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Full text of "Illinois : the heart of the nation"

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ILLINOIS 

THE HEART OF THE NATION 



BY 



HON. EDWARD F. DUNNE 

FORMER JUDGE, MAYOR, AND GOVERNOR 

Author and Editor 



ILLINOIS BIOGRAPHY 

Gratuitously Published 
By Special Staff of Writers 



Issued in Five Volumes 
VOLUME V 



ILLUSTRATED 



THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

CHICAGO AND NEW YORK 
1933 



Copyright, 1933 
The Lewis Publishing Company 



• Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 



http://archive.org/details/illinoisheartofn05dunn 



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. !■ 



HISTORY of ILLINOIS 



Joy Morton has had a career which would 
make him conspicuous in any group of Ameri- 
can financiers, industrial leaders and men of 
affairs. It is not unlikely, however, that his- 
tory will take chief note of the activities 
which he has classed as his avocation and 
hobby. Like his father before him Joy Morton 
has found his chief pleasure in setting in mo- 
tion a train of experimental work which will 
continue long after his own generation and 
will add something to the permanent well 
being and beauty of the world. 

Joy Morton was born at Detroit, Michigan, 
September 27, 1855, son of J. Sterling and 
Caroline (Joy) Morton. In the paternal line 
he is a descendant of Richard Morton, one of 
the early members of the Plymouth Colony 
of Massachusetts, where he arrived in 1625. 
In the maternal line Mr. Morton is a descend- 
ant of Thomas Joy, who built the first town 
house of Boston, in 1650. J. Sterling Morton 
was a territorial governor of Nebraska, and 
up to 1896 was the dominant figure in the 
political life of that state. In 1893 he was 
made secretary of agriculture in the cabinet 
of President Cleveland. In Nebraska in 1872 
he originated "Arbor Day," an arbitrary date 
for setting out trees, which thus became an 
established custom in a state where arbori- 
culture was a primary necessity and a prac- 
tice which has since extended to nearly all the 
other states in the Union. The home of Gov- 
ernor Morton was a short distance west of 
Nebraska City. On that beautiful estate he 
personally superintended his hobby of grow- 
ing native and other trees, and among other 
picturesque features of the state today is a 
dense grove of lofty pine trees. This place 
he named "Arbor Lodge," and in 1923 Joy 
Morton donated the homestead to the State 
of Nebraska, and it is one of the real show 
places of the state. 

This country home was the boyhood en- 
vironment of Joy Morton, and the labels on 
several of the fine specimens of trees that 
adorn Arbor Lodge today indicate they were 
set out by Joy Morton. He finished his edu- 
cation in Talbot Hall at Nebraska City. 

Joy Morton since 1879 has been a resident 
of Chicago. The next year he became a part- 



ner in E. I. Wheeler & Company, a business 
which was the successor of the firm of Rich- 
mond & Company, which as early as 1848 was 
bringing salt from New York State around 
the lakes for distribution in the West. Out 
of these early companies has developed the 
Morton Salt Company, of which for many 
years Joy Morton has been president. The 
Morton Salt Company in 1923 celebrated its 
seventy-fifth anniversary. It is the largest 
organization in America manufacturing and 
distributing salt and has plants in Michigan, 
Kansas, California, Texas and other states. 

Since 1885 Mr. Morton has also been senior 
member of Joy Morton & Company, financiers. 
Mr. Morton is president of the Standard Office 
Company, which built and owns the Railway 
Exchange Building in Chicago, and in 1926, 
largely through his own personal finances, he 
erected the twenty-three story building at 
Wells and Washington streets. Mr. Morton 
is also director of the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
way, of the Western Cold Storage Company, 
and of the Equitable Life Assurance Society 
of the United States. During the World war 
he was a member of the Inland Waterway 
Transportation Committee of the Council of 
National Defense. 

His country home for many years has been 
in DuPage County, near Lisle, where he owns 
about two thousand acres of the rolling land- 
scape along the DuPage River. On part of 
this estate he has set aside and developed the 
Morton Arboretum, a great experimental lab- 
oratory for the cultivation and propagation 
of trees, shrubs and plants, established not 
only as a hobby but for a valuable economic 
purpose to encourage practical forestry and 
to demonstrate the types of native and exotic 
trees and shrubs which can be grown in these 
climatic surroundings for ornamental and 
commercial purposes. Mr. Morton has wisely 
insured the perpetuity of the arboretum by 
placing it under the management of a special 
trust, thus "creating a foundation to be known 
as the Morton Arboretum, for practical, scien- 
tific research work in horticulture and agri- 
culture, particularly in the growth and cul- 
ture of trees, shrubs and vines, by means of 
a great outdoor museum arranged for con- 



ILLINOIS 



venient study of every specie, variety and 
hybrid of the wooded plants of the world able 
to support the climate of Illinois, such museum 
to be equipped with an herbarium, a reference 
library and laboratory for the study of trees 
and other plants, with reference to their char- 
acters, relationships, economic value, geograph- 
ical distribution and their improvement by 
selection and hybridization; and for the pub- 
lication of the results obtained in these 
laboratories by the officials and students of 
the arboretum, in order to increase the gen- 
eral knowledge and love of trees and shrubs 
and bring about an increase and improvement 
in their growth and culture." 

Mr. Morton is a member of the Chicago 
Historical Society, American Forestry Asso- 
ciation of Washington, D. C, Art Institute of 
Chicago, Chicago Club, Chicago Plan Com- 
mission, Chicago Zoological Society, Commer- 
cial Club of Chicago, Field Museum of Nat- 
ural History, Chicago, and of numerous other 
clubs and organizations. He married in 1880 
Carrie Lake, daughter of Judge George B. 
Lake, of Omaha. She died in 1915, leaving 
two children, Jean, who was married in 1904 
to Joseph M. Cudahy, and Sterling, an official 
in the Morton Salt Company. Sterling Mor- 
ton married in 1910 Preston Owsley and has 
one daughter, Suzette. In 1917 Mr. Joy Mor- 
ton married Margaret Gray, daughter of 
James Gray. 

Morris Birkbeck was an English immigrant 
who settled in Edwards County in 1818. He 
was very earnestly opposed to slavery and 
came into Illinois to settle because he thought 
the Ordinance of 1787 would forever pro- 
hibit slavery in this state. Mr. Birkbeck was 
a fluent writer and a fine conversationalist, 
but he seems not to have been a public 
speaker. His writings were published in the 
Illinois Gazette, edited by Henry Eddy, at 
Shawneetown. 

Joseph E. Gary, who was on the bench 
forty-three years, a record of unprecedented 
length in the history of the Illinois judiciary, 
was born at Potsdam, New York, July 9, 1821, 
and died in 1906 at the age of eighty-five. 
He read law in St. Louis, was admitted to the 
bar in 1844, and for several years practiced 
at Springfield, Missouri, but on the termina- 
tion of the war with Mexico and the discovery 
of gold in California, he went over the Santa 
Fe trail to New Mexico. There he met Murray 
F. Tuley, and they, destined both to become 
prominent figures and distinguished jurists 
in Chicago, practiced law in the land of the 
herder, the trader, the teamster, the rancher. 
From there he went on to California, practiced 
three years at San Francisco and in 1856 
established his home in Chicago. In 1863 he 
was called from the private practice of law 
to the bench of the Superior Court of Cook 



County. Under successive elections he con- 
tinued a judge of that court until his death 
in November, 1906. He held the office of judge 
of the Court of Superior and General Juris- 
diction for a longer period than any other 
person so chosen in the United States. On 
four occasions he received the nomination of 
both political parties. In November, 1888, he 
was transferred by appointment of the Su- 
preme Court to the Appellate Court of the 
first district and became its chief justice. 

In all his long experience on the bench 
Judge Gary never flinched from his responsi- 
bilities. It became his duty to preside in the 
famous trial of the "anarchists" for throwing 
the bomb in Haymarket Square on March 4, 
1886. It was inevitable that his decision 
should arouse a storm of controversy in press 
and public opinion. The terse words used 
some years later in referring to the trial 
illustrate both the integrity of his character 
and his clear vision of the law and an indi- 
vidual's responsibility under the law: "In 
law and in morals the anarchists were rightly 
punished, not for opinions, but for horrible 
deeds." 

Elbert Henry Gary. His dominating posi- 
tion in American industry as chairman and 
chief executive officer of the United States 
Steel Corporation overshadowed the fact that 
Judge Gary was for many years a Chicago 
lawyer. In 1893-94 he was president of the 
Chicago Bar Association. 

The Gary family were among the first set- 
tlers of Wheaton, and Elbert H. Gary was 
born in that Illinois village October 8, 1846, 
son of Erastus and Susan A. Valette Gary. 
A number of years ago Judge Gary built the 
Gary Memorial Church as a memorial to his 
parents. He attended Wheaton College and 
the old University of Chicago, graduating from 
the Law Department of the latter institution 
in 1867. He was admitted to the Illinois bar 
in October of that year and to the bar of the 
United States Supreme Court in 1878. For 
many years Judge Gary had his home in 
Wheaton, where he served as president of the 
village three times and was the first to hold 
the office of mayor of the incorporated city of 
Wheaton. For two terms he was county judge 
of DuPage County. He was in active practice 
of the law in Chicago for twenty-five years. 
Much of his practice was incorporation law, 
and he was general counsel for several rail- 
way companies, manufacturing and other cor- 
porations. 

It was largely his mind that conceived and 
formulated the plans for the organization of 
the United States Steel Corporation. Prior to 
that he had retired from law practice to be- 
come president of the Federal Steel Company, 
which he assisted in organizing. As chairman 
of the board of directors of the United States 
Steel Corporation, and later as its president, 



ILLINOIS 



the corporation gave Mr. Gary an opportunity 
for accumulating great wealth, but through 
this position he also exercised a stabilizing in- 
fluence on business throughout America and 
the world. He served as president of the 
American Iron & Steel Institute from its be- 
ginning in 1909. Judge Gary was a trustee 
of Northwestern University. He died August 
15, 1927. 

Richard Teller Crane. The Crane Com- 
pany of Chicago has had much the same rela- 
tion with the iron and steel business as the 
Swift and Armour companies to the packing 
industry. The founder of the Crane Company 
was the late Richard Teller Crane, who came 
to Chicago in 1855. He was a nephew of 
Martin Ryerson, another significant name in 
Chicago's industrial history. 

Richard Teller Crane was born in New 
Jersey in 1832 and died January 8, 1912. The 
Crane ancestors had come to Plymouth, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1620. R. T. Crane's mother, 
Marian Ryerson, was a sister of Martin 
Ryerson. It was through the influence of his 
uncle that Richard T. Crane learned the trade 
of brass and iron worker. Martin Ryerson in 
the meantime came to Chicago and engaged in 
the lumber business, and when Mr. Crane 
arrived in 1855 he was furnished means by 
his uncle to establish a small brass foundry. 
His brother, Charles S. Crane, came soon 
afterward, and the two brothers established 
the firm of Ryerson, Crane & Brother, manu- 
facturing finished brass goods. About a year 
later they erected a building on Lake Street 
and in 1858 began the manufacture of steam 
heating apparatus, and in 1860 established an 
iron factory. By the close of the Civil war 
their business included a malleable iron foun- 
dry, a factory for malleable and cast-iron 
fittings, and a general machine shop. Subse- 
quently their business was incorporated as 
the Northwestern Manufacturing Company, 
with R. T. Crane as president and Charles S. 
Crane first vice president. In 1872 the name 
was changed to Crane Brothers Manufactur- 
ing Company, but Charles Crane soon retired 
and after that the head of the business was 
R. T. Crane. This company was the first in 
Chicago to manufacture freight and passenger 
elevators operated by steam power, and in 
1874 they began the manufacture of hydraulic 
elevators under the name of the Crane Ele- 
vator Company. However, the chief business 
of the company for a long period of years has 
been the manufacture of pipe, steam fitting 
and plumbers supplies, and in that line the 
name Crane is a synonym of highest quality 
in a world-wide trade. 

In other ways Richard T. Crane was a con- 
tributor to the broader welfare of Chicago. 
He was one of the original subscribers to the 
fund for the building of the Chicago Manual 
Training School and for many years did much 



to encourage the extension of manual training 
to other public schools. He was one of the 
largest contributors to the fund which made 
possible for many years the expositions held 
on the lake front. 

A son, Charles Richard Crane, who was 
born in Chicago in 1858, spent many years 
with the Crane Company and was its presi- 
dent after his father's death for two years. 
He was vice chairman of the finance com- 
mittee of the Woodrow Wilson campaign of 
1912. In 1917 he was a member of the Presi- 
dent's special diplomatic commission to Russia, 
was American commissioner on mandates in 
Turkey in 1919, and from May, 1920, to June, 
1921, served as American minister to China. 
His son, Richard Crane, a vice president of 
the Crane Company, was private secretary 
to Robert Lansing, Secretary of State from 
1915 to 1919, was United States minister to 
the Republic of Czecho-Slovakia in 1919-21, 
and is a recognized authority on government 
economics and international relationships. 

Another son of the founder of the Crane 
Company was Richard Teller Crane, Jr., who 
died November 7, 1931, and had been presi- 
dent of the Crane Company since 1914. 

Elias Kent Kane, a graduate of Yale Uni- 
versity, came from New York to Kaskaskia 
in 1814, at the age of twenty years. He was a 
lawyer of excellent preparation, and was 
gifted with the characteristics of a high-bred 
gentleman. He acted as a United States dis- 
trict judge a short time before Illinois was 
admitted to the Union. He took an active 
part in securing the admission of Illinois into 
the Union. He is said to have written much 
of the Constitution of 1818 before the meet- 
ing of the convention. He was an eloquent 
public speaker, was the first secretary of 
state for Illinois, under Governor Bond, served 
in the Legislature, and was elected to the 
United States Senate in 1824. He was re- 
elected and died while at Washington in 1835. 
He was an able lawyer, an uncompromising 
champion of slavery. 

Hon. Sumner Simpson Anderson, of 
Charleston, has for many years been a recog- 
nized leader in the bar of Eastern Illinois. 
He achieved a state-wide reputation during 
the Lowden administration as assistant attor- 
ney general. He was one of the able lawyers 
called to the assistance of the state govern- 
ment during that period, which included the 
World war. Much high and well deserved 
praise has been given him for the able and 
conscientious manner in which he discharged 
his duties. 

Mr. Anderson is a native of Coles County 
and descended from one of the distinguished 
pioneer families of that part of the state. 
His parents were James M. and Dorothy 
A. (Leitch) Anderson. His maternal grand- 



6 



ILLINOIS 



father was Robert Leitch, a native of Virginia, 
who served as one of the first county judges 
of Coles County. 

Sumner S. Anderson grew up on a farm, 
made the most of his school advantages, quali- 
fied as a teacher, and began the study of law 
in the office of his uncle, Samuel M. Leitch. 
For three years he attended special courses 
at the University of Michigan, where later 
he graduated with the LL. B. degree. He 
was admitted to the bar before the Supreme 
Court of Michigan, later was admitted to the 
Illinois bar, and has practiced at Charleston 
for many years. Mr. Anderson is a member 
of the board of governors at large of the 
Illinois State Bar Association and has served 
on many of its important committees. He is 
also a member of the Coles County and Amer- 
ican Bar Associations. 

His home community has many times hon- 
ored him with positions of trust and respon- 
sibility. He was for many years president 
of the Charleston Public Library Board. He 
was for some years a director of the Second 
National Bank of Charleston. Mr. Anderson 
is a prominent Presbyterian layman, and has 
served as delegate to the Synod of Illinois 
and to the Presbyterian General Assembly. 

His public and political service has been 
a notable one. As a young lawyer he served 
as corporation counsel of Charleston, and later 
was elected county judge. At the time he 
was supposed to be the youngest county judge 
in the state. Of twenty cases appealed from 
his decisions to the Supreme Court all but 
two were affirmed. At the end of his term 
he declined reelection in order to give his 
full time to his splendid volume of private 
law practice. He was assistant attorney gen- 
eral from 1917 to 1921. In this capacity he 
handled work from all parts of the state. 
He wrote many important opinions for the 
attorney general and represented that depart- 
ment of the state government in more than 
400 cases before the State Court of Claims, 
handling claims involving over two million 
dollars. Mr. Anderson is a former chairman 
of the Republican Congressional Committee, 
and in 1916 was appointed a member of the 
advisory committee to the Republican State 
Central Committee. In the presidential cam- 
paign of 1928 he acted as state chairman 
for the state outside of Cook County of the 
Hoover-Curtis Lawyers Association, organized 
under the auspices of the Republican National 
Committee. 

Mr. Anderson married in 1895 Miss Mary 
Piper, who at the time was a teacher in the 
city schools at Des Moines, Iowa. Mrs. Ander- 
son is a woman of fine culture, is a graduate 
of the Central Illinois Teachers College at 
Normal. Her father, Rev. James A. Piper, 
was for over a quarter of a century pastor of 
the First Presbyterian Church of Charleston, 
was a graduate of Princeton University, and 



was twice elected moderator of the Synod 
of Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Anderson had three 
sons. The oldest, Julian Piper, volunteered 
at the age of nineteen and was in the Navy 
Hospital Corps from the beginning to the 
close of the World war, making thirty trips 
across the Atlantic. Twice his ship encoun- 
tered submarines. After the war he graduated 
from the University of Chicago, is now a 
resident of Evanston and is head credit man 
for George H. Burr & Company, bonds and 
commercial paper, of New York and Chicago. 
Julian P. Anderson married Miss Mldred Den- 
nis, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. 
Dennis. Mr. Anderson's second son, Irving 
Gray, was a sophomore in the United States 
Naval Academy at Annapolis when, at the 
age of nineteen, he was accidentally killed 
in the line of duty. Sumner Morgan, the 
youngest son, graduated from the University 
of Illinois in June, 1925, having specialized 
as a geologist, and is now engaged in his 
profession as a geologist, with headquarters 
in New York City. He married in 1927 Kath- 
erine McKibbin, of Staten Island. 

John Mason Peck was a Baptist preacher 
who had come from Connecticut into Illinois 
about 1817 and had been very active in re- 
ligious matters. He worked mostly along 
missionary lines. For nine years he rode up 
and down in Illinois and Missouri. In 1820 
Mr. Peck settled at Rock Springs, eight and 
a half miles north of Belleville, St. Clair 
County. Here he founded the Rock Springs 
Seminary in 1826 which later became Shurtleff 
College. Mr. Peck organized a sort of anti- 
convention society in St. Clair County im- 
mediately after the passage of the convention 
resolution by the Legislature. This St. Clair 
County society came to be known as the par- 
ent society, and fourteen other societies were 
organized in as many other counties. Per- 
haps Mr. Peck's chief value to the cause of 
freedom in this great struggle was along the 
line of organization of the anti-convention 
forces. 

William E. Hinchliff was a citizen of 
Illinois whose character and influence must be 
estimated by other measures than those appli- 
cable to material achievements. In material 
affairs there stands to him in Rockford a mon- 
ument in the shape of the largest plant of its 
kind, the Burson Knitting Company. That 
may be taken as a symbol of his business suc- 
cess. More important than this was the man- 
ner in which his ability as an executive, his 
masterful control, his kindliness and sympathy 
permeated throughout the personnel of that 
great organization. It is doubtful if there has 
been an organization of workers and producers 
in Illinois with a greater sense of loyalty and 
effective cooperation to the business and the 
head of the business than the Burson Knitting 



ILLINOIS 



Company. Though intensely democratic in 
all his relationships with his employees, Mr. 
Hinchliff also exemplified the culture and the 
intellectual breadth of the true English aristo- 
crat, a type which has been described as the 
direct antithesis of snobbery, but in which the 
motives and action spring from the inner 
nature and not from rules and convictions. 

As one of his friends and associates has 
said: "Mr. Hinchliff had an unusual hered- 
ity of strong and sterling qualities. His Eng- 
lish blood, of the Yorkshire variety, gave him 
a combination of the qualities of mind, of hon- 
esty, dependableness and sustained purpose 
that were unusual. To these were added a 
broad and comprehensive intelligence and, to a 
certain extent, a tendency to artistic expres- 
sion in all he had to do. With these moral 
and intellectual endowments was combined a 
robust physique that enabled him to carry 
them into exercise and effect. There never 
was anything in his life record that would 
even remotely suggest the speculative, the 
sensational or the spectacular in his make-up. 
But along the lines of honest work, thoroughly 
done and effectively carried out, he was as 
unvarying as the sun. These basic qualities 
of his heredity, which he confirmed by their 
use, made him appreciative of others who 
achieved in the same way. This gave him a 
democratic interest in others, even in the hum- 
blest walks of life, who achieved in the same 
way." 

His parents, William and Clemewell (Col- 
lins) Hinchliff, were born in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, and coming to America, settled in Chi- 
cago in March, 1850. His father became one 
of Chicago's foremost mason contractors. He 
built Chicago's first Congregational Church 
and constructed the original buildings for the 
Elgin National Watch Company. He erected 
for himself the first brick residence in the city. 

The sixth child of the family and the second 
son was William Elias Hinchliff, who was born 
at the family home on May Street in Chicago, 
December 27, 1857. A few years later his 
father bought a farm of eighty-five acres, 
eighteen miles north of Chicago, at what is 
now Glenview. William E. Hinchliff 's earliest 
recollections were of this home. He assisted in 
farming activities, and there commenced his 
love for horses and riding. He attended school 
there, but his interest in good literature was 
chiefly aroused by student pastors who some- 
times visited the Hinchliff home. About 1867 
the family returned to Chicago and there he 
continued his education in the Skinner School 
and in 1877 was graduated from the West Chi- 
cago High School. Soon afterward he entered 
Amhurst College. He showed much proficiency 
in public speaking and other literary exercises, 
winning the Kellogg prize in his sophomore 
year. Because of his marked oratorical and 
literary ability the late Dr. Lyman Abbott ad- 
vised him to enter the ministry or political life. 



He was a member of the Beta Theta Pi fra- 
ternity. 

Soon after leaving college in 1881 he became 
private secretary of Franklin McVeagh, but 
about a year later became president of the 
William E. Hinchliff Company, manufacturers 
of brick, with yards at Porter and Hobart, 
Indiana. 

His first meeting with Miss Harriet Eliza- 
beth Emerson was in 1878, while he was a 
student in Amhurst and she at Wellesley.. 
Friendship and mutual attraction ripened 
through subsequent years and on December 31, 
1885, they were married. 

Miss Emerson's home was at Rockf ord, where 
her father was active head of Emerson, Talcott 
& Company. Her grandfather, Rev. Ralph 
Emerson, was a Congregational minister and 
a professor in Andover Theological Seminary. 
Ralph Emerson was born at Andover, Massa- 
chusetts, in 1831. He settled at Rockford 
in 1852. For a time he was interested in the 
hardware business, but later he and his associ- 
ates developed the water power on the Rock 
River and thus laid the foundation for Rock- 
fords' industrial power. Ralph Emerson gave 
to Rockford its first electric light plant, was 
the promoter of the Rockford Life Insurance 
Company and supplied capital and his per- 
sonal direction to a number of banks and man- 
ufacturing undertakings. 

The mother of Mrs. Hinchliff was Adaline E. 
Talcott, daughter of Wait Talcott. Of their 
eight children two of the sons died in infancy, 
and another son, Ralph, lost his life by a fall 
while acting as a volunteer fireman, August 
25, 1889. Ralph Emerson, Sr., died August 19, 
1914, and his wife on the 3rd of May of the 
following year. 

It was the death of Ralph Emerson, Jr., that 
caused Mr. Hinchliff to dispose of his manu- 
facturing interests in Chicago and move to 
Rockford in the spring of 1890. Here he 
became actively associated with Emerson, Tal- 
cott & Company. Upon the perfection of the 
Burson knitting machine and the organiza- 
tion of the Burson Knitting and Burson Manu- 
facturing companies he became secretary and 
treasurer, and after the death of Ralph Emer- 
son, Sr., was made president. 

"His success in the manufacturing business 
for many years was due in no small degree 
to his ability to hold the allegiance of his em- 
ployees. These same qualities of mind and 
character entered into the products of the fac- 
tory with which he was so long identified. 
They were dependable articles and of stand- 
ard make. The public learned to appreciate 
them as such and to rely upon their merit. 
The growth of the Burson Knitting Company 
to its present supremacy was due as much to 
the fact that it held its trade as to its aggres- 
sive policy in extending it. In this particular 
it reflected the special characteristics of the 
mind that so long supervised it." 



8 



ILLINOIS 



In 1916 he gave up all active business re- 
sponsibilities. He died at his home in Rock- 
ford February 19, 1921. 

Of his many personal interests only a brief 
account can be given. From boyhood he en- 
joyed horseback riding and hunting, and went 
to all parts of the country hunting game. In 
later years he enjoyed motoring and golfing. 
One of his daughters has written: "A culti- 
vated taste and training in music and litera- 
ture, equalled by skill in horsemanship, fenc- 
ing and shooting, and at golf, furnished him 
with a diversity of interests and an all-round 
development that is seldom found in this age. 
And not only did he possess this culture, but 
he was eager to share it with his family, for, 
in spite of extremely heavy business responsi- 
bilities, he read to us, sang with us, rode and 
drove with us, and even took us to the 'shop' 
whenever his presence was required there on 
Sunday mornings. He loved the out-of-doors 
(we had one of the first sleeping porches in 
Rockford) and spent long afternoons driving 
into the country where we frequently had fam- 
ily picnics. On the other hand, he was equally 
happy in-doors with a book or at a concert. 
Grand and light opera and the old English 
songs were often on his lips until we learned 
to appreciate good music. Shakespeare, 
Homer, Dumas, Victor Hugo, Kipling, he read 
aloud until literature opened before us to an 
extent seldom afforded children." 

To quote the words of Dr. John Gordon, 
pastor of the Second Congregational Church: 
"Mr. Hinchliff's religion was a religion of use- 
fulness. He joined the church in Chicago that 
his father built, and he never joined another, 
but he was a man whose religion was not con- 
fined to any church or any creed or any cere- 
mony. It was a religion that we term 'en- 
largement of life and fullness of service.' He 
was a man reverent and most devout. " 

Mr. Hinchliff was survived by Mrs. Hinchliff 
and seven children: Mrs. Harriet Coverdale, 
Ralph, Mrs. Jeannette Belle Parker, Emerson, 
Mrs, Dorothy Williams, Miss Mary Clemewell 
and Edward C. 

Today the office of president of the Burson 
Knitting and Burson Manufacturing Compa- 
nies at Rockf ord is filled by Mr. Ralph Hinch- 
liff. He was born in Chicago, but through 
most of his life has lived at Rockford. He 
was educated at Cornell University and in 
preparation for active association with his 
father's business attended a textile school at 
Lowell, Massachusetts. Mr. Hinchliff is a 
member of the Second Congregational Church, 
is a Kappa Sigma, member of the B. P. O. 
Elks, University and Country Clubs of Rock- 
ford, Arts Club of Rockford, Arts Club of 
Chicago, and City Club of New York, and his 
chief recreation is golf. 

He married Miss Hortense Devore, who was 
born at Berea, daughter of E. A. Devore, 
distinguished educator connected in its early 



days with Berea College in the mountains of 
Eastern Kentucky, and for many years Trus- 
tee of Antioch College. Mr. and Mrs. Ralph 
Hinchliff have four children, Ralph, Jr., Wil- 
liam Emerson, Rockwell and Patricia. 

Ralph Emerson established his residence 
at Rockford, Illinois, in 1852, about the time 
of attaining to his legal majority, and it is 
certain that no other man made greater and 
more cumulative contribution to the civic and 
industrial advancement of the city than did he. 
He was the leader in manifold movements that 
resulted in continuous progress and by his 
splendid ability he achieved much for the city. 
He was largely instrumental in the develop- 
ment of the water power at Rockford and its 
first electric-light plant, was financially inter- 
ested in banking enterprise, insurance com- 
panies, and in the upbuilding of many of the 
leading manufacturing industries of his home 
city, including the Nelson Knitting Company, 
the Burson Knitting Company and the Burson 
Manufacturing Company, mention of which 
is made in the memoir dedicated to his son-in- 
law, the late William E. Hinchliff, in the pre- 
ceding sketch of this publication. 

Ralph Emerson became greatly interested in 
the development of the agricultural implement 
industry, to which he devoted the major por- 
tion of his life. The Emerson Manufacturing 
Company, of which he was head, was one of 
the leading manufacturers of farming imple- 
ments in this country. 

Ralph Emerson was born at Andover, Mas- 
sachusetts, May 3, 1831, and was eighty-four 
years of age at the time of his death, August 
19, 1914, his wife having died on the 3d of the 
following May, which was his birthday anni- 
versary. Mr. Emerson was a son of Rev. 
Ralph Emerson, who was a clergyman of the 
Congregational Church and a member of the 
faculty of Andover Theological Seminary, 
the oldest Congregational divinity school of the 
United States. Joseph Emerson, a brother 
of the subject of this memoir, was for over 
fifty years professor of Greek at Beloit Col- 
lege, Beloit, Wisconsin. 

Ralph Emerson was reared in a home of 
distinctive culture and refinement and received 
in his native state the best of educational ad- 
vantages. Mr. Emerson's initiative and ad- 
ministrative ability came into play in the 
developing of some of the most important 
manufacturing industries of the West, and 
he was loyal in his stewardship as a citizen, 
supported measures and movements tending 
to advance the general welfare of his home 
city and was liberal in his contributions to re- 
ligious work, both he and his wife having 
been zealous members of the Congregational 
Church. His political allegiance was given to 
the Republican party. In addition to financial 
aid given to many institutions of learning his 



ILLINOIS 



personal intellectual attainments made his 
counsel invaluable to those engaged in educa- 
tional administration. Among the many 
schools thus benefited, special mention might 
be made of Rockford and Beloit Colleges, Wel- 
lesley College and missionary schools in many 
parts of the world. 

Mr. Emerson wedded Miss Adaline E. Tal- 
cott, daughter of Hon. Wait Talcott, and of 
the eight children of this union two died in 
infancy, while the son Ralph was killed by 
falling from a building in 1889, on the occa- 
sion of a severe fire at the water-power plant 
in Rockford. The daughters who survived the 
honored parents were as follows: Mrs, Ada- 
line E. Thompson, Mrs. Harriet E. Hinchliff, 
Mrs. Mary E. Lathrop, Mrs. Belle E. Keith 
and Mrs. Dora E. Wheeler. In April, 1900, 
Mrs. Emerson was appointed by Governor 
Tanner a commissioner to the great exposition 
in Paris, France. She was long a gracious 
figure in the social, cultural and church cir- 
cles of Rockford. 

Ralph Hinchliff is president of the Bur- 
son Knitting Company and the Burson Manu- 
facturing Company, industrial concerns of na- 
tional importance, with headquarters in the 
City of Rockford, judicial center of Winnebago 
County. In this connection and in his civic 
attitude Mr. Hinchliff is well upholding the 
prestige of the family name, and as executive 
head of the two companies mentioned he is 
the successor of his honored father, the late 
William E. Hinchliff, to whom a memorial 
tribute is dedicated on other pages of this 
publication, so that further review of his ca- 
reer and the family history is not here de- 
manded. 

Ralph Hinchliff was born in the City of 
Chicago, Illinois, on the 20th of March, 1889. 
He attended Cornell University, Ithaca, New 
York, and Lowell Textile School at Lowell, 
Massachusetts. He has from his youth been 
associated with the companies of which he 
is now the president. The Burson Knitting 
Company is one of the world's leading con- 
cerns in the manufacturing of hosiery, and its 
trade extends throughout the United States 
and Canadian provinces, with a large export 
business in virtually all foreign lands. The 
Burson Manufacturing Company manufac- 
tures machines for the making of hosiery, and 
this corporation likewise has contributed much 
to the industro-commercial precedence of Rock- 
ford. The stock of the two companies is held 
by representatives of the Emerson and Hinch- 
liff families. 

Mr. Hinchliff is found loyally aligned in the 
ranks of the Republican party, he and his wife 
are members of the Second Congregational 
Church of Rockford, and he is affiliated with 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and the Kappa Sigma college fraternity. He 



has membership in the local University Club, 
the Rockford Country Club, the Arts Club of 
•Chicago, the Arts Club of Rockford and the 
City Club of New York. His chief recreations 
are golf and tennis. 

In 1915 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hinchliff to Miss Hortense DeVore, who was 
born at Berea, Kentucky, a daughter of E. A. 
DeVore, a prominent educator and publisher. 
Mr. and Mrs. Hinchliff have four children*. 
Ralph, Jr., William Emerson, Rockwell and 
Patricia. 

In 1925 Mrs. Hinchliff established in Rock- 
ford a small hosiery shop to earn money for 
her charities. From this enterprise she has 
developed a unique series of shops known from 
coast to coast. Her modern and metropolitan 
establishment, grouping an exclusive apparel 
shop for women, a gift shop and decorative 
arts, and a restaurant-lounge, is known as the 
Guest House Importers. This unique estab- 
lishment now controls an annual business 
amounting to $100,000, is situated at 508-14 
North Main Street, and has received recogni- 
tion in special articles in national papers and 
periodicals. 

Edward Coles, a Virginian of education 
and culture, came into Illinois in 1819. He 
was conscientiously opposed to slavery. He 
freed some twenty slaves on his. way from 
Virginia to Illinois. He was registrar of 
the Land Office at Edwardsville, was elected 
governor in 1822 against Judge Phillips, Judge 
Browne, and General James B. Moore. It 
was known that Coles was opposed to slavery, 
but not much emphasis was put upon the 
slavery question in the election of August, 
1822. Mr. Coles gave his entire salary as 
governor, $4,000, to help carry on the con- 
vention fight. Following his term of office as 
governor Edward Coles tried unsuccessfully to 
"come back" into politics in Illinois, and in 
1833 he removed to Philadelphia. 

Isaac N. Arnold. The first clerk of the 
city of Chicago was Isaac N. Arnold, who at 
the time of his election, in March, 1837, was 
a young lawyer who arrived in Chicago the 
previous fall and had earned his first fees 
by drawing up real estate and general con- 
tracts. He soon resigned the city clerkship, 
and, associated with Mahlon D. Ogden, rapidly 
acquired a foremost position among the Chi- 
cago bar. "In that persuasive style of address 
which tells most effectually on the average 
juror he had no superior." He was con- 
nected with many important cases, being the 
principal attorney in the case carried to the 
United States Supreme Court in 1843, when 
that court, by Chief Justice Taney, held uncon- 
stitutional the statute of Illinois providing 
that unless the property of a judgment debtor 
should realize two-thirds of its appraised 



10 



ILLINOIS 



value, it should not be sold under execution. 
Perhaps the greatest service he rendered in 
the public affairs of his state was his per- 
sistent defense of the public credit during a 
time when many men favored the repudiation 
of debts incurred by the state under the sanc- 
tion of a reckless Legislature. Mr. Arn- 
old had a long and active career, both in 
state and national affairs. He was elected 
to Congress in 1860 and served till near the 
close of the war. His active hostility to 
slavery had brought him into prominence with 
many movements before the war. A friend 
and admirer of Lincoln, and a close student 
of his life and work, he devoted himself, im- 
mediately upon his return from Congress, to 
the task of writing a life of Lincoln, which 
work is one of the authoritative histories of 
the war president. Mr. Arnold, with the ex- 
ception of a brief season after the fire, when 
he was compelled to resume active practice, 
during the closing years of his life devoted 
himself to literary labors. He was born 
November 30, 1813, in Otsego County, New 
York, supported himself by teaching and 
other work while gaining an education, was 
admitted to the bar in his native county in 
1835, and died at Chicago, April 24, 1884. 
At all times in all places he was a gentleman. 

Hon. Paul B. Lauher, long prominently 
identified with the legal profession and with 
public affairs in Edgar County, is a resident 
of Paris and has recently completed two terms 
as county judge. 

Judge Lauher was born near Oakland in 
Coles County, Illinois, November 13, 1887, son 
of Evan and Cynthia Ann (Lane) Lauher. His 
father was born in Symmes Township, Edgar 
County, Illinois, February 22, 1841, and 
devoted his active life to farming. He died 
June 24, 1917. His wife was born in Pike 
County, Ohio, March 21, 1844, and passed 
away January 29, 1923. 

Paul B. Lauher was educated in the gram- 
mar and high schools of Edgar County, grad- 
uating from high school at Paris in 1906. 
In the interval from the time he left high 
school until he entered upon his chosen career 
he clerked for two years. In 1912 he was 
graduated LL. B. from the University of Illi- 
nois, was admitted to the bar the same year 
and soon afterwards became associated with 
his brother, James K., in a general law prac- 
tice at Paris. 

Judge Lauher enlisted April 29, 1918, and 
was member of Headquarters Company of the 
Three Hundred and Tenth Field Artillery, Sev- 
enty-ninth Division. He was at Camp Dix, 
New Jersey, Camp Meade, Maryland, and on 
July 14, 1918, sailed for overseas. He was 
in France until May 13, 1919, and after coming 
home was discharged with the grade of cor- 
poral, June 5, 1919. 

After the war he resumed his practice at 



Paris with his brother, but in November, 1922, 
was elected county judge, and by reelection 
filled that office for eight consecutive years. 
Judge Lauher is a Democrat in politics, is 
a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, 
member of the B. P. 0. Elks, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and Improved Order of 
Red Men. He is a charter member of Paris 
Post No. 211 of the American Legion. 

He married, June 4, 1922, Miss Gladys G. 
Bond, who was born in Coles County, daughter 
of Jerome N. and Georgia Ann (Mcintosh) 
Bond. Her father was born at Circleville, 
Ohio, and her mother in Shelby County, Indi- 
ana. Judge and Mrs. Lauher have one daugh- 
ter, Virginia Ann, born November 23, 1925. 

Ruben George Soderstrom, of Streator, 
printer, labor leader, has consecutively for 
fourteen years been a representative of La 
Salle County in the Illinois Legislature. 

Mr. Soderstrom was born in Wright County, 
Minnesota, March 10, 1888. His father, John 
S. Soderstrom, a native of Sweden, learned 
the trade of cobbler or shoemaker and on com- 
ing to America in 1866 located in Chicago, 
where he was in the shoe business until the 
great fire of 1871. Soon afterward he entered 
the ministry of the Swedish Mission Friends 
Church, and devoted many years to those 
labors at St. Paul and other portions of the 
northwestern states. In 1902 he moved to 
Streator, Illinois, and was in the shoe business 
there until his death in 1912. Rev. John S. 
Soderstrom married Anna G. Erickson, also 
a native of Sweden. She resides at Kankakee, 
Illinois. Of their six children four are living: 
Ruben George; John Paul, of Streator; Lafe 
E., of Chicago; and Mrs. Olga Rebecca Hodg- 
son, of Kankakee. 

Ruben George Soderstrom spent the first 
fourteen years of his life in Minnesota, where 
he had his common school education. When 
the family moved to Streator he became self- 
supporting, and for two years was an em- 
ployee of the American Bottle Company, in 
the capacity of "carry-in" boy. He left the 
bottle making trade to become a devil in the 
office of the Independent-Times of Streator 
and has been connected with this old and well 
known newspaper, now known as the Duily- 
Times-Press, for many years. 

Mr. Soderstrom has taken an active part 
in organized labor in Streator since reaching 
his majority. In 1912, when he was twenty- 
four, he was made president of the Streator 
Trades and Labor Council. Mr. Soderstrom 
is an old-time linotype operator. For a time 
he was editor of the Illinois Valley Tradesman 
and also edited the Streator page for the 
Peoria Labor Gazette. 

Mr. Soderstrom in 1916 was elected one of 
La Salle County's representatives in the Illi- 
nois Legislature, and has been reelected for 
every term since then. He has been chair- 



ILLINOIS 



11 



man of the utility and transportation com- 
mittee and in 1929 was chairman of the com- 
mittee on education. He has been a prominent 
figure in the Legislature, and has been espe- 
cially influential in forwarding legislation for 
the welfare of organized labor. He is a former 
president of the Printers Union of Streator, is 
affiliated with the Odd Fellows and B. P. 0. 
Elks and is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Soderstrom married, December 2, 1912, 
Miss Jeannie Shaw, of Streator. They have 
two children, Carl William, born in 1915, and 
Rose Jean, born in 1918. 

Thomas C. Browne, a Kentuckian, was a 
conspicuous public man in early Illinois his- 
tory. He came to Shawneetown, having 
studied law in his native state. Reynolds says 
before they had a courthouse or any public 
hall where court could be held, they impro- 
vised a courthouse by pulling two flatboats up 
to shore side by side, one being used by the 
grand jury and the other by the trial court. 
Mr. Browne is supposed to have practiced in 
this court. He served in the Legislature in 
1814 and was for a time prosecuting attor- 
ney for the counties along the Ohio. In 1816 
he was elected to the Council (or Senate) of 
the Legislature, which position he held when 
the territory was admitted into the Union. He 
was chosen one of the members of the Supreme 
Court in 1819. This position he held for a 
quarter of a century. In 1822 he was one of 
four candidates for governor. The other three 
were Chief Justice Joseph Phillips, Maj.-Gen. 
James B. Moore, and Edward Coles. Phillips 
and Browne divided the slavery vote and 
Coles was elected. Browne was brilliant but 
not a hard student, and for this lack of appli- 
cation he was severely criticised. "Honor, in- 
tegrity, and fidelity were prominent traits of 
his character." 

Thomas Church, who was the first mer- 
chant on Lake Street, and was one of the 
pioneers whose courage, enterprise and per- 
sistent labor gave Chicago its position as the 
metropolis of the West, was born in New 
York State November 8, 1801. His early 
youth was one of labor and for several years 
he worked hard to develop a tract of wild 
land in Western New York into a farm. Farm- 
ing was his first occupation, but shortly after 
his marriage he abandoned farming and 
opened a small store at Buffalo, New York. 
In 1834, with a capital of about $2,500 which 
he had acquired as a Buffalo merchant, he 
came to Chicago, and being unable to purchase 
a location on South Water Street, then prac- 
tically the only commercial thoroughfare in 
the village, he ventured beyond what many 
regarded as the limits of prudence by acquir- 
ing a lot on Lake Street. On this he built 
his house and store, and his store was the 
first business structure fronting on Lake 



Street. He opened his store the following 
spring, and in the same year the United 
States Land Office was established in this 
frame building. This was a means of attract- 
ing trade to his establishment. The business 
of Thomas Church was one of the few that 
escaped disaster in the financial panic of 
1837. He was one of the first owners of 
property along Lake Street to substitute brick 
and stone for wooden construction, and thus 
minimized risk by fire. 

After ten years as a merchant Thomas 
Church retired with a small fortune, and sub- 
sequently was engaged in real estate develop- 
ment. At one time he was one of the most 
extensive property owners in Chicago. He 
was one of the founders and in 1855 was 
elected the first president of the Chicago Fire 
Insurance Company. At one time he was 
Whig candidate for mayor of Chicago and 
was one of the earliest recruits to the Repub- 
lican party and a stanch friend and admirer 
of Abraham Lincoln. 

Hon. Anton J. Cermak. As one of the 
most significant political figures in Illinois in 
recent years Judge Dunne, on other pages, 
has presented an estimate of the political 
career of Anton J. Cermak. What follows is 
therefore just a brief statement of the con- 
ventional facts of biography which, as has 
been well said, "has withstood all the elements 
of political attack and come out of each politi- 
cal battle stronger than before." 

Anton J. Cermak was born at Prague, 
Czechoslovakia, May 9, 1873. In 1874 his 
parents, Anton and Catherine (Frank) Cer- 
mak, came to the United States and settled 
in Illinois. Anton J. Cermak attended public 
schools at Braidwood, Illinois, completed a 
high school and business college course in 
Chicago, and the foundation of a career of 
earnest and hard work was laid in his experi- 
ence in Illinois coal mines. In 1892 he moved 
to Chicago, and during the next sixteen years 
carried on a growing business as a coal and 
wood dealer. In 1908 he organized the real 
estate firm of Cermak & Serhant, and for 
many years has been a prominent figure in 
the business life in Southwest Chicago. He 
has been a director of the Lawndale National 
Bank and since 1907 president of the Lawndale 
Building & Loan Association. 

Mr. Cermak was at one time secretary of 
the United Societies and Liberty League, and 
president and director of the Twenty-sixth 
Street Business Men's Association. He was 
elected one of the representatives from Cook 
County to the Illinois Legislature, serving 
in the Forty-third, Forty-fourth, Forty-fifth 
and Forty-sixth General Assemblies. He was 
a member of the City Council, 1909 to 1912, 
bailiff of the Municipal Courts, 1912 to 1918, 
and again a member of the City Council of 
Chicago from 1919 to 1922. In 1922 he was 



12 



ILLINOIS 



elected president of the Board of Commis- 
sioners of Cook County, reelected in 1926 and 
in 1930 was again reelected. In 1931 he 
received the full support of the Democratic 
party for nomination for mayor of Chicago, 
and had the support of citizens of all classes 
in the fight for the overthrow of the Thomp- 
son machine. His election in April, 1931, 
accomplished by the largest majority ever 
given a Chicago mayor, brought to the head 
of the city government a man qualified by 
business and public experience to lead the 
community out of a maze of financial and 
administrative confusion. 

Mr. Cermak married, December 15, 1895, 
Mary Horejs, of Chicago. He has three daugh- 
ters: Lillian, Mrs. Richey V. Graham; Ella, 
wife of Dr. Frank J. Jirka; and Helen. 

John Wentworth was a native of New 
Hampshire, a graduate of Dartmouth College, 
and arrived in Chicago in 1836, shortly after 
reaching his majority. He became a writer of 
editorials for the Chicago Democrat and soon 
earned a reputation as a vigorous speaker 
on public questions. He was one of the loyal 
supporters of William B. Ogden's administra- 
tion as mayor. In the meantime he studied 
law, was admitted to the bar in 1841, and in 
1843 was elected to Congress from the Fourth 
Illinois district, and was re-elected, serving 
for three terms. While there he set in motion 
the organizations and the primary legislation 
which resulted in the improvement of the 
Chicago harbor and river. Later he served 
another term in Congress, and in 1857 was 
elected mayor on a fusion ticket. He became 
mayor in a period of depression and financial 
panic, and he inaugurated radical economies, 
though his administration as a whole was 
one of wholesome progress. He introduced 
the first steam fire engine in 1858, and started 
the paid fire department. In spite of a bitter 
contest he was re-elected and stood by his 
promise to enforce the laws, and he person- 
ally took charge of the police department in 
cleaning up some of the disreputable districts 
of the city. 

Mr. Wentworth left the mayor's chair with 
a reduction of current expenses and the 
municipal debt to his credit, and with the 
honor of having instilled a wholesome respect 
for the law. With the coming of better times, 
the citizens petitioned the state Legislature for 
better police protection through an expansion 
of their existing system. This was obtained 
in February, 1861, by the passage of a legis- 
lative law creating three commissioners of 
police, to be first appointed by the Governor 
and afterward elected by the people. In 1861 
Mr. Wentworth refused a renomination, with- 
drew from the newspaper field, acted as a 
delegate to revise the state constitution, was 
chosen a member of the city board of educa- 
tion, and after serving in that capacity for 



three years was appointed a police commis- 
sioner. He afterwards served another term in 
Congress and for four more years on the 
board of education, and throughout his entire 
career, until his death, in 1888, was one of 
the most picturesque figures of physical and 
mental energy and massiveness which Chi- 
cago and the West have ever seen. 

William H. Mitchell, one of the founders 
of the Illinois Trust & Savings Bank, of Chi- 
cago, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, 
March 9, 1817, and his first commercial ven- 
ture was transporting merchandise down the 
Ohio and Mississippi. In connection with this 
business he moved to Illinois in 1848, and for 
a number of years was a prominent resident 
of the city of Alton and a promoter of early 
packet lines and railroads. He was one of 
the principals in the old Alton Packet Com- 
pany which operated steamboats between St. 
Louis and Alton. Subsequently he became 
one of the contractors in building the Alton 
and St. Louis Railroad, now part of the Chi- 
cago & Alton Railway. He helped organize 
and later became president of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Alton. In the spring of 1873 
he became one of the organizers of the Illinois 
Trust & Savings Bank, and soon afterward 
moved from Alton to Chicago. In November. 
1895, he was elected first vice president of 
that institution and was its active head when 
the company erected the classic building across 
the street from the Board of Trade, subse- 
quently torn down to provide part of the site 
for the towering structure now the home of 
the Commercial Illinois Bank and Trust Com- 
pany. His son, John J. Mitchell, became 
president of the Illinois Trust & Savings Bank 
in 1880, and continued until the consolidation 
of that bank with the Merchants Loan & Trust 
Company and the Corn Exchange National 
Bank. 

John F. Farnsworth, a native of Eaton, 
Canada, was born of New England parentage 
and removed with the family to Livingston 
County, Michigan, in 1834. There he assisted 
his father in surveying, studied law, and was 
admitted to practice. He read in the office 
of Judge Josiah Turner, at Howell, in 1842-43, 
and was admitted to practice in 1843. He 
pushed at once for a new field in which to 
begin his professional labors, locating in the 
same year at St. Charles, Kane County, Illi- 
nois, Previous to 1846 Mr. Farnsworth was 
a Democrat in politics, but in that year left 
the party and assisted in the nomination 
of Owen Lovejoy for Congress. In 1856 and 
1858 he was elected to Congress by large 
majorities, on the Republican ticket, from 
what was then called the Chicago district. 
His speeches were widely copied by the news- 
papers, and he swept all opposition before 
him. In 1860, at the Chicago convention, he 




'M 





jflll 





ILLINOIS 



13 



assisted in nominating Abraham Lincoln for 
president. In October, 1861, he left St. 
Charles in command of the Eighth Illinois 
Cavalry. It was one of the finest regiments 
which entered the service during the War of 
the Rebellion. In November, 1862, Colonel 
Farnsworth was promoted to the rank of 
brigadier-general, and commanded the First 
Cavalry Brigade until after the battle of Fred- 
ricksburg, in December following. By being 
almost constantly in the saddle he had con- 
tracted a severe lameness, and was obliged to 
obtain leave of absence for medical treatment. 
Having been again elected to congress in the 
fall of 1862, he resigned his commission in 
the army March 4, 1863, and took his seat. 
In the fall of 1863 he was authorized to raise 
the Seventh Illinois Cavalry, and carried out 
the plan. By successive elections he was re- 
turned to congress, term after term, until 
1872, when he was defeated in the convention. 
In Congress, where he served for fourteen 
years, General Farnsworth was active and 
prominent, and held numerous important com- 
mittee chairmanships and positions. After his 
defeat in the Republican district convention, 
in 1872, he espoused the Greeley cause, and 
about 1879 removed from St. Charles to Chi- 
cago. He was several times a candidate for 
office after 1872. He removed to Washington, 
D. C, where he had a fine legal practice, and 
where he died in the summer of 1897. 

Joseph Phillips was a Tennesseean who as 
a young man was a captain in the United 
States Rangers in the War of 1812. He be- 
came a lawyer and was secretary of the Illi- 
nois Territory when it was admitted as a 
state. He was the first chief justice of the 
state. In 1822 he was a candidate for gov- 
ernor and in the campaign on the convention 
he was a pro-slavery champion. 

William B. Ogden came to Chicago in 1836, 
just as the village was merging into the city, 
and was appointed the first fiscal agent of the 
town to assist in securing loans for needed 
public improvements and municipal equip- 
ment. William B. Ogden was a native of 
New York, and was thirty-one when he came 
to Chicago. He had served a term in the 
legislature of the Empire State, and at Chi- 
cago he represented a number of eastern capi- 
talists who were making large investments in 
western lands. His success as fiscal agent 
was followed by his election as mayor, and he 
entered the office in 1837, just as the great 
financial panic of that year spread its blight 
over the entire country. It was in that crisis 
that the financial judgment, great courage and 
personal integrity of William B. Ogden under- 
went the tests which have ever since kept the 
name Ogden as one of the oldest and most 
honored in the history of Chicago. He served 
one term as mayor and subsequently became 



the dominant railway king of the Middle West, 
virtually founding the forerunner of the Chi- 
cago & Northwestern Railway. Again in the 
panic of 1857 he was the chief factor in sus- 
taining this railway. He retired from its 
presidency in 1868 and retired to his estate in 
New York. He came back to Chicago and 
assisted in the rehabilitation of the city after 
the fire of 1871. He died in August, 1877. 
Many great men have been engaged in the 
building of Chicago and the West, but William 
B. Ogden will remain through all time as the 
man who gave the city its first broad outlook 
into the field of public improvement and estab- 
lished it on a high and enduring plane of civic 
honor. 

Thomas Diven Huff, of Chicago and Evans- 
ton, graduated from the Northwestern Uni- 
versity Law School in 1895. At that time 
the outstanding problem in the business world 
was the aggregation of capital under corporate 
organization, and corporate control rather than 
individual management. Mr. Huff's father had 
been a successful railroad attorney in Iowa, 
and the term "corporation lawyer" in the early 
days referred almost entirely to attorneys for 
the railroads. Mr. Huff recognized the broad- 
ening scope of corporation methods and at the 
outset of his practice determined to become a 
corporation lawyer in the larger view-point of 
the term. He was one of the pioneers in 
that branch of the profession in Chicago; and 
years have brought him a record of such 
success that his name belongs among the fore- 
most American corporation lawyers of the 
present generation. 

He was born at Eldora, Iowa, January 9, 
1872, son of Hon. Henry Lewis and Elizabeth 
(Diven) Huff. His father was born in Penn- 
sylvania, was left an orphan at the age of 
twelve years, had to fight the battles of life 
alone, and did so with eminent success. He 
served in his youth as an apprentice to the 
tailor's trade, but soon left that trade to 
study law. On coming west he located in 
Hardin County, Iowa. For many years he 
was counsel for the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railroad, later for the Illinois Central Rail- 
road; and was one of the promoters and 
builders of the Iowa Central, now the Minne- 
apolis & St. Louis Railroad. He also became 
a leader in the Republican party of his state. 
For two terms he served as a member of 
the Iowa General Assembly and in 1880 was 
a delegate to the National Republican Con- 
vention that nominated Garfield for President. 

Thomas Diven Huff was one of a family 
of eight children. He was given the usual 
educational opportunities, but from boyhood 
was inspired with the ambition of carrying 
on his father's career. 

He attended public schools in his home town 
and later the Iowa Academy and College at 
Grinnell. During vacation periods he studied 



14 



ILLINOIS 



law in his father's office. In 1893 he entered 
Northwestern University Law School at Chi- 
cago, graduating in 1895. Since graduating 
he has been continuously a member of the 
Chicago bar, with over thirty-five years of 
successful experience to his credit. He was 
associated with Thomas J. Diven in business 
until 1903, during which time he was also 
a member of the law firm of Huff & Cook, 
which, by the admission of Joseph Slottow 
in 1911, became Huff, Cook & Slottow. Horace 
Wright Cook, his partner, died June 7, 1930. 
His legal associates at the present time are 
his brother, Hon. Herbert A. Huff, Henry L. 
Blim, Chauncey M. Millar, C. C. Jarvis, Orman 
I. Lewis, Leonard A. Scholl and Benjamin 
Gould. Mr. Huff has offices at 29 South 
LaSalle Street and also an office at 1612 
Orrington Avenue in Evanston. In both his 
Chicago and Evanston offices he has one of 
the most complete law libraries owned by any 
member of the Chicago bar. 

Mr. Huff is a recognized authority on cor- 
porate organization, management and financ- 
ing, as well as taxation law. He is Illinois 
editor of the Corporation Manual, a compila- 
tion of the statutory corporate laws of all 
of the states and territories of the United 
States and provinces of the Dominion of Can- 
ada, annotated. He is also recognized as one 
of Chicago's most resourceful attorneys, being 
equally gifted as a counselor and as a trial 
lawyer. He has been retained in many notable 
cases. He has contributed to the judicial 
interpretation of the Illinois revenue laws. 
He has frequently acted as counsel for bond- 
holders and reorganization committees of pub- 
lic utilities and industrial corporations. He 
is western counsel of the United States Cor- 
poration Company of New York, which has 
offices not only in America but in Canada, 
Latin American countries and in Europe. Mr. 
Huff is chief counsel of a land trust, and in 
that connection has personal direction of the 
prosecution of claims before the United States 
Mexican Mixed Claims Commission, involving 
approximately $375,000,000. In the course of 
investigations necessary to prepare for the 
trial of such matters before the commission, 
Mexican church records of marriage, births 
and deaths have been searched and photo- 
stated, official records of land grants and real 
estate transfers have been reproduced and 
translated into English. The commission, it 
is expected, will soon render a decision on 
these cases, and everything points to a decision 
favorable to the claimants. 

Mr. Huff is a director and stockholder in 
many corporations, including the Victor Manu- 
facturing & Gasket Company and the Central 
Cold Storage Company, both of Chicago. In 
his home city he has served as assistant cor- 
poration counsel. He has never sought public 
office and has consistently refused the requests 
of his friends to permit his name to be used 



for such purpose. He is a Republican, a 
member of the Chicago Law Institute, Chicago, 
Illinois State and American Bar Associations, 
the Hamilton Club of Chicago, and of numer- 
ous social and civic organizations. 

He married Miss Ethelyn K. Allen, of 
Helena, Montana, on August 18, 1903. There 
were born to them, three children, Emorie 
Cannon, Lewis Stevenson, deceased, and Curtis 
Allen. Mr. Huff resides at 624 Noyes Street, 
Evanston, Illinois. 

Samuel D. Lockwood had held minor offices 
in New York State where he was admitted 
to the bar in 1811, at the age of twenty-two. 
In 1818, in company with William H. Brown, 
he came down the Ohio River, landed at 
Shawneetown and walked to Kaskaskia. He 
was attorney-general in 1821 and when the 
convention fight came on he was one of the 
staunchest supporters of Governor Coles. He 
held many positions of honor in the state. He 
was elected a member of the Supreme Court 
in 1824-25. In later life he lived in Jackson- 
ville, where he was a warm friend of Illinois 
College. Judge Lockwood's contribution 
toward the defeat of slavery in Illinois has 
been universally acknowledged. He was a 
vigorous contributor to the press. His death 
occurred in 1874. 

Nathaniel K. Fairbank, one of Chicago's 
most constructive business men and most gen- 
erous citizens, was born in Wayne County, New 
York, in 1829. He began his career as an 
apprentice brick layer, later became book- 
keeper in a flouring mill, and in 1855 was sent 
to Chicago as western representative for a 
firm of grain merchants. About the close of 
the Civil war he provided capital for the con- 
struction of a lard and oil refinery and after 
several years of development the business 
took the name of N. K. Fairbanks & Com- 
pany. During the first twenty years the pri- 
mary output was lard and lard oil. Later 
the facilities of the business were adapted for 
the manufacture of soaps, and for at least 
two generations the name N. K. Fairbank & 
Company has appeared on labels of laundry 
and toilet preparations familiar in nearly 
every American household. 

N. K. Fairbank was a generous benefactor. 
He donated the land and he and his wife 
were among the most liberal supporters of St. 
Luke's Hospital. He was president of some 
of the May Festival organizations in the early 
'80s, and throughout the rest of his life was 
a generous supporter of the musical activi- 
ties which came to a climax in the establish- 
ment of the Symphony Orchestra under Theo- 
dore Thomas. While his friend George B. 
Carpenter conceived the plan of constructing 
a hall particularly adapted for music, it was 
N. K. Fairbank who conducted the campaign 
and aroused the generous financial support 



ILLINOIS 



15 



needed for the construction of Central Music 
Hall, which served an entire generation of 
Chicagoans as the home of music and other 
arts. He was one of the devoted members of 
the church resided over by Prof. David Swing, 
and he followed Professor Swing in the es- 
tablishment of the Independent Church which 
held its services in Central Music Hall. He 
helped finance the Chicago News Boys Home, 
for a time assumed the entire financial re- 
sponsibility of building the home of the Chi- 
cago Club. These were some of the more 
familiar institutions that exemplified Mr. 
Fairbank's eminent public spirit, but there 
was no time in his life as a Chicagoan when 
he failed of either personal initiative or gen- 
erous response in any movement character- 
izing the best ideals of the community. 

William J. Calhoun, who died in Septem- 
ber, 1916, was at once a distinguished Chicago 
attorney and a man upon whom had devolved 
at various times heavy responsibilities and 
honors in the public service of the nation. 

He was born at Pittsburgh October 5, 1848, 
was admitted to the bar in 1875, and after 
thirteen years of practice in Danville, Illinois, 
moved to Chicago, where from 1904 he was 
head of the law firm of Calhoun, Lyford & 
Sheean. He was western counsel for the Bal- 
timore & Ohio Railroad Company. 

Mr. Calhoun spent some of his early years 
in the same district with William McKinley, 
and in 1897 President McKinley designated 
Mr. Calhoun as special commissioner to Cuba. 
He served as a member of the Interstate Com- 
merce Commission from 1898 to 1900. Presi- 
dent Roosevelt appointed him a special com- 
missioner to Venezuela in 1905. From De- 
cember, 1909, until August 1, 1913, Mr. Cal- 
houn was the American minister to China. 

Chauncey B. Blair. Blair is one of the 
oldest and most distinguished names on Chi- 
cago's financial history. Chauncey Buckley 
Blair, of the first generation of his family in 
Chicago, represented the fifth generation of 
this Scotch-Irish family in America. Chauncey 
B. Blair was born in Massachusetts in 1810, 
and in 1835 came west and engaged in locat- 
ing public lands for settlers in Michigan, In- 
diana and Illinois. Later he and his brother 
Lyman engaged in the grain business at Mich- 
igan City. He was a prominent promoter of 
the old plank road from Michigan City south 
to LaPorte, also became president of a bank- 
ing company, and was one of the incorporators 
of the Northern Indiana Railroad, which be- 
came a part of the Michigan Southern. In 
1861 he removed to Chicago. He became in- 
terested in a private bank, and in 1865 organ- 
ized the Merchants National Bank, becoming 
its president. His action in insisting upon 
full payment of all depositors after the fire 
of 1871 helped establish the credit of Chicago 



at a critical period. During the panic of 1873 
he also resisted all demands and proposals 
that the prominent Chicago banks should 
adopt any other course than that of prompt 
payment of all demands. Chauncey Buckley 
Blair died January 20, 1891. He was, accord- 
ing to one of the many tributes to his life and 
character, "ready to give his last dollar to 
meet a bit of paper or an obligation in which 
his honor was involved in the faintest de- 
gree; his whole business career was one of 
protest against the rapid methods adopted 
by men of few years and less honor." 

He retired from the presidency of the Mer- 
chants National Bank in 1888, at which time 
he was succeeded by his son, Chauncey J. 
Blair. Five years later the Merchants Na- 
tional Bank consolidated with another insti- 
tution and became the Corn Exchange National 
Bank. Chauncey J. and his two brothers, 
Henry and Watson, were all identified with 
the Corn Exchange Bank. Chauncey J. Blair 
was born at Michigan City, Indiana, in 1845, 
and died May 10, 1916, after a service of 
many years as president of the Corn Exchange 
Bank. 

A son of Chauncey J. and Mary A. I. 
(Mitchell) Blair is Chauncey B. Blair, who 
was born August 18, 1886, graduating from 
Yale University in 1909, and for over twenty 
years has been an active Chicago business man 
and financier. During the World war period, 
except for the time he was at the Great 
Lakes Naval Training Station, he was cashier 
and a director of the Chicago Morris Plan 
Bank. He has been an official in several 
financial and industrial organizations. 

Samuel McRoberts was a native of Monroe 
County. He was well educated. He served 
in minor offices and became a lawyer and a 
judge. He served in the Legislature, was 
United States district judge. He was a 
solicitor of the general land office, and served 
as United States senator. 

Jean Paul Clayton was educated for the 
profession of mechanical engineer, and his 
work has brought him steady advancement in 
public utility circles. For over ten years he 
has been vice president of the Illinois Public 
Service Company, with headquarters at 
Springfield. 

Mr. Clayton was born at Sterling, Illinois, 
October 3, 1888, a son of Gilbert O. and Mary 
A. (Robinson) Clayton. His father was a 
native of Freeport, Illinois, and his mother 
of Willoughby, Ohio. His grandfather, O. S. 
Clayton, for many years conducted a jewelry 
business at Aurora, Illinois. The maternal 
grandfather was Rev. Dr. J. B. Robinson, a 
native of Ohio, who for a number of years 
was active in the Illinois Conference of the 
Methodist Church. Gilbert O. Clayton is now 
connected with the Bemis Brothers Bag Com- 



16 



ILLINOIS 



pany and lives at Burlingame, California. He 
is a Republican and he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Methodist Church. They had a 
family of five children, four of whom are 
living: J. Paul; Mrs. L. L. McMillan, in Cali- 
fornia; Earl Robinson, owner of the New 
Comer Trailer Company at Los Angeles; and 
Mrs. Leroy H. Dart, of San Luis Obispo, 
California, where her husband is a banker. 

J. Paul Clayton completed his education in 
Tulane University at New Orleans in 1909 
and from that fall took special technical work 
in the University of Illinois until 1912. After 
leaving college he became commercial engineer 
for the Union Gas & Electric Company of 
Cincinnati, remaining there two years, and 
then entered the service of the Central Illinois 
Public Service Company as power engineer. 
He became manager of the commercial depart- 
ment and in 1917 went to Chicago as commer- 
cial manager for the Middle West Utilities 
Company. In 1919 he returned to Springfield 
and has since been vice president of the Illinois 
Public Service Company. In January, 1932, he 
was elected vice president of the Middle West 
Utilities Company and resigned as vice presi- 
dent of the Central Illinois Public Service 
Company. 

Mr. Clayton married in 1915 Helen E. Bur- 
bank. She was born at New Orleans, and 
was educated in the Newcomb College in that 
city. Her father, Maj. J. A. Burbank, was 
a sugar planter. Mr. and Mrs. Clayton have 
three children: Jean Paul, Jr., born in 1916; 
Hugh Burbank, born in 1919; and Helen Ruth, 
born in 1922. 

Mr. Clayton is a Methodist, while his wife 
is a Catholic. He is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity, is a Republican and is a member 
of a number of prominent civic and commer- 
cial organizations. He is president of the 
Illinois State Chamber of Commerce. He has 
been president of the Springfield Chamber of 
Commerce, and while vice president of the 
Illinois State Chamber of Commerce he was 
chairman of its industrial committee, and has 
also done some valuable work in Springfield 
as chairman of the committee for the elimina- 
tion of grade crossings. He is a member of 
the Lake Springfield Committee, comprising 
a group of Springfield citizens working out 
plans for the constructions of a large lake 
near the capital city. Mr. Clayton is a mem- 
ber of the Illini Country Club and Sangamo 
Club and the Union League Club of Chicago. 

Thomas Carlin, governor of Illinois from 
1838 to 1842, was not surpassed by any 
pioneer in bringing Illinois up to statehood. 
He did not begin his labors as early as some, 
but he was continually serving the people and 
the state in some commendable way. He came 
on the scene in 1811. He was of Irish extrac- 
tion and, like many young men of that people, 
he was poor and without friends — two very 
serious handicaps. His education was very 



meager. He was a private with Capt. William 
B. Whitesides in the War of 1812. In 1813 
he marched under the orders of General 
Howard. At the close of the war he located 
near the present city of Carrollton, in Greene 
County. He was the first sheriff of Greene 
County. While living on his farm in Greene 
County he was often selected to serve in the 
Legislature. He also was receiver of public 
moneys at Quincy, which position he filled 
with great credit to himself and with perfect 
satisfaction to the Government. In the Black 
Hawk war he served as captain of a company 
in the Spy Battalion, commanded by Maj. 
James D. Henry. As governor he favored 
state construction and state ownership of 
natural resources. 

Hon. Joseph Burns Crowley, who for 
three terms represented the Nineteenth Illi- 
nois District in Congress, had a career of 
notable distinction in the law and in public 
affairs. Mr. Crowley was a resident of Rob- 
inson, and had practiced law in that city for 
nearly half a century. However, for about 
twelve years most of his time was given to 
the Federal Government. 

Mr. Crowley was born at Coshocton, Ohio, 
July 19, 1858, and died at Robinson, Illinois, 
June 25, 1931, age seventy-three years. He 
was the son of Samuel B. and Elizabeth (Wil- 
liams) Crowley. The Crowley family is of 
Irish ancestry. His maternal grandfather 
Williams was of Holland-Dutch ancestry and 
spent his active life in New York. His pa- 
ternal grandfather, John Crowley, was born 
in Ohio and lived to be ninety-four years of 
age. Samuel B. Crowley was born at Coshoc- 
ton, Ohio, and in 1859 came to Illinois, settling 
in Jasper County, on a farm. In 1868 he was 
elected sheriff, at which time he removed to 
Newton, the county seat. He was sheriff two 
terms, 1868-72, and on retiring from office 
moved to Robinson. He was a soldier in two 
wars, the Mexican war and the Civil war. He 
was a captain in the Union army. After the 
war he was loyally identified with his com- 
rades in the Grand Army of the Republic. He 
was a Mason, a Democrat and a Presbyterian. 

Joseph Burns Crowley received his early 
education in the schools of Jasper County, and 
also attended school at Robinson after he was 
fourteen years of age. Five years of his early 
manhood were spent in the retail grocery busi- 
ness. While thus employed he took up the 
study of law and in 1883 he was given a 
license to practice. At that time he opened 
his law office in Robinson. Mr. Crowley was 
always recognized as one of the ablest men in 
the Democratic party in Eastern Illinois. He 
enjoyed a wide fame as an orator, not only in 
political campaigns but on general occasions. 
For two terms he was judge of the County 
Court of Crawford County. He resigned this 
office to accept an appointment during the 
second Cleveland administration as special 




^-mu»^ y< flAsSC^lvLj , 



ILLINOIS 



17 



agent to the Treasury Department, under 
John G. Carlisle, secretary of the treasury. 
From 1893 to 1898 he devoted all his time to 
this work, being chief of the force of inspec- 
tion in connection with America's interest in 
the seal industry in Alaska. 

Mr. Crowley was first elected to Congress 
in 1898. He represented the Nineteenth Dis- 
trict three terms, until 1907. After his career 
in Congress he resumed his private law prac- 
tice. In 1912 he was elected state's attorney 
of Crawford County. In a period of half a 
century sixty-two men have been convicted in 
Crawford County and sent to the penitentiary. 
Fifteen of these convictions were secured 
during the vigorous administration of Mr. 
Crowley as state's attorney. He held that 
office four years. 

He was a campaigner in the Democratic 
party from the age of twenty years. For 
more than forty years he was a member of 
the Democratic County Central Committee, 
and during that time attended many state 
conventions. He was a delegate to the 
national convention at St. Louis when Alton 
B. Parker was nominated for President. Mr. 
Crowley was a member of the Crawford 
County Bar Association, was a Knight Tem- 
plar Mason, member of the B. P. 0. Elks, 
and Modern Woodmen of America and the 
Presbyterian Church. 

He married, December 1, 1889, Miss Alice 
Newlin. Mrs. Crowley was born in Robinson, 
daughter of Alexander Newlin. The Newlin 
family came to Illinois from North Carolina. 
Mrs. Crowley is a member of the Presbyterian 
Church and has been well known in the social 
life of her home city. They have two children. 
The daughter, Emily J., was educated at Rob- 
inson and at Washington, D. C, is the wife 
of Charles Everingham, a Robinson oil man, 
and has four sons, named Charles, Joseph, 
Richard and Robert. 

The son, Joseph B. Crowley, was educated 
in the Robinson High School and is a graduate 
of the Culver Military Academy of Indiana. 
He is in the loan business at Robinson and 
one of the successful younger men in the life 
of that city. He married Miss Fay Werner, 
of Robinson, and has a son, Joseph B. III. 

Sabin D. Puterbaugh was a native of Ohio, 
but had come with his parents to Illinois 
when he was five years old. His early edu- 
cation was obtained at the common schools 
of Tazewell County. He was admitted to the 
bar in January, 1857, and at once became 
partner of Samuel W. Fuller, then state sen- 
ator from that district. After the removal 
of Mr. Fuller to Chicago, Mr. Puterbaugh 
formed a partnership with John B. Cohrs, 
which continued until 1861. Mr. Puterbaugh 
then entered the army as major of the Elev- 
enth Illinois Cavalry, and remained in the 
service until November, 1862, when he re- 
signed and removed to Peoria. In 1868 he 



formed a partnership with E. C. and R. G. 
Ingersoll, the former of whom was then a 
representative in congress. This firm con- 
tinued until June, 1867, when he was elected 
to the office of circuit judge. He held this 
office until March, 1873, and then resigned to 
resume the practice of his profession. As a 
judge he was upright, painstaking, diligent 
and correct in his decisions, and discharged 
the duties of his office with ability and fidelity. 
He is perhaps best known to the profession as 
the author of Puterbaugh's Common Law 
Pleadings and Practice and Puterbaugh's 
Chancery Pleadings and Practice, both of 
which works are accepted as standard au- 
thority. 

Judge Puterbaugh also, in 1877, took a con- 
spicuous part in the measures before the Legis- 
lature for the reorganization of the judiciary, 
and the creation of the appellate courts. To 
his efforts probably more than to those of any 
other one man the state is indebted for the 
adoption of those measures. 

In politics he was a democrat until the out- 
break of the Rebellion, when he identified him- 
self with the republican party, and he was 
one of the presidential electors in 1880, at 
which time he cast his vote in the electoral 
college for James A. Garfield for president 
and Chester A. Arthur for vice president. He 
continued in the practice of the law until his 
death, which occurred on September 25, 1892. 

Hon. Robert Virgil Fletcher, a former 
attorney general and member of the Supreme 
Court of the State of Mississippi, has since 
1911 been a resident of Chicago, where he is 
now a vice president and general counsel for 
the Illinois Central Railway Company. He 
was promoted to the office of vice president 
January 1, 1931, with the title of vice presi- 
dent and general counsel, this being a new 
position and Judge Fletcher the first to hold it. 

Judge Fletcher was born near Williamstown, 
Grant County, Kentucky, September 27, 1869, 
son of John M. and Mary (Luman) Fletcher. 
His father was born in Tennessee and was a 
child when the family moved to Southern Illi- 
nois, at Shawneetown, where he grew to man- 
hood. John M. Fletcher's mother was a mem- 
ber of the McClain family, well known steam- 
boat operators on the Ohio and Mississippi 
rivers in the early days. After leaving South- 
ern Illinois John M. Fletcher located on a 
farm across the Ohio River in Grant County, 
Kentucky, where Judge Fletcher was born. 

His early life was spent in rural surround- 
ings. After the high school at Williamstown 
he attended a small college at Taylorville, 
Kentucky, known as the Spencer Institute, 
where he was graduated in 1886. When he 
was twenty-three years of age he moved to 
Mississippi, taught school in Chickasaw and 
Pontotoc counties, and carried a post-graduate 
course in the University of Mississippi, at 
Oxford. He studied law, was admitted to the 



18 



ILLINOIS 



bar at Pontotoc in 1899, and during the next 
seven years was a member of the law firm of 
Mitchell & Fletcher. 

On January 1, 1906, he was appointed assist- 
ant attorney general, his official duties causing 
him to remove to Jackson, the state capital. 
On the death of Attorney General Williams 
in April, 1907, he was appointed to fill out 
the unexpired term. In the general election 
of that year he was nominated and elected 
without opposition as attorney general. In 
November, 1908, the governor appointed him 
a member of the Supreme Court of Mississippi, 
to serve out the unexpired term of Judge 
Calhoun, deceased. He was on the bench for 
about six months, and in May, 1909, retired 
to resume private practice at Jackson, as a 
member of the firm Flowers, Fletcher & Win- 
field. This firm besides a general practice 
acted as Mississippi attorneys for the Gulf, 
Mobile & Northern Railroad. 

Judge Fletcher came to Chicago in February, 
1911. His first association with the Illinois 
Central Railroad was as general attorney. He 
held that office until March 1, 1920, except 
about eight months in 1919, when he was at 
Washington as assistant general counsel for 
the United States Railroad Administration. 
When the railroads were returned to their 
private owners, in March, 1920, he became 
general solicitor of the Illinois Central system. 
On December 31, 1927, he was promoted to 
general counsel and, as noted above, was given 
the additional title and office of vice president 
at the beginning of 1931. 

Judge Fletcher's career has been conspicu- 
ously enriched with honors and responsibilities. 
The general public and members of his pro- 
fession have come to know him as an able 
public speaker and he has frequently addressed 
the bar associations of states in the Mississippi 
Valley and the American Bar Association. He 
is an honorary member of the Kentucky State 
Bar Association, and in 1930 was elected vice 
president of the Illinois State Bar Association. 
Mr. Fletcher is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity, the Chicago Club, the Union League 
Club, the Gamma Eta Gamma legal fraternity, 
the Long Beach Country Club. He married, 
June 26, 1893, Miss Etta Childers, of Corinth, 
Kentucky. Their children are Ernest Lamar, 
Louise, Robert Julian and William McClain. 

Marshall Field was born near the village 
of Conway, Massachusetts, in 1834, and his 
English ancestors had lived in that locality 
for nearly two centuries. He grew up on the 
farm, but soon became clerk in a store, and 
in 1856, at the age of twenty-two, arrived at 
Chicago and sought and obtained a position 
in what was then the leading dry goods house, 
Cooley, Wadsworth & Company. In that busi- 
ness he became associated with John V. Far- 
well and other great men in the Chicago mer- 
cantile world and by 1860 had achieved a 



partnership. In 1865 he and Levi Z. Leiter 
bought the dry goods business of Potter 
Palmer, resulting in the firm of Field, Palmer 
& Leiter. After January, 1867, the business 
was known as Field, Leiter & Company, and 
in that year the firm occupied the building at 
the northeast corner of State and Washington 
streets, which for so many years has been the 
principal site of the retail establishment of 
Marshall Field & Company. The business was 
destroyed by the fire of 1871, but a new store 
was completed in 1873, and at that time the 
retail and wholesale departments were sepa- 
rated. Mr. Leiter withdrew from the firm in 
1881, and thereafter for a quarter of a cen- 
tury Marshall Field was the master and 
guiding spirit of the great business. 

While he was first, last, and at all times a 
great merchant, attending strictly to his busi- 
ness, such was the volume and magnitude of 
his affairs that he became one of the chief 
forces of some of Chicago's most valued insti- 
tutions, best known among them, of course, 
being the great Field Museum, on the Lake 
Front, which he endowed. He died January 
16, 1906. After a lapse of twenty years there 
is justification in quoting the words of an 
editorial tribute written at the time of his 
death: "There was no man in Chicago more 
kindly regarded by his fellow citizens than 
Mr. Field. There was no one so conspicuous 
of whom so few harsh things were said. His 
riches made him odious to no one, for the 
people high and low saw that he was un- 
tainted by wealth, and was always an upright 
man, fair and even generous in his dealings. 
He was the first citizen of Chicago when he 
died, and he has left no one to take his place. 
He will be sincerely mourned by the men, 
women and children of Chicago." 

Robert Green Ingersoll was born at Dres- 
den, Yates County, New York, August 11, 
1833, son of John and Mary (Livingston) 
Ingersoll. His father was a Congregational 
clergyman, well known in New York State for 
his eloquence and broad views. 

Having completed his education in the 
schools of Illinois, whither his father had 
removed in 1843, Robert G. Ingersoll studied 
law and was admitted to the bar. He opened 
an office at Shawneetown, Illinois, in partner- 
ship with his elder brother, Eben C. Ingersoll, 
who was representative in Congress from Illi- 
nois (1864-70), and both became active in 
law and politics. In 1857 he removed to 
Peoria, Illinois, then a rapidly growing busi- 
ness center, and here in 1860 he was an un- 
successful candidate for Congress on the 
Democratic ticket. From the opening of the 
Civil war he was active in his advocacy of the 
Federal cause, and in 1862 went to the front 
as colonel of the Eleventh Illinois Cavalry 
Regiment. He was captured and held prisoner 
for several months, but was finally exchanged. 



ILLINOIS 



19 



and in 1864 resigned from the army to resume 
the practice of law. 

Having changed his allegiance to the 
Republican party in 1866, Mr. Ingersoll was 
appointed attorney-general of Illinois, and 
further demonstrated his political importance 
as delegate to several successive national con- 
ventions. In the convention of 1876 he pro- 
posed the name of James G. Blaine as candi- 
date for President with a brilliant oration in 
which he originated the famous title, "Plumed 
Knight," as a designation for the Maine sena- 
tor. In 1877 he declined appointment as min- 
ister to Germany. He appeared in several 
historic litigations, most noted as counsel for 
the alleged "Star Route" conspirators, Brady 
and Dorsey, when he secured an acquittal. On 
account of his enhanced reputation he re- 
moved to Washington City, and some years 
later to New York City, where he resided 
until his death. 

He was one of the most eloquent and power- 
ful orators of the day; he had few equals 
before a jury, and was equally acceptable as 
a campaign speaker and on the lecture plat- 
form. His widest reputation, however, rests 
on his many attacks on certain popular forms 
of Christian teaching, as well as on the divine 
authority of the Bible, and which abounded 
in sarcasm and humor. His lectures, which 
were published complete in 1883, contain such 
titles as "The Gods," "Ghosts," "Skulls," and 
"Some Mistakes of Moses." Some of the best 
sayings were issued in book form in 1884, 
under the title, "Prose Poems and Selections." 
He also lectured repeatedly on the life and 
work of Thomas Paine and on Shakespeare. 

John Wood was the founder of Quincy. 
In the Black Hawk war he was a private in 
Captain Flood's company which was made up 
in Quincy. He served in the Legislature, was 
elected lieutenant-governor in 1856, and filled 
out the unexpired term of Governor Bissell, 
who died in March, 1860. 

John V. Farwell, Chicago merchant, was 
born in Steuben County, New York, July 29, 
1825, representing the second generation of his 
branch of the American family. At the age 
of thirteen he accompanied the Farwell family 
to Ogle County, Illinois, and grew up and 
completed his education there. He is said to 
have arrived in Chicago in 1845 with only 
three dollars in money, He became a book- 
keeper and salesman for a dry goods house, 
and by 1850 had achieved a partnership in 
the firm of Cooley, Wadsworth & Company. 
This was logically the beginning of the great 
house of John V. Farwell Company. In 1862, 
with the retirement of Elisha S. Wadsworth, 
the firm of Cooley, Farwell & Company com- 
prised Francis B. Cooley, John V. Farwell and 
Marshall Field. Mr. Cooley retired in 1864, 
and Levi Z. Leiter and S. N. Kellogg entered 



the partnership of Farwell, Field & Company. 
Field and Leiter soon withdrew, and in 1866 
W. D. and Charles B. Farwell joined the older 
brother, thus resulting in the familiar name of 
John V. Farwell & Company. The John V. 
Farwell Company was incorporated in 1891, 
and Mr. Farwell continued as president until 
his death, on August 20, 1908. 

John V. Farwell was a conspicuous figure 
in the work of the Young Men's Christian 
Association at Chicago, and through his per- 
sonal influence and financial backing did much 
to vitalize the great religious movement under 
Dwight L. Moody. The first lot in Chicago he 
donated as the site for the home of the 
Y. M. C. A. 

Gustavus Koerner was one of the justices 
of the Illinois Supreme Court from April 2, 
1845, until he retired in September, 1848, upon 
the reorganization of the judiciary under the 
new constitution. 

Judge Koerner was one of the earliest of 
those German patriots who fled from the 
fatherland on account of revolutionary upris- 
ings and sought refuge in the New World. 
He was born at Frankfort-on-the-Main, No- 
vember 20, 1809, graduated in law at Heidel- 
berg University in 1832 and was wounded 
during a revolutionary outbreak on the part 
of a society of university students. Coming 
to America, he located in St. Clair County, 
Illinois, and remained a resident of Southern 
Illinois until his death, at Belleville, on April 
9, 1896. He was in partnership at first with 
Adam W. Snyder and later with James 
Shields. Subsequently his associate in the 
practice of law was his son, Gustavus A. 
Koerner. His legal lore is said to have cov- 
ered every department in the science of juris- 
prudence, and he won distinction at the bar 
among men of national reputation, including 
Lincoln, Douglas, Trumbull, Breese and 
Palmer. While he was on the Supreme 
bench it was customary for the judges to hold 
Circuit Court, and he presided over a session 
of the Circuit Court at Belleville when a fugi- 
tive slave was brought before him, and though 
the jury three times decided that the plaintiff 
was a slave, Judge Koerner promptly set aside 
the first two of these verdicts in the face of 
the popular prejudice. He soon afterward 
broke with his party on the question of 
slavery, and subsequently was one of the 
strongest supporters of Lincoln. He ' first 
attracted the attention of Lincoln during his 
term in the Legislature in 1842, and in 1862 
Lincoln, then President, appointed him United 
States minister to Spain, a post which he 
resigned in January, 1865. 

He served as lieutenant governor of Illinois 
from 1853 until 1857, and at the beginning of 
the war was instrumental in raising the 
Forty-third Illinois Regiment, and for a time 
served on the staff of General Fremont. He 



20 



ILLINOIS 



was one of the delegates at the Chicago con- 
vention nominating Horace Greeley. In 1867 
he was appointed president of the board of 
trustees that organized the Soldiers' Orphans' 
Home at Bloomington. In 1870 he was presi- 
dent of the first board of railroad commis- 
sioners of Illinois. He was a master of many 
languages, and was the author of several 
books and many individual articles. At the 
time of his death, April 9, 1896, he was one of 
the oldest practicing lawyers in Illinois. 

Isaac Funk was truly one of the founders 
of Illinois' greatness as a state. In the domain 
of agriculture his achievements were fully as 
impressive and important as those of Pullman 
and Armour in the field of industry and only 
less notable than those of Lincoln in states- 
manship. It is possible to assert that the full 
significance of the phrase "The Illinois Corn 
Belt" would never have been realized without 
the leadership and the constructive and cre- 
ative ability of Isaac Funk and his descend- 
ants. 

In 1924 the Funk family of McLean County 
celebrated the one hundredth anniversary of 
its establishment in Illinois. Isaac Funk, the 
founder, was born in Clark County, Kentucky, 
November 17, 1797. He arrived in Illinois, 
coming from Ohio, in 1824; and at that time 
was burdened with a debt of some two thou- 
sand dollars. His place of settlement has long 
been known as "Funk's Grove." The only 
capital he possessed was industry, persever- 
ance and integrity. In 1826 he married Cas- 
sandra Sharp, of Peoria, who had come from 
Maryland. He soon formed a partnership 
with his brother Absalom and engaged in the 
business of buying cattle and horses and sell- 
ing them at various markets, chiefly Chicago. 
After 1841 Isaac Funk continued the business 
alone, and was one of the largest drovers of 
his time, sometimes driving as many as 1,500 
cattle and 1,000 hogs to Chicago. From the 
profits of his dealings in live stock he invested 
in land on a large scale. Long before his 
death he was the foremost live stock raiser 
and dealer, and one of the largest land own- 
ers in Illinois. He never speculated in land, 
since he bought for use and not for sale. His 
purchases between 1829 and 1853 aggregated 
25,000 acres, and most of that land is still 
comprised in the various Funk farms around 
Bloomington. Many larger areas of land have 
been held by a single family in the United 
States, but no land anywhere surpasses it in 
value for purely agricultural purposes. 

Isaac Funk was a pioneer. He grew up on 
the frontier of the middle west, and had only 
the simplest literary advantages. His dis- 
tinguishing virtues were his remarkable en- 
ergy and industry, his rugged integrity and 
his exemplification of the simple fundamentals 
of private and public life. He was elected a 
member of the Legislature in 1840, and in 



1862 was sent to the State Senate, serving 
during the Civil war. He made a speech in 
the Senate in February, 1863, that has been 
regarded as one of the most memorable of all 
war speeches. President Lincoln ordered the 
speech read before every Union regiment then 
in the field. The occasion of the speech was the 
critical time in the Illinois General Assembly, 
when the war and emancipation policy of Pres- 
ident Lincoln was being bitterly arraigned. A 
few sentences from Senator Funk's speech 
are best quoted in Smith's "Student's History 
of Illinois:" "I can sit here no longer and not 
tell these traitors what I think of them; and 
while so telling* them, I am responsible, my- 
self, for what I say. I stand upon my own 
bottom, I am ready to meet any man on this 
floor in any manner, from a pin's point to the 
mouth of a cannon upon this charge against 
these traitors — I came to Illinois a poor boy; 
I have a little something for myself and fam- 
ily. I pay $3,000 a year in taxes. I am will- 
ing to pay $6,000 a year; aye! $12,000. Aye! 
I am willing to pay my whole fortune, and 
then give my life to save my country from 
these traitors that are seeking to destroy it. 
Yes, these traitors and villains in the Senate 
are killing my neighbor's boys, now fighting in 
the field. I dare to say this to the traitors 
right here, and I am responsible for what I 
say to any and all of them. Let them come 
on, right here. Mr. Speaker, I must beg the 
pardon of the gentlemen in this Senate who 
are not traitors, but true, loyal men, for what 
I have said I only intend it and mean it for 
secessionists at heart." 

Isaac Funk and his good wife Cassandra 
both died on the same day, January 29, 1865. 
They were survived by eight sons and one 
daughter: George W. (1827-1911); Jacob 
(1830-1919); Duncan M. (1837-1910); Lafay- 
ette (1934-1919); Francis M. (1836-1899); 
Benjamin F. (1838-1909); Absalom (1841- 
1915); Isaac, Jr., (1844-1909); and Sarah 
Funk Kerrick (1846-1907), wife of Hon. L. H. 
Kerrick. The careers of these children might 
be regarded as the greatest glory and honor of 
Isaac and Cassandra Funk. 

Norman B. Judd. In many ways the name 
of Norman B. Judd was closely linked with 
Illinois and national life during the period 
from 1850 to 1870. 

Born at Rome, New York, January 10, 1815, 
he was admitted to practice in New York, and 
was a schoolmate and friend of John Dean 
Caton, on whose invitation young Judd came 
to Chicago in 1836, and the two young lawyers 
began a partnership which continued until 
Mr. Caton removed from Chicago, in 1838. 
Later Mr. Judd was associated in practice 
with J. Young Scammon until 1847, then with 
John M. Wilson until Judge Wilson's election 
to the bench, in 1853. While much of his 
later career was identified with politics and 






fw 




ILLINOIS 



21 



with public affairs, he always had a distinc- 
tive place in his profession. He was particu- 
larly eminent as a railroad lawyer and had 
extensive practice in that department of the 
law. 

He was a prominent member of the old 
literary association which founded the present 
Chicago library, and was a leader in many 
of the civic movements of Chicago. In his 
early years he was a Democrat, and in 1844 
was elected to the State Senate and served 
continuously in that body until 1860. He 
separated from his party in 1854 in the 
Kansas-Nebraska question, and was one of 
the men who helped to elect Lyman Trumbull 
to the United States Senate in 1855. He be- 
came identified with the Republican party, and 
was a steadfast and loyal adherent of Mr. 
Lincoln, and nominated that Illinois lawyer 
for the presidency in the wigwam convention 
of 1860. He accompanied Mr. Lincoln on his 
journey to Washington in February, 1861, and 
a few weeks later his nomination was con- 
firmed by the Senate as minister to Berlin, a 
post he held for four years, being recalled by 
President Johnson. After his return to Chi- 
cago, Mr. Judd was elected to Congress, and 
was in that body until he declined a reelection, 
in 1871. In 1872 President Grant appointed 
him collector of the port of Chicago, an office 
he held until his death. 

John A. McClernand was an editor in 
Shawneetown at the outbreak of the Black 
Hawk war. He was assistant quartermaster- 
general in Posey's brigade, was acquainted 
with Lieutenant Jefferson Davis, and remem- 
bered with great pleasure his days about 
Dixon's Ferry. He served in the Legislature 
and in Congress and was a presidential 
elector. He was made a brigadier-general in 
the Civil war, and soon rose to major-general 
of volunteers. He held high civil positions 
till late in life. 

William M. Springer was born in Sullivan 
County, Indiana, May 30, 1836. When twelve 
years old he moved with his parents to Jack- 
sonville, Illinois. He entered Illinois College, 
but, owing to some difficulty, was dismissed 
from the institution, and went thence to the 
State University of Indiana. In 1858 Mr. 
Springer returned to Illinois, and after study- 
ing law in Lincoln, was admitted to the bar 
in 1860. The same year he was a candidate 
on the democratic ticket for representative in 
the state legislature, for the district composed 
of Logan and Mason counties, but was de- 
feated by Colonel Robert B. Latham. In 1861 
he settled in Springfield, and soon formed a 
law partnership with Hon. N. M. Broadwell 
and General John A. McClernand, the latter 
of whom retiring some years afterward, the 
firm continued as Broadwell & Springer. In 
1870 Mr. Springer was elected to represent 



Sangamon County in the legislature. Sev- 
eral sessions were held and a complete revi- 
sion of the statutes of Illinois was made while 
he served in that body. 

For twenty consecutive years, he repre- 
sented the Springfield district in Congress, be- 
ing first elected in 1874 and serving until 
March, 1895. He became one of the recog- 
nized leaders of his party and was especially 
influential while the democrats had control of 
the House. In 1895 President Cleveland ap- 
pointed him United States district judge for 
Indian Territory. He died December 4, 1903. 

Col. George D. Gaw, president of the Gaw- 
O'Hara Envelope Company, is one of the 
most interesting figures in Chicago's com- 
mercial affairs. It was his unique and original 
personality and methods of doing business that 
brought him a position which has made his 
name and title familiar all over the Middle 
West. In July, 1931, he took the office of 
Chicago's commissioner of hospitality, a title 
more appropriately called by the press and 
public as Chicago's "official greeter," a payless 
post created for him by Mayor Cermak. As 
the hospitable representative of the city he 
meets notable guests on their arrival, not only 
public dignitaries, domestic and foreign, but 
convention delegates and others who represent 
formally and informally outside communities 
and organizations. 

Colonel Gaw is a Kentuckian by birth. He 
was born at Owensboro, January 15, 1889, 
son of Mattison and Louise M. Gaw. His 
father died when George was four months old. 
Mrs. Louise M. Gaw still resides at Owensboro, 
and when she visited Chicago in the summer 
of 1931 Colonel Gaw met her in his combined 
capacity as official greeter and loyal son. Col- 
onel Gaw credits no small measure of his 
individual success to his earnest and self- 
sacrificing mother, who after her husband's 
death clerked for several years in' a store 
in order to rear and educate her children. 
Colonel Gaw at Owensboro attended parochial 
schools and was also a student in St. Mary's 
College of that state, a school that afterwards 
conferred upon him the honorary degree of 
Master of Arts. 

His first ambition was for the stage. He 
had some real talent in that direction. When 
he was seventeen years of age, having com- 
posed a vaudeville sketch, he started for Nash- 
ville, having a few dollars in his pocket. In 
Nashville he hoped to have the opportunity 
of presenting his sketch on the stage. At that 
time a road company was performing George 
M. Cohen's "Little Johnny Jones," and Mr. 
Gaw was given the title role with the company. 
He accompanied it on the road from coast 
to coast. While with the company at Kansas 
City he started to return to Chicago and take 
up a business career instead of the uncertain 
life of an actor. 



22 



ILLINOIS 



It was in 1913 that he located in Chicago, 
which became his permanent stronghold and 
center of operations. His first job was as 
bookkeeper in an envelope manufacturing com- 
pany. Later he was given the opportunity 
to make some sales calls, and then decided 
to become a salesman. In the meantime he 
had met and had known Thomas O'Hara. They 
finally decided to combine their talents and 
other assets and set up in the envelope business 
for themselves. Colonel Gaw once remarked 
that they started business "with a capital 
of five hundred dollars and a million dollars 
worth of ignorance." Both of them were the 
company's salesmen, and in their modest plant 
the envelopes were made as rapidly as they 
could get the orders. The goods were delivered 
at first from a push cart. Super-salesmanship 
as well as original methods of manufacturing 
were responsible for the early success of the 
Gaw-O'Hara Envelope Company. Colonel Gaw 
in reminiscing concerning his early office as 
a salesman remarked that he "turned every 
door knob that might lead to a sale," and 
while building up the business he demonstrated 
the qualities that have caused him, to be 
spoken of as one of the best salesmen in 
America. 

The Gaw-O'Hara Envelope Company has 
grown into the largest direct-to-consumer man- 
ufacturing concern of its kind in the country. 
The business today occupies a modern indus- 
trial plant at the corner of Sacramento and 
Franklin boulevards. This building, with its 
equipment, represents an investment of over 
two million dollars. Not only the manufac- 
turing of envelopes, but all of the art printing 
and art work for their product are done at 
the plant. The plant is arranged especially 
for the comfort and health of the employees, 
and welfare work has been an important fea- 
ture of the concern's development. 

In one respect Colonel Gaw has set a new 
precedent in what might be called constructive 
welfare work, a unique plan which he insti- 
tuted as a permanent feature of employee 
relationship and which in its practical opera- 
tion has attracted attention all over the coun- 
try, winning the especial praise of the National 
Association of Real Estate Boards. A number 
of years ago Colonel Gaw, realizing the sta- 
bilizing benefits of home ownership among his 
employees, proposed a plan in which he offered 
a bonus of five hundred dollars to every 
individual in his factory who had saved a 
similar amount, for the purchase of a house 
and lot. The feature of the plan, which would 
appear to the conservative business owner 
as progressive almost to the point of being 
radical, may best be described in Colonel Gaw's 
own words: "I have always figured that any 
employe who owns his own home is worth 
five hundred dollars more than one who does 
not. Home owners are more satisfied with 
life in general than renters. They pay more 



attention to the education of their children, 
which tendency I consider very important to 
the future of our nation. I thought they 
might be better workers. I found they were. 
There are no strings to the bonus. A man 
who draws it can quit next day if he wants 
to. Only — they don't." The plan has now 
been in operation for over ten years and 
during that time many of the employees have 
availed themselves of its unique provisions 
so as to acquire homes of their own. The 
plan, as expected, has worked in two ways, 
contributing something to the great American 
ideal of home ownership and all the satis- 
factions and values which that entails, and 
also in improved efficiency and value of the 
worker in the Gaw plant. 

There are branch offices of the Gaw-O'Hara 
Company in all the principal cities of the 
United States. The building up of such a 
business has been accompanied throughout by 
salesmanship of a high order and a large 
amount of annual investment in public prop- 
erty. Colonel Gaw has not confined his orig- 
inal methods to the sale of his products, but 
was one of the first business men to develop 
friendly relations with his competitors. As 
a result of his genial personality and sincere 
desire for cooperation he has brought envelope 
manufacturers into an informal organization 
where they regard themselves not as competi- 
tors but as associates in business. 

For several years before Mayor Cermak 
created him Chicago's commissioner of hos- 
pitality, Colonel Gaw had been one of the 
individual business men putting forth effort 
in a determined way to promote desirable 
publicity concerning Chicago. This has taken 
much time from his business, but he has 
considered the time well spent. In his program 
of education he has made many radio speeches, 
addresses to local civic clubs and organizations, 
and has also written articles for newspapers 
and magazines, and has delivered a number 
of addresses in other cities. The emphasis 
in all these talks has been on the positive 
factors in Chicago's greatness, factors not 
as generally understood and appreciated as 
some of the minor undercurrents that have 
produced the cynical reputation. He has 
assembled a great array of facts and figures 
to show that there is actually a smaller per- 
centage of crime in Chicago than in many 
other cities, and that Chicago's advantages 
more than offset the adverse elements in its 
life. Colonel Gaw in his public speeches 
knows how to dress up his array of facts 
with a happy oratorical style, and any one 
who hears him carries away a deep impression 
of the city's educational facilities, its churches, 
ethical movements, welfare organizations, its 
wonderful systems of parks, boulevards, its 
famous lake front, which is the asset that 
causes many travelers to call it the most 
beautiful city in the world, its great library 



ILLINOIS 



23 



facilities, the extraordinary percentage of peo- 
ple who patronize the libraries and read good 
books, and hundreds of other things of which 
all Chicagoans are proud. 

Colonel Gaw gained his military title from 
the State of Kentucky, Governor Morrow hav- 
ing made him a colonel on the governor's 
staff. Colonel Gaw is a member of the Chicago 
Association of Commerce, the Illinois Chamber 
of Commerce, Chicago Rotary Club, Chicago 
Yacht Club, Kentucky Society of Chicago, 
Illinois Athletic Club, Evanston Golf Club, 
and the Lincoln Park Track Club. He is a 
sportsman and patron of sports, enjoys outdoor 
recreations and is one of the city's noted 
yachtsmen. 

Augustus C. French, governor of Illinois 
from December 9, 1846, to January 8, 1849, 
when he began his second term under re- 
election under the Constitution of 1848, serv- 
ing until January, 1853, began his public 
career with his election to the Legislature in 
1836. 

He was born in Hill, New Hampshire, 
August 2, 1808; was educated in the common 
schools and pursued a partial course in Dart- 
mouth College. He studied law privately and 
was admitted to the bar in 1831. He died 
September 4, 1864, at his home in Lebanon, 
Illinois. 

During his term as representative in 1836, 
he was elected prosecuting attorney for the 
Fourth Judicial Court, and in 1839 was 
appointed receiver of the United States Land 
Office at Palestine. He had so succeeded in 
establishing himself with the people that, in 
1846, he was considered as a candidate for 
representative in Congress to succeed 0. B. 
Ficklin, who had represented the district for 
many years. Ficklin, as a method of dispos- 
ing of French, suggested that he be made the 
Democratic candidate for governor, having 
little idea that he could either be nominated 
or elected, but believing that this would take 
the attention of French and his friends from 
the office of congressman. The counties in 
French's circuit were unanimous in their sup- 
port of his candidacy for governor, but the 
two leading candidates were Trumbull and 
Calhoun, neither of whom had a majority. 
After many ballotings, French was fully nomi- 
nated and later elected, and served until the 
adoption of the new constitution in 1848, when 
he was reelected for a full term of four years. 

As governor he is described as possessing 
"those qualities of prudence, economy, good 
judgment and integrity, which enabled him to 
fill the executive office with credit to himself." 
This description, however, does not give 
French full credit, for he was largely instru- 
mental in securing the legislation necessary to 
establish the credit of the state, and when he 
retired from the office in 1852, conditions were 
vastly improved because of his administration. 



After the expiration of his term as governor 
he served as professor of law in the law 
school of McKendree College at Lebanon. His 
only appearance in public life from that time 
was as a member of the constitutional con- 
vention in 1862. 

Melville W. Fuller was born February 11, 
1833, at Augusta, Maine; graduated at Bow- 
doin College in 1853; read law for a time in 
his uncle's office at Bangor; entered the Har- 
vard Law School; was admitted to the bar of 
Maine in 1855, and entered upon the practice 
of law in 1856. In the same year he was 
elected a member of the council in Augusta, 
chosen president of that body and elected cor- 
poration attorney for the city. He removed 
to Chicago in the same year, 1856, where he 
continued to reside until the time of his ap- 
pointment as chief justice, in 1888. He died 
July 4, 1910, at Sorrento, Maine. Before leav- 
ing Chicago for Washington to accept his 
appointment to the position of chief justice 
of the United States Court, Mr. Fuller had 
been actively engaged in the practice of law 
in Chicago since 1856, and during much of 
the time in litigation of wide interest. Shortly 
after his arrival in Chicago he entered the 
office of S. K. Dow at a salary of fifty dollars 
a month, and at the end of the year entered 
into a partnership with Dow, which terminated 
in 1860. 

His interest in public affairs is evidenced by 
his election, in 1861, as a delegate to the con- 
stitutional convention; in 1863, to the State 
Legislature; in 1864, '72, '76 and '80, as a 
delegate to the Democratic national conven- 
tions. In 1882 he was appointed attorney for 
the South Park Commissioners, and at the 
time of his appointment to the chief justice- 
ship, in 1888, he had participated in the trial 
of over 2,500 cases. He was appointed chief 
justice of the United States Supreme Court 
by President Cleveland in 1888, and exercised 
with wisdom and ability the functions of that 
office up to the time of his death. 

William H. Herndon was born in Greens- 
burg, Kentucky, December 25, 1818, and came 
to Illinois in 1820, and to Sangamon County 
in 1821, in company with his parents. As op- 
portunity offered, he attended the schools of 
Springfield until 1836, when he entered Illi- 
nois College, at Jacksonville, but only at- 
tended one year, being removed by his father 
in consequence of the abolition excitement then 
pending. The elder Herndon was inclined to 
be pro-slavery in his views, and did not care 
to have his son have abolition sentiments in- 
stilled in his mind by the professors in the 
Jacksonville institution. After his removal 
from the college, he clerked in a store for 
several years, and in 1842 entered the law 
office of Lincoln & Logan, where he read two 
years and was admitted to the bar in 1844. 



24 



ILLINOIS 



The partnership of Lincoln & Logan now be- 
ing dissolved, Mr. Lincoln and Mr. Herndon 
became partners, a relation which was never 
formally dissolved, and which existed until 
the death of Mr. Lincoln, though other tem- 
porary arrangements were effected by Mr. 
Herndon after Mr. Lincoln entered upon the 
duties of the presidency. His permanent fame 
is due to repeated references to his name and 
acts in every Life of Lincoln. 

In the days of the old whig party, Mr. Hern- 
don was an advocate of its principles, and 
the "hard-cider campaign" of 1840 was the 
first in which he participated. He was always 
an opponent of slavery, and on the organiza- 
tion of the republican party he became one 
of its strongest advocates. Mr. Herndon was 
never an office-holder, and the public posi- 
tions that he held came to him unsought. He 
held the offices of city attorney, mayor of 
Springfield, bank commissioner for the state, 
under Governors Bissell, Yates and Oglesby, 
besides other minor offices. 

John Hardin, a lawyer of Jacksonville, 
was inspector-general on the staff of Gen. 
Joseph Duncan, during the Black Hawk war. 
Later he was advanced to colonel and in- 
spector-general. He was a member of the 
Legislature and a member of Congress. He 
served as Colonel in the Mexican war and was 
killed at the battle of Buena Vista, February 
27, 1847. 

John R. Eden was born in Bath County, 
Kentucky, February 1, 1826, and died at 
Sullivan, Illinois, June 9, 1909, after having 
spent fifty-seven years as a lawyer. John R. 
Eden, whose father died in 1835, grew up in 
Rush County, Indiana, with very limited 
privileges. He came to Illinois on horseback 
in 1852 and was admitted to the bar after 
examination, at Shelbyville, by a committee 
consisting of Abraham Lincoln, Usher F. 
Linder and Samuel W. Moulton. His home 
was at Sullivan from August, 1853, until his 
death. He practiced over the circuit with 
other pioneer attorneys, and rose to front rank 
among the lawyers of his time. He was 
elected state's attorney in 1856, serving four 
years, and in 1862 was elected to the Thirty- 
eighth Congress, beginning his service at the 
height of the Civil war. In 1872 he was 
elected to the Forty-third Congress, and 
served three consecutive terms. In 1884 he 
was elected for another term by the Seven- 
teenth District. In 1868 he was Democratic 
nominee for governor. A brief and worthy 
tribute paid to him after his death read as 
follows: "He was a member of the bar and 
known far beyond its boundaries as an honor- 
able politician, a prudent statesman and an 
able lawyer. It will be long before his life is 
forgotten and it has left its imprint on other 
lives, making them nobler and better for their 
association with him." 



Edward P. Ripley, for many years presi- 
dent of the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Rail- 
way Company, was born at Boston, Massa- 
chusetts, October 30, 1845, and died February 
4, 1920. He graduated from high school and 
at the age of seventeen became a clerk in a 
Boston dry goods store. In 1869 he entered 
the employ of the Pennsylvania Company as 
a freight clerk in the Boston office, and in the 
following year became connected with the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company 
in a more responsible position. Two years 
later he was made the New England freight 
and passenger agent with headquarters in 
Boston; in 1876 was appointed general eastern 
agent, and in 1878 was promoted to be gen- 
eral freight agent with headquarters in Chi- 
cago. In 1887 the office of traffic manager 
was created by the management of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Com- 
pany, and Mr. Ripley chosen to fill the posi- 
tion. In the following year he was advanced 
to the office of general manager, which he 
resigned June 1, 1890, and on the following 
August was elected third vice president of 
the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad 
Company, his offices being in Chicago. On 
January 1, 1896, Mr. Ripley resigned to be- 
come president of the Santa Fe system, and 
continued in that position until his death. One 
service for which Chicago especially values his 
memory was in securing the adoption of that 
city as the site for the World's Columbian 
Exposition, and he was one of the leading 
members of the committee on ways and means 
and transportation. 

Eugene Field was born in St. Louis, Mis- 
souri, September 3, 1850, son of Roswell Mar- 
tin and Frances (Reed) Field. His mother 
died in 1856 and he was brought up by his 
cousin, Miss Mary Field French, of Amherst, 
Massachusetts. 

In 1865 he entered the private school of the 
Rev. James Tufts at Monson, Massachusetts, 
and matriculated at Williams College in 1868, 
but left on the death of his father in 1869 
to accompany his guardian, Professor John 
William Burgess, to Galesburg, Illinois, where 
he attended Knox College for two years. He 
afterward studied for one year at the Univer- 
sity of Missouri. In 1872 he visited southern 
Europe, and in May, 1873, he became a re- 
porter on the St. Louis Evening Journal. 
He was city editor of the St. Joseph (Missouri) 
Gazette, 1875-76; editorial writer on the St. 
Louis Morning Journal and St. Louis Times 
Journal, 1876-80; managing editor of the 
Kansas City Times 1880-81; managing editor 
of the Denver Tribune, 1881-83; and special 
writer on the Chicago Record from 1883 un- 
til his death. 

He wrote and published his first bit of verse 
in 1879, entitled "Christian Treasures." Ten 
years later he suddenly began to write verse 
frequently, meanwhile having written many 



ILLINOIS 



25 



short stories and tales. In 1889 ill health 
compelled him to visit Europe, and he spent 
fourteen months in England, Germany, Hol- 
land and Belgium. He died at Buena Park, 
Chicago, Illinois, November 4, 1895. 

Burton C. Cook was born in Monroe 
County, New York, May 11, 1819, and died 
at Evanston, Illinois, August 18, 1894. He 
was educated in the East, came to Illinois in 

1835, practicing law at Hennepin and later 
at Ottawa, and in 1846 was chosen by the 
Legislature state's attorney for the Ninth 
Judicial District. He was elected by the peo- 
ple under the Constitution of 1848. He was 
state senator from 1852 to 1860, and in 1861 
was one of the peace commissioners from 
Illinois in the conference at Washington. He 
was one of the founders of the Republican 
party in Illinois, being a member of the State 
Central Committee appointed in 1856, and 
chairman of the State Central Committee in 
1862. In 1864 he entered Congress, serving 
four consecutive terms. From 1871 to 1886 
he was solicitor for the Chicago Northwestern 
Railway. He presented the name of Abraham 
Lincoln for re-nomination at the National 
•Convention of 1864. 

John L. Beveridge was born in Washing- 
ton County, New York, July 6, 1824, and died 
May 3, 1910. His father's family moved 
to DeKalb County, Illinois, in 1842. He began 
the practice of law at Sycamore in 1851, and 
in 1854 in Chicago. He was major of the 
Eighth Illinois Cavalry in the Army of the 
Potomac, and in the winter of 1863-64 re- 
cruited and organized the Seventeenth Illinois 
Cavalry and was commissioned colonel and 
served in the department of Missouri. He 
was mustered out with the brevet rank of 
brigadier-general. He was elected sheriff of 
Cook County in 1866, state senator in 1870, 
succeeded General John A. Logan as con- 
gressman in 1871, and in 1872 was elected 
lieutenant-governor, and when Governor 
Oglesby entered the United States senate in 
January, 1873, became governor and served 
all but ten days of the regular four year term. 

Usher F. Linder, one of the most interest- 
ing characters appearing in public affairs of 
the state, took up his residence in Illinois in 
1835 at Greenup, in Coles County. He 
traveled the circuit and served in the Legis- 
lature with Abraham Lincoln, Stephen A. 
Douglas, Archy Williams, Ninian Edwards, 
John J. Hardin and Sidney Breese, and served 
one term as attorney-general, beginning in 

1836. During this period occurred the Love- 
joy riots in Alton, when Elijah P. Lovejoy 
was killed. Linder was in sympathy with the 
pro-slavery element, and his actions prior and 
subsequent to the murder of Lovejoy caused 
him to be subjected to severe criticism and 
censure. 



Linder was probably one of the best trained 
lawyers of his day, and while his fame is 
largely due to the fact that he tried success- 
fully many cases in all of the southern coun- 
ties of the state, still it is also doubtless true 
that it is due in part to his reputation as a 
wit, orator and story teller. His volume of 
"Reminiscences of the Early Bench and Bar 
of Illinois" relates entirely to men with whom 
he was acquainted and who were prominent 
in the southern part of the state at a critical 
period in the history of the state and nation, 
and forms a valuable contribution to Illinois 
history. 

Mr. Linder was born March 20, 1809, at 
Elizabethtown, Kentucky, near the birthplace 
of Lincoln. He died in Chicago, June 5, 1876. 

John P. Altgeld was the first foreign born 
citizen to hold the office of governor of Illi- 
nois. He was born in Prussia in 1848, was 
brought to America when a boy, and at the 
age of sixteen enlisted and served until the 
close of the Civil war with an Ohio regi- 
ment. He studied law at St. Louis and Savan- 
nah, Missouri, and in 1878 located at Chicago. 
In 1886 he was elected judge of the Superior 
Court of Cook County, resigning in August, 
1891. In 1892 he was nominated for governor, 
and was the first democrat elected to that 
office since 1852. His administration was a 
stormy one, in part due to the fact that he 
was governor during a time characterized by 
great financial depression and wide-spread 
labor troubles. The story of his career is the 
subject of a book by Waldo Brown. He was 
candidate for reelection as governor, but was 
defeated bv John R. Tanner. Governor Alt- 
geld died March 12, 1902. 

John Eldridge Northup. One of the most 
famous cases in the history of litigation in 
Cook County was brought to a close when in 
January, 1932, after two and a half years of 
investigation and about two months of actual 
trial in the court room, Mr. John E. Northup, 
first assistant state's attorney, won the deci- 
sion under which four former Sanitary Dis- 
trict officials were given penitentiary and jail 
sentences and fines in punishment for their 
connection with the colossal expenditure and 
misappropriation of the District's funds dur- 
ing their administration. This trial brought 
out a story of extravagance and waste of 
public money that was truly startling, giving 
a shock to the entire community, involving, as 
it did, not only the parties directly on trial, 
but many others, "buccaneers," as Mr. 
Northup termed them, who were illegal re- 
cipients of huge salaries and fees for which 
they rendered no services whatever. Mr. 
Northup performed this arduous work under 
severe handicaps, including the lack of neces- 
sary funds for carrying on the investigation, 
and he advanced his own money freely to 



26 



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bridge over this difficulty. This notable civic 
duty so efficiently carried out on the part of 
one man can perhaps be better recorded by 
quoting an editorial from the Chicago Daily 
News of February 6, 1932, under the head of 
"John E. Northup, Able Prosecutor." 

"There are times when events produce and 
clearly indicate men whose services a com- 
munity needs for bigger undertakings and 
higher responsibilities," said the News. "The 
successful conclusion of the trial of former 
trustees and officials of the Sanitary District 
is an event which points unerringly at John E. 
Northup, assistant State's attorney, singularly 
courageous and able prosecutor. That indica- 
tion of a man qualified by character, expe- 
rience and capacity to defend the rights and 
liberties of the people against crime and cor- 
ruption, despite political obstruction and dis- 
suasion, comes at a time when Republican 
leaders are seeking a candidate for the office 
of state's attorney. Mr. Northup's masterly 
handling of the Sanitary District case, his 
persistence in spite of all subtle efforts to 
discourage him, and his defiance of politics 
and politicians in the interest of public justice 
make him a logical candidate for that high 
office. To him, more than to any one else, 
belongs the credit for the successful issue of 
a case that has occupied the public mind for 
more than two years. Unless the Republican 
leaders in Cook County are blind to all that 
events have made obvious to the voters they 
will quickly recognize that Mr. Northup has 
displayed in high degree the qualities of a 
winner. Not to do so would be to defy that 
law of selection which operates most surely 
to demonstrate fitness — the hard test of cir- 
cumstances." 

John Eldridge Northup was born in Mar- 
shall County, Iowa, August 28, 1868, son of 
James Eldridge and Ippoletta (Eastman) 
Northup. He graduated from Drake Univer- 
sity at Des Moines with the degree A. B. in 
1891, and studied English and history on a 
fellowship at Vanderbilt University at Nash- 
ville, Tennessee, in 1891-92. From 1892 to 
1894 and during 1895-96 he was a graduate 
student at the University of Chicago in the 
subjects of political economy, sociology and 
history. From 1896 to 1899, inclusive, Mr. 
Northup was principal of schools at Elmhurst 
in DuPage County, during which time he 
studied law, and graduated in 1900 from the 
Illinois College of Law (now DePaul Univer- 
sity). He was admitted to the Illinois bar 
in 1899 and has had a career of over thirty 
years in law practice and public service. He 
was a member of the law firm of Pringle. 
Northup & Terwilliger from 1902 to 1904, of 
the firm of Northup, Arnold & Fairbank from 
1912 to 1916; the firm of Northup, Burnham 
& Fairbank in 1916-17; of Northup, Fair- 
bank and Klein from 1917 to 1922; and was 
employed as a trial lawyer by the firm of 



Mayer, Meyer, Austrian & Piatt from 1922 
to 1926. 

Mr. Northup from 1906 to 1912 was assist- 
ant state's attorney of Cook County, and in 
1913-14 was special state's attorney of the 
county. In 1921 he was appointed special 
assistant to the attorney-general of the United 
States, and served in that capacity until 1922. 
During this time he investigated and prose- 
cuted some big mail robbery cases, ending 
with the conviction of Timothy Murphy and 
others. He was first assistant United States 
district attorney from 1926 to 1929, and in 
the latter year was appointed as first assistant 
state's attorney of Cook County, from which 
he resigned in May, 1932, to resume private 
practice. He is now a member of the firm 
of Northup, Beardsley & Seyfaith, in the 
Foreman Bank Building. Many significant 
endorsements have been given of his ability 
and service as a public official, but none that 
has carried so much of the concurrence of 
approbation on the part of the public who 
think in terms of civic righteousness as in 
the case which was concluded in 1932. As 
the Chicago Tribune said in one of its power- 
ful editorials: "The public will be especially 
grateful to First Assistant State's Attorney 
John E. Northup, who, with great professional 
ability and, better still, with splendid courage 
and resolution has fought the cause of the 
people through to this victory in the teeth 
of bitter and powerful resistance. He will go 
down in history as a fighting champion of 
official responsibility and integrity. 
We have only to recall other instances in 
which the powers of politics that prey upon 
the community have been able through the 
exercise of subterranean influence to dis- 
appoint justice and insure the profits of official 
robbery to realize the importance and benefit 
of Mr. Northup's labors and success." 

Mr. Northup is a member of the Chicago, 
Illinois State and American Bar Associations, 
the Art Institute of Chicago, the Royal League 
and the Glen Oak Country Club. He is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church, a Re- 
publican in politics, and a member of the 
Masonic Order. His recreations are golf and 
motoring. He married, December 26, 1894, 
Mary Elizabeth Chisholm, of Albia, Iowa. 
They have a daughter, Dorothy. 

Marvin Hughitt, railroad man, for many 
years president of the Chicago, Northwestern 
Railway Company, was born on a farm in 
New York State, August 9, 1837. He left 
the farm at the age of fourteen, learned teleg- 
raphy at Auburn, and at the age of seventeen 
was an expert operator, being one of the first 
in the United States to receive messages by 
sound. He came to Chicago in 1854 and was 
employed by the Illinois and Mississippi Tele- 
graph Company, and subsequently as tele- 
graph operator and trainmaster for what is 



ILLINOIS 



27 



now the Chicago & Alton. He was train- 
master for the Illinois Central and earned 
high commendation for his work in forward- 
ing troops during the Civil war. On March 
1, 1872, after having in the meantime been 
with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul and 
the Pullman Palace Car Company, he was 
made general superintendent of the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railway, four years later 
became general manager, serving as vice 
president and general manager from 1880 to 
1887, and then became president and finally 
chairman of the board of directors of that 
railway system, and was president of a num- 
ber of its affiliated lines and branches. He 
was responsible for the institution of the 
pension system for employees which went into 
effect in January, 1901. 

Orville H. Browning was a lawyer of 
marked ability, a distinguished citizen of Illi- 
nois. He had served in the Black Hawk war 
and in the Legislature. He helped in the 
organization of the Republican party. Was a 
personal friend and advisor of President 
Lincoln, and was one of the hard workers who 
brought about the nomination of Lincoln for 
the presidency. Served as United States 
Senator, succeeding Stephen A. Douglas, and 
in 1866 as Secretary of the Interior, and for 
a short time acted as Attorney General in the 
term of Andrew Johnson. Mr. Browning was 
a delegate from Adams County to the Con- 
stitutional Convention of 1870 to which he 
brought a vast fund of experience and knowl- 
edge. He was one among the influential mem- 
bers of the convention. He died in Quincy at 
the age of seventy years. 

Edward Dickinson Baker, born in London, 
England, February 24, 1811, came to America 
with his parents when about three years of 
age, and he was still young when brought to 
Illinois. He studied law and practiced at Car- 
rollton, in Greene County, until 1835, then 
removing to Springfield, where he was asso- 
ciated with Josephus Hewitt and later with 
Stephen Logan and Albert T. Bledsoe. His 
first appearance in public life was in 1837, 
when he was elected to the General Assembly 
from Sangamon County, and from this time 
until his removal to California, he was a 
force in political and legislative affairs in the 
state. 

He was elected to Congress in 1844 and was 
a member of that body at the time of the 
beginning of the war with Mexico, when he 
returned to his home in Springfield, raised a 
regiment and was commissioned colonel. He 
fought throughout the war and at its close 
returned to Springfield and was shortly there- 
after, because of his military record and his 
known ability as a campaigner, considered as 
a Whig candidate for Governor. Baker, how- 
ever, believing that a Whig candidate could 



not at that time be elected Governor, did not 
accept the opportunity, and shortly after 
removed to Galena, from which district he 
was elected to Congress in 1848, from a dis- 
trict in which it was not believed any Whig 
could be elected. 

He was an intimate associate of Abraham 
Lincoln from the campaign of 1838, in which 
Carlin was elected Governor over Edwards 
when Baker, Hardin, Lincoln and Stuart 
were the principal operators for the Whigs 
against Douglas, Lamborn, Calhoun and 
Linder, who championed the Democratic cause. 

October 7, 1839, he was appointed president 
pro tern of the first Whig state convention, 
to be held in Illinois, and with Abraham 
Lincoln, J. F. Speed, Richard Barrett and 
A. G. Henry was appointed to constitute the 
State Central Committee. At this convention 
Abraham Lincoln was nominated as a presi- 
dential elector. 

John Dean Caton, one of the great names 
in Illinois jurisprudence, was born in Orange 
County, New York, March 18, 1812, and died 
in 1895. He had a youth of hardship and 
struggle, laboring on a farm and became a 
harness maker and a wagoner and peddler. 
While studying law he supported himself by 
teaching and farming. Coming west in 1833, 
he was licensed to practice law and in 1842 
was appointed one of the first judges of the 
Supreme Court under the new system by 
which each of the nine Supreme Judges pre- 
sided over one of the Illinois circuits. He 
was re-elected under the constitution of 1848, 
providing for three Supreme Court judges 
without circuit duties. He resigned from the 
Supreme bench in 1864, after having been 
chief justice during the last seven years. It 
is claimed that Judge Caton brought the first 
suit in the Circuit Court at Chicago, tried the 
first jury cases in Cook, Will 'and Kane coun- 
ties, and had the first law office in • Chicago, 
sharing it with Giles Spring. One of the his- 
toric cases in which he presided was the trial 
of People vs. Lovejoy in Bureau County, at 
the conclusion of which he instructed the 
jury that "if a man voluntarily brings his 
slave into a free state the slave becomes free." 

Timothy B. Blackstone, who was one of 
the ablest railway executives of the Middle 
West, was born in Connecticut March 28, 
1829, and died May 21, 1900. On account of 
ill health he left school to join a railway 
surveying corps, was rapidly promoted, and 
in 1851 came to Illinois to take charge of 
construction of a line between Bloomington 
and Dixon, part of the Illinois Central. For 
several years he lived at LaSalle and was 
chosen mayor of that town. He became chief 
engineer for the construction of a railroad 
between Chicago and Joliet. The road was 
completed in 1857 and was one of the links 



28 



ILLINOIS 



of a system comprising several other roads 
reaching from Chicago to Alton. Mr. Black- 
stone was elected president of the Joliet & 
Chicago Railroad in 1861 and conducted its 
affairs successfully while the other portions 
of the system were in the hands of receivers. 
In 1864 the Joliet & Chicago was leased to 
the newly organized Chicago & Alton Railway 
Company, and soon afterward Mr. Blackstone 
was elected president. He soon extended the 
line to St. Louis, and it was under his able 
direction that the Chicago & Alton was de- 
veloped into one of the large railway systems 
of the Middle West, and for many years under 
his presidency enjoyed an uninterrupted pros- 
perity. He was president until April 1, 1899, 
and from 1864 to 1868 was president of the 
Union Stonk Yards Company at Chicago. Two 
notable institutions of Chicago commemorate 
his name, one a great hotel, the other the 
Blackstone Memorial Library. 

William H. Bissell, governor of Illinois 
from January 12, 1857, to March 18, 1860, 
when he died, was born near Painted Post, 
New York, April 25, 1811. He studied medi- 
cine, and on coming to Monroe County, Illi- 
nois, practiced for several years. He then 
took up the study of law and became inter- 
ested in politics, was elected as a Democrat 
to the Legislature in 1840, and was colonel 
of a regiment in the war with Mexico. After 
the war he was elected two terms to Congress, 
and in 1856, as candidate of the Republican 
party, was elected governor. 

Bissell's campaign for governor was made 
about the time of the beginning of the Repub- 
lican party and was extremely bitter, and the 
bitterness did not cease with the election. 
Probably in the history of the state no public 
man up to the time of Bissell's election at any 
rate, had been subjected to more gross abuse, 
or been fought with more malice. 

Victor F. Lawson, who brought the Chicago 
Daily News to the acme of its prestige and 
service as a great newspaper, was a native of 
Chicago, born September 9, 1850. He died 
August 19, 1925, after having been publisher 
of the Daily News for almost half a century. 
His father was one of Chicago's pioneer real 
estate men, and Victor Lawson's first work 
after completing his education in the East was 
to take charge of his father's estate. The 
Chicago Daily News began publication Janu- 
ary 1, 1876. Its first owners soon sold out to 
Melville E. Stone, who in July, 1876, sought 
an ally in the financial responsibility of con- 
tinuing the publication in the person of Mr. 
Lawson. Mr. Stone continued in charge of the 
editorial department for several years, and it 
was left to Mr. Lawson to build up the busi- 
ness side of the newspaper. In 1881 they 
began the publication of a morning edition, 
first known as the Morning News and after- 



wards as The Record. After the retirement 
of Mr. Stone in 1888, Mr. Lawson became sole 
proprietor, and directed the editorial policy 
as well as the business department of the 
two newspapers. In 1901 he sold The Record, 
and after that devoted his attention to making 
The Daily News the outstanding evening paper 
of the city. Among the many public and 
political causes which Mr. Lawson advocated 
through the Daily News, one was for the 
establishment of government savings banks, 
and he became known as the "Father of the 
Postal Savings Bank in America." He was 
also the founder of the Daily News Fresh Air 
Fund, which in later years maintained the 
Lincoln Park Sanitarium for sick poor chil- 
dren. 

George Manierre, _From 1855 until his 
death, in May, 1863, the judge of the seventh 
judicial circuit, comprising Cook and Lake 
counties, was George Manierre. As a historic 
figure in the public life of the city and state 
during the middle period of the past century, 
he has been honored as a statesman, journal- 
ist, lawyer and jurist. Originally a Democrat, 
he was chairman of the committee on resolu- 
tions in the famous Aurora Convention of 
September, 1854, presented the party plat- 
form and suggested the name "Republican" 
for the new party. In Chicago affairs he is to 
be remembered for the part he took in the 
establishment of Lincoln Park, as a member 
of the board of regents of the old Chicago 
University in 1859, one of the creators of the 
Law Institute and Library, a founder of the 
Chicago Historical Society, and a devoted 
friend of public education, in token of which 
a school on the north side bears his name. At 
one time he was editor of the Chicago Demo- 
crat. He was born in Connecticut, began 
studying law in New York City, came to Chi- 
cago in 1835, was admitted to the bar in 1839, 
and from that time until his death was con- 
stantly in some official service. As city 
attorney during the early '40s, he prepared a 
digest of the original charter and municipal 
ordinances which was the standard of author- 
ity until 1853. 

Albert G. Spalding in his younger days 
was one of the leading men of the American 
game of baseball. For more than thirty years 
he was head of the house of A. G. Spalding 
& Company, one of the largest manufacturers 
of and dealers in sporting goods in the world. 
Mr. Spalding was a native of Illinois, born at 
Byron September 2, 1850, and died September 
9, 1915. From early boyhood he had been a 
baseball enthusiast, and attained local promi- 
nence as a player at the age of seventeen. 
Joining the Forest City Club of Rockford he 
did much to place that organization at the 
head of the amateur clubs of the West. He 
gained national fame as a pitcher. In 1871 



ILLINOIS 



29 



he joined the Boston Club of the National 
League, and for four years was its star 
pitcher as well as captain. In 1876 he became 
a member of the Chicago "White Stockings," 
and remained with it as manager, secretary 
and president until 1891. During this time the 
Chicago Club won the pennant six times, twice 
in succession. 

In 1876, soon after joining the Chicago 
Club, Mr. Spalding associated himself with 
his brother, J. Walter Spalding, and his 
brother-in-law, William T. Brown, in the es- 
tablishment of a house for the manufacture 
and sale of sporting goods. Later it was in- 
corporated with A. G. Spalding as president, 
and still later the manufacturing branch was 
added. It is one of Chicago business houses 
with a continuous record of more than half a 
century, and branches of A. G. Spalding and 
Company were during the lifetime of Mr. 
Spalding established in New York and other 
cities. 

A. G. Spalding's nephew, Albert Spalding, 
son of J. Walter Spalding, has attained world 
fame as a violinist. He was born in Chicago 
in 1888, and made his American debut in 1908. 

John A. Logan lived among the Shawnee 
and Delaware Indians in Missouri near Grand 
Tower. During the Black Hawk war he vol- 
unteered in the Ninth Regiment in 1831. In 
1832 volunteered again and was a surgeon's 
mate in Col. Jacob Fry's regiment and later 
was colonel of the Forty-fourth Regiment, 
States Militia. He graduated in medicine. At 
the opening of the Civil war he was Colonel 
of the Thirty-second Regiment, Illinois Volun- 
teers and was later breveted brigadier gen- 
eral. He became United States marshal for 
the Southern District of Illinois, 1866-70. 

Samuel Hubbel Treat was born in Otsego 
County, New York, June 21, 1811, was ad- 
mitted to the bar in that state, and coming 
to Illinois in 1834 settled in Springfield, where 
he entered upon the practice of law. On May 
27, 1839, he was appointed circuit judge by 
the governor to fill a vacancy and was elected 
by the Legislature January 31, 1840. Febru- 
ary 13, 1841, he was elected by the Legislature 
one of the associate judges of the Supreme 
Court, which office he held until March 23, 
1855, when he resigned to accept the position 
of judge of the District Court of the United 
States for the Southern District of Illinois, 
which position he held until his death, March 
27, 1887. At his death he had served as a 
judge in Illinois continuously for forty-eight 
years, a longer period than any other judge 
in the state up to that time. 

As was the case with most of the early 
judges, Treat had only a brief experience as 
a practicing lawyer before his elevation to 
the bench, and his reputation rests upon his 
administration of the judicial office. His opin- 
ions were usually short and clear. He was 



favorably known for promptness in his deci- 
sions and was generally liked by the bar and 
the public. The one work of public service 
with which he was connected aside from his 
judicial duties was as coeditor of the revision 
of the statutes with Scates and Blackwell in 
1857. 

The Most Rev. F. E. J. Lloyd, D. D. Many 
unprejudiced students of modern life, observ- 
ing the confusion and diffusion resulting from 
the hundred odd sects that mar the body of 
Christian unity, urged as the great solvent a 
reconstitution of religious activities on the 
basis of the Christian doctrine "pure and un- 
dented." One of the most interesting and 
promising of the definite movements toward 
this great objective had its origin in Chicago 
when in 1915 was founded the American Cath- 
olic Church. It is, as the name implies, a 
religious organization primarily adopted to 
American principles, and thus a national 
church. In the words of the Primate, "We 
want a church in this land truly Catholic, 
disciplined, adventurous — not Latin, yet claim- 
ing its full share of its great Western herit- 
age; not Eastern, yet holding fast to the faith 
once delivered to the saints; not Puritan, yet 
humbly ready to learn anew the graces we 
have lost through our separations; but Cath- 
olic, instinct with the spirit of our Divine 
Lord, broad as the inhabited world, and deep 
as the mysteries of God." 

While the American Catholic Church is from 
the standpoint of its founding new, it has a 
very ancient heritage, in fact, "is of an apos- 
tolic lineage more venerable than that of any 
religious body in the land." Again quoting 
the words of the Primate, "Her Orders issue 
from Saint Peter, Patriarch of Antioch, and 
the line has been continued to this day. But, 
since a valid ministry is not, of itself, suffi- 
cient for Christian or Catholic unity, the 
American Catholic Church maintains the 
necessity, complete and absolute, of holding 
inviolate the faith once for all delivered to the 
saints (St. Jude), and because that faith is 
enshrined therein, she accepts the Nicene 
Creed without addition or subtraction, quali- 
fication or amendment. She also acknowl- 
edges the dogmatic decrees of the Seven 
Ecumenical Councils, not merely in themselves, 
but as the fundamental basis of unity. In 
common with Catholic Christendom she be- 
lieves in Seven Sacraments, as being a clear 
and concise statement of the doctrine always 
held therein. In agreement with St. Augustine 
she teaches and holds that anything new in 
Christian doctrine is, therefore, false. She 
recognizes the five Patriarchates of Christen- 
dom, from one of which, that of Antioch, she 
herself has come, and thence deriving as well 
her mission as her Apostolical Succession on 
behalf of the Americas." 

The metropolitan Archbishop and Primate 
of the American Catholic Church is The Most 
Rev. Frederic Ebenezer John Lloyd, who has 



30 



ILLINOIS 



had a most interesting and distinguished ca- 
reer as a scholar, churchman and religious 
leader. He was born at Milford Haven, South 
Wales, June 5, 1859, was educated in England, 
attending the Dorchester Theological College 
of Oxfordshire, and in 1882 was ordained to 
the ministry of the Church of England by the 
Lord Bishop of Oxford. He immediately came 
to America, held a number of pastoral posi- 
tions in his church in Canada, and labored 
in Labrador for some years. He has been i a 
resident of the United States since 1893. He 
is president of the Intercollegiate University 
of Chicago and London, and for four years 
was superintendent of the Grace Episcopal 
Church Parish House. He declined ejection 
as bishop coadjutor of Oregon and in 1906 re- 
signed from the Episcopal ministry. _ On June 
18 1915, he was ordained to the ministry o± 
the American Catholic Church and was conse- 
crated Bishop of Illinois, December 29 of the 
same year. Since 1920 he has been archbishop 
and primate of the church. 

Those who know Archbishop Lloyd appre- 
ciate not only his great sincerity of purpose 
and ability as a religious leader, but nis rare 
culture and versatility. Besides his degree as 
a Doctor of Divinity he has degrees as a Doc- 
tor of Music, Master of Arts, Doctor of Let- 
ters He is author of: Years in the Regions 
of Icebergs, published in 1885; Six Easter 
Carols, Anthems and Settings for the Mass, 
acted as editor of Lloyd's Clerical Directory 
from 1898 to 1913, editor of Lloyd's Church 
Musicians' Directory in 1910, and was editor 
of Church Life, the Ohio diocesan organ, from 
1901 to 1903. In 1902 he founded the Society 
of Saint Philip the Apostle for Mission- 
preachers. Doctor Lloyd married, February 7, 
1917, Mrs. Peabody, widow of Hiram B. Pea- 
body, of Chicago. He has also interested him- 
self in politics. As a Democrat he was elected 
a member of the Forty-eighth General Assem- 
bly of Illinois from the Third Senatorial Dis- 
trict in 1912. He was a member of the Curran 
Commission for the investigation of home- 
finding institutions of Illinois. An interesting 
tribute to both his character and his activities 
is found in the words of Illinois' distinguished 
statesman and orator, J. Hamilton Lewis, who 
acclaims him "one of the men who has been 
ardent as a citizen, one of the important men 
in our civic life, a distinguished member of 
the Legislature, ever regarded as one of the 
first men of letters; and in the long life you 
have lived here, esteemed as a gentleman rep- 
resenting the highest ideals of honor, citizen- 
ship and integrity." 

Walter B. Scates was a lawyer of consid- 
erable prominence and was a judge of both 
the Circuit and the Supreme Court. He was 
a member of the Constitutional Convention 
from Jefferson County. Judge Scates was a 
major in the Civil war, and held important 
offices under appointment by the President. 



Luther L. Mills, lawyer, orator, reformer 
and Christian citizen, was born in North 
Adams, Massachusetts, September 3, 1848, 
and died in 1909. He was brought to Chicago 
when one year old, was educated there and at 
the University of Michigan, and admitted to 
the bar in 1871. The splendid work done by 
him therefore belongs to that period of Chi- 
cago history following the great fire. As 
state's attorney of Cook County from 1876 to 
1884, he established his reputation as one of 
the foremost criminal lawyers of the country. 
He was thoroughly feared by the criminal 
element, and accomplished much in correct- 
ing an outside impression that as a city Chi- 
cago was unstable and unsafe. He was called 
upon to assist in many noted trials outside 
the state and was one of the prosecutors in 
the Doctor Cronin trial, one of the most fam- 
ous in criminal annals. Along with the work 
and profession of an attorney he took an 
active part in Republican politics and be- 
came one of the noted orators of his day, 
having a national reputation in that field. 

John B. Murphy, surgeon, achieved national 
and international distinction as an original 
investigator and as an eminent operator. He 
was born at Appleton, Wisconsin, December 
21, 1857, and died August 11, 1916. He at- 
tended public schools in his native city and 
began the study of medicine there. In 1879 he 
graduated from Rush Medical College of Chi- 
cago, and thereafter Chicago remained his 
home, and Chicago claims him as one of its 
most famous men. He held chairs in Rush 
Medical College, the old College of Physicians 
and Surgeons and the Post Graduate Medical 
School, and was on the staff of several hos- 
pitals. He was president of the National 
Association of Railway Surgeons in 1895, and 
in 1902 Notre Dame University of Indiana 
selected him as the recipient of the Laetare 
medal, conferred for eminent scholarship and 
practice in surgery. He was a contributor to 
the standard literature of surgery and had a 
world-wide reputation in surgery of the ab- 
dominal tracts. His invention and wonder- 
fully successful application of the anastomosis 
button greatly reduced the fatalities incident 
to injuries to the intestines. 

John G. Shedd after the death of Marshall 
Field in 1906 became president of Marshall 
Field & Company. He had entered the em- 
ploy of Field, Leiter & Company on August 7, 
1872, and he was with that institution and its 
successors forty-four years, until his death on 
October 22, 1926. As president of Marshall 
Field & Company he attained his greatest am- 
bition, which was to be "simply a merchant." 
Marshall Field once said of him: "I believe 
him to be the best merchant in the United 
States." 

John G. Shedd was born in New Hampshire 
July 20, 1850, and like Mr. Field started in a 



ILLINOIS 



31 



country store, where he learned the funda- 
mentals of merchandising. From Rutland, 
Vermont, he came to Chicago in 1872. Among 
other things in the career of this great Chi- 
cago merchant which should be remembered is 
the fact that he originated and insisted in 
putting in force the Saturday half holiday 
among the wholesale establishments of Chi- 
cago. As chairman of the citizens committee 
he took a prominent part in the construction 
of the new County Building for Cook County 
in 1906. 

A number of years before his death Mr. 
Shedd remarked : "Too many men have made 
fortunes in Chicago and while making them 
have left the city to grow as it would. If 
some of these had found a little time for au- 
dience with men who had the welfare of the 
future city in mind and heart, fewer would 
have found fancied need to take up residence 
in more beautiful and more ripened environ- 
ment." In speaking of means by which he 
| might contribute in largest measure to making 
Chicago a center of culture as well as busi- 
ness, he tendered in January, 1924, a little 
over two years before his death, a donation of 
two million dollars to the South Park System 
with the understanding that the money was 
ito be used in establishing an aquarium in 
Grant Park. The following year the necessary 
legislation was obtained, and in 1926 Mr. 
Shedd added another million dollars to the 
donation. From this fund has since been built 
the Shedd Aquarium. 

Benjamin F. Taylor was born at Lowville, 
New York, July 18, 1819, and died February 
24, 1887. He graduated from Madison Uni- 
versity at Hamilton, New York, in 1838, and 
in 1845 came to Chicago and was on the staff 
of the Chicago Evening Journal until 1865, 
during the greater part of that time as lit- 
erary editor. He was also a war correspond- 
ent and wrote probably the most famous de- 
scriptions of "The Battle Among the Clouds" 
and the "Storming of Mission Ridge." After 
leaving daily journalism at Chicago he spent 
much of his time in travel, and his death 
occurred at Cleveland, Ohio. He was a con- 
tributor of prose and poetry to the Atlantic, 
Harpers, and Scribners, and attained high 
jrank as a poet. His most popular poems 
iwere: "The Isle of Long Ago," "Rhymes of 
the River," and "The Old Village Choir." 

John Crerar, Chicago merchant and philan- 
thropist, was born in New York in 1827 and 
died October 19, 1889. In New York he 
earned a partnership in a large mercantile 
Ihouse, and while in that city was president 
of the Mercantile Library Association. He 
moved to Chicago in 1862, as representative 
lof his firm, a railway supply house, and subse- 
quently became head of Crerar, Adams & Com- 
pany and engaged in the same line of busi- 



ness. Under his direction this became one 
of the largest concerns of its kind in the 
Middle West. He also assisted in the develop- 
ment of such institutions as the Pullman Pal- 
ace Car Company, the Chicago & Alton Rail- 
way, the Illinois & Joliet Railroad, the Illinois 
Trust and Savings Bank, and the Liverpool, 
London and Globe Insurance Company. 

During his lifetime he gave generously to 
many causes and at his death, being without 
wife or children, he bequeathed a million and 
a half dollars to various institutions of a 
religious, historical and literary character, 
also the great sum of four million for a free 
public library. The Crerar Library has be- 
come one of the great libraries of the Middle 
West and for some years past has been housed 
in the splendid Crerar Building, opposite the 
Chicago Public Library. 

Orson Smith, who died March 3, 1923, was 
born m Chicago December 14, 1841, son of 
Orson Smith, Sr., and member of one of the 
early pioneer families. Orson Smith at the 
age of thirteen became a bundle boy in the 
retail dry goods store of Potter Palmer. The 
following year he went to work in the bank- 
ing house of F. Granger Adams, an institution 
that later became the Traders Bank and sub- 
sequently the Traders National Bank. In 1870 
Mr. Smith became cashier of the Corn Ex- 
change National Bank, and continued with 
that institution when it became a state bank 
as The Corn Exchange Bank until 1884. In 
1884 he became vice president of the Mer- 
chants Loan & Trust Company, was president 
from 1898 to 1916, and after that chairman of 
the board until his death. Orson Smith mar- 
ried in 1871, Anna M. Rice, daughter of John 
B. Rice, distinguished in the early history of 
Chicago as an actor, theatrical manager and 
mayor. In 1847 he opened Rice's Theater on 
Randolph Street. He was elected mayor in 
1865 and again in 1867, and in 187% was 
elected to Congress. 

John Deere was born at Rutland, Vermont, 
February 7, 1804, and at the age of seventeen 
was apprenticed to learn the blacksmith's 
trade. At the end of four years he was a 
thorough mechanic, an expert in all branches 
of iron making. In 1837 he came west and 
settled in the Village of Grand Detour, in Ogle 
County, Illinois. He soon gained a reputation 
by improvising a rude equipment by which to 
forge a pitman shaft which had been broken 
and which interrupted the work of a sawmill 
only two days. He repaired and made a great 
many of the iron implements and appliances, 
including plows. At that time Illinois farmers 
broke the prairie with an iron plow with 
wooden moldboard. It was his experiments 
and mechanical genius that perfected the steel 
plow. In 1838 the first two of his improved 
plows were made, and by 1840 the output of 



32 



ILLINOIS 



his shop had increased to forty plows. The 
great difficulty was to obtain steel or proper 
dimensions and quality, and American manu- 
facturers being unable to supply that demand, 
shipment was made from the steel mills of 
England to Illinois. By 1846 the Deere fac- 
tory produced a thousand plows, and in 1847 
he moved his business to Moline, Illinois, the 
city which has ever since been the home of 
the great Deere Plow industry. John Deere 
in 1858 took in his son, Charles H., as one of 
his partners. The business was conducted as 
Deere & Company until 1868, and was then 
incorporated, John Deere serving as president 
of the industry until his death, on May 17, 
1886. 

Emery A. Storrs was born at Hinsdale, 
New York, August 12, 1835, began the study 
of law with his father, was admitted to the 
bar in 1853, and in 1859 moved to Chicago. 
He was a delegate at large from Illinois to 
the National Republican Conventions of 1868, 
1872 and 1880. He died suddenly while at- 
tending the Supreme Court at Ottawa, Sep- 
tember 12, 1885. 

"But of all those who have been distin- 
guished for oratory at the Chicago bar none 
perhaps can compare in brilliancy and versa- 
tility with Emery A. Storr. No one whom I 
ever knew," said John M. Palmer, "was so 
ready on all occasions to respond to the popu- 
lar demand as he, and no one ever surpassed 
him in his ability to adapt himself to any oc- 
casion or any emergency, however sudden or 
unexpected it might have occurred. Nature 
had endowed him with gifts of the very high- 
est order and he had a genius for eloquence 
as marked as Cicero himself. His memory 
was tenacious and his powers of description 
were wonderful. He was as great in the 
forum as he was on the stump. As a political 
speaker he was not only effective, but fascinat- 
ing. As a jury lawyer he stood without a 
rival. He was one of the readiest men at 
repartee I ever knew, and his witticisms would 
fill a volume." 

Lyman J. Gage was for forty years closely 
identified with the financial life of Chicago, 
chiefly with one institution, the First National 
Bank, and later became a national figure as 
secretary of the treasury in McKinley's and 
Roosevelt's cabinets. He was born in Madison 
County, New York, June 28, 1836, and began 
his banking apprenticeship at the age of 
seventeen. In 1855 he came to Chicago, 
clerked in a planing mill for several years, 
and in 1858 entered the Merchants Loan & 
Trust Company as bookeeper, being promoted 
to cashier in 1861. In 1868 he was made 
cashier of the First National Bank, served 
that institution as vice president from 1882 
to 1891, and then as president from 1891 to 
1897, when he resigned to become secretary 



of the treasury. He resigned that office in 
February, 1902, and for several years was 
president of the United States Trust Company 
of New York, and in 1906 retired to San 
Diego, California, which has been his home 
for twenty years. 

Wm. S. Hamilton, a son of Alexander 
Hamilton, was a cadet at the West Point Mili- 
tary Academy, but resigned in 1817. He 
settled in Sangamon County in this state and 
was engaged in surveying the public lands. 
He served in the Legislature in 1824-25 and 
became military aide to Governor Coles with 
the rank of Colonel. He took part in the recep- 
tion to La Fayette in 1825. In 1827 Colonel 
Hamilton went to the lead mines and was 
there when the Black Hawk troubles occurred. 
When Governor Reynolds reached Dixon's 
Ferry he found among other prominent people 
Colonel Hamilton, who offered his services. 
Fort Hamilton was erected at the "Hamilton 
Diggins" on Pecatonica River just in the 
edge of Wisconsin. Colonel Hamilton was as- 
sociated with Colonel Dodge, who was a sort 
of whirlwind in Indian fighting. Colonel 
Hamilton commanded a company of Indians 
and rendered most acceptable service to the 
cause of the Government. When gold was 
discovered in California he went to that El 
Dorado where he died in 1850. 

James Semple was a lawyer in Edwards- 
ville. He volunteered for service in the Black 
Hawk war and was adjutant of the Old Bat- 
talion commanded by Maj. Nathaniel Buck- 
master. Later he was aide to General White- 
side. He volunteered as a private under Cap- 
tain Snyder for the campaign to Kellogg's 
Grove and he later was appointed brigadier- 
general. He had a long and honorable public 
life, having served in the Legislature, as 
attorney-general of Illinois, as minister to 
Granada, and as United States Senator. 

Francis Stuyvesant Peabody, who entered 
the retail coal trade in 1884, was for many 
years before his death one of the foremost coal 
operators of the middle west, founder and 
head of the Peabody Coal Company. 

He was born in Chicago July 24, 1859, at- 
tended the Exeter Preparatory School and later 
the Sheffield Scientific School of Yale Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated in 1881. In 
1884 he began his business career as a retail 
coal merchant, but his attention was soon at- 
tracted to the operating and production side 
of the coal industry and he founded the Pea- 
body Coal Company, which under his direction 
became one of the largest operating companies 
in the coal fields of Illinois and other sections 
of the Middle West. He was for many years 
president of the company and at the time of 
his death was chairman of its board of direc- 
tors. He was also president of the Federal 



i ■"*' J ;; i ' 



c 







^•v. ^-t^^^^O^^^ 



ILLINOIS 



33 



Coal Company and was chairman of the board 
of the Sheridan, Wyoming, Coal Company. He 
had many other business and financial connec- 
tions. 

During the World war he was made chair- 
man of the coal production committee of the 
Council of National Defense and assistant to 
the director of the Bureau of Mines in charge 
of explosives. In 1920 he was decorated by the 
King of Italy as Knight Commander of the 
Crown of Italy. • 

Mr. Peabody died August 27, 1922. His 
capacity for enjoying life was not measured 
by his business achievements alone. He was 
deeply read in literature, and had many asso- 
ciations with literary men and organizations, 
being a member of the Stevenson Society, and 
owned a notable collection of the works of 
Robert Louis Stevenson. He was a member 
of the Western Society of Engineers. 

He married November 23, 1887, Miss May 
Henderson of Utica, New York, and after her 
death he married, February 12, 1909, Mary 
Gertrude Sullivan. 

His son, Stuyvesant Peabody, who was born 
in Chicago, August 7, 1888, has been president 
of the Peabody Coal Company since 1917, and 
is also president of The Consumers Company 
of Chicago. He was a first lieutenant and 
later a captain in the World war. He married 
Anita Healey. 

Elijah Ikes, an early settler in Sangamon 
County, became the first postmaster at Spring- 
field, and was also state Senator. In the Win- 
nebago war he was a major. At the outset 
of the Black Hawk war he was a private, but 
was advanced to the rank of captain and it 
was in his company that Abraham Lincoln 
was a private. 

Alexander Legge. In June, 1929, Con- 
gress passed the agricultural marketing act, 
vesting the powers and functions of the 
measure in an administrative body known as 
the Federal Farm Board. Soon afterward 
President Hoover appointed the first members 
of the board, one of whom was a prominent 
Chicago business man, Mr. Alexander Legge, 
who upon the organization of the board was 
made chairman. Of this board, which has 
been the center of so much controversy in the 
economic discussions of the past four years, 
Mr. Legge continued as chairman until March, 
1931. 

Mr. Legge understands the agricultural 
viewpoint of the Middle West as few other 
men. He was born in Dane County, Wiscon- 
sin, January 13, 1866, and when ten years old 
went with his parents to Nebraska. In 1891 
he became a collector for the McCormick Har- 
vester Company, three years later was made 
collection manager of the company, in 1898 
branch manager, and in 1902 was made as- 
sistant manager of domestic sales of the In- 



ternational Harvester Company. He was pro- 
moted to assistant general manager in 1906, 
to general manager in 1913, and in 1922 be- 
came president of this great corporation. 
After retiring from the Federal Farm Board 
he resumed his position as president in 1931. 
During the World war Mr. Legge served as a 
dollar a year man, and was vice chairman of 
the War Industries Board and head of the 
Requirement Division of that board, and also 
manager of the Allied Purchasing Commis- 
sion. 

Hon. John Dill Robertson, for all his 
splendid public services as former commis- 
sioner of health and former president of the 
West Park Board of Chicago, was first of all 
an eminent physician. The phases of public 
service which chiefly attracted him were those 
marking new safeguards for human life and 
setting up new standards and institutions by 
which the health and sanity of the people of 
Chicago might be conserved. 

Doctor Robertson was one of the storm 
centers in Chicago politics for a number of 
years, and the publicity given him on that 
account doubtless obscured, in the minds of 
many citizens, his longer and more incessant 
devotion to the happiness and welfare of the 
people about him and his community in gen- 
eral. His individual aspirations and efforts 
enabled him to climb the ladder to success. 
He was born in Indiana County, Pennsyl- 
vania, March 8, 1871, son of Thomas Sander- 
son and Melinda M. (McCurdy) Robertson. 
Eighteen months later his father died. After 
attending local schools for a few years he 
started out to make his living. Eventually 
he became a railway telegrapher, also studied 
and qualified as a bookkeeper. In 1893 he 
came to Chicago and enrolled as a student in 
the Bennett Medical College. He was grad- 
uated as an M. D. in 1896 and for many years 
remained a most loyal alumnus of an institu- 
tion which subsequently became the medical 
department of Loyola University. He was 
president of the college for ten years, also 
professor of practice of surgery. He was 
successful in private practice, but always rec- 
ognized the call of duty to the larger interests 
of his profession. He was attending surgeon 
at the Cook County Hospital from 1898 to 
1913. From 1904 to 1915 he was surgeon-in- 
chief of the Jefferson Park Polyclinic Hos- 
pital, and his home in later years was a bun- 
galow on the roof of the institution. After 
retiring from the West Park Board he be- 
came medical and safety director of the Mo- 
torists Association of Illinois, and much of 
his time was devoted to the study of traffic 
conditions and the elimination of its hazards. 
He was a member of the Traffic Safety Com- 
mission which met at Washington under call 
from President Hoover. 

Early in his career he became interested 
in politics. He was one of the earnest sup- 



34 



ILLINOIS 



porters of W. H. Thompson in his early cam- 
paigns for mayor, and under appointment of 
Mayor Thompson served as health commis- 
sioner from 1915 to 1922. In 1922 he was 
made head of the Chicago School Board, but 
resigned a year later. Governor Small then 
made him president of the West Park Board 
and he served in that office for almost a year 
after Governor Emmerson was inaugurated. 
In 1927 he was candidate for mayor and in 
1930 he supported the aspirations of Judge 
Lyle in the Republican primary campaign. 
Altogether, in the course of sixty years, his 
activities summed up a notable career and 
justify his appraisal as one of the notable 
citizens of his generation in Chicago. 

Doctor Robertson died at his summer home 
in Wisconsin, August 20, 1931. He married, 
June 15, 1898, Miss Bessie M. Foote. By this 
marriage he left one son, Dr. Thomas Sander- 
son Robertson, of Chicago. Mrs. Robertson 
died February 9, 1930. On May 2, 1931, Doc- 
tor Robertson married Miss Helen Remy 
Hughes. 

From a public tribute given to Doctor Rob- 
ertson while he was president of the West 
Park Board it is possible to construct a more 
satisfactory statement, with considerable de- 
tail, regarding his eminent public services. 
Doctor Robertson arrived in Chicago during 
the World's Fair year of 1893. After grad- 
uating from medical college he was appointed 
an interne in the Cook County Hospital by 
competitive examination. Next followed his 
fifteen years of constructive service with the 
Bennett Medical College and the Cook County 
Hospital. He was the originator of the plan 
and had much to do with the building of the 
Frances Willard Hospital, and later he built 
the Jefferson Park Hospital, of which he be- 
came surgeon-in-chief. 

Doctor Robertson was commissioner of 
health of Chicago from April 27, 1915, to 
February 1, 1922. As commissioner he estab- 
lished the system of chlorination of water, 
established a bureau of water safety and ty- 
phoid control, forced by executive order the 
pasteurization of all milk and cream in the 
city, and by these and other measures secured 
a notable reduction in the death rate, and all 
but eliminated typhoid. It was Doctor Rob- 
ertson who presented to the City Council and 
had passed the so-called food covering ordi- 
nance, as a result of which bakery goods and 
other foods are no longer exposed to handling 
and other sources of contamination. He or- 
ganized the Municipal Tuberculosis Sanato- 
rium field work, established eight municipal 
tuberculosis clinics, free dental clinics for tu- 
berculosis sufferers, conducted a school sur- 
vey for the examination of children for symp- 
toms of tuberculosis, established the Municipal 
Tuberculosis Sanatorium Vocational Training 
School — these and other measures going far 
toward providing effective control over the 
"white plague." No less noteworthy was his 



effort for the control of venereal diseases. He 
started a municipal venereal disease clinic at 
the Iroquois Memorial Hospital, and five other 
clinics over the city, and introduced and had 
passed by the City Council the first venereal 
disease ordinance passed by any city in the 
United States, specifying such diseases as con- 
tagious and requiring that they be reported 
to the health department. 

As a result of the influenza epidemic he 
organized the* Chicago Training School for 
Home and Public Health Nursing, in which 
more than 11,000 women took the eight-weeks 
training course. This school was financed by 
the "Health Show," held at the Coliseum, and 
he was also a prominent factor in the several 
pageants of progress held in Chicago in suc- 
cessive years. Doctor Robertson inaugurated 
the practice of immunizing Chicago children 
against diphtheria. During his administration 
municipal bath houses were built, the first 
municipal laundry established, a division of 
mental hygiene created, a public health maga- 
zine published, and in many ways new and 
increased powers given to the health depart- 
ment. 

In 1924 Doctor Robertson was appointed by 
Governor Small as a member of the Chicago 
Park Board and was subsequently elected its 
president. He undertook a careful study of 
improvements that would eliminate traffic 
dangers, and inaugurated the West Chicago 
Park Safety Commission, to which he ap- 
pointed more than a hundred prominent citi- 
zens of the West Side. This commission car- 
ried on an intensive educational campaign 
whereby motorists were induced to cooperate 
with the police and other authorities in re- 
ducing traffic hazards. Doctor Robertson in 
1922 served as president of the Chicago Board 
of Education. It was a stormy time in the 
history of the board, but his brief administra- 
tion is marked by the beginning of construc- 
tion of twenty-six new school buildings. 

Even from this brief sketch it must be evi- 
dent that Dr. John Dill Robertson was in the 
best sense of the term a conspicuously useful 
citizen of his community. 

Catharine Waugh McCulloch, lawyer of 
Illinois, was born at Ransomville, New York, 
June 4, 1862. She received the Bachelor of 
Arts and Master of Arts degrees from Rock- 
ford College. In 1886 she was graduated from 
the Law Department of Northwestern Univer- 
sity and was admitted to the bar by the Su- 
preme Court of Illinois. Twelve years later 
she was admitted to practice before the Su- 
preme Court of the United States. Mrs. 
McCulloch practiced law in her home city of 
Rockford until her marriage in 1890 to Frank 
H. McCulloch and since then has been asso- 
ciated with him in the practice of law in Chi- 
cago. Their three sons are lawyers. Their 
home is in Evanston. She was twice elected 
justice of the peace in Evanston. From 1917 



ILLINOIS 



35 



to 1925 she served as Master in Chancery in 
the Superior Court of Cook County. 

Mrs. McCulloch was Democratic nominee 
for presidential elector in 1916. She is a 
member of the Chicago Woman's Club, Con- 
gregational Church, Woman's Democratic 
Prohibition Enforcement League, the League 
of Women Voters, Woman's League for Peace 
and Freedom, and a trustee of Rockford Col- 
lege. 

She was the author of several bills extend- 
ing the rights of Illinois women, among them 
the large suffrage bill of 1913, which had 
gradually gained friends through the twenty 
years she carried it to Springfield. When 
Governor Dunne signed the bill, Illinois thus 
gave more suffrage rights to women than did 
any other state east of the Mississippi. 

John M. Robinson, who became an asso- 
ciate justice of the Supreme Court on the 
14th of January, 1843, did not long survive 
to exercise the duties of his important office, 
his death occurring at Ottawa, the seat of 
the court over which he presided, on the 27th 
of April following. He was born in Scott 
County, Kentucky, in 1794, and emigrated to 
Illinois about 1818, taking up his residence 
in Carmi, White County, where he entered 
upon the practice of the law. Being well 
known as a thorough lawyer, he was 
appointed by the governor as prosecuting at- 
torney for his district. He was a brother of 
James F. Robinson, at one time governor of 
Kentucky. In 1831 he was elected by the state 
Legislature as United States senator, to fill 
the unexpired term of John McLean, deceased, 
his opponent being D. J. Baker, the govern- 
or's choice. In 1834 Judge Robinson was 
reelected for a full term, which expired March 
3, 1841. After his death his remains were 
taken to Carmi for interment. He was a 
man of ability and left his impress upon the 
history of the state. 

Harold L. Ickes, whose name in the politi- 
cal history of the present century primarily 
suggests Rooseveltian principles and ideals, 
has been a Chicago lawyer for a quarter of a 
century and has taken part in many cam- 
paigns for reforms in municipal and state 
government. 

Mr. Ickes was born in Blair County, Penn- 
sylvania, on March 15, 1874, of pre-Revolu- 
tionary stock on both sides of his family. He 
came to Chicago in the summer of 1890. He 
attended the Englewood High School and then 
entered the University of Chicago where he 
took his bachelor's degree in 1897. For sev- 
eral years he was a reporter with Chicago 
newspapers. In 1907 he graduated from the 
University of Chicago School of Law and im- 
mediately engaged in practice. In 1905 he 
managed the mayoralty campaign of John M. 
Harlan. In 1911 he was manager of the cam- 



paign of Charles E. Merriam for mayor. He 
was an enthusiastic supporter and follower of 
Roosevelt during these years and became one 
of the most earnest of the Progressives in the 
campaign of 1912. For two years he was 
chairman of the Progressive County Com- 
mittee of Cook County and was chairman of 
the Illinois Progressive State Committee in 
1914-16, and a member of the Progressive Na- 
tional Committee and National Executive Com- 
mittee in 1915-16. He was a delegate at large 
to the Progressive National Convention in 1916 
and delegate at large to the Republican Na- 
tional Convention in 1920. In 1916 he took a 
place on the National Campaign Executive 
Committee for the Republican party. In 1924 
he was the Illinois manager for Hiram W. 
Johnson for the Republican nomination for 
President. He is a member of the National 
Roosevelt Memorial Association and vice pres- 
ident of the Roosevelt Memorial Association of 
Greater Chicago. 

Mr. Ickes is a member of the board of the 
Chicago Government Planning Association, 
member of the National Conservation Commit- 
tee, and in 1929 became chairman of the Peo- 
ple's Traction League. 

During the World war he was chairman of 
the Illinois State Council of Defense Neigh- 
borhood Committee during 1917 and a portion 
of 1918, and from April, 1918, to January, 
1919, he was engaged in Y. M. C. A. work 
in France with the Thirty-fifth Division. Mr. 
Ickes married in 1911 Anna Wilmarth Thomp- 



Lawson A. Parks was born in North Caro- 
lina, April 15, 1813. He learned the printing- 
trade in his native state, moved West to St. 
Louis in 1833, and in 1836 became one of the 
founders of the Alton Telegraph. He was in 
the Presbyterian ministry for some years, and 
in 1854 resumed his connection with the Tele- 
graph as its editor. He died March 31, 1875. 

William A. Richardson was one of the 
prominent figures in Illinois politics as a con- 
temporary of Douglas and acquired distinction 
in his home district and also in Congress. He 
was born in Kentucky and came to Illinois 
in 1831, living for a time at Shelbyville and 
Rushville. He served as state's attorney for 
the Fifth Judicial Circuit and in 1836 was 
elected to the Legislature from Schuyler 
County, in 1838 was chosen a member of the 
senate, and in 1844 became speaker of the 
Lower House. When the Mexican war broke 
out he raised a company and led it to the 
front, and for gallant conduct at Buena Vista 
was made a lieutenant-colonel. While yet in 
Mexico he was nominated as a candidate for 
Congress and on his return home was selected 
to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resigna- 
tion of Senator Douglas and served in that 
representative body for ten years. In 1856 



36 



ILLINOIS 



he was given the Democratic nomination for 
governor and in 1857 President Buchanan ap- 
pointed him governor of Nebraska. In 1860 
he was returned to Congress from the Quincy 
district and in 1863 was chosen to fill the 
vacancy in the United States Senate caused 
by the death of Judge Douglas. Colonel Rich- 
ardson died December 27, 1875. 

James V. Blaney, Chicago physician, was 
born at Newcastle, Maryland, in 1820, and 
died at Chicago in 1876. He graduated from 
Princeton University at the age of eighteen, 
and at twenty-one from Jefferson Medical Col- 
lege. In 1843 he accepted the chair of chem- 
istry and materia medica in the first faculty 
of Rush Medical College, and that was the 
beginning of his long residence in Chicago. 
In connection with his work at the college 
he carried on a private practice. He was 
editing chief of the Illinois and Indiana Med- 
ical Journal, the first medical periodical pub- 
lished in this section of the West. He was 
one of the founders of the County Medical 
Society and as one of its delegates, in 1850, 
helped in founding the Illinois State Medical 
Society, of which he was later president. Dur- 
ing the Civil war he was medical director and 
medical inspector at Fortress Monroe, and in 
1864 was made medical purveyor with large 
responsibilities at Chicago, a service which 
gained him the rank of lieutenant-colonel. He 
succeeded Daniel Brainard as president of 
Rush Medical College. He was an active mem- 
ber of the Chicago Historical Society. 

Joseph Medill was of Scotch-Irish descent, 
born in St. Johns, New Brunswick in 1823. He 
was educated for law which he entered in 
1846, but in 1849 he entered the newspaper 
business. He was a Whig and later a free 
soiler. He came to Chicago and purchased 
an interest in the Chicago Tribune and 
was editor-in-chief of the Tribune dur- 
ing the war and warmly supported President 
Lincoln. 

Mr. Medill discovered the need of better 
facilities for news gathering, and it was upon 
his initiative that a meeting of newspaper 
men was held in Louisville, Kentucky, Novem- 
ber 22, 1865, where they organized the West- 
ern Associated Press. Mr. Horace White, 
managing editor of the Chicago Tribune, was 
a member of the executive committee. Mr. 
Medill helped to organize the Republican 
party and was a constant friend of Abraham 
Lincoln. Mr. Medill through the influence of 
the Tribune urged the issuing of the emanci- 
pation proclamation. He was selected as a 
delegate from Cook to the Constitutional Con- 
vention of 1870 where he brought forward 
and championed the principle of minority 
representation. His friends wished to honor 
him by electing him the president of the con- 
vention but he declined. For the last twenty- 



five years of his life he was the editor-in- 
chief of the Tribune. A school for the teach- 
ing of journalism at Chicago University was 
named for Mr. Medill the "Medill School of 
Journalism." Mr. Medill died in 1899. 

Louis H. Sullivan was a Chicago architect 
whose work was accorded the highest distinc- 
tion by discriminating critics. He was a mas- 
ter of the intricate problems involved in com- 
mercial building and also succeeded in working 
out features in mass and line which distin- 
guished Sullivan buildings wherever found. 

He was born in Boston, Massachusetts, Sep- 
tember 3, 1856, and died April 14, 1924. After 
an education in the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology and the School of Fine Arts at 
Paris, he came to Chicago in 1880 and during 
the following fifteen years was associated 
with Daukmar Adler and after that alone. 
Mr. Sullivan was architect for the Trans- 
portation Building at the Columbian Exposi- 
tion of 1893. He was architect for the Audi- 
torium Theater Hotel and office building. 
Much praise has been accorded his architec- 
tural treatment of the retail store of Carson, 
Pirie, Scott & Company. He was also archi- 
tect for the Stock Exchange Building, and of 
many buildings in other cities. 

Daniel Brainard, founder of Rush Medical 
College, was born in Oneida County, New 
York, in 1812. He graduated from Jefferson 
Medical College in 1834, and in the fall of 
1835 arrived in Chicago. He achieved an 
international reputation in his profession, but 
his great ambition was to found a medical 
college worthy of the name in the Middle 
West, and in 1843 his purpose was fulfilled. 
He named the college in honor of his old 
preceptor, Dr. Benjamin Rush of Philadelphia. 
In the first faculty of the college he occupied 
the chair of professor of anatomy and sur- 
gery. Doctor Brainard died of cholera in 
Chicago, October 10, 1866, at the early age of 
fifty-six. 

Cyrus Hall McCormick was born at Wal- 
nut Grove, Virginia, February 15, 1809, and 
died in Chicago May 13, 1884. He was edu- 
cated at common schools, worked on his 
father's farm and worked up, and at the age 
of twenty-one invented two ploughs. The date 
of his chief invention is 1831, when with his 
own hands he built the first practical reaping 
machine ever made. His father had tried to 
construct a reaper as early as 1816, and the 
son, working on a different line, finally real- 
ized his successful solution. He patented his 
reaper in 1834, and in 1847 moved to Chicago, 
where he built large works for the construc- 
tion of his invention. Numerous prizes and 
medals were awarded for his reaper, and in 
that connection, in 1878, the French Expo- 
sition gave him the rank of Officer of the 




*'* w "" 




,,v.*-, ..;^ ? :5>v i -«*y;. ;F .,.; : 



ILLINOIS 



37 



Legion of Honor. One of his early business 
partners at Chicago was William B. Ogden. 
William H. Seward once said: "Owing to 
Mr. McCormick's invention the line of civili- 
zation moves westward thirty miles a year." 
Cyrus H. McCormick, during the '60s, ac- 
quired the ownership of the old Chicago Times- 
Herald. In 1859 he gave $100,000 to found 
the Presbyterian Seminary of the Northwest in 
Chicago, later known as the McCormick Theo- 
logical Seminary and now known as the Pres- 
byterian Theological Seminary. 

Walter L. Newberry was born in Connecti- 
cut, September 18, 1804, and in 1828 removed 
to Detroit, and in 1833 settled in the Village 
of Chicago. He was one of the early mer- 
chants there, later took up banking, and his 
name is closely identified with the commer- 
cial history of the city up to about the time 
of the Civil war. He was for several terms 
president of the board of education, and for 
six years president of the Chicago Historical 
Society. His name was closely associated with 
many of the earliest aspirations of Chicago 
for art, education, sanitation and civic enlight- 
enment. He was one of the first board of 
trustees of the old Merchants Loan & Trust 
Company. A large part of his work con- 
sisted in judicious investments in real estate, 
and when he died, November 6, 1868, he left 
half of the estate for the purpose of founding 
a reference library. Nearly twenty years 
later, in 1887, the library was opened, and in 
1893 the first unit of the great Newberry 
Library, on the North Side, was completed. 
This is one of the great reference libraries of 
the country, and in some departments is 
unsurpassed. 

Eugene J. Buffington has been a prominent 
figure in the iron and steel industry for almost 
half a century and in many respects has been 
the leading executive in building up the great 
industrial concentration around the Lake Mich- 
igan shore from Chicago to Michigan City, 
Indiana. 

Mr. Buffington was born in West Virginia 
March 14, 1863. He acquired a liberal and 
technical education, attending the Chickering 
Institute at Cincinnati, and Vanderbilt Uni- 
versity at Nashville. In 1884, after leaving 
college, he was made treasurer of the Amer- 
ican Wire & Nail Company at Anderson, In- 
diana. In the process of the consolidation and 
merger of the many independent iron and steel 
works, Mr. Buffington in 1898 was made secre- 
tary and treasurer of the American Steel & 
Wire Company, and in 1899 became president 
of the Illinois Steel Company. He has also 
been president of the Indiana Steel Company 
and the Gary Land Company, a director of the 
U. S. Steel Corporation and many affiliated 
and kindred organizations. 

Mr. Buffington has been a generous contrib- 
utor to the cultural as well as the industrial 



life of the Chicago district. He is a trustee 
of the Community Trust of Chicago, is a trus- 
tee of the Chicago Sunday Evening Club, and 
of Vanderbilt University. His home is in 
Evanston. He retired from the presidency of 
the Illinois Steel Company and of the Indiana 
Steel Company, June 30, 1932. 

Swan Gustus Swanson, one of the honored 
and substantial citizens of Hancock County, 
was loyal, honest and generous in all the rela- 
tions of life and his character was the positive 
expression of a strong and noble nature. He 
held firmly to the idea that anything worth 
doing was worth doing well, and he exempli- 
fied this principle in his work, in his home 
and in his public service. He made of suc- 
cess not an accident but a logical result, and 
his personal advancement and prosperity were 
worthily won. He was always ready to use 
his influence and to cooperate in the support 
of movements tending to advance the public 
welfare, so that he ever commanded the fullest 
measure of public confidence and good will. 

He was born November 3, 1845, near Walde- 
marsvik, Trysarum, Sweden. He reached New 
York City July 3, 1869, and Augusta on Au- 
gust 13, 1869. 

He took up farming, specializing in fine 
driving horses for the eastern markets. When 
this became unprofitable, during the depres- 
sion of 1893, he turned to other branches of 
farming and by hard work and good manage- 
ment placed himself in the ranks of tihe 
extensive and progressive exponents of farm 
enterprise. 

For many years he was school director and 
road commissioner and was county supervisor 
for two terms, 1910-11 and 1912-13. Though 
ever progressive in his ideas of development 
he always insisted that every dollar of public 
money should be well spent and when he felt 
he was not justified in spending public money 
for a project he paid for it himself. 

He sold his farming interest in 1912 and 
moved to Augusta. 

In 1914 he was appointed by Gov. Edward 
F. Dunne to the Road Congress at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, and there became so interested in 
the hard road movement that he accepted the 
office of mayor of Augusta in 1927 and again 
in 1929 that he might more effectively assist 
in bringing route 99 through the town and 
secure the viaduct under the C. B. & Q. Rail- 
road. So earnestly did he desire to see a 
viaduct under this dangerous crossing that 
he paid for the right of way on both sides 
of the road, thus fulfilling the requirements 
of the C. B. & Q. officials for the building of 
the viaduct. 

Fraternally he was a Mason, being a mem- 
ber of J. L. Anderson Lodge, A. F. and A. M.; 
Augusta Chapter, R. A. M.; Almoner Com- 
mandery, Knights Templar. In the Scottish 
Rite his affiliation was with the Consistory in 
Quincy and as a Noble of the Mystic Shrine 



38 



ILLINOIS 



he was a member of Mohammed Temple at 
Peoria. He was a member of the Presbyte- 
rian Church of Augusta and of the Republi- 
can party. His death occurred August 4, 
1930. 

At River Falls, Wisconsin, on October 24, 
1874, he was united in marriage with Ann E. 
Hickok, of Augusta Township, Illinois. 

Ann E. Hickok was the daughter of Nelson 
Hickok, son of Amos and Anna (Foote) 
Hickok, who was born at Charlotte, Ver- 
mont, February 18, 1811, and died in Augusta 
Township January 11, 1878, and Amy E. 
Powell, daughter of William and Lucy 
(Newell) Powell, who was born at Madrid, 
New York, May 14, 1812, and died in 
Augusta Township August 11, 1881. Her par- 
ents were married at Carthage, Illinois, Sep- 
tember 10, 1841, each having come from their 
eastern home, her father in 1835 and her 
mother in 1839, by way of the Great Lakes to 
Chicago and then by covered wagon to Me- 
chanicsville, Augusta Township. This town, 
founded in 1835, had a wagonshop, employing 
over forty men, a blacksmith shop, flour mill, 
store, Congregational Church Society and Sun- 
day School, with a good Sunday School 
Library given by Amy Powell's father and a 
school where Amy Powell was the first 
teacher. When the depression following the 
panic of 1837 closed the shops some of the 
families returned to the East. Others moved 
to the surrounding prairie farms. 

The Hickoks moved to the northeast quarter 
of section nine in 1844 and there on the un- 
broken prairie, where the Indians had been 
driven out but twelve years before, began the 
pioneer's struggle to develop by hard work 
and thrift a comfortable home. They were 
following in the footsteps of their ancestors 
who had left their homes in England, Ireland, 
Scotland and Wales to become the first settlers 
of New England. Each generation having 
gone farther west took an active part in the 
civic, social and religious affairs of its com- 
munity in peace and war. Dr. Samuel Hickok, 
William Powell and Nathaniel Newell were 
Revolutionary soldiers. Rev. Abel Newell, 
valedictorian of his class at Yale University 
1751, took an active part in the religious free- 
dom of Connecticut. Other families were the 
Baldwins, Beaches, Blakesleys, Blakemans, 
Harts, Hurlburts, Gridleys, Moores, Nortons, 
Omsteads, Parmlees, Plumbs, Scotts and Sey- 
mours. 

Into the home of these pioneers who had 
taken the long move to the "Illinois Country" 
Ann E. was born July 5, 1847. In 1857 the 
family moved to River Falls, Wisconsin, where 
she attended select school and the River Falls 
Academy. 

In 1865 they returned to the old Illinois 
farm. She taught school, then cared for her 
parents and reared her family in the old home. 
A devoted daughter, wife and mother, she 



gave her life for others and in giving this 
lovely, cultured woman, with high ideals and 
sturdy independence, at all times a true friend, 
delightful companion and good neighbor, ex- 
emplified that to preside over a real home 
which her work and good management had 
helped to make and maintain was woman's 
highest goal. 

She passed to the great beyond August 1, 
1924, at Bay View, Michigan. 

The oldest daughter, Luella Ann Swanson, 
born July 3, 1877, interested in history and 
genealogy, organized the Martha Board Chap- 
ter, Daughters of the American Revolution, 
and through this organization established the 
Augusta Township Public Library. 

Amy Elmira, born October 2, 1880, was a 
graduate of the Western Illinois Teachers Col- 
lege and became a talented artist in china and 
water-color painting. She died August 12, 
1930. 

Minnie Mabel, the youngest daughter, born 
December 4, 1882, is a graduate of the West- 
ern Illinois State Teachers College and the 
University of Chicago and has made a record 
of successful service as a teacher in the pub- 
lic schools. Now, as librarian of the Augusta 
Public Library and secretary of its board, she 
is lovingly and capably directing the reading 
of the young people as well as serving the 
public. 

The Augusta Public Library is one of the 
most active and constantly growing institu- 
tions of the pretty little village of Augusta, 
Illinois. It is a Township Library and has 
gradually built up an exceptionally good ref- 
erence section on a wide range of subjects to 
meet the requirements of young and old, from 
the lowliest needs to those of considerable 
culture — a source of knowledge for the un- 
schooled as well as for the college bred. 

The Library had its inception in, was vir- 
tually founded by the Martha Board Chapter 
of the local Daughters of the American Revo- 
lution Society, under the leadership of Miss 
Luella Swanson. After donating the initial 
fifty dollars and collecting books and equip- 
ment during the summer and autumn, the 
Chapter opened the Library with 708 volumes 
in the Town Hall on December 18, 1915, and 
free to the public. The Chapter continued to 
carry on and enlarge the institution for a year 
and a half, by which time the number of vol- 
umes had increased to 1,038 and other neces- 
sary equipment had been added. 

In April of 1916, the people of Augusta 
Township voted a mill township tax by one of 
the largest majorities of any township propo- 
sition placed before the people. In May, 1917, 
the Library received its first public money 
of which the first portion spent was for refer- 
ence books and this policy of building up its 
reference section has continued to be the pol- 
icy of the Library, hoping to provide a means 



ILLINOIS 



39 



of education for those who otherwise had 
small opportunity. 

In December of 1918, a small room for 
strictly library purposes was rented. Shortly 
thereafter the Library was opened Tuesday, 
Thursday and Saturday afternoons and eve- 
nings and soon outgrew its quarters. In Au- 
gust of 1923 the four small but pleasant rooms 
now occupied by the Library were rented giv- 
ing it a loan room, a reading room, a stock 
room and a children's room with a small his- 
torical corner where old and rare books, pic- 
tures, old deeds and manuscripts, curios and 
anything of historical, educational or general 
interest is being collected. 

Friends of the Library have greatly as- 
sisted the Library by gifts of books, large 
and small, and gifts of money, pictures, rec- 
ords, etc. Mrs. Fredericka King, who is al- 
ways vitally interested in all progressive un- 
dertakings in the community, deeded, in mem- 
ory of her husband, the late Mr. F. M. King, 
a lot in the business section of town for a 
Library site — a most desirable location, as it 
is easily accessible by all of the most active 
centers of communal life of the village and is 
located on the state highway which is the old 
Cannon Ball Route. 

At present, November 3, 1931, the Library 
possesses 10,515 books, of which the greater 
percent are reference books, many of which 
are valuable standard works. There are also 
many pictures, records and pamphlets of 
value. The magazine department receives 
fifty-four art, historical, literary, business, 
story and children's magazines. All past 
magazines are kept on file and are proving 
valuable reference material. The yearly loan 
has passed the 13,000 mark, which places the 
Augusta Public Library above the average of 
libraries in its class of libraries who have less 
than 2,000 population to be served. 

The present library board consists of Mrs. 
M. J. Holt, president, Mr. Glenn Jones, Mrs. 
S. E. McAfee, Mrs. Earl Robison, Miss M. M. 
Swanson and Mrs. Aaron Weinberg. The two 
past presidents were Mr. George Catlin and 
Dr. A. F. Henning. Miss Minnie M. Swanson, 
librarian, and Miss Luella A. Swanson, assist- 
ant librarian, who have been active supporters 
of the Library since it was started, give their 
services that all available funds may be used 
for the enlargement of the Library. Miss 
Ethyl Bacon was the first librarian. 

Louis F. Swift in 1903 succeeded his father 
as president of Swift & Company and until he 
retired in 1932 had an active part in guiding 
the destinies of that great Chicago corporation. 

Mr. Swift is the oldest son of the late Gus- 
tavus F. Swift, founder of Swift & Company, 
who from his arrival in Chicago in 1875 until 
his death in 1903 was one of the city's most 
forceful business men, sterling citizens and 
philanthropists. Gustavus F. Swift repre- 



sented old New England ancestry and was 
born at Sagamore, Massachusetts, in 1839, 
representing the seventh generation in the 
Swift family in New England. The initial cap- 
ital on which the business of Swift & Company 
was developed was twenty dollars given him 
by his father. He used this to buy a heifer 
which he killed and dressed and sold in the 
home neighborhood. He soon had a growing 
business, buying and selling and slaughtering 
hogs and cattle to supply the residents of Cape 
Cod with fresh meat. In 1872 he became mem- 
ber of a Boston firm, acting as its buyer of 
cattle and hogs. This business took him as far 
west as Buffalo, and he soon realized the neces- 
sity of connecting himself with the primary 
market in Chicago. Thus in 1875 he trans- 
ferred the cattle buying department of his 
business to the Chicago Union Stock Yards. 
In 1877 he entered the local meat packing busi- 
ness and about the same time he secured the 
reluctant consent of a railroad company to 
operate refrigerator cars which Mr. Swift had 
built. Only ten of these cars were built and 
put into initial use, but during the next quar- 
ter of a century such cars, bearing the name 
of Swift & Company, grew into the thousands. 
Soon after coming to Chicago, Gustavus F. 
Swift brought his brother Edwin C. Swift into 
partnership, under the style of Swift Broth- 
ers, and in 1885 the business was incorporated 
as Swift & Company. 

Gustavus F. Swift was one of the original 
subscribers to the fund for the founding of 
the University of Chicago, and in after years 
the Swift family have been one of the largest 
contributors to the growing work of that in- 
stitution. The benefactions of the Swift fam- 
ily to Chicago's education, religion and char- 
ity might be continued indefinitely. 

Louis F. Swift, oldest son of Gustavus F. 
and Annie Maria (Higgins) Swift, was born 
at Sagamore, Massachusetts, September 27, 
1861, and from early boyhood was educated 
and trained with a view to entering the busi- 
ness of his father. On his father's death in 
1903, he became president of Swift & Com- 
pany. He held that office until 1931, and for 
another year was chairman of the board. Mr. 
Louis F. Swift married Ida May Butler. 

John Henry Wigmore, Dean Emeritus of 
the faculty of the Northwestern University 
Law School, has for many years been regarded 
both at home and abroad as one of the fore- 
most authorities on jurisprudence. He has 
achieved great eminence as a teacher, author 
and editor. 

He was born in San Francisco, California, 
March 4, 1863. He completed the classical 
course at Harvard University in 1883, and four 
years later was graduated with the degrees of 
Master of Arts and Bachelor of Laws. Sev- 
eral institutions have since bestowed upon him 
the honorary degree Doctor of Laws. He be- 



40 



ILLINOIS 



gan the practice of law in Boston, for a time 
was professor of Anglo-American Law in Keio 
University at Tokyo, Japan. In 1893 he was 
made professor of law in the faculty of North- 
western University Law School. He served as 
dean of the faculty from 1901 to 1929. 

Doctor Wigmore was president of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Criminal Law and Crimin- 
ology in 1909-10, and in 1916 president of the 
American Association of University Profes- 
sors. In August, 1916, he was commissioned 
a member of the staff of the judge advocate 
general's department with the rank of major, 
and in June, 1918, promoted to colonel and was 
awarded the distinguished service medal. He 
was a member of the United States section of 
the Inter-American High Commission from 
1915 to 1919. From 1908 to 1924 he was a 
member of the Illinois Commission on Uniform 
State Laws. 

Some of the fruits of his many years of 
study and research are the following works: 
Digest of the Decisions of the Massachusetts 
Railroad Commission, 1888; The Australian 
Ballot System, 1889; Notes on Land Tenure 
and Local Institutions in Old Japan, 1890; 
Materials for Study of Private Law in Old 
Japan, 1892; Treatise on Evidence, four vol- 
umes, 1904-05; Pocket Code of Evidence, 1909; 
Principals of Judicial Proof, 1913, and has also 
been editor of numerous standard works found 
in law libraries. 

Adam W. Snyder was an early comer to 
Illinois. He was a protege of Jesse B. 
Thomas, and through Mr. Thomas he became 
a lawyer. Earlier he was a wool curler, or 
roll-maker, in a fulling mill in Cahokia, as 
early as 1817. Was a member of the Legis- 
lature, and enlisted in the Black Hawk war, 
serving first as adjutant of the First Regi- 
ment and later as captain in Colonel Fry's 
regiment. Captain Snyder fought a battle in 
the vicinity of Kellogg's Grove. After the 
war he was elected to Congress. He was the 
democratic candidate for governor but died 
before the election and Judge Ford was put 
upon the ticket and was elected. 

Edward E. Ayer, Chicago business man, 
benefactor of the world of arts, anthropology 
and science, was born at Kenosha, Wisconsin, 
November 16, 1841. His father, descended 
from the old New England family of Ayer, 
went to what is now Kenosha in 1836, and in 
1856 acquired land in McHenry. County, Illi- 
nois, and laid out and founded the town of 
Harvard. 

Edward E. Ayer in 1860 crossed the plains 
to the mining districts of Nevada, and to San 
Francisco, and in the summer of 1861 enlisted 
in the northern army in California, being the 
first man sworn in on the Pacific Coast as a 
member of Company E, First California Cal- 



vary. He was in campaigns in the Southwest, 
among the Navajo Indians of California and 
other tribes, and was finally promoted to sec- 
ond lieutenant of the First New Mexico Vol- 
unteer Infantry. He resigned his commission 
at Fort Craig, New Mexico, in May, 1864. On 
returning north he became a partner in his 
father's store at Harvard, but soon engaged in 
contracting, particularly in the supplying of 
ties and other timber to railroads. This de- 
veloped into the chief business of his active 
career. He became widely known as a railroad 
contractor and in 1894 joined in the founding 
of the notable business known as the Ayer & 
Lord Tie Company of Chicago, probably the 
largest concern of its kind in the country. In 
1900 he retired from active responsibilities, 
though he remained a director in the Ayer & 
Lord Tie Company. 

Mr. Ayer's early experience with the wild 
Indians of the West developed a study and in- 
terest in the American Aborigines. About 
1880 he began the systematic collection of ar- 
ticles characteristic of the arts of the wild 
tribes. The Ayer collection has long been one 
of the most notable features of the exhibits 
in the Field Museum of Chicago. He also 
gathered probably the most extensive library 
of works on the American Indian, which he 
donated to the Newberry Library. Mr. Ayer 
served as president of the Field Columbian 
Museum from 1893 to 1898, and after that as 
one of its directors. For many years he was 
also a director of the Newberry Library, of the 
Chicago Art Institute, a life member of the 
American Historical Association. He married 
September 5, 1865, Miss Emma Burbank. 

Julia C. Lathrop. When in 1912 Congress 
provided for the creation of a Children's Bu- 
reau, which in the following year became a 
bureau in the Department of Labor, in filling 
the post of chief of the bureau President Taft 
conferred a worthy honor upon a distinguished 
humanitarian and social worker of Illinois, 
Julia C. Lathrop. 

Miss Lathrop, who died April 15, 1932, was 
born at Rockford, Illinois, in 1858. She was a 
contemporary and for many years a close asso- 
ciate of Jane Addams. Miss Lathrop like Miss 
Addams attended Rockford College. In 1880 
she graduated from Vassar College. In 1893 
Miss Lathrop was made a member of the Illi- 
nois State Board of Charities, and served on 
that body altogether for twelve years. From 
1899 much of her time except while in Wash- 
ington was spent as a volunteer resident at 
Hull House in Chicago. Miss Lathrop made a 
special study of the care of the insane, and 
was in many ways the outstanding authority 
on children's welfare and on the subject of 
laws providing for the care of juvenile delin- 
quents. She was the author of many reports 
and articles on these subjects. 










V 



ILLINOIS 



41 



Vincent Bendix, one of the men who have 
contributed in large measure to the advance- 
ment of automotive technique in recent years, 
is both a native of Illinois and during the 
greater part of his active business career has 
been a resident of Chicago. 

He was born at Moline, in 1881. His father 
was a minister of the Gospel. Vincent ran 
away from home when sixteen years of age, 
and went to New York City, where he first 
took up railroad work. He was fascinated 
by the automobile as soon as it became popu- 
lar, and for years he studied and experimented 
in the effort to solve one of the most difficult 
problems in the way of making the automobile 
capable of universal use. This was the prob- 
lem of the electric self starter. The name 
Bendix is almost a common noun in the de- 
scriptive catalogues of automobile accessories. 

Mr. Bendix is president and manager of 
the Bendix Corporation and of the Bendix 
Brake Company, manufacturers of starters 
and brakes for automobiles, and is also presi- 
dent of the Bendix Aviation Corporation. 

William J. Tuohy represents the third gen- 
eration of a pioneer Chicago family. The 
Tuohy's came from Ireland more than eighty 
years ago, and members of the family in its 
different branches have had many prominent 
relations with the city. Mr. William J. Tuohy 
is a former assistant corporation counsel of 
Chicago and is now engaged in private prac- 
tice. 

He was born at Bloomington, Illinois, March 
23, 1897. His grandparents were natives of 
County Limerick, Ireland, and settled in Chi- 
cago about 1848. Mr. Tuohy's parents were 
Daniel S. and Julia (Marshall) Tuohy. His 
father was born in old Saint Patrick's Parish 
in Chicago, in 1857. During the '80s he moved 
his family from Chicago to Bloomington. Wil- 
liam J. Tuohy grew up at Bloomington, at- 
tended public and parochial schools there, and 
in 1918 Columbia College of Dubuque, Iowa, 
awarded him the A. B. degree. Before he 
had formally graduated he left school to enlist 
for service in the World war. He was a private 
in the infantry in the Eighty-eighth Division, 
receiving his training at Camp Dodge, Iowa. 

Mr. Tuohy after his army service applied 
himself to the study of law. He attended the 
law department of the University of Chicago, 
and later the law department of Illinois Wes- 
leyan University. The training which he has 
regarded as of the highest practical value to 
him in his career was that acquired in the 
offices of the venerable Joseph Fifer of Bloom- 
ington, one of Illinois' most distinguished citi- 
zens, former governor, and for over half a 
century a great lawyer. Mr. Tuohy was an 
associate in the offices of Governor Fifer for 
three years, from 1922 to 1925. 

Mr. Tuohy came to Chicago in 1925 and 
has made rapid progress to success in the city 
where his family were pioneers. He served as 



assistant corporation counsel from 1925 to 
1927. In that office he had charge of matters 
relating especially to public utilities. This 
has been the branch of the law in which he 
has specialized. He is now associated with 
Mr. Patrick J. Lucey, former attorney general 
of Illinois, with offices at 10 South LaSalle 
Street. 

Mr. Tuohy is a resident of Rogers Park. He 
is active in the civic life of his community 
and is one of the Democratic party leaders in 
the Forty-ninth Ward. He is a member of 
the American Legion. His home is at 1100 Co- 
lumbia Avenue. Mr. Tuohy married Miss 
Helen O'Connor, of Bloomington. They have 
two children, Alice Clare and Patrick. 

Mildred Jeffress Bunn, of 1660 Leland 
Avenue, Springfield, has the heavy business 
responsibility of looking after the estate of 
her late husband, Jacob Bunn, who passed 
away May 10, 1926. He had for many years 
been one of the most active and wealthiest 
business men of Springfield. 

He was a son of Jacob Bunn, Sr., who was 
born in New Jersey, in 1814, and came to 
Springfield in 1836. In 1840 he set up in 
business as a grocery merchant, and at an 
early date became a stockholder in the Spring- 
field Watch Company. In 1879 that business 
was reorganized as the Illinois Watch Com- 
pany, and he was its president until his death 
in 1897. He was also president of the Marine 
Bank of Springfield. Jacob Bunn, Sr., married 
in 1851 Elizabeth Ferguson, a native of Penn- 
sylvania. 

Jacob Bunn, Jr., was one of a family of 
seven children and was born October 21, 1864, 
at Springfield and passed away May 10, 1926. 
He was president of the Illinois Watch Com- 
pany and was a leader in politics and public 
affairs. He was also president of the Marine 
Bank and the Sangamon Electric Company. 
He attended the National Republican Conven- 
tion at Cleveland in 1924. He had been lib- 
erally educated, and was a man of thorough 
culture and gave liberally to many civic and 
charitable undertakings. During his lifetime 
he built the beautiful home at 1660 Leland 
Avenue and he and his family have occupied 
it from 1917. 

Mildred Jeffress Bunn was born at Edwards- 
ville, a daughter of Edward Jordan and Mel- 
vina (Dugger) Jeffress. Her father was a 
native of Virginia and her mother of Illinois, 
and they were married at Edwardsville. Her 
father died in 1924 and her mother in 1915, 
Mrs. Bunn being the youngest of five children. 
Her father was a farmer and grain dealer, 
being one of the extensive land owners in 
Madison County, Illinois. He was a member 
of the Christian Church and a Prohibitionist 
in politics. 

Mr. and Mrs. Bunn were married October 
25, 1913. She has three children. Jacob, born 
September 9, 1914, and Henry, born August 



42 



ILLINOIS 



28, 1916, both attended the Choate School at 
Wallingford, Connecticut. Jacob is now in 
the Valley Ranch School at Cody, Wyoming, 
and Henry is at the Lawrenceville Preparatory 
School at Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Mildred 
was born April 6, 1924. Mrs. Bunn is a direc- 
tor of the Sangamon Electric Company. 

Lucius Teter, who was president of the Chi- 
cago Association of Commerce in 1918, has 
been a Chicago banker for forty years. He 
was born in Bowling Green, Indiana, Septem- 
ber 23, 1873, and was nineteen years old when 
in 1893 he entered the employ of the Conti- 
nental National Bank of Chicago. In 1902 he 
was one of the men who organized the Chicago 
Trust Company, of which he was cashier, vice 
president, president and chairman of the board 
during the following thirty years. Mr. Teter 
is chairman of the board of Baird and Warner 
Corporation. 

In 1907 he was president of the savings bank 
section of the American Bankers Association, 
and in 1920 president of the Trust Company's 
section. He has been president of the Eco- 
nomic Club of Chicago, of the Chicago Athletic 
Club, and for many years was president of the 
Infant Welfare Society of Chicago. He mar- 
ried in 1900 Clara Hahn Lodor. 

Clifford W. Barnes, founder and president 
of the Chicago Evening Club, is a man whose 
name would be readily connected by hundreds 
of thousands of citizens throughout the Mid- 
dle West with that organization. However, 
in Chicago, where he has lived for forty 
years, his service record embraces a score 
or more of worthy activities in the fields of 
religion, education, social work and business. 

He was born at Corry, Pennsylvania, Oc- 
tober 8, 1864, took the Bachelor's degree at 
Yale University in 1889 and the Bachelor's 
degree in Divinity in 1892. During the first 
year he was in Chicago he took work at the 
University of Chicago and gained the Mas- 
ter's degree in 1893. Mr. Barnes was a resi- 
dent worker in the Hull House Social Settle- 
ment and from 1894 to 1897 was pastor of a 
Chicago church. During 1898-99 he was di- 
rector of the Student Christian Movement at 
Paris, France," and at the same time acting 
president of the American Art Association 
in Paris. He was instructor in sociology and 
director of the university settlement work at 
the University of Chicago in 1899-1900. From 
1900 to 1905 Mr. Barnes was president of Illi- 
nois College at Jacksonville, one of the old- 
est institutions of higher learning in the Mis- 
sissippi Valley. He left there to become gen- 
eral secretary of the Religious Education As- 
sociation of America, and during 1906-07 was 
in Europe as a special commissioner to in- 
vestigate moral and religious training in 
schools. In 1907 he became honorary secre- 
tary and chairman of the executive committee 



of the international committee on moral train- 
ing. Mr. Barnes founded the Chicago Sunday 
Evening Club in 1908. 

His name has been closely associated with 
organizations for better government as well 
as moral reform. He served as chairman of 
the executive committee of the Legislative 
Voters League from 1907 to 1924, and dur- 
ing most of that time was its president. In 
1908 he founded and became president of the 
Committee of Fifteen. Since 1915 he has been 
chairman of the Chicago Community Trust, 
is a former president of the Chicago Church 
Federation, former vice president of the Chi- 
cago Association of Commerce, in 1931 was 
made vice president of the executive and budg- 
et committee of the Joint Emergency Relief 
Fund of Cook County. Mr. Barnes is honored 
both at home and abroad, and several foreign 
governments have given him orders and 
decorations. 

Frederick A. Stock, conductor of the Chi- 
cago Symphony Orchestra, has been identified 
with that organization continuously since 1895. 
Doctor Stock was born at Julich, Germany, 
November 11, 1872, and acquired his early mu- 
sical education at Cologne. When he came to 
Chicago in 1895 he entered the ranks of the 
Chicago Orchestra as a viola player. Theodore 
Thomas, the conductor, did much to encourage 
his evident genius, and for several years he 
was assistant conductor under Mr. Thomas. 
On the death of that renouned musician in 
1905, Mr. Stock was chosen as director of the 
Theodore Thomas Orchestra, which subse- 
quently became the Chicago Symphony Or- 
chestra. 

Doctor Stock has composed many major and 
minor works for symphony orchestras and 
other compositions. Doctor Stock has been 
chosen as the general supervisor and director 
of orchestral music for the Chicago Century 
of Progress Exposition. 

Edward A. Cudahy was born at Milwaukee, 
Wisconsin, on February 1, 1860, the youngest 
of five sons of Patrick and Elizabeth Shaw 
Cudahy, natives of Ireland, who settled in 
Milwaukee in 1842. At the age of thirteen 
Edward left school and began his packing 
career with the John Plankinton Company, 
one of the earlier firms of that city. After 
four years' service with the Plankinton 
Company he came to Chicago, where he en- 
tered the employ of Armour & Company, in 
which firm his brother Michael was a partner. 

After ten years' service in the Armour 
Chicago plant Edward Cudahy in association 
with his brother and Phillip D. Armour or- 
ganized the Armour-Cudahy Packing Com- 
pany at South Omaha, Nebraska, and bought 
the packing house which had been built in that 
city by Thomas Lipton, afterwards interna- 
tionally famous as a yachtsman. Thus, four- 



ILLINOIS 



43 



teen years after beginning his career in the 
packing industry as a boy, Edward Cudahy 
had become a leader of an important unit of 
the packing industry. In 1890 the Cudahys 
bought the Armour interests in the South 
Omaha plant and organized The Cudahy Pack- 
ing Company, with Michael Cudahy as presi- 
dent and Edward A. Cudahy as vice president 
and general manager. 

Mr. Cudahy's biography is written in his 
achievements. Under the inspiration of his 
leadership and that of his brother his com- 
pany developed from a comparatively insigni- 
ficant institution operating one packing house 
and a few distributive branches to one of the 
largest industries of its kind in the world, 
with producing and distributing units through- 
out the United States, foreign connections in 
Central and South America, the West Indies, 
Europe and Australia. 

On the death of his brother Michael in 1910 
Edward Cudahy became president of his com- 
pany and served in that capacity until Janu- 
ary, 1926, when he retired in favor of his son 
Edward A. Cudahy, Jr., to become chairman 
of the board. In 1884 Mr. Cudahy married 
Miss Elizabeth Murphy, of Milwaukee. Be- 
sides their son Edward A. Cudahy, Jr., their 
family consists of four daughters, Helen, Flor- 
ence, Alice and Eugenia. 

As a founder and a guiding spirit of his 
company Mr. Cudahy has achieved a high 
place in the history of American industrial 
and commercial accomplishment. Among the 
members of his own organization, many of 
whom have been in the service of the company 
almost since its inception, he is known for 
his kindly nature, his humanity and his 
loyalty to the men who have worked with him 
in building up the establishment that bears 
his name. 

Edward A. Cudahy, Jr., succeeded his 
father as president of The Cudahy Packing 
Company in January, 1926. The younger 
Cudahy began his career in the packing in- 
dustry as a youth. Under the tutelage of his 
father he received a thorough training in the 
fundamentals of the business. Through actual 
experience he became versed in the intrica- 
cies of live stock buying, the production and 
merchandising of meats and allied commodi- 
ties and in packing industry finance, so that 
when he was called to the presidency of his 
company he was adequately equipped to as- 
sume the responsibilities of that position. 

With E. A. Cudahy, Jr., as president The 
Cudahy Packing Company has continued to de- 
velop and has maintained its place as one of 
the largest establishments of its character. 
Apart from his accomplishments as a business 
executive Mr. Cudahy has distinguished him- 
self in promoting the interests of the com- 
pany's employees. At his personal direction 
numerous welfare plans, including insurance, 
recreation, education, health and employee 



conference boards which deal with the man- 
agement of the company on all points of mu- 
tual interest, have been initiated and main- 
tained to the lasting advantage of all con- 
cerned. 

Notwithstanding his heavy burdens as a 
leader of a great business institution Mr. 
Cudahy, an ardent sportsman, is a close fol- 
lower of boxing and all other forms of ath- 
letics. With his wife, who was Miss Margaret 
Carry, of Chicago, and their three children he 
lives in Lake Forest, Illinois, where with 
other members of the family the younger 
Cudahys hold a prominent place in the social 
life of the city. 

John D. Hertz, founder of the Yellow Cab 
Company, has lived in Chicago since boyhood, 
but was born in what is now Czecho-Slovakia, 
April 10, 1879. At one time Mr. Hertz was 
sporting editor for the old Chicago Record. 
His organizing genius led him to bring order 
out of chaos of the local transportation sys- 
tem, consisting of a motley array of horse- 
drawn vehicles and taxicabs, and in 1915 he 
founded the Yellow Cab Company, which from 
the first emphasized a standard of service and 
equipment which won the patronage of the 
public until the company had thousands of 
their distinctive cabs in operation on the 
streets of Chicago. Then, in 1922, Mr. Hertz 
organized the Chicago Motor Coach Company, 
and in 1924 established the Omnibus Cor- 
poration of America through the merger of 
the Fifth Avenue Coach Company and the 
Chicago Motor Coach Company. He is now 
chairman of the board of the Omnibus Cor- 
poration of America. From the operation of 
a system of taxicabs and motor buses in lead- 
ing cities of the country, he also turned to 
the manufacturing side, effecting a merger 
of the Yellow Cab Manufacturing Company 
and the General Motors Truck Division. 

As a man of wealth and business- prom- 
inence Mr. Hertz has been a generous patron 
of sports. He has helped build up racing in 
and around Chicago, and his own stables at 
his farm have contained some of the fastest 
horses in America. Another diversion of his 
interest has been in the motion picture field. 
He became chairman of the finance committee 
of the Paramount Public Corporation. He is 
a member of many clubs in Chicago and else- 
where. Mr. Hertz married, July 15, 1903, 
Miss Frances Kesner, of Chicago. 

Andrew MacLeish, who was the founder of 
the retail business of Carson, Pirie, Scott & 
Company at Chicago, was born at Glasgow, 
Scotland, June 28, 1838. His parents gave him 
a thorough academic education and at the age 
of seventeen he began his apprenticeship as a 
merchant. In 1857 he arrived in Chicago, 
spending the first six years as an employee and 
in 1864 was made a member of the dry goods 
firm of J. B. Shay & Company. In 1867 he be- 



44 



ILLINOIS 



came associated wth Carson, Pirie, Scott & 
Company, and after founding the retail store 
continued as its active manager for over forty 
years. Mr. MacLeish was vice president of the 
board of trustees of the University of Chicago 
and trustee of the Rush Medical College, and 
of the Chicago Manual Training School. His 
son, Bruce MacLeish, since 1919 has been sec- 
retary of Carson, Pirie, Scott & Company. An- 
other son, Archibald, has won distinction in the 
field of literature, particularly as a poet. 

Herman A. Eisenmayer, postmaster of 
Trenton, represents one of the old and sub- 
stantial families of Southern Illinois. 

He was born at Trenton, February 22, 1880. 
His grandfather, Andrew Eisenmayer, was 
born in Germany. He left the fatherland at 
the age of eighteen, and on arriving in the 
United States worked for a short time on a 
plantation in Louisiana and then came up the 
Mississippi River and settled at Mascoutah, 
Illinois. In order to get a start he worked as 
a teamster and in a mill, and later became 
one of the pioneer millers of Trenton County. 
He also conducted a general grain business. 
Andrew Eisenmayer married Christine Sauter. 

John C. Eisenmayer, father of the Trenton 
postmaster, was born at Mascoutah, Washing- 
ton County, Illinois, and completed his edu- 
cation at McKendree College, where he was 
a schoolmate of Senator Deneen. Later for 
a number of years he was a member of the 
board of trustees of the college. He had his 
early training in the milling business with 
his father and was a dealer in grain and 
for many years an official of the State Na- 
tional Bank, until his death. He was one 
of the organizers of the Trenton Mills and 
one of the outstanding business men of this 
section. He was an active Methodist, served 
as church treasurer and trustee, and was 
treasurer of his school district. John C. Ei- 
senmayer married Gussie Steinmetz, and they 
had a family of five children: C. W. Eisen- 
mayer; Herman A.; Homer C; August; and 
Amelia, wife of James Henry. 

Herman A. Eisenmayer after graduating 
from high school spent two years in McKen- 
dree College at Lebanon. He had two years 
of experience as an electrical worker at Wash- 
ington, D. C, later was in the milling business 
at Springfield, Missouri, and after the death 
of his father he took over the management 
of the farms and other properties. He has 
been prominent in Republican politics, serving 
as state and county committeeman, has been 
president of the Community High School board 
at Trenton, is a member of Trenton Lodge 
No. 109, A. F. and A. M., and the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Eisenmayer married Ina Leonhard, 
daughter of Frank and Elizabeth (Emig) 
Leonhard. Her father was a merchant at 
Trenton. The children in the Leonhard family 



were: Adolph, Lewis, Edwin, Elmer, Kathryn, 
Arnold and Mrs. Eisenmayer. Mr. and Mrs. 
Eisenmayer have two children: Allan L., who 
graduated from high school in 1932; and John 
K., who is in the public schools. 

Judge Mary M. Bartelme, one of Illinois' 
women most distinguished in her profession 
and in the broad realm of social service, is a 
native of Chicago and took her law degree at 
Northwestern University Law School in 1894. 
In her practice she early became interested in 
juvenile cases, and on March 3, 1913, Judge 
Pinckney of the Juvenile Court appointed her 
as his assistant to try the cases of delinquent 
girls. For sixteen years under appointment by 
successive governors she served as public 
guardian of Cook County. On November 6, 
1923, she was elected a judge of the Circuit 
Court and in 1927 was reelected for a term of 
six years. Her judicial assignments have been 
in the juvenile court division. 

George Walter Underwood has been a 
member of the Illinois bar since 1887 and 
has made a long and commendable record 
in his profession at Chicago. He has held a 
number of important public offices, and sup- 
plemented his professional knowledge by ex- 
tensive excursions into the field of general 
literature and culture. 

Mr. Underwood was born at Belleville, St. 
Clair County, Illinois, September 22, 1860, 
and represents an old and prominent family 
of Southern Illinois. His parents were Jos- 
eph Brown and Mary Letitia (McKee) Under- 
wood. His father was also an Illinois lawyer, 
and served as the first mayor of Belleville 
and as a member of the Illinois Legislature. 
Mr. Underwood's uncle, William H. Under- 
wood, was one of the luminaries of the Illinois 
bar during the middle of the past century. 
He served for eight years in the State Senate, 
for six years was circuit judge, was a member 
of the Illinois Constitutional Convention of 
1870, when the present organic law was 
framed, and is also remembered for his anno- 
tations of the Illinois Statutes. 

George Walter Underwood was brought to 
Chicago by his parents in 1867. He was edu- 
cated in the public schools, and spent five 
years of his early manhood with two of Chi- 
cago's old real estate organizations, the E. A. 
Cummings & Company and William Hale 
Thompson, Sr. In 1887 he was admitted to 
the Illinois bar. Subsequently he completed 
his legal training at the Chicago Law School, 
where he took his LL. B. degree in 1901. 
He organized the law firm of Underwood, 
Harding & Manning, and later Underwood, 
Manning & Treacy. After the death of Mr. 
Manning the firm became Underwood, Ste- 
vens & Timm. Mr. Underwood still con- 
tinues in the general practice of the law, with 
offices at 30 North LaSalle Street. Between 




...■;..... ; : : .; ■■:. ....... ..:. . : : .-.:-.:. 



CJb^o4 V\, tO^to^M 



ILLINOIS 



45 



1894 and 1906 he served six years as a police 
justice, under the system of minor courts 
superseded by the Municipal Court system. 
As a police justice some notable cases were 
brought before him, including a case against 
the owners of the Iroquois Theater growing 
out of the fire, on a charge of manslaughter, 
the Muscagni case, and the Brandenburg forg- 
ery case. Mr. Underwood was an assistant 
state's attorney of Cook County from 1908 to 
1910. During that time he had sole charge of 
the indictment department and grand jury. 
He was for several years village attorney for 
the village of Elmwood Park, and success- 
fully withstood an attack upon its charter. 
He is president for 1932 of the Chicago Law 
Institute and is a member of the Chicago 
and Illinois Bar Associations. During the 
World war he was designated at Washington 
by President Wilson and acted as member 
of the Legal Advisory Draft Board Division 
No. 2, at Mosely School in Chicago. He has 
contributed articles on current topics to the 
Hamiltonian, articles on war, death and life 
thereafter to London Light, has been a con- 
tributor to the Chicago Law Bulletin and 
the Chicago Daily News on questions of adop- 
tion of the Municipal Court act, legal prac- 
tice and procedure, and against abolishing the 
grand jury system. 

Mr. Underwood has been a delegate to many 
Republican conventions and for many years 
was a member of the executive committee 
of his home ward organization. He is a 
member of the National Geographic Society, 
the American Society for Practical Research, 
Illinois Historical Society, and is a Knight 
Templar Mason and Shriner. He is one of 
the charter members and a life member of the 
Hamilton Club. He married, February 3, 
1892, May Terhune, of Chicago. Their three 
children were George W., Jr., deceased, Mae 
T., now Mrs. T. Hansen, and William Edward. 

William Penn Nixon, for many years 
associated with the Chicago Inter-Ocean, was 
born in Wayne County, Indiana, March 19, 
1833. He graduated in law from the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania in 1859, practiced at 
Cincinnati for several years, and was business 
manager of the Cincinnati Chronicle from 
1868 to 1872. In 1872 he took the business 
management of the Chicago Inter-Ocean, 
which had only recently been established. His 
associate in journalism in Cincinnati had been 
his brother, Dr. 0. W. Nixon, and Doctor 
Nixon, in 1875, also became interested in the 
Inter-Ocean. The brothers acquired control 
of the property and William P. Nixon was its 
editor-in-chief during the years the Inter- 
Ocean enjoyed a prosperity and influence that 
gave it rank as one of the great newspapers 
of the country. William P. Nixon was at one 
time president of the Lincoln Park Board, and 
served two terms as collector of court of 
Chicago. 



Col. Edward Norris Wentworth. In Chi- 
cago's famous Stock Yards, and, indeed, in 
live stock circles throughout the country, no 
man is more highly esteemed for knowledge 
of his calling, integrity in his dealings and 
all-around good citizenship than Col. Edward 
Norris Wentworth, director of the Live Stock 
Bureau of Armour & Company. 

Born at Dover, New Hampshire, January 
11, 1887, a son of Elmer Marston and Eliza- 
beth Tilton (Towne) Wentworth, he is a mem- 
ber of the famous Wentworth family whose 
name is inseparably linked with the history 
of Chicago through John Wentworth. The 
latter, a native of Sandwich, New Hampshire, 
came to Chicago in 1836 as a young Dart- 
mouth College graduate, and entered upon a 
career as editor, Congressman and mayor that 
stands out as one of the most distinguished 
and eventful ones in the annals of the city. 

John Wentworth was descended from Eze- 
kiel Wentworth, while Col. Edward N. Went- 
worth is descended from Ephraim Wentworth, 
a brother of Ezekiel, these brothers being the 
sons of Elder William Wentworth, who was 
the founder of the family in America. Elder 
William Wentworth was born in England and 
came to America some time during the 1620s, 
settling first in Massachusetts, where there 
is a record of his having received deeds to 
Indian lands in 1629. The Wentworth clan 
was powerful in England as far back as 1066, 
and in this country members of the family 
were prominent in Colonial and Revolutionary 
history. One of the early ancestors, John 
Wentworth, represented the British Crown as 
lieutenant-governor of Massachusetts and as 
governor of New Hampshire. His son, Ben- 
ning Wentworth, for whom the City of Ben- 
nington, Vermont, was named, was Royal gov- 
ernor of New Hampshire from 1740 to 1767, 
and donated the 500 acres of land, upon which 
Dartmouth College was originally built. Sir 
John Wentworth, a nephew of the John Went- 
worth mentioned above, was graduated from 
Harvard University in 1755 and later was 
made Crown Governor of New Hampshire to 
succeed Benning Wentworth. He provided one 
of the endowment funds for Dartmouth Col- 
lege, and, remaining a Royalist, during the 
War of the Revolution was appointed governor 
of Nova Scotia. However, the Wentworths 
who joined the patriot cause during the Revo- 
lutionary days were numerous, and Colonel 
Wentworth of this review had five paternal 
ancestors in the war as soldiers, while on the 
maternal side, the Townes, there were six. 
Many of both of these families also fought 
bravely in the earlier Colonial wars. 

The father of Colonel Wentworth, Elmer 
Marston Wentworth, came to the West from 
New Hampshire with his family and located 
temporarily at Chicago in 1893, the year of 
the Columbian Exposition, better known as 
the World's Fair. He had a home at 6815 
Calumet Avenue, on what was then mostly 



46 



ILLINOIS 



prairie land. He was traffic representative 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad, and his busi- 
ness connection in this direction caused him 
to move in 1894 to Iowa, where his first home 
was at Marshalltown. About two and one-half 
years later he took his family to State Center, 
where he established a dairy herd and became 
one of the leading citizens and business men 
of his community. He served as president 
of the Iowa Live Stock Breeders' Association 
and of the Iowa State Fair. For many years 
he was a prominent and influential figure in 
Iowa state politics as a Republican, and was 
an active factor in the movement that caused 
the election of Albert B. Cummins as governor 
and Jonathan Dolliver as United States 
senator. 

Edward Norris Wentworth received his for- 
mal education in the public schools and at 
the Iowa State College of Agriculture and 
Mechanic Arts, from which he was graduated 
with the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
agriculture, followed by the degree of Master 
of Science. After this he had post-graduate 
courses at Cornell and Harvard universities, 
in addition to which he had an extended aca- 
demic career. In 1907 he became assistant 
professor of animal industry in Iowa State 
College, and in 1909 became associate professor 
of the same, a seat which he held until 1913. 
In the latter year he came to Chicago to 
become professor of zootechny in the Chicago 
Veterinary College, remaining until 1914, and 
during this period was also associate editor 
of the Breeders Gazette. In 1914 Colonel 
Wentworth went to the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural College, at Manhattan, Kansas, where 
he was professor of animal breeding until 
1917. 

Volunteering for service in the World war, 
in April, 1917, Colonel Wentworth went to 
Fort Riley, Kansas, where he was commis- 
sioned captain of field artillery, United States 
Army, August 15, 1917, and was assigned 
to the Three Hundred and Forty-first Field 
Artillery, Eighty-ninth Division, September 1. 
He went overseas with this division in May, 

1918. His artillery command, which was 
moved about frequently to different sections 
and with different divisions, was for the major 
portion of his service attached to the One 
Hundred and Sixty-fourth Field Artillery 
Brigade. Colonel Wentworth participated in 
the major engagements of St. Mihiel, and in 
the last phases of the Argonne-Meuse, and 
following the armistice joined the Army of 
Occupation, being transferred, in January, 

1919, to G-5, General Headquarters, and sta- 
tioned at Paris. Subsequently he was made 
military director of the College of Agriculture 
in the American Expeditionary Forces Uni- 
versity at Beaune, France, and for his services 
in this connection was decorated as an Officer 
du Merite Agricole by the French Government. 

Returning to the United States after his 
war service, Colonel Wentworth became con- 



nected with Armour & Company, Chicago, 
and was associated with the Public Relations 
Department of this great firm during 1919 and 
1920, in the latter year being transferred to 
the Bureau of Agricultural Research and 
Economics of the same concern, a capacity 
in which he served until 1923. He was then 
appointed director of Armour's Live Stock 
Bureau, and has served in that relationship 
to the present, in addition to which he has 
been a lecturer in his several specialties at 
the University of Chicago since 1923. 

Colonel Wentworth has continued to take 
a very active part in military affairs. He holds 
the rank of colonel in the Reserve Officers 
Corps, United States Army, in command of 
the Three Hundred and Thirty-first Field 
Artillery, and is past state president of the 
Department of Illinois Reserve Officers Asso- 
ciation of the United States, having also 
served as vice president and director of the 
Chicago Chapter of this organization, as well 
as national councilman for the Sixth Corps 
Area. He is also a prominent figure in the 
Military Order of the World war, of which 
he was one of the early members, and is now 
commander of the Department of the State 
of Illinois in this organization, and junior vice 
commander-in-chief of the national organiza- 
tion of this body. 

Colonel Wentworth is a member of the 
American Clydesdale Horse Breeders Associ- 
ation, of which he is vice president; American 
Farm Economics Association; American Soci- 
ety of Animal Production; American Associ- 
ation for the Advancement of Science; 
National Research Council, in which he is a 
member of the Committee on Animal Breed- 
ing; American Society of Zoologists; Ameri- 
can Society of Naturalists; American Eco- 
nomic Association; American Statistical Asso- 
ciation; American Academy of Political Sci- 
ence; Illinois, Iowa and Kansas Academies 
of Science; and Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion. He belongs also to the Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, Alpha Zeta, Alpha Psi, Sigma Delta 
Chi, and Phi Kappa Psi fraternities, and to 
the following clubs : Union League, University, 
Saddle and Sirloin, Army and Navy, Beach- 
view and Lincolnshire Country, all of Chicago, 
and the Cosmos, of Washington, D. C. Colonel 
Wentworth, in the midst of his many other 
activities, has found time to do considerable 
literary work, being the author of Portrait 
Gallery of the Saddle and Sirloin Club (1920), 
and co-author of Progressive Beef Cattle 
Raising (1920), Progressive Hog Raising 
(1922), Marketing Live Stock and Meats 
(1924), Progressive Sheep Raising (1925) and 
Cattle Breeding (1925). 

On June 14, 1911, Colonel Wentworth mar- 
ried Miss Alma B. McCulla, of St. Ansgar, 
Iowa, and they are the parents of one son: 
Edward Norris, Jr., who is now a student at 
Dartmouth College. The family residence is 
at 5838 Stony Island Avenue. 



ILLINOIS 



47 



Saint Philip Neri Parish. The Very Rev- 
erend Monsignor William J. Kinsella. The 
confines of Saint Philip Neri Parish embrace 
the districts which were formerly known as 
South Shore, Bryn Mawr and Jackson Park 
Highlands. Its territory lies just south of 
Jackson Park and its eastern boundary is 
Lake Michigan. The modern church was dedi- 
cated October 7, 1928, by Cardinal George 
Mundelein, and its present pastor, the Very 
Rev. Monsignor William J. Kinsella, has been 
in charge since the parish was organized. 

Before the coming of Monsignor Kinsella the 
territory now comprised in the parish of Saint 
Philip Neri was known as the "churchless" 
community. There were only a handful of 
residents in Bryn Mawr and few foresaw any 
great future development for the sandy 
stretches largely given over to garden and 
tree nurseries in what is now the South Shore 
District. Today, however, and due in no 
small measure to the influence of Saint Philip 
Neri Church and School and Aquinas High 
School, what were several scattered communi- 
ties have been merged into one compact unit 
which is equally well known as South Shore 
and Saint Philip Neri Parish, which merger 
is commemorated in the beautiful church of 
Saint Philip Neri at the head of Merrill Ave- 
nue on Seventy-second Street. The style of 
architecture is a modern adaption of Tudor 
Gothic, an adaption which is so strikingly 
fitted to the needs and environment of this 
district that it has been familiarly named 
"South Shore Gothic, 1926." 

The close of the International Eucharistic 
Congress held in Chicago in June, 1926, 
marked the beginning of the new Saint Philip 
Neri Church. During the late summer and 
early fall excavations and ground work were 
carried on. The cornerstone was laid Novem- 
ber 7, 1926, by Rt. Rev. Bishop E. F. Hoban, 
and from that date on the structure progressed 
rapidly. On Easter Sunday, 1927, the first 
Mass was celebrated. After having taken care 
of the needs of the congregation, the people 
realized the discomforts of the clergy in their 
old home and in a spirit of good will sub- 
scribed in full sufficient to erect one of the 
most serviceable and at the same time beau- 
tiful rectories in the country. This rectory 
is in a pure college Gothic style, constructed of 
seam-faced Plymouth granite and trimmed in 
sandstone. 

However, the parish had been in existence 
for some years prior to the above development, 
as it was organized on the first Sunday of 
Advent in 1912, under the direction of the 
late Most Rev. James Edward Quigley, Arch- 
bishop of Chicago. Rev. Father William J. 
Kinsella, then pastor of Saint Joseph Church, 
Libertyville, Illinois, was called upon to lay 
the foundations of the newly organized parish. 
In taking up this task Father Kinsella re- 
turned to the scenes of the labors of his early 
ministry. For fourteen years he had been 



assistant pastor at Saint Patrick Church, 
South Chicago. He was born and reared in 
the old Town of Lake, and attended Saint 
Gabriel Grammar School, so therefore he was 
on familiar ground when he returned to the 
South Side of the city. As a result of this 
the pastor of the newly organized parish had 
an exceptional knowledge of and acquaintance 
with his parishioners, an acquaintance not 
only with the families, but often their ante- 
cedents, and this intimate and personal rela- 
tionship of priest and people has been account- 
able in no small way for the wonderful spirit 
that has characterized the parish from the be- 
ginning and which has drawn together in an 
exceptionally well-knit unit, the priests and 
people of Saint Philip Neri Parish. Father 
Kinsella has shown remarkable executive abil- 
ity in handling the affairs of the parish. 
Among other innovations he organized the men 
to take charge of all the finances and business 
affairs, thus leaving the women free to devote 
themselves to the spiritual, educational and 
social phases of the parish, which departure 
has worked out most admirably. 

The foundations of the old church, which ad- 
joins on the west of the new structure, were 
laid in May, 1913, and the first Mass was cele- 
brated Christmas Day of that year. The 
building was formally dedicated April 26, 
1914, the parish then numbering on its roster 
some sixty families. Though there were at 
that time few children of school age, Father 
Kinsella made immediate preparations for 
opening a parochial school, two rooms of which 
were used as a rectory. His judgment was 
soon vindicated, and the school grew so rapidly 
that about five years later it was found neces- 
sary to enlarge the building to make provision 
for sixteen classrooms. This is all the more 
remarkable in view of that fact that a new 
parish, Our Lady of Peace, was organized 
to the south of Saint Philip Neri. 

The Sisters of Saint Dominic of Adrian, 
Michigan, took charge of Saint Philip Neri 
grammar school and also opened Aquinas High 
School for girls. The progress and develop- 
ment of the latter has kept pace with the par- 
ish, and the present fine high school building 
is one of the best in the city. 

The architecture of Saint Philip Neri com- 
mands the admiration of artists as well as of 
the general public, and the credit for its great 
beauty, as well as practicality, is due Father 
Kinsella, who traveled abroad and made an 
exhaustive study of European architecture. As 
is generally recognized the design of a modern 
parochial church calls for beauty, economy and 
practically, an abundance of the latter require- 
ment. Hence, in viewing old monuments, the 
architect must consider his work from all 
angles and choose those features that best suit 
the problem before him. 

In designing the church of Saint Philip 
Neri, while in general the Gothic style was 
followed, the ground floor plan was designed 



48 



ILLINOIS 



around the pew-arrangement. This, of course, 
is the modern surrender to practicality. This, 
with the accoustical treatment, allows that all 
may see and hear. 

In viewing Saint Philip Neri Church, built 
of Plymouth seam face granite with limestone 
trimmings, capable of seating approximately 
1,700 persons, one cannot help but be con- 
fronted with the thought of the unselfish ambi- 
tion of the churchman who sacrifices all per- 
sonal aims to express in a mighty monument 
his devotion to the faith he professes. It is this 
ambition which forms the nucleus with which 
the architect is inspired and from which he de- 
velops the material expression of the church- 
man's idea of glorifying his God. 

The Church of Saint Philip Neri is there- 
fore a temple of religion and a monument to 
the clergyman responsible for its erection. 
Whether or not it is in pure style has not 
greatly exercised the public. From all appear- 
ance they have accepted it as a satisfactory 
and agreeable solution of a comfortable and 
enduring parish church. 

Saint Philip Neri Parish was among the 
first to have a regular boys' choir recruited 
from the boys of the parish. The original 
Saint Philip Neri's surpliced chancel choir 
was formed around the famous old "Paulist 
Choir" which Father Finn so ably directed. 
Horace and Mary Anderson, who had been di- 
rectors for Father Finn, are in charge of the 
choir of Saint Philip Neri, but most of the 
boys in the choir are pupils of Saint Philip 
Neri School and the majority of the men were 
formerly Saint Philip boys. Father Kinsella 
is proud of the talent he has gathered in his 
church, not only on account of the beauty of 
the voices which add to the religious services, 
but also because this organization is a splendid 
means of discipline for the boys and a help in 
maintaining the morale of the school and par- 
ish, and in developing latent possibilities in 
the boys themselves. A boy's conduct in a 
schoolroom determines his standing in the 
choir and the nun who teaches him is the 
judge. A boy who misbehaves in school can 
not sing in the choir no matter what his 
musical qualifications may be. The choir sings 
church music as directed by the "Motu Pro- 
prio." 

Father Kinsella claims that pure Gothic 
would not have been practicable for the needs 
of Saint Philip Neri Church because of its 
costliness, but that Tudor, because of its elas- 
ticity and suppleness lends itself to a variety 
of conditions. He also claims that modernly 
developed Tudor Gothic, or Tudor Gothic 
adapted to modern conditions, is a perfectly 
legitimate style, since God meant all things 
to be subject to the laws of development. This 
is evident in the fruits of nature, in art, in 
personal attainments. Even in religious mat- 
ters, while the Faith itself cannot change, we 
can get greater light on it. Set amid fir trees, 



Saint Philip Neri Church is a fine example of 
medieval ideas applied to modern needs, and 
it seems to offer a welcome to all who draw 
near to its beautiful portals. 

Within the church there is an effect of light, 
of space, of warmth, of which Father Kinsella 
speaks at times as satisfying human nature 
in northern climates through its warmth, 
which is an outstanding characteristic of 
Tudor architecture. 

The first principle in the building of the 
new church was that of service to God, and 
for the people. An attempt, which is emi- 
nently successful, was made to reproduce the 
atmosphere of devotion found in little chapels 
and so often found lacking in large churches. 
The church is cruciform, so that the body or 
the congregation is near the Altar. The stat- 
ues on the church are two of our Lord at the 
front and rear inviting the people to come in; 
that of the Blessed Virgin overlooks the school 
on the west side of the building; while on the 
east is that of Saint Philip Neri, the patron 
of the parish. 

Saint Philip Neri Church has been the reci- 
pient of many very valuable gifts, the first of 
which was a donation of Saint Anthony 
Shrine. Others include the Shrine of the 
Little Flower, donated by some of the ladies 
of the parish; two Sisters, Margaret and Anna 
Mary Ewerts, donated Stations 11 and 12; the 
Stations of the Cross were made by D'Arch- 
ardi of Rome. This artist has been selected 
by both the Holy Father and the Roman gov- 
ernment to restore the Mosaics of Rome. They 
have already received the approbation and 
have been exhibited in Rome by the Italian 
National Art Commission. The furnishings 
for the sanctuary were donated by the Wo- 
man's Club. 

The method of financing the parish has been 
from the first based on the budget system, 
changing in application to suit the times, the 
main principle of which is that the men con- 
secrate themselves and the gifts which have 
made for their success in the world to the 
service of God. The problems are then 
threshed out in the fall of each year. Not 
only is Saint Philip Neri Parish one of the 
flourishing ones of the Catholic Church, but 
it is a powerful force for good in the com- 
munity and a builder of good citizenship and 
noble Christian womanhood and manhood. 

John R. Tanner was born in Warrick 
County, Indiana, April 4, 1844, and died May 
23, 1901, shortly after the close of his term 
as governor. He grew up in the vicinity of 
Carbondale, Illinois, and in 1863 entered the 
Ninety-eighth Illinois Volunteers, serving un- 
til after the end of the war. His father and 
all of his brothers were soldiers. After the 
war John R. Tanner followed farming in Clay 
County, also engaged in the milling and lum- 
ber business, served as sheriff, clerk of the 



ILLINOIS 



49 



Circuit Court, and as a member of the State 
Senate. In 1883 he was appointed United 
States marshal for the Southern district of 
Illinois, serving until 1885. He was elected 
state treasurer in 1886, and in 1891 became a 
i member of the Railroad and Warehouse Com- 
mission. During 1892-93 he was Assistant 
United States Treasurer at Chicago, and in 
1894 managed as chairman the Republican 
state campaign of that year. He was nomi- 
nated for governor in 1896 and elected over 
Governor Altgeld. 

Charles E. Jack, prominently known as a 
lawyer and citizen of Waukegan, is a native 
| of Ohio, but has lived most of his life in this 
Lake County community of Illinois. 

He was born at Mason, Ohio, August 15, 
1893, son of James B. and Anna (Riker) Jack. 
His parents were also natives of Ohio. Both 
his grandfathers were Ohio farmers and both 
gave service to the Union cause during the 
Civil war. James B. Jack is a carpenter and 
is still active at his work, with home at 
i Waukegan. He is a Republican and a member 
of the Christian Church. The grandfathers 
of Charles E. Jack were John R. Jack and 
I N. S. Riker. 

Charles E. Jack was the second in a family 
| of six children. He attended public schools 
in Ohio, completed his high school work in 
' Waukegan, and in 1917 was graduated from 
't the Chicago Kent College of Law. Mr. Jack 
• from 1915 to 1925 was secretary of the Lake 
1 County Title & Trust Company. In 1925 
' he resigned in order to devote his attention 
to his private law practice, which has been 
steadily growing in volume and importance. 
Mr. Jack married in 1923 Lueen Doud, who 
1 was born at Turin, New York, and was edu- 
cated in that state and was before her mar- 
! riage a teacher at Waukegan. They have 
f one son, Charles E., Jr., born in 1927. The 
family are members of the Methodist Epis- 
!| copal Church. Mr. Jack is a York and Scot- 
' tish Rite Mason and Shriner, has been secre- 
i tary of his lodge, and is also affiliated with 
| the B. P. 0. Elks. He enjoys outdoor life, 
his favorite sport being fishing in the waters 
1 of the lakes and streams of Northern Wis- 
I consin and Minnesota. A Republican in poli- 
j tics, Mr. Jack was defeated by a very narrow 
I margin for the office of county judge of Lake 
I County in 1930. For fifteen years he served 
as town clerk of Waukegan. 

Wilbur F. Storey, one of the notable names 
! in the history of Chicago journalism, was 
! born in Vermont, December 19, 1819, and died 
I at Chicago, October 27, 1884. He learned the 
printer's trade as a boy, and at the age of 
| nineteen was part owner of a Democratic 
I paper at LaPorte, Indiana, and was subse- 
quently identified with papers at Mishawaka, 
I in that state, and at Jackson and Detroit, 



Michigan. In January, 1861, he became the 
principal owner of the Chicago Times. This 
was the chief Democratic paper then pub- 
lished in Chicago, and subsequently became 
the recognized mouthpiece of the Anti-War 
party in the Northwest. The Times was sup- 
pressed by military order in June, 1863, but 
the order was revoked by Lincoln. Mr. Storey 
and his newspaper sustained heavy losses dur- 
ing the fire, and in 1872 he resumed the pub- 
lication and continued as its editor until he 
retired. 

Justus Chancellor has practiced law as 
a member of the Chicago bar since 1886. To 
say that he has long been a leader of the 
Chicago bar is only the statement of a com- 
monplace fact well appreciated and understood 
by his fellow attorneys. Mr. Chancellor has 
not only been a successful lawyer but a con- 
structive figure in advancing the standards 
of the bar. 

He was born at Oxford, Indiana, October 
12, 1863, son of John Cooper and Elizabeth 
Jennie (Justus) Chancellor. He graduated 
from high school at Vincennes in 1881, then 
came to Chicago and entered the Union Col- 
lege of Law, now the Law Department of 
Northwestern University. He took his Bache- 
lor's degree there in 1886. In 1923 the Chi- 
cago College of Law conferred upon him the 
degree Master of Laws. Mr. Chancellor for 
forty years, from 1888 to 1928, was a law 
partner of Charles S. Thornton, in the firm 
of Thornton and Chancellor. 

Mr. Chancellor is a past president of the 
Chicago Law Institute. He served as a mem- 
ber of the executive committee of the Ameri- 
can branch of the International Law Asso- 
ciation, served as chairman of the Illinois 
branch of the American Bar Association, is 
a member of the Chicago, Illinois State and 
American Bar Associations and also a mem- 
ber of the International Law Association. 
Since 1921 he has been president of the Law- 
yers Association of Illinois. Among the im- 
portant achievements of this association was 
inaugurating the "Bar Primary" for the se- 
lection and endorsement of candidates for 
judicial offices and the obtaining of the present 
"Lion Law," protecting attorneys in their 
fees. He is a member of the Historical Com- 
mittee of the Illinois State Bar Association. 
Mr. Chancellor is a recognized authority on 
corporation and real estate law, and for a 
number of years he has been active in the 
Chicago Real Estate Board and the Cook 
County Real Estate Board. He is a member 
of the Civil Legion of the United States. 

Mr. Chancellor drew up and perfected the 
legal and corporate plans for organization 
of A. Booth & Company. This was the only 
Chicago "trust" which stood the test of the 
anti-trust prosecutions before which so many 
other corporations such as the Standard Oil 



50 



ILLINOIS 



and the packers were compelled to reorganize. 
The basic principles which had been so care- 
fully worked out by Mr. Chancellor in the 
Booth company enabled it to stand the ordeal 
before all the courts, including the Supreme 
Court. Mr. Chancellor also successfully de- 
fended a prominent case a number of years 
ago in which the state prosecuted Charles R. 
Williams for embezzlement. He also success- 
fully represented the Ayers Estate in a com- 
plicated title litigation. 

Mr. Chancellor is a member of the Chicago 
Association of Commerce, Illinois Chamber of 
Commerce, is a Republican, a Knight Tem- 
plar and Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner. 
His hobbies are farming and motoring. He is 
a member of the Playgoers Club and the 
Pistaqua Heights Country Club. 

He married, May 2, 1889, Hattie Theodocia 
Lincoln Harper, of West Virginia. They have 
two children. Their daughter, Leola, is Mrs. 
Neil H. Gates, and the mother of seven chil- 
dren. Justus Chancellor, Jr., took his Bache- 
lor's degree at Yale University and subse- 
quently obtained the degrees of Civil Engineer 
and Doctor of Jurisprudence at the University 
of Chicago. He is now associated with his 
father in law practice at 6 North Michigan 
Boulevard. Justus Chancellor, Jr., married 
Dorothy Hellar and has five children, one 
of them being Justus Chancellor III. 

Richard S. Folsom was admitted to the 
Illinois bar in 1896 and has been in practice 
in Chicago for over thirty years. On the 
score of his professional associations and the 
prominent positions held by him he has en- 
joyed and deserved a notable place in the Chi- 
cago bar and community. 

Mr. Folsom was born in Chicago, August 5, 
1872, son of Charles Antoine and Sarah T. 
(Sweet) Folsom, his father a native of Maine 
and his mother of Norton, Massachusetts. The 
Folsoms were Colonial Americans and some of 
Mr. Folsom's ancestors participated in the Co- 
lonial wars. His father during the Civil war 
was a captain in the Twenty-fourth Massachu- 
setts Infantry, and soon after the close of the 
war established his home in Chicago. 

Richard S. Folsom came to the bar with a 
liberal education. He attended public schools 
in Chicago, took his freshman year in Colum- 
bia University, and* in 1894 was graduated 
with the A. B. degree from Williams College. 
His law studies were pursued in Northwestern 
University. A few years of work were suffi- 
cient to prove his fitness for his chosen voca- 
tion and he has not only been honored with a 
large and important law business, but has been 
considered an invaluable ally to other eminent 
members of the Chicago bar. Mr. Folsom from 
1910 to 1915 was a member of the law firm 
Louis, Folsom & Streeter, of which the head 
was Senator James Hamilton Lewis. He re- 
sumed his connection with Senator Lewis from 



191.8 to 1924, and then after a brief inter- 
ruption returned to active work with Senator 
Lewis in 1927. 

Mr. Folsom served as master in chancery to 
the Circuit Court from 1911 to 1915, by ap- 
pointment of Judge Edward O. Brown. 
Probably the public service from which he has 
derived the greatest measure of satisfaction 
was in the capacity of general counsel for the 
Chicago Board of Education, from 1912 to 
1915. Those familiar with the record of edu- 
cational affairs in Chicago will recall that this 
was a period notable for the honest and effi- 
cient administration of the school system. 
During the year 1915, by appointment of 
Mayor Thompson, Mr. Folsom was corpora- 
tion counsel for the city. During the World 
war he was chairman of the Legal Advisory 
Board for District No. 2, under the Selective 
Service Act. 

Mr. Folsom is a member of the University 
Club, the Chicago, Illinois State and Ameri- 
can Bar Associations. He is a member of the 
Loyal Legion and the Society of Colonial 
Wars. 

Mr. Folsom married Miss Dorothy E. Moul- 
ton. Her father, Gen. George Mayhew 
Moulton, who died July 24, 1927, was a Chi- 
cago citizen whose memory will long be cher- 
ished. He was conspicuous in the Illinois 
National Guard and held many of the highest 
honors in Masonry. At the time of the Span- 
ish-American war he was colonel in command 
of the Second Illinois Regiment, which served 
in Cuba. The Cuban government in recent 
years has erected a monument to the memory 
of Colonel Moulton and his regiment at Co- 
lumbia Barracks in Havana. Colonel Moulton 
in 1903 was advanced to the rank of brigadier- 
general in the Illinois National Guard, and in 
July, 1907, was made a major-general, serving 
until his retirement in November of the same 
year. He held nearly every office in the 
Masonic fraternity, including that of grand 
master of the Grand Encampment of the 
Knights Templar of the United States of 
America. He was president of the Sons of the 
American Revolution and commander-in-chief 
of the Spanish-American War Veterans. 

Julian M. Sturtevant was born in Litch- 
field, Connecticut, July 26, 1805, and died at 
Jacksonville, Illinois, February 11, 1886. He 
graduated from Yale College in 1826, from 
Yale Divinity School in 1829, and in the same 
year came to Illinois. He superintended the 
erection of buildings and was the first instruc- 
tor of what has since been Illinois College at 
Jacksonville. In 1844 he became president of 
the college and held that office over thirty 
years. He resigned in 1876, but continued a 
member of the faculty for ten years longer. 
Altogether he gave to Illinois College fifty-six 
years of his life, and it is properly regarded as 
a monument to his labors and character. 



ILLINOIS 



51 



Frank Posvic, city attorney and corpora- 
tion counsel for the City of Berwyn, is a 
Chicago man, and for twenty years has carried 
on a successful law practice there, his office 
being at 139 North Clark Street. 

Mr. Posvic was born in Chicago in 1884. 
He was educated in grade and high schools 
and in 1909 graduated from the Chicago Kent 
College of Law with the LL. B. degree. In 
the same year he was admitted to the bar, and 
has gone steadily ahead with his routine and 
special work and practice and has achieved 
recognition as one of the real leaders of the 
bar. Mr. Posvic for a number of years has 
resided in the attractive suburban community 
of Berwyn. He acted as attorney for two 
of the Berwyn banks, and all the legal business 
of the city goes through his hands as city at- 
torney and corporation counsel. During the 
World war he was a member of the Legal 
Advisory Board. 

Mr. Posvic is a thirty-second degree Scot- 
tish Rite Mason and Shriner, being a member 
of Medinah Temple of Chicago. He married 
Miss Irene Chocol, of Chicago, and they have 
one daughter, Dorothy. 

John H. Donovan was a small boy when 
he fixed his resolution and choice of a pro- 
i fession. He determined to be what his father 
i was before him, an earnest, high-minded and 
! successful physician. Doctor Donovan, him- 
! self, was graduated from medical college more 
I than thjrty years ago and the community in 
| which he has practiced his profession through 
all the years since has been Windsor in Shelby 
i County. 

He was born at Cornishville, Kentucky, Sep- 
i tember 14, 1867, son of J. B. and Nancy C. 
i (Driskel) Donovan. His father practiced for 
many years at Cornishville, Kentucky, but in 
1883 moved his home to Lovington, Illinois, 
where he continued his work with ever grow- 
ing popularity and success until his death in 
I 1920. 

John H. Donovan received his first educa- 
cational advantages in Kentucky. He at- 
tended school at Lovington and soon after 
leaving high school entered the Missouri Med- 
ical College at St. Louis, Missouri. He was 
graduated M. D. in 1889 and in the same year 
located at Windsor. The people of Shelby 
County have long learned to look upon him 
as a physician whose skill and devotion are 
out of the ordinary. He is a member of the 
the Shelby County and Illinois State Medical 
Association, votes as a Republican and is affil- 
iated with Windsor Lodge No. 322 of the 
Masonic fraternity. 

Doctor Donovan married, December 21, 
1890, Miss Mary C. Guinee, of Tower Hill, 
Illinois. Her parents, Mikael and Mary 
Guinee, came from Ireland to the United States 
in 1856, and her father was an Illinois farmer. 
Doctor Donovan has one son, Howard, born 



November 12, 1895, who has made a name 
for himself in the American consular service. 
Howard Donovan was educated in public 
schools in Illinois, and in 1917 graduated with 
the highest honors and as gold medalist from 
the Missouri Military Academy. He had also 
attended the Smith Academy in St. Louis and 
has to his credit a year and a half of work 
in the medical department of Washington Uni- 
versity at St. Louis. In 1920 he took his 
Bachelor of Science degree at Yale University, 
where he completed four years' work in three. 
On graduating he was appointed to a position 
in the consular service of the American Gov- 
ernment at London, where he remained two 
years. In 1922 he was sent as consul to 
South America. After four years he returned 
home, but in 1928 was appointed American 
consul at Kobe, Japan, where his attainments 
and brilliant work have attracted favorable 
commendation. He has a promising diplomatic 
career before him. 

Capt. Henry A. Blair has come to well de- 
served prominence in Chicago affairs, both as 
a lawyer and an executive. He is vice presi- 
dent and chief counsel for the Motorists Asso- 
ciation of Illinois. 

Captain Blair was born in New York City. 
As a boy he attended public schools there, is 
a graduate of the Washington Irving High 
School of that city, and in 1912 came to Chi- 
cago. Here he studied law in the Hamilton 
College of Law, was graduated LL. B. in 1915 
and admitted to the Illinois bar the same 
year. 

The next year he entered the claim de- 
partment of the Yellow Cab Company. In 
fifteen years of active professional experi- 
ence he has come to be recognized as an 
expert authority on automobile litigation. He 
left the Yellow Cab Company's service early 
in 1917 and after attending the Officers Train- 
ing Camp at Fort Sheridan was commissioned 
a second lieutenant of infantry. He was as- 
signed duty with the Three Hundred and Fif- 
tieth Infantry, Eighty-eighth Division, was 
with that division at Camp Dodge, Iowa, was 
promoted to first lieutenant, went overseas, 
and on October 31, 1918, was promoted to 
captain of infantry by special order of Gen. 
John J. Pershing. Captain Blair was in 
France a year, and after being released from 
military duty resumed his connection with the 
Yellow Cab Company. 

In 1921 Captain Blair took charge of the 
legal department and claims department of 
the American Automobile Insurance Company 
at Chicago. Two years later he took charge 
of the legal department of the Illinois Auto- 
mobile Club, which later became the Motorists 
Association of Illinois, of which he is now 
vice president and chief counsel. The chief 
service of the Association is the protection 
of its members through insurance and expert 



UBRART 



52 



ILLINOIS 



handling of claims for damages, and Captain 
Blair has developed a staff and an organization 
which gives this Association an enviable stand- 
ing among similar organizations throughout 
the country. 

Captain Blair is a member of the American 
Legion, helped organize the Motorists Post, 
of which he was elected judge advocate, is a 
member of the Beachview Club and of a num- 
ber of fraternities. 

Arthur B. Storm is a physician and surgeon 
whose kindly manner and capable skill have 
brought him a place of special honor in the 
community of Windsor, Shelby County, where 
he has practiced his profession for a third of 
a century. 

The Storm family were among the pioneers 
of Shelby County. Doctor Storm is a descend- 
ant of Peter Storm, who came from Germany 
and was a soldier in the Revolutionary army 
during the war for indepenence. One of the 
sons of this Revolutionary soldier came from 
Crab Orchard, Kentucky, to Shelby County, 
Illinois, where he was the first minister of the 
Christian Church. The grandfather of Doctor 
Storm was David L. Storm, who was born 
in Ash Grove Township, Shelby County, was 
a farmer and died there in 1872, at the age 
of fifty-six. 

Doctor Storm, himself, was born in Ash 
Grove Township, January 29, 1871. His par- 
ents, William A. and Mary A. (Curry) Storm, 
were also natives of Ash Grove Township, 
where his father was born in 1844 and his 
mother in 1848. She was a daughter of 
Nathan Curry, who came from Tennessee to 
Illinois when a young man and spent the rest 
of his life as a farmer in Shelby County. 
He died in 1895. William A. Storm was a 
highly respected and industrious farmer, 
served several terms as assessor of his town- 
ship and as trustee of the local schools. He 
was a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Christian Church. He 
died in 1925 and his wife in 1918. 

Thus the community where Doctor Storm 
has done his professional work is one in which 
the name Storm has been honored and 
respected since pioneer days. Doctor Storm 
grew up on a farm, and after the advantages 
of the local schools attended Valparaiso Uni- 
versity in Indiana and Austin College at 
Effingham, Illinois. For five years he was 
a teacher in the schools of his home county. 
In 1898 he was graduated from the Barnes 
Medical College of St. Louis, and in the same 
year he located at Windsor, where he has 
long held ranking position as a physician and 
surgeon. He has a very extensive practice. 
His college training and private experience 
have been supplemented by contact with many 
of the distinguished men of his profession. 
He has attended clinics under the Mayo Broth- 
ers and under the famous surgeon, the late 



Doctor Ochsner, of Chicago. Doctor Storm 
is a member of the Central Illinois, the Illi- 
nois State and American Medical Associations. 
He has been health officer at Windsor and 
is examiner for all the leading life insurance 
companies doing business there. In various 
ways he has given his time to local affairs 
and for twelve years was a member of the 
Windsor School Board. He is a director of 
the Windsor Mutual Telephone Company and 
the Windsor Mutual Building and Loan As- 
sociation. Doctor Storm is a past grand of 
the lodge and a past chief patriarch of the 
encampment of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and for ten years was district deputy 
grand master in Shelby County. 

He married, November 7, 1899, Miss Ora B. 
Harrell of Windsor, daughter of Rev. A. H. 
and Lurane (Porter) Harrell. The Harrell 
family came to Illinois from Virginia. Her 
father was one of the prominent ministers 
of the Christian Church in Shelby County. 
Mrs. Storm attended the Windsor High School. 
She is a member of the Christian Church. 
Their only child, Gladys I., died when twelve 
years old. 

Miller H. Pontius, a prominent figure in 
bond and investment banking both in the East 
and Middle West, came to Chicago and in 
May, 1927, established the Chicago branch of 
G. L. Ohrstrom & Company, a bond house with 
headquarters in New York City, of which Mr. 
Pontius is vice president and director. 

Mr. Pontius was born at Circleville, Ohio, 
in 1891, son of George H. and Ora E. (Hall) 
Pontius. The Pontius family is of Holland- 
Dutch ancestry. Members of the family set- 
tled in Ohio about 1804, only about two years 
after the first state was carved out of the 
Northwest Territory. 

Miller H. Pontius attended school at Circle- 
ville and is a prominent alumnus of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he graduated from 
the law school with the LL. B. degree in 1914. 
Mr. Pontius was one of the outstanding foot- 
ball men in the university and was end on the 
teams of 1912-13, and in 1913 had the honor 
of being selected for ail-American honors in 
his position, and in both years was on the 
all-Western team. After the close of his uni- 
versity career he did coaching work at the 
University of Tennessee and the University 
of Michigan. 

For a short time before the war Mr. Pon- 
tius practiced law with his father at Circle- 
ville, Ohio. In 1917 he entered the First Of- 
ficers Training Camp at Fort Benjamin Har- 
rison at Indianapolis, taking with him to camp 
a previous military training gained as a mem- 
ber of the Ohio National Guard. Taking one 
of the provisional commissions in the regular 
army, he entered the artillery branch and 
was sent to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where he 
acted with the instruction corps in the School 



^^SSs&jSEK 










w^> 





c 



ILLINOIS 



53 



of Fire. He was made a first lieutenant in 
the regular army and was kept on duty at 
Fort Sill until after the armistice. 

Mr. Pontius after the war joined the staff 
of the National City Bank of New York and 
in a short time was put in its foreign service. 
He spent about four years in Latin America, 
in Mexico and Central and South America, and 
for some time represented the Home Insur- 
ance Company in South America. After his 
return to New York he was associated with 
the management of the Latin American busi- 
ness of the Home Insurance Company. 

One of his college mates at the University 
of Michigan was Mr. George L. Ohrstrom, 
who while Mr. Pontius was with the Home 
Insurance Company had risen to the position 
of vice president of P. W. Chapman & Com- 
pany of New York. At the invitation of Mr. 
Ohrstrom, Mr. Pontius joined him in the 
Chapman Company, and when, in 1926, Mr. 
Ohrstrom organized G. L. Ohrstrom & Com- 
pany, Mr. Pontius became vice president and 
director in charge of the middle western terri- 
tory. This firm has a large business in in- 
vestment securities and public utility bonds, 
and is one of the sound and solid names in 
the investment banking field. 

Since coming to Chicago Mr. Pontius has 
become a member of the board of governors 
of the University of Michigan Club, is a mem- 
ber of the Attic Club, University Club of Chi- 
cago, the Knollwood Club of Lake Forest. He 
is a resident of Evanston. Mr. Pontius is an 
Alpha Delta Phi. He married Miss Mildred 
C. Taylor, of Port Huron, Michigan. She 
was educated in Smith College and in the 
University of Michigan. They have a son, 
David Taylor Pontius. 

Harry M. Kilpatrick. In the late Harry 
M. Kilpatrick, Elmwood, Peoria County, pos- 
sessed a citizen who prior to his demise had 
established a record for industry, integrity 
and fidelity that will keep his memory green 
for many years to come. Thrown upon his 
own resources when he was but fifteen years 
of age, he directed his activities so capably 
that he became one of the leading furniture 
dealers and funeral directors in the state, and 
subsequently held for many years the im- 
portant position of secretary-treasurer of the 
National Funeral Directors Association. 

Mr. Kilpatrick was born at Lafayette, In- 
diana, in 1865, a son of Robert and Anna 
(Kleinhans) Kilpatrick. His father, a native 
of Indiana, enlisted in the Union army dur- 
ing the war between the states, through which 
he served with gallantry, and immediately 
thereafter brought the family to Illinois, first 
taking up his residence at Clinton, later mov- 
ing to Brimfield, and finally, in 1874, settling 
at Elmwood, where he made his home until 
his death in 1880, although he traveled to 
many states, seeing the world and working 



at his trade. His death occurred at the Sol- 
diers' Home at Danville, Illinois, whence his 
family brought his remains for burial to Elm- 
wood. By his first wife he had two children, 
and Harry M. was the only child of his second 
union. 

Harry M. Kilpatrick at the time of his 
father's death, in 1880, was only fifteen years 
of age, but gave up his school work in order 
to assume the responsibility of taking care of 
his mother. At this early period in his ca- 
reer he began to evidence the sincerity and 
spirit that were to characterize his entire life. 
After working as a bus boy in a restaurant 
and as clerk for a grocer he took a position, 
at three dollars per week, in the furniture 
and undertaking establishment of J. F. Cav- 
erly. In order to better fit himself for his 
chosen business, at about this time Mr. Kil- 
patrick went to Chicago, where he took a com- 
plete course with Carl L. Barnes. Returning 
then to Elmwood, he rejoined Mr. Caverly, 
whose partner he became five years later, and 
subsequently became sole owner of the busi- 
ness by purchase. 

In 1896 Mr. Kilpatrick accepted the secre- 
taryship of the Illinois Funeral Directors As- 
sociation. At the start he did not know much 
about association work, but he learned so 
rapidly and gave such complete satisfaction 
that soon he was readily admitted to be the 
best secretary that association had ever had. 
From that time until his death he never had 
serious competition for the office. In 1898, his 
ability as an executive having been recognized 
far outside of the boundaries of his home state, 
he was elected secretary of the national asso- 
ciation, at the convention held at Omaha, and 
again was his ability acknowledged and but 
very few times was anyone found with the 
temerity even to suggest an opponent. 

Throughout his business experience Mr. Kil- 
patrick's slogan had been "business, first." 
This gave him a standing almost unparalleled 
in association history and won a host of 
friends who admired that characteristic and 
others equally worthy. No task was too great, 
seemingly, for him to undertake in the pur- 
suit of his routine and special duties. "Kil," 
as he was affectionately known to his close 
friends, was a smiling, jovial man, thoroughly 
posted in his business as an association man. 
Details never got away from him, and his 
methodical ways made him invaluable as an 
official. When he left home to attend a con- 
vention he was fully prepared for anything 
that might arise in the way of discussions 
and his material was listed and filed in a 
capable manner. He also found time to en- 
gage in civic affairs and was the organizer 
and first president of the Kiwanis Club, while 
during the World war he was in charge of 
the Liberty Loans in his district. Fraternally 
he was affiliated with the Masons, Odd Fel- 
lows, Rebekahs and Order of the Eastern Star. 



54 



ILLINOIS 



He was a member of the Board of Education 
and was its secretary for twenty-five years. 
His widow, who survives him, belongs to the 
Rebekahs, Royal Neighbors, White Shrine, 
Eastern Star and the Ladies' Oriental Shrine. 
Mr. Kilpatrick died after a third stroke of 
paralysis, August 1, 1930. 

Mr. Kilpatrick's first wife was Clara Hep- 
tonstall, who at her death left four children: 
Ralph; Edwin R., who married Frances 
Barnes; John R., who married Gaynell Stone 
and has two children, Mary and Jack, Jr.; 
and Margaret, who married Kester Watson 
and has one daughter, Mary Lorraine. 

Mr. Kilpatrick took for his second wife 
S. Elizabeth .Tones, a daughter of Samuel A. 
and Dorothy (Ritson) Jones. Samuel A. 
Jones was born at Farmington, Illinois, and 
for many years was engaged in farming in 
this state, but is now living in retirement in 
Colorado. He has five children: Oren H., 
S. Elizabeth, Grover, William B. and Charles 
R. The grandfather of Mrs. Kilpatrick was 
Samuel Atkinson Jones, who came from Penn- 
sylvania and several of whose ancestors were 
soldiers during the Revolutionary war. 

Oliver S. Turner is vice president of Baird 
& Warner, Incorporated, a real estate and 
financial organization that was founded in 
Chicago in 1855 and is at once one of the 
oldest and best known of the city's commer- 
cial organizations. It embraces an extensive 
organization with departments of property 
management, cooperative apartments, bonds, 
mortgages and general real estate investments. 
It is a distinctive honor for a young man 
barely thirty years of age to have reached an 
executive position as vice president in this 
firm. 

Mr. Turner was born in England, July 9, 
1899, and was ten years of age when, in 1909, 
the family came to Chicago. Oliver S. Turner 
attended grade schools and the Hyde Park 
High School, and his first regular employ- 
ment was as an office boy with the Consoli- 
dated Coal Company. An opportunity that 
meant more for him was his first connection 
in 1915 with the real estate firm of McKey & 
Poague, one of the old real estate organiza- 
tions of the South Side. He spent thirteen 
and a half years with McKey & Poague and 
rose to the position of vice president. In 1928 
he joined Baird & Warner, Incorporated. As 
vice president his headquarters are at 646 
North Michigan Avenue, and his time is de- 
voted mainly to the company's extensive in- 
terests in property management. 

For several years Mr. Turner has had a 
prominent part in the National Association 
of Real Estate Boards and was chairman of 
the Executive Committee of the Property Man- 
agement Division for the year 1931, an honor 
that has seldom come to so young a man. 
Mr. Turner is often quoted as an authority 



on different phases of property management. 

He has served as a member of the Board 
of Governors of the Chicago Real Estate 
Board, and is chairman of the executive com- 
mittee of the Chicago Homes Economic Coun- 
cil and has made numerous contributions for 
the improvement of practices and standardiza- 
tion of methods in his special field in real 
estate. He is a member of the South Shore 
Country Club and the Chicago Athletic Asso- 
ciation. 

Mr. Turner married Wilhelmina Wagner, of 
Chicago, on December 28, 1922, and they have 
two sons, Stansfield and Janus Twain Turner. 

Nathaniel Gardiner Symonds is a Chicago 
citizen who for nearly a quarter of a century 
has been officially connected with one of the 
nation's greatest industrial organizations 
maintaining offices in this city, the Westing- 
house Electric & Manufacturing Company, and 
with this important corporation his has here 
been a record of consecutive advancement along 
major executive lines. From the office of 
the Chicago district manager, a position which 
he assumed in 1921, he was promoted in June, 
1930, to his present administrative office, which 
had been created by the company a short time 
previously, that of commercial vice president 
of the central district, the local offices of the 
company being in the Civic Opera Building, 
20 North Wacker Drive. 

Mr. Symonds is an electrical engineer by 
profession. He was born at Ossining, New 
York, September 19, 1878, and is a son of 
Henry Clay Symonds and Beatrice (Brand- 
reth) Symonds. He was a youth at the time 
of the family removal to California, where he 
pursued his high-school course at Los Gatos 
and where he later continued his studies in 
Leland Stanford University, in which he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1901 
and with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 
electrical engineering. His has been marked 
loyalty to and appreciation of his alma mater, 
and he has served as a member of the official 
board of its national alumni organization. 

Mr. Symonds has been connected with the 
interests of the Westinghouse corporation 
since January 2, 1902, the date on which he 
entered the service of the company in New 
York City. He came to the Chicago sales office 
of the Westinghouse Machine Company in 
1905, and in 1912 he was here made district 
manager of the Westinghouse Machine Com- 
pany. When, in 1915, the Westinghouse Ma- 
chine Company was absorbed by the Westing- 
house Electric & Manufacturing Company he 
was appointed manager of the power division 
of the Chicago office. Three years later he 
became the industrial division manager, and in 
1921, as previously noted, he was advanced 
to the position of central district manager, of 
which he continued the incumbent until he was 
given assignment, in June, 1930, to his present 



ILLINOIS 



55 



executive office of commercial vice president 
of the central district. His district embraces 
an immense territory in the West and North- 
west. Mr. Symonds is a director of the Hins- 
dale State Bank, his home being maintained 
in the beautiful Hinsdale suburban district of 
the Chicago metropolitan area. 

As is well known, the Westinghouse corpora- 
tion had much of pioneer precedence in the 
development of the radio as a modern me- 
dium of communication, and Mr. Symonds de- 
rives much personal satisfaction from having 
been officially in the establishing in Chicago 
of the first radio broadcasting station west of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This station, the 
KYW, broadcast its first program November 
11, 1921, Armistice Day, from the stage of 
the Auditorium Theater, the two outstanding 
stars of the program being two distinguished 
members of the Chicago Civic Opera Company 
— Miss Mary Garden, who made a brief speech 
to her unseen audience, and Miss Edith Mason, 
who sang. When, in January, 1930, KYW 
opened its powerful transmitting station 
twenty-three miles west of Chicago, Mr. Sy- 
monds recalled this pioneer performance and 
made some other interesting statements on 
the future of radio, as projected from the 
standpoint of an experience of ten years, dur- 
ing which, as he said, the radio had made a 
place for itself in the home as nothing else 
has ever done in the same short space of time. 
During the period of American participa- 
tion in the World war Mr. Symonds was a 
| member of the Illinois Reserve Militia. He 
is a member of the Engineers Club of Chicago, 
j the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
j the local Electric Club, the Union League 
Club, the Hinsdale Club and Hinsdale Golf 
j Club, the University Club of Pittsburgh, Penn- 
! sylvania, and the Kappa Sigma college fra- 
I ternity. His political allegiance is given to 
; the Republican party. 

December 25, 1901, recorded the marriage of 
I Mr. Symonds to Miss Amy Irene Milberry, of 
i San Francisco, California, and the four chil- 
i dren of this union are Henry Gardiner, Na- 
! thaniel Milberry, Cortlandt, and Amy Irene 
j (deceased). 

Ray N. Van Doren, vice president and gen- 
eral counsel of the Chicago & Northwestern 
Railway Company, is a native of Wisconsin 
and began his career as a practicing lawyer in 
the City of New London. He was born at 
Oshkosh, January 11, 1878, son of Jacob H. 
and Anna (Cook) Van Doren. 

His father was a very prominent Wisconsin 
business man and citizen, a lumber manufac- 
turer at Birnamwood, and was a member of 
the State Legislature and appointed a member 
of the First Wisconsin Highway Commission. 

Ray N. Van Doren in 1895 graduated from 
the high school at Birnamwood, Wisconsin, 
and took his law degree at the University of 



Wisconsin in 1898. After eleven years of 
general law practice at New London he moved 
to Merrill, where he practiced until 1916, and 
then for a year was with the Milwaukee law 
firm of Flanders, Bottum, Fawsett & Bottum. 
While at New London he served as city attor- 
ney five years. 

Mr. Van Doren has come to the front rap- 
idly as a railway attorney. In 1917 he was 
appointed Wisconsin attorney for the Chicago 
& Northwestern Railway Company, and while 
the railroads were under the United States 
Railroad Administration he acted as Nebraska 
attorney for the company, with headquarters 
at Omaha, also as general attorney at St. 
Paul, and later was returned to Milwaukee 
as Wisconsin attorney. In 1921 he became 
assistant general solicitor at Chicago, was 
promoted to general solicitor in 1924, and 
since July 1, 1925, has been at the Chicago 
general offices as vice president and general 
counsel. 

Mr. Van Doren is a member of the American 
Bar Association. He is a Republican, mem- 
ber of the Masonic fraternity and Knights of 
Pythias. He resides in Evanston and is an 
elder in the Second Presbyterian Church of 
that city. He married, September 11, 1901, 
Miss Grace A. Roberts, of Birnamwood, Wis- 
consin. They have four children, Donald 
Wayne, Helen Grace, Gerald Ray and James 
Roberts. His oldest son, Donald, married 
Betty Parks, of Fort Smith, Arkansas, and 
has two children, Donald Wayne and Gretchen 
Elizabeth. The daughter, Helen, is the wife 
of J. R. Keach, of Evanston. 

Joseph B. Fleming, Illinois lawyer, of the 
law firm of Kirkland, Fleming, Green & Mar- 
tin, at 33 North LaSalle Street, Chicago, was 
born in Dairy, Scotland, February 4, 1881. 
Six months later his parents came to America, 
locating in Grundy County, Illinois. He was 
educated in high school at Carbon Hill, at- 
tended the Northern Illinois Normal School 
and Illinois Wesleyan University, receiving the 
honorary degree of LL. D. from that institu- 
tion in 1925. In 1903 he became a resident 
of Chicago, and entered the law office of Hemp- 
stead Washburne, a former mayor of the city. 
Later he was graduated in 1905 from the John 
Marshall Law School and also pursued studies 
in the Northwestern University School of Law, 

Mr. Fleming was admitted to the bar in 
1905. He has been a member of the firm of 
Kirkland, Fleming, Green & Martin since Jan- 
uary, 1918. The name and reputation of the 
firm bespeak his successful standing in the 
Chicago bar. 

Some of his professional work has been 
vested with considerable public interest. He 
became chief assistant United States district 
attorney at Chicago in 1914. During the 
World war he was special assistant to the 
United States attorney general in the prose- 



56 



ILLINOIS 



cution of war cases, among the more notable 
of which were those of Victor Berger and 
other leaders of the Socialist party for vio- 
lation of the Espionage Act, the I. W. W. 
cases and the India Revolution cases. Mr. 
Fleming also acted as attorney for the Illinois 
Building Commission, a commission created by 
the State Legislature for the investigation of 
building conditions in the City of Chicago. 
He has also served as attorney for the Board 
of Election Commissioners of the city. 

Mr. Fleming is married, has a family of 
five children, and resides at Lake Forest, 
Illinois. 

Joseph Z. Klenha has more to his credit 
than his successful achievement as a repre- 
sentative member of the Chicago bar, for his 
executive and constructive powers have had 
large and potent influence in furthering the 
development and progress of the Town of 
Cicero, of whose municipal Board of Trustees 
he has served as president more than fourteen 
years. He has a law office in Chicago, at 33 
South Clark Street, and his professional activ- 
ities also touch closely and effectively the 
vigorous community of Cicero, where he main- 
tains his home at 1837 South Austin Boulevard. 

Mr. Klenha is of sterling Bohemian ancestry 
and was born in Chicago in the year 1875. 
He profited by the advantages of the public 
schools of his native city, and his thorough 
fortification for his chosen profession was 
gained through the medium of the Chicago 
College of Law, in which he was graduated as 
a member of the class of 1899, his reception 
of the degree of Bachelor of Laws having 
been forthwith followed by his admission to 
the Illinois bar and by his initiation of the 
practice of his profession in Chicago, where 
he has in the intervening years built up a 
large and important law practice. He has 
been in the most significant sense the archi- 
tect and builder of his own career and for- 
tunes, and his host of friends honor him for 
his large and worthy achievement. 

Mr. Klenha has maintained his home in 
the important Cicero community of the Chi- 
cago metropolitan area since 1914, and has 
proved one of its most honored and influential 
citizens of progressiveness and unfailing pub- 
lic spirit. He was first elected president of 
the village Board of Trustees in April, 1917, 
and by successive reelections, that stand in 
evidence of popular confidence and approval, 
he has been retained as the executive head of 
this municipal government to the present time, 
each successive election having tallied for him 
a larger majority than the preceding, and his 
present term having been the sequel of his 
elections in 1928. Mr. Klenha is retained as 
attorney for the Lawndale National Bank of 
Chicago. 

When he was first elected mayor or presi- 
dent of Cicero the nation was just making 



its preparations for participation in the World 
war, and thus his first term was marked 
principally with patriotic movements, he hav- 
ing served as a four-minute speaker in fur- 
thering the campaign for sale of Government 
war bonds and for the support of the Red 
Cross and other benignant agencies, besides 
which he was a member of the Legal Advisory 
Board and did loyal and constructive service 
in all patriotic activities in his section of the 
metropolitan area. From a newspaper article 
that appeared in September, 1929, is repro- 
duced the following initial paragraph: "Fa- 
vored by a central location, excellent trans- 
portation, wide streets, good schools and low 
taxes, Cicero is today Chicago's fastest grow- 
ing suburb, as well as the largest town in 
Illinois." 

Cicero was chartered as an independent 
community March 25, 1869, and has retained 
its village form of government, with full 
metropolitan advantages but without the en- 
cumbrances of a chartered city. At this junc- 
ture may consistency be perpetuated the fol- 
lowing slightly modified extracts from an ap- 
preciative newspaper estimate that was pub- 
lished in September, 1929: "One figure stands 
out in prominence and sharp outline when the 
story of the phenomenal growth of Cicero is 
told — one man whose guiding hand has held 
sway over the destinies of the town for the 
past decade, administering the government 
during the period of the community's greatest 
growth, Joseph Z. Klenha, now serving his fifth 
term as president. To have served as chief 
executive for over fourteen years, to have seen 
his town grow in that period from a scattered 
population of 20,000 to a modern well knit, 
finely ordered community of 70,000 souls, with 
Cicero's largest and widely known industries 
growing by leaps and bounds and attracting 
the highest class of mechanics and laborers; 
to have been the guiding spirit for more than 
a decade of the fastest growing industrial 
center in the Middle West, — these are the bare 
outlines of the career of President Klenha, 
lawyer, banker and friend of the working 
men and women of the Town of Cicero, the 
'Giant of the Suburbs' and the important west 
gate to Chicago. Without doubt the greatest 
tribute to the confidence of his fellow towns- 
men in Mr. Klenha is his successive reelections 
to the highest office in the community. Here 
is his most obvious testimonial to his eminent 
qualifications for the office and his successful 
administration of its various responsibilities. 
Cicero residents are proud of the record of 
their chief executive and the achievements 
of his administration. For well into a second 
decade now President Klenha .... has pro- 
pelled the progress of the town with great 
foresight, attended by well chosen and able 
assistants. To this keen man who has di- 
rected public affairs with the efficient methods 
of sound business must be given the lion's 



ILLINOIS 



57 



share of the glory in the interesting tale of 
the civic development and commercial and 
industrial advancement of Cicero." 

Under the resourceful regime of President 
Klenha Cicero has been given a stable gov- 
ernment, has compassed great and modern 
public improvements, and has been made free 
of bonded indebtedness, while its tax rate is 
exceptionally low and its police and fire de- 
partments maintained under civil service 
provisions. 

Mr. Klenha has no minor leadership in the 
councils and campaign activities of the Re- 
publican party in Cook County, and he is a 
valued member of the Republican Central Com- 
mittee of the county. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity and has received the thirty- 
second degree of the Scottish Rite, besides 
being a Noble of the Mystic Shrine, and he 
is affiliated also with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, Loyal Order of Moose 
and Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In 
Chicago he is a member of the Hamilton Club, 
and he has membership also in the Butterfield 
Country Club'. 

In their native City of Chicago was 
solemnized the marriage of Mr. Klenha to 
Miss Mary Friedl, and they have two fine 
sons: Robert, who received the advantages of 
the University of Illinois, has been engaged 
in the practice of law since 1925 and is now 
an assistant state's attorney for Cook County. 
Harold J. is a student in the University of 
Illinois and is preparing to become a chemist 
by profession. 

Leslie Frank Fullerton as proprietor of 
the Leslie F. Fullerton Dairy, at 303 Frorer 
Avenue in Lincoln, is continuing under his 
own name and management the business which 
was founded nearly forty years ago. The 
name Fullerton has been a synonym of pure 
milk products to hundreds of families not only 
in Lincoln, but throughout Logan County. 

The founder of the business was the late 
Benjamin S. Fullerton, who was a native of 
Logan County. For ten years he conducted 
a retail milk business at Atlanta and in 1893 
moved to Lincoln, where he continued his 
establishment under the name of the B. S. 
Fullerton Dairy until his death in 1923. He 
was a dealer in milk and manufacturer of 
dairy products in the county for forty years. 
He married Mary Layton, who was born in 
Logan County and resides at Lincoln. The 
two children of these parents are both dairy- 
men, Ray A. and Leslie Frank. 

Leslie Frank Fullerton was born at Lin- 
coln September 5, 1894. His early education 
was acquired in the grammar and high schools 
and from boyhood he helped his father in the 
dairy. During his father's last illness he took 
charge as manager, and later he bought the 
business and changed the name to the Leslie 
F. Fullerton Dairy. Under his direction the 



business has made rapid strides in many im- 
provements. The need for larger space com- 
pelled him to put up in 1926 the thoroughly 
modern plant which he now uses and which 
occupies the same location his father had for 
many years. He does both a wholesale and 
retail business in milk and manufactured 
products. 

Mr. Fullerton married, April 18, 1912, Miss 
Emma Mae Pedigo. She was born at Wil- 
liamsville in Sangamon County, but grew up 
in Lincoln. Her grandfather, Marcellus Ped- 
igo, was a soldier in the Civil war from Ken- 
tucky. Her father, Marcellus C. Pedigo, was 
born at Louisville, Kentucky, and for a num- 
ber of years carried on an extensive business 
as a dealer in horses, at first at Williams- 
ville and later at Lincoln. He died in 1912. 
The Pedigo family is of French ancestry. Mrs. 
Fullerton's mother, Sarah Elizabeth Conquest, 
who was of English ancestry, was born at 
Williamsville and died at Lincoln October 5, 
1928. Mr. and Mrs. Fullerton have one child, 
Dorothy Mae, born September 3, 1917, and 
attending the Lincoln High School, class of 
1935. The family are members of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

John W. Ellis. A member of the Illinois 
bar since 1894, John W. Ellis is perhaps best 
known in the profession in Chicago on account 
of his many years of service as a master in 
chancery. Judge Ellis also has a private law 
practice, with offices at 69 West Washington 
Street. 

He was born in Kenton County, Kentucky, 
in 1871, son of James D. and Annie (Weakley) 
Ellis. He grew up in Kansas, was educated in 
a high school in Clay County, that state, then 
studied law with Attorney General Goddard 
of Kansas, and in 1892 was admitted to prac- 
tice law in Oregon. In 1893 he went to Wash- 
ington, D. C, as private secretary to a con- 
gressman, and while there continued his law 
studies in Columbian University, now George 
Washington University School of Law. He 
was graduated in 1894 and in the same year 
came to Illinois, and from 1894 to 1900 was 
associated in practice with his uncle, the late 
John W. Smith, in the firm of Smith & Ellis. 
Later, in 1907, he became a partner of Harry 
A. Lewis in the firm of Ellis & Lewis, and this 
firm continued until 1918. 

Mr. Ellis in 1909 was appointed master in 
chancery of the Cook County Circuit Court, 
and in 1918 he became master in chancery 
of the Superior Court. 

Judge Ellis is a member of the Chicago 
Athletic Club, the Hamilton Club, South Shore 
Country Club, Beverly Country Club, the Chi- 
cago and Illinois State Bar Associations, is 
a Republican and a member of the Baptist 
Church. He married, November 19, 1897, 
Miss Maude Barnes, whose father, John A. 
Barnes, was at one time American consul 



58 



ILLINOIS 



to Cologne, Germany. Judge Ellis' only daugh- 
ter is Mrs. Gordon A. Granger, of Miami 
Beach, Florida. Mrs. Ellis died in October, 
1930, and Mr. Ellis has since remarried, Mrs. 
Lillian M. Duffy becoming his wife. They 
reside at 9357 Pleasant Avenue, Chicago. 

Frank J. O'Brien is a native Chicagoan, a 
man just in the prime of his years, but is 
regarded as a pioneer and one of the most 
constructive forces in the civic and business 
life of the old community of Woodlawn Park. 
In the Woodlawn district Mr. O'Brien has al- 
lowed his loyalty to express itself in many 
ways. He has seen this district develop from 
a suburb in what was once the far South 
Side until it is now linked intimately with the 
commercial and civic greatness of the entire 
city. Mr. O'Brien has lived in Woodlawn since 
1888, or about five years before the old "Alley 
L" road was extended out to that section to 
furnish transportation to the World's Fair at 
Jackson Park in 1893. 

Mr. O'Brien, who in a business way is best 
known for his connection with the prominent 
South Side real estate organization of McKey 
& Poague Company, of which he is vice presi- 
dent and treasurer, was born in Chicago Octo- 
ber 12, 1885, son of J. H. and Rena (Miller) 
O'Brien. His mother is also a native Chi- 
cagoan, having been born at the corner of 
Twenty-ninth Street and Prairie Avenue when 
that was well out toward the southern limits 
of the city. J. H. O'Brien was brought to 
Chicago when three years of age from New 
York, and his first employment in the city 
was in the State Street store of Carson Pirie 
& Scott. Later he became a successful con- 
tractor. 

Frank J. O'Brien was educated in the gram- 
mar schools and in Englewood High School, 
and spent two years in the College of Com- 
merce and Adminstration at the University 
of Chicago. Mr. O'Brien was in the interior 
decorating business from 1908 to 1920. In 
the latter year he became a partner in McKey 
& Poague Company, and when the business 
was incorporated in 1922 was made vice presi- 
dent and treasurer. As an official of one of 
the oldest and largest real estate organiza- 
tions on the South Side he has also had a 
prominent part in the Chicago Real Estate 
Board, serving on the board of governors, and 
for two years as a director, and is a former 
secretary. 

Mr. O'Brien is a former president of the 
Woodlawn Business Men's Association. He 
had an active part in the organization of the 
Greater South Side Chamber of Commerce. 
This is more than a business organization, in 
fact it represents practically all the impor- 
tant business and civic organizations of the 
South Side. It was projected in 1924, after 
a careful survey of conditions in all the com- 
munities of the South Side. It was designed 



as a non-political, non-sectarian organization, 
concentrated upon a program to unify the 
scattered communities of that portion of the 
city, and by organized effort develop the in- 
dustrial, mercantile and residential interests 
of this great territory. The Chamber came 
into official being in January, 1926. Mr. 
O'Brien served as a director of the Chamber 
for three years and in January, 1931, was 
elected its president. He helped organize and 
was the first president of the Kiwanis Club i 
of Woodlawn. 

In 1930 Mr. O'Brien was also appointed a 
member of the Citizens Committee of Fifteen, 
an advisory body cooperating with the govern- 
mental agency of the city and county with a 
view to solving the pressing financial problems 
which have so seriously affected the county 
and city in recent years. Mr. O'Brien lias 
been much interested in the great institution 
maintained at Mooseheart. He is a member 
of Woodlawn Park Lodge No. 841, A. F. and 
A. M., Woodlawn Chapter, Royal Arch Ma- 
sons, Woodlawn Commandery of the Knights 
Templar, Jackson Park Consistory of the 
Scottish Rite and Medinah Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of Chi- 
cago Lodge No. 4, B. P. 0. Elks, is a Baptist, 
and a member of the Chicago Athletic Asso- 
ciation, Quadrangle Club, South Shore Coun- 
try Club, Olympia Hills Country Club, and 
Chickning Club at Lake Side, Michigan. 

Mr. O'Brien married Theo A. Leonard, 
daughter of W. H. Leonard, of Woodlawn. 
They reside at 6741 Euclid Avenue. Their 
three children are Helen, a senior in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago; James Leonard; and 
Frank J., Jr. 

Joseph Lustfield is one of the well forti- 
fied and distinctly representative younger 
members of the bar of his native City of 
Chicago, and is a man who has proved his 
power to translate ambition into definite and 
worthy achievement. He resides in the vital 
Cicero district of the Chicago metropolitan 
area, and that district claims him as one of 
its most honored and influential citizens. He 
controls a substantial and important law prac- 
tice and his Chicago office is established at 
33 South Clark Street. 

Mr. Lustfield was born in Chicago on the 
1st of July, 1896, and his public-school educa- 
tion culminated in his completion of a course 
in the Harrison Technical Lligh School, in 
which he was a member of the first class there 
to be graduated. His purposeful ambition 
found expression when he entered the Kent 
College of Law and he there completed the 
prescribed curriculum with such excellent 
powers of absorption and assimilation that he 
was graduated as a member of the class of 
1916 and when he was but nineteen years of 
age — two years before he was by law eligible 
for admission to the bar of his native state. 



ILLINOIS 



59 



He utilized a portion of the intervening period 
by continuing as a graduate student in the 
institution that had accorded him the degree 
of Bachelor of Laws, and through this appli- 
cation of further fortification he received in 
1917 the supplemental degree of Master of 
Laws, while he had the further distinction 
of being at the time the youngest possessor 
of that degree in the entire State of Illinois. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1919, but in 
the meanwhile he had shown his intrinsic 
loyalty and patriotism by volunteering for 
service in the World war. In the earlier part 
of 1917 he enlisted in the United States Navy, 
his preliminary training having been received 
at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station, 
where he was stationed when the armistice 
brought the war to a close. He received his 
honorable discharge in April, 1919, and since 
his admission to the bar he has been engaged 
in the active practice of his profession in 
Chicago. He has gained state-wide reputa- 
tion as an authority on election and municipal 
law and criminal-law procedure, and in these 
fields he has specialized in his law practice. 
Concerning him the following consistent state- 
ment has been written: "He has been a party 
to the solution of the most intricate cases of 
the day and has represented some of the most 
important business and political leaders of 
the state." 

Mr. Lustfield is a stalwart in the ranks 
of the Republican party and in the campaign 
of 1918 he was retained as the legal represen- 
tative of the Cook County Republican Com- 
mittee. His marked ability has led also to 
his being similarly retained by Democratic 
committees. In 1929 he was attorney for 
the Cicero board of fire and police commis- 
sioners, and he has given characteristically 
loyal and effective service as counsel for many 
of the west suburbs of Chicago, including 
Cicero, Lyons, Bellwood, Broadview, Hillside, 
Melrose Park, Stickney and Forest View. He 
was retained as assistant corporation counsel 
of Berwyn and as attorney for the Cicero 
park district, as well as for school districts 
Nos. 88, 98, 108 and 109. By President Hard- 
ing he was appointed Illinois commissioner 
of deeds for the District of Columbia. He is a 
stockholder in various business concerns of 
Cicero, and is secretary and treasurer of the 
Cicero Tribune Company in his home City of 
Cicero. 

The popularity of Mr. Lustfield is well at- 
tested by his membership in various organiza- 
tions, including the Masonic fraternity, the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the 
American Legion, the National Union, the 
Midwest Athletic Club, the Midland Athletic 
Club, the LaSalle Club and the Twin Orchard 
Golf Club. 

Mr. Lustfield married Miss Gladys Altschul, 
and they have continuously resided in Cicero, 
where in September, 1929, they are occupying 



their present beautiful and modern home, 
at 1823 South Austin Boulevard. Mr. and 
Mrs. Lustfield have two children, Donald Earl 
and Betty Joan. 

Stewart Burton Matthews, who rose to 
the rank of captain with the American Ex- 
peditionary Forces, is credited by his friends 
and associates with possessing a high genius 
of salesmanship, and for several years has 
held the office of manager of sales with Baird 
& Warner, Incorporated, at Chicago. 

Mr. Matthews was born at Alton, Illinois, 
June 29, 1893, but since 1906 his home has 
been in Chicago. He is a son of Rev. Dr. 
William Albert and Delia (Burton) Matthews. 
His father, a distinguished minister of the 
Baptist Church and widely known both in the 
Middle West and far West, was born in Eng- 
land. He was a one time pastor of prominent 
churches in St. Louis, Missouri, and Chicago, 
Illinois. For several years his home has been 
in Los Angeles, where he is president of the 
Los Angeles Baptist Theological Seminary. 
Delia (Burton) Matthews is a descendant of 
Elisha Burton, of Vermont, who served as a 
captain of militia in the Revolutionary war 
and was one of the founders of Dartmouth 
College. 

Stewart Burton Matthews was educated in 
Aurora and in Chicago, being a graduate of 
the John Marshall High School. Later he 
attended Wheaton College and the University 
of Chicago. While in school he earned money 
by selling books magazines, etc., and from 
early boyhood it has been evident that his 
main forte is salesmanship. For several years 
he was a salesman for James H. Rhodes & 
Company of Chicago, manufacturers of indus- 
trial chemicals. 

He was one of the first to enlist when 
America declared war on Germany in April, 
1917. He enlisted April 10, 1917, as a private 
in Battery C of the One Hundred and Forty- 
ninth Field Artillery, which was one of the 
units in the Forty-second or Rainbow Division. 
Later he attended the Second Officers Train- 
ing Camp at Fort Sheridan, was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant and was recom- 
mended for regular army service. At Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas, he was assigned to the 
Twentieth Field Artillery, a part of the reg- 
ular army, Fifth Division. Early in 1918 he 
went overseas with this division, and was in 
combat service along the front lines in France. 
Subsequently he was transferred to the Fifty- 
seventh Field Artillery with the rank of first 
lieutenant, and eventually was promoted to 
captain. He was discharged with that rank 
in February, 1919, and after his return to 
Chicago was for several years engaged in the 
industrial chemical business. 

In 1925 he joined the staff of Baird & War- 
ner, Incorporated, one of the oldest real estate 
firms in the Middle West. He was assigned 



60 



ILLINOIS 



work in the North Shore territory, and in a 
few years had run his sales volume up to 
over a million dollars annually. In 1929 he 
was made manager of the firm's branch office 
at 4545 Broadway. There he had the man- 
agement of the three departments of the office, 
sales, renting and loans. On September 1, 
1930, he was given complete charge of all sales 
at the main office, 134 South LaSalle Street, 
Chicago. Mr. Mattehws* experience has in- 
cluded all phases of real estate, property man- 
agement, sub-divisions, bonds, mortgages and 
general investments, and his record has been 
in line with that of the brilliant staff of men 
whom Baird & Warner have always gathered 
about them. 

Mr. Matthews' home is at 730 Milburn 
Street, Evanston. He married Miss Joy Vivian 
Keck, of Des Moines, Iowa. Their three chil- 
dren are Joy Marimae, Delia Jane Matthews 
and Stewart B. Matthews, Jr. 

Lieut.-Col. W. R. Matheny, of the law firm 
Dodd & Matheny, at 33 North LaSalle Street, 
Chicago, is the youngest of a notable succession 
of members of the Matheny family in the 
Illinois bar. Almost continuously since the 
close of the territorial period to the present a 
Matheny has been registered on the roll of 
Illinois attorneys. 

A very conspicuous pioneer citizen of Spring- 
field was Colonel Matheny's great-grandfather, 
Charles R. Matheny. He was born in Loudoun 
County, Virginia, in 1783. In 1786, when he 
was three years of age, his parents moved 
over the mountains into Kentucky. In 1805 
the family made another stage of pioneering 
when they established homes on the frontier 
of Illinois, in St. Clair County, where Charles 
R. Matheny served as a missionary of the 
Methodist Church. In 1817 he was appointed 
from the office in Washington to be prose- 
cuting attorney for the Illinois Territory. He 
was a soldier of the War of 1812. In 1821 
he came to Sangamon County and served as 
clerk of the Circuit Court. He is also credited 
with having erected the first log cabin on the 
site of the present capital city, and this cabin, 
which during those pioneer days served as 
the first courthouse for Sangamon County 
and also was used for services as the house of 
worship of the Methodist Church. Upon the 
organization of the Village of Springfield he 
was elected the first president of the village 
board. He died in 1839. 

In the year 1842 his son, James H. Matheny, 
was admitted to the bar, and continued in 
active practice for nearly half a century, until 
his death in 1890. James H. Matheny was 
born in 1818, the year that Illinois was ad- 
mitted to the Union. He served as county 
judge of Sangamon County from 1873 until 
his death. During the Civil war he served 
as a soldier, being a member of the One Hun- 
dred and Thirtieth Illinois Volunteer infantry. 



His early professional career was contempo- 
raneous with that of Lincoln. He was about 
ten years younger than Lincoln and was one 
of the groomsmen when Lincoln married Mary 
Todd at Springfield. 

The next generation of this very distin- 
guished family was represented by another 
James H. Matheny, who was born at Spring 
field in 1856, was admitted to the bar in 1877 
and practiced his profession in that city for 
over forty years, until his death in 1918. He 
married Fanny French, who was born at 
Springfield. Her father, Amos Willard 
French, an early-day dentist, located at 
Springfield in the early 1840s. 

Lieut.-Col. W. R. Matheny, a son of James 
H. and Fanny (French) Matheny, was born 
at Springfield April 10, 1890. He is a mem- 
ber of the Sons of the Revolution. His eli- 
gibility to that patriotic order comes through 
the wife of his great-grandfather. Charles R. 
Matheny married a daughter of Joseph Ogle, 
another distinguished Illinois pioneer, for 
whom Ogle' County was named. Joseph Ogle 
was a soldier in the Revolution. 

Colonel Matheny first chose a technical pro- 
fession instead of the law. He attended 
schools at Springfield and for two and a half 
years pursued the course of electrical engi- 
neering in the University of Illinois. On 
coming to Chicago in 1912 he was a member 
of the engineering staff of the Chicago Tele- 
phone Company for two years. In 1913 he 
became connected with the street lighting de- 
partment of the City of Chicago and by 1917 
had been put in charge of the entire street 
lighting operations of the city. 

He left this work in 1917 to volunteer, and 
attended the Officers Training Camp at Fort 
Benjamin Harrison, being commissioned a first 
lieutenant of engineers. In January, 1918, 
he was promoted to captain in the Signal 
Corps in the army and later went overseas. 
He remained in France almost a year. 

Colonel Matheny after returning to Chicago 
in 1919 took up the study of law in the John 
Marshall Law School and was graduated with 
LL. B. degree in 1920. He has been in active 
practice now for over ten years. He was 
with the law firm of Thorne & Jackson until 
1922, then a member of the firm Dodd, 
Matheny & Edmunds. In 1923 Mr. Edmunds 
withdrew to become commissioner of the Su- 
preme Court and since that time Colonel 
Matheny has been associated in practice with 
Walter F. Dodd, their firm having enjoyed 
a very extensive and important practice. 

Colonel Matheny, who resides at 5310 Fer- 
dinand Street, married Miss Betty Harnly, of 
Sangamon County. They have two sons, James 
H. and David H., who represent the sixth 
generation of the Matheny family in Illinois. 
Colonel Matheny is a member of Brotherhood 
Lodge No. 986, Cicero Chapter No. 180, Aus- 
tin Commandery, K. T., No. 84, is a thirty- 






mmi 











•1:;.: 




ILLINOIS 



61 



second degree Scottish Rite Mason and a mem- 
ber of Medinah Temple, A. A. 0- N. M. S. 
He belongs also to Chi Psi fraternity, is a 
past commander of Theodore Roosevelt Post 
No. 627, American Legion, and is avocat 
locale of La Societe, Des Forty Hommes et 
Eight Chevaux. He is president of the County 
Chapter Reserve Officers Association of the 
United States, a member of the Society of 
Mayflower Descendants and belongs to the Chi- 
cago, Illinois State and American Bar 
Associations. 

Frederick Knox Bastian is one of the sub- 
stantial property holders in the City of Ful- 
ton, Whiteside County, where he is now liv- 
ing virtually retired from active business. He 
was long and prominently identified with the 
newspaper business in this community, has 
served as postmaster of Fulton, and has been 
a leader in the councils and campaign activi- 
ties of the Democratic party in Whiteside 
County, where he likewise has stood as a loyal 
and progressive citizen who has taken deep 
and constructive interest in all that has 
touched the general communal welfare. 

Mr. Bastian was born in the City of Roches- 
ter, New York, September 23, 1856, and is 
a son of Van S. and Ann Eliza (Knox) Bas- 
tian. Van S. Bastian learned in his youth the 
trade of ship carpenter and for many years 
was in navigation service on the Great Lakes. 
He later followed the trade of cabinetmaker 
and finally became a contractor in bridge con- 
struction, in which connection he built the 
bridge over the Rock River between Sterling 
and Rock Falls, Illinois. He established the 
family home at the Town of Fairfield, Bureau 
County, in the year 1861, and passed the re- 
mainder of his life in this state, where his 
death occurred in June, 1874, his wife having 
survived him a term of years. 

Frederick K. Bastian was about five years 
of age at the time the family home was estab- 
lished in Bureau County and here he at- 
tended the public schools, as did he also the 
high school of Princeton, Bureau County. 
That he made good use of his advantages was 
I shown in the success that attended his service 
! as a youthful teacher in the public schools 
of this section of Illinois, and at the age of 
twenty-three years he entered upon his novi- 
tiate in the newspaper and printing business, 
i He was employed one and one-half years in 
! a newspaper office at Sterling, Illinois, and 
; then removed to Fulton and assumed the man- 
i agement of the Fulton Journal, a weekly 
i paper. In 1881 he and his brother, Anthony 
. W. Bastian, purchased the plant and business 
i of this paper, and a year later they made 
I the paper a semi-weekly. Under their effec- 
tive management the Journal was conducted 
I with marked success and its communal influ- 
ence was greatly expanded. In 1891 Mr. Bas- 
| tian purchased his brother's interest in the 



business, and he thereafter continued as indi- 
vidual publisher of the Journal until 1898, 
when he sold the property and business to his 
brother. Individually and through the medium 
of his newspaper Mr. Bastian came to large 
influence in political affairs in Whiteside 
County and gained much of leadership in the 
local affairs of the Democratic party. He 
was his party's candidate for the National 
Congress in 1895 and for the House of Repre- 
sentatives of the Legislature in 1898, his de- 
feat on each occasion having been compassed 
through normal political exigencies representa- 
tive of the supremacy of the opposition party 
in the respective elections. He attended the 
Democratic National Convention of 1892. Mr. 
Bastian served as postmaster of Fulton dur- 
ing the period of 1896-98, and in 1915 he was 
again called to this office, of which he con- 
tinued the efficient and popular incumbent until 
1921. While actively engaged in the news- 
paper business he served also as city mar- 
shal of Fulton during a period of three years. 
Mr. Bastian became interested in banking en- 
terprise in the year 1899. He is now retired 
from active business but continues to give a 
personal supervision to his various property 
and financial interests. He continues his 
active interest in the affairs of the Demo- 
cratic party and has served as a member of 
its Illinois state central committee, as well as 
a member of the county, congressional and 
senatorial committees. He is at the present 
time a valued member and counselor of the 
Democratic central committee of Whiteside 
County (1931). With all his varied activi- 
ties Mr. Bastian has found opportunity to 
indulge in travel in various sections of the 
United States and made a sojourn of two 
years on the Isthmus of Panama, where he 
was in charge of a printing plant connected 
with the building of the great canal. 

In August, 1884, Mr. Bastian was united in 
marriage to Miss Nellie J. Barton, of Mendota, 
Illinois, and she passed to the life eternal in 
January, 1924, no children having been born 
of this union. 

Holland M. Cassidy in winning a place 
among the representative members of the Chi- 
cago bar had the ability and courage to face 
and overcome the obstacles that almost in- 
variably confront the young lawyer who seeks 
success and prestige in a great metropolitan 
center. He has won high standing as an au- 
thority on municipal law. A large part of 
his practice is in an advisory capacity to 
large financial organizations, including invest- 
ment, banking, trusts and insurance compa- 
nies in connection with their handling of 
municipal bonds and securities. 

Mr. Cassidy was born at Flora, Clay 
County, Illinois, November 3, 1889, son of 
John J. and Edna L. Cassidy. After gradu- 
ating from the Flora High School he entered 



62 



ILLINOIS 



the law school of the University of Illinois, 
where he graduated Bachelor of Laws in 1914. 
After being admitted to the bar he became an 
associate and assistant in the office of A. H. 
Baer, a prominent attorney at Belleville, with 
whom he continued until the spring of 1917. 
He left his law practice to enlist as a private 
in the aviation department of the United 
States Army. He was promoted to first lieu- 
tenant, and during the latter part of the war 
was stationed at Washington, D. C. He re- 
ceived his honorable discharge in 1919, with 
the rank of first lieutenant. 

During the war his former associate, Mr. 
Baer, died. After his discharge from military 
service Mr. Cassidy formed a new contact 
with his profession, coming to Chicago and 
becoming an associate in the law firm of 
Chapman, Cutler & Parker. While with that 
firm he devoted his efforts to practice special- 
izing in municipal obligations. Immediately 
after severing his connection with that firm, 
in 1927, he engaged in practice under his own 
name, with offices at 231 South LaSalle Street. 
His success in his chosen field offers the most 
effective recommendation of his technical abil- 
ity and voucher for the popular confidence 
and esteem he enjoys. 

Mr. Cassidy is a member of the Chicago, 
Illinois State and American Bar Associations. 
He is affiliated with the Phi Delta Phi and 
Acacia college fraternities and is a member 
of the Union League Club of Chicago. He 
married in 1922 Miss Metella Bjorn. Their 
two children are Helene M. and Patricia M. 

George Walter Kemp joined the noted old 
real estate organization of McKey & Poague 
more than a quarter of a century ago. His 
remarkable success in the business and pro- 
fession of real estate is attested by the fact 
that he has had steady promotions from the 
ranks in this organization, of which he is now 
president. 

Mr. Kemp is of old New England ancestry 
and was born at Colrain, Massachusetts, July 
28, 1884. His parents, Walter H. and Mae S. 
(Martin) Kemp, are still living at the old 
homestead, which is a New England dairy 
farm. His father is a man of much promi- 
nence in his home community and has served 
three terms in the Massachusetts Legislature. 

George Walter Kemp was liberally educated, 
attending public schools at Colrain, spent 
three years in the Greenfield High School and 
one year in the Arms Academy at Sheldon 
Falls, Massachusetts. He completed his prep- 
aration for a business career with one year 
in the Bliss Business College at North Adams, 
Massachusetts. During 1903-06 he was a 
salesman for a grain firm at Greenfield, Massa- 
chusetts. Leaving there, he came to Chicago 
and since 1906 has been with McKey & Poague, 
real estate. . He became a member of the firm 
in 1915, in 1922 was made vice president and 



treasurer, and since January, 1929, has been 
president. The main office of McKey & Poague 
is at 1172 East Sixty- third Street. Mr. Kemp 
is also a director of the Woodlawn Trust & 
Savings Bank. He is a member of the Chi- 
cago Real Estate Board, member of the Chi- 
cago Art Institute, South Shore Country and 
Olympia Fields Country Clubs, is a Repub- 
lican, a Presbyterian and member of Wood- 
lawn Park Lodge No. 841, A. F. and A. M., 
and Woodlawn Park Chapter, Royal Arch 
Masons. 

Mr. Kemp married, October 19, 1914, Miss 
Margaret L. Smith, of Chicago, where she 
was born. She is a daughter of Mrs. Char- 
lotte (Morgan) Smith. Mr. and Mrs. Kemp 
have two sons, George Walter, Jr., and William 
Howard. 

Erwin F. Stolle is a member of the Illi- 
nois bar who has practiced both in Chicago 
and Evanston and at the present time is city 
attorney of Evanston. 

He was born in that North Shore suburb 
January 13, 1897, son of Louis and Jennie 
(Schramm) Stolle. After the public schools 
he attended Evanston Academy and completed 
his legal education in Northwestern University, 
graduating LL. B. in 1921. 

Mr. Stolle has had ten years of successful 
experience in the general practice of law in 
Evanston and Chicago. His Chicago office is 
at 105 West Adams Street and his profes- 
sional aind official place of business in Evans- 
ton is the City Hall. He has been city attor- 
ney there since 1925, and during that time 
has handled a large volume of important and 
frequently complicated legal work for the city. 

Mr. Stolle is a Republican, member of the 
Chicago and Illinois Bar Associations, is a 
Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, being a 
member of the Medinah Temple at Chicago and 
the Medinah Athletic Club. He is a member 
of the Wilmette Golf Club. Mr. Stolle mar- 
ried Miss Evelyn Park, and they have one 
son, Erwin F., Jr. 

J. Henry Aronson is senior member of the 
law firm of Aronson & Aronson, at 11 South 
LaSalle Street, Chicago. Mr. Aronson has 
made an enviable record in the practice of 
the law and is especially well known as a 
specialist in cases involving the application 
of the mechanic lien. 

He was born in Chicago, October 18, 1902, 
son of Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Aronson. He was 
born on the South Side, attended grammar 
school there and was a student in the Uni- 
versity of Chicago, but graduated from the 
law department of Northwestern University 
in 1923. 

Mr. Aronson began private practice in Chi- 
cago. He spent a portion of two years in 
the South looking after matters under his 
jurisdiction as vice president of the First Na- 






ILLINOIS 



63 



tional Title & Abstract Company at Miami, 
Florida, and as president of the Asheville 
Title & Abstract Company in North Carolina. 
He resigned his active connection with these 
two companies in 1926 and since that year 
has devoted his full time to his practice in 
! Chicago. 

Aronson & Aronson have achieved a very 
notable measure of success in their special 
, field and as a firm have a practice probably 
not exceeded by that of any other organiza- 
tion handling matters and litigation under 
the mechanic lien law. Mr. Aronson in his 
, practice represents a number of important 
' lumber corporations in Chicago and also mort- 
! gage and investment companies in chancery 
matters. His junior partner in the firm of 
| Aronson & Aronson is his brother, Leo E. 

Mr. Aronson is a member of the Chicago 
Bar Association and has been admitted to 
practice in the Federal courts. He belongs 
to the American Judicature Society, which was 
founded by Charles Evans Hughes for the 
purpose of securing important reforms in court 
procedures. Mr. Aronson is affiliated with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
is a member of a number of charitable 
organizations. 

Oliver C. Heywood. This publication con- 
sistently accords personal recognition to a 
goodly quota of the representative younger 
members of the Chicago bar, and prominent 
among the number is Oliver C. Heywood, who 
engaged in the general practice of law in his 
native city soon after he received, in 1919, his 
honorable discharge from the World war avia- 
tion service of the United States Army. His 
law office in Chicago is established at 29 South 
LaSalle Street. He served as village attorney 
of the attractive suburb of Berwyn, where he 
resides. 

Mr. Heywood was born in Chicago on the 
13th of January, 1895, and is a son of Charles 
E. and Grace May (Tunison) Heywood. 
Charles E. Haywood was reared and educated 
in his native State of New York and was a 
young man when he established residence in 
Chicago, he having been for many years prom- 
inently associated with the steel industry in 
this city and at Joliet. 

After completing his high-school course in 
Chicago Oliver C. Heywood entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, and in that institution 
he was graduated as a member of the class 
of 1916, when he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts. He had been prosecuting 
his studies in the law department of the Uni- 
versity, so that in 1917 he received therefrom 
his degree of Juris Doctor. It was in the 
spring of the latter year that the nation be- 
came formally involved in the World war, and 
thus the young law-school graduate found 
patriotism paramount to personal interests and 
forthwith volunteered for service in the United 



States Army. He was assigned to the air 
service, had training at various flying fields, 
principally in Texas, and finally, with commis- 
sion as second lieutenant, he entered overseas 
service with his unit, he having been two 
months in France and having returned to his 
native land after the armistice brought the war 
to a close. He received his honorable discharge 
in the early part of 1919, and he has since 
been engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Chicago, where ability and close applica- 
tion have gained to him rank among the 
representative younger members of the bar 
of his native city. He is a popular member of 
the Chicago Bar Association, his political al- 
legiance is given to the Republican party, he 
is affiliated with the American Legion and in 
addition was a member of the Three Hundred 
Seventeenth Cavalry Polo and Hunt Club. 

The year 1922 recorded the marriage of Mr. 
Heywood to Miss Dorothy Smith, and their 
home is in Berwyn. They have two children: 
George and Carol. 

Joseph M. Fiore, member of the Illinois bar, 
has won the rank and position of a success- 
ful advocate and deserves a great deal of 
admiration for the determination which he has 
shown in his effort to rise above circumstances 
and qualify as a member of one of the most 
difficult of the learned professions. 

Mr. Fiore is a native of Italy. He was 
reared and educated there and as a youth 
learned the trade of ladies' tailor. In 1905 
he came to America, first locating in New 
York City. He secured work at his trade and 
one of the first goals was to learn the Eng- 
lish language. He has been a naturalized 
American citizen since 1914. Mr. Fiore while 
working laid plans to win a better education 
and thus advance himself to a place of use- 
fulness and honor among his fellow men. 
During 1915-17 he attended the College of 
Arts and Sciences in the University of Buf- 
falo, New York. 

He then removed to Chicago and attended 
the summer quarters of the University of 
Chicago in 1916 and 1917, and was a law 
student in the law department of DePaul Uni- 
versity in 1917-19. Mr. Fiore returned east 
to complete his legal education in Buffalo 
University, where he was graduated with the 
LL. B. degree in the class of 1920. 

Returning to Chicago, he was admitted to 
the Illinois bar in February, 1921, and for 
ten years has employed his time and talents 
in a growing business in general practice. 
His law offices are at 127 North Dearborn 
Street. He is a member of the Chicago, Illi- 
nois State and American Bar Associations, the 
Justinian Society of Advocates, and belongs 
to a number of civic and social organizations. 
On January 6, 1926, he married Miss Mary 
C. Nigro, of Chicago. 



64 



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Ward Farnsworth, of the firm of Fred 
McGuire, specialists in financial and building 
management, was born in South Chicago, in 
1892, and in his individual record has meas- 
ured up to the fine traditions of one of Chi- 
cago's oldest and best known families. 

Mr. Farnsworth's grandfather was a cousin 
of Gen. John F. Farnsworth. The Farns- 
worths came from England, settled around 
Groton, Massachusetts, in early Colonial days, 
and a later branch of the family moved west 
to Michigan. John F. Farnsworth was born 
at Green Oak, Michigan, in 1820. He studied 
law, and in 1852 located in Chicago. His 
political affiliations turned him to the newly 
organized Republican party and on that ticket 
he was elected in 1856 a member of Congress 
from a district embracing all the counties west 
from Chicago to the Mississippi River. He 
was reelected in 1858, and had an important 
part in the turbulent activities that distin- 
guished Congress during the years leading up 
to the Civil war. In political campaigns he 
was an orator and debater in great demand, 
and he delivered speeches against the extension 
of slavery on the same platform with Owen 
Lovejoy and other distinguished men of that 
day. When the war broke out he raised the 
Eighth Regiment of Illinois Cavalry, was 
elected its colonel, and was at the first battle 
of Bull Run. He was a participant in many 
of the Virginia campaigns, with the Army of 
the Potomac. In November, 1862, he was 
promoted to brigadier-general. 

Ward Farnsworth is a son of William and 
Eleanor (Ward) Farnsworth. His mother was 
a member of the Ward family of Detroit and 
was a sister of the late Clara Ward, a dis- 
tinguished American actress who became the 
Princess Chimay. 

Ward Farnsworth attended the Hyde Park 
High School and for two years was a student 
in the University of Chicago. He was a vol- 
unteer for service in the World war, joining 
the United States Marine Corps, had his ini- 
tial training at Paris Island, South Carolina, 
and later was transferred to Quantico. Vir- 
ginia. He was commissioned a second lieu- 
tenant, and in June, 1918, went overseas with 
the Marines as a member of the Twenty-third 
Infantry, Second Division. He was in France 
until after the armistice and was discharged 
February 6, 1919. 

Mr. Farnsworth after the war became a 
traveling salesman and in 1922 became asso- 
ciated with Gordon Strong & Company, prop- 
erty owners and managers in the Loop district. 
Col. Gordon Strong and his firm turned out 
a number of young men of exceptional capacity 
and business training. It was under such cir- 
cumstances and conditions that Ward Farns- 
worth gained his knowledge of financial and 
property matters. He was made manager of 
the brokerage department of Gordon Strong 
& Company, and remained with that firm for 



seven years. In July, 1930, he resigned and 
became associated with Fred McGuire, with 
offices at 327 South LaSalle Street. They have 
handled the management of important proper- 
ties, particularly those owned and controlled 
by Mr. Harley Clarke, president of the Utili- 
ties Power & Light Corporation and the Utili- 
ties Power & Light Securities Company. The 
firm specialize in the sale and leasing of 
downtown Chicago and New York properties, 
having an eastern office at 100 Broadway. 
Mr. Farnsworth is a member of the Union 
League Club. 

John Vincent McCormick, A. B., J. D., is 

dean of the law school of Loyola University, 
one of the old and representative educational 
institutions of Chicago, and prior to assuming 
his present office he had made a record of 
successful achievement in the practice of his 
profession in this city. 

Mr. McCormick was born at Mineral Point, 
Wisconsin, July 24, 1891, and is a son of 
John and Loretta (Laverty) McCormick. In 
the public schools of his native city he con- 
tinued his studies until he was there graduated 
in the high school, in 1910, and he advanced 
his education along academic lines by com- 
pleting a course in the University of Wis- 
consin, in which he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1914 and with the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts. From the law depart- 
ment of the University of Chicago he received 
in the year 1916 the degree of Doctor of Law, 
and October of that year marked his admis- 
sion to the Illinois bar. From 1917 until 1924 
he was engaged in the active general practice 
of his profession in Chicago as a member of 
the representative law firm of Fulton, Mc- 
Cormick & Fulton, and in the meanwhile he 
served as attorney for the Legal Aid Society 
of Chicago, in which connection he assisted in 
framing and championing the legislative en- 
actments the law curbing the activities of 
loan sharks in the state. In 1924 he was made 
secretary and acting dean of the law school or 
department of Loyola University, and of this 
dual position he continued the incumbent until 
1927, when he was advanced to his present 
office, that of dean of this important depart- 
ment of the university. Mr. McCormick is 
known for his comprehensive and accurate 
knowledge of the science of jurisprudence and 
has proved not only an able executive but also 
a valued instructor in the educational work of 
his profession. He has membership in the Chi- 
cago Bar Association, Illinois State Bar Asso- 
ciation, American Law Association and Amer- 
ican Law Institute. His political allegiance is 
given to the Democratic party. He and his 
wife are communicants of the Catholic Church. 
In addition to being affiliated with the Knights 
of Columbus he has membership in the Chi 
Phi and the Delta Theta Phi Artus college 
fraternities. 



ILLINOIS 



65 



On the 17th of March, 1928, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. McCormick to Miss Ade- 
line M. Ulias, of Chicago, and their winsome 
daughter, Patricia N., was born April 25, 
1929. The family home is maintained at 6151 
North Talman Avenue. 

Philip R. Davis. Lawyer, author and poet, 
collector of books and etchings, and a promi- 
nent figure in the American Legion, Philip 
R. Davis, of Chicago, is a man of varied 
interests and diversions. A member of the bar 
since 1919, he is engaged in general practice, 
but his studies have brought him much pro- 
fessional business along special lines. His 
inquiring mind has brought him into touch 
with many sides of life, but he is by no 
means merely a dilettante, for there is a 
strongly practical side to his nature, as will 
be shown in his activities as an attorney and 
as judge advocate of the Department of Illi- 
nois, American Legion. 

Mr. Davis was born at Milwaukee, Wiscon- 
sin, January 17, 1895, and is a son of Henry 
James Charles and Elizabeth (Heerstburg) 
Davis. His father was a business man of 
Milwaukee, where he served as a member of 
the City Council, but in 1898 the family moved 
to Kansas City, where Henry James Charles 
Davis became one of the organizers of the 
First Missouri Volunteer Infantry for service 
during the Spanish-American war, in which 
he was commissioned a major. In 1900 the 
family came to Chicago, where Mr. Davis has 
since made his home. 

After graduating from high school Philip 
R. Davis entered the University of Chicago, 
where he received the degree of Associate in 
Philosophy in 1913, subsequently taking the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws from Northwest- 
ern University as a member of the class of 
1916. Soon after the United States entered 
the World war, in April, 1917, Mr. Davis en- 
listed in the army as a private and was sent 
to Camp Logan, Texas, where he went into 
training with the Illinois (Thirty-third) Divi- 
sion and was commissioned first lieutenant. 
He went overseas with the Ninetieth Division 
and saw active and dangerous service on sev- 
eral of the major fronts in France. After the 
close of the war he helped organize the Ameri- 
can Legion in France and upon returning 
home his Legion activities were of such a 
character as to warrant his appointment by 
Gen. Milton J. Foreman as the first judge 
advocate for the American Legion, Department 
of Illinois. He was the first commander of 
Chicago Loop Post, and again served as its 
commander for the year 1929. He has been 
a delegate to several state and national con- 
ventions of the Legion and was chairman of 
the legislative committee of the Illinois con- 
vention in 1929. 

Mr. Davis began the practice of law in 
Chicago in 1919, and has been successfully 



engaged therein since that time, his offices 
being at 188 West Randolph Street. His 
practice is general in character, but through 
study and research he has become known as 
an authority in various special branches, such 
as laws relating to contractual matters in the 
theatre business and theatrical productions, 
also special assessment laws and in medical 
jurisprudence, as well as psychiatry as used 
in medical practice. He has contributed arti- 
cles on these subjects to the Illinois Law Re- 
view and the Medico-Legal Journal. He be- 
longs to the American, Illinois, Chicago Bar 
Associations and the Chicago Law Institute. 
He has been a member of the War Veterans 
Committee of the Chicago Bar Association, and 
in December, 1929, he drew up a report of 
the work of that committee which received 
the commendation of General Hines. 

Mr. Davis has achieved merited recognition 
as an author, poet and playwright. He is the 
author of the well-known volume of poems, 
Purple Plectron, also Acid and Honey; and co- 
author, with Bartlett Cormack, of the play 
"The Racket," which has been produced both 
on the stage and the screen. One of his inter- 
esting diversions is the collecting of etchings 
and books, both rare editions and first edi- 
tions, and he is the owner of one of the val- 
uable personal libraries of Chicago. Mr. Davis 
is a member and a former director of the 
Auction Bridge Club of Chicago, and belongs 
to the Military and Naval Intelligence Asso- 
ciation, the Army and Navy Club, Reserve 
Officers Association, Northwestern University 
Club, City Club and is the official orator for 
the National Security League, broadcasting 
patriotic addresses over stations WMAQ and 
WGN. A member of the University Golf 
Club, Mr. Davis has achieved prominent notice 
on the sporting pages of the newspapers. 

Hon. Miles J. Devine as a Chicago lawyer 
and Democratic leader has had a career of 
more than ordinary success and influence, 
enriched by widely extended friendships among 
prominent men of the city, state and nation. 

Mr. Devine is a native of Chicago, where 
he was born November 11, 1866, son of Patrick 
and Elizabeth (Conway) Devine. His mother 
came to Chicago when a girl of eight years 
and she passed away in 1925, at the age of 
seventy-five. She was a sister of the distin- 
guished ecclesiastic, Vicar General P. J. Con- 
way, who for twenty-eight years was pastor 
of St. Patrick's Church and later was vicar 
general of the diocese and pastor of the 
Holy Name Parish. 

Patrick Devine was also born in Ireland. 
He came to America when about seventeen 
years of age. He worked his way through 
the college at Emmitsburg, Maryland, and on 
coming to Chicago became identified with the 
old South Side City Railway Company. He 
was present when the first rail on State 



66 



ILLINOIS 






Street was laid. For twenty-one years he 
was superintendent of what might be called 
the "Horse Commissary" of the company, hav- 
ing- general supervisory charge of the feeding 
and housing of the several thousand horses 
used in drawing the cars over the tracks ot 
the company. Just before the great Chicago 
fire of 1871 he bought a farm at Libertyville 
in Lake County, and that was his home until 
his death in 1908. 

Miles J. Devine spent most of his youthful 
years on the farm in Lake County. During 
1880-81 he lived with his uncle, Rev. P. J. 
Conway, then pastor of St. Patrick's Church, 
and attended St. Patrick's School, located at 
Desplaines and Adams streets. His early 
choice of a career, to which he was encouraged 
by his parents and his uncle, was the priest- 
hood. With that in view he attended the 
St. Francis Seminary at Bay View, Wisconsin, 
for two years and spent four years in his 
studies in the Seminary of our Lady of Angels 
at Niagara, New York. Before completing his 
work preparatory to ordination he decided to 
become a lawyer. With that idea in mind 
he spent two years at Lake Forest University. 
Mr. Devine was one of the early students in 
the Chicago College of Law and among his 
teachers were Judge Bailey, of the Supreme 
Court, and Judge Thomas A. Moran, of the 
Appellate Court. He was granted his law 
degree in 1890 and admitted to the bar the 
same year. His abilities brought him early 
recognition in the public life of the city. He 
acted as city prosecuting attorney through the 
administrations of three mayors, Carter Har- 
rison, Sr., Hopkins and Swift. In 1897 he 
was elected city attorney of Chicago 5< when 
Carter Harrison, Jr., was chosen to his first 
term in that office. He served two years and 
declined reelection in order to return to private 
practice. 

Mr. Devine declined the Democratic nom- 
ination for state senator from the Eighth 
District in 1895, and he also declined nomina- 
tion in 1896 to represent the Eighth District 
in Congress. That district was then Demo- 
cratic by fully 8,000 majority, and a nom- 
ination would have been equivalent to election. 
In 1912 he was candidate for the Democratic 
nomination for state's attorney of Cook 
County. His friends always claimed that he 
won the nomination, but the county machine 
counted him out. 

Mr. Devine has always represented the clean 
element in politics, and of all the honors 
conferred upon him he has perhaps appreciated 
most that of being president of the Cook 
County Democracy, an office he has held for 
nineteen years. This organization was started 
in 1882, fifty years ago. Mr. Devine has 
frequently been on the stump in campaigns 
in and outside the city, and when William J. 
Bryan was candidate for President he cam- 
paigned in several states. 



During his forty years as a practicing law- 
yer Mr. Devine has been retained in many 
famous cases in Illinois and in other states. 
He ranks as one of the ablest criminal lawyers 
in Chicago. He has been attorney for the 
defense in ninety-nine murder cases, and lost 
only four of them, the severest penalty ever 
inflicted on one of his clients being twenty 
years. 

Politics and the law have not bounded his 
many interesting contacts with the world of 
men. As a youth he was noted as an athlete, 
competed with some of the fastest runners 
in the United States and at one time held the 
twenty-five mile walking record of the world. 
Before he was twenty-one the late Captain 
Anson, the immortal baseball figure of Chicago, 
asked him to sign a contract as a pitcher, but 
Mr. Devine yielded to the objections of his 
father to entering professional baseball. Many 
older citizens of Chicago will recall the old 
race track in Garfield Park, which finally was 
removed to make room for the golf links. 
Mr. Devine was elected president of the old 
Garfield Park Driving Association, and since 
that organization was never disbanded he still 
holds the nominal title. He is a member of 
the Chicago, Illinois State and American Bar 
Associations, the Illinois Athletic Club, Chi- 
cago Association of Commerce, Citizens Asso- 
ciation of Illinois, Columbian Country Club 
and Knights of Columbus. 

Mr. Devine's home is at 5400 Washington 
Boulevard. He married, March 17, 1884, Miss 
Emma Gamash, of Waukegan, where she was 
born and reared. Seven children were born to 
their marriage: Miles J., Jr.; Paul P., who 
died in April, 1923; Leo Jerome, who while 
in service overseas in France was gassed, and 
this injury later caused his death; Mable Ruth; 
Raymond; Mildred; and Carter Harrison, 
deceased. 

Arthur Perrow, as general auditor for the 
Illinois Bell Telephone Company, has been a 
resident of Chicago since 1922. Mr. Perrow 
is an interesting personality as well as a thor- 
oughly modern type of the business executive 
His career illustrates the fact that accountancy 
is not merely a profession, but an opportunity 
through which understanding may be broad- 
ened to reach all the fundamentals and tech- 
nicalities of a great and complicated industry 
He possesses an immense fund of technica 
knowledge and also has established many con- 
tacts with his fellow men not only in his owr 
business but in others as well. Though i 
very busy man he has acquired an extensive 
relationship with outside interests and organ! 
zations, and has written a number of articles 
and made public addresses on subjects of vita 
importance to every business man. 

Mr. Perrow was born in Boston, Massachu 
setts, February 17, 1888, and grew up in th< 
cultured atmosphere of that city, going througl 



ILLINOIS 



67 



the local public schools and as a matter of 
course entering college. The family suffered 
financial reverses in the panic of 1907, and 
then, at the age of nineteen, he left college, 
went to work at a salary of fifteen dollars 
a week as junior accountant for a firm of cer- 
tified public accountants, and continued his 
education in night school, specializing in 
accounting. After completing his training 
apprenticeship he went to Dallas, Texas, to 
the office of a utility corporation, and soon 
afterward was made general bookkeeper for 
the Southwestern Telegraph & Telephone Com- 
pany there. Mr. Perrow spent five years in 
Dallas and was then transferred to the St. 
Louis office of the Southwestern Belle Tele- 
phone Company. In 1916 he was transferred 
to the New York offices of the American Tele- 
phone & Telegraph Company, on the comp- 
troller's staff. On accepting transfer to Chi- 
cago in 1922 he was made chief accountant 
of the Illinois Bell Telephone Company, and 
in 1930 was elected general auditor for that 
corporation. In his work for this corporation 
at Chicago he has had charge of a great 
variety of technical and executive duties, 
involving the application of accounting man- 
agerial and financial principles. 

Among some of his published articles are: 
"Salvaging Man-Power/' "Business and Edu- 
cation," "The College Man in Industry," 
"Functions of the Chief Accountant." In his 
addresses before many representative groups 
and in his articles he has emphasized what he 
believes to be the five cardinal principles on 
which any successful man's life and conduct 
should be based: Vision, sincerity, enthusiasm, 
perseverance and progress. 

Mr. Perrow is also vice president of the 
Bell Savings Building & Loan Association and 
a director of the Central Life Insurance Com- 
pany. He has been intensely interested in 
civic and educational affairs, and many of 
his addresses have been delivered before college 
audiences. The University of Illinois Chapter 
of Beta Alpha Psi chose him an honorary 
member. He is vice president of the Midland 
Club of Chicago, is a past president of the 
Executives Club of Chicago, a member of the 
Chicago Association of Commerce, the Traffic 
Club, the Electric Association and the Masonic 
fraternity. His intense and direct methods 
have made him valuable to the success of 
movements of various kinds and he has been 
sponsor of such enterprises as the Chicago 
season of the American Opera Company. While 
living in Dallas Mr. Perrow became a member 
of one of the church choirs ; he married another 
singer in that organization, Miss Gladys 
McEvoy. They are the parents of two chil- 
dren, Arthur, Jr., and Gladys Margaret. 
Arthur, Jr., was graduated from the Morgan 
Park Military Academy in June, 1930, and 
in the fall of the same year entered the Uni- 
versity of Michigan, where he intends to 



specialize in the law course. In September, 
1931, the daughter, Gladys, entered her junior 
year at Northwestern University. 

Werner W. Schroeder has exemplified his 
professional ability and resourcefulness both 
in direct practice and in connection with gov- 
ernmental affairs in his native State of Illinois, 
and has been established in the successful 
practice of law in Chicago since 1922. He 
maintains his offices at No. 1 North LaSalle 
Street, and his substantial and important law 
practice is largely with probate, chancery and 
corporation matters. 

Mr. Schroeder was born in the City of 
Kankakee, Illinois, December 20, 1892, and 
is a son of Rev. Frederick, now deceased, and 
Sophia (Steinmeier) Schroeder. Rev. Fred- 
erick Schroeder, a man of superior intellectual 
ken, had prolonged and zealous service as a 
clergyman of the Lutheran Church, and he 
maintained his residence in Kankakee from 
1881 until his death in 1916. 

Werner W. Schroeder is indebted to the 
Kankakee public schools for his early edu- 
cational discipline, which included that of the 
high school, and thereafter he continued his 
studies in the University of Michigan, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1914 and with the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts. In 1916 he was graduated in the 
law department of that great institution, and 
after thus receiving his degree of Juris Doctor 
and being admitted to the Illinois bar he was 
engaged in the practice of his profession in 
his native city, Kankakee, until 1921. In that 
year he went to Springfield, the capital city, 
where he remained in charge of the legislative 
reference bureau during a period of two years, 
under appointment by Governor Small. Within 
this period Mr. Schroeder formulated and' 
drafted a number of important measures that 
received enactment by the Legislature. It 
will be recalled that various attempts had 
been made to enact primary election laws for 
Illinois, but all such provisions proved futile 
until the bill drafted by Mr. Schroeder was 
finally presented, proved acceptable and was 
passed by the legislative bodies. It was thus 
that the Illinois primary election system, by 
enactment in 1927 and duly approved by the 
Supreme Court of the state, was put into 
force and well regulated commission. He like- 
wise drew up the bills covering the $100,- 
000,000 bond issue for improving the roads 
of the state, and by him was drafted also 
the bill under the provision of which the 
present Illinois boxing commission was cre- 
ated. It may further be stated that Mr. 
Schroeder loyally represented Governor Small 
in the vexed litigation projected in the latter 
period of the governor's administration. 

Upon leaving the state capital, in 1922, Mr. 
Schroeder established himself in the practice 
of his profession in Chicago, and here he has 



68 



ILLINOIS 



won prestige and success of constantly cumu- 
lative trend. He is eligible for practice before 
the Federal and Supreme Courts of Illinois 
and also the Supreme Court of the United 
States. He has membership in the Chicago 
Bar Association, Illinois State Bar Association 
and American Bar Association, is a stalwart 
in the ranks of the Republican party, is affili- 
ated with the Phi Beta Kappa and the Order 
of the Coif, collegiate fraternal organizations, 
and in Chicago he has membership in the 
Hamilton Club, the Illinois Athletic Associa- 
tion and the Bunker Hill Country Club. In 
his native City of Kankakee was solemnized 
his marriage to Miss Elizabeth More, who is 
the popular chatelaine of their home, at 1125 
Farwell Avenue. 

John Pierre Roche is president of the 
Roche Advertising Company, which since its 
founding in 1926 has become one of the largest 
organizations in Chicago handling national 
advertising throughout the Middle West. Mr. 
Roche, the head of the business, was born in 
Aberdeen, South Dakota, in 1889, but has lived 
in Chicago practically all his life. 

He is a son of the late Edmund H. Roche, 
who died in 1929, after a long and distin- 
guished career in business and public affairs. 
He was a native of New York City, where 
he was born in 1854. During his early years 
in Chicago he was a distiller, and later was 
engaged in the general insurance business. 
Edmund H. Roche was a close personal friend 
and political associate of Governor E. F. 
Dunne. While Judge Dunne was mayor of 
Chicago Mr. Roche was city purchasing agent. 
During the administration of Governor Dunne 
Mr. Roche was state auditor. These positions 
gave his name notable distinction throughout 
the state and city, and he was an able 
co-worker of Judge Dunne in the matter of 
economy and efficiency in public business. He 
was a member of the Illinois Athletic Club, 
the Iroquois Club and the Westward Ho Golf 
Club. Edmund H. Roche married Anna 
Dwyer. Both are deceased. 

John Pierre Roche was reared and educated 
in Chicago, attended St. Ignatius College, and 
in 1911 was graduated A. B. from Columbia 
University of New York. All of his business 
experience has been in the advertising pro- 
fession. For about fifteen years he was associ- 
ated with the McJunkin Advertising Company. 
He left that organization, in 1926, to establish 
a business of his own, the Roche Advertising 
Company, of which he is president. This 
company handles many large accounts through- 
out the country, representing a general line 
of business and industry, particularly organi- 
zations having a nation-wide sale and distri- 
bution. His company has specialized in auto- 
mobile advertising. 

Mr. Roche is a World war veteran. In the 
spring of 1917 he enlisted, at first in the 



Thirty-third or All Illinois, Division. He was 
in training at Camp Logan, Texas, with this 
division, but later was transferred to the 
Eighty-seventh Division at Camp Pike, Arkan- 
sas. He was overseas with the Eighty-seventh, 
and held a commission as second lieutenant. 
He received his honorable discharge in 1919. 
Mr. Roche is a member of the Union League 
Club, Chicago Yacht Club and Illinois Athletic 
Club. He married a member of an old and 
prominent Chicago family, Miss Frances Amb- 
ler, and they have two sons, John Kirby and 
Pierre Dwyer Roche. 

George Packard has been a member of 
the Chicago bar nearly forty years. His big 
work has been accomplished in the quiet rou- 
tine of his profession, with no important excur- 
sions into political life, and it is his fellow 
members of the bar who best appreciate the 
eminent qualifications of this Chicago attorney. 

Mr. Packard was born at Providence, Rhode 
Island, May 27, 1868, son of William L. and 
Mary (Easton) Packard. He received his early 
English and classical education in schools at 
Providence from 1876 to 1885, and then entered 
Brown University, where he took his A. B. 
degree in 1889. Soon afterward coming to 
Chicago, Mr. Packard entered the law depart- 
ment of Northwestern University and was 
graduated LL. B. in 1891 and admitted to 
the bar the same year. It has been his good 
fortune to have been associated from the 
beginning of his career with some of Chicago's 
foremost law firms. He was taken into the 
office of Peckham & Brown, but during 1892-93 
gave most of his time to his duties as assistant 
attorney for the World's Columbia Exposition. 
In 1893 he returned to Peckham & Brown, 
with whom he handled a general practice. In 
1897 this firm became Peckham, Brown & 
Packard. Mr. Packard was closely associated 
with his partner Mr. Brown, who was acting 
as attorney for the park board, in settling 
controversies of long standing involving the 
questions of riparian rights in Illinois. These 
controversies arose in connection with the 
development of Lincoln Park. Mr. Packard 
had much to do with that litigation through- 
out the years 1896-99. In the summer of 
1903 Mr. Brown withdrew from the firm to 
go on the Circuit Court bench, and at that 
time three other well known Chicago lawyers 
came into the firm, Edwin Burritt Smith, W. 
T. ApMadoc and Vincent J. Walsh. The firm 
was Peckham, Smith, Packard & ApMadoc 
until the death of Edwin Burritt Smith, and 
about that time Judge Brown retired from 
the bench and reentered the firm, which car- 
ried the title of Peckham, Brown, Packard 
& Walsh for several years. Later it was 
Miller, Starr, Brown, Packard & Peckham, 
and after the death of John S. Miller, in 
1922, became Brown, Packard, Peckham & 
Barnes. At the present time Mr. Packard 



ILLINOIS 



69 



is senior partner of the firm Packard, Barnes, 
McCaughey & Schumacher, with offices at 38 
South Dearborn Street. His partners are 
Cecil Barnes, Russell J. McCaughey and Bowen 
E. Schumacher. 

Mr. Packard is a member of the Chicago, 
Illinois State and American Bar Associations, 
is a Democrat in politics, a member of the 
Chicago Literary, University, City and Cliff 
Dwellers Clubs. He is president of the Soci- 
ety for Ethical Culture, and is a Phi Beta 
Kappa. 

He married, January 23, 1893, Miss Caro- 
line Howe, of Chicago. Their three children 
are: Dorothy, wife of F. Farrington Holt; 
Frank H.; and Mary, Mrs. Fred W. Copeland. 

Pittsfield Public Library. Nearly twenty 
years before the general library law was 
passed by the Illinois Legislature a library 
movement was under way at Pittsfield. Pitts- 
field was the early home of many cultured and 
distinguished Illinois citizens, and the library 
movement was in part a reflex of their activi- 
ties and influence. John G. Nicolay, editor 
of the Pittsfield Free Press, on October 25, 
1855, wrote: "We have already through the 
liberality of a few persons, who ever and 
always lend a helping hand to the advance- 
ment of the public good, and the energetic 
efforts of others with their means, a library 
of three or four hundred volumes. " The library 
trustees at that time were John G. Nicolay, 
John J. Weed, Charles C. Warner, Dan J. 
Brown, Marcellus Ross, D. H. Gilmer, chair- 
man, and Richard M. Atkinson, secretary. The 
secretary of the board stated: "Our library 
now has forty members and 400 volumes, and 
free from debt." 

The Illinois Library Law was passed in 
1872. In 1874 the women of Pittsfield organ- 
ized the Pittsfield Ladies Free Reading Room 
and Public Library, supported by subscrip- 
tions by members. In 1879 the citizens voted 
to levy a small tax to support the library 
and its usefulness. There were about a thou- 
sand volumes at this time, besides a number 
of papers and periodicals. The first library 
was located upstairs in the Matthews Building, 
on the northwest corner of the Square. It 
was later moved above the Dickson Building, 
on the north side of the Square, and it 
remained in that building until moved to the 
present library. Among the patrons and trus- 
tees at the time the library was organized 
were Ed Binns, Louis Hirsheimer, Albert 
Fisher, Judge Higbee, Thomas Worthington 
and Thomas Dickson. Judge Harry Higbee 
wrote the constitution and by-laws for the 
library. 

In 1906 Mr. Andrew Carnegie made a dona- 
tion of $7,500 for the erection of a new library 
building. Judge Harry Higbee and his mother 
gave the lot where the library stands. Mrs. 
Higbee also gave the furniture, pictures and 



the cork carpet for the children's room. Dedi- 
cation exercises were held on Thursday, May 
9, 1907. The trustees at this time were: 
A. Dow, president, F. W. Niebur, secretary, 
Mrs. Lizzie Duffield, Mrs. Will Bush, C. H. 
Harder, R. T. Hicks, Dr. Humpert, Mrs. Ben 
Hirsheimer and John E. Vertrees. 

In June, 1924, the work of standardizing 
the library was completed, the old system of 
cataloging being brought up to standard, and 
all books and material discarded that were 
useless to the library. At the present time 
the library contains over 9,000 volumes and 
the statistics of circulation show that that 
Pittsfield is a reading community. 

For many years those who acted as librari- 
ans were volunteers, including Maria Garret, 
Emma Hill, Nellie Rider, Iona Stanton, Fanny 
Watson, Sally Graves, Fanny Quinby and 
Lulu Quinby. Lulu Quinby was librarian for 
fourteen years, up to 1919. Since September, 
1919, the librarian has been Miss Helen S. 
Shadel. Her father was one of the substantial 
German-American citizens of Pittsfield, who 
died February 10, 1925. Miss Shadel was born 
and reared at Pittsfield, attended high school 
there and completed her library training in 
the library training school at the University 
of Illinois. 

Dot Dorsey Swan, as publisher of the Pike 
County Republican, at Pittsfield, has a position 
that gives her special distinction among Illinois 
women. Prior to the death of her late hus- 
band, Judge Burr Harrison Swan, her knowl- 
edge of the newspaper business was such as 
the wife of any successful man would have 
of his affairs. When she took over the per- 
sonal management of the plant she determined 
that the destiny of the business would rise 
or fall on the score of her own abilities, and 
from the first issue she placed her name on 
the editorial page as publisher. The Pike 
County Republican is today, as it was in 
former years, one of the strongest Republican 
papers in Southern Illinois, a real newspaper 
providing a literary medium for contact with 
the great happenings of the outside world. 
All the important experiences and events in 
Pike County find weekly publications in the 
columns. 

The Pike County Republican is now in its 
ninetieth year. It was founded in 1842, by 
Michael Noyes, as the Sucker and Farmers 
Record. It was Pike County's first newspaper. 
About 1850 Zebulon N. Garbutt acquired the 
plant and changed the name to the Free 
Press. Then came John G. Nicolay, foster 
son of Mr. Garbutt. John G. Nicolay through 
the columns of the Free Press was the first 
to propose the name of Abraham Lincoln for 
the Presidency. John G. Nicolay controlled 
the destiny of the paper in Pike County until 
he went to Washington as Lincoln's private 
secretary. Following that came a succession 



70 



ILLINOIS 



of owners and editors, and after the war the 
name was changed to the Journal. In 1868 
came another change in name, to the Old Flag. 
In 1894 the name was changed to the Pike 
County Republican. 

On March 1, 1901, Burr Harrison Swan took 
over the management and business control. At 
that time the circulation was about 400. Judge 
Swan had a real genius for newspaper work. 
He was a practical printer, and he often set 
the type on news and editorial articles without 
the use of copy. He gave the Republican a 
literary quality, gave it character as a news- 
paper, paid off the debts and made it a suc- 
cessful business, and as a result of a quarter 
of a century of hard work not only the people 
of Pike County but Republicans all over the 
state and newspaper men realized that his 
paper and his personal character were inte- 
grated as one of the most important institu- 
tions of the county. 

His record as a newspaper man and as a 
citizen of Pittsfield was well and briefly told 
in an editorial from the Quincy Herald-Whig, 
which said: 

"His death in active years — he was fifty-one 
years of age — recalls, to some Quincy men 
who knew him, a humble and obscure beginning 
in the printing and publishing business. Leg- 
end says Mr. Swan borrowed enough money 
to get his start on the Pike County Republican. 
It had a circulation of 500 or 600 in those 
days. Mr. Swan built it up to 4,000 and made 
it by far the best advertising medium in Pike 
County. It was ably edited, its news of the 
wholesome sort, it made a welcome entrance 
each week in the homes of its readers and 
it had a human touch that made the county 
seat and county feel that they were all good 
neighbors and friends. 

"The list of enterprises with which Mr. 
Swan was identified almost amazes one. He 
had helped raise money for a memorial hall 
for the Legion, had served a term or two in 
the offices of the commercial organization of 
Pittsfield, helped Pittsfield get her new high 
school building and served for eighteen years 
on the Board of Education, and twelve years 
as president of the board. This was com- 
munity activity which it is easy to shirk. 
It seems almost impossible that any one man 
could do everything that is credited to Burr 
Swan and still carry on a publishing business, 
be county judge and later postmaster, and 
take an interest in lodge and church work. 
But that was his record. 

"Burr Swan proved that there was oppor- 
tunity in 'the old home town.' He was suc- 
cessful. People used to say about Ed Howe, 
of Atchison, Kansas, that no man knew or 
represented Atchison better. Probably the 
same sort of an epitaph will do for Burr 
Swan in Pike County." 

Burr Harrison Swan was born at Chambers- 
burg, April 30, 1876, and died October 13, 
1927. He was a son of Christopher Irving 



and Cordelia (Dunham) Swan, and a grand- 
son of Burr Harrison Swan. Christopher 
Irving Swan was born February 10, 1850, 
and died in Texas in August, 1918. C. I. 
Swan was an early day school teacher and 
later county superintendent of schools and 
county clerk of Pike County. He was a Demo- 
crat and at one time published a Democratic 
newspaper, but his son, Burr Harrison Swan, 
was a resolute Republican and through the 
Pike County Republican did a splendid work 
in building up the party in the county. Judge 
Swan was county judge of Pike County from 
1918 to 1922, being the first Republican to 
hold a county office in Pike County in over 
forty years. During the Spanish-American 
war he was a sergeant in Company A of the 
Fifth Regular Illinois Infantry. He was a 
Mason and member of other fraternal and 
civic organizations, and he worked unceasingly 
for the upbuilding of Pittsfield schools and 
welfare organizations. For twelve years he 
was superintendent of the Sunday School of 
the Christian Church. He was postmaster 
of Pittsfield from 1922 to 1925. 

On March 29, .1898, Budd Harrison Swan 
and Miss Dot Dorsey were married. Mrs. 
Swan is a daughter of Edgar R. and Rachael 
(Chenoweth) Dorsey. The Dorsey family 
originated in France, where the name was 
spelled D'Orsey. A branch of the family 
moved to Scotland and from there came to 
America. The Chenoweths were of English 
and Welsh ancestry. The Dorsey family came 
to Pike County in 1826, just three years after 
the county was organized. Edgar R. Dorsey 
was widely known as a breeder and importer 
of fine hogs and horses. 

Mrs. Swan was educated in the schools of 
Pittsfield and attended the Illinois Woman's 
College at Jacksonville. She has three chil- 
dren. Her daughter Dorothy, editor of the 
Pike County Republican, was educated in the 
public schools of Pittsfield, attended the Penn- 
sylvania Woman's College at Pittsburgh and 
a trade school at Toledo. She was in the 
Government service at Washington when she 
was married, September 1, 1925, to Mr. Walter 
Preston Miller. Mr. Miller was born at Wash- 
ington, but his family came from Bristol, 
Tennessee. Both his grandfathers were col- 
onels in the Civil war, his maternal grand- 
father being in the Confederate army and 
his paternal grandfather a Union soldier. Wal- 
ter Preston Miller is now the business man- 
ager of the Pike County Republican. 

Mrs. Swan's second daughter, Maxine, was 
educated in the Chicago Normal College in 
physical education and was an instructor at 
Denver, Colorado, until her marriage in 1927 
to Mr. William F. Oatman, of Arpin, Wiscon- 
sin. Mr. and Mrs. Oatman have two children, 
John David and Rachael. 

Priscilla, the youngest child of Mrs. Swan, 
is a student in the Pittsfield High School, 
class of 1933. 



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ILLINOIS 



71 



C. W. Caughlan is editor of the Pike County 
Times, one of the most widely quoted Demo- 
cratic journals in Illinois. The Pike County 
Times was the successor of the Democratic 
Herald, which was founded in 1885, and in 
its present form represents a combination of 
jthree earlier papers. Mr. Caughlan has been 
(connected with the Times since 1895, when 
he purchased the Pike County Banner, associ- 
ated with A. C. Bentley, and the name was 
phanged at that time to the Pike County Times. 
The Times has always been Democratic in 
[politics, and has been one of the staunch 
upholders of the original principles of the 
party. It has a circulation of 2,500 copies, 
md the outside mailing list includes sub- 
scribers in practically every state in the Union. 

Mr. Caughlan is a veteran in the newspaper 
business, and he served his apprenticeship 
in Kansas City, Missouri. He was born on 
a farm north of St. Joseph, Missouri, July 
>, 1860. His great-grandfather was Cornelius 
Caughlan, a follower of Robert Emmet, the 
[rish patriot. For his devotion to the cause 
)f Irish freedom he suffered imprisonment 
n Ireland and after being released came to 
America and settled at Baltimore, where he 
ived out his life. His son, John Caughlan, 
vas an educator by profession. From Balti- 
nore he moved to Virginia, where he taught 
md where he married Mary Byrd Childress. 
She was of an old Virginia family whose 
mcestors were members of the original colony 
)f Jamestown. 

The father of C. W. Caughlan was also 
lamed John Caughlan. He spent most of his 
ife in Missouri, where he died in 1919, at 
;he age of eighty-seven. John Caughlan mar- 
•ied Nancy Jane Miller, who was of a pioneer 
'amily of Northwest Missouri. Her great- 
grandfather was a Revolutionary soldier. 

C. W. Caughlan had only a limited education 
;o far as schools were concerned, but when a 
)oy he had the good fortune to be employed 
>y the late Colonel Nelson in the early eighties, 
shortly after the latter founded the Kansas 
sity Star. At that time, says Mr. Caughlan, 
Colonel Nelson's office equipment was not as 
arge as the office of the Pike County Times. 
That was over fifty years ago. Mr. Caughlan 
vas associated with every newspaper in Kan- 
sas City during those years and he learned 
ournahsm by a practical experience that 
>rought him in contact with a number of 
he great names in American newspaperdom. 
tfr. Caughlan has always been a temperance 
tdvocate, and he asserts that contrary to the 
>opular opinion the old times country news- 
>aper man was not addicted to liquor more 
han other of his contemporaries. Once Mr. 
Caughlan attended a convention of newspaper 
nen in Florida, where drinking was the least 
•f the recreations of these busy men. 

Mr. Caughlan married Miss Anna Long, 
•f Payson, Illinois, daughter of Henry Long 



and his wife, Lavina Baker. The Baker fam- 
ily came to America in Colonial times. Mr. 
and Mrs. Caughlan have a family of children 
named John, Mabel, Arthur, Mary, Helen, 
Ruth and Fred. His sons are associated with 
him in the Pike County Times, which is pub- 
lished by C. W. Caughlan & Sons. Mr. Caugh- 
lan is a member of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and the Illinois Press Association. 

Zealy M. Holmes has one of the largest 
farms and is one of the outstanding repre- 
sentatives of the agricultural industry of Peo- 
ria County. His home is in Medina Town- 
ship, at Mossville. His career has been com- 
pounded of hard work, enterprise, foresight 
and thrift, but he also is indebted to the 
heritage of pioneer forefathers. 

The Holmes family has lived in Peoria 
County for almost a century. Zealy M. Holmes 
was born at the old Holmes farm, February 
8, 1866, son of John and Lydia Ann (Cham- 
bers) Holmes. John Holmes was born in 
Londonderry, Ireland, in 1824, of pure Scotch 
ancestry. He was a son of George and Nancy 
(Donaldson) Holmes. Nancy Donaldson was 
a descendant of John Donaldson, a staunch 
supporter of the Crown and the Protestant 
Church, and who at the time of his death 
was master of seals, an office in which he 
was succeeded by his son, John A. Donaldson. 
George Holmes brought his family to America 
in 1827, first settling in New York, where 
he was connected with the lumber industry 
for eight years. In 1835 he came to Illinois 
and settled in section 29 of Medina Township, 
where he lived until his death in 1873. His 
wife died in 1847 and they were buried in 
the Mount Hawley Cemetery. 

John Holmes was about four years old when 
he came to America and he grew up from 
the age of eleven in Peoria County. He pros- 
pered as a farmer and he and his wife had 
a large family of twelve children, ten of whom 
lived to maturity: Josephine, Thomas B., 
George, Nancy J., William, John C, Zealy 
M., Charles, Walter, and Lydia L. 

Zealy M. Holmes attended a grade school 
at Alta and a business college at Dunlap. 
From earliest recollection he had some duties 
and chores on the home farm, and on leaving 
school started his life as a renter, his father 
leasing him some land. Putting the accumu- 
lations of one year with those of the next 
and pursuing a steady policy of work and 
good management he has built up a farm 
of 640 acres in Medina Township. 

Mr. Holmes married, February 15, 1888 
Nellie M. Frye, daughter of Smith and Rebecca 
(Johnston) Frye. Her father was a suc- 
cessful farmer and stock man in Richwood 
Township, and both her parents are buried 
in the Springdale Cemetery. Mr. and Mrs 
Holmes have three children: Maurice, a Peo- 
ria County farmer, whose career is sketched 



72 



ILLINOIS 



elsewhere, Charles W., who married Edna 
Scheilein and has two children, named Ellen 
R. and Zealy M.; and John S., who married 
Frances Wilhelm, and their children are Nellie 
M., John R., Jean L. and Clifford D. 

Zealy M. Holmes has been a prominent 
Democrat and citizen of his township and 
county. He was elected township clerk, was 
for thirty-one years township school treasurer, 
was elected and served one year as tax col- 
lector, and for twelve years was supervisor 
of Medina Township. For three years he 
was a vice president of the Illinois Agricul- 
tural Association, and for two years was road 
commissioner and for five years a member 
of the executive board of the Agricultural 
Commission. For seven years he was presi- 
dent of the Peoria County Farm Bureau and 
for the past ten years has served as farm 
manager of Bradley Polytechnic Institute, and 
has been a trustee since the foundation of 
the institute. Mr. Holmes and his family 
take a prominent part in church and social 
affairs. For seven years he was president 
of the Board of Trustees of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church in his community. He is 
a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason 
and member of the Modern Woodmen of 
America. 

Robert B. MacDonald, of Moline, has had 
a business career which could be described 
in a few words. When he left school his first 
work was with a public utility organization. 
Public utilities has been his absorbing occu- 
pation and vocation ever since. Mr. MacDon- 
ald had the quality of concentration which is 
perhaps derived from his Scotch ancestry and 
that has brought to him responsibilities meas- 
ured by important relationships as president 
and in other official capacities with half a 
dozen or more of the best known electric 
power, transportation and other public utility 
organizations in the Mississippi River Valley 
between Illinois and Iowa. 

Mr. MacDonald was born on Prince Edward 
Island, Canada, January 24, 1882, while his 
grandparents came from Scotland. His parents 
were James Alexander and Alexia (Morrison) 
MacDonald, also natives of Canada. His father 
was a carriage maker, and spent the greater 
part of his active life at Monroe, Iowa, where 
he died in 1925 and where the widowed mother 
still resides. Both parents were active mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. James Mac- 
Donald was a Republican and at one time was 
mayor of Monroe. 

Robert MacDonald was the third in a family 
of eight children. He completed his education 
in the Monroe High School and at the age 
of seventeen went to work for a public utility 
company at Lincoln, Nebraska. He was at 
Lincoln from 1899 to 1906, then with another 
organization at Fort Dodge, Iowa, until 1917, 
and in the latter year came to Moline, being 



made president of the People's Power Com- 
pany, a subsidiary of the United Light & 
Power Company. 

Mr. MacDonald's official relationships at the 
present time include the following: President 
of the People's Power Company; president of 
the Tri-City Railway Company of Illinois, 
the Tri-City Railway Company of Iowa, the 
Moline-Rock Island Manufacturing Company, 
Riverside Power Manufacturing Company, 
People's Light Company of Iowa, the Clinton- 
Davenport-Muscatine Railway Company, Iowa 
City Light & Power Company; is vice president 
of the United Light & Power Engineering & 
Construction Company; director of the United 
Light & Power Company; director of the State 
Bank of Rock Island; and vice president of 
the Park Board of Rock Island. 

Mr. MacDonald married, January 27, 1909, 
Miss Margaret H. Koll, who was born and 
reared at Fort Dodge, Iowa. They have four 
children, all of them in school, Robert J., 
Margaret H., Richard P. and Norman J, twins. 
Mrs. MacDonald is a member of the Catholic 
Church. 

Mr. MacDonald is a York and Scottish Rite 
Mason, member of the B. P. 0. Elks, Short 
Hills Golf Club, Moline Rotary Club and is a 
Republican in politics. 

Robert T. Sherman, a lawyer, with offices 
at 1 LaSalle Street, and a resident of Evans- 
ton, is a great-grandson of Francis Cornwell 
Sherman, builder and owner of the original 
Sherman House in Chicago. 

Francis Cornwell Sherman was born at New- 
town, Connecticut, in 1805 and arrived in 
Chicago in 1834. During 1836-37 he put up 
a frame building on Randolph, between LaSalle 
and Wells street, eighteen by thirty-four feet, 
twelve feet high, in which he opened a board- 
ing house. It was the original Sherman House. 
For a time he also was interested in a pioneer 
wagon transportation business between Chi- 
cago and Joliet, Galena, Ottawa, Peoria and 
other places. The Sherman Hotel property 
remained in the ownership of his descendants 
until 1911. Francis Cornwell Sherman was 
long prominent in politics as well as in busi- 
ness. He was one of the first Board of Trus- 
tees of the Town of Chicago, was a member 
of the Board of County Commissioners, in 
1843 was in the Legislature, served in the 
Constitutional Convention, and in 1862, during 
the Civil war, was elected mayor, serving 
three terms, 1862-64. He died November 12, 
1870. His wife was Electa Trowbridge, of 
Connecticut. The oldest son, Gen. Francis T. 
Sherman, went into the Union army in the 
Civil war from Chicago and rose to the rank 
of brigadier-general. 

Robert T. Sherman was born at Evanston, 
in 1898, son of Edwin and Alida (White) 
Sherman. Edwin Sherman for a number oi 
years has been a well known Evanston bankei 



ILLINOIS 



73 



Robert T. Sherman was educated in public 
schools in Evanston, graduated A. B. from 
Princeton University in 1920, and from the 
Harvard University Law School in 1922. Dur- 
ing the World war he was in the United States 
Navy from May, 1917, until the spring of 
1919. 

Mr. Sherman has been engaged in the prac- 
tice of law at Chicago since 1922 and is 
member of the law firm of Miller, Gorham 
& Wales. His home has always been in Evans- 
ton, where he has been active in civic and 
business affairs. He now represents the First 
Ward in the Evanston City Council. He is a 
member of the Glenview Country Club. 

He married Miss Jean Palmer Dawes, 
daughter of Mr. Rufus C. Dawes. They have 
one daughter, Alida White Sherman. 

Benjamin J. Kough, director of Deere & 
Company and manager of one of its great 
manufacturing plants at Moline, started with 
that organization as one of the humblest 
workers on the payroll, in a job paying ten 
cents an hour. His tremendous enthusiasm 
and interest and a natural capacity for execu- 
tive duties in modern industry have brought 
him through a succession of responsibilities 
to his present rank and status with Deere 
& Company. 

Mr. Kough was born in Moorhead, Minne- 
sota, March 13, 1886, son of Benjamin J. and 
Silvia (Bennett) Kough. His mother was 
born in Virginia and his father in Huntingdon, 
Pennsylvania. In 1852 they moved out to 
Scott County, Iowa. B. J. Kough was a vet- 
eran railroad man. In 1872 he entered the 
service of the Great Northern Railway and 
was a conductor on that road until his death 
in 1914. His wife died in 1895, and of their 
five children four are living. Both parents 
were members of the Episcopal Church and 
B. J. Kough was a Republican and a Mason. 

Benjamin J. Kough attended school at Rock 
Island and completed his high school course 
in 1904. On August 15 of the same year 
he went to work in one of the Deere Company's 
plants, at ten cents an hour, as helper in the 
blacksmith's shop. From helper he was 
advanced to clerk to the foreman of the black- 
smith shop, during 1905 worked in the stock 
department, in 1906-07 was in the master 
mechanic's office, in 1908-10 was secretary 
to G. W. Mixten, the superintendent and in 
1911 was made general foreman in the cul- 
tivator room. In 1912 he was put in the 
piece rates department and for several years 
was assistant superintendent in charge of 
production. During 1916-17 he was at East 
Moline as superintendent of the Marseilles 
works, now the John Deere Spreader Works. 
He was advanced to manager of this plant 
during 1918-20 and for the past ten years has 
been manager of the John Deere Plow Works. 



In June, 1924, he was elected a member of 
the board of directors of Deere & Company. 

His connection with Deere & Company is 
both work and play, and his hobby and diver- 
sion is the experimental work by which the 
Deere plowing implements are adapted to cul- 
tivation of different soils over the globe. He 
has accompanied many experimental tours for 
plowing demonstrations, spending some time 
in Western Canada, around Calgary, in 1928, 
and has also accompanied the Deere demon- 
stration crews to Cuba. 

Mr. Kough married, February 21, 1914, Miss 
Emma Peterson, who was born at Orion, Illi- 
nois, and was educated in the Moline High 
School. They have one son, Benjamin A., 
born October 16, 1917. Mr. Kough and family 
are members of the Congregational Church. 
He was president of the Moline Rotary Club 
in 1926-27, is a member of the B. P. O. Elks 
of Moline, a member of the Moline Board of 
Education and a member of the Short Hills 
Country Club. 

Franklin Newton Wells, M. D., is a 
respected and well loved figure in the citizen- 
ship of Pittsfield, where for twenty years 
he has practiced his profession as a physician 
and surgeon and where in a quiet unostenta- 
tious way he has rendered that service to 
the community which only a high minded doc- 
tor can give. 

Doctor Wells has spent all his professional 
career in the State of Illinois. He was born 
at Ionia, New York, November 28, 1868. The 
Wells family ancestry has been carefully 
traced out by students of genealogy. It orig- 
inated in Normandy and was founded in Eng- 
land at the time of the Norman conquest 
in 1066. Members of the family were associ- 
ated with the Royalty and many of them 
became clergymen. One noted character was 
Bishop Hugo Wells, who led the Barons to 
King John when that monarch was compelled 
to sign the Magna Charta. There were three 
Wells brothers who came from England and 
settled in Connecticut in Colonial times. From 
Connecticut they went to Vermont, and Doctor 
Wells' grandfather, John Wells, was a native 
of Vermont. He settled in Wyoming County, 
New York, and later spent many years at 
Arcade in that state. He was both a farmer 
and merchant. The father of Doctor Wells 
was Simeon Judson Wells, who was a soldier 
in the Civil war and spent his life as a sub- 
stantial farmer in the community where his 
son was born. Simeon Judson Wells married 
Ellen Van Voorhis. She was a direct descend- 
ant of one of three Dutch brothers who came 
over on the Good Ship Spotted Cow, and settled 
on Manhattan Island, where they were sub- 
jects of the famous Governor Peter Stuyvesant. 

In a rural community in New York Doctor 
Wells grew to manhood. He was educated in 



74 



ILLINOIS 



the common schools, attended the Canandaigua 
Academy and received his pre-medical training 
in the University of Michigian. In 1895 he 
was graduated M. D. from the Homeopathic 
Medical College of Chicago. Doctor Wells for 
seventeen years practiced his profession in 
DeKalb County, Illinois. In 1911 he removed 
to Pittsfield, where he has been busy with 
an extensive practice ever since. When Amer- 
ica intervened in the World war in 1917 he 
volunteered his services, and was commis- 
sioned a captain in the Medical Corps. He 
was sent to Fort Sheridan, Illinois, on May 
29, 1918, and remained there until December 
7, 1918. He is now a lieutenant colonel in 
the Medical Reserve Corps, attached to the 
Three Hundred and Eleventh Medical Reg- 
iment. 

Doctor Wells was commander of the Amer- 
ican Legion Post at Pittsfield, while they were 
constructing their fine Legion Hall. He has 
been chairman of the Red Cross and through 
these and other worthwhile organizations has 
given a great deal of unremunerated service 
to the community. Doctor Wells for several 
years was president and has long been secre- 
tary of the Pike County Medical Society, and 
is a member of Illinois State Medical Society 
and American Medical Association. He served 
on the City School Board, and for eight years, 
from 1917 to 1925, was a member of the City 
Council, during which time many of the most 
important improvements of the city were voted. 
In 1931 he became candidate of the indepen- 
dent temperance party for the office of mayor 
and was elected in April, 1931, for a term 
of two years. Doctor Wells is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, Modern Woodmen of America 
and the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

He married, June 9, 1896, Miss Emma Flor- 
ence Morey. Her father, Andrew C. Morey, 
was born in New York State and in the same 
community where the Wells family lived, 
though Doctor and Mrs. Wells were not 
acquainted with each other at that time. The 
Moreys were Quakers, and had only a limited 
acquaintance outside the circles of their own 
church. Andrew C. Morey graduated from 
the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia 
and for many years was a prominent Chicago 
physician. Mrs. Wells grew up in Chicago, 
is a graduate of the West Division High School 
there, and attended the Normal University. 
She taught in Chicago until her marriage. 
At Pittsfield she has joined in many cultural 
and educational movements. Doctor and Mrs. 
Wells have two talented daughters, Emma 
Gertrude and Mary Louise. Emma Gertrude 
was born July 13, 1897, is a graduate of the 
Pittsfield High School and took her Bachelor's 
degree m education at the Illinois Normal 
University at Normal. She is now a teacher 
in the Pittsfield High School. Mary Louise 
born November 22, 1898, also graduated from 



the Pittsfield High School and from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois, where she took the Bachelor 
of Education degree. She is now a teacher 
in the University High School at St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

Erwin Perry Ellwood. Many of the finan- 
ciers who have left the impress of their ability 
upon the history and institutions of the coun- 
try had their start in enterprises of another 
nature, storekeeping, manufacturing or per- 
haps one of the professions. In the case of 
Erwin P. Ellwood, however, such a condition 
does not exist, for his entire career has been 
passed in connection with the First National 
Bank, in which he has risen from assistant 
cashier to the post of president. Mr. Ellwood, 
while giving his principal attention to his 
banking business, has numerous other inter- 
ests at DeKalb and elsewhere, and is accounted 
the wealthiest man in DeKalb County. 

Mr. Ellwood was born at DeKalb, Illinois, 
August 10, 1874, and is a son of Isaac Leonard 
and Harriet Augusta (Miller) Ellwood, and 
comes of Revolutionary ancestry. His father 
was born in the State of New York, whence 
he came in young manhood to DeKalb and 
was variously employed until 1851, when he 
made a trip to California. Returning to DeKalb 
with a modest capital of $2,000, he embarked 
in the hardware business, and from that time 
forward his career was one of repeated suc- 
cesses in several fields of activity. In 1873 
he had the foresight to identify himself with 
the manufacture of barbwire, and continued 
to be connected therewith until his death. With 
John Lambert and John W. Gates, he started 
the manufacture of steel wire, and their com- 
pany was later .taken over by the United 
States Steel Corporation. From his modest 
start of $2,000 Mr. Ellwood, through great 
industry, splendid business judgment and 
insight into property values and investments, 
realized several millions of dollars, and at 
the time of his demise was one of the wealth- 
iest men in his part of the state. He was 
the owner of much valuable Illinois land, but 
his principal properties were in 'Texas, where 
he had extensive cattle interests. He was 
a Republican in his political sentiments, but 
never sought public office, although it is prob- 
able that he could have secured any public 
position to which he aspired, so much con- 
fidence in his ability and integrity was held 
by his fellow citizens. He was a Mason and 
a member of the Methodist Church, in the 
faith of which he died September 11, 1910, 
Mrs. Ellwood, a native of Kingston, Illinois, 
passing away July 16 of the same year. They 
were the parents of five children, of whom 
four are living: William L., a resident of 
Lubbock, Texas, who is extensively engaged 
in the cattle business, having inherited some 
of his father's interests, to which he has 
added by his ability and industry; Harriet, 



. • ■'■■■: 



JM 




ILLINOIS 



75 



the widow of Dr. E. L. Mayo, residing at 
DeKalb; Jessie, the wife of Doctor Bonney, 
a physician at Denver, Colorado; and Erwin 
P., of this review. 

Erwin P. Ellwood attended the DeKalb 
schools, Beloit Academy and the Michigan Mili- 
tary Academy, and after graduating from the 
latter entered the employ of the First National 
Bank of DeKalb, in the capacity of assistant 
cashier. Consecutive promotions have elevated 
him to the position of president, and under 
his wise and energetic direction this has 
become one of the strongest and most reliable 
institutions of Northern Illinois. Mr. Ellwood 
has innumerable other interests and connec- 
tions of a business and financial character, 
which make him a very busy man, but he has 
always found the time and inclination to take 
a constructive part in civic affairs. He is a 
Christian Scientist in religion and is frater- 
nally connected with the Masons, Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights 
jof Pythias, while politically he is a supporter 
of the principles and candidates of the Repub- 
lican party. Saddle horses and sailing boats 
are his hobbies, and he indulges himself fre- 
quently in both of these healthful recreations. 

In 1898 Mr. Ellwood was united in marriage 
with Miss May Gurler, who was born at 
DeKalb and educated in the public schools, 
land is a daughter of H. B. Gurler, a pioneer 
dairyman of this section, who is remembered 
as the originator of what is now known as 
certified milk. To this union there have been 
born three children: Isaac Leonard, attending 
ithe University of Illinois, a member of the 
Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity; Patience, who 
attended a private school in New York City 
but is now at home; and John, attending the 
DeKalb graded school. 

East Peoria Community High School. The 
rapid growth of the industrial and residential 
community of East Peoria is well reflected 
in the development of its community high 
ischool. A special department affording high 
school instruction was started in 1919 and 
during the first two years was conducted in 
.the old Central School Building. In 1921 a 
(modern three-story structure, containing eigh- 
teen rooms, was completed at a cost of $150,- 
jOOO. In less than eight years this became 
(crowded and in August, 1929, the district 
voted bonds to provide another building unit, 
which, with equipment, cost $105,000. The 
isecond unit contained fifteen rooms, and made 
jpossible a great broadening of the curriculum, 
jWith emphasis on technical and vocational 
instruction. It has room for a complete 
'machine shop, manual training facilities, 
domestic science, gymnasium, cafeteria and 
iserving room. The entire building is of fire 
jproof brick construction. The Community High 
'School has an enrollment of 247 students, 
with a teaching staff of 17. To a large major- 



ity of boys and girls in East Peoria it rep- 
resents the ultimate educational opportunity. 
The curriculum has been arranged with a 
special view to the needs of the pupils. Excel- 
lent facilities are afforded by laboratories for 
work in general science and domestic science, 
the commercial department affords instruction 
in the fundamental business training courses. 
The Community High School if it has empha- 
sized one feature is notable for its musical 
instruction. It teaches both vocal and instru- 
mental music and students are given individual 
lessons in instrumental music without extra 
cost. The school maintains an eighty-two 
piece band and a twenty-five piece orchestra, 
and the band has won contests at the state 
fair. There is also a boys and girls glee 
club. Several football players of champion 
class have come from East Peoria. The ath- 
letic facilities include football field and a quar- 
ter mile track. The school grounds comprise 
seventeen acres, the buildings being located on 
a southern slope with a background of rolling 
hills. In 1929 there were thirty-two graduates, 
and approximately sixteen per cent of all 
the graduates so far have gone on to profes- 
sional schools or universities. 

The members of the high school board are 
John Dean, president, Wilbur Defenbaugh, 
secretary, Dr. F. L. Stiers and Herman Lubitz. 

About the time the pupils and teachers 
moved into the new school building, in 1921, 
the new principal took charge, Byron R. Moore, 
who has completed nine years of very suc- 
cessful work there. Mr. Moore was born at 
LeRoy, Illinois, January 18, 1900, son of Ben- 
jamin C. and Myrtle N. (Search) Moore. 
His father is a prominent Illinois school man, 
served sixteen years as superintendent of 
McLean County schools and is now principal 
of the Community High School in Eureka. 
Byron Moore has two brothers: Wayne Stew- 
art, born March 15, 1898, a graduate of West 
Point Military Academy and a first lieutenant 
now assigned to the Rhode Island National 
Bar; and Donald Clay, born October 7, 1910, 
a student at the University of Illinois. 

Byron R. Moore graduated from the LeRoy 
High School in 1917, and all through his 
high school course snowed a keen interest 
in athletic sports, being a member of the 
football, baseball and basketball teams. In 
the fall of 1917 he entered Illinois Normal 
University, but the war interrupted his studies 
and on January 18, 1918, he joined the navy. 
He was on board the SC-104, went across 
the Atlantic, later was transferred to the 
U. S. S. Perry and was in the South Atlantic 
fleet. He was discharged at Key West, Flor- 
ida, January 21, 1919, and soon afterward 
resumed his studies at Normal. During 1920- 
21 he taught in the high school at Chenoa, 
Illinois, and came from there to East Peoria. 
Nearly every summer has been spent in the 
Normal University or State University, and 



76 



ILLINOIS 



he regards education as his permanent life 
work. 

Mr. Moore is a Republican, a member of 
the Baptist Church and teaches a class in 
Sunday School, and is a thirty-second degree 
Scottish Rite Mason. He is a member of the 
State Teachers Association. He and four 
other students organized the Varsity Club at 
Normal University, which now has a member- 
ship of over 500. While at Normal he played 
on the football, basketball and baseball teams, 
and was junior class president. The sport 
he now follows as his diversion is golf. 

Mr. Moore married, November 29, 1923, Miss 
Louise Hinton, of Normal, daughter of Louis 
and Agnes Hinton. She is a graduate of 
Illinois Normal University and taught two 
years at Joliet. She has been active in 
Y. W. C. A. work and is chairman of the 
association's industrial board at Peoria. She 
is a Republican and a Methodist and is fond 
of golf and tennis. There is one son, Louis 
Byron Moore, born June 18, 1930. 

David B. Maloney is senior member of 
the Chicago law firm Maloney, Wooster & 
Whiteside, at 1 North LaSalle Street. Mr. 
Maloney has practiced law in Chicago since 
1914. 

He was born at Arcadia, Wisconsin, son of 
Patrick and Margaret Maloney. Mr. Maloney 
completed his education in the University of 
Michigan, taking his LL. B. degree there, 
and in a general law practice has found abun- 
dant satisfaction in realizing his ambition and 
choice of his profession. His law partners are 
Charles C. Wooster and Roy E. Whiteside. 

Mr. Maloney has acted as attorney in Chi- 
cago for several other municipal corporations, 
but has not been otherwise active in politics. 
He has supported many civic projects in Cook 
County. He married Miss Mildred Kromen- 
aker, and they have one daughter, Patricia. 
His home is at 6418 Magnolia Avenue. 

Berthold A. Cronson, who has been one 
of the most valuable members of the Chicago 
City Council since 1925, is a lawyer by pro- 
fession and is a member of the prominent law 
firm of Darrow, Smith, Cronson & Smith, 
at 77 West Washington Street. 

Mr. Cronson was born in New York City, 
August 24, 1895, son of Leon and Bertha 
(Ettelson) Cronson. His mother was a sister 
of Samuel A. Ettelson, one of the prominent 
political figures of Chicago and present cor- 
poration counsel. Berthold A. Cronson was 
seven years of age when his mother moved 
to Chicago, his father having died prior to 
that time. His education was acquired in 
grammar and high schools and in 1917 he 
graduated LL. B. from the Chicago Kent Col- 
lege of Law. He took up practice, and had 
just been appointed assistant corporation coun- 
sel when he was called to the service of the 



nation at the time of the World war. He 
was with the navy during 1917-18 and a few 
months in 1919. After being released from 
military duty he returned to Chicago and 
resumed his duties as assistant corporation 
counsel until 1923. Following that he was 
in the state attorney's office of Cook County 
until 1925. In that year he was elected alder- 
man from the Fourth Ward and was reelected 
in 1927, 1929 and 1931. 

Alderman Cronson has shown a great capa- 
city for intelligent work in the Council. He 
has been on some of the most important com-, 
mittees, including finance, transportation, rail- 
way terminals, gas, oil and electric light, 
judiciary and special assessments. 

He is a member of the Chicago, Illinois and 
American Bar Associations, is a thirty-second 
degree Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner and 
a member of the Hamilton Club. His home 
is at 1036 East Forty-eighth Street. Mr, 
Cronson married Ethel Larson, who was borr 
in Chicago, daughter of Edwin Larson. Theii 
two children are Donald Bert and Robert. 

David Kipling Cochrane. For more thar. 
forty years a member of the Chicago ban 
and among the foremost practitioners of the 
city, David Kipling Cochrane, member of the 
firm of Cochrane & George, has been mastei 
in chancery of the Superior Court of Cool 
County since 1915. In addition to being one 
of the leaders of his profession, Chancelloi 
Cochrane has large business interests, is prom- 
inent in Republican politics and has many 
social and fraternal connections. 

David Kipling Cochrane was born at Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin, March 23, 1865, and I 
a son of Capt. David M. and Jane (McManus) 
Cochrane. His father, who was born al 
Oswego, New York, became a seafaring max 
in young manhood and for many years was; 
captain of a steamboat plying the Great Lakes 
while his mother was born at Syracuse, Ne\r 
York, and was brought as an infant to Mil- 
waukee, Wisconsin. 

David K. Cochrane attended the publi( 
schools and the high school at Manistee, Mich 
igan, and in 1888 received the degree of Bach 1 
elor of Philosophy from the University oi 
Michigan, at Ann Arbor. At the same tim< 
he attended law school, and after his gradu 
ation came to Chicago, where he studied law 
took the bar examination and was admittec 
to practice in 1889, since which time he hat 
taken part in much important litigation, ane 
is now a member of the firm of Cochran* 
& George, with offices at 35 North Dearbon 
Street. In 1906 Mr. Cochrane was appointee 
justice of the peace by Governor Yates anc 
served in that capacity until 1910. In 1911 
he was made master in chancery of th< 
Superior Court of Cook County, and has acter 
in that capacity to the present. He is •{ 
member of the Chicago Bar Association, th<; 







&*&Je~o 



-T^^^^^^^ 



ILLINOIS 



77 



Illinois State Bar Association, the American 
Bar Association and the Chicago Law Institute. 
He has been a prominent figure in Republican 
politics for many years, and served as ward 
committeeman and as a member of the sen- 
atorial committee. Mr. Cochrane is a member 
of the Michigan Alumni Society of Chicago, 
the Phi Delta Phi legal fraternity and the 
Beta Theta Pi fraternity. He is a Knight 
Templar Mason and a member of the Hamilton 
Club, the Lake Shore Athletic Club and the 
South Shore Country Club. 

Mr. Cochrane married Miss Angela E. 
Noyes, who was born at Chicago, a daughter 
of Henry C. Noyes, for forty years a prom- 
inent attorney of Chicago, and to this union 
there has been born one son: David Kipling, 
Jr. The family attend the Fifth Church, 
Christian Science, and reside at 4734 Ellis 
Avenue. 

Hon. Frank H. Bicek, who was admitted 
to the Chicago bar in 1907, is best known 
for his capable service as master in chancery 
of the Circuit Court of Cook County, an 
office he has filled since 1925. 

He is a native Chicagoan, born October 16, 
1886, son of Martin and Marie (Vanek) Bicek. 
His mother resides in Chicago. His father, 
who died in 1910, came to Chicago in 1875 
and for many years was in business as a 
merchant tailor. 

Frank H. Bicek attended public schools and 
parochial schools and in 1907 was graduated 
LL. B. from the Illinois College of Law, now 
DePaul University. He has built up a suc- 
cessful private practice as a lawyer. Mr. 
Bicek is a member of the Chicago, Illinois 
State and American Bar Associations and the 
Chicago Law Institute. He has been prominent 
in Catholic organizations. 

John Blase Meccia, prominent Chicago 
attorney, has lived in that city nearly all 
his life and has had a number of pleasant 
and important connections with members of 
his profession and with other organizations. 

Mr. Meccia was born in New York City 
February 19, 1904, and a few months after 
his birth, in the summer of 1904, his parents, 
Ignatius and Grace (Micali) Meccia, moved 
from New York to Chicago. His parents were 
born in Italy and came to the United States 
soon after their marriage. In Chicago Igna- 
tius Meccia was engaged in the banking and 
steamship agency business. He died in 1915 
and his wife in 1914. 

John Blase Meccia, after the death of his 
parents, being about eleven years of age, lived 
with an aunt. There were difficulties to over- 
come during his boyhood, but he systematically 
worked himself through school, graduating 
from the Irving Park grade school in 1917, 
from the Carl Schurz High School in 1921, 
the Crane Junior College in 1923, and he has 



two law degrees, LL. B. and J. D., from 
Northwestern University School of Law. He 
was graduated Doctor of Jurisprudence in 1927 
and was admitted to the Illinois bar the same 
year. Mr. Meccia for two years was attorney 
for the Illinois Retail Coal Dealers Association. 
He has a successful general practice, with 
offices at 160 North LaSalle Street. 

In January, 1931, Mr. Meccia was honored 
by election as president of the Justinian Soci- 
ety of Advocates, after having served two 
years as secretary of the organization. This 
society is an association of members of the 
Chicago bar who are either of Italian birth 
or extraction. He is also a member of the 
Chicago, Illinois State and American Bar Asso- 
ciations, belongs to the Sigma Delta Kappa 
law fraternity, the Northwestern University 
Club, and is a past advocate and now treasurer 
of St. Francis Council, Knights of Columbus. 

George Albert Goodman. The general man- 
ager and superintendent of the Peoria County 
Home, George A. Goodman has substantiated 
his name and reputation as an individual who 
is particularly fitted for the position he occu- 
pies. This incumbency is one that calls for 
the possession of human understanding, kind- 
liness, tact and executive ability, all of which 
are to be found in Mr. Goodman's character. 
Under his direction the institution, situated 
in Limestone Township, has become one that 
serves as a model for others of its kind and 
that will stand as a lasting memorial to his 
wise leadership. 

Mr. Goodman was born at Port Royal, Juan- 
ita County, Pennsylvania, February 1, 1884, 
and is a son of William and Carrie (Reader) 
Goodman. His grandfather, a bridge con- 
tractor, served as a member of the Union 
army during the war between the states, in 
the Army of the Cumberland. William Good- 
man was reared on a farm and as a youth 
learned the trade of carpentry, which he fol- 
lowed in conjunction with his work on the 
farm. He became very proficient in both 
vocations, and by reason of his stalwart char- 
acter earned and held the esteem of his fellow 
citizens. 

The second in order of birth of his parents' 
fourteen children, it was necessary for George 
A. Goodman to start to work at an early age. 
In fact, during the entire period of his attend- 
ance at the country schools his vacations were 
spent in manual labor on the home place. 
When he started his independent career it 
was as a section hand on a railroad construc- 
tion "gang," but after one and one-half years 
thus employed he journeyed to Peoria, in 
which community he worked for a year on 
a farm. Returning to his home town, he 
learned the trade of stone masonry, and for 
about two years was employed in this occupa- 
tion by the Pennsylvania Railroad, after which 
he went back to Peoria and again took up 



78 



ILLINOIS 



farming as a hired hand. Mr. Goodman then 
became a renter of farm land, and continued 
as such for some fourteen years, at the end 
of which time he had accumulated sufficient 
capital to make the initial payment on an 
eighty-acre property in Trivoli Township, upon 
which he made the necessary improvements 
to make it a paying proposition. He con- 
tinued operations on this property until 
appointed to his present position, in which 
he has established an enviable record. In 
addition to his present position Mr. Goodman 
has served as supervisor of his township. 
He is a Democrat in his political allegiance, 
and fraternally is a thirty-second degree 
Mason and member of the Modern Woodmen 
of America. His religious connection is with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Goodman married Kathryn Patton, 
daughter of William Patton, a native of Penn- 
sylvania. Mrs. Goodman serves as matron 
of the home and is active in the work of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. and Mrs. 
Goodman are the parents of two sons, Lloyd 
Anderson, who has a son, Lloyd Anderson, 
Jr., and Roy Earl. Both of these boys are 
high school graduates and bright and prom- 
ising young men of their community, where 
they are greatly and deservedly popular. 

Frank Gates Allen, chairman of the board 
of the Moline State Trust & Savings Bank, 
has had a widely diversified career in industry 
and finance, covering a period of nearly half 
a century. Mr. Allen came to Moline soon 
after graduating from the University of Mich- 
igan and his first position in the industrial 
affairs of the city was as an assistant shipping 
clerk with the Moline Plow Company. 

He was born in Aurora, Illinois, February 
14, 1858, son of Edward Richards and Mary 
Ann (Gates) Allen. His grandfather, Edward 
Allen, was a native of Massachusetts, a black- 
smith by trade, and died in New York State. 
The maternal grandfather was Lute Gates, 
a shoemaker by trade and a native of Massa- 
chusetts, who became a pioneer settler of 
Aurora, Illinois. He married Mary Conant, 
a direct descendant of Roger Conant, the 
second governor of Massachusetts. Edward 
R. Allen was born in Cortland County, New 
York, and his wife in Dedham, Massachusetts. 
They were married in Aurora, Illinois, where 
he was a grain merchant. They were mem- 
bers of the Universalist Church at Aurora 
and he was one of the main pillars of the 
church and contributed largely to its building. 
He was a Republican in politics and during 
the Civil war period served as state senator. 
He was postmaster of Aurora during the 
administration of President Pierce. He joined 
the Republican party upon its organization. 
These parents had a family of seven children, 
only two of whom are now living, Lottie, 
widow of William S. Mack, a former super- 



intendent of schools at Moline, and Frank 
Gates. 

Frank Gates Allen was educated in the 
schools of Aurora, completed his high school 
course in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and then 
entered the University of Michigan, where 
he took the A. B. degree in 1881. While 
in the university he was initiated in the Sigma 
Phi, the second oldest college fraternity. Soon 
after graduating he came to Moline, and spent 
five years with the Moline Plow Company, 
rising to the position of treasurer. In 1886 
he established a branch factory of the com- 
pany at Omaha, Nebraska, but after a year 
in that city, moved to Ottawa, Illinois, to 
complete his law studies, begun some years 
before, in the law office of Capt. A. C. Little, 
of Aurora, Illinois. In 1888 he was admitted 
to the bar, practiced for five years at Ottawa, 
Illinois, and then returned to Moline and again 
joined in the industrial life of this city, becom- 
ing assistant manager of the Moline Plow 
Company. Later he was president and general 
manager of the company and held those posi- 
tions until 1919. 

Mr. Allen in 1902 secured the controlling 
interest in the Moline National Bank and the 
State Savings Bank & Trust Company, and 
later combined the State Bank & Trust Com- 
pany with the Moline Trust & State Savings 
Bank and was president of the Moline State 
Trust & Savings Bank until 1928, since which 
year he has been chairman of the board. Mr. 
Allen has many other active associations with 
the financial and industrial organizations of 
the City of Moline. 

He married, June 8, 1882, Miss Minnie Flor- 
ence Stephens, who was born at Moline, where 
her father, the late George Stephens, was a 
pioneer business man, owning a furniture fac- 
tory and later was connected as vice president 
with the Moline Plow Company. He was a 
native of Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania. 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen have one child, Marjorie, 
wife of Otto H. Seiffert, of Davenport, Iowa. 
Mr. Seiffert is manager of the Seiffert Lumber 
Company of Davenport and is vice president 
and member of the executive committee of the 
Moline State Trust & Savings Bank. Mr. 
and Mrs. Seiffert have two children, Allen 
and Helen Stephens. Mrs. Otto H. Seiffert 
graduated from Smith College in 1906, and 
has earned rank among the foremost of mod- 
ern American poets, three books of her verse 
having been published. 

Mr. Allen has been a vestryman in the Epis- 
copal Church at Moline. He has received the 
thirty-third degree in Scottish Rite Masonry 
and also belongs to the B. P. O. Elks. He 
is a member of the Rock Island Arsenal Golf 
Club, the Annandale Golf Club and Midwick 
Golf Club of Pasadena, California. For thirty 
years his hobby has been the game of golf. 
While in university he was active in athletics 
and won his letter in football. Mr. Allen 



ILLINOIS 



79 



is president of the Scottish Rite Cathedral 
Association, which recently completed a cathe- 
dral at Moline, pronounced one of the finest 
examples of Gothic architecture in the Middle 
West. Politically he is a Republican, and 
while active in the party and civic affairs 
has never sought any public office. 

Harry C. Montgomery, D. C. and Ph. C, 
is the popular sheriff of Scott County. His 
home is at Winchester, where he was born 
April 3, 1899, and in that community every 
one has known him in increasing terms of 
respect since he was a boy. 

His father is Mr. Joseph Montgomery, a 
prominent Winchester business man. The 
mother of the sheriff was Miss Daisy Lee, 
of the Virginia Lee ancestry. Her father, 
George Lee, is now past eighty years of age 
and, like all typical Virginians, has a great 
love for good horse flesh, and he finds pleasure 
and recreation in taking care of the several 
fine horses owned by Sheriff Montgomery, 
whose hobby is in that direction. 

Sheriff Montgomery grew up at Winchester. 
While in high school he learned the barber's 
trade, and for one year attended Millikin 
University at Decatur. While at Decatur he 
was enrolled in the Students Army Training 
Corps, and he was also stationed for a time 
at Fort Sheridan, Illinois. 

While he went to the university at Decatur 
with the intention of taking a pre-medical 
course, his attention was directed to the newer 
science of chiropractic, and in 1922 he gradu- 
ated from the Davenport Chiropractic College 
at Davenport, Iowa, with the degrees D. C. 
and Ph. C. After graduating he practiced 
for several years in Winchester and also had 
offices at Jacksonville. 

From the work of his profession he answered 
the call to politics and in 1926 was elected 
assessor and treasurer of Scott County. The 
four years he spent in that office were a source 
of a reputation which is by no means confined 
to the county. He saved the taxpayers a 
large sum on the revaluation of their property, 
and he reduced the valuations twenty per cent, 
and also stopped many of the sources of illegal 
taxation. When other officials refused to 
cooperate, he figured out the taxes himself, 
though it took six weeks of day and night 
work to do it. Then, in 1930, his splendid 
record followed him when he became a candi- 
date for the office of sheriff, on the Republican 
ticket. It was a year when the Democratic 
tide ran strong and though Scott County is 
normally 350 Democratic, he was elected with 
750 majority. 

Sheriff Montgomery is a Knight Templar 
and thirty-second degree York Rite Mason and 
a member of the B. P. O. E. at Jacksonville, 
and also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows. For four years he was com- 
mander of the Julian Wells Post of the Amer- 



ican Legion. Mr. Montgomery has always been 
fond of athletics and while in college made 
a considerable reputation as a baseball player. 
He married, December 26, 1924, Miss Louise 
Townsend. She was educated in the Illinois 
Normal University at Bloomington and was 
a teacher before her marriage, and since then 
has found an outlet for her culture in many 
civic and social enterprises at Winchester. 

John E. Andrew, former superintendent of 
the Illinois Soldiers and Sailors Home at 
Quincy, is a retired resident of that city. Mr. 
Andrew came to Illinois shortly after the close 
of the Civil war, and had a long and success- 
ful career both in business and in public 
service. 

He was born at Westboro, Clinton County, 
Ohio, June 6, 1849, son of John and Mary 
(Smith) Andrew. Clinton County, Ohio, was 
one of the important centers in the early 
Quaker settlements of that state. Mr. An- 
drew came from old Quaker stock, the fam- 
ily having been among the early adherents of 
that faith in North Carolina, which supplied 
thousands of valuable settlers and pioneers 
both to Ohio and Indiana. 

The founder of the family in America was 
his great-grandfather, William Andrew, a na- 
tive of Ireland. He came to America in 1750 
and settled near Fayetteville, North Carolina. 
The name of his wife was Hannah Holiday, 
and their eleven children were named Jacob, 
Henry, Samuel, Robert, Aaron, Isaac, James, 
William, John, Sarah, and Hannah. The first 
five of these sons and the two daughters all 
moved to Ohio, while the others remained and 
founded families in North Carolina. De- 
scendants of those who remained in North 
Carolina furnished a number of soldiers on 
the Confederate side in the Civil war. 

The grandfather of John E. Andrew was 
Henry Andrew, who married, November 14, 
1805, Jane Mills, in North Carolina. They 
had a family of seven children, three daugh- 
ters and four sons. Among them was John 
Andrew, who was born near Fayetteville, 
North Carolina, November 3, 1811. The year 
after his birth his parents, following the ex- 
ample of many other Quakers who were dis- 
satisfied with the institution of slavery, left 
the South and moved to the new region north- 
west of the Ohio River, settling near Wil- 
mington, Clinton County, Ohio. All the mem- 
bers of this family became farmers. John 
Andrew grew up in Clinton County, and died 
at Westboro in that county February 12, 1849, 
before the birth of his youngest child, John 
E. Andrew. The latter's mother, Mary Smith, 
was born near Fayetteville, North Carolina, 
December 12, 1812. Her father died in North 
Carolina and she and her brother, E. B. Smith, 
were brought by their mother to Ohio. Mrs. 
Mary (Smith) Andrew died at Champaign, 
Illinois, July 14, 1894. Her four oldest chil- 



80 



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dren were: Caleb B., who died in service dur- 
ing the Civil war and is buried in the National 
Cemetery at Memphis; Mrs. Sarah Ellen Van- 
derwort, who died at Middletown, Ohio, in 
1900; Joseph, who died in Kansas, in 1900; 
and Mrs. Nancy Jane Thornhill, who died at 
Champaign, Illinois, in 1915. 

John E. Andrew had the benefit of a few 
terms of instruction in the pioneer schools in 
Clinton County, Ohio. He was not yet twelve 
years of age when the Civil war broke out. 
On February 22, 1864, before he was fifteen, 
he enlisted at Cincinnati in Company C of 
the Seventy-ninth Ohio Infantry. Many years 
later the colonel of this regiment wrote: "I 
knew Andrew personally, we were both of the 
same county. When he came to the regiment 
I was doubtful by reason of his youth of his 
being able to stand the hardships of war with 
old veterans, but it afterwards developed that 

my fears were groundless I never knew 

a truer or better soldier than he, always ready 
for duty under any circumstances of peril. 
At the battle of Peach Creek in front of At- 
lanta, July 20, 1864, Mr. Andrew received a 
gunshot wound in the right leg below the 
knee. He refused the direction of his sergeant 
to go to the rear, pleading for time to fire a 
few more rounds. He continued to do so until 
exhausted from the loss of blood and had to 
be carried off the field. Following the capture 
of Atlanta, Mr. Andrew recovered sufficiently 
so that he was able to return to his regiment 
on November 1, 1864, and then took part in 
the march to the sea, up through the Carolinas 
to Goldsboro, to Raleigh, thence to Richmond, 
and on May 24, 1865, was one of the troops 
who marched in grand review at Washington. 
He received his honorable discharge July 22, 
1865. 

In September, 1866, Mr. Andrew left his 
Ohio home and came to Piatt County, Illinois. 
He worked on a farm, taught school, and in 
November, 1882, was elected sheriff of Piatt 
County. This county was strongly Repub- 
lican. Mr. Andrew, though he had been a 
brave soldier of the Civil war, had espoused 
the Democratic party. He was elected sheriff 
by a majority of twelve. Locating at Monti- 
cello, he engaged in the furniture and under- 
taking business. Mr. Andrew had the satis- 
faction of being elected mayor of Monticello 
for four terms. When he was first a candi- 
date one of the opposition papers spoke of him 
as a tramp and outsider. This he freely ad- 
mitted, stating that he had walked into the 
town and that he had worked as a section 
hand. The effort to discredit him was not 
successful, and his popularity with the mass 
of the people was shown by his repeated 
reelections. 

Mr. Andrew retired from business in 1912. 
In May, 1913, he was appointed by Governor 
Dunne as superintendent of the Illinois Sol- 



diers Home at Quincy, and he served in that 
capacity more than seven years, continuing 
during the greater part of Lowden's admin- 
istration. He resigned in September, 1920. 
In 1922 he received the great honor of being 
elected state commander of the Grand Army 
of the Republic, and at that time was pre- 
sented with a gold and diamond studded badge 
by his comrades. Mr. Andrew is a member 
of the Lodge, Royal Arch Chapter, Knights 
Templar Commandery and the Scottish Rite 
bodies of Quincy, and Ansar Temple of the 
Mystic Shrine at Springfield. He was reared 
as a Quaker, but he is now a member of the! 
Grace Methodist Episcopal Church at Quincy. 

Parlin Public Library, at Canton, repre- 
sents on the one hand the literary and intel- 
lectual interests of one of the state's progres- 
sive communities and on the other a generous 
interest and cooperation of one of Canton's 
foremost men of wealth and influence. 

It is named in honor of William Parlin, Sr., 
who at his death in 1890 bequeathed the sum 
of $8,000 to be used for founding a public 
library in his town. By modern estimate this 
was a small sum, but at that time was an usual 
gift for such a purpose in Illinois. The sum 
was bequeathed on the condition that the citi- 
zens of Canton contribute $5,000 more. The 
trustees names were Carroll C. Dewey, N. 
Steven Wright and David Beeson. The citizens 
cooperated with the spirit and purpose of 
Mr. Parlin's will and as a result in 1894 the 
Parlin Public Library was opened on a lot 
at the corner of East Chestnut and North 
Second Avenue, opposite the old Parlin home. 
The library started with a collection of 1,000 
volumes. 

The sum of $13,000 proved inadequate to 
complete and equip the building. Then the 
Parlin heirs from time to time donated further 
sums, until, when completed, the building rep- 
resented an investment of $24,000. This by 
no means ended the generous interest of mem- 
bers of the Parlin family. In 1918 they gave 
$30,000 in Liberty Bonds as a permanent 
endowment fund. Other gifts from the family 
include many valuable works of art, including 
copies of famous paintings and sculpture and 
also thousands of volumes of reference works 
and other books found on the shelves. Another 
gift, made in 1924, came from the late Alice 
Graham, who bequeathed $1,000 in money and 
many valuable books. The Canton Woman's 
Club has also given the library the bronze 
busts of Shakespeare, Lincoln and Emerson. 

Today Canton possesses a public library 
which in point of equipment and facilities 
for service would compare favorably with that 
found in any city of the size in the Middle 
West. The citizens of Canton have felt the 
greater interest in the institution because it 
represents almost entirely local cooperation 



ILLINOIS 



81 



or local generosity. The library today contains 
15,000 volumes. 

Of the board of trustees David Beeson, one 
of the original trustees appointed under the 
will of Mr. Parlin, served as president from 
1894 until his death in 1924. Since then 
the president of the board has been Mr. E. A. 
Heald. The first librarian, selected in Sep- 
tember, 1894, was Mrs. Josephine Resor. She 
served thirty-four years. During this period 
Miss Roberts was assistant for nine years, 
Miss Lida Hicks from 1903 to 1910, Miss 
Louise Slater, 1910-16, Miss Cecile Anderson, 
1916-17, and Miss Jeanette Wallace, 1917-19. 
Mrs. D. E. Houston was assistant from 1919 
to 1929, and since the latter date has been 
librarian. Mrs. Houston was born and edu- 
cated in Canton and is a graduate of the 
Library School of the University of Illinois. 

Hon. Edgar A. Eggleston, who is police 
magistrate at Canton, has been active in the 
citizenship of that community for upwards of 
half a century. He was in business for many 
years, and his intimate knowledge of local 
conditions and the reputation he enjoys for 
integrity have made him repeatedly honored 
with positions of trust and responsibility. 

Judge Eggleston was born at Canton, Jan- 
uary 26, 1862, son of William M. and Sarah 
(Rowley) Eggleston. The Rowleys were a 
Colonial family of New Jersey. William M. 
Eggleston was born at Rochester, New York, 
and came to Illinois in the late '50s. He was 
a carpenter by trade, and for many years 
was employed in the shops of Parlin & Oren- 
dorf, manufacturers of plows and farm ma- 
chinery. For several years before his death 
he was superintendent of the entire plant, 
which is one of the largest industrial organiza- 
tions in Canton, now part of the International 
Harvester Company. He gave much of his 
time to public duties, holding several offices 
without pay. 

Judge Eggleston has always felt himself 
indebted to the example of both of his parents, 
and he owes much to his mother, who trained 
him in the rudiments of citizenship and the 
principles of life. He attended public schools, 
and immediately after leaving school became 
a clerk in a grocery store. Following this he 
clerked in a dry goods store for two years, 
for sixteen years he clerked in one of the 
leading shoe stores, and then entered busi- 
ness for himself in 1905, conducting a grocery 
store in the suburban district of Canton. He 
retired from business in 1921, due to the ill- 
ness of his wife. While in business Mr. Eg- 
gleston was elected an alderman of the city, 
served as deputy coroner, was also city as- 
sessor, and in 1921 was elected constable, on 
the Republican ticket. In 1924 he was elected 
police magistrate and was reelected in 1928 
to a second four year term. Over a period of 
eight years Judge Eggleston has dispensed 



justice with an even hand, his tenure of the 
office having overlapped several city admin- 
istrations. Judge Eggleston is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, the Modern Woodmen 
of America and in political faith is a Repub- 
lican. In church affiliation he is a Presby- 
terian. 

He married, November 14, 1891, Miss Belle 
Dickey. She was born at Farmington, Illi- 
nois, her parents having settled in Illinois 
from Pennsylvania. She was very active in 
the social and civic life of Canton, where she 
died November 5, 1921. 

Godfrey Wys. For many years the late 
Godfrey Wys was one of the leading merchants 
of Peoria, being first associated with his father 
in the shoe business, of which he became 
proprietor in 1885 and with which he con- 
tinued to be identified until his lamented death, 
February 20, 1918. During this long period 
he established a record for honorable business 
dealing and superior workmanship, and at 
the same time was recognized as a good citizen 
of public spirit and enlightened views who 
contributed freely of his time, means and 
ability in the furtherance of worthy public 
measures. 

Mr. Wys was born at Berne, Switzerland, 
March 23, 1856, Easter Day, a son of Urs 
and Elizabeth (Moser) Wys, natives of the 
same country, who in 1857 embarked on a 
sailing vessel which made port at New Orleans, 
whence the family came up the Mississippi 
and Illinois rivers to Peoria County. For a 
time Urs Wys was employed in a dairy busi- 
ness, but subsequently moved to Peoria, where 
he went to work at his trade as a shoemaker. 
He embarked in business on his own account 
on Washington Street, making shoes and boots 
by hand, and the excellence of his work soon 
gained him a large and loyal patronage. Later 
he moved to Adams Street, where he remained 
about ten years, following which he built 
the present brick building, at 2007 South 
Adams Street, where the business has since 
been located. Mr. Wys, who was born Novem- 
ber 10, 1832, married in 1855 Miss Elizabeth 
Moser, and died August 3, 1902, both being 
buried in Springdale Cemetery. He was a 
member of the Peoria volunteer fire depart- 
ment for many years during the early days. 
There were four children in the family: God- 
frey, Arnold, Eliza and Emma. 

Godfrey Wys was about one year old when 
brought by his parents to Peoria, where he 
attended the German School and Brown's Busi- 
ness College. He then went to Chicago, where 
he was employed for two years, at the end 
of which time he returned to Peoria and 
became associated with his father in the shoe 
business. In 1885 the elder man retired, and 
from that time until his death Godfrey Wys 
carried on the business in a highly satisfactory 
manner. He had an excellent reputation for 



82 



ILLINOIS 



business honesty and fidelity, and was a Repub- 
lican in politics and a member of the Reformed 
Church. For some years he was a member 
of the old Crystal Club and also a member 
of the board of park commissioners. He 
served as master of Schiller Lodge, A. F. and 
A. M., was also a thirty-second degree and 
Knight Templar Mason and a member of 
the Turners and the Swiss Society. 

On October 27, 1891, Mr. Wys was united 
in marriage with Miss Mary M. Blaser, a 
daughter of Jacob and Magdalene (Bangerter) 
Blaser, who died when Mrs. Wys was a young 
girl. She was educated in Europe and mar- 
ried Mr. Wys in Nebraska. They had three 
children: Clara, the wife of Arthur Hirsch; 
Irma M.; and Arnold W., deceased. 

Henry Martin Seymour. Beginning in 
1930 there have been many centennial anni- 
versaries observed throughout Central and 
Northern Illinois, on the part of communities, 
institutions and families. In 1936 one of the 
oldest families of Adams County will com- 
memorate the hundredth anniversary of its 
arrival in Western Illinois. For nearly a cen- 
tury the Seymours have been conspicuous rep- 
resentatives of the wholesome quality of New 
England character, industry and enterprise. 
Mr. Henry Martin Seymour, of Payson, is in 
the third generation of the Adams County 
branch of the family, and throughout his 
active life has been engaged in farming, stock 
feeding and the growing of some of the apples 
and other fruits which have made this section 
of Illinois famous. 

Eight generations of the Seymour family 
lived in Hartford County, Connecticut, begin- 
ning with the first American ancestor, Rich- 
ard Seymour, who came from England in 
1639 and settled at Hartford. It was nearly 
two centuries later that his descendant, Mar- 
tin Seymour, departed from the environment 
of his ancestors and sought a new home in 
what was then the far West. This Martin 
Seymour was born in Hartford County Au- 
gust 24, 1789. On June 29, 1814, he married 
Lucy Butler, and their family came to num- 
ber nine children. On May 28, 1836, the Sey- 
mour family started for their western des- 
tination. In the absence of railroads 
west of the Alleghanies the journay was 
made almost entirely by river and canal. 
From New York City they traveled up the 
Hudson, crossed New York by the Erie 
Canal, went along the southern shores of 
Lake Erie and thence by canal across Ohio 
to the Ohio River, and from the mouth of that 
stream came up the Mississippi, arriving at 
Quincy June 28, 1836. The original Sey- 
mour homestead, located by Martin Seymour, 
was in section 12 of Fall Creek Township, 
Adams County. Martin Seymour died there 
November 19, 1842, and his wife passed away 
September 4, 1845. 



The youngest son of Martin Seymour and 
wife was Charles Willard, who was born at 
West Hartford, Connecticut, August 23, 1834, 
and was too young to remember any of the 
incidents of the journey which brought him 
to Adams County. He grew up on the farm 
now occupied by his son Henry Martin, at- 
tended public schools at Payson, and at the 
age of sixteen became associated with his old- 
est brother, Edward Seymour. Edward Sey- 
mour, who died July 15, 1904, with Charles 
W. Seymour, comprised a firm known as Sey- 
mour Brothers, as farmers, stock feeders and 
shippers. They were in business for nearly 
half a century and were very succesful. 
Charles Willard Seymour died at his home 
at Payson October 11, 1898. He married 
Emily Cynthia Kay, who was born at Payson, 
Illinois, March 4, 1844, and died at Quincy. 
Her father, Robert Kay, had come to Illinois 
from Virginia in 1833. The children of 
Charles W. Seymour and wife were: Henry 
Martin; Lyman K., who was born in 1865 and 
died in 1919, married Agnes Jarrett; Loren 
B., born in 1869, married Susan Jarrett and 
lives at South Pasadena, California; and 
Stella May, born in 1871, is the wife of Oliver 
Starr, who lives at Los Angeles. 

Henry Martin Seymour was born at Payson 
June 9, 1864. As a young man he and his 
brother Lyman realized that their best oppor- 
tunities for a useful part in the world of 
affairs was in following the lead of their 
father and uncle. Thus when the two older 
Seymour brothers passed away these brothers 
carried on the business under the same firm 
name, until the death of Lyman Seymour in 
1919. Much has been heard in recent years 
of chain farming and corporation* farming, 
but the Seymour brothers were in business on 
a scale that would compare favorably with 
some of the larger enterprises of that kind 
many years ago. The holdings now under the 
direction of Mr. Henry M. Seymour comprise 
about 5,000 acres in Adams and Pike counties, 
Illinois, with 2,000 acres in Mississippi. The 
southern lands are devoted to cotton grow- 
ing, and those in Illinois to general farming, 
stock raising and fruit growing. The Sey- 
mour apple orchards comprise about 400 acres, 
and some of the highest quality of Illinois 
choice apples come from the Seymour orchards. 
In one important respect the Seymour farms 
differ markedly from methods of corporation 
farming, which is almost wholly based on the 
single crop plan. The Seymour plan is one 
of an interesting diversification, fruit, live 
stock, grain, all operations being dovetailed 
so as to provide a maximum of returns from 
labor and capital invested. 

Mr. Henry M. Seymour married at Payson, 
August 9, 1895, Miss Lucy W. Nicholson. She 
was born at Payson November 4, 1864, daugh- 
ter of John and Mary Ann (Gilbert) Nichol- 
son. They had four children : Charles Willard, 



ILLINOIS 



83 



born October 22, 1898, and died May 22, 1915; 
Mary Gaskin, born September 27, 1900, wife 
of Emil A. House, and they have three chil- 
dren, Betty Kay, Barbara Jeane and Susana 
Mary House; Elizabeth, born October 30, 1904, 
wife of Lowell B. House, and they have three 
boys, Charles C, Henry Seymour and Theo- 
dore Grant; and Emily Kay, born September 
7, 1906, wife of Vivion A. Johnson, of India- 
nola, Mississippi, and they have two boys, Sey- 
mour Bennett and Lyman Kay. 

As a memorial to his only son, who was acci- 
dentally killed at the age of sixteen, while 
playing ball on the high school grounds at 
Payson, Mr. Seymour gave to the village what 
is known as the Charles W. Seymour High 
School Building and Gymnasium, one of the 
most attractive units in Adams County's edu- 
cational system. The building was completed 
and dedicated December 30, 1916, and a bronze 
tabJet in the entrance hall reads: "This 
building was erected by Henry M. and Lucy 
W. Seymour in memory of their only son, 
Charles." 

An old family like the Seymours are in 
many ways one of the most important assets 
of a community. The range of their activities 
and influence is not confined within themselves. 
While for many years the enterprise of the 
Seymour brothers has provided employment 
and living opportunities for scores of families, 
Mr. Henry M. Seymour has also accepted many 
opportunities to use his wealth for the welfare 
of the community at large. In 1918 he gave 
the "Illinois Centennial" band stand to Pay- 
son. Later he made provision for "Camp Sey- 
mour," at Decatur, a Y. M. C. A. lodge. 
Another gift that has placed his name among 
the benefactors of higher education was the 
"Henry M. Seymour" Library at Knox Col- 
lege, Galesburg. The Henry M. Seymour Li- 
brary was built of limestone quarried on the 
Seymour farm and shipped to Galesburg. The 
beautiful building, which was completed and 
dedicated February 15, 1928, has added to 
the campus a generous expression of sentiment. 

Homer Whalen, mayor of the City of Can- 
ton, has clone an important part for setting 
new standards in politics and local government, 
and while many political storms have centered 
around him in the course of years his influence 
on the whole has been in the direction of 
making the industrial and civic conditions bet- 
ter and more wholesome. 

Mr. Whalen is an interesting Illinoisan 
because of what he has done to advance him- 
self out of the obscurity of poverty. He was 
born on a farm in Schuyler County, July 9, 
1870, son of William A. and Elizabeth (Sher- 
rill) Whalen. The Whalen family came from 
Ireland to Schuyler County as pioneers. Wil- 
liam A. Whalen, born in Schuyler County, was 
a man of advanced ideas in his business as 
a farmer and as a citizen. He died at the 



age of eighty-two. The Sherrill family came 
from North Carolina. One member of it was 
Colonel Sherrill, who gained distinction as a 
soldier and later was prominent in the political 
life of Cincinnati, Ohio. Elizabeth (Sherrill) 
Whalen died in 1876. 

Mayor Whalen lacked many of the oppor- 
tunities which modern boys accept as a com- 
monplace of home and community environment. 
His education was the product of a few winter 
terms of school, and when he was thirteen he 
left school altogether and applied himself to 
the learning of a trade. For four years he 
was an apprenticed carpenter. During that 
time he was paid hardly anything beyond 
enough to fairly exist. At the close of his 
apprenticeship he was given the customary 
suit of new clothes and a set of new tools. 
He remained with the man who taught him 
the trade and for twelve years was a journey- 
man carpenter, for seven years of that time 
being foreman of construction. 

Out of this long period of working for others 
he developed a means and the resources to 
go into business for himself. With Andrew 
Sandberg as partner, he established the con- 
struction firm known as the W T halen & Sand- 
berg Construction Company. Mr. Whalen 
bought out the Sandberg interest and organized 
the construction firm of Homer Whalen & Son. 
In 1926 Homer Whalen bought out the interest 
of his son and since that year the business 
has been conducted as Homer Whalen, Con- 
tractor and Builder. This is an important 
business that has handled construction con- 
tracts over a large area in and around Canton. 

Mr. Whalen has accepted many opportunities 
to advance the position of the wage and salary 
earner. He organized the Carpenters Union 
in Fulton County and served as president sev- 
eral years. He also organized the Musicians 
Union of Fulton County, the Clerks Union 
and the Federation of Laborers. He was sec- 
retary of the Trades Labor Assembly for Can- 
ton for four years. As township supervisor 
for two terms he also served as overseer of 
the poor. 

His interest has always been sincere in 
behalf of the man who toils for his bread. 
It was this practical sympathy and his earnest- 
ness to help the under-privileged which 
brought him into the ranks of the Socialist 
party, and on the ticket of that party he 
was elected mayor of Canton in 1914. In 1918 
he was defeated as a candidate for reelection 
by a combination of the Democrats and Repub- 
licans, who put out what they called the Inde- 
pendent Fusion ticket. Ten years later, in 
1928, Mr. Whalen again appeared as a candi- 
date for the office of mayor, and this time 
he was chosen by a substantial majority and 
was reelected in 1930, without opposition. 
Under his administration the city has under- 
taken and completed some of the improvements 
that make Canton an outstanding progressive 



84 



ILLINOIS 



town in Central Illinois. The city was improved 
with playgrounds, ball diamonds, seats for 
those who go to the park to rest, and also 
many improvements have been made in line 
with landscaped architecture. Perhaps of 
equal importance has been his policy of making 
the city government open to the approach of 
all classes of citizens and on a basis of friend- 
liness and cooperation. 

Mr. Whalen is a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Improved Order of Red Men, 
the Fraternal Order of Eagles and the Loyal 
Order of Moose. He married, March 6, 1893, 
Miss Cora Tullis, of Fairview. Their first 
child, Theresa B., born in Canton, was mar- 
ried in 1923 to James Perrine, and they live 
at Portland, Oregon. The son Harry A., born 
in Canton, is in the glass business at Canton 
and married Golden Shearer. Edward A., the 
youngest of the family, is in the electrical 
business at Hammond, Indiana. 

The Illinois Odd Fellows Orphans Home 
at Lincoln was founded in 1891, through the 
efforts of the Daughters of Rebekah, who in 
collecting subscriptions for the purpose and 
working toward their end organized a separate 
corporation. Lincoln secured the site by do- 
nating $10,000 and forty acres of land in 
the southeastern part of the city. Today the 
grounds comprise nearly 160 acres and there 
are eight buildings, the total value of the 
physical plant being nearly a million dollars. 

More than 1,200 boys and girls, children of 
deceased members of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, have been reared and edu- 
cated in this home since it was founded. It 
is an institution which has more than justified 
the aims and ideals of its original promoters. 
It is at once a school and a home, and boys 
and girls who live there are given training 
that prepare them for something more than an 
ordinary share in life's responsibilities. In 
the home itself instruction is given through 
eight grades, and from the home school chil- 
dren go into the community high school at 
Lincoln. Instruction is thorough and well or- 
ganized, and includes not only the ordinary 
branches, but music, manual training, domes- 
tic science and other branches of vocational 
training. The farm itself contributes a large 
part of the produce consumed and affords also 
a valuable means of instruction in farming 
practice for the older boys. 

During the forty years since the founding 
of this splendid institution it has had just 
three superintendents. .The first was Miss 
Lizzie L. Morrison, who served until her death 
in 190G. The second superintendent was Mr. 
John A. Lucas, who continued at the post for 
over twenty years, until his death in 1926. 
The third superintendent is Roy Hillis John- 
son, with Mrs. Johnson as matron. The pres- 
ent board of directors comprise Dr. A. G. Neu- 
man, president, of Chicago; J. Parker Smith, 



vice president, of Chicago; W. A. Hubbard, 
secretary, of Carrollton; S. E. Newell, of 
Clinton, and W. D. Cooley, of Monmouth, 
Illinois. 

Roy Hillis Johnson, formerly grand master 
of the Illinois Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows, has since 1927 been superintendent of 
the Illinois Odd Fellows Orphans Home at 
Lincoln. He was born on a farm near Farmer 
City in DeWitt County, Illinois, October 2, 
1882, son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Lewis) 
Johnson. His father was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, of what is known as the Pennsylvania 
Dutch ancestry, and died in DeWitt County 
in 1927, at the age of ninety-seven. Mr. John- 
son's mother was born in Ohio, of French an- 
cestry, and she passed away in 1919. Solo- 
mon Johnson was a soldier in the Ninety- 
fourth Illinois Infantry in the Civil war and 
was wounded in the battle of Pittsburgh 
Landing. 

Roy H. Johnson, youngest in a large fam- 
ily of twelve children, of whom nine are living, 
grew up on a farm, and was prominently 
identified with educational work in DeWitt 
County until he came to Lincoln. He attended 
district schools, graduated from the LeRoy 
High School, took his Bachelor of Science de- 
gree at the Northern Illinois College at Dixon, 
and subsequently did post-graduate work in 
the Illinois State Normal University. Mr. 
Johnson began teaching in the country dis- 
tricts of DeWitt County. For seven years he 
was principal of the grade school at Clinton 
and for four years principal of the high school 
and superintendent of the grade school at 
Weldon. In 1918 he was elected county super- 
intendent of schools of DeWitt County and 
was reelected to the same office in 1922. From 
that post he resigned in September, 1926, to 
come to Lincoln and take over the active su- 
perintendency of the Orphans Home. While 
teaching he organized the first Parent-Teachers 
Association in DeWitt County. 

Mr. Johnson since early youth has been a 
devoted member of the great organization 
known as the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 
lows. He filled all the chairs in his home 
lodge, was elected grand warden in 1923, be- 
came deputy grand master in 1924, and in 
1925 was chosen grand master. He is also a 
past president of the Kiwanis Club at Clinton, 
a member of the Lincoln Rotary Club and the 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Johnson married, December 26, 1905, 
Miss Icie Foley. She was born in Wilson 
Township, DeWitt County, Illinois, daughter 
of Nicholas and Emma Alice (Thorpe) Foley. 
Her father was a farmer and stock buyer in 
DeWitt County. Her mother still lives at 
Clinton. Mrs. Johnson was educated in Illi- 
nois Normal University and for nine years 
was a successful teacher in DeWitt County. 
Since coming to Lincoln she has been matroi 



:/$■■■ 





William Gleason 



ILLINOIS 



85 



of the Orphans Home. They have two chil- 
dren, James Lewis, born November 25, 1915, 
and Robert Hillis, born July 2, 1920. 

Wesley Curtis Gullett, secretary of the 
Canton Chamber of Commerce, came to this 
work after a long experience in the field of 
teaching and journalism. The community of 
business and professional men represented in 
the Chamber feel that the interests of the 
city have been vested in most capable hands 
since Mr. Gullett became secretary. 

Mr. Gullett was born at LaFayette, Indiana, 
August 16, 1871. He is a descendant of a 
French family who spelled their name Goelet. 
His great-great-grandfather lived in France 
and after living for several years in England, 
where he married into an Irish family by 
the name of Leach, came on to America. Mr. 
Gullett's grandfather, John Gullett, was born 
in North Carolina, in the closing years of 
the eighteenth century, and later became an 
early settler in Southern Indiana. 

At New Albany on the Ohio River in Indiana 
was born his son John Wesley Gullett, Feb- 
ruary 27, 1841. John Wesley Gullett was a 
young man when the Civil war broke out and 
he served in the Union army, in Company 
M of the Twenty-third Indiana Infantry. He 
was a farmer in Indiana, and about 1880 he 
drove across the country with team and wagon 
to a new home at Marietta in Fulton County, 
Illinois. Just before leaving Indiana he went 
to the polls and cast his Republican vote for 
James A. Garfield for President. Having thus 
performed his civic duty he got into his wagon 
with his family and proceeded westward. He 
was active as a community man, serving as 
school director and county supervisor. He died 
at St. David March 11, 1912. 

John Wesley Gullett married Miss Mellie 
Parker, who was a native of Ross County, 
Ohio. Her father, James Parker, moved to 
Indiana when she was a young girl. James 
Parker was born in Virginia. Mrs. Mellie 
Gullett died February 27, 1917. Her two 
children were Wesley Curtis and Minnie Mae. 
Minnie Mae, who died in January, 1931, was 
the wife of John F. Varner, of Bushnell, 
Illinois. 

Wesley Curtis Gullett was about nine years 
old when the family came to Illinois. He at- 
tended school at Marietta, in the western 
part of Fulton County, received some of his 
high school work there, and in 1890 was gradr 
uated from what was then known as the 
Western Normal College at Bushnell. Mr. 
Gullett then entered upon his career as a 
teacher, and spent eighteen years in educa- 
tional work. This experience was consecu- 
tive except one year in newspaper work. In 
1897 he had established the Smithfield Sun. 
When he retired from his teaching career he 
resumed newspaper work at Canton, and for 
seventeen years altogether was connected with 



the Register and the Daily Ledger, his service 
alternating with these two papers, and he 
was managing editor and city editor of both 
of them until they were consolidated as the 

In 1927 Mr. Gullett accepted the office of 
secretary of the Canton Chamber of Commerce, 
and during the past four years he has been 
able to coordinate many of the civic and com- 
mercial plans undertaken and carried out 
under the auspices of this organization. Mr. 
Gullett is a member of the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, the Encampment of that 
order, also the Knights of Pythias, and was 
state commander in 1929 of the Sons of Vet- 
erans. He is a Republican and a member of 
the Illinoins State Chamber of Commerce. 

He married, July 14, 1903, Miss Ethyl 
Deming, of Macoupin County, Illinois, where 
she was born June 5, 1885. Her father, 
Huffman D. Deming, was a minister of the 
Methodist Church. Mrs. Gullett attended 
school at Rushville and taught school for a 
year before her marriage. They have three 
children: Glenn E., born October 4, 1904, a 
resident of Peoria, married Miss Dorothy 
Kelly; Carl E., born July 15, 1906, is at home; 
and Faye A. is a graduate of the Canton 
High School, following which for three years 
she was secretary to the superintendent of 
city schools, and is now pursuing her advanced 
education in Northwestern University at 
Evanston, Illinois. 

William Gleason. The late William Glea- 
son was for many years a substantial business 
man of Peoria, where he spent the greater 
part of his life as the proprietor of a suc- 
cessful grocery. He was largely a self-made 
man, for his father had died when he was 
still a young child and his early years were 
ones of earnest labor and of difficulties in 
securing an educational training. His career 
eventuated in success because of his untiring 
industry and good management, and at his 
death he not only left behind a substantial 
estate, but a heritage of an honored name. 

Mr. Gleason was born in County Kilkenny, 
Ireland, and was three years of age when 
he was brought to this country by his widowed 
mother, his father having met an accidental 
death in Ireland. The family first settled 
in Wisconsin, where William Gleason attended 
public school, and this later was supplemented 
by a course at St. Francis School, St. Louis, 
Missouri. He had been reared to agricultural 
pursuits, but preferred a mercantile career, 
and upon coming to Peoria opened a modest 
grocery establishment, which under his able 
and industrious direction developed into one 
of the city's successful enterprises, being 
located on Adams Street. In the later years 
of his life Mr. Gleason retired from active 
affairs and lived quietly at his home until 
his demise. As a youth he worked for his 



86 



ILLINOIS 



uncle on the farm and his capital was acquired 
through thrift and the strictest economy. His 
first modest venture was located at First 
and Munson streets, but at the end of three 
years his business had grown to such an 
extent that he found it necessary to move 
to larger quarters, and he accordingly took 
over the Adams Street establishment. During 
his later years he was largely interested in 
real estate, and proved a shrewd and capable 
dealer, acquiring a large amount of valuable 
property. He was interested in civic affairs, 
and was a devout member of the Catholic 
Church and of the Knights of Columbus. Mr. 
Gleason died in 1926, and was buried in St. 
Mary's Cemetery. 

Mr. Gleason married Mary Foley, a daugh- 
ter of James and Mary (Roche) Foley, natives 
of Ireland, who were educated and married in 
that country. After the birth of their two 
eldest children they immigrated to the United 
States and made their home in St. Louis, 
where both parents passed away. Their chil- 
dren were: Miss Julia Foley, a resident of 
Peoria; Mary, who became Mrs. Gleason; and 
Bridget, Patrick, John and James, all deceased. 
Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Gleason: William, who is married and has 
three children, William, Jr., Joseph and Pat- 
rick; Julia, Catherine and Mary. Miss Julia 
Foley, sister of Mrs. Gleason, is one of the 
well-known residents of Peoria and lives at 
930 North Glen Oak Avenue. 

Samuel John Tilton Everett, sergeant of 
Cottage 22 of the Sailors and Soldiers Home 
at Quincy, is a Spanish-American war veteran 
and one of the most popular citizens of 
Quincy. 

He was born at Chillicothe, Ross County, 
Ohio, February 28, 1874, son of John and 
Mary (Horland) Everett. His father served 
in the Union army in the One Hundred and 
Fifty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. He was 
three times wounded. In 1880 he came to 
Illinois and as a contractor and millwright 
built many of the buildings and much of the 
other construction work in the mines of San- 
gamon County. He died at St. John's Home 
at Springfield in 1886 from grief as a result 
of the tragic burning to death of his mother 
and two of his sons at East Springfield thirty 
days before. His wife, Mary (Horland) 
Everett, died in 1890. She had four brothers 
in the Civil war; Alex, who is buried at the 
Soldiers Home at Quincy; David, buried at 
Milwaukee; William, buried in Oklahoma; and 
one who was killed in battle in the war. 

Samuel John Tilton Everett's only two 
brothers met their tragic deaths as noted 
above. He spent his boyhood in St. John's 
Home at Springfield. He acquired a common 
school education and was still young when 
he started out in the world to make his own 
way. In his career he has shown a great 



amount of initiative and energy and has never 
been at loss in an emergency. As a boy he 
sold newspapers, and later became a bell hop 
in the old Keokuk Hotel in Keokuk, Iowa. 
During the two years he was there he saved 
four hundred dollars. He had heard a great 
deal of Steve Brodie's famous place in New 
York City, and on leaving Keokuk he bought 
a ticket to New York and satisfied himself 
with a visit to the Bowery, where Brodie's 
place was located. While wandering up and 
down the streets of New York City he one 
day saw a beautiful yacht lying at the dock. 
On inquiry he found it belonged to Mr. John 
Everett of Buffalo, New York, head of the 
Everett Piano Manufacturing Plant. He then 
explained to the captain of the boat that he 
was a relative of the owner and was taken 
aboard. When it was discovered that he did 
this as a ruse to inquire for a job the captain 
was going to throw him overboard, but the 
son of Mr. Everett, who was setting sail the 
next day on a two-year honeymoon trip, made 
some inquiries and concluded the matter by 
employing the intruder as steward and body- 
guard for the ladies when they went ashore. 
Then came a long voyage around the world, 
in the course of which they touched the ports 
of Gibraltar, Malta, Colombo, Singapore, Hong 
Kong, Hanchow, Shanghai, Sydney, Australia, 
Luzon, Honolulu, went through the Straits of 
Magellan and around to Seattle. The end of 
the voyage left Mr. Everett on the Pacific 
Coast, and having saved considerable money 
he used it for a trip to Alaska. 

He joined in the gold rush, visiting Fort 
Range and Chilcoot Pass and had more than 
the average fortune as a gold prospector. His 
earlier habits had given him a thrifty and 
a saving disposition so that he broughWiome 
the greater part of what he had won by his 
toils and adventures in the far North. He 
invested his capital and has never been at want 
for the material necessities. 

Soon after returning from Alaska and while 
in Chicago he enlisted in May, 1898, for duty 
in the Spanish-American war. He was in 
Troop H of the First Illinois Cavalry and 
served until discharged at Fort Sheridan in 
November, 1898. After the war he took up 
road work both as a business and for pleasure, 
and his travels have taken him to every state 
in the Union. Some years ago he received 
an injury, and having never married and no 
near relatives he accepted the opportunity to 
be among his old comrades, and in 1927 entered 
the Soldiers and Sailors Home at Quincy. He 
was soon picked out as a man of ability above 
the average, and was made sergeant in charge 
of the largest cottage, with 150 people. 

He is commander of Camp Funston Post 
No. 101 of the Spanish-American War Vet- 
erans, and he raised the membership from six 
to sixty in six months at the home. He is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge at Quincy, the 






ILLINOIS 



87 



Methodist Episcopal Church, and is regarded 
as the leading power in his ward in the Re- 
publican party. He is the present precinct 
chairman of his ward, and in the election re- 
ceived 450 votes, while only twenty-one votes 
went to his opponent. Mr. Everett married, 
December 4, 1929, Mrs. Ross Bernard. 

Neill M. Saunders. One of the important 
industrial concerns of Whiteside County is 
the Fort Dearborn Manufacturing Company, 
the well ordered plant of which is established 
at Rock Falls. Of this corporation Neill M. 
Saunders is the secretary and his father is 
the president. 

Mr. Saunders was born in the City of Chi- 
cago, Illinois, and is a son of George F. and 
Minnie B. (McNeill) Saunders, who now main- 
tain their home at Sterling, as does also Neill 
M. Saunders. George F. Saunders and George 
Olson organized in Chicago the Fort Dearborn 
Manufacturing Company, in 1893, for the man- 
ufacturing of special machinery and for the 
production of metal stampings. Mr. Saun- 
ders became treasurer of the company and 
retained this position until the death of his 
associate, Mr. Olson, in 1916, when he obtained 
controlling interest in the corporation and 
became its president, the office of which he 
has since continued the incumbent. The re- 
moval of the headquarters of the business to 
Rock Falls, Whiteside County, occurred in 
1915, and the plant here is one of modern 
order in all respects. The enterprise has be- 
come one of substantial order and makes defi- 
nite contribution to the industrial and commer- 
cial prestige of Whiteside County. 

In the public schools of the beautiful Town 
of Wilmette, a suburb of Chicago, Neill M. 
Saunders received his early education, and 
later he continued his studies in St. John's 
Military Academy at Delafield, Wisconsin, be- 
sides which he was for two years a student 
in the University of Wisconsin, in the capital 
City of Madison. 

Mr, Saunders was twenty-one years of age 
when the nation became formally involved in 
the great World war, and he gave prompt 
manifestation of his youthful patriotism by 
enlisting, in 1917, for service in the United 
States Navy, his training having been received 
at the Great Lakes Naval Training Station 
and he having continued in service until the 
armistice brought the war to a close. As a 
first class seaman he received his honorable, 
discharge in the spring of 1919. 

After the termination of his World war 
service Mr. Saunders was associated four years 
with his father's business, that of the Fort 
Dearborn Manufacturing Company, in the 
office of which he served as secretary during 
this interval. For a time thereafter he was 
retained as a salesman for other concerns, but 
in 1924 he resumed his active alliance with 
the Fort Dearborn Manufacturing Company, 



of which he has since continued to be the 
secretary. 

Mr. Saunders has taken a vital interest in 
political affairs, given unswerving allegiance 
to the Republican party, and at the time of 
this writing, in 1931, he has the distinction 
of being chairman of the Republican Central 
Committee of Whiteside County. His Masonic 
affiliations include his membership in the 
Commandery of Knights Templar in his home 
City of Sterling, and he has membership also 
in Sterling Lodge of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. His continued inter- 
est in his World war comrades is manifested 
in his appreciative affiliation with the Ameri- 
can Legion, and he and his wife have member- 
ship in the Presbyterian Church in their home 
city, where likewise they are popular figures 
in the representative social life of the com- 
munity. 

On the 15th of June, 1928, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Saunders to Miss Lucille 
Nehrling, daughter of Walter H. and Eliza- 
beth Nehrling, of Charleston, Illinois, and the 
one child of this union is a winsome daughter, 
Jeanne Elizabeth. 

Jonathan Young Scammon was born at 
Whitfield, Maine, July 27, 1812. His maternal 
grandfather, David Young, was a soldier in 
the American Revolution. He liked to be 
known as J. Young Scammon and grew up on 
a farm in the Pine Tree State. He attended 
the Maine Wesleyan Seminary and the Lincoln 
Academy, spent a year in what is now Colby 
University, and for several years alternated 
between the study of law and teaching school. 
He was admitted to the bar in 1835 and shortly 
afterward started for the West, traveling by 
the Erie Canal and around the Great Lakes. 
He stopped at Chicago, and the acquaintances 
he formed there determined him to become a 
permanent resident. He accepted the position 
of deputy in the Cook County Circuit Court 
and in December, 1835, was admitted to the 
Chicago bar. In 1836 he became a law part- 
ner of Morris S. Buckner and the firm of 
Buckner & Scammon was continued until Mr. 
Buckner was elected mayor. The great abili- 
ties Mr. Scammon displayed as a lawyer -re- 
main an honorable tradition in the Chicago 
bar. What is now known as the Chicago Law 
Institute, the second largest law library in 
the United States, had its origin in his home. 
However, the interest of his career for modern 
readers is in his related activities. He was 
one of the creators of Chicago as a great 
banking center. In 1837, the year the great 
panic began, closing the era of internal im- 
provements in which Illinois was especially in- 
volved, Mr. Scammon became attorney for 
the Chicago State Bank. Then and for years 
afterward he labored earnestly to secure bet- 
ter banking laws for the state. In 1851 he 
established the Marine Bank, and became its 



88 



ILLINOIS 



president. During the Civil war he became 
president of the Mechanics National Bank. 
In 1864 he offered the resolutions adopted by 
the Board of Trade pledging its members to 
have dealings only with banking houses that 
conducted their business on the basis of the 
national currency. 

J. Young Scammon was one of the citizens 
of Chicago who sent out the call for a river 
and harbor convention held in that city in 
July, 1847. This convention was attended by 
10,000 delegates from eighteen states, and out 
of it came some of the great influences which 
projected and brought about the building of 
railroads, concentrating upon Chicago. Mr. 
Scammon was one of the organizers and finan- 
ciers of the old Galena & Chicago Union Rail- 
road, which started the construction of the 
first line of steel from Chicago westward, 
eventuating in what is now the Chicago & 
Northwestern Railroad System. For four 
years, beginning in 1839, he was reporter for 
the Illinois Supreme Court. From 1838 to 
1847 he was a partner with Norman B. Judd 
in the law firm of Scammon & Judd, and in 
1849 he and E. B. McCagg organized the firm 
of Scammon & McCagg, which later became 
Scammon, McCagg & Fuller. Mr. Scammon 
retired from his law practice in 1872. 

J. Young Scammon was one of the organiz- 
ers of the Chicago Swedenborgian Church and 
of the Chicago Historical Society, of which 
he was at one time president, was one of the 
incorporators and president of the Chicago 
Academy of Sciences, was instrumental in or- 
ganizing the Hahnemann Medical College and 
gave to it the land for the site of the Hahne- 
mann Hospital. He was one of the incorpora- 
tors of the Old Ladies Home. He was made 
a regent of the Chicago University when it 
was founded. He was one of the organizers 
of the Chicago Astronomical Society and pro- 
vided the fund of $30,000 for the equipment 
of what is known as Dearborn Observatory, in 
memory of his wife, and which is now located 
in Evanston at the Northwestern University. 
In 1872 he was one of the committee which 
prepared a bill for the creation of the Chicago 
Public Library. He was an early member 
of the Union League Club. In 1844 he was 
one of the Chicago citizens who established 
the Chicago Evening Journal, to support the 
candidacy of Henry Clay. In 1865 he helped 
establish the Chicago Republican, and after 
the fire of 1871 he acquired the Associated 
Press franchise of the Republican and in 
March, 1872, brought out the first number 
of the Chicago Inter Ocean, in support of the 
candidacy of Horace Greeley. He made pos- 
sible the creation of the Chicago public school 
system, writing the ordinances for schools, and 
from 1845 to 1848 was president of the Board 
of Education. One of Chicago's public schools 
bears his name. J. Young Scammon died 
March 17, 1890. He married, in 1837, Mary 



Ann H. Dearborn, a cousin of Colonel Dear- 
born. In 1857 Mr. Scammon took his family 
to Europe, where they remained for several 
years and while at Dresden Mrs. Scammon 
passed away in 1858. Four children werej 
born of this marriage: Ellen, who died in in- 
fancy; Charles Trufant Scammon, who was 
a law partner of Robert T. Lincoln; Florence 
Ann Dearborn, who became the wife of Joseph 
Sampson Reed; and Ariana, who was active, 
for many years in the club and social life of] 
Chicago. In 1869 J. Young Scammon mar-J 
ried Mrs. Maria Sheldon Wright, sister ofl 
Mrs. Mahlon D. Ogden. Mrs. Scammon inl 
1901, as a memorial to her husband's interest! 
in the old Chicago University, gave to thel 
Univeristy of Chicago the land comprising the] 
site of the School of Education, known asl 
Scammon Gardens, and in her will provided 
for the "Scammon Lectures" at the Chicago 
Art Institute. 

Clark Scammon Reed is a Chicago attorney! 
with many years of active and successful asso- 
ciation with the professional life of his com- v 
munity and also with public affairs. His own: 
career has been a creditable one and the! 
public at large is also interested in the fact! 
that he is a grandson of one of Chicago's! 
most distinguished citizens, J. Young Scam-I 
mon, a list of whose activities in Chicago reads 
like a catalogue of all the constructive under-' 
takings that made Chicago a great city. Mr. 
Reed is also the great-grandson of the Rev. 
John Reed, the first chaplain in the Continental 
Navy. 

Clark Scammon Reed is a son of Joseph 
Sampson and Florence Ann Dearborn (Scam-j 
mon) Reed. He was born on"*Ladies Island, 
near Beaufort, South Carolina, February 14, { ' 
1878. His father was a cotton planter in 
South Carolina and at the time of his decease 
was county treasurer of Beaufort County. Ha 
was a native of Boston, Massachusetts, a grad-1 
uate of Harvard University, and during his* 
earlier career was for a time connected with 
the Marine Bank of Chicago. 

Clark Scammon Reed attended school in) 
Beaufort and Columbia, South Carolina, and 
was one year at South Carolina College. In 
1900 he graduated from the University of Chi- 
cago. In 1902 he took his law degree at 
Northwestern University and for a while was 
associated with Holt, Wheeler & Sidley and 
soon afterward established himself in private 
practice, in which he found ample satisfaction 
for his talents and ambition. Later he was 
a partner of Lynden Evans, the firm being 
known as Evans, Reed & Sullivan. He was 
assistant attorney of the Chicago Sanitary 
District during 1910-12, later served in the 
county attorney's office. During the war he 
was assistant director of the Bureau of Inves- 
tigation for Illinois in the United States food 
administration. 



ILLINOIS 



89 



On June 21, 1905, Mr. Reed married Miss 
Mabel Arvilla Lewis, a native of Chicago and 
daughter of Charles W. and Mary (Colahan) 
Lewis. Two sons were born of this marriage: 
Charles Lewis Reed, born October 27, 1909, 
who passed on in infancy; and Clark Lewis 
Reed, who was born July 11, 1914. Mrs. Reed 
passed on January 16, 1929. 

Mr. Reed is a member of the Chicago, Illi- 
nois and American Bar Associations, but his 
chief interest in professional organizations has 
been in the Chicago Law Institute. He has 
served on its board of managers for many 
years, was vice president and in 1927 presi- 
dent, and for several years has been treasurer. 
He is a trustee of the Chicago Junior High 
School at Elgin, a school for wayward boys. 
He is a member of the Sons of the American 
Revolution, the Chicago Literary Club, Uni- 
versity Club, Hamilton Club, the Chi Psi fra- 
ternity, and a life member of the Chicago Art 
Institute, and is a past president of its Alumni 
Association. 

Hale C. Scott, insurance broker at Polo, 
and supervisor of "The Pines" State Park 
east of that city, is a member of a pioneer 
family of Ogle County and he is widely known 
and respected through this section of Illinois 
not only on account of his individual activities 
but for the record of the family in general. 

Mr. Scott was born at Polo, November 25, 
1885, son of Jasper W. and Bessie A. (Law- 
son) Scott. His maternal great-grandfather 
came from Scotland in 1825 and after two 
years in Canada moved to Illinois, where he 
was a very early pioneer. He married a lady 
who was of Yankee stock of an old Rhode 
Island family. Mr. Scott's maternal grand- 
father was born in Ohio and in early age 
was bound out to a farmer who lived near 
the Indiana line. Later he came to Illinois, 
and was one of the pioneers in the district 
around Polo. Jasper W. Scott was born near 
Polo, August 1, 1855. He became a farmer, 
and, though he retired in 1915, still has many 
interests and is very active in their super- 
vision. He has played an active part in local 
civic and political affairs and for many years 
was a supervisor of Lincoln Township. He 
was a member of the Board of Supervisors 
when the first Ogle County courthouse was 
built. His wife died in 1929. There were 
three children, Robert, who lives in Minnesota; 
Hale C; and Rena, who died in 1892. 

Hale C. Scott attended public schools at 
Polo. When he left school he took up the 
life of a farmer on the old homestead. When 
his father retired he took over the manage- 
ment of the farm, and continued it until 1924, 
when the homestead was sold at $250 per 
acre. In the same year Mr. Scott opened an 
insurance office in Polo, and has built up a 
successful business in life and fire insurance. 



When the State of Illinois finally took over 
that remarkable tract of land east of Polo 
which contains the only native pine forests 
in the state, and created it a state park, Mr. 
Scott was appointed the supervisor of the park, 
and the construction of roads and the preser- 
vation and maintenance of this beauty spot 
have been under his personal direction since 
1927. Mr. Scott is a member of the Masonic 
Lodge and Royal Arch Chapter at Polo and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He 
is a Methodist and is a member of the Re- 
publican County Central Committee. 

On July 8, 1908, he married Miss Grace 
Tice, daughter of William Tice, of Polo. They 
have four children, all at home, Howard, born 
March 31, 1912, graduated from the Polo 
High School; Myron, born May 25, 1914; 
Harold, born in 1916; and Hale C, Jr., born 
October 17, 1927. 

Alexander V. Capraro is a Chicago archi- 
tect whose work has gained him not a little 
prestige among the progressive members of 
his profession, and he has the further dis- 
tinction of being the first licensed architect 
of Italian extraction to practice his profession 
in Chicago. Mr. Capraro is a master not 
only of the complicated technic of adapting 
the fundamental forms and masses of archi- 
tecture to modern demands in business and 
domestic structures, but has also done some 
very distinctive work in the application of 
color. 

He is in all essentials a Chicago man, 
though he was born at Pietrabbondante, Cam- 
pobasso, Italy. He was three years of age 
when his parents came to Chicago. In that 
city he was educated in public and parochial 
schools, is a graduate of the Joseph Medill 
High School and had his technical training 
in the Armour Institute of Technology. He 
studied there from 1912 to 1914 and later 
continued his studies in the Chicago Art Insti- 
tute and Chicago Technical College. Mr. 
Capraro was licensed to practice as an archi- 
tect by the State of Illinois in 1916. 

He was chosen as the architect of the 
first branch library building erected by the 
Chicago Public Library Board, a handsome 
structure on Crawford Avenue and Twenty- 
seventh Street. During the past fourteen 
years he has been designated as the architect 
and designer of a notable group of buildings, 
particularly modern apartment houses, where 
he has applied his original ideas in design 
to splendid advantage. His creative work has 
been widely admired. One of the best exam- 
ples in completed structures is the Casa Bonita 
Apartment on Ridge Road. The financiers 
of this building were strongly impressed by 
the designs submitted by Mr. Capraro and 
his associate, Morris L. Komar, as offering 
a wholesome departure from the commonplace 



90 



ILLINOIS 



in architecture. The outstanding feature of 
the Casa Bonita is the color scheme. This 
was perfected after five months of exhaustive 
experimentation with a special grade of terra 
cotta of which the entire facade is constructed, 
including all the court exterior. In the Casa 
Bonita Mr. Capraro brought to Chicago some 
of the striking effect that have been achieved 
in Florida with the Mediterranean type of 
architecture. At the same time the Casa 
Bonita has incorporated the comfort features 
required by northern weather without loss of 
the color and mass treatment that gives charm 
to the southern examples of this type of 
architecture. 

Mr. Capraro is a member of the Illinois 
Society of Architects and the Italian Chamber 
of Commerce. He is affiliated with the Knights 
of Columbus, the Oak Park Elks and is a 
member of the Elmhurst Golf and Country 
Club, the Frontenac Athletic Club, and the 
Alpine Gun Club. 

On February 1, 1920, Mr. Capraro was 
united in marriage with Miss Maude Pacelle, 
of Chicago. They have three children, Vin- 
cent Lincoln, William Columbus and Marion. 

John J. Logan has lived a very busy life 
since he was a boy, learned and followed two 
mechanical trades, and in later years took up 
the real estate business, in which he is still 
active at Quincy. 

Mr. Logan was born in Henderson County, 
Illinois, July 15, 1859, son of Andrew and 
Julia (Joy) Logan. Andrew Logan was a 
native of County Galway, Ireland, and as an 
American he had the distinction of serving 
in two of this nation's wars. He enlisted 
first in the war with Mexico and shortly after 
its conclusion he participated in the Cali- 
fornia gold rush of 1849. He then went back 
to Ireland, and brought with him to America 
his father, who died at Brooklyn. While in 
Brooklyn Andrew Logan met and married 
Julia Joy. She was a member of an old and 
prominent family of New York State, the name 
having been identified with the early history 
of the ship building industry. 

Andrew Logan subsequently came west to 
take advantage of the bounty lands in Iowa 
for the benegt of Mexican war veterans. He 
improved a claim near Fort Dodge, Iowa, but 
that town was then close to the Indian frontier, 
and after about three years, on account of 
Indian uprisings and hostilities, he abandoned 
his land and moved to Illinois. He established 
his home about twelve miles east of Burling- 
ton, Iowa. Burlington at that time was the 
metropolis of all this region. On Andrew 
Logan's farm in Henderson County his son 
John J. was born just before the Civil war. 
When John J. was a very small child Andrew 
Logan again enlisted, joining the Eighty- 
fourth Illinois Regiment. After his second 
service as a soldier Andrew Logan devoted 



his time and efforts to the management of his 
accumulating landed interests and farms, and 
he died at the age of seventy-eight. Julia 
(Joy) Logan died in 1887. 

John J. Logan probably possessed too much 
energy to be patient with the routine of a 
school room. He went through the grade 
school at Linnville in Henderson County and 
when only about fifteen years of age came to 
Quincy, where he found work as a mason's 
helper during the construction of the Adams 
County courthouse. The contractors of this 
building were unable to finance themselves 
and eventually abandoned the contract. This 
threw the boy, John Logan, out of work and 
he then turned his attention to another trade. 
He served an apprenticeship as a cabinet- 
maker and carriage builder. Andrew J. 
Logan, the father of John J. Logan, had the 
distinction of having built by hand work and 
skill the first hearse ever constructed in Illi- 
nois. He was a year in its building. The 
vehicle is still in existence at Oquaka, Hender- 
son County. In 1878 John J. Logan went out 
to Colorado, where he followed mining in- 
terests. In 1882 he returned to his father's 
farm in Henderson County, and continued with 
his father and brothers in operating their ex- 
tensive farming interest until he married, in 
1886. Following his marriage he continued 
farming until 1902, when he went on the road 
as a traveling representative of tile and brick 
interests in the buil^ng of silos. This con- 
tinued until 1918. During these years he 
bought and sold farms and carried on a gen- 
eral real estate business. In 1918 he moved 
to Quincy. While not as active now as in 
former years, he is a keen judge of real estate 
values in his home city and consequently has 
been frequently appointed on appraisal boards 
and committees for the city and county and 
also by private interests to aid in determining 
the value of real estate when involved in 
taxing or loan matters. Mr. Logan is an 
active Republican, but has never sought or 
filled office. He and his family are Presby- 
terians. 

He married in 1886 Miss Minerva Clark, a 
native of Henderson County, where her people 
were early settlers. She passed away May 
12, 1919. Mr. Logan has a large family of 
children and numerous grandchildren. His 
daughter Julia is the wife of Perry Robinson, 
a farmer near Colchester, Illinois, and has 
three children. Myrtle, deceased, was the 
wife of George Van Fleet. Leo M., the oldest 
son, lives at Macomb, and is married and has 
two children. Louis Luke Logan is a resi- 
dent of LaGrange, Missouri, and has two chil- 
dren. John J. Logan, Jr., a land owner at 
LaGrange, has three children. Andrew M., 
whose home is at Macomb, has three children. 
David E., of Tennessee, Illinois, has a family 
of five children. Margaret, wife of James Mc- 
Cowan, of Mendota, Illinois, is the mother of 



ILLINOIS 



91 



three children. Catherine is the wife of Wil- 
liam McDaniels, of Peoria, and they have one 
child. The two youngest of this family are 
Charles V. Logan, of Quincy, Illinois, and 
Frank Logan, of Industry, Illinois, who mar- 
ried Freda Aden. John J. Logan married 
on September 5, 1921, Mrs. Frances Hughes 
Williams, widow of Virgil Williams, and she 
had three children by her first marriage: Hur- 
ley and Archie Williams and Maude, deceased. 
Mrs. Logan is a daughter of J. J. Hughes, a 
native of Illinois, and Rozena (Vanderlip) 
Hughes, a native of Canada. 

George J. Patterson, postmaster of Genoa, 
represents one of the pioneer families of De- 
Kalb County. The Pattersons were early set- 
tlers, and their name is one that has been 
notable in the affairs of the county for many 
years. 

The founder of the family in Illinois was 
his grandfather, Joseph Patterson, who was 
born in Pennsylvania, September 10, 1786. 
He was a son of Joseph Patterson, Sr., a sol- 
dier in the Revolutionary war with Pennsyl- 
vania troops. The Patterson family is of 
Scotch ancestry and first settled in New York. 
Joseph Patterson, Jr., was a soldier in the 
War of 1812. He came to Illinois and took 
up an eighty acre homestead in DeKalb 
County during the administration of Presi- 
dent Jackson. He built a log cabin as the 
first shelter for his family in the West. He 
married Eleanor Compton, and they had a 
large family of sixteen children. Joseph Pat- 
terson was a cooper by trade and followed 
that work in connection with farming his 
homestead. He was buried at Genoa. 

The father of the Genoa postmaster was 
George Patterson, who was born August 17, 
1836, and died July 18, 1876. He was born 
at Meadville, Crawford County, Pennsylvania, 
and was a small child when his parents came 
west to Illinois. He grew up on the homestead 
in DeKalb County and at the age of twenty- 
two, in 1858, married Abigail Brown. He 
then engaged in farming for himself and 
before his death had accumulated a consider- 
able landed estate. 

He went out to Nebraska soon after that 
territory was admitted to the Union and ac- 
quired land in Grant County in August, 1868. 
After living in Nebraska about seven years 
he returned to Illinois in 1875, where he died 
the following year. The record of his children 
and grandchildren is as follows: Hattie, de- 
ceased, was the wife of Eugene Griggs, and 
left a son, Leslie, now deceased; another son, 
John, married Lena Tillery, and they had a 
daughter, Lucile; and Jessie became the wife 
of Raymond Helsdon. Emma J. Patterson, 
the second child, became the wife of Milton 
J. Corson, and their son John married Velma 
Crawford and has four children, named Bar- 
bara, James, John and Eleanor. Joseph Pat- 



terson, now deceased, married Margaret Peters 
and had two children, Dillon and Allen. Mar- 
garet E. Patterson, also deceased, was the 
wife of William Stephens and had two chil- 
dren, Floyd and Abigail. Jeremiah L. Pat- 
terson married Bertha Wharton and their 
children were: Irene, wife of David Burges 
and mother of Bruce and David; Evelyn, who 
married Ed Nebergall; and Oliver. 

Mr. George J. Patterson, the youngest of 
the family, was born in Nebraska and was 
a child when his parents returned to Illinois. 
His father had a soldier's record in the Civil 
war. He enlisted August 6, 1862, in Com- 
pany A of the One Hundred and Fifth Illi- 
nois Infantry and served with General Grant 
in the Army of the Cumberland, and later 
was in the fighting around Richmond. After 
his death his widow took her family to South 
Dakota, where she entered a homestead. In 
South Dakota George J. Patterson acquired 
some of his early education, finishing in a 
high school at St. Lawrence in that state, and 
then with a course in the State Agricultural 
College at Brookings. On returning to Genoa, 
Illinois, he took up work in some of the local 
stores. In 1903 he first come into the post- 
office, as a clerk, and later was commissioned 
postmaster. He served in that office until 
the Wilson administration, when he turned his 
attention to the teaming business. 

Mr. Patterson had some interesting expe- 
rience during the World war. Though past 
the draft age, he found an opportunity for 
service with the Y. M. C. A., and on account 
of his previous experience was given postal 
work. While overseas he was at Paris, and 
he made several trips with convoys back and 
forth. On returning to Genoa in 1919 Mr. 
Patterson resumed his work as a clerk in the 
postoffice and on February 7, 1924, was ap- 
pointed postmaster by President Coolidge and 
has been at that post of duty continuously 
now for the past seven years. He is one of 
the very popular men and reliable citizens of 
the community. He has served as a member 
of the school board. Mr. Patterson is a mem- 
ber of the Masonic Lodge and the Eastern 
Star. 

George W. Nisley, one of the publishers of 
the Mendota Reporter, is a native son of that 
city, born February 22, 1874. 

His father, the late Jacob L. Nisley, was 
born at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, and was 
brought to Illinois when a boy. He attended 
the common schools of this state and Knox 
College at Galesburg. For over thirty-five 
years he was street commissioner of Mendota 
and was a splendid type of the public official 
who in a quiet way does a great deal of work, 
more than most citizens ever appreciated. He 
died in 1918 and his wife in 1908. He was a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. His wife, Isabel Rife, was also from 



92 



ILLINOIS 



Chambersburg, Pennsylvania. They had five 
children: George W., Edgar P., Mrs. Susie 
Haegquist, of Rockford, Mrs. Mabel Blotch, 
of Mendota, and Jacob L., of Oregon, Illinois. 

George W. Nisley left his work in high 
school at Mendota in 1892, at the age of 
eighteen, and began working in the office of the 
Mendota Bulletin, where he learned the trade 
of printer. In 1895 he was employed as a 
printer by the Mendota Sun and in September, 
1896, when the Sun and Bulletin were con- 
solidated, he became an associate editor of 
the consolidated paper and was with that 
establishment until 1919. In that year he and 
William H. Leiser bought the Mendota Re- 
porter, and in September, 1927, they also ac- 
quired the plant and circulation of the Sun- 
Bulletin, which makes the Reporter the third 
largest weekly circulation of any country paper 
in Illinois, a valuable business as well as most 
influential organ of public opinion. In 1930 
a beautiful new modern printing office was 
completed in the heart of the business section 
of Mendota and provides a home of exceptional 
appearance and appointments for the Re- 
porter. In this new building has been in- 
stalled a modern Goss Comet press and other 
machinery of the latest type. The Reporter 
now prints 5,000 papers each week and is 
amply equipped to provide for the growing 
circulation and job work for some time to 
come. Mr. Nisley is a member of the Illinois 
and National Press Associations, belongs to 
the B. P. 0. Elks, Kiwanis Club, the Methodist 
Church, and is a Republican. 

He married, December 21, 1898, Miss Mae O. 
Edwards, of Mendota. They have one daugh- 
ter, Miss Hazel May. 

Fred Baber, who is now living virtually 
retired in his native City of Paris, the judicial 
center of Edgar County, is a representative 
of sterling pioneer families of this county, 
on both paternal and maternal sides, and both 
his paternal and maternal ancestors of the 
original or first American generation came to 
this country in the Colonial era of our na- 
tional history, one of his heritages from this 
source being his eligibility for affiliation with 
the Sons of the American Revolution. Fred 
Baber succeeded his honored father as presi- 
dent of the First National Bank of Paris, and 
since his resignation of this executive office 
he has lived virtually retired in this city, 
though he finds both satisfaction and diver- 
sion in giving his personal supervision in a 
general way to his fine farm estate in this 
county. 

Mr. Baber was born at Paris, Illinois, in 
1876, and is a son of Asa J. and Sibby Ann 
(O'Hair) Baber, the former of whom was born 
in Kansas Township, Edgar County, in the 
year 1832, and the latter of whom was born 
in Sims Township, this county, and both hav- 
ing passed the closing years of their lives m 



Paris, the county seat, where the former died 
in 1916 and the latter in 1928. The paternal 
grandparents of Mr. Baber were born in North 
Carolina but as pioneer settlers in Edgar 
County, Illinois, they came from their former 
home in Indiana. The Baber family was 
founded in Virginia in the Colonial period, and 
was one of prominence in Culpeper County, 
though the first representatives of the family 
in Illinois came from North Carolina. The! 
paternal grandfather of the subject of this- 
review was one of the substantial pioneer^' 
farmers of Edgar County. His wife passed 1 
the closing years of her life on their old home- 
stead farm in the present Kansas Township, 
and A. J. Baber died at Paris, Illinois. 

A. J. Baber, father of Fred Baber, wash 
reared and educated in Edgar County, assisted 
in the varied activities of the pioneer farm 
and eventually became the owner of a valuable 
farm estate in his native county. He was long 
one of the honored and influential citizens of i 
the county and served in 1854 as county treas- 
urer. In 1861 he and his brother Adin Baber- 
effected the organization of the First Na- 
tional Bank of Paris, and of this old and 
substantial financial institution he remained 
the president until his death, in 1916. He was 
a stalwart Republican in political alignment 
and he and his wife were earnest members of 
the Christian Church. Mrs. Baber was a!:i 
daughter of Michael and Lucretia (Tibbetts) 
O'Hair. Michael O'Hair was born and reared 
in Kentucky, and came to Illinois as a young 
man, and here passed his entire life, his 
vocation having been that of farmer, and his 
father having here been one of the very early 
pioneer settlers. The first American repre- 
sentative of the O'Hair family was Michael 
O'Hair, who was born in Ireland and who 
made settlement in Virginia in 1775. He be- 
came a patriot soldier in the War of the Rev- 
olution, in which he served in the command 
of Gen. Nathaniel Greene and took part in 
the latter's vigorous campaigns and numerous 
battles in Virginia and the Carolinas, his 
service having continued until the close of the 
war. Thereafter he became a member of a 
colony that made settlement in Jessamine 
County, Kentucky. This Revolutionary pa- 
triot was the great-grandfather of Fred Baber 
of this sketch. Michael O'Hair, Jr., died at 
his home in Edgar County, in the year 1875. 

After completing his studies in the Paris • 
High School Fred Baber attended a collegiate 
preparatory school at Lawrenceville, New 
Jersey, and upon his return home he took 
a position in the First National Bank of Paris, 
of which his father was the president. He 
was advanced to positions of constantly ex- 
panding responsibility, and upon the death of 
his father, in 1916, became president of this 
old and influential banking institution, of which 
he continued the executive head until 1925, 
when he resigned. Since his retirement he; 




•' 



(7 



ILLINOIS 



93 



has given major attention to the supervision 
of his fine farm estate of 760 acres. 

Mr. Baber has in all the relations of life 
well upheld the prestige of a family name 
that has been one of prominence in Edgar 
County since the early pioneer days. He has 
been a staunch advocate and supporter of the 
cause of the Republican party and was a dele- 
gate to its national convention of 1914. He 
has served as supervisor of Paris Township, 
as school director of Paris Union District, as 
trustee of the public schools of Paris, and 
gave one term of administration as mayor of 
his native city. He was reared in the faith 
of the Christian Church, which he still at- 
tends and supports. He has received in the 
Masonic fraternity the thirty-second degree 
of the Scottish Rite, besides being a Noble of 
the Mystic Shrine, and he is affiliated also 
with the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. 

The year 1902 recorded the marriage of Mr. 
Baber to Miss Daisy Lycan, who likewise was 
born and reared at Paris, Illinois, and who 
is a daughter of Hiram and Elizabeth 
(Thomas) Lycan, the former of whom was 
born in this county and the latter in Hamp- 
shire County, Virginia. Asa James, only child 
of Mr. and Mrs. Baber, is chief room clerk of 
the Stevens Hotel in the City of Chicago. 

William L. Carlin has been engaged in 
the practice of his profession in his native 
City of Chicago during a period of nearly 
a quarter of a century, and is one of the 
constituent members of the representative law 
firm of which the distinguished head of Clar- 
ence Darrow, one of the nation's foremost crim- 
inal lawyers. Mr. Carlin was born in Chicago 
on the 16th of July, 1887, and is a son of 
Dr. Peter S. and Mary (McCarthy) Carlin, 
his father having long been a representative 
physician and surgeon of Chicago. Nellie Car- 
lin, sister of Doctor Carlin, has gained dis- 
tinction as one of the influential women law- 
yers of Illinois, she having served as assistant 
state's attorney of Cook County and having 
held the position of public guardian under the 
administration of Governor Dunne. 

After completing his studies in the West 
Division High School of Chicago William L. 
Carlin here entered the Kent College of Law, 
in which institution he was graduated as a 
member of the class of 1914. He thus received 
his degree of Bachelor of Laws, in 1915 he 
was admitted to the bar of his native state, 
in the month of April, and in the general prac- 
tice of his profession he has been associated 
with Clarence Darrow during a period of 
twenty-two years, his admission to the firm 
of Darrow, Smith, Cronson & Smith having 
occurred in the year 1925. The offices of 
this important law firm are established at 77 
West Washington Street, and Mr. Carlin main- 
tains his home at 323 Fourteenth Street in 



the beautiful suburban City of Wilmette, where 
he has membership in the Breakers Beach 
Club, he being an adept in swimming and 
being likewise an enthusiastic devotee of golf. 
His political allegiance is given to the Demo- 
cratic party, but he considers his profession 
worthy of his undivided time and attention 
and thus has manifested no ambition for politi- 
cal preferment of any kind. 

Mr. Carlin enlisted for World war service 
in the United States Army, was stationed in 
turn at Fort McKinley, and Fort Williams, 
near Portland, Maine, he having been assigned 
to the artillery wing of the service and having 
held therein the rank of sergeant major at 
the time he received his honorable discharge. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Rose Azzato, 
likewise was born and reared in Chicago, and 
she is a daughter of John and Nora Azzato. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carlin have two children: 
Eleanor Patricia, born April 10, 1924, and 
William L., Jr., born December 22, 1926. 

Glenn W. Weeks, postmaster of Tremont, 
represents one of the early pioneer families 
of Tazewell County. When much of the land 
of this fertile Illinois district was still owned 
by the Government his great-grandfather 
Weeks came from the East and exercised his 
privileges as a homesteader. Not long after 
his settlement he was followed by his son, 
John Weeks, the grandfather of the Tremont 
postmaster. Both of them were homesteaders, 
and the patents to their lands were signed by 
the President of the United States. Mr. Weeks" 
great-grandfather came from England. 

Glenn W. Weeks was born at Washington 
in Tazewell County, July 26, 1893, son of 
William A. and Nora Blanche (Payne) Weeks. 
His father was born September 19, 1863, and 
is now a retired farmer at Washington. His 
special interest as a farmer was directed to 
the raising of live stock. He is a man of 
fine character, highly respected, but has never 
been a seeker of office. He votes as a Repub- 
lican, and for many years he and his family 
have been identified with the St. Mark's Luth- 
eran Church at Washington. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and Modern Wood- 
men of American and has always enjoyed hunt- 
ing and fishing. His wife was born at Wash- 
ington, Illinois, March 4, 1873. The Paynes 
were likewise among the early settlers of 
Tazewell County and were of English and 
Irish descent. Her father, Stephen Henry 
Payne, took an active part in Democratic poli- 
tics, holding several offices in Tazewell County, 
and his daughter follows him in her political 
affiliations. Mrs. William Weeks is a member 
of the Woman's Club of Washington, the 
American Legion Auxiliary and takes an 
active part in the social organizations of St. 
Mark's Lutheran Church. Of the children of 
these parents Glenn W. was the oldest. Ber- 
nice, born December 13, 1898, is a graduate 



94 



ILLINOIS 



of the Washington High School and the Illinois 
Normal University, has been a teacher for 
ten years and is now principal in the schools 
at Marseilles, Illinois. Gladys, born February 
20, 1900, graduated from the Washington High 
School, is the wife of Harlan K. Danforth, 
of Cambridge, county farm supervisor of 
Henry County, and they have a daughter, 
Margaret Weeks, born December 23, 1928. 
Myrvan W. Weeks, born July 25, 1904, grad- 
uated from the Washington High School, is 
cashier in the office of the Travelers Insurance 
Company at Peoria, and married, June 20, 
1928, Clara Frederick. 

Glenn W. Weeks graduated from the Wash- 
ington High School in 1911. While in school 
he played basketball, was on the track team 
and president of the junior class, and organ- 
ized and became the leader of the local high 
school orchestra. During vacations he did 
work that gave him some general knowledge 
of business and fitted him for other respon- 
sibilities. In the fall of 1911 he entered 
the University of Illinois, where he kept up 
his studies through three semesters, and while 
there was a member of the University Band. 
After taking a course in Brown's Business 
College at Peoria he joined his father in the 
garage business at Washington, and this chap- 
ter of his business experience covered the 
years 1913-17. 

On June 1, 1917, he enlisted, was sent to 
Fort Benjamin Harrison at Indianapolis and 
because of his knowledge of mechanics was 
made a sergeant in the Motor Transport 
Corps. He was kept on duty at Fort Benjamin 
Harrison until discharged, March 1, 1919. 

After about a year with the Holt Manu- 
facturing Company in East Peoria Mr. Weeks 
in 1920 came to Tremont, was a rural mail 
carrier until July 1, 1922, when he was 
appointed postmaster, under the Harding 
administration, and has served consecutively 
during the Coolidge and Hoover terms. He 
is himself a steadfast supporter of the Repub- 
lican party. He retains his membership in 
St. Mark's Lutheran Church. Mr. Weeks is 
a member of the Masonic Lodge and Grotto, 
for two years was commander of the Tremont 
Post of the American Legion, is a member 
of the Tremont Boosters Club and was for 
two years secretary of the Izaak Walton 
League. He has been very much interested 
in the wild game conservation movement. His 
hobby of growing things is now directed to 
rabbit raising. His reading is along the sub- 
jects of science, history and current topics, 
and since leaving school his chief game has 
been golf, and he seldom neglects an oppor- 
tunity to go hunting and fishing. Mr. Weeks 
organized the local Boy Scouts at Tremont, 
and his interest in music led to the organi- 
zation of the Tremont Band. He also used 
his influence to introduce musical instruction 
into the public schools. 



Mr. Weeks married, July 8, 1918, Miss Ruth 
H. Sencenbaugh, of Washington, Illinois. She 
was born November 5, 1894, daughter of Wil- 
liam and Molly Sencenbaugh. Her mother 
died June 1, 1918, and her father, in October, 

1919. Mrs. Weeks is a graduate of the Wash- 
ington High School, has her membership in 
St. Mark's Lutheran Church there, is a mem- 
ber of the Tremont Woman's Club and is 
president of the Parent-Teachers Association. 
She^ votes as a Republican. Music is the 
subject in which she is most interested outside 
of her home duties and her talents as a singer 
and pianist have made her a valuable factor 
in local musical circles. Mr. and Mrs. Weeks 
have three children, Nora Jane, born May 14, 

1920, Marilynn Ruth, born August 28, 1922, 
and Patricia, born May 21, 1924. All of them 
are attending the Tremont schools. 

Warner F. Whipple is a farm owner of 
Waltham Township, LaSalle County. The 
Whipple family were pioneers of the county 
and Warner F. Whipple was born on the old 
Whipple homestead July 15, 1894. 

The Whipples were New Englanders. One 
of its early members was William Whipple, a 
signer of the Declaration of Independence. 
Warner F. Whipple's grandfather was Warner 
W. Whipple, wlfo was born at Brandon, Ver- 
mont, in 1804. He went with his parents to 
Zanesville, Ohio, and in 1832 married Phoebe 
Foster Brown, of Brandon, Vermont. In 1851 
he brought the family overland to LaSalle, 
Illinois, and in 1853 established the homestead 
which is still the Whipple home. 

Frank H. Whipple, father of Warner F. 
Whipple, was born near Zanesville, Ohio, July 
7, 1836. For eight years the family lived at 
Wilmington, Ohio, where he secured part of 
his early education. He was a soldier of the 
Union during the Civil war, enlisting in Com- 
pany H of the Eleventh Illinois Infantry, later 
attaining the rank of sergeant major. He 
served under General Grant at Fort Henry 
and Fort Donelson, later at Shiloh and Vicks- 
burg, was wounded near Vicksburg, and finally 
was with the Union troops that captured the 
forts around Mobile Bay. After the war he 
returned home and engaged in farming, which 
was his work and occupation throughout the 
rest of his active years. In June, 1893, he 
was united in marriage with Charlotte Jose- 
phine Fairfield, daughter of Samuel S. and 
Josephine (McVean) Fairfield, of LaSalle. 
Mr. Fairfield, a native of Maine, was engaged 
in the contracting business at LaSalle for 
many years. Their two children are Warner 
F., of this review, and Josephine, born Decem- 
ber 31, 1895, who lives with her mother at 
LaSalle. Mr. Frank H. Whipple died in No- 
vember, 1919, and is buried in Oakwood Ceme- 
tery at LaSalle. 

Warner F. Whipple was educated in country 
schools and attended the Township High School 



ILLINOIS 



95 



at LaSalle. His education was completed with 
two years in the University of Illinois. After 
the death of his father he took over the 
operation of the home farm. He is a member 
of the Farm Bureau, is a past master of 
Waltham Lodge No. 384, A. F. and A. M., and 
a past patron of Waltham Chapter, 0. E. S., 
and he and his wife are active members of 
the Waltham Presbyterian Church. 

Mr. Whipple married, October 15, 1919, Miss 
Ida Margaret Monteith, daughter of James H. 
and Agnes (Riedy) Monteith. 

In 1832 James Monteith, great-grandfather 
of Mrs. Whipple, emigrated to Canada with 
his father, John Monteith, from County Ty- 
rone, Ireland, the family having originated in 
Scotland. For nine generations the names 
James and John have been alternated in suc- 
cessive generations of the Monteith family. 
Thus, the son of James Monteith above re- 
ferred to was John N., who continued to 
farm his father's homestead in County Perth, 
Ontario, Canada, but his son James H., came 
to the United States at the age of sixteen to 
engage in business at Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania, where he continued in the mercantile 
business until the panic of 1893 and after 1893 
he was a division manager and field superin- 
tendent for the Prudential Insurance Company 
of America. He now lives retired at Kansas 
City, Missouri. Mr. Monteith's grandfather 
James was a cousin of President Buchanan. 

Mrs. Whipple's mother was born in Lehigh 
County, Pennsylvania, of Pennsylvania Dutch 
extraction, her forefathers having immigrated 
from the borderland of Holland and Germany. 

Mr. and Mrs. Whipple have three children: 
Warner, born April 25, 1921, Malcolm, born 
February 27, 1925, and Phoebe, born July 8, 
1927. 

For convenience as a reference the following 
genealogical record is here included, which 
is the basis of eligibility of the Whipple chil- 
dren for membership in the Sons or Daughters 
of the American Revolution. The paternal 
grandmother of Mr. Warner F. Whipple, 
Phoebe Brown, was the granddaughter of Cyril 
Brown, who served in the War of the Revolu- 
tion as private of Smithfield and Cumberland 
Rangers, in Capt. George Peek's Company, 
Col. Richard Fry's Regiment. Cyril Brown 
was a great-great-great-grandson of James 
Brown, who in 1655 married Lydia Howland, 
daughter of John Howland, one of the pas- 
sengers on the Mayflower, who landed at 
Plymouth Rock in 1620. 

Robert Howard Patton, president of the 
Old Settlers Association of Sangamon County, 
was born on his father's farm in Auburn 
Township, that county, January 18, 1860. He 
is a son of Mathew and Margaret J. (McEl- 
vain) Patton. His father was born at Hop- 
kinsville, Kentucky, and was a boy when the 
family moved to Sangamon County in 1820. 



For over a century the Pattons have lived in 
Auburn Township. Mathew Patton attended 
pioneer schools and devoted his active life- 
time to farming. His father was Col. James 
Patton, who was born at Baltimore, Maryland, 
March 17, 1791, and lived in Virginia and 
later in Clark County, Kentucky. In the 
early days of Sangamon County he was called 
out for military service during the Black Hawk 
Indian war. His father had been in the leather 
business in Baltimore, and he supplied har- 
ness, saddles and other equipment for one 
of Washington's regiments. Mathew Patton 
was the father of six children: William D., 
Elizabeth, Samuel S., Charles M., Sadie and 
Robert H. 

Robert H. Patton attended country schools, 
including the Patton School, and is a grad- 
uate of the Auburn High School. He com- 
pleted his education in 1883 at the Illinois 
Wesleyan University at Bloomington and in 
1885 was admitted to the bar. He has been 
a member of the Springfield bar for over forty- 
six years. Over the state at large he is best 
known for his earnest work and leadership in 
the Prohibition party and at one time was 
candidate for governor on that ticket, and 
on two occasions refused the nomination of 
the party for President. He was permanent 
chairman of the Prohibition National Conven- 
tion at St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Mr. Patton married, September 23, 1886, 
Mary E. Gordon, daughter of Benjamin and 
Margaret (Manning) Gordon. Mrs. Patton 
died June 8, 1923. She was the mother of 
four children; Robert G., deceased, who was 
in the wholesale grocery business at Spring- 
field; Howard S., deceased; Margaret E.; and 
Gordon M., a traveling salesman. Mr. Patton 
has always been active in the Baptist Church 
and for fifty years has taught a class in 
Sunday School. 

George A. Rooney represented his native 
City of Chicago in gallant overseas services 
with the American Expeditionary Forces in 
the World war, and the same spirit of loyalty 
that he thus manifested has been exemplified 
also in his professional activities as one of 
the representative younger members of the 
Chicago bar. He is engaged in the practice 
of law, with offices at 77 West Washington 
Street, and he resides at 2152 East Seventy- 
eighth Street. 

Mr. Rooney was born in Chicago on the 
23d of October, 1892, and is a son of Owen 
and Rose (Morris) Rooney, who were born 
in Ireland, where the respective families were 
neighbors, but whose marriage was solemnized 
after they had come to the United States, 
their children being six in number: Rose, 
George A., Owen, Jr., Mary, Helen and Joseph. 

After completing his studies in the high 
school of St. Patrick's parish George A. Roo- 
ney was a student two years in St. Viator 



96 



ILLINOIS 






College, where he took a prelegal course. 
Thereafter he continued his studies in the law 
department of Loyola University three years, 
he having been graduated in this representa- 
tive Chicago institution as a member of the 
class of 1920 and with the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws, and was admitted to the bar in Octo- 
ber of the following year. He has since been 
established in the active general practice of 
law in Chicago, and enjoys a law business 
that shows constantly cumulative tendency. 
Mr. Rooney is serving in 1931 as vice president 
of the South Chicago Bar Association, and 
has membership also in the Chicago Bar Asso- 
ciation, Illinois State Bar Association and 
American Bar Association. 

Mr. Rooney was a student at the time of 
the nation's entrance into the World warand 
was among the Chicago boys who early enlisted 
for service in the United States Army. His 
enlistment took place August 12, 1917, and 
thereafter he continued in active service until 
the armistice brought the great conflict to a 
close. He became a member of Company L, 
One Hundred Thirty-second Infantry, which 
was assigned to the Thirty-third Division of 
the American Expeditionary Forces and with 
which he was nine months at the front in the 
great overseas battle sectors, where he won 
citation for gallantry and in consonance with 
which he was decorated by the Government 
of the United States. His total period of 
military service was of twenty-seven months' 
duration, and after the close of the war he 
returned to his native land and duly received 
his honorable discharge. While still overseas 
he availed himself of the privilege of attend- 
ing the special vacation term at Lincoln's Inn 
at London, England, in 1919, and upon his 
return to the United States he completed 
his course in law school, as previously noted 
in this review. 

Mr. Rooney is one of the gallant young 
stalwarts in the ranks of the Democratic party 
in Cook County and has been active and influ- 
ential in party affairs. His religious faith 
is that of the Catholic Church, and in the 
Knights of Columbus he is a past grand knight 
of Santa Maria Council. He has membership 
in the Lake Shore Athletic Club, and finds 
recreation in golf. Mr. Rooney is an ardent 
admirer of Abraham Lincoln and is an enthusi- 
astic collector of literature and souvenirs per- 
taining to the Great Emancipator. 

On the 29th of October," 1924, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Rooney to Miss Rita M. 
Cracknell, who was born in Chicago and whose 
parents, Henry and Clara (Argus) Cracknell, 
were born in the State of Indiana. The names 
and respective birth dates of the children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Rooney are here recorded: Mary 
Alene, July 21, 1925; George A., Jr., September 
26, 1926; Terrence J., June 28, 1928; and 
Marjorie N., February 16, 1930. 



Leslie K. Valentine, postmaster of Hinck- 
ley, DeKalb County, is a World war veteran, 
and was over the top five different times while 
in France. 

Mr. Valentine was born at Paw Paw, Lee 
County, Illinois, November 1, 1890, son of 
George and Lena (Dienst) Valentine, and a 
grandson of Gary C. and Fidelia Valentine. 
Gary Valentine was a native of Pennsylvania.; 
He came to Illinois in the early days, traveling] 
overland, and in Lee County bought land out] 
on the prairie and made himself one of the! 
prosperous general farmers in that district! 
His death was the result of an accident anJ 
he was buried at Paw Paw. He was a charter! 
member of the Independent Order of Odd! 
Fellows. His son, George Valentine, was borrj 
at Paw Paw, was a farmer in early life and 
later a merchant, a business he followed until 
he retired. He and his wife now live at 
Hinckley, the former at the age of seventy-two, 
and the latter at the age of sixty-six. For] 
some time he also conducted an oil station. 
He acquired his early education in country 
schools in Lee County, and made his start by 
renting land, subsequently buying a farm in 
Wisconsin, where the family lived for two 
years. Abou1^1906 he settled at Hinckley. Hej 
was a carpenter by trade. He and his wifa 
are members of the Methodist Episcopal! 
Church. They had three children: Etta, wifa 
of Merritt Evans, of Aurora, Illinois, and] 
mother of a daughter, Leila, who is now in 
college at Aurora; Leslie K.; and Ruth, wife 
of Clarence Dry, of Canton, Ohio. 

Leslie K. Valentine attended school at Pawj 
Paw and after completing the work of the 
grades went with the family to Necedah, Wis! 
consin, where he attended school for two years.1 
He completed his high school work in tha 
Hinckley High School, following that with a 
business course. While in high school he waj 
training himself for a business career by worlJ 
ing in the local stores, and he was connected 
with the mercantile business in Hinckley until 
the time of the war. 

He enlisted in 1918, was assigned to thl 
Second Regular Division and after a briefl 
period of training at Camp Gordon, Atlanta! 
Georgia, went from Camp Merritt overseas 
to Brest. He went direct to the front in 
St. Mihiel, and soon was in the trenches there! 
He had his first experience going over thl 
top in this sector, and he and his comrades 
had to proceed in the open for half a mill 
before making contact with the Germans. Hil 
next assignment was the Meuse Champagna 
sector, where after ten days in the Reserves 
he again went over the top. This time he 
was with the shock troops, and on the firsl 
day they took their objective. During thl 
advance he was struck on the leg by an explod-j 
ing bomb and knocked down, and ascribes 
the fact of further injury to the fact that 



ILLINOIS 



97 



a trench knife was in his legging. After half 
an hour he was able to rejoin his company. 
While in the great Argonne campaign Mr. 
Valentine was over the top three different 
times. After the armistice he spent eight 
months with the Army of Occupation in Ger- 
many and on returning to America received 
his honorable discharge at Camp Grant, 
Illinois. 

After the war he was in the real estate 
business for a time at Aurora, and during 
the Presidency of Mr. Harding was appointed 
postmaster at Hinckley and has made the 
administration of that office his chief respon- 
sibility. He has always been more or less 
actively interested in Republican politics. He 
is a member and a past commander of the 
American. Legion, a member of Hinckley Lodge 
No. 301, A. F. and A. M., and the Loyal Order 
of Moose. Outdoor sports have always appealed 
to him and he especially enjoys hunting and. 
fishing. Mrs. Valentine is a member of the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and active in the 
work of the Sunday School. 

Mr. Valentine married in 1920 Miss Emma 
Golden, daughter of Benjamin and Anna 
(Weiser) Golden. Her father was a substantial 
farmer in LaSalle County. To this union have 
been born two children: Gary, born January 
17, 1924, and Marylin, born May 22, 1928. 

Howard Lee Metcalf, M. D., formerly med- 
ical director of the Springfield Life Insurance 
Company, has practiced his profession in 
Springfield for over a quarter of a century. 

Doctor Metcalf is a native of Sangamon 

County, Illinois, and his people on both sides 

were early settlers in this section of the state. 

His parents, Samuel and Mary (Ray) Metcalf, 

were born in Sangamon County and his father 

spent his active life as a farmer. They were 

devout members of the Methodist Episcopal 

Church, his father voted the Democratic ticket 

and was affiliated with the Independent Order 

of Odd Fellows. Samuel Metcalf was a son 

t of Adam Metcalf, a native of Virginia, who 

made several trips to Illinois on horseback 

before establishing his permanent home here. 

I He acquired 240 acres from the Government, 

cleared it and improved it into a good farm, 

and lived out his life in Sangamon County. 

Doctor Metcalf's maternal grandfather was 

J Thomas Ray, a native of Ireland, who also 

' became a Sangamon County farmer. 

Doctor Metcalf was the second in a large 

family of eleven children, nine of whom are 

living. He attended school at Mechanicsburg, 

and went to Chicago, where he was a student 

in the Lewis Institute and the University of 

Chicago, and in 1904 graduated M. D. from 

Rush Medical College. He at once returned 

! to Springfield and has found his time and 

j energies fully occupied with his increasing 

! duties as a capable physician and surgeon. 

Doctor Metcalf has been honored with the 



office of president of the Sangamon County 
Medical Society and is a member of the Illi- 
nois State and American Medical Associations. 
He is a member of the Xiwanis Club, the San- 
gamo Club, is a Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner and a member of the Presbyterian 
Church. 

He married in 1907 Elesa R. Mueller, who 
was born at Springfield. Her father, Ger- 
hardt A. Mueller, came from Germany, started 
his career in Springfield as a poor boy and 
became one of the successful and highly re- 
spected citizens of the community. Doctor and 
Mrs. Metcalf have two sons: Howard Lee, Jr., 
who attended the Kemper Military Academy 
in Missouri and the Howe Boys School in 
Indiana, and is now taking a business col- 
lege course; and Robert Kenneth, a member 
of the class of 1930 in high school and now 
a student in the Lake Forest Academy at 
Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Thomas A. Maguire is president and gen- 
eral manager of the Servus Rubber Company, 
of Rock Island, one of the big and growing 
manufacturing establishments of that city. The 
Servus Rubber Company was organized Octo- 
ber 21, 1923. It is incorporated with $1,200,000 
capital, and at its plant in Rock Island has 
facilities for the manufacture of commodities 
that have an increasing use in modern busi- 
ness. The chief output is waterproof canvas 
and rubber soled footwear. It is an industry 
employing approximately a thousand people, 
with twenty-two traveling representatives who 
carry the reputation and goods of the Servus 
Company to all parts of the world. 

Prior to coming to Rock Island Mr. Maguire 
was a successful business man in the New 
York metropolitan district. He was born in 
Orange, New Jersey, February 17, 1885, son 
of Thomas D. and Mary A. (Cosgrove) 
Maguire. His father was born in Halifax, 
Nova Scotia, and his mother at Holyoke, Mas- 
sachusetts, and she now resides at East 
Orange, New Jersey. Thomas D. Maguire 
throughout his active life was a hat manu- 
facturer. He was a graduate of Halifax 
University and a man of fine character and 
unusual business ability. He served as fire 
commissioner of East Orange, was a Repub- 
lican, and he and his family were Catholics. 
Of the four children three are living: Bernard 
J., a at manufacturer at East Orange; 
Katherine, a widow living with her mother; 
and Thomas A. 

Thomas A. Maguire attended public schools 
at East Orange and was graduated in 1904 
from Princeton University. For about a year 
after completing his university career he was 
in the hat business, and then became identified 
with the dry goods trade in New York City 
as credit man for A. G. Hyde & Son. He was 
with this organization until 1909, when he 
was made president of John Alden Company, 



98 



ILLINOIS 



Limited, of New York City. During the World 
war he served with the rank of major in the 
supply department, cantonment division, at 
Brest, France. 

Mr. Maguire married, April 28, 1909, at 
Orange, New Jersey, Miss Anna E. McGoey, 
who was born at Orange, New Jersey, and 
attended school there and also St. Elizabeth 
College in New Jersey. They have two daugh- 
ters, Muriel Anna, born December 15, 1913, 
and Nancy Elizabeth, born July 1, 1922. Both 
children were born at East Orange, New Jer- 
sey. The family are members of the Sacred 
Heart Catholic Church at Rock Island. Mr. 
Maguire is a fourth degree Knight of Colum- 
bus, member of Lodge No. 980, B. P. 0. Elks, 
of Rock Island, the Rock Island Arsenal Golf 
Club, the Washington Club of East Orange, 
New Jersey, and the Wool Club of New York 
City. He is independent in politics. 

Mr. Maguire came from the East to Rock 
Island on February 1, 1927. In addition to 
his duties as president of the Servus Rubber 
Company he is a director of the Manufac- 
turers Trust & Savings Bank of Rock Island, 
and is secretary of the Nu-Way Company, a 
Rock Island industry manufacturing a line 
of oil burners. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ray Grant, postmaster of 
Shabbona, has lived in that DeKalb County 
town practically all her life, and her own work 
and activities have gone to increase the pres- 
tige by which her family have so long been 
known and respected in that community. 

Mrs. Grant is a daughter of the late William 
Henry Ray, who was the first railroad station 
agent and first postmaster of Shabbona, a 
teacher, editor and publisher, who spent a 
long life in useful public service and was active 
almost until the end. When he died, January 
19, 1930, he had reached the venerable age 
of eighty-six years, two months and six days. 

William Henry Ray was born at Nassau, 
Germany, November 13, 1843, oldest son of 
John and Elizabeth (Enders) Ray. He began 
his schooling in his native land, but in July, 
1849, when he was about six years of age, 
the family came to America and for several 
years lived in New York State. While there 
he attended school. On coming to Illinois 
John Ray lived for brief periods of time in 
Kendall and LaSalle counties, and then settled 
in DeKalb County, purchasing a farm in Shab- 
bona Township, on part of which was later 
founded the Village of Shabbona. Here Wil- 
liam H. Ray assisted his father on the farm. 
After the rural schools he attended Clark 
(now Jennings) Seminary at Aurora. He was 
a school teacher until the railroad was built 
and then became first station agent and also 
first postmaster of the new Village of Shab- 
bona. Later he became editor and publisher 
of the Shabbona Express, now the DeKalb 
County Express, and he worked daily at his 



editorial desk until 1914, and even after that 
for about ten years he retained a desk down- 
town, where he conducted some insurance busi- 
ness, as notary public, and wrote his reports 
as clerk for the Modern Woodmen and village. 
He was for several years president of the 
village board, for fifteen years was a member 
of the school board, and for nearly a score 
of years was village clerk. His many years 
of service in school room, railway station, post- 
office and print shop gave him a wide acquain- 
tance, and his friendship and contact with 
people seemed to interest him increasingly in 
later years. As an editorial at the time ofj 
his death said: "In all these varied capacities! 
certain qualities stood out in bold relief— 1 
absolute faithfulness to the office with which 
he was entrusted, sincerity and candor. Quite 
strongly partisan in politics and positive in 
his convictions on all civic questions, he pos-1 
sessed a trait many might well emulate to 
their distinct advantage. He could maintain 
strict adherence to any policy in which he 
believed and yet avoid criticism of or rancor 
toward those who differed from him." 

In December, 1870, at the age of twenty- 
seven, Mr. Ray married Imogene Loucks, who 
was born r& Oneida, New York, February 27, 
1850, and died at Shabbona February 19, 1922. 
She was the oldest daughter of Hiram and 
Amanda (Vosburg) Loucks, both natives of 
New York State, who later brought their fam- 
ily to Illinois and settled on a farm. Her 
father owned and conducted a farm near Sand- 
wich until he retired and moved into the City 
of Sandwich. He was interested in community 
affairs and served his district in the House 
of Representatives at Springfield for some 
years. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ray Grant was the only child 
of her parents. She was born at Shabbona, 
November 13, 1871, attended grade schools 
and the Shabbona Community High School, 
where she was graduated with the first class, 
in 1889. Following that she spent two years 
at the University of Michigan, and she taught 
in grammar and high school until her mar- 
riage. Afterwards she was associated with 
her father in the publication of the Shabbona 
Express and continued with that newspaper 
under his successor. She became village clerk 
in 1922, and since 1924 has been the Shabbona 
postmistress. 

She was married at Shabbona, June 6, 1900, 
to Mr. William Wallace Grant, who was born 
at Lenoir, North Carolina, May 23, 1866, and 
is a locomotive engineer. Mrs. Grant has one 
son, Ray Kent Grant, born December 1, 1905. 
He was educated in Shabbona, graduating from 
high school in 1923, following which he spent 
two years in Iowa State College at Ames and 
in 1926 graduated from the Northern Illinois 
State Teachers College. Since then he has 
been a teacher in the manual arts department 
in the West Aurora schools. 



ILLINOIS 



99 



Mrs. Grant is a member of the American 
Legion Auxiliary, has worked with the Red 
Cross, the Community Council and the Parent- 
Teachers Association. She is a member of 
the First Baptist Church, the Order of the 
Eastern Star, the Shabbona Woman's Club 
and Community Club. 

Edward Patrick Devine, postmaster at 
Somonauk, is one of the most popular men 
of that community, and all his life the people 
of the locality have known him as a thorough- 
going business man and an alert, high prin- 
cipled citizen. 

Mr. Devine was born in this locality of 
DeKalb County March 14, 1887, son of Thomas 
and Johanna (Reidy) Devine. His grandpar- 
ents were Francis and Nancy Devine. Francis 
Devine came from County Antrim, Ireland, and 
from New York State made the journey with 
his family overland to DeKalb County, Illinois, 
in 1835. This was one of the first Catholic 
families to settle in the vicinity of Somonauk, 
and Francis Devine built one of the first homes 
there. He became a land owner and successful 
and substantial farmer, and as a man of 
education wielded much influence in the early 
affairs of the community. He and his wife 
had a family of eight children. 

One of them was Thomas Devine, who was 
a small child when the family came to Illinois. 
He lived in the old home, a house built in the 
timber on his father's homestead, was edu- 
cated in country schools and later was one 
of the first students to enroll at Notre Dame 
University in Indiana. After completing his 
education he spent five years in Chicago, as 
an employee of the Burlington Railway, and 
then returned to DeKalb County, where he 
followed farming and stock raising until his 
retirement. He and his wife were active mem- 
bers of the Catholic Church and both are 
buried in Somonauk Cemetery. They had six 
children: Frank and John, both deceased; Mae, 
wife of James Connelly and mother of James, 
Jr.; Tom, who married Lillian Ulrich and 
has a daughter, Florence; Josephine; and E. P. 
Devine. 

E. P. Devine was educated in country schools 
and graduated from the De LaSalle School at 
Chicago. After his education he returned to 
the farm to help his father and later engaged 
in the mercantile business at Somonauk. For 
a number of years he conducted a restaurant. 
He is also a carpenter by trade. 

Mr. Devine was appointed postmaster of 
Somonauk during the administration of Presi- 
dent Wilson and he has been retained in the 

! office through the successive Republican admin- 
istrations, at the present time having the 
distinction of being the only Democratic post- 

; master in DeKalb County, which is evidence 

j of his efficiency and the high degree of esteem 
in which he is held by all classes of people. 

| Mr. Devine gives close attention to his duties 



as postmaster. He has been active in his 
party, and is a member of the Catholic Church. 
He has helped keep up an interest in local 
athletics and is manager of the local baseball 
team. 

Mr. Devine married Miss Edna Humbert, 
of Somonauk. They have one daughter, Char- 
lotte, born June 6, 1925, who is attending 
school. 

William J. McGah is making his native 
City of Chicago the stage of his professional 
activities, in which his success and prestige 
mark him as one of the representative younger 
members of the bar of Cook County. Here he 
has been established in the independent 
practice of law since 1915, and his office 
headquarters are maintained at 77 West 
Washington Street. He is also attorney for 
the Chicago City Council Committee on local 
industries, street and alleys. 

Mr. McGah was born in Chicago on the 
19th of January, 1891, and is a son of Patrick 
H. and Bridget (Lyons) McGah. After com- 
pleting his high school studies Mr. McGah 
entered St. Ignatius College, in which insti- 
tution he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1910 and from which he received the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. In preparation 
for his chosen profession he availed himself 
of the advantages of the law department of 
Loyola University, and from this representa- 
tive Chicago institution he emerged with the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws in the year 1913. 
Mr. McGah made also a record of successful 
achievement in the pedagogic profession, he 
having taught in the public schools of Chicago, 
and having been a teacher of English, com- 
mercial law and bookkeeping in the Burr 
Junior High School. While still in school 
work he gave service as examiner for the 
Chicago Civil Service Commission for several 
years. He was active in student athletics in 
his school and college days, and he is now 
secretary and a director of the Frontenac 
Athletic Club, besides having membership in 
the Midland Club. He is a member of the 
Chicago Bar Association and the Illinois State 
Bar Association, and within the fifteen years 
of his active professional career he has devel- 
oped a substantial and important law business 
of representative order, the while he has 
proved his resourcefulness both as a trial 
lawyer and as a well fortified counselor. 

The political allegiance of Mr. McGah is 
given to the Democratic party, he and his 
wife are communicants of the Catholic Church, 
and he is affiliated with the Knights of Col- 
umbus, in which great fraternal order he was 
retained several years in the office of advo- 
cate. Mr. McGah still retains vital interest 
in athletics, finds recreation in golf and is 
an enthusiastic baseball fan. 

In the World war period Mr. McGah was 
in service in the United States Army, but 



100 



ILLINOIS 



his unit was not called to overseas duty. He 
won advancement from the rank of private 
to that of sergeant, and was finally made a 
lieutenant, his period of service having been 
passed at Camp Jackson and Camp Sevier, 
South Carolina. His continued interest in the 
comrades of the World war is indicated by 
his affiliation with the American Legion. 

On the 13th of April, 1918, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. McGah to Miss Katherine 
Conlin, daughter of Patrick and Katherine 
Conlin, of Chicago. The names and respective 
birth-dates of the children of Mr. and Mrs. 
McGah are here recorded: Joseph W., Feb- 
ruary 26, 1922; William J., Jr., May 5, 1924; 
and Edward R., September 9, 1925. 

Herbert John Campbell came to the bar 
in 1904, and his individual record as a lawyer 
gives additional honors to a name long and 
favorably known in the Illinois bar. His father 
was the late William J. Campbell, who between 
the year 1873, when he was admitted to the 
bar, and his death on March 4, 1896, accumu- 
lated many fine professional distinctions and 
also the honors due a citizen of most unselfish 
attitude and giving worthy service in politics 
and public affairs. William J. Campbell was 
born at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, December 
12, 1850. A year after his birth his parents, 
John and Mary Campbell, came to Illinois 
and settled at what is now Chicago Heights 
in Southern Cook County. He was educated 
in the public schools of Illinois, and returned 
East to complete his literary education in the 
University of Pennsylvania, where he was 
graduated in 1871. In 1873 he was graduated 
from the Union College of Law at Chicago. 
During his early years in practice he was 
associated with Judge W. C. Goudy. He and 
Jacob R. Custer comprised the law firm of 
Campbell & Custer. An associate of this firm 
for some time was John M. Hamilton, who was 
governor of Illinois from 1883 to 1885 and 
spent the last twenty years of his life after 
leaving the governor's chair in law practice 
at Chicago. William J. Campbell for a num- 
ber of years was general counsel for Armour 
& Company. As representative of the Armour 
interests he took a prominent part in the 
founding of the Armour Institute of Tech- 
nology and served on its board of trustees. 

William J. Campbell for seven years imme- 
diately prior to his death was Illinois member 
of the National Republican Committee. In 
1878 he was elected a member of the Senate 
in the Thirty-first General Assembly and was 
reelected in 1882, serving two terms, eight 
years. When Lieutenant-Governor John M. 
Hamilton succeeded to the office of governor, 
William J. Campbell, as president of the Sen- 
ate, was acting lieutenant governor of Illinois. 
William J. Campbell was a member of the 
Chicago, Illinois and American Bar Associa- 
tions, was a member of the Lawyers Club of 



New York, the Chicago Club, Union League 
Club, Chicago Athletic Club, and was a 
Presbyterian. 

William J. Campbell married Rebecca 
McEldowney, who was born in Cook County, 
Illinois, October 8, 1851, and died March 8, .1 
1928, at the age of seventy-seven. Both the 
Campbells and McEldowneys were Scotch, but 
they came to America from the North of 
Ireland. Her father, John McEldowney, immi-l 
grated to the United States in 1833 and was 
one of the first settlers in Southern Cook 
County, at what is now Chicago Heights. He[ 
and his wife were the first couple married I 
in Will County, Illinois. i 

Herbert J. Campbell, one of the five children! 
of his parents, was born at Blue Island, a| 
suburb of Chicago, December 9, 1880. He! 
attended public school at Riverside, Illinois.! 
In 1897 he was graduated from the Armour j 
Institute of Technology, in 1901 took his Bach- 
elor's degree at the University of Michigan 
and then entered Northwestern University Law 
School in Chicago, where he was graduated 
in 1904. The successive law firms with which 
he has been associated have been Eddy, Haley 
& Wette$, Jeffery, Ott & Campbell, Jefferyj 
& Campbell, Jeffery, Campbell & Clark, and 
Townley Wild, Campbell & Clark, one of the} 
large law firms having offices at 105 South 
LaSalle Street. 

Mr. Campbell is a member of the ChicagoJ 
Illinois State and American Bar Associations, 
also belongs to the Law Club, Legal Club, 
and is a life member of the Art Institute and 
Field Museum. He is a member of the Chil ' 
cago Club, University Club, Chicago Literary} 
Club, Racquet Club, Knollwood Country Club, 
and is a member of Phi Kappa Psi and Phi 
Delta Phi college fraternities. He married! 
October 6, 1921, Nancy P. Lambertson, wh(j 
was born at Lincoln, Nebraska, and they now" 
reside at Lake Forest, Illinois. 

Hon. Adolph Elmer Rouland, Springfield 
real estate man, has his name closely assotik 
ated with politics and public service in San- 
gamon County. His is the record of the loyal 
son of a very old and influential Illinois family. 

Mr. Rouland was born October 30, 1880, 
in the northwest corner of Macoupin County, 
within a mile of the farm taken up as a home- 
stead by his great-grandfather, Jasper Rou- 
land, in 1830, just a century ago. Jasper 
Rouland came from Kentucky and was one of 
the first settlers in Waverly Township of 
Morgan County, where he lived out his life 
and where he is buried, together with several 
of his descendants. One of his sons, Alex 
Rouland, spent all his life on a farm a short 
distance from the original homestead. The 
oldest son of Alex Rouland is William Porter 
Rouland, whose home is at Litchfield, Illinois. 
William Porter Rouland married a daughter 
of Thomas Jefferson Edwards, who came from 



ILLINOIS 



101 



North Carolina and settled in Morgan County 
about 1850. Mr. A. E. Rouland is president 
of the Edwards Family Association, made up 
of descendants of Thomas Jefferson Edwards. 

A. E. Rouland attended schools in the rural 
neighborhood where he grew up and was also 
a student in that institution where the pupils 
pay their own way, Blackburn College at 
Carlinville. While a student at Blackburn, 
in 1899, Mr. Rouland became acquainted with 
the late Gen. John M. Palmer and assisted 
him in writing his autobiography. Among 
the activities for which he is to be remembered 
was a period of years devoted to teaching 
school. Mr. Rouland also has a serviceable 
knowledge of law, gained during three years 
when he read law in the office of James M. 
Mahoney, then state's attorney of Macoupin 
County. 

His business headquarters at Springfield 
are in the Reisch Building, where he has built 
up a successful organization for the handling 
of insurance and real estate. He served three 
years as secretary and treasurer and is a 
director of the Springfield Real Estate Board, 
and in 1929 was elected a director of the 
Illinois Association of Real Estate Boards, 
at whose annual convention in October, 1929, 
he was awarded the silver loving cup for 
the best speech on "My Home Town." Among 
special projects which he has been instru- 
mental in carrying out at Springfield should 
be mentioned the Roselawn Memorial Park, 
just east of Springfield. He is vice president 
and one of the stockholders of that corporation. 

Mr. Rouland has been prominent in fraternal 
affairs, particularly in the Knights of Pythias. 
In 1929 he was chosen royal vizier of the 
Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan. 

Members of the Rouland family have been 
identified actively with the Democratic party 
since the time of Andrew Jackson. Mr. A. 
E. Rouland was making speeches for the party 
before he was old enough to vote. He has 
served five years as vice president of the Tri- 
angle Circle Club, the Democratic Club of 
Sangamon County. In the 1928 campaign 
he was a member of the executive committee 
of the Democratic County Central Committee 
and made over thirty speeches in behalf of 
the presidential candidate. During the 1916 
gubernatorial campaign Mr. Rouland intro- 
duced Governor Dunne at Maywood, Illinois, 
to the largest crowd that assembled to hear 
the distinguished jurist in that year. 

In 1929-30 Mr. Rouland served as overseer 
of the poor in Capital Township of Sangamon 
County. He was elected to that office in the 
spring of 1929, after a long deadlock ;in 
the Board of Supervisors. After his election 
the Illinois State Register spoke very highly 
of his qualifications through his experience 
as an educator, humanitarian and business 
man for the duties of his office, and his record 
of administration fully justified the expecta- 



tions entertained of his giving an economic 
and efficient handling of the office. Mr. Rou- 
land and family are members of the Laurel 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Rouland married, May 7, 1902, Miss 
Bessie Maude Clevenger, of Carlinville, Illi- 
nois, where she was reared and educated. Her 
father, John R. Clevenger, was for many years 
superintendent of the Macoupin County Farm. 
Mr. and Mrs. Rouland have two children. 
Ralph R. was educated in the Wilmette, Illi- 
nois, High School, in the Atlanta, Georgia, 
Technological High School, and had one year 
in the University of Georgia. He married 
Annie Laurie Jones, of Rutledge, Georgia, in 
1925, and has a daughter, Patsy Ruth, born 
in 1928. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Rou- 
land is Mary Virginia, wife of Hubert Helmle. 

Henry A. Gano, who held the rank of 
captain in One Hundred Thirty-first Infantry, 
Thirty-third Division of the American Expe- 
ditionary Forces in the World war, and who 
is a former brigade adjutant, with the rank 
of captain, on the staff of Gen. Abel Davis, 
of the Thirty-third Division, is a prominent 
and popular figure in the affairs not only 
of the American Legion but also of the Illinois 
National Guard. He is established in the 
successful practice of law in Chicago, with 
offices at 100 West Monroe Street. 

Captain Gano was born in Posey County, 
Indiana, February 25, 1884, a son of George 
W. and Anna L. (Hutchinson) Gano, the 
former of whom is deceased, and is a grand- 
son of Henry B. Gano, who was born in 
Pennsylvania and who became a pioneer set- 
tler in Posey County, Indiana, whence he 
went forth as a loyal soldier of the Union 
in the Civil war, he having been killed in 
battle while thus serving. The Gano family, 
of French lineage, was founded in Pennsyl- 
vania in the Colonial period of American 
history, one branch of the family having thence 
moved to Virginia, and among the representa- 
tives of that southern branch having been 
the late General Gano of Dallas, Texas, who 
was a distinguished officer of the Confederate 
forces in the Civil war. 

Capt. Henry A. Gano received the advan- 
tages of the Indiana public schools and as 
a youth he learned telegraphy and initiated 
service as a telegraph operator. For the 
Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad he 
eventually gave service as train dispatcher, 
and subsequently he held a similar position 
with the Illinois Central Railroad. In the 
meanwhile he perfected plans for following 
the course of his ambition, which was to pre- 
pare himself for the legal profession, and 
he thus became a student in the Kent College 
of Law, Chicago, in which institution he was 
graduated as a member of the class of 1910. 
He thus received his degree of Bachelor of 
Laws, with virtually concurrent admission to 



102 



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the Illinois bar, and in 1911 he assumed the 
position of house attorney for the great Fair 
department store of Chicago. Later he 
engaged in the independent practice of his 
profession in this city, and his law business 
here continued to receive his close attention 
until the nation entered the World war and 
caused him to make quick response to the 
call of patriotism. In April, 1917, the month 
in which the United States became formally 
involved in the great war, Mr. Gano volun- 
teered for service in the United States Army 
and enlisted in the famous old First Infantry 
Regiment of the Illinois National Guard, this 
command having been inducted into the Fed- 
eral service as the One Hundred Thirty-first 
Infantry and having been assigned to the 
Thirty-third Division. With this division Mr. 
Gano entered active overseas service, and the 
history of the war must ever give high recog- 
nition to the splendid service that the division 
gave on the battle-torn fields of France. The 
subject of this review won promotion to the 
rank of captain and with his command he 
continued in active service at the front until 
the armistice brought the war to a close. He 
was then assigned to the department of the 
judge advocate general, and in France he 
received his honorable discharge October 31, 

1919, he having soon afterward been retained 
by the United States Department of State 
as a legal adviser to the Inter-Allied High 
Commission, in session at Coblenz, Germany. 
Captain Gano returned to Chicago in June, 

1920, and here he resumed the active practice 
of his profession, in which he controls a 
substantial and representative law business 
of general order. 

Captain Gano has not abated his deep inter- 
est in military affairs and in his old war 
comrades. He is a past commander of the 
fine Chipilly Post of the American Legion, 
and in the Illinois National Guard he is now 
brigade adjutant on the staff of Gen. Abel 
Davis, of the Thirty-third Division, in which 
connection he retains the rank of captain. 
In the Masonic fraternity he is a past master 
of Kenwood Lodge No. 800, A. F. and A. M., 
and Woodlawn Commandery, K. T., besides 
being a noble of Medinah Temple, A. A. 0. 
N. M. S. The Captain has membership in 
the Chicago and Illinois State Bar Associations 
and is a Republican. 

Hon. George M. Brinkerhoff was for many 
years a power in Illinois politics, and his name 
was closely linked with public affairs and 
important business interests in the City of 
Springfield from the close of the Civil war 
until his death in 1928. 

He was born near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, 
August 20, 1839, son of John Brinkerhoff, 
also a native of Pennsylvania, who after the 
death of his wife joined his son at Springfield. 
George M. Brinkerhoff married at Springfield, 



August 4, 1862, Isabelle Gibson Hawley, who 
was born in Springfield July 21, 1843, daughter 
of Eliphalet Hawley. The later was born in 
Albany, New York, May 30, 1816, and came 
to Springfield with his parents in 1822, the 
journey to the West requiring more than a 
year. At that time travel to the West was 
over trails and by river courses, there being 
no canals, railroads or improved highways. 

George M. Brinkerhoff graduated from Penn- 
sylvania College of Gettysburg in 1859, and 
in the same fall came to Springfield, Illinois, 
to teach Latin in a college. He was connected 
with the college for two or three years, and 
for several years was comptroller of the City 
of Springfield. He was also employed in the 
state auditor's office and afterwards studied 
law with James C. Conkling and was admitted 
to the bar. However, he made little effort 
to enter regular practice. While in the state 
auditor's office the Legislature passed the first 
laws requiring insurance companies to make 
regular reports to the state auditor, and Mr. 
Brinkerhoff had charge of the department 
handling these reports and drew up the forms 
which are still used in making similar reports. 
Mr. Brinkerhoff had the honor of handling 
in the routine of his office the only check 
ever written in favor of General Grant by the 
State of Illinois, and placed his O. K. upon 
that paper. It was for pay for Grant's services 
as drill master. After leaving the state aud- 
itor's office Mr. Brinkerhoff represented eastern 
insurance companies in loaning money in Illi- 
nois, handling loans for the Aetna Life and 
Phoenix Life companies. He also conducted 
a general farm loan agency for several years. 
Mr. Brinkerhoff helped organize and became 
the first secretary and treasurer of the Spring- 
field Iron Company, which became the largest 
organization of its kind in Central Illinois. 
After resigning his active connection with 
this company he gave all his time to his loan 
and investment business. About 1886 his health 
broke down and after recovering he turned 
his attention to conducting a greenhouse busi- 
ness, built up a large plant, and this was 
his line of work until he finally retired. 

Mr. Brinkerhoff was a delegate to several 
national Republican conventions and was sec- 
retary of the Chicago convention which nom- 
inated James A. Garfield. He was one of 
the 306 delegates who remained loyal to the 
last in the effort to give President Grant the 
nomination for a third term. Both he and 
his wife were active members of the Second 
Presbyterian Church in Springfield. He was 
a member of the Masonic fraternity. George 
M. Brinkerhoff and wife had six children, 
four of whom are living: John H.; Miss 
Marion B., of Springfield; George M., Jr.; and 
Miss Bessie W., of Springfield. 

John H. Brinkerhoff was born April 28, 
1866, was educated in the schools of Spring- 
field and then joined his father in business. 



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103 



He has carried on the Brinkerhoff investment 
business since his father retired. 

He married Georgie L. Freeman, a native 
of Springfield. Her father, Norman L. Free- 
man, was an able lawyer, but best known for 
his services as Supreme Court reporter. He 
compiled 101 volumes of Illinois reports. Mr. 
and Mrs. John H. Brinkerhoff have two chil- 
dren: George Norman and John W., who are 
both associated with their father in business. 

Don Garrison in a business way has been 
well known in Central Illinois as an insur- 
ance man for a number of years. An appoint- 
ment from former Governor Small brought 
him to Springfield, where he is assistant di- 
rector of the department of public works and 
buildings and is president of the American 
Life of Illinois, an Illinois life insurance com- 
pany located in Springfield. 

Mr. Garrison was born on a farm in Schuy- 
ler County, Illinois, June 2, 1884, son of 
Charles and Rosa (Kinnear) Garrison, both 
natives of this state and residents of Schuyler 
County. His father is a retired farmer, with 
home in Rushville. Mr. Garrison's paternal 
grandfather, Henry Garrison, was one of the 
early settlers of Schuyler County. The ma- 
ternal grandfather, Aurelius Kinnear, came 
to Illinois from Indiana. Charles Garrison 
is a Republican, a member of the Baptist 
Church and his wife is a Methodist. They 
have two children, Floyd and Don, the former 
a resident of South Chicago. 

Don Garrison was twelve years of age when 
he left the farm and completed his high school 
education at Rushville. He attended the busi- 
ness college there and after leaving school 
was clerk for six years in the Bank of Rush- 
ville, the oldest banking institution in the 
state. For eleven years he was engaged in 
the general real estate, loan and insurance 
business at Rushville and during that time 
took a special interest in life insurance work, 
representing the Central Life Insurance Com- 
pany of Chicago. 

Mr. Garrison for ten years has been assist- 
ant director of public works and buildings 
with offices in the state capitol at Springfield. 
His time is fully taken up with the duties of 
this position. In 1929 he organized the Ameri- 
can Life of Illinois, and became its president. 
This company is operating on a full reserve 
basis and writes a complete line of standard 
policies. 

Mr. Garrison married in 1912 Miss Sarah 
Young, a native of Illinois, who attended 
school at Rushville. They are members of 
the Presbyterian Church. He was for a num- 
ber of years keeper of records and seals in 
his Knights of Pythias Lodge. He is a Re- 
publican, and was a member of the Board of 
Aldermen while living at Rushville and secre- 
tary of the County Republican Central 
Committee. 



Benjamin P. Epstein has, in connection 
with various important services, proved his 
exceptional professional ability and has gained 
rank as one of the distinctly representative 
members of the bar of his native city and 
state. In the practice of law in Chicago Mr. 
Epstein maintains his offices at 110 South 
Dearborn Street, and his home is established 
at 5519 Hyde Park Boulevard. 

Mr. Epstein was born in Chicago on the 
19th of July, 1888, and is a son of Louis and 
Jennie Epstein. He attended the public schools 
of Chicago, graduating from the Medill High 
School in the year 1905. In the fall of 1906 
he enrolled as a student in the Northwestern 
University School of Law and was graduated 
as a member of the class of 1909, his reception 
of the degree of Bachelor of Laws having 
forthwith been followed by his admission to 
the bar of Illinois. From 1909 until 1914 
Mr. Epstein was associated in the practice 
of his profession with Jacob Marx, as senior 
member of the firm of Epstein & Marx, and 
in the latter year he was appointed assistant 
United States district attorney for the North- 
ern District of Illinois. Of this office he con- 
tinued the incumbent until 1920, and within his 
term of service as assistant and then as first 
assistant district attorney of this federal dis- 
trict he made a record of success in connection 
with several cases of major importance, includ- 
ing the famous Pan Motor Company, Blunt 
and Dorsey cases, in each of which he brought 
convictions. Shortly after his retiring from 
this office Mr. Epstein was appointed, in 1921, 
special counsel for the United States in the 
prosecution of the Consumers Packing Com- 
pany and its officers, the result being the 
conviction of fifteen defendants for the fraud- 
ulent use of the United States mails. In 
1920 Mr. Epstein had been appointed special 
master in chancery of the United States Dis- 
trict Court in connection with the receivership 
of the Aurora & Elgin Railroad. Within the 
past ten years he had a large and important 
practice in the federal courts, and in 1929 
he was appointed master in chancery of the 
Superior Court of Cook County. 

Mr. Epstein accords loyal allegiance to the 
Democratic party, and in 1912 he was chair- 
man of the Woodrow Wilson College Men's 
League. He holds membership in the Chicago 
Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar 
Association, and while a student in North- 
western University he became affiliated with 
Delta Sigma Rho, the honorary fraternity 
whose members have represented their respec- 
tive colleges or universities in inter-college 
debate. Mr. Epstein is a member of the 
Standard Club, and the Collegiate Club of 
Chicago, representative organizations of the 
city. 

September 2, 1915, recorded the marriage 
of Mr. Epstein to Miss Gabrielle Freschl, who 
likewise was born and reared in Chicago and 



104 



ILLINOIS 



who is a daughter of William and Emma 
Freschl. Mr. and Mrs. Epstein have two chil- 
dren, William F., born at Chicago January 16, 
1917, and Robert Louis, on the 5th of Novem- 
ber, 1920. 

John J. McMahon has given to his native 
city and county two intervals of service in 
the office of state's attorney, and since his 
second retirement from this position, in 1922, 
he has continued in the successful private 
practice of his profession in Chicago, where 
he has a representative clientele and a secure 
vantage-ground as one of the able and suc- 
cessful younger members of the bar of Cook 
County, while his is the further prestige of 
having represented his native city in gallant 
overseas service in the World war. His law 
office is established at 77 West Washington 
Street and his home at 222 East Chestnut 
Street. 

John J. McMahon was born in Chicago on 
the 25th of January, 1894, and here likewise 
occurred the birth of his parents, John J. 
and Pauline (Ferber) McMahon. After his 
course of study in one of the well ordered 
Catholic parochial schools of Chicago John J. 
McMahon attended St. Ignatius College of 
Chicago until 1910, in which year he was 
matriculated in the law department of Notre 
Dame University, South Bend, Indiana. In 
that institution he was graduated as a mem- 
ber of the class of 1914, his reception of the 
degree of Bachelor of Laws having been fol- 
lowed, in 1915, by his admission to the Illinois 
bar and soon afterward by his appointment 
to the position of assistant state's attorney 
of Cook County. His service continued through 
the ensuing year, and in 1917, within a short 
time after the nation's entrance into the World 
war, he subordinated all personal interests 
to the call of patriotism and enlisted for service 
in the United States Army, he having gained 
the rank of first lieutenant in the One Hun- 
dred Thirty-first Infantry, with which com- 
mand he went to France, where the regiment 
became a part of the Thirty-third Division 
of the American Expeditionary Forces and 
where he continued in active service until the 
now historic armistice brought the war to a 
close. In due course Lieutenant McMahon 
returned to his native land and received his 
honorable discharge. He then resumed his 
professional activities in Chicago, where in 
1919 he was again appointed assistant state's 
attorney of Cook County. In this office he 
continued his effective service until 1922, and 
since that year he has given his attention to 
the general practice of his profession, in which 
his success stands as the best voucher for his 
ability and for his hold upon popular confidence 
and esteem in his native city. 

Mr. McMahon is found loyally arrayed in 
the ranks of the Democratic party, his religious 
faith is that of the Catholic Church, he is a 



member of the Lake Shore Athletic Club, 
and his professional affiliations are with the 
Chicago Bar Association, the Illinois State 
Bar Association and the American Bar 
Association. 

On the 19th of April, 1921, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. McMahon to Miss Eleanor 
Probst, and the two children of this union are; 
Joan Clare, born January 1, 1923, and John, 
born January 12, 1930. 

Robert W. Johnson, Springfield attorney! 
is a native of Illinois, a son of a physician! 
but from the time he left high school he wal 
determined to make his own way, and his worlj 
brought him a college education, paid hil 
expenses in law school, and when he begad 
practice he had an equipment of business] 
experience such as few men have when theJ 
are awarded a professional diploma. 

Mr. Johnson was born at Assumption, 119 
nois, May 8, 1888, son of Robert W. and] 
Augusta A. (Hinton) Johnson. His father, 
was born at Winchester, Virginia, and hil 
mother at Oconee, Illinois, and she now resides? 
at Pekin in this state. Robert W. Johnson 
was educated in Rush Medical College, firs! 
practiced at Oconee, Illinois, for two yearsj 
and from 1876 until his death in 1921 lived 
at Assumption, one of the best loved citizens] 
of that community. He was an able doctor,; 
and his chief thought at all times was thj 
service he could render in a professional 
capacity rather than the rewards of a pron 
fessional career. He and his wife were earnest 
church workers as Presbyterians, and he was] 
a Democrat. Of their family of eleven chil-j 
dren ten are living, Robert W. being the sixth 
child. 

Robert W. Johnson attended schools at 
Assumption, through high school, and during 
his high school course learned the printer's 
trade. Altogether he followed printing as 
a business for about six years. When he 
entered Shurtleff College at Upper Alton he 
planned to pay all his living expenses, and 
part of the time he worked as a printer, 
waited on tables, and was also an employee 
in a glass factory at Alton. He made a cred- 
itable record in his studies and was gradu- 
ated in 1912, after which he entered the Law 
School of Illinois Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington and was graduated in 1916. Mr. 
Johnson for a time was claim agent for thj 
Illinois Traction Company and in 1918 began 
practice at Springfield, with A. M. FitzgeraU 
and from 1922 until 1930 he was senior part- 
ner in the law firm of Johnson & Pefferle. 
He is now senior partner of the law firm of 
Johnson & Davison, with offices in the Reisch 
Building. Mr. Johnson for two years was 
assistant state's attorney of Sangamon County. 
He is a well educated, resourceful lawyer, 
and has won his way to a well defined leader- 
ship in his profession. He is a member of 




A-YlfdcLMce^ <& 9r^. „ 



ILLINOIS 



105 



the Sangamon County Bar Association, a 
Republican in politics, a member of the Pres- 
'byterian Church, and his hobby is fishing: and 
hunting. He is a member of the Izaak Walton 
League. 

Mr. Johnson married Miss Martha Stevens, 
of Sangamon County. Her father, William 
Stevens, was a farmer and lawyer. Mrs. John- 
son died in 1928, leaving four children: Robert 
William and Joseph Frederick, both attending 
school at Springfield, Martha Ellen and Walter 
Edward. 

Josiah R. Balliet, one of the venerable 
and honored citizens and substantial capital- 
ists of Boone County, is living virtually retired 
in the City of Belvidere, judicial center of 
the county. Though he celebrated in February, 
1931, his eighty-third birthday anniversary, 
Mr. Balliet has the mental and physical vigor 
of a man many years his junior, gives a 
careful supervision to his various capitalistic 
interests, continues to be actively interested 
in communal affairs in general, and vigorously 
applies himself to his favorite game, that 
of golf. He was born and reared in Illinois, 
a representative of a sterling pioneer family, 
and much of the civic and material develop- 
ment and progress of the state has been com- 
passed within the period of his memory. 

Mr. Balliet was born in DeKalb County, 
Illinois, February 26, 1848, and is a son of 
(John and Hannah (Sarver) Balliet, who were 
born and reared in Pennsylvania, where their 
marriage was solemnized and whence they 
came to Illinois about the year 1845. John 
Balliet acquired land along the line of DeKalb 
and McHenry counties and there reclaimed 
and developed a productive farm estate. He 
was a sterling pioneer who did well his part 
in the march of development and progress 
in that section of the state, but he and his 
wife were revered ctizens of the State of 
Iowa at the time of their death, whence they 
had removed. Prior to coming to Illinois 
Mr. Balliet had been a stage-driver in Penn- 
sylvania, the family, of French extraction, 
having been founded in the old Keystone State 
in the Colonial era of our national history. 
Of the eleven children born to John and 
Hannah (Sarver) Balliet only four are living: 
Monroe, eldest of the surviving children, is 
ninety-three years of age in 1931 and resides 
in the City of Des Moines, Iowa. He was 
for many years a successful carpenter and 
builder, and in earlier years was a teacher 
of singing schools, his musical talent having 
been exceptional. George, next younger of 
the surviving children, is eighty-five years 
of age and is a retired farmer residing at 
McGregor, Clayton County, Iowa. Josiah R., 
of this review, is the next younger, and Eliza- 
beth is a widow who maintains her home at 
Ames, Iowa. John Balliet eventually removed 
from Illinois to Iowa, where likewise he gained 



pioneer prestige and where he became the 
owner of four large and valuable farms. When 
he arrived in Illinois his material possessions 
were summed up in seventy-five cents in cash, 
a team of horses, one ox and a wagon. He 
here purchased land at two dollars an acre. 
Passing years marked his achievement of sub- 
stantial prosperity through his assiduous and 
well ordered activities as agriculturist and 
stock-grower, and he was known and honored 
for his ability and for his sterling attributes 
of character. He cast in his lot with the Re- 
publican party soon after its organization and 
ever afterward continued a loyal supporter 
of its cause. He and his wife were zealous 
members of the Congregational Church. His 
father, Stephen Balliet, passed his entire life 
in Pennsylvania, where the original American 
representatives of the family made settlement 
upon coming from their native France, and 
records extant show that members of the 
family served as patriot soldiers in the war 
of the Revolution. Maternal ancestors of the 
subject of this sketch likewise were soldiers 
in that great struggle for national inde- 
pendence. 

The youthful education of Josiah R. Balliet 
was acquired mainly in pioneer schools at 
Woodstock, McHenry County, Illinois, and that 
he profited by the advantages thus afforded 
was shown in his subsequent three years of 
effective service as a teacher in the public 
schools — mainly rural district schools. While 
teaching winter terms of school he had found 
employment in the intervening intervals as 
clerk in a music store. He eventually assumed 
a local agency for the Singer Sewing Machine 
Company, at Belvidere, and he later added 
musical instruments and merchandise to his 
business, which is still continued and which 
gives him precedence as the oldest business 
man of Belvidere, where his activities have 
covered a period of more than sixty years. 
He is now a heavy stockholder in the National 
Sewing Machine Company and was mainly 
instrumental in obtaining for Belvidere the 
large factory of this corporation, of which 
he has been a director from the time it here 
initiated business. He was also instrumental 
in starting the first electric light plant in 
Belvidere and also in the organization of 
the second independent telephone company in 
the State of Illinois, at Belvidere, of which 
he was president and which continued in suc- 
cessful operation for thirty-four years. He 
was also active in securing the location at 
Belvidere of the Gossard Corset Company. 
Mr. Balliet has not only achieved large success 
in his business activities but has also proved 
at all times a loyal, liberal and progressive 
citizen, his being secure place in the confidence 
and good will of all who know him. His 
political allegiance is given to the Republican 
party and his religious views are in harmony 
with the faith of the Presbyterian Church, 



106 



ILLINOIS 



of which his wife likewise was an earnest 
member during many years prior to her death. 

On the 4th of February, 1895, Mr. Balliet 
received the degree of entered apprentice in 
a lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, 
and in the same he was raised in the same 
year to the sublime degree of master mason. 
He served four years as commander of the 
Commandery of Knights Templar in the City 
of Rockford, and he is an honorary member 
of Commandery No. 19 in the City of Chicago, 
where likewise is maintained his affiliation 
with the Red Cross of Constantine. In the 
Scottish Rite of the time-honored fraternity 
Mr. Balliet received in 1910 the thirty-third 
and ultimate degree. In his home community 
he is a member of the Belmar Country Club 
and on its links finds opportunity to indulge 
in his favorite game, golf. In former years 
he enjoyed periodical hunting and fishing trips, 
and he has traveled extensively throughout 
the United States. Mr. Balliet is one of the 
grand old men of Boone County and is emi- 
nently entitled to representation in this history 
of his native state. 

The year 1874 marked the marriage of Mr. 
Balliet to Miss Mary L. Detrick, who was 
born and reared at Belvidere and whose father 
was one of the honored pioneers of Boone 
County. The devoted companionship of Mr. 
and Mrs. Balliet was continued during the 
long period of fifty-six years, and the gracious 
ties were severed only when the loved wife 
was called to the life eternal, her death having 
occurred June 8, 1930. 

Frank Nathaniel Evans, M. D., came to 
Springfield in 1913, and in his profession has 
won enviable distinction, not only in general 
practice but as a specialist in the field of 
internal medicine and urology. 

Doctor Evans was born at Emerson, Iowa, 
May 11, 1888, son of Marion L. and Henrietta 
A. (Tubbs) Evans. His grandfather, John 
Evans, was a native of Ohio, came to Illinois 
in 1834 and in 1849 went west to California. 
Later he returned to Illinois, and spent the 
rest of his life as a farmer and cattle man. 
Doctor Evans' maternal grandfather, L. W. 
Tubbs, a native of Michigan, was also a Cali- 
fornia forty-niner. After his return he settled 
at Malvern, Iowa, where he raised cattle and 
conducted a farm. Marion L. Evans was born 
at Decorah, Illinois, and his wife at Malvern, 
Iowa, and they reside at Emerson in that 
state, where the former is still active in busi- 
ness as a banker and cattle breeder. He is 
seventy-two and his wife sixty-six years of 
age. He is a Baptist, while she is a Methodist, 
and fraternally he is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity and B. P. O. Elks, and has always 
taken a deep interest in civic affairs and in 
Republican politics. 

Doctor Evans was the third in a family of 
six children, five of whom are living. He 



received his early schooling at Emerson, Iowa, 
and in 1906 graduated from the Shattuck 
Military Academy at Faribault, Minnesota. 
The year 1906-07 he spent in travel in Europe. 
In 1907 he entered the medical department 
of the University of Michigan, where he was 
graduated M. D. in 1911. Following his grad- 
uation he spent a year as surgical assistant 
to Doctor Patton at Springfield. In order to 
complete the most thorough training possible 
before engaging in private practice he went 
abroad and during 1912-13 was a graduate 
student at Berlin and Vienna. Doctor Evans 
in June, 1913, returned to Springfield and 
again became associated with Doctor Patton. 
His practice is now largely limited to internal 
medicine and urology. He is a member of 
the Sangamon County, Illinois State, Missis- 
sippi Valley and American Medical Associ- 
ations. 

Doctor Evans married, March 12, 1919, Miss 
Gertrude L. Maw, who was born at London, 
England. They were married in England. 
Their two children are Mary May and Wini- 
fred Marion. Doctor Evans is a member of 
the Fir^t Presbyterian Church of Springfield. 
He is a York and Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner, member of the B. P. O. Elks, and 
the Phi Kappa Psi. In October, 1917, he 
was commissioned a medical officer, receiving 
special training at Camp McClelland at Annis- 
ton, Alabama, for four months was on duty 
at Fort McPherson, Georgia, and went overseas 
with the rank of captain and at the close of 
the war was chief of the medical service of 
Camp Hospital No. 40 at Liverpool, England. 
He returned home May 18, 1919, and was 
granted an honorable discharge on May 22. 
Doctor Evans is a member of the Illini Coun- 
try Club, the Sangamo Club, the Mid-Day 
Luncheon Club and is a Republican. His 
recreations are hunting, fishing and golf. 

Rev. John Theophilus Thomas, pastor of 
the First Presbyterian Church of Springfield, 
is an eloquent and gifted preacher, earnest 
in everything he undertakes, and possessing 
many of those qualifications for leadership 
which are so much in demand today in the 
Christian ministry. 

Doctor Thomas was born at Bristol, Ten- 
nessee, February 14, 1878, and in the paternal 
line is of Welsh ancestry. His great-grand- 
father, John Thomas, came from Cardiff, 
Wales, first locating in Baltimore and later 
going to Tennessee. His son, Frederick 
Thomas, was born near Bristol, Tennessee, 
and owned a large amount of land in that 
state and was accounted well-to-do. John 
T. Thomas, Sr., father of Doctor Thomas of 
Springfield, was born at Bristol, Tennessee, 
and died in 1916. He was a Confederate 
soldier under General Price and was slightly 
wounded in one battle and for a time was a 
prisoner of war at Fort Scott, Kansas. He 



ILLINOIS 



107 



was a great-nephew of Gen. George H. Thomas, 
ithe Virginian who remained loyal to the Union 
cause and was one of the most perfect exam- 
ples of a soldier and man among all the dis- 
tinguished leaders of both sides. The mother 
of Doctor Thomas was Hannah Stanley 
Thomas, who was born in Athens, Ohio, and 
is now past eighty -two years of age, a resident 
of Oklahoma City. Her father, Jacob Stanley, 
was born in England and was an early settler 
in Southeastern Ohio and at one time held 
the office of judge at Athens. John T. Thomas, 
Sr., was a stock man and farmer, a Democrat 
in politics and took part in many local and 
(States campaigns in Tennessee. He held the 
office of county assessor. He was a warm 
adherent of that great orator and statesman 
Bob Taylor of Tennessee. 

Rev. John T. Thomas was educated in the 
^Sweetwater Military College at Sweetwater, 
Tennessee, in King College at Bristol and 
Sin 1901 was graduated from the McCormick 
.Theological Seminary of Chicago. His first 
active charge was at Canon City, Colorado, 
(where he remained six and a half years and 
jfor two years of that time was assistant 
chaplain of the Colorado State Penitentiary. 
Following that he was western secretary for 
Ithe Federal Council of Churches, with head- 
quarters at Denver. For four years Doctor 
iThomas was pastor of Westminster Church 
at Grand Rapids, Michigan, four years at 
|the First Church at Louisville, Kentucky, and 
then, in 1918, he came to Springfield as pastor 
jof the First Presbyterian Church. 

The First Presbyterian Church of Spring- 
field is one of the oldest churches of any 
denomination in the state. The congregation 
Was organized in 1828. It has never been 
without a minister and in 104 years only eight 
pastors have served. The church has a mem- 
bership of 1340 and has long been one of the 
most flourishing congregations in the city. 
The present church edifice was erected in 1866, 
and has a capacity of 800 in the auditorium. 

Doctor Thomas married in 1901 Miss Ethel 
Scott, of Knoxville, Tennessee. She was edu- 
cated in the University of Tennessee and is 
|a daughter of J. Foster Scott, of a prominent 
(Tennessee family. Her father was a brick 
manufacturer. Representatives of four gen- 
erations of her family are buried in the ceme- 
tery at Knoxville. Doctor and Mrs. Thomas 
had four children, the oldest, Theodore, grad- 
uating from the University of Illinois in 1925. 
He died in 1926, just at the entrance of a 
promising manhood. The son Scott was edu- 
cated at the Univeristy of Illinois and is 
(now with the Illinois Power Company. Stanley 
[attended the University of Colorado and is 
now a student in Northwestern University 
Law School, and Robert Lee is a graduate 
of the class of 1930 in high school and is 
now a student in the University of Colorado. 



Doctor Thomas is a York and Scottish Rite 
Mason and served as grand chaplain of the 
order. He is a Republican. At one time he 
was president of the Optimist Club of 
Springfield. 

Henry Abels, of Springfield, is one of the 
outstanding men in insurance circles in Illi- 
nois, being vice president of the Franklin 
Life Insurance Company, one of the oldest 
and largest of Illinois old-line companies. 

For the success he has achieved no one has 
been more directly responsible than Mr. Abels 
himself. He began life as a country boy, and 
his industry, perseverance and ambition 
enabled him to turn small opportunities into 
the elements that constitute a successful career. 
He was born on a farm in Jasper County, 
Illinois, February 19, 1867, son of Martin and 
Emma (Leurssen) Abels. His parents were 
born in Germany, and were married in Jasper 
County, Illinois. His father came to this 
country about 1858 and a few years later 
entered the Thirteenth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry and fought for the Union cause three 
years, seven months. After the war he moved 
out to Kansas, bought a farm, on which he 
lived for six or eight years, and returning 
to Illinois, became an employee in the secre- 
tary of state's office at Springfield. He was 
a staunch Republican and a member of the 
Lutheran Church. Of the nine children eight 
are living, Henry having been the second in 
order of birth. 

Mr. Henry Abels had the advantages of 
the common schools only during his youth. 
After school he clerked in country stores, 
worked in woolen mills, was for four years 
in the secretary of state's office, also with 
Armour & Company, served as pardon clerk 
in the governor's office and was employed in 
the Illinois National Bank. He considered 
no useful work beneath him. It was in 1893, 
when he was twenty-six years of age, that 
he first entered the service of the Franklin 
Life Insurance Company. Later, for two and 
a half years, he was in Philadelphia with the 
Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Company. 
Returning to Illinois, he again joined the 
Franklin Company, in 1898 became its auditor 
and in 1901 became its secretary, and since 
1920 has been vice president, and now holds 
the office of first vice president. In 1913 he 
became the president of the American Life 
Convention, an association of life insurance 
companies, and for several years was a mem- 
ber of its executive committee. 

He married in 1892 Miss Eva K. Mooney, 
a native of Illinois, who died in 1928. She 
was the mother of two children: Kathryn, wife 
of William T. Kimber, who has charge of 
the advertising of the Weaver Manufacturing 
Company of Springfield; and Marian, wife 
of Ward Montgomery, of the Franklin Insur- 



108 



ILLINOIS 



ance Company of Springfield. Mr. Abels in 
August, 1929, married Jeannette M. Reid, who 
was born in Springfield, daughter of William 
Reid, of that city. She is a Presbyterian, while 
Mr. Abels is a Baptist. He is a member of 
the Illini Country Club, the Sangamo Club, 
the B. P. O. Elks, and is a Republican. Mr. 
Abels has taken much interest in civic affairs 
and is chairman of the City Shade Tree Com- 
mission and president of the Children's Service 
League. 

Louis Mead Dixon, treasurer of the Abra- 
ham Lincoln Insurance Company, is a great- 
grandson of that John Dixon who was the 
founder and name giver to the City of Dixon 
in Lee County. John Dixon came to Illinois 
in 1818, the year the territory was admitted 
to the Union, lived for a time in Sangamon 
County, later at Peoria, where he became 
clerk of court, and he also acted as mail car- 
rier between Peoria and Galena. He was at 
Dixon during the Black Hawk Indian war and 
rendered special service to the Government 
at that time. He was a native of New York 
State, and after leaving Peoria he acquired 
land along the Rock River, on part of which 
he laid out the Town of Dixon. 

Louis M. Dixon was born at Dixon, March 
20, 1873, son of Sherwood and Melissa (Mead) 
Dixon and grandson of James Dixon, all of 
whom were born in or near the county seat 
of Lee County. Melissa Mead was a daughter 
of Hiram Mead, an Illinois pioneer, who was 
of Revolutionary stock. Sherwood Dixon read 
law in his native city with William Barge 
and became a man of high standing at the 
bar, and was United States district attorney 
of Northern Illinois at the time of his death 
in 1894. He was a leader in the Democratic 
party, served several terms in the Legislature 
and was a member of the committee which 
brought about the election of Governor Palmer 
to the United States Senate. All the facts 
about his life indicated a high minded citizen- 
ship. He was a member of the school board 
and for twenty years was superintendent of 
the Sunday School of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. His three sons were Henry S., a 
Dixon attorney who died in 1928; Louis M.; 
and George C, who is practicing law at Dixon. 
Louis M. Dixon attended school in his native 
city, including high school, and the Northern 
Illinois Normal. Instead of following the foot- 
steps of his father in the choice of a profession 
he became a printer and worked at his trade 
in Dixon until the spring of 1898. In that 
year he located at Springfield and continuously 
has been associated with the life insurance 
business. 

Mr. Dixon married in 1918 Emma Brown, 
who was born in Sangamon County, daughter 
of John C. Brown, a farmer who lived at 
Mechanicsburg, Illinois. Mr. Dixon has two 
children, Louis Mead, Jr., and John Brown 



Dixon, both attending school at Springfield 
Mr. Dixon by a former marriage has a son 
Paul Goodrich, who was educated at Spring 
field and in Notre Dame University of Indiana 
and is now married and has three children. 

Mr. Dixon is a Presbyterian, is a Scottis] 
Rite Mason and Shriner, member of the Inde 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and B. P. 
Elks. He is a Democrat, member of tbl 
Kiwanis Club, Sangamo Club and the Grant 
View Country Club. His chief interest asioci 
from his business is his home and family. 

Percy Louis Taylor, M. D., has practice 
medicine at Springfield for over thirty year! 
His is a general practitioner, and his sue 
cessful standing reflects additional credit upo: 
a family that has long been identified wiflt 
Sangamon County. 

Doctor Taylor was born in Sangamo 
County, December 6, 1873, son of Dr. Isaa 
H. and Irene (Constant) Taylor. His patera* 
grandparents were Isaac and Sarah (Elliott 
Taylor. Isaac Taylor came to Springfield froi 
Maryland. Sarah Elliott's people were froi> 
Nonth Carolina, and one of her ancestors wa; 
Henry Kelly, a soldier in the War of the Revc 
lution. William Kelly was one of the firs 
settlers at Springfield, in 1818. Doctor Taylor 
maternal grandparents were Rezin H. am 
Mary (Halbert) Constant, who came froi 
Virginia to Illinois at an early date. Cap 
John Constant, grandfather of Rezin, wa 
an officer in the Revolutionary army. Rezi 
Constant was a member of the Illinois Legii 
lature when it met in what is now the oj> 
courthouse building at Springfield. 

Dr. Isaac H. Taylor was born in Sangamo 
County. He was educated in Rush Medics 
College of Chicago and practiced medicir 
for many years in Sangamon County, retirin 
from his professional work in 1920. He : 
a member of the Christian Church, _ tt 
Masonic fraternity and a Democrat in politic 
His two children are Percy Louis and Fann: 
Gertrude, the latter the wife of Dr. Benjami 
Pickrell. 

Percy Louis Taylor attended the Springfiel 
High School and was graduated from M 
Barnes Medical College of St. Louis in 189: 
He began practice alone in Springfield _ ar 
has carried on his work as an individu) 
through the years. The only important inte: 
ruption to his professional service came durin 
the World war, when he volunteered in Augus 
1918, and was commissioned a captain in tlr 
Army Medical Corps. He was sent to Fortri 
Monroe, Virginia, and in March, 1919, t® 
discharged at San Francisco as surgeon ( 
the Fifty-seventh Regiment, Coast Artillei 
Corps. 

Doctor Taylor married, September 29, 189 
Miss Amelia Seifert, who was born in Sprinj 
field, where her father was a well know 
physician. They have two children: Gladj 



v .: :■■''*■-:.;■';;:■:,•■■, 







•*'«' 







ILLINOIS 



109 



Lucille, wife of Gordon Klein, a ceramic 
engineer at Newcastle, Pennsylvania; and Lois 
Irene, wife of Irwin Rieger, who lives at 
River Forest, Chicago, and is a representative 
of the Mead Art Manufacturing Company. 

Doctor Taylor has taken an active share 
of work as a layman in the Christian Church. 
He is a Knight Templar Mason and Scottish 
Rite Mason and Shriner, is a past exalted 
ruler of the B. P. 0. Elks and a member of 
the Sangamon County, Illinois State and Amer- 
ican Medical Associations. He is a Democrat 
in politics. Doctor Taylor owns considerable 
real estate in Springfield. 

Hon. Charles F. Carpentier. In the labors 
allotted to men's lives, not the least in impor- 
tance or the most insignificant in their impress 
upon character are those which minister to 
our esthetic natures. There are many diver- 
sities of art, wide variations in the play of 
artistic gifts. The poet has the rare faculty 
of couching his thoughts in rythmic measure, 
the painter transfers his fancies to canvas 
and the sculptor carves his inspiration in 
living lines in bronze or marble. Yet it is 
given to the player to "hold the mirror up 
to nature," and reproduce upon the stage or 
silver screen the emotions and passions which 
make our lives sad or joyous, despondent or 
hopeful. To the comedian is given the task 
of arousing mirth and reviving the drooping 
spirits by jest or comic act. The tragedian 
portrays life's graver, sadder side, while the 
singer charms the ear and elevates the soul 
by the divine notes of melody. 

The aim of the theatrical manager is to 
place before the patrons of his house or houses 
alike the humorous and the pathetic aspects 
of life — its tragedy and comedy. This has 
been the successful aim of Hon. Charles F. 
Carpentier, who, with his brother, Emil J., 
owns and operates the Strand and Majestic 
theatres, the only two establishments of their 
kind at East Moline, and who endeavors not 
only to amuse the public but also to cultivate 
the popular taste for the higher forms of 
the talking screen. It is not alone as a 
showman that Mr. Carpentier is prominent, 
however, as he has for years taken a decidedly 
important part in civic affairs, and at present 
is giving East Moline an excellent adminis- 
tration in the capacity of mayor. 

Mayor Carpentier was born at Moline, Illi- 
nois, September 19, 1896, and is a son of 
Gregoir and Louise (DeConnick) Carpentier, 
natives of Belgium. Gregoir Carpentier was 
educated in his native land and was about 
seventeen years of age when he came to the 
United States. For many years he was engaged 
in the retail liquor business, later also enter- 
ing the wholesale field, but is now living in 
retirement at East Moline, where his wife, 
who came to this country with her parents 



at the age of three years, also resides. They 
are members of the Catholic Church and Mr. 
Carpentier is independent in politics. Charles 
F. Carpentier is the eldest in a family of 
six children, of whom five are living. 

Charles F. Carpentier attended the public 
schools until he was twelve years of age, at 
which time he began to work in order to secure 
a more thorough education. Through his 
labors he was able to pay his way through 
St. Mary's School at Moline and St. Ambrose 
College, Davenport, after which he became 
associated with his father in the elder man's 
business. In 1918 he entered the army for 
service during the World war and was sent 
to Camp Grant, Illinois, for training, and 
later to Camp MacArthur, Texas, continuing 
in the service for eight months and being 
honorably discharged in 1919. In 1920 he 
built the Strand Theatre, a motion picture 
house, at East Moline, in partnership with 
his brother, and subsequently they also became 
the owners of the Majestic. With the advent 
of the sound or "talkies," Mr. Carpentier at 
once displayed his progressiveness by install- 
ing this innovation in his Majestic, and this 
was the only picture house in Moline and 
East Moline to secure an award of merit 
for the production of sound. The establish- 
ments are conducted in an orderly, clean and 
refined manner, and Mr. Carpentier secures 
the best of attractions, displaying unusually 
good judgment in selecting pictures to meet 
the taste of his patrons. 

As has been noted, Mayor Carpentier has 
been active in politics and civic affairs. For 
five years he served capably in the office of 
alderman, and then, in 1929, became the first 
member of the City Council ever to be elected 
mayor of East Moline. He is giving his 
fellow-citizens an excellent business adminis- 
tration and during his term has worked faith- 
fully for constructive civic policies. Mayor 
Carpentier is a member of St. Mary's Roman 
Catholic Church. He belongs to the Knights 
of Columbus, Catholic Order of Forresters, 
the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks 
and the Fraternal Order of Eagles, and is 
a past commander of East Moline Post of the 
American Legion, being also a member of 
the East Moline Rotary Club and the Short 
Hills Country Club. Golf is his hobby, and 
he is known as one of the best amateurs in 
the county. He is a staunch Republican in 
political faith. 

On June 23, 1920, at East Moline, Mayor 
Carpentier was united in marriage with Miss 
Alta Leona Sarginson, who was born at Rapid 
City, Illinois, and educated in the East Moline 
schools, where she was graduated from high 
school. She is active in the work of St. 
Mary's parish and takes an interested and 
intelligent part in club and civic life. Mayor 
and Mrs. Carpentier have a son, Donald Dee. 



110 



ILLINOIS 



Emmett Vincent Poston, head of one of 
the largest brick making establishments in 
Central Illinois, is in a business with which 
his boyhood environment made him familiar. 

Mr. Poston was born at Nelsonville, Ohio, 
June 23, 1888, son of Irvin G. and Josephine 
(Musser) Poston. His parents reside at Mar- 
tinsville, Indiana. His father was born in 
Ohio and his mother in West Virginia. Irvin 
G. Poston has been a brick manufacturer 
throughout his active life, and is now living 
retired. Both parents are active members of 
the Presbyterian Church and in politics are 
Republicans. They had four children: Edwin, 
brick manufacturer at Martinsville, Indiana; 
Blanche, of Martinsville; Bessie; and Emmett. 

Emmett Poston attended school at Craw- 
fordsville, Indiana, and was graduated from 
the University of Illinois in 1911. He is a 
Beta Theta Pi. He learned brick manufac- 
turing with his father and in 1915 came to 
Springfield, where he organized the Poston 
Springfield Company, Incorporated, of which 
he is president, W. H. Moseley, vice president, 
and A. N. Reece, secretary. This company 
operates an extensive plant manufacturing 
face brick and paving brick of standards and 
qualities well known in the trade. The product 
is shipped throughout Illinois and adjacent 
states. 

Mr. Poston married in 1914 Miss Beryl 
Nutter, who was born at Martinsville, Indiana, 
and was reared and educated there. Her 
father, Walter Nutter, was a flour miller. Mr. 
and Mrs. Poston have three children: Frances 
Joeella, Walter Dow and William Emmett, ail 
attending school at Springfield. The family 
are members of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. 
Poston is a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner 
and a member of the B. P. O. Elks. 

Mrs. Grace McKee, postmistress of Kirk- 
land, DeKalb County, is a granddaughter of 
John Murphy, who came from Ireland and was 
one of the early settlers in the vicinity of 
Waukesha, Wisconsin, where he took up Gov- 
ernment land. He developed a good farm and 
was in the dairy business for many years, a 
leader in community affairs and reared a 
large family of children. 

The father of Mrs. McKee was Michael 
Murphy, who was born in Wisconsin, on his 
father's farm, and after completing his work 
m the public schools entered the railroad 
business. He became a telegraph operator 
for the Chicago & Milwaukee Railroad and 
was appointed agent and served in that posi- 
tion at Kirkland for forty years. He married 
Cora Eichholtz, and Mrs. McKee was their 
only child. Her father was a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and was affiliated with 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Mrs. McKee was born at Bensenville in 
DuPage County, Illinois, July 2, 1886, but 
has lived most of her life in Kirkland. She 



graduated from the schools there in U 
and was married to Mr. Roy McKee, son 
John and Adah (Ives) McKee. They he i 
one son, Donald, born March 9, 1921, and 
school. Mrs. McKee in addition to her dut 
as postmistress, takes an active part in co : 
munity affairs. She is a Republican, is 
past matron of the Eastern Star and atter 
the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

William M. Montgomery was a busim 
man and citizen whom the people of Sprii 
field learned to know and respect during t 
quarter of a century his home and activity 
made him a resident of the capital city. 

He was born at Petersburg, Illinois, in 18 
and died in 1925. Mr. Montgomery rep: 
sented a pioneer Illinois family, had the advs 
tages of public schools in this state, and 1 
inclination and character made him an al 
business man. He moved to Springfield 
1900 and for a number of years was preside 
of the Springfield Mattress Company. ] 
married Ettie M. Wheeler, who was born 
Caj^ollton, Illinois, daughter of Lyman F. a 
Mary Louise (Eldred) Wheeler. Her fath 
was born in Massachusetts and her moth 
in Carrollton, Illinois. Her father was 
early settler in this state and for many yea 
engaged in the lumber and general merchandi 
business. Mrs. Montgomery was one of fii 
children, three of whom are living. Her fath 
was a Methodist and her mother a Presb 
terian, and her father was an active Repu 
lican and temperance man and served at o: 
time as mayor of Carrollton. 

Mr. Montgomery belonged to the Presb 
terian Church, as does Mrs. Montgomery, ai 
he was an elder in the Westminster Presb 
terian Church of Springfield. He was affiliab 
with the Knights of Pythias, and was a Repu 
lican. His success in business was due 
his well directed energies and good judgmer, 
since he started life with practically nothin 
Mrs. Montgomery is active in church and ch 
circles, belonging to the Springfield Woman 
Club, and has served on several of its con 
mittees. Her home is at 809 South Walro 
Street. 

John S. O'Donnell. In the great metro] 
olis in which he was born and reared M ' 
O'Donnell has developed the ability and gaine 
the success that mark him as one of the abi 
and representative younger members of ty 
Chicago bar, and in the practice of his pi) 
fession he maintains his office headquartfca 
at 110 South Dearborn Street. 

Mr. O'Donnell was born in Chicago on tb I 
29th of December, 1896, and is a son of Micha< | 
F. and Katherine (Queenan) O'Donnell, th 
former a native of Ireland and the latter c 
the City of Chicago, where their marriag 
was solemnized and where they remained unt 
their death. Michael F. O'Donnell came t 



ILLINOIS 



111 



Chicago in the year 1892 and here he gave 
prolonged and effective service as chief engi- 
neer for the city water department and pump- 
ing stations, his death having occurred in 
1910, and his widow having passed away July 
2, 1930. Both were zealous communicants 
of the Catholic Church. The subject of this 
review is the one surviving son, and the 
daughters are Mrs. Mary Markham, Mrs. Mar- 
garet Fitzgerald, Mrs. Catherine Stepek and 
Mrs. Rose Howe. 

After profiting by the advantages of Catholic 
parochial schools in Chicago John S. O'Donnell 
was here a student of St. Ignatius Academy, 
and in 1920 he was graduated in the law 
department of DePaul University, from which 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws, 
the degree of Master of Laws having later 
been conferred upon him by Loyola University 
and his admission to the bar having occurred 
in 1920. He has since been established in 
the general practice of his profession in his 
native city, has membership in the Chicago 
Bar Association and the Illinois State Bar 
Association, has membership in the Hamilton 
Club, is active in the local councils and cam- 
paign work of the Republican party, is a 
communicant of the Catholic Church, and is 
a past chancellor of the Knights of Columbus, 
besides being affiliated also with the Pni Alpha 
Delta college fraternity. He was a member 
of the famous Black Horse Troop, and his 
hobby is represented in farming and horses. 
Prior to initiating his practice of law Mr. 
O'Donnell has made a record of success during 
his two years of service as a teachei in the 
Austin High School. In the World war period 
he enlisted in the United States Navy and 
was stationed near Chicago. The name of 
Mr. O'Donnell remains on the roster of eligible 
young bachelors in Chicago, and he maintains 
his residence at 2114 East Marquette Boule- 
vard. 

Harry Pierce Jones is secretary of the 
Security Improvement & Loan Association of 
Springfield, a building and loan association 
in which he had an active part in the organi- 
zation twenty-six years ago. It is the largest 
building and loan association in the capital 
city. 

Mr. Jones was born at Loami, Sangamon 
County, Illinois, February 16, 1871, son of 
Joseph and Laura E. (Davis) Jones. Both 
parents were born in Illinois and his grand- 
parents came to this state from Kentucky. 
Joseph Jones was a soldier in the Civil war, 
being a member of the Eleventh Missouri 
Infantry. He was wounded in one battle and 
after leaving the hospital was unable to con- 
tinue active service in the field. After the 
war he followed the mercantile business in 
Sangamon County, was postmaster for several 
years at Loami and held the office of justice 
of the peace. He was a Republican and a 



member of the Masonic fraternity, and both 
he and his wife belonged to the Universalist 
Church. 

Harry P. Jones was the second in a family 
of six children, four of whom are living. 
He attended the public schools at Loami, had 
a business college course in Springfield, and 
his active commercial career had as its foun- 
dation a period of work as clerk in a dry 
goods store. For two or three years he was 
bookkeeper with the Springfield Printing Com- 
pany and then became cashier of the Spring- 
field office of the Equitable Life Assurance 
Society. He was with this company for twelve 
years and later with the Franklin Life Insur- 
ance Company until 1915. 

Mr. Jones organized in 1906 the Security 
Improvement & Loan Association, and since 
1915 has performed the administrative and 
executive duties of secretary. This com- 
pany as the largest of its kind in Springfield 
has total resources of over five million dollars. 
Recently the company bought as its home an 
eight-story office building on Monroe Street. 

Mr. Jones married in 1900 Miss Josephine 
H. Fisher, who was born in Henderson, Ken- 
tucky, and was educated there and at Rockford, 
Illinois. Mr. Jones is an elder in the Pres- 
byterian Church, is affiliated with the Masonic 
fraternity and B. P. O. Elks, the Sangamon 
Club and Rotary Club, and is a Republican 
in politics. 

Hon. John Herman Hallstrom. It is too 
frequently the case in American politics that 
individuals attain high rank in official life 
through personal favoritism or by reason of 
the system of personal rewards for purely 
party services, where fitness for the place 
is a secondary consideration. Likewise there 
are instances of so-called "accidents," where 
men are the creatures of circumstance and 
through developments that could not be fore- 
seen nor anticipated are unexpectedly elevated 
to high place. There are notable cases where 
a kindly fate seems to have led men through 
experiences that prepared them for the able 
performance of the duties to which they sud- 
denly were called. Finally there are the rec- 
ords where the man chosen for the office has 
had the public experience and training neces- 
sary to permit of his rendering the people 
able service, and at the same time has cher- 
ished an honorable ambition which has inspired 
his every effort better to equip himself to 
serve. 

In the last named category is found Hon. 
John Herman Hallstrom, mayor of Rockford, 
whose ability and personal popularity are 
above question. Mayor Hallstrom was born in 
Sweden, November 18, 1888, and is a son of 
Karl and Maria (Carlson) Hallstrom, natives 
of the same country, both of whom are de- 
ceased. Karl Hallstrom, who received a com- 
mon school education, passed his entire life as 



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an agriculturist in his native land, and in his 
community had the regard and esteem of his 
fellow-citizens as a man of upright character 
and industry. He and his worthy wife, who 
also passed away in Sweden, were consistent 
members of the Lutheran Church, and the 
parents of six children, four of whom are 
living, all in Sweden except John H. 

The fifth in order of birth of his parents' 
children, John Herman Hallstrom secured his 
education in the public schools of Sweden, 
where he spent his youth in working on farms. 
Being of an ambitious nature, and seeing no 
future for himself in Sweden, at the age of 
nineteen years he left the parental roof and 
sought the broader opportunities offered by 
the United States. While he had no particular 
training at the time of his arrival, he was 
young, strong and willing, and had no trouble 
in securing employment as a building laborer. 
This brought him the opportunity to learn 
building and the brick-laying trade, and the 
latter he followed until 1920, in the meanwhile 
carefully saving his earnings. In 1917 his 
career was temporarily interrupted by the 
entrance of the United States into the fierce 
conflict raging in Europe, and, entering the 
army, he was sent to Camp Grant, Illinois, 
and subsequently to Camp MacArthur, Texas. 
He went overseas as a private and later was 
promoted corporal, and served for eighteen 
months with the Thirty-second and Forty-first 
Divisions. He finally returned to the United 
States and received his honorable discharge 
in 1919. Upon his return to Rockford he 
again took up the brick-laying trade, as a 
contractor, and in 1921 was elected mayor 
of Rockford, subsequently serving two other 
terms by reelection. He was then out of the 
office for one term, but in 1929 was again 
elected to the mayoralty, in which office he 
has done much for the benefit of Rockford 
and its people. Mayor Hallstrom has always 
maintained an independent stand in politics 
and has given every measure careful and 
thoughtful consideration as it has been placed 
before him. In 1927 he established a general 
insurance agency, and this has grown to be 
a large and important enterprise, covering 
all manner of insurance and representing some 
of the leading companies of the country. He 
is a consistent member of the Lutheran 
Church, and belongs to the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and the Sveas-Soner Society, 
the oldest singing society in the city, which 
has owned its own building since 1893. He 
belongs also to the Scandinavian Benefit Asso- 
ciation and the American Legion, and has a 
number of other connections of various kinds. 

^ In 1922 Mr. Hallstrom was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Ruth Hammarstrand, who 
was born in Sweden, and to this union there 
have been born two children: Irene, born in 
1923, and Roy, born in 1924. 



George David Lockie, M. D., was graduated 
from medical college in 1901 and has given 
the thirty best years of his life to the service 
of his profession. For twenty years he has 
been a resident of Springfield, where he is 
well known and held in high esteem among 
the representatives of medicine and surgery 
in the capital city. 

Doctor Lockie was born in Kankakee, Illi- 
nois, October 24, 1870, son of George and 
Cynthia (Bachelder) Lockie, and is of pure 
Scotch ancestry. His father was born in 
Scotland, son of Thomas Lockie, who took 
his family to Canada and in 1856 came to 
Illinois and acquired a tract of land in KanB 
kakee County. George Lockie was a boy when 
brought to Illinois, and was a farmer and 
for many years conducted a profitable business 
importing horses. He was highly educated, 
having attended McGill University of Mon- 
treal, Canada. In politics he acted as a Demo- 
crat, was a member of the Masonic Order 
and the United Presbyterian Church. He mar- 
ried, in Kankakee, Miss Cynthia Bachelder, 
who w*as born in Vermont. Her grandfather, 
Nathan Bachelder, was a native of Scotland, 
and lived to be ninety-four years of age. 

Doctor George D. Lockie was second in a 
family of five children, three of whom are 
still living. He was educated in the common 
schools of Kankakee and Will counties, 
attended the University of Kansas at Law- 
rence, graduated from the National Medical 
College of Chicago, and in 1901 took his degree 
from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, 
now the medical department of the University 
of Illinois. 

In the meantime he had made a record as 
a soldier, serving two years with the volun- 
teers during the Spanish-American war. He 
was in a camp in Florida and was in Cuba 
for some time. After graduating from med- 
ical college he practiced ten years at Pontiac, 
Illinois, and in 1911 moved to Springfield, 
where he has continued his work as a general 
practitioner. Doctor Lockie has had post- 
graduate work at the Mayo Brothers at 
Rochester, Minnesota, and at Chicago, and 
in no small degree his reputation is due to 
his unflagging devotion to his work, his great 
enthusiasm and his scholarship. He is a mem- 
ber of the Sangamon County, Illinois State 
and American Medical Associations. During 
the World war he was again accepted for 
military duty, this time as a medical officer, 
and was attached to the Walter Reed Hos- 
pital at Washington, D. C, serving with the 
rank of lieutenant. He was discharged in 
December, 1918. 

Doctor Lockie married in 1900 Olive C. 
Courson, who was born at Abington, Illinois, 
and was educated in Knox College at Gales- 
burg. She taught music for some time. Three 
children were born to their marriage. The 



ILLINOIS 



113 



oldest, Ruth Lockie, died in 1919, while in 
high school. Doctor Lockie awards the sum 
of fifty dollars each year, called the Ruth 
Lockie Memorial prize, as a memorial to this 
daughter. This prize is given to the best 
essay on history. The two living children are 
John David, who was educated in Eureka 
College, in Milliken University at Decatur and 
the University of Illinois, and resides at 
Springfield, and Clifford Theodore, who is at- 
tending school at Springfield. 

Doctor Lockie is a member of the Christian 
Church, is a Knight Templar Mason, member 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, the 
Spanish- American War Veterans, the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars, American Legion, is a mem- 
ber of the Mid-Day Luncheon Club, and a Re- 
publican in politics. He has some interesting 
hobbies, revealing his character as a scholar. 
These hobbies are collecting old books, Indian 
relics, and the study of birds and geology. 

Alexander Henry Penewitt, of Spring- 
field, has the distinction of being the oldest 
dealer in Buick automobiles in Illinois. He 
began selling Buick cars in 1908, handling 
some of the first models of that famous car, 
and he is familiar with every mechanical 
change and improvement that have represented 
the steady development of what is regarded 
as one of the most perfect automobiles, one 
of the few cars to retain name and identity 
through the revolutionary changes that have 
occurred in the past quarter of a century. 

Mr. Penewitt is a native of Ohio, born in 
Clermont County, April 9, 1864. His parents, 
Joseph and Mary (Boat) Penewitt, were born 
in Germany and came to the United States in 
1863. His father settled in Southern Ohio, 
and by great industry and thrift made him- 
self an independent farmer. He was a man of 
unusual intelligence, always interested in 
reading and study and took his religion very 
seriously, having been reared in the Lutheran 
Church and later became a Methodist. He 
was a Democrat in politics. Of the ten chil- 
dren of the parents three are living: John, a 
farmer in Mason County, Illinois; Josie, wife 
I of W. M. Frank, a farmer at Felicity, Ohio; 
and Alexander H. 

, Alexander H. Penewitt attended school in 
| Ohio and up to the age of twenty-one his 
, experience was bounded by the farm. Going 
I west, he spent three years at Hutchinson, 
; Kansas, working at the carpenter's trade, and 
I on coming to Illinois he followed his trade in 
i Mason County for five years. With an initial 
: capital of only $300 he started in the hard- 
ware business and later acquired a lumber 
| yard. 

As previously noted, Mr. Penewitt began 
selling Buick automobiles in 1908 and since 
1919 his business headquarters have been at 
Springfield, where he established the Buick 



agency and service station and handles the 
Buick line exclusively. It is one of the largest 
agencies in the state, his territory consisting 
of Sangamon, Menard, Cass, Schuyler and a 
part of Christian County. 

Mr. Penewitt married, September 4, 1895, 
Miss Minerva Towne, who was born in Mason 
County, Illinois, and attended school at Easton 
in that county. They have one son, Paul 
Slocum, who was born in 1903, was educated 
in the University of Illinois and studied law, 
but since leaving college has been associated 
with his father in the automobile business. 
Paul Slocum Penewitt married Maza Hall and 
has a son, Paul Slocum, Jr. Mrs. A. H. Pene- 
witt has a very interesting ancestry. Her 
great-grandaunt was the famous Frances Slo- 
cum who was born in the Wyoming Valley of 
Pennsylvania in 1773 and on November 2, 1778, 
was taken captive by the Indians. She had 
a distinct recollection of her capture, but she 
was treated kindly and adopted by an Indian 
family and for years led a roving life. She 
married a young chief of the Nation, going 
with him to Ohio and was so happy in her 
domestic relations that she dreaded being dis- 
covered. After the death of her first hus- 
band she married one of the Miami tribe. It 
was in 1837 that surviving members of her 
family learned that she was living near Lo- 
gansport, Indiana, and had no difficulty in 
establishing her identity. At that time she 
had children and grandchildren around her. 
She was known as a queen of the Miamis, and 
when that tribe was removed from Indiana 
John Quincy Adams made an eloquent plea in 
Congress so that she and her Indian relatives 
were exempted and she was granted by Con- 
gress a tract of land ten miles square. 

Mr. Penewitt and family are members of 
the Methodist Church. He is a Knight Tem- 
plar Mason and Shriner, a member of the 
Sangamo Club, the Country Club, the Kiwanis 
Club. A Democrat in politics, he served as 
county supervisor while living in Mason 
County. His hobby is hunting. He is a 
member of the Central Illinois Hunting Club, 
which was organized twenty-two years ago 
and has a splendid game preserve on the 
Illinois River. 

Albert William Hillier has been a busi- 
ness man of Springfield for a quarter of a 
century. He is the founder of the Hillier 
Storage Company, which during that time has 
steadily grown and prospered and now pre- 
sents the facilities of one of the most complete 
storage and transfer organizations in the State 
of Illinois. 

Mr. Hillier was born on a farm in Macoupin 
County, Illinois, September 18, 1873. His par- 
ents, Edwin and Matilda (James) Hillier, 
were natives of England, coming to Illinois 
when young people and were married in this 
state. His father was noted for his thorough- 



114 



ILLINOIS 



ness and industry, and for many years was 
one of the leading farmers, stock raisers and 
traders in Macoupin County. He was a Demo- 
crat in politics, a member of the Masonic 
fraternity and he and his wife were 
Methodists. 

Mr. Hillier attended school in Macoupin 
County and later the Springfield Business Col- 
lege, and also took correspondence courses. 
After his father's death he worked out for 
his board while attending country schools. For 
a time he was messenger boy in a jewelry 
store in St. Louis, and had several other em- 
ployments that gave him opportunity to learn 
something of several lines of business. For 
two years he conducted a storage and transfer 
business. He was bookkeeper for the LaFayette 
Smith Grocery Company. 

In 1927 the Hillier Storage Company opened 
its new home and storage plant at 413-419 
North Fourth Street, and at that time one of 
the newspapers gave an interesting historical 
account of the growth of the business. It was 
on April 1, 1906, that A. W. Hillier pur- 
chased from W. A. Pavey the business of the 
Springfield Storage & Transfer Company, at 
1000 East Monroe Street. The plant consisted 
of a building three stories and basement, 
40x100 feet, with 15,000 square feet of floor 
space, used for the storage of household goods 
and merchandise. Soon afterwards a moving 
outfit was installed, consisting of a blind horse 
and an old stake wagon. After a few months 
the rail and panel type of wagon was added 
and later a covered van. Due to the rapiol 
growth of the business Mr. Hillier was joined 
by his brother, R. J. Hillier, who became a 
partner October 1, 1909. They owned the 
business jointly until April 1, 1926, when a 
quarter interest was purchased by Russell E. 
Hillier, a son of R. J. Hillier, and these three 
men are the proprietors today. The facilities 
for moving and transfer have been added to 
from time to time. About 1916 they intro- 
duced a large horse-drawn van. In 1925 they 
bought their first motor van, and at the pres- 
ent time they operated several motor vans of 
the most modern type and size. 

Mr. A. W. Hillier in 1909 acquired a fire- 
proof building at 417-419 North Fourth Street, 
covering half the ground occupied by the pres- 
ent storage plant. In 1911 his brother, R. J. 
Hillier, bought a half interest in the real 
estate. In 1912 an addition was made to the 
main building and in 1914 another increase 
was made. In 1922 the company bought what 
was known as the Anheuser-Busch Company 
property, including a warehouse, which was 
remodeled into a fire proof building. Another 
unit was added to this warehouse in 1924 
and in 1927 they put up the complete new 
plant at a cost of $70,000, five stories in 
height, with basement, a reinforced concrete 
structure, rated as absolutely fire proof and 



giving the company a total of 55,000 square 
feet of floor space. 

This business was first known as the Spring- 
field Storage & Transfer Company, later as 
the Hillier Fire Proof Storage & Transfer 
Company and for a number of years as the 
Hillier Storage Company. As the result of 
the rapid building of hard surface roads this 
company, like other large organizations of 
its kind, has greatly extended its service be- 
yond the limits of the city, and transports 
by motor truck merchandise and household 
goods, frequently to points hundreds of miles 
distant from Springfield. 

Mr. A. W. Hillier married, December 10, 
1902, Miss Sophie Barnett, who was born at 
Springfield, daughter of Thomas and Sarah 
Barnett. Her parents were born in England 
and her father was in the stone business and 
did work on the State House at Springfield 
and also at the Reservoir Park. Mr. and Mrs. 
Hillier have two daughters, Helen Barnett, 
who married Charles Terry Lindner, of 
Springfield, and Elizabeth, now a student in 
Stephens College at Columbia, Missouri. The 
family are members of the First Christian 
Church and Mr. Hillier takes a prominent part 
in church activities, being chairman of the 
board of elders and a trustee. He is a York 
and Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner, and a 
past master of St. Paul's Lodge No. 500, 
A. F. and A. M. He is a member of the 
Optimist Club, is on the board of the Spring- 
field Y. M. C. A., a member of the Automobile 
Club and a past president of the Springfield 
Chamber of Commerce. Civic work is his 
hobby. 

David Lyman Phillips. Since the death 
of his brother, John L. Phillips, former mayor 
of Springfield, has carried on the business 
of the Phillips Printing Company, one of 
the oldest and largest establishments under 
one name in Central Illinois. It is a business 
that was founded by the Phillips Brothers 
nearly half a century ago. 

David L. Phillips was born at Mattoon, 
Illinois, September 3, 1862, son of William 
and Margaret (Pulliam) Phillips. His father 
was a native of Kentucky and came to Illinois 
when a young man, becoming a carpenter and 
contractor. William Phillips after attending 
the funeral of Abraham Lincoln at Springfield 
in 1865 decided to move to the capital city. 
David L. Phillips was at that time only three 
years old, while his brother John was about 
fourteen. The two boys grew up in Spring- 
field, having only the opportunities of the 
local schools. John L. Phillips had his first 
contact with printing in the office of the Illinois 
State Journal. 

It was in 1882 that the Phillips Brothers 
formed their partnership, starting with a small 
shop, with limited equipment and few 













Q*(fci*%4*s--ffOi^r-oJr^ , 



ILLINOIS 



115 



employees. The business has been in existence 
now for nearly half a century, and today 
the plant occupies a large building, 40 x 160 
feet, at the corner of Ninth and Adams streets 
and is capable of handling any of the largest 
and most technical commercial and general 
printing jobs. The late John L. Phillips was 
mayor of Springfield from 1901 to 1903. 

David L. Phillips married, November 11, 
1887, Miss Ida Hatry, who was born at Spring- 
field, daughter of Charles and Margaret Hatry. 
Her father was born in Germany, and came 
at an early day to Springfield and for many 
vears was an engineer and conductor with 
the Wabash Railway. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips 
nave three children: Lillian, wife of Carlyle 
Machay, a resident of Hinsdale, Illinois, and 
was general manager of the Rome Company, 
manufacturing the de luxe springs; Grace is 
the wife of Dr. G. Carruthers, a Springfield 
dentist; and Lyman E. is associated with his 
father in the printing business. The mother 
of these children passed away in March, 1929. 
She was active in the Methodist Episcopal 
jChurch and in several woman's organizations. 

Mr. Phillips has filled all the chairs in his 
Masonic Lodge and is a member of the York 
and Scottish Rite bodies and the Shrine, also 
Ibelongs to the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows and Knights of Pythias, the Country 
Club and is a Republican in politics. 

Martin J. Baum by his enterprise and con- 
structive ability contributed to the prestige 
ilong enjoyed by that family name in the City 
pf Springfield, where he spent practically all 
his active life. 

! Mr. Baum was born in New York City, in 
11857, and died in 1917. His father, Joseph 
Baum, was a pioneer of Springfield and in 
1865 established the M. J. Baum Monument 
& Stone Works. He carried it on alone for 
;wenty years and in 1885 Martin J. Baum 
joined him as a partner and in 1895 acquired 
fhe entire business, operating it until his 
death. This is a business which has been 
m the hands of three generations of the Baum 
family and the present manager is Elmer 
}Baum, a son of the late Martin J. Baum. 
JMartin J. Baum married in 1892 Nettie Ram- 
jstetter, daughter of Henry and Catherine 
(Mischler) Ramstetter. Henry Ramstetter was 
born in Bavaria and his wife in Hesse-Darm- 
ptadt, Germany. She was only a year old 
When she came to Illinois in 1830. The Misch- 
vers were a pioneer family of Springfield and 
Latherme Mischler as a girl saw a great deal 
pf Abraham Lincoln during the early years 
i; )f his struggling law practice in Springfield. 
Henry Ramstetter came to Illinois when nine- 
teen years of age. His father had owned a 
pill m Germany. The son entered the hotel 
'pusiness in Springfield, conducting the Bril- 

■ ?^.A ouse for years and he built th e hotel 
it fifth and Jefferson which is still standing 



as a landmark in that section of the city. He 
came to America with a liberal education. 

Mr. and Mrs. Martin J. Baum had a family 
of six children, five of whom are living : Alice 
B., wife of J. Clarence Lukeman, a clothing 
merchant of Jacksonville, Illinois; Elmer H., 
who carries on the stone . business, married 
Elizabeth McGough; Beatrice B. is the wife 
of C. A. Fisher Keller, one of the owners 
of the B. & F. Toggery of Springfield; Miss 
Dorothy F. is at home; and Catherine is the 
wife of Bert S. Taylor, of Akron, Ohio, con- 
nected with the Goodrich Tire Company. 

Mrs. Baum, who resides at 708 South Fifth 
Street in Springfield, is a communicant of 
the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. 
Mr. Baum was a member of the Knights of 
Columbus and a Democrat in politics. He was 
a successful business man and always alive 
to the civic interests of his community. As 
a recreation he delighted in everything 
mechanical, and had the distinction of owning 
one of the first automobiles seen in Springfield. 

Thomas Arthur Johnson, M.D. A leading 
medical and surgical practitioner of Rockford, 
Dr. Thomas Arthur Johnson has been engaged 
in the practice of his calling here since 1917. 
Not only as an individual physician and sur- 
geon has he been prominent, but has also won 
distinction as chief surgeon of the Swedish- 
American Hospital of Rockford and as the 
head of a clinic with three assistants and 
two nurses. 

Doctor Johnson was born at Malta, DeKalb 
County, Illinois, November 7, 1885, and is 
a son of Andrew J. and Matilda (Peterson) 
Johnson. His parents, natives of Sweden, 
came to this country with their respective 
parents, Mr. Johnson being eleven years of 
age when the family took up their residence 
in DeKalb County. He received a country 
school education and as a young man adopted 
farming for his vocation, following this 
throughout his life, and at his death, in 1922, 
at the age of seventy-nine years, was one of 
the substantial men of his community and 
one who was held in high respect and esteem. 
Mr. Johnson was a lifelong temperance man. 
Although normally a Republican, as an 
admirer of William Jennings Bryan he voted 
consistently for the Nebraskan. He and Mrs. 
Johnson, who died in 1913, were consistent 
members of the Lutheran Church. Of their 
six children five are living, Thomas Arthur 
being the second in order of birth. 

Thomas Arthur Johnson attended the gram- 
mar and high schools of Malta and DeKalb, 
following which he entered the University 
of Chicago, from which he received the degree 
of Bachelor of Science, and while attending 
that institution became a member of the Phi 
Beta Kappa honorary scholastic fraternity. 
In 1911 he graduated as second high man of 
his class from Rush Medical College, Chicago, 



116 



ILLINOIS 






receiving the degree of Doctor of Medicine, 
and was a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha 
honorary medical fraternity and the Phi Beta 
Pi social medical fraternity. From 1911 until 
1913 he served as an interne in the Cook 
County Hospital, following which he com- 
menced practice at DeKalb, and during his 
four and one-half years there served as city 
bacteriologist and as a member of the board 
of health. He was likewise assistant in bac- 
teriology for one term at the University of 
Chicago, and while a resident at Cook County 
Hospital lectured on anatomy, physiology, bac- 
teriology and chemistry in the Illinois Train- 
ing School for Nurses. Doctor Johnson com- 
menced practice at Rockford in 1917 and has 
since been engaged in general practice, 
although he devotes the major portion of 
his time to surgery and also does consultation 
work in his clinic in the Swedish-American 
Bank Building, where he employs three assist- 
ants and two nurses. He is also chief surgeon 
of the Swedish-American Hospital. In 1916 
Doctor Johnson received Certificate No. 2, 
among the first five physicians who took the 
first examination of the National Board, whose 
certificates are recognized by forty states with- 
out further examination, and also in Scotland, 
England and Canada. Doctor Johnson is a 
member of the Winnebago County Medical 
Society, the Illinois State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association and a fellow 
of the American College of Surgeons, and 
generally attends the annual conventions of 
all of these bodies. He has been an extensive 
traveler, having been through Sweden, Eng- 
land, Germany, Italy, France and Belgium 
as a visitor of the hospitals of the leading 
cities of those countries, and also attended 
the International Post-Graduate Assembly at 
London in 1925. While fishing is his principal 
hobby, Doctor Johnson has won some distinc- 
tion as a hunter of big game, having bagged 
a bear and a deer while on a hunting trip 
in Canada in 1928. He is a member of the 
governing committee of the Gorgas Memorial 
Institute of Tropical and Preventive Medicine 
and writes for this institution, being also a 
contributor to various medical journals on 
scientific subjects. He is a member of the 
Medical Editors and Authors Association, the 
Harlem Hill Golf Club and the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, is a Republican 
in politics, and belongs to the Lutheran 
Church. His biography is included in the 
National Cyclopaedia of American Biography. 
In 1922 Doctor Johnson was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Myrtle Elizabeth Swanson, 
who was born at DeKalb, Illinois, and educated 
in DeKalb High School, the Illinois State 
Teachers College at DeKalb and Northwestern 
University, from which latter institution she 
was graduated with the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in 1920. Prior to her marriage 
she taught in the public schools of Rockford. 



Doctor and Mrs. Johnson are the parents of 
two children: Thomas Arthur, Jr., born in 
1926; and Jerome Linne, born in 1929. Mrs. 
Johnson is active in club circles and in the 
work of Emanuel Lutheran Church. 

Edward Everett Staley is president of the 
Baker Manufacturing Company, one of the 
largest industries of its kind in Illinois. In 
fact it is an Illinois corporation with a national 
and international market for its output of 
road making machinery and snow plows. 
Machinery made in this plant is sold to such 
distant countries as Greece, Turkey, England, 
and large shipments go to South America 
and even to Honolulu. 

Edward E. Staley is a self-made man in] 
every sense of the word. When he started 
earning his own living as a boy in Springfield 
he had the clothes he wore but no money 
and no promising outlook in life save through 
his own ambition and energy. 

He was born at Springfield, December 4, 
1871, son of David H. and Sarah C. (Curley) 
Staley. His parents were born in Maryland. 
His father was a carpenter and died at an 
early age. Edward E. Staley was a small 
child when his mother died, and he lived 
for several years with an uncle on a farm 
at Chatham, a few miles south of Springfield. 
His education was limited to the common 
schools. At the age of thirteen he returned 
to Springfield, became a bundle wrapper in 
a shoe store, subsequently improved his edu- 
cational equipment by taking a course in the 
Springfield Business College, and he continued 
with the retail shoe business of Miller & Staley 
for twenty years. 

In 1917 Mr. Staley became secretary of 
the Baker Manufacturing Company and two 
years later its president. The first order 
for war equipment taken by the Baker Manu- 
facturing Company, and Mr. Staley took it, 
was signed by U. S. Grant, a grandson of 
General Grant. This order was to the amount 
of $290,000. The corporation is incorporated 
for $300,000 capital, and during 1929 they 
manufactured $1,500,000 worth of snow plows 
and other machinery. Mr. Staley is the major- 
ity stockholder. 

He is a member of the Sangamo Club and 
Illini Country Club of Springfield and the 
Central Baptist Church. He married, June 
20, 1898, Miss Elsie Converse. They have 
two children, William Converse and Niana, 
the latter at home. The daughter is a graduate 
of the Briar Cliff Manor School. 

The son, William Converse Staley, was bom 
at Springfield, December 28, 1899, was edu- 
cated in the Springfield High School, in Milli- 
ken University at Decatur, and was on his 
way to the training camp when the armistice 
was signed. He entered his father's business 
as an employee in the blacksmith shop anc 
worked in different departments of the busi- 



I 



ILLINOIS 



117 



ness, being now vice president and purchasing 
agent of the company. He married Jennie 
Barnes and they have two children, Elsie Jane, 
born in 1922, and William C, Jr., born in 
1923. 

Frederick Putnam Cowdin, physician and 
surgeon at Springfield, has been a member 
of the medical fraternity in that city for the 
past twenty years. Doctor Cowdin is a very 
successful physician, and his career is a 
tribute to the record of one of the very old 
and influential families of Southern Illinois. 

He was born on a farm in Morgan County, 
Illinois, in 1884. The Cowdin family is of 
Scotch origin. In 1721 Thomas Cowdin was 
born in Ireland and about 1750 came to 
America 'and was one of the first settlers at 
Fitchburg, Massachusetts. He conducted a 
tavern there, known as the Tavern of Thomas 
Cowdin, Esq. The family was represented in 
the Revolutionary war. Capt. Daniel Cowdin 
was lost at sea during the war. One of his 
sisters married Gen. Israel Putnam, that 
rugged military hero of New England. Doctor 
Cowdin's grandfather, Putnam Cowdin, was 
born at Fitchburg, Massachusetts, in 1812, 
and came to Illinois in 1837, settling in Mor- 
gan County, where he bought 300 or 400 acres 
of land in what was known as Joy Prairie or 
Yankee Prairie. He developed a fine farm 
and lived there the rest of his life. He 
passed away in 1872. Charles H. Cowdin, 
father of Doctor Cowdin, was born on the old 
ifarm in Cowdin County and during his active 
[life was well known for his success in the 
| live stock business. He was a member of the 
Congregational Church. He married Minnie 
Porawski, who was born in Saxony, Germany, 
daughter of John Porawski, who was a Pole 
as a youth and served in the Polish army. 
Doctor Cowdin is one of three children. His 
'sister Cora died in 1902, at the age of twenty- 
one. His other sister, Mabel, is the wife of 
Dr. H. P. Macnamara. 

Doctor Cowdin attended country schools in 
Morgan County, high school and Illinois Col- 
lege at Jacksonville, graduating from the oldest 
icollege in Illinois in 1905. For a year he was 
a teacher, being principal of the high school 
at Waverly. In 1910 he took his degree in 
medicine at Washington University, St. Louis, 
and was an interne in the City Hospital of 
St. Louis until 1911, when he located ait 
Springfield. He has been engaged in general 
practice, with considerable surgery, and is 
especially well known in his profession as 
a skilled obstetrician. 

Doctor Cowdin married in 1912 Margaret 
Barlow, who was born at St. Louis and was 
educated in the schools of that city. Her 
father, Stephen Douglas Barlow, was a son 
lof Stephen D. Barlow, Sr., who was the first 
president of the Iron Mountain Railway Com- 
pany. In 1930 Mrs. Cowdin was invited to 



act as a hostess for that railway company 
and had a very enjoyable trip to New Orleans 
and other parts of the South. Mrs. Cowdin 
has been president of the Springfield Woman's 
Club and is now executive secretary of the 
Springfield Art Association. She is a member 
of a very prominent family of Illinois. A 
farm implement widely used many years ago, 
the invention of one of the family, was known 
as the Barlow corn planter. Doctor and Mrs. 
Cowdin has a daughter, Lucy Frances, who 
was born March 9, 1918. The family are 
members of the First Congregational Church. 
Doctor Cowdin is a Scottish Rite Mason and 
Shriner, a member of the Sangamo Club, the 
Illini Country Club and golf is his favorite 
diversion. He is a Republican in politics and 
Mrs. Cowdin has been one of the prominent 
woman workers in the party and toured the 
entire state in behalf of Governor Emmerson 
during his campaign for governor in 1928. 
Doctor Cowdin is a member of the Sangamon 
County, Illinois State and American Medical 
Associations. He has worked hard, has al- 
ways been a student, and has accepted many 
opportunities to attend clinics over the country 
and has taken special post-graduate work in 
Washington University at St. Louis. 

Henry Clark Riddle. An agriculturist by 
vocation and a member of a family long iden- 
tified with Sangamon County agricultural 
operations, Henry Clark Riddle is also known 
as a citizen who has filled a number of public 
offices with credit and capability, being at 
present deputy county treasurer. His career 
has been an active and useful one, and at all 
times he has so comported himself as to win 
and hold the confidence and esteem of his 
fellow citizens. 

Mr. Riddle was born on the old Riddle farm 
in Clear Lake Township, Sangamon County, 
and is a son of Russell O. and Sabra (Con- 
stant) Riddle. His paternal great-grandfather 
was David Riddle, a native of Virginia, who 
first moved from that state to Ohio and then 
came with his family to Sangamon County, 
where he spent the remainder of his life in 
the development of a farm. Abner Riddle was 
born in 1814, in Virginia, and accompanied 
his parents to near Urbana, Ohio, and subse- 
quently to Sangamon County, Illinois. He at- 
tended the country schools of his day, became 
a farmer, and later was one of the first to 
start stock raising in the county. Mr. Riddle 
took his family to Kansas, where his wife, 
Mary Clark, died, following which he returned 
to Illinois and passed the last part of his life 
in retirement at Mechanicsburg, where his 
death occurred in 1905. During his day he 
was a prominent citizen of his community and 
numbered among his friends Abraham Lin- 
coln and other distinguished men. 

Russell O. Riddle was born on his father's 
farm in Sangamon County, November 17, 1848, 



118 



ILLINOIS 



and was educated in the common schools, work- 
ing on the farm during his entire school pe- 
riod. In 1867 he accompanied the family in 
a covered wagon to Kansas, where he spent 
four years, but returned to Sangamon County 
and took up farming and stock raising, in 
which he continued to be engaged with suc- 
cess during the remainder of his life. In Feb- 
ruary, 1872, he married Sabra Constant, and 
they became the parents of three children: 
Mary, the wife of Clay Hussey, who has two 
children, Stewart and Mary; Luella, the wife 
of Charles P. Hoke, who has two children, 
Evelyn and Russell; and Henry Clark, of this 
review. 

Henry Clark Riddle attended country school 
during the winter months and worked on the 
farm during the rest of the year, and for one 
year after completing his education taught the 
Bissell School in Clear Lake Township. He 
then returned to farming, to which he devoted 
himself for about ten years, and is still the 
owner of a productive and well-cultivated 
farm in Williams Township, to which he gives 
the greater part of his attention. This prop- 
erty is improved with commodious buildings 
and modern machinery and appliances, and Mr. 
Riddle is accounted one of the progressive 
agriculturists of the county. He has always 
taken an active interest in public affairs, and 
in 1926 was appointed deputy county clerk, 
under Oscar A. Becker, a position which he 
retained until December 1, 1930, when he was 
appointed to the office of deputy county treas- 
urer, which necessitates his residence at 
Springfield. Mr. Riddle has also served capa- 
bly as school director and commissioner of 
highways in Williams Township, and was su- 
pervisor for eight years. He belongs to River- 
ton Lodge No. 786, A. F. and A. M. 

Mr. Riddle married Lela Bell, a daughter 
of Frank and Rachael (Greer) Bell, and to 
this union there has been born one daughter, 
Lucile Frances, a graduate of the grade and 
high schools, and of the Illinois College at 
Urbana, and is now connected with the Frank- 
lin Life Insurance Company of Springfield. 

Charles Elton Kalb, a former president 
of the Illinois Osteopathic Association, has 
practiced his profession in the City of Spring- 
field for the past eighteen years. 

He is a native of Sangamon County, born 
at Round Prairie in Rochester Township, May 
25, 1884. In the paternal line he is of Ger- 
man ancestry, and his forefathers were of 
the same family as the famous German engi- 
neer, Baron De Kalb, who rendered such ma- 
terial aid to the colonies in their struggle 
for independence, and whose name has been 
honored in scores of towns, counties and other 
localities in American geography. Doctor 
Kalb's grandparents were Andrew and Anne 
Kalb, the former's father being a native of 
Germany and the latter of Loudoun County, 



Virginia. Andrew Kalb was born January 12, 
1812. The father of Doctor Kalb was George 
Emory Kalb, who was born in Loudoun 
County, Virginia, June 22, 1840, came to 
Illinois in the spring of 1851 and spent his 
active life as a farmer in Sangamon County. 
He and all his family were devout Methodists 
and he served as a trustee of his home church. 
George Emory Kalb passed away December 
6, 1920. He had come to Illinois in 1851, as 
above stated, and he married at Clinton in this 
state, February 22, 1881, Elizabeth Ann Tay- 
lor. She was born in Sangamon County, Au- 
gust 27, 1851, daughter of Phillip Whitehead 
and Anna (Connelly) Taylor. Phillip Taylor 
was born at Louisville, Kentucky, March 16, 
1826, and his wife at Georgetown, Maryland, 
March 21, 1835. Doctor Kalb was the second 
oldest of four children. His sister Nellie died 
July 11, 1917. Georgiana is the wife of Leon- 
ard J. Howard, in the gasoline and oil business 
at Springfield. The other son, Emory Taylor 
Kalb, is auditor for the Farm Bureau & Pro- 
ducers Dairy at Springfield. 

Doctor Kalb was reared on a farm, had the 
advantages of country schools and when 
eighteen years of age was granted a teacher's 
certificate. He never used that authority to 
teach. During 1902-03 he was a student in 
the Springfield Business College. For two 
years he was employed by George W. Hartnett 
in the wall paper and paint business. In Sep- 
tember, 1905, he entered Northwestern Uni- 
versity Academy at Evanston, graduating in 
1909, then spent a year in Northwestern Uni- 
versity, a member of the Scribbler Fraternity, 
and in 1911 entered the American School of 
Osteopathy at Kirksville, Missouri. This great 
school is now the Kirksville College of Oste- 
opathy and Surgery. He was graduated with 
the degree Doctor of Osteopathy in June, 1914. 
Doctor Kalb had to pay his way through 
school and college and has had a wide diversity 
of training and experience. He worked on a 
farm as a boy, and was a farmer on his own 
account for three years. After graduating at 
Kirksville he came to Springfield, and his prac- 
tical skill and his fine attitude towards his 
work have brought him a constantly enlarging 
sphere of service. In addition to having servec 
as president of the Illinois Osteopathic Asso- 
ciation he was honored with the same office » 
the Springfield Osteopathic Association and is 
a member of the American Osteopathic Asso 
ciation. He is a member also of the Atlas 
Club, the national osteopathic fraternity , # v. 
a Mason, member of the Springfield Optimists 
Club and Chamber of Commerce. 

Doctor Kalb is one of the leading member: 
of the First Methodist Episcopal Church a 
Springfield, is one of the church trustees, '< 
teacher in Sunday School and formerly super 
intendent of the Sunday School. His hobb: 
since early youth has been religious work 
He had to make a serious choice for himsel 






ILLINOIS 



119 



between becoming a Methodist minister or a 
physician, finally deciding that he would pre- 
pare himself to treat the body as well as the 
soul. By inhertitance he is a Republican in 
politics, though he cast his first vote for the 
Prohibition party, largely as a matter of ex- 
pressing his personal sentiment without hope 
of success. His recreation is automobile 
touring. 

Doctor Kalb married at St. Louis, Missouri, 
June 7, 1916, Miss Lulu Elizabeth Trower, of 
Lincoln County, Missouri, daughter of Henry 
A. and Margaret Elizabeth (Downing) 
Trower. Her mother was a descendant of the 
famous English family for whom the great 
financial thoroughfare in London, Downing 
Street, was named. Doctor and Mrs. Kalb 
have two children: Pauline Elizabeth, born 
March 16, 1917; and Evelyn Arlowynne, born 
September 9, 1919. Both daughters are at- 
tending school at Springfield. 

Arthur Edward Walters, physician and 
surgeon, has been a leading representative of 
his profession at Springfield for the past quar- 
ter of a century. He is best known for his 
attainments as a specialist in eye, ear, nose 
and throat. His offices are in the Prince 
Sanitarium. 

Doctor Walters was born in Sangamon 
County, Illinois, April 15, 1882, son of Wil- 
liam and Sarah (Green) Walters, his father 
a native of Kentucky and his mother of Ohio. 
William Walters went out to California in 
1849, had some success in the gold fields, and 
with what he made there he purchased a 
half section of land in Sangamon County, 
developing a farm which he occupied and 
worked the rest of his life. He died in 1896 
and nis wife in 1923. Of their nine children 
5even are living, Doctor Walters being the 
Toungest. Both parents were Methodists and 
;he father was a Democrat. 

Doctor Walters was reared on a farm, and 
after the advantages of the country schools 
ie attended Valparaiso University in Indiana 
md was graduated in medicine from St. Louis 
University in 1905. For several years he en- 
gaged in general practice, and as a specialist 
ias the value of a thorough experience in 
:ne general routine of a physician and sur- 
geon. Doctor Walters took work at the New 
York Polyclinic in eye, ear, nose and throat 
and for twenty years has been a recognized 
specialist. He has attended clinics every year 
and has kept in touch with the leaders in his 
3 J a ^h of the profession. He is a member 
)i the Sangamon County, Illinois State and 
American Medical Associations. He is chief 
oculist for the C. & I. M. Railway and on the 
>taff of the Illinois Terminal Railroad. 

Doctor Walters married, December 20, 1905, 
Miss Blanche Stockdale. She was graduated 
^om the Illinois Woman's College at Jackson- 
ville in 1905, is a talented musician and taught 



music for several years. They are members 
ot the Westminster Presbyterian Church 
Doctor Walters is a York Rite Mason and 
bnrmer, member of the Knights of Pythias 
Loyal Order of Moose, B. P. O. Elks. He was 
a Democrat in politics until 1928, when he 
supported Mr. Hoover. For two years he was 
president of the Springfield Park Board. He 
is a member of the Sangamo Club, the Coun- 
try Club, Kiwanis Club. His hobby is big 
game hunting and he has killed several moose 
in Canada. 

m George William Peers, mortician, has been 
in business at Mattoon for the past twenty 
years. Thousands of families have had occa- 
sion to appreciate the splendid service rendered 
by the Peers organization. 

Mr. Peers was born at Baraboo, Wisconsin, 
November 20 1879 son of Reuben H. and 
Ada M. (Wilcox) Peers. His grandfather 
Peers was a native of England, coming to the 
united btates when a young man. His ma- 
ternal grandfather, George Wilcox, was a na- 
tive of New York State and went to Wis- 
consin at an early day. Reuben H. Peers was 
born m Walworth County, Wisconsin, spent 
many years of his life there as a farmer, then 
came south and was on a farm at McMinn- 
V i ^V Tennessee, for seven years. On locating 
at Mattoon he engaged in the livery stable 
business. He died May 10, 1924. His wife 
was born in New York State and died Novem- 
ber 1, 1923. 

George W. Peers was a Wisconsin farm 
youth was educated in the high school at 
Baraboo and attended the University of Wis- 
consin. For a number of years he was asso- 
ciated with his father in farming both in 
Wisconsin and in Tennessee. They were to- 
fSi oL m ^ he livery bu siness at Mattoon. In 
1912 Mr. Peers sold his interest in that estab- 
lishment, and on September 1 of that year 
opened a new undertaking business, which he 
has continued under the title of George W 
Peers, mortician. He is a graduate of the 
Barnes Embalming College. Mr. Peers has 
from year to year perfected his service and 
has maintained it at a point of perfection in 
every detail. Motorized equipment is the rule 
including hearses, ambulances, funeral cars' 
Mr. Peers is a man of splendid physique, 
pleasing address, and has the finest qualifica- 
tions for a man in his profession. His as- 
sistant and associate through all the years he 
has been in business has been Mrs. Peers who 
is a graduate of the Worsham School of Em- 
balming, and her culture and business ability 
have been an important factor in the success 
ol the establishment. 

Mr. Peers is a member of the Illinois and 
National Funeral Directors Associations He 
is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason 
and Shrmer, Knight Templar, is a past chan- 
cellor commander of the Knights of Pythias 



120 



ILLINOIS 



a past exalted ruler of the B. P. 0. Elks, mem- 
ber of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
the Eastern Star, White Shrine, is a past 
dictator of the Loyal Order of Moose, mem- 
ber of the Modern Woodmen of America, the 
Chamber of Commerce and Country Club. He 
and Mrs. Peers are active in the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican. 

On July 17, 1912, he married Miss Leora 
Adrian, of Mattoon. They were married at 
Baraboo, Wisconsin. Her parents are Mel- 
ville M. and Mary (Hughart) Adrian. She 
is a niece of Mayor Hughart of Mattoon. She 
attended school at Mattoon. Mrs. Peers is 
a member of the Eastern Star and the White 
Shrine of Jerusalem, the Business Woman's 
Club, the Auxiliary of the American Legion, 
Pythian Sisters, Royal Neighbors, Rebekahs, 
Pocahontas and the Woman's Relief Corps. 

Joseph Bartlett Perkins, a Springfield 
business man, a specialist in real estate, is a 
member of an Illinois family that has been 
in this state for over a century. Mr. Perkins 
during his younger years studied law and was 
admitted to the bar, but has used his knowledge 
of the subject chiefly in his own business. 

He was born on a farm in Sangamon County, 
August 20, 1867. His grandfather, Edward 
Perkins, was born March 15, 1791, in Wilkes 
County, North Carolina, and married in 1812 
Miss Anna Pierce. In 1820 he came to Illi- 
nois and was a pioneer farm maker in San- 
gamon County. He and his wife had a family 
of eleven children. Their son Joseph B. Per- 
kins was born in Sangamon County, May 15, 
1824. The first important experience in his 
early life came when he enlisted in Company 
A of the Fourth Illinois Infantry for service 
in the Mexican war. After his return he en- 
gaged in farming, later was elected sheriff 
of Sangamon County and for a number of 
years operated a livery stable and was in the 
real estate business during the latter part of 
his life. He died July 5, 1896. He was at 
one time president of the Sangamon County 
Agricultural Society. He was always a 
staunch Democrat in politics, and he and his 
wife were devout Presbyterians. Joseph B. 
Perkins married Ann Mary Price, who was 
born near Lexington, Kentucky, and she died 
May 5, 1931. Her father, Rev. Jacob F. 
Price, was a pioneer Presbyterian minister, 
widely known for his efforts in building up 
churches in Kentucky. He was born in Clark 
County, Kentucky, January 17, 1805, and died 
at Brownstown, Pennsylvania, while on his 
way home from a Presbyterian convention. 
Rev. Jacob F. Price married Marie Reed Miles. 
Joseph B. Perkins and wife had a family of 
four children, and the three now living are 
Joseph B., Jr., Robert L. and Reed M. 

Mr. Joseph B. Perkins while a boy on the 
farm attended country schools and later grad- 



uated from the Springfield High School. Fo» 
a time he was assistant librarian in the Su- 
preme Court Library and for two years was 
an employee of the Ridgeley National Bank. 
In the meantime he studied law, and after 
being admitted to the bar practiced for about 
three years. He has found a number of in- 
teresting and useful activities. For a time 
he was with the Young Men's Christian Asso- 
ciation in Springfield and for eighteen months 
was assistant reporter of the Appellate Court J 
For twelve years he had charge of the Ode 
Fellows Building. As a real estate dealer hd 
makes a specialty of coal mining property, ano! 
has handled an important volume of transac 
tions throughout the Springfield mining dis^ 
trict. His brother has been a partner witlj 
him since 1919. 

Mr. Perkins is unmarried. He is a membe: 
of the First Presbyterian Church, is a Scottisl 
Rite Mason, member of the Independent Orde: 
of Odd Fellows and a Democrat in politics. 

Jesse Wilbern Dugger, Doctor of Chiro 
practic, is a resident of Springfield, is a man 
of very high standing in his profession, has an 
extensive practice and has also given a grea 
deal of time to organization work amon; 
chiropractors in establishing the standards o 
his professional group. He was the first chirc 
praetor appointed a member of the Illinoi 
State Examining Committee. 

Doctor Dugger was born in Greene Countj 
Illinois, August 16, 1874, son of Elvis ann| 
Sarah (Jackson) Dugger. His grandparent 
were Simeon and Dillie (Pritchett) Duggei 
the former a native of Virginia and the latte 
of County Cork, Ireland. They settled i 
Illinois in 1850. Elvis Dugger was born s 
Jackson, Tennessee, March 12, 1848, and wa 
about two years old when the family settle- 
in Illinois. The Civil war broke out whei 
he was thirteen and he had the opportunity I 
getting into the army, joining the forces und^ 
General Sherman at Chattanooga, and server 
until the end of the war. After the war I 
followed farming. He was a Democrat II 
politics and a member of the Methodiij 
Church. Elvis Dugger died in 1917. His wii 
was born in Macoupin County, Illinois, Se]{ 
tember 6, 1858, and died in 1920. 

Jesse W. Dugger was educated in counti! 
schools and graduated in 1893 from the Virde 
High School in Macoupin County. For tw 
years he took the liberal arts course in norniij 
school at Bushnell. 

Doctor Dugger had an interesting and even 
ful experience under the Arctic Circle, goirj 
to the Yukon territory as a prospector in tl : 
spring of 1897, when the first rush to tl; 
gold district began. He remained in the 9 
North for six years and in 1903 located 
Western Canada, where he bought four set 
tions of land, comprising 2,560 acres, and wei 
into wheat ranching on an extensive scale. J 



ILLINOIS 



121 



the midst of a busy career he was crippled 
by an accident, and for a time faced the pros- 
pect of being a helpless invalid for life. He 
was paralyzed from the waist down. Perma- 
nent relief came through the medium of chiro- 
practic and because of the wonderful success 
attending his own case he decided to take 
up the profession and make its services avail- 
able to others. 

In 1912 he entered the Palmer School of 
Chiropractic at Davenport, was graduated in 
1915 and in the same year located at Spring- 
field, where he has had a busy practice for 
fifteen years. In 1926 Doctor Dugger or- 
ganized the Chiropractors Society of Illinois 
and has served four consecutive terms as presi- 
dent. Governor Small in 1923 appointed him 
the first chiropractor on the Illinois State Ex- 
> amining Committee for Medical Practitioners, 
and he was reappointed to the same position 
under Governor Emmerson. 

Doctor Dugger was one of the organizers 
and is president of the General Life Insur- 
ance Company. He is an active Republican 
| in politics, is a member of the Knights of 
: Pythias, and a Baptist. His hobby for a num- 
ber of years has been fine horses. 

Doctor Dugger married, February 19, 1908, 
Miss Elsie Walters. They were married at 
Regina, Saskatchewan, but she is also an 
Illinois girl, her father, S. J. Walters, having 
been a farmer in Sangamon County. Doctor 
jand Mrs. Dugger have one son, Wilbern Wal- 
ters, born May 6, 1909, at Victoria, British 
i Columbia. He was reared and educated in 
Springfield, and for several years has been 
prominent in Boy Scout work in Sangamon 
County, having organized the Scout Troop for 
ithe Kiwanis Club. 

William Patrick Sullivan has devoted all 
jhis active lifetime to the cause of education. 
Several Illinois communities have known him 
|as a teacher and school administrator, but 
ithe place of his longest service has been Illi- 
opolis, where for twenty-two years he has been 
principal of the high school and superintend- 
ent of the school system of that Sangamon 
; County community. For fifteen years he has 
been secretary of both boards of education. 

Mr. Sullivan was born at Noblesville, Indi- 
ana, December 12, 1876. His father, Patrick 
Sullivan, came from Ireland and was also 
for many years a teacher. Patrick Sullivan 
; married Jennie Burdett, who was born at 
Noblesville, Indiana, in 1846. 

William Patrick Sullivan attended public 
schools at Indianapolis and completed his edu- 
cation in Edgar County, Illinois. In 1897 he 
entered the Illinois State Normal University, 
and in 1901 graduated with the degree Bache- 
; lor of Pedagogy from Greer College at Hoopes- 
ton, Illinois. In 1910 he completed work and 
was given a limited state certificate by the 
State Teachers College and in 1912 received 



a state high school certificate from the normal 
department. In 1920 the Normal University 
of Missouri conferred upon him the A. B. 
degree. During 1925-27 he was a post-grad- 
uate student in the University of Wisconsin. 

His first work in teaching was done in 
Edgar County. He was principal of the high 
school at Garland, and in 1906 became principal 
at Patoka, remaining there until 1911. He 
then entered upon his duties at Illiopolis, 
where he has been principal of the high school 
and superintendent o*f the grade schools for 
the past twenty-two years. In 1930 he be- 
came a candidate for the office of county su- 
perintendent of schools in Sangamon County. 

Mr. Sullivan is a Royal Arch Mason, member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and 
has taken much interest in the Republican 
party organization. He is a member of the 
Lions Club,. His hobby is fishing in Wis- 
consin and the streams of the Ozarks. Mr 
Sullivan is a member of the Christian Church 
and his wife is a Presbyterian. 

He married Miss Mable Simcox, of Patoka, 
daughter of John L. Simcox, a merchant. Mr. 
Sullivan has two sons and two daughters: 
Robert Patrick, born in 1904, a graduate of 
Illinois Wesleyan and who spent one year in 
Harvard University, married a Wisconsin girl; 
Paul, born in 1906, a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Illinois; Iris, born in 1910, a stu- 
dent in the Wesleyan Conservatory of Music, 
married a banker at Pontiac; and Dorothy 
May, born in 1914, a graduate of the high 
school at Illiopolis and now a student at James 
Milliken University. 

Henry Blair Davidson. Standing out 
prominently from a long life crowded with 
worthy civilian experiences and achievements, 
the war-time record of Henry B. Davidson, 
during the dark days of the '60s, is one that 
is well worth mentioning in any history per- 
taining to the accomplishments of citizens of 
Illinois. This worthy retired resident of 
Springfield, who for nearly half a century 
was engaged in the manufacture of carriages 
and wagons, saw some of the hardest fighting 
of the great struggle between the North and 
South, and emerged therefrom with a record 
for valor and fidelity unsurpassed and seldom 
equaled. 

Mr. Davidson was born at Edinburgh, Scot- 
land, and after the death of his father in that 
country was brought by his widowed mother 
to Virginia, Cass County, Illinois, where her 
parents resided. He received his early edu- 
cation in the country schools and worked on 
the farm until January 15, 1862, when he 
enlisted at Camp Butler, Springfield, in Com- 
pany G, Twelfth Illinois Cavalry, for service 
during the war between the states. His regi- 
ment was assigned to the Army of the Poto- 
mac, under General McClelland, and he was 
first stationed on the advanced line running 



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from Winchester, Virginia, to the new State 
of West Virginia. At the time that "Stone- 
wall" Jackson's army captured Harper's Ferry, 
Mr. Davidson was at Martinsburg, Virginia, 
where he had his baptism of fire. His com- 
mand started through the lines at night via 
Sharpsburg and with another regiment got to 
Greencastle, Pennsylvania, and afterwards 
joined the main army. Being detained at 
Williamsport, Maryland, for thirty days, they 
missed the bloody battle of Antietam Creek, 
and went to Dunfee, Virginia. At this time 
General Burnside replaced McClelland in 
command, facing the Confederate forces under 
Stuart. When Burnside was relieved, Joe 
Hooker took command, Mr. Davidson's com- 
pany at that time being behind the Confed- 
erate lines, and were within six miles of Rich- 
mond at the time of Stoneman's Raid. From 
that point they went to Chesapeake Bay at 
Gloucester Point, opposite Yorktown, where 
they were allowed to rest for a short time, 
after which they crossed the Rappahannock 
River and fought their way back to Penn- 
sylvania. Placed under General Beauford, 
they fought two engagements, and then went 
to Frederick, Maryland, where Hooker was 
replaced by George B. Meade. General Howard 
was in charge of the left wing, of which Mr. 
Davidson was a member, in advance toward 
the Confederate forces. General Beauford, in 
charge of this advance, had about 4,000 men, 
but Mr. Davidson's immediate commander was 
General Reynolds. After twenty-seven days 
of almost continuous fighting and skirmishing 
this brigade reached its objective, Gettysburg, 
June 30. The horses were in poor condition 
and the regiment went on duty on the Cham- 
bersburg Road, only three miles from Lee's 
army. Subsequently the regiment took an 
active and distinguished part in all of the 
cavalry fighting at and around Gettysburg. 
During his eastern service Mr. Davidson took 
part in twenty-eight engagements. At the 
close of his first enlistment Mr. Davidson went 
to Chicago, and the regiment was recruited 
up to its regular strength. Going to St. Louis, 
they embarked on a boat for New Orleans, 
and went up the Red River, where they re- 
mained for about three months. Subsequently 
they made their way to Mobile and then re- 
turned to New Orleans, later going to Mem- 
phis, Tennessee, from which' place they 
operated for a time, being then transferred 
to Natchez, Mississippi, where they consoli- 
dated with the Fourth Illinois Cavalry. Mr. 
Davidson was located at Collinsville, Tennes- 
see, at the time of the assassination of Presi- 
dent Lincoln. He served another year after 
the war had closed, being under General Cus- 
ter on the border, and was mustered out at 
Houston, Texas, June 18, 1866. Following 
the war Mr. Davidson took up his residence 
at Springfield, where he secured employment 
as a carriage and wagon maker. In 1873 



he embarked in business on his own account 
and continued therein for forty-seven years, 
or until his retirement. He was at all times 
known as an exemplary citizen and a man 
of the highest business character, and won 
success through his own industry and good 
management. 

In December, 1872, Mr. Davidson married 
Margaret Clasplill, of Springfield, a member 
of an old and honored family, and to this 
union there were born three children: Arthur, 
of Detroit, Michigan, who is married and has 
one son, Allen; Margaret, who married Jesse 
Thomas, of Springfield, and has three chil- 
dren, Robert, Francis and Catherine; and 
Harry, of Springfield, who saw service at 
Camp Taylor during the World war but was 
not called upon for overseas duty. 

Mr. Davidson has long been prominent in 
the Grand Army of the Republic and at one 
time was adjutant-general thereof. He also 
served as commander of Stephens Post No. 30, 
Springfield, of which he was adjutant, in 1929- 
30 he was department commander for Illinois 
and under Commander-in-Chief Jewel he was a 
member of several committees. His residence 
is at 121 North Glenwood Street. 

Berton W. Hole, physician and surgeon, is 
a native of Illinois, and his professional ex- 
perience covers a period of nearly forty years. 
Doctor Hole is one of the popular representa- 
tives of his profession practicing at Springfield. 

He was born at Havana, Illinois, October 
11, 1870, son of William H. and Susan R. 
(Dieffenbacher) Hole. His grandfather, Ste- 
phen R. Hole, was a native of Ohio, lived in 
Indiana for a time and in 1854 came to Illi- 
nois and settled in Mason County. Doctor 
Hole's maternal grandfather, Daniel Dieffen- 
bacher, was a native of Pennsylvania and 
came to Illinois about 1850, taking up Govern- 
ment land in Mason County. William H. Hole 
was an Illinois soldier in the Civil war, serv- 
ing in the Eighty-fifth Illinois Infantry. After 
the war he devoted his labors to the farm in 
Mason County and was a highly respected 
and useful citizen of that community. He 
was a Republican, was affiliated with the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and was a Pres- 
byterian, while his wife was a Methodist. 
They had two children: Berton W. and Gar- 
net, the latter the widow of William Chestnut 
and a resident of Mason City, Illinois. 

Berton W. Hole at the age of eighteen and 
a half years graduated from the Havana High 
School. He prepared for his profession in 
Northwestern University at Chicago, graduat- 
ing in 1892. During the next twelve years he 
looked after a general town and country prac- 
tice at Talula, Illinois. From there he moved 
to Springfield, but two years later went to 
Okmulgee, Oklahoma, and practiced in that 
old Creek Indian town, which after statehood 
came to Oklahoma rapidly developed as a 



ILLINOIS 



123 



city. He remained there until 1921 and on 
returning to Illinois established his home and 
practice at Springfield. He is engaged in a 
general practice, handling considerable sur- 
gery. Doctor Hole spent the year 1906-07 in 
the New York Post-Graduate School and has 
also taken special work in the American Hos- 
pital in Chicago and in the Barnes Hospital in 
St. Louis in 1921. 

He married in 1910 Miss Nettie E. Fruits, 
a native of Menard County, Illinos. She at- 
tended school at Petersburg. Doctor Hole is 
an elder in the First Presbyterian Church. He 
is a York and Scottish Rite Mason, member of 
the Knights of Pythias, the Grand View Coun- 
try Club and a Republican in politics. He 
enjoys a high standing among his profes- 
sional associates in the Sangamon County, 
Illinois State and American Medical Associa- 
tions. 

William M. Carroll has won distinct van- 
tage ground and marked professional and 
civic influence as one of the representative 
lawyers of the younger generation in his na- 
tive McHenry County, and is established in 
the successful practice of his profession in the 
City of Woodstock, the county seat. 

The fifth in a family of seven sons, only 
one of whom is deceased, William M. Carroll 
was born on the parental home farm in Hart- 
land Township, McHenry County, July 25, 
1894. He is a son of John J. and Antoinette 
(Miller) Carroll, the former of whom was 
j born on a farm near Hebron this county, and 
the latter of whom was born at Seneca, Mc- 
Henry County. John J. Carroll was long 
numbered among the substantial exponents of 
farm industry in his native county and was 
I one of the influential and highly honored cit- 
izens of McHenry County at the time of his 
death, in 1922, his widow being now a resi- 
dent of Woodstock. John J. Carroll was a 
Democrat in politics and was a leader in pop- 
ular sentiment and action in his home com- 
munity. He served as delegate to various 
conventions of his party and was efficient and 
! loyal in his administration as road commis- 
i sioner in his home township. He was a zeal- 
ous member of the Catholic Church, as is 
also his widow, and was affiliated with the 
Catholic Order of Foresters. His father, John 
Carroll, was born in Ireland and gained a 
goodly measure of pioneer precedence in Mc- 
Henry County, Illinois, where he made settle- 
ment in the 1840 decade and where he passed 
the remainder of his life as an industrious 
farmer and loyal and public-spirited citizen. 
The maternal grandfather of William M. Car- 
roll of this review was born in Germany, 
where he received the best of educational ad- 
vantages, and he was a youth when he came 
to the United States and found employment 
in the customs service in New York City, he 



having later come to Illinois and having here 
passed the remainder of his life. 

William M. Carroll completed his course 
of study in the Woodstock High School and 
thereafter prepared himself for his chosen pro- 
fession by attending the law department of 
fine old Notre Dame University at South 
Bend, Indiana. In that institution he was 
graduated as amember of the class of 1915, 
and his reception of the degree of Bachelor 
of Laws was forthwith followed by his ad- 
mission to the bar of his native state. The 
City of Chicago was the stage of his profes- 
sional activities the first year, and he then 
returned to McHenry County, where he has 
since continued in the successful general prac- 
tice of law at Woodstock, judicial center of 
the county. He has proved his powers as a 
resourceful trial lawyer and as a well forti- 
fied counselor, and his law business shows a 
constantly cumulative trend. He has given 
eight years of service as assistant state's at- 
torney of his native county and has made a 
record of equally effective service as city at- 
torney of Woodstock. His political allegiance 
is given to the Republican party and in 1930 
he was its nominee for representative of Mc- 
Henry County in the State Legislature. Aside 
from his professional activities Mr. Carroll 
has gained much of prestige as a vigorous 
and entertaining public speaker and has been 
called upon for many addresses before repre- 
sentative civic assemblages. He has mem- 
bership in the McHenry County Bar Associa- 
tion and the Illinois State Bar Association. 
He is a communicant of St. Mary's Catholic 
Church, and here he maintains affiliation with 
the Knights of Columbus, the American Le- 
gion, of which he is a past commander of 
Peter Umathum Post, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, of which he is a past 
exalted ruler, and the Loyal Order of Moose. 

In September, 1917, the year that marked 
the nation's entrance into the World war, 
Mr. Carroll enlisted for service in the United 
States Army. He received preliminary train- 
ing at Camp Grant, near Rockford, this state, 
and in August, 1918, accompanied his com- 
mand overseas, where he was in active serv- 
ice when the armistice brought the war to a 
close and where he remained until July, 1919, 
when he returned to his native land and in 
due course received his honorable discharge, 
with the rank of second lieutenant. 

In 1918, prior to his departure for overseas 
service in the World war, Mr. Carroll was 
united in marriage to Miss Dorothy Lemmers, 
who was born and reared at Woodstock and 
who is a representative of one of the old and 
honored families of McHenry County. Her 
father, George W. Lemmers, has long been 
engaged in the abstract business at Wood- 
stock, and in the public schools of this city 
she received her youthful education, which 



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included a high-school course. Mr. and Mrs. 
Carroll have two children: William M., Jr., 
born March 5, 1922, and James P., born Jan- 
uary 30, 1927. 

William Calvin Shaffer. The superin- 
tendent and general manager of the Sanga- 
mon County Infirmary, W. C. Shaffer, has held 
this position at Buffalo for a number of years, 
and under his able direction it has flourished 
and been a great power for good in the com- 
munity. He is a man of high intellectual at- 
tainments, being versed in the law, and for 
some years was a school teacher and a min- 
ister of the Presbyterian Church. His early 
life was such as to give him the necessary 
training and experience which he put to such 
good use in his present post, in addition to 
which he has never lost interest in his church 
work or his legal studies. 

Mr. Shaffer was born March 27, 1872, at 
Argenta, Illinois, and is a son of Francis 
Shaffer. His father, who was born in Ohio, 
enlisted in Company H, Ninety-ninth Regi- 
ment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for service 
during the war between the states, and dur- 
ing the two years that his regiment was at- 
tached to the Army of the Cumberland he 
saw much active service, including Missionary 
Ridge and Murfreesboro and the fierce fighting 
that marked the Tennessee campaigns. He 
was finally disabled and honorably discharged, 
returned to his home, where he married a 
Miss Swander, and about 1865 left Ohio in a 
covered wagon and came to Argenta, Illinois. 
Buying a farm in Macon County, he spent 
the remainder of his life in agricultural opera- 
tions and became one of the substantial men 
of his community. He was a member of the 
Grand Army of the Republic for many years 
and always took a great interest in that or- 
ganization, attending its encampments when- 
ever possible. He and his worthy wife were 
the parents of six children: Nora, who married 
Perry Parr; Anna M., who married Charles 
Sellars; Sarah A., who married Frank Ham- 
mond; W. C, of this review; James W., who 
married Lena Stroh; and Jessie L., who mar- 
ried Al Pierce. The paternal grandfather of 
W. C. Shaffer was George Shaffer, who came 
to Illinois in late life and died here on a farm. 
He married a Miss Boyer, also a native of 
Ohio. 

W. C. Shaffer attended the old Zion School 
in Whitmore Township, Macon County, fol- 
lowing which he pursued a course at Lincoln 
University and the Lebanon (Tennessee) 
Seminary. For four years thereafter he 
taught public school in Tennessee, following 
which he became a minister of the Cumberland 
Presbyterian Church, and for nineteen years 
was pastor at Pleasant Plains. At the end of 
that period he was appointed to his present 
post as superintendent and general manager 
of the Sangamon County Infirmary, which is 



located on a tract of 240 acres of land ad- 
joining the Town of Buffalo, and in this ca- 
pacity has conducted all matters to the satis- 
faction of the inmates and of the general 
public. He is still interested in his church 
work, and on occasion fills a pulpit. In his 
younger days Mr. Shaffer read law for several 
years, and still maintains his interest in this 
direction. He belongs to the Blue Lodge, 
Chapter, Consistory and Commandery of Ma- 
sonry, and is a Shriner and a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He was for- 
merly supervisor of his township and also a i 
member of the school board, and in various 
ways has contributed to the progress and 
good government of his locality. 

Mr. Shaffer married Miss Ada B. Miller, of 
Argenta, Illinois, daughter of M. S. and Belle 
(McMullin) Miller, and to this union there 
have been born six children: Francis Miller, 
a coach at Richland Center, Wisconsin; Wil- 
bur Calvin, attending Milliken University; 
Donald Hand, a graduate of the Illiopolis High 
School; Lena Feme, a nurse residing at St. 
Louis, Missouri; Ferry Faye, a resident of 
Los Angeles, California; and Miriam Maxine, , 
the wife of Richard Dunkle. 

Alfred Booth has been a familiar figure in I 
Springfield business circles for over half a 
century. His name has been associated with 
a number of organizations. Mr. Booth had 
the distinction in 1905 of supplying most of 
the capital and enterprise for the erection of ij 
the first tall building in the down town dis- j 
trict and he owned the building for five years, i 

He was born at Springfield, November 15* > 
1852, son of William and Elizabeth (Berri- 
man) Booth. His parents were born in Eng- 
land and his father for many years was con- 
nected with the foundry and machine shop 
business at Springfield. He spent his last 
days in Missouri. Both parents were members 
of the Church of England and the father voted 
as a Republican and was a member of the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Of their 
three sons only the one is now living. 

Alfred Booth attended public schools in 
Springfield and was only a boy when he began 
work and laid the foundation of his career as 
a clerk. For about half a century his business 
experience was in groceries. He started work 
in a grocery store at Eleventh and Monroe 
streets, remaining there a few years, then 
went to another store and for a time was 
with the business of Bunn & Company. Dur- ; 
ing these years he was accumulating a little 
capital as well as learning the grocery business 
and eventually he bought a store of his own 
on Adams Street. Mr. Booth was a grocery 
merchant at Springfield for a period of forty 
years. During the past sixteen years he has 
given his chief attention to the Springfield 
Auto Sales Company, of which he is president. 



;i 



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125 



He married Miss Annie Burkhart, a native 
of Springfield, where she was reared and 
educated. Her father, John M. Burkhart, was 
a pioneer merchant of the city. Mr. and Mrs. 
Booth have one daughter, Elizabeth, who is 
the wife of Edward Clark, auditor of an oil 
company at Tulsa, Oklahoma. The two chil- 
dren of Mr. and Mrs. Clark are Edward, Jr., 
and Dorothy, both attending school. Mr. and 
Mrs. Booth are members of the First Presby- 
terian Church and for a number of years he 
was superintendent of the Sunday School. He 
is a Scottish Rite Mason, member of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows and B. P. O. 
Elks and a Republican in politics. 

Herbert Bullock Bartholf, president of 
the St. Nicholas Hotel Company at Spring- 
field, is a native of Illinois, was with the 
Aviation Corps during the World war, and 
has had some influential connections with sev- 
eral large financial and business corporations 
both east and west. 

Mr. Bartholf was born in Chicago, in 1895, 
son of Charles S. and Grace (Bullock) Bart- 
holf. On both sides he is of Colonial ances- 
try and Revolutionary stock. His grand- 
father, Gulliam Bartholf, was a native of New 
iYork and came to Illinois at an early date, 
becoming a farmer in this state. The ma- 
ternal grandfather, Milan C. Bullock, was a 
native of Vermont. Mr. Bartholf's father 
was born in Springfield, Illinois, and his 
mother in New York City. His father was 
ja graduate of the University of Michigan and 
at one time was principal of the Goethe School 
in Chicago. Later he was president in the 
Standard Diamond Drill Company. The fam- 
ily were Unitarians in religion. Charles S. 
Bartholf was a thirty-second degree Scottish 
Rite Mason and an independent voter. 

Herbert B. Bartholf was the second in a 
family of six children. He was educated in the 
public schools at Glencoe, Illinois, completed 
his work in the University of Michigan in 
1916 and for a time was in the employ of the 
Austin Company. 

In May, 1917, he joined the colors and was 
(trained as an aviator at Minneola, Long Island, 
reaching the rank of first lieutenant in the air 
service. He received his discharge in March, 
1919, and during the following five years re- 
mained in New York, where he represented 
the American International Corporation and 
the Hayden-Stone & Company. 
: Mr. Bartholf has been president of the St. 
Nicholas Hotel Company of Springfield since 
1924. He has kept up a keen interest in 
nymg. He is a member of the Sangamo and 
fllini Country Clubs, the Rotary Club, is 
independent in politics, is a York and Scot- 
tish Rite Mason and Shriner and a member 
of the Beta Theta Pi college fraternity. His 
wife is an Episcopalian. He married, June 
15, 1929, Miss Susan H. Pasfield, daughter of 



George Pasfield and a member of one of the 
old and wealthy families of Springfield. They 
have one daughter, Carolyn, born June 1, 
1931. 

Hon. Simon Peter Kinahan. The chief 
executive of the Town of Illiopolis, Hon. Simon 
P. Kinahan, has been a lifelong resident of 
Sangamon County, where the family has re- 
sided for more than sixty-two years. Reared 
as an agriculturist, he began renting land in 
his younth from his father, later became a 
farmer and stock raiser on his own account, 
and finally turned his attention to the real 
estate and insurance business, in which he is 
now successfully engaged. 

Mayor Kinahan was born April 7, 1870, on 
his father's farm in Lanesville Township, San- 
gamon County, Illinois, and is a son of Wil- 
liam and Elizabeth (Purdie) Kinahan. His 
father was born in Parsonstown, Kings 
County, Ireland, in 1830, and lost his parents 
when he was a small boy. He had a sister, 
Margaret, who never left her native land, and 
a brother, who went to New Zealand, where 
all trace of him was lost. William Kinahan 
left Ireland as a young man of twenty-two 
years and went to Melbourne, Australia, 
where on October 17, 1855, he married Eliza- 
beth Purdie. In 1869, they went to Glasgow, 
Scotland, but after a short stay continued on 
their journey and arrived at New York City, 
December 6, 1869. December 13 saw their 
arrival in Sangamon County, and shortly 
thereafter Mr. Kinahan purchased a farm in 
Lanesville Township, where he passed the re- 
mainder of his life in agricultural operations. 
Elizabeth Purdie was born at Glasgow, Scot- 
land, January 6, 1833, and at the age of 
eighteen years accompanied her family to Aus- 
tralia, where she met and married William 
Kinahan. She visited her native home when 
she was eighty years of age. For many years 
she was a member of the Order of the Eastern 
Star, and was a woman of many sterling 
qualities of mind and heart. She was a daugh- 
ter of Alexander Purdie, a native of Scotland, 
who immigrated to this country in his later 
life and died here. To William and Elizabeth 
Kinahan there were born ten children- Mary, 
born in Australia; Elizabeth, also born in 
Australia, now deceased; Margaret, born in 
Australia; William, Jr., born in Australia; 
John, born in Australia; Alexander, born in 
Australia; Simon P., of this review; James, 
born in Illinois; and Ruth and Arthur, both 
born in Illinois, and both now deceased. 

Simon P. Kinahan attended the Smith 
School in his native locality, and worked on 
the farm during all the period that he was 
gaining his education. In young manhood he 
began renting land from his father, and when 
he had saved sufficient capital from his earn- 
ings invested it in land in Illiopolis Township, 
where he carried on operations in farming and 



126 



ILLINOIS 



stock raising for many years. He applied 
scientific methods to his labors and secured 
excellent results, built commodious buildings 
and installed modern machinery, and was ac- 
counted one of the leading and foremost agri- 
culturists of his locality. He still has large 
and important holdings in Sangamon County 
but his farms are now being operated by 
others, Mr. Kinahan preferring to devote his 
attention principally to his real estate and 
insurance business, which has grown to large 
proportions. He is known as a reliable man 
of business, honorable in his dealings, and has 
carried through to success a number of large 
transactions in realty and insurance. Mr. 
Kinahan belongs to the Masons, is a Knight 
Templar of Springfield Commandery, a mem- 
ber of the Shrine, and has passed through all 
the chairs in the Blue Lodge. Mrs. Kinahan 
is a member of the Eastern Star and the White 
Shrine, and she and Mr. Kinahan both are con- 
sistent members of the Christian Church. Al- 
ways a keen and willing supporter of all 
worthy civic measures, Mr. Kinahan has taken 
a great deal of interest in public affairs, and 
has borne his share of the responsibilities of 
citizenship. He served for several years as 
a member of the town board, and at present is 
the incumbent of the office of mayor, a posi- 
tion in which he has set an admirable record 
for businesslike handling of the town's prob- 
lems and conscientious attention to the dis- 
charge of duty. He has won the full confi- 
dence of his fellow citizens by his unfailing 
integrity, and his friendships are numerous 
and sincere. 

On September 16, 1903, Mr. Kinahan was 
united in marriage with Miss Flora B. Council, 
who was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, 
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Hay) Coun- 
cil. Her paternal grandparents were George 
W. and Jane (Mitts) Council, the former of 
whom came from White County, Illinois, as an 
early settler of Sangamon County, where he 
became in time an extensive farmer and stock 
raiser and the owner of much valuable land. 
John M. Council, the father of Mrs. Kinahan, 
was born in Fancy Creek Township, Sangamon 
County, where he received a common school 
education, and for some years was engaged 
in farming, his home being at Illiopolis, where 
he had come at the age of twenty-one years. 
He had two farms, one of eighty acres ana 
the other of 120 acres, when he sold out in 
1912 and went to Kansas, and bought land 
near Nortonville. He died at Topeka, Kan- 
sas, February 23, 1921, and was buried at 
Mechanicsburg, Illinois, and his wife died Au- 
gust 3, 1931, at Topeka, and was also buried 
at Mechanicsburg, Illinois. He was the father 
of ten children: Flora B., who is now Mrs. 
Kinahan; Robert A., of Topeka, Kansas; Mrs. 
Luella J. McFadden, of Buffalo Hart, Illinois; 
George W., deceased; Jesse E., of Oskalusa, 
Kansas; and Lena, Irena, Olive, Benjamin F. 



and Percy H., all of Topeka. Mr. Council 
was one of the substantial men of his com- 
munity and was highly esteemed by those who 
knew him in Illinois and Kansas. Mr. and 
Mrs. Kinahan have no children. 

Samuel Porter Headrick. The automobile 
industry, than which none other has ever en- 
joyed a more rapid or consistently successful 
growth and development, has attracted to its 
ranks men from all walks and occupations of 
life. Many there were who had no definite 
knowledge of this new industry which they 
were just entering, but all of those who have 
made a success therein have had the abil- 
ity to shape their talents to the needs of their 
calling, and all have been men who undoubt- 
edly would have succeeded in other lines of 
activity. In Sangamon County the agency for 
the Ford Motor Sales Company is owned and 
managed by Samuel P. Headrick, general man- 
ager, who conducts his business under the name 
of S. P. Headrick Company, at Illiopolis. He 
learned the business in a practical way, and 
has made himself a leader therein by con- 
sistent study and industry and practical ex- 
perience. 

Mr. Headrick was born in Blount County, 
Tennessee, December 8, 1884, and is a son 
of James H. and Rowena (Clark) Headrick, 
and a grandson of John Headrick, a farmer, 
sawmill man and thresher, who was also in-] 
terested in live stock! James H. Headrick was 
born in Tennessee, where he followed farming 
and stock raising and also owned land, and 
never left his native state. Although too 
young to take the field during the war between 
the states, he performed Home Guard duty, 
and while thus serving was captured by the 
enemy, but made his escape in a desperate 
swim across the Mississippi River. He and 
his wife were the parents of a large family 
of children, as follows : Catherine, John, James, 
William, Edward, Ollie, Ernest, Samuel P., 
Dolly Omega, Nora, Bertha, two children who 
died in infancy and Alice. 

Samuel P. Headrick attended the country 
schools of Blount County, Tennessee, in the 
meanwhile working on the home farm until he 
was sixteen years of age, at which time he 
went to Jacksonville, Florida, where he secured 
employment in a nursery. Subsequently he 
came direct to Buffalo Hart, Illinois, where 
one of his elder brothers had already located, 
and for about two years worked on a farm. 
His next venture was in the pure-bred cattle 
and hog business, in which he held two large 
public sales of Shorthorn cattle and Duroc- 
Jersey hogs per year, but after a time discon- 
tinued this business to engage in the vocation 
of farming near Buffalo Hart, where he 
operated with his brother for three years on 
a tract of 320 acres. The partnership being 
mutually dissolved, Mr. Headrick engaged in 
farming alone on one property for eight years 



J 



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127 



and on another for three years, and in 1921 
went to Dawson, where he became identified 
with the automobile business. He embarked 
in this line in the sales end, but, being of a 
somewhat mechanical turn of mind, learned 
that end of the business also, and in 1923 
came to Illiopolis and took over the Ford 
agency for Sangamon County, under his pres- 
ent style of business. He has made a great 
success of this venture, and now has a large 
plant in the central part of the business dis- 
trict, occupying the first and second floors and 
basement of a building 80x100 feet. His 
equipment is modern in every particular, and 
he personally supervises everything done at the 
establishment, although he has a thoroughly 
competent working force under his direction. 
He has several other buisness connections and 
for a time was a director in the local bank. 
As a fraternalist Mr. Headrick is identified 
with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows 
and the Loyal Order of Moose, and his re- 
ligious connection is with the Presbyterian 
Church. He has done his share of work as 
a good citizen, and has an excellent record 
as an office holder, having served formerly as 
tax collector at Buffalo Hart, and as road 
commissioner, school director and member of 
the town board at Illiopolis. For his social 
activities Mr. Headrick generally goes to 
Springfield, in which city he and his family 
have numerous warm and appreciative friends. 
In 1909 Mr. Headrick married Miss Alma 
Bell, daughter of William and Laura (Cope- 
land) Bell, and to this union there were born 
two children : Geneva and William Virgil. The 
present Mrs. Headrick was formerly Miss Nell 
Wilson, daughter of William Wilson. They 
have two children: Marylin Jean and Shirley 
Bell. 

Charles L. Best, M. D., has a record of 
service that has given him notably high repu- 
tation as a surgeon, and he has been engaged 
in the practice of his profession in his na- 
tive City of Freeport somewhat more than 
twenty years. Here he has also large and 
varied capitalistic and business interests of 
importance and is an influential citizen of 
marked liberality and progressiveness. 

Doctor Best was born in Freeport, judicial 
center of Stephenson County, Illinois, Decem- 
ber 21, 1879, and is a son of Thomas K. and 
Ida J. (Moeller) Best, the former of whom 
was born in Ireland and the latter in Penn- 
sylvania, their marriage having been solemn- 
ized at Freeport, where they continued to 
maintain their home during the remainder of 
their lives. Thomas K. Best was here en- 
gaged in the dry goods business approximately 
fourteen years, and thereafter he was long 
and successfully engaged in the real estate 
business, through the medium of which he 
accumulated a substantial fortune, he having 
been one of the honored and influential citi- 



zens of Freeport at the time of his death. 
Mr. Best was a Republican in politics and 
he and his wife held membership in the Pres- 
byterian Church, Doctor Best, of this review, 
being their only child. 

In the public schools of Freeport, Dr. 
Charles L. Best continued his studies until 
he had duly profited by the curriculum of the 
high school, and in 1902 he was graduated in 
the University of Michigan, from which he 
received the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
In the following year he was a graduate stu- 
dent in the University of Chicago and received 
therefrom the degree of Master of Science in 
1903, while in the ensuing year he was grad- 
uated in the celebrated Rush Medical College, 
which is now the school of medicine of the 
University of Chicago. After thus receiving 
his degree of Doctor of Medicine he further 
fortified himself by eighteen months of serv- 
ice as an interne in the Norwegian Hospital 
of Chicago, and he next gave a similar period 
to intensive post-graduate study in leading 
European hospitals and clinics, including those 
of Vienna, Paris, Berlin and London. Upon 
his return to the United States he opened an 
office in Freeport, where he has continued in 
successful practice during the intervening 
years and where for a number of years he 
has given major attention to surgery — in fact, 
he has specialized in this department of service 
from the initiation of his professional career. 
The Doctor is retained as surgeon on the 
staff of each of the hospitals of Freeport and 
is chief of staff of the Methodist Episcopal 
Hospital. He has kept insistently in touch 
with the advances made in surgical science 
and practice, and as a means to this end has 
attended clinics in leading cities. Doctor Best 
is a fellow of the American College of Sur- 
geons, and has membership in the American 
Medical Association, the Illinos State Medical 
Society and the Stephenson County Medical 
Society, of which latter he is a past president. 
He is also local surgeon for the C. M. & St. P. 
and Great Western railroads and for numer- 
ous local industries. 

Doctor Best is a director of the State Bank 
of Freeport, is chairman of the board of 
directors of the Stephenson County Telephone 
Company, and is also chairman of the board 
of the Northwest Telephone Company, is chief 
medical director of the Bankers Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of Freeport, and is the 
owner of valuable real estate in his native 
county, including a number of business blocks 
in Freeport, much of this property having 
come to him as a direct heritage from his 
father. His political allegiance is given to 
the Republican party, he is a Scottish Rite 
and Shriner Mason, is affiliated also with the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is a 
member of the Freeport Country Club and 
has been a director of the Chamber of Com- 



128 



ILLINOIS 



merce, and holds the surgical classification in 
the Rotary Club. 

The year 1910 marked the marriage oi 
Doctor Best to Miss Florence Whiteside, who 
likewise was born and reared in Freeport, 
where she was graduated in the high school, 
and who was a daughter of George White- 
side, a pioneer in the manufacturing of paper 
boxes at Freeport. She died in December, 
1930. She was an active worker in the Epis- 
copal Church and a popular social figure. 
Virginia, elder of the two children of Doctor 
and Mrs. Best, was graduated in the Freeport 
High School and is a student in the Uni- 
versity of Illinois. Sarah Jane is a student 
in the Freeport public schools. 

Hiram A. Brooks, who has practiced law at 
Dixon since 1893, represents one of the pio- 
neer families of Lee County. The Brooks 
family is of English ancestry. The founder 
of the family in Lee County was his grand- 
father, Benjamin Brooks, who came from Hart- 
ford, Connecticut, to Illinois in 1837. He de- 
veloped one of the early farms near Dixon. 

Hiram A. Brooks was born on a farm in 
Lee County, in 1866, son of Benjamin F. and 
Susan (Morris) Brooks. Benjamin F. Brooks 
was a child when brought west from Con- 
necticut. He was also a Lee County farmer. 
His wife, Susan Morris, was a native of Vir- 
ginia and her people settled in Illinois prior 
to the Civil war. 

Hiram A. Brooks grew up on a farm, at- 
tended district schools and was graduated 
from the Northern Illinois College at Dixon 
in 1890. He studied law with William Barge 
and in 1893 was admitted to the bar, and 
since that year has enjoyed a high place in the 
professional and civic life of his community. 
He has practiced law with success, has par- 
ticipated in many community enterprises, but 
in politics has always maintained an inde- 
pendent attitude and has never sought any 
public office. However, he served for a time as 
city attorney. He is a member of the County 
and State Bar Associations and the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows. 

He married in 1893 Miss Mary Fischer, who 
was born in Lee County, daughter of Edward 
and Sophia Fischer. Her people settled in 
Illinois in 1850, her parents coming from Ger- 
many. Mrs. Mary Brooks died in April, 1901, 
leaving one son, Byron A. Brooks. He is a 
graduate of Carthage College of Illinois and 
was a lieutenant in the World war. He is 
now superintendent of a public utility plant 
at Mineola, Texas. Byron A. Brooks married 
Elouise Hartman, of Carthage, Illinois, and 
has three children, Hiram H., Mary Louise and 
Edward W. 

On June 30, 1904, Mr. Brooks married Mrs. 
Charlotte (Alwood) Baldwin. By her first 
marriage she has a son, Edward Foster Bald- 
win, who was a second lieutenant in the United 



States Navy during the World war and spent 
twenty-eight months in active duty. His 
father, William E. Baldwin, was a major in 
the United States Army during the Spanish- 
American war. 

Richard Henry Taft. The ownership and 
operation of 264 acres of valuable Sangamon 
County land alone would indicate for its pos- 
sessor abilities something beyond the ordinary 
run, and when this is combined with good 
citizenship and public spirit the result is very 
apt to be beneficial to the community. In 
this connection reference is made to Richard 
H. Taft, a substantial farmer and stock raiser 
of Rochester Township, who has for years car- 
ried on successful operations in that com- 
munity. 

Mr. Taft was born August 19, 1876, in San- 
gamon County, Illinois, and is a son of William 
W. and Emma (Green) Taft. William W. 
Taft, the elder, his paternal grandfather, was 
born in Vermont, whence he came to Illinois 
with his wife, Eliza, and took up Government 
land in Sangamon County, where he was an> 
early settler and prominent citizen. He had 
a wide acquaintance among leading men of his 
day and enjoyed the friendship of Abraham 
Lincoln. One of his cousins went to Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, where he founded the distinguished 
Taft family of that city, among whose mem- 
bers was the late President William Howard 
Taft, who was Richard H. Taft's third cousin. 

The father of Richard H. Taft, William 
Taft, the younger, received a common school 
education and worked during the vacation 
periods (which were the greater part of the 
year) on the home farm. He worked faith- 
fully and industriously during his life as a 
farmer and stock raiser, and while he made a 
success of his life before he reached his de- 
clining years, he never saw a reason for 
retiring, therefore carrying on his work right 
up to the time of his final illness. In his 
death his community lost a man who was rec- 
ognized for his stability as a man of integrity 
and his earnestness as a citizen who was 
always ready to do the best he could for tht 
common weal. He and his wife were the 
parents of the following five children: Richarc 
H., of this review; Joseph; Lydia; Justin, £ 
review of whose career will be found elsewhere 
in this work; and Jason. 

Richard H. Taft attended the public school; 
at Rochester, and, as was the custom of th< 
farmers' sons of his day and locality, workec 
during the summer months on his father': 
farm. At the outset of his career he decide( 
to become a cattle farmer, and when twenty 
eight years of age commenced operating alonj 
these lines on his own account. In 1919 h< 
purchased his present farm in Rochester Town 
ship, and through steady application ha 
brought himself to a position of leadership 
During the past few years, while his energ; 



ILLINOIS 



129 



is unimpaired, he has allowed himself to be- 
come supervisor of the regular work, his 
sturdy sons carrying on the actual manual 
labor entailed. Mr. Taft has borne his share 
of public responsibilities as an able and effi- 
cient member of the town board of Rochester. 
In his religious belief he and the members 
of his family belong to the Methodist Church. 
In 1902 Mr. Taft married Emma Baldwin, 
and to this union there have been born seven 
children: John, who married Anna Beard, and 
has four children, Wilma, Charles, Richard 
and Kenneth; Loren; Elmer, who married 
Mary Shreve, and they have a daughter, Dixi- 
ana; Howard; Frances, who married Edward 
James, and they have a son, Edward; Doro- 
thy; and Ernest. 

Lewis Elmer Bird. Since 1828 the name 
of Bird has been widely and favorably known 
in Sangamon County, and particularly in that 
section which surrounds the Mechanicsburg 
community. Members of this family have 
engaged in a variety of pursuits, all con- 
nected with the growth and development of 
the locality, but in the main they have been 
agriculturists. The present generation of this 
family is worthily represented by Lewis E. 
Bird, who has always been interested in gen- 
eral farming, but who is also clerk of the 
Probate Court of Sangamon County and one 
of the prominent and influential Republicans 
of his part of the state. 

Mr. Bird was born January 19, 1876 in 
Sangamon County, and is a son of Jacob F. 
and Anna E. (Hughes) Bird. His paternal 
grandfather, Richard Bird, was born in New 
Jersey, where he received a public school 
education of an advanced character and began 
his life as a school teacher. Seeking a broader 
field for his activities, he left home in young 
manhood and made his way to the State of 
Kentucky, where he resided for some years, 
but in 1828 came to Illinois and took up land. 
Here, through great industry and good man- 
agement, he developed a fertile and prosperous 
property, on which he erected the structure 
that is still the residence of his grandson, 
and rounded out his career as an agriculturist. 
He was a man who was greatly esteemed in 
his community for his many sterling qualities 
of mind and heart, and during the early days 
became widely known as a circuit-rider. 

Jacob F. Bird was born in Sangamon 
County, where he was reared on his father's 
farm, assisting in the development of this 
property while attending the common schools. 
He adopted agriculture as his life work when 
he reached man's estate, and was content to 
tollow this line of endeavor throughout a long 
useful and honorable career, in which he won 
the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. 
A s a Republican he was deeply interested 
m politics, although his only official position 
was that of school trustee. He and his wife 



were laid to rest in the cemetery at Mechan- 
icsburg. They were the parents of two chil- 
dren: Lewis E., of this review; and Mary, 
who married Lawrence Kennedy and has one 
daughter, Elizabeth S. 

Lewis E. Bird was born in his present home, 
where he has always resided, and acquired 
his educational training in the common schools. 
Reared to the pursuits of the soil, he took up 
farming as his life work in young manhood, 
and has always been actively engaged therein,' 
the present large estate consisting of some 
1,200 acres. The greater part of this property 
is under a high state of cultivation and is 
devoted to general farming and stock raising. 
As a Republican Mr. Bird belongs to all the 
township and county organizations and is one 
of the most popular men in his party, as was 
testified when he was elected to his present 
position, that of clerk of the Probate Court 
of Sangamon County, in 1930. He was one 
of the few men elected by his party during a 
Democratic landslide in this section, running 
second on his ticket, and has proved a capable, 
efficient and energetic official. 

Mr. Bird married Miss Nemmie Shumway, 
a daughter of J. M. and Lily (Rothchild) 
bnumway, and to this union there have been 
born two children: Shumway, a graduate of 
the University of Illinois, who is associated 
with the Insull interests at Chicago ; and Gene- 
vieve, who is attending school in Springfield. 

Asa Been Moore. A member of the agri- 
cultural contingent of Sangamon County, Asa 
B. Moore is engaged in general farming, but 
is perhaps best known to the people of this 
community as a successful raiser of seed corn. 
In this special field of endeavor he has achieved 
something more than a local reputation, and 
his product is in constant demand over a wide 
area of country. He likewise has various 
other interests, and since 1927 has been presi- 
dent of the Caldwell State Bank at Chatham 
and is also vice president of the Chatham 
Farmers Elevator Company and president of 
the Sugar Creek Cemetery Association. 

Mr. Moore was born on his present farm ii? 
Chatham Township, in 1858, and is a son of 
Morrison and Elizabeth (Crow) Moore. Mor- 
rison Moore was born in Hardy County, Vir- 
ginia, and was a child when taken by his 
parents to Kentucky, where he acquired a 
public school education. Prior to the war 
between the states he came to Sangamon 
County, Illinois, where he acquired a large 
an valuable property and was known as one 
of the substantial men of his community A 
younger brother served for several years in 
Congress from Illinois. To Morrison and 
Elizabeth Moore there were born the follow- 
ing children: Joseph, John, Charles (deceased) 
Mrs. Margaret Nuckolls (deceased), George' 
Douglass, Asa B. and Mrs. Sadie Kirk 
(deceased). 



130 



ILLINOIS 



Asa B. Moore attended the Sunny Slope 
public school, and worked on the home farm 
during all of his school period, following which 
he became a hand for his father until he was 
twenty-six years of age. At that time he 
began renting land and became a general 
farmer, and for many years carried on a 
general business of that kind. In 1908 he 
began to give his attention to raising seed 
corn, and as the years have passed he has 
developed this to large proportions, he being 
at this time the largest seed corn grower in 
the country, with a capacity of 20,000 bushels 
and a market that covers the principal corn 
states in the country. In addition to his best 
seller, Krug, Mr. Moore grows Funk's Yellow 
Dent, Learning, Western Ploughman, Illinois 
High Yield, Boone County White, Funk's 
Hybrid and Silver Mine, and these brands 
without an exception have a nation-wide repu- 
tation as being reliable and trustworthy. In 
addition to his own 320 acres of land Mr. 
Moore has different farmers hired to grow his 
brands, and he agrees to buy their crops out- 
right, which he resells in the market. He 
has been alone in his own business, which 
he has built up through his own initiative 
and resource. He bears an excellent reputation 
and standing in business circles and is a 
citizen who takes a public-spirited interest in 
everything pertaining to the welfare and 
advancement of his community. He is a mem- 
ber of the Anti-Horse Thief Association, and 
an elder in the Presbyterian Church, and since 
1924 has been president of the Chatham Bank. 

Mr. Moore married Miss Lou Anna Scott, 
daughter of Thomas and Mary Scott, who 
were born in Ireland and she was a Scotch 
Presbyterian. In young manhood he immi- 
grated to the United States, taking up his 
residence at Chatham, where for a time he 
was employed in railroading. Later he turned 
his attention to farming, to which work he 
devoted the remainder of his life. Three 
children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Moore: Mary Erma, who married Milton Vogt 
and has a daughter, Patty Lou, and a son, 
Milton Moore; and George Morrison, and 
Charles William, who reside with their par- 
ents and assist their father in his business 
and farming enterprises. Mrs. Moore has been 
active in the work of the Presbyterian Church. 

Bert P. Luedke. Prominent among the pub- 
lic officials of Sangamon County who through 
their conscientious labors have contributed 
materially to the welfare and development of 
their respective communities is found Bert 
P. Leudke, commissioner and supervisor of 
Chatham Township. Mr. Luedke, who is one 
of the self-made men of the county, has for 
years been engaged in agricultural operations, 
having accumulated a valuable property 
through his own efforts, and both as a farmer 



and an official has established a record that 
entitles him to the respect of his fellow citizens. 

Bert P. Luedke was born September 16, 
1874, in the province of Posen, Germany, and 
is a son of Daniel and Charlotte (Raatz) 
Luedke, and grandson of a German farmer 
who never left his native land. Daniel Luedke 
was educated in Germany, where he served 
his time in the army, and in 1899 immigrated 
to the United States and settled on a farm 
in Sangamon County, where he carried on 
operations until his death, when he was laid 
to rest in the Chatham Cemetery. There wer^ 
ten children in the family, of whom Bert P. 
was the second eldest. Daniel Luedke was za 
citizen of sterling integrity and one who was 
loyal to the interests of the country of hisl 
adoption. He and his worthy wife were faith-' 
ful members of the Lutheran Church. 

Bert P. Luedke attended public school in 
Germany, where he gained a knowledge of 
the English language and also had two years 
of experience in a law office at Wiersitz in 
Posen province. Feeling that he could better 
himself in the United States, in 1892 he left 
his native land and came direct to Chatham 
Township, Sangamon County, which has.sincej 
been his home. As a start he and his brother 
rented a tract of land and gradually increased 
their operations, in the meanwhile putting 
aside a goodly part of their earnings. Thus 
Mr. Luedke accumulated sufficient means to 
make a first payment on his present fine farm 1 
of 160 acres, which is now entirely clear ofj 
indebtedness and on which he has a beautiful 
home and other substantial buildings, as well 
as modern machinery and improvements of 
all kinds. He is a scientific farmer as well, 
as an industrious one, having made a thorough' 
and comprehensive study of agricultural con-^> 
ditions and methods. For one term, three 
years, he served effectively as commissioner 
and during four terms he served as supervisor 
of Chatham Township, and has rendered valu- 
able service to his community. During the 
World war he was registered for service ifll 
the last draft, but was not called, but did 
valiant work in supporting drives. He belongs 
to the Lutheran Church and is an elder therein 
as well as church treasurer. 

In 1906 Mr. Luedke was united in marriage 
with Miss Carrie Wallner, daughter of Emil 
L. and Minnie (Krueger) Wallner, the former 
of whom was born in Germany and was eleven 
years of age when brought by his parents 
to Sangamon County, the family settling on 
a farm in Ball Township. Mrs. Luedke comes 
of a farming family and is the eldest of nine 
children. To Mr. and Mrs. Luedke there have 
been born four children: Gertrude Magdalene, 
a normal college graduate, who is now teach- 
ing public school at Springfield; Bert P., 
deceased; Walter Gustave, who attended Jack- 
sonville (Illinois) College and is now a student 




mjJ[Mj (L iMu^vxrfAr 



ILLINOIS 



131 



in the University of Illinois; and Esther Char- 
lotte, a high school graduate, now a student 
in the Springfield High School, class of 1932. 
During the World war Mrs. Luedke was very 
active in Red Cross work, being the chairman 
of the Red Cross Auxiliary, of Chatham. 

Miles Abbott Tipsword, attorney at law, 
Charleston, has made the most of the oppor- 
tunities and circumstances of a career which 
has been an honorable record of service in 
the field of education, in the domain of the 
law, and in honorable and patriotic service 
to his community, state and nation. 

Mr. Tipsword is descended from a race of 
people who have in the various generations 
acted well their part. It has been a family 
tradition that no Tipsword is worthy of his 
name who has not been willing and ready at 
all times to risk his body, his well being and 
his life in any national emergency. Within 
the limits of this brief sketch it is possible 
to assemble sufficient facts to prove how well 
this tradition has been maintained. The rec- 
ord may properly begin with the great-grand- 
father of the Charleston attorney, Griffin Tip- 
sword, who was born in Pennsylvania, in 1755. 
In the proceedings of the Commissioners' Court 
of Coles County is a statement sworn to and 
subscribed by Griffin Tipsword under date of 
October 15, 1832. This statement is at once 
an important historical document in local Illi- 
nois history and in the annals of the Tipsword 
family. 

On that date he appeared before the court 
and under oath stated that he was seventy- 
seven years old, and that he entered the serv- 
ice of the United States as a Revolutionary 
soldier under the following named officers, and 
served as herein stated, viz.: In General 
Rutherford's Brigade, Colonel McKatty's Regi- 
ment, Major Horn's Battalion and Captain 
Grimes' Company; that he entered the service 
about 18th day of July, 1775, and was dis- 
charged by General Washington at the close of 
the war, which discharge was accidentally sunk 
in the Ohio River. That he was in the engage- 
ment at the battle of Eutaw Springs, under 
General Greene, Colonel McKatty, Major Horn 
and Captain Grimes ; that he was in the battle 
of Kings Mountain, under Colonel Shelby; 
that he was in the battle of Charleston, under 
Colonel McKatty and Captain McGuire; that 
he was in the battle of Cross Creek, under 
General Gates, Colonel McKatty and Captain 
McGuire; that he was in the battle of Haw 
River, commanded by General Green, Colonel 
Chamberlain, Major Peat and Captain John 
Galloway. He states that he was here wounded 
by a musket shot from the enemy's gun. 
That he marched first after leaving North 
Carolina into the State of Virginia; that he 
was at the surrender of Lord Cornwallis, 
under General Washington, Colonel McKatty 
and Captain McGuire. That he lived in the 



County of Roane and State of North Caro- 
lina, when he entered the service; that he 
first enlisted for three months, and at the end 
of the three months enlisted for the duration 
of the war. That he was born in the State 
of Pennsylvania, near the Susquehanna River, 
in the year of our Lord, 1755; that he moved 
to Kentucky the second year after the expira- 
tion of the war; that he settled in the neigh- 
borhood of Boonesborough, where he resided 
until he removed to the Territory of Illinois, 
in which territory and state he has resided 
about twenty years. That he now resides in 
Coles County and State of Illinois; that his 
name will be easily found on the Continental 
Rolls. 

Griffin Tipsword made this declaration for 
the purpose of obtaining the benefit of the 
Act of Congress passed June 7, 1832, relating 
to the pensioning of Revolutionary soldiers. 
Griffin Tipsword after having lived some years 
in Kentucky came to Southern Illinois in 1812, 
and in 1824 came farther north, locating in 
that part of Clark County now embraced in 
Coles County. His settlement was made at a 
point seven miles southeast of Charleston. 
Griffin Tipsword had a brother, Johanny, who 
came from Kentucky early and settled in Illi- 
nois Territory, in what is now Effingham 
County, where history says he was the first 
permanent white settler in the county and 
that he was "mightily feared" by the Indians 
who inhabited that section of the territory. 

A young son of Griffin Tipsword, Douglas, 
was killed near the site of the Blakeman 
Mill, on the Embarrass River, three miles 
south of Charleston, in 1815, in a battle 
between the Illinois Rangers, under command 
of General Whiteside, the pioneer Indian 
fighter, and a large band of Kickapoos, Pot- 
tawatomies and Winnebagoes, who had col- 
lected in force in the Upper Embarrass coun- 
try, and, proceeding to the Kickapoo settle- 
ment, committed many depredations among 
the scattered settlers, stole and drove off a 
large number of their horses and cattle. Gen- 
eral Whiteside and his "Rangers" followed 
their trail to the site of the Blakeman Mill, 
where it crossed the Embarrass River. There 
they gave battle to the Indians and the fight 
raged fiercely until the Indians were defeated. 

On coming to Coles County Griffin Tipsword 
settled in Hutton Township. This land in 
1832 was deeded to John A. Tipsword by 
Government land patent. John Adams Tips- 
word, grandfather of Miles Abbott, married 
Elizabeth Harris. Among their children were 
James Madison Tipsword, who was born on 
the old homestead farm in Coles County, April 
3, 1835. James Madison Tipsword at the 
early age of seventeen was licensed to preach 
the Christian faith and doctrine. It was 
his vocation throughout all his remaining 
years, and he was unceasing in his good 
labors and ministry until at the age of sev- 



132 



ILLINOIS 



enty-eight his soul was taken to its Maker. 
His mind was clear to the end. James Mad- 
ison Tipsword had a brother, Griffin, who 
volunteered his services as a Union soldier 
in the Civil war. He was honorably dis- 
charged at the close of the war and later 
moved to Missouri, where he died. 

James Madison Tipsword married Sarah 
Carlin, daughter of John Carlin. John Carlin 
was a nephew of the distinguished Illinois 
statesman, Thomas Carlin, who served as a 
Democrat in the Illinois Senate at the old 
capital at Vandalia in 1824-26-28-30-32, and 
in the House of Representatives at Springfield, 
1848-50, and was governor of the state from 
1938 to 1842. The Carlins, as well as the 
Tipswords, came from Kentucky, settling in 
Southern Illinois about 1812, and later moving 
northward into what was then Crawford 
County, a district that was subsequently 
divided into other counties, one of which is 
Coles. 

James Madison and Sarah Carlin Tipsword 
had a family of ten children, five sons and 
five daughters. Of these only three survive, 
Miles A., John C. and Clarence E. 

Miles Abbott Tipsword was born in a 
log cabin on a farm two miles south of Bee- 
cher City, Effingham County, Illinois, March 

13, 1873. Mr. Tipsword confesses that in 
his earlier years he yielded to the old super- 
stition that the number 13 is a hoodoo, and 
consequently he changed the record in the 
old family Bible to read March 9, by crossing 
a line through the 13 and writing the figure 
9, which he adopted and has ever afterwards 
kept as his birthday. At a very early age 
he was apprenticed to a neighbor who under- 
took to teach him the carpenter's trade. While 
working on a barn, at the age of fifteen, he 
fell from the rafters to the ground floor, 
sustaining such bone fractures and bruises 
that he was unable to do any physical work 
for a space of two years. However, he turned 
this enforced leisure to account, and applied 
himself strenuously to the fundamentals of 
bookkeeping, attending country school faith- 
fully. Thus at the age of seventeen he earned 
a teacher's certificate, and for more than 
eleven years afterwards taught in the public 
schools of Cumberland and Coles counties. 
During the last six years of his teaching 
activities he studied law in and o.ut of the 
law offices of Hon. Peter A. Brady, of Greenup, 
Cumberland County. After having success- 
fully passed an examination at Springfield 
he was admitted to the Illinois bar October 

14, 1899. Since then he has been admitted 
to practice in all the courts of the state, 
including the United States District and Cir- 
cuit Courts of Illinois. For two years he 
lived in Oklahoma and was admitted to the 
state and federal courts of that state. For 
over thirty-three years he has applied himself 
to a busy professional routine and has long 



enjoyed a high standing at the bar of 
Charleston. 

Mr. Tipsword in the spring of 1898, after 
the beginning of the Spanish-American war, 
became a corporal in Capt. LeRoy Fancher's 
Company H of Col. Aden Knoff's Provisional 
Regiment at Greenup. Owing to the fact that 
the company was largely made up of teachers 
and superintendents of public schools in Cum- 
berland County, the need for their service 
as soldiers had passed before their respective 
terms of school had expired and they were 
not called to active duty. During the World 
war Mr. Tipsword was secretary-treasurer of 
the Charleston Government Club, doing daily 
practice under Government supervision and 
subject to call as home guards. 

On May 22, 1901, Mr. Tipsword married 
Miss Lola Maud Beck, daughter of James 
F. Beck, of Coles County, a Civil war veteran. 
To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Tipsword 
were born four children: Winifred, now Mrs. 
Oliver White, of Springfield; Freda, Mrs. 
Lionel Bruce, of Champaign; Carlos Beck, of 
Memphis, Tennessee; and Miles Abbott, Jr., 
at home. 

Thomas Rhea Maxwell-, M. D. Numbered 
among the leading professional men of San- 
gamon County is Dr. Thomas R. Maxwell, 
who is engaged in the practice of medicine 
and surgery at New Berlin, where he is held 
in general respect and confidence. His experi- 
ences have included service in the United 
States Army Medical Corps, both in the 
United States and in France, and he is ac- 
counted a thoroughly learned and skilful prac- 
titioner, a capable diagnostician and a careful 
operator. 

Doctor Maxwell was born May 5, 1884, in 
Sangamon County, and is a son of Richard 
E. and Lou (Rhea) Maxwell. His father was 
born October 4, 1850, a son of William and 
Hannah (Batty) Maxwell, the former of whom 
came from Pennsylvania and the latter from 
England. Richard E. Maxwell settled on a 
farm in Island Grove Township, where he 
passed the rest of his life in agricultural 
pursuits and married Lou Rhea, daughter of 
Thomas and Lucinda (Wilcox) Rhea. Thomas 
Rhea was a son of James and Rachael (Jol- 
lisse) Rhea, natives of Greenbrier County, 
Virginia, who came to Illinois as young people, 
the latter being a daughter of Abner Jollisse, 
the latter a son of John and Margaret (Ran- 
chey) Jollisse. John Jollisse, who was born 
in 1510, was the first Earl of Essex. Lucinda 
Wilcox, the grandmother of Doctor Maxwell, 
was a daughter of Ellis and Ann (Lewis) 
Wilcox, the former born in Kentucky and the 
latter in South Carolina, his parents being 
John and Lucinda (Oglesby) Wilcox, and 
Lucinda's father, William Oglesby, was a sol- 
dier during the Revolutionary war. They came 
from Loudoun County, Virginia, settling first 



I 



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133 



in Logan County, Kentucky, from whence they 
came to St. Clair County, Illinois, and in 1818 
moved to a farm on the Sangamon River in 
Sangamon County. 

Thomas R. Maxwell was reared on the home 
farm, where he worked during his spare hours 
while attending the public schools of New 
Berlin. After graduating from high school 
he attended the Kentucky Military Institute, 
Louisville, for a time, but returned to New 
Berlin to accept a position in the bank. Decid- 
ing that a career as a financier was not for 
him, he returned to Louisville and in 1916 
was graduated from the university with the 
degree of Doctor of Medicine. He served his 
interneship in the Louisville City Hospital 
and then enlisted in the United States Medical 
Corps and was first sent for training to Rocke- 
feller Institute, New York City, and later to 
the Army Medical School. Doctor Maxwell 
first saw service at Camps Meade and Han- 
cock and at Base Hospital No. 53, and eventu- 
ally was sent to New York City and then to 
Langre, France, where for about one year 
he saw active service in the corps, having the 
rank of first lieutenant. Upon his return to 
this country he received his honorable dis- 
charge at Camp Dix, New York, and then 
returned to New Berlin, where he has been 
engaged in the general practice of medicine 
and surgery since January, 1920. 

Doctor Maxwell has built up a large and 
lucrative clientele and is a close student of 
his calling, being a member of the Sangamon 
County Medical Society, the Illinois State Med- 
ical Society and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. Fraternally he is affiliated with the 
Masons, Shriners and Elks, and also belongs 
to the Sangamo Club. His hobby is hunting, 
and he belongs to the select few who have 
enjoyed the thrill of big game hunting. 

Justin Taft. Aside from any distinction 
that may attach to his being a member of a 
distinguished family, Justin Taft is known as 
a prosperous, reliable and industrious citizen 
of Rochester Township, Sangamon County, 
where he is the owner and operator of a 
well-cultivated and valuable farm. It his been 
his fortune to have accumulated material prop- 
erty and to have so conducted his affairs and 
comported himself as to win and hold the 
friendship and esteem of those among whom 
he has lived and labored during an active and 
industrious career. 

Mr. Taft, a third cousin of the late Presi- 
dent William Howard Taft, was born on the 
old Taft farm in Sangamon County, July 17, 
1889, and is a son of William and Emma 
(Green) Taft. His paternal grandfather was 
William W. Taft, who, with his wife, Eliza, 
came from Vermont and took up Government 
land in Sangamon County, where he was an 
early settler and prominent citizen. He had 
a wide acquaintance among prominent men of 



his day was a friend of Abraham Lincoln. 
One of his cousins went to Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and established there the distinguished Taft 
family which gave to the United States a 
President. 

William Taft, the father of Justin Taft, 
was born on the old home farm, received a 
common school education, and devoted his life 
to farming and stock raising, dying "in the 
harness." He took an active part in civic 
affairs and was known as a public-spirited 
citizen. He and his wife were the parents of 
five children: Richard H., Joseph, Lydia, Jus- 
tin and Jason. 

Justin Taft attended the public schools of 
Rochester, following which he returned t l o the 
farm and took up the pursuits of the tiller 
of the soil. He has always been a farmer and 
stock man and has made a success of his 
work, due to his application, intelligent use 
of modern methods and good business manage- 
ment, and is accounted one of the substantial 
citizens of his community. He has been a 
member of the Board of Trustees of Rochester 
and member and clerk of the school board, 
and both he and Mrs. Taft are active members 
of the Christian Church. Fraternally he is 
identified with the Masonic order. 

On October 10, 1918, Mr. Taft married Jen- 
nie Craig, a daughter of John and Mary 
(Murphy) Craig, natives of Glasgow, Scot- 
land. Her paternal grandparents, William 
Craig and his wife, both died on the ocean 
while coming to the United States, but their 
four children all arrived safely at Spring- 
field and became substantial people. Mr. and 
Mrs. Taft have four children: William Webb, 
Justin, Jr., Helen Jane and Arnold Craig. 

Augustus C. Werckle represents one of 
the old and substantial families of Peoria 
County. Mr. Werckle has lived in that county 
practically all his life, was for many years 
an outstanding dairy farmer, and since retir- 
ing from business has devoted much of his 
time to public affairs and politics. He is 
supervisor of Richwood Township. 

He was born June 20, 1861, in section 29, 
Richwood Township, Peoria County. He is 
a son of Henry and Caroline (Brua) Werckle. 
His father came from Alsace-Lorraine, was of 
German stock, and served as an officer in the 
Prussian army. He married in the old coun- 
try, and brought with him to America his 
wife and one child. He settled in Richwood 
Township, Peoria County, and lived out his 
life there. There were six children: William, 
Henry, Augustus C, Fred W., Caroline and 
Sarah. Both daughters are now deceased. 

Augustus C. Werckle grew up on the home 
farm, attended the Loucks country school and 
also completed a course in the Peoria Normal 
School. Since completing his education he 
has had a busy round of duties and respon- 
sibilities. In 1884 he embarked in the dairy 



134 



ILLINOIS 



business, and was one of the early dairymen 
of the county, and much of his success was 
due to his skill and judgment in managing 
and building up a fine breed of dairy cattle. 
He became a recognized authority on fine dairy 
stock. 

Mr. Werckle married in 1887 Miss Martha 
J. Lynch. They have three sons. The oldest, 
Frederick W., married Ethel Bauer and has 
a daughter, Marylin. Robert A. married Mary 
Clare. Earl, the third son, married Marie 
Fehl and has two children, Winton E. and 
Robert D. 

Mr. Werckle even while an active dairy 
farmer took a keen interest in local affairs 
and politics. He has held the office of super- 
visor of his township for the past twenty 
years. He is affiliated with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church and is a Democrat. 

Hon. James Cook Conkling. Although the 
history of Hon. James Cook Conkling belongs 
to the past, rather than to the present, of 
Illinois, his achievements were so numerous 
and his connections so important that no rec- 
ord dealing with the lives of distinguished 
Illinois men would be complete without mention 
of his name. A contemporary, associate and 
friend of great men of his times, he played 
no small part in the political history of Spring- 
field, where his achievements and talents as 
a lawyer and public official kept him prom- 
inently in the public eye from the early '60s 
right up to the time of his death. 

Mr. Conkling was born in New York City, 
October 13, 1816, and received his common 
school education at Morristown, New York, 
following which he attended Princeton Uni- 
versity and was graduated therefrom as a 
member of the class of 1835, when he was only 
nineteen years of age. After studying law 
he went to Mount Vernon, Ohio, and practiced 
for a time, but became dissatisfied with his 
surroundings and accordingly came to Illinois, 
seeking a suitable location in which to display 
his talents. After visiting Chicago, Vandalia 
and other communities, he finally decided upon 
Springfield, where he settled permanently in 
1838 and where he soon took his place among 
such future great men as Abraham Lincoln, 
Stephen A. Douglas, Edward D. Baker, Ste- 
phen T. Logan and John J. Hardin. He was 
also a friend of Cyrus Walker and Gen. James 
A Shields. 

Mr. Conkling was for years one of the lead- 
ing members of the Illinois bar and partici- 
pated in numerous hard-fought cases which 
attracted widespread interest. He joined 
other prominent men of his day in founding 
the National Republican party, in which he 
wielded a strong influence all of his life, and 
at various times was the incumbent of impor- 
tant positions, including the mayoralty of 
Springfield. He was an elector in the national 
convention that nominated Lincoln for the 



Presidency, and in 1861 was decidedly active 
in aiding Governor Yates in raising troops 
for the Civil war. Mr. Conkling was an 
important force in bringing the state capital 
to Springfield. Governor Cullom appointed him 
a member of the board of trustees of the 
University of Illinois, and he also served for 
some time as postmaster of Springfield. Presi- 
dent Lincoln's famous letter "to overcome 
slavery" written to Mr. Conkling was heralded 
all over the world. With his family he 
belonged to the Westminster Church, and ill 
the organization he played an important part. 
On September 21, 1841, at Baltimore, Mary- 
land, Mr. Conkling married Mercy Ann Levi 
ering, daughter of Captain Levering, and to 
this union there were born the following chilJ 
dren: Clinton L., who married Georgia Bar4 
rell and had two children; Charles, deceased;' 
Annie, who has been twice married and has 
no children; and Alice, deceased. 

John Burke, LaSalle County business man 
and farmer, whose home is on Rural Route 
No. 1, five miles north of Utica, has lived 
all his life in Waltham Township, where h« 
was born February 19, 1866. 

His parents both came from Ireland. His 
father, Thomas Burke, was born at Cashel, 
Tipperary, son of Nicholas Burke, who headed 
the family when it came to America. Nicholas 
Burke took up Government land in LaSalle 
Township. They came from Ireland in 1850J 
Thomas Burke was about twenty years of age 
at the time. As a young man he worked on] 
a steamboat on the Mississippi River, butj 
most of his active years were spent as a 
farmer in LaSalle County, where he died Janu- 
ary 30, 1911. His wife, Bridget McGrath, 
was born in Clonmel, Tipperary, in 1837/ 
and her parents came to the United States 
in 1855. She died at the old homestead August 
8, 1900. Both parents were devout Catholics. 
Their children were: Mary, born in 1857, 
wife of William Brandes, of Mendota; Thomas, 
born in 1861 and died in 1928, married Maria 
Manley; William, born in 1868, a resident of 
Deer Lodge, Montana, married Mary Duffy; 
David, born in 1871, is a resident of Waltham 
Township and married Nellie Sharp; Frank, 
born in 1873, died in 1916; James N., born 
in 1875, is a resident of Waltham Township 
and married Margaret Boyle. Mr. John Burke 
was the third child. 

He acquired a common school education in 
Waltham Township, finishing his school days 
in February, 1885. He has devoted more than 
forty-five years to an active career as a farmer 
and business man. He has eighty acres of 
land in Waltham Township, using it for the 
growing of grain, live stock and fruit. Mr. 
Burke is also president and a director of the 
Utica Elevator Company. 

He has been active in community affairs 
for the past thirty-five years and has filled 



ILLINOIS 



135 



the offices of justice of the peace and school 
trustee. He is a Democrat and during the 
World war was treasurer of the Waltham 
Chapter of the Red Cross. He is a member 
of the National Geographic Society, Camp 
No. 262, Modern Woodmen of America, at 
Utica, and he and his family are members 
of St. Mary's Catholic Church at Utica. Mr" 
Burke has lived a busy life but has formed 
many interesting contacts with people and 
affairs. His favorite diversion is baseball. 

Mr. Burke married, February 13, 1901, Miss 
Margaret Kinnegar, who died February 15, 
1915, leaving one son, John Thomas Burke, 
born May 27, 1903. On November 30, 1916, 
at Utica, Mr. Burke married Anna Waldron, 
who was born in Waltham Township, March 
7, 1872, daughter of Charles and Elizabeth 
(Cahill) Waldron. Charles Waldron was a 
native of Ireland, where he acquired most of 
his education. In 1852 he came with his 
parents, Thomas and Anna (Burns) Waldron, 
to America. Thomas Waldron was one of the 
pioneers of LaSalle County and built one 
of the early log houses in Waltham Township. 

Major Albert E. Gage is a prominent Chi- 
cagoan, one of the last surviving officers of 
the Union army in the Civil war. Major 
Gage for many years has been commander-in- 
chief of the Blue and Gray Legion. This was 
organized nearly fifty years ago, by two of- 
ficers with the rank of major, one from the 
Union and one from the Confederate side. 
Major Gage has recently devoted much time 
to promoting a projected last reunion of the 
Blue and the" Gray. 

He is a native of Illinois, member of one 
of the pioneer families of Waukegan. He 
was born in Waukegan, Lake County, August 
15, 1845, son of Gen. Ben and Miranda (Ste- 
vens) Gage. The Gages were a historic fam- 
ily of Vermont, dating back to early Colonial 
times. Gen. Ben Gage was a western pioneer. 
From Buffalo, New York, he traveled by sail- 
ing vessel to Waukegan, where he landed in 
1835. He was a millwright and bridge builder, 
and he constructed the first bridges in Lake 
County and helped build the first bridge across 
the river in Chicago. 

Albert E. Gage recived his early education 
in Waukegan. He was not yet sixteen years 
of age when he enlisted for service in the 
Civil war. He joined the famous Thirty-sev- 
enth Illinois Infantry, which was organized at 
Chicago in the summer of 1861, the original 
name being the "Fremont Rifle Regiment." 
It was mustered in September 18, 1861, and 
the following day started south. It was one 
of the regiments in the expedition to South- 
western Missouri and had a notable part in 
the campaign against the Confederate forces, 
culminating in the battles in Northwestern 
Arkansas, which removed the menace of Con- 
federate control of the State of Missouri. 



Major Gage was with his regiment in the vi- 
cinity of Springfield, Missouri, for over a year 
and participated with his regiment in the 
battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, in March, 
1862, in the fight at Elkhorn Tavern, and In 
the fall of that year in the fighting around 
Fayetteville, at Prairie Grove and in other 
engagements. Some of these battles were 
the hardest fought in the entire war. The 
opposing troops fought face to face and used 
their bayonets in hand to hand conflict. In 
one of the battles in which Major Gage took 
part there was what was known as "volley 
firing," accompanied by a dense smoke screen. 
During 1863 the Thirty-seventh Illinois was 
under the command of Grant in the siege of 
Vicksburg and later in the year participated 
in the Banks expedition to the Rio Grande 
River, proceeding as far south as Browns- 
ville, Texas. In March, 1864, the regiment, 
having reenlisted, returned north on veteran 
furlough, but soon afterward again started 
south, going to Memphis, was in fighting in 
Northern Mississippi and Louisiana, early in 
1865 went to Pensacola, Florida, and then 
participated in one of the culminating opera- 
tions of the war, the siege of Mobile. After 
the surrender the regiment was assigned gar- 
rison duty in Texas and was not mustered out 
until May 15, 1866. Thus Major Gage was 
in the army nearly four years. The Thirty- 
seventh Regiment participated in thirteen bat- 
tles, sieges and skirmishes and had the march- 
ing record in American military annals, 
marching on foot 3,500 miles, traveling by 
rail and boat about 13,000 miles, and cam- 
paigned in every western and southern state 
that was in hostility to the Government. 

Major Gage from the organization of the 
Grand Army of the Republic has taken an 
active interest in that organization, but has 
been chiefly devoted to the Blue and Gray 
Legion. During the Spanish-American war 
he organized a Blue and Gray Legion which 
sent out two immune regiments. He also 
volunteered his services during the Boer war 
in South Africa. He joined Dr. J. B. Mur- 
phy's Ambulance Corps in Chicago, which was 
organized to provide assistance to the Boer 
cause. 

After the Civil war Major Gage engaged in 
farming and during the '70s conducted a fine 
farm in Winnebago County. In 1879 he re- 
ceived the notable honor of being designated 
as the "Premium Farmer" of the county, an 
honor based upon efficiency and success as a 
practical agriculturist. After leaving his farm 
Major Gage removed to Chicago. He has 
assisted in organizing and has supported nu- 
merous social, economic and financial move- 
ments, such as the Economic Federation, 
American Liberty Association, the General Ben 
Gage Foundation and the Universal Service 
of America, the last named sponsoring a sys- 
tem of international currency. Major Gage 



136 



ILLINOIS 



is a member of the Borrowed Time Club of 
Oak Park, the Old Settlers Club of Chicago 
and other organizations. His office is at 10 
North LaSalle Street and his home is in the 
LaSalle Hotel. 

Albert Jarvis Taylor. In the retired for- 
mer citizenship of Sangamon County agricul- 
turists there are to be found numerous men 
who have made their marks through the stren- 
uous work of their own hands and the coopera- 
tion of good management and the adjusting 
of opportunities when seen and recognized. 
Among this class of retired citizens is A. J. 
Taylor, who now resides at New Berlin, from 
whence he supervises the operations of his 
land through subordinates. Mr. Taylor is an 
octogenarian, but still retains the energy and 
mental strength of many men years younger 
than he, and likewise maintains interest in 
all of the affairs that are going on around his 
sphere of life. 

A. J. Taylor was born October 7, 1850, on 
Long Island Sound, Westport, Connecticut. 
His father brought the family in the following 
year to Illinois, traveling from Connecticut to 
Pittsburgh, and thence down the Ohio River 
to Cairo, Illinois, and up the Illinois River 
to Bates in Sangamon County, where he be- 
came one of the earliest settlers. He came 
into this section to take up the management 
of a farm for New York parties, and later 
rented land on his own account, after which 
he bought land on his own account and even- 
tually became one of large land owners of 
the county. Francis Taylor's first wife, Hen- 
rietta Morehouse, died during the Civil war 
period, leaving four children, as follows: 
Mary C, A. J., Francis I. and Edward H. 
Later he married Harriet Rumsey, and there 
were four children born to this union: C. R., 
William (deceased), Harriet and Fred D. 

During the period that he was attending 
the public schools of New Berlin, A. J. Tay- 
lor spent all of his vacation periods in assist- 
ing his father on the home farm, particularly 
in connection with the livestock business, his 
father having been one of the largest cattle 
feeders of the township. At the age of twenty- 
one years, like many farmers' sons of his day, 
he was attracted to railroading, learned teleg- 
raphy, and was agent at Bement and other 
township points until 1881, in which year he 
gave up railroading and returned to New 
Berlin, where he became associated with his 
father and brother in general merchandising, 
as F. Taylor & Son. In the big conflagra- 
tion which visited New Berlin in 1894 this 
enterprise was one to suffer most greatly and 
it was never continued after that. A. J. Tay- 
lor then resumed farming, in which he con- 
tinued to be engaged until his retirement, and 
he is still the owner of some valuable farm 
land in Sangamon County. He is likewise 
engaged in the insurance business, and is 



active mentally and physically, despite his 
more than eighty years. 

Mr. Taylor has been for years a supporter 
of religious movements, and very active in 
civic affairs. He has a distinct recollection 
of Abraham Lincoln, and his father was one 
of the martyred President's personal friends. 

Edward Hyde Taylor. A worthy and capa- 
ble representative of the farming interests of 
Sangamon County is found in the person of 
Edward H. Taylor, who owns and operates a 
tract of 400 acres in Berlin Township, near 
New Berlin, on R. F. D. Route No. 1. Mr. 
Taylor is one of the self-made men of the 
county, where he has passed his entire career, 
with the exception of a short time spent in 
business college in Iowa, and has always in- 
terested himself in civic affairs, having been 
a member of the board of school trustees for 
nearly forty years. 

Mr. Taylor was born in 1860, on his father's 
farm near New Berlin, Sangamon County, and 
is a son of Francis and Henrietta B. (More- 
house) Taylor. His parents, natives of West- 
port, Connecticut, went from that place to 
New York City,, whence they made their way 
overland to Erie, Pennsylvania, then via the 
Great Lakes to Chicago and finally to San- 
gamon County by stage. Mr. Taylor was 
manager of a large tract of land for New 
York interests, but eventually became a 
farmer on his own account and accumulated 
a large and valuable property. By his first 
union Mr. Taylor was the father of four chil- 
dren: Mary, who married Frank Coulter; Al- 
bert J., a retired citizen of New Berlin; Fran- 
cis; and Edward H. Mr. Taylor married for, 
his second wife Harriet Rumsey, and they also 
had four children: Charles R., William, de- 
ceased; Hallie, of New York; and Fred, of 
Chicago. 

The grandparents of Edward H. Taylor, 
Dan and Sally (Adams) Taylor, were farming 
people. He was a son of Abijah and Isabelle 
(Wiley) Taylor, the former of whom was 
born September 22, 1740, and served in the 
French and Indian war under Gen. Isaac Put- 
nam, who made him second sergeant of the 
Fifth Company, A Battalion, September 13, 
1764, this commission being on file at the Nor- 
walk (Connecticut) Historical Society. He 
likewise saw service during the Revolutionary 
war. Abijah Taylor was a son of Lieut. Josiah 
and Thankful (French) Taylor, a grandson 
of John and Waite (Clapp) Taylor, and a 
great-grandson of Capt. John and Thankful 
(Woodward) Taylor, the former a captain of 
militia who was killed by the Indians, May 
13, 1704. He was a son of John Taylor, who 
was born at Windsor, England, in 1612, and 
came to America on the ship Mary and John, 
before the sailing of Governor Winthrop's 
party. He sailed for England on the first 
ship built in this country, in 1645, known 



ILLINOIS 



137 



as "the phantom ship," which was lost at 
sea and never heard from. 

Edward H. Taylor attended the schools of 
New Berlin, working on the home farm during 
vacations, and at the age of twenty-three years 
took a course in a business college at Burling- 
ton, Iowa. Returning to Sangamon County, 
he applied himself to farming in Berlin Town- 
ship, where he now has a valuable and well 
improved property and is accounted one of 
his community's reliable and responsible citi- 
zens. As before noted, Mr. Taylor has been 
a school trustee for forty years. He has been 
an active member of the Presbyterian Church 
all of his life and has been helpful in its 
various enterprises, and likewise takes an 
active interest in all civic affairs. He resides 
in a large Colonial style home near Bates, 
[llinois, on the main route from New Berlin. 

On March 4, 1891, Mr. Taylor married Min- 
nie E. Coulter, a daughter of F. G. Coulter, 
a carpenter and dealer in horses, who came 
to Illinois as a boy about 1847 with his parents 
from Pennsylvania. He married first Nellie 
A.. Ratikin, and after her death, Mary C. 
Taylor, a sister of Edward H. Taylor. They 
had four children: Mrs. Cornelia Bird, Earl 
C, Arthur A. and Frank G., Jr. He married 
for his third wife Grace P. Clark and died in 
1922, being buried in Oak Ridge Cemetery, 
Springfield. Four children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Taylor : Mary C, who married 
Percy Wilcox, and had two children, Edna 
and Mildred, all of whom met their deaths in 
an accident at Springfield; Violet, of Spring- 
field; Edna, deceased; and Evan, who married 
Frances Wilcox and has one daughter, Ruth. 

John Quinn Harrison. Among the highly 
esteemed residents of Pleasant Plains, one 
whose life's labors have been crowned with 
success and who has the esteem and respect 
of the people of his community is John Quinn 
Harrison. Although he is now living a retired 
life, having accumulated what he considers a 
sufficiency of this world's goods, he still super- 
vises the operations on his valuable farm of 
400 acres, located in Cartwright Township, 
where he labored for many years. 

Mr. Harrison was born on the above prop- 
erty, September 7, 1869, and is a son of Robert 
P. and Almeda (Bone) Harrison. His paternal 
grandparents were Simeon and Mary Har- 
rison, the former of whom was born in Vir- 
ginia, whence he moved to Illinois, via Ken- 
tucky, and settled in Cartwright Township, 
where he became a leading farmer and an 
intimate friend of prominent citizens, including 
Abraham Lincoln. Robert P. Harrison was 
born on his father's farm in Sangamon County, 
where he first attended the common schools 
and later completed his education in a paid 
school. He commenced his career as a farmer 
on rented land, and by industry and good 
management rose to be one of the wealthy 



and influential agriculturists of the county, 
being the owner of much valuable land at 
the time of his death. He and his wife were 
laid to rest in Oak Ridge Cemetery at Spring- 
field. They were the parents of three chil- 
dren: John Quinn, of this review; Mary, the 
widow of Langley Whitley, and who has one 
daughter, Catherine, the wife of Glenn Rhodes ; 
and Nellie A., the wife of Lockridge D. Hulen. 

John Quinn Harrison attended the country 
schools and assisted his father on the home 
farm until the elder man's death, at which 
time he bought out the interests of the other 
heirs to the estate and from that time forward 
continued to cultivate the land and add to its 
improvements until his retirement from active 
labors. Although he now makes his home 
at Pleasant Plains, he is still the owner of 
400 acres of land in Cartwright Township 
and is accounted one of his community's sub- 
stantial citizens. Mr. Harrison has always 
been a public-spirited and constructive citizen, 
taking an active interest and participation 
in civic affairs and beneficial movements. He 
belongs to Pleasant Plains Lodge No. 700, 
A. F. and A. M., the Consistory and Shrine 
at Springfield, and the local lodge of the 
Modern Woodmen of America. He is affiliated 
with the Federated Church of Baptists and 
Presbyterians, of which Mrs. Harrison is also 
a member, she likewise belonging to the Royal 
Neighbors of America. 

On June 21, 1899, Mr. Harrison married 
Nellie Happer, daughter of John G. and Annis 
(Brown) Happer. Mr. Happer, who was born 
in Sangamon County, finished his schooling 
at Indian Point and then settled down to farm- 
ing, becoming one of the prominent and influ- 
ential farmers of his locality. He and his 
wife were the parents of three children: How- 
ard, who is deceased; Nellie, now Mrs. Har- 
rison; and Mrs. Helen Allan, who has two 
children, Verne and Russell. To Mr. and 
Mrs. Harrison there have been born three 
children: Helen, the wife of Glenn Wineman, 
and Lucille and Annis, who live with their 
parents. 

Hon. William Sherman Hensley. The 
chief executive of the thriving little City of 
Pleasant Plains, Hon. William Sherman Hens- 
ley, has been a lifelong resident of Sangamon 
County, and for many years has been engaged 
in the undertaking business. A man of high 
character, he has won the confidence and 
esteem of his fellow-citizens, not only in his 
specialized field of endeavor, but also as a 
public official, having served capably as mayor 
since 1924. 

Mr. Hensley was born on a farm in San- 
gamon County, July 4, 1865, and is a son of 
John and Lee Anna (Lynch) Hensley. John 
Hensley was born in Virginia and as a lad 
was taken by his parents to Pickaway County, 
Ohio, where he grew to young manhood, receiv- 



138 



ILLINOIS 






ing a common school education. When the 
discovery of gold in California was announced 
in 1849, he drove an ox-team in the long and 
perilous journey across the plains and eventu- 
ally settled at Santiago, California, where he 
remained for from eight to ten years. Having 
accumulated some money, he made the return 
journey via the Panama and settled in Sanga- 
mon County, Illinois, where he invested his 
capital in farming land, on which he continued 
operations during the remainder of his life. 
Mr. Hensley married Anna Lee Lynch, who 
was born at Circleville, Ohio, daughter of 
James and Sarah Lynch, and was four years 
of age at the time her parents came to San- 
gamon County and settled at Old Berlin. She 
attended the old log schoolhouse and was one 
of the oldest residents of the county, having 
reached the age of ninety-four years on Jan- 
uary 14, 1931, and died February 20, 1931. 
To John and Anna Lee Hensley were born 
eight children: Kate, Mary and Jane, who 
are deceased; Harry, who married Georgia 
Corder and has one daughter, Georgia; Sam- 
uel A., the proprietor of a grocery at 813 
North Columbia Street, Springfield, Ohio; 
William Sherman, of this review; Wallace, 
deceased; and Leonard. 

William Sherman Hensley attended the 
Franklin School in Cartwright and then 
returned to the home farm for a time, but, 
becoming dissatisfied with the life of an agri- 
culturist, went to Chicago, where he attended 
the Chicago School of Embalming for one 
year. Returning to Sangamon County at the 
end of that period, he established himself 
in the undertaking business, in which he has 
since been engaged, and his patronage now 
extends all over the county. He maintains 
a modern funeral home, with up-to-date equip- 
ment and every convenience for the dignified 
and reverent care of the dead, and his tact 
and kindliness have earned him the gratitude 
and confidence of countless persons to whom 
he has been an adviser in the time of bereave- 
ment. Mr. Hensley was elected mayor of 
Pleasant Plains in 1924 and has served effi- 
ciently and energetically in that capacity ever 
since. He is a Mason and a member of the 
Eastern Star, and is prominent in the affairs 
of the Presbyterian Church. He has a modern 
home at Pleasant Plains, standing in the midst 
of ten acres of land. 

In 1887 Mr. Hensley married Josephine 
Griffin, daughter of William B. and Malinda 
(Farris) Griffin, and to this union there have 
been born two sons: Reed, who married Verna 
Boyd; and John, who is married and has one 
child, Barbara Ann. Reed Hensley attended 
the Chicago School of Embalming, and at pres- 
ent is associated with his father in the embalm- 
ing firm of Hensley & Son, in addition to 
which he is assistant cashier of the local 
bank. He is a Mason and a member of the 
Eastern Star. John Hensley is a graduate 



of the College of Osteopathy of Chicago, Illi- 
nois, and now practices his profession at Crys- 
tal Lake, Illinois, and is one of the important 
citizens of his community. He is also a Mason. 
All members of the family have been active 
in the work of the Presbyterian Church and 
interested in civic matters. 

William Ryder. The postmaster of Auburn, 
Illinois, William Ryder, has been a resident 
of this community for more than thirty years, 
during which period he has followed a variety* 
of pursuits, principally connected with thJ 
coal mining industry. He has always beea 
prominent in public affairs, having filled a 
number of positions with marked ability and! 
to the entire satisfaction of his fellow citizens! 
by whom he is held in high esteem ana 
confidence. 

Mr. Ryder was born in 1870, in England, 
and is a son of John and Susan (Harris)? 
Ryder. His father was born in England, 
where he received only a meagre education 
and at a tender age was sent into the coal 
mines to earn a very modest wage, always 
turned over to his parents. However, when 
he reached his majority he married and was 
able to save a part of his earnings, and in 
1880, with a view of bettering his condition, 
brought his family to the United States and* 
took up his residence in Illinois. In 1900 - 
he went to Kansas, but returned to Illinois, 
and spent the rest of his life in the coal 
mines of Sangamon County. He and his wife- 
were the parents of five children: William, 
of this review; John; Eli; Tom, and Eva, 
who married James Rowe and has five children. 

William Ryder attended the common schools 
of England until he was ten years of age, at 
which time he accompanied his parents to 
the United States and attended school in Kan- 
sas and at Auburn, Illinois, where he had 
two years of high school. In the meanwhile 
he had started working in the mines at the 
age of thirteen years, and for about thirty-five 
years, all told, worked in various capacities 
in the mines, advancing in position as his 
abilities and experiences increased and at all 
times displaying industry and fidelity. For 
two years he was manager of the Miners 
Cooperative Store, and also for a period was 
employed at the baker's trade. In 1922 Mr. 
Ryder was appointed postmaster at Auburn, 
and has continued to act in that capacity to 
the present. He has given fully of his ability 
and energy to this work, and during his incum- 
bency of the office has raised the standards 
of service considerably, so that the people 
of Auburn and the surrounding community 
receive their mail expeditiously and without 
error. This has not been his only public 
service, as he was formerly a member of the 
board of school directors and of the town 
board of Auburn. He belongs to the Advent 
Christian Church, of which he is an elder, 




J&Lx^-fy K '\2^-e£t*a~c^~ 



ILLINOIS 



139 



and has worked effectively in behalf of its 
various movements and activities. Fraternally 

1 he is affiliated with the Masons, Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, 
Knights of the Maccabees and Improved Order 
of Red Men, and in the latter is a past national 
officers in the Haymakers degree. Politically 

i he has always been a supporter of the candi- 
dates and principles of the Republican party, 
in which he wields a strong influence in this 
section. He belongs to the Commercial Club 

: and is interested in all civic matters. 

In 1902 Mr. Ryder married Emelia Chap- 

i man, a daughter of Frank and Nellie (Parker) 
Chapman, and a granddaughter of a veteran 
of the war between the states. Frank Chap- 
man was for a number of years a merchant 
in Kansas. Three children have been born 
to Mr. and Mrs. Ryder: Thomas, who married 

| Miss Byers and* has one daughter, Eloise; 

I Elizabeth, who married Glenn Dobb and has 
two children, Elma and Norma; and Thornton, 
who resides with his parents. Mrs. Ryder has 
taken an active part in the work of the Advent 
Christian Church, and like her husband has 
many friends in the community. 

Oscar Fletcher Cochran. Cochran is one 
of the oldest names in the Moultrie County 
ibar. The leading law firm of Sullivan is 
! Cochran, Sentel & Cochran. The senior mem- 
ber of this firm is now practically retired 
I from active law work. He is judge William 
Granville Cochran, a. Civil war veteran and 
la man of long and honorable distinction in 
I his profession and in public service. The 
active member of the Cochran family at the 
Ibar is Oscar Fetcher Cochran. 
# Judge William Granville Cochran was born 
m Ross County, Ohio, and in 1849 the family 
moved to Illinois, his father settling on a 
farm in Moultrie County. William Granville 
Cochran was born November 13, 1844, and 
was five years of age when brought to Illinois. 
When seventeen years old he enlisted for 
service in the Union army. He was with the 
colors three years, a member of Company A 
of the One Hundred and Twenty-sixth Illinois 
j Infantry. He participated in some of the 
(early western campaigns through Arkansas 
and was at the battle of Gettysburg. During 
his early life he followed farming. In 1866 
he married Charlotte Ann Keyes, who was 
born at Philippi, West Virginia, March 17, 
1843, and died December 14, 1899. Her father, 
James F. Keyes, came to Illinois in 1850, and 
during the rest of his life lived on a farm 
in Moultrie County. Charlotte Ann Keyes 
was a woman of unusual education and intel- 
ligence and very ambitious. After her mar- 
riage she helped her husband, who had had 
a limited education. She gave him the benefit 
°f her knowledge and inspired him to study 
and qualify for the law. In 1877 he was 
admitted to the bar, and since then for over 



half a century has ranked as one of the 
strongest attorneys in this section of the state. 
When he was admitted to the bar he located 
at Lovington, but since 1892 has been a resi- 
dent of Sullivan. He served eighteen years 
on the district bench. For many years he 
was a leader in the Republican party. He 
was elected in 1888 a member of the Thirty- 
sixth Illinois General Assembly, and was 
chosen speaker of the House in its second 
session in 1890, known as the World's Fair 
session. He was again elected to the General 
Assembly in the Thirty-ninth and Fortieth 
Assemblies, and was again speaker of the 
House in 1895. At the conclusion of eighteen 
years on the bench he resigned on his own 
accord. Few men have left a finer impress 
on the annals of the law and general affairs 
in his district. He served for many years 
as president of the Moultrie County Bar Asso- 
ciation, is a member of the Illinois State and 
American Bar Associations. He is a past 
commander of the Illinois Department of the 
Grand Army of the Republic and is now 
Judge adjutant of the National Grand Army. 
He is a Knight Templar Mason and member 
of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
and he put forth splendid effort to locate the 
Masonic Home at Sullivan and served as one 
of its first trustees. During the World war 
he was president of the County Exemption 
Board. He is a member of the First Methodist 
Episcopal Church at Sullivan and for sixty- 
four years has been qualified as a local 
preacher of the church and was the first 
president of the Laymen's Association of the 
Illinois Conference. 

Judge and Mrs. Cochran had a family of 
eight children. Carrie died in infancy. The 
second in age is Oscar Fletcher. Frankie 
also died in infancy. Prudence died when 
twelve years old. Grace May, who was edu- 
cated in the Illinois Wesleyan University at 
Bloomington and in Cornell University, was 
married to E. W. Richardson, by whom she 
has one daughter, Charlotte, who married Mr. 
Cummings, and they have a son and daughter, 
William and Rachel. Archie B. Cochran is 
connected with the Franklin Life Insurance 
Company at Springfield and is unmarried. 
Arthur G. Cochran is a graduate in law of 
the Illinois Wesleyan University of Bloom- 
ington, and has risen to high rank in his 
profession, being head attorney for the Mid 
Kansas Oil Company at Tulsa, Oklahoma; he 
is married and has a daughter, named Maur- 
ine. The next child, Laura, died after her 
marriage to Frank J. Thompson, a Sullivan 
attorney, and she left children named Vir- 
ginia, Pauline, Grace and Frank J., Jr. 

Oscar Fletcher Cochran was born at Lov- 
ington, Moultrie County, September 24, 1869. 
He attended the public schools of Moultrie 
County, including high school, and for six 
years was a teacher in local schools. In 



140 



ILLINOIS 



connection with his work in the school room 
he farmed, and altogether devoted fifteen 
years to his work as a farmer. He still 
regards himself as an agriculturist, and owns 
and conducts one of the fine farms of the 
county. Mr. Cochran began the study of 
law in the office of his father. Before he 
had been admitted to the bar he was elected 
county judge of Moultrie County. While county 
judge he was several times called to Chicago 
to hold court, and displayed the judicial tem- 
perament which distinguished his father dur- 
ing his long career on the bench. Oscar F. 
Cochran was county judge from 1918 to 1922. 
Except for that term he has been master 
in chancery in Moultrie County since 1916. 
He is a Republican, is a steward in the 
Methodist Episcopal Church and a delegate 
of the Laymen's Association, and a Knight 
Templar Mason. 

He married, October 5, 1887, Miss Nona 
Dawson, of Lovington, daughter of Thomas 
W. and Priscilla (Weakley) Dawson. Her 
father was born in Ohio. Mrs. Cochran is 
a member of the Friends and Council Club, 
Domestic Science Club, G. H. R. Club of 
Lovington, is a past matron of the Eastern 
Star Chapter and a member of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Of the children of Mr. 
and Mrs. Cochran the oldest is Grant, who 
was born August 18, 1888. He attended school 
in Moultrie County, now lives at Sullivan, 
Illinois, and married Miss Ethel Collins, of 
Sullivan. Their children are: Granville, who 
died in January, 1931, Wayne, Margaret, 
Floyd, June, Don, Dean, Kathryn, Nona and 
Helen. The second son, Willis E. Cochran, 
born August 26, 1889, was educated in Moul- 
trie County, lives at Decatur, and married 
Miss Alice Coventry, of Findlay, Illinois, and 
has seven children, Jean, Vere, Dale, Rex, 
Doris, John and Benjamin. Harry Allen Coch- 
ran, born August 4, 1895, after the local 
schools attended Illinois Wesleyan University 
and is now a minister of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church, located at Edinburg, Illinois. 
He married Miss lone Mumma, of Lovington, 
and has two children, Thomas and Robert. 
Willard Glenn Cochran, the youngest of the 
family, was born May 26, 1900, is a high 
school graduate and is manager of a depart- 
ment store at Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He 
married Miss Kathryn Mills, of Kokomo, Indi- 
ana, and has a daughter, named Jo Ann. 

Thomas Bragg, LaSalle County farmer, 
whose home is two miles northwest of the 
courthouse at Ottawa in Wallace Township, 
has lived all his life in that county. 

He was born in section 36 of the same 
township on December 20, 1871, son of Thomas 
and Betsy (Delbridge) Bragg, and grandson 
of William Bragg. William Bragg was a 
blacksmith in Devonshire, England, where he 
lived out his life. Thomas Bragg, Sr., was 



born November 13, 1836, in Devonshire, was 
educated there, and after the death of his 
parents came to America in 1857. After a 
short stay with an older brother, John, at 
Batavia, New York, he came west and found 
employment in LaSalle County. He continued 
to work until he had accumulated enough 
to make a payment on an eighty acre tract 
of land. He also farmed as a renter, renting 
land from a brother who lived in the county. 
Thomas Bragg, Sr., married Betsy Delbridge 
in 1860. They had five children: Mrs. Julia 
Morrell, deceased; Silas W., who married 
Katie Kummer; Mary E., deceased; Thomas; 
and Bessie, who became the wife of Otto B. 
Schmidt and is now Mrs. Bessie Bragg Pier- 
son, of Chicago. 

Mr. Thomas Bragg was educated in country 
schools, had some high school work, and from 
earliest youth was trained to the work of 
a farm. At the age of twenty-two he began 
farming as a renter, getting land from his 
father, and he has been closely identified with 
the farming interests of the county ever since. 
He has been for several years an active mem- 
ber of the Farm Bureau and is a director of 
the Wallace Grain Elevator, and wsa also 
director of one of the banks in his community 
He is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Bragg married, March 14, 1901, Miss 
Mae Townsend, daughter of James A. Town- 
send, of Ottawa, Illinois, and they have a 
family of four children, Marguerite, Helen, 
Lyle and Lucille. Marguerite and Helen fin- 
ished their education in the Bradley PolyJ 
technic Institute at Peoria and both were 
teachers. Helen married, June 20, 1931, Johni 
R. Hinch, a large operator in the poultry 
raising business at Marseilles, Illinois. Lylcj 
is associated with his father on the farm. 

Mrs. Bragg is descended from one of the j 
old Colonial families of Massachusetts. Her J 
first American ancestor was Thomas Town- [ 
send, who was born in Norfolk County, Eng- j 
land, January 8, 1594, and died December 22, j 
1677. His mother was Mary Forthe. Thomas I 
Townsend with three brothers came from Dev- | 
onshire, England, and settled at Lynn in the j 
Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1636-37. He | 
married Mary Newgate, of Boston, who died i 
February 28, 1692 or 1693. Their son, John | 
Townsend, born in 1640, and died December j 
14, 1727, married, April 23, 1690, Mahittable | 
Brown, who died in July, 1735. Their son, j 
Daniel Townsend, born April 1, 1700, and died i 
October 10, 1761, married, October 18, 1726, |, 
Lydia Sawyer, who died April 30, 1749. The I 
fourth generation of the Townsend family 
was represented by Thomas Townsend, born- 
August 23, 1736, and died July 27, 1814. He 
served in the Revolutionary war as a sergeant, 
and later became first lieutenant in Captain 
Perkins Company, Colonel Pickering's Regi- 
ment. His brother, Daniel Townsend, was 
killed in the battle of Lexington, while serving 




^ 




vT& 



ILLINOIS 



141 



as a minute man. Thomas Townsend married, 
November 19, 1762, Susanna Green, who died 
February 19, 1813. Some years after the 
close of the Revolutionary war, in 1785, 
Thomas Townsend moved from Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts, to Reading, Vermont. 

His son, Aaron Townsend, born May 16 
1773, died April 17, 1846. He married, March 
5, 1797, Lydia Swain. Their son, Almon Town- 
send, born July 26, 1803, and died April 6, 
1855, married Elvira Butler, who was born 
October 8, 1811, and died February 15, 1880. 
Almon and Elvira (Butler) Townsend had 
six sons and one daughter: Charles G., Rut- 
land, Vermont; James A., Ottawa, Illinois; 
John W., Bridgewater, Vermont; Henry H., 
Ottawa, Illinois; Eugene, Bridgewater, Ver- 
mont; George W., Ottawa, Illinois; Carrie 
May Townsend, Bridgewater, Vermont. Three 
of the sons came west in 1865 and settled in 
LaSalle County and lived there until their 
death. These were James A., Henry H. and 
; George W., all of whom lived near Ottawa, 

Illinois. 
| James A. Townsend, son of Almon and 
' Elvira (Butler) Townsend, representing the 
seventh generation, was the founder of the 
family m LaSalle County. He was born Feb- 
ruary 8, 1838, and died April 27, 1916. He 
came west from Reading, Vermont, in 1865, 
first locating at Plainfield, Illinois, then spent 
the following year at Grinnell, Iowa, and 
after selling his stock rode horseback to 
Ottawa, Illinois, where he located and lived 
out the rest of his life. He married, March 
: 10, 1870, Mary A. Cowdrey, of Bridgewater, 
Vermont. She was born December 7, 1846' 
and died January 3, 1878, the mother of two 
daughters, Mrs. Thomas Bragg and Miss Myra 
L. Townsend. James A. Townsend married 
lor his second wife Susan A. Kain, who was 
born August 28, 1842, and died May 9, 1923. 
Tney had two sons: Charles A., who married 
Edith Gebhardt, of Ottawa, Illinois, and G. 
Wallace, who died December 31, 1902. 

William V. Lehr, supervisor of Farm Ridge 
Township, LaSalle County, has been four times 
elected to that office, which is in itself evidence 
o± the general esteem and marked leadership 
he has exercised in that community. 

Mr. Lehr belongs to LaSalle County as a 
native son. He was born in Grand Rapids 
lownship, March 7, 1878, son of Godfrey and 
Anna (Eric) Lehr, and grandson of Valentine 
and Anna Lehr. Valentine Lehr was a native 
ot Germany, with the German army, and 
iought m some of that country's wars. After- 
wards he came to America, a stranger in 
a strange land and without money. He worked 
m the town at Ottawa and on farms, later 
wok up farming, becoming one of the earlier 
settlers of the county, and out of his great 
industry and good management accumulated 
a large estate of some of the best farm lands 



m LaSalle County. All his generous fortune 
represented his capacity for hard work He 
was active in the Lutheran Church. Godfrev 
Lehr was also a native of Grand Rapids Town- 
ship, was educated in the public schools there 
and became one of the well-to-do farmers 
of the county. He served as clerk of his 
township and he and his wife were active 
members of the Presbyterian Church. Thev 

Thpir / led l ^ hQ Grand Rid ^ e Cemetery. 
Iheir four children were: Carrie, deceased 

Two Tu thG W £ e „ 0f Frank Shearer and eft 
two children, Nellie and Gertrude. Anne 

deceased, was the wife of John McCombs and 
also had two children, Gerald and Vera: Wil- 
liam V. is the third in age; Frank married 
and A?icT S tW ° children ' Catherine 

William V Lehr attended country schools 
and had a business college course. From 
boyhood he has known farming as his practical 
vocation and during five years of his early 
manhood worked for monthly wages on a farm. 
b or two years he was in the railroad service 
at Aurora and then returned to LaSalle County 

tL eng M ge *\ fa J ming as h ^ permanent voca- 
tion. Mr. Lehr farms 320 acres of Farm Ridge 
Township and has one of the most attractive 
country homes m that locality, on Route 23 
about six and a half miles north of Streator! 

Mr. Lehr married Violet Bute, daughter of 
Jackson and Sarah J. (Lewis) Bute. Her 
father came from Pennsylvania to LaSalle 
County Mrs. Lehr has a brother, Ellie, who 
married Minnie Sesler, and a sister, Lou! 
who is the wife of Frank Hook. The three 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Lehr are: Keith 
who married Marie Black and has a daughter! 
Marjorie; Doris, the wife of Lester Bacon 
who is m the postal service; and Miss Loraine, 
at home All the children accepted the advan- 
tages of the common and high schools in 
their community, including the township high 
school at Ottawa. Keith was born while his 
parents lived at Aurora. He is now a farmer 
in Deer Park Township. 

Mr. William V. Lehr is affiliated with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is a 
member of the Presbyterian Church. 

Hon J. Leroy Adair, member of the Illinois 
State Senate from the Thirty-sixth District 
is former state's attorney of Adams County 
and is one of the leaders in the bar and 
pontics at Quincy. 

Senator Adair was born at Clayton, Illinois, 
February 23 1888, and is a son of the late 
Henry L Adair, member of a pioneer Adams 
County family. The grandfather, Willis M 
Adair, a native of Kentucky, settled in Adams 
County when a young man, acquiring 400 acres 
m Honey Creek Township. He is credited 
r 5 h i? vl 5? brou S ht th * first herd of pure 
bred Shorthorn cattle to Adams County Willis 
Adair was a leader in the Democratic party 



142 



ILLINOIS 



in the county and for many years ; held the 
office of assessor. He died April 6, 1866. His 
second wife, Margaret J. Hester was born in 
Tennessee in 1829, and died m January, 191/. 
The late Henry L. Adair was born m 
Honey Creek Township in Adams County, 
December 14, 1855, and died after a long 
andTseful life August 15, 1928. As a farmer 
he became widely known as a specialist in hog 
breeding. He developed one of the finest 
strains of the Poland China stock, and many 
of his animals were shown and were prize 
winners at the State Fairs and his annual 
sales were attended by buyers from all oyer 
the Middle West. His home was in Clayton 
Township from 1890 and he was township 
supervisor from 1906 to 1912 and part of 
the time was chairman of the board and also 
chairman of the Board of Review Both as an 
official and as a private citizen he did much 
to promote substantial road and bridge build- 
ing in his township and county. He was a 
mfmber of the County Central Democratic 
Committee, was a Mason and his wife was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Henry L. Adair married Emma Pevehouse, 
daughter of J. J. and Susan Pevehouse, of 
Brown County, Illinois, where she was born 

J. Leroy Adair grew up on the farm and 
in the village of Clayton, and graduated from 
the Clayton High School in 1904, From early 
experience he knows the life of a farmer and 
stock raiser. For two years he taught the 
school which he attended as a boy. Irorn 
1906 to 1908 he was in the grocery business 
at Clayton, giving up this to continue his 
advanced education. For two terms he at- 
tended Illinois College at Jacksonville and 
while there was a member of the debating 
Team and played baseball. In 1910 Senator 
Adair entered the law department of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. He was a member ot 
The debating team in 1910 and 1911, and also 
joined the athletic squads, but did not make 
the team. After taking his law degree in 
1911 Mr. Adair practiced for three years at 
Muskogee, Oklahoma. On returning to Illi- 
nois in 1914 he located at Quincy and in the 
same year was elected city attorney serving 
two years. Mr. Adair was elected state s at- 
torney of Adams County in 1916, serving four 
years. He was state's attorney during the 
World war period. He was defeated for re- 
election in the Republican landslide of 1920. 
This gave him opportunity to build up his 
private practice as a lawyer, but in 1924 he 
was again elected state's attorney, serving the 
four year term, until 1928. In tha , year he 
was elected on the Democratic ticket as a 
member of the State Senate from the Thirty- 
sixth District, his term ending in 1933. 

Senator Adair is a member of the Quincy 
law firm of Penick, Adair & Pemck He is 
a member of the Adams County and the Illi- 
nois Bar Associations, a thirty-second degree 



Scottish Rite Mason, a member of the B. P. O.I 
Elks, the Eagles, the Moose, and is a past 
president of the Lions Club and president of 
the Quincy Country Club. He is a director of 
the Quincy Chamber of Commerce and a mem- 
ber of the Congregational Church. Mr. Adair 
is one of the local citizens who have promoted 
the building of the Lincoln-Douglas Hotel. 
He owns some valuable farming interests in 

th He°married, April 15, 1912, Miss Maude 
Gruber, who was also born at Clayton. 



Joseph Milton Funk represents one of the 
old and substantial families of La Salle County. 
His home is at Kernan, where he still owns 
the grain elevator. He is a retired farmer and 
grain buyer. 

Mr Funk was born at the old Funk farm, 
June 30, 1858, son of Henry and Malissa 
(Kleiber) Funk, and grandson of Christian 
Funk Christian Funk was the pioneer oi 
the family in Illinois. He learned the trade 
of blacksmith in his native State of Virginia 
and then moved to Ohio, locating near Lan- 
caster in Fairfield County. In 1846 he came 
to LaSalle County and in 1848 settled his 
family permanently in this county, where he 
acquired approximately 1,000 acres of land, 
all of which he eventually divided among his 
children. Christian Funk was a son of Henry 
Funk, a Virginian, who fought as a soldier 
for the American cause in the Revolutionary 

Henry Funk was born near Fairfield, Vir- 
ginia, went to Ohio with his parents and came 
with them to LaSalle County. He finished 
his education in Illinois and after leaving 
school assisted his father on the farm. As 
a farmer for himself he had a quarter section 
of land and at all times was a leader in his 
community. During the Civil war he was 
rejected for military service.. He voted a 
a Democrat and was an active member oi 
the United Brethren Church. He was buriec 
in the cemetery for which he donated the 
land. He and his wife had six children anc 
the only one to reach mature years was Josepi 

Jo°seph M. Funk began attending schoo 
when he was five years old. All during hi 
school years he had chores to do at home an< 
he was still quite young when he took ove 
the practical management of the home fa™ 
He still owns a farm in LaSalle County an 
operated it in conjunction with his gram bus 
ness. In addition to this he owns the elevato 
and two houses and five lots in Kernan an. 
another farm of 160 acres. . Mr. Funk becam 
postmaster of Kernan during the Clevelan 
administration, being appointed to that omc 
in 1886 and has held the office ever since. 
1 He married, December 30 1889 Miss Inc 
Mason, born April 21, 1868 daughter of Isa, 
and Miranda (Pickens) Mason. Her peop] 



ILLINOIS 



143 



vere from Massachusetts and her father while 
n the sea coast was a fisherman and went on 
everal whaling voyages. Mr. and Mrs. Funk 
lad four children: Irene, born May 4, 1891, 
narried Julian Royce and they had a daugh- 
er, Ruth, born November 9, 1916. Mr. Royce 
lied in 1919, and Mrs. Royce married, in 
August, 1930, L. S. Phipps, a realtor of 
Charleston, Illinois. Clement, born October 
6, 1893, died in July, 1915. The next child 
[ied in infancy. Irvin, born June 1, 1899, 
narried Alice Sprague and has two children, 
ieorge M., born September 2, 1923, and Donald 
rvin, born January 22, 1929. Mr. Funk is 
, member of the Woodmen of the World and 
e and his family are affiliated with the Pres- 
yterian Church. 

Lester L. Hart is one of Morgan County's 
nterprising and successful farmers, his home 
eing in the locality near Sinclair. 

He was born in that vicinity, August 12, 
885, son of Francis and Ketura (Fox) Hart, 
nd a grandson of David and Ann Hart. His 
ather and his grandparents were born in 
r orkshire, England. They came to America 
n a sailing vessel in the early days. David 
lart was one of the early circuit riding Meth- 
dist preachers in Central Illinois, a contem- 
orary of Peter Cartright. In later years 
e moved to Nebraska and became a chaplain 
i the Legislature. Francis Hart was reared 
nd educated in Morgan County, and was 

farmer, merchant and grain dealer. He 
loved to Jacksonville in 1909, retired from 
ctive business and passed away there in 1913. 
lis wife, Ketura Fox, was a native of Morgan 
Jounty. Her parents came from Virginia in 
he pioneer times and settled in Morgan 
Jounty. She died in 1888 and is buried with 
ier husband in the Hebron Cemetery at Sin- 
lair. Lester L. Hart is the youngest of three 
hildren. His brother, Eugene E., is a stock 
armer in Morgan County and his sister, Lou- 
se, is the wife of E. T. Harrison, a farmer 
f Morgan County. 

Lester L. Hart was educated in the Hebron 
chool, and since early boyhood his experience 
las been that of a practical farmer. When 
le was twenty-three years of age he began 
enting land, and out of his own efforts has 
tccumulated a substantial property of 200 
icres, devoted to grain farming and located 
i mile southwest of Sinclair. Mr. Hart is 
i trustee of the Hebron Methodist Episcopal 
Church and is a Republican in politics. 
^ He married on February 24, 1909, Miss 
3ora M. Harrison, a native of Morgan County 
ind a daughter of Thomas and Ann (Hart) 
Harrison. Her father is a retired farmer 
of the Sinclair district of Morgan County 
and resides with his wife in Jacksonville. 
They have four children: Harrison, born Feb- 



ruary 13, 1910; Alice L., born March 1, 1911; 
Lester, Jr., born July 29, 1917; and Thomas 
L., born March 31, 1920. Harrison and Alice 
graduated from the Jacksonville High School, 
and Harrison also completed a course in the 
Brown's Business College at Jacksonville. Alice 
L. is in training as a nurse in the City Hos- 
pital at St. Louis. 

Walker Lee Hylton. Among the con- 
scientious and capable officials of Randolph 
County, one who has the respect and full con- 
fidence of his fellow-citizens is Walker Lee 
Hylton, of Chester, who is serving his second 
term in the capacity of county clerk, a posi- 
tion which he has held since 1926. Prior to 
this he had acted in numerous other official 
capacities both in times of war and peace and 
his official record is one without blemish. Dur- 
ing his career he has followed school teaching 
and several other lines of occupation, but was 
best known in the business world as a success- 
ful merchant. 

Mr. Hylton was born February 6, 1867, at 
Kaskaskia, Randolph County, Illinois, and is 
a son of Maston Bottom and Nancy Elizabeth 
(Lindsey) Hylton. Maston B. Hylton was 
born in Floyd County, Virginia, where he was 
reared on a farm and received a country 
school education. At the outbreak of the war 
between the states he espoused the cause of 
the Confederacy and enlisted under the colors 
of the "Bonnie Blue Flag," serving gallantly 
for four years with a Virginia volunteer in- 
fantry regiment. At the close of the war he 
found conditions in his native state intoler- 
able during the period of Reconstruction, and, 
like many other Southerners, sought a new 
field of endeavor. Coming to Illinois, he took 
up his residence near Kaskaskia, in Randolph 
County, where through energy and well-ap- 
plied labor he developed a farm and became 
one of the substantial citizens of his com- 
munity. He took an active part in township 
affairs, and at the time of his death, in 1919, 
was one of his community's most highly-re- 
spected citizens. Mr. Hylton married Miss 
Nancy Elizabeth Lindsey, of Wythe County, 
Virginia, who survived him until 1929, and 
they became the parents of five children. The 
two living are Mrs. Anise Grogg, of St. 
Mary's, Missouri; and Walker Lee, of this 
review. 

Walker L. Hylton attended the rural schools 
of Randolph County and the high school at 
Chester, following which he pursued a short 
course at Dixon, Illinois. During vacation 
periods he worked on his father's farm, but 
about 1889 began teaching school in the rural 
districts of Randolph County, and was thus 
engaged until 1899. During the summer 
months he worked on farms and also acted as 
a clerk in the store of J. Beare & Brother, 
and eventually became a partner in the firm 



144 



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of J Beare & Brother, at Modoc, being as- 
sociated with the Beares in all for about 
twenty-two years. Moving: to Chester, he was 
appointed deputy sheriff of Randolph County, 
but at the end of about nine months, in 1914, 
resigned to enter the mercantile business on 
his own account. With the entrance of the 
United States into the World war, in 1917, 
Mr. Hylton was appointed, July 8, 1917, chair- 
man and chief clerk of the local draft board 
by President Wilson. He worked energetically 
and intelligently in that capacity until receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge March 19, 1919. 
In 1921 he resigned as manager of the re- 
tail department of H. C. Coles to become post- 
master of Chester and served two years and 
two months as such, giving his fellow-citizens 
excellent service, and in 1923 was again ap- 
pointed deputy sheriff and served until 1926. 
In 1926 he was elected county clerk of Ran- 
dolph County, assuming the duties of that of- 
fice in 1926, and still is the incumbent, being 
reelected in 1930. Mr. Hylton's public serv- 
ice also includes membership in the city coun- 
cil of Chester and eight years as justice of 
the peace in the Ellis Grove Precinct. Fra- 
ternally he is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Wood- 
men of America. A Baptist in his religious 
views, he is superintendent of the Sunday 
school at Ellis Grove, a position which he has 
held for thirteen years. 

On August 6, 1890, Mr. Hylton was united 
in marriage with Miss Eliza Laura Roberts, 
of Ellis Grove, Illinois, and to this union there 
were born ten children, of whom six survive: 
Pearl, Homer L., Irma, Ruby, Percy H. and 
Ina May. Mrs. Hylton died October 6, 1929. 

Henry M. Merriam, prominent banker and 
insurance leader at Springfield, is of pioneer 
Illinois ancestry. 

He was born on a farm in Tazewell County 
in 1865, son of Jonathan and Lucy (White) 
Merriam. Both his grandfathers were early 
Baptist ministers. His grandfather Jonathan 
Merriam came to Springfield in 1836, was 
pastor of one of the early Baptist churches 
in the capital city and later moved to Tazewell 
County and bought a farm. This .land is 
still owned by his descendants. The maternal 
grandfather, John White, was also a minister 
of the Baptist Church and well known m edu- 
cational affairs in Illinois, being head of the 
Baptist College at Greenville. Mr. Merriam s 
father was born in Vermont and his mother 
in Illinois. His father died in 1919 and his 
mother in 1924. His father was a farmer,, 
banker and for ten years lived at Springfield, 
performing his duties as collector of internal 
revenue. For six years he was United States 
pension commissioner and for several terms 
was a member of the Legislature. He and his 
wife were active Baptists. He served as lieu- 



tenant colonel in the One Hundred and Seven- 
teenth Illinois Infantry during the Civil war. 

Henry M. Merriam was one of a family 
of seven children, six of whom are living. 
As a boy on the farm he attended country 
schools, completed a high school course ana 
finished his education in Shurtleff College at 
Upper Alton. On leaving the farm he came 
to Springfield, at the age of twenty-one. Soon 
afterward he became a clerk in the Illinois 
National Bank and has been with that insti- 
tution for over forty years. He is vice presi- 
dent and a director. 

For the past twenty-five years most of his 
time has been given to the Franklin Life 
Insurance Company at Springfield. This com- 
pany was organized in 1884. He has been 
president since 1923. Mr. Merriam is a Baptist, 
a member of the B. P. O. Elks, the Sangamo 
Club, Country Club and is a Republican. He 
has never married. 

Capt. James Emmett Wilson, World war 
veteran, leading Quincy business man, is the 
present mayor of that Illinois city. 

Captain Wilson was born at Quincy Novem- 
ber 21, 1897, and is of Scotch and English 
ancestry. His grandfather served as a soldier 
in the Civil war with the Eighteenth Missouri 
Cavalry. His father, Charles A. Wilson, was 
also a native of Quincy and for many years 
was connected with the Best Plumbing Com- 
pany of that city. He died July 17, 1911. 
Charles A. Wilson married Miss Mary Gould, 
of Liberty, Illinois, who survives him. Of 
their ten children eight are living: Sister- 
Madonia, of St. Louis, of the order of Sisters 
of St. Mary; William F., of Quincy; Mrs. 
Marie Childs, of Quincy; John A., of Quincy; 
Mrs. H. N. Stewart, of Quincy; James E.; 
Agnes R., of Quincy; Edna, of Quincy. 

James Emmett Wilson from early boyhood 
has shown an ability and initiative that have 
been largely responsible for his successful 
career. He was graduated from the Quincy 
High School in 1915. He worked his way 
through school, utilizing his spare time by 
serving an apprenticeship in the Figgen Drug 
Store for three and a half years. He re- 
mained with that firm until 1916, when he 
became a clerk in the Gunther Hardware 
Company. . . . 

In the meantime he had joined the Illinois 
National Guard and with that organization 
was inducted into service during the World 
war. He went to the camp at Springfield in 
August, 1917, as a member of Company E 
of the Tenth Illinois Infantry. In December, 
of the same year he returned to Quincy, and 
in February, 1918, received an honorable dis- 
charge from the National Guard. At that time 
he enlisted and was sent to Jefferson Bar- 
racks, Missouri, and on February 26th was 
transferred to the ordnance detachment al 
the Aberdeen Proving Grounds in Maryland 






ILLINOIS 



145 



Here he was made a corporal in Company E 
and on August 3rd was transferred to Camp 
Lee, Virginia, where he entered the Sixteenth 
Central Officers Training School. On Novem- 
ber 30, 1918, he was commissioned a second 
lieutenant in the Infantry Reserves. 

After the war Captain Wilson returned to 
Qumcy and became buyer and department 
manager in the Gunther Hardware Company. 
He was with that house until January 1, 1928. 
Since then he has been active in promoting 
and developing several lines of business. He 
was vice president and treasurer of the Menke 
Lummis Advertising Company until January, 
1929, and was also treasurer of the McMean 
Printing Company. In January, 1929, he or- 
ganized the Multigraphing Letter & Service 
Company, which he still operates. He was 
the organizer of Consolidated Manufacturers 
and was sales manager of this business. 

After the war he was commissioned in the 
Officers Reserve Corps and in 1925 was pro- 
moted to first lieutenant in the Infantry Re- 
serves, and in 1928 was commissioned captain. 
He is a member of the regimental staff of the 
Three Hundred and Forty-third Regiment of 
Infantry. Captain Wilson has taken a prom- 
inent part in American Legion work and in 
1929 was commander of Post No. 37. In 1928 
he was chef de gare of the Forty and Eight 
Society of the Quincy Chapter, and in 1926 
was president of the Quincy chapter of the 
Officers Reserve Association. Most of his time 
is now given to his executive duties as mayor 
of the City of Quincy. In 1931 he was elected 
vice president of the Illinois Municipal League. 
He is a member of St. Peter's Catholic Church 
and a staunch Republican, 
t Captain Wilson married, November 24, 1920 
Miss Helen Stewart, of Churchville, Mary- 
land, where she was born June 4, 1899. Their 
children were: James E., Jr., born March 17, 
1922; Betty Ann, born November 23, 1923 
and died June 11, 1927; and Robert Lee, born 
lJuly 19, 1925. 

John W. Virgin, of Cass County, spent 
about fifty years of his active life in the 
West as a miner in Colorado and later as a 
stock man in New Mexico, and then returned 
to the state where he was born and where his 
people have been prominent farmers and stock 
men since pioneer days. Mr. Virgin still owns 
two of the finest farms in Central Illinois, lo- 
cated in Cass County, but he is practically 
retired from business. 

The Virgin family came to America in 1722 
trom Somerset, England. They first settled in 
Virginia and about 1781 moved to Pennsyl- 
vania. Mr. Virgin is a descendant of Capt. 
ttezm Virgin, a soldier of the American Revo- 
lution. His great-grandfather was Eli Virgin, 
°ne of the three sons of Captain Virgin. His 
grandfather, John H. Virgin, who was born 
] n Pennsylvania, moved to Ohio and from 



Mount Vernon in that state came to Illinois 
m 1852 and bought land for seventeen dollars 
an acre in Menard County. That land has 
grown many times in value during the past 
eighty years. 

The father of John W. Virgin was George 
Virgin who was born in Fayette County, 
Pennsylvania, May 10, 1827, and died Sep- 
tember 2, 1907. He grew up in Ohio, in 
Mount Vernon, and early became interested in 
the stock drover business. In 1849 he and 
his brother Eli came to Illinois by way of the 
Ohio, Mississippi and Illinois rivers for the 
purpose of buying cattle. George Virgin had 
$5,000 in gold with him. After purchasing 
cattle they drove them back to market in 
New York City, spending three months in 
• iJc?' Eh Vir ^ in was accidentally killed 
in 1858. George Virgin subsequently settled 
in Menard County, Illinois, in 1852. At the 
time of his death he owned 800 acres of land 
in Cass County. He was extensively engaged 
in the cattle business and farming. The last 
fifty years of George Virgin's life were spent 
m Cass County. About 1887 he moved to 
Virginia, the county seat of Cass County. At 
the time of his death, in 1907, he was presi- 
dent of the Farmers National Bank of Vir- 
ginia and had held that position for twenty- 
seven years. 

He married Miss Eliza Enslow, of Scioto 
County, Ohio. She while a girl visited in 
Lincoln, Illinois, and attended a private school 
there for a time, and while there she met 
Mr. George Virgin. She died in 1914, at the 
age of eighty. Her father was Rezin Enslow, 
who was one of the fifteen children of David 
and Rachael (Virgin) Enslow. Thus the Ens- 
low and Virgin families were related by mar- 
riage two generations before George Virgin 
married Eliza Enslow. The children of Mr. 
and Mrs. George Virgin were: John W.; Ida, 
wife of George Aldrich, of Virginia, Illinois; 
Eh, who lives in Junction City, Oregon; 
George, in Los Angeles; Frank, a farmer near 
Virginia; Oral, who died in 1925; and Fred, 
an undertaker at Virginia, who owns the old 
Virgin homestead. 

Mr. John W. Virgin was born in Menard 
County, January 31, 1854. His birth oc- 
curred on the homestead where his father 
and mother had first started housekeeping. 
They had bought eighty acres of land at 
twenty dollars an acre, then considered a high 
price, but the same land during the past decade 
was worth fully $500. In 1860, when John 
Virgin was six years of age, his parents 
moved to Morgan County, near the Cass 
County line. While they were living there he 
first attended a country school. In 1863 his 
father sold his farming interest in Morgan 
County and in order to get more land bought 
three farms six miles southeast of Virginia 
in Cass County. It was on the family home 
farm in Cass County that John W. Virgin 



146 



ILLINOIS 



grew to mature years. He had the work of 
the farm as a responsibility from an early 
age, and attended winter and summer terms 
of school and completed his education in the 
high school at Virginia. In 1872 he went to 
work for Petefish, Skiles & Company, a pri- 
vate bank, and was there three years, fol- 
lowing this he was assistant cashier of the 
Farmers National Bank of Virginia until 1879. 
Mr Virgin in 1879 went west and spent 
several years in the mining districts of Lead- 
ville, Colorado, and was there until 188d. in 
that year he entered the ranching and cattle 
business in the South Central part of New 
Mexico. Since he had children who were grow- 
ing up and needed school advantages, he sold 
out his New Mexico interests and in 1898 
bought farm land in Cass County, Illinois. He 
has made his home in Virginia since 1914. lie 
has an aggregate of 240 acres of rich farming 
land, one farm being a mile west of Virginia 
and the other eight miles southwest. He gives 
a general supervision to his farms from his 
home in Virginia. Mr. Virgin has served four 
terms as a member of the Board of Alder- 
men He is a Democrat in politics, a member 
of the Masonic fraternity, and his family have 
been Presbyterians for generations. For over 
ten years Mr. Virgin has held membership in 
the Illinois State Historical Society. 

Mr Virgin married, March 8, 1881, Miss 
Lou Margaret Stribling. They were^ married 
on a farm a mile west of Virginia. Her 
grandfather, Benjamin Stribling, was identi- 
fied with the first settlement at Virginia. Her 
father, I. M. Stribling, was born in Logan 
County, Kentucky, and was a youth when the 
family moved to Illinois. The mother of Mrs. 
Virgin was Margaret Beggs, daughter of Cap- 
tain Beggs, of Rockingham County, Virginia. 
Captain Beggs was a soldier in the American 
Revolution and after the war moved to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, in 1797, and then, on account 
of his opposition to slavery, he crossed the 
river in 1800 to Indiana. He was in a cavalry 
company in the battle of Tippecanoe under 
General Harrison. Later he came to Illinois 
and settled in Morgan County. Mr and Mrs. 
Virgin have reared a family of children, giv- 
ing them thorough educational opportunities, 
and the oldest, Miss Dorothy, attended the 
Illinois Woman's College at Jacksonville and 
is now engaged in hospital and medical work 
in New York City. The second daughter, 
Norma, graduated from the Woman s College 
at Jacksonville and received an artistic edu- 
cation in the Chicago Art Institute and Artists 
League of New York City. She has made 
much success as an illustrator of books and 
magazines. She is the wife of Benjamin Van 
Swearingen and resides at Santa Fe, _ New 
Mexico. The son, Eli Horace Virgin, a 
farmer in Cass County, served in France dur- 
ing the World war with the Twentieth Engi- 
neers. He married Rachael Rexroat, of Vir- 



ginia, and their children are Robert Horace, 
George Eugene, Alice Lou and Dorothy. Mr. 
Virgin's youngest child, Miss Emma Louise, 
also attended the Woman's College at Jackson- 
ville, taught school for several years and lives 
at home. 

Hon. George Manning Reynolds, until 
recently one of the valued members of the 
Illinois State Senate, is president of the Utica 
State Bank. He is a native of LaSalle County, 
and his people were the second family of white 
settlers in this region of North Central Illinois. 
Mr Reynolds was born at Utica, June 11, 
1862. His father, James C. Reynolds, had 
the distinction of being the first white male 
child born in LaSalle County. His birth 
occurred near the City of LaSalle, June 27, 
1832. He had a common school education and 
devoted his active life to farming and stock 
raising, and filled all the local offices of his 
township. He died October 8, 1910, at the 
age of seventy-eight. James C. Reynolds mar- 
ried, March 20, 1856, Caroline C. Clayton, 
who was born at Wheeling, West Virginia, 
January 1, 1833. Of their four sons two are 
now living George M. and Sam W., the latter 
living near Utica. The mother of these chil- 
dren passed away December 12, 1918. The 
Reynolds family is of Scotch and English 
ancestry and settled in Illinois in 1827, and 
for several years lived on the frontier edge 
of the white settlement. , 

George Manning Reynolds was educated at 
Utica, and completed his education in 188b 
at the Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloom- 
ington. While in college he played football 
and was a member of the Adelphian Society. 
As a young man he worked on his fathers 
farm, taught a rural school one year near 
Towanda, and in 1888 entered upon a career 
of business activity that has continued now 
for forty years. He was secretary of the 
Utica Sewer Pipe Company from 1888 to I89d. 
For several years following he was in business 
at Milwaukee, Wisconsin, conducting a build- 
ing contracting business known as the G. M. 
Reynolds Company. On returning to Laballe 
County in 1898 he bought a farm and lor 
the next twelve years gave all his energy 
to farming. He had served as a member 
of the Utica City Council in 1888-89, and 
while living on the farm was township super- 
visor and road supervisor. _ 

Mr. Reynolds in 1910 organized the Utica 
State Bank and has been its president for- 
twenty years. During the World war he 
was a member of the home defense committees. 
He has served as president of the Utica School 
Board and in 1918 was elected county treas- 
urer, holding that office four years. In 1926 
he was elected a member of the Illinois State 
Senate, in which he continued until January 
1 1931 He is regarded as one o± the out- 
standing leaders in the Republican party in 







I 



ILLINOIS 



147 



his section of the state. Mr. Reynolds is a 
thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason and 
is an honorary member of Tripoli Temple 
of the Mystic Shrine at Milwaukee. He also 
belongs to the B. P. O. Elks and is a member 
of the Episcopal Church. 

He married, May 29, 1888, Miss Althea 
Miller, of Bloomington, Illinois. Two daugh- 
ters were born to them, Mrs. Louise Sims, 
of Utica, and Miss Helen, who passed away 
October 23, 1926. 

C. T. Ohnemus. Three generations of the 
Ohnemus family have had their place as busi- 
ness men and constructive citizens at Quincy. 
Mr. C. T. Ohnemus, a fireman with the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, has served 
two terms on the Board of Aldermen of the 
city, where his work has been of special im- 
portance in extending the opportunities of 
recreation and wholesome play to the youth 
of the city. 

Mr. Ohnemus was born at Quincy May 29, 
1886. His grandfather, George P. Ohnemus, 
was born in Germany and like many other 
German immigrants came to America, landing 
at New Orleans and thence up the Mississippi 
River. The father of C. T. Ohnemus was also 
George P. Ohnemus, who was born in Quincy, 
in 1856, and died in that city March 17, 1914. 
His career was identified with transportation 
and he was interested in some of the river 
shipping when that was a large item in the 
commerce of the Middle West. He also served 
on party committees but was never a seeker 
for public office. He married Frances Marie 
Trapp, who was born in Quincy. Her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. August Trapp, were natives of 
Baden, Germany. She is still living at 
Quincy. 

C. T. Ohnemus attended the parochial schools 
of St. Boniface parish and the high school 
department of Quincy College. After finishing 
his high school course he became shipping 
clerk in the plant of the Electric Wheel Com- 
pany, and was with that local industry until 
1914. He has been in the service of the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railway for the 
past seventeen years. 

Mr. Ohnemus married, June 3, 1908, Miss 
Bertha Blanche Ralph, of Quincy, a daughter 
of Roland R. Ralph and Louise Jane (Staf- 
ford) Ralph, both natives of England. 

From early manhood Mr. Ohnemus has been 
a staunch Democrat and active in local party 
circles. He has taken part in many political 
campaigns, but was never a candidate for 
office until 1929, when he was elected an alder- 
man in April and was reelected to the board 
in 1931. He represents the First Ward in 
the City Council. He is chairman of the ordi- 
nance committee, a member of the police and 
firemen's committee, and some of his most 
important work has been accomplished through 
his membership with the water committee. He 



was instrumental in bringing about the con- 
struction of the wading pool at Reservoir 
Park, at a cost of $6,000, and also secured the 
playground equipment in that park. His com- 
mittee also improved the public playground 
at Seventh and Elm streets. Largely through 
his influence a new water softener plant has 
been installed, at a cost of several thousand 
dollars. In his official capacity Mr. Ohnemus 
has shown himself to be a staunch friend of 
the boys and girls of the city, and his policy 
is that by supplying adequate recreation fa- 
cilities and opportunities for play the influ- 
ences leading to vandalism and crime will be 
largely offset. Mr. Ohnemus is a member of 
the Knights of Columbus and Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, and the St. Boniface Catholic 
Church. 

August Claire Caylor. Although he is 
still one of the younger members of the legal 
profession of Cumberland County, August C. 
Caylor during the comparatively short period 
of his connection with professional activities 
has made such rapid strides as to make his 
future success seem a positive certainty. Not 
only is he active in the profession of law at 
Greenup, but likewise in politics, he being 
one of the leaders in the young Republican 
organization. 

Mr. Caylor was born March 27, 1908, at 
Greenup, and is a son of Allen A. and Clara 
(Scranton) Caylor. The family is of what 
is known as Pennsylvania Dutch stock, and 
the paternal grandfather was A. A. Caylor, 
who was born in Indiana and moved to Illinois 
in 1861. He was a cabinetmaker by trade, 
but for the most part followed farming and 
became the owner of a large and valuable 
property, accumulated by his own industry 
and good management. He was a warm per- 
sonal friend of Governor Morton of Indiana. 

Allen A. Caylor was born at Cumberland, 
Indiana, where he received his education, and 
in 1861 accompanied his parents to Illinois, 
where he was destined to pass the remainder 
of his life. He first took up his residence 
at Toledo, but after a short stay moved to 
Greenup, where he lived until his death, Feb- 
ruary 28, 1930, having passed his life as 
an agriculturist. He was a man of high 
character and public spirit who enjoyed the 
confidence of his fellow citizens. 

After attending the Greenup schools and 
the high school of the State Teachers College 
of Charleston, August C. Caylor spent two 
years in pre-legal work at the University of 
Illinois. In 1929 he graduated from the law 
department of the same institution and at 
that time went to Chicago, Illinois, where 
he secured a responsible position with the 
National Theatre Supply Company. He was 
admitted to practice in the courts of Illinois 
March 28, 1930, and at that time located 
at Greenup, where he has since built up a 



148 



ILLINOIS 



gratifying and paying practice. He is a young 
lawyer of brilliant attainments and the future 
holds much for him if the past may be taken 
as a criterion. 

Mr. Caylor is a member of the Cumberland 
County Bar Association and the Illinois State 
Bar Association, the Phi Alpha Delta frater- 
nity, the Masons and Knights of Pythias. His 
religious connection is with the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. A Republican in his politi- 
cal views, he is one of the leaders in the 
young Republican organization, and his per- 
sonal popularity should assure him a successful 
political career. 

Fred Hamann, assistant superintendent of 
the Little Metal Wheel Company at Quincy, 
and member of the Board of County Super- 
visors of Adams County, is at once an expert 
in the iron industry and one of the accepted 
leaders of the Democratic party in his home 
county. 

•Mr. Hamann is a son of Fred Hamann and 
grandson of Fred Hamann. His grandfather 
was born in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, and 
came to America and reached Quincy in 1827. 
After a short time he returned south to New 
Orleans and on his second coming to Illinois 
located in Peoria County. Here the Hamann 
family were known both as farmers and as 
butchers and meat dealers. Fred Hamann II 
was born in Peoria County, July 4, 1849, and 
devoted his active lifetime to business. He 
served as committeeman in the Democratic 
party, but was not otherwise an office holder. 
He died January 17, 1907. His wife was 
born at Dayton, Ohio, November 16, 1850, and 
died July 17, 1927. Both are buried in Quincy. 
In the family were four sons and two daugh- 
ters: Julius, of Quincy; Elmer, who died in 
childhood; Fred; Ramona, who was burned 
to death; Arnold and Florence, both of 
Quincy. 

Mr. Fred Hamann attended the public 
schools in Quincy, and after leaving high 
school attended the Union Business College. 
He had some experience in office work, and 
then became associated with his father in the 
butchering business. On the death of his 
father he took up blacksmithing, and served an 
apprenticeship that brought him a thorough 
knowledge of iron working and manufacture. 
In Quincy he is probably without a peer in 
his technical knowledge of all branches of 
iron manufacture. Mr. Hamann spent eight 
years with the Koeing Manufacturing Com- 
pany at Quincy, but since 1907 has been asso- 
ciated with the Little Metal Wheel Company. 
He is assistant superintendent of this industry. 
Mr. Hamann married, April 22, 1908, Miss 
Edith Ziener, of Quincy, where she was born 
and educated, daughter of Alois and Mary 

(Sullivan) Ziener. Their oldest child, Ed- 
ward, born March 1, 1909, was educated in the 

Quincy High School and studied his chosen 



profession in the Missouri Florists School at 
Sedalia and is now in the florist business in 
Quincy. Robert, the second child, born De- 
cember 20, 1910, is associated with his ma- 
ternal grandfather, Alois Ziener, who owns 
one of the largest tinsmith and sheet metal 
plants in Quincy. The third child, Marie, was 
born February 23, 1913, and Fred J. Hamann, 
Jr., was born June 20, 1919. 

Mr. Hamann began taking part in local 
politics before he was twenty-one. He served 
as a deputy sheriff of Adams County for six- 
teen years, under four different sheriffs and 
under different political administrations. In 
1928 he was elected a member of the Board 
of Supervisors, his known integrity and per- ' 
sonal popularity getting him the election with- 
out having to spend a penny in advertising 
or campaign literature. He has been a dele- 
gate to county and state conventions in the 
Democratic party many times. He is a leader 
in Union Labor circles in Quincy, and has 
exercised a powerful influence among laboring 
men in elections. Mr. Hamann is a member 
of the Lodge of Eagles and the Loyal Order 
of Moose. On the Board of Supervisors he is 
chairman of the election committee, a position 
in which he controls the political patronage of 
the board. 

Arthur J. Wylie represents one of the old 
and prominent families of Waltham Town- 
ship, LaSalle County. He is a practical 
farmer, well known in the live stock indus- 
try, and has continued a line of work for 
which both his father and grandfather were 
noted since pioneer times in this section of 
Illinois. 

Mr. Wylie was born May 3, 1891, son of 
Adam and Mary E. (Johnson) Wylie, and 
grandson of William F. and Margaret (Cur- 
rie) Wylie. William F. Wylie brought the 
family to Illinois in the early days and ac- 
quired a tract of Government land in LaSalle 
County during the administration of President 
Andrew Jackson. Adam Wylie was born in 
Waltham Township, on a farm, attended coun- 
try schools there and completed a course in a 
school at Davenport, Iowa. After graduating 
he returned to the farm and engaged in farm- 
ing and stock raising. He owned 320 acres 
in LaSalle County, now operated by his son 
Arthur, and had another large farm in Ohio, 
now operated by his son Elmer. He was 
active in community affairs, serving as school 
treasurer, and always voted the Republican 
ticket. He was actively interested in banking 
both at Utica and LaSalle, being a director 
in both banks many years and vice president 
of the Utica State Bank at the time of his 
death, July 25, 1921. He raised fine stock, 
and one of his Clydesdale horses, Barney W., 
won championships in state and international 
affairs. On December 29, 1887, Adam Wylie 
and Mary Johnson were married. Her par- 



ILLINOIS 



149 



ents were Henry and Hannah (Lewis) John- 
son. The Johnson family came from Connecti- 
cut and Henry Johnson went to California in 
1849. Later he returned to Illinois and lived 
on the land he had taken up from the Gov- 
ernment. The Johnson family were active in 
the Presbyterian Church. 

Arthur J. Wylie attended District School 
No. 184 and the LaSalle-Peru High School, and 
then continued his education in the State Uni- 
versity at Urbana. He worked on the farm 
while m school and since the death of his 
father has been engaged in independent farm- 
™ g U' R i e 1S one of the leadi ng stock feeders 
m this locality. He is a member of the Pres- 
byterian Church and one of its elders, is a 
member of the Masonic Lodge and Eastern 
fetar. In 1921 he married Miss Irene Thurman 
of Kansas City, daughter of John and May 
(Jennings) Thurman. 

Mr. Wylie's brother, Elmer Wylie, married 
Gladys Stockley, of Harding, Illinois, and has 
three children, Mary J., Betty A. and Ethel. 

The only daughter in the family is Roxy, 
wife of Ira Hartshorn. Their three children 
are Anna, Irene and Ruth. Mr. Hartshorn is 
in the elevator business at Utica and was 
overseas in France during the World war. 

The farm of Mr. Arthur Wylie contains 
320 acres and is located one mile west of the 
mam road and five miles north of Utica. 

Charles Edwin Beggs was one of the old 
and honored citizens of Cass County, a farmer, 
land owner and business man, and his name is 
held in grateful remembrance not only by his 
immediate family but by hundreds of people 
who knew and respected his sterling honor 
and ability. 

He was born in Cass County, Illinois, in 
January, 1851, son of James and Mary (Crow) 
Beggs. The Beggs family originated in Scot- 
land, and came to America by the way of 
Ireland The first American of the name was 
James Beggs, who came from County Antrim 
w y wx, th 4 se Y enteenth century. He married 
Elizabeth Hardy, and they became prominent 
citizens of Rockingham County, Virginia A 
son of James and Elizabeth Beggs was Capt. 
Thomas Beggs, who served as a captain in 
the Virginia militia during the Revolutionary 
war and from this ancestor many of the pres- 
ent line of descendants are eligible to member- 
ship m the Sons and Daughters of the Ameri- 
can Revolution. Charles Beggs, a son of Capt. 
ihomas, was a soldier in the War of 1812 
tfff^ h - 1S 5? 7 a ™S e to Dorothy Trumbo he 
settled m Woodford County, Kentucky, but 
alter a short residence there moved to Indiana 
and founded the Town of Charlestown. His 
second wife was Mary Ruddell. Charles Beg^s 
was the grandfather of Charles Edwin Beggs 
James Beggs was born near Charlestown! 
Indiana, in 1818, and died in Cass County 



Illinois, in 1886. He came to Illinois when 
quite young and followed farming as his 
occupation. 

Charles Edwin Beggs was educated in coun- 
try schools and from early youth engaged in 
farming and built up a fine home and estate 
in Cass County. He was a farmer and grain 
dealer and his business headquarters for manv 
years were at Ashland in Cass County. He 
married m 1879 Emma Beggs, daughter of 
John and Sally (Sinclair) Beggs. The Sin- 
clair family were very early settlers in Mor- 
gan and Cass counties. The Town of Sinclair 
in Morgan County was named for Samuel 
Sinclair of Kentucky. By this marriage there 
were a large family of children: Miss Nelle 
who lives at the old home in Ashland: George' 
who married May Ingalls and has a son,' 

vlll g %? r ' ; v ar 7> deceased >' Mary, of New 
York City; Frank, at home; Edistina, wife 
of Henry McKeown and mother of Jessie, 
Clinton John, Edistina, Catherine and Sally 
John V., who married Josephine Parkhurst 
and has a son, John Vincent, Jr.; Virginia 
wife of Albert Willson and mother of Bar- 
bara, John N., Donald and Frederick E.; Sallv 
deceased; and Lutie. Charles Edwin Beg^s 
died in January, 1916. Emma Beggs, his first 
wife and the mother of his children, died in 
August 1901 After the death of 'his first 
wife Charles E. Beggs married Jessie Wilson, 
who died June 6, 1931, after having been a 
good mother to all the children of her husband. 
Ine Beggs family were Presbyterians before 
coming to America and upon their settlement 
to America many went into the Methodist 
Church. In political faith they have been 
Republicans as a rule. 

Hon. Frank A. Jasper, who for two terms 
was mayor of Quincy, and a former county 
treasurer of Adams County, has exhibited an 
extraordinary zeal and capacity for public 
service His integrity and his methods or 
above-board administration of public affairs 
gained him the unlimited confidence of his fel- 
low citizens, and this confidence he still retains 
10 ™ nl i T A - Jasper was born at Quincy, July 1, 
1890. His grandfather, Henry Jasper, was 
also born m Quincy and was one of the 
prominent men in the politics and business life 
of the city in the early days. He was a 
member of a company organized at Quincv 
for service in the Union army during the 
Civil war. Frank Jasper's father, Bernard 
Jasper, was born on a farm near Dubuque 
Iowa, but spent most of his active life in 
Quincy, where he organized and operated a 
transfer business. He died in January 1905 
at the age of forty-nine. Bernard Jasper mar- 
?« i5£f S A ^ elu / Klostermann, who also died 
m 1905. Her father, August Klostermann, 
came from Germany. Bernard Jasper and 
wife had three sons and three daughters all 
living except one daughter. ' 



150 



ILLINOIS 



Frank A. Jasper grew up at Quincy, was 
educated in the parochial and public schools, 
and after high school spent two years in the 
Gem City Business College. With this prep- 
aration he found his first job in the account- 
ing department of the Otis Elevator Com- 
pany. After a year he was made assistant 
city treasurer, and his experience in that office 
and his growing popularity as a citizen led 
to his election as city treasurer for the term 
1915-17. He then became assistant in the 
county treasurer's office, and in 1918 was 
elected county treasurer of Adams County. 
He served the term of four years, and being 
ineligible by law for reelection, at the con- 
clusion of his term he again became assistant 
city treasurer. During the World war Mr. 
Jasper served as a member of the Adams 
County Exemption Board and was active in 
other war activities. In 1931 he was elected 
to honorary membership in the United Span- 
ish-American War Veterans. 

Mr. Jasper was first elected mayor of 
Quincy in 1925, his term running from the 
first of May of that year until May 1, 1927. 
He was defeated as a candidate for reelection, 
and during the following two years was an in- 
come tax expert with the Illinois state gov- 
ernment. In April, 1929, he was again elected 
mayor, his second term running from May, 
1929, to May, 1931. Quincy people feel that 
Mayor Jasper's administration marked the 
high tide of constructive improvements and 
developments within the power of the public 
revenues. During his administration a two 
million dollar improvement program was car- 
ried to conclusion. During that time thirty- 
eight miles or half of the seventy-five miles 
of streets in the city were paved, the sewer 
system was developed and other improvements 
made that will remain of lasting benefit. He 
introduced a system of public hearings, by 
which tax payers were freely admitted to all 
discussions over the improvement program in- 
volving the expenditure of public funds. The 
mayor's office was open at all times to citizens 
who came in for counsel and advice regarding 
city affairs. Mr. Jasper's formal policy was 
"that a public officer should consider it his 
paramount duty to his fellow citizens to give 
prompt, efficient, honest service, a.nd that they 
should know where every dollar expended 
goes." 

Since retiring from office Mr. Jasper has 
given his time to the management of his 
property interests and a successful insurance 
business which he has built up. He is a 
Democrat in politics and is prominent in the 
state affairs of his party and an active worker. 
He is a member of the B. P. O. Elks, Fra- 
ternal Order of Eagles, Loyal Order of Moose, 
the South Side Boat Club, the Western Cath- 
olic Union, St. Aloysius Society, St. Boniface 
Catholic Church. 



He married Miss Frances C. Clarke, daugh- 
ter of Montgomery Clarke, of Oakwood, Mis- 
souri. She was educated in the schools of 
Oakwood and attended college. Mr. and Mrs. 
Jasper reside at 629 Broadway. 

Walter W. Williams, mayor of Concord, 
Morgan County, represents a pioneer family 
in this section of Illinois. 

One of his ancestors was a Revolutionary 
soldier from Vermont. The founders of the 
family in Illinois were his grandparents, Uel 
and Emily Williams, who came from Vermont 
with wagons and teams in the early days. 
Charles E. Williams, father of Walter W., 
was born in Vermont and came to Illinois with 
his parents. He became a prosperous farmer 
and as a young man rented the home farm 
and later bought out the interest of his sister 
and lived there until his death, December 6, 
1925. He was a member of the Christian 
Church. He married Fannie Holliday, and 
both of them are buried at Chapin. She died 
February 10, 1920. They had six children: 
Cecil, deceased; Wilbur, of Markham, who 
married Lois Paschall and has two children, 
named Ruth E. and Thomas; Clyde H., of 
Morgan County, who married Caroline Wol- 
ford, and their children are Margaret, Lor- 
raine and Charles; Chester L., of Morgan 
County, who married Estella Christenson and 
has a daughter, Alma; Bertha, wife of A. D. 
Peters; and Walter W. 

Walter W. Williams was educated in the 
Hazel Dell School and the high school at 
Chapin, and also attended the Illinois Normal 
University at Normal, Illinois. As a young 
man he taught school five years. Later he 
attended the Brown's Business College at Peo- 
ria. His last teaching work was done at 
Concord and when he left it he took up the 
mercantile business there in 1926 under the 
title of W. W. Williams. He has become a 
leading business man of the community. In 
order to devote his entitre attention to his 
modern filling station he disposed of his mer- 
cantile interest in 1931. All his prosperity 
has been the direct product of his energies 
and capabilities. 

Mr. Williams is a Democrat and has been 
active in local affairs since establishing him- 
self in business at Concord. He was elected 
mayor in 1931, making a successful campaign 
against the man who had held that office for 
the previous ten years. He has done much 
to influence community development and prog- 
ress, and deserves much credit for bringing 
about the construction of the north and south 
hard road through the town, which eventually 
will be extended through the county to Beards- 
town. 

Mr. Williams married, on June 11, 1924, 
at Chapin, Miss Verla Baker, daughter of 
Charles and Susan (Cox) Baker. Charles 







sriiaLi s^&4%£+*# / 4"=<^^' 



ILLINOIS 



151 



Baker is one of the prominent farmers in this 
community. Susan (Cox) Baker is a descend- 
ant from one of the early settlers of Morgan 
County, who came from England. The three 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Williams are Mary 
M., Marilyn J. and Walter W., Jr. Mr. 
Williams is a member of the Modern Wood- 
men of America. He was registered during 
the World war but was not called to duty. He 
is a member of the Community Club and he 
and his wife are leaders in the social activities 
of the town. 

Mark Lee Cottingham. Many of the earli- 
est settlers of Tazewell County came from 
the State of Tennessee, and in Tremont Town- 
ship is a locality known as Tennessee Point, 
suggestive of the state from which came some 
of the best known families in this region, 
including the Cottinghams. A representative 
of the third generation of this family is Mark 
Lee Cottingham, who has lived most of his 
life in Tremont Township and who has played 
an effective and varied part in the affairs of 
his community, but is best known for his long 
and able management and editorial control of 
the Tremont News. 

The Tremont News was established May 
12, 1893, and has never missed an issue for 
thirty-seven years. It is a home newspaper, 
devoted to the news and worthy publicity 
of everything affecting the locality and shows 
complete independence in the matter of politics. 
It is not only a good newspaper but a suc- 
cessful business. Mr. Cottingham is the sole 
owner. He has a fine plant, not only equipped 
for getting out his weekly newspaper but 
to handle commercial printing, and he does 
a great deal of that work for firms over 
the state. 

Mr. Cottingham was born in Tremont Town- 
ship July 11, 1861, son of James Nelson and 
Minerva Jane (Trout) Cottingham. The Cot- 
tingham family came from England. Thomas 
Cottingham and his brother Isaac were early 
colonists in Massachusetts. The Tremont 
newspaper man is a direct descendant of 
Thomas Cottingham. That pioneer had a son 
named Thomas, and a representative of the 
third generation was Capt. Joseph Cotting- 
ham, a Revolutionary officer. A brother of 
James Nelson Cottingham, named Thomas 
Cottingham, was a Union soldier in the Civil 
war and was killed in action at Upperville, 
Tennessee. 

James Nelson Cottingham was born at Ten- 
nessee Point, Tremont Township, Tazewell 
County, July 10, 1836. He was a small child 
when his father died and his mother married 
again. Throughout his active career he has 
been a Tazewell County farmer. There were 
few schools of any kind during the '40s and 
'50s, and the circumstances of his own life 
were such that he acquired only a very mea- 
ger education, but in spite of that handicap 



has made more than an average success of his 
life's vocation. He has been one of the out- 
standing members of the Democratic party 
of Tazewell County and has many friends 
throughout this section of Illinois. Though 
ninety-four years of age he still enjoys a rea- 
sonable degree of strength and activity. 

James Nelson Cottingham married, July 25, 
1857, Miss Minerva Jane Trout, who was 
born in Tremont Township November 26, 
1842. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Michael 
Trout, also came from Tennessee. She was 
only two years old when her father died in 
1844. Mrs. James N. Cottingham passed away 
December 14, 1908, and is buried at Tennes- 
see Point. She was a member of the Meth- 
odist Church. Mark Lee Cottingham has a 
sister, Mrs. J. 0. Barton, born March 14, 1873, 
living at Tremont, and a brother, Olin, born 
in 1875 and a resident of Pekin. 

Mark Lee Cottingham was educated in grade 
schools and during and after school days fol- 
lowed farming for several years. For a trade 
he took up carpentry, spent one year as a 
railroad bridge builder, and then went back 
to the farm, occupying himself with the tasks 
of a general farmer until 1885. About that 
time Mr. Cottingham saw the opportunity to 
bring to this section of Illinois and sell among 
the farmers the Percheron draft horses and 
for several years he was in business as a horse 
importer. He made two trips to France, in 
1886 and 1887, to purchase after personal 
inspection a number of Percherons. 

On discontinuing his connection with this 
business he established the Tremont News, in 
1893, and to that paper he has devoted his 
time and talents for over thirty-five years. 
He has succeeded in his aim of constituting 
the Tremont News an effective organ of pub- 
licity through which he can express his public 
spirited support of every good cause. While 
he is personally a Democrat in politics, he 
does not consider political partisanship when 
he is convinced of the outstanding virtue of 
a cause or the special superiority of a man 
for office. He has himself long been an in- 
fluential figure in the public life of his local- 
ity and county. He was clerk of Tremont 
from 1891 to 1901, then served ten years on 
the city board, for one year was city treasurer, 
in 1914 was elected mayor for a term of two 
years and in 1918 was again chosen to that 
office for two years. From 1924 to 1928 he 
was deputy sheriff. During the war he was 
investigator for the district exemption board, 
and for months he gave two days every week 
to this patriotic duty. Needless to say, his 
paper was a medium through which the Gov- 
ernment and local patriotic organizations were 
privileged to present the important issues of 
the day. He was active in the Liberty Bond, 
Red Cross and other drives. Mr. Cottingham 
is a member and former president of the 
Tremont Merchants Association. He attends 



152 



ILLINOIS 



the Baptist Church, and there are many sub- 
jects that arouse in him a keen intellectual 
interest. Probably no one is better informed 
on Tazewell County history than this Tre- 
mont editor. In politics and other matters 
he has a habit of speaking his mind and yet 
without permanent offense, since everyone 
knows that he can be depended upon to cham- 
pion every worthy undertaking. He has a 
great fondness for outdoor life and athletics 
of all kinds and for about ten years was man- 
ager of the Tremont ball team. The principal 
form taken by his own diversion is going to 
the cabin he maintains in the woods on the 
Mackinaw River, and here he finds recreation 
during the summer months. 

Mr. Cottingham married, November 16, 1880, 
Miss Kittie Pearl Lance, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Conrad Lance. She was born at Macki- 
naw, Tazewell County, April 1, 1861, was edu- 
cated in public schools there, is active in the 
work of the Christian Church and a Democrat 
in politics. Her home and family have al- 
ways come first in claiming her affection and 
energies. Mr. and Mrs. Cottingham have an 
interesting group of children and are also 
proud to claim a number of grandchildren. 
Their eldest child, Mrs. Ethel L. Dingle, was 
born July 4, 1882, lives at Pekin and has a 
daughter, Virginia. Grace, born July 26, 
1886, is the widow of Roy Pepper, of Peoria, 
and their children are: Wayne Pepper, of 
Denver; Eunice, Helen and Mariam Pepper, 
of Peoria. Leslie Cottingham, born May 31, 
1888, served during the World war as dieti- 
cian in a hospital at Lakehurst, New Jersey, 
is married and has a daughter, Bettie. Edith, 
born April 1, 1891, is the widow of Roy Green, 
of Tremont, and has four children, named 
Mildred, Kenneth, Cletus and Duane. Ralph, 
born November 26, 1893, was overseas in 
France with the army during the World war. 
Earl, born July 3, 1896, is associated with his 
father in the Tremont News. Hazel, born 
February 28, 1890, and died January 24, 1924, 
was the wife of Ray Nebbilin, an ex-service 
man of the World war, and she left two chil- 
dren, Marjorie and Lois. Donald, the young- 
est child, was born in 1905 and is a reporter 
for his father's paper. 

Harold Griffith Baker, of East St. Louis, 
and formerly one of the three United States 
district attorneys in Illinois, was the youngest 
man ever appointed to that office in the his- 
tory of his own district. He was only twenty- 
seven years old and had been admitted to the 
Illinois bar only five years when he was called 
to the duties of this position. He left office 
August 1, 1931, and formed a partnership 
with Ralph F. Lesemann, who had been first 
assistant United States attorney, as Baker 
& Lesemann, with offices in the Murphy 
Building. 



However, Mr. Baker represents several old 
and distinguished family names in the legal 
profession of Southern Illinois. He was born 
at East St. Louis, February 16, 1899, son of 
Martin D. and Gertrude (McLean) Baker. 
The Baker ancestry includes relationship with 
the family of President Martin Van Buren. 
His grandfather, John Baker, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, came to Illinois before the Civil 
war and was a successful farmer in Wayne 
County. He was one of the early Republicans 
in that county. Martin D. Baker, who was 
born at Maple Crossing, Wayne County, lived 
at East St. Louis from 1880 until his death 
on August 17, 1927. He' was the first chief 
clerk of the Board of Election Commissioners 
of East St. Louis. He became a very able 
lawyer, was state's attorney of St. Clair 
County from 1896 to 1900, and always a vigor- 
ous leader in the Republican organization. 

Gertrude (McLean) Baker, who died in 
1922, was a daughter of John J. McLean, who 
at one time was mayor of East St. Louis and 
had been a soldier in the Civil war. He died 
in 1908. John J. McLean's father was Milton 
McLean, who came down the Ohio River and 
up the Mississippi on a boat to East St. Louis 
before any railroads had been constructed 
across the Mississippi. He was one of the 
first lawyers to practice in East St. Louis. 

Harold G. Baker laid the foundation of his 
education in the grammar schools of East St. 
Louis, in 1916 was graduated from the Smith 
Academy at St. Louis and was a student in 
the University of Illinois when America inter- 
vened in the World war. After attending 
the Officers Training School at Fort Sheridan 
he was commissioned a second lieutenant, and 
was assigned duty at Camp Grant until after 
the armistice. He was discharged February 
19, 1919, and then resumed his interrupted 
studies at the University of Illinois. He was 
graduated LL. B. in 1921 and after ten months ' 
of service as a state bank examiner joined 
his father in law practice at East St. Louis. 

His personal abilities brought him distinc- 
tion and reputation, and his appointment as 
United States district attorney on July 5, 
1926, was favorably commended by the press 
and by members of the Illinois bar. He is a 
member of the East St. Louis, Illinois State 
and American Bar Associations. 

Mr. Baker has been active in American 
Legion work. He is a Sigma Chi and Phi 
Delta Phi, a Scottish Rite Mason and Shriner,. 
member of the Rotary and Kiwanis Clubs. He 
has been a member of the Republican County 
Central Committee for several years, has 
served as secretary of the committee, and as 
a speaker has participated in political cam- 
paigns. 

Mr. Baker married, December 10, 1927, Miss 
Bernice Kraft, of East St. Louis, daughter 
of Fred W. and Adolphina (Buhs) Kraft. The 



ILLINOIS 



153 



Kraft family have been in St. Clair County 
since pioneer times. Mrs. Baker was presi- 
dent of the Junior League and is prominent 
socially. They have a son, Harold Griffith, 
Jr., born August 29, 1929. 

Ralph Frederick Lesemann was assistant 
United States attorney for the Eastern Dis- 
trict of Illinois, at East St. Louis. He comes 
of an old and prominent family of Washing- 
ton County, and though still in the early years 
of his professional career has distinguished 
himself by intellectual ability and energy and 
forcefulness. 

He was born at Nashville, Washington 
County, Illinois, December 9, 1899. His grand- 
father, Frederick Lesemann, came from Ger- 
many to Illinois in pioneer times and was a 
Washington County farmer. The maternal 
grandfather, Fred Franzlau, was born in 
Alsace-Lorraine. During his life in Illinois 
he was a merchant and served in the Union 
army during the Civil war. 

The parents of Attorney Lesemann are 
Phillip B. and Anna M. (Franzlau) Lese- 
mann, both of whom are still living at Nash- 
ville, where they were born. His father is a 
successful dentist, is a past president of the 
Southern Illinois Dental Association and mem- 
ber of the Illinois and National Dental So- 
cieties. Outside of his profession his activi- 
ties have made him one of the best known 
men in his community. He was a member of 
the Nashville School Board and its past secre- 
tary, is a past president of the Chamber of 
Commerce, and was secretary of the Hospital 
Association and the prime mover in the estab- 
lishment of the hospital at Nashville. He is 
a Republican. He and his wife are Metho- 
dists and they were leaders in the movement 
for the consolidation of the two Methodist 
churches at Nashville into one. He has served 
on the church board for many years and is a 
steward. Ralph Frederick Lesemann has one 
sister, Miss Ferrol Franzlau Lesemann. After 
graduating from the Nashville High School 
she attended the James Millikin University at 
Decatur, was graduated A. B. from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1926, and is now teach- 
ing at the Fairfield Community High School. 

Ralph Frederick Lesemann attended gram- 
mar and high schools in his native town, after 
which he became an educator. For a time he 
was principal of the Nashville High School. 
His advanced education was acquired in the 
University of Illinois, where he was gradu- 
ated A. B. in 1922, and in 1924 received the 
degree Doctor of Jurisprudence in the same 
university. He is a member of the Gamma 
Eta Gamma fraternity. At the end of his 
freshman year in university he received high 
honors and also at the end of his sophomore 
year. He graduated with high honors, was 
elected a Phi Beta Kappa, and was also elected 
a member of the Order of the Coif in the law 



school, was elected a member of Pi Gamma 
Mu and was student editor of the Illinois Law 
Quarterly. 

While in college he distinguished himself as 
a speaker of more than ordinary powers, and 
since his admission to the bar has taken an 
active part in every Republican campaign. He 
is also in much demand as a speaker before 
civic organizations, and schools, and has de- 
livered a number of commencement addresses. 
This fluent command of language has made 
him a power in jury trials. He was admitted 
to practice before the Illinois Supreme Court 
in 1924, has also been admitted to the United 
States Court of Appeals and Federal District 
Courts, and in 1928 was admitted to practice 
before the Supreme Court of the United States. 
After graduating from law school he spent 
two years as an associate of the prominent 
East St. Louis firm of Kramer, Kramer & 
Campbell. Then, in 1926, he was appointed 
first assistant United States district attorney 
and for five years his time and energies were 
fully taken up with the duties of this office. 
On August 1, 1931, the firm of Baker & Lese- 
man was established, with offices in the Mur- 
phy Building and a branch at Nashville. 

Mr. Lesemann is a member of the East St. 
Louis, Illinois State and American Bar Asso- 
ciations. He is a Royal Arch and Council 
degree Mason. He is a member of the East 
St. Louis Lions Club. While at the univer- 
sity Mr. Lesemann was in the Reserve Officers 
Training Corps, and is a past county judge 
advocate of the American Legion Post of 
Washington County and a member of the 
Forty and Eight Society. He retains his mem- 
bership in the Methodist Episcopal Church at 
Nashville. While teaching in Washington 
County he was treasurer of the County Teach- 
ers Association and treasurer of the Junior 
Red Cross. 

Arthur John Mollman is a Southern Illi- 
nois editor and publisher, a business with 
which he has been identified in some capacity 
or another for forty years. He is owner, 
editor and publisher of the Millstadt Enter- 
prise. 

The Enterprise was established in 1897 by 
E. W. Cross, and Mr. Mollman acquired the 
plant in 1906. He has given it a circulation 
of over 900, and has made it a profitable busi- 
ness enterprise, and as a newspaper is a fine 
example of country journalism. Mr. Moll- 
man conducts it independent in politics. He 
is a member of the Southern Illinois Editorial 
Association, the Illinois State Press Associa- 
tion and the National Press Association. 

Mr. Mollman was born at Mascoutah, Illi- 
nois, September 29, 1874. His father, the late 
John D. Mollman, who died July 25, 1924, was 
born in Hanover, Germany, December 20, 
1834. He lived to the advanced age of ninety. 
When he was sixteen years of age, after hav- 



154 



ILLINOIS 



ing acquired a practical education in Ger- 
many, he came to America in 1850. For a 
time he worked in St. Louis and in 1857 moved 
to Mascoutah, where he established a busi- 
ness as a manufacturer and dealer in saddles 
and harness. He continued in that business 
for nearly half a century, finally selling out 
in 1904 to his son Julius. John D. Mollman 
married Miss Wilhelmina Hagist, daughter of 
Andrew Hagist. They were married in 1861, 
and all of their nine children are still living. 
Arthur J. Mollman after completing the 
work of the public school at Mascoutah spent 
several years of apprenticeship in the print- 
ing and publishing business of Carl Montag, 
then publisher of the Mascoutah Herald. After 
another year with Fred Kraft, publisher of 
the East St. Louis Democrat, he and his 
brother Fred acquired the plant of the Demo- 
crat. A year later, in 1898, Arthur J. Moll- 
man moved the plant to Mascoutah, and pub- 
lished the Mascoutah Times. It was a Re- 
publican paper. After four years he sold out 
to Mr. Montag, and, returning to St. Louis, 
was with the C. P. Curran Printing Company 
for some time. He resigned in 1906 and 
bought the Millstadt Enterprise, which he has 
conducted now for a quarter of a century. 

Mr. Mollman has been prominent in local 
affairs. He is a former president of the Mill- 
stadt School Board and was one of the organ- 
izers and charter members of the Millstadt 
Commercial Club. He is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity, the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, and for many years was secre- 
tary of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
During the war he was chairman of the Mill- 
stadt Chapter of the Red Cross. Mr. Moll- 
man is the present postmaster of Millstadt. 

He married, September 29, 1897, Miss Alma 
C. Lill. They have six children. 

Lilbert Arthur, born October 30, 1898, grad- 
uated from the College of Engineering at the 
University of Illinois in 1924, and is now with 
the Union Electric Company of St. Louis. He 
married in September, 1930, Miss Vera Zagel, 
of Peoria. 

Kenneth John, the second son, was born 
June 29, 1900. After graduating from the 
Belleville Township High School he was asso- 
ciated with his father for a number of years 
in the Enterprise, and is now in the insurance 
business at Belleville. He married Miss 
Maurine Farrow. 

Richard Amos Mollman, born April 8, 1902, 
is a graduate of the Belleville Township High 
School and is now business manager of the 
Millstadt Enterprise. 

Carl Edmund Mollman, born March 14, 
1904, graduated from the David Rankin Trade 
School at St. Louis, is a draftsman and is 
connected with the Alcoa Ore Company of 
East St. Louis. 

Margaret Elise, one of the two daughters 
of Mr. and Mrs. Mollman, was born July 11, 



1905, and is assistant postmaster. The sec- 
ond daughter, Louise Elinor, was born June 
24, 1914, and is a student in the Belleville 
Township High School. 

John V. Utz, of Belleville, possessed the 
age and other qualifications that made him 
eligible for service with the colors during the 
World war, and he represents that generation 
of ex-service men who have proved so valuable 
in citizenship and business since the war. 

Mr. Utz was born at Belleville, December 
15, 1895. His father, Valentine Utz, now liv- 
ing retired at the age of seventy-five, was 
born in Poplar Bluff, Missouri, November 10, 
1855, and coming to Illinois, settled on a farm 
in Monroe County, where he spent the greater 
part of his active life. For over fifty years 
he has voted the Democratic ticket straight, 
and is what is known as one of the "wheel 
horses" of his party. Valentine Utz married 
Miss Elmyra Greer, who was born in Kansas 
and passed away in 1904. 

John V. Utz grew up at Belleville, attended 
the public schools of that city, and after leav- 
ing school learned the trade of broom maker. 
He followed this trade until the factory was 
moved from Belleville. About the same time 
of the change of this industry he responded 
to the call for soldiers. Mr. Utz was with 
the colors just one year, and practically all 
his time was spent at Camp Dix, New Jersey. 
He enlisted April 29, 1918, with the Seventy- 
eighth Division, later was shunted into the 
medical department and finally was in the 
commissary department, with the rank of first 
cook. He was discharged April 29, 1919. 

Since his military service Mr. Utz has con- 
centrated his attention upon a business as a 
merchant at Belleville. He shares the same 
political opinions as his father and at the 
present time is secretary of his precinct for 
the Central Committee. When he moved into 
his present ward at Belleville there were n<H 
Democratic votes in it. He built up the party 
representation until it stood normally at 172 
Democrats and twenty-four Republicans. In 
1930, when Senator Lewis contested the elec-< 
tion with Mrs. McCormick, 380 votes were cast 
in the precinct for Lewis and only thirty-four 
for Mrs. McCormick. Mr. Utz is vice com- 
mander of the Twenty-second Congressional 
District, American Legion. 

Soon after his enlistment in the army he 
married Miss Myrtle Bohn, of Collinsville. 
Five children were born to them: John 
(Jack), born March 7, 1919, and died Janu- 
ary 26, 1921; Robert Lee, born September 11? 
1921; Rachael Jean, born November 30, 1923; 
Doris, born February 13, 1929, and Richard 
Franklin, born December 25, 1930. 

Mr. Utz is a member of the Fraternal Or- 
der of Eagles, but the organization to which 
he has devoted himself heart and soul is the 
American Legion. He has been active in the 




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Henry W. Wales, Sr. 



ILLINOIS 



155 



post since it was organized in Belleville and 
has held every office, including that of com- 
mander, in 1927. His initiative was largely 
responsible for making the post a live and 
functioning organization. He brought about 
the organization of the Post Band, and while 
he was commander the post gained a member- 
ship larger than it ever had had before, and 
only during 1930 was the membership aug- 
mented above the number it had while he 
was commander. During his term as head of 
the post the band was awarded first prize at 
the State Convention at Quincy. Mr. Utz 
has been a delegate to the State Convention of 
the Legion five consecutive times. 

Calvin Nesbit, mine operator at Belle- 
ville, and secretary of the Democratic County 
Central Committee of. St. Clair County, is a 
member of a family which has been conspicu- 
ous in the mining industry of this portion of 
Southern Illinois for many years. 

Mr. Nesbit was born at Belleville, Septem- 
ber 18, 1885. His father was the late Charles 
Nesbit, who was brought to Illinois by his 
father when a small boy. He grew to man- 
hood there, and worked his way up in the 
mining industry, becoming eventually an in- 
dependent operator. At the time of his death, 
in August, 1923, he was manager and owner 
of the Nesbit Mine. Charles Nesbit married 
Miss Helen Green, who died in July, 1918. 
She was born in Staffordshire, England, and 
was a girl when her parents came to America. 
Mr. Calvin Nesbit was the third in a family 
of seven children. His oldest brother, Charles 
Nesbit, is a mining operator at Belleville. 
Hon. Walter Nesbit, the second son, has long 
been a leading figure in the United Mine 
Workers of America, enjoying the confidence 
of laboring men as well as the substantial 
business element. He was elected secretary- 
treasurer of the Illinois Miners' Union and 
has served for the past fifteen years. The 
fourth son is Dan Nesbit, a shoe merchant at 
St. Louis. The daughters of the familv are: 
Blanche, wife of Fred Hazer, of St. Louis; 
Clara, Mrs. Herman Beyer, of Belleville; and 
Eleanor, Mrs. Jacob Bank, of Belleville. 

Calvin Nesbit grew up in Belleville, attend- 
ed school there and since leaving school has 
been occupied first and last with the mining 
industry. At first he was associated with his 
father, but is now an individual operator, han- 
dling his own properties. Mr. Nesbit knows 
jmining from the standpoint of the worker as 
,well as the operator, and is frequently spoken 
of as one of the leading mining authorities 
'in St. Clair County. He is held in very fa- 
vorable regard in the United Mine Workers 
i of America. 

Since early manhood he has given much 
attention to politics as a Democrat. Those 
who understand the local political situation 



say that Mr. Nesbit was more nearly responsi- 
ble as an individual for the great victories 
of his party in the county in the elections of 
1928 and 1930 than any other one man. He 
planned and cooperated with other able men 
in an educational campaign to direct the at- 
tention of people to the needs of the state 
and county and the most capable men to rep- 
resent them in public office. Mr. Nesbit has 
been chairman of the St. Clair County Demo- 
cratic Central Committee for four terms. 

He married Miss Elizabeth Schedler, of 
Belleville. Her people were of German an- 
cestry and pioneers of St. Clair County. Her 
father was Cornelius Schedler, who died in 
1924. Her mother, Appolina (Echenf elder) 
Schedler, was born in Germany. Mr. and 
Mrs. Nesbit have seven children: Dorothy, a 
graduate of the Belleville High School; Wil- 
bur, with the International Shoe Company; 
Calvin, with the Karr Range Company; Ken- 
neth, attending parochial school at Belleville; 
Thomas, also in school; William and David. 

Henry Whitwell Wales, M. D., spent the 
greater part of his active and useful life as a 
physician and surgeon in one Illinois com- 
munity, Lanark, Carroll County. He was a 
native of Illinois, and was a descendant of 
Nathaniel Wales, who came from England to 
Massachusetts in 1635. 

The Wales family were among the early 
pioneers of Northern Illinois and the records 
of Ogle County make conspicuous mention of 
the fact that the first sheriff of that county 
was Horatio Wales, father of the late Doctor 
Wales. Horatio Wales was born at Wales, 
Massachusetts, in 1810, and in 1833 came west 
and settled on a farm in Ogle County. He 
died at Polo in 1890. Horatio Wales married 
Mary Eliza Williams, a descendant of Thomas 
Welles, who was Governor of the Colony of 
Connecticut (1655-1658) ; she was born at 
Brimfield, Massachusetts, in 1811, and died at 
Polo in 1892. 

Their son, Henry Whitwell Wales, was born 
in Ogle County June 17, 1840. He attended 
local schools and the Frances Shimer Academy 
at Mount Carroll, concluding his literary edu- 
cation in Beloit College. During the Civil war 
he enlisted in the hospital corps from Illinois. 
In 1864 he was graduated from the Hahne- 
mann Medical College of Chicago. After one 
year of practice at Forreston, he located at 
Lanark, where he continued his professional 
work for forty years, until his death on Octo- 
ber 6, 1905, and became one of the most promi- 
nent physicians in Northwestern Illinois. 

Doctor Wales had a prominent part in se- 
curing the right-of-way for the Chicago and 
Council Bluffs Division of the Chicago, Mil- 
waukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. He 
was local surgeon for the railroad until his 
death. He was a member and repeatedly held 



156 



ILLINOIS 



the highest offices in the lodge and chapter of 
Masonry and was also a Knight Templar and 
Shriner. 

Doctor Wales married at Lanark, in 1865, 
Miss Elizabeth Muir. She was a native of 
New York City, of English and Scotch ances- 
try, and died in 1919. Doctor and Mrs. Wales 
had four children: Dr. Albert H.; Frederick 
M., deceased; Henry W., and Reginald C. 

Henry Whitwell Wales was born at 
Lanark, Carroll County, Illinois, October 8, 
1875, of English and Scotch ancestry, de- 
scended from pioneer Illinois families, and for 
over thirty years has enjoyed a highly suc- 
cessful law practice in Chicago, where he is 
member of the prominent law firm of Miller, 
Gorham & Wales, at 1 North LaSalle Street. 

His father, Dr. Henry Whitwell Wales, was 
born in Ogle County, Illinois, in 1840, de- 
scended from ancestors who came to America 
in Colonial times. For many years he en- 
joyed a practice and reputation as one of the 
outstanding physicians in Northwestern Illi- 
nois, his home being at Lanark, where he died 
in 1905. Doctor Wales married Elizabeth Muir, 
who was born in New York City and came 
with her parents early in the '60s to Carroll 
County. His father, Horatio Wales, settled 
in Illinois in the early '30s and was the first 
sheriff of Ogle County. 

After attending public schools at Lanark, 
Henry Whitwell Wales came to Chicago, con- 
tinued his education in the Hyde Park High 
School, received the Bachelor of Philosophy 
degree from the University of Chicago in 1896, 
and completed his law course at Northwestern 
University in 1899. Admitted to the bar the 
same year, he has since practiced in Chi- 
cago. The firm of which he is a member is 
among the foremost at the Chicago bar. Mr. 
Wales is a member of the Chicago, Illinois 
and American Bar Associations, the Law 
Club, University Club, Skokie Country Club. 
His home is at 480 Sheridan Road, Winnetka, 
but for a number of years he lived at La- 
Grange. He was village attorney of LaGrange 
in 1907-09, member and president of the La- 
Grange School Board. 

Mr. Wales is a member of LaGrange Lodge 
of Masons, is a past commander of Trinity 
Commandery No. 80, Knights Templar, mem- 
ber of Medinah Temple of the Mystic Shrine, 
is a Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Delta Phi, Beta 
Theta Pi and a Republican. 

He married Miss Mabelle Willett, whose 
father, Consider Willett, was a well known 
Chicago attorney, at one time county attorney 
of Cook County and attorney for the Town of 
Hyde Park. Mr. and Mrs. Wales have two 
sons and one daughter. The older son, Henry 
Whitwell, Jr., is a graduate of Princeton Uni- 
versity and is now successfully established in 
the wholesale lumber business at Louisville, 
Kentucky. The second son, Robert Willett, is 



an A. B. graduate of Princeton University, 
took his LL. B. degree at Harvard Law 
School, served one year thereafter as secretary 
to Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes, the ven- 
erable and venerated justice of the Supreme 
Court of the United States, and is now asso- 
ciated with his father's firm. The daughter, 
Lois Elizabeth, received her A. B. degree from 
Smith College. 

Joseph Nicholas Buechler is president of 
the Buechler Publishing Company of Belle- 
ville. This business was founded by him thirty 
years ago, and has been developed primarily 
as a complete commercial printing plant, but 
a large part of its business is also represented 
in the publication of several periodicals. The 
most important of these is the Messenger, a 
weekly Catholic journal, which was established 
in 1908 and which has an average weekly cir- 
culation of 4,200 copies. It is an eight page, 
seven column religions weekly and is the offi- 
cial organ of the Belleville diocese. Through 
it Rt. Rev. Bishop Henry Althoff makes his 
official communications to the diocese. An- 
other publication owned and published by the 
Buechler Publishing Company plant is the 
Schoolmate, a Catholic weekly established in 
1914, with a circulation of 76,000 copies, pub- 
lished during the school term, with forty 
issues a year. Another publication is the 
Catholic Girl, a Catholic magazine for grow- 
ing girls, established in 1925. Rev. E. Dalmus 
is editor of the Messenger; Rev. J. B. Henken, 
editor of the Juvenile Weekly and the Catholic 
Girl. Mr. Buechler also owns and publishes 
the Mascoutah Herald, having owned this 
paper since 1927. It was Democratic in policy 
until 1927, when Mr. Buechler changed its! 
politics to Republican. 

He founded the Buechler Printing Company! 
in 1902, and has made it one of the most com- 
plete commercial printing plants in Southern 
Illinois. It has facilities for high grade book 
publishing, binding, catalogues. Mr. Buechler 
himself has had forty-five years of experience 
as a master printer and periodical printer, 
and has brought to his establishment a staff 
of able newspaper writers, linotype and mono- 
type operators and craftsmen, each one an 
expert in his field. 

Mr. Buechler was born at Belleville, April 
15, 1876, oldest son of Albert and Elizabeth 
(Kuenz) Buechler. Albert Buechler was born 
in Zweibruecken, Rhenish Bavaria, February 
11, 1852, and a year later his parents came 
to the United States, first locating at BuK 
lington, Iowa, and in 1858 removing to Belle- 
ville, Illinois. Joseph N. Buechler was eight 
years old when his parents moved to St. Louis. 
In that city he attended parochial and public 
schools. Four years later his parents returned 
to Belleville, and that has been his home ever 
since. He began his apprenticeship at the 
printer's trade with the News-Democrat, 






rim 



t^Ccas 



ILLINOIS 



157 



whose plant was then located on the public 
square. He was there but a short time, then 
went with the National Live Stock Reporter 
at the National Stock Yards in East St. Louis, 
and was with this paper fourteen years. On 
May 1, 1902, he established the printing busi- 
ness of his own, at 220 West Main Street, 
Belleville. In addition to being president of 
the Buechler Printing Company he is presi- 
dent of the Mascoutah Aluminum Company, of 
the Mascoutah Herald Printing Company and 
of the Special Products Laboratories of Belle- 
ville. In 1910 he purchased property at 332 
West Main Street in Belleville, on which he 
has developed the plant and offices of the 
Buechler Printing Company. 

Mr. Buechler's father, Albert Buechler, is 
also a veteran of the printing trade. He grew 
up at Belleville, attending the parochial school 
conducted in St. Peter's Church, in what is 
now the Cathedral of the diocese. In 1864, 
at the age of twelve, he entered the printing 
office of the Belleviller Zeitung, then published 
by Fred Rupp. After an apprenticeship of 
several years he was employed on the Omaha 
Herald at Omaha, Nebraska, in 1872, then 
with several printing houses in St. Louis, and 
altogether spent fifty-four consecutive years 
in the printing trade. In January, 1917, he 
had the misfortune of having the fifth ver- 
tebra dislocated, and as a result was helpless 
for several months. He recovered sufficiently 
to be able to do a little work, and in later 
years has conducted a printing business with 
his son, Alfred, in St. Louis. Albert Buechler 
and Miss Elizabeth Kuenz were married in St 
Peter's Church at Belleville in 1874. She was 
born at New Athens, Illinois, January 31, 
1852. To their marriage were born seven chil- 
dren, two of whom died in infancy. Those 
living are: Mrs. Frank Scher, of Los Angeles; 
Joseph N.; Edward; Mrs. Julia Bertold; and 
Alfred, of St. Louis. 

Joseph N. Buechler married, August 20, 
1902, Miss Caroline Koch, daughter of Jacob 
and Frances (Winschell) Koch. Her father 
was born at Herbitzheim, Canton Blinskaster, 
Rhenish Bavaria, January 16, 1838, but from 
early manhood lived at Belleville. He was a 
brewer by trade and was a soldier in the 
Union army during the Civil war. He mar- 
ried Mrs. Frances Winschell, September 16, 
1871. He died on the sixty-seventh anniver- 
sary of his birth, in 1905. His wife was born 
at Walten, Bavaria, August 30, 1843, and 
came to America with her mother in 1852, 
settling at Belleville, where in 1861 she was 
married to Mr. Andrew Winschell. Mr. Win- 
schell died in 1869, leaving four children. In 
1871 she was married to Mr. Joseph Koch, 
and of the three children of this union two 
are living, Mrs. Joseph N. Buechler and 
Michael Koch of St. Louis. The children of 
her first husband were: Albert Winschell, of 
Kansas City; Charles, of Staunton, Illinois; 



Mrs. Elizabeth Visel, of Seattle, Washington. 
Mrs. Joseph N. Buechler was born at Trenton 
Illinois, February 27, 1876. She was educated 
m parochial schools and when ten years of age 
TrTt W \^ her P aren ts to Salt Lake City, 
Utan. After two years they returned to Illi- 
nois and located at Belleville. Mrs. Buechler 
as a young woman learned the trade of seam- 
stress, which she followed until her marriage 
Mr and Mrs. Buechler have four children: 
William Oliver, in the office with his father- 
* ranees Cecilia, who graduated in 1931 from 
Mount St. Mary's College at Milwaukee; 
Louise E., who died in 1918; and Rita Marie 
a pupil in the schools of Belleville 

Mr. Buechler has been active in business for 
forty-five years. While business has demanded 
most of his time and attention he has been 
interested in local affairs and in 1912 was 
elected and served as a member of the Board 
of Supervisors of St. Clair County. He is a 
charter member of the Belleville Turnverein 
and was the organizer of the Turner Activi- 
ties Association. He served on the Belleville 
Board of Health in 1913-14 and 1917-18, being 
f 2 r «? w ^ y ? a , rs its secret ary. He is a member 
of the Knights of Columbus, Western Catholic 
Union, Catholic Knights of Illinois, St. 
Peters Men's Society, St. Vincent De Panl 
Society, the Belleville Chamber of Commerce 
and the West and South Side Improvement 
Association. 

Daniel Bertram Moore. Of the follower of 
any of the important trades no better rec- 
ommendation is required than the credit of 
long employment under a reliable manage- 
ment. From 1892 until his death, June 19, 
1931, Dan B. Moore was identified with the 
Kewanee Boiler Corporation, and from 1910 
occupied the position of superintendent of this 
great and prosperous plant. While he was 
given few advantages in his youth, he was 
naturally ambitious and industrious, as well 
as quick to adapt himself to his surround- 
ings, and thus had been able to work his way 
to a place where he commanded respect and 
esteem. 

Mr. Moore was born at Kewanee, Illinois, 
May 18, 1878, and was a son of Lewis and 
Kate (Morin) Moore, early residents of the 
city. He was allowed to attend public school 
until reaching the age of fourteen years, at 
which time he secured employment with the 
company with which he was connected ever 
afterward, winning advancement honestly and 
without adventitious aid or outside influences. 
Mr. Moore was a member of the local lodge 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks for thirty-one years, likewise belonging 
to the Knights of Columbus, the Chamber of 
Commerce and the Rotary Club, of which lat- 
ter he was a director and in which he declined 
the office of president. The religious connec- 
tion of the family is with the Catholic Church 



158 



ILLINOIS 



of the Visitation parish. Mr. Moore was 
public-spirited and generous with his time 
and means in all measures for the public 
welfare. He was a member of the board of 
directors of the Kewanee Community Chest 
organization, and also of the Welfare Asso- 
ciation. During the World war he served in 
the secret service department of the United 
States Government for Henry County. He 
was a lover of the out-doors, enjoyed sports, 
and was a golf enthusiast. His hobby may 
be said to have been flowers, of which his 
attractive home surroundings give ample 
evidence. 

On May 30, 1910, Mr. Moore was united in 
marriage with Miss Emma M. Adams, who 
was born at Carlisle, Illinois, a daughter of 
Joseph and Mary (Rohr) Adams. Mrs. Moore 
was the first graduate nurse from St. Francis 
Hospital, Kewanee. She and her husband had 
three children, of whom one is living: John 
Daniel, a student in the class of 1934 at the 
Kewanee High School. 

Edgar Charles Grossmann, of the Belle- 
ville law firm of Grossman & Grossman, rep- 
resents one of the oldest German families of 
Southern Illinois, and he is one of several 
prominent men of the present generation of 
the family. 

He was born on a farm in Smithton Town- 
ship, St. Clair County, July 5, 1888. His 
grandfather, Charles Grossman, was born in 
Germany and was a boy when brought to this 
country by his parents, who settled in St. 
Clair County, being among the early German 
colonists there. Louis Grossman, father of the 
Belleville attorneys, was born in Smithton 
Township and for many years was a substan- 
tial farmer. He married Miss Regine Ahrens, 
whose people were also German pioneers of 
St. Clair County. The children of Louis 
Grossman and wife were: Louis J., born Feb- 
ruary 28, 1886, is a graduate of Central Wes- 
leyan College of Warrenton, Missouri, of Val- 
paraiso University and Yale University, and 
is practicing law at Belleville; Edgar; Wal- 
ter, born June 22, 1890, now judge of the 
Municipal Court of Belleville, graduated from 
Central Wesleyan College of Missouri, took 
his law degree at Valparaiso University, and 
also attended Northwestern University. Dur- 
ing the war he was in the air service as an 
instructor in air gunnery. The next son, 
Richard, a veterinary surgeon of Columbia, 
Illinois, graduated from McKillop's College "of 
Veterinary Surgery at Chicago. Eugene, the 
youngest of the family, is a graduate of the 
University of Illinois, was in front line duty 
during the World war, being at the battle of 
Verdun, and is now a teacher at Millstadt, 
Illinois. 

Edgar C. Grossmann was reared on a farm, 
and the farm routine prepared him for the 
tasks and responsibilities of mature years. 



He attended local schools and the Central 
Wesleyan College of Warrenton, Missouri. 
Following that he entered Valparaiso Uni- 
versity at Valparaiso, Indiana, took his law 
degree in 1916, and had made some progress 
in the practice of his profession before he was 
called to military service. He enlisted and 
served ten months in France. Soon after re- 
turning home he was elected a member of the 
Board of Assessors on the Republican ticket, 
serving one term. Since then he and his 
brother Louis have been associated in a gen- 
eral law practice at Belleville. 

Mr. Grossman is a member of the St. Clair 
County and Illinois State Bar Associations 
and the American Legion George E. Hilyard 
Post No. 58. He married Miss Lillian Riess, 
of Mascoutah, Illinois. They have a daugh- 
ter, Melba E., born April 12, 1921. 

Clarence George Stiehl, manager of the 
Patterson-Harding Coal & Mining Company 
of Belleville, is one of the most progressive 
young men of that community, where he has 
lived practically all his life. 

He was born there May 16, 1892, son of 
John Philip and Emma (Haas) Stiehl. His 
father was born at Nashville, Illinois, but fori 
many years was active in business as a mer- 
chant at Belleville, where he and his wife 
lived retired. Miss Emma Haas was also born 
in Illinois, of German ancestry. Their chil- 
dren are: Dr. E. P. Stiehl, a Belleville physi- 
cian; Sherman, a mining man at Belleville; 
C. G. Stiehl; and Wyona, deceased. 

C. G. Stiehl grew up at Belleville, and was 
graduated in 1909 from the Belleville High 
School, before it was made a township high 
school. Immediately afterward he went to 
work for the Royal Coal Mining Company. 
For several years he was a clerk with this 
company, until he and his brother Sherman 
opened and operated a store at Scott Field. | 
He left this business to enlist in the United | 
States Army in June, 1917. He was sent to 
Kansas City, Missouri, in the motor artillery, 
and was then transferred to Camp Taylor, 
Kentucky, where he was held until after the 
armistice. He was discharged in December, 
1919. Mr. Stiehl has attended as a delegate 
every state convention of the American Le- 
gion since the war, and always has a helpful 
and kindly attitude toward men who were in 
the service. He became one of the charter 
members of George E. Hilgard Post No. 58 
at Belleville, and has been frequently honored 
by his comrades, being elected junior vice 
commander in 1928, senior vice commander 
in 1929 and in 1930 was made commander of 
the post. 

Mr. Stiehl after the war again resumed his 
connection with the business at Scott Field. 
The store was sold in 1923, at which time he 
and his brother acquired an interest in the 
Patterson-Harding Coal & Mining Company. 



: ^^^^^^^^^^^3fM^s^^^ x xss: 




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ILLINOIS 



159 



For the past eight years Mr. Stiehl has been 
manager of the mine, which is one of the 
largest in St. Clair County. 

He votes as a Republican and was reared 
a Methodist and attends that church. On 
July 4, 1923, he married Miss Florence Stof- 
fel, of Belleville, daughter of Mr. August 
Stoffel. She attended school in Belleville. 
They have a son, Bill Donald, born Decem- 
ber 3, 1925. 

Hon. William Forman Borders, a former 
president of the East St. Louis Bar Associa- 
tion, has won many of the substantial honors 
find rewards of a professional career. He is 
how in his third term as judge of the City 
Court of East St. Louis. 

I Judge Borders was born at Nashville, Illi- 
nois, February 7, 1886, son of James B. and 
kda (McCormack) Borders. The Borders 
family is of old Colonial and Revolutionary 
American stock. His great-grandfather, An- 
drew Borders, settled in Randolph County 
kfter he had been a soldier in the War of 
812. He built the first flour mill in the 
tate and became one of the largest land own- 
rs in Randolph County. The grandfather of 
udge Bordeds was James J. Borders, well 
nown for many years as a banker at Sparta, 
llinois. James Borders, father of Judge Bor- 
ers, was a leading Democrat, a real estate 
foerator in Washington County, and died when 
jomparatively young. Mrs. Ada (McCormack) 
[{orders is still living. One of her sons, James 
I was killed in France during the World war. 
(he living children are: Grover C, a prom- 
inent East St. Louis attorney, and a mem- 
fer of the General Assembly; William F.; 
ndrew J., in the automobile business at At- 
jmta, Georgia; and Ruth, wife of Charles 
jaldwin, of East St. Louis. 
(William F. Borders graduated from high 
fhool at Nashville, then spent two years in 
LcKendree College at Lebanon, and in 1912 
ok his LL.B. degree at the University of 
ichigan. He is a member of the Alpha Tau 
mega fraternity. After graduating from 
[w school he located at East St. Louis, and 
| a very short time had won enviable prom- 
|ence by his work as a lawyer. In 1922 he 
as elected judge of the City Court, was 
pcted for a second term, and then chosen for 
fe term in which he is now serving. He has 
fe judicial temperament, and his experience 
M given him a state-wide reputation as a 
nst. He has frequently been called to hold 
mrt in other counties, including Chicago. 
! Judge Borders is a leading member of the 
emocratic party, belongs to the Illinois Bar 
;ssociation and is a member of the faculty of 
fie City College of Law and Finance at St. 
Puis, Missouri. He is affiliated with the 
• P. 0. Elks and the Loyal Order of Moose. 
•Judge Borders married in 1918 Miss Violet 
uith, of Evansville, Illinois, daughter of 



Harmon and Elizabeth Smith. She attended 
school at Evansville. She is a member of the 
Eastern Star. Judge Borders' mother recently 
returned from France, where she went with a 
group of Gold Star Mothers. 

James W. Breen has been a member of the 
Chicago bar since 1897. He has long had the 
qualifications of an able lawyer, and his work 
has also brought him prominence in the public 
life of the city, particularly during the many 
years he served as assistant corporation 
counsel. 

Mr. Breen was born in Chicago, in 1873 
son of Thomas B. and Mary (Flaherty) Breen' 

f 6 ^ W f S ^ ed ^ ated in P ublic schools, and at- 
tended the Chicago Athenaeum, where he com- 
pleted the four year high school and university 
preparatory course. He also had the advan- 
tage of six years of study under a private 
tutor taking the regular college curriculum. 
Mr. Breen is a graduate of the Chicago Col- 
# ge ? f TT L ? w > the law department of Lake 
£ Q ° re - i^?i VerS \ ty ; He was admitted to the 
bar m 1897, and forthwith engaged in a gen- 
eral law practice, handling cases in both the 
civil and criminal courts. His early success 
in private law practice brought him large 
recognition. From 1907 to 1911 he served as 
assistant city prosecutor. He was assistant 
corporation counsel of Chicago from 1915 to 
1920 and was first assistant corporation coun- 
sel from 1920 to 1923. In the latter year he 
was made assistant state's attorney of Cook 
1 097 ^ an ° ffice he held until 1925. In April, 
1927, for the second time he was appointed 
nrst assistant corporation counsel, and served 
m that capacity until 1931. 

During the two periods of his service in 
the corporation counsel's office he had charge 
o± the drafting and approving the legality 
?C ^e °rdmances passed by or introduced in 
the City Council. This was a work requiring 
great care and skill as a lawyer and a knowl- 
edge of the complicated legal issues involved 
m many such ordinances. At the same time 
he had charge of litigation in behalf of the 
city involving important issues and values to 
the municipal government and to the tax- 
payers. Some of these cases involved amounts 
running up into millions of dollars. 

In 1930 Mr. Breen was brought out as the 
regular Republican candidate for judge of 
the Superior Court to fill the vacancy caused 
by the death of Hugo Pam. One of his chief 
sponsors was Edward J. Brundage, former 
corporation counsel and former attorney gen- 
eral of Illinois, who gave emphatic endorse- 
! n ^ I ? t . *° J 1 *"- Breen's qualifications for the 
judicial office. On one occasion he said- "Mr 
Breen made a splendid record in the corpora- 
T ' 0n io C i .T elS offic ? ™der ™y administration. 
In 1915 he was called back to the city's serv- 
ice because of his eminent legal qualifications » 
It was also pointed out that some of his 



160 



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opinions as assistant corporation counsel were 
embodied in Supreme Court decisions of the 
state. Another testimony to his qualifications 
was: "His best references are those who have 
come in contact with him during his term of 
public office. His devotion to his public trust 
is unquestioned. He is recognized as one of 
the hardest workers in the legal department 
of the city." 

Mr. Breen is a member of the Chicago, 
Illinois State and American Bar Associations, 
the Hamilton Club of Chicago, the Chicago 
Law Institute, Chicago Association of Com- 
merce, Chicago Historical Society, the Chi- 
cago Art Institute and the Field Museum. 
He resides at 947 West Fifty-fourth Place, 
and his law office is at 159 North Clark Street. 

Mr. Breen married, August 7, 1919, Miss 
Mary L. Lewis, daughter of Thomas and Ellen 
Lewis. 

Dennis Augusta Prindable, county clerk 
of St. Clair County, has lived all his life in 
Southern Illinois, and for a number of years 
has been prominent in Democratic politics in 
St. Clair County. 

Mr. Prindable, whom his friends know as 
"Doc" Prindable, was born on a farm at Car- 
rollton, Illinois, November 2, 1882. His 
grandfather, Patrick Prindable, came from 
Ireland, and in the early days before the first 
bridge was thrown across the Mississippi 
River at St. Louis was engaged in the freight- 
ing and transport business. "Doc" Prindable. 
is a son of John P. and Mary (Dwyer) Prind-' 
able, who were well-to-do farmers at Carroll-) 
ton. His mother died many years ago andi 
his father passed away in 1924. Of their four? 
children three are living: Francis, at Peoria, 
Mrs. Julia Combs, at East St. Louis, and 
D. A. 

D. A. Prindable was educated in the paro- 
chial and public schools at Carrollton and at 
the age of sixteen left school and for about 
a year was in the employ of Swift & Com- 
pany. He has been a resident of East St. 
Louis since 1900. For eight years he wasi 
foreman for an express company, then be-, 
came a whiskey salesman for Albright Broth- 
ers, and from 1909 until the prohibition era) 
in 1919 was in the saloon business at Thirty- 
third and State streets, East St. Louis. After 
1919 he was with the McGregor Baking Com^ 
pany for a time, then with the American Steel 1 
Foundry, and in 1925 was elected justice of 
the peace, being reelected in 1929. On No- 
vember 4, 1930, he was elected as the Demo- 
cratic candidate for the office of county clerk, 
being inaugurated in that office on Decem- 
ber 1 of the same year. 

Mr. Prindable is advocate of the local lodge, 
Knights of Columbus, is a member of the 
B. P. O. Elks, the Eagles, and he and his 
family are members of St. Joseph's parish 
of the Catholic Church. He married Miss 



Marie A. Kinsella, of East St. Louis. They 
have three sons: John Dennis, born in 1907, a 
haberdasher; Thomas Kinsella, born in 1909, 
a student at St. Louis University; and James 
Francis, born in 1911, attending the East St. 
Louis High School. 

Herbert Kingsbury Browne is editor of 
the Mascoutah Herald and secretary and man- 
ager of the Mascoutah Publishing Company, 
Incorporated. The Mascoutah Herald was 
founded in 1885, by Carl Montag. Montag 
was one of the ablest newspaper men of his 
generation in Southern Illinois. He conducted 
the Herald for over forty years, until 1928. 
All the time it was under his management it 
was Democratic in politics. In 1928 it became 
one of the Buechler publications, Mr. Joseph 
N. Buechler being president of the Mascoutah 
Publishing Company. Since then it has been 
a Republican paper. 

H. Kingsbury Browne was born at Green- 
villle, Illinois, July 3, 1900. His grandfather, 
John Browne, was an Illinois farmer. His 
father is Herbert Stevens Browne, a retired 
business man and prominent citizen of Green- 
ville, who for over a quarter of a century was 
connected with the Pet Milk Company there, 
and before locating at Greenville was in the 
wholesale grocery business at Chicago. He 
has been a leader in Republican politics, and 
was offered the appointment of postmaster of 
Greenville, but refused it because of his busi- 
ness interests. He has been president of the 
school board and secretary of the board for a 
quarter of a century. He was born at Buda, 
Illinois, March 13, 1857. By his first mar- 
riage he had two children: Ruth M., wife of 
William E. Cole, circuit clerk and recorder 
at Hillsboro; and Stuart C, with the Missouri 
Pacific Railway at Desoto, Missouri. The 
mother of H. Kingsbury Browne, the only 
child of his father's second marriage, is Mrs. 
Charlotte Hannah (Kingsbury) Browne. The 
Kingsburys are of English ancestry. Her 
father, Dennis Kingsbury, was one of the 
leading criminal attorneys of Illinois and at 
one time was judge of the Circuit Court in 
his district. Dennis Kingsbury's brother Car- 
lisle was also a noted lawyer at Hillsboro. 
Charlotte Hannah Kingsbury was born at 
Greenville, and is a woman of exceptional edu- 
cation and culture. She attended the Illinois 
State Normal University at Normal, the Nor- 
mal College at Jacksonville, in both of which 
institutions she subsequently taught, and she 
also was a student of Shurtleff College at 
Upper Alton. She was a member of the Car- 
negie Library Board for eight years, in 
Greenville. 

H. Kingsbury Browne was educated at 
Greenville and his first experience in the news- 
paper line was with the old Greenville Item. 
During the World war he was employed in 
essential work for the Pennsylvania Railway 



ILLINOIS 



161 



at Greenville for about a year. He was not 
yet seventeen years of age when America 
entered the war. Afterwards he was con- 
nected with the Greenville Advocate until he 
came to Mascoutah in 1928. 

Mr. Browne is secretary of the local Re- 
publican Central Committee and holds the 
office of justice of the peace. He is a member 
of the Masonic fraternity and the Eastern 
Star at Greenville, the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows and Loyal Order of Moose, and 
is a charter member and one of the organizers 
of the Mascoutah Rotary Club, serving as its 
first and only secretary to date. He is also 
secretary of the Mascoutah Commercial Club. 

Mr. Browne married Miss Bessie Wood, of 
Vandalia, Illinois, on December 17, 1927. Mrs. 
Browne attended school at Vandalia. She is 
active in the social and civil life of her com- 
munity. 

Nicholas Hemmer, of O'Fallon, is an Illi- 
nois citizen who has won respect and success 
both as a business man and public official. His 
name is known all over St. Clair County for 
his tact and efficiency. 

He was born July 18, 1880, on a farm near 
the present site of the army air field, Scott 
Field. His grandfather, Anthony Hemmer, 
was a native of Alsace-Lorraine and came 
to America just before the Civil war. He was 
an Illinois farmer. The father of Mr. Hem- 
mer is Peter W. Hemmer, a retired resident 
of O'Fallon. He was born on the Hemmer 
homestead in St. Clair County in 1851, and 
has reached the advanced age of seventy-nine, 
while his wife is seventy-five. He started out 
as a farmer and followed that occupation for 
many years and later was in the mining in- 
dustry until he retired. Peter W. Hemmer 
married Miss Julia Quigley. They had a large 
family of nine sons and four daughters, four 
of the children dying in infancy. Those who 
grew up were: Nicholas; Peter, of St. Louis; 
Julia, wife of Gustave Budina of O'Fallon; 
Louis S., in Texas; Mary, deceased wife of 
John Horner; Edward, of Taylorville, Illinois; 
Irene, wife of Clem Fournie, a manufacturer 
at East St. Louis; Margaret, wife of Ray 
Weaver, of O'Fallon; and Elmer, of Green- 
wood, Mississippi. 

Nicholas Hemmer grew up in St. Clair 
County, and as one of a large family he early 
sought opportunities to make himself useful. 
When thirteen years old he was working in 
the mines. When he went to work he did 
not neglect school and education, and by at- 
tending night school rounded out a practical 
training for larger responsibilities. Mr. 
Hemmer was a miner until he was thirty 
years of age. He has had an extensive ex- 
perience in the coke industry. He assisted in 
constructing the coke burning plant at Tyler, 
and Sikesville, Pennsylvania, and served as its 
foreman for several years. 



During the administration of Governor 
Dunne, Mr. Hemmer was appointed, in 1913, 
state humane officer. He held this position 
throughout the four year term of Governor 
Dunne. He was the first and only man to 
hold this position who made it something 
more than a nominal office and whose authori- 
ty was not only respected but was translated 
into practical humanitarian results. Largely 
through his efforts the railroad yards at East 
St. Louis had the streets surrounding them 
paved. Mr. Hemmer in his investigations 
noted how draft horses were mistreated while 
trying to pull heavy loads from the yards 
through the muddy streets. He used tact 
rather than the full authority of the law in 
suggesting that the railroad companies might 
benefit themselves as well as the public by 
remedying the situation. At the same time 
he secured the cooperation of the property 
owners in a plan to pave the streets. One 
company praised Mr. Hemmer's actions by 
saying that in his demand that draft horses 
should not be worked when in poor condition 
the company had saved twenty per cent of the 
cost of operation, since with the new rule in 
effect employees saw that horses were not 
taken out when unable to do a proper day's 
work. Mr. Hemmer not infrequently caused 
men to unhitch horses that had been ill fed 
or were unequal to the task assigned them, 
and when this was done the driver was quite 
ready to cooperate in seeing that the horses 
were in good shape. 

After leaving the office of state humane 
officer Mr. Hemmer resumed his former pro- 
fession as an expert on coke plant construc- 
tion and operation. He was superintendent 
of several coke plants in Pennsylvania. Aft- 
erwards he returned to Illinois and since 1927 
has been connected with the Swansea Stone 
Company at East St. Louis. 

Mr. Hemmer has been a loyal Democrat 
since acquiring his majority. He has been a 
delegate to many state conventions of the 
party, has been a Democratic committeeman, 
has served on the City Council of O'Fallon 
and as a member of the Fire Department 
Committee. In 1916 he was a candidate for 
the Legislature, but was defeated by the over- 
whelming Republican vote, though he carried 
many of the strong Republican precincts. He 
was also unsuccessful candidate of his party 
for clerk of the Probate Court. Mr. Hemmer 
is a third degree Knight of Columbus and a 
member of the Catholic Church. 

His first wife was Catherine Richard, who 
was born in Alsace-Lorraine and was brought 
to America when a girl by her parents. She 
died in 1923, mother of the following children: 
Vincent Nicholas, deceased; Miss Catherine, 
at home; Clemens, of St. Louis; Rita, a tal- 
ented singer who won a gold medal in a 
singing contest, now a Red Cross worker at 
St. Louis; Sullivan Joseph Roger, attending 



162 



ILLINOIS 



high school, who has also distinguished him- 
self as a vocalist and won a medal in a high 
school contest and one in a Southern Illinois 
contest. Mr. Hemmer's second wife was Miss 
Louretta Fournie, of Belleville. They have 
three children, Joseph, John and James. Mrs. 
Hemmer has a sister who is in the Catholic 
Sisterhood and one brother who is a priest. 

William Philip Klein, superintendent of 
the Dixie Mills at East St. Louis, was on the 
battle front in France when the armistice 
was signed, and is the past commander of the 
St. Clair-Monroe County organization of the 
American Legion. He is a successful business 
man and has taken a very intense interest in 
the welfare and betterment of the men who 
were with the colors during the war. 

Mr. Klein was born at East St. Louis, May 
17, 1894, son of Max and Margaret (Rupp- 
recht) Klein, both of whom were natives of 
Germany. His mother is deceased and his 
father is a retired resident of East St. Louis. 
Max Klein served in the German army during 
his youth and came to America at the age of 
twenty-three. 

W. P. Klein's education was limited to the 
opportunities of the public schools in East 
St. Louis. Since leaving school he has been 
working and making his own way. For a 
short time he was employed in St. Louis, 
then for two years with Swift & Company of 
the National Stock Yards, and for a year and 
a half was an office man for the American 
Steel Foundries Company. His chief study 
and experience has been in the field of traffic 
work. He was with the Terminal Railway of 
East St. Louis when the war came on. 

Mr. Klein was one of the first men from 
East St. Louis to enlist, answering the call 
of patriotic duty in June, 1917. He was 
assigned to the One Hundred and Twenty- 
fourth Field Artillery, formerly the Third 
Illinois Field Artillery. He was sent for 
training to Camp Logan at Houston, Texas, 
with the Thirty-third Division, but illness com- 
pelled him to leave his outfit. Later he was 
sent on to New York, was transferred to the 
Three Hundred and Twenty-eighth Field Ar- 
tillery in June, 1918, and was oyerseas dur- 
ing the summer and fall of that year. He 
was with the defensive sector on the Metz 
front and was in the trenches the day the 
armistice was signed. After the armistice he 
had a furlough which he used for travel and 
sight seeing in Germany. Coming home he 
was discharged at Fort Sheridan in March, 
1919. 

After the war he resumed his work with 
the Terminal Railway Company. Later the 
Government gave him vocational training in 
the Dixie Mills, where his previous expe- 
rience enabled him to take hold rapidly of 
the traffic work. He has been with the Dixie 
Mills since February, 1920. Within a year 



he was promoted to assistant traffic manager. 
For a year and a half he was on the road as 
a salesman, then returned to the plant as 
traffic manager and in 1930 was promoted to 
superintendent. 

Mr. Klein is a charter member of American 
Legion Post No. 53 at East St. Louis, and 
was its commander in 1929-1930. He is a 
member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He married Miss Blanche Hulick. 
They have two children, Kenneth and 
Wilmadean. 

Hon. Eugene Peter Kline, who on Novem- 
ber 4, 1930, was elected a member of the Illi- 
nois State Senate from the Forty-ninth Sen- 
atorial District, is a resident of East St. Louis, 
and has been active in the business and civic 
affairs of that community for over a quarter 
of a century. 

He was born at Louisville, Kentucky, July 
31, 1879. His grandfather, Michael Kline, 
was a native of Alsace-Lorraine, Germany, and 
died at Louisville. The father of Senator 
Kline was also Michael Kline, who was born 
in Blandenburg, Ontario, Canada, January 12, 
1852, and died in April, 1914. He was a 
pioneer in the stove industry at Louisville, 
and at the time of his death was president 
of the Kentucky Stove Company. His wife 
was Barbara Liebold, who resides at Louis- 
ville and is a native of Kentucky. These par- 
ents had a large family of fourteen children: 
Robert, deceased; Cornelius, deceased; Ira J., 
in the hotel business at San Antonio, Texas; 
Eugene P.; C. E., of Louisville; L. E., with 
Armour & Company at Kansas City; Irvin J., 
with Swift & Company at Fort Worth, Texas; 
Lillian, deceased; Corinne; Gertrude; Dean 
R., of Louisville; Robert K., deceased; and 
two who died in infancy. 

Eugene Peter Kline was educated in the 
public schools of Louisville, for two years at- 
tended the University of Louisville and had 
a three year course in' a business college. His 
entire commercial experience has been with 
the great packing firm of Swift & Company. 
He started at Louisville and in 1902 came to 
the National Stock Yards at East St. Louis, 
where he is Swift & Company's auditor in 
the accounting department. 

His home has been in St. Clair County for 
nearly thirty years and for fully a quarter 
of a century he has been active in Democratic 
politics. For many years he was precinct 
chairman of the Sixty-fifth Precinct, and this 
precinct was solidly Democratic under his ad- 
ministration. In 1925 he was appointed to 
rill a vacancy on the County Board of Super- 
visors, and in 1927 was reelected for a two 
year term and was again reelected in 1929. 
He was chairman of the board. His record 
as a supervisor, particularly his efforts in I 
behalf of an administration that would be at 
once progressive and economical, furnished the 




ft- - .cf. JcCsfa^-e^A^^e^sL-^y 



ILLINOIS 



163 



chief plank in the platform on which he was 
elected a member of the Illinois State Senate 
in 1930. 

On February 5, 1902, Mr. Kline married 
Miss Laura Miller, of Louisville, where her 
father, Fred Miller, was a merchant. Their 
children are: Lydia May, now with the Ameri- 
can Chemical Company at East St. Louis; 
Cornelius, a medical student in St. Louis Uni- 
versity; Marguerite Barbara, wife of Gaston 
Shellman, of East St. Louis; and Norma, a 
high school student. 

William Frederick Schoeneweiss, World 
war veteran, Greenview business man, is a 
native of Menard County. He was born near 
the village of Tallula, December 29, 1893. 

His grandfather, Frederick William Schoene- 
weiss, was born in Goldschein, Furstentum, 
Waldeck, Germany, and married a girl from 
Bremen Elberfeld, Germany. His wife died 
in 1910. Frederick William Schoeneweiss 
brought his family to America in 1870 and 
settled in Menard County. His son, August 
W. Schoeneweiss, was at that time six years 
old. He was born in Germany April 13, 1864. 
Part of his boyhood was spent in a log cabin 
home and the family came to America poor 
and worked themselves out of the hardships 
and limited circumstances of a rural locality, 
becoming people of substance and influence. 
August W. Schoeneweiss is a resident of 
Greenview and has spent his active life as a 
farmer. He is a man known for his straight- 
forwardness and honesty, is a Republican 
voter, member of the Presbyterian Church and 
has always shown a great love for children. 

August W. Schoeneweiss on March 18, 1891, 
married Lydia K. Paas, who was born in 
Mason County, Illinois, April 29, 1870. She is 
an active worker in the Presbyterian Church, 
is devoted to her home and family, votes the 
Republican ticket and is a member of the 
American Legion Auxiliary. Her father, 
Frederick William Paas, was born in the 
famous City of Duesseldorf, Germany, com- 
ing to America in 1856 and locating at St. 
Louis. When the Civil war came on he en- 
listed in the Union army, joining Company 
A of the One Hundred and Fourteenth Illinois 
Infantry, and served three years under Col. 
James W. Judy. He was at the siege of 
Vicksburg, taking part in the battle of Jack- 
son, Mississippi, and later was in the battle 
of Nashville. An injury received in the war 
was eventually the cause of his death. He 
passed away in January, 1908. By occupation 
he was a saddler. Frederick William Paas 
married in 1858. His wife was born in Arens- 
berg, Germany, and died November 25, 1890. 
William Frederick Schoeneweiss was the sec- 
ond in a family of six children. His sister 
Kathryn Ida, born March 8, 1892, is Mrs. 
Lester Nichols. Elsie May, born May 26, 1895, 
is Mrs. Carl H. Morgan, of Peoria. Cordelia, 



born April 10, 1898, is Mrs. Charles E. Den- 
nis, of Mason City. Oscar Milton, of Peoria, 
born August 6, 1903 ; and Virgil August, of 
Greenview, born May 6, 1908. 

William Frederick Schoeneweiss was edu- 
cated in grade schools at San Jose and Green- 
view, graduating from the high school of the 
latter town in 1914. While in high school he 
played basketball, was on the track team and 
took part in the literary programs. Later he 
gained a considerable knowledge of the law 
by correspondence work with the American 
Extension University. His early business ex- 
perience was gained working in a general 
store at Anchor, Illinois, and as bookkeeper 
in the bank at Greenview. 

He left the bank to answer the call to the 
colors on September 18, 1917. For two months 
he was in training at Camp Dodge, Iowa, was 
sent from there to Camp Pike at Little Rock, 
Arkansas, where he remained about seven and 
a half months. At Camp Pike he was put 
in the Three Hundred and Forty-sixth Infan- 
try Band, part of the Eighty-seventh Division. 
On August 24, 1918, he sailed from Hoboken 
on the transport Ceramic, landing at Liver- 
pool and after about a week crossed the chan- 
nel to France, to Le Havre, on the transport 
Viper. He ranked as a second class musician 
in the band. He was at Tours, Bordeaux 
and Montoir, and was at the latter place, not 
far from the port of St. Nazaire, when the 
armistice was signed. On March 19, 1919, he 
sailed for home on the transport Alaskan, and 
was given his honorable discharge at Camp 
Grant April 17, 1919. 

On returning to Greenview he resumed work 
in the bank for about two and a half years 
and for a time was with the Standard Oil 
Company. He engaged in business for himself 
in February, 1928, and has built up a large 
clientage in insurance, loans and real estate. 

Mr. Schoeneweiss is a Republican and an 
interested worker in his party. He is now 
(1931) village clerk. He has an unusual range 
of wholesome interests and activities. For 
nine years he was scout master, after serving 
as assistant two years, and was responsible 
for much of the good work done by the Boy 
Scouts at Greenview. As a member and dea- 
con in the Presbyterian Church he is leader 
of the church choir, teaches a class in Sunday 
School and is treasurer of the Sunday School. 
He is treasurer of the Greenview Lodge of 
Masons, is a past vice chancellor of the 
Knights of Pythias, is chaplain of American 
Legion Post No. 116 and a member of the 
Forty and Eight Club. Music is his hobby, 
and he is master of a number of instruments. 
Nature makes a big appeal to him and hiking 
and camping have been among his favorite 
diversions. He also follows basketball, base- 
ball and tennis. On August 9, 1930, he was 
united in marriage with Edith May Burns, of 
Greenview. 



164 



ILLINOIS 



Oscar Louis Becker, of Belleville, chief 
deputy sheriff of St. Clair County, has had a 
career that has brought him prominently be- 
fore the people. He is a veteran of the mov- 
ing picture industry, and has shown a high 
degree of capability in every undertaking. He 
was chosen for his present office not so much 
on political grounds as because of his record 
as a business man and citizen. 

Mr. Becker was born at New Athens, St. 
Clair County, Illinois, January 31, 1888. His 
grandparents on both sides were of German 
birth and ancestry. His father, Peter Becker, 
was born June 14, 1857. The grandfather 
was a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, 
and came to America about 1848. Peter 
Becker married Louisa Wagner of New Ath- 
ens, and Oscar L. was one of a family of 
eight children. 

Mr. Becker grew up at New Athens and 
Belleville and has made his home in the lat- 
ter city since 1901. He completed his high 
school education there. After leaving high 
school he worked in a hardware store, and 
from that turned his attention to the new 
profession of motion picture machine operator. 
It was a new and crude industry, and his ex- 
perience has made him familiar with all the 
technical developments, from the day of the 
old flickering pictures to the complicated tech- 
nique that produces the films of beauty and 
color and sound today. From operating a 
projector he turned to the managing end of 
the business. He was manager of the Washing- 
ton Theater in Belleville until his service was 
called as a soldier. He became junior grade 
master engineer with the One Hundred and 
Fourteenth Engineers of the First Army 
Corps, was trained at Louisville, Kentucky, 
and at Camp Beauregard, Alexandria, Louisi- 
ana, and in August, 1918, went overseas. His 
regiment was twice cited for bravery and effi- 
ciency for their work in constructing a road 
for heavy artillery within the space of twenty- 
four hours during the Meuse-Argonne drive. 

Mr. Becker came home from France in May, 
1919, and from 1919 to 1926 was manager of 
the Lincoln Theater. For a short time he 
managed a theater at Alton and then became 
interested in the Midway Theater of Belle- 
ville. He sold out in 1929, and had some 
theatrical interests in East St. Louis until 
he took his position as chief deputy sheriff 
on January 1, 1930. 

Mr. Becker is a Democrat and has been a 
leader in his precinct and county. He was 
precinct chairman several years, for two years 
committeeman of the Fifth Ward. He has 
also given much time to the work of the 
American Legion. During 1921-22 he was 
commander of George Hilgard Post No. 58 at 
Belleville, the only man to serve two succes- 
sive years, and he brought new life into the 
Post and built up its membership until it be- 
came one of the largest posts in the state. He 



is also a member of the Forty and Eight and 
the B. P. 0. E. of Belleville. Mr. Becker is 
a member of St. Clair Lodge No. 24, A. F. 
and A. M., at Belleville, Belleville Chapter 
No. 106, Royal Arch Masons, Belleville Com- 
mandery of the Knights Templar and Ainad 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at East St. 
Louis. He married, March 10, 1928, Miss 
Alfred Fuchs, of St. Louis, Missouri. 

George Richard Hays, M. D., is a country v 
physician, member of a fast diminishing army 
of men who have known what sacrifice means, 
who have accustomed themselves to the routine 
of going by day or by night wherever duty 
has called, and who find their satisfaction in 
an approving conscience and in the growing 
appreciation of the hundreds and thousands 
whom their skill and professional aid have 
helped in time of need. 

Doctor Hays, who has practiced in South- 
ern Illinois for thirty-five years, is a resident 
of Marissa, St. Clair County. He was born 
on a farm near Baldwin in Randolph County, 
Illinois, December 17, 1870. His father, 
George Hays, was born in South Carolina, in 
1814, and married in that state Margaret 
Gray Cathcart. She was born near Winns- 
boro, South Carolina, of Irish parentage. 
They came to Illinois in 1848 and settled on 
the great prairie, as it was then known, where 
George Hays developed a home for himself 
and family. He died in 1890 and his wife in 
1912. Doctor Hays parents had a typical old- 
time family, fourteen children, seven boys and 
seven girls. His mother was married at the 
age of eighteen. When she came to Illinois 
she had the care of one baby a year and a 
half old and another six weeks old. She was 
remarkable for her energy, her loving care 
and her strength and endurance. She lived 
to the ripe old age of ninety-two. She was 
born in 1820 and died in- 1912. At the age of 
eighty-five she fractured a hip, but such was 
her physique that she recovered except for a 
mere limp and lived seven years longer. Of 
the children only four are now living: Charles, 
a merchant at Houston, Illinois; Thomas, a 
farmer near Marissa; Nancy, wife of John 
Moffat, of Sterling, Kansas; and Dr. 
George R. 

Doctor Hays was reared on a farm, attended 
country schools and the high school at Sparta. 
After attending high school he entered Beau- 
mont Medical College of St. Louis, now the 
College of Medicine of St. Louis University. 
This institution gave him the degree of Doc- 
tor of Medicine in 1896. For nine and a half 
years Doctor Hays practiced at Oakdale in 
Washington County, and since 1905 his home 
has been at Marissa, where a host of friends 
appreciate the loving care he has given them. 
Doctor Hays is a member of the St. Clair 
County, Illinois State and American Medical 
Associations and of the United Presbyterian 



ILLINOIS 



165 



Church. He is a Republican. His great pub- 
lic service has been his professional work, 
and after these duties have been performed 
his first thought and attention are devoted 
to his family and home. 

Doctor Hays married, May 19, 1897, Miss 
Rosetta McHatton. Her parents were Scotch 
people. She grew up in Randolph County 
and is a graduate of the Sparta High School. 

Ethel Marguerite, oldest of Doctor Hays' 
children, was born February 18, 1901, was 
graduated with the A. B. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Illinois in 1923, and then taught for 
four years in the Carlyle High School. She 
is the wife of Oscar Schoendienst, of Carlyle, 
cashier of the First National Bank of that 
city. They had two children, Thomas Paul 
and Betty Jean, but Betty died January 1, 
1932. 

Dr. Thomas George Hays, the older son, 
both sons having chosen the same profession 
as their father, was born August 5, 1903. He 
graduated from the College of Medicine of 
the University of Illinois with the class of 
1928. On graduating he became a candidate 
for appointment as a physician in the United 
States Navy. He took the examination with 
700 young medical graduates. Only fifty were 
given commissions and he stood twelfth in the 
class after an exhaustive examination last- 
ing a week. He was. given the rank of lieu- 
tenant, was sent to the Brooklyn Navy Hos- 
pital and then to the Base Hospital at San 
Diego, California, subsequently was trans- 
ferred to a battleship, spending some time in 
Chinese waters, and his latest assignment was 
to the airplane carrier Saratoga, the largest 
of the ships of the navy of that type. Dr. 
Thomas George Hays married Julia Lips- 
comb, of Columbus, Mississippi, and has a 
son, Thomas George. 

Robert Paul Hays, the younger son, was 
born April 5, 1912, and is a member of the 
class of 1933 in Illinois University. 

The youngest of the children of Doctor and 
Mrs. Hays is Mary Louise, born March 4, 
1917. She has completed her second year of 
work in the Marissa High School. 

Robert Everett Johns, East St. Louis 
contractor and builder, is one of the best 
known men in St. Clair County in Union 
Labor circles, and has been an influential fig- 
ure in many matters of arbitration affecting 
the building trade workers. He is now sec- 
retary of the Tri-County District Council 
Carpenters Union. 

Mr. Johns is member of a family well 
I known in St. Clair and adjoining counties. He 
was born in Randolph County, February 12, 
1868, son of Smith and Elizabeth (Skinner) 
Johns. Smith Johns was a native of Ken- 
tucky, came to Illinois in 1859, and through- 
out his active career followed the business 
of carpenter and contractor. He lived suc- 



cessively at Chester, Baldwin, Marissa, Salem, 
and from 1890 until his death in 1893 at East 
St. Louis. Smith Johns married, at Chester, 
Miss Elizabeth Skinner, a native of Ohio, who 
died in February, 1927. Of their family of 
eight children Robert E. is the oldest; Wil- 
liam A. is also a carpenter and contractor at 
East St. Louis; John D. has been a contractor, 
but is now president of the East St. Louis 
Levee District; Arthur is general manager of 
the Swift Fertilizer Plant at Norfolk, Vir- 
ginia; all three of the daughters are deceased, 
Mary, who died about 1867, Lora, who died 
in 1926, and Minnie, who died in 1909; Charles 
W. Johns, the youngest son, is district super- 
intendent for the Midwest Publishing Com- 
pany at East St. Louis. 

Robert E. Johns attended public school and 
in the choice of an occupation was no doubt 
influenced by the atmosphere in which he 
grew up, that of carpenter work. For three 
years he was employed in a lumber yard at 
Salem. Since then he has been a carpenter 
and contractor at East St. Louis. His work 
could be identified by a number of prominent 
pieces of construction. He was assistant su- 
perintendent during the erection of the Chi- 
cago & Alton Railway office and freight depot 
in East St. Louis. For four years he was 
building foreman on the Cahokia Power Plant 
in East St. Louis, handling all the heavy con- 
struction for that plant. For some years he 
was general foreman for his brother, J. D. 
Johns. He was also foreman during the con- 
struction of the Mobile and Ohio Railway 
freight houses in East St. Louis. Mr. Johns is 
a member and a past secretary, a past presi- 
dent and a past business agent of the Car- 
penters Union No. 169. In March, 1927, he 
was elected secretary of the Tri-County Dis- 
trict Council Carpenters Union, and since that 
time has been fully occupied by the duties 
and responsibilities of this position. His 
office is in the Arcade Building at East St. 
Louis. 

During the World war Mr. Johns was a 
member of the Illinois State Council of De- 
fense, and after the war was appointed by the 
secretary of the treasury a member of the 
Council of War Civics. He is a member of 
the B. P. O. Elks. Mr. Johns married Miss 
Matilda K. Schwartz, of East St. Louis, 
daughter of Ferdinand and Mary Schwartz. 
She attended school in East St. Louis and is 
a member of the Daughters of the Veterans 
and is active in the Episcopal Church. Their 
children are: Alice, who was educated at East 
St. Louis, is the wife of Lester Dalby, of that 
city; Mary, who also attended the public 
schools of East St. Louis, is the wife of Ber- 
nard Stookey, of Belleville; Mabel is the wife 
of Milton Boehmer, of East St. Louis; Rob- 
ert E., the onljr son, and unmarried, was edu- 
cated at East St. Louis and now represents 
the third generation of the Johns family as 
a carpenter and contractor. 



166 



ILLINOIS 



Julius Adolph Holten, member of the 
Board of Assessors of St. Clair County, and 
former member of the County Board of Su- 
pervisors, has been a popular and prominent 
citizen both as a worker and in public affairs 
since early manhood. 

Mr. Holten was born at French Village in 
St. Clair County, December 25, 1875. His 
twin brother, Joseph Holten, another St. Clair 
citizen and former member of the Illinois Leg- 
islature, was born half an hour later but on 
December 26. The father of these brothers 
was John Holten, a native of Leipsig, Ger- 
many, who came to America and worked his 
way up the river from New Orleans to St. 
Louis on a river boat. At the age of thirty 
he married Charlotta Eicherman. John Hol- 
ten was a farmer and was the contractor who 
built the old rock road known as the Belle- 
ville and East St. Louis Turnpike. He died 
at the age of fifty-five, in 1877, and his 
widow survived him until November 11, 1929, 
being ninety-five when she passed away. 

Julius A. Holten attended public schools in 
East St. Louis. For several years of his 
childhood he lived on a farm at Jerseyville, 
Illinois. He returned to East St. Louis at 
the age of twelve years, and after leaving 
school was apprenticed to learn the trade of 
sheet iron worker. This was his occupation 
for eight years and he became a member of 
Local No. 6 of the Sheet Iron Workers Union. 
Among other talents that Mr. Holten devel- 
oped when young was a bent for music. He 
is a cornet player of first rank and as a young 
man he led the band in a circus and traveling 
show for three years. In 1900, after return- 
ing to East St. Louis, he became a salesman 
for Anheuser Busch, Incorporated, and was 
with that company for eleven years, and for 
twelve years with the Independent Brewery 
Company. Since prohibition he has been con- 
nected with other local corporations. He is 
a member of the Musicians Protective Union 
No. 717, and the Cake and Bread-Drivers Lo- 
cal No. 611. 

He was elected a member of the County 
Board of Supervisors in 1927 and again in 
1929, holding office until January 1; 1931. In 
1930 he made the campaign as the Democratic 
nominee for the County Board of Assessors 
and was elected on November 4 by a substan- 
tial majority. His term of office is from 
January 1, 1931, to January 1, 1937. In the 
primary of 1930 he won the nomination over 
eight opponents by 3,000 votes. Mr. Holten 
is a member of the Catholic Church and the 
Order of Foresters. 

He married, April 30, 1900, Ada Ortgier. 
They were married twice, the first ceremony 
being performed by a justice and the second 
by a priest. Her father, William, was a car- 
riage manufacturer. Mr. and Mrs. Holten's 
oldest child, Erma, was born in 1904 and died 
in 1918. The second child, Chester, born in 



1905, is a high school graduate. Olivett is 
Mrs. Edward Fry, of East St. Louis, and 
has a son, named Dale. Norman, a gradu- 
ate of high school, is with the Illinois Levee 
Board at East St. Louis. The three youngest 
children, all attending high school at East 
St. Louis, are: Forest, who is both a splendid 
student and a star on the football team, Ada 
Louise and Ruth. 

Robert William Tiernan, county auditor 
of St. Clair County, has been in business at 
East St. Louis for the past sixteen years. 
Whether as a business man or as a public 
official citizens have learned to trust him im- 
plicitly and rely upon his earnestness and 
zeal for efficiency and economy in govern- 
mental affairs. 

Mr. Tiernan was born at Ashland, Ken- 
tucky, February 13, 1892, and is a member 
of an old American family. His grandfather, 
Miles Tiernan, was born near Indianapolis, 
Indiana, was a Union soldier during the Civil 
war, and after the war moved to Kentucky, 
where he lived to a ripe old age. George 
Miles Tiernan, father of Robert W., is still a 
resident of Ashland, Kentucky, where he was 
born, and is an operating official of the 
Chesapeake & Ohio Railway. George Miles 
Tiernan married Lucina Short, whose people 
came from Virginia and were pioneers of Ken- 
tucky. Her father, Charles Short, has 
reached the remarkable age of a hundred 
years. He served as a captain in the Con- 
federate army. 

Robert W. Tiernan grew up at Ashland, 
graduated from the Ashland High School and 
completed the work of the College of Agri- 
culture of the University of Kentucky, where 
he was graduated in 1915 with the degree of 
Bachelor of Agriculture. Shortly after his 
graduation he visited an uncle in East St. 
Louis. While here he saw an opportunity 
which he quickly converted into practice and 
launched himself in the real estate and insur- 
ance business, a field in which he has oper- 
ated with signal success. He devoted his full 
time to business until he was elected county 
auditor in the fall of 1928. He began his 
official term December 1 of that year, his term 
expiring in December, 1932. 

Mr. Tiernan married Miss Agnes E. Soucy, 
daughter of P. J. Soucy, of East St. Louis. 
Soucy is a name of French origin. Her father 
is a business man at East St. Louis. Mrs. 
Tiernan completed her education in St. 
Theresa's Academy in East St. Louis. They 
have two sons, Robert William, Jr., born 
March 22, 1922, and Thomas Soucy, born 
August 24, 1928. 

Mr. Tiernan and two of his brothers were 
with the colors in the World war. His brother 
George, who served with the rank of first lieu- 
tenant in the army, is now assistant editor of 
the Indianapolis Star. The other brother, 




/tuUL 



r 



t 



ILLINOIS 



167 



Paul Arthur, also with the Indianapolis Star, 
served with the Marine Corps. George was 
with the Intelligence Department while in 
France. Mr. Robert W. Tiernan had a rec- 
ord of four years with the Kentucky National 
Guard and was a first lieutenant in the Cadet 
Corps at the University of Kentucky while a 
student there. Soon after America inter- 
vened in the World war he volunteered and 
helped organize the Third Field Artillery at 
East St. Louis, which under the National 
Army organization became the One Hundred 
and Twenty-fourth Regiment. However, Mr. 
Tiernan was not called to active duty. In col- 
lege he was a Pi Kappa Alpha. As a loyal 
Democrat he has by his official record earned 
the confidence of members of all parties. In 
his campaign for county auditor in 1928 he 
received the support of every Republican pa- 
per in the county. 

Will Taylor made his permanent business 
affiliation at the age of nineteen, when as a 
stenographer he went on the pay roll of the 
Franklin Life Insurance Company at Spring- 
field. Mr. Taylor has for many years been an 
official of this great organization, being secre- 
tary of the company. 

He was born on a farm near Springfield, 
July 15, 1875, only child of Rev. John W. and 
Nancy E. (McKinnie) Taylor. His parents 
were also natives of Sangamon County, and 
his father was widely known as a minister of 
the Baptist Church. The maternal grand- 
father, William P. McKinnie, was born in 
Sangamon County, a son of a pioneer who 
came to this section of the state in 1819 and 
took up Government land, being one of the 
first settlers in the county. 

Will Taylor during his boyhood lived on 
his grandfather's farm in the country near 
Springfield. After the country schools he at- 
tended a business college, learned stenography 
there, and the first opportunity to try his skill 
came when he entered the Springfield office of 
the Franklin Insurance Company in 1894. His 
work gave him opportunity to learn the busi- 
ness and he rapidly mastered the general rou- 
tine, qualified for administrative and executive 
duties, was made assistant secretary and in 
1920 was advanced to the post of secretary 
of the company. 

Mr. Taylor married in 1910 Charlotta 
Waucker, who was born at Virden, Illinois, 
and was educated in the schools of that town 
and at Springfield. Her father, James E. 
Waucker, was a dealer in musical instru- 
ments. Mr. Taylor and his wife are members 
of the First Presbyterian Church. He is a 
member of the board of directors of the 
Springfield Y. M. C. A. He is a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, Knights of Pythias, 
B. P. 0. Elks, is former president of the Ro- 
tary Club and was district governor in 1929 
and in 1930-31 he was a director of the Rotary 



International. Politically he is an independ- 
ent Republican. His hobby is cultivating his 
flower and vegetable garden. Mr. Taylor has 
traveled over Illinois in the interests of the 
Rotary Club and is a much admired public 
speaker. He is a past president of the Spring- 
field Council of Social Agencies and has been 
president and a director of the Springfield 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Harold Baltz, of Belleville, was admitted 
to the bar in 1928, and his abilities and effort 
have been rewarded by a successful practice 
and a position in which he is well regarded 
and respected by his fellow attorneys and 
fellow citizens. 

He was born at Millstadt, St. Clair County, 
May 21, 1904, and is a member of one of the 
old and honored families of that county. His 
father, G. F. Baltz, is cashier of the First 
National Bank of Millstadt. Harold Baltz 
grew up in Millstadt, attended local schools 
and completed the greater part of his high 
school course and two years of college work 
in the Illinois Normal University at Normal. 
He had some experience as a teacher in the 
Pittsfield High School in Pike County. He 
completed his professional training in Wash- 
ington University at St. Louis, where he was 
graduated with the law class in 1928. He is 
a member of the Phi Alpha Delta legal fra- 
ternity. After graduating he returned to 
Belleville, and is associated with the law firm 
of P'armer & Klingel, with offices* in the Com- 
mercial Building. 

He is a member of the St. Clair County, 
Illinois State Bar Associations. He belongs 
to the younger progressive school in the 
Democratic party and is a member of the 
Evangelical Church. Mr. Baltz married, No- 
vember 23, 1929, Miss Frances Clelland, of 
Joliet, Illinois. She is of Scotch ancestry. She 
is an A. B. graduate of Normal University 
and taught for two years in the university 
before her marriage. She is active in social 
and civic affairs at Belleville. 

Wilbur Edward Krebs, who served in the 
Thirty-fifth Division overseas in the World 
war, is a prominent Belleville attorney, hav- 
ing won a high position in the bar since his 
return from France. 

Mr. Krebs was born in Chicago, Illinois, 
August 31, 1893. However, he represents an 
old Southern Illinois family, both parents be- 
ing of German ancestry. His father, Arthur 
Krebs, was born in Belleville, where he has 
been a manufacturer. Mr. Krebs' mother was 
Emma Rutz, who is also living at Belleville. 

Wilbur E. Krebs was a small boy when his 
parents returned to Belleville. He attended 
the common and high schools of that city, and 
from high school entered the University of 
Illinois, where he took the law course and 
was graduated LL. B. in 1916. He had made 



168 



ILLINOIS 



some progress in building up a law business 
when America entered the World war. He 
closed his law office, enlisted in the Officers 
Training School, was commissioned a second 
lieutenant and sent to Camp Grant and put 
with the Eighty-sixth Division. He was soon 
promoted to first lieutenant, and when his 
division went to France he was transferred to 
the Thirty-fifth Division. 

After the war he returned to Belleville and 
soon opened his office in the First National 
Bank Building. He is said to have one of 
the largest practices in the city. Mr. Krebs 
has interested himself in his soldier com- 
rades, was a charter member of American 
Legion Post No. 58 at Belleville, and is now 
its judge advocate. He has been secretary of 
the Belleville Lodge of Elks for ten years and 
has filled most of the chairs excepting exalted 
ruler. He is a member of the St. Clair Coun- 
ty, Illinois State and American Bar Associa- 
tions and votes as a Republican. He is master 
in chancery of the Circuit Court of St. Clair 
County. 

On December 16, 1922, he married Miss 
Amelia Steuernagel, of Belleville. Their chil- 
dren are: Anne Catherine, born July 15, 1924; 
and Mary Elizabeth, born June 16, 1927. 

The Lincoln High School of East St. 
Louis, has a record of sending a higher per- 
centage of its graduates to college than any 
other high school in the county or state. It 
is a school that has realized in an admirable 
degree the functions as well as the ideals of 
giving its pupils a broad and efficient educa- 
tion. The Senior High School enrolls 300 
pupils, with a staff of twelve teachers, all of 
whom have degrees, and some of them with 
graduate credits toward higher degrees. In 
the Junior High School are enrolled 600 stu- 
dents, with seventeen teachers, some of whom 
also do work in the Senior High School. The 
school is fully accredited and the students are 
eligible for entrance to all universities on the 
accredited list of the North Central Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools, of 
which it is a member. 

The Lincoln High School in the • minds of 
most people in St. Louis is synonomous with 
its principal, Mr. J. W. Hughes. Mr. Hughes 
was born at Warsaw, Gallatin County, Ken- 
tucky, and from boyhood exemplified the spirit 
and practice of self help in attaining an edu- 
cation. He worked his way through Berea 
College of Kentucky, where he took his A. B. 
degree in 1895. For several years he taught 
in Kentucky, also at Wheeling, West Virginia, 
and in 1916 came to East St. Louis. At that 
time the Lincoln High School had a course of 
nine credits, while now it has thirty-three and 
a half credits. Mr. Hughes took his M. A. 
degree from the University of Chicago. He 
is a member of the National Education Asso- 
ciation, the Principals Division of the Illinois 



State Teachers Association, and is a mem- 
ber of the High School Conference of Illinois. 
His hobby is travel and he has seen a great 
deal of the world. During the summer of 
1930 he made a trip covering 19,500 miles. 

William Eugene Walter, of East St. 
Louis, is one of the vice presidents of the In- 
ternational Boilermakers Union. Mr. Walter 
is one of the ablest men in union labor organ- 
ization in the Middle West, and in his practi- 
cal work and influence he has represented 
other branches of labor than his own trade 
and has been particularly a trusted factor in 
handling grievances and arbitration cases. 

He was born at Indianapolis, Indiana, April 
21, 1880, son of Henry and Nellie (Cronin) 
Walter. His mother died in Indianapolis. 
Henry Walter was a carpenter by trade, was 
born at Youngstown, Ohio, lived at Indianap- 
olis for some years and later moved to St. 
Louis, Missouri, where he died. 

William Eugene Walter had a public school 
education and at an early age entered the 
shops of the Missouri Pacific Railway Com- 
pany as an apprentice boilermaker. At the 
end of five years he was given his card as a 
qualified boilermaker, and he gave a long and 
efficient service in the practical work of his 
trade, until he was called to more responsible 
duties as a representative of his fellow work- 
ers. As a journeyman boilermaker he worked 
at Pine Bluff, Arkansas; at Paducah, Ken- 
tucky, and then after a year of travel through- 
out the West settled permanently at East St. 
Louis in 1908. 

In 1910 he became an official in the local 
Boilermakers Union, being made business 
agent for the local at East St. Louis. At the 
Kansas City convention of 1930 he was made 
one of the international vice presidents, with 
headquarters at East St. Louis, but with 
supervision over the organization throughout 
the states of Illinois, Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky 
and Pennsylvania. Early in 1930 he was 
called to work in Florida, and his position is 
one that requires his presence in many parts 
of the United States and Canada. 

Mr. Walter married Miss Edna Kline. She 
was born and educated at Great Bend, Kan- 
sas. They have two children. The son, Wil- 
liam L. Walter, is in the oil business at East 
St. Louis. The daughter, Evelyn, graduated 
from Stevens College at Columbia, Missouri, 
with the class of 1925, then taught for several 
years in Missouri, and is now attending the 
University of Illinois, where she will receive 
her degree in physical education in 1932. 

Mr. Walter is a member of the Masonic 
Lodge at Mattoon, Illinois, and belongs to the 
Ainad Temple of the Mystic Shrine at East 
St. Louis. He is a Republican in politics. 

Mr. Walter is known for his fairness to 
both labor and capital, and both sides in con- 
troversies have learned to trust his judgment 



ILLINOIS 



169 



and sense of rectitude. One of the reforms 
in the work of his trade for which he is 
credited was the bringing about of the five- 
day week standard. He has been a powerful 
factor in extending union organization 
throughout St. Clair County and also over 
into Madison and Macoupin counties. 

James Russell Richards, Illinois state 
mine inspector for the Eighth Illinois District, 
which includes St. Clair, Clinton and Monroe 
counties, is a resident of Belleville. Coal 
mining has been the chief business of the 
Richards family in Southern Illinois for a 
great many years. Mr. James Richards had 
held office under the Department of Mines and 
Minerals of the state government of Illinois 
since the election of Governor Frank Lowden 
in 1916. 

He was born at Belleville, August 15, 1878. 
His father, the late George Richards, was 
born in Lincolnshire, England, April 1, 1849, 
and came to America when fourteen years 
of age. For many years he was an independ- 
ent mine operator in St. Clair County, having 
a mine on the Freeburg Road and another on 
the Mascoutah Road near Belleville. Mr. 
George Richards died August 20, 1918. He 
married Miss Margaret James, who was born 
at Pottsville, Pennsylvania, of English and 
Welsh parentage. She is now past eighty 
years of age and a resident of Belleville. 
George Richards was for twelve years an ald- 
erman in Belleville. The children of the fam- 
ily are: George, of Belleville; James R. ; Ed- 
ward, a mining man at Belleville; Elmer, also 
a miner at Belleville; Anna, wife of Jacob 
Meyer, of Belleville; and Florence, wife of 
John Wegner, of Belleville. 

James R. Richards grew up in Belleville 
and attended the public schools, but at an 
early age went to work in his father's mine 
and has been through all the grades of ex- 
perience of a practical mine worker. After 
he began work in the mines he continued his 
education, attending night classes of a com- 
mercial college and thus getting a practical 
commercial education. He was associated 
with his father in the mining business until 
1917, when he was appointed to a position on 
the State Mining Board. In 1920 he was 
made state mine inspector of the Eighth Dis- 
trict, serving the two terms of the Governor 
Small administration and was reappointed by 
Governor Emmerson. He represents the state 
department in the enforcement of state laws 
relative to the operation of mines and the 
conditions under which miners shall work. He 
has shown a peculiar efficiency and talent for 
handling the duties of his position, and in any 
controversial matter moth sides know in ad- 
vance his integrity and fairness, and his sug- 
gestions for adjustment are seldom refused. 

Mr. Richards married Miss Emma Respich, 
of Belleville, They have four children, Ruth 



Margaret, Russell George, Norma Florence, 
and Catherine Marie. "Mr. Richards is affili- 
ated with the Knights of Pythias and is a 
member of the Good Samaritans. 

Egbert Irvin Rogers, a railroad man with 
more than thirty years of practical experience 
in the engineering and executive departments, 
has since 1921 been connected with the Peoria 
& Pekin Union Railway Company. On October 
11, 1929, he became president to succeed V. 
V. Boatner, who had just been elevated to 
the presidency of the Chicago-Great Western 
Railway Company. 

Mr. Rogers was born at St. Joseph, Mis- 
souri, August 3, 1876. In 1897 he graduated 
Bachelor of Science in engineering from the 
University of Missouri, and immediately 
accepted the first available opportunity for 
work in the field which he had chosen. He 
became a section laborer on the Illinois Cen- 
tral Railway at Jackson, Tennessee. He was 
with the Illinois Central a number of years, 
with a steady climb to larger responsibilities. 
He was assistant division engineer and road- 
master on construction and maintenance in 
the South. From June, 1912, to January 1, 
1916, he was chief engineer employed by the 
Lorimer & Gallagher Construction Company 
at St. Louis and acted as chief engineer for 
the Texas City Transportation Company at 
Texas City, Texas. He then resumed work 
for the Illinois Central Railway, in the valu- 
ation department, and later, in 1916, was 
promoted to roadmaster of the Iowa division, 
with offices at Fort Dodge. 

On August 15, 1921, Mr. Rogers came to 
Peoria as chief engineer of the Peoria & Pekin 
Union Railway Company. From that position 
he was promoted to his present office. 

Mr. Rogers is a member of the American 
Railway Engineers Society. He has been very 
popular in business, transportation and social 
circles since becoming a resident of Peoria. 
He is a member of the Creve Cceur Club, 
Peoria Country Club, Peoria Association of 
Commerce, and is affiliated with Illinois Lodge 
No. 263, A. F. and A. M., the Scottish Rite 
Consistory and the Mystic Shrine at Memphis, 
Tennessee. He married, October 31, 1899, Miss 
Ethel Claire Harbour. She was born in Iowa. 

Raymond Bernard Hendricks, who was ad- 
mitted to the bar in 1903, has won some of 
the most satisfying distinctions as an able 
lawyer and is one of the recognized leaders in 
the East St. Louis bar. 

Mr. Hendricks was born at Chicago, Illi- 
nois, February 22, 1882, son of Samuel and 
Jane (Tansey) Hendricks. His father was a 
native of old Vincennes, Indiana, and while 
in the service of a railway express company 
was transferred to Illinois about 1880. Jane 
Tansey was born in Chicago. Both of Mr. 
Hendricks' parents are still living. 



170 



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In Chicago he attended parochial and pub- 
lic high schools, and in 1903 was graduated 
LL. B. from the University of Michigan. He 
at once located in East St. Louis, and his pro- 
fession and his leadership in public affairs 
have made his name widely known throughout 
the southern part of the state. He is engaged 
in a general law practice and is a member of 
the East St. Louis and Illinois Bar Associa- 
tions. 

Mr. Hendricks by appointment of Governor 
Dunne served as public administrator of St. 
Clair County from 1912 to 1917. He has 
always been a staunch Democrat, has taken 
part in many campaigns and is a very force- 
ful speaker on political and general subjects. 
In 1924 he was the Democratic candidate for 
state's attorney of St. Clair County. 

Mr. Hendricks is a member of the Knights 
of Columbus and the Catholic Church. He 
married in 1912 Miss Sallie Tozier, daughter 
of Alfred and Hallie Tozier. She died, leav- 
ing two children : George, who was born in 
1913, is a graduate of the East St. Louis 
High School and is now taking the medical 
course in St. Louis University; and Mary, 
who was born in 1914 and is in high school. 
In 1922 Mr. Hendricks married Miss Eva 
Maddox, of East St. Louis, daughter of 
Thomas and Emma Maddox. She received her 
education in the schools of East St. Louis. 
By this marriage Mr. Hendricks has a daugh- 
ter, Lenore, born in 1924. 

Ivan James Grieve is one of the prominent 
younger men in the mining industry of South- 
ern Illinois. His experience has covered every 
phase of work underground and above ground, 
and he is now superintendent of mine rescue 
and first aid work for the Belleville District. 
The district under his supervision comprises 
Madison, Clinton, St. Clair, Washington, Ran- 
dolph and Bond counties. 

Mr. Grieve is a member of a family that 
has long been well known in mining circles 
in Southern Illinois. However, his native state 
is Utah. He was born at Salt Lake City 
September 16, 1895. His father, Thomas R. 
Grieve, was born at St. Louis, Missouri, but 
grew up near Caseyville in St. Clair County, 
Illinois. Thomas R. Grieve married Miss Isa- 
bella Kinghorn*, and both are of Scotch ances- 
try. She was born at Bethalto, Illinois. 
Thomas R. Grieve about 1890 moved to Salt 
Lake City, Utah, and lived in that state until 
1912, when he returned to Illinois. Since 
then his home has been at Belleville. He and 
his wife had a large family of children: Peter, 
in Salt Lake City, where he is a foreman 
with the McDonald Candy Company; William, 
in the mining business at Belleville; Thomas 
E., superintendent of the Gordon Candy Com- 
pany of Corning, New York; Ivan J.; John, 
Lubricating Engineer for the Standard Oil 
Company; George R., a foreman with the Gor- 



don Candy Company at Corning, New York; 
Miss Margaret, at home; Vernon G., a gradu- 
ate of the University of Utah and now sport- 
ing editor of the San Francisco Examiner 
at Denver ; Albert, in the oil business .at Belle- 
ville; and one child who died in infancy. 

Ivan J. Grieve lived in Salt Lake City until 
he was seventeen years of age. Two years 
of his high school education were acquired 
there. He returned with the family to Illinois, 
and finished his schooling at Pocahontas. On 
leaving school he went to work in the mines, 
and this was his routine until the beginning 
of the World war. In 1917 he enlisted in the 
Marine Corps and was sent to Paris Island, 
South Carolina. There he was assigned duty 
as instructor in gun practice. Mr. Grieve was 
kept at Paris Island until May, 1919, when 
he was discharged as a sergeant. 

After the war he resumed his mining work. 
In 1924 his abilities were recognized and he 
was called to the responsible position of county 
mine inspector of St. Clair County. In this 
position he did much to bring about a better 
understanding and practical working agree- 
ments between the miners and operators. At 
the end of his term he entered the service 
of the Commonwealth Steel Company at Gran- 
ite City. 

Governor Emmerson appointed Mr. Grieve 
to his present position as superintendent of 
first aid and mine rescue work in the Belle- 
ville District. He knows the working condi- 
tions of the mines, has the confidence of miners 
and operators, and has done some splendid 
work in instruction and demonstration. His 
fitness and qualifications are fully recognized 
by the practical miners with whom he has to 
deal and with his superiors in the department. 

Mr. Grieve is a member of American Legion 
Post No. 58 at Belleville. He is a Republican. 
He married, December 31, 1917, Miss Olive 
May Carr. Her father, James Carr, is one 
of the pioneer miners of the Caseyville dis- 
trict. Mrs. Grieve grew up and was educated 
in the public schools at Belleville. They have 
two children: Ivan Wayne, born September 
7, 1920, and Loren James, born January 22, 
1925. 

Clifford Moore Harris is a resident of 
East St. Louis, but his work and profession 
of construction engineer has made him widely 
known on both sides of the river. He has a 
fine reputation as a business man, is a leader 
in labor circles, and a citizen whose value 
has been appreciated in the community on 
many grounds. 

Mr. Harris was born at Pana, Illinois, May 
17, 1880, son of James J. and Mollie (Horner) 
Harris. The venerable James J. Harris at 
the age of eighty-seven is still possessed of 
health and normal faculties and is a much 
loved resident of Ramsey, Illinois. He has 
had a remarkable career. He was born at 






ILLINOIS 



171 



North Vernon, Indiana. He and another youth 
from the same town, John Phillip Sousa, went 
into the Union army as drummer boys. Sousa 
subsequently came to international fame as 
a great band leader, head of the Sousa Band 
for forty years. James J. Harris was a 
very young boy at the time and his father 
caught him and brought him back home. Again 
he left and this time was accepted as a 
drummer boy. He served out his first enlist- 
ment, and remained until hostilities had closed. 
James J. Harris was a son of William Harris, 
who moved to Indiana from Kentucky. After 
the war James J. Harris lived at North 
Vernon, Indiana, married in Kentucky, and 
on coming to Illinois located at Pana, where 
for several years he followed the trade of 
plasterer. He then became a fireman with 
the Ohio & Mississippi Railway, was promoted 
to engineer, and in the fall of 1889 was made 
an engineer with the Nickel Plate Railroad, 
on a branch that was then a narrow gauge 
line. He continued with this road as an 
engineer until his retirement from service 
in 1910. He is a Republican and since the 
age of twenty-five has been a member of 
the Masonic fraternity, belongs to the Brother- 
hood of Railway Engineers and the Christian 
Church. His wife died in 1890. 

Clifford M. Harris attended high school at 
Charleston, Illinois. He was a boy when he 
went into the shops of the Clover Leaf Rail- 
way to learn the machinist's trade. He com- 
pleted his apprenticeship at Frankfort, Indi- 
ana, and remained with the Clover Leaf for 
about six years. Then followed a period of 
journeyman experience as a machinist, which 
took him to many different parts of the United 
States. For about two years he was foreman 
of the machine shops of the Wabash Railroad 
at Decatur, Illinois, and coming to East St. 
Louis, was a machinist with the Terminal 
Railroad Association for about two years, and 
for a short time with the Troy & Eastern 
Railroad. Since leaving the railway service 
he has practiced as a construction engineer, 
in which field he is one of the foremost men 
in Southern Illinois. Many firms have em- 
ployed him on big construction jobs through- 
out the southern part of the state, and he 
is generally acknowledged as an expert not 
only in technical knowledge but as an executive 
in the handling of men. For two years # he 
has been secretary of the Illinois Operating 
Engineers Association, and is a member of 
the International Association of Machinists. 
For the past eight years he has been secretary 
of the East St. Louis Gun Club. His hobby 
is marksmanship and he is a member of the 
National Rifle Association, president of the 
Rifle Association of East St. Louis, and dur- 
ing the World war he trained many recruits 
in rifle marksmanship. He is a member of 
the Masonic Lodge. 



Mr. Harris married, November 29, 1900, 
Miss Anna Kirby, of Frankfort, Indiana, 
daughter of Kale Kirby, who came from 
County Clare, Ireland. Mrs. Harris attended 
school at Frankfort. They have two children. 
Susie Fay, born April 24, 1903, is a graduate 
of the East St. Louis High School and is 
now Mrs. Edward R. Hiob, of St. Louis, 
Missouri They have one daughter, Jane Anne, 
born May 20, 1931. Miss Mary Thelma Har- 
ris, born March 4, 1906, is a graduate of the 
East St. Louis High School. 

John Wesley Carrington is doing admir- 
able service in the educational field of his 
native state and has been since 1926 the effi- 
cient and popular superintendent of the public 
schools of the City of Cairo, metropolis and 
judicial center of Alexander County and one 
of the important entrepots on the Mississippi 
River. 

Mr. Carrington was born near Loda, Iro- 
quois County, Illinois, March 31, 1891, and 
is a son of Wesley O. and Havana (Willis) 
Carrington, the former of whom was born 
near Greencastle, Indiana, whence he came 
with his parents to Illinois when he was a boy. 
The mother was born and reared in Illinois. 

After his graduation in the high school at 
Loda John W. Carrington was a student two 
years in the Illinois State Normal College 
at Normal, Illinois, and in 1922 he was grad- 
uated in the University of Illinois, from which 
he received the degree of Bachelor of Science. 
He later had one year of graduate work in 
the University of Chicago, besides returning 
to his alma mater, the University of Illinois, 
for advanced graduate work. His pedagogic 
career was initiated in the autumn of 1910, 
when he was nineteen years of age, and he 
thus passed two years as a teacher in rural 
district schools in his native county. In the 
meanwhile he attended summer sessions at 
the State Normal School, besides being there 
a regular student one year. He next gave 
two years of service as principal of a grade 
school at Fairbury, Livingston County, and 
one year as superintendent of the public 
schools of Manteno, Kankakee County. Dur- 
ing the ensuing three years he was principal 
of the high school at Washburn, Woodford 
County, and during the following year he was 
a student in the University of Illinois. He 
next served two years as principal of the 
high school at Homer, Champaign County, and 
he gave a similar period of service as prin- 
cipal of the high school at Oakland, Coles 
County. Since 1926 he has been doing charac- 
teristically loyal, efficient and constructive 
work as superintendent of the city public 
schools of Cairo, and he has done much to 
advance the standards of service in all depart- 
ments of the local schools. The Cairo schools 
have an enrollment of fully 3,000 students, 



172 



ILLINOIS 



the physical equipment of the various schools 
is of modern order, including two fine high- 
school buildings, which were completed in 
1925. The schools retain a corps of 101 
teachers in the grades and in the high schools. 
Mr. Carrington has been an enthusiast in his 
chosen profession and his success therein has 
been reflected in the excellent work of the 
various Illinois schools with which he has been 
identified. Mr. Carrington is a member of 
the National Education Association and the 
Illinois State Teachers Association. As a 
resourceful educator he still continues a stu- 
dent and keeps in advance of all progress 
made in the various details of public-school 
administration. His political allegiance is 
given to the Republican party, he is a mem- 
ber of the Rotary Club in his home city, and 
he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and 
the Phi Delta Kappa college fraternity. 

Mr. Carrington subordinated all other in- 
terests to the call of patriotism when the 
nation became involved in the World war. In 
March, 1918, he enlisted in the United States 
Army, was given assignment to the Sixty- 
eighth Artillery Regiment, C. A. C, with 
which he had eight months of service over- 
seas with the American Expeditionary Forces. 
He received his honorable discharge in March, 
1919, and the more gracious associations of 
his World war service are perpetuated through 
his affiliation with the American Legion Post 
No. 406. In the City of Joliet, Illinois, in 
1919, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Carrington and Miss Alice DuMoulin, and they 
are popular figures in the representative so- 
cial and cultural circles of their present home 
city. 

Thomas P. Reilly, chief of police of the 
City of Edwardsville, has had a distinguished 
record as an officer of the law, and for many 
years has also been well and favorably known 
in the business and public life of his home 
community. 

Mr. Reilly was born in Bradford, Yorkshire, 
England, March 3, 1879, son of Peter and 
Mary Jane (Griffin) Reilly, and is the only 
survivor of their three children. His father 
was a master tailor in the British army. His 
post was one that took him to many places in 
the far flung dominions of Great Britain. 
Thus the early years of Thomas P. Reilly were 
spent in many different places. He attended 
school in Ireland, England, Bermuda, Nova 
Scotia, West Indies and South Africa, and 
completed his education in Ohio after coming 
to America. He has been an American since 
1892, when he was thirteen years of age. 
After leaving school he took up the trade of 
marble cutter and in 1896 came to St. Louis, 
Missouri. His mother died in 1889, at Jamaica, 
West Indies, and his father in 1905, at Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 



Chief Reilly has been a resident of Ed- 
wardsville since 1899. His first association 
with the city was as a marble cutter for the 
N. O. Nelson Company. In 1904 he became 
international organizer for the International 
Association of Marble Cutters for the United 
States and Canada. At Philadelphia he re- 
signed this work in 1905, in order to return 
home and be with his family. 

It was in May, 1905, that Mr. Reilly did 
his first work with the police department of 
Edwardsville. He resigned in 1909, to resume 
his trade as a marble cutter. In 1910 he was 
elected tax assessor of Edwardsville Township 
of Madison County, being the first to hold 
that office under the two-year term. He was 
reelected in 1912, and then refused further 
office. In 1914, during the administration of 
Governor Dunne, he was appointed deputy 
state fire marshal, holding that office until 
1916. In 1916 he was Democratic candidate 
for the office of sheriff of Madison County, 
and after the campaign he engaged in the 
insurance business. Mr. Reilly has been writ- 
ing insurance in Edwardsville for the past 
fifteen years, and since 1922 he has also con- 
ducted a real estate business. 

During 1917 he was employed in work in 
connection with the Intelligence Department 
of the United States Army. In 1918 he was 
elected a member of the Edwardsville City 
Council and served four consecutive terms of 
two years each. During the World war 
period he was also chairman of the War Sav- 
ings Stamp Committee in the Belleville dis- 
trict. This district comprised several counties, 
and it showed the greatest per capita sales of 
any district in the state. 

Mr. Reilly has gratified a normal ambition 
for reasonable success in business, but for 
many years his heart has been in his work as 
a peace officer, and he has devoted much of 
his time to it from a sense of public duty. In 
1924 he acted as personal body guard for 
Thomas Williamson, the United States dis- 
trict attorney who was handling the prosecu- 
tion of the Egan gang, the most notorious 
band of gangsters in the country up to that 
time. Mr. Reilly also acted as body guard 
for the late William J. Bryan, and was body 
guard for Senator Deneen while he was gov- 
ernor of the state, and also served as personal 
body guard for Vice President Thomas Mar- 
shall. He was appointed chief of police of 
Edwardsville in 1929, and has built up the 
police force to a point of efficiency unexcelled 
in any of the smaller cities of the state. In 
his career he has demonstrated again and 
again a peculiar talent for handling police 
work in connection with the enforcement of 
the laws. In May, 1931, Chief Reilly accepted 
the position of fire chief of the Edwardsville 
fire department for the good of efficiency in 
the reorganizing of the fire department. Mr. 





A^fiLS&ZkkZ'. 



^Lw^. *■$. 



ILLINOIS 



173 



Reilly is a member of the Police Chiefs Asso- 
ciation of the United States and Canada, and 
is a fourth degree Knight of Columbus. He 
was for several years secretary of the Demo- 
cratic Central Committee of Madison County, 
chairman of the Township Central Committee. 
He has been a loyal supporter of wholesome 
sports. During 1915-20 he trained a running 
team, representing the Edwardsville fire de- 
partment, which won the state championship 
three successive years, thus entitling them to 
permanent possession of the medal. 

Chief Reilly married, November 17, 1899, 
at St. Louis, Miss Bertha Stutz, of Belleville. 
Of the ten children born to their marriage 
nine are living, Ruth, Hazel, Albertha, Wini- 
fred, Evelyn, Thomas II, Evans, Cleo and 
Judith. 

Hermon Harrison Cole, M. D., is an able 
specialist who since the close of the World 
war, in which he did his part as a medical 
officer overseas, has practiced at Springfield, 
where his offices are in the Leland Building. 

Doctor Cole was born at Alton, Illinois, 
February 6, 1893, a son of Hermon and Lil- 
lian (Gillham) Cole, both of whom represented 
old and prominent families of Southern Illi- 
nois. His grandfather, Hermon Cole, was one 
of the original members of the Chester Milling 
Company at Chester, Illinois, one of the larg- 
est flouring mills in the country. Hermon 
Cole, father of Doctor Cole, was born at Ches- 
ter, for a number of years was in the hard- 
ware business at Alton and since moving to 
Springfield has employed his time chiefly in 
land inspection work. He has been a leader 
in the Republican party in his locality and 
state and is a member of the Masonic fra- 
ternity. Both he and his wife are active in 
the Baptist Church. Lillian Gillham was born 
on a farm near Alton, Illinois, a daughter of 
Daniel B. Gillham, a distinguished Illinoisan. 
Daniel Gillham was born in Madison County, 
April 29, 1826, and died April 6, 1890. He 
was a farmer and stock raiser in the American 
Bottoms and in 1872 located at Alton. In 
1866 he was made a member of the State 
Board of Agriculture and for eight years was 
its superintendent and later its president. He 
also served in both Houses of the Legislature. 

Dr. Hermon H. Cole was one of the two 
children of his parents. He attended the 
Alton High School and from there entered 
the University of Michigan, where he was 
graduated in 1917. After a short period of 
hospital training in St. Louis he was called 
to the colors and served twenty-three months, 
spending a year in France with Base Hospital 
No. 115. Doctor Cole received his honorable 
discharge in 1919 and after resting from his 
strenuous service located at Springfield and 
entered practice. He is captain of the United 
States Medical Reserves. Later he became 
associated with Dr. G. T. Palmer and in 1925 



they erected a new private hospital. Doctor 
Cole has a general practice, and is a lung 
and heart specialist. He is attending specialist 
at the United States Veterans Bureau. 

He married in October, 1917, Miss Kath- 
erme Stadden. Her father, George Stadden, 
was at one time president of the Franklin 
Life Insurance Company of Springfield, and 
well known for his success in business and his 
high character as a man and citizen. Doctor 
and Mrs. Cole have four children: Hermon 
Harrison, Jr., born in 1919; George Stadden, 
born in 1921; Kenneth Gillham, born in 1923; 
and Cecine Elizabeth, born in 1925. 

Mrs. Cole is a member of the First Christ 
Episcopal Church, while Doctor Cole is a 
Baptist. He is a Scottish Rite Mason, a mem- 
ber of the Delta Upsilon social fraternity, the 
Nu Sigma Nu medical fraternity and the 
Alpha Omega Alpha honorary medical frater- 
nity. He is a member of Sangamon Post No. 
32, American Legion, the Rotary Club, the 
Sangamon County, Illinois State and Ameri- 
can Medical Associations and the International 
Pneumo-Thorax Society. 

Fred Lippert, inspector of mines for St. 
Clair County, is a practical miner himself, and 
not only has the advantage of thorough 
knowledge and experience in the mining in- 
dustry, but is a man whose tact and ability 
are appreciated equally by the mine workers 
and the mine owners. 

He was born at Millstadt, St. Clair County, 
April 16, 1881, and is of German ancestry. 
His father, Fred Lippert, a native of Alsace- 
Lorraine, spent most of his life, in St. Clair 
County and died at Millstadt in March, 1897. 
Fred Lippert grew up in the Millstadt com- 
munity, and his first teacher there was Fred 
Baltz, long a prominent and outstanding citi- 
zen of the community. He attended school 
until he was sixteen. His father's death threw 
upon his youthful shoulders the burden of 
running the business of contracting teamster. 
In 1899 he closed out the business, and since 
then has been a miner. For over thirty years 
he has been active in Union circles. For a 
long time he acted as secretary of Local No. 
304 of the United Mine Workers of America. 

Mr. Lippert was appointed county mine in- 
spector in 1926, and performed his duties in 
a way that made him the unanimous choice 
of the Democratic Board of 1930 for continued 
work in this office. Mr. Lippert is himself a 
Republican. He is a Mason and a member 
of the Evangelical Church. 

He married Miss Bertha Niemeier, of Mill- 
stadt, daughter of Jacob and Catherine 
(Kern) Niemeier. Jacob Niemeier was born 
in Millstadt, while his parents came from 
Germany. Catherine (Kern) Niemeier, who 
died in 1924, was a daughter of George H. 
Kern, a native of Germany, and of his wife, 
Catherine (Sparwasser) Kern, a native of St. 



174 



ILLINOIS 



Clair County. Mrs. Lippert's brothers and 
sisters are: George, of St. Louis; Fred, a 
merchant at Belleville; Amanda, wife of 
George Paglusch; and Olga, Mrs. Harry Jann- 
sen. Mr. and Mrs. Lippert have two daugh- 
ters. Mabel is the wife of Theodore Funde- 
bork, of Belleville. Hazel is secretary of the 
Title Loan & Trust Company of Belleville. 
Mr. Lippert and family reside in Belleville. 

George T. Vogelpohl. In the midst of the 
rich farm lands of Madison County stands the 
pleasant, bustling City of Alton, and much 
of its prosperity and attractiveness may justly 
be attributed to the enterprise and sound busi- 
ness judgment of such reliable men as George 
T. Vogelpohl. To some extent Mr. Vogelpohl 
is a self-made man, for through industry and 
devotion to familiar interests for many years 
he practically laid a firm foundation for larger 
interests and still greater rewards. 

Mr. Vogelpohl was born at Alton, Illinois, 
October 15, 1880, and is a son of Henry and 
Caroline (Hummert) Vogelpohl. Henry Vo- 
gelpohl, who for many years was a resident 
of Upper Alton, was a baker by trade and 
operated a successful business of his own, 
being known as a business man of integrity 
and a citizen of public spirit who was active 
in the development of his district. 

George T. Vogelpohl acquired his education 
in the public schools of Alton, and after his 
graduation from high school entered the bak- 
ery business in association with his father. 
Subsequently he became identified with the 
theatrical business, in which he has continued. 
He has a well-earned reputation for thorough- 
ness and excellence in filling his contracts. Mr. 
Vogelpohl is a Republican in his political alle- 
giance and has been active in political and 
civic affairs. 

On January 6, 1908, Mr. Vogelpohl married 
Miss Viola Spencer, of Alton, and to this 
union there have been born three children: 
George T., Jr., Marion and Elinor, who live 
at home. 

William Hartman, of Millstadt, is a rep- 
resentative of the great mining industry of 
St. Clair County. His father was a miner be- 
fore him and William Hartman grew up in 
the atmosphere of the coal industry. He has 
had a practical working knowledge of busi- 
ness since he was fourteen years of age. 

Mr. Hartman was born at Belleville, Illi- 
nois, March 18, 1872. His father, also Wil- 
liam Hartman, was a native of Pennsylvania 
and came to Illinois when a boy. He worked 
in the coal mines of St. Clair County from 
the time he arrived. For four years he was 
a soldier in the Union army in the Civil war. 
Alter the war he returned to St. Clair County, 
and was connected with the mining industry 
until his death in 1915. He married Miss 
Mary Schlader, who was born in Germany 



and came to America when a girl. She died 
in 1920. Of their seven children two died in 
infancy. The son Louis was killed in a mine 
in St. Clair County. George lives at St. Louis, 
also Fred, and Mrs. Sarah Mulligan is a resi- 
dent of Millstadt. 

William Hartman grew up in St. Clair 
County, and the family, like others who fol- 
lowed mining, lived in different localities near 
the mines. Thus William Hartman attended a 
number of public schools. At the age of four- 
teen he went into the mines. In early man- 
hood he had reached the responsibilities of 
mine manager. On August 1, 1899, he was 
made manager of the St. Clair Mine at Free- 
burg. For seven years he was manager of 
the Little Oak Mine for the Southern Coal 
Company. For the past six years he has been 
with the Parry Coal Company of St. Louis, as 
manager of the carbon at O'Fallon. 

In politics he has given his loyal support to 
the Democratic party since early manhood. 
In 1913 he was appointed state mine inspector 
by Governor Dunne and served in that ca- 
pacity throughout the Dunne administration, 
until 1917. He then became general super- 
intendent of the Kolb Coal Company, with 
mines located at Mascoutah and New Athens, 
Illinois. Mr. Hartman is a member of the 
Masonic fraternity. He married Miss Eliza- 
beth Weis, of Millstadt. Her father was 
Peter Weis, a native of Germany. 

Robert William Redpath, Doctor of Dental 
Surgery, has made a place and a name for 
himself in his profession at Marissa, St. Clair 
County. 

Doctor Redpath is a native of Illinois, born 
at Baldwin in Randolph County, February 4, 
1902. Incidentally, this was the same day 
that Col. Charles Lindbergh first saw the 
light of day. He is a descendant of pioneer 
ancestors of Southern Illinois. More re- 
motely, he is a descendant of two brothers 
who came to America from England in the 
seventeenth century. Of one branch of the 
family was the late John Clark Redpath of 
Indiana, distinguished as the author of the 
most popular series of United States histories 
ever published. Doctor Redpath's grandfather, 
Andrew Redpath, was born in Southern Illi- 
nois, where his parents had settled in early 
times, when the Indians were still a menace 
and when the howl of the wolf lulled them to 
sleen at night. The father of Doctor Redpath 
is William Redpath, who was born on a farm 
near Baldwin in 1870 and was for many years 
a successful cattle breeder, still manages his 
agricultural holdings, and is also in the real 
estate and insurance business there. William 
Redpath married Stella Mary Foster Lyons. 
There were two sons, Dr. Robert William and 
Eugene M., the latter a farmer near Baldwin. 

When Robert William Redpath was thirteen 
years of age his parents moved west to La- 





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ILLINOIS 



175 



junta, Colorado, a year later to Burlingame, 
Kansas', where they lived four years, and then 
went to San Fernando, near Los Angeles, 
California. In 1920 they returned to Bald- 
win, Illinois. Doctor Redpath finished his 
high school education at Sparta, then entered 
the College of Dentistry of St. Louis Univer- 
sity, and graduated Doctor of Dental Surgery 
with the class of 1926. For four months he 
was located at Litchfield and then removed to 
Marissa, where he has found abundant de- 
mand for his professional ability and where 
he and his wife are active in the social and 
civic life of this beautiful little community. 
Doctor and Mrs. Redpath are members of the 
United Presbyterian Church. Doctor Red- 
path is registered for practice in Missouri as 
well as Illinois and is a member of the Dental 
Society of both states. While in the university 
he was in the Military Corps and on gradu- 
ating joined the Medical Corps of the United 
States army as a reserve officer, with the rank 
of first lieutenant. 

He married, June 8, 1925, Miss Zeba Cox, of 
St. Louis, daughter of Hosea Cox, a St. Louis 
business man. Mrs. Redpath is a graduate 
of the Missouri Baptist Hospital, a registered 
nurse, and practiced her profession until her 
marriage. They have a daughter, Roberta 
Jean, born May 10, 1928. 

Oscar Henry Fischer, owner of the Fischer 
Drug Company, at 401 Collinsville Avenue, 
East St. Louis, is a business man and citizen 
whom the people of St. Clair County have 
learned to respect and honor. 

Mr. Fischer was born at Drake, Missouri, 
September 3, 1888, son of Rev. J. G. and 
Emma (Boettner) Fischer. Both parents 
were of German ancestry. The Boettners 
lived at Chester, Illinois, where Mrs. Emma 
Fischer was born. Rev. J. G. Fischer was 
born in Germany and in 1883 came to the 
United States. He came here to complete 
his theological training, and in 1886 was grad- 
uated from the Concordia Seminary of St. 
Louis. As a Lutheran minister he gave his 
service for twelve years to the church at 
Drake, Missouri, where he died in February, 
1898. His widow survived him until March, 
1925. 

Oscar H. Fischer attended a Lutheran par- 
ochial school at Perryville, Missouri, and in 
1906 was graduated from St. Paul's College 
at Concordia, Missouri. Taking up pharmacy 
was a matter of inclination as well as favor- 
able opportunity, and in 1911 he was gradu- 
ated from the St. Louis College of Pharmacy. 
Mr. Fischer followed his profession in St. 
Louis, Missouri, until 1919, after which he 
was with A. G. Schlueter until 1929, when 
he bought the drug store at 401 Collinsville 
Avenue in East St. Louis. Since then the 
name of the business has been the Fischer 
Drug Company. Mr. Fischer is a thoroughly 



trained registered pharmacist, and on the 
basis of his profession has developed a thriv- 
ing business, his establishment being one of 
the best known in that section of the city. He 
is a member of the National Drug Association, 
is a Lutheran, a Republican, and has responded 
to the life and needs of his community at all 
times. 

Mr. Fischer married, October 12, 1912, Miss 
Callie Constantine, of St. Louis, Missouri. 
She attended school at St. Louis, and is a mem- 
ber of the Episcopal Church. 

Thomas Lewis Thomson is a physician and 
surgeon, a specialist in eye, ear, nose and 
throat, and during the past ten years has been 
engaged in a busy routine of duties at Mo- 
line. Doctor Thomson came to Moline after 
many years of successful general practice in 
Iowa. 

However, he is a native of Canada, born at 
St. Thomas, Ontario, March 18, 1878, son of 
John D. and Sarah E. (Fowler) Thomson. 
Both parents were born in Canada. His grand- 
father, Daniel J. Thomson, was a native of 
Argyle, Scotland, crossed the ocean to Can- 
ada when eighteen years of age and was a 
pioneer farmer of Ontario. The maternal 
grandfather, Thomas Fowler, was born in Eng- 
land, came to Canada when fourteen years of 
age and also followed the business of farming. 
Doctor Thomson's parents were people of un- 
usual education and culture. His father was 
a farmer all his life in Canada, a Liberal in 
politics and a trustee of the local schools. 
John D. Thomson died in 1912 at St. Thomas, 
Canada. Mrs. Sarah Thomson is now eighty- 
three years of age and lives at St. Thomas. 
She has been a great reader all her life. She 
is an active member of the Christian Church 
and two of her brothers, Rev. Dr. George 
Fowler and Rev. Dr. Thomas Lewis Fowler, 
are preachers in that denomination. Of her 
nine children seven are living, Dr. Thomas 
Lewis Thomson being the fifth in age. Doctor 
Thomson's youngest brother, Herbert E. 
Thomson, served with notable distinction in 
the World war. Enlisting from his native 
country, Canada, shortly after Canada joined 
the Allies, he was a member of that famous 
air squadron under the command of General 
Bishop, the greatest ace of the World war. 
Another brother, Dr. George E. Thomson, died 
in 1918. 

Thomas L. Thomson attended local schools 
while a boy on the farm, continued his edu- 
cation in the Collegiate Institute at St. Thomas 
and then entered Western University at Lon- 
don, Canada, where he was graduated in med- 
icine in 1905. He took special work in Mc- 
Gill University at Montreal and had clinical 
experience. Doctor Thomson in 1906 came to 
the United States and located at Blairstown, 
Iowa, where he had a successful experience 
in general practice for fifteen years. In 1920 



176 



ILLINOIS 



he moved to Moline, where he has largely- 
limited his work to eye, ear, nose and throat. 
Besides the opportunities of a broad general 
practice he has taken post-graduate work in 
hospital and clinics in Chicago and in Roches- 
ter, Minnesota. 

Doctor Thomson married, September 7, 
1910, Marguerite Connell, who was born at 
Toledo, Iowa, daughter of William M. and 
Adelaide (Wadley) Connell, pioneers of that 
state, and a granddaughter of Col. John Con- 
nell, a native of Paisley, Scotland, who was 
in command of the Twenty-eighth Iowa In- 
fantry in the Civil war and in one battle had 
an arm shot off. He was captured and spent 
some time in Libby Prison. He was offered 
the rank of brigadier-general, but on account 
of failing health had to resign his commission. 
Doctor and Mrs. Thomson have three sons: 
John William, born July 27, 1913, Daniel Con- 
nell, born May 28, 1915, and George Herbert, 
born April 22, 1919. The family are mem- 
bers of the Congregational Church, of which 
Doctor Thomson has for six years been a 
deacon. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a 
member of the Knights of Pythias, a Repub- 
lican in politics and while living in Iowa 
served as local health officer. 

At Moline he is a member of the Chamber 
of Commerce, the Short Hills Country Club 
and his recreations are afforded by participa- 
tion in the sports of golf, volley ball and mo- 
toring. About twice every year he takes a 
motor trip to Canada. He is a member of the 
Rock Island County, Illinois State and the 
Iowa-Illinois Medical Societies, the American 
Medical Association and the Moline Physicians 
Club. 

William Frech, probate clerk of St. Clair 
County, is a man of the people, and his fellow 
citizens have taken repeated opportunities to 
show their confidence in his judgment and in- 
crease his responsibilities in a public way. 
One of his characteristics has been willing- 
ness to serve and diligence as a worker, and 
his popularity and known efficiency paved the 
way for his election to one of the important 
offices in the county in 1930. 

Mr. Frech was born at Lenzburg, St. Clair 
County, November 23, 1894, son of William 
and Katherine (Schmidt) Frech. His mother 
is living, but his father died several years 
ago. William Frech grew up at Lenzburg, and 
what he learned in the public schools there 
was later supplemented by correspondence 
work with the International Correspondence 
Schools of Scranton. This and his practical 
experience has given him a more than ordi- 
nary technical and commercial education. As 
a boy he began an apprenticeship in the office 
of the Neivs-Democrat at Belleville. The con- 
finement of an office proved unsatisfactory to 
him, and so at the age of seventeen he became 
a practical coal miner. He was in the mines 



until January, 1929. In addition to mining 
he has written insurance at Lenzburg for a 
number of years. Much of his personal popu- 
larity is due to his friendship among laboring 
men. Since 1914 he has been secretary of 
the local No. 341 of the United Mine Workers 
of America. 

Mr. Frech is a staunch Democrat in politics. 
He was city clerk of Lenzburg from 1920 to 
1930, also trustee of the Lenzburg Evangeli- 
cal Church since 1922, and from 1925 to 1931 
was a member of the County Board of Super- 
visors. For twelve years he served as secre- 
tary of the Lenzburg Fire Company. In Jan- 
uary, 1929, he became deputy recorder of St. 
Clair County, with office at Belleville, and in 
November, 1930, was elected probate clerk 
on the Democratic ticket. He received a ma- 
jority of 6,000 in a county that is normally 
Republican by over 4,500 votes. 

He married Miss Anna M. Reuttel, daugh- 
ter of George and Sophia Reuttel, retired 
farmers at Lenzburg. Mr. and Mrs. Frech 
have two children: Virginia Emma, born Au- 
gust 31, 1919; and Shirley- Ann Hilda, born 
December 1, 1926, who was just four years old 
the day Mr. Frech was sworn in as probate 
clerk of St. Clair County. 

Lawrence Darrell Bunch is doing with 
characteristic loyalty and efficiency his as- 
signed part in connection with governmental 
affairs in his native county, for in the City 
of Cairo he holds the office of sheriff of Alex- 
ander County, besides being ex-officio tax col- 
lector for the county. He is a scion of families 
founded in America in the colonial era and 
of one that gained pioneer honors in Illinois. 
He maintained the high patriotic standards of 
his forebears through his overseas service in 
the World war, and intrinsic loyalty has char- 
acterized him in all the relations of life, so 
that it may well be understood that he is giv- 
ing a most efficient and popular administra- 
tion in the office of sheriff. 

Mr. Bunch was born in Alexander County, 
Illinois, September 19, 1891, and is a son of 
Joseph and Nellie (McRaven) Bunch, of 
whose five children he was the second in order 
of birth. Joseph Bunch likewise was born and 
reared in Alexander County, here gained sub- 
stantial success through his long and close 
association with farm industry, and he was 
called upon to serve in various local offices 
of trust, including those of drain commis- 
sioner, road supervisor and school director. 
His father, Andrew Jackson Bunch, passed 
his entire life in Illinois, was a skilled and 
pioneer wagonmaker and made wagons for 
the use of the Government during the Civil 
war period, besides which he served as post- 
master of the Village of McClure, Alexander 
County, in the latter part of the 1860 decade. 
Andrew Jackson Bunch was a son of Decatur 
Bunch, who was born at Hopkinsville, Ken- 



ILLINOIS 



177 



tucky, and who became the pioneer representa- 
tive of the family in Illinois, where he served 
as a soldier in the Black Hawk Indian war 
and where he continued to reside until his 
death. The Bunch family, of sterling English 
origin, was founded in Virginia in the colonial 
period of our national history, and it has been 
here indicated that it had pioneer prestige in 
both Kentucky and Illinois. The paternal 
grandmother of Sheriff Bunch was a member 
of the Phillips family and had kinship with 
the Brewer family that settled at Chillicothe, 
Ohio, when that state was still a part of the 
great territory under jurisdiction of Virginia. 
After the completing of his high school 
studies Lawrence D. Bunch took a course in a 
business college at Quincy, Illinois. He was 
reared to the sturdy and invigorating disci- 
pline of the home farm, and his first independ- 
ent venture came when he obtained the posi- 
tion of mail carrier on one of the rural free 
delivery routes in his native county. In this 
service he continued four years, and when the 
nation entered the World war he promptly 
volunteered for service in the United States 
Army, in which he was assigned to the field 
artillery. After having been stationed at 
Camp Dix, New Jersey, his command crossed 
overseas to France in April, 1918. He was 
in active conflict service in various sectors in 
France, and after the armistice brought the 
war to a close he served with the Allied Army 
of Occupation in Germany until August, 1919, 
when he returned to his native land, his 
honorable discharge having been granted Sep- 
tember 1, 1919, and he having then returned 
to his native county. Here he held a position 
with the State Bank of McClure until 1927, 
he having thereafter been for a time asso- 
ciated again with farm enterprise, and hav- 
ing later engaged in the insurance business. 
In 1929 he was appointed county sheriff, to 
fill out an unexpired term, and in November 
of that year he was regularly elected to this 
office. His political allegiance is given to the 
Democratic party, and he is affiliated with the 
American Legion Post No. 406, in which he 
served in 1928 as vice-commander of his post. 
The maiden name of his wife was Muriel M. 
Bankson, a daughter of S. A. and Joyce (Ellis) 
Bankson of Pulaski, and their two children 
are Nellie Joyce and Minnie Jo. The family 
home in Cairo is maintained at 723 Thirty- 
fifth Street. 

Hon. Thomas LeBeau Fekete as business 
man, soldier and leader in public life has a 
record which gives him an outstanding place 
in the citizenship of East St. Louis. Mr. 
Fekete is an attorney-at-law. His place of 
business is at 324 Collinsville Avenue, where 
he owns the Fekete Real Estate, Insurance 
and Loan Agency. 

Mr. Fekete was born in East St. Louis, July 
1, 1882, son of Thomas Louis and Charlotte 



(LeBeau) Fekete. In 1901 he was graduated 
from the East St. Louis High School. In 
1904 the University of Michigan bestowed 
upon him the LL. B. degree, and he immedi- 
ately returned home and engaged in a law 
practice which has kept him busy for the 
past twenty-seven years. He has owned the 
Fekete Agency for real estate, insurance and 
loans since 1915. 

So much for his successful business career, 
but that represents only a part of his varied 
activities in a public way and in his social 
connections. From 1905 to 1910 Mr. Fekete 
served as assistant supervisor on the county 
board and held the office of chief supervisor 
of his township during 1910-12. In 1912 he 
was made chairman of the Board of Super- 
visors and chairman of the Board of Review 
of St. Clair County. He was city attorney in 
1913-15, assistant corporation counsel of East 
St. Louis, 1915-17, and was elected city attor- 
ney in 1917 and 1919. In 1922 he was elected 
a member of the House of Representatives of 
the Illinois General Assembly and in 1924 
and 1926 was reelected. 

His soldier record began as a private in 
the Third Illinois Field Artillery in 1917. 
While in the federal service he was captain 
of the One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Field 
Artillery and served with the rank of major 
during the latter part of the war. He was 
mustered into the federal service July 25, 
1917, was in France from May, 1918, to July, 
1919, received his discharge at Camp Grant, 
Illinois, August 7, 1919, and is now lieutenant 
colonel in the Judge Advocate Reserves, U. 
S. A. He participated in the St. Mihiel and 
Meuse-Argonne drives and in 1919 the French 
government bestowed on him the "Officier 
d'Acadamie" decoration. Major Fekete is a 
past commander of Post No. 516 of the Amer- 
ican Legion and is a past chef degare of Voi- 
ture No. 38 of the Forty and Eight Society 
of St. Louis, Missouri. 

Major Fekete has for many years been a 
student of Masonry and has enjoyed many 
posts of honor in that fraternity, including 
the thirty-third, supreme honorary degree in 
the Scottish Rite. He is a member of East 
St. Louis Lodge No. 504, A. F. and A. M.; 
Royal Arch Chapter No. 56, St. Clair Council 
No. 61, R. and S. M.; is a past commander 
of East St. Louis Commandery No. 81, Knights 
Templar; is a past thrice potentate master of 
St. Clair Lodge of Perfection, a past sovereign 
prince of Cahokie Council Princes of Jeru- 
salem, a past most wise master of John M. 
Peirson Chapter, Rose Croix, and a past com- 
mander-in-chief of the Mississippi Valley 
Consistory, Ancient and Accepted Scottish 
Rite. As a member of the Supreme Council 
of the Northern Jurisdiction he received the 
honorary thirty-third degree. He is a past 
potentate of Ainad Temple of the Mystic 
Shrine. 



178 



ILLINOIS 



Mr. Fekete is a member of the Illinois Bar 
Association, president of the East St. Louis 
Bar Association, a member of the National 
Sojourners Club, St. Clair Club, Illinois Real- 
tors Association, is a director in the East 
St. Louis Real Estate Exchange. He is a 
member of the Kappa Sigma college frater- 
nity. In 1909 he married Miss Grace Ford, 
daughter of Judge Thomas E. Ford of Carlyle, 
Illinois. They have two children, Thomas 
Ford and Charlotte Eliza. 

Erwin Stelzer is one of the progressive 
representatives of the automobile business in 
the City of Cairo, where the Stelzer Auto 
Company now has the agency for the DeSoto 
automobiles, with well equipped and appointed 
headquarters at 910 Commercial Avenue. 

Mr. Stelzer was born in Madison County, 
Illinois, May 28, 1890, and is a son of August 
and Margaret (Roniger) Stelzer, the former 
of whom was born in Germany and the latter 
in Illinois, their children having been nine in 
number. August Stelzer was a lad of nine 
years when his parents came from Germany 
to the United States and established resi- 
dence in Illinois, where he was reared and 
educated and where he made a record of suc- 
cess in the lumber business and later in the 
automobile business, his activities having been 
staged principally in Madison and St. Clair 
counties. 

Erwin Stelzer attended the public schools in 
Madison and St. Clair County, and as a youth 
of fourteen years he began working in his 
father's automobile establishment. He became 
a skilled mechanic along this line and in the 
City of Saint Louis, Missouri, he found em- 
ployment at his trade, he having there re- 
mained until 1914, when he came to Cairo and 
established the business that he has since con- 
ducted here with marked success, he having 
made a reputation that is in itself one of his 
most valuable business assets. In the begin- 
ning the Stelzer Auto Company had the 
agency for the Ford automobile, but since 
1929 the concern has functioned as the author- 
ized agency for the staunch and popular De- 
Soto automobiles, the sales of which are here 
showing a constantly cumulative tendency 
under the vigorous and reliable policies denned 
by Mr. Stelzer, who is one of the progressive 
and popular exponents of the automobile busi- 
ness in Southern Illinois. Mr. Stelzer is an 
active member of the Cairo Automotive Trade 
Association, of which he was vice president in 
1929, and he has membership also in the 
Cairo Automobile Association and the local 
Association of Commerce. His sales and dis- 
play rooms, with well equipped repair and 
accessory department, utilize 150,000 square 
feet of floor space, and the establishment is 
one of the best modern standard, with metro- 
politan facilities and service. He gives em- 
ployment to eleven persons, and in addition 



to his automobile business he is vice president 
of the Southern Flour Mills Company. He is 
affiliated with the Masonic fraternity and the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

When the nation became involved in the 
World war Mr. Stelzer promptly volunteered 
for service in the United States Army. His 
enlistment occurred in June, 1917, and he was 
assigned duty as instructor in the motor 
transport department of the army, with rank 
as sergeant. He continued in service until 
the armistice brought the war to a close and 
he received his honorable discharge December 
7, 1918. His interest in his former comrades 
is indicated by his affiliation with the Amer- 
ican Legion Post No. 406 of Cairo. 

In Cairo was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Stelzer and Miss Blanche Parsons, daugh- 
ter of George Parsons, a former mayor of this 
city. Mrs. Stelzer is a gracious and popular 
factor in the representative social and cultural 
circles of her home city, and in the World war 
period she was here active in the work of the 
Red Cross, in the promotion of the drives for 
Government war bonds, and in other phases 
of the local patriotic service. 

Albert H. Schott, banker and business 
man of Highland, was born in that interesting 
Southern Illinois community September 15, 
1870. During a period of forty years his 
activities and public spirit have constituted an 
important service and have gained for him 
the favorable esteem of his fellow citizens. 

Mr. Schott is a son of Martin J. Schott, a 
native of Germany, who came to America in 
1856. For many years he was engaged in the 
brewing business at Highland. Martin J. 
Schott married, soon after coming to High- 
land, Miss Bertha Eggen, who was also born 
and reared in Germany. 

Albert H. Schott had before him during his 
youth the example of a father who was in- 
dustrious, capable and a man of marked in- 
tegrity in business and citizenship. After 
attending the public schools of Highland he 
went into his father's office. After his father's 
death he and a brother took over the business, 
but in 1911 he sold his half interest to his 
brother. For several years he was interested 
in the milk industry in Marysville, Ohio. In 
1915 he returned to Highland and entered the 
banking business, as assistant cashier of the 
First National Bank. In 1920 he resigned 
this office to engage in the real estate and 
investment business, and he is still one of the 
directors of the bank and especially interested 
in the real estate department. 

No small part of his time and effort have 
been bestowed upon community enterprises 
and organizations. He was president of the 
Highland, Madison County, Fair Association 
from 1900 to 1922. During the World war 
he was a member of the Council of Defense 
and had charge of the Liberty Loan drives in 




(s\7 c>Q/ (M<T^0>^rr7 7^7/ aOj 



ILLINOIS 



179 



Highland and surrounding territory. Mr. 
Schott was one of the organizers and secre- 
tary of the Highland Country Club, and secre- 
tary of the Highland Chamber of Commerce, 
is a thirty-second degree Scottish Rite Mason, 
being a member of the Consistory and Ainad 
Temple of the Mystic Shrine at East St. Louis. 
In political faith Mr. Schott is a Democrat. 

He married, December 17, 1897, Miss Ella 
Roth, of Highland, daughter of George and 
Emma (Kuhnen) Roth. Her father was a 
business man of that city. They have two 
children. The son, Waldo R., was a soldier 
in the World war, lost his health while in the 
army, and is now recuperating at El Paso, 
Texas. He married Helen Hediger, and they 
have a daughter, Maxine. The daughter, Miss 
Dorothy, who lives at home with her parents, 
is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin 
and is now the wife of Hon. Clarence Stocker, 
who is at this writing mayor of the City of 
Highland. 

Richard Deyo Dugan, physician and sur- 
geon, with offices in the Illinois National Bank 
Building at Springfield, came to the capital 
city to practice medicine after the close of the 
World war. 

Doctor Dugan, who was overseas for a time 
as a medical officer, was born at Edinburg, 
Christian County, Illinois, April 4, 1876, son 
of Rev. John J. and Florence (Denton) Dugan. 
His father was born in Arkansas and came 
to Illinois during the Civil war period. Doc- 
tor Dugan's mother was born in Knox County, 
Illinois, daughter of Frank Denton, a native 
of Kentucky. Rev. John J. Dugan was edu- 
cated in the Illinois Wesleyan Univeristy at 
Bloomington and took up the work of a min- 
ister of the Gospel as a young man and for 
many years toiled in the Illinois Conference. 
He retired from the active ministry in 1913 
and died in 1923. His wife passed away in 
1916. They were Methodists, and he was a 
member of the Masonic fraternity and a Pro- 
hibitionist, later being a Republican. They 
had a family of four children. 

Dr. Richard Deyo Dugan was educated in 
the Greenfield, Illinois, High School and in 
1899 was graduated in medicine from the 
Washington University of St. Louis. For a 
short time he practiced at Philadelphia and 
Pleasant Plaines, Illinois, and for eighteen 
years was a representative of his profession 
in the Town of Illiopolis. 

In June, 1918, he enlisted, received training 
at Fort Oglethorpe, Georgia, and after four 
weeks went overseas to France. He was on 
duty there for four months until illness com- 
pelled him to return home. He held the rank 
of lieutenant. Doctor Dugan on August 1, 
1919, began practice at Springfield. In addi- 
tion to a general practice he handles consid- 
j erable surgery and is especially well known 
as a proctologist. 



He married, July 3, 1900, Miss Pearl B. 
Huber, a native of Kansas. They are mem- 
bers of the Presbyterian Church. Doctor 
Dugan is affiliated with the B. P. O. Elks, is 
a member of the American Legion, the Grand 
View Country Club, and the Sangamon 
County and Illinois State Medical Associations. 

Oscar H. Juengel, of 514 North Twenty- 
third Street, East St. Louis, district agent for 
the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada, 
took up insurance after many years of varied 
business experience in other lines. 

Mr. Juengel represents an old and sturdy 
family of German ancestry in Southern 
Illinois. He was born at Baden Baden, Illinois, 
March 24, 1889, son of Edward and Anna 
(Seyfried) Juengel. The Juengel and Seyfried 
families have been in America for three gen- 
erations. His grandfather, Edward Juengel, 
was a native of Germany and when a young 
man came to America. He was a meat dealer 
at St. Louis, Missouri, where he founded the 
old French market in that city. He was 
active in the market business until his death. 
Mr. Juengel's maternal grandfather, John Sey- 
fried, came from Germany at the age of 
twenty-three. He was a shoemaker by trade. 
He worked in St. Louis, Missouri, at Vandalia, 
Illinois, but for over fifty years lived in one 
house at Millersburg, Illinois, and he followed 
his trade until his death. His parents had 
come from Germany with him and they also 
lived out their lives at Millersburg. 

Mr. Juengel's parents were married in St. 
Louis, Missouri, where his father was born. 
His mother was born at Baden Baden, Illinois, 
and she died in February, 1895. Edward 
Juengel was associated with his father in 
the market business at St. Louis. He died 
there in June, 1889. 

Oscar H. Juengel was only a few weeks 
old when his father died. He grew up in the 
home of his grandparents at Millersburg, at- 
tended school there, and his first business 
experience was gained as clerk in a general 
store at Millersburg. He was a clerk there 
from the age of thirteen to seventeen. He 
came to East St. Louis in 1905. Mr. Juengel 
clerked in a grocery store a year, was in a 
planing mill three years, and spent eight years 
in a foundry establishment as shipping clerk, 
timekeeper and foreman. When he left the 
foundry he went into the general offices at 
East St. Louis of Armour & Company and 
remained with that organization for twelve 
years as shipping clerk. 

Mr. Juengel resigned his place with Armour 
& Company to take up life insurance. He 
has displayed unusual forte and ability in this 
field and has built up a splendid business for 
the Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada 
in his district. 

Mr. Juengel volunteered for service in the 
World war. He was sent to Camp Logan June 



180 



SIONITII 



27, 1917, and received an honorable discharge 
on September 11, 1917. He is a Democrat in 
politics and a member of the Catholic Church. 
On September 5, 1914, he married Miss 
Josephine Viola Rebstock, of East St. Louis. 
She graduated from the East St. Louis High 
School in 1908. Four children were born to 
their marriage: James Roland, born June 23, 
1918, and died November 18, 1922; Charles 
Loraine, born June 18, 1921; Robert Joseph, 
born February 7, 1925; and Adrian William, 
born September 29, 1929. 

Owen O'Neil Dillon, prominent attorney 
at East St. Louis, is a member of a substan- 
tial Southern Illinois family of Irish ancestry, 
a family comprising in the three generations 
of its residence in the state, farmers, railroad 
workers, business and professional men. 

Mr. Dillon was born at Shipman, Illinois, 
May 27, 1889, son of Patrick and Anna 
(O'Neil) Dillon. His father was a native of 
Tyrone, Ireland. Both his grandfathers, John 
Dillon and John O'Neil, were natives of Ire- 
land. John Dillon was a weaver in Ireland 
and spent all his life in that country. The 
grandfather John O'Neil on coming to Amer- 
ica settled in Pennsylvania and about 1855 
came to Illinois and lived out the rest of 
his life on a farm at Carlinville. Patrick 
Dillon located at Shipman, Illinois, in 1858. 
For nearly fifty years he was a roadmaster 
for the Chicago & Alton Railroad and was 
a man of much local prominence in his com- 
munity. At one time he was mayor of Ship- 
man. He died in 1927. His wife, a native 
of Pennsylvania, died in 1917. 

The children of these parents were as fol- 
lows: Nell, wife of J. T. Maher, sales manager 
for the International Harvester Company, liv- 
ing at Oak Park, Illinois; Patrick, who is 
manager of the Merchants Exchange in East 
St. Louis; Annie, wife of James Lassey, of 
Shipman, a foreman with the Chicago & Alton 
Railroad; Owen; Leo, a captain in the United 
States Army, stationed at St. Louis, Missouri. 

Owen Dillon was educated in the grammar 
and high schools of Shipman. In .1914 he was 
graduated with the LL. B. degree from the 
University of Illinois, and at once located 
in East St. Louis, where during the past 
seventeen years his name has become increas- 
ingly well known as a practicing attorney. 
For one year he acted as court reporter for 
Judge Silas Cook. He then opened a private 
law office, and his talents have won him more 
than an ordinary share in the legal business 
of the community. He has won a special rep- 
utation as a trial lawyer and is an eloquent 
speaker. He is a member of the Phi Delta 
Phi, the St. Clair County Bar Association, 
is a Catholic and a Democrat. He has worked 
effectively for his party, but only once was 
a candidate for office, seeking election as city 
judge. 



William L. O'Connell, a Chicagoan dis- 
tinguished by his leadership in the Demo- 
cratic party and as a business man and man- 
ufacturer, was at one time county treasurer 
of Cook County, also chairman of the State 
Public Utility Commission of Illinois, and is 
now president and treasurer of the O'Connell 
Truck Company. 

He was born in Chicago May 15, 1872, son 
of Michael J. and Anna (Bennett) O'Connell. 
He received his early education in public 
schools and in St. John's School, and for three 
years attended night classes in the law de- 
partment of Northwestern University. 

His interest in politics was aroused at an 
early age. His first work was done in his 
home ward, and from that his leadership ex- 
tended to the Democratic organization of the 
city and county. For four years he was 
chairman of the Democratic County Commit- 
tee, and from 1906 to 1908 he served under 
Mayor Dunne as commissioner of public 
works. On November 8, 1910, he was elected 
treasurer of Cook County, and at the expira- 
tion of his term in 1914 he was appointed 
by Governor Dunne as chairman of the Illi- 
nois State Public Utility Commission, on which 
he served from 1915 to 1917, until the end 
of the Dunne administration. As manager of 
Mayor Dunne's campaign for governor he was 
largely responsible for building up the tre- 
mendous- majority received by the candidate 
not only in Cook County but throughout the 
state at large. He is still a power in the 
party, and in 1930 as campaign manager for 
Hon. J. Hamilton Lewis, he was given an 
important measure of credit for the tremen- 
dous victory which put that Illinois statesman 
into the United States Senate. 

Mr. O'Connell has also been interested in 
banking, but since 1916 his chief business has 
been in the manufacture of two-way drive 
motor trucks, under the firm name of O'Con- 
nell Motor Company at 2399 Archer Avenue. 

Mr. O'Connell is a member of the Chicago 
Athletic Club, the South Shore Country Club, 
the Press Club, the B. P. O. Elks, National 
Union, Woodmen of the World, Knights of 
Columbus, and Catholic Order of Foresters. 
He married in 1905 Miss Anna J. Curry. 
Their children are Mary, Anna and William 
L., Jr. 

Oliver M. Barr is a pioneer resident and 
business man of River Forest, which has been 
his home for over forty years. Mr. Barr built 
his first house in River Forest east of Ashland 
Avenue and between the North Western tracks 
and Chicago Avenue. One of the oldest and 
best known firms of lumber dealers in the 
western suburbs of Chicago was Barr and 
Collins, of which Mr. Barr was the founder. 

He was born at Aurora, Illinois, in 1862, 
son of James G. and Maria (Miller) Barr. 
The Barr and Miller families were among the 



ILLINOIS 



181 



earliest settlers of Aurora and had a con- 
spicuous part in the history of the Fox River 
Valley. The grandfather of Mr. Barr was 
Rev. Oliver Barr, an early minister of the 
Christian denomination and a patron of educa- 
tion. He was of Scotch ancestry, a native of 
Massachusetts, and one of the early followers 
of Alexander Campbell in the ministry. From 
New York State he moved west, and became 
associated with the eminent educator Horace 
Mann in the founding of Antioch College at 
Yellow Springs, Ohio. He traveled and lec- 
tured to secure financial and other support 
for that school. He established his home at 
Aurora, Illinois, in 1843, locating there half 
a dozen years before Aurora was connected 
with the outside world by railroad. 

James G. Barr, father of the River Forest 
business man, had an important part in the 
early history of Aurora. He was the first 
city clerk at the incorporation of the city, 
and was internal revenue collector for the dis- 
trict in which the city is located. By profes- 
sion he was a lawyer and practiced in Aurora 
until his death in 1872, when a comparatively 
young man. 

Maria Miller was an early teacher in the 
Aurora schools. Her brother, Holmes Miller, 
was mayor of the city in 1880, and another 
brother, Col. Silas Miller, commanded the 
Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry until killed at 
the battle of Kenesaw Mountain in 1864. The 
Miller family came west in the early 1840s to 
Aurora. 

In 1888 River Forest had recently been laid 
out and was at the beginning of its develop- 
ment as a village. It was laid out on lands 
owned by the Thatcher, Quick and other 
families. In 1890 he established the firm of 
Barr & Collins, and was the active head of 
that concern until he retired a few years ago. 
Besides dealing in lumber and building mate- 
rial he erected some of. the first residences in 
River Forest, and has taken a great deal of 
pride in seeing River Forest develop into one 
of the most attractive residential suburbs. 

Walter F. Coolidge, principal of the Gran- 
ite City High School, is a native of Illinois and 
has spent over thirty years in educational 
work. He has taught in three states besides 
his own. 

Mr. Coolidge was born at Galesburg, Illi- 
nois, July 24, 1876, son of James H. and Ellen 
Frances (Brown) Coolidge. His mother was 
a native of New Hampshire. His father spent 
his active life as a farmer. Walter F. Cool- 
idge grew up on a farm. He attended the 
grammar and high schools of Galesburg and in 
1899 was graduated Bachelor of Arts from 
Knox College. By post-graduate study he ob- 
tained the Master of Arts degree from Knox 
in 1907 and at the University of Chicago in 
1914. 

Beginning in 1899, he taught a year at 
Lockport, Illinois, and two years in the Gales- 



burg High School. For four years he was an 
instructor in the Wisconsin State Normal Col- 
lege at Oshkosh, one year in the Michigan 
Military Academy at Orchard Lake, and for 
two years in the Louisiana State Normal Col- 
lege. Returning to Illinois, he was for four 
years a member of the faculty of Shurtleff 
College at Alton. Mr. Coolidge has been prin- 
cipal of the Granite City High School since 
1913. The school personnel represents in a 
graphic way the remarkable and rapid de- 
velopment of this industrial center of South- 
ern Illinois. When he became principal there 
were five teachers and an enrollment in the 
high school of 131. At the present time he 
has under his supervision the work of fifty- 
seven instructors and 1,170 students. 

Mr. Coolidge is a member of the Department 
of Superintendents in the National Education 
Association and also the Department of Prin- 
cipals of Secondary Schools. He is a member 
of the State Historical Society, is a thirty- 
second degree Scottish Rite Mason and mem- 
ber of Aimad Temple of the Mystic Shrine at 
East St. Louis. 

Mr. Coolidge in April, 1898, enlisted at 
Springfield, Illinois, for service in the Spanish- 
American war and was assigned duty with the 
Sixth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under com- 
mand of Col. D. Jack Foster, of Chicago. With 
his regiment he saw service in the Porto Rico 
campaign, under Gen. Nelson Miles, and was 
discharged with the rank of duty sergeant at 
Springfield in 1899. He is a member of the 
United Spanish-American War Veterans, 
Granite City Post. 

Mr. Coolidge married, December 25, 1902, 
Helen Edith Abernathy, of Knoxville, Illinois. 
They have one son, George Abernathy Cool- 
idge. 

Thomas F. Olsen. From the time that he 
completed a business college course Thomas 
F. Olsen has been connected with the post- 
office, first as clerk and then as an assistant 
to his father, and since 1923 in the capacity of 
postmaster. During his administration the af- 
fairs of this department have been conducted 
in a manner highly satisfying to the people 
of this community, who are being given ex- 
peditious and effective service. 

Mr. Olsen was born at Osage City, Kan- 
sas, September 5, 1881, and is a son of Martin 
Andrew Luther and Clara (McGinnis) Olsen. 
His paternal grandfather, Thomas Olsen, was 
born in Norway and in young manhood im- 
migrated to the United States, being natural- 
ized February 24, 1859. He settled first at 
Chicago, whence he moved to Rockford, re- 
maining one year, after which he took up his 
residence at LaPorte, Indiana, and there fol- 
lowed the trade of tailor during the remain- 
der of his life, being one of the highly esteemed 
and reliable citizens of his community. Mar- 
tin Andrew Luther Olsen was born at Chi- 
cago and was given a collegiate education 



182 



ILLINOIS 



at Fort Wayne, Indiana, becoming a well-edu- 
cated man and linguist, able to speak five 
languages. In young manhood he went to 
Osage City, Kansas, where he engaged in 
general merchandising for some years, but in 
1882 came to DeKalb and engaged in the mer- 
cantile business. In 1898 he was appointed 
postmaster, and served in that capacity dur- 
ing the administrations of Presidents McKin- 
ley, Roosevelt and Taft. He is now living in 
retirement at the home of his son, Thomas F., 
at the age of seventy-five. Mr. Olsen was 
always active in Republican politics and in 
1904 was president of the John Ericcson Re- 
publican League, and for some years served 
with the state food inspection department. 
He is a member of the Lutheran Church. 
Mr. Olsen married Miss Clara McGinnis, who 
was born at Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, a 
daughter of Cornelius McGinnis, who was born 
in Pennsylvania, and was originally a man- 
ufacturer of mill machinery for flouring mills, 
but later moved to Chicago, where he manu- 
factured smoke burners. Mrs. Olsen died Oc- 
tober 11, 1917, in the faith of the Congre- 
gational Church. She became the mother of 
four children, of whom two are living: 
Rachael, the wife of D. D. Pitney, a writer 
at Geneva, Illinois; and Thomas F., of this 
review. 

Thomas F. Olsen attended the grammar and 
high schools of DeKalb, following which he 
took a course in a business college at Chi- 
cago and immediately entered the postoffice, 
where he remained as a clerk and assistant 
under his father until 1923, when he himself 
was appointed postmaster, being reappointed 
to this office in 1927 and again in 1931. As 
before noted, he has made a record as an ex- 
cellent official and one in whom the public has 
full confidence. He has always been active 
in politics as a Republican and wields a dis- 
tinct influence in his party. He is a member 
of the Congregational Church, in which he 
takes a helpful part, and sings in the choir, 
and his fraternal connections are with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, of which latter he 
is a past exalted ruler. He belongs also to 
the Rotary Club and was its president in 
1929. 

In 1905 Mr. Olsen was united in marriage 
with Miss Inez Stewart, who was educated in 
the public schools of Freeport, and is a daugh- 
ter of William Stewart. Mr. Stewart was a 
captain in the Union army during the war 
between the states, and although a Democrat 
was elected sheriff and county treasurer in 
a county normally Republican by a large ma- 
jority. Five children have been born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Olsen: William, of DeKalb, who 
spent two years in normal school; Margaret, 
who is attending the University of Wisconsin 
in the class of 1934, after finishing two years 
at DeKalb Normal School; Robert, who grad- 



uated from high school in 1931 and is now 
attending Teachers College at DeKalb; and 
Clara Louise, who is attending grammar 
school. John C. died in 1923 at the age of 
two and one-half years. 

Richard H. Bailey, chief of police for the 
City of Maywood, represents the third genera- 
tion of a family who have lived in Proviso 
Township of Cook County for sixty years. 
Each of these generations has furnished citi- 
zens of prominence in the localities of Melrose 
Park and Maywood. 

The founder of the family in this country 
was Richard James Bailey, Sr., an English- 
man, who brought his family to America and 
settled in Proviso Township in the summer of 
1871. He built one of the first homes in Mel- 
rose Park, at which time there were only 
twelve other houses in the village. He started 
the first Sunday school in the community and 
for years was active in the civic, educational 
and religious work of the community. 

The father of Maywood's chief of police was 
also named Richard James Bailey. He was 
born at Bristol, England, and was seven years 
of age when the family came to America. For 
a number of years he held the office of chief 
of police of Melrose Park and is now con- 
nected with the American Can Company. 

Richard H. Bailey was born at Melrose 
Park, May 19, 1892. He attended public 
schools there, learned the trade of tool and 
die maker in the plant of the American Can 
Company in Maywood, and subsequently was 
employed in the special agent's department 
of the Chicago and Northwestern Railway. 
This gave him his first police experience. He 
handled work on the Galena Division of the 
railroad. Later he was made employment 
manager for the Sturgis-Burns Manufactur- 
ing Company, manufacturers of milk cans. He 
also had general charge of the secret service 
work of this company. Later he returned to 
the American Can Company and during the 
World war period had charge of its secret 
service department, with nearly fifty men on 
his staff. 

Mr. Bailey joined the Maywood Police De- 
partment on July 1, 1921, by appointment of 
Mayor Henry W. Tolsted. He started as 
patrolman, later was promoted to first ser- 
geant, then to the grade of lieutenant, and for 
some time was lieutenant of detectives. In 
1930 he was appointed chief of police by Mr. 
Tolsted, who in that year had again been 
chosen mayor of the city. 

Maywood is now fifty years old as a village 
and city, and it is one of the most popular 
communities in Cook County outside of Chi- 
cago. And among other factors that have 
contributed to the growing fame of this 
municipality has been the notably efficient 
police organization. Chief Bailey has a staff 
of eighteen men. He conducts a police school, 



ILLINOIS 



183 



has squad cars equipped with radio for crime 
detection, and has also established a new 
record for criminal investigations. During 
the past year, of $30,000 worth of lost and 
stolen property, $27,000 was recovered. Dur- 
ing the month of May, 1931, there were only 
eight criminal complaints filed, a remarkable 
record when it is remembered that Maywood 
has a population of 27,000. The Police De- 
partment's Bureau of Records and Identifica- 
tion has provided an example for imitation by 
police executives. 

Mr. Bailey is a member of the Illinois Police 
Association and the Chicago Metropolitan Re- 
gional Police Association, serving in the 
capacity of secretary of the organization com- 
mittee of the latter body. He is a Mason. He 
married Miss Anna Selk, of Hinsdale, Dupage 
County. They have four living children, 
Elizabeth, Evelyn, Richard and Edith. 

Victor Hugh Honey is local agent in the 
City of Cairo, Alexander County, for the Fed- 
eral Barge Lines of barges that are in com- 
mission in transportation service on the Mis- 
sissippi River, with Cairo as one of the im- 
portant shipping ports. As head of the Cairo 
agency for this line Mr. Honey has ten em- 
ployes under his direct supervision, and his is 
proving a most careful and progressive ad- 
ministration, the while he finds satisfaction 
in making his agency contribute its share to 
the commercial prestige of the city that is 
the judicial center and metropolis of his native 
county. 

On the parental home farm in Alexander 
County, Victor H. Honey, one of a family of 
six children, was born August 19, 1899. He 
is a son of Edward and Minnie (Pence) 
Honey, both of whom were born in Alexander 
County, where they still reside on their fine 
farm estate, Mr. Honey being one of the sub- 
stantial and honored citizens of his commu- 
nity and being a member of the school board 
of his district. He is a son of Andrew Honey, 
who was born in Arkansas and who settled in 
Alexander County, Illinois, prior to the out- 
break of the Civil war, in which he served as 
a loyal soldier of the Union. He continued as 
one of the substantial farmers of Alexander 
County until the close of his life. 

After completing his studies in the public 
schools of his native county Victor H. Honey 
took a course in the Brown Business College 
at Cairo. At the age of eighteen years he 
initiated service as a reporter for the old 
Cairo Herald, but six months later he ter- 
minated his alliance with newspaper work 
and took a position in the Cairo office of the 
Illinois Central Railroad. There he was en- 
gaged in clerical service during a period of 
six years, and during the ensuing year he 
was here connected with the Southern Weigh- 
ing and Inspection Bureau. In 1925 he was 
appointed chief assistant to the local agent of 



the Federal Barge Lines, and in December of 
that year he was appointed agent for this 
service at Cairo, the office he has retained 
during the intervening years. Mr. Honey has 
membership in the Cairo Association of Com- 
merce and also the Junior Association of Com 
merce. 

In September, 1918, Mr. Honey enlisted for 
World war service in the United States Army 
and received special training at the Univer- 
sity of Chicago, where he was a member of 
the Reserve Officers Training Corps when the 
signing of the armistice brought the war to a 
close. 

Mr. Honey's wife was born in Kentucky and 
her maiden name was Edith Jones. They have 
two children, Edward Gabriel and Dolores 
Ann, both attending school at the time of this 
writing, in 1932. 

Capt. Martin Wojciechowski, superintend- 
ent of police of Cicero, has to his credit a long 
and notable period of service in that densely 
populated and industrial section of the county. 

Captain Wojciechowski was born in Posen, 
Poland, in 1889, and was six months of age 
when his parents came to America in 1890. 
For over forty years the family have lived 
in Cicero, where his father was a pioneer set- 
tler. During these forty years Cicero has 
increased as a community to a population of 
nearly 100,000. Old Cicero Township in 1890 
included Oak Park and Austin, which has 
since been organized as separate municipali- 
ties. Captain Wojciechowski also states that 
when the family came to Cook County the 
western limits of Chicago was Crawford Ave- 
nue. He grew up in Cicero, attending public 
and parochial schools there. As a boy he was 
noted for his physical strength, and old 
friends recall many stories of his prowess, 
particularly as a professional wrestler. As a 
wrestler he went under the name of Kid Mar- 
tin and won many contests in that branch of 
sport over famous opponents. His career as 
a wrestler took him from coast to coast and 
he was a popular favorite wherever he went. 

For over twenty years Captain Wojciechow- 
ski has been in the service of the City of 
Cicero. He started in the department of the 
city electrician. In 1917 he went on the police 
force, at first as patrolman. During the ad- 
ministration of Mayor Klenha he received pro- 
motions through the ranks of sergeant, lieu- 
tenant and captain, and in June, 1928, the 
mayor made him superintendent of police. In 
this office he has developed one of the most 
efficient police departments in Illinois. Its 
personnel consists of sixty-seven men. Three 
of the staff are University of Chicago men 
and others rank high in intelligence and effi- 
ciency. The department is under strict civil 
service rules, promotions being made on the 
basis of merit. Superintendent Wojciechow- 
ski has emphasized the rule of courtesy toward 



184 



ILLINOIS 



the public, and this is everywhere in evidence 
in Cicero. The department has ten squad 
cars, four motorcycles and two patrol wagons. 
Both the mayor and superintendent of police, 
having families of their own, are deeply inter- 
ested in keeping Cicero as free from crime 
and law violations as can be possibly done in 
a community of this size and with such a cos- 
mopolitan population. Crimes such as hold- 
ups and banditry, that appear so largely in 
the public print, are, according to the official 
records, much fewer in Cicero than in some 
of the neighboring communities that make 
much pretension to superior civic virtue. 

Captain Wojciechowski's headquarters are 
in the Cicero City Hall. He and his family 
reside at 4850 West Twenty-eighth Street. He 
is a Knight Templar Mason and Shriner, 
member of the B. P. O. Elks, Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, Woodmen of the World, and the 
Polish National Alliance. 

Rush Clark Butler has been a member 
of the Chicago bar since 1894 and is senior 
member of Butler, Pope, Ballard & Elting 
at 120 South LaSalle Street and Butler, Pope, 
Ballard & Loos, Munsey Building, Washing- 
ton, D. C. His name and work are associated 
with many issues of public interest, and in 
Chicago with some of the most outstanding 
movements in the direction of civic decency 
and reform. 

He was born at Northwood, Iowa, August 
27, 1871, son of Lindley Schooley and Julia 
(Pickering) Butler. His father was an Iowa 
attorney. Mr. Butler grew up in a home in 
which the traditions of education and culture 
were strong. He was graduated from the 
Northwood High School, and in 1893 grad- 
uated Bachelor of Philosophy from the Uni- 
versity of Iowa. During his senior year he 
also carried studies in the law school and in 
1894 was admitted to the bar. Mr. Butler 
came to Chicago, December 24, 1895, and in 
1899 became a member of the law firm Casso- 
day and Butler. His partner, Eldon J. Casso- 
day, died June 18, 1910, after which Mr. 
Butler remained senior partner in the firm 
of Cassoday, Butler, Lamb & Foster, changes 
in which have resulted in the pleasant law 
partnership of Butler, Pope, Ballard & Elting 
of Chicago and Butler, Pope, Ballard & Loos 
of Washington, D. C. 

For many years Mr. Butler in his prac- 
tice has specialized in litigation before the 
Interstate Commerce Commission and in cases 
involving Federal regulation of industry 
through the Sherman Act, the Clayton Law, 
and the Federal Trade Commission Law. 
From 1908 to 1914 he was retained by the 
Interstate Commerce Commission to represent 
the public interest in the investigation of 
relations between coal carrying roads and coal 
operators under the terms of the Tillman- 
Gillespie Joint Resolution of Congress. At 



the request of the coal operators of the coun- 
try he organized the National Coal Asso- 
ciation and served for a number of years as 
general counsel. During the World war he 
acted as general counsel for the National 
War Savings Committee, of which Frank A. 
Vanderlip was chairman. Mr. Butler in 1928 
was appointed by Judge E. K. Jarecki presi- 
dent of the Voters Non-Partisan Association. 
He was the president of the Illinois Associa- 
tion for Criminal Justice which published the 
Illinois Crime Survey. Under Governor Em- 
merson he was appointed a member of the 
committee for the investigation of the West 
Park Board in Chicago. 

Mr. Butler was a charter member of the 
committee of fifteen, which carried on the most 
searching investigation ever made in social 
evil conditions in Chicago. Mr. Butler was 
president of the University of Iowa Alumni 
Association in 1920-21, was president of the 
Industrial Club of Chicago in 1924-25, and 
is a life member of the Chicago Art Institute. 
He is a Mason, a member of the Chicago 
Law Institute, Chicago, Illinois State (presi- 
dent, 1928-29) and American Bar Associations, 
and belongs to the Chicago Club, Union 
League Club, University Club, Law Club, 
Mid-Day Club, Indian Hill Country Club, 
Racquet Club, Attic Club and Old Elm Club, 
and at. Washington is a member of the Metro- 
politan Club. 

He married, June 6, 1901, Miss Isabelle 
Crilly, member of one of Chicago's best known 
families, daughter of Daniel F. and Elizabeth 
Crilly. They have three children, Rush Clark, 
Jr., Crilly and Milburn. 

Hon. Edward Henry Wegener. A member 
of the Illinois bar since 1917, Hon. Edward 
H. Wegener, former mayor of Chester, now 
county judge, has led a career that reflects 
great credit upon his versatility and persist- 
ence. Beginning life as a hand on his father's 
farm and a country school teacher, he con- 
secutively was employed as a bookkeeper and 
stenographer, and eventually became proprie- 
tor of a modest general store. Elected deputy 
Circuit Court clerk, he was given the oppor- 
tunity he had long sought of preparing him- 
self for a legal career, and during the more 
than thirteen years that he has been engaged 
in practice at Chester has been identified with 
much important litigation. Not only as an 
attorney has he been prominent, but as a 
conscientious public official who has contrib- 
uted materially to the progress and develop- 
ment of the city of his adoption. 

Judge Wegener was born June 1, 1882, on 
a farm near Red Bud, Illinois, and is a son 
of Henry and Caroline (Rosenberg) Wegener. 
He belongs to one of the old and honored 
pioneer families of this part of the state, of 
German extraction, his father having been 
born in the vicinty of Red Bud, where he was 






ILLINOIS 



185 



educated in the country schools, was reared 
to farming, and passed his entire life as an 
agriculturist. He was a man of high charac- 
ter and standing in his community and a 
citizen of public spirit. He died in 1923 and 
his widow still makes her home at Red Bud, 
where the members of the family are held 
in high esteem. There were nine children 
born to the parents, five of whom survive: 
Mrs. Matilda Rahn, of Red Bud, Illinois; Ed- 
ward H., of this review; Mrs. Anna Rehmer, 
of Adelo, Montana; Miss Rose, of Red Bud; 
and Mrs. Emma Liefer, also of Red Bud. 

The public schools of Randolph County fur- 
nished Edward H. Wegener with his early 
educational training, following which he pur- 
sued a course at the Southern Illinois Normal 
School at Carbondale, completing his studies 
there in 1899. During the summer months he 
occupied himself with working on his father's 
farm and subsequently taught school for one 
term and took a course in a business college 
at Quincy, Illinois. With this added equip- 
ment he was able to secure a position as 
bookkeeper and stenographer in the offices of 
the Burlington Railroad at St. Louis, but in 
1904 returned to Red Bud, where he em- 
barked in the mercantile business on his own 
account and remained therein with success 
until 1912. Appointed deputy Circuit clerk 
in 1912, he came to Chester, and while thus 
engaged had access to law books and made 
the acquaintance of a number of attorneys 
who gave him valuable advice, and in this 
way he mastered his chosen profession and 
was admitted to the bar in 1917. He imme- 
diately entered practice at Chester, where he 
has since built up a large and representative 
general legal business and gained and sus- 
tained an enviable reputation as an energetic, 
able and reliable attorney. He has been iden- 
tified with much litigation of an important 
character and has displayed the possession 
of a keen and intimate knowledge of princi- 
ples, precedents and procedure, at the same 
time maintaining high standards of profes- 
sional ethics. Judge Wegener is a member 
of the Illinois State Bar Association and the 
American Bar Association, and has several 
fraternal connections. His religious faith is 
that of the Lutheran Church. During the 
World war he served as a member of the 
advisory committee of the local draft board. 
Since locating at Chester, he has been very 
active in civic and political affairs and for 
some time was a member of the city council. 
Elected Mayor of Chester, he served four 
terms in that office and his incumbency there- 
of has been characterized by good business 
administration and progressive and beneficial 
civic movements. In 1930 he was elected 
county and probate judge. He has interests 
outside of his profession and is a member of 
the board of directors of the Chester Build- 
ing and Loan Association, 



Judge Wegener married for his first wife 
Miss Freda Pfarrer, of St. Louis, who died in 
1920, leaving one daughter: Mrs. Viola Baue, 
a resident of the same city. In 1921 Judge 
Wegener was united in marriage with Mrs. 
Marie Gnaegy, of Chester, and they have no 
children. Judge and Mrs. Wegener are well 
and favorably known at Chester, where their 
home is frequently the scene of pleasant social 
affairs. 

Hon. Harry W. McEwen. An honored 
member of the bench and bar of Illinois since 
1896, Judge Harry W. McEwen has been a 
resident of DeKalb since 1905. He served as 
judge of the City Court for fifteen years and 
since 1930 as judge of the DeKalb County 
Court and he also sits at Chicago, formerly 
as a judge of the Municipal Court and more 
recently as a judge of the Circuit, Superior 
and Probate Courts. His career has been one 
of marked integrity, in which he has set an 
excellent record for high and outstanding per- 
formance of duty, and the respect and esteem 
in which he is held evidence the confidence re- 
posed in him by those among whom he has 
lived and labored. 

Judge McEwen belongs to an old and hon- 
ored Scotch family which traces its ancestry 
back to one Duncan McEwen, who was the 
original immigrant to this country and several 
of whose descendants fought as patriot sol- 
diers during the War of the Revolution. Henry 
McEwen, the grandfather of Judge McEwen, 
was born in New York State, where he spent 
his entire life. Lewis M. McEwen, the father 
of Judge McEwen, was born in New York 
State, where, although he was self-educated, 
he became a man widely read and of broad 
knowledge. In 1849 he joined the gold-seekers 
in California, sailing around the Horn, but 
did not find his fortune there and in 1852 
came to Illinois and began farming in De- 
Kalb County. In 1869 he moved to DeKalb, 
where he embarked in the lumber business, 
and continued therein during the remainder 
of his life. Mr. McEwen was a prominent 
figure in Republican politics and was the first 
supervisor of Milan Township. Later he 
served capably in the State Legislature from 
1872 until 1874, and at all times was active in 
civic affairs of his community, where he was 
greatly respected and esteemed. Mr. McEwen 
married Susan Ward, who was born in Ver- 
mont, a daughter of Chester Ward, who was 
born in the Green Mountain State in April, 
1797, and died there in 1884, he being of 
English descent. Mrs. McEwen was a mem- 
ber of the Adventist Church, and she and her 
husband were the parents of six children, of 
whom three are living, Harry W. being the 
youngest. 

Harry W. McEwen attended the grammar 
and high schools of DeKalb, following which 
he pursued a course at the Chicago College 



186 



ILLINOIS 



of Law and was graduated in 1896, in which 
same year he was admitted to the bar. He 
began practice at Chicago, in association with 
his brother, Willard M., but in 1905 changed 
his residence to DeKalb, where he took up 
practice alone. In 1915 he was elected judge 
of the City Court, a position which he held 
until 1930, when he was elected to the office 
of DeKalb County judge, in which he is now 
serving. He continues to make his home at 
DeKalb. Judge McEwen belongs to the De- 
Kalb County Bar Association of which he is 
a past president, the Illinois Bar Association 
and the American Bar Association. He has 
always been active in Republican politics and 
for a number of years served as precinct com- 
mitteeman. With his family he belongs to 
the Baptist Church and is a member of the 
advisory board thereof. He has passed 
through the chairs of the Masonic Blue Lodge 
and is a member of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, the Kishwaukee Coun- 
try Club, the Rotary Club of which he is now 
president, and the Hamilton Club of Chicago. 
Fishing and hunting are his hobbies. 

In 1897 Judge McEwen was united in mar- 
riage with Miss Mary H. Goodrich, who was 
born at Owego, New York, and was one year 
old when brought to DeKalb by her parents, 
Erastus Goodrich and wife, her education 
being acquired in the public schools here. 
Judge and Mrs. McEwen are the parents of 
two children: Willard L., a graduate of the 
DeKalb High School, the Teachers College of 
DeKalb, the University of Illinois- and Har- 
vard University, and who is now a chemist 
in the employ of the great DePont plant in 
Delaware; and George M., a graduate of the 
DeKalb schools and Lewis Institute of Chi- 
cago, who makes his home at DeKalb and is 
a state oil inspector. He married Ruth Eliza- 
beth Leech, a daughter of Judge Leech, of 
Dixon, Illinois, and they are the parents of 
one daughter, Mary Jean. 

The Moody Bible Institute of Chicago 
which honors in its name and carries on the 
great purpose and ideals of its founder, 
Dwight L. Moody, an eminent Chicagoan and 
one of the world's great religious teachers 
and leaders, is an institution which in its facil- 
ities and personnel is a magnificent tribute to 
the cumulative power of Christianity. 

The institute has more than a thousand stu- 
dents enrolled in its evening school, drawn 
mostly from Chicago and vicinity, but the 
day school, whose roster is somewhat larger, 
represents not only every state of the Union 
but most of the foreign countries. In the 
correspondence school are enrolled over 12,000 
students, residing practically wherever Chris- 
tianity is known. About 1,300 of the former 
students are now preaching the Gospel and 
carrying on Christian work in various mis- 
sion lands. The institute also conducts an 



Extension Department, with a staff of evan- 
gelists and Bible teachers; a Publication De- 
partment for the printing of Christian litera- 
ture, including a monthly magazine; and a 
Radio Department with a powerful station 
located at Addison, Illinois, whose programs 
carry spiritual inspiration to all ages and 
races by