air a minute 
passing, divided into two splits. 

Xo. 1 Split. — I found 8,400 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the use 
of twenty men and four mules, making an average of 263 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. No explosive gas was found in this mine ; the timbering and roadways were in good 
order. 

No. ,' Split. — I found 9,600 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the use 
of forty men and eight mules, or an average of 150 cubic feet of air for each unit employed. 
18 



K 274 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



No. 6 Mine. 
I >. Walker, Overman; .). Thompson, Fireman. 

This shaft, like No. 5, is sunk to the Lower seam, al ' feel deep, Imt only the Upper 

seam is being worked. It is worked practically the same as is No. 5 shaft, operating on both 
sides of the shaft. There is not much solid work going on in this shaft. Only a little up the 
No. 1 incline and a little in the dips on the west side of the shaft ; all the rest of the workings 
is splitting of pillars. 

This coal is like that in No. 5 shaft, of a very hard nature, with bands of rock running 
through the coal, making it hard to shoot and to keep clean ; 30-per-cent. Giant powder is used, 
and shots are fired by electric battery. 

The ventilation is produced by an exhaust fan of the Guibal type, making 106 revolutions 
a minute, producing .'50,000 cubic feet of air a minute \\ ith 1 inch wati r gauge. 

The shaft is divided by a strong midwall between the hoisting and upcast portions, each 
being 5 x 6 feet in section. 

When T made mv inspection ill I lecember last, tie -re was 2 1, 100 Cubic feet of air a 111 ill lite 
passing into the mine, divided into two splits. No explosive gas was found in this mine, and 
the timbering and roadways were in good order. 

No. I Split. -I found 12,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for the use 
of fourteen men and three mules, or an average of 461 cubic Eeel of air for each unit < mployed. 

No. 2 Split. -There was 12,600 cubic feet < if air a minute passing into this split for the 
use of thirty-four men and six mules, or an average of 200 cubic feet of air for each unit 
employed. 

No. 7 Mini:. 

T. A. Spruston, Manager; F. Jaynes, Overman; II. Clifford, N. Huby, R. Bonner, 

and II. Dai idson, Firemen. 

This mine is situated about five miles from Cumberland ami about seventeen miles from 
the shipping point at Union Bay. 

During the year there have been twenty-five additional houses built, making in all 100 
cottages. In addition to these, there has been built a mine manager's house, a large store, and 

an up-to-date hotel. The town has been called I '.even. .V new school house is in the course of 

erection. 

The mine is entered by means of two slopes running N. ."••"> E., and is down a distance of 
5,600 feet, having been driven 621 feet during tin ir ; owing to labour troubles the 

development-work has been retarded. At a point 2,000 feet down the Main slope, No. 3 Mast 
Diagonal slope branches oil' and is down a distance of 1,500 fi 

During the past year the pillar and-stall system has been practically abandoned in favour 
of the Ion- wall system ; the coal, ranging from 21 to 3 feet in thickness, is of a very hard 
nature, being well adapted to this method of working. 

No. 1 Main Slope. 
From this slope levels are turned off east and west Nos. 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9 on the 

side, and Nos. .",. 6, 8, and 9 on the east side. The thickness of the coal varies from U> inches 

to 3 feet. 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 275 



No. S East Diagonal. 

This slope is driven off No. 3 East, at a distance of 500 feet from the Main slope, and is 
running north-east. Levels are only driven on the east side of this slope owing to there being 
a large fault on the west side. The levels are in good coal and are being worked by the long- 
wall method. 

During the year the improvements at this mine consisted of the erection of the new tipple 
and the installation of two No. 3 Marcus screens, and picking-tables capable of handling 1,800 
tons of coal a day. 

The cars are dumped in a Phillips improved crossover dump, where the empty cars are 
returned by a " link-belt " car-haulage. 

The ventilation is produced by a small Murphy exhaust-fan running 140 revolutions, 
producing 49,500 cubic feet of air a minute with a water-gauge of H inches. A new Sirocco 
fan to be driven by electricity, has been ordered, with a capacity of 270.000 cubic feet a 
minute. 

When I made my inspection in December, there was 39,500 cubic feet of air passing into 
this mine, divided into three splits. 

No. 1 Split East. — There was 18,500 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for 
the use of fifty-four men and five mules, or an average of 2fi8 cubic feet of air a minute for 
each unit employed. No explosive gas was found in this split, and the timbering and roadways 
were in good order. 

No. 1 Split West. — There was 4,400 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for 
the use of twelve men and one mule, or an average of 293 cubic feet of air a minute for each 
unit employed. No explosive gas was found, and the timbering and roadways were in good 
order. 

No. 2 Split West. — There was 15,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing into this split for 
the use of forty men and three mules, or an average of 288 cubic feet of air a minute for each 
unit employed. A little explosive gas found in the No. 1 slant and in No. 8 level ; all the rest 
of the split was clear. The timbering and roadways were in good order. 

No. 8 Mine. 

T. A. Spruston, Manager. 

This mine is situated about one and one-half miles east of No. 7 mine and about four and 
one-half miles from the town of Cumberland. This company has erected a sawmill with a 
capacity of 20,000 feet of lumber a day. 

Two shafts are being sunk. The main shaft is 11 x 22 and the air-shaft 11 x 18. The 
main shaft is down a distance of 300 feet. 

The plant consists of a Sullivan air-compressor with a capacity of 1,200 cubic feet free air, 
two return-tube boilers of 107 horse-power, and two hoisting-engines. 

Twenty-five houses are nearing completion, and the railway-sidings are being excavated 
by a steam-shovel. In all, large sums of money are being spent to make this mine an 
up-to-date concern. 



K 27K 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



The following are the official returns from the Comox Colliery for the year 1912 :- 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,2401b.) 


Tons. 

269,020 
•"■7. Ii77 
15,311 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 

a export to United States 




4,266 














342,008 












4,266 




114.246 
40.256 












154,502 
496,510 














23,488 
2,781 


6,636 
2,370 




Stocks on hand first of year 




20,707 














4.266 








Output of colliery for year 


475,803 


Xil. 



By-products — Fireclay. .'!,819 tons. 

Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Unoeroround. 


Above Grocxd. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


Xo. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
W age. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


42 

10 

60 
38 

21 

.v. 

46 

85 

129 


S 
3.57 - 9.00 
3.30 - 5.50 

3.00 
2.47 - 3.30 
3.3(1 • 3 85 
1.37 • 2.47 

350 

1.75 

3.50 

1.75 


7 


4.00 • 6.00 


4!l 
■>i 
10 
98 
7S 
33 
55 
58 
85 
237 














38 
40 

12 

12 


2.47 - 3.02 
3.30 - 3.85 
1.10 - 1.65 
















a labourers 


1.40 - 1.65 






108 


1.40 - 1.65 








Totals 


766 




217 




983 











Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Limited.* 
SUQUASH COLLIERY. 

.lames Kenny, Overman : John Jenkins, Fireboss. 

Tins colliery is owned by the Pacific Coast Coal Mines. Limited, and is situated on the 
northern part of east coast of Vancouver Island. 

A shaft 6 x 1" feet in the clear is down 170 feet, with a midwall between the hoisting 
and the upcast compartments. Two levels are turned off from the shaft-bottom, N. 17) W . 

See also page 263. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 277 



and S. 45° E. respectively. The North-west level has not been advanced during the year ; the 
South-east level is in quite a distance, and long-wall work exclusively has been opened out in this 
level. The coal ranges from 4 to 6 feet in thickness, with small bands of rock running through 
the coal ; this seam is well adapted for the long-wall work, and mine should make an ideal one 
for this system. Two slopes are turned off 500 feet from the shaft-bottom on this level, running 
N. 45° E., and are down 1,700 feet, but have not been worked during this past year. All the 
work done was in opening out the South-east level on to long-wall system. The coal is of 
excellent quality and is in great demand. 

On my inspection, I found the mine in very good order, well timbered and cogged, and 
with a very good roof. For the use of ten men and one horse, there was 13,000 cubic feet 
of air a minute going through the mine and around the long-wall workings, the ventilation 
being produced by a Sheldon fan, 4 x 21 feet in size, making 125 revolutions a minute, with a 
water-gauge of l\ inches. 

The following are the official returns from the Suquash Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Co 


AL. 


COKE. 


(Tons of 2,240 It). ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




3,026 






























3,026 




















685 










685 






















3,711 






7S1 










781 
4,492 






Difference added to stock during year 



















Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily- 
Wage. 




1 
10 


8 


1 


$ 


2 

10 


$ 




4.00 


4.00 












2 


3.00 


3 

•2 


3.00 
3.50 


5 
2 


3.00 




3.50 


































































Total 


13 




6 




19 













K 278 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



Name of seams or pits — Suquash No. 1 mine (upper seam). 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — One shaft 6x10 feet, 
with midwall one side for hoisting and one side for ventilation. From the shaft^bottom 
two levels are driven south-east for a distance of about 1.2"<i feet. Two slopes arc 
driven down a distance of about 1,200 feet north-east. Seam is from 5 to 6 feet in 
thickness and of good quality, being practically smokeless and giving off great heat. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — One donkey-engine with vertical boiler 
attached (for hoisting) ; one small fan for ventilation, producing about 14,000 cubic feet 
a minute ; one duplex pump, capacity 50 gallons a minute, for pumping water from 
mine ; a small pit-head and screening arrangements capable of handling 200 tons daily. 
A narrow-gauge tramway runs from pit-head to wharf, a distance of about 400 feet. 
The loading arrangements are suitable for loading scows and small craft. Underground 
there is about one mile of narrow-gauge track and sixteen mine-cars. 



British Pacific Coal Co., Ltd. 

The British Pacific Coal Company, Limited, has, for the past couple of years, been 
developing coal-seams on the south end of Graham island, one of the Queen Charlotte group. 
These seams are near Skidegate channel, on which the shipping wharf has been built. 
Considerable development- work has been done and a few tons of coal sold but the property 

has scarcely as yet entered the list of actnal producers. 

The following are the official returns of the property for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and OcrrrT for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lb.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 










« export to United States 






























Used in making coke 










Used under colliery boilers, etc 


32 


32 










Total for collisrv use 






Stocks on hand first of year 








n last of year 










Difference added to stock during year 




















Output of colliery for year 


32 









3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 279 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 

Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


1 
6 
3 


$ 
4.00 
4.00 
3.75 




$ 


1 

6 

IS 














15 


3.50 




























































































10 




15 




25 













Name of seams or pits — Coal Creek tunnel. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — Seam A, 5 feet 9 inches, 
graphite ; seam B. 5 feet 10 inches, 4 feet 4 inches coal ; seam C, 5 feet 4 inches, 4 feet 
coal; seam D, 5 feet 4 inches, 4 feet coal; seam E, 5 feet, 2 feet coal; tunnel, 757 feet. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Tramway, one and three-quarter miles long, 
operated by logging-engine; wharf (with approach), 600 feet long; powder-magazine near 
sea-beach. Buildings in camp, bunk, wash, cook, and foreman's house, and stable ; 
buildings at mine, blacksmith-shop and powder-house ; at portal, one 5-horse-power Pelton 
water-wheel, with small fan for ventilation purposes. 



NICOLA-PRINCETON INSPECTION DISTRICT. 
Report of Robert Strachan, Inspector. 

I have the honour to submit my annual report as Inspector of Coal-mines for the Nicola- 
Princeton Inspection District for the year 1912. 

The Nicola-Princeton District, which was created a separate Inspection Division of the 
Coast District in the latter end of May, 1912, comprises the mines of the Nicola Valley Coal 
and Coke Company, Limited, Middlesboro ; Inland Coal and Coke Company, Merritt ; 
Diamond Vale Colliery Company, Limited, Merritt ; Pacific Coast Colliery Company, Merritt, 
in the Nicola District; Columbia Coal and Coke Company's Mount Carbon Colliery, Coalmont ; 
Princeton Coal and Land Company, Limited, Princeton ; United Empire Mining Company, 
Princeton, in the Princeton District. 

The accidents previous to June 1st, when I was transferred here, were reported to 
Inspector Morgan, since when I have only seven to report, none of which are fatal ; of these, 
four were due to haulage and three to "falls of top coal." A list of these accidents is attached. 

Since June there have been two prosecutions, one for a shotfirer charged with shooting 
off the solid, the case being dismissed ; one for a miner smashing his safety-lamp, contrary to 
Special Rule 79 — the accused fled the country ; and in one case the Hon. the Minister of 
Mines directed an inquiry to be held as to the competency of a miner who had faked tamping 
cartridges, using coal-dust in the centre, with clay at each end. 



K 280 Report of the Minister of Minks. 19 1:} 



Nicola Valley Coal & Coke Co., Ltd. 
Head Office — Vancouver, B.C. 

Capital, $1,107,700. 

Officem. Address. 

John Hendry, President, Vancouver, B.C. 

Alexander McLaren, Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C. 
W. H. Armstrong, Managing Director and General Manager, Vancouver, B.C. 

J. J. Plommer, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C. 

Charles Graham, Mine Manager, Vancouver, B.C. 

Value of plant, 8170,000. 



MIDDLESBORO COLLIERY. 

Charles Graham, Manager. 

The above colliery is situated about one mile from Merritt, and at present only Nbs. - and 
4 mines are being operated. 

No. 2 Mine. 

Robert Fairfoull, Overman. 

This mine, which is situated in the Coldwater hill, is operated by a slope driven on tin- 
coal-seam ; the coal is 5i feet thick, dipping at about 20 degrees to the west ; the pillar-and- 
stall method of mining is used, the stalls being about 30 feet, leaving a pillar of 20 x 30 feet. 
The coal is all mined by hand. Monabel powder being used for blasting, fired by an electric 
detonator and battery. In the interior of the mine the coal-cars are hauled by compressed-air 
hoists to the main landings, from where it is lifted by a tail-rope to the head of the slope : a 
15 x 18-inch steam-hoist works the tail-rope. 

At the No. 2 mine there is one return-tubular boiler ((ioldie McC'ulloch) of 1 ~>0 horse-power 
capacity for providing steam for the hoist, and a 14- x 18-inch Canadian Hand compressor, 
having a direct steam end, compounded on the air end ; this provides the compressed air to 
operate the inside hoists and pumps. 

The coal from this mine is hauled by a steam locomotive to the No. 1 tipple. \ entilation 
is provided for by a 06- x 36-inch belt-connected Sheldon fan, drived by a 15- x 1 I inch steam 
engine ; engine-speed, 1G6 revolutions a minute : fan-speed, 30'J revolutions a minute. 

I have inspected this mine every month and have always found conditions very g 1. 

both in respect to timber, roads, and ventilation. 

In the No. 2 split (lower workings) I found a very faint cap of gas with the Cadman- 
Cunninghame gas-detector, fitted into a CrariSer-Wolf safety-lamp; this part of the mine i- 
worked by safety-lamps exclusively. 

The No. 1 split is worked by open lights, and T have never found any trace of gas : the 
division between the Safety-lighi and open light district is well marked with danger hoards and 

safety-lights showing a red or danger colour. There was. at my last inspection, 2(>,0ou cubic 
feet of air a minute provided for the use of eighty men and live horses, allowing 273 Cubic feet 
of air a minute for every unit in the mine (a horse equals 3 units). 

Since taking charge of this district 1 have not had a single accident to report 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 281 



No. 4 Mine. 
David Brown, Overman. 

This mine is reached by a crosscut tunnel from the main level of the No. 5 mine, which has 
been abandoned, and has generally been considered as in the top seam of the Coal Gully series, 
but during the past summer a tunnel has been driven from the top of the No. 4 slope which 
has uncovered another seam situated about 150 feet higher up. The coal is about 10 feet 
thick, dipping at an inclination of "25 degrees to the south. The method of work is pillar and 
stall, the stalls being 12 feet wide and the pillars 60 x 30 feet. 

As mentioned above, another seam has been discovered by a crosscut tunnel 400 feet long 
driven level from the top of the No. 4 slope ; this new seam is termed the No. 6, and is 5 feet 
thick, dipping at same rate and direction as the No. 4 seam. The present intentions are to 
open this up on the long-wall system, and, although in the initial stages, all work at present 
being done is in this direction. 

Haulage in the No. 4 seam is by hand to the slope, hoisting up the slope by a 12- x 15-inch 
air-hoist ; horses take the cars from top of slope to the tipple. 

Ventilation is provided by a Sheldon fan 8 1 - feet diameter, having a capacity of 100,000 
cubic feet a minute, with a 4-inch water-gauge ; at present the quantity of air circulating is 
60,000 cubic feet a minute for the use of sixty-two men and five horses, allowing 778 cubic feet 
of air a minute for each unit in the mine ; water-gauge, 4 inches. Speed of fan-engine, 184 
revolutions a minute ; speed of fan, 220 revolutions a minute. 

I have examined this mine every month and have generally found conditions fairly good ; 
at my last inspection I found a small quantity of explosive gas in an abandoned place, which 
was, however, fenced off, all the other places being clear and fairly well ventilated. The roads 
and working-places were all well timbered and in good condition ; Wolf safety-lamps are 
exclusively used in this mine. Blasting is done with Monabel powder fired by electric 
detonator with battery. 

All the safety-lamps used in the mines (both Nos. 2 and 4) are cleaned and tested as 
provided for by section 91, Rule 10, "Coal-mines Regulation Act," at the lamp-room near the 
tipple, and again examined by the fireboss previous to being allowed to enter the mine. 

As required by Rule 4, the firebosses are equipped with Cramer- Wolf safety-lamps fitted 
with the Cadman-Cunninghame gas-detector, so as to enable them to detect smaller percentages 
of gas than can be detected with the ordinary safety-lamp. 

The tipple, which is of wooden construction, handles the coal from both mines ; the cars, 
which have a capacity of 1.5 tons, have a door at one end, and are built at the mine, of 2-inch 
plank with iron fittings. The cars are dumped by a Phillips crossover dump, the coal passing 
to a shaking screen which allows all slack under 2\ inches to pass into a hopper ; the round or 
lump coal being taken over a picking-table, 42 feet long, where the refuse is picked out by 
hand, the coal being then conveyed by a scraper conveyor to the lump-coal bin. The screenings 
or slack coal is fed to a Stewart washer erected by the Roberts & Schaefer Company, Chicago, 
capable of treating 100 tons an hour. Three grades of coal are made — namely, " lump," " pea," 
and " slack." The scraper conveyor is so arranged that the coal from the picking-table and 
washer can be put either directly into the bin, of 350 tons capacity, or carried direct to the 
loading chute. A portable Christy box-car loader is used to load box cars. 

The plant at the No. 4 mine consists of four 1 50-horse-power return-tubular boilers ; one 
Canadian Rand cross-compound air-compressor, capacity 2,000 cubic feet free air a minute ; and 
one 27J-kw. generator for electric-lighting purposes. 

A rescue training-station is also maintained, fitted with four 2-hour Draegers, two i-hour 
Draegers, recharging-pump, pulmotOT, water-gauge for testing feed, and .-in ample supply of 
regenerators and oxygen. 



K 282 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



All the certificated officials have either taken a course in rescue-work or are doing so at 
present, as are also many of the miners. 

During the past year twelve certificates were granted to those who had taken a satisfacl i >rv 
course, and the granting of these certificates is giving great encouragement to others to qualify. 

Note by Management. 

During the past year the output has been decreased by about 50,000 tons, due principally 
to the shutting-off of No. 1 mine on March 22nd, owing to fires having broken out in this 
mine. The principal operations during the year were in Nos. 2 and 4 mines. During the year 
a new seam (No. 6) about 5 feet thick was discovered, and a tunnel driven in 400 feet to open 
up this seam. This was completed late in December, and is a continuation of the tunnel driven 
from old No. 5 to No. 4. No new equipment or improvements of any other kind have been 
made during the past year. 

The following are the official returns from the Middlesboro Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 It.. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




134,803 






























134,803 






















8,354 










8,354 














615 
431 








143,157 




« last of year 








184 






















142,973 














Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 




22 

140 


S 
3.50 - 4.00 
3.30 - 5.50 


7 


S 


29 
140 


















7.'. 


2.75 - 3.30 


40 

20 

6 


2.75 - 3.00 
3.30 ■ 4.25 
1.25 - 2.00 


20 
6 


































































Totals 


237 




73 




310 













3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 283 



Inland Coal & Coke Company, Ltd. 
(Formerly the Coal Hill Syndicate.) 

Head Office— Merritt, B.C. 

Officers. Address. 

Geo. I. Wilson, President, Vancouver, B.C. 

W. L. Nichol, Vice-President, 1200 Comox Street, Vancouver, B.C. 

K. C. Smith, Secretary-Treasurer, Pacific Block, Vancouver, B.C. 

Joseph Graham, Vice-Pres. and Gen. Man., Merritt, B.C. 

Andrew Bryden, Mine Manager, Merritt, B.C. 

Value of plant, $3,000. 

Andrew Bryden, Manager ; Geo. Hudson, Overman. 

This company's property is situated west, and about 500 feet higher up the hill than the 
Nicola Valley Coal and Coke Company's mines ; five seams have been opened, varying from 
8 to 16 feet thick. 

During the past year all the work has been confined to the No. 3 seam ; this seam is 10 
feet thick, and at an inclination of 35 degrees. The method of work is pillar and stall ; the 
pillars are 48 x 100 feet, stalls 15 feet. The coal is taken from the face by chutes, loaded into 
cars holding 1 ton, and then delivered to the hoist. The main slope is now down about 600 
feet, with five levels to the right-hand side and four to the left. This seam has a strong sand- 
stone roof and floor, very little timber being used, although lately there has been a tendency 
to use more, with a view to the prevention of falls from unseen slips. 

During my inspection I have generally found this mine in good condition ; I have never 
found any trace of gas, and there is sufficient water to keep the roadways damp. At my last 
inspection I found 18,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of eighteen men. The speed 
of the fan was 180 revolutions a minute. Open lights are used in this mine, the inspections 
being made with safety-lamps of the Wolf type. Blasting is done with a 40-per-eent. Giant 
and fuse. Copies of the Mines Act, special rules, and a plan of the mine are all posted at the 
entrance to the mine. 

The plant consists of two 50-horse-power boilers of the Leonard type, one of which is at 
present used for steam purposes; the hoisting-engine is an 8- x 10-inch double-drum Beatty 
engine, one drum of which is used for hoisting up the mine slope, the other for lowering the 
loads to the top of the gravity-plane and hauling the empties back. 

Ventilation is produced by a single-entry fan of the Sheldon type, capable of producing 
50,000 cubic feet a minute. The fan is driven by belt from a 12- x 16-inch steam-engine, ratio 
of fan to engine being 4A to 4 ; an alternating dynamo has also been installed for lighting 
purposes. 

The gravity -plane is a three-rail track 1,760 feet long, with a passing at the half-way ; the 
coal is delivered to a tipple, 400 feet long, with bunker capacity of 400 tons. The coal is 
picked in a primitive fashion before being delivered into the bunkers, from which it is drawn 
as required to load the cars. The tipple is connected to the Canadian Pacific Railway by a 
standard-gauge track one mile long, on which is a pair of Fairbanks railroad scales for weigh- 
ing cars. 



K 284 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



During the past summer it was found necessary to install a plant to pump water to the 
mine for steam and other purposes; a 5- x 3£-inch pump at the Coldwater river pumps to a 
water-tank, capacity :i0,000 gallons, situated near the tipple, where another pump then delivers 
the water to the mine. 

Rescue apparatus to the extent of two 'hour Draeger apparatus, with supplies of oxygen 
and regenerators, have been provided, and in the near future we expect all the officials, and 
many of the miners, will be sufficiently trained to he able to use these efficiently, should the 

necessity arise. 

The following are the official returns of the Inland Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 ft.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


30,000 





























30,000 
















1,200 










1,200 






















31,200 




a last of year 


100 








100 






















31,300 













Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
pli iyed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Xo. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 




4 
20 

5 
2 

1 


S 

4.00 
3.50 
3.00 
3.00 

4.00 


3 


$ 

4. :xl 


7 

20 
5 

to 

4 


4.40 

■.{ . .-,( i 


Miners 1 helpers 

Labourers 

Mechanics and skilled labour .... 






3.00 


3 


3.00 
4.00 


3.00 
4.00 












































14 




46 




Totals 


32 


3. 75 


3.60 


:s so 



Name of scams or pits — Nos. 1, ~2, 3, 4, and •">. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — The Xos. 1 and J 
seams "ere not worked during the year. The Xo. 1 i-. 2 feet il inches thick with a clay 
roof, and the No. •_' is 8 feet thick with a slate roof. The original prospect-shaft cut the 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 285 



No. 1 at 30 feet and the No. 2 at 100 feet depth. A slope has been driven on the No. 1 
300 feet and the No. 2 500 feet. The work done and the coal won during the past year 
has been from the No. 3 seam exclusively ; the slope, which has an average pitch of 35 
per cent., has been deepened ; and all the levels down to the No. 6 have been extended. 
Both the roof and floor are sandstone and the seams average 10i feet thick of coal. There 
is very little water, and is not sufficient for the boiler plant. No explosive gas has ever 
been found in any of the workings. No. 4 seam is 16 feet thick, but no work has been 
done on it ; No. 5 is 9 feet thick, and no work has been done on it, but it is the intention 
to open it up this year, as it lies between Nos. 2 and 3 seams. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — The hoist is a 25-horse-power Beatty double- 
drum type ; two 50-horse-power boilers, Leonard type, one of them only in use, furnish 
steam. The fan was supplied by the Robert Hamilton Company, and has a capacity 
of 55,000 cubic feet. The coal from the mouth of the slope is let down 1,500 feet on a 
3-per-cent. grade to head of the gravity tram, which is 2,000 feet long, with an average 
grade of 25 per cent., and handles 10- or 12-ton loads quite easily, connecting at the foot 
of the hill with the trestle which leads to the bunkers, which have a capacity of 400 tons, 
horses doing the hauling on the trestle. The coal is remarkably free from rock and dirt, 
but is cleaned by hand before going into the bunkers. A Fairbanks railroad scale is at 
the bunkers, and after being weighed the cars are run over the company's railroad, one 
mile long, to the C.P.R. tracks near Merritt for shipment. An electric-lighting plant has 
been installed of fair size. A water system from the Coldwater river was laid during the 
year to the mine, a distance of one and a half miles. 



Diamond Vale Collieries, Limited. 

Head Office — Vancouver, B.C. 

Capital, $750,000. 
Officers. Address. 

T. J. Smith, President, Pacific Building, Vancouver, B.C. 

F. J. Lumsden, Vice-President, Vancouver, B.C. 

J. A. Mclnnes, Secretary-Treasurer, Vancouver, B.C. 

A. E. Smith, Mine Manager, Merritt, B.C. 

Value of plant, $50,000. 



DIAMOND VALE COLLIERY. 

A. E. Smith, Manager ; A. Horroeks, Overman. 

This company's property lies immediately to the south of the Middlesboro Colliery, the 
Coldwater river being the boundary between them. The two shafts mentioned in the previous 
reports are not being continued, and the machinery has been removed. 

No. 3 Mine. 

During the past year only the slope (No. 3) has been in operation, and since the explosion 
in March last there has been very little work done in it, until November, when it was reopened 
for repair and to be put in shape for producing. The No. 3 slope has been sunk on the seam 



K 286 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



for a distance of 650 feet ; one level (No. 3) has been opened for a distance of 800 feet on the 
east side, and ~No. ± on the west side for 550 feet. The dip is about 35 degrees, and seven 
double-stalls have been driven on the east side and three double-stalls on the west side. In 
the working of these double-stalls the custom has been to connect them, about 25 feet up, so 
as to form a counter-gangway, then drive the stall 36 feet wide up the pitch, the refuse being 
packed in the centre to support the roof and to provide the means to conduct the ventilation 
to the face. The pillars were generally 36 feet thick. 

Since reopening, the fan has been removed so as to comply with the "Coal-mine-, 
Regulation Act "; safety-lamps of the Wolf type have replaced the open lights formerly used, 
and apparatus for testing the lamps installed, while the firebosses have been equipped with 
Cramer-Wolf safety lamps fitted with the Cadman-Cunninghame gas-detector ; crosscuts have 
been driven to effect communication between the various stalls and provide a return airway ; 
sanitary provision has been provided; special rules have been adopted ; an ambulance box 
acquired, while rescue apparatus of the Draeger type is expected at an early date. 

The power plant consists of one 30-horse-power and one 10-horse-power boiler; an 
8- x 12-inch hoist for hauling coal up the slope; a pump for pumping water from the river to 
boilers; the fan-engine, 8x8 inches, drives a 2| foot fan direct. 

New offices, a workshop, and engine-room have been built, and early in the new year a 
larger fan will be installed to cope with the increasing development of the mine. 

At my inspection in December I found no trace of gas; there was a good currenl of air 

circulating at the faces, and I found 6,270 cubic feet a minute tor the use of 1 L' men; the 
roads and timbering were in good condition, and so far as I could observe, the Mine-. A.< ' 
was being complied with. Copies of the Act, special rules, and a plan of the mine were posted 
at the entrance to the slope. The only blasting permitted in this mine is in rock work, where 
30-percent. Giant is used. 

The following are the official returns from the Diamond Vale Colliery for the year 
1912:— 



Sales and Output for Veak. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 lb.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




3,130 





























3,130 






















lso 










ISO 




















3.310 

























^ taken from l ^> •> 










3,310 













3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 287 



Number of Hands employed. Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


3 

18 


$ 
4.00 
3.50 


2 


$ 
4.50 


5 

18 


$ 
4.25 
3 50 


Miners' helpers 








9 


3.25 


7 
5 


3.00 
3.50 


i6 

5 


3 12 




3 50 






















































30 






3.67 








3.58 


14 


44 


3 79 







Name of seams or pits — No. 3 slope, Diamond Vale Colliery. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — The seam of coal in 
this mine is ih feet thick, with two bands of rock in it, each band 6 inches thick. It 
pitches at an angle of 45 degrees. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — The plant consists of one locomotive-type 
boiler, 30 horse-power, and two vertical boilers, a small hoist, and an exhaust-fan 2J feet 
in diameter. The slope is down 650 feet ; there are two levels turned off to the east, 
No. 1 East level being in 400 feet and No. 2 East 850 feet. There is also one level to 
the west which is in 550 feet. 



Pacific Coast Colliery Co. of B.C. 



Head Office — Minneapolis, Minn. 
Capital, $500,000. 

Officers. 
Jas. C. Andrews, President, 215 N.Y. Life Building, 
G. B. Norris, Vice-President, 
G-. H. Deny, Secretary, 
J. S. Sherril, Treasurer, 
W. E. Duncan, Consulting Engineer, 

Howell John, Overman. 



A ddress. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Merritt, B.C. 



The Pacific Coast Colliery Company's property is situated north and adjoining the Nicola 
Valley Coal and Coke Company's mines. During the present year very little work has been 
done on this property, and in the month of August all underground work was stopped, and I 
understand arrangements have been made to test the field by diamond-drill. 

The No. 2 slope, which has been driven 300 feet, is 7 x 8 feet, and has not been 
operated during the present year. No. 2 shaft, which is sunk to reach the coal-seam at 147 
feet, has a slope driven from the bottom for a distance of 700 feet, with several short levels on 
either side. 



K 288 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



During my inspections of this mine I found general conditions fair, but the ventilation 
poor, the fan provided being inadequate for the purpose. The equipment is small, consisting 
nt two 10-horse-power boilers of the tubular type ; the hoist for the shaft is a 7- x 10-inch 
reversible-motion hoist; the hoist for the No. 2 shaft slope is a 6- x 8-inch double-cylinder 
hoist. 

The following are the official returns for the Pacific Coast Colliery for the year ending 
1912 : — 

The company has been engaged in developing its property and no output of coal was made. 
Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ploye. 1. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


1 
4 


s 

5.00 

4 (Ml 


2 


5.00 


3 

4 


> 
5 

1 (HI 


Miners' helpers 








1 


3.00 


1 

1 


3.00 
3.50 


I 


■A 00 




■A .50 






















































6 




4 








Totals 


$12. 00 


$11.50 


10 


$15.50 



Name of seams or pits — No. 1 slope, No. 2 shaft. 

Description of seams, tunnels, le\els, shafts, etc., and number of same— No. 1 slope is driven 
from the surface to a distance of 300 feet at an angle of 30 degrees. The size of this slope- 
is 7 x 9 feet, and has not been worked during the past year. No. 2 shaft is down 147 
feet, 12 feet of which is used as a sump. A level, 7x8 feet, is driven foi !Mi feet from 
the bottom of the shaft, from whence a slope is driven for 610 feel with the dip of the 
seam, which dips at an angle about 20 degrees. The thickness of this seam in the shaft 
is 18 feet, with a few bands of rock in between. There are four levels turned to the left 
oll'the main entry and two levels to the right. This mine is ventilated by means of 

natural ventilation. 
Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. -There are two 10-horse-power vertical tubular 

boilers, at No. 2 shaft, also two hoisting engines ; one (i x 8 double-cylinder single -friction 
drum hoisting engine, which is used for hoisting the cars from the slope in No. 2 shaft. 
For hoisting out of the shaft we have an engine size 7 x 10. reversible-link motion, fitted 
with a throw ing-out clutch, also a depth indicator. 




» i 



;«M nl 



to 







l*riii<*«'toii < oliii'i-t — I If nil works :i nil Tippl 




y\ i. 4 ii i'Immi Collier j — i oi ii in hi 11 < mil a Colce Co, 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 289 



Princeton Coal and Land Company, Ltd. 
Head Office — 15 Great St. Helens, London, E.C. 

Capital, 8200,000. 
Officers. Address. 

A. St. George Hamersley, Chairman, London, Eng. 

Sheffield Neave, Director, Lundon, Eng. 

Alex. Crerar, Director, London, Eng. 

Arthur Hicklin, Advisory Director, London, Eng. 

Oswald J. Bambridge, Director, London, Eng. 

E. S. Neave, Secretary, London, Eng. 

Ernest Waterman, General Manager, Princeton, B.C. 

Jas. Holden, Mine Manager, Princeton, B.C. 

Value of plant, $77,000. 
This company began operations in December, 1909, and was formerly the Vermilion 
Forks Mining and Development Company. 

James Holden, Manager ; Andrew McKendrick, Overman. 
This company's property is situated at the junction of the Tulameen and the Similkameen 
rivers, at the town of Princeton, in the Similkameen Mining Division. The mine, which is 
situated on the bench above the Similkameen river, consists of a slope, which has been driven 
down on the seam for a distance of 1,100 feet. On the west side three levels have been driven, 
while four have been driven on the east side. The seam is 24 feet thick, intersected with 
bands of clay ; only the upper 9 feet of the seam is worked at present. 
The following is a section of the seam : — 
24" coal 
12" ii 



24" ., 




6" clay 
6" coal 


- Portion 


48" ., 




6" ,, J 
9" fired 
12" coal. 


ly . 


12" soapstone. 
16" coal. 


24" ., 


10" clay and bone 


24" coal. 


18" ,. 


6" ii 


24" ,. 





24' 0" 

Most of the bands are clay and vary from | inch to f inch in thickness. The coal is of 
lignitic nature and is worked bv pillar-and-stall method ; coal is mined and sheared by post coal- 
cutting machines, of either the Hardy or Rand type ; by this means the coal is blasted down 
with the minimum of explosive and giving the maximum of round or lump coal. Monabel is 
used for blasting, with fuse. 

Ventilation is produced by a 6- x 30-foot fan, Guibal type, driven by a 25-horse-power 

engine, belt-drive gear 2 to 1. The mine, which is very free from gas, is well ventilated, the 

above fan producing 36,000 cubic feet of air a minute for the use of sixty men and three 

horses, allowing an average of 521 cubic feet a minute for each unit in the mine. Speed of 

fan, 136 revolutions a minute ; water-gauge, \ inch. 
19 



K 290 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



I have always found the roads and places well timbered and in good condition ; copies of 
the Act, special rules, a plan of the mine posted at the entrance to the mine, and. generally, 
the Mines Art is strictly adhered to. Open lights are used in this mine, the inspection being 

made with safety-lamps of the Wolf type. 

The mine-ears have a capacity of 1.5 tons, and are hauled up to the tipple in trips of i\ 

by a ~)0 horse-power Jenks hoist. The tipple, which is situated I I feel above the level of the 

ground, is built of timber ; here the coal is dumped and screened into three sizes; all over 1 

inches is termed ''lump,'' from 2 to & inches is termed "egg," and § to 2 inches is termed "nut": 

the various sizes of coal are then taken by belt-conveyor to the bunker, where each size is kept 

separate; the hunker has a capacity of -MO tons. In drawing the eoal from the bunker a 

conveyor is used to take the coal to the box-car Loader; therefore any kind of coal can be 
loaded as required. 

The boiler plant consists of two 27"i hoi ,,e power < oildie-MeCulloeh boilers and one 
50-horse-power Gray boiler, the feed water being heated by the exhaust from the compressor. 

The power plant consists of one Kami compressor of a capacity of 711 cubic feel free air 
a minute, and one 6-kw. direct -current generator for lighting purposes. One 35-horse-power 
and one 25-horse-power engines, both of the Link Bell Company's make, are used for driving 
the picking-table belts. The box-car loader is of the Victor type. The machine-shop is 
equipped with a McDougal lathe, a 350-B). steam-hammer, drill-press, a 2-inch .Verne holt-cutter. 
a Merrill pipe-machine, a 20-inch shaper, a hack saw, and emery-grinder. .V 12- .\ 7- \ 12-inch 
pump is used for fire-protection purposes, pumping into a water tank with a capacity of 30,000 
gallons, giving a pressure of 200 Iti. to the square inch. 

The above forms a very efficient plant for handling the eoal, up to a capacity of aboui 
(iOO tons a day. 

Rescue apparatus of the Draeger type has been acquired; one 2-hour type, one |-hour 

type, one pulmotor for resuscitation, with an inhalation device attached, pump, wat 

and a sufficient supply of OXgen and regenerators are kept on hand ; most of the officials have 

or are taking lessons, so as to enable them to use the apparatus efficiently. 

The following are the official returns from the Princeton Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


1 "ICE. 


(Tons of 2,240 1b.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




18,220 
3,166 




























21,386 














4.011 

■J.::; 
















6,788 








































1 baken from 1 h J ' ' ' 












28,174 













3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 291 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. era- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance .... 


6 
32 
12 
14 
10 


$ 
4.50 
5.00 
3.00 
3.30 
3.75 


3 


$ 
4.50 


9 
32 

12 
32 
24 

1 


8 
4 . 30 
5 00 








3 00 




18 

14 

1 


3.00 

3.50 - 4.00 

1.75 


3 00 - 3 30 


Mechanics and skilled labour . 


3.50 - 4.00 
1 75 




















































74 


3.00 - 5.00 


36 


3 00 - 4 50 


110 


3 00 - 5 00 

















Name of seams or pits — No. 1 slope. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — The seam is 24 inches 
thick and lies at an inclination varying from 1 6 to 9 degrees. The top 9 feet is worked, 
and is a good-grade lignite and has jet-black appearance. The slope is down a distance 
of 1,050 feet, driven on full pitch of the seam, with main and counter levels on strike of 
the seam, and 500 and 1,000 feet respectively both east and west. There is an air-shaft 
down to the seam and has a depth of 60 feet. Nos. 2 and 3 East levels are in 1,200 feet ; 
No. 4 and No. 4 East counter 500 feet ; No. 1 West level 600 feet ; No. 2 West level 
and counter are in 100 feet. The coal is mined by post machines, of which six are used. 

1 'escription and length of tramway, plant, etc. — The plant consists of tipple having a length 
of 250 feet, with rotary dump, reciprocating feeder, shaking screen, picking-belts, and 
bunkers having a capacity of 240 tons ; conveyor-belt and Victor box-car loader ; two 
75-horse-power and one 50-horse-power boilers ; machine-shop containing lathe, shaper, 
pipe-threader, bolt-cutters, hack-saws ; blacksmith and carpenter shops with steam-hammer 
and all necessary equipment. 



United Empire Mining Co. 

Capital, $500,000. 

Officers. A dr/ress. 

W. C. McDougall, President, Princeton, B.C. 

E. P. Gaillac, Vice-President, Princeton, B.C. 

L. E. Marston, Secretary-Treasurer, Princeton, B.C. 

W. G. Simpson, Mine Manager, Princeton, B.C. 

Value of plant, $650. 



K 292 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



UNITED EMPIRE COLLIERY, PRINCETON, B.C. 
W. G. Simpson, Manager. 

This company's property is situated on the One-mile creek, about one and one-half miles 
from Princeton. The main tunnel is in about 1,100 feet. The coal is lignite, the seam being 
.">', feet thick, at an inclination of 60 degrees. The main tunnel strikes the coal at 900 feet in, 
at which point the counter-entry commences ; from the counter-entry a raise has been put 
through to the surface, a distance of 230 feet. Ventilation is by natural draught, but a fan 
is to be installed in the near future. This mine was shut down all summer and was only 
leopened in December, at which time I found conditions rather unsatisfactory. Thi 
gangway was under repair, and, although I found no trace of gas, I had occasion to find fault 
with the methods of ventilation. A mine manager, Mr. Simpson, has now been appointed, and 
I expect in future to find that the Mines Act is strictly attended to. There is no steam plant 
of any kind at present, all the workings being above water-level. Railway connection has now 
been made to this mine by the Great Northern Railway. 

The following are the official returns for the United Empire Mining Company for the year 
ending 1912 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 tb.) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


100 
400 



























500 
























Total for colliery use 






























Difference taken from stock during vear 














500 














Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


.\ v. rage 
Daily 
Wage. 




1 
7 
5 


s 

3.50 
3.50 
3.00 




$ 


1 

5 
1 






3.00 




Miners' helpers 


3 30 




















1 


2.00 


1 


2 50 









































13 




2 








Totals , 






15 













3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 293 



Name of seams or pits — No. 1 seam or tunnel. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — Tunnel 900 feet long 
when coal was struck, 4 feet thick, of a hard black lignite mixed with cannel ; the seam 
pitches from 60 to 70 degrees, with a sandstone roof and a soft bottom composed of coal 
and fireclay. The gangway is driven on the strike of the vein, 6 feet 6 inches high and 
5 feet wide at collar, and 7 feet 6 inches wide at bottom of props. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Tramway outside of tunnel, about 600 feet ; 
no plant. 



Columbia Coal and Coke Company, Limited. 

Capital, $4,000,000. 

Officers. Address. 

Hon. C. H. Campbell, President, Winnipeg, Man. 

J. L. Johnston, Vice-President, Coalmont, B.C. 

W. L. Parrish, Secretary-Treasurer, Winnipeg, Man. 

G. L. Fraser, General Manager, Coalmont, B.C. 

J. W. Powell, Mine Manager, Coalmont, B.C. 



MOUNT CARBON COLLIERY. 

This colliery, which is situated on the Tulameen river, between Granite creek and Collins 
Gulch, has a tunnel driven 2,300 feet, so as to crosscut the coal-seams which outcrop further up. 
This tunnel is situated 710 feet above the Tulameen river, and strikes the first seam at 1,900 
feet ; this seam is 16 feet thick, dipping at 40 degrees. Levels have been driven on both sides 
of the tunnel, that to the east for 400 feet, and that to the west for 850 feet. All the work 
this year has been concentrated on the west side, and consists of driving the main and counter 
gangways with crosscuts. Great trouble has been experienced in keeping the roadways open ; 
consequently, the air-shaft, for a return, was driven in the foot-wall. This air-shaft runs 
parallel to the coal-seam for a distance of 530 feet, where it is intersected by a tunnel driven 
in the underlying rock 350 feet long. 

In addition to the above, prospecting-work has been carried on at the " Bear's Den," which 
is situated about 3,500 feet north-west of the main tunnel, and about 1,000 feet higher. Here 
the No. 1 drift, B.D., has been driven 250 feet on the No. 3 seam ; a crosscut from this seam 
cuts the No. 2 seam at 150 feet, and the No. 2 seam has been opened up for a distance of 100 
feet. 

During my inspection of the above mine I have generally found conditions good, both in 
respect to timber and ventilation. Although a fan has been installed, owing to the difference 
in elevation of the two entrances there is a natural ventilation amounting to 9,000 cubic feet 
a minute for the use of eight men. At the " Bear's Den " there were only two men at work ; 
the tunnels were well timbered and there was no trace of gas. 

The plant consists of two locomotive boilers, and a small air-compressor, situated about 
half-way between the river and the tunnel, from which the air is conveyed in 4-inch pipes to 
the mine. 

There has been no production of coal from this mine, unless such as has been taken out in 
development or prospecting. 



K 294 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



The following are the official returns for the Columbia Coal and dike Company for the year 
ending 1912 : — 

Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above < [round. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Dailj 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 






s 


3 


7.00 


3 
15 

15 
17 
10 


I 

7.00 




15 
15 


3.50 
3.110 

: 


3.50 


Miners' helpers 






3.00 


15 
10 


3.00 
4.00 


3 00 




4.00 






























10 


■_' 25 


10 


















38 




70 




Totals 


32 

















Name of seams or pits — Nos. 1, 2, and 3. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — No. 1 tunnel, 2,000 
feet, driven in the underlying rock below the seams. No. 1 West drift. 700 feel on No. 1 
seam; from this point an upraise 600 feet to intersect No. 2 tunnel. No. 2 tunnel driven 
a distance of 350 feet in the underlying rock ; No. I drift, Kl>., 250 feet of No. 3 Beam 
crosscut from this seam to No. 2 seam in the underlying strata, 160 feet ; drift on No. 2 
seam, 100 feet. 



EAST KOOTENAY DISTRICT. 

Until within the year 11)09 there was only one company actually producing coal in the 
East Ivootenay District — that is, the Crow's Nesl Pass Coal Company, although this company 
operated three separate collieries : but during that year two new companies began to produce — 
namely, the Hosmer Mines, Limited, at Hosmer, and the Corbin Coal and Coke Company, at 
Corbin. These new companies only began to ship coal tow a ids the latter part of L 908, and, 
consequently, their outputs have not been large, but they have extensive and fully equipped 

colli, i-ics, and in the future will be important factors in the production of the district. 

The district is divided into two separate Inspection Districts. The Southern East 
Kooten.iv District, under Inspector Evan Evans, with headquarters at Fernie, includes the 

Coal Creel Collieries and the Carbonado Collieries of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal C pany, 

although this latter colliery has not been worked this past year. The Northern East Kootenay 
District, under Inspector T. H. Williams, witli headquarters at Fernie. includes the Hosmer 
Colliery of the Eosmer Mines, Limited, the Michel Collieries of the Crow's Nest Pass Coal 
Company, and the Corbin Colliery of tin- Corbin Coal and Coke Company. 

Both Inspectors now have their headquarters in the Government Rescue-station at Fernie. 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 295 

SOUTHERN EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT. 
Report of Evan Evans, Inspector. 

I have the honour, as Inspector of Coal-mines for the Southern East Kootenay District, 
to submit my annual report for the year 1912. 

In the early part of the year the Inspector's office was transferred from Cranbrook to 
Femie, thus enabling me to be nearly constantly in the coal-producing district. 

During this past year the Government erected a permanent Mine-rescue Station at Feroie. 
which has all the necessary facilities and appliances for training persons in the use of the 
rescue apparatus for mine-rescue work. There is installed at the station eight 2-hour Draeger 
apparatus, four 2-hour of the 1909 type, four 2-hour of the 1911 model, and two £-hour 
apparatus. The station has twenty-four tanks for supplying oxygen ; one oxygen litter for tin' 
purpose of conveying a person through a body of irrespirable gases, at the same time giving the 
person a supply of oxygen ; also one Draeger puhnotor for artificial respiration and a full 
supply of the necessary equipment. The rescue-station is under the supervision of an instructor 
who is always precent to instruct persons in the use of mine-rescue apparatus. I may state 
that a large number of persons are undergoing instruction. 

I regret to state that the number of fatal accidents in and about the mines was large ; 
most of the accidents are attributed to falls of coal or rock and to haulage, some of the accidents 
occurring under very peculiar circumstances. 

At Coal creek a serious accident occurred on the surface on December 30th by a snow- 
slido demolishing the carpenter-shop and electric shop, thereby causing six fatal accidents, six 
seriously and two slightly ; the snowslide occurred a few minutes after 7 in the morning, at 
the time the miners were entering the mines ; the alarm was given, when all the miners returned 
and rendered assistance to recover and rescue the men entombed under the snow and debris. 
This accident was not attributable to the getting of coal. 



Crow's Nest Pass Coal Co., Ltd. 

Capital, $3,500,000. 
Officers. Address. 

Elias Rogers, President, Toronto, Ont, 

E. C. Whitney, Vice-President, Ottawa, Ont. 

R. M. Young, Secretary, Fernie, B.C. 

Elias Rogers, Treasurer, Toronto, Ont. 

John Shanks, Colliery Manager, Fernie, B.C. 

The above company is now operating the following extensive collieries on the western 
slope of the Rocky mountains in the Fast Kootenav District, viz. : — 

Coal Creek Collieries, situated on Coal creek, about five miles from the town of Fernie, 
on a branch railway to the mines, commecting at Fernie with the tracks of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway and also those of the Great Northern Railway. 

Carbonado Collieries, situated on Morrissev creek and connected by a branch railway 
with the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Great Northern Railway at Morrissey. The 
colliery is about fourteen miles from Fernie by rail, in a south-easterly direction. This colliery 
has been shut down for more than a Pear. 



K 290 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



Michel Collieries, situated on both sides of Michel creek, on the line of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, being twenty-three miles in a north-easterly direction from Fernie. This last 
colliery is in the Northern Inspection District. 

The total gross output of the company's collieries for the past year was 950,706 tons. I >f 
this, 324,324 tons was used in the manufacture of coke, yielding 218,954 tons, of which 167 
tons of coke was added to stock, making the amount of the coke sold 218,787 tons, of which 
168,530 tons was sold for consumption in Canada, and 50,257 tuns was exported to the Ohited 
States. The coal exported to the United States amounted to 504,250 tons, while 66,547 tons 
was sold for consumption in Canada. 

The amount and disposition of this combined output of the company's collieries is more 
fully shown in the following table : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 It). ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




66,547 

.".04,250 




168,530 
50,257 


















570,707 












218,787 




324,324 
55,508 
















379,832 














129 

206 


607 
774 






950,629 






77 














167 












950,706 


218,954 











Number of Hands employed, Daily Wac.es paid, etc. 





Underground. 


.\r."\ E GrROl SB. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 

63 

717 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


48 

717 




15 






















139 

393 

25 




2( 16 
208 

7 




345 

601 
32 










Boys 












































436 








Totals 


1,322 






1,758 













3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 297 



CARBONADO COLLIERY. 

The Carbonado Colliery was not operated during the year 191: 



COAL CREEK COLLIERY. 

John Shanks, Manager ; Wm. McFegan, Overman ; W. J. Mazey, Fireboss. 

The colliery is five miles east of Fernie. Transportation is afforded by a branch railway 
making connection with both the Canadian Pacific Railway and the Great Northern Railway 
at. Fernie. 

The colliery was operated continuously during the year ; the coal trade was dull during 
the first six months of the year, but during the latter six months of the year it revived and 
the colliery operated at its full capacity ; the output of the colliery during the year was 696,844 
tons. 

In the several mines there was used, in the getting of coal, 22,045 tt>. of Monabel explosive 
and 11,957 B>. of Saxonite explosive in rock-work. There were 42,971 detonators and shots 
fired in coal, and 5,869 shots in rock ; all shots are fired with the electric battery. 

Two new tunnels have been opened about 2,000 feet north-east of the tipple ; the tunnels 
struck the coal at a distance in of 150 feet ; the size of the tunnels is 10 x 8 feet. The seam 
is about 6 feet thick ; the coal has to be lowered over an incline to the tipple, but as yet no 
commercial shipping of coal has been made from this mine. 

The general strike of the seams is approximately north and south, the seams dipping to 
the east at an average inclination of from 10 to 18 degrees ; in exceptional cases some of the 
seams have considerable undulation. The mines operating during the year are : No. 1 North 
mine, No. 5 and No. 9 mine, on the north side of the valley ; No. 1 south mine, No. 2, No. 3, 
and No. 1 east mine, on the south side of the valley. The coal from all the different mines is 
conveyed to the same tipple, a steel structure of 840 feet in length extending across the valley 
of Coal creek. The tipple is equipped with two revolving dumps, two picking-tables and 
screens, and two box-car loaders. 

No. 5 Mine. 

Jas. Stewart, Overman ; John McAlpine, Carmiehael McNay, Jos. Lane, Harry Dunlap, 
Peter Millar, and E. T. Davies, Firebosses. 

This mine is situated 3,800 feet west of the tipple ; the main entrance is by means of two 
tunnels ; the main tunnel is 4,200 feet in length ; the second tunnel is partly parallel with the 
main tunnel and, continued to No. 19 incline district, is used for both ventilation and a 
separate travelling-road. The dip workings of this mine are worked from No. 2 slope, which 
is driven to the dip for 2,450 feet from the mouth of the main tunnel. The upper workings 
are worked from No. 4 South level, which is at about 350 feet higher elevation than the main 
tunnel. No. 19 incline is driven to the full rise from a point 1,040 feet in from the mouth of 
No. 4 South level. The coal from No. 4 South level is lowered over a gravity-plane 1,100 feet 
in length, about one mile from the tipple. 

The seam is from 8 to 16 feet thick, and is worked on the pillar-and-room system; levels 
are turned off the inclines and slope 250 feet apart; rooms 14 feet wide are driven up the 
pitch of the seam ; the pillars between the rooms are generally from 40 to 60 feet wide, 
depending upon the thickness of the seam and nature of the roof ; all rooms and levels are 
timbered with framed sets. 



K 298 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



Over the incline and slope the cars are hauled by the tail-rope system and direcl method 
of haulage, and on the main levels by compressed-air motors. 

During my inspection of this mine I seldom found ;:as in No. 19 incline district, the 
ventilation was always good ; in Xo. 2 slope district the coal makes gas lively, ami on my 

inspection of this district, in December, I discovered gas in the faces of Nos. 3 and 1 r< is. 

No. I South level. 1 also found the ventilation in No. .; North and Xo. 1 South levels had 
from 1 to 1 .', per cent, of gas in the air. The roadways through the mine are generally in good 
condition, except that there is considerable crushing of the timber in No. 2 slope district, due 

to thick coal. 

Shot-firing is confined to a few places only, near the outcrop in No. 10 incline district; 
Wolf safety-lamps are exclusively used. 

(in December 6th, for Xo. 19 incline, I obtained :'.O,000 cubic feet of air a minute for 
fifty men and four horses; on December 13th, for No. 2 slope district. 1 found 18,300 cubic- 
feet of air a minute for forty-two men and three horses. At the fan drift 1 measured 127,000 
cubic feet of air a minute. The ventilation is produced by a Chandler fan. 16 feet in diameter 
and -1 feet 8 inches wide, running 138 revolutions a minute, with a wa* of 2.2 inche . 

No. '.i Mine. 
Win. McFegan, Overman : R. J. Brown and John Moore, Firebosses. 

This mine is situated 400 feet from the tipple ; the entrance to the mine is by two adit 
tunnels; the main tunnel is 3,350 feet in length and driven on the strike of the seam. A' 
present op ■ ire carried on in Xo. 3 incline, which has been turned to the ra 
distance of 2,920 feet from the mouth of the main tunnel. The mode of working is long-wall : 
levels are turned from the incline 200 feet apart, and stall roads turned from the levels at 
40-foot centres. Cogs are set along the side of the roadways 1 feet apart and packed with 
rock from the roof. The coal is soft and the roof is inclined to lie frail. The coal from 
too; of the incline is conveyed to the tipple by compressed-air motor. There is a little shot- 
tiring in this mine in rock ; shots are tired during the night shift ; Wolf safety-lamps are used 
exclusively. I seldom found gas in this mine ; on December lTth I found the mine clear of 
gas and the ventilation good. The timbering and roadways are generally in good condition. 
1 found 23,000 cubic feet of air a minute for twenty-eight men and three horses; at the fan- 
drift 1 measured 54, :ubic feet of air a minute. The size of the fan is 16 feet in diameter. 

and is driven by a 16- x 18-inch engine making ninety-six revolutions a minute, wa 
1.2 inches. 

No. 1 North Mine. 

Wm. Wilson. Overman : Robt. Adamson, John Chester, (has. O'Brien, 
Walter Joyce, and Wm. Wesnedge, Firebosses. 

This mine is situated on the north-west of the tipple ; the opening is by a tunnel 3" 
vertically higher than the tipple; a second level has been driven parallel, and for part of the 
way this, with the main tunnel, is used for ventilation. The coal from the main tunnel is 
lowered over a gravity-plane. 3,000 feet from the tipple. The seam varies from - et in 

thickness ; at present only the lower portion of the seam is worked. 

Nos. 2 and 3 inclines have been driven to the rise. 1,000 feet apart; in No. 2 incline 
workings rooms are turned oil' the incline 60 feet apart, and the rooms an i by 

crosscuts 'id feet apart, making the pillars 60 x 60 r 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mining. K 299 



In this district I seldom found gas and the ventilation was good ; the timbering and 
roadways were also in good condition. In this district I measured 11,200 cubic feet of air a 
minute passing for thirty-two men and two horses. In No. 3 incline district the rooms are 
turned off the incline 150 feet apart, and are connected by crosscuts 80 feet apart, thus making 
the pillars 150 x 80 feet. All the roadways are timbered with framed sets 8 feet high. 

In this district the coal is very thick, averaging 35 feet. About 2 to 4 feet above the 
timbers there is interbedded in the coal-seam a bed of soft shale 18 inches to 2 feet thick ; this 
causes the timbers to be much crushed along the roadways, and a large force of men has to be 
kept to repair the roadways ; the lower portion of the seam is of good quality. The coal in 
this district makes gas freely, and on a few occasions I have found gas in a few places in this 
district. 

The ventilation generally is good throughout the district. In this district I measured 
20,800 cubic feet of air a minute passing for fifty-two men and six horses. Shot-firing is 
confined to No. 2 incline district, and Wolf safety-lamps are exclusively used throughout the 
mine. The ventilation is produced by a force-fan, 5 feet in diameter and 2 feet wide, running 
300 revolutions a minute and moving 38,000 cubic feet of air a minute. 

No. 1 South Mine. 

A. G. Watson, Overman ; Thos. Ratcliffe, Wm. Stockwell, and Wm. Commons, Firemen. 

This mine is 2,500 feet south-west of and 200 feet vertically higher than the tipple ; the 
entrance is by two adit tunnels, 1,800 feet in length, driven on the strike of the seam. The 
main incline is 900 feet in length and driven to the rise at a distance of 1,300 feet in from the 
mouth of the main tunnel. The seam averages 30 feet thick ; the mode of working is by pillar 
and room ; about 10 feet of the upper portion of the seam is worked. Rooms are turned oft* 
the incline 150 feet apart, and these are connected by crosscuts from 60 to 150 feet apart, 
turned up from the rooms. All roadways are timbered with notched timbers. The cars on 
the incline are lowered witli the tail-rope system of haulage, conveyed to the mouth of the 
tunnel by horses, and then lowered over a gravity-plane to the main tram-road, on which it is 
conveyed to the tipple by an electric motor. 

On my last inspection, in December, I found a small quantity of gas in face of crosscut 
off 4 right ; the ventilation is good throughout. The timbering and roadways are generally in 
good condition. I found 22,500 cubic feet of air a minute passing through for fifty-one men 
and six horses. There is no shot-firing in this mine, and Wolf safety-lamps are exclusively 
usee] throughout. The ventilation is produced by a force-fan, 5 feet in diameter by 2 feet 
wide, running 450 revolutions a minute, water-gauge £ inch. 

No. 2 Mine. 

Win. Lancaster, Overman; Frank Landers, Jas. Bushell, and H. Lanfear, Firemen; 

Walter Clarkson, Shotlighter. 

This mine is situated on the south side of the valley and in line with the tipple; the 
opening is by means of a tunnel ; the workings arc at present in No. 1 or Highline district 
and No. 2 or Rock tunnel district. In both districts the mode of working is by pillar and stall. 

No. 1 District. — In the No. 1 district the workings arc in the upper part of the incline, 
which is at a distance of 1,400 feet in from the mouth of the tunnel. When inspecting this 
district I have always found the working-places clear of gas and the ventilation good, and the 
working-places well timbered. I found 36,000 cubic feet of air a minute in circulation for 
twenty-two men and three horses. 



K 300 Report of the Minister of Mines. 1913 



No. 2 District (or Rock Tunnel). — About 1,450 feet in from the mouth of the tunnel a 
slant was driven to the left from the main tunnel, and was continued parallel with the rock 
tunnel after the slant had reached the level course. When I made my inspection of this 
district, in December, I found the working-places clear of gas and the ventilation good, with 
the roadways in good condition. I measured 9,000 cubic feet of air a minute for ten men and 
one horse. 

These districts are ventilated by the No. 2 Highline fan, and 1 found 96,000 cubic feet 
of air a minute travelling in the fan-drift. The size of the fan is 18 feet in diameter and 8 
feet wide, running 120 revolutions a minute, against a water-gauge of 2.9 inches. Shot-firing 
is confined to the upper part of the Highline district, and Wolf safety-lamps are used in the 
mine. 

At present the old rock tunnel is being reopened ; it is the intention of the management 
to open up entirely new work in a new region, on the rise side of the rock tunnel. I may 
state that connection has been made by a rock-drift from the old rock tunnel to the Old South 
le\ el in the Highline district ; this will be used for the return airway from the new district 
and will be ventilated with the No. 2 Highline fan. 

No. 3 Mine. 

H. E. Miard, Overman ; John Biggs, John Worthington, and W. R. Puckey, Firemen. 

In this mine the same seam is being worked as in No. 2 mine ; all the workings are to the 'lip. 
The mine is entered by means of a slope 2,250 feet in length, commencing from underneath 
the tipple. At a point 1,450 feet in from the mouth of the slope, No. 2 South level, 1,950 
feet in length, has been driven towards the south ; at its termination, No. 3 slope has been 
sunk to a depth of 1,800 feet, where it struck some rock ; the coal is of good quality and the 
seam is 3 to 4 feet thick. The system of working is long-wall ; levels are turned off, on both 
sides of the slope, 200 feet apart ; 125 feet from the slope, slants are driven up half across the 
pitch from the levels, and stall-roads are driven off the slants at 40-foot centres ; cogs are set 
along the side of the roads 4 feet apart, and the waste or gob is filled and packed from the 
floor-brushings. 

With one exception, I have always found this mine free from explosive gas and the 
ventilation good, except a small percentage of gas in the air in faces of the 2nd right off tin- 
slope. The timbering and roadways are generally in good condition. Shot-tiring is carried on 
in this mine and Wolf safety -lamps are used exclusively. 

In No. 3 mine I found 38,000 cubic feet of air a minute passing for fifty-three men and 
eight horses. This mine is ventilated with the old No. 2 fan; at the fan-drift 1 measured 
132,400 cubic feet of air a minute, with the fan running 100 revolutions a minute and a 
water-gauge of 1.9 inches. The size of the fan is l<i feet in diameter and 8 feet wide, of the 
Wilson type. 

No. 1 East Mine. 

David Martin, Overman; John Caulfield, Tom Wilson, and John Bagglev. Firemen : 
John Bfawson and Alex. McFegan, Shotlighters. 

Practically, this is a new mine situated 800 feet to the east of the tipple ; the entrance is 
1>V means of a rock tunnel 215 feet in length ; the tunnel is 90 feet vertically higher than the 
tipple : the size of the tunnel is 11 x 8 feet : the seam is from 8 to 9 feet thick, although 
considerably more in places. 



3 Geo. 5 



COAL-MINIXG. 



K 301 



The total length of the main entries from the mouth of the tunnel is 1,800 feet, anil 
driven towards the south ; from the main entries at 1,600 feet in a pair of entries are being 
driven to the right and left. A diagonal entry, 1,500 feet in length and running south-east is 
being driven, commencing from a point 300 feet from the entrance of the tunnel. The main 
dip, 1,200 feet in length, is being driven on the "full dip" of 10 degrees, commencing from a 
point 400 feet from the tunnel-mouth. The size of the entries is 10 x 8 feet ; the system of 
working is mainly pillar and stall ; the rooms and crosscuts are arranged to have pillars 150 x 
300 feet. All places are timbered with notched timbers ; parts of the mine are very wet. 
The haulage from the main dip is by direct system of haulage operated by a 75-horse-power 
electric motor. The cars from the mine are lowered to the tipple over a gravity-plane 800 feet 
in length. Shot-firing is carried on in parts of this mine and Wolf safety-lamps are used. 

On my inspection, in December, I found a little gas above the timbers in Nos. 7 and 8 
rooms off the diagonal and in No. 1 water level. The ventilation was good; both timbering 
and roadways were in good condition. For the right side of the mine I found 24,600 cubic 
feet of air a minute passing for sixty men and five horses ; for the left side I measured 32,000 
cubic feet of air a minute for thirty men and four horses. 

No. 1 East mine is ventilated by the old No. 2 fan ; the main return airway is a rock 
tunnel, rising 1 in 4, driven from No. 2 dip entry, 550 feet from the mouth of No. 2 tunnel ; 
the air return to the fan is through No. 2 dip workings. In the return airway I measured 
70,000 cubic feet of air passing a minute. 

In compliance with section 106, "Coal-mines Regulation Act," there is installed at the 
colliery the following appliances for mine-rescue work : Two 2-hour Draeger apparatus, two 
2-hour apparatus of the Proto type, six i-hour apparatus of the Draeger type, two Draeger 
pulmotors, and one respirator, also 750 cubic feet of oxygen and other necessary equipments. 
The general and special rules are posted up at the entrance of each mine. 

The following are the official returns for the Coal Creek Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Output for Year. 


Coal. 


Coke. 


(Tons of 2,240 ft. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 

107,418 
41,952 


Tons. 


Sold for consumption in Canada 


55,294 
384,658 




















439,952 












149,370 




221,363 
35,537 














256,900 








111 
103 


446 




Stocks on hand first of year 

» last of year 


696,852 




















446 














696,844 


148,924 







K 302 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc., includim; Feknie Coke-ovens. 





Underground. 


Ar.u\ E GRO 


Totals. 


Charactkr of Labour. 


No. em- 

pl«i\ rd. 


Average 
Daily 

\Y age. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance . 


36 
493 
122 
305 

25 




8 




44 
493 

257 
468 












135 
163 

6 














Bo 






31 

















































Totals 


981 


312 




1 ,293 













Name of seams or pits — No. 1 North, No. 1 South, No. 1 East, No. 2, No. 3, No. 5 North, and 
No. 9 ; No. I! scam under development. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same Same as last year 
No. R seam is being developed on the four way system. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc — Same as last year. A Wilson fan, 16 feet in 
diameter. 8-foot blade, was installed during the latter pari of 1910 and completed in 1911 
on the Highline workings of No. 2 mine. Tin a capacity of 1 .'10,000 cubic feet 

of air a minute, against a 3-inch water-gauge. 



NORTHERN EAST KOOTENAY INSPECTION DISTRICT. 

Report of T. It. Williams, Inspector. 

I have the honour to submit the annual report as Inspector .if Coal-mines for the Northern 
East Kootenay Inspection District for the year 191:!. 

This district was in 1911 created a separate division with headquarters at Hosmer, and 
includes all the mines from Hosmer to the eastern boundary of British Columbia. 

The office of this district, formerly located at Hosmer, "as. in March. 1912, removed to 
Fernie, temporary quarters being provided in the Government building, pending the erection 
of the Mine-rescue Station, which is the present headquarters for the whole of the I 
Kootenay 1 aspect ion I district. 

The mines at present being operated are as follows: Hosmer Colliery, by the Hosmer 
Mines, Limited; Michel Colliery, by the Crow s Net Pass Co il Company, Limited : and Corbin 
Colliery, by the Corbin Coal and Coke Company, Limited. 

1 regret to state that the number of accidents during the year has 1 D large, -i\ fatal and 

twenty seven lion fatal being reported. Two of the fatal one- were caused by a fall of coal, 
two by a fall of rock, and two by hauls 



3 Geo. 5 Coal-mixing. K 303 



Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company* 

MICHEL COLLIERY. 

B. Caufield, Manager. 

This colliery, operated by the Crow's Nest Pass Coal Company, Limited, is situated on 
both sides of Michel creek, and comprises Nos. 3, 4, 5, and 3 East on the south side of the 
creek, and Nos. 7 and 8 on the ninth side. 

Operations were confined chiefly during the year to the south side, no attempt having 
been made to reopen No. 8, which, owing to a fire, was sealed off in May, 1911. 

No. 3 Mine. 

W. Robinson, Overman ; R. Spruston, A. Frew, A. Matuskey, J. Touhe}-, M. Littler, 

and J. Henney, Firebosses. 

This mine is 970 feet from the mouth of the main tunnel, which successively cuts Nos. 5, 
4, and 3 seams. As mentioned in the last report, the method of working this mine was changed 
from pillar and stall to long-wall, but after experimenting for some little time the management 
decided to revert to pillar and stall, which is the present method of work. The whole of the 
coal coal produced during the year was from Nos. 2 and 3 slopes, which have reached a depth 
of 1,500 and 900 feet respectively. 

Upon my last inspection I found explosive gas in No. 8 East, off No. 2 slope. With the 
exception of a few places, in which the centre posts were too far back from the face, the 
timbering was good, and all roadways and airways were in good condition. The ventilation is 
effected by three splits, as follows : East side of No. 2 slope, 16,875 cubic feet a minute for 
thirty men and four horses; west side of No. 2 slope, 22,500 cubic feet a minute for twenty- 
eight men and six horses; No. 3 slope, 15,300 cubic feet a minute for twenty men and four 
horses. This ventilation is produced by an 8- x 16-foot Wilson fan, giving 12,000 cubic feet a 
minute, with a 3-inch water-gauge, while running at a speed of 150 revolutions a minute. 

Considerable work has been done towards improving the ventilation in this mine during 
the past year, a new rock tunnel is being driven from No. 5 to No. 3 seam, which, when 
completed, will permit No. 3 mine to be ventilated with No. 5 fan (instead of with No. 1 
fan as at present), thus greatly reducing the length of the return airway, and doing away with the 
long circuitous route which the air has to travel to this fan. A new line of stoppings has been 
built on each side of No. 2 slope, and a great deal has been done in enlarging old airways and 
making new ones. The rock tunnel referred to is in 600 feet, and is expected to be complete 
early in February. The No. 5 fan, which will then be used to ventilate this mine, is a 6- x 12- 
foot Sullivan, capable of producing 150,000 cubic feet of air a minute with a 2-inch water- 
gauge. 

The coal is all pick-mined, and no blasting is done. 

No. 3 East Mine. 
T. Cunliffe, Overman ; E. Hayes, J. Mason, and W. AVhitehouse, Firebosses. 

This mine is situated about 2,000 feet south-east of the tipple, and is known also as No. 8 
South. The seam is 12 feet in thickness and is worked on the pillar-and-stall method. The 
main slope is down 1,400 feet, at which point it met with a down-throw fault. 

At the time of my last inspection I found small quantities of explosive gas in four places ; 
with these exceptions, the mine was in good condition and well timbered. 

See also page '295. 



K 304 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



The small fan which formerly ventilated this mine has been replaced by an Allis-Chalmers- 
Bullock fan 8 feet in diameter, and capable of produciag 80,000 cubic feet of air a minute, 
against a 2-inch water-gauge. The ventilation showed 56,000 cubic feet a minute for the use of 
forty-eight men and eleven horses, divided into three splits, as follows : No. 1 East split, 9,000 
cubic feet a minute for ten men and five horses ; East side of slope, 20,000 cubic- feel a minute 
for eighteen men and three horses ; West side of slope, 20,000 cubic feef a minute for twenty 
men and three horses. The fan was making 280 revolutions a minute, against a 1-inch 
water-gauge. Horse-haulage is employed to take the coal from the mine to the tipple. 

The only work done on the north side has been the driving of a prospect tunnel to locate 
No. 8 seam. This tunnel has an elevation of 47o feet above the tipple, and is l'.ihmi feet north 
of the entrance to No. 8 mine. Upon my last inspection it was in about 80 feet, and had 
struck the coal. Owing to the inclemency of the weather, operations were suspended early in 
December. Wolf safety-lamps are used throughout at this colliery. 

The following are the official returns from the Michel Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Cttpct for Year. 



(Tons of 2,240 ft.) 



Sold for consumption in Canada. . . 
a export to United States . 
a a other countries 



Total sales . 



Used in making coke 

Used under colliery boilers, etc. 



Coal. 



Tons. 



Tons. 



11,253 
119,592 



Total for colliery use. 



Stocks on hand first of year. 
a last of year 



Difference added to stock during year 
Output of colliery for year 



102,961 
19,971 



18 
103 



130,845 



122,932 



253,777 



85 



253.862 



Coke. 



Tons. 



61,112 

8,305 



161 

774 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc., inch him- Coki: 



Tons. 



69,417 



613 



70.030 



0\ ENS. 





Undergkoi mi. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


A verage 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 

Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


A verage 
Daily 

Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


12 
224 




7 




19 
224 


















Labourers 


17 
88 




71 
45 

1 




88 
133 

1 



















































341 












Total 




124 




465 





•Note. — Mechanics and skilled labour include: Underground — Drivers, motormen, rope-riders, hoist - 
men, trackmen, bratticomen, timbermen, pumpmen, faunien, and carpenters. Above ground— Lampmen, 
weighmaster, tipplemcn, firemen, machinists, carpenters, blacksmiths, engini ers.i >t. and plumbers. 



:> Geo. 5 Coal-mixing. K 30." 



Name of seams or pits — No. 3 East, No. 3. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — Same as last year. 
There was completed during the year the driving of a tunnel 600 feet long through the 
rock measures for main return airway for fan which was reported last year. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Same as last year. The fan which was 
relieved at No. 5 mine has been installed to ventilate No. 3 East mine. This is an 
Allis-Chalmers-Bullock fan 8 feet in diameter, capacity 80,000 cubic feet a minute, 
against a 2-inch water-gauge. 



Hosmer Mines, Ltd. 
Head Office — Montreal. 

Capital, §1,500,000. 
Officers. Address. 

W. D. Matthews, President, Toronto, Ont. 

Lewis Stockett, General Superintendent, Calgary, Alta. 

A. R. G. Heward, Secretary, Montreal, Que. 

H. E. Suckling, Treasurer, Montreal, Que. 

David G. Wilson, Mine Manager, Hosmer, B.C. 

Value of plant, §1,000,000. 



HOSMER COLLIERY. 

David G. Wilson, Manager ; John Musgrave, Overman, A Level ; Jas. McKelvie, Overman, B 
Level ; G. Rankin, R. Smith, S. Lynch, T. Manson, T. Wakelem, W. Rankin, J. Malt- 
man, M. Robinson, T. J. Fitzpatrick, R. Anderson, and A. Allan, Firebosses. 

This colliery has mines producing coal from two different levels, known as A and B. 

A Level. 
John Musgrave, Overman. 

The coal on this level is reached by an adit tunnel driven through the measures for a 
distance of 4,931 feet, crosscutting ten seams, but only three of these, Nos. 2, 9, and 10, 
produced coal during the year. 

No. 2 Seam. — This seam has an average thickness of about 12 feet and a dip of about 60 
degrees ; it is worked on the pillar-and-stall system, a gangway and a counter-level being 
driven north and south from the main tunnel. Every 400 feet a pair of chutes are driven up 
the pitch at an angle of 45 degrees, from which rooms 12 feet wide, with a 38-foot pillar 
between them, are driven across the pitch for a distance of 200 feet. The coal from these 
rooms is loaded into small cars, which are pushed back by the men and dumped into the 
chutes. The south gangway is 3,940 feet long, and has a pillar of coal 80 feet in thickness 
between it and the counter-level above. 

The ventilation is by two splits : Ninth side 14,490 cubic feet a minute for twenty-five 
men ; South side, 35,800 cubic feet for fifty -seven men. Upon my last inspection I found a 
little explosive gas in the south gangway : all other places were in good condition and well 
timbered. 

No. 9 Seam. — The coal in this seam is about 5 feel in thickness, having an inclination of 
about 10 degrees, which enables the regular mine-cars to be taken to the face. It is worked 
on the pillar-and-stall method. Most of the work done during the past year has been on the 
south side, the main entry of which is in 2,211 feet. 
20 



K 300 



Report ok the Minister of Mines. 



l'.H:; 



The ventilation is by two splits: North side split, 3,500 cubic feet a minute tor six men ; 
and South side split, . "54,000 cubic feet a minute for forty men. Upon my last inspection I 
found it clear of explosive gas and well timbered. 

A"o. 10 Seam. — This seam, which is nearly 5,000 feet from the main tunnel entrance, 
has been permanently abandoned on the south side, and operations haw Keen temporarily 
suspended on the north side. At the timo of my last inspection I found explosive gas in the 
counter gangway ; all the other places were clear and in good condition. 

The ventilation on A level is produced by a Walker reversible fan, which gives 135,000 
cubic feet of air a minute, with a 2.7-inch water gauge. It is driven by a pair of 38 \ Ml inch 
engines at a speed of 1 12 revolutions a minute. 

The coal in parts of No. 2 seam is mined with coal-cutting machines, and blasted with 
Monabel powder fired by electric detonators. No blasting is done in the coal in No. 1) seam. 

B Level. 

J. McKch ie, < Herman. 

This level, which is at an elevation of 500 feel above A level, has two producing mines. 
No. 2 North and No. 2 South. The main gangway of No. 2 North is in 1,200 feet, and that 
of No. 2 South 2,000 feet. The workings of No. 2 South, which is the principal mine, are 
separated from those of No. 2 South, A level, by a barrier pillar 100 feet in thickness. The 
same method of work is practised as in this seam on A level. I have never found any gas in 
either of these mines, and upon my last inspection I found them well-timbered and in good 
condition. 

Each mine is ventilated by a 6-foot fan of the Guibal type, driven by a 20-horse-power 
electric motor, producing, in No. 2 North, 12,000 cubic feet a minute for twelve men and one 
Ik. rsc ; and in No. 2 South, 12,500 cubic feet a minute for fifty-seven men and three horses. 

A Braun sampler, consisting of a pulverizer, Chipmunk crusher, and cone sampler, has been 
installed at this colliery to facilitate the assaying of the coal and coke. With this exception 
the plant is the same as last year. 

The timber is all framed on the outside before being sent into the mine for use. Wolf 
safety-lamps are used throughout on both levels. 

The following are the official returns of the Hosmer Colliery for the year ending 31sl 
I (eceinber, I !) 1 - : 



Sales and Output for Yeas. 


Coal. 


CORK. 


(Tons of 2,240 lb. ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 
14,511 


Tons. 




92,818 


























92,818 












4i..".ll 




72,681 
23,836 










91 






96,417 










ill 




1.687 
695 


267 
1,044 






189,235 


44,6(12 








992 










777 












ISS.243 


45,379 











3 Geo. 5 



COAL-MINING. 



K 307 



Numbeb of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily- 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily- 
Wage. 


Supervision and clerical assistance 


14 
100 
100 
80 
35 


$ 
3.50 - 6.00 
3.00 - 7.00 

2.75 

2.75 
3.00 - 3.75 


11 


i 

3.00 - 13.00 


25 
100 
100 
168 

71 

15 






Miners' helpers 




88 
36 
15 


2.47 - 3.00 

3. 00 - 3.85 

1.37 

































































329 


150 




479 













Name of seams or pits — A level, Nos. 2, 9, and 10 seams ; B level, No. 2 seam. 



Corbin Coal & Coke Company, Limited. 



Head Office — Spokane, Wash. 
Capital, $10,000,000. 



Officers. 

D. C. Corbin, President, 

Austin Corbin 2nd, Vice-President, 
A. T. Herrick, Secretary-Treasurer, 

E. J. Roberts, Superintendent, 
R. T. Stewart, Mine Manager, 



Address. 

Spokane, Wash. 
New York, N.Y. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Spokane, Wash. 
Corbin, B.C. 



Value of plant, $311,115. 



CORBIN COLLIERY. 

R. T. Stewart, Manager ; S. Richards, Overman ; J. Sharp, M. McLean, It. Garbett, 
J. Mackie, and H. Massey, Firebosses. 

This colliery, which is situated on the East fork of the South branch of Michel creek, is 
about fourteen miles from McGillvray Junction, on the Crowsnest branch of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway, and is connected to it by the Eastern British Columbia Railway. 

Nearly all the coal produced last year was from No. 1 mine, in which there are two seams, 
dipping nearly vertical, and varying in width from 4 to 150 feet. These are known as "A" 
and "A prime." The main entry of the latter, which is in about 2,000 feet, has not been 
advanced any during the year. There are four main tunnels, A, B, D, and E; A being the 
main haulage tunnel, and B, which is a counter to it, the main air-intake tunnel. In addition 
to the above levels, Nos. 2 and 4 in the A seam have been driven to the surface, and are 
maintained as travelling-roads, thus providing six exits. 



K 308 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



The method of working is pillar and stall, main raises being driven up at an angle of 
about 65 degrees, from which levels are turned off at right angles, and about 40 feet apart. 
These levels are driven parallel with the seam, rooms being turned off them at right angles and 
driven to the wall. The coal from these places is Loaded into cars having a capacity of 1 tun, 
which arc pushed back by the men and dumped into the chutes. 

During my inspection of this mine I found it free from gas, well-timbered, and in good 
condition. The timber used in the levels, rooms, and raises is framed on the outside before 
1 icing sent into the mine. 

The ventilation is produced by a -I- x 12-foot fan, which gives 38,000 cubic feet of air a 
minute, with a j^-inch water-gauge. This air is divided into four splits, as follows : A Split, 
3,000 cubic feet a minute for four men ; A Prime split, 12,500 cubic feet a minute for thirty 
men; D split, 16,000 cubic feet a minute for thirty six men and one horse; E split, 4,000 
cubic feet a minute for eight men. 

Monabel powder is used for blasting the coal, and is find by electric detonators. Wolf 
safety-lamps are used throughout the mini-. 

The equipment of Draeger rescue apparatus has been augmented during tin' year by a 
puhnotor. The length of tramway and description of plant is the same as last year. 

As mentioned in last year's report, steps were taken to wash the surface off what i- 
generally supposed to be a continuation of these seams at a point about two mile, south of No. 1 
mine, and which is known as the " Big Showing'' or No. 3 mine. The coal that was exposed 
after washing was mined in an open-cut, and loaded into dump-cars, which were conveyed by 
hand to a bunker, from where it was taken by teams to a temporary tipple near No. 1 mine, 
and reloaded into railway-cars ; this method did not prove sati factory and was abandoned 
early in the year. 

Operations were resumed in the summer, considerable work being done towards developing 
this mine and putting it on a shipping basis. The railway was extended from Corbin to the 
mine, and a stripping-machine installed to remove the cover overlying the coal at this place, 
but, owing to the early advent of winter and an exceptionally heavy snowfall, work was 
suspended for the season about the middle of < )ctober, before the actual mining stage was reached- 

The following are the official returns from the Corbin Colliery for the year 1912 : — 



Sales and Octitt for Year. 


Coal. 


( oKE. 


(Tons of 2,240 It). ) 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 


Tons. 




71,711 
47,492 




























119,203 






























3,060 




































Difference -' •'"',' 1 '''' .'" Utock durine vear 






Lnnercnci ^ t;ik^n from / 5lucK """"fe „> 












122,263 















3 Geo. 5 



Coalmining. 



K 309 



Number of Hands employed, Daily Wages paid, etc. 





Underground. 


Above Ground. 


Totals. 


Character of Labour. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Avorage 
Daily 
Wage. 


No. em- 
ployed. 


Average 
Daily 
Wage. 




6 
60 

55 




8 




14 
60 
55 
30 
14 
























30 
6 






Mechanics and skilled labour .... 


8 




















































129 








173 




Totals 




44 















Name of seams or pits — A and A 1. 

Description of seams, tunnels, levels, shafts, etc., and number of same — Strike of seam is S. 
18° W. and dip 70 degrees east to vertical. Outcrop along crest of ridge running south, 
width 4 to 150 feet. There are four main tunnels, A, B, D, and E. A is the lower and 
main haulage tunnel, 9x14 feet in the clear and 2,200 feet long ; B, D, and E are 9 x 10 
feet in the clear. There are five levels, about 40 feet apart, between B and D tunnels, 
and six levels, 40 feet apart, above E tunnel. There are no shafts, the tunnels and levels 
being connected by 6- x 10-foot raises. 

Description and length of tramway, plant, etc. — Tramway is 950 feet long ; 360 feet of thin 
on trestles leading to coal-bins, having 1,000 tons capacity. Power plant — Two 50-horse- 
power boilers, locomotive type; two 1 20-horse-power boilers, tubular type ; one 80-horse- 
power engine and dynamo ; one Rand high-pressure air-compressor ; two Porter air- 
locomotives ; one fan-engine and 4- x 12-foot ventilating-fan. 



K 310 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



191: 



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3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mixing. 



K 311 





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K 312 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



ANALYSES OF ACCIDENTS DURING YEAR 1912. 





No. or Agctdxcts inn 1,000 Mkn employed. 


Tonm of Coal siiskd pbr Accident. 




Fatal. 


Serious. 


Slight. 


Total. 


Fata!. 


Serious. 


Slight. 


Total. 




5.35 
3.18 


8.30 
5.08 


7.47 
6.14 


21 . 12 
14.40 


97,016 
117,633 


63,061 


70,070 
60,845 


24,730 
25,948 




3.93 


8.17 


6.59 


16.69 


108,061 


e8,766 


64,376 


25,426 







PER CAPITA PRODUCTION OF COLLIERIES. 



Gross tons of 

coal mined 

in 1912. 



Total number of 
men employ ed 
by collieries. 



ions oi coai mmeu , . , ions or coai nun en 

permanemplu V -.l ' ' ^J-,,, ■ ^ * i i*r man employed 
,- underground. 



at colliei i 



Bast Kootenay District 


1,261,21! 

1,764,1:17 


2,410 
4,720 

7,130 


523 
353 


1,780 
3,495 

5,275 


709 

505 






Total for Province 


3,025,709 


4!4 


573 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mixing. 



K 313 



DETAILED STATEMENT OF ACCIDENTS IN B.C. COLLIERIES DURING 1912. 

COAST COLLIERIES. 
Reported by Thomas Morgan and John Newton, Inspectors. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


] 


East Wellington . 
(V. &N.) 


Jan. 4 


Thos. Rimron 


Miner 


In No. 2 Dip stall off East level, a 
piece of roof- rock fell through lag- 
gings and bruised him. 


•2 


Nanaimo 

(W. Fuel) 


8 


Wm. Moore 


Timberman's 

[helper. 


Moore, who had taken the place of the 
pointsman, was standing between an 
emptj - trip attached to a motor, and 
two loads moving towards the shaft, 
the motor started, causing one car 
to jump the track and others to over- 
turn ; he was caught and sustained 
crushed hip and back ; died Jan. 12. 


:i 


Extension 

(Can. Coll.) 


19 


Eugene Santi 


Miner 


Leg broken below the knee. He was 
standing at the face of his roadway, 
when a piece of coal fell from the 
face, No. 2 West level, No. 2 mine. 


4 


Extension 


31 


David Davidson . . . 


Fireboes . ... 


He went in to examine the place when a 
piece of cap-rock fell on him ; a shot 
had been tired the previous shift. 


5 


South Wellington 
(P.C.C.M.) 


Feb. 13 


George Spowart . . . 


Miner 


Was occupied in replacing a prop, 
knocked out by a shot, when a piece 
of rock fell and bruised him about 
head and back. 


6 


Extension 


Mar. 5 


Mike Lynan 


"' 


A piece of rock fell from the rib, 
breaking his leg. 


7 


South Wellington 
(P.C.C.M.) 


6 


George Moore 


Shotfirer 


Was sounding the overhanging top 
coal after tiring a shot when it came 
away and bruised his shoulders and 
chest. 


8 


(W. Fuel) 


12 


Louie Korchuk .... 




Sitting on first car driving a mule, he 
fell and was run over by three cars; 
right arm and right leg broken and 
internal injuries ; died on March 27. 


9 


Extension 


Apr. 1 1 


Andrew Jack 


Miner 


Was standing on inside of haulage-rope 
while lowering a car when rope came 
off pulley and pinned him to the 
wall, burning his leg. 


10 




11 


David Wilson 




He was sitting under a piece of cap- 
rock known to be loose, was stooping 
to pull a piece of coal when the rock 
fell and sprained his back. 


II 




12 


Jas. Provin 




He had gone into the gob out of his 
working-place with the driver-boss 
to show him some rails, when a piece 
of rock fell and broke his pelvis. 


12 


tt 


26 


Alex. McKinnon. . . 




The fireboss had examined his place 
an hour previously and found it 
clear, but, on drilling a hole, 
McKinnon struck a feeder of gas, 
which he lighted. 



K 314 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



ACCIDENTS IN COAST COLLIERIES.— Continued. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


13 


Extension 


May 7 


Andrew Dickie. . . . 


Miner 


On No. 1 incline, No. 3 mine, the 
loaded ear jumped the track and 
broke the rope, and the empties 
dropped and cut and squeezed his 
legs- 


14 


" 


10 


Ed. Humes 




Squeezed about the hip when brake 

was taken off loader) ear without 
his having been notified. 


15 




20 




Miner 


Coal falling from face bruised him 
about hip. 


16 


Oyster Harbour. . 


•Tune 1 


August Mestolugh 


'/ 


Hoisting-bucket tore off piece of slid- 
ing-board, which fell 40 feet, cutting 
his head. 


17 


Extension. . . . 


July 9 


Samuel Juikish .... 




When he was timljering a pie. 
rock fell and Btruck him on tin- back: 
he had been warned by overman and 
fireman that his place should be 
limbered. 


18 


" 


11 


\V. Wilkie 




Elope came nil' eleves and empty car 
ran down slope, striking him and 
causing broken collar-bone. 


19 


" 


13 


Thos. Richardson . . 


Miner 


Weight of roof swayed timber out 
and he was jammed and sustained 
broken thigh-bone. 


20 




Aug. 7 




Labourer 


Was levelling-off a cave in the return 
airway and lit a small accumulation 
of gas with naked light : burned. 


21 


No. 1 Nanaimo. . 

(W. Fuel) 


Dec. 20 




Bock-miner . . . 


Charging a hole with dynamite when 
charge exploded, dnvmg tamping 
bar into Ins fai e and neck, i a 

blood to enter lungs ; killed. 


22 




Jan. 9 




Miner 


Fall of roof-coal broke his arm. 


23 


" 


„ •>> 


Kimoto 


" 


Fall of rock from between stringers. 
breaking his jaw and crushei 

shoulder. 


24 





23 


Jos. Santoni 




Was helping to adjust a timber oi a 
stopping when some lime w as squi't 
ed out into his eve. 


25 




26 


Vivian Keene 


Runner 


Lowering empty ear against his >ack 
when ear over ran him and clashed 
his foot. 


26 




Feb. 5 


I'. Pasquala 


Miner 


Fall of rock crushed foot. 


27 


" 


it i 


Matt. Cinda. 




Ignited gas coming from cav<, which 
occurred after the fireb'ss had 
examined place. 


_'S 


" .... 


27 


,1. Ridpath 


Runner 


Caught between cars and sustained 
broken collarbone. 


29 


rt 


Mar. 16 


Chu Wee 


Tracklayei . 


A shot broke tli rough fom another 
place and killed him. 


30 




Apr. 4 


S. I). Williams.... 


Miner 


Fall of rock bruised fort. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 315 



ACCIDENTS IN COAST COLLIERIES.— Concluded. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


31 




May 


23 




Miner 


Fall of rock from face killed him. 


32 





// 


29 


Angelo Murletti . . . 





Was timbering when a fall of rock 
caused compound fracture of fibula. 


33 


(W. Fuel) 


n 


30 


Victor Mackey . . . . 


Machine driller 


Fall of rock fractured right thigh and 
ruptured kidney. 


34 


Van. -Nan. C. Co. 


June 


16 


Harry Mainwaring. 


Engineer 


Draining boiler and was scalded on leg. 


35 




n 


20 


MahSu 


Miner 


An empty trip jumped the track and 
crushed him against the rib, causing 
dislocated hip. 


36 




a 


23 


H. Anderson 


Driver 


Working at pump, was struck by a 
lever ; concussion of the brain. 


37 





a 


23 


L. Shearer 


Fireboss 


Same accident ; fracture of base of 
skull. 


38 




July 


17 


Alex. Boruski 


Miner 


Letting car down from his place when 
it ran over him and killed him. 


39 


Pacific Coast O.C. 


Aug. 


5 


Henry Barkhause. . 




Easing cars down grade when his foot 
was caught in track ; cars struck 
him, bruising back and side. 


40 


Cumberland 


// 


26 


Ezra Coleman 


" 


Riding on trip, he stood up and was 
struck by a stringer; sprained back 
and fractured ribs. 


41 


( \V. Fuel) 


Sep. 


10 


Wm. J. Brown. . . . 


" 


Whilst leading horse past trip his arm 
was caught between horse-collar and 
a post and broken. 


42 
43 


(W. Fuel) 
(W. Fuel) 


„ 


11 
16 


Chas. Smith 


Machine-helper 
Rope-rider. . . . 


Fall of rock bruised him about back. 

Fell under car of trip and sustained 
broken leg. 


44 


Nanaimo 

(\V. Fuel) 




24 


Samuel Woodcock . 




Fall of rock ; bruised about back and 
hip. 


45 


V.N.C.C 


■i 


27 


Charles Scott 




Fell off ladder and injured knee. 


46 


Cumberland 


Oct. 


16 


Mick Wlakovitch . . 


Labourer 


Fall of rock fractured skull. 


47 


Van. Nan. C. Co. 


" 


21 


John Stevenson .... 




Jammed while coupling cars, sustained 
cracked collar-bone. 


48 


Cumberland 


Nov. 


29 


Chung Sam 


■> 


Crushed by car ; leg broken. 


49 


-/ 


Dec. 


27 


Mah Fung Sing 


Miner 


Fall of coal killed hiin. 



NICOLA COLLIERIES. 



:,n 



51 



Nicola Vallev 

[C."& c 



Reported by Thomas Morgan and Robert Strachan, Inspectors, 
Jan. 9 Jos. Stanhouse .... Miner .... 



'J'.' 



John Manson Driver. 



Was sounding the roof when a piece 
of rock fell trom side, breaking his 
ankle. 

Riding on his trip, fell off car and was 
crushed between cars and side of 
road ; died, broken back. 



K 310 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



ACCIDENTS IN NICOLA COLLIERIES.— Concluded. 



69 



71 
72 

73 
74 

7--. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


52 


Diamond Vale . . . 


Mar. 


7 




Pusher 


Killed by an explosion of gas and 
dust caused l>v a small quantity ol 
gas and dust being ignited in NOB. 
13 and 14 stalls, the resulting ex- 
plosion extending over a large area. 


53 





• 


7 


Wm. Hurd 




Same accident ; killed. 


54 


tl ... 


» 


* 


Henry J. Grimes . . 


Fireman 


it n 


55 


'/ ... 


" 


i 


Franklin Kallia. . . . 




» 


56 


„ 


It 


7 


Wm. Baxter 


» 


a a 


57 


'/ ... 


» 


7 


Jno. Pattie 





it a 


58 


It ... 


n 


i 


Jno. Templeton . . . 




it i< 


59 


II ... 


" 


7 




Pusher 


Same accident ; severely burnt about 
face and hands. 


60 


tl ... 


" 


t 


Harry Hogg 


Rope-rider .... 


Same accident ; burnt, face and hands. 


61 


Xir.V.C.&C.Co. 
( Middlesboro. ) 


May 


14 




Pusher 


In front of car removing blocks when 
he fell and draw-bar bruiied his 
back. 


62 


Middlesboro .... 


June 


6 


R. J. Farquharson . 


Switchman. . . . 


Injured between car and side when 
car left the track. 


63 




" 


12 


Otta Hytiai 




Samson post pulled out and fell on 
his leg, breaking it. 


64 


II .... 


July 


29 


Richard Smith .... 


Mechanic's 

[helper. 


Caught between car and post ; left 
arm broken. 


65 


Inland C. & C. . 


Oct. 


i 




Rope-rider 


Fell off trip; received scalp-wounds. 


66 


Middlesboro .... 


» 


31 


A. Bury 


Miner 


Fall of top coal broke collar-bone and 
bruised back. 


67 


PrincetonCA LCo 


Nov. 


2.1 


F. Pratt 




Fall of top coal dislocated shoulder. 


68 


// 


Deo. 


27 




Machine-helper 


Fall of coal fractured two ribs. 



Hosmer 

Michel No. 3 ... . 

Hosmer 



Michel No. 3 . 



May 8 

II 

15 
June 22 



July 

Aug. 



NORTH-EAST KOOTENAY COLLIERIES. 

Reported hy T. H. Williams, Inspector. 

A. Kunyente Screcnman Working on tipple, injured hand 

between spragg and rail. 

Thumb caught between bumper and 
rail and partially amputated. 

Fall of rock killed him. 

Piece of coal fell on his hand, fractur- 
ing third and fourth fingers. 

Fall of coal broke his collar-bone. 

Fall of coal fractured right leg. 



J. Cockram Mir 

J. Crippen . 

Vincent Kram 

Nick Bathisteth. . . 

T, Baybutt 

Herman Elmer .... 



i Whilst runninga Mr-Ginty was caught 

between car and face and sustained 
compound fracture of left leg and 
and laceration of right leg. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 317 



ACCIDENTS IN NORTHEAST KOOTENAY COLLIERIES.— Continued. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


76 


Hosnier 


Aug. 9 


Nick Hannan 


Miner 


Fall of coal sprained ankle. 


77 




29 


C. Salmo 


Rockman 


Piece of rock from shot fractured his 
right leg. 


78 





Sep. 28 


J. Altemere 




On surface, foot caught in car-haul 
machine and severely injured. 


79 




30 


Martin Stanoik. . . . 


Driver 


Killed by being crushed between ear 
and post. 


SO 


Hosmer 


Dec. 13 


Massime Marlield . . 




Fall of coal crushed chest and lungs. 


si 


Corbin No. 1 . . . . 


23 


J. Karlyevitch .... 


» 


Fall of rock killed him. 


82 


Hosmer 


26 


E. Thomas 


Timberman . . . 


Thumb injured between timbers. 


S3 


Corbin No. 1 . . . . 


Jan. ."> 


Mike Farrace 


Miner 


Pinned by cave between coal and car ; 
fractured three ribs. 


84 


Hosmer 


HI 


A. Dunsmore 


Hoist man 


Crushed between car and post, causing 
shock. 


85 


Michel No. 8 


13 


J. Velpatti 




Fall of coal bruised back and legs. 


86 


Hosnier 


IS 


F. J. Harrison 


" 


Struck a nail into his hand, lacerat- 
ing it. 


87 




18 


R. Pratt 




On surface, slight injury to face, 
caused by another person loading 
ashes. 






88 


Michel No. 3 


23 


J. Kempan 


Driver 


Lacerated thumb caused by jamming 
it against the wheel of a car whilst 
spragging. 


89 


// //.... 


27 


S. Hampton 




Partial amputation of thumb, caused 
by having it caught between the 
tail-chain hook and draw-bar of 
car. 


on 




30 


Anton Vingcr 


Miner 


Left index finger slightly crashed by 
moving timber on a car. 






91 




Feb. 3 


Fred Kurybuk 




Fall of coal caused scalp-wound and 
left index finger broken. 






92 


Michel No. 3.... 


9 


Joe Grillus 


" 


Struck his foot with pick. 


93 




,, 20 






Fall of coal broke leg. 

Finger pinched between a lump of coal 
and edge of car. 


!il 


Michel No. 3 


Mar. 5 





nr. 


ti a ... . 


5 


E. Cividian 


" 


Fall of coal broke leg. 


Ofi 




14 






When coming down a chute, a miner 
above allowed a timber to fall, 
which struck Laba and caused com- 
pound fracture of leg. 






97 




„ 27 


R. Doyle 




In switching cars he was thrown 
against reversing lever on motor; 
sustained rupture of lung and died. 












98 


Michel No. 3... 


27 


H. Eccleston 


Driver 


Three toes crushed between bumper 
of runaway car and ground. 



K 318 



Report of the Minister ok Mines. 



1918 



ACCIDENTS IN NORTH-EAST KOOTENAY COLLIERIES. -^-Concluded. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupatinii. 


Details. 


•ill 


Corbin No. 1 . . . . 


Apr. 2 


.loe Perfette 




Fall of coal killed biin. 


100 




15 


A. Ferfen 


" 


Caught between car and snubbing 
l».st, sustaining fracture of left 
tibia. 


llll 


Corbin No. 1 


n 15 


John Wasnowicki. . 


Mine-labourer.. 


Killed by fall of noal. 



SOUTH-EAST KOOTENAY COLLIERIES. 
Reported by Evan Evans, Inspector. 



102 

103 

104 

105 
106 
107 

108 
109 

1 10 

III 

112 
113 

114 

115 

116 



No. 3 Coal Creek. 

Coal Creek 

No. 2 Coal Creek. 



No. 1 South 
(Coal Creek. ) 



No. 1 South 

(Coal Creek. ) 

No. 5 Coal Creek. 



No. 1 North. . 
(Coal Creek. 



No. 2 mine . 



No. 3 mine. 



Coal Ck. surface. 



No. 5 mine 

(Coal Creek. ) 



No. 1 East 

(Coal Creek.) 

No. 3 Coal Creek. 



No. 5 Coal i Ireek. 



No. 1 North . .. 
(Coal Creek.) 



Feb. 28 



Mar. 1 1 



15 



29 



29 



May 6 



June 27 

Aug. 14 

19 

Sept. ."> 



Oct. 



16 



21 



23 
9 



Andrew Bierge. 

\Yni. Crompton 
Frank Brindley 

VVm. Corlatt .. 
Win. Whittle . . 



Win. Savage 



Joseph Szpila .... 
Albert Whitehouse. 

Richard Hembrow 

Ralph < lash. ...... 

James McPherson. 
John Caufield 



Henry Waters 

Mike Searpino 
James French, 



Miner 



Driver. 



Mil 



Mine-labourer . 

Motorman's 

[helper. 

Driver-boss . . 



Motorman's 

[helper. 



Fire buss 



Timberman's 

[helper. 



Miner 



While pushing car out of face he fell, 
and car moved back and fractured 
his thigh. 



Rope i ider 



Slipped on ice near blacksmith-shop 
and broke left fibula ; on surface. 

Driving out a trip, horse turned ; his 
leg was caught between the car and 
gun and fractured. 

Cave of rock fractured two ribs. 



Fall of rock killed him. 



When setting up timbers some coal 
fell from the face, causing fracture 
of both legs. 

Run over by car on incline and 
killed. 

Was riding on the motor when a pipe 
Struck him, injuring buttock and 
testicles. 

Was attaching drag to loaded trip: 
when trip started, the rope broke 
and car ran over and killed him. 

While uncoupling cars on surface from 
motor he fell under carsand sustained 
two fractured legs and fractured 

right arm ; died twelve hours later. 

While examining a place after firing 

a shot some coal fell and dislocated 
his left hip. 

Amputation of second and third fit [ 
of right hand by being crushed by 
driving-gear pinion of a pump. 

Waters \i as removing rock when a 
in broke and caught bis wrist; 
He became excited and died of 
fright. 

Fall of coal fractured femur: died 
four weeks later. 

running over him caused broken 
clavicle. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mining. 



K 319 



ACCIDENTS IN SOUTH-EAST KOOTENAY COLLIERIES.— Concluded. 



No. 


Colliery. 


Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Details. 


117 


No. 1 East 
(Coal Creek. ) 


Oct. 19 


Harold Bird 


Rope-rider .... 


Amputation of first and second 
fingers of left hand by a car running 
over him. 


118 


No. '2 Coal Creek. 


Nov. 18 


Peter Butala 


Miner 


Fall of rock at the face killed him. 


119 


No. 3 Coal Creek. 


18 


Modeste Theodolez. 




Sustained broken clavicle by being 
crushed between car and roof. 



K 320 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



PROSECUTIONS UNDER "COAL-MINES 
REGULATION ACT." 



As is incumbent upon the Inspector, he has been obliged to lay information before tin- 
local Magistrates in a large number of cases for infractions, by the workmen in the mines, of 
the general and special rules, which are provided solely for their own protection. The e 
regulations are for the general safety of all the underground employees, and the careless: 
of one man endangers all his fellow workmen, whose lives arc practically in the hands of such 
foolishly careless or criminal person. 

The following prosecutions have been brought during the year for the offences noted : the 
judgments given bv the .Magistrate being shown : — 



Date. 



Feb. 



Name. 



J. H. McMillan 

T. Beard 

R. McAllister. 
T. Coorane. . . . 



Occupation. 



Manager. . . . 



Dr 



J. Li Wis 

\ Ri ibertson. . 

s. Tabacco 

\l:i\ ( 'hung . . 

Ma Gunn 



• I- S.I! In. 



II. W. Bright- 

[well 

Ed. Woods. . . . 



Sept. 10 Benj. Browitt. M 



lager. 



Mine. 



Comox . 



Aii.ln v. 1'ilk- Miner 
[enen 



Diamond 

[Vale 



Middlesboro. 



( >ffence charged. 



Judgn 



Violating (Eight-hour Act) sec. Fined Sin and 
18, "C.M.K. Act " 



Ditto . 



s.-, 



Violating Uen'l Rule 9 (matches 
in possession) 



no 






Violating Gen'l Rule 12 in two 



.*."> in each 



i .it ei 32, •■ C.M.R. Fined $30 and 
Aii ." employ iog fireboss who 
had no certificate as such 

Charged by Inspector with i Certificate as mana 
gross negli cancelled, by in 

quiry under sec. 4 s 

Charged with having, on July Mr. Stewart -us 
5th, filled BeveraJ dummy pended his ccrtni 
tamping cartridges with coal- 
dust, the cartridges being 
filled a) either • ad " ith claj 
with lutein to 
tirer in No. 2 mine, Middles- 



eate during the 
Minister of 
pleasure. 



3 Geo. 5 



Coal-mixing. 



K 321 



I'ROSKCl'TIOXS. Conduded. 



Date. 


Name. 


Occupation. 


Mine. 


Offence charged. 


Judgment. 


Sept. 4 


Peter Myers. . . 


Shotfirer. . . . 


Middlesboro. 


Charged with tiring shots in 
No. 4 mine, Middlesboro, 
these shots not being proper- 
ly placed or the coal well 
prepared 


Case dismissed. 


Oct. 16 


Fred Krisch . . . 


Miner 


Middlesboro. 


Information was laid against 
him for having tampered 
with his safety-lamp in the 
No. 4 mine, Middlesboro, 
contrary to Special Rule 7!) 


Accused fled the coun- 
try. 


Feb. 7 


John Magistic. 




Michel 


Charged with having matches 
in his possession in contra- 
vention of General Rule 9 of 
"Coal-mines Act" 


Fined §10 and costs or 
sixty days in gaol. 




Joseph Tipton 





« 




Ditto. 


Feb. 13 


Thomas Janco. 
John Vocalick . 










Fined go and costs. 




Ceasar Vince, 


n 






/' /' // 




Tom Leoskoski 


» 


» 





// it n 


Aug. 14 


Corbin C. k C. 
[Co. 


Company. . . . 


CorbiD 


Violating sec. 4 of " Coal-mines 
Act" in employing a boy 
under fourteen 


Case dismissed. 


Sept. 3 


T. Carmillo. . . . 


Miner 


Michel 


Charged with breach of Special 
Rules in riding on a loaded 
trip in No. 3 mine 


Fined S10 and costs or 
sixty days in gaol. 




A. Bartillon. . . 

Luiyi BeUa- 

[gamba 




Coal Creek . . 


Ditto 


Ditto. 


Aug. 3 


Loading out in a car of coal, 2 
1T». Monabel and four electric 
fuses; both explosives were 


Fined gill and costs. 










in same canister 





K 322 



Report of the Minister of Minks. 



lit I.". 



METALLIFEROUS MINES SHIPPING IN 1912. 



CASSIAR. 

PORTLAND CANAL MINING DIVISION. 



Mine or Group. 


Locality. 


< >\\ ner or Agent. 


Address. 


Character ol Ore 










G61d, silver. 




Bear river 




Gold, copper. 











EAST ROOT EN AY. 

GOLDEN minim; i>I\ (SION 



WEST ROOTENAY. 

NELSON MINING DIVISION. 



Monarch 


Field 












FORT STEELE MINING DIVISION. 




. 


.1 P. Farrell 






St. Eugene 


Kimherley 


T. w. Bingay, Secretary 











Arlington 

Canadian King 

Emerald 

H.B 

Molly Gibson i 
Motherlode. 

Poorman 

Queen 

Relief 

Queen Victoria 
Vancouver . 
Yankee Girl 



Erie 

Salino 

Kokanee creek 
Sheep creek . . 
Granite . . . . . 
Sheep creek . . 

Erie 

Nelson 

Sheep creek . . 
Ymir 



William Boluses 

Win. Holmes . , - 
R. W. Mifflin . . 
P. F Morton . . 
T. W. Bingay. .. 
Geo. E Farish . 
E. E. Guille .... 
E. V. Bucklej , 
A. D. Westbj . .. 
I ►, Lai mound . . 
G. H. Fisher 

fl. Mabry 



Nelson ... . 

Salmo 

Trail ..'.".'.'. 
Sheep Creek 
Granite .... 
Sheep < Ireek 
i tie 

i .,. enwood 
Sheep < ireek 
Spokane . . . 



Gold, silver. 
Silver, lead. 

Gold, silver. 

Col.l, silver, copper. 

Gold, silver, lead. 



ainsworth MINING DIVISION. 





Riondel 

Paddj 's peak 








Hope 


F. R. Wolfe 






Sih.-r. 






Trail 














w. s Bawley 

w h Burgess 














.' !■' Caldwell 




Sih er, lead, zinc. 









SLOCAN MINING DIVISION. 









rks 


Gold, sill • r 






sih er, lead, /.inc. 




<;. Stilwell 








1 vi r, lead. 






it ii 




Payne mountain 








T. McAllister 

w. B, Zwiuky 










Rambler-Cariboo 


Sandi in 




" 




T. W. B'mgaj 

W. E. Zwicky 


Trail 




Rio 








Ruth. .. 












W. II. North 

































3 Geo. 5 



Metalliferous Mines Shipping in 1912. 



K 323 



WEST KOOTENAY— Concluded. 

SLOGAN CITY MINING DIVISION. 



Mine or Group. 



Black Prince . 
Eastmont . . . 
Enterprise . . . 

Kilo 

Meteor 

Ajax 

Silver Cup ... 
Fidelity . 
High Grade . . 

.Nettie L 

Spider 



Locality. 



Lemon creek . 
Slocan lake. . . 
10-mile sreeb 
Lemon creek . 



Owner or Agent. 



Address. 



John C. Moen 
E. A. Griffith. 
a. S. Fowler. . , 

A. Sostad 

G. H. A v lard .. 



Riondel 

Nelson 

New Denver. 



Character of Ore. 



Silver, lead. 



Gold. 
Gold, silver. 



KEVELSTOKE, LARDEAC, AND TROUT LAKE MINING DIVISIONS. 



Ferguson . 



Gerrard - . . 
Trout lake 
Ferguson . . 
Pool creek 



F. C. Merrv 



J. E. Lamphere. . 
J. W. Livingston 

P. 0. Merry 

F. G. Wrightson . 



Ferguson . 



Gerrard 

Trout Lake 

Ferguson 

Comaplix Gold, silver, lead. 



Silver, lead. 



Gold, silver, lead. 
Silver, lead. 



TRAIL CHEEK MINING DIVISION. 



Blue Bird 


Rossland 

Grenville mountain 

Rossland 






Gold, silver, lead, zinc. 
Gold, silver, copper. 




M. E. Purcell 


Inland Empire . . 
I.X.I 


F. E. Pearce 




R. T. Evans 






Le Koi 


F. S. Pelers 




Gold, silver, copper. 


Le Roi No. 2 





E. Lew 





Nickle Plate 






I hoenix 


" 


K. Dalbv Morkill 











Gold, silver, lead. 



BOUNDARY. 

GREENWOOD MINING DIVISION. 



Copper Mine 

Elkhorn 

Emma 

Oiunby 

Jewel ... 
Mother Lode 
Wellington . 

Dividend 

Nickel Plate 



Greenwood 

Phoenix 

Long Lake 

Greenwood 

Phoenix 

Kruger mountain 
Hedle.v 



I). Moran 

C. Kenney 

O. Lachiinin.l 
G, w. Wooster 
C. A. Banks . 
O. Lachmund . 



Danville 

Greenwood . 



Grand Forks . 
Greenwood. . 



Silver, copper. 
. Gold, silver. 
Gold, silver, copper. 

Gold, silver, lead. 
Gold, silver, copper. 



OSOYOOS MINING DIVISION. 



.). C. Fisher 
G. P. Jones., 



Spokane 
H wile v.. 



Gold, copper. 
Gold. 



COAST. 

NANAIMO MINING DIVISION. 



Little Billy. ■■ 


„..| , 


II. P. Fogh 




Seattle 


Copper, gold, silver. 














VANCOUVER MINING 


DIVISION. 








J. W. D. Moodie 




Copper, silver. 



K 324 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



LIST OF CROWN-GRANTED MINERAL CLAIMS. 



CROWN GRANTS ISSUED IX 1912. 



c \S$] \k. 



Claim. 



Division. 



Alexandra Atlin 



Carnation 

i 

Eglantine 

Engineer No. 1 



Gulden Hope 

Haines . . . 

Kingston 



Montreal 

Northern Partnership 
No. I 



I »ute. 



■ 



160 G. 1 
1 



■ 

Rose Fraction 

^ "II 

A ja\ Portland Canal. 

iquin •> ii 



Ben Boll 

Ben Bolt Fractional >■ " 

i i ■ mond •• ■■ 

Bull Fraction 

50 No. 1 >- >- 

11 No. 2 . •■ 11 

Fractional 

Dundee 

Erie 

Jumbo 

mi 

Last 1 thatice 

Lucky Boy 

Maid of Erin 

Mammoth 

tional 

Minnie 

Fractional 



Penetang 



tide 

-! 

ae 

•\> 

u entwortb 

Donna Skeena. 

Einnia Fractional 

Eva 

Fanny 

Killhope 



1. >T Rocker 





Jan. 17 

April -iy 

Julv 20 
April 10 



Mar. 15 
July 20 

July 20 

April 1U 



Christopher w illiam Andrew Nevili 612 G. 1 

ser 157 

Johney Samuel Nunkove 

Simon Jarob Weitzman 

Samuel Martin Eraser 375 t*. 1 

James. Alexander Konrad Wawrecka, Denj. Green Nicoll, 

John Dunham 19 

Elizabeth Kirkland, Mary Ann Kirkland, admin - 

the estate of John Kirkland, deceased, and Fred Bovan. 

Simon Ja 1: - '■ ' -' ,;: ' 

Margaret Creighlon Gatewood > ; ~ 

Simon Jacob Weitzinan.. 153 G. 1 17. C2 

Louis Alphonse Pure S»9 G. 1 49.37 

James Alexander, Konrad Wawrecks Green Nicoll, 

John Dunham 

Noemie Eraser, Louis Alphonse Pare 

Rosa Lena W < .1 nnan , 

John Franklin Tompkins . . ■ 

John Gordon Morrison 

Samuel < Sow • •-■■ 

International Mining Co., ltd. (N.P.L.) 

Samuel Curl.". 

Pacific Coast Exploral ion Co., Ltd. 

International U 1 ltd. (N.P.I..) 

Fay Alfred Scott . 

William SpUrck 



Neil McLeod Curran 

International Mining Co., Ltd. (N.l'.L.) . 



Pacific Coast Ex| Co , Ltd 

Vancouver-Portland Canal Mines, Ltd. (N.P.L.) 
Glacier Creek Mining Co., Ltd. (N.P.L.) 



Samuel Gourlej 

Internati* nal Mining Co., Ltd. 1 n I 

Glacier Creeh Mining Co.. Ltd. (N.P.L 1 . 
Samuel Gnurlej 

Ltd. (N.P.L.).. 



International Mining Co., Ltd. (N.P.L.) 

Samuel Gourlej 

(reek Miuing Co., Ltd. (N.P.L.) . 

■■ ■ 
Vancouver-Portland Canal Mines, Ltd. (N.P.L ) 



International Mining Co., Ltd. (N.P.L.). 

George Martin, Win. Shannon, James P.. Mathers 





P.arl Fractional 
Pink 

Reid 



River Mouth 

Scepter 

pe 



Francis S. Dakers 

Watson D Noble, Edward Donahue, Win. E. Collison, and 
Jan rtson, administrators of the e^r 
Donald A. Robertson, deo - 

George Martin, Wm. Shannon, James B. Mathers 

Richard Arthur Trethewey, J* seph Ogle Trethewey 

Robie Lewis R< id ..... -. 

. Martin, Wm. Shannon, James B. Mathers 

Frank Round; . . 

Martin, Wm. Shannon, James B, Mathers 



a 1 <:. 


1 


: ■ 


Julv 


IS 


144 c;. 


1 


■ 


April 


19 




; 


;i.4 


Jcilv 






1 


- • 


April 


29 




1 




April 


19 




1 


42.77 


M;ix 




1490 G. 


1 




Sept. 


21 


:;i '. 


1 


37.5M 


Maj 


a 




1 


35.09 


NU) 






1 




Slav 




n»: v.. 


1 










1 


• 


.lull 


11 




1 




.. ■ 


ic 


■ 


I 






11 


•319 c;. 


1 




)Li 


2 1 




1 






21 


HVI c. 


1 


- 


• 




.71 G 


1 










1 






4 




1 


42.7 


rvi.. 


12 




1 




Feb. 


12 


773 <;. 


1 


31.09 


Hftl 






1 






flj 


41. > «:. 


1 


2.1 


K.-I.. 


12 




1 


27.4.1 


Mav 


2.) 


412 «;. 


1 


1.74 


Feb. 


12 


4"4 0. 


1 




Feb. 


12 


H'.>4 G. 


1 




Sept. 


21 




1 


30.6 


Mai 


■::'. 


4CI6 G. 


1 




IVb. 


IS 


-- 






■ late. 


4 




1 






4 


1"77 <:. 


1 






4 


I4W G. 


1 


■ 


- 


SI 




I 






21 


1252 R. 


4 




April 


:1 


- 


4 


61.10 


M;.r. 


4 


I24S R. 


4 




April 


12 


631 R. 


i 






4 


I2SI K. 


4 




April 


1! 


1247 R. 4 




April 


12 


- 


1 


61.65 




14 




] 




! 


24 




4 


51.65 


» :ir. 


4 


1250 R 


4 


.• • 


April 


12 


141 






Julv 


1 ■ 








Julv 


10 


124il R 


4 




April 


12 


lli74 (i 


1 




Julv 


s 


63? R 


4 


51 65 


Mar. 


4 


633 K 


4 


- 


M.,r 


4 



3 Geo. 5 



Crown Grants. 



K 325 



OASSIAK,— Concluded. 



Coronado 

Ooronado Fractional 



Home Kun . 
Pay Koll . . . 
Silver Star . 
South Weal 
Adonis 



I'.f'.'iruii-lirM 

Capital 

Edmonton 

Harriet .... 

Hot Punch 

iron, Duke 

Jessie 

Montreal 

Nelson 

Ottawa 

Quebec Fractional . . . 
Kegina Fractional ... 

Rossland 

South Easter 

Sweet Flag 

Toronto 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Winnipeg 

Winnipeg Fractional 
Champion 



Queen Charlotte 



Cariboo 



John E. Halley, Ronald J. McDonell, Perley R. Fleming . .. 

Ronald J. McDonell, administrator of the estate of VVm. S 
McDonell, deceased, intestate .. 

John E. H;ilk\ , Ronald J. McDonell, Perley R. Fleming . . 

Ronald J. McDonell 

Ronald J. McDonell, Jabez K. Ashman 

Jabez K. Ashman 

Richard Arthur Trethewey, Joseph Ogle Trethewey, Peter 
Drummond 

John McLellan, Alex, J. Gordon 

Edward i adlie 



Richard Arthur Trethewey, Joseph Ogle Trethewey. 

Roarer K.Hill 



Peter Drummond . 
Edward Baillie. . . . 



John McLellan, Alexander Gordon. 

Leonard Ry« Locke 

Edward Baillie 



Leon F. Champion, administrator of the estate of James 
Champion, deceased, intestate 



Lot No. 


Acres. 


1155 


R. 5 


51.65 


1167 


R 5 


6.5 


ii...; 


1(. 5 


16.76 


•2547 


B. 6 


n; -.. 


2646 


K. 5 


47. SI 


2648 


B. 6 


23.87 


1865 




50.24 


1303 




48.22 


696 




61.31 


607 




51.65 


MS 




32.06 


1376 




28.03 


11)77 




8S.47 


1861 




20 s- 


694 




33.63 


I'H 




61 66 


695 




40.01 


7ili 






701 




31 ,58 


690 




48.02 


1802 




33.56 


1864 




38 it 


693 




45.37 


60S 




51.65 


61V2 




12 mi 


i-,!I.j 




46 56 


700 




39.49 


428 G. i 


36.50 



Date. 



April 19 

April 19 

May S 

May 8 

May 8 

May 8 

June 24 

.Ian. 4 

Dec. 9 

Dec. 9 

June 24 

June 24 

June 24 

June 24 

Dec. 9 
Dec. 
Dec. 
Dec. 
I v.- 
Dec 
Jan. 

June 24 

Dec. 9 

Dec. 9 

Dec 9 

Dec. 9 

Dec. 9 



April 10 



EAST KmiTENAY. 



Evening Star 

Gtibralter Fractional 

Golden Key 

i lood Hope ■. 

Mamoth 

Rose 

Toolips 

War Eagle 

\\ asa 



Fort Steele 



Robert .Mi-Nair, Nils Johnson, Jacob Nilson 

CleniMit Hungerford Pollen... 

Bernbard Lundin 

Clement Hungerford Pollen 

Robert McNair, Nils Johnson, Jacob Nilson 
Bernhard Lundin 



6121 11. 


1 


51.10 


6122 il. 


1 


P. 68 


6120 G. 


1 


50.92 


9820 G. 


1 


60.06 


10316G 


1 


61 .65 


9821 ii. 


1 


29.52 


9822 G. 


1 


37.51 


61)9 G. 


1 


51.66 


10316G 


1 


51.65 



Sept. 6 
Sept. 20 
Sept. 5 

lune 5 

Oct. in 

June 6 

June 5 

Sept 5 

Oct. 10 



WEST KOOTENAY. 



Ameythyst 

Itenhurr 

Climax 

Cornelia 

Hillside 

Last i hance 

Legal Tender. 

Maple Leal 

Mayflower 

Moken Mini Fractional 
Nugget Fractional 

i 'Li i lominion 

Peggy 

Prince of Wales 

Bharorock 

Snow St.. nit 

Spud Fractional 

Summit 

Trilby 

Boone Fractional 

Cannon Ball 

Deer Lodge 

Kaslo Fractional 

Mountaiti View 

Nap Fracl tonal . 

Norl h star Fracl i il 

Patricks 

Pearl Fractional 
Romanes Fractional . 

Silver King 

Tamarac 

Bright Light 



Champion No. -2 

.. No. 2 Frac . . 



Nelson . 



Ainsworth 



.l.u-an . 'it . 



John B. Baxter 

A.-hille Israel Marentelle, Eugene Wilson Stoner . 



James R. Hunnex 

Samuel A. Hunter, Ole Larson 

Achille Israel Marentelle, Eugene Wilson Stoner . 

G "ge Kla\ iino 

Edmund C. Wtajfge 

Samuel A. Hunter, Ole Larson 

Edmund C. Wragge 

Montie J. Morgan, Wm. IV Pool 

Achille 1-1:1. I Marentelle, Eugene Wilson Stoner . 
Gertrude A. Rhodes, Frederick P. Drummond . . 

James It. Cranston 

James II. O'Donell 

William Wal.lie 

Achille Israel .Marentelle, Eugene Wilson Stoner. 



wm. E. Costello 

Phil Corrigan 

Frank Bailey 

w in. Lee McLaughlin 



John Wesle} Power 

1 1 Hollander Milling anil Milling Co 

John Wesley Power 

Win. E.luar.ls H...1. 1.T .. 

11. F. Strobeck 

David P. Hatch, Warren E. Lloyd, Frances J. Nellis . ... 

Wm, I..' McLaughlin 

Scot! Thornburg . 

Donald Duncan McPhereon, Andrew Jacobsen, Bertha 

Angrignon, John Thomas Black, Mary Ili.-ks, Alex. 

Mackie Rogers, Duncan James Weir 

I laiilt-1 A Ma.l.a. hlan .... 



1O680G. 1 
6984 11. 1 
8982 '1. 1 

limn ii. : 
10442G, 1 
si. Ml II, 1 
I0828G 1 
3262 11 I 
11)141 II. I 
3932 11. 1 
10406 G. 1 
VIN3 II. 

9356 G. 1 

1625 G. 1 
11.40:. (i. 1 
10018G. 1 
8987 G. 1 
B986 G. 1 

1626 G. 1 
1006 '«.. 1 
1512 s. 
1036 ti. 1 
1040 (I. 1 

11.11511. 1 
5266a G. 1 
10444 G. I 
5189 G. 1 

'..:'., 111 1 
6680 O. 1 
10SI '. 1 

7140 O. 1 



9845 c I 
IOS11G. 1 
10812G. 1 



48.69 

50.30 

..1 ,.;; 

41.11 
48.4 
44.52 
48.56 
41.21 
51 65 
12 B8 
2.66 
43.50 

41 SO 
51.00 
11.25 
46.03 

42 60 
51.17 
47.76 
40.93 
r.1.47 
51 .65 

1.93 
42.2 

2.30 
37 . 2 
51.65 

2.02 
16.33 

23.0 
51.65 



23.31 
41.30 
12.73 



April 


2 


April 


13 


ipril 


13 


Jan. 


17 


May 


28 


April 13 


Now 


13 


Jan. 


18 


May 


28 


Jan. 


18 


Feb. 


19 


April 


13 


Mar. 


1 ' 


April 


9 


Mar. 


111 


April 


4 


April 


13 


April 


13 


April 


9 


Mav 


14 


Aug. 


15 


May 


16 


April 


9 


April 


4 


Sept. 


23 


April 


4 


July 


10 


June 


24 


Aug. 


15 


April 


1 


Feb. 


1 1 


Fell. 


20 


S. p| 


4 


Sept . 


4 



K 326 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



w EST KOOTENAY.-G 



Division. 



Christina 

Cub Fractional . 



Slocan City. 



Missing Link . 



Sapphire No. '-' 

ii No. 2 Frae. 

Virgel 

1 oung Bear 



American 

Kalania 

Kaslo 

Liberal 

Miller Creek Fractional 

War Eagfle 

Broad\ iew fractional. . 

I loronation 

Glad Hand 

Indiana 

I, II 

Abe Lincoln No. 1 .... 

i >eer Park 

Grand I'rize 

.!■ i' Mac 

Last ' ihance 

Tuesday 

w hit- Iron 

Virginian 



Slocan . . 



Trail Cn ek. 



Grantee. 



Michael Murphy, Pal rick Henry Cosgrove 

Donald Duncan Mcl'h< w n, Amln-w Jacobsen, Berth a 
Angrignon, John Thomas Black, Man Hicks, Alexander 
Mackie Rogers, Duncan James Weir .... 

Donald Duncan McPherson, Andrew Jacobsen, 1 mi nan 
.lames Weir, Bertha Angrignon, John Thomas Black, 
Duncan Grant — 

Daniel A. MaeLachlan 



Michael Murphy, Patrick Henry Cosgrove 

Donald Duncan McPhers Andrew Jacobsen, Bertha 

Angrignon, John Thomas Black, Man Hicks, Alexander 
Mackie Rogers, Duncan .fames Weir 

John S. Bedier 

Hugh J. I'- Buckley 

Win Lee McLaughlin 

John S. Bedier 

i ■: I 'audrey 

Consolidated Mining & Smelting Company of < anada, Ltd. 

The Ohio Mines Development Co., Ltd i vp.L.) 

Cutler Thmnas Porter 

Wm. Hen net I. Bruce White, Nettie Davey 

The Ohio Mines Development Co., Ltd. (N.P.L.) 

Consolidated Mining* Smelting Co. of Canada, Ltd 



Chas. H. Hamilton, Edmund C. Wra 



Samuel W. Forteath 

Theodore Nels Okerstrom, Lyland Franklin McDougald 



Lot No. 

10596 G.l 
9S10 G. 1 



9844 <: 1 
10813G l 
ItttMG. I 
L0595G I 



98*3 G. 1 

5851 G i 

9184 G l 

1084 R l 

•2271 G. 1 

;,i»i G. i 

■ 

6019 <;. 1 

7861 <-. i 

K681 <:. 1 

6017 a. 1 

6018 <;. 1 
■ 

932 ■■. I 

I'M,. | 

l-'7- '. I 

i., i G I 

1C93 G. 1 



Acres. Date. 



49. GO 



Fed.. 20 



Feb. 20 

Si pt. 4 

I 90 Sept 4 

51.05 Jan. 4 



BO "1 
•:i 90 

31 97 

-.- 09 
41 18 

i :• - : 
i ■ ■ ' 

10.81 
1- 17 

17.96 

32 27 



Fel 

April 29 

Sepl i 

July 10 

i 

July 10 

Sept. L£ 

Ma.i ].. 

April 19 

July 2o 

Mav 15 

Mav 15 

Sepl 18 

Sept 19 

Sepl i:» 

Nov. in 

Sept. 19 

July 4 

Vpril 29 



BOl NDARY. 



Alert 

Alto Frai t ional 

Antelope Fractional . . 

\l InUl.UI 

Big Cub 

Black Bear ... 

Eclipse 

Eganville . — 

June . . . . 

Lil I le I 'nil Fractional . . 

Lock Port 

Original 

Ri .' d j I ash Fractional. 



R. Kipling Fraction 
Snow-hoe Fractional 

sr Joseph 

Transit Fractional . . . 

Twin Mine 



Wave Fraction 

fellow Jacket 

Atlantic Fractional 
Ati.int ic Fractional No. 2 

Atlas 

Belle* iew i 'racl ional 
Copper Queen 
i tiamond Joe Fractional. 
Fannj H. Fractional .... 

(ireal Laxei 



Lady of the Lake . 

Lily 

Monte I in isto 

Ohio 

st. Lawrence 

sniilix Fractional 

Acacia 

Acadia 

Alpha 

Australian 

i Iracker Jack 



July Fractional , 

Sew "» ori Frw 

Sacramento 

i topia 

Wellington 



Grand Fork; 



Osoyoos 



Forbes Murray Kerby 

Wm. J. 1' re i id e runs!, John s Boy< i . Chris. II. Reeves 

Herbert C. Kennan, Maggie M. Herman, David Shannon. 

i i bes Murray Kerby, Bernard Lequime . , 

Wm, J. Prendergast, John S. Boyce, Chris. H. Reeves 

&ngelo Luciani, Luigi Gri, Antonio Copicetti 

Herbert C. Kerman, Maggie M. Kerman, David Shannon... 

Isaac Hoy t Hallett, Jauies F. Cunningham 

Alexander E. Burr, ' harles E. Baker 

i Cook, Mar\ Turner McMynn, Louise Albert Smith, 

Joseph Ernest McEwan 

George Cook, Mary Turner McMynn 

John Mulligan 

Henry Johnson, Peter Edward Blakie 

B.C. Copper Co., Ltd 

Andrew Hamilton, .John .hitues < lu<',is administrator of the 

estate of Thomas Ken eased intestate 

Thomas H. Richards 

Forbes Murray Kerby, Bernard Lequime 

Gustave .Johnson 

Josiah Graham 

Eric B. Jackson, Francis W. Groves 

Normail Morrison . .. 

Wellington Elson, Jane Russel, Evan tarry 

No. 7 Mining Co., Ltd 

Andrew Hamilton, John James Clucaa, administrator of the 

estate ol rhomas Kermeen, deceased, intestate 

No. 7 Mining Co., Ltd 

John O. Thompson, Wm. D. Morton 

Sydney M. Johnson, Mark w. Smith, Philip B s. Stanhope. 

Phi ip i; s. Stanhope, Richard T. Nicholson 

Norman Morrison 

Isaac Hoyt Hallett, Albert Eashcrott ... .. 

Jennie Louise Wilby 

Frank Bailey, Waltei I Hodges, Fred H Gladden, John 

n, James N. Paton 

lied lev Gold Mining Co 

Adam Creelman 

Jennie Louise Wilby 

Frank Bailey, Walter E. Hodges, Frederick w. Gladden, 

John (. hidden, larni s N. 1'aton 



980 9 




926 S: 


16 98 


i - B 


> 


1 ;". S 


• 


vat s. 




1888 S. 




• 


. i BS 


1018 S 




ii. ,i S 






SI. 09 


591 S. 


43 14 


a 




12(H) S. 




L459 S 


31 .23 




1 9 


291 :> 


32 01 


1470 S. 


1.91 




IE 


1164 S. 




g i g 




782 S. 




res s 


7 1(1 


1164 


50. SS 


564 S. 


g 46 


i g : s 




- 


4I>.'/ 




13.61 


11 ' R 


45.19 





51.36 


. - 


4 7 50 


::I25 


33.5 


8124 fi. 1 


4 4 51 


1562 S. 




1064 


3S.50 


. H - 


13 35 


- 


51 65 






690 S. 


51.65 


708 


42.69 


• 9 


1 06 


158! S. 


. 


2678 


30.9 


692 S. 


43.36 


707 


87.49 



N1.il 


18 


Her. 


11 


Mar. 


13 


Sept. 


: 


v 11 


•.' 


M:.r. 





Mar. 


IS 


Sepl 


23 




8 


Mar. 


X 


June 


- 


April 


4 


Sept 


4 


Sept. 


1 


Mhj 


14 


Mar. 


•::: 


S 


1 


Feb. 


- 


Not. 


IS 


Mar. 


1.; 


Deo. 


16 


IN-.-. 


16 




IS 


Sept 


.'. 






April 


i 


Vl_ 


14 


Feb, 


- 




15 


S, i 


5 




is 


ti 


a 


June 




.lime 


17 


Feb. 


: 1 


Feb. 


1 1 


Feb. 


19 


Feb. 


19 


Jul, 


19 


Auk. 


1.' 


Jul, 


i 


Mar. 


a 


Feb. 


19 



July 19 



3 Geo. 5 



Crown Grants. 



K 327 



BOUN'DAKY.— CW/mferf. 



Claim. 



Division. 



i irunti'f 



Bovne KamloopE 

Cotton Belt j .. 

Evening Star I M 



Harison . . 
Iron Cap . 



Jessie . 
Joe 



Vale . 



Victoria 

Wellington 

British Queen 

Captain Jack 

Grimmer 

Homestake 

Hunter Fractional 
Little Gold Bug Fraction 
Lou Isabella. ...... 

Old Puss 

Ora 

Wheal Tamer 

Aggatite 

Bauxite 

Gipsy 

Night Hawk 

Tom Cat 

Bell Fractional Similkameen. 

( !olumbla Fractional ... h 

Freddie B ,. 

Puritan -. u 

Rambler ■■ 



Nicola 



Bertram F. Lund}' . 

John Hudson Morrison, Alex. S. McArthur, James Milne 
Harper 

Bertram F. Lundy, Thomas Ellis 

Frederick A. McLeod, Win. J. Harvev, Spencer Llwellvn 
Bulkeley 

Alex. Joseph McMulk-n, James Herdsman 

Bertram F. Lundy, Fred. Temple Cornwall, official adminis- 
trator of the estate of John N'idea, deceased, intestate . 

Bertram F. Lundy, Caroline Y. Daniels 

Robert Kieby 

Mt. Baker and Yale Mining 1 Co 

Oliver Redpath, James Manson, Thomas Bulman 

Clarence A. Kline 

Mt. Baker and Yale Mining Co 

ii n 

Owen Salusbury Batchelor 

Robert Henderson 

Win. Murray 

Francis W. Groves, Eric E. Jackson 

Robert Barrie, Albert Howard MacNeill 

Luke Gibson 

Ellen J. Barron 

Luke Gibson 



Lot No. 


Acres. 


210" G. 1 


32.1 


2105 G. 1 


28.2 


1013 0. 1 


51.65 


2108 G. 1 


33.1 


875 G. 1 


49.55 


2110 G. 1 


40.5 


2106 G. 1 


26.8 


8109 0. i 


311.9 


2111 G. 1 


51.4 


431 G. 1 


19.12 


432 G. 1 


20 . 34 


434 G. 1 


31.0 | 


2125 G. 1 


51.65 


435 G. 1 


6.75 


430 G. 1 


11.41 


433 G. 1 


18.76 


429 G. 1 


13.94 


436 G. 1 


51.65 


2126 G. 1 


61.65 


1259 G. 1 


40.3 


1267 G. 1 


51.56 


1258 G. 1 


48.47 


1519 G. 1 


17.3 


1517 G. 1 


51.48 


420a G. 1 


6.56 


135 G. 1 


7.14 


1521 G. 1 


51.65 


S07 S. 


51.65 


1522 G. 1 


49.38 



Feb. 21 
Feb. 20 

April 2 
Feb. 21 

Julv 31 
Feb. 21 

Feb. 20 
May 18 
Mar. 5 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 

ulr 25 
Mar. 16 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 
Mar. 15 
Julv 25 
Sept. 7 
Sept 7 
Sept 7 
Sept. 5 
Sept. 5 
Jan. 19 
April 29 
April 29 

av 14 
April 29 



VANCOUVER ISLAND AND COAST. 



Bear 

I iter 

Elk '.. 

Lynx 

Park 

Park Lane 

Vancouver 

Victoria 

Hanker 

Canada No. 28 

• i No. 29 Frac. . . 

.. No. 30 

., No. 31 

„ No. 32 

., No. 33 

.i No. 34 

n No. 35 

Chimnang 

Coinox Fractional 

Doralha Morton 

H Frac. . 

Douglas 

E\ a 

Lucky Jim 

Maggie May 

" Percy*' 

Rifting Sun 

Saxon 

Black Bear 

Edith 

A. T. Monteith 

Little Jap 

Uncle Sam . ........ 

I'topia 

Meryl 



N. Westminster. 



Nanaimo . 



Alberui . . 



Quatsino .... 
Vancouver . . 



Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd. 



Bowen Island Copper Co., Ltd. (N.P.I..) . . 

Fairfield Exploration Syndicate, Limited . 
Taconia Steel Co 



Fairfield Exploration Syndicate, Limited . 



Alexander McXair 

Fairfield Exploration Syndicate, Limited 

Alexander McNair 



Arthur E. Waterhouse. 



Andrew Tait Monteith, John L. Hangi, Joseph Hunter. 

Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd 

Albeit E. Stevens, Robert Th pson 

Britannia Mining and Smelting Co., Ltd 

Wm. A. Lorimer 



2348 G. 1 

■1 : 1 

2399 li. 1 

38 i G i 

2078 ('. 1 

2000 G. 1 

3367 G. 1 

3368 G. 1 
291 I: i 

317 
318 
320 
SI 9 
321 
322 
324 
323 

319 R. 1 
297 R. 1 
253 R. 1 
3(10 R. 1 

320 K. 1 
254 

723 

322 R. 1 

299 R. 1 

722 

721 

109 

108 

826 

2094 G. 1 
2324 G. 1 
1636BG. 1 

Sect. 90 



46.28 
51.65 
46.20 
45.73 
50.23 
51 c;, 

29.92 
51.6 
41.77 
30.2 
6.4 
19 >0 
23.3 
50.70 
41.4 
51.65 
49.50 
51.23 
19.85 
51.65 
23.3 
48.74 
42.14 
51.65 
24.0 
49.52 
51 .64 
43.29 
51.65 
51.65 
61.65 
39.17 
4*. 12 
41.72 
51 .55 



Sept. 


15 


Aug. 


15 


Aug. 


15 


Sept 


i> 


Aug. 


15 


Aug. 


13 


Julv 


10 


June 


17 


Jan. 


18 


May 


31 


May 


31 


Ma\ 


31 


May 


31 


Mav 


31 


May 


31 


Mav 


31 


Mav 


31 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


19 


Jan. 


19 


Ian. 


18 


Jan. 


18 


Ma\ 


15 


Jan. 


18 


Jan. 


18 


Mav 


15 


Mav 


23 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


12 


July 


19 


Dec 


20 


April 


19 


Deo. 


20 


Sept. 


13 



K 328 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



L913 



DEPARTMENT OF MINES. 

VICTORIA, B.C. 



Hon. Sir Richard McBride, 

R. F. Toi.miic, 

Wm. Fleet Robertson, 

D. E. Whittaker, 

Thomas Graham, 

Henry Devlin, 

John Newton, 

Evan Evans, 

Thomas H. Williams 

Robert Strachan, 

James McGregor, 



Minister of Mines. 

Deputy Minister of Mines. 

Provincial Mineralogist. 

Assistant Assayer. 
Chief Inspector of Mines, I ntoria. 
District ,, Nanaimo. 

,, ,, Ferni'e. 

',' Merritt. 

,, „ Nelson. 



GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORD1RS. 



Mining Divisions. 



Atlin Mining Division. 
Sub-office 



Stikine Mining Division . 

Sub-office 

Lianl Mining 1 >i\ ision . . 

Sub-office 



Skeena Mining Division . 
Suit office 



Portland I !anal M.D. . 

Bella Coola Mining Div 
Sub-office 



Queen < lharlol te Min D 
Sni i office 



Location of 
Office. 



Atlin 

Discovery City . . 
Telegraph < !reek 
Summit Station 

Wynnton 

Haines (U.S.) . . 
Nahlin 



Telegraph Creek , . 

Boundary 

I elegrapb Creek. . 
Porter s Landing. . 
McDame Creek. . . 



Prince Rupert. . . . 

Kitimat 

Port Simpson .... 

Kssington 

Stewart (Portland 
Qnuk River. . . . 

Hartley Bay 

< i' »>se Bay 

Stewart 



Prince Rupert . 
Bella Coola . . 



Queen Char. City . 

Jedway 

Masset 

Loekeport 



Omineca Mining Division. Hazelton 

Sub-offii e 

a Fort i Irahame. . 

« Fort St. James . 

a Manson I reek . . 

•i Copper City. . . . 

■i Aldermere 

» Lorne Creek 

n Terrace 

a Fort st. John . . 

a Babine P< >rt age 

a Fort ] 



Gold Commissioner. 



J. A. Fraser . 



John Cartmel. 



John Cart mel. 



J. H. MeMllllil 



< 'anal i . 



J. II. McMullin ... 
(at l'riiec Rupert i 
J. 11. MoMulUn. . 



E. M. Sandilands. 



Stephen II. Hoskina 



Mining Recorder. 



W. G. Paxton. . . 



(( .nil. for taking 

Affidavits) 



John I .11 tmel. 
John Cartmel. 



Sub-Recorder. 



J. II. McMullin 



K. W. b 
John ( lartrael. 
< leoffrey Puller. 
W. II. Simp 
Risdon M. OdelL 
J. V. Pilling. 



Willi, in St 

H.Smith. 
An..- Kverson. 



I .. i, I.. Anderson. 
J. R. C. Deane. 
,\. Forsythe. 

John ( '.mwiiy. 
Burt E. Daily. 



John Conway. 
J. II. McMullin 



. . . F. A. McKinnon. 



Frank Brouchton. 



F. M. Sandilands. I'. 

W. Prescott. 

C. Hai i 

H. I.. I'.- 



.las. E. Kirhv 



Win. Fox. 

Alex. C. .Murrav. 

U . P. Steele. 

P. It. Skinner. 
K. «.a]e. 
F. E. Holt 
T. W. s. p 
F. W. Beatton. 
!;. J. i aineron. 
J. E. Sooson. 



3 Geo. 5 



Officers of Department of Mines. 



K 329 



GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.— Coniim,,,!. 



Mining Divisions. 



Peace River Mining Div. 

Cariboo Mining Division. 
Sub-office 



Quesnel Mining Division. 
. Sub-office 



Clinton Mining Division.. 
Lillooet // 

Kamloops Mining Division 
Ashcroft » 

Nicola « 

Yale 

Sub-Office 



Similkameen 

Sub-office , 



Vernon Mining Division . 

Greenwood Mining Div. . 
Sub-office 



Grand Forks Min. Div. . . 

Osoyoos Mining Division. 
Sub-office 



Golden Mining Division. 
Windermere « 

Fort Steele Mining Div. . 
Sub-office 



Ainswnrth Mining Div 
Sub-office 



Slooan Mining Division. . 

Sub-office 

Slocan City Mining Div. . 
Trout Lake Mining Div. 

Nelson Mining Division 
Sub-office 



Arrow Lake Min. Division 
Sub-office 



Revelstoke Mining Div. . . 
Lardeau Mining Division . 
Trail Creek Mining Div. . . 



Location of 
Office. 



Fovt St. John 



Gold Commissioner. 



C. YV. ( train 



Parkerville . . 

Quesnel 

Fort George 

17-MilePostG.T.P 

150-Mile House. . . C. YV. Grain 

Quesnel (at Barkerville) 



Clinton F. C. Campbell . 

Lillooet Caspar Phair . . . 



Kamloops . 
Ashcroft . . 



Nicola . 
Yale . 
Hope . . 



E. T. YV. Pearse 

n (at Kamloops) 



Mining Recorder. I Sub-RecoHer. 



F. \V. Beatton . . 
R. S. C. Randall 



E. C. Lunn. 



A. P. Hallev. 
T. \Y. Heme 

Stanley Beyts. 



A. P. Hallev. 



Caspar Phair. 



E. Fisher 

H. P. Christie. 

W. N. Rolfe . . 
L. A. Dodd . . 



Princeton Hugh Hunter Hugh Hunter . 

Hedley ' 



Vernon L. Norris 



II. F. YVilroot, 



Greenwood YY". R. Dewdney 

Y'ernon 

Rock Creek 

Beaverdell ' 



Grand Forks . . 



S. R. Almond 



Fairview J. R. Brown 

Olalla 

Hedley 



Golden 

YVilmer 



Cranbrook . 

Steele 

Fernie 

Moyie . ... 
Marvsville . 

Kaslo .... 
Howser .... 
Trout Lake 



New Denver 
Sandon . . . 
Slocan City . 
Trout Lake . 



H. C. Rayson . . . 

Alfred C. Nelson 



R. .1. Stctisim 



K. .]. Stenson (at 
// Kaslo) 



R. .1. Stenson . 
W. V. Teetzel. 



Nelson 

Creston 

Ymir 

Sheep Creek . 

Nakusp \\'. F. Teetzel (at 

Vernon Nelson) 



Revelstoke. 
Beat* in 

Rossland . . 



liu I it. Gordon 

» (at Revelstoke) 
H. R. Townsend. . . 



S. R. Almond . 
Ronald Hewat 



F. H. Bacon . 

G. F. Stalker 



N. A. Wallenger. . 



Ewen McLeod, 
F. M. Gillespie. 



H. F. YY'ilmot. 
H. Nicholson 
E. F. Ketchum. 



R. W. Nbrthey. 
V. M. Gillespie. 



Joseph Walsh. 
.1. S. T. Alexander. 
John P. Farrell. 
G. W. Mowatt. 



A. McQueen 



Angus Mclnnes . . . 



Howard Parker. . 
K. Mummery. . . . 



S. S. Jarvis. 



James Thompson 
Walter Scott 



YV. E. McLauchlin. 

William A. Strtitt 
H. R. Townsend . . 



Y\ r m. J. Green. 
VV. Simpson. 
F. Mummery. 

W. J. Parham. 



i iny Loewenberg. 
( Seo. s. Coleman 



H. F. Wilmot. 
Newton R. Brow n 



K 330 



Report of the Minister of Mines. 



1913 



GOLD COMMISSIONERS AND MINING RECORDERS.— Concluded. 



Mining Division. 



Nanaimo Mining Division 

Sub-office 

» 

n 

Alberni Mining Division. . 
Clayoquot n 

Quatsino » 

Victoria Mining Division. . 

New Westminster Min. I). 
Sub-office 

Vancouver Mining Div. . . 



Location of 

Office. 



Nanaimo . . 
Ladysmith . 
Alert Bay . 
Vananda . . 
Rock Bay. . 



Alberni . . . 

i 'lavoquot 

Quatsino . 



Victoria 



New Westminster. 
Harrison Lake 

Chilli wack 

Vancouver 



Gold Commissioner. Mining Recorder. | Sub-Recorder. 



e Thomson... George Thomson. . 



John Stewart. 

II. 1. II.' 
Daviil Joni 
\V. H. Lines. 



.1. Kirkup 

n (at Alberni) W. T. Dawley .. 

a a 0. A. Sherberg.. 

Herbert Stanton... Herbert Stanton. 
S. A. Fletcher I. Wintemute... 



John Mahony A. P. Grant. 



L. A. Agassiz. 

.1. IVlly. 



3 Geo. 5 



Table of Contents. 



K 331 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



Subject. 



Mineral Production 

Statistical Tables 

Progress of Mining during Year 

Statistical Tables— Digest of 

Bureau of Mines — Work ot Year 

Assay Office Report 

' Examination for Assayers 

List of Licensed Assa\ T ers 

Examination of Coal-mine Officials 

Board of Examiners — Report of Secretary 

List of Licensed Coal-mine Officials 

Cariboo District 

Cariboo Mining Division — Report on 

// it n Notes on Mica Claims. . . . 

Quesnel Mining Division — Report on 

Cassiar District — Report on Atlin Mining Division .... 

Stikine and Liard Mining Divisions — Report on 

Trip to Dease Lake and the Groundhog Coalfield. . . 

Other Reports on the Groundhog Coallield 

Skeena District — Report on 

Skeena and Bella Coola Mining Divisions — Report on 

Skeena Mining Division — Notes on Claims on Princess 
Royal Island 

Portland Canal Mining Division — Report on 

Queen Charlotte Mining Division « 

Omineca Mining Division « 

a it tt Notes on 

Peace River Mining Division — Notes on 

« u ■< Report on Coal-measures 

of Peace River Canyon 

South-East Kootenay District 

Fort Steele Mining Division 

Xorth-East Kootenay District 

Golden Mining Division 

Windermere Mining Division 

North-West Kootenay District 

Revelstoke Mining Division 

a tt tt Not. s on Big Bend. .... 

Lardeau Mining Division 

Slocan District 

Ainsworth Mining Division 

Slocan n tt 

Slocan City » n 

Trout Lake n it 

Nelson District 

Nelson Mining Division 

it tt tt Notes on Reported Discovery 
of Platinum 

Arrow Lake Mining Division 

Rossland District - 

Trail Creek Mining Division 

Boundary District — Greenwood Mining Div. — Notes on. . 

Greenwood Mining Division 

(I rand Forks Mining Division — Notes on 

it a a Report on 

Osoyc wis „ ,, „ 

Yeruon u n a 

Vale District 

Kamloops Mining Division — Report on 

Ashcroft // tt it 

Yale „ „ „ 

Nicola /; tt it 

Similkameen n n Notes on 

// it tt Report on 



Submitted by. 



Provincial Mineralogist 



Assav 



tt .Mineralogist 

Tully Boyce, Secretary. 
Provincial Mineralogist. 



(lold Commissioner 
Provincial Assayer. 
Mining Recorder. . . 
Gold Commissioner 



Provincial Mineralogist 



Gold Commissioner 



Provincial Assayer. 
Mining Recorder . . 
Gold Commissioner 



Provincial Mineralogist . 



C. F. J. Galloway, P. Sc 
Gold Commissioner 



Provincial Mineralogist. 

Mining Recorder 

Gold Commissioner .... 

Mining Recorder 

J. A. Watson 

Mining Recorder 

Gold Commissioner ... 



Mining Recorder 



Gold Commissioner 



Provincial Mineralogist. 
Mining Recorder 



Gold Commissioner .... 
Provincial Mineralogist. 
Gold Commissioner .... 
Provincial Mineralogist, 
(iold Commissioner 



Gold Commissioner . 
Mining Recorder . . . 



Provincial Mineralogist. 
Mining Recorder 



Page. 



7 
7 to 15 
10 
17 
29 
8(1 
31 
32 

33 
34 
38 

49 
-19 
.-.'_> 
53 
55 
63 
65 
94 
99 
99 

1(10 
103 
109 
III 
110 
117 

IIS 
137 
137 
I. '19 
139 
141 
142 
142 
143 
145 
140 
140 
US 
1 51 > 
151 
152 
152 

150 
10O 
161 
161 
163 
107 

168 

174 
178 
183 
184 
184 
185 
186 
iss 
ISO 
190 



K 332 



Report of the Minister of Mixes. 



1913 



TAI5LH OF CONTENTS Concluded. 



Subject. 



Lillooet Disti - i« - 1- 

Lillooet Mining Division 

Clinton a i' 

Vancouver Island and Coast Districts 

Alberni Mining Division 

Clayoquot Mining Division 

« /> a Notes on 

Quatsino « " Report on 

Nanaimo n » /> 

Victoria » » n 

NY v. Westminster Mining Division 

Vancouver Mining Division 

I ii pection of Mines : 

Report of Chief Inspector 

DUmond Yale Colliery Explosion — Report on 

Inspection of Metalliferous Mines: 

West Kooteuay and Boundary Districts 

Fast Kootenay I listrict 

Coast District 

List ot Accidents in Metalliferous Mines 

« a a Tabulated 

Coal-mining in British Columbia 

( lollieries producing 

a of the Coast Inspection District 

./ » East Kootenay Inspection District 

Coal Potentialities oi British ( lolumbia 

Inspection of < !oal Mines : 

Van iver Island Coast Inspection District 

I'.. i i Kootenaj In- peel ion 1 tistrict 

Accidents in British Columbia Collieries, 1903 1912 

1912 

Detailed Statement of Accidents, Coast Distrii t. 

„ „ a East Km >t. -nay I W -i 

Pro ut ions under "Coal-mines Regulation Act" 

Shipping M ines List of 

Crown granted Mineral Claims, 1912 

Gold Commissioners and Mining Recorders— List of .... . 

TaMc nl ( '< 'lit nuts 

Index 



List of Illustrations . . . . 
Library Catalogue Slips 



Submitted ly . 



i (old < 'oiiim 



< lold I lommissioner. 
\l ining Recorder . 
Provincial Assayer. 
Mining Recorder . . 

i Sold ( ni 

Mining Recorder . . 



I'iiin incial Mineral 

• 'hut [nspe inn 



Inspector of I districts 
a District . . 



I'roviin ial Minei i 



[nspectoi s of Districts. 

Provincial Mineralogist 

r of District . . . 

Provincial Mineralogist 



1 



191 
191 

192 
193 
193 
193 
195 
196 
HIT 
198 
I! i 

■J! HI 

204 
216 
224 

•j:i.-) 

237 

•_':is 
240 
•J4I 
242 
■244 
245 
248 
249 

251 
294 
310 
311 
313 
316 
320 
322 
324 
328 
:i:ii 
333 
349 
351 



Index. 



K 333 



INDEX. 



A. 



Tage. 

A.A 107 

Abraham creek SI) 

Accidents in coal-mines 204 

Causes, percentages of, total 205 

In anthracite mines, paper on 210 

Reference to 205 

Accidents in metalliferous mines 240 

Detailed list of 208 

Causes of 241 

Agriculture. Iskut river S3 

Klappan river 83 

Stikine river 07, 72 

Ainswortii Mining Division: 

Reference to silver output 24 

Report of Gold Commissioner 146 

Report of Inspector 236 

Aja.r 151 

.Alalia inn 50 

Alamo 140 

Alberni canal, coal and copper on 193 

Aleerni District 193 

Alberni Minim; Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 193 

Iron-ore 193 

Alberta, reference to anthracite coal of 00 

Albert head, quarries at 199 

Alder Creek (U.S.A.) Dredging Co 51 

Alice arm 09 

.1 margosa 114 

American Hoy Ill, 112 

American creek 109 

Analyses of Groundhog i 1 95 

Dust at Diamond Vale 229 

Anaurug 115 

Anderson river 188 

Andesite 27 

Annie 1G1 

Babine range 115 

Bald mountain Hill 

Balsam creek 115 

Barkley sound 19:'. 

Barr creek 53 

Basalts of Stikine river 72, 81 

Bear lake (Princess Royal island) 100 

(Slocan) 140 

Bear Hirer (Portland Canal) 107 

(Clayoquot) 194 

Bear river 104 

Portland Canal 106 

Placer leases 107 

Clayoquot 193 

Beasley 152 

Bedwell sound 193 

Bella Coola Mining Division 99 

Ben M'Chree GO, 61 

Berry creek (Atlin I 63 



Tage. 

Annie Fraction 161 

Annie 1/ 144 

Anthracite coal (sec Coal). 

Anthracite creek, coal from 95 

An .vox 1 73 

1 />. i I Osoyoos) 1S2 

,, I Queen Charlotte I 110 

„ (Slocan) 150 

Archibald 194 

Arfio 107 

A rlington 155 

Arrow Lake Mining Division: 

Report of Mining Recorder 100 

Ashcroft • 118, 185 

Ashcroft Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 185 

'• Ashcroft trail " 83, '94 

Ashnola creek, placer on 183 

A x in n 155 

Assay ( Ifh'ee. work of year 30 

Assayers, list of 32 

Assayers' examinations 29, 30 

Reference to 31 

Athabaska Landing 125 

AtheUtan 103 

Atlin (town) 01 

Reported gold strike CO 

Minor reference to 04 

Dryest season on record 58 

Atlin Consolidated Mining Co 55, 56 

Atlin Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 55 

Gold production 23 

.4. T. Monteith 190 

Aufeas Cold Mines. Ltd 1S7 

Aurora 13"' 



B. 



Berry creek ( Liard ) 77. 

Berry Creek Mining Co. (now Boulder deck 

Mining Co.) 

Beven ( town > 

Bdernes creek Mi, '92. 

Big Bend district 

Report by .1. A. Watson 

Hit/ <lali na 

Big II urn 

Big Inii i ior 

Big Ledge 

Big Missouri 

Bimetallic 

Birch creek 

Bdl ter creek 

Placer gold 

Pi I ominous coal I Sec * 'oal ) . 

Black Hear 

Black point 



274 

97 

142 

143 

54 

ISO 

193 

100 

100 

154 

58 

Hill 

104 

161 

192 



K 334 



Index. 



Page. 

Black Prince 150 

" Black rock " 69 

Black sand, platinum in (Thibert crock) ... G3 

( Kamloops) 1*4 

Blubber bay 2S 

Bluebell 147 

Blue Bird (Quatsino) i 10(> 

I Trail creek) 161 

Blue canyon 57 

Muff 100 

Bliimo creek, coal from 95 

Board of Examiners 34 

Boat barbour 2<;5 

Bonanza 1<»9 

Boston bar 106 

Boulder creek (Atliu) 58 

(Thibert creek) 78 

Boulder Creek Mining Co. ( Atliu) ():{ 

i Liard I 77 

"Boundary" on Stikine river (ill 

Boundary District, gold production of 2o 

( !opper production 25 

Statis>tics is 

Provincial Mineralogist, notes by 163 

Inspector's report 25ii 

Boundary 1 Mining and Exploration Co 1GS 

Brewer creek 91 

Brick 

Red 27, 199 

iSMney island l'.tf) 

Lime silica 199 

Bridge river I'd! 



Page. 
i: i i hi n a in 201 

Report of Inspector 238 

Britannia Beach 200 

Britannia Mining and Smelting Co 200 

B.C. quartz-mine 51 

B.C. Amalgamated Anthracite Coal Co 93 

Report by G. W. Evans 95 

B.C. Anthracite Coal, Ltd 89,91, 116 

B.C. Anthracite Syndicate IP! 

B.C. Anthracite Coal Syndicate 86, '•>:: 

B.C. C per Co 152. 1<;::. 189, P."'. 236 

B.C. Electric Co., plant at Goldstream 198 

B.X. (British Columbia Express) Transpor- 
tation Co 118 

British Columbia Pottery Co 27, 199 

Shall' from Kyuquot 196 

British Pacific Coal Co.. Ltd 249 

Distribution of output 27* 

Broadx lew 151 

Buckhorn 115 

Buck's Bar 69 

Building materials, production of 1*. 27 

Building-stone, production of 27 

Bulkley lake (see Destline lake). 

Bull's tiead mountain 123, 127 

Burdette creeis »>'> 

Bureau of Mines 29 

Burrard inlet 200 

Purlin 160 

Hull.- I'rac 161 

Butte-Rocher Deboule" Copper Co 114 



Cache Creek group of rocks, reference to . . . 72 

Cadman-Cunninghame gas-detector 2S0 

Calgary, reference to 5.'! 

California, oil from 211 

Camborne 142 

Campbell-Johnston camp S6 

Campbell River, coal development 250 

Camp Medley 17* 

Camp Robertson 249 

Camp Wilson 111. 249 

i 'anada Gold Dredging Co., Ltd 192 

Cauadian-Alasfa Exploration Co 59 

Canadian Boy 151 

Canadian Collieries, Ltd.. labour trou'bles. . . 20 

( 'lay used for tiles 27 

< > 1 1 1 j .1 1 1 for year 260 

Output "Extension" 261, 263 

t 'oniii.x 271 

Reporl of [nsj tor 271 

Development-work 250 

Canadian Geological Survey, report on Skagit 

river 1*7 

Canadian King 112 

Canadian Marble and Granite Co 27 

Canadian Mining Operators 116 

Canadian Mining Institute, paper read to. by 

G. W. Evans on Groundhog coal 95 

Meeting in Vancouver 29 

Canadian Northern Ry. Co 125 

With reference to Cariboo mica claims.... 5:'. 

Yale 1** 

Canadian Pacific Railway. Sandon branch.. 146 

Kootenaj Central L39 

Crowsnest branch, reference to 139 

Steamer 29 



Canadian Pacific Railway — Concluded. 

.Minor reference to 52 

Phoenix 176 

Nicola coal used 1*:i 

.Main line Is.",. L'17 

Canadium. reported new metal 158 

Ca river, reference to source of 52 

Cap Sheaf 197 

Carbonado Colliery 297 

Cariboo, dredging ami lode-mining in 51 

Caribou camp, 1 > --a-- Lake trail 75 

Cabiboo Distbict 49 

Report of Gold Commissioner 49 

C tal in 2i:i 

Caribou lake, lode mines 54 

i lABTBOO Minim. I M\ (SION : 

Notes "ii mica in. by II. Carmichael 52 

Cold, placer, production 23 

Report of Gold Commissioner 4t» 

Carmichael, Herbert, retirement of. as Pro- 
vincial assayer 30 

Assays of Nelson platinum 1~>'.i 

Notes "ii Tetc Jaune Cache mica 52 

Peace Ri\ er coal analysed 134 

Notes on Clayoquot Mining Division 195 

Reporl "a Princess Royal island 100 

Carnes creek 144 

Cascade 115 

le creek (Portland Canal) 105 

i Ainsworth i 147 

Cascade Palls Mining Co 104, 106 

l Central Railway 68, 81 

Cassiar goldfields, old route i" 83 

Cassiar Hydraulic Mining Co., Ltd 115 



Index. 



K 33.5 



Tage. 
Cassias Mining Division : 

Copper production 25 

Report of placer sold 23 

Report of Gold 'Commissioner 55 

Gold rush to 07 

Gold-mines 68 

Early reports 09 

Gold production 71 

Chinese miners 71 

V.B 151 

Cedar creek 140 

Cement, Tod inlet, Princeton, Saanich arm, 

Prince Rupert 28 

Production of 9 

Vancouver Island 198 

Ventre Star 101, 235 

Chestnut Hill Mining Co 151 

Chief Inspector of jiines. report of 204 

Trip to Eastern States 209 

Chilcotin river, minor reference to 192 

Chimney-tiles 27 

China creek 51 

Chinese, gold-mining in Cassiar 71, 79 

Cliopaka 183 

Cinderella 149 

Villi of Spokane 161 

Clay from Canadian collieries 9 

West coast, V.I 27. 

Clayburn 27 

Olayhurn Company, Ltd., brickyards '. 27 

Clayoqi/ot Mining Division: 

Report of Deputy Mining Recorder 193 

Notes by H. Carmichaei 195 

Clearwater river 65 

Clinton Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 192 

Clue lake 147 

Clyde-Belt 155 

Coal, Groundhog, referred to 04 

Groundhog, report by Provincial Mineral- 
ogist 05 

Gross production of year 242 

Output of various districts 243 

Per capita production of various districts 242 

Markets of various districts 243 

Table of distribution 245 

Sales of 244 

Tuya river 75 

Riernes creek 86, S7 

Atlin 61 

Tulameen river 22 

Skeena river 20 

Eaglenes-t creek 8 1 

Klappan river 83, 84 

Similkameen 190 

Nicola 1SS 

Greenwood 168 

Skidegate inlet 249 

Peace river 219 

Cariboo 249 

Queen Charlotte 249 

Masset 249 

Graham island 278 

Princeton (lignite) 249 

Production table 11 

Analysis table, Peace river 130 

Quality of. Peace river 134 

Skeena river 26, 30 

Stikine and Nass rivers 30 

Queen Charlotte Ill 



Page. 
Coal — Concluded. 

Zymoetz river 115, 249 

Alberni 193 

Peace River Mining Division 117 

Report by Galloway 118 

Groundhog 92, 98, 116 

Analyses of Groundhog 95, 9S 

Labour agreements made in East Kootenay 22 

Output of Coast District 21 

Statistics 2n 

Prices of coal and coke 19, 244 

Anthracite 98 

Pick-mining of 303 

Coalfields, prospective 249 

Rulkley valley 249 

Telkwa valley 249 

Graham island 249 

Bear lake, Cariboo 249 

Quatsino 250 

Coal-miners' examinations, oandidates for ... 35 
Coal-mines (sec also Collieries), number 

men employed 245 

Coast District 245, 246 

Nicola-Princeton 247 

Vancouver Island 247 

Inspection of 251, 252 

Western Fuel Co., output of 252 

New developments 249 

Old collieries reworked 250 

East Kootenay, labour troubles in 20 

Canadian Collieries, labour troubles in . . . 20 

Reference to output IS 

Explosion at Merritt 29 

Coal-mine officials, list of 33, 3S 

" Coal-mines Regulation Act " 33 

Coal-mining in British Columbia, summary of 242 

Coal potentialities of British Columbia 249 

Coal creek ( Fort Steele ) 295 

( Peace River) 123 

Coal Creek Colliery 297 

Coal-cutting machines in use 289 

Coal-dust, analysis of, after explosion 229 

Coal gully 2S1 

Coal Hill Syndicate (see also new name, 

Inland Coal and Coke Syndicate) ...22, 2S3 

Coalmont 22, 190 

Coast collieries, output statistics 21 

Coast District : 

Statistics, minor reference 18 

Gold production of 23 

Reference to quarries of 27 

I rou-ores 25 

Copper production 25 

Coal of 193, 243 

Coast Inspection District, report of Inspector 238 

Cody 149 

< '< ik... production table 11 

Reference to output IS 

Making of, on Coast 21 

I ron blast-furnace 20 

Peace River coal 133 

Production of year 245 

Pennsylvania used 169, 243 

( 'oldwater hill 280 

Coldwater river 216, 284 

Collieries (see also Coal-mines), East Koot- 
enay District, output of for year and 

tables ' 248 

Collins gulch 190, 293 

Collison bay 110 



K 336 



Index. 



I'aoi:. 

Colonial 1 4!> 

Columbia canyon, Atlin 57 

Columbia Coal and Coke Co., reference to 

work- done 22, 190, 240 

Annual returns 293 

Columbia river 52 

.Minor references i 139, 143 

Commodore 19] 

( lomox, pol tery-clay from 127 

Referei to coal-measures 125 

Colliery at 272, 127::. 274, 276 

Reference to town 27] 

Comstock 105 

Consol. M. & S. Co., opening of Sullivan.... 24 

References to company 146, 152, 155, 16] 

Reference to Society Oirl 2.">7 

( 'ooper 2012 

< looper creek 1-17 

( 'ooper Creek Mining Co 50 

Copper nil 

Copper (Alberni) 193 

Red Cliff mine L04 

I (ease river si 

Vi mver Island 198 

Annua] production 24 

Easl Kootenay 13S 

Quesnel 54 

Reference to output 18 

Voight camp 1S9 

Copper Hill 114 

( lopper island 1 10 

Copper King (Clayoquol I 194 

i Kamloops) 1S4 

Copper mountain 166, 190 



Daven>port creek 00 

Davis lake 119 

Dawson, Dr., reference to gold statistics of.. 70 

Notes on Tahltan basalt 72 

Dease Lake trail 76 

Deadman ll'.i 

Dease creek, reference to. ...29, 63, 64, ~'K 71 

Water used for hydraulic mines 77 

I kawson's reporl SO 

Dease lake, mini r reference 2!' 

Placer of 01 

Reporl of Provincial Mineralogist 65 

Referei to 6S, 69 

Freights from Wrangell 77 

Dease river, reference to history 69, 77. 8] 

Deep creek 121 

1 » er creek 155 

Dellie 147 

Deloire river, or Li&rd river (>!> 

Department of Mines referred to 0'* 

Destline creek 82 

Destline lake 81, 82 

Determination free, Government Assaj Office ■"•! 

Devil's Portage, on Liard river till 

Diamond-drilling, Granby 168 

I. vnn ereeK ■ 202 

Diamond Vale Collieries, Ltd., report of 

Inspector 285 

Distribution of outipul 286 

Explosion at 216,224 

Plan of working 2.:i 

Reference to explosion 29 



Paoe. 

( 'oppt r Queen no 

Copper River Coal Claims, Ltd 115 

Coquihalla river, dredging 186 

Corbin 221. 294 

( "orl.in Coal anil Coke Co 2i > 

Reference to output 294, 303 

Cornell, Texada island 1H7 

( 'oronado 114 

i loronation Mines, Ltd 19] 

Cosmopolitan 106 

Costs of mining 16S 

Cougar lake 1 1 :i > 

Countless r.ii 

Courrier creek ' S7, 92 

Cramer Wolf safety-lamp 280, 286 

Cranberry district 2.".> 

Cranberry lake, source ol Cs r,i ariboo 52 

< Irambrook, Inspector's office at 204 

Crooked river 11l> 

Crown 1)7 

Crown Mining Co 117 

Crown mountain 20] 

Crowsnesl coalfield, eoal-measun-'. refer 

to 12:. 

( 'r i\\ '■• Nest Pass 1 'eal 1 !o., mill >r n 

2 207, 294, 303 

< !rushed rock 9 

<'nltus creek 155 

Cumberland, coal-miners' examination 35 

Inspectors office ai 204 271 

1 !oal deveb anient near 

Cumshewa inlet 110 

Csar ISO 



D. 



1 md Vale Coll ' 'oncludcd. 

I hltpnt 

Reference to 

/>" A- ns 

Discovers creek 89, 

I >i\ idei d-Lake View O I Gold Mil 

ins Co 

I lixen creek 

n.L.s 

Dog-team, transportation by 

Dominion Block, Peace Raver land 

Dominion Day 

Dominion mountain 

Double Standard 

Douglas seam 

Downie creek 1 41-i. 

Draeger us, equipment at various 
mines 

Morden ' Jolliery 

( 'anadian ( olli< rii s 

Reference to 207, 281, 

Drain-pipe 

Dredging, Cariboo 

Fraser river 1 v 0. 

Drilling for coal. M isse 

Duncan river 

I > >nt*I< <■ 

I Innvegan 

Durham 

Dust in mines allayed bj exhaust-steam.... 
Duti river, coal on 



20 
206 
197 

95 

182 
184 
103 
64 

127 
115 
155 
195 

2:. I 
1 II 

2i '4 
267 
271 
295 
27 
51 
192 
249 
147 
151 
127 
161 
216 



Index. 



K 337 



E. 



I 'AUK. 

Eagle creek 152 

Eaglenest creek, coal on 84 

Eastmont 150 

Edmonton, minor reference 52 

Eighteen-mile creek 182 

Eight-mile creek 122, 133 

Electro-thermic smelting of iron-ore 1M! 

Eldorado creek, placer gold 192 

Elkhorn HIT 

Elk river 195 

Emerald 152, 155 

i: in urn p>3 

Fire at 101 

Empire (Omineca) 115 

.. (Lillooet) L92 

Engineer 60, 61 

Enterprise 161 

Erie 155 

Fa \\ D creek 155 

Ferguson 151 

Ferguson Mines, Ltd 151 

Fernie, coal-miners' examinations at 35 

Inspector's office at 204. 295 

Fiddick Colliery 2114. 265, 266 

Fidelity 151 

Field, zinc at 25 

Finland Girl 106 

Finlay rapids 121 

Fir 119 

Firebrick 9, 27 

First aid to injured, progress in 207 

Five-mile creek 187 

Fleming 202 

Flood, glacier, Stikine river 66 

Florence 108 

Florence Mining Co 147 

Flossie 106 

Fluess apparatus 207 

Galena 24, 113, 117 

Quesnel Mining Division 54 

East Kootenav 138 

Omineca 105, 106 

I lease river SI 

Reference to 202 

Gallagher 147 

Galloway, C. F. J., report on Peace River coal 1 18 

Gambler island 20.", 

Gas in mines 272, 208 

George island 110 

Georgia river 105 

Gerrard 15] 

Gething creek 122 

Diagram of coal-measures 134 

Giscome Portage 110 

Glacial action, Stikine river 72 

i rlaoial clay in hydraulic mine 56 

Glacier creek 103, 108 

i ilarin- Creek Mining Co lol 

Gladstone 57 

i iladj s lake .' 60 

Glen mountain 112 

Glenora, geology 72 

Reference to 74 

22 



I'M. I 

Esquimalt, lime-kilns at 100 

E & X. Railway 269 

Eureka ( Ainsworth) 148 

(Xelson) 152 

(Slocan) 149 

Eureka Copper Mines, Ltd 152. 166 

Evening Star 202 

Evening Sun los 

Examinations for miners 34 

Mine officials 33 

Exhaust-steam for humidifying mine air. . . . 210 

Exit passage, coal under 250 

Explosion, Diamond Vale Colliery, report on, 

by Chief Inspector 224 

Report on, by Provincial Mineralogist.... 210 

Reference to 29 

Explosives 1 , testing of 209 

I'll: n.siull 115 



Forest Rose 

Fort George, Indians of 

Fort Steele 

Fort Steele Mining Division 

Lead 

Fossil leaves, Klappan river 

Peace river 

Stikine 

Four Leaf Clover Mining Co 

Four-mile creek (Quesnel) 

(Slocan) 

Francis 

Franklin 

Fraser river, reference to 

1 iinlging, Cariboo 

Mica on 

I hedging, Yale 1S6, 

French's platinum method, reference to 

French creek 

Water for hydraulic mines on Berry creek 



G. 



Glenora. railway features OS, 

Glory-hole mining at Granby mines 

Gold, discovery of, in Cassiar 

Discovery of, in Deloire river 

Princess Royal island 

Character of, on Stikine river 

1 lease creek 

Thibert creek 

Proportion of product from milling and 
smelting 

Production of 

Production iu Atlin 

Vale 

Gold, free-milling 

Perry creek 

Slocan City Mining Division 

Hedley 

Portland Canal 

Gold, placer, tables 10, 

Reference to output 

Annual production 

Becoming exhausted 

Tax evaded 

Reference to excitement at I iea.se lake .... 
I lisooverfes in ( lassiar 



49 
118 

i::o 

137 

24 

S5 

129 

72 

50 

53 

148 

los 

107 

119 

51 

52 

192 

mo 

143 



76 

176 

70 
69 

It 12 
74 

80 

78 

23 

23 

23 

188 

153 

137 

15o 

23 

105 

10S 

18 
2:; 
23 
23 
29 
23 



K 338 



Index. 



Tagb. 

Gold, placer, reported strike in Allin 60 

Peace river 118 

Bear river (Portland Canal) 104 

Louis creek (Vale) 184 

Yale ISO 

Lillooet 192 

Similkameen 183 

Gold, placer-mining, Revelstoke 1 12 

I lease lake 64 

Platinum 26 

Gold creek 115 

Gold Drop 107, 175 

Golden 130 

Golden Belle 155 

Golden Gate 194 

Golden Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 130 

Zinc in L!5 

Golden Star 105 

Goldi n Zone 1S1 

Gold Plate Mines Co 181 

Goldstream, electric plant at 198 

Goose creek 53 

Gordon 195 

Graham, Thos., report as Chief Inspector . .. 204 

Reference to 34 

Graham island Ill 

i Collieries on 27S 

Graham Island Coal and Timber Co Ill 

Graham Island Collieries Ill 

Granny bay 99 

Report on Granby Co.'s property 173 

Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and 

Power Co 167, 168, 175 

Granby Cons. M. & S. Co., Granby hay 90 

Granby smelter, shipments from Washington 

State 183 

Description of work done 172 

Grand Forks, smelter at 167, 169 

Grand Forks Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 174 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 16S 

Grand Rapids, Stikine river 07 



H 



Haematite 26, 189 

Hall creek (Nelson) 154 

( Ains worth) 117 

Hamilton 150 

Hammil creek 117 

Ilankin creek (sec also Tenas creek, Spatsizi) S6 

Harpers camp 54 

111:' he rbour 1 1n 

Harris Mines Ltd 112 

Hastings B.C. Syndicate 1."..". 

Hazelton, minor reference to :'.". 81, 111-116 

Route i" Groundhog 65, 94 

i ml near 249 

Hazelton Nine-mile Mining Co 113 

///■• 152 

i! . stamp-mill at 2.",. 237 

Hedlej Gold Mining Co.. reference t" 

163, 179, 237 

Hedley mountain 17^ 

!' o 1; timber, ELappan river 83 

Hercules 110 

Hercules Mines Ltd 106 

I d creek l^s 

Hidden Creek < ipei I o., report by .superin- 
tendent '. 17.': 



Tagf.. 

Grand Rapids, Silkim- river, geology 72 

Grand Trunk Pacific Railway .. :,2. 1U, 114, 110 

Coalfields on 249 

Granite as building-stone 27 

Dease Lake trail 72 

Granite creek 190 

Coal of 2:1:; 

Granite mountain 152 

Granite-Poorman 20, 157 

Platinum reported in 15:; 

< rrant mountain 127. 129 

Gravel 9, 28 

"Graveyard," Little Klappan river 84, 95 

Greal 1 'any on of the Stikine 72 

Great Northern mountain 151 

Great Northern Railway 154 

At Phoenix 176 

At Similkameen 292 

Gri at Ohio 114 

Greenw 1 1 town 1 It:::. 167 

Smelter at 153 

Greenwood Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 167 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 163 

Coal in 168 

Placer-mining 168 

Grenville mountain 162 

Groundhog 115 

Groundhog (see Marmot). 

Groundhog coal, analyses of 9S, 116 

Groundhog coalfield 92 

Geology, topography 96 

Route to 81 

Report by Provincial Mineralogist 65 

Minor reference 30 

Coal referred to 64, 249 

Groundhog mountain 9n. :> I 

Analysis of coal 95 

Visit of Provincial Mineralogist 30, v l 

Ground-sluicing in prospecting 191 

Guggenheims, reference to, in Quesnel 53 

Gun-a-noot, Indian outlaw M 

Gypsum 9, 1S5 

Highland 14<: 

Highland Boy 114 

Highland valley 185 

Hills liar is,; 

Hills Bar Gold Dredging Co 1^7 

Uobson Mining Co 150 

'i 1 Silver Lead Co 154 

Hollinger 1:15 

Hollyburn mountain 200 

II niiiiilsii i;i4 

Homestake 110 

//.,;.. 1 S .ran) 149 

.. 1 STale) 187 

Horsefly Gold Dredge and Mining Co 54 

II 1,1 si sin, 1 1 5,1 

: 294 

I I ■ Mmrs Ltd., 1 . , -jii. -_:: • 1 

Howe sound 200, 23S 

Hudson Bay 155 

Hudson Bay mountain 114 

llinl-'iii Bay Mountain Mining Co., Ltd.... 115 

1 hope 122. 127 

! Bay < lompai D lake 79 

NTs igation of Stikine river 65 

Old pes: at Glenora ''.^ 



Index. 



K 339 



Page. 

Hudson's Bay Company, Liard river 69 

Humming Bird 115 

Huston inlet 110 

Hydraulic mine, peculiar sloughing or caving 

of bank, Atlin 55 



/tltilio (Trail creek) 

( Quatsino) 

Idaho-Alamo 

Ikcda 

I keda bay 

Illustrations, Diamond Vale Colliery plan... 

Gething creek, sections of coal 

Johnston creek, sections of coal 

Moose Bar creek, sections of coal 

Peace River, sections of coal 

Peace river, map of coalfield 

Surf Inlet gold-mines, map 

Tahltan, basalt cliffs at 

Incomappleus river 

Independence mountain 

Indian Mines, Ltd 104, 

Indian river 

Ingenika 

Inland Coal and Coke Co., Ltd 20, 188, 

Report of inspection 

Distribution of output 

Inland Coal and Coke Syndicate (Coal Dill 

Syndicate) 

J nla nd Empire 

Inland Mining Co 

Inspection of collieries, report of Inspector, 

Northern District of Vancouver Island. . 

Inspection of metalliferous mines, West Koot- 

enay and Boundary Districts 

East Kootenay 

Similkameen 



Jack of Clnhs 104 

Jackson camp 90, 93 

Jackson creek 91 

Jackson mountain, coal from 95 

J. and L 144 

Jedway, removal of Gold Commissioner. .100, 110 

Jennie Belle 154 

Jewel 1G7 



Kallappa '. 194 

Kwnocirs Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 184 

Kamloops-Yale, copper production 25 

Kaslo 140 

Kaslo creek. South fork 146, 148 

K. & S. Railway, reference to damage by fire 21 

Keary lake 119 

Keefers ISO 

KeffiT. Frederic 104 

Keithley creek 53, 54 

Kelly (mica) 53 

Kemptville Extension 201, 202 

Kettle river, reference to 107, 177 

Keystone 144 

Keystone creek 144 

Khutze inlet 99 

Kiekane inlet 99 



Page. 

Hydraulic mine. Dease lake 64 

" Season " in Atlin 56 

H j-dro-jnagnesite, Atlin 01 



I. 



161 

190 
149 
110 
110 
234 
134 
131 
131 
12S 
126 
101 
73 
142 
1S2 
105 
200 
114 
233 
2S3 
284 

22 
102 
102 

271 

235 
237 
237 



K 



Inspector of Mines' report, West Kootenay 

and Boundary Districts 235 

East Kootenay District 237 

Similkameen District 237 

Coast District 23S 

Diamond Vale explosion 209 

Inspection of mines, personnel and organiza- 
tion of inspection staff 204 

Report of Chief Inspector 204 

Interior plateau 67 

Iron, Texada island 197 

Port Renfrew 198 

In British Columbia 25 

Skeena 09 

Alberni 193 

Magnetites 25 

Louise island Ill 

Electro-thermic smelting 26 

Iron Duke 180 

Iron Mors" 161 

Iron King (Clayoquot ) 195 

(Omineca) 115 

I ion Mask H>1 

Ironsides 171 

Iskut Mining Co 64 

Iskut river 60, SI. 82 

Island Belle 195 

Ivan. 110 

Ivanhoe 195 

l.X.L 102 

John D 105 

Johnson creek (Peace river) 122. 131 

(Atlin) 60 

Johnston's camp 93 

Josie 161 

J ii mho 1S7 

.< unifier 113 

Juniper creek 113 

Kilo 150 

King Solomon Mines Co 147 

Kingston 1S1 

Kitsalas 115 

Klappan river S3. 94, 9S 

" Klappan summit " S3 

Klastline river. Government bridge and 

trail si, S2, S3 

Klehini river 61 

Kloochman canyon, Stikine river 67 

Kluakaz river S5, 86, 95 

Kluatantan river 91, 97 

Kluayetz river ., 94 

Knot IHII 167, 175 

Kobanee creek 153 

Kootenay, East 22 

Coal-mine labour troubles 20 

Coal in 243 



K :uo 



1 \ 1 > 1 : v 



Pagi 

Kootenay. East, coal . . mii; .;i ii ii -i 291 

Kootenay, North-East, reports oi Gold Com- 
missioner 139, 302 

Kootenay, South-East, reporl of Gold Com- 
missioner 137 

Report of Inspector 295 

Kootenay, North-West, reporl of <Iold Com- 
missioner 142 



P oi 

Kooti nay B< lie 155 

Kootenay Central Railway 141 

marble-quarry 27 

Kruger mountain 178, 182 

Kumeoleon inlel 99 

Kyuquol sound L96 



Laboratory and mineral exhibit, moving of. .. 30 

Lai i- troubles, Easl Kootenay coal-mines . . 2<i 

Canadian Collieries (Vancouver Island).. 20 

Lachmund, Oscar 107, 104 

Ladyoird 106 

Ladysmith 198, 271 

Laketon 69, 77, 79 

I. ah, View (Portland Canal) 100 

(Osoyoos) 182 

I inglois creek 92, 95 

Lakdeaxj Mining Division: 

Report of Mining Recorder 1 15 

Report of Inspector 236 

Lardeau river 151 

Lardo, marble-quarry 27 

i .a i il, i Trout Lake Railway 27 

I.hkI < 'III! nrr 115 

Latona Mining Syndicate 203 

Lava-beds, Klastline river S2 

Lava-flows in vicinity of Tahltan 72 

Lawn point 196 

I, .11 151 

Lead, method of calculating values 24 

I mtpul '-'I 

Separation processes 25 

/.< ml l\ ing 113 

1., ml, ill, HIS 

Lemon creek 150 

Leora 195 

he Roi 161 

No. 2 163 

Le Roi No. 2. Ltd 163 

I.i \ nn Mining Division : 

Repoi'l of Gold Commissioner (','■'< 

Liard river (is 

Referred to as " Ore " or Deloire 69 

Transportation on 77, 7!) 

Lightning creek 50 

Lightning Creek Gold Gravels and Draii 

Co 50 

Lightning ('reek Hydraulic Mining <\> 50 

Lignite, Tuva river 75 



Lignitic coal 240 

Lim.ookt Mini m; Division : 

Reporl of Gold Commissioner 191 

Lily n 150 

Lime 9, 28 

Lime-silica brick made at Victoria 199 

Lime tone 

Dease lake 72 

Peace river 127 

Tod inlet T-»s 

Lincoln creek 59 

I.i si of certificated coal-mine officials 38 

Lipton 109 

Litih Billie 197 

Reporl of I Dspector 23S 

Little canyon, Stikine river, heavy snow at 7U. ii7 

Little Deloiri a eek (',.",. 79 

Little i lek 1m; 

Little Joe 191 

Little Klappan river 83, 86, 94 

i it 110 

;■! oduction of 10 

Di ase lake SI 

Lode-mining (*c< Gold, Silver, Copper, etc.). 

Loi ' elor 14!) 

Loni si,,,- 163 

ti d Miles, i. id i:u 

Lost Cahin 154 

Louis ci k, placer 1 v I 

Louise island, iron 1] 1 

Lowhee 49 

I.ou i creek 40 

l/uc\ 53 

Boy 151 

Lucky Jim (Clayoquot) 194 

Lucky Jim (Slocan) 25, 146 

Zinc in 140 

Lucky Sir.il, L06 

l.nlhi Fraction 161 

Lynn creek, zinc 200, 201 

Lynn Creek Zinc Mines, Ltd 20J 



M. 



Mackenzie river referred 10 69, 77. 135 

Mai stro 146 

1 ; I." 

Mag 1 1 ■ i i e -ii Ti sads ; - land 26 

On Vancouver island 26 

i I District 25 

Malaspina 197 

Mali* ck, G. S., reporl on Groundhog 93, 01 

Ref So, 8S 

Maluin Synd 59 

195 

oth 1 ' i7 

' ! i. 105 



'■■ for building at Lardo L'7 

K ii a x lake - J7 

T. IT 

Lime-kilns at 2s 



, 

Marl; creek 137 

it, animal v | 

<: il river 105 

Marten creek 53 

Martha Ellen 106 

IDI 

McAllister 149 



1nm:v 



K 341 



Page. 

McBride, Sir Richard 5 

Mc( 'ulloch creek 143 

MpDame creek 64, 70, 79 

Mel lonald creek, coal from 95 

McEvoy lints 87, 88, 91, 93 

MeGillivray 224 

MeGillivray creek L92 

MeGillivray Mountain Mines, Ltd 192 

McGuigan basin 149 

Mc&iUre 110 

McKee creek 55 

McLennan range, mica in 52 

McLeod lake, Indians of lis. 120 

M.I d Lake Post 120 

Mettdow creek 147 

Meal Ticket 110 

Mr;i res island 1114 

Men employed in mines 10 

Merril eyaniding plant 155 

Merritt, reference to coal-mine explosion .... 2!) 

Coal-miners' examinations at 35, 1 SS 

Inspector's office at 204, 216, 280 

Merry Widow 196 

Mest ua river 81 

Metalliferous mines, production table 13 

Inspection of -'-'7i 

Metalliferous-mine accidents, causes of 208 

Tabulated as to cause -41 

Detailed list of 240 

1 inspector's report 235 

Meteor 1 50 

Mica at Tete Jaune Cache, notes by II. 

• 'a nnicbael 52 

Mica creek 143 

Mica mountain 52 

Michel Colliery 200, 303 

Mickey 104 

Middlesboro Colliery, annual report 280 

Midway 107 

Reference to coal near 1GS 

Mile 53, G.T.P.R.. Tete Jaune Cache, minor 

reference to 52 

4/;//,Y Mack 160 

Mine Inspectors' Institute of U.S., Annual 

Convention, 1912 200 

Papers read at 209 

Mineralogist, Assistant, retirement of II. 

Carmichael 30 

Mineral products 8 

Tables of 14, 15 



N 



Xailen harbour Ill 

" Xahlin." gasolene-boat on Strkine river. . . . 65 

N:iii:iiniii, ( '.M.I. meeting at 0.~> 

Reference to coal-measures at 125 

Coal-miners' examinations at 35 

Rescue-station at 207 

Dnspi ctor's office at 204, 258 

Nan umo I Ustrict 107 

S'anaimo harbour 259 

.Nanaimo Minim; Division: 

Rerporl oi Gold Commissioner 107 

Napoleon 163 

river, reference to coalfields. .. .30, 'i">. 01 

Reference to 83, 02. 98 

Naiii'ii river 121 

ifelson Daily Y« »•.«. article on Granby, re 

ence to 17.~. 



Page. 

Minerals Separation. Ltd., process used 201 

Mine-rescue work, progress in,.during year . . 206 

Miners, examinations for 34 

Mines, shipping 10 

Non-shipping 17 

Minimi Magazine, reference t<> re I on 

Rainy Hollow 61 

Miscellaneous products, Table V 9 

Mission creek 11.", 

Molly Gibson 153 

Monarch (Golden) 139 

( Slocan ) , zinc 25 

Montana 110 

y„nir Christo 161 

Montezuma 196 

Monzonite, Nickel Plate 1 M 

Moonshine 115 

Moose Bar creek 123 

Sections of coal-measures 131 

Moosehorn creek 60 

Moose lake 57 

Morden Colliery 267 

Morehead creek 53 

Morehead Mining Co 53 

Morice river 115 

Morning 180 

Morning Star 202 

Morrissey 296 

Morrissey creek 205 

Mosquito creek (Liard) 63 

(Cariboo) 50 

Moss river (see Kluatantan). 

Motherlode (Nelson), stamp-mill at. .23, 152. 155 

( Greenwood ) 163, 230 

Mountain Chief 107 

Muit ii tu in Con 140 

Mountain of Rocks canyon US, 127 

Mount < Gladstone Mining Co 10S 

Mt. Baker and Vale Mining Co 18S 

Mount Carbon Colliery 293 

Mount Selwyn 121 

Mount Stephen 140 

Mt. Stephen Mining Syndicate 139 

Mow.- lake 137 

Mu, I,,, (ho 49 

Mud creek _ 113 

Mugwump 161 

Muscovite, occurrence of 52 

Mustang .reek 51 

Kelson District : 

Minor reference IS 

Import of Gold Commissioner 152 

Inspector's report 2.'!ii 

Nelson island 200 

Nil. mix Mining Division: 

Uold production, reference to 2.". 

Copper production, reference to 2r. 

Platinum reported- 26 

Reference to platinum investigations .... 30 

Report of <;.'!<1 I Y.mmissionor 17.2 

Platinum report by Provincial Miner 1 i 156 

Shipments to Grand Forks smelter L63 

V< ttie i lol 

Nettie L. mountain 151 

Newcastle 269 

Newcastle island, coal under 250 

\. u Crow 104 



K 342 



Index. 



Page. 

New (Denver 150 

New I »o in in inn I V|i;i> r Co 163 

New Westminster 1S6 

New Wbstminsteb Mining Division: 

Report of Gold Commissioner 199 

Nickel reported , 31 

A ickel Plate, stamp-mill at '-':;. 1T8 

Minor reference to 237 

Nickel Plate mountain 237 

Nicola-Princeton coalfield 243 

Nicola-Princetoni inspection District, report 

of Inspector 2TH 

Nicola 1S5 

Nicola Mining Division: 

Report of Mining Recorder 1SS 

Nicola river 'J 1 r. 

N icol i ^ ii llej . coal output of 20, 22 

Nicola Valley Ooal & Coke Co., Ltd., Middles 

boro Colliery, report of inspection. . .280, 282 

'.Reference to output 20, 189, 208, 216, 280 

Observatory inlet 99, IT:! 

O'Donnell river 59, 60 

Office statistics, Ainsworth Mining Division 1 Is 

Alberni 103 

Arrow Lake 101) 

Asbcroft I s -"' 

I l.!\OQUOt 194 

Clinton 192 

Fort Steele 138 

Grand Forks ITS 

Greenwood III s 

ICamloops I 1 " I 

Lardeau 145 

Lillooet 192 

Nanaimo IDT 

Nelson 150 

New Westminster 200 

Nicola 189 

Omineca 110 

( (soyoos 183 

Portland Canal 109 

Quatsino 196 

Queen Chariot te Ill 

Revelstoke '. 142 

Similkameen 190 

Slocan 150 

Slocan City 150 

Trail Creek 162 

Trout Lake 151 

Vancouver 2n:'. 

Vernon 183 

Pacific Coast Coal Mines, Ltd., reference to 

output 20 

Table of output 263 

Reference to 250 

Pacific Coast Collieries Co, or B.C., table 

showing output and men employed .... 288 

Annual returns 233,249, 287 

i !oast Exploro ion Co 104, 109 

Pack river 120 

Poo* Train 161 

Paradise creek 100 

Paradise lake 100, 103 

Parle Pas rapids - . 121, 127 



Page. 

Nicola Valley Mutual Improvement Associa- 
tion 207 

Nigger Bead mountain, Tete .lattne Cache, 

mica at r.2 

Ndne-mile mountain 112 

98 144 



\ oole Vive I Un i h) 

(Slocan), zinc from 

\ oonda y 

aarble-quarries 

North Bend, dredging at 

North Columbia Gold Mining Co 55, 

Northern Terminus Mines, Ltd 

"Northland Echo" (steamer) 

\ oi t>h Slur 

-V lr </</< t 

Nugget gulch 

.Xo. 1 (Ainsworth) 

t Trail creek ) 

2Vo. 7 



o. 



Office statistics, Victoria 

Windermere 

Yale 

Ogden Gol 1 Mining Co 

Oil. Vancouver Islam! 

Otard bay 

Oil-fuel from California, reference to. . . .21, 

O.K 104, 

O.K. mountain 

Old Chum 

Old Ironsidi a (Grai I Fi rks) 

(Greenwood I 

Old Spurt 

Old Town 

Old Wellington seam 

Oue-mile creek 

Oregon 

Oroville t U.S. town) 

Osoyoos Mining Division: 

Reference to stamp-mill 

Reporl of Mining Recorder 

Placer-minting 163, 

Otanl bay. boring for oil 

Otter creek 

Ottertail river 

Omineca Mining Division: 

Reporl of Gold Commissioner 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 

Omineca River district, placer mines 

Oyster harbonr 

Oyster Harbour Collieries 



14!» 

25 
1 19 

27 
187 

56 
L09 
125 
137 
I .'..-. 

51 
146 
101 
167 



190 
1 11 
L88 
50 
198 
111 
244 
108 
162 
109 
175 
HIT 
L96 
137 

269 

2j ,-_> 

182 

183 



23 

ITS 

183 

111 

59 

121 

111 
116 
115 
271 
271 



Parsnip river 120 

Peace river 1 '-I' ' 

ions of coal-measures 128 

Map of coalfield 126 

Geology of coalfield 12". 

H.B. steamer on 122 

c gold 118 

249 

P River Crossing 124 

Pi \< i Kim k Mini SO 1 iivision : 

Motes bj Provincial Mineralogist 117 

Pearl Fraction 161 

Pegmatite 52 



Index. 



K 343 



Page. 

Pemberton trail 200 

Perrier 153 

Perry creek 137 

Pete 105 

Peterboro 57 

Peters creek 50 

Phoenix 1(52 

Phoenix 163, 168, 175 

Phoenix Amalgamati d 167 

Pilgrim 161 

Pillnr-and-stall raining 303 

Pine creek 55, 57 

Pine Creek Flume Co 57 

Pine Creek Power Co 56 

Pine, river ( North 1 127 

(South) 127 

Pine River pass 127 

Pingston creek 160 

Pioneer 191 

Pittsburg-British Gold Co 55 

Placer gold 10 

Reference to output 18, 23 

Dease lake 68 

Reported discoveries in Cassiar 23 

Yale 1S6 

Placer Gold Mines Co 5S 

I'la tinum, Dease creek SO 

Thibert creek 03, 7S 

Yale 186 

Platinum, reference to production 26 

Method of extraction claimed by A. G. 

French 26 

Report on Nelson District 156 

Government and other assays, mode of . . . 31 

The Xelson dykes 15S 

Pleasant valley 51 

Poker 57 

Poorman (Trail creek) 161 

Poorman ( Nelson) 23 

Stamp-mill at 26 

See also QrarUte-Poormon. 

Porteau 200 

Porter 77, 79 

Porter's Landing (sec Porter). 

Portland 108 

Portland Bear River Mining Co 107 

" Quantity and Quality of Mine Air," refer- 
ence to paper 210 

Quartz creek 70 

Quartz-mining (Cariboo) 51 

(Yale) 187 

Quatsino Coal Syndicate 196 

Quatsino King 196 

Quatsino Mixing Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder l'.IO 

Quatsino sound 106 

Qua n 23 

Stamp-mill at 152, 154 

Queen Charlotte 109 

Queen Charlotte Island shales, reference to. . 125 

Queen Charlotte Mining and Development Co. 110 



Page. 
I'okti.ani) Canal Mining Division: 

Report of Mining Recorder 103 

Portland Canal Mining Co 103, 109 

Portland Canal Tunnels, Ltd 103, 109 

Portland cement, production of 28 

Portland Cement and Construction Co. .. 28, 198 

Portland Wonder Mining Co 104. 108 

Port Renfrew, iron at 198 

Pottery 9, 27 

Powder, expensive in Atlin 56 

Prices used in tables 7. 24 

Prince Alfred 194 

Prince Rupert, cement at 2S 

Reference to 30 

Princess I Portland Canal) 105 

(Greenwood ) 166 

Princess Royal 100, 103 

Princess Royal island 99 

Report by Provincial Assayer 100 

Princeton, coal production 22 

Cement at 2S 

References to 166, 190, 249, 2s9 

Princeton Coal and Land Co 20 

References to output 190, 249, !>:>. 290 

Processes for separation of lead-zinc-silver 

ores, reference to 25 

Producers Rock and Gravel Co., Ltd 199 

Production of minerals, tables 7 

Progress of mining 16 

Provincial Assayer, report on Princess Royal 

island 100 

Report on Clayoquot Mining Division .... 195 
Provincial Mineralogist, investigate platinum 

at Nelson 26 

Work of year 29 

Reference to Groundhog trip 64 

Q.C. islands, notes on Ill 

Nelson, report on platinum 156 

Diamond Vale explosion, report on 216 

Grand Forks Mining Division, notes on . . . 168 

Highland valley report, reference to 185 

Similkameen, notes on 189 

Boundary, notes on 163 

Notes on Britannia 201 

Ptarmigan Mines (Co.) 193 

Puntledge river 271 

Pyrrhotite 194 



Q. 



Ql I EN ClIABLOTTE MINING DIVISION: 

Reference to notes by Clapp 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 

Report of Gold Commissioner 

Qui ■ n Victoria (Nelson) 

„ (Greenwood) 

Quesnel Forks, minor reference to 

Quesnel lake, galena on 

Quesnel Hydraulic Mining Co 

Quesnel Mining Division: 

Lode-mining in 

1 'opper in 

Report of Mining Recorder 

1 river, dredging leases 51, 

North fork 



Ill 

111 

109 

152 

163 

53 

54 

53 

54 
54 
53 
54 
53 



R. 



Radford (hydraulic) 64 

Radford, Al. C, death of 56, 64 



Railways and Canals Department, surreys in 
B.C 



S3 



K 344 



Index. 



Page. 

Rainfall, poor in Atlin 55 

Rainy Hollow 61 

Rambler-Cariboo 146, 149 

Rath bar 70 

Raven L97 

Rawhide 163 

Re s mond >V- Sons, lime-burners 28 

Reco 149 

Red brick 9, 27 

Red Cliff Mining Co 104, 107 

Redeemable Investment ' '.. 181 

Red Elephant 147 

B( </ Mountain 161 

Red Reef 106 

Reliance Mining Co., report of Inspector .... 238 

/.'• ... 196 

Rescue apparatus, equipment at various 

collieries 206 

Fernie 294 

Middlesboro 281 

Na naimo 207 

l'rinceton 290 

Rescue-work at Diamond Vale explosion .... 232 

Reserve shaft (coal-mine) 250 

Reservoir 114 

Revelstoke Mining Division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 142 

I. .ule-mining 144 

Richardson mine 266 

Richmond ( Slocan) 14!) 

(Trail creek) 162 

Riondel 147 

Riprap 9 



Saanich arm. lime-kilns 2S 

Cement-works. 198 

Saanich inlet, cement-works 198 

Sadie 195 

Safety-lamps 233 

St. Eugene 24 

Minor reference 137 

■i of Inspector 237 

St. -Mary river- 137 

St. Patrick 147 

Salmo 155 

Salmon. Indian food 74 

salmon arm 200 

Salmon river ('Portland Canal) 104, 105 

( Nelson) 156 

Salmon-Bear River Mining Co 104, 105 

San. I 9 

lly.lranli.-king 28 

Sand Creek (mica claim) 52 

Sand creek, mica on ri2 

Saulter Landing 125 

Sawridge 125 

Saxonite powder 297 

Sayyca creek 7<> 

S river 67, 71 

Seaton creek 149 

Relief ir.c. 

S< ntinel group 197 

Seven-mile 151 

Seven-mile creek 53 

7" M V Mouse 118 

Sewer-pipe 199 

Seymour arm 1 8 t 

Seymour creek 200 



Page. 
K .I., rtson, W. !■'., Provincial Mineralogist. 

trip to Oease lake, Groundhog coalfield 65 

Grand Forks .Mining Division 168 

B porl on Boundary 163 

Rocher Deboule 1 Copper Co., Ltd 113 

I Derjoulg mountain ll.'l. Ill 

Roi he river 190 

ind gravel, production of 28 

Rock creek 168 

B mountains, referred to 69 

I .1 of 249 

i. elt 194 

B i Mining ( !o li'.l 

Rose 195 

Rose and I'" 11 197 

Rosebank I.ime Co 199 

Rosella creek 7'.i 

I: 11a Mining Co 79 

Rose \farie 195 

B ad 235 

ROSSLAND ] IISTBII I : 

Copper production 2o 

Gold iroduction 23 

Report of Gold Commissioner 101 

K..\ W. M ■ 1 1 1 1 1 . - ■ l Police, referred to, at 

" Boundary," Stikdne river 66 

Old camp at EUastline river N2 

Ruby creek 58 

Ruby Fraction (Portland Canal) 107 

i Trail creek) 161 

Ruth (Portland Canal) 108 

.. (Slocan) 149 

.. 

Shale from Kyuquol sound 196 

Shale-quarry, pottery-clay 27 

Shamrock 196 

Shawni lake ;>( 

creek 1'C 

Sheep Creek District 154 

I < re lort 

Shipping mines, table of 16 

. . Lnej ickyards 199 

Silica brick 9 

Silver, reference to output 1* 

Production affected by labour troubles.... 2:'. 

Reference to separation processes 25 

Silver. Portland Canal 106 

Princess K pal island 103 

Slocan 24 

Silver Creek 115 

reek (Atlin) 60 

(Tale) 1-7 

Silver Cup 151 

113 

1. 1.1 113 

Silver Hollar 155 

Silver Hoard Mining ( '.. 147 

N/7r. r King 162 

- er King Co 1".:: 

Siln r I. rail 156 

Silver-:. nee to 24 

Silver Picfc 113 

Silverplate 180 

Silver Ridge 149 

Silver Standard 112, 116 

n 148 

Silverton M. 149 



Index. 



K 345 



Page. 
slmilkameen mining division : 

Report of Mining Recorder 190 

Notes by Provincial Mineralogist 189 

Similkameeu river, placer TS3, 289 

Siwash creek 186 

Siwash Creek Mines, Ltd 186 

Sixteen-mile creek 182 

Skagit river, report of Chas. Camsell IS" 

Skeena Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 09 

Report of Provincial Assayer 100 

Skeena river, reference to coalfields' on 

26, 30. 65, 92. 98 

Reference to river S3, 94 

.Navigation 05 

Skidegate inlet 109 

Coal in 240 

Skincuttle inlet 110 

Slag-disposal at Granby ITS 

Slocan City Mining Division : 

Reference to silver output 24 

Report of Mining Recorder 150 

Slocan District : 

Statistics, minor reference 18 

Silver production 24 

Report of Inspectors 146, -'.',~i 

Slocan Mining Division 14-S 

sl,„ mi Star 149 

Slowmaldo creek 94 

Smelter, under construction at Granby bay. . 99 

Tacoma 104 

Trail 113, 140 

Kingston, Ont 140 

Grand Forks 169 

Smelting for gold and copper 23 

Smith 52 

Smith creek 143 

Smoky River shales 125 

Sninik Frac. 194 

Snowshoe creek, lode-miming on 53, 54 

Societe Miniere de la Columhie Britannique 5S 

Society Girl 137 

Inspector's report 237 

Sockeye 196 

Soda creek 118 

Sooke 198 

South Belt 101 

South Fort George, minor reference 110 

South Wales 50 

South Wellington 267 

Springer creek 150 

Spruce creek 57 

Spruce Creek Tower Co 57 

Spruce timber S3, 119 



Page. 

Spanish creek 53 

Spatsizi river 83, 86 

Spatsum 185 

Split Volatile Ratio, reference to Peace River 

coal 134 

Spuzzum creek 187 

S. S. White Dental Co.. assays Nelson 

platinum 150 

Stamp-mill at Hedley 23 

I'oorman 23 

Engineer 01 

Coronation 101 

Standard (Revelstoke) 144 

Slumlord (Slocan) 148 

Zinc from 25 

Statistical tables 17 

Steamboat mountain 187 

Stemwinder 137 

Stewart ( town) 100 

Stewart Frac 161 

Stewart Mining and Development Co 104 

Stikine Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 63 

Stikine river, gold on 69 

Minor references 20. 04. 02 

At Telegraph Creek 81 

Basalt cliffs (diagrams) 73 

Topography of 66 

Geology of at Telegraph Creek 72 

Mineral claims 64 

Coal 30, 04. 65 

Navigation on 65 

Stouts gulch 40 

Strawberry island 1 86 

Sugar creek 50 

Sullivan 24. 137 

Report of Inspector 237 

Summit camp 100 

Summit creek 50 

Summit Creek Hydraulic Mining Co 50 

Summit lake 110 

Sunnyside Xo. .} ISO 

Sunset 149 

Suquash Colliery 250, 268, 270, 277 

Surf inlet, mines on 100 

Surf Inlet Gold Mines, Ltd., report by 

Provincial Assayer 100 

Surprise (Omineca) 112. 115 

(Slocan) 140 

Surprise lake 55. .»6. 57 

Sustut river, coal 05 

Swanson bay 99 

Swede HO 

Stiontl 104 



Table mountain 92 

Table of production 13 

Tacoma. shipments to smelter 104 

Tacoma Steel Co 230 

Tabltan 71 

Tahltan river 71, 70 

Illustration of cliffs 73 

Taku arm 60 

Tangent 194 

Tanzilla river 75, 77 

Tasu harbour 1 In 

7. . (0 River 190 

Teeta River Mining Co 196 



Telegraph Creek (town) 29, 30. 04. 68, 71, SO, S7 

Route to Groundhog coal 65, 81, 85 

Geology at 74 

Report of new strike near 60 

Telegraph trail 04 

Telfer creek 91 

Telkwa 114, 115 

Tenas creek 86 

Ten-mile creek 150 

Teslin lake, reported gold strike 60 

Testing of explosives and detonating-caps, 

methods employed 209 



K 346 



Index. 



Page 
Tete Jaune Cache, notes on mica by II. Oar- 

michael 52 

Texada island, lime-kilns 28 

linn 26, 197 

Minor reference 197, 238 

Thibert creek 20, 70, 71 

Reference to old channel 77 

Gold in is?:; 69 

Visit of Provincial Mineralogist 77, 78 

Platinum 63, 7s 

Thiberl Creek Mining <\>. (now Boulder 

( ink Mining ( '<>. I 77 

Thompson creek 140 

T! pson river, gypsum 185 

Three Forks 146 

Tigi r 146 

Tiles 9, 27 

Timber, Klappan river 83 

Peace river 135 

Stikine river 72 

Tod inlet 2S 

Cement at 198 

Tofino 104 

Tooya (see Tuya I. 

Trail 113 

Shipments to smelter 14<i 



U 



United Empire Coal Co., reference to 

output 20, 240. 201 

Union bay 271 



Vana nda 238 

Vancouver 155 

Vancouver, reference to brickyards in vicinity 

of 27 

Gravel and granite quarries 28 

Minor reference 54 

Vancouver Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 200 

Vancouver Island 61,193 

I'd I cry-clay 27 

Magnetite 20 

i !oal statistics 247 

Coalfield 243 

Vancouver-Nanaimo Coal Mining Co 20 

New Mast Wellington Colliery, report of 

Inspector 269, 270 

Vancouver Portland Cement Co 28, 198 

Vancouver-Victoria l.imc and I'.t'ick Co 100 

1 an-Roi 25 

Zinc from 140 

Van Winkle (old town) 50 



Page. 

Trail creek (Spatsizi river) 85, 86 

(Courier creek) 86, 00, 92 

Tbail Cbeek Mining Division : 

Report of Gold Commissioner 161 

Transportation best in winter in Atlin GO 

Treadwell 161 

Trout creek (Atlin) 00 

(Ca siax) 7o 

(Trout lake) 151 

Trout lake 151 

Trout Lake Minim; Division: 

Report of Mining Recorder 151 

Reference to silver 24 

Tsertia creek 84 

Tulamecn river 22, 190, 293 

Reference to coal-mine 289 

Tuya river 75, 70 

Geologj 72 

Coal on 75 

Twelve-mile (Portland Canal) 106 

Twenty-mile creel; i Quesnel river) ."I 

i Peace river i 127 

Two-mile .reek 112 

Tyee Copper Co., minor reference Hi 

Tyee smelter 198 

i .S. Bureau of Mines 206 

Ure river ( same as Liard river I 69 

Utica 148 

Venture Company 50 

Venus 153 

Vermilion Forks Mining and Development 
i !o., changed to Prim eton < I and Land 

Co 2S9 

VERNON Minim; Division: 

Report of Cold Commissioner 1S3 

1 irtnr 107 

Victoria, minor reference 52 

Dime-kilns 28 

i iement-works 10,8 

Victoria 1 iisikkt 198 

Victoria Mining Division: 

Report of Cold Commissioner 108 

Victoria West, pottery-works at 27 

Victory 115 

Virginia 161 

Voigt 189 

Voigt camp 166, 1 89 

Volcanii a-beds, Stikine river M 



W. 



:. road. Telegraph Creek to Dease lake. . til 

Dawson's i in 70 

< llenora to Ti legraph Creek 68 

Walter 101 

Wan lie creek 187 

War Eagle (Portland Canal) 109 

(Trail creek) 161 

Washington 165 

Washington State, ore shipped from 163 

Wafer tor hydraulicking 55 

Scarcity of, in Atlin 40 

Watt rloo '. 108 



Water Tight Hipper Dredge and Mining Co. 53 

Wart rln .".1 

Wayside 191 

Wellington camp 163 

Wellington C Co., report of Inspector 271 

West Canadian Deep Leads 50 

Western 1 tevelopment Co 88, 93, 116 

Wester,, Fuel Co 20, 252 

Douglas mine 257 

made shaft 2.".:: 

Northfield 256 

ction 254 



Index. 



K 347 



Page. 

Western Fuel Co., Reserve mine 258 

Rescue-station 207 

WMte Horse 63 

White Moose mountain 01 

While Pass and Yukon Railway, freight rates 

on 56, 1 11 

White Swan 115 

White Swan creek 60 

White wa