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Full text of "Na hoa pono-1968"




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NA HOA PONO 






l'uhh*hr»l b» 



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— 



Pll ( HI Mi II 






IMF IH* M 



Our Leaders 



. ... 12 



The 


people 


who 


lead, direct, 


and 


guide 


our 


church and 


our 


col lege 







Section Head: Diane Morita 





Table 



of 



Organizations 4 2 

A unified, consolidated group 
organized of persons for some 
specific purpose 

Section Head: Moki Amona 



Athletics 58 

The people who are trained 
in sports requiring physical 
strength, skill, stamina, etc. 



Section Head: Lela Ja 



rman 






1 


±, 




■ -£ 








" '••***-** ■ 












I 




\ 














%> 


























_i 




Student Life 74 

The activities of students in 
college 

Section Head: Terry Brown 



Contents 



Church 100 

An organ/' zat ion given to us by 
God for the purpose of leading 
us back into His presence 

Section Head: Harate Winiata 





Classes 



A group 
together 

standing , 



110 



of students taught 
. . according to 
subject, etc. 



Se< 1 Ion ii«. hi 1 1 1 n**« 1 • 





" 


^■L~_ 




BK fl 





RIGHTEOUSNESS may 

lie in one's face alone 



A COMPANION 

has a smile and a cheerful word for his associates. 




MIHPHMIHIIUMHII 





On land, 



to the sea, 





or over mountains . . . . 



a man is sincere 





and humble. 





upon a sufferer with compassion 



A woman looks 




and upon a child with affection 





A RIGHTEOUS COMPANION is 




measured by the character and by the 



pleasantness of one's 



disposition. 






Teacher 



Bishop 



Our Dedication 



to Jerry C. Roundy 



Just among students 




With service to mankind in their 
hearts, men become great leaders. 
Patience, understanding, faith and 
love are among the qualities which 
build up the character and dispo- 
sition of our righteous companions. 
To associate and to communicate 
successfully with our friends and 
neighbors is one of the most worthy 
of goals for this life. 

This Na Hoa Pono of 1968 is 
dedicated to Jerry C. Roundy who 
has portrayed all of these quali- 
ties. In every situation, whether 
it be in teaching his religion classes, 
in his Bishopbric responsibilities, 
or just among our students of The 
Church College of Hawaii, Jerry 
Roundy has certainly represented 
our "Righteous Companion" of 1968. 



Our Leaders 



He stood et the crossroads all alone. 

The sunrise in his face; 

He had no thought for the world unknown 

He was set for a manly race. 

But the road stretched East and the road stretched West 

And the boy knew not which road was best 

So he strolled on the road that led him down, 

And he lost the race, and the victor's crown. 

He was caught at last in an angry snare, 

Because no one stood at the crossroads there. 

To show him the better road. 

Another day at the self same place, 

A boy with high hopes stood; 

He, too, wes set for a manly race. 

He, too, was seeking the things that are good; 

But one was there who the roads did know. 

And that one showed him which way to go. 

So he turned from the road that would lead him down. 

And he won the race and the victor's crown. 

He walks today the highway fair. 

Because one stood at the crossr oad s there. 

To show him the better road. 

At the C r ossroads by 
Edgar Guest 



12 







13 






UukM B. Rn>*n 
I iisi Counselor 
I i i si Pi esidencj 



^prcsidencQ 



Nathan E. Tanner 
Se< ond Counselor 
I i i si pi esidencj? 




14 



- 






f 













Alvin R. Dyer 

Apos t le 

Member of First Presidency 




Representing a wide variety of backgrounds and interests 
other than their church activities, they form a body known 
as the Council of the Twelve Apostles in the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Seated, Left to ri^hl . 
Ezra Taft Benson, Mark E. Petersen (on chair arm), Joseph 



Fielding Smith, council president, and Ictirand Richards, 
Standing, left to right, Gordon B. Hinklcv. Delberl L. 
Stapley, Thomas S. Monson, Spencer IV. Kimball. Harold It. 
Lee, Marion (;. Romney, Richard i. Evans, and Howard I. 
Hunter. 



15 




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) 





r 

♦ 

t 

d 
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n 

t 



Student campus life as represented in the pages of the Na Hoa Pono is an important 
adjunct of the education process. Higher education in the laboratory, the classroom, 
and the lecture hall. However, professions, business, and industry are seeking people 
who not only operate a slide rule but also understand and practice social graces. 

A dance is a dance but could it also be a part of the broadening experience, a learning 
situation in sharpening one's personality to the acceptance of the group? And how about 
the beach party or the hay ride or the group hike in the mountains? 

The importance of academic learnings is not be depreciated. Truly the demands and 
the expectations are great, but no person fully realizes his potential who does not 
also have the ability to meet people , to socialize, to relax and to have fun, 

A great opportunity and advantage at The Church College of Hawaii comes from 
inter -cultural exchange of ideas and associations. World problems will be solved when 
nations learn to love each other and appreciate each other's peculiarities, traditions, 
and culture. 

These pages depict that part of education for which no grades are given but which is 
highly effective in the development of the "whole" man. 



Owen J. Cook, President 



16 



m^ 





tutbttte 



The Dean of Students directs residence halls, cafe- 
teria, and student related activities on campus. 

He also supervises non-academic advisement for veterans 
of the armed services, the director of student activities 
and advises CCH's studentbody officers. 

Assisting Dean Olson as full-time secretary is MaryNiu. 




Ralph D. Olson 
Dean of Students 



^tadtmitz 




This year two associate academic deans were appointed by 
Dr. Owen J. Cook, CCH president. They are Dr. Wayne Allison, 
dean in charge of language arts, curriculum, and class scheduling, 
and Wylie Swapp, associate academic dean for continuing education, 
summer school, and forums and lyceums. 

Dr. Kay J. Andersen, academic dean, returned from a year's 
post-doctoral study at the University of Michigan. 

Also joining the staff late this year was William B. Tippy 
(not pictured) in a newly created post, Assistant to the President 
for Development. 



Dr. Kay J. Andersen 
Academic Dean 






Dr. Nephi Georgi 
Assistant Academic Dean 



Wylie Swapp 

Assistant Academic Dean 



Dr. Wayne Allison 

A s s i 8 tan t Ac ade m i c [)»• a n 



17 



Bu 



smess 



Off, 



ce 




Handing out student paychecks is one of the 
many functions of the college's Business 
Office. In addition, it keeps tab of money 
earned and spent, supervises the college's 
new post office and other college related 
money matters. 

Assisting business managers Dennis Agle 
are staff members Mildred Goo, Agnes 
Haiku, Delores Loveland, Dorothy Suafilo and 
Mary Eubank. 



Dennis Iglc 

Bu-. inesi M.i MgC r 




B 

o 
o 

k 

s 

t 

o 
r 
e 



Organization of items makes for easy access, right Glenn? 



A newly-remodeled air-conditioned and carpeted 
bookstore opened in September to meet the needs 
of students, faculty, as well as community residents. 

Besides books, the bookstore sells school and 
office supplies, candy, all-occasion cards, clothing, 
postcards and Hawaiian or CCH souvenirs, drugs 
and other products. 

There are several employment part-time oppor- 
tunities in the bookstore, which is open six days a 
week. 

L. Eugene Crismon became bookstore manager 
this year. 




Fugene Crismon 
Bookstore Manager 



18 




Student 
Aid 



K. Duane Skinner 
Director, 

Placement & Student Aid 



and 



The Financial Aids and Placement 
office handles student loans, scholar- 
ships, as well as campus job place- 
ments. 

About 300 part-time jobs are avail- 
able on campus and at the neighbor- 
ing Polynesian Cultural Center. 
These include faculty secretaries, 
grounds and maintenance workers, 
library, switchboard, bookstore and 
post office helpers and guides, en- 
tertainers and demonstrators at the 
Polynesian Cultural Center. 



Placement 



Supervising registration twice a 
year is one of the biggest responsi- 
bilities of the registrar. In addition, 
he and his staff answer inquiries 
about the college, applications for 
admission and records student grades 
each semester. 

Dr. Spurrier also provides admin- 



istration and faculty with data repre- 
sending trends of applications, en- 
rollment, drop out, class loads, grade 
curves, graduation eligibility, and 
grade point averages. 

Winona Logan, Paula Needham Tao- 
soga, Vernelle Arakaki, and other 
part-time staff members assist him. 





Dr. Joseph H. Spurrier 

Registrar 

Director of Admissions 



Registrar 



They are all filed alphabetically -- just keep searching your schedule 
must be there -- they are always kept tiled! 



19 




Dr IMI Barnej 
Directoi ■>! ( oanae I i n k 




Counseling 



A new Graduate Admissions Assistance 
Center was added to the Counseling Ser- 
vices this year. Its aim is to help seniors 
in their search for graduate study oppor- 
tunities in various parts of the United 
States. 

Confidential counseling on orientation, 
occupational, academic, or personal prob- 
lems is also available from a well-quali- 
fied staff of three full-time personnel. 

A browsing room with college catalogues 
and booklets relating to occupational op- 
portunities and personal improvement is 
also available to students. 

Dwayne N. Andersen, counselor, was 
also named Foreign Students Advisor 
this year to specifically aid foreigners to 
the U.S., which make up about one- 
fourrh of the CCH studentbody. 





Rick, we really ought to see one of the 
Counselors before we elope. 



Dvayne N. inoersen 
Counse 1 or 



Dr. Jayne Garside 

Women's Counselor 




If^^-* 


*iZ\ 


1 V*"B Ik ' J 

1 t( L 


j 




*^M 


F| 1 H i 

1 ™ 


I 



Library 




Everything is utilized in the librarj even the stand 
tollable chair for a studious student 



Helen Moore Moffat 
s can easily become a com- Director, Library Services 



20 




Audio Visual 



The CCH Audio-visual division, located in the 
library, is a center from which faculty and students 
may borrow films, slides, projectors, tape re- 
corders, record players and other audio-visual 
equipment for classroom use. 

Lambert McGrath, director, is assisted by Ann 
Johnson, Shishir Kumar and student workers. 



Lambert R. McGrath 
Director, Audio-Visual 




Henry K. Lindsey 
Language Lab Director 




Yes, Brother Lindsey -- It's clear focus! 



Services 





Late in April the CCH library was named the 
Ralph E. Wooley Library in honor of the late Oahu 
LDS stake president and developer of CCH andLaie. 

Also, a $25,000 air conditioning system was added 
to the entire library this year. 

In addition to more book stacks to provide space 
for a collection topping the 45,000 mark, the library 
has current periodicals and newspapers from the 
U.S. and the Pacific islands, a special Pacific col- 
lection of books and genealogy facilities. 

There are many opportunities for part-time stu- 
dent employment in the library. 

Helen Moffat became director of library services 
this year. Theron Atkinson joined the library staff 
as librarian of technical services. 



A. Zane Clark 
Public Services Head 



Theron H. Atkinson 
Technical Service Head 



21 



Music 



Performers, listeners, composers, or teachers 
of music may be developed from CCH's growing 
music curriculum 

Students will find a variety of courses in music 
history, individual instrumental instruction, choir 
methods, and other areas to increase appreciation 
for different types of music. 

Twelve electronic pianos valued at $6000, pur- 
chased for music majors, were initiated early 
in January 

Fred E. Peterson, specializing in vocal develop- 
ment, joined the music department staff this vear. 




Chester \. Stone 
kBaiata.nl Professor 



Beauty 





Merrell L. Tew 

Instructor 



Fred E. Peterson 
I ns t rue t or 




Brother stone -- do you think I'll ever learn to play 9 



22 



Lies in the Creative Hand 



Art 



Opportunities to unleash artistic talents and gain a 
greater appreciation for the arts are readily available 
to students at The Church College of Hawaii. 

In addition to courses in design, drawing, painting, 
sculpture and crafts, students may gain rich back- 
ground in art history and train for careers in art 
education. 

Campus art exhibits give budding artists opportuni- 
ties to display their best efforts and share their 
creative talents or techniques they have learned in 
classes. 

A. LaMoyne Garside was appointed new art de- 
partment chairman this year. 




A. LaMoyne Garside 
Assistant Professor 






A painting done well is beant> to behold. 



Wylie W. Swapp 
Associate Professor 



Ortho R. Fairbanks 
Associate Professor 



23 



English 




4 




mSA* 




Pel -- Knglish is really quite simple' 



T£Sl 




« 






William Conway 
Assistant Professor 



Alice Pack 
Ins t rucl or 



One of the nation's first undergraduate 
programs in Teaching English as a Second 
Language was initiated this year at the 
Church College. 

In addition to this new BATESL (bachelor 
of arts in the teaching of English as a second 
language) degree, department majors are 
available in arts and sciences English and 
English education. A minor in journalism 
is also offered. 

The Journalism Department provides stu- 
dents with experience in yearbook and new- 
dents with experience in yearbook and news- 
paper production, as well as knowledge In 
specialized areas such as photography, public 
relations, advertsing, and mass communica- 
tions. 

William Conway became director of the 
English Language Institute when Ishmael 
W. Stagner left for doctoral studies. Paul 
Thomas, Robert Tippetts, and David Pack 
are new instructors in the department. 





The tropical climate adds 



24 



Means of 



Communication 





Robert H. Tippetts 
Ins true tor 



Barbara Tupaea 
Ins t rue tor 






Paul Roger Thomas 

Instructor 



LeRoy King 
Assistant Professor 



David Pack 

Ins true tor 



Margaret Heywood 
Ins t rue tor 




V 

o the enrichment of both students and teacher . 



4_ 



J o urn a I i sm 




Ralph l). Barney 

Pub I ic Re la I ioni 

Dlrec tor 



25 



M 
o 

d 

e 
r 
n 




This is an excellent idea for language study, isn't it, Caroline? 



Language 





Kenneth J. Orton 

\ ss i s t an t Professor 



■ayne Ulison 

Professor 
Nephi Georgi 

\s,.h ia t e Professor 

Garnet Birch 
I us i rue tor 

Clinton Kanahele 

Inst rue t or 



Loft in A. Harvey 

Ins t rue t or 




Chinese, French, German, Hawaii- 
an, Japanese and Spanish are the dif- 
ferent languages taught in the Modern 
Languages Department. 

This division helps provide an in- 
sight into the various foreign cultures 
through literature, as well as an in- 
tensive study of grammar and pro- 
nunciation forms. 

Students may study language for 
humanities credit, or as aims toward 
a bachelor of arts degree or church 
mission calls. Minors in each of the 
languages except Hawaiian are of- 
fered. 

A specially equipped language lab 
helps students perfect their pronun- 
ciation and comprehension by provid- 
ing tape recordings of language les- 
sons and music for listening and 
learning. 

Garnet Birch and Clinton Kanahele 
are new instructors in Chinese and 
Hawaiian, respectively. 



Rey B. Kartchner 

Ins t rue t or 



26 





History 



Dr. Jerry Loveland 
Associate Professor 



Dr. Robert Dean Craij 
Assistant Professor 




Dr. Eugene E. Campbell 
Visiting Professor 




Garnet Elmer Birch 
Ins true tor 



Social 



Sciences 



Helping students learn the social and political life 
through study of the past and present is the aim of 
the History and Social Sciences department. 

Courses in history, political science, psychology, 
anthropology, sociology, and geography are included 
in this department. 

A new Asian Studies program is also affiliated with 
the history department. It is an interdepartmental 
major drawn from the fields of art, economics, geo- 
graphy, history, language, literature, political science, 
religion, and sociology and is designed for students 
interested in gaining a foundation for a business, teach- 
ing, or governmental career as well as for specialized 
work in the Far East. 

Dr. Eugene E. Campbell, visiting professor of history, 
and Dr. Robert D. Craig are new to the department this 
year. 




Such vast knowledge of the past unfolding in our 

times. . . 





Dr. Craig K. May field 
Associate Professor 



Hal H> do Hunter 
Assistant Professor 



27 




All Education majors are required to student teach in a local high school or ele- 
mental school during their Junior or Senior year. 




Education 



Dr. Bill ie Holl ingshead 

Professor 



Robert A. Slack 
In> t rue tor 



The Church College of Hawaii specializes in pre- 
paring teachers for the elementary and secondary 
schools. 

The Education Department offers a four-year 
undergraduate program plus courses to qualify the 
student for the Hawaii State Department of Educa- 
tion's professional (fifth-year) certificate. A variety 
of fifth-year courses provide poor opportunities for 
teachers in service to gain further up-to-date 
knowledge and professional development. 

Teaching majors are offered in 12 areas including 
art, the sciences, business, English, health and 
physical education, history, home living, industrial 
education, mathematics, music and speech. 

Additional teaching majors are available in journa- 
lism, modern languages, and physics. 

Dr. Billie Hollingshead became chairman of the 
Education Department following Robert Laird's de- 
parture for doctoral studies. Dr. L. Gail Johnson 
and Dr. Kent Myers are visiting professors this 
year. 




Dr. L. Gail Johnson 

Visiting Professor 




Rulon T. Shepherd 
Visit ing Professor 




Dr. Kent E. Myers 
Vis i t ing Professor 



28 



L 








Richard K. Coburn 
Associate Professor 




Daniel Joseph Kane 
Ins t rue tor 



Stick to it, Wanda -- just one more 



Mathematics 



The Mathematics Department provides a curri- 
culum to train math teachers and engineers. 

It offers teaching majors and minors, an engineer- 
ing major, an arts and science degree in math, and 
a science-math composite major. 

Up-to-date method techniques in algebra, trigonom- 
etry, geometry, calculus and other fields are taught 
by competent faculty. 

Daniel J. Kane joined the Mathematics Department 
this year. 





Alvin Yee 

Ins ( rue t or 



Jack V. Johnson 

Inst rue t or 



29 



Speech 



Giving CCH students opportunities to learn 
oral communication and foster dramatic 
participation and appreciation is the aim 
of the college's Speech and Dramatic Arts 
Department. 

It presents a wide variety of courses 
from fundamentals of speech and introduction 
to theatre arts to more specialized areas 
of ground discussion, debate, acting, speech 
criticism, and stagecraft. 

Paul Thayn and Bernard Miles III are new 
in the speech division and David K. Jacobs 
in the drama section of the department. 



John, didn't \otir monimv tell JTOU never to flirt 
especial 1] with your wife looking on"> 





l.aKae Kim 
I lis t rue ( or 



Bernard Louis Miles III 

Inslrur 1 or 



on 



d 





Oh, Lovey -- He's divine' 



Drama 





David Kent Jacohs 
Inst rue t or 



Paul H. Thavn 
Ins 1 rue tor 



30 




Spirituality is gained through inspiring men. Our close curcuit television network 
is used in all of our Book of Mormon classes. Tapes are pre-recorded at BYL and 
sent to church affliated institutions. 



Religion 




Designed to develop testimonies of the gospel 
among the students, the Religion Department, 
offers members as well as non-members of the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 
stimulating and instructive devotional speakers 
each Tuesday morning. Ranging from General 
Authorities to CCH faculty members, the program 
introduces gospel messages with congregational 
hymn singing and individual musical numbers* 

The courses offered by the Religion Department 
are also varied, with Bible classes and World 
Religion offerings to specialized LDS courses 
in geneology, Book of Mormon, Church History, 
Doctrine and Covenants, and missionary tech- 
niques. 

Lawrence Rast, former Army chaplain, and 
Roger Gull of the LDS Institute in Honolulu 
are part-time instructors in the Religion De- 
partment, as well as faculty members from the 
other departments. 





Jerry C. Koundy 
Assistant Professor 



Seek and Ye shall find! The keys to many new and 
marvelous things. 



Roger W. Gull 
Spec in I Instructor 

Lawrence u.tst 
Spec in I Ins I riui or 



31 




► 








Betsy, be sine to focus up on the coarse adjustment. 




Biological 

Science 



The Biological Science Department is de- 
signed to provide a liberal education or 
specialize in professional careers in biology. 
The Church College's biological sciences 
curriculum includes offerings from Hawaiian 
trees and shrubs to ecology, zoology, gene- 
tics, marine biology, and anatomy. 

Pre-professional courses in medicine, 
dentistry, and related medical sciences are 
also taught. 

Laboratory sessions help students study 
the various plants and animals first-hand 
and, thereby, gain insight into the life 
sciences. 





Dr. Delwyn G. Berrett 
Assistant Professor 



Dr. Patrick D. Dal ton 

Associate Professor 




Gosh' This musi be .1 fhurophx-oph.We (Green Algae) 



Dr. Dean M. Andersen 
Assistant Professor 



32 




rother Ormsby, one of the Physical Science Department 

nstructors, explains the utility of the various Physics 
quipment. 




■ 




Richard A. Niedrich 
Ins t rue tor 



Richard G. Graham 
Ins true tor 



Dr. J. Smith Decker 
Visiting Professor 



Physical Science 



Test tubes, telescopes, and chemical equations 
make up oart of the Physical Sciences microcosm. 
It offers majors or minors in chemistry, a minor in 
physics, plus a pre-medical and pre-dental curri- 
culum. 

Chemistry, geology, and physics fields are made 
up of classes in astronomy, organic chemistry, 
engineering physics, and other courses of physical 
science taught by four specialists in their fields. 
J. Smith Decker is visiting professor of chemistry 
this year. 




Brother Niedrich patiently demonstrates the usage of the spectrometer, a light absorption 
meter, to one of his Students. 



33 



Business 




Laurel I). Porter 

Inxtrurtor 




This department offers four different ma- 
jors: accounting, business education, busi- 
ness management, and executive assistant 
plus a two-year applied science program 
in business. 

Aiming to prepare students for positions 
in the growing business world, the department 
provides courses in typing, shorthand, and 
business machines, income tax accounting, 
and other managerial and sales courses to 
enable students to acquire an understanding 
of the inter-relations between firms, the 
economy and society. 

Laurel Porter chairman of the department 
this year, when 

Laurel Porter became chairman of the 
department this year when L. Eugene Crismon 
became college purchase agent and campus 
manager. 



Delilah Hunter 

I ns t rue t or 





Clyde D. Westwood 

I ns t rue ( or 




Union I in 
Inst rue tor 



eld 



Florence I warn i 
Ass isan t 



34 





George R. Gibbons 
Assistant Professor 




Ins true tor 



Jerry D. Grover 
Associate Protessor 



industrial 



Launching time is 0100. 




and 

Technical 
Education 



The Industrial and Technical Education De- 
partment offers degrees in industrial arts educa- 
tion and industrial education technology and 
courses in electronics, auto mechanics, engineer- 
ing graphics, welding, and other areas. 

This year the department graduated its first 12 
students in a special Cali-Pro (instrument to 
achieve attractive proportions in graphic arts) 
design classes (Industrial Education 485). 

Jerry Grover returned from sabbatical studies 
to resume the chairmanship of the department. 
O. Ray Turley joined the department as industrial 
education instructor. 



President Cook, this is the scale. . . 



35 





f 



Edith H. Gibbons 
I ns t rue t or 



Lavina Harper 

\BB i •. i an I Pro f« -^ BO r 






Lanaya -- You' 11 make a good 
homemaker someday. . . 



Roy Hilding Marlowe 
Ins t rue tor 



\ i\ ian Beth Halverson 
Inn t rue tor 




Three different majors designed to train future 
homemakers and home economics teachers are offer- 
ed by the Family Living Department. These include 
a composite Family Living teaching major, a com- 
posite major in Child Development and Family 
Relationships (CDFR)and elementary education, and 
a major in CDFR. In addition, minors are available 
in Family Living and Child Development. Atw-year 
associated of science degree is also offered. 

A well-equipped nursery school for four-year 
olds in neighboring communities is located between 
the men's dormitories. It gives CCH students 
and Family Living majors first hand experience 
to work with pre-school youngsters. 

Roy H. Marlowe, Vivian Halverson, and Edith 
Gibbons are new in the Family Living Department 
this year. 



Family 



Living 



Can you imagine Don Rice and Hendy Rlexins 
preparing your meal 



36 



Physical Education 



To prepare competent teachers and lead- 
ers in the field of Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation is the goal in this 
department. In addition, it provides facilities 
— Olympic size swimming pool, basketball 
court, tennis courts, wrestling-weight lifting 
room, 440 yard track, and athletic fields — 
for participation and instruction in sports 



to create a desire for physical fitness. 

The college intramural sports program 
offers recreational opportunities for both men 
and women students. 

Earlene Durrant and Wendy Pitcher 
are new in the women's division of the 
physical education department this 
year. 






Athletics keeps our boys on the top in Rugby. 



% 3f 

John C. Lowell 
Assistant Professor 




II 



Dr. Boyd 0. Jarman 
Assistant Professor 




Carl M. McGown 
Assistant Professor 




Lois Swapp 
Assistant Professor 



Kapua Sproat 
Ass istant 



Earlene Durrant 
Assistant Professor 





Parallel bars are anions man.\ Fine equipments 
provided by the Physical Education Department- 



Wendy Pitcher 
I ns t rue tor 



37 



Resumes. 



Denn h I \ 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Arizona State University - 1960 

Major: Business Administration-Accounting 
layne I \i lison 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1952 
MA. - University of New Mexico - 1955 
Ph.D. - University of New Mexico - 1964 
Honors: 

Foreign Language Cryptanalyst in Washington, 

D.C. - 1955-'56 
Language Consultant to Ecuadorian Armed 
Forces, Quito, Ecuador - 1956-'58 
Dean M. Andersen 
Degrees: 

B.S. - University of Utah - 1960 
M.S. - University of Utah - 1962 
Ph.D. - University of Utah - 1966 
Honors: 

Pennock Award - Outstanding Entomologist 
Phi Sigma Award - Outstanding Biologist 
Dwayne N. Andersen 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1948 
M.Ed. - Brigham Young University - 1954 
Honors: 

Best All Around Athlete Award in High School 
Intramural Football Award - Brigham Young 
University 
Kay J. Andersen 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Washington - 1945 

Major: Chemistry 
B.A. - University of L.A. - 1952 

Major: English 
M.S. - University of Southern Calif. - 1959 

Major: School Administration 
Ed.D. - University of Southern Calif. - 1959 
Post-Doctoral Scholar at the Center for the 
Studv of Higher Education - 1966-'67 
Theron H. Atkinson 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Denver 
Mj\. - University of Michigan 
0. Pat Barney 
Degrees: 

B.S. - University of Utah - 1948 
M.S. - University of Oregon - 1955 

Major: Secondary Education and School 
Administration 
Ed.D. - University of Oregon - 1962 
Major: Counseling Psychology 
Honors: 

Director of Counseling Service at the Church 
College of Hawaii, Associate Professor. 
Ralph Barney 

Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1957 
M.A. - State University of Iowa - 1960 
Honors: 

Member Research Committee, National Council 

of College Publications Advisors 
Chairman, Public Relations Sub-Committee of 
Hawaii State Vocational Rehabilitation Plan 
State Award from NCCPA - 1967 
Del*yn G. Berrett 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1957 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1958 
Ph.D. - Louisiana State University - 1962 



Honors: 

Phi Kappa Phi 
Sigma Xi 
Qarnel Blaer Birch 

Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1962 
M.S. - University of Hawaii - 1967 
I Ugene E. Campbel 1 
Degrees: 

A. A. - Snow College - 1935 
B.A. - University of Utah - 1935 
B.A. - University of Utah - 1939 
M.A. - University of Utah - 1940 
Ph.D. - University of Southern Calif. - 1951 
Honors: 

Listed in Who's Who in America since 1962 
National President, Mormon History Associa- 
tion - 1965-'66 
A. Zane Clark 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Utah State University - 1957 
M.A. - University of Denver - 1962 
Richard K. Coburn 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Utah State University - 1942 
M.A. - University of Washington - 1956 
M.S. - University of Washington - 1956 
M.A. - University of Illinois - 1962 
William D. Conway 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1959 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
M.A. - University of Hawaii - 1967 
Owen J. Cook 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Utah - 1940 
M.A. - University of California - 1946 
Ph.D. - University of California - 1955 
Honors: 

Member of Advisory Committee of New Me- 
morial Hospital Insurance Program. 
President of the Church College of Hawaii 
Past Legislative Chairman for the California 
Association of Public School Business Of- 
ficials. 
Member of the Advisory Committee for the Ca- 
lifornia State Department of Education. 
Robert Dean Craig 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Cincinnati - 1962 
M.A. - University of Cincinnati - 1964 
Ph.D. - University of Utah - 1966 
Honors: 

Member of Phi Alpha Theta (Hist. Honor Soc.) 
Attended University of Innsbruck, Austria, and 
University of Macon, France. 
L. Eugene Crismon 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1962 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1965 
Patrick D. Dalton 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Arizona State University - 1949 
M.S. - Utah State University - 1951 
Ph.D. - University of Arizona - 1961 
Honors: 

Eagle Scout with Three palms, BSA; Cold 
Service Medal, BSA; Scoutmaster's Key, BSA; 
Scouter's Award, BSA; Order of Merit, BSA 
Who's Who among students in American Uni- 
versities and colleges, 1949; National Science 
Foundation Fellowship, 1959-'60; Who's Who 
in the West, 1960-'68; Who's Who in Sci- 
ence, 1961-'68; American Men of Science, 
1961 -'68 
J. Smith Decker 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1932 
M.S. - Iowa State University - 1939 
Ph.D. - University of the Pacific - 1965 



38 



Honors: 

National Education Association 

AAUP 

Arizona Education Association 

American Association for the Advancement of 

Science 
American Chemical Society 
Arizona Academy of Science 
Arizona College Association 
Earlene Durrant 

Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University 
M.S. - Brigham Young University 
Ortho R. Fairbanks 
Degrees: 

B.F.A. - University of Utah - 1952 
M.F.A. - University of Utah - 1953 
Honors: 

Fellow-the National Sculpture Society 
Fellow - the International Institute of Arts and 
Letters. 
A. La Moyne Garside 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1957 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1960 
Honors: 

Received award for merit in painting Brigham 
Young University award for design, Lewis E. 
Rowe Memorial Trophy for landscape paint 

held student body office at Weber Junir College 
Jayne G. Garside 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1958 
Major: Spanish 
Minor: English 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1960 
Major: Presonnel and Guidance 
Minor: Human Development and Family Rela- 
tions 
Ph.D. - Brigham Young University - 1965 
Major: Educational Psychology 
Minor: Human Development and Family Re- 
lationships 
Nephi Georgi 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Utah - 1949 
M.A. - University of Utah - 1952 
Ph.D. - University of Utah - 1966 
Honors: 

Attended Indiana University, UCLA, and Uni- 
versity of Michigan (Post-Doctoral) 
Edith Gibbons 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Arizona State University - 1949 
George R. Gibbons 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Arizona State University - 1951 
M.A. - Arizona State University - 1956 
Honors: 

Graudate work at Northern Arizona University, 
Oregon State University, Stout State Univer- 
sity, and Utah State University. He designed a 
modern electronic laboratory, which com- 
pares favorably to any facility in the nation 
and has spearheaded the only four year 
college level electronics technology program 
in the state of Hawaii. 
Richard G. Graham 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1961 
Major: Physics 
Minor: Math and German 
M.A. - University of Utah - 1964 
Major: Physics 
Minor: Math 
Honors: 

NSF Science Faculty Fellow 1968-'69 



Jerry D. Grover 

Degrees: 

B.S. - Utah State University - 1959 
B.S. - Utah State University - 1956 
M.S. - Utah State University - 1961 
Ed.D. - Brigham Young University - 1968 
Roger W. Gull 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Church College of Hawaii - 1964 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1968 
Honors: 

Valedictorian at CCH in 1964. 
Served as Student Body Pres. at CCH. 
Vivian Beth Halverson 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1964 
M.S. - Purdue University - 1966 
Honors: 

Attended the University of Utah and Merrill- 
Palmer Institute of Human Development in 
Detroit. 
Lavina Harper 
Degrees: 

B.S. - East Carolina College - 1948 
M.S. - Utah State University - 1961 
Honors; 

Graduate work at Purdue, Iowa State University 

and Oklahoma State University and taught at 

Utah State University and taught as Visiting 

Professor at University of British Columbia. 

Loftin A. Harvey 

Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Utah - 1964 
M.A. - Universityof Utah - 1967 
Margaret Heywood 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Arizona State University - 1939 
M.A. - Arizona State University - 1951 
Honors: 

Member Kappa Delta Pi 
Member of Kappa Gamma 
Billie Hollingshead 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Texas Woman's University - 1922 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1929 
Ph.D. - University of Southern Calif. - 1935 
Post-Doctoral work at George Washington Uni- 
versity, University of Hawaii, New York Uni- 
University, and the Hebrew Union College - 
Institute of Religion 
Honors: 

Citation for outstanding service under army 

employment in Civil Service 
For Educational Planning and Teacher train- 
ing in the Prisoner of War Educational 
Program, 1952-'54 
For Planning and Administering Educational 
Programs for the rehabilitation and demo- 
cratization of the schools of Japan, 1947-'52 
Civil Service Rating of Outstanding in Con- 
nection with the prisoner of War Program. 
Delilah Hunter 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
Hal Hyde Hunter 
Degrees: 

J.C. Certificate from Ricks 
B.A. - Idaho State University 
M.A. - Brigham Young University 
Pre-Doctoral - Washington State University 



Florence Iwami 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Church College of Hawaii 
Honors: 

VI Delta Chapter 
Beta Sigma Phi 



N 4 



39 



Kennel h i Oi i an 
Degrei 

gham Young l diversity - L9 

\! i .:udies 

Minor: Englit 
Minor: I nglish 

. - Brigham Young University - I 
Major: History 
Mini >r: ' nglish 
Honors: 
Carnegie Foundation Scholarship to Seaon Hall 
l niversity, New York, for Japanese Langu- 
age studv, 196 

tional Defense Foreign Language Grant to 
Harvard Universil . dge, Mass., for 

Japanese Language Study, 1967. 
\i k e Pack 
Degrees: 

Church College ol Hawaii - 1965 
NLA. - University of Hawaii - 1968 
ita\ id Pack 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Church College of Hawaii 
Graduate work at the University of Hawaii 
i i ed i . Peterson 
Degrees: 

B.A. - San Francisco State College - 1963 
Private Study 
Honors: 

Choral Conducting. ..Dr. Bruno Walter and Ser- 
gey Koussevitsky Concert-Operatic Singing 
tropolital Opera and European Houses, 3 years 
Emma Ramse' Morris, 2 years Mabel Bad- 
dington.-.Covent Garden. Producer-Director 
of Western Colorado Opera Association. 
lend) Pitchei 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1965 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1967 
Laurel I). Porter 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1956 
Honors: 

C.P.A. - State of Washington - 1960 
C.P.A. - State of Arizona - 1961 
Jerrj c. Round] 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - I960 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
Knl on i. Shepherd 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1929 
M.S. - University of Southern Calif. - 1934 
Honors: 

Served as President of Arizona School Admin- 
istrators. 
Member of AASA. 
Member of AEA. 

Chairman of Mesa Housing Authority. 
Chairman of Park and Recreation Board 
Member and President of Rotary. 
I i u B Shunwaj 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1964 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1966 
Honors: 

nber of Phi Kappa Phi 
Clark -Thomas Award 

Outstanding Second Year Graduate student in 
iglish. 
K Duane Skinnei 
Degrees: 

B.S. - University of Southern Calif. - 1949 
M.S. - University of Southern Calif. - L956 
Honors: 

President of the Student Body 

Me mber of the Choir and Orchestra 



California Honor Society 
retary to Rotary club 

Member Honolulu bocial Agencies -Salary Re- 
vision Committee 
Member ol Honolulu Rehabilitation Job Op- 
portunities Cum in it 1 1 « 
Robei t \ Sla< k 
Degrees: 
B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1962 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1966 
Joseph ii. Spui i iei 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Texas Western College - 1950 

.. - University of Texas - 195] 
Ed.D. - Utah State University - I 
Honors: 
Conference Chairman oi Pacific Association 
of Collegiate Registrars and Administrators 
officers. 
Chestei \ Stone 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1941 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1950 
Graduate work at Utah Stare University, Uni- 
versity of Nevada, and University of Utah 
Honors: 

Director of the College Band 
Treasurer of the OBDA 
Member of the MENC 
Member of the Hmea 
Member of the College Band Directors 
National Association 
Lois Swapp 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Utah - 1942 
M.S. - University of Wisconsin - 1944 
Wylie \\. swapp 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1948 
M.A. - State University of Iowa - 1952 
Merrell I.. Tew 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - i960 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
Honors: 

The Honolulu Symphony in April of 1966 per- 
formed the first movement of one of my 
symphonies "Opus For Orchestra" 
Paul II. Thayn 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - Nob 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - L967 
Paul Roger Thomas 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1964 
M.A. - University of Virginia - 1967 
Robert II. Tippet Is 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1966 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1967 
Barbara Tupaea 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1959 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
.h.i Ra\ Turlej 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Northern Arizona i niversit} 1954 
M.A. - Norhtern An/«>na University - 1961 
Clyde I). West wood 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Long Beach State College 1961 
M.S. - University of Hawaii 19| 
\l \ in Yee 

Degrees: 

B.S. - New Mexico Lnstiiuu .. M.ning ana 

technology 1964 
M.A. - University ol California 19 



40 



Resumes continued 



David Kent Jacobs 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1961 
M.A. - Brigham Young University - 1967 
Honors: 

Performed for the U.N., World's Fair and 
for Government officials in D.C. 
Boyd 0. Jarman 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1954 
M.S. - University of Oregon - 1959 
Ed.D. - University of Oregon - 1965 
Honors: 

Member - 1950 NIT Champion Basketball Team 
Jack V. Johnson 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Idaho State University - 1964 
M.S. - Idaho State University - 1966 
L. Gail Johnson 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Utah State University - 1954 
M.Ed. - University of Oregon - 1962 
B.S. - Utah State University - 1954 
M.Ed. - University of Oregon - 1962 
Ph.D. - University of Ohio - 1964 
Honors: 

NDEA Fellowship 
Involved with Peace Corps 
Daniel Joseph Kane 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Idaho State University - 1954 
M.A. - Harvard - 1966 
Honors: 

NSF Grant at Harvard 
Received Harvard Prize Fellowship 
NSF Grant at Harvard 
Rey B. Kartchner 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Arizona State University - 1961 
M.A. - Arizona State University - 1966 
La Rae King 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Ricks College 

Major: Speech and Drama 
Minor: English 
Honors: 

Graduated as Salutatorian at Ricks College. 
Honored by the National Education Association 
as the Outstanding college teacher in Central 
California and teacher of the year in second - 
dary Education. 
LeRoy King 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Arizona - 1945 
M.A. - University of Southern Calif. - 1962 
Rulon Litchfield 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1955 
M.B.A. - Utah State University - 1966 
Jerry K. Loveland 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1951 
M.A. - University of California - 1954 
Ph.D. - American University - 1967 
Honors: 

Fulbright Scholar - 1951 -'52 
John C. Lowell 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1965 
m.a. - Brigham Young University - 1965 
Honors: 

All Army selection in track and volleyball. 



Coached Brigham Young University's volley- 
ball team. 
Achieved a ranking of third in the national 

tournament. 
All American selection in volleyball, act as 
assistant coach for the U.S. national team 
at the World Volleyball Championships at 
Praque. 
Manager of the U.S. Volleyball team for the QOYU 

Pan American Games at Winnepeg. 
Selected as manager of U.S. Volleyball team 

for 1968 Olympic games. 
Chosen as both graduate and undergraduate 

valedictorian, 
Elected to membership in Phi Kappa Phi Honor 
Society in 1966. 
Penny Madson 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Weber State College 
Honors: 

Outstanding Freshman and Sophomore student 

at Weber State College. 
National Cheerleader for Western States. 
Among the top ten teachers of a Utah School 
District. 
Roy Hilding Marlowe 
Degrees: 

B.A. - Brigham Young University - 1966 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1967 
Craig K. Mayfield 
Degrees: 

B.S. - University of Oregon - 1950 
M.S. - University of Oregon - 1957 
Ed.D. - Brigham Young University - 1961 
Post -Doctoral work at the University of Illinois 
Honors: 

Ford Foundation Fellowship 
Teaching at San Jose State College, Old Domi- 
nion College, and Indiana State College. 
Carl M. McGowan 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1963 
M.S. - Brigham Young University - 1964 
Bernard Louis Miles III 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Brigham Young University - 1966 
M.S. - University of Utah - 1967 
Helen Moore Moffat 
Degrees: 

B.A. - University of Utah - 1942 
M.A. - Arizona State University - 1955 
M.A. - University of Denver - 1958 
Honors: 

Phi Kappa Phi 
Kent E. Myers 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Colorado State University - 1953 
Mo Ed. - Brigham Young University - 1959 
Ph.D. - University of Utah - 1964 
Honors: 

George Washington Freedom's Foundation Medal 
Richard A. Niedrich 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Idaho State University - 1956 
M.S. - University of Utah - 1964 
Honors: 

Consultant to the Hawaii Science Teachers 

Association. 
Steering Committee of National Science Teach- 
er's Association Conference. 
Ralph D. Olson 
Degrees: 

B.S. - Utah State University - 1941 
M.S. - Utah State University - 1964 
Honors: 

Dean of Students 
Graeme Ormsbv 
Degrees: 

B.S. Cum Laude - CCH - 1965 



41 



Organizations 



Choose good companions, and find 

Among them those with whom you would 

Like to go through life and eternity 




President David 0. Mckay 



. 







42 




Lily Lindstv 

N < < re la r> for 
Prcs idcnl Cooh 



Secretaries 




Mary Niu 

Secretary for the 
Dean of Students 



Carol Torsak 
Secretary for the 

\i .idem i <■ Dean 



Phy His Lesa 

Secretary for the 
Counseling Services 



Sylvia Boe 

Secretary for the 

Placement and Student Aid 




- \ls 




Mildred Goo 

Head Secretary for the 
Bus i ness Office 



Dorothy Sua 

Secretary for the 
Business Office 



Agnes haiku 



Secretary for the 
Bus iness Of f ice 



Delores Loveland 

Secretary for the 
Business Office 



Mary Eubank 

Secretary for the 
Business Office 



Security Guards 




Craig kell\ 



Roger Harris James Seely 



Warren Ottley Spencer McMullin Richard Gibbs 



44 




Cafeteria Staff 



Emily Enos 
Head Manager 




Genevievi Peli 




Helen Watanabe 




Stella Suzuki 





Sally Canque 




Joyce Kakuni 




Amelia Taveuvea 





Hisayo Kanioki 




Mariana Scott 




Ah Hee Masako 





Shiela Alo 






'^NsS-iL 



Blossom Kekaila 




Mary Oberly 




Fratele Tapusou Bernise Neoreta 





Va Few son 



I rma Broad 



Aliitasi Fiso 



Ethel Hironaka 



- 

i ftverne Beal i> 



45 






yvi 










Jack Hinn has a friendly chat with 
I Wired kalehua. 




Inokr Punaki 

Vice-President of Assemblies 





Jack Winn 
Pres iden t 



Student Body Officers 



A very prominent group; our student body 
officers have tried to instill and promote 
the highest ideals of leadership and loyalty 
among our ever growing Student Body. 

And so at the end of another school year 
their pictures and names enter our Hall 
of Fame — Na Hoa Pono to be added to the 
glorious History that has made the Church 
College of Hawaii what it is today. 





Nevada li t ford 

Treasurer 



Bonnie Vail 

\ i ce -Pros iden I of Socials 



46 



Salu Hunk in 
Sei re tar) 




Makiko Sasaki 





Alan Goo 







IV 

1* 



Honor Council 



The unsung heroes of our campus govern- 
ment. Though there is little said about them, 
they do exist and are a very tangible part 
of our working government. 

This Body of Students is a representation 
of the 4 classes. Theirs was the task 

of considering problems that may have arisen. 




Sid Sandstrom 
Ch ief Jus t i ce 

First Semester 




Marilyn Leong 



Frank Hui 



Judd Brooks 
Ch ie f Jus t ice 
Second Semester 



An energetic team who worked together to 
bring about a successful year of socials 
for the Student Body. 




Social Committee 




Front Row. Gregory Enos, Diane Tanaka, Donald Koga 
Back Row: Marlene Makekau, David Bingham 



When is our social , Marlene? 



47 



Band 



^% 










m 

p 

i' fl 



M 



Ah well, it's better than the National Guard. 





O 



ir * ^ 




Flag girls. Marsha Maclntire Darlene Mustard, Majorette Nancy Mann Shannon Lee and Kathy Mckinney, 



Assembly Committee 





Mr CSiene) performs at the student assembly* 



Left to right: Inoke Funaki, Melanie Gressley, 
Marvalee Soon, Tevita Lui 



This able body had the responsibility of 
selecting choice entertainment for the stu- 
dent body for their Thursday Assemblies. 
They were also delegated the task of judging 
the student and dorm assemblies. Let's 
give them a hand! 



48 



Associated Men 
Students 



Two Clubs which encompass all of the men 
and women students on campus. For im- 
proved relations between and among the two. 
Their biggest socials being the Barn Dance 
and the Preference Ball. Both very success- 
ful events, thanks to Ronald Sing and Elissa 
Leong and their assisting heads. 




Who do you think you are- Dean Olson ' s son ? 




Associated Women 
Students 




Ronald Sing 
Pres ident 



AMS& 



AWS 





Elissa Leong 
Pres ident 



(lost- your mouths ni ■ 1* 
<iu\\ re onlj ix>\ s 



49 



Choi 




Pianist: Beverly Tana Row 1: llaunani kaanaana, Janet Bigalow, Jackie Bush, Maria Pek, Mr. Fred Peterson, 
Row 2: Terry Brown, Roger Harris, Lovey Apana, Carma Coburn, Linda Van Deusen, Richard Gibbs.Tim Hansen, 
Row 3: spencer McMullin, Winston Scoville, Shirley Smith, Dave Checketts, Candis Olson Craig Huish, Yuna 
Fa, Da\ id Barney 



Election Committee 




Barabara Jemas. Janet Matula, Nan Fllen Simmons. Regan Hunt 




Front row: Alvin Yee, Joseph Hui, Clyde Westwood, John Fung, Garnet Birch. Back row: Arron 
Yung, Faye Yee, Karen Chen, Peggy Pai, Diana Cheung, Frank Hui, Fanny Yee Ramona Lin, Anna 
Lin. Marilyn Goo. 



Chinese Club 



Under the auspecies of Aaron Young and 
the able advisorship of Brother Birch, the 
Chinese Club participated in various cultural 
as well as entertaining projects. 

A congenial group, these eager members 
have tried to keep alive the spirit and tra- 
dition that is theirs alone. 




Arron Yung, Pres. ; Garne t Birch, Advisor 

Karen Chen, Vice-pres. ; Faye Yee, Social 
chairman. 



Political Affairs Club 



Would you believe the United Nations 




M 



1 ^^H vViifi Sfit 


51 


tea* •am 






Hui 
Alii 



lot t in Harvea 




l know I look 1 ike CI aril 
Kent! 

The Hui Alii was organized in 1962, for the purpose 
of preserving the Hawaiian culture. It has been 
a club which always has a large membership, but 
it has never gained any real prominence until this 
past year. Under the leadership of President 
Thomas Kanahele and the advisorship of Bro. 
Harvey, the Hawaiian club has made great strides 
in the past year and has become one of the most 
powerful as well as most popular clubs on campus. 

Some of the club's achievements during the past 
school year are as follows: it was in charge of 
the entire Aloha Week; putting on a parade and several 
Hawaiian programs during that week. It sponsored 
the Holoku Ball which was one of the better dances 
of the year. During Christmas the club collected 




Aloha Week is here and the Hui Alii presents their royal court 

donations for the State Hospital at Koneohe and also 
put on a program there for the patients. At Home- 
coming it won first prize for the best jalopy. The 
Club also participated in the Pacific Islands Week's 
activities and won first prise, which was a trophy 
and $30.00. It put on a May Day program of Hawaiian 
culture. 

The Hawaiian Club is determined to go on to 
bigger and better things in the years to come. 




Fust Row: Eldred kalehua, Lance latsumoto. Henry Glendon. William Hussey, Rex Frandsen, Dennis Nakashima, Mike Padiken, Bert 

Miyamoto. Rodney Oshi.o. Robert Ho. Second BowrAlfred Daos. Sharon Samoang, Luana Brown-Historian, Naomi Ahuna, Janet Paik , 

Joeseph Coconaie. Dodie Fee. Diane Tanaka . Kenny Bell Loretta Perierra. Don koga. Pat Corpuz Third Row: Gary Enos, Bob 

Ing, Terry Brown. Kenneth ChiiiR. Carol Paik Finest Akimsiu, Cynthia kapualehua, Wanette Lum. Mokihana Amona-vice-president, 

Love} Apana-dance instructor Fourth Row. Stanley kayatani. Phyllis Andrade, Bobbilyn Akoi, Dede Makaio, Evan Ah Hee, Greg 

Enos,- Service projects. Charlene Kaulukukui, Bert Freitas Fifth Row: Ne d Aikau-music, Van Wai. Nevada Whitford, Jolene 

Camara. Ziona Wallace, Bruce Lelepali Marl en e Makekau William kanekoa Howard Lua-music, Janona kaupuiki, sixth Row: Mel 

Kalama. Chuck Basso. Dave Bingham. Richard llconcel, Bobby Lazarus. Thomas Kanahele-p resident, Abe Panoke Leonard Beck. 

Missing: Robert Gi lmoi e-Publ ic i t \ . Mervin Chun-Treasurer, I\ins Andreson- v. p. of socials, Nalani kanakaole-dance, Hazel 

Ayau, Paulette kaonohi.Bob Woods, Sheila Alatan.Ted Maeda. 



wi's 




Tommy and Luana strike a stately pose 
Hui Alii No Ka Best! 




All tied up and still smiling. 



■M* "* "" »" "-** ** "* 




Marilyn Leong, Pat Corpuz Geri Tanabe, Pearl Viu Lin. ami 
Charlene Makekau are some of the young ladies thai 
participate in (he Aloha week festivities. 



53 




iv 




Cassandra Horn 

Ed i ( or 



No Hoo Pono 




Edwin Yasukam 

Mead pho 1 ii|>ruphi' r 



meaning 



THE 



RIGHTEOUS 



COMPANION 




Ralph Barnes 

Advisor 



Not Pictured. 





Terry Brown 

Student LI fe 



Diane Morita 

Lcadc rs 



Hoki Amona 
Organ izat i one 



Harate Winiata 
Church 



Lei a .l.i i ri. in 
Athletic-, 



Mervin Tano 

I'ho t or ra|>h«> r 



Clifford Yamaguichi 
Photographer 



Elissa Leong 
I nde re I assmen 



Special Thanks to: City Art Works, for our class pictures R. Wallace Pischel, Inc., for our printing. S. k. Smith 
Company, for our covers, Jack Johnson, Lduard Sawada, Alex Crethar, Roy Goya. Ted Yiaeda, Shirley Muraoka, 
Tui Hunkin. Charlene Makekau, Marlene Makekau, Madeen Ly , Wilson Ganir, Betsy kiyabu, Bonnie Vail, Frank 



Harrer Charlene Akina 
Maunaala kinolau, Jean Taguma 




2Ce AlaJm'i 

* ZJhe J^eade 




\1 len J. Barney 
F,d i t or- in-t h ie f 



Marilyn Leong 
Type >ettcr 



Shirleyanne Gunning 
\ a a oe i a t e Kd i tor 



Nancy >lann 
Soe ia 1 Kd i t or 



law in Yasukawa Mervin Tano (lit ford \amaguichi Marie Nin 

Photo Director Photo Lab Technician Photographer Type Setter 



54 




Officers: Sharon Romrell 
Secre tary 

Limaitua Poloai 
Pres ident 



Irvine Richards 
V ice— Pres ident 

Kataferu Elisara 
Treasurer 



Somoana Club 



The Samoans on campus have worked to- 
ward promoting understanding of their cul- 
ture in relation to those others of the Pacific 
Islands. Thus we find their active partici- 
pation in many of our campus events. 



1 1 m ^B 






isiil^™ 


I2QI 








Is^d 




S^H k^Bjfc 






BP"^'"^ ■ 






-\ Wk 












HIB 


B ^ m 


m^s 




Row 1: Tulua Toia, Emmie Matua, Simaima Alofipo, Alice Reeve, R a y Turley. Eileen Clay, Sharon Romrell, Sauoleola Hi, 
Christine Biggs Row 2: John T imoteo, Vatau Beck, Tauamatu Siaki, Mariella Kaonohi, Sue Aumna, Tuiluaai Hunkin, Sherra 
Hull, Wanette Lum, Wayne Wong, Opetaia Mwtavao, Valapavaiso Ieremia, r ow 3 : Faigalilo Pisi, Koko Pula, Malofou Maumasi, 
Lisona Te' o, Albert Peters, Kalani Fitisemanu, Cimaitua Poloai Standing: Kataferu Elisara Alesana Tuimalealiifano, 
Penilosa Taosoga Jim McCormick, Pomeiti Seu, Aotearoa Pauga 




55 






Tongon Club 
6L#9 I J 








Firsl Row: Melchezedek Pakalata, Vika Naeta, Janet McCornick, sisi Kofe, Mele Fakatou, Ana Tuiasoa, 
Seini Pasi. Halahuni Langi, Second Row.Nolini Hateaki, Phyllis Cockett, Mafi Tonga, Siesia Mahuinga, 
Fololini Uluave, Dixie Indelin, Telusika >1ahuinga, Ofisi Putatau, Sosaia Paongo, Third Row: Inoke 
Funaki, Sione Fineanganofo, Harry Wight, 'lluamu Niulupui vaha, Tike Niutupui vaha, Clarence lyema, 
Uitileti Malupo, Kmil ttol fgramrn, Viliami Makoni, Sione Vehikite, lluamu Tuiiua 



Certainly a lively bunch, the members of 
this club are always on the go, laughing and 
singing -- expressing their love for Tonga 
and her people. 




A Tongan square dance ? 




',' , ■■ 



Rain' Rain" 




I wanna go to Tonga. 



56 



Turtle Club 






Harry Wight 
Pres ident 



Brent Wilson 
Vice— Pres ident 



Dixie Andelin 
Secretary 




A small but active club on campus. They 
are always in the "swim" of things. Many 
mainlanders are attracted to this club for it 
offers excursions, skin diving, hikes and 
picnics. 




57 



Athletics 



It is just as religious for us to observe the 
Rules of good health as it is to pray to God 
To heal our bodies. 

Anonymous 



58 



ra*/ , 



ft 



tM- — 



I'll"; 



it 




■ 




ecu 


OPPONI M 




SCORE 


HI POINT MVS 


104 


II.Hlu 111 III 


Comm. 1 


ol leu*' 


86 


C. Simmons 25 


!.". 


I . ol H. 


Mi lo 




75 


Busline 11 15 


81 


1 . nt 11. 


Kilo 




• . 


Simmons 20 


t. ; 


1 . ol 11. 


1 i osh 




4«) 


B. Tatom 17 


')(, 


(haminadi 


> 




81 


E. Veloria 38 


i > 


Mono lu In 


Comm. 


College 


:>4 


S Busline 11 15 


81 


(haminadi 


• 




70 


Simmons 17 


i i 


1 . ol H 


Prosh 




t.'l 


I). Barney 18 


66 


U. ol H. 


llilo 




{."> 


B. Tatom 15 


7 ^ 


1 . ol II. 


liosh 




59 


('. Simmons 19 


61 


(ham made 






64 


( Simmons 14 


<)> 


Honolulu 


Comm. 


Col lege 


61 


B. Tatom 23 


68 


(haminadi 






87 


C. Simmons 22 



1967-68 was the first year for 
the Hawaii College Conference and 
with a total game win-loss record 
of 9-1. CCH was the first college 
to win. This was an extra-or- 
dinary year for CCH in basketball. 
As Coach Jarman stated, "Each 
man was an important cog in the 
wheel, we could not have won with- 
out every one of them." 

Other than the usual bruises, 
bumps and sprains from the game, 
CCH was not hurting too bad until 
the last game when Sidney Sand- 
strom lost a toe or two to the 
lawnmower and consequently did not 
make it to that game. 

For the season CCH had a record 
of 23 wins and 4 losses. Congra- 
tulations to the Champions of the 
HCC Conference and to Coach Jar- 
man. 



HKY! YOU don't spike a basketball!! 



Ka>* 






^ 




•k 


L4 










" 


pi %&K ^ 


fe^HW 


Vl^g 


m 




xV^J^f ft> 




•• 


- 






Steve Bushnell.LOOh 
01 T ' 



Wait a minute. ... I won* t hurt v 



ou. 



60 



Basketball 




First Row: Patrick Andrade, Wilson Ganir, Edward Kalima, Bob Hoe, Dave Barney, Mike Skinner, James 
Dumaguin, Second Row: William Jacobsen, Chuck Simmons, Boyd Jarman (Coach), Sid Sandstrom, Peter 
Stanley, Earl Veloria 



Hey, Ben Tatom our basket 9 s 
on the other side! ! ! ! 




^ 



i 




^ - J 





STOP ACTION 




61 



Rugby 




11 right band, lot 'em here you out there. 








Aaa. . aaaaaa. mi mm uughhhhhhh' ' ! ' ' T 



Brother Lowell said, "The 
game with Stanford was the 
athletic thrill of my career. 
Areal rock-em sock-em rugby 
game that was a beauty to 
behold. We look forward to 
playing them again someplace 
that is a bit warmer. Our 
kicker is already practicing 
for next season." By the 
way, Brother Lowell has had 
his share of athdet ic thrills; 
he is the head coacn of the 
United States Olympic Volley- 
ball Team. 

Rugby is a Fall Semester 
Sport. 






What a handsome toam wo got hero 



Finder's keepers Loser's weepers 



Nice going, Sione 






First Row: Sefo Tonga, Paul Niu, Clarence Lyema, Uluamu Tuifua, Alani Pahulu, Inoke Funaki, 
Second Row: John Lowell (Coach), George Moleni, Josaia Vakalala, John Philip, Jim McCormick, Sione 
Fineanganofo, Harold Eynon, Sosaia Paonga 





We'll outrun those security 
guards yet. . .you wait. 



CCH OPPONENT 



SCORE 



19 HMAS Melbourne 6 

15 All -Tongan Stars 

25 Tongan Vikings 3 

37 Hawaiian Harlequins 3 

78 East-West Center 

54 Laie Tigers 

49 East-West Center 

25 Hawaiian Harlequins 3 

18 Los Angeles All-Stars 6 

11 Tongan Vikings 6 

Olympic Club 8 

3 Stanford University 6 



63 



Soccer 



I 




lust Row: Victor Cave, Abe Singh, Leroy Kaona. Guy Bleen, Neori Raeulc, 
Second Row:Shishir Kumar, David Sturt.Tehina Mo'o, Vaianui Gabriel Raymond 
Uanteragi, Forest Mapuhi, Suresh Narain, Pierre Kimitete 




Perhaps you ncn wonder jusi why I've called this meeting'' 



Continued domination of Hawaii soccer 
was the key this year as the Seasiders 
successfully defended two crowns (their third 
Hawaii Cup title in a row, their second Ha- 
waii Soccer Association crown in as many 
years). The CCH contingent, under the 
tutelege of Pierre Kimitete and Shishir 
Kumar lost two early season matches, but 
rallied to win a dozen in a row. 

In November, the Tahiti champions paid 
a visit to Laie, trimming the Collegians 
twice in pre-season play. Last summer 
the CCH team had won two of four matches 
in Tahiti and American Samoa. 



I should ha\e done whal "^ f * 




64 







LP 



and away we Gooooooooooooooooooooooo 



s^— 


\ 


fl 




'jJmt. \ * " 


1 , 






■ ■ I ■ .*- ■ 



OOPS! Sorry ' bout that. 



Now I was thinking. 





Won't you Char lost on with me? 



One more slam at CCH and V 11 come in there myself. 



65 



Volleyball 




Coach McGown Feels victory in a clasp of the hands. 





A 



7 s*w 



^ 

# 



: 






But don't touch that net. 



66 





Look , mom, no hands! \ ! \ 




i niMiimmaii 




Left to right: Earl Veloria, Edward Kalima, William Keliipaakaua, Joseph Soares, center: George Ikeda (manager) 
James Dumaguin, Peter Stanley, William Jacobsen, Ar+hony Crabb 



Are you serious? 





■ 



Precision and trace much iikt> ihc ballet 
Right Ed? 



67 



Track 




Short ridge is out of step. 






Kalani Fitisemanu, Wilson Ganir, Boyd Jarman (Coach), Laren Shortridge 



John watches carefully 



CCH went into the meet a real 
underdog as was shown by an 
article in the Sunday paper in 
which the University of Hawaii's 
coach Peter Goo stated that he 
had the strongest team in years 
and that they were going to 
"warm-up" for the State Free- 
style meet 13 of April by com- 
peting in the meet at Laie. 

After the meet it was appa- 
rent that Church College was not 
a "warm-up" but a very strong, 
well balanced team. 

College wrestlers won 4 first 
places, 4 second places and one 
third, John Philip was particu- 
larly impressive in winning both 
of his matches by a pin. He 
pinned his last opponent in 14 
seconds. 

Individual State Champions from 
CCH are: John Philip-Unlimited, 
Eton Carstensenl54 pound class, 
Uluamu Tuifua-140 pound class, 
William Hussey - 125 pound class. 

Second place winners were: Den- 
nis Camit-114 pound class, Cla- 
rence Uyema-138 pound class, 
Larry Clark -146 pound class, and 
Sione Vehekite- 191 pound class. 
Third place was won by A- 
lani Pahulu in the 163 pound 
class. 

Coach John Lowell stated that 
he has seldom been as proud 
of a team. "They are a group 
of dedicated, well trained, well- 
"nanner°d athletes who can really 
scrap when the chips are down,'* 
he concluded. 



68 



Wrestling 







First Row: Larry Clark, Clarence Cyema, uluamu Tuifau, Dennis Camit, Second Row: 
John Lowell (Coach), John Philip, Alani Pahulu missing: William Hussey, Don 

Carstensen 



The Church College wrestling team brought 
home the first state championship of the year, 
March 23, 1968, when they won the Greco-Roman 
Wrestling meet. 

According to John Lowell, Director, it was in- 
deed a real credit to the CCH ream that they were 
able to win and, in fact, dominate the meet. 

Team scores of 33 for CCH and 24 for runner 
up, University of Hawaii, indicate the dominance. 





I told you not (o call my bluff. 



I give up! You can use my wrest linn notes. 



69 





'Ken and Basso you mind if we play, too' v 



KA POW'' No one calls me hippy. 



And it is said ''cease to be idle. 




70 



Men's Intramurals 



MEN'S INTRAMURAL CHAMPS 



SPURT 


TEAM 


Flag Football 


Honkers 


Tennis Doubles 


Tongans 


Table Tennis Sing. 


Tongans 


Bil lards 


Honkers 


Badminton Sing. 


Tongans 


Judo 


Tongans 


Basketball 


Hammagang 


Handball Sing. 


Faculty 


Bowling 


Aliis 


Volleyball 


Warriors 


Free Throw 


Honkers 



The names of all the teams are Aliis, C.C.N.Z., 
Faculty, Hammagang, Honkers, Kubis, Samoan Vi- 
kings, Tongans, Warriors. 




Baseball, for the people who want to twist. 



But I can' t brush after every meal you guys! 




Shoot! I' m ready 



Oh no you don' t. 





7\ 



Cheerlead 



eeneaaers 



V 



« V 



Indoors and 






Tennis 




r f 






* 



Outdoors, the cheerleaders 




Urge our team on. 




Which is, you have got to admit a 
heck of a way to dry your socks . 



Stre. . . e. . . tch. 



72 



Women's Intramurals 



WOMEN'S INTRAMURALS 


CHAMPS 


SPORT 


TEAM 


Volleyball 


Samoans 


Swimming 


Kiwis 


Basketball 


Samoans 


Bowling 


Kiwis 


Badminton Sing. 


Ekolu 


Badminton Doub. 


Ekolu 




Splish, splash I was taking a bath 



zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz 




Some girl sure is over anxious. 



73 



Student Life 

Go out and have a good time, and 
Have such a good time that later in 
Your life you will have no regrets. 

Elder Nathan Tanner 




* 



1 



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74 






m 



J B 



in stx, » 



y tfe ' j 






U 

J 









! 






*' il *iW*%?r" ***?$(& 



i 




The Na Hoa Pono Pageant contestant s were (row 1) Shirle.vanne Gunning, Sue Hunter. Naomi Kahoilua, Marvalee 
Soon, (row 2) Lapreal Iosua. Carol Orton. Marilyn Johnson, Betty Pokipala, Janona Kaopuiki. 



NA HOA PONO PAGEANT 



The Na Hoa Pono Pageant came to a climax 
when Miss Shirleyanne Gunning was crowned 
Na Hoa Pono Queen, with Naomi Kahoilua 
and Caroline Wolfgram as her attendants. Also 
named at the dance were Caroline Wolfgram 
as "Miss Popularity" and Marvalee Soon as 
"Miss Congeniality." After the coronation 
the new court resided over the remainder 
of the dance. 





Intermission entertainment was provided by Tearo Md o. 



Naomi is shown in the talent competition. 



76 



NA HOA PONO PAGEANT 




SHIRLEYANNE GUNNING 
NA HOA PONO QUEEN 1967-68 



77 



ASSEMBLIES 




Vvone Kan's talent as a pianist was a determining 
factor in her reaching the finals- 




Yvonne Kan, second from the Left, representing the Church 
College of Hawaii is shown with the Narcissus Festival 
royalty. ^\onne was second runner-up to the Queen. 



NARCISSUS FESTIVAL 



CCH student Yvonne Kan was among 
the winners in the annual Narcissus 
Festival. She was second runner-up 
to the Queen, Cheryl Lau . Another 
CCH student, Marilyn Leong, was also 
a contestant in the festival. 




Marilyn Leong, another COI representative, 
is shown performing in the talent portion. 



78 




The Entertainers Five presented one of the most popular assemblies at CCH this year. 




MUSIC AND MUSIC 



A variety of musically oriented 
assemblies were presented to the 
CCH student body this year. The 
Thursday Entertainment assemblies 
offered the more popular styles 
of music with the Entertainers Five, 
The Genoa Keawe Trio, and Jimmy 
Murphy being just a few. The 
Lyceum program presented some 
of the more classical artists. The 
performances included the concert 
pianist Theodore Ullman, the UCLA 
Men's Glee Club, and the opera 
La Traviata. 



Theodore Ullman takes a bow alter a brilliant performance. 



79 




Traveling 
Assembly 



This year's Traveling Assembly 
presented a delighful program at 
the CCH auditorium, having already 
toured the outer islands and Oahu. 
The Traveling Assembly was a var- 
iety show having a theme of "Hap- 
piness." The entertainment ranged 
from song and dance to instrumental 
numbers — from a real western "hoe- 
down" to a sampling of Polynesian 
dances. The entire performance was 
received with great enthusiasm. 



Dave and Bette join in the theme presentation 'HAppiness" ' 




'Bamboo", an old folk song, is rendered by Sape Hunkin, Arva.v Siufanua, and Kka Sua. 



80 






Now that's SOUL, brother! 





A Hawaiian hula is performed by Yolanda Akita. 



Tavita Bingham (haole?) does the Tamure 



81 



Dorm Assemblies 



MEN'S AND WOMEN'S DORMS 2 




\ou don' t "wash out" an excited Frenchman that easy! Geev urn, Airald' 



Dorm Two's assembly was oriented about their theme , "We're 
Undecided Now!" The assembly presented the "ideas" of a dorm 
assembly committee as they attempted to work out their show. The 
result was a series of humorous, as well as serious sequences. 





'We' re undecided now 1 " 



Terry Broun and Loretta Perreira model "Sunday Best" 
in the Fashion Show. 



82 



MEN'S AND WOMEN'S DORMS 3 



Dorm Three's assembly, "Up, Up with People," 
displayed a number of songs and dances that were 
representative of various nations of the world. 
The final song, "This Land is Your Land" 
was appropriately changed to refer to all people. 




Vuna, you look like a girl! 



You too, Stuart! 





Spence McMullin and Doris Belt 
"Bess, you is my woman." 




Now Leonard! This is going a little TOO far! 



83 



Drama 




Carma Coburn and David Schepps 





^JmimmsL* 



The Boyfriend, a broadway musical directed 
by David Jacobs, CCH drama director, was 
one of the most colorful and exciting produc- 
tions ever shown at CCH. The musical por- 
trayed the glamor and gaiety of the "Roaring 
Twenties" on the French Riviera. Lavish 
sets, designed and constructed by Michael Bow 
enhanced the delightful costuming and excellent 
choreography. Outstanding performances were 
given by the romantic leads, Carma Coburn 
and David Schepps, as well as by Carol Ann 
Torsak and Lambert McGrath, and by Tisa 
Christiansen and John Bracht, and the chorus 
and dancers. The merriment and madness 
of "The Twenties" were relived at CCH. 




" The Boyfriend " 



Ah, Lord Brockhurst' Such a way with the women! 



84 




" Sur Le Plage 




The Riviera 



Think Your Way to a Million 




85 



HOMECOMING 




YOLANDA AKITA 
HOMECOMING QUEEN 1968 



86 




Pageant mistress of ceremonies Arlette Hew, second from right, congratulates 1968 CCH Homecoming Royalty, 
left to right: Bette Oveson, first runner-up; Queen Yolanda Akita, and Beverly Tano, second runner-up. 



HOMECOMING DANCE 



This year's Homecoming Dance 
was set under the theme, "The Look 
of Love." The Royalty well re- 
presented the Church College in their 
beauty, charm and poise. Home- 
coming Queen was the lovely Yo- 
landa Akita with Bette Oveson as first 
runner-up and Beverly Tano, second 
runner-up. The dance and all fes- 
tivities of Homecoming were enjoyed 
by all. 




President Cook dances with Homecoming Queen. 
Yolanda Akita. 



87 




The parade was accented by the presence of the Homecoming Royalty. 



HOMECOMING PARADE 







\ 



> 




Leonard Beck led the parade with an air of 
dignity reminiscent of the festivities. 



A multitude of entries filled the streets. 



88 




HAPPY BIRTHDAY! 

The February Birthday Party was 
actually a combination event. It was 
a party honoring those whose birthdays 
fell in February, a beginning-of-the- 
semester luau, and an occasion to say 
farewell to the Houghtons. It was a 
party enjoyed by all. 



Happy Birthday to you, Happy Birthday to you. 




Leonard was anxious to perform .... he is so seldom a part of things. 





Suck urn up! 



The HOttghton' 8 were also honored prior to 

their departure. 



89 



PACIFIC 




It seems fitting that the Hawaiian Royalty should be represented by the Hawaiian 
Club who were the winners ol the week's competition. 








The Samoans 



The Maoris 



90 



WEEK 




The Tongans 




Some guys always play around! 




PACIFIC WEEK 



Pacific Islands Week was a week 
of song and dance, and of learning 
about people . Each day an assembly 
was presented by a different Polynesian 
culture, and films and exhibits on Poly- 
nesian cultures were presented. The 
competition was won by the Hawaiian 
Club in a well-performed series of 
dances and song. 




The Tahil Luis 



91 



PREFERENCE BALL 




GLEN TUIA 
MOST PREFERRED MAN 



1968 



92 




Preference Ball was reigned over by "Most Preferred Mart Glen Tuia, center, 
Rex Frandsen, first attendant, and Sosaia Paonga, second attendant. 



PREFERENCE BALL 

Set under the theme , "Love is Blue," 
this year's Preference Ball was very success- 
ful . Couples dressed in their formal attire 
danced to the music of the Jerry Jardin Band. 
The highlight of the •evening came with the 
crowning of Glen Tuia as Most Preferred 
Man — 1968," and Rex Frandsen and Sosaia 
Paonga as attendants. It was an exciting 
evening for all concerned. 




The theme of Preference Ball, "Love is Blue'' 
is sung by Nevada Whit lord. 




Ita kino (iu>s were .ilso there In perform. 



93 



DORM LIFE 

A STUDY ON LIVING.... 




Some always sleep. 



zzzzzz. 




/////./. 




Some always study. 



Some try to keep them awake. 




Some like to eat. 



94 






Some just hang around. 



Some check the mail. 



Some enjoy sports. 





But there are sports 



and there are sports ! 





You can have a ball... 



it's not such a dogs life! 
(TROUT!) 



95 




A beach party provides a lot of good company. 



BEACH PARTY 





\nd t ime to sit around and eat and talk. 



There's plenty of hotdogs to roast.. 



96 



CHRISTMAS COMPETITION 




\ 



MW*llBlfIV'..<;r 



il„V *-*.»»• MR 




Well, one creature was stirring, 
and maybe a mouse. . . 





Twas the night before Christmas and all through the house 




The stockings were hung by the chimney with care. 



A^i*: Jl 




Merry Christmas! 



In hopes that Saint Nicholas 
soon would be there. 



97 



CAMPUS CANDIDS 




v 






Lwvxyw 



'J '. J_.ll SSa ! 




98 







m 



Church 



Those who have the Truth are not so 
Great as those who Love the Truth. 
And those who Love the Truth are not 
as great as those who Live the Truth! 



-Chinese Proverb 






100 



-s* 



W^ 'TJj 



A;***: 




_■ 



* <* 




/f^wH 








Our Spiritual Leaders 




Bishop 
Jerry C. Round. v 



Bishop 
Pat 0. Barney 



Bishop 

Dwayne Andersen 



The school year 1967-68 
has been an increased im- 
provement and growth here 
on campus. The campus wards 
have now been divided into 
three separate wards. 

Ward I is comprised of 
Hale Pukuniahi and Hale Nai- 
manui and all the married 
couples living off campus. 

Ward II is comprised of 
Hale Napela and Hale Nainoa 
Ward III is comprised of Hale 
Malo and Hale Pukui. 

Brother Roundy is Bishop 
of Ward I. Dr. Barney is 
Bishop of Ward n. Brother 
Dwayne Andersen is Bishop of 
Ward III. 







Brother Lindsay assists many elderly church members 
with their genealogical research. 



102 



B. i . WARD I 

/snopr/c 






Jerry C. Roundy 
Bishop 



Eugene Oshima 
1st Counselor 



It is pretty much a proven fact that all mankind 
desires happiness. Many strive to find happiness 
through various means of worldy pleasure. Few, 
however, realize that the key to real happiness may 
be found in a declaration of Jesus of Nazareth: 
"For whosoever will save his life shall lose it: 
and whosoever will lose his life for my sake shall 
find it." (Matt. 16:25) 

This past year, while serving as Bishop of CCH 
Ward I, I have seen many young people who are 
losing their lives. When I watch the many young 
people devote hours of service to the Church, 
give of their tithes and offerings, show an interest 
in their fellow students through the home teaching 
program, and nay number of unselfish services, I 
think I begin to get a peek at celestial love. 

We should regard service to the Lord as a privilege 
and not look upon it in the least as a burdening 
obligation --although we do have an obligation to do 
something in return for all the Lord has done for 
us. King Benjamin put it well when he said: "When 
we are in the service of our fellow men we are only 
in the service of the Lord." (Mosiah 2:17) 

We live our lives most completely when we strive 
to make the world better and happier for our fellow 
men. May I express my congratulations to the 
members of the ward for their efforts in trying to 
make the world happier and better for everyone at 
CCH. I have a deep love for everyone in the 
ward and the entire campus, and my greatest desire 
is that everyone find happiness— not happiness of 
the world, but happiness through righteous living. 

There is one thing needful for joy to which man 
is entitled, and it is the greatest of all. It is the 
service we render mankind. 




Reid Fullmer 
2nd Counselor 




Earl Cropper 
Assistant Ward Clerk 



Rex Frandsen 
Ward Clerk 



Priesthood 




Ted Maeda Richard Gubank Dennis Mau fimothj By a I 



103 



Bisfiopri 



WARD (f 









0. Pat Barne.\ 
Bishop 



Maui Uhaanga 
1st Counselor 



Way no Ri chard son 
2nd Counselor 



Serving as bishop for The Church College of Hawaii 2nd 
ward has been the most humbling and rewarding experience 
of my life. I am humbled as I head and feel the testimony 
of the young Saints in the ward, as I note their contributions 
to the church monitarily, and as they develop their talents 
and give their time. Of these students it could be said, 
"Faith with works brings life." 

I am rewarded and strengthened by the strong, unquestion- 
ing testimonies of these young adults and by their willingness 
and most concern, to become involved in the programs 
of the church. 

It is my prayer that the spirit of Our Heavenly Father 
will continue to be with each student to guide, direct, and 
"strive" with him or her. It is my further prayer that each 
young Latter-day Saint will have the courage to love close 
enough to the gospel to have the spirit of the Holy Ghost 
with him always. Remember, the Gospel is true. 




ney, Bisaop 
Colleger of Hawaii 2nd Ward 





rim rriksen 


Jack Johnson 




Bnil rtolfgramm 


Ward Clerk 


104 


Assistant Hard Clerks 












Bishopric 



WARD III 






•J^BT V 


. 


J 


Pi* 




■J 


Sff x- 




x^m 


ki 


L 




Dwayne Anderson 
Bishop 



Paul Partridge 
1st Counselor 



Anthony Ahmu 
2nd Counselor 



"Whatever principle of intelligence we 
attain unto in this life, it will rise with 
us in the resurrection. And if a person 
gains more knowledge and intelligence in 
this life through his diligence and obedience 
than another, he will have so much the ad- 
vantage in the world to come. There is 
a law irrevocably decreed in heaven be- 
fore the foundation of this world upon which 
all blessings are predicated — and when we 
obtain a blessing from God it is by obe- 
dience to that law upon which it is pre- 
dicated." (D&C 130:18-20) 

What a joy it is to be associated with 
this great institution which provides wonder- 
ful opportunities for students to gain both 
secular and religious knowledge. Many 
principles learned in the classroom are 
readily transferred to solving real life pro- 
blems encountered by students serving in 
the college wards. An added dimension 
of knowledge is made available to the stu- 
dents who diligently carry out their church 
that will rise with them to further their 
eternal progression. 

I am grateful for the privilege of serving 
as a bishop to a student ward. It is heart 
warming to watch you students grow in spi- 
ritual knowledge through your diligent ser- 
vice . You are truly following Alma's ad- 
monition," Learn wisdom in your youth." 
May your spiritual knowledge keep abreast 
with your secular learning as you journey 
through life. 




Singing praises 



Dwayq^N. Andersen 

Bishop 

The Church College of Hawaii 3rd Ward 



I OS 




YWMIA 



i esiel i Tonga Marie vin 

WARD // 



Yaal i Talakai 



WARD III 



Susan Hunt i> i 




Tisa Christensen 



Andy Archibald 

WARD I 



- 

Kaclene Laws 

Judy Esplin 




Candis Sims Lynn Johnson 

Robin Houghton Yvonne Mitchell 



YMMIA 



WARD III 




Ritchie Sorenson Limaitua Potoai John L. Bracht 





Calvin Olson Mike Foley Clarence lyema 



WARD II 



106 



Robert Wright Donald koga Allen Oleole 




Relief Society 



WARD I 



Sally Ann MacShane Mary Eubanks Mele Fakatou Jeanette Kahalehoe 
1st Counselor President Secretary 




Virginia Wilson Amanda LaTurner Shari Andrade Melissa Miller 
1st Counselor President 2nd Counselor Secretary 



WARD // 



This past year the Relief Society sisters have success- 
fully fulfilled their goals of visiting, comforting and doing 
everything that is required of them. 

It has been a blessing to be able to work success- 
fully with these righteous living young women who have 
come from many different cultures. 



WARD III 




Lynn Smith Nancy Honda 

2nd Counselor President 



Shirley Huraoka 
[a I Comae lor 



107 



Stake Missionaries 




Full-time 
Missionaries 



^ 



V 






■(** -H* 



i*' 






g^ g^' ^ 



. & 



This past year many baptisms have 
occurred. Through these baptisms 
many young men have been advanced 
in the priesthood. 

Here we can see that the mission- 
aries are successfully spreading the 
gospel here upon the campus. 




Elder David Stockes Elder Gary Fawson 



Sunday School 




Edwin Lakhan 



John Wilcox sione Fineanganofo 




Saia Poanga 



Harry White 



In this past year the Sunday School organization 
in the three campus wards has been a religious 
endeavor to present the Gospel to those members 
and non-members who have had a desire to learn 
about Our Father in Heaven. 

It has been a privilege to know that all the Sunday 
School teachers have done a wonderful job in giving 
spiritual food to their fellow members. 



108 



Devotional Assemblies 




Dwayne Crowther, author 




Brother King was one of many faculty 
members to address the College com- 
munity in a Devotional Assembly. 




Tradition, a lei is presented, this one 
to Smith Decker. 




Dean Kay J. Andersen gave the 
David 0. McKay Lecture. 




109 



Classes 



Tis not too late to seek a newer world, 

Push off .... 

For my pur pose holds, 

To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths, 

Of all the western stars, until I die, 

To strive, 

To seek. 

To find, 

And not to yield! 

from Ulysses 



by Alfred Tennyson 




no 




Barbara Ah Hee Naomi Ahuna Joseph Aki Ernest Akimseu Dean Akita 

Bobbil\n Akoi Sheila Alatan Darlee Andresen Simaima Alofipo Dixie Andelin 

Angelia Anderson Phyl lis Andrade Alconcel Dale Arakaki Leslie Au 

Richard 




Be Steadfast In Your 



Hazeline Ayau Cecelia Baehr John Bailey David Pat Barney Trudy Baxter Sandy Beebe Kenneth Bell Mary Bennett 

Holly Berry Christine Biggs David Bingham Wendy Blevins Vickie Brewer Jennifer Brown >bles Brown Joseph Bruey 




112 



Freshmen 




Mila Burton Christine Bush Jackie Bush Scott Butler Sterling 

Calabio 

Rhonda Calhoun Dennis Camit Sharon Campbell John Carbee Rhonda 

Carruthers 

Victor Cave Bertram Chang Joaquin Chang Susan David 

Cha f terley Checketts 



Work And Beliefs 



Joseph Chee Steven Cheney Jerry Chew Steve Chikazawa Wayne Edward Lamon Patricia Clark 

Chong Wong Christensen Christensen 

Lynette 
Cathryn Clayton Carma Coburn Susan Collins Alice Cook Merilyn Corpuz Judy CotterAlexander Crethar Crockett 




Freshmen 



113 




I 




John Dean Norma Dela Cru/ Clyde Dement Joseph Dowson Frank Kllis 

Gareth Enos Leonard Krroc JoAnn Evans Harold Eynon Helekisete Fakalata 
Stella Ferguson Eugene Findlay Gerald Fingueira Margaret Fobert Gary Fout/ 



Donna Dacalio Alfred Daos 
Daquioag Corazon Jeff Davis 
Kristine Davis Patricia Dawes 



Fro 



m 



Mary Fakatou Malveen Fanene Jamie Faust ino 

Mary Fox Burton Freitas Michael 

I it i inaga 




114 




Richard Fukunaga Dana Ferguson Ginger Furgeson Cynthia Richard Gibbs Christopher Cythia Goo Reginald Goto 

Germneri Gollan 

Roger Gray Melanie Gressley Judith Grimes Peter Hanohano Timothy Hansen Glenna Har man Michael Harper Herrick Hahn 



Janice Hasabe Ted Hashimoto Suzanne Hay George Higa 



Dennis Hilligoss Kenneth Lorna Hing Wayne Hi rata 
Hilligoss 



Unity Comes Strength 



Wilfred Ho Pauline Hoffmann j u dith Hogg Mae Honda Douglas Huish Glenn Ichimura Shirley Igarashi Karen 

Ikeuchi 

Kiyoka Inamura Donver Inaura Robert Ing Vernetta Iosua Gail Ishiara Johnny Jensen Yukiko Jin Dalles Joaquin 




Freshmen 



115 




Nicholas Johansen Ronald Johnson Susan Johnson Linda Johnson Vernon Juhl Naomi Kahoilua Peter Kahoopii Kdward Kali ma 

Vilani Kanakaole Mariel la KaonohiJonona Kaopuiki Cynthia Judy Kapu Glenn Kau Kdwin kawamura Luana heanu 

Kapahulehua Charlene 

Dona heuma N «> 1 I Kiaha Sarah Kihoi Lorna Kimura Colleen King Sadie Kinolau Cyrus Kise Kishimoto 



Togetherness. . . 
Is 
Happiness 



Gerald Kodama 
Donald Koga 

Wayne Ko/.uma 
De Lynn Kruse 

Jim Lake 
low in Larkhar 

Dorothy Lamph 
Amanda La Turner 

Lesl ie Lau 
Edna Lvarias 
Kobert Lazarus 
DeWayne La/.enby 




116 




Linda Lee Shannon Lee Bruce Lelepali Dorothy Lewis 
Laura Lucas Latai Lui Jean Claude Ly Veronica Macatiag 
Charlene Makekau Talafua Malufau Iosefo Maluia Nancy Mann 




Anna Linn Kinbourne Lo Michael Lo Howard Lua 
Taofi Magalei Eivina Mahaa Simone Mahotu Vanda Makaio 

Marianne Manning Emilee Marble Denise Marcella Gloria Martin 
Kinzo Masuda Opetaia Matavao Lance Matsumoto Malofou Maumasi 
Wes Mawae James McCormick Anna McCorriston Lorna Medeiros Vicki Merrill Diana Milliman Melissa R. Miller s "san Miller 
Walter Miller Robert Min Bert Miyamoto George Miyamoto Lawrence Miyasato Neil Mizokami Tuitui Moeai Connie Montgomery 




Freshmen 



117 




A Righteous Man 



is Humble 



Obedience 

Brings Life Eternal 



■arsha iooney Caryn Morales Claire Morinaga Paula Morrison Bruce Moss Gareth Murayama Harriett Mustard Penisimani Muti 
Leitha Naki la Benjamin Namahoe Cherrie Neermann Maureen Neimy Nelson Okamoto Gary Okamura Gregory Newell Harvey Niu 
\tsuko Noda Rosalita Nonies Francine Oandasan Lois Okawa Laura Olayon Karen Ono Warren Ono Marsha Onouye 




T18 




Lynette Ormsby Cheryl Ornold Shirley Orpilla Diane Ortiz Carol Orton Mary Ann Oshiro Bette Oveson Robert Owan 

Cassandra Paaluhi Janice Pacheco Michael Padeken Peggy Pai Janet Paik Tavesi Pakeafei Beatrice Parker Harriet Pau 
Viliami Pauni Linda Perkins Loretta PerreiraGraeme Perriton A i be rt peters Louise Peterson Christie Petrillawilliam Phelps 



Lori Pitton Betty Pokipala Lindsay Pope Dail Presho Goorge Price Tiuen i Purcell JoAnn Ramos Raymond Rippy 
Moses Rodrigues Mary Rowe Randall Runnells Norene Saito Tamotsu Sakuma Jeanne Salmon Gemeno Salvador Patricia Sarmento 




F reshmen 



11« 



Sauoleola ill 

D.i\ id Schepps 
Mark Still ak 

•lames Seel) 
Blossom Sergrave 
Tinella shaw 



Harriet Shinno 





The Virtues 
From 




Grace Siu Kenneth Skinner Sharon Somaoang Ritchie Sorenson Jacquelyn SproatPeter Stanley Gar ^ Stenzel Fuatai Stevenson 
Mary Stripp Da\id Stmt Tsuio Suguimoto Florence Sumbad Lind * Snnada Suresh Narrain Linda Svedi Grace Tahere 




of Life Spring 
Within 



Jerry Takemoto 



Geraldine Tanabe 



Karla Taylor 



Crestita Tenebro 



Julie Theurer 



Alexa Thoene 



Gale Thomas 



Graham Thomas 




Stephen Thompson Nuuausala Tilo Cynthia Chong Tim Tanasa Timoteo Richard Tolleson Leona Tom Kenneth Tomlinson Semisi Tonga 
Foloni Uluave Cathy Tworek Ana Tupou Tuiasoa Valaparai Ieremia David Vinas Patrick Vyas van Wai Ziona Wallace 









Freshmen 



121 




\i Leo fatanabe 

larilyn 
Watanabe 



David Wayman 



Erica Weber 



Steven 
Westover 



Margaret 
White 



Sherian Wilcox 
Dale Hi lies 




Jacquelin 
Workman 



Dianne Yamamoto 



Peter Willing 



Wol fgramm 
Caroline 



Amy Woo 



Marsha Woodburn Robert Woods Elizabeth 

Workman 



RnhPt-t Wright Aileen Yamamoto Albert Yamamoto Calvin 
Koneri wrigni Yamamoto 

Victor Yap Pearl Yiu Lin Fanny Yee Selina Yee 
Glenn Yoshimoto Karen Yoshimoto Darrell Young Nancy Youne 



122 





F reshmen 



123 



The Sophomore Class officers 
with Byron Cook as president and 
John L. Bracht as vice-president 
started out at the end of 1967 at 
least with good intentions. Tradi- 
tionally responsible for Frosh ini- 
tiation they directed initiation week, 
sponsored a "Longjohn" activity in 
Women's Dorm I, and then fell into 
a period of non-activity. Leadership 
may have been deserving of criti- 
cism, but "Sophomore Apathy" did 
not help any. 

After first semester, when pres- 
dent Byron Cook left for the Army 
the Class leadership fell to vice- 
president John L. Bracht. After a 
little student body prompting and a 
realization that something had to be 
done the new president tried a num- 
ber of times to organize a Class 
meeting. And so after some delayed 
action the Sophomore Class enjoyed 
two wonderful "evenings of the 
Town" in Honolulu with dinner and 
good entertainment and sponsered 
a film for the student body "55 
Days at Peking." 




William Adams Anthony Ah Mn 

Rudolph Arieal Suzanne Arthur 

Virginia Banis Darlene Beavers 



What is 



David Brown Kathleen Brown Michele Brown 




124 




Charlene Akina Yolanda Akita 
Maydell Asing James Bassett 
Joan Belliston Riki Benioni 



Charlene Akuna Christi Allen Shari Andrade Ivins Andresen 
Janet Biglow Ina Bio Daniel Baclayon John Bailey 
Tanya Bento Ann Berbower Joan Berry John Bracht 



Andrea Archibald 
Nancy Baker 
Paul Brooks 



education if it does not 



"/nvo/ve" the individual? 

Wayne Bulseco Jolene Camara Nephi Cardejon Philip Chang Kenneth Ching Andrea Chinn 







Sophomores 



125 



Nervin Chun Diane Chris tenser ii^.i Christensen Larrj M. (lark Rutii I. Cooper Patricia Corpus Patience Ckaaainga 



Our passwords to learning were 




Connie Disney Christine Dowel 1 Jeanette Dufrain Russell Durr Dan Kid Beverly Eiser Linda Fklund 

Tavita Fa rupou Finaulani Sione Fineanganolo Richard Pritze Rosalvn Fujinaga kam Biu Fung \irald Gaglio 

Vincent Guerreiro Charles Haglei Brian Hague Fli/abet Hamilton Michael Hamm Cheryl Hao Lynda Harmon 



126 




Lloyd Heder 
Brent Hepworth 




Susan Dana Noelani Demercer 



discovery and creativity 




Elisara Kataferu Judi Esplin Julene Evans 

Dianne Galloway Monty Georgi Gig Greenwood 

Frank Harrer Roger Harris Herold Harvey 



Gerald Higuchi 
Joseph Hing 



Beaver Ho Ching 
Sharon Hi rata 



Wilma Holi 
Steven Honda 



Lamia Hooper 
Robert Hoppes 



Mi ch<ie 1 Horikami 
Rob vn Houghton 












Sophomores 



127 





Marina lluckleldt David Huddv Tamara llunsaker 
Donna Jackson Susan Jarvis Kristen Johnson 



Teachers guided 



d; 



scovere 



d 



Charlene 
Kaulukukui Craig Kelly Donna Kilantang Harvard Kim shim Ja Kim Pam Kingsley Thomas kintaro 



David Kent Lee Elliot Lee 



128 



Larry Lemone Marilyn Leong Martha Lindsay Russel Lindsay Evette Logan 





William Hussey 
Raymond Jolly 



os students 
that. . . 



Alvin Iosua Caroline Ishiara Gertrude Ishimine George Ishida 
Eldred Kalehua William Kanekoa Phyllis Kam Patricia Kang 
Paulette Kaonohi Kenneth Kaopuiki John Kapapa Jinny kaulukukui 



Nellie Leapai 
Betsey Kiyabu Micheal Keliiliki Maria Kjelstrom Suliana Kope Pauline Laclaire John Langomazino 

Telusila 
Laau Liufau Maydeen Lu Wanette Lum Odette Ly Keith Madera Margaret Magyar Mahuinga 




Sophomores 



129 




Ruby Nakasone 



Kathleen Major Marlene Makekau William Makoni 
Uonna Moikeha Tuputeata Moo June Nacapuy 
Herbert Okawa Candis Olsen Sachiko Onda 



Alfred Malupo Victorine Mapu Raymond 

Mai iteragi 

Yika Naeata Michael Nakamoto Dennis Nakashima 
Roy Onouye Richard Otaki Warren Ottlej 



Education was 



Sosaia Paonga David Pathe 
Alonna Rice Fia Roberts 



Sione Pulotu Ofisi pututau Kan Edith Ramiacal Virginia Ramos 

Raktakanishta 







1 




130 




Edna Matsunaga Lanaya Maxwell 
Melvin Nakata Allen Nekota 



Henriette 
McCracken 

Terry Newman 



Bert Michimoto Valerie Mikaere Warwick Miller Jeanette Milliman 
Lana Newton Graham Nicholl Keola Nunies . Larry Okada 



more than remembering facts 



Lynda Patten Diane Patton Violet Park Stephanie Place Wilma Place 

Bruce Rogers Jeneanne Romney Sandra Sagasay Winston Scoville David Shearer 



Eddie Poon William Powell 



Laren 
Short ridge 



Mari lyn 
Short ridge 




Sophomores 



13) 







1 



^•7 yg^ 




Charles Simmons Paula Sinaukofe Ifahiendra Singh Palelei Sioloa Virginia Smarl Lynn Smith Robyn Smith 





I 




Christine Wolley 




Brent Wilson 




Bonnie W i 1 lis 



Application was 



Helvin Takahashi Beverly Tano koichi Takizawa Susan Tanaka Danny Taylor Glynda Tekare Susan Thompson 







Clifford Yamaguchi June Yamamoto 
Mary Yergensen Thelma Yonemori 



132 



Shirley Smith Tammy So Marvelee Soon Joan Stettler Darlene Stronks Lavon Sunada Hector Tahu 



the test of education 



Karen Toma Susan Tracy Robbie Trimble Sione Lluave Sandra Uyeda Linda Vandusen Gael Weberg 





Lester Yamamoto Pauline Yamamoto Edwin Yasukawa 
Glenn Yoshida Wanda Yu Karen Young 



Susan Wear 



Peter Wolsey 




Carl Yaraagata 




Sophomores 



133 




Juniors 



Secretary— Treasurer 
Judv fare 



led Maeda 
Prea ideal 








Sid Sandstrom 
Vice President 



This year's Junior Class has been 
one of the most active groups on 
campus due, largely, to the team ef- 
fort of its officers. 

Shortly after their election in the 
spring of '67, they met to start plan- 
ning some of this year's activities. 
One of the outstanding projects was 
a nativity scene boasting life-size 
plaster figures with stereophonic 
music and back-lighted by two palm 
trees displaying 800 twinkle lights, 
which appeared in front of the Col- 
lege several days before Christmas. 
This display, which will be perpetu- 
ated from year to year, won grand 
prize in the decorating contest which 
extended from Hauula to Kahuku. 
Coupled with this project was the 
printing and selling of 12,000 Christ- 
mas cards highlighting the nativity 
scene. Twelve hundred of these 
cards were sent to Vietnam. 

Also, one of the outstanding formals 
of the year, *'AL DI LA," was the 
theme for the Junior Prom. By 
making new and interesting decora- 
tion ideas such as a parachute ceiling, 
submitted by students. 

The Junior Class officers were 
also very active in studentbody af- 
fairs, introducing and amending po- 
licies in the Representative Assembly 
and l.C.C. 



Jack Johnson 

Adv is or 



Roj Goya 



Reprcsentat ives 

Kaelecn Laws 




I 




Kka Sua 



134 











Ukli 



Juliana Acob Ned Aikau Gary Aiwohi Laurie Ambridge Darla Andrew Sharon Arriola Sylvia Asing 
Melvin Asuncion William Autry Glenn Ayakawa Allan Barney Sandra Barrett Camela Basilio Charles Basso 



Vatau Beck / Stewart Bell Cherie Bone 
Ruth Buckley Minerva Burnham Gale Camara 



Diana Brown Richard Brammer Craig Brandow Alipate Brown 
Kevin Cameron Jean Campbell Karen Chen Franklin Chang 








Juniors 







* f 0^k ' 




AiiAiI^Jl 




Paul Ghing Claire Cho.v David fhue Eileen (lay Joseph Coconate Robert Cbleaan t,a ' Karet Col lard 
Audrey Corpuz lee Ray Ralph Deatherage falter Eugenia Decano Sharon Dietrich Sherry Douglas 

Deatherage 



Craw I ord 



We Will Be the Leaders 
of the New 



Tomorrow 



Timothy Dyal Jackie Earnshaw Helene El ia Cregory Ehos 
Vuna Fa Leslie Forester John Fox hatherine Fu j 1 i 



Emma Ernestburg Richard Eubank Alice Everett 






fekfjl 




<Jt» 




136 






rM ill It* ikti 




Warren Fullmer Billie Gahan Geraldjne Gahan Kay Galloway Henry Glendon Alan Goo Roy Goya 
Harriet Grass Shirleyann Jean Hansen Carolyn Harada Pauline Harada Pelenalse Havili Aileen Hee 
Gunning 






Alvin Higa 


Laura Hi rata 


Maureen Hogan 


Merry Hookano 


Cheuk Hui 


George HUnt 


Helen Ishida 


Thomas Jacobsen 


Michael Jellin 



Neil Holland Cherlynn Holokai Marcia Holt Cassandra Horn 

Regan Hunt Paul Hurley John Hurrell Ichiro Izuka 

Mary Lynn Jensen Barbara Jimas Evelene Johnson Marilyn Johnson 




Juniors 137 




Knlaml Josephs George Kalehua 




Lcroy Kaona Michael kawaguchi Victoria 

William kekuaokalani 



Margie kel 1 1 1 ik; 



kel i ipaakaua 



Kmily keuma 




Fka Sua concentrates all her attention on her art project. 

l.enore kuhaupio Tae Sun Kim Kugene kimura Naunaala kinolau R °y Koch] George Kong Linda krankenberg 
Isaac kukahiko llalahuni Langi Dorothy Larson Charles La Turner Pui Hing Lau Kaelene Laws Darlene Lee 




138 




George Lee Chieko Lendio Attilio Leonardi Ramona Lin Feng Sharon Linnell Tevita Lui Barbara Luke 

Darrylene Lum Candy Lundquist Theodore Maeda Pouli Magalei Siesia Mahuinga Fatafe Joseph Mapeli 

Malohifoou 



Malia Mateaki Lurline Matsumoto Dennis IVlau Janet McCormick Richard IVIcIllece Clarence Mills Yvonne Mitchell 
George Mo I en i Diane Morita Mosese Naeata Theodore Nakafugi Yasuo Niiyama Michael Nishimoto Allan Oleole 





?*&&££ 



Junior s 






j^ j*K 4fik A* 

£2M 






ttft li J life 




Jeanette Ota Petricia Paikuli Golden Pau Howard Pony Gregory Peterson limaitua Poloai Felipe Pomar 

lavis Pukahi Irwin Puree 11 Michele Rast Steven Richards Roger Rich ins Victoria Robinson Stephen Ross 



•June Saito Sidney Sandstrom Dennis Sasaki 

Candace Sims Ronald Sing Valerie Sipos 

Yosuke Soga Sandra Spitz 



>lakiko Sasaki Manuia Savusa Josephine Serrao Gary Shimi/u 
Fotu Siufanua Jo Anna Skaggs Julia Skedeleski John Smith 

Eka Sua Pete Sumarnap Lei and Sung Margaret Swensen 








aJWiJ 





M 




140 



1 




Frank Tahere Toia Tailua Larry Takahashi Judy Takakura Theresh Tamashiro Diane Tanaka Elaine Tanaka 



A Righteous Path We 



Hove Followed 



Howard Tanaka Luse Tapusoa Sione Taufa Lucy Taumoli Pisona Tevaga Nancy Teuscher Ron Tobler 




Lorena Tom Ted Toshiciyo Dennis Traver 

22& 



Juniors 



141 




The Knowledge of 



Gate 






The nativity scone sponsored by the Junior Class. 



Margaret 

Warren Trueblood I luamu Tuifua Brenda Turner Similati Vanisi Bonnie Vail Josaia Vakalala Vanstone 

Sione Vehikite Judith Ware Nevada Whit lord John Wilcox Theresa Wilkinson Henry Williams Sandra Williams 





£*/raifii 





142 



Words is the 



of Scholarship 




Students head toward the library. 



Joyce Yamauchi Laura Yamauchi Richard Ynigues 

■ 




Virginia 
Wilson 



Margorie 
Witehara 




Emil 



/ 



Wolfgramm 




Julia 

Woo 




Sharon 
Yamagata 




Juniors u: 




s 



en/ors 



The Senior class of 1967-68 was the largest since the founding 
of CCH. Although they got off to a slow start at the first of the year 
they were able to sponsor a Hobo Hop and a 'Career Day' (for those 
Seniors interested in obtaining jobs in Hawaii right after graduation) 
during the first semester. As second semester rolled around, they 
started planning for their Senior Banquet which was held in the Wai- 
kiki Plaza Room. The evening was an enjoyable one for all who attended. 
The Commencement Ball, sponsored by the Freshman class in honor 
of the Seniors was also an event to remember. 

Many members of the Senior class held positions in studentbody 
government and in their respective campus wards. These were oppor- 
tunities for growth for all of these people. Several members of the 
Senior class were recognized and honored as a result of their dili- 



gence as students of CCH. 



IDVISOR: Richard Niedrich 



V ICE-PRES. : Leonard Bock 





As Commencement approa- 
ches, we look backward over 
our years at CCH and we rea- 
lize that we have grown - phy- 
sically; mentallly; spiritually - 
in our years here; we realize 
that we have acquired some of 
the characteristics of a Right- 
eous Companion. 



SECRETARY: Darrylene lum 



PRESIDENT: Blair Olson 




Cheryl nil 



REPRESENTATIVES 
John Kepapa 



Elissa Leonp 




OPore«» Brooks 
Business Management 





144 




Work, 



Study. . . 




Sally Ann McShane is kept busy in 
the Registrar's Office as she helps 
fellow students complete their 
registration. 



Roselyn Amona 
Social Science 

Sylvia Boe 
Elementary Education 

Alroy Enos 
Physical Education 



Gary Beals 
Biological Science 

Merrily Brown 
History Education 



Leonard Beck 
History 

Lillian Burke 
Music Education 



Patoa Benioni Elsie Blevins 
Industrial Education Elementary Education 



Vivian Byous 
English 



Jesse Cheung 
Chemistry 



Amy Boe 
Art 

Earl Cropper 
Business Management 





Seniors 



I I aine Hieashi 
Elementary Kducation 



Cheryl Hi 11 
Elementary Kducation 




Rex 1 1 UHlsen 
Business ftmagemenl 

ii.ii i \ Pre it as 

Indus! rial I ducat ion 

inokc Funaki 
Chemist i \ 



John Green 
Biological sc lence 

Will lam Haleck 
Art 

l>a\ id Hawkins 
Elementary Kducation 




Neveda Whit ford, Jack Binn and Judd Brooks 
at kakela Beach. 



Recreation- 



Tivakno Ieli Lapreal losua Bill Jacobson 

Elementary Education Business hlu n Business Management 



1st her kamana 
History Composi t e 



Thomas kanahele 
Art 



Barbara kanda 
Klementarv Kducation 



Gary Hough ton 
Elementary Educal i 



Charleen How land 
Elemental^ Kducation 



Salu Hunk in 
Social Science 



I ii i Hunk in 
History Composite 




14<5 




Taniela V. Kinikini 
Biological Science 
Education 



Momi Larsen 
' Elementary Education 



William Lee 
Biological Science 



Elissa Leong 
Mathematics 



Ropeti Lesa 
Batesl (English) 

Lily Lindsay 
Business Education 




enjoy themselves at a Studentbody picnic 



Laverne Murakami 
Elementary Education 



Prepares Us. 



Allen Jeffers Sue Jonhnson Kane Kamae Janette Nakano 
Business Management History Education Biological Science Elementary Education 



Howard Kasaoka 
Speech Education 



Dean Kealamakia 
Mathematics 



Sung Bae Kim 
Accounting 





Shirley Muraoka 
Elementary Education 



Joan Nakatani 
Elementary Education 

Roy Nakatsu 
Industrial Education 



Mason Namahoc 
Business 

Leroy Ngai 
Industrial Educat ion 



Seniors i« 








^7 





Marie \in 

i ,,_i ixh i iim a1 ion 



Blair Olsen Eugene Oshima Rodnej Oshiro 
Speech Education Elementary Education Historj Composite 



I rrol Calmer 



\in .ill, mi Panoke 
\sian Studies 



Daniel Richards Irvine Richards Leonard Richardson Wayne Richardson Sharon Romrell Edward Sawada 

Elementary Education Historj Pic- Medicine Speech Education Mathematics Education 



To Take Our Place 



Paul Suafilo \nn Suzuki Sandra Taguchi Naati Talakai Man Tam Edwin lanaka 

Business Management Elementary Education Vsian studies i;iementarv Fducation industrial Education Biological science 

Predric Togo Lesieli Tonga Te Waha Tupaea Walter Uehira Hiia set 1 Lluave nan Lyehara 

Speech Music speech Education Industrial Education Mathematics Education Vsian studies 








148 




Diane Walmsley 
Speech 



Maui Whaanga 
Biological Science 



Harry Wight 
Elementary Education 

Jack Winn 
Physical Education 



Paul Partridge Pvobert Perriton Piilani Purcell 
Business Management industrial Education speech Education 

Beverly Ann Wong 
Alan Scharff Lorraine Segawa Arvay Siufanua Elementary Education 
Mathematics Education Elementary Education Family Living 

Ann Yamashita 
Elementary Education 



In the World 




Daphne Chang Robert Gilmore 

Charles Heirakuji Marjorie Johnson 




/ft -wv 





% 




•4 


\ 


& 




^ 



Fifth-Year Students 



Ruth Koyamatsu Myron Monte 




Anna May Wont: 



ifim Yao 




Fifth-year 



149 



A Righteous 

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Juke Box Compromised 



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CCH Student Union Building 
Finally in Planning Process 

23^ CCHSupport Card Program 







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*<&4&r College 
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