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Full text of "The Duluth Herald"

aBaBai-a*J 




THE piTT TTTH HERALB5 



} -^ r^c 




VOLUME XXIX— NO. 84. 



SATURDAY EVENING, JULY 15, 1911. 



TWO CENTS. 



WICKERSHAM 
TO BffUlN 

Atloniey General May Be 

CaDed oo to Gve Papers 

to the House. 



Accused of Purposely Delay- 
ing Action Too Long in 
Alaskan Case. 



I.. 

at 
d 

tet- vU Jul... .>-. 

al'iy.. 

The deciPi 

i . . ■■ 



— Attor- 

V, i. V ;4v ; .un in c«r- 

was clelayfd until 

■ions had 

-^c. if the 

. commil- 

„, : . u .-j.»v.n lavor- 

ne with charfres 

. c AVicktTSihani 

rijty frt-nt-ral. 

ritiodiued a 

f house ncii!.' 

t-n f a\ oraS . 

w til ell 

. idt-ra- 




AIIS; 
BOlcOASiSJ WBLLNOT DIE 

New York and San Francisco] Famous American Aviator 



Are 



to Be Attacked 
From Sea. 



Has Serious Tumble 
at Erie. 



Defenses of Each City 
Be Tested in Ma- 
neuvers. 



Accident FaUows His Sub- 
scription for Kreamcr's 
Fanily. 



l;itrt> 



f: It nds 
tCor. ■ - 



vtBtutr Brcrme Operative. . 

' kktrsham is ac- 

l.ermitting the 

oii>- to run aerainst 

ia syndicate who de- 

wMiment through per- 

•it vf $50 000. Th*- rtso- 

• . - • <»> attorney 

■ with all 

.; alimony In 

- to an affidavit 
. ... ,,, ;.~than a year apo 

:-n to by H. .). I'^^^^P^-'^s- /^'["If/ 

' . , i. Ai:,vkn pvndiraifc. in 1908. 

1 declines to dis- 

r committee. His 

intiniate "that the charges are 



on rape 6, third column.) 

FEUD MURDER IN 
PENNSYLVANIA 



JAMES WICKERSHAM. 
Congressional Delegate From Alaska. 

photofakT 

ohiolatest 

Story of Photographs Taken 

Before Art Was Known 

Pulls $1,000. 

Woman and Convict Involved 

in Maze of Columbus 

Scandal. 



Posse Is Searching for 

Slayer of Old-Time 

Enemy. 

McConnellsburg I'- J"b' 15.— Will- 
lam Lockard. who lives !n the moun- 
tains! of T-v.'tor: roimty, twelve miles 
from J. '<"1«''^ J K*^' ^*''- 



New York. July if,.— Naval mlHtla 
bepan tmlarking today all along the 
North Atlantic coast tor the coming 
attack on New York harbor and its 
defen' ^. The purpose of the maneuvers 
ntxt week is to ascertain the strength 
of New York 8 "back door " Seven- 
teen of the biggest battleships ever 
gathered here on a war footing will 
try to reach the city through Long 
lt.land sound, and the battle for the 
preservation of the metropolis will b« 
fought in Gardiner's bay. at the east- 
ern end of Long Island. , . . 

The battlships cihio, Mississippi and 
Maine today t<.ok aboard the amateur 
xaiU rs from tills slate, who will par- 
titipute in the attack. 

Mllilla OM DeteaiilTe. 

The city will he deUiidtd by most 

of the naval militia details in their 

owii ships, backed by a swarm of tor- 

l<eilv boats, submarines and an aero- 

oiane 

Participating in the maneuvers are 
the naval organizations of New York, 
MJxssachupetts. Maine. Lhode Is^nd. 
Connecticut. New .lersey, Mar> land. 
South Carolina and the L'lstricl of Co- 
lumbia. . . .. __ _,iii 

The maneuvers In these waters will 
lat-t until the amateur sailors go home, 
c^ Julv '^-:. when the wurfhips-- will go 
to Provlncetown for the regular sum- 
mer practice. 

• 

Will Try to Land. 

Ran Francisco, Va.1.. .^uly 1» — ^^^^ 
companies of coast artillery, reserves 
of the state of California encamped 
uT the I'resldlo today, preparatory to- 
taking part In maneuvf rs with the 
regulars next week when a naval force 
will attempt to run the Mo,^>tade ot 
batteries and forts that defend i-an 
Francisco, and land a force mside the 
Golden Gate. 



Erie. Pa.. July 15— J. C ("Bud") 
Mars, the aviator hurt in a fall with 
his aeroplane yesterdai. will recover 
and win be able to leave the hospital 
In about ten «iays. 

This announcement WM niade by the 
attending physlctans after further ex- 
amlnatwrn of the Injureo man today. 
Mars' injuries are noi nearly f>o Be- 
vere as at first reported He has a 
alight fracture of the i-kull. which Is 
mT serious but no other bones are 
broken and btyi-nd a slight hemorr- 
hage of the lungs which -a? »'c>I'PtJ 
this morning, there are no Internal 
iniuries a;>parent. 

Because ol the accident to Mars 

marhine the av.ation mtet has been 

^al^ed off It wa. being held under 

the auspices of a local newspaper. 

Mars lost control <f hiF air ma- 

(Continued on page 6. first column.) 




AGAIN 



CURTIS GUILD AND WIFE. 



^ 



New York. July ^^■-^-£^%'J^'^^^^^^^ 
_.. Guild is on his way to St^.I'^^,e/^,\',"'^^_^^;|\"^.Vk.h has 'V . raised against 
T. ^Jf'uTl\ ^^utr*t^rJe;-og';\Te'.?hl^rirhr/lV ^Jewish Un.. . States citizens 
to enter Russia as freely as Chri.-^tians. 



Mr 




AVIATOR NEARLY 

KILLED BY FALL 



LITTLE GIRL PROBE GRAND 
IS "BAD MAN"! JURY "LEAK" 



fcnii as 
armed.. 



;a laut night and 
arching? for him. 
, .-ter families have . 

>rrieil oii a feud and both men The last tempest to rise au' 
a to r.avf- threatened each other Ujje teapot of the etalebouse r 
a result u- Ivavt gor.e heavily ^J^ tjj^. nature of an art sc 



Columbus. Ohio. Ji ly IB.-'The lady 
or the convict," whit a of them painted 
the pictures? 

Hai^ a legislature the right to pay 
$2&0 each for copies of faded -photo- 
graphs" of former governors who 
reigned before photography was In- 
vented? 

Were the por trails really old and 
faded, and why was the comm-ssion 
Kiven a woman whol y unheard of as a 
painter, eliiier of portraits oi oi 

^Thc last tempest to rise and rage m 
- • .-..-. rotunda is 

scandal, in 





t — " 




■ 

i 











JOHN W. GATES 
HAS BAD NIGHT 

Fmancier Rallies With Dawn 

But Shows No Real 

Gain. 

ParlP Julv 15— John W Gates had a 

■ ba*l night, but rallied this morning and 

at r.o. n his condition was about the 

= • has been generally for two 

,.„.,.- and her son. Charles G. 
are constantly at the bed-side 
an adjoining room. Both are 
iiiilte' exhausted by their anxious w-atch^ 
^ At 3 o'cloek this afternoon Mr. Gates , 
wras ^ he somewhat better. His 

vhxsn re watching the heart ac- I 

tlon whKU varies from 82 to 99 and, 
^hen irregular responds readily to, 
etimuiants. Dr. J. Russell Ryan of 
Lnmion. who will arrive here tonight. 
wil' remain over Sunday in frequent 
conVultat.on with Dr. Gros and the 
ether attendin g physicians. 

MAY QUARANTINE 
GIRL FOR LIFE 

Typhoid Carrier Is Respon- 
sible for Three Deaths 
and fifty Cases. 

Chca^' July 15.— Miss Rose Boers- | 
ma known as the typhoid girl, who is 



BEDE DEHNES 

AN INSURGENT 

Also Predicts Taft's Nomi- 
nation and Rc-Election 
to Presidency. 

St Paul. Minn.. July 15— (Bpeclal 
oTVverv one else. alHO his own. xnose to The Herald. )-The diflerence be- 
principally involved are George Long. L^.g^^ an insurgent and a progressive 
|f^7l!ii'^g7w^?tif.'ror«,^:?rawlS."tea^ch?r ha« been determined. J. Adam Bede 

So^^e^d* aV%^"a ^mSJ t^^ in^"t\e"s7te^Tr- 
brary. and Henry "W .sidenbach. the Par- 
doned ex-convict. v.*ho retouched the 
"art treasures " in tiie capitol. 
Oave Her 91«M>«. 
Mrs. Ilollings'.vorth is said to have 
painted the copies of portraits of Gov- 
ernors Klrker, Lu las. Shannon and 
For this icork the las^t gen- 



which every one de. lies the statemen; 
of everv one else, alvto i.is own. Thofct 




Twelve-Year-Old Tries 
Rob Bank in Ohio 
Town. 



to I Sensational Allegations Made 
in Connection With Oleo 
Indictments. 



Pokes Revolver at Cashier 

and Tells Him to Give 

Her Money. 



Akron, Ohio, July 15— Pretty little 
11-year-old Edna Peebles, who tried to 



Judge landis Will Hear Two 

Charges Answered Next 

Monday. 



Chicago, July ID.— "WMiat federal of 
ficers declare is the greatest con 



11-year-old Edna Peebles. ^^ ^ cuva- splracy to violate the secrecy of the 
rob the Falls Savings Bank aVC"ya- splracy to ^^ ^^^^ 



Says He Read first Copy of 

White's Confession of 

Bribery. 

Tells of Veto Action That 

Cost the Jackpot 

$30,000. 



Washington, July 15.— Governor 
Charles S. Deneen of Illinois, who fig- 
ured In the Lf>rimer senatorial fight, 
again testified t<'day before the senate 
Lorlmer committee. It was the third 
day of Mr. Deneen s occupancy of the 
witness stand, and It was expected 
that he would conclude before ad- 
journment. The hearing opened with 
a discussion or tne alignment of the 
factions in Illinois politics in connec- 
tion with the senatorial contest. 

Mr Hanecy suggested tiiat none of 
the followers ol Chauncey ^^P*^ or 
John U. Thompson voted for Lorlmer 
until after a senatorial conference held 
in the governor 8 office. Mr Deneen 
replied that the purpose of that meet- 
ing was to prevent their lollower* 
from voting for Lorlmer. 

Governor L>eneen said ;4hut hf.'or* 
the publication of the ^'1*^?*^?^ ^,?"® 
confession. Editor Kelley ^^^ tho Clii- 
cago Tribune sugBi.*<ted to him that a 
si.ecial session of the legislature be 
convoked to consider the Lonmer case. 
The witness said that probably after 
the publication he tentatively wrote a 

n.essage proposing « ^^-P^.^j' ^dv^lsLrs' 
At a consultation wtlh his adMsers. 
however, the conclusion was reach«^Q 
that the investigating committee prob- 
ably would consist of ^he men^ho 
wefe guilty and the special session 

wa* not called. ,. x • _ ■ ^v.^. 

Governor Deneen told of ^'t'^ng in the 
office of the Tribune the night the 
WhUe story was printed. He «a}d he 
read probably the first coj.y printed 
and walked out with It hidden in his 
vest. He explained that he had been 
warn^-d that everyone leaving tne 
bifndlng that night would bo searched. 

White's reference to the , |.<(^000 loss 

to the corruption •■ja«»'r".^:^„ ''•■:",r^«.2[ 
the governor's vetoing one l-ill was 
taken up. Governor Deneen said that 
ft had fxamln<d his vetoes and 
Jiie^sed' White was referring to the 



hoga Falls, did the job between getting 
the meals lor her family. She had 
been used to rigging up her playmates 
as Wild West citizens, and so. her im- 
agination fired by something she had 

show, she 



eral assembly voted her $1,000. That is 

one-half the price isually paid pa^nt- ^^^^^^ ^ .^„ 

ers for making original portraits i.rom i^^ re-election are assured 



of Pine City solved the problem. Here 

Is what he said: 

•An insurgent is a progressive who 
has n >t been vaccinated. He's pot 
to have a little of the taming virus 
injected before he stops insurging 
find strikes a sensible gait. ' ^ . 

Mr Bede ts traveling and lecturing. 
He said while in St. Paul that he be- 
lieved President Taft's renommation 
"e .rw J although 



cm the other h.ind, many peopie 
about the statehoi se openly charge 
that ex-Convict Wtldenbach painted 
the copies. , ^ , 

The necessitv for copying the pic- 
tures at all is also ienied by some who 
have Investigated. They say the four 
portraits in question were stored in ; 
the basement. U'hen Weldenbach i 
cleaned and renovated them photo- 1 
graphs were taken of them. which 
show that they were in remarkably 
eood condition 

An "art guide" o the state house. 

(Continued on pag-' 6, second column.) 

raiseIaiS" 
on atuntic 



!Minne«»ota. South Dakota and Wiscon- 
*sln may instruct their delegates for 
La FoUette. 



J. C. (BUD) M\:<S. 

Mars ha.'' many daring '.erial feat« 
to his credit and In one respect his 
record is unique. He - the fli st 
American aviator. If not Of -^^",«^'t 
of any nationality, to ha'Cj^i. ha. 

was practically a globe-enctr< '•.•^^""^• 
Mars left i^an Francisco *«r December, 
and returned to New Yor» !a.st month 
laden with trophies and' • log book 
ol over 2H) successful nights On one 
occasion he had a royal paesenger— the 
king of Slam— on a tweive-mile flight. 
If Mars' accident at Erie t*rminatef in 
death, his will be the s,evi^-fint\ life 
known to have been lost Tsy aviation 
accidents since the first Was recorded 
I In the death of Lieut. Thomas Stl- 
frldge r. S. A.. Sept. 17. 1&08. 



seen at a moving picture 

thought of the bank when she found 



grand jury room ever known to the 
federal court In this city Is being in- 
vestigated under directions from Judge 
K. M. Landis. in connection with the 
recent indictments on charges of de- 
frauding the government in the oleo- 
margarine cases. 

Simmered down to simplest form, 1 

en I 



Her mother an >'^^*""' """ "; nterested in the conduct of the grand 
father not being employed regularlv | "/^^;_^^<«__ ^^^.^^ ^^ . .^„^, ^^^.^, 



the girl figured out what she thought 
would be the best method of replenish- 



ing the family supply of money- 
Th ... -_.,., 



rne tiny girl who was bold enough 
to try to rob the Cuyahoga Falls bank 
in broad davlighi. by poking a revolver 
Into the ckshler's face and ordering 
him to —cash up." looked little more 
than a babe as ^^e stood in the parlc^r 
of the Akron county jail, a prisoner 
^Ue came down the stairs with her 
finger in her nu'uth. 

L.lkrs BelBjt !■ Jail- . 

Edna savs she likes being m jail. 
When she "was taken there the matron 

discovered she was ^*fJr"freV The 
hnv'R clothing under her dress. ine 
U users werf rolled up. since Edr.a s 
skirts came only to her knees, bhe 
had planned to get K'SHcsslon of the 
money in the bank's vaults, then to 
ITlscard her own garments and escape 

'"l^rnet%"'n'-yelf-o"l'd"carl Peebles, the 



(Continued gn page €, second column.) 

showsIenators 
his fine horses 

Watson of West Virginia 

Entertains Party of 

Colleagues. 

Fairmont. W. Va., July in— SlK 
United States senators, colleagues ol 

„_.„ . ^ „ Senator Clarence W. Watson, will be 

ternal revenue Inspectors. Judge KM- , j^ ^^ guests, arriving here to- 



jury— Henry Coyne, an Internal re%e- 
nue officer, and Martin Dahl of May- 
wood, a member of the grand jury- 
were in a conspiracy by which the 
twenty-six men Indicted knew of tho 
action against them long before it 
was even reported to the judge. 
Searrhlntr InventlicatloD. 
Following the Indictmtnt by the fed- 
eral grand Jury of twenty-three men 
prominently connected with the oleo- 
margarine Industry and three In- 
ternal revenue Inspectors. Judge K. M. 



(Continued on pare 6. second column.) 



This Investigation follows a special 
report handed in by the jury to the 
effect that secrets of the jury room 
had been revealed to outsiders and 
that Improper use had been made oi 
the information. 

Judge l.andlB called before him 
Martin I»ahl of Maywotid^ a member 



I FIHISHING TOUCHES. I 

L.,,«„„. » n .., »' » **** **^ ** ' ■'-• ' "^ '***- 



Steamship Companies Say 

Higher Wages Make It 

Necessary. 

London. July U —The trans-Atlantic 
steamship lines « mbraced in the At- 
lantic conference have decided to in- 
crease the saloon and second cabin 
passenger rates for both easibound 
and westbound ! raffle by 12.50. the 
advance to take effect on Monday 
i next. The steerage rates will not be 
bong guarded by a city detective oni jj^pg^d «._^w. n..^.. 

. ,iry,,.r^ .o».h »/„C>,ic«. may ^ ^,.,^1,'^'Z If^S" ^u'n'.'t.-r «r 
^STZ:ir^SZ,y omeiafr; ^^,_ J the --r,'S,,--»?,VT«e'"uS>'^■.i'! 

from $126 to $2 50 In order to offset 
the increase In w iges which they were 
obliged to grant the strikers it is 
pSffife that th.re will be some In- 
crease in freight rates^ 



i 



4 s and directly responsible 
ivT three deaths and /Ifty cases of 
f,f - In the south division of the city. 
!- been under quarantine for more 
\. month. 

SAYS HEIoLD her 
"ROPES" FOR CIGARS 

Grl Snes Broker From Whom 

She Bought Cigar 

Stani 

Chicago. July 15— Mist Millie Stuber. 
the new proprietor ol a cigar stand In 



WOMAN AND TWO 
DAUGHTERS DEAD 

Bodies Are Found in Bed- 
room Filled With 
Gas. 

New York. July 15.— Julia Call and 



the new proprjtriwi «* •» «.-o— - 

the lobby of the Board of Trade, has two daughters. Angelina 

h.rt the broker who sold her the biisi- ' -- — ^ '"' "—' *• 

nl'^s arrested on a charge of obtaining 

money by means of a confidence game. 

""she' charges that somebody substi- 

tut*.ii "roueH "-orches, and. nicaei 

n"ovement^'' for :he boxes alle^ej to be 

filled with clear Havana &oo^,^j^^"« be-- 

fore she took possession of the stana. 

and that her business has been ruined 

AE a result. . 



and Anna, 
aged 16 and 17 were found dead on 
the floor of their bedroom in Brook- 
lyn, suffocated oy guB. The PoHce 
have not settled whether their deaths 
were accidental or a case of double 
murder and sui< ide. All the windows 
were shut and the gas was flowing 
from an open 11 jhtlng jet. 




(Continued on pag e 6, secon d column.) 

ASK FORFEDERAL 
MINT AT SEAHLE 

Spokane Men Also Want 
Gold and Silver Coin- 
age Resumei 

Spokane. Wash., July 15.— At a 
meeting of the Mining Men's Club of 
Spokane ye.<=terday the following reso- 
lution was adopted: 

•We recommend that congress direct 
the secretary of the treasury to estab- 
lish a mint at Seattle, Wash., for the 
coinage of gold and silver: that the 
mints at Denver and San Francisco be 
ordered to resume coinage of botn 
metals, and that all demands for the 
coins of either and both metals in the 
district lying west of the Mississippi 
be filled from one or the other of the 
mints herein named; transportation 
charges to be paid by the federa gov- 
ernment and charged agai..st the 
mint from which shipment was made. 

The placing of lead and zinc and 
their products upon the reciprocal free 
list was also favo red. 

DR. D.TDilAS 
BUYS BULLDOG 



Arranged In their honor is an exhi- 
bition of the famous Watson show 
horses, which will be given during tho 
afternoon, while in the evening a ban- 
quet win be served on the lawn of 
the Watson home. Fairmont farms, to 
which the Democratic members <>f the 
West Virginia legislators are mvlted. 
Senator Watson accompanied by 
Senators Chamberlain. Overman John- 
^n. Bailey. Kern and Taylor sex- 
Decied to arrive about noon. To meet 
uTe distinguished guests and to wit- 
ness the horses, the general P" ;«^ »« 
mvlted to the farms from 3 '"'^'l^ 
o'clock The entire stable of horses 
will be shown in events similar to 
Those m which they won blue ribbons 
in all the big horse shows 9t this 

^■''j:rrrc""w''wXon. who has won 
many plaudits as a woman whip, will 

ha'ndle'^the ribbons *" «^^„f ^ ,arm 
events. The management of the tarm 
Announces a program that will extend 
over two hours. 



Cass Lake Mayor Denies Any 

Relations With "Sandy'' 

Young. 

Bemidji, Minn.. July 15.— (Sipeclal to 
The Herald.)— Dr. D. F. Dumas, mayor 

of Cass Lake and held on f^haj-«es ^j^^'^^hrer7"w~ho "'stood 
brought by Assistant State Fire Mar- ^ ^ 

Bhal Samuel Fullerton. In an attempt - .-.--- -.«- »-v. 
connect him with a proposed rob- 



l^errand ^ buying"' ol the'-puposky 
Dostoffice, was here yesterday to buy 
a bull dog. and Incidentally confer 
with his attorney. Marshall A. Spooner^ 
Dr. Dumas preferred to talk about 
his new dog, a fancy, full blooded 
animal. The Cass Lake mayor pur- 
chased a collar and chain from the 
hardware man who testified at the 
doctor's preliminary examination that 
he had sold Dr. Dumas a revolver. At 
the depot, with his dog in tow. Dr. 

^"'There^^s^iit a thing that I can say. 
I don't know this man 'Sandy' \oung. 
irrested for burning the Blackduck 
building and 1 don't see how he can 



SHOOTS AGENT 
OF BLACK HAND 

Pennsylvania Man Opens Fire 

at Signal to Pay 

$2,000. 

Jeanette, Pa.. July l^--yP«° /^» 
signal of the "Bla.k Hand' to turn 
^oney over to Its agent. George 
Labarto, a wholesale fruit merchant, 
shot and killed Ve«e» Ceciliano. an 
Italian barber, here today, and imme- 

?i*;^-'.^Bla\^^"Hind" ^^U^Vr rn'o^rS 
S"La?Lno upon pain ot^eBtr^ were 
turned over to the police by Mrs. 

^^vlllv today Ceciliano entered 
T .^trto-K ctore and stood lighting a 
^ogle when L^blrto opened fire with 
Btogie. »*»'^' r».volver from the rear 
^? t?.f '^'^tlbflshmem.'' The ^i^^i^^ing^ r.f 
^h^ Ktocie wafc the signal for L^barlo 
tS pay ceciliano $2,000. "This signal 
was explained to Labarto in a letter 
he received after his barns were 
turned down and several horses de- 

''^The^'^^flrst shot struck Ceciliano In 
the face and he fell to the floor. Three 
more shots struck him In the breast 
^nd legs The fifth shot carried away 
a mt!f finger on a hand cf L'^Jf '•\° J 
daughter, who stood in line of the 

^■"cl^-niano was taken to a hospital, 
where he died, and Labarto has es- 
caped. 



-.^(p 



i 



DUCHESS OVERCOME 

AT RACE TRACK, DIES. 



London. July 15.-The dowager 
duchess of Devonshire, who was taken 
suddenly HI at the Sundown Park race 
meeting yesterday as a result of the 
rxtesslve heat, died early today. 

The duchess was removed in an un- 
conscious condition from the club en- 
closure to Esher Place, the j;««»«l*""» 



DEFECTIVE PAGE h 



!< 



i! 

11 



i 



X 



^ 






AA^rfritaMlMMMBS^ 



^y 



i 



« 



wmm 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 15, 1911. 




WKVTHKK— F«tr weather tonight and Sun- 
iliy. aoi murli rhaii;- Hi teniuerature; maA- 
er.it « t'i brisk wentiTly winJs. 



IHF. rOl'SG .V£A"A STORK." 



o 



UR Suit Sale is still 
going on with only 



a tew left at— 



$10.75 

All Oxr'orJa in our \ $2.85 
Shoe Jjepartmentat\ $3.85 



Superior St. at Second Avenue W. 



mm LiiE 



EXCURSIONS 



— TO — 



TWO HARBORS 

SUNDAY, JULY I6ih 



ADDITIONAL 
SPORTS 



CONTINUE 
AT OLD^PARK 

No Games Will Be Played 

on the Point This 

Year. 



MARINE NEWS 




LAKEWOOD MAN HAS LIFE BUOY 

THAT IS ATTRACTING ATTENTION 



STEAMER 

EASTON 

will leave Booth** Dock. I.Hke 
^veuue ^oMth, at »:30 «. ni.. -•■S^ 
I*, ui.. Nnil T:30 p. in. Returning 
lt>N%'f!« Two HarliorH et 1- noun, 
5 |>. ni. and i*:30 p. m. 

ttieanier leniinje T»'vo Harliora 
tit I- o'flofk will Htop at KnU> 
Hl^er tu take on paxweuKtrs for 
Diiluth. Then,. panwenKerM will 
tt* landed at Knife Hlver by 
i^tramer leavlnjs Uulutb at 7:30 
p. m. 

FARE-ROUHD TRIP: 

ll.t«»-en Duiuth and TwogQ^ 

H:irlM>rM 

ile<nt-en Uulutk and KnUeeQg 

Hlver 

B«>t*veen Two Harbori* ■■>^50e 

Knife River *"'*' 



FIH^T-CI.A«>S >IR\I.S at rea- 
nonabie rates. Hefre>»liiueut!« of 
all kind.xt. 




Sox Win Refarn for Long 

Series — Betting Must 

Stop. 

The Duiuth "W'h te Sox will return 
home Monday an.i open here with the 
La Crosse team. B )th the .Sox and the 
Outcasts have been playing good ball 
of late, although 1 )9ins a majority of 
their games. The/ both have braced 
and some good baseball Is expected 
during the series starting Monday aft- 
ernoon. 

All of the game.- during the balance 
of the season will be played at .ath- 
letic park, as the new grounds on Park 
roint will not b.; ready during the 
;>resent season. 

According to th i announcement of 
the management, all betting will be 
stoj'i'ed in the grtind.stand during the 
games at home during the remainder 
of the season, as well as all rough talk 
and rough remarks to the members of 
the teams. Order AriU be eiiforced and 
any fan not aotiniL the part" of a gen- 
tleman will be eje ted from the stand. 
While Winona h..s a good lead at the 
present time, local officials believe that 
the race will tighten and for the rest 
of the schedule w II be close between 
Winona. Superior. Duiuth, Eau Claire 
and La Crosse. 

The Outcasts ha "e been strengthened 
and are at the present time playing 
good ball. . , w » 

The Sox will l»e home for about 
twenty games and are expected to 
boost their percentage during the home 
stay. 

DREYFUSSlfANTS 
STARIBATTERY 

Pittsburg Latest to Enter the 

Bidding ior O'Toole 

and Kelly. 

Milwaukee. Wi... July 15. — Barney 
Dreyfuss. owner » f the Pittsburg Na- 
tional league basiball club, is the lat- 
est bidder for O'l'oole and Kelly, the 
-tar battery of the St. Paul .\nierican 
Association team. Dreyfuss today 
t'^lephoned to Hiiy Meehan, business 
manager of the St. Paul club, not to 
clo^e up any deal until he can send a 
man h^-re to put in an offer for the 
two players. 

This makes fiv ? clubs biddiner for 
the services of tie two men. Scouts 
from both Chica 'o big league clubs 
and Cleveland vvi 1 watch the coveted 
nlayers in action this afternoon. The 
St. Louis Nation il league manage- 
ment is ready to pay $16. 500 for the 
pair and It is reiorted that President 
Charles Murphy of the Cubs will 
raise this bid to 120.00 0. 

350 HORSESllE.ADY 

FOR KALAMAZOO MEET. 




Lighting Talks 



NUMBER 37 



DULUTH, JULY 15, 1911 



THE NEW LIFEBUOY. 



Frederick Woods, a farmer who Uvea 
near Lakew.jod. this county, has in- 
vented a Ufesaving buoy that has at- 
tracted the attention of vessel and 
marine men. 

The lifebuoy is spherical In form. 
An 8-foot buoy has a capacity of four 
tons and seating facilities for thirty 
passengers. It does not have to be 
launched. When it is percelvtd that a 
vessd is about to sink, the passengers 
tan enter the buoy, and when the 
vessel goes down the buoy will tloat 
with its human load. 

There is an attachment by which 
fresh air can be supplied for the pas- 
sengers. The air also helps in keeping 
the craft ailoat. A tube extending 
from the top of the buoy can be used 
to support a light or other distress 
signal. A water cnamber is provided 
for drinking water and there is room 
for a larger amount of provisions to be 
stored. 

The buoy is of metallic construction 
and can withstand the roughest weath- 
er. It can be carried on the deck of a 
ship or other convenient portion of a 
vessel. By mean.'? of its air chambers, 
its two casings and the weights ai tlie 
bottom, it will not roll over and turn 
Its passengers upside down. 

-Marine men and construction en- 
gineers who have examined it declare 
It to be mechanically correct. It la 
probable that e.xperiments to determine 
it.s availability on lake boats and ocean 
carriers will be conducted in the near 
future. 



FAIR WEEK'S RErORD 

FOR THE ORE DOCKS. 



12:40 p. m.: Empress of Fort William. 
12:50; Wtdener, 1:10; Manola. 2:20; 
Langell. Arenac. W. K. Moore. 2:10; 
Bessemer. Bryn Mawr, 4; Goulder, 4:20; 
Malletoa 5:30; Filbert. 5:40; Roumania. 
barge Crete. «:10; Steel King. W. E. 
Corey, 6:15; Renesselaer. 7:15; Oscoda. 
Tilden Filer, 7:50; Robert Fulton, 8:20; 
St Clair. 10:15; Hebard, 11:50. Up Sat- 
urday: Walters. Buckley. 12:40 a. m.; 
Wahcondah. 1:10; W. L.. Brown. 2; Wi- 
nona. Miami. 4:40; L. B. Miller. D. W. 
Mills, Anderson. 6:10; H. W. Hagood. 
6:20; Canadian. 6:30; Naples. 6:40; Un- 
derwood 8:30; Wldlar. 9:30: Planking- 
ton, 11:10; Impoco. 11:10; W. J. Carter. 
11:30. Down Saturday; Olcott. 12:30 a. 
m.; House, 1:50: Glenmount. 2:30: Jos- 
eph Wood, 2:50: Glenellah, 4:30; City of 
Paris. 4:40: Reed. 6: Marina. Magna. 
6:10; Chicago, 6:50; Ashley, 8:40: Tampa, 
Aurora. 9:50; Andaste. 11; Yates, 11:30; 
^haw, noon. 

Port of Ddliith. 

•Arrivals Maricopa. Roebling. Bunsen, 
Ream Black. Maia. Siemens. Jenney. 
H. E. Runnel.s. J. A. Donaldson. Gil- 
l)ert. Bell. Rockefeller, Gates, Agnew. 
Manda. Baker, light for ore; Living- 
stone, big; Snyder, Wlckwire. Jr.. coal; 
Homer Warren, light for lumber. 

Departures: Centurion. Norton. 
Venczula, P^endennis White. Frlck, 
Maricopa, RjMrhTlng. Benson. T. F. Cole. 
Ream, UtleiV Jenney. Siemens. Black. 
Mala. Kirby. .1 A. Donaldson. Rocke- 
feller, Gates. Manda. Gilbert, ore: Buf- 
falo, Schuylkill, nierchandise; McWil- 
liams. W. Scranton. Michigan, light. 

A NERVE TO.MC. 




S. T. SORENSEN. 

.SolU tht" iii»w«j.ir. .jii.i beat 
4iyl«» In ."ihotM. SllDptfr* anj 
Oxfjcj* t.i you. direct trum 
tlie tictnTj at wbjle^alD 
pr-Ues. 

You iive frnm $1 tt $2 o.t 
every yalr yuallty guar- 
»nt.'?'I. .S<?t> iHir wlmiuws — 
ftliere the hlni.< fly. 
317 West Supsrior Strtet. 



Kalamazoo, Ml-:h.. July 15. — Recre- 
ation park is cri-wded with over 3.^0 
hi>rses. and horsemen are flocking in- 
to the city in anticipation of the 
grand circuit me. ting here next week. 
The Indianapolis contingent arrived 
early today, there being a train of 
twenty cars. 

<>n Monday Nancy Royce, Grace. 
Willy. Dudle .\ri hdale and Spanish 
Queen will meet in the 2:07 trot. 

TAYLOR WrLirPAir$5.000 

FOR FIRST B.\SEMAN. 



Ore shipments from the local port 
were heavy during the past twenty- 
four hours, twenty-one big freighters 
having left for the Lower Lakes, car- 
rying almost 150. UOO tons of ore. 

During the week about 116 boats 
carrying over .S 12 000 tons of ore de- 
parted from this port, a record which 
Is considered pretty good for this sea- 
son wiien shipping is so quiet. Most of 
this was from the Allouez dock In Su- 
perior. 



Horaford** Acid Phosphate. 

Rft'oinrnen^leil for reltef if limJm:!!.!. Impitrt^l nerve 
tirre anj ftUf.if Inrlgoralea the entiM sysl-'in. 



Sauit Passages. 



THE IDEAL HOME 
FOR SINGLE MEN | 

is at the Bachelor Apartments?, 320 
We.<<t First street. Service and fur- 
ni.<!i!i!gs up-to-date, with every- 
ihinJT that ten<ls to solid comfort. 
Ai>pl\' at the apartments, or 

W. C. SHERWOOD & CO. 

!!'>( Manhattan Building. 

Both ritoue.n, ::::5. > 



Advertise in The Heralil 



St. Joaeph, Mo., July 15. — John I. 
Taylor, owner o:* the Boston Ameri- 
can league base >all team, has wired 
Owner John Holland of the St. Jo- 
seph Western le;igue club an offer of 
$5,000 for -Tex" Jones, first base- 
man of the loca team. 

Jones was purchased by the Chica- 
go Americans la.'* fall, but soon after 
the "resent season opened he was re- 
turned to St. Jo:*eph. 

Manager Hollt.nd said today he re- 
garded the Host m offer as favorable. 

AMERICAN mM WINS 

TRAP SHOOT .\T WINNIPEG. 



Sault Ste. Marie. Mich , July 15. — 
f Special to The HeraM. ) — Up Friday: 
Amasa Stone, noon: Manitoba. 1:30 p. 
m. : D'lluth. 2:3i>; Elba, 4:3<): James 
Donaldson. Wright, Dayton. 5. Senator, 
Tuxbury, Redfern, 5:30; Carter, 2; 
Hoyt. Matoa. 7:3'): Spokane. Hopkins. 
King, s: Sheldon. Parks, 9:30; Morgan, 
11. Down Friday: .Security, oil barge, 
Athabasca. 1 p. m. : Cornell, 1:30; Bope, 
2::50: Masalm. Malta. 5; D. O. Mlirs, 
Maritana. Marcia. 6:30: Curtis, Peter- 
son. Marvin. .Saxonia. .S:3i): Mundo. 9; 
Kaminisliqua. Willis King. 10; Watt. 
Maida, 10:30; Nornmnia. Montreal, 11; 
Cort, Thomas. Mary Elphlcke, mid- 
night. 

Up Saturday: Adriatic. 12:30 a. m : 
Vail. 1:30; Nye, Orinoco. Granada. An- 
gellne, 2:30; Kennedy. 3:35: Stailacona, 
5: Griffin. Cadilla--. Philip Minch, 7::?0: 
North .Sea, 8:30: Henry Rogers, Laugh- 
lin. 9:30; Peter Relss. 11:30. Down 
Saturday: Rowan. Mauch Chunk. 1:30; 
a. m. : Murphy. Corliss. Western Star, 
4; .Superior City Wartker. 5; Rochester, 
Gary, Amazon. 5:30; Black Rock. Eric- 
cson. Martha. 6:30. Fryer. 7:30: James 
Davidson, .small Gratwlck. 8; McGeatt. 
9; Kensington. Keewatln, 10:30; Lynch. 
11; Saronic. noon. 



BASEBALL 

White Soi vs. La Crosse 

AT HOME. 

MONDAY, JULY 17th 

Came 3:30. Athlatic Park. 



Wisdom, or Folly? 

It is a commonplace axiom that the ordinary man learns only 
from his own experience, but a wise man learns from the experience 
of others. 

And this holds true of cities also, as well as of individual men. 

Right now, before plunging into the folly of building a Municipal 
Electric plant that could not benefit either the City or any consider- 
able number of its citizens, this City of Duiuth has the opportunity 
of learning wisdom from the experience of other cities — not one or 
two cities only, but a majority of all the cities and important towns 
in the country which today own and operate municipal electric plants. 

For several weeks we have been gathering statistics of the cost of 
city lighting by municipal plants; and these figures, mark you, are 
NOT taken from a flamboyant speech by some irresponsible politi- 
cian a thousand miles or more from any of the cities named, but in 
every case have been obtained direct from the Municipal plant itself. 

Here, then, for each city named, are the number of arc lamps 
maintained by the municipal plant and that plant's own figures on 
the cost to the city of each lamp per year: 

Numl>cr Cost 

of Aiv poi* Lamp 

City population. Lamps, per Year. 

AlaiiUHla. Cal 23.r><>rt 1»0 $7H '>0 

AlexaiuIrJa, Minn ».»»« 12 75.00 

Alpena. Mich 12.700 101 69.12 

Anderson. Ind 24.500 285 60.00 

Arjtenta. Ark 11.200 68 75.00 

Aslitabula. Ohio 18.500 135 60.00 

Au.stin. Minn 7.000 114 48.00 

Austin, Texas 30.000 230 7250 

Batavia. N. V 12.000 95 60.00 

Bay City, Mich 45,000 471 55.00 

In every large city a part at least of the distribution lines for 
Electric lighting have to go underground, and this alone would make 
the cost much greater than in such small towns as Alexandria and 
Austin, Minn., but we have included in our alphabetical list all the 
municipal plants which were willing to give us this information on 
cost. That alphabetical list will be continued in the next Lighting 
Talk. 

Meanwhile, in scanning the above figures, remember that the 
Duluth-Edison Electric Company offers to light Duiuth at the EX- 
TREMELY LOW price of $45 a year for each arc light. Further, 
we will give this City FREE every year the contract may run $1,500 
worth of Electric Light for public buildings, improved parks, and an 
Electric sign on the Aerial Bridge. 

And this offer is not made at the expense of our customers, but 
includes a substantial reduction in the shape of free lamp renewals 
to every lighting customer. 

Don't miss the next Lighting Talk, in next Tuesday's Herald. 

DULUTH-EDISON ELECTRIC CO. 




I 



mMmim^M 



HEALY AND MILDOON 

RETURN TO PARLIAMENT. 



London. July 15. — By agreement of 
the parties. Timothy Healy, Independ- 
ent-Nationalists, and John Muldoon. 
Nationali.st, were today returned to 
parliament unopposed for the North- 
east and East division of Cork coun- 
ty, respectively. 

CARRIE ROSEN MADE 

MOLDE POSTMASTER. 




RED FROM 
POOR_FARM 

Crippled Immigrant Feared 

He Would Be Sent Back 

to Russia. 



Detroit Passages. 



DR. MITCHELL 



Try Ili.H Klet'tro-Maacnetic Treatmeat— 

it Will ( ure Vou. 

300 i'OI.l MUl.V BL.DG. 

It l.s an every day occurr<»nce with 

Dr. Mitchell to heal people who have 

bef-r disappointed by failure of other 

methods. The attached letters come 

s thousands of others during tlie 

ears, entirely unsolicited. 

.\n .-j. E E. YounETMuist of 1517 Seventh 
street. Superior. Wis., went to Dr. Mit- 
chell after she had given up all hope 
of Kettini? well and was cured of 
BriKht's I disease. Her daughter, Gert- 
rude, who had undergone three opera- 
tions, also went to see Dr. Mitchell, 
just able to walk, and is now cured. 

Mr. Oscar Waden. 2S20 West Huron 
strt-el. Duiuth. cured of a tumor by Dr. 
Mitchell. 

Mr .John Barker of Alabaster. Mich., 
tr< ;ite<! for stomach, heart and kidney 
trouble, and recommends Dr. Mitchell's 
treatment. 

Mr. O. D. Bennett. 2513 Twenty-sec- 
ond street. Superior. Wis., savs: 'I 
re<-omniend Dr. Mitchell's Magp.>tlc 
treatment to anyone suffering from 
stomach and bowel trouble. My wife 
went to him as a last resort and I 
consider he saved her life." 



Winnipeg, Mar.. July 15.— The Amer- 
ican team yesterday won the Interna- 
tional team shoot at the trap tour- 
ney 223 to 212. ind will take home as 
trophies two silt flags, the Stars and 
.Stripes and the ITnlon Jack. 

DECLARESMDER 
WAS COLDBLOODED 

Polk County Attorney Scores 

Simpson in Outlining 

State Case. 

Crookston, Miin., July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald. )— Just before noon to- 
day the jury In the Sivert Simpson 
murder case Wius completed the last 
three men accepted being J. Tofslev 
of Hammond. George Rose of Euclid, 
and Henry Steeg of Crookston. who 
were secured from the third special 
venire summoned. 

County Attori ey Hagen began out- 
lining the case for the state, contend- 
ing that the iiurder of Theodore 
Nelson by Simpson. In the latter" ? 
home, was on«t of the most coM 
blooded In the history of the North- 
west and that S mpson had full knowl- 
edge that Nelso \ had gone upstairs to 
get Mrs. Simpson to prepare a lunch 
prior to the sh >oting. 

— « 

10c will buy a permit to smoke a 
jpalma Leo, clear Havana oUrar. 



Detroit, Mich.. July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— Up Friday: Clement, 
11:.'?5 a. m-: Peck. 11:50; Buffington. 
12:50 p. m.; Flagg. A. W. Thompson. 
1:10; S.?lwyn Eddy, 2; Kotcher. 2:10; 
Maytham. Schlesainger. 2:20; J. J. Bar- 
ium. Woodruff. Alpena. 2:50: Smith 
Thompson. 4; Butler. 4:45; Conestoga. 
steamer Troy. 4:30; Suit. Chill. 5; Poly- 
nesia, 5:50: Poe. 6:30; Tuscarora. 7:30; 
Phlpps, 7:45: Moll, 10:40; Brazil. 11:30. 
Down Friday: Italia. Dinkey. Colgate. 



Washington, July 15— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Carrie Rosen was today 
appointed postmaster at Molde, St. 
Louis county Minn., vice W. Treudt, 
removed. 

CHARMS OF MUSIC UNDER FIRE. 

London Globe: "Leigh, Costln and 
.-nyself, • said Maj. P. H. Fawcett, R. E., 
In describing some exciting Incidents 
of the exploration of the course of the 
River Heath in Bolivia, carried out 
last vear by a party of which he was 
the head, "were some distance ahead 
of the leading canoe, the other haying 
fallen behind owmg to the difficulties 
of threading the labyrinth of snags. 

'On rounding a turn on the river we 
saw about a mile ahead a collection of 
newly made palm huts on the point of 
a large sandbank, and at the .same mo- 
ment heard an uproar of barking dogs, 
shouting men and screaming women 
and children, emphatic testimony to 
their appreciation of their civilized 
neighbors. We immediately endeav- 



ored to reach the huts before they had 
disappeared. 

'*Oppo.slte the sandbank was a red 
earth cliff, cut out by the river, and 
some twenty feet to thirty feet in 
height, extending the whole length of 
the sandbank. Against this cliff and 
on the .sand were tied up fifteen large 
canoes and various rafts, known as 
balsas. W'ith South American savages 
it Is foolish to show any hesitation, so 
passing directly under the high bank 
we landed opposite the huts. 

'There was no sign of a savage — 
only barking dogs. As the second 
canoe came up. however, an arrow 
struck It, passing completely through 
about an Inch and a quarter of wood, 
succeeded immediately by more arrows 
and bv fire from shotguns, which lat- 
ter had probably been stolen at dif- 
ferent times from the rubber pickers 
on the Madre de Dlos and Tambopata. 
How some one was not hit it is dif- 
ficult to understand. 

"Seeing that reprisals were out of 
the question. Maj. Fawcett. trusting in 
the proverbial Influence of music, told 
one of the party to strike up a tune on 
the accordion, which, though consid- 



ered under some circumstances a some- 
what deadly instrument must have 
been a new experience to savages. The 
rain of arrows, however, did not abate. j_ 
In time the savages showed them- 
.selves ready to parley and the party .. 
landed and were assisted up the cliff. 
After an interview with the chief last- 
ing about half an hour, according to 
Major Fawcett, the party returned to 
the bank, with the chiefs son wear- 
ing my hat and all of us the best of 
friends. We were not molested by 
Guarayos again throughout the river, 
although there was evidence of an 
extensive population." 



Read The 
HeraldWants 



D. H., 7-15-'lL 



Official 

D. B. C. 

Caps. 

These blue Yacht Caps 
are the official mark by 
which the visitor to the 
Midsummer Water Carni- 
val will know a member of 
thie Duiuth Boat Club. 

Wear one. 

For sale at 




At Third Ave. West. 

Store open late tonight. 



Strange Disease in His Heel 

Prevents Him Earning 

Living. 



When William Luvineo learned that 
efforts would be made to have him 
sent back to Rus.sla, his native land, 
he made his escape yesterday afternoon 
from the poor farm, where he was 
receiving free care. 

Luvineo appealed to the county for 
assistance some time ago on account 
of his poor physical condition. When 
he appeared before the commissioner 
he was hardly able to walk and was 
In a serious crippled condition. He 
was taken to the poor farm and 
placed under the care of the phy- 
sician there, who diagnosed his case 
as an enlargement of the caicis. or 
heel bone. 

Attention of the immigration de- 
partment was called to his case yes- 
terday, and the officers of this de- 
partment were preparing to have a 
warrant for his arrest made in order 
to comply with the laws of that de- 
partment. However, before this was 
done, word came from the poor farm 
that he had made good his escape. 

Now the poor farm authorities are 
looking fonr him. and if he is located, 
his case will be taken up by the im- 
migration officials with the view of 
sending him back to Russia, for he 
Is now in such, condition that he can- 
not work and would be a public 

charge. ' 

_ « 

3riMtol Mill CkMC. 

Bristol, R. I.. July 15. — The mills of 
the Natlo^l India Rubber company, 
employing about 2.000 operatives, 
closed today for an Indefinite period. 
Unsatisfactory eonditons in the rub- 
ber business are given as the cause 
for the ehutdowzi. 




John Hogan & Co.. painters and decorators, at 22 East First street, have been leaders in their line in Duiuth 
for the last sixteen years. The above photograph gives an interior view of their up-to-date store and showroom. 
The firm has always made it a point to employ the most expert workmen available, which explams, to a large 
degree, their great success. Their business has grovm steadily and old customers nave always returned to them 
for their painting, decorating and interior finisihing, which, in itself, is m high testimonial to its quahty. 




I 









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1 









L|ii I 1 11" ill 





^fm. 



I 
















'■f 


„„j 








1 




1 






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— 1 









Bliss 
Native Herbs 

Tli. Great Sprln* Blood PuHfler, 
Kidney and Liver Re«ul«tor. 

200 DAYS' TREATMENT $1.00 

For Sale only by 

FRED GABRIELSEN 

16 West Superior Street. 



COWEN & ZIMMERMAN 

531 E««t Superior Street. 

FURNISHERS & 
DECO RATORS 

Ftne Fabriea and Wall Paperit. 

FINE LINE Ol- WILLOW CKAFT 

FL'RNITIRE. 

Estimates clieerfully given. 

BOTH PHONES: 
New, Grand, 2(M. Old, Mel., 3488. 



Cakes and Bread 

That absolutely possess that 
home-made quality is what we 
claim to bake. When we Jntro- 
tluced our home-made bakery we 
were very careful that It also 
proved to be what we claimed for 
It. You cannot go wrong on your 
bakery goods if you buy from the 



Zenith Home Bakery, 

42T Eaut Fourth Street. 
Zenith Phone, Grand, 18TI)-D. 



All Disease 
Is Caused 
By Pinched 
Nenes 

Get cured 
iwlthont 
druita by 
Dr. D. W. 
HleMlaad, 

The 
Chlroprac. 
tor, at TOT- 
70.s-T09-riO- 
rn-712 Pal- 
ladlo Bld«. 




M. W. TURNER 



218-220 Cast 
First St. 



City 



Gun A 



Store 



for all kinds of Fishing Tackle. 
Hunting and Camping GooviB. 
and outdoor sports, you should 
see our line. 

Home of the 
Brilliant Search Light 

We Repair Everything, 

402 West Superior Street. 
Oppoalte Palladi« building. 

R. C. KRUSCHKE 



WestDuluth 

Cement Block Works 

Manufac'.urea Cement Blocks, Tile, Brick. 
Fence Posts; tdao «xciua;ve right In sm. 
lx>ul« county to manufacture the National 
Steel Reinforced WateiT/ro( f Cement Bunal 
Vaults. Price* upon application. 

H. C. BROW N, Prop. 
Residence: t'aluinet. 167-M. 
Office: Zenith 'phone, 3ia3-A. 
Office: Calumet. 246- L. 
N. W. Corner Fitty-iixtli and Grand Avenues 
West. 
N. P. Trmck. Sixty-second and Qrand 
Avenue* West. 



To Light the World 

with roe UUmcnd Is. of «>"^- /"L'J^ 
poealWllty. but U our stock of d«»mon« 
Were aU In one Urge settlr^ It would ai- 
Uatt ccasUlerable attention. 

OUR ASSORTMENT OF HANDSOME 
IBWKLRY U well w<irth seeing, and an lu- 
yccUon wUl sumrUa. please and (1i Jou 
buy), prcflt you. 

GARON BROS.. 

Wholesale and Retail Jewelers. 

JI3. 215 West First Street. Out of th* 

HiB^ Bent DiitrHt. 



Dululh Gas Engine Works 

PARK POINT. 



Builders of the safe tio-ilj Uat. st.itlug 
ten pereon*. equlpi>e<l wUh 4-cyclo. apart en- 
gine. CVme for a trial trip. 

Makers of all sizes of speed propellers. 
brass, aluminum casUnn; macblne work of 
kil kinds guaraiiteed. 



/ 


- 




. 








t 







Otte J. WcadUndt 



WendlandtBros.&Co, 



Blank Book 
Manufacturers 



LOOSE LEAF DEVICES AND 
MAGAZINE BINDING. 

114 and lis West Firat Street, 
DILL'TH, MINN. 

Xcnlth Pboae, 028. 




If you anticipate paint- 
ing don't stop and 
thiiik paints are too ex- 
pensive; the difference 
now and when paints 
vrere at the lowest price 
will not exceed |3 to |4 
on an average house with the 
present high prices of materials. 
Bl'V S. W. P. PAINTS. 

Northwestern Paint Co. 

323 Weat FIrat Street. 
Both Phones, HOii. 

Ask for Color Card and show it 
to your wife. 



FITGER 
BEER 

The Kind That 8ati*fi6$. 



Fitger Brewing Co., 

DULUTH, MINN. 



City 
Wood Yard 

115 Second Ave. W. 
J. D. OXONNELL, Proprietor 

Wood, Posts and 
Piling. 

BOTH 'PHONES 



FOR HOME, CLVB OR CAFE 

AND HOTEL. 

Pore and W^holeaome. 



ORDER BY PHONE. 

PEOPLE'S BREWING 
COMPANY 

FORTY-SECOND AVENUE. W. 
Both Phonea. 




= For= 



Prescriptions 

to be filled accurately 
and with dispatch, go to 

LeRlCHEUX'S 

DRUG STORES 

40S EUiat Foiirth Street, or 432 
Weat Flrat Street. 

BOTH PHONES. 



Now Is the Time 



to have your painting done be^- 
fore the weather gets too hot. 
Also to finish up your interior 
decorating, and w<e are ready to 
estimate your work or sell you 
the materials. 

Jno.Hogan& Company 

PAINTERS ind DECORATORS 

22 EAST FIUST STREET. 
Both Phonea. 




Our New Catalogue 
Is Ready for You 

WRITE OR 'PHONE FOR ONE. 
If you are thinking of preparing for a 
Stenographic or Bmkheerlng poHitic.n H »« «o 
your interist tc attend the. sihool which wlU 
(rtre you the best training for such a place. 
Give ug an opiortunity tu kIicw you where.n 
our school excels In this work. 

CENTRAL BUSINESS COLLEGE. 
30 East Superior Street. Duluth. Minn. 



P^r^^s 



occasions. 



40,000 FEET OP GLASS, 



ROOFING 

GENERAL JOBBING IN SHEET 
METAL. 

Metnl WIndowa, 



Tinning, 
Cornice, 
Sk-yllgbtN, 
Steel C^elllnga, 



Fire Doora, 
Ventilating. 
Smoke Stacks, 



931 Ea5t Third Street 

BOTH PHONES. 




Heat RegtilMtora, 

Warm .\lr Furnaeea, 

Gutters and Spouting. 

HOLLIH&N & MILOSTAN 

401-10.3 Eaat Flrnt Street. 

TELEPHONES: 

Grand, 701. Melroae. 2261. 



A SURPRISE 

Let UK surprise yon by making 
yon a Suit of < lothes to your 
mennure that ttIII be Stylish, 
Durable and First Class every 
WBV, at a price you can afford. 
Come In and be convinced. 

MATHESON & 
ARNIO, 

TAILORING EMPORIl M, 
28 Lake Ave. No., Duluth. 



SAM KJISSMIR'S 



New steam 
Baker and 
Carlsbad Ml i- 
eral Treat - 
ments, a poi-l- 
tive cure f >r 
all rheumatic 
ailments — are 
the Talk of 
the Town. 
Bithsare under 
Hotel McKi y. 
F'ifth av e n II e 
west and Fiist 
stretrf. 

OPEN DAY 
Zenith Phone, 




AND M<;Hr 
Grand. lS<t9- 



A. 



CONSOLIDATED 
Stamp & Printing Co. 

14 Fourth Avenue West. 
Dl LITII, MINN. 

MB raiiTii© 



Cnrd Engraving, 

Steel Die EmboH<ilng, 

Rubber StnmpH, 

Stencils and SeaU lu lurge 

varieties. 

Drop in and let us figure on 
yotir wants. 



Sick Men! 

Weak. futlgMed. nerrouaf 
We have mnde thousands of 
men well during our 20 
years practice In Dululli. 
We accept no Incurable 
cases. We guarantee all 
patients who are BUfferinc 
from Rheumatism, Stomath 
Trouble and all diseases of 
men. Consultation free 

Hours 9 a. m. to 8 p. ui 
Sundays 10 to 1 p. m. 

Progressive Medical Association, 

I West Superior Street, Upstair*. 




Got Your Garden Ready? 

We sell all kinds of fences and 
tools for it. 

L. K. DAUGHERTY 

— Denier In — 

Hardware and Farm 
...Implements... 

PAINTS AND FARMING 
I.MPLK.MKNTS. 

501 Enst Fourth Street. 
Old Phone 703. New Phone 1093-A 



SPIRELLA 
CORSETS 

made to order according to meas- 
ure. The only perfect and un- 
breakable Corset made. Guaran. 
teed for One Year. 

Made to Measure Pettlcoata. 



A $12.00 Rocker for 

$6.95 

Write for illugtration and description 
oi tliia rocker. 



MRS.E.A.NASH 

B31 East Superior Street, upstalra 
Zenith, 1780-D. 




8 E. Superior St. 

DULUTH. 




The Way to a 
Woman's Heart 

is paved v ith chocolates and 
bon-bons, aid the wise men who 
travel that road order theirs 
from dealer;! who sell and nan- 
die 

WINKLER BRO.S.' 

DELICIOUS CHOCOLATES. 

Winkler Bros., Mfgrs. 

Fnetoryt 2i30 W. Michigan St. 
DII.ITH, MINN. 



Q. MOISAN, 

French 
Hairdresser 



TWO BIG STORES, 
212 West First Stret and 
10 East Superior Street. 



Everything In human Sanitary 
Hair Goods; hlgh-est qualities al- 
ways. Prices always the lowest. 



Melrose, 2522. 



Grnnd, 024. 



ELECTRICAL 
WORK 

IN ALL ITS BRANCHES. 

REP AIR W ORK. 

THE WRIGHT ELECTRICAL CO. 

Practical Electrlclaus and 

Contractors. 
402 East Superior Street. 




A. LNorberiar's Optical Parlor 



Anomalies of refraction, care- 
fully corrected. Broken lenses re- 
placed or ground to order. Re- 
pairing and straightenirg of 
glasses while you wait. Arti- 
ficial eyes carried and Inserted. 
Consultation free. 

Parlor t Room 110 Oak Hall 
Building. 



Fred B. Loaasbcrry. 



Frank Makawskl. 



F. H. LOUNSBERRY & GO. 

General Printing 
Blank Books 
Loose Leaf 
Devices 

Mall Orders Promptly Filled. 



PROVIDENCE BUILDING, 
Fourth Ave. Weat and Superior St. 



Trunks 

Bags 
Cases 
















1 









THE NORTHERN TRUNK CO. 

arc hoiDe nianuiacturers. 

BUY FROM THE MAKER. 

328 WEST FIRST STREET 



John Wahl 
Candy Co. 

Duluth, Minn. 

Manufacturers and Jobbers of 

High-Orade Candies 

Dlatribater* of Rex and Sparrow 
Chocolates. 



EDWARD M. STONE, 

Wholesale and Retail 

BOOKSELLER and 
STATIONER 

Blank Books, Office and Type- 
writer Supplies. Drawing Mate- 
rials and Engineers' bupplles. 
Anytlilng In the book line wo can 
jet for you. Write for our cata- 
ogs. 

SSI West Superior Street. 
DULUTH, MIWN. 



fc 



C. F. Anderson. 



Arthur Falk. 



Duluth Pattern & 
Model Works 

1031 WFST SUPKRIOR STREET. 

DULUTH,^ MINN. 

Both Phonea. 

Machinery Patterns 
and Models 

Patterns for Steel. Iron. Brass 
and Illumlnum Castings. 



AGENTS 
WANTED! 

Men and women to sell our 
goods direct to consumer in 
every town of Northern Minne- 
sota. Call or write 

GRAND UNION TEA CO. 

214 West First St. 



30 East Superior Street. 




Photographer 



Both Phones. 



Victor Buofs 




MADE TODAY. 
EXPRESSED EVERYWHERE. 

"None Nicer" 

223 West Superior Street. 
BOTH PHONES. 



Phone Rings. 

"Qood heavens, John! The of- 
fice iB on fire!" 

"Never mind, Jane! All my 
books and papers are in my Her- 
Hng-Hall-Marvln Bafe. which is 
guaranteed tire proof, and tne 
Office furniture la Insured." 

Can you feel as secure? 

Buy your Safe and Office rur- 
nlture at 

Christie Lithograph 
<S Printing Co. 



HouseCleaning 
Time 

We are prepared to clean your 
house with our Invincible reno- 
vator. We send a competent 
man to do the work. Our prices 
are reasonable. 

Interstate Carpet Cleaoiog Co. 

SINNOTTB * VAN NORMAN, 

Proprietors. 

1028 Weat -Michigan Street. 

Both Phonea 



BREADMAKING 



Is our bus= 
the 8Ubj« 
thoughtful 

fained niu 
rom act 
bread we 
wholesomt 
Better 1 
than our 



Iness. W-e have given 
ct a great deal of 

study. We have also 
ch valuable knowledge 
ual experience. The 

bake Is as good and 

as can b>e made, 
iread cannot be made 

Diamond home-made 



loaves. 



Made Fresh Dally. 



E. I5J0RLIN 

2205 West First Street. 
BOTH PHONES. 



West End 

Furniture House 



2012 W'est Superior Street. 
JOE POPKIN, Prop. 

Zenith Phone — Lincoln, 447-A. 

The best place In tiie West end 
to buy Furniture, Carpets. Rugs, 

Stoves, etc. 

Either Cash or Credit 

We Boy Second-hand Farnltnrc. 





BAKER ELECTRIC 




U 



rioneer Shr.ft Drive. The OlJctt and Best 

Dolath Automobile Co. 

316 West Fint Strttt. 






Duluth Fur Co. 

Importera— Manufact urers . 

FUR 
STORAGE 

Place your furs 
In our care 

during the summer months. We 
Insure them against Moth, Fire 
and Theft. 
Furt to Order— Hcpaire* and Rein»d«le± 
325 West First Street. 
Melrose. 4836. Zenith, 624. 



»> 



"Will Go on 
Your Bond 

CONTRACTORS' BONDS, 
FIDELITY BONDS, 
W^^C OKI'K lAL BONOS, 
fl^^ DEPOSITOIIV BONDS, 
COURT BONDS. 

American Bonding Com- 
pany of Baltimore 

GEO. R. LAYBOtiRN, Agent. 
14 Phoenix Block. 



We Fool the Sun 



Now is the time to order your 
Awnings, Porch Curtains and 
OutdodT Sleeping Tents. 

BVERYTHINQ IN CANVAS. 

Poirier Tent and 
AwningCompany 

Established, 18881 

Incorporatea, 1911. 

106 East Superior Street. 

Both Phones. 



We are now ready for business 
In our new store, the finest west 
or Chicago. We sell Genuine 
Needles, Oil and Parts for all 
Sewing Machines. We have re- 
liable machines from $8, up. to 
the White Rotary, the finest me- 
cnanlcally construsted machine 
niade. which you can buy for Too 
Per Week. 

WHITE SEWING 
MACHINE COMPANY 

W. L. SMITH, Manager. 
O Cast Superior Street 




You are 
probably under 
the wea t h e r 
with this klud 
of weather. 

Let 

Herbaqueen 
Remedies 

they will cure. 

E. ANGERMEIER 

CHEMIST AND ASSAYER. 
31 East Superior Street. 



Zenith 
Dye House 

Largest exclusive 

CloUics Cleaoers 
and Dyers at the 
head of the Lakes. 

230-232 East Superior St. 



^ 





LAUNDRY 



Fancy Launderers 
French Dry Cleaners 

A Pttor e Brtno* • Wttao*^ 




'eimbach*s 






"Wears to a 
Wafer" 

Is Instantly detachable so It caij 
be worn on either shoe and Is 
absolutely sanitary, as there are 
no nail holes to carry dirt. Sold 
by all dealers. 



The 



GOPHER 



SHOE 
WORKS 



Famous over the Northwest for 

SHOE'S^ 

REPAIRING 

WHILE YOU WAIT. 

We also tell Hlgh-Orade Shoes 
for Less than you pay elsewhere. 

SHOPS AND STORES, 
Dvlnth aad Snpcrlor. 



We Handle a Complete 
Line of 

CUTLERY 

and guarantee satisfaction 
with each purchase. 
RAZORS HONED, 
GROl'ND 
AND REPAIRED. 

Aerial Cutlery 
Supply 

810 Weat Flrat Street. 



Duluth Bedding 
Company 

Manufacturers of the Beat 
Make of 

Mattresses 

IB the Iforthweat. 

Insist on Duluth Bedding Co.'i 
Goods, when buying Bedding. 

808 Lake Avenue South, 
DULUTH, MINN. 




J 



AGENTS FOR 

THOMAS, CHALMERS, HUDSOH 

Bee our second-hand Bargains 
and get some of the snaps we are 
offerTng In Supplies. 
MUTUAL AUTO CO., 

CENTRAL OARAOB. 
DISTRIBUTERS, DULUTH. 






■^B^ 












; 


1 










t 






) 1 

















< 


1 






' 


1 




' 
















1 




' 





- 






... - - ^ 


^S£^ r^ 


1 
s 


1 
1 


1 








■ — -^ -■^.— ^^ ^ 



^^^^^ 



i 



"*=* w 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTK HERALD 



July 15. 1911. 



i 



CAN STILL LEARN 

FROM HIS FATHER 



(• N /u'gler CZiK') ot the Kelley 
Hardware company, claims to have 
•ome kind ot a it p" tat ion as a nshei-- 
man. but h»' has to "take his hat oft 
to hla father. ^. .. ,, , »„ 

T! ' \ evenlnK " 7.ig' called to 

I,i«i •Lt'tJi K" ftfhingr tomorrow 

ani -iiow you how to get -some 

ti..ii Th.' father was wUlinK and 

-with Al Kil/-nack of the Lenox hotel 
and Mr Kinkel of the \\ Inchester 
Arms . )nu>anv they went down below 
Carlton in an automobile. Whether 
**Z1k* knows how to K*^t flsh or not. 
It inust l>e cone«^ded that he knows 
more than one stream and lake wliich 



abound in the spec! 

riving at the flshin 

l)ody Immediately i 

bu.sy." and "Zlg" > 

man to get his line 

when he came bac" 

he had a surprise 

He had but four troi 

anything to "brag" 

had fourteen and n 

them were more tha 

length Since ye.-<terd 

keeping very quiet. 

Ziegler. Is spending 

him and his daughti 

In location." # 
11 goods in a ^ 
Herald "Want 



Jed beauties. Ar- 
5 grounds every- 
roceeded to "get 
/as not the last 
n the stream. But 
c in the evening 
waiting for him. 
t. and they wern't 
ibout. His father 
ore than half of 
a fifteen inches in 
av "Zig" has been 

His father. K. B. 

the summer with 
•r. 



Quit "trusting 
Publicity will St 
barn If you use 
Ads." 



»»»»»»»*»»»«*»*»***»**■**•** 




MANAHAN IS 
HEAD-LINER 

Dollar Dinner Will Be Given 
By Newly Organized Pro- 
gressive League. 

W. L Nolan and Congressman 

Lenroot Are Also on 

the Program. 



The recently organized Progressive 
Republican league of Duluth will hold 
a dollar dinner at the Spalding next 
Tuesday evening at 6:30. Invitations 
are being sent to as many Interested 
In the progressive Republican cause as 
lan be reached and a big gathering 
is expected. 

A good list of speakers ha.s been ob- 
tained for the occasion. James Mana- 
han of St. Paul, who prosecuted the 
suit on behalf of George S. Loftus. 
against the Pullman Car company, will 
be one of the speakers. W. I. Nolan 
of Minneapolis, a representative In the 
legislature and some Humorist, Is also 
down on the program, and Congress- 





THIS 




■^A^^,.. 



<r 



EVERY WOMAN SHOULD 




SUNDAY AFTERNOON 

(WEATHER PERMITTING) 

3 to 5 O'CLOCK, AT BEAUTIFUL 

LINCOLN PARK 



BY THE BEST BAND IN MINNESOTA 

THE THIRD REGIMENT BAND 



Triumphant home-coming of Band Master Flaa- 
ten and hi.s thirty trained musicians and soloists 
afler their great victories at Camp Lakeview and 
Minneapolis, where they were given the prize aa the 
best band in Minnesota. 

Be with the crowds and enjoy the 
musi eal treat while resting In one of 
the most beautiful park-, in Aineriea. 




Buy An Electric Flat Iron at 
This Sale and Save One Dollar! 

We want to give every one of our xustom- 
ers who do not already know and use the cool, 
clean, quick G. E. Flat Iron an opportunity to 
obtain one at a very considerable reduction 
from the staple price. 

To this end we have been endeavoring for some time 
past to secure a shipment of sufficient quantity to enable 
us to advertise a really enticing bargain, and yet be sure 
to be in a position to fill all orders. 

At length, we have received ONE HUNDRED of the 

General Electric Six-Pound Iron 

' — an iron of sterHng- merii and proven quality. 

The fixed price of this famous flat iron is $3.50, but we have 
decided to quote this special shipment at a reduction of exactly 
One Dollar. 

— — ^^— 1^— — 1^1^— — y While they last; come 

and obtain one at this 
very special CASH price. 






*" 



ONE HUrMDRED ONLY! 




ONE HUNDRED ONLY! 




DULUTH EDISON ELECTRIC COMPANY, 

216 West First Street. Botli Pliones. 




::--im^)^'MM:^':^^mm-^- Wv' 



r- 



JAMES MAN AHAN. 



HOW TO GO TO UMCOIB PABK ! 

Take West Duluth cars to Twenty-fifth a\enue 
\ve3t and walk up three blocks, or take West 
Third street cars direct to the park. 

Splendid chance to enjoy the concert if you 
drive out or go by auto. 



HAVE A SAVINGS 
ACCOUNT. 



WE PA\ 



3% 



CO>IFOlND 

I.NTKRKST 

OX 

ACCOrXTS. 



More and more women ar 
wisiiom of having some moii 
as a safeguard against ur. 
fortune. 

It does not show any lo 
her husband for a woman 
putting some money in th 
own name. It is simply a v 
that common sense dictates 

We have a great many ' 
tor.s and the number is ln< 
day. 



^ realizing the 
ey in the bank 
expected mis- 

ss of faith in 
to ln.sirft upon 
» hank in her 
ise precaution 

vonian deposl- 
•reasing every 






Alt EKICAII EXCKADCE HATIIIMl lAIII 

Saving!* Uenartment Open Every Saturday Mt;l>t. C to 8. ^^^ 



man I L. Lenroot of Superior is also 
expected. An effort is being made to 
obtain Senator James P. Boyle of 
Eveleth. but his acceptance has not 
vet been received. 

' Frank T. McNally will art as toa.st- 
master at the banquet and he. with 
I K. Lewis and C. R Maguey, is mak- 
ing the arrangement. The Progressive i 
Republican league Is a strong body and 
many who have not yet officially en- 
tered the fold are expected to be pres- 
ent. It is also expected that a num- 
ber of members of the State Bar as- 
sociation, who will be here for the an- 
nual meeting, will attend the banquet. 

-• 

10c will buy a permit to smoke a 
Palma Leo. clear Havana cigar. 

FIRST OF HERALD 
FREE CONCERTS 

Third Regiment Band Will Be 

Heard at Lincoln 

Park. 

A splendid program has been pre- 
I)ared for the Herald band concert 
which will be given tomorrow, weather 
permitting, at Lincoln park by the 
Thrd Regiment band. 

This is the first appearance by the 
band .since its triumphant return from 
Camp Lakeview and Minneapolis, where 
it won the first prize as the best band 
in Minnesota. Bandmaster Jens 

Flaaten has arranged a delightful pro- 
gram which will appeal stronsiy to 
everybody and the afternoon ought to 
be most enjoyable. Extra car service 
had been promised by Manager Warren 
of the Duluth Street Railway company 
so that the crowds will have no trouble 
getting to and from the park. 

The location for the conc»-rt is one 
of the best in the city. The whole 
family can go and enjoy it. The child- 
ren will welcome a romp In this pretty 
park and H is a most comfortable and 
cool place to rest while listening to the 
inspiring strains of the music. 

The hours set for the program are 
from 3 to 5 o'clock and the music will 
be of the best. . , , ^ , • „ 

This park can be reached by taking 
thf West Duluth cars to Twenty-fifth 
avenue west and walking up three 
blocks or by taking the West Third 
street cars direct to tlu' park. 



SAFE DEPOSIT 
BOXWOTED 

Mrs. Margaret Klock Armour 

Robbed of $142,000 

By Employe. 

Money Spent on Flashy Gew- 
gaws and Cheap Art 
Works. 



STANDING UP 
FORWILEY 

Druggists of Minnesota Do 
Not Want to See Him ^ 
Removed. 



Send Letter of Protest to 

President Asking for 

His Retention. 



NO DULL TIMES SHOWN IN 
POSTOFHCE ANNUAL REPORT 



Kansas City. Mo.. July 15.— Mrs. 
Margaret Klock Armour, widow of 
Simeon B. Armour, the packer, filed 
suit in the circuit court here for $142,- 
000 against Miss Harriett Bymgton. to 
cover peculations alleged to have been 
made by Miss Byington while serving 
as companion and housekeeper to Mra 

Armour. . . , i;„ ..», 

The first Intimation the public re- 
ceived concerning peculations against 
Mrs Armour came about three months 
ago.' when the Star published a story 
saying that ».=iO,000 In bonds and se- 
curities had disappeared from Mrs^ 
Armours safety deposit box at the 
New England National bank of this 

^^ ^' Had Safety Depoult Key. 

The fact that the majority of the 
business of Mr.s. Armours householJ 
was conducted by Mrs. Armours com- 
panion. nurse and housekeeper, and the 
fact that this companion held the keys 
to Mrs. Armours safety deposit box. 
was mentioned, but the name of the 
comDanum was kept secret. 

Mrs. Armour refused to believe any 
charges of dishonesty against Miss 
Bv-ington. Meanwhile new discoveries 
Incretsed the amount of missing se- 
curities until the Armour attorneys 
stated it at 11.50.000. 

Under pressure brought to bear by 
friends of Mrs. Armour, and despite the 
expressed confidence of her employer. 
Miss Byington, several days after the 



discovery of the peculations 

that during the three years she 

been in Mr.s. Armour 



confessed 1 
had 
employ she had 



\ 



/ 



3« 



k TIMELY 

SUGGESTION WORTH 

CONSIDERING 



OUR CERTIFICATES OF 

DEPOSIT DRAW INTEREST 

FROM DATE OF ISSUE 

If vou have son e money you 
would' like to put ou at intere.st at 
once — bring it In ami take a certifi- 
cate of deposit for the amount. 
They bear 3 per cent Interest. 

Northerh National BARK 

ALWORTH Bl ILDI>G, 
DtXUTlI. 



\ 



ADDITIONAL 
SOCIETY NEWS 



Miss Lillian Berbig was hostess list 
Sunday at a picnic and marshmallow 
party at Lester park. Those present 
were: 




Misses — 

Kdlth Janzig. 

Lillian Berbig, 

Kathleen 
Kllgore, 

Lillian 

Hawklnson. 
Messrs — 

Tony Winson. 

Gus Hawklnson, 

Percv Hoad. 

Itegihald ^oad. 



Rae McLeod. 
F^lba Tierney, 
Hedenberg, 
Edith Hawklnson. 
Sepola. 



Tver Erlcson, 
Block, 
Shandoss Hoad. 



' ••' ' 



THE 

FIRST NATIONAL 

BANK 

OF DULUTH, 

Capital $600,000 

Surplus anil PriTlls. . SU26.000 



-WZ ISSUE- 



$19, $20, $50, $100 
Travelers' Checks. 



Safe, convenieot, sell -Identifying. 
Payable everywhere for full fact value. 




* "IT'S COOL IN DL'LLTH," * 
$ "IT'S HOT i.X NEW AOUK." * 

^ "It'M cool In Duluth." ^ 

^ TblM in <be slogan that ban been ^ 
^ a<lot>te<l by many l)ullilaii.<i, and ^ 
^ amtiue them I* Leon Solomon, a * 
«• loeal merchant. The MioKan U i^ 
^ .Htam;>ed on all hU mall, an<l Im ^ 
^ plnced In a oounplououM manner ift 
■i^ ou every euvel«»i»e. ^ 

^ That the motto Im attracting at- * 

* tention Ih evidenced b> the fact iH 
^ that ItunineMM men of other cItlcM If 

* are re|ilyln»e to It. Return mail * 
^ to Mr. Solomon from the Central • 
^ Hat company of New York today, « 
^ hore the word)*, typewritten over ^ 
^ the front of the eui elope: -k 

* "It'n hot iBi New York City." ^ 
» ^ 

« 

Ask the policeman about a Permit to 
smoke. 



from time to time extracted securities 
from the safety deposit box and sold 
Jhem to brokers on the pretense that 
«hA was doing -:t for Mrs. Armour, who 
"dishtd the money for private chari- 

ties " 

Cache in Dog KenneL 

Miss Bvlngton then directed investlga 
tors to a dog kennel at the Armotir 
htnie. where about $25 000 of the securi- 
tits were found buried in a corner, bhe 
promised to restore the remainder. 

It developed that thousands of dol- 
lars had been spent by Miss Byington 
for fine jewelery and for works of art, 
for which she had paid fabulous prices, 
lu.s^ine cases apparently with the use 
of llttU judgment. 

From storage houses in this city, 
under Miss Bylngton's directions. Mrs. 
Armour's representatives recovered 
$10 000 worth of Jewelry bought from 
one firm In the course of eighteen 
montiis $«.000 worth of Oriental rugs 
and $4 000 worth of mezzo tints pur- 
chasc-d from a local art dealer, whose 
shop she had frequented a great deal. 
Other eewgaws and tiashy art works 
were found in Miss Bylngton's apart- 
ments at the Armour home. 

Refuaed to Believe Charge. 

Miss Byington came to Kansas City 
from Rochester. N. Y.. and entered 
Mrs. Armour's employ about three years 

*^Mrs Armour is 76 years old. Gradu- 
ally she came to lean more and more 
unon her companion, untri eventually 
she gave her a large part in the con- 
trol of the financial management of 
her household. When told by her at- 
torneys of the disappearance of se- 
curities Mrs. Armour refused to lake 
any act'ion against Miss Byington. and 
for weeks afterward kept her in her 

employ. , . ^^ ■.. 

The amount named in the suit — 
$142 000 — Is stated to cover the entire 
amount of alleged peculations, includ- 
ing the bonds and the value of property 
returned. • 



The members of the Northwestern 
branch of the American Pharmaceutical 
association do not want Dr. Harvey W. 
Wiley, chief chemist of the department 
of agriculture of the United States, re- 
moved from office. 

At their meeting recently held in Du- 
luth in connection with the meeting of 
the Minnesota State Pharmaceutical 
association, resolutions were adopted 
against removing Dr. Wiley from office. 
The resolution.^ will be sent to Presi- 
dent Taft. Dr. Wiley and the varous 
drug journaLs. 

Dr. Wiley Is accused of hiring an ex- 
pert chemist at more salary than the 
law allows. The law alows $11 per day 
and it Is claimed that Dr. Wiley hired 
an expert with the understanding that 
the $1,600 yearly would be used at the 
rate of $20 a day for laboratory work 
and $50 per day for court work. 
The resolutions follow: 
"To his excellency, the president of 
the United States: 

'Whereas, It has come to our notice 
through the public press that there is 
a movement on foot to secure the re- 
moval of Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, chief 
chemist, bureau of chemistry, of the 
department of agriculture, and 

"Whereas. We the pharmacists of 
the Northwe.st believe that the 
charges brought are insufficient to 
warrant his removal, and 

"Whereas. In our opinion Dr. Wiley 
has adopted a most efficient means for 
the conservation of public health, and 
"Whereas, We have the utmost con- 
fidence in Dr. Wiley's Integrity" 

Therefore be it resolved that we 
t)elieve that his removal would be un- 
warranted. 

We therefore humbly request and 
pray that this resolution be given 
consideration. _ 

Signed. W. A. FPvO.ST. 

President, St. Paul. Minn. 
Northwestern Branch American Phar- 
maceutical Association, July 14, 1911. 
Attested. 

E. L. NFWCOMB, 
Secretary, Pro Tem. 



Postal reports for the present year 

ending June 30, just completed, .show 

that the increase in the money order 
department amounted to $.15,321.14 over 
that of the previous year, while the 
number of orders issued was exactly 
5,000 more. 

For the same time the Increase in 
the sale of stamps and stamped paper 
was $12,314.20. From July 1, 1910, to 
June 30, 1911, this department sold 
$:;40,566.85 worth of stamps, as com- 
pared with f32S.2.51 65 for tlie same 
time the year before. In June this 
year the stamp sale amounted to $27.- 
492.22, while the June 1910 sale was 
$25,883.92. 

There were 72,000 domestic orders 
made out by the money order depart- 
ment for $663,838.97, the fees upon 
which amounted to $4,176.84. Of the 
foreign order.s there were 14.000 is- 
sued for $398,508.29. fees upon whi- h 
were $3,702.19. These total in fees, 
$7,879.03. 



During the same time there were 

9,8<iO certificates <jl' deposits fron: otli>'r 

postoffices. which amounted to $3,1S7,- 

574.05. The total number of orders i)aid 

out were 83,786 for $860,848.84. The 

total of the local postoffice business 

[amounted to $5,118,649.89. 

I During the year previous, there were 

I 6S.433 domestic orders issued, the valu- 

! atlon of which was $661, 419. 2s. and fees 

i amounting to $4,567.84. In foreign or- 

i df rs 12.855 were issued amounting to 

i $279,136.17. fees for which were $2,642.83. 

In all the fees that year were $7,310.34 

or $668.69 less than last year. 

In certificates of deposits from other 
postoffices there were 9.783. amounting 
to $3,281,835.40 placed with the local 
! office that year. At the same time 73,- 
311 orders were paid, amounting to 
$753,726.95. The total of tlie years bus- 
iness on June 30, 1910, was $5,083 328.14. 
The year just closed, shows an in- 
I crease of 5,000 orders issued amounting 
Ito $35,321.75. 



I- 



Robert B Whiteside, E. P. Alexander 
and Andrew J. Tallas. It has been be- 
fore the court for many months, and 

now that the court has filed a decis- 
ion, it is understood that an appeal 
will be made to the United States su- 
preme court. 

The island In the St. Louis hay, 
known as Big Island, or Clough's» 
Island, is owned by Mr. Whiteside, ex- 
cept for a few acres which belonged 
to Alexander. 

Prior to 1902, the war department 
had a channel in the river some dis- 
tance north of Clough's Island. This 
channel formed the boundary line be- 
tween the states of Minnej^ota and 
Wisconsin, and placed the island iii 
Wisconsin. In 1902 the war depart- 
ment had completed operations started 
In 1899 for a new channel, which was 
made south of the old one. but between 
Clough's Island and the mainland. Mr. 
Whiteside claimed riparian rights to 
the old channel, and Mr. Norton <:laim- 
ed them to tlie new. Judge Morris 
sustains Norton's claim. 

It appears that as a result of the 
improvements made hy the war de- 
partment, that material was taken 
from the harbor basin, and deposited 
in the water between the main land, 
which was owned by the Norton es- 
tate, and the new channel. In the 
meantime the defendant Tallas con- 
structed a house upon this made land, 
and he claimed possession of it. The 



land thus made has never been sur- 
veyed, and .ludge Morris does not 
pass upon the ownership of it, and 
states that the plaintiff. Norton, will 
have to take it before the court on the 
basis of facts, and not as an equity 
case. 

The case being one of equity, the 
evidence was heard by Henry F. 
Greene, and the report suljinitted to 
the court on Sept. 3, 1910. IJsi Janu- 
ary it was taken up before Judge Mor- 
ris, and the hearing then lasted nine 
da ys. 

Notice of an appeal has already been 
made. 

J. L. Washburn appeared on behalf 
of Norton, while Alfred Jaques and L. 
C. Harri.-; represented Whiteside. J B. 
Richards appeared for Tallas and Wil- 
son G. Crosby was the attorney for 
Alexander. 



DEPUTY ASSESSOR QUITS; 
M. JACOBY TO SUC( EED HIM. 

W. J. Stephens, assistant city as- 
sessor, who recently resigned, left the 
office of the cltv assessor today. The 
resignation of Mr. Stephens is re- 
gretted by tho.se who worked with him. 
M. Jacoby will succeed Mr. Stephens. 
Mr. Stephens resigned some time ago, 
but remained during the busy spring 
season. 



* * 
^ BETTER RF.SULTS from Herald * 
^ Want Ada. Yon nave and make ff; 

* money when >'ou advertUe In TliLI 4e 
i HCUALU. m 

* * 



RIPARIAN 
RIGHTSFIXED 

Judge Morris Defines Rights 

of Property Owners 

on River. 

Norton Not Cut Off From 

Channel By Change in 

Course. 

A decree in an equity case of un- 
usual importance and interest was en- 
tered yesterday afternoon by Judge 
Page Morris of the United States cir- 
cuit court. It involves the ownership 
of lands on St. Louis river abutting 
government waters, including riparian 
1* i fifli t R. 

The case which called forth the de- 
cree Is that of George W. Norton, as 
executor and trustee of the estate of 
George W. Norton, deceased against 



SICK 




A WORD TO YOU. 




The Progressive 
Medical Association 
of Duluth is u n - 
doubtedly one of the 
most successful or- 
ganizations of able 



physicians ever office 



gone away strong and healthy are le- 
gion. Our testimonials and references 
are of a peculiarly strong nature. 
Rheumatism, piles, nervous debility, 
heart disease and all skin and blood 
diseases are invariably cured in this 



banded together for 
the cure of virulent 
diseases. Thou- 
.sand.s of cures cover- 
ing a period of many 
years has established 
our prestige abso- 
lutely in this city. 
There is no rseason 
why you should go 
bowed down under the 
weiglu of past indiscretion.s or suffer- 
ing the agonies of some fearful mal- 
ady. It is true that once having 
"crossed that bourne from which no 
traveler ever returns, science cannot 
call vou back, but while there is life 
there is hope, and the number of men 
who faltering at the very edge of the 
grave and filled with terrible thoughts 
of self destruction have come to us and 



through life 



Don't go to Minneapolis. Hot Springs 
or other far away places where you 
will be away from your business and 
burdened ijy unnecessary expense. We 
can perform a cure for you without 
in any way affecting your ordinary 
mode of life. Of all the cases that have 
come to us at least 50 per cent have 
come because some friend of whom we 
had cured referred them to us. This 
is the greatest endorsement that any 
medical association could offer and we 
can substantiate this claim. Men. if 
vou are ill, don't keep putting off 
seeing a physician. We would natural- 
Ij' prefer that you come to us. but 
in any event, do not make a mist.ake 
of deiaving a.s your ailment will i«e- 
come more dangerous every day and 
you owe it to yourself to be a strong, 
\ hearty man. Consultation free at 



i^K 



PROGRESSIVE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION, 

Corner Lake Avenue and Superior Street, From 9 a. m. to 8 p. m. 
Sundays— 10 a. m. to 1 p. m. 




— T 



— '-•^''^ 



> 



^ 



'4 




L-< 



X 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911 



mmmt 




VIOLANO 

VIRTUOSO 

A. Self-F»laylno Violin 






\ 



An instrument that has been declared one of the eight most wond- 
erful inventions of the decade bv the U. S. Government. 

An instrument that created such a furore in rnusicalcircl^^^^^^ 
don, that the late King Edward commanded that tt be exhibited be 
fore him. „^ , ^ 

A production that cost more than $150,000.00 to perfect. 



An Instrument that can play first and second vtohn, and piano ac- 
companiment more perfectly than human performers, with all the fire 
and genius of the living virtuoso. 

Mischa Elman, the world-famous violinist, after listening to the 
"Violano Virtuoso." remarked: "It is vibrant with life and intensity. I 
see a wonderful future for this instrument." 



This contest will be conducted along strictly fair lines; the class of business firtiis represented .s a 
^.arantee to vou of this, so that everyone will have an equal chance The organization having the highest 
min ber of votes, at the Auditorium Roller Rink on the night of December 18th, will get the >"^trumen 
which sells at $1 500.00. This is an opportunity to secure an instrument for your organization that will 
rake the place of a high-class orchestra, and will be a lasting source of entertainment. In entering this 
.nes it' would be a^vi.sable to begin at once and thereby take advantage of any votes that r"". "^-'i^; 
mav secure. The final count will Ik made by a committee appointed ^V the f.rms named in th^^^a^^^^^^^^^ 
tisement and bv representatives from the organizations in the con est. The $1 »00.M V olano Virtm.s^^^ 
is now being demonstrated at the Kreidler Piano Company's music store lO^ East Superior ™- ^ er 
Julv 23rd it can be seen at John J. Moe & Sons Company (the West End Big Depart mc.i Store) a fer 

August 1st at the M. M. Gasser Company. Grocers; after August 15th at the ^^y"""' P'': "\», J'^^^^ 
Seinember 1st at the Suffel Shoe Company, 103 West Superior St.: after September loth at the Iwm 

Po ts Clo hing Cot^pany, 405-407 Welt Superior St.; after October 1st »' the ^a^-Sampson Contpany 
219 We rSt perior St • after October 15th ai the Quayle-Larsen Company, 14-16 West Superior St.; after 
Novlb r rral B=:yha & Co., cor. Second Ave. West" and First St. ; after November 15th at the Henrick- 
sen Jewelry Company, 332 West Superior St.; after December 1st at Edward M. Stone, 221 West Su- 
perior Street. 



This beautiful instrument, known as the Violano Virtuoso, a ^flf-P'aying 
violin and piano in solid malu.gany, faultlessb' fn-hed. will be , awarded absohue ly 
free at the Auditorium Roller Rink, "where the nice people go -Third A%e. Last 
-indFrst Street, on the night of December 18th, 1911, by the well known business 
firms whose names appear below, to the society, lodge,xlub, church or organization 
: ig :. tained the largest number of votes. One vote will be .K-en '- w^h 
e-irl, -^ cents of vour cash purchase from anv of the firms mentioned below, be- 
gii mg lu ^^tll ,"nd contmumg to December 15th. 1911, inclusive ;-<! '- '- 
ganizafion having the largest number of these votes wil b^.;;^"<^,'-^;'^\fiS;^^ 
"Violano Virtuoso" absolutely iree, together wuh twenty-five musica ^elect on^ 
It .vill not cost the organization anything to enter this contest nor will >t cost he 
members anvthing to Secure votes. W,th every 50c worth «, --;'"-^;- / V" 
chased for cash from any of these firm^ you will receive "".^,J<;;^^ f:7. T';'^* "^ 
undoubtedly many of your members and friends trading with these f.rtttaread^ 
and thev. m> doubt, would be glad to turn in their votes for your organization it ^^^^ ^ 

thv-'v knew it had entered the contest. . t>ostal card addressed to F. L. Ouatsoe. 228 First Avenue 

u- . . ..^^*,t.uin,tni. Wouldn' tit be nice to eniov a rendition such as only Ku- ^rgst will britie a representative to vou, who will gladly gwe any 

It Will cost you nothing to try to get this mstru- ^«"'«^ ' violinist can render at your meetings? additiZal information free of charge, 

ment for your church, club, lodge or society. beltk or tne master vtu 



WHERE TO GET VOTING CERTIFICATES 

▼▼ ***^*^*^ ir^ir i-DVAM DABI oii« MEATS 



BOOKS, STATIONERY. NEWS 

AND CIGARS 

Edward M. Stone, 221 Wmt Supertor St. 

CLOTHING, FURNISHINGS, HATS 
AND SHOES 

The Twin P«»rt« <U»thlnK *o.. 
405-407 Wewt !»npJ«Tlor Street. 

OGARS AND TOBACCO 

Boll illaf*k^v«i<Ml> 

319 West •'iiiierU-r *tre«-t. and 27 \Ve«it 

Superior Street. 



COAL 

Taraeirte Fnel Co., l.yoenm nulldinK. 
DiiPARTMENT STORES 

Jnhn J. Moe * Son» <o.. 

The "vVeftt KnU Department Store* 

2102- •!-«-*♦ Went Superl««r Street. 

DRUGS 

l.r<*eum Pharmacy, L. B. Mnttix. P*op. 

DYE HOUSE 

/.enitb l»je II<iu«e, 

Fren "h I»rv ( leanerM and D>er», 

23U'232 liaMt Suoerlor Street. 



FURNITURE AND HOUSE 
FURNISHINGS 

BaTba A to., Whole-ale and Wf*""» ^ 
Comer Second Ave. Went and I- lr«t St. 

FURS 

Duluth Far to., Wm. C. 0»inan» 
325 V\e»»t First Street. 

GROCERS 

The M. .M. t;a»»»»er t'o., 
20U-11 \Ve»t Superior Street. 

HARDWARE, TOOLS, CUTLERY 

»luaMe-l.«r»en to., 
14-lU We»»t Superior Street. 



ICE CREAM PARLORS 

MarM-SnnipMon Co., 
210 Went Superior Street. 

JEWELRY 

IlenrickMen Jewelery To., 
332 Went Superior Street. 

LAUNDRY 

Acme Steam Laundry, J. T. Aminteadf 

I'rop. 

21T Went FlrKt Street. 

LUMBER 

The llelmbnch Lumber Co., 
City Lumber »urd. 20 Kant Itallroad St. 



MEATS 

B. J. TobiB, 121 Eant Superior Street' 

LeNter Park Market. 

Hnnter'M Park Market. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC iUPPLIES 

Zimmerman Uro.., 333 Went FIrat St. 

PIANOS 
Kreidler Plino Co., lOH E. Superior St. 

PRINTING 

J. J. LcTnuruenu I'rIntInK Co., 
221 Went Flrnt Street. 



SHOES 
The Suffd Co.. 1»S Weat Superior St. 
WIeland Shoe Store. 21S W. Superior St. 

ROLLER RINK 

Auditorium Roller Ilink, 

Third Avenue Fant and FIrnt Street. 

"Where the .Moe I'eople tio." 

One vote with each .%Oc worth of admla- 

■ion ticket*. 

TEAS AND COFFEES 

MiniieKotn Tea < o., IIMK'. W. Superior St. 
IMionCMt Lincoln ,452; Melrone- 3UIH. 




ISLANDS ARE 
INCREASING 

Fears as to Sea's Ravages 

on the British Coasts 

Allayed 

Forty-Eight Thousand Acres 

Added in Thirty-Five 

Years. 



Lofulon. July 15— Fears as to the rav- 
ages ol llie sea on llie coasts of Britain 
have beer, '.'' v^-d by the report of the 
royal cor n on coast erosion, 

which showd ti.at. instead of gradual- 
ly disappearing beneath the water, 
the British i.slands are annually in- 
creasing In area. .,„-,„. ic 

•On the whole." say the comnilf- 
Blontrs in their report, 'we think j.iat. 
whll( Bome localities have suffered se- 
riously from the encroachment of thv 
sea, from a national point of view the 
extent of erosion need not be consid- 
ered alarming." ^ . ^. ,„^. 
Actual figures prove that In the pas. 
thirty-five years no less than 4J> 0>)u 
acresj havt V>een added to the national 
area while during tlie same perud no 
more than 6 640 acres have been 
washed away. The places which havr 
Buffered most have been the ea.'-l 
coasts of England and Ireland, cut 
measures have been adopted which will 
prevent the loss in those localities from 
being so rreat in the future. 
Deing a laartiatlc Stamps. 

The blurred and inartistic appear- 
ance of the new postage stamps issued 
on the occasion of the coronation of 
Kinsr George lias given rise to \ery 
heated discussion. Both among the 
pubTc and in artistic circles dissatis- 
faction 18 expressed at the complete 
lack of resemblance in the portrait of 
His Majesty printed on the stamps. 
It has been suggested that a fresh Is- 
sue should be designed with a new por- 
trait of the king, and tlie subject is to 
be debated In the House of Commons. 
Meani.me. the stamps are being with- 
helcl from circulation until the stock 
of old Issues become exhausted. 
GetM a Silneenre. 
Lord Colebrooke has just been ap- 
Dolnted to one of those many snug 
blll<'ts in the king's household that 
are "reserved exclusively for peers. He 
has been made captain of His Majesty s 
Honorable Corps of Gentlen^en-at-arms 
ft a salary of $5,000 a year He will 
. have a very easy time c.f It earning 
Ms pay. The corps, which was founded 
In 1509, Is mustered only on great cere- 
monial occasions when men In gorK- 
^ous uniforms are needed to Proyiae 
Jicturesque effects at big court func- 
tions. It was long ago relieved of al. 
responsibility for the S'-vfekeeplng of 
His Majesty's sacred person which was 
the principal purpose for which it was 
created. Scotland Yard detectives who 
never appear in gorgeous uniforms 
and seek above all things to render 
themselves inconspicuous, now look 

* The^ members of the corps are all 
■ armv officers of go«^,.farn"y "who have 
done something to distinguish, them- 
selves. But bv one of those smgu.ar 
anomablles wlilch seem to govern the 
bestowal of exalted ornamental jor.s 
In England, It is not deemed essential 
that the rommander of the corps should 
even ever have been a soldier. He need 



know nothing about military drill and 
discipline. The two essential qualin- 
cations are that he should l^e a peer 
and of the same political persjJHSlon 
as the party In po ver. For all the 
best paving soft snips in the kings 
household are regariied as part of the 
spoils of victorv at the polls and are 
at the disposal of the prime minis- 
ter. 

KIne Only Ipprovea. 
The king simply a >proves nf the an 
pointments. According to the offici.al 
announcements by which the public 
are made acquainted with these ap- 
pointments he is a ways "pleased to 
approve ' but. as a natter of fact, he 
must approve, whether he is pleased 
or not And when there is a change 
of government all tiie high-salaried 
heads of departments in the king s 
household are given .the -sack and have 
to clear out of Bucningham palace to 
make way for anot ler batch of peers 
who are the politicc 1 adherents of the 
new prime minister. But these high 
salaried appointees fiave very little to 
do with the running of things at Buck- 
Ingham palace. Th it is dune by the 
permanent members of the i<alace staff 
who have no chance whatever of being 
promoted to the best paying posts. 
For the most part. tho.«e w^ho fl!i the 
latter are simply re luired to put in an 
appearance on stale occnsions. df>n 
gorgeous raiment. { nd look as solemn 
and impo.«ing ag th y know how. 
Made a Pe.-r la 1»0«. 
Lord Colebrooke was only made a 
pee*- in 1906. when a barony was be- 
stowed upon him. ^ut being a liberal, 
and the liberals b.ing in power, his 
elevation to the p-erage put him in 
the running for a . ourt billet, and he 
was soon afterwards appoinlta a lord. 
in- waiting, a position which he held 
until his pro.motion to the better pay- 
ing office which L-ord I>enman vacated 
to "become governor-general of the 
Australian tommon-vealth. There are 
seven lords-in-wa ting. They are 
paid 13.500 a year -ach. But only one 
has to l»e on duty at a time. Each of 
them In turn "waits" for a fortnight, 
and then Is allowe 1 twelve weeks off. 
But. although It seema extremely 
probable that the political powers of 
the peers will be greatly curtailed ere 
long, there Is no Indication of the ex- 
istence of any widespread desire to de- 
prive them of th(5e exalted, exceed- 
Ing well paid, and for the most part, 
purely ceremonial , ffices of which they 
now enjoy a monoc-oly. It aPPears to 
be generally recognized that when It 
comes to filling ai ornamental role a 
peer Is likely to d< It belter than any- 
body else. 



HONORS FOR 
GEN. DIAZ 

Former President of Mexico 
Given BriUiant Recep- 
tions in Paris. 

Greatly Affected By Demon- 
strations of Welcome at 
Spanish Ports. 



HOKE SMITH DECLINES 

TERRELL'S RESIGNATION. 



Atlanta Ga.. July 15.— Governor 
Hoke Srnith has received the reslgna- 
Hon of Senator J. M. Terrell, who had 
announced thai he would not return to 
?he"Tnited' States senate as one o 

Sc^^^dn^Unld'^tS^^t^ ept' ^he Teslg^a i^on 
Snd rlquelted the senator to c^tinue 
fn the senate at least during the 
l"es?nt sIssUn of the ^^^isl^^^re Jen- 
ator Terrell also .nailed a copy of his 
resignation to the president of the 
United States. ^ , _„^ ^^_ 

Governor Smith a few days ago was 
elected United St ites senator by the 
legislature and o le of his opponents 
was Mr Terrell. ^ , 

In declining to accept the resigna- 
tion. Governor Smith refers to prece- 
dents established in the United btates 
senate and points out the case of ^en- 
ator Purcell of South Dakota, who 
continued to serv? for several months 
after the selection of Senator Gronna, 
who was at the t me a member of the 
house. 

REV. MATHIEl MADE 

BISHOP OF REGINA. 



Paris, July 15.— Gen. Porflrio Diaz 
has received many official honors In 
Paris. Among the Latin American 
residents of the capital his presence 
has been the occasion of a series of 
brilliant receptions and feats. The 
former president of Mexico was re- 
ceived by President Fallleres at the 
Elysee and later the president paid a 
return visit to the Mexican. Senora 
Dlaa and Mme. Paliieres also ex- 
changed visits. 

Several hitherto unchronlcled inci- 
dents of the long voyage on the Ger- 
man steamship Yplranga from Mexico, 
have been told by fellow passengers 
as Interesting side-lights on the aged 
soldier's personality. Gen. Diaz min- 
gled freciy with all and talked on a 
variety of subjects. Outspoken thoughts 
of bitterness at his revolting fellow- 
countrymen formed the least place In 
these talks so eagerly Indulged by 
fellow travelers, anxious to K^t a close- 
to-hand view of the man acredited with 
the building up of modern Mexico. 

The Kreat topic of interest to Gen. 
Diaz was the old world, whose shores 
he was approaching for the first time 
In his life. He wanted to know all 
about the nations of Europe, and espec- 
ially of France and of Paris. He re- 
counted often his experiences with the 
troops of Napoleon III. to help the 
Maximilian campaign when he was 
made prisoner by the French offlcerb. 
who treated him, however, with tlie 
greatest courtesy, more, indeed, as a 

''"'Ae'^was greatly affected by the 
demonstrations of welcome at the 
Spanish ports. Unlike the times later 
when he was officially greeted in Eng- 
land and France, he was more at home 
there— for those about spoke his own 
Spanish tongue. At Santander boat- 
loads of enthusiastic visitors brought 
him masses of beautiful flowers. The 
president was I'terally burled under 
noral pieces, made up from the finest 
beds of S^nnlsh gardens, ^onriebody es- 
timated tiiese fiowers as worth at least 

Tlie day after leaving Santander Gen. 
.1 .' .v,«. T.„.-«»r "Purser. he 



ferest me; I am sure 1 shall be happy 

here. ' .^ », . 

After Freneh S«vln«r«. 

The financiers of New \ ork and Ber- 
lin are In active rivalry for oppor- 
tunities to invest French S'-JV 'JKS 
which amount to more than $1.000,000.. 
t-OO yearly. German diplomacy has 
sought ft.r ten years tt list govern- 
ment bonds on the Paris exchange, 
hut the French government has stead- 
fastly refused their admission. French 
3 per cents sell at 9C while imperial 
German 3 per cents are usually at 
about &5. The German government de- 
sires to avail itself of the I-rench 
market for an enormous number of 
municipal, state and imperial Issues, 
thus releasing German savings for in- 
vestment in Industrial and commercial 
undertakings. ^ , „ 

Berlin bankers have been borrowing 
great sums from Paris regularly 
through Swiss houses, but up to the 
present the French government will 
not allow German seturitles of any 
sort to be openly listed on the P<i «' ''' 
bourse. New York has been able this 
year to make its first official entry 
on the floor of the Paris stock ex- 
change, where three different Ameri- 
can stocks are now a<lmltted. The 
I robablllty Is that some twenty other 
companies will receive within the next 
twelve months fiffi( ial recognition. 
Probably the l.nM. 
The great International aviation 
contest just ended probably will be the 
last for this year, as the public has 
been shocked by the recent fatalities. 
These deaths have caused much dis- 
cussion, not only In parliament, but in 
technical quarters regarding the im- 
propriety of offering prizes of from 
$40,000 to $50,000 and thus attracting 
daring experimenters, who are Inade- 
quately trained and using machine-) 
which have been subject to no authori- 
tative test or examination. 

The effort to reduce weight by light- 
ly constructed motors was liie prob- 
able cause of the burning to death or 
Prlncetau and Landron by burstiiu, 
gasoline tanks. Mon.sleur Ernest Arch- 
deacon of the Aero Club of Frarice. ad- 
vocates an official examination of 
aeroplane motors as the only means or 
preventing too light construction. 




New York. July 15.— R. G. Dun & 
Co.'s Weekly Review of trade today 

says: 

prevalence of high temperatures 
throughout the country has adversely 
affected business. notably in retail 

In response to the broader dem.and 
for finished materials the steel mills 
are rapidly resuming operation.s hav- 
ing taken less time than usual for re- | 
[.airs and inventories. Plants in the 
I ittsburg district are working fully up 
to the June rate, whle the leading in- 
terest is running at slightly over 67 
per cent of its steel ingot capacity. 

A more favorable showing than had 
been expected was disclosed in the un- 
filled tonnage report of the steel cor- 
poration, orders on hand <lunng June 
increasing 246,871 tons, whereas In the 
two months immediately prec€-dlng 
there was a combined falling of fuuy 
3:;4 000 tons. Only a moderate accum- 
ulation of pig Iron has been reported 
and It is believed the output of mer- 
chant fum-aces is now below consump- 
tive requirements. Two additional 
stacks have been blown in at the south. 
Activity In the structural division is 
temporarily more pronounced '" t"* 
west than In the east, but almost 30,000 
tons have been taken here within the 



past fortnight. Numerous orders for 
railroad e(iuipment are in sight, but 
delay is noted in making awards. 

Buyers are still hesitating about 
ilacing forward orders in drygoods. 
Prices are generally well maintained, 
exceptions being noted in s<'me gray 
cloths. Jobbers have extensive plans 
for merchandisin" special sales ""ring 
the coming week, when many of the 
largest buyers will be in the east to 
attend important meetings, ^f-urtall- 
ment of mill operations is still very 
liirge in all textil.-s. Dress goods 
agents will open their new 1 nes about 
the 20th or 2.1th inst. The best trade 
reported in men's wear is on wool suit- 
ings of a fancy description. iarns 
show an easy tendency. 

Movement of footwear gradually in- 
creases. , ,. ^ 
■* Buvers are more numerous in the 
j New "England market, but caution con- 
i tinues to be displayed in all transac- 
I tions. lUtail trade, however continues 
I to show improvement. Pronounced 
' strength still rules throughout the 
Heather market, with special firmness 
I In sole leather. Trade is not active and 
business Is reduced by the slowing 
down of shoe factories and by excessive 
heat Exeept for a slight wejikness in 
; England, all European markets are 
I strong. 



Singing society, and others. The pro- 
gram follows: 

Pipe organ solo — "Overture to Nor- 
ma' Bfllini, arranged by A. F. 

iLunhdliolm 

A. F. Lundholm B. M. 

Scripture re.'iding and prayer 

Rev. J. A. Krantz, D D. 
.Song selections — "Herdens Hondags- 

sang" Paslu» 

Orpheus. 
Cantata — "Light Out of Darkness' 

first part Adam Giebel 

Elim Choir and Soloists. 

Address 

Rev. C. Solomonson, B. D. 

.Soprano solo— "Jerusalem" GounoA 

Mrs. G. Ny);:nder. 
Pipe organ solo — "Floeten Consort" 

, Ch. H. Ivlncb 

A. F. Lundholm, B. M. 
Song selection — "Lofsaiig ' music 

Landsighting l>y Ed. (.;rieg 

Orpheus and Holo by Hj. Enlund. 

Instrumental trio — 'Serenade" 

Fr. Sch ubert 

Mrs. A. F. Lundholm. piano, Fred Ed- 
lund, violin, and A. F. Lund- 
holm, organ. 
Cantata— 'Light Out of Darkness' 

second part Adam Giebei 

Elim Choir and Soloists. 

Closing remarks 

HJalmar Swanson. 

Choral No. 3, 7 verse 

Congregation. 
A. F. Lundholm is organist and choir 
director. 

(MS BLOWS UP PART 

OF OKLAHOMA FARM. 



Winnipeg. Man July 15. — It is an- 
nounced here tha Rev. O. E. Mathieu, 
superior of Quebfc seminary, Quebc<^. 
has been appointed by Pope Pius X. 
as bishop of the Regina diocese, em- 
bracing Southern Saskatchewan. 



Diaz" saw the purser. "Purser," he 
slid "I think we'd better throw those 
flowers overboard now. It was very 
nfce to have given them to me, but I 
have no use for them." On the way 
ark to his cabin he said to a friend: 
.'Ifrer all. flowers are all humbug. I 
Would have been better to have spent 

^^lt"Ha7re°V'^'«''"^'« ^^°^^ ^° ^*"' 
Gen. Diaz salu: ^ . ,. 

•'1 am going into a vast country, 
whose languages I do not ^^^7f- ^J^^^' 
I fear I am too old to learn. Then, 
with a gleam In his eyes and a 
straightening of his shoulders, he 
added: 'But Europe has much to In- 



lOc will buy a permit to smoke a 
ralma Leo, clear Havana cigar. 

JEWlSifPRiVAfE 
EXAMINED AGAIN 

Is Given New Chance to Win 

Commission in the 

Army. 

Washington, July 15.— Private Frank 
Bloom of the Fifteenth Cavalry, the 
young Jewish soldier whose attempt to 
gain an army commission resulted in 
a public reprimand by President Taft 
of Col. Garrard, commandant at J^o" 
Myer, Va.. on account of an alleged 
race prejudice, has been ^Iven another 
examination. It will b? several weeks 
however, before It will be ^ j^no^" 
whether young Bloorn was S";:<=«!^;"1:_ 

"Lack of aptitude," which means 
general appearance, soldierly aspect 
and pleasing address, is said to have 
been responsible for Bloom s failure 
upon the former examination. So tar 
as his studies were concerned, nia 
showing was satis factory. 

ATWOOD LANDS ON 

WHITE HOUSE GROUNDS. 



on behalf of the Aero club of Wash- 
ington, presented him with a meilal 
for his flight from Boston to Washing- 

The feat of making a safe landing 
in the White House grounds is con- 
sidered remarkable by aviation ex 
perts for not only is tlie space on 
whlc^ he landed narrow, but the 
density of the trees offers such diffi- 
culties that other aviators have 
"balked" at the Idea. 

After the presentation of the medal, 
Atwood made a remarkable ascension 
through the sprays of the White House 
fountain and flew to the polo fields In 
Potomac park. The machine was left 
there for the night, guarded by a de- 
tail of police. 



Washington. July ?5.— Harry N^ At- 
wood. the Boston avh^tor, in his aero- 
plane called on President Taft yester- 
day at the White House. He was in- 
troduced to the president by Acting 
Secretary of War Oliver, and Mr. Taft, 



PLAIN HINT FOR BANKERS. 

Directors Must Direct or Bank Be 
Treated as Unsafe. 

Washington. July 15 —Directors ot 
national banks who fall to hold meet- 
ings frequently and who give other 
evidences of a lack of personal inter- 
est In the affairs of their banks, will 
hereafter find a national bank ex- 
aminer overhauling their institution 
at least four times a year. 

Orders have been Issued to all na- 
tional bank examiners to ^request 
banks In their districts to hold di- 
rectors' meetings at least once a 
month, to maintain a discount conra- 
mlttee an examining committee and to 
adopt 'a permanent system of ^PPT(-\ 
Ing loans and discounts. Those w'hlch 
refuse will be examined at leas-t 
quarterly a procedure adopted witn 
banks which are considered unsafe. 

ONE PE.\UE PLAN COMPLETE. 

Japanese Will Lecture at Minnesota 
and Other Universities. 

New York, July 15.— The custodians 
of the $10,000,000 Carnegie peace foun- 
dation announce a campaign of popular 
education to establish friendly rela- 
tions between the United States and 
JaiVan The division of intercourse and 
education has arranged an exchange 
"to give to each people better knowl- 
edge of the other and to help build up 
a public opinion in both countries that 
will resist all attempts to arouse an- 

**UndeT''thl8 plan Dr. Inazo Nitobl 
president of the flrst higher college of 



Tokio and one of Japan s foremost edu- 
cators. will be brought here early n 
October. He will spend about six 

weeks each at Brown university, Co- 
lumbia, Johns Hopkins .and the Univer- 
sities of Virginia, Illinois and Minne- 
sota, lecturing on Japanese history and 
current problems. Tlie following year 
a "distinguished American will be 
sent to Japan for a similar service. 

The plan Is to make this exchange 
permanent, representatives of each 
country visiting the other on alternate 
years. The committee says that the 
Japanese government has heartily ap- 
proved the undert aking. 

insuranteIieads 

visit zenith city. 



J. M. Dlment of Owatonna, Minn., 
and E. W. Randall of St. Paul, repre- 
senting the committee on Investments 
of the grand lodge of the A. O. U. W., 
visited here all day Tliursday, making 
a careful study of local conditions. 

The lodge has made large Invest- 
ments here in the last six months and 
intends to Increase its holdings. 

E W. Randall is president of the 
Minnesota .Mutual Life Insurance com- 
pany, which company is represented 
here by John F. Shea, and also has In- 
vested heavily In Duluth. Both ex- 
pressed themselves as highly pleased 
with local conditions^ 

NINETY-NINE REASONS 

FOR HENWOOD RETRIAL. 

Denver, Colo.. July 15.-Nlncty-nine 
reasons, including charges of bja 
aeainst Judge Greeley W. Whitfora, 
and tlie cKilm that new w nesses 
have been found In Kansas City and 
CaHfornla have been filed In court n 
a petition for a new trial for Harold 
V Henwood. convicted of kll.lng 
George ECopeland in a hotel bar 
the niKht of May 24. while shootliig at 
S L Von Phul, the St. Louis balloon- 
ist, whom he al so killed. 

Wni Give Cantata. 

The sacred cantata ;'Light Out of 
Darkness" by Adam Giebel will be 
rcnde"red%onday night at 8 o'clock at 
The First Swedish Lutheran church 
cornner Sixth avenue ^ast and -Third 
street, by the choir of the Swedish 
Lutheran Elim church, assisted b> 
Mrs. G. Nylander, soprano; Mrs. J. Gui- 
branson. llto; J. Ostrom, tenor: and 
Ray Abbott, bass; also the Orpheus 



Tulsa, Okla. July 15. — A gas explosion, 
on the David Shlpman farm sevea 
miles south of here yesterday tore up^ 
earth for twenty acres, injured ono 
man seriously, killed five horses and 
demolished a large amount of valu- 
able machinery. 

The explosion was preceded by a 
rumbling noise lesembling an earth- 
ouake. There was a mighty concus- 
sion and then the earth gave way. 
Charles Reed, a rig builder, jumped 
from a height of forty feet and was 
badly hurt. The horses were a con- 
sl<lerable distance from the P>^c« 
where the explosion first broke, but 
before they had time to get away the 
earth broke under them and the ga« 
burst forth. The animals were thrown 
a Kreat distance. 

It is thought that gas gathered near 
the top of an oil well being dug on 
the land to such an extent as to force 
open the sixty feet of overlying earth. 

BAY STATE^ENATiTfoR 

DIRECT ELECTION PLAN. 

Boston. Mass.. July 15.— A resolutlo* 
indorsing the hill "o^ pending in con- 
Kress for the direct election of United 
States senators. with the Brlstow 
amendment providing for eupervis on 
and control of such elections by the 
federal government, was adoj.ted oy 
the senate by a vote of 34 to 3. 



CAPbULLb 




CATARRH 

OF THE 

BLADDER 

RBlieied iB 
lA Hours 



ofcounterfi 



4 



m ■ "■ w 



PARKLH'S^ 
HAIR BALSAM , 

Pronutei > 1"*""""' .^' ,i«..k 
never F»ll« to B?*^"'*^ "??' 
Hair to its Touthful Co or. " 
dm Malp diMMU * b^r laiJu«. 



tl*M 



V 



-► —I 



■d .^~ 





t 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



15, 1911. 



i LOVE HIM," 
HEREXCUSE 

Girl With Whom William 

Nichols Eloped Would 

Die for Him. 



Man Has Daughter Older 

Than Girl He Called 

His Wife. 



ter>i I , 
pan rtit-n 



•.- hinr" sai.1 Claret H.>fer yes- 
aft-!-noMn ia tlu' woman's de- 
lice heaJu'iarters whon 
had accompanied Wi\- 
. > the Pacific coast and 



ret'-.i'ti 

Tlie two were arrested yesterday aft- 
»rnH in t.y l»et''Otive Irvine at the in- 
Btari. r- L>r i!i ■ feder. 1 autliorities. after 
fcavina b-- ti Uuoed halt" way across the 
con: 11! tit and back, by a United States 
•ecrei service agent attached to the 
flepartment of justice. They are being 
held under the federal white slave law. 

The ilofer girl is but 17 years of age, 
^hile Nichols is 40 years old. with a 
daughter 4 vears older than she is. 
They have been traveling steadily for 
ft niontl: as man and wire, it is claimed. 
■1th • iKh Nichols has another wife at 
his h ime ia Minneapolis. The girl said 
that they had left just a month ago 
yesrerdav Because of her age Nichols 
is amenable to the federal statutes. 

Mi!*s Hofer is . .usually pretty. She 
appears to be more than 17 years ot 
age .Vbove the average height, with 
flashing dark eyes and regular features 
an<i heoomlngtv claii in a black picture 
hat and a prettv gown, she attracted 
unusual attention when she was 
Lrought into the police station yester- 
day afternoon by her alleged husband. 

She appeared to take the situation 
philosophically, although she does not 
seem to be unusually sophisticated or 
ejtperienced 

".Vre you married to this man with 
Whom you were taken to the police 
Ijtation'" she wa.'i asked. 

"Why. y.s. we re manrled." she ans- 
wered. But we were not married by 
any minister or Judge. We were just 
K-arrled 

••Do v-vi I'lve him"" 

••With all my heart and soul." she 
weadily replied. 'I love him; I love him. 
I would almost die for him. I think 
wore of him than anybody in the 
world ■■ J ,- 

Mi-ss Mofer was arraigned in police 
court thi-^ morning on a statutory 
charge. She entered a plea of guilty. 
but .li.«i>'.sit;.)n of the case was ad- 
journed laiul M >nday. Bail was tlxed 
at s* ' 

s was arraigned in the federal 
C". >fore €omnH.ssii>ner Pressnell 

thtti inorning H.- asked for a prelim- 
inary hearing, which was set for 3 
o'cloik th:s afternoon. 

• 

lOr v\ ill buy a permit to smoke ft 
Pal in L L- ). clear Havana cigar. 

MARS FALLsr WILL NOT DIE 

vContlnued from page 1.) 



should b« swelled to $10,000 for his 
children." 

Following this. Mars started a fund, 
c ntributlng an amount for the relief 
of Kreamer's family. 

DE\EE>roYsfANFAGAlX 



(Continued from page 1.) •- 



chlii*» during a ttlght and crashed from 
a height of several hundred feet to 
the ground. The lieavy biplane 
drt,>pped '•n top of him. 

Wife SufferiuK ^thook. 

The aviator's wife witnes.sed the ac- 
cident and Is in a .serious condition 
on ae .>unt of tlie shock. Mara had 
male one succe.ssful tlight earlier in 
the afternoon. 

Several thou-=5and .spectators were 
watching Mars while he was circling 
the Held. .Sudilenly tlie machine made 
ft dii> liownward and Mars was seen to 
Jerk at something in an effort to re- 
grain control It was a futile attempt, 
and an t:!.stant later the biplane struck 
the gr »und. The machine was com- 
pletely wrecked and Mars lay under It. 

T!:e amazed spectators stood still 
foi a nsomeiit. There was a .scream, 
an Mts. Mars, the blrd-man"s wife, 
r toward the wrecked machine. 

I, .slie reached her husband's side. 

howt . r. she was overcome with grief 
ami wa.s carried from the field. 



"corporation bill." 
atioii laws of the ^ 

The governor sa 
cause it allowed a 
corporate and buy 
witt»''.>is said a la 
leading lav/yers of 
him In behalf of tl 

•Did Mr. Bancrof 
the International 
see you about ^ not 
asked Mr. Hanecy. 

"I do not recall w 
fore or after the b 

The witness add 
know whether Be 
f.>ature of the bill v 
able to l>eneen. 

llliBOlH PO 

Nearly evei y pli 
tics was entered in 
ecy in eross-exaii 
during Ms six-ho 
The testimony c<> 
of political allgnm- 
the time Mr. Dene 
state's attorney fo 
Hanecy tried to si 
neen who orginlz. 
luring his term a; 
L,orimer, but Mr. 
that he hln:self < 
chairmen of commi 
uier had attended 
where" wherein It 
the minority Repu 
f-rats organize the 
tor Lorimer. 

Donern H 

Mr. Hanecy souj 
rtfteen Deneen men 
kin.s on the tlrst 
senator. Hopkins 
elected. Mr Denee 
•:ay that all these 
rledged Ueneen me 

■'Hopkins reeeiv 
house. " declared 
these 15 more w 
that would have b 
elected him, would 
iie liad a majorlt 

"Well. 61 and 1 
sponded Mr. D^ 
you are correct 
i'orrect. but your 
He would have b« 
sixty-one not chari 
they would have c 

Mr. Hanecy reat 
testimony Thursda 
his friends retard. 
until the guherna 
test was settled, a 
ne.ss had these fl 
when he so testifl> 

Mr. Deneen said 
at or Jones. Repre 
Brady and other 
reforms. 

CONld % 

Mr. Deneen cou! 
when his friends 
nuestion of postpo 
Hopkins, but said 
after the balloting 
gun 

"I didn't have a 
or a phonograph." 
when pressed for 
swer. 

The witness exp 
wa.s done to post 
tlon was to have a 
Foss. On the last 
returned to Hopki 



revising the corpor- 

■ tate. 

id he vetoed it be- 
"bar'oer.shop to in- 
a railroad." The 

•ge number of the 
the state had seen 

e bill. 

'.. general counsel of 

Harvester company, 
vetoing the bill?" 

hether he called be- 
ill was passed" 
{?d that he did not 
ncroft favored the 
/hich was objection- 

(KivM .tired. 

use .>f Illinois poli- 
() bv Attorney Haii- 
linlrig the witness 
ir siege yesterday. 
Kstitutes a history 
•nts In Illinois from 
*n was fl^.^t elected 
• Cook county. Mr. 
ow that it was Do- 
■d the legislature 
I governor, and not 
Oeneen was certain 
lid n.jt dictate the 
ttees and that I..orl- 
i conference "some- 
wa.^ agreed to have 
blicans and Demo- 
house which voted 

*ii'n .\ctlon. 

{ht to show that if 
had voted for Hop- 
day's balloting for 
would have been 
a was not willing to 



OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER 



fifteen were 



ig tc 

full- 



Mi 61 votes in the 

Mr. Hanecy. "'and 

>uld make 76. and 

een enough to have 

it not — for you say 

• In the senate?" 

5 make 76." re- 

•neen "That far 

Your addition Is 

•onclusion is wron^. 

ten elected had the 

ged their votes, but 

hanged." 

from Mr. Deneen's 
y in which he said 
•d Hopkins' election 
tortal election con- 
tid asked if the wlt- 
fteen men In mind 
d. 

he had in mind Sen- 
<entative3 Hull and 
. Interested in his 

»( Recall. 

d not recall exactly 
first discussed the 

ning the election of 

it was some time 

for senator had be- 

stop-clock, a diary 
declared Mr. Deneen 
a more definite an- 

lalned that all that 
pone Hi)pkins" elec- 
>out 10 men vote for 
ballot, he said, they 

13. 




rORe3C.%«T TIM, 7 
SLXDAV 

Kor Uulutli. Sup^rim and Tlciiilty. 
ill lulling tiie Mc:utba uiul VeinuUon 
iron rangm: Fair wmiher t»iil|[lil 
ami .Siiiiilay; ii.t much oiiaiitfe in 
(iinpKMture. muiierala to brlik wpst- 
criy w'liulM. 



Air pnaurr 



EXPLANATOPV NOTES 
Ofe«>nruiona ukf tl 4 * m . wv«nty.<iftk OMndian um«. 

mlyewi lo sn Irvel. 

IwBAaft, M «oiitMi«aui lifMB. pMS thro>igh pomu ii «qu*l air pnwurc 
IsOTMtaa^ or dotted Imn. put ilirough potaU al fqual tntpmaturr. th«j 

mil b. drawn o.-Jy for •aro. freuiot; lO*, and I'W* ^ 

SrMaoLa uvlK.tr Malr of »ntbcr Q litu, ^ partly cloudy, 9 

cloudy (§) rain ; (g) snow. (^ rrport htiaanc *ito»i dy with the wiixt. Full 

fi(un, tcmperatun; aceod. 24 how nialall. tl il rqualt 01 inch, tkjrd. wind 

wlocity <jl 10 mil« prr hour or mnrr 



WIND SCALE. 

Ulles PM 
Hour. 

Calm to » 

Light ****!* 

M.derat* IS »• " 

Rrlok 25 to 33 

BIgh 35 to 50 

Gale 5" •• " 

ButrlctiM 65 aod abo»» 

U. W. RICHARDSON. 



M 




COINJXMACTOR 
WAPWXEO 

To Clear 80 Acm of Pine Stumps 

CALL 416 LYCEUM. 



<*anr K reamer Fall. 

f;.. .14.. July 15 — M.irs left here late 
Thursday niglit for Erie, after having 
v,,.,^~jad thf- fall of D. A. Kreamer. 
V t death while trying for a pilot's 

1:„ :. The sight of Kreamer's acci- 

dent, while not unnerving Mars, seemed 
to weigh heavily upon him. 

• Another life given up to cope with 
th air" he said, "and it has taught 
us niLhing. No one ever will know 
What was the exact cause of the ac- 
eldetit Every condition seemed favor- 
abl-. and still he fell." 

Still .•'T)eaklng of Kreamer'.? fall, and 
«ppar^>ntly almost with an Intuition of 
coming harm, he added; 

"Now that he Is gone, we mu.st re- 
member hts family. I for one will be 
Blad to chip In to start a fund that 



PROBE GRAM) JURY 'LEAK 



.'■'» 



(Continued from page 1.) 



Dr. Konkler 

CHRONIC niSB.^SES 
A Sl*Ktl.\I.TY. 

CoannltatioD and Examination Free. 

54N-3 C«>lunil>lu Bldg.. Duluth, Mlnii. 



• if the grand jurv. and Henry Coyne, 
internal revenue officer, and ordereil 
them to be prepared Monday to show 
cause why they should not be pun- 
ished for contempt of court In hav- 
ing betrayed theli trust. 

The indicted revenue officers are ac- 
cused of having accepted bribes from 
oleo manufacturer 1. while the men con- 
nected with the Industry are accused of 
conspiracy to defraud the government 
out of the tax of 10 cents per pound 
placed on their pr )duct. 

Were 4itveu Tip. 

Immediately after the indictm-^nts 
were returned the grand jury presented 
a special report ti Judge Landis to the 
effect that througi a leak in the grand 
jury room the inHcted men knew of 
th-lr indictment ten days ago. 

Judge Landis at once began a search- 
ing investigation Into this, and uncov- 
ered what govern nent officials believe 
to be the greates conspiracy to learn 
the secrets of thi grand jury in the 
history of the fed oral court in Chicago. 

Two of the mei alleged to be Impll- 
oat*»d In the "leak" were ordered b.^ 
Judge Landis to .'how cause why they 
should not be punished for contempt of 
court. They are Henry Coyne, an in- 
ternal revenue officer, and Martin 
Dahl of May woo I, a member of the 
grand Jury. 

Practically all of the men indicted 
appeared in the United States district 
clerk's office and gave bonds. 



Kidney Dlaennea .Are Caralile 

Under certain co iditlons. The right 
medicine must I e taken before the 
disease has prog 'e.ssed too far. Mr. 
Perry A. Pitman, Dale, Tex., says: 
I was down In bed for four months 
with kidney and bladder trouble and 
gall stones. One bottle of Foley's 
Kiilney Remedy, :ured me well and 
sound." Ask for It. For sale by all 
druggists. 



LITTLE GIRL LS "BAD MAN 



»» 



GARAGE 



ELECTRIC V£HICLE,GASOLINE CAR 

GENERAL REPAIRS 

ELECTRIC SERVICE & REPAIR CO. 

922 East Superior Street 




(Continued from page 1.) 



girl's best friend 
is filled with hit 
little sister's darl 

"Gee!" he explo 
"she's got more 
Why. her fingers 
t!ie trigger if tl 
loaded." 

"The little one 
was not an easj 
quer." sahl the n 
her. "She put i 
tried to cover i 
caught her wrist, 
over my arm ai 
volver away froi 

Edna's father, 
porter, ig being 
and neglect of t 
Blames 

"Do you know 
Vou are largely 
this child has di 
ecutlng Attorney 
his talk with the 

Mrs. Lillian Pt 
an invalid, and 1 
keeper-ln-chief i 
brothers, Carl at 
399 Bryan street 

Mrs. Peebles, 
room, shaking wi 
fever, told of tl 
tween herself an 

"She would tal 
person." she sal 
much and was si 
for me that I c 
away. Do you tl 
today?" 

Edna had bee 
clothes. "I wou; 
had nice dresses." 
her pretty brown 

The authorities 
able home for thi 



and faithful brother. 

t admiration at his 

ng 

led in the jail parlor. 

nerve than I have! 

couldn't have pulled 
e revolver had been 

armed to the teeth. 

proposition to con- 
arshall who arrested 
p a good fight and 
ne with the gun. I 

then threw her back 
id wrenched the re- 
a her." 

Henry Peebles, saloon 
held for non-support 
le little girl. 
Her Father. 

this i3 your fault? 
to blame for what 
ne now," cried Pros- 
Frank Rockwell, In 
man. 

ebles. the mother, is 
Idna has been house- 
or her and her two 
d John, In her home. 

lying in a darkened 
;h palsy and sick with 
e companionship be- 
1 the child, 
k to me like an older 
1. and she knew so 
ich a dear companion 
an't sleep, haing her 
dnk I'll gat her back 

1 teasing for new 

dn't be homely If I 
she had said, fluffing 
hair about her face. 

may find a more sult- 

) little girl. 



L.A.-^T f>vening was 
cool and delightful 
and must have made 
visiting tourists 
realize why people 
like to live In Du- 
luth. This morning 
dawned bright, but 
the sky clouded lat- 
er and J. Pluvius 
threatened with a 
shower that -the 
weather man hadn't 
t.>ld us about. Fair 
and continued cool weather is prediiiied 
for tonight and tomorrow. 

Beautiful wSather prevailed a year 
ago today. 

The sun rose this morning at 4:28 and 
it will set at 8 o'clock giving fifteen 
hours and thirty-two minutes of sun- 
light. 

Mr. Richardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"A low pressure condition has devel- 
oped to the northward of Lake Superior. 
This in connection with the disturbance 
centered over the extreme Southwest, 
has caused showers over Manitoba, 
Northern North Dakota. Southeastern 
Lake region, St. Lawrence Valley, Gulf 
and South Atlantic states and scattered 
parts ot" Iowa and Nebraska during the 
last twenty-four hours. Hot weather 
prevails in the C^Mitral Valley, the West 
and South. At the Head of the Lakes 
fair weather is indicated for the en- 
suing thirty-six hours." 

General ForecaHta. 

Chicago, July 15. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Sunday: 

Upper Michigan — Generally fair to- 
night and Sunday. 

Wisconsin. Minnesota and Montana- 
Fair tonisht and Sunday. 

Iowa — Fair tonight, slightly cooler In 
Northeast portion; Sunday fair. 

North Dakota — Fair tonight and Sun- 
dav: moderate temperature. 

South Dakota — Fair tonight, slightly 



markable state of preservation 
these pictures. 

During all the work of renovating 
and cleaning tlie paintings in the 
state house Mrs Holilngsworth was 
with Mr. <Veidenbach almost con- 
stantly and seemed deeply interested 
in his work. 

Then came the announcement that 
tfie four portraits mentioned above 
could not be renovated. This occurred 
after pictures had been taken showing 
them in excellent shape after renova- 
tion. 

"BnlarKed Pljotograplia. ' 
Mrs. Holilngsworth gave the reason. 
She said the portrait painters had 
fooled the state. Thty had painted no 
l)ortrait3. but had enlarged old photo- 
graphs of the four governors in aues- 
tion and had touched them over with 
oil. She volunteered to copy the "old 
and faded" works of art on the chance 
that the general assembly would ap- 
prove the work and pay for it. 

This was done. On the last day of 
the session Secretary Long had $1,000 
added to the unauthorized deficiency 
appropriation bill and it was passed. 
That $1,000 went to Mrs. Holilngsworth. 
the voucher having been cashed last 
Friday. 

But some cruel person consulted an 
encyclopedia and found that the pho- 
tographic plate was not Invented until 
1S51 Thomas Kirker was governor In 
1S07. Lucas took office in 1833. Wilson 
Shannon in 183a and Thoraas Corwin In 
1841. 

So there could have been no photo- 
graphs of those men, especially since it 
was later than 18S0 before tlie first 
photographic plates were made suffi- 
ciently large to have covered the can- 
vas of the four portraits. 

Deniea Her {Statement. 
Yet State Auditor FuUington has a 
typewritten signed statement given him 
by Mrs Holilngsworth when she cashed 
her voucher for |1,000, which says that 
the four portraits could not have been 
restored because they had originally 
been photographs. 

Mr. Long corroborated this, and when 
reminded of the fact that photography 
was unheard of in those days, he said 
he had taken Mrs. Hollingsworth's 
word for It 

Mrs. Holilngsworth has now denied 
again her typewritten statement, and 
says that the portraits couldn't hava 
been restored because they were paint- 
ed on paper. 

Art critics in Columbus charge open- 
ly this could not have been true. They 
say Mrs. Hollingsworth's art guide was 
wholly the work of ex-Convlct Weiden 
tach. They also know his work, whlc' 
Is most excellent as an artist, and sa 
he painted the four copies whleh bea 
Mrs. Hollingsworth's name. He did 
su'^h wonderful work In restoring th 
paintings about the statehouse that h 
gained a pardon and has since secure 
the work of cleaning and restoring th 
real works of art which were damage 
bv the recent fire at the Albany capitol. 
Wliere Are the Orlslnalaf 
The originals of the four governors 
which are supposed to have been 
•photographs," have disappeared. 

Mrs. Holilngsworth knows nothing 
about them, and some frugal brethren 
have raised a huUaballoo because they 
are listed In her "Art Guide" at |500 
each and may have been stolen. They 
(the frugal brethren) cry that this 
means the state has been "done" out of 
11.000 worth of "art treasures" and 
has paid out $1,000 for new work, 
which Is almost worthless. 

Secretary Long says he ordered the 
work done because the chain of por- 
traits would have been incomplete. 
This might have been true of three of 
the governors, but there are two other 
excellent portraits of Thomas Corwin 
in the statehou.se besides the "photo- 
graph" that has faded and had to be 
copied before It "disappeared" entirely. 

VVICKERSHAM TO EXPLAIN 



lO'der in extreme west portion; Sunday , 
fair. i 

Upper Lakes — Moderate southwest j 
shifting to northwest winds. Local \ 
thunder showers this afternoon. Gen 
erally fair tonight and Sunday. 



Hi«h. Low 



68|Mianednga 7i 

.JJIM.Kleiia, 88 

Montgomery !)U 

Montreal 80 



M. M<v>rlieail 



.84 



The Temperaturea. 

Following were the highest tempera- 
tures for twenty-four hours and the 
lowest for twelve, ending at 7 a. m. 
today: , 

' High. Low 

.Vl.tl«ne (14 

.VIp«ii« 7l) 

.UUiitlf city 7t5 

Itittleford ..n 

r.lsnurck 86 

lloi-H! v,<.9*, 

Huston i..'..l* 

Buffalo .M 

I'llgarr 82 

.'harlcston !)2 

tlil<-..igi) 78 

Corpua CtirUU ..8« 
DenviT 88 

l>,~» Moines Ufl 

DevlU Ukj V>. 

Doilge Sto 

I>iil>uqu« ....|,..S4i 

DULUTH ...v.. .79 

Duraiigo 78 

F^a«ti>ort 78 

Kilmontoii 

K.fcaiiabii 78 

iS.ilvfStoii 86 

Oraii.l H^ven ...7li 
.88 



.\#w <>rl(>aiu 8S 

.New York 76 

North I'latta 84 

Oklaliouia 92 

Omahii 90 



6'i Parry .Sound 78 



I'lioenU S« 

Pl.«rr» »0 

Pittslmng 80 

54iPiTt Arthur 7ti 

CUlPortUml. Or »2 

96 Priii>-e Albert 78 



Urwii Ilay . . . 

HdtteriA 

Havte 

Helena 

Houtflitoii . . . , 

Hurtjii 

jH'-ktoriFille . 
KamlJopA . . . . 
ivaiw.i.s City . 
Kitoxvtile ... 
Li Cro.tM . . . 
Loiiterllle ... 

Madison 

Marauetie . . . 
MetlU'iue Hat 

M !nph..i 

.Miles Oltf..., 
Milwaukee tk 



...84 
. ..iM) 
...8t 

'."^ 

..% 
...90 

...88 

.80 

...72 
..90 
. ..9<) 
...M 
...80 



6l|tiu'Api>elIe 7G 

M UideUth 80 

5« KapM rity 8rt 

46 Koselmrt »8 

58 Uoswrll 86 

80 St. l.<nfb 90 

61 .St. Paul 84 

S4 Sail Lake OUy 04 

72 San ni,tio 92 

.■58 .Siu KninclHCO «<> 

.'•t Sdult Ste. Marie... 7 2 

.-6 Seitttle 86 

54 Sheridan BO 

72 Shrevtport 84 

56 .Sioux City 86 

/4'Spokane 94 

64 1 swift Current 86 

...90 



60 
68 
64 
58 
5« 
74 

6a 

66 



Tump* 

Toledo 86 

WnHliiiigton S4 

Wmiston 86 

Wtniirmucra 94 

Wluiiiiieil 78 

Yellowstone 76 



52 

58 

72 

62 

54 

76 

62 

64 

74 

70 

51 

82 

St 

66 

50 

64 

50 

52 

68 

62 

58 

66 

74 

62 

66 

64 

50 

52 

60 

64 

72 

04 

60 

50 

72 

Ct 

63 

52 

06 

58 

«8 




PHOTO FAKE OHIO LATEST 



(Continue! from page 1.) 



edited and lssu« d by Mrs. Holilngs- 
worth, copies of which are In the pos- 
session of oTfice's of the state, con- 
tains reproductii ns of these photo- 
graphs and comtnents upon the re- 



he produced a copy of an affidavit re- 
lating to an alleged criminal act com- 
mitted bv Oapt. D. H. Jarvis of the 
Alaska byndicate. and formerly prom- 
inent in the government revenue cut- 
ter service, who committed suicide on 
June 2::, the day following the intro- 
duction of the Wickersham resolution 
.ailing for production of tlie papers in 
the case, and by John Bullock of the 
John J. Sesner Coal company of Nome. 

Through connivance of these men. It 
was charged that the government was 
defrauded on coal contracts and that 
►'vtdence to that effect was permitted 
to remain unacted upon In the attorney 
general's office for more than a year, 
until the statute of limitations expired, 
last May 

Photograph of Letter. 

Delegate NMckersham furnished the 
committee with photographic copies of 
a letter of- an attorney for the Alaska 
syntllcate to D. H. Jarvis admitting the 
expenditure of money to control gov- 
ernment witnesses In the Pasey mur- 
der trial in 1908, wherein an agent of 
the Alaska syndicate was accused of 
murdering laborers employed by rival 
Interests during the construction of a 
railroad In Ala.ska. 

A photograph of an expense account 
for $1,133.*0 of M. B. Morrlssey, em- 
ployed by the syndicate, It Is claimed, 
to entertain government witnesses for 
jurymen in that connection, also was 
submitted to the committee. This evi- 
dence. Delegate Wickersham declared, 
also Is In the possession of the attor- 
ney general. 

Delegate Wickersham tirged on the 
judiciary committee the Douglas affi- 
davit Involving the representatives of 
the Northwestern Commercial com- 
pany, one of the Alaska syndicate con- 
cerns, and the Sesner Coal company. 
Defrauded by Perjury. 

"On May 24. 1»10." he said, "I sent 
to Attorney General Wickersham a 
copy of the affidavit, calling his at- 
tention to the fact that the govern- 
ment had been defrauded of $50,000 
by perjury and a combination of these 
two corporations in the sale of coal 



SYRUPorflGS 



AND 



(Continued from page 1.) 



old and that a certain phase of them 
still Is under Investigation. They de- 
clined to Indicate just what this phase 
was. 

Copy of .\ffldaTlt. 
Delegate Wickersham startled the 
committee when, la executive session, 



IIElixir°^5enna 



Cleanses the System 
effectually; Dispels 
colds and Headaches; 
due to constipation. 
Best for men« women 
and children : younq 

and old. 
Toqetits Beneficial 
effects, always note the 
name of the Company 

CAUFORNIAfKiSYRUPCa 

plainly printed on the 

front of eyefy |)dckaqe 

of the Genuine 



to the government for militar:- .losts 
in Alaska. I asked him to make an 
Investigation and prosecute those peo- 
ple for the crime committed in that 
transaction. . , 

"I received a letter of acknowledge- 
ment in May 23. 1910. and we had fur- 
ther correspondence, and on June 13, 
1911. more than a year later, I re- 
ceived a letter from the attorney gen- 
era! stating that the statute of limita- 
tions had expired." 

"I read the last letter," continued 
Delegate Wickersham. "to show that 
the attorney general now say.s that 
tlie statute of limitations has run 
against the prosecution of these met. 
who committed perjury and defrauded 
tlie government. They submitted false 
affidavits to the government and com- 
mitted fraud In April and May, 1908, 
and the statute of limitations did not 
expire until May, 1911. 1 sent all the 
evidence to the attorney general a 
year before and he failed and refused 
to prosecute these people for robbing 
the treasury, and he permitted the 
statute of limitations to run in their 
favor. 

Aronaea Attorney General. 

"I want the committee to have all 
the facts so that it may know whether 
the attorney general has deliberately 
shielded these people from prosecu- 
tion for crime or not. It Is fair to 
him and me. I say that he has." 

"Did you send tiie attorney general 
evidence enough attd indicate where 
witnesses could be found to win an 
indictment?" asked Representative 
Webb of North Carolina. 

"Undoubtedly." replied the territor- 
ial delegate, 'and 1 furnished him with 
evidence of other crimes. The Alaska 
syndicate is an organized crime." 

"What do you mean by the Alaska 
syndicate?" Chairman Clayton .nquired- 
* "I refer to the Alaska syndicate 
composed of J. Pierpont Morgan, the 
Guggenheim brothers. Kuhn. Loeb & 
Co.. Jacob H. Schiff and Graces." 

"Who do you mean by the Guggen- 
heim brothers?" asked Representative 
Norris of Nebraska. 

"Senator Simon Guggenheim and his 
six brothers." 

"Who is Graves?" asked Rerpresenta- 
tlve dlraham of Illinois. 

"He represents Close Brothers, the 
English syndicate and other English 
capitalists." 

Jarvla la Dead. 

"Captain Jarvis," added the dele- 
gate, "was the confidential agent of 
Morgan In charge of the syndicate in- 
terests in Seattle. He committed sui- 
cide immediately following the intro- 
duction of this resolution you are now 
considering. He knew that this reso- 
lution would bring out the facts." 

The Douglas affidavit charges that 
when the war department advertised 
for bids for coal to supply the Alaska 
military posts, Jarvis, treasurer of the 
Northwestern company, and John H. 
Bullock of the Sesner Coal company, a 
rival of the syndicate, agreed to su- 
mlt bids which would Insure the award 
of the contract to one company or the 
other, there being no other competitor; 
agreed to certain lighterage charges, 
and fixed upon a division of the profits. 
The Sesner conjpany got the contract to 
furnish 4,000 tons of coal at J28 a ton, 
u price which Douglas claimed was 
nearly twice too high, and the profits 
were divided, Douglas himself entering 
J6,7 00 from the Sesner company on the 
books of the Northwestern company as 
the latter's share of the profits 
Made Falae Afflda\-tts. 

Both Bullock and Jarvis, Douglas 
swears, made false affidavits to the 
government that no one but the com- 
pany which each represented had any 
Interest in the contract. 

The evidence submitted Indicating an 
attempt to control government wit- 
nesses. Is a fac simile copy of a letter 
written by John A. Carson, counsel for 
the Alaska syndicate, to Capt. Jarvis 
under Seattle date. May 6. 

The resolution asking the attorney 
general for documents In the Jarvis- 
Bullock matter will be reported to the 
house early next week. 
♦ 
JarvU Had Hero Medal. 

Seattle, Wash., July 15— H. K Doug- 
las, former auditor of the Alaska syn- 
dicate, and the late Capt. D. H. Jarvis, 
whom he has accused, were generally 
considered to represent opposing In- 
terests in the syndicate. 

Jarvis, a former officer In the reve- 
nue service, where he won a medal 
for heroism, was introduced to J. P. 
Morgan by Theodore Roosevelt and 
was regarded as Morgan's representa- 
tive. Douglas was lined up with the 
Guggenheim interests, and the two 
clashed frequently. 

Following a railroad men's fight In 
Keystone canyon and the trial of two 
of the syndicate's men on the charge 
of murder, Douglas charged Jarvis 
with Improper use of money In con- 
nection with the trial. Douglas later 
left the company, from some pressure, 
but took with him to New York pho- 
tographic copies of alleged vouchers 
for expenditures In the trials and other 
documents unfavorable to Jarvis. 

The Guggenheim Interests waxed 
strong In the syndicate, and Jarvis 
was pushed down from complete man- 
agement to the treasurahlp of the 
Northwestern Fisheries company, a 
subsidiary concern. He planned to re- 
sign from this, but It was sold to the 
Booth Fisheries Interests of Chicago 
and Jarvis was made president and 
put In charge of the Booth Interests 
in the Northwest. 

When Jarvis committed suicide at 
his club, June 22, he left a note saying 
"tired and worn out." At that time his 
salary was $15,000 a year, and his per- 
sonal fortune was estimated at |400,- 
000. 

ENGINEER KILLED IN 

WRECK ON THE ERIE. 



Rochester. N. Y., July 15 —West- 
bound Passenger Train No. 5 on the 
Erie, running from New York to Buf- 
falo, ran at full speed Into a switch 
engine one-half mile east of the High 
bridge at Portage, early today, derail- 
ing the train and totally wrecking the 
express car. Engineer OlHver of the 
passenger train was killed and his 
fireman Injured, but may recover. Six 
or seven passengers were slightly in- 
jured 





DULUTH 

HERALD 

POPULAR 

EXCURSIONS 



DELDGIHlTFyLLMI 
km BBWEB TBDP 




A Rest for Tired Nerves 
—a Tonic for the Over- 
worked—a Joy for All! 



EVERY MONDAY MORNING 
UP THE RIVER 

ON THE NEW FAST STEEL 

STEAMER COLUMBIA 




I. 






toMi^Mi 



Steamer Columbia nlll leave 
dock at foot of Fifth .\veuue 
\%est at a. m. KeturuluKt 
leave Fond du Lac at 4 y. ui. 

ROUND TRIP 

<IF TICKRTS ARE BOUGHT 
AT THE HKKAI.D OFFltK!) 



SET TICKETS AT THE HERALD OFFICE AS THE 
REGULAR PRICES WILL BE CHARGED AT THE DOCK 

No more delightful trip in all the world than up 
the St. Louis river with fishing, swimming and boat- 
ing at Chamber's Grove. Fond du Lac. A perfect all- 
day outing for the family. Bring the children and a 
well-filled lunch basket — but If you desire. m«als can 
be secured at the grove. 



IVERY 



THURSDAY AFTERNOON 



DOWN THE LAKE 



ON THE PALATIAL STEAMER 



EASTON 



>^ 



•AM 



Leaving IJooth's Dock at tlie 
foot of Lake .\venue at 4 p. 
m., going direct to Two Har- 
bors, and returning by moon- 
light at U p. m. 

ROUND TRIP . . 

(IF TICKETS .\RK SECURED 
AT THE HERALD OFFICE!) 



GET TICKETS AT THE HERALD OFFICE AS THE 
REGULAR PRICES WILL BE CHARGED AT THE DOCK 

A beautiful 60-mile ride on good old Lake Supe- 
rior and return by moonlight. One of the most rest- 
ful and Invigorating trips that could be conceived. 
Make up your parties and take advantage of this 
magnificent opportunity. Bring your lunch baskets, 
or If you desire supper can be secured on the boat or 
at Two Harbors. 



TICKETS NOW 01 SALE AT HERALO OFFICE 

Get yours In advance as the number to be sold will l>e 
limited to Insure the comfort and pleasure oi all who go. 



! 



■|- 









Saturday, 



THE DUUUTH HERALD. 



July 15. 1911. 




West ^ worw ff^^^ 



m 



A. Jensen. UO Nor«k S7th Ave. 



TWENTY-MILE 
WALRWEEKLY 

Rev. AHen Clark, 70 Years 

Old, Finds Sunday a 

Strenuous Day. 

Walks From West DuIuA 

to Fond du Lac and 

Return. 



BKAKCH OFFICES" 

W. J. J. Mornii. SI«V4 Nerlh Central A »e. 






Rev Allen Clark, pastor of the Ply- 
mouth Congregational church. West 
Duluth. and 70 years old. walkd. m-jre 
than twenty miles every Sunday in or- 
der to keep his preaching appointments 
at his charges at West Duluth, New Du- 
luth and Fond du Lac 

Rev. Mr. Clark lives In West Duluth. 
His Sunday routine is to preach at Ply- 
mouth church. Fifty-fourth avenue 
west and Bristol street at 10 oclock, 
walk 10 miles to a church at Fo''d du 
Lac. preach there, walk six mues oacK 
to New I'uluth, where services are neid 
at 6 p. m. and winding up by walKing 
home after church is out at New uu- 
luth which is usually at 9 p. m. , „ 
Patti r Clark is not a walker from 
choice and would willingly ride if there 
were any train accommodations suit- 
able As" it Is. however, he cannot get a 
train from West L»uluth after the morn- 
ine .«-ervice in time for the afternoon 
service at Find du Lac and the train 
schedule in returning does not suit it- 
self ui his convenience. 

Mr (^.ark in spite of his advanced 
ve-ii- i^ i-n enthusiastic church worker 

and ri'^ a- mplishmeiiis in covering his 

lenr. ; . : ^ considered remarkable. 

MASS MEETUNG ON 
Y. M. C A. PROSPECT 

hterest in Branch for Wesl 

Dululh Will Be Re- 

vivei 



I with relatives and f r ends in Toronto, 
W'alkertoii and Durh im, Ont. 

M.- Willard Lincoln and two child- 
ren of Los Angtles. Cal.. are guests 
at the home of the formers niolher. 
Mrs Lloyd of North Fifty-ninth ave- 

"^Mrr^Fred Frazer and children. Ruth 
and Haywood, have returned from a 
trip to Saginaw, Miin. 

Dan McEachon. for the past twenty- 
seven years a resideit of New nulutli. 
is reported to be cr tically ill at his 

home. , »,, , « rm 

Mr. and Mrs. E. I». Nickerson of 718 
North Fifty-fourth avenue west have 
returned from a lake trip. While away 
they visited friends at Attica. Micli.. 
and also at Detroit aid Port Huron. 
Flat for rent. 6032 Raleigh street. 

The funeral of Miss Anna Carlson, 
who died Thursday at the home of her 
brothtr-in-law. Louis Larson, 511 North 
Fifty-seventh avenu.i wtst. was neia 
this afternoon at 2:3) oVlock from the 
Richter & Bellmuer '>ndir taking rooms 
and 3 oclock from the Third Swedish 
Baptist church. Fifty-ninth 
west and Ramsey street, 
was in Oneota cemetery. ^-on. 

Unexcelled ice f r. am f or »" occa- 
sions manufactured -y *'""*L ^'emly 

Mrs Frank Cashi i of 5905 Loa> 
street' has gone to Minneapolis and 
Stugeon Lake on a ^ \»\^- ^ „ f, _,. 

Mrs. L. A. Root ard Mrs. C..H. t.ari 
son both of New Dul ith. are visiting in 

'^HurA". watch repairing. West Du- 
luth. 

A Barifnln. 

The corner lots m Grand avenue, 

with all Improvements. »750. Scott- 

Kreidler company, 405 Central avenue. 



next metin<? of the club will be held on 
July 27. 

— ■ - 

Fniled <o I'ny Tnx. 

J. D. Bergman pleaded g"»'ty., '" 
police court this morning to violating 
the wheelage tax ordinance and paid i 
fine of $7.50. The coniplaiM was sworn 
out by Inspector James Walsh. i 'u 
latter declares that vehicle owners 
will not only have to pay their li- 
cense, hut will also be re(|uired to dis- 
play the tags received fr< m the oflic^ 
of the city clerk. Since May 1 about 
112.000 has been collected under tne 
wheelage tax ordinance. 

^ 

Retania From VnenHon. 
Brown a.« a nut. City Clerk Harry A> . 
Cheadle returned this morning from a 
short vacation at Lake VermlUon. He 
was out with his family and states 
that he had a most enjoyable tune 
Deputy Clerk Palmer had charge 
the office during his absence. 



DYNAMITE 
HIHHOICE 

W rensball Farmer Ends His 

Life in a Peculiar 

Manner. 



be held next Thursday, and it is ex- 
pected that nearly a.*-- many more more 
will be entered by the time the line is 
formed. ^ , 

The Duluth Humane society tocla> 
announced the prizes it will offer rh- 
prizes will be a first and second for 
I the oldest and best-conditioned worK 
horses in the parade, age being the 
t first con.iideration In judging condl- 
' tion; first and second for light delivery 
liorses. and first and second for team- 
sters' horses. 



of 



WANTED! 



Bv Well Known New 
York Manager 



avenue 
Interment 



CA.RO OF XHA.IMKS 

To all who MO k ndly K«ve niinlKt- 
anre and nymv»tby diirlniK ««"■"«* 
berenvement. the ileatU «« our IHtle| 
Hon. Wnlter, Had for the many heaii. 
tlful floral «.flrerti.u*i. we here«itn| 
extend our heartfelt thaukw. 
>IH. .\M> Mils. C. 
AM> KAMn/>. 



Jt»H!>i!SON 




Will FUh tfce Clo«|Met. 

It Is expected that all the big fish 
within a radius of a '>o^en, ""^^^^_"^ 
Clouuet will be caught tomorrow. 
FouV members of the city engineers 
office left this morning for that »o- 
calitv on what they said ^as to be .^ 
fishing trip. The fishermen from the 
citv hall are Chris Brian. H*.rbert 
Ti«cher Ed Johnson and Henry Ander- 
son. They have promised every of- 
ticlal in the hall a mess of fish and 
declare that they will bring back some 
of the biggest specimens of tlie finny 
tribe ever seen In Duluth. 

Return* From Convention. 

Building Inspector Samuel M. Klei- 
ley returned today from the conven- 
tion of the National Building Manufac- 
turers' association. He staled that he 
heard a considerable number of Inter- 
esting papers which will be of great 
value to him In his work in Dululh. 
He added. (|uite emphatically, that he 
would have appreciated a few of old 
Lake Superiors breezes. It was hot 
In Cleveland, and he couldn t help but 
think that •It's cool In Duluth. 

.♦^ ■ 

Held to Grand Jury. 
Ole Jensen, arrested yesterday morn- 
ing on a warrant charging him with 
the embezzlement of $121.46 from the 
Minnesota Fruit company, waived ex- 
amination when arraigned in police 
court yesterday afternoon. He was 
bound over to await the action of the 
next grand jury. Ball was fixed at 
?"00 Mr Jensen was formerly In the 
jrrocerv business on Kast Fourth street 
and is" well known In that part of the 
city. 

C.lrls. get your sweetheart a Permit 
to smoke. 



lights the Fuse and Hugs;^ 



A Singer. profeKwional or amateur, ^Xh 
KOiiie moiuy. Leading part In high 
flaHM produvtiun. Wonderful opening 
AddreKw. N. Ilobcrti* 
w York City. 



NO "THREAT," 
SAYSDENEEN 

Governor Denies Story Ahout 
Shurtleff and the Speak- 
ership. 



140a llroadviayi 



WICKERSHAM 
MAKESREPLY 

Says He Is Not Through 

With Alaskan Cases 

Yet 



Explosive to His 
BreasL 



Peter Peterson, a farmer who lives 
near Wreiishall, took his life by the 
dynamite route. He touched a match 
to a stick of dynamite and then laid on 
the ground and hugged the dynamite to 
him. The explosion blew off one of his 
arms and put out an eye. The attempt 
at suicide, which occurred yesterday 
morning, was successful early today 
Teterson died 



in a local hospital to 



STILL AFTER HIS 
TWO FARMS 



Chicago, July 15. — Thomas Foulkes 
of Danbury, Iowa, who gave ?11.31i 
and two farms for the hand of Miss 
Lodavine Miller, only to be jilted, was 
in this city today In connection with a 
motion for a new trial, which 
made in Judge Devores' 
Miller and her 
Marion Miller, were 
obtaining money 



which he had been hastily taken. i m^-ins of a confidence game. The mo- 

It is said that Peterson tried to kill | ^j^,,, ^^j, argued today, but was con- 

hlmself once before. The body was | ^^J^^^^^y until the August term of court. 

removed to J. L. Crawford s undertak- 1 . 

ing establishment. An effort will be 

made to find his relatives. 

A farmer near Thompson, in the same 

neighborhood, killed himself two years 

ago by lighting a stick of dynamite 

which he held in his hand. 



SEE 



THE WATER 
CARNIVAL 



Washington. July 15.— Touching on 

the election of Shurtleff as speaker in 

the legislature which elected Mr. Lorl- 

mer, Mr. Henecy. of counsel for Lori- 

I m.;r! asked Governor Deenen of Illi- 

I nois, a witness in the Lorimer hearing, 

j it he had not said in the presence of J. 

! W. Ford, Jr., and Representative D. D. 

(Browneback that he "would defeat 

I Shurtleff if it was necessary to use all 

' the patronage to do it.' 

•I never did," replied the governor. 

He added that Ford claimed that in 

one conversation Deneen was using all 

the patronage to that purpose. . 

Governor i»eneen denieu that he had 

said to Representative Charles Durfee, 

when Durfee announced to him that he 

court. Miss I was going to leave Hopkins for L,o»»: 

brother. Attorney J. mer, that Lorimer would be elected and 

'that the election would be satisfactory 
to him. 

Tried <o Control Durfee. 
"I tried to prevent Durfee voting for 
Lorimer," said tiie governor." and sug- 
gested to him that I pobably would ha.ve 
to call a special session of the legisla- 
ture In the fall to pass on waterway 
matters, and In the meantime the sen- 
atorial candidates would fight the mat- 
ter out before the people." 

Conversations Governor Deneen had 
with Frank B. Noyes, then publisher ol 
the Chicago Record Herald, were gone 
into. The witness denied that Noyes 
had said to him that -Lorimer was the 



was 



found guilty of 

from Foulkes by 

The mo- 



NO PENSION LEGISLATION 

DLUIXCi THIS SESSION. 



Washington. July 15— There will be 
no consideration of pens-ion legislation 
at this session of congress. This no- 
tice was served on the house today by 
L>emocrat Leader I'nderwood. 



From the new Baseball Park, Park 
Point -Cocxi accommodations, and 
room fcr all. 




A mass meeting, which is calculated to 
arouse new interest In the proposition 
of a branch Y. M. C A. at West Du- 
luth, may be called in the near future 
and a committee appointed to push the 
matter iiv lively. 

The W.st Duluth W. C. T. U. and the 
local branch t,f the Ministerial associa- 
tion intend to work hard to bring 
about definite results on the project 

this summer. 

Several donations toward the project 
have been offered, and two lots, bought 
three years ago by the W. C. T. U. will 
be ui=ed as a building site, when mat- 
ters materialize. ^ , 

Last vear the proposition was taken 
up, but was dropped, or at l^ast no 
progress was made at the time. Three 
years ago. w hen the site for a branch 
bui'ding was bought, the movement 
was started, but at that time it was 
postponed owing to reques-ts made by 
the directors of the central association. 
It is believed that West Dulutu 
could support a J::5.000 building and 
that a membt rship of 300 could be es- 
tabli.«h*-d. There is no place of Us 
kind in West I'ulutii now. where boya 
can enjoy healthy exercise under 
proper supervision. 



VaudeviUianH Here. 

J. B. Rogers, tlie veil known theatri- 
cal man Is in the city, visiting v.ith 
his wife's parents. \lr. and Mrs. James 
Di Santo, 315 tfeven'eenth and One-halt 
avenue we.«-t. Mr^ Rogers has been 
here for several m mths. 

Mr. and Mrs. K< gers are kjiown to 
theatrical folks as Dutch" and *Babe 
Rogers, the singing and dancing Ger- 
man comedians. Mr. Rogers has been 
the manager of tl-e Embree Theater 
companv in Salt Lake City up to a fev. 
weeks ago, when h. returned to vaude- 
ville, and for the i ast four weeks has 
been playing at tht Salt Palace, m tlie 
siini© citv. 

Mr Rogers and Ms wife will remam 
in the city for about ^three weeks 
going from here t) Buffalo. N. Y.. to 
visit his parents and from there they 
will proceed to New York city to re- 
hearse their new a :t for next season. 

Fred Di Santo, a brother of Mrs. 
Rogers, left i^aturOay with the Parker 
Brothers Carnival company, and ex- 
pects to remain wtiii them for the rest 
of the season. Di Santo is a singing 
and dancing comec ian. 

• 

Herald Exeumlon* Xext Week. 

The Herald will have two excursions 
next week— Mondiy uP, the river on 
the steamer Colun bia. fare for round 
trip i;5 cents; Thursday afternoon 
•ttown the Lake- m the steamer Kas- 
Kin fare for i ound trip 30 cents. 
Tickets for Herald excursions must be 
bought at The Herild office, as regular 
prices will be charged at the dock. 




BUSINESS 



SINGERS IN 
CONVENTION 

Several New Societies Ad- 
mitted at Meeting Held 
Here. 



00 LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advert laement Leaa Tkan U Ocata 



ti:n 9 bv 12 uros. vp:lvkt.^ and 

axminsters; forty cotton mattresses, 
ail sizes; iron and brass beds; leather 
davenj.orts; kitchen cabinets. Call at 
showroom. li'JOl West First street, 
and make your own prices. Must be 
sold at once Factory agent 



720. 



FOR SALE— DO YOU WANT A O.OlN(; 
farm clicap'.' 40 acres cleared, 40 
timbered, nine-room house. cost 



* nlv Republican wlio could take or con- 
jis'.enlly h&v*f the office of senator by 
Democratic votes." 

He also denied that Noyes had told 
him "that if an attempt was made by 
Lorimer to elect Shurtlefi senator, 
everv vote the newspapers could con- 
trol "would be thrown to Hopkins ana 
Hopkins would be elected." 

No New«|»aper Control. 
' --l do not recoUn-t any such con- 
I versation, and do not recall any con- 
versation in whicii he claimed that he 
could control any votes in the Jegls- 
' lature." added Governor Deneen. 
I W iicn the committee adjourned lor 
i lunch Mr. Hanecy said he hoped to 
I finish his cross-examinattion in about 
an liour. ^ 

■* * 

* MATHEWSON, ONT., SAID * 
^ .iL^ini:. ,^^^^ ^^ ^^ PERIL. * 

* * 

Toronto, tfnt., Jnly 15. — The * 



Ex-Secretary Dickinson Also 

Said to Have Known 

of Fraud. 



Washington. July 15. — Attorney Gen- 
eral Wickersham today made an In- 
formal reply to the charge of Clilef 
Delegate Wickersham that he had al- 
lowed the statute of limitation to ex- 
pire in certain Alaska criminal cases- 
without taking action. He said: 

"I have not given a definite opinion 
that the statute of limitations has ex- 
pired in all of these cases. It is not 
improbable that criminal action may 
be taken. This matter is still undei 
inveetie^ation. in so far as it relates 
io the^alVeged combination of bidders 
in the coal proportion. The "a^ej 
case, however. 1 think Is barred hy the 
statute. I will continue my investiga- 
tion of the others. It has been under 
way for some time and has never been, 
discontinued." 

Sajn Dlcklnnon Knew. 
Delegate Wickersham of Alaska to- 
dav declared that Former Secretary of 
War Dickinson had been furnibheU 
with the same evidence concerning 
Alaskan frauds that was furnished to 



Attorney General Wickersham in May 
^910, and that he never acknowledge^- 
receipt of the documents. He had this 
statement placed in the records of the 
hearlnKS of the judiciary committ^^e 
^Comded with it' was the further state- 
lent that Delegate Wickersham fcub- 
the attorney general, more 







Printins aniji B«M»kblndlnac 

Thwlng-Stewart C >. Both 'phones, 114. 



Militia .Men Return. 

Companies A. i and E of 



Duluth. 
of Hib- 
from the 



H I- 



BUILDING ACTIVITIES 



F of Evelelji, and M 
bing. returned esterday 
annual encampnu nt at Lake ^"V- 
They are part oi the Minnesota Na- 
tional guard. Th.- local companies at- 
tended the big civiC celebration at Min- 
neapolis on their way to the encamp- 
ment and carriet off th ree prizes. 

For Sale. 

Empty whisky barrels J.t cents. 
Wall's family liquor store. 310 West 
Superior street. 

— ♦- 

Back From Convention. 
Dr C. W. Benst n returned from Eau 
Claire. Wis., wh. re he gave a clinic 
before the Wisco isin State Dental as- 
sociation, on bridge and crown work, 
br Benson has leen asked to give a 
similar clinic at the National Dental 
meeting at Cleveland next month. 

— ♦ 

Northlaitd PrlnterT- „^ 
Good Printing. Call Zenith 494. 

— ^ 

Hit By Street Car. 
Ed Olson was run down by a street 
car vesterday a'ternoon on Superior 
street, a short distance from Sixth 
avenue west. Ht dodged an eastbound 
car and ran in i ront of a car headed 
west He sustai led a fractured collar 
bone and a bruis >d hip. It is expected 
that he will rec .vtr in a short time. 
He was taken to St. Luke's hospital in 
Ford's ambulance. 

Noted Traveler Will Speak. 

Rev l>avid McConaughy. who will 
speak" tomorrow morning at 10 o clock 
at the First Presbyterian church, is a 
noted traveler, 1 aving devoted twelve 
vears in the Orient, most of which 
time he was ii India. During his 
stay in India, he was the national sec- 
•retarv of the Y. M. C. A. of that coun- 
AT NEW DULUTH.! try At the present time Rev Mc- 



The fire at the foot 
of FIftli Ave. West 
merely burned our 
yard office, and in 
nowise interferes 
witli 

PROMPT AND SATISFACTORY 
DELIVERY OF COAL ORDERS! 



CARNEGIE 
FUEL CO. 



»J,700; - - ^ 

macl.inerv, three cows, one horse, 
chickens,' pigs, etc.; this property is 
at a railroad station twenty-hve 
miles from Duluth. Price |4,500. 
Terms. Tilson & Giavatt, 715 Torrey 
building. 



VAN LEAR TO SPEAK. 

MiQiieapoIis Socialist Will Deliver 
Address at Machinists* Picnic. 

Thomas Van Lear, the Minneapolis 
Socialist, who came within 2l'0 votes 
of being elected mayor of the Mill 
City at the last municipal election, 
will be the principal speaker at tlie 
machinists' picnic at Fairmont park, 
Saturday, .July 22. 

It has been erroneously s'.f.ed that 
the picnic will be l.eld on Sunday. 
July 23. The committee, however, has 
not changed the date and it will be 
held as originally planned on July 2J. 

Mr Van Lear will speak at exer- 
cises which will be held in the morn- 
ing and afternoon. Louis Harthill of 
St. Paul a labor leader, will also be 
one of the speakers at the afternoon 
exercises. , . 

The outing has been arranged for 
the machinists unions of Duluth. Su- 
perior. Two Harbors and Proctor. 
Members and their families, about 300 
strong, will attend. 




2 LYCEUM BUILDING 



Phones: 



.. 30 
2400 



PERSONAL 



The most important business trans- 
acted by the Norwegian Singers of 
America at the session at the Commer- 
cial club today was the admission of 
singing societies from New York city. 
Hoboken, N. V.. Sioux City. Iowa, 
Decorah, Iowa, and St. Paul. 

In all 107 new singers were admitted. 

making the total "?*"'"V*''"''* L^'Lin^ 
society over i>00, the Increase J^*^}^f^ 
the largest that the socie'.y has had in 
;iny one year. ion 

Plans for the trip to Norway In 1914, 
the centennial of Norway's freedom 
win be taken up at the session this 

^ A'^chorus of the Norwegian Singers 
of America will make the trip to their 
fatherland, and plans for their going 
and other details In connection with 
the contemplated t rip will be discussed. 

kitcheneiTgets 
egyptian post 

Succeeds Sir Eldon Gorst as 

British Agent 

There. 

London. July 15.— Official announce- 
ment was made today that Field Mar- 
shal Lord Kitchener has been ap- 
pointed British agent to K^yPt- , "e 
succeeds Sir Eldon Gorst, who died on 
July 12. 



^ ^ .^ towa MaihewKon, tint., one «»f me » 

stable, chiken coops, sheds, j ^ p^iuorn of miiiplleH lor the Kwept * 

»,,...„„ ^ n.iniDK reKton, If. tn Iwimlnent ^ 

^ danger, according to « ineHHage * 
^ received bv T. W. <i»b»«on, deputy * 
4le coronilHuloner of mlnen. Flrett t 
^ were Maid to l»e nenrlng the town » 
^ rapidly. * 

LEGISLATURE AT 
MADISON ADJOURNS 



FUK ItKNT— FOrU-HOOM 
:Uii«v^ Kast First street. 



FLAT AT 



W'ANTICD — LAKGE CORPOUATION 
wishes woman representative in or 
within 100 miles of Duluth to handle 
prospective customers and introduce 
the newest and only scientific drug- 
less fat-re<luclng treatment known; 
do not answer unless you weigh over 
175 pounds, as we can only engage 
fat people; no one will be employed 
without reference to prove that they 
weigh over ]7o pounds; permanent, 
profitable employment, which should 
pay 120 weekly to special repre- 
sentatives; state age. weight and ref- 
erences; only itart of time required. 
AdC.ress Marjorie Hamilton Corpora- 
tion, suite 991), Colorado building, 
Denver. Colo. 



1 Conaughy 



Otto Krueger of New Duluth has be- 
gan the erection of a one-story brick 
building. 25 by 50 feet, on Common- 
wealth avenue near the Maccabee hall. 

There Is considerable building activ- 
ity at the present time in the suburb, 
many small houses being erected In 
the Gary and Pittsburg location.-*. 
About twenty are now In course of 
construction. , ,. ^ ^ ,, 

The addition to the Maccabee hall, 
consisting of the addition of another 
story and costing $2,000. has been 
completed recently. 

CANDIDATES FOR STHOOL 

BOARD ADDRESS ILLB. 

An open meeting of the West Du- 
luth Commercial club was held last 
evening, at which affairs concerning 
the school election and the school 
board were discussed by the candidates 
In tooav's election. 

W. B. Getchell, A. H. Kreiger and 
Andrew Nelson gave talks. They are 
the candidates, which have been in- 
dorsed by the club. E. R. Cobb, a 
candidate for re-election to the board, 
and L. A. Barnes, also spoke. 



board of 



i.c set retary 
the 



§ 



Race at Proctor. 

A dispute as to the r.ight of title of 
champion 110-dash runner of tiie vil- 
lage of Proctor was yesterday settled 
by a race between Harry Cinderman 
and Harry Fusfelt. the former winning 
by a six-foot margin and making it 
m 10 1-5 seconds. The race was held 
on the race track, which has been im- 
proved recently. 

West Duluth Briefs. 

John M. Holm has returned to his 
home in Milwaukee after a visit with 
friends In the western end of the city. 
Mr. Holm was a former West Duluth 
"business man. _ . , 

Edward Madden. Llndsey Stevenson 
and Christ Tracey returned yesterday 
from a fishing trip to Beaver Lake. 

Herbert Scanlon will leave this even- 
laS on the Fere Marquette for a visit 



of the foreign 
Presbyteislan church. 
wTth"headc|uart*rs in New York city, 
and as such is lirectlng the policy of 
the church In Ai i»-rica in foreign work 
His large experience jilaces him in a 
"osition to speak with authority on 
matters pertaining to foreign mission- 
ary work. 

Tfc« »w Baae Ball Park. 

on the Point will be in <7;n<>i- 
tlon for the pu'dlc to view the VV ater 
Carnival next ^^eek. seats can be se- 
cured and a goo 1 view of the sports on 
the water seen. If you do not belong to 
the Boat club ry the ball park and 

have a good time. 

__ . * 

"Made G»od" In Canada. 

Frank A. Maxwell, formerly physical 
director of the local Y. M. C. A., and 
under whose direction the present sys- 
tem of physical work of the local de- 
nartment was placed upon a larger 
flehl fs In the city for today and to- 
morfow. Since he left this city four 
.^nd a half vears ago. Mr. Maxwell ha« 
been very successful in his work in 
Lethbrillge. Altu. He started tiiere in 
the farmlnk industry, but later entered 
the real estate business, and has made 
good His family is residing In Min- 
neapolis. 

•. 

Twenty learn ol ProKrewa. 

"There's been a wonderful change 
since I ;\as here last.' said L. N. W ood 
this morning. .Mr. Wood is a delegate 
to the drugglsis' convention. Twenty 
vears ago he was in the drug business 
'«n Superior street. He is also a char- 
ter member of the I>uluth Lodge of 
Elks. No 133. He states that the im- 
provements which have been made at 
the Head of tie Lakes since he left 
here have beer mos . remarkable. He 
commented up"n the handsome brick 
buildings whlcri have been erected 
upon Superloi street to replace the 
frame structur-^s which lined the main 
street v.hen he left Duluth. Mr. Wood 
Is now located at Oakland, Cal. 

— ♦ 

NataialUatlon Club. 

The Norweg an Naturalization club 
held an Interesting meeting last night 
at the Kalamazoo hall. The present 
school election was discussed. The 



Rev. .tnd Mrs. T. S. Oadams of Two 
Harbors, and daughter Har.el. passed 
through Duluth today on their return 
from their summer home at l^Kc 
Mills Wis. Their daughter Florence 
has gone East to spend a month in 
Bost<m and Vermont. . 

Edward Dupont of Cloquet is in Du- 
luth renewing acquaintances made 
when he attended a local business col- 

^^r" M. Knack of Bay City is at the 

^'"a^^'r Romeo and wife of Eveleth 

n^A.^Brown^'orGrand Rapids Is at 

'*'h.^R.^^ Harris of Biwablk is at the 

^^WinVam Sibley and wife of Iron 
River Wis., are at the McKay. 

W. R. Oliver of Chlsholm Is at the 

^T^T. Johnson of Coleralne Is at the 
St. Louis 



For Motor Parties 

Run oat eighteen and one-half mllen 
on the Itloe Lake road to the luliird 
l.akr inn and net one «« Ihowe Spring 
1 bifken Dlnnern at any hour, or an 
afternoon luncheon, served on the '«''K« 
Moreened porche« overlooking the lake. 



WA.VTED— AT ONCE. COMPETEN-T 
girl for general housework. 21) 
West F ifth street. 

WANTED TO BUY— A FEMALE DOG 
about 1 vear old, nice and fat. Ad- 
dress R 193, Herald. 

WANTED — LARGE CORPORATION 
wishes man reprcseniaiive in or 
within one hundred miles of Duluth 
to liandle prospective customers and 
introduce the newest and only .scien- 
tific, druglcps fat reducing treat- 
ment kn'-wn. l>o not answer unless 
you weigh over 175 pounds, as we can 
only engage fat people. Nn one will 
be employed without reference to 
prove that they weigh over 175 pounds. 
Permanent profitable employment i 
which should pay 520 weekly to spe- 
cial representative. State age, ] 
weight and references; only part of i 
time required. Address Marjorie 
Hamilton Corporation. suite 888, 
Colorado building. Denver, Colo. 

SITUATION WANTED — WASHING, 
ironing, office cleaning preferred. 
Call Grand 1029- Y. or 416 East 1 1 
Fourth street, base ment. 

LOST— TH URSDA Y.~f WO RED COW.S. 
one mulley, one with big horns. 
Finder plea.se return to H. Fishman, 
323 East Ni nth street. 

LOST — BRINDLE COW, WITHOUT 
horns. Notify P. Sher & Co., 25 
East First street. 



Madison," Wis.. July 15— The Wis- 
consin legislature adjourned sine die 
today after sustaining the governor's 
veto to the Bichlor bill reducing the 
primary election vote to 5 per cent of 
the preceding election vote to secure 
a nomination. 

Among the important laws enacted 
and approved by Governor McGovern 

A graduated income tax; a working- 
men'v compensation act; a stringent 
corrupt practices act; a law providing 
for the control of water powers as a 
public utility; completion of the forest 
referee and dozen acts relating to 
the subject of conservation; ' home 
rule" law for all cities and an annual 
appropriation of $350,000 for state aid 
for highway improvement. 



the orgai 

''^-l' have evidence. " declared Delegate 
Wickersham. "that f3,000 was used to 
br be a deputy district attorney. That 
K, the kind of matter 1 have been va n- 
Iv trying to get this government to in- 
vestigate and pr osecute. 

BRIDGKWANTS 
HIS DAUGHTER 

Chicago. July 15.-An echo of the 
trial of Evelyn Arthur See of "AbBO- 
lute Life" notoriety was heard in the 
juvenile court today, when Stephen 
Bridges asked for the custody of hit. 
daughter Mildred. j, ^ t^ 

Custody of the girl was awarded to 
Mr Bridges until September >^''^" »'^*^ 
case will be decided finally '^'^'^g'^ 
in his petition declared that neither 
Mrs Bes^sle Clingen. a probation officer 
in whose custody the daughter has- 
been nor his wife, whom he is suing 
for divorce. Is a fit person to care for 
Mildred. 



HARRY HIGGINS 
SENT TO PRISON 



Chicago, July 15.— Harry Higglns, a. 
labor "slugger" convicted of shooting 
and wounding James Dillon, was de- 
nied a new trial today and sentenced- 
to serve an indeterminate sentence of 
from one to fifteen years in prison. 



SEVENTH WARD 

GARDEN DIVISION! 




as 



is spending a few wf-eks here 
euest at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. 
¥ Plummer, 2825 West First street. 




SUBJEa IS 
ANNOUNCED 

Wickersham Will Speak on 

Regulation of Interstate 

Commerce. 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR, MOLES, 
warts, removed forever. Miss Kelly's 
Manicuring and Massaging Parlors. 
131 West Superior street. 



Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co.. 214 Providence building. 



LA CLAIRE. BASKET BRAID. Bis- 
cuit colls of real human hair, 25 per 
cent off for one week only. Beauty 
Comfort shop, 20 West Supeiior 
street, upstairs. 

Launches and all kinds of small boats 



H. S. Patterson. 6th 



Ave. west slip. 



TOTS WITH MATCHES 
CAUSE $15,000 FIRE 

Five Buildings in Gwinner, 

N. D., Gone Before Flames 

Are Checked. 

Gwinner. N. D.. July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Children playing with 
matches started a fire here this af- 
ternoon which caused 115,000 damage 
and destroyed five buildings. The fire 
departments of Cogswell and Milnor 
responded to a call for help but were 
too late to assist. The places destroyed 
are- Town hall, Gwinner State bank, 
Westerburg's store, Dr. Williams resi- 
dence and office, Peter Backstrom s 
residence. The losses are about half 
covered with insurance. 



Attorney General George W. Wick- 
ersham will speak on "What Further 
Regulation of Interstate Commerce ia 
Necessary or Desirable'.'" 

The speech of Mr. Wickersham will 
be the feature of the met-ting of the 
state bar association, which will meet 
in Duluth July 18, 19 and 20. Mr. 
Wlckersham's address takes place on 
the afternoon of July 19. 

The place at which the meeting will 
be held is still undecided. It nmy be 
held at the Spalding hotel and It may 
be held at the Orpheum theater. Ne- 
gotiations for the theater are now 
going on and if it can be sectjred It is 
probable that the mtetln« will be iveiu 
there, otherwise at the .Si)alding. "The 
public is cordially invited to hear Mk 
Wickersham and no admittance will be 
o h ci 1' tr 6 il 

The announcement of the subject of 
the address came this morning when 
Charles Farnham. secretary of the 
state bar association, notified ^^ arren 
E. Greene of the local committee on ar- 
rangements. ^'•' 

PRIZES OFFERED 
FOR WORK HORSES 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Alexander Beck and Lydia Peltonen, 1 1 
both o f St. Louis county. 1 

7 j ! 

I DEATHS AND FUNERALS j 

BUIGCS— Eincst Harc-ld Briggs. 11- 
vear-old son of Mr. and Mrs. E. A. 
Briggs of Battle Creek, Mich., for- 
merly of Duluth. died at Nicholas 
hospital, Battle Creek, July 4. follow- 
ing an operation for jippendicitls. 
He was born at 218 West Fourth 
street, Duluth, where the family for- 
merly resided. The funeral was held 
at Battle Creek, Th ursday, .luly 6. 

HAGEN— Anna Evelyn, the 11-year-old 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew 
Hagen. of 814 I-Iast Third street, died 
last night. The funeral will be held 
from the family residence Monday 
afternoon at 2 p. m. 



Traetti lli 
SiM yp 

The Seventh Ward Garden Division, located 
twelve blocks from Piedmont Avenue car line, 
facing Morris Thomas road. The new Hutchin- 
son road runs through this land. Part oi the 
land is cleared and balance wooded. Inquire from 
the owners, Karl J. Hagberg, 9 Twentieth ave- 
nue west, or Andrew Bergquist, 404 Exchange 
building. 
HAGBERG WILL BE ON THE GROUNDS 

JULY 13 to 29. w^^^^^ ^^^^ ^"^ ^^•"'^• 



I 



■*n» 



Monuments direct from factory, no 
store rent, no agents; you save 25 
per cent. Charles Benson, cut stone 
contracti->r, 2301 West Second street, 
or 'phone me, Lincoln 334, new 'phone. 




MONUMENTS AT COST, to save expense 
of moving them to our new building 
at 230 E. Sup. St. P. N. Peterson 
Granite Co.. 332 E. Sup. St. 



Ahout 200 horses have already been 
entered for the work-horse parade to 



BUILDING PERMITS. 

'To Edward Wendorf, brick 
apartments, Jefferson street 
between Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth avenues east $ 10,000 

To O Pearson, repairs. Lake 
a'ehue south 

Tc A. A. Adams, frame dwell- 
ing. West Ninth street be- 
tween Second and Third ave- 
nues 

To Henrv Fee. brick fiat. East 
Superior street between 
Eighteenth and Nineteenth 
avenues 

To J. Essen, frame cottage, 
West Third street between 
Thirty-fifth and Thirty-sixth 
avenues 



nesota. 



reliability of 
the Union Pain- 
less Dentists has 
never been ques- 
tioned. The class 
of work done 
speaks for Itself. 
We employ only 
graduate dentists, 
who are legally 
qualified to prac- 
tice dentistry 
under the laws of 
the state of Min- 
We employ no. students. Our,, great size. ,8upej1or^ eriulpmeTit 



and svstem of specializing the work allows us to place 
low prices on the .finest grade of dentistry: 

NOTE THESE PRICELS: 



22 



800 



1,500 



6,000 



500 



$3 



None 
better at 



50c 



SILVER FILUNeS 

any price 

WHALEBONE PLATES {>J ^^?.%% 

ma ~^A . . ▼ 



ues, $8 and. 



GOLD CROWNS J^r'at. 

No better at any price for. 

BRIDGE WORK 'w^Vgh't?'^0 

beauty and quality has never A^ 

been excelled ~ 

We SyeelalUe !■ Gold Inlay-— Cold and AlaminnrnPlateii. 

UNION PAINLESS DENTISTS 

DR. FRANKLIN 8REER k CO., Owners, 317 W. Superior S*. Duluth 

Opea from 8:30 a. m. to T p. m. Sunday. 10 to 1. 



'f 



T 



^^ 



" 






I 


1 


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i 

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i 


1 


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1 

1 










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—— 




8 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 15, 1911. 



rXHE DULUTH HERALD 
AN INDEPENDENT NEWSPAPER. 

-ESTABLISHED APRIL 9. 1883- 

Publishe<l everv evening except Sunday by 

THE HERALD COMPANY. 

Heraia Buil.linii. Opposite Postofiioe Square. 
422 an.l 424 West First St. 



Duluth. Minn. 



KnUtrea j» seiouJ-cUa* nutter si tlie 



Uuluth fwiofflce uuJer the act iH 



TKLKPlltlXES — B»II ■■* Zenith: 

BusineJ Office. 324. Editorial Roonn*. 112 6. 



nPFlCIAL PAPER cTTY of UiiLUTH 



that of ts opponents. Theoretical o^jonents ol 
protectio i have thundered for years, but their argu- 
ments fell on deaf ears. The downfall of high pro- 
tection, vhich is coming as surely as tomorrow 
comes, will be due to the abuses committed by its 
advocate 1 and beneficiaries 



relation to private health. Michigan in seeking to 
provide men to fill this field is performing a valu- 
able public service. 

Also, the policy of bestowing honorary degrees 



THE OPEN COURT 



(Readen of The Herald are invited to make free 'U* 
of ttiU colubiu to cx;jre»a their Idea* about the topic* 
of general Iniereet. but dlacunsions of gectarlan reilg- 
. 1 J • ' lou). aifferein.ea are barred, letters itooiild not ex- 

that have meaning, as this one has, is f OUnued in l ceed SJO worda— the aUorter the better. They must be 
7,. . . ■ , c A ^^t -.^ ^rlwrltttii ou one sl.le of the p.ip<r only, and they mu»t 

common sense. OlVing the degree OI aOCtor Ol i j^ accompanied in every ca»e uy t!» name aod ad- 
dress of Iht writer, thuugh these need not be pub- 



One < f the grossest of these abuses is retaining laws to a man who got his schooling on the fly 
the tariff tax on the necessities of the people when [when he was a boy, but who has "cvertheless 
the reas(.n for it, it there ever was a reason 



has 



.11.00 
. .35 j 
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.fl.OO 
. 1.M 



~ SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 

(By mail payable In advanoo.) 

Dally, three montiis 

l>aily. one month 

Dil'y. six month.s 

Dally, one year ■ 

iialurday llrrnhl, on* year 

Weekly Herald, oue year 

Rem: tuv« ma> U. nmde by ohcck. post.ifflce >''^"_.'^*''r} 
ktlcr ..r eipr^ order Make aU reaUftanres payahla 1 1 The Herald 
Company Ui-e D.Jsta(flco « lire* In full. Inoludlne «:ate and county. 

BY CARRIER— CITY OR SUBURBS. 

Daily. .>ri- ^^>•ek » J? 

Daily, one month «; oo i 

Dail. one year "• ^" 

But». riljers will i-c.!,fer a f »'or i^n the elrc^ilatl.m d^aitment ^ bjr 
tilling .TJl. either 'phoiitf. and muktng kii'wn any coiupUlnt of »ir\''<'; 

V. U tiaiwrtifil wh.Mi dciiring the addcaa* of your p»P«r changed to 
gl»e both the old aiU new ad>lre*je» 



disappeared, and the only thing that keeps it is the 
power of the beneficiaries it has made rich and 

strong. 

Whet this country cannot produce enough meat 
to feed itself it is folly of the rankest kind to main- 
tain tariff duties against meat products. 

Mr. Armour proposes that American packers go 
400 I to Argentina for their cattle. Probably he would 
like to see cattle put on the free list so the pack- 
ers won t have to pay anything to bring them in. 



achieved something that makes it proper to honor 
him. is well meant enough, but it will not stand 
analysis. 

Says the Chicago Record-Herald: "Why not 
establish degrees of master and doctor of applied 
sociology, masters and doctors of applied ethics, 
masters and doctors of public service and adminis- 
tration? Persons who deserve recognition deserve 
real recognition, not the privilege of participating 
in a solemn farce or idle ceremony." 

Why not, indeed? Then the honors bestowed 



Uahed. 
evci.) 



A algced letter U atwaya more e((acilv». bow- 



THREE-CENT FARES. 



HANGING TO IT. 




The Duluth Herald accepts advertlslns contraots 
with the di-^tinet guarantee that it has tfie largest 
circulation of anv newspaper published in Minnesota 
outside the Twin" Citlea. Its value as an advertising 
mediu^n l.s apparent. 



IS 




The greatest pltjsure I know is to Jo a 
good action by stealthy and have it found 
out by accident. — Charles Lr.mb. 




THE END IN SIGHT. 

The country is very much obliged to the heat, 
exhaustion, a belated sense of shame or whatever it 
is that 13 responsible for the most welcome fact that 
the senate has agreed on dates for voting on the 
several pending measures, and that adjournment 
and rest are in sight. 

The senate will vote next Saturday on Canadian 
reciprocity, and it will pass it without amendment. 
That does away w ith the need of returning it to the 
house, so It will go directly to the president, who 
will sign it promptly and thus complete the noblest 
piece of work of his administration. 

The senate votes on the wool revision bill July 
27. the farmers' free list bill Aug. I, congressional 
reapportionment Aug. 3 and the statehood bill .\ug. 
7. Adjournment, it is e.xyected. will follow imme- 
diately after the vote on statehood, unless some of 
these measures should be passed with amendments 
involving delay in conference. 

Whether the senate will pass any. all or none of 
these other measures it is hard to say. There will 
be a fight on all of them. If the so-called "pro- 
gressives" are in good faith, they will join with the 
Democrats to puss the wool bill and the farmers' 
free list bill. The latter is a complete answer to 
their charge that reciprocity takes the tariff off 
everything the farmer sells and leaves it on every- 
thing he buys. The former is a long step toward 
that real tariff revision which the progressives late- 
ly professed to favor ardently. 

But the things of chief interest are that reciproc- 
ity will pass and that adjournment is in sight. 



THF DOWNFALL OF THE REPUBLIC. 

The Republic totters to its fall! The end 
near, and presently the bright star of free govern- 
ment, which blazed in the heavens for a century and 
more alter Yorktown, will lose its brilliance and 
tumble ignominiously into darkest depths. 

We know this is going to happen because the 

iXew Yi.rk Sun has proved it with an acrostic. It 
has discovered a group of tendencies in the public 

'life of the nation today which it arranges cleverly, 
so that the first letters of each line, read in order, 
spell tlese fateful words: "DEATH TO THE 
REPUILIC." 

Pro! ably it is too late to save the Republic. A 
glance it the tendencies that so affright the Sun 
makes it clear that it is too late, because there is 
nothing surer than that most of these tendencies 
have come to stay and to work themselves out to 
their final end. whatever hosts of annihilation and 
disaster hover about that fearsome end. Here is 
the acDStic: 

I'lrect prlmarie.s: direct election, 
t mploy-rs- liability up to the handle. 
Abolition of the executive veto everywhere. 
Tenure of office determined by plebiscite. 
Haphazard laws enacted at the street cor- 
ner. 



application and long study have perfected them- ouluth want the summer 



To the Editor of The Herald; 

I read with much interest the Inter- 
view In The Herald tonight with 
Georgs N. Lyman of Minneapolis, in 
which he polntei out some of Dululhs 
faults. It reminded me of something 
that I am afraid 1 have been allowine 
readers of the Open Court to forget 
for a few days— the idea of getting the 
national summer capital established in 
Duluth. Why doesn't somebody do 
something about this, Mr. Editor? W hy 
doesnt somebody with some inlluenc« 
and position say. •Lets go after It 
1 don t for the Ufe of me understand 
the lethargy that seems to have fallen 
on the city in this matter. This ses- 
sion of congress Is golrig to adjourn 
pretty soon, but there will be another 
next winter, and If we don t look out 
some other city will be grabbing after 
the honor and advantages that go witn 
the summer capital location. V"l®sn t 

capital here^ 



A Way Tbey Have. 

Litchfield Independent: The Minne- 
sota railroads went back to 3-ccnt 
fare July 1. Of course, as heretofore, 
they will discriminate in favor of cer- 
tain interests by selling 2,000-niile 
books at $40 Hat, or 2 cents per mile, a 
rate that the court says is conttscatory. 
Tney will put the screws on the gen- 
eral public at the straight 3-cent rate. 
Freight rates have also been jumpea 
10 to 30 per cent. 



It'll H«rd to Submit. 

Albert Lea Standard: The railroads 
are now more than ever a law un'^o 
themselves, for. backed by federal 
judges, who seem to suit the big in- 
terests, they override the legislature 
and state court-i and impose an ad- 
ditional holdup of 3-cent passenger 
tare and of 25 per cent increase in 
freight rates, and challenge the people 
to help them-selves if they can. And, 
with a subservient and truckling gov- 
ernor and supine railroad commission 
the people — until the next election, are 
helpless and must endure the great 
robbery that is being committed and 
the despotism that rules the state, with 
the best grace the character of the 
wrong and tlieir increasing resentment 
will permit. 



se 



iVes in learning so that they really deserve these 'J,^X ^^r\ """'' ' '^"'' *"''''"' ^ 



degrees which the college universities are scatter- 
ing broadcast. 



Theoretical democracy made actual and 
absolute. 

Cregon and Oklahoma methods Cor every 

stato. 

The referendum substituted for the Con- 
stitiitlon. . , .,, ^ 

Hysterical reform directed by the Open 
Mouth . ^ ^ 

i;ight per cent vote starts a statute. 

Keal self-government, as In France in "89. 

Klectlve officers removable at any time. 

I'ubllc and private utilities on the same 
basi*i. 

I npopular judges suhject always to recall. 

liusiiiess. big and little, under political 
management. 

l.aws good until repealed by railway train 
can''ass. 

Initiative, referendum and recall. Including 
the judiciary. 

fommisslon rule in city, state and nation. 



ANOTHER PHASE OF IT. 

J. Ogden .-Vrniour says that this country is no 
longer producing beef enough for its own needs, 
and that this has been the condition for some time. 
Yet the beef trust has been e.xporting beef, paying 
ocean freights on it and selling it in Europe cheap- 
er tlian it does here. 

When this country hasn't enough beef to go 
around, and every pound exported tends to increase 
the price of what remains, what sort of a public 
service is it that consists in e.xporting beef needed 
right here and selling it abroad at prices lower than 
are charged here? Isn't it, in fact, a crime? 



THE TAX ON FOOD. 

J. Ogden Armour, returning from Europe, told 
the reporters that though there is a large European 
demand for American beef, it will be necessary to 
go to South America to fill it, because this coun- 
ty i.s no longer producing any more beef than it is 
able to consume. 

Nor is it, apparently, producing as much as it 
needs. That will not be the case until it is pos- 
sible for the average family to eat all the beef it 
wants and needs, and that isn't possible with 
prices anywhere near where they are now. 

Europe, doubtless, will get all the beef it needs 
from South America. 

But what about American consumers? 
Against South American beef, or any kind of 
beef except that produced here, there is a tariff 
duty. If this is a protective duty it is absurd, be- 
cause freight rates are protection enough if the 
beef industry needs any protection, which it most 
decidedly does not. 

If it is a revenue duty it is infamous, because 
it is wicked to tax the people's food when there are 
thousands underfed and many more thousands un- 
able to indulge themselves freely in good beef. 

No more of a case than the Armour interview 
establishes is needed to prove that the tariff should 
be removed from meats. It is needless as protect- 
ion and it is wicked as a tax. 

When the growth of this country so far out- 
Strips the production of food that the domestic 
supply is inadequate, every reason of justice and 
fair play demands that the tariff bars shall be 
thrown down and free admission offered to the 
food products of the world. Nothing can more cer- 
tainly destroy the whole system of protection than 
the maintenance of duties on food products when 
there is no demand for them whatever except from 
the masters of the food supply who wish to keep 
out foreign competition while wringing unjust 
profits from the necessities of the people. 

The system of protection devised by Hamilton 
and distorted into oppression by the Republican 
party in the McKinley. Dingley and Aldrich tariff 
bills, is wrecking itself by its iniquities and its ab- 
surdities. If it falls to the ground completely it will 
be the doing of its own advocates far more than 



Here are eighteen separate tendencies which are 
conspii ing to undermine the palladium of our liber 
ties an 1 to tear down the bulwark of the same. Of 
the eighteen, thirteen can be grouped under one 
head: ilirect control by the people of legislation and 
the public service. Of the remaining five that re- 
lating to commission government is practically un- 
der that head also; employers' liability is simply 
giving the man who makes wealth a decent show 
agains the man who takes wealth; "real self-gov- 
ernment as in France in 89" is a general grouping 
of the whole bundle of tendencies, except that it is 
libel to compare the self-governing capacity of the 
Ameri :an people with that of the French of '89, 
who h id just thrown off in a mighty convulsion the 
rule of monarchy and aristocracy that had smoth- 
ered them in ignorance for generations; and the 
regulation of business in the public interests, which 
is the only alternative to the old tendency of shack- 
ling the public for the benefit of big business. 

If the tendency toward real democracy, real self- 
government, and direct control by the people of 
legislation and the public service, means the down- 
fall o: the Republic, then the Repulbic is indeed 
doomed. 

And if the Republic could endure only by keep- 
ing b;xk these developments, then the Republic is 
a poor, unworthy thing that it will be well to end 
as speedily as possible. 



PROGRESSING INTO THE DITCH. 

Many people believed that when DoUiver died 
the progressive Republican cause lost its brains and 
its heart. Now it appears that it lost not only 
these things, but its conscience as well. 

Never has a movement that promised so well 
fallen so far in so short a time. A year ago there 
was strong reason for believing that the insurgents 
would either get control of the Republican party or 
form the nucleus of a new party containing the 
progressive elements of both the old parties. Now 
there is nobody who looks forward to anything so 
improbable. The "insurgents" have insurged once 
too often, and by convincing the public that they 
are playing politics instead of serving the people 
wholeheartedly and without personal designs, they 
appear to have committed political suicide. 

Some current comments will indicate the drift 
of opinion: The New York Tribune says that 
"even the senate galleries tittered" when Senator 
Cummins criticised President Taft's Indianapolis 
speech as "inconsistent," so soon after Cummins 
had been shown up as advocating reciprocity a few 
years ago though he is opposing it now. 

Says the New Haven Journal-Courier: "The 
reckless manner in which they have dissipated the 
fine reputation they had acquired is pitiful." 

The Baltimore Sun says that they "have been 
making a losing fight because they have failed to 
live up to their professions, have sacrificed prin- 
ciple to political expediency and on the reciprocity 
questions have proved more reactionary than the 
reactionaries themselves." 

Says the St. Louis Republic: "The whole 
course of obstruction pursued is doctrinaire, aca- 
demic to a degree; it suggests the spirals of small 
politics, rather than the right lines of true states- 
manship." 

The Providence Journal adds: "As a vital 
force either in their party or in the country the 
insurgents have failed utterly to demonstrate their 
value." 

The Toledo Blade says that "the country is fast 
learning the hollowness of the gentlemen." 

The New York Evening Post says: "These 

en who are now so busy splitting hairs and re- 



mental feature to such an 
acqui;sltlon, and I can think of two 
or three distinct advantage;?. Can i 
vou' Then why doesnt somebody get 
busv? The proposition strikes me as 
having the nature of an investment 
with sure returns, for If we didn t get 
it we wouldn't have to pay a great 
deal, and If we did get it we d be a 
long ay the gainers. Once more, why 
doesn't somebody get '>u^y"'^„_„_^ 

C. PREVIOUS LETTERS. 

Duluth. July 14 



A LETTER HOME. 



and 



m( 

fining and making exceptions and planning and 
making cute little tactical campaigns— can these be 
the magnificent champions who entered the senate 
to make an end of corner politics as well as of cor- 
ruption, to slay the 'interests' in the meshes of their 
own wicked devices? The insurgents were Ishmael; 
nothing was to be sacred to them — senatorial cour- 
tesy, precedent, good taste; they would smite and 
spare not. Where are the Berserkers and Dervish- 
es of yesterday? Today they hem and haw and 
make explanations and bring up distinctions quite 
after the fashion of the 'interests'." 

It isn't a laughing matter, this precipitous 
downfall of a promising movement in American 
life. It is a pity, a very great pity. Not only is a 
promising movement proved hollow, but promising 
political careers are wrecked. Worse still, by mak- 
ing a mockery of their fine pretensions, the so- 
called "progressives" have turned into contemptible 
cant the very battle cries about which the people 
seemed ready to rally. In this way they have ac- 
complished a harm greater even than the good 
they promised so short a while ago. 

COMMENDABLE MERCY. 

We don't know much about the personal char- 
acter of Angelina Neapolitano, the Italian woman 
who was sentenced to death for the murder of her 
husband at the Sault, but we are heartily glad the 
Ontario government has decided not to hang her. 
Whether those are right who say she killed her 
husband because he forced her to lead a life of 
shame, or those who say she killed him because he 
objected to her evil conduct, makes no difference. 



Like to come to see you. daddy, 

perhaps I will some day. 
Like to come back East to visit, but 1 

wouldn't care to stay. 
Glad vou're doing well and happy, glad 

■you like your country best. 
But for me 1 always hunger for the 

freedom of the West 
There's a wholesomeness about it tnai 

I never could explain; 
Once you breathe this air you love it. 

and vou long for it again. 
There's a tie you can't discern In tne 

.splendor of the sky. 
It's just home to you forever and l 

can't tell you just why. 

It's so big. and broad, and boundless, 

and Its heaven Is so blue. 
And the metal of Its people always 

rings so clear and true; 
And its billowed acres quiver like tne 

shudder of the sea, 
\nd Its waves roll rich and golden 

upon the shore to me. 
Why your farm and all the others that 

we used to think so fine. 
Wouldn't lump 'em all together— make 

a corner lot in mine. 
And your red clover pasture, wth its 

gate of fence rails barred. 
Why. It wouldn't make a grass plot 

In our district schoolhouse yard 

Not a foot has touched Its prairies but 

is longing to return; 
Not an eye has seen the sunset of us 

Western heavens burn, 
But looks back In hunarry yearning. 

with the memory growd dim 
And the zephyr of its prairies breathes 

the cadence of a hymn, 
That l.s sweet and full of promise as 

the "Beulah Land" we knew. 
When we used to sit together In the 

queer old-fashioned pew; 
And at eventide, the glory of the sun 

and sky and sod 
Bids me bow my head in homage and 

in gratitude to God. 

Yes. I love vou, daddy, love you with 

a heart that's true as steel, 
But there's something In Dakota makes 

vou live breathe and feel: 
Makes" you bigger. broader. better; 

makes vou know the world of toll. 
Makes you free as are her prairies, and 

as noble as her soil. 
Makes you kindly as a man is, makes 

you manly as a king. 
There'.s something in the grandeur of 

the season's sweep and swing 
That casts off the fretting fetters of 

your East and makes you blest, 
With the vigor of the prairies, with 

the freedom of the West. 
—James W. Foley, In Bismarck Tri- 
bune. 



Railroad Piracy. 

St Cloud .Journal-Press. The rail- 
road's are giving the laugh to Judge 
.Sanborn, who said that the railroads 

r^ufle""bVsel7inrSrg" book^ *g"o^ I Uttle -ab6ut anything save 

for .OOO^'mfles tor $40. The big rti-n,^ day's work,_the best Jhey 

who send out traveling men will onlj 

^ay 2 cents, while the fo k who do not 

travel for a living will ^ont nue o 

pay 3 cents. Oh! you railroad captain 

Kids'. 

How Do You Like It. 

Red Wing Free Press; Lnder the 
new railroad regulation.s created by 
Judge Sanborn, and. which w;ent Into 
effect July 1st, the rich may now iide 
on the railroads for 2 cents a mi e, the 
middle cla.:r, for 2>^ cents, win e the 
poor must pay 3 ctnts u mile. That is, 
Cse who^can aftord to pay out tie 
money for a 2,000-mileage book at the 

time get the 2-cent i?^^- V(MW» m^ll 
who can stand to pay tor a l.'^'^.^-'"'/^^ 
coupon book are given a ^Vz-cent rate 
while those who can o"ly.P^>^f,i''^^ 
go must pay 3 cents a mile. How do 



you like it. you people who vote away 
your rights and your power at eveiy 
election? 

One Bright Spot. 

Virginia Virginian: If you don t like 
to oav a 3-cent per mile fare In Mm- 
nesVni. walk to Duluth and then take 
the Missabe or ^^--,^f,tl}%,ll' ^c^ 



IS a 



the 

glnia. This 

to live. 

Not SeekluK Friends. 

Carlton Vldette: The 3-cent railway 
fare went Into effect in Minnesota lasi 
laturdf?. Many had lived in hopes that 
the railroads would not actually en- 
force this rate, or that It would be 
abrogated bv them. The fact that the 
passfnger receipts have been more pro- 
lific with the 2-cent rate than they 
formerly were with the 3-cent ra^e 
would make It appear that the com 
panies might not be los'iig money b> 
at least compromising the rate at saj 
2U cents and at the same time they 
would gfve the traveling public a far 
more friendly feeling toward the pow- 
erlul corporations. 

It'n Not VUlble. 

Mankato Free Press: ^If^^^fe ff^I 
Kern's decision Is to the effect that the 
who wants to travel a few 



Ks"must"p;y"^-railroad 3 c^^ 
but the rich man who wishes to travel 
a thousand miles ,pr "-'"re "lay do so 
at 2 cents a mile." says the Fairmont 
Sentlnll. IS there any justice in that 
sort of thing? 

Knew What They Were Doing. 

Warroad Plaindealer: If a time had 

fdj'Srned and would "»','«"' «|Sr, 

f.^1f;i'c'k,'raSe/,"%e"/,^f.a{^,MEi 
i = -_ j_ o.^ •«...<¥ v<»nr" and all conuiii'Jns 



tion in an ''off y^f\^--—^ favorable 



^■^^ ^^"ijul^n^ c;^^a--^unt of that 
kind. 



SATURDAY 
NIGHT TALK 



The Pursuit of Happiness. 

Our fathers used to read the Declar- 
ation of Independence on Independence 
day. No Fourth of July celebration 
was quite complete unless some stout- 
lunged orator declaimed before the 
holiday crowd those words of Thomas 
Jefferson that called a nation into be- 
ing. We have largely dropped the cus.s 
tom, though the old document is fa- 
miliar to thousands of school children 
throughout the land. Probably most 
young Americans could repeat some 
part of it from memory. 

There are the fine sounding words 
about the inalienable rights of men as 
being "life, liberty, and the pursuit of 
happiness." The last clause sets one 
thinking. Men. of course, have a right 
to pursue happiness. But it s another 
thing to catch it. Even if they pur- 
sue It through all the years there is 
no assurance that they shall ever hunt 
down the quarry. If they set out de- 
liberately to overtake it they may nna 
It alway.s Just eludes their grasp. 

The strange thing about happiness 
is that It very rarely comes to us when 
we seek it directly. It is rather an in- 
direct result of a good and useful Uie. 
Have you ever remarked that the hap- 
piest people are those who think very 
' - ■ doing the 

.._ can? They 

are not trying to be happy flr-st of all, 
but to be faithful. And somehow hap- 
piness comes, even though they have 
not expected it. Did you ever know a 
day in which you had some trouble- 
some duty to perform, some irritating 
question to decide to be crowned with 
jov at its close? You had not pursued 
happiness at all; you had gone out of 
the way where happiness i.s supposed 
to be found; but. behold, you were 
happy. , . 

When we make fun the one end and 
aim of life we have engaged in a sorry 
business. Some one asked the French 
youth what he did In the world and he 
replied. 'Ja mamuse" — I amuse myself. 
\ll he had found was the recipe for 
final disgust both with himself and 
with the world. An Oriental king once 
tried the experiment of pursuing hap- 
piness. He said to all around him, 
•Go to now, 1 am going to be happy." 
Let Solomon tell of his own success. 
"I made me great works. I made me 
gardens and orchards; I got me serv- 
ants and maidens; I gathered me also 
silver and gold; I got me men singers 
and women singers, and whatsoever 
mine eyes desired I kept not from 
them." Here were all the ingredients 
of happiness, properly mixed. This 
favored gentleman must have been 
known through all the country for the 
exuberance of his spirits and the con- 
tagion of his smile. Not a bit of It. 
Hear hi^ own testimony, "I looked on 
all the works that my hands had 
wrought and on the labor that I had 
labored to do and. behold, all was 
vanity and vexation of spirit." 

The truth is that we spend most of 
our time In this world trying, like 
Solomon, to get the things we want, 
only to find that we don't want them. 
An apple woman in the park watched 
enviously the rich people riding by in 
their carriages. A lady who had no- 
ticed her unhappy countenance re- 
solved to give her a day of real happi- 
ness. She took her home, dressed her 
in fine clothes and sent her driving In 
the victoria. But when she came back 
the shadow of disappointment still 
rested on the apple woman's face. "If I 
could only have seen myself ride by." 
she said. ^ , . , 

How are you going to find happi- 
ness? Not by working for it con- 
sciously and directly. Not by diligent 
search or the multiplying of forms of 
entertainment. Joy Is a wary sprite 
and eludes those who make a "dead 
set" for her. She comes to those who 
have ceased to strive mainly for the 
good time and are Intent on living 
well and working faithfully. I would 
rather be a section hand trudging 
gratefully home after an honest day's 
work than a rich and useless loafer 
chasing one novelty after another to 
relieve the acute boredom oif living. 

THi: PARSON. 



1 



.r 



does 



DOCTORS, REAL AND BOGUS. 

Tl ough ordinarily there isn't the slightest dif- 
ficulty in getting people to accept the honorary de- 
grees bestowed every year by institutions of learn- 
ings, save in the notable exception of that premier 
of Australia who refused Oxford degrees because 
he said he didn't have the education to go with 
them, the bestowal of these honors is often a good 
deal )f a joke. Most beneficiaries of these atten- 
tions lack the sense of humor which saved the 
plain, democratic Australian. 

The University of Michigan this year provided 
a no\-elty, and gave real meaning to this bestowal 

of honors which are usually deserved but often Hanging is barbarous at best. Minnesota has re- 
fail t) fit because the beneficiaries are not doctors deemed herself from barbarity by abolishing it, and 



of anything, their honorary titles to the contrary 
notwithstanding. Realizing the value of preven- 
tive medicine and hygiene, Michigan has estab- 
lisheil courses for the benefit of those who would 
prom ote~ public health scientifically in public or 
private positions, and has provided for degrees of 
master and doctor of public health. The first de- 
gree of doctor of health has been conferred on Dr. 
Evat s, former health commissioner of Chicago, and 
it is well bestowed. . 

People used to laugh at the Chinese, who do 
ever}'thing upside down and who, it is said, have a 
practice of paying their doctors for keeping them 
well and stopping their pay when illness comes. 
Peoi le laughed merely because this method is in 
such sharp contrast with our way of paying our 
doctors only when we are sick, thus making it to 
their financial interest to have us sick. It is a con- 
trast, indeed, but the laugh really is on the other 
side, for the Chinese way is a pretty good way. 

But there isn't so much laughing about that 
sort of thing now as there used to be. There is a 
wider realization that after all. the best thing medi- 
cal men can do is to teach us how to keep well 
After we get sick because of our ignorance or 
negligence, they can help nature restore us, but 
their drugs do not do us much good and the best 
of them are ceasing to use drugs a great deal. 

There is a wide field for prophylactic medicine. 



it will never return to this state. 

The Neapolitano case is a pretty good example 
of the atrocity of capital punishment. The fact 
that the condemned woman was about to become a 
mother made no difference in her offense, whatever 
it was, but it did show what society is doing when 
it takes human life. 



A POOR EXCUSE, 

Commenting on The Herald's criticism of the 
action of the legislature in repealing the laws re- 
quiring purchasers of state lands to meet certain 
requirements as to cultivation and settlement, the 
St. Paul Dispatch quotes an unnamed state officer 
as saying that "these provisions of the law in the 
past have only been perfunctorily complied with." 
Are we to understand that the officers whose duty 
it was to see that these provisions were rigidly en- 
forced offer as an excuse for their approval of their 
repeal the fact that they did not do their duty? H 
that is the reason they urged the passage of the law 
repealing these wholesome provisions it looks like 
a very poor one. At any rate, it has nothing to do 
with the fact that these provisions were wholesome 
because they tended to keep state lands from going 
into the hands of speculators, nor does it affect the 
fact that the legislature should at its earliest oppor- 
tunity do what it can to remedy the blunder of the 



Taft Beating Innurgent*. 

Springfield Republican: The presi- 
dent is slowly gaining ground. He Is 
more popular than he was a year ago. 
The country thinks better of him. He 
did not whimper about the terrific 
thrashing his party and administration 
received in the November elections; 
on the contrary, he has displayed since 
then a surer-footed leadership than 
before. His reciprocity campaign has 
been masterly, and all indications 
point to its success. And he will get 
the credit of it, even if the Democrats 
made success po.ssible. The president 
has made excellent supreme court ap- 
pointments, and he has strengthened 
his cabinet. 

turhance he emerged with prestige in- 
creased. The country liked it because 
he did not plunge into war for the 
sake either of national honor or of 
civilization. His International arbitra- 
tion policy has delighted lovers of 
peace the world over. And there have 
been the supreme court decisions de- 
stroying the two most odlou* trusts 
in the United States — what are they 
but triumphs of a sort for the Taft 
administration? It is very clear that 
Mr Pinchot, Mr. Garfield. Mr. Bourne 
and even Mr. La Follette will be found 
supporting Mr. Taft in iai2 for re- 
election. There will be nothing else 
for them to do. The president is beat- 
ing them, to use his distinguished pre- 
decessor's historic phrase, "t& a J^raz- 

zle."' 

• 

A Soaree of Danger and Expenae. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: Commis- 
sioner Quezon, who represents the 
Filipino people at Washington, ad- 
dressed a Democratic meeting In New 
York on the Fourth, making an urgent 
appeal for independence for the Isl- 
ands. He permitted his ardor to run 
away with his judgment when he at- 
tempted to draw a parallel between 
the relative position of the United 
States and the Philippines In 1911 and 
the relative position of England and 
the American colonies just previous to 
the Revolutionary war. Such a com- 
parison will not bear close analysis. 

On another point, however, the com- 
missioner is right beyond question. 
H" says that the Philippines have been, 
are still and will continue to be, a 
source of weakness and expense to the 
nation which took them as one of the 
prizes of an unwise war. 

If America could have seen further, 
or had taken time to think more deep- 
ly, she would never have accepted 
sov 
e 

S-- . 

of keeping the Islands, 
an enlightened statecraft can do, this 
constant drain of resource promises to 
continue Indefinitely. 

The weakest point In the national 
armor is the Philippines. There would 
be no '"yellow peril," so far as this 
country Is concerned, did we not pos- 
sess '.hem. 

At the earliest moment , compatible 
with national honor and justice to the 
Filipinos themselves, the United .States 
should surrender her hold upon the 
islands. Quezon wants an immediate 
promise from congress that the Fili- 
pinos win be given their Independence 
on some certain date. The administra- 
tion replies that the Filipinos will be 
given Independence as soon as they 
show the requisite qualities of educa- 
tion and self-control. But even this 
Indefinite pledge lacks the binding for- 
mality of a congressional declaration. 
Congress might well make such a 
declaration. The Filipinos are entitled 
to that further definite incentive to 
progress. 



Pointed Pa-agraph*. 

Chicago New-s: A corkscrew 

'''X sii'rgLo^ looks for the worst there 

'' S*Ws ''r wTse girl who can analyze 

'«^'n^rs"s r m'anlrilive to his oppor- 

^"?1[^% Tre%^J'^Vr^l silent wit- 
ness is an unspeakable nuisaiice. 

The more questions a woman asks 
the fewer answers she remembers. 

If a man says -Youre another ho 
mans vou are just as bad as he is. 

Froni seven different angles there 
are always six fools among seven wise 

""au the average girl ^o^^^ J-ather be 
a silly goose than an ugly duckling. 



A MOMEM WITH THE WITS. 



i. 



Detroit Free Press: "Is it hot enough 



for you 



?" he .said with a sickly smile. 



"No. my dear friend." was the 
prompt reply. "It is not yet hot 
enough for me. If you look closely 
you will observe that I am still wear- 
ing ear muff's, arctic overshoes and a 
paper vest to avoid getting pneu- 
monia." 



Puck: The rhinoceros surveyed the 
world complacently. 

"After all. I set the pace, in a man- 
ner of speaking." quoth he. 

Whereat the other beasts burst out 
laughtlng. 

"Well, it's a fact, where would civili- 
zation be If It were not for men with 
hides like mine?" 



AdJuMtable Maxims. , -^ „ 

Cincinnati Times-Star: James J. Cor- 

bett found one of his friends in t e 

Out Of the Mexican dis- throes of thought the other da>^ "The 

friend was contemplating giving .up a 
fat salaried position to take an inde- 
pendent chance Whenever he thought 
Ef the profits ahead if he made good as 
a business man he glowed like an oil 
famp Whenever he thought of resign- 
ng that sure envelope at the end of the 
wfek he became solid ice to the midriff. 
•When I first began boxing In Cali- 
fornia,"" said Corbett, "my father used 
to lecture me. 'Stick to the job In the 
bank. Jlmmle. b"y," said he. It s the 
nne salary you do be getting there, and 
as long as you live you can kape that 
nne j5b at the desk. Remeinber. "a 
rolling stone gathers no inoss. 

"But I kept on fighting." Corbett said. 
"And father kept on panning me. Fin- 
ally I fought with John L. Sullivan and 
you know what happened. W hen I got 
home I carelessly peeled a thousand 
dollar bill off a roll as big as a cabbage 
and tossed It over to dad. 

"•Just a little pipe money for you. 
father," I said. 'Part of what I made In 
my last fight." Father"s grin began at 
the corners and kept on expanding. His 
eyes twinkled. . 

"'Ah Jimmy, b"y,' said he, 'its the 
roving bee that gets the honey. 

. — »- 

The Bony Man. 
Chicago Post: Mr. James Jimsoe 
bounced out of bed at 6:30 a. m. 

He raised Cain because the rest of 
the family were not up. 

He scolded the children for not 
dressing rapidly. He asserted in loud 
and peevish tones that he had to have 
his breakfast on the dot. that he had 
Important business at his office, and 
wanted to know how In the name of 
Samuel Hill he was going to get to his 
office on time if the family did not get 
up and dress and eat breakfast. 

He rushed through his breakfast. 

and 



'And 



Browning's Magazine: 
woods skirt your farm?"' 

"Yes. Rather narrow, though, 
of hobble skirt it" 



do the 
Sort 



Baltimore American: "I've been 
warning Clara Skeggs about allowing 
her hu.sband to play so much baseball. 
Now, it's made her a widow."" 

"What are you talking about? Noth- 
ing's the matter with Skeggs."' 

"I tell you it's ^nished him. I saw 
myself In the paper where Bill Skeggs 
was playing a game and died on the 
base."' 

Exchange: "You observe." remarked 
the host, who was showing his dis- 
tinguished foreign visitors around 
Newport, "that we Americans devoto 
ourselves to pleasure regardless of ex- 
pense," 

"I'd hardly put it that way." re- 
torted the witty foreigner. "Rather 
you devote yourselves to expense re- 
gardless of pleasure." 

Judge: Mrs. Dwlgg — Do you put al- 
cohol on your windows to give them 
that polish? 

Mrs. Swigg — No; I just breathes on 
"em. 



New York Sun: Stella 
the bride a shower? 

Bella — Well, all her friends 
cold water on the bridegroom. 



Did you give 
threw 




botl in its relation to the public health and in its last session 



MLamb** Deflavd by a Bear. 

Cincinnati Enquirer: 'James R. 
Keene. at a celebration in Cedarhurst," 
said a New York broker, "once gave. 
In a dozen words, the Wall street defl- 
nltion of a Iamb. 

" 'A lamb," said Mr. Keene. 'is one 
who Invests first and investigates aft- 
erward.' " 



in spite Of all l^\^,P\^h"°w™y"to- town he fumed about 
the way things and people tried to 
combine to hinder him. ^ ^. _ .„ v.«o 

On the way from the station to his 
office he stopped at a cigar store and 
shook fifteen games of dice for cigars, 
succeeding in winning a dollars worth 
for »3.75. and putting in three-quarters 
of an hour at It. 

This Is the age of hustle. 

*' 

Tbey Had No Waralng. 

Harper's Magazine: Two young em- 
ployes of a florist In Philadelphia, who 
are supposed to be variously employed 
in the rear of the establishment while 
the boss looks aftei* things In the front, 
were recently startled by the appear- 
ance of the "old man" while they were 
engrossed In a game of checkers. 

The proprietor was justly Indignant. 
'How is it."" he demanded, "that I hard- 
ly ever And you fellows at work when 
I come out here?" 

"I know." volunteered one of the 
youths; "It's on account of those rub- 
ber heels you Insist on wearing." 



Pittsburg Post: "These hanging 
gardens of Babylon are said to have 
been 300 feet in the air." 

"Why did the king put them so 
high?" 

"Perhaps the neighboring kings kept 
chickens." 

Catholic Standard and Times: "Dum- 
ley's just back from a trip after trout, 
and he says it was the most dismal 
failure he ever experienced." 

"What else could you expect of him? 
He couldn't make a fishing trip a 
success because he has absolutely no 
Imagination." 

Philadelphia Record: Blobbs — The 
money young Milyun"s father left thetn 
won't last long. 

Slobbs — Why. Is he such a spender? 

Blobbs — Spender? Why do you know 
what that fellow Is doing? He's act- 
ually paying his Income tax. 



i 



4r- • 



ReaHOB to B« ApprehenalTe. 

Ohio State Journal: What makes 
most of our statesmen regard Governor 
Woodrow Wilson as a dangerous man 
Is that the radical professor apparently 
really means It when he advocates 
placing the country's interests above 
the party's. 



Reflectlonn of a Barbelor. 

New York Press: If a woman has an 
ax to grind she induces some man to 
turn tne grindstone. 

When a man begins to sympathize 
with himself It's a sign he has out- 
lived his usefulness. ._ ... 

The man who Is down and out should 
go In and get the elevator chauffeur 
to take him up. . , . 

Never bring the family skeleton out 
of Its closet for an airing when 
strangers are present. 

In stealing kisses, young man. be 
careful that the girl's mother doesn't 
catch you with the goods. 

Many a spinster insists that she is 
true to the memory of her first love, 
who was In the good-die-young class. 

When you bump up against a man 
who boasts of his iron will, an 
analysis will usually disclose the fact 
that it is plglron. 

After a woman has divorced one man 
and married another. the first one 
feels as an old doll looks when lt« 
owner gets a new one. 




I 

I 



^ 



M rT" ~" ■"— ~~ • ' ■ 



I 

I 



-«*— l- 



Saturday, 



DULUtri HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



__, iw 

-■^ " ■ ■ ■ 

— *" > ■ * 

I 



TWENTY YEARS AGO 




• ••The I>uluth retail clerks elect«'il 
officers last ni^ht for the year, as fol. 
lows rresldent. Charles Freimuth; vice 
nresUlent. Fred Sooville: secretaries, 
Oeorne \V. Mason. \V. C. McHolne and 
Harry Mason, treasurer, Hans Chris- 
tianaon; delegates to trades assemly. 
Charles Freimuth, D. H. Morrison aiid- 
B. L. Griffin. 

•••At a meetiriK of the different lo- 
cal and terminal railway interests held 
last nlsht. the officials of the Duluth, 
W'.ssabe & Northern roa.l stated Its po- 
eltlon and proposed chanses in tne 
terminal roads plans, makintf a gen- 
eral public corporation rather than a 
company of private gain «*n'>' ,^^ '^^^ 
want $J OOO.OOO of terminal stock m- 
Tlded as follows: $r,0().000 to the comUy 
and $r.o...000 each to the Terminal. Mus- 
aabe and Winnipeg roads thus giving 
111 an e'lual Interest In the affair. It 
Js understood that the city owns cer- 
tain property which may be donated 
for railway uses. If thl^ is done, the 
MissaI.e people propose that the city 
t>e given 1375.000 in stuck of the Ter- 
minal company. They also desire that 
dividends he restricted to 5 p.>r cent, 
all ovf»r that to go toward keei>ing the 
road In condition and redeeming the 
bonds. 



»,«|,'ro!n a letter from a citizen In 
The Herald on Dull th as the peer- 
le.-;s .summor resort: Look at the two 
plcture-i — E>uluth, the beautiful, the 
'omfortable. the good. Its brow fanned 
by cooling breezes, lis arms stretched 
out in hearty welcome to the thou- 
sands who flock thitherward for health 
and comfort; Chicago, paved no doubt 
with gooil Intentions, but where wick- 
edness calls down up >n her for a tern- 
perature of SiJ deg." 

•••Traphagen & Fttzpatrlck are 
drawing plans for u $5.0-)0 residence 
to be built by K. H Hinton near M. 
B. Harrisons' residence in the East 
end. 

•••Articles of incirporation of the 
West Duluth Construction and Im- 
provement company have been flle«l. 
The purpo.se of the >rganlzatlon Is to 
l>ulld houses in common. Tlie capital 
stock Is $50,000. Inorporators and di- 
rectors are: John Gieen. president: E. 
a. Walllnder, vice presldt-nt; Hans Kn. 
gelson. treasurer; O ?orge M. <;iadlng. 
Frederick Iflorge. George Falk and 
Paul Frlinwell, all of West Duluth. 



Ben Butler in the GoUaday case and 
l.ypotliecate it herein: Suppose the 
pre.sident of the United States was a 
Democrat and resolve<l on a grand oc- 
toi>us chase for which he required a 
great legal luminary as head of the de- 
partment of jU5t.ce. Now It IS possi- 
ble that If sul»j«>ct''d to a rlgbl and 
morseless application oi" the •'thud 
Kree" the torture might extort 
Ml. Dalley the confession that 
only the best lawyer In 



•••Rev. Charles 
English preacher. 
<lyiag ill London. 



Spurgeon. the great 
is reported to be 



•••.stin>s are being taken to establish 
« monthly paper in the Interests of all 
fhe building and loan associations at 
the Head of the Lakes It will be 
known as "The Money Maker." 



•♦•George Buck of Colllngwood. Ont. 
Is looking ov.-r We it Duluth with a 
view of locating. 

•••L Sinotte has bought the res- 
taurant at 24 Wes Superior street, 
formerly owned by Gen. Kilgore. 

•••A pleasant surprise was given to 
Mr and Mis. 1>. Van Baalen last 
nlKht bv friends wh.» called ui)on them 
to celebrate the sixteenth anniversary 
of their marriage. 




t)CCUPANT OR SENATOR? 



By >SAVOyAIiI>. 



re- 
de- 
from 
he Is not 
America, but 
that he Is the best lawyer In the world. 
All right. Mr. Bailey Is selected by the 
president for attorney general and 
sends his resignation as senator to the 
governor of Texas. But suppose the 
governor of Texas refused to accept It . 
Horrible thought! We would miss the 
greatest show on earth — an octopus 
chase a la Bailey. ,, , 

And It Is just as absurd to say that 
a senator may withdraw a resignation 
as to hold that a governor may refuse 
to accept it. The Golladay case and 
the HalUy case are pract cally Iden- 
tical In t^ict and absolutely Identical 

in principle. 

» • • 
I knew Jake Golladay well I was 
one of his constituents and spent hours 
in his society. He was a curiosity — 
a man of showy parts and little under- 
standing On the stump he was chaln- 
Itghtnlng and magnificent as a de- 
clalnier Unfortunately lie was a hope- 
less tlamagogue, as eloquent as lie was 
shallow. But for the episode in is 
career of which the resignation of his 
seat In congress was the culmination, 
he would have l)een senator, and his 
power at home flrmly established. He 
was accuser! of selling a West Point 
cadf-tshlp; but nobody believed h» 
profited a cent by the transaction. The 
general opinion was that he allowed a 
friend, who.se son ha.l failed In the 
examination for admission to tlie 
academy, to sell the privilege, and it 
was bought by a man of Ithaca. N. i. 
Had (Jolladay dlscovereil the manhoo5> 
to tell tlie whole truth about It. I 
doubt little that he would have been 
returned to congress. 

Jake Oolladav was an honest man. 
Conclusive proof of this Is found In tlie 
fact that he entered public lite wealthy 
and left It Insolvent. Instead ot wax- 
ing rich In congress, he Krew noor, an.i 
tliat at a time wlu-ti the lobby v^as 
hrazen and ilagitlous. and corruption 




walked 



Some speculation is indulged in 
to the motive of the Hon. Joseph 
Bailev when he procured the utterance 
J>V the United btates senate of the ad- 
dress of a Mr. Haywood to the pe«>ple 
of North Carolina relative to his res- 
ignation of his Seat in the senate many 
years ago. Mr. Haywood, sooner than 
vote for or against the "iree trade 
tariff of 1S4«." as James G. Blaine call.s 
It resigned from the senate. -^a l 
gather, he would have voted with the 
Adversaries of the measure had it nut 
lieen tiiat his party associatts In the 
jsenate were practically unanimous In 
their support of it. The Democratic 
pre.sident favored the bill and It was 
the work of a Democratic secretary or 
treasury, one of the greatest masters 
of the science of political economy our 
country bad produced, even Robert J. 
Walker. , . 

This address of Mr. Hayw.^od Is a 
atump speech against the Walker tar- 
iff, which, as 1 understand. Mr. Bailey 
regards as the very butt-cut of tariff 
excellence thus far practised by the 
American congress Hence we can- 
not suspect that Mr. Bailey would have 
It niaile a senate document for that. 
It Is an argument, false in theory and 
falser in prophecy, in favor of "««0'>- 
«ratt protection." whatever that is. and 
Mr Bailey protests that he Is opposed 
to protection of all sorts, so 
could not have insisted upon 
llcatlon for its economic 
phies. 

• • • •• 

Haywood resigned because he 
himself at discord with his 
on a paramount issue, and there 
> -ttrlng to his resignation. Laie- 
lilev -le.-^igned — with a string 
,.• he was at discord with his 
associates in the senate on a 
n that nobody but himself cared 
about. Therefore we may as- 
that Mr. Bailev had this thing 
printed as a precedent for — perhaps 
vindication of— his flamboyant resig- 
nation ■ of last March. 

That brings that historic episode 
deck again, and 1 trust that I shall 
pardont'd if I shall make effort 
■what impression It made 
onlooker In our Vienna. 



as , day of February, 
W S. Golladay sent 
'G 



1870. the Hon. Jacob 

th s epistle to JanifS 

speaker of the Forty- 



that he 
Its pub- 
phlloso- 



Mr. 
found 
party 

ly "■ 

party 
questl< 
a rap 
Bume 



Blaine, then 
first congress; 

'Sir: I enclose .-ou a letter here- 
with tendt-rlng my resignation to the 
^overnor of Iventuc tv as a member of 
< OHgress from the Third district." 

Here Is the left* r to the governor 
of his state: 

•Dear Sir: I herewith tender you my 
resignation as a n ember ot congress 
from the Third district." 

Governor Stevenson indignantly re- 
fused to accept the reslgnatl>>n an>l de- 
manded that Golladay cl^ar himself of 
charges alleged ags-lnst him. No sup- 
pression here. 

• • • ' 

Like Bailey, Golladay withdrew his 
resignation and strenuously sought to 
rAnaln a member »f congress. There 
was considerable . ebate over It — the 
late James B. Beck championing the 
course of hi.^ colle; gues. and insisting 
that thf rcslsfnatloi had not been con- 
summated. But it was held otherwise 
and Mr. Golladay h id to go. I believe 
the governor of Texas declined to ac- 
cept the reslgnattoi of Senator Bailey. 

As f'>r the powt r and duty of the 
governor in such citse I shall take ttie 
liberty to approprhte a thought of old 



in darkness an>l pollution 
wasted at noonday. He was a proud 
and a brave man. and he woubl sooner 
have endured penury. Indigence and 
want a lifetime than to have become 
Infamous In his own esteem for one 
moment of time, though he reaped 
minions as the bribe. That was Jake 

Golladay. 

• • • 

The main difference In the Golladay 
case and the IJalley case Is this: <.•<>•- 
laday notitied the governor of Ken- 
tucky by mail, and Bailey warned the 
governor of Texas bv wire. There is 
tradition for It that Nevada came Into 
this glorious Union of ours upon 
telegraphic dispatch, 
state can come In by 
a federal senator go 
Here is a job for your 

Another difference 



a 

If a soverlgn 

wire, why not 

out by wire? 

casuist. 

Is that In the 
Golladay case the record is preserved; 
in the Bailey case part of it. at least, 
was suppressed. But honest and brave 
men look only to the facts, and 
s.de issue here Is: Did Bailey resign 
If he did. he Is an occupant 
senate, and not a member, 
senates of Clay, Calhoun and 
the senates of James M 



the 

arn? 

of the 

and the 

Webster, 

Mason. Ste- 



i>hen A. Douglas. Jefferson Davis. John 
J Crittenden and William Pitt Fessen- 
den would have scrutinized with lynx 
eyes the episode and ascertain If the 
rule In the Golladay ca.<»e maintains. 

But the matter Is easy of settlement 
If Mr. Bailey shall announce from 
seat In the chamber upon his 
ks a man and upon his dignity as 
senator, that he did not resign. 



his 
honor 
a 



on 

be 

to tell 

on me. an 

I Intend to 



FINDING JOBS FOR EDUCA TED WOMEN 

College Graduates Attack Economic Problem-Intercollegi- 
ate Bureau of Occupations— New Work 
to Start in Fa ll, 

By CANDACE THURBER. 



shall 
viz. : 



certainly be 




ot 
as 
on 



Texas: 

resignation 



Hale and 
overcome 



be courteous. I 
plain, as follows. 

The first thing a greenhorii news- 
oar.er chap Is taught when he gets 
?r his town is to call the United States 
ienate "the most dlgnitled l^«'^l*»i^'« 
toodv in the world." and to speak 
the" Unlte<i States supreme court 
-the most august J""iit''a^ ,^»"\^"'l^' ,,,, 
«arth." But It is greatly to be feared 
that the senate Is losing some of i%s 
dignity. Unouestionably it allows a 
ceftain conspicuous character to tr fie 
M-lth It. If. Indeed, he does not bring 
It Into public contempt. I allude to 
Mr. Joseph W Bailey, who. <*>\tnmon re- 
port salth. resigned his seat in that 
fcodv last March, though he Is yet al- 
lowed to minister at Its deliberations 
and iveigh In Its divisions. 

Last March Mr. Bailey, then a sen- 
ator, sent to the vice president a 
paper which that official suppre.ssed. 
Ihough the instant he received it it 
became a public document and the 
property of the United States senate. 
At the same time Mr. Bailey seat by 
-wire this message to the governor of 
Have this date tendered ray 
as senator from Texas to 
take effect Immediately." Thus the 
■enator attempted to resign. I think 
be -succeeded. Certainly he ought to be 
lawyer enough to know how to re- 
sign- 

■We are told that* the vice president 
was "Visibly agitated." that hf calle^l 
a senator to th- chair, resigned to him 
*heSvel. sought Mr. Bailey, threw his 
arms around him and besought him to 
reconsider. Then there were Kath*?^^') 
in conventicle with the vice president 
tfUfh senators as Root. Lodge 
Burrows, all of whom were 
with grief because of this awful calam- 
ity that had befallen the country In 
the lo.ss of the services o'^.t^is Kreat 
man. Mr. Sherman -wrastled with the 
governor of Texas In this fashion: 

"Washington. March 4 — Hon. O. B, 
Colquitt, governor of Texas. Austin. 
Tex —I understand that Senator Bailey 
lia.1 telegraphed you that he has tend- 
ered his resignation. I have not laid It 
before the senate, and I express the 
reneral wish of both Democrats and 
Republicans in that body asking yotJ 
ti) take the same course. tlt%se™^,\» 
too valuable to our country to be lost. 
« that can be avoided, and there is no 
distinction of party in the universal 
feeling of the senate.^ gHERMAN. 

"Vice President." 
• • • 
1 know nothing in history that rivals 
the pathos of this extraordinary inci- 
dent and the only thing in letters, so 
far as my limited readings go, that 
equals it, is Shakespeare's account of 
the tender of the crown to Richard III 
by Buckingham. The late Edward W. 
Carmack held a certain prominent man s 
friendship as a liability and not 
an asset, and there are Democrats of 
the very first water who would not 
feel complimented by the dismay that 
Eenotrated the ranks of the standpat 
senators when the awful tidings came 
that Bailey had resigned. The scene 
was the most audacious comedy in the 
entire history of American politics. It 
would take Swift and Pope composite 
adequately tell the tale. 



(Exclusive Servir( tlu* Suney PressS 
Itur-^au.) 

"The economic parad'^x that con- 
fronts women in general. ' writes 



Mrs. George Hn-ven Putnam, "is 
especially uncomi-romising for the 
lady. In defiance of the axiom that 
he who works, eats, the lady who 
works has less tv eat than the lady 
who does not." In spite of this dis- 
couraging outloot. a new organiza- 
tion is to enter tlie field of practical 
economics in Septomber to help wom- 
en who want to work at professions 
other than leachittg, to find the work 
that wants them. 

This does not i retend to bo a new 
and original sch-me It is one of 
those ideas that tlie air and the news- 
papers are full >f in terms of the 
["jobless man. and the manle.ss job," 
but there are certain aspects of this 
'project that are different from any- 
j thing that has b. en tried before. It 
is the first time tiiat graduates of the 
women's colleges of a certain locality 
have made comn on cause In a plan 
to help all specially equipped women 
whether they do, or do not. hold col- 
lege degrees. 

Barnard. Bryr Mawr. Radclltre. 
Smith. Va.ssar an 1 Wellesley are the 
alumnae associations whose repre- 
sentatives, so far. make up the board 
of directors of tho new bureau. They 
will employ a paid secretary and as- 
sistants. The oljects of the bureau 
will be: 

1. To secure employment for col- 
lege and other specially equipped 
women. . 

2. To investigate and do all in Its 
power to lncrea.-e their efficiency In 
occupations. 

3. To establish cloae connections 
with the colleges, especially in advis- 
ing and informing undergraduates 
concerning occuj ations. 

4. To insure, la ever" way. a free, 
wise, choice of occupation. 

The bureau wi l charge a small fee. 
the amount of which has not yet been 
determined, and a percentage of thy 
first months salt ry. It alms, in time, 
to become self supporting. It will 
differ from any of the agencies at 
present In existence in New York un- 
der private own<^rshlp. as any money 
which it may eventually earn will be 
turned back to extend the work of 
the bureau. 

Although call!= for teachers will b« 
filled when the/ come, the bureau 
Aill confine its 
effort upon work 



generally felt is shown by the fact 
that once started, the scheme seemed 
to move of its own momentum. 
Groups of graduates in each of the 
colleges had been tumbled out. un- 
backed and unprepared, into the la- 
bor market. They had felt the be- 
wilderment of the new alumae who 
wants to do something but does not 
know exactly what and had found 
themselves thrust either Into teach- 
ing, because that was the only form 
of occupation with which there was 
any existing machinery to connect 
them: or else they had to waste 
several yeaFs In finding out what they 
did want to do and how to go at it. 
There were married women who 
were working because tKev wanted to. 
and those who were working because 
they had to; and there were others 
who were not salary earners them- 
selves, who were, nevertheless, inter- 
ested in the dllflculties of those who 
were. In short, the founders of the 
bureau saw that they would have a 
support behind them which was 
representative of all of the strong 



types of the college 



board of di- 
Van Kleeck. 
investigations 
the 



to 



Ideas — 



But the party of Great Moral 
and of Predatory Wealth— emerged 
irom the Slough of Despond when the 
Texas Achilles came out of the sulks. 
• withdrew his resignation, and armed 
for another sham fight against the 

The gloom from the face of the heav- 
ens retired; 
winds ceased to murmur, the 
thunders expired. 
And there was joy unconfined among 
the scullions and the turnspits In the 
►Itchen of the fat-fryer. 

That is a fair history of this extra- 
ordinary transaction as the newspapers 
tecord It and as the public understands 
t. Here Is another case. On the 28th 



as it is consider 
agencies. alread.\ 
ing etflcient wo 
the Women's 



The 



mnin emphasis and 
other tb'in teaching. 
d that the teacher's 
In the field are do- 
k. The Bureau of 
Educational and Indus- 
trial Union will not be open for the 
registration of graduates of high 
schools, as the vocation committees 
of the public schools are already car- 
ing for them. The women who are 
not college graduates wljose regis- 
tration will be accepted are archi- 
tects, lawyers, b icteriologists. doctors, 
nurses, graduate! of schools of music 
or design, trained Journalists, secre- 
taries, socially g fted women who are 
willing to become companions, and 
women whose ejperlence would equip 
them for executive positions. Insti- 
tutional management or welfare 
work. An efforc will be made to ob- 
tain part time work for those who 
have a portion r f their time occupied. 
Arrangements for close co-opera- 
tion have been made with all of the 
college appolntn ent bureaus, the Bos- 
ton bureau and the agencies of the 
Yi>ung Women't Christian association. 
That the need for such a bureau la 



and helpful 
graduate. 

The chairman of the 
rectors Is Mary Abby 
who. while conducting 
on women's work, came to the con 
elusion that the position of the col- 
lege graduate in the world of paid 
work was chaotic. 

In m<)at of the women's colleges 
there exist appointment bureaus that 
do what they can in finding work 
for their own graduates, but as most 
of the colleges are not situated in 
large cities, they have difllculty in 
Investigating the calls they receive. 
Moreover, few of the alumnae who 
have experience register with them. 
These bureaus will find the co-opera- 
tion of a New York office a great 
help. 

It is therefore as an outpost of the 
colleges, aiming to help in directing 
the energy which the colleges have 
done so much to stimulate, that this 
bureau is founded. It Is a significant 
thing that not only in New York, but 
all over the United States, women are 
waking up to a realization of the 
amateur way they have gone about 
peddling their wares. While this 
New York bureau is only an experi- 
ment station, It is hoped that, in 
time, there will be a chain of bureaus 
In all of the large cities, conducted 
by the alumnae of the colleges, for 
the benefit of all women who have 
trained themselves for any specific 
line of work. 



THE CRUISE OF THE SNARK. By 
Jack London. New York: The Mac ■ 
mlllan company. Boxed. |2 net. 
Somehow, it seems exactly like Jack 
London to ooni'eive the delicious! y 
mad Idea of cruising around the world 
on a cockleshell called the .Snark. It 
seems like him, too, to plan a boat 
costing 19.000 and then to spend $30.- 
000 building her, only to find that he 
had been cheated by practically every 
person furnisliing labor or materials*. 
That the crazy craft should have been 
wrecked before Its crazy cruise was 
half done, seems to fit Into the piece. 
Ami It Is still more like Jack London 
that after It was all over he should 
write a corking book about It. a book 
with an entertaining vigor of expres- 
sion which nobody familiar witli Lon- 
don will need to he told about, and 
with a vivid coloring that makes 
every page of it fascinating. Every 
lover of redblooded literature and of 
the romance of adventurous travel will 
enjoy U. 

• • * 

THE PRICE. By Gertie de S. Went- 
worth-James. New York: Mitchell 
J<i;nnerley. $1.35 net. 
The heroine of this story, a social 
climber with much u'.ore of an ai>peal 
than such characters usually have 
was comfortably marr'ed to a man 
with money enough to indulge her in 
her aspirations, when slie discovered, 
or was led to believe that she had <lis- 
lovered, that her husband's wife was 
living and that she had no legal 
existence In his life. The price she 
paid for smothering thi.s secret is what 
tlie title refers to. and it Included not 
only buying up the real wife hut fall- 
ing tragically In love with an amateur 
aviator. The autlior has made the most 
of a rather slender Uiread of plot 
which does not hang together any too 
well, since t^iere seems no obvious 
connection between her Illicit love and 
"the price' she paid for keeping the 
position she 'was willing to sacrifice 
to be with the man she loved. 
• • • 

THE GARDEN OF THE SUN. By 
Capt. T. J. Powers. U. S. A Boston: 
Small. Maynaid & Co. $1.20 net. 
If "The Garden of the Sun" ever is 
read by a Democratic congressman 
there will be a red hot investigation of 
the army, the occupancy of the Philip- 
pines and military gentlemen who love 
and are loved by other gentlemen's 
wives. The captain does not weary his 
readers with the details of military 
government nor the glory of gory com- 
bat. He has a story to tell and he 
wastes no time about It. 

Right off the bat the hero. Capt. Bal- 
lard, while after bloodthirsty savages, 
swims out with his men to a yacht and 
chases a bunch of pirates away. This 
happens In the first two pages. In the 
next two he m<ets Mrs. Bennett, wife 
of the yacht's own^r. As he leaves 
the yacht he feels that he loves for the 
first time. 

Ballard gets back to town from haz- 
ing Filipinos. Guess who's there. 
You're right. It's Mrs. Bennett, with 
her sister. Kitty Bouton. and Mrs. Ben- 
nett's husband, who Is always a.sklng 
people, regardl'ss of sex, to have a 
drink. Kitty fills In love with Lieut. 
Condon and then Into his arms. At a 
ball attended bv the military set one 
learns that Old Man Bennett is usually 
"three sheets In the wind." He mak^'S 
lovt' to various ladles and his wife re- 
fuses to havo anything to do with him 
although she does not eject him from 
the yacht. She fears scandal. 

Capt. Ballard and Mrs. Bennett gf^ 
plenty of opportunity to tell each 
other how th.ir souls are panting for 
their mates. The first time thoy come 
to close (4uarter3 Is when they are In 
swimming. Bennett loves his wife, too. 
Ballard and he finally decide that the 
best man will win. Th.re will be no un- 
written law, no polic- reporters, no 
headlines. Ballard takes Bennett on 
an expedition against some piratical 
Filipinos and Bennett sav.'s Ballanl s 
life. They shake hands. But r. mem- 
ber no odds and let the best man win. 
Old Man Bennett didn't have a 
chance for his white alley. His wife 
was onto his curves, in th- language 
of the sports editor; but Ballard was 
new-comer and he had spee<l and 
ers to burn. He was a baffling propo- 
sition and she f'dl for him. Recurring 
to a proper style for this department 
of reason and light, she found that she 
was "ravished by the turbulent melody 
of love." and then some. Still she was 
only a woman and when she saw Mrs. 
Payton. wife of a lieutenant, making 
love to h»r captain she was sufflcleritly 
peeved to turn a cold but beautiful 
shoulder to the brave military hero. 
He was caught at midnight with his 
arms around the lovely Payton but the 
reader knew that she had led him into 
this agreeabl** but compromising atti- 
tude and that he was spurning 
when the colon^-l of the regiment 
Mrs. Payton's husband happened along 
with a spot light.' J... ,„»,♦.. 

Mrs Payton sees that the doughty 
captain will not take her conventional- 
ly or unconventionally so she confess.-s 
In the presence of Mrs. Bennett that 
the captain Is a brave man and true 
and that he repulsed her love. Mrs. 
Bennett promptly grabs the capt^'n 
again and the curtain is rung down to 
.soft music as the beauteous lady sobs 
out her joy on the captain's 'j" ''»|;'^„„ 
There are various rrther nilxed up 
love affairs that strain connubial ties 
but somehow all are mysteriously set- 
tle.l by the time the «t;>ry close.s. Old 
Man Bennett appears with a nifty little 
dancer. She Is traveling with a pug 
who has a giant Chinaman for a serv- 
ant. The pug -lells Bennett for try'"^ 
to steal his girl. The Chinaman stands 
guard over The girl and the conscious- 
less Bennett so his master can escape. 
The girl heaves a lighted lamp at the 
Cole-stlal. and jumps out o^ the window 
and shins down a tree. The Chinaman 
follows but his weight breaks the limb 
fall.s, almost hitting a soldier 



FINDS EVERY 30TH 

WOMAN A TEACHER 




Bars" the story of the influence that a 
father's prison ."Sentence had on a little 
boy and how it colored his life. Mabel 
Wood Martin. In "The Woman in the 
Picture." describes the jealousy of a 
man's second wife for her dead prede- 
cessor. Henry .Sydnor Harrison, In 
"Cousin Fred of the Leisure Classes." 
tells a really funny story of the efforts 
of one man to get an'bther a job. Other 
good stories in this Issue are "A Les- 
son In Mechanics," a summer Idyl of a 
man, a girl and a motor boat, by Ber- 
ton Braley; "The Road Actress.' a 
story of stage life, by Adele Luehrman; 
"The New Commissioner," a woman- 
in -politics story, by James Alvin; "Mr.s. 
Bart's Bridge Debts." by W. Carey 
Wonderly: 'the Man's Other Wife." bjr 
Hoxann White; and "Barney McNab, ' 
by .Sampson Rourk. 

• • « 

In The Survey for July Is an article 
on Syrians In the United States which 
acquaint 



^ ^^VILI-IAM E(/TA5ROOK 
CHANCELLOR 



IQilS 



In an "open letter to one who is just 
beginning to teach" which William Es- 
tabrook Chancellor has apjiended to his 
new book, "Cla.ss Teaching and Man- 
agement," he makes the interesting 
statement that "of American women 
one in one hundred is now teaching 
school, and one In thirty has taught 
school. Of those who leave the w.)rk. 
one in every two marrle.s." In "Class 
Teaching and Management' Dr. Chan- 
cellor does not lay stress on the (lues- 
tlon of sex: for it is his belief that 
in America nearly all teachers are es- 
sentially of the same temperament 
whether they are men or women. Dr. 
Chancellor gained his intimate knowl- 
edge of school conditions and needs 
as superintendent of schools in the 
I>lstrlct of Columbia, superintendent of 
schools?, union city district. Norwalk. 
Conn, and president of education, sum- 
mer sessions. Northwestern university. 
"Class Teaching and Management' Is a 
book designed for reading circles, nor- 
mal schools, colleges, and for all who 
are Interested In educational work. 
Dr Chancellor has delivered numerous 
lectures before the teachers of Vir- 
ginia and for a session was in charge 
uf tlie summer school. University of 
Wooster. Wooster. Ohia. 



aims to acquaint Americans more fully 
with the needs and spirit of the great 
company of these new Phoenicians 
within our own threshold. Owing to 
the foreign outlook 'of the missionary 
movement we are at present more fa- 
miliar with the conditions of the 
.Syrians in Asia than we are with the 
lives of those here at home. Louise 
Seymour Houghton, under the auspices 
of the Carnegie institution, has gath- 
»-reii at first hand from men and 
women both in Syria and in this coun- 
try a wealth of material for a sym- 
I>athetlo Interpretation of a new race 
migration. "Fire Waste," by Powell 
Evans, who is chairman of fire preven- 
tion and Insurance committees of the 
National Association of Manufacturers, 
presents conclusions on this subject 
based on experience as a merchant, 
manufacturer, and engineer. Don D. 
Lescohler. In the "Risks of the Ore- 
Diggers," tells a story of graphic In- 
terest about industrial accidents In 
an employment which has its seat in 
the rural and wild districts of Minne- 
sota, which is the only state that 
keeps a complete record of its trade 
accidents. "The Discoveries of Co- 
lumbus" tells the story of an Interest- 
ing awakening In this bustling Ohio 
city to festering evils that had long 
been overlooked. The Issue also con- 
tains a very complete report of the 
National Conference of Charities and 
Correction recently held In Boston. 
• * • 
In the Issue of Harper's Weekly 



for July 8 appears a remarkable ar- 
ticle by Sydney Brooks in which the 
intentions of Mr. Roosevelt concerninff 
his possible future candidacy for the 
presidency are for the first time made 
public. Other articles in this number 
are: "New York Revisited." by "Aa 
ngllshman;" "An Ottoman Leap-year 
Gici," by Charles Johnston; "Folk- 
Dances for Health." by William Inglls; 
"Golfing Witli Father Neptune," by 
William Edmund Cooke. Many other 
articles, with fiction, humor, and the 
usual editorials, go to make up thle 
interesting number. 

• • • 

The sensation of a friend returning 
from a trip, or dropping his suit-case 
for a chat between trains comes with 
the National Magazine, for the editor 
keeps "on the move." This month It 
Is Alabama, first In the alphabetical 
roll-call of states, and first in natural 
charms. Th© editor and his party* cov- 
ered every county in Alabama, and 
have made a breezy, home- folks' story, 
concisely setting forth the wonderful 
recent developments In this historic old 
state. "A Peep at I'arliament in Ses- 
sion." being a sketch prepared front 
the editor's recent visit to the house 
of commons contains compact Infor- 
mation, timely comments and first- 
hand knowledge of British policies and 
politics. A characteristic sketch of 
perhaps the worlds Kreatest business 
executive. Theodore N. Vail, president 
of the American Telephone & Tele- 
graph company. Is aptly entitled "The 
Lure of Work." A delightful sketch 
on the famous residence of the British 
prime ministers. "No. 10 Downing 
.Street," is contributed by Oscar Frl- 
chet. Illustrated with excellent carlca- 
ture.s. Matrimonial Deductions of a 
Bachelor Governor" elves the humor- 
ous observations of Governor Albert 
Waller Gilchrist of Florida. A liberal 
Instalment of William Hodee's fasci- 
nating serial. "The Guest of Honor" is 
printed, ami the fiction for the month 
is calculated especially to please the 
summer reader. 




* • • 
The August St. Nicholas is a sports 
and outiloors number, with sketches on 
tenni.s, baseball, and model aeroplane 
building and Hying, l)esldes new chap- 
ters of those wholesome outdoors stor- 
ies: Ralph Henry Barbour's 'Team- 
matos," Katherlne Carleton's "Doro- 
thy the Motor Girl." Frederick Orln 
Bartlett's "The Poorest Castaways." and 
I Lovell Coombs's "Young Crusoes of 
tlie Sky." E. Willis .Scott has much of 
Interest to tell young readers about 
•Fine Points of Tennis," and illustra- 
tions from photographs give helpful 
hints for correct positions and grip, 
••follow-throughs." etc. C. H. Claudy's 
fifth paper In 'The Battle of Base- 
ball" series discusses defense and 
pitcher and cat<'her; anrl the author 
of "The Boys' Book of Model 
planes." has further fascinating 
tions on how to build and 
aeroplanes of 1911, and gives 
scription of "the famous 
Williams model." There is a 



r 



Aero- 
dlrec- 
Ily model 
a full de- 
FlemmlnB 
jolly story 
of boating and boyish bravery. ''The 
Cockswain," by Leslie W. Quirk, 
author of "Baby Elton, Quarterback. 
Mr. Quirk is to have a new book of 
sport this fall, "Freshman Dom, 
Pitcher." 



]RH.^^uMis£etn/^ 



PPtM TeRS\BfMDePS 



Providence Building, 

Fourth Avenue West aod 
Superior Street. 



a 
twlst- 



in her heart with the label of Napoleon 

Before this comes about there Is the 
very deuce to pay. A pretender to the 
French throne rattles around in nis 
little sphere for a while and then dies. 
A cousin of the little Walewska loves 
her and when he finds that the em- 
peror has the Inside track he puts a 
bullet Into himself and died. There are 
a few adventures that are meant to be 
exciting and there Is enough swearing: 
and muttering of asides in "that dear 
language" to warrant the suggestion 
that the reader should piovlde himself 
with a menu card or some handy 
French lexicon before tackling "The 
Cross of Honour." 



'eimbach 's 



Doubl&'We 



her 
and 




Hsy Fever aad Summer Cold* 

Must be relieved quickly and Foley's 
Hpney and Tar Compound will do It. 
E. M. Stewart, 1034 Wolfram street, 
Chicago writes: "I have been greatly 
troubled during the hot summer 
months with Hay Fever and find that 
by using Foley's Honey and Tar Com- 
pound I get ^reat relief Many others 
who suffer similarly will be glad to 
benefit by Mr. Stewart's experience. 
For sale by all druggists. 

•— 

Unless you are willing that people 
shall CHANCE to come to your store, 
you must advertise. 



can find 
have other 



Bv Mary 
, Maynard 

re- 



ring in the 
variation it 
notice with 



has been a failure- and that his wife 
has a right to snatch happlne.ss. It be- 
ing within her grasp.. 

There Is more but the reader 
It out for himself. 

work to do. 

• • • 

THE CROSS OF HONOUR 
Openshaw. Boston: small 

Some dJy'when thl.s «^ePa'-t"?!'"Vlcal 
celves a book of fiction or historical 
romance that does not 
French triangle plot or a 
will get a bang-up show .„„»i«„< 

red headlines and Rreen iUustrat on-v 
There is no need for excitement, how- 
ever, because 'The Cross of Honour 
does not belong to the categorical ex- 
ception. It deals with the love story 
of Napoleon. Of course .the wonian 
who wrote the book couldn't help what 
The emperor did. so perhaps she cannot 
be blamed for what happened in Jhe 

^*Afterjockeying for a start the author 
gets into the swing 
fairly well written 
the title imge is a 
to the Strong. 



Of Books and Writers. 

"The Life and Letters of Moses Coit 
Tyler" late professor of American his- 
tory at Cornell, which was to have 
been published by Doubleday. Page & 
(^o this summer, has been postponed 
until fall when It will be brought out. 
The book was written and compile<l 
by Tyler's daughter. Jessica Tyler 

Austen. 

• * • 

Gen. Basil W. Duke of Ix)ulsville. 
Ky whose reminiscences will be pnb- 
ll.shed in the fall by Doubleday, P;igo 
& (.'o. Is a brother-in-law of Gen. 
.Morgan the Confederate raider. Dul 
was one of the youngest members 
Morgan's band. 

• • • 
A new edition of "The Life of Pa<?- 

teur." the celebrated French surgeon 
who discovered and perfected the treat- 
ment for rabies that bears his name. 
Is now on the presses of Doubleday, 

Page & Co. 

• • • 

For all his Frenchy name Jacques 
Futrelle, the author of "The High 
Hand." Is a native born American and 
Ills ancest'jrs have been Americans 
for some centuries. He has been a 
newspaper man — successively on th-j 
Atlantic Journal, the Boston Post, the 
Hearst papers In New York, the New 
York Herald, the Richmond Leader and 
the Boston American — and general 
manager of the George Fawcett stock 
companies in Baltimore. Now he lives 
at Scltuate. Mass.. where he runs a 
farm (on which the only thing he can 
raise is an umbrella) and a motor 
boat. The r)lppy. which goes only when 
It gets darned good and ready. 

• • • 

George Bronson Howard has ju-'t 
completed the dramatization of his 
latest book. "An F:nemy to Society" 
which Is to be brought out in the early 
fall by Doubleday Page & Co. Ar- 
rangements for the enactment of the 
play have been completed and it will 
probably be seen before the winter. 



UNIQUE— A Triumph of Duluth Genius 
It! Wear It! Up-to-date Shoemen Sell It! 



See It! Buy 
Attached 50c 




, 



of her story. It is 

and readable. On 

line. "The Battle Is 

which shows at the 



BOOKS & MAGAZINES 

Reviewed on this page can be 



on this page 
cured at 



■e- 



EDWARD M. STONE'S 

BOOK STORC. 
221 \%'c«t Superior ift., Dninth. 



Start that the Countess Walewska has 
no chance. Napoleon comes to Poland 
on his way to bitter victory over the 
Russians and the burning of Moscow 
Madame Walewska is the y«V"K „^''^ 
of an old Polish noble who watches out 
for himself, but is careless a»>o"t Ms 
wife She sees Napoleon, and the em- 
peror falls In love with her. 

Little Walewska repulses him be- 
cause she Is a respectable marr ed 
woman with a reputation. The Polish 
patriots try to prevail on her to ac- 
cept the emperor's advances so he will 
free Poland from Russia's Influences. 
She tells 'em where to "get off. but the 
poison is distilled into her heart. She 
finally goes to Napoleon and becomes 
his mistress because she has come to 
love the Image which she has set up 



Among the Magazines. 

The first story in the August num- 
ber of Short Stories Is the new trans- 
lation of Dumas' "The Red Rose." a 
brilliant romance of the French revo- 
lution. It is one of Duma.s' earlle.- 
works entirely unknown to the Eng- 
lish-speaking public. Then. "The A«l- 
mlrable John." first of the three Ellis 
Parker Butler stories, appears In this 
number. The author of "Pigs Is Pigs 
Is bound to succeed when he sets out 
to make one laugh. The second of th<i 
•Adventures of Emily Giles' series 
"Miss Devereau's Diamonds." presents 
this girl detective with a puzzling 
problem, puzzling from start to finish 
The number has also another of the 
new O. Henry stories. 'The T/an.s- 
formatlon of Martin Burney: a joyful 
«!tory of Jay Junction, by W. B. Kerr, 
entitled "That Doggoned Duel;" one of 
Nalbro Bartley's switchboard series, 
and good stories also by Frank Con- 
don J Walnwrlght Evans. Arthur S. 
Roche Hapsburg Liebe and others. 
♦ • • 
Leroy Scott contributes a clever sa- 
tirical novelette to the August number 
of the Smart Set. The title Is "Mrs. De 
Peyster's Idea." and the story tells of 
the pitiful straits to which one of the 
leading figures In New Yorks 
Hundred is reduced through the 
tallment of her Income due 
of financial depression. 
Galllenne seeks to refute, 
on "Modern Aids to Romance, the cur- 
rent theory that the -good old roman- 
tic days." are gone forever. Never, he 
.says were the conditions .so favorable 
to romance as today, and he points out 
many things in present day Hff /^ 
Drove his contention. This is written 
Mr. Le Galllenne's choicest vein, and 



WHOLESALE 

JOBBERS AND 
MANUFACTURERS 

OF DULUTH, MINNESOTA. 

Reliable and Up-to-Date Concerns Who Do a Stri<ftly 
Jobbing and Manufacturing Business. 



ASBESTOS. 
A. H. Krieger Co. 

BAKERS. 
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BLAST FURNACE. 
Zenith Furnace Co. 



FURNITURE. 
DeWitt-Seitz Company. 



BREWERS. 
Dtilnth Brewl-g & Malting 
Fitger Brewing 



Co. 



Co. 



Four 
cur- 
to a period 
Richard Le 
in an essay 



Jl-e"sen ts" real! y' a good logical 
ment. Anne Warner tells in 



argu- 
"Iron 



BUTTER AND ICE CREAM 
MANUFACTURERS. 

Bridgeman-Rustell Co. 

CEMENT AND PLASTER. 
D. G. CuUer Co. 

COMMISSION AND PRODUCE. 
FiUsimmons-Palmer Co. 

CONFECTIONERY. 

National Candy Co. 
(Duluth Factory.) 



FOUNDERS and 
Clyde Iron 



MACHINISTS. 
Works. 



DRUGS. 
U W. Leithhead Drug 



Co. 



DRY GOODS. 
A. Patrick ft Co. 



GLASS, PAINTS AND BUILD- 
ING MATERIALS. 

Paine & Nixon Co. 

GROCERS. 

Gowan-Peyton-Congdon Co. 

Stone-Ordean-Well: Co. 

Wright-Clarkaon Mercantile Co. 

HARDWARE. 

Kelley-How-Thomson Co. 

Marahall-Wella Hdw. Co. 

WHOLESALE AND MAN'F^ 

OF MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 

Cbristensen- M endenhall- 
QriAiam Co. 

— J»c!« 

PAPER. 

Duluth Paper ft Stationery Cow 

McClellan Paper Ca 

Peyton Paper Co. 



M, 











, 


} 




1 


\ 






» 

« 













f 




i 



> 







Saturday, 



THE DITLUTH HERALD. 



July 15, 1911. 




RANGES 



L m .j ^ 0^0^^'> ~> i " ! r* !! — -^ *■ -■ 



HOT ELEaiON 
IN PROGRESS 

Virginia Takes Deep Interest 

in Choice of School Board 

Members. 

Possibility of Socialists Poll- 
ing Large Vote Complicates 
Situation. 



Virginia. Minn , July 15.— (Spetial to 
The Herald.)— With the school elec- 
tion en this afternoon, interest has 
crystallized into voting. A large early 
vote 18 being cast. For the tirst time 
the namts of Carl R. Johnson and C. 
E. Htn.iri.k were printed yesterday 
ui»on the same ticket and a fight »s 
being made for i>oih candidates. 

A strong contest is being put up 
for Mitchell Stewart and Mrs. Jane 
Cook, though many of Mr. Stewarts 
supporters are also for Mr. Hendrick. 
The campaign has been the cleanest 
waged here in years. It is impossible 
to forecast the result, but those who 
are in the hottest part of the c-am- 
paigti profess to believe that the tnree 
leaiHr.ff candidates will be Mitchell L. 
Stev.art. Carl It. Johnson. C E, Hend- 
rick not all. however, be:ieving the 
order will he the same. A great many 
believe Johnson and Iltndruk will 
lead and a good many say that Hend- 
rick and Stewart will lead. The bo- 
tlalists have been conducting a very 
active campaign and claim they will 
poll 500 votes. If they do. some slates 
Wir be smasiied. A year ago the total 
vote in the school election was about 
a.OOO and this year the total is likely 
to bo fuUv as large, but with the 
leading candidates in a much closer 
race ihan last year. 

^ 

Klectlun at CMnbolm. . 

Chisholm. Minn.. July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The annual election 
of Independent School L'lsirict No 40 
■Will be held this evening in the high 
Bchool building. Matters to be voted 
on are the elt< tion of officers for the 
coming fiscal year: their renumera- 
tlcn. the length of the school term, 
whether nine months or ten. 

• 

Bveletk Election Qnlet. . 
Eveleth. Minn.. July 15. — « Special to 
The Herald, t — The school election to 
be held tonight is not attracting much 
attention. Two school directors for 
three-year terms are to be elected to 
•ucce.'d Directors It. C. W. Moore and 
George F. I)ormer, v.hose one-year 
terms expire this month. The old di- 
rectors are candidates for re-election 
and as thev have made good records 
and' no opposition has appeared to 
their candidacies, it is e.xpected that 
they will easily be re-elected. 

« 

Three HlbblnK Caadidatea. 
Hlbbing. Minn.. July 1. — tSpecial to 
The Herald.* — Up to noon today about | 
eighty votes had been cast in the ; 
Bchool election which thus far has been [ 
the quietest in vears. So far there is | 
no oppc>sltlon to the re-election of the } 
three present members who are candi- 
dates for election: G. H. Thompson, 
president of the board: C. L. Holtz- 
lander clerk, candidates for the three- 
year term and T. J. Ryan, county com- 
missioner candidate for two years. 

It Is rumored that during the after- 
noon opposition candidates will de- , 
reiop. which might inject ginger into j 
the campaign. 

makinTprogress 
on new buildings 



of the fill and the rip-rapping. This 
work will be started it once. Abcnit 
sixteen men are employed on this 

job. 

KINSELLA HAS 
BEEN SUSPENDED 

Governor Temporarily Re- 
moves Him an 1 Appoints 
Dulutbian to Hear Case. 

St. I'aul. Minn.. Ju y 15.— Governor 
Kberhart has ordered he suspension of 
John Kinsella, county attorney of Lake 
county, pending the investigation of 
charges made against him by Hans Ot- 
terlee. chairman of th» board of couiity 
commissioners. Mario fi Douglas of Du- 
luth was appointed -ommissioner to 
take testimony to submit to the gov- 
ernor In the matter <f permanent re- 
moval of Kinsella from office. 

A few davs ago the county commis- 
sioners reported to vttorney General 
Simpson that Kinsella had been indict- 
ed un seven counts b / the grand jury 
of Lake county in coi nection with the 
distribution of two circulars during the 
last session of the legislature. The 
county board asked Mr. Simpson to 
start proceedings for Kinsella s re- 
moval, but Mr. Simp^on decided that 
some one would have to make charges 
of malfeasance in of fit e. 

What Otterlee Charges. 
The complaint which was filed by 
Otterlee through the i.ttorney generals 
office vesterdav alleges that Kinsella 
has wilfully and wi ongf ully refused 
and neglected to a< vise the county 
board as to its duties and rights in 
matters which the county board sub- 
mitted to him for his opinion. Several 
specific instances arc cited. Kinsella 
never was admitted ti the bar. 

Kinsella is a Social:8t and was elect- 
ed county attorney la ft November. He 
came into public n»tice last winter 
when he distributed a circular among 
the members of the legislature, excori- 
ating Attorney General Simpson and 
l>r. H M. Bracken, secretary of the 
state board of healtii. for not taking 
his view and giving ihe aid he wanted 
in getting certain improvements in the 
water and sewer systems at Two Har- 
bors. ^ ^ ^ 

There is no p^ovi^ ion in the state 
Constitution preventi ig the election of 
a county attorney wl o is not admitted 
to the bar. 

WILL BUiLDTlNE 

IN nvi! MONm 



REGISTER AND 
CASHSrOLEN 

Buhl Burglars Get $250 

Money Holder and $225 

in Cash. 

St. Louis Hotel Saloon Bur- 
glarized During Early 
Hours of Friday. 



Hassett was formerly a brakeman for 
the Missabe at the end of the line. 

Mrs. I>an Cassldy and son have re- 
turned from a long visit to Chicago. 
Mr. and Mrs. Cassldy intends making 
Taconite their home in the future. 

Mrs. -M. Caashen from Coleraine and 
Miss Agnes Walsh from Ishpeming. 
.Mich., liave been guests at the D. K. 
Cashen residence for the past few- 
days. , . 

Mrs. Pederaon from St. Paul, who 
has been visiting her sister, Mrs. John 
Fraser for the past week, returned to 
her home Thursday. 

Miss Werrie WcConville at Taconite 
Junction has just returned from a 
four weeks' trip to Hibbing. 

Miss May Cronm from Coleraine 
left here for her home tonight. Cronin 
Cronin has been visiting Taconite 
friends for the past few weeks. 

George Haines, who left here a 
month ago on account of his health, 
has returned in good health. Mr. 
Haines was married during his vaca- 
tion and is receiving congratulations 
Irotn his many friends. 

FIX CLOSING TIME. 



rived this week to visit with her par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. P. O. Lundgren. 

Arthur Schmeldel. Mae Schlelntz. 
Anton Klmer and Theodore Burchar:i. 
truck gardeners, visited Duluth this 
week for the purpose of disposing of 
their vegetables. 

W. H. Nichols of Marble was here 
Thursday on his weekly trip, looking 
up vegetables. He shipped eight 
baskets Thursday evening. 

A. S. Osborn of Duluth. who bought 
eighty acres near .St. Louis river, ar- 
rived here this week. He Intends to 
open up his farm and put up a nice 
new dwelling. 

SMALL FIRES IN 
VICINITY OF ELY 



and 



Grand Rapids Is Scene of 
Considerable Building 
Activity These Days. j 

Grand Rapiils, Minn., July 15. — [ 
(Special to The Herald.) — There is 
considerable building activity here 
this mimmer and good progress is be- 
ing made on the several structures. 
John Hofer, who has the contract for 
building the new steel water tank, 
had the old affair dismantled, having 
jjlown it down last Thursday, as told 
in The Herald, and is working on 
the foundation for the new tank. 

Contractor Arscott has the excavat- 
ing for the new paper mill well un- 
der way. The excavation, which has 
to go down twenty feet on the deep 
side i.s now down about fifteen feet. 
Dirt is being hauled out at the rate 
of between thirty and forty yards per 
hour. It is expected that the ex- 
cavation will be completed in two 
w^eeks, Mr. Arscott has sixteen men 
and six tf'^'^<» employed. 

To Bo Large Bidl<lln«. 
The building will be a big affair, 
AS a few of the details show, the main 
boiler room will be 92\i by 41. To the 
north of this will be the fuel room, 
which will be 25 by I»2Ji. while to 
the east will be the engine room. 54 
by 41. The base, or foundation, for 
the smokestack will be twenty-six 
feet snuare, and the smokestack, 
which will have a six-foot flue and 
will be of concrete, will be 175 feet 
high above the base. From the boiler 
room to the basement of the mill 
there will be a 10-foot tunnel, allow- 
ing easy access to the mill from the 
boiler room. The fuel room will be 
built so that a car loaded with coal 
can be run right into the room and 
unload Into the basement, which will 
be about twenty feet deep. Overhead 
will be the elevator and machinery of 
automatic stoker, which will take the 
coal from the fuel room and feed it 
mitomatlcally to the fireplaces of the 
boilers. 

St. Joseph's Church. 
On St. Josephs chunh much prog- 
ress is being made. The rafters are 
up and the roof, excepting the 
singles, is on. The brick work on 
the tower has been delayed for a 
short time owing to a lack of face 
brick. Some of this material has 
been secured, however, and the work 
will go ahead. It is expected that the 
church will be ready for occupancy in 
October. A force of a dozen men is 
employed. 

The concrete base, or wall, of thg 
courthouse retaining wall, which Is 
being done by C. R. McLean of Du- 
luth, was completed Wednesday. On 
this job there now remains only the 
laylnsf of the drain, tiling behind the 
wall, the filling In. the water settling 



Backers of Range Interurban 

System Are Pleased With 

Outlook. 

Virginia. Minn.. July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Attorney Oscar 
Mitchell of Duluth. accompanied by 
tifteen Eastern capitalists interested 
in financing the prcposed new inter- 
urban street railway line on the range 
were here Friday and, with A. B. Coates, 
examined the proposed right-of-way 
jn the city and at ether points. The 
company went over the entire pro- 
pc>sed right-of-way, being on the 
range several days. They expressed 
themselves as great y pleased with 
conditions and assc rted that they 
would at once take steps for the 
financing of the line and its construc- 
tion. The engineer in charge of the 
construction depart nent stated that 
he could complete the line v.ithin five 
months, but it will oe another month 
before actual work can begin; how- 
ever, it is expected that considerable 
of the construction work will be ac- 
complished this fall. 

The line will conrect Virginia. Eve- 
leth. Gilbert. Hibbing, Buhl. Chisholm 
and Mountain Iron. It will be thir- 
tv-six miles long an 1 will be the most 
modern electric line that can be con- 
structed. Virginia will be the head- 
quarters for the company and it is 
expected that the < entral power sta- 
tion will be located in this city. 



Buhl, Minn., July 15.— (feTpecial to 
The Herald.) — There was some class to 
the work of the burglars who visited 
the St. Louis hotel and saloon of 
Johnson Bros., here early this morn- 
ing. They took not only the cash 
register valued at %2bO from the sa- 
loon, but walked off with the $225 in 
cash left in the money receptacle. 
There does not appear to be any clue. 
Probably Left Town. 

The men who turned the trick are 
believed to have left town as some 
strangers were seen driving rapidly 
from the village about 2:30 a. m.. and 
the supposition Is they made good 
their escape before the burglary be- 
came known. They are supposed to 
have gained entrance to the place be- 
tween 1 and 2 a. m.. finding ingress 
easy because the proprietors claim the 
help failed to properly lock up the 
saloon part of the establishment ot 
the hotel whence the register and 
monev were taken. 

Telephone messages have been sent 
to other range towns and to Duluth 
warning the police to be on the look- 
out for the burglars or any one trying 
to dispose of a cash register. 

EVELETH SELLS 
SCHOOL BONDS 

Issue of $60,000 to Build 

New School Taken By 

Mill City Firm. 

Eveleth. Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At a meeting of the 
school board yesterday afternoon, the 
Minnesota Trust & Loan company's bid 
of 4.90 per cent interest on the $60,000 
school bonds offered by School District 
No. 39 for the erection of the new Fayal 
school, was accepted. The bidders will 
divide the bonds with P. Keene. of Chi- 
cago who also bid. A third bid for the 
bonds was submitted by the First Na- 
tional bank of C'llcago. represented by 
President George A. Whitman of the 
First National bank of this city. Bids 
for the erection of the new school will 
be opened July 21. and work on the 
building is to be completed by Feb. 1. 

Superintendent Burton O. Greening, 
at the head of the local school for 
seven years was offered a contract for 
one vear, and it is believed he will ac- 
cept.' The school term which will open 
Sept. 5, will be for a period of ten 
months. The annual reports of the 
treasurer and clerk of the board were 
accepted. 



Eveleth Clerks and Merchants lleach 
Agreement. 

Eveleth. Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A joint meeting of the 
Retail Clerks' union and merchants 
was held at the city hall last evening 
with a large attendance. It was de- 
cided to allow the clerks to quit work 
at 6:30 p. m. dally, with the exception 
of paydays and Saturdays and one 
other day during the week, which will 
be decided upon by the merchants. 
Many of the merchants were in favor 
of extending the 6:30 p. m. closing 
agreement to 7:30 p. m. to accommo- 
date transient trade and day shift 
workers. A change in the closing 
agreement will be decided upon later 
by the clerks. - 

Following the Joint meeting the 
members of the union went Into ex- 
ecutive session. 

LEAVES CHISHOLM. 

Jack Krause, Merchant, Goes to 
State of Washington. 

Chisholm, Minn., July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Jack Krause, who has 
retired from the grocery firm of 
Krause Brothers, left this week for 
the state of Washington, where he in- 
tends to enter business with D. Whit- 
more, who is also going West. 

Mr. Krause has lived In Chisholm for 
four years and was formerly employed 
as ttamster and salesman for one of 
the local grocery firms. He has been 
in business with his brother as partner 
during the last two years. 

Mrs. Krause will remain in Chisholm 
for some time and possibly may not 
move to Washington until next spring. 
There was a special communincatlon 
of the Masonic lodge on Friday night, 
during which team work was done in 
the first degree. ' ,, ^ 

Miss A. Cree of Ishperlng, Mich., a 
teacher in the public scho<d8 near that 
citv, arrived tn Chisholm to make her 
home with her parents, Capt. and Mrs. 
Cree of First avenue. ^ , . i 

The Methodist Sunday school picnic 
is to be held on Friday, July 28. but 
the place has not yet been announced. 
Mrs Richard Bateson of Alice, Minn., 
accompanied by her daughter. Miss 
Hilda, visited Chisholm this week. Miss 
Hilda remained in Chisholm to continue 
her work as nurse at one of the homes 
in the Myers location. 

Crowds of berry pickers are In the 
woods every day and everyone gets as 
many as desired. Children calling at 
the doors selling their berries are of- 
fering them for 10 cent per quart 

The official board of the M. E. 
church met in a special meeting Fri- 
day night. The matter of the church 
finances was discussed. 



FOR SALE BY OWNER! 

Seven-room house with good foun- 
dation, hardwood iloors throughout, 
in finest residence district. Good 
reason for selling. Call or address. 
710 Central Avenue South, Virginia, 
Minn. 



HAS 2,600 POPULATION. 

Grand Rapids Assessors Show That 
Federal Couit Was Off. 

Grand Rapids. Minn., July 15. — •Spe- 
cial to The Herall.>— The census of 
this village just completed by Assessor 
Charles Millaney, employed by the 
council to take an accurate count of 
the Inhabitants shows a population of 
-.600. ^ , J 

The figures returned by the federal 
census enumerator last year did not 
prove satisfactory to the people of 
Grand Rapids, many being convinced 
that the total. 2.2 10, did not Include 
the entire population of the village, 
with the result thnt Assessor Millaney 
was authorized to go ahead and take 
another census. The work has just 
been completed and a report was made 
to the village council this week. 
• 

Eveleth to Play .\aror«. 

Eveleth. Minn.. .luly 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Eveleth and Aurora 
rines of the Eastern Mesaba league will 
play tomorrow on the local grounds 
with "I'lng" Richaid. Victor Parks and 
L, .\ndrews, as E^ eleths battery and 
Carver and Beecrt f t working for the 
visitors. Eveleth vlll play Chisholm at 
Chisholm July 23. md Winton later In 
the season. A garie is also being ar- 
ranged with the Hopkins Girls of De» 
Moines, Iowa. 



THREE MEN ARE 
HELD FOR ASSAULT 

Trio That Cut John De Grote 

at Holman Are Bound 

Over. 

Taconite, Minn.. July 15. — (Special to 
Ihe Herald.) — The preliminary hearing 
held here Thursday of Frank Delenza, 
Aug. Delenza and Angelo De Rubis for 
the assault and stabbing of John De 
Grote at Holman July 4. resulted in 
their being bound over to the grand 
jury on Oct. 24. , „ , , 

Attorney Stone from Grand Rapids 
represented the defense while Attorney 
McQuat from Coleraine the state. 

Ball was fixed at $2,500 for Frank, 
$700 for August, $300 for Angelo. De 
Grote is still very weak from loss of 
blood. 

COLORED GOPHERS 

AGAIN BEAT HIBBING. 



APPRAISES RIGHT-OF-WAY. 

Board Values Virginia Property for 
Canadian Northern. 

Virginia, Minn., July 15— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A meeting of appraisers 
appointed by the district court was 
neld ye.-terday to appraise the value ot 
real estate owned by James Sullivan, 
Gust Anderson and Rooney & Murphy 
just within the city limits in West %id 
to be used as a right of way for the 
Canadian Northern Railroad compan>. 
The property will be condemned for a 
right of way and sold to the railroad 
company. The Canadian Northern ha.^ 
purchased about twenty additional 
acres of land about a mile west of the 
Virginia A Rainy Lake Lumber com- 
pany and this, together with that here- 
tofore secured, will be u.sed as a site 
for shops, roundhouse and yards, en- 
gineers are already on the ground 
making preparations for its preparation 
f^.r the improvements. The board of 
appraisers consisted of Mayor Andrew 
Hawklnson and A, B. Coates of \jr- 
ginia and Mr. Church of Dulu th. 

w ickeyTomestead 

LEASED FOR CARDEN. 



Supervisor Fitzwater 
Foresters Go Out and 
Extinguish Flames. 

Ely. Minn., July 15.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— Small brush fires prevailed 
in the vicinity of Ely during the week 
presumably started by campers or 
berry pickers. Supervisor Fitzwater 
and the foresters went out and soon 
succeeded in extinguishing the blaes 
-thereby removing the possibility of 
danger. Mr. Fitzwater and his men 
also went to Tower to extinguish fires 
in that locality. 

R. J. Whiteside of Duluth has been 
in the city this week with his assist- 
ant, Bert Boucher, looking over his 
land at Hunters camp. 

Mrs. J. K. Kloobuchar, who has been 
visiting with her sister, Mrs. John 
Gouze, returned Tuesday to her home 
in Calumet, Mich. 

Miss Hazel Richardson, who has been 
visiting with Dr. and Mrs. Lockhart 
here for several weeks, left for her 
home yesterday in Hudson, Wis. 

E. Keifner of Tower was in the city 
Wednesday looking over a fire in the 
Bass lake country, and with a few 
other men putting out the fire which 
started there. ^ ^ . t j „ 

Mrs. Olaf Berglund entertained a 
party Saturday in honor of Mrs. Axel 
Carlson, who returned from Sweden 
last week after an absence of about ten 
months. 

To Start BoardloK Houae. 

Mrs. Lawrence of Winton has leased 
Wagners house and will occupy it 
about Aug 15. She will conduct a 
boarding house here. She had charge 
of the Club House at Winton, before 
she leased this house. 

Mr and Mrs. J. I. Laing returned 
Tuesday from a three we«»^s ^igit with 
relatives at Gladstone, Mich -^h?J^ 
there several members of the family 
arrived there and a grand reunion was 
held some of the members not having 
met for as long as forty years 

Word has been received of the mar- 
riage of R. B. Newman and Miss Eliza- 
beth Dodson at Tecumseh Neb. Both 
were popular teachers ot the hlgn 
school here last year. rminth 

p T Brownell went to Duiuin 
Wednesday for a few days on busl- 

"*^ffr and Mrs. Metcalf returned Mon- 
day from a visit in Duluth. 

Mrs. G. T. Ayers and Mrs. A. A. 
Ayers visited friends in Tower Wednes- 

'**Dr. and Mrs. Parker left Friday for 
Duluth where they remained until bun- 

^' William Kron has returned from his 
visit in Duluth and is again at his place 
in the Shipman hospital. 

Mrs Edward Purdy arived 'ro"} Crys- 
tal Falls, Mich.. Sunday for a visit with 
her sister, Mrs. Harry Cinn. -^„^v, 

Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Conan and daufh; 
ter Rachel, left Saturday for a visit 
with relatives and friends at Superior. 

^^An army recruiting station has been 
established In the rooms over I aul> s 

^^Mr "and Mrs. J. W. Osborne went to 
Superior Monday afternoon to visit 
wUh the mother of Mr. Osborne, who 

'%uJ.^A."j: Fenske is enjoying a visit 
with her sister, Mrs. V. C. Burnett, and 
daughter, of Detroit. Mich. 

Miss Mary Western of the Berg und 
Bros.- store is out on a visit to Minot. 
N. D., with relatives and friends. 



MINER HAS 
INVENTION 

Employe in Ran^e Mines 

Has Perfected New 

Explosive. 

Company Is Organized in 

Duluth to Manufacture 

the Product. 



A factory for the manufacture on 
a large scale of a new kind of an ex- 
plosive to take thr. place of dynamite, 
will soon be established in Duluth. 
The company has been incorporated 
and the capital stock has been placed 
at $250,000. The articles were file 1 
with the register of deeds this mora- 
ing. Mrs. I. C, Buell, a local attorney, 
represents the firm. 

Dynamite is said to have many 
faults that are overcome in the new 
explosive. Dynamite makes so much 
smoke and leaves so much gas that 
the miners lose much time in getting 
back to their work. It Is said. 

The use of the new powdtir, it is 
claimed, will do away with *.his delay 
as It leaves no smoke and no gas. Sev- 
eral of the powder companies nave 
tried out Bettanins invention and It is 
said that they speak highly of It. 

Bettanln is a common miner and has 
done his experimenting at odd times 
while employed in mines on the range. 

The incorporators are: George Bos- 
kovlch, Capt. J. H. Lanyon, William A. 
Kethtel and Frank Suech. All are 
Duluth men. 

A factory will be established and 
the manufacture of the new powder 
begun at once, It is stated. 

The company has been incorpor.ite.l 
under the name of "The National Dy- 
namite Company of America." 

Foley Kidney Pills are composed 
of ingredients specially selected for 
their corrective, healing, tonic and 
stimulating effect upon the kidneys, 
bladder and urinarv passages. They 
are antiseptic antillthic and a uric acid 
solvent. For sale by all druggists. 

FREEDOM ON 
HABEAS CORPUS 

Commitment Papers for Chis- 
holm Man Not Just Grounds 
for Imprisonment 

otto Leinon secured his liberty from 
the county jail this morning on habeas 
corpus proceedings brought against 
Sheriff Meining by his attorney. 

He claimed that he was imprisoned 
without just grounds and that the 




*l 



KING NICHOLAS 
Of Montenegro. 

London, July 15. — The king of Moil' 
tenegro will be 70 years old this year. 
He has occupied the tlirone for forty- 
one years. His family has ruled over 
Montenegro since 1697. Recently Mon- 
tenegro has been much stirred up by 
raids into Albania made by the Turks. 
King Nicholas has put troops on th& 
border to subdue the Turks. Monte- 
negro has an army of between 50.000 
and 60,000 on paper, but its actual 
strength Is about 30,000. These are all 
militia troops, each household contrib- 
uting one man. 



commitment did not show a cause of 
action against him. Judge Dancer sus- 
tained the argument of the attorney 
and Leinon was allowed his freedom. 

Leinon was sent to Duluth from 
Chisuolm some time ago by the justice 
of the peace at tiiat place to serve » 
60-day sentence for attempting to de- 
fraud Julius Bernstein, a merchant at 
Ciiisholm of $63. &6 by means of ft 
check. 

The crime for which Leinon was Im- 
prisoned Is not very clear as th» 
papers from the village do not state 
exactly what the nature of it was. They 
simply state that he attempted to de- 
fraud and sentenced him to a jail term. 

Assistant County Attorney Warrer* 
E. Greene admitted in court that the 
charge was not very clear. He could 
not throw a great deal of light on the 
matter which took place in Chisholm 
and Judge Dancer allowed him his 
freedom. 

• 

Good wives should see that their, 
husbands secure a Permit to smoke. 

OBSTACLE TO WALSlTs 

PAROLE LS REMOVED. 



-* 



i» — 



J 



Chicago, July 15. — The last indict- 
ment pending against John R. Walsh, 
former Chicago banker, now serving a 
term In Fort Leavenworth peniten- 
tiary, was quashed yesterday by 
United States District Judge Landia. 
This removes the chief obstacle In the 
way of parole of the former banker. 
The parole board will meet in Fort 
Leavenworth in September and It la 
said the Walsh case will be the first 
to be considered. 



Eveleth Soldier* Return. 

Eveleth. Minn.. July 15-— ^Spec.al to 
The Herald.)— Company F, which at- 
tended the annual encampment of the 
fatate guard at Lake City, and the Min- 
neapolis Civic celebration, «fty-eight 
strong returned last evening from Lake 
Cltv fn command of Second Lieutenant 
Cass U. Jenkins, numbering but thirty- 
eight, as many of the soldiers stopped 
cff at points on their way home. The 
bovs won many honors at Lake City 
and are well pleased with this year s 
encampment which was the fourth they 
have attended. 



They Come Hundreds 

of Miles to See Him 



IN THE DAY'S WORK 
AT WASHINGTON 



AT DULUTH, MINN., 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL, SATURDAY, JULY 22nd, 

From 9 a. m. Until 6 p. m. 

WILL GIVE FREE TREATMENT THIS TRIP ONLY. 



m, 



Eveleth Cliild Burled. 

Eveleth. Minn.. . uly 16. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The funeral of Fulvia. 
the 1-year-old daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs Caesar Capitenelll of the Fayal 
location, who died Thursday afternoon 
after a short illness with kidney 
trouble, was held yesterday afternoon 
from the St. Patrick church. Rev. 
Father J. B. Culll fan officiating. In- 
terment was made at Virginia. 

The infant child of Postmaster and 
Mrs. Edward H. 1 Catch died yesterday 
noon at their horn J on Jones street. 




Hibbing, Minn., July 15.— t Special to 
The Herald.) — P^'or the second succes- 
sive day yesterday the Hibbing Colts 
tasted the dust of defeat at the hands 
of the Twin City Gophers. The latter 
team have now won two games of the 
series of five which is to end with Sun- 
day afternoon's contest. Miserable and 
inexcusable fielding on the part of the 
locals was mainly responsible for their 

This afternoon the two teams will 
l>lav their fourth game, weather per- 
mltUng. Williams will be In tiie box 
for Hibbing and Pangburn for the col- 
ored lads. Tomorrows game will end 
the series. 

TRAIN CREW 'entertains. 

Taconite and Holman People Enjoy 
Festive Affair. 

Taconite, Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Missabe crews stop- 
ping at Taconite made Broncho hall at 
Holman a scene of festivity Thursday 
evening when they held a banquet In 
honor of the "Comedian" engineer 
Tom Dempsey. Jfr. Dempsey is known 
from one coast to the other as a nat- 
ural born comedian and is popular 
wherever he is known. The committee 
of arrangements were J. E. Woods. (). 
H. Cripe, and John Corrlgan. The af- 
fair was a success. 

Mandes Van Wave has taken a 
contract to keep the baseball park In 
good condition for the remainder of 
the season. He is painting the grand 
stand and fence this week. 

The Taconite brass band gave an 
extra long concert here at postofflce 
sciuare Wednesday evening, which was 
well attended by a number of stran- 
gers as well as town people. 

Albert Regal has purchased a new- 
Regal automobile which he expects to 
arrive this week. 

Charles Gowell has finished nalntfng 
the Restaurant block and grading the 
grounds, it looks much better from 
both Depot street and the center of 
the village. 

Charles Hassett was In town this 
wek visiting his numerous friends. Mr. 



Eveleth. Minn.. July 15. — ^Special to 
The Herald.) — John Glode, proprietor of 
the Glode hotel yesterday leased the 
Wickey homestead at P^ly lake from 
Forrest Wickey now of Duluth and will 
raise stock and vegetables at the lake, 

°C A^ Morrison of Mud Hen, a former 
Evelethlan was here yesterday with a 
load of radishes and peas which he sold 
at good prices. He reports that much 
hay is bei ng grown in his dis trict. 

HUNGER BRIEFS. 

Munger, Minn.. July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Another dance will be 
elver at Brussell s pavilion, near Mun- 
ler Station. Saturday evening. 

Mr and Mrs. Peter Stransky, Matt 
and Bennle Stransky. Fred Morton, 
Charlev Carlson, Lydla Fagerstrom, 
Mr and Mrs. Albert Miller. Oscar Brus- 
SVl Amanda Leiste and Mr. McDonald 
Were all Duluth visitors this week. 

Sarah Butler. Florence Butler, Ruth 
Danlals and Olaf Johnson of Pike Lake 
attended the dance at Brussell s pa- 
vilion last Saturday. „ u * 

Marie Miller. Ella I^hleen, Herbert 
Dahleen and Albert Miller, Jr. spent 
Sunday evening driving around Pike 

^* Peter .Stransky's mill had to be 
closed down for a while this week be- 
cause of shortness of water. 

Farmers are all busy haying, and 
crops somewhat better than last year 

Mr and Mrs. George Johnson and 
family from Birch have moved here to 
make their future home. 

MEADOAVLANDS NOTES. 



CnmmlBS Makes Prediction. 

Washington, July 15. — Senator Cum- 
mins of Iowa insurgent, after adjourn- 
ment yesterday expressed conviction 
despite the program there would be 
general tariff revision before the close. 
He based his belief on the fact that the 
Democrats and insurgents would stand 
together and force amendments to the 
free list bill, adding wool, sugar, steel, 
cotton, etc. to that measure. 

"At least we shall have legislative 
revision before we adjourn he said. I 
do not know what the president will 
do but we will give him a chance to 
speak for himself. 



Meadowlands. Minn.. July 15.--(Spo- 
cial to The Herald.)— A special train 
arrived Sunday morning from Duluth 
at 5 10 with a distinguished party to 
innk over farm sites. There was a 
arSe number of teams with rigs which 
took them out in the country on a 
pleasure Trip. They returned to Du- 
liith at I'lO p. rtl. 

Mrs Edward Olson and son of 
OsVeoia Wis., returned home Monday 
after a' few days' visit with her son, 
Saunders and family, 
''"fi p Daner of Silica was here Sun- 
day on a visit with J. A. Bergeson and 

'^TheVe was afternoon and evening 
services In the Union church Sunday 
conducted by the Revs. Sauer and 

^'paui^M Bolz of Duluth received two 
cars of material this week. He started 
work on the new school building Mon- 
day and has a large force at work 

A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs 
Lawn Speece, Wednesday. 

Mr and Mrs E. J. Peterson and son, 
who 'were visiting with their parents, 
Mr and Mrs. James Bergeson, returned 
to Minneapolis Thursday. , ,. , 

C A. Worthing and family left for 
Duluth this week. ^ ^ ^ 

Mrs. J. W. McCarthy has been very 
sick for the past week but is improv- 

Mlss ciara Langdon of Hibbing ar- 



Balley May Quit Senate. 

Because of variance between his 
views and the views of some of his 
Democratic colleagues on tariff legis- 
lation Senator Bailey of Texas Is said 
to be thinking of asking to be re- 
lieved from duty on the finance com- 
mittee for a time at least. He de- 
clined to say whether he would resign 
from the committee. He has been suf- 
fering from an inflamed eye, which he 
fears might prevent his being able 
to give sufficient attention to tariff leg- 
islation. 

Kenyon Wanf(» Fine* Abolished. 

Senator Kenyon made an argument 
before the senate committee on Inter- 
state commerce in support of his bill 
amending the Interstate commerce law 
so as to elimate the provision permit- 
ing the punishment of offenders by 
fine. As the law stands, it allows 
either fines or imprisonment. The Iowa 
senator said it was Impossible to get 
some courts to Impose prison sentences 
so long as there is an alternative, and 
he contended that no other punishment 
is effective in preventing violations of 
the law. Mr. Kenyon also urged favor- 
able action on the portions of the bill 
forfeiting patents used in the forma- 
tion of trusts, and forbidding Inter- 
state corporations from owning the 
stock of other corporations of a similar 
character. 

Vcteran«' Joba to Hold. 

The senate passed a resolution put- 
ting I'nion veterans in its employ upon 
a civil service status, to be retained 
permanently so long as their services 
are satisfactory. 

« 

Pilgrimage to Ste. Anne De Beau- 
ppe, Quebec, $30.00. 

Via the South Shore, leaving Duluth 
and Superior each day July 20 to July 
24. Return limit August 31. Stop overs 
at any point. Rate $30.00 for round 
trip. A. J. Perrin, General Agent. 430 
West Superior street. 

• ■ 

Held on SeriooH CharKe- 

Cumberland, Wis., July 15. — George 
Polyard, aged 40 years, married, was 
arrested here yesterday, charged with 
attempted assault on a young girl. 
At the primary hearing Polyard was 
bound over to the October term of cir- 
cuit court and placed in the county 
jail to await trial. 



The success of Dr. Rea is attributed 
to his special study of specialism. Dr. 
Rea, student, philanthropist and man of 
wide reputation, having given his en- 

, tire time and practice to a line of spe- 
cial diseases, which enables him from 

;iong experience in handling these trou- 
bles to certainly come forward as a 
master specialist. His faculty for mas- 
tering disease, his ability to diagnose, 
and his plan of treatment are not to be 
excelled by few other physicians. Dr. 
Rea. although a young inan in hfe. a 
plain man, and one who is used to the 
UPS and downs of life. P"ts himself on 
a level with his patients, and does not 
profess or pretend to practice the old 
p[an or fa.shlon, which is to look wise 
and say nothing. He knows disease: he 
knows how to explain the symptoms of 
disease; he knows where to look for 
disease, and the spot where located, and 
most of all he knows from experience, 
from what he has done m the Past, he 
can certainly do for others In the fu- 
ture It is said by Dr. Rea s friends 
that he can diagnose a disease of anj 
patient without asking them a single 
question; that being the case, he is not 
I kely to doctor them for the wrong ail- 
ment- he will not take, any Incurable 
disease and lead the patients to believe 
that he can cure them when there is 
really no hope for them. His business 
Is large and he has plenty to do, even, 
at times, more than he can do, without 
taking incurable diseases and deceiving 
his pltlents. Dr. Rea Is a graduate 
from one of the best English universi- 
ties, as well as being a graduate from 
two of the best schools in America. He 
has practiced his profession in some of 
the principal hospitals in this country. 
His specialty comprises that class or 
diseases which the ordinary home doc- 
tor fails to cure. His practice is mostly 
among the plain, hard-working People, 
who are unable to come to his cit./ or- 
flce for treatment; he is reasonable in 
hfs charges, and very lenient ,^^>th ^^ 
who are unable to pay. He is cliarita- 
ble, and It is said has never been Kno^ " 
to refuse to treat a patient who is wor- 
thv and in need. A number of impor- 
Jant caSes°that we hereby take the lib - 
ertv to publish, which might be of in- 
terest to some who wish to know more 
of Dr. Rea's great work 



Anton Simonson, girl, Wahpeton, N. 
D. Cured of chronic catarrh and dis- 
charging ears. 

Mrs Michael Murphy, Emmetsburg, 
Iowa Cured of chronic blood disease, 
that other doctors had all failed to 
cure, even after years of experimenting 
with' her, 

Oscar Morks, 609 W. Superior St., 
Duluth Minn. Cured of chronic dys- 
pepsia, bowel troubles. 

Wm. F. Myer, Dexter, Minn. Cured 
of chronic stomach and bowel troubles 
by Dr. Rea's Cascarine treatment. 

Oscar Halstein, Fargo. N. D. Cured 
of consumption. Mr. Halstein had doc- 
tored with a number of other doctors 
before treating with Dr. Rea. 



Mike Curren, Minto, N. D. Says Dr. 
Rea's treatment worked wonders on 
him- after taking it a short time felt 
better than he had for years. 

Mrs. G. W. Varco, Austin, Minn. 
Cured of a large cancer of the breast 
without cutting or without the plaster. 
Cured with Dr. Rea's new plan of treat- 
ment, which is one of the grandest dis- 
coveries the world has ever known for 
completely curing cancer, so that It 
never returns again. 

A. C. Mever, Ormsby, Minn. Cured 
of bad cancer of the lip in two treat- 
ments. Cured by the injection plan. • 

Mrs. N. F. Johnson, Morton, N. D. 
Cured of nervous prostration and epi- 
lepsy, after all other treatments had 
failed. 

Mrs. Martha Murphy, St. Cloud. Minn. 
Says Dr. Rea saved my life. He was 
the doctor who knew where to look for 
disease, where to find It and to cure it 
after it was found. 

A. FuUwhller. Round Lake, Minn. 
Cured of chronic Bright's I'isease. 

Edgar Putman, Weaver. Minn. Cured 
of a bad case of eczema of the skin. 

Mrs. H. C. Dorman. MIniski. Minn. 
Cured of bad case of protruding piles. 

Mrs. B. A. Moore, near Grantsburg, 
Wis. Cured of floating kidney that had 
almost taken her life. 

Mrs. Christ Wcthal, 3821 Halifax St., 
West Duluth, Minn., cured of cross eyes 
in five minutes. 

Mrs. Alexander Swanson. Oakes. N. 
D., cured ot bad cancer of the face. Had 
had it cut out and came back. Three 
of Dr. Rea's Injection treatments cured 

s! M. Moore. Gladstone. X. D., writes: 
"Dr. Rea, you cured my son over a year 
ago. I have another sick boy, and want 
you to doctor him.'" 

Fred L. Dicker, Gllby, N. D., cured of 
disease of the kidney. Was very bad. 
A few months' treatment completely 
cured him. 

Mrs. Maurice Miller, Beaver, Mian., 
cured of epllpsy, 

Mrs. N. C. Olson, East Grand Forks, 
Minn., cured of big knee, varicose vein 
and rheumatism. 

O. H. Larson, Bue, N. D., cured of 
chronic rheumatism. 

MiSs Emma Geving, Mcintosh, Minn., 
cured of consumption. 

W. H. Nulph, Wvndinere, N. D., cured 
of cancer of the face in two treatments. 

Martha Wllheim. Rt. No. 5. Minneapo- 
lis. Minn., cured of long standing epi- 
lepsy 

Joe McGowan, St. Anthony Park, 
Minn., cured of gall stones of the liver. 
Doctors said he would die. Dr. Hea 
cured him in three months. 

Charles Grondysee, Slayton, Minn.. 
cured of consumption by Dr. I'oran with 
Dr. Rea's celebrated cure for consump- 

Mrs. Nels Carlson, Buffalo. Minn., 
cured of large cancer of the breast. 
Cured by the hvpodermic injection plan 
discovered by Dr. Rea. There is no 
failing with this treatment. 



Dr Rea has arranged to give free treatment to all who call on him thUi 
July visit to Duluth. Dr. Rea has set aside one month each year whereby he 
ireats anyone who calls on him at his appointed visit. ^^ th*'tL«t^^.«'t^*of''^^ 
felcharge, making only a charge for medicines used m the treatment of pa- 
tients until cured. 



V 



If 



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4 



•«j 







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m^ml 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD^ 



July 16, 1911 



11 




Mrs. Selby and Prize Baby 

" I have always usckI Cuticura Soap 
and no other for my baby and he 
hiw never had a sore of any kind. 
lie does not even chafe as most babies 
du. I feel sure that it n all owing to 
Cuticur* Soap, for he is tine and 
hoa'.thy. and when five months old, 
won a prize in a baby contest. It 
makes my heart ache to go into so 
IT any homes and see a sweet-faced 
baby with the whole top of its head 
a :julid inaas of scurf, caused by poor 
soap. I always recommend CutK-ur», 
and nine times out of ten. the next 
time I see the mother she says. Oh I 
I am so gla<i vou told me of Cuticu- 
ra ■" I Signed) Mrs O A. Selby. Re- 
dondo Beach. Calif.. Jan. 15. 1911. 

Although Cuticura Soap and Oint- 
ment are sold by druggists and deal- 
ers everywhere, a liberal sample of 
each, with 3-*-page booklet will be 
s«nt. post-free, on application to 
•Cuticura." Dept. 3, Boston. 




R0ADR4CEAT 
LATERDATE 

Dululh-Hibbing Run Will Prob. 

ably Tako Place in 
September. 

Poor Condition of Roads 

Makes It Impossible at 

Tbis Time. 



BOB 6URMAN, 
SPEED KING 

Holds More Records Than 

Any Other Driver in 

the World. 

Fast Time Made in Blitzen 

Benz, Barney Oldfield's 

Old Car. 



Uott. secretary of the Touring Club of 

'rhe main object of the trip is to 
study highway conditions between 

Washington and the caP'i»l "^Hr^h" 
Klnia. At various points State Hign- 
way Commissioner Wilson and Assis- 
tant Director Sargent will meet the 
local authorities and offer suggestions 
for road maintenance so that by tne 
latter part of October the highways 
may be In the best possible condition 
for motor travel In this month a 
caravan of automobile tourists from 
many Northern cities will travel to 
Richmond to attend the flrsit Ameri- 
can Koad congress to be held in tnat 
citv under the auspices of the Ameri- 
can Association for Highway Improve- 
ment with the co-operation of the 
Touring Club of America. 

The touring club will have charge 
of the organization of tours through- 
out the United States to Richmond, 
and Is taking early action to Interest 
the highway officials, not only in Vir- 
ginia, but other slates with a view to 
having tlu> roads in much better con- 
dition in the fa ll. 

WORK CAUSES EYESTRAIN. 



ANGLO-JAP 
PACrnXED 

Obstacle to Arbitration Treaty 

Is Removed By the 

Action. 




m 






The postponement of the Duluth-Hlb- 
bing auto race, wl Ich was planned for 
Sunday, was very disappointing to a 
number of enthusaatlc motorists who 
had planned to enter. 

The condition of the roads at this 
time made the run almost an Impossi- 
bility and it was postponed at the re- 
ciue.st of those who had been over the 
road. 

Last year the MlUer Trunk road was 
In good shape aid both Dululh and 
range motorists made some good time 
records over It. This year filling and 
aradlng have spoiled It for the time be- 
ing Work will lie continued at once 
and it Is safe to my that the race for 
the prize of $100 will be run some time 
during the month of September. 
• The county cominlsaioners were taken 



-. "^ 



Iron Fencln*. 45c ■ foot «iid up. 
Wire «Juard« lor Window*. 
Ura.HH HailloK.<«. , ^ j 

CriMman PBrafloe Paint for fownda- 

tloa walln and Iron worW. 

Wayne GaaoUn* Pumpa aad Ta«ka 1 oy^^ the road Monday and they have 
tor Karanei*. promised to get It In good repair as 

' soon as possible The farmers who 
have the contract.! have placed red rtay 
en a number of places and It makes the 
going extremely rough. 

A number of autolsts had planned on 
entering the race and iS they had spent 
some time In getting their cars in shape 
tor the run they are disappointed, to 
say the least 



QUAYLE LARSEN CO. 

» 14-16 West Superior Street 




Bob Burman again demonstrated his 
right to the title of 'world speed king" 
when he made a mile In 4J4.72 seconds 
at the Independence day race on the 
mile circular dirt track of the Brighton 
Beach motordrome. This remarkable 
time of Burman's beats the old world's 
record for circular dirt tracks, which 
was made by De Palma In a Flat at 
Syracuse. N. Y.. Sept. 17. 1910. 

With this new mark Burman la the 
holder of more worlds speed records 
than any one driver in the world. He 
has traveled faster than any man on 
any course, hanging up new records 
(or the mile, kilometer and two miles 
on the Daytonia. Fla.. course. In of- 
rtcial record trials. April 23. driving 
the 'Blitzen" Benz at the rate of 141.. 3 
miles an hour. Burman broke the rec- 
ords held by Oldtleld. Burman used the 
same ca/ and drove over the same 
course as Oldfleld. 

Not content with holding the world s 
records for stralght-away courses. Bur- 
man. In record trials at the Indianapo- 
lis motor speedway. May 29. captured 
the world's speedway marks for tne 
mile, kilometer, half mile and quarter 
mile. He also established a worlds 
record for driving at night, making 82 
miles an hour on the Long 
motor parkway. 



Island 







ONE block from Grand Central Sta- 
tion — Subway. Espreca and 
Local — Elevated and Surfaca 
Car line*. Thia *ri3ely and favorably 
known Hotel crowna Murray Hill— 
the moat de»irablo of central loca- 
tion*, with the fashionable (hoppint 
anH theatre di»tricU directly at hand. 
Cxtenaive unproTementa complete. 
Popular price*— European plan. 



We roqueat your patronage. 



Levis P. Roberts ) '^ 
Cbo. T. Sanoalls. Manager 




Subscribe for The Herald 



I 




Jiftmt 



present time In pi>or shape 

As soon as the Improvements can be 
made, the date o: the race will be an- 
nounced. 

longgrinT" 
at brighton 

Twenty-Four Hour Auto Race 

at the Beach in 

August 

Interest In automobillng racing 
circles is now centered in the twenty - 
four hour race t.» be heid at the Brigh- 
ton beach motordome. Aug. 4 and 5, 
under the direction of K. A. Moross. 
lormerly direct, r of contests at the 
inlanapolis mot. r speridway. The twice 
around the clock performance will 
start at !>:45 p. m. Friday evening, so 
that the finish will be made fairly early 
Saturday evening. It Is expected, ac- 
cording to info: Illation from the pro- 
moters, that tit teen cars will be en- 
tered, piloted i«v some of the most 
famous drivere in the automob'le 

Klch stakes have been hung up to 
tempt the pilots into the long grind. 
The winner of the event will receive 
a cash plrze of ;> 1.000. Cash prizes will 
be offered to ihe finishers, including 
the fifth, the total amount that will 
go to the winnt rs being J2.500. In ad- 
dition to this j.mount $100 will be 
awarded to the driver finishing first in 
his class. The race Is open to non- 
stock cars of < lass E, in divisions 2. 
3. 4 and 5. ^ 

PUNCTURELES8 AUTO TIRE 
IS ANNOUNCED BY EDISON. 



of spectators .very tew of whom sus- 
nected that he would be able to estab- 
lish a world's record under such con- 
ditions. ... J »,„,,» 
All of Burman's world's records have 
been made with the 200-horse power 
'Blitzen- Benz. Practically all of tie 
old records were made by Oldficl-l in 
1910, In the same car and upon the 
.same courses. 



Why Do Oe^fecti* and Overwork Caawe 

Kyt'Mtraln, and Why l>o Aooiirately 

or Properly Kitted tilai»»e« 

Uveroome the $4traluf 

To understand why optical defects 
produce eyestrain. It becomes necessary 
that one shouhl thoroughly know the 
anatomy and physiology of the eye. 

Twenty-tive of the forty-eight states 
have obtained through hard fighting 
independent boards of optometry ex- 
aminers, thoroughly competent to de- 
cide if a candidate Is qualified in the 
science of fitting glasses and to give 
him a certificate as a 'registered op- 
tometrist " 

In ISHT. or twenty-four years ago. 
when A. L. Norberg of Duluth. Minn., 
first started In the optical business, 
these conditions -id not prevail, and 
the country was overrun with street 
peddlers and traveling fakirs selling 
what to Innocent people had the ap- 
pearance of being spectacles and eye- 
glas-si's. and charged great big prices 
tor them. , 

In 1901, when the state law took 
effect in Minnesota, he was the first 
one In Duluth to go before the state 
board of examiners and pass a satis- 
factory examination, to which his cer- 
tificate from this board bears evidence 
to this day. Mr. Norberg Is also a 
member ot the Minn»»sota State Asso- 
ciation of Optometrists to further the 
Inte.-est of optometry and optometrists 
In Minnesota. 

During his long experience as an 
optometrist. Mr. Norberg has found 
that "hyperopia" (or far sight) Is a 
real and most important defect of the 
eye and a serious menace to health 
and It may be regarded as a paramount 
cause for "cataract." glaucoma, Iritis 
and all other Intraocular defects. 

The fitting of glasses Is an exact 
science when done by an efficient oper- 
ator, and but little excuse can be given 
If done otherwise. However when fit- 
ting glasses to an "asthenoplc" patient, 
the strength of the lenses rests upon 
the good judgment of the operator to 
produce most comfort for the patient. 

The "asthenopia" above referred to 
Is that coming from overworked em- 
metropic eyes, namely, bookkeepers, 
stenographers, readers, and all who 
strain the eyes at close and confined 
work, and thousands of school chil- 
dren. Mr Norberg does not mean to 
Infer that "myopia" (or near sight) 
and "aatlgmatism" do not have their 
retributive train of evils, but they ap- 
pear less frequentl.v. and when dis- 
covered in time, perfect vision may be 
restored. If an expert operator Is con- 
sulted. ... 

A. L. Norberg. the optometrist and 
optician, may be consulted at his par- 
lor, room 110 Oak Hall building, Du- 
luth. Minn. Consultation free. 



Change Removes One Pos- 
sibility of War for 
United States. 



is embodied In Article 4. which reads. 

"Should either high contracting par- 
ty conclude a treaty of general aroi- 
tratlon with a third power, it Is agreed 
that nothing In this agreement shall 
entail upon such contracting party an 
obligation to go to war with the power 
with which the treaty Is In force. 
Objects Stated Aa Before. 

The objects of the alliance are set 
forth as In the previous draft, i^ese 
Include the consolidation and mainten- 
ance of general Peace in V^® '«» '°"^„^: "What~would you have, celestial son? 
Eastern Asia and India. ;h«,^P^«„Y^,*e Quoth the genii. 'Shall it be 
tlon of the territorial .rt8n_ts_.?i„^'i^ A castle on the snowy Alps. 

A palace o'er the sea?" 
"No; If you please." Aladdin crle<l. 



f 



I ■■ III II k 



aln and Japan was made here today 
and the text of the treaty made public 
It provides for a term of ten year* 
from date, thus adding six years to the 
existence of the alliance which ac- 
cording to the treaty of 1906 was to 
expire in 1915. 

-♦ 

The .^rablaa Nighta. 

The genii sat in his rocking chair. 

And he winked his upper eye. 
While Aladdin rubbed the lamp so rar«^ 

For another wish to try. 



Lion Ul lllO «.c« t ■>."• •— .• -«= , _« 

contracting parties In the r/K^o^^ o* 
Eastern Asia and. India and tjie de- 



London. July 15.— The Anglo-Japan- 
ese alliance has been modified to ex- 
clude the United Slates from Great 
Britain's possible enemies, and the life 
of the alliance has been extended near- 
ly six years by the new version of the 
treaty which Sir Edward Grey, the 
British secretary of foreign affair, and 
Count Kato. Japanese ambassador at 
London, signed yesterday. The or»f »n- 
al agreement, which was signed Aug. 
12, 1905, included eight ai't cl«8 ,and a 
preamble. The only practical ai"f;f- 
ence between the old and new version 



fense of their special Interests In those 

"^""Although It had been expected that 
the revision would be speedily ar- 
ranged, the changes made coincide 
with public expectations. and the 
greatest satisfaction Is felt that the 
li^ftasteful possibility of Great Br tain 
being drawn Into a conflict betwen 
Japan and the United States no longer 

exists. 

• 

Taft 'Sot Surprised. 

Washington. July J^-Thts govern- 
ment, on receipt of the news that there 
had been modification of the British- 
Jaoanese alliance treaty, .fXl>ressed the 
irieatest satisfaction, for it Is generally 
fonlldefed^ that this •notification ha.s 
removed the last obstacle to the con- 



onsld^red that this 'nodi')cation has 
.emoved the last obstacle to the con- 
firmation of the proposed arbitration 
t eatv between this nation and Great 



^■"^Ves^ident Taft. when advised of the 
action, expressed no surprise, Init 
showed plainly his satisfaction. He 
Indicated that his previous advices 
had assured him that the two countries 
would agree to such a "modification 
The state department Is *^^'^^}]^ 
oleased as It clears the way to the 
adoption of the arbitration treaty by 

the senate. 

• 

Announced In Toklo. 

roklo. July 15.— Announcement of the 
treaty of alliance between Great Brit- 



A thing Ive wished for years — 
A hammock by a cool lakeside. 
And golden grain belt l)eers." 
Order of dealer or duluth branch of 
mlnneapolis brewing company. 

THIRTY TWO PASSENOERS 
GO DOWN WITH STEAMER. 

New York. July 15. — A dispatch from 
Port Linion. Costa Rica, reports that 
thirty-two passengers and several 
members of the crew of the steamer 
Irma were drowned or crushed to 
death when the vessel was sunk in a 
collision during a storm In the estuary 
of the San Juan river. The colliding 
steamship Is given as the Diamante 
and the news is .said to have reached 
Port Llmon from Bluefields. 

Most of the passengers of the Irm» 
were below when the collision oc- 
curred because of the heavy weather, 
and to this fact, the dispatch fays^ is 
due the heavy loss of^ life. The Dia- 
mante it is stated, was damaged, but 

kept afioat. 

. • 

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prepaid if your druggist does not have it. 

REA BROS., Manufacturing Chemists 

Ccotury BIdt.. Minneapolis 

LEITHHEAU DRUG CO. 



•1"^ 



New York July 15.— On the day the 
announcement was made that ^eorge 
VVestlnghou.se had Perfected an air 
sorniK for use on automobiles, by the 
use of which he pneumatic tire may 
be discarded, there al.so came the an- 
noun.ement that under the supervis- 
ion of Edison. :here has been perfected 
an automobile pneumatic tire which Is 
regarded as lumune from any punc- 
tuFe It is practically indestructible 
until the rubier itself wears out. 

• 

Those Who Tiike Foley KIdnev Plila 
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|?ealway.s grateful both for the quick 
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for their tonh and strengthening ef- 
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For sale by all druggists. 



GOVERNMENT 
CO-OPERATES 

United Stales Office Sends 

Representatives on Practical 

Road Inspection Tour. 

Touring Club of America Is 

Always Working for 

Better Roads. 



The interest of the United States 
government In everything relating to 
highway Improvement will be shown 
in a unique manner, when within the 
next fortnight the office of public 
roads will co-operate with the Tour- 
ing Club of America in a practical road 
inspection tour. This will be the first 
time In the history of automobillng In 
this country In which a motoring or- 



Dulutb. Minn. 



Oittributor* 




•\Keun\aticOi'* 






ganlzatlon will l>ave the active aid of 
the government in efifective work for 
road improvement. This tour will start 
from Washington with Richmond as 
the objective point, the trip b«>ng made 
by one of the touring clubs otttclai 

*^*"he United States office of public 
roads will be represented by Assistant 
Director Paul D Sargent, formerly 
state highway commissioner of Maine; 
P St Julian Wilson, state highway 
commissioner of Virginia: J. E. Penny- 
backer, secretary American Association 
for Hiehway Improvement; Col. Henry 
MacNalr. editor of the official Autonio- 
blle Blue Book; and Frederick H. £.1- 



DULUTH AUTO OWNERS 



HELD UP 





On the r<.ad when you have 
etarted out for a pleasant drive m 
your automobile Is always annoy- 
ing Tou will always have trouble 
In this manner If jrou don't have 
your car lut into good working 
order by ht vlng it overhauled and 
repaired at a first-class shop Uke 

THE INTERSTATE AUTO CO., 

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Beth Phones 




CHIEF RA^IDALL. 



LORDS MAY YIELD 
ON VETO BILL 

Interesting Situation That Now 

Exists in English 

Politics. 

London. July 15. — British politics at 
the present bears a peculiarly interest- 
ing aspect. Nobody doubts that the 
veto bill win become a law. Lord 
Lansdowne himself spoke on that as- 
.suiiiptlon In the last debates In the 
house of lords. The only question is 
whether the lords will carry their 
opposition to tlie extent of forcing a 
wholesale creation of peers. 

Generally such a policy is regarded 
as suicidal, because when the veto 
bill Is passed the hou.se of lords would 
still retain effective power In delaying 
legislation which would be entirely 
lost If the creation of peers estab- 
lished a permanent Liberal majority. 
Hence It Is the almost univer.sal opin- 
ion th-at the lords will yield at the 
last moment. 

L'BloetjitM SpllttinK Vp- 
The fate of the Unionist party Itself, 
however. Is more engrossing than the 
fate of the veto bill. After three suc- 
cessive defeats at the polls, the party 
appears to be torn by Internal dis- 
sension, and from present appear- 
ances a situation exists which Is like- 
ly to end In an attempt to dethrone 
A. J. Balfour from the leadership. 
A large section of the party has ex- 
pre.ssed Itself as wearied by Mr. Bal- 
four's vacillation and sees no hope 
for the party unless a stronger leader 
can be found. This discontented sec- 
tion places hopes for the future on 
Austin Chamberlain. 

Clinuix Im Reached. 
Apparently matters have now 
reached a climax. So many conflict- 
ing counsels have been given on how 
to deal with the veto crisis that the 
Unionist organ, the Saturday Kevlew. 
boldly calls for a caucus of the party 
to ascertain where It stands. The 
Spectator, repre.sentlng the moderate 
Unionists, reminds its readers that 
many Liberals wish nothing better 
than the degradation of the house of 
lords, which would follow the whole- 
sale creation of peers, and earnestly 
appeals to the "no surrender party to 
cease bluffing, which can only result 
In loss of dignity and prestige. 

VISITS KOOlHTlHiXG. 

State Inspector of the Consolidated 
Schools Looks Over Field. 

International Falls, Minn., July 15.-— 
(Special to The Herald.)— Miss Shel- 
laAd, county superintendent ot schools 
spent several strenuous days showing 
E M. Phillips, Inspector of consoli- 
dated schools, over the coun^J- ,^^ ^.^^ 
done for the purpose of getting hs 
recommendations as to what consoli- 
dations could be made to advantage 
at this time, and as the result of the 
same. Chairman Durrln of the county , 
school board and Miss Shetland have 
gone down river to locate consolidated 
schools for Loman and Blrchdale. The 
plan Is to consolidate the school dis- 
tricts of the county, so far as pos- 
sible, in order to improve them by the 
state aid such a tnove will secure^ 
Larger and better buildings will be 
the result, they will secured annua 
appropriations from the state, ana 
nianukl training and other advanced 
and modern work wil l resul t. 

RICHEST AMERICAN GIRL 

TO MARRY ENGLISHMAN. 

New York. July 15 —Ralph Francis 
Julian Stonor, Lord Camoys "sher at 
the Decles-Qould wedding and chum 
of the Hon. BobbvBeresford, is en- 
gaged to be married to Miss Mildred 
Shfrman. daughter of Mr. and Mrs^ 
William Watts Sherman, one of the 
wealthiest heiresses in the ^United 
States, according to a cable dispatch 
from London which the American pub- 
lishes todav. It has become known, 
the dispatch adds, that Lord Camoys 
soon will visit the Shermans at their 
Newport residence. 



^■■^.•^.•:••^■■.'•^^f^:• 



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V. 






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''.-y<: 



1 v^.^ \i •T™*'*! 



O 



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-TOASTED CORN FLAKES 

for breakfast warrants all the children in expecting a feast fit for a king 
What monarch could ask for a choicer spread than that provided when 
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NONE GENUINE WITHOUT THIS SIGNATURE 






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To the North Pacific Coast and return, [Daily to 

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&mmlFoT Park Tour as a Side Trip in connection with Paoftc 

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LET us GIVE YOU FREE ILLUSTRATED BCX)KLETS 



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12 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 15, 1911. 



1..MH.»^»o> .****«** *** * *** * * ** ' » * * * * * * ^^-^*- 



e»j | (»»»»»»«»» »^lHMHtHHei|H!HMHNHMHN^HM^<l^» »««» 



*:*ii^ ^if^*^^t^*.**ttt**^**:»^*******'^***********************J 



{THE MEN WHO ARE PROBING INTO THE COUNTRY'S SUGAR BARREL 



!■ ^ I 

The Chairman of the Congressional Committee j 
That is Now Investigating the Sugai- Trust 
is its Youngest Member, and Ever Since He 
Has Been in Politics He Has Been in the Midst 
of the Bitter Political Contests That Are Now 
the Fashion in Georgia ^ The Committee 
Member Who Cleaned Up Dodge City, Despite 
Personal Assaults and Threats of Death- 
William Sulzer, Picturesque Dresser uid Pic- 
turesque Statesman— The Man Who Stood 
Back of Speaker Cannon for Eight Yeai's— The 
Committee's Fighting Member, and How His 
Predilection for Fight Saved Twenty-C ne Men, 
Charged With Murder— Two Ardent Cannon 
Admirers -The Modest Member From Yell 
County, Arkansas-And Last. But Not Least, 
Good Sirs, the Poet of the Committee. .". /. 



jHi.j H»» »<«» »*M r » l nrTtft"y**'**** *«*** »*»».»»»<i»»»»»*«***» **»* » ^ 



it 
^^ 

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Written For The Herald By E. J. Edwards C Holland,) 



! 1911 ly E. J E«lw»r«»s.) 
^tmm^im^' .n\ . stigation conducted 
y <^ irl t y a special committee of 
I ^Wj I ounnress in recent years 
I X^l I ^^^ behind it sueh a mul- 
E^^HMMM titude of reasons for its 
IJ^^^SSI txistence as has the In- 
lK?fc aS3l l vestlnation now goin^ on 
^SBSmSSB0 before a special commit- 
tee cf the house of representatives with 
respect t« the American Sugar Relinlng 
company, familiarly known as the 
••Sugar Trust. • and !<ome of the largest 
independent concerns engaged in the 
same Imt cf business. The purpose of 
the nivestlgaiK'n nuiy be summarized 
as- 






J. t..n..\v8; 

ertain whether or not a mo- 
niu •> in restraint of trade exists in 
the sugar business either as to produc- 
tion, manufacture or distribution 

To uocertaiti whetht^r or nut urriciais 
Of the Ameriv.in Suu-ar Refining coni- 
nany have bt-en guilty of criminal acts 
\3i the conduct of its business. 

If so whether they have been pun- 
lBhf-,1 f.'F such acts and. ii not. why not. 
ertaln the extent of the frauds 
c ted by the American Sugar Re- 

t\ (impany in the avoidance of the 

J, : of customs du»-s. for which 

tra-iit. the company has already made 
utiiUition to the gdvernment in an 
amount in excess of $2.0CO.ooO. 

To fi^ '.he orluiu of these frauds and 
11,. - .sibility. both personal and 

J, aiich exists for their long 

contiiii.iiu>»n. 

To k.y the groundwork for a Pemo- 
crat' • . i^v n of the sugar schedule 
in I t.iriff law. 

•r ,.i the purpose of tne 

I . h >uae of representatives in 

tt-..-^ .... . .iguiion. a special committee 

ol tilt bMiise. consisting of nine mem- 
bers. ua> created by the house on May 
16. This committee consists of Repre- 
pentr.tivfs Thomas W. Hardwick. 
Ge. hatrnian; Finis J. Garrett. 

Ten William Suliier. New 'iork; 

H M ;< oway. Arkansas, and John E. 
Rak. > I'uUfornia, L'emucrats: George 
R Mallv. New York; Joseph W. Ford- 
ney. Michigan. K. H. Madison, Kansas. 
and A^h(■r C. Hinds. Maine. Republicans. 
Tke ( omnilttev'n Youthful Chairman. 
RepreMeniativt- Hardwick. the chair- 
man, is the youngest member of the 
in point of years, but one of 
hi piditieal" experiences. He 
■.ears old and looks consid- 
. tiger. He first went to the 
itgislature, where he served 
two term:*, and he is now serving his 
fourth term in the house. Hurlng all 
of til is time, however, he has been in 
th. f^iick of a continuous and bitter 
, between the various factions of 

C a Itemocracy. He is a follower 

of Hoke Smith, who was secretary of 
the interior in the second Cleveland ad- 
ministration and was recently re-elect- 
ed gi'vernor of Georgia. To be a lieu- 
tenant of Mr. Smith or anybody else in 
Georgia politics means that a man 
must have a.s many bitter political ene- 
mies as he has ardent friends. 

In la.st falls contest for re-election. 
he went through what is considered to 
be one of the mos^t bitter ptditical 
fights ever seen in Georgia. Among 
Mr. Hardwick's most ardent political 
enemies is Tom Watson, the former 
leader of the I'opulist party, who has 
returned to the Democratic fold as a 
free lance. The feeling between Wat- 
eon and Hardwick became personally 
Intense last fall. 

Aside from Mr. Hardwick's master 
passion for politics, his greatest hobby 
Is a sort of political sideline. Ever 
since he has been in congress lie has 
delivered a speech in almost every ses- 
sion proposing the repeal of the Four- 
teenth amendment to the Constitution 
which enfranchised the negroes. He 
belleve<! the "experiment" of permit- 
ting the negro to vote has proved a 
failure. In a recent speech In the 
bouse, he J<aid: 

"Amalgamation being Impossible so 



com -' 
the 
Is I. - 
era 
Geoi!- 



long as there Is a single droo of blood 
in the veins of a single Southern white 
man it follows that there can be 
neither social nor political equality be- 
tween the races; that so long as they 
live together there must be the posi- 
tions of -superior and Inferior, and that 
the white race will d.imand and take 
the superior position ii beyond contro- 
versy. Six thousand 'ears of history 
proclaim his right to do it. Superior 
mental and moral f on e assert It. Jus- 
tice and eciuity unite In confirming his 
title to it in this land that his ad- 
venturous ancestors discovered and 
conquered from its sa\ age Inhabitants, 
wrested from forelg i tyranny and 
which they have founded and pre- 
served." 

Mr. Hardwick throughout his con- 
gressional career, and tlesplte his youth, 
has always been a serlous-mlnded mem- 
ber of the house. In ntature he Is un- 
dersized, which only gives emphasis 
to his boyish cast of countenance. 
Nevertheless, he is conducting the 
sugar inquiry along dignified lines and 
has been of "material iissistance in get- 
ting unwilling witnesses to tell the 
committee all there i; to know about 
the American Sugar Kefining company. 
Mr. Hardwick comes* from a wholly 
non-producing sugar section of the 
country, and It is lor that reason, 
among I'thers, that h» was selected to 
introduce the resolutb n of inquiry and 
to head t!ie investigating committee. 
The Bowery's l*lctureiM|ue Repreaeata- 
tlve. 
One of the most pi Jturesque figures 
in all congress Is ^^ illiam Sulzer of 
New York, who Is taldng a prominent 
part In the sugar investigation. It 
would not be fair to tfr. Sulzer to say 
that his principal fame Is his facial 
likeness of Henry Cltiy. for Mr. Sulzer 
Is the possessor of personal charms and 
accomplishments, some of which might 
have added luster eve i to Henry Clay s 
fame. However, Mr. Sulzers resemb- 
lance to the 'compromise'" statesman 
of Kentucky is so murked as to bring 
down upon him much humorous com- 
ment. It has even bten said In this 
connection that the New York states- 
nians principal cone* rn in life is the 
perfection and per >etuation of this 
likeness. Certain It It* that Mr. Sulzer s 
noticeable forelock grows a little bit 
more Clnyish every day, and through 
study or otherwise, j-enuine Clay fur- 
rows are rapidly assviming deep seated 
permanency in the S lUer brow and 
about the Sulzer mouth. 

Mr Sulzer represents the Bowery dis- 
trict of New York. His penchant is 
for the erection of monuments to dead 
heroes and great events. His dignified 
mien, even when "sasdng" the speaker, 
suggests an ambltloi to be a sena- 
tor. Mr. Sulzer is p'obably the most 
bold dresser in the house. He usually 
wears a suit of clothes tailored out of 
vlvidlv checked or riottled materials, 
and liis coat Is always possessed of 
long, statesmanlike tails. He has a 
predilection for cravats of the puff 
variety highly colored, and his shirt 
bosom is always of an exquisite hue. 
His stickpin and rings are set with 
large green stones; nls hftlr and face 
are reddish. Aitoge' her. . It is not a 
difficult matter to hnd Mr. Sulzer, even 
in a crowd. 

While Sulzer looks like an Irishman 
and Is sometimes ret erred to by those 
who do not knovi' hln and who forget 
what his name soui ds like, as '"that 
Irishman Sulzer," he has not a drop of 
Irish blood In his veins. Nevertheless. 



Mr. Madison. He was the only Repub- 
lican member who found against Mr. 
Balllnger and he drew his own report 
which, for logic and common sense, 
compared favorably with the reports r.f 
the majority Republicans and the mi- 
nority iJembcrats. each of which was 
prepared bv a number of legal minds. 
Mr. Madison's entire training in life 
has been of a legal and political na- 
ture. As soon as he had passed his bar 
examination, which was soon after he 
attained his majority, he was elected 
county attorney of Ford county. Kan., 
of which Dodge City, "the toughesV 
town In the West." is the county seat. 
The liquor laws of the county and 
state had for many years been a joke 
and I»odge City was a typical wild 
West community. It was the gather- 
ing place for cowboys for miles around 
after pay day. Mr. Madison, with all 
the zeal of his youth, started In to 
clean up the neighborhood. After a 
long drawn out fignt. he had the mayor 
removed and sent a number of the 
roughest element, which was in the 
habit of "shooting up the town," to 
jail, but not before he had been re- 
peatedly "beaten up" by friends of the 
••Influential citizens' he hud dealt with 
according to law, and his life often 
threatened. 

Before he became a la-wyer. Mr. 
Madison taught school in a small coun- 
try schoolhouse in Kansas. One of the 
families living along the road wMiere 
hi« school was located was named Mur- 
dock. and the pride of J^e family was 
the present Representative Victor Mur- 
dock one of tiu most rampant insur- 
gents In congress. Miirdo<k was then 
1.1 years oUl and Mr. Madison says that 
Victor waf Just as red-headed and 
frtckled then as he Is now. For some 
reason or other. Murdock did not at- 
tend Madison's school, and the latter 
has frequently expressed regret that 
he did not have an ojiport unity tu g'^e 
Victor a good "whaling" occasiona ly 
and so l>e In a position now to claim 
credit for part of the mental ac^'O"^" 
pllshments which Mr. Murdock fre- 
quently exhibits In the house. 

^fter his experience as county at- 
torney, Mr. Madison served as judge 
on the circuit bench of his state, and 
there he made a fine record, .^mong 
his colleagues in Washington he is 
famlliarlv known as "Judge. 
The Cireateat LIvIub Parllaaaeatarlao. 
Asher C. Hinds of Maine, another 
Republican member of the committee, 
was the parliamentary clerk of the 
house of representatives from 18S4 un- 
til March 4 last. Although considered 
by many the ablest parliamentarian in 
this or" any other country, you could 
not get Mr. Hinds to admit at the point 
of a gun that his ability In this direc- 
tion Is even a tenth as great as that 
given him by those who seek to pralse 
him. He is beyond /luest Ion one of the 
most modest men In public life today 
and puts In more time "hiding his light 
under a bushel" than any other meni- 
ber of the house. As an illustration 







i 



W/WA/^ SUUm OF w^ 
rA S^JJT/^/ j^^/^J^y^ AMP ^W//if6 



rJ^m£ssjE£, 7/f^ /^^r ofz/^j^ 



tant spirit which he has shown in con- 
ducting his side of them. One of the 
principal cases In which Mr. Raker par- 
ticipated was the famous Modoc county 
ivnching case. In 1901 twenty-one 
prominent farmers of Modoc countj 
captured and lynched five men t-e- 
lieved to be involved in horse stealing. 
Mr. Raker appeared as the lynchers 
attorney when they were arraigned be- 
fore the court and for five long month.s 
the legal battle for their lives was 
waged. During the conduct of the 
trial. Mr. Raker's fighting spirit oc- 
casionally got the better of him and 
he was many times reprimanded by 
the court and once sent to jail for con- 
tempt. 

As a result of his tenacity, however, 
the entire twenty-one defendants were 
acquitted. 

It is said that Mr. Raker came to 
I Washington Intent on becoming chalr- 



,,.«»«-??*!>.**r 







^ 



7 • 



Eati««Sft>. 



/iS'/z^-k t >/>/V^J> 




s.M/^^P^^oAf or 

ci^ANkt} UP Doo9^^^yy 

/^ARaJS ^^^ £iA//A/(} 



THE 



MILWAUKEC 



moted Hinds to the job of parliamen- 
tary clerk, expressing at the same time 
his own misgivings as to whether 
Hinds could make good or not. He kept 
Hinds at work studying rules both 
night and day and even by the time 
Mr Reed retired as speaker in 1^96. 
although Mr. Reed himself was per- 
haps the most skilled parliamentarian 
who ever sat in the speaker s chair. 
Hinds was able to take care of himself 
in arguments with Reed over points 
of order which were carried on in an 
undertone on the speakers rostrum. 
Mr Hinds always likes to tell the story 
of Mr Reed's conversation with a new 
member as illustrating the fact that a 
iittle knowledge of the house rules Is 
one of the most dangerous accomplish- 
ments of a new member of congress 
This new member came to Reed and 
E^id * 

".Mr. Reed, what do you think is the 
best thing for a new man to do? vvhat 
lines should be take?" 

"A knowledge of the rules of the 
house is very useful," replied Mr Reed. 



BPII 



Bottled at the 
brewery. Just 
about 100 per 
cent, perfect. 

For health's sake have 
it in your home. 

"Always tho ssuno 
Good Old Blatz" 

Duluth Branch 

Lake A^e. and Railroad SL 

Pboae 62 



some of his best experiences have h^d len, Mr. Reeds secretary, 

an Irishman at the bottom of them, member of the house, Mr. Reed pro 

One story Mr. Suiter took a lot of 
delight In telling on himself concerned 
an Irishman who isked him for a 
drink of whisky. After partaking of 
Mr. Sulzer's bounty, he remarked: 

"Begorra, but that s good. When you 
go to the wicked pit ce may I be there 
to give you a cup ( f cold water." 

There Is a good leal of sentiment 
about Sulzer and no man would go far- 
ther to do a favor f jr a friend. A few- 
years ago he receivi d an Invitation to 
attend the wedding of a daughter of 
one of his constluteits. an Irishman of 
the name of Michael Mullett. Mullett 
was wounded in t le Civil war and 
when home on a furlough was cap- 
tured by some bointy pirates and 
shipped under another name on a 
naval receiving shit-, where he w-as 
compelled to serve in the navy, finally 
receiving an honorable discharge at 
the end of the war. In the meantime, 
he was listed as a deserter from his 
company in the arm / and the fact only 
became known to him a short time be- 
fore the wedding, causing him a great 
deal of worry. Sul -.er heard about it 
and resolved upon a unique wedding 
gift. Unknown to Mullett he passed 
a bill through congress correcting 
Mullett's military record so as to re- 
move the blot up. in It. This Mr. 
S^ulzer presented tt the daughter on 
lier wedding day t.> the great joy of 
both herself and 1 er father.. 

On his feet, Mr, Sulzer is a handy 
man with the tngl sh language^, He 
can talk about anything 4fiu If always 
entertaining. He Is noted for his 
courteous retorts vhich, nevertheless, 
possess a sting. Once, when Represen- 
tative Mann of CI icago, the present 
minority leader, sarcastically remarked 
to Mr Sulzer that ; speech Sulzer had 
made was so good he (Mann) "would 
like to hear It again,' Mr. Sulzer re- 

"It never hurts an old song to sing 
it twice " 

Mr Sulzer was t larrled three years 
ago and the even: created no little 
furore in the hous< , where he Is very 
popular on both shies of the chamber. 
The event was so newhat notable in 
Mr. Sulzer's career as he reached the 
age of 45 years aid his friends had 
about worn them> elves out arguing 
with him that his irilliant career was 
being wasted upon himself alone. Mr. 
Sulzer and his w fe are inseparable 
after the closing o '. each day's session 
of the house. _ _, 

The Man Who Cleaned Vp DodRe City. 

Edmond H. Ma«!lson of Kansas, a 
progressive Republ can and one of the 
original Republlcai Insurgents against 
Cannon rule in th« house, is the only 
member of the sugar Investigating 
committee who ha* had recent experi- 
ence in an invest gation of similar 
caliber, he having been a member of 
the famous Ballinj'er-Pinchot commit- 
tee That investigation served to In- 
dicate the absolut J independence of 



Mr Hinds has taken absolutely no ad- i man of the house committee on public 

vantage of the fact that he Is a mem- ' - ' '-'-'- *• -'• '""' 

ber of the Republican minority in tlie 
present house to rasp the Democratic 
rules. A majority of his very few ap- 
pearances on the rules have been in 
the nature of Impartial remarks with 
a view to setting the house straight on 
a tangled parliamentary situation. 

Mr. Hinds was brought to Washing- 
ton bv Thomas B. Reed as his assistant 
private secretary. When Amos L. Al- 



was elected a 



lands, an honor which is not accorded 
to first-termers. No sooner was the 
election over which made him a mem- 
ber of this congress than Mr. Raker 
packed up and moved to Washington 
and began an exhaustive study of leg- 
islative procedure In congress. While 
he failed of his ambition to become 
chairman of the house committee, he 
succeeded in piling coals on fire upon 
the head of his predecessor, Represen- 
tative Englebrlght of California. 
Whatever Englebrlght tried to accom- 
plish in the way of appointments and 
legislative procedure for the district. 
Mr Raker succeeded fairly well in 
heading off. The result was the growth 
of considerable personal hostility be- 
tween the two. 

Tv^-o Ardent Caanon Admirera. 
Joseph W. Fordney of Michigan, is a 
practical lumberman and on the com- 
mittee Is understood to represent .^s 
far as may be the interests of the 



with the sixtieth congress. Mr. Malby 
Is a man who says little; he rarely 
ever makes a public speech in the 
house. His district borders on the 
boundary line between Canada and the 
United States, and he has been an ac- 
tive opponent of Canadian reciprocity 

In conseciuence. ^ 

H M. Jacoway is a first term Demo- 
crat member of the house from the 
Fifth Arkansas district. Like Asher C. 
Hinds, he was secretary to his prede- 
cessor Representative Reed, before 
succeeding the latter in the house Mr 
Jacoway was recognized as one of the 
most valuable congressiorial secre- 
taries at the capltol and bids fair to 
make an equally enviable reputation 
as a member of the house. ^)h«-n he 
came to Washington, he found In the 
cabinet of President Taft, Jacob M 
I.lckinson of Tennessee, secretary of 
war, who had been one of his instruct- 
ors in law at Vanderbilt university. 
Mr. Jacoway was secretary of the 
Tiawes commission which investigated 
affairs in the Indian Territory during 
the second Cleveland administration; 
he had then barely attained his ma- 
jority. He also served two terms as 
prosecuting attorney of Dardanelle. 
Yell county Ark. Notwithstanding the 




1/ /tAH/i/Sf ^^£l^^9 



1 


i 






i 




1 


1 




beet sugar producers of the state of ^olsy community from which he comes 
Michigan. Mr. Fordney is a rough and 
ready fighter whenever the Interests 
of his constituents are affected. When 
the Payne tariff bill was under con- 
sideration he made a hard fight for a 
high duty on lumber and did his utmost 
In a general way for the highest pro- 
tective duties offered. 

Throughout his career in the house 
Mr Fordney has been an ardent ad- 
mirer of Former Speaker Cannon and 
his protective leanings. Mr. Fordney 
fought the Cuban reciprocity bill be- 
cause of sugar and he opposed free 



q£ong£ ^,A7MJiB/or 





"You are fortunate," responded Mr. 
Reed "I have been studying these 
rules for twenty years and do not un- 
derstand tiem yet." 

Although Mr. Hinds has compiled 
eight volumes of precedents en the 
house rules and has analyzed thejn 
backwards and forwards, day in and 
day out. and has as retentive a mem- 
ory as belongs to a man of his brams, 
he still subscribes to the dictum of Mr. 

Hinds is a big man physically and 
mentally. He is a careful student and. 
although his training has been that of 
a newspaper man and pari imen tar y 
clerk he possesses the judicial tem- 
nerainent to an unusual degree. It is a 
SotoHous fact tbat Former Speaker 
Cannon was one of the least versed 
men in parliamentary law who ever 
sat In the speaker's chair hence much 
of the responsibility for the conduct of 




Canadian reciprocity. The climax of 
Mr Fordney's admiration for Mr. Can- 
non was reached in his congressional 
convention prior to the last Repub- 
lican national convention. bo eager 
was Mr Fordney to elect Cannon presi- 
dential' delegate to the big convention 
that he held his own convention be- 
fore the call was issued for such con- 
ventions by the Republican national 
committee. When the final test In the 
national convention came. Mr. Cannon 
got one vote from Michigan, and that 
came from the Fordney district. 

George R. Malby, Republican of New 

York is one of the most experienced 

legislators in congress, having been a 

member of the New York assembly 

or five years, speaker one term, and a 

nember of the slate senate for twelve 



He served in the 



of the last two years of Mr. Cannon s 
speakership. Mr. Hinds achieved a rep- 
utation for great coolness and self-pos- 

The Commlttee'ii Fighting Member. 

John E. Raker of California, a Demo- 
cratic member of the committee, who 
is serving his first term in the house, 
could aptly be termed the committee 8 
fighting member; his main character- 
istic is his predilection for a fight not 
necessarily physical, but legal. In 
Modoc county, California. Mr. Raker is 
known as the "fightlne judge ' because 

legal battles In 



f 

m_ 

years after that. - - 

New York legislature when the old 

guard" of the slate was securely in the 

iaddle and his name was mentioned 

from time to time in connection with 

legislative matters considered by the 

New York legifclatlve investigating 

committee of 1910. ,. ,^ . . 

In Washington. Mr. Malby has been 
a steadfast supporter of the Cannon 
organization. He Is a standpatter froni 
the ground up and has been ^ potent 
factor in suggesting ways and means 
of conducting Republican legislation 
before congress. He is one of those 
congressmen who has had absolutely 
no sympathy whatever with Republic- 
an Insurgency either in Washington 
or In New York state. Legislatively, 
his principal service has been on the 
appropriations committee of the house, 
to which Mr. Cannon appointed -Mr. 



It is the duty of every expectant 
mother to prepare her system for the 
coming of her little one ; to avoid as 
far as possible the suffering of such 
occasions, and endeavor to pass 
:hrough the crisis with her health 
end strength unimpaired. This she 
aiay do through the use of Mother's 
Friend, a remedy that has been so 
long in use, and accomplished so 
much good, that it is in no sense an 
experiment, but a preparation which 
always produces the best results. It 
is for exernal application and so pen- 
etrating in its nature as to thoroughJy 
lubricate every muscle, nerve and ten- 
don involved during the period before 
baby comes. It aids nature by ex- 
panding the skin and tissues, relieves 
tenderness and soreness, and perfectly 
prepares the system for natural and 
safe motherhood. Mother's Friend 
has been used and endorsed by thou- 
sands of mothers, and its use will 
prove a comfort and a benefit to any 
woman in need of such a remedy. 

"' "" MOTHERS 



Mr. Jacoway is disposed to be some- 
what modest and retiring in manner. 
The poet of the Committee. 

And last, but not least, there is Rep- 
resentative Finis J. Garrett of Tennes- 
sir who has been through four ses- 
Ifons of the house, taught country 
school before he became a lawyer, and 
once upon a time displayed such a de- 
cided w-eakness for writing poetry that 
his fame as a producer of verse ex- 
fended bevond the limits of his con- 
gressionar district until It .^o^e^l^^ his 
native state of Tennessee like the d^ew 
one result being that when 



AprtJ/i^a or"(^A/cjL£ :so£^ 



ness with Irregular ftroke; 
Across the bridge the carriage of somo 



handed 



%^^^\T^. tllTeTparT Vthrmiu" [ ilalbT* when' he"came to' IWashingtoa 



is sold at drug 
stores. Write for 
free book for 
expectant moth- 
ers, which con- 
tains much valuable information 



he first 
came'^trcongress his"colleagu*8 on the 
Tennessee delegation lost ho time in 
calling the attention of the house to 
Mr Garrett's metrical accomplish- 
ments. Today, .should you Q" '^ ^r 
Garrett about his poetry, he will pro 
test that he reformed long ago. None- 
{heless wlien he was asked recently 
for a sample of his poetry for pub- 
lication, he unhesitatingly 
over the following: 

A June Night. 
A murk of cloud, half rifted here and 

there, spreads over all. 
Veiling the stars which show but dim- 
ly through its dusky folds; 
The soft air stirs as . gently as the 
breathing of an infant slumber- 

Bearing^the while upon its lazy wings 
the grass scent and the odor oi 

And fr^alrlnf breath of the magnolia^s 
bloom and the jasmines sensu- 
ous, rich perfume. ^^^i, 

All mingled with the dank earth smell 
which follows in the wake of 
June time showers. . 

From out damp grasses and quick- 
growing weed beds rise the fire- 

To blink and glimmer through the 
mists of night; ^^ , ^ . „ 

The frogs croak from the late replen- 
ished streams and pools: 

The cricket sings right blithely; the 
self-conscious katydid from its 
•resting place .i. , . • 

On quivering twig, 'neath dripping 
leaf, calls forth its name in hur- 
ried way 

As though it feared that- some might 
pass ere learning It was there: 

The smaller Insects, each in its God- 
given way, uplift a voice to swell 
the evening chorus; 

The silly candle-fiy leaves shade and 
safety to dally round the flaming 
lamp , , ., 

Until Its wings are scorched; then 
helpless falls to die. 

Poor foolish ny, to be thus lured by 
glare and glitter! 

Ihow many men thy prototypes have 
been! 



late traveler rumbles; 

ig gi 

motive i.uii.= , _, 

Then hastens on until Its regular pulT 



Up the long grade, with labored cough, 
the locomotive toils- 



is in the distance lost; 
And suddenly above them 



all, and; 
IweTter^ faT than "allVbut blend^ 
Ing with them all. 
Rings out Sir Mockers roundelay a» 
he begins his evening song. 

"All commonplace?" Ti' nor^slght nS^ 
face view presents nor signi nut- 

Which'°Bt"irs the spiri^t unto mighty- 
thoughts or great desires 

But is it after all. so trite and un- 
eventful? , „„- 

Is there not in the very calm an* 
quietude, in the unlsonance ofi 
natures night sounds 

A tender calling unto the gentler sym-- 
pathies of men? 

A calling unto which an answer must 
be made? A mystic cord thro-wni 
out , , 

To bind out the heart and mind more- 
closely up to nature's breast 

And lead us nearer, nearer unto God> 

Its very harmony a poem, ungraspablo- 
In full, but sweet withal. 

And tender, too, and restful in th©. 
calm which it Inspires? 

hHICHESTER^PILI^ 

'^^*=^ L,dle«t A.k yr— " ■-' '- '-^ 

Chl-ebe*-ter'« 1 
IMIU in Ued 

bold, sealed 
Tkk* BO other. 

l>r«n<«t. Ask for Ciri-ClTEf^TEB n 

DIAMOND HRAND FILLS, for a»I 

years Wnown as Best, Safest. Aiwa j-s Ke;ia- '.% . 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERY^HERfii 







OLD SORES CURED 



;£R1NE 



^VE. 



BRADFIELD REQVLATQR CQff Ai^*"^ ^ A powbell' tinkles through the dark 



Cures Chronic Ulcers. Bone L leers. )f,»^<^ 
Clcem, Scrofulous l'«c«"',^?"«"^*»l ^Jf,*'? 
l-ever Sores. Gangrene. Blood P««*o»»°fc 
Whit* SwelliDE. Milk Leg, Poisoned W ounfls. 

Pa lore. « 10^ stll^dlnK. *'Po.mvay aever_ f^U. 





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Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



13 



INCREASE IN OUTPUT OF 
BUHE DISTRia IN JUNE 



Butte & Superior Again Fig- 
uring on Erection of 
Concentrator. 

North Butte's Report Next 

Week Expected to Be 

Gratifying. 



Butte, Mont . July 15.— (Special to 
Tlie Herald* — The official figures of 
tho Washoe and Great Falls smelters 
for the ai.Miili ot June show that the 
produiti-'n was 21.S50.00 pounds as 
compared with 21.700.000 pounds in the 
month of .May. Tiie Increase in the 
production for the past month of 150.- 
O'J') I '.umls was largely du to the Tuo- 
lumne shipping more ore than in May. 
which made the production of that 
compi^ny in the vicinity of 600j)00 
pound.-* as compared with 500.000 
pounds In May. while the North Butte 
also ran » little over the a^^^';**'; '^ 
X.OOO.ii'M) pounds for many months past 
Of the pn.ductlon of 11.850.000 pounds 
the Wa.shoe .smelter at Anaconda 
turned out Ifi.TOO.OOO pounds of_ cop- 
and the tireat Falls smelter o.l«".- 



fiur dredge.s at 
f an Im- 
flay and 
In «'alifornia 
locailtj of Alder sulch, 
the scene of extensive 
the fir.^t 



STRIKE IS 
IMPORTANT 



per 



IS 

mill 



000 pounds. All the ore ot the North 
Butte and the Tuolumne companies 
«..fs to the Washoe smelter. Tue 
mines of the Anaconda company prac- 
tically remained the same as m ..lay 
«.<* to production- The Ki*3t Butle 

compiiny produced about l.ioo.ooo 
pounds so that the total production of 
this district for June was 22.1)50,000 

tons 

Butte & Superior. 

The Butte & Superior compatiy is 
again considering the question of the 
erection of a concentrator on the com- 
panVs ground, near the mine. It 
contended that the building of a 
to tieat the ore would considerably 
lessen the e.xpenses. In that the freight 
on the 350 to 400 tons of ore now 
haul.d daily to Basin for treatment 
■would be jsaved. It Is stated that the 
company Is In a position to go ahead 
with the construction as it i-^ earning 
about |;J5.000 a month, and In addi- 
tion It has a treasury balance after 
meeting all Mils from the money re- 
ceived from Havden. ritone & Co.. from 
the bon.l sale When the company had 
this matter under consideration more 
than one year aiio the plans were pre- 
pared and practically all arrange- 
ments made fur the material, so that 
•when once a decision Is arrived at 
little time wlU be lost in putting the 
bifllding up. However, before a defi- 
nite decision la made. It Is stated that 
President Wolvin will come to this 
city and make an Inspection of the 
property and consult with local inter- 
ests on the matter. 

Ryan Well SatUfied. 
John D. Ryan, president ot the 
Amalgamated Copper company, spent 
the first week of this month In Great 
Falls looking over the Improvements 
•which have been made to the smelter 
since his last visit. He has expressed 
himself as well satisfied with the man- 
ner In which the plant is operated and 
the working of the ecnonomies which 
have been introduced. Mr Ryan also 
devoted considerable of his time to the 
other interests which he has in Great 

Fall^^ . ^ 

Deri in To Be IM»iiolved. 

Some time ago the North Butte com- 
' panv purchased the Berlin company 
claim and as the stockholders in the 
Berlin were without property applica- 
tion was recently made to the court 
lor permission to dissolve. The order 
has been made and John D. Pope, man- 
ager of the North Butte company. >\ . 
D. Thornton, stockholder of the Ber- 
lin company and also president of the 
Oreene-Cananea company, and Harry 
Holp also a stockholder of the Berlin 
comp.tny. named to act as trustees 
the dls.«olutlon proceedings. The 
lln claim Is now one of the North 
Butte's most valuable assets. 
Tuolumne. 
The Tuolumne company has declared 
the regular dividend of 15 cents, pay- 
able on August 15. "We can very eas- 
rv take care of this rate of dividend 
and meet all obligations without im; 
pairing the treasury to a"y, e^^^.'J.V.t 
.i said President Hlckey recently. but 
•Rith the market conditions as they are 
at present It would be folly to attempt 
' to Increase the rate as some think we 
would be Justified In doing. The mar- 
ket looks good for an Improvement. 
and It would not surprise nie to see 
the .surplus largely wiped out and IJ- 
cent copper in the next few months 
but we win wait until that time ar- 
rives before we increase the dividena. 
We are Increasing our ore reserves 
every dav and shipping about 200 tons 
daily besides, and when the new equip- 
ment is in place we will be In a posl- 
t 

the new" surface"' plant ^ have already 
arrived, but It Is not believed that the 
equipment will be In position 



different sections of this state this 
summer. In the Rub.\ valley the Con- 
rev company has ., . , 
work. The company li digging an Irn 
mense amount of ear h every 
getting good return < 
guUh, in the 
whicli was 

placer mining years ago. 
clean-up of tlie seaso i. has brought *<) 
light one nugget weighing 100 ounces 
and another twelve c uiices. Owing to 
the presence of somi white quartz it 
is impossible at present to state their 
welglu In gold, but experienced gol 1 
miners say that the value Is at least 
$1,200. The discovery of tliese nuggets 
along wltii a large quantity of tine 
gold In the ftrst clean-up. has created 
quite a little excltensent and has l)een 
the cause of many { eople abandoning 
their occupations and taking up ground 
in the locality. 

E:a«t Battc. ,, . 

When the new f u -nace is Installed 
at the F.ast Butte j^melter it is esti- 
mated that the company will be in a 
position to produce i, 000, 000 pounds ot 
topper a month. 1 his new furnace 
which will make three, will be hn- 
ished In the course of the next three 
months and possibly sooner as all the 
materia* is now on he ground. While 
It Is not the Intenth n of the company 
to run the smelter t> its full capacity 
under present copp >r market condi- 
tion:*, there will imssibly be some 
slight Increase as tlie company has a 
very large amount ot ore blocked out. 
In the improvement; now being ma,:e 
at the smelter the company expects to 
be in a position to reduce costs con- 
siderably. 

Nortk llutle, . ^^ 

The next quarterly report of the 
North Butte compar y is due on July 
22 and It Is expected that It will turn 
out to be one of tie most gratifying 
ever made to the stockholders. The 
ore now being shipped to the .smelter 
is said to average i per cent copper 
but only sufficient Is being shipped 
to maintain a produ tion around 2,0o0,- 
000 pounds per mcnth. The ore re- 
serves are now very large and are 
i>elng increased evei y day. 



More Rich Copper Ground Is 

Found By Mayflower 

Company. 

Hancock Makes Good Recov- 
ery From Rock Sent 
to Mill 



In 
Ber- 



ment xs in piace we w*ii wc ... ^ '""• 
tlon to 3hip at least aOO tons a day to 
the Washoe smelter." Some parts or 



and 



II I II ill ■■nil 



ready to be operated much before the 
middle or latter end of August. ti 
will be installed without a delay of 
more than three days in mining opera- 
tions. „ ^ , 

Iron Mouataln. 
The Iron .Mountain Tunnel M'n*n» 
comp-anv which is owned by W. U. 
Ka laft and others of Boston and other 
fl?les of the East, promises to deve op 
Into a profitable zinc property. In the 
course of new development work In 
addition to a large amount of s"ver 
lead ore, there has been opened up 
a zinc body of much promise. The or- 
ficials of the company are very much 
©lateil over the future of tlie property, 
especially in view of some very profi- 
table returns received from the Ea'Jt 
Helena smelter on ore shipped. 

Raderaburs Mine*. 
There Is a great deal of activity in 
the Radersburg district. due to the 

showing being made by 
which have entered the 



SUCCESS MINE TO 
PUT ON MORE MEN 

Wallace Property Is to Be 

Operated on Larger 

Scale. 

.Spokane. Wash.. July 15. — Reports 
come from Wallace. Idaho, that the 
Success mine will be operated on an 
extensive scale hereafter. Ten cars 
of concentrate.<i were shipped a week 
ago. and it is rep )rted the ore nuv 
tn sight is sufficient to assure regular 
dividends at 60-da7 Intervals. A dis- 
bursement of 1 cent a share was 
made at the annual meeting a few 
months ago. and it la given out that 
another dividend <-f 1 cent, or $15.- 
000. will be declared at the next meet- 
ing of the direct" rs The company 
has improved the crushing and sav- 
ing equipment in its mill and the 
output is greatly increased. 

Plans have beei completed by the 
t^oeur d"Al-ne De^ elopment company 
for an active season on the Sliver 
King mine in Go /ernment gulch, in 
the Coeur d'Alenj district Robert 
Sterling, who has 'Charge of the work, 
reports that the main tunnel haa 
been retimbered t nd the cutoff tun- 
nel is to be the main working exit 
The company was successful recently 
in opposing the ef'orts of the Stewart 
company to condemn Its tunnel, 
which runs along the Stewart prop- 
erty lines. 

Bunker Hill & Sulivan Mining & 
Concentrating company. operating 
properties of the .^ime name at Ward- 
ner. Idaho, disbursed $65,400 as a 
dividend for July, making a total of 
$12,832,650 to date. The mino 
produced appro> Imately 70.000,000 
pounds of lead aid 1,245.000 ounces 
of silver in 1911. A shaft haa been 
sunk and levels opened to a depth 
of 1.200 feet bel )w the lowest tun- 
nel level, developing the vein more 
than 3,000 feet on Its dip, beneath the 
apex, as the dip of the vein nearly 
conforms to the bedding planes of 
the formation. It ie believed that 
much greater depth ran be obtained 
before the vein \.ill have passed out 
of the Rlvett and Burke quartzite. in 
.vhich occur all the rich ore bodies of 
the district 

ACTIVin AT 

SOMORA MINES 



The Greene-Cananea Resumes 

Operations at the Hen- 

riette Mine. 



excellent 

produclnl clasV" and" Kitting fine re 
turns on the shipment.s. In the Black 
Fr 



Cananea, Mex. July 15.— The smel- 
ter and mines of the Greene-Cananea 
have been operating 
the month now 
brought to a clo.ie. During this month 
Henriette n ine. which was shut 



Copper company 
steadily during 



the 



resumed 



on 



In the 
iday^mlnr another body was opened 
„„ the 700-foot level about three feet 
^ide and assays shows $300 to the ton 
In gold In the Mohawk mine which 
adjoins the Black Friday four feet of 
ore ha« been opened up running ?-0 
to the ton. The Keating company Is 
mining on a .«ihoot 400 feet lung and 
an average width of three feet. Oper- 
ations are being carried on on the 
6()0-fuot. level and It is stated that 
there the best ore Is to be found. Tlie 
company is sending out three cars a 
day for treatment. The Ohio-Keating 
Is 8hii>plng about three cars of ore 
each week. There are a dozen other 
properties operating, and all are being 
equipped with eleitrlc plant.s. 
Chlaese Iare»tlisa««r. 
F H T Chen, the supervi.«or of 
mining and smelting for the Chinese 
government, has completed a very 
thorough examination of the manner 
of handling and treating ore at the 
Washoe smelter and has gone to 
Tooele to Inspect the plant of tlie in- 
ternational Smelting & Refining com- 
pany. He proposes to visit every 
irlning center In this country before 
returning to his native land. In mak- 
ing his examination of the different 
plants he takes elaborate notes on the 
various processes the ore is put 
through and posse.'^sing a very fine 
English education he Is quick to un- 
derstand. He says that the Informa- 
tion he is gathering Is to be used for 
carrying on copper mining on an ex- 
t'^nslve scale In China and that lie ex- 
pect.-? some day his country will p ay 
an Important part In the production 
of copper. 

Plae«T >llBlng. , . 
The revival of placer mining is 
progressing at a wonderful rate In 



down about a /ear ago, 
operations. A f( rce of about 150 men 
Is now employet at the property. An 
electric holat hits been in-stalled. At 
the smelter the plant has been op- 
erating steadily and the number of 
furnaces In operation was six on an 
average. The )utput for June will 
compare favorably with that of May. 
The Calumet fe Sonora of the Can- 
anea Mining company ^i" 8«>o" i*« 
actively engaged in operating Its cat- 
allna mine, work upon which was 
re.sumed recentl /. It Is e'^Pf V^.^. ^^at 

the mill will be oP^'-a^'^K ^f;^*^"^ f,'^ 
a short time, when electricity will 
be u.sed as p >wer. The electrical 
plan is almost n readiness. 

The Silver Srals property, located 
in the Nacozarl neighborhood, recent- 
ly made a carload shipment of ore 
which netted the company $3,oOO 
There is enouglt ore in sight to war- 
rant three shipiients of one car each 
monthly. A. J Warner, a director 
in the Calumei & Sonora company, 
was recently at the property and re- 
->orts that everj thing is looking nice- 
ly. C. B. Bell ia In charge of the 
operations. 

Electricity is now the motive pow- 
er for the Tigr ' mines and mill. The 
first electricity was transmitted over 
the line on June 25. Since that time 
the property hus been using the new 
power. The power is generated at 
the Copper Qu ?en power house in 
Douglas, Ariz., and transmitted to 
the property o^ er a line seventy-two 
miles in length This is the only line 
of Its nature in use in this portion of 
Mexico. 



Houghton. Mich., July 15— (Special 
to The Herald.)— The Mayllower Min- 
ing company has made a strike of 
rich copper ground in the horizon of 
the so-called St. Louis lode. The 
disclosure duplicates the fine show- 
ing obtained In the No. H drill hole 
and is a most important deve^lopment. 
The St Louis lode lies in "the ap- 
proximate horizon of the Baltic lode. 
Whether or not It is a continuation 
ot that famous bed cannot be definite- 
ly determined from data In hand, and 
It will require work of years to show 
its proper relation, but whatever its 
identity it promises well. Drill bor- 
ings have yielded excellent showings 
in the cores extracted from varying 
depths and at several polnta on the 
St. Louis and Mayllower properties. 

The Algomah Mininff company con- 
tinues to open coppor ore in the ex- 
ploratory shaft sunk in what Is ex- 
pected to prove an extension of the 
Lake lode. A total distance of 1.^00 
feet has been driven in this tormi- 
tion all m rather low grade ore 
though not without posaibilitlea, judg- 
ing from the character of that dis- 
played on the dump. A change from 
ore to native copper Is anticipated at 
greater depth. No work has been 
done below the 104-foot level. There 
is but a trace of native copper at thl.-. 
depth Exploratory ^^'•>l'^.„'^l''*^'''',\,l!'^ 
i« confined to diamond drilling The 
fifth hole h ts Just been stopped at a 
depth .d about 2.300 feet and Hole 
No 6 started to the northeast and 
distant about 600 feet. 
Quiivy. 
The Qulncv Mining company is giv- 
ing full time and attention to the 
development of the Pewabic-Quincy 
lode In the Pontlac tract acuuired 
some years ago from the Arcadian 
Copper company. A considerable 
amount of development work has been 
ac.v>mt4ished In the comparativel> 
few years that this property has been 
in the possession of the Quincy. This 
has been pos.slble through the exten- 
sion of the north laterals of the 
M.-snard shaft workings. The P'>nti.>.c 
shaft, through which this ground will 
eventuallv be wrought, has attained 
a depth of about 1.500 feet, and at 
2 200 feet will connect with the first 
of several Mesnard drifts. The char- 
acter of the ground opened is In every 
way similar to that obtaining in the 
higher laterals of the several adjoin- 
ing shafts on this formation — general- 
ly poor above 2,000 feet, but impr<)v- 
ing materially with added depth. The 
south end of the mine is nearlng ex- 
haustion and that territory tributary 
to the No. 7 shaft will probably be- 
come so within another ten years^ 
The north end, however, is only just 
coming in and but two-thirds of all 
that territory embraced by the Pon- 
tiac Mesnard and Section 14 has been 
made productive. This tract is near- 
ly twice the size of the original hold- 
ings of the company on the Quincy- 
Pewabic lode. 

La Salle. 
The La Salle Copper 
centering all activity in 
work in the Tecum.seh , ,. » 

s'-afts are sinking .steadily, the first 
is down over 2,000 feet and the sec- 
ond is approaching 1.500 feet in 
depth Both shafts are opening cop- 
per ground of rather poor quality 
with the exception of occasional 
stretches like those at the moment 
showing on the twelfth and thirteenth 
levels m No. 2 shaft and In several 
snots on various levels In the deeper 
No 1 shaft. The La Salle of today Is 
a mere specimen mine, prolific iii 
copper crystals and small nuggets of 
.silver The more de.slrable stamp 
rock is conspicuous for Its absence. 
Production has declined to less than 
fifty tons rock dally and promises 
soon to cease altogether. The most 
encouraging feature at the La Salle 
is the growing betterment In copper 
content as greater depth is attained. 
Hant'ook. 
The Hancock Consolidated Mining 
company reports a copper recovery of 
19 45 pounds fine copper per ton of 
rock milled during June. The aver- 
age recovery for May wa.i 192. 
pounds. The July extraction is not 
expected to show less, and for the 
first period was considerably better 
than the average noted. No selectlori 
is being made, but on the other hand 
only first-class ground Is being 
.stoped. thus lowering the proportion 
of poor ground extracted In the 
course of drifting. A recovery of fif- 
teen pounds copper per ton of rock 
mined Is altogether probable during 
the life of the mine and no recovery 
greatly in excess of this figure Is an- 
ticipated for any considerable period 
uf time. The production is being 
milled in the Centennial - Allouez 
stamp mills. The company some 
time ago purchased a mill site, hut is 
delaying the erection of its own mill 
of which m fact it stands In no Im- 
med«-*^ need. The mill site also Is 
of questionable capacity, being limited 
as to sand room for the tailing dump, 
and in all probability will be put to 
other uses. A new mill .site may be 
acquired from among many on the 
shores of Lake Superior, five or six 
miles dLstant, and this will likely be 
done. Operations In the mine con- 
tinue centered in development work 
in the No. 3 lode and in shaft sink- 
ing. Drifting Is in progress in the 
several levels from the twelfth to the 
eighteenth, inclusive. The shaft Is 
around 2.300 feet deep and again 
sinking steadily to Intersect and de- 



company is 
development 
tract. Two 



velop the underlay of the Qulncy- 
Pewabic lode, which has proven so 
productive in the lands of the Quincy 
Mining company adjoining. The com- 
pany Is employing a force of about 
200 men in and a|i)out the mine. 

SIWASHCREEK 
F ORGES AHEAD 

Swarming With Prospectors 

and Experiencing Its 

First Boom 

Seattle. Wash., July 15. — Steamboat 
Mountain got a selback last week and 
Siwash Creek, near Yale, forged 
ahead. They are contiguous camps 
and are well filled with prospectors. 
Values have petered out in the orig- 
inal Greenwalt Stevens discovery 
from which so much was expected. 
In fact, gold is found only in the 
float from the ledge where pay la 
iTood. but in the vein values run too 
low to pay. However, this is true of 
di^*covery alone, and many new things 
more promising have been found. 
The Steamboat country is mineralized, 
and tlie zone of mineralization begins 
in the Mount Baker district south of 
the American boundary and extends 
northeast to the head of the Simllka- 
meen. Porphyry dykes, from which 
veiruj and veinlets of hard quartz pro- 
trude, are the characteristics of the 
section. Above timber line, where 
the softer porphyry has eroded, leav- 
ing the hard quartz standing intact, 
this characteristic is moBt marked. 

On Siwash creek a new strike was 
made on the Godfrey claims below 
the forks and another on the north 
fork above the Mount Baker and 
Tale mill. Lewis Stenger has been 
investigating the Mount Baker and 
Yale dyke, where it goes into the 
North mountain and has established 
th> existence of a great zone of free 
milling ore, distributed not in lenses, 
as on the south side, but with rather 
marked uniformity throughout the 

' ^The Marvel mill haa started on ore 
from the great exposure of the Wat-d. 
All of these claims about the forks 
are located to coverthe great main 
dyke of the creek. .^The Godfrey and 
Roderick and the *a<iW Revesbeck 
strike alone are on t(«lns in the slate, 
which la the country formation. 

Siwash Is swarminir with pros- 
pectors and is experiencing its only 
boom, though it has produced more 
or le.ss for half a century. 

CHUROira 
AT THE LIVE OAK 

Meeting With Uniform Suc- 
cess That Has Attended 
Company's Operations. 

Globe, Ariz.. Julv 15. — The Live 
Oak has five churn drills working on 
the property and they are meetlnt; 
with the uniform success that has 
characterized the operations of this 
company since the first drill began 
boring In April. 1911. 

The new shaft, generally referred 
to as No. 2, Is considerably belovv 
400 feet In depth. Mcllver Bro.s. & 
Ross, who are sinking the shaft un- 
der contract, are keeping up the rec- 
ord-breaking pace that broke tne 
world's record for a months work 
recently, although the greater depth 
and moisture of the shaft as it deep- 
end makes it impossible to equal the 
pace at which they are sinking tor- 

""s'ilaft No. 1 is 445 feet ill dejUh 
at which level the work Pre iminary 
to the -blocking out" that wl 1 honey- 
comb the ore body with drifts, cross- 
cuts and ral.ses. is in progress 

Considerable work is 
on the surface In 




I 




CHICAGO PASSENGER TERMINAL 
— NORTH WESTERN LINE 



w^ <^ ' ~ 



Located on Madison Street, between Canal and Clinton Streets, in 
the heart of Chicago's business district, a short distance from termi- 
nal stations of all Eastern railways. 

The new terminal represents the perfection of passenger structures. In 
this structure have been combined all the best and most modern utili- 
ties, appointments and architectural beauty of the greatest terminals of 
Europe and America. 

CHANGE IN CHICAGO SERVICE 



^ 



m II ■ ■ ►• 



EFFECTIVE SUNDAY, 
JULY 9, 1911. 



4:45 p.m 

5 :05 p.m. 

7 :45 a.m. 

Arrive Chicago 8:1a a.m. 



Leave Duluth .... 
Leave Superior. .. 
Arrive Milwaukee 



CHICAGO 

EXPRESS 

Daily. 



Q^ICAGO 

LIMITED 

Daily. 



6:15 p.m 
6:35 p.m. 
6 :45 a.m. 
8:15 a.m. 




Chicago Express 



Duluth 8 :15 p. m., Superior 8 :35 p. 
Chicago Sleeping Car and Coaches. 



m. 



will make regular stops Duluth-Supcrior 

to Eau Claire. This train formerly left 

Equipment consists of Observation Cafe Car, 



i^n^t^^^^W^k ¥ imf toH ^'^^ continue on its familiar schedule pro- 
^UlCoUU l-lllllllt^U viding the highest standard of serivce. 
Equipment consists of Buffet Library Car, Dining Car, Drawingroom Sleeping Cars 
to Milwaukee and Chicago, RecUning Chair Car and Coaches. 



Twilight Limited 

apolis 10 :25 p. m. New Steel Observation 

quick, pleasant ride, through the lake region to the Twin Cities. 



leaves Duluth 4:15 p. m., Superior 4:35 

p. m. Arrives St. Paul 9 .50 p. m., Minne- 

New Steel Observation Parlor Car, Cafe Club Car, Coaches. A 




Special pamphlets on Excursion Fares to 
the EAST— also to CALIFORN I A—mailed 
upon request, 

TICKET OFFICEi SlfPKRIOR' 010 TOWER AVElVrB. 

TICKET OFFICE: DULLTIi, 30:i WE.<<T SUPERIOR STREET. 

Steamship Tickets to All European Ports. 



in progress 
the way of Im- 
provements. Work has begun on tho 
office building thfit Is to be erected 
near the original headquarters, the 
various points of operation on th« 
property have been connected \v 1th 
the office bv telephone, oil burners 
have taken the place of the former 
fire boxes beneath the boilers In the 
power plant, and various other Im- 
provemen ta are under way^ 

more'gId¥ 
theplacers 

Increased Production From 

This Source in Colorado 

Expected. 




of 

Peak 

of 
of 



Denver. Colo.. July 15.— Although 
the discovery of gold bearing placers 
was the cause of the first rush 
fortune seekers to the Pike's 
country, and although the placers of 
Colorado have been the scene of 
profitable mining for more than hair 
a -century, recent developments 
Droml3e a great revival of placer min- 
ing and a largely increased produc- 
tion from this source. In the recent- 
ly issued report of the state bureau 
of mines the prediction is made that 
there will be a development of dredg- 
ing in Colorado comnarable to the 
development that has added so much 
to the gold output of California 



tag. by whom it had been owned for 
a long time. Burlew Immediately 
sold a two-thirds interest In the Mon- 
tag ground for the price he paid for 
the whole tract, and preparations 
have been made for working it with 
modern machinery. The Miller placer 
of 160 acres just below the Montag 
placer is reported sold to Daniel 
Giles for $24,000. The owners of the 
RelUng dredge, which Is operating on 
a placer near Breckenridge. have 
leased the old Peabody placer, which 
lies on the creek near the Miller 
ground. The Peabody Pjacer is 
credited with a production of 16,000,- 

000. 

The dredges working on the water- 
sheds of the Blue and the Swan river 
in Summit county made a production 
of $660,000 in the season of l»l"- " 
la reported. Of this amount $3a0.000 
is credited to the Swan river plant 
$210,000 to the Relling and $100,000 
to the Reliance. The gravel handled 
by the Swan river plant runs from 
25 to 45 cents a yard and the ex- 
pense is 4.7 cents r> yard. 

The Wellington Mines company, 
operating near Breckenridge in Sum- 
mit county, has just paid a dividend 
of $50,000, the second of this year. 
The management expects to make 
another disbursement before the ena 
of the year. 

mining¥the 
black hills 



the present 3 00 -foot level Is to be de- 
veloped at depth. This body has been 
prospected, but not much opened uy. 
It carries a fair grade gold value. 
The company has a 30-stamp mill on 
the ground. 

Near Bear Butte, at a point about 
four miles from Galena, John McGof 



the new Osterman smelter, which will 
be of particular benefit in that lo- 
cality. 

The Trojan mine, near Portland, 
which was put out of commission by 
a fire that destroyed 
tramway and hoist 



its ore bins, 
house, has re- 



to h^lu«t made whrt^Vie lived to sumed work with temporary struc- 



«iiv*»r He owns the ground which, , ^. . ,,, 

sil\er. tie owns me b ^ducer of commission this week. This mill was 

formerly on the property of the 



years ago was a heavy 
high-grade ores and has done some 
work in the last few years In other 
portions of the property. A small 
vein that outcropped on the surface 
was opened up and is now develop, 
ing into a large vertical from which 
samples of ore assay high, some run- 
ning 105 ounces in silver and some 
lead. The property is located near 



American Eagle Mining company and 
is a 200-ton cyanide plant that can't 
be enlarged. The company la now 
shipping much of its ore to Denver 
and some to the Lundberg. Dorr & 
Wilson mill at Terry, but expects to 
be able to treat the largest part in 
its own plant from now on. 



There's always somethlnug of Interest to you on the want pages. Read 
them cfrtfufly There's many a good story as well as a good bargain on 
these pages. 



WHY NOT 



Have Ut Do Your Printint ? 
MERRITT & HECTOR 

PRINTERS AND BINDKRS 
•Roah Orden a Pleaiure" 1 1 2 WhI Flftt St. 




At 



present extensive dredging operations 
are In progress in Summit county, and 
from Summit county come reports or 
discoveries similar to those that 
started crowds of prospectors Into the 
hills in the early days. In the om 
Tarryall district of Summit county, 
where fortunes were taken from the 
beds of the streams in 1860, some ex- 
ceedingly rich gravel has been opened 
on placer ground belonging to Bon i., 
B and John Look, Denver mer- 



I. 



have 



YOU KNOW 

SAPOLIO 

Will Do It 

CXEANS, SCOURS. POLISHES 
Works Without Waste 



Never Has Production 
Gold Ore Been as 
High. 



in 



chants who for several years 
been developing lode claims in the 
same vicinity. By driving a tunnel 
they have cut Into what appears to 
be a channel long since •♦^andoned 
by the stream, and in this channel 
they have encountered gravel that 
ylelda quantities of small nugets and 
tine gold in every pan washed. Not 
enough work has been done yet to 
«rive any accurate idea of the width 
of the old channel or the depth to 
bed rock. The Look brothers own 
only SVi acres of placer ground but 
.say that they would not sell it for 
550.000. ^, _^ . 

Before the strike on the Look 
ground had become known to others. 
Harrv E. Burlew of Denver had se- 
cured for $13,000 an option on 141 
acres adjoining from George A. Mon- 



iJeadwood, S. D.. July 15.— Never 
the history of the Black Hills has 
the production of gold ore been as 
high as at the present time, and with 
a continuance of the present rate 
through the remaining six months 
the annual output for 1911 will far 
exceed any previous figure. The lo- 
cal United States assay office during 
the last quarter has received over 51,- 
750 000 in bullion and other com- 
panics are planning to send their out- 
nut to It within a few weeks "The 
addition of the Homestake bullion 
the increase in size and value of the 
wLp bullion and the Golden Reward 
increase, together with ^. f ^« "«;; 
shipments, some from the Sauthern 
Jrins have caused the higher figures^ 
Preparations are being made by the 
officers of the Lucky Strike company 
to develop their property on Box 
Elder creek more extensively. The 
Siaft is to be sunk an additional 300 
feet and the ore vein which show, at 




I 



An Aisle In Onr Fireproof 
Warehouse 



STORAGE CO. 





1 


1 






1 


' i 




', 1 




^ 

< 




1 






T 




I 



I 



14 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



LATEST 





Standing of the Toams. 

Won. Lost Pet. 

Winona 4 }.>* 'H^ 

I^a Crosse 28 34 .*^l 



(iames Today. 



DuUiih at Winona. 
Superior at La t.'rop=e 
Eau Claire at Rochester. 



^»^.**,^^******'^****'^* »■'< * ' '" ' '"■"■' *** ************** ***************** ^^^^ TV^A* 

SOME HYDROPHOBICS— BY THE DOG 



int*tt**t*t**tt*^^***^****^ 



y W ^ ' ^ W W ifc: 



^m^-^ 



O'BRlENrrES 
LOSEAGAIN 

Dauss Beats Duluth in Second 

Game By 3 to 1 

Score. 

Walliser's Triple and Har- 
grove's Single Are Only 
Hits Scored. 



Winona. Minn. July 15.— Winona 
won tilt iitcond Kanie of the present 
serif- from the White Sox. the score 
Y,^ -u 1. E^auss was opposed to 

Bl;, ;-,i cleverly outpiiched the 

Diila, .un all the way through. 

An -V. :. duzen of the visiting batsmen 
ft-ll viiiims to the puzzUnif slants ol 
I... .-> 







IN QUArXnTI H^J^l 







— ^ 



VyASH BwRM'.JilS' VA/ORV<. 




/ TO BE ArTHfc W ^(j MtPt mTHt 
\ WATEf? CAR NWAi-lf CHIC KEN COOP V 
S, IN DOtUTM - 7/ ALL WEEK At4D 

AND 2 a ? y \ tVWUK U^^T 




DAY 



REGULATIONS 
FOR REGAHA 

United States Customs Officer 

Will Enforce Government 

Rules Next Week. 




I 



;Gr|^v/ATT- 






^^ 



_-- (J 



t^eCiCW^^— 






w 



i he was steady throughout. 

:;ple and a single by Har- 

for Duluth. 



Mrovf s^vui^d the one run 
The score: 

AB 



R. H. 





Duluth — 

Corrigan. If 3 

De Jlavtn. ::b... .2 

Ment ice. lb i 

Krarn* r. if 3 

Leber, .b 3 

Miller, cf 3 

Walliser. ss 3 1 1 

Hariirove. c 3 l 

Blancke. v - ^* " 

•C. .FohnF' n 1 '' » 

••O Brlen 1 ^ 



PO. 
3 

<) 

A. 

12 
1 
1 
1 

3 
1 





A. 

1 
1 



1 


3 



E. 
















Totals . . . . 

Winona — 
Graves, rf . . 
Brewer. 2b . 
Davt-v, ss . . 
Collins. If . . 
Swan son, cf 



.27 1 
AB. R. 
..4 1 



.4 
.4 

.3 
i 



Leifheit. 3b 3 

Curtis, lb 2 

Anderson, c - 

Dauss. p - 





1 





1 





H. 

1 



1 



1 






24 

PO. 

1 

2 
o 


1 

9 
12 




10 
A. 


5 


5 
1 




13 




E. 



















VU tAQTVO 



AS B>VCi j>o<^^— WHO vnAhts To 




TR^^\V^ UVB^/ TI^YvUer '/^W^^\ 



Totals - * 

•Jonnson bailed for Blancke in the 

••O'Brien batted for De Haven in the 
ninth. 

Score by ir.nuigs — „„,„„„AAn ^ 

T)i,iijth 00100000 — 1 

Winona 1 11 x-3 

Summary: Two-base hits — Orayes. 
Brewer Curtis. Three-base hits — Wal- 
User Sacritlce hits — De Haven. Dauss. 
Bwi.nson. Struck out — By Blancke. :•; 
bv I'auss, li:. Bases on balls — Off 
Blanke. i: off Dauss, 1. Left on bases 

Wir.ona. 5: Duluth. 1. Time of game 

— Wlri'tna. 5: Duluth. 1. Stolen bases — 
Swun.<on. Graves. Time of game — 1:40. 
Umpire — Jones. 

oi]tcasts¥n 
from superior 

Ked-leg Hurlers Are Easy 

and La Crosse Takes 

Game 10 to 7. 

La Cross^e, Wis., July 15.— La Crosse 
took the second game of the series 
from the Superior Red Legs yesterday 
fey the score of 10 to 7. Watson was 
driven from the slab and was succeed- 
ed by Brenton. who held the visitors 
to three scattered hits during the re- 
mainder of the game. Both Dunbar 
and Cummings proved very easy for 
the Outcasts. The score: 

Superior — AB. R. H. 

Bancroft, ss 5 

Bennett, cf 4 2 1 

Landry. If 4 

Dolan, lb 4 

Ford, rf 4 

Lizzette, c 4 

Grogan, 2b 3 

Llppold. 3b 4 

Cummings, p.... 2 

Dunbar, p 1 

Dahlgren. p 

xHoff man 
















tCuCHUx^ABOUr TO 



on balls— Off Dunbar 2. off Cummings 
off Dahlgren 2. off Brenton 1^ 
Struck out— By Du ibar 3. by Cummings 
1. by Dahlgren 1 by Watson 1. b> 
Brenton 6. Wild Patches— Cummings 
Dahlgren. Hit by pitched ball— B> 
Dunlfar (Black), by Brenton ^Ljolan). 
Time of game— 1:5 0. Um pire— Schuler. 

rochesterY\kes second 
game frdm eau claire. 

Rochester. Minn., July 15.— With 
Manager Ted Corb -tt in the t.ox Roch^ 
ester took the second game from Eau 
Claire yesterday xv'inning by the score 
of 3 to 1 Corbet! held the champs to 
five hits, an error resulting In the one 
score of the vlsltos. Score: R. H. L. 
P r?chester ....00021000 x— 3 9 3 
Ea u Clai re ..... 1 0-1 5 3 

Butteries- Corbitt and McAlease 
Chase and Stark. Umpires— Kelly and 
Lyman. 



AMERICAN ASSOCIATION 



Standing of the Teams. 

Won. Lost 

Columbus 43 \n 

Kansas City ^6 4U 

Minneapolis 4* 

Milwaukee 43 

St. Paul 42 

Louisville '* 

Toledo 42 

Indianapolis <>' 



42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
49 



Pet. 
.663 
.635 
.612 
.500 
.484 
.483 
.477 
.443 



well but the fielding back of him was 

^",'Jl^\^a^'^'ee ^.^."^^^6 2 1 x-f" | "^1 

St Paul 00000 00 1—1 7 3 

Batteries — McGlynn and Marshall; 
Oehring and Keily. Umpires— Chill 
and Weddldge. 



AMERICAN LEAGUE 



1 
1 
1 
1 





1 






3 
1 
1 
2 

1 







p. 

2 
2 


7 
1 
7 
3 
1 


1 




A. 
3 
1 

3 

2 
2 
2 
1 
2 
2 




E. 







1 
1 









BASEBALL 

TOMORROW—ATHLETIC PARK 

— DOlHLc:-HK\DER — 

TWIN PORTS vs. TWO HARBORS 
UNION CLOTH'G CD. vs. CITY DYE WORKS 

One AdmlsHlon. 



Games Today. 

Columbus at Toledo. 
Louisville at Indianapolis. 
Minneapolis at Kansas City. 
St. Paul at Milvaukee. 

WILD PITCHES GIVE 

GAME TO COLUMBUS. 



NATION&L LEAGUE 



Tot.tls 35 7 9 24 

La Crosse — AB. R. H. PO. 

Klein, rf 5 3 2 3 

Kelly, lb 3 2 2 9 

Crangle, If 3 2 

Bafford. cf 4 2 1 

Black, 3b 4 2 2 1 

Kernan. I'b 3 1 2 5 

"Wais, c 4 1 8 

Bnyder, ss 3 1 

Brenton, p 8 

Watson, p 1 



18 
E. 
1 



2 
1 
1 
6 
1 
1 

12 



E. 



1 


1 

1 

1 



Standing of the Teams. 

Won. Lost. 

Philadelphia 48 

New York 47 

Chicago Y 

St. Louis • *' 

Pittsburg \\ 

Cincinnati %i 

Brooklyn •• 

Boston 



.29 
.19 



31 
31 
30 
33 
33 
44 
47 
68 



Pet. 

.608 
.603 
.600 
.571 
.566 
.421 
.382 
.347 



Games Today. 

Cincinnati at ^ew York. 
Pittsburg at I hiladelphia. 
Chicago at Boiton. 
St. Louis at Brooklyn. 



Totals 33 10 12 27 

xBalted for Dahlgren in nintn 
Bcore by Innings: „„,„^-aa ■, 

Bucerior 023100000 —7 

STro°se 2 3 2 12 x-lO 

Summary: Two base hits — Lizzette, 
Landrv. Kernan. Wais. Safford. Sacri- 
fice hits — Bennet, Grogan, Kelly (2), 
Kernan. Stolen bases— Ford Snyder. 
Kelly (2). Double plays — Klein and 
Kelly, Kernan and Kelly. Left of 
bases. La Crosse 8, Superior 4. Bases 



PHILLIES TAKE FIRM 

HOLD m FIRST PL.\CE. 



Louisville Ky.. July 15.— Three wild 
pitches by Higginbotham yesterday 
gave Columbus enough runs to defeat 
Louisville in the last game of the 
series. The ex-major leaguer was also 
batted hard while Packard allowed but 
three scattered hits. Fast double 
piays and a one-handed catch by 
Havden featured the game. President 
Chivlngton was here yesterday and 
stated that Catcher "Tubby &J>*;ncer 
still belonged to St. Paul, as he had 
not been released by that club. It was 
erroneously reported that Spencer 
had been awarded to Louisville. Score 

rv. tI. c- 

Loulsvllle 2 0000 00—2 3 1 

Columbus .... ..01002000 2-592 

Batteries — Higginbotham and Miller. 
Packard and Walsh. Umpires— Hayes 
and Ferguson. 

RUBE WADDELL WINS 

ANOTHER FOR MILLERS. 

Kansas City. Mo.. July 15.— Minne- 
apolis took the second game of the 
series here yesterday from Kansas 
City 8 to 4. Waddell kept his hits well 
scattered and was effective with men 
on bases. Minneapolis hit consistently. 
Clymer was put out cf the game for 
disputing one of Bierhalters ^strike 

decisions. Score: „ „ „ „ ^ , . V'at 

00003001 — 4 9 3 

.02010230 0—8 10 4 

Rhoades and 



Standing of the Teams. 

Won. 

Detroit 55 

Philadelphia 49 

New York 41 

Jioston 42 

Chicago 40 

Cleveland 40 

Washington 27 

St. Louis 22 

♦ 

Games Today. 

New York at Cleveland. 
Boston at Detroit. 
Washington at Chicago. 
Philadelphia at St. Louis. 



Lost. 


Pet. 


24 


.696 


29 


.628 


37 


.526 


38 


.525 


37 


.519 


42 


.488 


53 


.338 


56 


.282 



HOTEL 
HOLLAND 

„, European,,, 

AB80l.VTEliY FIRBJ-PHOOF. 

Clab Bre«M«»t, Po»«l«» Prte«« 

Lnachcoa and Dlnacr. 

Mnslc at Dlaacr, « to 8 P. X. 

■JWTERTAINMBNT NiaHTI.T 
AVTBK MiSt. 






F^romme pltche 

TJntterles — Fr<mme, ©'".'tn anu i«v 
Lean: Alexandei and Dooin. Umpires- 
ODay and EmsUe. 

C.\RDIN.4LSl.0SE LAST' 

GAME TO BEAN-E.4TERS. 

Roston Mast.. July 15.— Manager 

Bresnih"an used four pitchers in venter- 

<lavs eame in an effort to maite wie 

ser^sl straigh: win for St. Louis, but 

♦ KLiao/i taken bv the locals In the 
the lead taken^^oy^^ ^^^ ^ 



Kansas City. 
Minneapolis . 

Batteries— Brandom. 
O'Connor; Waddell and Smith. Um- 
pires — Bierhalter and Handlboe. 

TOLEDO DROPS* HARD- 

FOUGHT GAME L\ TENTH. 



TIGERS MAKE CLEAN 

SWEEP OF THE SERIES. 

Detroit, Mich., July IB. — George Mul- 
lin who has been out of the game for 
several weeks, owing to an operation 
on his nose, returned yesterday and 
pitched fine ball, allowing Detroit to 
make a clean sweep of its four-game 
series with Philadelphia. Coombs 
lacked effectiveness at critical times 
and half of Detroit's runs were due to 
a bad throw by Strunk in the third 
inning Hartsel finished the game iiT 
left field. Bush's fielding featured. 

Score: ^- ^- ^* 

Philadelphia 10000000 0—1 5 1 

Detroit 00 400 10 ix— 6 9 1 

Batteries — Coombs and Lapp; Mullin 
and Stanage. Umpires, Perrine and 
Dineen. 

NINTH-INNING RALLY 

WINS FOR THE BROWNS. 

St Louis. Mo., July IB. — Two runs be- 
hind In the ninth, St. Louis rallied and 
scored three runs on three singles, a 
base on balls and a double, winning the 
final game 4 to 3. and breaking even 
on the series with New York. The 
locals' fielding was fast and perfect. 

Score: ^- ^- ^• 

New York 2 10 0—3 8 2 

St Louis 000000 13—4 11 

Batteries — Qulnn, Vaughn, Caldwell 
and Blair; Wallace, Lake, Hamilton and 
Stephens. Umpires, Connolly and 
O'Loughlln. 



AMATEUR TEAMS 
CLASH SUNDAY 

Two Games Wai Be Played 

Between Strong 

Nines. 

Tomorrow afternoon at Athletic 
Park the Duluth baseball fans will 
have a chance to witness two of the 
fastest games seen on the local dia- 
mond this season. The first game will 
be between the strong Twin Ports 
Clothing company team of Duluth and 
the Gophers of Two Harbors. The 
Harbor team is looked upon as one of 
the fastest baseball aggregations in 
Northeastern Minnesota. The Twin 
Ports having met and defeated some 
of the fastest teams in the Northwest, 
the game promises to be one of the 
best games seen in Duluth thus far 
this season. Griffin and Lambert will 
do the battery work for Two Harbors 
and Westholm and Olin will probably 
be seen for the Duluth clothiers. 

The second game will take place im- 
mediately after the Twin Ports-Two 
Harbors game. The Union Clothing 
company team of Proctor, formerly the 
Proctor All-Stars, which has not met 
defeat this season, will clash with the 
fast City Dye works team of Superior. 
Nelson and Johnson will do the bat- 
tery work for the Superior team and 
Kliske will be on the mound for the 
Proctor clothiers and Bulner will do 
the receiving. The first game will be 
called at 2 o'clock and the second at 
3:45. 

GO TO WINNIPEG. 



SPORTING WRITER 
IS ASSAULTED 

Love, of Kansas City Team 

Fined $100 By Manager 

and Arrested. 

Kansas City. Mo., July 15.— John 
Love, left fielder for the Kansas City 
American association baseball team, 
was fined $100 yesterday for attacking 
Edward Cochrane, sporting editor of 
the Kansas City Journal, just before 
the game with Minneapolis. The hne 
was Imposed by Daniel Shay, manager 

° Lov^e took' exception to articles writ- 
ten by Cochrane and attacked him at 
the ball park, knocking him down and 
beating him severely until a policeman 
interfered. Cochrane had a warrant 
sworn out for Love charging him 
with disturbing the peace. His case 
will come up in municipal court today. 



Will Direct Movements of 
Boats tn Course Dur- 
ing the Races. 



No vessel of any description will be 
permitted to pass up or down the 
course during the progress of a race 
in such a manner as to endanger oars- 
men or passengers on yachts or other 
craft whether observers or partici- 
pants in the regatta. This does not 
apply to official boats, however. 

Upon special permis.«ion from the 
United States officers in charge, ves- 
sels may pass over the course imme- 
ditely before or after a race, at a ^ 
speed not to exceed five miles an hour. 

A succes.sion of sharp, short whistles 
from a United States vessel patrolling 
the course shall serve as a signal to 
stop. Pilots of vessels shall stop when 
directed to do so, to insure the safety 
of passengers. , 

The above regulations will be en- 
forced subject to the discretion of the 
United States officer in charge, so as 
not to obstruct unnecessarily the 
navigation of vessels of the merchant 

Th" foregoing regulations have been 
received at the local customs office 
from Washington. Any part of them 
which seems necessary for the safety 
of all, will be enforced. . 

The midsummer water carnival 
brings with it some semblance ot 
danger as there will be many boats - 
on the water. As all will want posi- 
tions of vantage so as to give passen- 
gers a good view, the scene of the re- 
gatta will each day and evening bo 
patrolled bv an officer from the local 
customs house, whose duty it will be 
to regulate traffic so that the celebra- 
tion may be made safe for all. 

The secretary of commerce and labor 

is authorized to make regulations to 

promote the safety of life on navigable 

I waters during regattas and marine 

The foregoing regulations were sent 
out from Washington by Benjamin 5* 
Cable, acting s ecretary. 

JACK JOHNSONMAT" 

SAIL FOR AUSTRALIA. 

London, July 15— Jack Johnson will 
probably not return to the United 
States to keep the theatrical dates he 
recently contracted to fill, unless ho 
should again change his niind. He 
stated todav that he plans to accom- 
psnv Hugh Mcintosh to Australia fol- 
lowing his season in the music halls 
here and will probably harvest a good- 
ly lemon crop in the antipodes 

The report that Johnson had already 
agreed to meet Sam Langiord in Syd- 
ney on Dec. 26 next, was positively de- 
nied, however, by the big black He 
insisted that he would not meet the 
Boston tar baby any time unless the 
rurse was made right, and Sam would 
bet $10,000 on the side. 

Johnson is having too good a tinie 
here at present to bother much about 



t 



p.. 



. I 

I 
1 



I 



me 



fighting although he will pick up so 
easy mone y in Dublin nex t month. 

BINGHAMS DROPPF^ FROM 
DULLTH-SUPERIOR LEAGUE. 

AcUon in regard to the Bingham 
team of .Superior, a member of 'he Du- 
luth-Superlor league, was taken at the 
meeting of the board of directors of 
the leaffue held last evening. The 
droppini of the Binghams 9^ StiPerior 
will leave the league with eight teams. 

The revised standing of the teams, 
incident to the dropping of the Supe- 
rior team, is as follows: 

Clubs— Played. W( 



Clubs- - _ 

Pease Hdw 7 

Big Duluths 6 

Oak Halls B 

Duluth Heights » 

Jefferson * 

Kenney & Anker... h 

Woodruffs o 

New Duluth i 



'on. 
6 
5 
4 
5 
8 
3 
1 




Lost. 


Pet. 


1 


.857 


1 


.833 


1 


.SOO 


3 


.625 


4 


.429 


5 


.375 


5 


.167 


7 


.000 




second inning c«,...o 

ton winning 7 to 5. Score 



R. H. E 
.. . » o^B 1 6 6 1 — 7 7 

St Louis":::: :ooo2ooo2i-5 e i 

Batterie^Tyler and Kllng: L. Lau- 
dermilk a Landermilk. Golden Geyer 
and Bresnahai. Umpires-Johnstone 
and Eason. 

Chicago-Broo«lyn and Plttsburg- 
New York gam iS postponed on account 
of rain. 



Toledo. Ohio, July 15.— After twice 
tleing the score by success.ful batting 
rallies, coupled with errors. Toled.i 
dropped the second extra inning gajne 
of the series to Indianapolis in the 
tenth inning. 7 to 6. Houser;8 scratch 
single, a wild pitch and Getz s pop 
back of second produced the winning 
run Score' "• "• •''•'■ 

Toledo .'.... .0 2 4 0—6 11 1 
Indianapolis ..0200001301—712 .^ 

Batteries— Ylngllng. Swann and 
Carisch; Shlltzer and Ritter. Umpires 
— Owens and Edd lnger. 

EXCITING GAME IS 

WON BY BREWERS. 



BOSTON WINS CLOSE 

GAME FROM CHICAGO. 



Milwaukee, Wis.. July IB.— The home 
club won an exciting game from St. 
Paul yesterday afternoon, 3 to 1. Mc- 
Glynn pitched steady ball until the 
ninth when he passed a man and was 
hit safelv three times. Beaumont was 
put into "the game to bat for Gehrlng 
with the bags full and two out, but 
he fouled to Clark. Gehrlng pitched 



Chicago, July 15. — White's errors, 
coupled with two doubles, gave Boston 
the final game of the series with Chi- 
cago yesterday, 2 to 0. Pape was in 
fine form and keot ihe hits of the locals 
well scattered. Score: R. H. E. 

Chicago 000000000—0 4 2 

BostoB 00 0020000-2 9 

Batteries — White, and Payne and 
Sullivan; Pape and Williams. Umpire, 
Egan. 

OLD CY YOUNG 

PITCHES GOOD BALL. 



Cleveland, Ohio, July 15.— Graney's 
sun muff of Schaefers fly in the ninth, 
saved Washington from a shut-out. Cy 
Young outpitched Walker, and Cleve- 
land won, 4 to 1. Score: ^' *|- ^i 

Cleveland 10000120 x— 4 7 2 

Washington ..,.000000001—1 7 2 

Batteries— Young ai-d Fisher, Walker 
end Henry. Umpires, MulUn and Evans. 



Tennis Players From Canadian 
Town Capture Tennis Trophies. 

Grand Forks, N. D., July 15.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Fred Lelstikow 
of Winnipeg, formerly of Grafton, N. 
D., wrested from E. S. Read, also of 
Winnipeg, possession of the Trafford 
Jayne trophy in the Red River valley 
singles in the North Dakota Tennis 
tournament In this dty yesterday aft- 
ernoon. The trophy was won last year 
by Read, the first season it had been 
put back in play by Mr. Jayne of Min- 
neapolis, he having gained possession 
of it by three consecutive victories 
when it was put up by the association. 
The cup is valued at $500. 

Leistikow gained his right to play 
Read by defeating H. G. Mayes of Win- 
nipeg on thi day previous, but his vic- 
tory in the manner he gained it, over 
Read, was not entirely expected. Out 
of the five sets, he won three love 
sets while Read took two sets, 6-3 and 
6-4 Leistikow took the first and the 
last two sets, playing splendid net 
tennis and exhibiting more of the 
smashing game than did Read, who Is 
one of the most deliberate players 
ever seen on the local courts. 

Not onlv did the big cup go to Win- 
nipeg, but the championship in the 
open doubles also went to representa- 
tives of that city. Leistikow and 
Mayes defeating Elton and Willson of 
Grand Forks. 

Results of the other events follow: 
State doubles — S^nberg and Blather- 
wick defeated Russ and Phelps, 6-3, 6-4 

* Consolidation singles— H. L. Willson 
defaulted to Theodore Elton. 

Mixed doubles— Leistikow and Miss 
Beede defaulted to Mayes and Miss 

^Handicap singles — Wilkerson de- 
feated Balrd. 



New York. July 15.— The New York 
Athletic club has a senior eight in the 
championship races to be held during 
the latter part of the month on Sara- 
toga lake, under the auspices of the 
National Association of Amateur Oars- 
men. Great interest is manifest in the 
series, which will have an overwhelm- 
ing list of the fastest oarsmen in the 
United States and Canada. 

Fred R. Fortmeyer, secretary of the 
association. announced that John 
ONelll of Halifax, N. S., the Winner of 
the singles in 1909, will compete in this 
year's event. O'Neill did not start last 
year in the races on the Potomac. 

It is expected that Fred Shepard will 
put up a good fight for the honors if 
he settles down to a systematic course 
of training for the event, and is the 
only one in local circles to make O Neiil 
show his best pace. ONeill is credited 
with being the best single sculler of a 
generation, not excluding Ten Eyck 

and Greer. , ^ .. o* t5„,.i 
The Minnesota Boat club of St. Paul 
will have two crews in the regatta, a 
senior eight and a four. J. p. Dene- 
gre the secretary of the c utj, antici- 
pates a good showing by his mates 
when they line up against the pick of 
the Eastern contin gent. 

INVESTIGATES CHARGES 

AGAINST UMPIRE HAYES. 



Louisville, Ky., July 15. — Thomas M. 
Chivington, president of the American 
association, was here today investigat- 
ing charges made by spectators that 
Umpire Hayes had used vile language 
to them during a game last Wednes- 
day. After hearing Hayes' side of the 
case the questioning of several sport- 
ing writers, Mr. Chivington announced 
he would give out a statement re- 
garding the matter later. 

In regard to the claim the Louis- 
ville club had made on the services of 
"Tubby" Spencer, Mr. Chivington an- 
nounced that Spencer still was a mem- 
ber of the St. Paul club and that the 
Louisville club would ftave to arrange 
with St. Paul for the catcher. Mr. 
Chivington left for Chicago tonight. 



championship oaii lot ""= Chicago 
White Sox. ^ ^ 

The Grand Rapids team of the Cen- 
tral league has been transferred to 
Newark, Ohio. ^ ^ 

It is said that the Cubs are trying to 
buy Downey from the ^Cincinnati club. 

Catcher Nunamaker of the Boston 
Red Sox is out of the game with a 
badly split finger. ^ ^ 

Owen Bush o*f the Detroit Tigers is 
likeWU) lead both major leagues in ihe 
number of runs scored during this sea- 
son. ^ , ^ 

Farmer Burns, who brought Frank 
«otch to the front as a wrestler, has 
Organized a baseball team and will 
tour the Western states. 

Manager Jimmy McAleer will pick an 
all-star team to oppose the Naps in 
Cleveland in a beneht game for the 
family of Addle Joss. 

Mr. Franoeto Sanguineta Pezalo, oth- 
erwise ••Ping" Bodie, continues to clout 
the ball and play a good game in the 
field for the White Sox. 
« « • 

The National league race »s a 120- 
horse power "dingsnorter.' Chicago, 
New York. St. Louis, Philadelphia and 
Piusburg are nicely bunched and run- 
ning strong. , * « 

If Vin Campbell can gtt in condition 
he will be a great help to the Piitsbt re 
team Vin showed lots of class witB 
the Pirates last se^on.^ 

Playing with a tail-end team 'doesn't 
seem to bother Bill Sweeney of the 
RosTon Rustlers. Bill is in the game 
an the time and fighting until the last 
man is out. ^ ^ « 

"King" Cole of the Cubs has shaved 
the top of his head to keep the hair 
from falling out. And he used to be a 
barber and sen punk restorative stuft 
to his customers. ^ ^ 

Wliat a difference in the two St. 
Louis teams this season. The Cardinals 
are rigi't on the job. while the Browns 
are down so low that they have nearly 
dropped out of the American league 
■ standing. 



>m>m. 




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LATEST 





July 15. 1911 



OF THE®/ 





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o. B^itler. .St. Paul 

Pirkinl. «v.lunibu» 

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r.et.^. l!idIiiii.ipolls 

MaliUnt;. * 'oluiubu.* 

Carduff. (iWumbiw 

M.«d.l'>:<. KanjiiU City 

Ilowermmi. Ivans** City.. 

Hreeii. Milwiiuk<-e 

W. Itntler. Tdeilo 

llronklp. Tolivlo 

riiarl'X. MllwdiikM 

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.StolgLT. St. Paul 



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HOW TO LEARN TO SWIM 



Some Simple Instructions for Beginners in a Very Necessary 
Art, By Albert B. Wegener, Physical Director of Y. M. C. A. 



OOcrortn . 

a. r-* _ b 



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Pltoliern* 

Pltrlier^. flub*. 

IViyle. C olu.-ubua 

.sitton. < 'olumbuu 

K.ibiT. Slinii?:il)"lU 

ni«iO'. I.ouUvlIle 

0»«i. KMiiis* I'lty 

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t'i>Hi., Mliincip'^U* 

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I^v^ird. folumbui 

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>liinibii4 

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M iild'ix Kanaa* City 

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r;u..k. St. Paul 

P,«ckard. Columlau 

Pi'ii.iter. Mliinuiipolls • . • • 

I. Uobiiut'in. Toledo 

Smith. Mlmi'apolia 

lliloy. Cdumbus 

UToy. St. P.iul 

Swaim. Tole.lo 

I^velett. Mliiii^apolM ■■•■ 
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Mcrz. Iiidlaii.ipolln 

l,.m.ltfU. Mini.- ipolt* 

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DAD CLARKE WAS ONE OF 
GAMES RICHEST CARDS 






H-t.. I'tttsSi'irg ■ • 

O.. :,: >• I-.'UU .... 

Ball. IJjooklyn 

Bucker. llr>oklyn . . . 
W S««l. ^t Uiuls . 
Scha: It Ilro >klyn . . 
Bsrg'W. Br.^oklyn - • ■ 
E. Stet-le. Pitta.'^urg . 
Kowan. Pli;la<!rU)!iU . 
r. Snilth. Ciu..-iimall 
Fronim-?. ' bi.'iimall . 

Ainm. New Y--* 

Fefg'is.j.ii. Briton 

Mattsn-., B<!»'..>n 

Wewer. Huston 
McQuillan. Cincinnati 
H.Miii'i:. Kr -klyn ... 

p.-ni'i-' P-'i'on 

CiutU. f:-i-.H{0 

T]rl*r. II.i'--ti 



10 . 167 
5 .167 



Ten Leadi 

Pl*y-?rs. <.nu'j». 
Wiigtu'T. Pitt.sburg . . . 
f Clirk.». Pittaburg. 

Srliulte. C til. -ago 

IKiyle. New Vork 

Iwderui. PiUladelphl* 
Itagee PhLU<l<-lphla 
Bofc^Utiell Cliiclmittl 
StmrnviHiaii. Chicago 
B. MlUer, Bout >n 
liurrwy. New York. . . 



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PUyera Clubs •^ **" *' 



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DWTore. N«w T>rk 

Be»:t)>Y CliK-iniiatl ... 

Herzog. B.is'on 

Mf-rklo. .N>.T York 

^t>dgT':«. New Yark.. 
Batt«. cuictiui 111 . . . . 
lAbert. PbiU'Mplil* . . 
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li. Doyle. .New T.-)tk «* " 






Ten LeadinK Kiin-tJetterti 

Player*. Cluba. *' 

8lMCk.ir<t. CldraiBO 

M«««>. PhllidelphU 

Lolwrt. PhU.vlelplUa '•'^ *" 

Bwvore New Y^ork 

Pwichrr. ••inc.nTHtl '' 

KnaU'!. Phll.i.Klphla 

I»f)Tl«. Ni!w York 

P»,»kcrt PlUiadilpUta 

Sclmlte. C1i!m«o ^i *» 

Kootf*.. !iy St LouU 'S *" 



R 

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American League. 



v» 



PItoherj*' 

Official .\merioan le.igue 
lUVi.-! it! Th,« Honild Tiiu 
Pir -'uT*. Cluta. 

Miol eli. Detroit 

KKlUny. B'Wton 

Works. IKtroh 

Coflttgtoii. D',':r)it 

OregK. Clei.'land 

L«ntw. I>e!rT»it 

Ben.ler. .VtUls-t lea 

KraMf. AlSiletlrs 

Morgiu. A'Ulrtics 

ralkenUTg. CUjTeland 
VV.ilte. rUi'.igu 

Ford. New Y-nk 

Coombs, .\t!iiaa.» 

Plank. Aihlrtl.* 

Wal»h. Chi ago 

ItuUtn. livtrult 

W(ie<l. B ston 

BttKkutt, New Torfc 

Suniaior*. l>etr<dt 

WUlelt. Detroit 

Pnpe. B K'on 

Jolinson. Waahlngton •• 

Qtilnn. New Yur* 

OlHKitead. ChlcMO ■ • • 

Kariivr. Bo»t.m 

Kralip. « 'leireland 

Warliiip. New Yoi* 

Wail^er, Woatilngtim . . 

CiUdwell. New York 

D Y.iuiig. Clweland . . 

Utrely Uttrolt 

Batknf». cirt»eUnd ... 

rishei. N\w Yr* 

jjgimntd. .\thletloa 

lialiuu. St. Loula 

Lunge. Chicago 

HaU. ll'Jsttui 

L*kB. s:. Louia 

B. Mitchell. St. Lwula 

DuDoTun. Hetrolt 

Clfotte. Bostiin 

Vaughn. N»sw York 

8 »lt. Chicago 

Ormy, Waahlngton 

WoBl. CleTtdaivl 

Rughe.«. Waahlngton . 
W. James. Cleveland . 
I Yotiiig. Chl<Nigo . . 
W. MlUhell. ClMcUnd 

P«Itjr. St. Louis 

£. ColUaa, Boatoa ... 



Iterordn. 

!mt!l2ig average* were 
r*Uy. „ 

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. 545 

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.500 

. 500 

.500 

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.453 

.444 

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.400 

.400 

.385 

.373 

.375 

.364 

.333 

.333 

.333 

.333 

.331 

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.300 



W H (Dad) Cli.rke. once one of the 
star' pitchers of he National league. 
5vho heard the Inal decision in the 
game of life a f..w weeks ago when 
thp Great Umplrs called bun at a 
Lorain Ohio. ho.«pltal. where he had 
been an inmate for some time, sul- 
terlng from a par tlytic shock, was one 
of the characters of the game, as well 
as one of the b .st twTrlers in the 

'^ircli"rke.''jou. tt Meekln and Amos 
Rusie the New \ ork team had a trio 
of pitchers the oqual of any in the 
country. .^ ^ _ .j.. »j_. 

During the war between the Na- 
tional league aid the Brotherhood 
Clarke was eagerly sought by teams 
in both leagues. Out the Omaha Neb 
club where he ^as playing at tne 
time, would not »; Ive him up. 

with Charles Nichols, who was the 
star with the 1 »cal National league 
team for several years, and Phil Knell, 
who was with t:ie PhilaJelphia Play- 
ers league team m 18K0. and Clarke as 
boxmen. the Om tha team landed the 
Western league p mnant In IbSa clarKe 
at the time wa.s the most valuable man 
of the trio, having officiated in nfty- 
two games in which he sustained but 
few defeats. -say:, the Traveler 

Ha remained in Omaha until 1S93 
when he was ti ansf erred to trie or 
the Eastern league. Hig work there 
was so satisfactory that New iork 
purchased his re ease. 

In 1«94 he male his big league de- 
but with New Y )rk. pitching in three 
games two of wilch he lost. It wasn t 
an auspicious entry for a minor league 
star, but Dad was game and didn t 
give tile losses iiuch thought. 
Baffled the TraHeni- 
The next seast n he was a marvel in 
the box. His success, however, was 
chletly against the second division 
teams. These aggregations were fairly 
hypnotized bv lad. He succeeded in 
winning 18 out of the 3:: games he 
twirled in. . _^ <a ^s 

In 1896 he pitched 43 games. 18 OT 
which he won. He fell off badly in 
189T, getting but three opportunities to 

^' \X the conclu 4ion ol the season of 
1S97 N^w York gave him his release. 
From there he went to Chicago, where 
he officiated in but one game. About 
this time hla aim went back on him 
and he became a drifter. 

Clarke was a heady fellow and he 
joshed many a star and pulled many 
a. clever trick off during his career. 

When Fred Teiney of the local Rust- 
lers first broke into the major league 
company he ran against Dad. who 
then was pitching In Gotham. Fred 
had just gradu:ited from Bro5vn uni- 
versity and ha. a fine crop of hair 
^uch as is woin by college players. 
Clarke tipped lils teammates that he 
would have some fun with Tenney be- 
fore the «ai"^..^*'*»,,'*\*'"-nart- as the 

••Sav there yelled Dad, as tne 

ex-Brown man walked to the bench 

-you college-br*d g">'- ^'^ .?" ^ 
cut that hair of and look nice f 

Tenney turnel Quickly around to 
Cllrke and^ ta dng hold of the lat 
ter'g collar, ex.dalmed after stowing 
a piece of tooac co under his tongue: 

•If you are talking to me. you cheap 
duck. I'll t.Ke you under the grand 
stand after the game and make >ou 
look like a bag of salt'" 

That was too much for Clarke, -who 
was never kn. wn to fight anybody; 
and as Tenney walked off, Daa, 
after recovering his breath, growled. 

"College bred eh? Why. that fellow 
never went to night school." 
Golf}- -^mbltloaa. 

In 1897 Dad made the hit of his 
life in New Yoik. He caught the golf 
fever and purcdased all the parapher- 
nalia. Dad in the garb of a High- 
lander was a tight to behold as he 
roamed over t le Polo grounds In a 
Korgeous plaid and with a caddy w^ho 
was equally as boisterous in dress as 
Ills master. ^ ..,.._* 

It was Dad's ambition to break into 
society circles in Manhattan Island, 
and he deemed It nece.ssary to first be- 
come proficient as a golf player before 
he advanced toward the elite of Fittn 

p Y g j\ )j ^ 

While Dad wis learning to play golf 



in 1S97 he coniia.ted a had eoM on the 

\:^Xtl^^. f tfte?" hls^^ttU g 
?.^^ t^'^n^clill^X'^nel >e ct/'e^ wiuVffs 
exercises Dad did. and the heavy coU 
resulted A physician was called and 
Dad tofd him what he had done 

Th.» medle.) thumped his ', hest in 
the'e-u.s?oniary manner ,?' "-^^^^J^Tf 

V^. ai-e^nt '"^r'^efut' this 'J^ld^ wll^-bi-^ 
come serious. It Is on your lungs 




MAJORS ARE 
GOlNG^BAa 

Few Star Players Available 

for the Big League 

Teams. 






"°md was thunderstruck, but l»e re- 
irnlned his composure ju.st as quicKij, 
^nd then came back In his iovial_way : 
•Why. what do you mean. Doc.— that 
my wind pads are on the bum? 

The way In which Dad doped out 
hlJow^ condition brought a ^mlle to 
til doctor's face, and at the sanie flme 
the players who were present couldn t 
repress their mirth. A loud laugh fol- 
low vni that went some distance In 
cheering Dad up. 

Futile Carve. 

This same year he was credited with 
Having invented a new raise ball Hut 
Dad could not make good with it. only 
in practice. He would start the sphere 
whirling as if it were ««»»« J-^^t<{,7'^ 
but there wasnt enough o'-^'^«yV^ing 
on it to deceive the batter. It was the 
opinion of many of his fellow-players 
that he injured his arm trying to per- 

■'c»ncS Did 't;fok'a trip to New Orleans 
He looked the city over and declared 
that It was the queerest place he ever 
saw He talked about the place often 
and' told many a funny story about 
the town. One which he recently told 
follows: ^ _ „ „ 

•Several years ago, when I was a 
rube m a one-night stand ba team I 
paid a visit to the Crescent city. Ihe 
HtUens kept telling me they were 
proud of their leading cenjetery which 
u.-^ed to be a race track. I was rather 
struck on it myself. It covers more 
ground than Herman Long used to 
when chasing flies. 

"That graveyard in New Orleans is 
looked upon as one of the most inter- 
esting spots In the town. Abner Powell. 
then captain of the New Orleans tejim. 
.showeil me all over It and told me how 
"the race hor.<;es ran over the very 
ground that was transformed into a 
rltv of the dead. Somehow, the place 
reminded me of my sporty days on the 
race track. 'Abner.' said I to Abner 
Powell, 'this place certainly 
race track — you're next to 
dead ones when you're here 
Kaew the Annwrr. 
During his career. Dad was with a 
manager who had a bug on lectures 
and theories. One day that manager 
railed the members of the aggregation 
together in the club dressing room and 
catechised one player after the other 
on certain conditions and plays trat 
came up during a game. Finally '>« 
came to Dad. 

•Now Mr. Clarke, you understand 
what I "am trying to get at." said the 
manager. '"I do,' said Dad in his quiet 
way. "Well, If you were pitching and 
there were two out. three men on base.s 
and three balls and two strike."* on the 
man at the bat, who was a terrific hit- 
ter what would you do?" 

Dad hesitated before replying. He 
was debating with himself whether or 
not a fine would ensue the answer to 
the hypothetical question that had been 
put up to him. 

••What would T do? ' said Dad, repeat. 
Ing the question. "Well, in that case, 
I think I'd have a rush of hair to the 
head." 

That was the last meeting of the 
players, for the manager turned on his 
heel at the replv and walked out of the 
club quarters "heartily disgusted at 
Clarke's behavior. The players' faces 
•were wreatlied in smiles, while Dad 
was as sober as a Judge who had a 
capital case to decide. 



recall.s a 
so many 



PCPCR'S 



TRUE SMOKE 

TOBAOCX>. 
•A man who ■nwkM True Smoke eaU better, 
thinks better. sleep* better— that ■ trua. 



We are now at the time of year 
when everyone desires outdoor recrea- 
tion. 

Swimming is not merely a recrea- 
tion, but a necessity. A prominent 
business man of Duluth told the writer 
that he considered It the duty of every 
parent to teach hl.s children to swim 
as much as anything else, but not hav- 
ing the time and patience to teach his 
timid son he had to seek the held of 
a professional director. At first the 
boy was so frightened that he could 
rot be induced to let go the edge of 
the tank even with a belt and rope 
attachment about his waist. In a 
month's time he could swim with eas.-;. 
That parent did hi.s duty even though 
he could not teach the boy himself. 

Swimming ought to be an obligatory 
subject In the public schools. No 
normal child should be allowed to pass 
through the grammar or grade schools 
without learning this most u.seful art. 
A public swimming pool Is needed 
for this purpose, but if the school 
boarfl would take this matter up It 
could make satisfactory arrangements 
with the Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. 
C. A. 

Thi.s would not only be more valu- 
able than the few callsthenlc exercises 
they are now taught, but be more en- 
joyable to the pupils. 

Every boy and girl wants to be- 
come a duck at this season of the year. 
There l.s no one exercise that Is so 
beneficial from the health standpoint 
a.s .swimming. It is the best tonic 
kno5vn. 

But I need not waste any time try- 
ing to convince the normal person that 
swimming Is both healthy and useful. 
The thing that he Is most concerned 
about Is how to learn to swim? 

What shall I do on the start? How 
shall I move my arms and legs? How 
shall I hold my head? How shall I 
breathe? etc. 

Although a person may be said to be 
able to swim If he can keep afloat and 
paddle about a little In any old fash- 
Ion, yet lie cannot claim to know the 
art of swimming unless he can swim 
one or more of the standard .strokes. 
Where Help Is Keeded. 
Here is where many need help. Any- 
one coming from the East or South Is 
surprised at the few who can swim 
at all and of the fewer still who can 
swim a well recognized stroke. The 
awkward double kick that so many 
have Is a surprise to a newcomer. I 
often wonder if some one with more 
enthusiasm than knowledge has not 
been trying to teach them to swim like 
a frog. 

If there Is one thing to refrain from 
doing it Is not to try to swim like a 
frog. The frog swims with a back- 
ward kick with both legs that Is both 
jerky and awkward. 

The Ntrokca. 
The standard strokes are: 

1. The alternate overarm stroke. 

2. Thfj crawl stroke. 

5. The breast stroke. 
4. The side stroke. 
B. The trudgeon stroke. 

6. The back stroke. 
The easiest stroke to learn as far 

as the motions are concerned Is the 
back stroke (swimming on the back) 
but beginners are too much frightened 
to assume this position In the water 
to place It the first on the list to be 
taught. 

Until recently the stroke that was 
universally taught first was the breast 
stroke. But this is a difficult stroke, 
perhaps the most difficult, but it Is so 
even and pretty when well executed 
that It must always remain an Import- 
ant stroke for ordinary pleasure swim- 
ming, one which I believe should still 
be first to be learned by ladles. 

But for men and boys, to whom 
speed and utility Is or greater Import- 
ance than elegance the best stroke to 
begin with Is the alternate overarm 
.stroke. This is Just like the crawl 
stroke, that Iftteat aod fastest stroke 



known, except that the face is held up 
in place of under the water. 

The .\lternate Overarm Stroke. 

This l.s not an elegant movement, but 
is the easiest learned. 

The arms move alternately forward 
in a circular manner. When one arm 
is down deep in the water the other 
one Is being brought forward high out 
of the water. It is much like a wind- 
mill motion. The arms are heia 
straight or nearly so throughout the 
movement. In starting to learn It the 
learner should keep the arras straight, 
although in the correct style the arms 
are .slightly bent. The reason for this 
is that If the learner tried to bend 
them a little he usually bend them too 
much. This can be avoided by the 
straight arm movement. Naturally tne 
body rolls from side to side as the arms 
are brought first high out of the water 
then low down In the water. 

At first it Is best to practice this 
arm movement 'on land, standing 
with body bent forward as shown in 
the accompanying illustrations. After 
a few minutes land drill the learner 
should put on the belt and »"«■ ap- 
paratus and be held horizontally In 
the water while practicing the arm 
movement (see Illustration). 

Up to this time no attention need be 
given to the legs except to hold them 
Straight back and together or near- 
each other, but after a lesson or two 
with the belt, using the arms only, 
then the legs may be used. . ^, . . ^^ 
At first the leg movement should be 
tried without the arm movement, "ihe 
leg movement is simple and consists 
merely of holding the legs near each 
other and extended backward, and al- 
Uinately bend knee and straighten 
again. Be careful not to bend the 
knee too much. There should be no 
beni at the hip jolnt.s The feet mus 
not be lifted more than a foot from 
the straight leg position. 

Don't be too vigorous with the kicK. 
There Is not much propelling power In 
the kick. Most of the work In propell- 
ling is done by the arms wlhel the legs 
merely kick a Httle to keep them up 
near the surface of the water. 

After a lesson Iri which the leg 
movements are perfected then the 
learner Is readv to try the combination 
of arms and legs still In the harness 
with the belt and rope attachment. 

In this the learner must be careful 
not to work too fast: a steady easy 
stroke and kick Is better than the 
jerky rapid movement always made by 

'"''fluris' one of the worst faults in 
beginners, they thrash about and work 
like stea^ engines, thinking "neces- 
sary to move as fast as possible. If 
thev would but stop a moment to ob- 
.serve a good swimmer they would see 
that all his movements are long, slow, 
and graceful. , , , _ *„ 

No attention need be given to 
rhythm of movement between the arms 
and legs. They need not work In 
unison. They may work absolutely In- 
dependently of each other. Some swim- 
mers make one kick to one arm move- 
ment, others make two or more very- 
small kicks, or "Wiggles/' for often 
the kicks are no more than a sma.i 
wavy motion. _. ^i. i. _ 

After a lessson or two with the har- 
ness the swimmer is ready to put on 
a pair of water wings, (25 cents at 
sporting goods dealers) and then 
practice in shallow water until the 
stroke Is learned; after a few lessons 
the air can be partly let out of the 
wings. This gradually weakens so 
that he depends less on the artificial 
support. But at first he needs it. 
".Swim or Drown." 

I have no sympathy with the opin- 
ion many people have of throwing 
the learner out Into deep water and 
••make him swim or drown. borne 
have learned to swim by this cruel 
method, but more have been so fright- 
ened that they never tried to swim 
afterward. There Is no sense In It. 

A very Important part in learning to 



swim is to get accustomed to getting 
the head under water and allowing the 
water as it will, to get Into the ears 
and nose. This is really the hardest 
thing to get accustomed to. but even 
before the belt and line are put on the 
beginner should take several lessons In 
ducking his head under water and 
raising head above water and breathe, 
without the necessity of using his 
hands to wipe the water from eyes or 
face or ears. . .^ 

One never sees an expert stop to 
wipe his face. He breathes easily 
through the mouth, and when he 
wishes to breathe through the nostrils 
he simply first blows the water out of 
them. Of course, in an » Indoor tariK 
thi.s and expectoration of all kinds 
should not be done in the water, but In 
a trough provided for that purpose. 

The temperature of the water Is Im- 
portant. If cool, one should remain 
only a short time. In any case one 
.should come out and dress when he 
begins to feel cold. Beware of stand- 
ing around out of water in the wind 
when wet. 




FINNERAN AND RIGLER. 
There promises to be quite a lively 
controversy over the affair in Phila- 
delphia, when Sberwood Magee, the 
star left fielder of the Phillies, strtick 
Umpire Flnneran on the face, cutting 
a deep gash on the cheek bone and 
sending the arbitrator to the hospital. 
Magee claims that Flnneran ^chal- 
lenged him to fight and called him 
names. Flnneran denies this and says 
he is going to have Magee set down. 
President Fogel of the Phillies says 
that be will fight the case to a finish 
and if they punish Magee they will 
have to punish Flnneran. President 
Lynch says he is going to stop this 
sort of thing In the National league. 
He fined and suspended Magee. 



Minors Are in Some Instances 

as Strong as the 

Majors. 



New York. July 15. — Whatever the 
moguls of baseball may tell y »u. re- 
gardless of how tliey may buost their 
own game, there l.s one thing that 
stands out notoriously as an undeni- 
able fact — the big leagues are going 
back. 

Where a few years ago — yea. ona 
year ago — t'nere was a wealth of ca- 
i able men for each position on the dia- 
mond, when top-notch ball was being 
played bv at least half the loams In 
both leagues, there Is very little of 
the first-caliber article being displayed 
in the majors now. The conJitions lu 
the National league find their dupli- 
cate in tlie American. And the line of 
demarcation that logically sliould dia- 
tlnguisli the two larger organizatlom* 
from the little fellows is now fainter 
than ever. 

The minors have come up with a 
rush. There is no getting away from 
the fact that the real stats ot tho 
minors were let out by the big leagues. 
It breaks the heart of a major league 
magnate to have to back a player who 
has been banished because, in the mag- 
nate's opinion, the man had become a 
has been. Result — the good ones stay 
where they have been sent, and the 
minor league club is in consequen'o 
almost If not quite as strong as tho 
hig league outfit that is missing out 
because of the narrowness of false 
pride of its leader. , . . , 

Who would be willing to lay 1>) to 1 
that a team like tlie St. Louis Browns 
or the Boston Rustlers could l)eat Co- 
lumbus of the American association? 
Not many. At best It would be even 
money whereas even these tail-enders 
should, in the natural order of things, 
1)6 lop-heavy favorites over any team 
the minors could put forward. 

One thing that strikes tlie veteran 
fan this year Is the tremendous differ- 
ences between the stars and the rest 
of the bunch. The good ones look bet- 
ter and tlie bad ones worse. And there 
are more of the latter getting away 
with the Uicrative berths than ever be- 
fore. It is the contract 'hat makes tha 
good ones look better. The few really 
high-class men — anil they can bo 
counted on your lingers and toes — are 
made by the comparisi>n to look like 
veritable man-mountains. 

Some of the tioods. 
Ty Cobb is the goods. .So is Eddie 
Collins, likewise Magee. Wagner. 
Cha.se, Bre.snahan. Joe Jackson. Kling. 
Mclnnis. Byrne. Gibson. Grant. Hof- 
man. Speaker, Crawford Chiei Myers. 
Bodie and a few others. These men are 
all gems of the first water, equal to 
the top-liners of other days. But 
where tliere are a dozen now there 
were fifty then. This leaves out the 
pitchers. The genuine star tlingers in 
the two leagues at present number 
rarely a half dozen. 

Mathewson once more looms up as 
the most consistently effective twirler 
In the game. Russell Ford of his 
rival New York club is about the next 
best in captivity. Ed Walsh of the 
White Sox is again performing like a 
champion, as also is young Adams of 
the Pirates. Walter Johnson, the back- 
bone of the Washington Americans, la 
another live one. and Harry Saliee. 
the elongated southpaw of the St. 
Louis Cardinals, is doing great work. 
Old Cy Young of Cleveland is also still 
a flr-st-rater. But beyond these few. 
it would be hard to name any one who 
can honestly be placed in the best bet 
division. There are several heavers 
winning games with comparative reg- 
ularity, who bask In refiected glorv. 
earned by their teammates in the field 
and at bat. Among tliese might be 
mentioned such men as Earl Moore. 
Howard Camnltz, Ed Reulbach. Miner . 
Brown and George Mullin — all of them 
passable twirlers. but not the wondera 
that would be indicated bv their per- 
centages of victories. There are sev- 
eral dozen just or nearly as good, and 
some better ones who own marks far 
less Impressive. But. after taking a 
look over the whole bunch, you are 
forced to concede that the ultching has 
retrograded more within the last year 
probably than any other department 
of the game. You cant blame It all 
on the lively ball. ^^ ^ ,, . ..^ 

The law of rise and ebb holds forth 
In baseball t!ie same as it does in all 
other things. It may be that next year 
will witness one of the greatest sea- 
sons In the history of the national pas- 
time, and such would not be contrary 
to precedent. Often a bad season is 
followed the very next year by one 
completely the rever.se. 

If the magnates could forget all 
this personal pride thing and would 
admit a mistake when they see they 
were wrong, we might have some old 
familiar faces cavorting around the 
green again. But if there is a more 
egotistical animal in the world than 
a baseball manager It has never been 
put Inside a cage. ... 

Frank Chance saw clearly his error 
In letting .Stelnfeldt go. There was a 
constant weeping and wailing anH 
gnashing of teeth in St. Louis for 
many moons after the demoralization 
of the Browns when McAleer turnefl 
loose the men who almost landed a 
pennant for him In 1908. Those same 
mdividuals, Hobe P^rrls and Jimmy 
Williams, went to Minneapolis of the 
American association, and delivered a 
class of goods that far surpassed any- 
thing the new Brownies displayed. 
And even today they are good enough 
for any man s team. But they stay 
burled, so far as tlie Hon. Hedges and 
his lieutenant on the field. Wallace, are 
concerned. Dozens of other such cases 
could be cited, all going to show 
where the builders of teams have ac- 
complished negative results by their 
desire to Infuse new and young blood 
into their teams. Tlielr overanxlety to 
make good has worked their disaster. 

The young fellows are all right, they 
are necessary. However, the gambling 
chance of picking up a possible star 
has caused the passing of many a 
great warrior of the diamond who fell 
from the good graces of his boss dur- 
ing a temporary slump in his work. 
The scouting for the youngsters has 
degenerateil into a mad scramble. A 
manager gets a tip that such an dsuch 
a youth is playing good ball, and h« 
grabs the $5,000 beauty before he can 
begin to know what Is In him. ^ine- 
tenths of the expensive purchases ot 
the last few vears have turned out to 
be lemons of the rankest sort. Their 
work that caught the scout's eye was 
but a flash in the pan. But. every 
time a new one was taken on. a vet- 
eran had to go — a man who often had 
several years of good baseball left \m 
him. 



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16 



Saturday, 



HE DULUTH HERALD 




July 15, 1911. 



LATEST 



OF THE 




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DAY 



: 



^^ 




THE PERCY RAPE 

No. 2. 

Being Some Modern Sport Fables Sy 





iKROY ANI> CL.ARKN* li 
WKAKSIi^TEH were 

.U.;idly rivals in the 
hfiit^a game of love. 

Sweei love bubbled in 
I i. chest of Ftrse like 
.1 jjeyser showing off 
:..r a lot of Yellowftono 
park visitors, and though I'erty wore 
evoirlasses as thick as the glass in a 
show case, the love light beat its w.ay 
through them and wired gurgling 
mess-ag.-s and mutely bore witness 
that IVrse had been beaned by one 
of Cujiid s high f.ast ones. 

All ..f the members of the Rah Rah 
AthlftU turi) were very htavy for the 
Blants that tame from the deep brosvn 
Tungsttn headlights that glowed from 
the fair and open face of Madeline 
Mulvetney. Give V,?:iU3 those arm.^ 
that joets have roeted about and all 



practice men deplored the loPts of. and 
Madeline Mulveeney could start ai 
scratch with her in any figure race 
and breeze under the wire looking over 
her shapely slioulder. . 

Mr.dge has thrice the conventional 
wealth^ of raven locks, and continuing 
along the line of material iis'^-^t^, '» 
miKl-.t be said that even if Pa Mul- 
veeney siarled in life with a cant hook 
In one hand :ind a package of Peerless 
In the other he owned two lumber 
comi-anies. was the final shriek at ths 
mteilng of the ftTces of sever;;! banks, 
and no one ever thought of saying a 
Word If he ate with his knife and held 
a dialogue with the consomme. 

Pcrst was one of these cold creatures 
you sometimes see left in the auto- 
mobile to play with the pomeranian 
while mamma goes in to have a spool 
of tliread sent out to the house by 
8peci.ll .ielivcry. He had a haughty 
look and the post no bills sign was 
pasted across his face. His lane of 
good'ellowship had had a gate nailed 
across ii and grass liad grown knee 
high. He was hard to approach fi>r 
his drawbridge wa.s .always closed. His 
amile was about as healthy as an over- 
ripe banana that had been run over 
by a seven-passenger Packard, it was 
BQuasiiy, like the fallen fruit. 

This Madeline charm display wasn t 
strong fur fudge and fldos. She was 
the kind of a girl who could go out 
in the big dewv and delicious morn- 
ing and J. lay a set of tennis against 
any healthy masculine who had the 
price of a flannel suit. After that she 
might go riding on the geegees and 
later In the day try her hand at golf. 
In the evening at the dance, partners 
would be so thick around her that a 
Bimpte minded stranger might be par- 
don.,! for believing someone was tell- 
ing a story with three fast breaks. 
I>erry*s Problem. 
This is what Percy and Clarence 
"Weaksisler. seized upon as an excuse 
to be sentimental, mopey. and to do a 
general catch-as-catch can wresting 
match with the spring poets and her 
photograph that they had cut out of 
the evening paper. 

Percv reallv never had an idea. He 
would "chase one around the ring of 
consecutive thought for a couple of 
rounds, would spar for an opening. 
back it into a corner and swing, only 
to flnri that the idea had sidestepped or 
ducked and had escaped injury. 

Clarence Weaksister was of the same 

feneral tj-pe and to Ijoot had nervous 
Istractlon and the asthmJ. 
If Madeline Mulveeney had been a 
roan she would have been captain of 
the football team and licked all the 
policemen that were assigned to cam- 
pus dutv. She had a constitution like 
Tom Sharkey's, only hers was more 
cultivated and Tom had been allowed 
to run wild. She was very dafydil 
about this athletic thing, and when 
the rah rah active members won cups 
and meadals for strong-limbed en- 
deavor. Miss Madge was in an auto- 
mobile shouting ain't he grand stuff. 

All of which raised the greenatls 
grermatis of envy in the narrow gauge 
•ystems of Percy and Clarence Weak- 
sister. Brea'. 'ng a slender cane, which 
he was able. In his lavender gloved 
hands, Perse gritted his gold filled and 
hissed one of those child Harold 
speeches from the back seat of mam- 
ma's tonneau. Fortunately no one 
heard him and the sun shone on and 
the ilay was beautiful 

Clarence "Weaksister. the sly rascal, 
through blue smoked glasses watched 
the bronzed brutes run their heads off. 
with a jealousy so strong that It 
turned three handsprings and a double 
flp-flop. also saw handsome Madge 
Mulveeney do the big whoop act and 
clasp In a combination of muscular 
enth islasm and higher ethical move- 
ment, her hands stitched In neatly 
in swell suedes. 

One time Percy had met the swell 
hit of the Mulveeney mansion and the 
next dav had asked some of the gang 
If her father was In the ice business. 
He had a perfect right for thinking 
thusly, and yet faint hope sicked on 
by Percy's ego, which he led around 
on a chain and fed frequently on false 
promises and feminine looks that were 



1-^ tended lor someone -Iso, crawled to 
ts feel at the count ol nine and wh.s 
.ereU in Percys ear to go in and play 
one of tho-e dashing ^evll parts. 

Overlooking for the time being that 
dashing Madeline forgot for the once 
"ml several times to recognize either 
Percv or Clarence \V. aksister at the 
semi-annual liUl of t^.- Itaii Bah c luK 
and leaving Percy to ^lt sadly l'»a>»"P 
hide and seek with a grouch on one 
of the Louie the quln '.e chairs out in 
the cloakroom we mus-t also pass over 
brieflv the period whe i Perse was to d 
by the bronze brute who danced six 
dances with Miss Mulv.-enty. that Clar- 
ence Weal.sister was rapping his rep 
at the batting avera^re of .4iS. sug- 
gesting that Perse challenge Clarence 
to oppose him at th ! next amateur 
bouts of the Pah Hah t lub. 

Tralnrd Faltlifully. 
Cutting across the 'awn of idle de- 
scription we must f >r the sake of 
avoiding pathos and also In an en- 
deavor to save space, c nly briefly state 
that Perse trained fathfully for two 
weeks with a rough j.nd uncouth per- 
son who before becom ng a pal of John 
Barlevcorn. used to really accept monev 
for beating human b-ings. This guy 
recognized in Perse a meal ticket and 
therefore told falseho.>ds to Percy re- 
eardlnfr his punch and other attributes, 
sti. king Perse for pin noney to spear a 
drink after each playful romp with 
the pillows. , 

Like Joes place on the square, and 
vet in many ways unlike it. the Rah K.ah 
"gymnasium was crowded on the night 
of tiie amateur bout*, for be it told 
'hat suVcribers of the village blue book 
considered it quite trie th"ng to as- 
semble at the bouts as the athletes 
wore sleeveless shirts and wh.te duck 
trousers and parted tl eir names in the 

Therefore when the • called for Percy 
and Clarence Weaksi Uer and Perse 
was dragged through the ropes, scout- 
ing for composure ar.d sending wire- 
less messages for coi tideme. It mig.it 
have been one of then ere coincidences 
or a little practical . oke of fate that 
Madeline Mulveeney. iressed in every- 
thing but the cook s ove and a sweet 
picture hat, sat two rows back with 
the younger sister of the bronze brute. 
Pale but deterininetl, Clarence W eak- 
sister entered the arena. His knces 
trembled and his cointenance played 
tag from hectic Hushes to pasty pale- 
ness. But Clarence Weaksister had .a 
foxy guv for a second, and he called 
Clarence Weaksisteis attention to 
Percy Thus, in a sm ill way. was con- 
fidence caged and brought over to 
Clarence Ueaksiste 's corner. For 
frozen-faced misery Percy had the 
Spiiinx looking like Eva Tanguay 
singing "1 Don't Caie." 

They put on the boxing gloves and 
Percy made the first iiad break by try- 
ing to scoop some w&ter from the bot- 
tom of the pail to « ool his steaming 
brow. The bell rang and both boys 
tried to shake hands with the referee, 
merely to receive one pleasant smile 
in the midst of doom. 

After shaking han« » both Percy and 
Clarence Weaksister got as far awav 
from each other as p> sslble. for though 
there was love's bitter malice doing 
a dress parade before their glowering 
orbs, fear had spurs m and was riding 
furiously on the heroic hobbles of the 

^'Thly^'^fefnted and went^ through 
enough Delsarte an 1 calisthenics 



He rides with the batter and usually is 
in the right spot after the ball. He has 
studied all the famous batters and 
knows where each and every douter 
has a tendency to hit. This is one of 
the things that gof* »» m&lie a player 
famous. 

Being fast of foot. Bodie can cover 
any amount of ground either forward 
or backward, and has made many sen- 
«<ational one-hand spears while going 
full speed with the ball this season. 
Outside of Cobb, he can go back for 
a drive further than any man in the 



And what a whip Bodie has! He can 
peg from a deep field right to the p ate 
on a dead line and can throw the ball 
from anv angle. He is very fast in 
getting away, and never has to wind 
up for the longest peg. 

On the bases he is an exceptionall> 
fa.st man for one so heavy, for I tng 
probably tips the beam around the I90 
mark, although rather short of stature. 
He hasn't perfected the knack of get- 
ting the lump on the pitcher yet, but 
I>uffv, a great base runner himself, is 
sure" to Impart his own knowledge to 
Ping before the season is over. 

But Bodie is not the only outfielder 
of class that the White Sox possess 
this season. "Come-Back" Jimmy Cal- 
lahan and Matty Mclntyre are playing 
grand ball. It Is this great trio that 
are keeping the Windy City team up in 
the race. 

Did JeuniugH Errf 

For once It looks as though Hughy 
Jennings made a fatal mistake when 
he let Mclntvre drift from the Detroit 
pasture. Mclntyre is clouting well 
over the .300 mark and fielding his po- 
sition In grand fashion. 

Callahan has upset all the dope by 



making good after a six-year lay-off. 
Although a grand ball player when he 
quit .cirganlzed ball to manage a semi- 
professional team in Chicago, critics 
figured that he would do a JeiTries. 
But never in his long career on the 
diamond has Callahan played such ball 
as he has this season. 

He started off hitting around the .350 
point and hasnever shown any signs or 
dropping down. And he is one of tne 
heaviest clouters in the business. 
Doubles, triples and homers are almo.st 
as common with him as lone base 
smites. 

While Jimmy's arm is not as good as 
it was ten or a dozen years ago. his 
throwing hasn't cost the White box a 
single run so far this season. A.s a 
fielder, there are none better. He can 
cover almost any amount of ground, 
and is equaily as clever on shortstop 
iipears as on soarers. He judges a bail s 
flight perfectly. 

In Bodie. Mclntyre and Callahan, 
Comiskey has about the cleverest out- 
fielJ in the American league, although 
many will claim that Crawford, Cobb 
and Jones are a better combination. 
At any rate, it is a toss up between 
them right now. 

Connie Mack has a clever garden, 
too. in Lord. Murphy and Oldring. and 
so has Boston in Speaker, Lewis and 
Hooper. Also Hal Chase has three 
swell fielders In Cree, Daniels and 
VS'olters 

But the fact that the White Sox for- 
merly were supposed to be very weak 
outside the infield, makes the Windy 
City aggregation look all the better. 
The two rejuvenated veterans and an 
early developed youngster have fairly 
set the baseball world on fire.. 




WORK OF BRESNAHAN 

KEEPS CARDINALS UP 



to 
head of 




lovelv until some rude person 
back of the hall yelled, with raucoiis 
voice and Intense earnestness, that 
when the Willies w nt the entertain- 
ment might proceed uninterrupted, 
"''in an kindness th, referee who was 
on speaking acquain ance with both or 
the boy's mothers, popped the exer- 
cises and announcea that the aebate 
had been called a draw. I* "T'f.^^.^^ 
entirely aside, but it was r^PorJ^^,^*;^^ 
Madeline Mulveeney remarked that the 
Rah Rah club was sure ptitting on , 



«BV W. S. FARXSWOilTH.) 

New York. July 15.— Roger F. Bres- 
nahan. behemoth of St. Louis. Mo.. an<i 
surrounding country! That title U 
richly deserved by the man who is 
considered the most expensive human 
baseball chattel of all times. Roger 
I'atrick is at present being idolized 
and lionized by St. Louis fandom, and 
any one who can wedge his way into 
the heart of the Missouri sport fratern- 
ity, the like of which there is not. 
from a critical standpoint, has earned 
his spurs. ^ .1. 

Roger Patrick Bresnahan, be it 
known, is manager of the St. Louis 
Cardinals. For years the team has 
been in the mire In the National league 
standing, and until last year It was 
looked upon by all strong teams as 
being in the league for the sole pur- 
toee of Increasing their percentage. 
The Cardinals, ever despl«ed by their 
stronger sisters, appear to have reached 
the tether of their stepping-stone pro- 
cllvitles, and are in the slashing race 
this year with hands, feet and whole 
anatomy. , _. _ 

This narrative deals with Roger P. 
Bresnahan. and 1 have picked out the 
superb showing of the Cardinals as a 
means of serving to show why Roger 
should be eulogized. 

Third Vear With Team. 
The splendid work of the Cardinals 
Is due mainly to Bresnahan — both to 
his personality and his ability as a 
baseball general. Before Roger toon 
hold of the "Show Me " crowd, St. Louis 
was a habitual occupant of the cellar 
position In the National league. It 
is a well-known fact that it takes sev- 
eral years to whip a championship 
team Into line. Bresnahan has had 
hold of the St. Loulsans for two whole 
years. This Is Roger's third year as 
manager. During the first two years 
of Bresnahan's regime, the Cardinals 
fared rather poorly, though not as 
badly as in previous years. Bresna- 
han lacked ^he material, and tne 
shrewdest manager in the world can 
do nothing with a team of crude play- 
ers But Bresnahan possessed two or 
three players that were real ball play- 
ers. And he formed a nucleus of this 
trio and built his team around them. 
He 'picked up new players right along, 
until now he has about the youngest 




FIRST ROUND 
IS FINISHED 

Good Progress Is Being Made 

in Boat Club Tennis 

Tourney. 

Dinwiddie Is the First Player 

to Reach the 

"Eights." 



The preliminary round in the tennis 
tournament at the Duluth Boat club has 
been played off and a number of games 
in the first round are being played 
daily. 

The event is getting down now to 
where the games will be close and hard 
fought. Most of the games in the pre- 
liminary and first rounds were won by 

large scores. ^ . ^ ^ 

The players now left In the tourna- 
ment are the older and more experi- 
enced men. Many of the contests froni 
now until the finish of the tournament 
will provide good amusement for those 
who like to watch a good tennis game. 
The semi finals will probably be 
reached next week. There is always 
much interest in the final ganies each 
vear and spectators turn out m large 
r.umbers for them. Only three matches 
have been played In the doubles. 

The standing of the players showing 
the results of the first round, follows: 
Flr«t Round. 2nd Round. 3rd Round. 
W. Kennedy 
F. Maher 

Le Lure 
Hastings 

Gude 
La Bell 

Grady 
Heimbach 

Beecher 
Mullin 

Becker 

Amundson 

R. J. Davis 
Llbby 

Washburn 
Chinnick 

Dickerman 
McBride 

Gardner 
De Witt 



end, unless they can show something 
this year. Jimmv McAleer, the man- 
ager of the Washington Senators, is 
now being persecuted because he has 
been unable to produce a winning com- 
bination for Washington, and Clarke 
Griffith is undergoing the same kind 
of treatment in Cincinnati, because his 
leadership of the Reds has been a fail- 
ure. 

Can't Turn Out Wlnnerw. 
Both of these men have had long 
and useful careers on the diamond as 
players, but they have never been suc- 
cesses as managers for some reason 
or other. All these men would have 
to do to win favor with the fans in 
their cities would be to get a first 
division team, hut that seems out of 
the reach of either of them. Both of 
them are getting the second oppor- 
tunities to make good as managers, 
and both of them are falling down be- 
of a combination of circum- 
over which they have no 



cause 

stances 

power 

Judgment in running their teams 
mav have something to do with the 
failure of the Senators and the Reds, 
but Griffith and McAleer are not to 
blame because they cannot get win- 
ning plavers. No team that has a star 
is willing to part with him. Last fall 
Griffith made one of the biggest trades 
that was ever made in baseball when 
he traded Lobert, Paskert, Beebe and 
Rowan to Philadelphia for Grant, 
Bates, McQuillen and Moren, but the 
trade has been the biggest knock that 
Griffith ever has made in his career, 
because all of the men he traded to 
the Phillies have made good, while the 
men he got in return have been unable 
to bolster up his team. 

Lobert was unable to play good ball 
in Cincinnati for some unknown rea- 
sons, but he is burning up the grass 
around third for the Phillies this year, 



and Paskert is making records for 
himself every few days In the outfield. 
The atmosphere in Cincinnati is not 
conducive to good ball playing for 
the same thing happened to plavers 
that were traded by that team before. 
In Cincinnati they are unable to play, 
but as soon as they get away they are 
wonders. Stein feldt was an example 
of that when he came to the Cubs six 

years ago. ,, ^ ■•.» 

Overail was another man that couia 
not pitch for the Reds, but after he 
came to the Chicago team he developed 
into a star. These conditions prevailed 
before Griff took the job as manager 
of the Reds, so he Is not the hoo- 
doo. 

In Washington these conditions seem 
to V>e much the same. For twenty- 
three years the Senators have been 
playing just about the same class of 
ball that they are at present, ana 
Jimmy MrAleer is not the reason, be- 
cause he has not been there that longf. 
Last year the Senators played better 
ball than they have played for years 
and finislied out of last place and are 
still able to keep out of the last ditch, 
but life is being made about as un- 
pleasant for Jimmy as it is possible 
to be made because he has not been 
.able to land his team up at the top of 
the second division. 

W'tlllBK <o Spend Money. 
Both clubs are willing to spend 
money lavishly if they have a chance 
to get players that will help ^them. 
One reason that Washington and Cin- 
cinnati are not winners >s./hat they 
have no developing plant. Most of the 
successful g league clubs have ar- 
rangements with minor league ciub8 
where young players are sent for a 
little more seasoning every spring If 
they are not quite ready for fast com- 
pany. 



\ 



1' 



-* 



La Pell, 
6-0; 6-1 



Beecher, 
6-2; 6-1 

Amundson 
1 6-2; 7-5 

Davis, 
I forfeit 

Washburn, 
6-4; 6-2 



OLD MAN COURTNEY 

A MASTER OF MEN 



-Hr 



New York, July 15.— Whenever a 
genius springs up. no matter what the 
line people Immediately busy them- 
selves analyzing his character, search- 
ing out the qualities which are the 
••reasons why" in his success. Being 
studied and analyzed in this way. it is 
doubtful is there is a man who is more 
closelv studied by a multitude of ad- 
mirer; than Charles Courtney, the J^. 
mous old rowing coacn of Cornell. 
"The old man" has been watched and 
watched since he first k'e^^ame the real 
head of aquatic sports at Cornell over 



one 



ROGER BRESNAHAN. 



y^\ PnTnmpnt- I aeercKatlon of pastlmers In the game. 

some punk shows ! '4^J;tost Zu|hts ^^To^^ard the cfose of last season the 



who was 



Ing further on the irinerm 
of this athlatlc young la«ly 
strong enough to carry without stoop- 
fni about IS 000 ton.^ of admiration and 
wfrm regard. It ml ,'ht be stated that 
she also said that 1 omecroft idea and 
lervlng tea to ladb s In a dry goods 
store were occupati >ns open to aspir- 
ing young men wno were suffering 
from excess of anlnal spirits. ^ . , _ 
Percy took a vacation and tried to 
forget the vacant stare of beautiful 
Madeline Mulveeney when she sighted 
Perse tacking hej way. Clarence 
Weaksister went out to fathers farm 
and hvpnotlzed son e country maidens 
with some big league drawing room 
chatter. Father decided Percy ought 
to go to work after all his excitement, 
and placed him In i harge of the over- 
all department of his factory. Because 
Perse came to work In fathers auto, 
the girls looked upon him as a hero. 
All of which goet to show that It Is 
a poor and neglected frump indeed who 
can't search out some spot where 
he can shake hams every hour with 
his self-conceit and wear a hole in the 
back of his Norfolk by patting himself 
on the back. 



PING BODIE GREATEST 

SENSATION OF GAME 



New York, July 15. — Old Roman Co- ' 
mlskey certainly landed a live wire 
when he signed France to Sangulneta 
Pazola — n(«, don't crowd, men; give him 
air — for the gentleman Is none other 
than Ping Bodie. For the first time 
since Chicago has had a berth In the 
American league the team Is possessed 
of a real slugging outfielder. 

Bodie punched out thirty home runs 
for the San Francisco club in the Pa- 
cific Coast league, last season and 
scouts from every big league team 
were on his trail. But Comiskey's 
gumshoe artist beat 'em all to it. Then 
the other scouts began to claim that 
Bodie wouldn't do in fast company; 
said that he was a mighty walloper 
when he connected, but that against 
flrat-class twirling he would be an 
awful boob. 

Bodie In those days took mighty 
swings at the pill. It was a case of a 
home run or a whiff. But Hugh Duffy 
took the young man aside and in- 
structed him in the art of chopping his 
Stroke. And the result is that Bodie 
Is hitting just as hard as ever and 
much more often. 

Today he is one of the most dreaded 
batters in the American league. Rus- 
sell Ford, the Yankees' great spltball 
twirler, is one of Bodie's best boosters. 
"Bodie connected with my spltball in 
New York one day when it broke a 
yard," said Ford, "while I have made 
such great batsmen as Collins and Cobb 
Biids ones that were not half as decep- 
tive. Bodie is one of the most nat- 
ural batters I ever pitched to. He Is 
a student, besides, for he is always 
trying to outguess the pitcher." 

3odle got away to a flying start with 



the White Sox an 1 has never shown 
any sign of falling off In his work. He 
played his first big league game on 
April 27, and in four times up he 
cracked out a double, a triple and two 
singles, which is sure going some for 
a starter 

The Bodie of today Is a sure hitter, 
and he will not do the fan many times 
this year if he sticks to his present 
form "at the plate. 

Ping Is built lite an egg, but this 
fact, taken seriously. In one way ac- 
counts for his acrurate knowledge of 
the balls flight. His eyes, when he is 
in position at the idate, are nearly on a 
level with the piti hed ball, and he can 
therefore follow is fluctuations read- 
ily. 

Gibson <Gllrl Walk. 

Bodie has a regi lar Gibson girl walk, 
very much like th it of Lewis, the for- 
mer Brooklyn she rtstop, but when he 
arrives at the batters box he digs a 
hole to plant his feet In and having 
done this, graduullv telescopes him- 
self, and, with w.ivfng willow, awaits 
the pellet. 

His ability as a clouter owes itself to 
the muscular devi lopment of the man. 
His shoulders, chest and biceps are 
Herculean — he locks like the back of 
a hack as he stands at the plate. Ping 
is a very modest >oung man. and when 
any one speaks a lout his development 
he says Its fat. 

Although Bodie is a most happy go- 
lucky chap off th.' diamond, he growls 
and fumes all the time he is at the 
plate, very much as Bid Ed Delehanty 
used to. Ford Jokingly says that Bo- 
dies eyes shoot l re while he la wait- 
ing for the ball t'> be served. 

And Bodie's batting is not his only 
assets either. Uu Is one grand fielder. 



mould had been cast. The team played 
harmoniously and showed a fine sPurt 
at the wlndup. But still, experts per- 
sisted In placing the Cardinals among 
the basement occupants in the National 
organization this year. Their calcu- 
lations have been rudely upset, as the 
records will attest. The Cardinals 
boast a percentage of over .500, thi3 
first time in many years that they 
have been up so high in the rating at 
this stage of the race. 

Credit Due Bresnahan. ,^ . 

All credit Is due to Bresnahan for | as a pitcher 
making the National league race a 
five-team affair. He Is one of the few 
players that have branched out as 
successful managers. Bresnahan is 
still very much In the game and his 
heavy stick work and brain work 
have reaped their Just rewards. Bres- 
nahan is a brainy. agVe-'^sive and 
scrappy player. He Is a keen student 
of the game, besides being versatile at 
the bat and on the bases. Bresnahan 
has succeeded so well that there Is 
talk that he will become owner of the 
club before another year. 

Bresnahan will ever be looked upon 
as one of the greatest catchers In the 
game. He helped bring a couple of 
league banners and a world's cham- 
pionship to New York while a mem- 
ber of the Giants. In 1907, when the 
Giants were going bad and it was al- 
leged that McGraw was not particu- 
larly anxious about tlie welfare of hi* 
team, Bresnahan was reported as 
about to become manager of the 
Giants. This report created quite a 
stir in baseball circles for a time. 
The rumor that he was to become a 
manager looked good to Bresnahan 
and from that time on he yearned to 
manage a ball club. His ambition 
was realized on Dec. 12, 1908. when he 
was shipped to St. Louis In a gigantic 
triple deal In which St. Louis. New 
York and Cincinnati were Involved 
Bresnahan went to St. Louis in return 
for Catcher Schlel, Outfielder Murray 
and Pitcher Raymond. Schlel was ac- 
quired bv the Cardinals from the Cin- 
cinnati club in exchange for Pitchers 
Karger and Lush. Bresnahan also re- 
ceived a block of stock before as- 
suming the managerial reins, and he 
was signed up for three years for $25,- 
000. Bresnahan's contract expires at 
the end of this season. What Roger 
Intends to do when his time is up, no 
one knows. But it Is certain he can 
have anything he wants so long as it 
is within reason. 

The late Stanley Robinson, owner of 
the Cardinals, thought so much of 
Bresnahan that at the outset of the 
1909 season he insured the star catch- 
er-manager for a term of five years on 
a J50.000 policy. The tax was |1,300 
per annum. 

Bresnahan went along swimmingly 
for half of the 1909 season and then 
things begaji to happen to him. His 
team was shot to pieces and tjiey of- 
fered but feeble resistance in their 
games. In October the St. Louis fans 
displayed open dislike for Bresnahan 
and not a few recommended his re- 
moval. It was alleged that he abused 
his players. Not only that but It was 
said that he snubbed friends and well- 
wishers. But Bresnahan has lived 
down this animosity of the Caradlnala' 
fans until now they actually worship 
him. 

In June, 1907, Bresnahan was almost 



fatally Injured by a pitched ball. Andy 
Coakley, now with the Yankees, de- 
livered the wild throw and the ball 
struck Bresnahan behind the left ear. 
He was rendered unconscious Instantly. 
He was carried to the club house and 
when he was revived he gasped for a 
priest. A pastor of a nearby church 
administered extreme unction and 
then the catcher was hurried to a Cin- 
cinnati hospital. For days he hovered 
between life and death. His magnifi- 
cent physique carried him through 
safely. For weeks Bresnahan was gun 
shy and backed away from the plate. 
But he ovecame this fault in a short 
while and now stands as close to the 
pan as common sense will allow. 

Bresnahan was born in Ireland June 
14. 1880. and came to this country at 
an early age. He played baseball 
while attending school. In 1897 he 
secured an engagement with the Wash, 
ington National league team. He was 
re-engaged the following season and 
In 1899 he joined the Minneapolis 
Western league team. In 1900 he 
played with the Chicago Nationals. 
Manager McGraw, then with Baltimore, 
picked up Roger the following year. 
Bresnahan was engaged as pitcher, but 
In an emergency he was placed behind 
the bat. That was the end of Bresnahan 
as a pitcher. He performed so well as a 
backstop that he was retained to occu- 
py that position regularly. McGraw 
brought Bresnahan to the Giants with 
him and remained here until the mam- 
moth swap which sent him to the 
Mound City and opened a path for him 
to become one of the best managers in 
the game. 



Craig 
Ingalls 

Davis 
Wright 

Walker 
Dinwiddie 

Rockwell 

Sinclair 

Robinson 
Stiilman 

Morgan 
Graff 



I Ingalls, 
1 6-0, 6-1 

Davis, 
6-2; 6-3 

Dinwiddie, 
6-0; 6-0 

I Rockwell 
I forfeit 



Btillman. 
6-1; 6-2 



Dln^widdie, 
6-0; 6-3 



HOODOO FOLLOWS 
McALEER AND 'GRIP 



There is nothing bo unenviable in 
baseball as the management of a los- 
ing ball team, while there is no honor 
too great to bestow on the man fort- 
unate enough to have a ball team lead- 
inf the league, says George Rice In the 
Chicago Journal. Hughie Jennings, 
Frank Chance, Connie Mack and John 
McGraw have been lionized in their 
cities because they have brought home 
the honors with their teams, but the 
manager of the tall-end team Is 
shunned and avoided by the same class 
of people that wjould honor the suc- 
cessful ones. 

There are two men in major league 
baseball today that have suffered all 
kinds of torture for years because they 
have been unable to land any pennant 
and their days are fast drawing to an 




twenty-one years ago. and no 
has been quite able to say just what 
quality U is that he possesses which 
makes'^ him such a Perfect master of 
men. such a remarkable teacher of 

t hifl &rt 

As regards the first-named quality 
the concensus of opinion is that the 
unusual power lies in Mr. Courtney s 
eyes. No one who ever meets Mr. 
Courtney forgets that piercing look, 
which seems to make an open book or 
every face and mind it comes in con- 
tact with. After being under his 
tutelage a day or so it would be an 
unobservant student of the art of row- 
ing who would not know that to tell 
the "old man" anything but the whole 
and unadaulterated truth would be as 

I futile as telling it to oneself. It is al- 
most the religious creed of the ^boys 
that nothing escapes the "old man ani 
consequently they are careful that 
nothing happens which they care to 
conceal from him. 

Perfeet Judge of Men. 

It is safe to say that in any field 
into which *Mr. Courtney might have 
been attracted he would have been 
as successful as he has been as a row- 
ing coach. The excellent qualities 
which make him a natural commander 
and leader would have been as ap- 
plicable on the Cayuga inlet. 

To begin with, Mr. Courtney is a per- 
fect judge of men. He knows abso- 
lutely how to get the best work out of 
them, by keeping them anxious all the 
time, but at the same time hopeful. 
His superior judgment has been il- 
lustrated time and again, when people 
have wondered at the sudden upheavals 
in his crews, only to see his Judgment 
indorsed by better crews and better 
records. A man trying for one of the 
Cornell boats is never sure »' his P»ace 
"till the gun goes off," and it is this 
fact that keeps the candidates work- 
ing hard up to the last minute and 
keeps them on the anxious bench con- 

^^ Ju^t as the men in the first boats are 
dropped unceremoniously upon the least 
show of indifference to work, so are 
the men in the other crews rewarded 
for faithful and deserving work. It is 
far from an uncommon thing to see 
an oarsman shifted directly from the 
third or fourth crew into the first in a 
day During the season, at some tlnie 
or other, every man gets a chance to 
show what he can do "in fast com- 
pany," and if he makes good he holds 
his seat— as long as he keeps on mak- 
iner good. 

It Is these methods that keep every 
man under Mr. Courtney's lns\ruction 
working his hardest, those in the first 
boats on account of the fact that they 
realize that the least slackening ot 
Is liable to be disastrous, and 



points, which they know will be recog- 
nized if they art deserving of recogni- 
tion. 

Word !■ I'aw With Crews. 

Cornell oarsmen also have implicit 
confidence In Mr. Courtney's lairnesa 
in dealing with them. They know that 
the personal element does not tnter 
with him. He has never been known 
to show the slightest partiality to any 
one trying for the coveted places In his 
crews And furthermore, any infrac- 
tion of rules will bring about the drop- 
ping of an oarsman regardless of the 
position the man in question holds, or 
of the probable injurious consequences 
to the chance of victory. Nothing bet- 
ter Illustrates this fact that the ^peedy 
dismissal of four of the freshman crew 
who were careless enough to partaKe 
of the product of an Ithaca confec- 
tionery. They committed an infrac- 
tion of the training table rules Their 
loss would have disabled the 1911 crew 
materially, and with the Pouglikeepsle 



-/.« 



egatta so' near at hand it would have 
,een difficult to whip the eight into 



pace 



those below in the hope of attracting 

the "old man's" attention to their good I name 



winning form, but the ^^^^""^^-^Z^^J} 
he heard of their breach of ordera, 
forgot everything but his orders which 
had been broken. The fact that Cornell 
might lose the freshman race, and thus 
I'ave a break in the string of victories 
of the last two years, was never con- 
sidered. With discipline of this sort. 
Mr. Courtney's rules are seldom 

broken. ... „ .v- 

Although it is business 'from the 
word go" down at the boathouse, and 
when the men are working on the ma- 
chines in the winter. Mr. Courtney 
comes into contact with his charges 
socially much more than the average 
coach. His house is always open to 
them and there is seldom an evening 
when one or two cannot be found there, 
engaged in conversation with the old 
man," which may relate to any subject 
imaginable, but seldom to rowlrig. 

If there is any one topic whie^h occu- 
pies the time to the exclusion of others, 
It Is fishing. The old man" is an ar- 
dent lover of the pastime and has been 
known to give the boys a rest at 
Easter time, toward the end of the va- 
cation, if they are all rowing well and 
he has heard that the trout are run- 
ning well somewhere up the lake. 
YonnK at «3 Years ot Age. 
He Is the busiest entertaining his 
pupils, however, in the fall. Before 
two days of the college year hay© 
elapsed every member of the squad wMll 
have called on the "old man. to in- 
Qulre about his health, and perhaps to 
hear a word or two about prospects. 
Last fall the men were unusually so- 
licitous, because Mr. Courtney had been 
quite ill during the summer, but they 
found him in the best of health, as he 
Is today. His 63 years seem to be no 
burden; in fact, one would never regard 
him as an old man at all. and the only 
thing old about him is the name he has 
been given by those who know him. 
Intellectually, he is the equal of any 
man half his age. and when it comes 
to an exchange of wit, the man has 
never come into the crewroom who 
could beat him. And many have un- 
dertaken the task. 

Mr. Courtney's magnetism, his 
charming personality and his attrac- 
tiveness awav from the inlet, as well 
as his wonderful capabilities wiien busy 
there, have served to make him idol- 
ized by every one in the vicinity who 
has ever known him or even heard hJS 



\ 



MARQUETTE FIGHTING 

COLLEGE BLACKLIST 



Milwaukee, Wis., July 15.-Despite Denver officials took the only wise 



the fact that Marquette university of course open 



to them and assured the 



Milwaukee, the big Jesuit university, Milwaukee people that much as they 
is on the blacklist of the athletic auth- desired to, "unavoidable circumstances' 



fective. but the season will not be with 
out Important schedules despite the 
hostile influence of the authorities of 
Chicago and Wisconsin especially. 

The conference has succeeded in pre- 
nting the University of Denver fron 



vent 



ol-ities of the" Big EYght "conference, the intervened, and the papers were not 

fcotbail manager is securing dates for signed. ..... ^ v,i,- 

games next fall and has already ar- Manager O'Connor then turned hiS 
FarvKed six of the schedule of nine attention to South Dakota and was in 
glmes He finds the boycott still ef- a fair way to round up the woolly 

gameo. xic iwi" .,-,_„. v.„ „,ifv,. Westerners for a game in Milwaukee. 

This announcement was made and the 
game appeared to be an assured mat- 
ter, but again those ever present seem- 
ingly unsurmountable "unavoidable 
circumstances" intervened, and nego- 
tiations were dropped without much 
further ado. 

With the loss of these two. O'Connor 
got busy again and landed Wabash uni- 
versity. This time negotiations were 
carried on "subrosa." Those 'circum- 
stances' did not get on the job. The 
little Giants will be here for Mar- 
quette's first game on Oct. 21. 

Coach Juneau will be in charge ot 
the sports at Marquette again in 1912. 
There was a persistent rumor current 
among the undergraduate body that 



■« "■ *"■ 



BRAINERD CITY BALL TEAM. 

Front Row, Lelf to Right: Herb Paine, First Base; James Alderman, Captain 
and Pitcher; Sig Shefflo, Left Fielder. Second Row: Tom Tcmpleton, 
Third Base; Clyde Trent, Center Fielder; John Mahlum, Utility; Harold 
Kalland, Right Field; Leslie Bush, Pitcher and Second Base. Third 
Row: Ira Roderick, Substitute; Bud Roderick, Catcher; A. G. Loom, 

Br^ne^d.^Minn., July 16.— {Special to The Herald.)— The I)*" 'anB.of this 
city are very proud of the record being ma'^e by the Bralnerd City ball team. 
The officers of the organization are: George Hess, president; D. A. Peterson, 
manager; John Mahlum, assistant manager. The nine has a eeries of victories 
to its credit and In a recent game, defeated the crack Royalton nine by a 9 to 1 
score. On Sunday thmf will play the Little Falls team. 



coming East. Marquette went W e^st 
last year and played Denver but the 
protests were so strong that Denver 
was unable to fight the combination. 

It appears that the Rocky Mountain 
conference, as a result of Big Eight in- 
tereference, has a decided aversion to 
allowing one of its most respected 
members to come East and invade the 
domain of the famous beer city aggre- 
gation. This conference kicked up a 
rumpus last fall when Marquette in- 
vaded the W^est, but the Denver of- „ .... _ „ 

ficials were set, and much though they the cherry monitor would make his de 
hated to do it. they were forced to I parture either for Wisconsin or Ne 
stand by and see the'ir champions hold 



.*>■ 



the "muchly-touted squad from the 
North to a tie. 

Denver was to come East In 1911 
and. as a matter of course, Marquette 
was to be played. This was definitely 
settled and all that was necessary was 
to sign the papers. Just at this junc- 
ture the conference decided to play the 
villain in the little drama and forbade 
Its erring and wayward member to 
sign the papers. Six or seven games in 
Its own neighborhood looked better 
than one 1,000 or more miles away, and 
with the ultimatum and prospect of 
tmclng a hostile conference in 1912, the 



braska. but he is still here, and here 
he will stay. Juneau has put sports at 
Marquette on a high plane and his loss 
would be a severe blow to athletics la 
general. , . 

The schedule thus far announced la 
as follows: 

October 7— Carroll at Waukesha. 

October 14 — St. John's at Milwaukesu 

October 21 — Wabash at Milwaukee. 

October 28 — DePau at Chicago. 

November 4 — Open. 

November 18 — Open. 

November 25 — Loyola at Milwaukee. 

November 30'— Notre Dame at Mllwatt-. 
kee. 



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INNESOTA 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 15, 1911. 



j HISTORICAL- 1? 







MM 



given during the afternoon before 
about forty guests. ,., ^ . , 

The rooms were prettily decorated 
with daisies and branches of eidei- 

bc-rrles. 

* * « 

Miss Marian Young of Lester Park 
entertained at luncheon Monday aft- 
ernoon in honor of Miss Gertrude 
Gardner of Owatonna, who Is visiting 
her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. K. A. 
Ostergren. The guests were: 
Misses — 



Gertrude 

Gardner, 
Abigail Foot, 
Merle McLennan, 
Lucile Snyder. 



Madeline 

Thomas, 
Alice Oaten, 
Myra Smity. 



Mrs W. A. McGonagle was hostess 
at an out-of-door luncheon Tuesday 
at her home In Hunter's Parle at which 
her guests were the members of the 
board of directors of the Young Worn 
en's Christian association and a few 





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1 



MISS THELMA GILMORE. 



JAMES McLENNAN. 



^NK of the most impcrtant 
society events of the 
season will bo "Jappy- 
land* the tuneful and 
artistic oriental opera, 
which will be put on by 
local talent at the Or- 
pheum theater, July 2' 
and 28 for the benefit of the Children b 
Home under the direction of the Amer- 
ican Amusement company of New Yorlt 
with E. H. Coates personally super- 
vising- Nearly 300 members of Duluth 
society will have parts In this beauti- 
ful and alluring production and the re- 
hearsals are bringing the various 
numbers up to the professional sland- 

Tv,e =. t^.- win present a cherry 
^rrtl ve with wisteria gardens 

K th : ce ami with the gorgeous 

Ssl uraing -ultl-colored lights elec- , 
trim! fountains and other "'^"" "„ 
4cenVc invesfuure wlli present a scene 

'"■^ ^'ast'' has been filled with the 
■ fmlLT tltnt of the city ^^^-euniented 
with two professional „f 'i.^^T^,,_ ^ " 

have received the »i»K'^*- V^Jk wlU " •'ing 
Ralph Errolle of New York v^Ul sms 
tho leadine tenor role, that oi «-ar« 
Ne^i le enfign of the Amer'can Navy 
and Miss Thelma Glim ore of New 
York win take the prima donna role, 
that of -Sang-Foy. an American heir- 
ess in Japanese disguise. „„♦„ 
Mr ErroUe is a tenor of some note 
having created the leading tenor pari 
in '-rhe spring Maid" which played 
In New York all last season. "^ »» 
untVr a four vears' contract with An- 
dreas I-lppel of New York and next 
Reason will create the feature part in 
a new big light opera under "/"^y ^V 
Savage. The season after next he will 
Bing the following operas in Chicago 
New York and Boston under the 
Metropolitan .syndicate: -Rigoletto 
"Lc Boheme." "La Tosca." "Madam 




GIVE YOUR BABY 

The "Tearless" 
Nursing Bottle 

drawn out. No chance for baby to 

swallow air. thus i-reventing coHc. 
PoaltUelT Preventii ColUpslnK »« Wlp- 

-li 1100 reward If It does not— 

provided bottle is used In accordance 

with instructions. 
E««lly Cle-B**. owing to shape ot bet- 

tie and wide mouth. 
Any Good Nipple fits It. 
Full directions with every bottle. See 

that you get them. 

10c Each — At All Dni«Kl"t»- 

F. H. RHENO COMPANY, 

ai»9 Flflk Avenae, C^CHgo, 111. 









! 



I SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

Moles anu Warta permanently re- 
moved. 

KNAUF SISTERS, 

^4 Wr«t Snperlor •«tr*et. 
Sceond Door E««t o« Clddlnge- 



Butterfly," 
"Cavaleria 
cia." 

Mr. Errolle, who 
K. Errolle Smith i 
cation here with h! 
ff her parents, i! 
Clark '-f 2417 East 
Smith was Miss 
known in the your 
sical circles of thi^ 
Miss Thelma <■ 
lyric soprano vole 
fully capable of 
donna role. She h; 
ber of the best op 
ing leading roles 
vears. Miss Gilm< 
Strollers,' "The 1 
and was with H< 
over three years, 
up this work with 
ling on these oper; 
the highest prais' 
Southern cities fo 
Loeal 
Philip Gordon B 
part of the Emp» 
his splendid voice 
fectlon. He carrie 
roles in the opera, 
will sing the part 
to date New York 
llie cast will be u 
pie. 

The play which 
nine through it, i.' 
little specialties ii 
choruses lead by a 
"something doing' 
fal of the curtain. 
Some of the spfcf 
ceptlonally pretty 
ber, a Spanisii lov 
ish dash and aban 
senoritas .will ex 
fandango to the a< 
bcvaiines and cast 
are typical and a) 
treme. 

The yatchlng r>u 
numbers but prol 
resistance" and 
strongly will be tl 
moon Chorus." s 
eight couples of p 
costumed de regu 
Louis XVI. 

The Parasol Da 
part will be sun; 
Burns Is a fasoii 
six girls in a syi 
white will appea 
with lace paraso 
neath a Parasol." 

The "Red Red 
by six well Irair 
folks will be one 
bers with its stat' 
and charming gli 
The "Delia ' cht 
by Miss Barbara 
Southern darkey 
chorus in brillian 
a vigorous numb 
Sunny South. 

The "Girls. Gii 
be a pretty little 
sisting of a chor 
The chorus of ' 
really the sustai 
out the opera .is » 
maids who will a 
rational costume 
girls in this chor 
Farrell, Marie 1' 
Margaret Hoyt, 
trude Bradt. M 
E\ered, Gertrude 
Bergen. Majori* 
Rothschild. Grac 
ler. Marje.rie Bj 
Eunice "V\'hlpple, 
Patterson, Elda 
McDonald, Dorot 
E. Ingalls. Berth 
Newell, Kathen 
Dryer, Dorothy 

There will be 
chorus lead by . 
another pretty n 
duet by Miss A| 
nan. Bi>th of 
known for thel 
this kind. Mist 
much praise on 

The grand fit 
military finish 
fitting close on* 
lar operatic ex 
In Puluth, evei 
stage. 

The cast as a 
Sho-Gun. emper 

Dreams 

O'Hana-San, en 

of Dreams. . . 



in private life is 
J spending his va- 
8 wife at the home 
r. and Mrs. N. C. 

Second street. Mrs. 
Marie Clark, well 
ger social and mu- 
1 city. 

illmore has a pure 
e which is beautl- 
slnglng the prima 
vs been with a num- 
era companies sing- 
for a number of 
»re sang In "The 
op of the World," 
nry \V. Savage for 
taving him to take 

Mr. Coates of put- 
.s. She lias received 
in Eastern and 
- her work. 
Sinscrii. 

rown is to take the 
ror •Sho-Gun"' and 
fits' the part to per- 
i one of the heaviest 
Mrs. Ralph Errolle 

of •"Ltorothy " an up 

girl and the rest of 
ken by capable peo- 

has a light plot run- 
filled with brilliant 
i which well trained 
ble soloists wll keep 
from the rise lo the 

ialties which are ex- 

ire the Spanish nnm- 
' dance full of Span- 
don, in which twelve 
?cute a scintillating 
companlment of tam- 
tnets. The costumes 
fe colorful in the ex- 

rty will sing several 
ably their "piece de 
»ne to appeal most 
le "Under the Honey- 
ung and danced by 
ominent society folk, 
eur of the period of 

ice In which the solo 
,' by Miss Frances 
lating skit in which 
nphony of black and 
• "on the sea shore" 
is and sing "'Under- 

Rose " number danced 
ed couples of young 
o£ the prettiest num- 
•ly minuet movements 
Is. 

rus which will be led 
Rupley Is a rolicking 
lance number and the 
t costumes will dance 
er reminiscent of the 



MRS. RALPH ERROLLE. 



RALPH ERROLLE. 



Is. Girls'" chorus will 
flirtation number con- 
is of six girls. 
Jeisha maids which Is 
nlng chorus through- 
nade up of about fifty 
ppear In the gorgeous 
of Japan. Among the 
js are: Misses Myrtle 
Istorl. Vera Boonson, 
Virginia "Woolen. Ger- 
/Ttle Hobbs, Helen 
Final, Alexandria Van 
Willard. Ethel V. 
» Grant. Mildred Mll- 
hlie. Mabel Balllie. 
Pauline Alford. Louise 
E. Luzon, Marguerite 
hy G. Gibson, Marion 
a S. Johnson, Merna B. 
ne Hodgdon, Helen 
McDonald. 

a pretty little fairy 
4iss Marie Agatln and 
umber will be a dance 
atln and J. A. McLen- 
these people are well 
- ability In affairs of 

Agatln having won 
former appearances. 
ale with its snap and 
will bring to a most 

of the most spectacu- 
travaganzas ever seen 
I on the professional 

f ranged is as follows: 
or of the Island of 
..Philip Gordon Brown 
press of the Island 
Miss Elsie Cole 



Sang-Foy, an American heiress in 

Japanese disguise • • • 

..Sllss Thelma Gilmore of New York 
Carl Neville, ensign of the American 

navv ,.. Ralph Errolle of New ^ prk 
Dorothy, an up to date New \ork 

girl Mrs. Ralph Errolle 

Capt. Nelson. commanding the 

yatch "Amerlka" • • 

Ban-Ko. matrimonial adviser to the 

emperor C. Herbert Smith 

Japonlca watching over happy Jappy 

maids ' Miss Jean W anless 

Aphrodite, spirit of Golden Summer 

Miss Frances Burns 

Delia a dancer from the Sunny 

South Miss Barbara Rupley 

T-Van, a Chinese empress ........ . 

Miss Marie Agatln 

Klne-Low, In love with Tl-Yan 

J. A. McLennan 

Fairy Queeii,' Nightingale of tlie For- 
est ■,■■■;■ "I'li 

Miss Patsy Ann Epperson, Louisville 
Promlere-Danseuse. .Miss Marie Agatln 

Tiiania, an Elfin sprite ;;•••,••;„„ 

Miss Virginia Harrington 

Royal Princesses — Geisha maids, 
Japanese dancing girls, sun wor- 
shippers. American yachting party, 
slaves and royal attendants. 
Boxes have been taken by the fol- 
lowing: Mrs. Frank Brewer, Mrs. A. B. 
Wolvin Mrs. John Mlllen, Mrs. A. L. 
Ordean. Mrs. T. F. Cole, Mrs. L. S. 
Loeb, .Mrs. George Stone, Mr.s. A. M. 
Marshall, C. E. Bassett G. A. French, 
Mrs A. C. Hubhell. Mrs. George 
Crosby. Mrs. J. B. Cotton, Mrs. M. L. 
Fay. 



events of Interest 



Mrs. Ward Ames, Sr.. was hostess at 
a dinner party at the main house of the 
Duhith Boat club Thursday evening. 
The table was prettily appointed with 
a centerpiece of red roses and ferns. 
Covers were laid for eleven. 
« • « 

Mrs. B Murray Peyton of 1034 East 
First street entertained at three ta- 
bles of bridge Thursday afternoon at 

her home. 

• « • 

A party of about eighty young peo- 
Dle enjoyed the dancing party given 
Thursday evening at the boat club by 
the Misses Mary Wh'PPle. He»*n ^"J ,\^^- 
Gladys Lennlng. Chelsle Final Ruth 
Nelmever and Madeline Cheadle. An 
effective arrangement of daisies and 
hnakets of red roses formed a pleas- 
ing decoration for the hall and recep- 
tion room. Blewetts orchestra 
Dlayed a well chosen program for the 
voung people who were chaperoned by 
-Mr and Mrs. H. D. F'^a • Jtfr. and 
Mrs. Charles Nelmeyer, and Mrs. Will- 
iam Smith. ^ ^ 

St Paul's Episcopal church was the 
object for which a benefit card party 



was given Monday afternoon at the 
home of Mrs. R. M. Atwater. 1914 East 
Second street. Bridge was played at 
fourteen tables on the lawn and the 
prizes were won by Mrs. Fraker, Mrs. 
G. Herbert Jones and Mrs. E. D. Ld- 
6on. 

Pink and white "W^ere the colors 
chosen for decoration and they were 
prettily carried out In ices and cakes. 
Dainty little baskets of candy tied with 
pink top (lover and pink tulle were 
sold. The hostesses fdr the afternoon 
noon were the members of Circle No. 
« of the church. 

• « • 
Mr. and Mrs. Nick Jeanetta enter- 
tained Monday for their son. Vlto, 
in celebration of his 16th birthday 
anniversary. The rooms were decor 
ated with red, white and blue, and the 
evening was spent with games, music 
and dancing. The gu^ts were: 
Messrs. and Mesdames--- 

Peter Morris, Charles Rosso, 

R. Capita. James Jerry. 

James Jeanetta, Tony Manilla. 

Peter Jeanetta, 
Misses — 

Kate Laletta. 
Lizzie Je«nette, 
Julia Jeanetta. 
Isabella 

Jeanetta, 
Clematine 

Jeanetta. 
Margaret Car- 
penter, 
Messrs — 

Joe Jeanetta, 
Joe Laletta, 
Joe Morenda. 
Dominic Cadula. 
John Jeanetta, 
C. Pantllanna, 
Mlkal Jeanetta, 
Mike Jeanetta, 
Vlto Jeanetta, 
Frank Malnilla, 
Peter Peizetta, 
Robert Dandy 



others. Covers were laid for thirty. 
The regular monthly business meet- 
ing of the board was held previous to 

the luncheon. 

• • • 
A party of students at the Tanis 

School of English enjoyed a P i' " >c 
party Sunday afternoon on l arK 
Point. Those in the party were: 

\\ i S H (* ^ * 

j. Tanis, M. Lltman, 

T. Nelson, G. Flax. 

B. Haffld. B. Tuiman. 

Messrs: . » •. 

R. Call, A. Lltman, 

R. Lltman. E. Sukov. 

I. Sukov, 

• • ♦ 

Miss Lois Wesenberg was hostess to 
twenty-four of her little friends Tues- 
day afternoon at her home in Lake- 
side in celebration of her 14th birth- 
<lav anniversary. The afternoon was 
.•-pent with games and dainty refresh- 
ments were served. Those present 
were: 




PHILIP GORDON BROWN. 



-|_ -|_ I > I I ~n — fc^~ "^ •* 



Margurlte Wes- 
enberg, 
Ada Stocker. 
Marion Gordon, 
Rob- 



Anna Carpenter, 
Laura Edward, 
Pearl Edwards, 
Pauline 

Desaslivo, 
Ella Cullens, 
Margaret 

Laletta, 
Bvelyn Laletta, 

James Dandy. 
Dan Page, 
Dominic Luclans, 
Gust Trlplano. 
Abe Tabit. 
Robert Peters. 
Fred Luclan, 
Mike Luclan, 
Sam Campbell. 
John Frank, 
Carlo Caveso, 
Roy Russell. 



Misses — 

Lillian Sabln, 
Aneate Lund 

berg, 
Gladys Ryter, 

Florence Piersnn, Margurlte 
Bernlce Murray, ertson. 

Kathren Wells, Leona Deetz, 
Helen Kerkwood, Clara Matson, 
Francis Pond, Helen Session. 

Roberta Rich, Mable Wing, 

Louise Blackmar, Florence Miller, 
Martha Norton. Beatrice Bonham. 
Vera Smith, 

Masters — 

John C. Wesenberg, Jr. 
« • * 

Miss Marie Prudhomme, who is the 
guest of relatives here, was the guest 
of honor at an Informal party given 
Wednesday evening at the home of 
Miss Pearl Massie of Woodland. The 
evening was spent with games and 
music and dainty refreshments were 
served. The guests follow: 
Misses — 



catro- Messrs Harold Sailor and Edwin 
Jacques, both of Detroit: Herbert Buck 
of Cleveland, and Joseph Sellwood, Jr 
of this city. They plan to go Monday 
and remain a week. 

• • « 
The Past Matrons' club of the Wom- 
an's Relief corps was entertained at a 
picnic dinner Monday at the home 
of Mrs. Prlscllla Johns at Thirtv-fourth 
street, Park Point. 

Mrs. Fred Krause of 2<)19 West 
Eighth street entertained informant 
Tuesday evening at her home in honor 
of Mrs. Albertina Peterson of Chisholm. 
who is a guest in the city. 
• • • 

The members of the congregation 
of the Unitarian church held their 
annual all-day picnic yesterday at 
Fond du Lac. The party went up by 



boat at 9 o'clock and the day wa^ 
spent informally at the pretty resort. 

Mrs B. F, Anderson of 711 Ninth 
avenue east entertained the Pasi 
presidents of the Women s Relief 
Corps yesterday afterno<m at her homo 
at an Informal afternoon tea. 

* • • 

Ml.««8e8 Sadie and. MathilJ.. ^«''"1^,?:^C 
cnt* rtain.-d info, mally ,Wednes<lay 
evening at their home, 707 East Sec- 
ond street. In h^^nor of their guest. 
Miss Anna Elfenbeln of St. Paul. 

• * • 

Mrs. Edward M.rk of 531 West First 
strec t was hostess at a luncheon given 
kt Lester Park Sundav in honor of Mrs. 
Meletn and family o^ Mnrduette Mich. 
Covers were laid for thirty. Among 
the guests entertained were; Mr. ana 




Edna Tarican. 
Maud Massie, 
Mabel Mahew, 
Marie Herbert. 
Mary Mahew, 
Margaret Lai- 

renier. 
Rose Prudhomme, 
Amelia Massie. 
Alma Dahl, 
Martha Dahl. 

W. E. Prudhomme 
Albert Richard. 



Mrs. A. F. Schwelgcr t!?^*'!^^^'"t'*ftJr' 
formally at her home Monday aftci- 
noon. Those present were: 
Mesdame.s — 



Le Molgnam, 

Forsyth, 

L. Baudin. 

Pochert, 

Miller, 

W G. Hammond, 



Evelyn Ham- 
mond. 



Bloedel, 
Sloan, 
Roberts, 
Curtlss, 
Macauley. 
Appleby, 
Misses — 

Elsie Schwelger, 
Helen Mcauley. 

Mrs. J. Latshaw,* who left Tuesday 
with her two sons. Max and Glen. 
Tor Los Angeles, Cal.. to reside until 
her sons finish at the Lcland Stan- 
ford university, was the guest of honor 
at a farewell reception Monday 
given at the residence of Mrs R. W. 
Nichols. 1801 East Third stree^t by the 
ladles of the First Baptist church. 
An Informal musicai program was 



Gladys Yunberg. 

Irene Brown, 

Mary Regall, 

Alice Johnson, 

Frances Bcla.=ky 

Eula Baker. 

Gertrude Schub. 
Isky, 

Victoria Massie, 

Tillle Johnson, 

Birdie Cloutler. 
Messrs. — 

Fred Therrio, 

Alex Boisgolie. . 

D. V. Prudhomme, John DrVK"?;, , , 

Ray Dunlap, Arthur Robillard, 

Herbert Massie. John Brown. 
• • ♦ 

Mrs C. G. Traphagen, 1931 East 
Superior street, Entertained at a pret- 
tlWappointed tea Thursday afternoon 
for her Kiece. Miss Gertrude Traphagen 
of San Francisco. Cal. Baskets of pink 
roses decorated the rooms and sixty of 
the younger society gl^rls called. 

Mr« F C. Harris entertained at a 
prettily appointed luncheon yesterday 
fn compliment to her guests Misses 
Fern Lawrence and Grace McClaln of 
Cleveland, Ohio. Bachelor buttons 
V^rlrrnVd the centerplece and boquets 
o7The same flower"^ marked the eight 
rlace.s. Misses Myra and Molly IJar- 
HrwHl entertain at a house party at 
«oi on Springs. Mr. and Mrs. Harris 
!ni Mrs A S Jackson will be the 
chanerones and their guests will In- 
clude Misses Mary North. Fern Law- 
rince and Grace M^Claltv a 1 of Cleve- 
land, and Miss Edna White of Chi- 



Dr. C. Tellx Gowrauas 



Oriental Cream 

Protect Your CorepUMon During the Summer 

Every woman who spends the Summer at 
the seashore, in the mountains or at some 
fashionable wate.ing place should take with 
her a few battles of GOURAUD'S ORI- 
ENTAL CREAM to improve and beautify 
her complexion and protect her skin from 
the burning sun. bleaching winds, and damp 
night air. It has been in actual use for over 
half a century, which proves its superiority. 
GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL CREAM 
cures Skin Diseases and relieves Sunburn. 
Removes Tan, Pimples, Blackheads, Moth 
Patches, Rash, Freckles and Vulgar Red- 
ness, Yellow and Muddy Skin, givmg a deh- 
cately clear and refined complexion. It has 
the highest recommendations and cannot be 
surpassed when preparing for evening attire. 

For Sale by Drnggists and Department Stores. 

Send 10c in stamps for a book of Gou- 
raud's Oriental Beauty Leaves, a handy lit- 
tle volume of perfumed powder leaves 
which can be slipped into the purse and 
used in any emergency. 
FERD. T. HOPKINS. Proprietors. 37 Great Jone. Street. NEW YORK 




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Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



honor 
recep- 
at the 



Mrs. Kmil Mark. Mr. an.1 Mrs. Charles 
Mork. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Mork. Mr. 
and Mrs. I^rson. George Olson and Mrs. 

Emma Olaon. 

• • • 
Rev. Carl Solomonaon of the F^rst 
Swedish Lutheran church and Mrs. ^>ol- 
omonson were the guests ot 
Thur.-<day evening at a farewell 
lion given by the congregation 
Church, corner of Sixth avenue east 
and Third street. Kev and Mrs. Sol- 
omonson will leave next Tiiesday for 
Sweden, where they will spend a \ ear. 
and the members of the ohurch g" ve 
this affair as an expression of their 
regard for the departing people. 
400 people attended 
tereatlng program, 
hour waj» enjoyed, 
church serving 



Di 



iscovers 



Voice Wkile 
Studying tke Piano 



About 

and after an in- 

an informal social 

the ladies of the 

refreshments. The 



were 
and 



effectively 
ferns and 



parlors of the church 
decorated with roses 
Oth»'r auinmor flowers. 

Speeches of farewell were made by 
Hjalmer Carlson as representative of 
the young people and F A. Burg as 
representative of the church, to which 
Rev Solomonson responded with a 
lew words. F. A. Phorwall read an 
original poem; A. H. Mehlander gave 
an Interesting speech; the ohurch choir 
«ang a delightful number, and Ludwig 
Mel.mder played two beautiful violin 
solos R. A. Vlxtrora. the organist of 
the church, played an organ solo. Prof. 
A. F. Lundholm of the Swedi.sh l.lim 
L.utherun church gave a short talk and 
j|i ,1.,. ... \hi g^ave an interesting deo- 
I , The guest of honor was 

pi a with a purse as a gift from 

thf ohurch He will preach his fare- 
W''ll sermon Sunday morning at 10 
o'i:\-H:k 

The Holy Angels Sodality of St. 
Cleiiifnts chun^h entertained the 
aluiiin! of St. Clement's .s.hool Wednes- 
day . vening with a banquet and social 
evening. This was the fir^^t ban-iuoi 
of this nature given in the history of 
. .il and wa.s greatly enjov<»t 
r neventv-rive gue.st.* During 
ihig an informal program cou- 
,jf the following numbers was 



t' 
I 

th.- 



ing 



■ 1: 



•*T ..■ .Ml'. -Vctor" 

. Mr?*. Lawrence l»rohan 
•'.Miss Mary Shesgreen 

, i ■ Agnes Nunan 

' .^ N- vt-r Sm»led'\ 

Kennedy 



Th 


ose present 


were: 


Me>.-*r<t — 






' rs. 


E. Rohlnson, 




ley. 


J, Quinn, 


L 


t T >han. 


Mr. King. 


D. 


England, 


J. Wade. 


F 


L-v.>ns, 


J. tleran. 


s 


1 1 iti.^es. 


A. Hegland, 


L 


1 Ir iTisrer, 


C. Nolan, 


L 


! >„i %■ 


C. Kremer, 


(.", 


1 "»'.,i.-;e. 


J. At.il, 


I 


v\ . tterham. 


C. Carroll, 


K 


W lifers. 


J. Hurley. 


J 


<>Hern, 


F. naley. 


A. 


Nolan, 


J. Miller. 


Mi.^j^es — 




M. 


rviley. 


T. Koneczney, 


il. 


Do Ian, 


A. D.iusereau, 


E 


O'Neil. 


E. Hovaney, 


H. 


Grimes, 


R. Cea.se. 


A 


Van. 


A. Lamb. 


V 


M Nerney. 


A. Walters. 


A 


I 'ill ay, 


M. Wiley, 


A. 


()■ Toole. 


Viola radden. 


B. 


Bvron, 


E Doisey. 


F. 


Wade. 


L. McAlinden. 


Mrs C Nolan. 


I. Gratto. 


Ml 


•. Campbell, 


G. Sullivan, 


I.. 


Wright. 


F. Ryan. 


A. 


Koneczney, 


H. OXeal. 


T. 


M«Nerney, 


I. Chartier. 


M 


Buckley. 


Veronica Pad- 


r. 


Beers. 


den. 


A. 


Cookshank. 


O. Dorsey. 


3k(. 


Wade. 


M. Harris. 


Ml 


■s. R. King. 


A. McDermott, 


m. 


McMahon. 


E. McNiekel. 


J 


Miller, 






ed much attention from lovers of poetry. 
Mrs. Ea^on 4a the widow of the late 
Wyatt Eaton, the artist. 
' • » • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M, Peyton of Four- 
teenth avenu« east and Superior 
street hawfe as |helr guest, Mrs. G. V. I. 
Brown of jMilwaukee. Selby Brown Is 
the guest* of Dr. and Mrs. G. Herbert 
Jones. 

• « • 
Miss Dorothy Seymour left Tues- 
day evening for Chautauqua. N. Y.. 
to spend several weeks. Mrs. R. M. 
Seymour will join her there later. 

• • • 
Mr and Mrs. . B. E. Baker of Lester 

Park apenj a fpw days in Minneapolis 
this week: called there by the unex- 
pected death o^ Mrs. Clothier, who was 
a former rfesldeht of Lester Park. Misa 
Helen Clothier .returned with them to 
make her home here. 

•■^ • • 
Mr. and Mrs. Carroll Graff of 1601 
East First street have returned from 
a two weeks' trip to Eastern points 
where they visited friends. 

• • • 
Margaret Walker. Norrine Thomp- 
son and Margaret Dunn of Salt Lake 
City; Misses Vilette Wainwrlght and 
Florence Richards of Philadelphia, and 
Miss Alice O'Brien of St. Paul, who 
were the house guests of Misses Marie 
and Nannie Turrish. 403 East Second 
street, for a ci)uple of weeks have re- 

to their homes. 
• • • 

J. B. Adams and Miss Esther 
returheil Monday evening from a 
stay In Minneapolis. 



turned 

Mrs. 
Adam.s 
week's 



Mr and Mrs. Charles d'Autremont 
of 1401 East First street have returned 
trom a month's visit in the East. 

« • • 

Mr. and Mrs. C. J. Bell of Washing- 
ton D. C, are expected next Monday 
for'a visit here. Mr. Bell is the presi- 
dent of the National Trust company. 
• • * 

John Mc.Xlpine. Mr. 
Carr, and Mr. and Mrs. 
and son. M. O. Hast- 
Robert Bell of Wash- 
Dale McAlpine have 
outing at the Mc- 



Mr. and Mrs. 
and Mrs. Walter 
W. B. Hasting.s 
ings of St. Paul. 
Ington. I). C. and 
returned from an 



urday 

were 

Falls. 

Miss 

Lund. 

Young 

Emma 



Misa 



MISS FRIEDA ROECKER. 

Mi.-s Frieda Uoecker, who has ju.^t returned to New York, after a visit 
here with her patents, Mr. and Mr.*?. William Roecker of London road, is one 
of Duluth's most promising singers. Miss Roecker went to New York last 
fall to study the pUuio and it was iiuite Incidentally that her voice was dls- 
covered, and undt r the advice of her In.structors she has taken up the study 
of the voice with the view of operatic work. She is studying with Prof. Sulll 
of the Metropolltin opera house, and Is also keeping up her work on the 
piano. She has already had some very high praise. 



the river resort. A baseball game he- 
tween teams representing the two 
councils will be o le of the features of 
the outing, and the members will com- 
pete in other spot ts. The Joint picnic 
of the two couniil.s is an annual af- 
fair and has always proved an enjoy- 
able outing. 



following notice of the 



city 
Du- 



• • * 

Miss Etta and Erna Bartholdi enter- 
tained a few friends at a week-ena 
party at their country lu>me last .^at- 
and Sunday. Those in the party 
Miss Grace Fisher of Chippewa 
Wis., Miss Albertina Engman. 
Marie Peterson. Miss Dorothy 
Miss Ethel Nelson, Miss Alda 
of Superior. Wis., and Miss 
Kunze. 

• • • 
Cora Ryning was hostess at 

four tables of bridge Monday evenlrig 
at the home of her sister. Mrs. W . !•..■ 
Williams 330 South Fifteenth avenue 
east. A centerpiece of red carnations 
deioratod the dining room, and in the 
parlor water lilies and white roses 
were used. „ ^ „ 

Mrs M. W. Turner. 1910 East Supe- 
rior street, entertained at bridge Mon- 
day afternoon at her home. Three 
tables were in the play and the prizes 
were won by Mrs. Frank Hibbing and 
Mrs A. C. Loeb. Garden flowers dec- 
orated the rooms. 

• • * 

Mrs E. G. Slocum and Mr.**. Norman 
B Barness entertained at a picnic sup- 
per Thur3.1ay evening at Lincoln park. 
Covers were laid for eighteen. 

• • • 

A n imber of young women were en- 
tertained Tuesday evening at a picnic 
supper at the Petz inn at Woodland. 
Tho.se present were: Misses Inez Lee. 
Isabelle McLean. .\nna Flood. Gertie 
Holt. Mamie Gould. Katherlne Petz. 
Cora Schmtttdlel. Nan Pola.sky. Helen 
Miohalek. Alice Gould and Pearl Petz. 

• * « 

Miss Lottie Crowley was hostess at 
»n Informal afternoon tea yesterday at 
her home 115 East Third street In cora- 

?Ument to Miss Grace Parker, who Is 
o be one of next months' brides. The 
fne;<t of honor was presented with a 
andsome hand painted bon-bon 
The table appointments were in 
and C'Vers were set for ten. 



aieddittds 



Invitations havt been received from 
Mrs. Ernest Leeds of London, England, 
formerly of Dulut i. to the marriage of 
her daughter. Misf Catherine Leeds, to 
Philip Mellor. on Wednesday, July 26, 
at 2;30. The -narrlage will take 
place at St. Lul e's church. Redcliff 
square, and will ne followed by a re- 
ception at the home. 

• • • 

A wedding of interest to Duluthians 
took place Thursday at Cleveland, Ohio, 
when Miss Anna N. Carey and Calvin 
F How of this city were married. The 
wedding took pla-e at the home of the 
bride's sister. Mr*. Howard Strong of 
that city. ^^ ^ ^ , „ . 

After spending a month at Isle Roj - 
ale Mr. and Mrs How will return to 
Duiuth and reside at 203 South Seven- 
teenth avenue eait. Mrs. How was a 
teacher in the state normal school 

here. 

• • • 

Dr and Mrs. Charles B. Hutchinson 
have arrived f roi i their wedding trip 
and will make th iir home in this city 
Dr Hutchinson vas married 
day. July 5. to Miss Clara J. 
of" Decatur, 111. The 



Wednea 
Laughlln 
Decatur Review 



printed the 
wedding. 

•Miss Clara J. Laughlin of this 
and Dr. Charles B. Hutchinson of 
luth, Minn., were married Wednesday 
evening at 8:30 o'clock at the resi- 
dence of the bride's brother, P. P. 
Laughlln and wife, 605 West Macon 
street. The officiating clergyman was 
Rev. J. H. Miller of Gibson City, nephew 
of the bride. Miss Clara May Graybill 
served as maid of honor and Mrs. J. H. 
Miller acted as ring bearer. Miss Hen- 
rietta S. Graybill played the wedding 
march from "Lohengrin." 

"The bride's gown was of a deep 
cream peau de cygne silk, with lace 
and pearl trimmings. Her boquet was 
pink roses. The maid's dress was of 
Persian lawn with eraproldery trim- 
mings. 

'The decorations through the house 
were extremely pretty. Boquets of 
marguerites, pansles, roses and sweet 
peas being arranged In a tasteful man- 
ner. Following the ceremony a wed- 
ding supper was served. 

A musical program was a feature ot 
the evening. Misa Henrietta Graybill 
.sang a solo. 'Absent,' Miss Pogue 
played a piano number and Miss Clara 
Graybill sang the wedding benediction. 
The Road of Life" Dr. Hutchinson and 
his bride sang a duet. 



Alpine lodge at Trout lake. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mr.s. T. V. Cole. Miss Elcey 
Cole, Fred Cole. Mr. and Mrs. G. G. 
Hartley and the Misses Hartley left 
Wednesday on Mr. Coles yacht Al- 
vlna for a short trip to Houghton, 
Mich. 

• • * 
Mrs H. .s'lmon of New York arrived 

Wednesday to apend a month with her 
mother, Mrs. J. B. Culver. 

• • * 

Mrs. C. E. Adams of 412 Oxford 
street ia In Minneapolis, this week. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs., T. H. Hawkes of 210 
Sixteenth aventie east have as their 
guests Mr. Hawkes's sister. Miss 
Hawkes of Springfield. Mass., and Dr. 
Howard H. Mitchell of the Sheffield 
Scientific School of New Hampsiiire. 
« « « 

Theron Hawkes. Jr.. has returned 
from Hotchklss. where he has been at- 
tending school. He visited friends for 
a short time after the close of school 
before returning. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Morrison of Glen 
Avon have as their guests for a short 
time Mrs. Johnston and Mrs. McKenzie 
of Sault Ste. Marie, Can. 

• • • 

Miss Katherine Morton is visiting In 
Chicago and later will go to Three 
■ avers. Mich., to spend the remainder 
of the summer with friends. 

• • • 

Miss Helen Jenswold of Lakeside 
was hostess at a week-end party at the 
Jenswold farm in honor of her guest, 
Miss Laura Pinkerton of Paynesvllle, 
Minn. 

• • • 

Mrs. H. Montgomery and Miss Dale 
Montgomery leti Monday for their home 
on the range after a visit with friends 
here. Miss Montgomery is on her way 
home from Grinnell college, where she 
was a member of the graduating class 

■his year. 

• * • 

Miss Isabelle Pearson 
studying organ niusic 
the past few months 
America on Aug. 9 on 
to the Olympic which 
first trip at -that time. 

• • • 

Frank Randall, superintendent of 
the reformatory at St. Cloud, and Mrs. 
Pwandall, arj guests of Mr. and Mrs. 
O. H. Clarke ot 1420 
street for a week. 

• * * 

Miss Chloe Richards 
day from Albert Lea. 





■'sses Hortense and Estella. returned 
•Saturday on the Hamonic from Detroit 
where Miss Hortense has been attend- 
ing school the past term. 
* * « 
Bertha Mendelson of '418 East 
street left Tuesday evening 
steamer Minnesota for Chicago, 
she will spend six or seven 
as the guest of friends. 
« • • 
Annie Vogt left "Wednesday 
two months' visit with her 
at Spring Lake. Minn. 



Miss 
First 
on the 
where 
weeks 

Miss 
for a 
mother 



Buffalo flats is 
weeks' visit in the 



MISS THIELE. 



Personal mention 



Mrs. Charlotte Eaton of New York 
is the guest of Mrs. J. D. Stryker of 
Woodland. She is an author of both 
prose and poetry and her book of son- 
nets, published a few years ago attract- 



who has been 
in London for 

will sail for 
the sister ship 

will make its 



East Superior 



A large life insurance company 
which during its existence has paid to 
policy holders almost, if not quite, a 
billion dollars, makes the statement 
officially that "the improvement In 
the general death rate is due largely 
to a reduction in infant mortality and 
to greater efficiency In prolonging the 
lives of the feeble and delicate." 

The placing of Infant mortality at 
the head of the causes should give the 
Scottish Rite Masons of Duiuth en- 
couragement in their work for human- 
ity and satisfy them as to the wisdom 
of their choice of endeavor in which to 
engage to secure the greatest results. 

That Duiuth is no exception to the 
other places on the map ig evidenced 
by the fact that the Consistory nurse 
has over thirty-three infants under her 
care and this within two months since 
the scheme materialized into practical 
effort, with all the ignorance and mis- 
information, prejudice and bigotry, 
pride and indift'erence to overcome. 
Quietly, unobtrusively and without 
brass band accompaniment Miss Thlele 
came, saw, conquered; has organized 
her work while attending to the de- 
tails, and has placed at the disposal 
of the poorest home the active serv- 
ices of a skillful person, better than 
which the millionaire could not com- 
mand. 

The result has been, so far, very sat- 
isfactory, and bv confining her ef- 
forts within the well defined bound- 
aries of Infant welfare there has been 
no friction which has not easily 
overcome, everything 
oughly mastered and 
be permanent. While 
feature of the work 
tion of unnecessary deaths among In- 
fants, there is the ereat idea of the 



her 
are 

af- 



dish 
pink 



.^^>^>w^^^^%^>^>^>^>^* 



.merican ^VoInall Appeared 

as Juliet at Coronation Ball 



events Planned 



Miss Esther .Adams has invited 
iruests for a dinner dance to be given 
thi.s evening at the Country club 
In compliment to her guest. Miss Chase 
of Santa Barbara. Cal. 

• • • 

Mrs. J. L. Washburn will be hostess 
to the members of the Saturday club at 
their annual picnic next Tuesday at 
her home in Hunter's Park. This Is 
one of the largest social events of the 
club year and one which Is anticipated 
with pleasure by the members. 
« « * 

Mrs. J. L, Washburn has l.ssued invi- 
tatlon.s for h-jr annual garden party to 
b» given at her home In Hunters Park 
Tuesday afternoon. July 25. A large 
number of guests have been Invited. 

• • • 
Miss Grace Weston, 2130 East Supe- 
rior street, ha.s Invited guests to an 
afternoon tea Monday at her home. In 
compliment to her guest. Miss Mar- 
garet Geggie. formerly of this city. 

• « « 
Miss Marie Erd of 202 South Nine- 
teenth avenue east will entertain Tues- 
day afternoon at her home for Miss 
Dale Montgomery, who will spend the 
week here with friends. 

• « • 

The teachers' training class of the 
First Presbyterian church will give a 
little three-act comedy, entitled "Miss 
Fearless and Her Company." This will 
be given at the assembly hall of the 
Young Women's Christian association. 
« • * 

The regular Sunday afternoon vesper 
service of the Younsr Woman's Chris- 
tian a.s30clatlon will be held tomorrow 
afternoon at the home of Mrs. A. L. 
"Warner at Hunter's Park. All who 
wish to go are asked to assemble at 
the local building at 3 o'clock. The 
services will take place at 4 o'clock. 

• • • 
Mrs. E. D. Edson of 1809 Jefferson 

street will entertain at an afternoon 
bridge party Tuesday afternoon of 
next week In compliment to her guest. 
Mls.s 'l-onstance Watson of Fargo and 
Miss Elizabeth Maglll also of Fargo, 
wtio Is visiting Miss Annie Hugo. 

• • • 

Meinbers of Duiuth and Superior 
councils. Knights of Columbug, their 
families and friends, will enjoy their 
annual joint outing next Tuesday. 
July is. They will leave for Fond du 
Lac on the steamer Columbia Tuesdav 
morning, and will spend the day at 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 



MOST DELIOHTFtTL ATTD LITXVUL. 
OUS RESTAURA.'«JT IN DULUTH. 




returned Mon- 
Mlnn., where 
she has been visiting her sister, Mrs. 
John Ransom, for the past two months. 

* * • 

Mr. and Mrs. James V. Watson have 
returned from a month's trip in the 
East. They spent a week at Atlantic 

City. 

* * « 

Miss Edith Henderson of 
who has been a guest at the 
Mr. and Mrs. Henty Fee. 
wee'K-end guest of Mrs. J. A. 
worth. Miss Maud Watterworth of 
same place arrived today to be 
guest of her aunt for the 
the summer. 

« * « 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Douglas Bostwick 
have returned from their wedding trip 
In the West and will be at home at 216 
Fourteenth avenue east. 
• • * 

Mrs. R. G. Henderson and Mrs. A. 
Griffith and son. Ralph, formerly of 
Duiuth, have returned from Junction, 
Col., arid are the guests of friends here 
before going to Milwaukee, Wis., 
where they will make 



Toronto 
home of 
is the 
W'atter- 
the 
the 
remainder of 



been 
has been thor- 
the results will 
the prominent 
is the preven- 
deaths among 
great idea of 
avoidance of malformation of those 
who get through the infant period. It 
is acknowledged by physicians that 
one-half of the blind babies are in 
that condition from easily prevent- 
able cause.s; that ful'v one-half of 
the nermanent deformities, other f_ 
blindness, could have been readily 
avoided if proper care had been ex- 
tended during the soft, almost plastic, 
period of Infancy. Can anyone place 
a value on the services which would 
prevent a blind man or a cripple from 
being a burden to his parents or the 
public and and a curse to himself? 
That Is another of the aims of infant 
welfare. 

Educating Parent*. 
Another feature of the work is the 
education of the mother prior to and 
after the birth of the child. To es- 
tablish that Miss Thiele arranges for 
a meeting in some neighborhood to 

" are Invited, a 
scheme is de- 



whlch those interested 
reception with a color 



cided on, and there is pink tea, blue 
ice cream and chocyjlate cake, after 
which a few scenes from the opera of 
the "Tower of Babel" are rehearsed 
to give the reception a touch of real- 
ism, then such instruction is given 
as the circumstances demand. Actual 
demonstrations are given in the proper 
manner of handling and caring for the 
Infant. 

The preparation of foods, the ad- 
ministration to the infant, the mod- 
ification to be made to suit the con- 
dition of the child, the meaning ot the 
cries of the infant and all those end- 
less matters which the mother ig 
norant of the great concern of 
life should be best Instructed in, 
taught. ... , , ^ 

Should the family be unable to 
ford those articles which are Indispen- 
sible in such cases, loans of them are 
made to those needing them and after 
the need Is past they are taken back 
and kept for another time wherever 
possible. Incidentally, while It Is in- 
tended to stick closely to the one fea- 
ture, inf£^t welfare, there are many 
ways in which the trained nurse can 
be of benefit to the rest of the family, 
' and many articles of clothing, bedding 
and household necessities are placed 
where they are really needed and at 
the time they are wanted. 

It Is the fundamental idea of Infant 
welfare that nature's food is by all 
odds, the very best to u.se and every 
effort Is made to have that impress.?ll 
on the minds of mothers and secure 
their co-operation In the Interest of 
their charges. With the cool summer 
weather and many good dairies the 
milk supply is not thought to be a 
question to %vhlch Duluthians will have 
to give much prominence, but should 
occaislon demand and the dairy stand- 
ard and inspection fall behind, every 
necessary effort will be made to se- 
cure a .supply of the substitute of 
cow's milk, and let the people know 
where the dangerous dairies are. so 
they can be avoided. The Infant mor- 
talltv among babies maternally nursed 
is comparatively nothing compared 
with that of the poor unfortunates 
who have to depend on the bottle, es- 
pecially during the hot months, with 
Duluthians probably between July 1 
and Sept. 1. and even here it is a 
wlae precaution to sterilize the milk 
for the baby. 

Miss Thlele does not believe that 
in her work the office is very neces- 
sary, hence her office hours are very 
brief, between 11 and noon, when she 
Is In, but messages will be taken at 
the office and she will get them when 
she gets a chance to attend to them. 
The office Is that known as the sec- 
retary's, in the Masonic temple, on the 
Second street level and tho.se who call 
will find a charming, enthusiastic 
young woman, full of good nature, 
sympathy and tact. 



of Mlnne- 
is a guest 
J. B. Wea- 
street for 



HALLIE ERMINIE RIVES. 
Hallle Erminle Rives, whose husband Is Port Wheeler, the secretary pf the 
American emba isy to Russia, was In London during the coronation festivities 
and was a cons dcuous figure In the social life of that period. She was present 
at the great Shikespeare costume ball, appearing as Juliet. 



their home 

• • • 

I A. Caswell, clerk of the supreme 
court, and family, of St. Paul, were in 
the city Tuesday. They left for a trip 

down the lakes. 

• * « 

Miss Lillian Lisle of Lexington. Ky., 
Is the gluest of Miss Marie Agatin of 
2402 East Fifth street. 

• • * 

Mrs. F. W. DeVey. 804 East Third 
street has as her guests Mrs. J. T. Mc- 
Arthur and family, late of Fort Snel- 
ling who are on their way to Fort Slo- 
cum. N. Y., where Capt. McArthur is 
now stationed. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Sargent, who 
have been visiting Mr. .Sargent s sister. 
Mrs W. A. McGonagle, of Hunter's 
Park left Tuesday for their home lu 
Fairbanks, Alaska. 

• • * 
Robert McGonagle returned Tues- 
day from Hamilton. Mont., to spend 
some time with his parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. W. A. McGonagle. of Hunters 

park. 

• • • 

Mrs. Charles A. Smith and daughters. 
Misses Delia and Katherine. of Hun- 
ter's park have returned from a short 
visit with Mr. and Mis. Phillip A. Smith 
of Grand Rapids, Minn. 

• • * 

Miss Marguerite Geggie 
apolls, formerly of Duiuth, 
at the home cf Dr. and Mrs. 
ton of 2123 East Superior 

several weeks. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sheridan's guests, 
Mr. and Mrs. John Fltzglbbon. re- 
turned Tuesday to their home at 
Sioux Falls. S. D.. after a few days' 

visit here. 

• • • 

Mrs. D. Boyle and Miss Mabel Boyle 
have returned to Stillwater. Minn., 
after a short visit with the Misses 
Gowan. 1010 East Second street. 

• • • 

Mr and Mrs. N. F. Hugo of 2407 
East Third street have as their guest 
for a few days, Mrs. Hugos brother, 
A. F. Wells of Cheyenne Wells, Colo. 

• • • 
Mrs. Margaret G. Jeffrey of 28 South 

Twenty-first avenue east, has as her 
guest Mrs W. D. Wiggins of Pitts- 
burg. Mr. Wiggins will arrive in a 
few days and they will remain until 
the last of the month. 

• • • 

Mrs. William O'Brien of Cleveland 
returned to lier home Wednesday after 
being the guest for a few days of her 
sister-in-law, Mrs. Alice A. Taylor, 
of 2121 Jefferson street. 

• • • 
Miss Louisa K. Melning has gone 

back to London. Eng.. to resume her 
position with the Canadian Pacific 
Railway company in the Immigration 
department. She was called home .sev- 
eral weeks ago by the Illness of her 
mother. Mrs. L. N. Melning of Second 
avenue east. Miss Melning is very 
well known in business circles In Lon- 



abroad. 

929 
day 
took 
river to 



don having held important positions 
as representatives of American and 
Canadian firms both here and 

• * • 
Mr and Mrs. R. M. White of 

East' Third street returney Thur.^day 
from a several weeks' trip. 'They 
the trip down the Mississippi 

Memphis. 

• • * 

Mrs H Sanborn and son. Ray. hava 
returned ' from North Yakima, wher>3 
they have spent the past year, to make 
their home here again. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Webster returned 
Wednesday from a lake trip. 

♦ • • 

Mrs H. T. Hazen of 1612 East Supe- 
rior street left the last of this week for 
a visit at various points In Canada. 

♦ • * 

Mr. and Mrs. A. O. Smith and family 
of Milwaukee are guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. William Roecker of 1913 London 

road. 

» • • 

Miss Grace Wright of the Central 

high school faculty has returned to 

Duiuth for the summer from a visit 

at Janesvllle and Madison, Wis. 

• • • 

Mrs W C. Brundage of Chester ter- 
race is visiting friends at Larimore, 

N- I>- . • • 

Mr and Mrs. Thomas H. Collins and 
Miss "Bertha lOngleder arrived Wednes- 
day from New York city to be the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. Edwin J. Col- 
lins, 1810 Jefferson street. 

• * « 

Miss Margaret Smith, 326 West Third 
street, left Wednesday for her home at 

Dunsheath, N. D. 

• • • 

Miss Florence McKay has 
Grand Marais to pass her 
with Miss Lucille McPherrm. 

• • • 

A R. Bjorquist left Monday evening 
for Chicago, where he will be joined by 
Mrs. Bjorquist, who 
Ing there, and they 
Shrlners' convention 
N. Y. 

Mrs. J. L. Morrison 
is the guest of her son. John L. Mar- 
ston. at Marston manor, 2329 Minne- 
sota avenue. 

• • • 

Miss "Vivian Burrell left Monday 
for a week's visit on the range with 
Miss Dale Montgomery. 

• • • 

Mrs. Joseph Lingelbach and son 
Reiner have returned from a month's 
visit at Chicago and Ottawa. 111. 



week with their relatives, Mrs. C. L. 
Rakowsky of 2516 East Sixth street, 
and William Pfenning. 

• • • 
Mis.«es Grace and Lena Ward of 

Lakeside are enjoying an outing at 
Toben's Harbor. Isle Royale. 

• • ♦ 
Mrs. A. Lucus and two little girls 

have returned to their home In 
Everett. Wash., after a week's visit 
here with Mrs. F. D. Orr of 1114 East 

Second street. 

• * * 

Mr and Mrs. H. Y. Joseph and fam- 
ily have gone to their farm at Grand 
Lake. Minn., for a 



has 
will 
at 



gone to 
vacation 



been visit- 
go to the 
Rochester, 



of Tabor, Iowa. 



• • • 
Mrs. Charles Dall of East 
visiting Miss J. S. Moody 
East First street. She 
in Duiuth when Mr. Dall 
resentatlve of the 
here. Mrs. David 



Orange is 

of 1220H 

merly resided 

was the rep- 

Bradstreet company 

J. Sinclair of Minne- 



apolis is also the guest of her sister 
Miss Moody. ^ ^ 

Mr and Mrs. William Beaufuss and 
son. William, of Chicago. 111., arrived 
on the steamer Minnesota to spend a 



two weeks' outing. 

* • * 
Mr. and Mrs. Oliver Overby of 4711 

ICast Superior street are visiting rela- 
tives in Minneapolis for a couple of 

weeks, 

• • ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. John Olsen and family 
have moved to their cottage on Park 
Point to spend the rest of the summer 

there. 

♦ • • 

Miss Lucy Maud Wood of 201 Hugo 
street, Duiuth Heights, has gone to 
Minneapolis to be the guest of Miss 
Ella Thorp for a month. 

• • • 

Rev. James S. Dauerty who has been 
a visitor at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Benjamin Wood of Duiuth Heights has 
returned to his home at Bruno, Minn. 

* • » 

T. W. Thatcher and son Allan have 
gone to Chicago by boat for a three 
weeks' visit there and at Fort Wayne. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Harker. Miss 
Mabel Harker and Mr. and Mrs. 
Peron have returned from a two 
outing at Deerwood. 

• • • 

Mrs George Dion and sons, and Miss 
Ida Allard of Hancock. Mich., who are 
guests at the home of Mrs. John 
Levine, 429 Fourth avenue 
gone to Cloquet to spend 
with Mr. and Mrs. J. R. 

• • • 
Miss May Dion of Hancock. Mich., is 

visiting her aunt. Mrs. J. F. Dennis of 
"Dennistoon," Park Point. 

• • • 

Mrs R. C. Handy has returned to 
Minneapolis after a visit wuii her son 
and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. R. 
D. Handy, of 1922% East Superior 

street. 

m * m 

Mrs. M. M. Hanna and children of 
Park Point have returned from Mil- 
waukee. Wis., where they spent two 

weeks. 

• • • 

Misses Clara and Nellie Stark re- 
turned Sunday evening from Minneapo- 
lis, where they spent a week. 

« • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert N. May. 2820 
Helm street, have gone to Northwest- 
ern Canada to visit friends. 

• • • 

Miss Lea Block and Miss Grace Cul- 
len have returned from Minneapolis 
where they attended the civic celebra- 
tion last week. 

• • • 

Mrs. L. R. Bondy and daughters. 



Miss Clara Garabel of Sioux City, 
Iowa, and Miss Rose Walswlck of 
Northwood. Iowa, are visiting the lat- 
ter's sister, Mrs. L. Brathole, 2606 West 
Third street. 

* • * I 

Miss Maud Neff has gone to spend - 

the rest of the summer with her sis- 
ter, Mrs. Sydney Cullyford, In Denver, 

Colo. 

* • * 

Charles Buehler of Steubensville. 
Ohio, arrived today to be the guest of 
Mr. and Mrs. Franklin Paine of Lake- 
side for a month. 

• • • 

W. C. Johnson of the 
home from a three 

East. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. King of 2615 
East Third street have as their guest 
Mr. Kings aunt. Miss Woodruff of De- 
troit. Mich. Siie arrived Tuesday morn- 
ing. 

* • • 

Mrs. Charles J. "V. Berg of Minne- 
apolis 13 the guest of her mother, Mrs. 
B. O Donnell. Mrs. Hugo C. Nelson and 
children who have been visiting at 
various points in the West, have re- 
turned and are guests of Mrs. Nelson's 
mother. Mrs. O'Donnell. 
« • « 

Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Totman have re- 
turned from Solon Springs, where they 
were the guests of Capt. and Mrs. 
Harry Roberts for a few days. 

• • • 

A week-end party to be enjoyed at 
Solon Springs has been planned by 
Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Dunning. Miss An- 
neke and her guests. Miss Elsa Cel- 
larius of San Francisco, Cal.. and Miss 
Ellen Bausemer of St. Louis, Mo., 
Messrs. Eby Gridley. Walter Mlchler 
and Thomas Miller. 

• * * 
Mrs. J. A. Campbell of 1420 Ea.st 

Fourth street left Tuesday for Lake 
Nebagamon to spend the week-end 
with friends. On her return she will 
be accompanied by her son. Frederick, 
who has been the guest there of Mr. 
and Mrs. A. "V. Hollhan of Superior. 

• • » 

Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Campbell and son, 
Harold, of Eveleth are spending the 
week with Mr. and Mrs. James AL 
Campbell of Lakeside. 

• • • 
Mrs. Thomas Foley and Miss Eliza- 
beth Monaghan of Alpena. Mich., are 
the guests of Mrs. Walter W. Nott of 
lOOS East Second street. 

• • » 
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Bergin of Mun- 

ger terrace returned Tuesday evening on 
the Hamonic from a three weeks' lake 
trip, visiting Toronto. Buffalo, Detroit, 
Cleveland and other lake points. 

• * * 
Mrs. Maria C. Koehler of No. 14 

Chester terrace left Tuesday for V'al- 
dez. Alaska, where she will spend the 
remainder of the summer. She will 
spend the winter In California, return- 
ing to Duiuth in June. 

• * * 
Miss Sadie Terhorst has gone down 

the lakes for a three weeks' visit In 
Milwaukee and Detroit. 
» 
Mr. and Mrs. 
Floodwood were 
yesterday. 

• * • 
Mr.s. James Barnes, who has been ill 

at St. Mary's hospital Is reported to 
be improving. 

• « • 
Miss Anna J. Mark of 

apartments is in New^ 
guest of Mrs. Henry 
three weeks. 

• * * 
Wolvin of 1105 East Su- 

is expecting her sister. 
Hamilton of North Da- 
her guest. 

• • • 
Mr. and Mr.s. T. F. Cole, Miss Hoat- 

son. Miss Elcey Cole, Fred Cole, Mrs. 
O. G. Hartley and the Mis.ses Hartley 
will return this evening from a trip 
to Houghton on Mr. Cole's yacht Al- 
vlna. "They will be accompanied by 
two guests who will visit at the Cole 
home. 

• « • 
Miss Marguerite McGregor is ex- 
pected tomorrow to be a guest at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Phelps for 
a few weeks. 

• * • 
Miss Constance Watson of Fargo 

will arrive this evening to be the guest 
of Mrs. E. D. Edson for a week 

• * • 
Miss Annie Hugo of 2407 East Third 

street has as her guest Miss Eliza- 
beth Magill of Fargo, N. D. 

• • • 
Mrs. Parker Paine of 1820 East Su- 
perior street expects her sister Miss 
Vida Barrager of New York to arrive 
the first of the week to be her guest 

until Sept. 1. 

• • • 

W E. Ensign, wife and a party of 
friends arrived this morning and spent 
the day with Miss Franc Adele Ensign 
of 422 East Third street. Tomorrow 
they will leave accompanied by Miss 
Ensign for Tourists Home, Isle Royale, 
for a two weeks' outing. 

• « • 
Mrs. Fred Downey Rollins has as her 

guests her mother, Mrs. F. C. Snyder, 
and her sister. Mrs. J. W. Bates, and 
little son, all of Minneapolis. 

• « • 
After a year of study at St, Bene- 
dict's academy, .St. Joseph. Minn., Ger- 
trude and Francis Chester are guests 
for the summer of their aunt, Mrs. 
John L. Morrison, 2329 Minnesota ave- 
nue. 

• * * 

Supt. and Mrs. Frank L. Randall of 
St. Cloud are the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. O. H. Clarke, 1420 East Superior 

street. 

• o • 



*r 



i-"^ 



^^^m» 



•r^^ 



E. B. 
guests 



Robinson of 
In the city 



the Barrington 
York city, the 
Rosenthal for 



Mrs. A. B. 
perior street 
Mrs. W. A. 
kota to be 




Mrs. T. C. Goodman 
Miss Ethel Z. Goodman, 
visiting Mr. and Mrs. O. 
East Superior street. 

Mrs. Goodman is the 
Col. Goodman of the 
army. They returned 
pine islands a year 



and daughter, 
of St. Paul are 
H. Clarke. 1420 



«A«w 



A- 
weeks' 



east, have 
the week-end 
Medley. 



wife of Lleut.- 
United .States 
from the Phillp- 
ago, where the 
colonel had been stationed for two 
years. It having been their second visit 
to the Islands. They toured the world 
on their last return and the colonel 
w^s ordered to report at .St. Paul as 
chief paymaster of the Department of 
Dakota. 

On the 1st inst. a change was made 
In the departments of the army, and 
Lleut.-Col. Goodman was transferred 
from St. Paul to Chicago as chief pay- 
master of the Central division. 

Mrs Goodman and daughter, after 
visit, will go from 
Chicago. 
« • 

Murphy and 
Moorhead. Minn., who 
uests of Mr. and Mrs. 



concluding their 
Duiuth direct to 



Mrs. Thomas 
Claude, of 
been the 



Young, 
turned 



son, 
have 

f uests 01 Mr. ana airs. C. B. 
West Fifth street, have re- 
to their home. 

• * • 

Mrs. Fred Fraser, Ruth Fraser and 
Raywood Fraser have returned from a 
three months' stay at Saginaw, Mich. 

• • • 

Miss Dale Montgomery will arrive 
Monday to spend the week with friends 
and relatives here. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. K. A. Ostergren of 
Lakeside will leave Monday for a two 
weeks' visit In Southern Wisconsin. 

• • • 

J. Johnson. Sr. of Chl- 
arrlve tomorrow morn- 
ing to be a guest of Mr. and Mra 
Franklin Paine of Lakeside. 

• • • 

Dr. and Mrs. F. C, 
Superior street, have 
an auto trip to 
Center. Minn. 



Mrs. Bensen 
cago, 111., win 



Lee, 1421 
returned 
Minneapolis and 



East 
from 
Sauk 



f 



Fletcher 
have as 
mother. Mrs. Fust- 
Mrs. Charles Heihl 



• * • 
Mr. and Mrs. William 

Fusting, 5413 London road, 
their guests his 
ing. and Mr. and 
of Louisville, Ky. 

• * • 

Mi'^s Frances Bobbins has returned 
to her home In Springfield, Ohio, after 
a vNlt with the Misses Swift. Mrs. H. 
M. Shallenberger of Rochester. N. Y., 
and Misa Eleanor Greenwood of Col- 
orado Springs are guests at the horn* 



1 

1 




T 



^ ^ 



i- 



■ " " WIT 





Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 



July 15, 1911. 



Mrs. Swift, 2320 East 



of Mr. and 
First street. 

• ♦ « 
Mr<! Jarkson of Toledo. Ohio 
vlsltin« with her sister. Mrs. fa. 
Frazer? ^i^H Ka*'t Superior street. 

Hof?er Kopp of York. Penn.. ar- 
rlve-l in the city yesterday to pa.-'s 
.♦•veral weeks at the home of r>r a"d 
Mrs A C Stewart. 2020 East Third 
•treet. Virs. Kopp has been here for 
■ome time. ^ 

Mr and Mrs. F. S. Kelly and two 
mons. 414 Kast Third street. are 
mt Watertown. Wis., visiting with rela- 
tives. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred A. Moore and 
family of Hlbblng are guests at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Clar^, 
li07 East Third street. 

Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Harris and 
daughters. Myra and Molly, ^^a'^'®.^';*;; 
turned from a lake trip and a 8e%ernl 
weeks- visit in the East They were 
accompanied home ^V . M»f ''f ^^ K,\\^ 
LAwrt'nce and Orace McClaln. both 
SfTMevetand Oht... who will be their 
■rupstf* f"r a month. 

Mrs P C. Smith and daughters. 
Miss's Ethel an<l Elfva. will leave this 
eTveninK for a trip down the lakes on 
tbr<!'cu.rkra. They will visit friends 
at Sastnaxv. Mloh. 

M:.<4 Isabel Brown of East First 
■trrei is visiting friends at Fort Ar- 
thur. Can. 

• • • 
Mr^*. W. E. Jones of 129 Ninth ave- 
nue -Asx. and her brother, Kev. F. (.. 
CoolhaiiRh of Cloquet. have gone down 
the Uikc3 to Cleveland for a visit there. 

• ♦ • 
Mr 'rs. M. Mutz and two 

daupMt-is. the Misses Kathryn and 
MarKaret, of Jamestown. N. L>.. are the 
guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Starlha 
of 52U Eaat Fifth street. 

• • • 
Miss Kathryn Starlha of 520 East 

Fifth str»'et has returned from Min- 
neapolis and Litchfield. .Minn after a 
ten .lays' visit with her brother. 

Mr. and Mrs.'jaJ ^^- ^"^^^^ ,^fJ^V\ 
Bast &uperl..r street have r'^^turne.! 
from a two weeks' vl-slt at Mount 
Clemens and other points en route. 

• * • 
Mr and Mrs. Robert Rankin of 1918 

Wtst Third street left Thursday even- 
ing for a trip down the lakes on a 

freighter. 

• • • 

Mr*) \V F. McVav and two daugh- 
ters irft yesterday for a trip through 
the Yellowstone park. 

• « • 
MNa Eveleyn Ahlen and John Ahlen 

of l.=il7 Jefferson street are visiting 
In Minneapolis for a few weeks. 

• « • 
M'sa Effle Anderson of 10 Vernon 

BtTf^i has return«-d from a ten month s 
trip through the Southwest. 

Mrs. Gibson L. Douglass and daugh 
ter. Faith, of 2330 East Fifth street 
have rt turned from a months visit in 
Kew Y-rk. ^ ^ 

Mrs. Alexander Milne has as her 
»uest her sister. Miss Tlbbilts of Col- 
umbus, Uhlo. ^ ^ 

Mrs A. C. Hubbell of 1105 East First 
•treet has as her guests J}<'r "''\"*''": 
ter Mrs. W L. Johnson of St. Paul and 
Mi!=s Louise Lyon of Washington, 

D. C. 

• • • 

Mrs. E. C. Alstead of 21S North Fif- 
teenth avenue east left last evening 
for Minneapolis to meet Mr. 
who la returning from a 

Mexico. 

• • • 

Mrs. Florence King and son - 
returned yesterday from a two weeks 
visit at Hancock, Mich. 

• • • 

Dr and Mrs. D. D. Murray. 2028 East 
Superior street have as their guests 
Mrs. Arnold S. Wakeman and two 
children of Winnipeg. 

• • • 

Mrs. J. T. Hammill of 411 North Fif- 
ty-third avenue west has as her guest 
for a few weeks her sister. Mrs. George 

H. Singleton of Chicago. 

• • • 

Miss Mildred O'Brien Is home from 
FarKO N D.. where she has been at- 
tending college, to spend the summer 
with her mother. Mrs. R. OBrien of 
* i2S» East Second street. 
■*'* « • • 

Mrs. Angus Cameron of 1829 H East 
Superior street has Mrs. L. Dempsey of 
Bemidji as her guest for the week-end. 

• • • 

C A Moore of Richmond, "\ a., is 
rlsitlng friends here and In Proctor. 

Mis.sts Florence and Grace Wllkln- 
lon of 722 West Second street are en- 
ovlng a two weeks' outing at Lake 
Vermilion where they 
h camping party. 




Wealtliy Denver Girl Is 

Bri(3e of New York Man 




Alstean. 
trip to 

Roswell 



MRS. I. TOWNSEND BURDEN 




Ices, 10:30 a. m. and 



m., with 



..... - -— 8 p 

preaching by the pastor. Rev. (jeorgo 
E. Silloway. In the morning, his sub- 
ject will be "The Victory of Faith." 
and in the evening he will preach on 
"A Guest Unrecognized." Sunday 
school will be at noon. R. R. Forward 
is superintendent. 

* * • 
Trinity — At Trinity pro-cathedral. 
Twentieth avenue east and Superior 
street. Rev.. Artliur H. Wurtele. dean 
and rector, services for the fifth Sun- 
day after Trinity will be as follows: 
Holy communion, 8 a. m., Sunday 
school and Bible class. 9:45 a. m., 
morning prayer, litany and sermon, 11 
a. m., subject: •Spiritual Letters. The 
Epistles of St. Paul,' preacher, Dean 
W urtele. This is the first of a series 
of summer sermons on the "Letter 
Writers in the New Testament." 
Musical program: 

Organ prelude — "Ave Maria' 

M. L. Molr 

Processional hymn — "We Sing the 

Glorious Conquest" German 

Venlte and Gloria and "Te Deum".. 

H. Smart 

Litany hymn — "My God I Love Thee" 

Stalner 

Hymii— "Christ For the World" 

Bennett 

Anthem— "Sweet Is Thy Mercy ".Barnby 
Recessional hymn — 'Rejoice Ye Pure 

in Heart • Messiter 

Organ postlude — "March Romalne ' . . 

. . , .; Ch Gounod 

• • • 
St. AndreWit— At 5?t. Andrew'* 
chapel. Park Point mission, Twenty- 
eighth street and Lake avenue. Sun- 
day school and Bible class for young 
ladies will be at 3 p. m., evening 
s<^rvice at 8 p. m. Special music and 
special sermon on "St. Paul's influence 
Upon Religion and Literature, 
preacher. Dean Wurtele. 
♦ • • 
Bethel— At the Bethel Norwegian 
church, Sixtieth avenue west and Bris- 
tol street, there will be services at 3 
p. m., conducted by Rev. O. J. Flag- 
stad. 



\ 



- — — 



n w 




— r 



On account of several of the local 
societies suspending services for th© 
month of July or August, the local 
union has decided to discontinue the 
publication of the notices until 
first Sunday in September, when 
will again be resumed. 

It Is an item of Interest to 
Christian Endeavorers to know 
at the time of the Atlantic City 
vention just closed, reports were 
which showed the Chrl.<5tlan 
deavor society had achieved the 



the 
they 

all 

that 
con- 
read 
En- 
in- 



Miss Florence S 
married recently 
den, Jr., of New 
gone to England 
Miss Sheedy is th* 
Sheedy, a very w 
who has large In 
There were two 
and Florence. Ma 
rled in the spring 
ton of New York 



needy of Denver was 
o I. Townsend Bur- 
Vork and they have 
jn their honeymoon, 
daughter of Dennis 
ealthy Denver man, 
terests in the East. 
Sheedy girls. Marie 
rie Sheedy was mar- 
to Robert L. Living- 



Gallagher, Fanny Marvin. Berly and 
Madeline McLennan and Dorothy Bal- 

lou. 

« • • 

Mrs. A. E. Sch alter of Lake Mills, 
Iowa, and Mrs. J. C. Engleman of Sum- 
ner. Iowa, are the guests of the Misses 
Schlatter at 3701 Minnesota avenue. 



NORMAL NOTES 



are members ot 



of 



. this city now 
arrived today 
her daughter, 



Mrs. Skuse formerly 
»f Spokane. Wash., 
to be the guest of ..-- -i.,.-., „. 
UrB Hans Chrlstensen of 191S> Last 
rec^.nd street for a short time before 
returning to her home with Mr fakuse 
who haa^^heen here since the middle of 
Jurke Mri-. Skuse is returning from a 
tour months' trip aT>road. 

• • « 

Mrs O \ Stein will return tomorrow 
from^ a weeks visit in Minneapolis. 

• • • 

Miss Kelley Is the guest of friends 
this week at Waverly, Mtnn. 

• • • 

Miss Vlnopole Is spending the week 
In the Twin Cities. ^ 

Ml=(=; Anna C Jer.nlmus. daughter of 
Mr and .Mrs. Claus Jeronlmus or 1 . 
East Fourth street, returned yesterday 
from a two weeks' visit with relatives 

In Seattle, Wash. 

». 

Park Point notes 






Mrs. Harter of Twenty-eighth street 
has gone to Akron. Ohio, where she 
will spend the summer with her par- 
ents. 

• * • 

Miss Helen Ballou of Thirtieth street, 
who has been visiting with relatives in 
Barnum, has returned. 

• • • 
Mrs. Williams of Winona, who has 

been the guest of her sister. Mrs. Hen- 
dricksen. has returned home. 
« • • 
Mrs E. T. Hughes will entertain the 
ladles of the Presbyterian auxiliary 
fit her home at 2310 Minnesota ave- 
nue Thursda; afternoon at a thimble 

^«^- . • • 

r Ballou of Thirtieth street has gone 
on a three weeks business trip to 
Grand Rapids, Wis. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Broughton and 
daughters, Ruth and Francis, of ^^ aco. 
Tex formerly of Duluth. arrived the 
first" of the week and will spend a 
month in their cottage at 2827 Minne- 

30ta avenue. 

• • • 
Miss Mav Blon ts spending a week 

with her aunt. Mrs. Dennis of 3(19 
Minnesota avenue. 

• ♦ • 
Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Maynard and 

child returned to their home. 1127 
Minnesota avenue to<lay, after spend- 
ing several weeks at White Bear, Minn. 
m • • 
Mr. and Miss Ziegler have taken the 
Heney cottage at 2138 Minnesota ave- 
nue for the season. They were joined 
by their parents of Prescott, Can., who 
will spend the summer with them. 

Miss Idah Waller and nephew. Master 
Donald Kingsley. who have been spend- 
ing two weeks with Miss Ualier s par- 
ents in Litchfield, Minn, have returned 
to their home at 2114 Minnesota ave- 

»"•• • • . 

Mr and Mrs. George Lindberg have 
Kone to Chetek. Wis., for a month s 
visit with her slater. Mrs. Andrews of 

that city. 

• • • 

Dr and Mrs. Sherman of New Rich- 
mond Wis., win occupy the Lindberg 
cottage at Twentieth street for a 
month. ^ ^ 

Ml88 Evangeline Wlneke and Miss 
Charlotte Marvin gave a surprise party 
for Miss Dorothy Ballou. The quests 
entertained were: MlsaeH Kathertne 
Williams, Josephine Gude. Mildred Gor- 
«<m of Superior, Florence and Emma 



President Boh innon reminded the 
seniors in chapt 1 Thursday morning 
that the summer term was drawing 
to a close and ihat the spelling ex- 
amination will be held at the end of 

next week. 

• * * 

The manual training clasea of Mrs. 
Lyons gave a picnic and a marsh- 
mallow roast at Le-ter Park Wednes- 
day evening. 

• • • 

Miss Adeline Buckley and Miss 
Ethelwvnn Phelps, graduates of the 
1911 class, visited the school on 

Wednesday. 

• ♦ • 

Miss Laura lllberson of Proctor 
was a visitor )n Tuesday. 

• • « 

Miss Marie I rise-oil will spend the 
^rpek-end with friends at New Du- 
luth. ^ ^ 

• • • 

All the boarders at Torrance hall 
enjoyed a picnic supper at Lester 

Park last even ng. 

• • • 

Miss Elizabeth W'asley was a visitor 

on Tuesday. 

• * • 

The arithmetic classes of Miss 
Home are planning a picnic to Two 

Harbors. 

• « * 

Miss Isabel J >yce is spending today 
and Sunday with Miss Etta McMur- 

trie of Proctor. 

» • • 

Miss Annie n'oodworth of Carlton 
will be the w*ek-end guest of Miss 
Maytie Beattie. ^ , 




Si. Jolin'i. Lutheran- At this church, 
corner Lake avenue north and Th rti 
street. Rev. J. E, Shewell. pastor will 
conduct morning services at 10.30. 
Sunday s'hool will meet at 11:45 a. m. 
The ladles' aid picnic will be held 
Wednesday afternoon, July 19, at Les- 
ter I'ark. 

♦ • • 
Scandinavlno I nltnrlam— Rev. Hage- 
ruo-Nissen will preach at Gilly s hall. 
Central avenue. Vest,.Duluth, Sunday 
at 11 a. m.; subject: "True and False 
Liberalism." All are welcome. 
« • • 
Flr.t ChrlMlnn— At the First Chris- 
tlon church. Fifth avenue west and 
Fourth street, A. B. Wegener, physica 
director of the Y. M, C. A. ^yl 1 preach 
at the morning servues, which wi » ^e 
held at 10:30 o'clock. Bible school 
Will meet at noon. Ohristlan Endeavor 

prayer meeting at 7 V.f'P.i'*;, follows- 
Musical program will be as ^^ ^^s. 

8?^!.r?orV''"'^.•.^■•^■•^•^^^■'^^■«<^■""-''- 

communion voluntary . . ',.: • ' t^'l^;^!'-^ 
Athem— "Be Telling of His foaWa^^^ 

The glial ete lis composed of Mrs. 
Kelly Compton, Miss Marjor.e Wonder- 
ly H L. Pantel and G. H. McClain. 
Miss Leona Grleser Is organist and di- 
rector. 

• • • 

BetbeMdM Norweislan l,nthernn — At 

Bethesda Norwegian Lu/ii^rj*" ^^"^e ' 
Sixth avenue east and FiMh street, 
there will be no services i?i"*^'^y t^'^V 
noon, as the pastor. Rev. Theodore J. 

Austkd. will conduct '=*'7><^th« ^.vJnJ^ng 
wood. Minn. Services in the evening 
win be at 7:45 o'clock. The Norwe- 
gian Sunday school will have its picnic 
at Chester park. The young ladles aid 
society will meet with Mrs. John Lui>t, 
|''2Ea.^t Tenth street. Wednesday 
evening, a, 8 o'clockr Jhe little girl ^ 
society will meet with Mrs. T. J. 
Austad Saturday afternoon, July ^-. at 

2 o'clock. 

• * * 
TheoMophical— The Theosophical so- 
ciety will hold classes for members 
every Tuej-dav and Thursday evenings 
in July and August, at s o' clock, at -S 
Winthrop block. First strei:t a^a 
Fourth avenue west. The date of the 



at noon. The lesson topic wiU be 'Com- ] 
pensation.' Midweek service will be 



THE HANDSOME NEW HOME OF THE FIRST 
UNITARIAN CONGREGATION. AT EIGHT EENTH AVENUE EAST AND FIRST STREET. 

SPEND YOUR VACATION 

at the Inland l-«ke Inn, eighteen and 
one-half miles out on Hice Lake road. 
Fine FUlilnB and Hunting, aiul the 
BrMt 3f MenlH nnU I,od«lnK. Rnten, VlO 
ner week, Including hoatn and nilnnowd. 
Xo mo»qultoe«. For f"r*|»*«' ^'I'^^IT^V 
tlon call zenith, Grand, 21«2j Duluth, 
Mel roue, 24S8. 



Wednesday 
o'clock. 



evening in the hall at 8 



FIrMt Norweiclan 
EpiHeopal — At this 
fourth avenue west 
preaching service will be 
m on "An Importunate. 



• 
l)anl"h MetbodUt 

church, Twenty- 

and Third street, 

at 10:30 a. 

The Sun- 



crease which they pledged at the St. 
Paul international convention in 190». 
In the two years Just passed new 
Christian Endeavor societies to the 
number of 10,000 have been formed, 
and new Christian Endeavor memberg 
numbering several thousand more than 
1,000,000 have been taken m. inia 
si.owing is merely anot»ier ln:Uance of 
the power of the movement and the 
missionary spirit In the hearts of the 
young people composi ng the society. 

Rates for Hancock Honie-Coniing. 

The South Shore will apply round- 
trin rate of $10.75 to Hancock, Mich. 
Tickets on sale July 15 to 19. Return 
limit July 27. Through sleeper on 
»ii..iit train leaving 6:15 p. m. a. j. 
PeVrln. leCeraf agent, 430 West Supe- 
rlor street. 



tudy c!a.'^Be8 will be announced 



Normal students, especiaUy the 
members of tie junior ^'lass 'were 
much interested to hear of Miss A. 
Carey's marriage to C. F. How of 
Duluth. Miss Carey was the English 
teacher at the normal. 



CLUBS AND MUSICAL 




SRONZALEY QUARTET. 

Matinee Musical Will Bring Fa- 
mous Organization Here. 

HE Sionzaley String quartet 
has been engaged by the 
Matin »e Musicale club to give 
one c f its artists' concerts 
durlni; the coming season. 
These concerts are always of 
the bast and this quartet is 
one of the bes: in the country, having 
gained great popularity in the East 
and in St. Pau and Minneapolis where 
it has played. According to the opin- 
ion of Philip lale of Boston a noted 
musical critic, this quartet plays with 
even more finish of style than the 
world-wide known Kneisel quartet 

The date set for this concert Is Jan. 
31 1912 and ir their playing the mem- 
bers of the club are looking forward to 
a great treat. One other concert has 
been arranged and the contracts will 
be signed soo i. The third concert Is 
under consideration. 

The board m£ the Matinee Musicale 
has the greater part of its preparatory 
work for next year accomplished 
Committees h ive been appointed and 
the program for the year Is being 
planned. 

PROMINENT E.ASTERNERS 

VISIT MESABA RANGE. 

A party of Easterners visited the 
Mesaba range yesterday, going to Hib- 
bing In a sp< cial train over the Du- 
luth, Mlssabe & Northern. 

The party comprised Mr. and Mrs. 



I. TOWNSEND BURDEN. 



H. Oliver of Pittsburg. Pa.; Mrs. J. 
C Burnett, Louisville. Ky.; P. Tecum- 
seh Sherman. New York City; Mr. 
and Mrs. P. Hampton. D. Ewing. Mas- 
ter James Hampton Ewing and Miss 
Bartle Dunlop. all of Yonkers. 

"I have visited the range before, 
said Mr. Oliver, "but the others had 
not. They were greatly Interested in 
mining work and its magnitude. The 
weather in the East was extremely 
hot when we left. The cool weather 
here is exceedingly pleasant." 



A WEALTH OF 

BEAUTIFUL HAIR 



public 
later. 

• • ♦ 
M. Panl'i. EpUoopal— At St. Taul » 
Episcopal church. Lake avenue north 
and Second street. Rev. A. NV . .«>^V' 
rector; Rev. R. S. Read, assistant, 
holv communion will be at 8 a. m.. 
morning prayer and litany at 11 «.•"); • 
evening prayer at 7:30 p. m. ^%^^'' 
subject In the morning will be In a 
Garden. " The rector will preach. The 
musical program follows: 

MORNINC4. „ 

Processional— "Holy, Holy, "ob'-uV;-^. 

Te Deum. In C • • -l^- %"^^^^ 

Litany hymn— "Lord in This, Thy 

Mercys Day" • •••.•. 

Hymn— "O Mother Dear Jerusalem 

Solo • • • 

Mary Syer Bradshaw. 
Anthem— "God Is a Spirit ... .Bennett 
Recessional — "Savior, Source of 

Every Blessing" 

EVENING. „ 

Processional— "Holy, Holy. Holy ... 

Canticles Chanted 

Hymn— "Savior, Breathe an Even- 
ing Blesing" VV; " LJ- ' ' ' 

Anthem— "Now the Day Is 9,\^r ... 

Commentz 

MaiideMatteson and Choir. 
Orison— "Softly Now the Light of 

Day" • • •; 

Recessional — "Savior, Source or 

Every Blessing'* 



day school will meet at noon. John 
J Moe is superintendent. Preachmg 
service will be at 7:45 p. m.; topic, 
• Darkness and Light." Prayer service 
will be Wednesday evening at 8 p. m. 
• • • 
netbnny Norwegian DanUh Metho- 
•ilNt KplHCopal— Services at tnis 
church .^Ixty-fifth avenue west and 
Polk street.- Rev. C W. Schevenius 
pastor, will be as follows. Sunday 
school, 9:45 a. m.; services, 10:45 a-"\' 
Epworth league, 7 p. m.; services, H p. 

^- ... 

Flrnt Norwegian l.««»»e'*««»— At this 
church First avenue east and T-hira 
street, the pastor, o. H. Stenberg, will 
preach in the morning on Luke \ .:>, 
"At Thy Word." and In the evening ih 
English on II Chrom xxxiii:l-13, A 
Great Sinner Converted." 
• • • 

.Secoad Presbyterian— Dr. Robert 
Yost pastor of the First ^^'■esbyterian 
church win occupy the pulpit at the 
morning service at 10:45 o'clock and 
Rev C W. Lowrie of Cloquet in the 
evening at 7:45 o'clock. Sunday school 
will be at noon and Christian Endeavor 
at 6:45 p. m. 

Flrat Orthodox Chrlntlan Sclenoe— 

At the First Orthodox Christian Science 
church. Burgess hall. 312 West First 
street, services will be held at 10.45 a. 
m.. the subject being "God Is a Flam- 
ing sword." from the text 'For Om- 
God Is a Consuming Fire "«^''-^,\t -9_ 
The midweek meeting will be held on 
Thursday evening at 8 o^dock. Read- 
ing room 310 West First street »s open 
daily except Sunday Irom 2 until 5 
ocl6ck. , , , 

LeHter Park Methodist Epliioopal--At 

the LeJter Park Methodist Episcupa 
church. Fifty-fourth V^""«, „*^^,lL,^,'l'J 
Superior street, the pastor. Rev. Chaiies 
R OatenfwiU conduct the services ai^d 
preach tomorrow. At l^^^O o'clock in 
\he morning the theme of the se«-rnon 
will be "The Song ot Life, and How to 
Sing It." At 8 o'clock in the evening 
another of the Sunday evening ad- 
dresst'S on "Commonplace Pf ople ' will 
be given. The topic for this address 
will be "The Man Who Never Makes 
Any Mistakes." Sunday school will 
meet at nocm and Epworth League at 
7 o'clock in the evening, 
invitation is extended to all 

with us. 

« « « 



10c will 
Palma Leo. 



buy a permit to smoke 
clear Havana cigar. 



Chester park near Eighth street. Mid- 
week services will be Thursday even- 
ing at 8 o'clock. „ , . ,n. _ vr 
St. Mnrk'w— At St. Mark's German M. 
E church. Fifth avenue east and feixtn 
street, Jonathan Brewer, pastor, there 
will be preaching both morning anrt 
evening. At the morning services at 
11 o'clock the theme will be ^ The 
Heaven and Hell of the Bible." At the 
evening services at 8 o'clock the theme 
will be "A Glorified Christ." Sunday 
school will meet at 12:15 p. m., Mrs 
George Adams, superintendent. "ine 
choir will sing at both services. Mi**. 
Samuel McNlel. organist; Harvey L. 
PIttman, director. 

• • * 
PHarrtm Congrregatlonal — At this 
church, Alexander Milne, Pastoi"._the 
morning sermon will be on "The Gain 
of the Poor and the Loss of the Rich 
The evening sermon will be on cnrist, 
the Revealer of God." 

The musical program follows. 

MORNING. ^ , 
Grieg 

Sought tlie Lord" 

Stevenson 

Cross'' 

Mrs. Flaaten. 



Want to Sell State Farm*. 

St. Paul, Minn.. July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Governor Eberhart Is re- 
ceiving many letters from farmers and 
land companies who want to sell the 
state a farm under the act of the leg- 
islature providing for model farms In 
St. Louis county and Waseca county. 
The letters are all being referred to 
the board of regents of the state uni- 
versity. 



,<k_-i.- 



Prelude . . • ■ 
Anthem — "I 

Soio— "The 



, .Ware 



Offertory 
I'ostlude 



. .Foote 
.Parker 



.Dubois 



A cordial 
to worship 



Nothing equals an aureole of beau- 
tiful hair as a frame for a pretty face. 
Without a background of nice hair a 
really pretty face frequently becomes 
plain and. with it. unattractive fea- 
tures assume life and beauty. 

Every woman can increase her nat- 
ural charm by using Newbro's Herpl- 
cide. Herpicide makes hair beauti- 
ful. The dandruff germ saps the vi- 
tality of the hair. Herpicide kills this 
germ and prevents the hair from fall- 
ing out. giving it a snap and luster, a 
soft, silky flufflness which can be ac- 
quired in no other way. 

Your druggist will sell you a one- 
dollar size bottle under an absolute 
guarantee. 

Send 10c in postage for sample and 
booklet to The Herpicide Co.. Dept. 
R., Detroit, Mich. 

Applications may be obtained at 
the best barber shops and hair dress- 
ing parlors. 

Lyceum pharmacy and Lenox drug 
store, special agents for Duluth. 



Flrat Baptlut ohnrch — At this church, 
First street and Ninth avenue east, 
services will be at 10:30 a. m. and <:45 
D m The preachers morning topic 
will be -Mercy." In the evening the 
sermon will be on "Soul Leanness. R. 
Edward Sayles will preach. Sunday 
school will meet at noon. W . B. 
Patton is superintendent. B';"^Vier- 
hood will meet at noon. Edward Mor- 
gan Is leader, ^ , , - 

Seven Day Adventist— Services will 
be held In the church at Tenth avenue 
east and Sixth street Sunday evening. 
The pastor. Rev. E. L. Sheldon will 
preach on "Blasting at the Rock of 
Ages." , , , 

St. Stephen's^At St. 

man-English Lutheran 

seventh avenue west 

street. Walter Sievers . • „♦ 

will be services Sunday morning at 

10 15 o'clock conducted in the Ocrman 

language. Rev. Theo. Buenger of bt. 

Paul will preach. 

At St. Stephen's East end branch. 
Fourth avenue east and F'fth street, 
German services will be held In the art- 
ernoon at 3 o'clock. ^ 

V«loB Churcli— The regular services 
of the Union church are held in the 
K P. hall, 118 West Superior street 
Sunday morning at - 10:50 and in the 
evening at 8 o^clock. B. V. Black is 
pastor. The subject of the morning 
iermon will be "God Our Sufficiency ' 
The evening theme will be What Is 
Eternal Life? ' Sunday school will be 



Stephen's Ger- 

church, Slxty- 

and Raleigh 

pastor. There 



Flr»t Prenbyterlan — At the First 
Presbvterian church, t^econd street and 
Third avenue east, there_wlll be serv- 
ices at 10:30 a. m. and i Ab p. m. At 
the morning service l>avid McConaughy 
of New York, secretary of the Presby- 
terian Board of Foreign Missions will 
speak on "The Signs of the Times 
At the evening service the pastor, Rev. 
Robert Yost, will preach t-n the sub- 
iect "The Concealment of Christ an 
Impossibility. " The Bible school will 
meet at noon and the Christian Ln- 
deavor meeting will be held at 6:45 p. 
m There will be a mid-week service 
Thursday evening at 7:45. The musical 
program follows: 

MORNING. ^ ,, 

Organ prelude Gullmant 

Anthem— '"There Is a Holy City^^.^.^j^^ 

Response^'mVResV In the Lcird " . . . 
^ Hanscom 

Offertory '[["'.'."'. Massenet 

Solo • • 

Miss Louise Prosser. 

Organ postlude Read 

** EVENING. 

Organ prelude Karg-Elert 

Anthem— "Savlous. Breathe an Even- 
ing Blessing" ^."^l"° 

OfteFtory • • • " "t ^^'f^.^.^"" 

Anthem— "Through Peace to Light 

Protheroe 

Organ postlude Mendelssohn 

• . • 

St. Peter'* EpUcopal — At St. Peters 
Episcopal church. Twenty-eighth ave- 
nue west and First street, services will 
be as follows: English Sunday school. 
10 a. m.; English service, morning 
prayer and sermon, 11 a. m. ; Swedish 
Sunday school, 12:15 p. m.; Swedish 
service in the evening at 8 o'clock. 
. • * 

Flrat Mcth€>dlBt Epliieopal — At the 
Fiist Methodist Episcopal church, 
Third avenue west and Third street, 
the pastor. Rev. M. S. Rice, will preach 
Morning services will be at 10:.J0 
o'clock and the evening services at 8 
p m. Sunday school 
noon. Epworth league 
7 p. m. 

Trinity Kiorweglan Lntheran— Even- 
ing service will be at 8 o'clock. Rev. 
o J Flagstead will be Installed as pas- 
tor of the church by Rev. J. Halvorson 
of Ashland. Wis. Mrs. Teppen will en- 
tertain the Ladies' Aid society 
Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock m 



EVENING. 

An?hem-"Source of All' Lighr^^p^ -^„ 

•■•• . . . .Lainont 

^' Th'e J"hoif ■ consists of : ' ' Soprano, M r^. 
D R Flaaten: contralto. Mrs. R. JL^- 
Suck: tenor. John C. Nafc^ hass J^ ^V 
Hie^tand. Organizer and choir director 
is Faith H. Rogers^ ^ 

FIrNt German* MethodlKt Epl-oopal— 

At the first German M. E. church. F fth 

in?0 a m. and i.oo p. '••• '-^"' „ / 
s?hool will meet at S.:30 a. m. and Ep- 
worth league at 7 p^. m^ 

i=t NMnth avenue east and First street 
le^vl^es wUl be held at 10.45 a. m an.1 
services w.* subject being Life. 

Th^^ r'^eg.nar .Wednesday evening testl- 
monitl "^f.et'nK ^ill^f« f/j * a1 worth 
Sfl1linr'i?'opr^;;he ^ubUc dany 
except Sunday from 10 a. m. to i v 



m 



10 a. 

♦ * • 

<;. j<n. M B.— "Unused Energy 
w,!'l°b'°"the'Vubjrct of .he «rmo„ by 




VANDERLIP. 



Sheparrl 

. .Leslie-Leach 
Walsh, Mr. 



will 
will 



meet 
meet 



at 
at 



Trio— "Eternal King' 
Mrs Baldwin. Mrs. 

Koneczny. _^^^,^^ 

i3"o!l''Teach- Me' to' Pray" Jewltt 

I . . Mrs. Baldwin. ^^^^^^ 

Postlude 0" ' m" 'i 

«t Paul'*— At St. Paul's Lutheran 

r^SV\" ill Wc. 4.^|i;r: 

Sunday school will^meet at 9.46 a. m. 

Immannet Lutheran- At the Im- 

,v,ilr,^i T.utheran church, corner of 
FifVy-«=eventh av"enue west and Roose- 
veU strict, there will be no service 
Sunday. . . • 

o vii.i. T*iMmie The Swedish Bap- 

tis^t''^empl^?w^Ty second avenue 
west and Third street. Rev. Swaney 
Ne'lson^ pasTor , there will be «erv ce., 

^11^ 4ea"k Tn"" t'hf iSor^lng^'on" '"Tl^e 
r-^^er'lnd Use of Friendship. ' and In 

;fi1li:t7r"'o"r^h^ ^^irc xpicrr^'^'iV 

V!,? Nation's Life." the ninth sermon 

n a series on "Evenings With Joseph." 

s"umllys'chool, conducted byAThoren 

^111 rv^sot at 10 a. m. The LAOies >iis- 
^na^v- society will meet at 4 p. m 
and be addressed by Mrs Griffin re- 

furned missionary V^^rnpN ^E Eric- 
will be in charge of Prof. N. E. Eric- 
son.- • ♦ ♦ 

Bible Stndent.— The local class of 
International Bible students »^ave ar- 
ranged a chart talk to the public in 
Hall A Kalamazoo building. Sunday at 
" p m. Tli subject will be "The 
Three W^orlds." ^ 

Grac« MethodUt EpUoopnl— At the 

Grace Methodist Episcopal church 

Twenty-second avenue west and Third 

I BtTeet. Sunday there will be two serv- 



New York. July 15.— Frank A. Van- 
derllp the president of the .National 
City bank, was a Chicago news,;aper 
reporter onlv a few years ago Then 
he Ceclme pflvate secretary to the sec- 
retary of the treasury, assistant of the 
secretary of the treasuiry and finally 
vice president of the^ National City 
bank He is to be one of the great fl- 
Slncial kings of the world if the Na- 
tional City company just organized 
under his control should carry out the 
nolicies for which it is supposed to 
C-e heen organized The National 
City bank has absorbed many other 
banking institutions and has bought 
into the stock of others. Men In con- 
trol of the National Cltv bank are di- 
rectors in the Hanover National bank, 
[he RlggB" National Bank of Washin^- 
lon. and other banking instlttulone Tn 
Omaha Kan.sas City, Seattle New- 
nort etc. Now It has organized the 
K'atlonal City company, whose stock of 
S10 000,(»00 Is to be dlstr buted to the 
stockholders of the National City 
bank Its affairs are to be under the 
control of three trustees who are t» 
be officers of the National City bank. 
The trustees for the first year are 
James Stillman, Frank A Vanderll:> 
and fe. S. Palmer. It is forbidden to 
national banks to own stock in other 
banks directly, but through the Na- 
tional City company the National City 
bank may control many other financial 
institutions, and in this way the Na- 
tional City bank may control a chain 
of banks covering the entire country. 



Nothing Like It 

The Junior Arctic 
Fire Extinguisher 

for Your Automobile, 
Oarage 

See Them at 

404 WEST FIRST ST. 

458- Both Phones— 458 





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•*?^ 



--^ .- : ^-f .. ^ ■ 



THE DULUTH HERALD. 






HE MISSED SOMETHING. 



CITE man who had been telling his 
friends for months and months 
how Klad he would be to get out 
Into the country for two or three 
woeka, had put In a day and a night 
at a Qulet farmhouse when he aston- 
ished his host by saying that he 
guessed he would go back to town! 

"But have you any cause for com- 
plaint?" was asked. 

"Not against you. This seems to be 



a very nice place," 

"Then It's business that calls you 
back?" 

"Well, no. Tou see, I miss some- 
thing! All day yesterday there were 
no fire alarms, no murders, no one 
run over, no arrests. Last night there 
was no whooping, no theatres, no pic- 
ture shows, no dances, no hoodlums. 
No dally paper this morning to read 
of a suicide or double murder." 



"And you must have such things?" 
asked the farmer. 

"Why, man alive, this Is a cemetery! 
The watermelon peddlers don't yell 
— there Isn't a saloon within five 
miles — there Isn't a child to be kid- 
napped or a tenement to be blown 

i up. Let me go back where I can take 
comfort, and the matter of health be 

, durned." 

I JOE KERR. 



POINTED. 
Reggy— Yes, although It Is blooming monotonous, I turn In ©very 
night at 9 o'clock sharp. 

Peggy — How do you manage It? 

Reggy— Manage what? 

Peggy — Why. to turn In sharp after being so dulL 






. 









DIFFERENT. 

"I decline to spend $200 for a bathing suit" 

"But, hubby you don't understand. This isn't a bathing suit; thUr ifl ft 
beach costume." 



BERE'S to the maiden 
Who knows her own mind. 
Who In ways of the world 
la a long way from blind. 



«l 



HO knows her own mind. 

And holds a good lease 
of it: 

And heavens prevent us 
From getting a piece of It! 




The BiJtchcr's Son Gets the Puzzle Fad. 



EartKquake Taxes. 

TWAS In Mexico when the June ; the road In an auto. For a few seo- 
earthquake took place," said an | onds I Imagined all sorts of things, 
American who has an Interest in ' and the way the ground shook and 
a mine down there, "and 1 was out on heaved and that old auto stood up on 
— 1 its hind legs was truly bewildering. 



A FLARE-BACK. 
She — At times the ocean reminds me of you, Johnny 
He — Ah — so grand, eh? 
She No. Only at low tide when it's all going out ind nothing com- 



ing In. 



How It Affects TKem. 



«-■ LAWYER who sat In his office 

VV chair, 

J i Engaged in a case to be fought; 
Struck hard at a fly and thus did ex- 
claim : 
"This weather's most legally hot!" 

A banker reclined on his office couch. 
And thought of the bonds he had 

bought; 
And he urdered a flzz. and said as he 

sipped: 
•"This summer's financially hot." 

A uoctor came In from his dally 

rounds. 
And with him some weather he 

brought; 
And he took off his coat and hung up \ 

his hat. 
And said " 'twas medicinally hot," 

A lady sho sat In her glided salon. 
And of thinks she hadn't a naught; 
Except lor to fan, and lisp as she 

fanned: 
"It strikes me unconsciously hot" 



A man who wasn't afraid to speak out. 
And cared not a -i pper If caught; 
Wiped the sweat from his brow and 

feelingly ye; led: 
"Oh, Moses, it's III and Its's hot. 

JOB KERR. 



HIS JOr RIDE. 

Hodge — There goes Henpeck in his 
machine. Where Is he going in such 
a hurry? 

Podge — Joy rldlag. 

Hodge — Joy rldng? 

Podge — Tes. he is going to take his 
wife to the station and she Is going to 
be gone two weeks. 




FICKLE. 

Tes. I've thrown him overboard. 
Then it Is all over forever? 
Oh, no, not foverer 
him a line at any time. 



Not Up-to-date. 

TATHER," said Johnny, "you told | 
me awhile ago that I ought ^ 
to be well posted In the history J 
of my country and in that of others." 

"Yes, my son." j 

"Yesterday I looked through the 
history of England and found It way ^ 
behind the Umes." 

"Indeed: Why I can scarcely credit 
that!" 

"And today I found the same fault 
with America. Neither had a word of 
a great event." 

"You must have read carelessly.** 

"No, I was very particular." 

"But what WM it?" 

"About Papke knocking out the 
British champion middleweight and 
thereby becoming champion of the 
world!" 

The father had to agree that his- 
tory was not up to date. 

JOE KERR. 

FOR HER SAKE. 

Harold — So you quit smoking be- 
cause she asked you to? 

Horace — Yes. 

Harold — And then? 

Horace — Then she went walking 
w!th a man who smoked a pipe be- 
I may drop , cause she said It kept away mosqui- 
toes. 







TRAHK. 
^f^R^SHAl.U— 



THE OLD H 
I see the new narrow shoulders ar 
broad shoulders? 

I was against a pair last night 



AMMOCK. 

e being worn by men. Are you against 



It ran into a soft bank of earth and 
btood still, and though things clat- 
tered and clashed around us no one 
was hurt. We were close to the cot- 
tage of a peasant, and he and his wife 
came running out and fell on their 
knees to pray. When the dust had 
settled the man came up to me to say: 

" 'It is an earthquake, is It jot, 
Senor?' " 

" 'It Is.* " 

" 'But It is passed?* ** 

" "I think so.' " 

" 'But they will tax us for It of 
course. Nothing can escape taxes!* " 

"And I had been In the country long 
enough to know that his fears were 
not altogether groundless. When you 
tax .k grade, a coffin and a headstone, 
you are getting pretty near to taxing 
the people for earthquakes.** 

JOE KERR. 

CORRECTED. 

The Colonel— Majah, I'll bet Tv 
sweat no less than seventeen gallons! 

The Major — Begging your pardon, 
gentleman don't sweat, they perspire. 
Horses sweat. 

The Colonel — Well, then, by gad, 
suh, I'm a hoss! 




m 



IN SEASON. 
'I'm fearfully lazy all of a sudden, 
'Hookworm?" 
'No. Fish worm.*' 




WANTED TO KNOW. 
The City Kid — Say. uncle, where does pertaters growT 
His Uncle — Why In the ground, of course. 
The City Kid — Then how can you tell when they're ripe enough to dig? 



Wayside Wisdom. 

The first mortgage is always the 

best 

Time Is money, but It takes an eter- 
nity to redeem it 

When one resolves to do right, he 
should not get left 

Many a man who means to live well 
lives beyond his means. 

Men who have but little honor are 
right to defend It from assailants. 

Whether or not a man has too many 
irons In the fire depends on the size 
of the fire. 

A man's hopes are a see-saw, one 
end of which Is covetousness and the 
other end fear. 

Half the time policemen are not 
around when wanted. The other half 
the time they are around when not 
wanted. 

If .ou take away from the Intelli- 
gent man the rlglit to kick when 
things go wrong, you make him lower 
than the mule. 




I 



•<' 



■^' H ' 



LIGHT DIET. 
Doctor Billy — Your pulse Is entirely too fast What have you been Mit- 

Ing? 

Paii'^i-t — Nothing but a French novel and one of those cheap alarm 

clockfl. 





-■^ 



? 








Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



21 1 




•^ •■■■■■ 



AT THE LYCEUM 



r 



without a 
• arth but 



eveu^.^.^ ■■ iniUion dollars. * Prtws- 

t€T'!? Millions. • in which the audience 

- ; nds thr€i» hilarious hours of slosh- 

- .irounil in rtioney, has proved one 

the jrr'attst successes of recent 

irs Maniiger Forbes has chosen 

s dcHflbtful comedy for the fourth 

k of his local engagement, and. 



the vounpsters a particular Pl«f,^"J"* 
now and then, and next week will Dc 
one long to be remembered by the 
children, for it is seldom that any- 
thing so interesting and instructive 
this troupe of wonderfully 
animals is offered U'T their 
ment. The science 
is very difficult, 
cats, pigeons and 



the 
this 



this 

W t V 



as 
trained 
amuso- 
of training dogs 
but in the case of 
rabbits, which com- 
prise this minature circus, it is even 
more ditflcult. These animals are 
proverbially indolent and ease-loving 
and it is extremely difficult to teach 
them. However, with Infinite pains 
patience of Job, 



Prof. 



play will prove 
the bills thus far 



of 
proved 



•M(n- 

his friends, 



get 
three 



it ia exp€cted the 
the most popular of 
presented. 

"Brewrstcr s Millions" is on the or- 
der of the farce comedy. The play 
was made from George Parr Mc- 
Cutchecn's novel of the same name. 
and contrary to the general result 
■uch efforts, the play has 
more popular than the novel. 

The Plav teils the story of Mont- 
gomi-rv Brewster, whose uncle Uaves 
him ST. 000. 000. en condition that he 
Bpend the million his grandfather be- 
queathed him within a year, 
tv." as he is known to 
accepts the condition and starts in to 
rid of the million. During the 
ts of the play he spends 
mon^v as one breathes the Lake Su- 
perior air. His purpose Is not known 
to his friends, who do all in their 
; t.^' , r to save him from his recklesa 

Montgomery tries all of the tried 
and testt d ways of losing money 
legitimate Iv. He produces the comic 
opera of a friend and features an un- 
known chorus girl in the piece. The 
opera succeeds and the chorus girl 
becomes a real star and both insist 
upon returning the money advanced. 
He bets on the races, choosing the 
horses v^hich apparently haven t the 
ghost of a chance and the horses 
prance in first He buys stocks that 
hav- no other support, even the en- 
gravers of said stock having lost faith, 
•and they turn out to be a fine in- 
vestment. He supports tottt-nng 
ba.nks to have them re 
themselves and regav him. 
auton "■ - and gives 
eot'H; ith -^rodipal 

bi'vf a ^acht and takes his friends 
on* a r.-und-ihe- world cruise. 

And the scene on ihe 
proved one of the most 
and spectacular of 
for many seasons, 
promising a most 
for the vacht scene 
ters of 
In the 



what 
as 
aver- 
filled 



Klut- 
wlth 
his animals and has taught them to 
perform feats that border on the 
marvelous. In fact, it is said, that 
the performance of his dogs 
vlrltable paradox, and everyone 
fancier of dogs or otherwise 
take keen delight in this 



is a 
a 
will 
exhibition. 



Those 
ories of 
blnation. 
will be 
ment of 



doubt, there is isrending the million. At the close of 

would enioy the play he gathers the girl he loves 

to his arms secure in her affection 

and a paltry $7,000,000 to kttp her 

and himself from want. 

E\ery human being 1 nes to spend 
money. To the majority of people 
th*» onnortunitv of lavi4hly spending jand the ^_ 

withSSrsUnrisnotgivn in this lite;, ng has accomplished wonders 
and so 'Brewsters MIU ons" supj«lies 
vicariously the longing that nearly 
everv- one has. This is )»robably 
the psychologists would ascribe 
the success of the play. To the 
age mind It is just a havpy Pjay 
with ioy and fun and a delightful 
evenins's p.istime. 

The first performan 'e of Brews- 
ter'«« Millions" will be *fiven Monday 
evening and the play will be con- 
tinued every evening n. xt week with 
the usual Wednesday, Saturday and 
Sunday maiinees. ,*^>«^«« 

Tonight and tomorrow afternoon 
the night the concludlnj. performances 
of "Arizona" will be given. This play 
of Western life has prt ved very pop- 
ular all of the week and large audi- 
ences have witnessed the fine per- 
formance which Mr. Forbes and his 
p'ayers are presenting.^ 

Mrs. Fiske's summer tour in 
Bumnstead-Leigh. " the play in 
she is to appear at the Lyceum on 
Aug 5, is much more comprehensive 
geographically than it s chronologic- 
ally. Embraced In th.- itlnerao' are 
Des Moines. Sioux City. Omaha 
coin. St. Joseph. Toj eka, 
Colorado Springs, Dt nver, 
Ogden, Leadville. Salt Lake 
Angeles, San Diego, Santa 
Monterey, San Franc sco. Oakland, novtlty 
Sacramento, Portland Seattle, Mc- unique 

Vancouver. Tact ma. Aberdeen, jing to the Empress 

Yakima. Spokane, Butte. Great 

Billings. Fargo, Winnipeg and 

k stand is San 

weeks' stands 

Portland and 

if the tour is 

territory has 

within 

strange 

a f«rw weeks" 

rehearsals of 

season 

Mra 



rapidity and soulful melody the new- 
est creation in musical instruments, 
the colloBsal marimbaphone. Instru- 
ments similar to this have been seen 
before, but this one is the only one 
of its kind in the world, ft was con- 
structed bv Mauro H. Soils and is con- 
ceded to * be a most . wonderful 
achievement in instrumetotal con- 
The marimbaphone re- 
xylophone in many ways 
similar keyboard but 
are produred from 
make the xyloplione sound 
number harpischord. and 
of it is that these artists 
get real music out of it. 
Their repertoire embraces popular 
and classic selections, but principally 
the latter, although 
but just the right 

^The moving pictures will be up to 
usual standard. A matinee is given 
dailv at 2:45 and evening 
ances at 8 and 9:30. 
reserved one week in 
either telephone, 
children's matinee 

?:a?f cff* age are admitted for 5 cents 
Special attention is paid to 
fort and entertainment 
children at all times. 



St ruction, 
sembles a 
and has a 
tones that 
instniment 
like a back 
the beauty 
know how to 



not too classic, 
combination of the 



perform 

Seats may be 

advance by 

A special school 

is given every Sat- 

AU scholars under 14 



Australia, It opens the regular season 
of 1912 in California. 

• • • 

Victor Herbert says light opera is 
not on the decline, and the reason it is 
apparently so is because there are but 
few genuine offerings. He says 
opera on which he is now engaged 
be his masterpiece, 

• • • 

The excessive heat caused the can- 
celation of the Sothern and Marlawe 
engagement in New York. Mr. Soth- 



the 

will 



em will sail for England for his sum- 
mer holiday, and Miss Marlowe will go 
to her home in the Catskills. 

Caruso has written to an American 
friend that his voice is in as good con- 
dition as ever. . 

The newspaper series of verses ana 
drawings called the Widow Wise are 
to be turned into a musical play and 
produced by A. H. Woods. The author 
of the book will be Paul West, who 
wrote the original verses and the com- 
poser will be Hugo Felix. 



half, and ~ 

occurs in 

which the more 

is a variation: 

of the national 

■"nnazourka, ' be- 



"BOOKING A SHOW" 

How the Theatrical Managers Solve the Intri- 
cate Details of Arranging a Tour. 



of 



the com- 
ladies and 



ROLLER RINK 

WILL REOPEN 



-establish 
He buys 
dinners and 
favors and 



•Mrs. 
which 



Lin- 
Wkhlta. 
Pueblo. 
City, Los 
Barbara, 
Oakland. 
Seattle, Vic 



yacht has 

interesting 

theatrical scenes 

Mr. Forbes is 

elaborate setting 

with the blue wa- 

the Mediterranean glancing by ,„.i^„ 

moonlight. In spite of all his j charactenzation 



toria. 

North 

Falls. 

Duluth. The only we< 

Francisco, and the onl; 

Denver, Los Angeles, 

Seattle. The Kngth 

nine weeks and the 

telescoped to br:ng it 
limit since Mrs. Flske. 



who retain pleasant mem- 
that delightful vocal com- 
the Empire City quartet, 
delighted in the annoiince- 
thc apnearancc of Harry 
Mayo, who will be remembered for 
his resonaut and svmpathetic basso 
voice Upon the dissolution of the 
famous quartet Mr. Mayo remained 
in vaudeville and for his specialty 
renders popular song hits in an in- 
comparable manner. Mr. Mayo s 
reputation rests largelv on the pos- 
session of one of the deepest basso 
voices ever heard in this city, but in 
addlton to this, he is an actor of 
rare ability. It will also be a source 
of great delight when it is learned 
that Mr. Mayo will sing some of the 
songs made popular by the Empire 
City quartet on their last Westorii 
trip This offering is one that should 
appeal to all lover.s of good music 
and Mr. Mayo will no doubt be ac- 
corded a warm reception during his 
engagement at the Empress. 

The constant clamor fur genu ne 
newness and something 
been the source of bring- 
next week .as the 
added attraction the four Solis broth- 
ers, who manipulate with marvelous 



Tomorrow afternoon the big Duluth 

Auditorium roller skating rink will 

have a grand opening. 

Decorated. gaily^Jn^Japanese^deslgn. 

wondt-r scloptl- 

tlful and plctur- 

effects, Its huge 

„Tr%prce"entir;iy' Vesurfaced, the big 

rink will offer to 

th^ is 

irecomlng 



the 

of a 

hap- 
plan 



fitted out with 
and euulpped with the 
con, that throws beaut 
esque electrical color i 



Should one have occasion to travel 
to any point requiring an all-night 
journey, one will naturally spend 
much time and thought on the de- 
tails. 

If that predicament exists in 
passage from one city to another 
single person what would surely 
pen if one were called upon to 
the tours of twenty-five organizations. 

The idea v^ould floor the ordinary 
person, but when you met Charles A. 
Miller, the booking manager of the 
William A. Brady office, you come into 
direct relati(-n with a man whose mind 
is an actual storehouse of timetables 
and traffic conditions, \V Ithout dlg- 
cinK Into complicated series of rail- 
road guides he will tell what is the 
most convenient train to take in mak- 
InK a trip say between Albany, c.a.. 
and Columbus. Ga, Should you feel 
uncertain regarding the best manner of 
handling a party from Kingston, >. x .. 
to Amsterdam, N. Y.. and 
'-B about, just ask 



engagement ended the receipts were 
in four figures but the second night s 
business Indicated that Mr. Miller was 
right. The business dropped to about 
one-fifth of the amount played to on 
the first night. Today, Mr. Miller is 
the booking manager for Mr, Brady, 
the old friendship that started in a 
business way in Columbus many 
years ago. being in force at the cur- 
rent moment. 



pa- 
en- 



its hundreds of 
trnna Improved facilities for the 
lovment of a pastime th^ is rapidl> 
^''^'"*^" immensely popular in l^^l^^j^: 

- a revival oi 



Here In 

J P< 
roller 



has 



been 

that - 

as it may seem, desires 

rest before beginnins 

her new play's for ne:it 

Bumpstead-Lt Igh" is so dif- 



lloller skating is having 
int».ri.Vt all over the country 
nuth skating has never been so pup 
li.. in<i<-iMl so popular has 

^'^A^surprise will await those who en- 
t«.r the ble structure tomorrow after- 

iren cleaned from the hoor to the roof 
and wllT present a spick and span ap- 
t.i-.irante for the reopening. 
' The sciopt icon, throxvlng a'-^'s^'*;^"^ 
^«ior#.d liKhts in the shape of mo\ing 

innovation. 

The grand march win 
of the afternoon and 
grams. 



Mr. Miller 

him and he will 

the tangle out for 



«'"''Mr.^ Mifler^eveYs inth-e time cards 

railroads and is so expert In his 

of railroad conditions in 

that he is paid a very at- 

annually by William A. 

- ■ theatrical 



be the feature 
evening pro- 




Fgo ssip of the rialto 



which 



-ood or bad luck Monty succeeds 



ferent from any other play in 

has ever b.-en seep that it 

an anomaly, since the 

of the I lay and of the 

is to amuse, and 

in I that it does most mer rlly. 



Mrs. Flske 
seems almost 
sole purpose 



AT THE EMPRESS 

Imer season for it has scored triumph 




"He Came From 
visit the Pacific 
for the first time, 
probably the only lead- 
star who has 'J*''^'*''' 
Francisco or any of the 
cities. In all his experl 
been west of Omaha. 
• • 
But one eompany will 
"Madame X" on tour 
Byron Douglas has 

In the 



Sam Bernard, in 
Milwaukee," Is to 
coast next autumn 
Mr. Bernard is 
Ing American 
played in San 
other coast 
encc he has never 



main 
the La 
«ent a 
culture 
depicts 



keep 
and cause 
scene repre- 
physical cul- 
attendant re- 
a 
of 
le- 

BtU- 

closely 
succession 



Beginning with the Sunday matinee. 
the patrons of the Empress will be 
Offered one of the *>*"«* biHs of 
vaudeville of the summer Season. The 
attraction for the week will be 
Vine Clm.eron trio, who pre- 
satirical creation on physical 
entitled -Imagination, which 
in a most laughable manner 
the experiences of a physical culture 
crank These artists bring forth 
rmous laughter J^om every source 
and ev^TVone wonders what the> are 
going to do next. Their laughable 
antics and eccentric acrobatics 
their audience in an uproar 
« uch wonderment. The 
*8ents the interior of a 

ture emporium. An „_j 

'ie'ves tL prospective students and 
i?oceeds to illustrate the course 
Kercise one must practice to be bene 
fited l>y phvsical culture. The 
dents follow the instructor 

and la-Jghs follow in quick 

and lajgn ^^^^^^^ ^^^^^ various 

Thev also sing and dance 
during the action of the satire. 
gives it a deUghtful blend. 
La Vine of this trio Is one oi 
ca'8 foremost pantomime comedians. 
He has* also been Identified with lead- 
ing pantomime companies abroad. 
This act is intended for laughlnp pur- 
poses only and holds 
being the laughing 



antly everywhere. 

WllUard Hutchinsoti. whose name 
alone awakens pleasant memories as 
the leading juvenile comedian 
"Piff Paff Puff." will be seen In 
ciety playlet entitled 'A Leap 
Leap." There is humor 
Bvllable of this little farce. 



present 
next season, 
been engaged for 
the n.le of the elder C.lorlot. and Ade- 
line Dunlap will again be seen 
title part. , , • 

Still another play by Porter Emerson 
Brown has found Its way Into 
hals & Kemper's office. This is 
ond play by that author 
firm Is holding 



sentation at the Kornlscheopera house 

Berlin, recently. ,M/- , VAtrcfs'' wi h 
manuscript of *^^^,*-^^^, \" 
he sails next week and de- 
Unian Russell. If she likes 
Werba &. Lutscher hope to 
under their banner. 



Pos.sibly you 



bring the 
him when 
liver it to 
the work 
enlist her 



for Cohan 
Angeles to 



and he has 
his attention to 
preserved a qiuet 
-tut characteriza- 
voung dan 

shies at 
The playlet 
In a dainty 



as they 
stunts 



which 

Oliver 

Amerl- 



the position of 
hit of the sum- 



wlth 

a so- 

Year 

in every 

as well as 

in the work of Mr. Hutchinson. Mr. 

Hutchinson is a cle>er young actor. 

reared in the legitln ate 

onlv recently turned 

vaudeville. He has 

manner and clean 

tion, even as the flip young dand> 
who calls upon a darisel and 
Dopplng the questit n. 
tolls an Interesting story 
■anner Mr. Hutctiinson portrays 
hia role gracefully i.nd with admir- 
able restraint, keepiig in the spirit 
of the playlet. He .s aided by Miss 
Rosamond Harrison, who Is tj?e 
charming country girl, full of bright 
wit and not afraid to match it with 
anv one. These talented players and 
the pretty playlet are a combiriatlon 
hat is hard to beat and should win 
the approval of the theatergoers 
next week. 

An attraction 
to the children 
animal circus, 
the aim of 
pulUvan & 



Wagen- 

Ihe sec- 
which the 
for production. 

The vehicle *ln ^h»^l?,^„Y?-^"Ele* 
Luescher will star Louis Mann is ii-^e- 
vating a Husband." 

George Hcbart has 
pand the little drama f,^A^^ ^ 

the Jardln de Paris into a full-fledged 
r.lay. The enlarged version 
will be called •Hhyme and 
and F. Zlegfeld^ Jr. wHl produce it. 

Madame Lllliam Nordica will appear 
in February In a new opera called 
••»e Blue Forest." by Henry J}^^^^^^ 
It will be produced in Boston, Madame 
Nordica. who has Just returned from 
Berlin with her husband. George W 
Young, is now at I»eal Beach. N. J. Her 
concert tour to the Pacific 
in September. Another 
•'The Blue Forest" 



derided to ex- 
"Everywlfe" at 



probably 
Reason, ■ 



Sam Forrest, general stage director 
-. Harris, has gone to Los 
attend performances of a 
rew play by James Montgomery, en- 
mi^d "Jfrnrny. Jr. ' Mr. Montgomery is 
the author of "The Aviator." w'hich Co- 
han & Harris produced l>;re last sea- 
son ytlU another convsdy by Mont- 
gomery called -Ready Money, "will be 
f?cKiu?ed in Los Angtleg during the 
bummer. # • • 

Just at present Franz Lehar is work - 
InK on two operas at Isihl, a countr> 
idace near Vienna. One is "Eva, for 
l.lace n^?r^.^^^,p^ ^^e London manager. 

Last Alone." which Fred Whit- 
ney has purchased for America and 
England. ^ ,^ 



next season, 
stands in the 



move- 
Satur- 
at the 

the entire 



George 
and "At 



•The Only Son," a drama, 
duct of Wlnchell Smiths i-en, 
accepted by Cohan and Harris 
give it an eaHy fall production 



the pro- 
has been 
■who will 



Koon learn what condition ^he "lancers" derived its name from 
of the theater Is In. He^^e fact that this variation .«f^\he 
^^ ^ '-*• '"' QuadrlUe was orlgtnally Improvised by 

a comrany of lancers for 

amusement while seated in 

dies. The "polka" is 

and its name comes 



coast begins 
member of 
Mile. Brozla. 



that will be pleasing 
espedally is Kluting's 
It lias always been 
booking managers of the 
Consldin > circuit to give 



>1 -JKZ 



Klil^ 




cast Is 
• • 

James K. Hackett P^ans to produce 
not only "The Grain of Dust this 
vear "' but to follow it with t raig 
kenAedvr the "Twentieth Century 
Scientific Detective," a dramatization 
of Arthur P. Reeves stories, and My 
Adventures With Your Money, bj 

Graham Rice. 

• • • 
Maxine Elliott will play the Domini 
girl in "Garden of Allah." a dramati- 
sation of Robert Hlchens novel. In the 
New theater. New York, under George 
Tylers management n«xt winter. Miss 
Elliott had contemplated retirement 
from the stage, having a fine fortune 
and a desire to remain abroad. «u^ 
she met llichens within a , "lonth at 
the Duchess of Sutherland's. Mary 
Anderson De Navarro also was Prjsent 
at a supper. Hi^hens agreed to 
dramatize the novel with Mrs. L»e 
Navarro. Miss Elliott consented 
the arrangements, 
Marv Anderson have 
the r>e Navarro 



Fred Niblo. who will resume 
of Nathaniel I'uncan in Cohan 
riSB Eastern "The Fortune 
company early in September, 
been elected president of 
Society of America. 



the role 

* Har- 

Hunter" 

has just 

the Actors' 



Elsie Leslie is to be George Arliss' 
leading lady in "l»isra»ll." 
* • • 

The new play by Augustus Thomas 
is called "The Devil to Pay.' 



agreed 
Mrs. 

to 
Hlchens and 
been working at 
home near Broadway, 
In Worcestershire, and MIss Elliott h-is 
agreed to play the tempestuous wom- 
an in the dramatic story of the Sahara. 
• • • 
The Shuberts announce that they 
have completed arrangements where- 
by all the members of the supporting 
company which appeared with John 
Mason in Augustus J^y^,^%.^^i^,^^ 
r.iav "As a Man Thinks." at the Thir- 
Iv-ninth Street theater, will continue 
with the organization after the brl'^t 
summer vacation. The engagement 
has temporarily discontinued, but will 
be resumed at the same playhouse on 
Aug. 7. . , , 

Henry Dixey is the most recent ad- 
dition to the cast of "Gypsy Love, in 
which Marguerlta Sylva is to star. The 
cpera will have its American premiere 
at the Globe theater in October. 

In "Gypsy Love" there are four com- 
edy roles, and the most important one 
win go to Dlxey. Others in the cast 
are Julius Steger, Albert Hart. Harry 
MoDonough. Robert r-»tklns Forrest 
Huff Frances Demarest. Albert Albro. 
Frltz'l von Busing, Maude Earle and 
Anna Pardington.^ ^ ^ 

A H. Woods has definitely decided to 
call Eddie Foy's new musical farce The 
Pet of the Petticoats." The Foy season 
will be Inaugurated at the Olympic 
theater. Chicago, Sept. ^4. 

Harrison Grey Flske controls the 
American rights of "Kismet, by Ed- 
ward Knoblauch. 

•The Red Widow." Raymond Hitch- 
cock's starring vehicle for 1911-12. will 
be given Its premiere by Cohan & Har 
rls in Boston. The opening 
be on or about Labor day. 

that 



Sir Herbert Betrbohm Tree has a 
play by Zangwill called "The God of 

War. " 

• • • 

Fifty midgets are to be brought frorn 
Europe for A. H. Woods production of 

"Little Nemo." 

• • • 

Helen Ware is to begin the season 
in her new play. "The I'rlnct , ' in Bos- 
ton early In September. 

• • • ■ 
Elsie Ferguson will go out again the 

coming season in "Dolly Madison, be- 
ginning in October. 

Mrs. Leslie Carter after a tour of 
the South and West in "Two \N omen 
will appear in New York in a new 
play 

w m ^ 

big 
of 



pany 

able date, 
arrangement 
in accord with 
ing office. The 
Ing the attraction 

and he returns 



which acts as 
aters throughout 
In turn 
town to the manager 



his copy 
contracts come 
office of Mr. 
ea^h contract 
in readiness for 



to detour 
that coni- 
best avail- 
an 



a 
revival 



suc- 
•The 



Marie Temrest is making 
cess In London in a 
Marriage of Kitty.'* 

• • • 
Tetrazzinl will fill an opera engage- 
ment in this country and then win 
make a concert tour, 

• • « 
In her impersonation of Cleopatra 

Gertrude Hoffman wtars a green wig. 
She claims to be historically correct. 

• • • 
William Hawtrey's farce. "Dear Old 

Billy," is by a writer named R.sque. 

But* the farce isn't. 

• • • 
It is said to be among the possibili- 
ties that Pauline Hall may head an 
opera company of her own. 

• • • 
It is said that Mme. Schuman-Heink 

may make her home in Chicago. Her 
son Hans has already done so. 

• • • 
Florence Roberts gave a remarkably 

successful performance of the title roie 
of "Madam Sans Gene" In 
Cisco at that famous play's 

• * • 
role 



date will 



week 



ROBERT 



LE SEUR, „ ^ . 

Next Week. 



• • • 
The announcement last 
Ruth M*Ocllffe would be Eltlnge s lead- 
ing lady next season was quite a sur- 
rrWe to those who knew of the strained 
rt-latlons that existed between the im- 
personafor and Miss Maycliffe. espe- 
rlallv while in Cincinnati. The an- 
nouncement this week that Winona 
Winter would succeed her, however, 
clears up the situation. ^ 

Mark A. Luescher announces that he 
has obtained an option on the Engllsn 
rights of Frederick Llncke's new oper- 
etta. "Cis Cis." 



Llncke's new 
which had its first 



pre- 



San Fran 
revival. 

Lucy Weston will play the 
of "The Quaker Girl" when Henry U 
Harris makes the American production 
of the musical play in October, - 

The composer of "The Girl of the 
Golden Wt*st" dedicated it to Queen 
Alexandra, who sent a letter of thanks 
and a jeweled present to Puccini. 
• • • 

Three ticket speculators have been 
sent to Jail in New York for violating 
the law Hitherto they have been 

ifned only. It is expected J^H sen ences 
will break up the violations or me 

1*^- • • • 

Sophie Barnard has been e^.^a'^^'' ^^^ 
thp leadlnK soprano role in i ne uf" 
Widow." in which Raymond Hitchcock 
18 to star. Miss Barnard formerly sang 
the title part of^"The Merry Widow. 

Peggy Monroe, a western girl, has 
made her eastern debut in New York, 
and seems to have caught the public. 
Her specialty Is singing 
with the impersonation 
types. ^ ^ , 

Joseph M. Galtes will produce "Tbals'' 
in London next spring with Constance 
Collier 
trange 



you. 

of the 

knowledge 

the country 

tractive sum 

Brady, the famous producing 

manager to arrange the tours of the 

^^HJ^Theatrlcal companies that are 

sent from the Atlantic to the Pacinc 

nrder Mr Brady s management. 

At tlve present moment there are not 
more than six men In the <nl»re coun- 
try who are able to arrange or book 
as the theatrical term Implies, four 
complete tours of four companies 
playing the same I'laj;' ^o that tach 
shall play in cities an^ l^^^^^^^'^J: \^^ 
other conipanv appears in. and >ei ue 
so handled that the minimum of cost 
^haS be incurred. Of ^hi^ rn'ost""": 
Mr. Miner is considered the moft ^» 
TiPi-t Thirty years in the business 
end of Th tlieater have given him the 
expert and intimate knowledge he pos- 
lls^cs and it is not only cities that 
arl imbed'led in Mr, Miller's marve - 
out memory, but the names of the 
theaters ana managers as will. There 
are twelve hundred theaters »", the 
rnlti^l States and to merely remember 
,hA nameB of the manager^, of tliat 
n an i" playhouses would tax the con- 
centrated remembering power of al- 
most »^,>-'"^,,.„. „, Bookl-R. 

* have woiuK-red at times 

iJave the remainder of the work in Mr 
Miller's hands. For example, at a con 

East and t^ie other com- 

i^tlsfaclon Mr. Miller will start for the 
and he will 

Erf »"^oU"''c.i'..r„',v„i^T,.r3 . 

and he does not care to make many 
fhanges. "e may haye 
through a section to bring 
in Duluth at the next 

and gradually he effects 
which satisfies him and is 
the dates of the booK- 
actual work of booK- 
Is ended for the time 
i.*.liiir and he returns to the office to 
draw up the contracts which .jre made 
for each individual engagement^ 
contracts are «e..^^tc^be^bookln..^ 

the land. The office 

sends the contracts for each 

of the theater in 

that town, who signs and return.^ the 

contrlcr"o the hooking office and the 

office in tur^n^se^es^that^Mr. Ml"- «rot« 

In the route book in the 

Miller is filled out and 

Is verified and bundled 

the advance agent who 

is to represent the company on tour. 

During the regular season every ad- 
vance agent, who is to be referred to 
in the future as 'agent." Is under the 
carlful supervision of Mr. Miller and 
a more just and kind-hearted chief 
can not be found In the theatrica 
w "rid to which every Brady agent 
will testify gladly. Should the theater 
in which the company is to P^ay^^" 
Walla Walla Wash., be damaged and 
the route be affected it will be Mr. 
Miller who will instruct the agent 
where he Is to "fill" that date and 
what changes have been made in his 
tour that enable him to play the date. 
Mr. Miller will protect the agent by 
ordering the material he will need in 
the newest town to "bill" or advertise 
the company, and generally take a 
fatherlv interest in him. 

Many of the younger members of 
the business are wont to look to Mr. 
Miller as they would to a patriarch 
who has seen troubles of many kinds 
and who still maintains his faith In 
the goodness of men because his ex- 
periences have not soured him At the 
holiday periods he is the recipient of 
many presents from the "boys who 
are «ure their Interests are being zeal- 
ously guarded by Mr. Miller while they 
are away on the "road." 

Back in the old days. Mr, Miller 
managed the leading theater in Col- 
umbus. Ohio. According to the hap- 
hazard methods of -booking attrac- 
tions then In vogue, companies dealt 
directly with the local managers In- 
stead of being represented in New 
York as they are today. In the usual 
course of business, Mr. Mlllex received 
word from an actor named \N lUlam A. 
Brady that he wanted to play After 
Dark" a very popular melodrama, m 
Columbus for two performances. Mr. 
Miller happened to have the date open 
as Mr. Brady desired and he made an 
arrangement with him to play that 
niece m Columbus, but before 
Bljtned the contract Mr. Miller 
Mr Brady that he was overstaying 

in playing two days. But Mr. 

could not see the matter In that 

way and insisted upon the two days. 

Bo Columbus saw Mr. Brady twice in 

"After Dark." When the first night a 



SELLING TIES IN THE STREET. 
Here were two street men in the 
same block selling neckties from push- 
carts. Each had a solid cartload of 
neckties and all were of the same kind, 
though of many colors. But while 
their stocks were just alike these two 
pushcart men had very different meth. 
ods of inviting custom, says the New 
York Sun. , , 

One had his stock trimly arranged in 
the original boxes. His stock com- 
pletely covered the pushcart from end 
to end and from side to side and over- 
lapping; the open boxes ranged along 
close together in long rows, making 
with the varied colors of the various 
ties a striking display. It might have 
seemed that this was the only way to 
show them to the best advantage with 
the highest power of attraction. 

The necktie man with his pushcart 
against the curb twenty feet further 
along had his stock all out of the boxes 
and piled loosely in a big mound that 
all but covered the cart. The colors of 
this mound were kaleidoscopic and the 
mixture of the ties was as complete as 
would have been that of the jack- 
straws In a dozen bundles dropped In 
a head all at once. 

It may be that each of these necktie 
venders had found by experience that 
the mt-thod he followed was the btst. 
but to an outsider it seemed as if the 
two methods might more likely reveal 
the personal characteristics of tht- sell- 
ers. One was a man of an orderly, pre- 
cise habit who liked to see his stock 
arranged .symmetrically. The other 
was a man more on the slai'dash order, 
who went In for effect in anotherway. 
And what was the actual drawing 
power of these two methods? Well, 
the outsider has no knowledge as to 
which stock would attract the greater 
number of customers In the long run, 
but he knows how the two stocks 
struck him and what he actu.ally s.aw. 
It seemed to him that he would feel a 
little shy about pulling and hauling 
over the ties arranged in the boxes 
the primly arranged stock, while 
would feel quite free and easy about 
the other stock to do as he pleased; 
and as matter of fact there was at this 
time nobody even looking at the t^ys- 
tematlcally arranged stocks, while at 
the other cart there was a man pawing 
the stock over and now and then pull- 
ing out a tie and h(ddlng it out to see 
how it looked. Evidently he enjoyed 
this freedom of inspection: and he 
looked like a man who was interested 
in the ties and who intended to buy. 



mian word ••pulka." meaning 
refers to the half step which 
this lively measure, of 
graceful "•schottische" 
both names, like that 
dance of Poland, the 
ing native terms. . .w ,.. ■ 

The short steps peculiar to the old 
time favorite— the •minuet'— gave the 
dance its name, the Latin for 'small 
being -minutus.' The 'waltz.' again, 
owes its name to its characteristic 
movement, the German "waltzen -— 
meaning to revolve — expressing the 
circling motion of the dancers. 

The "Roger de Coverley' is named 
after its originator, while the less la- 
minar dance known as the "tarantella 
is so called because its vigorous move- 
ments were supposed to be a certain 
antidote to the poison of a noxious 
Fpider at. Taranto in Italy, where the 
dance is highly popular. 

The evolutions of the dancer suffi- 
ciently explain the term "reel." "Jig 
is from the French "glgue" and •'break- 
d< wn " Is a term from across the At- 
lantic, and refers to the final rout be- 
lore the breakup of a free and easy 
dancing party. 

Every year dancing takes place lo 
the parish church of Musgrave in West- 
moreland in connection with the an- 
cient rite of ru!<hbearing. On May day 
twelv young maidens of Brough, ap- 
proved bv the vicar, assemble at 10 
o'clock in the morning at the foot of 
Brough Bridge decorated with flowers 
and tresh garlands on their heads. Ac- 
companied by a band they proceed 
through the fields to Musgrave. the 
band playing and the rushbtarer* 

The girls are led up the north aisle 
of the church and hang their garlands 
at the side, there to remain unt'l the 
following vear. The Gospel is read by 
the vicar, prayers are offered and 
psalms sung, alter which the clerk and 
vicar retire. A space is then cleared 
near -he altar and a fiddle produced. 
Dane c now commences, and contin- 
ues utitll the afternoon. ^ 

L>anc«ng is frequently seen in^ con- 
tinental churches. During the Vorpus 
Cnristl octave a ballet Ts performed 
every evening before the high altar 
Seville — cathedral by b&ys 
plumed hats and the dress of 
the time of Philip HI. 



of 

wearing 
pages of 



THE MEGILLAH. 
American Hebrew: Purim has de- 
veloped into a festival of many aspects 
In modern Jewish life. It is the time 
when the rich remember the poor^ 
when friends remember one another, 
when children learn that religion 
r<-.>^<^<:i,:iniinl and amui 

Jews in 



has 

Its processional and amusing aspects 

and when the position t.f Jews in th» 

to be typified in the 



characteristic 
ding 
and 



dispersion Is seen 
Biblical narrative. 

But perhaps the most 
feature of the festival is the readln 
of the Megillah both In the home 
In the synagogue tery ce The "'^rra- 
tlve thus lead or told Is one ot the 
most striking and most eflfectlv^ 
stories of the world, even regarded as 
fciories records the ups and downs 

and appeals thus 



of 
he 



a story, it 

t,f interesting persons i„.,tnrv 

to what Stevenson calls the aleatory 
instincts of mankind. 

It is well known that servant 
are especially pleased to read the 
novel which tells of the rise 
of one of their own class, 
a marquis or a millionaire, according 
to the locale of the istory. So too 
all care to read 
of a deserving young 
comes the right 



in 
wh(> 



glrlB 
dime 
fortune 
marries 



we 

of the rise in fortunes 

man who be- 

hand of a great mer- 



chant or a prince. . . .„ ,»,« 

A similar interest attaches to the 
careers of Ktsther and Mordecai in the 
narrative of the MeglUah, of which 
TJ c&n nexGT get tired. The book of 
Esther" "as of course another interest 
for us. It records a crisis in 
career of the Jewlst people and 
this was averted by the 

Jewish maiden raised 
of (lueen. and of her 



how , ^ 

sacrifice <'f the 
to the dignity 



the 

tells 
self- 



THE POPULAR DANCES. 
London Globe: The position taken 
UP by the dancers gave the name to 
the •quadrille. • which is literal French 
for "a little square;'* while 'country 
dance- has no connection with rustic 
Kvmnastics, but is simply a corruption 
of the French centre danse, which has 
leference to the position of the couples 
opposite to each other during 



became 



far 

kind 



are 



the 



the-ir own 
their sael- 
a Polish dance, 
from the Bohe- 



relatlve who 
equivalent. 

Times have so 
great events of this 
to be Influenced se> closely 
personalitieH. but Jews 
always looked forward 
helper as Mordecul 
knew the lAte Dr. 



vizier, 
changed 



or Its 



that 

not likely 

by single 

at least have 

to some Kuch 

Every <»ne who 

Herzl recognized in 



him just such a type of man. who 
could speak his mind in the presence 
of kings on behalf of his people. And 
Sere may come a time when even the 
czl? ofthe king of Roumanla may have 
[o defend himself in presence of some 
representative Jew. 

Thus the book of Esther 
ing an interesting story In itself 
roots deep in Jewish feeling 
ish history and It gives 
the glow of romance to 



besides be- 
has 
and Jew- 
so'metl.ing of 
the festival. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



These 
"booking office 




WEEK COMMENCING WITH SUNDAY MATINEE 



SULUVAN A 



The Laughing Success of the Season 

LaVINE-CIMARON 



A Screaming 
Satire on Physical 
Culture 




Europe's Foremost Animal Act. 

KLUTIIfi'S ANIMALS 

Cats, Dogs, Rabbits and PiP*<'"«- 
Delightful and Amusing Icats. 



in 



The Noted Comedian, 

WILLABD HUTCHIISON 

. In the Society Comedy. 
-A LEAP YEAR LEAP." 



AND 
CO. 



If you want 

a good laugh don'^ 

fail to see thi. 



HARRY MAYO 

Former SoU.ist in r^'urir* 
Quartet, in Popular Hits 
Catchy Melodies. 



City 
and 



SCHNEIDER'S ORCHESTRA 

Popular Selections That Please. 



Best and Newest 
In Town, 



EMPRESSCOPE 

Motion Pictures 



EXTRA ADDED FEATURE 

4— SOLIS BROTHERS— 4 

In a S|>ect«ciU«r Musical Ensemble. 



he 
warned 
his 



limit 
Brady 



and dancing 
of character 



Tyrone Power and JuUxiu 
The company will then 



L'E»- 
go to 



a 



AMUSEMENTS. 



WHIRL OF THE TOWN' 



MATINEE DAILV, 2i4S 
9x30— 10c, 15o, 25e. Order 



and 20<*. 
Keiierved. 



Every 
Bulb 



Pbunei 



■n4 



i 



^ 



■^ 



-m I 



-m^l. 




i 

i 



I 



■I 



I 



'M 



1 



AT THE 



AUDITORIUM 
ROLLER RINK 

OPENS SUNDAY AFTERNOON AT2 p.m. 

With high-class Roller Skating 

— the popular pastime. 



LYCEUIVI 



Tonlsht. ftnitday Mat. and Nisht 

••ARIZONA'* 



Week Commencing Monday, July 17 S2%k^un. 

THE FORBES STOCK COMPANY 



Will be S**" 



WiDcbell Smith «nd Byron Oniflej-'M 
of Mctatcheon'i. TbrllllBK t omedy, 



DramatluitloB 



i 



BREWSTER'S MILUONS' 



With 

Remember the 



"Monty" 

Seene and 



GUS FORBES 

lleBlUtIc \mrht 

of Ibe Rich." 
PRICES: Evenlnit, 25c, S6c, 50c. Matlnc 
Order Se«l« l^low! 



Brewster. 

tbe "Little Brolber 



■Alt Seat* 25 Onts. 



NEXT WEEK— "A M 



AN ASD HIS WIFB." 





'inlSH^lHI 



f 



\ 



>^i«AMi««iateMK2^*«MMi^ta* 



y^' 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD, 



[July 15, ISII. 




OTOUr 




COHASSET 



Cohassel, Minn.. July 15 —{Special to 
The Herald. )— The Krskine Stackhouse 
coiniaiiy have gone out of buaiiies.s and 
their si.ore will be run by Stone-Ordean- 
Wells cKupanv of Diiluth Mr. Tl alters 
Of Ashland. Wis., has been appointed 
manaxt r. He will move his family to 
Cohat*.-.ot ifi the near future. 

Joiiu Lane is employed by the Min- 
nc'^ota Woodenware company to Iook 
afiet their sawmill and logging in- 
terests in this vicinity. 

Davjl Kribs and Alonzo Towers were 
Col-.a'.SL't visitors Monday. 

Will Woods who canne here from 
Foley several years a^o and was In- 
tere.s\.Hl in the Minnesota Wooden- 
wart factory moved his lamily on Mon- 
day t«' Black Duck. Minn. 

C H. Frees. druKglst, Is erecting a 
lesicletice in Soutii Cjhasser . .. . 

E r. QuaokenbU3h of Dululh visited 
a couple of days with his sister, Mrs. 
J W Lane and family his week. Mrs. 
Quai-kenbush recently moved from rsew 
Tork citv wh.?re he was engaged 
Stvt ral lines of bu.-*lness. Ho 
most of Northern Minnesota 
decided to locate soon. 

A number of youns: people took 
luncheon out to Tat. Kinney s grove. 
Tuesday, and as mie:ht be expected pro- 
tccd-d to enjoy tliemselves. 

Mi I?aird wh> with his family has 
resided h-'re for several years and made 
many warm friends has moved to Black 
Du'-k. Mian. ^ ^ , v. .u 

The brick work on the school build- 
ing is almost completed 

The voung ladies of Mrs. A\ . v\ . 
Fletchers Sunday school class had a 
bakt sale and served coffee and c;>ke on 
Saturday in Mrs. Fletcher's store. 



in 

has seen 
and has 



In 



Dunn 

Mich.. 

as far 




Kelsev. Mi:ui , .July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald. >— John Channer was in 
Eveleth Saturday. 

Miss Lillian Siaiity returned from Du- 
luth Saturilav evening. 

Master Willie Baker returned Friday 
from Brookslon ^ . 

Mrs Weldy and children who have 
been tlie guests of her sister Mrs W 
8 Parks returned to their home in 
Montana Wednesday. 

Lawrence Bishop of Hibbing was the 
rucst of Melviii Overon Tuesday. 

Amos F'reston was in Duluth during 
the week. ,. ., 

Chas Anderson was at Wallace Mon- 

Mr and Mrs. William Stanty went to 
Princeton Monday where they will re- 
side M 

Mis. C J Keenen was the guest of 
Cotton friends during the week 

Mrs Edstrom and son of Duluth, who 
have a rarm near Kelsey are in town 
for an indefinite period. 

Clar.^nce Cederstrom returned to 
Hlbijing Wedne.^day after being the 
guest of Orln Ohanner 

Mi-^3 Pearl Mathews returned 
Dululh Thursday. 



Sunday school clasi at a picnic in 
Pineliurst park. W. dnesday 

Mis. M. K. Whittemore returned 
Saturdav from Nor h Yakima. NVasb.. 
where she has been vl-sitlng her par- 
ents. Dr. Whittemo'e met her in Min- 

^^^AHsi'^' Ruth W hitman returned 
Wednesday from a two weeks visit 

Duluth. , ^, . „ 

Archie Toupln aid Charles 
left Monday for Like Linden, 
Gene Fish accompaaylng them 

^^Muss'^DoUa White returned Saturday 
from a visit with leiallves m Duluth. 

At the regular meeting of the Ke- 
l.ekahs Monday e- ening. , "«•»• _4,Vi 
Berglund was elec ed noble grand. 
Mrs Andrew McK.nzie. vice grand; 
an.l Miss Jennie Smith, recording sec- 
retary. The ladies served a l^'VP 
after the business meeting. Rev. L. h. 
Blake, chaplain for the grand lodge ot 
Minnesota, gave a t ilk on Odd Fellow- 
ship and liebekah work. . 

Mrs. William CIos j of Hibbing is vis- 
iting in Cloquet. i- he is accompanied 
by Mrs. F. A. ClatiH of Hibbing Both 
ladies liave been ca iiping at Deerwpod. 

C;iaritv Camp No. iJS35. Royal Neigh- 
bors, will give a lance in Beaupre s 
hall the evening of July 25. 

■An auto parly comprising Mr. ana 
Mrs. P. t>. Anneke, Miss M. Annekc. 
and Victor H. Aniieke. Walker and 
Warren Jamar of Duluth, and Filer 
Basemer of M. Lou s. Mo., were guests 
at Hotel Cloquot. Sunday. 

Mrs. Marco lias l)een seriously ill 
with rheumatism tor several days. 

T O Bowman w» nt to Duluth Tues- 

granddaughter, Helen 

CI tire. Wis., who will 

CO iple of weeks. 

Mesdames George 

W. Walker 

and daugli- 



tlonallv good one this year and many 
pickers have gone to the fields, expect- 
ing to make pretty good pay. J. Lwald. 
buys the berries and packs them, 



for 



he 
on 



day to meet his 
Bowman of Eau 
visit here for a 
Messrs. and 
Crosby, and daugh er, W. 
and son. Coiyate Wilson 



who ....J- — _, - ^. 

is In the city making preparations 
the opening of his case factory. 

Andrew Hlltonen, who has played 
ball with Calumet this year, has been 
added to the Ishpemlng pitching stair. 
The word comes from Calumet that 
is the stronge.^t hitter and pitcher 
the team. Richardson, who has played 
in the field, has been released. Clark, 
who has been playing at .short the last 
few games, will be back at second and 
Dehaner, a new man, will be tried at 
short. . . 

Prof. Swan has moved his Museum 
of Anatomy into the Robblns building 
on Main street. 

• One of the advance agents q»L the 
Barkhool shows which will be here 
next week, has been In town the past 
few days advertising the show. 

Bergdahl & Son finished laying a ce- 
ment sidewalk In front of J. J. Leffler's 
meat market and grocery store Thurs- 
day. 

Work is progressing rapidly on the 
Knights of Kaleva new building. The 
plasterers expect to begin work next 
week, as nearly all the lathing Is fin- 
ished. 

W. Galo of Republic was in town 
Wednesday on business. 

Wade Slebenthal of Republic was In 
town Wednesday on business. 

W. J. Williams of Iron Mountain was 
In town Wediiesday. 

A. B. Silverman of Escanaba Is in 
town for a few days. 

Recent births recorded are: A son to 
Mr. and Mr.s. Joseph Robare, a daugh- 
ter to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Murray, twin 
boyg to Mr. and Mrs. William Vivian 
ai.d a daughter to Mr. and Mrs. John 
Harmala. 



ceived for the benefit of the local Cath- 
olic church. 

Harry Cicas, formerly section fore- 
man for the Great Northern at this 
point, but now employed on the Soo line 
in the same capacity, was calling on his 
numerous Brookston friends Thursday. 

Mrs. J. H. Raubert of Lakewood. who 
was the guest of local relatives last 
week and her sister. Miss Dora Keable, 
departed last Saturday for Erlcsburg. 
where they will suend several weeks 
with their father, who is employed on 
the Canadian Northern railway. 

Announcement has been made of the 
approaching wedding of Miss Blanche 
Stokes and F. J. McMahon which occurs 
next week. 

L. A. Pell, who is connected with the 
Brldgeinan-Russell company of Duluth, 
was In the village the first of the week. 
Mr. Pell was endeavoring to interest 
some of our settlers In the dairy branch 
of farming, stating that there was no 
portion of St. Louis county better sit- 
uated for marketing dairy product.s. 

The Brookston Bloomer baseball t^am 
attended a picnic at Scanlon, Saturday, 
and engaged In a game of ball with the 
Scanlon girls. 

Jos. Dougay transacted business In 
Duluth, Tuesday. 

Mrs. M. Brittany has leased the Sher- 
man liouse and will take charge imme- 
diately. Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Spur, own- 
ers of the iMoperty, will spend the re- 
mainder of the summer at tlie cottage 
on Cass lake. 

Mrs. Mary E. Garland was taken to 
the St. Mary hospital at Duluth the 
first of the week and submitted to an 
operation. She is getting along nicely 
according to reports. 



the city on a visit to her aunt, Mrs, 
H. K. Gillon. 

Contractor J. D. O'Connell of Duulth 
transacted business in the city on Sat- 
urday. 

Anna Smith was down from 
the guest of Miss Maybelle 



from 



INDEPENDENCE 




Inaependence. Minn.. July lo.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald ) — Mr. and Mrs 
Arthur Morford. who have spent the 
past tl'.ree months at Riverside, leti 
for Minneapolis Monday. 

Thci Ladles Aid of the Norwegian 
LiUtiieran church was entertained at 
the home of Mrs, O Peterson Tuesday. 

A hall game betvi een the Culvei -In- 
dependence team and the Northland 
team was held on the Culver grounds 
Our. da V The score was 13 to 11 in 
favor of the Northlanders. 

N. Nielson, a photographer from Su- 
perior transacted business here last 

Percy Vibert of Cloquet was a local 
caller Wednesday. 

V.' Alllion of Hermantown was in 
Independence Ihursday. 

Rev J. H Stenberg of Duluth con- 
ducted his regalar services at the 
Noiti land school Tuesday evening 

Ow ing to scarcity of water, the drive 
on the Cloquet river was closed this 
week. 

Mrs. Malik of Cotton was a brief 
caller here Wednesday. 

County Commissioner Al Overton 
called here Tuesday 



ter, George Mance, Cassius Bagley and 
George WlUls of l>uluth motored to 
Cloque Sunday and were guests at 
Hotel Cloquet. , .. , 

The 1 -year-old diughter of Mr. ant. 
Mrs. Victor Sunde-n of Third street, 
died Wednesday night, following a 
short illness. 

Dr. T. O. Braafladt and wife will 
return home Monday from a visit in 
Cokalo. , . , 

The Viking chor js enjoyed a picnic 
Tuesdoy evening ii Pineiiu/U park. 

Mrs. W. 1 Gibeison of Deer River, 
who has been visiting her parents, Mr. 
aand Mrs. A. H. i ich, returned home 
Thursday. 

Miss Hulda Holin is visiting rela- 
tives In Duluth anl Superior. 

Miss Beth Rich has returned from 
a visit to her bro her at Crane Lake 
Portage. 

Miss Jennie Smith went to Superior 
tills morning to be present at a party 
given this afternoon at the Arthur 
Smith home. „, ^, , 

Mrs F. P. Barnv m and L. W. Clark 
and daughter. Me le, who have been 
guests at the A. H. Rich home, left 
Thursday for Stlllvater. 

Mrs. Nellie Gear of Duluth is the 
guest of Mrs. John Morlarlty. 

Mrs. George Dlo u and Miss Ida Al- 
lord arrived heie Thursday from 
Hancook. Mich., tt visit at the J. R. 
Medley home, 

Mrs. Nelson and children of Duluth, 
who liave been visiting Mrs. Olaus 
Johnson, returned home Wednesday. 

Elmer Xanton lias returned from 
St. Paul. , , 

Mi^s Izetta Letsell of Ironwood. 
Mich.. Is visiting friends in the city. 
Henry Norgard of Milaca has been 
a guest at Dr. Nynuist's home for sev- 
eral days. . . . 

Mrs. Magne of St. Peter Is visiting 
friends in the cit /. She is the wife 
of the late Rev. A agne. who was pas- 
tor of the Svvedi ih Lutheran church 
at Carlton for seviral years. 

Mrs. 3. Anderson has returned from 
a visit to Mahtow i. 



lu — (.Special to 
F. Kenney spent 



Alborn, Minn.. July 
The Herald.)— Mrs. J. 
Thursday in Duluth. 

W. J. Holinan, superintendent of the 
iron ore drill, spent several days In 
l>uluth this week. He returned to Al- 
born Thursday. 

Miss Lora Wahlin of Independence 
was in Alborn Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Myklebye was In 
Duluth Thursday. 

B. Hanson of the Stone-Ordean- 
Wells company was In Alborn Tuesday 
and Wednesday. 

Messrs. Thomas Decorsey. Ben Han- 
son and William Hanson are camping 
at Silica for a few days. 

Miss Margaret Nordln arrived from 
Elmer Monday to spend a few weeks 
at her home In Alborn. 

Master Fiarl Harris of Duluth Is vis- 
iting with his grandparents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Maloney. 

P. M. Maloney spent Sunday w^lth his 
daughter, Mrs. D. Harris. 

Rev. Mr Stenberg of Duluth held 
services at the Canyon schoolhouse last 
Monday. 

A. G. Johnson of Proctor spent Sun- 
day with his parents. 

Rev. P. J. Gramness of Virginia held 
services in Alborn Sunday morning. 

Miss Violet Hagen of Kelsey spent 
Thursday in Alborn. 

Rev. Mr. Olson of the Swedish Luth- 
eran church in Duluth held services in 
the Alborn Lutheran church Sunday 
morning 

The Alborn-Burnett Juniors went to 
Meadowlands Sunday, where they de- 
feated the Meadowlands Juniors. 



Miss 
Mesaba 
Owens. 

Miss Ellen Johnson returned home 
from a week's outing at Sunrise. Minn. 

J, G. Jelle returnea Saturday from a 
visit to Minneapolis and Northern Min- 
nesota. 

Nazard CowesoUe was up from Du- 
luth over Sunday, visiting with rela- 
tives and friends. 

Charles Pettibone was down from 
Ridge on Thursday, visiting relatives 
and friends. 

Mr.s. L. C. Anderson of Silver Creek, 
who has been at the hospital, returned 
to her home this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Matson and chil- 
dren and Mr. and Mrs. Jorgen Hanson 
and daughter, Third avenue, visited 
with friends at Ely on Sunday. 

J. C Manville Is expected home 
Thursday from Lake Geneva. Wis., 
wh»»re he has been attending the sum- 
mer school of the Y. M. C A. secre- 
taries. 

Mrs. Axel Algotson and children of 
Duluth came up Tuesday evening for 
a visit with relatives. She Is staying 
with her sister, Mrs. John Eckholm, 
Third avenue. 

Charles Weaver and daughters, Grace 
and Helen, of St. Paul, and Miss 
Charlotte Welterlund of Duluth, vis- 
ited relatives and friends in the city 
t!iis week and also spent a few days 
at the P, K, Anderson camp at Stew- 
art. 




been 
Wis., 
expected 






-foot 
where 



[ aOQUET 

Cloquet. Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Misses Delia Shlels and 
Blanche Dunphy of Carlton visited 
friends in Cloquet Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs Albert Cox entertained 
Wednesday evening In honor of their 
wedding anniversary. 

Luther League of the "IMorweglan 
Lutheran church will picnic at Thom- 
son tomorrow. 

Misses Edith Falk and Margaret Pe- 
terson of Two Harbors are gues*8 of 
Miss Elma Elm. Miss Fay Kedfield en- 
tertained for the two young ialies 
Monday afternoon. 

Mrs. William Merrigan and children 
left Tuesday for a visit with Mrs. 
Merrlgan's parents in Crookston. 

Mi.ss Mate Rose of Minneapolis is 
the guest of Miss Catherine McLeod 
liiss McLeod returned Monday from 
a vi.'^it with friends in Aitkin. 

Mls.-j Lola Shiels will be the gues* 
of Mis.^ Lillian Ryan of Brookston for 
the week-end. 

Miss Margaret McLeod leaves Mon- 
day for a visit with friends In Aitkin. 

Misses Florence Skemp. Ada 
Orenier. Margaret Huseby. Ruby and 

Sess Brower, and Me.ssrs Victor 
Ichaelson, John Rogentine, Joe 
Longpre. Harold Hanson and Harry 
Blinn will spend Sunday at Mile Post 
17. 

Misses Helen and Verona Phelion 
returned Tuesday night from a visit 
In Minneapolis. They were accom- 
panied home by Miss Phellon of Min- 
neapolis, who will visit here. 

Misses Florence Skemp and Ada 
Qrenier were guests at the home of 
Miss Ruby Brower In Thomson Tues- 
day evening. 

Mrs. Alfred Till has been ill for sev- 
eral days with a severe attack of 
rheumatism. , 

Mrs. W. H. Skemp returned Satur- 
day from a viSIt to her son. Dr. Frank 
Skemp. at Excelsior. 

uArs. Bessie Holland of Duluth was 
a week-end guest at the home of her 
•later, Mrs. E, W. Spoor. 

Mrs Fred Tonklin will entertain the 
Ladies' Aid of the Methodist church 
next Tuesday afternoon. 

Misses Mabel Lynch and Mildred 
Clark were shopping in Duluth 
Wednesday. 

Miss Florence Ford returned Mon- 
day from a visit with relatives in Eau 
Claire. 

C. H Dunn of Lake Linden. Mich.. 

who has been visiting bis sons. Lea 

and <'harles. returned home Tuesday. 

Cllffor Selble left Wednesday to join 

bla mother in St. Paul. 

Mrs. Rising of Winona is the guest 

of her daughter, Mrs. Sherman L. Coy. 

A party of ladles were entc.-talp.^d 

at the A. J. Taylor cottage at Chub 

lake Friday. 

City Attorney J. A. Fesenbeck was 
in Duluth on business Wednesday. 

Miss «irace Scrihner arrived here 
from Chicago Wednesday for a ten 
days' visit, when she goes to '^emmell. 
to visit her parents Miss Hazel Scrlb- 
Aer of Duluth will spend the week end 
in Cloquet. 

Miss Lillian JoUlffe entertained her 



Twig, Minn., Jiily 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Tht Wisconsin Bridge 
company has a crew of men at work 
putting up the steel for the 50 
bridge over the Cloquet river 
the Canadian Pacitic will cross. 

The water tank and tv,'o depots are 
about completed here and the engin- 
eers on this division have been trans- 
ferred to Munger 

Tiie St. Louis River Dam & Improve- 
ment company J as completed the 
drive of logs on the Cloquet river for 
this season. „ 

John Peterson : nd Charles Engman 
have completed their contract of grad- 
ing the Mud Lake school grounds. 

The Twig Dvnainlte club held an en- 
joyable session tU the Grand Lake 
town hall grounds last Sunday. About 
twentv-five membors were present and 
refreshments wer-; served. 

Ludwig A. Johnion, who has been at 
the state hospital at Fergus Falls for 
the past three months has returned to 
his family here. 

Miss Sarah Appel of Duluth spent a 
week with her in other here. 

Both the town Hoard and the school 
board held business sessions at the 
town hall last Sa uiday. 

Mrs S. N. Peterson and daughter 
Fern are vl8ltin»- with friends and 
relatives at Duluth. _ 

Messrs. Hamiltiti and Hovis of Can- 
yon were in Twig on business Sunday. 

Many Twig people wish Miss Lackey, 
former teacher <f this village much 
hiving been married 
a;fo In Duluth. Miss 
s :hool here for some 
many friends. 

Harris of Canyon 



FOND DU LAC 




*^^^«<'»^«^>^>^«^»^i^>^«^»^>^ 



happiness, she 
about a week 
Lackey taught 
time and made 
Mrs. Charles 



1'wlg last Wednesday 



passed through 1'wig 
on her way to Duluth. 

Word has been received of the death 
of Johan Larson. formerly of this 
place. He was employed on the rail- 
road for some time and was also em- 
ployed by S. N. Peterson and was well 
known. He went from here to rela- 
tives In Michigan where he was killed 
by a train. , ^ , 

Mrs. Percy Lavson and two sons oi 
Duluth who hav>' been spending some 
time with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Ole Nlckelson, las returned to her 

home. „ , .1. 

N Nelson of Si. Paul, who has 
spending a two weeks' vacation 
Mr. and Mrs. John Peterson 
turned to his hone. 

Hamilton & Hovls of Canyon expect 
to put a sawmil In here in the near 
future. 



Fond du Lac, Minn., July 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Mr. and Mrs. Alex 
Fra.>5ier and Mrs. C A. Peterson of Du- 
luth were guests of Miss Hilma Peter- 
son Saturday. 

O. C. Reitan and Mr. Opell of Du- 
luth transacted business at Fond du 
Lac .Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hogstad of Du- 
luth were guests of Mr. Hogstad's par- 
ents, Sunday. 

Rev. -\llen Clark of West Dululh 
conducted services at Fond du Lac 
Sunday. 

Misses Ethel, Loula and Alta Hewitt 
of Superior spent Sunday at Fond du 
Lac. 

J H. Crowley of Duluth was in 
Fond du Lac Monday. 

Mrs. McKeon of Duluth spent Sun- 
day at their summer cottage here. 

Mrs. M. E, Chambers was in the 
city Monday. 

Mrs. James Crawford entertained the 
Ladles' Aid Society of the First Pres- 
byterian church of Duluth at her 
summer cottage at Fond du Lac Tues- 
day. 

Miss Celia Durfee was in the city 
Wednesday. 

John Bardon of Superior was a 
Fond du Lac visitor Thursday. 

Miss Blanche Brlgham was in the 
city Thursday. 

Misses Marie and Johannah Johnson 
entertained a few of their friends at 
the Elim church at Fond du Lac. Those 
of the party were: Edith Dahl, Tlllle 
Johnson, Anna Nordstrom, Llda John- 
son, Tillle Larson of Duluth, Alma 
Peter.son from I'arker's Prairie. Minn.; 
Ruth Cassel from St. Peter, and Ella 
Johnson from Oxford, Ohio. 

Rev. Mr. Nordstrom conducted serv- 
ices at the Swedish Mission church 
Thursday evening. 

Mrs. C, A. Runquist was in the city 
Thursday. 

Andrew Erlckson, who spent several 
months In Sweden returned the first of 
the week. 



Two Harbors, Minn.. July 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Robert McCurdy, 
William Fortman, Jr., and Mllford 
Brown returned Saturday from a lake 
ti ip. 

Miss Esther Anderson returned Sun- 
day from Minneapolis, where she went 
to attend the funeral of a cousin. 

Mr. and Mr. R. E. Jones and children 
visited In Tower at the home of J. Ma- 
hady over Sunday. 

Twenty-two engine crews were .sent 
out on ore Monday. Between the hours 
of 2 and 2:30 in the afternoon seven 
crews were called. 

Miss B. M. Small returned Monday 
from Duluth where she 8i>ent several 
days visiting at the home of Mrs. 
James Hickox. . 

Rev. John A.. Anderson of Marinette, 
Wis., will preach In the Swedish Metho- 
dist church next Sunday, both morning 
and evening. 

Mrs. P. J. Holland who has 
visiting relatives at Bayfield, 
for the past two weeks, is 
home today. . . ,, ., ., 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Loomis left Monday 
for Duluth where they will spend a 
couple of weeks, after which they go 
to Houghton. Mich. ... . 

Mrs. William Tracey visited with her 
daughter. Mrs. William (J'Rourke. at 
Ely several days this week. 

L H Bryan received a telegram on 
Friday of last week from his brother. 
Jay R. Bryan at Chicago, announcing 
the death of their mother, Mrs. E^ B. 
Secor, who had passed away on July 
7 at Inglewood, Cal. Mrs. Secor had 
lived in the South the past two years. 
The remains were forwarded to 
Aurora, III., her former home, where 
the funeral was held. Mr. Bryan left 
on Tuesday to attend the funeral. 

Sheriff Emll Nelson returned the 
first part of the week from a business 
trii> to Minneapolis. 

C Benson of Duluth, the monument 
man, transacted business in the city 
the first part of the week. 
Mr. Jackson of Superior 
city Tuesday visiting his 
Jackson. ,, . ,. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
jus Bangsund on Tenth avenue. 

Clow & Nicholson, steamship owners 
of Duluth, are negotiating for the pur- 
chase of .1 boat which on Its arrival 
here will be placed on the north shore 
rout", calling at Two Harbors. Grand 
Marais and other settlements between 
Duluth, Port Arthur and Isle Royale. 

Mrs H G Glassford arrived Monday 
for a' visit with friends in the city. 
Mrs. Glassford is now living 
Dull, Saskatchewan, Can. 

A dance will be given at Glen 
on Saturday evening. July 
will be furnished by the 
Marine orchestra. 

Rev J F. McLeod left Tuesday on a 
month's vacation of which he will 
suend a few days vl.ilting with his son 
at Detroit, Mich., after which he goes 
to Erie Pa., -where he will spend a few 
week.«^ visiting: relatives. Mrs. McL,eod 
went to Bralnei-d, Minn., where she will 
si.end the time during Mr. McLeod s 

Eastern trip. . ^. , « , „„i 

The annual school meeting of School 
District No. 2 will be held at the high 
school on Saturday evening. Besides 
the regular routine business, a school 
site will be designated and funds pro- 
vided for a school north of Waldo and 
to fix salaries of school officers. 

Miss Nellie Riley of Biwablk visited 
in this city most of the week 

Mr and Mrs John McFarlane and 
children are visiting in Tower at the 
home of Mr. and -Mrs. George Hunter. 

Iver Amundsen and Ben Puent, who 
with their wives, motored to Minne- 
apolis last week, returned home Sat- 
urday after a delightful trip. 

Miss Marlon Thompson 



Deerwood. Minn., July 15. — 'Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. E, R. Mason and 
L'orothy and Felix, her children, went 
tc Braineru Wednesday to meet rela- 
tives from St. Anne. 111. 

On Sunday Cuyuna and Deerwood will 
play a game ot baseball at Cuyuna, 

The ladies of the Catholic church met 
Wednesday afternoon with Mrs, Thomas 
Keating. ^ , ^ i ..^ 

James Brownlee is reported to have 
the bigg*est raspberry crop his gardens 
ever produced. Currants are also yield- 

The A S. Nygord building is having 
the front completed and carpenters are 
busily engaged here. 

M D Stoner has removed the offices 
of the Cuyuna Range Light & Power Co. 
from the first addition to the new Carl- 
son & Crone building near the postof- 
flce. On July IS Mr. Stoner will appear 
before the Aitkin city council and give 
them a talk on electricity and make the 
city fathers a proposition for lighting 
their town. 

The Methodist Ladies' Aid society met 
Thursday with Mrs. T. F. Cole. During 
the balance of the summer season they 
will onlv meet once a month. 

Mrs W. F. Guthrie, two sons and 
daughter have arrived from Kansas 
City, Mo., and will spend the summer at 
Archibald's . „ -^ , ^ 

Miss Eliza Magoffin of St, Paul and 
Miss Rosalie Mondshein of Duluth are 
\isiting Mr. and Mrs. Beriah Magoffin, 
Jr 

Miss Jessie Bishop of Owensboro, Ky, 
is visiting the Misses Bishop. 

The Augsburg society meets July ^0 
with Mrs. C. G. Theoria. 



laundry at Deer River, was a visitor 
in Bemidji, Monday. 

Gus Melges returned Monday morn- 
ing to his present home in St I'aul, 
after having spent several days in 
Bemidji on business. 

J. M. Reed and wife and Mr. and 
Mrs. E. N. Smith of Blackduck, came 
to Bemidji Saturday evening in an 
automobile. 

J. E, Carpenter, the Crookston capi- 
talist, was a business visitor in Be- 
midji last .Sunday. 

J. E. McGrath of Superior was 
among the visitors In Bemidji the first 
of the week 

Arne Solberg. the Cormant Valley 
agriculturist, was a visitor in Bemidji 
the first of the week. 

According to several of the leading 
physicians of Bemidji, there is less 
fever and other diseases at the present 
time in Bemidji than there has been 
for many years. 

J E. Cahill Is again serving as dep- 
uty with Sheriff Hazen. having com- 
pleted the work of assessing the city 
' of Bemidji. W. E. Hazen, who has 
been acting as deputy sheriff during 
the absence of Mr. Cahill, has leased 
the Remore hotel and will operate that 
hostelry. 

Register of Deeds J. O. Harris has 
been In Duluth visiting with friends 
at the head of the lakes. 

Three final proofs were made before 
Clerk of Court Rhoda Monday, all of 
those making the proofs residing in 
the town of Eland, this county, as fol- 
lows: Harry Provo, John P. Nllson, 
and Peter Berg 

Eugene Caldwell, who farms in the 
town of Quiring, was transacting busi- 
ness at the courthouse Tuesday. 

A. J. Trustv, who owns a farm near 
Farley, while in the city Monday, told 
of receiving a letter from his son. 
Howard, who Is now located in South 
Dakota, in which the latter tells of 
very undesirable conditions that pre- 
vail in that section. 

Mrs. A. Lemlah was in the city 
Monday from the Lemlah farm home 
near Puposky. 



year 
Mra 

ip to 

here 




was in the 
brother, Gust 



Jul- 



at Hazel 

hall 
15th. Music 
Two Harbors 




Aitkin. Minn., July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mr. and Mrs, H. I. Clay 
of Hutchinson, Minn., are guests of 
Mrs. Klee. 

Miss Hurn of Spokane. Wash., is a 
guest at the home of her uncle. J. C. 
Hurn. 

Mrs Mearow, former resident of Ait. 
kin. but now of Walker, is here visiting 
friends. 

Mrs. Chester Berry and infant 
daughter of Cuyuna arrived Thursday 
and are at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
C. Berry. 

Mrs. R. C. Trudgeon and son 
ard, returned last week from a 
St. Paul. 

Miss Rhue Young is at home from the 
Duluth normal for the summer vaca- 
tion 

Mr. and Mrs. Adam Gray, Jr. 
Anna Gray and Louis Harseim 
been spending several days this 



Cotton, Minn.. July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A son was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Erick Erickson. July 5. 

Mr. and Mrs. I. Nelson of Canyon, 
Minn., were here Sunday. 

Rev. K. E. Forsell of Minneapolis 
held services at the Miller Trunk 
school here Sunday. 

County Commissioner Overton of Du- 
luth was a caller here Wednesday. 

Gust Ecklund of Duluth Is spending 
a few days at his farm here. 

E. J. Fillatrault of Duluth was a 
caller here Saturday on his way to the 
range. 

C. Lindbeck, who has been seriously 
ill here is recovering. ^ , x. 

Otto Norman returned from Duluth 
last week where he spent the Fourth. 

Haying has begun here and a large 
crop is expected. 

Miss Flora Bergner of Superior is 
visiting with friends here. 

Miss Esther Soderlund returned 
home from Duluth Sunday after a visit 
with friends. 

Victor Carlson returned home from 
Fergus Falls last week, where he has 
been spending the summer. 

Miss Myrtle Stantz of Kelsey was 
here Sunday. ^ ^ ^, 

The ladles' sewing society met at the 
home of Mrs. N. M. Nelson on Thurs- 
day. , „ , .. 

Samuel Goldstein of Duluth was a 
caller here this week. 

Mrs. William Soderlund was a caller 
at Kelsey Tuesday. 

William Stevens of Kelsey was here 
on business Wednesday. 



a host of friends who regret their de: 
parture. 

Prof. Loefgren, principal last 
of the Gilbert high schooL and 
Loefgren left the city last week. 

The Misses Galligar made a tr 
Virginia Thursday. 

Phil Bolland of Duluth was 
Thursday. 

Mr. Child of the engineering depart- 
ment of the state board of health was 
in Gilbert Wednesday looking over the 
proposed outlet of the Gilbert sewerage 
system. 

Roy McQuade went to Tower Sun- 
day. 

Dr. and Mrs. Rodermacher have re- 
turned from a visit to Barron, Wis. 

W. F. Moenke of Elba was in Gilbert 
this week. 

James Dowling of Gilbert has re- 
cently completed a contract tu build 
four miles of road north of Virginia. 

James Falk was renewing acquaint- 
ances in Gilbert this week. 

Ed Husebach of Grand Rapids wae 
here Wednesday. 

The Gilbert fire team is out every 
night practicing faithfully lor the 
tournament in Proctor the latter part 
of the month. 

E. L. Pryor returned this week, 
bringing with him his bride, who was 
Miss Hughes, from his home town in 
Missouri. Mr. Pryor has been trans- 
ferred from Gilbert to be agent at the 
Duluth & Iron Range depot at Virginia, 
and in his departure Gilbert loses an 
esteemed citizen. 

Mesdames Stillman and Conoday en^ 
tertalned "Thursday night at bridge for 
a large party of young people from 
Gilbert, Eveleth and Virginia. 

City Attorney Radermadier has re- 
tuintd from a short vacation at points 
in Wisconsin. 

Mayor Cosgrove and Frank Bowman 
went to Duluth Momlay. 

Gilbert weather thi.s week has been 
fine. "It's cool in Gilbert" and also 
pleasant. 

Paddy Hogan went to Minneapolis 
this week. 

Anton Indlhar and son Tony made a 
trip to Duluth Monday. 

Sunday a party of Gilbert young 
people went for an outing on Ely lake. 
A canoe containing a newly married 
couple was upset and the occupants 
were nearly drowned. Prompt action 
on the part of all present prevented 
any serious results. 

Work on the new power plant at 
the Pettit mine is progressing rapidly. 

J. B. Mlshler of Duluth has a crew 
at work doing some railroad grading 
at the Gilbert mine. 

The school election Saturday night 
promises a little excitement It is re- 
ported that W. P. Chinn will be op- 
posed for re-election as clerk by C. G. 
Fulton. 

C. R. Conkey of the Genoa mine was 
in town Sunday. 

The woj-k of installing the sanitary 
sewer system Is being carried on with 
characteristic vigor by the I*astoret- 
Lawrence company. Three gangs are 
employed and the pipe is being laid 
very rapidly. Ed Kircher is inspector. 

W. A. Drichen, state mining en- 
gineer, was in Gilbert this week. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Jones went to 
Biwablk Sunday to see the Eveleth 
baseball team beat Blwabik. 



r' • 



■r 



c 



I 



■« 



i 





Rich- 
visit in 



Miss 
have 
week 



to 

R. 

left the 
two weeks' 
and other 



leave 
Meri- 



been 
with 
has re- 



BROOKSTON 

lTj-i_nj~_ru~i_n_r r i ~ — ~ - ~" »-~ — »»»~ — »» — « 



Tower 
Tower 
up tlie 
Mrs 




Ishpeming. Mi< h., July 15.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Hobart Matson has 
gone to Hancoc t with his sister to 
spend a few wee is. . , * «».«. 

Spencer Libby was elected to the 
office of chief ranger at the last elec- 
tion of the A. O. O. F. 

About a dozen sites are being dis- 
cussed as the best for the new fire hall. 
F Braastad has made a tempting 
offer, and as thU site is just opposite 
the one receivln f the most votes the 
common opinion is that the place will 
be taken. . ^ , 

J. Wahlman a id son have taken a 
contract for the erection of seventeen 
double dwelling houses at Nortli Lake 
Location. He built fifteen double 
houses there las: summer and several 
the summer befi re. 

The L, S. & I. i>ridge over the North- 
western and the D.. S. S. & A. railroad 
tracks is being r;palnted. 

Nell Ready ol Superior street has 
been confined to his home this week 
with an attack o' appendicitis. 

The fountain la the city square was 
repainted this woek. 

Many people have been taking ad- 
vantage of th» fine weather to go 
I berry picking. The crop is an excep- 



Brookston, Minn., July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Mose Jones returned 
from Bingham, Me.. where he spent 
several weeks among relatives and 
friends. Mr. Jones was called east by 
the death of his mother. 

Mrs. H. A. Perkins returned Saturday 
evening from a two weeks" visit with 
relatives and friends at Clam Falls. 
Wis. 

Quite a number of Brookston citizens 
were in Duluth Saturday, as witnesses 
in the condemnation case of tlie Village 
of Brookston againct the Great North- 
i em Railway company. The village 
seeks to acquire a portion of the com- 
panyls right of way for use as a public 
street crossing at a point where Second 
avenue crosses the railroad tracks. 

The Brockelhurst Business College 
baseball team was here Sunday after- 
noon and was defeated by the locals by 
a score 6 to 2. 

The Great Northern extra gang which 
has been working here since early 
sr)ring. was transferred to Dedham last 
Saturday. A. Stein is in charge of the 
crew. 

Wesley Kern and Fred Banta. home- 
steaders, residing a short distance 
southwest of town, have been very 
sick for the past week. It is thought 
that they have been suffering from 
ptomaine poisoning. They are rapidly 
recovering from their sickness. 

Mrs. A. J. Sullivan of Mellen, Wis., 
arrived here Monday for an extended 
visit with relatives. Mrs. Sullivan Is a 
sister of Mrs. C. E. Shortell. Dr. Mar- 
garet A. Ryan and Miss Francis Ryan, 
all of whom acquired homesteads near 
here last summer. 

The county board of education is ad- 
vertising for bids for the construction 
of a school house on section 1-50-19. An 
acre of land has been secured on the 
J. H. Tedford place, which is about six 
miles from this village. 

Monday, July 17, has been designated 
as Tag day. when donations will be re- 



went up to 
Wednesday to join a party of 
young people who are camping 
lake. 

August Betzler and children 
from Two Harbors visited Mrs. Betz- 
ler's mother. Mrs. Samuel Menadue. a 
couple of days this week 
Rev T. Stanley Oadams 
expect to arrive from th 
ut Lake Mills, Wis. 

Miss Irene Miller, who was operated 
for appendicitis several weeks ago 



and family 
ilr vacation 



Budd hospital, has left the hos- 



are in 
Coslow's 



officer Is 



In 
in 



on 

at the 

^^'mi-'s J E. Coslow and daughter 
Marian, of Jacksonville, Fla.. 
the city visiting with Mrs 
sister, Mrs. H. K, Gibson 
A United States army 
the cltv and has opened up offices 
the Commercial hotel. Recruits for the 
nrmv are being sought. 

Tg Hamper left Wednesday for 
I ake Geneva. Wis., where he will 
spend several weeks attending the ses- 
sion of summer school of the Y, M. 

^'Urs McDonald and l>aby arrived 
vAsterdav from Cleveland. Ohio, and 
^re guests at Vhe home of T, M. Wood- 
flil Mrs McDonald was formerly Miss 
Morell and was employed Im the post- 

^^Mrs^T^E. Vallencey of Dickinson, 
TC D wlio has been In the city vlslt- 
liiir with her sister, Mrs. A. W. Dodge 
on ElKhth avenue, the past three 
weeks left on Monday for Wadena. 
Mfnn.V for a visit before returning to 

^®Mr3°"Allce Bleecker of Sacramento. 
Cal 4 sister of C. H. Nugent of this 
city died Satur4ay from heart disease, 
while en route from Sacramento, Cal., 
To her former home at Oshkosh. Wis. 
Her brother went down last week ex- 
pecting to meet his sister at ()shkosh^ 
E-larnlng of her sudden death he came 
home and Tuesday again went to 
kosh to attend the funeral. 
Mrs P. J. Holland Is visiting 

field. Wis. ■ . »»,„ 

Andrew Larson Is at the 
nital 111 with typhoid /ever. 

A son was born to Mr. 
Conrad Carlson. Saturday. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
A B Muntle, Eighth avenue, I- rlday. 

Mrs MS. Stott or Duluth visited 
friends In the cHy on Thursday. 
Maggie Ross of Duluth is in 



in Duluth attending the meetings con- 
ducted l)y Pastor Russell 

The home ot Daniel Kane has been 
released from quarantine, their daugh- 
ter Mrs. Frank O'Nell, having recov- 
ered from smallpox. 

Foster Wakefield, who is "now em- 
ployed in Superior, was in town the 
first of the week. 

James Seavev arrived home last week 
after an extended tour as a musician. 

Miss Cora Gates of Glendlve, Mont.. 
Miss Catherine McLeod of Clonuet, Miss 
Benson of Fergus Falls and Miss Rose 
of Minneapolis, all former Aitkin teach- 
ers, have been enjoying an outine: at 
Bay lake and were calling on friends 
here this week before leaving for their 
various homes. Miss Rose accompanied 
Miss McLeod to Cloquet. 

Rev. and Mrs. W. E. Hermann of Du- 
luth have been spending their vaca- 
tion at the nome of Mrs. Hermann's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hokanson. 

S J Lane of Staples has taken a po- 
sition with the Aitkin Republican. 

Rev Father Smiers of St. James 
Catholic church is enjoying a vacation 
and taking an automobile tour with 
friends through portions of Minnesota 
and North Dakota, 

Fred Blais has gone to St. Henri, 
Quebec, on a two weeks' trip. 

F O. Nelson and family, who moved 
to klmberly some time ago, have re- 
turned to Aitkin and are occuping their 
home on the South side. 

F S Clayton of the Little Pine stage 
route has purchased an auto wagon 
from a local dealer. The distance 
which heretofore required a day's driv- 
ing is now covered In two hours. 

A son was born last week to Mr. and 
Mrs. W. J, Millard. 

John A. Harris, who was village elec- 
trician several years ago before going 
Ing to Oklahoma, has returned here 
with his family and will locate In this 
county. ,,. _ 

Mrs Daneswlck and sister. Miss Syn- 
der have moved their hou.sehold goods 
to 'Crosby where they will engage 
in the drug business with Robert Lund- 
bohm as manager. 



Eveleth, Minn., July 15. — (Special 
The Herald.) — F. C. Brayant. Supt. 
J. Miller's private secretary, 
fore part of the week for a 
visit at Washington, D. C. 
Eastern points. , , 

Andrew Ny<iuisi has returned from a 
visit at Meridan, Miss., but will 
next week for another visit at 
dan and other Southern I'oints 

Rev. Father Hugh A. Floyd of the 
Sacred Heai i cathedral, Duluth, a for- 
mer Eveleth resident, visited here 
Tuesday, leaving In the afternoon for 
Hibbing, accompanied by Rev. 1- ather 
J. B. Culllgan of this city. 

Miss Emmalissa Mandeville, for 
many years in charge of the domestic 
science department of the local schools, 
who has been spending her summer 
vacation al Mors, and othd'r Southern 
Minnesota points, arrived here for a 
short visit Tuesday. Next fall she will 
be employed at Miles City, Mont. 

Joseph Bjornstadt has left for a two 
weeks' vacation which he will spend 
at Minneapolis, where he was fof'"e';'.>' 
employed, and at La Crosse, Wis., his 

Frank E. Carpenter has returned 
from a week's visit with friends and 
relatives a this former home. Hope, 

Organizer John Grelff of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Svithoid of fc>t. Paul, 
who organized an order here Tuesday, 
left Wednesday for Virginia and Hib- 
bing, where he will continue his fra- 
ternal work. 





in 
Budd 
and 



Osh- 
Bay- 
hos- 
Mrs. 



with 
Miss 



Bemidji, Minn.. JJuly 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Gre- 
well and daughter, Dorothy, of Ames. 
Iowa, have been visitors In the city 
during the past week of the family of 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Bailey. Mrs. Gre- 
well Is a niece of Mr. and Mrs. Bailey 
Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Rathman of James- 
town, N. D., daughter and son-in-law 
of Mr. and Mrs. Bailey have also been 
guests at the Bailey home. 

O. E. Bailey, one of the pioneer resi- 
dents of Bemidji. who now makes his 
home on the Pacific coast, principally 
at Portland, making trips eastward 
Into Montana, is home for a brief visit 
with his father and mother, Mr and 
Mrs. H. W. Bailey and other relatives 
here. 

F. B. Winslow who has been travel- 
ing on the road for a wholesale house, 
has departed for Crosby, where he will 
hereafter make his home. 

Martin Erickson. who conduct* • 



Hill City. Minn., July 15.— (bpecial to 
The Herald.)— Mrs. Asslin and children 
of the Hill City hotel returned Wed- 
nesday from an extended visit with 
friends and relatives at Crookston. 

Prof. Ingerham has begun the erec- 
tion of another cottage. 

The Merry-go-round will be enter- 
tained by Madams Gilchrist and Sulli- 
van Saturday at the home of the 

former. . . ,,. « 

Mr Chatman of Faribault. Minn., is 
visiting relatives in the village for a 

time. , . ,^ , 

Rev. Mr. Gilchrist and mother visited 
friends in Duluth a few days this week. 

Ella Mills, who has been visiting her 
parents at this place for a month, re- 
turned to Grand Rapids last Tuesday. 

The Misses Magnessons. who have 
been employed at the Hill City hotel 
the past five months, departed for 
Crookston last Tuesday. ^ „ . 

Aleck Roblson was arrested Monday 
for violating the liquor laws and was 
brought before Justice Fowler. He was 
bound over to await the action of the 
grand jury. , ._ .^. . . 

Harry Arnold is visiting with his 
parents in Barron, Wis, for a time. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mra 
Taylor at Leseuer, Minn., July 9. 

Miss Ila Emburg of Faribault, Minn., 
is visiting her brother and family at 
this place. 



li^rf^^^i^i^i^^i^i^i^ 




GILBERT 




Gilbert, Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mr. Guthrie of Chicago 
has taken a position on the engineer- 
ing staff of the Schley mine. 

Pat Boyle has moved to the Kinney 
mine, where he will have charge of 
the engineering work. 

W'. F. Lawrence made a flying trip 
to Duluth Sunday. 

Dr. More of Eveleth was in Gilbert 
Tuesday. 

Mrs Frank Bowman entertained Sat- 
urday at bridge in compliment to Mrs. 
J. B. Thompson, who left Sunday for 
Minneapolis. Mr. and Mrs. Thompson 
were very popular in Gilbert and leave 



Iron River, Wis., July 15. — (Si>ecial 
to The Herald.) — The committee ap- 
pointed to determine the financial dif- 
ferences arising between the town of ' 
Iron River and Tripp met here.".. 
Under the findings the town of Tripp ' 
owes the town of Iron River the net 
sum of $716. The committee consisted 
of C. H. Werden of Mason,, August H 
Hoffman of Washburn and Con- 
tractor Pugle of Ashland 

The finest ball game of the season 
was played here last Sunday, when the 
Iron Rivers def<'ated the Ashland Owls 
by a score of 7 to 1. 

Postmaster Hall received a telegram 
Tuesday moraing informing him of 
the death of his father, Hamilton H. 
Hall, who jiassed away the day previous 
at the home of his daughter at New- 
bury, Or. The deceased was a veteran 
of the Civil war and was 67 years of 
age. 

The marriage of "^'allacc E. Thorson 
of this city and aiiss Ella D. Meyer of 
Bloomer was solmnlzed at the German 
Lutheran church at Bloomer, Wednes-j^ 
day. After a short wedding tour. Mi:**- 
and Mrs. Thorson will make their home 
in this city. • .* 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Chantelois 
and family were pleasantly surprised 
Tuesday evening when Arthur Chantel- 
ois, who has been in the West for the 
past three years, came home unexpect- 
edly and will visit with relatives and 
friends some time 

The road and highway committee of 
the county board of supervisors, con- 
sisting of A. J. Mussell of Bayfield. 
Ole Aune of Washburn and W. E 
Tripp of Tripp, spent some days last 
week inspecting the county highway 
and laying plans for new work to be 
taken up this year. 

The Washburn team will play the 
Iron River team on local grounds next 
Sunday, 

Mr. and Mrs. Hans Morne.ss spent 
Sunday at the Head of the Lakes. 

Mrs. E. E. Day and son, Evered, will 
leave Friday for Madison, where they 
will visit for about tliree weeks, 

Mrs. P. Taylor left Monday morning 
for St. Paul, where she was called by ' 
the death of a cousin. Miss Celia ac- 
companied her as far as Duluth. 

Anthony Kirsch of Bemus, Mich., a 
brother of Mrs. Arthur Elliott of this 
citv arrived In the city Wednesday 
morning and will spend a week visiting 
at the Elliott home. 

Mr. and Mrs. T. N. Okerstrom ac- 
companied by their children were in 
the city Sunday enroute to St. Peter. 
Minn. 

Dr. Paterson made a trip to Port 
Wing last Saturday. 

Mrs. Nellie McCullum and daughter. 
Mlnota of Ottawa. Can., are visiting at 
the home of the former's sister. Mrs. 
J. B. McDonald. „ ^ . 

Miss Madge and Master Fay Snyaer. 
sister and brother of Mrs. M. C. Helmer. 
are visiting this week at the Helmer 
home. , . .... .1 

Miss Eileen Mathews of Ashiand is 
visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. 
F. Morris. 

John W. Hall returned yesterday from 
a trip to Duluth. Chicago and Mil- 
waukee. 

T. F. Macmiller and Isaac Hubbard re- 
turned last Saturday from Chicago, 
where they spent a few days on busi- 
ness. 

Miss Cora Swenson returned last 
Thursday from Hill City, Minn., where 
she spent a few days visiting her par- 
ents. 

Martha Helium and Helen Laqua 
spent Thursday with friends at Winne- 
bago. 

Miss Mary Nolan of Superior is visit- 
ing in this city the guest of Miss Qen- 
erva Williams. 

Miss TllUe Loshea and brother. Will 
of Duluth are visiting In this city the 
guest of Mi.ss Hattle McDonald. 

The Christian Endeavor society will 
have charge of the evening services at 
the Congregational church next Sun- 

dsiy 

One of Mr. and Mrs. George Swan- 
sons children is ill with dyphtherla and 
the Swanson home is under quarantine. 

Mrs K. Shannon of Nora Springs. 
Iowa, arrived in the city Monday to 
spend the summer with her daughter. 
Mrs. A. E. Kennedy. „ . ., 

Mrs. M. Costello left last Saturday 
morning for Deer River, Minn., to visit 
for an Indefinite time with her sister. 
Mrs. Ira Spangler. , , ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. Alex La Lond and fam- 
ily of Superior visited with relatives 
and friends in this city for a few days 
during the past week. 

Dr. Feed G. Johnson, H. O. Lund, 



mm^ 



--^ 



...HMk 



« 



^ 



f^mmmmm 



^ »\ 



and 
was 

ir 



' 



James H- Tomlinson ami Arthur 
Elliott srent a day during the ^ytK 
camplnK at the junction of ^^.e L^" 
Forks anil Iron river. The water was 
too hlgrh and muddy, consequently the> 

«"^ha;il/>rar[rn "and wife are camping 

•'lI*^Tue'!.day evening at the horn. 
of^lr andMrJ Emil Hernard^'^ jP^^[^> 
was Elven in honor of Mis-s i-^'»";| 
r^Vlfants of Superior, w^o ».as .been 
tisiHnk: with friends in thit. clt> lor 
Se pa^: week. About thirty-six were 
lKre4nt. Cards and music were 
Entertainments of the even ng 
about n oclock a dainty lunci 

"*FraVices Sullivan ST.i-nt Sunday 

''^ mSI's LIda Miles spent several days in 
Duluth last week. «- »»» ,0 

Mrs P. J- Olson and son, Pc^pJ. up- 
turned to their home in "VS oodvine. 
"Wt.s , last Saturday. ^ . • 

Harrv Hopplin transacted business 
at poln\.s east of Iron River the latter 
Dart of the week. . 

MO Helmer, manager of the iron 
River Hardware company was a Dull- 
ness vis-tur in DuUith Tuesday. 

Father Sherron is spending a lew 
days at Bavfield this week. . „. , » 

A party of young r*-;'P'%;"Jj'^ ''iU^t 
dancing party at Crystal "^^^l^J^^^ 
Friday evening. -^^X''^^., MrJ 1? 
coupUs were present. ^^ .f-J'-'^ v.^ucUa 
H. B.nts and .Mr. and Mrs. \au<.aa 
cliaptruned tl-e party. 




is 
to each 



Hmcklev. Minn., July 15.— (.Special to 
The Herald. V-W. B. Plalsted reports 
that he sold the first of the week d99 
acres in section 4. 41-19. to J. B. Grldl 
of Stratford, S. D. At the same time 
he sold to W i^. Williams of Aberdeen. 

S I. all of 3-ct*«^ '-'^ a"*^ ^*'^ ^'•"'*" 
west" quarter of section 3:;. 41-19. con- 
Talningtri acres, and the eighty tor- 
me?lv owned Lv James Mulllns. west of 
Rose Hill cemetery. It is understood 
that this latter was jointly purchased 
by the two gentlemen, and that u 
their intention to divide it 8 
erect a house on his half. 

Rose Eb*-rsold. the 5-year-cdd daugh- 
ter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Ebersold dle< 
last Saturday of Southern malaiia. 
fever. The little gli 1 had been Mck 
for some time and last ^veek a t^n- 

sultation of doctors ^^as ^^^^f^.v, T.'it 
funeral was held at the Methot^M 
churth Sunday afternoon. Rev. All. 
Fritz officiating. , „. , r.^.^^ 

Elmer Johnson and Hjalmar Peter- 
son who recently moved here from 
Chicago aTid purcliased the Koch farm 
lust w-st of Friesland. bought the big 
stallion and mare that made up the big 
team owned ly C T. Swain. 

John Shober of Grand Rapids bought 
the li>-acre farm in the estate of fcwan 
Johni-on that was sold at auction last 
Saturdav for J 1.700 and rented it to 
CharUs'Larson. Mr. Shober also pur- 
chased the village lot belonging to Ihe 
Bame estate in the rear of the Lutheran 
church for $102. .„»„„ 

Supt. Fickard was up between trains 
Monday from Cambridge, where he is 
In charge of the summer school, mt. 
Plckard says the school is a success 
and has the largest enrollment of an> 
that has been held near here. 

Thr» case against John Holler, who is 
accused of having a deer In his pos- 
sessl -n out ot season, was brought up 
before Justice Conner last Saturday and 
continued until Wednesday of this 
■week, when it was again continued 
until July 21. , . = 

Mi-*" Lizzie Williams is working in 
the postoffae. It is understood that 
Miss Noble will ".eave the office to 
keep books for the Noble & Lyon com- 

''^mV. and Mrs. J. J. Flannery 
children of Winona have been 
gues'ts of the J. R. Mulllns family 

V report has reached here mat 
James Mullins. who formerly owned 
the eightv west of Rose Hill ceme- 
tery died at his home In Mankaio last 

we*'k. 



to visit his parents f dl and broke his 
lea while playing ball at that place last 

^Mr.* and Mrs. Osct*r Renstrom and 
chidren spent Sunday in Duluth. 

A large number of lots were sold In 
Gary this week. 

Mr and Mrs. Thomas Havron and 
daughter Edna, spent Sunday with rela- 
tives in West Dulutl . , ^ 

Miss Bernice Johi son and brother 
Lester of Short Line E^ark are camping 
in their cottage here. 

The Ash bury Hiking club composed 
the majority of the young people of the 
Ashbury M. E. church and their fi lends 
tnjnyed another of its hiking expedi- 
tions Monday evening. They lelt the 
church at Sixtieth a\enue and Kaieit,n 
street at 6:45 and w ^re entertained at 
Camp Minnehaha h» re. There were 
about forty people who took the hike. 
All reported a fine t me ,„. ^,1 _. 

Mrs. Ed Johnson entertained at 
luncheon at their <^ottage here Thurs- 
drv Her guests were Mrs. charits 
Strand Mrs^ Charlt 1 Gustafson. Mrs. 
AuKUSt Jacobson. Florence Jacobsun. 
Hafel Jacobson, A'ayme Gustatson. 
Margaret Strand. Sidney . acobson 
Standley Gustafson, Lester Johnson of 
New Duluth. Bernice Johnson of Short 
Line Bark. Lawrence Jacobson. Carl 
Jacobson of New Duluth. Mrs. Thomas 
Havron, Edna Havnn. 

Mr and Mrs. J. G. Brink entertained 
a party of Duluth riends at a lawn 
party. The guests Avere Mr. and Mrs 
Hubert Malcome, Mi. and Mrs. Max 
Mahler. Mr. and Mrs E. Cossi. Mr. and 
Mrs A D. Mahoney. Miss Edytli Rick- 
. rt Miss Sarah Hanucock. Miss Mildred 
Maicome. Helen Ma come. Miss cossi. 
Eileen Mah(mey. Elh 1 Mahoney Misses 
\rthur Chalmer, 'Vallace Malcome. 
Vincent Malcome. Edward Dash. 

The S. S. H. club had a meeting at 
the school house Tuesday e\5""«"«^„/J\® 
guests were Mis.-es Lorothy Dash. Ethel 
Overton. Cella Swen^on. Mae bwrnson 
Kdith Swenson, Clara Burg, Nettie 
Amundson. Myrtle Amundson. Mary 
Dunn, Katherine Neubauer. Glaclys Ren- 
strom. Mesdames Victor Das^h Jr.. Auk- 
ust Neubauer. Seid< n Boyd, Donald 
Bovd. Fred Schole. 



Detroit and other cities on a two 
week's trip. 

The funeral of Florence Solomonson, 
aged 9 years, took place Wednesday. 
Rev. Homsdahl officiating. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Ham. ^ ,^ , _ ^ 

Chris Gribble returned Friday from a 
short visit to Duluth. 

Rev J A. Ten Broeck has gone to 
Marquette for a few day.s. 

William H. Foster and wife have gone 
to Chicago, Milwaukee and other cities. 

Miss Agnes Cuddihy has returned 
from Detroit and other cities. 

James Rogers and daughter have re- | 
turned from »>orth Dakota, where they . 
spent six weeks. 

Miss Florence Lang has gone to 
Cleveiand. Buffalo and Niagara Falls. 

Misses Libbie and Lillian Niemark 
have returned from Ann Arbor, where 
they attended the University of Michi- 
gan. 





CALUMET 



and 

the 

this 




I WARREN 



4f» 



1 




■■- 


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■ 











Warren, Minn.. July 13. — < Special to 
Tlie Herald.)— George Hayes alias, 
Murphv and Maure is alleged to have 
pasi^ed' three worthless checks on local 
business men last Saturday. The I eo- 
ples Trading company, p. 1. Ayres and 
Arvid Bohman were the victinns for 
respectivelv $10 and $'.•• He had been 
working for A. C. Knudson of Boxville 
and the latter's name was forged to 
the checks. No trace of the accused has 
been found. . „ , 

In 'he repfrt prepared by the Crooks- 
ton land office it appears that there 
are still 41.7»8 acres of land in Mar- 
shall county open to filing for home- 
8t ^li (1 (^ r '^ • 

Ed Iverson. employed on the G. W. 
Smsth <Iray was badly hurt m an ac- 
cident last Thursday. He was riding 
on the dray loaded with mowers when 
he fell off under tne mowers. 

Esther Ekblad was buried at the local 
cemetery Saturday in the presence of a 
large number of friends and relatives. 
She suciumbed Thursday morning to 
the white plague and was only 1* years 

The commencement exercises of the 
Warren Hospital Training school tor 
Nurses was held m the Swedish Luth- 
eran church Monday evening. The 
graduates were Misses Mary C. Dahl- 
Quist, Clara M. McMillan, Marie C. Ol- 
son and Grace Noyes and Mrs. Mane M. 
Budd. . , ^ ^ 

C- W. Anderson is back from the hos- 
pital where he was taken last week aft- 
er being the victim of a runaway that 
just missed havine serious results. 

Marriage licenses have been Issued to 
Carl E. Westberg and .Anna W. Peter- 
son \dolph J. BatalUen and Effle Sands 
Thomas W. Vary and Margaret A. Mc- 

*^'judge Grlndeland attended court at 
Crookston Saturuay. at Roseau Tues- 
day and returned home Wednesday. 

Ingolf Grlndeland. son of Judge 
Grlndeland. was successfully operated 
on for appendicitis at the Warren hos- 
pital. 



'; SMITHVILLE 

Smithville. July 15. — (Special to The 
Herald.* — Thomas Higgin of Grants- 
burg was h»-re and moved his camp to 
GraWtsburg. Higgin & McDonald have 
finished their contract with the Cana- 
dian Northern railroad. 

Mr and Mrs. John Nelson entertained 
at a iaunch party Friday evening. Those 
of the j>arty were Misses Mable Byer, 
Helen Renstrum. Myrtle Amundsen. 
CtHa Swenson. May Swenson, Edith 
Swenson. . ^ 

Miss Helen Renstrum was hostess at 
a week end party. Music and games 
were the feature of the evening. Her 
srueats were Misses Mae Nelson. Mable 
Bver Mvrtle Amundsen. Annie Neu- 
bauer. Katherine Neubauer, Agnes Neu- 
bauer. Ruth Renstrum. 

Miss Mable Byer who spent several 
weeks here returned to her home In St. 

Bernice Johnson entertained at a cot- 
tage party the guests were Miss Ruth 
Renstrom, Nellie Swenson, Hazel Olson, 
Agnes Neubauer. Ebelyn Dunn. Agnes 
Boyd Clara Amundson; Messrs. Jen 
Amundson. Winifred Boyd, Albert Over- 
ton. Allen Boyd, Henry Neubauer, Lester 
Johnson. .., . ^ 

Walter Brett who went to Mahtowa 



Calumet. Mich, Jv ly 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Adolph Hermanson has 
gone to the Soo. 

Peter McKinnon has returned from 
lower Ontario. 

Miss Maud Sleep has gone to Detroit 
for two weeks. 

John Natpp of Milwaukee Is visiting 

here. 

William T. Hotten and daughter have 
gone to Detroit. 

Ernest A. Warren has gone to De- 
troit for a visit. , „ w . 

.Misses Mary. Margaret and Catherine 
Lang have gone to Detroit. 

Miss Ena Sundqi ist has left for a 
trip to Detroit. 

Joseph Halley has gone to Calgary. 
John James has gone to Detroit. 
Mrs. Jerry Sullivan has returned 
from Detroit. 

Sam Hoffenberg went to Atlantic 
City to attend the Elks national con- 
vention. 

George Jacka has gone to Iron Moun- 
tain where he will join Mrs. Jacka and 
son ' Paul, who are returning from 
Darien. Wis., whe e they spent the 
past two months vl-dting. 

The funeral of the late Herman 
Brookhouse, superintendent of the man- 
ual training at thi high school, tooll 
place Sunday, Rev. D. Stalker officiat- 
ing. The decedent had been 111 only a 
couple of days. V widow and two 
small children surv ve. 

George F. Schwab of Milwaukee is 
visiting here for a week or ten days. 

Richard Hocking has gone to De- 
troit. 

Miss Helene Nelson has gone to De- 
troit. 

Mrs. John Jame.>- of Woodland ave- 
nue has returned f 1 om Vpsilanti. where 
she attended the graduating exercises. 
Her daughter, Mist- Anna, was a grad- 
uate. 

Joseph Grathwold has gone to De- 
troit. 

William T. Rait y of Grand Haven, 
formerly of Calun et, has returned to 
liis home after attemlina: the funeral 
of Ids father, the late William P. Raley. 
Charles Roehm Itas gone to Chicago 
or several days. 

Miss Marjorie Bartlett of Copper 
Cliff. Can., is the guest of Miss Irene 
Fienwick. 

Dr. ar.d Mrs. Detallng of Chicago are 
visiting at the hon e of Peter Sauer. 

Mrs. Soevryn j nd daughter, Miss 
Florence of Spokai e. Wash., are guests 
at the <'harrier hotne in Laurium. 

John Harvey left this week for a trip 
to his old home in England. 

Announcements have been received 
here of the wedding at Chicago on July 
1 of Miss Olive Jlarter and Attorney 
Euger.e-A. McNally, both of Calumet 



Barnum, Minn., July 15. — (Spe'-ial to 
The Herald.!— F. K. Cannon ^nd Mi.^s 
Kuth ."^plague Barstow were rnairled 
last Saturdav noon at the home of 
the brides father by tho Rev. I... L. 
Litchfield. Mrs. Cannon Is the only 
daughter of J. D. Barstow and one 
of tlie most popular young lad't-.^ in 
this village and is well Icnou ;i 
throughout the county. Mr. Cinnon is 
a voung man. in the employ of the 
Stramberg-Carlson Telephone company 
of Minneapolis, who he travels for. 

Services at the M. E. church Sunday 
morning at 10:30. Sermon by the 
pastor. Rev. L. L. Litchfield. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Eckley we-o at 
Duluth Tuesday and attended *he lec- 
ture given by I'astor Russell it the 
Auditorium. ^ .,. , .^ .w . 

News wa<« received from Duluth that 
A R Skelton and wife are the narents 
of a son. born to them. June 10. 

Mrs W. S. Thompson and Miss M.uy 
Brett 'of Mahtowa were shopping and 
visiting friends here between trains 
Monday. , ^ ,^ ,,, 

Rev P. S Person of Detroit, Minn., 
has been holding services during the 
past week among the farmers living 
around Sandy Lake. ._,.,. , 

Mrs. James Peterson of Duluth. and 
her sister. Miss Hulda Johnson of 
Rush Cltv. visited at the home of Au- 
gust on West street last week. 

O E. Hervlg and John .\nderson of 
Mankato have arrived and will start 
clearing on the land recently pur- 
clia.sed by Mr. Hervlg. 

Mrs. May Brown, who has been at 
Royalton. Minn., for the past three 
months, has returned and has accepted 
the position of housekeeper for J. D. 
Barstow. . ^ , .v. 

Architect W. J. Sullivan of Duluth 
was here Wednesday getting informa- 
tion and details for the plans of the 
new six-room school building soon to 
be erected. . ,. ^ 

The Ladles' Aid society of the Pres- 
byterian church will be entertained by 
Mrs. Cy Blackmore at her home next 
Wednesday. July 19. 

The Infant daughter of Mr. an^t 
Mrs. F. M. Zlmmer died last Saturday ■ 
of an infantile sickness. The little 
one was buried in the cemetery here 
last Sunday afternoon. 

T T Hunter received an enormous 
salmon' from a friend In Oregon last 

Saturday. ^ ^, ^ i,t!„„ 

Otto Huemoller of Pipestone, Mmn., 
arrived Tuesday and is stopping at 
the home of his cousin, H. E. Bunger. 
He is going to stay here and engage 
in the carpentry business. „ . . „ 

Messrs Karl Miller. J. H. Kahring. 
Ed Simpson and Frank ShilUn report 
that the Scotch pea seed secured from 
the Van Camp Canning company at 
Algoma, Wis., last spring by Mr. 
Shinin while on a visit to that place. 
Is doing fine at each place and tha.. 
the pods are filling to a good size. It 
Is expected that firm will visit this 
town soon to report on the conditions 
for establishing a cannery liere. 

Mrs. .\. W. Leonard returned to Du- 
luth Monday after spending a few 
weeks visiting parents and friends 
here. 



daughter. Vivian, on I02nd avenue 
Tuesday in honor of her 6th birthday. 
Refreshments were, served and games 
played. , v, 

Mrs. Charles Stran. Mrs. Jacob'on, 
Mrs Gusteforson and Mr. Carlston 
joined Mrs. Johnson of Shortllne Park 
at her summer home at Smithville for 
a picnic Thursday. 

Mr. and Mrs. f. E. Powers of St. 
Paul. Minn.. Is visiting at the home of 
Mrs. Francis Fischer on Ninety-seventh 
avenue this week. „,,„„ 

There was another frame building 
burned early Thunday morning at 
New Pittsburg. 

Lizzie Mcl'onald of West Duluth was 
a guest at the Robert Bloyer home the 

last of the week. ... , ,,,,,,,„„ 

Violet Tupper entertained Misses 
Hllma Frvberg of Duluth, Emma 
Fischer and Florence Wills of New 
Duluth Tuesday, ^ ^ , ., .v,^ 

Mrs A P Tupper entertained the 
Larklns club Wednesday. Those pres- 
ent were Mesdames C. E. Kielly from 
Superior, R. B. Mitchell A P. John- 
son. A. M. Johnson. C. Winstead W, C. 
Campbell of Duluth. Refreshments 
were served and a pleasant time was 

^^Mrs H D. Blover and children cf 
West "l>uluth visited In New Duluth 
Wednesday. , ,, , 

Rev Allen Clark was a caller in 
New Duluth Thursday. 

Alderman Otto Kruger and John 
Berger are hauling the brick and get- 
ting the material ready to build a 
brick building on Commonwealth ave- 
nue near the Maccabee hall. 



visiting relatives in Cloquet this week. 

Miss Carlson left Saturday for her 
home at Moorhead. 

Miss Erna Peterson -eturned to her 
home at Moorhead Thursday. 

Arthur Clemens returned to his home 
in f'argo Friday. 

The Park hotel grounds, that were 
bought by C. C. Styles, has been 
platted into lots and are for sale. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Briggs returned 
last week from Springfield, Kan., 
where they spent several months. 

The Rice lake dam went out last 
week, which accounted for the crowd 
of rlvermen that have teen in Frazee 
for the past week. 

M. J. I'engra returned Saturday from 
St. Paul. 

Mi-ss Mable Moore visited friends 
here Wednesday, returning to Lake 
Park Thursday. 

The water is so low at Height of 
Land lake, that the drive is hard to get 
down and has been delayed lor some 
time. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Loucks of Min- 
neapolis arrived here Wednesday to 
visit with Mr. and Mrs. John Gunner. 



IRON MOUNTAIN 




Hallock, Minn., Jnly 1«.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Mrs. E. P. Nelson and 
children have left for Los Angeles 
Cal.. to spend the rest of the summer 

^ Miss^rarle Nelson, of Wilmar is visit- 
ing at the home of Mrs. C. A. Enckson. 
* Letter Powers, who has been attend- 
intr the Grand Forks university, is 
visiting here, and says that he may 
spend the rest of the .summer bore. 

R B Johnson has returned from Ada, 
V here he attended the fire tournament 
as a representative of the local fire 
department, , _ 

Oscar Voungren, Nels Olander. James 
Davlnle and A. E. Hales have returned 
from their several weeks' visit to the 
Pacific coast. ,1., , ,, 

E G. McMean lost a valuable saddle 
horse last week. He was ilding at a 
good pace when he turned a corner and 
the horse slipped and fell and sustained 
such injuries that it had to be shot. 

After having been away about two 
months at the cities, Elnar Dahlen is 
back again at the Nordln & Hellher 

bakery. , , .. ^ v. 

The county training school for teach- 
ers has now been running for two 
weeks, and has had a good and steady 
attendance. 





DULUTH 

\XKf J-U— M -* W ^ B ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ » ^ I 



Rev. Father Bohan, a counsin of ihe 
bride groom perfot med the ceremony at 
the Holy Name cathedral. 

Mrs. Ruel of « Ireen Bay, Wis., is 
visiting in Calum« t. called here by the 
illness of her dai ghter, Mrs. A. Par- 
inentier. 

Miss Mildred Romsdahl, accompanied 
by Miss Ingeborg l.eraan, have returned 
from Duluth and other points in the 
Northwest. 

A daughter has been born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Thomas Pipt r. 

The funeral of Michael Keough, aged 
74 years, took place Tuesday from the 
Sacred Heart church. 

The engagement of Miss Gail Hins- 
liff and Fred Ford has been announced. 
The wedding will take place the last 
of August. Miss Hinsllff is one of 
Calumets most i opular young ladies. 
Mr. Ford is empb yed in the First Na- 
tional bank. 

Robert McDonald has rturned from 
Detroit where he spent the past three 
weeks. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. H. White have been 
called to Sandstone, Minn., by the death 
of a relative. 

Mr. and Mrs. Claries Cash and child- 
ren of Animosso, Iowa, are guests at 
the Seifert hom.e. 

Miss Etta CoUiis of Lindsay, Cal.. is 
visiting her par* nts here. 

Word has been received here of the 
df-ath of Richari Pearce in England. 
He formerly r« sided in the Copper 
country and is survived by two daugh- 
ters here, Mrs. vV. J, Bloy and Mrs. 
John Dawe. and ' wo sons. J, Pearce of 
Hibbing, Minn., and Richard Pearce of 
Duluth. . ... 

John Pasture has gone to Astoria, 

Oregon. ,- ,.. ^ 

Mr. and Mrs. A. Kubiac have re- 
turned from Mil neapolis. 

G. W. Pfltzinger has gone to Buf- 
falo business. ,. „ , , 

Mrs. Edward Dion left Monday for 
Racine. Wis. 

Mrs. J. Thomas and children left 
Monday for Duluh to join Mrs. Thomas 
who is located t) ere. 

Miss Stefance has gone to Lansing 
to resume her duties in one of the state 
departments. She has been visiting 
her parents here 

Mr. and Mrs. John Ethler have re- 
turned from their wedding trip. 

Mrs. O. Knee and and Mrs. F. L. 
Anderson of Me iico City, mother and 
sister, respectivdy of Mrs. John T. 
Been are guest;; at the Been resi- 
dence. 

A son has been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Henrv Schmitt. 

Miss Irene Cronin has gone to Du- 
luth. where she *ill enter a convent. 

Miss Mamie Mmmons has gone to 
St. Paul. Mlnnej polls and other cities 
on a mtinth's vacation. 

Otto G. Weiss of Milwaukee was a 
Calumet husinesj visitor this week. 

Miss Genevlen • Condon has gone to 
Dulutli for a shirt visit. 

Mlss Anna Mo gan left yesterday for 



New l)uluth. Minn., July 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Mrs Joel Lee of 
St. Croix Falls, Wis., who has been 
visiting friends and relatives in New 
Duluth and Duluth for the past tliree 
weeks returned to her home last bai- 
urday. accompanied by her nephew, 
Tom Hicks, , . 

Mrs, William Fogerty and her nep- 
hew. Clinton Repp of Chippewa Falls. 
Wis., was the guest of Mrs Robert 
Crager from Saturday until Monday, 

Hllma Fryberg and Alvena Johnson 
of the West end were the guests of 
Florence Wills the past week. 

Manlfee Whitt, wife and children, 
who have been visiting In New Duluth 
and Duluth the past two weeks left 
for their home at Frederic, Wis.. Mon- 

Ruth McGrath of South Superior 
and A. Coman of Two Harbors, Minn., 
were In New Duluth, Sunday. 

Mrs. Francis Flynn was an over bun- 
day visitor in Duluth. 

Mrs. Alta Wells moved in her new 
building on Commonwealth avenue 
Monday. . , , 

Carrie Bangham of Superior was a 
guest at the Hecklinger home Sunday. 

Mrs. Frank Brand and her daughter, 
Ethel Brand left Sumlay for a visit in 
Finland and Switzerland. They ex- 
pect to be gone until September or 

Mrs Joseph Ringer of West Duluth 
was a guest of Mrs. Brouillette the 
latter part of last week. 

Word has been received here that a 
sen has been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
William Hicks of Baudelte. 

The ladies' league met at the home 
of Mrs. George Lee Tuesday afternoon. 
The meeting was called to order by 
the president and a prayer was given 
by the vice president. The secretary 
pro- tern called the roll and read the 
minutes of the previous meeting. New 
business was transacted and the meet- 
ing then adjourned to meet the first 
Tuesday afternoon in August with Mrs. 
Robert Crager. Refreshments were 
served Those present were Mesdames: 
Becklinger, Bernt, Bloyer, Crager, 
Dash, Dletz, Glddings, Knudsen, Lee, 
Miller, McKay Peters Wallace, Wise- 
man; Misses Ethel Becklinger, Louise 
Smith, Winnlgred Tower. Visitors 
were Mrs. Victor Dash and Dorothy 
Dash of Smithville, Mrs. Hutter, Mrs. 
McKinsev and Mrs. Anna Smith. 

Miss "Josepliine Chriske of Lady- 
smith. Wis., is visiting her sister. Mrs. 
Joseph Dartis this week. 

John McEachin is seriously ill at 
his home on McCuen street. 

The Kenney & Anker nine played 
ball with New Duluth here Sunday, 
the score being 2 to 7 in favor of the 
visiting team. 

Rev. S A. Blair. Sabbath school mis- 
sionary of Duluth Presbytery visited 
the Presbyterian Sabbath school here 
Sunday morning. 

Born, to Mr. and Mrs. James Hall, a 
daughter. July VI. 

Rev. P. Knudsen held services at 
Kelsey Sunday. 

Mrs. Frank Herbert and children. 
Mrs. Archie Herbert and Miss Tallan 
of West Duluth were guests at the L 
S. McKay home Thursday. 

Mr and Mrs. John Valine and chil- 
dren of Duluth were guests at rhe 
Frank Wldell home on Ninety-seventh 
avenue Thursday. 

Carl and Lawrence Smith left 
Wednesday for Poplar. Wis., for a visit 
with their grandparents. 

Patrolman and Mrs. L. A. Root gave 
a birthday party for their young 



Roseau. Minn., July 15,— (Special to 
The Herald.)— The next state land sale 
will be held here July 24. , . , ., 

W. Stuart Leech. M. D., has decided 
to locate In this town, 

A deal has been closed by which Mck 
Hae-en becomes the owner of the 
Charles Myer meat market. 

Peter Westland is back from Elk 
River. Idaho, where he has been the 
t.ast five years. He located on a valu- 
able homestead near Wannaska many 
vears ago, but when he had proved up 
he went West as the distance to mar- 
ket at that time did not warrant him 
to go into farnrng. He now intends to 
go back to the farm and begin farm- 

"Mr. and Mrs. Carl Funneseth were 
pleasantly surprised on their twenty- 
fifth marriage anniversary by a num- 
ber of their friends and they were the 
recipients of many valuable Pre^ents^ 

Kev. R. R. Otis, pastor of the Hope 
chapel. St. Paul, preached in the local 
Presbyterian church Sunday o" /J»e 
subject "Workers. Jerkers and Shirk- 
ers " 

The Old Settlers' picnic on the ridge 
three miles west of town drew a large 
crcnvd Of people from the adjoin ng 
vicinity and Badger and .'^reenbu^h. 
Israel Sjoberg, president of the as.so- 
ciatlon presided, and among the speak- 
ers who took part in the r'^^P""?' ".^J'';^ 
the following: M. J. He.^land. Judge- 
Mike Holm. Hon. G. H, ^'''ttson J. W • 
Durham. Gulbrand Broaten and others. 



Iron Mountain, Mich., July 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — L. T. Sterling has 
purchased from the Detroit Building & 
Loan association the Tierney building 
directly opposite the city hall. Mr. 
Sterling has had the plans made to re- 
model the same into an office building. 
The contract for the erection of tiic 
new school building at Felch was 
awarded to G. A. Gustafson, of Norway, 
at a meeting of the township board of 
education held yesterday afternoon. 
The contract price was $9,300. Tend- 
( rs w f re also received from Nelson & 
Bergman, of Escanaba, and F, E. King 
of Norway, The tender of the Escan- 
aba firm was $9,432 and of King, $9,368. 
A meeting of the stockholders of the 
Scandinavian Hospital society was held 
last Thuisday evening at which time a 
board of nine directors were elected 
as follows: For three years, Eric 
Hagar, John E. Johnson and Gustav 
Norman; for two years, Andrew Bjork- 
man, Charles Peterson and Alfred E. 
Rood; for one year, Gabriel Ohman, 
Charles E. Anderson and Dr. Otto Alv- 
Ing. The organization embraces every 
Scandinavian church and organization 
in the cltv. At a meeting of directors 
iield on Monday the following officers 
were elected; ITesident, Andrew 
Bjorkman; vice president. Alfred E. 
Rood; secretary, Charles E. Anderson; 
financial secretary, L>r. Otto Alving; 
treasurer, Eric Eager. Work on the 
foundation is progressing rapidly, 

Tne annual meeting of the stock- 
holders of the Twin Falls Land com- 
I-anv was held Wednesday afternoon 
at the office of L. T, Sterling and re- 
sulted in the election of the following 
directors; O, C. Davidson, Iron Moun- 
tain; C. V, Seastone, H. L. Russell and 
F E. Turncaure, Madison; Frank H. 
Jossivn, Oshkosh. Later the directors 
elected the following officers; Presi- 
dent, Frank H. Josslyn; vice president, 
C. V. Seastone; secretary-treasurer, L. 

T. Sterling. , .„,. t^ n 

Rev. James F. Record, Ph. D., will 
address the people of Iron Mountain at 
the Presbyterian church next Tuesday 
evening. "The subject of Rev. Record s 
address will be; "Educational Work ol 

the Church." ..,_■,. ♦!„„ 

The brick building for the heating 
plant of the new high school and the 
Central school is nearing completion. 

Arthur Johnson arrived here Wednes- 
day from Jacksonville to spend a few- 
weeks with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Magnus Johnson, v.*««» 

Mrs George Nau and Miss Kittle 
Brvom of Green Bay visited friends in 
the city last Tuesday en route by auto- 
mobile to Crystal Falls. 

Mr and Mrs. A. E. Brauns have as 
guests Mrs. and Miss Brauns of Green 
Bav Mrs. Aawater of Minneapolis, and 
Gaie Van de Brook of Pasadena. Cal. 

D W Mead. F, E. Turneaure and C. 
V Seastone of Madison, spent Wednes- 
day in the city in attendance at the 
meeting of the stockholders of the 
TAvin Falls Lands company. 

Mr and Mrs. E, J. Pearce of Negau- 
nee are spending the week in the city. 
Mr Pearce is mining engineer for the 
Republic Iron & Steel company and is 
doing some work at the Traders mine. 



perimental station at Grand Rapids 
was present this week and gave 
demonstrations in milk and cream test- 
ing. ^ , . 

At a meeting of the county board this 
week an appropriation of $12,000 was 
made for county roads and bridges next 
year. This is the largest appropriation 
for roads ever made in the county and 
much benefit is expected to be derived 
from it. , ^ 

The annual picnic of the Congrega- 
tional and M. E. churches will be given 
next Wednesday. The launch Mega- 
watt will carry the picnickers to Mich- 
ael's point on Leech lake where they 
will spend the day. 

Miss Helen Balton of Minneapolis 
is visiting with her sister. Mrs. Ed- 
ward Rogers, this week. 

President Schumaker of the St. 
Cloud normal was in town the first of 
the week. 

Superintendent Denfeld of the schools 
of Duluth was in attendance at the 
summer school this week. 

Harry Glidden and wife of Minne- 
apolis are stopping at the Chase this 
week en their annual vacation. 

Miss Inez Stickney of St. Anthony 
Park has been giving instruction at 
the summer school this week. 

Superintendent Ross visited at Rices 
over Sunday and while there attended 
the wedding of his sister Sophia. 

Albert Erickson has gone to North- 
ome to fulfill a cement contract. His 



new patent mixing machine arrived 
this week. 

Miss Mae Ross has closed her mil- 
linery store for the season and has 
gone to Pine River to spend a few 
weeks with her aunt. 

John Norrls, representing the Peyton 
Paper company of Duluth. was In 
town Thursday evening and Friday. 

The blueberry crop is reported as 
being a large one in various parts of 
the county. 

Mrs. Anna Mearow is visiting friends 
at Aitkin this week and looking after 
her property interests there. 

Joseph Holtz has opened a tailoring 
establishm.ent in the postoffice build- 
ing next to The Pilot office. 

Editor W^elles of the Sauk Center - 
Herald has been rusticating at Glen- 
garry this week, 

Hon. Albert Pfeander returned to- 
New Ulm this week after spending 
several days here at the lake. 

Miss Mary McFadden of Duluth was- 
in town this week with her sister. 
They were en route home after spend- 
ing several weeks at the Itasca state 
Piirk. 

A party of Oklahoma autoists arrived. 
in town this week and are stopping at 
Glengarry. They made the entire trip- 
by automobile. 

Colin Campbell is enjoying a visit 
from his brother and mother this week. 

Mrs. Hilbergs little girl was quite- 
badly burned this week by the mother 



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102-104 AVest Michigan Street, 
DULL Til, Ml.XN. 



— r- 





Frazee. Minn.. July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Mrs. Homer Skinner re- 
turned .Saturday from a visit with 
friends at Royalton. 

Mrs. C C. Au.xer and son, Lloyd, re- 
turned on Monday from a visit with 

friends in Duluth. , 

Miss Catherine Chilton returned 

Monday from a visit In ^'eJ"a"i;. „ . ^ 

Mrs. Louis Poole returned Monday 

from a visit to Fargo. r^^f^^s. 

Mr. Hamilton and family of Detroit 

pislted friends -n Fra/ee Sunoay. 

Raymond Schleher returned Wed- 

nesdav morning from a trip to tne 

Twin Cities. , ^ . , ,^^^ 

Chap Chilton returned to his home 

at Baker. Mont., Wednesday. 

Dr G. W. Kirnlse returned Satur- 
day from a business trio to Minneaoo- 
lis 

Word was received here from De- 
troit that Fred Lenke, a former black- 
smith here, was very ill at his home 
with tuberculosis. George Clayton and 
John Neuner visited him Thursday. 

Carl Bates spent Sunday at his homb 
in Frazee, returning to the Pinery 
Tuesday. , , , 

George and Bruno Baer made a busi- 
ness trip to Detroit Saturday. 

Charley and Mike Smith left Thurs- 
day for Fargo. N. D. 

Mr. and Mr.<». Miles of Prescott. WIp., 
arrived here Wednesday to visit their 
son. Ralph Miles. . 

Mrs. Hartly entertained a number 
of friends at her home In honor of 
his sister. Miss Hartb', who will leave 
shortly for Mason City, Iowa. 

Mrs. Pieskie and family arrived here 
Wednesday from Mahnomen. 

Bert Stiltzner made a business trip 
to Detroit Thursday. 

Henry Mllbie returned from Hitter- 
dah, Minn., with his bride. They will 
reside In Frazee. 

Frances Thomson returned to her 
home at Moorhead Thursday, having 
vis^ited at the Adam cottage at Kos^ 

1 fl 1< P 

Mrs. R. Miles entertained at her 
home Thursday evening at five hun- 
dred the occasion being Mr. Miles 
birthday. A delicious lunch was 
served. ^ , t-. u 

Mrs. Carl Schmitz arrived Friday 
from a visit with her mother at St. 
Cloud. , . - 

Miss Olson of AKeley Is a guest of 
Miss Nettie William. ^ , 

Dr Melvin, wife and baby, are visit- 
ing their relatives this week, return- 
ing to Minneapolis Saturday. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lord returned to Lake 
Park Saturday. _ 

Addison .\lbertson left Tuesday for 
Cro.sby. Minn., to visit with his 
brother. , 

Edward Brogen returned Saturday 
from a trip to the Twin Cities. 

Miss Catherine Tennessen left Sat- 
urday for Storden. Minn. 

The men at the mill are working 
eleven hours a day Instead of ten, try- 
ing to make up a little of the lost 
time during the lay-off. 

Mrs. Joe Durochl and children are 



Crosbv, Minn., July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald. >—Mr.«. H. Inpalls and 
fciand daughter, Norma, who have been 
V limiting the fcrmers daughter, Mrs. H. 
L Nicholson at Gilbert, have returned. 
Mrs Nicholson accompanied them and 
with her husband. Mr. Nicholson, for-; 
merly in the newspaper business on the, 
range, will malte their home in Crosoy. : 

Chester D. Trif.p, the general man- 
ager of the Rogers, Brown Ore com- 
panv, has returned Irom Chicago. 

The Ingalls Motor Boat Co. has in- | 
stalled a five-horse power Domain en- 1 
gine in Frank Dears launch which they : 
are rebuilding. 

James Reed, the business manager of; 
the Northern Minnesota Hospital asso- 
ciation and Dr. R. H. Monohan of In- 
ternational Falls, were in Crosby Mon- 
day examining the hospital being erect- 
ed for the company. 

The council met last Thursday and 
also had a special meeting on Wednes- 
day afternoon. Contracts are to be let 
for the sewer and water works on July 
9?; 



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The telephone controversy which the 
town is having with the Aitkin-Deer- 
wood Telephone company over certain 
prcjvisions in the proposed franchise has 
not been settled and both are still at 
loggerheads. 

When Crosbv played Aitkin last Sun- 
day Ike Fawcett struck out his usual 
quota of baiters, fle was w.dl support- , 
ed but the victory went to Aitkin by j 
the score of 2 to 4. ^ , ', ., ., 

Brick work on the Brink building is ; 

now up one story. , , - » ' 

A Lovdahl left Wednesday for Be- , 

midji as a delegate to the M. B. A. con- 1 

vention there. ,• ,• 

Miss H. VanBergen cf Minneapolis is 
visiting her sister Mrs. Wm. Deerlng. j 
On Julv 4th the 'ngalls Motor Boat 
company "handled 1.000 people without: 
accident or inconvenience and visitors 
were most favorably impressed with 
the promptness and courtesy shown by | 
the officials of the company. ^ ,, . 1 
The girls have farmed a baseball nine ; 
and defeated the Crosby Juniors Mon- | 
day by the score of 8 to 2. l 

The First National bank has reached 
a height of one storv and the brick lay- 
ers are making good progress when not 
hampered by the lack of cut stone. 

Mr and Mrs. Will S. Pitt have re- 
turned from an automobile trip to Min- 

Mrs Vernie lianewick. Miss Maud 
Snvder and Robert Lunbohn, all of 
Aitkin, will conduct the Danewick store 
in the new building just completed by 
Mrs. Danewick. 

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Walker, Minn., July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Big improvements ar*^ 
being made on the Walker-Akeley : 
road so as to make the highway pass- 
able for automobiles. Considerable 
wo'-k has been done this week and as 
a result more automobiles have been in . 
lown than tver before. • ,,. 

Summer school is progressing nicelj 
and the attendance continues to be on 
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1% 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD* 



July 15, 1911. 




OlOUV 





mist iking a bottle of t-a»-bol c acia for 
ointment for a sore on the cluM s face^ 

Mrs A W. Morris ai»<i party of five 
ftrrivt'ti this week from tit. Couis to 
snen.i th*> remain>ier of the smnmer at 
Moni.^ Point. Mr. Morris is due to ai- 
rlv-' this week. . . „ 

Mrs Martin Quani has been enjoying 
a visit from her sister, Mrs. Rdygreen 
of FarsTo, this week. ^ t i.» 

E.1 I P. Staede of the Leech Lake 
LumJ> r company sent a c'^'"'-^^^'^'' J^^u 
to th- local fire dei-artment this wet^K 
In :i;'rr.<-i:ition of valiant work done 
at ih ' fir.' in the mill yards Sunda> 

"'lirs. Mary McC jbe and daugf;^^';. 
Mrwi Wilford Bri^iht. and Ht-Ie" .V/**^ 
Thursday evening at «'"}>''£• ^ 
1 abel Clias • returned this week 
from Minneapolis where she has been 
attending sohool. 



her- visiting her lister. Mrs. Paul 
Proux for a few days. 

Miss Jennie An lerson left tor 
Feeley Tuesday to sfend the sumnier. 

Kinest Westurn eft for Hlbbin^ 
Thursday with an Insurance adjuster 
to adiust some fire los.-«es sustained 
by the Coolidjje-Schitssler Co., In that 

Mis George Johnson and daugrhter 
returned home to F.rbes. Friday after 
a few weeks" vi-'it 
of Henry Johnson. 



Here at the home 



groom 
has 



is employed as 



returned from 
to St. Paul. He 
and attended tlie 

is recovering from 




aRLTON J 



Carlton. Minn.. July 15.— tSneclai 
The Herald.)— Miss Hulda Holm 
Cloqufi visited with her 



to 

of 

Mrs. 



.V 



til 



r. , 
ern> 



friend, 
Norman over Monday 
, , 1 circus struck the city on 
v and procee.led to stretch 
-. in liailr^'ad park, and gave 
itioiis in the afternoon oni 

..award Walton entertained the 

s' Aid S..ciety of the Methodist 

.pal church on Wednes'lay a.t- 

n and a plea.sant time Is re- 

! I.v the women in attendance. 

. -orge Gilbert entertained th* 
^ Aid Society of the Catholic 
on Wednesday afternoon, in 
ruit new home on Chestnut 



of di 

pl IC*' 

Ba; ■; 
ir.. 
api- ■ 
and 

d 



,) at 



Mrs. 

who 
Ken- 



a 
W. 



who 
Ken- 



to 



cliurcii 

her el 

**AiT - il i".eetlns of Twin Lakes 

fan;i.rs \\ as held Wednesday lUKht at 
the h. me of Gus Hinz. for the purpose 
us^in- exliibils to be taken and 
tl.e Carlton county fair ot 
whi-h takes place about tlu^ 
September. Committees were 
■ to arrange for an exhibit 
take charg* of the different 
nts It is proposed to maKe 
of all varieties of grasses, 
vegetables and fruit. Tlie 
; exhibitors last year spent 
' in rtxing up their exhibit, so 
lent that it requires some ti- 
-upport. . . _. 

if Hirry McKinnon has been ab- 
s-ve:al days this week in at- 
e at the United States feJ,^5''\' 
The particular case upon which 
' 'f was called was that of Ui^ 
■on of the man Cooper, whj 
..ited here la^t spring for com- 
;, . y tn the robbery of the post of- 
I. -romwell. _ , , ,,, „ 

isier T. F. Tyler of tho 
X Pacific railway was In the 

citv' on official business on Tuesday. 

Mrs John D. Gilbert, who has been 
enjoving a visit from her triend 
De.ui Sehrt of Beloii. Wis., for 
days. Kave a very pleasant lUt.e danc- 
ing party In honor of her guest 
Thurslav evening in the Odd Fellowr, 
hal! U'wag confined to only tiie un- 
married people of the city and was a 
delightful little affair. 

The Swedish Lutheran church 
day School held a picnic at Chub 
on Tut^^sday. Three big tallyho 
of peoi'le went out from town ana 
Joyed the event very much. Tiie 
©r was pleasantly cool and a pro 

sports boat riding. tishins. etc 



W 

a' 
it . 

sent 
ten iaiu 

court. 

e>. 

w - 



Zirn. Minn.. .luiy 1.— (Special to The 
Herald.)— J. H. Carl, on and Mrs. John 
Peterson of Hibblng visited with 
s. W. Levin Saturda> and Sunday. 

Mrs. B. McKusky of Holyoke, 
has been the guest < t Mrs. U. D. 
worthy, returned hone Thursday. 

Miss Midlie Carlson returned Frida> 
to Ortonville. Minn., after spending 
week liere as the g lest 

Vmong those who ittended the dance 
at Furmoy Saturd; y evening were: 
Misses Ksil'.er Olson, Hilda Olson. Ger- 
trude Norberg and Louise WiUner: 
Messrs Knute Peter 4on. Joiin Johnson, 
\lbert Peterson. Kl. hard Lind. Henry 
Johnson. p:mil Johnson, Walter W utala 
and Manuel Gradine. , ^ 

Miss Dilsie Pryoj of Eveleth. 
has been the guest .<f Miss Sadie 
worthv. returned home Tuesday. 

William Bvrnes t -ansacted business 
in Hibblng Wednesd ly. 

Miss Hilda Olson )f Hibblng arrived 
home Saturday for v two weeks" vaca- 
tion. 

Anthony Pryor >f 
guest at the home of 
Sunday. 

Mrs. Victor Swans 
her sister, Mrs. Car 
luth. 

Engineer Coe of Puluth was 
Mondav looking ove: road work. 

Mrs. "Nat X, Nashmd visited In 
lutli and Fond du l..ac from 
until Monday. 

Ole Abramson of Cotton was a caller 
here Sunday. 

Jack Killbrlde of Eveleth was a 
cuest at the home of U. D. Kenworthy 
Sunday. 

Mrs. S. V,'. Levin 
ter, Helen, at Two 
ami Sunday. Miss 
Swedish school ther ,». 

Swan Swanson of Payne was a caller 
here Sunday. 

Miss Inez Davy o 
Lotus Sullivan of 



rlor. wliere the 
a inai. lilnlst. 

Charles Erlckson 
a motorcycle trip 
visited Minneapolis 
civic celebration. 

Mrs. A. M. Opsalil _ ,, 

an operation pei formed for appendi- 
citis. . , , , , 

J. A. Wilson has disposed of his har- 
ness business and will travel for a 
heating firm. 

Mr and Mrs. N. H. Ingersoll on Wed- 
nesday evening gave a reception in 
honor of the newly wedded Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank G. Hall. Assisting the 
hostess and host in receiving was 
Mrs F:. L. Towle, mother of the bride. 
Kecelvlng at the door were: Mrs. F. 
W. Wieland and Dr. Howard G. Inger- 
soll. Miss Louise Beare presided at 
the frappe bowl on the porch. Mrs. 
Tliomas Beare presided over the dining 
room and was assisted by Mrs. C. L. 
Hoffman, the Misses Coma Stickney, 
p:ioise Smith and Nell Fie Alderman. 
Pink roses, carnations and ferns were 
used In tlie decorations. Tlie lawn 
was brilliantly illuminated with elec- 
tric ligius. 

Dr. George E. Brown and Miss Irma 
Parker were married at tlie home ol 
the bride on Wednesday evening. It 
was a quiet home wedding. The couple 
will make their home in Miles Cl;y. 
Mont., where Dr. Brown has associated 
himself with Drs. Andrews and Bus- 
klrk. 

Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Kaley of Hnm- 
hne are visiting their daughter, Mrs. 
F. W. Wieland. at Hubert. 

Dr. Frederick Popple and wife of 
Minneapolis are the guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. F. W. Wieland. at Hubert. 

Adam Brown is visiting relatives at 
Bemidji. 



Eveleth was a 
U. D. Kenworthy 



on has as her guest 
L Swanson, of l)u- 



Wright of New York 
her parents. Mr. and 
She will remain for 



her visit to the southern part 
state Monday. 

Jack Lelsenfeldt left Tuesday morn- 
ing for Montana, where he expect.s to 
make his home. His family will follow 
if he finds a suitable location. 

Miss Nellie Bender, who Is one of the 
teachers in the public schools, returned 
to Badoura the first of the week. 

Merton Vandewater of Chicago, who 
has been visiting his parents near 
Usage, returned to Chicago Friday 
morning. 

Mrs. Will Lord of Aurora is visiting 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Fuller, 
this week. 
I Mrs. Florence 
(city la visiting 
Mrs. A. Rlma. 
Several weeks. 

Miss Bertha Panchot. who Is well 
known In this village, was married at 
the home of her parents In Fosston to 
Thomas Stuart of that place. 

U. S. G. Henry, who has been in the 
Twin Cities for a week, returned home 
Monday. 

Mrs. T. M. Wooley, who has been ab- 
sent for some time visiting friends at 
Delano, returned home Wednesday 
evening. 

Mrs. E. E. Bonham. who has been 
ill Minneapolis v;siting her daughter. 
Beth, who is a nurse in St. Barnabas" 
hospital returned Wednesday evening. 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred Klma. Mrs. Ben 
Senske and Mrs. Harry Crawford are 
campln? on Big .>*and lake near Dorset. 
Mrs. Charles Foster of Minneapolis 
is \-isitlng her parents and friends this 
week 

Mrs. George Campbell of Fergus 
Falls Is visiting her parents, Mr. ami 
Mrs. Charles Bradt, who live two miles 
north of town. 



W. Colby home from Sunday until 
Friday. 

The Misses Margaret Llndley and 
Rach Webb have returned from their 
visit in the Twin Cities. 

Mr. and Mrs. Herman Teuber de- 
parted last Saturday for Mllaca. where 
they will make their home In the fu- 
ture. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Tesselle of Hol- 
land. Neb., visited with Mr. and Mrs. 
William Stegeman Monday. 

Alex Bisset has returned to Sioux 
Falls, S. D., after a week's visit at 
liome. 

Louis Chrlslensen returned \v ednes- 
dav from Duluih, where he attended a 
meeting of the board of directors of 
the Farmers" Co-operative Market as- 
sociation 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Lowe returned 
last Sunday from their honeymoon tour 
to the Pacific coast, and W. F. D. Long, 
who has been filling the Great North- 
ern agent's place, returned to Superior 
Monday evening. 

Henry and Fred Luther of Ferguj 
Falls were guests at the J. H. Tom- 
have liome Tuesday. They -will locate 
on their 240-acre farm near Friesland. 



«r^^^» nm m^^m v^'iv^ 




here 

Du- 
Saturday 



visited her daugh- 

llarljors Saturday 

Helen la attending 



and Miss 

were the 

Sartih Byrnes Saturday 



Eveleth 
Virginia 




ass LAKE 



was shopping 



Miss 
several 



Sun- 
lake 
loads 
en- 
weath- 
ram 



gue.'Sts of Miss 
and Sunday. 

Mrs. Herman Wutala 
In Eveleth Thursday. 

Miss Marie Gabru l of Gilbert Is vis- 
iting with her aunt. Mrs. William Mc- 
Kinnen. 

Charles O. Stenluiid transacted busi- 
ness in Duluth MonJay. 

William Byrnes v\ as a caller In Eve- 
leth Tuesday. 

The Ladies" Aid S >clety of the Swed- 
ish church will me ?t at the home of 
Mrs. S. W. Levin Tl ursday. July 20. 

S. W Levin trarsacted business In 
Duluth Tuesday and Wednesday. 

Mrs. C. O. Stenlund spent Tuesday 
and Wednesday in I'veleth. 



the 
end 
conform 
yterian 
a fine 



was''c"arrled"oIIt. with"°a general picnic 
dinner at noon, and a lunch lo the ait 
cm "^ cm 

Tiie dedicatory services for the new 
Pres.>yterian church will take place l:i 
about three weeks. The edihce has 
teen thoroughly overhauled and 
pulpit rearranged, and the south 
of the place remodeled to 
to the style of the Presbyterian 
ct ^. and it will present 

a; ce at the opening. 

c in t fever lias been prevalent In 
a couple of families in town the past 

Miss Rose Chase of Minneapolis is 
spending a few weeks in the city visit- 
ing wi'h Rev. and Mrs. Henry Hulne. 

A little daughter of Hans Harder 
was quite severely injured on Tuesday 
of this week, by falling into a barbed 
wire. She received a cut over the 
right ej'e. 

A small party of Carlton young 
people drove down to Mah.t 
day and had a picnic at 
near John G. Carlsons place. 

Winiam Carter, brakeman, narrow- 
ly escaped being crushed to death 
Wednesday, while switching in the 
yards at Cloquet. He was making a 
coupling and in some manner got 
cauglit so that his body was Jammed 
up into a space of only about eight 
Incl e:?. One of his hands got jammed 
in the pilot beam of the engin-j and 
his elbow and arm were badly bruised. 

Deputy Sheriff Flynn went to Clo- 
quet Wednesday and brought over 
Minnie Anderson. Slie was arrested to- 
gether with her husband, on suspicion 
of having been implicated in a daring 
daylight ho!dMi» in that city at about 
noon on Wednesday. A man by the 
name of John Jacobson was held up 
on that day and robbed of $45. 

Judge Skemp. F. B. Vibert. and Dr. 
Dolaii were over from Cloquet on Mon- 
day appearing before the county com- 
missioners to secure an appropriation 
to build the road from Cloquet out to 
the state forest farm. 



MIDWAY 



owa 
Park 



Sun- 
lake. 



Midway, Minn.. July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Haysng Is now In full 
blast, and eveo'l'ody is busy. The crop 
is fairly good bu' the grasshoppers 
have done .serious damage to some of 
the clover fields. 

Matt Kemp has moved his family 
and household goods from Alborn to 
his farm at this pi ice. 

Mrs. Johnson oi' Crosby was the 
guest of Mr. and Mrs. August Mag- 
nusson last week. 

The Mls.^es ."vlartha and Zella 
Burrell of Duluth \ isiied with Mr. and 
Mrs. E. .M. Olson and Lewis F. Hill 
over Sunday. 

A. Swanstrom of Duluth spent Sun- 
day at his farm In Midway 

iliss Gerda Ekliind of West Duluth 
is visiting with tbe Misses Ellen and 
Alma Strom. 

Mrs. -\ugust Anderson will entertain 
the Ladies" Aid society next Wednes- 
day afternoon. Jul/ IS). 

Miss Helga Ekei oth has been visit- 
ing for a couple of weeks at Mahtowa, 
Minn., the guest ol Miss D. E. Scott. 

Andrew Hedeen "ecentiy lost a valu- 
able cow through an accident. The 
animal was found in the woods with 
one of her hind logs broken and was 
so badly injured that she had to be 
killed. 

The Peterson brothers of West Du- 
luth. who recentl / bought the old 
L>ouglas farm on the Thomson road 
have moved in thl.-. week. 

The members oi the Swedish Luth- 
eran church are planning for a gra id 
picnic which is t > be held near the 
Midway schoolhou^e, Sunday. July 23. 
There Is to be games and contests of 
all kinds, and r« freshments will be 
served. 

M. Wlllette and son of West Duluth 
were Midway call )rs last Sunday. 



'^^^%^k^h^h^«^W 



Cass Lake, Minn., July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald. >— Mrs. H. N. Harding 
t>mi daughter M'ss Bertha, returned 
Monday evening from a week's visit 
with Minneapolis relatives ana friends. 
H. N. Harding, cashier of the First 
National bank, was at Remer a couple 
days tlie first of the week, assisting to 
mt on the finishing touches of the new 
bank building, recently erected by the 
First State bank of Remer. Mr. Hard- 
ing Is president of the new Institution. 
Miss Anna Rooney of Sur>erior Wis., 
arrived the first of the week for an ex- 
ttnded visit with her friend Miss Zella 
Gardner. The young ladies spent Thurs- 
dav between trains visiting with Mrs. 
E."L. Warren at Federal Dam. 

Judge L. M. Lange leaves Monday 
morning for Hackensack to attend to 
SLme land matters. 

G. E Pierce of St. Paul, state agent 
for the Hartford Fire Insurance com- 
pany, accompanied by Speciil Agent 
Morrison of the Chicago office, were in 
the city Wednesday looking after the 
Interests of his company. 

Mr. Berghum of the firm of F. A. Pat- 
rick & Co.. of Duluth. arrived in the 
city Friday to act as cashier at the 
closing out sale at the New York store. 
Attorney Fred W. Smith spent Friday 
at Wilkinson in connection with a fore- 
closure sale. 

Father Kornbrust returned Thursday 
from a trip to the southern part of tlie 
county, including the cities of Walker 
and IMne River. 

The Mlskella Furniture company are 
busy moving their entire stock of new 
furniture to the Fairbanks & Warren 
building across from the Endion hotel. 
The company will be ready for business 
on the 17th. 

A J. Hole of the First National bank 
left Saturday for Moorhead. whore. It 
Is stated, he will take unto himself one 
of. the fair maidens of that place. 

W. J. Mlskella. manager of the Vul- 
can Western Electric company of Chi- 
crgo arrived Sunday for a short visit 
with his brother and sister. He left 
Wednesday for Little Fork accompanied 
by his brother Ed and will spend his 
\acation with the family. 




Hermantown. Minn., July 15. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Mrs, H. E. Gell- 
now and daughter Leona, who have 
been visiting friends and relatives In 
Hermantown for the past month have 
returned to Duluth. 

Miss -Mary Liodahl. who has been 
visiting her father left the first of the 
week for Minneapolis where she will 
spend several days. 

The Sunday school of the Five Cor- 
ners church will hold their annual pic- 
nic at Pike Lake outlet tomorrow. 

Mrs. Burton and children of James- 
town, N. D., are spending the sum- 
mer at the home of Mr. and Mrs. 
Charles Avery. 

Misses RangheM and Ethel .Tohn- 
son spent last Sunday at their home. 

Aug. Dahlborn si>ent Sunday with 
Five Corner friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. Fred Erickson 
family of Duluth visited with Mr 
Mrs, Edwin Johnson. 

English services will be held at 
Five Corners church at 8 p. m. 
last Sunday In July by the Rev, P. J. 
Gramness of Virginia. Scandinavian 
services will be held in the morning 
at the usual hour. 

Mrs. A. L. Tusch who has been visit- 
ing with friends In Duluth for the last 
week has returned to her home here. 



and 
and 

the 
the 





Helnlnger has returned 
Illinois where she spent 
weeks visiting relatives 




^^i^^t^r^f^^^^^t^t^t^*^ 




BOVEY 



!• i'lMiv.-ood, Minn.. July 15. — tSpeciai 
to The Herald. I — Hans Johnson of 
Dawson, father of Mrs. N. O. Stage 
berg, and Lewis Peterson, a cousin, 
returned home Sunday after a few 
davs' at the Stageberg home, 

t: B. Robinson and family returned 
Tue.slay from Richville. where they 
attended the golden wedding of his 
parents, and a trip later to Isle Roy- 

.Mrs. Westurn and Mrs. ■V\'ll3on were 
Cloquet visitors Wednesday. 

Miss Belle Paul returned Wednes- 
day from an extended visit at Hill 
Cltv. slie was accompanied on her re- 
turn by Miss Nora Arnold, who will 
visit with her grandparents here. 

Messrs. M. H Schussler and M. H. 
Coolidge of Minneapolis were looking 
aflei tlieir business interests hero 
Wedn'^sday. 

Charles Sanboe is spending a few 
davs with his father at Marble. 

..4iS8 Aill Kangas returned hpme to 
Duluth Sunday after a visit here with 
her sister. Mrs. E. Aspfors. 

J. D. Moore was a business caller at 
Duluth Tliursday. 

Miss Katie Kangas came up 
Minneapolis Wednesday for a 
days' visit with her parent-'?. 

Mrs, C H. Williams and sons. 
ten and Homer, returned Friday 
a couple of weeks visit with relatives 
at Minneapolis. 

AVarren Williams returned to Marble 
Sunday to resume his duties as fire- 
man on one of the steam shovels there. 

Charles Lindljerg returned Friday 
from Thompson, where he has spent 
the past few weeks with his family. 

Miss Margaret Wright returned tj 
her home in Grand Rapids. Monda-. 
after a week's visit here with Miss 
Mae Nagle 

Mrs. J. C. Arnold and Mrs. U. V. 
Ullan left Monday for Caulmet. wher" 
they win spend a few days visiting 
relatives. 

Joseph G. Fogarty returned Monday 
from a business trip to the Twin 
Cititis. , „ 

Ml-ss Julia Alberg returned Tuesday 
from Dulutii. where she has been vis- 
iting relatives for the past three 
weeks. _ 

Miss Alice Randall of Deer River Is 
a g'lr'st of Miss Edna New. 

.Miss Esther Lessard of Duluth is 



Bovey. Minn.. July 15. — (Special to 

The Herald. 1 — Mn . Fred Desonia went 
to Virginia Satuniay morning, return- 
ing Monday eveni ig. 

Mrs. Dixon entertained her sister. 
Mrs. Elford of liveleth. over Sun- 
day. 

Mrs. Oscar Johnson left Mondav 
morning for Chi *holm to visit Mr.s. 
La Fond, who is suffering from blood 
poisoning. 

Mrs. Barlow o" Virginia, who has 
been visiting at the home of her son. 
left for her homt Tuesday morning. 

Mrs. P. K. Priest entertained the 
Ladies" Aid society of the Presbyterian 
church Wedaesda: afternoon. 

Henry Herbert left Tuesday morn- 
ing for Duluth. vhere he will receive 
treatment for rheumatism. 

D. Foley left "uesday morning for 
Brandon. Man,, where he will be em- 
ployed on a steam shovel. 

Miss Lillian Bellenger returned 
Thursday after j few days 'visit In 
Sandstone. 

B. Leiberman o' Grand Rapids tran- 
sacted business in town this week. 

Eric Johnson sp Mit two days in Nash- 
wauk this week 1 »oklng after his busl. 
ness interests there. 



Aurora. Minn.. July 15, — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Ida Porthan and 
George Porthan returned this week to 
their home at Ely after a three weeks' 
visit at the home of Mr. and Mrs. E. 
W. Lund. They were accompanied by 
Miss Jennie Lund and Robert Lund. 

Will St irr was the guest of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ed Starr at the Mohawk last 
week. 

Mrs. D. Welner visited at Gilbert 
several days this week. 

Len Lord and Lewis Stein were at 
Eveleth last Saturday. 

Ml.ss Edith Rogers of Ishpeming. 
Mich., Is the guest this week of Mr. 
and Mrs. K Nicholas. 

l>. J. Eyer was a Coleralne visitor 
i Monday. 

Arthur and Frank Nelson returned 
this week to their home at Willow- 
River after a short visit at the home of 
P. M. Olson. . , ^ ^. 

Ole Erickson is working for the 
Lucknow Mercantile company this 
w ^ ^ k 

Charles Olson of Highland was the 
guest of his aunt. Mrs. Adolph Olson, 
last Sunday. , , 

O. B. Warren of Hibblng was in 
town on business Monday. 

C M. Dor way of Virginia was In 
town on business several days the first 
of the week. ,^ . 

Alfred Skoglanrt of Ely was the guest 
of Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Skogland at the 
Mohawk the past week. 

Mr, and Mrs. J. E. Wallgren and Mr. 
and Mrs. M. Sandberg drove to Mesaba 
last Sunday. 

C E. Moore of Virginia was In town 
on business Monday. 

Miss Rhoda Olson and Miss Carrie 
Olson went to Brlmson this week to 
spend several days with relatives. 

Rev J W. Schenck and J. 11. Simons 
were Virginia visitors Thursday night. 



Virginia. Minn.. July 15. — (.Special to 
The Herald.) — Miss Orkce Dillworth 
has as her guest Miss Gertrude Torger- 
»on of Dulutli. 

William Sincock returned early In 
the week from Southern Michigan, 
wiiere he spent the Fourth witli rela- 
tives. 

Miss Helen Oberg has returned from 
Detroit. Mich., where she attended col- 
lege. 

Miss Violet 
from points In 
the past five 
and friends. 

The wedding of Miss Anna Larson 
and Slgfrled N. Erickson was solemn- 
ized at the home of the bride's parents 
Wednesday, July 12. Rev. Hugo Tiior- 
ene officiating. The groom Is the 
proprietor of the Fair store and the 
bride has been a teacher in the Vir- 
ginia scliools. 

Announcement was made Friday of 
the wedding of Miss Anna Bridget 
Walsh, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mich- 
ael Walsh of this city, to John A. 
Janesky of the grocery firm of Gulan 
& Janesky, to take place at Our Lady 
of Lourdes church next Tuesday. They 
will make their home In Virginia after 
Aug. 5, . , J 

Miss Cora Reppe of Rt, Paul visited 
during the week with Mrs. H. S. Gilles- 
pie. . 

Anton E. Johnson of Duluth visited 
this week with his brother. Carl R. 
Johnson. „ . 

A. E. and Albert Shipley. Walter 
Newcombe and S. S. Dahl spent Sunday 
on Vermilion lake. 

Frank Randall of Duluth spent Sun- 
day with R. L. Griggs, a former class- 
mate at the University of Minnesota. 



SANDSTONE 




War- 
fro m 



returned Tuesday 
visit at Staples. 
G. A. R, will meet 
with Mrs. James 



Brainerd. Minn. July 15,— (Special to 
The Herald.)— Dr, and Mrs. J. A. 
Thabes and Dr. and Mrs. J. L- /rfa- 
erick have returned irom a 600-miie 
auto trip to S Paul, Minneapolis, 
Owatonna. Wase ;a and other points. 
They assisted George Price, the Min- 
neapolis lumberman, when his car 
turned turtle an I Dr. Thabes set Mr. 
Prlce"s broken arm. and attended to 
the injuries su talned by the four 
other members ot the party. 

Unity band w U give a concert at 
Lum park Sunday. 

The Brainerd Brewsters baseball 
nine have chang id their name to the 
Brainerd City te^^m. Tiiey played Hop- 
kins Brothers Lodies team Friday and 
will play Little falls here on Sunday. 

Ike Preston and Miss Mabel Wick- 
lund former Bialnerd young people, 
were married at Minneapolis at the 
home of the bride's grandmother. 
They will make their home lu Sup«- 



PARK RAPIDS I 

Park Rapids. Minn.. July 15.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— The continued 
hot winds are Injuring the growing 
crops considerably. Small grain Is suf- 
fering for want of rain. Haying and 
harvesting rye Is well under way. 
While the growth of timothy Is short 
the amount and quality are good. Rye 
Is a bumper crop, heads well filled and 
plump kernels. . ^ , ^i. 

The Commercial club Is having the 
Potato rapids surveyed and have taken 
levels to ascertain the cost of building 

series of locks from Fishhook lake 
Potato lake. There Is a fall of 
10.65 feet between the lakes. It is 
proposed to build two locks on Potato 
river. This will allow launches and 
rowboats to pass from one lake to the 
other When the locks are finished it 
will give nearly twenty-five miles of 
shore line navigable for launches. 

The county commissioners were in 
session this week. 

A J. Woolev and family are vlsltin 
the homes of "W. "W. Wooley and T. > 
Wooley, brothers of J. J. He came up 
in his auto and is enjoying the fine 
roads around Park Rapids,. 

Miss Mary McFadden of St. Paul has 
been sj.endlng a month at Itasca Park. 
She came down Saturday and left for 
her home Monday. 

George Schoneberger was thrown out 
of a wagon Saturday. His team ran 
away, and. being up on a double box, 
was unable to manage them and was 
thrown to the giound, receiving a se- 
vere shock. 

Miss Emma Jacob of Detroit, Mich.. 
is visiting her uncle, A. T. Jacob. 

Mrs. Joseph Schearer returned from 



If. 



Sandstone. Minn.. July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — .Mrs. James Slaven 
and Mrs. William Mangold were Twin 
City visitors the first of the week. 

Miss Belle Dredge of Lake Crystal 
is a guest at the home of her brother. 
Dr. H. P. Dredge, having arrived Tues- 
day. 

Miss Florence Armstrong returned 
Wednesday from a two weeks' visit 
with friends at Carlton and Cloquet. 

Miss Pansy McCoy of Bruno Is vis- 
iting at the J. F. Hawley home this 
weeK. 

August Stenmark 
from a three days' 

The ladles of the 
Monday afternoon 
Carolan. , ^ 

Mrs. Hugo 'VN'lckstrom returned from 
Pine Cltv Tuesday, having been called 
there by the death of her father, 
Charles Glanville. 

The dry goods and grocery depart- 
ment of the Sandstone Co-operative 
store Is being moved into its own 
quarters this week. 

A. P. Belanger and daughter. Lil- 
lian, of Hibblng, are visiting at the 
A, H. Belanger home. 

Rev. J. H. Kretzschmar and family 
of Elic River were guests of Mr. and 
Mrs. J. H. Tomhave over Sunday. 

A W. Gunn, the geneial clerk of 
court at pine City, greeted friends 
Here last Saturday. 

Prof and Mrs. Louis Anderson at- 
tended" the banquet given In honor of 
the state university alumni at Duluth 
last Saturday. 

Miss Tilda Dahlberg has been visit- 
ing friends and relatives at Mora the 
past week. , 

Mrs. David Ru.=!sell returned Thurs- 
day from a month's visit at Amenla. 

N D 

* Ben Tlghe of Fort Frances. Ont., Is 
visiting his sister. Mrs. E. Stratton. 

Miss Christine Olson came from Min- 
neapdlls last Saturday to spend a 
couple of months here with Mrs. 
Oscar Larson. „ , ,,, ^. - ^ , 

Mr. and Mrs. V. L. Hlgble departed 
Wednesday for Wisconsin, and will 
make their home at Fort Atkinson for 
the present. ,. , ■. , 

Mrs Charles Lzzola and son. who 
have been visiting her sister. Mrs. P. 
Ghlrlnghelll. have returned to their 
home In Dulutii. 

Mrs. J. Long and son of Milwaukee. 
Mrs. C. Prefke and Miss Kate Schneider 
of Minneapolis, are enjoying a weeks 
outing here and are the guests of Mr. 
and Mrs. N. U. Klein. 

Miss Margaret Betts of Minneapolis 
Is visiting at the F. L. Betts home. 
Mrs J. V Anderson and daughter of 
Drayton, N. D., were guests at the C. 



Ironwood. Mich., July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Miss xMusadora Wal- 
ters left Tuesday for Ishpeming, where 
she will visit friends for a short time. 

Mr. and Mrs, John Tredinnick havs 
returned to their home after a visit 
with their son, J. P. Tredinnick at 
Eveleth, Minn. 

.Mr. and Mrs. John :More and son, 
Robert, left Thursday for a two weeks" 
outing at San Souci, with Mr. iMoore's 
mother, Mrs, J. R. Moore. 

Mr. and Mrs. May. George and Alice 
May. returned Monday from a week's i 
outing at Lake Gogebic, north end. | 

.Miss Ethel Holmberg. who attended 
the Epworth League convention at Du- 
luth, is visiting friends at Minneapo- 
lis. 

The Ladie.s" Aid Society of the First 
M. E. church held a lawn social last 
evening at the residence of Mr. and 
Mrs. Ernest Dear, north side. Icv3 
cream and cake were served, and a 
very enjoyable evening was spent by 
the large number of people who at- 
tended. , , ^ 

The funeral services for the late 
Mr. Deitrich, were held at 7:15 at the 
residence on Saturday evening. The 
remains were taken to Appleton for 
interment. 

The auditorium of the new M. E. 
church h.as been completed. The seats 
are In place and the carpet has been 
laid. Sunday will be children's day. 
In the morning the pastor. Rev. W. B 
Combe will deliver a sermon to the 
children. This will be in the nature 
of an object lesson. In the evening the 
Sunday school will have charge of the 
service, when recitations and dialogues 
will be rendered, as will special music. 
The auditorium will be used from now 
on for church services and It is 
thought that the structure will be 
dedicated on the first Sunday in Au- 

Miss Alice Nyberg of Duluth is vis- 
iting friends and relatives in Iron- 
wood. 

Mr and Mrs. William Harris are vis- 
iting friends and relatives at Ishpem- 
ing, Mich. 

Mrs. Fred Datson and children, who 
have been visiting the former"s par- 
ents. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel S'lade, 
Aurora location. have returned to 
tlielr home at Menominee. 

L. P. Stevens is in town visiting 
friends from California. 

Miss Sadie Peterson of Curry street 
Is In Duluth visiting friends. 

A son was born on Tuesday 
and Mrs. Quin Hamjeston. 

Miss Mavbert Sampson spent a 
couple of days this week with her 
aunt. Mrs. H. H. Keese. on her way to 

Lake Gogebic. 

Mrs. John Parks and her daughter, 
.Margaret, left Tuesday morning for 
Salt Lake City. Utah. . ., ^ , , 
Miss Mabel Tonkin left Tuesday 
morning for Ishpeming for a visit with 
friends for a couple of weeks. 

Capt. and Mrs. George Brewer re- 
turned this week from Eveleth w'here 
they visited their daughter, Mrs. Harry 
Lyons. 

Miss Elma Isaacson formerly 
Ironwood. now of Berkely. Cal., Is 
Itlng friends here. 

John Gannon of Thomaston was 
town Monday, visiting friends 

Miss Ida Peterson left Monday 
evening for Battle Creek and Chicago. 
Miss Alex Larson of Mansfield 
street is visiting friends in Minneapo- 
lis. . . , 

Miss Irene Llndquist is visiting 
friends and relatives at Ashland. 

Dr and .Mrs. Fitzsimmons have gone 
to Lake Gogebic for a few days" out- 

"fir and Mrs. J. A. Tederstrom and 
family have gone to Mercer to spend 
the .summer at their cottage. 

Mrs jGeorge Beddow and her mother 
Mrs ChrLs Larson and Miss Hilda 
Anderson spent the latter part of the 
week at Mercer. 

Mrs. John .Mullenberg and Mrs. Olle 
Nordqulst left for Skanee, Mich., to 
spend a couple of weeks. 

Miss Bertha Hautala left last 
for Bay City, where she intends 
remain until next spring. 

The annual school election was 
on Monday and was a very quiet af- 
f lir 

J W Healy was the only candidate 
for' trustee and of course was electee. 

The Oliver baseball team and the 
Newport nine will meet on the Iron- 
wood grounds this Saturday after- 
noon in a game of ball. 

Dudley Houk has returned 
visit at Lansing and Detroit. 



of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, are in town, 
visiting friends. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Hickey of E.^canobi, 
Mich., who have been visiting at the 
home of Mr. and Mrs. L. Bruneau. have 
retu»-n'»d liome. 

The hay crop In this section promises 
to be the best in years. 

Mrs. Victor Liaas has returned to 
her home In Ely after a three weeks' 
stay at the Soudan hospital, where she 
underwent an operation. 

The Misse.s Hertlien and Meigs, and 
Master Arthur Orr, of Keokuk, Iowa, 
are at the Vermilion hotel and will re- 
main all summer. 

R. E. Brown and family, who drove 
over from Gilbert to spend the Fourth 
with Mr. and Mr.s. J. H. Jeffery, have 
returned to their home, 

Fred Johnson has been informed by 
tlie district secretary that he passed 
the civil service examination with a 
percentage of 80.06, Mr, Johnson has 
applied for a position as clerk in the 
Duluth postoffice. 

Mrs. Camiel De Coigny. who has 
been ill at the Soudan hospital for 
several weeks, has recovered and re- 
turned to her home at Buych. Miss 
Rice of Cloquet. and Mr.s. De Coigny',s 
little daughter accompanied her. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs, 
Frank Landgren, Tuesday. 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Bolkcom. who 
have been visiting Tower friends have 
returned to their home In Minneapolis. 

Miss Marion Thompson came up 
from Two Harbors Wednesday to join 
a party of Tower young people who 
are camped up the lake. 

William Hazelbladt of Ely visited 
his sister. Mrs, Frank Shoberg for sev- 
eral days, this week. 

Mr. and Mr.s. R. E. Jones and chil- 
dren of Two Harbors are visiting at 
the J. Mahady home. 



INTERNATIONAL 
FALLS 



to Mr. 



of 
vls- 

in 



International Falls, Minn., Jiriy 15. — 
(Special to The Herald,) — Word re- 
ceived from L. A. Ogaard states that 
he and his bride (formerly Miss 
Thompson) were just about to board 
a vessel bound for San Francisco, 
after which thev would be ready to 
start on the trip homeward. 

W. C. Hasselbarth Is entertaining 
his brother, Bruce, of Grand Forks. 
X. D.. who has just received his dis- 
charge from the navy after eight years 
of service for Uncle Sam. 

Herman Koeneke has purchased the 
John Berg warehouse, now located at 
the rear of the International State 
bank building, and commenced remov- 
ing it to his lot on Second street. 

The most important shipping point 
on the line of the Canadian Northern 
railway, between Ranier and Virginia, 
is the' town of Ray. and still that 
place is without a depot. The situ- 
ation is to be altered at an early 
date. 

Fred Dillingham, a young man. 
whose home was at Oakes, N, D,, died 
at Pither's point Sunday morning of 
consumption. Deceased was but 21. 

Yesterday proved to be the banner 
day in Judge litis' court, in point of 
number of marriages performed. First 
to be married were John Thompson of 
Ranier and Miss Rosie Abbott of 
Brainerd, Mr Thompson is deputy cus- 
toms collector at the port of Ranier, 
His bride comes from Brainerd, where 
Mr. Thompson's parents live. The sec- 
ond marriage was that of August A, 
Gilchrist, a homesteader in the Ray 
neighborhood who Is well known here. 
His bride was Miss Sarah Josephine 
Otness. Mr. Gilchrist's friends wish 
for he and his bride a long and happy 
married life. 

The contract for the construction of 
the proposed two-room school building 
in the additions south of town was 
let Thursday to George W. Charters 
for the sum of $2,947. The other bids 
were as follows: International Con- 
struction company. $^.115; Johnson & 
Klnshella, $3,455; Stubee & Co.. $3.*22, 
The old building has not as yet been 
disposed of 

The state auditor's office was not 
represented at the sale Thursday, the 
county auditor having been authorized 
to conduct the sale, which attracted 
but little interest on account of the lands 
offered being what were left from 
several prior sales. But one tract was 
disposed of. It Is expected that at the 
August sale some new offerings will 



be made, as the appraisers are now 
busy listing new tracts of land. 

W. J. Bennett has left for his home 
at St. Paul after a week's visit with 
his children at the homestead of his 
daughter. Miss Lois Bennett. near 
Frontier. On his way to and from the 
homestead Mr. Bennett paid short 
visits at the home of his daughter of 
this city, Mrs, O. C Heleie, 

J. S La Du, the contractor, who for- 
merly resided here but who for the 
past year has made his home at 
Crosby, has arrived to attend to mat- 
ters in the district court. 

Mr, and Mrs, A, T, Scarlett of Pel- 
land are among county seat visitors. 
They are accompanied by Miss Mag- 
gie Scarlett, their neice. ., 

F. E. Herschleb of Duluth was 
among visitors here this week. 

E. W, Francis of Mizpah attended 
Court yesterday and found time to re- 
new acquaintance with his county 
seat friends, 

Mr, and Mrs. O. Klefstad. A. F. Hun- 
sta))le and Aaron Shelgren were 
among Littleforks representatives at 
the count yseat this week. 

Hugh Mcintosh has gone to Lomaa. 
to make arrangements to commence 
the work of constructing a hotel and 
saloon building. The busine.«s will be 
carried on In separate buildings, 
which will be located near the Loman 
residence on the Rainey River. 

Herman Koeneke will remodel the 
Berg warehouse which he is remov- 
ing to his Second street corner lot. It 
will be used as a restaurant and room- 
ing house by an Italian, who has 
leased it for a period of time 

Mrs. (George Shaw and children de- 
parted yesterday evening for Wiscon- 
sin to visit relatives. 

Miss Florence Larson returned to 
her home at Liltiefork yesterday 
evening. 

Jake Greengard has gone to Win- 
nipeg to visit over Sunday with his 
family, who have been the guests of 
relatives there for several wenks. 

R. S. McDonald, of the International 
Lumber company, is making a trip up 
the lake to look after a bunch of logs 
whicli are being boomed In Black 
bay. 

Mr. and Mrs. James Gordon of Tus- 
con, Ariz., liave arrived to visit at tiie 
home of Mr. Gordon's parents at Fort 
Frances?. It has been twenty-three 
years since the members of the family 
base seen Mr. (jord on. His homecoming 
has caused much happiness. 

The county board of equalization 
will meet next Monday. 

The Knights of Columbus are 
planning a big excursion and picnic 
up the lake for Sunday. July 23. Sand 
Point will be the picnic grounds, and 
athtietic sports will help make the 
occasion a pleasant one. 

• 

IIoneNt Medloluen Versim Faken. 
President Taft's recent messatje sug- 
gesting an amendment to the purfa 
lood and drugs law in its relation to 
prepared medicines, does not refer to 
such standard medicines as FoIi.*y's 
Honey and Tar Compound and Folay 
Kidney Pills, both of which ar.j true 
medicines carefully compounded of In- 
gredients whose medicinal <iualities are 
recognized by the medical profession 
itself as the best known remedial 
agents for the diseases they are in- 
tended to conteract. For over three 
decades Foley's Honey and Tar Com- 
pound has been a standard remedy for 
coughs, colds and affections of the 
throat, chest and lungs for children 
and for grown persons, and it retains 
today Its pre-eminence above all other 
preparations of its kind. Foley Kidney 
Pills are equally eflfeciive and meri- 
torious. Sold by all drugglst.s. 



• 




WIRELESS FROM AEROPLANES. 

Washington Evening Star: The first 
tests of wireless from areoplanes by 
tlie government In tills part of the 
country were made at Potomac park. 
Saturday. They were small but satis- 
factory. It is now stated that the 
signal corps will continue the same 
sort of work at College park, where a 
training ground for aviators is being 
established. The government expects 
to purchase three machines for a 
starter. Lieut. R. C. Kirtland of the 
Fourteenth Infantry has been detailed 
to the park to have general charge 
of the work. Efforts will be made to 
have a number of officers trained in 
aviation and experiments will be made 
in sending wireless messages to the war 
-flepartment laboratory in Washington, 
the navy yard and the wireless 
station at Annapolis. 



week 
to 

held 



from a 



Listened to Wife, Saved 

By Neal Treatment 




A MICHIGAN MAN ES- 
CAPED DRINK'S 
, BONDAGE. 



the 
re- 



of 



and sons left 
with relatives 
location, Chis- 



A Superior Neal Institute 
Graduate Writes a Cheer- 
ful Letter of Appre- 
ciation. 



glad. You see 

stopping of his 

always go. I 

drink' all out of me now 

satisfied and don't want It 



did. Now I am very 
the doctrine of a man 
own accord doesn't 
have 'the 
and I am 



Tower. Minn., July 15.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — John Thorp of Memphis, 
J. H. McRoy and Ed Mercler of Ash- 
land who have been looking over the 
Gilbert tract of timber for 
Stearns Lumber company, have 
turned to their homes. 

Mrs E. Marcom returned from 
Eveleth and Virginia, where she has 
teen visiting relatives and frienas. 

George Pfieffer underwent an oper- 
ation Sunday for an affection of the 
bone In one of his limbs that has been 
troubling him for several years. 

Dr Herdman and R. R. McQuade 
Gilbert spent Sunday on the lake. 

Mrs. W. G. Galllen 
Thursday for a visit 
and friends In Monroe 
holm. ^ , . 

Miss Julia De Cora, an employe at 
the Vermilion Lake Indian school, left 
for her home in Nebraska, to spend 
her summer vacation. 

Miss Julia Peterson came home from 
Duluth for a week's vi.sjt with her 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Peterson 

Miss Amelia Reigart. who has been 
visiting friends in Virginia the past 
two weeks has returned home. 

Miss Delia Murphj-, who has been In 
Virginia and other range towns for 
some time, has returned to this city. 

Two of Mr. and Mrs. Reynold John- 
son's children are 111 with scarlet fever 

Mr. and Mrs. Hugh McLaughlin and 
child •returned to their home In Chls- 
holm after a short visit with relatives 

^•The Ml.=ses Elsie and Ethel Shepperd 
of White Water, Wis., are visiting rel- 
citivGS her© 

Miss Julia Mahady of Duluth Is 
camping out with her parents and 
some friends In a houseboat on Lake 

Vermilion. , ,, /-. t^ 

Mrs R. Filewood and Mrs. C. Ken- 
nedy, "former Tower residents, but now 



When the Superior Neal Institute 
was opened and dedicated to the sav- 
ing of victims of the drink habit. It 
BO happened that the first case of 
excessive drinking discussed was 
that of a man up in Michigan. The 
man himself didn't realize that he 
was a subject of grave concern to 
all who knew him and held him dear. 
He didn't know that he had crossed 
drink's danger line. There was noth- 
ing strange in that. Few excessive 
drinkers ever realize their plight. 
The persuasion of those nearest to 
him, however, overcame his own dis- 
senting views about taking the Neal 
Treatment and down from his Michi- 
gan home he came. 

The story of the results of hla 
three-day stay at The Neal Institute 
j3 best told In his own letter of grate- 
ful appreciation which has Just been 
received. 

Prefacing hl« message with the 
words 'To my friend" and naming 
the doctor In charge, he writes: 

"Well, sir. I am home again, all 
right and feeling fine, thanks to you 
and The Neal Treatment. You and 
your assistants were very kind and 
attentive to me while with you and I 
can't thank you too much. I at first 
thought I would not go. but my wife 
and daughters wanted me to. 1^9 J 



any more. My daughters feel grate- 
ful to you and will always remember 
you with a kindly feeling. My wife 
la more than happy and says 'Thanks 
to you.' If you see any of the con- 
tractors and dentists who were with 
me at The Neal Institute, tell them 
to 'stick to it,* and keep away from 
old alcohol." 

This Michigan man's case is not 
unusual. Hundreds of bright busi- 
ness men whose faculties were dulled 
through drink's influence "break 
away" from liquor for good ever>' 
month through the Neal Treatment, 
which in three short days transforms 
craving desire and resistless appetite 
Into aversion for all alcoholic drink. 
The Superior Neal Institute Is one of 
over three score such grand Institutes 
in American, Canadian and Austrj^lian 
cities. 

The Neal Treatment is ethical — a 
vegetable remedv taken internally, 
adminstered by regular physicians 
and with positively no hypodermic 
injections. It is tonic in its effects, 
restores shattered nerves. brings 
sleep to restless eyes, puts color of 
health Into bloated cheeks, brightens 
foggy eyes and clears muddled brains. 
Three days spent at the Neal In- 
stitue will bring about a transfor- 
mation In any excessive drinker so 
wonderful that Father Flavin of Des 
Moines. Iowa, after witnessing the 
results of the Neal Treatment 
clared: "Nothing like it has been 
since Lazarus was raised from 
dead." 

Guests at the Neal Institute enjoy 
all the comforts and privacy of home, 
club or hotel. Meals are 
the patient's own room, 
never divulged. 

For further Information and 
booklet, write, call or 'phone 
Neal Institute, corner Belknap 
West Seventh street. Superior, 
St. Paul Institute. 67 6 Dayton 
Minneapolis Institute, 
street soutb. 



de- 
seen 
th« 



served in 
Names are 



free 

The 

and 

Wis. ; 

avenue; 

Seventh 



403 



f 




1 



' i ^ ■ ■ t ■ ■ ■■ .A - ■« 



* 




^ 




DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 




Quarter of the Boutheaat quarter ol 
aectiun 18, 46-29. • Ira W. Smith and 
wife of Duluth have platted West 
I'ark addition to Crosl>> . situated in 
the southeast quarter oi the Bouthwest 
quarter of section 11. 4C-2». 

FALLS FROM BOAT. 



TAKES SHOT licLOQU ET boys out aniPiNG 
AT HUSBAND 



"'m, 



Fires Small Bullet Into His 

Bead Inflicting insig- 

nificent Wouni 

H t Williams and Wife Living 

lear Brainerd Have 

Strencoos Row. 



Minn.. 
a'sd > — H 



July 



&s 
Br. 

he- 

bl::' 

Oi: 

i» 

^•. 

Ir, 






an 



art 
— ♦• 



here 



15. — i Special 

Williams and 

: Is knovrn 

. ke, "west of 

altercation and 

-fle and shot 

liis left ear. 

and came 

. The •wound 

- -"US by the 

.n.iured man 

• ! a warrant 

-' .n by 

et as 

aired 



today. 



SCHOOL ELECTION 
IS HOT AFFAIR 

Pine River and Sonthem Por- 
tion of Cass County in 
Battle Array. 




iLuBiWrinan's Son L««> His Life in 
Lakf of the NVood>. 

Spooner. Mlr.ii . July ::> — i.<speoial to 
The Herald.* — The tuMral was held 
h^re vesterdav afternfcn of William 
.Arnold s>^'n ol EdwarcT Arno'.d, ot the 
intt-rnational Cedar company, who was 
dri'wntd at Rocky Point. Lake of the 
Woods, while endeavoring to anchor 
h;s ooat. A stiff grale was 
acroB* the lake and he slipped 
into tiie df-ej' water and was not seen 
alive ag'ain. The body was recovered 
after a few hours' search. 



A hor»e in the barn was nuffocated and 
a large quantity of supplies were 
burned. The Iobs is eetiraated at about 
$6,V0i>. partly covered by insurance. 

• 

BvrylBK Bemldjl 'Wire*. 
Bemidji. Minn.. July l^- — C^M'ecial to 
The Herald.* — The work of putting the 
city telej>hone wires under the ground 
in "the business .section of Eemidji has 
begun. All telephone wires will go 
through conduits. wh4ch are now be- 
ii.g ^]:str;bi;ted. Men wi'.l at onre be- 
gin digging ditches for the tile, in 
order liiat there may be no delay 
in laying the twelve new blocks of city 
paving. 



Celestine Remillard of Lake Linden, 
look his final oath Thursday at t>t 
Vlateur's college at Bourbonnais. 111., 
and was ordained a priest of the C^at-"- 
olic church. Rev. Father KemiUard 
has arrived in Lake Lindt-n for a visit 
with his relatives. He will sing his 
first high mass next Sunday at St. 
Josephs church 



next Tuesday 
control for » 




RYE AND BARLEY 



Kerthome DruKClM Accnited. 

Internal lonul Falls. Minn.. July IT ^ 
(Special to The Herald » — The state 
blowing i i>harniacv board lias filed a complaint 
and fell I against Dr. Ward, the Northome drug- 
gist, for the illegal sale ol narcotics 
and he will have hia hearing in the 
munii^'ipal court at tl.is place as soon 
as the sheriffs office caji produce 
him. 



Crops About ( uinbeiland. Wis., Are , p£J\JI^SLJLA BRIEFS 



Large. 

Cumberland. Wis.. July 15. — (.«ipeclal 
to The Herald. > — The farmers of this 
locality are harvesting the be.'it and 
' szeeX crap of rye and barley ever 
r,.i-,^J in this section. Owing to the 
u'l jlh last year the acreage of rye. 
l»arley as weu as corn, was greatly 
increased and as all these crops prom- 
ise a heavv \leld, the farmers are 
jub.lant. Tht hay crop, while not a-a 
ht^avv as usual on account of old 
in" geltlnc dried out last vear, 
produce a heavy yield as wUl the po- 
tatoes and 



st»ed- 



yield as will 
other "vegetable croits 

«. ■ — 



STATE FAIR RMARH AND 

INI(»N MEN MAKE IP. 



Irjn M.>i.:ittt.ri — A Finlander named 
Jacob J'\yneaki was Ktruck by a St. 
Paul freight train near the Amasa 
l)ridge and received injuries that re- 
sulted in his death four hours later 
The man was sitting on the track and 
for some reason refu.sed to vacate when 
the train came along He was a mar- 
ried nian. about r>lt years of age. and 
leaves a wife and three children re- 
sulittg in the old country. 

Huughton— Ed Haas has received a 
telegram announcing the death o^ 
Nathan Haas at Porcupine. Can The 
telegram did not tell the time or cause 
of death. The late Mr Haas was a 
graduate of the Michigan College of 
! Mines and was prospei ting In 

He was 36 years of 



St 



YOUNG MEMEZRS OF THE Y. M. C. A. PHOTOGRAPHED IN 
TH^IR CAMP AT GRAND LAKE. TWO MILES FROM SAGiNAW 
ON*THE DULUTH & NORTHEASTERN ROAD. 



Paul. Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
Tie Herald.) — Follov ing a conference 
between union labor leaders and Sec- 
retary J. C S;mi..««on of the .ctate lair 
bourd, it i^ announced that the dif- 
ferences which have existed between 
tl.e two have been teutaiively settled 
If the trade and lalx.r asRem!>lles "f 
St. Paul and Minneapolis approve, the 
controversy will be ended 

I'nion lal'or protected some time ago 
that non-union men were getting the 
»H-.'»t of the work at the fair grounds 
and that labor was bwinp snubbed. The 
uiii'-ns threatened lo hold their Labor 
dBV celebration af some pla -e other 
than the slate fair -on the opening day. 
Secretary Slmp!">n is now said to have 
promised the unions that they will get 
a botinliful share of all state work 
from now on- 

OVER H.\Tf million 

IN INHERITANIE TAXES. 



81 



er 



for 
wt 



: - — . Special 

i.as a 
g a case 

y against 

:'ter a f^'i.fuM' 
■ e'.'i'le i.'f the 

c'^artered a 
-.. Staples to 
se of carry- 

'se^i to the 



ele''^t 3 or ^ 
part\ ! 
of the ^ - 
tion. 



■r.«!sary 

ian. f 

.ist ai 



to entitle one to a 
■om ro to 5 per cent 
the preceUiUg eleC- 



INCOME T.^X IS JUST 



Savs 



Ap. 



; Cass ro"jnt> 

- tlie antlre county. Tl\e 

he county Is also ex- 

.e in getting out the vote, 

' ;>men over 21 will be im- 

.r-:o »er^"ice. Both sides have 

and the day promises great 

.•;«nt8 



THREE INDiaMENTS 
HAVE BEEN FOUND 

Grand Jury at htemational 

Falls Returns Some 

True Bills. 



(iovernor iiciiovern m 
proving \^ istOEsin AeL 

Madlii -n. Wis.. July 15. — Governor 
McGovern has signed the income tax 
bill and attached j lengthy memoran- 
dum which, in part, follows: 

•There has been so much miscon- 
ception concerning this measure that 
in signing it I fet I justified in mak- 
ing a brief stateneJit in the hope of 
correcting false imjtreBsions and of 
directing attention from insignificant 
details to the ma n provision of the 

t>ll. 

*'To begin with, it should be under- 
stood that practictlly ever>- penny of 
revenue raised b> this bill o\er 
above the cost of administraUon 
go to support loial government 
will be si>ent to 
roads and bridges 

i and jails, provide fire 

' tpctlon. and support 
those who pay th 
•By the terms 
cent 
will 
the county 



has been experienced some seasons 
is expected. 

Attractions have been engaged that 
are more elaborate than in former 
years, and one of the features will 
be a race between a Wright biplane, 
driven by Frank Ooffyn. and the 
Grand Forks aeroplane, driven by 
Thomas McGoe y 

MRS. NEAPOLITANA FAINTS. 



at 



St. 
The 
ends 



Paul Minn.. July IG — (Special to 
Herald.) — Before the fiscal year 
Julv 31 it Is believed that the 
states" total ci»nection of inheritance 
taxes will aggregate more than $..oo.- 
000. At the jiresent time the total 
Is $4r.f. 8$t» S6 La.<t year the total ex- 
ceeded a half a million The follow- 
ing table shows how the income to the 
state from this source is ini ' - : 



International Falls 

(Special to Thf- H^'- 
Jury that haji 
■p- -13 returi.vu 

£._; ... -- the wetk 
of Kelly and Br 
Thev pleaded not 
griver: separate 



Minn.. J-aly 15.— 

^,-..1.1 1 — The grand 

- ssion this 

. i.^i;iifc indictmentB. 

a pair by the name 

yvra were indicted. 

guilty and will be 



and 

will 

It 

pave streets, build 

maintain hospitals 

and police pro- 

the courts for 

tax- 

of this law 10 per 

of the revel ue raised under it 

go to the st.ue. 20 per cent to 

and * per cent to the 

is 

of 
by 



^i.* 



trials next week, 
was als" an Indirtment made 
gainst two men named John- 
: l)urglari2ing La Chapelle's sa- 
ai Little Fork early this spring. 
Cosmopiitan conipacy tax title 
which occupy so much of the 
ar for this term, have heen 
•=»d to Aug. 2. when Judge Stan- 
.. hear them at Grand Rapids. 
I he records of the cases will be 
convenient. George Rupley of 
Uuliith represents the company, which 
is fit-ding out that it cannot secure title 
lands In t 



f v.. 

loon 
Tl.e 

cases 
calf'T.i. 

T 

X : 

"W . e ■ • 



to 

truces without 

*:treet Cur 

J. -d until 



1 ij.' 

.,;t.i- 

J UlT 



thiin It. 
tlpmpni 



unty for unpaid 
. to fight for it. 
uoctluB ra»e> 

arguments in the 
■11 " case has been 

29 at Bemldji. 

^»se of Jolm C»lm- 

railway. wherein 

; the value of a 

• --anslt over the 

ciiy, gave the 

t~t less than 

amount more 

.iJ offered in set- 



town, citv or \-lliape in which it 
collected. But the entire expense 
the administration will be borne 
the state. 

GIRLS' TEiM BEATEN. 

Female Acsreffiitioo From Iowa 
Beaten Bj Biainerd Playe^^. 

Brainerd. Minn . July 15.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— By a score of 7 to 2. 
th.e Brainerd City team defeated the 
Hopkins Bros, champion ladies" nint» 
of I»es Moines. Iowa, yesterday. I'p 
to the eighth iniilng of the afternoon 
game, th« score was 7 to 0. when 
Madigan of the girls drove a home 
run over the fence and Fey scored 
with him Terai'leton of the Brain- 
rrd's made a hon e run in the seventh 
inning Brainen outfielded and out- 
plaved the visito s. The batteries lor 
Brainerd were K iUand and Roderick , 
for the girls, Fe /. Madigan and Hull. 
Last evening tht ground."' were illu- 
minated and a crowd of 2.O00 saw 
Brainerd defeat 1 he girls by a 4 to 2 
score Brainerd :nade a pretty double 
plav in the eigl th Inning. The bai- 
Uries were Wl ite and Koderlck for 
Brainerd. Madigrn. Fey and Hull for 
the girls. Both irames were well pat- 
ront'/.ed Brainei d plays Little Falls 
at Brainerd next Sunday and another 
record crowd is t spec ted. 



Coudemned ^^ oman Overjoyed 
iiood News From Ottawa. 

Sault Ste. Marie. r»nt.. July IS — 'Spe- 
cial to The Herald. > — The glad tidings 
fr..m Ottawa that her sentence of death 
had been commuted proved too much 
for the nerves of Mrs. Angelina Neopol- 
itana when notified in the jail here yes- 
terdav afternoon and she fainted She 
was making clothing for her expected 
child when the news came. 

As soon as the Jailor and matron had 
rivived her .'■he went into ecstasies. ^ 
•'1 not be imnged: I not be hanged.' 
i^he fairlv screamed in broken English, 
as she realized the true worth of the 
formation she had received 

Then tailing t" her knees she gras 
the matron's skirl and kissed it 
tearri streamed from her eyes. 

Mrs Neopolitana killed her husband 
on April 16 last under unusual circum- 
stsnces. She alleged at her trial which 
quickly followed the commission of the 
crime, that her husband was on the 
of forcing her to lead an im- 
life for his financial benefit, 
to protect her name and the 
of four children, she killed him. 
was convicted, despite her plea 
justification and was sentenced t > 
hanged on Aug. 9 next, about twelve 



IS* 06 •..*• ,,.,..••-. 

19**7 ,.,.•••••••••••••••• 

1 9t'S ........•.•••••••••• 

1 !M'9 .....••».•••••• 

1910 

The attorney general's 
ing espfclal attention to 
of these taxes 



it. ■■■■- ■■'*'< 

. ... 4S,4r.4 r.6 

2ir..(»9S.?.8 

508.881.92 

office is pay- 
the collection 



at 
and 



in- 

ped 

while 



rlairn" 



■ase o. 
.s being 
.'ift'! for 
tc .have I 



LvJ-lS 
heard. 



Bunk vs. Bert 

Bunk is suing 

1 damages he 

when the de- 

.'T last ■" ■■ ''■■r 
:. trover- • : 



Cawvemor 

'Madison. AV 

t-.. - , ■ ■ ■ 



>l«'.overa Vet«»«^. 

Iv 15. — Governor 

l" the senate bill 

further reduction of 

votes at the primary 



1 

»-- » II I I m 



$3.50 Recipe Free. 
For Weak Kidneys, 



LYN€H\S HO>!E THREATENED. 

Fire Menaces St. Paul Man's Sum- 
mer llesidence. 

Brainerd. Minti.. July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald. >- -Flames ran over the 
low ground mosi ly marsh, swamp and 
meadow lands, between Hound and 
Gull lakes Thursday evening, and en- 
dangered ilie su nraer homes of i 
Lynch of St. Paul, and A. Bresler 
Owensboro. Ky., near Gull 
the home of T. J Hurley 
boro. Ky„ near F.ound 
een men worked ten 
the flames 
fire fiamed 



point 
moral 
when, 
honor 

Stie 
of 

be .. .. 

davs after she expected to become a 
mc'ther for the fifth time. 

Much pressure was exerted on the Ot- 
tawa government to prevent the execu- 
tion of the woman. 

EXHIRITINC; GIN TROPHIES. 

Marinette Man IMsplaying Relics of 
African Hunting Trip. 

Marinette. TVis.. July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — At the club house of 
the Coleman Lake club in Marinette 
county, all the trophies brought from 
Africa by Fred Stephenson are now dis- 
played. Tliev include a lion mounted 
and an elej>hant head with hide com- 
plete. Hundreds of other animals and 
birds are also Included in the display. 
Mr. Stephenson, who shot with Theo- 
dore Roosevelt in Africa, during his 
hunting expedition with John McCutch- 
eon the cartoonist nearly lost his lite 
in securing the pelt of one of the lions 
which are now a part of the exhibit at 
the Coleman Lake club. 

(ROSBYlsfMHVISIONS 

PLAHED BY DILITHIANS. 



DENTAL ( OlNdL NAMED 
BY PRESIDENT (iALLACillER. 

Winona. Minn.. July 15. — Dr. J. W. 
S. Gallacher of this clt3'. president of 
the Minnesota State Dental associa- 
tion, announces the appointment of 
the following to serve for the coming 

Executive council. R B Wilson of 
St Paul E T. Tucker of Minneapolis, 
master of clinics: F. J. Yerke of Min- 
neapolis, J. M. Walls of St. Paul, 
r. Rosenquist of St Peter. 
Marston of Minneapolis and 
Andrews of St. Paul. 

Legislative (.ommitiee 
Jordan. J. D. 'JBrien 
ler of Bird Island. 

Chairman of membership commit 
tee. A. C. Fawcett of Rochester. 



H 

G. 



A. 
F 
F. 



G. O. Orr of 

and D. R. Mil- 



^ ^_ the 

Porcupine region 
age 

Calumet — George Campbell, the for- 
mer Calumet man who is held at Pon- 
tiac on a nianslaugl;ier charge for the; 
killing i>i Benjamin I^ay in a street 
figlit several weeks ago. secured bail | 
Wednesdav in the amount of $4,tHM». j 

Houghton— William Kelly of \ ulcan 
president of tlie board of control ol ] 
liie College of Mines, arrived at Hough- i 
ton. and M M. Duncan of Ishpeming. 
also a member of the board, arrived 
Tliursdav to attend a m.eeting of the 
l.oard held Fr*day to discuss and take 
action upon matters pertaining to the 
celebration next month. 

Hancock— Mrs Sarah Mitchell, aged 
f.P. died Wednesday evening at her 
home on r..ailroad avenue in 'West Han- 
co. k. after an extended illness Irom a 
complication of diseases. Mrs. Mitchell 
is survived bv her husi>and, Richard I>. 
Mitchell, who has been blind lor the 
pa.st twentv-five years as the result ot 
Inluries received by a blast in a mine. 
She also leaves several sons and daugh- 

I)ollBr Bav — Tlie l5-month-old soa of 
Mr and Mrs. Louis P^isette of L»ollar 
Bav died Thursday alternoon. The 
f'liieral was held Friday afternoon 
the I>ollar Bay Catholic chunh ^ 
interment took place at the old cata- 
olic cemetery in Han'^ock. 

Torch Lake — Charles McNichle sus- 
tained a bad s?alp wound "V\ednesdaN 
through jumping from a moving street 
car Mr. MrNichle had been at the hos- 
niial for medicine for his children oiie 
of whom is suffering from diphtheria 
and the other from scarlet lever. 

Negaunee — The Negaunee Mine 
Workers' union will hold its fourtli 
annv.al picr.ic at Cleveland park Sun- 
dav Julv 2S Walter J. MlMard, a 
prominent lahor orator of Clricinnati. 
will give an address In English, and 
Axel Erickson. organizer In the iron 
districts t.f tlie Marquette and Menom- 
inee ranges, will speak in Swedisli 
l8Jip>»mlng Finnish band will give 
concert durit.g the afternoon, and 
refreshments will be served on 

grounds. « «,« r.^^ ..^ 

Maniuette— The issue of $10,000 re- 
funding bonds recently authorized by 
I the common council, has been sold to 
the First National bank of this city 
for $17') premium, wlili accrued 
from date of issue. The b 
per cent interest and mature 
after issue Several 

celvc'd 

Chatham — Fire? started to clear land 
here Thursday caused sj.arks to fall iji 
a pile of sawdust at the old millyard. 
starting a blaze which for a time as- 
sumed serious proportions. The fire 
was verv close to the Munising. Mar- 
quette & Southeastern railroad tracks, 
and the con.pany took an active part 
in extlngi'lshing the flames. No dam- 
age resulted. 

Lake Lir.flen— "V^ 



Princeton — Mr.';. J T. I>. Dudley, while 
descending the stairs of the cellar at 
her home on Sunday morning, slipped 
and fell to the bottom. Her neck and 
shoulders were bruised and she sus- 
tained a severe shock from the con- 
cussion. 

St. Cloud — A warrant has been Is- 
sued by Justiv-^e Schwaiikel of the town 
of Farming tor the arrest of William 
Black, who is charged with threaten- 
ing to take the life of William and 
Clara Luecken. the children of Black's 
neighbor. Barney Luecken of Farm- 
ing. 

Wadena — Monday. Hon. Asher Mur- 
rav purchased from W. D. Merickel 
the Eagle Block property, paying $3.2;>0 
for the same. Mr. Murray feels that 
he got a good bargain on this prop- 
erty, as there is considerable salvage 
in the burned structure. The south 
wall is in fa;rly good condition and the 
floors and joists are not at all burned. 
Bemidjl — Installing officers Earl Geil 
and Hazel E. Phillippi of the Odd Fel- 
lows and ll.el>ekah lodges, respectively, 
installed the newly elected officers of 
these orders. The new Odd Fellow of- 
ficers are R. L Given, noble grand; 
C. F. Schroeder. vice grand; Dwipht 
Miller recorriing secretaiy. and of the 
Hebekahs Mrs. C. F. Schroeder. noble 
grand. Mrs. Emma Brownlee. vice 
grand and Miss Margaret Slough, re- 
cording secretary. 

Gland Marais — Father Simon of 

CloLiuet will arrive here Wednesday 

evening. Julv 19, and give instruction 

: to the children in the morning and 

afternoon of Thursday. Friday and Siit- 

urday. Sunday, the 2ord, the children 

will be admitted to the first Holy C.om- 

I munion at 10 o clock ma.ss Sunday 

I evening he will go to Grand Portage. 

! Stillwater — Sheriff Jarchow has been 

' advised by the stale board of control 

»t Minnesota that tlie state board of 

control of ..isconsin has directed that 

George Keefe l>e sent to Washlnc- 

1 e taken care of. M? 

lived In this city and 

hospital lor insane in 



grand jury, is to apply 
to the stale board of 
parole. 

Neenah — During the year over 150.- 
000 feet of fish net. worth $7,000. his 
been confiscated and burned by gam* 
wardens on Lake Winnebago. This 
belonged to fishermen who were fish- 
ing illegally. 

Grand Rapids — "^'esper. a vill.npe be- 
tween Grand Rapids and Marshfield. is 
to have a newspaper, edited by Mias 
Hone^■elt. 

Wausau — Ira C. Painter of Zanes- 
ville. Ohio, has »>een engaged by the 
bOard fit education B.s successor to C. 
C. I'arlin, who recently resigned as 
principal of the Wausau high sclu>ol. 

Neenah — Fred Lemjtke. an employe 
in the city stone quarry, is in a pre- 
carious condiiion as a result of being 
crushed with a big stone which fell 
from a crusher. 

Grand Rajnds — In an effort to avoid 
a collision Willi a farmers wa^ion. 
Felix La Point, landlord of the Mon- 
treal house, Marshfield. turned liis au- 
tomobile into an emt>ankment. He 
was tiirown out and several ril's frac- 
tured. His companion, William Welsae. 
escai'ed injury. Tlie automobile was 
WT-ecked. 

Neenah — H. C. Vetter. head of the 
Wisconsin Oil & Gas company. la 
critically ill, following heat prostra- 
tion. 

Madison — Agents of the university 
have authorized the construction of 
a $ir.o.ooo annex lo the university gyra- 
n.isium. it is jdanned to have the 
building ready next fall. 

Fond du 1.AC — Circuit Judge Chester 
A. Fowler lias ruled that game war- 
dens are not entitled to witness fee* 
in prosecutions for violations of the 
state fish and game laws The 
wardens have been turning all fees 
over to the state treasurer, but this 1* 
also declared to l«e Illegal i>y Judge 
Fowler, who says the state is not en- 
titled to them. 

Neenah — L'eclsrinc that her neigh- 
bors were sending black tomcats to 
overrun her x»roperty. Mrs. August 
Zlegert was examined and was de- 
clared by physician.-- to l*e insane. She 
imagined she could see black cats all 
over the place. 

Ashland — Hiss Rea Raven has ac- 
cepted a position with the Schubert 
ci>ncert company, and will .loin It 
about the first of Sejitember. as one 
of the quartet of tlial well-knoi 
company. 



1 



!■■- 



I3C 




Th.^ 

a 

light 
the 



intere.st 
onds bear 4 Vj 
ten years 
bids were re- 



ton county lo 
Keefe formerly 
is now in the 
"V\'is.onsin. 

Fergus Falls — Comstock & Comstock. 
who were Jormeriy in the job print- 
ing business in this city, have es- 
tablished a newspaper to l>e known as 
the Kadville News. Radville. Saskat- 
chewan. .„, 

Pine City — The Chicago and Pine 
County Medical association met in I'ine 
Citv Tuesday in annual session. The 
meeting was well attended, the fol- 
lowing members being present: Drs. 
Grav and Anderson. Rush City; Drs. 
Zeien and Lin berg North Branch; Dr. 
Werner. Lindstrom: Dr. Muidock, Tay- 
lor Falls, and Dr. Wiseman, P<ne City 
Rovalton — As Nels Larson, a rest- 
dent of the west side of the M;ssis- 
slpjii river, was crossing the tracks 
here Thursday with a one-horse rig 
containing himself and three cliildren. 
the vehicle was struck by pasSenper 
train No. D as it came into the sta- 
tion at a high rate of speed. The rig 
was deniolisiied and one of the chil- 
dren, a girl, is quite seriously hurt and 
fears are entertained that she is in- 
jured internally. Mr, Larson received 
several bruises. 

Barnum — Last Saturday afternoon 
the citizens of school district No. fi 
voted bv nearlv 4 to 1 in favor of 
issuing i»onds to the amount of $lo.490 
to the stale for the pun»ose of build- 
ing a new sclfool house here. 

Balaton — .lohn H. West bee, a prom- 
inent merchant of this village, died 
in Norway July 10. according to a 
cablegram received Thursday after- 
noon. Westbee has been in ill health 
for the past year, and after several 
operations in this country finally went 
to Norwav for treatment. Death fol- 
lowed by operation. Cancer is said to 
have been the cause. 




P.f>mlllard, son 



WISCONSIN BRIEFS 



Ashland — Information has just b'-en 
received here that Mori Vougiit. who 
w:is convicted of grafting town or- 
ders from the city of Mellen. after be- 
ire indicted four years ago by the 



Fargo, N. 1 '. — 1 he itchool buiiids ail 
over Ca.ss countv held their annual 
meetings 'Wednesday. At these meet- 
ings ihe officers of the board were 
cliosen and the clerks were appointed 
by the governing bodit^s of the Cass 
county educational inieYests 

Bismarck. N. D — Sheriff Frank 
Barnes has returned from the West 
with Adolph Meiizel. wanted here ot» 
the charge of forgiiig a check for $10 
on the Fox Laud comjtany some time 
ago. 

Jamestown. N D. — About thiily In- 
dians Were in the city this week, en 
route to Fort Toll en on their annual 
visit with the Indians on that reser- 
vation. The visitors came from Stand- 
ing Rock and had a i>ermit to be ab- 
sent a week. They expect to have a 
grand time, 

Fargo. N. D. — A communication has 
»)een received t» the effect that Willis 
Moore, head of the national weatlier 
bureHU. will arrive in the city Monday 
evening or Tuesday morning, and will 
fulfill hlF engagement at the interstate 
fair next Week. 

Mitchell, S D. — Miss Amanda Clem- 
ent, Hudson's female baseball umpire, 
has recovered from an accident so that 
she is able to get Into the game again. 
Ml.ss Clement made her first aj>pear- 
ance as umpire at a a game at iU. 
Lawrence on July 4. She has been 
engaged to officiate at a number of 
games in the central and northern part 
of the state during the rest ot the 
summer. 

Grand Forks. N. O. — Former Insur- 
ance Commissl(»ner E. C. Cooi»«r was 
In tirand Forks Wednesday evenmg. 
having just returned from a trip West 
where he hail been engaged in ad- 
justing hail losses. 

Lakota, N. D — In the case of Carl 
Stenslee of Pekin. charged with con- 
ducting a blind pig. the jury returned 
a verdict of not guilty 

Bismarck, N. D.— State Curator H. C. 
Fish left Thursday morning for Dev- 
ils Lake, where he will be busy lor 
the next few days In the interests of 
the society. There is a great deal of 
histori.^al data in the vicinity of the 
lake, especially in rerard tu the early 
Indian tribes of that region 



^ 



t 



Brainerd, Minn.. July 
to The Herald (—Within 
plats of subdivisions 
been filed. Carrie 



15 — (Special 

a week three 

near Crosby have 

P. Hill and hus- 



B 

of 
lake, and 
of C)wens- 
lake. Eight- 
hours to check 
Yesterday afternoon the 
up ligain and a call for 



e 1 i e ▼ c t Urmary and Kidney 
TrouWes, Backache. Straining, 
S'srelimg. Etc. 



Btops Pain 



in the Bladder, 
and Back. 



Kidney* 



'c'- was sent In to Brainerd. and 
.:.j: es M. EMer picked up men in his 
auto 'to fight th • names. In addition 
to the residences* endangered, there is 
valuable standing timber nearby. 



band of Duluth have platte.l line 
Grove addition In the southwest quar- 
ter of the northwest quarter and part 
of lot 4 In section 13. 4«;-f9. Thomas 
Keating and wife of I»eerwood have 
platted a sul)division in the southeast 



KARLSTAD MAN SCORES 

HUiH IN HI HER (ONTEST. 

Karl5tad. Minn.. July If..— (Special 
to The Herald. >—D. J. Ostlund of the 
local cre.amer>- scored 99^ at the 
second Minnesota butter scoring con- 
test which closed July 1- The prize 
for the month went to John Harms 
of Ada. who scored 93 \. There were 
227 entries, nineteen more than the 
t.revious month, which shows that 
the butler makers of the stale are 
alive. There were thirty-six entries 
from this district.^ 

THREE rTtTE MINERS 

MEET VIOLENT DEATHS. 

Butte. Mont.. July 15 —Three men 
lost their lives ia mining accidents 
Thursday. ,, , ^, 

m the Elm Orlu. Paul Holonen and 
John Wilson were uaugbt in a prema- 
ture blast while loading a round ot 

Edwin Jones, a wiper at the Moun- 
tain View mine, lost his life by get- 
ting his clothing caught In the en- 
gine and dragged around in the ma- 
chinery. 

(LAY COUNTY LAND ~ 

BRINGS *75 AN ACRE. 



Moorhead. Minn., 
cial to The Herald, 
recorded recently 
liarnes transfers to 
in 



PREPARING FOR FAIR. 

Grand Forks Gt tting Ready for En- 
tertain tts Thron?. 



W' ulcint It be nice within a week or 
PO to begin to say good-bye forever to 
the scalding dribbling, straining or 
too frequent passage of urine, the fore- 
lead ar.u the back-of-the-head aches; 
CkC stlches and pains in the back; the 
)wlng muscle weakness; spots bef">re 
;.e fv«s; yellow skin, sluggish bowels; 
Birt : T-i eyelids and ankles !»g '■ramps; 
lannb.ura! short breath; sieeplessncBa 
And t: e despond Acy? 

I have a recipe for these troubles 
CItat 3-0U can depend on. and if yon 
want to make a «aftek recede ry. you 
Aught to write and get a copy of It. 
Itany a doctor would charge you $S 50 
fuiit for writing this prescription, but 
I have It and will be «lad to send it 
tgn you entirely free. Just drop me a 
Uno like this; Dr. A. £. Robinson, K 
$4 L'-rk Building, Detroit. Mich., and 
send It by return mall In a 
envelope. As 3'o will gee wh»>B 
von get it, this recipe contains only p jr*., 
nafTSlees remedies, but It has rreat 
AMling a&4 palnconquerlng power. 
ft wi:i Qulclcly show Its power once 

Ka use it, eo I think you hud better 
Tihat It is without delay. I will 
^nd you a eopv free — you can use It 
^nd cuTa yourself at home. 



ir. — (Spe- 
officers of 
to be held 
night and 
readiness, 
are also 



i wil 
inaln 



Grand Forks, C D . July 
cial to The Herald. > — The 
the Grand Forkf state fair. 
July 25 to 29. a'e working 
dav to have ev. rjthing in 
while the t^-opL of the city 
'.lanning to enU rtain the throngs ex- 
f»ected. , ^. , 

Special attcflfticm will be given this 
vear to agricultural displaj-s. and It 
is believed that some mightj fine ex- 
hibits will be m ide. 

The machinertr cjchibits also old 
fair to establiah a new mark, the 
number of > that has signed 

up for dis ;.g larger than 

ever before 

The cattle ard horse sections will 
also be well fill id. A number of the 
leading stock nisers of the states of 
Minnesota, South Dakota and North 
Dakota have written that they are 
coming with so ne fine strings. 

In the horse racing department the 
card that haa >»«*n arranged Is very 
good. Entries in t^^" stake events 
will be closed oMnday — In fact, all 
harness events this year are stake 
events— and a bigger entr>- list than 



Take Off the Fat 
Where It Shows 

1^ T s .!T'.r much humiliation 

and inconvenience, especially during 
the hot summer months, because of 
great Quantities of fat. so located that, 
no mailer how they drtss, everybody 
sees that they are abnormal. This is 
the season and the day of the slender 
figure, and fat women are simply not 
t..!erated either in business or social 
affair.f Women may n^t know it. but 
n.en when they see a fat woman pass 
til em on the street make all manner 
of sympathetic remarks about her. 
Thev do not mean to be unkind or to 
seern unmanlv, but it is natural for a 
man to dislike fat on a woman. \% here 
fat shows the most there is where it 
must be removed, and as ouickly as 
possible. Hot weather dresses seem 
to be made for the fat woman's mlserj- 
and the slender woman's delight. They 
evt>o8e all the charms of woman and 
her ugliness as well. Exercise and 
diet will not rem-ve fat. This has been 
proved. The famous Marmola prescrip- 
tion which has met with such phe- 
nomenal success and has so many of 
our society women as its sponsors. Is 
now being sold in l»Met fr>rm to meet 
the demand of t ■ ic for this style 

of treatment. Ittle tablets go 

into vour systezn ju>i^ like food. They 
stop the stomach and digestive ap- 
paratus from producing fat and reduce 
the fat up >n the body at the rate of 
from 12 t> ir> ounces a day. They 
are harmless in hot as well as cool 
weather and can be carried in your 
j.urse and taken even after you have 
indulged in a hearty meal away from 
home They are sold at all drug stores 
at 'o cents a case, or If you prefer 
you tnav write the Maj-mola Company. 
'l»l Farmers Bids.. Detroit. Mich. 



July !'•■ — <Ppe- 
> — The deed was 
whereb}- G S. 
Henry Schroeder 
4 32.96 acres in section 5. township 
13it. range 47. i>art of the Barr.es 
form, for $S2.4T2, that being at the 
rate of $75 per acre and pretty near 
the top notch price paid for Clay 
county farm lands^ 

HANCOCKniEPARlNG 

F(»R BIG CELEBRATION. 



Hancock. Mich.. July 15. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — A message has been 
received here that John D. Ryan of 
New York, honorarj' president of the 
Hancock home-coming and semi-cen- 
tennial celebration, would arrive here 
Wednesdav morning on the North 
Western train. Suitable arrangements 
will be made for his recejtUon. 

Thomas F. Cole of Duluth. who ar- 
rived here Wednesdav on his 3'acht 
Alvina. will also be at the home-com- 
ing, and word has been received that 
James B. Knight, representative in 
jhe legislature from Norway 
editor of the Norway Current 
here to p*eet old friends 
qualntance s. 

SA^ATER COUNTY FAIR 

D-\TES ARE OCT. 3, 4 AND 3. 



and 

will be 
and ac« 



Couderay. Wis.. Julv ^^•—'^^f^}^}. , 
The Herald.) — It has been decided that 
the Sawver County fair will be 
at Havward on Oct. i. 4 and o. 
vear The management are doing all 
in their pow^r to make this year s 
fair the best that Sawyer county 
had. 



held 
this 



ever 



Meaomlaee Fire. _ 

Menominee. Mich.. July li>. — SpeclU 
to The Herald.)— The grocery store 
shed and barns of Emil Beyer. 142i 
Dunlap avtnue. were destroyed by ilv^ 




^ 



r 



i 



ir 



, ►- 



-•■*- 



I 'd 



r 



> 



ii 







<ffiHi 



JL 



>i ■ ■ 



ifci P 



THE DULUTH HERALD \ 



July 15, 1911. 




LAND NEAR WOODLAND IS 
SOLD FOR $200 AN ACRE 



C F. Colman Purchases 160 

Acres at Price Said to 

Be Record 



Good Inquiry for Lots 
New Additions on the 
Market. 



in 



Only 
durin:- 



■^^^, . was made 

...... w;i> itii.K the trans- 

res« of land about one- 
f the Wooilland 

J,;,,, _., ...... ;i sold for $::00 per 

acr<>. C. F. Colman a real estate man 
o( Ihi- !iurohai>ed from Mary C. 

Ewini: ■■.'itheast quarter of see- 

ti„j, - I - ; 1 :. :■ i:'.2.(00, the transfer 
being: leccriitii I-'iiiiay. 

ThLi quarter adjoins Colman's addi- 
ti( ; :: Mr. Cuhnan platted some 

tiij .ind wiiich he ha? practically 

dispoft-u of in small tracts. Mr. Col- 
man ivill plat this quarter also, ani 
put it on sale on an easy payment 
nystem, and from the manner in which 
land is being taken by small Investors. 
It j» believed that the tracts will soon 

The price of $200 per acre sets a 
new prue upon acreag^e in this section 
of the tountry. Last year Richardson 
Dav .% Harrison sold eighty acres of 
land, a quarter of a mile west of this 
parcel of land for ?100 per acre, which 
was then considered a jrood price. 
Within the last year G. O. Hartley 
purchased the south one half of sec- 
tion 3 the same section in which Mr. 
Colman made his purchns. •■ r $Um' per 
acre, paying $32,00(' for it. 

* « « 

During the u-etk A. C. Vuik & Co. 
received three inquiries from outsiders 
relative to sites for industrial plants 
In or V. the tones of wliich 

we ft.- irospec-tive purchasers 

were «.t->^i! t u^ of coming to Duiuth 
with fnciories. One of these was 
from . '■ in Kansas City. Mo. The 

natur- the industries were not 

given "vii, lut. it is understood, were 
thev to come here, they would add ma- 
ter";"' 'o the growth of that part of 

Ih. 

• « « 

The f lots in Gary. First di- 

visioj.. .- - norted to be good, and 
Bcveral d« ins were closed during the 
past week. The inquiries for lots in 
Garv i.s continually coming in from all 
parts of the country and every week is 
bringing more visitors here to view 
the prospects. A. C. Volk & Co. re- 
port that the outlook for a pood fall 
trade is better than ever. The com- 
pany ■ •■ preparing some new IJt- 
eratui ribing the western part 
of the .. .i which will be replete witii 



illustrations of that work that is now 
under progress by the steel corpora- 
tion. 

• « • 

Charles P. Craig 4 Co. report the 
sale of three Greyso on farms and the 
negotiations for several others. These 
fariiis are in excelle it condition, hav- 
ing been cleared and ready for actual 
cultivation. The company started tho 
construction of another house on tha 
farms iluring the past week. Ma^iv 
inquiries were received, all of which 
manifested a lively interest In the 
farms, and the propi sitlons offered. 

• « • 

The Highland company reports that 
four sales were madt during the week 
on the Iniluth Heights, and that In- 
terest in the lots on the Heights con- 
tinues. N. J. Upham & Co. also made 
four sales of acre tiacts in the Home 
Acres this week. 

• « * 

\V. M Frindle & ''o. have been re- 
ctiving many inquirit s during the week 
relative to Crescent View and Crosley 
Parks, and also cU sed several sales 
there. Kenilwor<h I'ark is still at- 
tracting much attention, and sales are 
being made. In these parks many 
houses have been constructed during 
the past year, while a large number of 
others who have taken up tracts there 
are planning to bulM. 

• * « 
Richardson, Day «'i Harrison report 

the -sale of two lots to E. Thorsell. on 
Tacoma street and Sixtieth avenue 
west for $450. Mr. Thorsell will build 
a residence. 

• * « 

Arthur H. Burg has sold to Nels 
Backstrcm lot 338. block l:i.1. Duluth 
proper, Second divisl »n. for $1,600. 
« « • 

Judson H. Evans has purchased from 
Nels Barkstrom the southerly 35 feet 
of lot 3:^8 and the e.ist half of lot 340, 
block l;;4. Duluth pioper, Second divi- 
sion, for $4,000. 

• * * 

Charles Nelmeyer las purchased lots 
7 and f. block "A." London addition, 
from Lucien P. Hall, for $6,000. 
« • • 

Elizabeth Overmar has sold to E. G. 
Schneider lot 11, block 60, Portland 
division, for $4.0UO, 

• • • 

Edward C. Junker has sold to Minnie 
E. Llndberg lot 4. block 3:!, First Glen 
Avon division, for $: .600. 

• • « 

Ludwlg B. Donnei purchased lot 12. 
block 6. Lester Pa k. First division, 
from Ole Carlson for $3,S00. 

• • • 

For the considi ration of $2,200 
Amanda Kolstad has sold to James 
Crowley lots 7. 8. 17. 18, 19 and 20, 
block 3, Colmans ai ditlon. 

• « * 

The Pacific company has sold to the 
Arcadian Realty company lot 15, block 
L", Hall's aildition, nnd lots 29. 30. 31 
and 22, block 2. resurvey of Murray & 
Howes addition, for $1,250. 

• * • 

For $1,612.67 All* n P. Lovejoy has 
purchased from Robert E. Carroll lot 
11 and the south hj If of lot 10, block 
20, Altered Plot, West Duluth, Third 
division. 

• * • 

John H. McLean las sold to Walter 
T. Wright the southerly eighty feet 



$1,236 



550 



of lot 3, and the southerly five feet of 
the nurthlv seventv-flve feet of lots 
1 and 2, block 92, Endlon division, for 
$1,000. 

• « • 

Peter Spina and others have sold to 
A. W. Shaw, lots 9 to 14. block 2. and 
parts of lots 15 and 18, block 2, for 
$1,000. 

« « • 

W. S. Micks has purchased from 
William Jones, lots 26 and 27, Superior 
View addition, for $1,000. 

• « • 

John Maleskl has sold to William 

Mallnskl. lot 6, block IB, Dodge's addi- 
tion, for $4S5. 

• * * 

William Klinbal has sold to James 
R. Rvan the easterly thirty-seven and 
one-half feet of lot 374, block 122, Du- 
luth Proper, Second division, for $ioO. 
« • • 

For $1,250, H. Slegrest has sold to H. 
Demars. lot 10, block 119, West Duluth, 
second division. 

• * • 

Charlotte Jentoft has sold to August 
Halverson. the southerly thlrty-flve 
feet of the northerly seventy feet of 
lot 431, block S.'>. Duluth Proper, Second 
division, for $550. 

« * * 

Jenny Brandt has purchased froni 
Anna S. Swenson the east one-half of 
lot 22, West Fourth street. Duluth 
Proper, First division, for $1,800. 

• * • 

The fnllcwtn* were thr re»l estate transfers during 
the wfck! 

H. Sltfreot to H. Pemars. lct» 10 ami 11. 
Iilk. ll;'. West Duluth. Scctma (ll»i«l(n 

South Side Kealtjr fo. to .lohn Hill. loU 23, 
'.'4. I'lk. !'3. Stronil «il<llll<n, VIrBlnIa 

('lia.'k'tte .lentoft et mar to August HnlTer- 

• Si n. Kouthtrlj- 3."> fctl ft northeri.v 70 ftet. 
let 4"1. blk. 85, Duluth Proper. Sccciid 
division 

P. fJeorge Haiiaon et ux to Charlotte Jentoft, 
?ame 

F W Holliitx'k et lUt to Iliirns Lumber Co., 
lots 20. 21. l>lk. 18. PrtKtirtaKift 

Nels .\nder»ou et ux to Jetis A. Westewund, 
v-t III !.'•. lot 16. Ilk. 13. Anderson's 
Sei-ond addlUon. Virginia 

bftlah W. Diirr et ux to Edward M. 8aiU. 
avi% of (.w>4. section 17; n^ of nw^4. 
<>e. lion 20, 56-21 

Arthur S.ilml et u.x to Edward WUllam*. lota 
1. 2. section 12. r.6-lfi 

Chriatoffer Monson to tilna FlnsUd. eH of 
ne^. eH of «eH. Mctlon 8: nw^ section 
0. 6fi-17 •• 

Aiin.i S. Swenson et mar to Jenny Brandt, e** 
lot 22. West Fourth street. Duluth Proper, 
First dl»l.<lon ;' • • ;," 

.\rtkur S. CorUery U> John K8r«ch. lot 3. sH 
of nel4. ne>4 of ne%. s»-ctlon 19. 63-21 

Fred B. Rossom et ux to John Loneala, ne^4 
of «eV». section 21. 59-20 

Emmett L. Fenr»i'*on el ux to OeorBe Rupley. 
8e>4 of ne'4. ne% of seV.. grrtlon 26. 60-18 

William E. Wrlglit et ux to Andrew Annan. 
^'4 lot 10. blk. 2. Went End addition 

\utra»ta Ostby to .\wdrew Annan. un<ilTlde<l 
1-3 Interest In lot », blk. 2, West End addi- 
tion 

Alfrrd E Mi-i'onllc et al to Sulla A. Miller, 
p.nrt F-'vernment lot 4. seolloi. 18. 51-14 

Great Northern Railway fo. to .Northern Pad- 
fip Rallw.iy Co.. part lot 11, blk. "D." Du- 
imh Proper. Third division 

Amoa L. Warner et ux to Sllnnie H. Strick- 
land, part lot T. blk. 1, Flret division, Hun- 
ti P.S Park • • • • • • • 

AuKUbtA «><>tby to Andrew Annan, lot 9. va. 
1'. West KJid addition ••• 

SIwTtn ore Co. to John O'DonneH. lots 3J, 
o3. blk. a. Buhl • 

Peter Spina et al to A. W. Shaw, lota 9 
to 14. Mk. 2. paru loU 15. 18. blk. 2... 

UoosereU Atklitlon Co. to Charles A. May- 
nanl. Iota 22. 23. blk. 1. Ho<«evelt addi- 
tion, iiibiine .••;:• ;k' 

J H. Knowrt et ux to B. BaesetU. lot 10, 
tlk 4 Northern ad«lillon. Chlsholm 

Miirtln Bninl to J< lin Heltni:.:.n. undWded 
»4 interest In minerals on undivided 4 of 
n^s (f wKi. n'i of nw%. settlon 8. 63-20.. 

(tie .M.ikeln to I>ar J^.hnwn. e4 lot 21, btt. 
81. Se<<inU addition. Virginia •• 

Joelah H. Ro»coo to I.ydia K. Johson, eH 
of e>s of 8W^4. wiUoii 10. 50-16 

.Mary HukkUa el mur to Andrew Uamalalnen. 
lots 28. 2P, Ilk. 15. Virginia 

Fred B. Ro9s<ira et ux to Ole O. Wnods, 



450 
1 



1,200 



1,100 



1.800 
1,400 

310 



341 



175 



1.000 



JOO 
350 



1 

1.200 
4.700 



(Continued on page 27, second column.) 



HERE IS A HOME FOR LOWER SIDE 

OF THE STREET FACING THE LAKE 



^^ - 





> 




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1181 ill 



tLnvATion. 




OtCK 




etc r</^ 
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CLO » I .-0> 



Site *«A<s 
,3: o- »'?■ «• 



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OtCOA\TD -Fl-OOT^ 



F-n=?.ti-T -p-uOOT^ 



RA.OLDEA. ARG-T^'T 



DULOTM 



LAKESIDE im\ 

Two-thirds of Lakeside to select from. Prices right — terms easy. 

LAKESIDE HOMES 

Five swell new and modern homes — two of them brick veneer 
— select your own decorations. They are now nearly completed. 



A HOME WITHIN YOUR REACH! 

$3 Par Monh Buys a $150 Lot-$10 Par Month Buys a $1500 Housa and Lot. 
Fifftaan MEnutas, rida from Spaldins Hotal. 

ARE YQU THROWING YOUR MONEY AWAY FOR RENT?— DONTI 

Our salesman at top of Seventh Avenue Incline Sunday will gladly tell you ticw to stop itl 




DULUTH 



Six Miles 



III 



ii 



HEIGHTS 



Six MHas 



HIGHLAND CO C*»*- ^- <^'^>>K & Co.. Asants *" 

niUriLMnLf W.y sOS Sellwood Bulldlnc 

LET VOUR RENT .MONEY BUY YOU .^ HOME' 

BEST BUY IN WEST DULUTH ! 



LAKESIDE LAND CO. 



$1500 



Phones, 408. 



Fifth Floor Sellwood Building. 



A fine seven-room house, four blocks 
from Fifty-seventh avenue car line, 
one block from school; beautiful 
view, two large lots, fine garden, 
if you take it quick. Your Own Terms. 

SEE US QUICK. 

Chas. P. Craig & Co.y sejiwood'eunding. 




1 




A GOOD SPECULATION! 

$1,000WiliBuy 155 
Acres of Land 

on the Vermilion Range near the properties of the North American Iron 
Mining Company and the Vermih'on Iron Development Company. 

Fee Title Including Mineral Riglits. 

GEO. R. UVYBOURN, 14 Phoenix Block 



LAKESIDE LOTS— I am offering the 
Best and Ctieapest Lots in Lakeside — E. W. 
MARKELL, 306 Lonsdale Building. 




j: 



«r- 



-•^r 



•»♦ 



WATCH US GROW 

Did you ever know that Colman's Addition to Woodland Is the 
fastest growing addition in the city of Duluth? There are now thirty 
homes built or under construction In this addition, and less than one 
year ago it was a wooded wilderness. The lots are BIG GARDEN LOTS, 
from one to three blocks from street car line; 9l.r>0 to 9::. 50 per week— 
NO IXTKRFST — will buy you a lot in this GROWING ADDITIO.N. Prices, 
•175 to |I300 raMh. Come out any day and look the property over. Take 
Woodland car, get off at Winona street, walk two blocks west and 
call at the loST cottage, and we will show you the property. Come to- 
day — any day — any time, ESPECIALLY EVENINGS. 

C. FRANCIS COLMAN, 



4il MANHATTAN RIILWIXG. 



TiM 



AT A SACRIFICE— THESE PALATIAL 
HOMES, 1509 & 1511 East Superior St. 

Each iiouse lias eieven rooms, fwc baths, three 
toilets, hardwood floors, hardwood fiuisb.andbot 
■water heat. 

Finest Realdenees For Rent in the City et This Time. 

EXCLUSIVE AGENTS, 

Real Estate. Loans, Ccneral Insurance 



FOR RENT 



LITTLE & NOLTE COMPANY, 



Lots in file townsite of New Du!ulh for sale by 

THE NEW DULUTH CO. 



OFFICE, 411 LONSDALE BUILDING 



DULUTH, MINN. 



MR. F. FULTON, 

Formerly Passenger 
Conductor on tlie D. & 1. R. 

^iMheM to nnuonnoe 1t> bN friends In 
Diiliitti and vioinKy that he in at 
prcnent engnK*<l •«» *•>*■ real entate 
buMlueKM In Portlend, Or., iiiid In In 
a iKfMltlon to handle anythInK In 
that line In the Mtate of WanhinKton 
or OreK<»n, to the advniitaee of hin 
pntronM, a« he baM a very larise lint 
uf MOine of the beMt farm lundit In 
U'aNhlngton and Oresou. 




PEOPLE HAVE BUILT HOWES 

ON OUR EA.SY MONTHLY 
PAYMENT PLAN. 

TALK TO US 

CITY AND VILLAGE LOANS IN 
MINNESOTA. 



LET US LEND YOU 
THE MONEY 

Wllh Which to Build YonrHome 

STANDARD HOME GO. 

Open Monay, Wednesday and Sat- 
urday Evening: Vntil t) O'Clock. 
418 PROVIDENCE BUILDING, 
DILLTH. 

Zenith Phone, 2435. Old, Mel., 1700. 



UNION SAVINGS 
ASSOCIATION 

C. A. Knippenberg, 

General Representative. 
300 Alwortli BUIg. — 'Phones 597. 



PARK 



*r 



SALE TOVIORROW, 2 TO S F». Vf. 

Perfect building sites — commanding an un- 
surpassed view of the lake — tstoneless, level, 
perfectly drained, in the most Ix-autifully 
parked and improved residence part of l.»u- 
luth. from US© to 9MM, on eaiiy term*. 

Take tlie Lakeside car to Fifty-fourth ave- 
nue east and walk nortli to Wyoming street. 

W. M. PRINDLE, Lonsdale Buildins ^\§. 

_ — . -^- <is^- 



'3^^ 



3<S 



ai^i' 



!^^: 



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.iL 









^ 



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^a."?.-^ ' 




The above plan is intended for a lot | 
on the lower side of the street, facing 
the lake. The living room facing the 
south makes it very attractive. There 
is a large private veranda off the liv- 
ing room, reached by a pair of French 
doiir.s. There is a nice large fireplace 



at one end, which makes an ideal i 
living room. The dining room is verv 
large havintr a large built-in buf- | 
fet. The rest ol the front floor is 
laid out very conveniently. The sec. 
end floor has two large bath rooms 
and four bedroon 8 with large closets. 
The third floor coitalns two bed roonra 



and bath. The first floor is finished 
in oak and the second and third floor 
in pine for paint, with hardwood doors. 
The outside is treated In rough sid- 
ing and stucco. This house can be 
built in Duluth or vicinity, including 
heating and plumbing, for the usm of 
$6,8000. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

5, SVs and 6 per cent. 

FIRE INSURANCE 

Old Reliable Companiea. 

REAL ESTATE 

Monthly Payment Plan. 



IVIONEY 
LOANfED 

At lowest market rates on im 
proved Duluth Real Estate 

Motaey Alvrnys on Hand. 

MENDENHALL 
& HOOPES 

200 First National Bank Bldg:. 



We have the exclusive sale of a few tracts from a half acre to one 
and one-half acres in size, about five minutes' walk from Piedmont ave- 
nue car line. Excellent soil, and ready for the plow. These are plat- 
ted into twenty-five-foot lots. The owner is forced to sell at a very 
low price. 

Why not invest now at these bargain prices, and sell in a year or 
two vears one or two lots for the price you now pay for the entire tract, 
while in the meantime cut your living expenses by one-half. Apply 
quickly. 



1V^2 WE!sT SfPERIOR STREET, 



22-Acre Tracts 
at $150 Each 

.Short distance from end of Wood- 
land car line, on flrst-class road; 
fine soil and some heavily timbered 
Ternia eaay. 

COOLEY & UNDERHILl, 1 WHITNEY WALL CO 



209-10-11 Exchanse BulldInK' 



^^) UTTLE& NOLTE CO. 

^?<|^^^ REAL ESTATE, MORTGAGE LOANS, 

^^i»Ji^ SURETY BONDS and GENERAL INSURANCE 

A HOME FOR »3,S00 on East Sixth street, near Thirteenth avenue 
east seven rooms, hardwood floors and finish, furnace, hath, 
electric light and gas. concrete foundation, strictly modern 
and just what you have been looking for. Offered exclusively 
by us. Let us show it to you. 

Bill DING SITE — You can't beat this location or price, and atlll 
niore, you can't equal it, i. e., 50x140 feet on the upper side of 
East Superior street, near Twenty-eighth avenue east. $1,150 
cash will take it. A fine specuiation. — 234-3. 

INVESTMENT — Pays 15 per cent net. Four-flat, frame building, 
stone foundation: rents |88 per month. $1,500 cash will han- 
dle. Price, f 7,000. 

FOR RENT— Second floor of building on Michigan street, suit- 
able for manufacturing; 50x110 feet; a freight elevator, track- 
age, etc. 

216 East Third street, eight rooms, modern W*'» 

429 Third avenue west, five rooms, modern WO 

1509 East Superior Street, eleven rooms, modern »75 

1921 Jefferson street, eight rooms, modern f-5 

1123Vi East Third street, five rooms, modern VZ'Z 

1201 West Third street, five rooms, modern f 15 

319 Fourteenth avenue east north, nine rooms, modern. .. .t-ts 

2240 Minnesota avenue, five rooms, modern J20 

709 East Fourth street, five rooms, modern fuo 

623 West Second street, nine rooms, water, sewer, bath, 

gas. electric light, furnace, suitable for roomers $35 

1213 East Superior street, eight rooms, modern. 

Store, 13 First avenue west Jl® 

Store, 10 Fifth avenue west • .- »35 

WANTED TO RENT — First-class East end home. Liet your prop- 
erty with us. 



warn 



301 Torrcy Building. 



f-»- 





M 



■t 



\ 



■^ |I«II M — 



iqpaa 



m" ' M^ 



Ml m 



WEEKLY SURVEY OF RE/\L 
ESTATE DEVELOPMENTS 



Ihiluth*s Progress and the 
Pessimistic Citizen Rec- 
ord Price for Remote 
Acreage— Conventions of 
Real Estate Men — Sum- 
mer Quiet in the Market. 



THE $25,000,000' 

MINNESOTA STEEL PLANT 



>N.-l!r.!; \ULK comment 

Cw IS -a used by t*-^ 
fn. Tvu.y criticism ma.le 
l,y lU-orge N Lyman of 
Mmn.'apolis. which was 
published in The Heraia 
la.st evening Mr. L.yman 
,Uil n .t give his views 
W'if; I e idea ..t * knocking" the city. 
as many outsiders wouKl, who are for- 
ev.-r ,.u>hinc for ttselr own towns, but 
h 

Ing 

Real estate men sny that there are a 
number of business men and 
citizens in this city 




thinking that attention 

.,iM. -^i t.> some of the draw- 
ith whicli lUe city is contend- 



in 



large 
prominent 



who 
have not visited the site of the steel 
plant since work started there and that 
many of these leading men of Duhith 
are si ill doubting Tliomases. and take 
llttl.> .stv),k ill wliat the corporation is 

of 



do'-iia for tho CJtv 

Furthermore, tliey say that many 
these men have un -on-^i lously fallen 
Into the habit of expresising pessimistic 
views as to the progress of Dulutn, 
and it.H future business su-cess. Al- 
most invariably tlie strangers and vis- 
itors are more entliuslastic boomers 
th.:u Si>:ne of the residents. 
• • • 
INCE the visit here of the uni- 
versity regents, those who 
question the value of the St. 
Lrtui.s county land, have been 
silenced in the main. There 
:ire still some citizens of Uu- 
luth who express views in a 
pes.simistie wav witliout regard as to 
what weight they may have should a 
stranger hear them. Their competency 
to judgr> the value of agricultural 
land.s might be uuesiioaed, for prac- 
tically all of them have been 
deviJted to a business far remote from 
that of farming, but tiiey sweepmgly 
express their ideas of the worthless- 
nesa of lands about the city. In spite 
of the fact that on every hand they 
can see some of the finest exhibits ot 




farm produce ever put before the 
public. 

However, the people who are buying 
tl'.e lauds about ti e city seem fully 
satisfled, and every year are turning 
out produce which other counties ot 
this state cannot e< ual. and which are 
selling at prices tl at are netting the 
t;irmer good profit upon his investment 

and labor. 

• •■ • 

NKW pric« for agricultural 
lantls was set this week when 
C. K. Coltnan nurcliased 1«J0 
acres of land from Mary C. 
Kwing. for $:52,000. This is the 
biggest piice that has ever 
been paid for acreage land 
the vi-Miiity of the purchase, an.l 
shows that there I i a big demand tor 
tracts. People witU small Incomes art- 
investing their money every month in 
lands about the 'Ity, are clearing 
tracts, building snail homes and de- 
voting their spare time to gardening. 
Not only are the vage-earners inter- 
ested in small farms, but there are 
manv professional and business men 
who" have tracts under cultivation and 
en'oying tlie fruit; of their evenings 
recreation. They not only enjoy this 
work in nature's field, but they are 
reaping much bent fit. for the produ'^e 
of their gardens is of the highest an J 
best quality. 

• * • 
WO BIG cnventions of Inter- 
cut to re:tl estate men were 
poheduled for this month. 
I )ne has just been finished. 
that of the National Build- 
ing Managers" association, 
held in rieveland. at which 

r>u!ath was repre^entd by only two 
nif-n Whitney Wall and Building In- 
spector S. M. Kit Uey. From reports 
coming from Clevt land, the conven- 
tion was a big su< cess, and those who 
attend'-d it were v/ell repaid for their 
trip. The other c invention will open 
next Monday in l>enver, and last all 
week. It is the ai nual meeting of the 
National Association of Ileal Estate 
Kxfdianges. which promises to be the 
biggest of its kind ever held by the 
association. Several Duluthians will 

attend 

* • • 

fIR midsu nmer dullness was 
m.)re in evidence this week 
than ever, for few reports of 
sales we e made, and not 
many nenitiations are on at 
the pres« nt time. Inquiries 
are stea»illy coming in, but 
prominent dealers say that the num- 
ber does not equal that of last year 
at this season. V'hlle the depression 
in the general niiirket may have con- 
siderable influenct upon the real es- 
tate market, yet .t is the l»elief that 
tlie dullness is mire due to the fact 
that this is the vacation time for most 
people, and they do not care to be 
troubled with making purciiases. 



IS LOCATED AT 



GARY, MINN. 

—the only townslte ad|olnIng plant. 
60,000 people by 1916 Is our slogan. 

for LOTS and BISI.\ESS OPENII^GS see the owners 

A. C. VOLK & COMPANY 

307-8-9-10 PALLADIO BLDG., DULUTH, MINN. 

BEAUTIFUL 



a' 



COURTHOUSE 
CONTRACT 

Dululh Firm Will Erect New 

County Building at 

Grand Marais. 

Other Building Work Let Dur- 
ing Week Consists Chiefly 
of Residences. 



*t 



The only contract of any size let 
during the week, was for the cor.struc- 
tion of the Grind Marais courthouse. 
Kt'llv & Li^;ncn. architects. Bow- 



by 



Duluth secured the 
and the American 



Burlte company ot 
general contract 
Heating company was awarded the 
contract for plumldng and heating. 
The electrical wiring contract will he 
let later. The ivvo conracts let 
amounted t.. ab..ut J32.000. The foun- 
dation for the building was put 
last fall 
house v%iU 



in 

When finished, thi.'-; court- 
liuve Cj-<t about $45,000. 



J ^ 



Anotlier contract, let during the 
week by the .same architects, was that 
of the Broolon school, the general 
contract going to J. H. Olson of Wil- 
miir. and the plumbing and heating to 
Beniimin Benson, alao of Wilmar. This 
is t.) i'e a four-room brick and stone 
building, costing about |10,aOO. 

• • ♦ 
Plans are being prepared by P. M. 

Olsen. architect, for a brick and stucco 
residence tor .lames McCartliy, to be 
erected at Twenty-seventh avenue east 
and .Si.vth street When finished it 
will iiave cost about |8,000. 

* * • 
P M Olson will take figures next 

■week <>!>. tlie Wallace five-house apart- 
ment, which is to be built on Fourth 
street between Twenty-second and 
Twentv-lhird avenues east, of brick 
and stone, costing about 1-0,000. 

• « • 
Work will be started next week on 

the new frame residence of W. L.. 
Smithies at Twenty-seventh avenue 
eiist and Superior street, by Clyde 
Cordner, contractor. The plans were 
prepared by Frank L. Young & Co. It 
will have a stone and brick founda- 
tion and will cost |6,000, 

♦ * • 
W. A. Hunt is preparing plans for 

a frame residence, of eight rooms, with 
a stone foundation, for Ed Peterson, 
to be constructed on Fourtli street, 
between Fourteenth and Fifteenth 
avenues east, at a cost of |6,50O. 

♦ * • 
A. C. Void & Co.. report that a rang«» 

irian, who iias purchased a 50-foot lot 
In Gary. First division, is planning on 
erecting a $5,000 building, two stories, 
frame, on a stone foundation, tlie first 
floor to be used for stores and the 
upper story for hotel purposes. 

• * • 

The Highland company is going to 
construct two frame houses upon lots 
In the district on the Duluth Heights. 
One house was started last week. 

* * • 
I>. V. Case & Broomhall, architects, 

postponed the opening of bids for the 
plumbing, ventilation and heating ot 
th Hill City high and grade school, 
which were to have been received last 
Monday, and have revised the plans 
BO as to Include an improved water 
system, which will be included in the 
bids to be received on July 24, at which 
time the contract will be let. 

• * * 

Work has been started upon Charles 
P Craig's new residence, which will 
be built on East First street, between 
Twenty-fourth and Twenty-fifth ave- 
nues, at a cost of about $15,000. It will 
b« of brick and stone, of very hand- 
some design. 

■• * • 

E. H. Dresser is constructing a $2,000 
frame dwelling at New Dulutb. permit 



for which was ismed during the past 
week. 

• • • 

A $3,000 frame residence Is being 
built by H. Carl on of West Duluth, 
on Eighth street t>etween Fifty-eiglith 
and Fifty-ninth ; venues west. 

• • • 

Cora A. Underhll is having a $4,000 
frame dwelling built for her at 
Twenty-second av ?nue east and Fourth 
street, p»>rmit fo • which was issued 
during the week. 

• * • 

Following were the permits Issued 
during tlie week; 
To J. Stuart, rem >dellng. East 
Tenth street b. tween Third 

and Fourth avenues $ .. IDO 

To G. Thorstad, frame cottage. 
West Fourth street between 
Forty-second and Forty- 
third avenues 500 

To H. Carlson, frome dwelling. 
West Eighth si reet between 
Fifty-eighth and Fifty- 
ninth avenues 2,500 

To Cora A. Underhll 1. frame 
dwelling. East Fourth street 
Twenty-tirst and Twenty- 
second avenues 4,000 

To G. CoUatz, lepalr church 
roof. East Second street be- 
tween Second a id Third ave- 
nues 200 

To H. E. Ditzell, basement and 
repairs, Jefters m street be- 
tween Fifteenth and Six- 
teenth avenues 600 

To A. Johnson, addition, 
Oneota street between For- 
tieth and Forty-first avenuea 

west 200 

To S. M. Kane , porch and 
foundation, Ea.^t Fifth street 
between El< venth and 

Twelfth avenuts 500 

To A. I'eterson. frame dwell- 
ing. East Seventh street be- 
tween TwelftI and Thir- 
teenth avenue.H 1,500 

To J. Koscanow.ski. frame ad- 
dition. East Teith street be- 
tween Fifth and Sixth ave- 
nues 150 

To the New Di luth company 

frame dwelling. New Duluth 1,500 
To J. A. Racette. frame dwell- 
ing. West Eighth street be- 
tween Fifty eighth and 

Fifty-ninth avenues 2,00( 

To J. Saunders, frame addition. 
West Fourth street between 
Sixth anad Sevtsnth avenues. 606 

To Alliance Kea Estate com- 
pany, frame d\/elling. Fifty- 
sixth avenue west and Sixth 

street 2,500 

To L. F. Chapm in, frame ad- 
dition. Minn«is< ta avenue.,.. $130 
To A. I^angl, frame dwelling. 
East Eleventh street between 
Seventh and Eighth avenue.. 
To M. C. Iverson. frame 
dwelling, W^es- Tenth street 
between Twenty-second and 

Twenty-third i.venues 

To B. H. Dr ssser, frame 

dwelling, Nev/ Duluth 

To A. E. Skinner, frame ad- 
dition. Fifteen h avenue east 
between Fou -th and Fifth 

avenues 

To J. Essen, fame cottage. 
West Third fatreet between 
Thirty-fifth and Thirty- 
sixth avenues 

To John Faroli. frame store 
building and repairs, Mesaba 
avenue between Second and 

Third avenue:! west 

To A. Swans' n. alterations, 
West Second Ureet between 
Eighteenth a id Nineteentli 

avenues 

To George Holland, frame cot- 
tage. West FoJrth street be- 
tween Thlrtj -seventh and 

Thirty-eighth avenues 

To C P. Craig. >rlck dwelling. 
East First s .reet between 
Twenty-fourth and Twenty- 
fifth avenues 

To Mary Broil), foundation. 
West First ^treet between 
Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
avenues 



$1,000 

1,500 
2,000 

150 

500 
1,300 

400 

1.000 

13,000 

150 



LAND NEAR WOODLAND IS 
SOLD F )R $200 AN ACRE 

(Continuec from page 26.) 



ne\ at oe\. jectlo! 7. 5'i-n 

AniUe Kltz et al to Michael Cupanere, 
25. blk. II. KHctIU. 



lot 
loU 



Allien R. Dyer et al to Chrbttue 3«ntl, 
U, 12, blk. 5. Uit>) in« HelKhU. 

Wo'Jdland Co. t) Ji.teptilim .SohuhUky. eH 
or iiH. lot 3,- VV.MKllanJ Park. Eighth dWt- 
»!on 

Peter M. JohiL'wn et uz to LouU Hockerar. 
lot n, blk. 1. Flr>. dlvUlotL Aurora 

Uu.st Kklund to l.outi Llndgreo, ^ iuterait 
lu mineral rights to ne\i of auM. a«cUou 3; 
lot 1, sectliii 10. 5 -17 

Steel Plant Laad Ct . to Jotaa Laraoa. lot 



1T5 

T5 

SOO 
330 




[making BOTH] 
ENDS MEET 

Snaps at both ends of the city: 

WKST DULUTH — Four splendid 
lots, centrally located; house on 
each lot; combined yearly 
rental, $890. A snap for quick 
sale, 90.500. 

LAKESIDE — Fine, graded 50x 
140-foot lot. between Fifty- 
third and Fifty-fourth avenues 
east, on London road, $1,000. 

HOUSES AND LOTS in all parts 
of the city. 

EBERT, WALKER & MeKNISHT 

'•SpeeialiMtfl In Kapid Deals." 
3l5-31(t Torrey Bldg. 

H., 7-15-11. 





For Sale 
at Only... 



$11,500 



Owner Leav- 
ing the City. 



Just read the following description: 

MATERIAL— Brick and stone, slate roof, full Hascment, hot water 
heat, laundry, hardwood floors throughout, quartet-sawed oak finish 
first floor, natural birch second floor; first floor contains reception hall, 
music room, living room, with large fire place, panelled dining room 
with built-in sideboards, kitchen, pantries, lavatory, etc. There arc four 
large bedrooms and bath on the second floor. Clothes closets ni every 
room and plenty of linen closets. Extra toilet in basemewt. Large attic. 
Large porches across front of house on both first and second stories. 
Two-story brick garage. House is situated on uppcK side of street and 
affords an unsurpassed view of the lake, which can never be shut off. 
Lot 50.k14<) feet. House has been built two years. The finest bargain in 
a home yet offered in this city. No telephone calls. ; 

LITTLE & NOLTE CO., Exclusive Agents 



The Most Desirably Located 

Woodland Ave. C orner 

141 X 170 feet; sewer, gas and water in avenue; want to dis- 
pose of this lot at once; can sell it for 

$1^5 

R. F». DOWSE & CO 

General Insurance. - - 106 Providence BIdg. 



■^^ 



EAST END HOME PUL^LANT qrq3by, MINNESOTA 




The Edmund G. Walton Agency 
WUl BuUd a House for You 




If you own a lot In Duluth. You can pay for it by Monthly 
iiieiits. No bonus nor commissions. The title ffuiaiiis iu your name. 

Call and talk it over. Open evenings by appointment. 




PROPERTY 

I on SALE on RENT — Hotel build- 
infi. just completed: right at the 
.Steel Plant location. Two-story 
frame, 28x66 feet. twenty-one 
room.s, store and barbershop. Price 
|i::<r»00: one-third cash. Will rent 
for Itjo per montli. 

TEN-KOOM HOUSE in New Duluth 
stone founadtion, furnace, good 
condition; 100 feet frontage of 
ground; cheap at $4,000. 

A FINE I.OT, two blocks from Steel 
Plant buildings. A snap at 9350. 



402 Torrey Building:. 



IHEELER & PARSON! 

SO8 ALWORTH 



in 



INSURANCE 

ipa 
firt 



best companies, carefully writ- 
ten, means fire protection. Let us 
write yours. 



PLATE 



provides against loss by 
of windows and show 



insurance 
breakage 
cases. 

«We Write Fire Inaurance Right. 



THE METROPOLIS OF THE CUYUNA IRON RANGE 1 



CHOICE BUSINESS LOTS FOR SALE 

Within two blocks of the new SOO DEPOT. 

Now is the time to buy as these lots will soon be worth 
many times what is now being asked for them. 

For Prices and Terms, See 



D. W. SGOTT & SON I GEORGE H. CROSBY 

^n.. ^ .. «..n...„^. : I DULUTH. MINN. Or CROSBY, MINI 



CROSBY, MINN. 



SPECIAL BARGAINS 

Bitlt^K APARTMENTS In excellent location, at the East end — four apart- 
ments of .si.\ rooms, bath, electric light and gas. grate and mant.^1. 
laundry tub.s. hardwood finish and Moors, hot water heat. Total r^nj^-'j 
IJOO per month. Price floOOO 

EIST FIFTH STREET, 2-flat brick building. 5 rooms and bath in" each, sep- 
arate hot water heating pl.ints, ga.s and electric light, la""'''"/. I,"''-^; 
hardwood rtoors. . Rental, |5S per month. Reasonable terms, at f««IH)0 

MKSABA AVENl'E, between Superior and First streets, double house, seven 
rooms each side, bath, electric light, gas. part hardwood «l'ioi;s- 
Price »«,»«0 

NICE APARTMENTS overlooking Cascade .Square, two flats of five rooms 
and bath. ele«'trlc light and g.is. pas ranges and water Ireaters, luandry 
tubs, part hardwood finish, hardwood floors throughout, ^^^'^sonable 
terms »u,-50 

A SIX-ROOM HOUSE on Seventh street, near Fifth avenue east, elo'trir 
light; lot ::5.\140 feet f 1,500 

ONE HUNIJRED DOLLARS cash and monthly payments of twenty dollars 
will handle six-room house witli city water in at West Duluth. 

Price f l,-'00 

STORES. HOUSES AND FLATS FOR RENT. MONEY TO LOAN. 

STRYKER, MANLEY & BUCK 



l.a.ke:side: 

$2,500 — BliNGALOW — Heady for oc- 
cupancy-, has fireplace, water, 
sewer, gas, bath and hardwood 
floors. Lot 50x140 feet. A pretty 
little house. Can be had on very 
easy terms, 

$4,.%no — Six-room house, stone foun- 
dation, water, sewer, gas, laun- 
dry, hardwood floors and finish. 
Only two blocks form car ilne. A 
Miiai»— ean l>e made on terniM. See 
us. 

$4,4(00 — A new strictly modern large 
six-room house, only one block 
from car line. Terms that can- 
not be bent. 

$R,ooo — $400 cash takes a brick and 
stucco home on Mct'ulloch street. 
Tills place has seven rooms, hard- 
wood floors .and finish; all modern 
conveniences; electric light, "fix- 
tures and gas plates all in. A 
bargain — monthly payment* on 
balance. 

LOTS — 50x140 feet in any part of 
the suburb, on the monthly pay- 
ment plan. 

LARGE LAKE SHORE LOTS — lOOx 
500 fept. We have .some extra 
bargains in these. 

GREENFIELD 

310-11 Columbia IliiildinK:. 



$3,500 

Takes seven acres adjoining Home- 
wood Addition, ten minutes' ride 
from Postoffice, which can he plated 
into fifty-six building lots and bas- 
ing prices, adjoining lots are sell- 
ing for, you should do better than 
double your mnoey In short order. 

ALFRED W. KUEHNOW 

403-4 Columbia nuildinK, 
DULUTH, MINN. 

West Fifth Street 

$600 

For any one of three 50xl50-foot 
lots on West Fifth street, near 
Eleventh avenue west; street and 
avenue graded; city water and gas 
in street. 



LOANED 




J. D. HOWARD & CO., 

Providence Uullding. 




RLALtSTATE. 

vJ o M rsi A 

& CO 
WOLVIN BLOC DULUTH. 




HUNTER'S PARK 

Corner lot 160x90 feet; on street- 
car line 




REALESTATE LOANS INSURANCE 

•MO Alworth ItltlK. 



A Beautiful Home on East Third 
Street, Near Nineteenth Avenue 

$8,000 

This is a frame house on a lot 50x140 feet. 
There is a fine lawn both in front and in rear. The 
street, avenue and alley are paved with tar ma- 
cadam, so there are no street assessments to be paid 
for years. The house has hardwood floors through- 
out, hardwood finish downstairs, white enamel up- 
stairs, hot water heat, fine bath room, five bed- 
rooms, four on second floor and one on the third; 
living room, dining room, reception room, kitchen, 
etc., on the first floor. Basement is well lighted and 
has laundry, outside entrance, etc. Reasoiiabhe 
terms. 

RICHARDSON, DAY & HARRISON 

EXCHANGE BUILDING. 



$2,700 

WILL BUY IT 



An exceptionally attractive 
having granitoid pavement: 



corner, 
witfiln 
three blocks of Normal school. If 
contemplating building a nice home 
or looking for an investment, call 
us up about this. — (522). 

9050— For 50x160 feet on upper side 
of London road, near Lester Park. 
All nice houses in this block, and 
an excellent lake view. — (161). 

fOOO — For 100x140 feet on Glenwood 
street and Fifty-first avenue east; 
small cash payment and balance 
to suit purchaser. — (125). 

IM. *J. URHAIVf CO. 

18 Third Avenue Went. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON REALESTATE 




Business Property 

If you are looking for West End 
l)Udines3 property, see us at once. 
Vy'e have a 50-foot lot on .Superior 
troet with store and flat build ing.«i 
i-..t r,s»>' bf^tter than 10 per cent 
net and the increase in the value 
of the lot will make you rich. 

Eby & Gridley, 

.'SOS Palladio nid^. 



BEST CONTiiACT-LEAST C05I 



T.W.TIlJffi 



S9. blk. 13. Ironton, Fourth dlTUlon I 

Uoisevelt Addition Co. to Mary Ola.l.so. lot 

13. blk. li. lloo»e»elt addition. Hibbing IJJ 

Baruet Litman et ux »o Andrew Doml)row»kl. 

Ifjl a, blk. 46. Virginia * 

John Berg et al to P. A. Stokke. lota 22, 23. 

blk. li». Ptot'tor HeighU » 

Patrick J. McDonald to Liiiie Koskl. ae\k of 

sw^4. aecUon 2.5. 58-20 400 

W J Sullivan to Joanas Candaia. lot 2. blk. 

h Stowcll'8 addition. Wwt l>uluth 1 

Luclen P. Hall et ux to Charles Ndlmeyer. loU 

7 8. blk. "A," London addlUon 6.0C0 

Ri -hard Whiteside et ux to V.evrte Heiidrtck- 

«on. lot U. blk. 9. Fall Lake 100 

Mr.i Selma £. Olson ct mar to John H. Piatt. 

.s«% of aeSk. section 27. 51-15 IM 

ttlohard D. Rice to Ootfrld Johnson, lot 18. 

blk 120. Wist Duluth. Sixth di»i«lon I 

Guaranty Farm Land Co. to LewU O. He- 

trum. sH of neVi. n«hk of swV». nw\4 of 

aeM. aecUon 18. 58-12 .;.-.i-:- '• * 

Edgar L Colby et ux to Friuk B. Neuhaua. 

wV» of awH, aecUon 11, 02-19 »50 

Guil Lee et ux to Arthur 8. Kltto. ne^ of 

swVi. nw\4 of ae^i. swW of n»H. sei'tlon 

Xt. 83-17 * 

WUUam Joaea et ux to W. S. Mlcka. lota M. 



7. Superior View addiUon 

John MalesU to William Malinaki. lot 6. blk. 
15. Dodge'* addtUon 

Boston & DulutJi Fami Land Co. to St. Loula 
Hirer Power & ImproTejtaSnt Co. se*4 of 
svi\t. secUou 14, 52-1% 

H. W. Coffin et ux to Northern Lumber Co., 
»w of 8e^4. section 5. 51-13 

Dowllng.-Klrby-Hepworth Realty Co. to M. L 
Stewart, lot 7. blk. 3, BrooklUie 

WillU 7. Holmes et ux to August Johnaon. 
lot 3. bUt 2. West F-rai addition 

Blwabik Realty Co. to J. H. Zimmtrly et ux. 
lots 10. 11. 12, 13. blk. 5. Shank's addi- 
tion, Ulwablk 

B. 11. Hayes et al to Knink buslUn. lot 1«. 
blk 15. Mesaba HeithtB<«ddMon 

B. H. Hayes et al to Mn. Jessie E. R«8a^. 
loU 7. 8. blk. 1. Mtsaba ReighU addition.. 

Koki Improvement Co. to Matt Nelmariti, lot 
13. blk. 14. KoakiviUe 

St. Loula County Inrestsent Co. to O. W. 
Akenon. lot 1. section |5, 63-18 

Joaiah R. Uoscoe to LyWa K. Johnaen. eH 
of e^ of sw^, secUon 10, 50-16 

.Situta Fe RaUraad Land Co. to WUUam D. 
Washburn, Jr., lots 1, 2, 3. section 4, 63- 
U; se^ of MM. ancUon 3t; sH >f (w^, 



No Matter What 
You Want 

A Want Ad in this pa- 
per will meet the eye of 
some one who can sup- 
ply it. 



I six-room house In 

iKALESttUANDINSUUNa.ood condlUon on Sercn 
CODY HOTEL CORNU ty-flrst avenue west, hard- 
wood floors downstairs, 
electric light, well water. 
11.150; $300 cash, bal- 
ance to suit. 

Tlueo level lots with 
water and sewer between 
Cody and Elinor BV«i^. 
on Sixtieth avenue west. 
$280 each; terms easy. 

Fine building lots on 

North Fifty -first. Fifty - 

second and Flfty-thrd 

jivenues wmt, $350 each; 

10 down. $S per month. 



W12J 



THE 

COMING 

SPOT 




A GOOD BUY! 

Duplex Hou.se on East Second .St. 
Built 1909. Separate lieating plant.s, 
laundry tub;? and strictly modern in 



every way. 



Price $9,000 

$3,800 cash will handle. 
See us for particulars. 

CLARKE-WERTIN CO., 



:200 Aiworth. 



1.000 



(85 



300 



800 
325 

1 

65 

125 

100 

1 

1 



BW\4 of «e%. aecUon 33. 64-12 

Southside Itealty Co. to Die Hakela. loU 20. 

21. blk. 81. Second addlUon. Virginia 

CooIldgB-Schussler Co. to Oust LahU. lot T, 

section 8, 54-19 

George Waters et ux to Zenith Box ft Lum- 

»>er Co., loU 9, 14. blk. 63. Oneota 

George F. Lliniiay to The Virginia ft Rainy 

L.ike Co., BWV4 of s«V. aecUon 27; nw^4 

of neS4. secrlon 31. GO-18 

State to L. M. Mann Land Co.. undivided H 

of nwV4 of uwV4, secUon 10, 60-15 and other 

laud. 
C. C. Yftwkey et al, executors of William C. 

Yawley to Allecheny Iron Mbiing Co., deed 

In bk. 176, page 358. - extended to Jan. 4. 

ly20 

A W. Shaw et ux to RepubUc Iron ft Steel 

Co.. loU « to 14 Inclusive, blk. 2. parts lots 

15. m. IT. 18. blk. 2. Spina townslte 

John Farah et al to WlllUm Abalan, lot 184. 

blk 27, Duuth Proper. Second division 

Euonder NlUson to Lilly SchulU, uw% of 

ne^4. section 10. 51-18 

Boston ft Duluth Farm Land company to J. 

B. Nygaard, lot 5, section 29, 51-19 

Oust Eklund to Carl G. Anderson, bw^4 of 

se'4, section 3. 54-lT 



REAL ESTATE. 
MORTGAGE LOANS. ETC. 

SMITH REALTY CO., 

524 Manhattan Bld«. 



3,739 



(Continued on pa«e 28. first column.) 



160 ACRES on Cayuna Range, on 
line of attraction, well located: 
three-quarter interest, 92,400. 

80 ACRES, Douglas county. Wi.s.. 
fine farming land. Snap at 9lM)00. 

92,500 — Good seven-room house. East 
end, $500 cash, balance easy terms. 

9200 — Choice lot In Ironton; easy 
payment plaui. 

9400 — 160-acre cut-over land, well 
located. Snap. 

We Have Some SnapH la Caynna 
Iron I..an«bi. 

LOCKER-DONAHUE 
COMPANY 

416-417 LoBHdale BuildlMT. 



Woodland Cottages 

9500 CASH and J20 per month gets 
you a neat .six-room cottage witli 
water, gas. and electric lights. 
Price only 91,»00.00. 

92,300 BUYS a fine corner. 100 by 
142 feet, with a dandy four-room 
cottage, equipped with water and 
gas. Fine view and only two 
blocks from car. 

EXCLUSIVE. 

C. E. ROE, 

412 Peovldenee Building. 



$2,200 — 61C Kast Eighth atreet. fSOo cash, bal- 
ance $20 per mouth; six rooms, electric light, 
water and gas tt curb. 

$2,000—3227 W«t Third street. $200 cash, bal- 
ance $20 per month; five r)onn. water, gas. 
flntrlc light, bath, cement walk. 

$2.7S*— 205 FUty-secuud avenue west, $oOO cash, 
balance on easy paymeul^; cement baaemeut. 
bath, electric lights. 

$2.800 — 1113 Weil Third street. tT50 cash, bal- 
ance $27.00 per month, watrr, gas. bath, elec- 
tric light, 

$3,330—4109 West Third street. $800 cash. b«l- 
anr* $27 0<) per mouth. 

$500— Lot on Thirteenth avrnue east, near Sev- 
enth street. 37 Vi feet by 100 feet. May pay- 
ments. 

PDLFORD, HOW t CO., 

809 Alwerth Building. 





1 






1 




r 
















1 








1 








. 


1 




r 



I 




f-m 



\ 



* h 






^k< 



i 




> 



28 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



COOPER IS 

F OUND GUILTY 

Will Be Sentenced Monday 

for Stealing From 

PostofBce. 

AnilrfW Cooper, who was indicted b> 
the ftilt-ral grand jury on the cliarge 
of stealing stamps and money from the 
postoffice at Cromwell in Carlton 
county, Minn., was found guilty after a 
trial in tlie I'nlted States circuit court, 
held before Judge Page Morris. 

OwlnK to the inability of his at- 
torneys, ["ietrich & Dietrich of Supe- 
rior, to come to the court this morning, 
nenteni e will not be passed on him 
until Monday. 

The ( ase of the United State.s against 
Loxley Culp will be continued on Mon- 
day morning, no session having been 
held tcday. Culp is accused by the 
grand Uiry of having perjured himself 
•W! linjtT as a witness in a land 

ct tried before the land of- 

flci.i.> ii 'iiss Lalse. 

RUBBER MMXs (LOSE 

FOR LACK OF ORDERS. 




AV.. socket. R. I. July 15. — The 
Alut- .uul Millville mills of the Woon- 
Borkct Friliher companv clo.sed today '• 
for a month because of lack of or- 
dt I s In the Alice mill 1.500 hands 
are affected and in th Millville plant 

soo. 

— • 

Plaaup. Snialliwx niul Cholera. 

Amoy. China. July 15. — During the 
tn'o weeks ending yesterday there 
were reported here 25 deaths from 
the bubonic plague, 8 from smallpox 
lUld 3 from cholera. 

LAND NKAR WOODLAND IS 
, SOLD FOR $200 AN ACRE 

(<\ir: tinned from rntre 27.) 



E. G. Hall, president of the State 
Federation of Labor, elected at the 
recent convention at Mankato, is in 
the city today. 

Mr. Hall, who lives in Minneapolis, 
is m Duluth for the purpose of plan- 
ning with Secretary W. E. McEwen 
the work for the nex three months. 
He arrived in the cit / this morning. 

Mr. Hall succeeded <»eorge B. How- 
ley as president of the state federa- 
tion. This is his first visit to Duluth 
since his election. 

Mr. Hall states thj t labor condi- 
tions throughout the state are good. 
For the next three m« nths he ex- 
pects to put in a g< od deal of his 
time with the organizations at Brain- 
erd, Crookston and Jiankato. 

The new president »tates that it is 
his intention to get i ccjuainted with 
the members of all the labor or- 
panibations in the state. He is going 
to inquire fully into a 1 the details of 
the work being done by each or^an- 
izatioh that he ma> know their 
needs. 

He has been traveling much of the 
time since he was e ected and this 
will be continued until he has visited 
all the organization*. During the 
winter months he exnects to put in 
several weeks in Dul ith. 

After talking over with Secretary 
McEwen the work for the next three 
months, Mr. Hall returned to Min- 
neapolis. He came to Duluth from 



Braincrd, where he had been doing 
some work. 






1 
K 

1 



I 
Wi 

1 t 



Em' 

«r !< 

t ' 
An 
I 



it iil to J;.iUf> It. r:yan tt 

. ftt lot ?:», Ik. 1--:. i>u- 

- II ml liivUii ii . . 

Ol»f A. Or«l»in, v.v\ of 

51 17 

tt ux to Emll Ulsm. part 
... s. SpalJlr.g'i! S«-' till lUvUlon 
1 ft u« tp .\u\Mk C. Highmark. 
:k 2. Central Oivifiun. Wtst Du- 



He 

Pai 
1 



11. -■ 
|«lin vv 

a*--* 
J - ■ 



iiicturd S.i]o. sh% of Ml4, 

To. to .Mike ili&r. lot 20, 
. Iditi^n. Virginia 

!i 1\'. tf «;nrff W. i^mitll. 
. t . SouthtTTi hdditicn. Hib- 

•. w.AT to E4l»ia J. Puliner 

vV.4. »»ctiin 7. .'•2-14 

SaiifaiJ M al to MarEMlle 
< t'lk. \i, Mesala Uftghta 

Jchn D. iolinaon. part 

spaliUiig's atliliticn unij 

, liuUah I*n;<c«r. Stc- 

ct mar to Jnmes I'rviwley, 
■i li'. 2f>, life. 3. Ccleman'* 

X tr- H..rrT .\. Hopkins, 

n 

^ Cr . lot 

: , t'ut' :a. lots 20. 

li'urvfy Murray & 



750 
1 
I 

1 

1 

1 

600 



M 



Frii-ii 



ux to Minnie KMliler. 

. . n 3:.. 5-H 

ux tf Mary Allard. IcU 6, 

u.,-t Imluth, Sixth lilTljlon 

; oUn et ux to Hinae & (lanlen 

Co., VATX <x'^ of *W»4. SJK-tltU 1, 4t>-15.... 

Borne .V- ' -^■•. Cc to Frank T. OUn. lot 
S22 plal of Bay VUw Heights 

rtirk • , 

Cu«UT i;.,>rkiuu.l ft ux to Andivw Pearson. 

lot ;. Mk. 5, Tower 

Jack halloas tt al to May K. -Nagle. nw'4. 

settle i. :i*. :.e-i6 

Bame tr c'hri»t Kangai. tiw^ cl nw\«, w'lk 

of i.W«. .'wtijn 10. ,'.6-ifl 

Cliarles U. Snuth et ux to Virginia A Hainy 

Lake Co.. fart nwVi of seVi. section 24. 

fin..i'":B Ii.v.liment Co. to Krauli .\rko, lol 23, 

blk. .'. C< t!. n • • 

WUli..m H' Met.atf ri ux tc selma koi^kl, 

1ft 8. Ilh. 1". I'ill«t"i.-y i.i.Utlf.ii. Hll>btiig 

Belle r-.i-rscn tt^ Herrriiin K. Kt'.v.sW. Kl 11, 

blk. U'i, W>st iMjlultJ. !«tc<jn<l tiirlslcn. . . . 

John Utrr'tri m lo TluiiDiis A. Tlsoma*. let 1, 

aecticr. t. I't t'. >rition 5.^. 62-16 

A. W KuehiKW tt ux to KraiMfs A. Mtka. 
Kt 8. bik. 11. Norton's Sletl Plant tllvlslon 
Barry C. .strcns rt ux to Ji hn K. Mi-<".lff«rt. 
lot ". blk. 311. Ka»t Lawn iSlTtScii: lots 4, 
6, yt^ kit .'. tik. n. I.<.:igTifW ii(J,mi.in... 
Bdw.inl t . Jiinkir it ux to Mlunle E. IJnd- 
berg. lot 4. blk. 32, rirst Ghn Avon 

dlttoli'D . 

Betwrt K. «am.U et ux to AlUn P. Lctejoy, 
lot 11. s'l lot 10. l>Ik. «01. Aittred plat. 

West iMilulh, Third <!h1slon 

F. O. H,i;wn *t \\x to Matt Pohlman, part 

lot 22. tlk. 104. Seioml addicii ii Vlrgiiila. 

Ouarauty farm Lam) C". t« iMluth Home 

C".. *Mi 't i^e^A- seitUn 19. 10-14 

H. C Kulton to Crace T. Adamo. Icta 3, 4. 

blk. '.' I'rlnceton I'lace addition 

Duluth Hiraie Cc. to C. S. Witoca, sH of 

nfM. fecthn I'J. :.0-I4 

|»bn .Mi-lHiiinell to H.'irriett Mcl»onntll. un- 
dlTide<l 1-3 of r.ey^ tf neU. secttcn 31; 
»w^ of l'Wl4 of »w^. section 29. 6.">-10.... 
Nets A. FCIS9 (-t ux to Iamc I.jtke Iri'n ft 
Steel Co.. i;»'^ 'f »e'*. » Vji'f »w'^. lot 
4. »e<tlon 32, r4-17; lot 2. «eeUta 5. 53-17, 
800 shares ot fio. 
Oecai- Waleni tl ux tc Zenith Box k Lumter 

Co. lots 11, 12. Hk. «.•». Onefcta 

Frank S < o1t;i. et al to Etert. Walker ft 

McKiilichI Co.. lft» 7. 8. sertUn 30. .^7-12.. 

Arthur U. Burg to Nek Barkstnm. lot 338, 

VOt. 124. KuUith I'mper. biwoud dlrlsion . 

KeUi Ha<k.'«!n>ni to Jud*« n H. Evans southerly 

85 ft It li.t :v<!<. e'i lot 340. blk. 124. Duluth 

PnT-e r. i^<^ ond (iivlslon 

Wwteni Land pssoe-iatlon t'.i Arthur H. Burg. 
•H let 340. tlk. 124, Uuluth Prcper. Sec- 
ond (itvisic n 

W<*i<ni Litnd asMx-tatlon to ArhJr H. Burg, 
lot :39. Wk. 124. Duluth Proper, Second 

division . . 

JnUuA Wellberg et ux tu Brtr E. Wellberg. 
Iwn I re aiwJ other minerals In »wV4 of 

aw 'A. «««tion r42. 35-15 

Charli-< Olsfii et ux to Henry Nelson. ne% 

of sw'i- .""ctitu 10. 54-17 

BarhsrA B.irtholoinew et mar to Herman 8. 

Wlbu I., lots 3. 4. section 12. 61-13 

VmierU-li I'.uis et al to Eilw.ird Hagurty. 
Jot : i . . - Wi'st InjJuih. Second 

dlvisii tl 

Alex O. Ilk «'. '* 1" Krank P. Winkle, lot 

6. 7. se.t:<n .5, .13-16 

Mary <' Kwiiig to C. F. Colmiin, iie>4. »*«- 

tlin :'. in- 14 

lAke»de Land Co. to Thomas J. Borgeson, 

lot 1. Wk. r<7. I»n<!on addition 

Charley Frll'erK tr. .Alfred J Johrwon. «w«4 

ol nev»K4. Ml* of swVi. swtlon 17. fl-15 . 

IMer J. t^teeii t" Valur V. Kam^yn. neH of 

nw\i, •KctU/n 20. 51-14 

Arthur H. Buri to Nels Bi.ik.Htrom. e'4 lot 
S4n, Uk. 124, Duluth Hnper. Second dltl- 

tlon 

Walter V. rnmlyn et ux to Peter J Steen, 
lot 11. Wk. 22. .Mjers ft WhU'ple'a addi- 
tion 

Conlelia WiuH el mar to Mary C. Ewing. 

i»e>4. sei-tliu 3. .',0-14 

AUcgheiy Irtn Mhdng Co. et al to WUliam 
O'Brlin, laiid and timl*r In section 2, 
•0-i.'. ete. i!es*rit*<l in schedule if nine 
pagrs {800,000^ licirumtut dated 9(pt. 5. 
1910. 
■dwanl Krtvmpasky et ux to John C. Faim- 
'. let 8. blk. 53, Flnt addldon, McKln- 




ID NEW 




TO BEAUTIFY 
WKTEND 

Many Improveirents Under 

Way West of Point 

of Rocks. 



2200 
1 

1,25C 

9(0 

1 

1 

1 
SCO 

1 
1 

1 

250 
1.650 
315 
500 
350 

1 

3.600 

1,612 
1 

6,000 
1 

6.00C 

1 



Paving of West Fifth Street 

Biggest Job of 

Year. 



DEDICATE 
NEWCHURCH 

Prominent Catholic Clergy- 
men Will Attend St. 
Clement's Services. 



Bishop McGolrick Will Bless 

Edifice — Banquet and 

Parade. 



1 

1 

1,600 

4.0C0 

675 

1,400 

1 
1 
1 

600 
343 
32,000 
250 
€40 
1 

730 

1 

200 




to ■■ 

D- W. Freeman, tnatof, to Andrew Plemon- 
terl el al. lots 13. 14. Wk. 53, Secmd Ad- 
dltiou, Cilll.*rt 

WMl Iron Co. to Alex Olson, lot S, tlk. 
4. Flwt Addition. taUien .. 

D. W. Freeman, trustee, to Mike Panlrh. lot 
15, blk. 10. Gilbert 

BlaalierJi OTemion et mar to E. U. Schneider, 
lot 11. blk. 60. Portland dlristen 

Oto Carter n to Ludwig B. IHinner, lot 13. 
blk. «, Lester Park. First OlTlsion 

IX W. Freeman, trustee, to Jtftph F. Janlsli, 
lots 13, 14. blk. 22. Gilbert 

BMei VUiA Land Co. to .Millie A. Kaitinf, 
lote :i. 4. blk <i. Ironton. Tlilrd rtlTiilon.... 

OMver K. H:;ney et al to WIU J. Hood, lots 
M. H8. 90, !>2, P4, ^^^st street : lets 85, 
■7. 81). ?1. 03. Second street. Fond du Lac 

Lodwig H. IXinntr to Uie Carlstu. seVi. sec- 
tion 18. 62-12 

Oiarles V. McCoy to L^Hlwig B. DouBvr, 
•e^. section 18. 62-12 

C. F. Colman K ux to John B. Archambault, 
nH ('f '''*■ ""''^ *' nw%. sictlon 10. 
•1-13 

f1^ ^n ^. McLean tt ux to Walter T. Wright, 
•outhcrly 80 feet, lol 3, southerly 3 feet 
of nirtheily 75 feet lots 1. 2, blk. 92. En- 
dlon (inlsion 

B»Tto r.eal Kfllate Co. to <'»»arl«B and Fred 
Larsiii, l<t.s 189, 190. 191. blk. 18. Cros- 
lej Park addiUon H 

Joseph Karl ux to Mouiitain Inn Firuilsh 
Wiirhinrrnan's ;»ii«>0Ciati( ii. lot 8. Uk. 5, 
Grant 

Flnniali Socialist Hodety of Mountain mn 
to Mountain Iron Flnulata Wcrkirigraan's 
assoilaHiiin. lit 8. blk. 5, town if «ir.int, 
new village if Mountain lion. Nichols town- 
ship 

John W. Ko*.oc el UX to Jckiab ft. Roscoe. 
•ii ut eH ol »*^. »«c^«"> 1«. ^"-16 



1 

200 

250 

4,000 

3.800 

30i) 
1 

1 
1 
1 

45C 



1.000 

255 

1 

1 
1 



The agitation of th. West end civic 
organizations for bett ?r streets and a 
more attractive West end is meeting 
with results. 

Monday the board of public works 
will let several contriicts lor imptove- 
ment? on West end ttreels, the prin- 
cipal job being the West Fifth street 
jcb. This thoroughfaie will be graded, 
curbed and guttered oetween Twenty- 
third and Twenty-fifth avenues west. 
When the bitls were opened Friday, 
Hugh Steele, contract, r, had the lowest 
bid at $41,141.1:0, and will probably be 
awarded the contract. 

The improvement of West * »i}" 
street has long been (lestred, and wil 
be rushed to an early completion. Tho 
specifications call foi ;^ither f »""€ or 
cement gutters. On the grading and 
sunacini of Third alley from Twenty- 
third to Twenty-four h avenues went, 
the bids submitted to the board yester- 
.lav called for various kinds of worK. 
Hugh Steele was low at 1630 on grave 
surfacing and cement gutter work, and 
George B. King was low on crushed 
rock surfacing and ough stone gut- 
ters at |b45,G0 and i^so on macadam 
surfacing with cement curb and gut- 
ters at H 211-60, Tlese bids will all 
be checked over carafully before the 
contract is let Monda/. 

Other improvement* along this line 
will also be made d irlng the coming 
year. Manv streets f.nd avenues, more 
especially avenues. >vest of Twenty- 
tiist. need to be lev elt^d and grai»ed. 
After a heavy rain several of the 
thoroughfares are in passable and re- 
semble a cow path with ravines on 
both sides. Property owners have be- 
eun to realize that streets in such con- 
ultion tend to keep property values 
down, and that such thoroughfares do 
not add to the attractiveness of the 

West end. .» u-.,u <» 

In Oneota an improvement wnicn is 
now being rushed is the construction 
of a trunk sewer in Forty-first avenue 
west It is planned to have it ready 
for connection with the new Meirltt 
school building at t le opening of the 
f.'tll school term. Tl e board of public 
works has advertised for t>ids for trie 
sewer on Fifth str.et running from 
Tliirty-ninlh to 1-orly-first street, 
which will connect tie Forty-first ave- 
nue sewer with the trunk. 

Several new sidewnlks have also been 
ordered in the West -nd by the council 
They will be laid ahng the north side" 
of Michigan street fiom Thirty-first to 
Thirty-second pven, es west, on the 
north side of West Fourth street be- 
tween Forty-first and Forty-second 
avenues west, and ou the north side of 
Eleventh street from I'iedmont to 
Twenty-second averues west. 

The water main extension to supply 
the hillside district «^ill soon be start- 
ed according to premises which have 
been made by the vater board to the 
West End Hillside Improvement club, i 
which held a meeting last evening at 
the Ensign school. Twenty-third ave- 
nue west and Tenth street. The work 
will be commenced as soon as the 
pipes arrive. A iO-i »ch main will con- 
nect the main at Thirteenth avenua 
west and Fifth street with the exten- 
sion. It will run northwest to Seventh 
street and west on Seventh to Twen- 
tieth avenue, Fron there it will run 
up I'iedmont avenue to Tenth street 
and Twentv-thlrd j. venue, where the 
school is located. I'Vom this point 6- 
'nch pipes will be laid to Eleventh, 
Twelfth and Thlrttenth streets and 
west to Twenty-fo irth avenue. The 
work will not be c« mpleted until next 
year. 

West enders are Tfiuch interested In 
the improvement o the city dock at 
Twenty-first avenue west. At the 
meeting of the boa d of public works 
yesterdav C. R. M. Lean submitted a 
bid of $1,008,40, the lowest of several, 
and he will probabiy be awarded the 
contract Monday. The specifications 
call for the extension of the pier for 
seventy-five feet, iiaking it possible 
for good-sized boj ts to land there. 
As It is now. the dock is practicallj 
useless, as it is with difficulty that the 
excursicm boata get In and out cf the 
slip. The improve nent is one much 
desired by West er d people, who will 
save a trip down t< wn when they can 
board a boat at th.i Twenty -first ave- 
nue dock. 

Free Baod Concfrt. 

If the weather it fair tomorrow, a 
large crowd is expected at Lincoln 
Park to listen to he free band con- 
cert, which will be given under the 
auspices of The Herald by the Third 
Regiment band. The free concerts last 
year proved very popular with West 
end people, who t irned out enmasse, 
whenever the conierts w«re held at 
Lincoln Park. 



Further details for the dedication 
ceremonies of the new $60,000 St. 
Clements Catholic church, tomorrow, 
have been completed. 

Pontifical high mass will be sung by 
Rt. Rev. Patrick R. Heffron. bishop of 
Winona, at 10:30 a. m. at the church. 
Twenty-first avenue west and Ttiira 
street. Tlie clergy who will assist at 
the altar are Reverend Fathers Au- 
gustine, Eugene, Wilfrid, Raymond 
and Hvacinth, Thirty-two altar boys 
will assit-t in the sanctuary. 

A parade will be held in the after- 
noon in which the Catholic societies of 
the Duluth and Superior will take part 
The line of march will form at 2:30 
at the courthouse and v,ill move to the 
chuich. _ , , , .1. T>. 

At the church at 3 o'clock, the Rt. 
Rev James McGolrick, bishop of Du- 
luth. will deliver the .'If^i^a^o^y .f^J,: 
men, after first blessing the church 
both from the exterior and mterlor. 
In this ceremony he will be assisted 
bv the local and visiting clergy. At 
the conclusion of the afternoon serv- 
ice a banquet for the clergy, thebulld- 
ing committee, the contractors and 
other invited guests will Le held In 
the baseiutnt chapel. There will be 
several addresses made. Covers will 
be laid for sixty. 

The church has been prettily deco- 
rated for the occasion %vith evergreens 
and other adornments. In the b»n*lM,^t 
room in the basement, the Duluth Edi- 
son Electric company has furnished aij 
elaborate and pretty table display of 
colored incandescent lights, . 

The new communion railing arrived 
this moining and was installed in the 
church. All the furnishings are now 
complete. 



WIPED OUT 
BYJLAMES 

Manager of Porcupine Mines 

Hears of Fire While 

Visiting Here. 

Herbert Poirier Tells of Con- 
ditions in Flame Swept 
District 



Herbert Poircr, who is here visiting 
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Camille 
Poirier of 2128 East Second street, has 
received a message announcing that 
the surface workings, of the Vipond 
mine cf the i orcupine Gold Mines com- 
pany, of which he is manager, were 
wiped out In the recent fires in that 
district, but that no lives were lost at 
that property. 

Mr. Poirier came to the United States 
to contract for a ten-stamp mill which 
is to be installed on the property. 
There was a one-stamp mill in opera- 
tion and other machinery valued at 
about $26,000, while the buildings were 
worth about $4,000. Mr. Poirier will 
visit the mine :. d determine the ex- 
tent of the loss, after which he will 
go to New York, where the head office 
of tlie company is located, and con- 
tract for new machinery, 

Mr, I'oirer left the mine July 1 and 
at that time there were a few small 
fires burning, but no blaze that threat- 
ened seriously. About six or eight 
weeks ago, the Hollinger property was 
destroyed by fire which spread from 
the forest, entailing a loss of about 
$150,000, but the fire causing that loss 
had teen extinguished. 

••There are prospectors all through 
that district and the probabiitv is that 
they were none to careful with their 
camp fires," said Mr. Poirier today, 
"The ground is covered with heavy 
moss and a fire may burn along under 
the moss for weeks without being no- 
ticed to anv extent. The winds through 
the district are something terrific, com- 
ing from the northeast, and a heavy 
wind would find many small fires run- 
ning along under the moss and fan 
them into conflagration proportions." 

"There has been no lumbering 
through the district and the forest is in a 
virgin state, which gives much food for 
flames. There are a few big pine 
trees scattered through the district, but 
most of the limber is spruce, cotton- 
wood, jack pine and poplar, compara- 
tively small trees. We had a clearing 
orouhd our property of sixty acres, and 
the towns and camps all had clearings, 
but no efforts by men could prevent a 
big fire driven by a high wind from 
jumping the clearings. 

"They have a forest ranger system in 
the district, but it is not as efficient as 
it might be. The rangers have little 
authority and must enter court pro- 
ceedings to enforce their warnings. 
Their control over careless campers is 
thus weakened, while they do not exer- 
cise the authority shown by United 
States forest rangers in compelling men 
tc fight fires. 

'•The Dome property had a stamp mill 
recently completed at a cost of about 
$125,000 and that was wiped out. The 
other properties also had expensive ma- 
chinery and the property loss will be 
heavy. The buildings In the district 
were, of course, frame structures and 
the loss in tliat direction will not be 

•I notice in the list of dead the name 
of Bob Weiss, manager of the West 
Dome property, which Is owned by 
Augustus Helnze. Mr. Weiss was well 
known through the mining districts of 
the West. He was a man weighing 
about 460 pounds and was a conspicuous 
figure wherever he appeared. H« was 
an interesting and likeable character 
and had manv friends In different min- 
ing camps throughout the country." 




A SYRIAN QUARTER WATER CARRIER. 

New York. July 15.— During the recent hot weather in this city must of 
the most intense suffering was experienced in the quarters of the eity occupiea 
by foreigners. Among the Syrians, however, there were some enterprising men 
who filled huge, queer-shaped tankards with water and went about peddling it 
at a trifling sum per glass. Men, women and children patronized these water 
carriers, and some of them picked up nice little sums out of the hot wave. 



>^^^^^^^Si^^k^i^>^^^kiMi/N^«iA^>^S"' 



ASSOCIATED CHARITIES CON- 
GRATULATED ON FIRST REPORT 



Secretary Courtenay Dinwiddle of 
the Associated Charities is In receipt 
of several letters of congratulations 
on "Six Months of Team Work,' the 
review in pamphlet form which was 
published recently on the work of the 
Duluth society for the first six months 
of its existence. 

The pamphlet was sent to the heads 
of other charitable organizations that 
they might have a chance to see what 
Is being done in Duluth. This is a 
courtesy that is a common practice 
between the societies of the different 
cities. The work being done in one 
place is of much help to those in other 



places as many new ideas are usually 
contained In the reports. . , . 

Hugh F. Fox of New York, president 
of the New Jersey Board of Children s 
Guardians and editor of a charity aiid 
correction paper speaks very highly 
of the report submitted by the secre- 
tarv of the local organization. 

Mrs. Ilelene Ingram, superintendent 
of Relief Association of New Y'ork, 
which is maintained for the improve- 
ment of the condition of the poor, in 
a personal letter of congratulation 
states that the Duluth society is ap- 
parently doing a great deal of good 

E T. Lies of Minneapolis, general 
secretarv of the Minneapolis Associat- 
ed Charities of the Mill City writes a 
letter of congratulation to Secretary 
Dinwiddie as does Perry N. Hiser of 
the Peoria, 111., Associated Charities. 



West End Briefs. 

Mrs. S. Olesen of 320 North Nine- 
teenth avenue west returned today 
from a two weeks' visit at the home 
of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Patterson 

of Mlnong. Wis. irr^^* TTirot 

Mrs. K Madsen of 1715 West First 
street entertained yesterday afternoon 
at her home In honor of her birthdaj. 
games and music being the feature of 
the occasion. Refreshments were 
served, covers being laid for about 
twenty- five 

Mrs Helsler and daughter, Mrs. Tate 
of Minneapolis, former West end resi- 
dents are visiting in the western end 
of the cltv for a few days. 

Mrs Peter Olson of XOe North 
Twentv-third avenue west has as her 
gue"t "Mrs Andrew Olson of Los An- 
geleV Next week, both will leave lor 
Alfa, Minn., on a visit. 

Mr, and Mrs, L A, Slmonson are ex- 
pected to return tomorrow from a trip 
to Grand Marais, Minn. 

No funeral arrangemtnts have been 
made as vet for Mrs, Andrew Carlson, 
aged ''2 of 926 Garfield avenue, who 
died Thursday at St. Lukes hospital. 
Her hnsband.' who was at Isle Royale 
at the time of her death has been no- 
tifieil and is expected to arrive In the 
West end tomorrow. The funeral wiil 
probably be held Monday, 

Helnur Johnson of Sioux Fails, S. 
D a former West end resident, is 
spending a few days in the western 
end of the city, the guest of friends 
and relatives. 

TWOKIli& 

MICHIGAN, N- D. 



Silling on Edge of Ties Are 

Struck By Oriental 

Limited. 

Devils Lake, N. D, July 15.— (Special 
to The Herald.) — Two men by the nam© 
of Kelly and Craft, transients, were 
struck at Michigan, N. D., last night 
by the Oriental Limited train of the 
Great Northern. Both men apparently 
were seated on the edge of ties and for 
some reason failed to notice the ap- 
proaching train. j, ^ ,^ 

Kelly died instantly and Craft was 
rushed to Devils Lake, where he died 
at 1:30 this morning. 

♦ 

Sontkem Bank Examiner. 

Washington. July 15. — William T. 
Marfield of KnoxvlUe. Tenn., was to- 
day appointed a national bank ex- 
aminer and assigned to the district of 
Mississippi and Western Tennessee, 



10c will buy a permit to smoke a 
Palma Leo, clear Havana cig ar. 

ONE MAN DIES IN 
BATTLE CREEK FIRE 

Another Man Is Missing and 

Property Loss Is 

$15,000. 

Battle Creek, Mich., July 15.— One 
dead, one missing and a property loss 
of $15,000 was the toll of an early 
morning blaze today in the business 
district. The Harley Hamlin livery was 
destroyed and the Richtmyer bakery, 
the Munford & Gustke furniture store, 
the Southton grocery and the Powers 
block, containing the circuit court 
rooms, were damaged. 

Leo Hunt, aged 26, was burned to 
death while sleeping In the Hamlin 
livery office and the police have been 
unable to locate Hamlin, who usually 
slept in the barn. Eighteen horses 
were burned to death. 

VICTIM OF THE 

FOURT H DIES 

Eight-Year-Old Boy at Wil- 

liam$town,MiclL,Succumbs 

to Tetaaus. 

Lansing, Mich,. July IB.^Bert Per- 
kins, aged 8 years, died today at the 
home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
Philip Perkins, in Wllllamstown from 
tetanus, the result of being wounded 
In the hand with a blank cartridge on 
the Fourth of July.^ 

SURVIVOR OF CREW 

OF MONITOR DIES. 



COPPERS STEADY; 
TRADING LIGHT 

Values Mark Time in Dull 

Market — Crops Are a 

Factor. 

The copper market today was dull 
and steadv. The undertone was firm. 
Considering the unfavorable crop re- 
ports which were issued by two crop 
experts the marked acted well. The 
metal situation Is unchanged. The gen- 
eral news was featureless. The bulk 
of the trading was an evening "P Pro- 
cess that did not turn values out of the 
rut in which they have stagnated for 
several days, ,„„ „_ _ . . 

Amalgamated sold at $68. .5 Butte 
Coalition at $18.50, O jib way at I6. calu- 
met & Arizona at $58. $58.50 and $58, 
Giroux $6.37»«s and $6.43^4, North Butte 
at $32.50. $32,62»^ and $32,50. 

There were no sales on the local ex- 
change. . • • 

During June the production at 
Greene-Cananea amounted to 3,46-000 
pounds of copper, 102,606 ounces of sil- 
ver and 509 ounces of gold. Copper 
production fell off materially as is 
shown from the high figures of May 
when slightly in excess of 4.000,000 
pounds were produced. The low pro- 
duction for June, however, has no sig- 
nificance as it is more or less of an 
evening up of process. 

Cananea's nominal production at the 
present time is around 43,000,000 pounds 
per annum, while the ultimate capacity 
of the present reduction plants is in 
the neighborhood of 80,000,000 pounds 
of copper, which would indicate opera- 
tions being carried on al a little over 
50 per cent capacity. At the concen- 
trator but part of the plant is in com- 
mission, while at the smelter several 
blast furnaces are held in reserve, with 
the new roverberatories giving addi- 
tional supply. During June, everything 
went along as usual at the reduction 
plants. At the mines, no new discov- 
eries of Importance were made, but par- 
ticularly at the Sierra de Cobre, dt^vel- 
cpment continued to show improvement. 
The report previously received, stat- 
ing that the most of producing copper 
at Cananea- had been reduced to slight- 
ly under 9c per pound, is a matter or 
Kreat importance to Cananea stock- 
holders. In the making of this cost 
some exceptionally favorable conditions 
existed, while on the other hand cer- 
tain others tended to produce a higher 
cost than normal. In view of this the 
management is reticent about making 
anv statement concerning this cost un- 
tillt has been thoroughly demonstrated 
over a longer period of time. X 9c cost 
at Cananea represents a large decrease 
over last vear's operations when the 
total cost was '11.20 per pound, of which 
construction amounted to nearly l»4iC, 
This last named worked is now prac- 
tically completed. 

Based on a 43.000,000 pounds per an- 
num production a 9c cost and copper at 
12^c per pound, Cananea's earning 
would be approximately 65c per share. 
Based on the ultimate capacity of the 
reduction plants, this figure would be 
increased to $1.20 per share. 
• • « 



and sixth levels north, are richer than 
anything disclosed on the first three 
levels, to say nothing of the seventh 
and eighth level developments Besides 
this the company has $350,000 cash In 
Its treasury. , . 

Lake Copper is now .-ellnng ex- 
enthusiasm," which accounts for the 
difference of over $50 per share m the 
price of the stock, nothwlthstanding 
that developments of the past year jus- 
tify a relately higher intrinsic price 
than any at which the stock ever 

sold. , , ii,„* 

Lake Copper has already proved that 
it will make a mine, and develop- 
ments now indicate that it will make 
a large and rich one. 

Closing quotations on the Duluth 
Stock exchange today follow: 



PIONEERS TO 
H0LD_PICN1C 

Annual Outing of Old Settlers' 

Association at Superior 

Next Wednesday. 

Gathering to Be Held al 

Billings Park — Two 

Harbors Invited. 



The annual picnic of the Old Set- 
tlers' Association of the Head of Lake 
Superior will be held on Wednesday, 
July 19, at Billings Park, Superior. 

All old settlers, their families and 
friends have been invited to attend. 
It is expected that all who can con- 
veniently do so will, as on former oc- 
casions, bring well filled baskets. 

The contents of the baskets may be 
served in the pavilion or here a,nd 
there in the shady nooks in the park 
as the guests may select, upon tables 
and seats available for the purpose. 

Billings park has city water and 
sanitary conveniences and is situated 
on St. Louis bay immediately south 
of the Gitchinadji club and golf 
errounds and about directly opposite 
West Duluth. It can be reached by 
small boats and light launches, but 
the channel is not deep enough for 
the regular ferries. The park is ac- 
cessible to automobiles over well 
paved streets, via Tower avenue and 
Twenty-first street. 

The best way, however, to eo to 
the park is by street car on the bill- 
ings Park line, which furnishes a 20- 
minute service all day to and from 
the park. Passengers from Dulutn 
and Superior are transferred to this 
line without extra charge. The time 
from any part of Duluth or ^"Pe^'O^ 
to Billings Park by street car ranges 
from thirty to fifty minutes. 

Peonle should reach the park not 
later than 11:30 a. m. to take part 
in the festivities. 

There will be few formalities, be- 
yond short introductory remarks by 
the president of the society, and pos- 
sibly three or four 10-minute talks 
by old settlers in the way of early 
reminiscences and anecdotes. So- 
ciability among the n^^'^^^^.^^^i'^Jf, 
the rule, and it is expected there will 
be a large attendance and an enjoy- 
able outing. The Old Settlers' Asso- 
ciation of Two Harbors has been in- 
vited to attend. 



LlHted Stock!*— ! Bid. [Asked 



American Saginaw .... 

Butte Coalition 

Butte-Alex Scott fl pd 

Butte Ballaklava 

Calumet & Arizona... 
Cactus Development . 

Copper Queen 

Denn Arizona 

Giroux Cons 

Greene Cananea 

Keweenaw 

Live Oak Dev 

North Butte 

O.iibway 

Red Warrior 

Savanna, part paid.... 
Savanna, full paid.... 
Shattuck Arizona .... 

Warren Dev 

Warrior Dev 

IniiHted Stocks — 

Amazon Montana 

Boston & Ely 

Butte & Superior 

Butte & Superior old. 
Calumet & Montana. 
Calumet & Coroin, 
Calumet & Sonera, 

Carman Cons 

Chief Cons 

Cliff 

Elenita Dev. 

Keating Gold 

North American 

Summit 

San Antonio 

St. Mary . . . 

Sierra 

Tuolumne 

Vermilion Steel & Iron, 



Sawtelle, Cal., July 15.— Michael 
Mooney, said to be one of the two 
survivors of the crew which manned 
the Monitor, when it fought and van- 
udlshed the Confederate steamer Mer- 
rlmac, died here last night at the Na- 
tional Soldiers' home. On the last an- 
niversary of the battle, Mooney sent 
a letter recalling the events of the day 
to the other survivor, who lives in 
Philadelphia. Among his papers was 
found a complete list of the vessel's 
officers and men, including his own 
name as a stoker. 

— ^ — • 

Plaintiff WlBM Option Salt. 

Bemidjl, Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — In the case of Carl Hof- 
fron vs. M. G. Foley, both of this 
city Judge McClenahan has decided In 
favor of the plaintiff. The point at 
Issue was to enforce the specific per- 
formance of an option contract on 
eighty acres adjoining the Heffron 
tract "on the west side of this city. Mr. 
Heffron values the court decision at be- 
tween $2,000 and 13,000. 



Very soon the Magma and Arthur 
mills of the Utah Copper company will 
be completed, giving the company a 
capacity of 20,000 tons of ore daily, or 
the annual milling yearly by all the 
Lake Superior mines together, and 
twice the amount of ore mined by all 
the properties in Butte. 

No less an authority than Henry 
Krumb. the mining engineer who has 
been Identified with most of the por- 
phry successes, prophesies that for the 
next fifteen years, and possibly for 
many years thereafter, the Utah Cop- 
per company will be able to produce 
150.000,000 pounds copper annually 
mined, milled, smelted, refined and sold 
at a cost of not over 7%c F. O. B. New 

York. ^ T 1 

A year ago last spring when Lake 
Copper was advanced marketwise from 
a few dollars a share to $94. every 
little development at the property was 
published and magnified, and every 
time a new level was cut from $10 to 
$20 was added to the price of the 
shares. Nowadays comparatively little 
is heard of undergrcund developments 
at the Lake property, and the eighth 
level was recently opened v,-ithout af- 
fecting the price of the shares $1. al- 
though the eighth level was found as 
rich as any of the upper levels, and 
drifting so far has disclosed the same 
copper richness as above. The Lake 
lode has now been opened up to May 
] by 12,000 feet of drifts, of which 
nearly 8,000 feet or two-thirds, was 
accornplished during the past year, or 
since the excitement in the stock in 
the sprinK of 1910 subsided. 
The fifth level south, and the fourth 








-« 



• - 



' tmm^mm^* 



TOOK HIM IN. 

Chicaeo News: "I did hope," said 
Mi-s Curfew, indignantly, "that one 
horning wSuld pass -itliout any agents 
^r,m\nfr to the door, but here you arc, 
w^Ui.^.ur valise full of sample nutmeg 
Craters or e|gbeaters. I declare there s 
ro nlace in this world for a poor hard- 
wor^kTng N^oman. and there wont be un- 
Ul the supreme court passes a law that 

"•^.'•iirdaughffr^s'comin^r^n from the 
country thfs evening to «pend a couple 
of days with me, and Im trying to get 
lie house fixed up so ^^^ wo"\^.^ 
ashamed of it, for, she "^o^^^V^^Ip «em' 
rietv being a graduate of a female sem- 
inary, althou|h at the present time 
Rhe-s teaching school for $40 a month 
Ind boarding with a family of the name 
of sparks, and while they do their best 
to please her Mr. Sparks has certain 
ways and customs which are annoying 
?^ a lady with a fashionable education 
"He drinks his coffee from a saucer 
and persists in singing The Old Oaken 
Bucket' to the tune of 'The Star Span- 
gled Banner,' and when he has fin-shed 
fating at the table he always fills his 
mouth with fine-cut chewing tobacco 
But it can be said to. his credit tnat he 
iB terribly set against agents, ever 
since a stranger came to his house one 
dav in the summer und talked a long 
rigmarole about the germs in well wa- 
ter which cause typhoid fever and 
spinal meningitis and lumpy Jaw and 
I don't know what else. The stranger 
had some sort of fluid that was com- 
pounded, he said, by the royal chemist 
at Berlin, and if you poured a pint of 
the fluid into a well the germs would 
all be killed, and the water would be so 
rure and wholesome that any one 
drinking it would never be sick, and 
would live forever, unless soniebody 
shot him, or a brick fell on him, or 
something like that. 

"Mr Sparks wasn't feeling well at the 
time and somebody had told him that 
the water on the place was bad, and so 
he bought a gallon or two of the mix- 
ture which co.st like everything, the 
asent saving that it had over forty in- 
gredients, and then I suppose the royal 
chemist had to have his rake-off. as 
well as the agent, for that's always the 
way. Mr. Sparks poured a Quart of it 
into the well, the agent telling him he 
mustut u.se the water for an hour .aft- 
erward, that being, of course, to give 
the agent time to get out of range of 
the family shotgun, for agent;-- are siy. 
and I don't doubt that if you sold m.e a 
fire extinguisher you'd act the same 
way fearing that it would explode and 
set the house afire before you got round 
the corner. . v,„_o 

"Well, what was I saying, anyhow? 
Oh yes Mr, Sparks waited an hour he- 
fore using the water and then he 
drank a good big cupful, and my 
daughter says his contortions were 
something frightful to witness, and the 
language he used was simply ridiculous 
for the father of a family. 

"That water tasted as though there 
was an alum mine at the bottom of the 
well, and Mr. Sparks' face war' so puck- 
ered up that all his features were 
drawn together, and when he tried to 
pick his teeth he found he was prod- 
ding his ear, and he had to open his. 
mouth with a glove stretcher when he 
wr.nted to take a chew of tci^>acco, and 
It was a week before his ears slid back, 
to their proper places and his eyes got 
far enough apart to let him use his 
spectacles. And the worst of it is that 
tne water is just as bad now as It was- 
when the stuff was first put into it, and 
Mr. Sparks has to carry water from a 
well a mile away, and my daughter 
says It's most distressing to be com- 
pelled to listen to his remarks at such. 
times. 

"I can sympathize with Mr. Sparks, 
for I have suffered at the hands or 
agents, so that whenever I see one at 
the door I feel like a martyr; so yot» 
can see for yourself that I have no use 
for your patent ironing board that may- 
be converted into a calf weancr by 
pressing a knob just back of the rlnk- 
ty-doodle." , . , ^ 

"I am not an agent. " said the strang- 
er- "I just stopped to tell you that your 
cow seems to be choking to death back 
of the house." 



QUEEN OF BULGARIA. 



The queen of Bulgaria was a princess 
of Reuss Kostritz, one of the smaller 
principalities of Germany. She mar- 
ried King Ferdinand when he was only 
a prince, but shortly after Bulgaria de- 
clared herself free and he was pro- 
clalnned king. His first wife was the 
daughter of the duke of Parma, and 
there are four children of that union, 
who now have Queen Eleonore for a 
step-mother. 



DyiiyiTiKi's m^ki 




-• 



-4r 



i— O.- 



<0 «l - 



fr. 



■^ 



-*f 



< 



•«■. 



•| 























1 

* 


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Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15, 1911. 



29 




BULL NEWS 
IN REPORTS 

Estimates on Spring Wheat 

Crop Cause Shorts to 

Ron to Cover. 



AMERICAM 

Opto. 



July — 

Duluth 

Minneapolis -•• 

Chicago 85-% 

Winnipeg S*5V4 

September — 

Oiiluth "8 

Minneapolis . . . 

Chicago 

Winnipeg. Oct.. 

Ntw York 

St. Louis 

Kansas City . . . 

Deoember — 

Minneapolis . . . 

riiicajto 

Winnipeg 

Nf w York 

St. Louis 

Kansas City 
SdutiiwiMtteni 



WHEAT 

High. 



MARKETS, 

Low. 



H7i 
.92% 



% 



88 



.86V4 
.96>4b 

.96«4 

.8SV4 

.92% 

.93<4 

.85 

.83% 



.85% 

.9r.% 

.9414 
.87% 
.90% 
.92% 
.84% 
.83 



JULY 

Close. 

I .98%b 
.95% 
.S(ib 
.96%b 



15. 



1911. 

July 14. 
I .»7%o 
.94%a 
.85% 
.96%b 



.9«Vib 
.95%-%a 

.87%-8Sa 

.91%-»2 

.93% 

.84%-% 

.83% 



95b 



.96% 
.10% 



.96% .96%-%a 

.90% .90%-9l 

.90%-%a .9l%b 

.96%' .95% .96% 

•••. VkS? 89% .88% .88%.-% 

::. .v.»;% .86% .86% .86%-% 

Ml J WUi itpec QUot«tlv)nii furulaiied by U E. Udker k Co. 



% >' 



Market Was Oversold— 
Southwest Weak — Hedg- 
ing Sales Heavy. 



Duluth Board of Trade. July 15.— 
•Wlieat worked upward today after a 
flecllne from the opening. The rally 
Btarted shortly before noon when shorts 
covered and some buying wa.s occa- 
sioned on account of two bullish crop 
reports. July wheat gained Ic to 88%c. 
September advanced %c to 96VgC bid. 
Cash wheat was 2c over September. 
6fptenib«r durum advanced Vic. Oats 
lost 'so to 46ViC. Rye was unchanged. 
Corn declined %c to 65 Vic. Barley was 
Iiol quoted. 

Lanseud wa.s lifeless. July lost Ic to 
42 05 bid. September was unobanged 
at $2 05 bid and October was unchanged 
at $1 iiT bi I. Cash was on a parity with 
July lieports from North Pakota in- 
dicate an improvement In the condition 
of the crop. ^. „„„ 

Foreign linseed quotations were 
lower. Antwerp Plata July-August 
closed at $2.12 V,, %c off; Buenos Ayies 
July lost %c to $2.02 -k. and London- 
Calcutta closed at $2.31%. 1%4C off. 

Foreign quotations generally were 
lower. The scarcity of the spot 
and prospects for light 
ments caused a 
foreign opening, 
across, the water 



July 
.Sept 



July 
Sept 
Oct. 



DULUTH DURUM MARKET 

op 'n. High Low 

.$ .X9 I .89Vib I .»9b 

. .87% .88b .87%b 



Close. 

$ .M^Vib 

.88b 



.96b 

.94% 

.87%b 

.91% 

.92% 

.84% 

.83 



.97%-%a 

.92%-%a 

.91% 

.97% 

.90%-% 

.86% 



July 14. 
.89b 
.87%a 



DULUTH LINSEED MARKET. 



open. 



High. 



1.97b 



Low. 



1.96b 



.'lose. 

O'Vb 

.0.')b 

.97b 



July 

ja.oob 

2.05 b 
1.97b 



14. 



clears. $3.25 $j' 3.45; second clears. $2.25 
©240. I - 

Flax— Receipts, i cafs; year ago. & 
cars, shipments, nope. Demand sttong 
for tlax at lo bel^fv the Duluth July 
contract. Closing price, $2.04. 

Barley— Rev 6ipls, 6 cars, year ago, 
30; Bhipinents, 7. {§t*ady; demand lair 
for either malting of feeding grades; 
prices unchangeij. taoslng range, 75c 

» 

Liverpool Grola* 

U»«n>)ol. July I.-..— <:i<wo. Wheat— S«pt, steady; 
\v 1 MdiiltolM. 7i 5Wil; fi^rfti, e».y; July. Oi 
i<)V»d; Oetolwr. &< JVfcJ; lieconi^-r. ii» SHJ Coin— 
.■>b..l Amfricau mliwl okl, >'A 7 J; iww ABieric*n 
kUa. 3s :tWt; futuwu. finn; .>*epteinl>er. %i 0%^: 

October. Us «i^4J• 

» • 

New York Orain. 

New York. July 15 —Close: Wheat- 
July, 91 %c; Septembor. 93 %c. Corn — 
Spetment, 71 %c. ,, 

THE COPPErTtOCKS. 

The following are the closing quo- 
tations of the copper stocks at Boston 
today, reported by Paine, Webber & 
Co.. 316 West Superior street. 



99%c. 
arrive: 



Duluth close: Wheat— On track: No 1 hard, 
northern. 98%c: No. 2 northern. 9'^ V«:^t''^^S, 
9TV,c; No. 2 nortlern. 94V2-95V2c; July. 98%c 
Durum — On track, to arrive an.l in store: No 
S9Ur bid: .Septemb -r. 880 bid. Lin.seed— On 
$2.05 bid: Septemb. r. $2.05 bid; October. 

^"""ReceVts— Wh..at. 15.635 bu. last year 61.418 bu; oats 
2,740 bu; linseed, 2,3:}7 bu. last year 

Shipments — W leat 
year 88.554 bu. 



On track: No. I 

No. 1 northern. 

bid; September. 96 %c bid. 

1, 89 %c; No. 2. 97V4c; July, 

track and to arrive. $2.05: July. 

$1.97 bid. Oats, 46 %c. Rye, 73-75c. 



2?)0,246 bu. 



year 
7.4»i7 bu. 
last year 



2,205 bu, last year 
163 bu; oats, 4,000 bu, last 



STOCKS— 



X 
9 



article 
world's ahip- 
flrmer tone after Iho 
but later the markets 
weakened in sympa- 
thy with a soft Buenos Ayres market. 
Conditions for the crops In Argentina 
are excellent. More favorable reports 
came from Russia and India. 

American markets opened weak. In 
addition to the bearish foreign outlook 
the weather map was not of specula- 
tive interest to the bulls. The tem- 
peratures In the Northwest are lavor- 
aole. but rain is needed in many places 
to raise the average of the crop In 
localities where moisture would be a 
favorable factor in the flUing of the 
•wheat. 

The Southwestern 
cesslvely weak on 
receii)ts. which are 
ords for this period 
sales in the 
in Chicago 



Duluth 

Chica.go 

Winnipeg . . . . 
Minneapolis 
St. Loula. bu. 
Kansas City . . 



markets were ex- 
account of large 
breaking all rec- 
of July. Hedging 
Southwestern markets ami 
caused a congestion ol 



Last 

Year. 

40 

18 

120 

120 

60,OO«J 

179 

Last 

Year. 

10 

5 



coun- 

11 bu 

were 



\ 



orders on the short side in connection 
vlth the speculative activity of pro- 
fessionals. 

Murket O^eniold. 
The market was oversold and waa in 
a receptive condition for an upturn 
■when two bullish spring wheat re- 
ports were issued, the first by Inglis 
and the second by Snow. Whether they 
can be regarded as accurate is ques- 
tionable. These crop experts are paid 
to see the way their employers want 
them lo. Snow, who is fairly relial>le 
■when given halt' a chance, said that 
the average of winter wheat thrashiii.'; 
is running 15 bu to an acre Indicating 
a cri>p of 4S3.O')0,0O0 bu. In Kansas, 
^rhere some experts predicted 70,000.- 
000 bu and the grain dealers associa- 
tion forecasted 6^,000,000 bu, the yield 
■will run more than 80.000.000 bu. Mis- 
souri and Nebraska are turning out 
good vields. The S'outhwestern mar- 
kets felt tJie effect of this news as 
•well AA the heavy selling from the 
country and large arrivals. The South- 
western markets did not follow the 
upturn in the Nortliwest and at Chi- 
cago. 

The Northwestern markets took the 
leod in th* advance which started 
■bortly before noon. The bulge was 
occa.Hioned by Snow's report that the 
condition of North Dakota wheat as 
of July 10 was 70 per cent and the 
entire spring wheat crop would be 
225.000,000 bu. The report of John 
Inglis was so bullish as to cause con- 
siderable skepticism. He estimated the 
South Dakota yield at 10,000.000 bu In 
which he probably Is about correct. He 
said, however, that North Dakota 
would produce onlv 70.000.000 bu and 
that Minnesota would raise 6O.OOO.O0O 
bu.. a total of 140.000,000 bu tor the 
three states. He declared thrashing 
results would be highly unsatisfactory 
both as to quantity and quality. 

The Northwest got very little rain. 

-The %veather map showed showers In 

•> l*he Devils Lake region and there were 

scattered rains In Western Minnesota. 

The Chicago market followed the 

'*■ Northwest. That marKet was between 

two flres — the bearish situation in the 

Southwest and the bullish activity in 

the Northwest. The market was so 

heavily oversold, that it was easy for 

the bulls to start a buying movement 

thai trightened the snorts to cover. 

The cash situation in the North- 
west was not as strong as yesterday. 
Purcha.-ies were moderate, but tiie de- 
mand was not Insistent. The flour 
trade is fairly steady, although there 
la very little buying for future needs. 
Corn tried to work upward on ac- 
count of bullish reports from the 
South w^est, but in the face of the holi- 
day there was considerable realizing. 
Widespread showers and some fair 
rains in Nebraska caused the market to 
easu oft" at the close. 

Statistics on Monday promise \o be 
moderately bullish. It is expected that 
decreases will be .shown in ijractlcally 
all flgures. 



I .n 

.97*4 

.»IH 

.87 
2.05 



American weather. 1-Ater there was a 
decline of %d on tha cheaper second 
hand offers and free- offers of -\merl- 
can parcels. At the close undertone 
still firm with sell»rs generally re- 
served. ^ ^, 

Russia — In the .southeast the weather 
continues cool with light showers. 

• • • 
Cars of wheat recjlved: 

Today. 
19 

>>•••*••>• 4l3 

186 

1S8 

210,000 

280 

• • • 
Cars of linseed re-'elved: 

Today. 

Duluth 1 

Minneapolis 

Winnipeg «> 

• • • 

Minneapolis wired Blue Earth 
ty reports oats tin ashing out 
per acre where last year 35 bu 
secured. 

• * • 

Cutting of wheat at St. Boniface 
started this mornin,;. This is In Hen- 
nepin county. 

• • • 

Closing wheat ca >les: Berlin wheat 
%c lower. Antweri %c lower. Buda 
pest l%c lower. Liverpool %(^%d 

• • ^ 
Minneapolis put 

asked; calls, 96%c Md. 

• • • 
Forecast: Illinois Missouri. Wlscon- 

.gin. Minnesota. Nebra.ska. Kansas and 
Montana — Fair tonight and Sunday. 
Indiana — Generally fair tonight an.l 
Sunday, preceded b,\ 8ho%vers In north 
portion this morning: moilerate tem- 
perature. Iowa — Fair tonight, slightly 
cooler In northeast portion. Sunday 
fair. North Dakota —Fair tonight and 
Sunday, moderate emperature. South 
Dakota — Fair tonu ht, slightly cool- 
er m extreme wea: portion, Sunday 

fair. 

• • * 

Cars Inspected: No. I northern wheat 

No. 2 northern 1, No. 1 durum 7. No. 

durum 1. winter 2, total wheat 19. last 

linseed 1. ast year 10. Total 

On track 18 



47@47%c to 47%c and sagged to 
46Vi«c. 

Firmness of hogs helped sustain 
provisions. Initial sales were 2%c 
lower to a shade hlghe. with September 



delivery $8.37 Vi 
S.47% for ribs, 
business In pork. 



for lard and $8.45ia 
There was but little 



Ship- 
ments. 

12,000 
12s, 200 
24:".. 800 
481,000 



Off. 



IS — July 94%-%c 



Articles. Receipts. 

Flour, bbl 13,700 

Wheat, bu 531,200 

Corn, bu 130,000 

Oats, bu 185,400 

Rye. bu 2,000 

Barlev. bu 15,000 3.700 

Car lot receipt.^ — WHieat. 445 cars, 
with 409 of contract grade; corn, 103 
cars, with 17 of contract grade, oats, 
115 cars Total receipt.** of wheat at 
Chicago, Minneapolis and Duluth today 
were 522 cars, compared with 332 cars 
last week and 178 -ars the correspond- 
ing day a year ago. 

Cash close: Wheat — No. 2 red. 84 Vi 
^86%c; No. .3 red, 83%'g-85%c; No. 2 
hard 84%(a87%c; No. 3 hard, 83% S^ 
S6-c: No. l~northern, $1.02 rfii $1.06 Vi ; No. 

2 northern. $1.00r»i>$1.03; No. 3 north'^rn. 
92';t>98c; No. 2 spring. 88r.r98c; No 3 
spring. 88@94c; velvet chaff, 86fi^90c; 
durum. 82@88c. Corn — No 2, 66VbWJ 
663^c; No. 2 white, 66%®67c; No. 2 yel- 
low. 66^(g>67c; No. 3, 66(i*66V»c; No. 3 
white. 66%iS'66%c; No. 3 yellow. 66% 
@)67c; No. 4. 65<li>66; No. 4 white. 65 Vi 
^'66c: No. 4 yellow. 65V-i@66c. Oats- 
No 2. 45%c: No. 2 white. 4S(?M8%c; No 

3 white. 47''*47%c; No. 4 white, 46%((i) 
47V4C; standard. 47%({i'48. Rye — No. 2. 
82%® 83c. Barley. 75e'$l,l7. Timothy. 
$10.0bCa'$14.00. Clover. $9.00(S'$15 50 



8. 
2 

year 
cars 



40; 
20. 



Stores 
changes 
Spring 
c'uruni 



of grain Uere yesterday and 
this week in bushels follow; 
wheat, 752,000. decrease. 2S6.0O0: 
64.000. Inert ase 3,000; bonded 
vsheat 81,000, increa.-e 1.000; total wheat 
8'»7 000 decrease 2>' 2.000: corn 308,000, 
oats 475,000. decrease 128,000; lln.seed. 
141,000, increase 7.0 »0. Total grain. 1.- 

821,000. 

• « • 

Primaries— Wheal receipts 1.522,000 
last year 457.000; shipments 491,000, last 
year 800.000; corn today 407, 00 J. 
year 308.000; shlpiients 388.000, 
year 326j000. 

John Inglis wir. d: Counties north 
from 
show 
make 



WhMt 
July ... 
rtept . . . 
Doc .... 
Mait .... 

Com— 
J.ily ... 
sapt . . . 
l>e<: ... 
May . . . 

OatJ— 
July .. 
Sept .. 

r>ec . . . 
M»y . 
Mesa 

'.Sepl .. 
I Jan 

I S.nit . . 

July .. 

1 Jan . . 
I Short 

.S.-PI .. 

' .July . . 

J;in 



Open 

.83H-»« 

.90H-71 
.9i% 



.«-iH 
.67 k 
.64\ 

.63%- 



CT 



High 
.»lVi 

.65H 

.65 
.67 



last 
last 



... .MV4 


.««m 


... .♦7^-V4 


.47^4 


... .<■) 


.49 


... .'.m H 


.r,i>4 


Pork, per l»t)l 


— 


...15.85 


l«.0?\4 


. ..IJ.M 


ii.t;o 


p«: l.>0 lb— 




. .. 8.:?-)-:57H 


8.17H 


... ».n\i 


%.a% 


... ».37^ 


« J.) 


Ribs, per 10( 


ii>— 


... g.^-*?^ 


S.4.'.-47H 


... 8.:w 


8.:!2V4 


... 8.10 


8.10 



.87^ 
.9H4 
.Ct% 
.ti4 

.ctm 

.4B% 
.46 
.47%- 
.50 



48 



Cl»»« 
.»« 

.87% -88 
.•>t%-l>l 
.»M«-''« 

.%■% 

.4ii>4 

.48-^ 

.50 



M 



l(S.O 
15.5 



!K 



32S-3S 

3TV4 

:ia 

OiH-05 



8 3'i 

8.-i7H 
8.iU 

8 45-17 

8.06 



Corn and Wheat Bulletin. 

houra iiiJliig »t 8 It m.. .Situr 



Algoiiiah I 

Amalgamated Copper.. | 

.Vdventure - . . . 

Aiimeek 

Allouez 

American Telephone. . . 

American Zinc 

Arcadian 

Arizona Commercial . . . 

Buite-Ballaklava 

Boston Corbin 

Butte Coalition 

Calumet & Arizona.... 

Calumet & Hecla 

Centennial 

Cons. Mercur 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

Davis Daly • 

East Butte • 

Franklin 

First National 

Giroux 

Granby 

Green Cananea 

Hancock Cons 

Helvetia 

Indiana 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

Lake Copper 

Li> Salle 

Mass. Cons 

.Mus.s. Gas 

Miami Copper 

Mi< higan 

Mohawk 

Nevada Cons 

Nevada Utah 

North Lake 

Nlplssing 

North Butte 

Ojibway 

Oil Dominion 

OscMoia 

Parrot 

Pneumatic Service . . . 

Qniiic>% 

Ray Cons 

.Santa Fe 

Shannon 

Shuttuek 

Shoe Machinery 

Superior Boston 

.Superior Corbin 

Tamarack 

Trinity 

United Fruit 

U. S. Mining 

U. S. Mining pfd 

Ut.T,h Apex 

Utah Cons 

Virginia Chemical . . . 

Victoria 

Winona ' 

Wolverine • 

Wyandot 

Yukon Gold 

Bohemia 

Begole i 

Boston Ely 

(Jactus 

("hemung 

Cliff 

Chief Consolidated . . 

Chlno 

Corbin Copper 

Goldfield Consolidated 

Inspiration 

La Rose 

Live Oak 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco 

Ray Central 

.South Lake 

Tonopah Nevada .... 



Bid. I Asked. 



9Vi 



DULLNESS 
INSrOCKS 

Demand Unusually Light and 

Few Brokers on the 

Floor. 



PW dto. 



.ir 



Kgss, fnsb, carton*, 
PKANIJTS— _ 

Faiic;, raw, per Its by the sack. .....••• JJ 

roasted, tacks, par lb • 

roaste<l. teas Itian sacks.... 

peanuts. SO-lb palls 

peuuuts. 10-lb sacks 

Juiuuoa. roaaled. l>*f lb......... .•••..• 

Jumbos, taw. pM lb «.«•••• ••• 



Fancy. 

Fallen. 
Salted 
Salted 
Fauc; 
Kane J 



•7H 
.08 
S.7i 

1.40 
.10 

.0«H 



SO-lb box. per lb. 



.•**•••.••••■*.••*•.* 



8 '-'a 
60% 

6 

195 

29 

138 

28 

15 9i 
4V4 
14 

18 Vi 
57^4 
450 

nv4 

4c 
60 

h\ 
89 

13% 

ll^V* 

15-16 

6% 
39 

7 
28 

1 
13Vi 
16Va 

2** 
37 

3V4 

8 
94 
21V* 

2^ 
45 
19 
71 

7% 

9^4 

32 

' "47vi 

100 

12 7* 

4\ 

73 "4 

17 V* 

IMi 

10»4 

Iti 

51 V4 

5 
31% 
34 

4 
195 V4 
38% 
48Mi 

2% 
17 
57V^ 

l\ 

8 
110 

1% 

2.% 
3% 

1% 
10c 



sale 



6Vb 



30 Va 

13»V» 

28V3 

•i% 

16 

4% 
15 
19 
58 
455 
12V4 
7c 
60 Vi 
6V!, 
95 
14 

12% 
1 7-16 
6 9-16 



Shading of Prices in Specula- 
tive Leaders in Second 
Hour. 



Zl'a. 



.91.10(8 



s ••■ ■ • • • 



lb. 
5-lb 



4.00O4.50 
2.3d 



.17 
.15 
.14 
.13 
.20 
.14 
.S9 



now. 



car- 



Fur tlip twcMly-(yur 
dAy. July 13; 



STATIONS. 







Cash 


Sales 


.Saturday 


No 


1 


nortliem 


i 


rars. 




^J. 


1 


northern 


1.600. ti a 


rrita 


No. 


L 


n.irtliern 


. 1. 


500, to 


amw 


B<H>di.-d wlieat. 


1 


car 




No. 


l 


U'lPim. 


1 CU.' 




«•. 


3 


ilunmi. 


2-3 


car 




Ifo. 


1 


iiiLied. 


1-3 


car 


............^ 



-■Ir 



1 

-« 

1 


m 


% 




■ 




■ 




\ 



MARKET GOSSIP 



Broombiill cabled from Liverpool; At 
the opening the market wa.s eas>% Va U) 
%d lower as a result of the weakness 
in American but this was offset to 
some extent by the scarcity of con- 
tract and there was some covering by 
shorts on the expectations of light 
world's ahlpments this week. During 
the morning the market again turnc' 
weak c nd declined a further' V^d on 
the heavy American movement and 
primary points and the fact that sam- 
ples of new spring wheat are reported 
at Minneapolis of excellent auallty. 
Buenos Ayres closed weak under con- 
tinued favorable weather and crop ac- 
counts with reports from Itussla that 
favorable and also India. Spot mar- 
kets were heavy. Just before the 
clo=>e th*>re was some steadiness with a 
disposition to cover over the week-end 
but at this time, prices were %'&'%ii 
lower tiian yesterday. 

Corn — Corn opened higher on the 
firmness in America and unfavorable 



Counties 
Fargo bordeilng on Red river 
good wheat, but average will 
only a mod. rale crop. Barnes- 
vllle east through otter Tall, Douglass, 
Todd and Stearns c >unties general con- 
dition poor. Whitening up before per- 
fect maturitv. cutting commenced. 
There will be disappointment after 
thrasiiing with yields and quality. Oats 
a light crop. Co;n tasselling. .Still 
maintains good healthy appearance. 

• a • 

Kansas Citv wirni: "Corn condition 
in the Southwe.'<t steadily getting 
worse. The sensat onal features of the 
heat have not be-n in evidence this 
week, but there h is not been enough 
rain to maintain seasonable growth. 
None of the damage already done has 
been repaired. Tie chances for im- 
provement are beli g cut off rapidly as 
the time passes wi hout sufficient rain. 
Many farmers kej.t up hope for Im- 
provement, but no V the opinion Is be- 
coming widespread that the outlook 
is worse than at irst admitted. 

• • • 

B W Snow wir'd: "Stiow's special 
returns under date of July 10, covering 
every Important wheat district in the 
country, shows winter wheat thrashing 
well advanced un ler Ideal conditioiis 
of weather for hat vest work Thrash- 
ing deals are ma erlally above the 
harvest expectations and the .iijality or 
.sample is exceptl mally good. The 
average rate of yield developed by 
thrashing to date Is 15.2 bu, making 
total crop of 483,0('0.000 The yields in 
Missouri, Kansas und Nebraska are^ es- 
pecially large. Ksnsas showing above 
' - ^ • •-- a state crop of over 
condition of spring 
;llne of .seven points 
standing at 69 and 
of 24 4,000,000 bu on 
figuring or one of 
the new government 
principal decline Is 
in North Dakota, where conditions 
dropped from 90 to 70, the result of a 
better appreciation of the damage In- 
dicted by the hot weather by the end 
of June. 



IStmte of 
[weiibec 



Temperature 



a 
i 

s 



a 
a 



Italii 
faa 



7Vi 
28V^ 

1^ 
14 

17 Vi 

3 
38 

4 

8V^ 
94V^ 
21VS. 

2Vi 
46 
19Vi 
76 

8V4 

9TJ, 
32Vi 

6 
48 Vi 
102 
12% 

5 
74 
17% 

1% 
11 
17 V4 

51^4 
5^8 

32Vk 
37 
4M, 
197 
39 
48=^ 
3 

17'/4 

sale 
2 

8Vi 
113 
l=Vi 

4V4 

4 
12c 



New York, July 15. — The demand for 
stocks was unusually light In the 
early trading today, although the mar- 
ket held firm. Southern Pacific. Chesa- 
peake & Ohio. Missouri Pacific. Vir- 
ginia-Carolina Chemical and Western 
Union made slight fractional gains. 

Slight Interest was taken in the mar- 
ket and the attendance on the floor 
and in commission houses was slim. 
Fluctuations in the representative 
stocks were without significance. St 
Louis and San Francisco preferred and 
Western Union were pushed up 1 and 
Texas company 2Vi. 

The market closed steady. The list 
dragged Its slow length along In the 
second hour with some shading of 
prices in the speculative leaders, Union 
Pacific and Heading selling lower, but 
changes were insignificant, except for 
a 1 point rise in Interborough-Metro- 
politan preferred. 

(arolshad The Herald 



N>w Tork stock quotaUuns. 
by Piper, Jahiison ft Case: 



HTOCKH— 



I Open. I Blgli. I Low. | Clo^ta. 



Amalgamated 

Aniei Iran Smelten 

A T. & T 

A(<;liUou 

Ualtimore & Otilo 

P.roklyii Rapid Triturit. . 
('Iiei^pdake & Olilx.... 

«' . M ik St Paul 

I\in.t<ila4i Pacific 

ItlsUlIen 

Krie U\ pfd 

Crrat NorUiorn 

^|lu<^irHle & NashrUla 

Mis.ymrl Pacific 

New York Ceiiiral 

Nortiiern Pacilic 

IVciiwylraiiU 

ttei>ulill<- .Slael ft Iron pfd. 

Il»> k U'.atid 

Iloadliig 

s.iiitlicm Railway . . . 

Souttieni Pacific .... 

ITnlrjn I'a.-lflc 

t'ltlied .Stales Steel . 
do pfd 

WalinAh pfd 

Wr.si.Tii Union 



<ai%, 






68% 


BO 


80 


79% 


79% 


i:(«V4 






138% 


112% 


112% 


112% 


112% 


109\ 


ioa% 


100% 


1U-J% 


8314 


88% 


83% 


83% 


81% 


82% 


81% 


82% 


12li%| 


126% 


126% 


12(3% 


21 tW 


242 


241% 


242 


acTi 






su% 


53% 


58% 


58% 


08% 


134% 


135 


134% 


135 


15lVk 






154% 


49% 


49% 


49 


49 


108% 






108% 


131% 






131% 


l-.!i% 


125 


124% 


125 


93% 






.)3% 


31% 






31% 


157% 


157% 


i57 


15T% 


32% 






32% 


122% 


ii2% 


122 


122 


188 


188 


187% 


187% 


7» 


79 


78% 


78% 


118% 






118% 


35% 






35% 


81% 


82 


81% 


! 81% 



MAPLE STRUP— 
Vermont, per gal... 

UAPLK SUUAH— 
Io»a, asaorteU pkcs.. 

PUP i;ouN— 
SnowbaU pop com. 40-pkg. box 
Santa Claus pop com, caaa. .... 

Pup coru. on tlta cob •••« 

Pop com, sbelled 

HONEY— 
WUi ^tisln whlu cloTsr. per caae. 

CaBUAOIv— 
TeuIle^se« cabbaga. craU 

POTATOES— 
MliiQesoia. pat bu ••..• 

New, bu 

ONIONS— 
Esyptluii, sack 
Ttxas. crata ,.••».••.••.••..•■••••••••••■••• 

Wainuia. new, Callfomla. 110-lb sack, per lb 

Filberts. HtcUy, per lb 

Utijsli. extra Urge, per lb 

Pccaus. exua faucy poliabed, per lb 

.Umouda, Taragaida. per lb 

Mixed nuU. 100-lb and 50-lb boxes, lb, 
Cocoanuu, per doi. 
New luckorj nuu. large or saiaU. vat 
ftc»u». lialves, slielleO. exira laacy, 

\.uiii. per lb 

Waiuuis. aheUed. extra fancy, 5-lb cartuos. 

CliKilnuu. per lb ;• i:' " L' '': ' \i.' 

Aimouds. abelled. extra fancy. 5-lb cartona, lb. 
UATES ANU rlUS— 

lUUuwl dales. 70-lb boxes, new 

UtUowl dates. 30 packagea, per box 

iard dates. 12-lb boxus, ucw 

Sugar waluut dates, tf-lb boxes 

Ne* CalUuiuia ligi. iZ-pkg. box. per box 

New Stuitua flga. a-crowu. 20-lb box. per box. 
New bmyru* figs, 7-cruwa. 100-lb box. per 

box /■ ■ 

New Smjrua fli»»- a-crown. 10-lb. par box.... 

tUE^iH VEGETAi;UiS— 
Qrada. craia .................. ..•..•...^•"O^ 

Mmt, doz ....... 

Carrots, box 

Kgg piaiit, crate . 
U>sier plant, dox 

Pep^effs, baaket •......•■..*••.«•..*.•• 

Head letluco. bamper 

Lettuce, leaf, doz 

Deans, wax. pet box • •«»• 

Parsley, boua grown, per doi.. •.........•*•• 

Uiecii oiilous. doi 

Cauliflower. California, per crata ii'^i 

Spmacli, box • :-™® 

Round radishes botbouae. large buucbea. 

^ox •« 

Hoibouse cucumbeta, par <tos • 

Ttxaa cucumtjers crate ••...... 

New Orleans cucumriers. doi..... • 

Celery. Callfomla, pet buncb. .•.•*.•«••..•... 

Celery, Florida, ctal« • 

fcadi»e. New Otleaiu. pet bbl 

New beats, per dos. ........ ......*•*•*.......« 

New carrots, per doa.. ................ ....•..* 

A^iparatfua. doa ,.....••........••..........•• 

Asparagus, case ..•.•.•••...•.•...••.....•..•« 

UarHC, pound ..••.•••••••.••••••••••••••••••" 

ROOTIS— 

Table T>e3l*, pct cwt •.••......•..... 

Uurse ladlsU, tool, pet bbl • 

Uurfcs raUdlali- SMt lb. ..•..*.••.... .**••*•«••« 

MISCEIXAN hJU lib— 
UuuiM. uavy. per bu. ........................ • 

kit:aus. browu. per bu ........*.••........ 

trult baskets, per liuudi«a 
MEATS— 



1.73 
.10 

s.so 

1.T5 
..«3H 
.M% 

«.as 

4.iM 

1.2s 
l.St 



••••••••• 






•••••«■• 



» »• • • ••■ 



• • •••••• 



•••••••••••••■a 



.5* 

.48 

.10 
.4S 

4.M 

%.1A 
1.40 
1.3S 
1.00 
2.fS 

.14.50 
l.UO 

I.3O 

.40 

1.60 

S.SiO 

.Vi 

.»(! 

S.76 

.80 

a.iis 

.«» 

.12% 

2.25 
.&• 

.IB 
1.25 
l.TS 
1.00 
1.10 
3.75 
0.60 
.T9 
.75 
1.15 

a. 25 

.15 

2.00 

,10.50 
.15 

1.60 

0.75 
1.00 



before entering the water. Into which 
the men waded up to their necks. As 
soon as their feet came In cotnact with 
any of the shellfish, which seemed to 
lie in beds, the fishermen loosened 
tbem as well as they could from the 
muddy bottom of the creek and then 
brought up the "take" In a grasp net. 
The men were eminently successful 
during the short time we stopped to 
watch them and piled up a big catcb 
on the fore-shore. 

Another sight which interested ua 
was a novel way of fishing. Two small 
boats were moving parallel with one 
another about thirty feet apart. The 
ends of a line about sixty feet long to 
which small, unbaited hooks were at- 
tached about fouf Inches apart to two 
sticks were held respectively by a man 
in each boat. As the .boats moved 
slowly along, first oner man and then 
the other would give his stick a jerk. 
Immediately that the hftoks struck 
anything the line was gradually 
hauled in and Invariably with success. 
We certainly saw fish struck four out 
of five times, many of thetn running 
apparently from a half pound to two 
or more pounds. It may be that China 
Is the only place in the world where 
fish are caught with unbaited hooks. 

The third Incident we wltne.ssed oc- 
curred at the well known Shapa, or 
lower barrier. A native shooter had his 
glngal with him — a most uncanny 
looking weapon. That there should be 
no question as to Its length, it was 
placed upright alongside myself and 
towered above my head two feet two 
Inches (measured), which would make 
the piece of ordnance over eight feet 
In length. 

We foreigners sometimes growl at 
the CV4 to 7Vb i>ounds our guns usually 
weigh. Fancy having to carry a 
twenty-four pounder which was what 
this man did all day long and for every 
day In the week. 

lie was accompanied by a ."miall. 
weird looking anitnal. a most in|>re- 
senlable little wonk. on whom he laid 
great store. Curiosity impelled us to 
look at man and dog at work, and 
what we saw made such an impres- 
sion upon us that we thought some 
little record of it might Interest 
others. 

A hen pheasant happened to drop 
into a furrowed field at feeding time. 
The native took her bearings, crept 
up as closely as he safely could, de- 
posited his gun on a bit of higher 
ground and kept It trained on the 
bird. Meantime the dog lay down 
across the barrel of the gun as a 
screen for his master. The psohologl- 
cal moment arrived the gun was fired, 
the bird was killed upon the ground 
and the dog remained on the barrel 
until his master took the guh up to 
reload It. 



•««•• ••••• 



*•••••> 



Duluth Securities. 



9()c 

1 
23 Vi 

4 

5V4 

8% 

3Ti, 
20 Vi 

1% 

2Vi 

ITi 
8 
11-16 



9r.c 

1 1-16 

4V^ 

8\ 

4 
20V4 

TV, 
11-lC 

2V4 

2 

8V«i 
13-16 



SKCURITIES— UBld lAsked 


Flfsi National Bank 


400 




Atuerkau Excbange National Bank 


SS5 


..... 


City National Bank 


130 





Nortberu National Bank 


130 




St. Louis County Bank 


ZOO 




«Vcstero Stats Bank 


140 




Uulutu-Supertot nacuon Co 


77 


ii 


do pfd 


83% 


04 


UulutU Street Ballway, 1st g. Sa SO U. ft 






N. A 


•S 


101 


Duluth Edison Kleotrlc, Ist g. a. t. to 






March, 1831, ap. U. ft S. A 


08 


101 


Great Northern Power Co. bonds 


80 





American CarboUe, par fl 


2,85 


S.3I 


Zenith Furnaca Co 


85 


101 



•••••.. 



.••..•a.... 



.Vltixxiiilrla .... 

Campbell 

( 'rook.4t on 

l>etnilt City . . 

HaUud 

M'Mitt.'Vldeo 

.New Ulni 

Park ItaplJs . , 

RiK-hfiter 

Wl:iuob»<o City 
Wottliliiglun :. 

.Vnienla 

li'jtlliieau 

Uk'kiiisun 

tiraflim 

Liiig'lun 

Larliuoro 

I..i.ilx>ii 

Mliiot 

Naix)u-on 

Prmbbia 

Wahpeton 



Clear) 

Clear) 

Cloudy] 

Clear) 

Cloudy) 

Clear) 

Clear) 

. .Pt. Cloudy) 

Clear 

Clear] 

Clear) 

..Pi. Cloudy) 

Cloudy! 

Clearl 

Cloudy) 

Cloudy) 

. .Pt. Cloudy 

Cloar 

Clear 

Clear 

Cloudy 

Clear 



Aberdeen <-"'«»«■ 

.M'.UI>iink iiUAT\ 

Mi'.ilmU l'le<»n 



Pollo.-k 

Uetirwid 

sioix Kails 
Watertown 
Yinkton .... 
(H^aniark 
1 Devils Lake 

lHjUjth 

iHlir'n 

ILrii Croaaa . 
Mlnne.ipolla . 
tMiothesd 

tPlerre 

J.St Paul ... 
Wlnnii»eg . . . 



15 bu and making 
80,000,000 bu. Th. 
wheat shows a de 
since July 1. now 
indicating a crop 
the old method o' 
2.^5.000,000 on 
method The 



,Pt. Cloudy 

Clear 

Clear 

Clear 

...Pt. CUmily 

Clrar 

Cloudy 

,..Pt. Cloudy 

Clear 

. ..Pt. Clouily) 
...Pt. Cloudy) 

Cloudy) 

Clear) 

. ..Pt. Cloudy) 
Cloudy) 



82 
81 

80 

8)i 

82 

88 

i)8 

8U 

86 

*l 

1*0 

'Jii 

82 

90 

80 

78 

80 

83 

86 

WI 

78 

81 

88 

8^ 

88 

W 

88 

88 

88 

88 

8t> 

82 

70 

90 

84 
84 
90 
84 

78 



5( 

50 

54 

58 

54 

58 

58 

5« 

54 

5t> 

54 

52 

50 

46 

50 

50 

56 

48 

54 

44 

56 

48 

52 

54 

54 

44 

42 

56 

52 

62 

50 

54 

61 

54 

60 

62 

54 

58 

62 

58 







.12 

.04 

.10 



.01 




.00 

(1 

.OS 


.02 
•10 
.06 






.02 












.34 






.06 














.04 




Ni^w Tork. July I'l.— Bni.Litrecfs bank rlojri-.ins 
report for the w-ck .-ndlng July li show.n an aga-T- 
rfato of $3.047. 17';. MO as agalii.^t $3,142.1;H5.«00 U-it 
»re«.k .iiid tJ.O'JO.'Jii.ono in the oirrwiM.iidlng wnk 
1a« year. Tlie following U a list of the citim: 

_ - • •'''" 



RK.M VHKS— Hot weather prev.illed orer Kentucky. 
Indiana. Mtaouri. Kansas. Weeleni Iowa. Eaateru 
Nebraska and South Dakota. Showers fell o?er Michi- 
gan Iowa Northern North DakoU. MaiUtoba auj 
p-irtlons of Nebraska. U. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local t'oreoaster. 



Nf'T York .... 

Chvigo 

Itostoti 

PhtladWphU . 
St. Louis .... 
Kansas City . 

Pittsburg 

Siti Kr.inctsco 
Itiiltimore .... 

I'ltn-lllllAtl ... 

MtiiiitijpolU 
r'.evolaud .... 
Nt*w Orleans 

Detroit 

Omaha 

Lus .\iigelea . 

tinu'svllla 

Mlhr.iukae ... 

.Si-attlf 

St Pi'il 

Atlanta 
P,>rtUnd. 

Buffalo 

Donver 

Washington. l>. C... 

Slit Laki City 

Tacoina 

.Spokane 

I»os Mo'nea 

Duluth 

.>»loux city 

(;r»nr| Raptda 

Davenport 

rvalani.i/.o<>. Mii'h .... 
Ctxlar Rapids. luwa .. 
Sioux Kalis. S. O.... 

IleliNia 

Kargo. N. D 

tHouston 

;ijalveston 

t— .Not IncluJed In 
Items than clearln«i. 



....Ml, 



;;/t 



Or 



CHICAGO MARKET. 

Wheat Tone Steadies on Denial of 
Bank Loan Calls. 

Chicago. July li.— Denials that there 
had been any 



A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD-LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 



Special attention glTen to 
trralna. We give all shipments our 
personal attention. 



OVLUTH. 



MINlfKAPOU*. 



calling of bank loans 
give tht wheat market today 
tone. In de<nded contra.st 
prevlou4 ae-SBion, trade was 
Most of the outside news 
bearl-sh cast, and led to" some 
everv a Ivance Ideal weath- 
Northwest knd heavy receipts here 
lormed the principal fntluence aga nst 
the bulls. The opening ^a^ ^^^f*^, 
!ower to ^c up. September stai^ted at 
,S7So to SSc, the »ame as last n/Kht to 
a, e higher, fell ba :k to ST^bc and rallied 
to xT^^^c. 

Subsequently 



tended to 
a steady 
with the 
not large 
had a 
.selling on 
er 



T— Indicate* tnapprectabie ralnfaU. • — Maximum for 
yesterday. •— Minluium for twenty-four boun, endln« 
8 a. m. T5th meridian time. 1— Minimum lempel- 
alure for 12-hour period fndlnf at 8 a. m. 

j^QXK The averuga mailwum and minimum tern- 

naratures are made up at each cenur from the actual 
number of repoiU revetted, and the a»era«e rainfall 
from the number of staflotu reporting .1 Inch or 
more. Tha -state of weather" U Ujat prefaUlug at 
time of obsdrralloo. 



737,335.000 

2r:i,'>Tr,ooo 

Ki.TlO. 100 
14<.2:i2.0O0 
7S.443,00'r 
82.<i67.oao 
SO.IH'.OO") 
50.82-..i)00 
5'8.ill.)il0 
J7,)'J2.OO0 
17.521.000 
2.1,316.1100 
17,70!).OO0 
20.774.000 
14.417.iJ-» 
20,176.1.011 
n.'rti4.oon 

11.277.0110 

13. 179.000 

Ifl.nilt.OOO 

ll.o.-|7.onO 

11.408.000 

10.757.000 

8.286.000 

T, 272,0110 

6. 86;, 000 

4.199.000 

4.666.000 

4.17i>..)00 

».1)20.')00 

2.4»2.0O<) 

2.875.000 

1,256.0011 

625,000 

1.634.000 

739,000 

1.019,000 

4:10.000 

2.1.i«li.000 

11.247.000 



.8 

6.3 

13.4 

'7.1 

17.0 

1.4 



Ci-ot. 

l»ec 
3.5 
1.5 
5.7 



S.4 



11.7 
.2 

24!6 

16.0 

7.1 

3.7 

irs 

3.2 
3.4 



7.1 

13.3 

"i'.-l 
3^3 

22!5 



14. 
4 



Cotton Market. 

New York, July 15. — The cotton mar- 
ket opened steady at an advance of 't 
points on July, but generally unchang- 
ed to 6 points lower in response to 
lower cables than due, unfavorable 
trade reports and continued rains in 
the .Southeast. Offers were not very 
heavy, however, and the market 
steadied up alter the opening on cov- 
ering of shorts and a little trade buy- 
ing, which again developed around 
12.75 for the next crop months. Busi- 
ness was quiet during the middle of 
the morning and prices ruled about 3 
points higher to 3 points lower, or 
some 3 to 4 points up from tlie lowest 
on the new crop months. 

Futures closed steady; bids: July. 
14.06; August, 13.06; .September, 13.01; 
October, 12.81: November. 12.77; Decem- 
ber, 12.78; January. 12.76; March, 12.82; 
May. 12.90. 

Spot closed quiet, 5 points higher; 
middling uplands 14.3; middling gulf, 
14.55. No sales. 



ilpuf. pet lb. ........•••.*•.*••• •«••« 

Mutton, pet lb 

Pork loiua. per lb. ...... .•*.•••....< 

Veal, per lb .....•••••..•.....• 

Lamb, per Id. •.•.........«...•■•••< 

Laid, per lb ' 

DRli«i»LI> POULTRY— 
lieus. laucy, fat, par lb.. 

2>prlug8, per lb 1 

Durks, per lb 

Geeae. pet lb. •,...«.•... 
Ileus, per lb 

UVK POULTRY— 

Ileus, per lb •. 

tjmail Ueus, per lb 

6pflnss. per lb ••••• 

KISU— 

Tiwui, Lake Superior, fresh 

WhtteflsU, fresh 

Pike, fresh ...........••■. 

Pickerel frozen . 

Salmon 

Halibut 

bmoked wblteflsh 

Smoked Chinook bslmon 

Kresh fruieu mackerel, each. 

Hoe shad, eadi ..- 

Khad, roe, per pair.. 

Steak, cod. per lb 

bcaliups. per gai 

UAY AND straw- 
No. 1 tlmothi nay. per ton....... 

No. 2 timothy bay, per ton 

No. 1 mixed timothy hay. per ton.. 
No. 2 mixed Uuiothy hay. per ton. . 

No 1 upland hay. per ton 

No. 2 upland nay. per ton 

No. 1 midland hay. per ton 

No. 2 midland hay. par ton 

iRya Btraw. per ton 
Oat atraw. per ton 



..089 

..urn 



»*•••••••••• 



..209 

. .20(# 
,.ll#(tf 
,.15tf 



••••••••»••••■•«■•• 



■*••••«• 



••••■•••••• 



•••••••••«•• 



■••*••••••• 






■••••••••••«« 



»•••••••• 



.10 

.10. 

.12 
.10 

.13 

.00 

.23 
.23 
.22 
.16 
.10 

.15 h 
.17 

.u 

.13 

.12 

.12H 

.06 

.11 

.13 

.10 

.11 

.85 
1.2s 

.33 

.12^ 
l.»0 



A HUGE EARTH DAM. 

Popular Mechanics: The big Belle 
Fourche irrigation dam in South Da- 
kota, which is the largest earth em- 
bankment in the world, is nearing com- 
idetion. Construction of the project 
was authorized by congress on May 10, 
1904, at a cost of $5,000,000. 

From an engineering standpoint the 
Helle Fourche project is one of the 
most Interesting which the government 
has yet undertaken. Its principal 
structure is the earthen dam. 
wonderful dike, which closes the 
est depressions in the rim of a 
ural basin. Is 6.200 feet long, 
wide on top and 115 feet high 
highest place. . . . 

The Inside face of this structure, 
which has a slope of 2 to 1, will be 
protected from wave and ice action by 
two feet of .screened Rravd. on which 
will be placed concrete blocks, each 
four by six feet and eight inches thick. 
The cubical contents of this dike will 
be 42,700,000 cubic feet, or about half 
of the famous pyramid of Cheops. The 
reservoir created by this dam will cover 
about 9,000 acres, and will be the larg- 
est lake in the state. 



This 
low- 
nat- 
^0 feet 
In the 



...918.00@$19.00 
... 16.00CS 17.00 
... 15.00(» 
... lO.OOtd 
... U.W& 
... lO.OOlS 
... 12.00® 
... 8.00® 
... 6.50(g) 

... e.ooa 



16.00 

12.00 

15.00 
12.00 
14.00 
10.00 
7.00 
0.60 



LEGAL TWISTS. 
Los Angeles Times: Attorney Gen- 
eral Wlckersham was talking at the 
Lawyers" club in New York about 
some of the absurd defenses 
set up in 
Involved 



cases wherein rich 



that 
men 



are 
aro 



2.6 



10.3 



9.7 
1.8 

J7!i 
7.1 

ioie 

13.3 

.1 

34^2 

is .6 
2.2 



totaU because coouiniiif other 



STATEMENT OF 
NEW YORK BANKS 



Chlcaso Llventock. 

Chlrago, July 1',. —Cattle— Ittteipt.s esliinated at ."00; 
ni.irkct steady; l>eevps. H.ATi^nl.m. Texas steers. 34.60 
ta«.10; western stoeri. $4.75(«f6.'»; stockcm an<l feed- 
ers, $:i.00<3'5. 10; cows and helfen, $2.25(S!3.7"): caivM, 
$5 00147.25. Hog.H— Rec«»ipta eHtlm.tlerl at 9.000; mar- 
ket att*ady at ye3t.or<lay's l)«*t figures: light. $6.33':'* 
i?.80; nUxed. $<> 30(3t5.80; heavy. |6.10i'?0.80; rough, 
%f<.VU-»(iM: g'lod to choice hesvy, $6.3j(«6 80: ptgn. 
$'..50r'r6.4ii; liulk of salos. $G.50«i'«.70. Sheep— lle- 
'-iilpl.H .■iUmaitsI at 6.000; market steady, native. li.'iJ 
(.«4<;5; wostem, $3.0(i/.i»1.7o; yearlings. $1.40@5.5O; 
limlM, natire, $4.00*7.10: western, $4.50(ff7.OO. 



New York. 

New York. July l5.-»utter-,<?teady; rerelpU, 
6 6Sa; creamery specials. 23 %r; ratras, 24 Vic; fhsts, 
22 Vital 23 Vao; second-s, 20Vi(iy22c; thlrtU, 19«i20c; 
sUle dairy. flne.<t. 2;iVi(*24c; good to prime. 21(a23c. 
common to fair, 18(320c; pn>cess special. 21 Vt; 
eiuas. 21; fireU, 19Vi@20>ic; seconds, 17'«(!l8c; 
factory current make, firsts, lilVic; setonds, 18V4W 
19c Cheaee— Steady; receipts, 2,166; weekly cr- 
poru. 900 lx>xos; nuw. sUte, whole milk, special. 12c; 
do small, colored, average, fancy, ll%ic; do, large. 
lolored, average, fancy, 12Vic; do, small, white. 
Hveruge. fancy. 11 Vic; do, large, white, average fancy, 
llV*c; lower grades, colored. 9ViOnllV4c; U.wrr 
(,ra.let. white. OVsCsU^c; daUlm, best. 12%c; new 
skinis, special, OVic; average, famy 8\4&8V4c; fair 
to goo.1. 5Vi«?7V4c; common, 3Vift^4Vic; hard. 2Vi0 
2^c old stale, whole mUk. fancy, colored, 13<,<tl3%c, 
do white. 12(»i:ic; do, lower grade.s, colored, U@ 
I'Vic do lower grades, white, lU<»il2V4c. Kggs— 
.Steady- recolpU, 10,474; fresli gatherwl. extras, 20(»> 
23c- extra flrsU, l7(«18Vic; flrau. ISc^iec; seconds, 
ISVtfr'HVsc; tliir<l4 to poorer, ll(?13c; verj- poor, 8W' 
lie- fre.sh galhere.1, dirties. No. 1, ll(ol2c; No. 2. 
10c- dirtiea. poor to fair, 6(3 9c; fresh gaUiere.1. 
checks good lo prime. Si" l$c; poor to fair. case. $1.50 
in i 25 slate, Penn.sylvaiila and nearby heiineo', white. 
ri(>Vi.l<--- do, g,Atlier..l. white. 20(g24c; do. henneiy, 
brown 21(3'23c; western gaUierod. whites, 17(920c. 



Midvrar Horse Market. 

MlnnMota Transler, .St. I'.iu: .Minn.. July in.— Bar- 
rett & Zimmerman report: Market extremely quiet 
With slow clearance in all cla.wc*. .'<lilpments mida 
to Madlton iWid Asliland. WTs.; Duluth, Minn 



Chleaso. 

Clilcago. July 15.— BuUcr— tlecoipts, 17,039 tula, no 
market Kggs — No market, rei-elpU, 9,764 ca-ses. 
(.l,e<.jo— ,stea.l} ; daisies. 13(al3Vic; twins, 12C<^'12Vs,c; 
yoiMg Ameri.-aH, 13V4(al3Vic; long Ix.rns, i;t*»(<il4c. 
Potal')e.>i— Kasy; choice to fancy, barreled. $4.7j®j..tO 
Poultry — live, uuiettled; turkej-s, 
aprhigs. 15c. Veal— Steady; 50 to 
00 to 85 lb wis.. 9Vif«rlOVic: 85 to 



'.Such defenses seem to indicate," he 
said "that some lawyers deem the 
public as Ignorant of common law and 
common sense as Calhoun White was. 

"Calhoun White was a Southern 
lawyer, and once. In a case in a South 
Carolina court, he made frequent ref- 
erences to 'de ex-facto-posthole" law. 

"The judge, with a quiet smile, at 
last set him right. 

•"You mean, Mr. White," he said, 
'the ex-post-facto law.' . . „ 

'But Calhoun White drew himself 
up with dignity. ^ ,^ . ,. 

" 'Ah begs pawdon ob de Co t, ne 
said in a pitying voice, 'but Yo 
Honah sartinly am lame on dat ar 
term. Why, gents, hit am dat law 
wot perhlblts a man from dlggln de 
hole arter de post am set." " 



12c; fowls, 13c; 
60 Ih wts.. 8(<<9c; 
110 lb wts.. lie. 



Drafteni. extra 

DrafU'rs. choice 

Drafters, common f) good 

Fanu mares and horses, extra... 
Karm mares and liori4e8, choice., 
Kami horsea. common to good . . 

Dellvry 

Oriters and saddlers 

Mule.i, aaiordliig to sixe 



. .$190(»2n 
120«*'190 

95c«'115 
laflc^iftO 
ItOialte 

70cn;110 
130 (".iOO 
125('f210 
160ti!'245 



etport 



sales led to an 
advance. p:3timates of only 140.000.000 

Dakotas and 



bushels total ylel 1 In the 
Minnesota furnis led all. The cl»ise 
however, was caa • with .September %9 
^sc net higher at 87vg(^'?*Sc. 

.\ssertloiis thai the damage to the 
Kansas crop api eared to be largely 
theoretical took the edge off the corn 
market. Absen e of any moisture 
worth mentioning, however, made 
prices prl'es at first rather stiff. Sep- 
tember openetf ^k wMc to =^'^^c higli- 
t-r at 67i<i(: to 67V:C. A decline to 66 %c 
'.'jllowed. 

Afterward rains In Nebraska brought 
about a little further decline. The 
close was steady at 66 %c for Septem- 
ber, a net loss of %®%c. 

rientiful ofterli gs of new oats had a 
weakening effect upon that cereal. 
!:eslde8, country cash concerns were 
leading sellers o* futures. September 
iitarted a shade )ft to %c advance at 



MINNEAPOLIS M.\RKET. 

Crop News Makes Wheat Advance 
After Opening Weakness. 

Minneapolis, Minn.. July 15.— Bullish 
reports on spring wheat crop and 
further black rust damage made prices 
advance sharply after early weakness. 
K.stimates on condition of wheat In 
North Dakota now placed at 20 per 
cent lower than the government. July 
clo.sed at 95%®95'>fcc, %|C higher than 
yesterday. September at 'db^((«%}\c. 
\c higher and December at 9b Mil" 
9»>%c-, Vi®^'^ higher. Local elevator 
.stocks decreased 12.5,000 bushels for 
one day. Minneapolis today received 
158 cars of wheat against 120 a year 
ago; Duluth 19 against 40 and Winni- 
peg 1S6 against 120. July opened 
95%c; high, Oo^SiC; low, 95%c; closed. 
•j5=isc. September opened 94T'i»c; hlgn. 
96V8c: low 94'/«c; closed. 95(8*95*10. 
December opene<l 96^c; high, 97V*c; 
low 95V*c; closed, »6Va(5;96%c. 

Cash wheat was quoted steady but 
the demand was not so keen. No. 1 
northern sold for l{ai2»^c above the 
September contract. Cash close: No. 1 
hard 9S%c; No. 1 northern, 97 V^ (&" 
U7%.': to arrive, 97Vi(&97%c. No. 2 

northern. »*^ <S*»«'^<^-„^'' *j:';'j®' ^1^% 
96%c: No. 3 wheat, 92t4(&'94%c: No. 3 
yellow corn. 67(»67Hc; No. 3 whlto 
cats, 46@46^(': No. 2 rye, 83@79c. 

MlllstufC.s — .Shipments. 2,140 tons. Ex- 
cellent demand, mills well soM ahead. 
Prlceu registered still another advance. 
Bran In lOo-lb sacks, >20.50(gi21.60. The 
demand for Hour continued alow to 
fair. Shipments Increased and prices 
firm. Shipments, 51,409 bbl. First pa- 
tents in wood fob. Minneapolis $4,904* 
5.10, second patents. |4.40®4.65; first 



statement 

the week 

$9,147,70tJ 



New York, July 15.— The 
of clearing house banks for 
show.s that the banks hold 
re.serve In excess of legal requirements. 
This la a decrease of $1,776,550 in the 
proportionate cash reserve as com- 
pared with last week. The statement 
f ollowsi * 

Daily' average. Loans, $2,012,731,000; 
decrease, $2,070,000. Specie, $348, 48S,- 
000; decrease. $4,920,000. Legal tenders. 
$85,116,000; incre;i.se, $2,183,000. Net 
deposits, $1,876,108,000; decrease, $27,- 
000. Circulation. $47,206,000; Increase. 
$631,000. Banks cash reserve In vault, 
$363,331,000. Trust companies cash re- 
serve in vaults, $70,273,000. Aggregate 
cash reserve. $433,604,000: decrease. 
$2 737.000. Reserve required, $469,027.- 
000; decrease. $6,750,000. Excess law- 
ful reserve, $9,147,700; decrease. $1,- 
776,5r.O. Trust companies reserve with 
. bearing house members carrying So 
per cent cash reserve, 162,401,000. 

Actual conditions: Loan.s. $2,008,331.- 
000; decrease, $872,000; specie. $348,- 
853,000; increase. $3,477,000. .Legal 
tenders. $86,819,000; Increase, $3,191,- 
000. Net deposits. $1,874,910,000; In- 
crease $12,902,000. Circulation, $4i.- 
676,000; Increase. $955,000. Banks cash 
reserve In vault, $366,320,000. Trust 
companies reserve cash reserve In 
vault, $69,152,000. Aggregate ca.sh re- 
serve, $435,672,000; lnciea.se, $b. 668, 000. 
Re.serve required, $468,727,500; Increase, 
$3 225,000 Excess lawful reserve. $11,- 
712 800; Increase., $4,335,000. Trust com- 
panies reserve, with clearing members 
carrying 25 per cent cash re-serve. $63,- 
284,000. Summary of state banks and 
trust companies In greater New York 
not reporting to the New York clear- 
ing house: Loan.s. $636,162,600, In- 
crease. $4,483,300. Specie. $66,059,000; 
Increase, $552,400. Legal tenders. $13,- 
131000; decrease, $125,000. Total de- 
posits, $734,829,400: increase. $823,400 
« 

Buy in Duluth. 



South .St. Paul LIveMtock. 

.South St. Paul, Minn,. July 15 — 
Cattle receipts. 200; market steady, 
quotations unchanged. Hogs receipts, 
1,300. Market steady, range, $6.20 li' 
6.50, bulk sales, $6.25a6.30. Sheep re- 
ceipts, 900; market steady, sheep. $1.0C 
@4.-25; lambs, $3.00(&»6.75. 

New Vork Moucy. 

New York, July 15. — Money on call. 
r;omlnal; time loans, dull; 60 days, 2^ 
per cent and 90 days 3; six months 3% 
<^3\ per cent. 

Clo.s»^: l^rime mercantile paper, A(a 
AVt per cent. Sterling exchange easy, 
with actual business In bankers' bills 
at $4.84.60 for 60 days and at $4.86.20 
for demand; commercial bills. $4.84. 
Bar silver, 52%c: Mexican dollars, 45c 
Government bonds steady; railroad 
bonds steady. 

THE PRODUCE MARKETS. 



HIDES, TALLOW AND FURS. 



.08% 
.09 
.13 
.80 
i.6« 

.!• 



GREEN SALITD H1DE«»— No. 1. 

0. li. steers, over 60 lb I .09% 

U. H. steen. 25 lb. and up and steers 

uuder 60 lb 

O. 8. long haired kips. 8 to 25 lb... 

U. U. Teal kips. 3 to 25 lb 

ii. b. Peacoii sklos. uuder 8 lb 

U. B. borschldes 

DKV HALTEU — 

Dr/ tlln''. hides, over IS lb 

Va Uliuesota, UakoU. Wlaconsta 

and lofa hides 

Muskrat, wUiter 

Murraiui .••......••...•. 

lirj kid ♦,,............••. 

Dry Mlted calf 

TAJXOW AND QllEAaB— 

Tallow, in cakes 

Tailow. ua bbl 

Urease ..•..........••.•..■.*•.•. 

PtLTS— 

Pelta. large, CAch 75 

Felts, medium to small 3fi 

L>r> pelts, butcher. Montana and 

Washington 12% 



No. 1 
$ .08% 

.07% 
.07 H 
.UH 
.70 
t.«0 



.14 
.«0®34 
.. .ISM 
.. .18 

.. .0<H 
.. .06 
.. .05% 



Dry sheanugs, cactt 

WOOLr— 

Unwashed medium wool. 

Unwaehed coarse wool... 
Unwashed due medium. . 



••••.••a.. 



CAIJFORNIA ORANGi 

Extra taoc; navels, 90s $3.50 

Kaucy navels, 126s-230s 3. Si 

Vaucy cavcls, 288s ....•...•.•■••••.•«• 8.50 



..■•••..•«. 



....•■■• 



..■•••■»• 



.•..•...•..•«••*.••*. 



Choice navels. 2888 

Choice navels, 1268-2501 

FLOUIPA GUAl'Efc-UUIT— 

|4s. 46s, iMX 

Grapefruit, box 

CalUornls 

CAUFORNIA LEMONS— 
Extra fancy, hox, any slae... 
lmp<:){ted limes. Iwx 
Pl.Nl^APl'LEel— 

21-.i6s. crate 

18-42S, crate 

TOMATOES — 

Florida, basket 

Florida, tnte ...,••»••••••••••••••••••••...•. 

Al'PLES— 
^4Q0, f t&ncjf. box* •«•••••••••••••••■ a^ •••••«•« 

jj^Q DAvi63. box* > * •••«••••••■•••••••■■'«••••• • 

STKAWUEUUIES— 

WlsCiHisin, case. Id at* ...........$1.23® 

HEI»1*AN1— 

Bot • • 

KUUIT JUICES— 
Orange, keg ... 
Kaspljera. keg 
Cherry, keg ... 
G rape, keg . . . 

Cider, keg 

BANANAS— 

IJanauis, per lb 

U UTTER— 

Kancy creumery. per lb «•( 

Dairy, P*r lb ■ 

CUEESB— 

Twins •••' 

Wisconsin, full crea», per It. 
Amerlcaa. full cream, per In-- 
Block Swiss, pel lb. No. A... 

PrtaMMt •• 

Wheel SwlM. per lb. ...•• 

BOOS— 
£ggs, bulk, doa 



25 



• ■••■ ••• 



■ • •••• •••• 



••••••«••••• 



•••••• • 



• •••■•••• •■■• a 

■•••••••••••4 



••«••«•••« 



8.00 
5.50 
4.00 

S.OO 
1.2S 

S.7S 
8.50 

.80 

4.50 

S.SO 
8.25 

1.50 

1.50 

s.ri 

8.T5 
8.75 
8.75 
8.78 

.M 



••• •••••«■•••• 



LKATIIEU— 
Texaa oak sole A... 
Xexas oak sole. ...................... • ... 

Hemlock slaughter sole xx I .85 

Ucmlock slaughter sole No. 1 S4 

Hemlock dry hide sola 

Hemlock baniuss leather..... 

Oak harness leather 

rUUS — l^rge. 

Skunk, black 84.30 

Skunk, short stnpe .1.00 

Skunk, long liirrow stripe 2.00 

Skunk, broad stripe and wblM. . 1.00 

MusKral. faU 30(*2r 

Miiskrat. klU 



.18 

S2®i« 

!i( 

.18 

.05% 

.05 

.03% 

1. 00 
.80 

.11 
.05 
—Per lb- 
No. i. No. S 
.18 .88 

.10 .18 

.19% .17% 

—Per lb- 
Mo. 1. No. 1 



JAMES S. MATTESON 

PUBLIC ACCOITNTAIS'T AND 

AUDITOR. 

BuHlneii Counselor and SyBtemUer 

702-703 AIAVORTH DLDG. 

Telephone — .MeIro»e, 4700, 



.10 



Raccoon . . 
Mink, dark 
Mink, pale 
Bearer .... 
Cat, wUd... 
Fisher, dark 
Fisher, pale 
Fox. nd . . 
Fox. gray. . 
Lynx 
Marten. 
Marten. 
Marten. 
Weasel. 
Weasel, 
Wolf, 
Wolf, 



and brown. 



...•*••••< 



dark 

dark brown. 

light brown 

white 

stained, damageu 

timber ■ 

brush, cated 



and 



.179 



• e«« •• •••■« 



•••»•■ 



.lS%c9 



•••••••• «• 



.81% 
.18 

.11% 

.13% 

.10 

.14 

.07 

.18 



Wolf, open 

Wolf, coyote, cased 

Bear, as lo alae 

Badger, civet and bouse 
mountain Uon, opossom and 
ket prtcea. The above prices are 

Noa t. 3 and 4 in proportion. 




PAINE, WEBBER 
& COMPANY 

We handle orders for all 
stocks listed on the Boston, 
New York or any other ex- 
changes. 

■ We can give you the best and 
most accurate service possible 
on local curb or other unlisted 
securities. 

We are members of tiie Chi- 
-vo Hoard of Trade and give 
particular attention to trade in 
{jiam, provisions and cotton. 

Our daily market letter and 
Walkers' weekly copper letter 
will be sent to you without cost 
upon application. 

Telephone, write or wire u& 
for quotations or information 
pertaining to anything market, 
wise and we will give you the 
best obtainable. 



Torrey BulldluK, .II ^>«it Su- 
perior Street; Telephone*: Grand 
J 39 1, Mel roue 2343. 

M. J. O'Brien, Keaildent Man- 
aser. 



\ 



— 



^■"•" 



-»-.«- 




nm mm > 



TOP PRICE GUARANTEED 
FOR CHOICE 




.IScd .15% 



CHINESE .SPORTSMEN. 

North China Newa: As we passed 
throught the townlet of Huk-ou on the 
Nadoo creek a crowd was on the 
hank watching, the maneuvers of two 
fishermen who were reaping a harvest ; 
of niu-ssels and winkles. The-se rtsher- | 
men were dressed In fowling costume i 
— a cowskln coat and stocking all In i 
one piece, with the hair turned Inside. | 

The only apertures In the garment i 
Into which the wearers worked their 
way feet foremost were at the neck ' 
and the cuffs, which were securely tied 



LOFTUS-HUBBARD CO 

DULUTH. 



Duluth. M*l. 



Zenith, 14«4. 

Martin Rosendahl ft Ca 

(INCORPORATED.) 

COPPEI STOCK BROKERS 





il 



l! 




s 





80 



Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALDi 



July 15, 1911. 



HEAVY VOTE 
AT ELECTION 

Voters Turning Out to Ex- 
press Choice for School 
Directors. 

Women Showing Uncommonly 

Keen Interest and Are 

Casting Votes. 



street yesterday 
occupants of the 
shaken up. 
Causland of 



a fternoon. the two 

auto were badly 

They were E. F. Mc- 

Superi >r and W. C. Sher- 



wood of Duluth. Mr. Sherwood at- 
tempted to jump, and In doinp so 
sustained a cut arm and was injured 
about the hands and back. Mr. Mc- 
Causland was unirjured. The dam- 
age to the auto w;is about $50. 

New Town Hall. 

A new town hall will be erected 
bv the town of Superior, the contract 
fur the building huving been let yes- 
terday to Henry Vard for $2,150 by 
the town board at its meeting yes- 
terday. The build] np will be erected 
Just outside of the city limits of Su- 
perior. It will be 30 by 40 feet and 
two stories high. 

— . - — »i» 

**Owr Car Service. 




Th. it the annual school elec- 

tion uar^ .. .11 above normal In nearly 
all prtcincts of the city this morning 
and the prediction that the heaviest 
vote in many years woiild be cast stlU 
holds Rootl. Unusual in«*'«'*^^},^„''^^ 
been aroused in this year s eleCiion bj 
the vigorous campaign made on benair 
of some of t.'ie cundiilatvs. and as a re- 
sult the three men elected will owe | ent_rance 
their choice to a representative ^ole 

*Vhe hea^vy vote at a school election 
always comes In 

o'clock today 

which could be 

reported a vote 

As there are furty-Diree pre- 

lity, the vote at that time 



The first "'owl" 'ar on the 
Jine will leave Bell nap street 
a. m. tomttrrow mc rning and 
to Allouez. reaching there 
/o'clock. If the p-'tronaKe 
another car will be added 
ice. In view of th * 
number of railroad 
and dockmen 
louez. the new 
ly appreciated. 



Allouez 

at 2:39 

will run 

about 3 

is pufflcient, 

to the serv- 

fact that a great 

crew members 

are employed at Al- 

service will be great- 



the afterncK-n and 
evening ui' lu 7 oclock, at which time 
the polls close. At 1 
fifteen precincts 
reached by telephone 
of 454. 
cints in the 



Break Into Depot. 

Burglars bnke into the Northern 
Pacirtc depot at the East end last even- 
ing, but onlv took away f.o cents In 
small cliange and a few .«tamps. The 
entrance wa? gained by breaking 
window. The polk? were ni>tlhed t 
morning, after th. agent opened 
the place. 

NO PERMIT 



RATES FOR 
CARNIVAL 



Two-Cent Fares From 
Minnesota Points to 
Daluth. 



All 



a 
liy 
up 



close I 



thv 



through the city must V^^^, ' ^"„„^,., 
to ).i»«0. which is nearly the normal 
vote at a school election for the en- 
tire time the polls are open. 

The East end district t-howed 
heavie^-t vote during the mornmg 
hours, the Fifth precinct of the 1-irsi 
■ward, the polling place for which is 
located in the Endion school, pol.ing 
the banner vote. iOl. The Jefferson 
jBciiool. the Second precinct of tlie Sec- 
ond ward, reported 5i votes, althoupn 
In sotsie of the other precincts the vo.e 
did nt>t run tliat high. 

Oi tlie small percentage of votes 
cast tills morning, a goodly number 
were cast by wonien. who are 
an uncomnuinly keen interest 
election. It is expected that 
vote will be cast by women 



takin.i, 
in the 
a heavy 
this afi- 



used 
are the 

school 
school 
build- 
school 



FOR DANCING 



Railroads Hand the Commit- 
tee Substantial and Un- 
expected "Boost" 



Announcements were made this 

morning by the officials of the Northern 

Pacific, the Great Northern and the 

.'^oo railroads, that 2-cent fares would 

be in vogue commencing 

holding good until July 

points in Minnesota to 

turnable until July 24. 

This gives the people 
a rate which will make 
inducement to them to 
city to attend the big 
which is to be held 
21 and 22. The 



July 19, and 

22. from all 

Duluth, re- 



But 



a Roller Flink Near Ches- 
ter Park Cannot Be 
Ousted. 



school 
avenue 
Fourth 

school 

street. 
I'aul'8 

Fourth 

school 



eriit)On. a:id the men will also get out 
In great numbers after office hours. 

There are ten cundidates for the 
three places on the board. 

Trie precin. ts of the city are the 
game as at the general elections but 
there is a difference in the polling 
pla^e.s. scho<»l buildings being 
wherever pi'Ssible. Following 
polling places: 

First Ward. 

First precinct — Lester Park 
building. , , .- 

Second precinct — Lakeside 
building. ^ , . ^ . 

Third precinct — Salter school 

Ing 

Fourth precinct — Washburn 

building. . , . .,. 

Fifth precinct — Endion school build- 

"lixth precinct— ns Fourteenth ave- 
nue east. 

Second \\ aril. 

First precinct — basement First Pres- 
byterian church. 

Second precinct — Jefferson 
tuihiing. 

Third irecxnct — 421 Ninth 
east. 

Fourth precinct — 703 East 
street. „ , ,. 

Fifth precinct — Franklin 
building. 

Third AVard. 

First precinct — -6 West First 

Second precinct — Easement St. 
Episcopal church 

Third precinct — 103 \\ est 

•treet. ^. ., . » 

Fourth precinct — Nettleton 

building. . ^ 

Fourth Ward. 

First precinct— Whittier school build- 
ing. Park Point. , , 

Second precinct — 'N\ ebster school 
building. , , 

Third precinct— 2:0 Lake avenue 

Fourth prec;nct— The Armory, East 
First street. „. 

Fifth precinct — The Washington 
school building. First avenue east and 
Third street. 

Fifth Ward. , , i.» 

First precinct — Jackson school buiJQ- 

*^SeC(nd precinct— :5 North Fifth ave- 

""rhi^d^ precinct— 028 West Second 
street. „ 

Fourth precinct — Emerson 

building. , ,, V, , 

Fifth precinct — Lowell school 
Ing. I'ulutii Heights. 

Sixth Ward. 

First precinct— lll-b West Superior 

Second precinct— Basement. Second 
Presbyterian church. 

Thifu irecincl — Adams school 

Ins .. -,1 

Fit:h precinct — Madison 

in if 

Srveuth Ward. 

First precin.t — Basement Grace M. E. 

church. ,, „i,^„i 

Se: . nd precinct — Monroe school 

buiUUng. . , . .,, 

Third precinct — Bryant school buiiu- 

F'ourth 
buiitiing. _ 

Fiftli precinct — Vestry room, Con- 
Kregational church. Wes^t I>uluth. 
Risbth Ward. 

First precinct — Ely school building. 

Second precinct — Longfellow schoo. 
building. ^ . . I, , 

Third precinct — Fairmount school 
building. ^ , ^ ,,j 

Fourth precinct — Irvmg school build. 

Ing. 

Fifth precinct — Bay View Heights 
Sthool building. , ._ ^ , 

Sixth precinct — Smllhville school 
building. 

Seventh precinct — Stowe school 
building. New Duluth. 

Eighth j'recinct — Fond du Lac school 
building. 



Residents Complain — Police- 
man Needed to Regulate 
the Crowi 



of this state 
it a special 
come to this 
water carnival, 
here on July 20. 
Commercial club and 
the water carnival committee, which 
endeavored to get the fares some time 
ago were unsuccessful. It is said, and 
gave up the idea of securing rates. The 
announcement which came today, was 
a great surprise to them, but it Is 
believed will be instrumental in get- 
ting many here. 

In addtion to the 2-cent rate, the 
companies have made a special rate 
of $6 for a round trip from the Twin 
Cities tj Duluth during this time. 



discharge of the xepresentatlve and the 
sureties on hfc l>#nd. 

IT IS uHDEltEli, That said petition 
be heard, and iai||l final account exam- 
ined, adjusted Und allowed by the 
Court, at the«PTobate Court Rooms In 
the Court House, in the City of Duluth, 
in said Count*, on .M.>nday. the Slst day 
of July, igil.^at ten o'clock A. M., and 
all persons Interfsted In said hearing 
and in said matter are hereby cited and 
required, at «»l4 time and place, to 
show cause, ■ aay there be. why said 
petition should not be granted. 

OKDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, a«cordlng to law. 

Dated at Pulfth, Minn., July .th, 
191L 

By the Court, 
' S W. GILPIN, 

' Judge of ITobate. 
(Seal Probate Court. St. Louis Co., 

Minn.) 
ALFORD * HUNT, 

Attorneys. 
P. H., July 8. 15. 22, 1911. 

URDER FUR HEARING ON PETITION 

FUR ADMINLSTRATION— 
State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Madison 

Monroe Ormsby, Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF Mary Alice 
Ormshv of Davenport, Iowa, having 
been filed In this Court, representing, 
among other things. that Madison 
.Monroe Ormsby, then being a resident 
of the County of St. Louis. State of 
.Minnesota died intestate, in the Coun- 
tv of St. Louis, State of Minnesota, 
on the 28th day of January. 1909; leav- 
ing estate in the County of St, Louis, 
State of .Minnesota, and that said peti- 
tioner is the surviving spouse of said 
decedent, and praying that Letters of 
Administration of the estate of said 
decedent be granted to Fred E. Weath- 
erwax of Duluth, Minn, 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard before this Court, at the 
Probate Court Rooms in the Court 
House in Duluth, in said County, on 
.Monday, the 24th day of July. 1911. at 
ten o'clock A. .M., and all persons in- 
terested in .-^aid hearing and In said 
matter are hereby cited and required 
at said time and place to show cause, 
if any there be, why said petition 
should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication In The 
Duluth Herald, according to law, and 
that a copy of this order be served 
on the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
County not less than ten days prior 
to said day of hearing. 

Dated at Dulutli. Minn., June 30th, 



cedent, then being a resident of the 
County of St. Louis, State of Minne- 
sota, died testate In the County of St. 
Louis, state of Minnesota, on the 30th 
day of May. 19n, and that said peti- 
tioner Is the surviving spouse of said 
deceased and that she Is named In the 
said Instrument to be the executrix 
thereof and praying that said instru- 
ment be allowed and admitted to pro- 
bate as the last will and testament of 
said decedent, and that letters testa- 
mentary be Issued to Ragnhild Dahl 
of Virginia. Minnesota, thereon. 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard before this court, at the Pro- 
bate Court Rooms in the Court House, 
in Duluth, in said County, on Monday, 
the 24th day of July, 1911, at ten 
o'clock a. m., and all persons interested 
In said hearing and In said matter are 
hereby cited and required at said time 
and place to show cause, if any there 
be, why said petition should not be 
granted. , . 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this 
order be ser.ed by publication in The 
Duluth Herald according to law, and 
that a copy of this order be served on 
the County Treasurer of St. Louis 
Count V not less than ten days prior to 
said day of hearing. 

Dated at Duluth. Minn., June 30th, 

1911. 

By the Court, 

S. W. OILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court. St. Louis County, 

^"nn.) , ,„,, 

D. H., July 1, 8 and lf>, 1911- 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 

From Pages 31 and 32 




FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE. 



FOR SALE. ^ 

CHEAPEST LOT IN CITY. * 

Upper side of Sixth street, just * 
easrt of Lake avenue, 30 by 140; *■ 
uninterrupted view, street graded, *• 
with gas, water and sewer; very * 
central to city and wholesale * 
houses. Must sell quickly lor * 
cash. Apply owner, H. Nesbitt, «• 
V24 East Fourth street. *■ 



has beeii 

of a rink 

Fourteenth 



Considerable indignation 
aroused over the presence 
and dancing pav.lion at 
avenue east and Sixth street, that has 
been in operation or several days. No 
dancing has beer allowed, but it is 
said that the plac ; has been well pat- 
ronized with roUtr skaters, who have 
disturbed people 'n the neighborhood 
after the rink ha* been closed in the 
evening. ^_ ^ ^. ,.„ 

Inquiry at the office of the city 
clerk this mornii g revealed the fact 
that no license Is required to operate 
a skating rink. b\ t that if there is to 
be dancing within 3u0 feet of a park 
a permit must b" secured. There Is 
no ordinance whicn can stop the opera- 
tion of the rink, so long as no dan- 
cing is allowed. 

Manv complaints have been made to 
the police and a special officer has been 
detailed to see tl at there are no dis- 
turbances after the rink is closed. 
Mavor CuUum 'a id Alderman Joseph 
Shcirtel. president of the council, said 
this morning tha: they did not think 
that a skating rink or a dancing pa- 
vilion should be conducted in a resi- 
dence district siridlar to that near 
Chester park. Alderman Shartel said 
that before the ilace was opened, the 
proprietor should have waited until 
the council had made some dispositio.>i 
of his applicatlo 1 to operate a dan- 
cing pavilion. 

The application was made several 
weeks ago. and leferred to the police 
and license comiiittee. of which Al- 
derman Charles 1 oar is chairman. The 
committee has b.en investigating the 
situation, and up to the last meeting 
had made no report of any kind. The 
mavor said tha: amusement places 
which are liable to have a demoraliz- 
ing influence upoi ciiildren should not 
be allowed. 



WILL COST $15,000,000. 

Canadian Northern Extension in 
Canada Will Be Expensive Work. 

St. Paul. Minn.. July i:>. — The Can- 
adian Northern railway contract award- 
ed yesterday for the construction of 
550 miles of railway, calls for an ex- 
penditure of $15,000,000. The line will 
extend from Port Arthur, Ont.. on the 
north shore of Lake Superior to Sell- 
wood Junction, just north of Sudbury, 
Ont. 



of St. Louis 



of Frank 



1911. 
By 



the Court, 

S'. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate, 
Court St. Louis County, 



(Seal Probate 

Minn. ) 
D. H., July 1, 



8. 15, 1911. 



Next week all 
sue a Permit to 



cigar dealers will is- 
sinoke. 

— ♦ ' 



RAINS SUBDUE 

FOREST HRES 

Conditions in Canada and 

Michigan Are Much 

Improvei 

Bay City. Mich., July 15- — Conditions 
In the northern fire country were very 
much improved today. The rains of 
Friday afternoon and night have large- 
ly subdued the brush fires. 



school 
build- 



build- 



school build- 



precinct — Oneota school 




FUNERAL OF SI PERIOR 

PIONEER MONDAY. 



Funeral services will be held Mon- 
day morninn for Mrs. A. Fregeau, 
pioneer Superiorite, who died Thurs- 
day evening. The services will be 
held from St. Frances Xavier Catho- 
lic church at 9 a. m. with interment 
in Nemadji cemetery. 

Mrs. Freseau was 70 j'ears old and 
had lived in Superior for sixty-one 
years, coming to the city with her 
parents in 1854. She died at the 
family residence, 3 90 West Third 
street. Ten children, five sons and 
five daughters survive her. They are 
Mrs. Joseph Coburn. Mrs. T. S 
lor. Miss Adele Fregeau and 
Adele Fregeau and Miss Anna 
genu, all of Superior- Mrs. W 
Kelley of Joplin, Mo.; Joseph A. 
Fregeau, James Fregeau and Peter 
W. Fregeau, all of Superior; Frank E. 
Fregeau of Dulutb and Frederick A. 
B'regeau of Minneapolis. Mrs. Fre- 
p-eau also leaves twf» sisters and two 
brothers. Mrs. Joseph De Foe of Clo- 
quet, Minn., and Mrs. Frank Belalr of 
Superior, and John B. La Fave. Jr.. 
of Superior and Joseph La Fave of 
Bayfield. Wis. 



Tay 
Miss 
Fre- 
H. 



Car Strikes Ante. 



When 
collided 



a Billings Park street car 
with an automobile at the 

Winter 



MANY PROCTOR 
PEOPLE AHEND 

Engineers Lodge Sends Dele- 
gation to McKellar Funeral 
in Superior. 

Proctor, Minn., July 15. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A large delegation of 
the local lodge of engineers and other 
friends of the t eceased went to Su- 
perior vesterday afternoon to attend 
the funeral of Archie McKellar, a 
member of the order, for several years 
an engineer on the Missabe road, who 
died Wednesday of tuberculosis after 
a lingering illne »s. The deceased had 
to give up his work on the road about 
two years ago. He tried treatment at 
the sanitarium at Walker and later 
lived in the wo nls at Burnett to no 
avail. The f une al was held from his 
parent's home at 2:30 p. m. Rev. C. W. 
Ramshaw officiating and Interment be- 
ing in Greenwoo 1 cemetery. 

Tu Op* a Kew Hall. 
The Rebekahs surprised Mrs. Henry 
L. Wombzacher at bridge at the home 
of Mr. and Mrs. George Rich, Wednes- 
rlay evening. The evening was pleas- 
antly spent in gtmes and music. Punch 
was served throughout the early part 
of the evening and later ice cream and 
cake were served. In behalf of the 
Rebekahs. Mrs. Wombacher was pre- 
sented with a dozen teaspoons, a sugar 
shell and buttei knife. About fifteen 
were present. ^ ^ „ i,. . 

Proctor Lodge. I. O. O. F. will give 
the grand opening ball of the new Odd 
Fellows' hall on next Wednesday even- 
ing from V to :. Blewett's orchestra 
will furnish thi music and the graAd 
march wil begin promptly at 9 o'clock. 
The Rebekahs -n 111 serve refreshments. 
The Burns Lumber company having 
offices and yards in St. Paul and Du- 
luth, have puroh ised the business which 
has been conducted by F. W. Hol- 
brook for the )ast two years. They 
intend to put i i a good line of lum- 
ber and all bull ling material and will 
continue handling wood and coal. 
A R Schroeder, who has been em- 
ployed by Mr. Holbrook for the past 
two months, w.ll be manager of the 
local office. 

Mrs Thomas Grimes and children 
are spending s few days at Solon 
Springs with friends. 

Miss Leona P luia has gone to Solon 
Springs where she is isiting friends. 
Mrs. C. F. Pi terson left Friday for 
Pengilly where she will spend a few 
days at the Sugg cottage. Mr. Pet- 
erson will join her for an over Sun- 
day visit. 

Miss Inis Eaniquist of Coeur d Alene, 
Idaho, spent a tew days last week vis- 
ting at the William McMurtie home. 

Several parti !S of campers are at 
Silica and Norway Ridge picking blue- 
berries which ire very plentiful this 
year. , , .^ 

Mrs. P. J. Sa iter is enjoying a visit 
from her parents and sister of St. 
Paul 

A son was birn to Mr. and Mrs. y£ 
F. Sweeney, Jul / 12. 

Court McCull im left Wednesday for 
a trip to the W jst. 



RalDM In MtrhlKan. 

Detroit, Mich., Julv 15. — Reports from 
Northern Michigan indicate that there 
is now no danger of serious damage 
from the forest fires which have de- 
vastated great areas of timber lands. 
de«>troved villages and farm property 
and rendered homeless hundreds of 
families during the last few days. 
Copious rains have fallen In the vicin- 
ity of East Tawas, Au Sable and Al- 
pena and lighter showers at other 
points In the fire zone. The wind also 
has decreased and isolated settlements 
which have been constantly threatened 
with destruction, are safe. 

BKTTEU KESLLTS from Herald H 
Want AdM. Vuu aave and make * 
niouey v»hen you 
HEKALU. 



ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 
COUNT— 

State of Minnesota, County of St. 
Louis — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Stephan 
I'uliek, Decedent. 

THE PETITION OF Northwestern 
Trust Company as representative of 
the above named decedent, together 
with lt.s final account of the adminis- 
tration of said estate, liaving been 
filed In this court, representing, among 
other things that it has fully adminis- 
tered said estate, and praying that 
said final account of said administra- 
tion he examined, adjusted and allowed 
by the Court, and that the Court make 
and enter its final decree of distribu- 
tion of the residue of the estate ot 
said decedent to the persons entitled 
thereto, and for the discharge of the 
representative and the sureties on Its 

IT IS ORDERED. That said petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court, at the Probate Court Rooms In 
the Court House. In the City of Du- 
luth in said County, on Monday, the 
7th day of August, 1911, at ten o'clock 
A M., and all persons Interested in 
said hearing and in said matter are 
hereby cited and required at said time 
and place to show cause. If any there 
be, why said petition should not be 

granted. „ _. . ... 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be selved by publication In 
The Duluth Herald according to law. 
Dated at I>ulutli, Minn, July 8th, 1911. 

By the court, ^ ^ ^^^^^^ 

Judge of Probate. 
(Seal, Probate Court, St. Louis County, 
Minn.) 



ORDER LIMITING TIME TO FILE 
CL.MMS. AND FOR HEARING 
THEREON — 

State of Minnesota, County 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate 

B Daughertv. Decedent. 

Letters testimentary this day hav- 
ing been granted to Edwin B. 
Daughertv, Louis E. Daugherty anl 
Otto M. Daugherty. 

IT IS ORDERED, That the time 
within which all creditors of the 
above named decedent may present 
claims against his estate in this court 
he. and the same hereby is. liniited to 
three months from and after the date 
hereof; and that Monday the 23rd day 
of October, 1911. at 10 o'clock A. M., in 
the I'robate Court Rooms at the Court 
House at Duluth. in said County, he, 
and the same hereby Is. fixed and ap- 
pointed as the time and place for hear- 
ing upon the examination, adjustment 
and allowance of such claims as shall be 
presented within the time aforesaid^ 

Let notice hereof be given by the 
publication of this order In The Duluth 
Herald as provided by law 

r-.ted. Duluth. Minn.^Jxdy^l5.^1911. 

.Tmlge'of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court. St. Louis County, 

Minn."> ^^., 

BALl>WIN & BALDWIN. 

Attorneys for Executors. 
D. H., July 15, 22, 29. 1911. 



FOR SALE — BEAUTIFUL ALLEY 
corner lot, 50 by 70; centrally lo- 
cated; J400; part time. M. D. La 
Breck, Lyceum Livery company. 



FOR SALE — A LEVEL LOT ON 
Eighth street and Nineteenth avenue 
east; street graded; city water and 
gas; can be bought cheap. W. E. 
Wright, 303 Palladio, Melrose 1333. 



PERSONAL. 



FOR SALE— THINK OF IT, TWO 
lots 50 by 140 feet, between Twent- 
ty-third and Twenty-fourth avenue 
west; water In street, price J950, 
terms to suit; don't miss It. Call 2401 
West Fourth street. 

FOR SALE— LOTS AT STEEL PLANT; 
$5 down, |5 per month. Melrose 2634, 



PERSONAL^ 
MADAME STERLING. 
WELL KNOWN PALMIST AND CAR1> 
reader is in the city. Madame Ster- 
ling has been before the public pro* 
fessionally nearly thirty years and' 
from her long experience is prepared 
to give advice on all the affairs of_' 
life. Madame Sterling has been for 
years teacher and demonstrator at 
the College of Palmistry, New York 
city, the only institution of its kind- 
in the world. Thousands can testify 
to her ability as a reader. Ladiea 
are requested to call In forenoon or 
afternoon as much as possible to- 
avoid the night crowds. Arrange- 
ments can be made for entertainment 
at private home if desired. Open- 

Sundav. 

MADAME STERLING, 
129 East First street, across froi» 
Armory. __^__ 



r 



-« 



FOR SALE — THREE TWENTY-FIVE 
foot lots one block from Third street 
car line at Thirty- first avenue west. 
Worth $500 each. f375 on your own 
terms for a quick sale. Call Lincoln, 
250 X. 



BOARDERS WANTED. 

BOARD OFFERED— FOR BEST HOME 
cooking in city at moderate prices 
try a meal at the Melrose, 318 West 
Second street. 



BOARDERS WANTED— GOOD BOARD 
and room, modern conveniences. 218 
West Third street. 

- MEALS AT 
Hotel Irving. 



PERSONAL — PROF. FRANCIS GI- 
rard clairvoyant, will open his office ^ 
in Duluth in August; he will answer .#»•• 
six questions bv mail for $1; send 
date of birth; full reading 15. Ad- 
dress Prof. Glrard, Markham. Mlnn.r 
St. Louis co unty. ^ *«• 

i'ERSONAL— FAMILY WITH NO 

children wants child to board for 
responsible party. Call Melrose 3018. 

Personal — Wanted pupils to tutor. Ml8» 
House 1502 t ast 3rd St. JJchool held 
in Y. W.C.A. Bldg. Phone 160- A Grand. 

PERSONAL — COMFORT, BEAUT Z" 
shop. 20 W. Sup. St., upstairs. Mani- 
curing, 2Bc; shampooing and hair- 
dressing, 50c; swltciies made from- 
combings. Both p hones. 

PERSONAL— WHY NOT GET AWAY 
from washday troubles by sending 
your family wash to us; B cents per 
pound. Lute's laundry. 808 Ea«( 
Second street. Both 'phones 447. 



r 



r 



BOARDERS WANTED - 
all hours. 521 W. 2nd St. 



WANTED TO RENT. 

WANTED TO RENT — A DOCTOR 
would like to lease for one year, 
furnished house in East end. with 
nine or ten rooms — not on car line; 
one with garage preferred; two in 
family: for suitable place willing to 
$150 per month. Apply John A. 



pay . . ^ 

Stephenson & Co. 



i. 



Notice to Contractors. 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That 
sealed bids will be received by the 
Vniage of Crosby, of Crow Wmg Coun- 
tv Minnesota, at the office of tne 
!age Clerk thereof, VP^wfi^i 
P M Tuesday, July 25th, 1911 



Vil- 
oclock 
whicii 
will be publicly opened and read at a 
meeting of said council to be held on 
.said day, at eight o'clock P. M., for the 
laving, building and construction 
sewers in said Village, at 
and of the kind and quality of 
ials, and of the width, 
manner of construction 



WANTED TO RENT— A SMALL FLR- 
nislied flat or cottage for balance or 
summer; either Duluth or Superior. 
Address L 155, Herald. 



PERSONAL — WESTERN ST(X:KMAN, 
42 worth $30,000, would marry. J., 
Box 35, Toledo League. Toledo, Ohio. 

PERSONAL — WE CAN SAVE YOU 
money on shipping househtdd goods to 
Twin Cities, Pacific coast and West- 
ern points. Duluth Van & Storage 
company. 



1 



^C 



WANTED TO RENT — SMALL COT- 
tage on Minnesota Point during 
August and September. A. G. Her- 
ald. 



KODAKS AND CAMERAS. 

Eclipse Photo Supply Co., 17 4th Ave. 
Develop and finish for amateurs. 



W. 



PERSONAL— FREE FORTUNE; SENI> 
birthdate three questions, five red 
stamps for book 'The Sphinx." Read- 
ing sent free. Secrets of life re- 
vealed. Madam Mizpah, 1440 Acoma 
street, Denver, Colo^ 

PERSONAL— BIG MONEY WRITING 
songs; thousands of dollars for any- 
one who can write successful words- 
or music; past experience unneces- 
sary; we want original songf. 
poems, with or without music*. 
Write for free particulars. H. Kirku» 
Dugdale Co., Department 424, Wash- 
Ington. D. C. SIS - 
PERSONAL — FUTURE REVEALED 
free; mail three questions. Mrtlk 
date, four 2-cent stamps for postage. 
Will send reading that will amauo 



^■^1 



advertlM« In THE 



^l^jtHMHMHMHMt^lH*- ************* ^ 



LEGAL .VOTICE9. 



FOR 



Dis- 



SUMMONS IN APPLICATION 

REGISTRATION OF LAND— 
District Court, Eleventh Judicial 

Sta'te of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— — SS. 

In the matter of the application 
of Sarah Ii. Robinson to regis- 
ter the title to the following 
described real estate situated 
in St Louis County, Minne- 
sota, namely: The Southeast 
quarter of the Southwest 
quarter (SEV4 of SW»^) of 
Section Sixteen (16) In Town 
ship Fifty (50) north, of 
Range Fourteen (14) west of 
the Fourth Principal , Meri- 
dian, according to the United 
States government survey 
thereof. Applicant, 

vs. 

All persons or parties un- 
known, claiming any right, 
title estate, lien or interest 
in the real estate described 
the application herein, 



ORDER TO EXAMINE FINAL AC- 

State o'f Minnesota, County of St. Louis. 

"■ In Probate Court. 

In the Matter of the Estate of Ole N. 

Fixen, l»ecedent. „ „ , , i* 

THE PETITION OF M. F. Rusfeldt. 
as representative of the above named 
decedent, together with his final ac- 
count of the administration of said es- 
tate, having been filed In this court, 
representing, among other things, that 
he ha« fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said final a^^'^'^i" „.i 
said udministration be examined, ad- 
justed and allowed by J^^e court, and 
that the Court make and enter its final 
decree of distribution of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
per.'ions entitled thereto, and for the 
discharge of the representative and tne 
sureties on his bond. ..♦«„« 

IT IS ORI>ERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account exam- 
ined, adjusted and allowed by tue 
Court at the Probate Court Rooms in 
the Cburt House, in the City of Duluth 
in said County, on Monday the 24tn 
day of July, 1911. at ten o clock A. M., 
and all persons Interested in said hear- 
ing and In said matter are hereby cited 
and required at said time and place to 
show cause, if any there be, why said 
netition should not be granted. 

ORDERED FURTHER, That this or- 
der be served by publication in The 
Duluth Herald, according to law. 

Dated ac Duluth, Minn.. June 30th, 

''bV the Court. ^ ^, gix^vI^, 

Judge of Probate. 
Probate Court, St. Louis Coun- 
Mlnn.) ., ,„,„ 

July 1, 8 and 15, 1911. 



in 



above 



Defendants. 
The State of MinnesoJ,a to the 

named defendants: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the application of the 
applicant in the above entitled pro- 
ceeding and to file your answer to the 
said application in the office of the 
clerk of .^aid court, in said county, 
within twenty (20) days after the 
service of this summons upon you, ex- 
clusive of the day of such service, and. 
if vou fail to answer the said application 
within the time aforesaid the appli- 
cant in this proceeding will apply to 
the court for the relief demanded 
therein. , , i * • i 

Witne««< J P Johnson, clerk of said 
court, and the seal thereof, at Duluth, 
In said county, this 7th day of July, 

A. D. 1911. ^ ^^ 

- Court, 



(Seal 
ty. 

D. H.. 



EXAMINE 



FINAL AC- 
Of St 



Of Wll- 



the 
and 



dis- 
the 



(Seal of 
County, 



District 
Minn.) 



St. Louis 



J. P. 



By R. E. 



JOHNSON. 

Clerk. 
JOHNSON, 
Deputy. 

W. P. HARRISON, ^^^ ,,, ^ 

Attorney for Applicant. 609-611 Tor- 
rey Building, Duluth. Minn. 
D. H., July 8. 1^, 22. 19n. 



AC- 



EXMINE FINAL 

County of St. Lou's 




ORDER TO 

COUNT— 
State of Minnesota 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Joseph 

Walkoviac, Decedent. 

THE PETITION of Chasmer Grac- 
kowski, as representative of the above 
named decedent, together with his final 
account of the administration of said 
estate, having been filed in this court, 
representing, among other things, that 
he has fully administered said estate, 
and praying that said final account of 
said administration be examined, ad- 
Justed and allowed by the Court, and 
that the Court make and enter its final 
decree of distribution of the residue 
of the estate of said decedent to the 
persons entitled thereto, and for the 



ORDER TO 

COUNT— 
State of Minnesotsi, County 

Louis. — ss. 

In Probate Court. 
In the matter of the estate _ 

helm Lehtto, Decedent. 

The petition of Adolph H. Lehtto as 
representative of the above named de- 
cedent, together with his final account 
of the administration of said estate, 
having been filed In this court, repre- 
senting, among other things that he 
has fully administered said estate, and 
praying that said final account of said 
administration be examined, adjusted 
and allowed by the Court, and that 
the Court make and enter Its final 
decree of distribution of the residue of 
the estate of said decedent to the per 
sons entitled thereto, and for 
charge of the representative 
sureties on his bond. 

IT IS ORDERED, That said petition 
be heard, and said final account ex- 
amined, adjusted and allowed by the 
Court at the Probate Court Rooms In 
the Court House, In the City of Duluth 
In said County, on Monday, the 2-lth 
day of July, 1911, at ten o'clock a. m., 
and all persons Interested In said 
bearing and In said matter are here- 
by cited and required at said 
place to show cause, if any 
why said petition should 

ORDERED FURTHER. That this or- 
der be served by publication In The 
Duluth Herald according to law. 

Dated at DUluth, Minn., June 30th. 

1911. 

By the Court, 

S. W. GILPIN, 
Judge of Probate. 
(Seal Probate Court, St. Louis County. 

Minn.) 
D H., July 1-8-15, 1911. 



of 
places, 
mater- 
the sizes and 
thereof, speci- 
fied in a resolution duly adopted by 
the Village Council of %ald Village 
therefor on the 11th day of May, 1^11, 
and in accordance with the plans and 
profiles therefor duly adopted by sa d 
Village Council, on file in the office of 
the \Mllage Clerk of said Village. Each 
bid must be accompanied by a certined 
check on some bank authorized to do 
business in the State of Minnesota, for 
five per cent (5 per etnt) of the 
amount of such bid. made payable to 
fhe Treasurer of said Village, as a 
guarantee that such bidder will, wlth'n 
six (C) days of the award, enter into a 
r-ontract In writing and furnish a satis- 
factory bond or security for the per- 
formance of said contract, should the 
contract be awarded to him. It any 
bid shall not be accompanied by such 
certified check, the same shall not be 
considered. The certified check of the 
successful bidder shall be forfeited to 
said Village should he fall to comply 
with all the requirements of the reso- 
lution ordering and directing the doing 
of said work, duly passed by the \ 11- 
lage Council of the Village of Crosby 
July 12th, 1911. to which reference is 
made for greater particularity. 

All bids arc to be submitted and will 
be received on this clear understand- 
ing, and also on the following express 
conditions, which shall apply to and 
become a part of every bid and of the 
contract subsequently entered into 
with the successful bidder, to-wlt: 

That bidders have personally ex- 
amined the location of the proposed 
works, and the plans and specifications, 
maps and profiles therefor, and that 
they will not at any time make any 
demand, complaint or claim of any na- 
ture whatsoever against the Villngo 
that there was any misunderstanding 
in regard to the nature or amount ot 
work to be done. 

Tli<» prices bid shall include and 
cover the furnishing of all materials 
and the performance of all labor requi- 
site or proper, and the building and 
completion of all the work called for 
under the accompanying contract, and 
in the manner set forth, described and 
shown on plans, specifications, maps 
and profiles for the work, in said reso- 
lution of Mav 11th. 1911. contained and 
on file in the office of the Village 
Clerk. . , ^ 

Contractors will be required to com- 
plete the entire work under the in- 
spection and to the .satisfaction of an 
engineer to be employed by said Vil- 
lage in accordance with the specifi- 
cations and plans. No deviation there- 
from will be allowed unless the same 
has been previously authorized In writ- 
' n GT 

The entire work must be fully com- 
pleted and delivered on or before the 
loth dav of November, 1911. 

The Village of Crosby reserves the 
any or all bids, 
the Village Council of 
(Trosby. 

S. G. LATTA. 

Village Clerk. 
Dated July 14th. 1911. 



DYE W ORKS. 



ZENITH CITY DYE WORKS— LAR- 
gest and most reliable. All work 
done In Duluth. Work called for and 
delivered. "Phones: Old, 1154-R; new, 
1888. 232 East Superior street 



Duluth Dye Works — French dry clean 
ing; fancy dyeing. Old 'phone, Mel 
rose 4191; new, 1191-A. 330 E. Sup. 



St 



Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co.^ 
Oldest reliable dyers and French dry 
cleaners in Northwest, 19 Lake Ave. 
north. 'Phones: New, 1616; old. 1337. 



NATIONAL DYEING AND CLEANING 
company, 319 E. Superior St. French 
dry cleaners and fancy dyers. Both 
'phones 2376. Branch, 15 Lake Ave N 



Plumes cleaned and dyed any color. 
Perfect satisfaction guaranteed. Miss 
FltzPatrick, 502-4 E. 4th St Both 
'phones. 



you. Prof. Herman, 
wood, Colo. 



Box 518, Engle- 



MRS. VOGT, 17 EAST SUPERIOR ST... 
upstairs; Shampooing and Hairdress- 
ing, 50c; Manicuring, 25c. 



PERSONAL — LADIES — ASK YOUR 
druggist for Chlchestera Pills, ther 
Diamond Brand. For 25 years knowck. 
as best, safest, always reliable. Take 
no other. Chichesters Diamond Brand 
Pills are sold by druggists every- 
where. 



PERSONAL — COMBINGS AND GUI' 
hair made into beautiful switches. 
Knauf Sisters. 



right to reject 
Bv order of 
the Village of 



Notice to Contractors. 



time and 

there be, 

not be 



ORDER OF HEARING ON PETITION 

FOR PROBATE OF WILL — 
State of Minnesota, County of St. 

Louis. 

In Probate Court. 
In the Matter of the Estate of Andrew 

Dahl, Decedent: 

A certain instrument purporting to 
be the last will and testament of An- 
drew Dahl having been presented to 
this court and the petition of Ragnhild 
Dahl being duly filed herein, represent- 
ing, among other things, that said de- 



NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That 
sealed bids will be received by the 
Village of Crosby, Crow Wing County, 
Minnesota, at the office of the Village 
Clerk thereof until six o'clock P. M. 
Tuesday, July 25th, 1911, which will 
be publicly opened and read at a meet- 
ing of said council to be held on 
said day at eight o'clock P. M. for 
the letting of a contract, under and by 
which the contractor shall be given 
the privilege of constructing, operat- 
ing and maintaining a system of water 
works at his own cost and expense, 
In and throughout said village for the 
purposes of supplying, selling and dis- 
crlbutlng water from Serpent Lake or 
other sources, for village purposes and 
to the inhabitants of said Village, for 
th*> term of twenty (20) years, upon 
the c« ndltions specified in and by an 
ordinanc? of said Village entitled, 'An 
ordinance to provide water mains and 
other water works as a means of 
water supply for the Village of Crosby, 
and as a measure for the prevention 
and extinguishment of fires therein, 
and to legulate the use thereof," duly 
passed and adopted by the Village 
Council thereof July 12th, 1911, and 
which provides among other things, 
that the contractor shall construct a 
plant at the places, and of the sizes, 
kinds and qualitv of materials, capac- 
ity and power designated and speci- 
fied in specifications, plans, maps and 
profiles thereof, duly adopted by said 
Village Council therefor, and on file in 
the oiflce of the Clerk of said Village, 
and maintain and operate the same for 
the term aforesaid, and that he shall 
lease and let unto said Village fifteeii 
(15) fire hydrants, and such additional 
hydrants as said Village may require, 
for and during said term, and that as 
the consideration therefor the con- 
tractor shall be entitled to and shall 



have .charge, collect and receive for 
the services to be performed and main- 
tained, 

1. From the Village of Crosby such 
a sum per annum as rental, payable 
quarter yearly pro rata, for water 
furnished to and for each and every of 
fifteen (15) fire hydrants specified in 
said plans and specifications, and the 
locations of which are designated on 
said maps and blue prints, and for 
each and every additional fire hydrant 
as said Village mav from time to time 
in numbers of not less than twelve 
(12) to the mile on new mains and 
at such points on the old mains re- 
(luire to be installed and maintaineil. 
HK shall be fixed therefor by the bid 
of the successful bidder accepted by 
said Village, and . , ^ . 

2 Such rates for water furnished to 
the Inhabitants of said Village for 
private use which has passed through 
the meters of the consumers as shall 
be fixed for the following specified 
iiuantities furnished in or during any 
monih to-wit: for the first five thousand 
(6000> cubic feet, and for the second 
five thousand (5000) cubic feet, and for 
any additional five thousand (5000) 
cubic feet or over, and the rate of dis- 
count that all ccnsutiiers shall at all 
times be entitled to have and receive 
for prompt payment of bills for quaJi- 
tities used, by tiie bid of the successful 
bid<ler accepted b.v said ViUage. 

That the successful bidder whose bid 
is accepttd, shall within ten U0> drtvs 
after the award of s.»i>l ci>ntv:»ct enter 
into a contract in writing with said 
Village embodving the provisions of 
said ordinance, duly executed in du- 
plicate. , , , 

That said ordinance provides that 
said plant shall be completed and in 
readiness for operation on or before 
eight (8) montlis from the award of 
said contract; and otherwise the con- 
ditions that shall be expressed in and 
be a part of said contract, to which 
ordinance reference is hereby made for 
greater particularity. 

Each bid must be accompanied by a 
certified check on some bank author- 
ized to do business In the State of 
Minnesota for the sum of Five Hun- 
dred Dollars ($500.00) made payable to 
the Treasurer of said Village as a 
guarantee that such bidder will enter 
into a contract in writing and furnish 
a satisfactory bond or security for the 
installation of said plant, should the 
contract be awarded to him. No bid 
not accompanied by such certified 
check will be considered. 

The Village of Crosby reserves the 
anv or all bids, 
the Village Council of 
Crosby. 

S. G. LATTA, 
Village Clerk. 

Dated July 14th, 1911. 



AGENTS WANTED. 

AGENTS— WE'VE THE HOTTEST 25- 
cent seller yet. Rarely less tha« 
three sales to a home. Woolverin Co., 
Pittsb urg. Pa. ^ 

AGENTS — $6 TO $30 r>AlLY SURE; 
everv autoist buys quick; write no-«r 
for explanation free; guarantee suc- 
cess; bank backing. Day produce- 
company, Albe rt Lea, Minn. 

AGENTS — OUTSELLING EVERY- 
thlng; eleven sanitary kitchen uten- 
sils; steel r.ick worth $1.50; sell like- 
hot cakes. 75 cents; samide. 35 cents. 
Parker Chemical company, Chicago^ 



AGENTS — IT COSTS YOU NOTHINCS- 
10 learn how to double your income- 
handling our fast seller; ask for par- 
ticulars. The Keith .Manufacturing 
companv. C^mton. Oliio^ 



AGENTti^THE CANCHESTER IS THE 
biggest r.or.ev maker ever known; 
ore age..t n.ade $107.50 in four days; 
one $73.25 ir. five days. Others are? 
making from $S to $10 a day selling: r 
ihe improved l&ll patented Can-ua, 
Chester Kerosene Incandescent Lamp- 
Burns air instead of money. ^Ix^ 
times brighter than electricity, gas^""^ 
or acttvlene at one-lent:i cost. 
Burns with or without mantle. 
Burner fits any lamp. Saves 75 per 
cert oil. No trimming wicks. 1-ignt- 
ing methods revolutionized. Show- 
ing means selling. Territory going: 
fast Write today. Particulars free^ 
Handsome outfit furrnished. Btv.are 
of imitations. Canch^ster Light 
company, 26 State street, Chicago.. 
111., L'epartment 26-Y. 



right to reject 

By order of 

the Village of 



PROGRAM OF EXAMIIATIOHS 

— FOR — 

COMMON SCHOOL CERTIFICATES 

To be conducted at Duluth Central High Sch'wI. 
Evelelh Hibblng and Tower on the following dates; 
JULY 3l8t, and AVGVST let and 2nd, 1911. 

MONDAY JULY 31*t. (Second Grade StudleB ) 

AM- P M — 

■ goo— Knrollment. 1:15— Geography. 

8 30— Prtiftsstcnal Test. 2 .4.";— Compogltlon. 

n:30_SpelUng. 3:4^— Reading. 

jp:Oo_Anlhiiiellc. 4:40— Penmanship. 

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2nd. (Fl»l Grade 
Continued. ) 
P. M.— 
Statea 1:15 — Physiology- Hygiene. 

2:45— f "hies. 
Grammar. 4:00 — Agriculture. 



HOUSES, VEHICLES, ETC. 

HORSES! HORSES! HORSES! 
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET. 

•THE HORSE AND MULE HKAD-- 
quarters of the Northwest;" 500 to BOO. 
hoaa of horses and mules coasiantly 
on hand; part t ne given if desired. 
Private sales dally. If you need draft, 
horses, general purpose horses, de- 
livery horses, raule« or raiiroadiniC. 
or other purposes, drivers or suddlera^ 
we can fill your order. Every hor«»- 
bold guaranteed to be as represented. 

BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 
Midway Horse Market, St. Paul. Minn. 



FOR SALE— YOUNG TEAM OF BATT 
horses, harness and wagon; welghtJ 
3 200. For terms address W. H. Sears^ 
R. F. D No. 3. 



FOR SALE— DRAFT AND DRIVING' 
horses; F. E. Bellows. Cumberland,. 
Wis. . 

THE WESTERN SALES - STABLE- 
company has removed from 11. 
Eleventh avenue west to l^ and 24- 
East First street, and will have two- 
carloads of draft, driving and gen- 
eral purpose horses Saturday diiewt. 
from the Blue Grass farms. 



FOR SALE— JUST ARRIVED 1- nOM, 
countrv with sixteen head of driv«n|p: 
and work horses. Call at 5602 Al- 
bion street, end of Fifty-seventh c*r- 
line. Call Calumet 320-L.. ^ 

HORSES ACCLIMATED HORSEa 
Young heavy horses; several teams* 
for sale. Red Cliff Lumber company, 
barn. Thirty-ninth avenue west. 



I 



I 

I 

t 



For Ssde — Forty head of draft and gen- 
eral purpose horses just out of woods' 
to be sold cheap. 209 W. Ist St. 
FOB SALE— TWENTY-FIVE HEAD OF.' 
'^ ^tSll Lake avenue north. 



horses 



FOR SALE— 30 HORSES 
Sale & Boa rding Stable 



AT ZE.NITH 
524 W IstSt. 



A. M — 

8:00— United 
History. 
{i:4J— Kr.gUsh 
11:30— Music. 



All 

write 



WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8nd. (First Grade 
Studies. ) 

1:15— Algebra. 
2 :43 — Physical Geographj 
ot General History. 
4 :15— Drawing. 

certificate* will be rejtjulred to 
Test. N. A. YOUNG, 

County Supt. oC Bchoola. 
20. 1911. 



. M — 

8 :00 — Enrollment 
8:30 — Geometry. 
10:15— Physl«B. 



ai>plicants for 
on Profeesioual 



SW EDISH MASSAGE. 

MRS LUZINA OJALA. located at S4»- 
Lake avenue south, will cure rheu- 
matism, stomach troubles, constipa- 
tion catarrh of the bowels and ner- 
vous debility. Can also cure dis- 
abled limbs. 1 am a graduate ot 
Helslngfors Clinical institute. ^ 



MANICURLNG. MASSAGE. FACE A^p* 
scalp treatment. 813 Torroy building. 
G rand 946-X. ^ 

wrnfi ii WIKINO. SWEDISH MASl- 
"^^ 305 East First St. Melrose 44»4. 



sage. 



D. H.. July 15. 22. 



Mrs. Calmodeen. Room 7, Wlnthrop bUt.- 
ith Av. W. and Ist Bt Grand 207i-T» 













_ _ _ ' 


L.. .1... \ 


k— — 


■ 






\ 


1 


« 




\ 




• 



-^ 




Saturday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



July 15. 1911. 





HERALD EXCURSION iS^SlS^ 



4 

\ 



AUTOMOBILES. 




"WE REl^RESENT MAXWELL. PRE- 
mier. Oakland. Moilne pleasure cars 
•nd Wilcox trucks. All kinds of re- 
pairint;- even tire vulcanizing. Old 
cars bought and sold. It will pay 

rou to try us. Also have automobiles 
or hire. Call, 'ph^ne or write M. *. 
Falk. Rapid Transit Auto & liepalr- 
InK Co.. 2110-12 W. Mich. St. Phones 
Mfll. 347; Zen 47 Lincoln. 



WATCHES RIPAIRED. 

CJuarantPed Main Sprt igs. fl.OO; watch 
cleaned. $1. Garon Hros.. 213 W. Ist. 



UPHOLSTI RING. 



FURNITURE, AUTOMOBILES. CAR- 
rlaees: reasonable t^rtces. E. Ott, ll> 
Flrdt avenue west Both 'phones. 




FOR RENT— FLATS. 

(Continued.) 

FOR REVt'^'nICE SEVEN-ROOM 
flat; water, bath, electric light, hard- 
wood floors. Call P. Malnella. 1101 
West S uperior street. 

FUR RENT— MODERN FIVE-UOOM 
tlat; good sized bathroom; »-l _P>-'.» 
month. Call Charles P. Craig, 
hoor Sellwood building. 



fifth 

725 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
On Pages 30 and 32 



FOB REKT— HOUSES. 



WHERE TO GET WHAT YOl WANT 

Each lirm a leader in its line. Consult this list before placing 
your order if you want the best at a price you li^e to pay. 



' f m 



AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKS ACKS. 

Polrler Tent & Awning Co., lo*; K. Sup. 
St.. mauufa cturer and repairing. 

Duluth Tent i Awnins *-'» . ISV^w^V.^^i? 
St. F'acksacks 75c up. Zenith 347-K. 



AWNINGS AND TENTS. 



WAU.. TENTS 
Am-^rlcan Tent 



FROM $4.50 

& Awning Co 



UP 



ACCOUNTANT. 



HATS RENOVATED. 



Don't throw your hats away. Old hats 
made new at the Z*nith Shoe Shining 
parlors, in Sullivan s barber shop, 215 
W. Sup. St. 



FOR RENT — MODERN NINE-ROOM 
brick apartment, liot water heat, de- 
sirable location. 1017 East Second 
street. Only $40 per month. Inquire 
lOia East Second -street or at J2 East 
Superior street. Grand 13H2. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM STRICTLY 
modern steam-healed flat; janitor 
service; central location, within easy 
walking distance of courthouse, post- 
ottice and lailroad depots; only $30 
to lighi party, no children. Cuil 
Melrose 2615. '-^ 



FOR RENT — 
street; seven 
gas; $25 per 
4U3 Lonsdale 



119 Vi EAST 
large rooms 
month. H. 
building. 



SECOND 

and bath, 

J. MuUin. 

721 



per 
.21 



FLATS FOR RV^NT— IDEAL SEVEN- 
ruoni apartmi-ni with beautiful lake 
view; hot and cold water; janitor 
service supplied; storeroom. $57 
month. St Elmo apartment.>s. 
East First street. Rental dcpartinetit, 
John A. Stephenson & Co.. Wolvln 
b uilding. '_^ 

FOR RENT— SEV EN- ROOM FLAT* 
modern, hot and cold water, newly 
papered and painted. $20 per month. 
517 First avenue last. 



FOR RENT — 4lJ FOLuiK AVENUE 
east, ten-room modern house, with 
all conveniences; $50 per month. 
Stryker. Manley & Buck. Toiro 
building. 



FOR SALE— HOUSES. 



721 



FOR liENT — 141« 
street. &-room house, 
veniences; laundry 
Stryker. Manley & 
building. 



E.\.ST FIRST 
with all con- 
In basement. 
Buck. Toirey 
721 



* 

if- 
* 

f. 

* 



HOMES WITHOUT CASH. 

We build you a home to suit, 
without any down payment or 
bonus, on any good lot you own 
in Duluth — just monthly pay- 
ments. Act today, as we aie 
limited as to the number of 
houses we can build. No expense 
to you until your house Is fin- 
ished. Get our plans and prices. 
Uur houses built by union labor 
for Duluth climate. Office open 
evenings by appointment. 



THE 



EDMUND G. 
AGENCY. 



WALTON 



208 EXCHANGE BLDG. 



a] 

* 

* 
it 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 

WOOD PURDY CO.. 
501 Manhattan Building. 



77 



HOTEL FOR SALE AT A BIG BAR- 
gain, 23 rooms, furniture worta 
$1,200; selling price only $750; easy 
terms. 



1)1 PROVED SHOE REPAIRING. 



MONEY S.WING. TI..IE SAVING. SHOE 
saving. Whlld you wait. Gopher Shoe 
works. 



A»"COUNTANT— F. D. HARLOW. 41 
Lyceum building; phone, Melrose 

3 'J X 

" Til PROVIDENCE 

•phones 862. 



B. M. LESTER, 

buliJing. Both 



ART GLASS AND MIRRORS. 

All km. is glass; lowest prices. St. Ger- 
main Bros.. 121 First avenue west. 



KEY, LOCK AND SAFE WORKS. 



Sander Bros.' Hardware 
store. 20 1 W. Isf St.Phones: 
Old. Mel 3':'69; New. 2:8S-.'V. 



FLATS FOR RE.NT — EX«'ELLENT 
sev»'n-room at>arttnent with lovely 
lake view, hot and cold water and 
Janitor serviir- supplied; storeroom, 
$53 per montli. Adams apartinent.s, 
715 East First street. Rental depart- 
ment, John A. Stephenson Ht, Co., 
Wulvin building. 72S 



FOR RENT — 1510 LONDON ItOAD. 
five-room flat: all conveniences ex- 
cept heat; $25 p«'r month. Stryker. 
Manley & Buck, Torrey building. 724 



FOR RENT — NINE-ROOM HOUSE. 
1426 East First street; $45 per 
month, laundry, furnace. Pulford, 
How &, Co., 60» Alworili building. 






FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM HOUSE; 
all modern except heat; rent reason- 
able; 423 Vs East Fifth street. In- 
quire at I'uritan laundry, 22 Lake 
avenue north. 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
centrally located. $l!« per month. 
Inquire 501 West Michigan street. 



FOR RENT— WE HAVE ONLY ONE 
of our new brick East end houses 
left, modern In all particulars Do 
not fail to see us at once and cnoose 
your own decorations. F. I. Salter 
company. 721 



FOR SALE. * 

Dandy, brand new, six-room cot- •A- 
tage, hardwood floors, beautiful ie 
surroundings; large lot, 50 by 140. ^ 
If you are looking for an attrac- •* 
live home at a very reasonable i(r 
price, see us at once. ii: 

W. M. I'RINDLE & CO.. ?V- 

3 Lonsdale Bldg. * 

New 'phone 239; old, Melrose, 2400. * 



BOARDING HOUSE — AUSTRIAN 

trade. This place is getting the busi- 
ness; big snap. Building and all only 
$250; worth $900. 

CONFECTIONERY— CORNER LOCA- 
tion; three living rooms; daily sales 
from $25 to $40; good fountain; big 
lunch trade; rent only $30. 



CONFECTIONERY — FIVE LIVING 

rooms; selling price $300; rent $35 
month. This is one of the biggest 
snaps in the city. 



OCEAN STEAMSHIPS. 
LAKELAND RIVER STEAMERS. 



S. S. COLUMBIA. 
Tim* Card. 

Trip* to Fond dii Lm. 
Lrares Duluth for Kou.l du Lac daily (n<^ft* 
urday and .Sundar) at 9 a. m.. returninx to 
lutti at G p. 111. 

Siiturdajs aud Sundays leaTes Duluth at 9 a. 
and 2 i>. m., rcturnlus to Dulutb at 1:45 p. 
and 8:20 p. m. 

Round Trip Tickets, SOe. 



!>«• 



ROOMING HOUSP:- 
selling price only 



A-V^rt-;'5^^*>'v-v^*-**'***'>'^.'^^.^>-^**'*'^^'«- 



LANDSCAPE GARDENING. 

GARDENS OR LAWNS TAKEN CARE 
of, grading and s idding, by day or 
contract, b. Johnson. 'Phone Mel 4242. 



SITIATION WANTED— FEHALE. 

SITUATION WANTED— SEWING BY 
the day by experienced dressmaker. 
J li;*. Herald. 



FOR RENT— NINE- ROOM HOUSE. 708 
West Second street; $40 per month; 
hot water heat, water paid. I'ulford, 
How & Co.. 60^ Alworih building. 

725 



H. B. KEEDY. 
Melrose 1390; 
for sale. 



1709 LONDON ROAD. 
Grand. 148S-X. Loam 



ALTO TIRE REPAIRLNG. 



Dulutii Auto Tirt Repair Co. — Re- 
treading and sectional work. \\ e also 
repair and apply solid tires. Satis- 
faction guaraiUeeO. 329 E. Sup. St. 
Grand 983. 



ALTOS FOR HIRE. 

Ddv or night; Asa Lyons, Ben Skinner, 
drivers, at St. Louis hotel; old. 1996; 
new 2127-X. or Baltimore Lunch. 



BLSINESS CARDS PRINTED. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 




A. Haak'tnsen. dealer 
ai d expert repairer, 
at J. W. Nelson's. 5 
K.ist Superior street. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY <^yOp 
dressmaker, prices reasonable. Write 
or call, entrance rear 2216 West sec- 
ond street. 

ASHING, 
day. 623 



SITUATION WANTED — W 
ironing and cleaning by the 
East Seventh street. 

SITUATION 
wanted to 
laundress. 

2007. 



WANTED — LAUNDRY 

take home by experienced 

Call old phone. Melrose 



FOR RENT— THREE-ROOM HOUSE; 
1127 West First Street. Inquire 
Wolvln building, barber shop. 



^1 



FOR RENT— TWELVE-ROOM BOARD- 
ing house; two minutes' walk from 
Gla.ss Block; two bathrooms, electric 
light, etc. Walil-Messer Realty com 
pany, 2oS Lonsdale building . 

FOR RENT — FOUR- ROOM HOUSE, 
water, sewer and electric light. 321 
East Fifth street, inquire Bloom & 
Co., 102 West First street. 



FOR SALE — FIVE- ROOM MODERN 
cottage on good lot in nice loca- 
tion, near Thirty- ninth avenue west. 
Water, hardwood floors, basement, 
concrete foundation. For sale at 
your own price Must be sold this 
week. Call new "phone, Lincoln 
250 X. 



tion 
place 



good 
up. 



-TWELVE 
$550; best 



ROOMS; 
of loca- 



furniture. 



Look this 



MEAT MAPKET — MANAGER FOR 
same, with the privilege of buying; 
price only $250; good location and no 
competition. 



KVERYTHING IN MUSIC; SEND FOR 
catalogues; populir sheet music 10 
cents; Boston Music Co. 



AT STONES BOOK STORE 
you wait; 50c per hundred. 



WHILE 



CARPENTER REP.UR WORK. 

REPAIR OR NEW WORK DONE REA- 
soaaoly; plans made, estimates lur- 
nls.TL-i Ole Heigetun. 2209 West 



\ 



^ev:ond 
4s»2-Y. 



street New 'phoue Lincoln 



WOKK DONE ^'^.f I^^Y:,-i*- Jy;^**8<^^-• 
207 W. Isl St. Zen 12.4, or Z.<e:\. 609 1. 



CABINET MAKER AND FINISHER. 

^^^"'WESTEIU.UND, 207 W. 1st St. Store 
showcase fixtures a specialty, bia 



M0\ INU AN1» STORAGE. 

HOUSEHOLD GOOJ>S packed, moved, 
stored and shipped at reduced rates. 
General draying Machinery and 
sates moved. Duluth Van & Storage 
company. Both phones 492. 210 
West Superior street. 



SITUATION WANTED— BY EXFEKl- 
enced woman, washing and ironing. 
by the day or at home. 720 East 
Third stre et. Melrose 18 93. 

SITUATION WANTED— COMPETENT 
girl desires position di>ing general 
house work. Address 312 Fifty-first 
avenue west. 



SITUATION W.VNTED — WASHING, 
ironing or nursing by the day. l'.>i 
Thirty-ninth avenue west. 



OXY-ACETVLEXE WELDING. 

do3?t'"scrap''a^j Irok^^ 

or machine part of any size of Iron. 
■ tecl. aluminum it brass until you 
have conferred vith us. Buck & 
Spring. 313 East Michigan street, 
•phonea: Bell, Mil. 974. Zea.. Grand 
974. 



OSTEOPATHY. 



aud 



CARPET CLEANLNO. 

Interstate Carpet Cleaning Company—- 

^"sfnoue & Van Noi man. coiupressed 

air cleaners and rug weavers. 1926 

West Michigan street. Both 'phones. 



! 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

. D^in^h^El^gU^^^rT^^g'c^^ 
>- Mg: I 613 Palladio bldg. Specincations 
►* Drepared and construction superln- 
tenaed for waterworks, sewerage, etc. 



Dr. C. B. Hutchlnsjn, specialist. 306-7 
Alworth Bldg. tifflce Grand 821-D; 
residence Melrose 4481. 

Dr. Lillian Moffat, osteopathic physi- 
cian. 4»>4 Providenc* bldg. Both phones. 



SITUATION WA.NTED— MALE. 

t-TUATlON WAN TED— PUBLIC JAN- 
Itor and window-washer. Prudence 
Robert the best new window-cleaner 
In the city. Melr ose 305. La Salle hotel. 

SITUATION WANTED— WANTED Po- 
sition as salesman. Considerable ex- 
perience la whole.sale groceries. Best 
of references. Address X 105. Her- 

ald. 

SITUATION WANTED— A SET OF 
books to take care of evenings. Ad- 
dress «4 14 4. care Herald. 



FOR ItENT — NINE-ROOM HOCSE, 
with heat, water and janitor service; 
centrally located, nicely finished. 
J D. Howard &■ Co., Providence build 



Ing. 



724 



* FOR SALE. a- 
11 BIG BARGAIN. *• 
i^ Do you want a natty six-room i^ 
a- cottage, very neat and well built, *- 
?:- Willi good big lot, beautifully sit- *• 
ic uated? Must leave city, and for i:- 
H- cash will take exceedingly low t- 
ii- price. Act quickly if you want -^ 
H- thi.s bargain. Address V 220, *• 

* Herald. * 

FOR .SALE— NINE-ROOM HOUSE IN 
West end, close to car line; stone 
foundation; price $1,800; easy terms. 
Western Realty company, 1922 W^e.st 
Superior street. 728 



FOR .SALE — SMALL HARDWARE 
store; tine location, cheap rent and a 
money-maker; and the price is right. 

719 
WOOD-PURDY" CO.. 
501 Manhattan Building. 



Moonlight Excuraiont or the Lake. 
Lmtps Duluth, foot of Fifth aveuuo woat. at ItM 
p. m. returiuDg at 10:oO p. m. 

Tickets. 25 eeats. 

Special rales to cliurrlie,-i and sivletles. 

H. 0. CLOW. Manaser. 

Office and Dock. Fool of t'ifiti .Krenuo West 

Melrose. 567. Grand. 567. 



RAILROAD TIME TABLES. 



MlNNEAPDLI5.ST.PAUL 

hj'SaultSte.MarieRy. 



UNION STATION— Superior St. aod Sixth Ave. W«*L 



■»^ ■ 



Leare. TWIN PORTS EXPRESS. 



\rrlv*. 



FOR SALE — STRICTLY FIRST CLASS 
rooming house, nicely furnished; nice 
neighborhood; a big bargain; huiry 
for this; for quick sale, price $550. 



FOR SALE — LAUNDRY; ONE-HALF 
Interest; everything modern and up- 
to-date.; clears around : oO monthly; 
good location; price $3,000. 



FOR RENT — BEAUTIFUL SEVEN 
room brick house, 412 Eighth avenue 
east; hot water heat, hardwood fini.-Jh, 
everything strictly modern; $37.50 per 
month. Massac h use I la Real Estate 
company, IS Phoenix building. 724 

FOR RENT— TWELVE-ROOM HOUSE. 

315 We.st Third street, hardwood 
Hoors. electricity, gas; suitable for 
boarding house or roomers. $60. E. 
D. Field Co., Ex change building. 728 

FOR RENT — bEVEN-ROOM HOUSE. 
1626 4 East Third street; every con- 
venience; $35 per month. R. P. Dowse 
& t;o., 106 I'rovlde nce building. 72S 

'i'OR ItENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
bath, furnace, gas range, electric 
lights; 112 South Nineteenth avenue 
east; $32.50. E. D. Field company, 
204 Exchange building. 723 



FOR SALE— $6,000, SEVEN-ROOM 
modern house, 100-foot corner lot, 
shade trees and shrubbery; most 
beautiful neignborhood. F 151, Her- 
ald. 

FOR SALE OR RENT— COTTAGE, 2827 
Minnesota avenue on bayslde; ttve 
rooms. Iiardwood hoors and gas; will 
sell reasonable on terms. Imtulre ot 
owner at house. 



FOR SALE— RESTAURANT: THIS IS 
well located and doing a nice busi- 
ness; good reasons for selling; sacri- 
ficed for quick sale; price $175. 



. *9 . OOam 
B.SOam ts.OOpa 
S.ISam lO.iuaa 
4.0Uain t^.Siam 

12. 01 km Frum iu. 
Claire and 

CiU !»>«>• 

t.SOpm ValU 
*7.00pin 
DlnlDg Cars. Palaca ble«per» ami Libmry Obserra- 
tion Car*. Ve»llbulcU — Vacuum Cleaueu — Electna 

»r<.iuie.tioii at Li'ly-^miih wltli Train « f T .Miult- 
lUue. UUUstoiis and InlermedUUi polnta. 



*6.4Spni 
t7.30ani 7.15pm. 
2.4Spni I0.20i)in. 
tS.OOpm ll.30pffl 
For Kau 3.22ara 
Clatra and 
CUipijewa 
faiia 7. 1 Sam. 
*8.4Sam. 



DULUTH 

Superior 
tLaviy:iinllu 

UMCUi 



Milwaukca 

ChUngo 



FOR SALE — CONFECTIONERY WITH 
four living rooms; rent $20; daily 

' Bales $15; good location; this is a 
snap; price only $450. 



FOR SALE— HOTEL; TWENTY-FOUR 
rooms, all nicely furni.shed; will .sell 
at a big sacrifice; price $500; worth 
$1,800; easy terms on this. 



DULUTH 



BUSINESS 

509 Torrey 



EXCHANGE 
building. 72!: 



Leave. 


BROOTEN EXPRESS. 


kiUe. 


t5.45am 


Duluin . . . 


..t».00pm 






17.00am 6 


liam 


.... Supeuol .. 


.. 8.;iUpin 


15. 


00p« 


10. OOam 8 


2:affl 


...Mouw Lake.. 


.. 6.20pin 


U 


Jbpm 


S.ltvm 10 


2Uam. 


WiliUon . . . 


.. 4.42pm 


/ 


26aa 


t4.V0pm 10 


.SOam 


.... Uuauila .. 


.. 4.25pm 


t8 4iaM 


fl 


.20pm 


. . . . Biuoteu 


..tl.45pm 






Connect loiia at 


Urouteu for tVIo Ciiliu, 


WetUrs 


Canada ai: 


1 the 


Pacific Coast 








Leave 


DULUTH-WINNIPEG 


LINE. AfTlTe. 


t 9.30ani.. 




Uulttio . . . 





r 5 


Item 


lO.OSam.. 




. . . . Superior . . 




4.4l.«ai 


II. 25am.. 




....Moot* Lake.. 




S 


lapm 


4.00pm.. 




Ca.-s Lake.. 




lU 


2Aam 


4.37pffl.. 




Bemidjl ... 




M 


S-taa 


7.30pm.. 




.Thi^r Ulver KalU 


i 


00a« 


Couiiccuuns at 


Tlilcf UUi-r iuLi 


(ur Winnipeg. 





FOR .SALE— BIG SNAP AT LAKE- 
side; must leave city; five-room 
house; corner 50 by 140 lot; $9o0; 
cash required. $300. Harris Realty 
company, Manhattan building. 727 



SITUATION W.\NTED— WANTED A 
set of books to work on evenings; 
work reasonable. Address Z 1002, 
Herald. 



PATIINTS. 



PATENTS — ALL ABOUT 
&ee Stevens. 61o Jcllwood 



PATENTS, 
building. 



FLINO REPAIRING SHOP. 



SITUATION W.VNTED— BY AN Ob - 
fice man; workeil fifteen years in one 
office; solicited four years; will work 
Inside, travel or solicit; rea.sonable 
salary or salary and commission. Ad- 
dress K 152. care Herald. 



FOR RENT — EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE, 
1312 East Fourth street; $25 per 
month; furnace, good basement, bath. 
Pulford. How «( Co., 609 Alworth 
building. 725 



CHIROPODISTS. 



WHY SUFFER ^VITH t,oRE 
corns, bunions and all foot 
positively cured, single corns 
cents. Dr. G. S. Smythe. 
Superio r street, room 1". 

COitNS REMOVED. 25c. 
nails and bunions cured 
20 West Supt-rlor street. 



FEET, 
trouble 



The 
10 



Twin Ports 
• E. Mich. St 



I iano 
Hel. 



Repairing 
788; Grand 



Co.. 
544. 



17 East 



INGROWN 

Dr. Scott, 
upstairs. 



CARPET AND LINOLEUM WORK. 



F. J. Lowe, the window shade ma^. 
Carpet and linoleum work. W all pa- 
.leaned. Leave orders at acott s 
store. 



per 

drui 



CARRIAGE AND WAGONS. 



6EE J. 

pair 

Alley 



G. ELDER. CARRIAGE 
and horseshoeing; it-a 
East. 



RE- 

Flrst 



PIANO & FURNITURE REPAIRING 

Piano refurnishing carpenter and cab- 
inet maker. Juhnson & Carlson. 220 Va 
W. Third St. Gt and 2322; Mel. 140o. 



PAINTING AND PAJ'ERHANGING. 



FOR 
see 



PAINTING VND DECORATING 
Youngdahl & Dlers. 223 W. 2d. St. 



F. Leonard. Hous. , sign, carriage and 
marine painter. J'. Grignons ship yds. 



BUG WEAVING. 



SlTU.VnoN WANTED— BY MIDDLE- 
aged man as night watchman in a 
hotel or wholesale house, used to 
janitor work; can also take care of 
any kind of furnace; best of refer- 
ences. L 191. Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— YOUNG, SO- 
ber. reliable, married man as driver 
or coachman; well acquainted to city. 
S 165, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED — BY ALL 

around tlorlst and gardener In pri- 
vate place, life experience; steady 
worker; German; please state wages 
and partlculais in first letter. O. 
Studer, 360 Sixty-first av enue east. 

JEFFERSON. PUBLIC JANITOR. ALL 
kinds ot store and office cleaning. 
Mel. 2623. 2l;j East Superior street. 



FOR SALE— NEAR STANFORD UNI- 

verslty, California, two modern resi- 
dences, one rented, four years' con- 
tract, at $30. Write No. 3 Sherwood 
building. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HOUSE; $16 

i)er month; water and gas. 307 West 
^Mfth s treet. 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE. 109 
Thirty-ninth avenue west; city water 
paid; rental, $10 per month. J. D. 
lioward A Co., Providence building. 

719 



FOR SALE — A MODERN EIGHT- 
room house near Fifteenth avenue 
east; a bargain If taken at once. S 
172, Herald. 

FOR SALE— BY OWNER, 2412 WEST 
Second street, six-room house, built 
1909, water, gas, electric light, hard- 
wood floors. Price $2,500. 



FOR SALE — DAIRY. FOURTEEN 
cows, two horses and pigs; will sell 
witii or without property. Address 
A 190. Herald. 



BU.SINESS CHANCE.S— WANTED— AN 
experienced, practical man to take 
charge of our farm and timber land 
bu.siness; chance for half Interest to 
right man. We also want a man as 
manager of one of our branch em- 
ployment offices; in business for 
twenty-five years; good opening for 
right man. with part Interest in of- 
fice. National Employment Office. 
Fifth avenue west. 



Lcuie. 



CUYUNA RANGE LINE. 



Airtre. 



l>'i!utli t'O SOani 

.Sujxrlor lO.lSam 

La«ler 8 00am 

Ea.st J.*ke rS^"* 

_.^ Darliia 7.28am 

6 30pm Uustljfrg 7.18am 

6.4ipm Allklu 7 0«am 



S.iOpm. 

3 40pm. . 
5.50pm. . 
6.03pm.. 
6.21pm 



Irun Hub 



6.50am 



7.00pm 

Arrive 7.10pm OEERWOOO 6.35am Lease. 



t7.42pm.. 
7.50pm . 



•UdUj tUally except SmiJar. 



Cuyuua 
CruaLiy 



teOSam 
6 OOaM 



FOR RENT— DESIRABLE SIX-ROOM 
and alcove brick; modern conven- 
iences; 213 East Fifth street. Hart- 
man-O'Donnell agency, 205 Lonsdale 
building. 724 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM BRICK 
bouse. 2010. East Fifth street; entire- 
ly modern. Rent $22.50 i>er month. 
L. A. Larsen, 514 Providence build 



Ing 



720 



REAL ESTATE LOANS. 



MONEY TO LOAN. 
FOR SALE— SEVERAL GOOD 6 PER 
cent first mortgages on city property; 
$1,000 to $1,500 each. 

N. J. UPHAM CO.. 
18 Third Avenue West. 



FIRST-CLASS RAC- AND FILLER HUG 
weaving. &Ielro le 3341. 



RESTAURANTS. 



■" DANCING AND LESSONS. 

Daiicing Tues.. Thurs. and Sat. even- 
ings at 224 W. 1st St.. also dancing 
taugnt. 



DENTIST. 



bt W H Olson, 222 New Jersey Bldg. 
All w>rk guaranteed. Both phones. 



For good cooked neals try the Hoine 
Cooking restaurj-nt. 24 First Ave L. 



ROOFING, CORNICE, SKYLIGHTS. 



BURR ELL & HARMON. 308 E. Sup. 
Both 'phones. First-class work. 



St. 



RIFLES L\D GUNS. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON CITY PROP- 
erty; lowest rates; small and large 
amount!*. Scott-Kretdler company, 
405 Central a venue. Both 'phonea. 

VILLAGE LOANS IN MIN- 
Buy or build a home on 

payments. C. A. Knippen- 
Aiworth Bldg. 'Phones 5!W. 



CITY AND 

nesota. 
monthly 
berg. 300 



FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 220 
Fourteenth avenue east; $28 per 
month; furnace, bath, water paid. 
Pulford, How &. CO.. 609 Alworth 
building. . 725 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HOUSE, 
centrally located; $18 per month. In- 
quire 501 West Michi gan street 

FOR RENT— SIX-ROOM HOUSE, CEN- 
trally located, $12.50 per month. In- 
<tuire 501 West Michigan street^ 



FOR SALE— GOOD WORKING TEAM, 
5 and 6 years old, weighs 3.150 
pounds; will sell at a bargain if 
taken at once, also several good farm 
mares; part lime given It desired. 
608 North Flity-sixth aVenue west. 
Z enith phone Cole 3001. 

FOR SALE — NEW SIX-ROOM HOUSE; 
just being completed; all modern ex- 
cept heat; a snap at only $2,700. 
Smith Realty. 524 Manhattan building 
720 

FOR SALE— SNAP I'OR QUICK BUY- 
er, at Duluth Heights, six-room 
house, newly decorated, good condi- 
tion, electric lights, fine garden, 
vegetables growing, fruit trees, etc. 
Corner lot 50 by 100 feet. Highland 
Co., 505 Sellwood building. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE OR 
rent, a large brick building with 
grocery store and butcher shop, do- 
ing a good business, together with 
two, three, four and five-room flats, all 
elegantly furnished and with every 
convenience. Owner must do elth'^r 
one or the other to save wife and 
children's health. L 127, Herald. 



DILUTH, MISSABE&NOKIU. 
ERN RAILWAY. 

Offlcet 4^0 Weait Superior St. 



'I'huiie, 



Superior 
9Wi. 



Leave 



Arriia. 



FOli SALE— AT LAKESIDE, A FOUR- 
room house, wired for electric light, 
with storm sashes, to be moved; or 
will sell house and lot, 50 by 140; 
large shed and chicken coop; water, 
sewer and gas in lot L 147, Herald. 



FOR SALE— NEW SIX- ROOM HOUSE, 
concrete foundation; water, gas. 
electric light, toilet and bath, hard- 
wood rtoors, Georgia pine finlsii; price 
$2,150; $250 cash, $2u per montli. 
Thomas Olafson, 5417 Ramsey street. 
West Duluth. 72? 



FOR SALE— NEW SWC-ROOM HOUSE, 
city water, electric lights, $1,250 
cash, or $1,300 in payments. 122 
Sixty-first avenue south. West Du- 
luth. Inquire 108 East First street. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — WANTED, 
partner for hardware business; $2,000 
cash required. Address K 202, Her- 
ald. 



FOR SALE— CHEAP, THREE-CHAIR 
barber shop doing good business. In- 
quire L. H. Horstman, Sandstone, 
Minn. 



BUSINE.SS CHANCES— FOR SALE — 
County seat newspaper, 180 miles 
from cltie.s. Cylinder, Jobber, folder, 
gasoline engine, plenty news and 
job type. Value $2,800. First reason- 
able cash offer takes it. R. H. Dud- 
ley Ortonville, Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE 
or rent, store building, barn and 
warehouses; suitable for general 
merchandise, grocery store or meat 
market; good location. Finnish 
Mercantile company, Cloquet, Minn. 



HI'SINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE, MY 
hotel restaurant and saloon com- 
bined, doing good business; good lo- 
cation and cheap rent; good reason 
for selling; this is a snap; look it up 
at once. Joe Beaver, Phoenix hotel. 
Staples, Minn. ^^^ 



I Bibbloc. ChUiiola. Virginia. Bv*- | 
•7.40«m 4 letU. Coleraioe, Sbarou (Buhl) 

i tMounlu Irou. tSparta. tBlwabtll, 

I UlLbUig. CliUtiolm. SU;;roo 
•3.50pffl t (Uuhii. Virginia. Kfeleili. 

I Colcralue. 

I Tlrgtnta. Cook, Kalner. Toit 
•7.j«pm \ J-rancee. Port Arthur, Bau- 

i dette. Warroad. Winnipeg. 



•3.2l»a 



•la Slai 



. r^^ 



•i.ium 



•Daily. tl>allj except Sunday. 
Cafe, Observation Car. Mesaba Range 
Points, Solid Vestlbuled Train. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 



THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 

MVERMILION ROVTB" 



DUL'JTH— 



I Laara. | Arrlta. 



Knife Uifer. Two Haibora. Towai, 
EU, Aurora, Utwablk. McKlnUy. 
.SparU. fcvtleUi. Gilbert «"d 
Virg.nla 



•7.30am{t>2.00M 
t2.45pmi *6.00pai 



•Daily tD»lly except Sunday. 



FOR RfENT — FINE NlNE-ROOM 
brick house at 709 East First street; 
large light rooms; $60 per month, 
liental department, John A. Stephen- 
son He Co., Wolvln building. 720 



FOR SALE— BY OWNER, 1931 WEST 
Seventh street, a good house and 
fine lot, full of shade trees; good 
view; one block from car line. Price 
$2,500. Call evenings. 

FOR SALE— SIX-ROOM HOUSE. NEAR 
Twenty-sixth avenue west and Third 
street; bath, electric light and gas; 
hardwood rtoors all through, good 
basement; price $2,700; good terms. 
The Swedish Real Estate Bureau, 
2602 West Thi rd street. 

^ENT 



BUSINE.SS CHANCES' — STORE AND 
small slock of groceries and confec- 
tionery at St. Hilaire, Minn. Will 
sell same at a bargain for cash only. 
Mike Anderson, Baudette. Minn. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— 1708 WhiST Su- 
perior street; fourteen rooms, water 
paid; suitable for boarding house, 
rental $40 per month. J. D. Howard 
& Co., Providence building. 724 



FOR RENT — TWELVE-ROOM 
boarding house; two minutes walk 
from Glass block; two bathrooms, 
electric light. etc. Wahl-Messer 
ReaRy Co.. 20 8 Lonsadel building^ 



MONEY TO LOAN— LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm lands. John Q. A. 
Crosby. 3i;o I'ail adio building. 

Sl'X PER CENT INTEREST ON SMALL 
real estate loans; money on hand; 
prompt service. F. I. Salter com- 
pany, Lonsdale building^ 



FLORIST. 



J Le Borljus. florist, 9 
Flora! funeral designs. 



51 E. 3rd St.— 
cut flowers. 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 



Let Forsell do your 
334 E. Superior St. 



UPHOLSTERING. 

Zenith 'phone 949. 



FOR AN EXPERT UPHOLSTERER 
call Larsen. Lincoln 369, Mel. 738. 
Samples shown In latest designs. 



FURNITURE AND PIANOS. 

Finished and repaired. Theo. Thomp- 
336 E. Sup. St. Old phone 3828. 



son. 




Grinding and Repairing a 
specialty. City Gun Store, 

R. C KRtJSCHKE, 
402^ West Superior Street. 



SEEDS, PLINTS, TREES. 



\TTENTION— NO AT IS THE TIME TO 
nrune flowering siirubs and hedges. 
Call Mercer. M.d. 3545; Grand 234*. 
He knows how. 



SECOND HAND DEALERS. 



ANY AMOUNT OF MONEY TO LOAN 
on Improved property. A. H. Burg 
& Co., Alworth Bldg. 



FOR RENT— ELEVEN -ROOM HOUSE 
on Superior street and Fifth avenue 
east; all conveniences except heat; 
rent $43. Apply N. J. Upham Co., 
18 Third avenue west. 



Money to loan — Any amount; low rates 
Cooley & Underhill. 209 Exchange. 



Money 
Title 



to 
Co. 



loan, no 
613 First 



delay. Northern 
Nat. bank bldg. 



MONEY TO LOAN ON IMPROVED 
property. C. F. Graff. 450 Lonsdale. 



WANTED TO BUY. 



WANTED TO BUT — 
•mail tract of land 
I 99. Herald. 



A LARGE OR 
Cor lovestmeot. 



New and 
sold. A. 



second hand goods bought, 
B. Davis. 172J» W. Sup. St. 



SECOND-HAND MACHINERY. 



FURNITURE FINISHING. 



Finlslung. painting, paper hanging. 
W. Jr)hnson. Lincoln 369; Melrose 



A. 

738. 



HORSESHOEING. 



Shoeing crippled and Interfering horses 
my specialty. Carl Schau. 14 3d Av. B. 



HOTEL SUPPLIES. 



WE WILL FURNISH YOUR KITCHEN 
and dining room complete; write or 
'phoae E. F. Burg. 224 West First St. 



Wo buy and sell scrap 
ond-band machinery. 
Metal Co., Llnccln 366, 



Iron and sec- 
N. VV. Iron & 
Mel. 667 630. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

^L^T'iHInSEN?' MASSEUR. 400 NEW 
Jersey building. Old phone 4273 MeL 
rose. 



We bay acconJ-.^and 
stoves. Lincoln 295-X. 



furniture and 
1629 W. Sup. St. 



TUNING AND REPAIRING. 



C. M. RUD. TU:<ING AND REPAIR- 
ing of pianos and player pianolas. 
33o East. Super or St.. -Melrose JS28. 



WATIUMAKEE. 



j^dvertise in The Herald] 



Repairing neatly 
304 Manhattan 
rose 4719. 



done. Wra. E. Rose, 
bldg. Old phone Mel- 



WANTED TO BUY— OLD CLOTHES* 
auto and carriage tires. 328 Ea&t Su- 
perlor street. Zenith 1243. 

WANTED TO BUY, SELL OR EX- 
change property, any kind, any- 
where. Addre.-<a Northwestern Busi- 
ness Agency. Minneap olis. Minn. 

WANTED TO BUY— R«X).MING HOUSE 
state price and location in first let- 
ter. Y 158, Herald. 

WANTED TO BUY. FOR CASH. AN 
Interest in an established plumbing, 
steam and hot water heating busi- 
ness by man experienced in tliis line. 
Addrn.ss Y 157. Herald. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES. ETC. 

FOR RENT— 228 EAST SUPERIOR 
street; under construction, ready 
Sept. 1; liglit basement, first floor 
and second floor 25 by 60 feet; fine 
modern front; will make long lease. 
See H J. Mullln, 403 Lonsdale build- 
ing 724 



FOR SALE — $150 CASH AND 
money for 3-room cottage and 
foot lot. Lakeside, $1,100. C. E. 
412 Providence. 



50- 
Roe, 

721 



FOR SALE— DO Y-OU WANT A HOTEL, 
restaurant, rooming or boarding 
hou.'ie? We are the people who can 
furnish the largest list in the west 
for you to select your location from. 
Hotel & Restaurant Clearing House, 
Fort Dodge, Iowa. 



DULUTH 4 NORTHERN MINNESOTA RAJLWAY. 
Offieaa, SIO LanadaU bl«t- Ouluth. 
Trains comiett at KuiXe K"er ddiiy liucluJ.ng Sunday) 
with D & L K. Iraliia leaving UulutlJ at 1 .iO a. m.. 
.ud errtvUig at Duluth at 6:30 p. m. ConnecU at 
Cramer wllU Grand Marau .taga wben running 



NORTHERN PACIFIC RAILROAD. 



Leave. 
•4.00pm. 
•8.00am. 
•7.30pm. 
•t.Osam 



Aahlaiid and Kast 

Ashland and Ea>t 

. .Mluii. aud Dakota ICstreai. 
North Coast Llnilltd 



ArrUe. 
• M.iMm 
. •6.40pa 
. •S.lSaa 
. *6.29pai 



l^ave. 
tS.OOam 
• 1.55pm. 
•ll.lOpm. 



'Duiutii Sbun Lia*' 

8T. PAUL 

.. MINNEAPOLIS . 



Arilie. 

•6 . 30aa 
. t2.05pa 
. •7.oo»a 



•Dally. tDally ei' t^t SuiiJay. 
Depot at 334 Wcat Siiltrlor atreei. 



Thuns 211. Untoa 



FOR SALE— SIX- RtX)M HOUSE; 2027 
West First street. 'Phone Lincoln 

37-A. 



FOR SALE — HOUSES 02i THE EASY 
payment plan. Talk with Elder. 18 
Third avenue west. 



FOR SALE — A SPLENDID 9 -ROOM 
house, arranged two families; large 
corner lot; ail Improvements; snap at 
$3,300; cash, $1,000; terms. Smith 
Realty, 524 Manhattan building. /20 



FOR RENT — TWO FRONT ROOMS 
over Kelley Hardware company, three 
large windows. $37.50 per month. A 
good location for business. Pulford 
How &. Co.. 609 Alworth building. 

728 



FOR RENT — NICE LARGE ROOMV 
and airy store with Al basement; 
suitable for grocery, butcher, candy, 
confectionery or other purposes. Call 
at 29 West First street. A. Borgen. 



FOR SALE— SMART, NEW. MODERN 
six-room l^ome; hardwood floors, oak 
flnl.sh, stone foundation, hot water 
heat; $4,250. 5-0 Seventeenth avenue 
east. 720 



BUSINESS CHANCES — FOR SALE— 
Restaurant in city of 5.000, doing 
good business, owner want.s to sell 
on account of other business. Ad- 
dress Herald, O 94. 



FOR SALE— A SM.A.LL HOUSE AND A 
fine lot on East Fifth street; for a 
quick sale only $1,250. Smith Realty, 
524 Manhattan building. 720 



CLAIRVOYANTS. 

MADAM STERLING. PALMIST, CARD 
reader. 129 East First street, oppo- 
■Ito Armory. 



FOR RENT— VERY DESIRABLE OF- 
flces, fifteenth floor Alworth build- 
ing; two or more adjoining rooms In 
suits. Apply R. M. Atwater. Jr., Al- 
worth building. 



FOR RENT— 2010 WEST SUPERIOR 
street; $40 per month. Stryker, Man- 
ley & Buck, Torrey building. 721 



ASHES AND GARBAGE. 

REMOVED PROMPTLY, ZENITH 2378- 
X. 807 Sixth avenue west. 



FOR RENT— LARGE. LIGHT HALL 
suitable for lodges, private clubs, or 
meeting rooms. R. B. Knox A. Co. 

723 

FOR RENT— LARGE FRAME BUILD- 
Ing. corner Eighth avenue east and 
First street, easily remodeled for 
laundry plant, garage, light manu- 
facturing, etc. F. I. Salter company. 

FOR RENT— FINE LIGHT OFFICE IN 
front of Edison building 214-216 
West First street; newly decorated. 
Rental department, John A. Stephen- 
son & Co., Wolvln building. 720 



MRS. ANNA. CARD READING. LOST 
articles and property traced. 329 W. 
Superior St., room 12. Melrose 3275. 



FOR SALE— THE ONLY BAKERY 
and candy kitchen in town of 2,500, 
doin^ wholesale and retail business, 
can be bought cheap. Address L 157, 
Her ald. 

FOR SALE— CONFECTIONERY AND 
cigar store doing good business; 
owner leaving city; 2102 West Third 
street. ^ 

BUSINESS CHANCES — FIFTY-ROOM 
brick lodging house on Lake aveiiue 
south; $150 per month. Rental de- 
partment. John A. Stephenson & Co 
W olvin building. 720 

BUSINESS CHANCES — TELEPHONE 
system; 400 miles in Southern Min- 
nesota and Eajsterii South Dakota; 
will sell or trade for Minnesota lands 
Ebert Walker & McKnight company. 
315 Torrey building. 



NowS^WiItermIiheI 



C 

Li«4.45pa> »6.l5i,m 
Lv»5 05pm 6.35pm 
AxlO.liOam 7.45am. 
Ar* 1 1. SOam 6. 1 Sam 



Dulutii . 

.Superior 

MilMuukes 

Cliicagu 



Al»*.2aam • 1 2.40pm 
.Ar 7.53am 12.20am 
,.Lv 7.4jpm 
.Lt 6.25pm 10.13pm 



O.iSpm 
9.36pm 
4.30pm 

4.uupa 



LTtS.SOam *4.l5pm... Duluth . . .ArtS.JSpm 
L. 9.10am 4.35pm.. Superior -Ar 3.05pm 
Ar 4 30pm 9.50pm. .. .S"- Paul. ...I.« «-' 0am 
Ar S.OSpoi 10.25pm. iiinne<poUi .Lt 7.iOaiS 

•DaUy tDally except Sunday. 

Otnce. 302 West .Superior Su. Dulutb. 

Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



L,eare. 



8TATIO.N3. 



Arrlra. 



T7.4Mm 
tt. 12am 

tft.20U) 



••.15pm... Duluth ...•lu.3aam Ti 40pa 

(Sue Line Uniun Station.) 
•a. 45pm... Supeilor ...*ia.00am tS.lOva 

(Soo IaUw Liiion 6UUOI1.) 
•»«.ft»»m... Superior ... •».50«m tS.BO»a 
tUiuou Depot. I 
ATlTt. LeaTfc 

17 55»m 5.40aa.. Hou«hton ..tll.OCpa 
to 35pm e.aoam... Calumet ...ttO.IUpm 
t7 05pm •4.20am.. UUpemiug ..•12.20am 
t7 45Bm •5.00am.. Uarquette ..•H.'Mpm 
• la.ZOamSMit Sta. Maria •6.2ipa 
•B OOaa... Uontraal ... *9.5Cpm 
••.ZOpa.... iiuatun •lO.OOam 

!*•»* ., . 

tS.OSam ♦8.l5pa. . Mcntreal . 
TlO.OOpm »I0. 20am.. .New York. 



.•10. OOam 
. *7.l5pa 



i«.20aa 
tS.20*a 

•■.20»a 

•«.3Uaa 

Tio.oopa 

• i.Staa 



Business Chances — We Uuy stocks ot 
merchandise, paying spot cash. No 
matter where located or slse of stock, 
write Eastern Salvage Co., merchan- 
dise brokers. Duluth. Minn. 



Ci^AIRVOYANT — PSYCHIC READ.-J 
your entire future on all affairs in 
a reading by mall. What's for you"? 
Full Information, enclose 4 cents in 
stamps; interview private daily. 
Prof. Dorerkoren. suit 424-426 Hayes 
block, Zanesville. Wis. 



REMOVED O.N 
Barrett. 1122 



SHORT NOT'iJE— DICK 
E. 4th St. Zen. 1945-Y. 



PICTURE FRAMING. 

OUST AVE HENNEGKE. 411 K. SUP. 8T. 



GARDEN TRACTS. 

f^oiTI^ale^^^^beauHfiH^^ 

tract at Woodland; twenty minutes 
from car line; will be placed on sale 
Sunday. July 16; aniall payments; 
easy terms. Address Z. A. D., Her- 
ald. 



CLOTHES CLEANED & PRESSED. 

Bring your skirt to 10 4th Av. W. to 
be cleaned and pressed for 50c; dry 
cleaning also. Zenith Grand 1852-X. 



WANTED — Ladles and gentlemen to 
know that the best pressing and re- 
pairing in the city Is done at F. A. 
McFarTin's, 201Vi W. Ist; Grand 1134-X. 



BOARD WANTED. 

BOARD AND ROOM WANTED— RE- 
flned young mother with 5Vs-month- 
old baby wishes room and board with 
private family; use of piano desired. 
Address U 189. Herald. 



Blanchett Hotel 

522 LAKE AVENUE SOUTH. 

TourlsCi and othen wlU find a comfortabia hooie- 
llka place near harbor front, steam beat and all coo- 
venleni-ea; apeclal rates by day. week or month. ^ 



tDally except Sunday. 'DaUy. 



THE GREAT NORTHERN. 



Leava. 




lO.eOam 




•3.2Spm. 




ail.lOpa 




••.45M 


Cr 


•S.SSpa 


, 



STATIONS. 



ArrlrtL 



tl.55pm. 
tt.OOam. 



•T. PAUL 
sad 

MINNEAPOLIS 

Crookaton. Utaod Forka. 

Montana and Coavt 

Swsn Mher. Uibbing. Virginia 

St Cloud. VVUmal. Slojx City. 



TlO.lSpa 
•i.55»a 
•O.aoaa 
•6.35pa 

•7.l»«a 

tl2.50pa 
TiO.'ipa 



•Dally 
ready at 



tDaUy 
9 p. aa. 



except 
Otrica. 



Sunday. 
SpakUng 



Twin 
tiottL 



Ctty 



HOTELS. 



JOHN MUELLER, 
street. 



2011 WEST FIRST 



72« 



C THOERSEN, 11 Lake avenue north. 
Grand 2197-Y. Everything in tailoring 



STOVE REPAIRS. 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10,000 different stoves and ranges. C 
F Wiggerts & Son. 410 East Supe- 
rior street. Botb 'ptionoa. 



Cody Hotel 

Corner Central and Ramsey, West Du- 
luth. Newly furnliihrd and modern. 
Kur<»pean plan. RooniM 50c and up. By 
month <S.OO to tia.00. 



Hotel (Superior 



Hotel McKay 

Caraar Flrtt SL aatf Firtk Am. WaaL DUIUTM. 



Imperial Hotel 

Thoroughly modern and up-to-dat» 
In every respect. 
ROOMS, 78« AND UP. 
206-24»8 West Superior Street. 



—SUPERIOR. WIS.— 



Lead Ing Hotel 
popular prieaa. 
train a. 

EUROPEAN 



of the aity. 
Larga Saapla 



Fiat 
Raom. 



Cat* Stnriea 
But maata 



PLAN— 7Sa ta I2.9C 
Isl Waakiy Rataa, 



pv tfa>. 




Frederic Hotel 



Carnar FIrat Awaua Waat and FIrrt S'.reat. Oaluth. 
maat hama-hka place in the city. Rsomt aiagia 
•ulta: kat aart coK runninp water In eacfe 
HALEY RESTAURANT CO.. Pra»a. 



The 
ar an 






1 

1 

I 

• 

4 








- 




• 








> 



Saturday, 



THE BULUTH HERAIiD 



July 16, 1911. 





ALD EXCURSION 



a 



THE RIVER 



tf 



p9^ NEXT MONDAY 




t'>~ -,-■«" 







One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Atl\erllseincnt I>css Tl»«n 15 Ceujls. 

WTephonFdTrectory 

-UK- 
BUSINESS 
HOUSES 

Below you wiU Jin<J. a 
coimensea Usl o£ . reiiabU- 
business lirms. Ti»»s i» ^e- 
biiinc-a lor U\e convenience 

turder Ij any one ot tnein 
Svili receive lUc saiue care- 
ful aiienlion as would be 
gjvcn an order placed in 
kptrson. iou can saiely rte- 
Jpcnd upon Uie icliai'tuiy 
\ut any ou© of ihese nrina- 

l^liune. 'rtione. 

CHinOPOD»ST— 

Ur. liuyt, Temple bldfif. 
DRi laiiyrs — 

Ed ilc Jtrcnimus . 

Bo V c e . - • • 

bniith A: Smith . . . 
DYK UOKliS — 

City L>ye Works. .. - - 
Zenitli City Dye works.lbbS 
Northwestern ^l-'ye'»S_ 

& Cleaning Co ■^■^* 

^, r al I>yeli.s **..,-, 

. , auirig Co. . ;-•"• 

liitcri^tati- Cleaning At 

Dv.lng Co. -Kelly s l^iO 
GROCIJIS— 
Thatci.cr .Sc Tnatcher.. 

FcL-rU'SS l-aundry ... 

Yale Laundry 

Lutvs Laundry 

Home Li- ludry Co... 

Model Laundry . 

Puritan I'ower Laun- 
dry • ...13.8 

Incline Hand Lsundry. 
•pi. one Mel ^*>^9 

Sn 'W flake Laundry. SSJ» 

M A. Ccx *3<S 

MEAT >i\iiKi:rs— 

Mork Bro3 i-'»" 



One Cent a Word 1 acn Insertion. 
No .Advcrtlsciuent Less l'*»"Hj^'*_SS."*^ 

helFxvamed Ifem ale. 

WANTED— NORWKGl AN GIFiL FOI; 
i-'eneral housework. 2-31 West 

ruurth street. 



\V.\NTt:D — DISH W'ASHEK. OHIO 
cafe, 617 West Supe rior street. 

WA NT IID— WOMAN TO ACT AS COOK 
and hou:sekeeper for club of six 
youuK men al Hibbing. Minn; furnish 
references. Address box 749, Hib- 
IdnK. Minn. 



.1243 
. 163 

. ;:&» 
19^2 



. 42S 
. 47!> 
. 447 

. 478 

.2749 



GSJ3-Y 

10-7 

163 

7 

2174 

1516 

2376 

30 

1907 

428 
479 
447 

478 
13'2 

G 1373 
62 



189 



WVNTHD — OIKL ^OR GKNKHAL 
housework. 1:21 We >t Third street. 



WANTED— NK.\T Al'PKAKlNG GIUL 
to help around sunnmer hotel; no 
heavy work. Applj S14 Ea.st First 
i-treet. 



WANTED — A WOMAN ABOUT 35 
ve<:rs old for gene al work around 
suniiner hotel; iniisl be able to cook; 
good wages. Appl> 914 East First 
street. 



One Cent a Word Kach Insertion. 
No Advertiiieiucnt l'<?^^3|i^^?J_i^;J:^Siii^* 

HElTwANTED— M ALE. 

WANTED^EN TO KNOW WE GROW 
» head of hair or no pay. Bryant A 
Co.. room 12. Piioenix building. Mel- 
rose 3257. 



WANTED— BRIGHT MEN TO TRAIN 
us chauffeurs; ^radical instruction 
given. Auto owners' association. l«l^ 
Hennepin ave nue, Minneapolis. 

NATIONAL EMFLOi.MENT CO. Estab- 
lished l!>S:i. 'Phone 376 for men. 



WANTED— DKV LU.MBEK GRADERS. 
Work year round. Apply to Virginia 
& Rainy Lake company. Virginia. 

Minn. 



WANTED — WOMAN COOK ACCL'S- 
tomed to good wages. 2531 West 
Superior street. 

WANTED — CHA.MBERMAID. AFFLY 
jll St. Croix avenii >. 



Ri.AL ESTATE, FIRE 

IXSURA.\XE AND 
RLXTAL AGENCIES^ 

cHTTi^nrr^J^^kyXT^^r^'l Exch. bUis 
John A Sttphenson & Co.. U olMn bldg. 
E. D. Field Co.. 203 Exchange building. 
L. .\. Larsen Co.. Frovld-.-nce build iig. 
W. C. Sherwood, lis Manhattan bld.^. 



FOH SALE HISIELLANEOIS. 

FO R^^ALFr — REMINGTON TYPE- 
•Wfiter; bargain, time or will rent to 
rlgiit part y. J K'l. Herald. 

FOR SALE— THw^.OUGHBRED ENG- 

lish setter pups, 5 mouths old. In- 
<iuire evenings. 422 Ninteenth and 
One naif avenue west or can be seen 
at K. F. D. No. 2. Box 22. 



WANTED— YOFNG GfRL FOR LIGHT 
housework. Apply J22 Central ave- 
nue, West Duluth. 

WANTED— YOU.VG '.ADY EXFERI- 
enced in soda founain: state wages 
expected. Address j 153, Herald. 

WANTED — STRON CJ CuMPET ENT 
nurse girl. i:219 East Supevioi- 
street. 

W-\.NTED— GOOD GTRL FOR GEN- 
eral housework. :016 East First 
ftreet. 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. No. 5 M. Elmo flats, 721 
East First street. 

W -ANTED — A GOOD COOK. MRS. J. H. 
Htartling, 2305 East Third street; 
Melrose 2540. 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY NOW. 
Earn |60 in railroad position lu spring. 
E.\celieni opportunity, don't miss it. 
Write Thompson's Telegraph insti- 
tute, Minneapolis. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No .\dverti.seniont Less Than 15 Cents. 

AlTDmON WANTS 
On Pages 30 and 31^ 

FOR RE:^T— UOOMS. 

FOR SALE AND FOR RENT CARDS 
15 cents at Judd's. 20 East Superior 
street. 



One C(^at a Word Each Insertion. 
No .Vdvcr lisenicut Less Tliau 16 Cents. 

FOR RENT— FLATS. 

fOR RENT— FIVE VERY ATTRAC- 
tive rooms, second floor, 501 East 
Fourth street; splendid condition; 
new hardwood floors; modern except 
heat; |20 per month. F. I. Salter 
company. <^1 



FOR RENT— LARGE, WELL FUR- 
nithed Iront room and single room; 
all conveniences. 201 East Second 
street. 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM; 
stoam heated aparUnent near Sev- 
enth avenue east and First street; 
good home for right party. Address 
P. O. bo.\- lO'J. 



WA.\TP:D— GIRLS AT CENTRAL EM- 
plovment Agency, room 3 over Big 
L'uiuth store. Botl 'phones^ 



WANTED— AN E.XPl RIENCED LADY 
bookkeeper; must furnish references. 
Apply 232 East Superior street. 
Zenith L>ye house. 



WANTED— SKAT SOAP. A GREAT 
side line or specialty for any salesman : 
Minnesota is one of the few states 
not covered; the right man mtist be 
a hustler, can get control. Write 
Skat. Hartford, Conn. 

WANTEiJ— YOUNG MEN AND WOMEN 
— The Whitney School of Telegraphy 
for practical knowledge of the art. 
Day and evening sessions. I'rogres- 
sive. West Duluth. Minn. 

WANTED— MEN TO LEARN BARBER 
trade; few weeks completes b> our 
method. 111. cat. free. Moler Barber 
Col., 27 E. NIC. Ave., Minneapolis, 
Minn., Established lhy3. 



WANTED — SIDE LINE. POCKET 
samples: 10 minut* s, $40 commission; 
high guide men only; no others need 
apply. Advertising Novelty com- 
jiany, Newton. Iowa. 



WA.NTED — SALESMAN EXI'ER- 
lenced in any line to sell general 
trade in Minnesota; unexcelled spe- 
cialty prupositiim with brand new- 
feature; commission with $35 weekly 
for expenses. The Continental Jew- 
elry company. Clevelaiid. Ohio. 

WANTED — PAINTER. GEORGE 
Stratton. 15 Third avenue east. 



FOR RENT— TWO OR FOUR FUR- 
nlshed rooms for housekeeping. 2609 
We.st Huron. 



FOR RENT— FOUR -ROOM FLAT AT 
2102 West Third street; $10 per 
month, water furnished. D. W. Scott 
& Son. 402 Torrey building. 721 



FOR RENT— FLATS. 

NO. 16 FIFTEE.NTH AVENUE WEST, 
four rooms, first floor; $12. 720 

1S03 WEST MICHIGAN STREET. 
$14.50; water and sewer; water 
paid. 720 

410 EAST FIFTH STREET, GROUND 
Jlotr: hot water heat; modern; 
$30. 720 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS WITH G.\S. 
water and bath. Call 17 East Fourth 
street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR ROOMS, CBN- 
trally located, $8 per month. Inquire 
501 West Michigan street. 



FOR RENT— ROOM WITH PRIVATE 
family; breakfast if desired. A 136, 
Herald. 

FOR RENT — NICE FURNISHED 
front room with alcove, nice balcony, 
good view of lake. Call Melrose 1C68. 

FOR liENT— FOUR ROOMS. FURN IS li- 
ed or unfurnished, very reasonable. 
J. W. Thonip-'-on. 16>/4 Ea^'t Sixth St. 



21 SECOND AVENUE EAST, SIX 
rooms; water and sewer; $25. 720 

428 WEST FOURTH STREET— FIVE 
rooms, modern except heat. Call at 
office. 726 



W. M. PRINDLE & CO., 
Lonsdale building. 



WANTED- 
St. Luke 



-AN ELEVATOR 

s hospital. 



BOY AT 



FOR SALE — FURNITURE OF TWO 
rooms; rugs, dishes, everything com- 
plete for housekeeping; casn. $1.>0. 
Call 126 Mesaba avenue, downstairs. 

FOR SALE— FRAME BUILDINGS SIT- 
uated ar 2004 West Michigan street; 
buver tj remove or wreck within 
thirty days. J. D. Howard & Co., 
Providence building. 



WANTED— .\ COMPFTENT GIRL FOR 
general housework. 1931 Jefferson 
street. 

WANTED— LADIES, MAKE SUP 

porters; $12 per 1 undred; no can- 
vassing; material furnished; 
stamped envelop© for particulars. 
Wabash Supply company, Dept. I 13?, 
Chicago. 

WANTED— GOOD COMPETENT GIRL 
for general housework. Apply at 
once. 315 Second a enue east. 



WANTED — WASH-M.\N AND EN- 
glneer. Good wages and steady job. 
Canlsteo Steam laundry, Bove y. Minn. 

WANTED — $lot' MONTHLY— posi- 
tions waiting for automobile drivers; 
we teach by mall; write today for 
first lesson — free. Coey's School-Mo- 
ti>ring, Cliicago. 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS V.'ITH GAS. 
water and bath. Call 17 East Fourth 
street. 



FUR RE.VT — FRONT ROOM AND AL- 
cove room, newlv furnislied, one 
block from postollice. tor one or two 
gentlemen; rent reasonable; also 
small room. 510 West Second street. 
Flat D. 



WANTED— WOM.\N. SELF-RELIANT 
of mature years, willing to work for 
advancement. Wri e or call after- 
noon. 4 to 5, Duluih Vlavi company, 
20S "Temple building^ 

WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. Call 1916 East Third 
street. 



FOR SALE— FRENCH POODLE I'UP- 
ple . They are beauties; call or 
telephone Mrs. Gruneau, Saratoga 
hotel, Superior. Wis. 



WANTED — GIRL TO 

general houseworl;. 
ond street. 



ASSIST WITH 
501 East Sec- 



WANTED— DON'T WORK FOR OTH- 
ers; start mall order business at 
home on capital of $6; i>roflts large: 
spare time; I made $8,500 last year 
in one mail order business; free 
booklet tells how. Voorhles. Desk 
381. Omaha. Neb. 



SALESMEN WANTED— SELL GROC- 
ers our new food product. Lady 
Washington compa ny. Seattle. Wash. 

WANTED— CAPABLE SALESMAN TO 
cover Minnesota with staple line; 
high commissions; $100 monthly ad- 
vance and j-ermanent position to 
right man. Jess H. Smith company. 
r)etroit, Mich. 



WA.M'ED — GIRL FOR OF^NEIiAL 

housework. Apply 232 East Supe- 
rior street. Zenith Dye House. 



FOR 

eaf«! 
aid. 



S\LE— GOOD SECOND-HAND 
chtu!'; must sell. H 1+9, Htr- 



FOR SALE — CHEAP; A SLIGHTLY 
used seven-foot horse hay rake. 
Joseph Proff. 1032 West .Ninth street. 

FOR SALE— FURNITURE OF ,F1VE 
rooms, bargain. Inquire tlat i, 1»03 
West Sui«erior street. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housewo k. Mrs. Thomas 
Walker. 203 South Elgliteenth ave- 
nue East; Zeniih 'phone Grand 
2077-D, 



Hotel and domestl ; help furnished. 
Out-ol-town orders solicited. i'ark 
Employment ageni y. 15 Lake Avenue 
north. Both 'phones. 



W^ANTED — GIRL:i AT MRS. SOaM- 

mers' employment office, is Second 
avenue east. 



FOR SALE— STERlXtPTlCON AND 
moving picture machines, including 
Edison. Povver.s and other makes al 
half price. Film and song sets, talk- 
ing machines for sale, or exchange. 
The National company, 5 South Fifth 
avenue west^ 728 

FOR SALE — SMALL WtiOD OR COAL 
heater, cheap; call mornings, 2t'2b 
West .-econil street. 

FOR SALE— MUST BE SOLD AT ONCE, 
lit and 21 -foot gasolines launches. 
Call Melrose 3o53, 1116 Lake ave- 
nue south. 

FOR SAI.E— TEN SA.MPLE RUGS. 9 
by 12 and J>-3 by 10-6. Axminsters 
and velvets, will be sold at your 
price. Call at show room. 22ol west 
First ^t^eet at once. 720 

FOR ~SA LE— SIXTY-FOOT COMPLETE 
sldenalk two inches thick, three feet 
wide, I6.U0 21i> Twelfth av e. east. 

FOR SALE— ALL KINDS OF MA- 
terial used in packing furniture, bur- 
lay, excelsior, etc. We also furnish 
pa' kers by the hour Estimates free. 
Duluth Van & Storage Co.. 21tf West 
Superior street. Buth 'p hones 492. 

FOR SALE — OLIVER TYP E W Rl T E R . 
good condition. $2 5. Herald. S 174. 

FOR SALE— PIPE! PIPE! PIPE! 
Ail st^fs from ai-inch to 12-inch, suit- 
able for steam, water, gas and lences, 
at very low prices. Excellent bar- 
gains in wood-working machinery 
and engines. One 12 -horse power 
Bacine gas engine, suitable for boat 
or otner purposes, $150. Duluth Ma- 
chinery company^ 

FOR SALE— FIVE KITCHEN CABIN- 
ets; four leather davenports; brass 
and iron beds, springs and mat- 
tresses: fumed oak dining chairs, 
tables and buffet; must be sold at 
or.ce; prices about one-half retail. 
Factory Agent Showroom, 2201 West 
First street. 

-SECOND-HAND OFFICE 
in excellent condition; 
new. Apply to R. M. At- 
1503 Alworth building. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 

housework. 2029 E ast Third street. 

WANTED — THE NEW METHOD 
Dressmaking scaooi loaches you to 
become a dresismaker in alx we»;k»; 
make dre.-ses lor yourself or others 
wnile learning. 310 West Second 
street, next to Y. M. C. A. building 



FOR RENT— CHEAP FOH SI M.MEH. 
nice cool room for one or two gen- 
tlemen. Call 12 7 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM 
suitable for two; breakfast and Sun- 
day dinner. Melr ose 4728. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN ROOMS. ALL 
newly painted and tinted, hot and 
cold water. $20 per month; also four 
rooms furnished for light housekeep- 
ing, $14 per month. 517 First avenue 
east. . 



FOR RENT— VERY DESIRABLE SIX- 
room corner flat, Munger terrace; all 
conveniences; attractive surround- 
ings, no telephone calls. F. I. Salter 
c J m par y. 721 

FOR RENT— THItEE-ROOM FLAT, 15 
East Superior street; water. gas, 
electricity and steam heat. $25. in- 
cluding heat. R. I". Dowse. 106 I'rov- 
idence building. 728 



Que Cent a Word Kach Insertion. 
No .Vdvertiscinent Less Than 15 Cents. 

FARMTSiTFRSiFLASi)^^ 

7t LAND— $5 A MONTH— LAND. it 
i^ You can get a 1, 2 or 5-acre tract ie 
•!(■ of good land fronting on a good if- 
iC' road and only thirty minutes' -H- 
i$- walk from car line. The tracts are ic 
if- well drained and half of them are -,'v- 
fr- cleared, ready for cultivation. The ii- 
if- soil is a sandy loam with clay -^ 
■^ subsoil, not stony. These tracts ^- 
a- being on a good road, only three ic 
■^ blocks irom Snlvely's boulevard rt 
7^ leading into Lester I'ark, so near -^^ 
i(- the car line and on the low terms -X- 
■^ of $5 down and $5 a month, no in- ;^ 
•Jt- terest, makes them the best acres -k- 
-Pt offered near Duluth for gardening it- 
ic- or poultry farming. Some of the * 
lY tracts are wooded and overlook ■^ 
•^ lake, making them an ideal sum- -^ 
i:- mer outing spot. Call and get tur- •^ 
~^ ther particulars. C. Francis Col- if 
ie man. 421 Manhattan building, *- 
^ Duluth, Minn. '^ 

%»?^ii^i^iMi^ i('^(^)^ii^i'»i^'^^^6^^ 

ifr FOR SALE. * 

•^ 20.000 acres in St. Louis county; * 
4 30.000 acres in Carlton county; all iC- 
^ near railroads. Will sell in tracts :¥ 
if. of forty acres and up. Price $8 to ^ 
^. $10 an acre; very easy terms. Let -h 
ie- us show you these lands. H- 

^ BOSTON & DULUTH FARM ^■ 

■^ LAND CO., *- 

a^ 1603 Alworth Building. * 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 




PALE.STLNE LODGE NO. 7», 
A. F. & A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month, at 
8 o'clock. No meeting until 
further notice. Rene T. Hugo, 
W. M.; H. Nesbitt. secretary. 

IONIC LODGE NO. 186. A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meetings 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month, at S 
o'clock. No meeting until fur- 
ther notice. W. N. Totman,. 
W. M.;'Burr Porter, secretary. ^ 

KEYSTONE CHAPTER NO. 
20. R. A. M. — Stated convo-- 
cations second and fourta 
Wednesday evenings of eaclv 
month at 8 o'clock. No meet- 
ing until further notice. 
W. Kieswetter, H. P.; Alfred 
ux, secretary. 



^ J 




i: 



■^ 



is 



t 




Charles 
Le Hiche 



FOR RE.NT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT. 109 
East Fifth street; water and ga.s, 
$14 per month. R. P. Dowse & Co.. 
106 Providence building. 721 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all conveniences. 122 Third 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT— TWO OR THREE FUR- 
nished rooms for light housekeeping. 
702 West Second street. 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
room with modern conveniences in 
private familv; very central. Mel- 
rose 1089; 15 East Third street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT IN 
brick building at 114 I'irst avenue 
east. $25 per month. Rental depart- 
ment, John A. Stephenson & Co., Wol- 
vln building. 7-21. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 1201 
West Superior street, upstairs; wa- 
ter, toilet, hardwood floors, electric 
lights. $13. Inquire 404 Palladio 
building. Phone Grand 88. 



FOR RENT— TWO, FOUR AND SIX- 
room flats. $5, $8 and $12 per month; 
five rooms furnished, $18. <02 i.ast 
Second street. Grand 1299-D. 

FOR RENT— NEW FIVE- ROOM UP- 
stairs flat, $23 per month, water 
paid by owner. 721 East Fourth 
street. Inquire on premises or at 215 
East Superior street. 



FOR SALE— DO YOU WANT A GOING 
farm, cheap? 40 acres cleared, 40 
timbered. nine-room house, cost 
$2,700; stable, chicken coops, sheds, 
macliinery, three cows, one horse, 
chickens pigs, etc. This property is 
at a railroad station twenty-five 
miles from Duluth. Price $4,5o0. 
Terms. Tils on & Gravatt. 

ii^i6'^iii-i6-')6i^}6^-i6i^itiiii'i&rfi^-'ii'i6'^^ 

1 FOR SALE. * 

* * 
■5^ 20,000 acres choice lands along the 7^ 
a. lines of the Alger-Smith and Du- ■A- 
i(. lulh & Iron Range railroads, at ifr 
^ low prices and easy terms. H- 

* HAZEN & PATTISON, * 
•i^ 1009 Alworth Bldg., Duluth. *- 

* * 



ford, T. 
corder. 



DULUTH COUNCIJ. NO. e, 
R. & S. M. — Next meeting. 
Friday. June 16. 1911. at 8 
p. m. No meeting until fur- 
ther notice. James A. C^aw- 
I. M.; Alfred Le Richeux. re- 



DULUTH COMM.\NDERY NO. 
IS, K. T. — Stated conclave first 
Tuesday of each montn at 8 
o'clock. Next conclave. Tuea- 
^ day, Aug, 1. 1911. Work- 

General business. Frederick E. Hough, 
E C • Alfred Le Richeux, recorder. 




-« 




-M^ 



WANTED — INTELLIGENT MAN 
with experience in house to house 
canvasslng who can write good hand. 
Salary. Call al once. W. M. Prlndle 
& Co.. Lonsdale building^ 

WANTED -^Experienced cL"erkj 

to take charge of wholesale and re- 
tail store. handling butter, eggs, 
cheese ui all dairy products, must 
furnisi, -,..od releiences. Address Q 
162. Herald. 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
front room, all conveniences, hbt wa- 
ter heat, hot and cold water; use of 
'phone and piano, breakfast if de- 
sired. 2 321 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
rooms; all conveniences. 518 East 
First street. Melrose 2595. 



WANTED— COOK. APPLY 301 EAST 
Fourth street. 



W' ANTED — Giro. AT 219 FOURTH 
avenue east. 



WA.NTED— A YOUNG GIRL TO TAKE 
care of child 3 y< ars old. Apply at 
119 »,i East Fourth street^ 



WANTED — CIVIL SERVICE EXAM- 
iuations open the way to good gov- 
ernment positions. I can coach you 
by mail at small cost. Full particu- 
lars free to any American citizen ot 
eighteen or over. Write today for 
booklet, E 302. Earl Hopkins, Wash- 
ington, P. C. 

WA.NTED— $25 WEEKLY AND EX- 
penses to trustworthy people to 
travel and distribute samples for big 
wholesale house. C. H. Emery, 26i. 
North Chicago. 



FOR RENT— SUITE. OF ROOMS FOR 
one or two In private family: only 
respectable people, -who like a clean, 
cozv place need apply; rent cheap. 
610\i East First street, upstairs. 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM FLAT, 
ready for occupancy August 1. Ap- 
ply .Mrs. Din. 19 West Fourth street. 

FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM APARtI 
ment on the second hoor of Barring- 
ton apartments, 115 Eighth avenue 
east; heated, water free and Janitor 
service. Rental department. John A. 
Stephenson & Co.. Wolvin building. 

724 



FOR SALE— DIRECT FROM OWNER— 
Forty acres in Lester I'ark valley, 
one mile and three-quarters from cat- 
line. Address S 171, Herald. 



SCOTTISH RITE— REGULAK 
meetings every Thursday 
evening at 8 o'clock. Next 
evening at 8 o'clock. No meet- 
ing until further notice. 
Henry Nesbit t, secretary. 

ZENITH CHAPTER NO. 25^ 
O'-der of Eastern Star — Reg- 
ular meetings second and 

w ^ fourth Friday tveulngs of. 

y each month at 8 o clock. 
No meeting until further notice. Eliza- 
beth Overman, W. M.; Eila F. Gearhart, 
secretary. 

EUCLID LODGE NO. 198. A. 
F. & A. M.— Meets at West- 
IHiluth second and foucth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next meeting 
July 12. 1911. Work — Second. 

degree. M. M. Meldahl. W. M.; A. 

Dunleav y. secretary. . 

DULUTH CHAPTER NO. 5iV 
R. A. ■ M. — Meets at West 
Duluth first and third Wed- 
nesdays of each month at 7:30 
p. m. No meetings until Sept. 
6, 1011. Roger M. Weaver, H, 
P.; A. Dunleavy, secretary. 



-•—*,- 



f 



[ 









-T 



FOR RE.NT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT. 219 
North Nineteenth avenue west. 



FOR RENT— FIVE OR SEVEN-ROOM 
flat, cheap; electric light, gas and 
water; 319 East sixth street. Call 
Calumet 127-L. 

FOR RENT — FIVE NICE ROOMS; 
water and gas and hardwood floors; 
no children. 623 East Sixth street. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 809 
West Superior street. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
room; $8. Melrose 2789, 512 First 
avenue west. 



FOR RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping; all 
conveniences. $4 per week. 405 Vi 
East Fourth street. 



WANTED — SHOEMAKER AT 
Ramsey street. West Duluth. 



541.7 



WANTED — BRIDGE CARPENTERS 
and helpers. Pacific Labor Agency, 
517 West Michigan street. 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENER.\L 
housework. 424 Ninth Ave, ea st. 

WANTED— F:XPER1 ENCED GIRL FOR 
general housework. Mrs. W. A 
Eaton, 122 North Twenty-first Ave 
East. 



W^ANTED — $300 TO $500 PER MONTH 
easily made by salesmen and gen- 
eral sales agencies selling our new 
automatic wrapping paper printers 
to merchants. For exclusive terri- 
tory address Automatic company. 
312 South Clark street. Chicago. 



FOR RENT — TW^O FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 136 
Mesaba avenue. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLAT, 928 
East Superior street; hardwood 
floors; water paid: $18 per month. 
Pulford, How & Co.. 609 Alworth 
building. '-^ 



FOR SALE — MONTANA. MONTANA, 
520 acres, all tillable, with splendiu 
water rights, ditches over 40 acres; 
good corrals, barns, sheds, seven- 
room house, hot and cold water; 
milkhouse, icehouse, chicken liouse; 
spring water; land cuts 200 tons of 
hay; proprietor grazes 600 sheep ten 
months every year; twenty acres 
alfalfa; offers $1,200 to sell this sum- 
mer; scenery unsurpassed; land near 
Augusta; proprietors wife ordered to 
California by doctor; $7,500 cash, 
balance on time or trade for good 
California property. Snyder Bros., 
212 West First street. 

FOR SALE— 200-ACRE FARM, MID- 
way Duluth and St. Paul; all im- 
provements; $25 per acre; long time: 
cheap. 801 Torrey building. 719 




K. of P. 
NORTH STAR LOD<JE, NO. 33. i. of F. 
— Meets every Tuesday evenin* it C4<rtl« 
hall. 118 West Superior etreit. iNui 
meeting TuiedHj eviiihig, July 19. 8 p. 
- , ,- m iliarp. All knlchts curdlhUj InvUetl. 
A. L. Stursl^, C. C: S. A. Heani. K. of R. & 8. 

DIAMOXU U'ltOK, No 45. K. of i?.-- 
Mi'Cts every Monaay eveiilng in Sloan t 
liail comer TwcnUeth bvcnue west and 
Superior street. All knlgtits cordiaUy in- 
vited. L. B. .^Uen, C. C; S. L Pierc* 
K. of R. ic S. _^ 

DULITH 1.0DOE, NO. £8, 1. O. O. F.--MEETa 
every Friday evening al 8 o'ckth tl Odd 
FeUows' hall. 18 LaKe avicue nonb. 
— - Next meeting ni«ht July 14. Iiiitialon[- 

O. Jl. GUuss. N. G.; F. L. Blrrer, Kec. B«^.; A. H. 

I'aul. Fill. Ktc. 




FOR RENT — FIVE ROOMS AND 
bath, hardwood finish, gas and fire- 
place. 420 Sixth avenue east. $28.50. 
E. D Field company, Exchange build- 
ing. i^ 



FOR SALE- TEN-ACRE TRACT OF 
land inside city limits, terms to suit; 
land A-1. T 6V1. Herald. 

FOR SALE — 40 ACRES FINE FARM- 
ing land, near railroad, good soil; a 
snap; price, $350. Smith Realty. 524 
Manhattan building. 720 



WANTED — GIRL FOR GENERAL 
housework. 1428 Jefferson street. 



MONEY TO LOAX 
;»$$$?*$*$$$$$«»$$l*»»fMf >»♦**'♦*"♦!! 



$$ 

f$ 

f$ 

H 
$$ 



MONEY or; CilEDlT. $$ 

SOMETHING NEW. $$ 

flO upwaid. f>r housekeepers, $| 
workingmen ana salaried em- $$ 
ployes. at charjjes that honest $$ 
people can aftora to pay. $$ 

Open Saturday Evenings. |$ 

DULUTH LOi*N COMPANY. $> 
Cor. Third Ave. W. and Sup. St., $« 
307 Columbia Bldg. %t 

Old phone, Melrose 2355. $| 



WANTED — TWO EXPERIENCED 

salesmen one for city and one for 
Range — must be hustlers; prefer 
those who have sold otfice supplies. 
Address V 155, Herald. 



WANTED — DON'T PREPARE FOR 
any civil service examination with- 
out seeing our illustrated catalogue, 
free. Columbian Correspondence 

college, Washington. D. C 



FOR S.\LE- 

furnl'ure 
practically 
water. Jr., 



FOR SALE— FURNITURE. ALMOST 
new. and cheap. 718 East Fifth 
street, in basement. 



For Sale — Two-chair 
shop; fine location. 



poolroom barber 
X 80. Herald. 



«$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $$$$I$$$$$$SIIS^$«I 



v.i ARE \OU ( 

ii, VAC A 

■fi- Can't you use a i 
ii- SPECIAL VAl 

i- Money lor all ni 

^ is good here. Di 

i^ tunity Slip by. 

-.t ni. to 6:ao p. 

,* Saturdays until 
ii, DULUTH F 

■^ 3t>l Pall* 



;ulNG UN A * 

TIUN ? * 

ittle more money?* 
ATION RATE, 
eds. Your credit 
n't let the oppor- 
Office hours, 8 a. 
m. Open nuuub. 



NANCE CO.. 
.dio Bldg. 



WANTlft) — FIRST-CLASS WlNl>OW 
trimmer card writer and salesman 
at once.' The Twin I'orts Clothing 
company, 405-407 West Superior 
street, Dul uth. 

WANTED— YOU ARE WANTED FOR 
government position. $80 month. 
Write for list of positions open. 
Franklin Institute. Dept. 188 G. 
Rochester. N. Y. 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
room; all modern conveniences; light 
housekeeping allowed. 319 Mesaba 
avenu e. Melrose 1874. 

FOR RENT — THREE FURNISHED 
rooms for housekeeijlng at Lakeside; 
modern new house; one block from 
car line; $20 a month. Address Her. 
aid. T 216. 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOMS: 
all modern improvements, from $2 to 
$3.50 per wee k. 219 Fifth avenue W. 

FOR RENT— F©UR ROOMS CEN- 
trally located. Call at 11 East Third 
street. 



FOR RENT— TWO, THREE AN):) 
four rooms in brick building: all 
conveniences; furnished or unfur- 
nished; rent reasonable. Call 1030 
West First street. 



Ji-OR RENT — SIX-ROOM HEATED 
flat- central location, hardwood 
floors and finish, hot and cold water; 
janitor service; thoroughly modern. 
Corporate Investment company, Tor- 
rey bu ilding. 7-4 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM STEAM 
heated flat with modern conven- 
iences; 117 East Superior street: $30 
per month. W. M. Prlndle & Co.. 3 
Lo nsd ale building. 

FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM UPPER 
flat. 331 East Superior street. In- 
quire 15 Fourth avenue east. 



FOR SALE — 40 ACRES IN CARLTON 
county, adjoining; Northern Pacific 
railroad; fine soil; for quick sale, 
$500. Smith Realty, 524 Manhattan 
building. 720 



WEST Ui;bVTH LODe-.B. .NO. 168 1. O. O. F. 

Meet* every Tuesday night at I. O. U. r. 
hall West Uuluth. Next meetiug JuU 
ig Wurk: Ii.iUatory degree. W. £. 
Cowden, N. C,.', W. B. HariUy. Rec. Sec. 



FOR RENT — MODERN SIX-ROOM 
flat; electric light, gas, gas range, 
laundrv heat and water furnished; 
$40. Massachusetts Real Estate com- 
pany. 18 Phoenix building. 724 



FOR RENT— ONE OR TWO FURNISH- 
ed rooms. 421 East Fourth street. 
Call upstairs. 

^^57: RENT — TWO FURNISHED 
rooms for light housekeeping. 305 
AVest Fifth street. 



WANTED— $100 MONTHLY AND Ex- 
penses to travel aiKl distribute sam- 
ples for big manufacturer; steady 
work. S. Scheffer, 161 M., Chicago. 



■^a iei:<li^cii'i^i^itjci^ 



WANTED— CIVIL SERVICE E.XA.MI- 
nations open the way to good gov- 
ernmen positions. I can coach you 
by mall at small cost. Full parttcu- 
iars free to any American citizen e-f 
eighteen or over. Write today for 
booklet, E 302, Earl Hopkins. Wash- 
In gton, D. C. 

WA.NTE1>— BOY. DULUTH CIGAR 
company. 118-120 West Michigan 



FOR RENT— NICELY FURNISHED 
re>oms light housekeeping allowed, 
from $1 up. 314 Ea.«t Second street. 



FOR RENT — 316 EAST FOURTH 
street, ground floor flat, six rooms, 
bath, toilet, electric light, hardwood 
floors in hall pantry and kitchen. 
Rent $27.60. W. C. Sherwood &. Co., 
118 Manh attan building. 

^^ RENT — NICE FIVE-ROOM 
heated flat in basement of Barring- 
ton apartments, 115 Eighth avenue 
east water and gas range supplied; 
$20 per month. Rental department, 
John A. Stephenson & Co., Wolvin 
building. 724 

FOR RENT— NEW MODERN SIX- 
room flat, rent reasonable. 815 East 
Fourth street. Call Melrose 4761. 



FOR SALE— 600 FARMS— IMPROVED 
and unimproved, 40 to 4,000-acro 
tracts, midway between Duluth and 
St. Paul. Clover, corn, potato belt. 
From 5 to 40 years at 4 per cent. 
Good soil, markets, roads and schools. 
Also land near Duluth. Come and 
get your choice. No better chance 
anywhere on earth. Minnesota Land 
& Immigration Co., 801 Torrey buiid- 
ing. 

FOR SALE — FORTY ACRES, WELL 
situated land in fruit belt, Bayfield 
county; easily cleared; land short 
distance selling for twice amount; 
price $15; half down, balance to suit 
purchaser. M. J. Goodm n, 25 West 
Fourth street, Duluth, Minn. 




DLLL'TH ENCAMP.MENT, NO. 33. I O. 

f Mettb on the aeccud and foirUi 

Tliutsdays al Odd Fellows hall. IS U-k» 
avenue north. N(Xt mectiiig night JuU 
•5 1 Regular iHUihiesp. Wm 1'. Caniu- 
uil C P. : F. L. Blrrer. Uet. Sorit*. 



# 



K. O. T. M. 
VVLVra TENT NO. i-MEET8 ETEia 
Monday. 8;15 p. ni.. »l Maccabee hall. 
21 Lake avenue north. Vi£:Ung mem- 
ber j always v»ekome. F. C. Freer 
commander, flat 4. Mucger row. W.*t 
— Duluth- J. B. GtUneau, record ke<i-er, 
of rice ui halL Hours, 10 ». lu- to 1 P. m.. diliy. 
Zenith "phone. G rand. 610-X. ^^_^^__^_^ 

" A. O. U. W. 

nOFXlTY LODGE. NO. 105 — MEETS 
Rl Mactabce h.iU. 21 Lake ivtt,ue nortb. 
every Thureday al 8 p. m. \^h»n* 
members welcome. M. Co«l, U. W.; A. 
E Piering. recorder; O. J. Munold. n- 
nai.cler. 217 East Fifth street. 





MODEUN SAMARITANS. 
ALPHA COUNCIL. NO. 1-TaKE NO- 
lice that Samaritan degree and Bene- 
liilent degree won't mecl .Valj aod 
August montlji. Lucy A. I^ir'ly,. -"'^y 
t; S ; N. B. Morrison. G. S. : Waliac« 
r Wiilhanks, scribe; T. A. Gall. V. S., 
Firfl NaUonal l?ank building 



4k* 



FOR RENT — FURNISHED ROOM; 
bath and phone. Call 412 Fourth 
Hvenue east. Grand 1977-D. 

f^^ RENT — ONE FURNISHED 
front room and bedroom, at 126 East 
Fifth street; all conveniences. In- 
quire 421 East Fourth street. 

F^yr KENT^^^FOUR ROOMS ; ALL 
conveniences. 27r.9 Wellington street. 



street. 



BISIXESS ANXOIXCEMEM. 

% THE NORTHWESTERN 

i^ TEACHERS' AGENCY. 

# 310-311 PRUVIDE.N'CE BLDG. 
i^ DULUTH. MINN. 



f 



"We have many grade vacancies 
on our lists. Write us for appii- 
blaiiks. 



<j^ cation 



FOR SALE— COUS. 

FOR SALE— CHE.aP, FRESH MILCH 
cow, must be sold. 15 West Lemon 
street. Duluth Heights^ 

FOR S-\Le — A JERSEY Gl'ERNSEY 
cow. 1122 r.,ast Fourth street. $45. 



MONEY TO LOAN' ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, furs, rifles, etc., and all 
goods of value. $1 to $1,500. Key- 
stone Loan & Me-cantiie company. 22 
West Superior st reet. 

SECURITY MORTGAGE LOAN CO.. 
401 First Nalioaal Bank building, 
idoney to loan "n household ^uodi,. 
pianos or other security. A liberal 
discount if paid lefore aue. All trans- 
actions treated conildentiaUy; cour- 
teous treatment. 

fcfecurlty Moi tgage Loan Co., 
401 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 



WANTED— MEN, AGE 18-35. FOR 
firemen $100 mo"hthly; brakemen. 
$80, on nearby railroads. Experi- 
ence unnecessary; no strike. Posi- 
tions guaranteed competent men. 
Promotion. Railroad employing 

head<iuarters, 4.866 ment sent to po- 
sitions in 1910. State age; send 
stamp. Railway Association. Box 
Herald. 



LOST AUD FOUND. 



LOST— SCOTCH COLLIE FEMALE PUP. 
four months old. 1201 West Third. 
Reward if returned to same. 

LOST— JULY 2 AT SMITHVILLE. 
Jersey heifer with horns. Finder 
please notify S. Widdes, 429 Forty- 
sixth avenue west. Cole 3133-Y'. 
for reward. 



FOR REN"!— FOUR-ROOM LOWER 

flat, new building, $14 per month C 
A. Knlppenberg, 300 Alworth Bldg. 
Both ph ones 597. 

FOR RENT — 109-111 TWENTY-SEV. 
enth avenue west, two five-room 
flats; bath; $18 per month; water 
paid. Westerir Realty company, 1922 
West Superior street. 728 



FOR SALE— EXTRA FINE TRACT 
for colonization; 1,020 acres; all fine 
land and heavily timbeied; one and 
a half miles of water front; railroad 
right beside it; now retailing at $15 
to $25 per acre; owner going away; 
if taken within next ten days will 
sell for half price and give easy 
terms. Address George T. Cress, 
owner, 61 5 Lyceum building. 72 

^^ATER FRONT TRACTS. 
Extra fine small tracts on St. Louis 
river and Grand lake; only a few 
rods from railroad; terms: $10 down, 
balance in small monthly payments. 
615 Lyceu m building. 

TEXAS INVESTMENTS. 
Buy Orchards and Garden Lands at 
Aldine, near Houston, the greatest 
city in the Southwest, where values are 
growing upward ail the time. Address 
K. C. Robertson. 601 Klam building, 
Houston, Tex. 




FOR RENT— A SIX-ROOM FLAT; 
modern except heat; good condition; 
fc20 East Fifth street, upper flat. 
Cooley & Underhill. 208 Exchange 
building. 



FOR SALE — FRESH MILCH COW. IN- 
quire Zenith Broom factory. 



ZENITH LO.vN COMPANY — MONEY 

loaned on perse nal property of all 
kinds; low rat<;; business strictly 
confidential. 4i: Columbia building, 
•phone Grand 17 I6-A. 



FOR RENT— COTTAGES. 

FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM COTTAGE; 
water and sewer. 16 East Fifth 
street. 



P 



FOR SALE— JTTST ARRIVED, CAR 

load of fresh milch cows, also two 
first-class horses. Call at once at L. 
Pol i ns ky Co.. 1124 East Si xth. 

FOR SALE— A CARLOAD OF FRESH 
niUch cows; wll. -irrlve Tuesday. 
July 11. to S. Goldslne. 1117 East 
Sixth street. 



WE LOAN ON AIL KINDS OF PER- 
sonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us, 43U Manhattan Bldg., and gel 
rates. Duluth M irtgage Loan Co. V>. 
Horkan. New I a98-D; Melrose 3733. 

MONEY SUPPLlilD TO SALARIED 
people, women keeping house and 
others, upon the ir own names with- 
out security; ea> y payments. Tolman, 
510 I'alladlo building. 



DRESS HAKLNG. 



MRS. ROY— EX"P CRIENCED DRESS- 
nriRker. 1114 JeJterson street. 



FOR RENT— FURNISHED SUMMER 
cottage, on lake, $7 per week, includ- 
ing boat. A. E. Doherty, Solon 
Springs. Wis. 



LOST— WATCH FOB WITH THREE 
school pins attached; finder return 
to 304 West Michigan street for re- 
ward. 



LOST— IN TORREY BUILDING OR 
between the Torrey and Fourth ave- 
nue east, gold belt pin set witii 
amethvst. Return to 311 Torrey 
building for reward. 



LOST— SOLID GOLD STAR PIN; SET 
with pearls. Reward If returned to 
531 West Third street. 



FOR RENT— MODERN FIVE-ROOM 
flat. Inquire 34 East Fifth west. 
New 'pho ne Grand 1461. 

FOR RENT— THREE-ROOM FLAT ON 
Garfield avenue; $8 per month; will 
put In first-class shape. Rental de- 
partment John A. Stephenson & Co., 
\\olvln building. 720 



FOR SALE— 500 FARMS, 5 TO 40 
years time at 4 per cent, midway 
Duluth and St. Paul. Minnesota 
Land & Immigration Co., 801 Torrey 
building. 



UNITED OliDER OF FOKliSTERS— 
Court Easter-i SUr. No. 66, meets everr 
first and third Tueeday at V. 0. F. 
haU, ooroer Fourth avenue west and 
Flrit street. Charles V. Hansrn. C. IL. 
.^ 507 West Fifth smet; A. R. Olund. sec- 

r«.firv Kill West First stieet Harry Millies, treas- 
u?er! room 23, W^inlhroD block. Zenith 'phone 1080-X 

M. W. A. 
IMPERIAL CAMP. NO. 2208 — MEETS 
at L. O. F. hall. Fourth avenue wert 
and First street, second and fourtll 
Tuesdays of each month. Harvey W. 
Wike, consul; C. P. Earl, clerk, bos 411; 
F. E. Doremus. deputy; addriM, K. r. 
freight office. 





FOR SALE — LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual settlers only; good 
location for dairying and truck gar- 
dening. For further Information call 
on or address Land Commissioner, 
Dulvtb & Iron Range Railroad com- 

£any. 101 Wolvin building. Duluth. 
[inn. 



FIRST-CLASS D tESSM.A.KING AND 
ladles' tailorini! done at 310 West 
Second slreet. Uisa Maycrofl. 




FOR RE.NT— PARTLY FURNISHED 
cottage on Park Point; Thirtieth 
street and Minnesota avenue; $20 per 
month. R. P. Dowse & Co.. 106 Prov- 
idence buil ding. 726 

FOR RENT — LAKE NEBAGAMON. 
furnished cottage: rowboat; accom- 
modation for eight; $30 per month. 
A H. Burg & Co., 308 Alworth build- 
mg. 721 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED — THE 
"Brown" cottage fronting on Pike 
lake; very attractive. $25 per month. 
F. I. Salter Co.. Lonsdale Bldg. 714 

FOR RENT — FURNISHED — THE 
"Brown" cottage fronting on Pike 
lake; very attractive, $20 per month. 
F. I. Salter Co., Lonsdale Bldg. 728 



LOST— BLUE COAT BETWEEN HER- 
mantown road on Boulevard and 
Fourteenth avenue east this morn- 
ing; if found return to 414 Second 
avenu e west. 

LOST— SORREL HORSE, WHITE FACE 
and legs. Please notify L. Polinsky. 
Grand 1429. 



LOST— RED COW WITH WHITE FACE 
last Monday. Finder return to 2131 
West Eleventh street. Lincoln 123-X. 

LOST— FRIDAY APTERNOON, S.MALL 
black pu -e containing about $10. 
Finder please return to 473 Mesaba 
avenur* for reward. 



FOR RENT— FIVE ROOMS: .MODERN 
except heat, East end: ready Aug. 1; 
ren t $22.50. H 69. Herald. 

FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM FLAT; HOT 
water heat; all newly painted and 
decorated; all modern conveniences; 
hardwood floors; gas range and 
grate- janitor service; $38 per month. 
128 West Fourth street. Call Melrose 
47h7. In quire next door. 

f^OR RENT — SIX-ROOM STEAM- 
heated flat, centrally located; water 
and janitor service furnished; rental 
$40 J. D. Howard & Co., Providence 
building. 719 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; ALL 
conveniences; 606 East Sixth, street. 
$19 per month. Apply N. J. Upham 
company. 1 8 Third avenue west. 718 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM MODERN 
flat; call Dr. Oredson , Lincoln 62. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FLAT, 320% 
West Fourth street, water, sewer and 
electric light; $12 per month. Stryker 
Manley & Buck, Torrey Bldg. 718 



SELECTED FARMING LANDS. 

On line of the Alger-Smith railroad, 

On easy terms to settlers. 

ALEXANDER McBEAN, 

Sales manager. 4 06 Columbia Bldg. 

EBERT, WALKER & McKNIGHT CO., 
315 Torrey building, buy and sell 
farm and timber lands. See us for 
10-acre tracts. 




bia ha 
North 



CLAN STEWAIIT, NO. 50, O. S. C.-- 
Mects first and third Wednesdays each 
montn k p. m.. at VO-^- ".='"•«'"''' 
Fourth avenue west and First street. Next 
Hgular meeting July 19. Kol*rt. Feigu- 
_,, son chief; D. n McLennan, stcrelary. 

Jcun Uuiuetl. FJn. Bee.. 312 Torrey building. 

— " "^ KOYAL ARCANUM. Dulath CcuucU. No. 

llg3-\IetU second and fourth Tuesday 
evenings. Maccabte hail, il Lake avthu* 
north Cllnlon Brooke, secreiary, 401 

^•SI4 "i^St: NO. 1493^Meet. m.» 
and iblrU Wednt«daj evenings, Colum 
,:i. West end. A. .M- Johu»on. «:cieury, UI 

Tweullelb a\e Due we!.l. __^ 

ORDER OK OWLS. tl^LUTH 
Ne«t .N'o. 1200— Mecilngf are held 
every flisl and Ihinl Wediie»d»y of 
ea^h month at Owls" hsU. 118 
WtBl Superior street. Joseph l>. 
Feaks. secretaa. 22 ^"^ ""P^ 
nor slie«t. 

FmVATEHOSFITAL. 

l^TTI^I^E^llOSPlTAL^^^^PROS^^ 

motheis will find a pleasant home 
before and during conttnenient at 
Ashland Maternity ^^^"'^^.J^^'^V}}.^ 
avenue west. Ashland. Wis. Infants 
c ared for. 

MRS. ILVNSON. GRADUATE MID- 
wife; female complaints. 413 Sevenin 
avenue east. Zenith 1225. 



i 

r 










TIMBER LA^NDS. 

TIMBER AND CUT-OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby, S>05 Palladio building. 

WANTED — PEOPLE TO SETTLE ON 
well timbered homesteads just open- 
ing for settlement. Inquire for J. W. 
N., Midland hotel. 

FOR SALii;— FORTY ACRES LAND, 
all white pine and spruce timber. In- 
quire 709 Hammond avenue. Superior, 
Wis. 



^< 



I buy standing timber; also cut-over 
lands. Geo. Rupley. 615 Lyceum bldg 



FOR SALE AUTOS. 

FOR SALE^^AN ELECTRIc'^AUTO^ 
mobile. Call or write P C. Miller, 
care of the Water, Light & I'ower, 
Superior. 



FOR RENT — FROM JULY 1 COM- 
pletely furnished seven-room flat, lo- 
cated on Superior street in vicinity 
of Eighth avenue east. R. P. Dowse 
& Co.. 106 Providence building. 719 



FOR RENT — FOUR- ROOM .MODERN 
flat; very central. S. S. Williamson, 
515 Torrey building. 



Coutiutt«d on pace 31* 



FOR SALE — 40 ACREIS LAND. ALA. 
White pine and spruce timber. In- 
quire f09 Hammonnd avenue. Supe- 
rior. Wis. 



Mrs A. Ferguson, graduate midwife; 
female complaints. 211 Minneapoli* 
avenue. Grand 1971-Yj ^^^ 

S. WAROE, GRADUATE MIDWIFE 
and nurse. 215 Twenly-sixth avenu© 
west. Zenith phone, Lincoln 200-J>. 



PERSONAL — Private home for ladies 
before and during confinement, ex- 
pert care; everything confidential, in- 
lanis cared for. Ida i^^f '«^";, '^[■.^■' 
2»4 Harrison avenue, St. Paul. ..iinn. 



TTZr X Ferguson, graauate midwife; 

"femtfe complaints. 211 Minneapolia 

av enue, W oodland. Grand 19 a- 1. 

Mrs H Olson, graduate midwife. Pri- 
vate hospital, 329 N. 58 Av.W. Zen- 
ith 3173; Calumet 173-L. 



Homesteads and timber claims located. 
From 40 to 80.000 acres of timber 
lands for sale. 316 Palladio Bldg. 



HAIR DRESSING PARLORS. 

G. Molsnn Is the only French hair dres- 
■cr in Duluth. Expert in making 
wigs, toupees and hair dye. Switches 
and puffs made from combings. Mall 
orders promptly fiPed. 212 W. 1st St 



WO.MAN'S HOSPITAI^— MRS. .MARY 
Barrel!, matron. 931 London road. 
Zenith phone. 1597. 



SCHOOL OF ENGLISH. 



'"FImTs^IOOLOFENGLISH OFFERS 
the foreigner a thorough training in 
English and prepares young men and 
women ' for entrance into other 
schools. Winthrop block, corner of 
Fourth avenue west and First stre«C 
John Tanis, principal. 




■ 



-I- 
i 




DULUTHHERALDJ 




• 1I<I^«1 



VOLUME XXIX— NO. 85. 



MONDAY EVENING, JULY 17, 1911. 



— s a oiETY, 



•CENTS. 



DREADED CHOLERA IS 
BEING FOUGHT BACK 
ATPORT OFNEWg 

Their Efforts. 

Six Deaths Have Occurred 

Among Passengers on 

the Moltke. 

More Than 500 Persons Are 
Held Under Close Ob- 
servation. 



MADE IBURGESS AND TURRISH OF DULUTH 

BYPETfrr BYGOMPERSi CALLED AS WITNESSES BEFORE 

SENATORS IN LORIMER PROBE 



-Washington. July 17.— The entire 
public health machinery of the povern- 
ment has been put into motion to f^ght 
off the tl :> ^ -nvaslon from Europe. 

All consul I rts from Europe bear- 

ing on -aj^cs iit any points are being 
carefullv stuaietl by officials here, and 
the public health officer at Naples has 
been instructed to cable a report every 
Ave d;vy-« as to developmeiits In the 
epUlemlc that is ravaging Italy. 

All "hips are being watched here and 
flbrond and special instructions have 
S'ln iss ed throughout the service to 
Safeguard this country from the dis- 

•ftse. 

» — 

Six Victims Have Died. 

New York. July 17.— The fight to 
bar cholera from the port of New 
York continued today with a federal 
expert helping the local health de- 
partment. The 248 persons who ar- 
rived here two weeks ^^o^yntne 
steamer Moltke and are still under 
Observation will undergo ^a^^tejio log- 
ical examinations, and a more rigia 
Quarantine will be enforced at !^^vln- 
bu?m island, wh.re fmeen_£ases_of 
"oSU^tinuedJ-n page 13, ^Uth column.) 

ITALlArPLEADS 
UNWRITTEN LAW 




Grain Man's Money Raised 

Pretty Manicurist to 

Stage Star. 

Chicago Company's Business 

Under Control of 

Committee. 



Court's Position in Contempt 

Cases Attacked in 

Vain. 



Committee of Lawyers Up- 
held Over Labor Lead- 
ers' Protest. 



TRIAL IS SET FOR NEXT OaOBER 




J. M. TERRELL. 

Washington. J ily 17.— Senator Ter- 
rell of Georgia cased to be a member 
of the United Stutes senate at li -" f; 

m. today. A. tint; V^°" ■^'^^^'^Sf^rmLn 
request to Vice ITesident ^herman 
this morning, the senate ordered that 
Mr. Terrell-s name be .stricken fom the 

roll of the senate, l^a^i"^ ^^*%,^t*h 
vacant until Governor Hoke bmuii 
(lualitles as his successor. 



ii_i ~>-ii~X'""fcr''~"^ 



"TRUST" HAS 
THEM SCARED 



Chicago. 111., July 17.— Out of the 
snarl of dark secrets surrounding the 
tragic death of James Pettlt In Lake 
Michigan and the tangled affairs ol 
the Peavey Grain company, from which 
he defalcated for more than $1,200,000 
has arisen the face of a woman. 

This woman, identified by fellow 
operators on the board of trade as 
being a pretty, young actress, until 
recently a member of a company play- 
ing in Chic-ago, is said to have been 
raised from the lowly position of a 
manicurist in a big Chicago hotel to 
a star In the theatrical world at one 

jump. 

•Jim' Pettlfs money Is said to have 
brought about the transformation. As 
late as Tluirsday before his death, 
I'ettit Is said to have been with tne 
young woman. They were together 
in Austin, where the young woman s 
mother lives. . ^»j^„ 

A strange coincidence In connection 

with Pettils death Is t»>a^t»^«= J,^""/ 
woman left the city on the ^layfol ow- 
ing her trip to Austin in an au^""'"" 
blle with him. She Is said to be lining 
now at a near-by summer resort. 

When the young .woman ^ as 
••brought out" as a star in the th^^t;"'- 
cal world, a short time a^o. U ^as 
announced that she was a beaiUlf ul 
and talented University of ^Ch cago 
co-ed. whom the theater managei_ had 

(Continue d on page 13. sixth column.) 

JUST PUTfoTk. 
ON TOGA BUYING 



Washington, July 17.-— Attacking the 
Jurisdiction of the court and the legal- 
ity of the proceedings. President Sam- 
uel Gompers, Vice President John 
Mitchell and Secretary Frank Morri- 
son of the American Federation of La- 
bor appeared In the equity branch of 
the supreme court of the District of 
C»dumbia today to resist the latest con- 
tempt order issued against them by 
Justice Wright. The first moves were 
of a technical nature and were over- 
ruled by Justice Wright. 

A motion to dismiss on the ground 
that the service of the order was in- 
complete was sustained, but when Jus- 
tice Wright directed the marshal to 
serve new papers for them the point 
was waived. 

Muved to DUmUa. 
Next the defendants moved to dis- 
miss because the report of lh« ^^o/"- 
mlttee of lawyers submitted to tne 
court In the case was not a proper one. 
in that the members of the committee 
did not and could not exercise the 
iudiclal qualities required in the order 
It was contended that the members of 
the committee were counsel for the 
National Anti-Boycott association, and 
that the conclusion of the Bucks stove 
& Range company case did not stop 
•their persecution of these defendants, 
and therefore they "'ere not qualilled 
to pass Judgment on the acts of the 
ilefendants. ' „„„-♦ 

This motion was overruled, the court 




Wiehe's Talk on Train Is 
* Recounted at Wasb- 
mgton. 

Witness Denies W. H. Cook 

Told Him to "Gve 

'em Hell!" 

Charges Made to Hines Lum- 
ber Company Are 
Gone Into. 



m^ 




•^- 



1 



JOHN McNAMARA. JAMES McNAMARA. 

As They Appeared in Court When Arraigned Before Judge Bordwell m 

Los Angeles. 



Claims Man He Shot During j 

Quarrel Ruined His 

Home. 

Kew Tork, July 17.-"He ruined my 
home. • saui Ciuseppe Romanello today, 
when arraigned un the ^ha'-^^e «' f ' ; 
ing Alessandro Zarro and raortall> 
wounding Flllpo Pros=apio. 

The shooting occurred in an Italian 
«ofc »n Harlem late last night, while 
?Sousa"nds "of" Italians outside w^ere , 

celebrating the a"","*!]*,^^''.;*!" and 
r.adv of Mount Carmel. Zarro anu 
Prosaoi^o were at a table when Ho- 

do to get Romanello to the PoHce sta- 
tion through an angry crowd of cele- 
brators. 

BARON ROSEN IS 
NOT TO RETURN 

New Russian Ambassador 

to Washington Not Yet 

Chosen. 

St Petersburg. July 17.— The foreign 
office today confirmed the report that 
Baron Rosen would not return to his 
post as R-^ssian ambassador at Wash- 
ington. George Bakhmetieff Is the 
nominee now in view f'-r the American 
mission, but this , ^PP^^f "J^"' j"^ 
await the return In the f^iil^^' ^?i^*='f " 
Minister Sazanoff. who '» ""^^ in the 
Vos-fcc region i pearch of health. 

Rakhnietieff was formerly ambassa- 
do? to Ta'ikn and stUl -"rlier minister 
at The Hague and Russian diplomatic 

•^latoir Ro^sSTrobably will be given 
a ieltln t he council of the empire. 

NEW TrStyTn 
FORCEJVITH TOKIO 

Clause Containing Immigra- 
tion Restriclions Not in 
Present Pact. 

Washington. July IT.-The new 
treaty of commerce and navigation be- 
tween the United States and Japnn 
went into operation today rep-aclng 
?Le old treaty negotiated during b^c- 
retary Greshams administration. The 

important point of Jiffj-T^"^* ^^^^J .^i*;' 
the two conventions lies m.^ne V .V,,. 
•ion fr^m the :.f-.v convention >.f the 
Saragrai^ relating to immigration rc- 
SfricUons. which was ol'5^^l^iom^^^^Xo 
th« Ja.Dune.=e. tie United Slates re.>in„ 
t.p^Lnt'he" honor of Japan to carry out 
the spirit of exisiing '^'"^1^'^^?'''"-^^ 
which prevent the departure of Jap- 
anese coolies to America. 

There is also provision for the sun 
mission if ^he new Japane.<.e customs 
thrift for the existing general cnven- 
ifonMi rateV It happens that a siml ar 
Irtlfy whfch Japan'^has negotiated wlrh 
Francp does not become effectiv e until 
iugu's't Tina in conformity with an 

agreement between the ^ "'ifl..;Yi not 
and Japan, the new tariff fates ^11 not 
apply to goods Imported into Japan 
from America until that date. 



Planters and Independent Re- 
finers Afraid of Big 
Sugar Concern. 

Head of Louisiana Growers 

Testifies Before Con- 

giessmen. 



Washington, July 17.— That Louisi- 
ana sugar planters and Independent re- 
finers fear the American Sugar Refin- 
ing company vas declared today by 
J. E. Burguieres, president of the 
Louisiana Planters" assocaition, before 
the house sugir trust committee. He 
testified that eduction of the sugar 
tariff would ri in the Louisiana sugar 
industry. 

•I cant get independent refiners to 
come to LouHiana and bid on our 
sucars- he sad. 'They say they will 
no! come into our field but. wiH buy 
our sug.'.rs if we get them into their 

'""'nieV gave no satisfactory reason 
therefor, but 1 made n>y, ^i,^'" ,^^^;^"^: 

tions— that tie in<l*'P5"*^t?.^,n -^uJa? 
regard I.ouisis na as American bugar 
ifefinlng compuny territory and retuse 
to enter that territory for fear lhe> 
will orecipitat. trouble for themselves 
w th the trust. The,- have stayed away 
ever since we got into trouble with 
the trust for selling to outsiders sev- 
eral year.s agi." 

Have No Agrtement. 
••Do the independents have any 
aKieement to teep away from the ter- 
rU.rtr- asked Representative Madison 
•'I think no . The condition results 
from a combined fear of the Planters 
to sell away trum the trust and of in- 
dependent refi^ieries to invade what is 
.>r.nsi(I»-red tri st territory. 

"I predict a crop of l.0<.0.000 tons of 
sugar^ a year ir Louisiana and Texas 
within a few years. It the sugar 
Tariff is cut -n half it would Imoie- 
ita Jlv annlh late the sugar industry 
of Louisiana and affect the prosperity 
of more than 2.000.000 people . 

executeTfor 
second murder 



Senator Heyburn So Char- 
acterizes Campaign 
Publicity Bill 

Washington. July 17.— "A law that 
simply requires a man to report what 
money he spent to get Into the senate 
virtually Indorses his right to buy his 
election," declared Senator Heyburn of 
Idaho when the senate took up the 
campaign publicity bill today. 

Senator Lodge of Massachusetts de- 
clared that the whole purpose of a 
publicltv law Is to let the public know 
exactly what money Is spent and how It 
Is handled; that the "theory Is that 
money publicly accounted for Is prop- 
erly spent." 

The bill, as It pas.<?ed the hou.«'e, re- 
Qulr^-s publlcltv of campaign expenses 
not only after the election as at pres- 
sent, but also during the fifteen days 
before election. The senate committee 
proposed amendments that would ex- 
tend the publicity to primary elections 
and force candidates to publish their 
promises t<r their campaign supporters. 
Senators Sutherland and Burton se- 
cured adoption of an amendment broad- 
ening this paragraph so that candidates 
must report all promises by anyone 
who had been given authority to act 
for the candidate 



(Continued on pa ge 13. 7th column.) 

JOHN wTgATES 
GAINS SLOWLY 

Sick Financier Is Reported to 

Have Had Good 

Night. 



DlArS HEALTH 
SEEWB EXCELLENT 

Ex-President Will Go to Paris 
and Then to Switz- 
erland. 

Bad-Nauhelm. Geripany, July 17.— 
Gen. I'orflrio Diaz, former president of 
Mexico. Is preparing to leave for Paris, 
being advised by a consulting phy- 
sician here not to take the waters 
on account of his age. His health, 
however. api-ears excellent. From 
Paris Diaz will go to Switzerland 
where he will remain throughout the 
summer. 



Paris, July 17.— John W. Gates, the 
American financier, wbo is lU In thj* 
city passed a cnmfor.able night. He 

'^Tf\eriiil°se^*ond'llsii''ioday Dr. Gros 
vaid that Mr. Gates continued Improv- 
ing and that while It probably would 
l"e^'some dajs before the P'n;«U ans 
,.niiUi sav that he was out oi aau^-er, 
Ihe condition of the patient justlfiec 

confident nopes of r^f^'^errrt sneclallst 
Dr Pierre Tlsslon. a heart special isi. 
examined the Onancler today and sa^d 
that he had a good heart, which ne 
befleved was Sufficiently strong to 
stand the heavy stra in placed upon It. 

TWO ( HI RCHES^ARE 

WRECKED BY QUAKE. 

wa^stTc^t^rJ^^e"^v/r"J^;ar\^irsKl 
?^ the Kecskemet district, fifty miles 
^".nlhLst of here from 5 until 7 o'clock 
fl^^s morning'^ At Kecskemet the tovv^ 

!.i;!ir^i ;Vre^re^kfS^aB^"\hl'^^wa?iro1 
k nurnb^r of buildings were cracked. 



DOG'S BARKING 

SAVES LIVES 

Five Families in Burning 

Building Aroused By 

the Noise. 

Chicago, July 17.-The barking of 
Buster, a pet dog owned by David 
Morden, saved five families from seri- 
ous injury today in a South side apart- 
ntent building fire. The occupants of 
ihe building were aroused from their 
slumber by the barking of the dog 
when the flames broke out. Later tne> 
were carried from the burning building 
l>y firemen. 



McMANIGAL'S 
WIFE CITED 

Must Answer Charge of Con- 
tempt for Refusing to 
Testify. 

Claims Detectives Were in 

Auto That Ran Down 

Daughter. 



Washington. July 17.— The JIOO.OOO 
legislative "Jackpot" about which re- 
volve charges affecting the election of 
Senator Lorlmer figured in the testi- 
mony at the opening of todays hear- 
ing before the senate Lorlmer com- 
mittee. 

William Burgess, manager and treas- 
urer of an electrical company at Du- 
luth. Minn., testified before the Helm 
investigating committee of the Illlnola 
senate that on a train running out or 
Duluth. in March, lail. C. V. .W»ehe, 
who is associated in business wlih LQ- 
ward Hlnes. declared to him that -there 
was a jackpot raised to elect Mr. Lorl- 
mer 1 know what 1 am talking about 
because I subscribed »10.000 to it my- 
self " 

Telln of WIehe Talk. 
Mr Burgess testified today about 
this conversation. It was planned also 
lo call Henry Turrlsh of Duluth before 
the days session closed. 

Mr. Burgess said that he and \\«ehe 
had not niet before that day. They 
began conversing in the smoking car. 
Burgess said he made a remark about 
the Lorlmer election, which finally leO 
the stranger, who he said was Wiehe, 
to remark that Burges.s "did not know 
very damn much about it." 

Shortlv afterward, according to wit- 
ness today. Wiehe said: 

"There was a jackpot for Lorlmer a 
election. I know what I am talking 
about, because 1 subscribed flO.OOO to 
U myself." ^ ^ 

"Didn't you think It strange that % 
perfect strang er should make a con- 

(Continued on pagt 5, second column.> 



Los Angeles. Cal., July 17.— Superior 
Judge Walter Bordwell will decide to- 
day whether Mrs. Ortle E. McManigal, 
wife of the alleged dynamiter. Is