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THE DULUTH 



VOLUME XXX— NO. 221. 



MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 23, 1912. 



VICEROY HARDINGE OF 
INDIA IS WOUNDED DY 
BOMB HURLED IN DELHI 



Attack Is Made on Him Dur- 
ing Procession at Change 
of Capitals. 



Driver of His Elephant Is 
Wounded and One At- 
tendant Killed. 



VICTIM OF ATTACK BY 

FANATIC AT DELHI 



DES MOINES 
GAS RATE IS 
NOT ENJOINED 



Supreme Court Refuses to 

Forbid Enforcement 

Pending Litigation. 



Missile Thrown From 

Housetop Wrecks Howdah 

of Vice-Regal Party. 



r>clhl, India, Dec. 23. — Baron Har- 
tflngre, viixroy of India, was wounded 
and an attendant was killed by a bomb 
hurled at the viceroy from a house- 
top as he was entering' the new capital 
In state today. The bomb struck the 
howdah, or basket, of the viceroy's 
elephant, kiUing the attendant in- 
stantly. The viceroy was removed to a 
hospital. 

Got Several M'ounds. 

Three splinters of the powerful bomb 
pfntirated the back and shoulders of 
the viceroy, and he also was wounded 
In the neck by the screws with which 
the bomb was filled and which passed 
through his helmet. 

The doctors wiio removed the metal 
splinters from the wounds declared it 
marvelous tha.t the viceroy escaped fa- 
tal injury's. 

Lady Mardingre. immediately after 
the explosion, asked her husband if h»; 
Was hurt. The viceroy replied: 

"I am all right; go on." 

Lady Hardinge then said: 

"We cannot. There is a dead man 
behind. ' 

The elephant on which they were 
riding ha lted, and the viceroy tried to 

(Continued on page ."), fourth column.) 

UNCLE SAM SLOW (N 
MILITARY AVIATION 

Chief of Navy Corps Says 
Japan Leads This Coun- 
try in That Work. 

Washington. Dec. 23. — The United 
States, home of the first heavler-than- 
alr flying machine, is far behind other 
nations In military aviation. This ls> 
the assertion of Capt. Washington 1. 
Chambers, U. S. N., chief of the navy's 
aviation corps, an expert who is de- 
voting his entire time to the science. 

"France leads the world in aviation, 
and all that she does la worth noting," 
paid Capt. Chambers. 'A short time 
ago. in response to an inciulry by the 
minister of war, over 3,000 officers 
signified their desire to learn aerial 
navigation. Germany leads in aerosta- 
tions, but is making great progress In 
aviation also. France has eight dir- 
igibles and (Germany thirty. The num- 
ber of aeroplanes actually possessed 
by each rapidly is Increasing. France 
probably will possess about 350 before 
the end of the year, the ultimate aim 
being to have 1,000 as soon as the 
requisite number of pilots can be 
taught to use them. 

"It is significant of German forc- 
Biglit that one of the first steps under- 
ta.ken. when it was decided to con- 
struct a large aeroplane fleet, was to 
found an aero-dynamic laboratory 
This is at Gottlngen, where the best 
known course of instruction in aero- 
nautics is conducted by Prof. Prandtl." 

France leads with a total approprii- 
tlon of $0,400,000 to date and a popular 
BubsoriiJtlon of ?1, 000,000. Germany 
is second with a total appropriation 
of |l,500,'t00 and a popular ?750,000 
subscription. >:e.\t come Russia. Great 
Britain, Italy, Japan arid then the 
United States. 




Indiana's Law Taxing Hold- 
ers of Foreign Stock is 
Declared LegaL 



NATION-WIDE SEARCH 







W OF NEW HAVEN 



FOR SUYERS OF LOGUE IS 1 AND GRAND TRUNK ARE 
STARTED FROM CHICAGOl INDICTED IN NEW YORK 



Washington. Dec. 23. — The supreme 
court today declined to enjoin the city 
of Des Moines, Iowa, from enforcing 
its 90-cent gas ordinance. pending 
the consideration by the court of its 
constitutionality. Under ordinary 

circumstances the constitutionality of 
the ordinance will not be considered by 
the court for two or three years. 
State Stock Tax Valid. 

The constitutionality of the Indiana 
statute taxing an owner of stock in 
foreign corporations was today up- 
held by the supreme court. The ques- 
tion arose In the attempt of the state 
I to collect 512,000 in taxes from I. M. 

' (Continued on page 12, fiftii column.) 



BARON HARDINGE, 
Viceroy of India. 

London, Dec. 23. — Baron Hardinge 
was appointed last summer to succet;d 
the earl of Minto, who was former 
governor general of Canada, as viceroy 
of India. Shortly after his appoint- 
ment he was elevated to the peerage. 
He Is 52 years old and a. graduate of 
Cambridge. He entered the diplomatic 
service in 1S81 anj has remained In it 
continuously until the present time. 
He served successively at Constanti- 
nople, Berlin, Washington, Bucharest, 
Teheran and St. Petersburg in diplo- 
matic positions. In 1904 he was ap- 
pointed ambassador to Rus.'^la and two 
years later was made under-sfccretary 
of state for foreign affairs. 



SAY CASTRO IS 
"IN VERY BAD" 

Federal Officials May Brand 
Ex-President as Un- 
desirable. 



SUCCEEDS DR. WILEY AS 
UNCLE SAM'S CHEMIST 



Consider Refusing to Allow 

Him to Land in This 

Country. 




Washington, Dec. 23.— Whether Ci- 
priano Castro, former president of 
Venezuela, will be permitted to land In 
the United States Is being considered 
by officials of this government. It is 
reported that he has started from Paris 
to N&w York. Although the state de- 
partment, through Its consular agents, 
has been keeping a close watch on 
Castro's movement. It has not been ad- 
vised of his move toward the United 

Officials frankly confess that they 
have not yet reached a decision as to 
the treatment to be accorded if he 
should appear at an American port. 
Technically there is no charge against 
Castro, though the treatment he meted 



HICXEY MAY END 

L iFE IN PRISON 

Boy's Murderer Gets Sen- 
tence Whose Minimum 
Is Twenty Years. 

Buffalo, N. v.. Deo. 23.—.!. Frank 
llickey, convictea of murder in the 
second degree for the killing of Jo- 
seph Joseph, a T-year-old I^-aekawanna 
boy Oct. 12, 1911, was sentenced this 
morning to the state's prison at Au- 
burn for an Indeterminate sentence, 
the minimum of which is twenty years 
and the maximum life. 

After twenty-six hours' deliberation 
the jury brought in a verdict of mur- 
der in the second degree. Thirteen 
ballots were taken to decide Hlckey's 
fate. Twelve resulted, accoring to the 
Jurors, in a vote of nine for conviction 
and three for not guilty on the ground 
of insanity. The thirteenth and la.st 
ballot was taken after the jury had re. 
ported to the court that thoy could not 
agrte. Justice Brown at that time de- 
clined to discharge the man, and di- 
rected them to make another effort 
to reach a verdict. 

StrnnKled lliii Victim. 

Hickey, after buying young Joseph 
candy, enticed him to a deserted build- 
ing, strangled him and hurled his body 
Into cesspool. A country-wide search 
of over a year failed to afford any 
clew as to the boy's fate. 

Rectntly the police received a series 
of postal cards telling in detail of the 
crime. These cards led to the recovery 
of the body and the arrest of Hickey 
at an inebiiate colony at Whiting, N. 
J. He made a confession, admitting 
at the same time the killing of Edward 
Morey in Lowell, Mass.. In 1883, by 
giving him poisoned whisky, and the 
strangling to death of Michael Kruck, 
a New York newsboy, in Central park. 
Dec. 10, 1902. 

Judge Brown. In discharging the 
Jury, said it was "extremely to be re- 
gretted that justice could not be done 
to the defendant. The public and the 
court do not feel satisfied with this 
result. For those of you who have 
earnestly endeavored to procure a dif- 
ferent result, the court depires to ex- 
tend to you its sincere thanks for your 
efforts to render Justice." 

Public indignation at the outcome of 
the case H? intense, and in legal circles 
the possibility of having Hickey tried 
for the murder of the Kruck boy Is 
being discussed. 



CARL L. ALSBERG. 

Xew York, Dec 23. — Dr. Harvey W. 
Wiley, former chief chemist" of the de- 
partment of agriculture, disapproves 
of the appointment of Dr. Carl L. Als- 
berg as his successor In Washington. 
Dr. Wiley says the debasers of food 
will rejoice at the new appointment. 
Dr. Alsberg was chosen by Secretary of 
Agriculture Wilson, and approved by 
President Taft. He has already held 
some notable positions in this coun- 
try. He was at one time a chemistrv 
Instructor in Harvard. In 1906 he was 
chief biologist of the bureau of plant 
industry in the department of agricul- 
ture, where he achieved considerable 
fame as an expert. He is a German by 
birth, but is now a citizen of the 
United States. 



Two Men Are Sought and 
Ail But Four Already Ar- 
rested Are Freed. 

PostofficeAuihorities Enter 

Case Owing to Finding 

of Stamps. 



i: 



RAILROAD CHIEFS ACCUSED OF BREAKING LAW 



Chicago, Dec. i3. — A country-wide 
search for two men believed to be the 
slayers of Joseph H. I^oerue, diamond 
merchant, who was murdered In his 
office of McVicktr's Theater building 
last Friday, was begun today. Tele- 
grams were sent to the jpollce of every 
large city In- the United States and 
Canada, giving a description of the 
two men sought. 

The Chicago police assert that they 
are convinced that the ten suspects 
now being held had nothing to do with 
the murder, and they are doubtful 
whether they can b« held for any other 
robbery In Chicago. 

Following is a description of the 
two men sought by the police In con- 
nection with the murder. 

No. 1 — Twenty to 30 years old, 5 Jeet 
8 inches In height, 175 pounds, wore a 
sweater jacket with a large roll collar, 
blue trousers and a dark cap. 

No. 2 — Long, peaked nose and face, 
wore dark clothes and shirt. 
Seen Xetr Office. 

Men answering this description were 
seen loitering about the hall in tho vi- 
cinity of Logue's office for several 

(Continued on page 5, sixth column.) 




RAILWAY ALLOWED 
TO GRANT ALLOWANCE 

■ I. ■ ■■■■■■ ■ I ^ 

Commerce Commission Up- 
holds Action for Com- 
petitive Reasons. 

Washington, Dec. "... — The interstate 
commerce commission held today that 
a "railroad may, for competitive rea- 
sons, grant an elev£.tnr allowance al- 
though no transport, '"n service is 

rendered by the sli^c \; owning the 
elevator." p ,^, 

The case decldeu*-^- .as that of H. 
Gund & Co. of Nebijiska City against 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, the 
commission holding further that In the 
payment of the allowance to a com- 
petitor of Gund & Co., no undue dis- 
crimination was shown. 



^ CORPSE ARRESTED * 

^ IN GRAND FORKS. ^ 

^ ^ 

^ Granil Forkii, N. D.. Deo, 23. — ^ 
^ (Special to The Herald.) — That ^ 
^ Jamen Jobuson had been deail tin ^ 
^ hour before be wa» nrreMt<?d ^ 
^ chnrg;ed '«vith drunkennesft, ^tm ^ 
^ discovered at the police Mia Hon ^ 
^ last night by a phyKieian called ^ 
^ to attend him. . « 

^ JohnMon wai* taken out of a -^ 
^ rooming; honoe, Kupposediy tntoK- ^ 
^ icated, but it is ciaimed he ^v«s %i 
^ dead when he was loaded into ^ 
^ the patrol wagon. ^ 

4 



CHARLES S. MELLEN, 

President of the New York, New 

Haven & Hartford. 



CONVICTED NEGRO 
LYNCHED OVER NIGHT 



^' ^ ^ ^ i 



Sheriff Finds Body Swing- 
ing From Pole in Baton 
Rouge. 

Baton Rouge, La., Dec. 23. — When 
Sheriff Parker went to the courthouse 
of West Baton Rouge this morning he 
found the body of Norm Cadore, a 
negro, swinging from a telegraph 
pole a short distance from the jail. 
Cadore had been convictea of killing 
James Norman, a plantation manager, 
about three weeks ago. 



LUDWIG VETOES THE 
PLAN TO CROWN HiM 

Bavaria's New Prince Re- 
gent Rejects Offer of 
the Kingship. 

Munich, Bavaria, Dec. 23. — Prince 
Ludwlg, the new prince regent of Ba- 
varia, sent an autograph letter to the 
Bavarian premier today, vetoing the 
movement to place him on the throne 
as king. 

He declares that he desires to ad- 
minister loyally the honor bequeathed 
to him by his father. Therefore, In 
view of the popular movement in re- 
gard to the regency, he expresses cate- 
gorically his desire that nothing 
should be done for the present In the 
matter. 



HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF. 



(Continued on page 5, third column.) 

WOULD bTaTnegroes 

FROM THEU- S. ARMY 

Proposal Is to Be Discussed 
at Meeting of Rank- 
ing Officers. 

Washington, Dec. 23. — The proposal 
to eliminate the negro as an Ameri- 
can soldier is a topic slated for con- 
sideration when the conference of the 
ranking officers of the army Is held 
here Jan. 8. 

Some officers favoring the plan are 
prepared to urge It on the ground that | 
in the Philippines the natives are said 
to resent the appearance among them 
of the black troopers, and that there 
are signs of dissatisfaction in Hawaii, 
owing to the fact th?A the Twenty- 
fifth infantry, a negro organization, 
has been ordered to the Islands to form 
a permanent garrison. 

Friends of the negro soldiers are 
preparing to make a strenuous fight in 
their behalf, pointing to their splendid 
record in time of war in Cuba and in 
the Philippines. 

SIX FATAilfllURT 
AT SCHOOL PROGRAM 

Floor Falls During Enter- 
tainment in North 
Carolina. 

Greensboro, N. C, Deo. 23. — Six per- 
sons were probably fatally injured and 
a score seriously hurt at Elkln, N. C, 
when a section of a school building 
in which a Christmas entertainment 
was being given collapsed, throwing ! 
200 persons a distance of twenty feet. 
Fire added to the horror of the ac- 
cident. Two women and a girl received 
fatal burns. Three men will die from 
fractured skulls and other wounds. 

Elkin is in a remote mountain coun- 
ty. Ten of the less seriously Injured 
sustained broken legs and eight suf- 
fered broken arm^ 



3>>2^=: 



^^^/^^ 



BRmGVNG HOt^E THE 
TURKEY »H \6V?*- 







/\ND BRiKGAMG UOrAE THE 



E. J. CHAMBERLAIN, 

President of the Grand Trunk of 

Canada. 



SCORES USE 

OF DYNAMITE 

Attorney for Defense at In- 
dianapolis Says Unions 
Oppose It. 



Arguments in Big Conspir- 
acy Trial Are Con- 
tinued. 



Indianapolis, Ind., Dec. 23. — "Organ- 
ized labor nevtr did and never will ap- 
prove of such a nation-wide relgn of 
violence and! terrorism as has been 
charged here," asserted Clifford S. 
Langsdale In arguing to the jury at 
the "dynamite conspiracy" trial today. 

Attorney Langsdale spoke particu- 
larly in behalf of W. Bert Brown and 
William J. McCain of Kansas City, Mo., 
both of whom were charged with hav- 
ing guilty kTOwledge of an explosion 
on a bridge in construction across the 
Missouri river. Ortle McManigal said 
he blew up the work in August, 1910, 
after James B. McNamara had visited 
Kansas City. 

"It has been shown by the govern- 
ment," said Hr. Langsdale, "that James 
B. McXamari was in fealt Lake City, 
blowing up a hotel there at the time 
It was charged he was in Kansas City 
talking to Brown and McCain. He was 
too busy caiislng .explosions elsewhere 
to have been in Kansas City." 
Attacked Barber's Story. 

The attorney attacked the testimony 
of a Kansas City barber, who had said 
McNamara and Brown had invited him 
to become a- dynamiter, offering him 
good pay if he would go to Dos An- 
geles, "to blow up the whole town." 
Mr. Langsdale said it had been shown 
that the ts.rber did not live at the 
places in Kansas City where he said 
he lived. 

Attorney Daniel V. Howell read to 
the jury a letter from John J. Mc- 
Namara to McCain, referring to the 
Iron Workers' union "twilight commit- 
tee." He asserted that the 'twilight 
committee"' simply was "a joke." 

It was pointed out that Brown, the 
other Kansas City defendant, re- 
signed as business agent two days 
before the b Idge explosion. Attorney 
Howell said Brown would not have 
resigned liad he expected to profit by 
the exploslor. 

STEEL GRINDHIGS 
PUT INTO QUARRY 

Two Carloads for Duluth 
Take Fire on Burling- 
ton Road. 



Chicago. D 

Herald.)— Tw 
ings valued 
which had 
into a ston* 
owned by th 
Friday, to ] 
spontaneous 
pert inform* 
fire could no 
break out m 
would arrive 
point they Y 
carloads of 
train. 



ec. 23. — (Special to The 
o carloads of steel grlnd- 
at thousands of dollars, 
taken fire, were emptied 
( quarry at Aurora, 111., 
» Burlington railroad, last 
>revent further fire from 
combustion, after an ex- 
^d the officials that the 
t be prevented and might 
any times before the cars 
at Duluth, Minn., to which 
ad been billed. The two 
grindings were part of a 



WILSON SITS WITH 
THE PARDON BOARD 



Seventy Cases Taken Up 

by the New Jersey 

Body. 

Trenton, K. J.. Dec. 23. — Governor 
Wilson sat with the board of pardons 
today and leard the applications of 
seventy convicts for pardons. In order 
that those entitled to their freedom 
might have their liberty before Christ- 
mas, the go.-ernor directed that the 
meeting of the board be held today 
instead of In January. 

More than 200 convicts applied for 
pardons, but the cases of only seventy 
were recommended for a hearing. 



■iS£»afH»|ltl«- 



Violation of Sherman Act 

Alleged Against Three 

Railroad Men. 



Mellen, Chamberlain and 

Smithers Are Named in 

True Bills. 



Seven Overt Acts Are Al- 
leged by the Federal 
Government. 



New York, Dec. 23. — Charles S. ifel- 
len, president of the Xew York, New 
Haven & Hartford railroad; E. J. 
Chamberlain, president of the Grand 
Trunk Railway of Canada, and Alfred 
W. Smithers, chairman of the Grand 
Trunk board of directors, were in- 
dicted by the federal grand Jury here 
this afternoon, charged with violatinfif 
the Sherman anti-trust law in the al- 
leged monopoly agreement between 
the two roads. 

The Indictment avers Mellen, Cham- 
berlain and Smithers were engaged on 
Aug. 3, 1912, and have since engaged 
In an unlawful combination to pre- 
vent the completion of certain ex- 
tensions of the Grand Trunk railway 
into New England. 

It is also charged they conspired 
to prevent the operation of steair.ships 
between Providence and New York, and 
transportation of persons and property 
In Interstate and foreign commerce 
over these lines of railroads and steam- 
ships. 

Sereii Overt Acts. 

Seven overt acts are alleged by the 
government. It Is charged that the 
defendants met In Xew York Aug. 5, 
1912, and discussed a memorandum 
theretofore exchanged beti^een Messrs. 
Chamberlain and Mellen, which pro- 
vided that the Grand Trunk should 
sell the New Haven Its Interest in the 
Central of Vermont and its sub- 
sidiaries, which would Include all the 
proposed extensions into New England. 

SEEK BODJESOT 
OF WRECK VICTIMS 

Survivors of the Atlantic 

Steamer Florence Are in 

Bad Condition. 

St. John's. N. F., Dec. 23.— Search 
was begun today for the bodies of 
Capt. Barr and the twenty-one mem- 
bers of the crew of the steamer Flor- 
ence, which was wrecked Friday on 
the rocks near St. Shotts. News of the 
wreck reached here last night, when 
Mate J. Hedley and two members of 
the crew arrived at Trepassev, almost 
exhausted. Two other seamen, the 
only other purvlvors, are being cared 
for at a small Isolated settlement a 
few miles from St. Shotts. Their con- 
dition Is serious. 

The Florence had sunk before Mate 
Hedley and his little band left the 
cliffs, upon which they had found ref- 
uge Saturday morning. Most of the 
men who went down with the ship 
were lashed to the rigging. The sur- 
vivors stood on shore unable to aid 
them. 

Capt. Barr and the entire crew made 
a landing on a shelf of rocks soon 
after the vessel struck, but ^he high 
cliffs on all sides made It impossible 
for them to escape and the rising tide 
compelled them to return to the shtp. 
Later Mate Hedley and four of the 
crew took a small boat and succeeded 
in making a landing. Before others 
could follow them, all the other boats 
were washed away. The Florence was 
bound from Halifax to St. John's. 



OVER 200 DEAD IN 

JAPANESE MINE 

Explosion in Coal Workings 

at Sapporo Probably 

Fatal to All. 

Toklo, Dec. 23. — Over 200 Japanese 
coal miners were entombed and are 
probably dead as the result of an ex- 
plosion which occurred in the L'barl 
colliery at Sapporo, on the island of 
Hokkaido, today. 

Of the 200 and more men who were 
working In the galleries of the pit at 
the time, only three were brought to 
the surface alive and the officials fear 
that all the rest have perished. 



WHEAT THAT DEHES 
GOLD IS^ISOOVERED 

New Variety of Durum Is 
Brought From South- 
eastern Russia. 

Washington, Dec. 23. — A new variety 
of durum wheat which promises to be 
valuable for the cereal growers of the 

Noithwest has been imported by th* 
department of agriculture. It comes 
from Bezenshook, Southeastern Russia, 
where It was originated at the Russian 
governments experiment station. 

Frank N. Meyer, agricultural ex- 
plorer of the foreign seed and plant 
introduction division of the depart- 
ment, discovered the new wheat last 
summer during his trip through Cen- 
tral Asia. He describes it as being a. 
new and valuable variety of black- 
bearded durum wheat, having very 
long, open ears. It Is called teiskaia 
and is proving extremely hardy, hav- 
ing survived snowless winters, when 
other wheats either were killed or se- 
verely injured. 



Newly Elected Mayor Dies. 

Roanoke, Va., Dec. 23. — John W. 
Woods, recently elected mayor of Roa- 
noke on a good government ticket, 
died this momlns. 







2 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 




GLEANED 

ALONG THE 

PHICE 
RUN 



/ton fiao/i 



t 



..IS 



1 Tr parole wiU b? more 
;.'::n m police court from 

ni'wly appointed pro- 

■ f the bo.ird of public 

ddSun.od his duties and 



will henceforth take oharffe of pris- 
oners who pare placed on probation 
I'rom that court. 

In the past there has been very little 
opportunity to ascertain whether or 
not thoste who were given clumces to 
mend their ways lived up to their 
promises. About the only source of 
Information was the police department. 
If one sot so bad as to be re-arrested 
the Judfte knew that he or she had 
not observed tlie provisions under 
which they were grlven their liberty. 
But if tliey escaped the tolls of tlie 
bluecoats or left town the court was 
none the wiser no matter how well 
or how badly they conducted them- 
selves. Now it will be different. Be- 
ing- placed on probation will mean 
something:. Probation Officer Hicks 
will keep track of all who are re- 
leased on their pood behavior and If 
they f-ail the court will take other 
steps to bring them to time. 

This morniner Anton Andler was ar- 
raigned on a charge of drunkenne.sa. 
Anton is an old offender. Time after 
time he has gone home drunk and 
driven his wife and family out of 
doors, regardless of time or weather. 



Because of his family he Ivas some- 
times lueii alluwtj to go. This morn- 
ing he pleaded guilty to drunkenness. 
The court turned tho ca.se over to the 
probation olYicer and continued It un- 
til tomorrow for sentence. in the 
meantime the piobation officer will 
make a thorough investigation of the 
condition at the Andler home and will 
advise with tho court in h^andllng the 
case. 

* • • 

.Joseph Arnold, 64 years old. the 
worst dope tlend ever picked up by tlie 
police, will be taken into probate comt 
111 is afternoon or tomorrow to be ex- 
amined as to his sanity. He has twice 
been sent to an asylum for the criminal 
insane and the officials are of the 
opinion that he will again be found to 
be mentally unbalanced, due to ex- 
cessive use of drugs. Tlie case will 
then come under the jurisdiction of 
tlie state board of control, according 
to Courtenay Dinwiddle, and it will be 
up to that body to determine whether 
or not he should be confined to a state 
hospital In Minnesota or turned over to 
authorities of another state. 

* * • 

"Hello girls." called Carl Palmquist 
to two young women who were walk- 
ing along the street in tlie West end 
yesterday. 

The voung women hod ftnlj' time to 
give him a look characterized In 
stories as "daggers," when Humane 
Officer Bob McKercher, who chanced to 
be walking behind them, collared him. 

Palmijuist struggled to release him- 
self and two men who were with him 
came to his a.^slstance. One of them 
started to help him break the officer's 
hold, but he only started. The husky 
humane officer tapped him on the chin 
and ho went sprawling into a snow- 
bank. 

In police court this morning Palm- 
quist said that he would not have 
acted as he did had he not been drunk. 
He paid a tine of $7, promising that 
never again would he try any mashing 
stunts. 

Jennie Schwantz burst into tears in 
police court this morning when she got 
sixty days In the county Jail after 



pleading guilty t9 third offense drunk- 
enness. Th»t {3^h<" sentence fixed bv 
statute for the third offense. After 
Jennie hasiserVed her time she will 
probably rfturt i all over again, and 
about tho 'steenTh time Bhe will again 
be booked for a third offense. 

Jennie's 'tPar# 'did not nave the 
soothing effect Jivhich is generally 
credited to a goad cry. Jennie cried 
herself into a mge. The more she 
cried tho rD^ddac she got. She began 
by being A^^ I|t herself for crying 
and then ski crlid herself Into curses. 
The way she burned up the atmosphere 
would have shamed an old time river 
hog who C}>uldji:t spit naturally and 
comfortably, 'wltlfout a cuss word. 

Jennie is a fomer wife of the •'Min- 
nesta Chicken," 4 former artist of the 
squared rlnfe In the palmy days of the 
I'arlor theater, i^he Is one of the most 
regular of the select set which moves 
in a cycle from the Bowery to the bull 
pen, tho bull pen to the county bastlle 
and from the bastile to the Bowery 
again. 

Thomas M'alsh and William Fox 
have been hanging about the Bowery 
so long that even the barkeepers and 
the policemen are tired of seeing them. 
Their eyes will have a rest for a montta 



\ 




For here is a Man's Store with a "thousand 
and one things" he will like. 



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II 



If you knew what a lot of choice Christmas Gifts we are showing at the present time, 
you'd come in tonight or tomorrow and make your selection while assortments are largest 
and everything new. 

Just Gifts for Men and Boys and everything of the highest quality; that's all we sell, 
and the excellence of the values is unmistakable. 

The following list will give you an idea of what you will find here but only by an in- 
spection can you realize how large are the assortments and what pleasing gifts they will 
make. 



Gifts for the Boys 


Sweaters 


Overcoats 


Fur Caps 


Skating Caps 


Cloth Hats 


Reefers 


Cloth Caps 


Suits 


Gloves 


Suspenders 


Mittens 


Scarf Pins 


Handkerchiefs 


Cuff Links 


Neckwear 


Watch Fobs 


Underwear 


Slippers 


Mufflers 


Storm Coats 


Angora Suit3 


Night Robes 


Rompers 


Pajamas 


Dancing Pumps 


Mackinaw Coats 


Indian Suits 


Skating Caps 


Cowboy Suits 


Gauntlet Gloves 



Gifts for the Men 


Neckwear 


Sweaters 


Gloves 


Underwear 


House Coats 


Hosiery 


Bathrobes 


Suspenders 


Slippers 


Overcoats 


Umbrellas 


Fur-Lined Overcoats 


Canes 


Fur Coats 


Suit Cases 


Fur Caps 


Traveling Bags 


Fur Gloves 


Full Dress Suits 


Fancy Vests 


Tuxedo Suits 


Mufflers 


Silk Hats 


Handkerchiefs 


Pajamas 


Mackinaw Coats 


Night Robes 


Russian Vests 


Jewelry 


Sheep-Lined Coats 



SPECIALS FOR TONIGHT AND TOMORROW - 

t Turtle Neck Sweaters at V2 Price. 

Holiday Suspenders^ One Pair in Box, V2 Price. 



m 




Silk Hose and Ties to match, put up 
in separate boxes, $1.25 and $1.50 val- 
ues, for tonight and Tuesday — 



98c 



TOO LATE 
TO CLASSIFY 

One Cent a Word Each Inaertlon. 
No Adverti«emett« L«as Than IS Ceu<«i 

One Cent a Word Each InHertlon. 
No AdvertiMcmcnt Leits Than 15 Centa. 

PKRH^MEs'"oF''T?OTXL~RliCHI^^ 
at Miss Horrigan's. Today the cor- 
rect use of perfumes Is as certain 
an inde.\ of good taste as is the cut 
of a gown. 



W^E INVITR YOU TO SATISFY YOUR- 
self that in purchasing from me a 
^perfume, toilet water or toilet ac- 
cessory, you are getting tho best. 
Miss Horrigan, Oak hall building. 



REDUCED PRICES ON ALL HAIR 
goods tomorrow at Miss Horrigan's 
Hair shop. 



MISS HORRIGAN'S SKIN FOOD AN 
Indispensable and necessary articlo 
for particular women who desire to 
retain a youthful appearance. 

HAVE YOUR HAIR DRESSED IN AN 
attractive style for Christmas at 
Miss Horrigan's tomorrow. 



L. T. PIVERS FAMOUS TOILET 
waters at reduced prices tomorrow. 
?1.00 bottles 75c. Miss Horrigan. 



TRY IT ONCE. YOU'LL MIANT IT 
always. Our own mixture Sachet 
Powder. 50c oz. Miss Horrigan. 



pleast: your little girl wixti 

one of Miss Horrigan's natural hair 
doll wigs. Can be washed combed 
and curled. 



Combings made into beautiful switches; 
$1.50 up. Marinello shop, Fidelity bldg. 



Hair, Moles, Wares removed forever. 
Miss Kelly, 131 West Superior street. 



anyhow. This morning each of them 
got thirty days in tlie county jail 
afltr admitting that thty have volun- 
tarily become Intoxicated. 

• • • 

Erick Lundberg, a one-legged man, 
hasn't been visible in the grist for 
some time. This morning he re-ap- 
pearod and the reason appeared with 
him. He had been holding down a job 
In the mission in Superior. But he got 
tired of earning .a living in a respecta- 
ble manner and came back to this side 
of the bay. For a week or two he has 
been frequenting his old haunts. He 
didn't seem to be able to bring him- 
self to go ba«k to work, so the police 
arrested 1.1m for vagrancy. This morn- 
ing he pleaded guilty and got |15 and 
costs or fifteen daya In the county jail. 

• • • 

Joe Robinskl invited Patrolman 
Dlckman and Telephone Operator For- 
restal to go down to the railroad yards 
with him and fight when he met the 
two officers on the Bowery Saturday 
evening. They advised him to go take 
a jump In the lake, or words to that 
effect. This did not meet with Joe's 
approval and with a growl he snarled 
that he would "fi.x" both of them. His 
hand started to seek his hip pocket, 
but before he got that far both arms 
were pinioned to his side. The officers 
found a loaded revolver and sent him 
into headquarters on a charge of car- 
rying concealed weapons. He pleaded 
guilty and didn't have a word of ex- 
planation to offer. The court handed 
him the nice little Christmas package 
of three months in the county jail. 

• * • 

August Lowlen, a resident of Duluth 
for thirty years, denied In police court 
this morning that he was guilty of 
stealing a case containing a dozen 
quarts of whisky from the freight shed 
of the Northern Pacific. His trial was 
set for Thursday. The special who ar- 
rested him said he saw him leave the 
sheds with the case of booze under 
his arm. 

• • • 

The squad which was sent from the 
city jail to the county bastlle Satur- 
day earned their automobile ride in 
the Black Maria. The patrol stuck In 
a snow drift and the prisoners had to 
get out and dig out the machine be- 
fore they could continue their journey. 
The four sets of chains on the wheels 
were ripped off while the machine was 
being extricated. 



MARRIAGE LICENSES. 

Earl C. Kellmar of Pine county and 
Sarah E. Amy. 

Helge Braatin and Minnie Wethers. 

Oscar Carlson and Lydia Ring. 

Robert E. Wilkes and Mrs. Ida 
Blacher. 

Wallace Harry Witchall and Petra 
Maudstad. 

Philip Daniels N^'son and Edna May 
Patrick, both of Superior. 

W. H. Hasklns and Marion B. Grant. 

SOLID GOLD WEDDING AND EN- 
gagement rings made and mounted 
to order at Henrlcksen's. 




BIRTHS. 



to Mr. and 
West Third 



MORIN — A son was born 
Mrs. J. ^lock.,rin of 2628 
street, DeCV"^, 

JOHNSON — A Ion was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. G. Johnson of 602 South Eigh- 
teenth avenue east, Dec. 18. 

DWVER — A son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. F. A. Dwyer of 20 West Third 
street, Dec. 17. 

CARR — A son was born to Mr. and Mrs 
W. W. Carr of 1915 East Third street. 
Dec. 1.3. 

SHURICK — A son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. E. P. Shurick of 309 West Sec- 
ond street, Dec. 15. 

PATTON— A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. N. D. Patton of 10 East Sec- 
ond street, Dec. 9. 

ABRAH.\MSON— A son was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. M. Abrahamson of 424 Lake 
avenue south, Dec. 12. 

LAINE — A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. A. Laine of 1104 Garfield 
avenue Dec. 13. 

LARKE — A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Larke of 807 Fourth 
avenue feast I>ec. 20. 

LAWRIE — A son was born to Mr. and 
Mrs. W. R. Lawrie of 4210 London 
road Dec. 16. 

BYRNES — A daughter was born to Mr. 
and Mrs. M. J. Byrnes of 315 Four- 
teenth avenu* ea.st Dec 20. 



Dea ths and Funerals 



LAUGHLIN — Mr.s. Eva Laughlin, wife 
of M. Laughlin, died yesterday morn- 
ing at the home of her daughter, 
Mrs. J. A. Anderson, 2902 West Sec- 
ond street. She is survived, besides 
her husband and daughter, by her 
mother, Mrs. P. Williams; a sistei*. 
Mrs. John Elbs, and four brother.-!, 
William, George, Arthur and Charles 
Lamson, of Negaunee, Mich. The 
funeral will be held at 2 o'clock to- 
morrow afternoon from the resi- 
dence, with Rev. George E. Sllloway 
of the Grace M. E. church officiating 
and interment at the Forest HiU 
cemetery. 

AXFORD — Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Axford, 
69 years old, wife of Samuel Ax- 
ford, 626 North Fifty-sixth avenue 
west, died yesterday morning after 
an illness of several weeks. 

SPELLMAN — The funeral of Thomas 
L. Spellnian of Proctor, who died 
Saturdav at the St. Mary's hospital 
of Superior, was held at 8:30 o'clock 
this morning from the home of his 
brother, Patrick Spellman, 218 Eaat 
Third street, and at 9 o'clock from 
the cathedral. Interment was ot 
Calvary. 

SMITH — The funeral of William B. 
Smith, 91 years old. Civil war vet- 
eran, who died early Saturday morn- 
ing at the home of his grandson, 
William C. Smith, 6105 Highland 
Ftreet, was held at 2 o'clock this 
afternoon from the Filiatrault fu- 
neral parlors. Interment was at 
Soldiers' rest in Forest Hill cenic- 
terv. Willis A. Gorman post, G. A. 
R., " and the Sons of Veterans had 
charge of the funeral. 

MELLEN — The funeral of Peter Mel- 
lin, 39 years old, 1822 West Second 
street, who died last Friday after a 
short Illness, was held at 1:30 o'clock 
this afternoon from the residence 
and at 2 o'clock from the Central 
Baptist church. Twentieth avenue 
west anl First street. Rev. Milton 
Fish pfiiclated and interment was 
at the Forest Hill cemetery. 

ACKER — The funeral of Mrs. Emille 
Wilke Acker, of Hermantown, 77 
vears old. whp died a week ago Sun- 
day at the Mobne of her daughter, 
Mrs. C. W. Erickson of Duluth, wa."?! 
held Saturday afternoon from the 
Hermantown church. Rev. Herman 
Beatzel of the German Evangelical 
church of Duluth officiated and in- 
terment was at the Hermantown 
cemetery, 

HALEY — Dorothy, the 1-month-old 
daughter' .of Mr. and Mrs. Louis 
Haley, S South Sixty-first avenuo 
west, died late last evening. The 
funeral wiil b« held at 10 o'clock to- 
morrow niornlng from the St. 
James" Cafholic church, Fifty-sr;Vf>nth 
avenue wAt and Klnnear place. Rev. 
D. W. Lyilch will officiate and inter- 
ment will 'be at Calvary. 

MONl'MENTS — Wie have our own quar- 
ries and factory. Let a Duluth concern 
do your vpork. Ilnndreda In stock. P. 
N. Petersoh Granite Co., 230 E. Sup. St. 



CENTRAL 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 



30 East Superior Street. Duluth. 
WINTER TEKM, JAN. «TH. 

New classes in all departments. 
Day school. Night school. 

BARKER A IMcPHERSON. 




THIRTEEN KILLED 
IN THEATER PANIC 



Menin, Belgium, Dec. 23. — Thirteen 
are dead and fifty seriously Injured 
as a fesult of the fire, which burned 
down a cinematograph theater at Bar- 
raques, near here, last night. None of 
the audience was burned to death, the 
medical examination of the bodies 
showing that deatli in every case was 
due to internal hemorrhage caused by 
pressure in attempting to escape. 

The panic In the auditorium was 
frightful. The theatre was capable of 
accommodating only 600 people with 
comfort, but more than 700, Includ- 
ing many children, had crowded in. 
When the flames broke out, some of 
the spectators jumped from the low 
balconies on the heads of the strug- 
gling mass of people below. 



Duluth 
New York 



Cincinnati 
Paris 



^f Correct Dressf or Women^ and Girls 

HAVE JUST RECEIVED A 
FRESH SHIPMENT OF 

Christmas Blouses 

New Styles in Alat-^ 
alesse^ Charmeuse 
Waists and White 
Voiles. 




A Waist is a present that 
is sure to please — a gift that 
can be made to suit any purse 
— something that is useful 
and always welcome! 

One could hardly conceive 
a gift more universally ac- 
ceptable — a thing suitable 
for Young Ladies, Mothers 
or Grandmothers — Just the 
thing for a member of the 
[family and just as suitable 
for any friend! 

WE DIRECT SPECIAL 
ATTENTION TO 

New Brocaded Silk Waists 

Beautiful styles in white and 
colors. — Price, $9.50. 

Hand-Made Voile Waists 

Styles beautifully hand - em- 
broidered and trimmed with real 
laces— $3.50 to $25.00. 

Tailored Linene Waists 

Plain pleated and embroidered. 
Prices, $2.50 to $10, 




<«mm Stft ftvp. At 
Correct Dress for Women and Oirl$ 

(Open This Evening) 



CKri^mas Gloves 

The finest glove is still an inexpensive gift— 
a thing always suitable and always well re- 
ceived. The Perrin stamp carries a signifi- 
can«:e of quality that arouses due respect. 
Pric es $1.50 to $3.50. 

Special lines at $1.00. 

A Glove Bond 

Is the most convenient sort of a gift and one 
on which you can't go v.rong. A gift that 
permits the receiver's choice. 

Christmas Neckwear at Va, Off 

A replete selection of exquisite styles. All 
the latest neckwear fads in choice hand-made 
designs and real laces. 

"Just a little remembrance" — a dainty and 
refined gift, always suitable and always in good 
taste. Regular prices 50c to $15. 

Sale prices 35c to $11.25. 

Holiday Gifts in Brass and 
Leather V3 & V4 Off 

Aristocratic little gilts, thoroughly useful, 
but not common, things that people really like 
to have, yet things they seldom buy for them- 
selves — Limousine Cases, Traveling Sets, Score 
Sialics, Memorandums, Phone Slates, Desk 
Clocks, Bill Folds, miniature Photo Frames, 
Sevring Sets, Library Sets, Portfolios, Collap- 
sible Cups, etc. 

Shoulder Scarfs and Auto Veils at 
Special Holiday Reductions 

Beautiful styles in Chiffon, Crepe de Chine, 
Chenille Shoulder Throws, Silk Mufflers, etc. 
Regularly $1.50 to $10.00. 

Christmas Sale of French Jewelry ^kOil 

Select designs in Gold, Silver and Gun Metal 
Bags, Chain Purses, Card Cases, Vanities, Coin 
Carriers, LaVallieres, Bracelets, Brooches, Ear- 
rinjgs, etc., plain, carved and filigreed styles, 
with or without fashionable stone settings. 
Regular prices $1.00 to $20.00. Sale prices 
One-fourth Less. 

Christmas Handkerchiefs 

A little gift that aptly expresses the Christ- 
mas spirit, and always fits in everywhere. A 
really fine handkerchief is a pretty compliment 
to anv woman, and a tribute to her good taste. 
Price's 15c to $8.00 each. 

Boxed Handkerchiefs in initialed and em- 
broidered styles, at $1.00. (Three in a box). 

Umbrellas 

Very newest styles — for men and women. A 
fine assortment of sterling silver and gold 
trimmed handle.^, detachable and collapsible 
styles, $3.75 to $18.50. 

Silk Hose 

Full selections of colors and sizes in the fa- 
mous McCallum and Kayser makes, plain and 
embroidered stvles, $1.00'to $5.00. 

Feature lines' at $1.00, $1.50 and $2.50. 

Boot Silk Hosiery, 50c. 

A Stylish Hair Ornament 1 Wouldn't 
That Make a Good Gift ? 

Worn in New York and Paris — Jeweled Ban- 
deaux, of Gold or Chiffon, with Jeweled Orna- 
ments or Standing Aigrettes — Velvet Bands — 
Tir seled Flowers — Ribbon Flowers, etc., $1.50 
to l$5.00. 

I'ans, Hand Bags, Silk Underwear, Richelieu 
Ruffs, French Boutonnieres, and other knick- 
knsicks are all decidedly giveable. 

Furs 

No man could make a safer choice than he 
who selects Furs for the lady of his household 
wham he wishes to honor most. 

But remember, a woman takes a certain 
pride in the label of her Furs. For their label 
is the passport every time she lavs them off. 

In the richer Furs, beautiful "sets of Mole, 
Sable, Mink, Skunk, Kit Fox, Cross Fox. Civet 
Cat, Hudson Seal, White Fox, Black Fox and 
Natural Raccoon are first choice of women who 
appreciate rich peltrv. Prices range from $45 
to 5^375. 

In the less expensive Furs, practical stvles 
in .American Fox, Jap Mink, Wolf, Cat Lynx, 
Coney and other hardy Furs. Range from $15 
to $40 per set. 

Fur Coats — in luxurious stvles of fine Hud- 
son Seal, Mole Seal, Real Russian Pony and 
sturdy Auto Coats are gracefully fashiv)iied and 
richly lined. Prices $45 to $350. 

How About a Handsome Wrap ? 

Could you imagine a gift more worthv of a 
fair recipient than a beautiful draped or fur 
trinmed wrap of Matelesse Silk, brocaded Vel- 
vet, or rich, plain Velour? Or perchance a 
plainer style of Black Velour or White Chin- 
chilla, a handsome Corduroy, or perhaps a 
"Great Coat" for auto wear, or genuine service. 
Many people have already bought such gifts. 
Fancy styles, $45 to $125 ; plain styles, $25 up. 





•* 






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Vsusifl^: 



""'tt^.-STRTrtStJI 




f 





Suggests 
Diamonds ior Christinas 

Especial attention is called to our Holiday Display of Diamonds 
and Diamond Jewelry. We state, without fear of successful contradic- 
tion, that our showing of Diamonds and Diamond Jewelry is the larg- 
est, most varied, best selected and most moderately priced of any in 
the Northwest. If you are contemplating presenting Diamonds in any 
form, it will be to YOUR advantage to see our display FIRST. 

Special Prices on Our Ow^n Importations 

J/2 carat Diamond, set in plain Tiffany setting, $65.00. 

% carat Diamond, set in plain Tiffany setting, $45.00. 

1/4 and 1-16 carat Diamond, set in plain Tiffany setting, $35.00 

14 carat Diamond, set in plain Tiffany settings $25.00. 

Our display of Diamond and Platinum Jewelry sugge!^ts many new ideas in Pendants, Rings, 

etc., and is very m«Klerately priced. 



John Dwyer Dies as Result 
of Accident at 



John Dwyer, who was Injured at the 
Algtr-Smlth mill on Rice's Point last 
Tuesday afternoon, died Saturday at 
St. Mary's hospital, where he was 
taken Immediately after the accident. 

Dwyer, who was employed unloading 
logs from the oars at the mill, was 
caught underneath a large log that 
liad rolled off one of the cars. Dwyer 
was picked up uncionscious and hur- 
ried to the hospital, where it was 
found that he had sustained several 
internal Injuries. He died at 6:30 
o'clock yesterday nujrning. 

The deceased was 40 years old and 
leaves a widow and an Infant child 
at :j102 West SuperiQj: street. He was 
well known throughout this end of 
the city, having lived here a number 
of years. He was a member of the 
Longshoremen's union. He is also sur- 
vived by a sister, Mrs. George Oven, 
of West Duluth. 

The funeral will be held at 9 o'clock 
tomorrow morning from the St. James's 
Catholic church. Fifty-seventh avenue 
w. St and Kinnear place. Rev. D. W. 
Lynch will officiate and interment will 
be at Calvary cemetery. 

'A CHRISTMAS PROPHECY' 




Q I ^ Starts Tomorrow Morning 

of Cnristmas Gixts 

at V2 and Vz Off 



.-!>.. 



WE Ol-TER 
YOU PKO- 
TECTIOX 
FROM MIS- 
REPRE- 
SEXTATIOX. 




OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL CHRIST:MAS. 



Bagley ^ Company 



jew:elers axd silversmiths. 

(Established 1885.) 

315 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



A SMALL. 
DEPOSIT 
\^^LL HOLD 
ANY AR- 
TICLE. 



S^ 



rsx 




...'.>. \\-->V!'>\.i.f3. ..'■■..' 



ryr- 



ENGLISH PHEASANTS 
AND WILD DUCKS 



Plan Started for Restock- 
ing the Country With 
Game. 

New York, Dec. 23. — English phea.s- 
ants and wild mallard ducks have re- 
cently been sent to all parts of the 
T'nited States by the American Game 
Protective and Propagation associa- 
tion. The birds were distributed free- 
ly to members of the association who 
agreed to protect them. 

These shipments are the first to be 
made In accordance with a plan for re- 
stocking tlie country with game 
through the establishment of sanctu- 
aries on wliich birds can increase un- 
molested. The overflow from these 
sanctuaries will provide shooting on 
contiguous lands. With the aid of its 
members the association hopes to start 
Buch refuges in every suitable com- 
munity by supplying the birds to stock 
them. 

Although only pheasants and mal- 
lard duck.s were reared last summer in 
sufficient numbers for distribution, ex- 



periments with quail, ruffed grouse, 
wild turkeys, wood ducks and Cana- 
dian geese proved very satisfactory 
and resulted in a supply of these birds 
from which it is hoped that enough 
can be raised next year to warrant 
sending them out. Especial attention 
is being given to the native upland 
birds, and if success with quail and 
grouse continues, they will In time 
entirely supplant the English pheas- 
ants at the associations farm. 



Rich Holly AVreathH, 

40 cents; home made, Victor Huot's. 



ANNUAL ELECTION 

OF GORM AN POST. 

Willis A. Gorman post, No. 13, G. 

A. K., late Saturday held the annual 
election in Memorial hall in the court- 
house, choosing officers as follows: 
Commander, John Diamond; senor vice 
commander. t»amucl Anderson; Junior 
vice commander, Cornelius Donohue; 
officer of the day, James C Ferguson; 
chaplain. Joseph A. Jjathrop- surgeon, 
V. S. Wilkinson; quartermaster, Asa 
Dailey: officer of the guard, O. A. 
Strickland; delegates to the depart- 
ment encampment at St. Paul, James 

B. Geggie and I^ouls Woolfrom; alter- 
nates, Albert Woolson and Samuel 
Anderson, daughter of the post. Miss 
Mamie Donohue. 

The new officers will be installed 
on Tuesday afternoon, Jan. 7, at a 



Joint installation with Garfield circle, 
Ladies of the G. A. FL Capt. S. F. 
White will be installing officer. After 
the installation a banquet will be 
served by the ladies. 

DESERTS TO SPEND 
CHRI STMAS AT HOME. 

Escanaba. Mich., Dec. 23. — The dread 
of spending his first Christmas day 
away from home caused Daniel Mul- 
lane, aged 23, to desert from the United 
States army at Fort Cook, Neb. He 
walked into the police station Satur- 
day and gave himself up to Chief of 
Police Andrew Iverson, telling him 
his story with tears running down his 
cheeks. The boy left Sunday in charge 
of the chief of police for Sault Ste. 
Marie, from where he will be trans- 
ferred to Fort Cook to answer to the 
charge of desertion. The lad was a 
native of Massachusetts. 



Dickinson P. O. Site. 

Dleklnson, N. D., Dec. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The site for the new 
Federal building here has finally been 
determined upon by the treasury de- 
partment. Official notice has been re- 
ceived that the building will be lo- 
cated on the corner of First and Sims 
streets. This will be Immediately 
north of the Masonic temple, one of 
the largest buildings In the city. Bids 
for the construction are expected about 
the first of March. 




ONLY ONE MORE DAY 

FOR SANTA CLAUS TO DO HIS CHRISTMAS SHOPPING 





This is your opportunity to take advantage of the won- 
derful bargains at our Reorganization Sale. 

SUITS and OVERCOATS 

All our Bovs' and Children's Suits and Overcoats — all 
iMcn's and BoysMLJnderwear, Union Suits, Shirts, Hats, 
Caps, Hosiery, Neckwear, Mufflers, Collars, Gloves, Mit- 
tens, Handkerchiefs, Belts, Suspenders, Trousers, Mack- 
inaws. Sheep-lined Coats, Suit Cases, Satchels, Trunks 
and all other Christmas Goods on display and for sale at 
greatly reduced prices. Come and get your share. 

FEDJE CLOTHING & SHOE CO. 

BOMAN, WIDTH & HEGLAND, Proprietors, 

2016 and 2018 WEST SUF^ERIOR ST. 




We, Alfred Boman, August B. Width and Annan 
Hegland, wish to hereby express our many thanks to all 
our friends and customers for their patronage in the 
past. Hoping we will have the same pleasure in the fu- 
ture, we wish you all a VERY MERRY CHRISTMAS. 



for 




Pastor Says Christ Will Come 
Second Time as a Deliverer. 

"When Christ returns to earth for 
the second time, the Jew will recog- 
nize In him the Messiah and deliverer 
of the Hebrew race," said Rev. J. A. 
McGaughey of the Second Presbyterian 
church, 1515 "West Superior street. In 
his sermon yesterday morning on '*A 
Christmas Prophecy." 

Rev. Mr. McGaughey took his sermon 
from the many prophecies in both the 
old and new testaments, In which 
return of Christ is assured. That 
Savior will return the second time, 
as a Savior, but as a deliverer, is 
belief of Rev. Mr. McGaughey. 

"There is no doubt," said Rev. Mr. 
McGaughey, "that there are many 
prophecies not yet fulfilled and which 
will be when Christ returns for the 
second time. The Jews must not be 
criticized for refusing to accept Christ 
as their Savior, when He came to 
earth the first time. They had ex- 
pected a deliverer, one who would 
bring them back to their promised 
land, but He was only a sufferer, 
when He came to earth." 



Novelties, 
Stationery, 



the 
the 
not 
the 



Christmas Service. 

Rev. E. Wulfsberg of St. Paule 
Lutheran church. Twentieth avenue 
west and Third street, will conduct a 
special English service at 11 o'clock 
on Christmas morning. The program 
for the morning follows: 

Prelude Licht 

Hymn — "From Highest Heaven".... 
Congregation, 

Altar service and responses 

Rev. E. Wulfsberg. 
Song — "Angels From the Realms of 

Glory" Reed 

Choir. 
Hymn — "Rejoice, Rejoice Ye Chris- 
tians' 

Congregation. 
Sermon — "The Chrisin^- Gospel"... 
Rev. E. WulJR.jerg. 

Hymn — "O Morning Star" 

Congregation. 
Song — "There Were In the Same 

Country" Bohanan 

Choir. 

Offertory — Selected • 

Collection and Benediction 

Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" 

Handel 

The Sunday school wIH hold its an- 
nual Christmas tree festival Friday 
evening. A special program of music 
and recitations has been arranged for 
the evening. 



Dolls, Leatn* 
Jewelry, 

Leather Hana Bags, 
Parisian Ivory , Art Goods 

at V2 an 



i. % Off 



W^ Don't Miss This Opportunity 




o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the 
residence, with Rev. George B. Sll- 
lowav of the Grace M. E. church of- 
ficiating and Interment at the Forest 
Hill cemetery. 



Christmas Festival. 

Lysglimt Lodge No. 7, I. O. G. T., 
will entertain at a Christmas festival 
Wednesday evening at the Woodmen 
hall. Twenty-first avenue west and 
First street. In addition to a Christmas 
treat, the following program will be 
rendered during the evening: 

Piano solo 

Miss Gerda Hanson. 

Reading 

Ltudvig Nagel. 

Address • 

P. A. Nelson. 

Reading 

C. Olson of J^TQCtor. 

Recitation 

Ludvlg NageL, j 

Christmas songs .....'.... 

Members of. Lodge. 
The follnowlg comriilttee Is in charge 
of arrangements: Gund6.r Okstad, 
chairman, and L. A. Slmonson, Ragnar 
Larson, Mrs. L. A. Slmonson, Alis.'s 
Emma Hanson and Miss Bertha Gund- 
helm. 



Return From Chicago. 

Dr. and Mrs. L. Q. Greeley of 317 
North Twenty-third avenue west re- 
turned yesterday from Chicago, where 
•Dr. Greeley took a post graduate 
course In the Polytechnlcal School of 
Surgery and Medicine. Mrs. Greeley 
and her daughter joined Dr. Greeley In 
Chicago several days ago, after visit- 
ing with her parents at Rochester, N. 
y., for the past two months. 
~^, ■ 

Surprised by Friends. 

Mrs. M. Mclver of 2805 West Second 
street was pleasantly surprised at her 
borne Saturday evening. Five hundred 
was played during the evening and 
favors were won by Mesdames John 
Roos, J. C. Cox. M. Grube, Frank Fix 
and A. J. Gladman. The other guests 
were: Mrs. C. H. Stang, Mrs. Oliver 
Barton, Mrs. John Schneider, Mrs. A. 
Forrest, Mrs. R. J. Burt, Mrs. W. A. 
Brown, Mrs. A. Peterson and Mrs. A. 
Anderson. 

Carlson-Peterson. 

Miss Gerda Carlson and Ivar Peter- 
son were married Saturday evening at 
the home of Gust Melln, 2014 West 
Fourth street. Rev. C. W. R. Wermlne 
of the First Swedish M. E. cliurch, read 
the ceremony, after which a weddln;? 
supper was served. Mr. and Mrs. Peter- 
son will make their home in'the West 
end. 



general, secretary of state and super- 
intendent of banks as a commission to 
pass on the value of the stock which 
may be offered for sale, instead of leav- 
ing It In the hands of the superinten- 
dent of banks, as provided In the bill 
drawn by Mr, Preus. 



OFFERED TO PAY 

100 PER CENT. 



Mellin Funeral. 

The funeral of Petei* Mellin, 39 years 
Ola, 1822 West Second Btre^t, who died 
last Friday after a short Illness, was 
held at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon 
from the residence and at 2 o'clock 
from the Central Baptist church. Twen- 
tieth avenue west and First sti'eet. 
Rev. Milton Fish officiated, and inter- 
ment was at the Forest Hill cemetery. 



Acker Funeral. 



The funeral of Mrs. Emilie Wilke 
Acker of Hermantown, 77 years old, 
who died a week ago Sunday at the 
home of her daughter Mrs. C. W. Eric- 
son of Duluth, was held Saturday after- 
noon from the Hermantown church. 
Rev. Kerman Beatzel of the German 
Evangelical church of Duluth officiated, 
and interment was at the Hermantown 
cemetery. 



Give Vaudeville Show. 

The French Athletic club gave a 
vaudeville entertainment last evening 
at the French hall, Twenty-fifth ave- 
nue west and Tlilrd street. The pro- 
gram Included several musical and 
literary selections by the members of 
the club. 



West End Briefs. 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermlne of 315 North 
Twentieth avenue west is reported 111 
at his home. 

Miss Edna Bergquist returned home 
yesterday from Augustana college. 
Rock Island, 111., to spend the holidays 
with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Gust 
Bergquist, 1931 West Fourth street. 

Sylvester Hanson, who has been at- 
tending school at Collegeville, Minn., 
Is spending the holidays with his par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. M. Hanson, 2013 
West Third street. 

The trustees of the Bethany Swedish 
Lutheran church will met Friday even- 
ing at the home of A. Andreen, 2120 
West Second street. 

liie Five Corners Sunday school will 
hold its Christmas festival in the 
church Wednesday afternoon. 

Mrs. John Stohlanske of Hermantown 
is reported ill at her home. 

Miss Violet Anderson, who Is teach- 
ing school in Stearns county, has re- 
turned home to spend the holidays with 
West end relatives. 

Our perfumes and holiday goods, the 
finest in the city. Swedberg, Red Cross 
Pharmacy, 2015 West Superior street. 

« 

Packed to Exprews Ever>"where. 
Victor Huot's candy and flowers. 



Chicago, De 
T\hich advert! 
Interest a yea 
1 cent to $15 
with the arre 
promoter, en , 
mails to defrt 
Inspecto 
box wh 
of the "( 
sent to 
throughout th 
posits. Carsor 
talned many t 
his priv-ate ba 



Into a stret car at Superior street Sat- 
day night. 

Mr. Kendall was pitched twenty feet 
end was picked up unhurt; the horse's 
back was broken and had to be shot: 
some windows of the car were smashed 
and a few of the passengers were coir- 
siderably frightened. The collision at- 
tracted a large crowd of holiday shop- 
pers and It was some time before traf- 
fic resumed its normal trend at the 
corner. 



office 
office 
dress 
were 



23. — A private bank 
9ed to pay 100 per cent 
r on "all deposits from ; 
,000,000,000," was closed 1 
St of F. B. Carson, its 1 
a charge of using the ! 
lud. According to post- 
rs, Carson rented a post- 
ich he gave as the ad- 
^hicago bank." Circulars 
principals of schools, 
e country asking for de- 
i is alleged to have ob- 
housand dollars through 
nking scheme. 



HORSE COLLIDES 

WI TH STR EET CAR. 

A horsa afi^ched to a sleigh con- 
taining H. C. Kendall created consld- 
frable excitement when it dashed 
down F=rst avenue west and crashed 



COSMOPOIITAN CLASS 

AT THE Y. IW. C. A. 



The English -teaching branch of the 
educational department of the Duluth 
y. M. C. A., under the direction of H, 
J. Sopher, is having a remarkably sue- 
cessful year The class which meets a^ 
the association building consists or 
twenty-nine persons of thirteen differ- 
ent nationalities, including natives of 
Finland, Norway, Sweden, Italy, Japan, 
Russia, Greece, Turkey, France, Den- 
mark, Bulgaria, Dalraatia and Syria. 
This remarkably cosmopolitan gather- 
ing gets along with surprising har- 
mony. 

The beginners' and advanced Eng- 
lish classes held two days each week In 
the Northern Pacific shops are attract- 
ing great interest on the part of the 
men and are well patronized. 




Store Open Tonight Until 10 0' Clock. 



Christmas Festival. 

The Hazelwood S^unday school. Thir- 
ty-ninth avenue west and Fourth etroet, 
will hold its annual Christmas festival 
tomorrow evening. Rev. J. A. Mc- 
Gaughey, pastor of the Second Presby- 
terian church, and Albert Compbell, su- 
perintendent of the school, will have 
charge of the program during the 
evening. 



Mrs. Laughlin Dies. 

Mrs. Eva Laughlin, wife of M. 
Lau-^fhlln, died yesterday morning at 
the home of her daughter, Mrs. J A. 
Anderson. 2902 West Second street. 
She is survived, besides her husband 
and daughter, by her mother Mrs. P. 
Wiliiams; a sister, Mrs. Johp Elbs, and 
four brothers, William, George, Arthur 
and Charles Larneon of Negaunee, 
Mich. The funeral will be held at 2 



Liver Ills 

Are Cured by 

HOOD'S PILLS 

26c. 





LODGE O F INST RUCTION. 

High School Girls Will Assist at Ma- 
sonic Installation. 

A "Lodge of Instruction'* will be 
presented by a number of high school 
girls this evening at the Masonic 
temple, in connection with the annual 
Installation of officers of Ionic lodge, 
No. 186, A. F. & A. M. Following the 
ceremonial work at which Warren E. 
Greene, retiring worshipful master 
will install into office Carl E. Lonegren 
worshipful master-elect and other of- 
ficers; the members will adjourn to 
the Temple auditorium, where enter- 
tainment will be offered by the high 
school girls under the direction of 
Prof. A. F. M. Custance. Later in the 
evening refreshments will be served 
in the banquet halh 

PASTORS OPPOSE 

NEW YEAR LICENSE. 

Chicago, Dec. 23. — Protest from al- 
most every pulpit in this city was 
made Sunday as a result of Chief of 
Police McWeeney's order that cafes 
might sell liquor until 3 a. m. New 
Year's eve. Clergymen of all denom- 
inations predict a saturnalia. A weekly 
ball introduced by a hotel in the the- 
ater district also came In for minis- 
terial attacks. Champagne is the only 
drink hold at the ball, evening dross Is 
required, and the gayety is said to be 
extreme. Mayor Harrison has an- 
nounced that he would investigate the 
dances. 

w 

DraftH "Blue Sky" Latr. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 23. — ..amts A. 
Larson, assistant secretary of state, 
has drafted a "blue sky" law to be 
presented at the 1913 session of the 
legislature for enactment. The meas- 
ure is similar to the one drafted by 
J A. O. Preus, state Insurance com- 
missioner, but designates the attorney 




^imipaiu/' 




Christmas Furs 

Sacrificed to l/j and ^y^ Price. 

Bay Furs Here, Where Both Style and Quality Is Assured. 




muff are 
guaranteed 

$7.50 



French Coney Fnr .Set, including 
large shawl collar and half-barrel 
muflf; both collar and 
lined with Skinner's 
satin — attractively 
priced at , . 

Black Wolf Set. made with large 
shawl collar, finished with fancy 
tails; half-barrel muflf; a real $35 

j;Sl?-^'".^. $19.50 

Japanese Mink Fur Set — New 

pointed back neckpiece, fin- 
ished with silk ornamenta; 
extra large muff to match: a 
beautiful $62.50 ^^T CA 
set at ^Oi««fV 

Moleskin and Coney Sets — 
Long throw, finished with silk 
ornaments: large pillow muff 
to match; special ^QC AA 
ChrLstmas price. . .V«>w*VW 

PYench Coney Set — This set, 
of Black French Coney, is 
shown with scarf in new ani- 
mal shape; huge half -barrel 
muff, special Christmas d^Q ^f ff 

price, per set ^v* ■ «* 

Muffs of French Coney at 
$5, $2.08 down to 

$50.00 Black Russian Ponv 0Qe AA 
Fur Coat, Skinner satin. . . vO«f .W V 



$1.98 




Big Values In Christmas Waists — 
98c, $1.50, $1.95 and up. 

Siik Blouses— $3.98, $5, $5.95 and up. 

Silk Petticoats, all the new colors, $1.95 up 



EXTRA SPECIAL, 

V2 Price 



AU mussed and soiled 
Tailored Shirts in pure 
Linens, etc 



$6, $7 Heavy Mannish Coat Sweaters $5.00 




-.4- 



-^im 



iM^ 






They lend dignity and refinement and as a gift 
cannot be equalled. 

\ ou do not need all cash at The Albert Co. Our 
jewelry expresses the true Holiday Spirit. 

I FEW IHIOLDOM SFEeB^LS 

LADY'S WATCH— fine gold filled; 
7-jewel movement 

LADY'S FINE CHAIN AND 
LOCKET 

GENT'S KNIFE EDGE, LATEST 
MODEL, WATCH; 7-jewel movement. . . 

GENT'S COMBINATION CUFF 
LINKS AND SCARF PIN 

Engraving Free on all articles purchased here. 

Our stock is complete in every way with a beauti- 
ful assortment of everything pertaining to jewelry. 

WATCH OUR WINDOWS FOR SUGGESTIONS 

Xo extra charges for our credit accommodations. 



LOOKS GOOO 
FOR^PEACE 

Envoys of Turkey and Bal- 
kan States Hold Brief 
Session. 




Turks Admit Greeks and Re- 
ceive Proposals of 
the Allies. 




HOTEL HOLLAND CORNER 



London. Dec. 23. — The peace confer- 
ence resumed its sittings in St. James 
palace this afternoon. The plenipo- 
tentiai-ies remained together only a 
short time. Their discussions lasted 
not quite an hour and a half. The 
next session will be held on Saturday 
morning. 

The Turkish delegates did not insist 
today on the revictuallying of the for- 
tress of Adrianople, The discussion, 
according to M. Novakovitch of Servia, 
was "fairly amicable," and the pleni- 
potentiaries separated hopeful that 
next Saturday's reunion would produce 
something more definite. 

An official communication issued aft- 
er the adjournment had been taken 
said: 

"The Ottoman delegates having de- 
clared that according to their instruc- 
tions they had no objection to treating 
with the delegates of the allies, includ- 
ing the Hellenic delegates, the allies 
presented their principal proposals. 
The Ottoman delegates reserved their 
reply for the next sitting. 

The territorial proposals which the 
allied Balkan nations presented .were 
as follows: 

"The iniraediate surrender of Scutari, 
Adrianople and Janina, full military 
lienors to be accoi-ded to the garrisons. 
The evacuation by Turkey of tlie 
Balkan peninsula as far as the eastern 
end of the Tchatalja lines, the delim- 
itation to be made on the spot. 

The cession to Greece of all the 
Aegean lands. Including Rhodes, and 
eleven others now being kept by Italy 
as pledges of the fulfillment by Tur- 
key of the terms of the treaty of Lau- 
sanne. 

The annextaion of Crete to Greece. 
The payment by Turkey of a war 
indemnity, as well as the expenses 
sustained by the allies on account of 
the Ottoman prisoners. 

The question of the revictualling of 
the fortress of Adrianople has been 
left for discussion between the Turk- 
ish and Bulgarian delegates. 



ARE FIRMS 
COMBINED? 

Believed That Two Whole- 
sale Houses Have Been 
Merged. 



A i: • ''ting of the directors of the 
Gokvu.--reyton-Congdon company was 
held this morning to discuss the mat- 
ter oi" inlying in the Wriglit-Clarkson 
Met oaMiU' company. combining the 
two wholesale grocery houses, re- 
capitalizing them, and making them 

one grtat wholesale house. 

But little can be learned and there 
is nothing definite, but what can be 
lean.vi indicates that the deal was 



voted on favorably. On Saturday the 
board of directors of the Wright- 
Clarkson company met and voted upon 
the same matter. The result at that 
meeting was a favorable ballot. It was 
predicted a few days ago that there 
would be an adverse vote in the meet- 
ing today, but while nobody connected 
with the matter will say just what was 
done, the hint given out is that the 
vote w-as not adverse. It is expected 
tliat the combination will take place 
and that the efforts of C. A. Congdon, 
who. with T. F. Cole, has bought a 
controlling interest in the Gowan-Pey- 
tone-Congdon company, to buy the 
other company are successful. 

The effort to absorb also the Twohy- 
Eimon company of Superior proved 
fruitless. 

TWO GLADSTONE 

BOYS D ROWNED. 

Gladstone, Mich.. Dec. 23. ^-Albert 
Berg, aged 9, and Robert Heldm_an. 
aged 7, were drowned today while 
playing on the ice of Little Bay de 
Noquet. One lad was drawing the 
other on a sled when the ice gave way 
and both went to the bottom. 
• 

The best way not to succeed Is not 
to advertise. 




EDUCTIONS 



FOR THE LAST DAY 

T.Jc Tie Holders 50c 

85c Tie Holders 60c 

^2.00 Combination Comb and Brush Sets. .$1.50 

.$2.50 Travelers' Brush Sets : $1.75 

$2.00 Fancy Collar Cases .$1.50 

$3.50 Military Brush Sets $2.50 

$5.00 Military Brush Sets $2.75 

$7.00 IMilitary Brush Sets $4.75 

.$9.00 Leather Traveling Sets. $5.25 

$10.00 Leather Traveling Sets. .... . $7.25 

$10.50 Leather Traveling Sets $7.75 

$12.00 Leather Traveling Sets $9.50 

$16.00 Leather Traveling Sets $11.75 

CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTS 

In Floral, Fruit and Plain Colored Designs — At 

bisf reductions for the last dav. 

$6.00 Sets go at $4.50 

$8.00 Sets go at $6.50 

$12.00 Sets go at $9.00 

$15.00 Sets go at $10.00 

$17.00 Sets go at $12.00 

And hundreds of other useful gifts too numerous 
to mention await you here. Come and see. 




Ild&ri20 W£§T:SUP£RlQaar.^UUJTH.MIK«b 



I CITY BRIEFS | 

Diiliith Witness Returns. 

Charles Forsell of 324 East Superior 
street returned .Saturday from New 
York, where he testified in the case 
of the government against A. L. Wis- 
ner & Co., charged with using the 
mails to defraud. Mr. Forsell was 
catight for but $25 in the concern, 
which is the same as that alleged to 
have mulcted Rev. August Buh of Ely 
for $2.00fr.' Mr. Forsell said that it 
will cost the governme.nt about $100,000 
to prosecute the action. 



L.tinibermen In Diilath. 

S. J. Cusson, manager of the Rainy 
Lake & Virginia company's lumber 
mill at Virginia; A. G. Flournoy, one 
of the officials of the company at Vir- 
ginia, and Isaac Baker, with the Hlnes 
Lumber company of Chicago, are reg- 
istered at the Spalding today. 



Sterling (iuallt> Printing. 

Thwing-Stewart Co. 'Phones 114. Adv 

« 

Zenith \%ood Yard. 

All kinds of wood; 508 East Eighth 
street; Grand 366-X. George Muslof & 
Bros. 



Christmas Tree. 

Children of St. Paul's Sunday school 
will enjo_j- their Christmas tree cele- 
bration tomorrow afternoon at 4 
o'clock. Richard Close will amuse the 
children with some lantern slides and 
the gifts will be distributed from the 
tree. 



Sentenced to. Prison. 

Frank J. Wilson was sentenced to 
the state penitentiary by Judge Dibell 
in district court Saturday afternoon. 
Wilson pleaded guilty to attempted 
forgery. He attempted to pass a 
forged check on a West First street 
rooming house proprietor. 

• 

Thousands of Pieces Good Furniture 
Selling practically your own prices and 
vour credit good. Factory showrooms, 
2201 West First street. 



Rush at Postofflce. 

The registry department is getting 
"its." This morning as early as 7:30 
there was a lineup at the windows of 
that department for the purpose of 
registering Christmas packages. The 
stamp window was another sufferer 
and the rush continued all day. 



Qiiiitmas Gloves 

Aril^ hp-fe for everybody; put 
in pretty gift boxes if requested. 

Gloves make very accept- 
able gifts, and which ar« 
al'ways ivelcomed. 

*—fr. 




Christmas Perfumery 

Shown in large variety of fancy 

gift packages; in all ordors; 

priced from 25c up to $5.00. 

A nice bottle of perfume 

is always welcomed by 

any woman as a gift. 



Then 



Only One More Shopping Day: chStmas 

Christmas is but one dav away. If you still have some Christmas shopping to do, come here tomorrow and 

select the gift— our stock is still in excellent shape and choosing will be very easy. 

Then, too, you can shop with ease— goods are conveniently arranged; wide aisles; plenty experienced 
salespeople to serve you. If possible, shop in the morning — you can accomplish more in one hour 

... than in two in the afternoon. 




X3-£3 




A Qlft That May Reflect 
the Donor's Sentiments 




Book Special 

One lot of Standard 

Ficlion. Special. 95c 

In such titles and authors 
as follows: 

♦•The Marshall." 

By Mary Shipman An- 
drews 

'•Midnigrht of Mear's Home," 

By Harrison Jewel Holt. 

"Common Law," 

By Robert Chambers. 

Books by other authors: 
F. Marion Crawford. 
Alice MacGowan. 
Richkrd Harding Davis. 
Philip Oppenheim. 
Geo. Barr McCutcheon. 

One Table Lot 

Special copyrighted books; 

si^iBje febound, others in ori- 
gihal/bindings; spe- 5Qp 
»Gial tomorrow w-^v 



Handsome Pictures 

The gift of a nice picture flatters th-e recipient's 
good taste, and is appropriate for men, women, for 
school girls and college boys. 

Our stock of pictures includes hundreds of subjects 
all correctly framed and very reasonably priced. 




Photogravures — In. soft tone.s 
of gray with gray frames, size 
9x19; regular $1 value for 75c. 

Sepia Pictures. — Brown toned, 
beautiful subjects; size 8x10 in.; 
worth 40c, special at 25c. 

Sepia Pictures — Holy Pictures 
and copies of old paintings; 22x 
25 inches in size; $2.50 value, 
special, $1.50. 



Sepia Pictureti — Brown tone, 
9x12; one-piece frame; 40c val- 
ue for 25c. 

Fine Ktchings — Scenic sub- 
jects, 15x28 iri size; neatly 
framed; regular $1.50 value for 
$1.00. 

Imported Color Prints — Scenic 
subjects; dark brown frame; 
11.75 value, special, $1.00. 




Silk Hosiery For Gifts. 

The finest assortment of Dainty Silk Hosiery we have 
ever seen. 

A nice pair of Silk Hose is always giveable, always an 
acceptable gift for milady. We mention h<:rc a few of 
them. Come and see the many more. 
Liadics' Pure Thread Silk Hose I liadies' Pure miread Silk Hose 
-Beautifully embroidered, in all —With lisle he( Is, toes and gar- 



t^T>6»^3C!: 



B Christm's Gloves 

iJ Ask for anj' kind of Glove you 
Of wish; dress or street gloves for 
men, women and children; 
gloves of any kind whatsoever; — 
for this glove stock is without a 
peer. 

Put In Fancy Gift 
Boxes if requested. 

Women's Street Gloves — In 

Cape and P. K., one-clasp, man- 
nl-sh style, at f 1 to $1.25. 

Women's Dress Gloves — Over- 
seam and P. K., plain and fancy 
stitching, at $1 to $1.25. 

Children's Warm Kid Mittens 
— from 50c up to $1.25. 

Women's Evening Gloves — 16- 
button length — Glace, Kid and 
Silk — priced from $1 up to $3.75. 
' ChUdren's GIovch — Silk and 
fleece-lined; priced from $1 to 
$1.25. 

Ladles* Mocha and Kid Mit- 
tens — from $1 to $2. 

Full line of liadies' Fur-lined 
Gloves and Mittens. 

— Main Floor. 




•Jl! 



a 

t 
i 



colors; paii, 



$1,25. i ter top; pair, $1.00. 

Others from $1.50 up to $3.00. 




ixzsaT^^^Tx: 




Be Sure That the Little Ones 
• Qet Plenty of Toys 

Notiiing delights the youngster so mtich on Christmas as nice 
toys. Come tomorrow to this great Toytown and get the toy for 
the little ones to make them happy Christmas morning. 
Plenty of toys here to choose from and 
many special values await you. 

Three Table Lots of Toys 

Odds and ends and surpkis stock on sale to- 
morrow for a quick clean-up at — 

V2 Price 

One Table Lot Toys 19c 

Containing Tops, Block Games, Telephones, 
Drums, Tool Chests, Doll Shirt Waist Boxes, 
etc. Choose at 19c. 





Give Silverware 
For Christmas 

It will surely please and a present that 
will long be remembered. 

Our stock is still quite complete 
so that choosing is very easy. 

Tea Sets, Sugar and Cream Sets, Cas- 
seroles, Knives and Forks, etc. 

Silver Toilet Sets, from $4.98 up. 

Candlesticks from $1.25 pair up. 

Jewel Boxes in gold, ivory and French 
gray, 50c up. 
J Shaving Stands, $3.50 and up. 

Christmas Jewelry 

Neck Chains, Lockets, Brooches, \'eil 
Pins, Watch Fobs, Cuff Links, Waist 
Sets, Rings for Men, Women and Chil- 
dren, Bracelets, etc. 



Cjaus standing --^t has been^mar. 

kf 'hen for I window display, and it 
^ni h« nresented to the chUdren at 
Uiehome"^ for Christmas. It took about 
{wo wTeks- work to make the house. 

. ^~ — 

Dr. H. BrowB. 
Diseases of stomach and Intestlnet. 
J24-425 New Jersey building. ^ay. 



New Year Opening 

Of Duluth Business University for ua^ 
and night classes Monday, -^an^ «• 
College office open from 9 to 12 aui. 
from 1 to 5 each week day until the 
opening. Applicants are requested td 
call to make final arrangements. Loca 
tion 118-120 Fourth avenue west. 
Christie building. Both 'phones. 



sider the employment of a municipal 
expert was voted down. 

An ordinance prohibiting the loca- 
tion of livery stables within 400 feet 
of any club, school or other public 
building may be introduced this even- 
ing. 




PERSONAL 



Elaborate Candy Gift. 

The little Inmates of the Children's 
Home will have the most elaborate 
grift of candy in the city Christmas 
morning. A candy house with a Santa 



TOYS 

V2 PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & CO. 



DIAMONDS, 

JEWELRY, 

SILVERWARE 



Entire Stock to be Closed Out. 



Fifty $11.00 White Ivory Toilet 
and Military Sets, 
while they last. . 



$3.50 



Keystone Loan 
Company, 

22 West Superior St. 



F R. Smalley, traveling agent of 
theSoo Line, with head«3uarters at St 
Paul, win return to the Twin Cities to 
spend the holidays. He has been In 
Duluth for the last two weeks.. ^ ^_ 

F. P. Reed and wife of Hlbbing are 
at the Spalding. , ^ j 

J. H. Smith of Virginia is registered 
at the Spalding. 

Walter Ryan of Iron Mountain is at 

the Lenox. , , ,. tr tji«,.i, 

Robert Bloclt. son of Julius H. Block 

of this citv, who has been on his claim 

in the northern part of the state, is in 

the city today. 

Andv Thompson, traveling passenger 

agent of the Erie, is registered at the 

Lenox. . ,., • . > „* ti-,^ 

J. H. Johnson of Virginia is at the 

T. ^W. Ingersol of Tower 18 at the 

^Hat-ry G. Wilson of Litchfield. Minn., 
is at the McKay. ... ^ ,, 

George Short of Virginia is at the 

^^mts'Dorothy Ro^e of 623 Woodland 
avenue is spending the holidays in 
Marquette, Midi. 

POUGElVANT A 
NEW PATROL WAGON 

Council Will Also Consider 

Bonds and City 

Expert. 

Chief Troyer will ask the council 
this evening to authorize him to pur- 
chase a new patrol wapron. He 
states that the, present Black Maria 
has been i^ service four years ana is 

^*Every once in a while the machine 
is aoing out of commission and If a 
now outfit is not available the city 
will find Itself without its anto patrol. 
The present rig could be repaired jml 
kept In reserve after the new one is 
installed. . . ^ , , , „ 

A petition will be presented asking 
the- council: to use its best efforts to 
<=e ure the authority from the lesHla- 
ture whicli will enable the city to 
is«ue $100,000 of bonds to be used in 
rutting Superior street through the 
Point of Kocks. Tlie petitioners claim 
that traffic in tliat vicinity necessi- 
tates th:} ( pening of the street. 

An effort will be made to secure a 
recoiiEideratlon of the action of last 
weelc when the propo.sal to secure the 
appointment of a committee to <ion- 



WINNERS ANNOUNCED IN 
MISSING WORD CONTEST 

The winners in the mis.sing word 
contest appearing in The Herald Dec. 
20. follows: Mrs E. De Morrow, 313 Vi 
West Fourth street; Mrs. George W. 
Glenn, 319 Forty-second avenue west; 
Andrew Shepherdson, 317 Seventh ave- 
nue east. Tlie missing words were 
"We extend our wishes to all." 

"We" was missing from advertise- 
ment of A. W. Anderson. 

"Extend" was missing from adver- 
tisement of F. H. Lounsberry & Co. 

"Our" was missing from advertise- 
ment of Eclipse Photo Supply Co. 

"Wishes" was missing from adver- 
tisement of Thwing-Stewart & Co. 

"To ' was missing from advertisement 
of J. D. O'Connell. 

"AH" was missing from advertise- 
ment of Boston Music Co. 

The winners In the contest appear- 
ing in The Herald Dec. 21, follows: 

Mrs. A. G. Perry, 311 Sixth avenue 
west- Margaret Lynott, 1224 East 
Third street; Edna King, 519 Fourth 
avenue west. 

The missing words were: The hap- 
piest day of the year." 

"The" was missing from advertise- 
ment of "Ous," The Quality Shop. 

"Happiest" waa missing from adver- 
tisement of Mars & Co. 

"Day" was missing from advertise- 
ment of Bon Ton Bakery. 

"Of" was missing from advertisement 



of Central Reptiir Shop. 

"The" was missing from advertise- 
ment of Arcade Camera Shop. 

"Year" was missing from advertise- 
ment of Donne- & England. 

BOY AND MILUTH 

WOMAN IN CELLS 

Mrs. Ruth Ellis and Sam 

Kaufman Taken Back 

to St. Paul. 

St. Paul. Minn., Dec. 23. — Sammy 
Kaufman, three days ago on his way 
to California to spend the winter with 
Mrs. Ruth Ellis of Duluth, with whom 
he had eloped, returned to St. Paul to- 
day a repentant young pliilosopher. 
Detective Ben Waters of the local po- 
lice department, brought the boy and 
Mrs. Ellis back from Chicago, where 
they had been arrested with $2,100 
worth of jewel ?ry taken from the store 
of Meyer Kaufman. Sammy's father, 
344 Sibley street. 

"Every man finds a woman some- 
times or othei," philosophized Samuel 
through the tars of a cell at police 
headquarters, "for whom he'd go to 
hell! Ruth was the woman in my 
case. I'm not blaming her. I lost my 
head! I didn't even stop to think! We 
beat it!" 

Both Kaufman and Mrs. Elli.-? were 
locked up with a tab charge of grand 
larceny agalnsit them. She gave her 
age as 23. He is 19. 

"I was so crazy about her," Sammy 



continued, "that only one thing stayed 
in my mind. That was to get her. 

"Don't blame Ruth. She has stood 
by me and played square. I'm going 
to stand by her and see that she geta 
out of thi.s scrape." 

Mrs. Eilis, locked in the woman's 
quarters, talked franklv of the af- 
fair. 

"I was partly to blame." she said. 
"I know 1 should not have gone with 
him, but he urged me so! I knew he 
had the jewelr.v. but he told me he 
was a member of the firm, and that he 
had a right to take it. We Intended 
going to California and perhaps start- 
ing a store there." 

Mrs. Ellis" lite atory Is pathetic. Mar- 
ried at tlie age of 17 to a man in 
Colorado, he mistreated her for sev- 
eral years until he was arrested for 
forgery and sentenced to a long term 
in the Colorado state prison, she saya. 
In Duluth, where her mother lives, 
and in St. Paul and Minneapolis she 
was unable to make a living for her- 
self and a little child. 

"I don't care much what becomes of 
me." she said, "but I hope my mother 
will not hear of it. I hope she does 
not come down here. It will break 
her heart." 

Mrs. Ellis said she and Kaufman 
were not married, and did not intend 
to be. unless she could get a divorce 
from her husband after they arrived 
in California. 

The couple probably will be ar- 
raigned in police court tomorrow. It ia 
not likely that the fatlier of the boy 
will push the charges against either 
of the prisoners. 

♦ — 

Stores do not prosper Just because 
they are stores — nor even because they 
are' GOOD stores. They must be 
"pushed by publicity." 



r 



Appreciated Gifts 



n 



ARE THE KIND WE ALL TRY TO GIVE 




f 

are appreciated more than other g-ifts, as they furnish many pleasant hours to 
the recipient and only kind wishes for the giver. 

For this small sum you can ggg^ ^T^^ \V H ' 

have your choice of thousands ^^^H W^L^ ^ ^^ ^^ '^ 

of Books on our 50c Table. C«^F ^^^ ^^.^ Holly Box. 

Don't fail to look over our other stock of novelties, too numerous to men- 
tion, from 10c up. 

Fountain Pens, 14-carat gold, 75c up. 

Christmas Boxes of Cigars, 50c up. 

Come in and have a look at our busy store. 

Edward M. Stone, 

The Bookman. 221 West Superior Street, Duluth, Minn 



I 



■«« 




i»^ 





jj 





Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 



MINNESOTAPOLITICS 

^11 .y —.^— — ^,, ,,■,„■ I , ■ ■■y ■ ■ .-■ ■■ ■- » I ■ 1. i-L- — ■-■■ ■■ »» ■ ■. - ■^■.^■» ■ t — ■■■» ■■— ^ 

Standpatters of Senate Combine to Take Ap- 
pointment of Committees Out of Lieutenant 
Governor's Hands— Axel Ringborg of Bagley 
Is Candidate for Register of Crookston Land 
Office— Stirrup Club Agrees on I. and R. Bill. 



Senate Combine. ] 

A nenate combine to take the ap- 
pointment of committees out of the 
hands of Lieutenant Governor Burn- 
quiet Is being made. 

Senator George H. Sullivan of Still- 
water and Senator F. A. Duxbury of 
Caledonia, reactionary leaders in the 
the senate, are the visible heads of 
the combine. Though they vigorously 
deny any outeide interference, the 
connbine has something about it that 
smacks of K. E. Smith's genius. 

Senators Sullivan and Duxbury. in 
a statement given out at St. Paul 
yesterday, claim they have a majority 
of the senate and that they will put 
their deal through. They say they 
have been Joined by many Demo- 
crats. 

Senator II. W. Cheadle of Duluth Is 
one luim-crat who is credited In the 
Twin Citus with being in the com- 
bination, but Senator Cheadle said to- 
day he has given no pledge and is not 
committed eitlier way. Senator Pugh 
is also credited to the combination. 

The combination ie obviously an at- 
tempt to block progressive legisla- 
tion. Lieutenant Governor-elect Burn- 
qulst is a progressive, who will ap- 
point committees that will report out 
progressive legislation. The attempt 
to take the power of appointing com- 
mittees out of his hands can have no 
other purpose than to prevent pro- 
gressive legislation from getting to 
the floor of the senate in such form 
that it will be acceptable to pro- 
gressives and to the people. 

Most of the st-nators reported to be 
Included in the combination have nev- 
er been counted as progressives and 
n»any of them have been reputed to be 
Intimately connected with Ed Smith 
and the Interests of which he is pop- 
ularly supposed to be the represen- 
tative in state politics. 

A similar movement was started 
among the hovi.se standpatters earlier 
this year, but it was droppetLwhen the 
progressive control of the house was 
asserted by the choice of Henry Rines 
for speaker. The progressives in the 
St rate are not relatively so strong 
as in the house and the reactionaries 
are counting on that fact to put their 
deal through. 

The Democrats are evidently being 
drawn Into tiie combine by promisep 
'>f committee appointments. Some of 
them will probably see the error of 
their ways when they iiear from pro- 
gressive Democratic constituencies, and 
the early publicity given the plan may 
block It. 

The deal Is an obvious effort to 
override the people's will. Biirnquist 
was elected b« cause he Is progressive 
<'nd because his position as presiding 
officer of the senate would be an aid 
to progressive legislation. The effort 
to defeat the people's will will not be 
looked upon kindly over the state. 

* • « 

'Wants Land Office Place. 

Axel lUngborg of Baglej-, register 
of dteds of Clearwater county, is a 
candidate for register of the land of- 
fice at Crookston and his name will 
be presented for appointment by Presi- 
dent Wilson. 

Mr. Ringborg Is said to have strong 
Indorsement from Democrats of • the 
Ninth district. He is well known over 
the state and many men outside of his 
congressional district will support his 
candidacy. He was elected register of 
i^eeds of Clearwater county six years 
ago, being the first Democrat ever 
elected to that office in the county, and 
he has been re-elected at the three 
succeeding elections. 

Frank Jeffers of Red I^ake Falls is 
also understood to be a candidate for 

register of the Crookston land office. 

* « * 

Ivemon For State Land Tax. 

The plan of the Northern Minnesota 
Development association to have a 
state appropriation made to cover the 
amount that would be assessed as 
taxes against state land If they were 



OUT FOR REGISTER OF 
CROOKS! ON lAND OFFICE 




of the state and for the initiative on 8 
per cent petition, the total number for 
the referendum never to exceed 20,000 
and the total number for the Initiative 
never to exceed 25.000. 

The bill will not provide for the sub 
mission of any measures to referendum 
by the legislature without petition, on 
tlie principle that the legislature 
might adopt that method of evading 
responsibility. 

It will provide that statutory meas- 
ures may be adopted by a majority of 
all those voting on the proposition, but 
that constitutional amendments must 
have a majority of all voting at the 
election, as at present. Constitutional 
amendments may be initiated, undor 
the bill. 

The agreement is believed to be such 
that all real friends of direct legislation 
will be able to accord with it. Those 
who favor Inordinately high percent- 
ages are for the most part men who 
are not really friendly to the initiative 
and referendum, but appear to bow to 
public sentiment. 

GEORGE D. McCarthy. 



SAY CASTRO IS 

IN VERY BAD" 



ii\ 



AXEL RINGBORG 
Of Bagley. 



taxable. Is commanding strong sup- 
port. 

State Auditor S. G. Iverson, who is 
intimately acquainted with the handi- 
cap placed on development by the ex- 
eniption of state lands from taxation, 
lias come out in favor of the plan. Mr. 
Iverson has found that the sale of 
state lands is greatly restricted by 
the fact that settlers must pay all of 
the cost of roads and schools in town- 
ships where jnuch state land Is located. 

At the 1911 session of the legislature 
an appropriation of |50,000 was made 
for rural school aid on the basis of 3 
cents per acre, with the provision that 
no township should obtain more than 
$250. At the coming session a much 
larger appropriation will be asked, in 
order that roads as well as school" 
may be given aid on the basis of state 
land acreage. 

« • • 

Progreaslve Meetings. 

Both brandies of Republican pro- 
gressives In Minnesota will hold con- 
ferences late in January. The gather- 
ing of the Minnesota Progressive 
league, originally set for Jan. 7, has 
been postponed until Jan. 22, to accom- 
modate Senator Kenyon of Iowa, who 
could not come to the state on th(> 
earlier date. Tho conference of the 
Progressive partv will be held In* St. 
Paul Jan. 24, with Governor W. R. 
Stubbs of Kansas, Former Senator Al- 
bert J. Beverldge of Indiana and other 
leaders in the Roosevelt movement in 
attendance. The Progressive league 's 
in favor of progressive work within 
the Republican party. The Roosevelt 
men believe tlie only hope of tho Pro- 
gressive cause lies in building up a 
new party, distinct from the Republic- 
an party. 

• <• * 

Initiative and Referendnm. 

The committee appointed by the 
Stirrup club to draft a bill providing 
for the submission of the initiative and 
referendum has agreed on the essential 
points, and the bill will be framed soon. 

It will provide for the referendum 
on petition of 5 per cent of the voters 



(Continued from page 1.) 

out to the members of the diplomatic 
corps In Caracas while he was the 
practical dictator of Venezuela, and his 
disregard for every representation 
made by the American minister in tlie 
interest of Americans who held val- 
uable concessions, incensed tlie state 
department against him. 

Furthermore, there has been a tacit 

understanding that American Influ- 

: ence should be used to prevent Castro 

1 from returning to Venezuela and de- 

i stroying the peaceful conditions and 

I relations with foreign countries which 

the government of President Gomez 

now enjoys. 

Officials of the Immigration service, 
who, it has been suggested, might 
prevent the landing of the ex-president 
as an undesirable alien, have so far 
no request from the state department 
to act in that manner. 

Smnahed the Crookerr. 

Paris, Dec. 23. — The Matin prints an 
amusing account of the adventures In 
P2urope of Cipriano Castro, the ex- 
presldent of Venezuela. "When he ar- 
rived at Antwerp he found twenty de- 
tectives waiting for him. They dogged 
him with varying luck to Brussels 
and thence to Paris. 

The ex-president eluded the detec- 
tives several times with great astute- 
ness. When he arrived in Paris he 
thought he had managed to conceal 
his identity, but soon afterward he 
became involved In a quarrel in a cafe 
and demolished considerable crockery 
with his cane. The police were called 
in and Castro's Identity was disclosed. 

It is believed Castro came to Paris 
for the purpose of fomenting an in- 
surrection in Venezuela, but finding 
that he was not successful in this, 
decided to go to the United States. 
Castro is aboard the steamer La Tou- 
ralne, which sailed Saturday for New 



GREAT DAl^ 
FOR"NEIf$]ES" 

Free Papers for AH Boys 

Who Sell Heralds 

Tuesday. 



Mysterious Friend bf Boys 

Urges "Keep the 

Change" Day. 



The annual Christmas eve newsboys' 
benefit will be given carriers and 
newsboys of The Herald tomorrow. 

Everything taken in will be "vel- 
vet' for the boys. The unknown 
Santa Claus, who yearly pays for all 
the papers furnished carriers and 
newsboys of The Herald, has again 
sent his check to th©\Office and the 
toys will pay for no pat»ers furnished 
them for delivery to their patrons and 
for street sales. 

"Keep the change" will be the word 
tomorrow ■evening. Every year the 
people of Duluth join in the spirit of 
the unknown, who pays for the 
boys' papers, and no change is asked 
or expected by those who ouy papers. 

Nickels, dimes and quarters will be 
paid for copies of The Herald, and 
each will be accompanied by a "Merry 
Christmas" for the boy. The un- 
known pays a good round sum for the 
papers furnished the boys. All he 
asks In return is that his name be 
kept secret and that the people of Du- 
luth Join with him in the benefit by 
paying more than the set price of the 
paper and allowing the boy to "Keep 
the Change." 

Christmas eve is a harvest time for 
the boys. They have never been dis- 
appointed by the people of Duluth 
Everybody joins In the spirit of the 
day and the boy who doesn't make a. 
good week's wages tomqrrow evening 
to carry liim over Christmas time will 
be disF.ppointed. 



York. 



GETS G OOD S ALARY. 

Sheriff of Morton County, N. D., to 
Get About $3,000. 

Mandan, N. D., Dec. 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — 'U'hile the pay of th»» 
sheriffs will be much less under the 
new law, effective Jan 1, than under 
the old system. Sheriff McDonald of 
Morton county will be able to draw a 
salary of about $3,000, which will be 
the third largest in the state. Only 
Cass and Grand Forks counties will 
pay more. 

I'nder the new law the sheriffs are 
paid in proportion to the population of 
the counties, allowed mileage and ex- 

Fenses on trips, and the counties pay 
or the deputies. 
Under the old law all the fees of the 
office went to the sheriffs and in some 
counties the salaries were enormous. 
One year Cass county, in which Fargo 
is located, is reported to have netted 
its sheriff $30,000. That was many 
years ago when there were many sales 
under the old Woods law. 

• 

Blovrn From Boxcar. 
Mandan, N. D., Deo. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Blown from a boxcar on 
which he was working, Anton Klein of 
this city had both wrists dislocated 
and received much other serious injury. 
He Is a repair man for the Northern 
Pacific and was unable to maintain his 
footing because of the gale. 







MRS. ADAMS 
PASSES AWAY 

Weil-Known Duluth Woman 

Dies of Cerebral 

Hemorrhage. 



Mrs. John B. Adams died at 5 o'clock 
tills morning at the family residence, 
2110 East Superior street. Cerebral 
hemorrhage, which came on last "VN'ed- 
nesday, was the cause of death. 

Mrs. Adams was born in Bingham p- 
ton, N. Y., fifty-five years.ago and had 
lived in Duluth twenty-<our years. Her 
death will be a shock to "the *nan}' 
friends she made during her long resi- 
dence in the city. 

Besides her husband, Mre. Adams is 
survived by one daughter. Miss Esthcj- 
Adams. A brother, KuhseW*M. Bennett, 
and a sister, Mrs. Georjtg F. Raynolds, 
both of Minneapolis, aS©' survive. 

The funeral will be held Tuesday 
afternoon, with services at the resi- 
dence at 2 o'clock. Intimate friend.>j 
of the family are asked to attend. In- 
terment will be at Forest Hill ceme- 
tery. 



^«v. 



VICEROY HARDINGE 

WOUNDED BY BOMB 

(Continued from page 1.) 



The Turks are the most 

Nervous People in the World Today 

J hey are the Greatest 
Coffee Drinkers, 

m 

See the point? 

We are not quite sure we. could help them but 




Post\ifn 

helps a lot of people. 



fctand up, but reeled and fainted and 
the officials who gathered around had 
much difficulty in removing him from 
the elephant's back. The howdah in 
which he and Lady Hardlnge had been 
seated was blown into matchwood. 

The viceroy soon will be able to 
leave the hospital for the viceregal 
lodge. 

The bomb thrower has not yet beeji 
caught. A reward of lO.OfljO rupees 
(approximately $3,300)- has been of- 
fered for his arrest. 

The viceroy was making entry In 
state into Delhi as the last of th<; 
ceremonies in connection with the 
transfer of the capital from Calcutta 
to Delhi. The transfer was made in 
October, last, tut Lord Hardlnge was 
not to take formal possession of his 
new quarters until today. 

Bomb Hurled From Honaetop. 

A large gathering of troops, of- 
ficials and Punjab chiefs was present 
to welcome the viceregal party. Its 
splendid elephant processloa had just 
left the railway station, passing 
through Chandal Chowk, when the 
bomb was thrown. It was hurled by a 
man standing on a housetop, and it 
struck the howdah in which were Lord 
and Lady Hardinge. The attendant 
holding a large parasol over the vice- 
regal pair was instantly klllfed. 

The viceroys parasol bearer had 
been killed outright and another at- 
tendant seriously wounded by frag- 
ments of the bomb. 

Ceremonlea Renamed. 

The ceremonies were interrupted for 
only a short period, while the viceroy 
anti vicereine v.ere being conveyed to 
the hospital and viceregal residence 
respectively. 

Sir Guy Fleetwood "Wilson, financial 
member of the council of the governor 
general of India, tooit the viceroy's 
place in the procession, which then 
proceeded on its way through the new 
imperial city to the Durbar camp, 
where a great number of rajas and 
other Indian chieftains were gathered. 
Sir Guy then took up his position in 
front of the viceregal dais and read 
aloud a dispatch from Baron Hardiiig«, 
saying that he was only slightly In- 
jured. The reading of the message 
was received with prolonged cheering. 

The attempt on Baron Hardlnge's 
life roused feelings of intense indigna- 
tion, both among the natives and the 
British officials present, as he is one of 
the most popular men who have ever 
ruled in India. For a long period there 
had been a lull In the native agitation 
which had at various times led to as- 
sassinations of high officials. The at- 
tack on Baron Hardinge by a fanatic 
therefore came with great unexpected- 
ness. 

Expected Xo Tronble. 

Only a snoi t time ago the viceroy 
himself wrote to the India office in 
London saying that the country was 



n 



Duluth * s Great Christmas Em porium 

Che €la$$ Block Store 



"The Shopping Center of Duluth * ' 



Christmas Hints and Suggestions 

nj^HE ILLUSTRATIONS in this advertisement suggest a num- 
' ber of practical gifts that are suitable for persons of all 
ages and of both sexes. t|I Grouped in each picture are a nuni' 
' ber of articles that would make appropriate presents for the 
persons represented. You can duplicate each of these groups 
at this store at very moderate cost. 



We Have Immense 
Quantifies of Fresh, 
New Christmas 
Merchandise 



Gifts for 

Young 

Ladies 




Our Merchandise Is the 

Best We Can Buy and 

Our Prices as Low as 

Good Qualities 

Will Permit 



Gifts for 
Young 

Misses 



I 



T WOULD make a very long list if we should enumerate all of the 
pretty, useful and ornamental gifts we have for young ladies. 

In neckwear, for instance, we have doz- 
ens of kinds, ranging in price from a few 
cents to $20; then we nave a world of 
handkerchiefs, of all kinds, and at all 
prices. For instance, we have hand em- 
broidered handkerchiefs at 98c to $ 7. 98. 

Our ribbons alio furnish a wide range 
for choice. Our assortments are particu- 
larly complete in hair bow ribbons and 
ribbons for fancy work. 

Our extensive stocks of jewelry and leather goods em- 
brace another long list of beautiful and desirable gifts for young la- 
dies and misses. Likewise our glove and hosiery sections and the 
knit goods dept. furnish many beautiful and useful gift articles. 

In fact our store contains about everything that young ladies 
like or desire for Christmas— all are good and moderately priced. 





Gifts for Grand-parents 
and for Old People 



Gifts for Parents 
and Other Relatives 




J] 



// is always safe to conclude that 
:he older members of the family 
will appreciate useful presents. 

They like practical and comfort- 
able things— thmgs that they can 
wear or use. 

This store is Jilted with practical and useful 
gift merchandise, including such items as gloves, rwr^r^ 

handkerchiefs, hosiery, kimonos, bath robes, toilet sets, combs, 
brushes, neckwear, purses and a host of other things. 

If you are undecided as what to give father, grandfather, grandmother, 
your parents, or other serious and sedate friends, a few moments spent in this store 
•will solve the problem to your entire satisfaction. 

We have immense cfuanUties of gift merchandise of all 
kinds. It is allgood and tnoderately priced— that's why 
the store is thronged from morning until night. 




n 



Gifts for the Boys 



Viking Ice Skates 

Regular Price $1.50 



48c 




Gifts for Little GirU 



Dressed Dolls 

Regular Price 19c 

lOc 



We not only have immense quantities of practical gifts for boys 
and girls, we also have splendid picture and story books; some of 
them are very beautiful, all of them are interesting. 

Our list of books for boys and girls includes all of the favorite au- 
thors. Most of them will be sold at reduced prices. 

Our Toyland is filled with amusing, interesting and wonderful 
dolls and toys. If there are any little boys and girls who have not 
seen Toyland they should be sure to visit it tomorrow. 
s . - 

Store Hours Beginning December 26—8:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 

Saturday— 8:30 a. m, to 10 p. m. 



**TKere^s a Reasoiv^^ 



POSTl'M CEREJUi CO., l/TD., BATTLE CREEK, MICH. 



L 



quiet and that the urospects for his 
official entry into Delhi were most fa- 
vorable. 

The bomb was thrown as the great 
procession was passing through the 
Cliandai Chowk, which Is along, nar- 
row, typical Oriental street containing 
many merchandising places. The stores 
are mostly one-story, but some of them 
rise to the height of two stories. A 
street car line runs the whole length of 
the Chandal Chowk, but because of 
the importance of (he day's event tlie 
service had been susperided. 

The viceroy's elephant was an enor- 
mous animal. The driver sat between 
his ears, guiding him in the usual na- 
tive way by tapping hlwi on the for.j- 
head with a steel spike. Behind the 
driver was the great howdah, a box- 
like construction fixed on th© el<». 
phant's saddle. The howdah was cov- 
ered \vlth imperial purple draplnjfs 
decorated with gold lace and tasseLs. 
In It were seated the viceroy and 
vicereine, and at their backs stood an- 
other native attendant, holding over 



their heads the great parasol which In- 
dicates the royal dignity. »,„„,«-, 

Owing to the lowness of the houses 
In the Chandal Chowk, the assassin, 
who stood on one of the roofs, was 
only a few feet from the viceroy and 
vicereine. The bomb, which was evi- 
dently intended to explode by concus- 
sion, burst with terrific force. The 
native holding the umbrella was blown 
from his position and instantly klUed. 
while the driver sitting in front of the 
howdah was v.'ounded in eight places. 
Escaped as By Miracle. 

The escape of Baron and Lady Har- 
dinge was well-nigh miraculous. The 
missile fell only a foot or two from its 
target. The great procession immedi- 
ately came to a standstill and a crowd 
of officials rushed up and found the 
viceroy bleeding and pale, while the 
vicereine was terribly shaken. 

The police immediately surrounded 
the house from which the bomb was 
thrown, and made several arrests. All 
the outlets from the city were placed 
under strict guard. 

Today's celebration marked the car- 
rying out of the announcement that 
the king had made during the great 
coronation durbar of the transfer of 
the imperial capital of India to Delhi. 

Since that announcement was made, 
the viceroy, who had been created 
Baron Hardlnge on his appointment to 
office, has been busy vls-itlng various 

?arts of the country and has been able 
o pay only a few flying visits to Delhi 
to inspect the preparations for the ad- 



vent of the go'.'ernment into the new 
Imperial city. 



««None !Wlcer.*» 

Victor Huofs delicious fresh candies. 



NATION-WIDE SEARCH 
FOR SLAYERS OF LOGUE 

(Contlnu.?d from page 1.) 



hours last Fridlay before the murder 
was committed. Several tenants of 
the building who saw the men arc 
confident that they would be able to 
recognize them. 

The police also are looking for three 
women who are said to have frequent- 
>ed Logue's offloe. Two of them had 
light hair, and one of them is said to 
have called to see Logue at his office 
the day of the nurder. 

Mrs. Logue tcld the police she know 
of several women who sold diamonds 
for her husband on commission, but 
ridiculed the idea that any of these 
women could have had anything to do 
with the slaying of her husband. One 
of the women sought Is known as 
"Gertie." 

Four I'risonera Held. 
AH but four of the suspects were 
released by the police, today. Those 
still held are: 

Clyde Stratton, university graduate, 
who is said to have escaped three 
times from the Ohio state peniten- 



tiary at Columbus, Ohio. 

Frank WllUams, alleged safe blower. 

H. B. Hampton, alleged holdup man. 
fhI^'"^^,?**'"5*'L^* Johnson, believed by 
the police to be the wife of -Toronto 

siTe^blowe?."***"* "^^^^^^ ''"''«^*'^ ^""^ 
Police Capt. Halpin questioned three 
r^T^"^ *"^ *^° "^«" today, but It is 
said that no clews were disclosed. 
T'K "^T'^* ****** Stamps StttlcB.- 
The finding of $3,000 worth of par-, 
eel post stamps in the North side, 
flat used as headquarters bv Stratton 
and his companions today led Federal 
government officials to take a hand In 
the investigation. 

After Inspecting the stamps Post- 
office Inspector Otto expressed tho^ 
opinion that they were stolen from 
small sub-postal stations either in 
Chicago or in a nearby city. 
» - - 

Take Stratton to Ohio. 

Columbus. Ohio, Dec. 23. — Upon re-, 
celpt of a telegram from Chicago au- 
thorities announcing that Clyde Strat- 
ton, escaped penitentiary prisoner, 
held in connection with the Logue 
murder, would be turned over to the 
Ohio authorities, "Warden Jones of the 
Ohio penitentiary announced that he 
will send guards after Stratton to- 
night. 

The escaped prisoner will be brought 
back and compelled to serve the re- 
maining two years of the sentence, ac- 
cording to Warden Jones. 



'' 



.L 



6 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



Becember 23, 191^. 



MANY AGENCIES SEEK TO 
SPREAD CHRISTMAS CHEER 



Few People Who Will Not Be 
Cared for Christ- 
mas Day. 



* 
-> 

* 



■* 

Thf'te tvlll furniMb C hriMtma» ^- 

iay lo nei"«ty: -^ 

F.sdmatoil umber -in 

x,)«-|«>(« — oared for. * 

'■•ulviitlon \riny r»00 -:^ 

\<«Kt«M-iiiteil I'haritiea 1,:M50 * 

Diiliith lliiniaue itoolety... 150 -^ 

loaiiiy |»o«»r Itoaril 750 -# 

>ia«oiiU' Itat-helurH 70 -ajt 

I'ikM Inuuuierable, ^ 

Tho Kethel I nkno>vii. -:fr 

•"ionio of thrive rases iii:iy be * 
:!ui»!U-ated. ^ 

« tf >!<• <)^-ii^jlf-'fc*-4Mif-jfcA-^^ ^ A- JC S i f ♦ A A Ifc l i t 

»> 'r* ^^ •J* 1^ ^* '^> ^^ i^X "tX ^^ ^^ ^^ ^J^ ^^ *^ '|X ^^ ^^ ^^ T* 



T;i,t tho!-.^ will be few- people in 

I'liluth uhr> wii; not be taken care of 

ilay is eviilent by the 

!«reparrttions made in 

thou attention and 

>■ ; : -• irt! any who are 

! b <n overlooked, it 

tht'ir own fault, for, 

! . akiner, the city has 

' •[■ with a fine comb in 

t 1 ir those who need help 

" ■ Christmas joy situ- 

e same as that de- 

i'waln in England re- 

' "Pew escape it." 

tower needy peo- 

than nsual — for several 

- who have the chari- 

char^e declare. The 

so. is that there is 

this yoar and those 

t.i work have it. Only 

i the elderly as a rule 

r reason is that 

so grood until a 

.1 or fuel of any 

' li- tded as generally 

in-i therefore the 
institutions liave 



not been besletfed as they usually ate 
each fall and winter. 

Al«va>a Have Poor. 

'There are always poor people, 
said KnsiRn Graham of the SalV'Ution 
Army "and the army never overlooks 
elaborate preparations for their care. 
We solicit the submitting o£ the 
names of worthy people by persons or 
reputation, and gladly t-ake occasion 
to look after these on the day of our 
Savior's birth. This year we expect 
to send out over 100 baskets, each 
basket containing enough for meals 
for the dav for tlve people. We would 
like reputable people to send in more 
names, 'and we will agree to look 
after them. We will take care of 
about r>00 people." 

Mis.s Meeker of the Associated Char- 
itiea said todav that about 260 fam- 
ilies will be taken care of through 
that otYke. She swys that there are 
not nearly as many looking for char- 
itv as last year and .says that it is 
almost solely those who are sick or 
too old to work who have made rap- 
plication. Some she finds are too 
proud to report their needs, and It Is 
onlv through 'acQuaintances or neigh- 
bor's who know the conditions that 
thev are learned about. This, she 
hope.*;, will be done away with. Needy 
one who report for help, are investi- 
gated, but the matter is kept wholly 
contidential. 

D. McKercher of the 
society says that his 
not been besieged as 
as formerly because 
conditions that exist. 
He expects to aid in assisting between 
tl-.irty and fifty families but says that 
a number of homesteaders in the coun- 
ty have had to be looked after because 
of unfortunate conditions which have 
assailed them. Some of them started 
in with next thing to no money and 
have been living from hand to mouth. 
Frosts killed a good deal of their crop 
and got a lot of their vegetables after 
they had been stored, owing to a lack 
of proper facilities for .storing it. 
Tbe Poor Board. 
Charle.s Shogran, clerk of the coun- 
ty pi>or board, says the board is tak- 
ing care of IT)!) families this winter, 
and that this list will be all that will 
be looked after during the Christmas 
sea'^on. 

"We have our regular list," said Mr. 
Shogran, "but, of course, when any 
otlier case.-? present themselves, and 
have been investigated and found 



Agent Robert 
Duluth Humane 
organization has 
much this year 
of the favorable 









Gentlemen's Gifts 

Cravats de Luxe 

"The most perfect of their kind." 

Gontlcmcn ne\cr tire of fine neckwear, appropriate to the occa- 

•ul C!i!i>i,-tent with tlie style of collar worn. 

.re Silk Four-in-Hands, Club Ties and Ascots have the call. 

1 anrl woven fabrics are about equally favored — 50c upwards. 
Welch, Margetson & Co. London Cravats, $1.00 up. 

Rich Silk Mufflers 

Both knitted and woven— $1.00 to $15.00. 

Pure Linen Handkerchiefs 

25c to $2.50. 
Extra quality Initial — 25c and 50c, 

Values that every judge of quality will appreciate. Beautiful self 
>, checks and stripes. 

Shirts 

The latest styles just received. 

• Star," "Savoy," Wilson Bros., E. & W., and Cluett— $1.50 up- 
wards. 

Pure Silk Shirts combine elegance and durability. The patterns 
arc beautiful and wash as satisfactorily as handkerchiefs — ^$3.50 to $5. 

Ladies* and Gentlemen's Silk Umbrellas 

Extra quality sterling silver and gold-mounted handles at 20 per 
cent less than regular prices— $5.00 to $35.00, less 20 per cent. 

English, Steamer and Auto Rugs— $10.00 to $35.00, less 20 per 
cent. 

Traveling Bags and Suit Cases — $5.00 to $30.00, less 20 per cent. 

Pajamas, Lounge Robes, Smoking Jackets, Sweaters, Waistcoats, 
Seal Caps. 

Evening Dress Accessories 

Opera and Silk Hats, Fownes' and Dent's London Gloves, Dunlap 
and Stetson Hats, Imported Velours, Gift Certificates. 

SHOP EARLY. 

Sf, ^. Oiewert & Co, 



worthy, wi» are glad to help, and that 
is only doing our duty. Tliis year the 
list is much lighter than usual, owing 
to the better working and health con- 
ditions. Ordinarily at the poor farm 
and at the hospital we have »iulte a 
number of cases of typhoid among the 
poor, but this year we have none. Our 
list of consumptives Is cut about in 
lialf also. Tlie year has been health- 
ier and the work has been more plen- 
tiful. These facts have served to keep 
down the list." 

At the Bethel, anybody who Is real- 
ly needy and homeless will be taken 
care of. but tiie charitable end is not 
eni'ouraged. 

•Dependency," said W, .T. McCabe, 
one of tl»e board of directors, "Is a 
thing which we do not encourage. We 
make the prices not only at cost, but 
below that. A man may have a bed 
and bath for a week at 90 cents, and 
have quarters for sleeping, eating and 
reading of exceptional cleanliness. 
However, where a man Is not quite 
fit for work yet, he is given accommo- 
dation. Tliere will be a few at the 
Bethel on Christmas and they will be 
taken care of." 

The Masonic Bachelors have ar- 
ranged to take care of In the neghbor- 
hood of sixty-five to seventy children 
ranging from 8 months to 15 years of 
age. Tile money contributed by the 
Masonic Bachelors is being used to 
purchase clotlting for these children, 
and what is left over will be used to 
buv toys and candies for them, giving 
them a toiuh of luxury as well as 
supplying them with the necessities. 
The cases are those reported upon by 
Miss Heikklla, the nurse in charge of 
the welfare department of the consis- 
tory. 

The Klks. as u.sual, are doing an 
enormous work, and, as usual, refuse 
to talk about it. Jolm Doran is chair- 
man of the committee having the work 
in charge, and this morning he re- 
fused to discuss It. Said he: 

"It Is against the principles of Klk- 
dom to tell about any charitable work 
we mav happen to be carrying on. We 
may boast about the size of our lodges 
and of the good times we have, but one 
tiling we do not mention is the work 
of charity. It is one of the chief 
things of Elkdom to try to make our- 
selves and other.s happy. We are try- 
ing now as we always do." 

CROWOSlT 
NEW RECORD 



Saturday Was Greatest 

Shopping Day in Du- 

luth's History. 



D, H., in 



Stores and Cafes Will Be 

Crowded Two More 

Nights. 



304 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 






THE LAST SHOPPING DAY 



The W. & L. 
Shoe Store's 

TUESDAY 
SPEOAIS 



Men's Slippers, 95c, 
$1.50, $1.75, $2.00 . 

r^Ien's Red Morocco 
Cavalliers, $4 and $5 
grades, $2.50. 

Women's Fur Trim- 
med Juliets, 95c and 
$1.25. 




1912. 



Duluth's shopping district never 
before saw such a crowd as it held 
Saturday. 

From early Saturday morning until 
late Saturday night, people of all 
sizes and ages; people with money 
and people without money; people who 
live in Duluth and people from outsidj 
of the city; people with loads of bun- 
dles and people loading up with bun- 
dles; people of all grades and all con- 
ditions of life crowded through the 
streets and through the stores, gettinis 

ready for Christmas day. 

It was a crowd worth watching. 
The Christmas spirit was shown every- 
where. There was little 111 nature. 
Here and there was an exposition of 
the true spirit of Christmas, as strong 
men helped a feeble little woman or a 
child through the press. The pots of 
the Salvation Army were kept boiling 
at every corner. The salespeople were 
busy but their work was lightened by 
a good-natured tolerance for the rush 
of business that prevented immediato 
attendance. 

Money flowed Into the offices of the 
stores. It was a buying crowd, and 
with few exceptions, every man, wom- 
an and child had money to spend. Tl-c 
Christmas stocks that were kept .as 
complete as possible all •through tho 
rush were well picked over Saturday 
and needed repletion today. 

The trains coming Into the city 
brought thousands from the towns 
nearby to swell the crowds of Duluih 
people already out to wind up their 
Chri-stmas shopping. 

Early Saturday morning, those anx- 
ious to avoid the crowds were out. 
Shortly after noon the semblance of a 
rush began to appear and by the mid- 
dle of the afternoon the days shop- 
ping v.'as at its lieight. There was a 
little let-up during the dinner hour, 
but early In the evening the crowds 
began to assume wonderful propor- 
tions. The streets were black with 
people. The stores were jammed to 
the doors. Progress through the 
crowds was difficult, but everybody 
seemed to be on the move. It was a 
carnival crowd engaged In a carnival 
of Christmas shopping. 

The union depot at train time wa.s 
a sight. The big building was jammed 
with people, each person carrying bun- 
dles. Every outgoing train had stand- 
ing roohm only, although several 
coaches were added to every train. 

Todav and tomorrow are the wind- 
up days. Big crowds will be out 
again. The stores will draw big 
crowds of people who have not yet 
completed their shopping, while many 
others, led by the Christmas spirit, will 
take in the cabaret shows and the 
hotel cafes, reveling In the light and 
music and the Christmas charm. 

This has been the greatest Christmas 
shopping season in the history of I>u- 
luih. It will end tomorrow night, and 
people will turn to their homes to en- 
joy Christmas day by their firesides. 



Exquisite Flowers. 

Big assortment. Prices 
Huot's. 



right at 



Advertising serves the double pur- 
pose of creating a demand and telling 
where It may be supplied. 



Boys' Tan Boots — 
same style as father 
wears — reduced from 
$3.00 to $2.00. 

An endless variety of 
Christmas Slippers to 
choose from. 



We are open evenings. 
The North Country's Largest Shoe Store 



T-Rooiii House 

Modern, except heat, full stone 
basement, lot 50x140, barn and 
chicken house, electric lights. Own- 
er pays taxes 1913. Oue block from 
street ear. 




Terms to Suit. 

CHAS. P. CRAIG & CO. 

.Scllivoud Bnildlne. 'Phones, 40S. 




WW 



1 1 





218 West Superior Street 



1416 Ewt Fourth street, T-rooin hoiise, 
lance rooms, jtiA, hot air heat, electric 
llgUta $32.50 

2409 West Superior Btreet, 7-toom bouse. 
water, rent 15.00 

473 Mesaba avenue, flat, four rooms, new- 
ly iiaperetl and decorated, water, toilet 
drat floor 13.00 

1114 Eaat Superior street, 11 -room house, 
all nuKlem couveniencei, Icdirldual steam 
heating plants. Kent So.OO 

Ashtabula flats, G-roora brick flat, thor- 
ousiily Biodern, malii floor. Itent 42.50 



HOOPES-KOHAGEN CO. 




I As usual the last ^ay will 
J be the biggest of them 
all. Now think whether 
you have not forgotten some one. It's 
still time to mail a tie or some other 
small Columbia article to some out-of-town 
friend. From the ample and well selected Columbia 
stocks you can select scores of appropriate things for any man or boy. 





.^ery Fur Lined Coat 
at a Bargain Price 

We are going out of the men's fur-lined coat business and in 
future will sell from sample or catalog only. 

For this reason we have placed our entire present stock of fur- 
lined coats on sale at prices that will sell them at once. We have 
still on hand about 40 fine fur-lind overcoats. 



The new prices are as follows: 

$135 coats at $95 

$1 10 and $120 coats at . . $85 

$100 coats a't $68 ' 

$85 coats at $57 

$75 coats at $52 I 



$65 (and some $75) coats at. . .$46 

$50 and $55 coats at $37 

$45 coats at $28 

$40 coats at $26 

Some $40 coats at $24 

$35 coats at $24 



Tomorrow V"^^^^^^^'^'^ 
No. 9 of theVVtra Specials 

The last of our Holiday Specials consists of regular 50c and 
75c pure 

Silk Hose 
For Men 



at 



35c 



or 

3 

for 

$1 



All shades — maroon, tan, gray, navy, green and purple. 



Tomorrow last day of the $ 1 ^.65 Suit and It includes everything 
Holiday Clothes Special, the 1 ^ Overcoat Sale up to $20.00 in value. 

All other advertised specials of which we have any left will be good until tomorrow night. 



*CL«:? 



Dulufti, 
Minn. 




COLUMBIA 



At Third 
Ave. West 



The Man's Store that's now crowded with women shoppers. 



BOOSTERS 
ARE COMING 



iiib. 



Traveling Men Represent- 
ing Duluth Houses Head- 
ed Toward Home. 



Annual Hoyse Conferences 

Scheduled for Next 

Two Weeks. 



men of the firm's road sales force "will 
be in Duluth. 

Nearly 200 men who represent the 
Marshall-Wells Hardware company on 
the road will be in next week for the 
annual school of instruction. The 
school will be varied with entertain- 
ment, and the whole force will be 
guests of the house at a dinner at the 
Commercial club at noon New Year's 
Day. 

The Gowan-Peyton-Congdon com- 
pany's men, numbering about twenty- 
five, will be In during Christmas week. 
No program has been arranged, but 
the men will be taken in hand by the 
department managers for conferences. 

"The Wright-Clarkson Mercantile 
company ajad the Rust-Parker-Martin 
company will have some of their men 
in, but there will be no general con- 
ferences. 



W. H. GOOK SUED 
BY CHICAGO MAN 



If you are "easily satisfied" with 
your boarding place, it will not be long 
before nothing else wUl matter much, 
either. 



Lumber Broker Claims 

$35,000 in Fees for 

Sale of Stock. 



Chicago, Dei 
to the organi: 
trust Is expect 
suit filed in 

Donald MacMl 
broker, agains 
man of Dulut 
the L.orimer 
brought Into t 
Through his 



. 23. — Inside Information 
nation of the lumber 
ed to be developed in a 
the municipal court by 

llan, a La Salle street 
t Wirt Cook, a lumber- 
h, Minn. Sidelights on 

scandal also may be 
lie case. 

attorneys, Mr. MacMil- 



lan claims a commission of $35,000 for 
bringing about the sale of 6.l!»0 shares 
in the Virginia & Rainy Lake company 
to Frederick Weyerliaeuser, the St. 
Paul lumber magnate. 

The petition recites that Weyer- 
haeuser paid Cook $126 a share for 
this stock, or $778,680. Mr. MacMillan 
asserts that he was promised a com- 
mission of $5 a share by Cook, or $30,- 
900, which, with interest and costs, 
brings the claim up to the amount of 
the suit. The sale was consummated, 
it is said, June 15, 1911. The Lorimer 
investigation was then being con- 
ducted by the United States senate. 



W. H. Cook. v.-ho is the defendant 
in the suit, declined to discuss it today, 
except to say that there was "nothing 
to it." Mr. Cook was a promineiit 
witness in the Lorimer case. 



If "shopping" Is pleasant to you 
under most any circumstances, it 
would be delightful If you were a reg- 
ular ad reader. 



Duluth's best boosters are headed lor 
the town they tooost. 

They see Duluth only two or three 
times a year, but they talk Duluth all 
through the year, day in and day cut, 
from Portland, Or., to Portland, Me., 
and from Alaska to somewhere down 
along the Southern Iowa line. 

They are the traveling representa- 
tives of Duluth wholesale houses, and 
they are the best advertisers Duluth 
has. 

The annual house conferences are 
held during holiday week, when there's 
nothing doing in a business way on 
the road. The traveling salesmen then 
come into town to meet the heads of 
the houses, talk shop and partake of 
the hospitality of their employers. 

Almost every night after Christnas 
a crowd will gather at the Commcn:ial 
club for a dinner as guests of tlio 
"house." other crowds will be at the 
theaters as guests of the same general 
host Every house cultivates the good 
will as well as the salesmanship of 
its employes, and the road men are 
always welcomed with open arms and 
sent forth again believing that their 
house is the best, and that Duluth is 
the best town to represent ou the 

'^^Many of the traveling salesmen make 
their homes in Duluth. and they are 
already in to spend Christmas with 
their families. Others have homes at 
their headquarters, and they will turn 
toward Duluth after the Christmas 
dinner at home. Thursday and 1? riday 
Duluth will be flooded with traveling 
salesmen, who will get new material 
with which to sell goods and make 
Duluth better known. 

T^e Kelley-How-Thomson company 
will* have over fifty men in the <:lty 
Thursday, Friday and Saturday of this 
week Thursday night the men will be 
entertained at a dinner at the Com- 
mercial club, and It will be followed by 
a party at the Orpheum theater. Dur- 
ing the business hours of the three 
lavs, house conferences will be held. 

The men who travel out for the 
Stone-Ordesun-W^Us company and make 
their homes in Duluth are already ar- 
riving. The others will come In next 
week and Dec. 30 and 31 wlU be taken 
in hand by the heads of the house and 
department managers for Instructions 
in goods and new methods of sales- 
manship. The night of Dec. 30, they 
will be entertained at a theater party 
and the following night will be the 
guests of the house at a dinner at the 
Commercial club. About seventy-five 



-^; 



0/ (li* 



!V 



Vr 



iUUil'Hff 



Ill 



m 



•fi^^ 



f 



Pnin 



!«-%? 



^> 



fiJ" 



V.% 



^ 



^ ^ ^ A Piano for the Home 

'" STEINWAY AND KURTZMANN 

WERE USED BY 

EMIUANO RENAUD 

WITH 

CALVE AND GASPARRI 

IN THEIR CO\XERT AT DULUTH. 



STONWAY 

The Standard of the Piano 
World. 



KURTZMANN 

The Piano of the Cottage and 
Mansion. 



BOTH RECEIVED THE HIGHI.ST PRAISE FROM EMILIANO RENAUD 

Excluiive Representatives 

n 



309-31 1 
W«$t First St. 

Elks BIdg. 



9J 



Steinway Pianos O O Pianola Pianos 

■ T^lkiMg Machines i 



PbOMs: 
Mtlrm 1714 
6rMi lOOi 



Miax*- 



*«-| 




i 







Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 





,y^^/9/9/9/9%9i%9/9/«/S«'@yS/®.@^^S/S'^9^ 



MARINE 



t 



mm 




merry ebristmas 



Through this publication we extend to our 
patrons and friends our sincere wish for a Merry 
Christmas and Happy New Year. We thank our 
customers for their good will and liberal patron- 
age with the assurance that it shall be our pur- 
pose to merit a continuance of your trade. Our 
policy of square dealing and the high standard 
of merchandise will be maintained during the year 
of 1913 as it has been in the past. Our aim is to 
serve you. 



n ORE OFFERS 
VERY HEAVY 







MILllll— Si;rE2iOR— YlifilNU 




Vessel Managers Besieged 

for Bottoms for Next 

Year's Business, 




Thoughtful Christmas Gift Buyers 

win make wise and suitable selection from our most complete and 
varied stock of leather goods. We are showing durable, useful gifts in 

Hand Bags, Suit Cases, Leather Work Baskets, 
Traveling Bags, Thermos Bottle Cases, Pocket 
Books and Trunks, at moderate prices. Special 
values in Ladies' Hand Bags at $1.00, $1.75, 
$2.75, $3.75, $5.00, $7.50 and upwards. 

Call and see them. They're made to wear. They're sure to please. 

OURS, THE IDEAL GIFT STORE. 

DULUTH TRUNK CO., 

MANUFACTURERS. 
Established 1888 — Moritz, L'Amie & Moritz. 

220 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



Question Is as to How Mucn 

They Can Carry, 

Not Get. 



NOT IN 




// we -were, we ynould get 
out of it. 

MERRITT&HECTOR 

Printers and Binders. 

"Rvsh Orders a p:easure" 

112 WEST FIRST STREET 



Word conies from Cleveland that not 
for many years have vessel managers 
had so much ore offered them by sin- 
gle firms as has been the case since 
chartering for next season was started 
Tuesday. Ships that have never car- 
ried ore for some firms will next year 
liaul large amounts ror these com- 
panies. 

In the chartering that has been done 
so far managers have been asked how 
much they will be able to carry rather 
than being told they can have a speci- 
fied amount. Some of tlie largest 
shippers have, the last two days, 
passed the word down the line that no 
owner need fear that he will not have 
enough ore to keep liis vessels busy. 
This has led a few owners to believe 
they will be better off if part of their 
capacity is not under contract for the 
full season. 

In llie aggregate contracts and op- 
tions for the transportation of ore in 
1913 cover close to 4,500,000 tons, and 
with one exception, no sliipper has ar- 
ranged to float more than a small part 
of his shipments for next j-ear. 

The season of l'J12 demonstrated the 
unloading docks can do more than 
their rated capacity. With the tre- 
mendous movement of the season it 
was necessary that the unloading 
docks keep up a steady pace, with tho 
result boats made better time and 
carried more cargoes than they did in 
previous big years. The docks will 
have to do as well this coming summer 
to permit the fleet to handle the 50,- 
000,000 tons which apparently will je 
the total in 1913. 

The ore mines and ore railroads of 
the Northwest will use more coal thiin 
ueual in the work they will perform 
in getting this vast amount of ore 
to the lake front and the coal move- 
ment will be correspondingly large. 
The attitude of the ore shippers the 
last few years has been favorable to 
having the last cargoes loaded by the 
middle of November. There is no rea- 
son to expect them to change their 
views next season, and with other mat- 
ters out of tlie way they probably will 
make a determined effort to accom- 
plish this end. 



BEHER INSPECTION 
LAWS ARE NEEDED 



IS STRICKEN WHILE 
WaiTINC FOR TRAIN 

Albert Hankey, Railroad 

Meat Contractor, Dies 

Suddenly at Williston. 

AVIUiston. N. D.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — While waiting for a 



train here on his way to spend Christ- 
mas with a brother, Albert Hankey, 
aged nl, died of heart failure. He was 
seated alongside of his wife and her 
failure to get a response to a ques- 
tion was the first knowledge slie had 
that anything was wrong. 

Mr. Hankey handled the moat con- 
tract for the Great Northern when that 
road was building through the North- 
west twenty-seven years ago. He 
later was engaged in the stock busi- 
ness at South St. Paul, Minn., and the 
funeral will be held in St. Paul to- 
morrow. 



"Most Excellent,*' 

Victor Huot's fresh daily candies. 




Losses of Several Vessels 

Due to Unseaworthiness, 

It Is Claimed. 

Apropos to the recent loss of the 
schooner Rouse Simmons In Lake 
Michigan, and the water logging of 
three lumber "hookers" and their 
consequent abandonment at Detroit, 
Capt. John Stevenson has the follow- 
ing to say in the Detroit News. 

"There is not a particle of doubt that 
the majority of the barges lost were 
unseaworthy before they ever left port. 
Congress furnishes no means of pre- 
venting theee old hulks from going on 
a voyage and thereby imperiling hun- 
dreds of lives every year. Until con- 
gress passes a bill by which the 
barges and schooners come under an 
inspection service, loss and risks will 
continue as long as there are any 
barges left to navigate the lakes. 

'"Ocean going boats must undergo 
an Inspection, so why not those that 
navigate the lakes. The only inspec- 
tion law covering barges or schooners 
Is one that states that all schooners 
over 700 tons must be inspected,* and 
at the present time there is not a 
schooner on the lakes of 700 tons. 
When llie name of a barge Is changed 
she must be inspected for her sea- 
worthiness, but at no other time. 

"Waterlogged and old enough for re- 
tirement, the barges Donaldson and 
King He at the foot of Hastings street. 
If it were possible to engage a crew to 
man these two old hulks, they would 
be permitted to hoist sails and clear 
from port or be towed out, as there 
is no law tliat could prevent them. 

"Since 1852 various classes of boats 
have been added to the list of vessels 
tliat must stand Inspection or lose 
their license, but no provision has been 
made for the inspection of barges. 
Nearly every barge carries a com- 
plement of from six to seven men. The 
question arises, are the lives of these 
sailors not just as valuable as those 
of the men who navigate the larger 
boats? Are they not entitled to the 
same protection as the passengers wlio 
travel on the large passenger boats? 
The answer in each case is that they 
are. 

"The crews of the two barges that 
limped Into this port Sunday night 
were called timid because they showed 
a rebellious spirit In bringing the 
boats across Lake Huron and Lake St. 
Clair. If they had walked off the boat 
they would have been charged with 
mutiny and probably locked up. But if 
the barge had sunk and their lives 
lost the populace would have said that 
they were foolish to have shipped on 
the boats and the matter would have 
dropped at that. 

"That congress should get busy and 
add the barges and schooners to the 
list of boats to be inspected and re- 
ceive re-lnspectlon every year is evi- 
denced by the large number of boats 
lost and the larger number of lives 
that go to eternity with them. When 
t-.is is done the chance of sailors los- 
ing their lives on rotten old hulks of 
schooners and barges will be greatly 
reduced although not quite eliminated. 
"It would be an easy matter for 
congress to add these boats to the list 
of those to be Inspected. The only 
thing that would have to be done 
would be to change the law to read 
from "tow barges of from 700 tons' to 
'barges.' It should be done and It will 
be done Ifl tlijie." 



JAY W, ANDERSON, 

Agent, DULUTH BRANCH. 

PH0NE5, ZENITH, GRAND, 1800 DULUTH, MELROSE, 1800. 



NO DANGER OF COAL 
FAMINE NEXT YEAR 



Docks Well Supplied and 

Conditions Favorable 

for Producing. 

"November coal shipments from the 
Head of the Lakes were almost as 
heavy tills year as for the same month 
last year, according to reports from 
the railroad offices," says the Coal 
Trade Journal. 'The shipments last 
month amounted to 23,447 carloads. But 



I 



Our ''Last Suggestions to Those 
In Search of Qhristmas Gifts 






lir^---^T>^M— >^ 



Regular $3.75 Imported 3-piece 
Carving Sets for ^ g^ OiO 

Tuesday only 9^» "O 

8-inch Nickel Plated Casseroles, 
fitted with Guernsey ^ « OiO 
linings, special V^ '• 5^® 

Hundreds of Novelty fSiJOg^ 
Pictures to cloi»e at ^^OC 

4 

Rockinj^ Horses 

Upholstered Double Rocking 
Horses, on swinging ^g TC% 
gear w'* • >^ 

Skis for the Children g^Gr% 

Christmas special dOC 

Boys' and Girl's Polished »*jO^^ 
Steel Skates -^OC 



Tuesday being the last opportunity to complete your gift 
list we are offering a few very low priced specials for that 
day. Every department is fairly bristling v.ith tempting 
gift suggestions for the belated buyer. Every special that 
we are offering is worthy of investigation. If you are in 
doubt as to what to buy, let us help you. This is your last 
opportunity to profit by the Big Reductions noted below. 





Electric Portables 

Why not present your family with a 
handsome Electric Portable for 
Christmas? Our Christmas spe- 
cials are certainl}- more attractive 
than ever before. 
Special Brass Desk Lamps — with 
green shades; exceptional values, are 
marked to ^O PMG 

close at ^pjCm-^C^ 

Brass Portables — With green and amber 
art glass shades, two lights; ti^O ^/) 
regular price $11, Tuesday. . . ijpOa^C/ 
Japanese Art Craft Lamps — With silk 
shades of various design:;; ^/O fZi\ 
regular price $21.50, now . . .^pM^m Z^ " 



Regular $3.00 Quadruple Plated 
Sugars and ^g OiC 

Creams v'-" • Z^^ 



Goffee 
Machines 

7-cup CoiTee Ma- 
chines, in nickel or 
copper — a Christmas 
special at — 




$ /l- 75 



U 




$2. 75 



French & Bassett Co. 
special set 

Six Quadruple Plated Knives 
and Forks. The best ever. 



Special Price Table 



lOe 



Sugars and Creams. 
Plates, Cups and 
Saucers, Fern Dish- 
es, Candle sticks. 
Stickpin Holders. 



Bread and Milk 
Sets, Mayonnaise 
Bowls, Children's 
Sets, Rose Bowls. 



I5e 



Boxes, 



Powder 
Tea 

Trays, Tea 
Stands, Fern Dishes. 



Hat Pin Holders, 
Strainers, Ash Salts and Peppers, 
p X i Vases, Plates, Fern 
^ ° ^ j Dit hes. Match Hold- 
ers. 



50c 



Vases. 



75c 



Card Trays, Spoon 

Trays. Cande5ticks,1 ^^^'^^ J^^' ^'^^^ 
■' ' 'Fern Dish 



Salad Bowls, To- 
rass 
Hat 



hes. 
Pin Holders. 



$1.00 



Steins, Jugs, Tobacco Jars, Sugars and Creams, 
Plates. 



Doll Bu^^ies 

Special Doll Buggies— 6-inch wheels, 
14 inches long, at M Q^^ 

only -^OC 

Collapsible Doll Buggies — Rubber 
tires, fully upholstered — 

$1.15 

Handsome 
English Doll 
Cabs, to close 
at— 

$2.9S 




Specials From Our Popular 3rd Floor 



Real Lace Lunch 
Gloths and Doilies 

Real Cluny, Arabian and Florentine 
Lace Pieces, with linen centers, all to be 
closed out at Half Price. 
$7.50 Real Lace Lunch Cloths.. $3.75 
$12.50 Real Lace Lunch Cloths. . $6.25 
$15.00 Real Lace Lunch Cloths. . $7.50 
$30.00 Real Lace Lunch Cloths. .$15.00 
$35.00 Real Lace Lunch Cloths. .$17.50 

60c Real Lace Plate Doilies 35c 

80c Real Lace Plate Doilies 45c 

$1.00 Real Lace Plate Doilies 55c 

$1.50 Real Lace Plate Doilies 85c 

$2.00 Real Lace Plate Doilies $1.10 



Garpet Hassocks 
and Foot Rests 





l^'t^^ 






Oak Frame Screens 

Our entire stock of handsome Wea- 
thered Oak Screens, Avith fillings of red, 
green and brown Burlap, Cretonne and 
Tapestry, to be cltosed out at % Price. 

$4.00 Screens will be $2.00 

$6.00 Screens will be $3.00 

$10.00 Screens will be $5.00 

$12.00 Screens will be $6.00 

$15.00 Screens will be $7.50 

$4.00 Weathered Oak Fireplace 

Scrjiens $2.00 

Leather Table Mats 

$7.50 Leather Mats will sell for $3.75 

$8.00 Leather Mats will sell for $4.00 

$10.00 Leather Mats will sell for $6.00 

$14.00 Leather Mats will sell for $7.00 




Regularly $1.00 



V — in all stvles 



50c 



36x36 Reversible 
Imperial Rugs 

$L75 



Regular price 
$3.50 



27x5U Scotch 
Kilmarnock Ru^s 

in all colors; regu- 
larly $4.00 



$2.00 




Qhristmas Clearance of 

Magazine Racks, Plant Stands and Taborets 

At Half Price 



All Magazine Racks up to 
$4.75 in price to go at HALF 
PRICE. 



All Oak Taborets and 
Plant Stands to go at HALF 
PRICE. 



Regular $4.75 Magazine Racks 
will sell for ^ ^ ^Q 

only ^^J^mtyC^ 

Regular $3.00 Magazine Rocks 
will sell for only 

$L50 

All Bamboo Racks to close 
at HALF PRICE. 

$2.95 Music Racks will 
sell for-— 



$LU8 

$1.95 Music Racks will 
sell for — 

9Sc 





90c Weathered Oak 
Stands will be 

50c Golden Oak 
Stands will be 



U5c 



$1.75 Early English 
Stands will be 



88c 
98c 



GOOD 

Established 1887 



$1.95 Golden Oak 
Stands will be. .. . 

$1.25 Weathered Oak 
Stands will be — 

63c 

$2.75 Mahogany Stands 
will be — 

$1.38 

Many other equally 

First Street and Third Ave. West good values in au finishes. 



ri^/fN/Ti/i?^ 



for the fact that many of the dealers 
were well stocked In expectation of a 
possible shortage, the November ship- 
ments would have been fully as h«!avy 
this year as last. The weather also 
was much more moderate and when 
the cold wave did come it did not re- 
Bult In the usual stampede for fuel, 
for the reason that the .distributing 
dealers were quite Well stocked 




tn^ . - 

loaded close to ^h^t Is considered 
tliclr normal condition at this time or 
the year and there i^ more fuel In the 
hands of the dealers tbon there has 
been in previous years. Tnefe w/iH a 
big' rush of coal to the Heaa of the 
Lakes during the la.st few days of the 
seasdh and after navigation officially 
was closed the receipts here amounted 
to a considerable tonnage. iSome grades 
of antharcite coal will b? gcarce be- 
fore the winter is over and there also 
may be insufficient blrumlnoue in 
popular sizes, but generally speaking 
there will be nothing like a coal 
famine. 

"Much of the coal helng| moved now 
is for railroad use, as the roads were 
not included In the rush to stock up. 



having contracts with the coal com- 
panies to furnish the amount of fuel 
desired. In anticipation of cold weath- 
er and poor operating conditions the 
railroads now are moving coal to sup- 
ply points and the shipments at pres- 
ent amount to 1,000 cars of coal a day. 
At the present rate the December 
shipments will equal those of the same 
month last year, when the movement 
was considered tremendous." 



LOADlMe CHARGE. 

Escanaba Railroads Inflict Fine for 
Delays at Docks. 

The railroads at Escanaba have an- 
nounled a charge of 6 cents a ton wlli 
be made next season for loading ore 
into vessels. The charge Is regulated 
by the number of days elapsing be- 
tween the arrival of the 9re In the rail- 
road yards at Escanaba and the tlmo 
in which It Is put aboard the ship. For 
ore loaded within ten days a charge 
of 5 cents a gross ton will be made. 
For each ten days or part thereof after 
the expiration of the first ten days 5 



cents a ton a 
This will n 
sels, but will 
the stock of 
the minimum 
caseB tried to 
on the docks 
the ships w 
wait. The nt 
feet next mo 



dditlonal will be charged, 
ot be charged to the ves- 
have a tendency to keep 
ore at the docks down to 
. Shippers have In most 
have a few thousand tons 
throughout the season so 
juld have no reason to 
w tariff will go into ef- 
lUh. 



MATTHEWS IS SAFE. 

Last Vessel Down Lakes Enters Lake 
Erie Under Own Steam. 

Detroit, Mi:h., Dec. 28. — The freight 
steamer W^. J3. Matthews, reported as 
disabled In Liike St. Clair, passed down 
the Detroit river yesterday and last 
night was reported from Pelee island 
as making good headway on her trip 
to Cleveland! 

The ateanrer was not damaged. 
Heavy ice blocked her progress and 
this led to the report that she had met 
with accident. A tug sent to her as- 
sistance cleared a pas.sage through the 
lake and the Matthews proceeded un- 
der her own steam. 



MEXICAN REBELS 

GETTiNG BOLDER 

Situation in Durango ancfc 
Zaoatecas Is Grow- 
ing Worse. 

Washington, Dec. 23. — Revolutionists, 
appear to be growing bolder as they- 
see the ease of evading pursuit and. 
capture by the Mexican government, 
according to a statement authorized- 
today by the state department. 

Reports Indicate the renewal of ' 
rebel activity in the states of Morales, 
Puebla and Mexico, while the situation 
in Zacatecas and Durango Is rapidly 
going from bad to worse^^. Great dam- 
age has been done to the Northwestern ^ 
railroad south of Ciudad Juarez. The. 
strikers at the Cananea mines no^ 
number 1,800. 



/> 







i*.. 



w- 



9 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, ldl2. 



THE "GO OD fELLOW" DEPA RTMENT 

Slogan— "Not an Empty Stocking in Duluth Christmas Morning/' 



MORE NAMES 
ARE^ANTED 

List of Empty Stocking 

"Prospects" Has Been 

Exhausted. 



FILL OUT THESE COUPONS. 



Only One More Day of the 
Good Fellow Cam- 
paign. 



r 



-.?> nioro day for the 

pr*^sont themselves. 

i'ditor will be at 

T" . :itil C o'clock to- 

,iv.,\ will tl'.en take 

lilt on the list and 

inions? a few of his 

v-> or three for hlm- 

t: > t> have a list of 

t\.ul.U)le tor telephone calls to- 

r-'i rnv 'irt.M noon. 

s.uvr. lay evening found the Good 

F ■low IMitor with a clean sheet and 

.1 few Good Fellows to 

'- : V name that had been 

:i investigated and 

t;>od Fellow to take 

i.-tt of the Associated 

;.lso been exhausted. 

an that every family 

• 1 Charities list had 

:i!upl'. provided for, but 

- hi^t,] been made for a 

iiitii (Maus to every child 

and it Is assured from 

.-! that every family will 

iinner on Christmas and 

• 1 keep them warm. 

< 'li-.;i-n or more Good 

•i> sent their names 

ice who have not yet 

name of a child to care 

las eve. That is because 

• nv KJitor has no more 

ui3i these Good Fellows 



rec> 






To the Ciood Fellow ISdItori 

cliilil 
I will neree to take the names of children and aee 

s 

$1 that Santn ClauH at leuHt payti them a visit. 

Stoned 

Addreifs . . . . ? .». 



To the r^ood Fellow Editor: 



There is a fanUly llvlnie at (Klve Cull addresa here). 



.conMiMtins of children, who will 



have no ChrlMtmas toya unlesiM aome (<ood Fellow takes the ca.te in hand. 
The children's ages are (state name, age and sex o( each child) 

I ■•' 

Signed 

Address 



Rememlier that all of the information you may eive in eonMldered 
Confidential. If you iTant t<* Klve food or olothlnK- In atldition to tojs 
^ pieuse mention it on the coupon and it will avoid duitlloatiou of charities. 



have been overlooked. Names are 
wanted today. If there Is a child in 
the city who is likely to awake next 
Wednesday morning to find an empty 
stocking the Good Fellow Editor wants 
to know it and know It today or to- 
morrow. Don't be afraid of duplicating. 
The hames sent In are checked over 
with the Associated Charities list and 
there will be no duplications. 

If you know of a family |hat is like- 
ly to be in want, send the name in and 
the case will be investigated. This 
Good Fellow movement has Just one 
object, to give the greatest possible 
measure of happiness to tlie greatest 
possible number of people on Christ- 
mas day and Christmas eve. And the 



TALKS ON TOWN 

DEVELOPMENT 



HOW DOES THIS 
TOWN LOOK FROM 

THE RAILROAD? 

By Frank Parker Stockbrldge. 

: ipmoiit cimi<aTiy. 
I ilia who isn't 
I ">wn. 

■ • proud of your town, 
^ o you to stay here? 

: lere are some things 
It '. — ^aboui any town — tliat 

i he liEALLY prou:il of, 

I :':-i that are easily 

J ; pull together to 

the town looks from 
I . instance. 

i traveler see when he 

< a train? Being proud 

• i like to have it make 

i ; • .s.sion as possible on 

viuj never saw it before. 



pas 
H n y 



duz- 
p ■',. 

I 



of ■ 

I 

f 

I'- ; 

y .-1 
i 

I.,.;- 



iUo.l. 



m passing through get 
iai tliat he says: 'Gee. 
t live town, all right, 
re." 

two towns that made 

It way — one or two. 

■r your town is one 

■r. hiir the towns you 

the railroad haven't 

I don't wonder at 

way most of them look 

ed to tell my name if I 

reputable and down at 

. r>st American cities look 

m window. Going from 

Buftalo a short time ago 

Vnrlc «'entral we passed 

• a hundred cities and 

'.n-s. There weren't a 

1 the station signs where 

cai.s could see them. I 

' ) know the names of 

: ; too — they looked so 

: : i . about it?" you ask. 

and see to it that all 

,- facing the railroad 

up and painted and KEPT 

You can do as old Bill 

i o do. up at Eyons. Rill 

warehouse alongside the 

an apple warehouse 

~ !'ie object, at best, 

kept his warehouse 

; and the grass cut 

i: ! • :i-' windows clean, and 

_, -;-a in white letters feet 



much for the town, if it didn't go any 
farther. 

But It ought to go farther. Why 
don't you put it up to them? 

If you'll pull together you can stir 
up such a civic pride among the prop- 
erty owners of this town that this tim<; 
next year everybody that goes through 
will want to come back to stop awhile. 
That's where team work comes in. 
Any bunch of live men can make any 
town look like a regular metropolis. 
Tliere'a a live bunch working to make 
your town better. If you can't fiad 
any other excuse for working with 
them, try this one. 

You can't expect the rest of the 
world to be proud of this town unless 
you make the town so proud of Itself 
that it's ashamed to be seen in its 
shirt sleeves, with its collar off, its 
face dirty and its shoe.'j muddy. 

That's the way most towns look 
from the railroad. 

You'll be surprised to find how 

qulcklv the people of this town grab 

at the idea, once you suggest It to 

them. 

Try It. 

. « . 

Candied Fruits. 

None nicer than Victor Huot's. 



Good Fellows have a better time than 
those who receive the gifts. It is a 
chance for the Good Fellows to study 
tact In giving, to learn thoughtfulness 
for others, and to give that which 
counts more than money — time, care 
and thought. 

And remember the slogan — "Not an 
empty stocking In Duluth on Christmas 
day." 

P. f. — Parents please watch those 
Santa Claus letters, so that the Good 
Fellow Editor will not be fooled by 
them and mistake them for an appeal 
for help. These letters cause many 
useless trips of investigation, fo" Uncle 
Sam is turning over most of the Santa 
Claus letters to The Herald. 



of longer period.^. This bill also nro- 
vides that examinations shall be made 
of such institutions by the insurance 
oomriis sioner and that licenses shall 
be Issued to Its solicitors. This class of 
companies shall also be subjected to 
a general supervision as other classes 
of insurance companies, and that they 
shall pay the same tax as other in- 
surance institutions, making annual 
statements to the departments, and 
coniorming to similar regulations. 




THIS WEEKS MATHER 



REGULATION OF 

INTER-INSURANCE 



WII.LTAM DEADT 
APPLES 
EYONS. N. Y. 



lis; 
pii 



:r...l 



ETOt past Tiyona without 

name of the town and 

^vh<re Bill Deady did biisi- 

il.^ who had never stopped 

at rayons got so they felt 

with Bill and with the town. 

P.ill shipped his apples to 

• If Bufi'alo, with his name 

•■!?! md boxe.s, the buyers 

'j: about those apples 

i.ce in them, because 

tiiat a rnan that would 

i.^ ' < keep hi.s property In such 

m si'.ape wouldn't try to 

' apples on them. And 

ejht. Bill was proud of 

I pro'id of hla business and 

self — too proud too cheat, 

pple business. 

it Y(jU can do. But if 

any property frontage on 

. ')u can .still do something 

igers take an Intere.st in 

in do more, in fact, than 

il ran do, by taking hold 

r fellows in the Commer- 

1 getting them to Join to- 

• tiie town a new "face." 

iaatlop can put a label on 

n, i.,r one thing. Put up big 

hat every one will see before 

1 the town, telling what its 

:. 1 whjt it's on the map for. 

approaching Prosperltv Cen- 

^ tif*^ it" worth livlng.'''Home- 

''vit The Commercial club 

ny trouble doing that 



■V\'ashlngton, Dec. 23. — General ralna 
in the .Southern states and snow and. 
rain in the Northern states east of the 
Mississippi river and in the southwest, 
are predicted for this week by the 
weather bureau as a result of disturb, 
ances now covering the far Northvve.st 
and the Rio Grande valley, which will 
move eastward to the Great Central 
valley Monday, and the Eastern states 
Tuesdav or Wedne.sday. 

Another disturbance will appear in 
the far West about Wednesday and 
move eastward, attended by snows in 
Northern and Middle states and pre- 
ceded by rising temperature, crossing 
the Mississippi valley about Thursday 
and the Eastern states Friday or Sat- 
urday. This disturbance will be fol- 
lowed bv a period of much colder 
M'eather over the greater part of the 
country, east of the Rocky mountains. 



rtM 

i;n<i 

the-,- 
tHk'.- 

t>ai 
til- 
his 
pr . 
ev 



5'0' 

th. 

to . 

thi^ 

er. - 

v/i- 

rA:,: 

You 

the V 
Signs, t 
he '-'• 

"Yo 
ter. 

thir 
V. 



V.'il 



Bill Prepared for Legisla- 
ture by Insurance 
Commissioner. 

St. Paul. Minn., Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — A bill providing for 
the regulation of inter-insurance, as 
approved by the National Convention 
of Insurance Commissioners, has been 
prepared by J. A. O. Preus, Insurance 
commissioner of Minnesota, for pre- 
sentation at the next session of the 
legislature. It is similar to a bill which 
will be introduced in practically every 
state of the Union. 

"The state of Minnesota," said Mr. 
Preus. "during recent years no doubt 
has been losing thousands of dollars 
in taxes because many of its largest 
property holders have been writing 
their Insurance through the medium 
of an attorney or intcr-lnsurer. It is 
to regulate this the new law has been 
proposed." 

Among other things, the bill will 
provide: 

That property holders through their 
attorney shall file with the commis- 
sioner of Insurance of the state a veri- 
fied declaration giving the names and 
addresses of dU subscribers to such 
indemnity contracts. 

The kind of insurance in which such 
organization intends to engage. 
A copy of the policy contract. 
A copy of the power given the at- 
torney or inter-insurer. 

The location of the office of such 
Insurance exchange. 

That application has been made for 
insurance upon at least 100 sepan^te 
risks, aggregating not less than 
$1,500,000. 

That there is on deposit with such 
attornev. available for the pavment of 
losses, at least $25,000. The "bill pro- 
vides that the Insurance commissioner 
shall be appointed attorney to accept 
service of process so that any action 
against or by an inter-insurer may be 
instituted by serving upon the In- 
surance commiasioner. 

It is provided that the insurance 
commls.sioner shall look into the finan- 
cial rating of each separate Inter- 
insurer and that the attorney sliall 
submit an annual financial statement 
upon which the commissioner of In- 
surance may base action In licensing 
such inter-insurance concerns. 

It is further provided that a reserve 
shall be maintained In cash or con- 
vertible securiticfl erjiial to 50 per cent 
of the net annual deposits collected 
and credited to the accounts of the 
subscribers on policies having one year 
' or less to run and pro rata on those 



WILL PLAN NEW 

ARMY SYSTEM. 

Washington. Dec. 23. — Most of the 
ranking army officers in the United 
States have been ordered to be in 
\\'ashington Jan. 8 for an important 
conference to arrange the details of 
the extensive plan of reorganization of 
the army. This will be the last im- 
portant act concerning the army the 
retiring administration will und'^rtake. 
One such conference was held last 
summer to initiate the project. 

TAKET CATAN yMAN. 

Lone Sandit Pulis Off Great Act in 
Seattle, Wash. 

Seattle, Wasli., Dec. 23. — A lone 
bandit late Saturday night comman- 
dered the touring car of Frank McDer- 

mott, president of a large department 
store, compelled the chauffer, Charles 
Osland, to drive him about the city, 
held up a saloon and a grocery store, 
engaged in five running fights, wound- 
ed two men and escaped. 

The highwayman was arrested earlv 
Sunday. He gave his name as Alexan- 
der Thompson, 24 years old, and said 
he was a sailor. 



ORANGES ARE BEING 

RIPENED IN DULUTH 



Head Aches? Co To Your Doctor 



Headaches. Headaches. 

Biliousness. Biliousness. 

J, Constipation. Constipation. 

Ayer's PilU. Ayer's Pills. Ayer's Fills. 

If your doctor says this is all right, remember it ! 



Headaches. 
Biliousness. 
Constipation. 
Ayer's PilU. 



Headaches. 
Biliousness. 
Constipation. 
Ayer's Pills. 

J. O. Arer Oo.. 

Lowell, MaB«. 




This is a picture of an orange tree 
which Is being raised in the office of 
County Attorney .Tohn H. Norton. Tlie 
tree Is 3 years old and has borne three 
oranges as fruit two of which are still 
on the plant. The tree blossomed ttrst 
In October. 1911. The fruit ripened 
last summer. County Attorney Norton 
also has two fine specimens of lemon 
trees In his collection. 



i 1 iftl 

<n Hit 







3^e 



- - - -'^=' ' 



arc 



■ -^-'- -.i^^^ 



arc 



!3a 



EH 



BIG CROPS DO NOT ALWAYS 

SPELL UNBOUNDED PROSPERITY 



George T. Hawkin.% a farmer living 
in the vicinity of Larimore, N. D., at 
the Denox today stated that while 
there is the great talk of prosperity 
among the farmers of the Northwe.<jt, 
and while It is true more or less, there 
is also the oth«r side of this beautiful 
picture of bucolic bliss. 

"We farmers naturally know that 
the price of flax and wheat are much 
lower than tliey were last year," said 
Mr. Hawkins. "We knew also that we 
were selling more grain and receiving 
less for It. From an elevator man 1 
learned in figures something of the 
difference. 

'This man stated that his line of 
elevators had. up to Dec. 10 purchaS'Sd 
over 30 per cent more grain than it 



did up to a similar period a year ago, 
but that the price for the grain also 
averaged over 2 per cent less than the 
price paid last year. This Is the %Ide 
of the o.ueation that the public does 
not generally take into consideration. 

••While I am not yelling calamity 
by any means, for the farmers of the 
Northwest and the country generally 
speaking are in much better shape 
than last year, it is a fact that while 
the farmer has more produce to sell, he 
is not getting the price for what he 
has that he was able to command a 
jear ago. 

"But on the whole the farmers of 
our state are the gainers. Most of us 
have had a good crop, while last year 
some of the farmers did not have any- 
thing to sell at all. Also 90 per cent 
of the farmers will get more money 
for their crops than they did last 
year." 



'S- 



I IRON AND STEEL REVIEW 

New York, Dec. ti. — The hoUdiy 1912 and 1913 shipments, and it is ex- 
spirlt was held responsible for a de- ! ^^S^^^^ that . before^the „cIof e^ of^^the 



crease in the volume of business in the 
iron Industry last week, but a very 



month, the year's total will be close 
to 5,000,000 tons. The December rail 
orders to date have been 380,000 tons. 



large tonnage of finished stee! prod- One feature of the week was the pres 

ucts, under negotiation, have been sure for billets and other sem.i-finished 

postponed merely until after the first steel and several Independent .<?teel 

of the year. Since the first of Decern- companies at Pittsburg and Chicago 
ber car shops have placed orders for .... - .^ «,... 



23,000 cars, and locomotive builders 
have received specifications on 160 en- 
gines. , ^ , 

Rail contracts last week aggregated 
about 175.000 tons, including 110 tons 
for the Southern Pacific, 37,000 tons 
for other Harriman lines, 5,000 tons for 
the Southern railway and smaller ton- 
nage for export to Belgium, Brazil and 
the Argentine Republic. 

The rail mills have booked orders to 



date this year for 4,850,000 tons for ' breaklnif 



were compelled to rely upon a Buffalo 
mill for an extra supply, resulting in 
sales of about 25.000 tons of open- 
hearth steel at $28 to $29 f. o. b. mill 
for January, and the first Quarter of 
1913 shipment. 

Structural contracts placed aggre- 
gated more than 16,000 tons. Since the 
first of De(?ember, the fabricating 
shops have booked orders for nearly 
70.000 tons, and the indications are that 
the 1912 contracts will be record- 



POISON IN LAS T FOOD. 

Father of Starving Family Is Accused 
of Murder. 

Curlew, Wash., Dec. 23.— Charged 
with havlnsr poisoned tho last food 
that remained in the house for hia 
wife and five children and with having 
caused the death by that means of his 
3-year-old daughter. FA Stoddard, who 
lives fifteen miles from here. Is being 
sought throughout l^astern Washing- 
ton. 

The last food in the house was pre- 
pared for breakfast Wednesday morn- 



CASTOR I A 

For Infants and Children. 

The Kind You Have Always Bought 

Bears the 
Signature bf 




ing. On3 of the little girls, unable 
to restrain her hunger, rushed from 
the table after drinking a cup of cof- 
fee. She fell to the floor In convul- 
sions and died almost immediately. 
Stoddard, so his wife says, seized the 
coffee pot and plate of pancakes and 
threw them on the floor. A dog which 
ate one of the cakes died immediately. 
Stoddard then borrowed $10 from 
neighbors, saying he wished to buy a 
cjffln for the child, and left for town, 
telling h=a wife he would arrange for 
the funeral. 

Mrs. Stoddard notified neighbors, but 
the district is remote, and as tele- 
phone communication was Interrupted, 
county officials did not reach the 
scene for three days. A coroner's 
inquest established the fact that the 
little girl died of poison and a ver- 
dict of the coroner%i jury places re- 
sponsibility for her death on her 
father. Stoddard Is believed to have 
become suddenly insane. 

MINISTER GLAD HE 

IS O UT OF POLITICS. 

Chicago. Dec. 23. — Rev. F. O. Smith, 
member of the Illinois legislature, 
who resigned to ffive his time to 



□SC 



church work, preached his farewell ] 
sermon here Sunday in the Warren | 
Avenue Congregational church. Mr. I 
Smith has acc?pted a charge in Kan- 
sas City. Mo. Mr. Smith served two 
years In the legislature and was a 
hard working mtr.iber. He said, in 
his sermon that his experience In the 
general assembly was invaluable to 
him. but that he resigned gladly, as a 
minister should keep out of politics 
except in a case of emergency. 

PLAY WiL.D WEST; 

T WO BO YS SHOT. 

Marlon. 111., Dec. 23. — In playing 
wild west, Eugene Goodall. 6 years old, 
was shot and killed, and Clarence 
Yates. 7 years old. was seriously 
wounded by a charge from a gun fired 
by Chester Yites, 9 years old, who 
didn't know .the gun was loaded. 

MARSHALlTGrVES" 

THIRTEEN FREEDOM. 



Indianapolis. 
Murshall has ^ 
twelve paroles 
mates of the 
have been told 
to spend Chr 
Thirty-nine otl 
leases were de 

Among the t 
cr.cy was Charl 
in-law of Unit« 
of California. 



Ind.. Dtc. 23. — Governor 
[ranted one pardon and 
and the thirteen in- 
state penal institutions 

they will be permitted 
stmas in their homes, 
lers who applied for re- 
lied. 

hirty-nlne denied clem- 
es E. Van Peit. brother- 
d States Senator Works 

Van Pelt is In prison 



for killing Charles H. Tlndall because 
l.e had accused Mrs. Van Pelt of being 
"short" In her accounts as secretary 
of a lodge of which Tindall was a su- 
preme officer. Senator Works ad- 
dressed a letter to the board of par- 
dons asking the release of Van Pelt. 



Cut Flowern. 

Prices right, big stock, at Ku:.f«. 

FRAT FIGHT'gOES OVER. 

Wooster Trustees Unable to Agree on 
Plan. 

Wooster, Ohio, Dec. 28. — Aft«r an 
all-night session, the board of trus- 
tees of Wooster university adjourned 
until February without determining 
the question of ousting fraternities 
from the university. Voices from the 
members of opposing factions could be 
heard across the campus during the 
session which terminated earlv this 
morning. The board was so divided 
that no vote was taken. 

The war on •'frats" at Wooster was 
precipitated by announcement of L. 
H. Severance of New York, who has 
given the university $1,000,000. that he 
would refuse to continue his support 
unless the "frats" were ousted. Sev- 
eiance has been tha most liberal sup- 
porter of the institution. President 
Holden of the I'nlversity requested 
the fraternities to give up their char- 
ters. Half the students are "frat" 
members. Thejr rofuF<»d tlie demand, 
declaring they would not barter away 
an integral part of the Constitution. 



4 



^ 



Holiday 



Greetings 

Western Union "Day Letters" 
and "Night Letters" are 
carriers of good cheer. 




Telephone for 

Special Holiday 

Blanks 



THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY 







^ 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 




inicrest 
which 



FioMi the 2 and 3-year-old little tots 
who rocked Industriously In their new 
little rocking chairs to the program 
given by the older children at the St. 
James' orphanage yesterday afternoon, 
everything was of Interest to the large 
number of guests entertained during 
the afternoon. The distribution of the 
wonderfully pleasing presents given by 
kind-hearted friends and the unbur- 
dening of the Christmas tree of Its 
candv and toys was a feature of the 
afternoon whUh was of perhaps more 
Interest lo the ihlldren themselves 
than ihrir program, although they 
gavo everv number with an 
a:ul rhlliUsli unconsciousness 
was upjiialing. 

Cue tiny little miss was much ex- 
cited bifore she got in to see the tree 
and Uopt Insisting that she "wanted a 
big autumohile with a man in it." 

The program was varied with 
maniies, drills, dances, songs and reci- 
tations which had been directed by tlie 
sisters. Miss Mary She.sgren coaching 
the cliiiilren in their pieces and dra- 
matic numbers and Prof. Leo, w lio put 
on the drills and dances from the Irish 
Jig to the stately minuet. 

nishoi. Mc C.olrick. who was the guest 
of hoiiur lit the entertainment, voiced 
hla keen appreciation of the kindness 
of the frieiuls, the good work whlcli 
tile (lulld of bt. James Is doing In 
keeping the home up and the effi- 
ciency and kindness of the sisters wlio 
cur« for the little homeless children 
and e.spe;taily to those wlio have given 
Of th'lr time to train tho children for 
the ;■: c-rra-p., every number of whlcli 
ho I '■;!< iilir:.<:ited. 

The >>r;.hanage Itself with Its spot- 
lessnt'ss and careful arrangements, 
was also of interest to the visitors who 
complimented those In charge on the 
excellent condition. 

On Vhrlstmas eve the children will 
hang up their stockings for the visit 
from Santa Claus himself. 

CLASS^EUNION. 



MML NAZIMOVA TAKES HER 

LEADING MAN AS HER HUSBAND 



Members of '05 Will Have Dinner 
at Club. 

Members of the cTass of 1905 of the 
imiuth Central high school are plan- 
ning il'cir annual reunion and have de- 
cld. d t.< hold It in the form of a dinner 
partv at tlie Commercial club on Thurs- 
day "evening this week instead of hav- 
ing a •hop," as they have done in the 
past. About tlfty of the class mem- 
t»ers with their husbands, wives or 
fruiKls will attend, and the affair will 
be made informal with talks of old 



1|lmc 



!id matters of mutual interest. 



Church Meetings. 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the Lrst*^r 
Lark M. K. church will meet Friday 
afternoon of this week at the home of 
Mrs. Clinton Brooke, 5407 London road. 



Mr- 
sir. 

Wii 



li, Snyder will be the assisting 
- and a large attendance is de- 
i^ the annual election of officer.? 

hold at th's meeting. 



For 

Miss Carolyn 



"ff^ 



km 




tatlons and there wlU be a Christmas 
tree. 

« • • 

An Interesting program was given 
yesterday afternoon at the Pilgrim 
Congregational church for member» 
of the Sunday school. Mrs. Grace Sen- 
ior Brearley opened the afternoon 
with an organ prelude followed by a 
hymn by the members of the school. 
Sliort services Including Bible readini?, 
prayer, the singing of carols and 
songs, preceded the following num- 
bers: 

Song— "The Secret of the Stars" 
Recitation — "Christmas Bells" 

Charlotte Grawn. 
Solo — "Ring Christmas Behs"... 

Roberts B. Larson. 
Recitation — "Gifts For Jesus" 
Six Boys and Girls. 
Song — "Christ Was Once a 

Baby" 

Recitation — "I Wonder Why" 
Marion Anderson. 

Recitation — "Christmas" 

Mary Heimick. 
Recitation — "The First Christinas" 

Everlta Edes. 
Song — "Christmas Lullaby" 
Offertory — "Romance" 

Miss Gunderson. 

Offertory Prayer 

Pastor. 
Recitation — "This Happy Day" 

Jane Baldwin. 
Recitation — 'O Little Town of Beth 

Ifrhcm" 

Thelma Bestler. 
156 — "Joy to the World". 
Congregation. 



Hymn No. 
Remarks . 
Recitation- 



Pastor. 
-"The ChHst Child", 
i'-.jizabeth Gray. 

Chorus — "Nazareth" 

School. 

Prayer , 

Hymn No. 1€6 — 'It Came Upon 

Midnight Clear" 

Congrtgatlon. 

Benediction 

Pastor. 

Postlude 

Mis. Brearley. 
• * . * 
The Christmas festival of the Sun- 
day Ecliool of this same church will 
be held in the churcli parlors this 
evening at 7:30 o'clock when each cla.ss 
will take gifts for the jjoor and Santa 
Claus and his wife wifT be introduced. 
All members of the school and their 
friends are invited. 4 

Christmas Dinner Party. 

Mr. and Idrs. Alfred Gillon of 10 
Forty-fourth avenue -'tja.st will enter- 
tain at a dinner party for thirty-one 
Christmas day. Tiie guests being their 
immediate relatives ih this city. 



Debutantes. 

Marshall will be hostess 
at an Orpheum party this evenln??, in 
coinplini.-nt to Misses Dorothy and 
Elizabeth Olcoti and their house guests. 
Mis.-; .lantt Kane and Miss Martha 
Mi-Millan. A supper will follow the 
prrfu' nianc.'. and tomorrow evening j 
Mhuii Huiiii^ll will be host at a theater) 
party. 

W. R. C. 

The Woman's Relief Corps will meet 
Tliursdav afternoon at their regular 
session at 2:30 o'clock at Memorial 
hall, courthouse. Arrangements will 
be made for the joint installation with 
the Willis A. Gorman Post, G. A. R., 
Which will be held in January. 



MME. NAZIMOVA AND CHARLES BENNETT. 

Mme. Xazimova, who is appearing at the Empire theater. New York, in the 
dramatization of Hichei^s's story "Bella Donna," was married to her leading 
man. Charles Bennett, last week. Mr. Bennett was a member of the London 
company producing this play and was brought to America especially to support 
Mme. Nazimova. 



Will Study "The Jew." 

Mis. Hcuiy Abrahams will lead the 
mtcting of the Jewish Chautauqua to- 
morrow afternoon at the library club 
room commencing at 2:30 o'clock and 



A GIFT FOR THE ADORNMENT OF THE 




WILL BE APPRECIATED. 

Every woman appreciates a crift 
that will add to her natural attrac- 
tiveness. For your mother or sis- 
ter, or an Intimate friend, we sug- 
gest your making a selection from 
our stock of beautiful switches or 
curls. 

Wliere you w^ould not feel at lib- 
erty to .vend a switch, a gift of .-i 
very fashionable Bandeau, or a 
really good comb would be warmly 
welcomed. We carry a wonderful 
assortment of all hair ornamenLs. 
plain and beautifully Jeweled, at all 
prices. 

TOMORROW'S SPECIAL! 



Band embroidering 

Hrniififiil selection of piece* io 
ehuuKe fr«»in — Hut they are KOing 
fRMt — at Stbbett'H Millinery, 5 West 
Suiierlor Htreet: Nnthlne oonld be 
luure acceptalile an a CbrtNlmaH gift. 
MISS JORGINE POS( HE. 



"The Jew" by Cumberland will be dis- 
cussed. Mrs. Abrahams will give the 
synopsis and critical analysis of the 
play and papers on other phases will 
be read by Mrs. A. Llgnell and Mrs. 
Sllbar. Mrs. Harry Geller will review 
Lessing's "Nathan the Wise.'* 



Shakespeare Class. 

The Shakespeare class of the Twen- 
tieth Century club which usually meets 
Monday evenings will not meet again 
until, Monday, Jan. 7, at the library 
clubrooms. 



L.. T. 



$ 



Fiver Toliet WaterH, 

all numbers — 



1.00 BOniES FOR 75c 

SOc 



Our own ml.sture Sachet 
Powder, per ounce 

We sell the best American 
foreign perfumes. 



Miss HOR 



Oak Hall nulhiing. 



and 




Will Give Luncheon. 

Mrs. A. W. Frlck of 2231 East Sec- 
ond street will be hostess at a lunch- 
eon of thirty covers ne.xt Monday, Dec. 
30 at the Northland Country club. 

CHRSTMAS* CANTATA. 



Faith Daisy Smart 

Hope Mary Myron 

Charity Marion Brown 

Goddess of Dreams. . .Mrs. p:3. G. Smith 

Goddess of Love Miss Shaver 

Shepherds. .H. H. Durham, A. E. Brown, 

Loren S. Pfautz, Frank Bartlctt 

Sophie Helen W^harton 

Jessie (flower girl) Glory Myron 

Three little children. . .Pauline McKln- 

ley, Betty Thompson, Katherine 

Callan. 
Dialogue characters 

P'rank Thomas, Archie McFadden, 

Lyle Snyder, Margaret Morgan, 

Frances Hall, Eleanor Sederquist, 

Elizabeth Brooke, 

Miss Florence Watt and Ronald 
Myron will be the accompanist.s. 



Cast Announced for Church Con- 
cert. 

The cast for the cantata, "The Birth 

of Christ" which wMll be given by fifty 
Sunday school scholars and the choir 
of the Lester Park M. E. cliurcii Friday 
evening at the church has been an- 
nounced. The cantata will be given in 
costume under the direction of J. C. 
Myron and the arrangement is as fol- 
lows: 

Santa Claus H. G. Inman 

Frost King J. C. Myron 

Guardian Angel Marie MacDowell 

First Angel Isadore Dodge 

Second Angel Ina Shaver 



CENTRAL 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 

no Eamt Superior Street, Dulutb. 
\%IXTEIl TERM, JAN. 6TH. 

New classes In all departments. 



Day school. 
BARBER 



Night school. 
& Mei'Hi:nsox. 



Sunday School Parties. 

Mcmbeis of the Sunday school of St. 
Johns Episcopal church at Lakeside 
will hold their Christmas exercises 
Thursday afternoon, Dec. 26 at Har- 
monic hall. A tree with gifts will be 
a program will follow 

with games. 
• « • 

Eaton entertained the 

members of the beginners' class of the 
Sunday school of tlie Lakeside Presby- 
terian church and their mothers In 
the parlors of the church this after- 
noon and this evening the other mem- 
bers of the Sunday school will be en- 
tertained with an old fashioned 
Christmas program of songs and reci- 



unloaded, and 
which will end 

Mrs. Willis 



SACRED PICTURES 

A fine new lino of Imported Sa- 
cred Pictures, some by thf* old mas- 
ters, others by later celebrities. In 
Sepia Carbon and Black and White. 

They coitje in all sizes, and frame 
up very beautifully. Prices reason- 
able. 

New designs in Picture frames, 
and mouldings. A large and complete 
stock to select from. 

All our framing is done by expert 
workmen. 



The Chas. Decker Co. 

16 Second .\veniie ^Vest, 
Dulirth, Minn. 



r 



MEN WHO 
SMOKE 



Know and appreciate the quality of 
our cigars, pipes and smokers' 
articles. Ladles' patronage and tele- 
phone orders solicited. 





By PEGGY PEABODY 



.1 






CRATHWOl CICAR CO. 



Grand 389 — Both Phonrs — Melrose 
216 \%>iit Superior Street. 



52 



Thoughtlessness and Irresponsi 
bility, Criminal and Other-wise. 

It seems sometimes that a hole in the 
ground would be a safer place for 
hard-earned savings than many of the 
institutions for the purpose left to the 
guidance of men. 
High-salaried offi- 
cials and low-sal- 
aried clerks are 
alike liable to the 
same weakness of 
making a splurge 
with other people's 
money. The instinct 
which prompts men 
to this sort of thing 
Is not so radically 
different from that 
which we term 
thoughtlessness or 
Irresponsibility In 
every day life. It 
is only when it pre- 
cipitates an avalanche 
we call It crime, 
tween the two Is 
marked. 

We appropriate the rights and priv- 
ileges of others every day 
thou.ght of regret, 
us do. We contract 
and instead of 




of trouble that 
The difference be- 
never very strongly 



without a 
At least, many of 
debts for luxuries, 
tending to the busi- 
ness of paying for those already ac- 
quired spend our means for more. We 
count ourselves honest. We really 
mean to pay some time and so does the 
bank official or the clerk who, having 
access to large sums of money, helps 



himself — fully realizing that he does 
wrong, yet condoning It because- he 
means to pay it back. 

He means to repair dishonesty by 
honesty in the end. In the meantime 
his first dishonest move leads him 
from bad to worse seeking to cover 
one by the other. The finale is some- 
thing he never took Into consideration 
! in the beginning. Rarely does a man 
plan in cold blood injury and loss to 
i ijeople whom he does not know. He 
I never thinks of them In any individual 
sense until his doom is sealed and then 
frantically grasps at every straw that 
gives promise of recouping his for- 
tunes and the fortunes of those he has 
robbed, making a bad matter worse 
In his extremity. 

It does not lessen one 
sibility that so many of 
escape the consequence 
are not strictly honest and at the same 
time are not entered into with the de- 
liberate plan of injury to any one. 
High-minded men and women feel, 
and rightly, too, that embezzlement 
from a bank in which people of all 
classes and conditions entrust their 
money is a crime that can be classed 
with that of murder. Indeed many will 
go so far as to say that it is worse 
than murder. It brings, in so many 
instances, more misery In its trail than 
would result from a dozen murders. 
Some day It may be held an equal 
crime, but before this we shall have 
progressed many leagues beyond our 
present status as regards personal re- 
sponsibility in our dealings with our 
fellow men. 



man's respon- 
us Just barely 
of deeds that 



New Year's Eve Party. 

Miss Dorothy Thompson, 311 
Third street, will entrrtain at a. 
Year's eve party at her home. 

— ^ 

Personal Mention. 

Miss Marguerite Culkin is home from 
Chicago, wliere she is studying at t!ie 
school of civics and philanthropy, to 
spend the vacation with her parents, 
Mr. and Mrs. W E. Culkin of Hunter's 
Park. 

« « • 

Mrs. D. H. Day of 1231 East Superior 
street left today for St. Paul, where she 
will spend the holidays. 
« « * 

Miss Melville Silvev has returned 
from Chicago, where she is studying at 
the Conservatory of Music, to spend tlie 
vacation witli lier mother, Mrs. W. B. 
Silvey. 

• • * 

Miss Marion Williamson has returned 
from Ann Arbor, Mich., where .''he has 
been studying. She will spend the va- 
cation with her parents, Mr and Mrs. 
S. S. Williamson of 2020 East Second 
street. 

« * * 

Miss Marv Whipple, daughter of Mrs. 
W. L. Whipple of 1215 East Third 
street, lia.s returned from Oberlin, 

where she is studying this year. 

« • * 

Mrs. J. W. Naughton of 1124 East 
First street is entertaining Miss Emily 
R. McBride of Minneapolis during the 
holidays. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. Sumner Covev and lit- 
tle son, "Billie," of Minneapolis axe 
guests of Mrs. Covey's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. A. Watterworth of 2&32 
East Superior street for the holidays. 
Earl Watterworth will arrive tomorrow 
from Winnipeg to spend the holidays 
with his parents 

« « * 

Mrft H. B. Ruettell and two chira*en 
of International Falls, Minn., are the 
holiday guests of Mrs. James Henderson, 
No. 4 Lafayette flats. 

• • * 

Mrs. H H. Phelps has returned from 
a week's' visit at Wausau, Wis. 

• * * 

Miss Rae Abraham of 2422 East Third 
street will spend the Christmas iK-ll- 
davs with friends in Minneapolis. 

• • • 

Mrs. J. D. Keough and children of St. 
Paul are here for the holidays with the 
formers parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. 
Sweeney, 127 West Fourth street. 

• « * 

Mrs. William Wardell of 1113 East 
Tliird street has left for Ironwood, 
Mich., where she will spend the holi- 
davs with Mr. and Mrs. F. F. Bartlett. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur J. Allen of 129 
Twelfth avenue east have as their 
guests for the holidays Mr. and Mrs. 
H. E. Nye of Hudson. Wis. Mrs. Nye 
and Mrs. Allen are slstois. 

• « * 

Mrs. R. C. Barnes and little daughter 
of Portland, Or., are visiting Mrs. 
Barnes' father, Oscar Fleer, and sister, 
lyiiss Lena Fleer of 409 East Fourth 
street. 

• * * 

Mrs. John Cogan and daughter, Mrs. 
Alexander Marshall, Miss Jean >Tar- 
shall and Master Jack Marshall and 
Mrs. J. L. Washburn and family, who 
are traveling in Europe, have just left 
for Kussia. where they will spend .the 
i;us.slan Christmas, Jan. 7, at Moscow. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hayes and chil- 
dren of Winnipeg arrived here Satur- 
day. Mrs. Hayes will spend the holi- 
days with her mother, Mrs. McD nald, 
here, and Mr. Hayes went on to St. 
Thomas, Ont., to spend Christmas with 
his mother there. They will return to 
Winnipeg after the holidays. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. David Casmir of Minne- 
apolis are spending the holidays in 
Duluth. 

• • • 

Mrs. Vern Culbertson 4 708 C(»ok 
street has as her guest for the holi- 
di^y vacation her brother, Albert Oakes, 
frcm St. Thomas college, St. Paul. 

• * • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Kennedy of 
Lakeside and Mr. and Mrs. Stacey H. 
Hill left yesterday for .Minneapolis, 
where they will visit until Thursday, 
leaving then for Claybourn, Tex., to 
visit Mr. Hill's relatives. Miss Claire 
Kennedy and Betty Jane Kennedy will 
spend the holiday weeks in Minne- 
apolis. 

• • • 

Mrs. Melnlng and Miss Meinlng of 
217 Second street have as their holiday 
guests, little Miss Helen 
Master Louis Hoople of 
and Mr. and Mrs. H. C. 
little daughter, Helen, of 

Minn. 

• « • 

Mr. and Mrs. K. T. Buxtjon of St. 
Paul, formerly of Duluth, are guests 
of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Merrill, 
2G26 Greysolon road, for the holidays. 

• • « 

W. A. Edwards of Minneapolis is a 
guest at the home of his niece, Mrs. 
F K. Itandell, 4301 Robinson street. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Getty of 523 East 
Fourth street have as their 
Christmas Mr. and Mrs. J. 
of Khlnelander, Wis. 

• • « 

MiSB Lee Morrison and-. Evan Morri- 
son of Winnipeg are holiday guests of 
Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Morrlaon of Lewis 
street, Hunters Park. 

Miss Janet Haley of 1810 West Sec- 
ond street has returned from Aitkin, 
Minn., where she visited friends for a 

few days. 

• • • •» 

Mrs. Morrison L. Smith of Still- 
water. Minn., returnra to her home 
Saturday after a visit her* with her 




FURS 

ENTER THE BARGAIN LIST 

in Wenger's Fur Special's. You can now buy furs — \^ 
the choicest in the city — at bargain prices. In many 4/i 
cases the prices have been reduced to nearly one- 
half their values. 
These items will give you an idea of the sale prices: 



$25.00 Persian Paw Sets — Large 
mutr and shawl ^'1^ f\f\ 

neckpiece JbX ■ • vlU 

$30.00 Natural Opossum Set — Large muflf and 
shawl neckpiece 

$37.60 Black Wolf Set— Large muff and 
shawl neckpiece 



Store Open Evenings 
Untii lU o'CSock. 



Odd Muffs and Nockpioccs at cost. 

One-fourth off on all Black and Russian Pony Coats. Natural Pony, 
Mamiot. Sable Squirrel, Caracul, Near Seal and Hud!>on Seal Coats. 

One-fourth oft on Black Fox, lied Vox, Raccoon, Jap Mink, Persian 
f..anib and Hudson Seal Sets. 

10 i>er cent to 15 per cent off on Mink Muffs and Xeckpieces. 

T HE QUALITY FUR HOUSE! 

H. S. WENGER 

203 West Superior St.— Oak HaU Bldg. 




$22.00 Persian Paw Sets — Large 
muff and shawl 
neckpiece 



\NV\.\\\SX^>SS\SX:^^\VA\\\V\\\^S\\\\\S\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\\S\\\\\\\\\S\\ 



^ 



daughter, Mrs. E. F. Kelly, 626 East 
Fifth street, for two weeks. Mrs. 
Kelley. Miss Mae Kelley and Harold 
Kelley returned with her to spend a 
week in Stillwater. 

« • • 

Mrs. Ia Blackwood of Minneapolis 
arrived today to spend the holidays 
with her mother. Mrs. M. Grube of 121 
East Third street. 

* * • 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. RandaU of 4201 
Magellan street will spend the Chrlst- 
n;as holidays with their daughter, Mrs. 
J. J. Roberta at Keewatin, Minn. 

* • * 

Miss Esther Coffin, who has been 
studying at Wells college, Aurora, N. 
Y., returned Saturday for the holidays 
here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
H. W. Coffin of Hunters Park. 
« * « 

Robert McGonagle returned yester- 
day from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania to spend Christmas and New 
Years with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. 
W. A, McGonagle of 9 Oxford street. 

* * • 

jriss Nellie McFadden, who is teach- 
ing at Iron, Minn., has returned to 
spend her vacation with her parents. 
Dr. and Mrs. C. W. McFadden of Fifty- 
fourth avenue east. 



the guest of fiiends on the Point last 
week. 

« • • 
Mr. and Mrs. Wicks of Thirty-first 
street will spend Christmas with 
friends on the range. 



Park Point notes 



Mr. and Mrs. John Hulqulst of 
Thirty-second street spent the" week- 
end with friends In Chlsholm, 
« * * 

Mrs. N. J. Hendrickson and daugh- 
ters. Aline, Marlon and Irene left Satr 
urday morning for Winona to spend 
the holidays with Mrs. Hendrlckson's 
mother. 

* • • 

Mrs. Hauslaib of Twenty-eightli 
street entertained the Mission guild, 
Tuesday afternoon. Those present 
were: Mesdames Harry Harrington, 
S. W. Richardson. Herbert Page, Mary 
Cfeborne, Peter Burg. James Byrne, 
Harter, McGary; and Misses Ruth Os- 
borne and Josephine Stevenson. 

• • • 

The pupils of the Radisson school 
gave an interesting Christmas pro- 
gram Friday afternoon, with numbers 
by the various grades. 
« <» • 

Miss Anna Gallagan of Gilbert vis- 
ited her sister. Miss Margaret last 
week. They left today for their old 
home in Eau Claire, Wis., to spend 
their holiday vacation there. 



• • * 

Mrs. Kimbal and son. 

Twenty-fifth street, left 

for Rome, Ga., to spend 

with Mr. Klmbals par- 



Mr. and 
Stanley, of 
Wednesday 
the winter 
ents. 

• * * 

Mr. and Mrs. George Hensel and 
family of North Dakota, who were the 
guests of Mr. Hensel's parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. M. Hensel of Twenty-sixth 
street left Wednesday for Michigan, 
where Ihey will spend some time with 
Mrs. Hensel's parents. 

• • * 

Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Zant and 
daughter left Thursday for Hlbbing, 
wjiere they will spend the winter. 

• • • 

Benjamin Harrison of Superior was 




Hoople and 

Minneapolis, 

Meining and 

I^ittle I'^ails, 



fuests for 
^ Taylor 



FURS 




Direct From the Manufarturem. 

Save MlddlcmRn'it Profits Oa 

Vonr Furn. 



MAR RY YO UNG. 

This is the Advice Dr. Eiiot Gives the 
Coming Generation. 

Dr. Eliot of Harvard declares that 
postponed marriage is a irreat modern 
evil in educated society. His belief 
is given in full in Harper's Bazar, a 

cheerful message to the coming gen- 
eration. In the course of which he says: 
"You will hear some young man say: I 
cannot Invite a girl, who has been 
brought up to do nothing for herself, 
and to have every gratification and every 
luxury provided for her, to marry me, 
until I can eain an income which will 
enable her to live with me in that 
way. I have two remarks to make 
about that doctrine — that if a girl has 
been brought up in that manner, the 
sooner she has a chance to live dif- 
ferently the better for her; and, sec- 
ondly, that it is only fair for a young 
man who lov.es a young woman to 
consult her as to whether or not she 
wishes to marry him before he can earn 
a large Income. 

'The young »\'oman has a clear right 
to say a word on that subject to the 
man she loves, and not to be obliged 
to wait till he is 35 years old before 
he asks her to marry him. This is a 
matter of looking ahead at a critical 
point in your lives. You arc not in the 
habit. ptrhapB, of contemplating this 
event of marriage. It would be wiser 
to do so. T*ie sooner you begin to 
think about it the belter — first, because 
It will be thinking about the most im- 
portant event in your lives in respect 
to the development of your characters 
and to the happiness not only of your- 



selves, but of the women you will 
marry, and of the family life which 
will normally result." 



SAVE CHRISTMAS! 



Margaret Deland Suggests More 
Sensible Gift-Giving. 

In Harper's Bazar Margaret Deland 
writes a remarkable article which she 
calls "Save Christmas:'' She handles 
the Christmas present question without 
gloves. In this Bazar article she de- 
clares that "to commemorate the Su- 
preme Gift to the world by weariness 
and irritation is to profane an ideal. 
When Christmas day arouses profanity, 
it is time fo» people who care for It to 
rise up and protect it: And there can 
be no. possible doubt that the Christ- 
mas folly which causes 'swearing' is 
increasing. By the first of December 
the very air seems to tingle with tho 
mad compulsion of giving. Contrast 
the number of gifts we feel we 'must' 
make with the number we made ten or 
fifteen years ago; contrast the elabo- 
ration of ribbons, papers, boxes, labels 
and what not, with the casual bundle 
we used to leave at a neighbors door. 
Shopkeepers foster the folly, custom 
takes It for granted, and timidity 
cannot resist it. The result la a whirl 
of meaningless exasperation. The de- 
partment stores during the two weeks 
before Christmas are a sight that 
makes thoughtful women ashamed of 
their sex (men are so few and far be- 
tween at the crowded, ill-tempered, 
vulgar bargain counters, that they 
don't count). But look at the pushing, 
tired women, buying things which very 
often they do not wish to purchase, for 
people who cannot conceivably want to 
own them I" 

Mrs. Deland concludes her Bazar ar- 
ticle l)y some very pointed suggestions. 



Four to Five WeekH Freaher. 

Victor Huot's delicious home-made 
candies fresh dally. 





YOU SHOULD SEND YOUR 
Id APPAREL TO 
BE FRENCH DRY 
CLEANED: 




We are prepared to show you a 
most complete display of fashion- 
able Fur Garments. 

Everv Fashionable Fur in the 
newest etyle. The quality, style 
and prices of our furs will satisfy 
you. 

Fum Repaired, Remodeled and Made 
to Order, at Moderate Pricea. 

DULUTH FUR CO. 

»25 W eat FIrat Street. 

Kenitb. 624. Meirone, 4S.'je. 

Open Rvenlngn Until 8. 



FIRST- Superior Service 

Our boast of unexcelled equipment 
for Frr'neh Dry rieauiiiff and Dyeing 
has Ix-en ju.«5tified by the many pa- 
trons who have given us tlieir work, 
and a<knowledscd the SUPERIOR 
RKSU LTS we give. 

SECOND — Convenience 

Fifteen wagons eover the entire city 
and suburbs daily, and work for our 
Cleaning and Dyeing Depart- 
ment ean be sent witli laundry 
and promptly delivered when 
fiiiibhod. Gloves and other 
Ifglit vi'ork can be called for in 
the mornhig and delivered the 
liutne (lay. 

THIRD— Reasonable Charges 

for Ihf RESISTS we give. You 
cannot afford to send to other 
establisiunents, where the 
eliarjefe arc higlier. The qual- 
ity of our work is of the high- 
est grade, while oar prices are 
the lowest possible. 




OUR WAGONS PASS 
EVERY DOOR. 




TROY LAUNDERING CO. 

LEADERS IN CLEANLINESS. 
22 ll\sr SUPERIOR ST. Both Phones 257. 





1 





10 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



, December 23, 1912. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INO£P£-MDEMr NEWSPAPEi«. 

PiihliMhrd every rvenluR except Sun- 
<lu}- h> The Herald Compan7> 

Both T<lo!>hoiic3 — Husiriess Office. 324; 
Editorial Rooms, 1126. 

Ei'tfred u «econd-cI«« in«ll?r at the Duluth pott- 
ottice ttnder t!i« »ct of cnngrea* of March 3. IJtO. 

OmtlAl PAPER. CITY OF DILITH 

■ y 

sin.*i«KIPTIO.\ RATES — By mall pay- 
abl.' in advance, one month. 35 cents; 
three months. $1; six months, $3; one 
year. S4. Saturday Herald, $1 per 
year. W e.kly Herald. $1 per year. 

Daily ''^ i-arrier. city and auburbs. 10 
cents a wtek, 45 cents a month. 
Sutaorlber* will confer • fuTor by maklin known 

■tij coau'laliit of terTlce. 
When cUaniitiix the address of jour paper. It la 

tnipi>naiit to glv« tratli old and new addresses. 



The l>uluth Herald accepts adver- 
tising- I .>!itratts with the distinct guar- 
anty th.it U has the laiffest circulation 
In Minne.sota outside the Twin Cities. 



1 



CHRISTMAS IN VICTORIAN DAYS I 



AN APPEAL TO THE PUBLIC SPIRIT 
OF THE ALDERMEN. 

Last Monday the city council rc- 
jecte<l .1 resolution providing for an 
invest:- it:>n into the advisability ol 
empl ■\ :;-; :r. expert in municipal et- 
tlciencN to make a survey of the hti.si- 
nes:* of the city of Duluth. and t« 
prepare for tlic information of the 
now e 'tinuission when it is elected a 
tentati\e plim of organization along 
the lines oi the greatest possible ef- 
ticieney and eeont>my. 

Th!> aeiion. it seemed to us at the 
time, w .IS taken rather hastily, and 
withou'. the discussion the project de- 
served Tr i> to be hoped that the 
coune will see fit to reverse 

its deei-! )t\ .it a week ago. 

It >! <!,i!.l be remembered that this 
lesolni! .ti commits the council or the 
city to nothing. If it is adopted, all 
that will be done is that a council 
committee, v.orking with a commit- 
tee from the charter coitimission, will 
investigate tlic matter. If it sees fit, 
this coinniittec will present a resolu- 
tion pr..\iding for the employment of 
such an expert, and fixing the terms 
of his employment. If it sees fit. the 
coune il may adopt this resolution — 
or it may reject it. The pendiag 
resolution, however, is merely a pro- 
posal to IXVKSTIGATE — and it 
cannot cost a penny or hurt anybody. 

It hd< })ecn said that since Duluth 
is goinj to elect a commission com- 
posed of business men, the whole 
matter mi^Iit as well be left to them. 
If the commissioners zire business 
men, one of the first things they 
would do — and they could do little 
until they had done it — would be to 
employ an expert to create a busi- 
ness-like and efficient system of or- 
ganization. 

If the city council will do this work 
in advance, much time will be saved, 
and tlie city and its citizens will be 
that mttch ahead. 

And it should be remembered, too, 
that Duluth isn't electing a commis- 
sion of experts in municipal efficiency 
to organize a city government, but a 
commission of citizens to operate a 
city gnernment: and any reasonable 
commi^-i.>n would be grateful for 
such help toward an effective organi- 
zation as the proposed survey would 
provide. 

This plan would give the commis- 
sioners, whoever they may be, in- 
formati.m which otherwise they would 
have to take time to dig out for them- 
selves, and suggestions as to the or- 
ganizati.^n of the city business on 
which they could work, adding to or 
subtracting from as they pleased. 

The word "expert" seems to have 
irritated some people. These people 
confuse the "expert" with the '"theor- 
ist." Tlicy are not the same thing, 
by any means. 

The test of an expert is practicality. 
The test of his plans is workability 
and efficiency. Nobody should be 
scared by a word. 

The Herald hopes that the city 
council will give this matter full con- 
sideration. It hopes that for the 
sake of Duluth the aldermen will 
vote unanimously to pass this resolu- 
tion. Tonight's action cannot pos- 
sii)ly e.)^t anybody a penny. It sim- 
ply provides for an official investiga- 
tion of a suggestion which was made 
by The Herald in perfect good, faith 
and for the best interests of Duluth. 
The suLfgestion should not be adopted 
without an investigation, but unless it 
is too utterly absurd to be considered 
for a luiniite it ought to have the 
recognition of an investigation. 

That's all The Herald asks of the 
council— that it provide for an in- 
vestigation of the plan. What the 
committee may do with it, and what 
the council may do afterward with 
the committee's report if it favors the 
plan, are bridges that may be crossed 
when they arc reached. 

In the meantime, it is to be hoped 
that the council will do the city this 
service, and by a unanimous vote. 



By C'harleH DtckeoM. (<'A ChrlfttmaM Carol.**) 



For the people who were shoveling away on the housetops were 
jovial and full of glee; calling out to one another from the parapets, 
and now and then exchangping a facetious snowball — better-natured 
missile far then many a wordy jest — ^laughing heartily if it went right 
and not less heartily if it went wrong. 

The poulterers' shops were still half open, and the fruiterers' were 
radiant in their glory. There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets 
of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling 
at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic opu- 
lence. There were ruddy, brown-faced, broad-girthed Spanish onions, 
shining in the fatness of their growth like Spanish friars, and wink- 
ing from their shelves in wanton slyness at the girls as they went by, 
and glanced demurely at the hung-up mistletoe. There were pears 
and apples, clustered high in blooming pyramids; there were bunches 
of grapes, made, in the shopkeepers' benevolence, to dangle from con- 
spicuous hooks, that people's mouths might water gratis as they 
passed; there were piles of filberts, mossy and brown, recalling in 
their fragrance ancient walks among the woods, and pleasant shuf- 
flings ankle deep through withered leaves; there were Norfolk biffins, 
squat and swarthy, setting off the yellow of the oranges and lemons, 
and, in the great compactness of their juicy persons, urgently en- 
treating and beseeching to be carried home in paper bags and eaten 
after dinner. 

' The very gold and silver fish, set forth among these choice fruits 
in a bowl, though members of a dull and stagnant-blooded race, ap- 
peared to know that there was something going on; and, to a fish, 
went gasping round and round their little world in slow and passion- 
less excitement. The grocers! oh, the grocers! nearly closed, with 
perhaps two stutters down, or one; but through those gaps such 
glimpses! It was not alone that the scales descending on the counter 
made a merry sound, or that the twine and roller parted company so 
briskly, or that the canisters were rattled up and down like juggling 
tricks, or even that the blended scents of tea and coffee were so 
grateful to the nose, or even that the raisins were so plentiful and 
pure, the almonds so extremely white, the sticks of cinnamon so long 
and straight, the other spices so delicious, the candied fruits so caked 
and spotted with molten sugar as to make the coldest lookers-on feel 
^ faint and subsequently bilious. 

k Nor was it that the figs were moist and pulpy, or that the French 

^ plums blushed in modest tartness from their highly decorated boxes, 
^ or that everything was good to eat, and in its Christmas dress; but 
1 the customers were all so hurried and so eager in the hopeful promise 
f of the day that they tumbled up against each other at the door in the 
^ best humor possible; while the grocer and his people were so frank 
i and fresh that the polished hearts with which they fastened their 
S aprons behind might have been their own, worn outside for general 
^ inspection and for Christmas days to peck at if they chose. 
^ But soon the steeples called good people all to church and chapel, 

I and away they came, flocking through the streets in their best clothes, 
I and with their gayest faces. At the same time there emerged from 
f scores of by-streets, lanes and nameless turnings, innumerable people, 
^ carrying their dinners to the bakers* shops. The sight of these poor 
i travelers appeared to interest the Spirit very much, for he stood with 
f Scrooge beside him in a baker's doorway, and, taking off the covers 
^ as their bearers passed, sprinkled incense on their (Snners from his 
i torch. And it was a very uncommon kind of torch, for once or twice 
# when there were angry words between some dinner-carriers who had 
^ jostled each other, he shed a few drops of water on them for it, and 
^ their good humor was restored directly. For they said it was a shame 
f to quarrel upon Christmas day. And so it was! God love it, so it was! 



pleased with his appointment because 
of his interest in, knowledge of and 
sympathy with the cause of efficient 
agriculture. 

Through its agricultural department 
the state university touches the peo- 
ple of Minnesota — all the people — 
more widely and more closely than 
in anj' other division of its activities. 
.\nd we say this with due regard to 
the importance and value of the uni- 
versity as a whole. 

Therefore the appointment of a 
man like Mr. Williams is peculiarly 
timely and praiseworthy. 

Besides, Duluth has the state farm 
school, soon to be operated, an im- 
portant arm of the agricultural side 
of the university with a vastly import- 
ant meaning to Duluth and to North- 
eastern Minnesota. 

It is interesting to note at this time 
that the late Governor John A. John- 
son wanted Mr. Williams on the 
board of regents, and through a local 
mutual friend offered the place to him 
at the time of the vacancy filled bj-- 
Mr. Hovland's appointment. At that 
time, however, Mr. Williams was un- 
able to accept the place because of 
the pressure of private aftairs. 

The Herald congratulates Governor 
Eberhart on this most excellent ap- 
pointment. 



M;'3. Gunnes.«( is found again. There's 
a woman who is rapidly breaking into 
the Kins Menelik class. 



INTERESTING. 

We find much interest in the atti- 
tude of the News Tribune upon The 
Herald's plan to employ an expert in 
municipal efficiency to make a sur- 
vey of the city with a view to sug- 
gesting, for the convenience of the 
new commission, a tentative system 
co-ordinating the various b-anches of 
city business along lines of simplicity, 
economy and efficiency. 

Editorially, it damns it with its 
praise. 

Locally, it has managed to scrape 
together a few interviews opposed to 
the plan, including several individuals 
who had already given The Herald 
interviews in favor of it. 

Very interesting, indeed. 



Al.so this is an easy time of year to 
impres.s young grills with the advisabil- 
ity of keeping their stockings darned. 



At least It isn't too late to resolve 
to shop early next year. 



A SPLENDID APPOINTMENT. 

It is a great pleasure to be able to 
commend Governor Eberhart un- 
stintedly for his appointment of John 
O. Williams of this city as a member 
of the board of regents of the state 
university to fill the vacancy created 
by the resignation of H. B. Hovland. 

Mr. Williams is abundantly equipped 
in every way for this high position. 

But The Herald is particularly 



THE PARCEL POST. THE LOCAL MER- 
CHANT AND THE COUNTRY PAPER. 

The fight against the parcel post, 
which goes into effect the first of the 
year, was always waged in the name 
of the local merchant. The express 
companies, the many concerns with 
which the express companies are more 
or less secretly allied by investment, 
the railroads, and even the whole- 
salers and many retailers themselves. 
~all declared that the cheap carriage 
rates of the parcel post would wipe 
out the local merchants and leave 
nothing but big city mail order 
houses. 

None of them stopped to think that 
if the business of the country mer- 
chant is on a basis so insecure that 
cheap transportation w^ould ruin it, it 
was bound to die anyway — and 
should die. 

But they did the country mercharit 



less than justice. He gives credit, and 
the mail order houses don't. His 
goods are on exhibition for approval, 
and the mail order purchase is "sight 
unseen," He knows his customers, 
and the mail order house doesn't. 

On top of these advantages, the 
local parcel post rates are so much 
lower than the zone rates that the 
local merchant has a clear advantage 
in transportation rates. 

The trouble with the rural mer- 
chant whose business might be in- 
jured by the mail order houses is that 
he is not progressive. Interpreted 
into more concrete terms, the trouble 
with him is that he doesn't advertise. 
True, he sometimes runs a card in 
the local paper stating that he is in 
business, and keeps "fine goods," but 
that isn't advertising. Everybody 
knows he is in business, and nobody 
expects him to say anything else than 
that his goods are "fine." But it 
doesn't get him anything. 

What his possible patrons do not 
know is that he has bargains as well 
as the mail order houses. This 
knowledge he can convey to them 
only by advertising. 

What the country merchant ought 
to do, parcel post or no parcel post, 
is to study advertising. Let him 
study what the city retail merchants 
do in that line. Let him learn how 
to do it for himself by copying them. 
A country merchant could do no bet- 
ter in this territory, for instance, than 
to study the retail advertisements in 
The Herald. If he does not take The 
Herald his local newspaper editor 
probably does, and he will be glad to 
keep it on file for this use If he is 
asked to do so. 

The country merchant should ad- 
vertise precisely as the city merchant 
does. Only in that way can he let 
his possible patrons know what he 
has in stock and what bargains he can 
offer. He can circularize his ter- 
ritory, it is true, but it will cost him 
more and he can be sure that though 
every newspaper is read, nine out of 
ten circulars reach the waste basket 
immediately. He must advertise, and 
he must do it exactly as the success- 
ful city merchants do. He will find 
no better school to study advertising 
methods in than the advertising 
columns of this newspaper as they 
are filled by the Duluth merchants. 

The country merchant, if he knew 
it, has a weapon at hand with which 
he can successfully fight t'^e city mail 
order house, no matter how cheap 
carriage rates are made. That weap- 
on is his local newspaper. 



forest reserve and park in Northern 
llasca county is so attractive. 

A day's journey north of Grand 
Rapids lies a peculiar region, limited 
in area but with strongly marked 
characteristics throughout. It com- 
prises roughly four townships — town- 
ships 59 andi ♦yf^ ranges 24 and 25 — 
though of cpucj|e|jt is not so regular 
in form as' thd geographical town- 
ship lines. In a small part of these 
towns there^|!s fkcellcnt agricultural 
land, which VoAld not be included; 
and there is a little territory outside 
the four towns which belongs to this 
tract, and which will be included. 

It is a place of rock and boulders 
and picturesque confusion. There are 
few tracts like it anywhere in the 
north. It is the western end of the 
Vermilion range formation, and 
marks the spot where apparently 
there has been some mighty convul- 
sion of nature. Clear, cold lakes, full 
of black bass and other game fish, 
abound in it. It has been cut over, 
and then burned; and now a flourish- 
ing young growth of pine and spruce 
is coming up. This timber, if it can 
be protected, will in time be worth a 
great deal of money. 

The plan is, as we understand it, to 
select from this area all the land 
which is utterly worthless for agri- 
cultural purposes; and this includes 
most of it. Some of it the state now 
owns. Much of it which is in private 
hands is gradually coming back to 
the state because the owners do not 
think it worth while to pay taxes on 
it now the original growth of timber 
is gone. If the state would set this 
area apart as a forest reserve and 
public park, it would have a nucleus 
in the land it already owns, and as 
most of the rest is useless except for 
public purposes it probably would 
have no trouble in buying all it 
needs for a merely nominal price. 

Such a park \vould be the nucleus 
for a great state forestry work. In 
time to conie— it ought to be done 
now — all of Northern Minnesota will 
be surveyed and the non-agricultural 
land set apart for forestry purposes. 
Here is a tract obviously fitted for a 
beginning of that work; and more- 
over it is already supplied with a 
promising growth of young timber 
that should be conserved. Besides, it 
could be turned, with almost no ex- 
pense, into a state park w^here people 
from all over the state could go for 
camping, hunting and fishing excur- 
sions. 

This project will be brought before 
the legislature at its coming session, 
and it should tjave earnest consider- 
ation. The time to set apart state 
playgrounds is no*-, for soon the op- 
portunity will be gone. The time to 
begin setting apart the non-agricul- 
tural land in Northern Minnesota for 
forestry jiurpose is now, and the 
smalLarea described offers an excel- 
lent opportunity for a beginning. 

Sereno Payne l.<3 said to be fond of 
mixing up things to eat. He ought to 
be satisfied with the stew he stirred up 
by his tariff bill. 



THE OPENCOURT 

(Readers of Tlie Hetald are Invited to make free 
iiae of this column to express tlielr Ideas about the 
topics of general Interest, tut discussion of sectarian 
rellRloiis differences are barred. Letters should not 
exceed oOO words— the shorter the beUer. They must 
be written on one side of the paper only, and tbey 
must be accompanied in every case by the name and 
address of the writer, though these need not be pub- 
lished. A alcned letter la always more effective, 
however.) 



MR. GOOD FELLOW. 



>F 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

The snow was falling, 

The night was eold. 
Beneath a bright light 

A waif stood bold. 

Her eyes they glistened 

As she beheld tJUe sight. 
A window filled with Christmas Joys, 

Dolls, clothe^, candies, sleds and toys. 

She turned her eye.s across the street, 

Then, speedily there did go. 
On a flaming poster was Santa Glaus, 

At the moving picture show. 

A stranger came and took her In, 

And as the film rolled on, 
Eagerly watching it to the end. 

Depicting Santa Claus to the throng. 

When the lights turned on 

She asked: "Is Christmas really 
gone?" 
He answered: "Oh, no;" 

And took her to the window show. 

He opened the door and in they go. 

There was a busy clerk, 
And don't you kno«v 

They made Christmas really so. 

GRATIA MUHLENBRUCH. 

Biwabik. Minn., Dec. 21. 



la not Olio function they are expected 
to perform first, I would like to know 
wluit is the chief end of public ser- 
vants besides drawing their salaries, 
if the householder in supposed to keep 
the sidewalk In front of his house in 
navigable shape, the authorities should 
see that he does it. If it Is up to the 
city, then why is it not done? 

A PEDESTRIAN'. 
Duluth, Dec. 23. 

WHY NOT MlRrSTARKET 

FO R MINNE SOTA WOOL? 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

The all wool mackinaw has been 
found to be etyllsh, as well as chuclc 
full of comfort in the winter for rich 
and poor, ladies as well as men. 

The same holds good In all wool 
blankets and all wool flannels and 
clothing, Books and mittens for old and 
young. The all wool mackinaw is the 
stylo In 1912. 

And our Commercial club wants your 
active co-operation for the upbuilding 
of public sentiment for Minnesota 
home grown wool. We ask you to 
actively get behind the movement to 
build up the Minnesota sheep industry 
so as to supply our Minnesota wants 
for pure wool. 

A few of the reasons why we need 
slieep: 

In the timbered and cut-over districts 
to help garner the millions of dollars 
of wild summer forage that annually 
is going to waste for want of live- 
stock, and also to help clear our brush 
lands as only sheep can do economical- 
ly and prepare the lands for clover, 
cows, liogs and other crops, as well as 
make a home market for the surplus 
supply of roots and potatoes and other 
vegetables. 

And In the prairie districts we want 
the sheep In the fall to turn loose on 
the stubble fields to pick up the waste 
grain, and eat and pick off the wild 
seed plants that "have taken hold of the 
old grain farms. 

Get busy with the railroads and 
needed money men, to bring in tlie 
spring sheep here from tlie Montana 
and Western bunch grass ranges to 
feed here during the summer, and in 
the fall ship them to the Eastern mar- 
kets or sell them to local farmers here. 

Let Minnesota and Montana and the 
railroads join hands to double the 
Northwestern wool and mutton output 
in the next five years. Your truly, 

J. J. OPSAHLfc 

Bemidji, Minn., Dec. 21. 




Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fnd C. Kelly. 



Twenty Years Ago 



rrom Tbe Herald of this date, 1892. 



A WORD OF THANKS. 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

I desire to express to you my thanks 
for your courteous editorial of Dec. 
10 in reference to the article in the 
December Christian Science Journal. 

I appreciate very fully the kindly 
spirit reflected by your editorial; at 
the same time, if you knew how many 
men there were apparently of a breadth 
of mind the opposite of yours, you 
would see why sometimes these things 
that appear unnecessary to men of in- 
telligence and broadness of vision are 
absolutely required for a large pro- 
portion of the so-called thinking world. 

I thank you, however, for your In- 
terest in the matter and with best 
wishes for the holiday season, I am. 
Very cordially yours, 
HENRY DEUTSCH, 
Christian Science Committee 
on Publication. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 20. 



Minnesota Opinions 



Commeata of Um State Preat, 



Practical Education. 

Austin Transcript: A Winona manu- 
facturing firm is allowing a limited 
number of high school pupils to work 
in the plant after school hours and on 
Saturdays to gain actual " experience 
along mechanical lines. This is a wise 
and practical move. 



ITaHeecaaary Trouble. 

Winona Independent: Michigan went 
to some unnecessary trouble in defeat- 
ing the woman svtffrage amendment. 
It will have to adopt it in a few years, 
so why not now? 



Concildcrate Govemor. 

Stillwater Gazette: Governor Eber- 
hart is considerate and thoughtful. He 
has fixed the date for opening the 
"jag farm" at Willmar for Dec. 26, the 
day after Christmas. A whole lot of 
men would never have thought of that 
very appropriate day. 



Cook Connty Optimism. 

Grand Marais News-Herald: North- 
ern Minnesota will continue to develop 
— no matter what the politics of tlie 
president. — Bralnerd Tribune. 

And the Tribune took Northeastern 
Minnesota into the scope of its vision 
in saying so. At any rate we in Cook 
county are optimistic enough to say: 
"The same over here." 



It Sbonld Be Doae. 

Moorhead News: There appears to 
be a movement on foot among the 
members of the legislature to shorten 
the session this winter to sixty days. 
There ought not to be any difficulty in 
accomplishing this needed reform now 
that the members are paid by the year 
Instead of by the day. 



Another name that always comes to 
mind at this time of year is that of 
Ebenezer Scrooge. 

A NORTHERN MINNESOTA GIFT TO 
THE STATE. 

Northern Minnesota is asking the 
state to do a good deal for it, though 
it is not asking a single thing that 
will not work out to the profit and 
glory of the entire commonwealth. 

But because Northern Minnesota is 
asking so much, it is only fair that it 
should do sometliing for the state as 
a whole. 

This is why the project for a state 



CLEA NING W ALKS. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

Pretty soon you will begin to think 
that "A Pedestrian"' la a chronic 
kicker, but that is not the case. I 
merely see things that should be regu- 
lated for the good of the public, but 
which the authorities, for some' reason 
or no reason, fail to take cogni- 
zance of. 

In the present Instance the kick I 
have to register-^ over the condition 
of sidewalks,, 'si^be the heavy snow- 
falls began. '^ path is worn through 
in most casa^i, tNpt In the middle of 
this path onj^almost all sidewalks on 
residence streets is a ridge of hard 
snow. Attempt to walk on It and you 
will slide down its sides, cutting a ri- 
diculous figure, Inconveniencing and 
really endangering yourself. I see lots 
of people slin and fall on these ridges, 
and some of » theni are hurt. It doe» 
not take mueh of,, a fall to break an 
ankle or a \vrist,\ lind it is surprisinr 
that more such accidents have not 
happened. It Is particularly dangeroua 
to elderly people. 

It seems to me that the least the 
city authorities can do is to take what- 
ever step.s are necessary to protect the 
lives and llmftS 6t\be citizens. If that 



Bad FlnanclmB. 

Anoka Union: Minnesota had to bor- 
row $2,500,000 to pay expenses. That 
is bad financing and should not be 
tolerated. The finances of the state 
need overhauling. 



Good Plan. 

Cambridge North Star: The plan to 
have all county officers elected upon a 
non-partisan ticket seems to be grow- 
ing in favor. It woufd probably do a 
great deal toward making the mem- 
bers of the different parties vote the 
proper ticket at primaries. At pres- 
ent, in counties where one party or 
the other overwhelmingly predom- 
inates, as is the case in most counties, 
the party nomination ends the contest, 
so if a voter is to have anything to 
say about county officers he must call 
for a party ticket, and he naturally 
votes at the primary upon all the can- 
didates. If county officers were non- 
partisan, the voters would be less like- 
ly to "cross over" In legislative and 
congressional contests. 



More Non-Partiaanaklp. 

St. Peter Tribune: The selection of 
postmasters by a vote of the people 
at a local election is again being agi- 
tated, and such a measure may be In- 
troduced in congress. The appoint- 
ment of a postmaster by a congress- 
man is the cause of much of his trou- 
ble. A non-partisan election on post- 
master M'ould prove popular, and In 
line with non-partisan candidates for 
county offices. 



Washington. l>ec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — AM who look at news- 
papers have bum]>ed into a lot of pure 
reading matter appertaining to the 
proposition for tt^e government to buy 

Monticello — oh, certainly, pronounced 
"chello" — the home of Thomas Jeffer- 
son, now owned ty Representative Jef- 
ferson Levy at New York. 

And Just to slow how such things 
get their start, liere Is a little tale: 

A certain congressman and a news- 
paper man started from the capitol one 
afternoon some months ago to a near- 
by hotel, which makes provision for 
those who thirst. 

On the way over the two passed 
Levy. 

"That's Jeff I^vy, the man who owns 
Monticello," said the congressman. 

"So it is," said the newspaper man. 
"By the way, I've often wondered if 
the government wouldn't try to get 
control of that property some time." 

"Say, wouldn't it be a great joke on 
Levy to start a r.iovement of that sort 
and take the place away from him," 
laughed the congressman. 

Both chuckled over the idea, as they 
entered the hotel, after the restoratives. 
The more they thought about the 
thing, as they stood each with a foot 
on the brass rail, reaching for the little 
cardboard check»i, the more they be- 
lieved it would b<5 a rich practical joke 
on Levy. 

• • • 

They separated and the congressman 
went home to get Into the conventional 
corpse olothes and keep a dinner en- 
gagement. 

It was a brilliant, though select, din- 
ner party. Among those at the tablei 
were Senator O'Gorman. Mrs. Martin 
Littleton, John Sharp Williams, Mrs. 
T. P. O'Connor, iind others, every one 
as smart and clever as can be. All 
were in fine conversational fettle and 
the congressman referred to sought for 
a topic by which he could make a show- 
ing in the gay talk. He happened to 
think of the Joke on Levy that he and 
his newspaper friend had been discus- 
sing. 

Turning to Senator O'Gorman, he 
asked: 

"Have you heard about the movement 
to take Monticello away from your con- 
stituent, Jeff Levy?" 

• • • 

O'Gorman said he hadn't heard a 
thing about it. The other guests 
perked up and wished to know more 
about it. and th« first thing he knew 
the congressmari with the sense of 
humor was right In the vortex of the 
conversation. The project was tossed 
back and forth, iind the women, being 
patriotically inclined, said it would be 
a grand thing to have the shrine of 
Jefferson owned by all the people of 
the United States instead of by one 
man. Senator Ci'Gorman and Senator 
Williams were a sked about the legal 
aspect of the cass and they talked both 
learnedly and brilliantly about eminent 
domain, tracing the precedents right 
back to Blackstone and points beyond. 

"All that is ni»eded," said the Joker 
congressman, "is for somebody to give 
the movement a start." 

Mrs. Littleton i?ot to thinking it over 
the next day, €ni the patriotic side of 
the proposition .appealed to her. She 
determined to stirt the agitation. And 
It looks as If she might possibly be 
successful. 

Thus we find a little joke acorn 
growing into a serious oak. 

But the funniest thing about the 
whole deal ia that the congressman 
whose sense of humor started the 
movement, cast his vote against It, re- 
cently, when the question came up In 
the house. 

• • • 

By virtue of being secretary of war, 
Henry L. Stlmsoii was the boss of the 
government passenger ship that carried 
a congressional party to the Panama 
canal recently. The ship was due to, 
sail on the return trip at 2 o'clock In 
the afternoon. I5ut Stimson wished to 
get away a little sooner and had the 
sailing time moved back to 12 o'clock 
noon. Whatever he said went, you un- 
derstand, just a§ if the ship were a 
taxicab that he had chartered for tlie 
day. 

The notice was posted, therefore, that 
the vessel would start away at noon. 
The majority of the hundred passen- 
gers who expected to sail were stay- 
ing at the other end of the canal, where 
they could get better hotel accommo- 
dations, and the earlier sailing hour 
made it necessary for them to get up 
at 5 o'clock and catch a train at 6:35. 
Most of them had been up late the 
night before and it was a sleepy bunch 
of people who got off that early morn- 
ing train. 

Twelve o'clock came and the ship 
stuck right in tte harbor without any 
sailing activity about it at all. People 
hunted up other i>eople who knew about 
such things and learned that Stimson 
had decided not to go 'til 9 o'clock that 
night. 

Several particularly sleepy, yawnful 
passengers glared at Stimson the next 
time he walked by. 

• • • 

Swagar Shcrlev, the Kentucy mem- 
ber with the name like a country es- 
tate, wished to hold a brief caucus with 
the Kentucky delegation in one of the 
house cloak rooms. He beckoned to a 
page boy who happened to be new on 
the Job. 

"Do you know all the Kentucky dele- 
gation?" asked !?herley. 

"I know most of It, sir," replied the 
new boy, anxious to please. And 
straightway he went and fetched big 
Ollie James. 

• • • 

Richmond Pea-son Hobson. of Ala- 
bama, owns up in his biography In the 
Congressional Directory that he is the 
tenth in descent from Elder Brewster, 
who. it win be remembered, was a first- 
cabin passenger on the original May- 
flower. 

• • • 

Representative Burleson of Texas, 
who stands right up close to the In- 
coming administration, has a habit of 
M-earing his coat collar turned up, as 
if he were afraid of a draft. 
(Copyrl<tit, 1912. by lYMt C. KeUy. All rights rcamred. ) 



••♦Theodore E. Tenney left Duluth 
yesterday for a year and a half of 
study at Amherst college, Mass. 



•••Miss Ray Culver has returned 
from Toledo, Ohio, and will spend the 
winter at the Brighton. 



•••Col. G. R. Montfort and W. F. 
Summers, the bonifacea ©f the Windsor 
hotel, St. Paul, are on a visit to Du- 
luth. 



•♦•Editor M. A. Hays of the Duluth 
News Tribune returned yesterday from 
a three weeks' trip to his old home in 
Ohio. 



•••The excursion given bs' the Du-. 
luth, Missabe & Northern road was 
thoroughly enjoyed by the 317 people 
who accepted the invitation to visit the 
Mesaba range. The party went to the 
Mountain Iron mine, the Missabe Moun. 
tain mine and Virginia, the new town 
which lias sprung up in the wilder- 
ness. It already has about 100 build- 
ings, several three stories in height, 
and many are being erected. The 
party was in charge of President K. D. 
Chase. Supt. G. H. White and other of- 
ficials of the road. Col. W. F. Gore 
and J. R. James looked after the in- 
terests of the Virginia Inraprovement 
company on the excursion. 



♦••Of the teachers at the Washing- 
ton scliool, Miss Clara A. Sawyer will 
spend the holidays at Cedar -FallB. 
Iowa; Miss Mattie J. Rice at Green 
Bay, Wis., and Miss Grace Danforth. 
the assistant kindergarten teacher, at 
St. Paul. 



•••The Lurline Boat club of Minne- 
apolis has secured the services of Fred 
Plaisted as trainer for next season. 



•••D. Gilchrist, formerly superin- 
tendent of the Iron Bay company at 
West Duluth, left last evening for Port 
Henry, N. Y., where he will engage in 
the iron mining business. 



•••C R. Brown, wife and children 
arrived in the city yesterady from 
Kitchi, Mich., on a visit to Mrs. Brown's 
brother, A. B. Palmer, of the Windsor 
hotel. Mr. Brown was proprietor of 
the Kitchi hotel, which was destroyed 
by an incendiary fire a few mornings 
ago. He was severely burned about 
the head and ears ^-hile carrying his 
wife out of the burning building. 



•••J. F. Hobbes, a newspaper man 
from Muskego, Mich., accidentally fell 
at the Mountain Iron r. ine while on 
the Duluth, Missabe & Northern road's 
excursion and broke his right wrist. 



•♦•The A. Booth Packing company 
has nearly reached the close of the 
season's fish business. Nearly 2.000,000 
pounds of fish from the Lake Superior 
catch was received here. About 300 
men have been employed and nearly 
seventy sail and row boats. The capi- 
tal invested, outside of the Booth com- 
pany. Is about 1150,000. 



The Hard Hand 



Carlyle: Venerable to me is 
the hard Hand ; crooked and 
coarse ; wherein notwitlistanding 
lies a cunnings virtue indefeasibly 
royal as of the Scepter of 
this Planet. • • • Hardly en- 
treated Brother! For us was j 
thy way so bent, for us were thy 
straight limbs and fingers so de- 
formed; thou wert our Conscript 
on whom the lot fell, and fighting 
our battles wert so marred. For 
in thee too lay a God-created 
Form, but it was not to be un- 
folded. Encrusted must it stand 
with the thick adhesions and de- 
facements of Labor; and thy 
body, like thy soul, was not to 
know Freedom. 



1%e First Pure Food La«^a. 

Health Culture Magazine: Prof. 
George A. Reisner of Harvard univer- 
sity has discovered among some speci- 
mens of earliest Hebrew writing in 
the excavations of the city of Samaria. 
In Palestine, a most Interesting record 
of the first pure food laws In history. 
He has also found ancient writings 
dealing with the first instance on rec- 
ord of the keeping of wines in a gov- 
ernment warehouse under bond. 

Dating back to the period of King: 
Ahab, 850 B. C, these inscriptions are 
considered to be one of the greatest 
finds of the Harvard Palestinian expe- 
dition which delved Into the city of 
Ahab and Amrl for three years. "They 
found labels on wine and oil Jars. 
These mention the year In which the 
wine was laid down in the cellars of 
the palace storehouse, and they state 
the vineyard from which the wine 
came, important facts that are recog- 
nized equally well by vintners today. 

On the oil Jars the label reads, "A 
jar of pure oil," with the mention of 
the district from which the oil came. 
The bits of pottery on which the de- 
scriptions were written were not parts 
of the jars, but were evidently Intend- 
ed to be attached to the necks of the 
receptacles, just as are labels or seals 
at the present time. 



AMUSEMENTS. 




LYCEUM 



And Ye Hear Not 



The Soiuc •( the 8eas*B. 

St. I>ouls Republic: It might be 
called the season of the sweet buy 
and buy. 



Chance for EeoBomy. 

Philadelphia Record: When the wolf 
Is at the door we can at any rate dis- 
pense with a watch dog. 



Oh, when, within our proudest cities, 
where 
The stanchest blows for righteous- 
ness are struck. 
Vice stalks In unshamed horror, 
through the glare. 
Dragging the name of "mother" in 
the muck. 

Or when. In ncisome, crowded, ugly 
dens. 
The little children toll amid the 
grime 
And work long, painful hours in air- 
less pens 
That doom them to a sordid life of 
crime. 

How must the Christmas angel fold 
bis wings. 
And turn away to hide his shame-hot 
tears, 
As. through the stars above tlie smoke, 
he sings 
The same song he has sung two 
thousand rears! 

— K. L. Euell In Colliers. 



CHRISTMAS DAY MATINEE 
OAVIO 8ELASC0 PTMCsti 



l > \\ 11) 

WARFiELD 




THEATER 

•••ond Hm. Cast and I 



MATMEES 

DAILY 

10c& 



Niibtt. lOe. 250. 
SAc tmi 7S«. 



TNIS -WEEK'S SILL 



"PUSS IN BOOTS" 
•. A. KsHTt CMSMiV 

APDALrs 
200L0SICAL CIRCUS 
MR. AND MRS. 

JACK MtQRECVY 

HAL * FRANCIS 

CHARLES OLCOTT 

BCRTISH 

Oayllikt Pktitns 

TIM OMMHt Qnhwlra. 




«%.' 



4ft 






»!/■ 



_,,; 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




-;^A/micna£^ 



18 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 

Ready -io-Wear for Ladies, Misses and Children. 

TODAY 

We Started Our Half-Price Sale 

THROUGHOUT THE STORE 
Simply to Show That This Store Keeps Ahead 



December 23, 1912. 




HANDLE THEIR 
OWN GRAIN 

I m 

Canadians Believe They 

Will Not Need Much Help 

From Duluth. 



Fort William Man Estimates 

Total Capacity of 65,- 

000,000 Bushels. 



You Know What Half Price Means 

A\'e don't have to mention prices, styles or quality. 
Come tomorrow, pick out everything you want from our 
big stocks and pay 

Half Price on Coats, Suits, Dresses, Hats and Furs 

"SEE THE NATIONAL FIRST." 



TOMORROW ENDS THE 
GREAT PANTS SALE^ 

Gemifne $5, $6 and $7 Pants 
Made to Your Order for 






Come-afoot or horscback-any 
way to get here. Choose any 

GENUINE $15 TAILORS 



The Greatest 

Bargain of 

The Season-^ 

Quality 
Considered, 

Don't Miss It! 



GEORC^E: H, mills. Mgr. 

333 West Superior St. 




Open Saturday and Monday Evenings 



FLIES FROM TUNIS 

ACROSS TO ROME. 

Kome, Dec. 23. — Roland Garros, the 
FreiK-h aviator, tompleted Sunday his 
long fllK'it from Tunis. Africa. Gar- 
ros after a splendid fllRht from Tunis 
on Dec. 16, landed at Trapanl. Sicily, 
a distance of about 160 miles over the 
Mediterranean sea. He left Trapani 
Saturday and flew to the Italian main- 
land, faunday he continued his flight, 
landing at Naples for lunch. Favor- 
able weatJier enabled Garros to cover 
the last .stage of his journey at great 
Bpetd. He landed at Rome fullv ;m 



hour and a half before he was ex- 
pected. In making the landing the 
aeroplane was slightly damaged, but 
Garros was not hurt. 



Kankakee Scorched. 

Kankakee, 111., Dec. 23.— Fire today 
attacked the local freight depot of the 
Chicago. Indiana & Southern railway 
and communicated to an adjoining 
storage warehouse. Loss estimated at 
$100,000. 



E. J, Henderson of Fort William, 
connected with the Grain Growers' 
Grain association of Winnipeg, who 
was on the Duluth grain exchange to- 
day, indorsed the opinions of quite a 
number of recent Canadian visitors, 
who think there will be little bonded 
grain received from Canada at the 
American Head of the Lakes during 
the coming winter, inasmuch as the 
Canadians have fairly adequate facili- 
ties of their own for handling it. 

■'I do not see," said Mr. Henderson, 
"how the necessity can arise for the 
storing of any great quantity of Ca- 
nadian grain in the Duluth and Su- 
perior elevators during the coming 
winter. There are fifty-five or sixtv 
beats of large storage capacity win- 
tering in the Fort William and Port 
Arthur harbors and these we figure 
will take about 13,000,000 bushels of 
grain. Most of these are American 
boats, but the Canadian government 
has suspended the operation of the 
law forbidding a foreign boat to carry 
grain from one Canadian port to an- 
other, so that these boats may receive 
all the grain that it is found conven- 
ient to store in them, whether it is to 
be shipped to either Canadian or 
American ports in the spring. 

•On Dec. 10 we figured that we still 
had capacity in the elevators, in- 
cluding the new ones, at Fort William 
and Port Arthur, for 32,000,000 bushels 
of grain, in addition to the 4,000,000 
bushels they already contained. This, 
together with the boats, would give 
us storage capacity for 45,000,000 
bushels. The Canadian Pacific railway 
officials figured that their road would 
take 20,000,000 bushels of grain from 
these elevators to the East during the 
period between the close of navigation 
and the opening next spring. This 
would give Fort William and Port Ar- 
thur a total receiving capacity of 65,- 
000,000 bushels. I think that will be 
Pkoty for .all the ^r^jn that comes, and 
that is the general expectation. It 
should be remembered that the grain 
of Western Canada Is in 90 per cent 
better co-idiflon tlan it was a year ago. 
There is no such necessity of rushing 
it along on account of Its dampness, 
as there was last year. 

"There is no congestion of cars 
carrying grain from various points in 
Western Canada to Fort W'illiam and 
Port Arthur. It is true that for about 
two or three weeks prior to Dec. 8 
there was an embargo r.n the .shipment 
of flaxseed from Western Canadian 
points to the Canadian Head of the 
Lakes. This was done, because there 
was a congestion of flaxseed cars in 
the railroad yards at Fort William 
and Port Arthur, owing to the fact 
that the facilities for cleaning the 
flax did not operate fast enoutrh to get 
it out of the way. There Is absolutely 
no embargo now. 

"Tliere is some congestion of cars 
ready for shipments to the East over 
the Canadian Pacific, but that is due 
to recent wrecks, whicli have handi- 
capped the movement of cars. There 
are 800 to 900 cars of grain ready to 
leave Fort William for "the East. The 
delay Is not at all serious. 

Since Dec. 10 the receipts of grain 
at Fort William and Port Arthur have 
been comparatively light. I see no rea- 
son to fear any congestion. Some 
Western Canadian grain mav take the 
Soo route through the United States 
Instead of the road through Port Ar- 
thur in going to the East this winter, 
but I do not think very much will go 
in that way. I think nearly all of it 
will take the direct route through 
Port Arthur." 



FAIR, MILD 
CHRISTMAS 

Weather Man Promises 

Warm, Pleasant Day 

for Holiday. 



"None -Xlcer." 

Roses, beauties, cardinals, poinset- 
tias, valleys, violets and carnations at 
Victor Huot's. 



THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE BUY 

USEFUL CHRISTMAS 
PRESENTS 



AT GATELY'S 



LADIES' SUITS at ^4 Off. 
LADIES' COATS at $14.75, $17.50 and $19.50. 
MEN'S SUITS— $15.00, $18.00 and $20.00. 
MEN'S WINTER COATS— $15.00,' $20.00 and $25. 
Full line of Ladies' and Gents' Furnishings and Shoes. 

USE YOUR CREDIT— Pay as You Get Paid. 




MILUTH— SUPERIOR— VIRQINU 



The crispness of air and the snowfall 
that usually go with thoughts of 
Christmas will be missing this year. 

On the other hand, the blizzards and 
extremely low temperatures that often 
detract from the cheer cf the day arc 
not in the forecast. 

Fair, mild weather is the prediction 
given by the weather man today. 
There will be some clouds in the sky 
but the sun will break through occa- 
sionally and the aspect will be gener- 
ally fair. 

The lowest temperature tonight will 
be 15 deg. to 20 deg. above zero and 
no very great change Is expected be- 
fore Christmas day passes. 

The weather is ideal for the windup 
cf Christmas shopping. Chrislr^a.s 
church services and entertainments 
should draw out good crowds, for the 
weather conditions will not keep peo- 
ple at home. The heavy snowfall of 
the past week insures a "white" Christ- 
mas, hut there will be no new blanket 
of snow, according to present pre- 
dictions. 



RICH SALVAGE FOR 
CREW OF TRAWLER 

Three-Masted Schooner Is 

Found and Towed Into 

Port at Cape Cod. 

Boston, Dec. 23. — The three-masted 
schooner Henry R. Tilton, abandoned 
and waterlogged, arrived off Cape Cod 
today in tow of the steam trawler Swell 
which picked up the derelict ninety- 
five miles southeast of Highland llglit. 
Tilton was bound from Windsor, N. H. 
for New York with lumber. The 
Swell's crew of fifteen men will share 
In one of the biggest Christmas pres- 
ents, through salvage money, that has 
ever been divided among fishermen 
here. 

The fate of the crew of the Tilton is 
still in doubt. They may have been 
rescued by some passing vessel. 
• 

Supreme Court Recesiie«. 

"Washington, Dec. 23. — The supreme 
court, after announcing several minor 
decisions, today recessed until Jan. 6 
without giving a decision as to the 
rights of Union Pacific stockholders In 
tl:e distribution of the Southern Pa- 
cific stock held by the Union Pacific 
Railroad company, or making a de- 
cision in the state rate cases. 




11 



•'•I 



ul; <r ) 



You II Do Better at Kelly s 



Clirisbnas Gifts at Removal Prices 

U the Money Is Running Low, Use Our Credit DeparlmentI 

t\anTf^^lZ" ^S" p*'^*".' 'I"'?,"" ?"■ ♦°"!,°"°^^ «:"' be delivered before Christmas. We have made ample prepara- 
tions lor the rush. Practical gifts from $1 upwards, and everything at Removal Prices. 



Gifts at Removal Prices 



$9.00 Golden Quartered Oak Telephone Set— Com 

plcte with chair. Removal Sale Price 



$6.00 Early English Telephone Set— Complete with 
back on. Removal Sale Price : 



$6.75 Telephone Sets— Complete with chair, in 
fumed t»ik finish. Removal Sale Price 

$8.00 Golden Quartered Oak Telephone Sets— Re- 
moval Sale Price 



$6.00 
$3.98 
$4.45 
$5.75 
$15.00 

tyle. 



$7.65 
$1.69 
$1.85 



$22.75 Circassian Walnut Music Cabinet— \\ith 5 
shelves and drawer at top. Removal Sale Price.. 

$13.75 Golden Quartered Oak Music Cabinet— Massive 

with heavy roll front. Removal Sale i^'i A Off" 

P"ce.... $lU*dd 

$10.50 Music Cabinet— In either golden oak or ma- 
hogany finish. Removal Sale Price 

$2.50 Pictures— Dull Roman gold frame; size UVi- 
x29i4; a variety of subjects. Removal Sale Price.. 

$3.00 Pictures— Size 191^x23'^; of Circassian wal- 
nut. Removal Sale Price 

$1.00 Pictures of various subjects; dull Roman gold ItO^ 
frames, with Circassian walnut mats. Removal Price. .. 0«fC* 

$1.00 Pictures— Size 10x20; landscapes and other subjects such 
as "The Gleaners," "Reapers," "Hope," etc. Removal Mik^ 
Sale Price 1«f C 

$18.75 Fumed Oak Cellarette- Large size; has bookcase front; 
upper part drops out of sight when not in use; ^-l Q '7ff 
a very practical Cellarette. Removal Sale Price 9JLt9«i9 

$36.00 Fumed Oak Cellarette— Large size; has porcelain tray, 
shelves for bottles, glasses, etc. in upper part; lower part has 
patent zinc-lined cigar compartment and extra shelves; each 
compartment fitted with a flat key lock. Re- tf^O/l "^ff 
moval Sale Price ^MTLmi 9 

$28.00 Massive Frame, Golden Quarter-sawed Oak Rocker — 
Very broad and high back; made for comfort; leather head rest, 
genuine leather seat. Removal Sale I^OO f A 

Price 9^^* v" 

$14.50 Fumed Oak Rocker— Good roomy chair; «eat and back 
upholstered in genuine Spanish leather; also golden oak with 
black leather upholsrering. Removal Sale ^ ~ 
price 



Read Over This List 



Lady's $16.50 Flat Top Desk— Complete with inkwell; in either 
golden oak or mahogany finish. Removal Sale ^10 9/? 

Lady's $.20.00 Desk— Golden oak finish; good Colonial style, with 

drawer md shelf underneath. Removal Sale — - — 

Price 



$10.75 



$19.75 Massive Golden Quarter-sawed Oak Rocker — Seat and 
back upholstered in genuine black leather over ^^ /| ^ fZ 



oil-tempered springs. 

$16.50 Mahogany Frjune Rocker — Broad arm, 
Spanish leather, over 



Removal Sale Price, 

upholstered in 
genume bpanish leather, over oil-tempered ^4 4 Qff 

springs. Removal Sale. Price 9XX««r9 

$21.00 Sleepy Hollow Rocker — Massive golden oak^ frame,_up- 
holstered in genuine leather; tufted seat and back; ~ - - 
a bargain at, Removal Sale Price , 



$16.75 




Morris Chairs 



Lady's 
drawer 



Desk— With 



$16.00 
$10.85 

substantially 

$21.50 



$14.50 Circassian Walnut 
Removal Sale Price 

Lady's $27.00 Large Size Desk— Fumed oak finish; 
made; with large drawer underneath. Removal 
Sale Price 

Lady's $19.50 Golden Quartered Oak Desk— With two small 
drawers and one large one. Removal Sale ^'f >| i*A 
Price 9l4«OU 

Lady's $17.75 Bird's-Eye Maple Desk -A pretty 
piece for the bedroom. Removal Sale Price 

$8.00 Golden Oak 



Lady's 

Price. 



Desk- 



$13.35 

-Removal Sale O^M Qff 



Lady's {J37.50 Fumed Oak Limbert's Arts and Crafts Desk— 
With drawer and large storage space under- tBOQ AA 
neath. Removal Sale Price 9^0«"" 

A gifnuine Cadillac desk table answers for a desk and also 
a librar} table. It makes an ideal Christmas gift. 
$24.50 Fumed Oak English Breakfast Table— 

Flanders design. Removal Sale Price 



$16.50 



$6.00 Fumed Oak Table— Size of top 22x22; a strong ^O ^7 tZ 
table with shelf underweath. Removal Sale Price. . . ^O* i ff 

$13.50 Cadillac Desk Table — Made of golden quartered oak; plain 
design; lias large drawer with desk; size of table ^•T ^fZ 
top 22x30 inches Removal Sale Price ^ m m i 9 

$14.50 Mahogany Desk Table — A beautiful design in a rich, dull 
finish; size of top 22x30 inches. Removal Sale tfQ fZfk 
Price 9v«tlV 

$18.00 Fumed Oak Library Table- Size of top 24x36; drawer 
in center and shelves on each side for books or ^'fl O tZi% 
magazine s. Removal Sale Price 9 JL mI«9" 

$6.50 Magazine Rack — Made of solid oak; genuine fumed finish, 
heavy posts, three slats in each end; height 42 inches fl^O Q/^ 
4 shelves, each 11x16 inches. Removal Sale Price.. vO«OtF 

$4.75 Magazine Rack — Made of solid oak, genuine fumed finish, 
four large shelves, large piece in each end; a very ^O ^fZ 
handsome piece. Removal Sale Price ^m* ■ tW 

$5.50 Magazine Stand — Arts and Crafts design; made of quar- 
tered oak, genuine fumed finish; height 36 inches; just right 
for music. Ladies' Home Journal, Post or other Q^O CA 
magazints. Removal Sale Price ^0«tfv 

$6.75 Magazine Stand — Genuine Limbert's; small size has three 
shelves, tumed finish; made of quartered oak. Re- ^Q QC 
moval Sale Price ^0»lJtf 

$3.95 Genuine Burrows Lightweight Folding Card Tables— Top 
covered with green fiber cloth. Removal Sale $2 8^ 



^$39.00 Fumed Oak Streit Slumber 
■hair — In genuine Spanish leather; 
the only Morris chair that adjusts 
itself to the body. Re- ^OO "7 fZ 
moval Sale Price ^iUO* fl 9 

$37.00 Mahogany Streit Slumber Chair 
—Best black leather. ^0>7 ff A 
Removal Sale Price ^M i •9" 

$26.50 Fumed Oak Morris Chair— 

W'ith loose air cushions in imitation 
Spanish leather. Re- 
moval Sale Price 

$23.50 Golden Quartered Oak Mor- 
ris Chair — Cushions of Spanish imi- 
tation leather, spring seat and back. Removal Sale tt*! ^ fZik 

$8.00 Early English Morris Chair— Upholstered in tfj. Off 
black Boston leather; two only, at ^VsOw 



Genuine Spanish 
Leather Rocker 



a 111 luiudiiun 

$21.00 



Here is a Christmas gift that 

will be appreciated by every 

member of the family and a 

piece of furniture that will last 
for years. 

This is a large, handsome 
rocker, one that is thoroughly 
well made; the frame Is well 
braced. Note the comfortable 
back and broad arms; the seat 
is filled with oil tempered 
springs; co\ered with genuine Spanish leather, in a ftOQ fZtk 
rich brown shade. Removal Sale Price ^•'Vvvtf 

Come early, as we have but a limited number. 




Your Credit 
Is Good 




Your Credit 
Is Good 






I 

■j 



m 



I 



Christmas Problems Best So lved at The Big Duluth 

No time left for shopping! This, the one store that can serve you 
best, is the one to which you should come — where you will find 
tjie largest assortment of such articles as mankind needs or desires. 

ANY OF THESE WILL PLEASE HIM: 



"1 




Smoking Jackets 
Bath Robes 
Holiday Neckwear 
Christmas Suspenders 
Silk Mufflers 
Fancy Hosiery 
Initial Handkerchiefs . 
New Jewelry 
Tie Folds 



Suit Cashes 
Traveling Bags 
Pa jamais 
New Shirts ~ 
Collar Bags 
Curling Coats 
Silk Un-ibrellas 
Night Robes 
Fine Uniderwear 




MACKINAWS FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY 

of Mackinaws in Duluth. 



Store Open Evenings Until 
Cfiristmas. 



Stetson Hats 
Sealskin Caps 
Fur Collars 
Fur-lined Coats 
Boys' Overcoats 
Boys* Mackinaw Suits 
Boys* Fur Gloves 
Boys' Neckwear 
Boys' Flannel Shirts 

— Here is the largest showing 




z^a^ 



WILLIAMSON & MENDENHALL 



I 



ON THE IRON RANGES 

^f^^^^9^9i9/9^9i99/99/9^9^9/9/9/99>^9 ^9 ii99/9/99^9f99/99/^9 9/9^/^^9^/9'9/9/9/9^^/Si/^/9'®^'®/9/99 9^'S/9/9'^^/^/^'®^®^'^^'^^ 




GILBERT TO HAVE 

FINE POSTOFFICE 



Equipped With Burglar- 
Proof Safe Will Have 
Up-to-Date Affair. 

Gilbert. Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The HeruKl.t — The tixturea for the new 
postoffico building are expected to ar- 
rive this Ui.k. They cost about ^1.500, 
IncludiiiK I t)ui>jlar-proof safe, and 
will be til' most modern and up-to- 
date set uistuUed on the ranse. The 
Kovornnuiit has taken a ten years" 
lfas«« on the building: whioh is on 
BroudWciy adjoining the l-^rst National 
bank building and very centrally lo- 
cated. 

Mun> iJilbert citizens having an in- 
terest in the Alberta mine at Virginia 
will be J. based to learn that it has a 
contract with the Zenith Furnace 
Company oi" Ouluth, to take all the ore 
tht-y produff and that the mine will 
be 8Jii'>t>ini{ all winter. 

>kntlBK Kiuk Soon Heady. 

Th. new skathm rink is rapidly 
being bi-.>ught into shape on the ball 
grounds. Mayor Coagrove will soon 
hav. it in shape for use. 

Herman Kmlas is erecting a sawmill 
on the .'^r l.ouis river. 

The Hl!a Mil!.' has purchased a fine 
new drivinv 

COMMITTEElwiLL 
DRAFT FRANCHISE 



Representatives of Range 

Towns to Act Together 

on 'Phone Matter. 

Virprinia, Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — As a result of the meet- 
ing held In the council chamber here 
Saturday afternoon the representatives 
of ll;e councils of Biwablk, Eveleth, 
Gilbert. Mountain Iron and Virginia 
to agree upon a franchise to be 
granted in the several towns of the 
range to the new Range Telephone 
companv a committee consisting of the 
attornos oi those places will draft a 
uniform iranchise. 

The meeting here was evecutive. all 
representatives of telephone companies 
Anil others bfint? excluded, the various 
official.-* decidiriif to agree upon their 
plan of acllou without outside sug- 
gestion. 

Mayor Murphy of Virginia presided. 
Thosi- who attended the meeting were: 
Kveleth, J. S. Wilson, president of the 
coimcil; I>. A. Sprin-^or, vice president; 
J. M. Tre\-arrow. Joi^ Brince. L>. Decker, 
W, i:df!i ■ ■ :-■' Tom Trengrove. Gilbert. 
P. R. vf. president; W. H. 

Radernui. .1. . , village attorney; C O. 
Welch, d.puty clerk. Mountain Iron, 
Robert Oakuian. president of the coun- 
cil. Hi'.vibik. Don C. Anderson, village 
nttorney. Virginia, Mayor Murphy. 
Michael Roylan, president of the coun- 
cil; A. D. Heritage. R. J. McGhee. 
Conrad Matison. Dan Coffey. 



MANY WILL GREET 
UNIVERSITY HEAD 

Virginia Will Entertain Pres- 
ident Vincent When He 
Comes Jan. 10. 

Virginia, Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald. > — George K. Vincent, pres. 
Ident of the University of Minnesota, 
win address the teachers at the Roose- 
velt school auditorium when he comes 
here for the public library opening on 
Jan. 1«». He will make his main ad- 
dress at the library in the evening. 
The Range Alumni association will 
also do something in the way of hav- 
ing a r -eption for the head of the 
nniversitv while he is In the city. Mr. 
Vin.-ent comes In the morning and re- 
mains until the next day. 



MARBLE TEACHER IS 
TO BECOME BENEDICT 



INSTAL L IN P UBLIC. 

Gilbert Woodmen Plan to Have Open 
Exercises on Jan. 2. 



Cllbo! 
The H. 
bave el 
erable 

worth\- 
feter t 
truste*-, 
watchii 
J. W. < 
It Is 
Inst-illa 
rampb' 
lUlwar' 
for th« 
Jan. 3 
where 
home •■ 
Btallati 
respect 
recogni 
ficlent 
lod'^e. 



■t, -Minn., Dec. 23.— (Special to 

., il,i > — The Modern Woodmen 

• . t-'il officers as follows: Ven- 

. .1 sul, Samuel B. Kellar; 

1- i< u. .\. E. MacTnnls; clerk. 

banker, Jules Bordeau: 

yeais. Matt Hyovalti: 

■A-l Frederickson; sentry, 

iiM- intention to hold a public 

tiai "f offuers Jan. 2. C. M. 

M '> tv... installing officer. 

has been consul 

,, , I !w. :• ears, leaves about 

f.ii- l"l'i]-;ii i" with his family, 

1 • . V (•< to make his future 

:iiiU farm. After the In- 

,, as.-;':mbly will pay their 

1 Mr. and Mrs. Brov.-n In 
n of his untiring and ef- 



s t 
1 i . I 

-se 



rvice for the benefit of the 



SPECT ACULA R FIRE 

Occurs at Virginia When Old Rainy 
Lake Shops Burn. 

Virginia. Minn.. Dec. 2?,. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Fire broke out In the 
abandoned shops of the Rainy L.ake 
road about 9 Saturday night and the 
building was entirely destroyed. These 
ihops wfie located on the tracks north 
of the iixiiicrator plant and midway 
betweeji the Oliver ball field and Ol- 
eott park. Several flat car.s. one box 
ear an>l nnf locomotive tender were 
partly s .n ..l. Much of the machin- 
fcry wt.; I; had been In the building 



The Army of 
Constipation 

Is Growing Smaller Evel 

CARTER'S LITTLE 
UVER PILLS aie 

retpoDsi! 

only gi 

they permaocDt! 

cure CoDstij 

tion. Md. 

lions use 

them for 

SUiou- 

■CM, Indige«ti«a, Sick Hudaclie, Sallow Skia. 

SMAU PILL, SHALL DOSE, SMALL PRICE 

r GeEfume nuwtbMLi Signature 






EARLY GARINGER. 

Marble, Minn., Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Chri.'^tmas will be a 
memorable celebration for Early Gar- 
inger, manual training, teacher in the 
Olcott school, for on tliat day he will 
marry Miss Edith Avery of Grand 
Rapids. They will bo wedded in a 
new home all ready for them on Kate 
street, Rev. Mr. Orris Suver of Hill 
c'ity, formerly local preacher, officiate 
ing. Mr. Garinger came to Marble 
from Traverse City. Mich., where he 
was director of manual training, two 
years ago. He has been very success- 
ful and is well known In school and 
church alTatrs on the Western Mesaba. 
Miss Avery came to Marble from Kan- 
sas about two years ago. She was 
closely identified with local Sunday 
school work until she removed with 
her mother to Grand Rapids, where 
she has been identified with church 
work; being a member of the choir of 
the Methodist cliurch, also president of 
the Epworth league. 



had been removed to the new shops 
In West Virginia. Several cars of ma- 
terials and equipment which were 
standing on tracks in the building 
were hauled out by a locomotive and 
saved. The building was entirely of 
wood and having been used as shops 
for twelve years was thoroughly oil 
fioaked so that the fire could not be 
controlled. The tire had been under 
way some time before the alarm was 
turned in. The origin of the fire is 
not known. The fire was spectacular 
and many hundreds who were down 
town shopping went to It. 



CHiSHOLM MAN 

SHOT, HUNTIHC 

Joe Le Doux Is Accidentally 

Wounded by His 

Brother. 

Chlsholm. Minn., Dec. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — As a result of a 
hunting accident late Sunday after- 
noon Joseph Le Doux, aged 25, well 
known here is in the Rood hospital at 
HIbbing with a big hole In the calf 
of his right leg. 

A hunliUK party consisting of Henry 
Happle, drayman; Harry O'Brien, 
Ligent for the Mesaba Railway com- 
pany, Joseph Le Doux, baggageman at 
the Mlssabe depot and his brother, 
Fred I^ Doux were at the Matt Borl- 
in farm hunting rabbits and were just 
preparing to start for home when Mr. 
Happle saw a rabbit run from a brush 
pile and being ahead of the rest of 
the party pTilled up and shot. 
Brother's Gun Goeit Off. 

Fred Le Doux was walking about 
twenty-five feet behind his brotlier 
and was carrying his gun cocked and 
almost simultaneously with the shot 
from Happle's gun his gun accident- 
ally discharged striking Joe in the 
calf of the right leg. 

His clothing was immediately re- 
moved and the limb bound above the 
knee and while this was being done 
the rig was rushed to the scene and 
he was hurried to the Rood hospital 
here and the wound temporarily 
/dressed and he was then taken to 
Hibbing where the physicians will de- 
cide whether amputation is neces- 
sary or not. 

Joseph La Doux Is a very active, 
strong young fellow and withstood 
the accident well. He has been with 
the Missabe about six months and in 
addition plays the drums in the Sims' 
orchestra and in the Commercial band. 

Mr. Le Doux, Sr., Is at present at a 
hospital at Rochester having under- 
gone an operation there last week for 
gall stones. 

The Le Doux family is among the 
oldest on the ran^e and well and fav- 
orably known. 



ITALIANS HAVE 

PROTEST MEETING 

Object to Alien Employes 

Feature of Proposed 

Compensation Act. 

Hibbing, Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Local Italian residents 
to the number of about 200 gathered in 
mass meeting In Central hall here yes- 
terday to protest against the working- 
men's compen-sation bill prepared by 
the Minnesota Employers' Liability 
commission for presentation to the 
next legislature. 

Denounce .Vltea Feature. 

Speeches were made in Italian de- 
nouncing the measure, especially that 
feature which allows alien employes 
only 25 per cent as much damages as 
citizens and those having families 
here. 

As many of the miners working on 
the range are aliens they consider 
that feature of the bill an injustice. 

The following committee was named 
to go to St. Paul and fight the bUl: 
Herman Antonmelli, Adolf SanagUa. 
Dominic Baretto and John Daiuomin. 



GOOD FARMING 

LANDS REACHED 



GILBERT WELCOMES 
OPENING NEW LINE 



Canadian Northern Expects 

Settlement Between Du- 

luth and Virginia. 

Virginia. Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald. — After the Canadian 
Xorthern from Virginia to West Du- 
luth has been In operation for two 
weeks with a local service, Supt. C. W. 
Houston reports that business is satis- 
factory with good prospects for de- 
veloping rapidly. Mr. Houston says 
there is much timber in the country 
the new road traverses and that there 
are many lumber operators who have 
camps in the country adjacent to the 
tracks. The traffic of the road Is 
Itrgely In carrying men and supplies 
to the camps. Althougli there is much 
muskeag land along the line Mr. 
Houston also says there Is consider- 
able good land that will be gr'^od for 
agricultural purposes and which will 
fill up with settlers much more rap- 
idly now tliat the road is through and 
in operation. 

The stations on the new line from 
Virginia to West Duluth are: North 
Loop Junction, West \'irginla, w^here 
the freight depot and round house are 
located; Eveleth, Peary, Trunk Road. 
Bailey, Whiteface, Shaw, Duluth & 
N'orthvibstern Junction, Taft, Bartlett. 
Twig, Slmar, Harney, Nopeming, West 
Duluth yard, and Northern Pacific con- 
nection. The distance from the North- 
ern Pacific connection at Duluth to 
West Virginia is seventy-three miles 
and to North I>oop Junction, the con- 
nection with the Virginia-border di- 
vision is seventy-three and two-fifth 
miles. 



First Car on Mesaba Range 

Railway Runs Into the 

Range Village. 

Gilbert. Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Sunday was a red letter 
day, as it brought the first car over 
the new Mesaba range electric railway 
and placed Gilbert on the electric rail- 
way map. The coming of the car was 
cause for much gratification on all 
.«ldes. The run was a te.st. but it is 
expected the system will be opened 
in a few days for traffic. 

Gilbert was the first town on the 
Me.s.iba range to have a complete set 
of tiolley wires and rail.s in i>iace. 



JUNIOR S ENT ERTAIN. 

Gilbert School Pupils Show Their 
Proficiency on Piano. 

Gilbert. Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— The Junior class piano 
pupils of Mrs. W. J. Dowling gave a 

recital in her rooms in the Dowling 
block before -the parents and a few 
music lovers of Gilbert who compli- 
mented Mr.s. Dowling very highly upon 
the work which had been accomplished 
in so short a time. The program fol- 
lows: 

Duet, "Dreaming of Angels," Anna 
Nolan and Ursula Babich; solo. Hazel 
Anderson; ''At the Race," Isabelle Sul- 
livan; "Maypole Dance." Lane New- 
berry; "Christma.s Song," Agnes Burns, 
Josephine Jeglosky; "Capricciso." Anna 
V. Nolan; "Bobolink," Marion New- 
berry; "Sonatina," Ursula Babich; mel- 
ody. "Bird.s* Lullaby," Ruth Colvln; 
••Jolly Darkies," "Happy Hottentots." 
Anna Noble; "La Fontaine," Esther 
Ander.<?on; instrumental trio, A. Nolan, 
W. Babich, E. Anderson; trio. Jean 
Rutherford, Margaret Sullivan and Inez 
Masterson. , 



IRON RANGECHANGE, 

Reported in Ely New Train Schedule 
Will Soon Be Announced. 

Ely. Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — A report is current here 
that the Duluth & Iron Range railroad 
is planning on a change in the train 
schedules between here and Duluth. 

A representative of the road has 
been here ascertai'iing the desires of 
the residents here In regard to the 
matter. There seems to be a great 
difference of opinion relative to the 
change. Some want the train to leave 
here earlier in the morning and re- 
turn from Duluth later at nigiit. giv- 
ing a longer stay in Duluth. while oth- 
ers desire an earlier evening train. 
It Is reported that the changed time 
table will go into effect Jan. 1. 



HOME FROMDULUTH. 

Tower Young Women Attending Nor- 
mal School Are Having Vacation. 

Tower, Minn.. Dec. 2". — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Many young ladies from 
Tower and Souda,^i. who are attending 
the state normal school at Duluth. are 



9%%'9/9/9/Si9/9'9%9/9/®/9/9/9/®/99/9%/9/9/99/9/9/9^i9/9/9/9^/9/99i9%'9/9%9/9%/9/9%/9/^ 

ofMcial map of the weather 



%i9/9^i9/t/9/9i9/^^'®.'Q^ ^/®/^/^/^'®/®,'®/9/99/®.%99/9/9/9i%^^99/9/®/^/99/^^'9/9^%/9/^/9/^/^^/9^/9/9/%^^^ 



Among them being Misses 
Strand. Mabel Thorpe, Fena 
Lanie Taylor and Miss Anna 

from the St. Cloud normal. 

Hardy, railroad agent at High- 
town on Sunday between 



home. 
Esther 
Holter, 
Hewitt 

H. C. 
land, visited 
trains. 

F:iaborate preparations are in prog- 
ress for the Masonic banquet to be 
given Friday at the Vermilion hotel. 
Some 200 invitations have been issued. 

Miss Mabel Morin is spending the 



VIRGINIA PROVIDES 

BASK ETS FO R NEEDY. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 23.— (Special to 
The Herakl.) — City Clerk A. E. Blck- 
ford, secretary of the city council and 
city official organization for holiday 
and winter relief, states that about 
sixty families will have baskets deliv- 
ered to them from the city hall aup- 
I)ly depot. The deliveries will be made 
Tuesday morning. 

» 

New School Delayed. 

Virginia. Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — The new North side 
school win not be ready until Feb. 1. 
The steel stairways to be used in the 
buildings lave not yet arrived, neither 
has a large part of the furniture. 
Work on the heating plant has also 
been delayed. The building will have 
cost $70,000. 



ASTHMA CATABBH 



WHOOPING COUGH 
BRONCHITIS 



SPASMODIC CROUP 
COUGHS COLDS 




eSTABLISHCO 1879 

A simple, safe and effective treatment 
for bronchial troubles, without dosing the 
stomach with drugs. Used with success 
for thirty years. 

The air car ry ing the antiseptic vapor, in- 
spired with evevy breath, makes breath- 
ing easy, soothes the sore throat, and 
stops the cough, assuring restful nights. 
Cresolene is invaluable to mothers with 
young children and a doo/i to sufferers 
from Asthma. 

Send us postal for 
descriptive booklet, 

\\Ju DRVGOI8TS. 

Try CrcBolone AiitiEoptic 
Throat Tablets for the ir- 
ritated throat. They aro 
xiiiiple, effective andanti- 
/•Iiti-.-. t)f your dnifrpist 
< T 1 1 ora us, 10'! i.T stamps. 

VAPO CRESOLENE CO. 
62 Cortluiat St.. N. Y. 




FORECAST TILL 7 
TITKMDAV 

For Duluth, Superior and vicinity, 

inctudltiK the Mttsaba aiid Vermiiiuu 

iron raiisev: Fair w«aUier (oiilght 

and Tuesday ajid probably Wediiw- 

day: moderate tetupei-ature; miuimuiu 

tonight 15 deg. to 20 deg. above zero; 

mcderat* westerly wind*. EXPLANATORY NOTES. 

Ob«»rT»tioM taken at 8 a. m., to taiy-flfth lueridlan time. Air (irauure reduced to se» level. Iso0irji (--ontinuoua lines) p«« thro«gh_poiDU ofMiuit lif pMtaure 
PM« through poinU of equal temjwatiue; drawn only for t«f», freenng, 90", and 100°. Q «''»f; O P^^ly cloudy; 
tfao wind. Tint figtires, t*roperatii<«t tecond, precipiUtioo of .01 l^oh or more for part 24 boure; third, maximum Vrmd Telotity 



SCALB. 

MUM 
Per Hour. 

Calm to 5 

Light S to 15 

Mo<<er«M 15 to 29 

Brisk ... «5 to 35 

Uigh 35 t« 3) 

>»le 50 to 65 

Huirlcan* 65 and at>ove 

H. W. RICHARDSON. 

Local foraoMtar. 



cloudy, R taio; S MOW, M npofi 



UOTBtaM* (dotud lioet) 
miniog. Anowt fly with 




Duluth had a 
pretty snappy Sun- 
day. The mercury 
went down to 11 
Jegrs. below zero 
yesterday morning 
and the day was 
'lear and cold. The 
weather man ea.sed 
iip a little last 
night, and the low- 
v?8t temp e r a t u r e 
W.18 10 doKs. above 
xoro. Today is gray 
arid mild. Fair, mild weather is pre- 
dicted for tonlgrht and tomorrow. 

Fair, mild weather prevailed a year 
a^o today. 

The sun rose thl^ morning at 7:52 
and it will set at 4:2:i this evening, 
giving eight hours and thirty minutes 
of sunlight. 

Mr. lilchardson makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Barometric depressions centered 
over Alberta, Middle Ontario and 
fc>outhern Louisiana caused snow or 
rain in Oregon, Washington. Central 
and Eastern Canada, the lake region 
and most of the Southern states dur- 
ing the last twenty-four to forty-eight 
hours. Heavy rains fell over Louisi- 
ana and Eastern Texas. Much warmer 
weather prevails this morning in the 
Missouri. Red river and upper Mi.ssis- 
sippl valleys arid .western lake region. 
The minimum temperature at Duluth 
Sunday morning was 11 degs. below 
zero, and the lowest last night was 
11 degs. above zero. Conditions favor 
generally fair weather and moderate 
temperature at the Head of the Lakes 
during the ensuing thirty-six to forty- 
eight hours." 

♦ — 

General FereeadtM. 

■Chicago, Dec. 23. — Forecasts for 
twenty-four hou'i«s ending at 7 p. m. 
Tuesday: 

Upper Michigan -^ .'^now flurries to- 
night or Tuesday. 

Wisconsin — Cloud.v tonight with 
colder in west portion; Tuesday :ind 
Wednesday generally fair with mod- 
erate temperature 



Iowa — Fair tonight. Tuesday ana 
Wednesday; colder In east portion to- 
night. 

Montana — Generally fair tonight and 
Tuesday, except rain or snow in ex- 
treme west portion tonight; warmer 
in southwest portion tonight; Wednes- 
day fair. 

Shippers' forecast — Protect thirty- 
six-hour Bliipments of perishables 
against temperatures 10 degs. to 20 
degs. above zero in the Dakotas, Min- 
nesota and Wisconsin. 



Miles City 

^tlln'aukee 22 

Mir.nedosa 34 

Modeiia 30 

Mijtitgomery 46 

Montreal 14 

Xew Orleans 

New York 88 

North Platte 40 



Oklalkoma . . 
Omaha .... 
Parry Sound 
Phoenl-t . . . 

Pierre 

Piltsbin-g 36 

Port Arthur 



Minnesota, North 
kota — Fair tonight, 
ably Wednesday; 
ture. 



Dakota. South Da- 
Tuesday and prob- 
moderate tempera- 



The Teinperaturea. 

Following were the highest 
atures for twenty-four hours 
lowest for twelve, ending at 
today: 

High. Low. 

Abilene 28 

Alpena 24 14 

Atlantic City.... 40 26 

Baltimore 40 28 

Hattleford 40 10 

liismarck 36 20 

Boise :J0 14 

lUNiton 36 30 

Buffalo 34 22 

("al«ao' 44 20 

(lliarleston 48 42 

Chicaso 28 24 

(•orpTJs Chrlsti...48 42 

Denver 38 12 

Des Moines 38 2« 

I>eril3 Lake 32 16 

HodBB 40 14 

Dubuque 32 24 

DULUTH to 10 

DuraiiKO 84 4 

liaotixjrt 12 10 

Edmonton 40 26 

ICscanaba 12 4 

(Ulveston 52 42 

tirand Forks 16 

(fraud Haven 28 28 

Oreeii Bay 10 8 

Ilatteraa 48 42 

Havre 40 22 

Helena 36 28 

HouRhton V. 2 

Huron 34 20 

JacksonvlUe 82 50 

Kainloops SO 24 

lia'na."* City 44 32 

Kiioxvllle 36 28 

l.a <"ro?se 28 

r/>ulsville 42 28 

Mattlsan 20 20 

Marouette 12 2 

Medicine Hat 40 28 

Memphis 40 34 

•Mlaral T« 



temper- 
and the 
7 a. m. 



High. Low. 

...40 18 

20 

16 

2 

38 

8 

28 
14 
30 
28 
10 
30 
22 
22 
-^2 



an appeal by Edwin N. Keatley from 
the decision of the Federal court of 
Northern Illinois, which held it had 
Jurisdiction to administer $1,400,000 of 
assets In Chicago of the American 
Guaranty company. 



SHOPLIFTERS 



PLEAD GUILH 



.44 
.40 
.30 

.5« 
.40 



Portland. Or 36 32 

Prince Albert 38 14 

Qu'.\ppelle 32 10 

KaleiKh 38 SO 

Uapid City 38 24 

Itoseburg 44 M 

Ro.well 36 4 

.St. Ixiuls 32 32 

St. Paul 24 24 

Salt Lake City... 28 14 

San Diego 62 40 

San Francisco ... 58 42 

Sault Ste. Marie. 22 8 

Seattle 44 39 

Slteridan 40 10 

Shreveport SR 34 

Sioux City 38 28 

Spokane 82 30 

Swift Current ...38 14 

Tampa 76 60 

Toledo 32 16 

ValcnthiP 1! 

Washington 40 22 

WUUston S8 18 

Wliinemucca . . . .-12 8 

Winnii«g 18 18 

YeUowitone 20 10 



holidavs with her parents here, arriv- 
ing from Little Palls Saturday evening. 

Gus Carlson of the D. & I. general 
offices was a Tower visitor Saturday. 

Dr. O. O. Benson of the Vermilion 
Lake government Indian school was a 
Tower visitor Saturday. 

C. M. Everett, mine host of Hunter s 
lodge. Vermilion dam, was at Tower 
Saturdav on business. 

G. D. "Lizer, now of Virginia, was a 
Sunday visitor liere. 

Mrs. N. J. Benson and daughter, Miss 
Helen, were arrivals here Saturday 
evening and will remain for the holi- 
days. 

Miss Lugenia Jeffrey arrived home 
Friday evening fj;aui. Menominee. Wis., 
where she is attending the Knapp in- 
stitute. ? 



INDIAN GETS LIQUOR. 

• T 

Charles Beargreas^ Is Committed to 
Jaii a^Eiy. 

Ely, Minn., Dec. 35. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — Charlfes Beargrease, an In- 
dian, was brought before Judge Jury 
In municipal court .Saturday cliarged 
with being drunk. lHe was sentenced 
to seven days in jail or pay a fine of 
$5. He chose the jail sentence. Bear- 
grease refused to tell where he secured 
his liQuor, so nothing has been done 
with the person to sold it to him. 

Dan Mattson was also brought be- 
fore Judge Jury on the charge of 
being drunk. He' was lined $5 or seven 
days in jail. He paid the fine. 

TO KEEP OPEN HOUSE. 

Mohami Club of Virginia to Have a 
Christmas Tree. 

Virginia, Minn.. Dec. 23.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — The Mohami club, a so- 
cial organization of the Oliver Iron 
Mining company employes, will keep 
open house Christmas. There will be 
a Ciirlstmas tree and a Santa Claus 
during both the afternoon and even- 
ing and the children of the club mem- 
bers will have a rousing time. Candy, 
fruit, nuts and popcorn will be dis- 
fibuted bv the patron saint oC the 
children, the Mohami band, the club s 
musical organization, will play both 
afternoon and evening in the assem- 
bly hall. 



thrown Into use for patients which 
will enable them to care for more 
serious cases than they have previous- 
ly been able to do. 



Vlrsinla ChrlRtmaH SerWces. 

Virginia, Minn., Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Rev. F. Gustafson. pas- 
tor of the Swedish M. E. church, an- 
nounces services Christmas as follows: 
Preaching, 10:30 a. m.. Children's 
c:hristmas festival. 7:30 p. m. 
# 

Hlbbins In Cbautaaqna. 

Hibbing. Minn.. Dec. 23. — The Chau- 
tauqua Managers' association is con- 
sidering Hibbing as a possible town to 
be included in its Northwestern circuit 
next summer and is endeavoring to in- 
terest local people. 



l.eaHe Gilbert Tfaeatcr. 

Gilbert, Minn.. Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Me.ssrs. .Tunnila and Ja- 
oobson have leased tlie Lyceum theater 
and started a moving picture show 
Sunday night with the (general Serv- 
ice company films. 




DEATH COMES^UDDENLY 

Euclid Mine Shift Boss Expires While 
Leaving From Work. 

Chlsholm, Minn.. Dec. 23.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— While leaving the 
Euclid mine Saturday evening where 
he was shift boSB. Mattia Luke of \li- 
fflnla fell and «>on expired His fel- 
low workmen scAt word to the coroner 
and the body ^lil« taken to Lundall s 
undertaking rooms i^.,*,. 

Examination disclosed that his death 
was due to a complication of dis- 
eases closely associated with the 

He has been here but a few days 
and leaves a wife and family 'n^\"- 
glnia. whence \>f W^f to Chlsholm. 

The body will bel taken to Detroit. 
Mich., for Interment in a small village 

near that city. 

♦- 

MoTea From Hospital. 

Chlsholm, Mirtift.. "^Dec. 23.— (Special 
to The Herald. )-f-Df. A. B. Kirk has 
moved his famtfy from the hospital 
into his spacious fine new home on 
Poplar and SecMd »vonue. 

The rooms iMid** vacant will be 



OES MOINES GAS RATE 

I S NOT ENJOINED 

(Continued from page 1.) 

Darnell, late of Indianapolis, Ind., on 

the shares of a Tennessee corporation. 

TeleKt^ph Tax Void. 

Cities must not tax telegraph com- 
panies for sending messages If the 
companies have accepted the terms of 
the act of congress of 1866, making 
them governmental agents under cer- 



Two Women Arrested for 

Stealing Table Covers 

in Store. 

Two Superior women giving their 
names as Mrs. H Ima Hill and Mrs. 
Marie Waukkonen were arrested Sat- 
urday night for (stealing two table 
covers from the stcre of the Silberstein 
& Bondy company. They were caught 
red-handed in the shop-lifting act by 
the floor manager, who detained them 
until Detectives Ir^'ine and Schulte had 
been summoned from headquarters. It 
is claimed that tht-y were in the Lels- 
er store earlier in the evening.' but 
nothing was found on them to show 
that they had stcden anything else. 
The Waukkonen woman lives next to 
Sllja Polll, who recently paid a |25 fine 
for stealing a waist from the Leiser 
store. She telephoned her to tell her 
husband that if he did not furnish $50 
ball she would have to stay In jail 
'over night. 

The two women pleaded guilty when 
arraigned in municipal court this morn- 
ing. Mrs. Hill waj« sentenced to pay a 
fine of $50 and costs or go to Jail for 
sixty davs. Mrs. Waukkonen paid a 
fine of $42.60. 

FIRE WILL NOT 

CHANGE PLANS 



Despite Loss of Opera 
House Fargo Will Enter- 
tain Tri-State Meet. 



Fargo, N. D.. r 
The Herald.) — Tht 
tlton will be hel 
despite the burni 
opera house in 
were to have be< 
Worst has secured 
Some of the evenir 
held during the di 



•ec. 23. — (Special to 
Trl-state conven- 
i here Jan. 14-17. 
ng of the Fargo 
vhich the sessions 
n held. President 
the Grand theater, 
ig programs will be 
ly session. 



tain circumstances, 
clsion today by the 
In the case of D. 
for the W'estern 
company at Talladega, 
fined $25 for sending a 



according to a de- 
supreme court. 
G. Williams, agent 
Union Telegraph 
Ala., who was 
message with- 
out the company first having obtained 
a license for such business, it was 
held that the tax was Invalid. 

Guaranty Cane DlNinitwed. 
By deciding it was without jurisdic- 
tion over the controversy at the pres- 
ent, the supreme court today dismissed 



BRIGHT'S DISEASE 



Let there be no evasion — we mean 
chronic and supposed incurable cases 
involving dropsy, albumen and casts. 
They are curable in many cases. 

Let us cite a typical case — that of 
Mr. R. F. Nitscke. of 1246 Spalght 
Street. Madison. Wis. There had been 
eight physicians on this case and it 
got so extreme that he finally had one 
of the last sjTnptoms; namely, failing 
eyp.sight. In January, 1907, the doc- 
tors admitted that nothing further 
could be done, and they sent him to 
Eureka Springs, Arkansas. He con- 
tinued to get worse, the dropsy finally 
reaching the stomach, heart and lungs. 
He stated that at one time the tests 
showed albunlen as high as 76 per 

cent. 

He learned of Fulton's Renal Com- 
pound and began to lake it July 3rd. 
Dropsy began slowly to decline and 
the albumen dropped to forty, then to 
twenty, then to ten. and finally to two 
per cent in May, 1908. 

He had returned to his employment 
at last advices. 

Send for free pamphlet and write 
us if not Improving by third week. 
Jno. J. Fulton Co., 645 Battery St., 
San Francisco. 

Druggists supplied by Lelthhead 
Drug Co. 



CONTEST JSJTARTED. 

Battle for Billings County, N. D., 
Office Is Commenced. 

Medora, N. D., Dec. 23. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Gresit Interest is taken 
in the contest instituted by N. D. 
Nichols for the office of register of 
deeds of Billings county. He started 
litigation on the grround that Mr. Mc- 
Closky, who was elected In November, 
is a resident of Golden Valley county, 
which was created from Billings since 
election. Nichols received some votes 
by stickers at the general election. A 
year ago he was appointed sheriff to 
fill a vacancy and was defeated at 
the primaries for nomination to that 
office. 



PUTS DYNAMITE 

IN^HOME STOVE. 

North Dakota Yomth Tries to Thaw 
It and Expli!>sion Results. 

New Salem, N. D., Dec. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Told to place dyna- 
mite under the stcve to thaw It out a 
youthful son of Mi-s. John Ellis, living 
seven miles from here, put the ex- 
plosive in the oven of the stove. He 
got a few feet from the home when 
the explosion occurred. The kitchen 
and a part of the main dwelling were 
wrecked. 

Mrs. Ellis and ocher members of the 
family were absent and no one was 
injured. Two sons of Mrs. Ellis had 
been blasting cos 1 a short distance 
from the house and the dynamite was 
too cold to work with. 



LOGGING WEATHER GOOD 

Difficult to Secure Men in Spite of 
High Wages. 

Logging companies report that 
weather conditions in Northern Minne- 
sota are excellent for their business, 
with the lakes and swamps well frozon 
and plenty of enow for teaming. 

They conr.plaln, however, that It Is 
very hard for thern to get men and to 
keep them at work. Many men aro 
receiving $40 a month for their labor 
and OP the whole the wages are higher 
by about $5 a month than they were 
a year ago. The loggers say they 
would not mind this If they could only 
keep the men at work. The high 
wages that the man are receiving 
make them very independent and they 
frequently get themselves into a con- 
dition that renders them unfit for 
service by buying; and drinking the 
low quality of liquors that are often 
sold in the villages. 

-• 

Can Enforce ••Dry*' I^vr. 

Mandan. N. D.. Dec. 23.— (.Special ti 
The Herald.) — That the prohibltio-i 
law can be as rigidly and readily ca- 



FINAL 

GIFT 

SUGGESTIONS 



Ladies' Handkerchiefs — 
25c, 35c, 50c and up to $5.00. 

Ladies' Silk Hosiery — 

50c, 75c, $1 and up to $4.50. 

Fancy Scarfs and Throws — 
$1.50, $2.50, $3.95 and up to $35. 

I'^ancy Neckwear — 
25c, 35c, 50c and up to $7.50. 

New Umbrellas — 

$2.50, $3.75, $5 and up to $12.50. 

Italian Silk Underwear — 
$2.50, $2.95 and up to $5.00. 

Fine Silk Petticoats — 

$1.95, $2.50, $3.50 and up to $10. 

A^ew Marabou 

Mufifs at $5, $7.50, $9.50, etc. 

Scarfs at $4.95, $8.75, $12.50. 
etc. 

Marabou Sets at $10, $15, 
$19.50, etc. 

Beautiful Kimonos 

Silk Kimonos, $5.00, $7.50, 
$12.50, etc. 

Albatross Kimonos, $6.50, 
$7.50, etc. 

Bath Robes, $3.95, $5.00, etc. 

Advance Style 
Waists 

Lingeries, $2.50, $3.50, etc. 
Chiffon, $3.95, $5.00, etc. 
Messaline, $3.75, $4.50, etc. 

miller- 
Jflbenberg 



CAFE ORDENEWALD, 

the New Restaurant 
of Minneapolis 

In the heart of the theater, shop. 
pinK and bn«iness dintrlrt. 24 Jioath 
Sixth street. MInneapolla, Minn. 
Strictly Gernuin Cooklnfc. A comic 
and refined Cabaret. Margaret 
Thonip.Hon of DuJuth, Soloist. Wire 
or phone >'ew Year'a Eve reser^^a- 
tions. 

J. A. HICKEY, Manasrer. 

Formerly ef the >>w St. Louis Hotel 
of Duluth. 



forced on this side of the Missouri riv- 
er as in the Red river valley, along 
the eastern edge of North Dakota, wis 
demonstrated here by the recent sen- 
tencing of eight offenders. Their 
fines ranged from $200 to $375 and the 
terms of imprisonment imposed went 
from ninety days to five months. 
State's Attorney Bitzing was assisted 
in the prosecution of the cases by As- 
sistant Attorney General Hetfron. 



SNOW FALLING IN 

TH E SOU THWEST. 

Oklahoma City, Okla.. Dec. 23. — 
Snow fell steadily throughout North- 
eastern Oklahoma this morning. At 
Muskogee the ground was covered to a 
depth of two inches at daybreak. From 
four to seven inches of snow was re- 
ported from the Panhandle region of 
Texas. At Abilene. Tex., snow still 
was falling at 7 a. m. 

• . 

>Vant Milk Inspection Latv. 

Carrington, N. D- Dec. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald. > — A radical milk in- 
spection law is demanded for this city 
by the health board and prominent res- 
idents. It is claimed that the health 
conditions demand more protection b© 
given the people. 



/? 



CHICKERING 
PIANO 



^ 



Howard, Fameli & Co. 

120 East SuperitriL 

.ALLEN, Mgr. 



W 



^ 



LOANS ON DIAMONDS 

Watches, etc., $1.00 to $1,000. We 
charare lowest rates in dtr. 

KEVSTOHE LOAI COMPAMY 

22 1«>st Superior Street. 



-*% 



J- 



1 






CHICHESTER S PILLS 

W.^-^ . THE DIAMONB BKAND. ^ 
M^^mt^. ■.•AIbbI Ask VMir I>*mb4^^ <h> A\ 




L*4iMl ^ , 

IMlIs in Red 

boxet. sealed v._ 
Tslis BO other. 



Tslis BO other. Hajr mf rsar ^ 
DrmytHt. Ai>kfarOin.Oire8.TEn«l 
DUUvnD ItRANIt FIllS; f^)»S 

ye»CTknownMB«wT,Sifcgt. Always RcKjMs 

SOLD BY DRUGGISTS EVERYWHERf 




NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST I 



FARGO LOSES 
ITSJHEATER 

Fargo Opera House De- 
stroyed by Fire Involv- 
ing a Heavy Loss. 



Plans Are Already Being 

Considered for Building 

Another Playhouse, 



made a tierce fire as the tanks melted 
or burst. 

A. F. t)rsesk.v. manager of the plant, 
thinks the explosion of the steam 
boiler in the basement caused the dis- 
aster. He says the gras the company 
manufacture.^ will not explode. 
C'oaeuMctluu KmImcm Car. 

A conductor of a Rice street car 
said the concussion raised his car 
from the truck.s at Rice and Front 
streets several blocks away. 

Every window In the Northwestern 
Blau Gas company's plant about forty 
feet from the wrecked bulldinff was 
broken and doors were sprung and 
unlatched. 

In many other building's and homes 
in the vicinity windows were shat- 
tered and doors thrown open. 

The property damage, aside from 
broken windows, was confined to the 
demolished plant. 

The Prior Avenue police gave spe- 
cial attention to the Twin Cilv state 
bank in the Exposition building, Ray- 
mond and University avenues, im- 
mediately after the explosion, as all 
the bank windows were broken out 
and it was feared the explosion might 
have sprung the vault safe. 



tendent. He then resigned and the 
commissioners of Billings appointed 
Miss Ackcrman to fill the vacancy 
hence she will succeed herself. The 
county commissioners of Golden Valley 
county then appointed Mr. Kitchen as 
temporary superintendent of that 
oouuty. and that will not only place 
lum in the office for the balance of 
this year, but for the two ensuing 
years as well. " 



T. 
ih- . 
the 
Air- 
ai- 



2n.— (Special to 

was visited by a 

yesterday when 

se was destroyed. 

the future 



X. n., Dec 
il J. ) — Fargo 
-'! ■ :h Hre early 
b'argo opera hou 
•ail> several deals for 
r consideration. 
<>ne oi the most popular schemes is 
to i:av.- the theater and the public 
:n combined In some manner, 
i M .ai.s tlie city has sought an audl- 
t iri'i;n Recently plans were complet- 
»ii riiting with the militia com- 

; constructing a building on 
't- owned by the latter. Many 
peoiile would like to see all three now 
C' niliinfil under one roof. 

W.i'k.r Rro.s., who own houses at 
"VViiuiiiieg, Fargo, Grand Forks and 
Crookston, have announced nothing 
tTefiriite. but it is thought unlikely 
that ih.-y will rebuild on the old site. 
It IS pi ubable they will make a con- 
tract with one of the local vaudeville 
hou 's t,, handle the bookings for tlie 
bi:r: i lio'.ise for the rest of the sea- 

H<>'1. j 

The los.^ on building and furniture I 
for the Walker Bros, was about ?5.000 i 
with only $20,000 Insurance. The loss ' 
on f'lrnlture for occupants of the flats | 
in the opera house anne.x and the 



pa 
the 



SUGAR IVIAI\MI\IDIGNANT. 

Wisconsin Sugar Company Head De- 
nies Beet Sugar Hurts Bees. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 23. — R. G. 
Wagner, president of the Wisconsin 
Sugar company and a prominent figure 
In the beet sugar industry, has taken 
emphatic issue with Prof, J. G. Sanders 
of the University of Wisconsin In re- 
gard to the published statement of the 
latter, that beet sugar contains ele- 
ments fatal to bees. Mr. Wagner has 
written to President Charles R Van 
Hise of the university and to Dean H. 
R. Russell of the school of agriculture 
demanding a retraction of the profes- 
sor's statement or proofs to substan- 
tiate It. 

"There is no chemical or phvslcal dif- 
ference between beet and cane sugar," 
said Mr. Wagner. "Dr. Harvey Wiley, 
while chief of the bureau of chemlstrv 
of the department of agriculture of the 
United States, made a declaration that 
there Is no distinguishable difference 
between the two kinds of sugar, and 
has been supported in this statement 
by hundreds of chemists who have 



l^lrand T'nlon Tea company's .<;tore was i made exhaustive investigations 



about *$5, 000 additional, with about 
•|,''.,0<»0 insurance. 

M alker BroM.' iBMaranre. 

Walker I^ros. carried the following 
Insurance: Home of New York, Aetna, 
Firemen's Fund. Implement Dealers' 
Mutual. Merchant.s' National Mutual, 
<'.:»nimercial Mutual, $2,000 each: St. 
I'aul. Hart Cord. Fire Association, Roval, 
Orient. $1,000 each: North British and 
Merchants, Providence of Washington, 
$1.'>00 ea-l!. 

There is no definite information 
about the origin of the fire except it 
seemed to havt- first originated under 
the stairs of the main opera house 
block. 

In addition to the dozen or more 
railway mall route agents, there were 
.veven families in the Hats. 



Prof. Sanders made the statement 
that he would not be surprised if beet 
sugar was found to be harmful to hu- 
man beings. This is absurd in view of 
the fact that beet sugar has been manu- 
factured In Europe since 1802. and its 
production has increased each vear un- 
til in the last twenty-five years 90 per 
cent of all the sugar consumed in Eu- 
rope is beet sugar. 



TWO CITIES ARE 

GIVEN SHAKING 

Fatal Explosion in Midway 

Plant Makes Both 

Towns Quake. 

.St. I'aul. Minn.. Dec. 2i — The plant 
of the Pre.stollte company, Hampden 
avenue and Charles street. Midway, 
was totally destroyed by an explosion 
early Sundiiy morning. 

Henry Hohn. watchman, was found 
dead in the ruins near the boiler after 
.much of th" water In the basement 
had b :;iped out. The body was 

almost ated bejond recognition. 

Tlie liiiaiicial loss is estimated at 
IT.'i.OOO. 

^\■in•i()ws within a, radius of a mile 
of t'l^ plant were demolished and the 
two cities were shaken for five miles 
around. 

The ruins took fire immediately fol- 
lowing the explosion and gas from 400 
portable taiik.s stored in the building 




GETTING GREY EH -OLD MAN 
AND BALD TOO. 

Looking twenty years older than you 
really are. Being made the laughing stock 
of your friends and the butt of their jokes- 
"Old Age Class" simply because grey 
hairs are so closely associated with old age. 

It is very humiliating to be grey and bald 
when your age doesn't justify cither— to be 
classed as a "Has Been" and set aside by 
your young friends as too old for them— to 
be turned down possibly, in your applica- 
tion for that new position because a 
YOUNG-LOOKING MAN was WANTED, 

Get the best of the grey hairs — don't let 
them get the best of you. 

USE HAY'S HAIR HEALTH 



Kee p^Abi^Epdkirt^Y&rfth^ 



$1.00 and 50c at Drui< Stores or direct upon 
recdpt of price and dealer's name. Send 10c for 
trbl bottle. Pbiio H»y Sd»c Co.. Newark. N. J- 

titi Sail and RscomiiMaeed by W. A. Aborn- 



NOT AL L HAVE FILED, 

Many Newspapers Have Not Observed 
New Law About Statements. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 22.-01 6J0 

newspapers published In the state, only 

360 filed statements showing their oun- 

ership as provided by the corrupt prae- 

tlces act passed at the extra session 

1 of the legislature, according to a list 

; complied in the office of the secretary 

I of state. The act provides that only 

those publishing political matter shall 

I file such a statement, but it Is not be- 

I lleved likely that any one of them went 

i through the recent campaign without 

publishing political advertisf-m.-nts, 

news or editorial comment of some 

sort. 

No action will be taken against the 
publishers who failed to file, tlie sec- 
rftary of state said. 

Only candidates who feel aggrieved 
may reiiuhe the statement to be made. 

havel osTr ights. 

Failure to Comply With Law Hits 
Nine Minnesota Societies. 

St. Paul. Minn.. Dec. 23.— Nine prom- 
inent societies organized under the 
laws of the state have lost their right 
to participate and vote in the meet- 
ings of the state agricultural society, 
according to a report made bv the sec- 
retary of state to the agricultural 
as.soclat'on. The organizations are: 

State Horticultural socletv. Minne- 
sota Veterinary association. S«^ate 
Poultry association. Minnesota Imple- 
ment Dealers' association, Minnesota 
Florists' association. Minnesota Short- 
horn Breeders' a:>sociatlon, Minnesota 
Guernsey Breeders' association, Minne- 
sota .Jersey Breeders' association. Min- 
nesota Hereford Breeders' association. 

Paragraph 4, section 1, chapter 3S1 
of the General I.,aws of 1911, requir-js 
such .societies or associations to file 
with the secretary of the state not 
later tlian Dec. 2o, summaries of the 
financial .statements in order to gain 
admission and secure voting powers In 
the meetings of the state agricultural 
as.sociatlon. According to tlie secre- 
tary of the state, the nine mentioned in 
his report failed to file tliese stato- 
nient.s. and a certified li.st mailed to- 
day to. Secretary J. C Simson of the 
state board does not include them as 
entitled to recognition in the delibera- 
tions of the society. 



NEW SUP ERINT ENDENTS. 

Bismarck. N. D., Dec. 23. — There will 
be sixteen new county superintendents 
in the state after the fir.st of Januarv. 
They are as follows: Billings. Marie 
Ackerman; Dickey, Mary I'lemington; 
Divide. J. 11. Phelps; Eddy, H. H. Max- 
well; Grand Forks, Beatrice Johnstone; 
McHenry, A. C. Berg; Mc.Kenzle, F. J. 
Steffeck; Nelson. P. .J. Iverson; Olive- 
Frank Karger; Pembina. I.,ottie Jones; 
Ransom, C. E. Cavett; Richland. R. K 
Smith; Rolette. Mrs. Mary K. Packard; 
Sheridan, K. O. Keve; Stark, C. E. 
Ward. 

In Golden Valley county there was 
a peculiar turning of affairs In the 
matter of county superintendent. J. A 
Kitchen was county superintendent of 
Billings county, and l;;st spring was 
defeated for renoinination bv Marie 
Ackerman. When Golden Vulley coun- 
ty was created he found himself in the 
new county of which he was superln- 



DIETZ SANGUINE 

O F GETT ING OUT 

The "Defender of Cameron 

Dam" Model Prisoner in 

Hope of Pardon. 

Waupun. Wis., Dec. 23.— John Dietz, 
the defender of Cameron dam, and the 
members of his family, have strong 
hopes that Governor McGovern will act 
favorably on his application for a par- 
don filed with the state board of oar- 
dons recently. 

Only a few days ago Mr. Dietz was 
I'r , ^^''•t.^' *'^® prison by his daughter. 
Helen Dietz, and two sons, Leslie and 
Utt e John, and at that time Mr. Dietz 
said that he hoi>ed the governor would 
be able to see that he could not pos- 
sibly have killed the man of whose 
death he was convicted. Mr. Dietz is in 
good, flesh and In good health, save 
from his wounded hand, which contin- 
ually gives him trouble. The bullet 
wound which he sustained In the siege 
of the log cabin at the Dietz home- 
stead never entirely healed. 
GaiB^d in Health. 

Throughout the summer he has been 
employed at outdoor work, and he has 
steadily gained in health. He worked 
continually during the summer paint- 
ing the exterior of the prison, doing 
all of the work on the main tower. 
When the weather became cold he was 
given indoor work and is now em- 
ployed in the knitting department. 

Warden Woodward of the state pris- 
on has found Dietz to be an e.vemplarv 
prisoner. He attends night school reg- 
ularly, never missing a recitation, and 
he deports himself as the ordinary 
model prisoner, obeying all the rules 
of the prison. It is believed he Is in 
the Irame of mind that should he be 
denied a pardon he will accept the 
inevitable with the resignation he has 
shown in all of the phases of his case 
so far. 



the triangular collegiate debating 
league are Sam Halpern of Minneapo- 
lis, Earl Louden of Cayuga, Lester 
Smith of Grand Forks, Edgar Gust.^if- 
son of Hannaford, Rheinhart KampUn 
of Grand Porks and Clemens xveleh of 
I..lnton, N. D. Alternates are H. Swen- 
son of Lakota and John Moses of Val- 
ley City. 



TO DR AFT R EPORT 

state Educational Commission Is 
Meeting in Fargo, N. D. 

Fargo, N. D., Dec. 23.— The state 
educational commission is holding a 
most important meeting today at the 
office of Walter L. Stockwell. in the 
Masonic temple, the last meeting that 
the members will hold before present- 
ing their report tw the state legisla- 
ture next month. Those attending the 
meeting are: President McVey of the 
State univer.'sity; President Worst of 
the agricultural college; George A, 
McFarland, presideni: of the state nor- 
mal school at Valley City; E. J. Tay- 
lor, superintendent of public instruc- 
tion; Lieutenant Governor U. S. Bur- 
dick of Willlston; and George T. Webb 
of Ellendale, state n6rmal school. 

The -matters to be discussed are of 
great importance and it is expected 
that the report to the members of the 
legislature will be drafted. 
• . 

Xewspaperman .Seeks Job. 

Bismarck. N. D., Dec. 23. — George 
Weatherhead, city editor of the Bis- 
marck Daily Tribune, is the first can- 
didate in the field for the position of 
secretary of the senate. He was as- 
sistant secretary of the senate under 
James W. Foley during the session of 
1907 and was also secretary during the 
session of 1905. For four years he was 
state expeit printer. 



Claire club. 

Milwaukee — C. W. Mott, manager of 
the Upper Peninsula Development Bu- 
reau of Michigan, with headquarters 
at Menominee. Mich., will deliver an 
address New Year's morning, at a re- 
ception to be tendered the "Old 
Guard," or life members of Independ- 
ent Lodge, F. & A. M., at the Masonic 
temple in Milwaukee. 

Wausau — Archbishop Sebastian G. 
Messmer, Bishop James Schwebach of 
I 1^ Crosse and twenty priests from the 
northern part of the state were at 
\\ ausau on Thursday to participate in 
t^he dedication of the newly erected 
St. James church. A class was also 
confirmed by the bishop. 

Eau Claire— Eau Claire Commandery 
Z: ^' ^' ^" ^^8 elected the following 
officers: Eminent commander, E. B 
Farr; generalissimo, H. D. Davis; cap- 
tain general, George J. Nash; senior 
warden. Norman A. Auer; junior war- 
den. G. A. McDermid; prelate. G. Tabor 
Thompson; treasurer. F. H. D. Gotten- 
recorder, C. W. Dinger; trustee. A H. 
Stevens. 



have practica ly arranged that their 
first match will be played on Jan. 10 
at the Calumet gymnasium. 

Houghton — '"he new pipe organ for 
Trinity churct has arrived and O.' A, 
Marshall of Kansas City has already 
begun to set it up. 

Hancock — A mararonl factorv, which 
will be quite an affair, will begin op- 
erations in W?st Hancock on Dec. 26. 
The factory will be situated for the 
present In the building owned bv 
Victor Jedda. Bart Mllano, Houghton 
business man, and a number of other 
Italian business men, are back of the 
new enterprise. 




Wisconsin Briefs 






I Peninsula Briefs 



CONTRACT SYSTEM 

For Handling Road Expenditures in 
North Dakota Counties. 

Grand Fork.s, N. D., Dec. 23. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — Change in hi 
metliods of handling the state automo- 
bile tax so tliat the greatest possible 
benefits may be derived were consid- 
ered at the good roads conference, held 
here, when State Engineer T. R. Atkin- 
son met with members of the Grand 
Forks Good Roads commission. 

I.ast year the automobile owners of 
Grand Forks county paid about $1,200 
into the automobile road fund, about 
half of that amount being paid by the 
owners In the city. The money, how- 
ever, was apportioned In such manner 
that less than $100 was expended on 
roads directly adjacent to the city. 
That the money should be applied to 
roads in the Immediate vicinitv from 
which the tax is derived is the conten- 
tion of several of the good roads pro- 
moters. 

Decision was made to draw a bill 
which will provide for tire contract 
system of handling road work and for 
the casli payment of road taxes, and to 
have it introduced at the coming legis- 
latue session. 



BURY B0Y;S VICTIM. 

Funeral of John Kiing, Killed by Olaf 
Christopherson. 

Morris, Minn., Dec. 23. — The funeral 
of John Kllng, who was killed Wednes- 
day by a boy whom he had befriend- 
ed, was held at Donnelly. Mr. Kllng Is 
survived by his wife and a daughter, 
Hannah, both of whom he expected 
soon to join at Los Angeles, Cal.; a 
daughter, Nellie, a teacher in the Phil- 
Ipplne.s, and four sons — Emii of Min- 
neapolis, Henr.v. a lumber dealer of 
New Salem, N. D., and two others who 
live ofl the farm. His aged wife Is an 
Invalid, and it was Impossible for her 
to make the trip to attend the funeral. 

Olaf Christopherson, the accused boy, 
took the sheriff to the very spot where 
he threw away his gun, twelve miles 
north of the Kllng home. The boy Is 
fearful of the consequences of his 
crime. His confession has not been 
made public. It Is rumored, however, 
that the boy said Mr. Kllng told him 
he didn't earn his board, and this so 
angered him that he picked up the gun, 
walked to the door of the room where 
Kling was and shot him in the back. 
He did not see what happened when 
he shot, and went back and ate his 
supper. His hearing will be Jan. 7. 



Milwaukee — Miss Christiana Hopkln- 
son, sister of Doctors William and 
l^aniel Hopkinson, Milwaukee, died 
Saturday. Miss Hopklnson was a grad- 
uate of Trinity Hospital Training 
School for Nurses, and since graduat- 
ing had devoted her life to nursing. 
Miss Hopkins took part in the small- 
pox epidemic In Pittsburg. Pa., in 1903 
and 1904. Miss Hopkinson was born 
in Leeds, Eng., Aug. 27, 1869. She came 
to Milwaukee with her parents in 18;)1. 
Both her father and mother have since 
died. 

Manitowoc — The Co-Operatlve Or- 
chard company organized and estab- 
lished largely by Manitowoc capital, 
now has the largest chervj- orchard In 
the world. 

La Crosse — Between 2.'>.000 and 30,000 
muskrats have been killed in this ter- 
ritory within the last ten days, ac- 
cording to the declaration of M. Rosen- 
steln of the La Crosse Fur & Hide com- 
pany. The average price per muskrat 
hide is between 40 and 50 cents, mak- 
ing a total of $12,500 that has be<>n 
paid out to Indians and trappers by fur 
and hide companies of La Crosse. 

Ashland — Rev. J. E. Salter of Excel- 
.sior, Minn., lias been engaged as rector 
for the local Episcopal church. Rev. 
Mr. Salter will preach his first sermon 
here on Dec. 29. Mr. Salter is a young 
man, recefltly married, and will occupy 
the former home of J. T. Hooper on 
Seventh avenue west until spring. 

Eau Claii-e — The tenth annual New 
Year ball given by Eau Claire Lodge 
No. 402, B. P. O. E.. Is to be held on 
Wednesday evening, Jan. 1. at the Eau 



Calumet— J (An P. Jones of Butte, 
Mont., has arrived here after an ab- 
sence of eighteen years, and is visit- 
ing with his mother, Mrs. William H. 
George of Tamarack. Mr. Jones was 
born and raised in Calumet. 

Lake Linden — The election of Lake 
Linden aerie of Eagles resulted as fol- 
lows: Worthy past president, Louis 
Arsenault; vice president, Germann Ol- 
zer; chaplain, Fred Monseau; secretarv, 
Carl Meyer; treasurer, Eugene St. 
George; trustees, H. E. Pennengor and 
Henry Nathanson; physician. Dr. Pich- 
ette. The installation will be held 
Jan. 14. 

Hancock — John M. Shepperd. who 
had been a resident of the cltv for 
more than forty years, died Saturday 
of pneumonia. Mr. Shepperd was 69 
years of age. Two children survive, 
a son and a daughter. Mrs. Shepperd 
died in August. 1911. 

Negaunee — The Mary Charlotte Min- 
ing company laid off one shift, num- 
bering about fifty-five men. This in- 
cluded miner.s and trammers, and from 
now on the Mary Charlotte will work 
with two shifts at eight hours each. 
They are willing to give the men six 
and one-quarter shifts for sl.x. This 
is the best the company feels they 
can do. 

Ontonagon — Mrs. Alexander, wife of 
Trueman Alexander, one of the fore- 
men at the Diamond lumber camps, 
died last week. Besides the husband 
and two sons, one about 10 years old, 
the other about 6, she leaves many 
friends. 

Calumet — Calumet lodge of Masons 
elected these officers: Worshipful mas- 
ter. Dr. Alfred Baldwin; senior war- 
den. Josiah Harper; junior warden. 
William Heir; treasurer. Charles L. 
Noetzel; secretary, George Williams; 
tyler, George Unsworth; trustee for 
three years. Dr. Alfred Baldwin. 

Marquette — J. A. Hatch. Jr., of Cold- 
water, chairman of the legislative 
committee of the Unitarian Commer- 
cial Travelers, says that the traveling 
men of Michigan will" make an effort 
to get some bills through the next 
legislature that will improve condi- 
tions In hotels and on railway trains, 
from the standpoint of sanitation. 

Hancock — At the eighty-fifth convo- 
cation of the University of Chicago 
Tuesday. Thure Johannes Hedman of 
Hancock received the degree of Ph. B 



Calumet— The managements of the. with full Masonic ceremonies. 



Calumet Y. M. C. A. and the Michigan 
College of Mines basketball teams 



I Dakota Briefs | 

Grand Forks. N. D. — Charged with 
indecent assault upon Lottie Hilyar. 
employed as a pantry girl at the Fred- 
erick hotel. H. M. Carnen was arrested 
at Minenapolis Saturday night and will 
be brought back by Sheriff Benson to 
face trial. 

Mlnot, N. D. — ^Nels Ness was arrest- 
ed, charged with asjsault and battery, 
his wife being the complaining witnes--. 
The family has been residing on Vai- 
ley street, but trouble arose last Sun- 
day which is uaid to have resulted In 
Ness giving his wife a severe beating. 
Taking the children, she went to the 
home of her parents, who reside on 
Hiawatha street. 

Devils Lake. N. D. — Although it has 
been several dfiys since the frozen body 
of an Indian woman was found near 
Pelican Point, no steps have yet been 
taken to ascertain the direct cause of 
the woman's death. 

Willlston, >'. D.— Willlston Is now 
lighted with power furnished by the 
Federal government station at the 
Willlston - Buford irrigation project. 
Under a recent agreement between the 
city and the government the station 
is connected up with the city electric 
lighting system, and the entire supply 
will be received in the future from 
the government. 

Grand Forks — The sale of 160 acres 
near Walle by William W. Bunde to 
William O. Bunde for $8,000 has been 
recorded with the register of deeds. 

Wahpeton, K. D. — Negotiations are 
under way for the settlement of the 
alleged civil liability upon the part 
of E. T. Tompkins, the St. Paul land 
man brought to this city on criminal 
charges, to several Richland county 
residents who cUilm he collected money 
from them on Canadian land deals and 
failed to make good his agreement. 

Mlnot, N. D. — lice Johnson, a former 
agent for the Standard Oil company in 
this city, who was arrested some time 
ago charged with embezzlement of $339 
of the company's funds, waived pre- 
liminary exam; nation in justice court 
end was bound over to the next term 
of the district court. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — Judge C. F. Tem- 
pleton is affirmed by the supreme 
court In the case of C. W. Turner vs. 
F. R. Crumpton and W. H. C:rumpton. 
partners as Cr^impton £-. Co.. orlginailv 
tried in Xelsori county. The plaintiff 
secured a verdict against Crumpton & 
Co.. on the purchase of two carloads 
of shelled corr. Turner claimed that 
there was excessive moisture In the 
corn and that by reason of that fact 
It became heated. 

Fargo. N. D. — W. E. Hoover, grand 
master, and W I... Stockwell. grand sec- 
retary of the <llflferent Masonic bodies 
of the state, ivill leave here next 
Thursday afternoon bound for Graf- 
ten, where the next day the beautiful 
new Masonic temple will be dedicated 



n-ous Mouse river drainage cases when 
he held that the raiir"ads must remova 
certain bridges .so that the draiuaga 
v.ork could be carried on. 

Towner. N. D.— Walter Rockgord. 
convicted in this city two years ago 
of attempting to commit a 'statutory 
oflen.se, was denied a new trial by 
Judge Barr. He was sentenced for 
iifte«?n years. 

Devils Lake, N. D. — A real estate 
deal of considerable interest was con- 
summated last week whfn Ilev. H. C. 
Kllngel ;-iold his farm in Cato town- 
sliip to Jacob Wolfe of this city. ReVv 
and Mrs. Klinijel and family expect to 
move to Montana in the spring where 
they will take up residence on their 
land there. 



Bottineau, N D- 
dered an important 



-Judge Burr ren- 
declsion In the fa- 



Roseau — Pupils in the advancea 
grrades in the local school have taken 
a thorough course in well digging the 
last three weeks. 

Crookston — The funeral of Bert O. 
Anderson, aged 42. who died Thursday, 
was held Saturdav afternoon. Aside 
from a wife and two children here, he 
leaves two brothers at Columbus. Ohio, 
but the brothers cannot come because 
of sickness in the family. 

Moorliead — The jury In the case of 
the county of Clay against Fritz Gruhl 
brought in a verdict for the county in 
tlie sum of $423.50. The verdict, how- 
ever, excluded certain expense.s of pre- 
liminary work on branch ditches, which 
was a point for which the defendant 
contended. 

^ International Falls— The American 
>uburb3 company has taken over 
Woodgreen addition to this city, tbe 
property consisting of thirty-four lots 
and located on what was devoted prin- 
cipally to routine business. 

Bralnerd — William Casey, for many 
years a resident of Brainerd in the 
early days, died recently at the Soldiers 
Home in Minneapolis. Mr. Casey, whose 
health had been good all summer, con- 
tracted bronchial pneumonia, and after 
a short illness died. 

Baudette — Editor Noonan. of the 
Baudette Region, has departed for 
Eastern New York state, on a month'a 
visit with his parents and relative*. 
Mr. Noonan advised that there will 
be a family reunion at the parental 
iiome, the first in twenty years. 

Perham — Mrs. Harry Johnson waa 
severely burned with hot tomato soup 
at the depot while arranging her 
husband's night lunch. She had a can 
containing tomato soup heating 
the stove. The cover was on tight 
as she was trying to take it off 
Imprisoned steam blew the lid off 
splashed the contents of the can on 
face, burning her painfully. 

Fosston — Johannes Brustad, aged 86. 
who has lived here ten years, died last 
week. His wife and eight children 
survive. 

Pine Cit.v — Hiram Brackett returned 
to his home in this city Tuesday from 
the woods above Duluth. where he has 
spent the past couple of month.s. Hiram 
has been on the sick list and is home 
for a few days' rest. 

Walker — Cl.ristian W. Christianson. 
aged 34 years, died at the state sani- 
tarium near Walker of tuberculosis. 
He had been sick less than two 
months, coming to the sanitarium from 
Minneapolis, where he held a clericail 
position In the city hall there. 

Staples — A. A. De Smidt. president 
of the Battle Lake Nurseries, has been 
In town figuring with the city of- 
ficials for ornamental trees and 
shrubbery for the city park and for 
the railroad park. 



on 
and 
the 
and 
her 



fiss bring 



(50 



toy 



in 

l^Iifornia 



Sk ^ J^Z 



' r • 



N^ r\ 



INTERNATIONAL 

FALLS HAS FIRE. 

International Falls, Minn.. Dec. 23. 
— Fire Satiirdar In II. L. Frank & 
Co.s store did abo\it $12,000 damage 
with about $8,000 insurance. The fire 
originated from an overheated stove 
In the rear of the store, and burned 
through the upper story and caused 
the eoniplete destruction of the stock 
and also the furniture in the living 
rooms over the store, by fire and 
wat?r. 

Prompt service of the volunteer fire 
department not only saved the build- 
ing from destruction, but also prob- 
ably the entire liuslness section on 
lower Main street. 



Select TVorth Dakota Debaters. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Dec. 23. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — The intercollegiate 
debaters of the University of No'-th 
Dakota who today meet the Univer- 
sity of Manitoba and i-argo college In 



IG TREES are grown on the roadside, as a border tree. They seem 
to thrive best aroiind vineyards. They are vigorous and require but 
httle care. The fruit is allowed to fall, then gathered and dried. Three 
thousand tons were packed, which means $150000, in Fresno alone last 
year, and this is only a minor part of the fruit industry in California. 

There are also enormous profits in growing grapes. More skill and intelligent care is 
required, but the work is not heavy. The average yield is five to seven tons per acre. The 
maximum return islSOperton, the average $25; the minimum is $10— even this price will pay grower's profit. 

Oet some land now. It does not require a great amount of capital. You can make a nominal cash 
payment and defer the remainder with interest for a number of yeare. 



m ^.m 



Go out and investigate conditions for yourself. Go now 
while the reduced rates are in effect. There is a great 

Homeseekers' Excursion 

first and third Tuesday of each month. Round trip costs only 

$74.50 from Duluth 



When you go, travel over a double-track system of OO-Ib. steel 
rails on a roadbed ballasted with Dustless Sherman Gravel. Auto- 
matic Electric Block Safety Signals every inch of tlie way. 

Excellent Dining-Cars on all trains. (204) 

Union - Southern Pacific 



^^ ^,. 



STANDARD ROUTE OF THE WEST 
Direct RooU to P«n«nia-P*C4fic Expositioa, 19 IS 

H. F. CARTER. District Pass. Agent 
la 25 South Third Street Minneapolis, Minn. 



UNION 
PACIFIC 



I Minnesota Briefs | % 



y\ 




u 



Monday, 



THfi DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 



^^^'•'^'•'•'^'^'•'^^•^■^'^^^'^^'•'•'^•^^^^^♦♦•♦^♦•'•'♦^■•♦•'^^ 



LATEST SPORTING'NEWS OF THE DAY 



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OSSIP AND COM- 
MENT ON SPORTS 
AND PASTIMES 
OF ARENA, FIELD 
AND TRACK. 



B^ BRUCE I 



W 



V ARE all prone to exagger- 
ate tlio events i-f ihe past. It 
- . -r of the faults of hu- 
lii.m nature. As 'we review 
the cvcais of tie prcseni Cay 
the belief i>iton intruiles itself to the 
elTect that thnm'- are not as they were 
in what we are liisposed to classify 
as the Ici ciavs. 

An.. ;. - when one compares tlie 
fighters ..i {!:e present day with some 
of the ^ io.it «'ries of the past, it is 
;ke i!!!" consideration this 
f extolling beyond 
\a;ue ... se events and per- 
It-rt tiuir vi\id impression 
_er and more imprcs- 



well '. 
habit 
their :: 
sons ! 
upon 
siona 

tight t 
that • 
gling 
mem- 
.Km: 
credit 
tight e 
ican ; 
was t 
active 
markai 



■ •e 



;•; en the square — the 

y are not the artists 

irew out into a strug- 

iight for the emolu- 



; nerally given the 
t: many of the great 

. .vilen dawn of Amer- 
liiis wonderful man 
: lioxing during his 
.. -. ,.;... he imparted his re- 
k:-.o\v!eeige to those Avho 
came after him. 

just where Jim Corbett learned his 
we>ndcrtul knowledge of the boxing 
game ■ clearly known. Tint was 

a w> I student and learned 

soniet rom all of the men he 

fcugli! lilt there was Jim Hall, 
coming ■'\er frc>m Australia, and 
Tommy Tracey, from the same coun- 
try. There was also young Griffo. 
classed .is perhaps the greater boxer 
the r; - ever produced, and the 

great . .: Jackson. 

All of these men w-ere artists. They 
were n< t Mind sluggers: they seldom 
swung. ;.nd consequently they sledom 
injured their hands. They had a 
great 'v of blows and they were 

adept- e art of feinting, one of 

the gr a: -c.rtts of the boxing art. 

Fackey McFarland. according to 
some \ ' TV shrewd fedlowers of the 
tight!- e. is the greatest boxer 

of • ■■ :;'.'.t among the big fighters 

of t^ei.t time there are none 

to ct with the Halls. Corbetts 

or Ja - of the past, and if the 

game u:cs to turn out some of 

the j< ke- tiiat are flourishing at the 
pre'?ent time, it is a grave question 
wheth.; r th ■' boxing as it was 

know: ' ^ . ; the greatest fight- 

ers c "f old. is not going to 

he sp; . otten. 

Thi, - ...i : one.", of the past were 
trained faithfully in the art of deliv- 
ering .1 hl'uv. the art of countering 
and al-<> the art of avoiding a punch. 
Diligently thiey were rehearsed at 
their task^. In those old days any 
sucker that would swing would have 
had .d knocked oft for his 

ignorv...... .f the fine art of bo.xing. 

Ncwadavs it is different. 

.•\nd tlie ques'tion is, whether the 

ring i- cTMiror to produce some of the 

rs of the days when Jem 

rning was being passed 

, :;e? 

• ♦ * 

Art '^h::,u:r c,f the Giants threatens 

to quit the i^^ame for the simple reason 

that he receives so many scented 

nt.tes. Art apparently has lots of 

sense. 

• • • 

The little (PP. its origin clothpd in 
roTnanoe In th«^ best cliJcken famillr-p, 
and vavut-ly associated with thn Ply- 
inoutl' r.o. k Viy a few enthusiastic stu- 
dents of the .Saturday Afternoon His- 
tory clvib. has degenerated woefully. 
Today the beinR of the egg is almofit 
a mechanical function, romance being 
thus rudkly cast aside, and its habitat 
ie th»' 1 (lid storage. In the early days 
of its i.istory it was sometimes hurU-d 
at iiiisguid<^-d persons who sought the 
Btapc and thus missed other callings, 
Bueh as laying brUks or handling the 
broom. It was also employed In d'.co- 
rative sehenies on Easter, and it rare 
Intervals eaten. Now the egg is talked 
of and Is a great news source, and is 
found in a few of the homes of the 
multi-millionaires — but to eat the 
egg — : The price forbids. A prominent 
cold storage own»^r recently presented 
an eg^; to t'..e Metr.ipoiitan museum. 
A grurp of energetic Philadelphia 
women, a.idtd by some of the prominent 



philanthropists, and some hens, are 
vigorously endeavoring to restore tho 
<^es to general use. Those who aro 
fond of ham, and to those to whom tb^ 
picnic of the present, without the In- 
evitable hard-boiled egg, is but an 
empty Jest, liave courage: The house- 
holders' league may cure the achlns 
void 

• • * 

By the old free lunch counter, looking 

eagerly for me. 
There's a wrestler a-sittin', and 1 know 

he wants a V; 
For the touch is In the air, pal, and th ? 

little birds they say: 
Come you baek, you earnest toller; 

come you back and make a play. 

• * • 

While there are few who believe that 
Matsuda. the Oriental streak of light- 
nins. can defeat Walter Miller, one of 
the greatest wrestlers at 154 pounds 
that t'lie world has ever produced, yot 
the lovers of fast and scientific wrest- 
ling will see one of the finest exhibi- 
tions of the sport that could be pos- 
sibly stagtd between two men, when 
the Jap and Walter come together. 

The Jap is one of the fastest and 
cleverest men in the game. His sid?- 
stepping and ability to feint and keep 
away from an opponent are someth'ng 
wonderful. His foot work is as tood 
as that of any boxer In the ring to- 
day. Miller will have to go at the 
very limit of iiis speed to defeat the 
Oriental, one of the most eel-like grap- 
plers that we have ever seen in action 
in this part of the country. 

• • * 

Miller's bout with Matsuda will be 
his last before his meeting with the 
miglity Mike Yokel of Salt Lake City. 
The contest with Yokel is the one the 
fans in this city are waiting for. Ac- 
cording to the negotiations the battle 
between the two bitter rivals will be 
staged here some time in February. 
After the bout with Matsuda. Walter 
says he is going to the woods for a 
complete rest, and then will endeavor 
to get one of the best wrestlers in the 
world to train him for the contest 
with the man he would sooner defeat 
than any other man in the whole world. 
And permit us to say here th.at the 
match between Miller and Yokel will 
be one of the greatest, no matter 
which one wins, that has ever been 
wrestled in North America. Two of the 
greatest middleweights in America, it 
is generally acknowledged that the 
right of possession of the middlewelprht 
title rests between these two little 
men. 

Yokel comes about up to Walter's 
nose. But he has the body of a giant. 
His neck Is something really marvelous. 
Imagine a man shorter than Walter 
Miller with a neck larger than that of 
the heavyweight champion of the 
world, and you have some adequate 
conception of the man who Is disputing 
the title that Millers friends have 
claimed is as much the property of the 
little Pole as it Is the rightful posses- 
sion of either Yokel or Gehring. 

The match with Matsuda will be the 
best thing in the world for Miller, for 
the wily Oriental will speed the little 
Pole up more than any man in the 
world is capable of doing — and speed 
is something that Walter will need the 
night he tangles with Mique Yokel, the 
fair-haired kid of Salt Lake City. 



FAMOUS BASEBALL PAIR 
MAY BECOME HATED RIVALS 



great 
Mac« 
down 



€bri$tm<i$ ereefings 

rein< 

TEEi! 



And remember tliat - 



REALLY STOPS THE DAXDRIFF. 



Yours for better barbering. 
EiKtatb Floor Alrrorth Bldg. 




NORTHLAND 
AFTER SMITH 



Famous Golf Player May 

Come to Duluth as an 

Instructor. 



Willie Leith May Not Return 
to Position at Coun- 
try Club. 



TWO SPEED KINGS ARE 

MA TCHED TO WRESTLE 

Miller and Matsuda, the Jap, Will Meet in Finish Match 

at the Duluth Auditorium 



McGRAW AND EVERS. 

! Tills picture was taken before the appointment of Johnny Evers as the 

manager of the Cubs. One wonders whether the photographers" will ever have 
the opportunity of catching this illustrious pair in a similar position. As pilot 
of the Cubs Evers may become the greatest rival of McGraw — hence the specula- 
tion regarding the future relations of the tv.'o. 



ZIMMERMAN PROVES THE 
GREATEST RUN PRODUCER 



Heinle Zimmerman of the Cubs was 
the J. Franklin Baker of the National 
league last season, leading the players 
of the senior organization In batting 
in runs. The Chicagoan hammered 
home 98 tallies In 145 contests, being 
outranked in percentage of runs batted 
home per game by Larry Doyle of the 
Giants, winner of the Chalmers car 
awarded to the National league's most 
valuable player, and by Jerry Eding- 
ton of Pittsburg and Charlie Stengel 
of Brooklyn. athletes who can be 
placed In tlie morning glory class be- 
cause they took part in only a few 
games. 

There was a close struggle for the 
leadership in the total of runs batted 
in. Hans Wagner and Owen Wilson of 
the Pirates and Bill Sweeney of the 
Braves doing almost as wolf in this 
respect as Ziir.merman of Chicago, who 
was born in New York, and Doyle of 
New York, who was born in Illinois. 

Wagner batted in 94 markers, Wil- 
son 93 and Sweeney 92. Other con- 
sistent clubbers v/ere Konetchy of St. 
Louis, Murray of New York, Mitchell 
and Hoblltzel of Cincinnati and Miller 
of Pittsburg. 

The National league's team of 
timeliest hitters would be made up of 
Alexander of Philadelphia and Meyers 
of New York as battery men: Konetchy 
of St. Louis, Doyle of New York, Zim- 
merman of Chicago and Sw'eeney of 
Boston as infielders, and Wagner and 
Wilso nof Pittsburg and Murray of 
New York as outfielders. These men 
put the finishing touches to 722 tallies. 

Thirty-five hits were made in the 
National league last season that swept 
the bases clear of their three tenants. 
The onlv player who twice turned this 
trick was Chief Wilson of the Pirates, 
he making a triple with the hassoi ks 
congested off Dickson of Boston and a 
homer when three were on off Steele 



of St. Louis. That there was class to 
New York's pitching staff is shown 
by the fact that only once during the 
year was a long hit made off a Giant 
hurler that brought in three runs. Lee 
Magee of the Cardinals made this wal- 
lop off Jeff Tesreau when acting as 
an emergency hitter. 

Below will be found a list of the 
National leaguers of 1912 who averaged 
.500 or better in driving in runs: 



ft t ? 



Player. Club, 




Edlngton, Pitts.,.. 15 9 2 

Stengel, Br'Ulyn... 17 ll 1 

Dovle, N. Y 143 85 6 

Zirnmerman. Chi... 145 83 7 

Wagner, Pitts 145 84 8 

Lennox, Chi 27 11 2 

Murray, N. Y 143 67 12 

Wilson, Pitts 152 87 6 

Merkle. N. Y 129 70 5 

Konetchy, St. L...143 73 10 

Sweeney, Bos 153 79 8 

Mltchel, Cin 147 67 7 

Hoblitzel Cln 148 68 8 

Almeida,' Cln 16 8 1 

Miller, Pitts 148 75 7 

Phelps, Br'klyn 52 27 1 

Titus. Phil.-Bos.. .141 68 4 

Cravath, Phila 130 61 8 

Magee, Phila 132 52 13 

Lobert. Phila 65 29 3 

Bridwell, Bos 31 14 1 

•V^Tieat, Br'klyn 123 56 4 

Tinker, Chi 142 48 16 

Schulte, Chi 139 60 6 

Daubert. Br'klyn.. 145 61 6 

Devlin, Bos .124 51 2 



2 13 
12 
6 97 
8 98 
2 94 
17 
88 
93 
78 
86 
92 



4 

9 
1 

3 
3 
5 

11 85 
8 84 



S 
83 
29 
77 
71 



•7 72 
3 35 



16 

62 



8 72 



70 
73 
62 



.867 
.706 
.678 
.676 
.648 
.630 
.615 
.612 
.605 
.601 
.601 
.578 
.568 
.562 
.561 
.558 
.546 
.546 
.545 
.538 
.516 
.512 
.507 
.503 
.503 
.500 



Alec Smith, rated as perhaps the 
greatest professional golf player in 
the world, is likely to be engaged as 
the next coach of the Northland Golf 
club. 

This is common talk among the of- 
ficers of the club. Nothing definite 
has been decided upon as yet, but as 
the matter stands at the present time, 
Alec Smith is very likely to be the 
instructor of the club for the coming 
season. 

Willie Leith is not likely to come 
back, according to the rumor that is 
going the rounds of some of the club 
members, and to take the place of 
the brilliant young Scotch player, one 
of the most promising professionals 
playing the game today, the officers 
of the club and the more enthusiastic 
players of the Northland club desire to 
secure the services of the best man 
possible. Alec Smith is the man. 

Already some correspondence has 
been carried on with the great player. 
The matter has not progressed to the 
stage where any definite information 
can be given out. It is stated that 
Smith is willing to come to the North- 
land club as Instructor, and it goes 
without saying that the players would 
be more than glad to have one of the 
greatest and most famous players 
known to the history of the game come 
here as instructor. 

Much prestige would accrue to the 
Northland club by the engaging of 
Alec Smith. Wherever golf is known 
the name of Alec Smith, dinna ye ken, 
tags close behind. While Mr. Thomas 
Lipton may be justly charged with 
putting the tea in tiffin. It also 
might be said that Mr. Smith helped 
to put the go In golf. 

It is stated that a decision will be 
made regarding the engaging of Mr. 
Smith shortly after the first of the 
year. The players and leading mem- 
bers of the club are strong for him. 
and it is generally believed that the 
present negotiations will come to a 
satisfactory head. 

setsIOlTs 
for boxing 



New York Commission Es- 
tablishes Scale of Weights 
and Other Regulations. 



HOTEL HOLLAND 



EUROPEAN 



Model of Fireproof 
Construction 



A Magnificent Structure — Equipment 
the Best in thj Northwest. 

BUSINESS MEN'S NOONDAY 
LUNCHEON SERVED DAILY ! 



THE NEW ST. LOUIS 



Spcrlnl winter rates for faml- 
llcn — Kiiropean or American 
iilan. Dime In fl>e >VootIiand 
Cnfo. a Kfrikiniely beautiful 
decorated retreat. Service a la 
Carte. After-tbe-tbeater aiipper 
kpeclaltleN. Excellent muMlr. 

Club Dreakfanta. 

UuNlneaM Slen'a Lunebeon. 

TILTON LEWIS, Manager 



GERMAN OLYMPIC 

LIKE SWEDISH 

Berlin Will Copy Stockholm 

Plans for 1916 Meeting 

of Athletes. 

Stockholm, Dec. 23. — The general 
secretary of the Olympic games to be 
held in Berlin in 1916, Mr. Diem, has 
been spending some time in Stock- 
holm to gather information from the 
Swedish committee which conducted 
the successful meeting of 1912. Mr. 
Diem told the correspondent of the 
Associated Press that the German 
games will be conducted on the same 
lines as were the Swedi.sh. with one 
central body and different committees 
for various branche.e of sport. 

The stadium in Berlin, which is 
nearing cftmpletion, will contain a 
large running track surrounded by a 
cycling track. The running track will 
be 666 meter.i long and tliere will be 
plenty of room on the green inside for 
field sports. The Berlin stadium will 
cost $800,000. 

At the next Olympic congress. Ger- 
many will propose that fancy cycling 
and figure skating in an ice rink be 
added to llie Olympic program, and 
will strongly oppose the inclusion of 
bo.\lng. The Germans do not under- 
stand boxing at all, said Mr. Diem, and 
con.«ider it a barbarous sport. Ger- 
many probably will be opposed on this 
point by England, the United States, 
Sweden and Denmark, nations which 
have favored boxing. 

* 

Athletic Conference. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 2?.. — Represen- 
tatives of the colleges composing the 
Minnesota-Dakota athletic conference 
are lioldlng their annual session here 
today. They do not expect to complete 
tlielr deliberations before tonight. The 
colleges represented are: 

Hamline, MacAlster, St. Thomas of 
St. Paul; St. Olaf of Northfleld, Minn.; 
T'niverslty of North Dakota, Grand 
Forks, N. D. ; North Dakota Agricul- 
tural college. Fargo college, Fargo, N. 
D. : South Dakota state college, Mitch- 
ell, S. D.; Dakota Wesleyan, Brookings, 
S. D. 

The principal questions under con- 
sideration are the^applicatlons of Qus- 
tavus Adolphus college of .St. Peter, 
Minn., and the .St. Cloud normal school 
for membership and the selection of 
the place for the next conference 
meet. 



BOYS' DEPARTMENT TO 



HOLD ATHLETIC MEET 



Starting today the boy's department 
of the Y. M. C. A. will hold open ath- 
letic house. Some athletic event is 
scheduled for every day of the holi- 
days, the full schedule of the various 
events being given below: 

Monday, Dec. 23 — 10 a, m., indoor 
baseball games; 3:30 p. m., games in 
the gymnasium, volley ball, basketball, 
ball hustle and battle ball; 7:30 p. m., 
regular evening class gymnasium pe- 
riod. 

Tuesday. Dec. 24—10 a. m., swim- 
ming at the pool; :i:30 p. m., ski trip; 
building w!ll close at 6 o'clock. 

Wednesday, Christmas day — 11 a. m. to 
12 club room open for games and story 
reading; building will be closed until 
4:30 p. m.; 4:30 p. m., games in the club 
rooms; 8 p. m., moving pictures; song, 
J R Batchelor; club swinging by 
Clinton Johnson and Kenneth Jones. 

Thursday, Dec. 26 — 10 a. m., boys 
from the Fairmount, Irving, Longfel- 
low and Ely schools will be guests at 
the club for some competitive games. 
High jump, shot put, potato race, bas- 
ket ball, battle ball. The school win- 
ning the most points may elect one of 
their number to a free membership in 
the boys' department for one year- 
2:30 p. m., swimming at the pool; 4 
p m., games in the gymnasium; chase 
five bottle, three deep, tumble ball, 
peanut race pole climbing: 7:30 p. m., 
obi-ervation trip to Zenith Furnacf 
company. ^ .^ - 

Friday, Dec. 27 — 10 a. m.. boys from, 
the Bryant. Knsign. Merrltt. Dincoln, 
Adams, and Madison schools, guest? 
at the gymnasium for competitive 
games; 2:30 p. m., coasting party (boys 
with bobs report at office); 7:30 p. m.. 
stereopticon of Camp Miller and camp 
srngs. 

Saturday, Dec. 28 — 9:15 a. m., swim- 
ming at the pool; 10:15 a. m., candy 
hunt, hang tag, bouncing in blanket, 
chariot race, relay race, broad jump, 
basket ball; 12:30 p. m., dinner with 
after-dinner stories; 2:30 p. m., boy 
hunt (swim on the return); 7:30 p. m.. 
gymnasium and clubroom. 

Sundav. Dec. 29—3 p. m.. Knights of 
Sir Galaiiad; 4 p. m., alumni meeting, 
old members of the club will speak. 

Monday, Dec. 30 — 10 a. m., roller 
skating party at Auditorium rink 
(courtesy of the Auditorium company); 
2 p. m.. swimming at the pool, boys 
from Emerson, Jackson, Washington, 
Franklin, Jefferson, Nettleton schools 
will be guests at the boy.s' building for 
competitive games; 6:30 p. m., annual 
dinner and reunion of former cabinet 
members. 

Tuesday, Dec. 31 — 10 a. m., ski trip 



(Camera club will take pictures'); 4 p. 
m., games in the gymnasium, volley 
ball, boxing, wrestling; 6 p. m.. Camera 
club banquet; 8 p. m., progressive 
games; 11:30 p. m., watch night serv- 
ice; the club will serve refreshments. 

Wednesday, Jan. 1 — Boys' building 
will be closed all morning; 11 a. m., 
swimming at the pool; 2:30 p. m.. an- 
nual New Year's open house, special 
program; 8 p. m., moving pictures, 
sketch, song. 

Thursday. .Ian. 2. — 10 a. m., ice skat- 
ing party; 2:30 p. m., SMlmming party: 
7:30 p. m., stereopticon trip through 
Mexico. 

Friday, Jan. 3 — 10 a. m., boys from 
the Endion. L.ester Park. Lakeside and 
Washburn schools guests at the boys' 
building for competitive games; 10 a 
m., slti trip and snowshoe tramp: 2:30 
p. m., fun at the pool, open to ai; 
members who can swim; 50-yard dash 
floating contest, egg in spoon, pick-a- 
pack race, dive for objects, candlf 
race, neat high dive; 6 p. m., box of 
candy to winners in each event. An- 
nual midwinter dinner and conference 
of committeemen. 

Saturdaj'. Jan. 4-^9:15 a. m., swim- 
ming period; 10:15 a. m., games In the 
gymnasium and announcement of mid- 
winter plans: 12:30 p. m., Bible class 
luncheon; 3:30 p. m., observation trip 
to Alger-Smith Lumber company, swim 
on the return; 7:30 p. m.. auction sale, 
old-fashioned parlor games at the 
close. 

Sunday, Jan. 5 — 3 p. m.. Kn'ghts of 
Sir Galahad, J. R. Batchelor, speaker; 
4 p. m., Sunday club, N. D. McLeod, 
speaker. 

HOCKEY TEAM fo^ 
HOLD FIRST PRACTICE. 

.•*■ ■ .' 

Permission ht« :Wen secured from 
the board of itfu-k commissioners by 
the officials of |h<$ curling club which 
will allow the curling club hockej- 
team to practice on ^he rink at Twelfth 
avenue east on TueiUay and Thursday 
evenings. The :^r^ practice of tho 
season will be held tomorrow evening 
from 6 to 7 ami H is particularly to 
be de.slred that et^ery candidate for 
the team he on hantj. 

A letter was f^ce(ied from John Mc- 
Namara of Houglitbn yesterday in 
which he statefi that the Duluth team 
could have datiSB at Houghton on Jan. 
2 and 3. Whether these dates wl!l be 
accepted cannot 'be stated definitely at 
the present time, -i 



New York, Dec. 23. — Announcement 
was made last night by the state ath- 
letic commission, which is vested with 
feolfc jurisdiction over boxing in New 
York state, of a complete set of rules 
under which all ring contests have 
been enforced hitherto, but many new 
ones have been added and the commit- 
tee promulgated an official scale of 
weights and definitely decided other 
mooted questions. The light-heavy- 
weight class, 15S to 175 pounds has 
been designated as "commssion 
weight." 

The commission rules that the ref- 
eree must be stationed inside the ring 
and not on the outside, a system used 
at the National Sporting Club of Lon- 
don and recently tried by a local club. 
The ring shall not be less than 16 feet 
nor more than 24 feet square. 

While prohibiting a referee giving a 
decision in professional contests, a de- 
cision can be given in contests held 
under the jurisdiction of the Amateur 
Athletic union. The commission makes 
ringside weighing imperative, and or- 
ders that main bouts must be staged 
not later than 10 p. m. 

Only soft cotton or linen bandages 
can be worn by contestants and no 
boxer In the lightweight class or un- 
der shall be permitted to box against 
an opponent ten or more pounds heav- 
ier. Specific penalties will be enforced 
for inlractions of the various rules. 

The scale of weights adopted by the 
commission Is: 

Paperweight, 108 pounds. 

Bantamweight, 116 pounds. 

Featherweight, 125 pounds. 

Lightweight, 135 pounds. 

Welterweight, 145 pounds. 

Middleweight, 158 pounds. 

Commis.'jion, 175 pounds. 

Htavyweight all over 17 5 pounds. 



Walter Miller and Matsuda, the Jap, 
will wrestle in a finish match at the 
Duluth Auditorium on the evening of 
Dec. 30. 

The match bet\k-een the Oriental and 
Miller was consummated late Satur- 
day, the arrangements being closed 
by wire between Duluth and Chicago. 

Miller even at the present time is 
training with I'recision and syste- 
matic care for the match with Mike 
Yokel of Salt Lake City. The contest 
with the Jap will probably be the last 
of any importance that Miller will 
wrestle before he s<eps on the mat to 
attempt to husli the claims of the 
wonderful Yokel to the middleweight 
championship. 

From the standpoint of speed and 
wonderful display of science and 
every trick of the wrestling game, 
the contest between the little Pole 
and the Jap should be the greatest 
wrestled here so far the present sea- 
son. Even though the majority of the 
fans are heartily of the opinion that 
Miller can beat the Jap, they also 
realize that the Adamson protege is 
one of the speediest men in the world. 

There will be iibout five pounds dif- 
ference in the nij-n's weight. Matsuda 
weighs around the 147-pound mark, 
and Miller's usual weight is 152. 

The greatest chance the Jap has is 
in speed and trickery. Miller is one 
of the fastest little men in the world, 
and to outspeed the Pole the man 
from the Flowery Kingdom will have 
to go some. Tha; is just what he in- 



tends to . do, according to the lettem 
from Adamson — but most of the fans 
doubt whether he can travel at a 
rate of speed Buffi<ient to beat one of 
the greatest boys in the whole world 
at his weight. 

Miller didn't care anything about 
wrestling the Jap. It was only th# 
persistence of Ed Adamson and an old 
promise Miller made to give the Ori- 
ental a chance, that resulted in the 
match being made. Walter fignree 
that he will gain little credit In beat- 
ing the Jap, and If he should be 
caught with one of the tricks of Mat- 
suda and thrown, he will be discred- 
ited right on the eve of his efforts to 
land the big match with Yokel. 

The little Pole 1b in Calumet at the 
present time, where he went to spend 
Christmas with his mother and sis- 
ter. He will return to Duluth around 
Thui-sday or Friday and will put the 
finishing touches to his training here. 
Since he has been in the Copper coun- 
try, Miller has been training and he 
will step on the mat wiith the Jap 
In the same superb condition that en- 
abled him to make so great a fight 
against that consummate master of 
the mat, Freddy Beell of Marshfleldi, 
Wis. 

Adamson has requested that the 
men wrestle in a larger ring. He also 
wants the mat to be made harder lo 
order that the Jap can exhibit hi» 
wonderful footwork. The ring will 
not be enlarged any. but the men can 
wrestle on any kind of a mat they 
see fit. Miller Is willing to give the 
Jap any advantage in the world and 
Adamson can dictate any terms ho 
sees fit. 



MANY SKI TOURNAMENTS 

HAVE DEEN SCHEDULED 



To the Sporting Editor of The Herald: 

A great man:' tournaments under 
the auspices of the National Ski as- 
sociation will be conducted all over 
the Northwest <lurlng the next two 
months. 

Btoughton, Wis., opens the circuit 
on Jan. 18 with the first big Inter- 
state tournament, followed en the 19th 
by Virginia, Minn., 25th at Beloit. Wis.. 
26th at Chippe-w a Falls and on the 
same date at Gary, HI., where the na- 
tional was held a year ago. 

Milwaukee will Introduce the ski 
sport with a big tournament on Feb. 2, 
while Arcadia, 'VN'ls., will also hold one 
on the same day. Spring Grove, Minn., 
Is a new club, just recently joining 
the association and a tournament will 
be pulled off on their new hill on Feb. 
4 while Rushford comes In on the 6th, 
Hudson cmr the (th. Red Wing on the 
9th. with Glenwnod following on the 
11th, Fergus Falls Feb. 13, with the 
national at Irorwood, Mich, on Feb. 
15, 16 and 17, while Ishpeming. as 
usual, holds fort! on the 22nd. There 
wHl also be con<lucted tournaments at 
lola, Cameron, Eau Claire, Colfax and 
Starbuck. 

Several new clubs will be admitted 
this season. Spring Grove already hav- 
ing joined with Ladysmith coming In 
at the beginning of the new year, 
while others are In cofrespond'ence 
with the secretarv on the proposi- 
tion of Joining. The loss in the mem- 
bership, througl the withdrawal of 
_ Duluth and St. I'aul, has already been 
j greatly overcome by the large increase 
in memberships of several of the clubs 
and judging from present indications, 
the association will number at least 
500 more members by Feb. 1 than a 
year ago, so the association has never 
been In a healtller condition than at 
present. The fact that it is now op- 
tional with any affiliated club to abol- 
ish professional tournaments If they 
so desire and hold nothing but amateur 
tournaments antJ yet retain member- 
ship in the national body has done 
away with much of the opposition to 
professionalism as supported by the 
organization. an3 the clubs realize 
that by sticking together they can do 
more towards bettering conditions 
than if they drop out, so the best of 
harmony is now existing and we don't 
believe there will be another rupture, 
the present syst'^m seeming to please 
the great majority of the clubs. 

Under the nev svstem no club is 
permitted to advertise a tournament 
as professional or as amateur. All the 
Information the public will get re- 
garding the skiers to compete at tour- 
naments will be that they are stars 
In class A. B. or C. 



saf that fights will be held under the 
supervision of the Gary authorities. 
The opening is scheduled for New 



CHAS. W. MURPHY IN 
PHIUNTHROPIC POSE 



Chicago, Dec. 23. — The status of 
Mordecal Brown, the three-fingered 
pitcher, formerly of the Chicago Na- 
tionals, who has been released to Louis- 
ville, and who, it has been announced, 
is to be manager of the Kentucky ag- 
gregation, about to be set free to join 
the American league and other possi- 
bilities, was fixed here by Charles W. 
Murphy, president of the Chicago club. 
Brown' still belongs to Chicago, ac- 
cording to Murphy. He is held by the 
Chicago team for Brown's own protec- 
tion, so that no deal can be arrange?-! 
for him that does not suit the three- 
fingered one. 

•The Chicago club would pay Brown 
more next season than any other club 
wouid. in all probability," said Murphy. 
•'He has done too much for Chicago to 
be left at the mercy of trades that 
might not suit him. 1 will not sanction 
any deal that does not suit Brown." 
« 

Power Boat Races. 

Peoria, 111.. Dec. 23. — The fifth annual 
regatta of the Western Power Boat 
association will be held in Peoria on 
Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 9 and 10. 
The races will be run on Peoria lake 
and under the auspices of the Peoria 
Yacht club and the Illinois Valley 
Yaciit club. There will be prizes of 
fL-'jOO for the four regular events. The 
Sunday racing proposition brought 
forth a lively discussion at the meeting 
of the two clubs, but finally carried. 

Fights at Gary. 

Chicago, Dec. 23. — The boxing lid is 
to be lifted at Gary, Ind., twenty miles 
from Chicago, according to plans from 
promoters made public here. They 



^\ e are sorry Duluth could not see 
Its way to let bygones be bygones, 
and come back with us under the new 
system, especially so when we have 
the assurance of skiers and clubs th«t 
each In the future will abide by any 
decisions rendered In case of dispute* 
by a board of arbitration. Of course, 
we are aware of the fact that Duluth 
has a large individual membershlo. 
and that it can well afford to be In- 
dependent, and the national assoclft. 
tlon wishes it every possible suc- 
cess, yet. we shall be glad at anv tlmo 
to receive the club's application for 
reinstatement. 

We have just received an Invita- 
tion to participate In the internation- 
al ski contests fn Sweden next Febru- 
ary, but as we are not vet strong 
enough, financially, to undertake the 
sending of a team over there, we hav^ 
declined for the present, but In an- 
other year there is no question but 
what we shall be able to accommo- 
date the international association wltfc 
a couple of our be.«t amateur skiers. 
The annual publlration of the ski as- 
sociation is now being distributed It 
contains no less than eightv pages of 
Interesting reading matter and is pro- 
fusely illustrated, several copies hav- 
ing been mailed to members of the Du- 
luth club. 

There will be a scramble at the con- 
vention for the next national tourna- 
ment, the fact that the as.soolation In 
1914 will celebrate its tenth anniver- 
sary will make this the most Import- 
ant in our history. 

Several newsoaper articles having 
been publi.«hed Idtely. originating at 
Stoughton. telling us that any amateur 
who has won two championships must 
necessarily become a professional are 
very much misleading, as there Is no 
article- in the national constitution re- 
fering to such compulsory conditions, 
and the reporter who publishes such 
stuff knows nothing, absolutely noth- 
ing, about what he is talking. The 
same Is the case with the reporter who 
recently furnished an article for pub- 
lication claiming Barnev Riley as the 
greatest amateur ski jumper In the 
world. This is stretching things some- 
what too far, and tends to making us 
the laughing stock of those who know 
better, Barney not having been on the 
amateur list for two seasons, havlnr 
joined the ranks of professionals at 
the beginning of last season, to begin 
with, and, furthermore, other qualities 
are required of champion material in 
the international association than 
merely being able to jump further 
than any one else. 

AXEL HOLTER. 

Ashland. Wis., Dec. 20. 



Year's day. Rudy ITnholz and i^anny 
Goodman are listed to furnish the 
starter attraction. 







Low Round Trip Fares 

VIA 

WASHINGTON 

INIBOTH DIRECTIONS,OR0NE WAY 

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ViERY Liberal Stopovers 

RerufMbMn« oMTicKirsTonjORioA Points JuNil.t9l3 
To Cuba Six(6) Montm 5. 

No. d "New York Limited" Leaves Chicago 5.46 p.m. 

A t»l«ndM Min. alMtrieally •4Utpp«d, enrnttbt* In aMielntnwnts, af 
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it pauM thi«uth th* AilMhsny lllountalna In dayllaht. Oth«/ htalw 
^Mthraitgh train* lMv*Chleaa» ^ 

0.16 a.m., 11.00 e.in. »nd 8.30 p.m. 
from Caltlment 4i Ohio Sutlon, Fifth Awnua and Harrlton Strata 
for particulars cenoult nearest Ticket AganI or addraaa 
R. C. HAASE, N. W. P. A., ST. PAUL. MINN 




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LET US MAKE IT MERRIER FOR YOU WITH A CASE OF 





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They are pure — brewed in the most sanitary brewery. 

They stimulate the appetite, help to assimilate the food. They restore shattered 
nerves and rest tired muscles. 



IT 



A Call on Either Phone, 138, WM Bring a Case For Christmcis 

ft -r* 



FIX 






WING 




SAYS RAILROADS AND 
STEAMSHIP COMBINES 
CONTROL WATERWAYS 



Luther Conant Reports on 

Inquiry Into Traffic 

Competition. 



Passenger and Package 

Freights on Great Lakes 

Under Railway Sway. 






% ^ ^ ^ -^ 

* FfcZVTl RES OF REPORT. ^ 

* * 

^ Rallrond oonipanlen and Mteam- ^ 
'$• Hhi|> conibtnation!* control the ^ 
¥lt reKMlnr dome«tic nteaDinhlp lluen ^ 
•* «f the I nited States, deiitr07inK ^ 
■^ much foinpetltion. ^ 

^ Uater linen alone Atlantic and ->*( 

* Cinlf ooaNtM to lar»e extent are M^- 
•l!^ auxiliaries or sub«ldlarie» of rail- j|e 
^ roadM. ^ 
•# The !Vew Haven ayiiteni Is ^ 
■^ changed ^Tlth attemiitlnic to muii- ^ 
^ l»rt->i.H i-ompetltiua un Long Island ^■ 
•^ »<ound. ^ 
•S:- The >ew Haven srstem and the ^ 
^ FaN<eru Steamship companjr, in ^ 
■Jjf ^Thifb the railroad is a stock- -jje 
■^ bolder, control Xew York city- ^ 
i^ Sr^\ Kuf^land trnfTic. ^ 
T^ The Southern Pacific Is de- ijf 
•* dared to have shown a dlsposl- ^ 
•J(f tittn to restrict steamship compe- ^ 
■^ tltion on the Atlantic coast. ^ 
-3^ Railroads own the Important ^ 
•^ through passenger and package ^ 
•* frelsSit lines on the Great Lakes. ^ 
■* There Is some competition on ^ 
^ the Pacific coast, but railroad * 
■^ control also is found there. ^ 
^ Important hard coal fleets on ^ 
^ North Atlantic coast are owned by ^ 

* a few sreat anthracite railroads. * 
^ I<-iilr«>ads control 00 per cent of $ 
■* the mlleaKe of private canals, and ^ 

* have caused many such water- ^ 
■^ ways to be abandoned. ^ 

* Westbound business on the # 
4jt Erie canal Is virtually controlled ^ 
^ by railroads, and eastboiind bnsl- ^ 
•!* ness has been largely diverted to * 
mt the railroads. ^ 
iff Further Federal reRmlatlon of * 
^ Joint rail and water traffic is * 
■if- auKgcated. X 

* I 

Washington. Dec. 23.— Railroad com- 
ranles and steamship combinations 
control the regular steamship lines of 
the I'nited States and have destroyed 
competition on many of the wa'ter 
highways of commerce, declares Lu- 
ther Conant, Jr., commissioner of cor- 
l)orations, In a report just made to 
President Taft. 

The revelations of the report, based 
upon an extenslv--» Investigation, force 
upon the Federal government, says the 
••ommissloner. the con.sideration of 
further regulation of Joint rail and 
■water traffic. 

In practically ^11 the coast waters of 
the country. It l.i declared, railroad or 
steamship consolidatiims dominate wa- 
ter transportation. Tlu-ir control of 
both through passengir and package 




LUTHER CONANT, JR. 






freight trade Is especially striking, 
says Commissioner Conant, on the At- 
lantic and Gulf coasts and on the Great 
Lakes. 

Mater lines along the Eastern sea- 
DoarU, he adds, have become to a lar.q^ 
extent au.x-illaries or subsidiaries of 
railroads. While competition exists in 
greater measure on the Pacific coast, 
the commissioner points out important 
instances of railroad control there 

It is a striking fact, says Commis- 
sioner <'onant, that between a number 
of the more important ports on the At- 
lantic and Gulf coast there Is only a 
single regular service. 

„. ^fT^ Haven System Accused. 

Xhe !\ew Haven sytem, it is charged. 

has pursued a determined policy of 

Huppre.ssing any effective competition 

on Long Island sound and several at 

least of Its recent acquisitions must 

^H.^'*'"5^'* ^/ ^"« t'' this policy." 
Elimination of competitio.i also was an 
Important factor, says Commissioner 
Conant, In the New Haven's purchase 
of a majority Interest in the Merchants 
& Miners Transportation company 

The extensive water traffic between 
New York city and .lew England ports 
13 almost completely controlled, the re- 

Eort adds, by the New Ifaven road or 
y the Eastern ^Steamship com pan v, 
in which the New Haven Is a consider- 
able stockholder, though claiming to 
have no voice in the management. 
Southern Pacific's Attitude. 
The Southern Pacific likewise is de- 
clared to have shown "a disposition to 
restrict competition." on the Atlantic 
coast, although Its steamship lines 

are really a water extension of that 
company's rail lines." In addition, th« 
report says, "the control of the South- 
ern Pacific by the Union Pacific (re- 
cently dissolved by the United States 
supreme court) obviously tended to 
limit the Importance of competition by 
the Southern Pacifies rail and water 
route. 

The railroads controlling the great- 



est tonnage of steamship lines, accord- 
ing to Mr. Conant, are the New Haven 
system. Union Pacific, Southern PaciHc, 
the Pennsylvania, New York Central 
and Central of Georgia. 

Nearly all the Important anthracite 
fleets on the North Atlantic coasts, the 
commissioner says, are owned by a few 
great anthracite railroads. 

Put Canals Out of Business 

A number of the principal canals 
of the country have been abandoned 
or fallen Into disuse, the report de- 
clares, because of railroad Influence. 

'The conditions here set forth," says 
Mr. Conant, "cannot fall to command 
attention. So far as the eastern part 
of the country Is concerned, water lines 
have to a large extent become auxil- 
iaries or subsidiaries of railroads. 
These considerations force considera- 
tion of the policy to be adopted toward 
such water carriers. Since water com- 
petition has in considerable measure 
been restricted by railroad control of 
water lines, this fact must be taken 
account of. 

The interstate commerce commission 
has bj' recent legislation secured a ';on- 
slderable increase in jurisdiction over 
joint rail-and-water traffic, particu- 
larly with respect to the establishment 
of joint rail-and-water rates and the 
equitable division of such rates be- 
tween the co-carriers. This is a matter 
of vital importance. If there is to be 
any successful attempt to Increase 
competition in domestic water traffic, 
it seems certain that such joint rate 
arrangements should be far more gen- 
erally established than at present. 

"Since Joint through rates are almost 
invariably less than the sum of the 
local rates, a steamship line deprived 
of the advantage of a joint rate ar- 
rangement with railroads on an equi- 
table basis is practically unable to 
compete with a rival enjoying it." 
What Twenty Roads Control. 

The report says that twenty rail- 
roads of the country control steam 
vessels and barges of 810,000 gross 
tonnage engaged exclusively in do- 
mestic trade, and continues: 

'The tonnage of the New Haven sys- 
tem is the largest, aggregating a little 
over 200.000 gross tons. Next in im- 
portance is the Union Pacific-Southern 
Pacific, with a grand total (excluding 
tonnage engaged In foreign trade) of 
over 150,000 gross tons. The Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad company's water lines 
have C8,500 gross tons in steamers and 
8,500 tons in barges; the New York 
Central, over 50,000 gross tons; the 
Central of Georgia railway, over 40,- 
000 gross tons. 

"The total capitalization of water 
lines controlled by these railroads (this 
not covering holding companies and 
several very important unincorporated 
services) aggregates $53,339,375 in 
stock and $31,263,«87 in bonded debt. 
Of the stock $40,223,800 and of the 
bonds $19,911,137 are owned by eigh- 
teen railroads or their subsidiaries. 
In most instances railroads own prac- 
tically all the stock of the separately 
Incorporated water lines which they 
control." 

On Eastern Seaboard. 

Of the traffic not dominated hv 
railroads along the Eastern seaboard, 
the great bulk, adds the report, is 
controlled by two important steamship 
consolidations, the Atlantic, Gulf and 
West Indies steamship lines and the 
Eastern Steamship corporation. With 
a few exceptions the constituent com- 
panies of these consolidations were 
formerly subsidiaries of the Consoli- 
dated Steamship Lines, organized by 
Charles W. Morse, and which collapsed 
In 1907. 

M'hlle there appears to be no inter- 
ownership of stock between these two 
steamship consolidations, Mr. Conant 
adds, they have several directors in 
common, indicating a considerable 
community of Interest. 

On the Great Lakes. 

On the Great Lakes all the import- 
ant passenger and package freight 
lines. It is declared, are owned by 
railroads. In the local nackage freight 
traffic there are a large number of 
Independent water carriers. Several of 
the principal lake fleets handing ore 
coal and lumber. It is said, are under 
the control of Important industrial 
concerns, the largest being the Pitts- 



burg Steamship company, controlled 
by the United States Steel corporation. 

On the Pacific coast, the commis- 
sioner found Independent steamship 
lines forming an Important factor In 
the coastwise trade, but said several 
water lines were under railroad con- 
trol, Instancing the interest of the 
Union Pacific-Southern Pacific in the 
Pacific Mail and the San Francisco & 
Portland Steamship company. The 
Southern Pacific also controls a fleet 
of oil vessels, belonging to the Asso- 
ciated Oil company, he adds; 
On the Mississippi. 

Steamboat lines on the Mississippi 
river. Mr. Conant says, have largelv 
succumbed to railroad competition or 
natural difficulties. The great bulk 
of bituminous coal, the principal item 
of traffic today on the Ohio and Mis- 
sissippi rivers is handled, he adds, by a 
single industrial line — the Mononga- 
hela River Consolidated Coal & Coke 
company, controlled by the Pittsburg 
Coal company. 

Railroads now control, continues Mr. 
Conant about 90 per cent of the mile- 
age of the few private canals still In 
operation. 

"On the Erie canal, the most Import- 
ant artificial waterway in the coun- 
try," says the commissioner, "the west- 
bound business has virtually passed 
under the control of the rallroafls 
v.'hile eastbound traffic hks been large- 
ly diverted from the canal by the re- 
peated reductions In rail rates, rate ar- 
rangements and railroad control of 
terminal facilities. These reductions in 
rail rates are, however, to a consider- 
able extent attributable to canal com- 
petition." 

The report deals chiefly with regu- 
lar through passenger and freight 
steamship lines and fakes no account 
of tramp steamers. It lis the fourth 
installment as the result of the bu- 
reau of corporations' extensive inves- 
tigation of water traffic, the three j>re- 
vlous reports relating to water routes, 
volume of traffic and the control of 
terminals. 



Choice Cut Flowers. 

"None nicer." Prices right at Huofs. 

MEW PftSfORlS^ 

NOW IN CHARGE 

Rev. W. W. Lawrence 

Preaches First Sermon 

at Gien Avon. 

Rev. W. W. Lawrence who came to 
Duluth last Friday from Lincoln, Neb., 
to take charge of the pastorate of the 
Glen Avon Presbyterian church, 
preached his first sermon as the regu- 
lar minister of that pulpit yesterday 
morning. The pastor preached on the 
topic, "Tho Kingdom of God Coming 
Down Among Men," saying that hu- 
manity now looked for enjoyment of 
heaven during this earthly "life, and 
that this could be accomplished only 
by living a just life and following the 
golden rule. 

The new minister and his family are 
now residing at the home of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. W. Coffin. 1925 Woodland ave- 
nue, but about the last' of the week 
will move Into the manse at 2104 
Woodland avenue. 

NO GIFTDINNERS 

WANTEO AT FARM 

Poorhouse Inmates Will Get 

Christmas Cheer at the 

County's Expense. 

Sending Christmas dinners to county 
poor farm inmates will be a misdi- 
rected philanthropy, according to Dr 
C. J. Woolway. superintendent. 

"The people at the poor farm will 



set down to as good a Christmas din- 
ner as one would wish for." declared 
the doctor. "And what Is more, the 
county will stand the expense. 

"People desiring to give away Christ- 
mas dinners or things tc eat should 
not send them to the poor farm, when 
there are poor families In Duluth who 
need these things worse. 

"The county will furnish the In- 
mates with a chicken dinner and all 
of Its embellishments. There will be 
plenty of fruit, candy and nuts for 
those who want them." 

EXTRAVACANCE IH 

THE PHILIPPINES 

Judge Elliott Tells of Differ- 
ences With Governor 
Forbes. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 23. — Judge 
Charles B. Elliott, who announced in 
Washington a week ago that his resig- 
nation as secretary of commerce and 
police of the Philippine Islands was at 
the request of President Taft, reactied 
Minneapolis Saturday evening and 
talked freely of the disagreements 
with Governor General W. Cameron 
Forbes which led to his retirement. 

He makes charges of gross extrava- 
gance against Forbes. When Forbes 
took office there was a surplus of 
$3,r.00.000 in the treasury, and at the 
end of the last fiscal year he showed 
a deficit of more than $4,000,000. 

"He ran the islands like a vast pri- 
vate estate," said Judge Elliott. 
'Funds were used for the laying out of 
a polo grounds. He emulated Roose- 
velt in relegating law to the back- 
ground whenever he wanted to carry 
out a certain project. 

"Mr. Forbes' complaint was that I 
was an obstructionist. I confess that 
I have been. I have protested as far 
as I was able against what I felt to be 
Illegal acts. I have fought them with 
some pretty drastic opinions, I admit. 
I have said, and still say, that It Is an 
Infernal outrage- to run the govern- 
ment of the Philippines with so little 
regard for law. We are trying to 
teach these people how to run a gov- 
ernment, and that sort of conduct Is 
setting them a poor example. I op- 
posed Governor General Forbes con- 
tinually on those matters, without any 
personal feeling on my part. I did not 
know there was any on his until after 
my resignation had been requested. 

"I am satisfied with the record as It 
stands. There will be a congressional 
investigation of the administration in 
the Philippines, I was told In Wash- 
ington, Just as soon as the Democrat-^ 
get in full control next spring. It will 
bo a hostile Investigation and It will 
bring out some sensational nnatter. I 
have done nothing to stir up the in- 
vestigation, but my protest will be 
found on file as to all the acts I felt 
to be Illegal or unwarranted. Much 
public money has been wasted or mis- 
spent. The governor general has In- 
terfered often In the administration of 
justice to favor personal or political 
friends." 




ton moved to Nebraska Cltv a short 
time ago from Letiven worth, Kan. 

TAli« TO MEN. 

Leonard Young (lives Address at Y, 
M. C. A. on Christmas Spirit. 

Leonard Young, principal of the Du- 
luth Central high uchool. addressed the 
men's meeting at the Y. M. C. A. yes- 
terday afternoon on the subject, 
"Christmas." Christmas, he said, was 
the grandest season of the year, calling 
for the best that was In a man. He 
said good fellowship reigned supreme 
during this hollda\ time, and each suc- 
ceeding year fourii more hearts beat- 
ing for those about them, and not for 
self alone. Several songs, appropriate 
to the occasion, were sung by the en- 
tire gathering. 

TAFT PUTS McADOO 

IN RED CROSS JOB. 



New York. Dec. 
Adoo, vice chalrma 
national committee 
of his appolntmen 
to membership on t 
rators of the Am. 
Cross society, to fl 
by the resignation 
Dewey. The appoj 



by other members of the board at a 
recent meeting, the anneunceraent said 

SIXTY DAYS TO 

GET EVIDENCE. 

St. Louis, Mo.. Dec. 23. — The judges 
of the United States circuit court of 
appeals have given the attornevs for 
the International Harvester company 
sixty days in which to prepare for the 
hearing of Harvester company wu- 
nesses in the government's suit "to dis- 
solve the company. 

— • ^-* 

Priest's Anniversary. 

Beloit. Wis.. Dec. 2.3.— The fortieth 
anniversary of the Rev. M. J. Ward in 
the Roman Catholic priesthood was 
celebrated here Sunday in St. Thomas 
church, of which he has been pastor 
for thirty years. 



3\ 



Rich Hollj- Wreaths, 

40 cents. Order today by phone. Vic- 
tor Huot. 



23.— William J. Mc- 
n of the Democratic j 
, has received notice ' 
t by President Taft , 
he board of incorpo- i 
|irlcan National Red { 
ir a vacancy caused} 

of Admiral George 
ntment wa.s ratiSed 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPA LDING 

MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURIOUS 
REST.^URANT IN DULUTH. 




LONE MOTORIST 

KILLE D BY CAR. 

Dorchester, Neb., Dec. 23. — A. J. Den- 
ton, member of a Kansas City grain 
firm, was killed near here Sunday In 
an automobile accident. He was found 
Bhortly after 2 p. m. pinned under the 
steering wheel of his overturned car. 
His neck was broken and death is 
believed to have been instantaneous. 
No one knows how the accident oc- 
(!urred, as he left here alono in the 
(•■BT. "The bodj' was found by Prank 
West, a farmer. 

The acc'dent occurred on a smooth 
etretch of road, which leads to tho be- 
lief that Denton was speeding. Tracks 
In the road show that the automobile 
turned completely around on two 
wheels before turning over, Mr. Den- 



HOME FOR THE HOUDAYS 

THE DULUTH, SOUTH SHORE & ATLANTIC RAILWAY 



SOU'] If 



SlIORI- 



HAVE AGAIN AUTHORIZED THEIR LOW EXCUR- 
SION FARES TO ALL LOCAL POINTS ON ITS 
LINE AND MINERAL RANGE R. R. 

TICKETS ON SALE DEC. 18 TO 25 INC.. 29. 30. 31, 1912 
AND JAN. 1, 1913. FINAL LIMIT— JAN. 10. 1913. ' 

TO EASTERN CANADIAN POINTS 

F^ROM DULUTH & SUPERIOR 

TO—— 

North Bay, Ont. $$0.30 Kingston, Ont sft 30 

Toronto, Ont , 30.30 Ottawa. Ont 38.85 

Hamilton, Ont 30.30 Jl*'*^.^""; ^"^ B».8"» 

Owen Sound, Ont 30.80 QS"b^**b?e *" l?i? 

Woodstock, O.U 28.60 St^^ J^^i.'i^.^B tHo 

PetcrtM>ro, Ont 34.85 Halifax n" S^'?n 

Belleville. Ont 36.30 MoncJon. N.^B i ', l '. [ \ ] '. J .' SJ.sS 

PROPORTIO^•ALLY LOW FARES TO INTERMEDIATE POINTS 

llmlTlarit ml.''"- "' ''' ''' "• '' ""•^ ''' ''''' ^»"*» -«^"- 
Train Service of the very best — Modern Un-tn-dntA iri*«»>- 

Il'TFORMATlON CHEERFULLY GIVEN BY 
Eit^; Pho^e";S. ^' ^- * ^- ^ «« «P»»^»« Hotel Block. Duluth, 

Bro'L?93****"^^''' ^' ^' **' '^**''^' '^'^^■' Superior, Wis. Bell, 
James Maniiy, G. P. A., FideUty Bld«., Duluth. BeU, Melrose 1535. 



-9 




J 



16 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 






a 

I 

ir 

a 




mm 





kllU 





8 



t 



< 



I 
[ 



I 



mu WIT 





'llunisaiuls of dollars' worth of merchandise 
ivT iiK'u and boys that does not even smell of 
.<nir>ko. Thousands are here today. You had bet- 
u-v ccmc tomorrow, the last shoppmg day before 
I iiri^iiiKis. It will pay you even if you live a 
hundreds miles from our .tore. 

Open late tonight and tomorrow night. 

The entire stock is high-grade merchandise 
purchased right at the beginning of cold w^eath- 
er. and manufactured by the leading wholesale 

tailor- <'f the United States. 



ri 

ri 

rl 

M 
aS 

[4] 

M 
In 



123 WEST SUPERIOR STREET 



HELP! 






"I've gone through every 'dog-goned' shop in town. I'm 
tired out. And I'm near-sighted from looking at things. There's 
n* thing new I This great annual swap affair has me beaten to 
a frazzle. 

"Every time I try to buy her a gift it's the same thing over 
againc The very thought of Christmas gives me fifty-seven va- 
rieties of gloom. The stores are packed. I never saw such a mob 
in all my life. This Christmas mania is worse than an epidemic. 

"But I've always given her something, some way — something 
nice. She always knows just what I need and like most of all. 
It's intuition. Every woman has it. They don't seem to mind 
shrij.ping. She has been preparing for weeks and has a trunk- 
ful already. 

"Women have the right idea; they certainly can buy gifts, 
.^he reads THE HERALD every night — goes through those ad- 
vert i?c:ncnts in no time. She always finds the very thing for 
Ihirry, jubt what mother has longed for, and the cutest little 
I-resenis for those Darrow children. 

"By George! That's the idea! Wonder I never thought of 
it before. If she can pick and choose all her gifts so satisfactor- 
ily in THE HERALD, so can I. I'll choose her gift from THE 
HERALD'S Christmas advertisements tonight and then get it 
in no time tomorrow." 

(Copyrighted, 1912. bj J. P. FaUon.) 



Burgess Electric 

Company 




We carry a line of the 
most reliable and up-to- 
da te elec trical goods. 




American, Simplex 
and Universal Irons, 
Toasters, Percola tors, 
Disc Stoves, etc. 



.*^-*r. 



(^ Decorative and praC" 

tical Stand Lamp, BeaU' 
tiful Shower Liahts, make 
a novel and highly ap- 
predated gift. 

-^OPEIM EVENINGS^ 






COUNCIL WILL BE ASKED 
TO MAKE INVDiTIGATION 



Inquiry Into Advisability of 

Employing Expert Is 

Proposed. 



Opponents of Plan Are Un- 
der Misapprehension 
as to Purpose. 



A resolution will be Introduced at 
the council meeting tonight providing 
for a committee to investigate the ad- 
visability of employing an expert to 
map out a plan of organization for sub- 
mission to the commission on talting 
office. 

A somewhat similar resolution was 
Introduced last Monday ni^ht and was 
defeated. Some of the aldermen are 
believed to have been under a mls- 
talten impr<?ssion as to the purport of 
the resolution and others are said to 
have given the matter more considera- 
tiun and to have changt-d their atti- 
tude as a result. 

The proposed resolution will commit 
the city to nothing. It will not pro- 
vide for the expenditure of a cent of 
city money. It will merely provide 
for an investigation of the question in 
order that the council may have all 
possible light before final action is 
taken. 

The plan suggested by The Herald 
attracted general attention. It has 
been widely discussed by citizens, 
many interviews liave oeen published 
in support of the plan and some in 
opposition to It. 

MlMapitrchenMion. 

The opponents of the employment 
of an expert seem to be laboring un- 
der two or three wrong impressions. 

Expert and theorist are confused. 
Some people seem to believe that an 
expert is merely a theorist. The im- 
pression is erroneous. The essential 
quality of an expert must be practi- 
cality. Any man brought to Duluth to 
arrange a system of origination for 
the city government would necessarily 
be a man who had not only made a 
study of city government but had been 
connected with the practical working 
out of methods for obtaining economy 
and efficiency. 

Some others, notably some of the 
city officials, seem to think that an 
expert would be merely an expert in 
accounting. If the accounting system 
of the city were involved at all, it 
would be merely a detail. The plan is 
to have a man make a survey of the 
whole city government and co-ordinate 
all its details in a comprehensive sys- 
tem designed to obtain the greatest 
efficiency at the greatest economy. 
Accounting would very lilcely figure 
in his recommendations, but for all 
anybody knows now the present ac- 
counting system of the -city Is ade- 
quate. 

The third point on which there is 
a misapprehension, purposely fostered 
by certain opposition, is the expense 
of obtaining an expert. Tlie statement 
that siich a man would cost $4,000 to 
$5,000 is absurd on its face. Men fully 
capable of doing the work intended — 



I AMUSEMENTS | 



TONIGHT'S ATTRACTIONS. 



I.,YCEUM— David War field. 
OHPHEUM — Vaudeville. 



CHRISTMAS BILL 

AT THE OBPHEUW 

New Vaudeville Program 

Has Many Features to 

Attract the Children. 

It's a good children's show at the 
Orpheum this week, and judging from 
the verdict of the big audience that 
filled the theater last night, the 
grown-ups find much in it to amuse 
them. 

"Puss In Boot.<9," the headline act 
this week, is about the biggest and 
most elaborately staged musical com- 
edy act the Duluth theater has yet 
presented. Tliere are four scenes, and 
many changes of costume for the ex- 
cellent chorus. It is an elaborate 
act for a vaudeville theater to stage. 
The company comprises twenty-five 
people, mostly pretty chorus girls, and 
it carries its own musical director. 
The scenery is quite pretentious, and 
the costumes would do credit to any 
musical comedy or comic opera. Some 
of the jokes carry the dust of age, 
but such a hard-working comedian as 
Will J. Kennedy is bound to get a 
laugh sooner or later. He got them 
sooner last evening, and the audience 
seemed to be with him almost from 
the start. The little company boasts 
of several excellent voices, although 
Miss Gertrude Taylor, as Colin, the 
youthful hero, was suffering from such 
a cold yesterday that she could scarce- 
ly say her lines, and singing was out 
of the question. As a whole "Puss in 
Boots" compares very favorably with 
an average musical comedy, and it 
makes an excellent children's attrac- 
tion, owing to the clever work of Da- 
vid Abrahams, Jr., as "Puss." 

Charles Olcott, who looks like a col- 
lege graduate of very recent date, has 
a clever little vaudeville novelty in 
his travesty on a musical comedy. With 
the assistance of a piano and some 
musical compositions of his own, he 
shows just how a comic opera is 
thrown together. He has a "fat" place 
on the bill, immediately following the 
headline act, wliich gives him a chance 
to burlesque it. 

Mr. and Mrs. Jack McGreevy got a 
most enthusiastic welcome on their 
leturn, and "The Village Fiddler and 
the Country Maid" never drew more 
laughs in tne many performances they 
have given In the Duluth theater than 
they did last evening. The McGreevys 
have a sure-fire comedy hit in their 
little turn. 

Apdale's animals have the most en- 
tertaining of trained animal acts. The 
most pleasing feature of tlie act Is the 
free and easy manner in which the 
animals are allowed to roam about the 
stage. There are three bears, several 
monkeys, a troupe of dogs, and an ant 
eater. The monkeys and some of the 
dogs roam about at will, and one little 
fox terrier keeps the audience amused 
throughout the act with his efforts to 
get re'Venge on the monkeys for their 
constant teasing. In fact, so occupied 
are the spectators with the constant 
warfare between the dogs and the 
monkeys, that they miss most of the 
clever tricks of the other animals. 

Bertlsh is a much-muscled young 
man of apt)arently small build, who 
performs wonderful feats of strength. 
In both acrobatic lines and weight 
lifting. He puts twice his own weight 
above his head with a one-arm lift. 

Hal and Francis have a lively little 
comedy turn called "The Stock Farm." 
and they start this Christmas week 
bill off In a brisk and entertaining 
way. 

The pictures, including views of the 
Balkan war, complete a very strong 
bill, which will continue all weelc with 
a daily matinee. Manager Billings an- 



men who have had experience as 
municii)al specialists — may be obtained 
lor approximately $300 a month. Tne 
coHt of making a survey of the city 
and working out an organization 
would be at the outside $1,000. Tne 
work could be done in the three months 
remaining before the commission takes 
orfice and the recommendations of ihv 
expert could be available for the com- 
missioners when they take hold. 
City Shoald Start HJKht. 

The city of Duluth wants to start 
right. Everybody is agreed as to that. 
To start right the commisslonera must 
be fully Informed, not only as to the 
city government of Duluth, but as to 
methods employed in other cities. In- 
formation as to tlie details of the 
various departments of the present 
government must be assembled. The 
head of each department will have 
recommendations to make. The ex- 
perience of other cities must be 
studied. Out of all that will come some 
system of organization. 

Unless steps are taken this winter 
for assembling facts and recommenda- 
tions for the "commission, much time 
will be lost in preliminaries after the 
commissioners take office. They will 
be anxious to make a record and might 
start with the machinery already at 
hand, with the intention of working 
out a better organization later. If a 
system of organization, based on ex- 
pert study and proved by the exper- 
ience of other cities, were submitted 
to them when they take office, they 
would be able to start right immediate- 
ly instead of waiting until later. 

Those who claim that the commis- 
sioners will be fully capable of work- 
ing out an organization without ex- 
pert advice are presupposing the elec- 
tion of a commission of experts. The 
chances are that the men elected will 
not be men who have made a study of 
municipal government. They will be 
men of judgment, executive ability and 
honesty, but they will not be municipal 
experts. They^~wlll have a big task 
and their way will be made easy by the 
work of a specialist in municipal af- 
fairs. 

Many Indoritements. 

The plan to employ an expert has 
been indorsed by City Comptroller W. 
S. McCormlck, City Treasurer Fred J. 
Voss, City Engineer John Wilson, City 
Assessor James Myron, S. R. Hat<:h, 
acting manager of the water and light 
department, and Henry Cleveland, sec- 
retary of the park board. 

Former Mayor M. B. Cullum, H. V. . 
Cheadle, former city clerk, and several 
former members of the council have 
Indorsed it. 

Chairman T. T. Hudson. Secretary 
Charles F. Macdonald, H. H. Phelps, 
S. A. Foster. Thomas Olafson and W. I-]. 
McEwen of the charter commission 
have given it their support. 

Seth Marshall of Marshall-Wells 
company and R. A. Horr, manager of 
Stone-Ordean-Wells company. who 
have had experience with the efficiency 
obtained through expert advice in pri- 
vate business, believe the right kind 
of expert advice would Insure effi- 
ciency and economy in city adminis- 
tration. 

W E. Richardson, N. F. Hugo, D. A. 
Barnes, Julius H. Barnes, George M. 
Jensen, Gust Landin, A. B. Anderson, 
S. W. Hill, David Adams, John Molr, 
John J. Moe, O. A. Oredson, A. F. 
Swanstrom, A. Lofgren, Leonidas Mer- 
rltt and many other private citizens 
have given their unqualified indorse- 
ment to the plan. 



nounced today that the curtain would 
be held for the Christmas matinee un- 
til 2:45 to permit everybody to en- 
joy their Christmas dinner without be- 
ing rushed. 

NEW VOGAl^f 

AT THE EMPRESS 

Picture House Has an Add- 
ed Attraction for Christ- 



BUYS A BRAND NEW 

PIANO 

AT J. F. WEISSMILLER'S 

From now until Tuesday night we will sell you any Piano in 
this entire stock at any price or terms that is at all in reason. We do 
not overstate the situation when we make the assertion that this is 
the most sensational, mammoth, tremendous, overwhelming Pi- 
ano sale ever inaugurated since the inception of the piano business 
in this country. 



mas Week. 






$250 



$75 
$4.00 



$1.00 






Kimball. 



$325 



$115 
$5.00 



$1.50 



I'lilVnr 






»« 



Hazelton. 



^P'^^'- 



PIANOS MOST IDEAL GIFT 

The Piano is the best present you could give the whole family. 
Brand new Pianos, $87 up, on terms of $1.00 a week. 
Pianos delivered until 12 o'clock Tuesday night. 



J. F. WEISSMILLER, 

203 EAST SUPERIOR STREET 



A special holiday week attraction is 
furnished at the Empress theater this 
week in the singing- of Miss Lockhart, 
the new vocalist, who makes her ap- 
pearance at the popular playhouse for 
the first time this week. She is blessed 
with a voice rich in tone and wide in 
range. She also has a pleasing person- 
ality. 

"These Three Fellows," who have 
been at the Empress are still there, and 
are proving very popular with the reg- 
ular patrons, siijsing the latest songs, 
etc. 

The film "Following the Star," had 
a human interest plot which marked it 
as one of tiie most forceful projected 
this season. The theme deals with a 
stage-struck village maiden wlio fol- 
lows the rainbow of the stage. 

In photoplay, the Empress has one 
of the best offerings of the season. The 
audiences yesterday who witnessed the 
opening of the Christmas vreek hill 
thoroughly enjoyed the various pic- 
tures.: 

The Pathe weekly release this week 
shows a number of Balkan war filjns, 
besides a number of other current 
topics of Interest. 

"Glimpses of Montana" is a trav- 
elogue which l« particularly interesting 
Its scenes surpass in beauty most land- 
scape subjects. 

"Buck's Romance," a Selig release, 
which Is shown furnishes the comedy 
portion of the b ill. 

DavTd Warfieid. 

David Warfieid will appear tonight 
at the Lyceum theater in David Belas- 
co's plav, "The Return of Peter Grimm." 

Mr. Warfieid arrived in this city 
this morning with his company. 

EGYPT BUYiMGlTS 
COAL IN AMERICA 



Report That Welsh Market 

Is Being Deserted 

Causes Sensation. 

Cardiff, Wales. Dec, 23.— The report 
that 100,000 tens of American coal Is 
being purchased by the Egyptian rail- 
roads in place of the customary Welsh 
supply caused a sensation here today. 

TELLS DlTAilFOF 
PERUVIAN HORRORS 

American Consul Fuller Re- 
ports in Person at 
Washington. 

Washington, Dec. 23. — Stewart Ful- 
ler, American consul at Iquitos, who 
investigated the reported outrages 
against the Peruvian Indians in the 
Putumayo rubber district, arrived In 
M'ashington today and conferred with 
state department officials. 

The outrages brought to light by 
Consul Fuller's Investigation are such 
as to give rise to one of the most 
perplexing Latin - American probhnns 
with which the state departhient has 
had to deal, especially in view of the 
fact that British corporations are the 



principal operators in the Peruvian 
rubber field. 

Consul Fuller's report, mailed before 
his departure for the United States, 
had previously reached the depart- 
ment, but he supplemented the dis- 
closures made therein with other in- 
formation, all tending to show the 
horror of the outrages perpeti-ated 
upon the Indians by their foreign em- 
ployers, as well as the gravity of the 
problem with which this government 
has to deal. 

The principal purpose of Consul Ful- 
ler's mission was to ascertain whether 
the outrages against the Indian rubber 
gatherers had ceased, as the Peruvitp 

fovernment Insists is the case, but this 
act cannot be known until the con- 
sul's report is transmitted to con- 
gress, which already has called for 
it by a special resolution. 



MiNNESOTANS ARE 
AFTER POSTAL BONDS 



One Hundred and Seven- 
teen Depositors Apply 
for $45,680 Worth. 

(FrMi Tfe* lUrmid Wathington Bureau.) 

Washington, Dec. 23. — Infoi-matlon 
made public today by Postmaster Gen- 
eral Hitchcock shows that 117 postal 
.savings depositories in Minnesota have 
made application for $45,680 of the 



postal savings bonds to be distributed 
on Jan. 1. 

St. Paul leads the cities, with a 
total of J21,340, and is followed In 
order by Minneapolis with $4,220, Vir- 

finia $3,540, Duluth $3,400. Hlbbine 
2,600, Chl&holm $1,500. Eveleth $1,200. 
Buhl $1,000, Houston $720, Stillwater. 
North Branch, St. Cloud, Moose Lake, 
Grand Rapids, Hancock, Ulson and 
Randall $500 each. 

Compared with the application made 
by depositcrles in the state of Minne- 
sota on July last, the present applica- 
tions show an increase of $20,280. or 
79.8 per cent. 

» 

"Xon« Xleer." 

Roses, beauties, poinsettias, carna- 
tions, valleys and violets. Prices right, 
as always, at Victor Huot's. 




Make This Christmas Last A II Year 




FA VORITE— Mahogany or Oak 

With 26 ^f^ r\ \C\ 
Selections.. M> H^ I I . I U 



59 




EASY PAYMENTS- 

Most Popular Proposal Ever Made to Music Lovers 

Grafanola Favorite, jvith 26 selectiors, including the great sextet from Lncia and the 
famous quartet from Rigoletto, for which two selections alone many people have paid $13.00 
— enough of the best music for an entire evening's entertainment. Keep your boys and girls 
home evenings by giving them and yourself good music and entertainment from the world's 
greatest artists. 

The motor is a powerful three-spring ; the speed is regulated by a graduated scale. The 
reproducer, which is the same as in the ^200 machine, is operated beneath the lid, and the 
sound waves are led through the tone arm to the tone chamber, which is entirely separate 
from motor mechanism and is scientifically constructed, patterned after the Violoncello; here 
the tones are amplified and thrown out through the opening, subject to control at your will 
by the partial or complete closing of the "Tone Control Shutters." 

If you have been waiting for the perfected talking machine, don't wait any longer, it's 
here. If you cannot come in, write for catalog and particulars of our other offers. WE ARE 
OPEN EVENINGS. 

DOUBLE DISC RECORDS 65c 

W. IVI. EDIVIOIMX, 

Exclusive Agents for This Territory. 



\ 



330 WEST SUPERIOR STUEET. 



l^^^^^^^S 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December S!3, 1912. 



»r 



THIS Store is 
full of fine 

merchandise which 
men want, and we 
can help you select 
just the right thing; 
the sort of things 
men buy for them- 
selves. 

Special Christmas 
Sale of all Bath 
RobeSf Smoking 
Jackets and Fancy 
Vests Today and 
Tuesday only- 
All Smoking Jackets 
at V2 Price 

An ideal j^itt for a man. 

AH Bath Robes 
at '/a Price 

Voii couldn't do better; every 
man likes them. 

All Fancy Vests 
at Va Price 

A gift any man would appre- 
ciate. 



Our Christmas 

Sale 01 High- 

Grade Clothing 

Affords you an unusual oppor- 
tunity of presentin]^- yourself or 
s(.me one of your friends with 
a handsome fashionable Suit or 
Overcoat at a big saving. 

Any Hart Schafiner & Marx 
$28, $30, $32 and $35 Overcoat 
and Suit for — 

$24.50 

Any Hart SchafTner & Marx 
$22, $25 and $26 Overcoat and 
Suit for — 

$19.50 

Any $18.00 to $20.00 Over- 
coat or Suit for— 

$ 1 4.50 

Any $12, $13, $15 or $16 
Overcoat or Suit — 




Dress Shirts, $1.50 to $2. 

Neckwear, 25c to $1.50. 

Silk Hose, 50c to $1.50. 

Underwear, 50c to $5. 

Caps, 50c to $2.50. 

Lisle Hose, 25c to 50c. 

Sealskin Caps, $18 to $25. 

Suspenders, (in boxes), 50c. 

Umbrellas, $1 to $10. 

Fur Gloves, $3. 

Fur-lined Gloves, $3 to $5. 

Pajamas, $1 to $2.50. 

Mackinaws, all colors ; all sizes, 

for all. Men and Boys, $5 to $8. 

Sweater Coats, $1 to $8. 

Dress and Street Gloves, $1 to 

$3.50. 

MufHers, 50c and $6. 

Suit Cases and Grips, 

$1.50 to $25. 

Negligee Shirts, $1 to $3.50. 



Store Open Evenings Till 
Christmas. 



KENNEY & 




The Store of the Christmas 

Spirit. 

409 and 411 West Superior St. 



■^ /^ 



SCENE AT DEDICATION OF STATE OF MINNESOTA 

STATE BUILDING AT SAN FRANCISCO m DEC. 1 1 




More than 20.000 people assembled 
on the grounds of the Panama-Pacific 
International exposition at Harbor 
View when Minnesota's Panama ex- 
position commissioners received a 
deed to the site of the Minnesota 
slate bulldiner from the exposition au- 
thorities. At the same time Ambassa- 
dor Jonlcheer John Louden was triven 
a deed to the site of tlie exposition 
palace to be built by Holland. A mili- 
tary pageant lent splendor to the cere- 
monies. Diplomats of foreign coun- 
tries and other dignitaries were pres- 
iMit. and at the completion of the ex- 
ercises battleships in the harbor and 
cannon at the portals of the Golden 



Gate boomed a salute of twenty-one 
guns. "Minnesota is thoroughly alive 
to the possibilities of this great 
American celebration," said Panama 
Commissioner tSone of Minnesota. "As 
loyal Americans we will do our part 
to make the greatest success of the 
celebration at which America will 
welcome thB world." Every state In 
the Union will be represented at the 
exposition. 

J. \V. Weber, W. A. Gray. John H. 
Robertson, George H. Sullivan, O. G. 
TrapliAgen and Chairman Cal E. Stone 
ocmpriaed the Minnesota delegation. 
Miss L3ona Babcock of Minnesota 
raised the flag of the North Star 



SHE'S INDEED PRECOCIOUS 



Little Winifred Stoner at 
10 Is Prepared for Col- 
lege— Speaks Eight 
Languages. 



w 



INIFRED SACKVILLE STO- 
NER, JR., of Pittsburg, who 
was only 10 years old on Aug. 
19 last, is already prepared 
for college. in addition to 
studying astronomy and some 
other branchc?s. She speak.'s 
eight languages; she can recite a thou- 
sand poems and she has written nearly 
500 poems and Jingles herseif, says the 
New York Sun. 

Winifred plays the piano well. With 
no lessons except the game of 'making 
up stories on the piano," she can read 
ovei a page of Schub-^rt'ft "Serenade," 
close the book and play it accurately 
and with mych expression. She can 
also hear a difficult selection played 
and so keen is lier concentration she 
can immediately sit dbvvn at the piano 
and play it. Winitred draws well and 
prints admirably. Like Browning, one 
would imagine she will hardly know 
which to choose for lier life v.ork — 
music, art or writing — but .she is very 
decided as to what slie expects to do. 
Winifred is going to earn and buy and 
be the editor of a great children's 
magazine. 

When I tell mv friends about this 
little girl they exclaim, "Poor thing! 
She has had no childhood, she will die 
of too much study." So here is ques- 
tion No. 1 to answer in the game of 
motherhood which her case present's. 

How can readers account for the fact 
that Winifred is a perfectly normal, 
happy child, romping, singing, loving 
and lovable, gay as the canary she is 
giving the freedom of the entire house, 
and teaching to whi.stle and to keep 
perfect time to all the music tnat sh? 
whistles? Winifred has a hundred 
dolls. As fast as she learns anything 
.she imparts it to her dolls and pets. 
Sl'.e is ardently devoted to sports. She 
swims, races, plays ball, dances and 
physically she is as well as she is 
mentally. Her little muscles are strons 
as armor bolts. She is as large as an 
ordinary 12-year-old girl and siie cau 
walk five miles wllhout the least fa- 
tigue. 

I looked to the father and mother to 
account for this wonderful and lovely 
phenomenon of childhood, anj I dis- 
covered the answer to question No. 1. 
Mrs. Ston<^r said tc me: 

"Yes. We studied prenatal Influence 
with Cherie," for thus she calls her 
little daughter, "a.nd I tell you that 
children born of love have great ad- 
vantages over others. Every love 
thougiit breathed by the expectant 
mother must have influence upon the 
child. Clierle is a love child, and it 
is love which has made lier what she 
l."3. Any olilld can develop just as 
Winifred has done. She is not a ge- 
nius, she is just a child that has h,id 
her intere.sts aroused, so that she lias 
wished to drink deep draughts from 
knowledge's fountain." 

Q'lestion number two. whl.?h the 
reader may ask. Is, How sliould this 
training begin? Mrs. Stoner explained 
her mcthod.s. I- quote her own words: 

"From the day Winifred vas born 
.•^he has been shown beautiful objects 
ond has heard beautiful thought.'?. I 
have talked and read to her, reciting 
poems and scanning Virgil. All young 
babies sliould be shown gr^at pictures, 
hear great poems and talked to sen- 
sibly. Most children are obliged to 
l<arn two languages, baby language 
and real language." 

Question number three from mothers 
v/ill be. Is a child physically able to 
hive her mind developed so rapidly? 
Winifred's parents have for the most 
part kept their child out of doora. 
They think It a crime to imprison chil- 
dren behind brick walls. If parents can 
afford to teai;h tl;eir own children 
they believe thoy should do so and not 
help to crowd the public schools. 

Winifred's father is a colonel and a 
.= urgeon In the marine hospital service 
of the United States. Now he Is sta- 
tioned in Pittsburg. From him Wini- 
fred undoubtedly gets her splendid 
physical care, and she is a perfectly 
well child. She Is practical, like her 
father, and possess^iS .ill her mother's 



love of art and music and the gift of 
writing. 

Readers in question number four 
will say: "What are these games she 
has invented for her child? Llow did 
rile teach her baby?" 

From babyhood Winifred has heard 
no ronsense. When she was one year 
old she understood that the three fair- 
ies who would bring her everything 
worth while were observation, con- 
centration and intense Interest. She 
has never been made to studj'. She has 
never had a lesson in anything until 
-she has asked for it. Her knowledge 
has been put into such interea'.ing and 
fXcitlng games by her motiier that 
Chorie would rather play geography 
than craps, and she talks about his- 
tory as she would of things to eat. 
Cherie is an inventor herself, and she 
and I played her cancellation game. 
though of course she passed by can- 
cellation pleasures three years ago. 

"You can be Napoleon and I'll be 
Wellington," she explained, "and we'll 
write numbers on these slips of paper 
and drop them into this bowl. Now, 
you draw and then I will, and we call 
these our battalions.'' 

So it stood this way: 

2 X 5 X 14 X 4 



li X !} X 13 X 10 



"Now. the fight is on. Napoleon on 
the upper line. I see that you have 
turned your little 2 battalions on my 
12, and killed 6. I will annihilate 
your 6 battalions. You turn your 4 
on my 8 and kill all but 2. Well, I 
v.-ill charge your 14 and kill 7. So, 1 
win, for you Napoleon, only have 7 
men left, and I have 180 men." 

Then it stood this way: 



(2) X (6> X (14) X (4)=7 



(12) X <S) X 18x 10 180 
(O (2> 



TOYS 

% PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & CO. 



It sounds simple, but how many lit- 
tle children have puzzled their tired 
gray m.atter over cancellation, and 
said it over sing.^ong. wasting their 
energy, when Winifred by a game has 
caught it Joyously and easily. Num- 
erous teachers have criticised Mrs. 
Stoner and her games, but the fact re- 
mains Winifred Is ready for college, 
and she actually knows, as examina- 
tions with others preparing for col- 
lege have proved. Mrs. Stone invent- 
ed games for geography, history, Es- 
peranto and other branches. She 
showed me a drawer full of packs of 
cards — the games by which Winifred 
has been taught. I turned from the 
drawer to the happy little girl who 
actually has the knowledge In her big 
little head. 

She writes all her articles on her 
typewriter, and has done so since she 
was 3 years old. By means of th.> 
typewriter she learned to spell and 
also to become familiar with beautiful 
poems. Construction and punctuation 
came easily this way. Mrs. Stoner 
thinks that typpwrlters ."should be in- 
troduced Into all public schools. In or- 
der to do away with the bugbetyr 
method of learning to spell by means 
of spelling books. 

How does the child remember such 
a store of learning? Mrs. Stoner ex- 
plained It easily. 

"Winifred has worked out a way to 
put all her knowledge into nutshells, 
so she won't forget." .said her mother. 
"She keeps the keys to open her sto'-f- 
house of knowledge. For example she 
takes the rulers of Great Britain, 
writes their names, and opposite she 
puts their characteristics. Then she 
composes a poem about them, and by 
the time It is completed she knows 
the rulers by heart. So she has done 
with the presidents of the United 
States and with the bones of her body. 
The poem of the bones she calls 'The 
Bony Song.' " 

"Oh, mother," cried Winifred, "now 
you have told her the secret, and I 
wished to surprise her by giving her 
my "Bony Song." 

Winifred is a charming little hostess 
She recites snatclies of verse in eight 
different languages, played the piano 
and showed me how Ninita, the canair 
wculd whistle always wh'en she did 
She had taught Nlnlta all this in ton 
•lays, for the bird had oome as a gift 
to her only a. few days before. She 
urged me to come to dinner, and naive- 
ly strengthened her invitation by say- 
ing she would feeri me on olives and 
candied cherries, her favorites. Then 
she kissed her mother, and skipped 
gayly out on the veranda and was 
lost In her book until I went out to 
say good-by to her. She is really un- 
ppoll'^d. ani she instinctively has the 
.sense to know how much there is to 
be learned and that she can only hope 
to grasp a little. 

She Is the happiest ehlM I have ever 
met. When I said this to her mother 
Mrs. Stoner replied: 

"Yes, and I always wish her to be 



— PluKO bjf W. W. 8rtt«i;ey. 

State. Former Minnesotans from dis- 
tant parts of the Paolflc coast attend- 
ed the ceremonies. Every resources 
and industry of Minnesota. all Its 
commercial, educational and industrial 
interests will be displayed In one of 
the most comprehensive series of ex- 
hibits ever made by a commonwealth. 
"We people of Minnesota are thor- 
oughly alive to the possibilities of this 
exposition." Commissioner Stone said, 
"We of Minnesota have much In com- 
mon with your state. We hibernate 
In California. I predict that the first 
man to come in February of 19ir. and 
the last man to leave in December of 
the same year will be a man from the 
North Star state." 



happy: and to do this she must not be 
a lopsided genius. I do not wish 
Cherie to be a genius. i?he must know 
enough art to appreciate the art of 
others and her own; enough of music 
to appreciate all; but I do not wi.4h 
her to specialize. Great people so 
often are not happy. I wish her to be 
happy and to do good." 

Winifred is already an altruist. She 
has just been writing some stories 
about the animals In Highland Zcio, 
Pittsburg, and so distressed is she 
about the elephant, Mrs. Guskey, 
that she has asked the public through 
her article to gtt Mrs. Guskey a good 
husband from the jungles of India and 
that the couple ma>' have a house to 
themselves in the park and not be 
chained in one spot all the years. 
She started the public subscription by 
giving all her first month's salary to 
Mrs. Guskev. 

Like her mother^ Winifred believes 
in woman suftragflT, ,' Qlt^e has written 
several poems In behalf of equal fran- 
chise rights, which have been pub- 
lished in various ne^fspapers and mag- 
azines. Her "Vftlentineg for Suffra- 
gettes" are decidedly clever and have 
helped the cause. She and her mother 
are inviting In the boys and girls of all 
the neighijorhood, and they invent suf- 
frage games and have talks. M'-s. 
Stoner believes in explaining suffrage 
to the boys and girls. They are the 
ones who will soon be the power in 
America — "It is tive little ones who 
lead us," she says. 

Edgar Lucien Larkln, director of 
Lowe observatory. Mount Lowe, Cal., 
has written a book containing a new 
view of mind, man and life. It Is 
called "Within the Mind Maze." He 
says In his preface that Winifred 
.Sackville Stoner, Jr., has been its in- 
spiration. 

The manner in which Winifred mas- 
tered mathematics will give mothers 
an Idea for their own little ones. Mrs. 
Stoner never liked mathematics and 
neither did her little daughter at first. 
She decided she ought not to try to 
teach anything which she did not lo\-e. 



POULTRY HOUSE ARCHITECTURE. 
Success in raising and keeping folws 
and particularly in getting winter 
eggr, depends as much upon the poul- 
try houses as upon the stock, their 
care and feeding. The three ess<^ntial3 
of a good house are that it shall be 
dry, receive plenty of sunshine and 
ventilation without drafts. Any house 
that will provide these things should 
prove successful, no matter what the 
form of construction or the design. 

The first consideration in building 
« poultry house is its location, accord- 
ing to Farm and Home. It is important 
to have well drained soil so that the 
ground around it will be dry. Tne 
buildings should also be located near 
the dwelling house, for much of the 
work of caring for the poultry usually 
devolves on the woman members of 
the family A sunny location, well 
sheltered from the north winds, is 
highly desirable 

Dryness in the house itself Is the 
first essential. Next to actual starva- 
tion nothing Is surer to reduce the egg 
yield and affect the health of tiie 
fowls than dampness In the house. 
Wet yards mean cold, dirty feet, and 
this In turn results in dirty eggs and 
less of them. If th(» site is not dry It 
should be under-drained. In any case 
the foundation should be high enough 
above grade to prevent the entrance 
of surface water. On dry soil a dirt 
floor may be used, although this be- 
comes foul if not removed and renewed 
each year. A good double board floor 
or one of concrete Is tlie best. 

Good ventilation is essential, but It 
must be without drafts. If the build- 
ing is tight on three sides and over- 
head with no cracks at the eaves fir 
sill, there will be no difficulty with 
drafts. If one or more window open- 
ings or a i>art of the front is covered 
with muslin cloth, it will keep out the 
wind during the cold weather and at 
the same time permit a good circula- 
tion of air without blowing on the 
fowls. 

Plenty of sunshine in winter and 
spilng is the third essential. This la 
abundantly provided for in the two- 
compartment house, which can be 
throxvn almost entirely open and the 
building flooded with light, yet there 
is not 80 much glass that it will be- 
come very heated Irj the daytime, and 
likewise excesslvelv cold at night. At 
least 50 per cent of the front of the 
house should consist, of openings cov- 
ered by glass and cloth. 



A DIANA OP tut: AIR. 

Los Angeles Tlme.s: The beautiful 
and athletic Eleanora ' Sears, at a 
luncheon at Sherry's, said of aviation: 

"I like the biplane well enough, and 
tiie monoplane I am simply head over 
heels in love with." 

To this remark one of Mis.=! Sears' 
many unsuccessful suitors answered 
reproachfully: 

"Ah, another case of man being 
supplanted by macliinery!" 

-m ! 

Those who buy advertised thingt. 
buy 'In the light"— after comparison 
and consideration, and with a knowl- 
eds;e of the stores. 



Jewelry 



FROM 



Henricksen's, 




IDEAL GIFT! 



Since the first Christmas, Gold, Silver and Precious Stones have been con- 
sidered the ideal gifts. Today, in Duluth, these are found, in their most beautiful 
form, at Henricksen's. It is because of their rare beauty, and their known high 
quality that the gifts from Henricksen's are prized above all others. 

DiamondsMakeaMerry Christmas 

No More Pleasing Gift Can Be Made Than a Diamond to 

Your Friends and Loved Ones. 

The rapid increase in value is only second to the great pleasure of owning 
one of these remarkable gems. The Henricksen diamonds are superior both in 
cutting and brilliancy, and cost no more than stones of less merit. 

A beautiful Christmas diamond can be secured at prices ranging from $10.00 
to many hundreds of dollars. 

Mounted Diamond Goods in Platinum and Gold 

Christmas Bar Pins, $5.00 up to $600'. Beautiful Pendants, $3.50 up to $1,000. 
Cluster Dress Rings, $10.00 to $1,000. Diamond Studded Watches, $25 to $500. 

No time like the present — no present like a Diamond. 



Almond Dishes 

Amber Beads 

Anniversary Rings 

Antique Copper and 
Silver Trophies 
and Prize Cups 

Ash Receivers 

Auto Clocks 

Auto Flower Vases 

Auto Lunch Sets 

Babies' Bib Pins 

Bags 

Bangles 

Barrettes 

Bead Necklaces 

Belt Buckles and 
Pins 

Berry Forks 

Bonbon Baskets 

Bottle Stands 

Bouillon Spoons 

Bracelets 

Bread and Butter 
Plates 

Bridge Sets 

Brooches 

Butter Knives 

Button Hooks 

Candelabra 

Candlesticks 

Canes 

Card Cases 

Carriage Clocks 

Carvers 

Caviar Jars 

Celery Dishes 

Centerpieces 

Charms 

Cheese and Cracker 
Dishes 

Chests of Silver 

Children's Rings 

Cigar Cases 

Cigarette Cases 

Cigar Lighters 
plain, engine 
turned, and en- 
graved 

Circle Brooches and 
Bar Pins, gem set 
and plain gold 

Clocks 

Clothes Brushes 

Coasters 

Cocktail Sets 

Coffee Sets 

Cold-meat Forks 



Collar Pins 

Cologne Bottles 

Combs 

Compasses 

Compotiers 

Coral Beads 

Corkscrews 

Crosses and Cruci- 
fixes 

Crumb Trays 

Cuff Pins and Links 

Crystal and Silver 
Powder Jars 

Curios 

Demijohns, in crys- 
tal and wick<;r, 
with lock tops 

Dessert Forks 

Diamond Jewelry 

Diamond Collars 

Dinner Services 

Dog Collars 

Dressing Cases 

Dutch Silver 

Earrings 

Egg Spoons 

Engagement Ringsi 

Entree Dishes 

Envelope Openers 

Eyeglass Chains 

Exclusive Designs, 
Black Opals — In 
rings, scarf pins 
and brooches 

Exclusive Enamel 
Watches, with 
chains to match. 

Fans 

Field Glasses 

Fish Knives arid 
Forks 

Fitted cases for Car- 
riage and Auto 

Flasks 

Flower Baskets 

14K Gold Toilet Set 

14K, Thin Model, 
Traveling Acces- 
sories 

Fobs 

Fruit Bowls 

Game Carvers 

Gem-set Vanities 

Gentlemen's Knife, 
Pencil and Cigar- 
ette Holder in 
Sets or Single 



Gentlemen's Knife, 
Pencil and Cigar 
Holder in Sets or 
Pieces 

Gold Beads 

Gold Jewelry 

Gold Toilet Articles 

Gorham Leather 

Gorham Canes and 
Umbrellas 

Grapefruit Spoons 

Grape Scissors 

Gravy Boats 

Hair Brushes 

Hair Ornaments 

Hall Clocks 

Hat Brushes 

Hat Pins 

High-ball Sets 

Hors -d ' Oeuvre 
Dishes 

Horseradish Pots 

Hot-milk Pitchers 

Ice-cream Forks 

Ivory Miniatures 

Ivory Toilet Articles 

Jelly Dishes 

Jewel Boxes 

Kettles 

Key Chains 

Lavallieres 

Leather Goods 

Lemonade Spoons 

Letter Cases 

Liqueur Sets 

Lockets 

Lorgnons 

Lorgnon Chains 

Lorgnettes, gold and 
platinum, with or 
without Precious 
Stones 

Loving Cups 

Macaroni Forks 

Manicure Articles 

Mantel Sets 

Marine Glasses 

Marmalade Jars 

Match Boxes 

Mayonnaise Bowls 

Meat Dishes 

Medallions 

Medicine Cases 

Mesh Bags of solid 
gold and solid sil- 
ver 

Military Brushes 



Miniatures 

Mirrors 

Mourning Jewelry 

Mustard Pots 

Natal Stones 

Necessaire Cases 

Necklaces 

Nursery Pins 

Nut Bowls 

New Silver and 
Enamel Jewelry 

Opera Glasses 

Our Special $12.00 
"Elgin" Wat civ 
for Men and 
Young Men 

Our Special $12.00 
"Elgin" Watch for 
Ladies 

Oyster-cocktail Cups 

Pearl Collars 

Pearl Necklaces 

Pencils 

Pendants 

Pepper and Salt Sets 

Pie Knives 

Pitchers in Sterling 
Silver and Shef- 
field 

Pin Cushions 

Pipes 

Platinum Bracelets, 

Playing Card Cases 

Pocket Books 

Porringers 

Preserve Dishes 

Punch Bowls 

Purses 

Ramekins 

Reading Glasses 

Relish Dishes 

Riding Crops 

Rings 

Roast Holders 

Rosaries 

Russian Silver 

Salad Bowls 

Salt Cellars 

Sandwich Plates 

Saratoga-chip Serv- 
ers 

Sardine Forks 

Sautoirs 

Scarabs 

Scarf Pins 

Scissors 

Seals 



Sheffield Plate More Popular Than Ever 

Our English designs in Shefifield plate are proving more popular than ever before. 

Sheffield Trays $5.00 to $50.00 
Service Dishe.s $7.50 to $25.00 
Tea and Coffee Sets $10 to $75 






We Have Watches for $r.50, $10, $15 up to $500 

This store will be open very late tonight— very early tomorrow morning and 
tomorrow night until all are waited on. 



I 



U 



MBim 



JEWELRY AND ART STORE 

332 West Superior St. 





n 



JEWELRY AND ART STORE 

332 West Superior St. 





tm 




w 



Monday^ 



THE bULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1012. 



3 BIG 





eOMiDi 



Tlic nuinunoth $75,000 bank- 
rupt >took i*f the Twill Ports 
Clothi; ;^' Co., and $25,000 cash 
purcl'..:>c of new winter wearing 
.luparel, made for the Twin 
Pon-^ Clothing Co., and bought 
by us at a ridiculously low 
fiijuro. and the trcmendou.s sale 
« f lioliviay goods, selected from 
t'.o country's best markets, all 
Ic tomorrow at Bank- 
c <. wliich means a sav- 
I One-Third to One- 
iiu I > !i ttic best to be had. 

$4.70, $9.86, 
$13.88, $17.86 

For Suits and Overcoats 

Worth From $10 to $30. 

\t the .ibove prices you will 

' ,',1! tlio pt^pular shades and 

- i'loluding the new Xor- 

f - and now Chinchilla 

()'.:«. ••.lis; sizes to fit every- 

b i(iy. whether large or small, 

■ or slim. 

MEN'S FUR-LINEO OVERCOATS 

$17.86, $24J6, 
$28.76, $49.86 

Regular Prices $30.00 to $75.00. 

BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S 
SUITS AND OVERCOATS 

$Z.3S, $3.53j 
$4.70, $6.35 

Regular Prices $5.00 to $13.50. 

A Few Christmas 






Specie's 



$1.00 Silk Mufflers 69c 

$3.00 Cluett Shirts $1.98 

$1.50 Flannel Shirts 98c 

$VfX^ Gordon Hats $1.98 

.V.I. Bath Robes $4,47 

Jv'^.fo Ladies' Sweater Coats $5.98 
$3 Men's Jersey Sw^eaters $1.89 
Si.cto Boys' Sweater Coats 98c 
$7.00 Smoking Jackets. .. .$4.69 

$2.00 Driving Gloves 98c 

$1.00 Dress Gloves 69c 

50c Wool Gloves 39c 

25c Hose 14c 

$j.oo Dress Shirts $1.48 

$2.00 Caps $1.29 

$1.00 Caps 69c 

I'resident Suspenders 35c 

IOC flandkerchiefs 5c 

35c Wool Cashmere Hose.. 19c 
$-'.50 Wool Union Suits. . .$1.39 
$1.50 two-piece Underwear 79c 

IOC Canvas Gloves 5c 

$8.^0 Men's Mackinaw Coats 

$598 

$3.50 Men's Fants $2.39 

$5.00 Dress Shoes $2.69 

$7-oo High Top Shoes $3.98 

$3-00 Shoes $1.69 

75c Underwear 390 

$7.00 Fur Caps $4.49 

$8.00 Hand Bags $4.69 

$5. IX) Suit Cases $3.48 

$3.50 Fur Lined Gloves. .. .$2.39 

$400 Union Suits $1.98 

75c Silk Hose 39c 

$-2.50 Pajamas $1.19 

$1.50 Night Shirts 70c 

75c Belts 390 

50c Xeckwear 19c 

75*^ Suspenders 37c 

$2.00 Flannel Shirts $1.29 

$-'.00 Adler Dress Gloves. .$1.29 

$3.00 Umbrellas $1.98 

75c Link Buttons 39c 

$1.50 Scarf Pins... 98c 

$i.(X) Tie Clasps 48c 

TIE AND HOSE SETS. 
Put Up in Single Boxes. 

Phoenix Silk Hose with tie 
to match: 

$1.50 values — now 79c 

$2.00 values — now $1.29 

HOSE. TIE AND HANDKER- 
CHIEF TO MATCH. 
Put up in Single Boxes. 
$1.50 values — now 98c 

SUSPENDER AND GARTER 

SETS. 

Put up in Single Boxes. 

$1.00 values — now 69c 

$1.50 values — now g8c 

SUSPENDERS. 

Put up in Fancy Christmas 
Boxes. 

50c values — now ^gc 

75c and $1.00 values — now.. 59c 

President Suspenders 35c 

LINEN AND SILK HAND- 

KERCHIEFS IN BOXES. 
3 in box, 50c values — now.. 29c 
3 in box, 75c values — now . . 59c 
3 in box, $1.00 values — now 69c 
3 in box, $1.50 values — now 98c 
NECKWEAR. 

In Fancy Christmas Boxes. 

35c Ties — now 19c 

50c Ties — now 29c 

75 c and $1.00 Tie s — now.. .. 45c 

\V*e etroiiKly urg'p our custo- 
mers to do their Christma.s shop- 
ping in the morning for their 
own convenience, as nearly 
double the time is required in 
th»' afternoon and evening, 
wlien the crowd of hnyers ren- 
dtr Khopping more- difficult 
!»ture Open KvenlnsM Be/p¥« 
C'briNtninM. 



I 

g 



ONE MORE DAY FOR SALE 

OF CHRISTMAS SEALS 



series of eritertalnments during the 
next few moilths. Committees will be 
, appointed to talie charge of fTiese af- 
fairs. 



Only one day remains for the sale of 
Red Cross Christmas seals. 

The proceeds do not pro towards 
Christmas dinners and toys — fortu- 
nately there will be plenty of these — 
but towards lending a helping hand 
to those who are struggling for health 
against withering, destructive disease. 
When the Christmas spirit 's lost in 
the rush of business cares, the Red 
Cross Christmas fund will be doing a 
work of which the value cannot be es- 
timated in dollars and cents. Here and 
there the pennies which are expended 
for the little red stamps will be de- 
voted in small sums to buy medicine 
for a .sick Uttle boy or girl; to supply 
milk and eggs and nourishment for a 
irail body; to relieve overburdened 
fatners and mothers; to further in 
scores of ways the work which is bein:? 
niade to stamp out the white plague in 
Duluth. 




THE RED CROSS SEAL. 



WEST DULUTH 

HRRALD BIIANCH OFPfCBSi 
A. Jensen. 330 Xorth B7th Ave. W. J. J. Moran. 310 >/, North Central Ave. 



(£'' 



NO REVISION 

OF DEPOT PLANS 

Commercial Club Will Ap- 
peal Again to State 
Commission. 

Tt was stated at the Northern Pa- 
cific office this morning that the 
present station plans at West Duluth 
would not be revised, as reported 
yesterday morning. 

Work on the new station is now go- 
ing on and there is no likelihood of 
any let up at the present time. A com- 
mittee of tht West Duluth Commercial 
club will report the matter to the state 
railroad commission. The commission 
has already pass-d on the plans and 
there is little likelihood of interfer- 
ence. 



WOMAN OVERCOME 
BY G AS FRO M STOVE 

Mrs. Jver Iverson Uncon- 
scious When Neighbor 
Discovers Condition. 

Escaping gas from a coal stove near- 
ly caused the death early this morning 
of Mrs. Iver Iverson of 313 North Fifty- 
ninth avenue west. 

Mr. Iverson, who is employed as a 
foreman at the steel plant, had made 
a fire in the cook stove before leav- 
ing for his work at 5:30 o'clock this 
morning. One of the stove doors had 
been left open by Mr. Iverson and as 
a result escaping gas soon filled the 
house. 

Mrs. 1j. Leno, who lives on the floor 
below the Iversons, smelled the gas 
about 6::J0 o'clock and immediately 
rushed upstairs to investigate. She 
found Mrs. Iverson in bed, overcome by 



SI P'T^S 

35c, 50c, 75c, $1.00, $1.25 
and $1.50. 

SKIS 

65c, 75c, 90c, $1.00, $1.25 
and $1.50. 

SKATES 

50c, 65c, 85c, $1.25, $1.50, 
$1.75 to $4.50. 

RIFLES 

50c, $1.00, $1.25, $1.50, 
$2.25, $3.00. 



We are headquar- 
ters for useful pres- 
ents. Save your money 
by shopping at 



Wleland & Wade 

329 Central Avenue. 



tile gas, the fumes having penetrated 
every room on the floor. She im- 
mediately notified neighbors and Dr S 
C. Grover of the Ramsted building. 

Mrs. Iverson was In a serious condi- 
tion when found by Dr. Grover. She 
is do'ng nicely now, however, and i.« 
expected to fecover within a fev/ 
days. 

teachersTeave 
for tkeir homes 



The teachers at the Duluth Indus- 
tral high school and the Irving school 
will spend their holiday vacation as 
follows: S. A. Foster, principal, Min- 
neapolis; Miss Bernice Foster, Minne- 
apolis; Miss Pearl M. Belting, Duluth: 
W. A. Xonnamaker, Illinois and Ohio; 
Miss Pearl C. Hansen, Duluth; Henrv 
J. Sullivan, E>uluth; Miss Agnes P. 
Walker, Minneapolis; Miss ' I.eola 
Markus, Duluth; Walter R. Mathews, 
KelFey, Minn.; Miss Esther A. Perusse. 
Minneapolis; Miss Irene Walker, Du- 
luth; Miss Cecelia Vaughn, Evota, 
Minn.: Miss Mary J. Burke, Albert 
I.ea, Minn.; S. L. Potts, Duluth; Miss 
Adele Abbott, Duluth; Miss Josephine 
McMahon, Sauk Rapids, Minn.; Miss 
Katherine Waddick, Duluth; Miss Jane 
Murray, Duluth; Miss Edna M. Jones, 
Duluth; Miss Vera Stevens, Duluth; 
Miss Belle Crawford, Cusson, Minn.: 
Miss May Crumpton, Superior; Miss 
Nellie Ryan, Duluth; Miss Mae Jack- 
son, Mansfield, Ohio; Miss Margaret 
Cunneen, Duluth; Miss Laura Laumann, 
St. Peter, Minn.; Mrs. Helen Besnah, 
Duluth, and Miss Estjer Myhrberg. 
Duluth. 

MRS. A XFORD DIES. 

West Duluth Woman Passes Away 
After Long Illness. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Ann Axford, 69 years 
old, wife of Samuel Axford, 626 North 
Fifty-sixth avenue west, died yester- 
day morning after an illness of sev- 
eral weeks. The deceased had been a 
' resident of West Duluth for over twen- 
ty years and was well known through- 
out this end of the city. She is sur- 
vived by her husband, two sons, Will- 
iam of Duluth and Ernest of St. Paul; 
a sister, Mrs. William Blamey of West 
Duluth, and a brother, Richard Blight 
of Hibbing. 

Tiie funeral will be held at l:f?0 
o'clock tomorrow afternoon from the 
residence and at 2 o'clock from the 
Asbury M. E. church. Sixtieth avenue 
v.'est and Raleigh street. Rev. W. H. 
Farrell will officiate and interment 
will be at Oneota cemetery. 

W. C. T. U. "Meeting. 

The West Duluth branch of the 
Women's Christian Temperance union 
will hold its first meeting of the new- 
year on Jan. 2, at the home of Mrs. 
G. D. Shoup, 122 North Fifty-third ave- 
nue west. Mrs. M. E. Allen will be 
leader during the afternoon, the sub- 
ject being "What Has Made Labor 
Laws Necessary?" Mrs. Shoup will be 
assisted by Mesdaraea T. B. Jones and 
M. E. Allen. 



Erickson-Manaugh. 

Miss Stella Erickson and Oscar H. 
Manaugh were married Saturday eve- 
ning at the home of the brides par- 
ents, Mr. and Mrs. Otto Erickson. G 
North Thirty-ninth avenue west. Rev. 
W. H. Farrell of the Asbury M. E. 
church read the service, after which a 
wedding supper was served. Mr. and 
Mrs. Manaugh left late Saturday eve- 
ning for a two weeks' wedding trip in 
the Twin Cities and Chicago, after 
which they will make their home In 
Bemidji. 

Surprised by Friends. 

Mrs. Charles Rakowsky of Fond du 
Lac was pleasantly surprised by a fev/ 
of her friends Saturday afternoon. 
Those present were: Mesdames C. A. 
Krause, C. A. Runqulst, Cameron Hew- 
itt, D. Clow, Mrs. Gray of Duluth an<l 
Misses Maud Lane, Clara Johnson and 
Erna and Sylvia Rakowsky. 
^ 

Boys' Cabinet. 

The boys' cabinet of the We.^^t Du- 
luth Boys' and Girls' club, 208 Central 
avenue, will hold a special business 
meeting this evening in the club rooms. 
Plans for the coming year will be dis- 
cussed and arrangements made for a 




HNSON & JERMSTAD 



501 NORTH FIFTY-EIGHTH AVENUE WEST. 
Calumet 88— 'PHONES— New, Cole 83. 



We have, in preparation for your Christmas dinner, laid in a supply 
of good things with which to help you make this occasion a merry one. 



OFFEBSiaS ¥m 




M. Cook and .«. E. GiUlenon, Pur- 
cliaNcr;* of tbe Ilankrufit Stovk. 

TWIN PORTS 
CLOTHING Co. 

405 and 407 Went Supertor St., 
Dnlath, Minn. 



I 

I 



GROCERY DEPT. 

Oranges at 25c dozen and up. 
Grape Fruit. 
Mixed Nuts. 
Christmas Candies. 
Malaga Grapes. 
Dates. 
Ptgs. 

Fresh supply of Green Vege- 
tables. 

Green Onions. 
Shallots. Celery. 

Parsley. Lettuce. 



MEAT DEPT. 

Turkeys — Direct from the 
country; choice, selected 
birds; fresh killed, lb 22c 

Geese, lb 18c 

Chickens, lb 15c and 17c 

Whole Small Pork Loins, Ib.l2i4c 
Choice Rib Roast of Beef, lb... 15c 

Pork Chops, lb 14c 

Pot Roast, lb 10c and 1254c 

Oysters, qt 55c 

Home-made Mince Meat, lb.... 15c 



Large stock of Holly Wreaths and decorations for your Christmas Tree. 
STORE OPEN LATE TONIGHT AND TOMORROW NIGHT. 



Inspect Highway. 



The followln^j party, including f.ev- 
rral state officials, was at Fond du 
Lac Saturday Insi^'-eting the proposed 
Duluth-Twin Cftjes automobile high- 
way: Dr. J. A. MoCuen, mayor of l>u- 
luth; Charles KauppI, county commis- 
sioner-elect; y, K. Coe, road engineer; 
Dr. J. D. Park, president of the auto 
club; H. J. Mullen, secretary of the 
auto club; A. Jr. Meldahl of the board 
of public works; John Wilson, city on- 
glneLM-; Jahn Tlscher, county comriiis- 
sioner; W. *t. Acton, assistant high- 
way engineer of St. Paul; J. H. Mullin, 
«leputy state engineer of St. Paul. 

Smith Funeral. 

The funeral of William B. Smith, 
SI years old. Civil war veteran, who 
died early Saturday morning at the 
home of his grandson, William C. 
Smith, 6105 Highland street, was held 
at 2 o'clock this afternoon from the 
Fillatrault funeral parlors. Interment 
was at Soldiers' Rest in Forest Hill 
cemetery. Willis A. Gorman post, G. 
A. H., and the Sons of Veterans had 
charge of the funeral. 



Spellman Funeral. 

The funeral of Thomas L. Spellman 
of Proctor, who died Saturday evening 
at the St. Mary's hospital of Superior, 
was held at S:30 o'clock this morning 
from the home of his brother, Patrick 
Spellman, 218 East Third street, and at 
9 o'clock from the cathedral. Inter- 
ment was at Calvary. 

Temporary Pastor. 

Johannes Nystrom, a divinity stu- 
dent from the Augustana Theological 
college at Hock Island, 111., arrive«l in 
the city this morning to take charge 
of the Bethel Swedish Lutheran 
church. Fifty-third avenue west and 
Wadena street, during the holidays. 
He will conduct a .lulotta service at 
5:30 o'clock W'ednesday morning. 
• 

Returns From West. 

Rev. Gideon Nylander, former pas- 
tor of the Third SwedishBaptlst church 
Fifty-ninth avenue west and Ramsey 
street, returned hom this morning 
fro:n Reglna. Sask., where he has 
been in charge of a mission for the 
past two months. Rev. Mr. Nylander will 
occupy the pulpit of his former church 
at ihe early Christmas service 
Wednesday morning. 



Annual Election. 

"White Clover camp of New Duluth, 
No. 1844, Royal Neighbors, held Its 
annual election of officers Saturday 
evening. The officers named are: 
Mrs. Johanna Brand, past oracle; Mrs. 
Myra Thayer, oracle; Mrs. Helena 
Crager. vice oracle; Mrs. Alta Wills, 
chancellor; Mrs. Annie Bartz, record- 
er; Mrs. Mary Youngberg, receiver; 
Mrs. Hilda Olson, marshal; Mrs. M. 
Viergutz, inner sentinel; Mrs. M. Mc- 
Eachin, outer sentinel; Mrs. Rosie 
Rutter and Mrs. Alvina Riendl, mana- 
gers and Dr. C. R. Keyes and Dr. C. 
J. Wallace, examining physicians. 

Maccabees Elect. 

Golden Rod hive of New Duluth. No. 
43. Ladies of the Maccabees, held its 
annual election of officers Saturday 
evening at the Maccabee hall. The of- 
ficers elected are: Mrs. Knudsen, com- 
mander; Mrs. Tryphena E. Bowles, 
lieutenant commander; Mrs. Nellie Mc- 
Kay, record keeper; Mrs. Matilda 
Krueger, finance auditor; Miss Lillian 
Krueger, chaplain; Mrs. Hannah Gus- 
tofson, sergeant-at-arms; Mrs. H. Ja- 
cobson, lady-at-arms; Mrs. Catherine 
Millen, sentinel; Mrs. Barbara Berger, 
lady picket; Miss Mary Fischer, offic- 
ial prompter, and Mrs. Edith Berger, 
pianist. 



SUSPENDS WORK 

FOR THE WINTER. 

The Pennsylvania Engineering com- 
pany, which is in charge of the con- 
struction of the coke stoves at the steel 
plant, has shut down for the winter. 

About 100 of the employes of the 
company have left for their hom^s and 
will return again early next spring. 
Many of the men will work on other 
jobs for the company in various parts 
of the country. According to the pres- 
ent plans, operations will be renewed 
next March. 



Curliiig Games. 



Four games will be played this eve- 
ning in the first round of the Union 
Match company's event at the Western 
Curling club. Mallory and Holland 
will play on lee No. 1, Wleland and 
Zauft on ice No. 2, Sullivan against 
Judson on ice No. 3 and Keyes and 
litis on ice No. 4. The winners this 
evening will play in the semi-finals 
Christmas afternoon and in the finals 
Wednesday evening. 



Infant Girl Dies. 

Dorothj', the 1-month-old daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis Haley, 9 South 
Sixty-first avenue west, died late last 
evening. The funeral will be held at 
10 o'clock tomorrow morning from the 
St. James Catholic church. Fifty-sev- 
enth avenue west and Kinnear place. 
Rev. D. W. Lynch will officiate and in- 
terment will be at Calvary. 



Surprise Party. 



Mr. and Mrs. Peter Ocklind of 626 
North Sixtieth avenue west were sur- 
prised by the entertainment committee 
of the Good Templar lodge at their 
home last Saturday evening. Mrs. Ock- 
lind was presented with a combination 
gas and electric percolator as a gift 
of the members of the local lodge. 



West Duluth Briefs. 

Mrs. Albert Humble of Crosby, Minn., 
is a guest for a few days at the home 
of Rev. and Mrs. W. H, Farrell. 6009 
Raleigh street. 

Don't forget the frozen plum pud- 
ding at Murray Bros. 

John Simpson, who has been at- 
tending Minnesota university. Is spend- 
ing the holidays with his parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Simpson of Forty-seventh 
avenue west. 

Bargains for your Christmas dinner; 
cranberry slierbet. Murray Bros., 
422 Central avenue. 

The Gopher club of New Duluth gave 



ISLE OF PINES 
GRAPE FRUIT 

About Jan. 20 I will receive direct 
from the Lsle of Pines, a shipment of 
grape fruit. This fruit will be es- 
pecially picked and packed for nie, 
and will be the finest fruit ever 
grown. I want the people of Duluth 
to know what good grape fruit is. 
Boxes will contain 38, 42, 54, 64 apd 
80 fruit each, and will cost $6 per 
box, with 15 cents added for delivery 
at your home. 1 do not make a cent 
on this shipment. Am giving you 
the fruit at actual cost laid down In 
Duluth. I want you to know what 
good grape fruit is and where It was 
raised. I do this to advertise the 
Isle of Pines. 

Send me an order for a box, with 
your check for $6.15. Indicate size 
you want, f'rlce per box the same. 
It will keep from four to six weeks 
in a cool place. Only 100 boxes will 
be received. Checks will be re- 
turned after 100 boxes are sold. 
First come, first served. Rememler 
boxes are all the same size. Th^ 
size of the fruit varies, the largost 
being 38 to the )>ox and the smafiost 
80 to the box, 

H. L. SHEPHERD 

113 BTanhAttaH Bulldins. 



Special Christmas Sale ! 

For the remaining shopping deiys before Christmas "we will make extra in- 
ducements. We'd rather sell now at a sacrifice — at cost — below cost — than take 
a chance later on. 

EVERYTHING IN THE STORE GOES! 

Here are a few samples of how you can save by coming up the avenue: 



Pennants 

18x48 Minnesota and Duluth Pen- 
nants; regularly $1.50, now 75c. 

Minnesota, Duluth, K. .of C, Elks, 
Eagles and other lodge pennants and 
pillows at Half Price. 

Skis 

5-foot Skis, regularly $1.25, for 75c 

6-foot Skis, regularly $1.75, for $1.00 

8-foot Skis, regularly $2.50, for $1.50 



Skates 



Big line of Skates, Hockey, Rockers, 
etc. 

Ladies' Hockey Skates, regularly 
$3.50, for $2.25. 

Men's Laminated Hockey, regularly 
$4.00, for $3.00. 

Ladies' Lock Lever Nickel Plated 
Skates, regularly $2.00, for $1.15. 

Clamp Hockeys at $1.00 and up. 

Roller Skates at 50c and $1.00. 



Sleds for tine Boys and Girls 




All Sleds Half 



We have a large stock of all 
different models to choose from. 
Something here that will surely 
please that boy or girl and you 
can buy it here at a small part of 
what you pay elsewhere. 

Coasters, Children's Sleds, 
Sleighs and Flexible Fliers. 



GEIMUIIME 

Cut 
Glass 

The finest Cut Glass 
made in this country. 
Heavy glass, deeply cut, 
highly polished. 

9-inch Jelly Dish, worth 
$8.50, for— 

$4.50 

8-inch Berry Bowls, worth $4, for $2.25 
Bon Bon Dish, worth $2.50, for. . .$1.50 

Cream and Sugar Sets, worth $4,. .$2.25 ' 12-inch Cut Glass Vase, worth $7. .$4.00 
Tumblers, Olive Dishes, Plates, Trays, Small pieces of All Kinds. 




12-in. Cut Glass Trav, worth $11. .$5.50 
12-in. Water Pitchers, worth $7. . .$4.00 



jmrnsL 





Carving Sets 

Made of best Sheffield steel, 
highly tempered and with stag, 
silver or ebony handles. 

Three-piece Stag Sets, worth 
$4.50, for— 



$2.50 



Two-niece Stag Sets, worth 
$2.70," :for— 



$1.S0 



Others up to $10 and $12 at 
same reductions. 



Aluminum 
Ware 



Full line of W 
aluminum ware; fin 
No. 9 Aluminum 
Cast Frying Pan . . 

2-qt. Coffee Pot, 
octagonal 

3-qt. Coffee Pot, 
octagonal 

4-qt Coffee Pot, 
octagonal 

4 - qt. Aluminum 
Preserving Kettle . . 

6 - qt. Aluminum 
Preserving Kettle . . 



ir Rifles 



Lever Action, 1,000-shot Repeater 
Air Rifles — Just what that boy 
wants for Christmas. Sell for $2 
everywhere. Our price ^^ CA 
now, only 9 A«tf " 

500-shot Air Rifle, same as 
above, $1.25. 

350-shot Air Rifle, same as 
above, $1.00. 

Single Shot Lever Action Air 
Rifles— 45c, 65c and 75c 



ware 

We handle 
only the highest 
grades of 
granitewa'e that 
will not chip off; 
white, blue or 
gray fini'ih. No 
seconds or im- 
perfect pi»?ces. 



agner cast 
est made. 

$1.50 
$2.00 
$2.25 
$2.50 
$1.75 
$2.00 

Silverware ! Stoves 



We have a full line of 
silverware and it all goes 
into this sale. 

Fruit Knives— 12 dwt. 
silver, $1.25. 

Knives and Forks — 

Guaranteed 12 dwt. silver, 
per set of six, $2.50. 

Nut Picks and Cracker 
—Per set, 50c. 



Favorite — Hard 
coal burner with 15- 
inch firepot; lots of 

bright nickel; large 
feeder, hence uses 
little fuel. Price cut 
to $50.00. 

Same as above 
with 16-inch fire- 
pot, $55,00. 



DULUTH HARDWARE CO. 



19 SECOND AVENUE WEST 



a dancing party Saturday evening at 
the Kulascewicz hall. 

O. U. no-excelled frozen pudding for 
Christmas dinner. Murray Bros. 

Thomas Jackson of Carlton is spend- 
ing the week with relatives at Fond 

du Lac. ..... X 

Holiday overcoat bargains. Twenty- 
flve per cent discount on all men's and 
boys overcoats. Some fine boys' over- 
coats at half price. The Great Eastern. 

Rev. and Mrs. E. F. Stidd of Ely, 
Minn., arrived in the city this morn- 
lug to spend Christmas with Rev. and 
Mrs. C. W. Emery, 4602 Oneota street. 

Miss I.ouana Phelps, who is teaching 
school at Ely, Minn., returned home 
yesterday to spend the holidays with 
her parents, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Phelps, 
5617 Highland street. 

Wanted — Girl to assist with general 
housework. Apply 428 North Fifty- 
eighth avenue west. 

J. T. Morgan returned yesterday 
from Eveleth to spend Christmas with 
his family at 4601 Rene street. 

J. F. Lee of 618 Nortli Fifty-eighth 
avenue west returned yesterday from 
Ladyemith. WJ?., to spend Christmas 
V ith ills family. , ^ „ 

Band at Western Curling club Tues- 
day and Friday. Gentlemen, 25c; la- 
dies, 15c. 

Rev. B. L. Opdahl of the Bethany 
Norwegian IvUtiieran church will con- 
duct Christmas services Wednesday 
evening at Iron River, Wis. 

Modern houses and cottages for rent. 
W. B. Getchell. 319 Central avenue. 

The famous Gold Bond boys* watches, 
regular price $1.50, special price 95 
cents; all warranted. Hurst. Jeweler, 
301 Central. , ^ ^ ^ 

Wouldn't she appreciate a hand- 
painted plate or dish for the dining 
room? We have them from 50 cents 
9il5 tip. Hurst, the West Duluth jew- 

Beautiful holiday gifts. Fur caps, 
gloves, umbrellas, eusrenders, mufflers 
and neckwear. Daintily boxed; at 
popular prices. The <^reat Eastern. 
Watch repairing. Hurst. W. Duluth. Adv 

» 

ESxpreHMed Everywhere, 
Victor Huot's home-made candles. 



For Quick Results Use Herald *1Vanls' 



IS'T^^rf^^!^^^?!?? 



VERY SPECIAL! 

Table Percolattng Machin es 
and Clialing Dishes — 

MX high-grade articles to close out at half the regular prices. 




Universal [ 
Percolator 

capacity, 
ize, reg- 

$4.00 



4 - cup capacity, 

regularly 

$7.00.. 

6 - cup size, reg- 
ular $8.00 ^ ^ 
special. . . 

9-cup size, reg- 
ular $9.00^ J ra 
special. . .v ■•v" 




CHAFING 
DISHES 

in copper and nickel 
plate; all half the 
regular price — 

$12.00 Dishes at $ 6.00 

$ 7.50 Dishes at $ 3.75 

$ 8.50 Dishes at $4.25 

$18.00 Dishes at $ 9 .00 

$25.00 Dishes at $12.50 



QUAYLE-LARSEN CO. 

14 and 16 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



V 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 



n 



CASE OF PAUL GOLIK 
STIRS DULUTH'S BAR 



Injured Working Man Got 

Nothing From a $1,1 00 

Verdict. 



Attorney De La Motte Gives 

His Side of Now 

Famous Case. 



^^^^ "^ T> ^ ^ '^^n /f\ ^j\ /yv ^7* ^f\ v^i "^ ^ ^^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ -^ 'n " 'P 

^ >^ 

^ PVIL GOLIIv'S SACHIFICE. * 

'lit "Tbr .sarrlfle«- of I*iiul r;oIlk ^ 
•^ Titli iirobabljr be for the heueflt ^ 
■M' t*t all Morkinumen of >llnue<«ota. ^ 
')!(' lie l.H n iiinrtyr to the eauMe and -M- 
Uli he «%ai poiM Into hiMtury like H/i 
Sh> oiher men who have been Maori- -Jtt 
■H^ tired to other Kooil cRUMeN. ■sjf 

* "The (•olik <^,He will sttirely ^ 
')i^ ehullenKe attentiou to the absto- ^ 
41^ lute Idioey of our preMent uieth- >)( 
^ odft of bandliuK elaltUM for per- -^ 
^ Munal injury and MtandM out In ^ 

* bold relief an the best poMMlble * 
•* ariTument for a thorouKhKoing ^ 

* ^\ork:nKnieu'M eompensation law. )Jf 

* "i hope The liernld will nee * 
•)l^ that the full tmvtH in tblst oane ^ 

* reneh every member of the Mln- •:^ 

* iieMotn leelnlature. no that the ab- -jj? 

* surd length to whieh the bleed- ■*■ 
jje Injf of a per.HonaI injury elaimant ^ 
^ has Koue may ^ruune leei^IatorM ■* 

* to the neeeMMlty of preveutine -^ 
■* muy Hiit'h Ikleediun; e%er happeniuj; -^ 

* In any other ease.'* ^ 

* "A. O. MeK.MtillT." * 



* * 



ThrotJiriioiit the history of personal 
Injurv liti^atiuu with its long delays, 
"^' ind wastefulness, no 

^^'^^ -I ingraged the attention 

of the local courts has so clearly 
dfiiviistrated the crying need for a 
workiiif;men's compensation act as has 
ti;e ciis.- of Paul Golik, which is creat- 
ing- a nuld sensatioa in Duluth legal 
circles. 

l^aul Holik, a foreigner, unable to 
read, write either English or his own 
language, three years ago got a $1,100 
verdict in a personal injurv suit as 
daniases for injuries which "have left 
him a liie-long cripple. Through a con- 
tract which he sisned with his at- 
torn, y, J. r.f. La Motte, of this cltv. 
%vhi.;h provided that all expenses of 
the lawsuit should be charged to his 



mm 



v- vv:--- • 



•f; V f . 








— Plioto by McKenzle. 

PAUL GOLIK. 

half of tlie verdict, instead of the at- 
torney's, Golik was placed in a position 
so that he never recovered a cent from 
the judgment which was entered in 
his favor last July. 

The case was fought to the supreme 



Remember When 
You Were a Kid ? 

Didn't every new pair of shoes just tickle you to pieces— couldn't 
wait to get them on, could you? 

Let us pugcrcst a pair of SORENSEN 
SHOES— especially skating shoes, as an 
i ioal Christmas gift for a boy — 

$ 



2,25 ^2.50 

an-" ^3.00 




And don't forget the girl! Nothing could please a girl more 
than a pair of pretty dress shoes or party slippers. Sorensen 
prices $2.50, $3.00 and $3.50— quality guaranteed. 

We haye an unusually large assortment of attractiye footwear, 
just in, from the dalntie-'^t colored satin party slipper.s and bedroom 
s!i:>pers to the high-cut, black or tan calf button boots. 

Our enormous stock includes the latest styles in Chanipaene Kid, 
Hed Kid, tJray, Brown and Blark Suede, Satin and Cravenette Shoes 
for ladies. 

See Our AVlndowM, '-Where the Birds FIy.*» 




V»ENS£N 



Wholesaler and Retailer 
317 WEST SUPEDIOR STREET. 



Note — This store will close promptly 

at 9 o'clock on Cliristma.« Kve. We will 

gladly exchange goods before or after 
Christmas. 






A FewReal Good Christmas Suggestions 

FOR MOTHER OR FATHER 

Electric Lamps $3.00 to $28.50 

Comfortable Rocker or Arm Chair $6.50 to $50.00 

Pictures 15c to $25.00 

Carving Sets 98c to $5.00 

Dinner Sets $3.85 to $65.00 

House Desks $5.00 to $50.00 

Silver Knives and Forks, per set $1.30 to $15.00 

ODD CHINA ONE-HALF PRICE— 500 PIECES. 

And Hundreds of Other Cseful Articles. 

SEE OUR ADS IN OTHER TART OF PAPER. 

SOLID MAHOGANY PIECES 




Make a Splendid Chlrstmas Gift. 

Our No. 888 Solid Mahogany aiorris Chairs, 
regular $27.50; sale jklfi 75 

Our No. 3110 Overstuffed Wing Rocker, 
regular $26.50; sale %\t% flA 

Our No. 938 Arm Chair, reg'u- CIO /SA 

lar $19.50; sale price ^l.A.OU 

Our No. 929 Sleepy Hollow Chair. 

prfc^e.^.'. .*.^.';^?'. .^.^.^^^ $24.50 

Our No. 311 High Back Chair, reg- 

^H^e .*'.':'':.'*'.' $42.50 

Our No. 109 George Washintjton 
Sofa, regular $90; saie ftfiTO f^tk 

price ^9A»W3 

Our No. 206 George Washington 
Chair, regular $60; sale SSS 00 

And a great many more. 

Some splendid Mahogany Library 
and Parlor Tables at special sale 
prices. 



Yonr 

Credit la 

Go«d. 



3S.IlSJcru;anl^ 



Complete 

MoiiMe 
FuriUKhera. 



202 and 204 EAST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 



court twice. Do La Motte winning both 
times. Tile verdict for $1,100. which 
was returned bv a .lury 'n February, 
1!»10, togttiu-r with interest at that 
time, amounted to $1.2r>3.3i». De La 
Motte, it is claimed, took half by vir- 
tue of his contract. Witness fees fof 
expert medical testimony and other 
legal charges ate up the re.st of tlie 
judgment. Golik was left without a 
.suiKle cent and is today dependent on 
charity and a charge of the Associated 
Charities. 

Attorney Summoned. 
In district court .Saturday afternoon 
Attornev De La Motte appeared before 
Judge I>lbell on an order to show 
cause why he should not make a resti- 
tution of certain money claimed to 
owing to Golik or be punished for con- 
tempt of court. The story of the case 
was largely unfolded at this proceed- 
ing. Mr. De La Motte appeared In his 
own defense and G. W. C. Ross of Uoss 
& McKnight, attorneys, represented 
the Associated Charities which is look- 
ing after the interests of Golik. At 2 
o'clock this afternoon the case came on 
before the court for final ai-guments. 

Golik was injured on July 29, 1909, 
while in the employ of Erickson & 
Long, stripping contractors, on the Me- 
saba range. He came to Duluth with 
his case. His story of the case is that 
he came to Duluth to engage an attor- 
ney, first visiting the office of County 
Attorney Jolin H. Norton. He gave Mr. 
Norton a statement of his case but did 
not engage him at the time. 

Wniiie in Duluth Golik stopped at an 
Aurstrian boarding house. He claims 
that while there he was visited by one 
Ljuobo Bogicevich, who at that time 
was associated wltli Attorney De La 
Motte as a solicitor. Bogicevich, he 
claims, persuaded him not to give his 
case to the county attorney but rather 
take it to what he was pleased to term 
'the best lawyer in town." Bogicevich 
talked Golik s language, and with little 
per.suasion he was led to the office of 
Mr. De La Motte. 

Contract .Sisned. 
A contract was .signed in this office 
by Golik on liis visit. 

Golik claims that he told De La 
Motte through Bogicevich as an Inter- 
preter, that he would pay him 10 per 
cent for his services and denied in 
court Saturday afternoon that he had 
any other understanding of the situ- 
ation. He testified that nothing was 
-«aid at that time about paying ex- 
penses. 

Mr. De La Motte's statement regard- 
ing the contract follows: 

■ Prior to the making of the contract 
for 5"J per cent (which is the contract 
lliat was introduced in the evidence on 
this hearing, on Dec. I'l) Golick came 
into my office several times. The first 
time he wanted to have a contract 
made for 10 per cent and I then told 
him I would have nothing to do with 
it. He went out and, I suppo.se, inter- 
viewed some other lawyer v.ho told 
him tliat the usual charge was 50 per 
cent Then he carne Ixack to my office 
again and seemed to be willing to 
sign the contract. The contract was 
lead over to him by Mr. Bogicevich in 
ilip Austrian language and he was 
asked if he understood it and he said 
he did. 

"Mr. Golik talks some Englisli and 
understands about everything you sav 
to him in ordinary language. I then 
said to him 'Now Paul, do you under- 
stand that this contract means that 
you are to get one-half and I am to 
get one-half." and he said that he un- 
derstood it, and I then said 'all right' 
and the contract was signed and he 
made his mark upon the contract. 
There never was any agreement upoji 
my part to take the case for 10 per 
cent although there was an attempt on 
his part to get me to take it, which 
I refused to do." 

Bogicevichs testimony was to the 
effect that the final agreement was 
that Golik should get one-half of the 
net damages; the case to be main- 
tained entirely out of the other half. 
The money collected on the judgment 
which was finally enterea in district 
court in Golik's favor against the 
Erickson & Long company kas as fol- 
lows: 

Total collected on final 
$1,357.28. 
Costs taxed in judgment.. 

Total additional costs 

Tran.<cript of testimony.... 
Expert witness fees (,!).... 



execution 
...$ 



94. 

19 

17. 

95. 



Total 

Net recovery . 
Four doctors 



testified and 



.. .$226.30 
. .$1,130.98 
were en- 



titled to $25 each as expert w'itnes.=!es. 
The testimony Saturday showed that 
Bokiccvich who had quit the employ 
of De La Motte had taken the doctors 
claims for witnesses and raised the 
bills to $75 each and through his part- 
ner B. M. Golberg had sued Golik for 
each amount. Recovery was had out 
of the Golik judgment for $1,357.28. 

The judgments with costs against 
Golik then stood: 

Dr. Cheney $104.38 

Dr. Walker 104.38 

Dr. Stewart $104.38 

Dr. Deslauriers 151.06 



Total for doctors $464.20 

Tlie Dr. Deslauriers bill also Includ- 
ed, besides the $25 witness fee, a 
charge of $100 for attending Golik 
during the pendency of the case. 

The testimony Saturday to the effect 
that when judgments were recovered 
against Golik in the first three named 
cases, Attornej- Goldberg returned to 
each of the doctors $25. 

Golik got absolutely nothing from 
the case and is indebted to the Bethel 
and St. Mary's hospital at the present 
time. 

He has a wife and child In Croatia, 
Hungary. He is 38 years old and has 
been in this country six years. 
De La Hotte'ti Statement. 

"I was retained by Paul Golik. I 
staited his action under a written con- 
tract wliich was introdu(^ed in evidence 
the other day in court. I prosecuted 
that suit under that contract and re- 
covered a verdict for $1,100, and was 
dissatisfied with the verdict and made 
a motion for a new trial. Mr. Hollister 
made a motion for judgment, notwith- 
standing the verdict. During tho 
pendency of that motion, Golik, angry 
at the long delay and not understand- 
ing that It was unavoidable, came Into 
the office and told me I could drop the 
case, and that he would get another 
lawyer. I immediatelv withdrew my 
motion for a new trial, as I did not 
care to lose my lien on the case for 
the amount of my fees. 

"This case was appealed to the su- 
preme court twice and I was succes.«ful 
on both appeals. Remanded back here 
and the judgment would have been col- 
lected, but in the meantime, for the 
purpose of getting .square with me, for 
some fancied grievance, Ljubo Bogici- 
vich went to the three doctors who tes- 
tified in the case, representing that he 
was able to collect their bills from 
Golik, and told them he would charge 
them nothing for the collection. The 
doctors had filed their bills with mo 
for the services they rendered, amount- 
ing to $25 each. The claims were turned 
over to Benjamin M. Goldberg for suit, 
and instead of suing for $25, which was 
the amount of the bills as rendered to 
me, commenced suit for $75 in each 
case. That the action on the part of 
Mr. Bogicivich in procuring the cr.ses 
from the doctors was purely spite 
work, as borne out by the fact 
the doctors so stated under oath 
Mr. Bogicivich had so stated to 
at the time he got the claims, 
other doctor, whose claim was 
placed in judgment, performed an oper 
ation on Golik at St. Mary's hospital, 
for which his charges were $125. St. 
Mary's hospitals' charges for the care 
of Golik was over $41. 

"In the case of Kmil Otllich again.st 
Paul Golik, he came to me and re- 
quested fne to try the case for him. I 
appeared therein and asked permission 
of the court to file an answer In the 
case, which the court denied. I then 
appealed to the district court and pro- 
cured a reversal of the order. After 
coming back to the municipal court for 
the trial of that case. Mr. Golik again 
Informed me that he was gol.ig to get 
another lawyer, so I notified the court 
of my withdrawal from the case, re- 
questing the court, however, to protect 
Mr. Golik by giving him actual p-^r- 
sonal notice of such fact, so that he 
could procure some other attorney. I 
understand he did not do that and 
judgment was taken by default. 
Knew NotliInK of Doetorft' CaMeit. 

"In none of the cases brought by the 
doctors was I notified of the fact of 
the bringing of such ca.<<e against him 
and knew nothing of the amount of 



the claim sued upon until the setth?- 
nitnt of tiie action by, the sheriff of 
Carlton county in (Mf. Marshall's oi- 
tice on July 25. 

"I had procured several orders in 
supplementary proceedings agalmU 
the defendants, Eriefc»»«yn & Long, and 
on one pretext or another Mr. Hollister, 
who was representing the insurance 
company which inHured Erickson K- 
Long, got the matter continued. It fi- 
nally became necessary to file a tran- 
•scrlpt of the case In Carlton county 
and Issue an execution out of that 
court to the sheriff of that county, di- 
recting him to levy upon the property 
of Erickson & I..ong, who live at ov 
near Cloquet. After this was dont*. 
Alexander Marshall, who succeeded Mr. 
Hollister as attorney for the insurance 
company, notified me that they were 
goirg to pay the claim and to have 
the sheriff come down. The sheriff 
came to Duluth on July 25, and at some 
time during that day Mr. Marshall 
called me up over the telephone, tell- 
ing me that the sheriff of Carlton 
county was in his office and that he 
would pay the money over to him in 
the Golik matter, requesting ine to 
come over. I asked that he and the 
sheriff come over to my office, but i.c 
said that there were five or six gen- 
tlemen waiting for me there and to 
«,-ome over tliere. 

"I went to Mr. Marshall's pfflce and 
found the sheriff of Carlton county, 
Mr. MoKinnon; Mr. McGee, deputy sher- 
iff of St. Louis county; Mr. Goldberg, 
Mr. Myers, and Mr. Courtney in Mr. 
Marshall's private office. I went in 
and Mr. Marshall asked me how much 
the claim with interest and costs 
amounted to and 1 then informed him 
what my figures were, and after jfome 
comparisons of different amounts back 
and forth, the amount was finally de- 
cided upon. Mr. Marshall then paid 
the money over to the sheriff of Carl- 
ton county in cash and he turned the 
sg.me over to me. Thereupon Mr. Mc- 
Gee, deputy sheriff of St. Louis county, 
stepped forward with a number of ex- 
ecutions and served them upon me at 
that time, levying upon the money in 
my possession on the table. I objected 
to paying the money at that time and 
said the matter oughi to go into court 
and be passed upon by the court as no 
the amounts that should be paid thero- 
from. The executions \rere fair upon 
their faces and there was nothing I 
could do under the circumstances uut 
pay the money over to the sheriff, 
which I did, under protest. 
Tfeie I)octort«* BlllM. 

"Mr. Goldberg represented the three 
doctors whose bills were sent to me as 
being $25 each and after the matters 
had been settled I told Mr. Goldberg 1 
did not understand how the amounts 
could be so large as I had bills from 
each of the doctors for their services 
in the -sum of $25. Subsequent to that 
time I received a telephone communi- 
cation from Mr. GoMberg asking inc 
if I had the bills of the doctors in my 
possession and asking if I would let 
him have them for a short time. I did 
not know what he wanted tlie bills 
for at that time and allowed him to 
take the bills from the office. 

"After the payment of this money 
over to the sheriff upon these execu- 
tions, which amounted to $577.90. Mr. 
Courtney served fa. garnishee summons 
upon me In a suit agaiAst Paul Golik 
for St. Mary's hospital (where Golik 
had gone for a further operation upon 
his leg). At that time, as I figure it 
out, I had $43.50 belonging to Golik 
and that would scarcely be enough to 
p«ay St. Marys hospital and the costs 
of suit. * 

"Subsequent to the payment of that 
money to the sheriff Mr. Goldberg and 
I were before Judge Cant arguing 
some other motion and I spoke to 
Judge Cant at that time of the situ- 
ation, telling him what the situation 
was and wanted to know if there was 
not some way in which this matter 
might be adjusted in the court, re- 
lieving me of any further responsi- 
bility in the matter. There was some 
conversation between Judge Cant. Mr. 
Goldberg and myself at that time, but 
it did not result in anything being 
done. 

"Subsequent to this time Mr. Ross 
came to my office, saying he repre- 
sented the Associated Charities and 
requested to {je in^-hied as to the 
situation in the Golik matter and I 
gave him all the information I had 
and also the docto'r's bills, which ho 
asked for. I saw Mr. Dinwiddle of 
the Associ-ated Charities after Mr. 
Ross had called upon me and ex- 
plained matters to him and told him I 
would be glad to do anything in my 
power to show them just what the 
situation was with reference to Mr 
Golik. 

*I have at all times been anxiou.'^ 
to have this matter disposed of in 
.some way so that I could be relieved 
from any further responsibility in the 
case, but I did not imagine that a pro- 
ceeding of the kind that was brought 
here would be taken. In which all of 
the actors In the proceeding except- 
ing myself were left out. It seems 
to me that if anything of this sort 
was done that all the parties who 
were present in Mr. Marshall's office 
and who had anything to do with se- 
curing Mr. Golik's money from me, 
should have been brought in, and a 
complete hearing had. but that was 
not done. 

"Summarizing the matter, it seems 
that through the fault of Mr. Golik in 
not seeing any attorney when he was 
sued by the doctors and in not call- 
ing the matter to my attention, he 
permitted judgment to be taken 
against him by default, by reason of 
which he had to pay more than four 
times the amount of the doctors 
claims, and that if it had not been 
for Mr. Boglcivich's desire to get 
'even with me,' as he stated to the 
doctors, such a proceeding would 
ntver have been taken. In each of 
the doctors' cases who testified in 
court whose bills were $25 the sheriff 
collected over $104, and the doctors 
received only the amount of their fee, 
flat is, $2!'>. 

'"All ©f the facts which I have stated 
herein are a matter of record In court, 
in the proceedings taken on the 21st 
and can be verified." 



THP: stoke FOR SERVICE. 

113-115-117-119 West Superior Street, Duluth, Minn. 



f 



. 



i 






that 
that 
them 
One 
also 



IF YOU CAN'T GO TO SLEEP 



Counting, Reading and Special Diet 
Are Suggested as Helpful. 

Le Temps: A sufferer from insomnia 
retails a number of counsels he has 
received, of which the first comes from 
the poet, M. Leconte, who says: 

"Open your window wide. Lie with 
your head as low as possible and you 
will sleep like a post." 

"Accustom yourself to take an hour 
or twos rest in a deck chair after 
every meal," writes another. "Take 
down from your shelves some old fash- 
ioned novel of which you have an af- 
fectionate remembrance as one of the 
joys of your youth &nd read it whlla 
you are on your deck chair. The more 
you are wearied by it the better you 
win sleep. The secret of a good night 
is not to tire yourself out in the eve- 
ning, but to Idle away the time. 

"An important point, though a dif- 
ficult one, Is to avali any dread of In- 
somnia. Personally 1 derive benefit 
from calculating the multiples of two 
Or three as far as I can go. Or else I 
'count elephants;' one elephant and on^ 
elephant make two elephants, two ele- 
phants and one elephant make thre* 
elephants; three elephants and one ele- 
phant, and so on. 

"Finally, knock off your black coffee, 
even your morning ciip on rising, and 
take no meat In the evening. For luncii 
eat nothing but fruit, and for dinner u 
vegetable soup, vermicelli, mashed po- 
tatoes and one or two biscuits. 

"If In spite of all this sleep refuse.i 
to come try reading. But don't read 
anything lively or interesting. In my 
own case it is very rare that insomnia 
does not succumb to two or three 
pages of Plato's 'Phaedo.' 

"An eminent doctor of Lyons says 
much the same thing. Another sug- 
gests: 'Count slowly from one upwards. 
It In very rare one gets up to two hun- 
dred without going off to sleep. It l.i 
on record, however, that one victim 
got up to 16,987, and then It was tlmo 
for him to get up!' " 



MARRON DELICACIES. 
The Housekeeper: That the fruit of 
the chestnut tree Is nearly as valuable) 
as bread and more valuable than po- 
tatoes for our dallj' diet we seem slow 
to comprehend in tlU^ country. 

The large Frencrt/^hestnut.s, better 
known as "marrons," are delicious 
when used in cake, c&ndy, desserts and 



Shop at the Store of the i 
Christmas Spirit ^\ 

It's the store for service — that's proven con- 
clusively by the way v^e've taken care of the 
greatest holiday business that ever came to 
this growing store! 

It's too late for you to read ads — and 
we're too busy to write them — just 
come here as quick as you can — look 
at our windows — look at the displays 
throughout the store — everything 
marked in plain figures — you am al- 
most wait on yourself. 

"If It Comes From 
Gray's It*s Good" 

Everybody knows that — so come tonight — or come 
early tomorrow morning and share in the advantages of 
this great Christmas store. 

Our wide aisles — our broad stairways — our double ele- 
vator service — our splendid ventilation makes shopping 
here a pleasure. 






O 




^^^sii^v^* 





.NS 



"-i^^ 



^1^ 



Fresh Air 

Our ventilating system keeps 
the air fresh and pure. Yo'j'll 
enjoy shopping here. 



Damaged Toys at Less Than Cost 

Lots of Fun in Them Yet 

In order to clean up all 
slightly soiled and un- 
boxed toys, we are mak- 
ing great reductions re- 
gardless of cost. All 
such toys on the tables 
reduced as follows : 

10c Toys 5c 

25c Toys 15c 

50c Toys 35c 




Many others 
at great reduc- 
tions. 

\\t wish to 
close out all 
samples, and 
will do so re- 
a^ardless of cost. 
It will pay you 
to shop in the 
basement store Tuesday. 



dressings. Nothing could be more 
tempting, for instance, than 

Chestnut Stuffing — Remove the 
sinews from a half pound of lean veal, 
separate the strings from a pound of 
leaf lard, chop separately and fine. Then 
put all together in a mortar with salt 
and pepper, pound vigorously for five 
minutes moisten with a ladleful of 



broth and add a quart of prepared 
chestnuts for stuffing. Fill the breast 
and body of turkey, tie both ends very 

closely, truss firmly with strong twine 
and a dressing needle, and it is ready 
for roasting. 

And for dessert, a novelty would be: 
Marron Blanc-^fange — Put or.e quart 



of milk in a double boiler and place 
over the fire. Sprinkle into It one level 
tablespoonful of farina. Cover and cook 
about twenty minutes, stirring fre- 
quently. Just before taking off the 
fire, add pieces of marrons. Mold and 
put on ice till firm. Garnish with a 
few marrons and serve with sugar 
and cream. 




Specials in 
Useful Christmas Gifts 



Women's Comfy Slippers, red and gray /JO/" 

:olors, all sizes, regularly $1.00 O^C 

Women's Crochet Slippers — per /kO/» 

pair I •€ 

Men's House Slippers, black and choc- Oil/» 

olate colors • C/C 

Men's House Slippers, black and chocolate tf 4 TQ 
colors; regularly $1.75 «Pi •Dmf 

Women's Fur Trimmed House Slippers — Oil/" 

all sizes and colors • C/C 

Men's and Women's A^elvet Slippers-^ ^ C^ 

per pair k. .» 21 ^C 

Boys' 10-in. Leather Top Rubbers; tf <# QO 

all sizes; per pair , ^ M. •^O 



PURCHASES ENCLOSED 
IN APPROPRIATE 
HOLIDAY BOXES. 





I 



WIELAND SHOE CO. 



222 WEST FIRST STREET. 





20 



Monday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 



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EVERYTHING 
CHRISTMAS FEAST 



% 



IJV/- 



JJ'tt. 



'A^. 



kfr 



% 



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PRICES YOU LIKE 



PAY THE GROCERS AND 



MARKETMEN THAT SELL YOU THE GOOD THINGS 








ONE-ONE-ONE WEST SUPERIOR ST. 



In the heart of the shopping district. 

Bui/ Your Christmas 
Candy There I 

The Minnesota Candy Kitchen 



A. APOSTOLAKOS & CO. 

Ill WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

C'aiulj in All \aricties:. Good for Chi-istmas — Good for Children. 



ONE— ONE— ONE. 






J 




that only yesterday were strutting around the Spring Rock 
turkey ranch. This means we received a bill of lading in- 
forming us that 3,000 pounds of these turkeys were at the 
express uffice. They will be ofTered to our trade tomorrow 
muniing at the lowest possible price. 

HOME-MADE LUTEFISK, per lb 7c 

Christmas Swedish Sausage 15c 

Fancy high quality Beef, Pork, Veal and Mutton. Advance 
ordtrs will receive first choice. 

MORK BROS. 

631 WEST FIRST STREET. 

PHONES — Mehose 1590; Grand 189. 



Our Turkeys, 
Ducks and Geese 

are sure to win first prize and be the aristocrat of your Christ- 
mas dinner table. They have all been selected from Hve stock 
and liy an expert who appreciated what our trade demands. 
Our prices will be the lowest and quality the very best. 





2230 WEST THIRD STREET. 

To all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 




A Real 

Christmas 




Surprise your 
wife by sending 
her a sack of 

DULUTH 
UNIVERSAL 

It's a fine 
thing to know 
that— 



DULUTH UNIVERSAL 

is the best on the market. When making out your list of gifts, 
lon't overlook this one— HOME MADE. 

DULUTH UNIVERSAL MILLING CO. 




TCSTT" '» 



•THE FLOUR THE BEST COOKS USE 




MISS M. WEILER. 



MI.SS M. THOMAS. 



THOMAS-WEILER CO. 

(lirocfra and Bakers. 

330 West Vlrnt Street. 

Phones: Melrose 1060; Grand 1020, 1858. 
W> y%\n^ to extend to all onr patronii a Merry Chriiitinas. 




Here Are (he Good Things 
That Go With Turkey 

A fine line of Fancy Groceries, Fruits and Nuts for Christmas. 
Thanking all our customers for the liberal patronage with which they 
have favored us during the year just about to close, hoping to con- 
tinue to serve you for many years to come, we wish all a Merry Christ- 
mas and a Happy New Year. 

AI^FRCD I^YSGN 

2802 AND 2804 WEST THIRD STREET. 





m^ GOilFLETE 

iOiiE^, iE Sy^E TO 
DIM@LyOE WDTO YOUJIIB 
@^06E^Y OiiEIR 



HONOR Brand- 
Fresh New Currants 

HONOR Brand- 

New Seeded Raisins 

HONOR Brand- 
Fine Pure Spices 

HONOR Brand- 
Steel Cut Coffee 



HEADQUARTERS 



FOR 

Grape Frviit — Indian River Grape 
Fruit; size 64-65-46's; per ^Q Ati 
case, only ^wb'Ww 

Oranges — Indian River Russets; size 
126 and ISO's; per case, ^O HQ 

Half Case $1-60 

Mixed Nuts — 3 and 5-lb. lots, 1Cf% 
per lb IWU 

CELERY. 
California Celery, per 7i%f* 

dozen ■ wU 

Meadowlands Celery — Per OQf^ 

dozen fc w V 

We boy in car lots, which gives ua 
a buying power that commands low 
prices. 

Headquarters for the people who 
buy goods of quality. 

Low prices on Canned Goods , 
Dried Fruit, Flour, Sugar, e tc. 

Consumers' Wholesale House. 

6ARTHE- 
MARTIN CO. 

Both 'Phones, 1315. ^' 
102 and 104 West Michigan Street. 



SlP 



DUGGAN 

BEEF & PROVISION CO 

505 EAST FOURTH ST. 
CHOICE TURKEYS— 

20c 



FANCY TURKEYS- 




FANCY GEESE— 

18c 



FANCY DUCKS- 




FANCY CHICKENS— 

17c 




MRS. L. C. 

KING 

18 SECOND AVE. EAST. 

Both Phones. 
Turkeys, our prices. .. .20-22c 

Geese, our prices 16-18c 

Ducks, our low prices. .19-20c 

Hens, heavy 16c 

Hens, light weights 14c 

Springs, fancy birds .... 16-18c 
Pork Roasts, a snap. .13-12-llc 
Mixed Nuts, new and fresh, 

2 lbs. for 25c 

Remember there are no pea- 
nuts or hickory nuts mixed in. 
Celery, well bleached and 

brittle, the dozen 40c 

Apples, all fancy, peck. .30-40c 
Oranges, dozen 25-30-40-50-60c 

Bring your market baskets 
and have them filled and I will 
deliver them quick for you. 



JOHNSON & CO., 

TWO CASH MARKETS— 

Lincoln Park Market, 
2516 West Third Street. 

TM\}X9^- iig^ JiMO MW West Duluth Market, 
' ffjSH m\ aSHiy Fifty-seventh and Grand. 

iiil^r For Your 

Christmas 
^/i^* Dinner 

THE CHOICEST TURKEYS, lb 22c 

A few at 20c 

EXTRA FANCY GEESE, lb 17c 

DUCKS, lb 20c 

CHICKENS— Large Springs, lb 17c 

CHICKENS— For Roasting, lb 16c and 15c 

All kinds of fancy cuts of Christmas Beef, Pork, Veal 
and Mutton. Home Soaked Lutefisk. 






YOyiR OIHIillSTil^S OliiiE^ 



will not be complete without some of our 

VELVET ICE. CREAM 
and ICES 

Tlie following is our 



ey^g 



MENU 



KESSELRUD 



TURKEYS, 
DUCKS, 
GEESE, 

CHICKENS 

All especially selected for 
our Christmas trade, also a 
fine line of Meats, Home 
Made Lutefisk and Christmas 
Potato Sausage. Our best 
wishes to all for a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New 
Year. 

We go to Lakeside every 
Tuesday, Thursday and Satur- 
day. 

A. W. Anderson, 

527 East Fourth St. 
Melrose 1382. Grand, 1809. 



BISQUE • MAPLE MOUSSE 

ALMOND 
MACAROON WALNUT 

Ices and Sherbets 

CRI:AM DE ROSE CREAM DE MINT 

ORANGE. 
CREAM DE VIOLET PINEAPPLE 

As many of the above are made up special, we will 
kindly ask you to get your orders in as early as pos- 
sible to avoid any delay in getting out our orders 
Christmas morning. 

lEHM^I^IUISSELL COo 



— Both Phones — 
13 E. SUPERIOR ST. 14 AND 16 W. FIRST ST. 




A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A 
HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL! 

We wish to thank our many friends and patrons for 
their past year's business and assure them that all future 
business will be given the same careful attention. 

ANDERSON & OGG 



Both Phones. 



102 East Fourth Street. 



Duluth Sausage 
Company 

32 WEST FIRST STREET. 




If for your Christmas dinner 
you would like some of the 
choicest fowl, give us a call. 
Wishing you a Merry Christ- 
mas and a Happy New Year. 

Fancy Turkey 20c-24c 

Fancy Geese 18c 

Fancy Duck 20c 

Fancy Ham 16c 

Fancy Chicken 17c 

Mince Meat, 2 lbs 25c 

We have the nicest cream 
sausage in the city. Have some 
for your Christmas Breakfast. 

STEVE POUPORE, 

Manager. 



NEW AMERICAN 
INDEPENDENT 
MEAT MARKET 

508 WEST FIRST STREET. 

HARRY DAHL, Prop. 

Zenitti 'Phone, 1782-Y. 

WHERE THE WORKINGMAN 
TRADES. 



300 Fresh 
Dressed 
Turkeys 

They have been especially fat- 
tened for us on grain and milk, 
and are th<; finest blue ribbon Tur- 
keys ever shipped to Duluth. All 
dry hand picked and massaged. 

Advance orders will receive 
first choic: and reservations. 

A Merry Christmas and Happy 
New Year to all my customers. 



LUTEFISK 



We prepare it our- 
selves. We know it is 
good. 

'Phone your order 
early. 

GEO. PERSGARD 
&C0. 

631 East Eighth St. 

Both 'Phones: Melrose 
1760; Grand 900. 

Staple and Fancy Gro- 
ceries. 



^'^ 



■JjfiS 



#- 



i 



9- 




^mmmm 



Tdk J^ * « ft.*- 



^-JEt^j^ 




Monday, 



THE DULU 



Market 




The Best Turkey Gobblers 
You Ever Gobbled. 

250 Nebraska corn fed Turkeys arrived this morning 
from the famous Henry Turkey Ranch near Omaha. They 
are all Bhie Ribbon Turkeys and the first shipment of 
such high quahty birds ever received in DuUith. 

Turkeys, 23c and 20c 

Geese, 17c 
Chickens, 16c & UVzc 

Leaders of low prices and high quality of meats and 



groceries. 



West End Provision Co. 

2501 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

S. THKRRIEX, Manager. 

A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 



TURKEYS, DUCKS 
AND GEESE 

Fit for Any Ruler's TabI* 

Tomorrow hundreds will buy their Christmas Turkeys, 
Ducks and Cicese. We can assure you of the highest quality 
of birds ever shipped. Every one fed on golden corn, and 
dry hand picked. Also a fine line of Christmas Beef, Pork, 
\ cal and Mutton. Our prices will be lowest in the city con- 
sidering quality. 

LARSON GROS., 

2732 WEST THIRD STREET. 

Wishing all a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. 



Both "I'hi'ne.H, 371. 

O'LEARY 

GROCERY 
CO., 

i;Jl lOast .Superior Street. 

OPEN LATE 
TONIGHT! 

I<mve ynur f'hri»>tinaM order ^%Hh 
tin anil Ise u.sMurf<l of eettinie all 
nen ^o«Hl!» at lowest poMitible prices*. 

New Plum Pudding, Ta- 
ble Raisins, Mixed Nuts, 
Figs, Dates, Fruit Cake, 
Mince Meat (brandied), 
Oranges, Lemons and Cit- 
ron, also new Candies. 

Holly, Mistletoe, Mag- ; 
nolia, Ground Pine. 

Holly, 20c bunch 10c 

Magnolia Wreaths, per 

bunch 20c 

Ground Pine, per yd . . . 5c 
Needle Pines, each .... 15c 
Milwaukee Celery, 6 

stalks 15c 

Leaf Lettuce, 3 for ... . 10c 
Best grade Mixed Nuts, 

per lb 20c 

Second grade Mixed Nuts, 

2 lbs 25c 

Mince Meat, home-made, 

per lb 20c 

Apples, per box 95c 

126 size Oranges, a snap 

only, per doz 35c 

49-lb. First Patent 

Flour $1.20 

Eggs, fresh, per doz . . . 28c 
Print Butter, per lb 33c 

I.akeni«Ie Delivery at S o'clock 
TiieMilay a. iii. 

Store open until 10:S0 toniKbt. 



Give Her a 
Dress Form 



Wife, mother ot 
sister would surely 
like a Dress Form 
so she can do her 
own sewing. 

We have them at 

$1.98 to $15 



^kov^^Cl'.^Tfa^^ 



(Ue Extend to 

Vou One ana m\ 

tbe Usual 

noliaay 

Salutations 

Thanking- you for the liberal 
patronage you have favored us 
witli, we trust we may con- 
tinue to serve you, as we have 
in the past, honestly and sat- 
isfactorily. 

Respectfully, 

John G. 
Gajewski, 

4 West Eighth St. 



Turkeys! Turkeys! 
Turkeys! 

We will be headquarters for all 
kinds of poultry. Our stock all 

grown in St. Louis county are 
now being dressed by experts. Our 
prices will be the lowest in the city. 

Cox Bros,, 

10 First Avenue East. 
Half a Block from Superior Street. 




CHRISTMAS 




OF ALL KINDS 

Call: Melrose, 1799, 
4 Rings. 



We extend our best wishes 
for a Merry Christmas and 
a Happy New Year to all our 

customers. 

INDEPENOESIT CASH 
MARKET 

205 WEST FIRST ST. 



LOWER RATES 
TO THE BORDER 



Reductions In freight rates between 
Duluth and International Falls were 
announced today by the Canadian 
Northern road. 

The opening: of the new line between 
Duluth and Virginia is probably re- 



The 

thirty 

The 
of the 



L.EGAL NOTICKS. 

articleFofTncorporation 

— OF— 

CUYUNA-SULTANA IRON 
C OMPAN Y. 

I'or tlie purpose of formingr a cor- 
poration under and by virtue of Chap- 
ter .■)S of the Revised l^ws of the State 
of Minnesota for the year 190Ci. and 
the acts amendatory thereof inrofur 
as the same applies to mining com- 
panies, the undersigned do hereby de- 
clare that they do hereby associate 
together and agree upon the following 
certihcate of incorporation: 
ARTICLE I. 

The name of the corporation shall b© 
CUYUNA-SUL.TANA IKON COMPANY. 

Tlie principal place of transacting its 
business shall be in Duluth, Minne- 
sota. 

The general nature of the business 
shall be exploring, leasing, sub-leasing, 
deal'ng in mineral or other lands for 
mining purposes, mining, smelting, re- 
ducing, reflning, working for iron ore 
or ores and minerals, and the marketing 
for any sucli ore or products; to mort- 
gage, bond, lease, sell, convey and dis- 
pose of any property, rights and privi- 
leges which may be owned or held by 
this corporation, and to do anything 
whatsoever wliich may be advantageous 
or necessary in conducting the business 
of tile corporation. 

ARTICLE II. 
period of its duration shall bf; 
C30> years. 

ARTICLE III. 
names and places of residence 
incorporators are as follows: i* 
I* Culbertson, George Waters and W. A. 
McClaren, all of Duluth, Minnes'^ta. 
ARTICLE IV. 

The government of this corporation 
and the management of its affairs shaU 
l>e vested in a board of directors, con- 
sisting of eleven members, who siiall 
be stockholders, and elected by the 
stockholders of the corporation at their 
annual meeting to be held at Duluth, 
Minnesota, on the second Monday in 
November of each year, and sliall hold 
their office for the term of one year 
and until their successors are elected 
and uualified. The officers of this 
corporation and of the board of direc- 
tors shall be President, Vice Presi- 
dent, Secretary, Treasurer, and such 
other officers as may be provided for 
in the by-laws, which officers shall be 
elected by the Board of Directors at 
its first meeting of the board of direc- 
tors, after eacli annual meeting. Until 
the tirst annual meeting of the stock- 
iiolders, the board of directors shall be: 
George Waters, E. J. Bunker, W. A. 
McCiaren, H. P. Proctor. E. J. W. Dona- 
hue, J. E. Bowers. W. H. Denny, W. H. 
Locker and L. L. Culbertson, all of 
Duluth. Minnesota: D. S. Clark of Eau; 
Claire, Wisconsin, and E. Y. Sarles of 
Hillsboro, Nortii Dakota. And until the 
first annual meeting, and until their' 
successors are elected and gualitled, the 
following shall be the officers of the 
cori)oration: 

President. L L. Culbertson. 

Vice President, E. J. W. Donahue. 

Secretary, H. P. Proctor. 

Treasurer, W. H. Locker. 

The terms of the several officers 
sliall terminate on the election of his 
or their successors. The Board of Di- 
rectors shall have the power to fill 
vacancies in its membership and in its 
officers, and to transact any other busi- 
ness within the power of the Board of 
Directors. 

ARTICLE V. 

The amount of the capital stock of 
this corporation shall be One Million 
Dollars ($1,000,000 1, divided into One 
Million (1,000.000) shares of the par 
value of One Dollar (?1.00) each, and 
shall be paid for in either propertv, 
money or services, as the board of di- 
rectors shall elect, and said stock 
shall be subscribed at such times and 
in sucl\ amounts as may be prescribed 
by tiie board of directors. The judg- 
ment of the Board of Directors as to 
ilie value of property and services shall 
be conclusive. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The highest amount of indebtedness 
or I'abilitj' to which this corporat'on 
shall at any time be subject is Five 
Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000) 

IN WITNESS WHEREOF. We have 

hereunto set our hands and seals this 

14th day of i^'ecember, 191i. 

GEORGE WATERS. 

W. A. McCLAREN. 

L. L. CULBERTSON. 

Signed, Sealed and Delivered 

in Presence of: 

N. M. LOWE. 

GRACE WEISS. 




HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 



.sponsible for the Towering of tlie rates. 
The cut is a subsliaTtlal one, and pro- 



e announced for 
and the border, 

was opened the 
heavy, and the 

ved, will stiniu 



portionate decreaij^t-s 
the points between h 

Since the new r 
traffic over it hap 
lower rates, it is be 

late trade betweerui>iiiuth and the rup. 
idly growing border country 

Following is a A*li!e of the> old and 
new rates to IntMTJational Falls: 

Old. New. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

a 

b 

c 

d 

e 



PROPOSES "PIRE SHOE" 
LAW FOK THE NATION 



60^ 


68 


r, 1 iL 


49 


■ioii 


38 


80% 


29 


24 


23 


25 


23 


21Vi 


20 


18Vi 


17 


15 


14 


12 


12 



CENTRAL 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 



30 BuMt Superior Street, Duluth. 

WIXTEK TF^KM. JAIV. BTH. 

New classes In all departments. 
Day school. Night school. 

BARBKU A MePHBRSOX. 



TWO BRITISH 

VESSELS LOST 



Fifteen Go Down With One 

and Seven Are Missing 

With Second. 

Mobile, Ala., Dec. 23. — The British 
schooner Georgiana with eleven pas- 
sengers and a crew of four, foundered 
off Lucea, Jamaica, in trying to make 

that port during the November gulf 
storm, and all on board were lost, ac- 
cording to dispiatehes received here 
today. The British schooner Carte- 
gena has not been heard from since 
Nov. 17 and it is believed that vessel 
with her crew of seven also has gone 
down. 

One of those who perished on the 
Georgiana was W. R. Bodden, a well 
known merchant of Georgietown, Grand 
Cayman. 

SURVEYORS ON 

NEW HIGHWAY 




Work Begun on Canadian 
End of Proposed Inter- 
national Road. 

Fort William, Oht., Dec. 23. — A par- 
ty Of surveyors left last night to sur- 
vey a route for the interrwational high- 
way, to be built frbm Fort William 
to Duluth. The party does not ex- 
pect to reach Duluth before spring. 



Active steps are being taken by St. 
Louis, Lake and Cook county people 
to make possible the building of the 
proposed international highway. 

It is proposed to connect the road 
alre»ady built from Duluth to Two 
Harbors with a road through LaJce 
and Cook counties to connect at 'he 
border with a road to be built from 
Port Arthur and Fort William by the 
Canadian government. Cook county 
expects to issue bonds to defray the 
cost of the portion of the ro»ad run- 
ning from the Lake county line to the 
border. » • ' • ■ 

Two MotortntA Killed. 

Decatur, 111., Dec. 23. — Glen Blue and 
Floyd Wright were killed and Ray 
-Liindsey and Ralph Blue of Mahomet 
were fatally injured in an automobile 
"wreclv near Maifiatle^d early today. 
Floyd Davis, ji'Ho was^lriving the car, 
{escaped unhurt. 



(Seal) 
( Seal ) 
(SeaU 



State of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— ss. 

On this 14th dav of December, A. D. 
1912, before me, a Notary Public within 
and for said County, personally ap- 
peared George Waters, L. L. Culb-^rt- 
son and W. A. McClaren, to nie known 
to be the persons described in and who 
executed the foregoing instrument, and 
acknowledged that they executed the 
same as their free act and deed. 
N. M. LOWE, 
Notary Public, 
St. Louis Co., Minn. 
(Notarial Seal, St. Louis Co.. Minn.> 

My commission expires Dec. 20, 1918. 



State of Minnesota^ Department of 

State. 

I hereby certify that the within ir.- 
strument was filed for record in this 
oftice on the 17th day of December, 
A. D. 1912, at 11 o'clock A. M., and was 
duly recorded in Book W-3 of Incorpo- 
rations, on page 248. 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of St\te 



195113. 
OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 
State of Minnesota. County of St. Lou's 
— ss. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed in this office for 
record Dec. 23, 1912, at 11:10 A. M.. And 
was duly recorded in Book 15 of Misc. 
page 130. 

BENJAMIN F. SMITH. 

Register of Deeds. 
By STEWART SMITIi 

Deputj . 
D. H., Dec. 23, 24, 1912. 



TO PARENTS 



Chicago News: 'I know nothing 
whatever about children," said the 
family man. "I have several of my 
own. These little angels go over me 
carefully every day and disinfect me 
from all theories that may have ac- 
cumulated since the last previous 
overhauling. So I 'itn entirely sanitary 
so far as theory, germs are concerned. 

"But I just want to talk over with 
you the question o^ what makes you 
and me such tooiit In the matter of 
disciplining our children. 

'It has been said that nobody strikes 
his children nowadays except in self 
defense. That Is too nearly true of us 
in our indulgent moments. But what 
naggers we have become since we be- 
gan accumulating theories and 
psychological information about the 
little dears! 

"What, for instance, would you have 
a 3-year-old boy be, just now? A 3- 
f ear-old boy. wouldn't you? Well, then, 
what makes you get so excited and so 
surprised and so shocked and disap- 
pointed and pained when he takes a 
Pail of water or A sprinkling can and 
carries it around aJid plays in It un- 
til his clothej aiy wet and his shoes 
are sopping? ^ 

"Isn't that the S-year-oldest thing a 
boy could do? Did you expect him to 
go and ask for a piece of table oil- 
cloth, go and get out his rubbers and 
put them on and sedately carry that 
pail around, carefully leaning over to 
keep himself dry? 'W'hat fun would 
slopping a pail of water around be to 
a child who was so mature as to think 
of all that? 

"Didn't you do the same thing when 



W. A. OLDFIELD 
Of Arkansas. 

A "pure shoe" bill has been Intro- 
duced in the house at Washington by 
Congressman W. A. Oldfleld of Arkan- 
sas. This bill makes the pure food 
laws applicable to the shoe industry. 
There is no business in which there is 
so much adulteration. Shoes are made 
out of paper, strawboard, leather- 
board, pineboard and other substitutes. 
This bill originated with some St Louis 
makers of shoes. They had it proposed 
to the Missouri legislature more than 
a year ago and fought for its adop- 
tion, but the opposition of other shoe 
manufacturers defeated it. The law 
would compel makers to brand a shoe 
with the statement of the fact that it 
was made of leather substitute. 



you were his age? 

"Yes, you had all the fool foibles 
your little son has. You did 3 -year- 
old things when you were 3. just as 
you do 40-year-old things now that 
you are 40. And so long as you do 
things that are as nearlj^ normal at 
40 as the things your son does are 
normal for a 3-year-old, your son 
will have no occasion, now or here- 
acter, to reprimand you or be ashamed 
of you. It is only when the 40-year-old 
begins showing 17-year-old proclivities 
and tendencies that the trouble sets 
ip for everybody concerned. 

"So you should earnestly endeavor to 
be as thoroughly 40 years old as he is 
thoroughly 3. You'll be all right If you 
succeed in attaining that high degree 
of proficiency In living up to your 
age and opportunities." 



TH[ MONOPLANE HUNT 



CITV NOTICES. 

CITY CLERK^ OFFICE— 

Duluth. Minn. 

Notice is hereby given that applica- 
tions have been filed in my office by 
the following named persons fur li- 
cense to sell intoxicatmg liquors in 
the following named locations, viz: 

Ed. Peterson at No. 118 East Supe- 
rior street. 

L. Casmlr at No. 529 West Superior 
street, being a transfer from No. 102 
Lake avenue south. 

Said application.^ will be considered 
by the Common Council at a reguk.r 
meeting thereof to be lield on Mondav, 
January 6, 1913, at 7:30 o'clock P. M. " 

C. S. PALMER, 

City Clerk. 
E'. H., Dec. 23 artd 30, 1912. D 588. 



TOYS 

V2 PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & CO. 



THE LARGEST AND BEST 
ASSORTMENT OF 

MECHANICAL 

TOYS 



CUTLERY, SKATES AND 

SPORTING GOODS 

in the city. Call a4id see before 
buyirifi, 

NORTI^RN 
HARDWARE GO. 

Two Stores — 222 WEST SU- 
PERIOR ST., and 408 FIFTY- 
FIFTH AV% WEST. 



To the ordinary Individual there 
might appear little that is humorous in 
aviation, writes Graham-White in the 
Strand Magazine; it would seem, 
rather, to be a grim and grisly busi- 
ness, with su(3den death always at the 
pilots elbow. But the dangers of .air- 
manship are ridiculously exas^gerated, 
and there is, as a matter of fact, much 
that is amusing in what 1 might call 
everyday aviation, and particularly in 
regard to the operation ot a flying- 
school. 

And now as to the most amusing 
incident 1 can tliink of. "VVell, here 
it is: 

A -Dupil, after landina: at my Hendon 
aerodrome one evening at the end of 
a flight on a monoplane, jumped out of 
the machine before It had stopped 
running along the ground. Stumbling, 
he not only let go of the machine, but 
accidentally touched the engine-switch 
.and accelerated the motor to a high 
rate of speed. 

The result was that the monoplane 
darted away like a big, angry bird; 
and, as thougii rejoicing in its new- 
found freedom, it ran this way and 
that about the aerodrome, its motor 
humming defiarce. 

With confident mien, some of the 
meclianics hurried out to catch the 
runaway; but they had not reckoned 
upon the ridiculously eccentric actions 
cf the machine. 

Soon we who were watching were 
convulsed with oiirth. \N'hirling hither 
and thither under the Impulse of its 
propeller, but without the power actu- 
ally to risf, the monoplane seemed In- 
stinct with the desire to elude pursuit. 
Buzzing awpy across the aerodrome, 
it led the mechanics a fatiguing chase. 
Then, suddenly wheeling round, it 
plunged at thorn, and scattered thera 
with the fear of its sninning propeller. 

Again they chased it; again the m« 
chine, as though a thing alive, wheeled 
round and made a vicious dart at them. 
This time one man managed to grip 
its tail, but he was shaken off and fell 
flat on his back. 

Perspiring freely, and with many 
terse remarks to express thetr annoy- 
ance, the mechanics again took up 
their weary pursuit. Meanwhile, quite 
characteristically. unfeeling onlook- 
ers merely laughed. 

Up and down, to and fro, the men 
ran and dodged and slipped and fell, 
their furious, unavailing shouts and 
cries mingling with the spiteful splut- 
ter of the monoplane's engine. 

At length, having laughed at the 
ludicrous spectacle until we could 
laugh no more, some of us who were 
standing by the sheds made a move to 
join In the game. 

But the machine seemed possessed. 
It ^-renched itself away from the grip 
of several pairs of eager hands, and 
then hopped and floundered to some 
other corner of the aerodrome. One 
or two of the pursurers sat on the 
ground, quite exhausted. Others were 
laughing too much to pursue effectual- 
ly. And still the monoplane buzzed at 
large. 

Finally, when we were all weak 
from running or laughing, I managed 
to get hold of a wing-tip. The mono- 
plane whirled round and round fu- 
riously, but I was able to hold on. 
And then a mechanic ran in and 
switched off the motor. At once the 
machine stopped its absurd gyrations. 
But while it lasted the monoplane 
hunt was the funniest sight you could 
imagine. 



Christmas 
Jewelry 



I EVERYBODY WELCOME TO CALL. 

Gifts are, or should be, keepsakes — how appro- 
priate, indeed, something in Jewelry — for '*her ;" or, 
for that matter, for "him." 

A knicknack will answer, if intended for only an 
acquaintance — a more pretentious article for a friend 
or dear one. 

Here you find everything in Silver or Gold — 
Jewels, too — timepieces for mantel or hall or shelf — 
useful things and of value. 

Prices go in easy stages from trinkets up to 
Diamonds — and even Diamonds are within the 
reach of any purse — beginning with rings at $5.00. 

For 26 years we have continued to serve our cus- 
tomers honestly and satisfactorily by always giving 
them the highest quality in Jewelry and Diamonds. 

Pay us a visit, we are out of the High Rent dis- 
trict. You get the benefit. 

JMRUESEN, 



JEWELER. 
232 West First St. 

Opposite Wolvin Bldg. 





TOY DEPARTMENT 



HaU 

Price 



All Toys and 
Dolls in basement, to 
close out, ]\Ionday 
night and Tuesday. 



Tonr 

Credit 

!• Good. 



^"JiSmmd^ 



Complete 

Honse 

Furnishers. 



202 and 304 EAST SUPERIOR STREET. DlXl TH. 



One $250 Used 
Piano — Quick 
Sale 





STORY & CLARK PIANO CO. 

Factory Salesrooms 426 West First Street 



STREET FA KER IN O LD LONDON 

Madam, a Marvelous Woman, the Real North Amer- 
ican Mystery, Told Futures for Two 
Pence Each. 



NOW HE LIVES A LONELY LIFE. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: This Is t'le 
way he lost his home, as he called at 
the house where he used to roam to 
lUrt with the girl he liked the best — 
'twas thus tliat he lost that cozvnest- 

•You know Mr. Benjamin Griffirs"' 
said she. ' 

■J hate the son-of-a-ffun." said l>e. 

•Listen — last niprht he paid me a 
rail and he tried to kiss me, out in the 
hair." 

"The dickens he did! Well, well 

poor Ben". .So the poor fellow is drink- 
ing agrain:*' 

And that was the jest that started 
the fight, and that was the way he 
lost the delight of seeing his lady on 
Saturday ni^ht. And all who knew it 
say. •Serves him rightl" 



TOYS 

V2 PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & €0. 



Keble Howard 

I came acroiss 
street of an old 
had taken up ' 
principal hotel 
— an excellent 



in the London 



Mail: 
them In the main 
Dorsetshire town. They 
heir pitch, between the 
and the corn exchange 
position, as the crowd 
of gaping courtry folk, three or four 
deep, testified. 

Their visible "props" consisted of a 
very old pony, a very old cart, a small 
dog in a net tag and a kind of ban- 
ner, supported by an easel, on which 
were depicted numerous scenes of 
gruesome and quite unexpected mis- 
fortunes. 

Tliere were j ist the three of them — 
the man, his wife, and the negro. The 
man wore a peaked cap and a gray suit 
mucli the worse for wear. He had 
tired eyes but <i hopeful mustache. His 
intonation was in harmony with his 
mustache, but Ids manner agreed witli 
his tired eyes. He clung bravely to 
the upward note and the patter was 
cheerful enough, but the face 
utterly without expression, and 
tired eyes look'^d constantly from 
to end of the street and not at 
spectators. 

^MNdani la Marvelona.** 

"We have served royalty!" he 
saying as I api)roached. "Three times 
at Cowes we have served his majesty 
King Alfonso of Spain'. We had the 
honor of servlniir the late King Edward 
— bless his memory ! We have served 
Prince Eddy, the young prince of 
Wales! We havis also served Sir Thom- 
as Llpton and anotlier man who is a 
friend to you all — Lloyd George!" 

tiere came a timid groan, followed 
by a general Is. ugh. 

"You are now beholding." he con- 
tinued, "the real North American mys- 
tery! All you liave to do is to show 
madam your L^ft hand! Madam is a 
marvelous woman — a very marvelous 
woman is madsm. If we charged you 
a f'hllling you'cl think all the more of 
us! We're showing you a wonderful 
turn! Madam is just doing this be- 
tween her engagements on the stage — 
just for a few weeks — to amuse her- 
self! .\ very miirvelous woman Is ma- 
dam!" 

Madam Aninnes Hemelt. 

I pressed forward, anxious to see 



was 

the 
end 
the 



was 



madam amusing herself. I discovered 
a weary looking woman, dressed in a 
thick cloth coat, a dragging gklrt and 
a blue hat trimmed with lace that had 
been white. She was examining the 
hand of a shy. giggling maid from the 
hotel, whose friends in the crowd 
shouted eager comments on her char- 
acter. Presently madam, that "wonder- 
ful woman," dropped the hand took a 
printed slip from a bundle that she 
carried in a reticule and marked it 
here and there with a, pencil. Finallv 
she scribbleu a word or two on the 
back, lianded the paper to the maid- 
servant, collected some money, and 
went on to the next client. 

»*Two Pence, Pleajie.** 

The patter continued. "Peer or peas- 
ant, bl.shop or burglar, madam gives 
them all the same attention! You all 
get the same attention from madam' 
hhe 8 a wonderful woman! STie's the 
real North American mvstery! She'<? 
only doing this for a few weeks to 
amuse herself— just for a little holi- 
day! We have served King Alfonso of 
Spain three times at Cowes! ^We had 
the honor of serving the late King 
Edward!' And the rest as before 

Waiting an opportunity, I pushed 
through the circle and gave madam my 
left hand. I noticed that the expres- 
sion of her eyes was very gentle and 
her voice cultured. I was comforted 
to think that she was only doing this 
to amuse herself — just for a little holi- 
day. 

She examined my hand for perhaps 
half a minute, then she selected one 
of her printed papers, marked it rap- 
Idlv. and gave It to me. 

••How nitJch?" I asked. 

"Two pence, plea.se!" 



Read The 
HeraldWants 




I DEFECTIVE PAGE 



Monday, 



Market 




The Best Turkey Gobblers 
You Ever Gobbled. 

2'»0 W-braska corn fed Turkeys arrived this morning 
he famous Henry Turkey Ranch near Omaha. They 
11 Blue Ribbon Turkeys and the first shipment of 
siicli high iiuality birdb ever received in Duluth. 

TurkeySf 23c and 20c 

GeesCy 17c 
Chickens, 16c & 12V2C 

Leaders of low prices and high quality of meats and 



i^rocenes. 



West End Provision Co. 

2501 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 

S. THKKKIILN. Manager. 

A -Merry Christmas and a Happy Xew Year. 



TURKEYS, DUCKS 
AND GEE 




Fit for Any Ruler's Table 



T'lii 'rri)\v hundreds will buy their Christmas Turkeys, 

Ducks and decse. We can assure you of the highest quality 

•" Mrds ever shipped. Every one fed on golden corn, and 

h.and picked. Also a fine line of Christmas Beef, Pork, 

\ v-al and Glutton. C>ur prices will be lowest in the city con- 



.ciiii.; t|uality. 



LARSON eROS., 

2732 WEST THIRD STREET. 

\\ ishing all a Merry Christmas and a Happy Xew Year. 



O'LEARY 

GROCERY 
CO., 

i:;i lOa^tt Superior Mreet. 

OPEN LATE 
TONIGHT ! 

l.t-:i\e ><»iir ( hrlf^dnnM order t^ith 
ii.H tiiiil ':*- ii.HMiirtMl <>t' t:«'<Uni> »l! 
n«M\ K*>otl» at loufxi iiuHMible prlves. 

New Plum Pudding, Ta- 
ble Raisins, Mixed Nuts, 
Figs, Dates, Fruit Cake, 
Mince Meat (brandied), 
Oranges, Lemons and Cit- 
ron, also ne\v^ Candies. 

Holly. Mistletoe, Mag- 
nolia, Ground Pine. 

Holly, 20c bunch 10c 

Magnolia Wreaths, per 

bunch 20c 

Ground Pine, per yd . . . 5c 
Needle Pines, each. . . .15c 
Milwaukee Celery, 6 

stalks 15c 

Leaf Lettuce, 3 for .... 10c 
Best grade Mixed Nuts, 

per lb 20c 

Second grade Mixed Nuts, 

2 lbs 25c 

Mince Meat, home-made, 

per lb 20c 

Apples, per box 95c 

126 size Oranges, a snap 

only, per doz 35c 

49-lb. First Patent 

Flour $1.20 

Eggs, fresh, per doz . . . 28c 
Print Butter, per lb. . . .33c 

I.aUf.Hiilc Oelivery at S o'l-loek 
Tiit->i).-i} a. III. 

Sti:rt> ofu-n until 10:::n tonight. 



iUe extend to 

^ou One ana ^11 

tbe Usual 

fiolidav 
Salutations 

Thankin<4 you f(jr the Hberal 
patronage you have favored us 
with, we trust we may con- 
tinue to serve you, as we have 
in tlie past, honestly and sat- 
isfactorily. 

Respectfully, 

John G. 
Gajewski, 

4 West Eighth St. 



Turkeys! Turkeys! 
Turkeys! 

We will be headquarters for all 
kinds of poultry. Our stock all 

Krown in St. Louis county are 
LOW beinff dressed by experts. Our 
prices will be the lowest in the city. 

Cox Bros,, 

10 Fint Avenue East. 
Hnlf a Illuek from Superior Street. 




CHRISTMAS 




OF ALL KINDS 

Call: Melrose, 1799, 
4 Rings. 




Give Her a 
Dress Form 



Wife, mother or 
sister would surely 
like a Dress Form 
so she can do her 
own ^ewinir. 

We have them at 



$1.93 to $15 



We extend our best wishes 
for a ]\Ierry Christmas and 
a Happy Xew Year to all our 
customers. 



I 



INOEPEMgEeST CASH 
MARKET 

205 WEST FIRST ST. 



LOWER RATES 
TO THE BORDER 



Reductions in freight rate.'^ between 
Dulutli and International Falls were 
announced today by the Canadian 
Northern road. 

The opening of tlie new line between 
r>ulutli and VirKinla is probably re- 



^ARficrEFdFTNWRPORATION 
-OF— 

CUYUI\1A-SULTAI\IA IRON 
COMPANY. 

!■ or tl'.u purpose of forming a cor- 
porau'u under and by virtue at Chap- 
ter "is if the iievised l..aws of the i<tate 
of Minnesota for the year ll>or>. and 
the acts amendatory thereof in^X)fi:r 
as tlie same applies to mining' oom- 
panit;!, the undersigned do hereby de- 
clare that they do hereby associate 
loet'iher and ai;i'<^^e ui»on the following 
certiiicate of incori)oration; 
ART1CI.L-: 1. 

The name of the corporation shal! be 
CUYL'NA-Sri/J'ANA lUUN COMPANY. 

The principal place of transactii:f.j its 
busir.cbs shall be in Duluth, Miniie- 
sota. 

The general nature of the business 
shall be exploring, leasing, sub-leasing:, 
dealiig in mineral or other lands for 
mining purpos<s, mining, smelting, re- 
ducing, I'etiiiiny, working for iron ore 
or or(^s and minerals, and the marketing 
for any such ore or products; to mort- 
gage, bond, lease, s'^11, convey and dis- 
pose of any property, rights and privi- 
leges which may be owned or lield by 
this corporation, and to do anything 
whatsoever which may be advantageous 
or necessary in conducting the business 
of llie corporation. 

AKTICL.E II. 

The period of its duration sliall bf.- 
thirty (Z\i) years. 

AllTICLE III. 

The names and places of residence 
of the incorporators are as follows: 1* 
I* Culbertson, George Waters and W. A. 
JNlcCIaren, all of Duluth, Minnesota. 
ARTICL.K IV. 

The government of this corporation 
and ihe management of its affairs slitiU 
be vested in a board of directors, con- 
sistiiig of eleven members, whi shall 
he stockliolders, and elected by the 
^•tockholders of tht> corporation at tiielr 
aniiual meeting to be held at Duluth. 
.Minnesota, on the second Monday in 
November of each year, and sliall lioid 
their office for the term of one year 
and until their successors are elected 
and qualified. The oilicers of this 
corporation and of tlie board of direo 
ti>rs shall be President, Vice Presi- 
dent, Secretary, Treasurer, and such 
other officers as ma.v be provided for 
in the by-laws, wliich oilicers shall be 
elected by the Board of Directors at 
its first meeting of the board of direc- 
turs, after each annual meeting. Until 
the first an'iual meeting of tlie stock- 
iioMers, tile board of directors shall be: 
(ieorge Waters, E. J. Bunlver, W. A. 
McCiaren. H. P. Proctor, E. J. W. Dona- 
hue, J. E. Bowers. \V. H. Denny. W. H. 
Locker and L. L. Culbertson. all of 
Duluth. Minnesota: D. S. Clark of Eau 
< 'laire, Wisconsin, and E. Y. Sarins of 
Hillsboro, North Dakota. And until tlie 
first annual meeting, and until their 
successors are elected and (lualitied, th'> 
following shall be the officers of the 
corporation: 

I'resident. L. L. Culbertson. 

Vice President, E. J. W. Donahue. 

Secretary. H. P. Proctor. 

Treasurer. W. H. Locker. 

The terms of the several officers 
sliall terminate on the election of his 
or their successors. The Board of Di- 
rectors shall have the power to f.ll 
\acancies in its membership and in its 
officers, and to transact an>' other busi- 
ness within the power of the Board of 
Directors. 

ARTICLE V. 

The amount of the capital stock of 
this coipoialion sliall be One 3^Iillion 
Dollars ( ?l,Oow,»tOi) i, divided into One 
Million (1,000,000) shares of the par 
value of One Dollar (§1.00) each, and 
shall be paid for in either propertv, 
money or services, as the board of di- 
rectois shall elect, and said stock 
shall be subscribed at such times and 
in such amounts as may be prescribed 
by tile board of directors. The judg- 
ment of the Board of Directors as to 
tlie value of property and services shall 
be conclusive. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The highest amount of indebtedness 
or liability to which this corporation 
shall at any time be subject is Five 
Hundred Thousand Dollars ($500,000> 

IN WITNESS WHEiiEOF. We have 

hereunto set our hands and seals tiiis 

14th day of ji>ecember. l^lj. 

GEORGE WATERS. 

AV. A. McCLAREN. 

L. L. CULBERTSON. 

Signed. Sealed and Delivered 

in Presence of: 

N. M. LOWE. 

GRACE WEISS. 



('Seal) 
( Seal ► 
(.Seal) 



.^tate of Minnesota, County of St. Louis 

— s.s. 

On this 14th dav of December, A. D. 
1012, before me. a Notar.v Public within 
and for said County, personally ap- 
peared George Waters, L. L. Culb--t- 
son and W. A. McCiaren, to me known 
to be tlip persons described in and who 
executed the foregoing instrument, and 
acknowledged that they executed the 
same as their free act and deed. 
N. M. LOWi:. 
Notary Public, 
St. Louis Co., Minn. 
(Notarial .'^eal. St. Louis Co., Minn. < 

My commission expires Dec. 20, 1918. 

State of Minnesota, Department of 

State. 

I heieb.v certify that the within i-.- 
strument was filed for record in this 
office on the 17th day of December, 
A. D. iyl2, at 11 o'clock A. M.. and was 
duly recorded in Rook W-S of Incorpo- 
rations, on pag*' 248. 

JULIUS A. SCHMAHL, 

Secretary of Sttle 



ll^all.-J. 

OFFICE OF P.EGLSTER OF DEED.S. 

State of Minnesota, County of St. Lou's 

S3. 

I hereby certify that the within in- 
strument was filed in this office for 
re.'ord Dec. ti. litlJ. at 11:10 A. M., suiil 
was duly recorded in Book 15 of Misc. 
Iiage 1;10. 

BENJAMIN F. SMITH. 

lieg^ister of Deeds. 
By STEWART SMITI: 

L>eputj . 
I». II., Dec. 23, 24, 1912. 



CITY KOTK KS. 

I ITY CLERP?s"ofFiCE^ 

Dulutli. Minn. 

Notice is hereby given that applica- 
tions have been filed in my office i>v 
the following named persons for li- 
cense to sell intoxicating liquors in 
thf- following named locations, viz: 

F:d. Peterson at No. US East Supe- 
rior street. 

L. Casmir at No. .''.29 W"est Superior 
street, being a transfer from No. li)2 
Lake avenue south. 

Said application^ will be consld-^red 
by the t'ommon Council at a reguh.r 
meeting thereof to be held on Monday, 
.'anr.ary 6, 1913, at 7:?.0 o'clock P. M. 

C. S. PALMER. 

City Clerk, 
r*. XL. Dec. 23 and 30, 1912. D 588. 



TOYS 

V2 PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & CO. 



HE DULUTH HERALD 

sponsible for the lowering of the rates. 
The cut is a substantial one, and pro- 
portionate decrea.-^es we announced for 
the points between h«tie and the border. 

Since the new rOttA was opened the 
trafile over it has b^ heavy, and the 
lower rates, it is belfeved, will atlniti- 
late trade betweeri Vuluth and the rup. 
idlv growing bord^T r<)uiitrv 

Following is a t«ble of tlie. old and 
new rates to International Falls: 

^ Old. New. 

1 60 Ml 58 

- 51 >a 49 

3 40 Vb 38 

4 ^. ., 30»i 29 

5 i.i^4■ 24 23 

a 25 23 

b 21 Vi 20 

c ISVa 17 

d 15 14 

e 12 12 



December 23. 1012. 



21 



PROPOSES "PURE SHOE'* 
LAW FOR THE NATION 



CENTRAL 



BUSINESS 
COLLEGE 



.^0 Kant Superior Street, Uiiiiith. 
WINTKIl TKUM, JAN. 6TH. 

New classes 111 all departments. 
Da\' school. Night school. 
RARUIOK & MrPHKIlSOX. 



TWO BRITISH 

VESSELS LOST 



Fifteen Go Down With One 

and Seven Are Missing 

With Second. 

Mobile. Ala., Dec. 23. — The British 
schooner Georglana with eleven pas- 
sengers and a crew of four, foundered 
off Lucea. Jamaica, in trying to make 

that port during the November gulf 
storm, and all on board were lost, ac- 
cording to dispatches received here 
today. The British schooner Carte- 
gena has not been heard from since 
Nov. 17 and it is believed that vessel 
with her crew of seven also has gone 
down. 

One of those who perished on the 
Georglana was W. R. Bodden, a well 
known merchant oi" Georgietown. Grand 
Cayman. 



SURVEYORS ON 

NEW HIGHWAY 



Work Begun on Canadian 
End of Proposed Inter- 
national Road. 

Fort William, Ont., Dec. 23. — A par- 
ty of surveyors left last night to sur- 
vey a route for the intern«atlonal high- 
way, to be built frbm Fort William 

to Duluth. The party does not ex- 
pect to reach Duluth before spring. 



Active steps are being taken by St. 
Louis, Lake and Cook county people 
to make possible the building of the 
proposed international highway. 

It is proposed to connect the road 
alre»ady built from Duluth to Two 
Harbors with a road through Lake 
and Cook counties to connect at the 
border with a road to be built from 
Port Arthur and Fort William by the 
Canadian government. Cook county 
expects to issue bonds to defray the 
cost of the portion of the ro»ad run- 
ning from the Lake county line to the 
border. 



T^vo MotorlHtH Killed. 

Decatur. 111., Dec. 2:!. — illen Blue and 
Floyd WriKlit were killed and liay 
Lindsey and Ralph Blue of Mahontiet 
were fatally injured in an automobile 
wreck near M^isfield early today. 
Floyd Davi.s, ji'Mo wasidriving the car. 
^escaped unhurt. 



TO PARENTS 



Chicago News: 'I know nothing 

whatever about children," said the 
family man. 'I have several of my 
own. These little angels go over me 
carefully every day and disinfect me 
from all theories that may have ac- 
cumulated since the last previous 
overhauling. So I .im entirely sanitary 
so far as theory germs are concerned. 

•But 1 just want to talk over with 
you the question of what makes you 
and me such foola In the matter" of 
disciplining our children. 

■"It hag been said that nobody striV:es 
his children nowailays except in self 
defense. Tliat is too nearly true of us 
in our indulgent moments. But wliat 
naggers we have become since we be- 
gan accumulating theories and 
psychological information about the 
little dears: 

"What, for instance, would you have 
a n-year-old boy l>e, just now? A 3- 
.vear-old boy. wouldn't you? Well, then, 
what makes you get so excited and so 
surprised and so shocked and disap- 
pointed and pained when he takes a 
Pail of water or a sprinkling can and 
carries it around and plays in It un- 
til his clothej are wet and his shoes 
are sopping? 

"Isn't that the 3 -year-oldest thing a 
boy could do? Did you expect him to 
go and ask for a piece of table oil- 
cloth, go and get out his rubbers and 
put them on and sedately carrv that 
pail around, carefully leaning over to 
keep himself dry? What fun would 
slopping a pail of water around be to 
a child who was so mature as to think 
or all that? 

"Didn't you do the same thing when 




W. A. OLDFIELD 
Of Arkansas. 

A "pure shoe" bill has been intro- 
duced in tlie house at Washington by 
Congressman W. A. Oldfield of Arkan- 
sas. Tills bill makes the pure food 
laws applicable to the shoe Industry. 
There Is no business in which tliere is 
.so much adulteration. .Shoes are made 
out of paper, strawboard, leather- 
board, pineboard and other substitutes. 
This bill originated with some St. Louis 
makers of shoes. They had it proposed 
to the Missoviri legislature more than 
a year ago and fought for its adop- 
tion, but the opposition of otlier shoe 
manufacturers defeated it. The law 
would compel makers to brand a shoe 
with tlie statement of the fact that it 
was made of leather substitute. 



you were his age? 

■•Yes, you had all the fool foibles 
your little son has. You did 3-year- 
old things when you were 3, just as 
you do 40-year-old things now that 
you are 40. And so long as you do 
things that are as nearly normal at 
40 as the things your sou does are 
normal for a i! -year-old, your son 
will have no occasion, now or here- 
acter, to reprimand you or be asliamed 
of you. It is only when the 40-year-old 
begins showing 17-year-old proclivities 
and tendencies that the trouble sets 
in for everybody concerned. 

"So you should earnestly endeavor to 
be as thoroughly 40 years old as he is 
thoroughly 3. You'll be all right if you 
succeed in attaining that high degree 
of proficiency In living up to your 
age and opportunities." 



TH[ MONOPLANE HUNT 



THE LARGEST AND BEST 
ASSOirrMEXT OF 

MECHANICAL 



CUTLERY, SKATES AND 

SPORTING GOODS 

\\\ the city. Call a4i(l see before 
buying. 



NORTHERN 
HARDWARE CO. 

Two Stores — 222 WEST SU- 
PERIOR ST., and 408 FIFTY- 
FIFTH AVE; WEST. 



To the ordinary individual there 
might appear little that is humorous in 
aviation, writes Graham-White in the 
Strand Magazine; it would seem, 
rather, to be a grim and grisly busi- 
ness, with sut'den death always at the 
pilot's elbow. But the dangers of .lir- 
ma'i.=?hip are ridiculously exaggerated, 
and there is, as a matter of fact, much 
that is amusing in what 1 might call 
everyday aviation, and particularly in 
regard to the operation of a Ilying- 
school. 

And now as to the most amusing 
incident I can tliink of. "^Yell, here 
it is: 

A lu^oil. after landing at my Hendon 
aerodrome one evening at the end of 
a llight on a monoplane, jumped out of 
the machine before It had stopped 
running along the ground. Stumbling, 
he not only let go of the machine, t>ut 
accidentally touclied tht; engine- switch 
.Tud accelerated tlie motor to a hlgii 
rate of speed. 

The result w.is that the monoplane 
darted away like a big. angry bird; 
and, as thougii rejoicing in its new- 
found freedom, it ran tliis way ;ind 
that about the aerodrome, its motor 
humming defiarce. 

\\ith confident mien, some of the 
mechanics hurried out to catch the 
runaway; but they liad not reckoned 
upon the ridiculously eccentric actions 
cf the maclilne. 

Soon we Avho were watching were 
convulsed with piirth. \\'hirling hither 
and tiiither under the Impulse of Its 
propeller, but without the power actu- 
ally to rise, the monoplane seemed in- 
stinct with the desire to elude pursuit. 

Buzzing awt'v across the aerodrome, 
it led the mechanics a fatiguing chase. 
Then, suddenly wheeling round, it 
plunged at them, and scattered them 
with the fear of its sninning propeller. 

Again they chased It; again the m« 
chine, as though a thing alive, wheeled 
round and made a vicious dart at them. 
This lime one man managed to grip 
its tail, but he was shaken off and fell 
flat on his back. 

Perspiring freely, and with many 
terse remarks to express their annoy- 
ance, the mechanics again took up 
their weary pursuit. Meanwhile, quite 
characteristically. unfeeling onlook- 
ers merely laughed. 

L'p and down, to and fro, the men 
ran and dodged and slipped and fell, 
their furious, unavailing shouts and 
cries mingling with the spiteful splut- 
ter of the monoplane's engine. 

At length, having laughed at the 
ludicrous spectacle until we could 
laugh no more, some of us who were 
standing by the sheds made a move to 
Join In the game. 

But the machine seemed possessed. 
It wrenched Itself away from the grii> 
of several pairs of eager hands, and 
then hopped and floundered to some 
otlier corner of the aerodrome. One 
or two of the pursurers sat on the 
ground, quite exhausted. Others were 
laughing too much to pursue effectual- 
ly. And still the monoplane buzzed at 
large. 

Finall.v, when we were all weak 
from running or laughing. I managed 
to get hold of a wing-tip. The mono- 
plane whirled round and round fu- 
riously, but I was able to hold on. 
And then a mechanic ran in and 
switched off the motor. At once the 
machine stopped its absurd gyrations. 
But while It lasted the monoplane 
hunt was the funniest sight you could 
imagine. 



NOW UK LIVES A LONELY LII^E. 

Cleveland Plain Dealer: This is the 
way he lost his home, as he called at 
the house where he used to roam to 
iHrt with the girl he liked the beat — 
'l\v:is thus that he lost that cozxiiest: 

•You know Ml. Benjamin GriggsV' 
said she. 

• I hate the son-of-a-gun." said he. 

■'Listen — last night he paid me .a 
caW and he tried to kiss me, out in the 
hall!" 

■The dickens he did! Well, well 

poor Ben'. So the poor fellow Is drink- 
ing again!'" 

And that was the jest that started 
the fight, and that was the way he 
lost the delight of seeing his lady on 
Saturday nigiit. And all who knew It 
say. 'Serves him right!" 



TOYS 

V2 PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & €0. 



Tr^~^ 



Christmas 
Jewelry 



\ EVERYBODY WELCOME TO CALL. 

Gifts are, or should be, keepsakes — how appro- 
priate, indeed, something in Jewelry — for '"her;" or, 
for that matter, for "him." 

A knicknack will answer, if intended for only an 
acquaintance — a more pretentious article for a friend 
or dear one. 

Here you find everything in Silver or Gold — 
Jev.els, too — timepieces for mantel or hall or shelf — 
useful things and of value. 

Prices go in easy stages from trinkets up to 
Dismonds — and even Diamonds are within the 
rea:h of any purse — beginning with rings at $5.1>0. 

For 26 years we have continued to serve our cus- 
tomers honestly and satisfactorily by always .giving 
them the highest quality in Jewelry and Diamonds. 

Pay us a visit, we are out of the High Rent dis- 
trict. You get the benefit. 

J.GRUESENy 





JEWELER. 

232 West First St. 

Opposite Wolvin Bldg. 




TOY DEPARTMENT 




HaU 




All Toys and 
Dolls in basement, to 
close out, Monday- 
night and Tuesday. 



Tour 

Credit 

Is Good. 



'S^^J/smmb^ 



Complete 

House 

Furninhers. 



202 and 304 EAS'I' SI PKRIOK STRHFT, Dl LI TH. 



One $250 Used 
Piano — Quick 
SaleHr 




STORY & CLARK PIANO CO, 

Factory Salesrooms 426 West First Street 



STREET FA KER IN O LD LONDON 

Madam, a Marvelous Woman, the Real North Amer- 
ican Mystery, Told Futures for Two 
Pence Each. 



as the crowd 
three or four 

consisted of a 



Keble Howa d In the Ixindon Mail; 
I came across them In the main 
street of an olc Dorsetshire town. The> 
had taken up their pitch between the 
principal hotel and the corn exchange 
— an excellent position, 
of gaping country folk 
deep, testified. 

Their visible "props" 
very old pony, a very old cart, a small 
ttoK in a net hag and a kind of ban- 
ner, supported by an easel, on which 
were depleted numerous scenes of 
gruesome and quite unexpected mis- 
fortunes. 

'Jliere were just the three of them — 
the man, iii.s wife, and the negro. The 
man wore a peiiked cap and a gray suit 
much the woise for wear. lie had 
tired eyes but i hopeful mustache. His 
intonation was In harmony with his 
mustache, but nis manner agreed wltli 
Ills tired eyes. He clung bravely to 
tiie upward nt)te and the patter was 
cheerful enough, but the face 
utterly without: expression, and 
tired eyes looked constantly from 
to end of the street and Hot at 
spectators. 

"Madam la Marvelonn.*' 

"We have served royalty I" he 
saying as 1 aporoaclied. "Three times 
at Cowea we have served his majesty 
King Alfonso ot Spain! We had the 
honor of .serving the late King Kdward 
— bless his memory ! We have served 
Prince Kdd\'. the young prince of 
Wales! We have also served Sir Thom- 
as Lipton and another man who is a 
friend to you all — ^I>lovd George!" 

t-tere came a timid groan, followed 
by a general hiuglt. 

"Vou are tiow beholding." he con- 
tinued, "the re;! North -American mys- 
ter.v! All you have to do is to show 
madam your left hand! Madam is a 
marvelous wonan — a very marvelous 
woman is madam. If we cliarged you 
a shilling you'd think all the more of 
us! We're showing you a wonderful 
turn! Madam is just doing this be- 
tween her engagements on tlie stage — • 
just for a few weeks- 
self .\ very marvelous 
dam!" 

Madam Auiiine!! Hernelf 

T pressed forward, anxious 



was 

the 
end 
llie 



was 



-to amuse her- 
woman is ma- 



te see 



madam amusing herself. I discovered 
a weary looking woman, dressed in a 
thick cloth coat, a dragging skirt and 
a blue hat trimmed with lace that had 
l>een white. She was examining the 
hand of a shy, giggling maid from the 
hotel, whose friends In the crowd 
shouted eager comments on her char- 
acter. Presently madam, that "wonder- 
ful woman," dropped the hand took a 
printed slip from a bundle that she 
carried in a reticule and marked It 
here and there with a pencil. Finally 
slie scribbled a word or two on the 
liack, lianded the paper to the mald- 
.servant, collected some money, and 
went on to the next client. 

♦Two renre, Pleaar.** 

The patter continued. "Peer or peas- 
ant, bishop or burglar, madam gives 
them all the same attention! You all 
get the same attention from madam" 
She s a wonderful woman! She's the 
real North American mvstery! She's 
only doing this for a few weeks to 
.amuse herself— just for a little holi- 
day! \Ae have served King Alfonso of 
.Spam three times at Cowes! We had 
the honor of serving the late King 
Edward!" And the rest as before 

Waiting an opportunity. 1 pushed 
through the circle and gave madam mv 
left hand. I noticed that the expre.s'- 
sion of her eyes was very gentle and 
her voire cultured. 1 was comforted 
to think that she was only doing tlils 
to amuse herself — just for a little holi- 
day. 

She examined my hand for perhaps 
half a minute, tlien she selected one 
of her printed papers, marked it rap- 
Idlv. and gave it to me. 

"How mnch'.'" I asked. 

"Two pence, please!" 



Read The 
HeraldWants 



INTENTIONAL DUPLICATE EXPOSURE 



I DEFECTIVE PAGE 




t 



DECREASE IN 
THE VISIBLE 



Smaller Quantity on Hand 

Than a Week Ago— 

Prices Stiffen. 

Demand for Flaxseed Very 
Dull— Offers Are Fair- 
Values Sag. 



AMERICAN WHEAT MARKETS, DECEMBER 23, 1912. 



Dec. — Open. 

Duluth 81%b 

Minneapolis 80% 

ChicaKo 86 »4 

Winnipeg 81^ 

Mav — 

Duluth Rr>Mib 

Minneapolis 85%-% 

(Mileago 91-% 

Winnipeg 85 ^i 



Deo. 
May 



Dec. 
Jan. 
May 



Open. 

.84!!4 

.87% 



Open. 
1.25a 
1.25a 
.1.28 



High. 


Low. 


Close. 


Dec. 21. 


Vr apow 


.82%b 


.81%b 


.82%a 


.81 %n 


1.07 %n 


.81% 


.80% 


.81%a 


.80%a 


1.02%b 


.86% 


.86 


.86% 


.864^a 


.94 % 


.81% 


.81 -^ 


.81 %b 


.81% 


.96 V» 


.86% 


.85%b 


.86aib 


.85%b 


1.04% 


.86% 


.86% 


.86-% 


.85%a 


1.05%-U6a 


.92 


.90% 


.91%-y: 


:a .91- %b 


.98%b 


.87 


.85 'S. 


.87b 

MfARKE 


.85-;»b 

T. 


.98%-% 


UTH 


DURUM ] 




HiKh. 


I>ow. 


Close. 


Dec. 21. 


y'r ago. 


.85 


.84 


.85 


.84 %n 


1.00 


.88% 


.87% 


.88%a 

MARK] 


.88 

IT, 


1.00% 


JTH LINSEED 




HiKh. 


Low. 


Close. 


Dec. 21. 


Vr ago. 


l.::5 


1.24% 


1.24% 


1.25 14 n 


2.10a 


1.25 


1.24 


1.24 %b 


1.25 %n 


2.07 


1.28 


1.27 


1.27% 


1.28%b 


2.07 



84c; No. 1 nortn»T*. 82@S3%c; to ar- 
rive, 82#83c: choice to arrive, 83%c, 
No. 2 northern, 80^ 81c: No. 2 hard 
Montana, 83c; N0» cj wheat, 78@79c; 
No. 3 yellow corn, 41%@42c; No. 3 
white oats, 30%@31c; No. 2 rye, 5i'ip 
58 %c: bran In 100-pound sacks, I19.0S? 
@ 19.50. :■*. 

Plour — Market wae unchanged; de- 
mand t^lrly good. Shipments, 52,695 
bbl. In wood f. o. b, Minneapolis, first 
patents, $4.05@'4.J8!; second patents, 
$3.90®4.15; first clears. |2.90®3.20; 
second clears, |2.104()2.40. 

Flax — Receipts, &1 cars; year ago, 
holiday: shipment^, 4. Demand good. 
Closing price, $l.?iS%@1.24%. 

Barley — Recelpta, 197 cars; year ago, 
holiday; shipments, 119. Demand 
good. Closing T^ngt. 42(ge0c. 

T-'^ 



HEAVINESS 



IN STOCKS 



Prices Sag to Their Lowest 

Figures Near the 

Close. 



Ponrd 



of Trade. Dec. 23. — 
..nslderably on the mar- 

.. ..inerica before the close 
ly on account of the re- 
decrease m the American 
iiluth 

Cash 



Bulr.t' 
Wheat 
Kcts it ■•>> 
today, lur^ 

olosed 



Duluth 
wheat clo8«d ^c hightT. 
*,«c over December. Durum 
a cent up. *.»uts closed %c down 
wnd b.ulev wert- xmu hungeU. 
I>ecember Max closed a cent 
Jinuary and -May V*S- ^^- „ 

Wheat was vi-ry bullish on 
keis of North America this 
although the rabl»s from 
a different kind of a 
American receipts were 
American visible supply 
to have actually 
84,00i« bu 

Di:luth 
urday at ^r>^4C 
85 %c 
86V»c 



l>alf 

i:>e 

l>uluth 

off and 

the mar- 

mornlr<K. 

Europe tolci 

storv. The 

large, but the 

was reported 

decreased, bein;? 

U.>.s than it was a week ago. 

Mav wheat, which closed t^ai- 

!vr>\c bid. opened today »ii 

bid and at noon was s**lVrJfn'\- 
Therc were Jiigher quotation.- 



Duluth close: Wheat — On track: No. 1 hard, 84%c; No. 1 northern, 83%c; 
No. 2 northern, 81 \c; No. 1 northern to arrive, 83%c; Montana No. 2 hard, 83%c; 
July, 87 %c nominal; December. 82 %c asked; May, 86 %c bid. Durum — On track: 
No. 1, 85%c; No. 2. 83%c. To arrive: No. 1, 85%c; No. 2. SS'Sc; December, 85c; 
January, 85c nominal; May, 88%c asked. Linseed — On track, $1.24%; to arrive, 
11.24%; December. $1.24%; January, $1.24% bid; May, $1.27%. Oats, on track. 
30%c; to arrive, tJOVsC. Kye, on track, 62-57c; to arrive, 52-57c. Barley, on 
track. 40-60C. 

Klevator receipts of domestics grain — Wheat. 324,897 bu, last year 103,748 
bu; barley, .Tl,683 bu, last year 9,053 bu; f\ax, 59,463 bu, last year 48,038 bu; rye, 
2,799 bu. last year 4,478 bu; oats, 1,173 bu, last year 54.466 bu. 

Shipments of domestic grain — Wheat. 1,268 bu. last year 2,567 bu; flax, none, 
last year 17,000 bu; oats, 2,450 bu, last year 5,500 bu;" barley, none, last year 
1,827 bu; rye. 2,692 bu, last year none. 

Elevator receipts of bonded grain — Wheat, 8,756 bu, last vear 19,780 bu; flax, 
2.610 bu, last year none; oats, 1,905 bu, last year none; barley, 1,148 bu, last 
year none. 

.^Shipments of bonded grain — Wheat, 2,567 bu, last year 30,000 bu; oats, 116 
bu, last year none. 



THE HAY MARKET. 



also at Chicago, 
nipeg. 

Llvt rpoi'l 
changed at 
Av&s bearci, 



Minneapolis and Win- 



wheat today 
S.(l lower. 
V the reports 



of- 
Iho 



closed un- 
The market 
of continued 
fine weatn.r in Argentina and the 
i.rospe<is of further heavy Ameiicdn 
shipments, and in spite of l»g'\t^r 
ferings ;n.d a bt-lter inQulry from 

contii.' r.t . w^ 11 

Kins DemaDU uuii. , 

The-. vs.t"*t" "emand for flaxseed 

on he Duiuth market ^^^'^^^JPfZ^f- 
find what iht re was was quite ^cai- 
tered it'. -it\'-s and receipts were 
fairlv lar:-:t Trade was very 
noon tod.,:. I'iUuh December 
was 'i.c liuti. Januar\ 1 ''4«- - 
il^v ic off Minneapolis cash seed di.l 
M-'> 1^ f'ff^^ -Yrom the Duluth Decern - 
■ itipeg December ilax- 
,v was ic off at $1.0o4. 
./ uii.ier Duluth December. 



not vary 
ber pric 

eeed at r. 
being li^ 



dull. At 
flaxseed 
off a '.id 



Ni. 
.\.) 
-No 
.N) 
.No 
.\i 
.N.i 

No 
No 
No. 
-No. 
No. 
.No. 
\(. 
No 
• o. 
.No. 
No. 
No. 
No. 
No 
No 



irraile 
grade 
grailo 
Krailc 
graite 
graile 
grade 
grade 
Krsde 
grade 
grade 



1 



car . 
cars 



tough 
tough 
tough 



aiui 
and 

and 



fiosteU . . 
f rostetl . . 
fiosted. . 



net and (ruzcn. . 



ulieat, 

wheat 

wheal, 1 I'&r. . 

wheat. 1 car, 

wheat, 1 car, 

wheat, 1 car, 

wlieat, 1 car 

wheat. 1 car, frosted 

wheat, 1 car 

wheat. 1 car, 

wheat, 1 car 

2 ncrthein. 2 cars, bonded. 

2 northern, 1 car, t>cuded 

1 durum, 3 cars 

1 durum, o cam 

I ihinini. 8.0tiO bu. to arrive 83 

1 durum, 1.250 bu, to arrive 84% 

1 unsiuu, pari car 84*i 

1 durum, 2,0DO bu. to arrive 85 Vi 

1 durum. 1 car 83',» 

2 durum, 6 cars 83 



.78% 

.7m 

.73>i 

.73',, 

.78>i 

.67 

.78 

.«8 

.77 

.78>4 

.78^ 

.H% 

.85 



2 durum, 1 
grade durum, 
grade durum, 
12 cars 
7 cars . 



car . . . . 
2 cars 
1 car . , 



Flaxseed. 



Flaxseed 
Saturday wi 



closing 



duriiic the week 
,s very steady, but the price 

l-ecember showed a gain oT ^*c. «u^"«» 
Avres Jar.uarv was reported exactly 
hV'lame'-:.. -a week before London 
faipiitta laiiuaiv wt-re -%t on. 

Aece'pts at Luluth have been falling 
cff rapidly. Durii-^ the 
last Saturday L>uluth --- before 

age last Saturday. 

the contrary,_ sii_o_v>j- ".,r„V received 



Du- 
at a 



week closing 
received 441 



that 



Minneapolis, on 
showed a considerable 
narket having 



week closing last 



for 



On tra 
lar. 



A«ked. 



Mi 

v.: 

Elevator 
Monday, ii; 
tu; Wednesday 
110.573 bu: 
day. 79,1*28 bu; 
before. 74u,570 

Shipments of domestic 
117.174 bu: 



Minneapolis 
some time 
for the 
seem to have 
thev have again 
Duluth price. 

Sinarket re- 

585 cars the 

cars the week 



1.20-*» 

1.25^4 
Nom. 

1.2i.'2 

Xom. 
1.28'i 
Bid. 

seed : 
91,835 



Barley, 

Parley, 

Barley, 

..:ity. 

■tarle.v. 

t.nriey. 
Uarley, 

lailey, 
Oats, 1 
Oats, 1 
Oats. 1 
Oats. 1 
No. 
No 
No. 
No. 
.No 
No. 
Nu. 



2 
1 
1 

1 

1 
1 



B cars 
,i cars 
S cars 
1 cars 
1 car . 
1 car 

car. 
car. 
car. 

car. 
1 
1 



Increase. ^^ 

481 cars dunng .t'^«:„ r \--- the "week 

a vear ago last Saturday 
crushers hu\ t been 
bidding over the Diiluth price 
seed, but of iate the> 
had enough, for 

*''A';''Avnnn\t'/the^ "ffaxseVd .receipts 
havl ^Vown^'tv.i\e a large increase. 
During last week that 
ceived 788 cars against 
^^•eek before and -^^ t" c:aturdav 
closing a year ago last Satuioa>. 
CIosiuK Prlce»i. 
^. . 1^,5 V.-cJ. Thurs. Frl Pat 

1 24^3 1-25% 1.2oH 

1 24 1.25»-a 1.251* 

Asked. Asked. 

i.-lOi 1.25^ 1.2il>.» 

Bid. Asked. N"m. 

1 •,::>» i.28»* i.28»i 

AsktU Asked, 
receipts of domestic 
If.- 2 52 bu; Tuesday. 

115,942 bu; Thursday, 
Fridav. 84.036 bu; Satur- 
tital, 600.666 bu; week 
bu: vear ago. 198,198 bu. 
seed: Monday, 
Tuesday, none: Wednesday, 
none- Thursdav, none; Friday, none; 
SaturdaT- none;- "total. H.l"* ^u: week 
before, 1,285,390 bu; year ago, 2-l,J4l 

^ •;dnelda"-V.S18 ";u/T'hursday, .^.53 bti; 
T-ruiav 1675 bu; Saturday. 9..-1 du- 
foial 47 569 bu; week before. 
bu; vear aj,o. 4.978 bu. 

Shipments of bonded 
last week; week before, 
none. 



No. 
No 
No. 
No. 
.No. 
Nn. 
.Vo 
No. 
No. 



No 

V,, 

So. 
No. 
No. 
No 



arrlte 

to arrive. . 



to arrire. 
to arrire. . 



4-W. . 
•S -W. . 
4-W.. 
4-W.. 
rye. 1 car . , 
rye, 1 car . . 
Hox 2 cars, to 
flax. 1.750 bu. 
flax, 22 cars .. 
Oax, C cars . . 
flax, 1,000 bu, 
fwy. ;'..(!iio bu. 

flax, 4 cars 

flax. 1 car 

flax. ."5.300 bu, to arrive 

flax, 4.000 bu, to arrive 

flas. 1,000 bu, to arrive 

flax, 1 car 

flax, part car 

flax, part car 

flax. 1 car, N. W., bonded.. 

Hejected wheat . 1 car 

No grade wlieat, 1 car 

No grade wheat. 1 car 

grade wheat . 1 car 

1 fi»x. 1 rar 

1 flax, 1 car 

3 wheat, 1 car, smutty 

2 nortliern. 1 car , 

durum, 1 car 



1 



.82\ 

.82*4 

.70 

.46 

.4S 

.44 

.48 

.49 

.4.'> 

.55 

.47 

.2fi'i 

.28 

.29H 

.29V4 

.55 

.56 
1.24 
1.24% 
1.2414 
1.24Vj 
1.24% 
1.24H 
1.24% 
1.24*i 
1.25 
..24H 
1.24H 
1.24 

1.2:^ '4 

1.22Vi 

1.06>^ 

.79 

.77% 

.79% 

.80% 

1.24»4 

1.24^ 

.76% 

.80% 

.85H 



I generally and great scarcity of cars. 

I The strength in the cash oats, the re- 

; suit of the export movement and the 

: short Interest in the December, makes 

I It all the more advisable to sell cash 

holdings. Even the No. 3 white oats 

are bringing a stiff premium over the 

May price. To those inclined to carry 

oats, purchases of May and sales of 

cash seem distinctly in order, as they 

not only do not have to pay carrying 

charges but are actually getting a pre. 

mium for the cash oats. 

"The movement of corn continues 
moderately heavy only, and the demand 
ample. Receipts are mostly of the No. 
4 grades." 

« • • 
Grain stocks in local elevators: 
Wheat— No. 1 hard. 36.369 bu; No. 1 
northern, 2,429,331 bu; No. 2 northern, 
644,707 bu; No. :i. 26,925 bu: No. 4. 99 bu, 
rejected, 1.021 bu; no grade. 46,534 bu: 
we.stern, 58,540 bu; special bin, 544,- 



MARKET GOSSIP. 

Duluth bonded grain receipts todav: 
Wheat, 19 cars; flax, 8 cars; total, 27 
cars. 



Cars of 



wheat 



25,466 



Duluth, dojaaestic 

Minneapolis 

Winnipeg 

Chicago 

St. Louis 

♦Holiday. 

• 

Cars of linseed 



Duluth, domestic 

Minneapolis 

Winnipeg 

•Holiday. 

* 

Foreign closing 
Wheat, unchanged 



* * 
received — 

Saturday and 
Sunday. 

354 

, . .. , 759 

417 

28 

206,000 

• * 

received — 
Saturday and 

Sunday. 

77 



91 
87 



Tear 
Ago. 

62 

• 

574 



Year 

Ago. 

20 

* 

21 



783 bu; durum, 515,770 bu; winter, 4:),- 
920 bu; bonded, 435,292 bu; total, 
4,785,291 bu; wheat afloat in harbor, 
942,052 bu: grand total, 5,727,343 bu; 
increase, domestic, 1.422.761 bu: de- 
crease, bonded. 143,698 bu; total in- 
crease, 1,279,063 bu; total a vear ago, 
6.761,993 bu. Oats — Bonded, 95,883 bu; 
domestic, 334,754 bu: total, 430,637 bu; 
Increase, bonded, 6,160 bu; increase, 
domestic, 21,810 bu; total increase, 
27,970 bu. Rye — Domestic, 129,835 bu; 
increase, 27,368 bu. Barley — Bonded, 
110,324 bu; domestic, 573,295 bu; total, 
683,619 bu; decrease bonded, 7,489 bu: 
Increase, domestic, 204,243 bu; total 
increase, 196,754 ba. Flax — Bonded. 
154,471 bu; domestic, 1.321,918 bu: 
afloat, 209,298 bu; total, 1,68.5,687 bu: 
increase, bonded. 26,969 bu; increase, 
domestic, 540,877 bu; total increase, 
567,846 bu. 

• • • 
Broomhall's Australian agent cables: 

"The wheat crop of New South Wales 
i.s officially placed this vear -.t 
24,368.000 bu; against 23,372,000 bu 
last year." 

♦ • ♦ 
BroomhaH'r; Indian agent cables: 

"The area planted to wheat in the cen- 
tral provinces and Beror this year is 
officially placed at 3.661.000 acres 
against 3,559,000 acres last year." 

• * * 

An Argentine cable received this 
morning says the weather in that 
country continues fine. 

* ♦ • 

A wire from Minneapolis savs: "The 
cash wheat market is steady "and the 
demand fair. No. 1 northern, blue 
stem. Is 2%Zr. under May. Velvet chafi 
Is Ic under blue stem. We find pretty 
fair flour sales with good export In- 
quiry and some business placed." 



The Duluth wholesale price of hay 
has gone up a little during the past 
two weeks. No. l timothy, which two 
weeks ago brought $12.50 to $13 per 
ton, now sells at $12.50 to $13.50; No. 
2, two weeks ago, $10 to $11.50; now, 
$11 to $12; rye straw, two weeks ago, 
$5 to $5.50; now $5.50 to $6; oat straw, 
two weeks ago, $4.50 to $5; now, $5 
to $5.50, Dealers say the rise is 
merely due to the fact that the mar- 
ket is no longer congested with the 
big movement of hay that was taking 
place two weeks ago and earlier. 

During the past two weeks 97 cars 
of hay were received and inspected at 
Duluth against 261 cars during the 
corresponding two weeks of last year. 
During December up to Saturday eve- 
ning, Dec. 21, 168 cars were received 
and Inspected at Duluth against 388 
cars received and inspected during the 
same portion of December last year. 
But, during November. 1912, the num- 
ber of cars received and inspected at 
Duluth was 450 against 368 during 
November, 1911. This year the move- 
ment of hay took place earlier than It 
did a year ago. The Northwest had 
good hay crops both this year and 
last. 

The present movement of hay 
through Duluth is far more local than 
it was last year. At present Duluth 
is drawing its hay from 200 miles to 
the west, south and southeast and 
sending it out over the range country 
of Northern Minnesota and the log- 
ging country of Northern Minnesota 
and Northern Wisconsin. A year ago, 
when hay was scarce in most parts of 
the countrv south of an east and west 
line through the Twin Cities, Duluth 
was sending hay as far as Florida. 



per keg. 



MIxrrt nuts, per 

CIPER— 
New apples sweet, 

HONEY— 
Twenty -f"ur frames. 

FRESH VEGETABLES- 

Lettuee leaf, per bu 

Head lettuce, bu. , . ^. . : — — 
Florida wu bc»M. per t«awcr 

Parsley, pet doz • 

Ciarllc, new Italian, P«r la 

OMlic. fancy. 50-lb hamDert, 
Hothouse radtohw, doi. 
Hothouse cucuii3»)er8, doi 



•••• ••••••••••••••• 



3.00 
4.M 



• • • ••• •• « 



par bbi. 



Pepper*, per »ni«il U*k«t.., 

CauUflovier, per bu 

Hubbard wiuaah. extra Uirge 

POTA TO Hii— ' 
White etock potatoes. *clect«d. 

JeSiy Vwe^t"pot*vo«*^ «*f bu hamper 
BOOTS- 

ParfnlP«, J*' ^^■••iLL 
Hcrte radlsJi. root, per 
rndUU, per U»... 



... I.l* 
... 2.M 
... 9.M 
... .60 

, •• ••■•■•■«••■•• ••*?■ 

per ID •■•••••■•« aiS 

unchM 85 

1.79« 2.00 

•>■•■• * . 99 

a.s* 



taaej, per 



bbl. 



Especial Weakness Shown 

By Hill Group in Late 

Trading. 



Horse 



cwt 



BOSTON COPPER STOCKS 

The Boston stock quotatlonB funitehed by Gay & 
Sturels, 320 West Superior street. 



L,i8ted Stock* 



:3 



cables: 
to %d 



Liverpool — 
lower; corn. 



THE CHICAGO MARKET. 



seed: None 
9,851 bu; year 



n^> 



«>ales Monday. 



i i,i.rt,]<:ni, 
1 wrtUrni. 

1 nor.titn: 
I nt'itlifni, 

I I,Ortl:(!!l. 

1 nf-rtherti. 
1 nrrtiifrn. 
1 ricr!..eni. 
1 nortlnr.i. 
J i.ortliern. 
1 i.i rthMM. 
1 rn.'rt!ieni, 
1 iiortlu-rn. 

1 iiorihern, 

2 r.ortheni. 
2 riorlhem. 

. 2 mr: 

i IM'T 

i.n •.,. . 
wheat. 1 
\v!ie:i' ■- 



to arrL.Te.. 



■ an 
'?, cars 
4. 800 bu. 

:;t lais 

1 lar 

i; cam 

1.-) Ot'O k>u, to arrive. . 
2('..(>.K) tu, u> arrive. 

:; cars 

o fare 

:; lars, to arrive 

C cars 

3.000 b'l. to arrive 

l.TPO I'U. to arrive. .. 

:8 cars 

9 rank 

1 1 <-»TS 

■ I ars 



..$ 



•1 



N ' crade vu.t..;, 
N> pracie wfkeal. 
>'i. grade whetr, 
No grade wheat . 
No eradc wtieal. 



damaged and frosted . . 



A GOOD FIRM TO SHIP 
YOUR GRAIN TO 

ATWOOD- LARSON 
COMPANY, Inc. 

Special attention griven to cash 
grains. We give all shipments our 
personal attention. 



DrLUTH. 



ItllNNEAPOLXS. 



SHIP TO 



" POEHLER CO. 

Established 1855. 

GRA.IIM CON4MISSION 

MIXMCAPOLIS. DlLITIl. 



^sd to %d higher, 

* * • 

Minneapolis indemnities: May puts, 
85%(5 86?ic bid; calls, 86U(S'86%c bid. 

• • • 

Decrease in American visible wheat 
supply, la.st week, 84,000 bu; increase, 
week before, 121,000 bu; decrease, year 
ago, 70,000 bu. Corn — Increase, last 
week, 1,346,000 bu; week before, 547,- 
000 bu; year ago. 882,000 bu. Oats — 
Decrease, last week, 784,000 bu; de- 
crease, week before, 847,000 bu; in- 
crease, year ago, 254.000 bu. 
« • • 

Visible wheat changes — Increases — 
Baltimore, 159,000 bu; Detroit, afloat, ^ 
256,000 bu; Duluth, 1,423,000 bu; Min- 
neapolis, 1,621,000 bu; New Orleans, 
55,000 bu. Decreasea — Boston, 15,000 
bu; Buffalo, afloat, 615,000 bu; in store. 
451,000 bu; Chicago, U82.000 bu; De- 
troit, in store, 459,000 nu; Galvasion, 
29,000 bu; Indianapolis, 13,000 bu; Kan- 
sas City, 135,000 bu; Milwaukee, 9,000 
bu; New York, 114,000 bu; Omaha, 204,- 

000 bu; Philadelphia, 54,000 bu; ^>t. 
Louis, 26,000 bu; Toledo, 77,000 bu; on 
lakes, 1,116,000 bu. 

• • • 

Clearances — Wheat, 932,000 bu; flbur, 
28,000 bbl; wheat and flour equal 
1,058,000 bu; corn, 66,000 bu; oats, 51,000 
bu. 

• • « 

The Winnipeg grain exchange will 
be closed Tuesday and Wednesdav. 

• * • 

American primaries — Wheat receipts 
today, 1,746,000 bu; last year, holiday; 
shipment stoday, 640,000 bu. Corn re- 
ceipts today, 1,654,000 bu ; shipments, 
594,000 bu. 

• * • 

Duluth car inspection: Wheat — No. 

1 hard, 2; No. 1 northern, 128; No. 2, 
northern, 98; No. 3, 13; No. 4, 2; western 
red, 3; mixed, 2; no grade, Zl; durum, 
50; rejected, 3; winter, 3; total wheat, 
354; last year, 62; flax, 77; last year, 
20; rye, 2; last year, 3; corn, none; last 
yeat> 2; oats, 4; last year, 17; barley, 
17; last, year, none; total of all grains, 
454; last year, 103; on track, 600. 

* * m 

Somers, Jones & Co.. of Chicago says: 
"The heavy Kuropean demand looks 
I distinctly favorable for wheat values, 
! but it is a question whether the 
strength in coarse grain will continue 
; until the rush movement of corn is 
out of the way. We feel friendly to 
I grain values at present low levels, but 
j notice too much bull talk because of 
I eiiirent light receipts. l.,attcr, we feel 
certain, is owing more to scarcity of 
cars than any other one reason, and 
may not continue. We notice, how- 
ever, that e.xporters take hold freely 
on weak spots, buying oats and barley 
a.s wtll as wheat, and tliis remains tlie 
encouraging feature. 

"Crop scares in winter, wheat, due 
during the next two months, and the 
heavy drain on this country, if con- 
tinued, i-ould easily mean higher prices. 
Tlie Balkan war difficulties are not 
settled by any means and are likely 
al?<o to remain bullish features. 

"Our travelers report ftill elevators 



News of Radical Kind Is Lacking and 
Trading Light. 

Chicago, Dec. 23. — Trade in the grain 
and provision pit was of a light, holi- 
day character at the opening today, 
due partly, however, to the lack of any 
news of a radical character. Grains 
opened unchanged to ^%c down and 
provisions, Influenced by a lighter run 
of hogs than had been expected, from 
unchanged to 5c up. 

May wheat opened unchanged to a 
shade lower, at 91#91i^c to 91c, 
touched 90%, and recovered to 91*40. 

The decrease in the domestic visible 
helped wheat which closed strong. May 
?*®%c up at 91%@92c. 

May corn opened unchanged to a 
shade lower at 48*4c to 48%@48%c, 
and sold at 48'^@48%c, 

Corn closed firm. Mav X 
at 49c. 

May oats started 
with little trade. 

May pork opened 5c up, at $18.1 2 14; 
Mav lard 2!S'5c improved, at $9.95 to 
|9.§2J^, and May ribs 2i^@5c higher, 
flt S9 75 

Cash grain: Wheat — No. 2 red, |1.09i^ 
Ql.lOJ/4; No. 3 red, $1.04® 1.07: No. 2 
hard, 89(g/93c; No. 3 hard, 87®90c; 
No. 1 northern, 89 at 80c; No. 2 north- 
ern, 88f>89c; No. 3 northern, 85@87c; 
No. 2 . 1 ring, 88(R)8Si/^c; No. 3 spring, 
84@S7c: No. 4 spring. 80rai84c; velvet 
chaff, 83@88»^c; durum. 83® 89c. 

Corn — No. 2 yellow, 48%@49c; No. 3 
old, 48c, new 46 @ 47c: No. 3 white, 
41\ic@4^/iic: No. nj yellow, 46i4@48c; 
No. 4, 44>A@46c; No. 4 white, 46@46%c: 
No. 4 yellow, 4 41/2© 46c. 

Oats — No. 2, 33i4@33*4c: No. 2 white, 
35(§ 3514c; No. 3 white, 33(g33^4c; 
standard. 34(5 34 %c. 

Rye, No. 2, 63#63i^c: timothy, $3.00 



closed firm. May ^'b®V*c higher 
',ic down, at 33Vbc, 



@'3.90; 


clover 


seed, $] 


10.00® 19.C 


0; bar- 


ley, 46(?i;75c. 








Wheat- 


- Open. 


High. 


Ixiw. 


Clcm^. 


nec ... 


.86H 


.86% 


.86 


.%€,% 


Mav . . . 


. .91-'.4 


.92 


.90% 


.91% -92 


Julv . . . 


. .89',4-88 


.88% 


.87%-% 


.88% 


Corn- 










Dec ... 


. .48%-48 


.48'i 


.47% 


.48% 


May . . . 


. .48%- -4 


.49 


.4SH-H 


.41) 


July . . . 


. .40'^ 


.49% 


.49%-'.4 


.44% 


Oata— 










De- ... 


. .33 


.S.?i* 


.S2% 


.32% 


May ... 


. .S,3^ 


.M>A 


.33% 


.33%-% 


Julv ... 


. .33'4 


.33 '.4 


.33% 


.33% 


Pork— 










.Tan . . . 


.17.95 


18.00 


17.90 


17.92% 


Mav . . . 


.18.12'^ 


18. 22 '4 


18.10 


18.20 


Lard- 










Jan 


. 9.90 


9.9% 


9.90 


9.92%-95 


>Iay . . . 


. 9. 95-92 ';i 


10.00 


9.92% 


9.97%$10 


Short IUt)»— 








Jan . . . 


. 9.7214 


9.77V4-80 9.70-72>4 


9.77% 


May ... 


. 9.75 


9.80 


9.72%-70 


g.TT-s-sj 




Wew York 


Grain. 




New 


York, D 


ec. 23.- 


-Close: Wheat — 


Decem 


ber, 95% 


c; May 


97?4c. 





Adventure 

Ahmeek 

Algomah 

Allouez 

Amalgamated ......... 

Arcadian 

Arizona Commercial . . 

Bosion & Corbin 

Butte & Ballaklava ... 

Butte & .Superior 

Chino 

Calumet &. Arizona . . . 

Calumet & Hecla 

Centennial 

Copper Range 

Daly West 

E-isi Butte 

Franklin 

Glroux 

Granby 

Greene Cananea 

Hancock 

Indiana 

Inspiration 

Isle Royale 

Keweenaw 

La ftalle 

Mayflower 

Mass • > . 

^11 ami ........ 1 .'4 .. .. 

Michigan . . . 

Mohawk 

Nevada Consolidated . 

Nipissing 

North Butte 

North Lake i- • 

Old Dominion 

Ojlbway 

Osceola • 

Pond Creek 

Quincy 

Ray Consolidated .... 

Shannon 

Shattuck 

Shoe machinery 

Superior & Boston.... 

Superior Copper 

Swift 

Tamarack 

Tuolumne 

U. S. Mining common 
Utah Consolidated.... 

Utah Copper 

Victoria 

Winona 

Wolverine ... 

Zinc 

VnllMted 
Arizona & 
Bay St-ate 

Begole .• • • • 

Bohemia .... 

Boston Ely 

Cactus 

Calaveras 

Chief Consolidated... 

Corbin Copper . 

CortesJ 

Crown Reserve 

Davis Daly 

Dobie 

Dome Extension 

Ely Consolidated .... 

First National 

Gcldfleld Consolidated 

Hdlinger 

Houghton 

La R ose 

Mines Co. of America 

Montana 

New Baltic 

Ohio Copper 

Oneco • 

Pocuplne Gold 

Preston 

Raven 

South Lake . .. • • • •■•••, 

Southwestern Miami .. 

Superior & Globe 

Temlskaming 

Tonopah 

Tonopah Belmont 

Tonopah Extension . . . . 

United Verde Extension 

West End 

Wettlaufer 

Yukon 



Bid i Asked 



'.^ 



Stock!) 

Michigan. 
Gas 



5 
325 

2^/4 
37 >^ 
74% 

2 hi 

3% 

5 

3% 
42 

43% 
69 
525 
17 
49V^ 

5- A 
141^ 

8 
15-16 

8% 

23 
15 

18 14 
31 »4 

1% 
24 ^i 

5 
15% 

5 
25H 

1% 

1 
I 

i 
i 
i 
I 

1 

i 

1 
] 
1 

] 

1 
11 

58 

1% 

3 */2 

68 
2«% 



330 
3 
381^ 



56 1 


19 H 


8»i 


31 »^ 


2% 


52i^ 


2^4 


102 


26 1^ 


76 


20% 


13 1^ 


28^4 


48% 


1% 


37% 


105 


33 


2 '4 


1 41»4 1 



2% 


4 


5% 


4 1-16 


42% 


44 


69% 


535 


18 


50 % 


4 


14% 


8Vi 


4 


67 


8% 


2414 


15% 


18% 


31% 


25% 


5\ 


16 


5% 


26 


23^ 


60 


19% 


8% 


32 


3,' 




53 


2% 


104 


26% 


77 


2114 


13% 


28% 


48% 


1% 


38 



New York. Dec. 23. — Some restraint 
was impo.^ed on speculation by uncer- 
tainty whether the supreme court 
would announce today its decision in 
the Minnesota rate cases. Bear trad- 
ers took advantage of this situation 
to make a br'ef demonstration against 
the trans-continental stocks, but when 
pressure relaxed the market made up 
its losses easily. Business was dull 
throughout the morning, and the re- 
luctance of traders to take a decided 
position was heightened by the ap- 
proach of the Christmas holidays. 
Bonds were steady. 

Trading was dull at the oper.- 
Ing of the stock market to- 
day and fluctuat'ons were Em.iU 
and irregular. The only movements of 
more than a fraction were In Canadian 
Pacific and Western Maryland, which 
lost a point, and Republic Steel pre- 
ferred, which advanced 1 point. 

Heaviness developed and Union Pa- 
cific and the Hill and Copper stocks 
lost a point. Dealings then contracted, 
but the market became steadier and 
rose briskly afterwards, when Steel 
and Reading were bid up strongly. 

Temporary activity and strength fol- 
lowed the announcement that the 
United States supreme court would not 
render any decision in the cases of 
immediate concern to Wall Street. 
Union Pacific bounded 2 points above 
Saturday's close, touching 162, and 
Reading, Southern Pacific and Steel 
improved 1 to 1%. The market tell 
back just as rapidly as it advanced 
and reaction occurring within the 
space of abcut five minutes after which 
speculation became inanimate. 

The market closed heavy. N?ws of 
the indictment of President Mellen of 
the New Haven did not create a ripple 
in the railroad fctocks, but later, when 
the call inonev rates went up to 6 per 
cent, prices sagged to their lOAvest 
figures. Especial weakness was shown 
by the Hill group and Great Northern 
lost 2 points. Declines of a po»nt or 
more were registered in Vnion Pacific, 
Amalgamated Copper and Lehigh % al- 
ley. 

— • 

Furnished by Gay & Sturgis, 320 West 
Superior street. 



per 



No 

Sc. 



Uutabagas, per 
Becu. per cwt... 
Carrota, per cwt 

CABBAGE— 
Hume groAn cabbage. 
Home Br..»n cabbage, 

ONIONS— 
Minnesota red onion*. 
MlDDesoU yeUow, per 
bpar-Ub unions, per crl 

BUTTKU— 

Cieamen. per Itt 

Dairy, per lb 

CHEESE— 

Twlna 

New Tork twJna. 
BlocK 8wi«. per 
Wheel Swiss 

Priuio»t 

Brick cheese, 

EGGS— 

Fiesh 

Storage, per 

MEATS— 

Beef, per lb •• 

Mutton, per lo 

Pork loins, per lb 

Veal, per lb 

Lamb, per lb 

Lard, per lb ■ 

nUESSED POULTB^ — 

Bens, per lb 

Geese, iier lb .• 

Dry r if kP'l turkeys . . 

6tM rooetert 

Springs, per lb...- 

LIVE POULTBT— 

Hens, per lb 

6prlng!<, per lb 

Stag roostert 

HAY— 



• •••<*•••••••■•• 



I •••••••»• 



.50 
2.00 

l.M 

.la 

.75 
l.M 
l.SC 



100-lb crt 1.00 

pi>r tou 15.00 



per sack. 100-Ib. 
aack, 100-Ib 



..259 



•••••••••••a 



1.... 



per lb. 



dos 



.28® 
.22® 



...7® 
.11® 
,.109 
..119 



.159 
.169 



.129 



I.2S 
l.S» 
l.M 

.37 
.i§ 

.It 
.19 
.21 
.22 
.OS 
.20 

.29 
.23 

.13 
.01 
.12 
.14 
.13 
.12 

.15% 

.17 

.21 

.12 

.15)6 

.13% 
.14 

.14 



Mowltza St. 
velopment. 

* * • 

Duluth curb stock quotations 
dav were as follows: 

Stork* — 
American Saginaw .. 

Butte-Alex Scott 

Cactus 

Calumet & Montana . 
Calumet & Corbin ... 
Calumet & Sonora .. 

Carman 

Chief Con 

Cliff Mining 

Copper Queen 

Denn-Arizona 

Duluth Moctezuma . . 

Florence 

Keating 

Elenita 

Mowltza 

Red Warrior 

San Antonio 

Savanna 

St. Mary 

Sierra 

Summit Copper 

Warren 

Warrior Development 



for to- 



Bid. 


Asked. 


«.50 


1 6.7S 


9.60 


10.00 


.10 


.It 


.12 


.14 


.09 


.U 


3.75 


4.M 


.45 


.M 


1.75 
1.00 


in 


.10 


.11 


6.50 


6.7S 




1.60 


1.12 


1.3T 


1.76 


2.00 




2.00 




.SO 


1.06 


1.3T 


3.00 


4.00 


2. 26 


2. ST 


• • • ■ 


.IS 


.9« 


1.00 


.10 


.IS 


.... 


4.00 


1.50 


2.00 



No. 
No. 
No. 

No. 
No. 
No 



prairie fll.OO 

prairie •.•• 

timothy, per Ion 13.00 

timothy, per ton 12.00 

mixed timothy, pfr ton 10.00 

mixed timothy Ui.y, per ton *.00 



Elgin, 
'.4 c. 



111. 



ISlKlH 

Dec. 23. 



-Butter firm at 



C'liioaKO. 

Cliicasc Dec. 23.— Butter— Ewy; receipts, 
tubs; creamery extras, 34c; extra first*, 33c; 
31@33c; seconds. 27@29c: ladles. No. 1. 24c; 
Ing, 22c. Eggs— Finn rc«lpt«, 2,»o3 cases; fresh, 
currents recetpU, at mark, cases indudfcd, 21 @ 24c; 
refrigerator firsts, lt>c firsts, 25c. Cheese— Klrm; 
daisies, 16^(*17c: iwins. 16%@16^c 
cas, 16%i(ql7c; long horns, lO^fel 
Firm; receipts, 47 car^; Michigan 
sota, 45@47c; Wisconsin. 43*a46c. 



4,705 
firsts, 
pack- 



young Amerl- 

e. Potatoes — 

45C«48c; Mlnne- 

Poultry— Steady; 



turkeys, lite, 
11 'sc; springs, 



15c: dieased. IS^c; 
114c. Veal— Stead}; 



chickens, 
9<&14c. 



live. 



STOCKS— 



High.', Low. 1 Close. ;Dec 21 



Can 

Telephone Co. 

Beet Sugar 

Smelting 

LC'Comotive . . . 



Amalgamated 

Anacor.da 

American 

An.erican 

Am« rican 

American 

American 

.\lchison 

IJaltlmore & Ohio 

Biroklyn Rapid Trarjlt 
California Petroleum .. 

Canadian Pacific. 

Car Foundry 

Cilorado Fuel & Iron.. 

Chiito 

Chesapeake & Ohio 

Erit 

do 1st 

Crtat Northern pM 

Oieat Nortlicm Ore 

General Electric 

Irterborough 

do Pfd 

l^hlgh 

Ix uUvllle & Nashville. 

Miss'url Pacific 

New York Central 

Nevada Cnnsolidaied 



76% 


75 


39 H 


39 


aivj 


31 


140^ 


140'i 


52 


51^ 


72»t 


n-u 


43M! 


42% 


106 


105H 


104H 


104 H 


89 >4 


8S% 


54 H 


534 


261 


250 >a 


55U 


55H 


34 


33 H[ 


44>4 


43%i 



7.1 H 

39 

31% 



76% 
40^ 
31% 



140%> 140% 



New York. » 

New Tork, Dec. 23. -Buuer— Frm ; recelpU. 7.201 
tvls: creamery extras, 37@37Hc; flflrsts, 32@35c; 
held extras, 32^a^33>4c; flrstg. 30(a31^4c: state 
diary, finest. 32@24c; process extraa, 26Vi@27M:c; 
25H<526c; Imitation creamery firsU, 25® 
fartory held, 23He24^^c; 
23',4@24c. Cdeese— Quiet; 
state wliole 



flfirsts, 
25 Vic; 
fiisis, 
boxes; 



Northern Pacific 1121%! 



79 
32 

49% 
124% I 

41 ! 
182%! 

18%! 

62% I 
172 I 
141 i 

42 i 
1C8 I 

19%l 

I 



24c 

2 

2 
l 1-16 

7c 

2»^ 

l*i 

8c 
40c 

3% 
15-16 
12c 

4c 
10c 

1% 

214 
151^ 

6c 

2% 

3 

1% 

ia» 

1 

1% 
16c 

2c 
20c 

«c 



I.ilverpool Gmlii. 

Liverpool. Dec. 23.— Close: Wlieat— .<?pot, steady; 
No. 1. Manitoba. 7s 7%d: No. 2. Manilob», 7s od; 
No. 3, Manitoba. 78 3d: futures, steady; December, 
7s 4%d; March, 78 3%d; .May. 7s 2d. Com— Sp<,f. 
quiet; American mixed, old. Cs 2d: futures, January, 
4s II '/id; Fberuary, 48 lOd. 



40c 
6% 
8 
2>4 

61c. 

23c 
3 



35 

3 

43 

11^ 
581,4 

2 

41,4 
691,4 
29 

15c 

25c 
2Vt 
2% 
li/« 

12c 
2% 

13-16 

14c 

60c 
3% 
2 

35c 
9c 
12c 
L 11-16 
2 1.4 
16 
6%c 
3 

?-M 
I 13-16 

1% 

IH 

2 
20c 

5c 
23c 

7c 

4c 
15c 
43c 

6% 

2% 
64c 

1% 
26c 

314 



Norfolk & Western ' 

National Ijead ' 

Pennsylvania I 

Ray Consolidated I 

Rrsoing 1 

Rock Island i 

Reiiiiblic Steel & Iron ! 

Riiliber ! 

Sovtliem Pacific I 

Sugar ' 

St Paul ! 

Tf\as on ! 

T'nlon Pacific I 

Steel common 1 

Wrstir.ghoiiKe Electric ....I 
Western Vnlon ' 



113 

5.i%l 

122%! 
21 I 

168%! 
23% t 
!fl%l 
65 %i 

106%! 

118%! 

112%! 

109 ! 

162 1 
69 1 
79%l 
75% I 



79 

31%l 
49%| 

132%! 
41 1 

182%! 
18%| 
62 ! 

170% 

14. >% 
41%! 

108 i 

ip%! 

120%! 

113 1 
55% 1 

121%) 
20% I 

167 ! 
23% 1 
26%! 
64 S.' 

104%! 

118%! 

112%! 

108%: 

159 1 
67% I 
7S%I 
74%1 



51% 

7i%i 

43% I 

105%! 

104%! 
89% I 
53%! 

261 j 
55% 
34 

43%| 
79 I 
31%! 
40% 

132%! 
41 

182% 
18% 
62% 



52% 
72% 
43 

loe 

104% 
88% 
54% 

2eo% 

56 

33% 

44 

Tfi'i 

32 

49 
135% 

41 
185 

18% 

62% 



current make, 
receipts, l.«29 
ml k, held colored specials. 18c; 
do. white specials, 18c do, white or colored, average 
fancj-, 17%(gl7%c; do fresh, white or colored, spe- 
cials, not creen, 17(§17%c; do, white or colored, 
average run, 16%eil«%c; state whole milk, very 
green and pasty. 16<g 16 %c; state whole milk. poor. 
14%(al5%c: daislea, best, 18c: tklms, 3^14%c 
Ejfgs— I'nsettled ; receirts, 5,343 cases; fresh fathered 
extra.s, 35<§3«c; extra CrsU, 33(a.S4c; firsts, 20(g32c; 
held fresh averaje be* , 23® 24c: fresh gathered dlr- 
tie:.. 16(slt>c: checks. 14@16c; refrigerator special 
marks, fancy, local storage charges paid. 20c; firsts, 
18%@19%c; firsts, on doc*. 18%^ 19c; western 
gathered, whites, 30@:«e. 

HIDES, TALLOW. FURS. 

Prices very hl^ 



170%! -171% 

140%! 140% 

42 j «2H 

108 I 108% 

19%! lOH 
120%! 121 
113 I 113 

,55% 1 55% 
iSl%i 121 "a 



20% t 

167 ! 

23%; 

65%! 

105 ! 

118%! 

112141 

108%! 

159%! 
«7%1 
79%l 
75 I 



21 
168 
2r,% 
26% 
65 

104 7i 

117% 

112% 

109 

160% 

68% 

»0',4 

74% 



Soath St. Panl L.tve«4<Krlc 

South St. Paul. Minn., Dec. 23— Cattle^ Receipts. 



1 .800 : 

heifers, 

feeders, 

ceipts, 

$7.05. 

$3.5D^ 



killers, steady; steers, $5.75(s8.5ti: «-v.-r- 

$*0«(a7.00; calves, steady, »4.00<a8.r.O; 

steady w strong. $3.75@6.90. Hogs— Be- 

2.600; .5c higlier; range, $6.75C»7.10: hulk, 

Stieep— Ret-eipts. 1,100; 5c higher; lambs, 

:.60; wethers, $3.25^4.35; ewes, |2.00a4.15. 



Xew Vork Money. 

New York, Dec. 23. — Money on call 
steady, 4^@6 per cent: ruling rate, 
4?4; closing bid. 53i; offered at 6. Time 
loans easier; 60 and 90 days, 6 p.-?r 
cent; six months, 6%. 

Close: Prime mercantile paper, 6 
per cent; sterling exchange, firm with 
actual business in bankers' bills at 
$4.81.50 for 60-day bills and at $485. 60 
for demand. Commercial bills, $4.80^. 
Bar silver, 62 ^c: Mexican dollars. 49c 
Government bonds, steady 
bonds, irregular. 



G. 


S. 


G. 


B. 


G. 


8. 


G 


S. 


G. 


S. 



Receipts becoming ouite heavy. 
Would advise prompt rJiipmeuU 

gre3:n «alted hides— No. 1. No. 2. 

G. S. steers, over 60 H) 14% .12% 

O. P cows. 25 lb acd up and steers 

under 60 lb 1«'4 -ISH 

G. 8. cows. 40 lb ard up, branded 

flat ^* 

long-haired kips. 8 to 25 lb... .14% .13 

veal kips, 15 to 25 lb 15% .14 

veal calf, 8 to 15 lb 18 .16% 

deacon skins, urder S lb 93 .75 

horse hides 4.00 l.SO 

Green liidcs and cal', l@l%c less than salted. 

DRY H1DE.S— 

Market steady at unchanged prices. No. 1. >c. s. 

Drr Western, over 12 pounds 23 .21 

Dry Minnesota, Dakota, Wisconsin 

and Iowa hides, ovtr 12 lb 20 .18 

Dry kips. 5 to 12 lb 22 -20 

Drv calf, under 5 pounds, all «ec- 

t'ions S* -23 

TALLOW AND G1U14SE— 

Receipts normal. Prices high. Keep it shipped In. 

No. 1. No. 2. 

Tallow. In cakes 06% .04% 

Tallow, in barrels "•'% •«*% 

Grease, white 05% ... 

Grease, yellow and bmwn 05 .03% 

Ship in tight two-headed barrels to avoid leakage. 

SHKF.P PELTS— 

Market firm. Demaiiu good. No. 1. No. 2. 

G S. pelts, larg* 7* l-S* 

G S. pelts, small to inedluui 35 .j5 

G. S. shearings 10 .23 

Drj butcher pelts, lb 14 .19 

Dry murralris, lb 13% .14% 

— PerU^— 

No. L No. 2. 



I.ESS POETRY Ife READ TODAY. 
The Bellman: It is likely that fewer 
reading people buy books of verse for 
the purpo.'>e of enjoyment than did so 
in America a generation or more ago. 
Of a narrative piece by Longfellow 
about the middle of the nineteenth 
century 10,000 cople.s were sold the 
first dav of its appearance. Such a 
thing is unheard of for Kipling or 
anv other singer today. 

the all engulfing interest In Action 
is, no doubt, one of a number of rea- 
sons why verse literature today la 
comparatively neglected. At the same 
time it is wrong to represent the 
change in such wise as to Imply that 
poetry in the past had general rec- 
ognition, while at present la has fall- 
en on evil days; and al.«o it Is al- 
together misleading to give the im- 
pression that there is now no attempt 
on anybody's part to hold up the hands 
of the languishing muse. 

As to the former idea, poetry has al- 
ways had a hard struggle to exist so 
far as general support is concerned, 
and h.-is won Its triumphs slowly, if 
surely. 

And the reason is not far to seek. It 
is onlv the few who are trained to ap- 
preciate the fine art of verse and the 
more delicate effects of song. Fiction, 
particularly Its romantic variety, takes 
care of a large part of the romantic 
feeling which make the response to 
imaginative literature; and. frankly, it 
is very much easier to read prose than 
poetry, for it takes more special 
preparation to receive the latter. 

As a result, poetry wins its way 
slowly: it percolates through the few 
to the many, if it ever reaches thena 
at all; and the genuine poet of one 
generation may therefore not get rec- 
ognition until the generation later. 
The young Browning, for instance, 
heard vaguely about such a poet as 
Shelley and tried to get a volume of 
his verse with much difficulty, for the 
reason that "not one of the local 
booksellers had ever heard of the 
poet's name." 

» 

"BURIED ALIVE" IN BROOKLYN. 
Interborough Bulletin: An acquaint- 
ance of mine who is both able bodied 
and industrious was born in Brook- 
lyn and has alwaiys lived within four 
blocks of the famous bridge, yet has 
j never seen it (except in the picture>, 
1 not even while it was under construc- 
I tion. 

Xor has she seen the elevated road 
structure, the dingy engines that used 
to do the snorting and the later elec- 
trically propelled trains. To the regu- 
lar cross-country steam locomotive and 
train she is an absolute stranger. 

The only car ride she ever undertook 
was in the early days of horse-drawn 
traction and that to a cemetery and 
back. When a cradle occupant she was 
taken to the battery, her only journey 
awav from Brooklyn town. 

Too young then for knowledge of 
onything she has yet to take her first 
view of an expanse of water. As for 
a steamboat, sailboat, tug or even a 
ferry, pictures are here only enlight- 
enment. 

The verv mention of a rowboat 
causes a shrug of her shoulders at the 
"frightful things." And the subway- 
is no less terrifying to her. for not 
even a kiosk entrance has met her 
eve. As for the tube under the river, 
she is fearful lest it would "break 
with her in it. " In the last six years 
she has not so much as gone to the 
corner of the block in which she lives 
while in the distance pass the trol- 
ley cars that await her initial pat- 
ronage. 



Ask vourself this question: 
afford NOT to advertise?" 



"Can 1 



railroad 



London Stoeka. 

Ixndon, Dec. 23. — .^ruerlcan securities 
regularly during tlie early trading today, 
prices raaiged from % above to % below 
New York closing. 

American securities moved 
Urlv within narrow limits during the 
forenoon Light buying steadied the 
market in the afternoon and prices 
hardened a fraction. 



moved Ir- 

At noon 

Saturday's 

irregu- 



THE PRODUCE MARKET. 



ChlcflKo l.lve«4ock. 

tb'cago Dec 23— Tattle— Receipts, 10,500; martet 
Benrrally 'lOc up: beeves, JS.S.-icaO.SO; Texas steefs. 
$4 50(85 75; western steers, t5.85@7.60; stockers and 
feeders J4 2o(S7.40; cows and heifers, $2.75®7.fD; 
calves ' $6 rioir 10.00. Hogs— Receipts, 28,000; marliet 
strong and 5c up; light, |6.90(a:.35: mixed, $7.00® 
7 45- heavy, $7.C0^7.45: rough, $7.00(»7.15; plj|s, 
$5o6@«.85; bulk of aales; $7.20<S7.45. t»heei»— r,£- 
ceipU 24,000; market strong, mostly 10c up; nutJ^e. 
$4 0t>^5 20- western. $4.10(<. 5.25; yearlings, $r.,8."@ 
6 90- lambs, natixe, $5.00(s8.23: weeUrn, $6.35(68.20. 



Horme Market. 

Minnesota Transfer, et. Paul, Minn., Dec 
Barrett & Zimmerman report: 
dullness dominates the market, 
meeting with limited Inquiry 
ets anticipate present 



c. 



DULUTH 



SHIP TO THE OLD RELIABLE 




WYMAN & CO. 



GRAIN COMMISSIOil 



MINNEAPOLIS 



MINNEAPOLIS MARKET. 



Wheat Tone Is Strong and Prices 
Make Fair Advances. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 23. — Wheat 
showed a strong tone and prices regis- 
tered fair advances. Tracing moder- 
ate and offerings light. Deceinbt-r 
closed l^c higher than Saturday, May 
%f; higher and July %c higher. Local 
elevator stocks increased 526,000 bu 
for two days. December opened 80 %c. 
high SlVsC, low 80 %c, closed 81 '4o. 
May opened S5%c to 85%c, higli. SQVaC-. 
low $5%c, closed 86c. July opened 
87c, high, 87%@87%c, low 86 %c, clo.sed 
87 %c. 

Cash wheat quoted steady. Demand 
fairly active. No. 1 northern 2%(?»3c 
under May price. Millstuffs — Ship- 
ments, 1,730 tons. Demand good for 
moderate offerings at steady prices. 

Closing cash prices; No. 1 hard. 



Midway 

23 — 

The usual holiday 

all classes of honies 

Receipts light. DeU- 

condltlons will prevail urJll 

after the flrat of the year. Valuea about as follows: 

Drafters, extra »]2*®"^,2 

Drafters, choice 135(ff . tto 

Drafters, common to good fl0(*;35 

Farm mares and horses, extra. KOef^OS 

Farm mares and horses, choice 110(«l3.5 



from the Jobben. 
80a. 



per 



navel crangea. new crop, 
navel oranges, new crop, 
navel orauges, new crop. 



per 



96s, 

ices, per 
150-2iisii 



$3.09 

3.50 

3. SO 

3.75 
S.2S 



common to geod. 



I'arm horses. 

Delivery 

Drivers and saddlers ..\. 
Mules, according to size. 



70(ff;iO 
115(SU25 
lir^MO 
13j<e:120 



Cotton Mnrket. 

New York. Dec. 23. — The cotton mar- 
ket opened steady and 4 to 12 points 
higher. There was considerable cov- 
ering In evidence. The advance was 
soon chocked, however, by heavy sell- 
ing for Vail Street and commission 
house account and most of the advance 
was lost. 

Spot closed steady; middling uplands, 
13.10; middling gulf, 13.35; sales, 1,500 
bales. 

Futures closed steady. Closing bidr: 
December, 12.73: January, 12.75; Feb- 
ruary, 12.63; March, 12.69: April. 12.tiS: 
Mav, 12.69; June, 12.61; July. 12.61; Au- 
gust, 12.47; September, 11.93; Oclobir. 
11.79. 



Quotations given below Indicate what the retaUert 
pay to the wholesaler, except the bay list, which 
glvee what the farmers receive 

CAIJFOKNIA ORANGES— 
California navel oranges, new crop, 

box . .- 
Callforiila 

California 

box . • • 
Calif onUa 

per box • 

Florldas. all sUes, per box 

JERSEY CRANBERRn^S- 
jpfcey cranberries, early black, bbl 
Jersey cranberries, early black, bu, , 

mUlTS— 
Imported Almerla grapes, fancy heavyweight. 

per keg 6.00® 

Catawba grapes, 5-lb basket 

California prunes, per box 

NEW BAltKEL APPI-l-S— (Southern Stock.) 

Faccy Jonathans, per Lbl 

Ben Davis, per bbl. fancy 2.75® 

NEW YOHK STATE APPLES— 

Giecuings. per bbl 13.00® 3.M 

Talman and Pound Sweets, per bbl 3.25(e 3.50 

Other fancy varieties, per bbl 8.60 

Kings Extra Fancy, per bbl 3,50(§ 3.75 

llubbardson Nonsuch, per bbl S.St 

llaiU»lns and Kosseis, i>er bbl 3.000 S.U 

WESTEKN BOX APPLES— 

Spltzenl>*igs, per box 1.85S 2,00 

Choice Delicious, per t>ox 2.25 

Jonathans, per box 1.75® 2.00 



■ .$e®io.oo 

3.50 



.50 

.IS 
2.50 



LEATHER- 
Texas oak sole A 44 

Htmlook hlaughter sole xz ?T 

Hemlock dry bide 8ol<' 35 

Hemlock liarness- leather 40 

Oak harness leather 42 

f^irs are generally lilgher. 

FURS — Large. Medium. 

Skunk, black »1.50 $3.50 

Skunk, short stripe a.&0 2.50 

Skunk, long narrow jtritie 1.10 1.75 

Skunk, broad stripe und white.. 1.25 1.00 

Muskrat, winter 60 .SO 

Raccoon * 00 2.50 

Mink, dark and browii 7.50 6.90 

Mli;k, pale 5.50 4.00 

Beaver 1100 7.50 

Cat wild 4.0) 2.50 

Fisher, dark 30.00 20.00 

Flsler, psle 10.00 4 OO 

Fox, red 9.00 6.50 

Fox. dark crt«s 25.00 20.00 

Fox. pale cross 15.00 12 00 

Fox. silver, dark 600.00 <«:i.PO 

Fox, fllver pale 300.00 200.00 

Wolverines 10.00 7.50 

Otter, dark 25.00 2ri.{t0 

Otter, pale 12.00 8.00 

Ljnx 20.00 15.03 

Marten, dark brown and pale... 25.(0 12.50 

Weasel, white 1.00 .65 

Weasel, stained, damaged 23 .15 

Wolf, timber 6.00 4.00 

Bear as to size 3®30 



.42 
.86 
.83 
.42 
.44 

Small. 

I2.5D 

2.00 

1.50 

.75 

.25 

1.50 

4.50 

3.00 

4.00 

1.50 

10.00 

S.OO 

5.00 

15.30 

10.00 

300. CO 

150.00 

con 

15.00 

4.00 

10.00 

5.00 

.so 

.10 
S.50 



S.25 
3.09 



Crimes Golden, per box J. 

Islug David, per tKix 1. 

GUAPEIKUIT— 
Florida Brlghts and RusseU. per box 

U.^NANA&— , ^ 
Jumbo bunches. Port Limon fruit, par lb 

TOMATOES— 
California, 4-box en 

CELERY— ^ 
Milwaukee celery. 12 dot bozet 

CALIFOnNlA LiaiOVH- 
CalUorula leiuons. extra fancy, per box. SOOt 

and 3t;0s •• 

Impcrted limes, per box 

MISCELLANKOIS- 

Beans, navy, per bu J. 75 

Beans, brown, per bu 2.75 

New California walnula, Itt IS^ 



50 
M 

3.25 

.04^ 

s.u 

3.S8 



a.so 

l.SS 



LOWER CLOSES 

IN THE COPPERS 



Copper stocks today closed generally 
lower, being di-agged down by the 
weakness of the general stock market 
of New York, t Hough the copper metal 
market of London closed fairly strong. 
On the market spot copper gained Ts 
and 6d, and futures 5b as the result of 
the day's transactions. Mining stocks 
were traded verv little during the day. 
Amalgamated dosed at a loss of |1.2o! 
Butte & S-'uperior lost 50c to |1 off. 
North Butte lost 50 to 75c. Calumet & 
Arizona was 50c to $1 off. Greene Can- 
anea was a little off. There were de- 
clines also in American Saginaw, Butte- 
Alex Scott, and Calumet & Montana. 
There were gains, however, in Cactus, 
Calumet & Corbin, Duluth Montezuma, 



THE LAW OF SUCCESS IX LIFE. 

Solon Lauer: When thou dost clearly 
see the path, thou canst not wander 
from it. Out of the lightnings of the 
mind come forth the thunder shocks 
of action. See thy act in thy mind's 
clear vision, and 'tis already done. In 
hours of strength prepare for hours of 
weakness, and thou shalt never fall. 
Forelive the thing thou dreadest. Fight 
thy battle in the high arena of thy 
mind, and when thou comest to the 
arena's bloody sands thy victory is al- 
ready won. In silence prepare thy battle 
shout. Steadfastly sitting in thy lone 
retreat, act thou thy coming part. In 
silence let thy speech be framed. In 
the still chamber of the mind let all 
thv acts conceive, and none shall fall 
of sturdy life. If thou dost fear temp- 
tation's power, alone in silence meet 
thy foe and slay him with thy thought. 
With sword thrusts of brave words let 
out his life; and when thou meetest 
him upon the sands, naught but a 
shadow faeeth thee. Trust not thy soul 
to conflict unprepared. Go armed' with 
predetermined thoughts, with will 
strained, like the bowstring, ere the 
strife begins. Sharpen thy arro^-s In 
the forge of thought. Let each be 
pointed with a willful word, and they 
shall reach the tempter's throbbing 
heart. 



Notice of Closing Books for Payment 
of Dividend. 

Notice is hereby given. That a divi- 
dend of 10 cents per share will be paid 
on Jan. 6, 1913. to all stockholders of 
record of the Cliflf Mining companv. 
Books clo.-ie on Dec. 26, 1912. at Mil- 
waukee, Wis. 

CLIFF MINING COMPANY. 
Per J. A. STEWART, Secretary. 
Milwaukee, Wis.. Dec. 20. 1912. 



GAY & STURGIS 

BANKERS AKD BROKERS. 

320 MT^mt Svperior Street. 

Members Nevr York amd B«stOD 
Stock Exckaasea. 

SPECIAL ATTENTION TO LOCAL 

SECURITIES. 
R, T. GOODELL, W. J. NORTH, 

ReMdeat Marr. Aaa't. llaaa«er. 



PriTBte 
BoatoB, 
New York, 
Ckleaso. 



Wires to 
Hoa^htoa, 
Coiniiiet, 
Haacock. 



PAINE, WEBBER & COMPANY 

BANKERS AND BROKERS. 
Members of New Tork Stock Rxcbaasc, Bostoa Stock Exchakse, Cbieaso 



M. J. 



Board of Trade. 

KPECIAL AITENTION TO LOCAL CURB STOCKS. 

0*BRIi:N, Rcsldcat M^r. JOS. R. PATTERSON, Aast Resident 



Msr. 



LEWIS H. H'ERRITT. 



LUClBN MERRITT. 

LEWIS H. MERRITT & CO. 

COPPER AND IRON STOCKS 



Zcalth, 7*7. 



IM ProTldeaca Balldlas. 



Dalatk, 1290. 



f I timi 



•-?•. 




t 

u 



m 




Monday, 



^•r'. -^i^Mv^?^^/^^^.^ 



1J^.'4-^:-'?v^^':-- 



PAY YOU TO READ 



All of the Want Ads— Business Chances, Help Wanted, For Sale, For Rent, Real 
Estate, Farms tor Sale, For Sale or Exchange. Every classification is interesting in 

THE HERALD'S WANT ADS! 



M^m 



% 



t RAILROADS 

RUN TRAINS IN 

TWO SECTIONS 

Cliristmas Travel Is the 

Heaviest Reported 

in Years. 

<^U Si - travel on some of the Du- 
!':• i.. -i.U has been the heaviest in 
^ -i-i Tiu' Omaha has been running 
li> <<>) train in two sections be- 

«"'i the h.eavy travel between here 

<■ ■ Wniiiy City. 

- ' ' lailroaa officials also report 

■ 'avy business, while the pai- 

>• lavel beiwet-n here and the 

ties ajid between Duluth and 

' : tile iron raiiije i;as also been 



Railroad Notes. 



\v 



'• Brawn, distrift freigrl.t agent 
• iMr.ahft at Duluth. is In the Twm 
t .t es on business. 

<-'. r. Ivenn^Hiy. commercial agent 'tf 
th" Milwaukee, returned vesterday 
from a trip to the t^outhern part of tho 
B'.att'. 

"THE CWIST 

T HAT IS TO BE" 

Every Individual Has His 

Own Ideas of Christ, 

Says Pastor. 



luist That Is to Be" was the 
f a serjnon by Rev. Georg-e 
i ■: at the First Unitarian 



B.. 

1\ ■•!.■:■ 

cu..;\'h yesterday. "Every nation, every 
I'eri > I of time, every state of culture 
'. I- is <!.rist." he aaid, "and so has 
idual Ills peculiar Christ. 
!it already is the Christ of 
the Jesus of Mark. Mark 
of fact Jew has a rather 
t Messiah. John, the ideal- 
tlie esoteric dreamer sees 
~Jii of Mary the mysterious 
•ome flesh. In Paul again the 
: ist is largely a theological 
ii, the means of salvation. 
•';o Christ in Egypt is colored 
10 notions, and in Greece the 
,)-sua of Nuzuri'th becomes trans- 



»- ■ 
K 

th 

tS! 

In 
lo. 

•a 

CO. 

by 

Sa::.' 

fo;:>i-a by a philosophy wliich leads 
thf way to the later trinltarlan con- 
cept i>n of God. In the forests of Cer- 
n-.a:; , witii the spirit 9? war supreme 
»ni .i.< ::ien tlie Son o , »nan becomes a 
V'-' ■'•■' prince. 

--> it Is today. I remember an 
e.v. ;.. .!i of modern Christ paintings 
»xhi .it-d in Berlin seventeen years 
*^" ^^ '! If ^ strange array of varying 
Cli..^-. and yet each one the son of 
Ml ' ' • in P-^tlilehem of Jiidea. To 

«>i artists Christ is supreme- 

ly -rclful aaviour; to another 

the h. 'ype of simple human love; 

to a !\e is the God-man; to a 

fourtr;. : ■ is the man of power, the 
super:!, ... who sways the destiny of 
soul^ to ;■ fifth lie is eminentlv the 
truth ..arcr. the light that shineth 
In <la;knr'ss and the darkness com- 
l-r-^ii'-iHiftli it not. 

"Tli-s ■ a! lists represent you and me. 
The :rtM).>itant thing In this Is not 
th -;.• conceptions differ, but that 

ti'- Ijring to each what he needs; 

ti h conception quickens prin- 

ci: life in us. And we must not 

t>e J:dturbed by even the apparent con- 
tradictions of these Ideals. 

'When will the true Christ come? 
When we are readv for him, when 
truth has i>repared the way. When we 
shall look upon life without prejudice, 
without those foolish, selfish hanker- 
ings wliich divide us from our fellows 
and destroy our own happiness, wlien 
he sliall be ready to learn from old 
men as well as babes: when we shall 
be ready to sacrifice every one of our 
superstitions for the larger truth. The 
true Christ will come, when we for- 
get ourselves in the larger self, our 
community, our country, humanity — 
Qod." 



OBITUARY 

Mrs. Sunan A. Dillon, who was the 

first wtilte child born In the territory 
now included in the state of Kansa.s. 
died In Kansas City, Mo.. Dec. 22, aged 
S3 years. She was born at an Indian 
trading post near the site of the old 
Shawnee mission, now a part of Ar- 
tnourdale, Kan., a suburb of Kansas 
City. Mrs. Dillon's father, Daniel Yoa- 
chum, conducted the old Westport tav- 
ern at Westport, Mo., now a part of 
Kansas City. 



Col. Oanlel BurnH Dypr, one of the 

rlctur>stiue, ciiaracters of Kansas City, 
Mo., died Sunday at his summer home. 
«"larendon, at Beaumont, Mo. He was 
Gi years old. Col. Dyer had been soi- 
dier. pioneer, frontiersman, capitalist, 
joui nallst, street car magnate and an- 
tiquary. For many years he was Unit- 
ed States Indian agent in Kansas and 
the Indian territory. He was the first 
mayor of Guthri\ Okla. In Atlanta, 
Ga.. Col. I>yer built the first street 
railway system in the South to be op- 
erated by water power. Col. Dyer was 
born in "jollet. 111. When 13 years jld, 
he joined his father and brother in the 
Uni jn army and served until the clothe 
of the Civil war. Then he went to 
Kansas, engaging in business. In 1 SS*) 
he moved to Kansas City. Eight year.s 
ago he gave up bu.siness and devoted 
his time to collecting art treasures. 
A year ago he contracted pneumonii, 
to wliich is attributed his general 
breakdown. 



G^orfse W. Hudxe, 43 years old, a 
well known newspaper man, died in a 
hospital at Louisville, Ky., Dec. 22, 
after a brief illness of cerebrill-. 
Hodge went to Louisville from Nash- 
ville, Tenn., and was connected with 
the Courier-Journal for more than 
twenty years. He engaged in newspa- 
per work also in Chicago and New 
York. Twenty years ago he was cor- 
respondent of the Associated Press in 
Louisville. 



^'lllinm W. Illeharilaoii. for several 
years news editor of the Washington 
t'tar and for many years connected 
witli newspapers in Washington and 
Atlanta. Ga., died at his residence at 
Drummond, Md., Sunday night, after a 
lingoriiig illness. 



PrInre!*M .4giies Salni-Salin is dead at 

Karlsruhe, Germany, after a most ro- 
mantic career. She was the daughter 
of an American colonel named Leclercq 
and was born at Baltimore, Md., sev- 
enty-two years ago. In her youth she 
gained some fame as an ^ctl'^ss an<,\ 
then she i»^rri-^ PiJLli<«i5 Felix Salm- 
lealna '.!». ls«)2. The prince was a sol- 
tlier of fortune. He served first in the 
German and then in the Austrian army, 
on leaving which he came to tlie 
United States and joined the Union 




COPR. 
LIFE PUB- CO- 



"Gee, but I'm glad that I didn't take out a lease on this place." 



army during the Civil war, rising to 
the rank of brigadier-general. After 
the war he went to Mexico and became 
aide-de-camp to Jlmperor Maxmilian, 
l)ut went back to Germany and .lolned 
tiie Prussian army on the outbreak 
of the Franco-Prussian war in l8tTJ. He 
was killed in the battle of Oravelotte. 
The princess accompanied him Ihrough 
all his campaigns, and In the Franco- 
Prussian war served as a hospital 
nurse and was decorated with the Iron 
Cross for bravery. Aftr the war she 
was married to Charles Heneage in 
1876. 



SENATOR OVERIVIAN- 

DOING VERY WELL 

■U'ashington, Dec. 23. — The condition 
of Senator Overman of North Carolina, 
who was operated on here Saturday 
for appendicitis, was reported by his 
physicians today to be very good. He 
spent a comfortable night. 



Look Out (or Stale Candy. 

Victor Huofs candies are made fresh 
every day. 



LEG.VL NOTICES. 



NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLO- 
SURE SALE— 

Default has been made in the pay- 
ment of the sum of Two thousand five 
hundred twenty-seven and 50-100 dol- 
lars ($2527. 50>, which is due and 
claimed to be due at the date of this 
notice for principal and interest upon 
a certain mortgage duly executed and 
delivered by Ella R. Mendenhall. an 
unmarried woman, mortgagor, to Gust 
I..evin. mortgagee, bearing date the 
29th day of September, 1905, with a 
power of sale therein contained, and 
duly recorded In the office of the Reg- 
ister of Deeds of St. Louis County, 
Minnesota, on October 3rd, 1905, at 
10:30 o'clock A. M. in Book 222 of 
Mortgages on page 208. 

Said mortgage and the debt secured 
thereby were duly assigned by the 
mortgagee Gust Levin to N. M. Pom- 
eroy by written assignment, dated 
July 26th, 1906. and duly recorded in 
the Register of I^eeds office for said 
county and state July 27th, 1906, at 
.3:30 o'clock P. M. In Book 189 of 
Mortgages on page 187. 

The time of payment of the princi- 
pal of said note, together with the 
mortgage securing the same, was ex- 
tended to September 29th, 1911, by 
virtue of a certain written agreement 
made and entered Into by and be- 
tween Ella R. Mendenhall, unmarried, 
and N. M. Pomeroy, bearing date Sep- 
tember 26th. 1908, and duly recorded 
In the Register of Deeds office for said 
county and state December 2nd. 1912, 
at 11:00 o'clock A. M. In Book 241 of 
Mortgages on page 150. 

Said mortgage and the debt secured 
thereby were duly assigned by the as- 
signee of the mortgage N. M Pome- 
roy. to George W. Buck, bv written 
assignment, dated November 30th 
1912, and duly recorded in the 
Register of Deeds office for said 
county and state December 2nd, 1912 
at 1::}0 o'clock P. M. in Book 303 of 
Mortgages on page 590. The said 
George W. Buck is now the assignee 
and present owner of said mortgage 

The mortgagor also made default in 
paying taxes on the mortgaged prem- 
ises for the years 1908 and 1909 which 
were paid by said George W. Buck 
assignee of mortgage, on December 
2nd, 1913. with costs, penalties and in- 
terest amounting to One hundred 
fifty-one and 20-100 dollars ($151.20). 

The mortgagor also made default In 
paying special assessments for sprink- 
ling against the mortgaged premises 
for the year 1911. amounting to Three 
and 69-100 dollars ($3.69). which was 
paid by George W. Buck, assignee of 
mortgage, on December 3rd, 1912. 

George W. Buck, assignee of mort- 
gage, claims and holds a lien under 
the terms of the mortgage for the 
whole of said sums so paid for taxes 
and assessments. 

There is actually due and claimed 
to be due at the date of this notice 
for principal on said mortgage debt 
and. Interest. Two thousand five hun- 
dred twenty-seven and 50-100 dollars 
($2527.50) and for taxes, assessments 
and Interest on the same as above 
stated One hundred fifty-five and 
05-100 dollars ($155.05). making In all 
due at the date of this notice Two 
thousand six hundred eighty-two and 
55-100 dollars ($2682.55). 

NOTICE I -J HEREBY- GIVEN, That 
by virtue of the power of sale con- 
tained in said mortgage and pursuant 
to the statute in such case made and 
provided the said mortgage will be 
foreclosed by a sale of tho mortgaged 
premise^ situate in .St. Louis County, 
ilirtneSota, and described in said mort- 
gage, to-wlt. Lot Fourteen (14), Block 
Forty (40), Endion division of Duluth, 
according to the recorded plat there- 
of on file and ot record in the office 
of the Register of Deeds In and for 
St. Louis County, Minnesota, which 



SITUATION WANTED. 

free: FREE! 

Some good used organs and 

some practice pianos. 

You to pay for repairing and delivery. 

Must have room 

for new goods. 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO. 
Factory Salesrooms, 
426 West Firs t Street. 

SITUATION ^VANTED^Y YoT^G 
man of excellent habits; has had 
fifteen months' stenographic expe- 
rience; can do bookkeeping to some 
extent; best of references. E loO, 
Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED — ADVERTIS- 
ing man of proven selling ability 
and experienced In all forms of ad- 
vertising, now employed, desires 
change. Q 607, Herald. 



SITUATION WANTED 
for middle-aged man. 
preferred. Call Grand. 



— POSITION 
Inside work 
670-Y. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY Y'OUNG 
married man, steady work, best of 
references. X 578, Herald. 



SITUATI6N WANTED— BY EXPERI- 

enced chauffeur; can furnish ref.^r- 
ences. O 581, Herald. 



sale win be made by tne sheriff of 
said county at the office of the sheriff 
in the Court House in the City of 
Iniluth, In said county and state on 
the 22nd day of January, A. D. 1913 
at ten o'clock A; M. at public vendue 
to the highest bidder for cash to pay 
said debt of Two thousand six hun- 
dred eighty-two and 55-100 dollars 
($2682.55) and Interest and Seventy- 
five dollars ($75.00) attorneys fees, as 
stipulated In said mortgage and the 
disbursements allowed bv law, and 
subject to redemption at any time 
within one year from the date of sale 
as provided b.v law. 

Dated at Duluth, Minnesota, Decem- 
ber 7th, 1912. 

GEORGE W. BUCK, 
Assignee of Mortgage. 
WILLIAM P. HARRISON, 

Attorney for Assignee of Mortgage 
608-611 Torrey Building, Duluth. Minn! 

IS^'lD^r* ^' ^^' ^^' ^^' ^^^'^' *'^*"- *' 



MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE— 

Whereas, default has been made In 
the payment of not^ and Interest 
thereon for which a certain mortgage 
was given as security, which said mort- 
gage was duly executed and delivered 
by Charles Boyle. Mortgagor, to Jed 
L. Wiashburn. Mortgagee, bearing date 
the fourteeenth day of July, 1910. and 
with a power of sale therein contained, 
duly recorded In the office of the Reg- 
ister of Deeds In and for the County 
of St. Louis and State of Minnesota, 
on the eighteenth day of July, 1910, at 
ten o'clock A. M., in Book 203 of Mort- 
gages, on page 471; 

And whereas, the said Jed L. Wash- 
burn, the Mortgagee and Holder of 
said Mortgage, has duly elected and 
does hereby elect to declare the whole 
principal sum of said mortgage due 
and payable at the date of this notice 
under the terms and conditions ol! 
said Mortgage and the power of sale 
therein contained; and whereas, there 
is now actually due and claimed to be 
due and payable at the date of this 
notice the sum of Seventy-three Hun- 
dred Fifty-five Dollars and Seventy 
Cents ($7355.70). with interest thereon 
at the rate of Six (6) per cent per an- 
num from the fourteenth day of July. 
1910; and whereas, the said power of 
sale has become operative, and no ac- 
tion or proceeding has been Instituted 
at law to recover said debt of Seventy- 
three Hundred Fifty-five Dollars and 
Seventy Cents ($7355.70) and interest, 
which now remains unpaid and se- 
cured by said Mortgage, or any part 
thereof; 

Now, Therefore, Notice Is Hereby 
Given. That by virtue of the power of 
sale contained in said Mortgage, and 
pursuant to the statute In such case 
made and provided, the said Mortgage 
will be foreclosed by a sale of certain 
of the premises described In and con- 
veyed by said Mortgage, viz: all those 
tracts or parcels of land lying, and be- 
ing In the County of St. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, described as fol- 
lows, to-wlt: Lots One (1) and Two 
(2) in Block Fifty-two (52 » as desig- 
nated upon the plat of West Duluth, 
First Division, as the same appears of 
record in the office of the Register of 
Deeds, in said St. Louis County, with 
the hereditaments and appurtenances; 
which sale will be made by the Sheriff 
of said St. Louis County at his oflfice- 
In the County Court House. In the City 
of Duluth, In siiid County, on the 
twenty-second day of January, 1913, at 
ten o'clock A. M., at public vendue,' to 
the highest bidder for cash, to pay 
said debt of Seventy-three Hundred 
Fifty-five Dollars and Seventy Cents 



ADDITIONAL WANTS 
ON PAGE 24^^ 

# * 

# FOR SALE. * 

t * 

t t 

# # 
^ A fine tract of 80 acres of land on •JIf 
^- the Northern Pacific railroad, for # 

# summer home and farm; lies about •^4 
^ two miles south of Barnum, on ^ 
ii- little lake well stocked with fish; •Jg. 
ii- thirty acres cleared and In grass; -;v 
■^ a well but no buildings; on a fine '^ 
if- road and only about a mile and a ^ 
a- half from Barnum fair grounds; ^ 
ii- ideal farm for city man; price $25 ^ 
■^ per acre; terms. Address •^ 

# * 

■* WALTER L. CASE. dg. 

^ Cloquet, Minn. ■* 



*■ SPECIAI* iii 

^ Several good 40-acre tracts near <^ 
ii- Alborn, $7 per acre; 40, 80, 160 up it 

* to 1,000-acre tracts good land closo i^ 
0- to railroad, vicinity of Two Har- ■^ 
^ bors, $3 to $5.50 per acre: 80 acres '^> 
*• near Blackhoff, Carlton county, $7 ^' 
^ per acre. >£ 

* EBERT. WALKER & McKNIGHT * 

* COMPANY, i^ 
i(- Good Lands at Right Prices, * 

WILLOW RIVER AND MIrIToR, 
Western (J^anada, offer excepti tral 
opportunities to the small Investor. 
Lots sold at gronnd floor prices b> 
Grand Trunk Pacific on easy terms; 
no interest; no sub-division or ad- 
dition stuff. 1£ fcnterested, call at 
once, as only a^very few lots are 
now available. Free literature, fold- 
ers, booklets, etc. R. F. Belleperche, 
Grand Trunk Pacific Townsite agent 
for Duluth & vicinity. 527 Manhattan. 



BAYFIELD ORCHARD LANDS. 
Large or small tracts and improved 
orchards; prices right; easy terms. ^Ve 
have 13.000 acres in the Cornucopia 
and Squaw Bay district. 



C. A. KNIPPENBERG, 
300 Alworth building; 'phones. 597. 



FOR SALE— LANDS IN SMALL 
tracts to actual settlers only; good 
location for dairying and truck gar- 
dening. For further particulars call 
on or address Land Commissioner, 
Duluth & Iron Range Railroad com- 
p.tny, 101 Wolvin building, Duluth, 
Minn. 



FOR SALE — WISCONSIN, THE BEST 
dairy and general crop state in tha 
Union; settlfra wanted; will sacrifice 
land prices to get them; ask fc- 
booltlet about V.'isconsin Centi-al 
land grant. Address Land Dept, 
Soo Line, Minneapolis, Minn. 



FOR SALE— 1 BUY, SELL AND Ex- 
change farm, mineral and timber 
lands and deal In city property. Im- 
proved and unimproved farm land 
for sale on easy terms. Barney Eden, 
407 Manhattan building 



WANTED TO TRADE— ^'E TRADE 
improved city property for Improved 
farms. .Several bargains on hand 
now. Whitney Wall Co., 301 Torrey 
building. 



FOR SALE — TEN ACRES WELL 
improved land In Bitter Root valley, 
Montana, at a bargain. Alex Mc- 
Bean, 406 Columbia building. Duluth. 
Minn. 



FOR SALE — IV^ AND 2Vi-ACRE 
tracts at Farmington. walking dis- 
tance from car line. The Home Realty 
company. 200-1 Alworth building. 



FARM. TIMBER AND CUT-OVER 
lands bought and sold. F. B. Rossoin, 
109 Manhattan building. 



Farm lands at wholesale prices. L. A. 
Larsen Co.. 214 Providence building. 



SEE US FOR MEADOW LANDS. R. C. 
Sanbo rn & Co., 910 Torrey building. 

FOR SALE— Fine little farm near Du- 
luth. W. H. Hassing, Carlton. Minn. 



HAIRDRESSING PARLOR. 

MME. MOISAN, 215 W. 1st St.— Mani- 
curing, shampooing, massaging, scalp 
treatments. Expert hair-dyeing col- 
oring. Toupee makers; combings and 
cut hair made up in sMitches, any 
shape desired. 'Phone. Grand 2401 



'"OR SALE— WE HAVE SELECTED 
from the various departments a great 
number of articles suitable for 
Christmas presents. We are includ- 
ing tliese in our holiday sale, offer- 
ing an opportunity to the gilt buyers 
by placing these all useful articles 
on sale at this time. R. R. Forward 
& Co.'s furniture store. Second avenue 
east and .Superior street. 



($7355.70), and Interest, and the taxes. 
If any. on the said premises, and One 
Hundred Dollar.s ($100) Attorney's 
fees, as stipulated in and by said Mort- 
gage in ca.se of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law, subject 
to redemption at any time within one 
year from the day of sale, as provided 
by law. 

Dated December 9th, 1912 

JED L. WASHBURN, 

A. T. BANNING, JR., ^^<^'-^«^S«e- 

Attorney, 1009 Alworth Building. 
Duluth. Minnesota. 
D- H.. Dec. 0-16-23-30. 1912, Jan. 6-13. 

X 47 Xtf, 



SUMMONS — ~ 

State of Minnesota, County of St 
Louis — ss. 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial Dis- 
trict. 

Albert Witt, 

Plaintiff, 
vs. 
Clara Etta Witt, 

Defendant. 
The State of Minnesota to the above 

named Defendant: 

You are hereby summoned and re- 
quired to answer the complaint of the 
plaintiff in the above entitled action, 
which complaint has been filed and 
is now on file In the office of the 
Clerk of the above named District 
Court, and to serve a copy of your an- 
swer to said complaint upon the sub- 
scriber at his offices in rooms num- 
bered 404-405 Columbia building, Du- 
lutii. St. Louis county. Minnesota, 
within thirty days after tho service of 
this summons upon you, exclusive of 
the day of such eervioe, and If you 
fall to answer salct complaint wlth:n 
the time aforesaid, the plaintiff in 
this action will apply to the Court for 
the relief demanded in the complaint. 

Dated December 2nd, 1912 

BENJ. M. GOLDBERG, 
Attorney for Plaintiff, 
404-405 Columbia Building. 
Tx XT -rv « « , Duluth, Minnesota, 
D. H.. Dec 2, 9, 16, 23. 30. 1912. and 

Jan. 6. 1913. 



CITY NOTICES. 

CITY CLERjTs'oFFICE^ 

XT ^. ... ^ - Duluth. Minn. 

Notice is hereby given that applica- 
tions have been filed in my office by 
the following named persons for li- 
censes to sell Intoxicating liquors in 
the following named locations, viz- 

Chas. Shubat at Nb. 713 West Su- 
perior street, being a transfer from 
Frank Kohnen at the same location 

Rady Orozdanlch at No. 204 Lake 
avenue south, being a transfer from 
Charles Peterson at the samo location 

Said applications Will bo considered 
by the Common Council at a regular 
meeting thereof to be held on Mon- 
day, Dec. 30. 1912, at 7:30 o'clock 
P. M. 

tf. S. PALMER. 

City Clerk. 
D. H., Dec. 16 and 2S. 1912. D 555. 



ONE $250$ 
NEW PIANO 

Returned from renting. 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO. 
Factory .Salesroom, 
426 West First .S treet. 

FOR SALE— KITCHEN CABINETS. DA- 
venports, couches, easy chairs, rock- 
ers, dressons, chiffoniers, bra.^s beds, 
springs, mattresses; hundreds other 
pieces furniture selling half retail 
prices and your credit good. Factory 
distributor's showrooms. 2201 West 
First street. 



FOR SALE— TEN SET OF SIX-INCH 
run logging sleighs, four-inch Mc- 
claren castings, Ijy nine feet runners, 
complete with bunks, swaybars and 
corner binds. These sleighs have 
been used about four months. Price 
$75 per set on cars. Address A. J. 
Macdonal Lumber companv, HOI 
Tower avenue. S uperior, Wis. 

FOR SALE — POOL AND BILLIARD 
tables. Large stock of new and sec- 
ond-hand billiard and pool tables; 
also bar fixtures, show cases, tables, 
chairs and refrigerators; time p.ay- 
ments. Wriee for catalogue, loerie 
& Heaney Manufacturing company, 
621-523 Third street south. Mluue- 
apolls. 



FOR SALE— KITCHEN CABINET.S, DA- 
venports, couches, easy chairs, rock- 
ers, dressers, chiffoniers, brass beds, 
springs, mattresses; hundreds otlier 
pieces furniture selling half retail 
prices and your credit good. Factory 
distributor's showrooms, 2201 West 
First street. 

FOR SALE— A NUMBER OP SECOND- 
hand ranges and heaters dirt cneap 
to make room for new stock. An- 
derson Furniture company. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Super:or street. 



FOUND— EVERY PIECE FURNITURE 
in our Duluth stock practically your 
own prices before Christmas and your 
credit good. Factory showrooms, 
2201 West First street. 



DULUTH TYPEWRITER CO. 

319 West First street. 

All makes, slightly used and rebuilt 

Typewriters, sold or rented. 

Me lrose 3218. Grand 2054-Y. 

FOR SALE— Second-hand woodworking 
machinery, portable sawmills, trans- 
mission appliances, pipes for steam, 
water and furnaces. Duluth Mach. Co. 

FOR SALE— BLACK SEAL PLUSH 
cape, ne'.v; ma'Ke a fine Christmas 
pres-,'nt. Can be seen at 111 South 
Thirty-ninth avenue west. 

FOR SALE— NEW ADAM SCHAAF 
plajer-plano; price $500; will sell for 
$30ij; time or cash. W. A. Ashleman. 
27 West Miohiyan street. 

FOR SALE— ICEBOAT: EXCELLENT 
condition; one of the fastest boats 
on the bay; will sell very reasonable. 
Address B 448. Herald. 



FOR SALE — LADY'S ^^ -LENGTH 
Russian calf coat; size 40; cost $150; 
will sell for $50. Call 24 Seventh 
avenue west. 

For Sale — Get a typewriter for 17 cents 
a day; all makes at greatly reduced 
prices. Edmont, 330 W. Superior St. 



RELIABLE NEW SHOES SOLD. 
Your old shoes soled while you wait 
Gopher Shoe & Repair company. 



FOR SALE — 200 SHARES CUYUNA- 
Millc Lao stock; $2.50 for quick sale. 
P 619. Herald. 



FOR SALE — CHRISTMAS TREES AT 
wholesale and retail. 106 West First 
street. 



FOR SALE CHEAP — BABY CUTTEP^ 
1418% East First street 



Guarantee Main Springs. $1.00; watch 
cleaned, $1. Garon Bros.. 213 W. Ist. 



DYEJWORKS^ 

Northwestern Dyeing & Cleaning Co.— » 
19 Lake Av. No. Grand 1516; Mel. 1S37. 



DULUTH, MISSABE & NORTHERN 
RAILWAY. 

Office: 426 \%'est Superior St 
'Phone, 9tt9. 



Leave. 



Arrlw. 



fHlbblng, Chtaholm. Virginia. E»e- 1 
•7.40«i«] lelh. rolwalne. Sharon (Buhl>. ■ 
t tMountaln Iron, tSparta, tBinrablk 



•3.50»ir 



*7.40pm 



Hibblng, Chtsholm, Sharoa 

CBuMK VU-Blnia. ETCletli, 

Caleraliie. 

Vlr^nla, Cook. Rainer. Fort 

Frances, Port Arthur. Bau- 

dette. Warrcad. Witiuipeg. 



*3.2lpni 



*l0.3la» 



■ *8.3lani 



-Dally, t — Ually except Simuay. 



Cafe. Observation Car. Mesaba Range 
Points. Solid Vestlbuled Train. Modern 
Sleepers through to Winnipeg. 

THE DULUTH & IRON RANGE 
RAILROAD COMPANY. 



DI.T.CTH— 



L«aTe. 



Arrlre. 



It 3.30am| 
Kr.Ife River. Two Harbora, Tow- ]♦ 7.30«m ]tl2.00ni 
er. £b'. Aurora. Blwabik. Mc- ,* 2.45pm 1* e.OOpra 
Klnley. Sparta. Ereleth. QU- •! I.30pm9ixl0.30pm 
bert and Virginia. ] | 



•—Dally. t— Daily except Siinday. J— Mixed 
trains leave and arrlte Fifteenth avenue east statlou. 
t — Dally except Monday, x — Sunday only. 



DULUTH II northern MINNESOTA RAILWAY. 
Orficei, 310 Lontdal* Bli|.. Duluth. 

Trairm conuev.'C at KuUe Kiver daily iex<-ept Sun- 
day) H'Uh I) & I. R. trains leaving Dululli at 7:30 
a. m.. arriving at tt p. m. dally; except Sunday. 
Cnnnei'U at Crauer w.tu Cirand Maral:* stage wbeu 
running. 



Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic. 



Leave. 



STATIONS. 



Arrive. 



t7.45«n 'S.ISPM 

<Soo 
t8.l2Mi •6.45PM 

iSco 
t8.20am *fi.35pni 



... Duluth ....*iO.30Ka t3.40p« 
Line Uulou Station. > 
.. Superior . . .*IO.OOam fS. lOpa 
Line Union Station.) 

Sui»eiior ... *9.30affl to.Mpm 
(UDlv,n Depot.) 



Arrive. 
t7.55pin 5.40am 
te . SSpm 6 . 30am 
t7.05pm M.20am 
t7.45pni •5.00am 
•lO.aOani 
•tOOam 
•B.ZOpm 
Leaw. 
tS.OSam •8.15pm 
tl0.08pni*IQ.20am 

"~t— Dally except Sunday 



.. Houghton ...fll 
.. Calumet ...flO 
.. Ishpeming ...*I2 
.. Marquette ...*ll 
Sault Ste. Marie. *5 
.. Montreal ... '9 
... Boiitoa ....*I0 



Leave. 

00pm 

I0»« 
.20am t<.20am 

30#m t5.20«m 

23pffl 

.50pm *8.20pm 

.00am *8.30«m 



Montreal 
New York 



.*IO.OOamtlO.OOpm 
. •7.15pm t8.30am 



-Daily. 



HOTELS^ 
BLANCHET HOTEL 

522 LAKE AVENUE SOUTH. 

Nicely furnidhed Bteara heaiod room* with g'-vod (able 
board, at yerj Ijtv catea for tho whiter. Buffet la 
ooaiwcttoa. 



RENT— STORES, OFFICES 



FOR RENT— 1: 
lug; suite ( 
rooms facinj 
room 25 by 
tng. Apply C 

FOR RENT— B 
Henderson b 
cation; $65 p 
restaurant lo 
ker, Manley 



^I FIRE-PROOF BUILD- 
•f two or ^three front 
courthouse park; also 
5 for light manufactur- 
hristle building. 



ARBER SHOP IN NEW 
ulldlng; very choice lo- 
er month; also the best 
cation in the city. Stry- 
& Buck. 



FOR RENT— P.\RT OF STORE. SUIT- 

able for office or other purposes; 
will rent reasonable. Call at 108 
East First street 



FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS. $15. AND 
single office. $5. in Axa building. 221 
and 2J3 West Superior street. R. B. 
Knox & Co. 



MANICUmNa 

MANICURING — MISS GERTRUDE 
Towers. Palladlo barber shop. 



DRESSMAKING. 



DRESSMAKINti— MRS. 
218 W. Superior St. 



A. NELSON, 
Grand. 1G4:-A. 



SITUATION WANTED. 

FEMALE. 



SITUATION WANTED — BY HIOH 
school graduate with two years' ex- 
perience In public school teaching. 
the care of one or two cliildren; ref- 
erences furnished. Eva Bergeron, 
Ironwood. Mich. 

SITUATION WANTED — EXPERI- 
enced stenographer, at present em- 
ployed, desires to make a change. 
Q 597, Herald. 

SITUATION WANTED— A MIDDLE- 
aged woman wants position as 
housekeeper. B 545, Herald. 



MINERAL LANDS. 



YOUR LANDS MAY CONTAIN MINER- 
al. Would you wish to know for 
sure? Have your lands examined by 
the greatest mineral locator in the 
world. Before you put a drill hols 
or a shaft on your land I will tell 
you whether it contains mineral. I 
can save you thousands of dollars. 
Write me; It may be the means of 
making you rich. Oscar Peterson, 
CIS East Eighth street, Duluth. 




Where to Get What You Want 

EACH F IRM A LEADER IN ITS LINE 

Consult This List Before Placing Your Order, If 
You Want tlie Best at a Price You Like to Pay, 

AWNINGS, TENTS, PACKSACKS. iANITOR AND WINDOW WASHER. 



POIRIER TENT & AWNING CO.. 41 
East Superior street. Both 'phones. 



ACCOUNTANT. 



START THE NEW YEAR RIGHT. 

Make your business tell you the 

truth; If there are false figures on your 

books they will ruin you. 

Professional ;.:Ingasements Solicited.* 

F. D. HARLOW. 405 Lonsdale Building. 

Telephone, Melrose 1208. 



PUBLIC JANITOR AND WINDOW 
washer. Prudence Robert, the best 
new window-cleaner in the citv. Mel 
4195. Grand 2285-Y. 120 Pioneer blk. 



MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS. 



MATTESO.N & MACGKEGOR, 
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANTS AND 
AUDITORS. 

Business Counselors and Systematlzers. 

702-702 Alworth Bldg., 

•Phones: Melrose. 4700; Grand, 71. 



ASHES REMOVED AND TEAMING. 

ASHES HAULED— WOOD AND TEAM 
work. Keedy. Mel. 1390; Grand 14li8-X. 



BRAZING. 



STOVE AND FURNACE REPAIRING. 
115 West Michigan St. 'Phone :J369-Y. 



CAHPENTER REPAIR WORK. 



Remodeling, new work and repairing. 
A. .S. Page. Lin. 185-D. Estimates free. 



Work done neatly. O. Pearson. 207 W. 
Ist St. Zenltli 1274-X, or Park 97. 



CARPET CLEANING WORKS. 



INTERSTATE CARPET CLEANING CO. 
L. Sinotte, Prop., compressed air and 
vacuum cleaners and rug weavers. 
1928 West M ichigan St. Both 'phones. 

LOWEST RATES, WORK DONE AT 
your home with electric cleaner. The 
Moore Co.. Mel. 3407. Grand 2225-X. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING. 

Duluth Engineering Co.. W. B. Patton. 
Mgr., 613 Palladlo bldg. Speciiications 
prepared and construction superin- 
tended tor waterworks, sewerage, etc. 




A. Haakonsen. dealer 
and expert repairer, 
at J. W. Nelson's. 5 
East Superior street. 



BOSTON MI'SIC CO.. MUSICAL MER- 
chandise. 6 and 8 West First street 



MUSIC LESSONS. 

^h^ll^^Ky^^i^- C. A. GREGORY. 
-01 S. r^lghtecnth ave. E. Grand 606. 



MOVING PICTURE SUPPLIES. 

^^?Vo*. P^'^U''"^ outfits bought and sold 
•National" Co.. 417 W. Michigan St 



PATENTS. 

PATENTS — "ALlTABOUT^^X^^^^i^ 
See Stevens. 610 Sellwood building 



PAINTING AND PAPERHANGING. 



For painting and decorating see 
Youngdahl & Dlerg. 223 W. 2nd St 



REAL ESTATE. 



L. A Lars 
C 



A Larsen Co.. 213 Providen^e^idT" 
^ity property, lands, loans fire fifa! 



RUG WEAVING. 



FIRST-CLASS WORK— SIL^ CUR- 
tains a sp?claltv. Melroge JS41. 



CARPET AND RUG WEAVINO 215 
Nineteenth avenue west 



CIRCULAR LETTERS. 

Try out wrlterpresa. fac-slmile letters; 
look just like typewritten ones. The 
Letter shop, 909 Torrey bldg. Mel. 116. 



CLAIRVOYANT-HAIR SPECIALIST. 

MRS. ANNA, In Bryant & Co.'s hair- 
growing parlors. Grows a head of 
hair or no pay. 18 I^ke av. Mel. 1145. 



CHIMNEY SWEEPER. 



Ed McCarty, 
Park 39- Y. 



5129 Glendale. MeL 4865; 
illso turnace cleaning. 



SWEDISH MASSAGE. 

TURKISH BATH PARLORS. 

Remodeled, refurnished throusrhoul 
Open for business. Hotel McKav 
Turkish bath parlors, under McKay 
^^°*^,^',P^"*^"*">' supervised by Prof 
Paul Krueger. masseur, from Berlin 
German.v The ladies' department at 
17 Last Superior street is conducted 
and in charge of Mrs. Paul Krueger 
professional masseuse. 

Pont forget the number and place. 

Luzina Ojala cures rheumatism and 
stomach trouble. 3*8 Lake Ave. S. 



A. E. HANSEN, MASSEUR. 400 NEW 
Jergey Bldg. Old phone 4273 Melrose. 



CIVIL ENGINEER AND SURVEYORS 

NIClIOLs"'&nF^vRREL£riu 

tan Bldg. Anything in engineering. 



CARD ENGRAVING AND STAMPS. 



Consolidated Scamp & Printing Co., 
Barker & Orr. props., 14 4th Ave. W. 



CORSETS. 



Splrella corsets, 7 W. Superior SL A 
M. Osborne. MeL 4479; Grand 2197-Y. 



DRESSMAKING SCHOOL. 

Miss Gray's school of garment cutting 
and making, also patterns cut to 
measure, 3rd rioor of Geo. A Gray Co. 

Standard School of L>ressmaklng, even- 
ing cla ses 20 W. Sup. St. Mel. 5019. 



DANCIMG ACADEMY. 

COFFIN — 25 Lalte avenue north. Either 
•phone. Open afternoon and evening. 



GRADUATE MASSEUSE. 305 EAST 
I irst street. 'Phone, Grand 121 5-X. 



SEWING MACHINE REPAIR CO. 

GEO. W. POND, MANAGER. 

1122 EAST FIFTH ST. 

Melrose 3641. Grand 1533- Y. 

We do not sell new machines but 

we correct any troubles and make ovt^r 

old ones to be usually better than new 

ones. Call tis for estimate. 



SAFETY RAZORS SHARPENED. 



Safety 



ifety razor blades all kinds sharn- 
ened and put in first-class condition. 



30c 



per dozen. Quayle-Larsen Co. 



SKATE SHARPENING. 

DULUTH GUN SHOI^ 
Key, Lock and Safe 

W ork.s of all des- 

criptions. Skates sharpened. 203 W 1st ^t 



TAXIDERMISTS. 



DANCING LESSONS. 

Lynn Dancing \cademy. lady instruc- 
tor, 18 L. Av. N. Hall for rent. Mel. 1145 



FURNITURE RE-COVERED. 

Let Forsell do your UPHOLSTERING. 

S34 E. Supericr street. Both "phones. 



FLORIST. 



DuL Floral Co., wholesale, retail cut 
flowers; funeral designs. 121 W. Sup. 



GRINDING. 

Central repair shop. 115 West Michigan 
street. K. E. Stewart, formerly with 
Northern Hdw.- \L A. Close, formerly 
with Kelloy lidw. Skate sharpi-nlng 
one of our sp'-cialtles. Grand 2389-y. 




WHEN YOU WANT 
A PIECE OF TAXI- 
DERMIC WORK 
DONE, HAVE IT DONE 
RIGHT BY 

STOREY BROS., 
227 Eaat Superior St., Dull 

Phone, G rand 2287-A. 

IF YOU WANT^VOURDEER OR MOOSE 
head mounted, natural and true to life 
call E. Fryberg. My work Is iulrkn- 
Ued moth proof, 1 also mount birds 
or small animals; prices reasonable. 
E. ^lyberg, 2826 West Michigan 
stree t. 'Phone Lincoln 137 -X, 

I do all kinds of taxlderralc work, but 
specialize on deer heads; work guar- 
anteed; prices reasonable, H. R. Helm, 
taxidermist, 1705 N. 6th St.. Superior. 



WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER. 

Watches and clocks repaired; satisfac- 
tion guaranteed. 6 West First street. 







^tta^l.A*i 



iJ 



Monday, 



THE DTULUTH HERALD 



December 23, 1912. 



HOME FOR A CHRISTMAS 



What could be a more suitable gift to your family at Christmas time than a home? Not necessarity a home att poW *f*-<^«'j*^ ^tS^-SSS*^ 
made would be very appropriate, the unpaid part to be taken care of with the money that now goes for nmt. Only you who are renting you who 
have moved time after time when you thought you had gotten nicely settled-realixe what it means to not have a home at your own. 



■fT'T 



LET THE HERALD WANT 
ADS HELP YOU 

Do you need help ? Do you need 

a tenant for that vacant room? 

Have you a business you 

want to sell ? 

Have you anything 

you cannot use and 

want to sell ? 



On© Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advcrlisement l>s« Tlmn 15 Cents. 

HELPWANTED^EMALE. 

WANTED— EXPERIENCED LADY FOR 
office work and bookkeeping; must 
have pleasant personality for meet- 
ing- people; permanent position for 
right party with chance for advance- 
ment, salary |50 per month; answer 
with own handwriting. Y 615, Her- 
ald, 



W A N T E D — O F F I C E GIRL. AND 
stenographer. Underwood machln?, 
salary ^8 to start; permanent posi- 
tion; answer in own handwriting. 
P 620. Herald. 



WANTED — GOOD HOME FOR ELDER- 
ly lady who will assist with light 
housework; steady place; $10.00 per 
month. Call Lakeside 179-L. 



WANTED — GIRL, TO ASSIST WITH 
housework; no washing; good wages; 
one that can go home nights pre- 
ferred. Phone Melrose 4177. 



One Cent a Word Koch Insertion. 
No AdvcrllsenM^nt Iie»» Tlinn 15 Cents. 

"AbDiTToiiiiL WAinra 

ON PACE 23. 

^FOR REIU— RqOMS;_ 

THE DB ANGELTERR HOTEL, 
310 E. Superior street, the newest hotel 
in the city, just finished; entirely 
new furniture, hot and cold wat«r 
in rooms, steam heated. Single rooms 
from 1^ to M per week; iwo-room 
suites, |6 to } 6 per week. . _ 

THE FKEDEKIC HOTEL, 
CORNER FIRST AVENUE WEST AND 
First street, is now making Buecial 
rates for the winter. Hot and cold 
running water in every room. Tiio 
most home-like place in the city. 
Rooms single or en suite. 



Perhaps you 
have household 
furniture you are 
not needing and 
want to turn into 
cash? 





Have you aflat 
that you want to 
rent or a house 
for sale? If so, 
the Want Ads 
will serve you? 



WANTED — COMPETENT MAID FOR 
general housework; two In family; 
good wages. Mrs. D. L. Falrchild. 
1432 East First street. 



AV ANTED — GIRL" TO TAKE CARE OF 
child and assist with light house- 
work. Mrs. F. H. Howe, 1405 Lon- 
don road. 



The cost is small. 

Competent operators 

are a waiting your call — 



WANTED — COOK; DINING ROOM 
girl and chambermaid. Marine hotel. 
206 Lake avenue south. 



WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; small family. 
222 East Third street. 



WANTED — MACHINE GIRLS AT DU- 
luth Steam Laundry. 16 South Fifty- 
seventh avenue west. 



FOR RENT— GET LOCATED FOR 
the winter in a warm, comfortable 
and homelike room, either large or 
small, at very reasonable raios. 
Transient trade accommodated, 'ioc 
Verona. 310 West Third street. 

FOR RENT — TWO NICELY FUR- 
nished steam heated rooms, with gas 
range, electric lignts, only 
utes walk from postoftice; 
reasonable to rlgnt party. 
West First street. 



One Cent a Word Kach Insertion. 
No Advertisement Liess Ttuin 15 Cents. 

^TOR^^NT^FUTST^ 

flat in the Whitney building, corner 
Eighteenth avenue west and Supe- 
rior street; bath, new gas range, 
new hardwood floors, walls newly 
papered, woodwork just varnished; 
■water and Janitor service also in- 
cluded; rent $25 per month. Apply 
Whitney Wall company. 301 Torrey 
building. 

FOR RENT— A LARGE SIX-ROOM 
flat, near Twelfth avenue east and 
London road; largo living room, 
16x21, overlooking the lake and har- 
bor; all rooms are large and airy; 
plenty of daylight; heat, water and 
janitor service. Rent $55 per month. 
Apply Whitney Wall Co., 301 Torrey 
building. 



five min- 
wlll rent 
Call 1030 




WANTED — COMPETENT GIRL FOR 
general housework; three in family. 
2330 East Fifth street 

WANTED — DINING ROOM GIRL." 
East St. Paul Restaurant, 14 East 
Superior street. 



TME IKlER^Li, iPLIUITH'S 



WANTED— GIRLS AT MRS. SOMERS' 
employment office, 15 Second Ave. E. 



WANTED— GIRL 
housework. 1409 



TO ASSIST WITH 
East Superior street. 



WANTED AT ONCE — TWO EXPERI- 
enced waitresses. Delmonico cafe. 



FOR RENT — ONE OR TWO FUR- 
nished rooms lor light housekeepiag, 
also single room; modern house; rea- 
sonable rent. 16 East Second street. 

i?or Rent — Large front room with al- 
cove; steam heated, hot and cold run- 
ning water; elegantly furnished. IIS 
East Superior street. Grand 1147 . 

FOR RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
and papered room, hot water heat, 
all conveniences; private family. 
1418^ East First street. 



FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HEATED 
apartment in central location, with 
the best of modern service; rooms 
are light and newly finished with 
hardwood floors; rents for $37.50 and 
we furnish the water and gas for 
laundry. Corporate Investment com- 
pany, 100 Torrey building. 



One Cen^ a IVord Each ^eertlon. 
No Advertisement Less Than 15 Cents. 

FOR KENT — EIGHT-ROOM BRICK 
house; hot water heat; lavatory on 
first floor; complete toilet on sec- 
ond floor; marble and tile vestibule; 
hardwood floors over all; gas range; 
$45 per month. J. D. Howard & Co., 
^09-212 Providence building. 

FOR RENT — WE HAVE FIVE-ROOM 
and eight-room houses centrally lo- 
cated; also eight-room house in East 
end; we will put them in first-class 
shape; we know we can satisfy you 
If you win call In and see us. R. r>. 
Knox & Co. 

FOR RENT— FIVE-ROOM FURNISH- 
ed house to timall family, water, gas, 
and electric light, heat furnished 
ready to occupy Jan. 1, rent reason- 
able. Apply Henry Halenback, 429 
East Sixth litreet. 



WANTED — CHAMBERMAID. BLAN- 
chett hotel. 522 Lak e avenue south. 

WANTED— MANGLE GIRL. MODEL 
laundry, 126 East First street. 



HORSESJ(EH ICUES^JTC. 



One Cent a Word Fach Insertion. 
No Advertisement I^ess Than 15 Cents. 

Telephone Directory 

—OP- 
BUSINESS 
HOUSES 

Below you will tind » 
condensed list of reliable 
business firms. This is de- 
signed for the convenience 
)t busy people. A telephone 
irder to any one of them 
will receive the same care- 
ful attention as would be 
-iven an order placed in 
person. You can safely 
pend upon the 
of any one of 




de 

reliability 
these firms. 



One Cent a Word Each Insertion. 
No Advertisement Ix»ss Than 15 Cent.s. 

JELP^WANTED^MAL^ 

WANTED — CHRISTMAS SHOPPERS 
to look over the useful articles wo 
are including in our Christmas saU*. 
No matter who you are getting the 
present for, be It man, woman or 
child, you will find something here 
to suit, and nine chances to one your 
selection will be a useful article. 
R. R. Forward Furniture company. 
Second avenue east and Superior St. 



FOR SALE. 

International delivery wagon, first 
class condition; owner will demon- 
strate. A good buy at $250. 

KLEYN AUTOMOBILE CO.. 
627-29 East Superior St. 



FOR RENT— TWO BRIGHT FUR- 
nished rooms, warm, for the winter; 
half block from courthouse. aliS 
We st Second street. 

FOR RENT— TWO WELL FURNISH- 
ed steam heated rooms; modern, 
walking distance. 727 East First 
street. Melrose 1621. 



FOR RENT— ONE SIX-ROOM FLAT 
and two three-room flats; all In 
good condition; rent very reason- 
able. Twenty-eighth ave. W. and 
Third St. Martin Smith, Astoria blk.. 
First ave. east. Phon e Grand 2156. 

FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM HEATED 
flat, central with modern service; 
water and gas for laundry furnished, 
$35. Corporate Investment company, 
$100 Torrey building. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FURNISH- 
ed house to iimall family; water, gas, 
electric light, furnace heat, ready to 
occupy Jan. 1, low terms to right 
party. Apply Henry Halenbeck, 429 
East Sixth street. 



SECRET SOCIETIES. 



PALESTINE LODGE, NO. 7», 
A. F. St. A. M. — Regular meet- 
ings first and third Monday 
evenings of each month at 
7:30 o'clock. Next meeting. 
Jan. 6, 1913. Work — First de- 
Hugh L. Joyce. W. M.; H. Nes- 
secretary. 

IONIC LODGE NO. 1&6, A. F. 
& A. M. — Regular meetings 
second and fourth Monday 
evenings of each month at 7:30 
o'clock. Next meeting. Dec. 
23, 1912. Work— Installation 
of officers, followed by musical pro- 
gram. Warren E. Greene, W. M.; Burr 
Porter, secretary. 





KEYSTONE CHAPTER NO. 
20, R. A. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, second and fourth 
Wednesday evenings of each 
month at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting, Jan. 8. 1913. Work — Installa- 
tion of officers. Carl E. Lonegrcn, H. 
P.; Alfred Le Richeux, secretary. 




FOR RENT — SIX-ROOM HOUSE, 
modern; hardwood floors through- 
out. 1422 V4 East First street. $35 
per month. J. D. Howard & Co., 210 
Providence building. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT, AL- 
cove and bathroom; electric light; 
gas for cooking; warm and light; on 
ground floor. Call at 912 East Sixth 
street, A. A. Flder. 



FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS, 110 
Twelfth avenue west, $10; four 
rooms, 110 Twelfth avenue west, $9; 
five rooms, 630 West First street, $18. 
R. B. Knox & Co. 



l<OR RENT— ^27. 50 PER MONTH. 502 
East Superior street; corner house; 
seven rooms and bath; electric 
lights. C. F. Graff. 405 Lonsdale 
building. 



A 



DULUTH COUNCIL NO. 6, 
R. & S. M. — Stated convoca- 
tions, first and third Fridays 
of each month at 7:30 p. m- 
Next meeting. Jan. 3, 1913. 
W^ork — Regular business. Herman 1* 
Dreseer, T. I. M.; Alfred L«e Richeux, re- 
corder. 

DULUTH COMMANDERY Nol 
18, K T. — Stated conclave, 
first Tuesday of each month 
at 7:30 o'clock. Next conclave. 



FOR RENT— TWELVE FURNISHED 
rooms, with water and toilet: very 
low rent. Inquire at Nick George, 
915 West Michigan street. 




Dec. 
— Christmas 
Underbill. E. 
corder. 



25, 1912, at 10 a. m. Work 
William D. 
Richeux, re- 



observance 
C; Alfred Le 



FOR RENT— EIGHT-ROOM HOUSE; 
213-215 Third avenue west; $32. C. 
L. Rakowsky & Co., Exchange build- 
ing. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
steam heated rooms, also rooms for 
light housekeeping. Inquire 410 
Ljwell block. 



FOR RENT — NEWLY FURNISHED 
steam-heated rooms, 50c, 75c and $1. 
Kaiserhof hotel. No. 10 Lake ave- 
nue north. 



FOR RENT — WILL GENTLEMAN 
please call who called Sunday, new 
flats Second avenue east between 
Third and Fourth. Call 201 East 
T hird. 

FOR RENT — NEW FIVE-ROOM 
strictly modern flat; just completing, 
Second avenue east between Third 
and Fourth. Call 201 East Third. 



FOR RENT — Furnished rooms; modern, 
hot water heat, newly furnished. 
Ra d 1 son Hotel, 219 East First str»?et. 

FOR RENT— HEATED UNFURNISHED 
rooms, very centraL Apply N. J. 
Upham Co., IS Third avenue west 



FOR RENT— TWO ROOMS FOR LIGHT 
huosekeeping; all conveniences; use 
of phone. 320 West Third street. 



FOR RENT— FOUR-ROOM FLATS; 
centrallv located; city water and 
toilet; $7 to $12. Apply 1119 East 
First street; both telephones 631. 



PADDED VANS for moving furniture. 
West Dulutli & Duluth Transfer Co. 



LOST— ON WOODLAND CAR OR ON 
road leadlniiT to St. James's Orphan- 
age, silver square coin purse, with 
engraved nronogram, S. L. M., or S. 
M. N., containing small change. Re- 
ward if returned to 1108 Alworth 
building. 



SCOTTISH RITE — REGULAR 
meetings. every Thursday 
evening at 7:30 o'clock. Next 
meeting. Jan. 2, 1913. Work^ 
Regular business; balloting on 
petitions. Henry Nesblt, secretary. 




ZENITH CHAPTER, NO. 25. 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meetings, second and 
fourth Friday evenings of 
¥ each month at 7:30 o'clock. 
Next meeting, Dec. 27. 1912. Work- 
Installation of officers. Nellie L. Allen, 
W. M. ; Ella F. Gearhart, secretary. 



^tJ 



FOR RENT— COSY MODERN THREE- 
room flat, $9; four-room flats, $11 ana 
$17 per month. Thatcher. 312 West 
Fourth street. Grand 1907. 



Old 
'Phone 

DniGGISTS— ^.„., 

Eddie Jeronimus. Ph.G.1243 
DENTISTS — 

Dr. F. H. Burnett,D.D.S.4608 
DYE WORKS 

Zenith Dye House... 

Northwestern Dyeing 

&. Cleaning Co 

L.W.NUKIKS — 

I'et^rK-ss Laundry . . . 

Yale Laundry 

Lutes Laundry 

Home Laundry Co... 

Modtl Laundry 

Troy Laundry 

MK.*T MARKET — 

Mork Bros 1590 



,1888 
.1337 



New 
'Phone. 

1072 

909-X 

1888 

1516 



WANTED AT ONCE — A BLACKSMITH; 
good horseshoer and handy with 
woodworking tools for sleighs and 
other rough work; must be sober 
and Industrious; good pay for the 
right party. Telephone at my ex- 
pense. Andrew Maki, Aurora, Minn. 



428 


428 


479 


479 


447 


447 


478 


478 


2749 


1302 


257 


267 



189 



WANTED — LEARN THE BARBER 
trade; big demand; big wages; easy 
work; few weeks complete by our 
method; free beautiful illus. catalogue. 
Moler Barber college. 27 E. Nicollet 
Ave., Minneapolis. Minn. Estab. 1893. 



REAL ESTATE, FIRE 
INSURANCE AND 

Duluth Realty Co.. 608 1st N. Bank bldg. 
C. L. Rakowsky & Co., 201 Exch. bldg. 
E D Field Co.. 203 j:xchange building. 
Getty-Smith Co., 306 Palladio building. 
The Home Realty Co., 200 Alworth bldg. 



LEARN TELEGRAPHY. 
Short hours; big salaries; great de- 
mand; railroad wires and expert 
instructors. Free catalogue. Barry's 
Telegraph Institute, Minneapolis, 
Minn. ^ 

WANTED — BE A DETECTIVE; EARN 
$150 to $300 monthly. Particulars 
write Frederick Wagner, 1243 Lex- 
ington avenue. New York. 



HORSES! HORSES! HORSES! 
We have just received at our local 
sale stable several carloads of tig 
1,600 to l.SOO-pound draft horses suit- 
able for logging and heavy hauling. 
These horses are entirely acclimated, 
right out of work, and ready to go 
Into the harness. Our Mr. Barker will 
be pleased to show you these big 
horses. We ca nsell you a team or a 
carload. Part time given if desired. 
BARRETT & ZIMMERMAN, 

Duluth, Minn. 

FOR SALE— THIRTY- FIVE HEAD OF 
logging horses. These horses are all 
acclimated, have worked all summer 
In the coal and wood business, are in 
prime condition and weigh from 
3,000 to 3,500 a pair. Will sell one 
or all for they must be disposed of 
before Jan. 1. Come and see them 
or write today to Healy-Brown Co., 
Wausau, Wis. 



FOR RENT— ONE OR 
nished rooms for light 
621 East Second street 



TWO FUR- 
housekeeplng. 



FOR RENT — FOUR ROOM BASE- 
ment, water and toilet. $5 per month. 
914 East Sixth street. 



FOR RENT — LA.RGE FURNISHED 
room; suitable for two. 16 West 
First street. Flat 1. 



HORSES! 100 HORSES! 

Drafters, delivery, farm horses and 
Fine drivers and ponies. Our 
are the lowest; part tine 
We buy, sell and exchange 
wagons and harness. 
RUN w CIST & CO., 
Sale stable, 209 West First street. 



mares, 
prices 
given, 
horses. 



FOR RENT— ONE LARGE ROOM FOR 
light housekeeping. 14 Fourth ave- 
nue east. 

FOR RENT — FOUR ROOMS AT 519% 
East Fi fth street. Call Grand 1218-D. 

FOR RENT— FURNISHED ROOMS ; 
steam heat. 316 West Second street. 



FOR RENT — FIVE-ROOM FLAT; 
central; all coiavenlences but heat; 
rent reasonable. N. J. Upham com- 
pany, 18 Third avenue west. 



FOR RENT — NICELY FURNISHED 
steam-heated, three-room flat, for 
housekeeping; all modern; $20 per 
month. 307 East Third street. 



LOST— FRIDAY, ON CAR OR BE- 
tween For^vard's store and Third 
avenue west and Fourth street, sil- 
ver purse; initials A. M. S. Finder 
please retv rn to Miss Eraser. 306 
West Fourth street. 



Reward. 



FOR RENT — FOUR-ROOM FLAT 
with water and sewer connections; 
only $10. N. J. Upham company, 18 
Third avenue west. 

FOR RENT — ONE SEVEN-ROOM 
heated Dacey apartment. 1008 East 
Third street. Either 'phone, 423. 



IX>ST — ON SUPERIOR STREET, BE- 
tween Fif te< nth avenue east and Fifth 
avenue west, ladies' gold bar pin, 
finished in green and white enanieL 
Please return to Edward Armstrong, 
Herald offic e for reward. 

LOST— BLAC K LEATHER HAND- 
bag on EJ.st Fourth street car or 
corner Third avenue west and Su- 
perior street. Finder call Melrose 
2385 for reward^ 

FOUND— EVERY PIECE FURNITURE 
In our Duluth stock practically your 
own prices before Christmas and your 
credit good. Factory showrooms. 
2201 West First street. 




gree. 
leavy. 



EUCLID LODGE. NO. 198, A. 
F. & A. M. — Meets at West 
Dulutli, second and fourth 
Wednesdays of each month 
at 7:30 p. m. Next m»&tlng 
Jan. 8. 1913. Work— First de- 
W. B. Getchell, W. M.; A. Dun- 
secretary. 



DULUTH CHAPTER NO. 69, 
R. A M. — Meets at West Du- 
luth first and third Wednes- 
davs of each month at 7:30 
p. "m. Next meeting, Jan. 1, 
1913. Work— P. M. and M. B. 

degrees. Mason M. Forbes, H. P.; A. 

Dunleavy, secrttary. 




FOR RENT— THREE UNFURNIHSED 
rooms, $6. 406 West Second street 



FOR RENT— SEVEN-ROOM HEATED 
flat; all modern; very centrally lo- 
cated. 119 West Fourth street. 



RIWLJSTATTLIIANS^ 



____ PERSONAL^ 



■WANTED— DULUTH RAILWAY MAIL 
clerk examinations Jan. 11; coach- 
ing free. Franklin Institute, Dept. 
180 W., Rochester, N. Y. 



WANTED— THREE YOUNG MEN TO 
take orders for local concern; neat 
appearing hustlers only. See Mr. 
Kearns. Hotel St. Louis. 



JWONEYJOJ^OAN^ 



•a 



MONEY— $10 TO $50— MONEY 

LOANED 

On furniture, pianos, or to salaried 

employes on plain note, quickly 

and confidentially. 

OUK RATES 
will please you, as they are de- 
sign*-d especially for those who 
cannot aftord a higher rate, while 

THE BASi'^ PAYMENT PLAN 
adopted by us makes it possible to 
repay the loan weekly Qi monthly 
to suit your income. 

DULUTH LOAN COMPANY. 

307 Columbia Bldg., 303 W. Sup. St. 

Open all day and every evening 

till Christmas. 



* 
* 

* 

* 



WANTED— TRAVELING REPRESEN- 
tative by old established paper houso; 
state age. experience and references. 
T 552, Herald. 



WAGONS — CUTTERS— SLEIGHS. 
Complete line always on hand; bar- 
gains In grocers' and butchers' wag- 
ons. Write for catalogue. L Hammel 
Co., 302-308 East First street, Duluth. 



FOR SALE— GOOD WORK TEAM, 
ages 9 and 10; weight, 3,000; can be 
seen at address, Beyer Bros., R. F. D. 
No. 4 , Box 162, Rice Lake. Minn. 

FOR SALE — TEAM WEIGHING 3,100 
pounds. Call 28 West Palm street, 
Duluth Heights. Grand, 2196-D. 



WANTED— BARBER. QUICK, SIXT1& 
per cent, with guarantee of $16; 
steady Job. William Malchow, Oakes, 
N. D. 

WANTED— MACHINISTS AND MOLD- 
ers at once. Lake Shore Engine 
Works, Marquette, Mich. 



SPECIAL CHRISTMAS RATES 
ON 

CHATTEL LOANS. 

.SALARY LOANS. 

THESE PAY EVERYTHING: 

Borrow $10. pay $0.50 w'kly or $2 m'th. 

Borrow $20, pay $0.75 w'kly or $3 m'th. 

Borrow $25, pay $1.00 w'kly or $4 mth. 

Borrow $30, pay $1.25 w'kly or $5 m'th. 

Other amounts in same proportion. 

Open evtnings until Christmas. 

DULUTH FINANCE CO., 
301 Palladio Bldg. 



MONEY TO LOAN — NOTICE TO 
hunters. We will loan you money on 
your rifles, shotguns and revolvers. 
Will keep them until next season, 
before sold. Keystone Loan Co. 'i'l 
West Superior street 

WE LOAN ON ALL KINDS OF PER- 
Bonal security at lowest rates. Call 
on us, 430 Manhattan Bldg., and get 
rates. Duluth Mortgage Loan Co. W. 
Horkan. New 1598-D; Melrose 3733. 



SIO 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 



BUSINESS^ 

$10 $10 $10 $10 $10 



FREE. 
TEN 



FREE 
DOLLARS. 



Cut out this ad and bring 
it to us and we will allow 
you TEN DOLLARS as part 
first payment on any one of 
the bargains advertised in to- 
days paper. 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO. 

Factory Salesrooms, 
426 West First Street. 



510 



$10 $10 $10 



$10 



$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 
$10 



FOR SALE — GOOD WORK HORSES, 
cheap If taken at once. Call 30.2 
Fifty-fourth avenue west. 



FOR SALE — 40 horses; all sizes. 28 
E First St Western Sales Stable Co. 



ONE $350 

NEW MAHOGANY PIANO 

ONLY $145. 

Cash or Terms. 

Case Slightly Checked. 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO. 

Factory Salesrooms, 

426 West First Street 



WE HAVE FUNDS 

On hand for mortgage loans of any 
amount be they large or small. 
LOWEST INTEREST RATES. 

P. I. SALTER COMPANY. 
Lonsdale Building. 




LOST— SUNEAY, AT ENDION M. E. 
church or -.-Icinity, plain gold locket; 
H S. eng,-aved. Finder please re- 
turn to C. W. Stllson, 1831 East Sec- 
ond street. 



***«««*'?^-?;^^?'sMf^J*3Wf«*i¥*??^.i^>^^ 



LOST — A PAIR OF GOLD-RJMMED 
glasses, between Second alley and 
Ten-cent store on First avenue west. 
Finder return to 110 West Second 
street. 

LOST— BUTTE-ALEX SCOTT COPPER 
stock certificate No. A 1051. Finder 
please return to 402 Palladio build- 
ing and receive reward. 



^^^^^^^^aWt^^^^^^^^^jfr^^^v^JiWp 



■^^-^^-^^^-^J^f^^^^^^^^^^i**?;^-^** 



PERSONAL— J. P. BRAND ER. FOR- 
merly of the firm of Brander & 
Gray, of 106 East First street, 
wants to supply you with your priv- 
ate trade family bottled beer for 
vour Christmas table. Order a 
case today. 'Phone Grand 2024 for 
prompt delivery. 



PERSONAL^YOU CAN BUY "DAD'S" 
easy chair, "mother's" kitchen cabi- 
net. Princess dresser for sister; hun- 
dreds other good pieces furniture 
practically your own prices. Factory 
showrooms, 2201 West First street 
Your credit good. 



WANTED AT ONCE. 

Loans on Real Estate Security. 
Money on hand. No delay. 
Lowest Rates and Charges. 

W. M. PRINDLE & CO., 
First Floor, Lonsa&le Bldg. 



*-^*';^**«««*j?«****^f^***A^->«*-* 



FOR SALE — 30 HORSES 
Sale & Boarding stable. 



AT ZENITH 
524 W. 1st St 



FOR SALE — 
horses. 1924 



TWO 
West 



HEAVY 
Second 



DRAFT 
street. 



FOR SALE — A LIGHT SPEEDING 
cutter. 2820 West Third street. 



FOR SALE— PAIR OF SINGLE IRON 
SLEDS. 1620 East Sixth street. 



FOR SALE — NEW SINGLE SLEIGH. 
Call Grand, 670-Y. 



PERSONAL— YOU CAN BUY "DAD'S" 
easy chair, "mother's" kitchen cabi- 
net. Princess dresser for sister; hun- 
dreds other good pieces furniture at 
practically your own prices. Factory 
showrooms, 2201 West First street. 
Y^our credit is good. 



PERSONAL — EXPERIENCED TE.^^CH- 
er, with A-1 references, will give 
piano lessons at your home; chil- 
dren, 50 cents. Address K 50, care 
Herald. 



FOR SALE— HORSES. CALL 112 EAST 
Michigan street. 



BUSINESS CHANCES— FOR SALE, 
mortgage on which $l,o70 Is still 
due, which Is being repaid in month- 
ly payments with 6 per cent inter- 
est; security first-class and pay- 
ments being made regularly. I need 
cash immediately and will discount 
this $150 for cash and look after 
collection of payments for you free. 
This Is a high-class investment which 
will net you about 10 per cent. If you 
want this for an investment address 
Z 558 Herald. 



RENTAL AGENCIES. 



rooms, 
rooms, 
rooms. 



FLATS 

104 S. 39th Ave. W $ 9.00 

Lake Ave. S 10.00 

121 19th Ave. W 16.00 



HOUSES. 



MONEY FOR SALARIED PEOPLE AND 
others upon their own names; cheap 
rates, easy payments; confidential. 
D. H. Tolman, 510 Palladio building. 

MONEY TO LOAN ON DIAMONDS, 
watches, furs and all goods of value, 
$1 to $1,500. Keystone Loan & Mer- 
cantile company, 22 West Superior St. 



STOVEJEPAIRS^ 

WE CARRY IN STOCK REPAIRS FOR 
10 000 different stoves and ranges. C, 
F. Wlggerts & Son. 410 E. Sup. St. 



BUSINESS CHANCES — LARGE COR- 
poratlon dealing in timber and forest 
products offers its 10-year collateral 
trust bonds at a price to yield a 
good return on the investment. Price 
of each bond $25, either all cash or 
$5 cash and $2.50 per month on bal- 
ance. If Interested in one or more of 
these bonds address Q 564 Herald. 



rooms, 1618 Piedmont Ave 16.00 

rooms, 1721 West Second street; 

water paid 18.00 

rooms, 1713 Jefferson St 20.00 

rooms. 1422% E. 1st St 35.00 

rooms, 1610 E. Superior St . 46.00 

room furnished house. 106 East 

Fourth street • • 45.00 

10 rooms, 1431 E. 2nd St 55.00 

J. D. HOWARD & CO., 

209-212 Providence Building. 

Melrose 193. Grand 326. 



WE HAVE ON HAND A LARGE 
amount of money which we are loan- 
ing out on improved real estate; low 
rate; prompt and efficient service; 
no delay. C. L. Rakowsky & Co.. 201 
Exchange building. 

WE WRITE INSURANCE IN STRONG 
companies, make city and farm loans, 
and solicit some of your business. 
Wm. C. Sargent, 208 Exchange Bldg. 



STRAYED— <iORDON SETTER DOG, 
lame In left fore leg. Suitable re- 
ward for r«turn. A. M. Marshall. 2605 
Greysolon road. 



LOST — AM BER WATCH CHARM, 
heart shat.e. Inlaid with gold cross 
and anchor. Return to Herald for re- 
ward. 



EUCLID CHAPTER NO. 66. 
Order of Eastern Star — Regu- 
lar meetings, first and third 
Tuesday evenings of each 
month at 7:3o at West Du- 
luth Masonic temple. ^ext 
meeting, Dec. 17. 1912. Work— Installa- 
tion of officers. Elsie J. Baxley. W. M.J 
Esther E. Murray, secretary. 

ZENITH COUNCIL NO. 161, 
Royal league, meets the sec- 
ond and fourth Thursdays ot 
the month at 8 p. m., K. of P. 
haU, 118 West Superior street 
next meeting, Dec. 26. l»i.4. 
Business. O. S. Kempton. archon, 305 
Wolvin building; collector. H. A. Hail, 
18 East First street. 




DLXtTH LODGE. NO. 28, L O. O. ,1^-MEETS 
even Friday eveain* ml 8 o clock »t Odd 
Kellow.- luiU, IS Lake avenue uotUl 
Next meelius uisht, IMday. Dec. 20. 
reunion of all eld Unie members, ^ua «. 
G. ; B. A. Anderson, Uec. Sec.; A. H. 
Sec. 



Big time; 
Forgy, N. 
Paul. Fin. 




K. O. T. M. _ 

DULLTH TEM. NO. 1. KNIGHTS 0» 
the Maccabees tf the World, meeta flm 
and liiird Mondays of each nior.tU aft 
ilaccabee ball, 21 Lake arenue nortlu 
tharlea G. Futter, c«minaridcr, 62* 
North Firty-seTenth avenue west; J. B. 
reccrd keeper, office In hall. Hours. 10 *. 
01 dallj-. Zenith "pbone. Grand «19-X. 



LOST — OPEN-FACE WATCH WITH 
fob; mltiaiis W. L S'. Finder return 
to office cf Y. M. C. A. Reward. 



Private home before and during con- 
finement; best of care by professional 
nurse; babies also cared for. Mar- 
garet Flnkle. Call Melrose 2454. 214 
Ninth avenue east. 



Private h Jme for ladies during confine- 
ment. Mrs. Mary Barrell, matron. Phy- 
sicians In attendance. 3510 Woodland 
avenue. Grand 1028. 



w 



DULUTH LODGE NO. 505, 
Loyal Order of Moose, meets 
every Monday evening at 8 
o'clock. Moose hall. 224 West 
First street. J. F. Conway, sec- 
retary, 304 Columbia building. 




BROTHERHOOD OF AMERICAN TBO- 

men— Duluth Homestead, No. 3131. evefj 
Thursday, 8 p. m.. Yeomen hall, Wood- 
ueu builuuiB, TwenU first avenue west 
Mid First street. Bert W. Loagwell. 
foreman. Grand 735; Mr*. J. A. B^- 
1 Exeter street. Llncola. 229-D. 



CASH ON HAND TO LOAN ON CITY 
and farm property, any amount, low- 
est rates, no delay. Northern Title 
Co.. 613 First National Bank Bldg. 



MONEY TO LOAN — FROM $500 UP— 
Lowest rates, no delay; money on 
hand. E. D. Field company. 204 Ex- 
change bank building. 



MONEY TO LOAN IN 
small amounts; let us 
home. W^ B. Roe, 
building. 



LARGE OR 

build you a 

412 Providence 



Personal — Ladies — Ask your druggist 
for Chichester Pills, the Diamond 
Brand. For 25 years known as best 
safest, always reliable. Take no 
other. Chichester Diamond Brand Pills 
are sold by druggists everywhere. 



PERSONAL — Christmas sale on all hair 
goods, switches, etc.; large reductl-,»ns; 
manicures, ladles, 25c; men, 60c- Dr. 
Bahr, chiropodist. Corn removed 
25c; bunions. 50c. 20 W. Superior St. 



PERSONAL— WE HAVE TAKEN ON 
extra help in our shipping dopart- 
ment, so that all out-of-town orders 
will receive prompt attention. R. R. 
Forward & Co.'s furniture store,, Du- 
luth. 



City and village loans in Minnesota. Re- 
pav loan monthly; easy terms. C. A. 
Kriippenberg, 300 Alworth; phone 697. 



MONEY TO LOAN — LOANS MADE ON 
timber and farm land.<«. John Q. A. 
Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 



Money to Loan- 
Duluth Realty 



-Low rates, no delay. 
Co., 1st National Bldg. 



PRIVATE HOME FOR LADIES T>VR- 
ing confinement; expert care; infants 
cared for. Ida Pearson, M. D.. 284 
Harrison avenue. St. Paul. 



Mrs. E. Ne.'ela, midwife and private 
home for ladies. 328 South 63rd ave- 
nue west Phone Cole 316-D. 

MRS. HANSON, GRADUATE MID- 
wlfe, female complaints. 413 Seventh 
avenue east. Zenith 1225. 



Mrs. H. Olson, graduate midwife — Pri- 
vate hospital, 329 North Fifty-eighth 
avenue west Cole 173. 



LYDIA 
West 



LEHTONEN, MIDWIFE, 240ti 
Second St. 'Phone Lincoln 475-A 



Money to Loan — Any amount; low rates. 
Cooley & Underbill. 209 Exchange. 



TIMBER LANDS. 

TIMBER AND CU?^OVER LANDS 
bought; mortgage loans made. John 
Q. A. Crosby, 305 Palladio building. 



I buy standing timber; 
lands. Geo Rupley. 612 



also cut-over 
Lyceum Bldg. 



PERSONAL— YOU CAN BUY "DAD'S" 
easy chair, "mother's"' kitchen cabi- 
net. Princess dresser for sister; hun- 
dreds other good pieces furniture 
practically your own prices. Factory 
showrooms. 2201 West First .street 
Y^our credit good. 



WANTED — A COMPETENT WAGON 
woodworker. Apply 318 St. Croix 
avenue. Grand 254. 



Massage — Constipation a specialty. Mar- 
garet Nelson. 218 W. Sup. St. Room 8. 



BU.SINESS CHANCES— DON'T LET 
your money lay Idle In a bank; make 
your pavings work for you; invest 
In real estate on monthly payment 
plan. Let us explain. O 630 Herald. 

BUSINESS CHANCES — RESTAUR- 
ant for sale or rent to responsible 
party, small place but big business; 
only three restaurants In city. Apply 
Mrs. P. Lawrence. Chisholm, Minn. 



fTiR SALE — M. LEVINE HAR AR- 
rlved with a carload of fresh milch 
cows Sunday. Dec. 22. 821 Fourth 
avenue east. Grand 1708-D; Melrose 
4702. 



Barker's Remedy cures coughs, colds, 
catarrh and rheumatism. At Boy ce's. 

cut hair made 
Knauf Sisters. 



WANTED TO BUY. 

WANTED TO BUY— IMPROVED OR 
unimproved farm land, water fronts 
preferred to lakes or rivers. Whit- 
ney Wall Co., 301 Torrey building. 



^^^ISALE^HOUSES^^ 

FOR SALi:— BEAUTIFUL MODERN 
home; central East end; corner lot 
60 by 14( ; corners paved; cement 
walks; hct water heat; laundry; oak 
finish; flroplace; eight rooms; alcove 
and attic; will accept smaller Wood- 
land property as part payment; make 
an offer around $10,000. Whitney 
Wall corrpany, 301 Torrey building. 



2612 
room 



UNFTED OUPER OF FOEESTERS— 
Court Eastern Star. No. 86. U. O. T. 
haU. first and third Tuesdays. c«n»«r 
Fourth avenue west and l^iret etreeC 
Newton H. Wilson. C. K.. 608 Torrey 
buUdlng; Julia Wilson, •ecrelary, Ne^ 

West Fourth street: Harry MUncs, treasurer. 

£3 Winlhrop block, new 'phone. Grand. 1694-A. 





AT 



U. W. A. 
niPERIAL CAMP. iSOe ~ MJiT-TS 
Maocabee hall. Lake avenue north. 
Olid and fourth Mondays of each montb. 
Bert Erldison. consul; C. P. lJu-1. clerk. 
P. O. box 411; F. A. Noble, district dep- 
uty, 314 Columbia building. 




relar>' ; John 
bulldins. 



CLAN STE\\"ART. NO. 50. O. 8. C— 
Meets first and third Wednesdays eadi 
mcnth, 8 p. m.. at V. O. F. b*U. corner 
Fourth avenue west and First street. 
Next reeular meet lug L>ec. 18. Ales 
Macrae, chief; Perclval M. Youj^. see- 
Burnett, fluaiicial secretary, 313 Torrev 




DIAMOND I^IHJB. NO. 45. K. 
—Meets every Mot:day ereniiit in 



WANTED TO BL'Y — PINE SPRUCE 
stumpage tributary to Rainy river 
waters. Send estimate and price to 
K 509, Herald. 



AV ANTED TO BUY — PINE SPRUCE 
stumpage tributary to Rainy river 
waters. Send estimate and price to 
K 509. Herald. 



Second-hand furniture and stoves. Joe 
Popkin, 29 W 1st St Grand 253-X 



Personal — Combings and 
Into beautiful switches. 



FOR SALE— REAL ESTATE 



For Sale — Confectionery, tobacco, gro- , 

eery store & bldg.; snap. 1412 West FOR SALE— 
Superior street * land, 1.175. 



2 % -ACRE LOT AT WOOD- 
Whltney Wall company. 



_JWAI^DaOJENT^_ 

WANTEd'tO^ENT — THREE Busi- 
ness women desire small, modern, 
Fteam heated, furnished flat, cen- 
trally located; for the winter; ref- 
erences exchanged. U 563, Herald. 



Wanted to Buy — Second-hand furni- 
ture and stoves. Hagstrom & Lund- 
Quist 2012 W. Sup. St Lincoln. 447-.\. 



FOR SALE — OWNER MUST DISPOSE 
of new six-room house in few days; 
big bargain if sold immediately; 
yellow pine finish, hardwood floors, 
concrete foundation, storm vvlndov.'s 
and doors; block from car line: cen- 
tral. West end; $700 cash, balance 
easy terms. Address F 565, Herald. 




OF P. 

Sloan's 
hall, corner Twentieth arenaa we«t an4 
S^uperlor street. Gtorge E. Duren. CX C.j 
S. L. Pierce. K. of H. and S. 

K. OF P. 

NORTH STAR LOIXJE, NO. 35. K. OF 
P.— Meets every Friday evening at Cas- 
tle liall. 118 West Superior street. L. I* 
:5parks, C. C, Old phone. Bmad. 14-Kj 
8. A. Beam. 28 North Twenty -eighth 
avenue west. K. of U. and B. 



Ti 



^'- 



i 



.**- 



I 




K. O. U. W. 
FIDEUTT LODGE. NO. IN — MKETB 

at Macrabee halL 21 LAke arenue north, 
every TImrsday at 8 p. m. VlsiUns 
members welcome. M. Cossi. M. W. ; A. 
E. Pleriiig. recorder; O. J. Murvold; •- 
nauclcr, 217 East Fifth street. 



FOR SALE— HOUSE, EIGHT ROOMS, 
water, sewer, gas, bath; price, $1,400; 
$200 cash. Inquire 323 Vs East Fifth 
street. 



We pay highest prices for furniture 
and stoves. Bloom & Co. 102-104 West 
First street. G rand 986. 

LARGE OP. 
Investment. 



AUTOS^JflOTORBOATS^ 

Get my list of new and second-hand 
motorcycles. Walter Holmberg. Indi- 
an Mo"to:ycle agent; expert repair 
work done. 301 E. Mich St Duluth. 




NO- 



Flrat 
Lady 
floers 



MODERN SAMARITANS. 
ALPHA COC.NCIL. NO. 1— TAKE 
tlee: That Beneficent degiee meets 
ond and fotuth Tuesdays, and the Sam- 
aritan degree the first and third Tues- 
days at K. P. baU. 118 We«t Superior 
streeU J. Kelly. G. S.; Walla^-e P. 
WeUbanks. scribe; T. A. GaU. F. S., 
National bajik bulldhig. Mrs. D. C. Burnett. 
G. 8. Remember that the installation of ef- 
wlll take place Tuesday evening. Jau. Tth. AH 




arc requested to be present. 



WANTED TO BUY — A 
small tract of land for 
I 69, Herald. 



__JJPHOLSTERING^^ 

Furniture, Automobiles, Carriages; rea- 
aonabl* prlcM. S. Ott 112 1st Av«. W. 



WANTED TO BUY — SECOND-HAND 
furniture and stoves. 'Phone. Grand 

1665-A. 



H. POPKIN BUYS SECCND-H.\ND 
stoves and furniture. Lincoln 2S5-X. 



LITMAN BROS. BUY SECOND-HAND 

Stoves and furniture. Both 'phones. 



BOATS BOLGHT AND SOLD. MOTOR 
Boat exchange. 511 Torrey building. 



BOARD &^OOMOFFERED. 

BOARD a;\'D ROOM — FURNISHED 
single and double room with board; 
modern. Mel. 4597. 218 W. Third St 



BOARD Al'ID ROOM — FIRST-CLASS 
board and steam-heated room. 122 
£a£t First strsst 



ROYAL ARCANVM, DULUTH COUK- 
cil. No. 148S— Meets second and fourtla 
Tuesday evenings at Maccabee liall. 21 
\Aix avetiue north. Clinton Brooks, 
relary, 401 Columbia building. 





ORDER OF OWLS. DITLUTa 
Nest. No. 1200 — Meetings are held 
every Wednesday evening of each 
month at Eagles hall, 418 Weil 
Superior street. Joseph K. Fralo^ 
aecTtUry. 22 East Superior strMt 




rUst gtrect. 



A, O. U. W— Duluth Lodge. No. 10.— 
Meeu CTtrr aeeond and fourth Tuesday 
night at I. O. O. F. haU. 18 Lake ave- 
nue north. Next meeting Dec S4, i-M' 
p. m. sharp. Visiting metabets Invttcd. 
A. J. Wluk. M. W.: O. E. Llndberc 
Rcc; T. i. SL 0«s*ta. Fla.. 18 Wa« 



-^" ■- ■^' 



LIST IMim 




VOLUME XXX— NO. 222. 



GALE DRIVES 
STEAMSHIP ON 
JERSEY SHORE 



Lifesavers and Revenue 

Cutter Unable to Reach 

the Turrialba. 



Wireless Tells of Plight of 
Ship and Sixty Pas- 
sengers. 




THE DULUTH 



TUESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 24, 1912. 



MAY BE NEXT HEAD OF 
THE AMERICAN ARMY 



Schooner Also Grounds in 

Blizzard on Sandy 

Hook. 



Sandy Hook, N. J., Dec. 24.— Xoslng 
her way thronsh a blinding enow 
Btorni. the stoamshlp Turrialba of the 
United Fruit .-ompany's line went hard 
aground e«r!y today on the sandy 
wastes of the Jersey shore line be- 
twf'tn Barnegat and Atlantic City. A 
stiff northwest gale was blowing. 

The vessel carries nearly sixty pas- 
seng. rs, and wrecking tugs, life sav- 
ers ar.d t!ie fnited States revenue cut- 
ter .<vii(( ;i at once started for the 
scene. The weather wag so thick 
however, that the rescuers had trou- 
ble m locatint; tho stranded ship, and 
the Seneca, putting out from New York 
under forced draught, reported by 
wirele.-^s that she would have to pro- 
ceed cautiously. 

"Too thick to proceed now." said the 
Seneca s wirtless at 10 o'clock. "Steam- 
er IS lyiui^r easy." 

W irelo.^M Told of PliKht. 

The Tuirialliu.s plight tlr.«t became 
known early today in a wireless mes- 
sage from Capt. Lindsav. her com- 
mander. The message read: 

'Four a. m. — Turrialba ashore off 
BarUfgat. Heavy snow squall. Ship 
afloat. Fast forward. Assistance nec- 
essviry." 

Cant. John .<=''. Cole, superintendent 
of the life saving district, ordered five 
crcw.s to the scene of the grounding, 

(Continued on page 4. third column.) 

STORM BEATS ^N 

HiK!NG WOf^EN 




KERN ARGUES 
FORJEFENSE 

United States Senator Ad- 
dresses Jury in the 
Dynamite Case. 



Says It Is No Wonder De- 
fendants Were Con- 
fused on Stand. 



GEN. THOMAS BARRY. 

New York, Dec. 24. — Gen. Thomas 
Barry is to be made chief of staff of 
the army on March 4, to succeed Gen. 
Leonard Wood. At least rumor carries 
this report from Washington. The po- 
sition carries with it practical com- 
mand of the army. The detail is for 
four years. Gen. Barrv is now In 
command of the Department of the 
East, with headquarters at Governor's 
Island. He is a native of Ney York and 
57 years old. He is a graduate of West 
Foint. He will go on the retired list 
in about six years. 



$600 GEM IS 
MURDER CLEW 

Diamond Left With Logue 

By Blonde Woman Is 

Being Sought. 



Indianapolis. Ind., Dec. 24. — United 
States Senator John W. Kern argued 
in behalf of the forty defendants at 
the "dynamite conspiracy" trial today. 
I He appealed to the jurors to remem.ber 
when preparing their verdicts that 
most of the defendants came from dis- 
tant parts of the country. 

"Plain working men," he said, "some 
of them uneducated Iron workers, 
taken from their homes hundreds or 
thousands of miles away, and made 
to face a strange court with a dis- 
trict attorney hurling harsh and abu- 
sive language at them — is it any won- 
der that some of them became con- 
fused? Is It any wonder that some of 
them could not remember details of 
letters they wrote five years ago? 
"Did Not Know Charge." 

"Some of these men did not know 
what they were charged with. They 
came to me and asked me what It was 
all about. I had to explain to them 
that they were not charged with dy- 
namiting, but only with tl-ansporting 
explosives illegally. 

"You Jurors can't convict these men 
of crimes with which they ar§ not 
charged. You can't convict them of 
causing explosions, but only of carry- 
ing explosives on passenger trains, or 



AHEMPT TO 

ROB TREASURE 

TRAIN FAILED 



Express Safe in Chicago & 
Alton Express Car With- 
stands Attacks. 



Six-Mile Tramp Is Day's 

Program of Seekers 

of Ballot. 

Upper Red Hook, N. Y"., Dec. 24. 

Braving one of the worst snowstorms 
In years, "General"' Rosalie Jones and 
her little army of suffragettes re- 
sumed today their march to Albany to 
carry a message to Governor Sulzer 
They planned to walk six miles 
thnnitrh knee-deep snow to Livingston, 
where they will stop for the night. 

"We must keep our schedule no 
matter what the weather." said Miss 
Jones. 



WALL STREET SPLITS 
UP ABOUT $I,80C,0C0 

Firms There Are Making An- 
nual Gifts to Em- 
ployes. 

New York, Dec. 24.— A tidy little 
fortune in Christmas gifts is being 
placed tod-ay in Wall Street's Christ- 
mas stocking.«. It is estimated that 
about $1,000,000 will be pafd out this 
year in Christmas presents to the 
army of salaried emploves in the fin- 
ancial (ii.strict. The distribution has 
been going on for a week, but in the 
m-ajority of cases the payment of bon- 
uses is made on the day before Christ- 
mas. The year now ending, although 
a fairly prosperous one for bankers 
hag been a lean one for stock brok- 
ers, owing to the dullness in specula- 
tion. For this reason the Christmas 
total will be sm-aller than in some 
former years In which trading in 
stocks wa.s heavy. 

Practices A'ary. 

In some houses In 'the street" fi.xed 
amounts in gold are given to clerk« 
stenographer.^, bookkeepers and me.s- 
senger.«. and in others the emploves re- 
ceive a percentage of their vearlv sal- 
aries. One of the large trust "corn- 
ran us presented to each employe, from 
the president down, ."io per cent of hi.s 
salary for the year, but in most ca.--es 
the am.iunt is much smaller. In a 
large mmiber of commission houses 10 
per c< rit is paid. 

Employes of J. P. Morgan & Co. will 
not receive their bonuses until just b-- 
fore the close of the year. Ten years 
ago their present was a vear's salarv 
but simc that time 10 per cent has 
usuallv been paid to clerks affiliated 
with the firm for ten j-ears or less and 
15 per cent to tho.se who have been 
lliere longer. 

^ There is a growing tendency In the 
financial district to substitute salary 
Increases at the first of the year for 
Christmas bonuses, on the ground that 
Indiscriminate di.stribution of lump 
sums places no premium on merit. 
Introdnoe I'enMionM, 

A number of large Wall .Street in- 
stitutions also have introduced the 
pension system for superannuated em- 
ployes in place of Christmas gifts 

Huge placards on the floor of the 
Ftock exchange today reminded the 
brokers of the time-honored Christmas 
fund of the exchange for its emploves, 
who annually receive several thousand 
dollars. 



Two of Those Arrested in 

Connection With Crime 

Are Arraigned. 



Chicago, Deo. 24. — A missing dia- 
mond, weighing 214 carats and valued 
at ?600, is sought by the police as the 
key to the solution of the mysterious 
murder of Joseph P. Logue, diamond 
merchant, who was slain In his office 
last Friday. 

The diamond, which was of excep- 
tional brilliancy, was left with Logue 
by a blonde woman shortly before the 
victim's body was found bound and 
mutilated, and was missing after the 
murder. Every effort made by the po- 
lice to find this woman lias thus far 
proved unsuccessful. 

The police still are of the opinion 
that rJbbery was the motive for the 
murder and that the or?me was com- 
mitted by two men who were seen 
hurriedly to leave the floor of the Mc- 
Vicker Theater building, in which 
Logue's office is located, shortlv be- 
fore the body was found by the "office 
boy. 

Two Men Arraigned. 

Harry Hampton and Frank Williams, 
two of the alleged suspects taken into 
custody in connection with the in- 
vestigation, were arraigned todav be- 
fore Municipal Judge Scullv and "their 
cases continued. Hampton is charged 
with robbery and with having bur- 
glars' tools in his pos.session His cas^ 
was continued until Dec. 30. The case 
against William.s, who similarly Is 
charged, wa.s set for Jan. 14. 

Williams, who is said to have robbed 
more than 100 postoffiees in the last 
year, confessed to robbing the pos*- 
offlce at McCool, Ind., several weeks 
ago. 

Clyde Ptratton, alleged safe blower, 
will. It is said, be returned to the Ohio 
state penitentiary at Columbus, 
whence he escaped a short time ago 
by swimming a mile through a sewer 



(Continued on page 4, second column.) 

PRIESfACCUSED OF 
ROBBING PARISHIONER 

French Pastor Is Said to 

Have Admitted 

Guilt. 

DlJon, France, Dec. 24. — Francois 
Montel, the parish priest at OJours, 
lias been arrested on a charge of steal- 
ing government bank stocks to the 
value of $2,600 from an old woman 
parishioner. 

The stock was missed eighteen 
months ago and the police were never 
able to trace it. Recently the executors 
of the woman, who had died mean- 
while, learned that a person who since 
is said to have been identified as Fath- 
er Montel, tried to sell the stock. It 
is said that tho priest admitted his 
guilt. 



Bandits Fire Five Charges 

of Explosive— Have 

Fight Witn Posse. 

Get Nothing From Bold Ef- 
forts— Brakeman Foils 
Holdup. 



START ENDS 
LONG jERVICE 

Closes Eighteenth Year on 
the Minnesota Su- 
preme Bench. 



Retiring Chief Justice Is 

Presented With Cane 

by Associates. 



Springfield, 111., Dec. 24. — More than 
150,000 in gold, currency and Jewelry 
being shipped for Christmas trade was 
in the big. safe of the express car on 
the- Alton "Hummer" train, which was 
held up by a gang of bandits near lies 
Junction, about four miles from here, 
shortly after midni.Kht this morning! 
But although the robbers used enough 
dynamite and nitro-glycerin to destroy 
the state capitol, they did not succeed 
in obtaining a dollar's M'orth of loot, 
the big safe resisting five terrific 
explosions. 

Deputy sheriffs and detectives by 
the score are searching this city and 
vicinity today, but up to 11 o'clock no 
clew as to the identity of any of the 
gang had been uncovered. 

Battle Ultfc Poaae. 

!• ailing to reach the treasure sought 
after forty-five minutes of desperate 
work, the desperado«s fled to escape 
capture by a posse brought to the 
scene of the holdup on a switch en- 
gine from lies Junction. There was a 
bright moon and thft robbers were for 
some time in plain sight of the of- 



ifc Tk A ^' "^i ^ *Ai A" 'A" ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ? i F i A .'fr W ^ *j f ifr ^ 1 ^ 

^ WIDOW DISI>TERS BODY ^ 

* OF mSBAN'D, THI>KIXG * 

* MYSTIC CAN REYIVE HIM. * 

* * 

Devi I n Lake, X. D.. Deo. 24. — * 



I 



POPE URGES ALL TO 
PRAY FOR PEACE 

Speaks of London Confer- 
ence at Meeting With 
Cardinals. 

Rome. Dec. 24.— The pope during his 
reception of the cardinals today re- 
ferred to the London peace conference, 
saying that all Christians should unite 
in prayer that the outco.me of the pres- 
ent counsels of the nations should be 
peace, for which he rejoiced to think 

that there was new and reasonable 
hope. 

The pope— appeared remarkably well 
in spite of the arduous task of re- 
ceiving many delegations who had 
come to bring him greetings of the 
season. 

The pope this morning received 
the members of the sacred col- 
lege, who brought their Christmas 
greeting. The pontiff did not deliver 
an address. The ceremony consisted of 
a simple exchange of felicitation. Car- 
dinals Farley and OConnell both tele- 
graphed their Christmas good wishes 
to the pope from America. 



. (Special to The Herald.) — Beller- ^ 
^ ing that there ^vas a poorer In ^ 
^ Minneapolis which would restore ^ 
^ life to her huHband, killed n ^ 
^ month ago in an elevator aecl- ^ 
<jf dent at Keith, S, D., Mrs. C. P. 4 
^- Unndertion had the body dlxln- ^ 
^ terred and shipped to the Mill ^ 
M^ City, where the dealer In myKtic ^ 
^jC- powern Ih declared to have exer- ^ 
*■ cised his Influence without re- * 

* MultH. The body is now in the * 
^ Keith, X. D., cemetery, having ^ 

* been returned there by the widow •* 
■^ yesterday. ^ 



(Continued on page 4, second column.) 

MANY ARRESI^ FOR 
AHAGKON VICEROY 

Baron Hardinge Suffers 

Much Pain From His 

Wounds. 

Delhi, India, Dec. 24.— The attempt 
on the life of Baron ..nd Lady Har- 
dinge yesterday by a^ Indian fanatic 
kept the police a«d ...* civil autheri- 
ties of the Imperial city of India oc- 
cupied today. A large number of per- 
sons have been arresteck 

It has been proved that at least 150 
people were gathered at the back of 
tne premises from which the bomb 
was thrown. In the vicinity also was 
a dense crowd of natives. No special 
police arrangements had been made 
for the occasion, and only the ordinary 
native police, commanded by British 
officers, were on duty in the streets. 

There are scores of theories, but no 
explanation of the attack. 

A bulletin issued this morning by 
the doctors in attendance on the 
viceroy says: 

"Baron Hardinge passed a restli»ss 
night. It was necessary to relieve his 
pain by injections of morphine. He 
suffered little fever last night and 
none was present this morning. 

"It was found through the operation 
last evening that the muscle under the 
shoulder blade was rather severely 
torn." 



St. Paul. Minn.. Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Charles M. Start, vener- 
able chief justice of the Minnesota su- 
preme court, gathered up the papers 
that lay before him when court ad- 
journed this morning, and with his as- 
sociates, silently moved toward the 
consultation room. The session had 
ended. The door closed behind the lit- 
tle group. Calvin L. Brown, chief jus- 
tice-elect, turned to Mr. Start and said: 

"Today practically ends your term of 
service as a member of this court. 
Your record has been a long and hon- 
orable one. surpassed by none of your 
predecessors. No one ever came to 
this court with a firmer determination 
to make the business of the court his 
sole occupation, than yourself, and you 
ha\e been faithful to every trust. No 
member of this court has exerted a 
stronger Influence in the course of hu- 
man rights than yourself, and through 
your guiding hand the court has taken 
advanced ground along these lines. 
The record you have made scattered 
through more than fifty volumes of 
our reports, will stand for years to 
come, a fitting monument to your high 
character and judicial attainments. 



RETIIIES FROM HKWST 

nm m state nEim 



J 




NEW YORK AND 
NORTH COAST 
STORMSWEPT 



^-^.^^^olis Getting Heaviest 

'^ \tmas Snow for 

'^'=>neration. 



Forty-Mile Gale, Steadily 

Increasing in Fury, Is 

Piling Drifts. 



(Continued on page 4, third column.) 

TRIES TO^MURDER 
PRINCE YAMAGATA 

Would-Be Assassin Gains 

Entrance to Palace, 

But Is Captured. 

Toklo, Dec. 24.— An attempt was 
made early today to assassinate Prince 
Aritomo Yamagata. the president of 
the Japanese privy council and su- 
preme military councillor of Japan. 
The prince escaped unhurt. His as- 
sailant tried to commit suicide. 

The would-be assassin broke into 
Prince Yamagata's residence just after 
midnight and endeavored to approach 
the prince. He was, however, ob- 
served by some attendants, and he 
then tried to commit suicide, but was 
caught and prevented as he was in 
the act of stabbing himself. He was 
arrested and an iBvestigatlon la pro- 
ceeding into the reason for his at- 
tempt. 

Prince Yamagata was the chief of gen- 
eral staff during the Russo-Japanese 
war. He is well known in all the 
European countries. 



J|g»»»)i()K»»»)(c»»X( »»)K»»»»»»»»»» 



CHARLES M. START, 

Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of 

Minnesota. 



PEACE ENVOYS 
ENTERTAINED 

Plenipotentiaries Are Let- 
ting Cares of Office 
Rest for Time. 



Shipping, Railroads and 

Street Traffic Brought 

to Standstill. 



Mediation Is Likely to Be 

Necessary to End 

the War. 



CLT THHOIGH BRICK 

AND STEKL ^VITH ONLV 
CASE KXIVES AS TOOLS. 



Fond da Lac, AViR., Dec. 24.— 
IK'ith only two case knlven for 
tools, Fred HanKon, who wan to 
have been paroled Saturday, and 
CharloM Jonca, charged with 
burglary, dag through two feet 
of Ktonc and orick tvall. sawed 
■tecl barH and ntade thetr CNi-ape 
from the county Jail last night. 




A MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR TO 

YOU AND YOURS. 



RLL ON BOARD SHIPS WITH UFT 
WILL HAVE LOOK AT THE BIG DITCH 



Colon, Tec. 24. — President Taft ;ind 
hts party arrived l^.ere today on board 
the United States warship Arkansas. 
They landed at S oclock this morning. 
The party includes the president and 
Mr.". Taft, Charles P. Taft. Jr., Miss 
Louise Tiiit. Charles D. Hilles and 
Mrs. Jliili.s, Beckman Winthrop and 
Mrs. Winthrop, MaJ. T. L. Rhoads, 
U. S. A., aide de camp; Lieut. Com- 
BCander J. VV. Timmons. U S. N. 

The trip from Key West was an un- 
eventful one. The weather was fine 
and the sea smouth throughout the 
voyage. 

The United States minister, H. Per- 



cival Dodge; a number of canal of- 
ficials and President Taft and party 
were the guests todav of Col. G W 
Ooethals at Culebra. ' Tomorrow eve- 
ning they are to attend a dinner given 
by the American minister, and after- 
ward a ball in the palace of Presi- 
dent Belisario Porras of Panama 

President Taft, before landing, sent 
a wireless dispatch to Col. Goethals 
asking him to have special t»-a'/3 in 
readiness, as 2,000 bluejackets and all 
on board the battleships Arkansas and 
Delaware, except prisoners, are to be 
given the opportunity of inspecting 
the canal during their visit 




London. Dec 34. — The peace plenipo- 
tentiaries of the Ottoman empire and 
of the Balkan allies have for the most 
part momentarily cast off the cares 
of office, and are enjoying the hospi- 
tality of their diplomatic representa- 
tives in Londcn, who are entertaining 
In their honor, or are visiting friends 
in the eountrj. 

Two or three of them have gone to 
Paris to consult with the French 
premier, Raymond Poincare. doubtless 
on the subject of mediation, wnich was 
niooted in his recent speech before the 
chamber of deputies and is practicalb' 
everywhere regarded as lnevii*.^o i ''- 
fore the widel;r separated views of the 
Balkan allies and those of the Turks 
'^!i^^^ brought to a compromise. 

The present long break in the nego- 
tiations of th.> peace delegates Is, In 
all probability, only the first of sev- 
eral, for whei the plenipotentiaries 
come together again in St. James- 
palace on Satjrday. the Ottoman re- 
sponse to the conditions of peace laid 
dcwn by the Balkan allies will doubt- 
less be found to be merely a series of 
counter-proposals. 

standarFblass 
plant is burned 

Chicago Concern Is Loser 

to Extent of Quarter 

Million. 

Chicago, Dee. 24. — Fire early today 
destroyed the three story brick build- 
ing occupied by the plant of the Stand- 

2i^?«9i?^^ company, causing a loss of 
?2o0.000. Dwellers in a dozen cottages 
near the fire moved their belongings! 
into the street and shivered for several' 
hours while firemen, summoned by sev 
eral extra calls, fought the flames. 



New York. Dec 24.— A blizzard, born 
at midnight and growing each 
hour, is sweeping New York and the 
Northern Atlantic seaboara today. By 
noon the storm had blanketed the city 
with t?^n Inches of snow; the wind had 
risen to a forty-mile gale and had 
driven two vessels on the treacheroua 
beaches of the New Jersey coast. 

With the snow still falling at mid- 
day, the city was fast becoming storm- 
bound. In the open places the snow 
was drifted to a depth of many feet.^ 

The local weather bureau declared 
the storm would continue without 
abatement for some hours at least, and 
that the wind would attain still great- 
er velocity. The indications were that 
New York will be buried under the 
heaviest Christmas snow in a genera- 
tion. 

Four Ltncra Stormbound. 

The snow in the harbor was blind- 
, ing. Four ocean liners, one of them 
with Mrs. J. P. Morgan aboard, lay at 
anchor off Quarantine, fearful of brav- 
ing the thick weather to reach their 
docks. They were the Rotterdam from 
Rotterdam, George Wasliington 11 om 
Bremen, Suriname from P'aramaribo 
and the Catherine Cuneo from Port 
Antonio. 

Earlier in the day a ferry boat and 

(Continued on page 4, third column.) 

AMERICANS' AT~ 

CANAN EA SAFE 

Order Has Been Restored in 

the Mexican Mining 

District. 

Washington, Dec 2"4. — A dispatch to 

the state department today tells of the 

restoration of order at the Cananca 

mines, and says danger to Americans 

is no longer expected. Morris, the 

I American railroad man Imprisoned by 

; rebels when he prevented them from 

! flring a Northwestern railway bridge, 

has been released and reports he 

was treated well. 



CHICKEN DINNER 

FOR THE C ONVICTS. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At state's prison each 
convict tomorrow morning will receive 
a box of candy and half peck of apples 
as a Christinas gift. A big chicken din- 
ner with all the "trimmin's" will be 
served, and a literary entertainment 
will be given. No one will be over- 
looked. 

Christmas pr-?sents from "home** are 
being received by hags and pouches 
today. There will be no work to do 
during Christmas day. 

YOUNGTHrPPSTO" 

WED IO WA GIRL 

Council Bluffi, Iowa, Dec. 24. — The 
marriage of Lt wrence C. Phipps, Jr., 
of Denver, son of the Pittsburg mil- 
lionaire steel manufacturer, and Miss 
Gladys Hart of Council Bluffs will take 
place at the home of Mrs. Charles Test 
Stewart here Saturday afternoon, Dec. 
28. Mr. and Mrs. Phlppa will leave at 
once for Egypt. 

• 

Four Aeroplanen Burn. 

Jollet, 111.. Dec. 24.— The building of 
the Illinois Aero Construction company 
at Coal City and all its contents. In- 
eluding four Jieroplanep, were de- 
stroyed by fire early today. The loss Is 
over $25,000, partly Insured. 



RAILROAD MEN GIVE 
$ID,0OO BAIL EACH 

Mellen and Chamberlain 

Both Appear Before 

Judge Hough. 

New York, Dec. 24. — Charles S. Mel- 
len. president of the New York, New 
Haven & Hartford railroad, and E. J. 
Chamberlain, president of the Grand 
Trunk railway of Canada, were in New 
York this morning and appeared be- 
fore Judge Hough In the Federal dis- 
trict court, to give bail and answer \o 
indictments found against them yes- 
terday, charging them with violation 
of the Sherman anti-trust law. The 
penalty, upon conviction, is one year 
in Jail, a fine 01 $5,000, or both. 

Neither Mr. Mellen nor Mr. Cham- 
berlain has had any extended comment 
to make on the government's charge 
which is, in effect, that the defendants 
entered into an illegal monopoly 
agreement, the result of which v.as to 
stop the construction of Grand Trunk 
exten.«ions into New England. 

Bail was fixed at $lo,oyo each. 

Although a British subject with 
headquarters in London, Alfred AV. 
Smithers. chairman of the Grand 
Trunk board of directors and co- 
defendant with Mellen and Chamber- 
lain, is expected to come voluntarily to 
tills country to plead to the indictment. 

On Jan. 7 the Federal grand jurv will 
resume Its investigation into' the 
Grand Trunk-New Haven agreement. 

kom"^^^ ,^u^^^ ^'^^ ^"^^^^^ to demand 
bail in either case and said at first he 
would release the defendants on their 
own cognizance. Counsel for the gov- 
ernment, however, objected to this and 
called the court's attention to the fact 
that neither resided within the juris- 
diction of the court. Bail was fur- 
nished by a surety companv. 

Frank L. Crawford. Mr. Chambcrlin's 
cou |:el. said before leaving the court 
room: "So jury ever will convict mv 
client. The only reason why the work 
of the Grand Trunk extension was 
abandoned was because of high money 
rates. We are sure of acquittal." 



WOODROW WILSON, WITH PIPE FOR 
TEXT, TELLS WHY HE DOESN'T SMOKE 



Trenton, N. J 
of a gold moi 
meerschaum pip 
day from one 
Princeton frlen« 
brought from ' 
confession that 
only once, did Y 

••It was this 
father was a si 
ments and had 
he liked a fat. 
leisure hours m 
tage of hlB habi 
blow the punger 
bushes to kill 1 
he was not at h 



, Dec. 24.— The arrival 
inted. amber stemmed 
e at the state house to- 

of Governor Wilson's 
is in Vicksburg. Miss.. 
he president-elect the 

once in his life, and 
e smoke. 

way." he said: "My 
noker of some attain- 
?ot to the stage where 

black cigar. In his 
y mother took advan- 
t and employed hlni to 
t smoke over the rose- 
isects. One day when 
)me she suggested that 



I try It on one of her favorite plants, 
and I obliged, somewhat proudlv. For 
flv^ minutes I steamed awav "like a 
furnace, and then it hit me with dis- 
astrous effects. I never tried it after 
that." 

"And you never had any ambition to 
learn smoking?" was suggested. 

"No." he replied. "You ste I never 
was forbidden to, so there would not 
have been any point to it. ' 

Through depths of snow which made 
automobile travel hazardous. Presi- 
dent-elect Wilson motored from his 
home in Princeton to the state house 
today. The governor found a cozy fire 
In the grate in his office, and settled 
down to his work with the state of- 
ficials. 



mumM 



IB 






St; 

1 




2 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 



CASES FOR 
GRAND^ JURY 

Light Criminal Calendar Ar- 
ranged for January 
Term of Court. 



HOW DELINODENT BOYS AND GIRLS OF'THE STATE 

ARE BEING TAUGHT TO BECOME USEFUL CITIZENS 



Grand and Petit Jurors 

Summoned for Duty 

Next Month. 



A- 

V. 

term 
corJ ! • 

at to 
of hi.-, 

f\ 

toi-.- 

1- 

I 

n ' '. '.• 

<■ 

J 

C L\ --- 

c 



u;. . . 
Tlie 

c.^ ■■■: 

1-:, •.,,-. 

1. 

WiKi-in 

T- 

i 

Ji'hn X 

l»!t!i: F: 
OpperiT. 

Es-.-: ■»■ 

It::!-.; a 

The 
larger 
druTVii : 

D : 

U'.l 

D. 

B. i. 

rl ?. I' 
H. C ' 

Duh'ti 

Ver 
H'l: 



Ir.tli: 

f: '.-> ' 



si)!is, 
G. v.. 

Iv.th; 
Einil ' 
Evfl't 



■ 1 r 

•■V 



ill number of cases 

. attention of the 

which will cou- 

of the January 

■ i next week, ac- 
i: Greene, county 

;'.l assume charge 

we<.lc. 

:, crin^.inal cases 

next gruml .uiry. 

r for January is 

The November 

cljsiiic:, resulted 
.ments^ being re- 

• case will prob- 

trial <1i!rins the 

: sn. Pyykko was 

:nb(.*r jury, but his 

AnOrew t?mlth 

irc'-ny next term 
ling against him. 

^ount resulted in 

.liirors ». 1 1> Mimmoned. 

- ' ., who have been 

at the opening of 
next are: John 
I J. Calvin, Vir- 
;i, Dniuth: Jacob 
iMistone, Biwabik; 
!>bing: R. R. For- 
1 GoJiins, Duluth; 
■. Dulut!;; M. W. 
.lames M'-Martln. 
irrav. DuUith; D. 
;. 1'. Xeff, I>uluth; 
M. D. Nobis. Du- 

nuluth: John H. 

Chris Pederson. 

ui. Duluth; Anton 

A. Kesden, Du- 

ist. Eveleth. 

will not be any 
The petit jurors 
! V term are: 
: ' Frank Barber, 

■:r. Duluth: Mlch- 

G. G. Dlckerman. 
. Duluth; Robert 
; ^Viaiam L. Gor- 

Gilbert, Duluth; 
:h; John D. Gunn 
-on. Canosia; C. F. 

■ dgAV Hovis, Cnil- 
i. Duluth; V.'. F. 

^v'l!!iam A. John- 

:.i:am E. Jonts. Du- 

■tzmarek, Duluch; A. 

■•-: \y. B. Lutz. Du- 

>ine. Cool:; Neil 

..: ^. John Mu3tonen, 

mas McArthur, Culver: 

" 'v.r. Duluth; Alfred 

Emil W. Oettel. 

r.binskoy, Duluth; 

uluth, William B. 

iv Sears. Duluth; 

!»uluth: R. H. Ses- 

iiy Shea. Eveleth; 

E. B. Sutton. Du- 

tJuskirk, Ev.:-leth.; 

a; Alvin Tvl. Weiss, 





H. Iluseby on a warrant charging him 
witli liavins deer and moose hidea m 
his possession with Intent to sell them. 
It l3 claimed that U<s ha.<3 been buyuiB 
the skins for a locsil dealer in hides. 
I£e says that he did not know tliat tlie 
law relative to the purchase and aale 
of hides had been cliaiiged by the last 
legislature. He will be arraigned thlij 
atlernoon. 

* * • 

Patrolman A. .1. N'oren pr'^vf*' ,. ^ 
practical Santa Claus yesterday to the 
wife and children of Anton Andler. 
who was arrested on a charge or 
drunkenness. Finding the larder emp- 
ty he told several Krocery men along 
his beat of the family's plight and the > 
contributed a sub.stintial basket of 
meats and groceries Those who helped 
the policeman in hi.^ work of charit> 
were H. E. Bartholdl, Harry Sander. 
Gronseth & Olson and Ander.son & 
OggChaH table societies will »«« that 
tife wife and child -en do not «utfer 
rom lack of warm clothing. Andler 
has been blowing his earnings a.^oj-s 
the bars of saloons while his family 
lias been on the vergre of starvation. 

N. Myers and Sam Myers pleaded 
guilty in police court this morning to 
having assaulted Henry Mueller. The 
former paid a fine of $16.74 and the 
latter settled an assessment of |15. 
The cass against Fannie Myers ana 
Sam and Isadore Cohen were di.'^miased. 
The trouble occurred when Mueller 
went to the talU)rlnig and cleaning es- 
tablishment of the Myers to get a 
dress which had been left there by his 
daughter. He expls.lned that the girl 
liad made thirteen trips for it and that 
when he asked for It the garment had 
not yet been finished. A dispute arose 
as to the price and Mueller claims that 



ho was set upon by the nve defendant*. 
N Myers alleged that Muller grabbed 
him by the whiskers and attempted to 
sever them with a pair of shears 
which he grabbed from the counter. 
* * * 
M Viener did not say a word or 
suspect anything wrong when ho 
cashed a very crudely drawn check for 
Fred Berg, a laborer yesterday. But 
when he saw him go Into the store 
next door and start to cash another 
he jumped to the conclusion that nm 
had been stung. Berg might have one 
check but not two. Wherefore h« 
called a policemen and Berg was ar- 
rested on a charge of having forged 
the name of R. E. Johnson to a check 
for I2C.50 on the Merchants National 
bank of St. Paul. This morning In po- 
lice court Berg waived examination 
and was bound over to the grand jury. 

C. I. JOHNSON 

PLAN T BURNS. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec 24.— The three- 
story building occupied by the C. L 
Johnson company, dealers in printers 
supplies, and Mendler Bros., manufac- 
turers of brushes, was gutted by fire 
last night. The loss sustained by the 
John.son company Is placed at $60.- 
000 and that of Mendler Bros, as $30.- 
000 The cause of the fire is unkown. 
The walls of the building are not 
believed by firemen to bo seriously 
damaged. __^._____^ 

"•None Xlcer." 

Roses, beauties, poinsetttas. carna- 
tions, valleys and violets. Prices right, 
KS always, at Victor Huot s. 



Dvhith Cineinnatt New York Parla 





— Pl'.oto by McKenzle. 

SOME SEWING DONE BY THE GIRLS. 



—Photo by McKenzia. 

SOME WOOD WORK BY THE BOYS. 



FIFTEEN HURT IN 

GEORGIA WRECK. 



Am- 
SO' - ■ 
V: 

th- 

trill I' 
iijar i 



d • 
lev 

ri 
R 

S'"iU; 

Ti'.e V 
U 



:. 24. — Fifteen per- 
several seriously. 
:i No. 2. known as 
it-d," on the Cen- 
road, was wrecked 



Let Infant Freexe. 

- 24. — (Special to 

1 HenrichSj a local 

> here from Val- 

^<^ci to permitting 

fant to freeze to 

^Iviing here a few 

accused George 

now working in 

1 will b? arresterl. 

tve a hearing in a 



Here are some pictures of what de- 
liquent boys and girls from this city 
are doing- at state correctional institu- 
tions. 

The pictures show samples of work 
done by Duluth boys at Red Wing, 
where the state industrial school is 
maintained. The collection which has 
been photographed is in possession of 
F. E. Resche, probation officer. It in- 
cludes samples of sloyd work and from 
the training school blacksmith shop. 

At Sauk Center, where the Minne- 
sota state home for girls is maintained, 
several of the Duluth girls there have 
been taught to turn out some excel- 
lent snecimens of fancy sewing work 
and needle craft. Many of the girls 
never touched a needle before going 
there. 

The bovs at Red Wing have an in- 
teresting daily routine. They arise at 
t; o'clock in the morning. After mak- 
ing their toilet, they eat breakfast, 
usuallv about HiiO. From 7 to 7:30 the 
class attending school in the forenoon, 
receives its instructions in singing. 
From S to 11:30 the boys attend school. 
Their training is similar to that of the 
public schools. Dinner is served at 12. 
The bov9 are divided into seven com- 
panies, "each of which has a separate 
ulavground which they are permitted 
t» U3e during tlie hour from 12:30 to 
l:2i>. under the supervision of tne 
company managers. In the afternoon, 
tl\e cla.-^s. which has attended school 
in the forenoon goes to manual train- 
ing shops to engage in tlieir daily 
work The afternoon class, which has 
been 'at the shops during the forenoon 
goes to school. Supper is served at o:.J0 
and the boys are given the use of the 
playgrounds again until 7 o cock, in 
cold and inclement weather, instead of 
making use of the playgrounds, each 
company takes advantage of the cmb 
features of the assembly rooms of tnelr 
-ospective cottages. The boys retire at 
.S o'clock and all talking must cease 
at 9 o'clock. 

Sleep in Dorniltorles. 
Thi^ bovs sleep in large dormitories, 
e\'^''^ being furnished with an Iron bed- 




.«';^- 



ATHER— Sno* fiurriss tonight or Wdnesday: warmer tonight with low 
t^mc«rar..r. 20 dcj. to about 25 dej. aba e zero: colder Wednesday a"en'-aon 
, V. J -,.> to brisk windj. southerly and easterjy shifting to westerly Wed 





Open Tonight Until All 
Have Been Waited On, 

1,000 Christmas Gifts 
Suitable for Men and Boys 
at Special Prices Tonight, 

Our stocks Are SHU Complete 

Notwithstanding the Enormous 

Demands That Have Been 

Made Upon Them. 




merry Cl)ri$tiiia$ to ffll 

Our Store Will Be Closed All Day Christmas 



We Wish One and All 



(( 



A Merry Christmas'' ' 
"A Happy New Year" 

Sincerely, 



stead, mattress, sheets, blankets and 
pillows. All of the seven companies 
eat in a common dining room, which is 
a large auditorium, sometimes used by 
the bovs in putting on entertainments. 
No outside labor, excepting instructors 
and superintendents, is employed at 
the institution, all the necessary work 
being done by the boys themselves. 
Some do cooking under the supervi- 
sion of a competent chef; others serve 
the food under the direction of the ma- 
tron in charge of the dining hall, while 
another detail of workers looks after 
the cleaning of the buildings. All 
laundrv work Is done In a steam laun- 
dry, where a number of boys are kept 
busy during shop hours. 

The Shop Feature*. 
The shop features of the Institution 
include besides the .steam laundry, a 
I well equipped blacksmith shop, a tailor 
shop, paint shop, printing shop, from 
which is l.'sued monthly a small maga- 
zine; a fully equipped sloyd shop, 
v/l.ere small boys are taught to use 
■^^'oodWorking tools, and a shop 
equipped with woodworking machinery 
for the older boys, where most of the 
furniture now In use In the Institu- 
tion has been manufactured. 

In the summer time a number of 
bovs are placed at work on the farm, 
thS products of which help in a large 
measure to m-aintain the institution. 
The boys are encouraged dtiring the 
hours of recreation to engage in 
healthful athletics and during the 
summer and fall seasons, baseball, 
football and similar sports are much 
in evidence. At this time of the year, 
a skating rink large enough to ac- 
commodate all, is maintained. A lar^ 
gymnasium is now being built. 

The total population at the Red 
Wing institution is about 275 boys, 
ranging in age from 8 to 21 years. 
None are committed, however, over the 
age of 17. Their stay there depends 
entirely upon their behavior until they 
reach the age of 21 years. 

Of the total number, about fifty are 
from Duluth and St. I-.ouis county. 
The average number of committment.^, 
according to P. E. Resche, probation 
officer of this city, is about thirty. Ac- 
cording to all reports, he says, the 
Duluth boys are doing as well as can 
be expected. As a rule the boys from 
this city have shown a proper appre- 
ciation of what is being done for them 
there and in some instances have pre- 
ferred the Institution to their homes. 
Tb« GirW Home. 
At a separate institution 200 miles 
awav from Red Wing, the state main- 
tains a home school for girls at Sauk 
Center. This institution receives girls 
from S to 17 years of age, who are 
inclined to be wayward or who lack 
proper surroundings and home train- 
ing. The cottage feature Is main- 
tained at this institution, even more so 
than at Red Wing. Girls sent there 
are taught housekeeping, cooking and 
sawing. Each girl -B encouraged to 




Correct Dress for Women^and Girls 



WISH ONE 
AND ALL 




<• 



AND- 



i mffi mM I 




mth m Best of 6ooa m%u% 

for a 3ovott$ Christmas to Jill 



tbe 



TOOLS MADE BY THE BOYS. 



make her own clothes. She is allowed 
a certain amount of money each week, 
from which she is permitted to pur- 
chase articles kept at the school store 
room. Instead of corporal punishment 
being inlUcted, an amount of their al- 
lowance is deducted. This seems to be 
the most effective and satisfactory 
way yet found to deal with some of 
the delinquents who are subjected to 
discipline there. 

The Sauk Center state home also 
maintains a largp farm in close prox- 
imity totiie school and buildings. Each 





ALONG THE 
POLICE 



— Plioto by SIcKenzle. 

girl is alloted a small space of ground. 
Flower seeds are furnished her and of 
late years considerable rivalry has 
sprung up among them as to which one 
will be able to cultivate the best 
looking flower bed. . 

In Sauk Center, the common dinmg 
room feature which is in vogue at Red 
Wing, is not maintained. Instead each 
cottage has its own kitchen and dining 
room, where meals are prepared and 
served Out of a total population of 
115 girls at the Sauk Center institu- 
tion, forty-one are from this county. 



was dismissed in police court yester- 
day afternoon for lack of evidence. 

S. A. Barsh and J. B. De Roy were 
rrrested yesterdav afternoon by Dep- 
uty Game Wardens Storey and Tabor 
( n charge of having violated the game 
laws. The case against De Roy was 
dismissed but Barsh paid two fines of 
$22.50 each for having two partridges 
in his possession and for having killed 

a beaver. 

« • • 

Henry McKusick was arrested this 
morning by Deputy Game Warden Q. 



Northern National Bank 

.^VLWORTH BUILDING. 

"Right in the Center of Business." 



To our many friends and patrons, 
We wish you all a 

merry Christmas 

The North Country's Largest Shoe Store 

218 West Superior Street 







...^ »*-. #«w^-*\**.^^^.''>-'^'-'.''^ 



Biffing kids on the nose with beer 
bottles or swatting them across the 
head with mopstieks is not profitable 
amusement. 

The police say that the newsies are 
often pests and run in and out of sa- 
loons as well as other places where 
they have no business. They admit 
that they cannot do much with them. 
But the court holds with them that 
because a kid makes a nuisance of 
himself does not excuse a man for rap- 
ping him across the face or assaulting 
him. 

Last evening Charles Malnella. the 
small son of Carlo Mainulla, went into 
the saloon across the street from his 
father's store on the Bowery to sell 
papers. He came out with a bloody 
nose and the water works turned loose 
and pumping overtime. Detectives 
Bradley and Toewe heard his wails 



half a block away and hastened to in- 
vestigate. The ncwsie sobbed out that 
a drunken man In the saloon had 
struck him across the face with a beer 
bottle. Thev went "with him Into the 
place and tlie boy 'pointed out Oscar 
Erickson as his as.sailant. He was ar- 
rested on a charge of assault and 
pleaded guilty when arraigned in po- 
lice court this morning. 

Erickson pleaded that the kid had per- 
.qlsted in hanging around and had only 
tried to get rid of him. He disclaimed 
any intention of hurting him and the 
boys face did not show that he hai 
been struck a severe blow. 

"Fifty dollars and costs or sixty 
days" decreed the court. Oscar doesn t 
sport a bank account, wherefore le 
will spend the holidays and some othi r 
days in the sheriff's hotel over the hill. 
Earlier in the day Sam Ezalle, man- 
ager of the Dundee Woolen mills store 
on Superior street paid a fine of |22.1!4 
for cracking Mlstah Elmer Calhoun 
Richardson, a young colored gentle- 
man over the coco with a mopsticlc. 
It appears that Mlstah Elmor Calhoun 
Richardson had been hired to wash 
the windows of the store Ezalle man- 
ages When he concluded the job the 
manager said that it was only an 
nlleged and prefnded washing. He 
demanded that Mlstah Richardson do 
better Mistah Richardson stood <»n 
his dignity and demanded his money, 
refusing to dq the job or alleged and 
pretended Job over. W hereupon the tv/o 
got into a quarrel which was termi- 
nated bv Ezalle with the mopstick. 
Mlstah Richardson promptly got out a 
warrant and caused his arrest for hav- 
ing assaulted him.^ ^ 

The case against Henry Casimor. 
saloonkeeper a,t 102 Lake avenue south, 
charged withliavlng sold liquor to an 
habitual drunkard after he had been 
served with a notice not to do no. 






A MERRY CWKXSlNihS 




TO YOU ALL 





We Thank You for the Liberal Patronage You Have 

Given This Store and Trust 
We Shall Continue to Merit Your Confidence 







LATE 

SHOPPERS, 

SEE OUR 

EXTRA 

SPECIALS. 



WHAT WE SELL, MIST BK RIGHT. 
Complete Housefurnlshcrs. 




A & 



Seotnd Av9. W. and First St 




WE 

CAN 

DELIVER 

IT FOR 

CHRISTMAS. 






Victor and Edison Phonographs and Records 





SEES 



SS&SS 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH H E R A I. D 



Dccem*>er 24, 1912. 



8 




f) '^/^■^/t^/fi/^/^^'^t/®/^'^/^/^y®/®/^'!y^'^/^/%/%/%/tt/%/fb/%/9^%/%/%%/%/^ 



WEST END 



/ 



HKUAI.D nRANrili 
Herman Oliion, Manaicor, lKi3 'Wt^mt Superior Street: 

"S "f ^ir 1> •*'^11 "^ tl -^ ""^ft ir '^ ••^ '" 1il "ffl T 1? 11 1^ 1t •< fl^'f 'Bit' i'^B •<'<•< 1>'l^ffl<<iMB''^i^ "TIT "tlT ft ^ 



SWEDISH RESIDENTS WILL CELEBRATE 
CHRISTMAS WITH A BIG FESTIVAL 




Is the Most Important on the 
December Calendar 

FOR BARGAIN SEEKERS 

Oar 2nd Annual Clearance Sale 

$50,000 Stock of 
High Grade Wearing Apparel 

Sacrificed to V3, Va and Less Than Cost 



I 



Remember the Date, Thursday, Dec 26, 1912 



PLEASED PATIENTS 



Thcst 



Substantial Proof of 
Satisfactory Service 

people are from \our Lest and most highly 
respectod families — people 
who know and demand the 
best of service, 
and are not at- 
tracted by low 
prices solely. We 
please by our at- 
t r a c tive offices, 
painless service, 
low, honest prices and 
higli-ffrade work. In- 
vcHtisate our financial standing. 

Examination Free — 10-Yenr Guarantee— Xotc These Prtccsi 




Finest 
22-car I 



$3.00 



SILVER FILLiMfiSS";,"" 

price in the city or elsewhere 



WHALEBONE PLATES 



GOLD CROWNS 

No better at any price. . 

BRIDGE WORK l^^^"^'^ 

ar:.l (luality has never iBiSallll I 515. Ou and ?25.00 values 
been excelled y'^"^^ j at $8,00 and 

THE UISIIOISI F» AIMLESS OEMTISTS 

Dr. Franklin Greer & Co., Owners. 317 West Sujierior St., Duluth 

Open from 8:30 a. m. to 7 p. nt. Sununyci, 10 to 1. 




ANDREW NELSON. 

Foi- the benefit of the members and 
their families the ITnlted Sons of 
Sweden lodge. No. 170, Vasa Order, 
will entertain at an old -fashicned 
Christmas festival I'riday eveninH: at 
the Woodmen hall, Twenty-first ave- 
nue west and First street. 

Amoj'g the feiturcs of the evening 
will be a Christmas tree for tlie chil- 
dren. Santa Claus. a program of ad- 
dresses, musical numbers and recita- 
tions and a Swedish Smorgasbord, or 
a baniiuet, including only cold dishes. 
The children attendiuj? the affair will 
be presented with candies and play- 
things. 

The members ti the local lodge have 
invited the Auxiliary Sophia lodge. No. 
209. and Gosta lodge, No. 243, of West 
Dulijtii, A\hich was organized last 
week. About 1,200 people are expected 
to attend the festivities. Among the 
prinefal speakers will be Andrew Nel- 
son, I'r. .T. J. Eklund, Ilev. W. E. Har- 
mann and A. T. Lind, president of the 
lodge, who will make ihe address of 
V elcome. The complete program for 
the evening follows: 
Address of Welcome 



Sons 



DR. J. J. EKLUND. 

A. T. Lind. 
S»ca Glee' Club. 



Piano solo 

Mrs. C. W. n. Wermine. 

Address 

Dr. J. J. Eklund. 

Declamation 

Miss Ruth Boren. 

Vocal solo 

Rev. C. W. R. Wermine. 

Address 

Andrew Nelson 

Song i 

Svea Glee CJUb. 

Piano duet ■. t^ 

Miss !j Esther Eckholm and Gei-da 
Erjckson: 

Remarks , 

Rev. W. E. Harmann. 

Duet 

O. G. Olson and W. A. Anderson. 

Recitation 

Charles Forsell. 

Son sr 

Svea Glee Club. 
The following committee Is In 
charge of the arrangentents for the af- 
fair Friday evening: Andrew Horne- 
gren. Otto Gafvert, A. T. Lind. C. T. 
Hoffm. I , A. Arneson, G. O. Larson and 
Elof Nelson. 



SVEA CLUB CLOSES 

SUCCESSFUL YEAR 



Christmas T$ eontitid 

THE CITY NATIONAL BANK, 

DULUTH, IVIINNESOTA 

Invites You to Open a Savings Account for your son or daughter, 
or friend. The Pass Book which you receive will make an ideal 
Christmas present. 





ONE $250 NEW PIANO CTC 

iiotU!i:ed from rentintr, t " 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO., 

Fnetory Salenroonm, 
«'J« \\ «-».l KlrHt Street. 



ELGIN BOARD^ELECTS. 

Membors Do Not Expect Government 
to Press Its Charges. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — At the first meet- 
ing of the Elgin Butter board since 
the government began its dissolution 

suit against the organization, officers 
for the year were elected. They were: 
Charles H. Potter, Elgin, president; 
Fred Grell, Johnson Creek, Wis., vice 
president; J. H. Monahan, Elgin, treas- 
urer; Colin W. Firown, Elgin, secre- 
tary. The selection of Potter was con- 
ceded before the meeting opened. 

President Potter threatened to eject 
Joseph Newman when he protested the 
action of the board last week in clioos- 



ing directors. He was ruled out of 
order. Newman then demanded a stand- 
ing vote and President Potter became 
a ngr.v. 

Members were of the opinion that 
the government would not pre.-as its 
suit now that the quotation committee 
had been abolished. 



GAG ON NEWS OF 

RUSSIAN FORCES. 

St. Petersburg, Dec. 24.— An imperial 
decree forbids the circulation of mili- 
tary or navy news of any kind what- 
soever. The decree remains in force for 
a year. It gives in minute detail a 
list of matters which must not be 
touched upon, including the fulfilling 
of factory orders for the army or navv 
and relating to furloughs or calls to 
the colors. 



Spain Ratiflen Treaty. 

Madrid, Dec. 24. — The senate rati- 
fied the Franco-.Spani6h treaty con- 
cerning Morocco, which pas.sed the 
chamber of deputies Dec. 17 Parlia- 
ment then adjourned. 



Packed to ExpreMM Rverjivhere, 

Victor Huot s candy and flowers. 



One $250 Used 
Piano — Quick 
Saletlir 




STORY & CU^RK PIANO CO, 

Factory Salesrooms 426 West First Street 




llsh Trinity Evangelical Lutheran 
church will hold its first Christmas 
festival Friday evenin.^ at the Bethany 
Swedish Lutheran church,' Twenty- 
third avenue west and Third street 
Rev. C. G. Olson, pastor of the lat- 
ter church and vice pastor of the for- 
mer, will have charge of the festivi- 
ties. 



CHARLES HELMER, 
Re-elected Director. 

The SVea Glee club closed a most 
successful year last evening with the 
annual election of officers and reports 
of tile various committees. 

The officers elected for the ensuing 
jear are: Reynold Johnson, president; 
Abel Pearson, vice president; Jack 
Oman, recording secretary; Albert Pe- 
terson, financial secretary; Charles F. 
Forsell, treasurer; S. G. Peterson, cus- 
todian; l^elmer H. Ogren, business 
manager; Charles Helmer, director; 
Hjalmer Enlund, assistant director; 
Frank Carlson, A. Pearson, C. E. Pear- 
son, Jack Wallln, music committee, 
and George Anderson, C. B. Pearson 
and S. G. Peterson, finance commit- 
tee. 

During the past year the Svea Glee 
club has taken an active part in Du- 
luth and range musical circles, giving 
several concerts here and in Cloquet 
and Virginia. The members also took 
part in the mid-summer's day festival 
last June, the water carnival at the 
boat club and the sangerfest held here 
by the American Union of Swedish 
Singers last August. 

During the coming year the mem- 
bers will again give a number of con- 
certs, both alone and in conjunction 
with other musical organizations. 
Those at the head of the club hope 
to raise enough money to defray the 
expenses of the members to the sang- 
erfest at Minneapolis in June, 1914. 

EARLY CARS FOR 

CHRIS TMAS S ERVICES. 

Two extra cars will be run tomor- 
row morning in order to accommodate 
those pla.nning to attend the early 
Christmas service in the various Scan- 
dinavian churches of the West end. 
One car will leave Twenty-fourth ave- 
nue east and Superior street at 4:50 
o'clock and the other extra car will 
leave Lester park at 4:40 o'clock. The 
regular owl cars will leave Woodland 
at 4:02 o'clock and Seventy-first ave- 
nue west at 4:02 o'clock. 



Leave for Minneapolis. 

Rev. and Mrs. George E. Sllloway of 
310 North Twenty-second avenue west 
left this morning for Minneapolis, 
where they will visit over the holidays 
with Rev. Mr. Silloway's parents. They 
expect to return on Jan. 2. 
« 

Christmas Festival. 

The Sunday school of the new Eng- 



Mrs. Bjorklund Dies. 

Mrs. Hilda Bjorklund, 32 vears old, 
wife uf John Bjorklund, 2822 West Sec- 
ond street, died yesterday afternoon at 
her home after a several months' ill- 
ness from tuberculosis. The decea.sed 
is survived by her hvi»band. The fu- 
neral will be held at « d'clock Friday 
afternoon from the St. Peter's Episco- 
pal church. Twenty-eighth avenue 
west and First street. Rev. W. E. Har- 
mann will officiate and Interment will 
be at Park Hill cemetery, 

WesfYnTBrrefs. 

Rev. C. G. Olson will conduct Christ- 
mas services at Alborn at 10 o'clock 
tomorrow morning. 

George A. Eklund, who has been at- 
tending the Minnesota School of Phar- 
macy at St. Paul, returned home y.»s- 
terday to spend the holidays with his 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Eklund, 1H23 
"West Second street. 

The Ladles' Aid Socie'ty of the Grace 
M. E. church will not meet tomorrow 
afternoon as scheduled, but will be en- 
tertained next Tuesdav afternoon at 
the home of Mrs. M. A. Barnes, 3407 
West Third street. 

Walter Hammerback of Crosbv ar- 
rived here yesterday to spend the" holi- 
days with his parents and relatives 

The Ladies' Aid Society of the First 
Swedish Baptist church will hold its 
annual election of officers Thursday 
afternoon in the church. Twenty-sec- 
ond avenue west and Third street. 

Beta council. No. 2, Modern Samari- 
tans, held a special meeting last eve- 
ning at the Columbia hall. Twentieth 
avenue west and Superior street. 

Hollisters R. M. Tea is a deadly 
enemy of clogged bowels, upset stom- 
achs, sluggish livers and impure blood. 
Lion drug store. 



CENTRAL SS 

30 East Superior Street, 4)alath. 
WIXTER TERM, JAN. 6TH. 

New classes in all departments. 
Day school. Night school. 
BARBER A McPHERSOX. 



COMPENSATION ACT 
WILL BE DISCUSSED. 

Grand Forks, N. D.. Dec. 24.— (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.)— Next Monday the 
local Trades and Labor assembly will 
hold a mass meeting to which citizens 
generally have been invited to discuss 
the working men's compensation act 
that will be introduced at the coming 
session of the legislature. 

Attorney Daniel B. Hult of Fargo 
chairman of the legislative commission 
In charge of the compensation act 
work, will explain the manner in which 
he expects the act proposed for this 
state will work. 



GldeoDH to Meet Jan. 3. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 24.— Prep- 
arations were completed for the inter- 
state meeting here Jan. 3, 4 and 5 of 
the Gideons, the organization of trav- 
eling salesmen. Scores of members 
from Iowa, Minne.-^ota, the Dakotas 
and Wisconslu will be present. 

A. B. T. Moore of Cedar Rapids 
Towa, national president of the or- 
ganization, and W. E. Henderson of 
Chicago will be present. 



8TATE OP OHIO, CITY OF TOLEDO, LUCAS 
COUNTY.— as. 

Frank J. Cheney makes oatli th«t he Is aenlor part- 
ner of the firm of F. J. Cheney & Co., dolnn busi- 
ness In the City of Tbledo. County and State afore- 
said, and that said firm will pay the sura of qxe 
JH'NPRKD DOI.l>ARS for each and every rase of 
Catarrh that cannot be cured by the use of Hair. 
Catarrh Cure. KIIA.NK J. CUf:xev. 

Sworn to before me and subscribed In my prese>i<v 
Uils Gth day of December. A. D. 189«. '"• 

A. W. CLEASON 

(Seal.) Notary Publla 

Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken Internally, and .ipu 
direcUy on the blood and raucous surfaces of the 
system. Send for testimonials free. 

F. 3. CHKXEY & CO., Toledo, O. 
Sold by all Druulsts. 75c. 
Take Hall's Famlljr rUla far constlDatlon. 



MANY NEW 
TOYS SEEN 

Wonderful Mechanical De- 
vices to Amuse Children, 
on the Market. 



Most of New Playthings 

Have Been Imported 

From Germany. 



German-made toys have been 4 great 
feature in the Duluth retail stores 
during the present Christmas shop- 
ping season. This is especially true of 
mechanical playtiilng.s. Many toys, 
imported from Germany, have mado 
their appearance in Duluth this winter 
for the first time. 

Elephants, donkeys, bears and other 
animals, covered with felt, laige 
enough for a child to sit upon, runniiig 
on wheels, and with a strong interior 
■frame-work of steel, are prominent in 
the great stoek of pretty tilings that 
njereliants iiave brought from thai 
country to supply the needs of th- 
American Santa Claus. Most of these 
artificial bodies contain apparatus 
producing the appropriate growl, bruv 
or grunt when a string is pulled. 

Another German toy that has made 
its appearance in this city for tlie fir.st 
time is the tin airship, wiiich is wound 
up and spins its screw propeller in 
realistic fashion, though it has to be 
supported by hanging from a string. 
.\nother is a little tin road roller, 
which is likewise wound with a kev, 
and reverses its action automatically, 
aeting like the big rollers at work. 

The walking dogs and elephants, 
also from the land of the Kaiser, have 
found eager customers. 

The German dachshund, the "Strubble 
Peter," from the same country, who 
would not cut his nails or comb his 
hair, and the Teutonic policemen, fai 
and slim, are all toys of felt that have 
proven very popular and have had a 
lively sale. 

Another German toy that has made 
quite a hit is the Kestner baby doll, 
with real hair and real skin, from the 
back of some small animal, on Its head. 

Another new toy that has proven 
quite popular among those who are 
looking for something that will last, 
is a doll made at Cleveland of a 
compound that resembles celluloid, but 
i.s claimed to be absolutely unbreakabl'^ 
and Incombustible. The nature of .he 
compound is, of course, a secret. 

The toy telephone has made its ap- 
pearance this year. The receiver and 
transmitter are of tin and the connec- 
tion merely a string, but if two per- 
sons hold the string taut they can 
readily transmit the sounds of their 
voices through the instrument. 

A little electric motor, that can be 
run by being attached to the socket of 
any incandescent light, is an American 
toy that will delight many an Ameri- 
can boy with a bent for the study of 
electrical mechanics. 

The strictly new toys are necessarily 
few, for the American markets have 
for many years been supplied with the 
very latest productions of the world'f 
thought and ingenuity along that line. 
Most of the toys that are on display 
in the stores are of kinds that have 
been seen before. Yet never were iht; 
toy displays on the whole so attractive 
and so intensely Interesting as th^y 
have been this winter, with the very 
latest together with the best of the 
old. 



ONLY DEMOCRAT IS 
AFTER FEDERAL JOB 



Sole Member of Party in 

Logan County Two Years 

Ago Boomed. 

Napoleon, N. D., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — At the primary election 
two years ago in Logan county only 
one man asked for a Democratic bal- 
lot. The records showed that it was 
O. T. House, for more thaa thirty 
years a resident of this section and 
always a Democrat. He is an appli- 
cant for the local postoffice and tlie 
patrons, regardless of politics, will 
petition President Wilson after March 
4 to name Mr. House, despite the faot 
that there are a number of other ap- 
plicants. 

DROP SMUGGLING CASE. 

No Further Prosecution of C. H. Ol- 
son of Cando, N. D. 

Cando, N. D., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Some months ago there 
was considerable publicity given the 

alleged smuggling case against C. H. 
Olson, the horse inspecter of this place. 
It was asserted he had smuggled valu- 
able goods when bringing in shipments 
of horses from France. Special Agent 
Foulkes of the treasury department 
was here and made Mr. Olson give him 
a |1,000 check. This has been returned 
to Mr. Olson by United States District 
Attorney Engerud and Mr. Olson en- 
tirely exculpated from all blame. 

CONVi cf'PIG GERS. 

Morton County, N. D., Juries Sur- 
prise Prosecuting Officials. 

Mandan, N. D., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — New records for the 
conviction of bllndplggers In a Mis- 
souri slope country were established 
at the Morton county district court 
term has adjourned till after the holi- 
days. 

Four convictions were secured by 
prosecuting officers and there are 
eleven cases remaining. In two cases 
acquittals resulted. State officials 
had sought a change of venue on the 
plea that convictions were impossible 
In this county. 

The remaining cases will be tried 
after the holidays. 



MAY ABANDON CONTEST. 

Settlement of Minot Doctor's Estate 
Out of Court Predicted. 

Minot, N. D., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — It is probable that the 
will made by Dr. J. D. Taylor of Minot 
In a St. Paul hospital last October, Just 
a few days before his death, will be 
ignored, and that a division of the 
estate will be made upon the basis of 
an agreement which is being drawn 
by legal heirs and those named in the 
will. A contest against the will was 
launched here on the contention that 
Dr. Taylor was mentally incompetent 
to draw a will at the time. 



Take Other 'Warehonae Reeeipta. 

Milwaukee, Wis., Dec. 24. — The Mil- 
waukee chamber of commerce has 
voted to amend its rules so as to 
provide that warehouse receipts In 
other markets are deliverable here, 
providing that at the time of the 
sale the name of the warehouse into 
which the grain will be shipped is 
specified. A few years ago such a 
rule was in force here, but was amend- 
ed to read that all deliveries must 
>'^ made from elevator "A" Milwau- 
kee. 



r 



Just the Gift 

for Motherm 

We know of no 
other article tosug- 
gest as a Christ- 
mas Gift for mo- 
ther, wife, sister, 
or friend that gives 
as much genuine 
pleasure and com- 
fort at_solowa_cost 

as a Bissell carpet 
sweeper. It will 
be a constant re- 
minder of the gi- 
ver for 10 years or 
more. 

No dtist, no back- 
aches, no weari- 
ness besides s'jving 
the carpets, rugs, 
delicate curtains 
and draperies. 

We can give you your choice of a number of fine woods 

and guarantee every Bissell sweeper. 

<!L Prices $2.30 to $5.00 





We Can 
Deliver 
It 



Complete Booseturatahers 




We Can 

Deliver 

If. 




We have oil sorts of 

DOLL BEDS 




While rliey last this $2.00 
Bed, white enameled — only 

$1.19 



*/4 "■ 1/2 Off 



On All 



Doll Beds 



and 



Doll Carts 



COMPLETE BOCSEFUINKIEK 




DULUTH, MINNESOTA 




A& 



LOUD ROAR 
FROJI[POINT 

Street Cars Are Consistent- 
ly Missing the Ferry 
Bridge. 



Residents Spend Nearly an 

Hour Reaching the 

City. 



It takes from forty minutes to an 
hour to come from Park Point to the 
city now, according to Park Point resi- 
dents. 

The Interstate Traction company and 
the board of public works are coming 

in for a vigorous grilling from the 
residents of the suburb. 

The war ^\hich started when the 
company failed to run its cars to tne 
end of the lino is being continued. The 
company is running to the end of the 
line, but is consistently and persist- 
ently missing the bridges, the residents 
of Park Poini say. As there is only 



a twenty-minute service on the bridge, 
the result is easy to figure out. 

The complaint against the board of 
public works is based on the fact that 
the bridge engineers are running the 
structure on a strlft time schedule. 
This morning, it is said, the bridge 
started from the Park Point side of 
the canal when a car was only two 
blocks away. 

The Park Point people sav that the 
traction company is harassing them on 
account of their complaint that the 
cars were not running to the end of 
the line. Now the whole Point is up In 
arms and another protest to the citjr 
council may be expected. 

• 

Candled Fruits. 

None nicer tlian Victor Huofs. 



BOWMAN COUNTY 

JEWISH FARMERS. 

Bowman. N. D., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Bowman county haa a 
unique distinction of having the only 
Jewish Farming association in North, 
Dakota and perhaps in the Northwest. 
Joseph Wesburd is president and Isa- 
dor Goldstein, secretary. There is quite 
an extensive colony in the vicinity of 
Austin, this county, and they have 
made a success of agriculture. Several 
other farming clubs have been organ- 
ized in this county as a result of the 
state Better Farming movement 

• 

Oeep \Vater\^ay Scheme Dead. 

Oshkosh, Wis.. Dec. 24. — James H 
Davidson, representative in congress 
from this district and member of the 
rivers and harbors committee, states 
that the deep waterway project from. 
Chicago to the gulf is practically dead 
at the present time, due to the oppo- 
sition to the fourteen-foot plan. 



DISTRESSES OF INDIGESTION 
KNOCKED O PT BY SAM UEL'S "3-P" 

Put Your Stomach in Trim to Enjoy and Digest Food by 
Taking These Wonder-Working Little Capsules. 

The most successful corrective remedy for all ailments of stomach and 
nerves is Samuel's "3-P," which has brought happiness to tens of thou«!and8. 

It isn't a secret medicine — simply a prescription after the famous Dr 
Robin formula, which has been found so effective in stomach and nerve ills 

If you ar( getting discouraged because of a growing belief that your 
"stomach is worn out" you owe it to yourself to give Samuel's "3-P" a 
chance. In t lousands of cases it has quickly tr.-insformed these clouds of 
despondency into the sunshine of hopeful cheerfulness. 

It Is DIFFERENT from other stomach remedies, as It acts on an entirely 
NEW principle; it will surprise you how quickly one or two little capsules 

will straighten out your sick. 




JskyowDrmgis, . „, ^-____ 

Samuel's 'J-HlookonPif>rypacke, 

fortne name ofT^ajuuvl and our .^ ..=i=^ 

JtadeMark ofb^efiguw"3'in the la/ge letterU 



disordered stomach, and addi- 
tional ones will permanently 
right your stomach's wrongs, 
feed your nerves and revitalize 
your whole system. 

When you get of your druggist 
a 50-cent packet of Samuel's 
"8-P" capsules you will find th« 
answer to all your stomach trou- 
bles; or, send a postal to The 
iSamuel Chemical Co., Cincinnati^ 
Ohio, for free trial box. 





r 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1012. 



GOOD FELLOWS 
ARE WANTED 



Fifty Volunteers Needed to 

Be Santa Claus to Poor 

Children. 



Associated Charities Also 
Needs Vehicles for Distri- 
bution of Baskets. 



r . 

ter,; 
n.iti 

w'-'P. 
ra J' ; 
to 1 

»! ■ 1 1 

and 

1 
1 
« . 

f.JC 

t,> » 

1 
!■-:• 

Will 

may 

A; 

in ! 

lint 
stii: 



■wor'. 



<\ns need for about 
Fellowa. 

t that there would 

irounA, but lute yos- 

txday so many mote 

nes ranie in that the 

I'fUowt! onrulU'd -".vas 

ltd and Tho Herald has 

Q. D. call for help, and 

ihat. 

I ho itood Follow league 

t> see to it U.at there 

: finiily in the city who, 

k of warnitiv and cheer 

nut enter into the spirit 

Ih and leel that indeed 

will toward men niani- 

'. 'It the day. If that 

iMifd out fifty more 

:>t come forward at 

r to be Santii Clau3 

^.lU up this afternoon or 

Mr <}ood Fellow, askins? 

tir Grand 11-tJ, you 

.me of a family who 

hy your t'fCorts. 

Th*^ Assooiated Chari- 

' lahle array of par- 

;;iorrow and is badly 

~ for transportation of 

At yl>ody wlio will vol- 

ish a wagon, or, better 

■o disliibute th,-se pack- 

■ orning. will be doin^ 

1 spreadinsr the good 

nas throughout Du- 

s of some volunteer 

, . so be appreciated. 



BIG BENEFIT 
FORJjEWSIES 

''Keep the Change" Will Be 

Christmas Eve Word 

to Boy. 

Mysterious Benefactor Pays 

for All Copies of the 

Herald for Street. 



ALASKA BANKER'S 

CASE DISMISSED. 



This is the ni^ht when the "nowsios" 
who sell The Herald get their papers 
free, and the night wlien the income is 
"velvet." 

Each year there is a mysterious bene- 
factor of the "newsies" who sends Tho 
Herald a check covering the cost of 
the papers which the little mercliants 
talwe out. and thus giving them a chance 
to liave the entire income of the eve- 
ning free. 

He ajjks the public in g^eneral to buy 
from the boys, to give more tlian tho 
price of the paper, and to tell tliem to 
"keep the change." That is all he asks 
in return for his generosity. Eacli 
Christmas eve for a number of year.s 
this has happened, and it also usuallv 
iiappens that the "keep the change" 
habit has served to give a good many 
little fellows a merry Christmas wlilcii 
they otherwise would not have. It has 
also often happened that the little 
mother or the sick daddy whom a lot 
of these youngsters are helping to sup- 
port have been afforded some needed 
delicacy or luxury which would other- 
wise be impossible. 

Tell the newsies tonight to "keep the 
change." 



Choice V»t Flotrem. 

Xone nicer." Prices right at Huofs. 



Va 
Of ^ 
Ir.g 

fori 
Aia- 
-M cl- 
eg.'. 
dis: 
1 

t. - 

«it I.", 
tjvi!' 
this 



An.; 

disr 

ar.d 

fl.xin 

suit 



la. Dec. 24. — The charge 

"'•■^rsion of func's, rest- 

Kibridge T. Barnettf-. 

>>f the VVashinyton- 

■'vada, of Fairbanks, 

l.'d nearly two years 

on dep'« it, has been 

ion of the govern- 

- tiie criminal docket 

r excr^pt for the mis- 

'.i Barnette was found 

i for a Tievv trial in 

• argued today. 



BUSIIVESS 
COLLEGE 



CENTRAL 

;!<» Kast Superior Street, Duliith. 
WINTER TEIOI, JAX. «TH. 

New classes in all departments. 
Day school. Night school. 

B.>KitKit A: Mel'HF.HSOX. 



«i 



g 1' 

Of 

F-1 



Fivini; Prleew. 

-. c'al., Dec. Jl.--Ti5e Los 
ce exchanse voted to 
• activities of its butt.-r 
^ committee .'n quoting and 
rices. T!i is action was the re- 
the government's suit against 
in bu'ti r int'M'f?"t s. 



ATTEMPT TO ROB 
TREASUR E TRA IN FAILED 

(Continued from page 1.) 



they e.\chanffed 



C A Merry Christmas 
and Our Heartiest 
Wishes for a Happy 
and Prosperous New 
Year to Our Many 
Patients. 

^^^"^-^^ 

Hew Method Dentisfs 

Dr. B. C. Rrown, OwntM-. 

25 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

: ;. '11 Ton Bakery, Xext door 
t .-' ..IS. Hours, S:30 to 7. 



FREE! FREE! 

TEN DOLLARS 



■ - ad and bring it to 

us .i;.,i \vt^ \vi:l allow you TEX 
I 'I <i,l..\ 1*.-^ ;is part first payment 
■ the bargains ad- 
% i ly's paper. 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO,, 

Faetory SaleMrooni!*, 
tl'»! \A«Nt First *«treet. 



THE PALM ROOM 

At the SPALDING 



MOST DELIGHTFUL AND LUXURIOUS 
KEST.\UI<.\NT IN DULUTH. 



CHAMBERLAIIV- 
TAYLOR CO. 

Office Outfitters 

Desks, Cliairs, Filing 
Devices, Stationery. 

323 West Superior Si. 



fleers, with whom 
several volleys. 

Tile train robbers rode out of 
.Springfield on the blind baggage, im- 
mediately in the rear of tiie locomo- 
tive of the fast Kansas City train on 
tile Chi(ago & Alton railroad, whicii 
left here about \z o'clock last night. 
Near lies Junction they crawled over 
the tender and compelled the engine- 
men, at the points of revolvers, to stop 
the train. The engine, together witli 
the express car, was detached from the 
rest of tlie train and run a couple of 
hundred yards ahead. 

Shot Over Pa.<«!4engers. 

Passenger.s who aligiited from the 
coaclies in tlie rear to determine the 
cause of the delay were hustled back 
to their places by careless shooting by 
one of the bandits. 

Express Messenger Fred Aycrs was 
ordered out of his car and to keep 
within range of the weapon with whicli 
tlie engineer and firemen were cov- 
ered, wiiile two of the bandits pro- 
ceeded to the task of breaking into the 
big safe. 

Horace Smith, the rear brakeman of 
the train, nieanwhile was speeding to- 
ward lies Junction to give the alarm. 
The robbers had neglected to guard 
the rear of the train. Before they 
could effect an entrance to the treas- 
ure the rescue party, armed with rifles 
and shotgun.s, had arrived, and the 
ilesperudoes beat a hasty retreat and 
eluded capture by dashing into thick 
woods on one side of the track. There 
all trace of them was lost. 

Bulletin a.s ArKuments. 

"While tlie train was held uji by the 
desperadoes. Conductor John C. Bo>d 
of Chicago, followed by a group of 
passengers, started to make an inves- 
tigation. Tliey were repulsed by a 
command to "'get back there damn 
you!" made more emphatic by accom- 
panying I'evolver shots. 

When Flagman Horace Smith ran 
back and notified the operator at lies, 
tile latter wired to the Alton offices in 
."Springfield, a switcli engine was pressed 
into service and fifteen deputies, po- 
lice officers and detectives were sent 
to the si'-ene. 

Engineer O. O. Hanks was at the 
tlirottle of the switch engine. To make 
the approach less noticeable, he dark- 
ened his headliglit and trusted to the 
moon to prevent possilde collision or 
accident. When the switch engine ap- 
peared on the scene the officers plain- 
ly could see two of the men at work 
rifling an express package at a point 
.iiiout 200 yards from the train. At 
first the pair paid no heed to the 
switch engine's arrival, but when the 
officers stepped down the men fled. 

The officers endeavored to surround 
the men, but the latter took to th^ir 
heels and disappeared. 

SiiMiteetM Arrested. 

Several suspects have been taken 
to the police station and questioned by 
Chief Underwood, who believes the 
bandits are in hiding in Springfield. 

Neighboring towns were notified be- 
fore daylight to be on the lookout for 

s!>ects. If definite clews are not 
found today Sheriff Me.ster probably 
will reiiuest Governor Deneen to is- 
sue a proclamation offering a re- 
ward. 




Look Out for Stale C'anily. 

Victor Huot's candies are made fresh 
every day. 

KERN ARGUES 

FOR DEFENSE 

(■Continued from page 1.) 



to violate the Federal 



Effect of One Bottle 

Crandall, Tex.— "After my last spell 
of sJcknc-is," writes Mrs. Belle Teal, 
of this city, "I remained very ill, and 
stayc'i in bed for eight weeks. I 
couUhi't get tjp, all this time, and 
though mj' doctor came to see me 
every day, he didn't do ine any good. 
I had taken btit one bottle of Cardiii, 
when I was tip. going everywhere, and 
60oi: I was doing all my housework." 
Cardui helps when other medicines 
have failed, because it contains ingred- 
ients i!ut found in any other medicine. 
Pure, safe, reliable, gentle-acting — 
Cardui is the ideal medicinal tonic for 
Uveak, sick women. Try it. 



conspiracy 
laws." 

Attacked MeManigral. 

Attacking Ortie E. McAIanigal, the 
confessed dynamiter, as "the greatest 
criminal of ills time," Senator Kern 
said the government's charges were 
liastd largely upon what McManigal 
had said. 

"This McManigal came here with a 
brazen face and related his crimes 
with an air of triumph," said the 
senator. "Would you permit a contest 
ever a cow to be decided by the word 
of such a man? 

"It has been said that the National 
Erectors' association and the United 
States .Steel corporation had nothing to 
do with this case. But it is has been 
shown here that the agents of the 
National Erectors' association took 
from the Iron Workers' union liead- 
quarters 60,000 letters. From those 
the government took 400 letters in 
which it was sought to show a con- 
spiracy existed. 

"Did the government read all those 
400 letters? No, only parts of the let- 
ters were read — the parts which the 
prosecution thought showed a con- 
spiracy. 

"Why. since the time for change in 
the administration in this country ap- 
proached, I have received scores of let- 
ters on a variety of subjects. If you 
read those letters literally you might 
convict the writers with almost any 
charge you wished to make against 
them." 

The Erectors' association, to which 



Senator Kern referred. Is an organiza- 
tion of "open sliop" contractors, 
against whom tlie Iron workers' union 
hud called a strike. 

Conviction "Wolild Be Anarchy." 

"If you listen to the assertions of 
the government, and, without remem- 
bering tho evidence, you bring back 
verdicts finding these forty men guilty, 
It will be anarchy of the worst kind," 
asserted Senator Kern. 

Iteferring to what he called "the in- 
terests which wanted to see those men 
prosecuted. Senator Kern said: 

"When the greatest criminal of the 
century is prosecuted — and it will be — 
It would be an act of retribution it 
these laboring men now on trial were 
called upon to pass upon the letters 
that would be produced." 

Senator Kern attempted to show 
that the evidence against Olaf A. 
Tveitmoe and Eugene A. Clancy of San 
Francisco; Frank K. Painter of Omaha; 
Michael J. Haiinon of Scranton, Pa., 
and against otlier defendants "wus not 
sufficient to convict them." 



START ENDS 

LONG SERVICE 

^Continued from page 1.) 



And though you now cease active par- 
ticipation in the work of the court, 
you will, in the many opinions writ- 
ten and left behind, remain a potent 
factor in the work of this court for 
many years to come. 

"The uniform kindness and courte-qy 
shown to your associates the help and 
assistance always cheerfully given 
them, has endeared them to vou bv 
enduring ties of friendship and grati- 
tude. Your present associates and 
your former associate. Judge O'Brien, 
authorize nie to say this much to vou, 
and as further evidence of their " es- 
teem and respect for you, to present 
you with this token, with the request 
that you accept with it the high re- 
gard, the friendship and affection of 
those who present it to you." 

As he spoke he handed the chief 
justice a handsome gold mounted cane, 
made from Spanish snakewood, and 
engraved — 

"Charles M. Start, Chief Justice, 1895- 
1913." 

The chief .iustice was vislblv af- 
fected by the speech and offering. He 
replied in low voice, thanking them 
for the gift. 

Justice Start will swear in his suc- 
cessor Jan. G. Practically all if not 
all the cases in which he has partici- 
pated, not yet decided, will be decided 
and opinions handed down next Fri- 
day. The chief justice will leave soon 
for the South, to rest the remsinder 
of tl.o winter. Ho has spent eighteen 
years on the supreme bench. 

GALE DRIVES STEAMSHIP 
ON JERS EY SHORE 

(Continued from page 1.) 

l)Ut at noon none had been able to 
reach tiie vessel owing to the high 
sea. At that hour the revenue cutter 
Seneca reported by wireless that she 
was close at hand. 

The stranded vi s;-el lies on one of the 
worst portions of a dangerous stretch 
of coast, about three miles off the 
Little Beach life saving station. 

A wireless message from the Tur- 
rialba was received shortly before noon 
as follows: 

"Not making any water. .Ship rest- 
ing easil;.. Strong gale still con- 
tinues." 



Schooner In Danger. 

Sandy Hook, N. J., Dec. 21. — The 
thrt-e-mastcd schooner John H. May 
came ashore liere during a blizzard 
this morning and grounded in a dan- 
gerous position. .She was bound from 
Charleston to New York and carries a 
CI ew of six men. 

Life savers from the Sandv Hook 
station went to the vessel to take off 
the crew. The schooner's home port is 
l>lti!ad.lphia. 

The schooner's crew was landed 
safely about 11 o'clock. They left their 
Vessel high on the beach. 



NEW YORK AND NORTH 
COAS T STO RMSWEPT 

(Continued from page 1.) 



tug collided in the upper harbor, in- 
juring four men. two of them fatally. 

Acro.s.s the Hudson the railroad yards 
were choked witli incoming passenger 
trains, some of them liours late and all 
of them heavily laden. Conditions in 
the yards of the Grand Central and 
New Haven roads in Manhattan were 
similar. 

lieports of snowbound suburban 
train.s, of street traffic blocked and of 
vessels stormbound weie received from 
Eastern cities as the day advanced. 
Late Shopper.s In l>l)«treit!!i. 

Hopes for a whit<' Christmas were 
fultilled, but with <listress to the army 
of day-before-Christmas shoppers and 
business generally. Most disappointed 
of all were th<^ street-cleaners, who hid 
been promised a day off tomorrow for 
the first time in twenty >ears. 

Suburban trains were late, shipping 
lied up and street traffic at a stand- 
still. 



SKATING 

WKSTKKX < I RMXG RINK. 

Open every evening. 
MuMic hy Italdwln'N Rand. 

Cliristinas night and Friday niglit. 
Admis.-;ion — GeJitlemcn, I'oc: Ladles, ir)C. 



SUES RAILROAD ' 

FOR TIMBE R DAMAGE 

John L. Owens started suit in dis- 
trict court this morning against the 
Duluth, Winnipeg & Pacific railroad in 
which he asks for $1,500 damages for 
timber claimed to have been burned in 
a fire which originated on the railroad 
right-of-way which luns through his 
land. Owens asserts that 100,000 feet 
of jack i)ine, tamarack and spruce were 
destroyed on his land which Is located 
on the west half of the southwest quar- 
ter of section 10. 61-18. The fire in 
question is alleged to have started on 
May 6, 1911. 



Grange Is Organized. 

The first grange organized in .St. 
Louis county has been formed at Kel- 
sey with about thirty members. F. J. 
McCarty is master and Gran Channer 
secretary. The branch is Icnown as 
Kelsey grange, No. 617. 

The grange is a secret organization 
of farmers and is especially strong in 
the old farming communities. There 
are several organizations in the south- 
ern part of Minnesota, but the branch 
formed at Kelsey is the firait in this 
section of the state. 



WALLACE PROBASCO TO 
WED MISS INGERSOLL 

New York, Dec. 24. — The marriage of 
Miss Maud Inger.soll, daughter of Rob- 
ert G. Inger.soll, to AVallace Marcus 
Probasco, will take place next Monday 
afternoon, Dec. 30. 

The wedding will be quiet at the 
home of the bride-elect's mother, Mrs. 
R. G. Ingersoll. Only members of the 
immediate family and a few intimate 
friends will be present. 

Miss Ingersoll. like Iser father, is an 
agnostic. Dr. John Elliott of the Eth- 
ical Culture society and an old friend 
of the family, will perform the cere- 
mony. 



Elect Officers. 

The Duluth Progressive Workmen 
circle, branch ?>^", held a special meet- 
ing Sunday evening for the purpose of 
electing officers. The following offi- 
cers were elected: Chairman, S. Jeffy; 
financial secretary and treasurer, N. 
Shnider; recording secretary, Solomon; 
control committee. Dorfman, S. Myer-s, 
Solomon; hospitaler, S. Dutch; social 
and literary committee, A. Litman, S. 
Myers, Dorfman, Singer, Carnival. 



"6000 EVENING. HAVE YOU 
: „ BEEN MENTIONED* YET T 



Who fa sui*e of being elected to Du- 
luth's ne^v t^nunlssion? 

Mr. Nobodj-. 

Who li^sn't been mentioned for one 
of the places on Duluth's new com- 
mission"? • ^' 

Mr. Nobody. 

Who isn't hoping the lightning will 
strike him when tlie ballots are count- 
ed? 

Mr. Nobody. 

Who doesn't think he can run the 
city betfer than anybody else'? 

Mr. Nobody. 

The man who hasn't been mentioned 
for one of the places on Duluth's new 
commission is certainly exclusive, for 
almost everybody in Duluth, who is 
"anybody" has been mentioned. 



fTTTlITH most sincere thanks 

[ W I tor the many favors 
igg^l rendered us during the 
i yfi**^ past year, and with best 
wishes for health, happiness 
and prosperity for all the fu- 
ture, we wisii vou 



''J\ merry 
Cbrl$fma$'* 

— and — 

Zenith Telephone 
Company 




OPPORTUNITY 
OVERLOOKED 



Sheep Raising Might Be 

Profitable Industry in 

Minnesota. 



MR. NOBODY, 
The Only Man in Duluth Who Hasn't 
Been Mentioned for City Commis- 
sioner. 



praise than can be set down here. 

It is all very well done in the true 
Belasco style, but it is not "The Music 
Master." 



At the Orpheum. 



BUILDING TO BE ACTIVE. 

North Dakota Builders Are Facing 
Quite Good Year. 

Bismarck. N. D.. Dec. 24.— .\lthoiigh 
this is supposed to be the dull season 
in a building way tlie indications are 
that North Dakota will see a lot of 
building underway early next spring, 
the big ctbps this year having giver 
building a boom and t)rougiit on opti- 
mism. 

A new 40.000-bushel elevator will be 
erected at Fairdale. Bids will be re- 
ceived by C. O. Dokken, chief clerk 
of I'aranabo school district, for the 
erection of thi-ee school houses. The 
St. tOlizabethan parochial school house 
to build in the spring at Dickinson 
A new school is being built at Dick- 
inson. Two frame school houses will 
be built in Clear Lake district near 
Turtle, N. D. 

C. P. Swanson of Minot will build an 
implement warehouse. The cells in the 
old jail will be removed to the new 
jail at KUendale. 

Frank Glijieg will erect a garage at 
Braddock. A 3,000-bushel elevator will 
be built at Ryder by George Krueger. 
An electric light s.vstem is projected 
at Taylor. The new station at Devil.s 
Lake will be " of Gothic design, two 
waiting rooms, frame, oak interior 
finish. 



Charles Olcott. who is at the Or- 
pheum this week, is a graduate of 
Columbia university in the class of 
1904, and a member of the Alpha Delta 
Phi fraternity. His full name is 
Charles Olcott Young, and it was in 
the Columbia college glee club that he 
got his first training. 

"I was headed for the profession of 
law." said Mr. Young last evening, 
"but when I got to New York I found 
thousands of young lawyers who were 
not able to make a living, and who 
had just as good a mind as I had or 



Hostetter Says Suggestion 

of Bemidji Man is 

Good One. 



A. B. Hostetter, superintendent of 
agiiculture of tho I>uluth Commercial 
club, believes that sheep raising can be 
made an important industry in Min- 
nesota. 

Mr. Hostetter igrees with the senti- 
ments expressed by J. J. Upsahl of Be- 
midji in a communication publislied in 
The Herald last evening. 

"Sheep require a certain amount of 
open country and are at a disadvan- 
tage in thick brush, but there are 
large tracts in the northern part of 
the state that ;ire very suitable for 
sheep raising," staid Mr. Hostetter to- 
da>'. 

"Some attempi-9 at sheep raising 
have been made in this part of the 
state, but they 1 ave failed on account 
of lack of enterprise. A man cannot 



turn sheep loose without attention. 
The herds must have keeptV.^ to llv« 
with the sheep and direct theif move- 
ments so that they will not get- ^^^^ 
land that is unsuitable for them. 

"The rocky hills of Vermont hav* 
been producing wool for years. Ther« 
Is no rea.son why much land In IhU 
part of the state, now unsuitable fot 
agriculture, should not be devoted t<j 
slieep raising. Land must be cheap tc 
make she<.-p raising pjofitable, but the 
land in this part of the state that is 
unsuitable for agriculture is cheap 
enough for the purpose. 

"TJie woolen industry is growing In 
this state. The manufacture of mack- 
inaws and blankets in Duluth is ba- •. 
coming an important industry, and 
there are cloth and woolen mills in 
other .sections of the stote. With a 
market near at hand, the sheep rais- 
ing Industry should flourish, if it W 
conduct«-'d on the propei- basis." 

mrs.sickl'es^heck. 

Five Thousand Paid Toward Fund 
General Had in Charge. 

Albany, N. Y.. Dec. 24. — Attorney 
General Carmody has turned over to 
State Comptroller Sohmer a $5,600 cer- 
tified check as part payment for the 
$28,000 unaccounted for by Gen. Daniel 

E. Sickles as chairman of the New 
York monuments commission. The 
check was signed by Mrs. Sickles. 

Unrler an agreement made by the 
attorney general's office and Stanton 
Sickles, son of Gen. Sickles, the bal- 
ance of the money unaccounted for is 
to be paid in two or three >freeks. 

■ • 

"N<me Xleer.** 

Roses, beauties, cardinals, polnset- 
tias, valleys, violets and carnations at 
Victor Huot's. 



Those who buy advertised things, 
buy 'in the light" — after comparison 
and consideration, and with a knowl- 
edge of the stores. 



^ Cilt.\.\n FORKS BF.1.I.HOP 4- 

^ STKALS CASH KF.iilSTER. ^ 

^ Grand Forks. X. D.. Dec. 24 

*• Rriile Kenville. aged 15), has con- 
^ feKweil that he carried the cash 
^ rejclNter of the Frederick hotel out 
^ Into an alley and roIil>e«l it of f.lS. 
^ Henvilie wn.«« employed ia the ho- 
^ tel aM a "bellhop'' and cuiumltted 
^ the robbery early .Sunday nioru- 
^ Ing. He Is charged with grand 
^- larceny. 

AMUSEMENTS 





€jf Duluth's Greatest Store 

has again demonstrated its wonderful 
facilities to meet the demands of the 
people at all times and especially so dur- 
ing the holiday season. 

This has been the most successful 
holiday season in our business history 
and for the triumphant conclusion we 
must thank you. We also thank our 
employes for their ardent co-operation, 
their lovalty and their untiring: efforts. 



We gratefully acknowledge, as the re- 
sult of your patronage, the largest 
volume of business in our history. For 
this evidence of your good will and con- 
fidence, we thank vou most sincerelv and 

Wish You One and All 

A Merry Christmas 






t:) 



SERMON ON 

SPIBITUflUSM 

David Warfield Seeks to 

Preach Life After Death, 

Dramatically. 

Before a moderately large audience 
at the I.yceum last evening David 
Warfield m*de his appearance in the 
Belasco play, "The Return of Peter 
Grimm." 

"The Return of Peter Grimm" is an 
excursion into "the undi.scovered 
country, from whose bourn no traveler 
returns. It is, moreover, a dramatic 
expounding of the doctrines of modern 
spiritualism. 

In this curious play David Belasco 
and David Warfield have conspired to 
present dramatically — and therefore 
i"ragmentarily — a theory of spirit-life' 
after death. They have sought to tell 
the story of a man who died and who 
afterward came back, like the ghost of 
Hamlet's father, to set his house in 
order. 

But, though Peter Grimm is visible 
and audible to the audience after his 
return, no one of his friends or family 
can see or hear him. save a sick lad, 
who, to use the psychical term, is a 
"sensitive." 

The difficulties In the way of mak- 
ing a stage story of this sort con- 
vincing are evident. The ghost in 
•Hamlet." though it appears but brief- 
ly and in the supernatural guise dic- 
tated by tradition, is seldom con- 
vincing to the modern theater-goer. 
But Peter Grimm returns in his own 
likeness and habiliments, including his 
•'funny old hat." He speaks in his 
natural voice, he does characteristic 
things, he exhibits the old traits, 
though sublimated by the breadth and 
loftiness of his new knowledge. 

So far as the acting is concerned, 
however, Mr. Warfield has to do about 
all of that in the first act, where he 
reveals the living Peter, with his lov- 
able crotchets, pis kindly obstinacy, 
his pride of farhily, his capacitv for 
generous affection. This is a fine pic. 
ture in the -best Warfield manner. It 
is the basis, of course, of what Is to 
come. When Peter returns, Mr. War- 
fields opportunities are lessened, for 
this is a refined, a saintly sweet su- 
perman, who has lost e.xactly that 
human quality which brought him so 
close in the first act. He Is no long- 
er affectionately dunderheaded. no 
longer lovingly obstinate. It is as 
the living Peter that Mr. Warfield 
achieves something fine and .iustifles 
his art. As the returned Peter he 
walks through the rest of the plav 
a spirit, an Influence, a being whom 
we cannot Qu'te understand. 

The other characters of the play are 
Individual plptures, each worthy of its 
setting, each a finely wrought concep- 
tion, deserving of more discriminating 



CHARLES OLCOTT, 
At the Orpheum This Week. 



maybe better. I decided I would not 
starve and Immediately fell back on 
the thing I knew next best to the law, 
and that was the art of entertaining. 
I have never regretted the change. Mv 
present profession may not be as dig- 
nified as the law. but it is a sight 
more filling to the pocket book, and 
just as honest." 

A special Christmas matinee will be 
held at the Orpheum tomorrow and 
Manager Billings has announced that 
he will hold the curtain until 2:45 in 
order that everybody mav have a 
chance to finish his Christmas dinner. 



A toilet necessity for the entire fam- 
ily— Hygenol Cream of Roses keeps 
the skin in perfect shape in all sea- 
sons and under all conditions. Sold b.^ 
Lyceum Pharmacv. 



OATMEAL TRUST 

IS ALLEGED NOW. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — Investigation of 
an alleged attempt to secure control 
of the oatmeal business of the United 
States has been started by the Federal 
grand jury here. Purchase of the 
Great Western Cereal company by the 
Quaker Oats company will be inquired 
into first. Robert Gordon, secretary 
of the Quaker Oats company, and Dan- 
iel Peterkin, private secretary to Joy 
Moton, head of the Great Western 
company, have been ordered to ap- 
pear before the grand jury. A number 
of other employes have been sub- 
poenaed to tell of the transaction. 
* . 

Cnn Attack Luretto. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Dec. 24. — Attorney 
General I.,yn<lon .A. Smith has agreed 
to allow citizens of Loretto to use tho 
name of the state in a suit attacking 
the validity of the incorporation of 
the town. It is claimed that the in- 
corporators included four and one-half 
sections of land in the territory neces- 
sary to get 200 inhabitants, as re- 
quired by law. and that of this area, 
only fourteen acres is platted. 



ALL TOYS 
HALF PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & CO. 



«)\K »a.'.0 \KW >I A not; ANY 
PI.IXO ONLY »145. 

Cash or terms. Case slightly 

STORY ft CLARK PIANO CO., 

Factory SalcnroomH, 
42C Went Flrwt .Street. 



i^T^i 





1879 




1912 



UNDER GOVERNMENT SUPERVISION 
The Oldest Bank in Duluth and the Elmph-e of SteeL 

IX IS XIIVIE 

for you to begin to think of starting a .savings account. Interest 
begms the first of the month, and whether you start with $1 or 
$100, that is the factor to consider. 

It does not take a large amount to make a start. The in- 
terest rat'% at the end, is the same to all. The principal thin..? 
is to start, and have something drawing you to the bank, regu- 
larly. 

Deposit a regular amount when you get your pay, for a 
minimum. Don't give yourself a chance to waste it. 

AMERICAN EXCHANGE NATIONAL BANK, 

SavlnsM Department Open Every Saturday Xlgbt, « to 8 O'Cloek. 



HEALTH AND VIGOR 

Restored to Weak Men ! 

VIT.\L.ITY is the pride of manhood, and its absence causes man to lose in his 
own estimation, realizing that he has fallen in Importance in the universal 
struggle for fav >r, fame and fortune. There is so much in modern life to 
stimulate, excite and wreck the nervous system that many men are alnnst 
recklessly burning the candle of vitality and of life at both ends If vou ar» 
weak, nervous, listless, unambitious, unspirited and debilitated vou " should 
<onsult us without delay. We cure many sucli cases every month, an'd never fall 
to build up a pal lent to robust, healthy manhood. We' have not the space or 
desire to read you all the resultant vital complications tliat mav arise from 
your weakened condition. But we invite you to call and talk overvour case in 
confidence. You will be cheerfully received. Our fees aie reasona"ble and our 




^ . u T » ,4. . ., - ,^ , , Ight's Disease. Stricture, 

Catarrh. Locomotor Ataxia. Cancer. Kczema and Rupture. 

All consultations are free and confidential. If others have failed to cure 

you. we invite yo j to come to us, and if we find vour case curable vou mav rest 

assured that you :an get back your health, for we back our opinion with a" legal 

written guarante.?. If living out of town, write for our free instruction book 

and symptom bla ik. Hours: \i to 8; Sunday.'^, 10 to 1. 

VARICOSE VEINS CHRONIC DISEASES 



Wormy veins, varicose veins, reduced 
and cured without cutting. No pain. 
Kupture, Hydrotele, Varicocele and 
Piles cured without operation. Consult 
us free and find out how ws cure with- 
out the knife. Our price for a cure is 
the cheapest in the Northwest. 



And skin diseases, eczema, discharges, 
ulcers, swellings, sores, constipation, 
itching, heart, kidney, liver, stomacli, 
rheumatic pains. 

Consult us at once upon arrival and 
maybe you can be cured before re- 
turning home. Many cases can b« 
cured in one or two more visits. 



Progressive Medical Association 

NO. 1 t%'e:st superior strukt, duliith. 



Fa-- 



! ■ I 



i 



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Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 



6 






*-*4^ 



Tmitiiiiiiiiiiiiii !iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiii 'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii!iiiiiiiimiiiiTmnj 

O our many 
patrons during 
the year of 19 12, 
J^SS^f ^^ extend the heart- 
iest greetings of the 
Yuletide season 
wish them all 

A Merry 
Christmas 

and trust that the 
New Year will be 
full of promise and 
prosperity. 

Duluth-Edison 
Electric Co. 

216 WEST FIRST STREET. 




6> 





WONDERFUL SHIP 

DESIGNED BY BOY 



The "Grandfifcld Whit.,,' an tvact 
reproduction of one of the largest 
freight vessels on the Great Lakes, Is 
attracting marked attention where it 
Is on exhibition in the display window 
of the Kelley Hardware company. 

The "Grandfield White," which Is a 
miniature vessel five feet In length, 
•quipped with wireless and all mod- 
ern devices, was designed and con- 
structed by George A. Cook, son of 
Postmaster Arthur P. Cook of this 
city, the young man's ability as an 
architect having elicited much favor- 
able comment by the hundreds of in- 
terested spectators who have viewed 
the boat. 

The one for whom the freighter was 
named is no less a personage than the 
small grandson of Hon. Charles Grand- 
field of Washington, first assistant 
ostmaster general, the youngster 
aving readied the dignified age of 
five months on Dec. 13. He is the only 
child of Attorney Harry Faber White 
and Mr.<». White of East Fourth street. 



child. Five clergymen made addresses 
in many languages and tlie entertain- 
ment ended with a dinner in which 
figured Ice cream and other dainties 
strange to a large majority of the 
gue.sts. 

The men received briar pipes, collar 
buttons, or purses. The women were 
given small ornaments or toilet ar- 
ticles, and the children a variety of 
toys. 



MINNESOTA POLITICS 

Greeks of Minnesota Senate Offer '^Progressive** 
Organization to the People— The Albert Lea 
Tribune on Reapportionment — St, Louis 
County* s Attitude on One-Mill Amendment Not 
Appreciated by St. Peter Free Press. 



Cut Flowers. 

Prices right; big stock, at Huot's. 



BULLET ENDS 



TROUBLES 



E 



SANTA CLAUS AT 

ELLI S ISLAND. 

New York. Dec. 24. — Twelve hundred 
Immigrants from all parts of the world, 
detained on the threshold of the new 
world, were given a taste of Uncle 
Sam's Christmas cheer yesterday that 
Increased their anxiety to enter. From 
two big ChristmaH tree.s In the dining 
room on Ellis Island, gifts were dis- 
tributed to every man, woman and 



Wealthy Walsh County, N. 

D., Farmer Kills Self 

By Shooting. 

Grafton, N. D., Dec. 24.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — James Vikmund, reputed 
to be one of the wealthiest farmers of 
western Walsh county, shot and killed 
himself in a granary on his farm near 
Pisek, while the members of the fam- 
ily were at church. Domestic trou- 
bles are held responsible by officials 
for his suicide. 



Relieve Thaf Sore Throat 
Now With MUSTEROLE! 

MUSTEPv OI.E brings quick and 
blessed relief to the sore throat and 
leaves a delicious feeling of ea.se and 
comfort. 

It Is a clean, white ointment, made 
with oil of mustard. You simply rub 
It on. No plaster needed. 

Better than a mustard plaster and 
positively does not blister. 

There Is nothing like MUSTER OI^E 

for Sore Throat, Bronchiti-s, Ton.«ilitis, 
Croup, Stiff Neck, Asthma, Neuralgia, 
Headache, Congestion, Pleurisy, Rheu- 
matism, Lumbago, Pains and Aches of 
the Back or Joints, Sprains, Sore Mus- 
cles, Bruises, Chilblains, Frosted Feet 
and Colds of the Chest (It prevents 
Pneumonia). 

Doctors and nurses frankly recom- 
mend MUSTE ROL E. It is used in 
large hospitals. 

At your druggist's in 25c and BOc 
jars, and a .spei'ial large hospital size 
for $2.50. 

Accept no substitute. If your drug- 
grist cannot supply you, send 25c or 50c 
to the Musterole Company, Cleveland, 
Ohio, and we will send you a jar, 
postage prepaid. 

"Musterole la Just fine, and Is an Immediate re- 
lief for inflamed throat and pain In tlic back. It's 
tha) best thing I have ever tried."— George L. Mo.\- 
ley. Martiiisburg, W. V*. (33) 




MME. BLO CH AC QUITTED, 

Paris Novelist Who Killed American 
Woman Is Freed. 

Paris, Dec. 24. — Mme. Bloch, a nov- 
elist, who on July 31 last, shot 
and killed Mrs Mirnie Bvidi^eman, 
wife of James E. Bridgcman, an em- 
ploye of the Paris branch of an 
American life insurance company, has 
been acquitted in the assize court herf: 
of the charge of homicide. 

The tra.i;cdy was the outcome of an 
attachment betw<,-c n Mme. Bloch'a hos 
banl and Mrs. Bridgcman, who was a 
daughter of Henry Bernard of Mil- 
waukee. The acquittal of tlse defend- 
ant had been said by her lawyers vir- 
tuall.v to be a foregone concl.ision 
owing to the circumstances under 
which the crime was committed. The 
accused woman was condemned, how- 
ever, to pay 1 franc damages in con- 
nection with the civil action of which 
the shooting »vas the basis 

•'Mrs. Bridgt^man betrayed me and 
robbed me both of my husband and of 
my home. So I killed her." This was 
the defense set up by Mme. Bloch. 



EDITO R IS BA RRED, 

Briton Who Libelled King George Will 
Be Deported. 

New York. Dec. 24. — Edward F. 
Mylliis. the Englishman convicted in 
London of libelling King George V and 
sentenced to .serve a year in prison, 
has been ordered deported by the com- 
missioner of immigration at Ellis Isl- 
and. Myllus was held to be an unde- 
sirable alien and probably will return 
on the vessel which brought him here. 

Myllus published a sensational story 
that the English sovereign had con- 
tracted a morganatic marriage In Mal- 
ta in 1880. The story was disproved 
in an action for libel brought against 
him by the solicitor general of Eng- 
land. He was sentenced to a vears 
imprisonment, his term expiring Dec. 
7, liill. 



Miner** Tonsrne Cat Off. 

Kenmare, N. D.. Dec. 24. — Harry 
Armstrong, a miner, was brought to 
tliis city from the Bertelson mines, 
north of here, and was taken to the 
hospital. Armstrong was the victim 
of a fall of clay in the mine, the heavy 
mass falling on hi.s head in such a 
manner that his tongue was completely 
severed and he was otherwise bruised 
about the head. He will recover. 



J^enate "I'roKPewnlveH." 

They are going to organize the sen- 
ate on progressive linos. 

"They" Include such ardent progres- 
sives an Senator George H. Sullivan of 
Stillwater, Senator F. A. Duxbury of 
Caledonia. Senator W. W. Dunn of St. 
Paul, Senator George C. Carpenter of 
Buffalo and Senator Dan M. Gunn of 
Grand Rapids. 

Former Senator E. E. Smith of Min- 
neapolis, chiiirman of the Republican 
state central committee, is popularly 
reputed to be behind the movement, 
and who. except 99 9-10 per cent of the 
population of the state, would question 
-Mr. Smith's progressiveness? 

Senator George 11. Sullivan of Still- 
water preached tlie 'Let well enough 
alone' doctrine from the rear of the 
Eberhart special train in St. Louis 
county last fall, and that alone estab- 
lishes his progressiveness. 

The other senators mentioned have 
usually been progressive in their efforts 
to prevent the people from having what 
they wanted. 

"The senate is a self-governing body 
and should not delegate its powers to 
a presiding officer to protect the peo- 
ple's interests," the leaders in the sen- 
ate combine say. 

"The fact should also be remembered 
— that in organizing along progressive 
lines, the senate commits itself to a 
program of progressive legislation," 
says the Minneapolis Tribune, which 
reliects the Ed Smith brand of progres- 
siveness. 

One can imagine Senator George H. 
Sullivan standing in the senate cham- 
ber making an impassioned v>lea for 
the initiative and referendum with per- 
centages of 3 and 5 per cent. 

If the senate "organizes along pro- 
gressive lines." Senator W. W. Dunn 
may be expected to champion a law 
against brewery ownership of saloons. 

Senator Duxbury will probably intro- 
duce and lead the fight for a bill pro- 
viding for a public utilities commi.ssi ^n 
Avitli all the powers of ihs Wisconsin 
commission. 

It is not too much to expect that 
Dan Gunn will be t'.ij father of a bill 
which will allow ihe Roos-'Velt men in 
Minnesota to enter the next campaign 
with party standing, and to take part 
In the primary election. 

The short ballot and non-partisan 
county office elections will pro'.jably 
be the pet legislation of Senator Car- 
penter. 

Surely the Interests of the people 
would be protected if the S' nate were 
to 'organize along pro.'^ressive lines,"' 
by taking the power of committee ap- 
pointments out of the hands of Lieu- 
tenant Governor Burnciuist and placing 
it in the charge of a committee of 
ardent progressives. Nominations for 
the committee are hereby suggested- 
Senators Sullivan, Duxbury, Dunn. 
Carpenter and Gunn. 

Lieutenant Governor Burnquist, who 
Is a progressive, has not yet given 
his sanction to the plan to name a 
committee on committees in the senate. 
Senators Sallivan and Duxbury expect 
the new lieutenant itovernor to fall in 
v.ith their plan, but for some reason 
he is shy. Perhaps he fears tl.e 
"progressiveness" of those who are 
pushing the plan. It may be that he 
will come out in opposition to it. Of 
course the people elected Buvaouist as 
a progressive, but they didn't » xpect 
him to attempt to thv.art the will of 
such whole-hearted friends of the dear 
people as Senators Sullivan, Duxbury, 
Dunn, Carpenter and Gunn. 
* >i> * 

Reapportionment. 

The Albert Lea Tribune has the fol 
lowing on reapportionment, shoA\ing 
the attitude of one portion of the 
Southern Minnesota people; 

There Ijas been a great deal said 
of late about the matter of reappor- 
tionment at the coming session of 
the legislature. It is said that the 
northern part of the state is very 
much worked up about the matter 
and is bound to have a reapportion- 
ment bill at this session, or hold up 
all legislation. . 

There ought to be no difficulty in 
getting a just and fair reapportion- 
ment measure through the legisla- 
ture and that without any threats of 
what will be done if it is not passed. 
There may be here and there a mem- 
ber of the legislature in the south- 
ern part of the state who is opposed 
to a reapportionment bill of any 
kind, especially should it make any 
decided change in his district. But 
as a whole we do not believe there 
will be any considerable opposition 
to a measure which will do justice 
to all parts of the state. 
The north part of the 
serves a readjustment of 
lative districts of the state, so that 
it may have its just representation. 
This it can easily secure by working 
with the southern part of the state. 

AVe do not believe that the lead- 
ing members of the legislature from 
this part of the state have ever had 
any objection to a measure which 
would treat all parts of the state 
fair. What they objected to has 
been the scheme by which the big 
cities gobbled all of the representa- 
tion which was taken away from 
the Southern counties. In the last 
legislature the measure which was 
proposed, gave very little to the 
Northern counties, but nearly all of 
the members taken from the South- 
ern counties were given to the cities. 
It is the disposition of the interests 
centered in the big cities to hog 
everything and place it where it can 
be handled by tb^m. which has done 
ore than anything else to prevent 
reapportionment from being carried 
through. Let the North and South 
counties work together, and there 
will be no difficulty in arriving at 
basis where the northerti portion of 
the state will secure its full rights 
of representation as it should have. 
« ♦ • 
Stranee Point of TIctt. 
The St. Peter Free Press has a 
strange point of view — one that is 
common in the soutliern pr.rt of the 
state, but that i.^ hard to understi'nd 
by the people in this section: 

Hats off to St. Louis county! I'hat 
county pays more than 21 per cent of 
all the state taxes, and, conseqi'Utnly 
will pay 21 per cent of the entire 
amount that the 1-mlll road tax will 
produce, and St. Louis county gave a 
clear majority of 3.151 for the good 
roads amendmcjit. In the next legis- 
lature when demagogues are in- 
veighing against St. Louis county 
it would be well to remember these 
facts. — Princeton Union. 

Now don't be so terribly fast. 
While It is true St. Louis county will 
pay more than 21 por cent of tlio 
entire amount of the 1-mill road tax 
and yet gave a big majority in favor 
of the amendment, it should also be 
borne in mind that this large pcr- 



state de- 
the legls- 



Utterly Wretched 



XorvouM ProNt ration Lon^ Endured Be- 
fore Remedy Wuh Found. 

Miss Minerva Remlnger, Upper Bern, 
Pa., writes: "For several years I had 
nervous prostration, and was utterly 
wretched. I lived on bread and beef 
tea because my stomach would not re- 
tain anything else. I took many rem- 
edies, but obtained no relief until I 
took Hood's Sarsaparilla, when I began 
to gain at once. Am now cured." 

Pure, rich blood ryakes good, strong 
nerves, and this is why Hood's Sarsa- 
parilla, which purifies and enriches the 
blood, cures so many nervous diseases. 

Get it today in the usual liquid form 
or In the tablets called Samatalia. 



centage Is principally due to the iron 
ore property, which in a broad 
sense must be considered the prop- 
erty of the state at large. The in- 
dividual property ladders of St. 
Louis county, outside of the mining 
property, pay no larger percentage 
than people pay elsewhere. Neither 
is there any hostile feeling against 
the settlers of that county, as tlie 
Union seems to believe. On the con- 
trary they as well as the people of 
the whole northern part of the state 
have the best wishes and the good 
will of their neighbors in the other 
counties in everything to whioh 
they are justly entitled, including a 
big slice of the 1-miIl road tax. 
* « « 

Tlie Xew I.ynn Halnea. 

C J. Buell, Democratic candidate for 
congressman-at-large in the recMit 
election, is to be the Lynn Haines of 
the coming legislature. Haines has .-x- 
panded and is now Halnesing congress. 

GEORGE 1). McCarthy. 



••MoMt Excellent,'' 

Victor Huot's fresli made candies. 



CENTRAL 



BISINESS 
COLLEGE 



30 KaKt Superior Street, Dninth. 

Wl.NTER TERM, JA>. OTH. 

New classes in all departments. 
Day school. Ni.trht school. 

BARBER & MePHERSOX. 



VASSAR QUARTET 
LOOKS AFTER BABY 

Students Bring Child West 
to Its Mother in Min- 
neapolis. 

New York, Dec. 24. — A story of a 
Christmas baby, mothered by four Vas- 
sar college students on a journey of 
cheer from Poughkeepsie, N. Y., to 
Minneapolis, Minn., is told by Vassar 
undergraduates arriving at their 
Brooklyn homes for the holiday vaca- 
tion. 

The baby, a year old, is the son of a 
poor Minneapolis woman, phe wanted 
the child as a Christmas gift from a 
Brooklyn charitable organization in 
whose care she left it six months ago. 
Officers of the association wrote to the 
Christian association of Vassar, a stu- 
dent philanthropical organization, ask- 
ing if some students living In Minne- 
apolis would take the child west, and 
Miss Katherine Lewis of Chicago and 
three other students, one of whom lives 
in Minneapolis, volunteered. 

WHAT EM OLUME NTS ARE. 

Supreme Court Says Horse Feed and 
Servants Are Included. 

Washington, Dec. 24 — 'Emoluments" 
or allowances for army officers in- 
clude forage for riding and carriage 
horses and the hire of household serv- 
ants, according to a decision by the 
supreme court of the United States. 

The decision was announced in the 
suit of a Mis. Sarah K. McLean, widow 
of Nathaniel H. McLean of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, who. resigned from the 
army in 1864 to be reinstated in li-75. 

In 1905 congress pas.sed an act giv- 
ing him the pay and all the "emolu- 
ments" of a major during the years 
he was out of the army. Mrs. Mc- 
Lean sued the government because the 
comptroller of the treasury would not 
allow under the head of "emoluments,"' 
forage for two horser, usod by Maj. 
McLean for riding and drivinsr, ri.nd 
pay for two household servants hired 
during those years. The court of 
< laims likewise decided agiinst the 
claim, but the supreme court held that 
they should have been allowed. 

THOUSA~NDS'SPENT 

BY POLICE LOBBY. 

tz. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — Evidence of the 
payment of thousands of dollars by the 
United Police, the city policemen's or- 
ganization here, for the expenses of 

committees appointed to influence leg- 
islation, has been brought out in the 
investigation by the civil service com- 
mission into the operations of the oi- 
ganization. The attorneys for the com- 
mission are seeking to learn the truth 
about an alleged ?60,000 legislative 
fund which opponents of the United 
Police assert has been established in 
tne organization. 



ExpreHHed EA-erywhere, 

Victor Huot's home-made candies. 



SCORES SEE HOLDUP 

IN BUFFALO OFFICE. 

Buffalo, N. Y., Dec. 24.— Within sight 
of scores of people, a highwayman late 
yesterday afternoon held tip two men 
in the city ticket office of the Grand 
Trunk railway and succeeded in get- 
ting away with 5327. Joseph E. Ed- 
wards, chief clerk, and Harold D. Mow- 
r.v, a stenographer, were behind the 
desk when the man entered and draw- 
ing a revolver threatened to kill them 
if they made an outcry. He then 
walked behind the counter, rifled the 
cash drawer of all the bills in sight 
and fled. 



TRAIN ROBBER IS 

KIL LED "A T WORK" 

Tulsa, Okla., Dec. 24. — An unidenti- 
fied negro w^as sl.ot and instantly 
killed while attempting to rob the 
crew and passengers of St. Louis & 
San Francisco No. 412, Oklahoma City 

to Kansas City, shortly after the train 
left Chandler, Okla., last night. It l.s 
claimed the no gr ff had killed anotlier 
negro before boafcnng the train. The 
bandit was shot by an operative of a 
detective agency who was a passenger. 

PARTS OF PARIS'^ 

MORPH INE MAD. 

Paris, Dec. 24. — A general investiga- 
tion into the Illicit sale of morphine in 
Paris will be made as a result of the 
death from the use of the drug of R€it> 
Bichet, a young man recently ap- 
pointed professor of French in the 
Royal college at Budapest. The auth>n-- 
ities are convinced that an aggressive 
campaign must be waged in order to 
combat the growing craving for mor- 
phine in Paris. 

The vice Is said to be at its ;^'orsi 
among the young women frequenters 
of the night cafes and dance halls in 
the Montmartre district, and in col- 
legiate circles in the Latin quarter. 
The police are in ' possession of 
astounding statistics tr'ative to Ihe 
spread of the morphine liabit. 



TO CUT AWAY 
ROCKY CLIFF 

Council Acts on Petition to 

Cut Superior Street 

Through. 

Will Ask Legislature for Au- 
thority to Issue $50,000 
in Bonds. 



The city council last evening passed 
a resolution directing the city attor- 
ney to prepare a bill to be presented 
to the legislature giving the city of 
Duluth authority to issue not to ex- 
ceed |r.0,000 of bonds for opening Su- 
perior street between Eighth aijd 
Fourteenth avenues west. 

The resolution was passed after the 
council had received a lengthy peti- 
tion asking that this be done. Under 
it the bill will enable the city, if it is 
passed, to operate a rock crushing 

plant and take such other steps as 
may be necessary to open the thor- 
oughfare. 

The petition pointed out that there 
is now but a single street for the 
heavy volume of traffic which passes 
westward from the center of the city. 
This single street contains double 
street car tracks, water, gas and sew- 
er pipes, conduits and the tunnel of 
the Soo railroad. If any of them go 
out of service so that it is neoes.'^ary 
to make repairs the already congested 
condition of the traffic becomes much 
worse. 

A ledge of rocks at each end of Su- 
perior street is all that closes the 
street. Those who have investigated 
the matter state that it will cost not 
more than $50,000 to remove them and 
improve the street. The petitioners as- 
sert that should it cost $100,000 the 
work should be done. They cite a 
number of Instances in which sim- 
ilar improvements have been paid for 
by general taxation. 

SCHOONE R^SCR EW SAFE. 

Capt. and Men of the Tiiton Land at 
Lunenburg. 

Lunenburg, N. S., Dec. 24. — Capt. 
Sprague and the crew of the American 
schooner Henry R. Tllton are safe in 
port here. They arrived on the 
schooner W. M. Zwicker, which picked 
them up last Friday night after their 
vessel had become water-logged in a 
heavy blow. The crew of the Tiiton 
liad been lashed to the masts for many 
hours when the Zwicker, bound from 
City Island, N. Y., for this port, provi- 
dentially came to the rescue. 

Boston dispatches Afonday announced 
that the Tiiton, abandoned and water- 
logged, had been towed into the shel- 
ter of Cape Cod by the steam trawler 
Swell and that fears were entertained 
for the safety of the crew. 

threeMicted" 
on w ord o f madam. 

New York, Dec. 24. — Indictments 
charging extortion and bribery were 
returnecT by the grand jury against 
Policeman John J. Shelly, Manny Maas, 
a beer bottler, and Sol AVolff, a saloon- 
keeper. 

The indictments are based on the 
testimony of Mrs. Mary Goode, former 
keeper of a disorderly house, and her 
negro maid, before tlie grand jury in 
connection with the alleged payment 
by Mrs. Goode of $25 "protection" 
money. 

Policeman Skelly is now being tried 
before a deputy police comm.issioner 
on charges growing out of Mrs. Goode's 
recent testimony before the alderm.anic 
committee investigating the police Ae-. 
partment. 

incorporatI"new 

m ining company 

Articles for incorporation for a 
$1,000,000 company were placed on file 
yesterday afternoon at the office of 
the register of deeds when the Cuyuna 
Sultana Iron company organized for 
business. The new concern is incor- 
porated to engage in exploring, leas- 
ing and dealing in mineral and other 
lands. 

The incorporators are named as L. 
L. Culbertson, George Waters and W. 
A. McClaren. all of Duluth. The officers 
are I* L. Culbertson, president; E. J. 
W^ Donahue, vice president; H. P. 
Proctor, secretary, and W. H. Locker, 
treasurer. The board of directors is 
constituted as follows: George Waters. 
E. J. Bunker, W. A. McClaren, H. P. 
Proctor, E. J. W. Donahue, J. E. Bow- 
ers. W. H. Denny, W. H. Locker, L. L. 
Culbertson, D. S. Clark and E. Y. 
Sarles. 

Mr. Sarles, one of the directors, is a 
former governor of North Dakota. An- 
other prom-inent financier mentioned in 
the list of directors is D. S. Clark of 
Eau Claire. Wis. 



STUDY RAILROAD 

C ASE Y ET MORE. 

Washington. Dec. 24. — Attorney Gen- 
eral Wickersham will follow up the in- 
dictments of officials of the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford and Grand 
Trunk railroads for Immediate con- 
sideration of the question whether civil 
suit should be instituted to restrain 
the two roads from pursuing their al- 
leged combination in violation of the 
Sherman anti-trust law. 



China AKkd More Time. 

London, Dec. 24. — A dispatch to the 
Times from Pekin says the Chinese 
government has requested the powers 
to agree to postpone the payment by 
China of the arrears in the Bo.\er in- 
demnity for another year. 



IT IS PERILOUS TO 

vNEGLECTA 
COUGH PR COLD 



It sows the seed for 
grippe, pneumonia or 
consumption. 

Don*t trifle with S5nrups 
and nostrums; take Scott's 
Emulsion which effectively 
drives out colds and builds 
strength and resistance- 
force to avoid sickness. 

Ask for and INSIST on SCOTTS. 

Scott & Bowne, Bloomfield, N. J. 12-76 





)ITH sincere appreciation 
for the splendid patron- 
age accorded, and for the 
magnificent Christmas 
spirit which has been at 
all times in evidence, we gratefully 
extend not only to those who con- 
tributed to make this our banner 
Christmas season, but also to all 
of the good people of Duluth and 
vicinity our best wishes for a 





tbc Glass Block Store 

"The Shopping Center of Duluth" 



She Can Tell the Difference — 

Tk Sweetest Gilt of All 



\V7IIEN selecting your Christmas Candies, be sure to 
^^ choose from the brands of well-known manu- 
facturers of wholesome and delicious Chocolates and 
Bon Bons. We have such well-known makes as 



Guth, Baltimore. 


Ingenook, St. Paul. 


Reymers, Pittsburg. 


Samoset, Boston. 


Park & Tilford, New 


Lowney 


York, Paris. 


Morse 





n 



Lyceum Pharmacy 

CORNER FIFTH AVE. WEST AND SUPERIOR ST. 

(Open All Day Christmas.) 




J 



"P 



eace on 



Eartli, 



Good ^A^lll Toward Men 



Tomorrow wc celebrate the birth of Christ, in the church, 
cathedral, and home, by sending one to the other expressions of 
good ^.ill and friendship, and by making little hearts very, very 
happy. 

Christmas is the most extensively celebrated day on earth. 
Every civilized and Christian country will observe it tomorrow. 
Sinter Blaas, as the children call good St. Nicholas in Holland; 
Weinoohtsman, or Christmas man. as he is known in Germany, 
Jean Noel, the distributor of gifts in France-. Krisiine, who brings 
the to:s in Norway, and Santa Claus, the best known of them all, 
w-ill play important parts in the imaginations of millions of little 
children. 

THE HERALD, on behalf of its advertisers, extends to you 
who read these little talks on the value of reading THK HER- 
ALD'S advertisements closely and constantly every day, a very 
MERRY CHRISTMAS. 



(CcKTighted. iri2. by J. P. Fal!on.) 




Cash and Opportunity 



You need more than ready cash for seiz- 
ing the right opportunity. 

Financial judgment is necessary to make 
a sound choice or detect a pitfall. 

The savings depositor with a capital 
gradually built from small, regular amounts 
has the opportunity to make up his mind 
beforehand on what It will take to satisfy 
him. The advice of the First National wul 
be a help, too. 



4 



First National Bank 

of Duluth. 
Capital and Surplus $2,000,000 




r 



6 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 



NEWS OF THE NORTHWEST I 



NE1 



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BEHER SEED 
PLAN^PULAR 

North Dakota Farmers and 

Seedsmen Interested in 

Prof. Bolley's Work. 



had studied fur trte priesthood in his 
native country. 



Agricultural College Spe- 
cialist Gets Many Inquiries 
About His Scheme. 



Vh 
The ; 

men 
pre II' 
food 
Boll. 
1,. •.. 
i> 

•!■ 
ealil. 
bell. 

1> 

s. 
1 . 

Kami' 
turii 

ex:»n 

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is 
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nuT, 
cial . 
■whi' 
Dur. 
bruit 
tin.-*. 
Ittt. 
pa rt : 
wiui . 
gresi 
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Inu: ! 
oftir 
liars 
four 
Tl; 
are i 
port , 
kota 
ernor. 



At,'! 



N' IV. Deo. I'l. — (.Special to 

riio farmers and seeds- 

\ It I; 1 »ukota are taking a 

■I interest in the state pure 

!■!>.■■ accordiim: to Prof. 

.^i it.' utjricultural eol- 

'i tlio pure seed work 

i'.ist two years," he 
: ' I:* Stevens and Camp- 
> direction, have ana- 
ami examined 11,629 
■ M.d to determine their 

r.s have collected 2,400 

! houses have volun- 

.li»0 simples and the 

^tta in S.liO samples for 

litest of owners the in- 

examined 17J fields of 

"] .■ bromu.s antl flax. 

of educational work 

•>vith tSie pure seed 
' d with the depart- 
. have organized spe- 
U, the mailing list of 
uh^d 216,000 names, 
two seasons this 
; out 1,288.000 bulle- 
!;lr.■^. 12.500 dictated 
4 that time mv de- 
lved 32,000 letters, 
me to indicate tlie 
Is being taken in 
. .;i i)Ure seed work. Dur- 
.1 two or three weeks this 
1 '-'Ut 2.1,000 seed calen- 
i <iuarter of a million 
^ l.ulletins." 
; and many other facts 
!• .1 In the biennial re- 
'r. y of the North Da- 

le i. :..... college to the gov- 



HOME 



GARDENING 
PRIZE WINNERS 



Cleveland Cliffs Co. Makes 
Awards Among Ash- 
land Mine Employes. 

Irn; I. Mich.. Dec. 24. — (Special to 

The II ; ild.t — The prize winners In 
the V levtland-Ciiffs Iron company's 
contests for hiinie gardening on the 
comp (i.d mine propertj' dur- 

ing t. .ainmer. have been an- 

nouni <L 'I'll.' loeal judges were as- 
sisted !)v W H. Moulton, who is in 
char- ature of the com- 

pan> prizes were donated 

pei-.-4oi:al!y by i'resident William J. 
-Math. !■ 

Til >rted great improve- 

TCeni - in all sections of 

the A.~U!..ii.t iix'ittion. 

The I mv, t.d p!lze each season Is 
that f •!■ the b. st kept premises, Will- 
lam •.; 1 tz. li'iii^^ the winner this year. 

Th' r.fUewiiig is a list of the win- 
ners : T !!M2. liest kept premises, spe- 
cial 5!'>, Mrs. Fedeli Bertone: 
flr.'<t >lt'. \\'illiam Gertz; second 
prize. .?,, .-- ":.;ymond; third prize, 
8*., A; toil \ cowsi; fourth prize, 
S3, .\;iie\v : ttfih prize, $2.50, 
Mieh;i.-1 Cvu- 

V •!;■ I Ml. -lis — First prize, $10, 

(^. .\. >m: second prize. $7, 

Jw.s ■[ ! < -i, n. tl'.ird prize, $5, Patrick 
Falu' . .'iiuith priz^', $3, Dominlck 
Mauii'; lUth prize, $2.50, Andrew 
Iloonis. 

i"!.. .--^ iu bed.'?, boxes, tubs and 
barr st prize. $7. Mrs. Theo- 

dore . . .-.^err.nd prize $5. Mrs. Wal- 

enty < U'lavav tik: third prize, $3; Mrs. 
Edvviv \\i !!..<-: fourth prize, $2.50, 
Mi-s. . \'.ii'/. 

Vi. lilt;- First prize, $7. ^Irs. 

Kusie il rulfieks: second prize, $5, 
Felix < ;i's^.>i ;. : tliird prize, $3. Joseph 
Si.ska : fniith prize. $2.50, Mrs. Samuel 
MeCr..s,<..n. 

Mr. Mov.lton made two trip.«? to the 
city d 1! ir.g thf past summer for the 
purp- >' Writ'lung the improve- 

ment It i eurefuUy judging the 
premi.-e.s. 



LUMBERJACK IS 

MURDER VICTIM 



Mich. Dec. 24. — Pavao 
an .-Vnstrian, known in 

country by the name of 
. was shot and instantly 
■.■■AC Toddra. a Hungarian, 
elDiiging to 7>like Jachie 
P oil the Carp river, :'if- 
.■'!u St. Ignace. Toddra 
i l>y Officer Rainey at 
and is now here in the 
So far as can be learned 
was unpremeditated and 
'(■ and was evidently more 
of carelessness and a 

^al than from any other 

lis was 33 years old, 
V ed by a wife and two 
•n, who are destitute and 
e.- Ill this country. The 
II was well educated. 
dUlerent languages and 



Sf f 


^tiace. 


Kleir; 


•' let. 


the y. : 


' iuiuic 


Paul 


■. -ul 


kille 


i » '» > 


in a ■ 


iLnii b 


at Dill 


s' eaiii 


teeli !i 


■r. 


^vns e 


I p! IIV' 'i 


Trout 


Lake 


conn I y 


jail. 


the ni 


iider 


Willi Mi; 


t rr.alif 


as u 


■.•snli 


drui 




cau.'^ 




and is 


.>ur\ 1 


young 


childit 


with' I! 


t rel:!! 


miud : 


'• d mi 


talked 


four 



KILLED WHILE 



STEALING RIDE 



Marquette Man Rides on 

Tender of Locomotive 

Falling to Death. 

Marciuette, Mich.. Dec. 24. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Hemming Johnson, 
aged 29. a former employe of the Soutli 
.Shore railway, fell under the wheels of 
a moving freight engine on the south 

track of the Third street railway cross- 
ing and was almost Instantly killed. 
The wheels of the tender and locomo- 
tive passed over his legs, mangling 
ihem horribly. It required ten min- 
utes to extricate his body from its po- 
sition between the snow plow and the 
pilot v.-heels of tlie engine. Before this 
had been accomplished he had passed 
away. 

No One Sav>- HUn. 

Xeither the fla.gman at the Baraga 
avenue or the Spring street crossings 
saw any one on the tender when the 
engine passed those points, and neithei- 
the engineer nor fireman .saw any one 
along the right-ot-way. It is sun- 
posed Jolmson boarded the tender to 
ride to the Fifth street crossing, on his 
way home, as he lived with his brotluM", 
William John.son, at 120 Xortii Sixth 
street. At one time he was employed 
by tho South Shore railway as a 
painter. 

SEES HOLEJNJHE LAW. 

Lawyer Asks Question About Com- 
mitments to Jag Farm. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Dec. 24.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — Discovery of a "painful 
interim," as provided by the law for 
commitment of patients to the state 
'jag farm." has been made by a county 
attorney. The statutes say that after 
a drunkard has been sentenced to the 
farm by a probate judge, permission 
to send the inebriate there must be 
obtained from the state board of con- 
trol before he will be received. 

Question — "What shall be done with 
the inebriate, pending the notification 
from tlie board of control? Shall he be 
put in jail?" 

The question was put up to the at- 
torney general's office yesterday. Fol- 
lowing is the repU- made by Assist- 
ant Attorney General Edgertbn: 

"The issuance of the warrant is 
based upon the assumption that it is 
dangerous for the patient to remain 
at large. The placing of this war- 
rant in the hands of an officer nec- 
essarilv clothes such otTicer with the 
authority to exercise reasonable re- 
straint. During the time the court 
is awaiting the notification froni the 
boar.l of conrol, it is mv opinion tluit 
tlie i)atient should not be confined in 
any jail, unless a judge certifies in 
writing that such confinement Is nec- 
essary. It Is also my opinion that 
during the pendency of such matter 
and before the patient is finally com- 
mitted, such person may be restrained 
and cared for in some suitable place 
to be designated by .=;uch judge." 



PROPOSE LAW CHANGES. 

Wisconsin Liquor Dealers Would Pre- 
vent Brewery Ownership of Saloons. 

Madison, Wis.. Dec. 24. — The State 
iletail Liquor Dealers' Protective as- 
sociation is planning new legislation 
that would make radical changes in 
their bu.'^iness. 

A new law making it a misdemeanor 
for a brewer or wliolesaler to be in- 
terested in the retail trade to the ex- 
tent of holding a lease on a build- 
ing used for retail purposes is pro- 
posed. The bill also would limit the 
number of saloons to one to every 
1,000 persons. 

Unscrupulous dealers who throw 
discredit on the entire business have 
made such legislation necessary, it 
was said. 



DEADLY GAME TRAPS. 

Ironwood Game Warden Comes Across 
Some Illegal Contrivance. 

Ironwood, ilich., Dec. 24. — (Special 

to The Herald.) — Deputy Game Wai-den 

Claude Larson has returned from a 

trip along the South .Shore railroad, 

north of this city, bringing a deadly 

contrivance in the way of a deer trap. 

Many of these traps were found near 
Covington In Baraga county, and the 
state game warden's department is 
putting forth every effort to bring to 
justice the setters as well as the 
makers of these deadly contrivances. 

The trap Is composed of tv.o pieces 
of scythe blades hinged at one end. 
A very heavy wire is securely fastened 
to one end of the other ends of the 
blade. The wire loop is suspended on 
a deer runway and if an animal should 
get into the snare its efforts to release 
itself would result in its neck being 
drawn Into the deadly scissors, and tho 
deer would be decapitated. 

STUDENTSSELECTED 

From Sandstone High School for De- 
bate at Coleraine. 

Sandstone, Minn., Dec. 24. — The 
Sandstone high school has selected 
these students to represent the school 
at the debate at Coleraine Jan. 10: 
Myrtle Percy, Douglas Lynds and Em- 
ery Loke. The following Christmas 
I)rogram was given in the high school 
before a crowded house. 

Song, "Hark, the Herald Angels 
Sing," high school ciiorus; song, "Silent 
Xight, Hallowed Night," Haydn quar- 
tet; e.isay, "The Meaning of Christ- 
mas," Eniery Loken: song, "Christmas 
.Songs and Carols." Victor mixed chor- 
us; farce. "The Night Befoie Christ- 



Head Aches? Co To Your Doctor 



Headaches. Headaches. Headaches. 

Biliousness. Biliousness. Biliousness. 

Constipation." Constipation. Constipation. 

Ayer's Pills. Ayer's Pills. Ayer's Pills. 

If your doctor j^ays'this is all right, remember it! 



Headaches. 
Biliousness. 
Constipation. 
Ayer's Pills. 

J. 0. Ayer Co.. 



CUNARD 

Cruises 







Unsurpassed Luxury and Comfort 



Madt^ira, Gibraltar, Algiers. Monaco, 
Naples. Alexandria 



"LACONIA" Jan. V 
•*FRANCONIA" Jan. 18 
"CARONIA" Jan. 30. Mar. 15 

STOPOVERS PERMITTED 
A LA OARTK WITHOUT CHARGB 

•EXPRESS SAILING JAN. 4tli 
Monaco Naples Alexandria 

For Particulars apply to 

THE CUNARD S. S. CO. Ud., 21 State SL, N. Y. 

OR LOCAl- AGENTS. 






^^^*' 

^^^. 



'^ 



mas." high school; "Eine Weihnachts- 
bescherung." kinderchor; reading, 'The 
Legend of the Chrysanthemum," Lucie 
Bullis; drill, 'Chrysanthemum Drill," 
eighth grade: selection, "Coming of 
the Year." church bells; recitation. 
'•"Twas the Night Before Christmas." 
Arne Jarvela; selection, "Adeste Flde- 
lls." Westminster chimes; song. "O 
Tannenbaum," German class; farce 
• Dat Christmas Dlnnah," high school; 
■f>ong of the Vikings," high school 
chorus. 



TIMBER LAND 



SALES HEAVY 



Auditor Iverson Sold About 
$150,000Worth in North- 
ern Minnesota. 

St, Paul, Minn.. Dec. 21.— Approxi- 
mately J150,0l)0 worth of timber on 
state lands was sold by State Auditor 
Iverson in the northern part of the 
state last week, according to an esti- 
mate made on his return. Of this 
amount. $50,000 has been paid in cash. 
The highest price paid for pine was 
|21 and this Is the record price in 
this state. The section which brought 
this was in Rt. Louis county. Tamarack 
ties were sold for l'6 cents each and 
spruce pulpwood for $3.50 a cord. 

"There was an active demand for 
all the timber." Mr. Iverson said, "and 
all I offered at public auction was sold. 
This timber is scattered, is in small 
tracts and w^as sold because part of 
it liad been burned over, some was 
down in windfalls and it was to pre- 
vent a complete loss that it was placed 
on the market." 



BOILER BLOW-UP 



IS NEARLY FATAL 



Three Threshers Are Scald- 
ed and Pieces of Iron 
Hurled Around. 

Mott, X. D., Dec. 2 4. — Pouring cold 
water into the partly empty boiler of 
a threshing engine on the Henry 
Jose farm, near Wells, west of her, 
caused an explosion that endangered 
the lives of six men standing near. 

The boiler head was blown against 
the separator, forty feet away, par- 
tially wrecking the machine, while 
other parts of the engine plowed up 
the dirt about the several men. 

Three men were injured, Christ Jose, 
the fireman, being scalded about the 
shoulders, while Adam Fischer and 
Jacob Luither were scalded about the 
face. 



MORE M ONEY NEEDED 

To Run Rural Schools, Says State 
Superintendent Schulz. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 2i. — A deficien- 
cy of $104,247 e.vists in the fund for 
aid to rural schools for the years 1S)11 
and 1912, according to the report of 
C. G. Schulz, superintendent of public 
instruction, in his annual report to 
Governor Eberhart. Mr. Schulz says: 

"The amount appropriated has been 
sufficient to pay high, graded and 
semi-graded school.^ in full for each 
year, and to pay the special aid tor 
industrial training inider the Putnam 
act and the Benson-Lee acts consoli- 
dated schools, for the year ending 
July 31, 1912. In order that consoli- 
dated schools and schools entitled to 
aid under the Benson-Lee act inay i e- 
ceive the full amount of aid for the 
pre.«ent school year, these appropria- 
tions made two years ago will need to 
be increased." 



DROP H ELLE R CASE. 

Embezzling Charge Against Former 
Miiwaukeean is Dismissed. 

rklilwaukcc, Wis., Dec. 2 1. — After hav- 
ing a charge of embezzling $102,000 
resting against him for seven yjars. 

a jury last March being unable to 
agree after deliberation for fifty-seven 
hours of the testimony of nine weeks, 
the case against Frank J. Heller, for- 
mer secretary of the Skarb Polski Mu- 
tual Loan & Building society, was dis- 
missed Alonday in municipal court by 
Judge K. B. Belden of Racine. 

After the alleged defalcation Heller 
disappeared for a number of years and 
later returned and gave himself up. It 
is undei-stood that full restitution has 
been made to tlie society. 



to 



KILLED BY BAR NDOOR. 

Pioneer of Marquette Crushed 
Death at Farm Near City. 

Marquette, Mich.. Dec. 24. — Funeral 
services were held from St. John's 
church this morning for Timothy 
Messier, a pioneer resident who was 
killed last Saturday night at his farm 
ten miles from the city where he had 
gone after wood when crushed be- 
neath a barn door weighing half a 
ton. 

He was born at An Sable Forks, N. 
Y.. in 1845. At the age of 17 years he 
came to Marquette with his brothers, 
all older than himself. When old 
enough for such work, he entered the 
employ of the South Shore railroad. 
He was actively engaged in this work 
until fifteen years ago. He had lived 
in this city exactly fifty years, and 
leaves scores of lifelong friends who 
will mourn his unexpected demise. 

Mr. Messier had four brothers, Jo- 
seph, James, King and Czar, all of 
this city, and two sisters, Mrs. Joseph 
Bolduc and Mrs. Abraham Fleury, also 
of this city. He was a member of the 
Societe St. Jean Baptiste, the mem- 
bers of which will attend the funeral 
In a body. 



BARS SOLICITING 

FO R HOLI DAY GIFT. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 24. — Breaking 
up a custom that has prevailed for 
years, word has been passed out from 
the governor's office that no general 
subscription paper is to be circulated 
in the capitol this Christmas to raise 
funds with which to buy him a present. 
If individual departments or individu- 
als wish to send presents to the execu 
tive, that is a personal matter with 
them alone, but the governor does not 
wish any subscription paper circulated 
for his benefit. 



for mansiRt^ifi^r, wa.«t atsignvd yes- 
terday by Warden HoUstroni _as. phy- 
.mI' ian in charge of thip prison hospi- 
tal. Heretofore the prison hospital 
has had to secure outside medical 
scrxlccs. 

Moellerlilas convicted for the kill 
ing of MilllfOina Lien of I'nion, N. D. 



V^'^^i 




■'%^®/9^'^/%i'^/9/9/%/^'^/^/% 



CORPSE "ARRESTED," 
SUPP OSEDL Y DRUNK. 

Grand Fork.s, N. D., Dec. 24. — The 
inquest Into the death of A. Johnson, 
the drunk arrested by the local police, 
who proved to be dead, showed that 
when the officers picked him up ho 
was apparently suffering from delirium 
tremens and they started to tie him 
to a cot to keep him still when they 
discovered life had fled. 



Dr. Moelier Penitentiary PhyMlefan. 

Bismarck, N. D., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Dr. Thor Moelier, who 
was brought to the state penitentiary 
last week to serve a ten-year aentence 



Peninsula Briefs 1 

('banning — Scheldt & Dekeuster of 
Wausaukea have taken a contract to 
bank 1,50*,»00 feet of hardwood tim- 
ber for the Kiel Woodenware company 
In the Channlng district of Dickin- 
son county. The logs will be banked 
on the St. Paul road at Mitchell spur, 
about ten miles west of Ciiannlng, and 
will be shipped over that road to Kiel, 
Wis., where they will be employed In 
tlie camp. 

Menominee— Tho slicing of beets at 
the Menominee sugar factory has been \ 
concluded for the season and about 1 
150 men have been laid off. The plant 
will close for the season during the 
present week, when another 150 men 
will be dismissed. 

Marquette — Thomas Lang, manager 
of the Duluth office of the Standard 
Oil company, left Sunday night for 
that place, after spending the week- 
end in the city. 

Calumet — Calumet lodge. F. & A. 
INI., will hold installation of officers on 
Friday night of this week. M. M. 
Morrison will be the installing officer. 

Hancock — Edward Scallon of Han- 
cock, a graduate of the Michigan Col- 
lege of Mines, has been made chief 
mining engineer of the Roger Brown 
company at Hibbing. Minn. Mr. Scal- 
lon has been located in Northern Min- 
nesota for the past two years. 

Calumet — Three carloads of tur- 
keys were received in Calumet Satur- 
day for the Christmas and New Year's 
trade. F. H. Schumaker, the Red 
Jacket dealer, received two tons of the 
fowl. 

Lake Linden — The Union of French 
Canadian societies has elected the fol- 
lowing officers: President. E. F. 
Prince; vice president, F. Lanctot; sec- 
retary, M. Bordeau; financier, Donat 
Proudhomme; treasurer, L. F. Shabot; 
guardian, Stanulus La Belle; trustee, 
Peten Muchad Omezine; gervairs. Jo- 
seph Prevonchier; spiritual advisor. 
M. J. Raymond. 

Houghton — '■ The Christmas issue of 
the Houghton high school paper, the 
Amygdaloid, has been issued to the 
high school subscribers. The many 
added features In the Amygdaloid this 
mcnin makes it superior to any of its 
previous issues. 

Hancock — -^"uneral services were 
held Sunday f Or John M. Shepperd. 
who died at liis home on Pine street 
Friday night of pneumonia. He was 
69 years of age and had resided in 
this city for a long period of years. 
He is survived by a son and daughter. 

Crystal Falls — The local aerie of 
Eagles has elected these officers: 
President, H. C. Buenger; vice presi- 
dent. Frank Koob; chaplain. S. G. 
Chadbourne; secretary, W. J. Gribble: 
treasurer, O. P. Larsen; Inside guard, 
John Bickley; outside guard, Joe 
Holkup; trustees, James H. Johnson. 
I. H. Jackson and Charles Neugeauer. 




Wisconsin Briefs 



I 



Milwaukee — Capt. William F. Ange- 
vine, a^ed 72, a veteran of the Civil 
war and a resident of this city for 
over thirty years, died suddenly Sun- 
day while alone in bis- room at 600 
Jefferson str.eet. His body was dis- 
covered bv his landlady. 

Grand llapids — The new St. Paul de- 
pot will be finished and open to the 
public on Christmas. Thi.s is strictly a 
passenger depot, the old building hav- 
ing been moved below ti»e water tank 
and will be used for a freight de- 
pot. 

Kenosha — The Fred Eck bathhouse 
and building blijck ^as destroyed by 
flre early Hund«af, tlie loss being esti- 
mated at $15,000 with partial insur- 
ance. 

Kenosha — State Senator Isaac T. 
Bishop of the Kenosha-Racine county 
district, who has been In a hospital 
in Chicago for the past month and a 
half, returned to his home in Somers 
Friday evening. Senator Bishop has 
entirely recovered his health and will 
leave next week for Madison for the 
sessions of the legislature. 

Portage — Wllke Collins, a Portage 
newspaper man, purchased the plant of 
the Badger Blade Publishing company 
at Rio and will take possession Jan. 1. 

Rhinelander — Mrs. Kdward Fry and 
George E. Noel of Three Lakes are in 
jail here awaiting trial on a charge 
preferred by the woman's husband. 

Madison — Fairchild post of the 
Grand army of this city has entered 
upon a campaign to make Col. Clem- 
ent E. Warner, one of Its members, 
department commander when the en- 
campment njeets at Keenah next June. 

River Falls — ytrs. Eliza Wynn. dis- 
trict secretary of the Daughters of Re- 
bekah of the Fifth Wisconsin district, 
died on Saturday at her home in Riv- 
er Falls. 



Dakota Briefs 



Dickinson, N. D. — The Dickinson Gun 
club has decided to hold a tournament 
next summer, the first held In this sec- 
tion of the state. Dates will be se- 
lected soon, and it is expected that 
the latter part of July will be deter- 
mined upon. 

Carrington, N. D. — John Stambaugh, 
former sheriff of Foster county, wants 
to be postmaster of Carrington and has 
placed petitions in circulation asking 
that he be named. The term of the 
present postmaster expires Jan. 1, 1914 
There will be several otlier candidates 
in the field soon. 

Dickinson, N. D. — The site for the 
Federal building which will be erected 
in Dickinson has been selected after 
two years' of controversies. The so- 
called Wiley site is selected. 

Minot, N. D. — Knute Robely, who has 
been janitor at the Central school for 
the last four years, has resigned to 
return to Norway. Many of the chil- 
dren wept when they said good-bye to 
Mr. Robely. and he himself had diffi- 
culty In controlling his emotion. 

Bismarck, N. D. — Several men are 
being employed In setting the capitol 
restaurant in readiness for the session. 
The department Is being renovated 
and repaired. 

Fargo, N. D. — Fargo showed twenty- 
seven births and the same number of 
deaths during the month of November, 
according to the monthly bulletin of 
the state board of health. Of the 
deaths twenty-one were residents and 
six were non-residents. The report for 
the state shows a total of 758 birth:< 
and 229 deaths, with almost every 
county reporting. 

Minot, N. D. — G. G. W'oods of Ken- 
mare was acquitted in county court of 
a charge of practicing medicine with- 
out a license. The case against L. .L 
"V^'oods, his wife, waS''aismlssed Friday 
afternoon. 

Devils Lake, N. D, — H. G. Hanson of 



^GOUGH? 



Stop It quick, with Kondon's the orteli 

and BenuineCatarrhoIJoIly. Soothes theln 

e<l tissues- heals tUo raw places— slops the tickle. ' 

Splendid tor coldH, catarrh, sore throat, etc. Plea»-| 

ant and pure. Over 13 nallllon tubes already sold. 

Get Kondon's. In saQltarf 25c or&Oc tubes. M oney 

back If It talis. At druggist CTerywhere. 

Sample FRKE. 

KONDON MFC. CO., MInn*apoii», Minn. 



ONDONS 






v':HHKf»riH?-n-';;(?''J^HJ'f-H^;<H-'J?K'H;^;^^i^ 




8 



IliiillillllliilliiiillllllllllllDlMllill 



All you have to do is to ask for Schlitz 
in Brown Bottles. 

Sunlight grows hops, but spoils the beer. 

"Beer acted upon by light soon takes up 
the very disagreeable, so-called * light 
taste,' and also a repulsive, skunk-like odor," 

says no less an authority than the Wahl-Henius Institute 
of Fcrmentology, the scientific authorities on 
the subject. " Beer so affected," they say, "is 
offensive to the palate of most consumers." 

Light starts decay even in pure beer. Dark glass 
gives the best protection against light. The Brown 
Bottle protects Schlitz purity from the brewery to 
your glass. 

Why don't you, too, drink Schlitz? More and 
more people every year are demanding it. 

We started in a hut. Today our agencies 
dot the earth. Our output exceeds a million 
barrels a year. 

Phones ^?:L«]'-°f%.^ 

( Grand 3a8 

^ee that crown or cork Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. 
is branded ' ' Schlitz, " 35 1 St. Croi < Ave., Duluth. 




The Beer 
That Made Milwaukee Famous 




^^ 



Larlmore Is at Devils Lake superin- 
tending the packing of the Great 
Northern ice house. Mr. Hanson lias 
had this work In charge here ever since 
the erection of the big house. 

Minot, N. D. — Dr. Thor Moelier of 
Velva has been taken to the state 
prison at Bismarck by .Sheriff Edward 
Kelley to begin serving a ten-year 
sentence for the murder of Gina Lien, 
music teacher of Loraine, N. D. 

Grand Forks, N. D. — Gladys Schnack- 
er, employed in the Klondike restau- 
rant, made an unsuccessful attempt to 
commit suicide Saturday. She swal- 
lowed several capsules of poison, but a 
doctor was summoned in time to save 
her life, although she Is still in a 
weakened condition as a result of the 
attempt. 

Fargo, N. D. — Xorth Dakota will 
have a new probate code soon after 
the meeting of the state legi.slature in 
.January. A commission appointed by 
Governor John Burke to revise the 
present probate laws has completed 
its work and the result of its findings 
is now being Incorporated into an ex- 
haustive report, whicli will be pre- 
sented to the lawmakers. 



ports 18 bushels of flax and 20 bushels 

of wheat to the acre. The yield would 

have been much greater had the fall 

season been favorable. The fifty-acre 

field of Mr. Landljy's is timber-cleared 
land. 

Kelliher — Alderman J. B. Ander- 
son swore out a warrant last week 
for the arrest of H. White for using 
improper language to him in front of 
his restaurant. The parties appeared 
before .Justice Gilmour. Mr. White 
pleaded guilty tp the allegations and 
was tliereupon lined J5, and costs 
amounting to JT.iiO. 

Thief River Falls — Harry Bram- 



n ond, who has been conducting the 
Ogema hotel in this city for a year 
past, lias secured possession of the 
building recently vacated by the Hotel 

Evelyn and will oi-cupy the building 
the first of the year. 

Minneapolis — W. W. Ehle, former 
alderman of the Twelftii ward, died 
Sunday at his home, 3025 Twenty-third 
avenue south, after a lingering illness. 
He was 62 years old and had been a 
resident of ilinnoapolis for more than 
?0 years. Mr. Elile was born in New 
Lisbon, .Tuneau county, %\"i.'»oonRin, on 
Feb. 22, 1S60, and came to this city 
in 1879. 



1 Minnesota Briefs 



Baudetto — Theodore Stabakken and 
his neiglibor, Carl Dahlman, both of 
Carp postoffice, eacli brought in four 
live cross foxes. The former sold his 
quartet for the neat sum of $32.5 and 
Mr. Dahlman also aold his four for a 
fancy price. 

Red Lake Falls — Pierre Sancastier, 
one of the pioneer residents, died last 
w(ek. Mr. Sancastier was 78 years 
old and had been a resident of Red 
Lake county for many years. He Is 
survived by his widow and nine chil- 
dren, five " sons and four daughters, 
besides other relatives. 

Mllaca — C. H. Hammerberg, butter- 
mcker at the local farmers' creamery, 
was elected vice president at the but- 
termakers' convention In Wadena. 

Deer River — Miss Sarah Armstrong 
lias returned from Duluth, where she 
is attending school, to spend the holi- 
day vacation with her parents, Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas Armstrong, at Island 
Lake. 

Badger — Word has been received 
by Postmaster Peterson that Rural 
Route No. 1 out of Badger has been 
established and the delivery of mail 
to the farmers along the route will be 
commenced March 1. The route will 
extend over a distance of about thirty 
miles north and west of Badger. 

St. Cloud — Because of the death of 
his wife and daughter and injuries 
sustained bv himself. Harry Dyer of 
this city has started actions against 
the Soo railroad and the cases. It is 
understood, will be tried at the March 
term of court. The case brought as 
a result of his own injuries has 
already been started and the papers 
in the other actions will be served 
siiortly. 

Aitkin — Dr. Nelson of Bralnerd, a 
veterinary surgeon,' spent two days 
here administering the tuberculosis 
test to the Guernsey herd at the Graves 
& Murphy farm. He found no trace 
of the disease. 

Roseau — A. M. Landby Of Swift re- 




i* 






This Is The Train 



For You 



Lake 
Superi 
Limited 
DaUy 

Electric-lij^hted 
Observation-Caf«! Car 
Parlor Car and 
Coaches 



Lv Duluth. . . . 1:55pm 
Lv Superior . . . 2:24 pm 
Ar St. Paul . . . 6:45 pm 
Ar Minneaptolis . 7 :20 njm 
Similarly quick schedule 
returning 

Two other ^ood 
trains each way 

TICKETS 

334 W. Superior Street. Duhtlh 

fiJO Tower Avenue, Superior 

or at Stations 



A. M. CLELAND. C.P.A^ ST. PAUL 



Twin Ports 

to 

St. Paul 

Minneapolis 

Those "Great 

Bi£ Baked Potatoes" 

Are 

Toothsome I 



Northern PaciBc Ry: "Duluth Short Line" 



i 






Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 




t>ectmhtT 24, 1012. 








THE 



4-Coriicrs Buffet 



WALTER GRAMS, Prop. 

431 EAST FOURTH ST. 



The home-like place where a cheerful and pleasant 
smile awaits you at all times. 

The Best of Wines^ Liquors 
and Cigqrs Always On Hand. 

We Wish Our Many Patrons and Others a 
Merry Christmas and a Prosperous New Year. 



WisMHg Jill a merry CDrist mas m a Bappy new Se«r. 



7A> 



Park Hotel Buffet 

ELI RATKOVICH, Prop. 

Corner 6th Avenue West and Superior Street 



Watch for the Grand Opening of the hotel, which will be ready for 
business soon. The Park Hotel is centrally located, new and up-to-date; 
hot and cold water and all modern conveniences. The best medium priced 
hotel that Duluth w^ill have. Old Phone, Melrose 1673. 






Vuktjde 




reedngs 



If at home or abroad you feel ill. 
Seek relief in using "OW Red Still*' 



A Merry 

Christmas to 

All Our Patrons 

and your patronage for 
the past year appre- 
ciated, hoping for a con- 
tinuance of the same for 
1913. 

Duluth Ice Co. 

4 East First Street. 

(Both Phonfs.) 




ThcV 

1031^ East Superior St. 

G. HA GEN, 
Prop. 



Wishes All a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy 
New Year. 



Merry Dinner Parties 
With Bar Service 

Also Business Men's 
Lunch Served Daily 

—AT— 

Hanson's Cale 

BOYLE S OLD STAND 

37 West Suptrior Street 



ۥ eetlngs and J\ merry 
eDristmas to Jill 

WM. McCULLOUGH, Prop. 



THE FAVORITE SALOON 
ON EAST FOURTH ST. 



Osar Fleer's 



WHERE YOU ARE CORDIALLY 
WELCOMED AT ALL TIAIES. 



merry Cbriutmas to Jill! 



DON'T FORGET TO 
MEET ME AT THE 



LYCEUM 
BUFFET 

421 West Superior St. 

J, B. Coughlin and 
Fred Hartledge, Props. 



The finest of Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars always on hand. 

The Cleanest and Nicest 

Place for Business Men 

to Eat Their Noon 

Lunch in the City. 

Don 7 Overlook 

the Old' Time 

Sportsman 

John Wold 

413 East Fourth St. 



Everything the Best and Every- 
body Always Welcome. 

Wishes All a Merry 
Christmas and a 
Happy New Year 



Lanigan's 

Chop House 

415 West Superior St. 

Buffet in Connection 



The Best Place in the City for 

Business Men to Take 

Their Noon Lunch. 



A\'ishes the Public a Merrv 
Christmas and a Happy 
New Yeai:« 



Cbe ebristmas 

Spirit in 

Eoery gup 



M. Monson 

617 West Superior St. 




A Merry Christmas 
and Happy and Pros- 
perous New Year to 
My Patrons and Others 



Your A ttendance Is 
Appreciated by 

John H. Carlson 

507 West Superior Sirecl 

—DEALER IN— 

Choice Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars 



n merry Cbristmas to Jill 



(Zenith Phone, Grand 1334.) 

The Most Sanitary and Best Daylight 
Hotel in the City of Duluth, 

PEOPLE'S HOTEL 

CAVASIN & GLEESON 

246, 248 and 260 Lake Avenue South, 
DULUTH, MINN. 

RATKS — American, $1 and up; European, 50e and up. 



Steam Heat 
Electric Ijiffht 
3pen Day and Xlprht 



Modern Buildings 
Modern Conveniences 
Xew Furniture 



Wishing You a Merry Christmas. 



Chrisimas Greetings From 

CHAS. J. 
ENGSTROM, 

630 West Superior St. 



Don't forget I handle a complete line of 
Excellent Wines, Liquors and Cigars. 



YOU WILL FIND YOUR FAVORITE 
PRLXK HERE. 



I'LL MEET YOU AT 

Cook's Buffet, 

527 West Michigan St 

—OR AT— 

528V3 West Superior St. 

Where you can enjoy Good Wines, Liquors 
and HOME-MADE CIGARS. 



May This Be a Good Old Merry 
Christmas to AIL 



Blanckt Hotel 

H. BLANCH ET, Prop. 

Buffet in Connection 

620 and 522 Lake Avenue South. 



The best steam heated brick build- 
in the city, with excellent table board, 
either by the daj^', week or month. 

Merry Christmas to All! 



Wishing Alia Merry 

Christmas and a 

Happy and Pros- 

perous New 

Year! 




European Hotel 
and Chop House 

319 West Superior Street, 
DULUTH. 

Both Phones Xo. 12. 

THE NAME IS SUFFICIENT 
AS HIS GOODS. 

Peter 
BesGlienbDssel 

416 East Fourth St. 

THE QUALITY HOUSE OF 

Choice Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars 

■Make Him a Call. 

He Wishes All a Merry 

Christmas and 

a Happy New Year. 

Zenith Plione 1977.Y. 



When You Want a 

(lood Drink of 

Bourbon 

Don't Forget to Ask for 

Old Blue Ribbon 



Always in the "Tea Pot** 



CHAS. LANGBRIDGE, 

Ttie McKay Hotel Buffet. 

A Merry Christmas To All. 




^Wr/,'ArJii^'''- 




D. Butler's 

BUFFET 

(Successor to Al Salter.) 

220 East Superior St., 

Carries the best line of 
Wines, Liquors and Ci- 
gars, and wishes every- 
body a Merry Christmas 
and a Happy and Pros- 
perous New Y'ear. 



Theatrical 
Headquarters 



The 
Kalserbof 

Corner Lake Avenue 
and Superior Street 

Wishes Alia Merry 

Christmas and a 

Happy New Year 



Everybody Knotvs the Reliable 

Ormonde Hotel 

M. J. GLEESON, Prop. 
BfJKFEX IIM COIMIMECTIOIM 

221 and 223 Lake Avenue South. 

THE HOME-LIKE PLACE WHERE YOU 
GET THE BEST OF EVERYTHING. 



Wishing All a Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year. 



STOCKHOLM 
SALOON 

609 West Superior St. 

CH.\S. R. CARLSON, Prop. 

Clioice Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars 

Wishes all a Merry i^hrist- 
mas and a Happy New 
\>ar. 

Olil Phone, Melrose 2631. 



Mctropole Hotel 

EUROPEAN — 

Buffet in Connection 

Just O.f Superior Street on Lake Ave, South. 

JOSEPH KENNY, Prop. 

EVERYTHING NEW, 
STRICTLY UP-TO-DATE 



m%U% m\ a merry Cbristittas 
and a fiappy new year 



J\ merry 

€bn$tina$ to Jill 

and my kindest acknowledgment of the most 
liberal patronage accorded me this past sea- 
son. Hoping that I have your good wishes 
for the coming year I wish you all a Ilappv 
and Prosperous New Year. 

DOLPH TIFER 



350 LAKE AVENUE SOUTH. 




Co m 3olly eood fellows a 

merry €brl$titia$ 

ana a l^appy new Vear 



\\'ith Best Wishes of the Season from 

BERNARD J. 
MADDEN, 

505 West Superior Street, Duluth. 



CHRIS 
TRACEY, 

WestDuluth's 
Most Popular Buffet. 

5610 Raleigh Street. 

\Mshes Y'ou All a Merry 

Christmas and a Happy 

New Year. 



Tlie Peerless Bar 

JOHN Mclennan, Prop. 

Clioice Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars 

11 East Superior Street 

NEW PHONE 837 



n merry €bri$tma$ to Jill 



MANHATTAN 
WINE HOUSE 

The Home of the Best Domestic and Imported 
Wines and Liquors to Be Found. 

CARLSON BROS., Proprietors 

15 West Superior Street. 

Wishe? tn thank its patrqns for theff past fa- 
vors and to wish all a M^ry .Christmas and a 



Happy New Year 
B9 



Peterson's Buffet 

Ed. and Pete Pelerson, Props. 

Wines, Liquors 
and Cigars. 

118 East Superior Street 
Also 10 Lake Avenue South, 



Telephones— 

Zenith, Grand 1104 
DuIaUi, Meh'oso 2480 



Telephone^— 

JO Lake Avcnne i^iith, 
Zenith. Grand 878-D 



Wlsh^ You All a Merry Christmas. 



Beonie VaiFs Place 

No. 1 West Superior Street 



Don't forget my big Free Turkey 
Lunch Christmas' day. Receipts of 
the day go to the help'of the house. 



Wishing All 

A Merry Christmas 

and A Happy New Year 








1 



8 




Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 



THE DULUTH HERALD 

AN INOEF£ND£NT NEWSPAPEit. 

PubliMhcd every eve«iBK except Sun- 
day by The Herald Company. 

Both Tolephom-s — Business OJ'iice, 324; 
Kditorial Rooms. 1126. 



Eiterel a» seci>n<l-cla« matter at the Duluth poat- 
oftloe unJer the act of cnngreia of March 3, 1870. 

OrFIlJAl PAPER, CITY OF DILITH 

6lB»(t UlFTIO.\ HATES — By mall pay- 
abl- in advance, one month, 35 cents; 
throe months, fl; six months. $2; one 
year, 54; Saturday Herald. $1 i>er 
year; Wetkly Herald, $1 per year. 

Daily by ciurier. eity and suburbs, 10 
cent.s .1 \\-i »-ii. 4j tents a month. 
SubstTilv-, ,1 I' roiifsr a favor by maklns knonn 

»i;y co:i:i.': ' rvlcif. 

Wtnii o;:— . . i ilii- address of your pai>er. It Is 

ln:portant to give t>otlt old and uew addresses. 



Tile l»ul!ni Herald accepts adver- 
tising; iKiit? ; ts with the distinct guar- 
anty that it iKis the largest circulation 
In Minne.>ota outside the Twin Cities. 



FOR EFFICIENT CITY GOVERNMENT. 

The purpose — and the sole purpose 
— of the i>lau which the city council 
last cvcnins; asked the finance coni- 
nittte t.« invc-tiyate is to provide for 
the city commission soon to be elected 
a tc ■ \n of organization of the 

city J, i.cnt that shall co-ordi- 
nate a!! tic ii'.uctions of the city gov- 
ernmeiu in a plan as simple, as di- 
rect. a> I ;cal and as efficient 
as ii'.^c ■.;it_\ I. Ill devise. 

Mauifv^tly. s:;ch work requires an 
expert— ii an expert in some single 
line of city business, not a collection 
of experts in various branches, but an 
expert in this very work of co-ordi- 
ratiuii the details of city business into 
a harniouioiis and efficient whole. 

If there ar ■ -'.ich experts — and there 
are niatsy oi llicm. it is said — it will 
pay the city handsomely to employ 
one. In Dr. B. M. Rastall, secretary 
of the Huluth industrial commission, 
DuUttii i.i- an expert in municipal ef- 
ficiency, hnl tnifortnnately his of- 
ficial duties will prevent his doing 
the work. The finance committee of 
the council will be able to get valuable 
advice from him, however, and The 
Herald sui^gests that the committee 
ask hi".i t'> give such information as 
lie may wish to contribute to the 
cause <>i the best possible city gov- 
ernruon* i.>r Duluth. 

Duluth has the best city charter in 
the liiited States, and it wants the 
best city l; ivernment. The commis- 
sion, when elected, if it is given the 
advai.tage of an expert's investigation 
and -' -;>-;>-• -.tii>ns. will be able to create 
the best city government in the 
country; and The Herald hopes to 
see that not only because it will give 
DdUtth groat direct benefits, but be- 
cause it will insure that hereafter, in- 
stead of the "Galveston plan" or the 
*'Dcs Moines" plan, people will talk 
about the "Duluth plan." There will 
be an incalculable advertising value in 
possessing a city government which 
city governments to be formed in the 
future will make their model. 

The matter is in the hands of Alder- 
men Jordan, Gibson and Makowski, 
the mcr.bcrs of the finance committee 
of the coin!nr»n council. They have 
an opp «; t -'.iity to be of enormous 
service to the city, and The Herald 
wishes them success in the enterprise 
which tiie council has committed to 
them. 



No reports yet as to -whether the 
Buffra^ist women walking: through 
Bleepy Holl.nv were met and joined by 
the siiade ol Ivatrina Van Tassel. 



ABOUT DULUTH. 

Th.e New York Press has bee*i try- 
ing, in a mild and courteous way, to 
have a little fun with Duluth. 

In a recent issue it had a piece 

about til is city, which follows: 

Duluth is tlie queerest city In 
America. Some one lias described It 
as twenty mile.s long, a mile wide 
anl iialf a mile high. That is not 
a !>ad description. The hills come 
dou-n almost to the sliores of Lake 
superior, the great wnsalted sea. 
The Zenith Ciiy, made famous by 
Proctor Knott's speech, stretches 
on the liiU.side for twenty miles. 
It is the greatest outdoor town In 
the world. You can catch -trout 
and shoot bear, moose and deer 
witiiin tlie limits of the city. One 
fall recently after a forest fire 
thirty black bears were killed 
within the city limits. The gii-ls and 
boys enjoy themselves in winter by 
traveling about on skis. They go 
ten or fifteen miles into tiie coun- 
try and then ski back. Winter 
camp tires are as common as 
bridge parties in the East. 

We cannot quarrel with the spirit 
of these comments, though we may 
with some of the statistics. W'e are 
used to .|he ancient joke about Du- 
luth being so many miles long, so 
few miles wide, and so many miles 
high. It's a li'uel, of course; but it's a 
joke we laugh at when we make it, 
so we must laugh when others make 
it. W'e may be glad that the Press 
did not repeat those other old jokes 
about the fellow who said the coldest 
winter he ever experienced was a 
summer in Duluth, and the other fel- 
low who said that Duluth had three 
seasons — July, August and winter. 

The joke about the wild life in the 
city limits i§ newer, but rather thread- 
bare. Because a bewildered bear or 
two happened to wander into the city 
one time, and an insane dear was 
killed in the outskirts another time, 
our outside friends delight in profess- 
ing to believe that wild animals 
mingle with the throng on Superior 
street. Of course they don't really 
believe it, but they like to make us 
think the}' do. 

That about outdoor life in Duluth 
is true— and it's "the goods." Duluth 
IS the greatest outdoor town in the 



^'©^'®/&3^'&'9,'&'@;^'3^'S^'»«^;^l)^'9/®^'^^^-3%»9^^^i%«<9/«^^/^a^«%%%^«^«1g^i& 



iETHLEHEM TOWN 




® Eu^GflG f\Q0P 



T 



HERE burns a star o'er Bethlehem town- 
See, O my eyes! 
And gloriously it beameth down 
Upon a virgin mother meek 
And Him whom solemn Magi seek. 
Burn on, O star! and be the light 
To guide us all to Him this night 1 



# 



The angels walk in Bethlehem town — 

Hush, O my heart! 
The angels come and bring a crown 
To him, our- Saviour and our King; 
And sweetly all this night they sing. 
Sing on in rapturous angel tluong, 
That we may learn that heavenly songi 

N^ear Bethlehem town there blooms a tree — • 

O heart, beat low! 
And it shall stand on Calvary! 
But from the shade thereof we turn 
Unto the star that still shall burn 
AVhen Christ is dead and risen again 
To mind us that He died for men. 

There is a cry in Bethlehem town — 

Hark. O my soul! 
'Tis of the Babe that wears the crown. 
It telleth us that man is free — 
That He redeemeth all and me! 
The night is sped — behold the morn! 
Sing, O my soul; the Christ is boriu 



world. But even here a stranger from 
Altruria might get the notion from 
what the Press says that it is an out- 
door town only in the winter. It's 
an outdoor town the year around, and 
csp»ecially in the summer when cool, 
perfect daj's follow cool, perfect 
nights, when the clean, clear, fresh 
air cures hay fever, asthma, corns, 
bunions and warts, and when you can 
work or play at your highest pitch 
while toiling millions melt in the heat 
of other places. 

Duluth IS the greatest outdoor 
town in the world. There is still 
more outdoors here than there is 
anywhere else on earth, and it's the 
very finest outdoors you ever ex- 
perienced. Having observed Duluth 
as an outdoor town in winter, we 
hope the Press man will come here 
some time and observe Duluth as an 
outdoor town in summer. Then he 
\V'ILL have something to write about. 



That man who drove off th ; pack of 
wolves with some lighted cjgars gave 
undeniable support to the timehonored 
stories about the Christmas smudges. 



THE HEART OF THE ISSUES. 

In his splendid address given upon 
his return from Bermuda, Governor 
Wilson put in a few words the hope 
and aspiration that animate those who 
are working and fighting k>r better 
things in the nation: 

Make prosperity accessible to the 
great b.ulk of the people, and a 
new nation will seem to rise up 
under vour wand and it will have a 
great creative ze.st that can come 
from the univers^al liope of the 
people and from nothing else. As 
long as heads are bowed this mar- 
vel cannot be wrought. The vi-sion 
must be made near enough to seem 
possible of achievement. 

This nation too long was con- 
tented with mere bulk prosperity. 
Now it is now longer contented with 
bulk, but demands the prosperity of 
all. Misleading statistics showing a 
huge bulk of wealth, with formidable 
averages arrived at by dividing the 
total by the number of people, have 
fooled us long enough. Today the 
people are realizing that there is no 
real prosperity where one per cent 
owns ninety per cent of the wealth. 

"Make prosperity accessible to the 
great bulk of the people" is the slogan 
of the new and peaceful revolution 
that is transforming the national life 
— and Woodrow Wilson is its spokes- 
man and leader. 



tail of its specifications, The Herald 
is inclined to the belief that eight oer 
cent of the voters should be required 
to invoke the referendum, that ten per 
cent should bo able to invoke the ini- 
tiative, that constitutional amendments 
at least should not be adopted except 
by a majority of those voting AT 
THE ELECTION', that possibly it 
would be better to require a majority 
of those voting at the election in all 
cases, instead of a mere majority of 
those voting on the propositions, that 
petitions should have a certain pro- 
portion of their signers in each of 
ten or twelve counties, and that there 
should be no referendum by legisla- 
tive bodies. On the last point we are 
quite clear, for the provision in many 
direct legislation laws allowing the 
legislature to refer measures to the 
people, in practice simply means giv- 
ing the lawmakers a chance to evade 
responsibility on ticklish issues. 

And of course these measures 
should be accompanied by the recall, 
with workable percentages — say ten 
per cent in the state at large, fifteen 
per cent in congressional districts and 
twenty-five per cent in smaller units. 



iConsidering that so many people 
claim baseball is scientific, it's re- 
markable that Chance cuts such a 
figure in it even out of season. 

THE OPENCOURT 

(Readers of The Herald are Invited to make free 
use of this column to express their ideas about the 
toiilcs of general Interest, lut discussion of sectarian 
religious ("KTerences are barred. Letters should uot 
exceed 300 words— tlie shorter the better. They must 
be written on one side of the paper only, and they 
must be accompanied in every case by the name and 
address of the writer, though these need not be pub- 
lished. A signed letter is always mora eSecUve, 
however.) 



HIRING EXPERTS. 



Now don't forpret to have them made 
of asbestos — and also to have a oail 
of water cluse under the shade of the 
old Christmas tree. 

DIRECT LEGISLATION. 

One of the first great duties of the 
Minnesota legislature at its coming 
session, if not THE FIRST great 
duty, is to prepare and submit to the 
voters a proposed constitutional 
amendment providing for direct legis- 
lation. 

There is no question that this will 
be brought up, and there is little ques- 
tion that action will be taken — none 
whatever if everybody concerned 
sees certain things clearly and acts 
accordingly. 

Two of the most important things 
to be remembered are these: 

First — That those who propose too 
high percentages on the petitions in- 
voking either the initiative or the ref- 
erendum, or who propose amend- 
ments making them or either of them 
practically unworkable, arc enemies 
of direct legislation, whatever their 
protests to the contrar)'. 

Second — That those who propose 
too low percentages, or a system too 
easily invoked, are mistaken friends 
of direct legislation whose efforts, if 
successful, would almost certainly 
bring these tools of democracy into 
undeserved reproach. 

Without being wedded to any de- 



To the Editor of The Herald: 

Now that the effects of the inebriety 
caused by the satisfying realization of 
having secured a new charter have, in 
a measure, worn off, and we have com- 
pleted our "fussing" about Christmas, 
so that we can calmly sit down and 
think for a few moments in a sane 
condition of mind, the return of good 
sense is apparent and I wisli to ex- 
press my approval of the action of tlie 
city council in rejecting the efforts 
made to anticipate the work of the 
commissioners by providing for the 
hiring of experts to formulate plans 
and specifications for the government 
of those commissioners wliom we are 
going to elect soon. I am also glad to 
note that several of the present city 
officials have expressed tliemselves as 
being unable to see the use of such 
experts at this time. 

In my opinion it would not only be 
a useless expenditure of money, but 
would be liarmful in its results. Let 
us consider, for a few moments: The 
present city charter, which has been 
so generally execrated and criticized, 
is the outgrowth of civic conditions 
following the Duluth real estate boom; 
bj" the city cliarter which preceded tliis 
present cliarter some provisions made 
it possible . for the city council to run 
in debt, and in conformity with the 
demands of owners and agents of real 
estate elaborate plans were made to 
build up the city beyond Its needs and 
pile up an indebtedness, and it was so 
done; but when the inevitable battom 
fell out the instigators ducked and left 
the city council to take the blame and 
stand up to the mark. To prevent a 
recurrence of this condition the cash 
basis system was Inaugurated througii 
the present charter, but under the im- 
pression that no matter who was 
elected they would be dishonest. We, 
Us & Co., the people of Duluth, pro- 
ceeded to tie up the liands of tlie offi- 
cials we were going to elect and did it 
so effectually that we tied up the 
whole machiner.e. denied the e.xercise 
of indivilual initiative, made it so that 
the most capable man in the world 
could be no more useful than a stupid 
one, and have amused ourselves since 
the adoption of this present city cliar- 
ter in damning the board of public 
works for doing wliat ^^e insist they 
shall do and for not doing what we 
have insisted they cannot do. As the 
years rolled around we, the same Us 
& Co., found out that tlie city gov- 
ernment was a purely business affair, 
and, to be successful, must be run un- 
der modern business rules which have 
been proven eminently satisfactory in 
other business enterprises, chief 
amongst which essentials is the plac- 
ing of the responsibility where it) can 
be reached easily; secondl^', hfrlng' 
competent men, payjrng; them a proper 
salary, and giving them the fullest 
opportunity to m3k«- good. 

This, withfn the state laws and what 



we believe |^ b^ are the main essen- 
tials and desiderata of civic govern- 
ment, is contained in the new city 
charter, but we do not seem to be will- 
ing to have the good features taken 
advantage of; we have already lost 
lonfidence in oiir.selves that we will 
elect tlie proper kind of officials, (in 
my opinion the maker, or the marrer 
at tlie whole reform), and we want to 
forestall an>» action on the part of 
those unknown men by tlelng them up 
through the opinions of some the- 
oretical dabbler in civic affairs with 
his experience either from some col- 
lege, or frokpi some other city whose 
needs are not at all similar to our own. 

Why not proceed along sane lines, 
step by step; the next tiling is elect 
your commissioners; let them be un- 
manaeled, unprejudiced, either by East 
end, West end, north or south inter- 
ests, or by any racial or social claim, 
the main qualifications being an hon- 
est, broad-minded, capable, experi- 
enced, safe, American citizen of Du- 
luth. Let them take their seats and 
study the situation. If they want as- 
sistance they will have sense enough 
to get some person who will be of 
some real value to the city; give the 
commission a cliance; it will talie time, 
but city building is a big undertaking. 
Yours, T. W. HUGO. 

Duluth, Dec. 2«. 



Mr. Hugo seems to mistake the pur- 
pose of the plan to provide an expert 
organization of the city government 
for the guidance of the city commis- 
sioners. Nobody proposes to "tie them 
up" and they can't be tied up. No- 
body proposes employing a "theoret- 
ical dabbler," but an expert — and the 
test of an expert is practicality. Mr. 
Hugo is an expert In engines — would 
he care to be called a "theoretical 
dabbler"? The plan is to make a sur- 
vey of the various branches of city 
business and to weld them into a com- 
pact, simple, efficient and economical 
system. The cammlssioners would not 
be bound 'to actSept the plan offered 
them, but they could accept the infor- 
mation contained in it, adopt the pro- 
posed plan as > working basis, and 
improve upoa it- as tliey learned how 
to improve it. If an entirely new 
managing t^rce ^were to be put in 
charge of a reconstructed private busi- 
ness capitalized at $40,000,000, and if 
results were .to b« expected from it at 
once, wouldn't it be a wise thing for 
the owners of thkt business to hire an 
expert in business efficiency to pro- 
vide for their - g^uidance a tentative 
working plan of organization? Would 
they, if it were a private business, not 
do this as a: matter of course? And 
shall public ^u&iness be managed less 
wisely?— The Editor. 



Christmas Day in Germany 



Mrs. I. A. R. Wylle. "Tiie German*." 



Duluth and The Herald 



Bouquets and Brickbats from the State Pres^. 



Dos't Need It. 

Holt N6rthern Light: A news item 
in The Duluth Herald says: "H. K. 
Hanson of Stillwater has found a sure 
cure for hog cholera, according to a 
letter he has written Governor Eber- 
hart," We have not heard of either 
the governor or Ed. Smitli being" ill. 



Olerf^ for Kver>-1»«dr> 

Preston Times: The Duluth Herald 
and News Tribune are so tickled over 
the adoption of thp commission form 
of government that they instituted an 
inquiry as to which of the two is en- 
titled to the credit of having discov- 
ered and pushed the good thing first 
Wasted efforts, boys. So far as we 
have been able to disjcern you botli did 
everything possible and gave the prop- 
osition loyal and efficient support. In 
the words of Schley: "There Is glory 
enough for both." 



Duluth I» Awake. 

Elk River ytar-News: Duluth has 
adopted the commission form of gov- 
ernment which is represented to be the 
remedy for most of the ills the po- 
litical body is subject to. Anyway, 
Duluth is awake to its opportunities. 



Germany without Christmas — or bet- 
ter — Cliristmas without Germany! For 
me the one state Is as unthinkable as 
tile other. After comparing my ex- 
periences, I can but come to the con- 
clusion that there is no country in the 
\\'ide world where Christmas flourishes 
with so much of its old truth, so much 
of its own true feeling — in fact, where 
Christmas Is so intensely "Christmasy" 
as In the Fatherland. I do not want 
to hurt anybody's feelings with this 
statement, and I must admit that my 
experience is not very wide. It extends 
only over England, France, Belgium 
and Italy, and I have no doubt that, 
for instance, the Yankees make the 
season an occasion for great magnifi- 
cence, the Russians for pomp and cene- 
monial, and so throughout the w^hole 
Christian world, each land imprinting 
its own national characteristics upon 
the festival. 

I always think of the Christmas 
spirit as a little child, who would be 
very happy to sing carols beside a tiny 
shrub In some poor German garret, but 
would shrink back involuntarily from 
the offer of gems and rich Incense. 
And it Is that childish, open-hearted 
simplicity which, so it seems to me, 
makes Christmas essentially German, 
or at any rate explains why it is that 
nowhere else In the world does It find 
so pure an expression. The German is 
himself simple, warm-hearted, unpre- 
tentious, with something at tlie bottom 
of him which is childlike In the best 
sense. There are fewer problems in 
his character; fewer dark, mysterious 
places; fewer Machiavellian twists and 
turnings; his heart is easily stirred, 
easily moved to respond to the touch of, 
all tliat is sincerely, truly human. 
"With such a man the "Chrlstkind" can 
be itself without make-believe and 
artifice — It can display its humblest 
attributes, which are its noblest, and 
know that he will understand, that he 
will treasure it the nxore because it 
was born in a poor manger, and car- 
ries no richer gift in its feeble liands 
than an all-embracing love. 

Y'es, all that is something for the 
German "Gemut!' It suits the German 
a.s well as a play suits an actor for 
whose character and temperament it 
has been especially written. He revels 
in it, and I really believe that the Ger- 
man atheist "understands" the spirit of 
Christmas better than hundreds of 
good Christians from other lands. Per- 
liaps the atmosphere helps. Perhaps 
the crisp north winds blowing over the 
Black Forest, where the fir tree bears 
its burden of virgin snoW, waiting for 
the hour when It shall be called thence 
to decorate some human home, carries 
with It a mysterious perfume, a mys- 
terious something which I cannot de- 
scribe, but which I feel and under- 
stand. Perhaps for the knowledge that 
all those around me feel it and under, 
stand it as I do makes its power all 
the greater. It seems to bring us all, 
rich and poor, friend and foe, into a 
wonderful communion wliich we can- 
not and will not resist. 



Statesmen, Real and Near 



By Fred C. Kelly. 



All IntelUseBt City. 

Albert Lea Standard: Duluth by an 
overwhelming vote has adopted the 
commission form of government," and 
tlius demonstrated the intelligrence and 
progresslveness of its citizens. And 
The Herald, the noblest newspaper of 
the state, deserves most of the credit 
for tlie success of the cause. 



Asalnst the Shoest rings. 

Aurora News: Reapportionment will 
be one of the main issues In the state 
legislature this winter. Aurora people 
hope that in a readjustment of dis- 
tricts We* will be placed In a district 
with other range villages witli whicli 
we ha\e common interests Instead o£ 
being tied to Duluth by a shoestring. 



A Scarce Article. 

Princeton Union: The Duluth Her- 
ald tells us that "there are thirty-one 
colleges in the country offering courses 
in journalism." Y'et, withal, journal- 
ists are particularly scarce, and the 
reason is that journalists are born, not 
made. 



Convention Im Needed. 

Luverne Journal: Some weeks ago 
the Journal made the assertion that 
Minnesota needed a constitutional con- 
vention. The Duluth Herald has taken 
up the matter and urges that the leg- 
islature pass a law calling such a 
convention. The old Constitution has 
served very well, but it has been 
amended over and over and now re- 
sembles a crazy quilt more than a 
document containing the fundamental 
law of- the state, ^\lllle It would be 
some expense to have a constitutional 
convention, in the long run it would 
pay. In the first place the new Con- 
stitution would be likelj' to contain 
most of the progressive fundamentals 
that we would doubtless otherwise 
have to wait years to get by the 
"amendment route"; and in the second 
place it would not be necessary to 
amend the Constitution for years to 
come, and thus the tremendous ex- 
pense of submitting amendments every 
two years would-be saved. Let us 
have a constittttlodjal convention. 



OlnmnesH ot American Families. 

From "The feuslness of Being a 
Woman," by Ida 3*. Tarbell: There is 
perhaps no more general weakness in 
the average American family than 
glumness: The silent reading father, 
the worried, watchhil mother, the sur- 
ly boy, the fredful k^vl, these are char- 
acters typical kn both town and coun- 
try. 

In onp of Mrs. Daskom Baqon,'s liycly 
i»Xe!0. "ArdeUa in Arcadia." the little 
■\ heroine is trai\splaiited from a lively, 
chattering, sweltering New York street 
to the maddening silence of an over- 
worked farmer's table. She stands it 
as long as the can. then cries out, "For 
Gawd's sak& talk-'" 



Never a Friend to Spare 

I have friends in the North, friends in 
the East, 
Friends in the South and West, 
And I call them all to my heart's glad 
feast. 
For I love each one the best; 
And this I know full well: 

That though in the hearts of many I 
share 
To the very last I will hold them fast. 
For I haven't a friend to spare, not 
one. 
No, never a friend to spare. 

When the stars shine out at night, 

I love to drift in a dreamlike spell 
And think that tlieir lamps hang just 
above 
The hearts I love so well. 
And never a sky but 'neath It I 
Can think of a loved one there, 
For each glad star points where they 

are, 
But I haven't a friend to spare, not 
one, 
No, nevej- a friend to spare. 

C>h, you of the far, broad Western 
plain. 
Or you of the Eastern shore, 
I call you into my life again. 

And I hear your words once more. 
And though I stray in a stranger way. 
It counts not when nor where, 
I'ou shall walk with me 
To that silent sea, 
For I haven't a friend to spare, not 
one. 
No, never a friend to spare. 

— "Anonymous." 



A Converted Bull Moose 



New Y'ork Press (Roosevelt): The 
Woodrow Wilson who has stood up to 
shake his fist in the face of stock 
market manipulators is not the Wood- 
row Wilson we thought he was in the 
campaign. 

He is a bigger and a better Wood- 
row Wilson than the American people 
knew in the contest for the presi- 
denc.v. He may even be a bigger and 
a better Woodrow Wilson than he 
imagined himself to be. A man's cour- 
age, suddenly demonstrated in trying 
emergencies, often astonishes himself 
more tlian anyone else; he shows him- 
self qualities that were never revealed 
to his own consciousness. 

We saw Mr. Wilson in the presiden- 
tial battle, as a timid man. avoiding 
some issues, skimming on the surface 
of others, and giving quarter to some 
raen worse than a few he put to the 
sword. 

We feared that he was not a fighter. 

We never quite trusted in his stamina 

or in his consistency. 

• • • 

If the majority of the American peo- 
ple were not with Mr. XN'ilson on elec- 
tion day, the vast majority will follow 
him on any issue like the one of let- 
ting unofficial power intimidate presi- 
dents. 

The whole American people will be 
at his back when he takes a stand like 
this. No question of partisanship can 
come In here. After all, what the na- 
tion wants is truly progressive govern- 
ment, and it will be glad to get it from 
any party or any combination of par- 
ties through which progressive govern- 
ment results. 

In carrying out progressive meas- 
ures Mr. Wilson needs the sentiment 
of the whole country solidly behind 
him. for he will have to fight the big 
powers of his own party on some is- 
sues. He is going about getting the 
people hehSnd him in a way that will 
L^>lp him to ^win. Y'et, win or lose, if 
he follows the line indicated -by his 
address to the panic-makers he will 
leave a record of which the American 
people will be proud. 



Tiie Small Boy Asal»> 

Chicago Tribune: "Boteb.v, do you 
see that bright star overhead, at the 
top of the big cross?" 

"Yes." 

"Well, that's Deneb. It Is nearly 
three quadrillions of miles away." 

""Huh! Then how f'o you know lt» 
rame i:-5 Dcncb?" 



Washington, Dec. 24. — (Special to The 
Herald.) — .Seated side by side among 
the dinner guests of a fashionable hos- 
tess the other evening were Senator 
Boies Penrose and a pretty little twen- 
ty-year-old "flappe:-" from a near-by 
finishing school. 

Cousin Penrose Is tall, huge and 
practical. His bulk completely fills 
the average taxicab. And he can talk 
politics and slates a.nd methods witb a 
great deal of savoir falre. But when 
It comes to scenting one's self up with 
white lilac and rose (in equal parts) 
and doing the La Grallienne stuff, and 
talking the society language — round- 
ing out his conversation with such 
expressions as *How attractive," 
"Charming," "How jjerfectly stunning," 
"Motoring," etc. — when It comes to that 
sort of thing the massive Pennsy sen- 
ator is a supreme 'i-ripple. 

So that Penrose felt himself at a 
conversational loss. Yet he recognized 
that the hostess expected him to talk 
to the attractive little thing at his el- 
bow, and not to sit there silently like 
an empty plate. He began to grope 
blindly for something that the debut- 
ante was interested in — something, if 
possible, that he cculd discuss intelli- 
gently. 

To his great relle'. he early stumbled 
on the fact that she liked horses — tf»at 
she was "fond of rahding," as she ex- 
pressed it — "rahdins" being finishing 
school for riding. 

Now, horseback riding is one of the 
best things Penrose does, and they soon 
made considerable conversational head- 
way. Penro.se talkel entertainingly of 
the time he was riding out In Rock 
Creek a few months ago and his horse 
took fright at a steam roller. The 
horse plunged, fell, rolled over on him, 
tramped on him and otherwise en- 
deavored to show him his finish. 

The debutante was looking across 
the table at a young chap who used 
"corking" and "bully" as his only ad- 
jectives, and missed part of Penrose's 
narrative, but cau^rht that about the 
steam roller. 

"You say the steam roller ran over 
you?" she asked wi'.h the utmost inno- 

Penrose gave her a quick glance, for 
this happened not long after election. 

"No-o," he replied, 'not that time — 
not till some months later." 

• •' • 

Senator Kirtland I. Perky, appointed 
to succeed the late Senator Heyburn, 
of Idaho, studied hiw in the office of 
Mr. Bill Bryan at Lincoln back in the 
days when Bryan was entirely un- 
known and half of his mail came ad- 
dressed ^s O'Brien 

Perky Is an agrei?able, compact man 
with a large head covered with a heavy 
black mane. He looks too stoutish 
for any exerci.se more strenuous than 
brushing his teeth of a morning — or 
croquet at the outside, but the funny 
thing about it is that lie can play a 
whirlwind game ol lawn tennis, and 
can step right out on short notice and 
kick as high as hi$ head. 

• «• * 

When It was announced that Perky 
had been appointee senator, a China- 
man he knows w<!ll out in Boise, 
stopped him to offer "congratulations." 

"Y'ou make fine councilman," said 
the Chink. 

"But it's a senator I'm to be," ex- 
plained Perky; "down at Washington, 
you know." 

"Oh," says the Chink, in a disappoint- 
ed tone, "that all; me thouglit you to 
be city councilman." 

• •■ • 

Louis Brownlow, Washington news- 
paper man, paused in a drug store in 
Greensboro, N. C, not so long ago, to 
ask for a match. While he was there 
a young colored chap came running in 
with a big- gash the whole length of 
his skull, and apparently a good deal 
Qut out about som«r accident that had 
befallen- him. 

"What's happened to you?" asked 
Brownlow, excitedly- but sympathetic- 
ally. 

"A friend hit m.? with a hatchet," 
replied the bleeding stranger. 

• M • 

William Sulzor, governor-elc»ct of 
New York, has only a moderate sense 
of humor. 

Whenever the members of the for- 
eign affairs committee, of wlilch Sul- 
zer has been chairman, wish to kid 
him a little they refer to him casually 
as "our distinguished chairman," sev- 
eral times in succession — "as our dis- 
tinguished chairman has so fittingly 
observed," "as our ilistinguished chair- 
man remarked a moment ago," etc. 

And the only noti'?e Sulzer ever takes 
of It is to place his right index finger 
against his forehead, in a statesman- 
like pose, and act C3mpletely immersed 
in thought. 

« « • 

Senator Norris Brown got up to 
speak at a Taft meeting in St. Paul a 
week or two before the crash came. 
The only available hall was controlled, 
for the time being, by an animal show. 
This meeting was held after the show 
was over, arwi the animal cages were 
pushed back to the rear of the stage. 
Brown was in the nidst of his remarks 
when a bear set u;) a howl. It gave 
Brown his chance. 

He turned and frowned at the bear, 
and said: 

"Well, well, there's Teddy. And it's 

the most logical argument I ever heard 

Teddy make." 

iCopyrlglit, 1912. by Fred C. Kelly. All rights reserved.) 
«• 

The Bachelor's Christmas 



7 wenty Years Ago 



rrom Tbe Herald of tbls date. 1S91. 



•♦•The Chapln-Wells hardware stor* 
on Superior street near the corner of 
Fifth avenue west was the scene yes- 
terday afternoon of the biggest fire 
that has occurred In Duluth since the 
burning of the Grand opera house in 
1889. The explosion of what is sup- 
posed to have been gasoline in th« 
basement is thought to have started 
the Are, and it spread with lightning- 
like rapidity to the upper stories. The 
building, like all wholesale and retail 
stores, was filled with combustibles In 
the shape of cartridges, gasoline, oIIb, 
etc., and probably some small lots of 
powder. Explosions' were numerous 
soon after the fire started, and one 
blew Fireman James Dunbar, who wa» 
on the first floor, clear through a win- 
dow into the street. Several other 
firemen were knocked down by the 
force of the explosion and Fire Warden 
Pllmil Applehagen was badly bruised. 
As soon as the Are got fairly well Into 
the shelves of the store, the cartridges 
began a miniature battle, and the re- 
ports sounded like a continued roar 
of musketry. It was dangerous on ac- 
count of the flying bullets to go within 
100 feet of the building, but the fire- 
men gallantly held their ground. It 
was impossible, however, to save the 
building, which was known as the 
Fergusson block. The old part of the 
block is a ruin from top to bottom, and 
the new part i.s badly damaged. Sim- 
ilar damage was done to Hatley & 
Hurveys bowling alley, Schiirer-Hub- 
bard cigar store and various offices. 
One loss, whicli can scarcely be re- 
placed, was caused by the total de- 
struction of maps, profiles, minutes, 
etc., of the Duluth, Mi-ssabe & North- 
ern road. The Insurance on the build- 
ing and rents aggregates $85,000. The 
losses on stock are: Chapin- Wells, 
$60,000: Schiller-Hubbard, $20,000; Du- 
luth Herald, $4,000; W. ' E. Wright. 
$3,000; A. S. Wilson, $500; C. E. Lovett 
& Co., $1,000; Dr. M. B. Cullum, $2,700; 
the Alhambra bowling alley.s, $7,000; 
other losses. $26,800; total, $125,000; in- 
surance, $69,250. 



♦••Secretary Thomp.«on of the Du- 
luth chamber of commerce today is- 
sued the call for a national ship canal 
convention to be held at the Arlington 
hotel, Washington, on Jan. 12. The 
governors of states are asked to ap- 
point five delegates each, and all com- 
mercial bodies will be represented. 



•♦•Miss Kate O'Leary of Ottawa l3 
here on a visit to her uncle, M. W. Mc- 
Donald. 



•••The cash bonus of $100,000. which 
was to be secured in Duluth In order 
to close the option for the removal bt 
the Great Western Electric company 
from Chicago to Duluth, has been prac- 
tically raised. Preferred stock is is- 
sued for this bonus. 



•••L. K. Esterbrook of West Duluth 
left last evening for Menomonie, Wis., 
to spend Christmas with his sister. 



••♦Miss Stella Woods of the Long- 
fellow school will attend the teachers' 
institute at St. Paul next week. 



A Real Transmigration 



1 






(With apologies to Rudyard Kipling.) 

A fool there wa.s aid he made his lair 

(Even as you and I,) 
In a lonsome den by his warm grate 
Are; 
(He watched the flames leap higher 
and higher) 
But his heart was sick with a dumb 
desire. 
(Even as you and I.) 

And the Christmas «;himes in the belfry 
rang. 
(Peal upon peal of Joy!) 
And the cracklin? flames on the 
hearthstone sing 
(To his hungry hoart came a mighty 
pang) 
As the glowing sparks up the chimney 
sprang • 

(Gemming the winter sky). 

O, If the fatherless. Youth could re- 
new! 
(Wiping a moistened eye.) 
Away from the torturing thought he 
flew. 
(Hasten, the last i\eetlng minutes are 
few!) 
Crying to God for some kindness, to do. 
(.Even as you and I.) 

A child he fot^nd. In the cold winter 
night, .... 

(Seeking a place to die) 
Naked and hungry, a pitiful sprite. 
(The bachelor called her his vision 
of Liatht.) 
The Star of the Eiist shone never so 
bright. 
(Heaven had heard his cry.) 

— A. A. Farrington. 
Duluth, Minn., Dec. 23. 

«, 

'When Jot I* Abiient. 
Now York Press: There's no water- 
wagon joy rldlnff. 



Lubbock: The Hin(ius have a 
theory that after death animals 
live again in a different form ; 
tho.'^e that have done well in a 
higher, those that have done ill 
in a lower grade. To realize this 
they find a powerful incentive to 
a virtuous life. But whether it be 
true of a future life or not, it is 
certainly true of our present 
existence. If we do our best for 
a day, the next morning we .'^hall 
rise to a higher life; while if we 
2^ive way to our passions and 
temptations we take with equal 
certainty a step downward to- 
ward a lower nature. 

« _ 

The Saxon Girdle of the Earth. 

From "The Saxon and His Empire," 
by Homer Lea: The Saxon has marked 
around this earth, as no other racej?e- 
fore him, the scarlet circle of his 
power. This thin, red Saxon line, so 
thin with his numbers, so red wittk his 
blood, was made possible only by his 
heroism and has racial fealty. 

Where this line has not gone, man 
has not found. It has crossed every 
sea; it has traversed every desert; it 
has sought every solitude; it has 
passed through swamps where only 
the sacred ibis fishes; over sands that 
have never been moistened; over snows 
that have never m«Ued. "Fhere has been 
no storm it has not encountered; no 
pain it has not endured; no race it 
has not fought and no disease it has 
not contented with. 

This Saxon line has been to the 
eartli a girdle heroic and tragic, bind- 
ing within itself aU the old and an- 
cient places of th© world. It has been 
silent in its duty. Ignored in its 
achievement and scorned in its devo- 
tion. Y'et it has given down to this 
now neglectful race a world such as 
mankind has never known before; an 
empire over which the sun and stare 
shine together and ■where night never 
falls and no day dawns. 



AMUSEMENTS. 




LYCEUM r'"*'"'" 



MATINEE TOMORROW 2:311. 
DAVID BELASCO PrOMttt 



I ) A \ I • ) 

WARFIELD 



ThtRtliiniof 



BatkMwraaS418. 



^ THEATER 

SeeondAve. Cast and Superior Street 



MATINEES 

DAILY 

lOct 



50r and 7Sc. 



THIS WEEK'S BILL 

"PUSS IN BOOTS"" 
B. A. R«4N'» 

APOALE'S 
ZOOLOGICAL CIRCUS 
MR. AND MR& 

JACK McGRCEVY 

HAL 4 FRANCIS 

CHARLES OLCOTT 

BERTISH 

OayUfht Pietima 

Th* Coiwtrt OrvkMtra. 



%' 




o- 



i^bfi 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



/ -- 



December 24, 1912. 




A KuK.:Tles party, at one of the East 
rnd hoiaos this evening, will be one 
of the features of Christmas eve. which 
will Klve a joyful time to a Duluth 
family, or rather two Duluth families 
for the hostesses have been enjoying: 
preparatloiiij for the event for over a 
week. 

T\v,> little erirls. Grace ami Helen, 
planned tho party just oh the lines of 
the ( hri-stmus party to Which Mrs. 
IluRgrles and hor children wtece invited 
to ti .• Hirds homo in the popular story 
of * riu< Bird's Ohristmas farol." A 
mother of a familv «)f tivo Itnle chil- 
dren received an invitatioa Jast week 
TO (nine to a dinner party tMs eve- 
r.iMK at their home. 

M. rubers of ttie Sunday sohortl where 
the tittle f^irls so were interested In 
■ I'-i^i Hid have s^-en to It that each 
I the Kuests Ims bt^rt provided 
^ 'Oil heavy clothins? for the 
utiier i'rien<ls bessed to be 
I to lielp In the partv hut the 
;;n!s and their mothtr insisted 
«>n mviiiK and geitlnR the dinner theiii- 
n«h.>s ;,nd tlien after the dinner a 
('inisitr.:is tree \vltl> eandv, fruits, toys 
and oih.r pretty and useful gifts will 
lI. To thi.-< friends wero al- 
ada their donations and the 
te.-i.se.s a;o as deliijhtod ainl 



OlU' 

w It 
wi'. 
all-w 
little 



be 
I<V 

lijt 



e»«rT lor dinner time to arrive as are 
the li'tle Ruesis and their mother who 
are in\ ued to the "nuggles party." 

SCHOOL PROGRAM. 



WILL BE MRS. WILSON'S SECRETARY 



:.vt:^S 



::<¥:!ft?;?s.:*:. 



Pupils at Girls' School Entertain 
Friends. 

C,\r\H at the Cathedral hlRh sehonl 
ont ■! taitied parents and friends with a 
pk-asiii.u: program yesterday afternoon 
at the cathedral hall. The program 
oi»ened with tlie sonj?. -'While Shepherds 
Watch Th.'ir Flocks by Nislit." sung 
by all the tiirl.s of the school. 

Bishop ^ik-Colrick, who was a jrueat 
of honor, ie<eivefl greetings from the 
*«>h >o:. 1. iivered by one of the scholars. 
Miss ilva Hoy. followed by a second 
lUotiis. While Glory Lifts the Mid- 
iiiR-ul Air." 

Mi->.s -Mary Quinii read "How .limmv 
Tejeicil the IJaby deligli tf ull v. and a 
reft. ims by Miss Anna Toben was also 
giVe. uith good effect. Songs and 
I'^'f - h\- the kindergarten chil- 

•'i* el.oruses by girls in the 

•idea were all features of the 
lent. 




Spend Tonight, 
Christmas^New Year's 

Among pleasant surroundings and with people w/iose 
companionstiip you value at the beautiful and homelike 

WOODLAND CAFE 



M 



NEW ST. LOUIS HOTEL 

Here among the happy and sunny smiles or the best people you n 

can sit and listen to the sweet strains of music provided by the best ^ f'l 

Cabaret entertainers in America and be served with the best and 1 
most delicious foods the markets of the world afford. 

SPECIAL CHRISTMAS PROGRAM AND DINNER, 12 to 8. 



n 



M 



^^'. 



S. S. PLAY. 



se\t 



Youngsters at Unitarian Church' 
: Will Have Program Friday. 

^i'" < 'hii.^fnias t- ntertainr.iont of th>^ 
^ ' lay school will take place 

' vening. According to the 

!5. the children will plav 
o R number of little ones 
^ • fortunate in this world's 

■y. Through their own 
111. I the generous gifts of 
!i lends, Muite a large sum has 
. cilized with which good, sub- 
clothing ha.s been bought, and 
•I youngsters have been fitted 
'!:ar ihoy can brave the sevi-re 
\y\n\-v. These children and the 
' f the church have been In- 
> I [ilay on Friday evening. The 
■•: is a.s follows: 
't!i ■ 1'ackhammer." Lawrenc<^ 
mis: Mack in tiie Box." Carl 
t' • 1 ; ti:i soldiers, 'Capt. Fritz," 
\\illi,i!i! <;ow, : "Private Jones," Ronton 
St.aiii-,: -I'vivate West," .Tay Atwood: 
• !":i\ace f ole," Max Gebauer; •'Private 
J!! I k. ' Cniory I)ills: jumping-ja'-ks, 
.1 1 '; «;ovv and Frank Grannis; Punches 
.T'iri i:tigil, IVrcy Flaaten. Georgo At- 
V. oud; "t-alrx Hright Kyes," Kva .Vt- 
dolls. ' (;retchen," Grace Dills: 
's.'. a la mode." Eleanor Keycs; 
Dorothea Engel; "Mav," 
Spiegel: ••Bessie." Winifred 
!:dith," Helen Bullard. 
!■•!:. ICeyes will play during the 



../ 



v.. 



ISABELLA L. HAGNER. 



Hagner" aT'be^M chos^n^'bv? MTj\vTw.n'*r" k""k^'^ ^°'*^^' *'^*t ^^^^ Isabella L. 
Mi." Hagn'er^^wL sectetary lo Mrs Hooseveu VuHn^J^i'j: ^S*^^ "'V'W^ "°"^«- 
dential mansion. She now is coi/nected with tvl ot5. ^V ""^V ^^ *'^« P''^'*'- 
ington. connected with the state department at Wash- 




I 



^".^i.^^'^^ Valborg Gunderson. violinist. 
This committee plans to take good 
programs to those who cannot go to 
them otherwise and this program whieh 
wi 1 be made up of Christmas music 
will be one of the best on the series 
planned for the year. 

Fraternity Dance. 

The membei^ of the Beta Phi Sigma 
fraternity of this city have issued in- 
vitations for a dancing partv Fridav 
evening of this week at the" old iVIa- 
sonic temple. 



101; 



East Superior 



woo'l ; 
"Hor 

•'FUa' 

^■ ■ 
i 



At Children's Home. 

> ■ hiKir.-n at the Children's Home 

'1 i\'e tii.ir '"hrisUnas tree partj- 

■ ' ' ' !' Kifts this evening and a big 

' - MIS dinner tomorrow will be 

&vi > e J at noon there. 



Ti- 
will 



Golden Wedding. 

^-.nd Mis. f. C. Deery were nleas- 
iiiiris.'l l;ist evening at their 
: .: ■-;,, ,111(1 avenue east in cele- 
ir golden wedding anni- 
gupsts. among whom 
their intimate friends, presented 
them with a tea set and otner pretlv 

gifts-. 



Visitors Called Home. 

IMr. and Mrs. P. H. Whalen of Man- 
kato. Minn., who recently celebrated 
their fifty-second wedding anniver- 
sary here and who were planning to 
spend th.3 holidays here wtih then- 
son and daughter-in-law, :\Ir. and Mrs. 
P. L. Whalen of 419 Twentv-first ave- 
nue west, were called home vesterday 
by the serious illness of a little grand- 
son. Mr. and Mrs. P. I., \\-halen will 
leave this ev ening fo r Mankato. 

Church Meetings. 

The T.uther league of the .^t. Math- 
ews Evangelical Eutheran ehureh 
will meet at the home of Mis. .Julius 
1-roehch. li'l Fifty-sixth avenue west 
J hursday evening. 



At. 



Mert 



Music at Hospital. 

.\ f'hristmas program will be given 
at .St. Luke's hospital, at 2:30 o'clock 
n.-\r .Sunday afternoon under the aus- 
"f t!ip philanthropie committee 
^fat[nce Musicale. Mrs. .John .A. 
>ri is in charge and will be 
I'v Mrs. C. P. Craig, soprano; 
.inn liartholomew. contralto- 



pi 



Mi.s, 



r 



MEN WHO 
OKE 

Know and appreciate the quality of 
our eigais, pipes and smok'^rs' 
articles. Ladles' patronage and tele- 
phone orders solicited. 



Fanning-Lowry. 




A simple wedding took place yes- 
terday at tlje home of .Alr.s. Emma 
i-anning. 7-'0 East First street, when 
siie became the bride of Thomas 
Lcwry of Almonte, Ont. Ur A \V 
Kyan. rector at St. Paul's Episcopal 
cuurch. read the service at noon in 

fviln!^'"^^r"'*' °/ ?"^>' ^ ^^^- personal 
friends from Duluth and Superior 
Palms and poinsettias were used in 
decorating the rooms. 

Mrs Lowry was the widow of the 
late ^^. K. Fanning of the Spicer- 
I'a-nning company of Superior and the 
bridegroom is a well known business 
man at Almonte. After the holidays 
Mr. and Mrs. Lowry will leave for 
their home in the Canadian city. 

Personal Mention. 

I ^rr. and Mrs. F. X. AVest of f,20 
i Loulevard street will spend Christmas 
I .vith Mr. and Mrs. H. S. Lord- of Carl- 
ton, Minn. 

* « * 
George Brandt of the Chicago Art 
ii-stitute is spending the holidays with 



GRATHWOL GIGAR CO. 



^ 



Grand 389 — Both Pbonm — Melrose 



316 Went .Sup«rlor Street. 



EVERETT, 

EMERSON, 

LINDEMAN, 

HARVARD 

SOLD Cj.\ i: \sv pavmexts 

OAK HALL BUILDIXG. 
Melrose 559U. Grand 321. 




his parents at 
street. 

* * * 

Mr and Mrs. James Kellv and 
daughter Gertrude of 518 Fourth ave- 
nue east left yesterday to spend 
Chr.stma.s with their son and daughter 
at Alankato, Minn. 

* • • 

Miss E. .T. Rawlings of 121 East 
Third street left today to spend the 
vacation with her paients at Eau 
Claire. Wis. 

* • • 

- ^;^w^: Chinnick is spending this week 
in Mmneapolip. 

* • • 

Mrs. F. ^V. DeVey of 8^4 East Third 
street ha.s as her guests for Christmas 
iier sons Howard of the University of 
Minnesota, and D. \V. DeVey of St 
Paul. 

* * * 

Mr and Mrs. Dwight W. Hiestand 
and daughter of 5i'6 East Fifth street 
have gone to Chicago for the Christ- 
mas vacation. 

* * • 

James Bradley, .117 Vernon street 
has as guests at hi? home over the 
holiday.s. Mrs. F. L. Bradley and son 
George of San Francisco. 

* • • 

Mi.^s Helen Shaver returned la.«t 
evening from Seattle. Wash., where she 
iias been teaching, and she will spend 
the res't of the year at home, 

* • • 

E H. "U-halen will spend Christmas 

at liis old home in Chippewa Falls 
u is. 

* • • 

^Tr and Mrs. Jerome K. Mahoney of 
Orookston, Minn., were in Duluth ves- 
terday on a short visit while en route 
to Eau Claire. Wis., where thev will 
spend the iiolidavs. 

* ■ • • 

Mrs. C. A. Mc Martin and son Harrv 
McMartin of .-)921 London road are 
spending Clnistmas and the holidavs 
in A\ innipeg. girests of H. C. McMartin 
and William J. McMartin 

* * • 

Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Morgan and little 
son. Sam. of 1922 East Superior street 
left yesterday for Minneapolis, wnere 
they win spend the holidays. 

* • ♦ 

Mr. and Mrs. Phillip A. Smith and 
children of Grand Rapids. Minn., are 
in Duluth, guests of Mrs. Smith's par- 
ents Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Fenton. for 
the holidays. 

* * • 

Miss Georgia Everest, who is teach- 
ing at Pratt institute. Chicago, Is in 



DINN]£R, $1. 



TILTON E. LEWIS, Manager. 






*^J 



vH' -'^'^ 



'^ 



(Wi#«%j 



F/.i V 



fc 






h 



1^.-' 



*l 



> 



i 



IM 



U 



/^A 



i-^ 



m: 



liS 



'<^/S^^r^^- 



n;¥iT-i;^^ 



/s 



W^^ 



fliiiiMii^imimiHtiiiiiiHiip niiTTjT 



M< 



has gone to 
holidays with 



Duluth to spend the holidavs with her 
father, D. A. PIverest of Lakesido 

* • • 
Mrs. .1. J. Stevenson 

Brainerd to spend the 
relatives there. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. :Murray Crawford and 
family o^ 305 East Eighth street, left 
yesterday for a visit with Mr. Craw- 
ford's sister, Mrs. T. N. Andrews of 
Port Arthur, Ont. 

* • • 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Day and children 
of 14281 East Third street left today for 
Brainerd to visit E. A. Dav over 
Christmas. 

* * • 

:Miss Selma Lundbcrg of 221 Ninth 
avenue east returned last evning from 
St. Paul, where she had been vi&lting 
relatives. 

* ♦ • 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Dorsev of 116 
West Fourth street have left for Sea- 
rorth, Ont., where they will spend the 
holidays witli both Mr. and Mrs Dor- 
sey's parents. 

• • • 

Miss Elizabeth Sullivan of 113 West 
Second .street has gone to her home at 
Virginia for the holidav.s. 

• * • * 

Miss Chelsle Final, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs. H. D. Final, 50.3 Woodland 
avenue, has returned from Iowa City 
where she is studying at the Iowa 
State universlt.v, to spend the holidays 
with her parents. 

• * • 

Miss Addle Smith has returned <'rom 
a several weeks' visit with relatives 
and friends at Iowa City, and Miss 
Helen Smith, her sister, who Is studv- 



Mi at the Iowa State university there 
will be home tomorrow morning to 
spend the vacation at her home. 27 
South Twenty-first avenue east. 

* • • 

Mrs. A. E. Prudden of 326 Thirteenth 
avenue east returned Sunday from In- 
dianapolis. Ind., where she has been 
visiting her daughter, Mrs. H. A. Eaton. 
Her daughter. Miss Mildred Prudden, 
who is attending the Teachers college 
there returned with her for the holiday 
vacation at her home. 
♦ • » 

Mrs. Frank Bradley and her son of 
San l-rancisco are visiting at the home 
of her brother-in-law, James Bradl«v 
of 317 Vernon street. 

• • * 

Dr. and Mrs. Frank E. Moorhouse of 
Minneapolis are guests of Mrs. Moore- 
house's parents. Dr. and Mrs. I. T. 
Burnside of West Duluth for over the 
holidays. 

• • • 

Mrs. Lorace Catterson of 614 Eigh- 
teenth avenue east has returned from 
a two months' stay at Bay Citv, Mich., 
where her mother has been seriouslv 
ill at the Bay City hospital. 

• • • 

Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Seaton have gone 
to Hibbing to attend the wedding of 
Bert McDowell and Miss Edna McLeod 
on Christmas day. 



simple veriie, read nonsense verse, 
read real poems, read, sometimes, such I 
poems as 'Thanatopsls" and bits of i 
Paradise liOst," she says. Of course, ' 
the child -vlU not understand the ! 
thought, but he will enjov the sound. '■■ 
and he w-i)l unconsciously learn the I 
words. Poetry was never meant ta be 
read to on<»'s self, but always to be 
read aloud or recited. It Is harder 
than prose. Tlie order of the words 
Is often unlike our everyday speech, 
and the words themselves are fre- 
quently different. H-ere, especially, 
children need help. If they find it. 
they learn to love poetrv, and there 
are few things that- so sweet«> Ufa 
as a genuirie love for poetrv. for Its 
beauties, and for the helpful "lines that 
come to one's mind in hard places. 



MAKING OLD 

PEOPLE HAPPY 



RIeh Holly Wreaths, 

40c. Order today by phone. Victor Huot. 

Poetry and* the ChUd. 

Eva aiarch Tappan, in the Home 
Progress Magazine, advises her readers 
to read poetry to the child. Read easy. 



An artlcl<( In the Woman's Home 
Companion on "Making Old People 
Happy" contains the following: 

"The secret of making old people 
liappy IS prinarily to disguise the fact 
that they are old. To pet, to Indulge 
to nurse, to nanage. without giving the 
ghost of a hint of superannuation — 
there's a nice problem for tact.' Con- 
scientious young people, especially if 
they have brought up vigorous chil- 
dren, find it hard to relax their discip- 
linary zeal when dealing with the frail- 
.hl^S ^?®- '^^'^^y seem to forget that 
childhood and second childhood face 




By PEGGY PEABODY 



Free 



Some good used organs and 
some practice pianos. You to 
pay for repairing and delivery. 
Must ha%e room for new goods. 

STORY & CLARK PIANO CO., 

Pnetory SnIeMrooinM. 
426 \Ve«t IlrJtt .Street. 



ime Music Not All Bad — It 
Has Its Appeal. 

That ragtime jars on the nerves and 
irritates the brain cells Is the conten- 
tion of Prof. Ludwig Brusmer, of Ber- 
lin. To its defense among others, 
leaps T'hilip Greel.v 
Ctapp, instructor of 
music at Harvard, 
who believes rag- 
time Is maligned 
and that it has 
rather a soothing 
than an Irritating 
effect upon the 
nerves. "Ragtime is 
a form of music 
characteristic of the 
country and for that 
reason cannot be 
overlooked when 
.Vmerican music as 
a whole Is being 
considered," declared Mr. Clapp, and 
we aro agreed that It does have its 
niche and that some of it is worthy 
of acclaim and to be classed as real 
music. 

As Mr. Clapp says. "Music worthy of 
the name isn't likely lo wear anyone 
out, and this does not exclude rag- 
time because there can be good rag- 
time as well as bad. Not all classical 
music is good or even nearly so." The 
true music lover will admit beauty and 
harmony in syncopation. Only the 
snob in music; the person who gauges 
his appreciation and approval on what 
has been lauded by the highest author- 





ities, will turn up his nose in utter 
disdain at the popular American rag- 
time. 

But there is a side to ragtime as 
played popularly at our seashore re- 
■sorts, in our cafes and dance halls, our 
theaters and even our first-class hotels 
that grows di.sagreeahly on the nerves 
of the sen-sltive person of American 
i>irth and breeding, inured to all the 
liurry and bustle of American life and 
living. It becomes exasperating: 

makes one wish oftentimes that he or 
slie need never be obliged to listen to 
it again. Doubtless this is poor rag- 
time, since good music 'of any de- 
.s> rlption ought never to irritate one 
but good or bad. I have known not 
one but many Americans to lose pa- 
tience with this typieallv American 
musical product. I liave myself. 

I should never call ragtime soothing. 
It is exhilarating, at its best. Certain 
temperaments might never experience 
anytliing but irritation under its spell. 
And a person who had never heard 
anything but the finest classical music- 
whose appreciation was developed ori 
that basis, would find, I am sure in 
the ragtime of our pleasure places 
much to annoy liim and much on 
w,liich to base his contention that a 
few years hence we should all be 
crazy in America unless we changed 
the nature of the music to which so 
many of us eat and dance and sing 
and listen as a matter of course, be- 
lieving ourselves entertained. 




NEW YORK SOCIETY WOMEN INTERESTED 

IT ANNUAL EXHIBITION OF PEMN D06S 



opposite ways; that it is not character- 
building they have in hand, but the 
sweetening of a bitter experience. They 
don t realize how natural, how inevit- 
able Is the recrudescence of primitive 
emotions, the development of a purely 
per.sonal point of view. Yet no real 
kindness toward the aged is possible 
•wnich does not recognize the hard 
mysterious facts. Old age is beautiful 
when It is guarded, sympatiiized witli. 
and understood. 

"Old people often come to feel that 
they are not regarded as 'one of the 
lamuy. The trouble springs naturallv 
from purely physical causes They de 
mand an amount of artificial heat dis- 
concerting to youtii or middle age 
h,y^" fi' August a nonagenarian will 
hug a fire. After smothering attempts 
to keep the living-rooms at a tempera- 
ture satisfactory to the torpid old bodv. 
the family falls into the easv solution 
of leaving Grandma to toa.n her toes 
before an open fire in her own bed- 
chamber. 

"Unfortunately, this is the beginning 
of a process of isolation from tlie heart 
of the family life. Grandma will mis.s 
many a story because she sits apart 
More and more will she drop out of the 
interests of the clan, until some day 
she wakes up to feel that she is no 
longer consulted, no longer thought of 
except in the way of duty, no longer a 
vital part of the familv. *""s«r a 

"Better a tliousand times devise 
means to warm the slow old blood 
without depriving her of her place in 
the home cirtle. • i » c tu 




RIek H»l|y A\reatk«. 

40c; home made. Victor Huofs. 

EpCPElTlMEXTS IX CQOKIXG. 
National Food Magazine: CoolMn? 
meat in a very liot oven offers no ad- 
^antages and many disadvantages a.«j 
shown In experiments at the Fniversit'' 
'2,* /"Jnois. A temperature of 3S5 deg 
Fahrenheit imposes a dlflficultv In the 
danger of burping. Much better results 
are obtained in a temperature of Sin 
deg.. and still better in an Aladdin 
oven with a heat of 212 deg In 'he 
last named instance the meat Is found 
to be more Juicy and highly Havored. 
and the cooking more uniform through- 
otit. 

The findings have added to the evi- 
dence in favor of fireless cookerv. and 
Miss Mitchell, one of the universitv !n- 
.structois. asserts that meats cooked in 
the tireless stoves are alwavs well done 
and more tender than when boiled '^he' 
slow cooking In the moderate tempera- 
ture causes the heat to penetrate to th - 
center of the meat, even in very Iirge 
pieces, and always this heat is of suffi- 
cient intensity to insure thorough cook- 
ing without danger of overcooking, and 
without toughening or hardening the 
outs'de. 6 •• w 

The university experiment.*!, for the 
most part, wero to exemplifv advan- 
tages in using the lower priced cuts of 
meat, and to prove the best ways of 
preparing them. The experiments boro . 
out the truthfulness of manv time-hon- 
ored theories of cookerv and. at the 
same time, supplied some interestlne 
new suggestions. 



The sen.sation of the show was Mrs M F Harbv's Novvn\T?-if,.«^^f^ir ? '^'' ^t.^.^^'^f ^'"1" » K^* a prize. 






nately To„ „^ „„„ ^..„ ... 

lowered his eolors to .Mr.s HarbVs' nrize' "v'o^C->^»"l"'V^i;:,';;;„"Xr "/-""i!!,"""' """^ wuj.>*e present nart no doubt he would have 

pete, including a challenge cup 'given by pterpon? Morgan ^ '"" """"^ *^">^»""K '^ which he wJs ellglbla to com! 

was bred by Miss Isabel BenJ^wnW Ind is by BrSarBllll ^.M-Gee T.in Mo. * *"* "' ''^ '•'* """^'^ admired. He 



Mrs. John Drew Better 

McLeansboro. 111. — "About five 
years ago." says Mr.<;. John 1.. Drew, 
of this place, "I was afflicted with 
pains and irregnlarity every month. I 
>^uffered . continually, was weak and 
(Iesp9i|dent, and ."liuible to do my 
housework. I took Cardiii, and in one 
month, I felt like a new woman and 
worked hard all summer. I am now 
in perfect health, and recommend Car- 
dui to all stiffening women." Every 
day, during the past 50 years, Cardui 
has been steadily forging ahead as a 
result of its proven value in female 
troubles. It relieves headache, back- 
ache, womanly misery and puts fresh 
strength into weary bodies. Try it. 



I 




—- «ta 




10 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 




DOESN'T WEAR A VEIL ^ 



A 



By C. L. SHERMAN 




WHY ARE. YOU 
HAPPY 




rVL .JU5T PICKED THf 
WINNER IN OUR CON- 
TEST FOT^ A POEM ON 






i!EI$E'6 "THE PR^ZE- WirSNER.'.' 
j^{r^ ^^^rvc ^k^ceai Ji^tTvct Z&d ^COA.^ 

(^ -U/e^rut o^cryt .^m4/>l ?Z?T/0^)rU^€/t / — 

7^/laie4^U^ ^<i4V^Q>C/tyC 'y^<X>c<J'-y7JZoC 
"Ue^ ^€U/€ .d^novt Cn^u<i^^y>^^<!t<L zcrCzA" 



JJSl 



WHATJ THE 
|PR\ze. GOING 
TO BE-? 



->* 



one or ThESE two 

TICKET5 TO THE 
CHRISTMAS 
MATINEIE. 



(vnIHY DOtHT YOU 
i)ENO HER BOTH 
[ OF THESEA vTS. 



YOU MUTT-THEV 
ARE R^GHT TO- 
GETHER AND I'M 
60»MG TO USE 

THE OTHER. 

ONE MYSELF 

1 




••^PiiW*GiM^«M'^^^^^^^i'^^*^^^^^BrtBM 



^SSSRV-^' 



^^g^: 



Chiidreti Cry for Fletcher's 




The Kiiul You Have Always Bought, and which has been 
in use for over SO j'cars, has home the signatiue of 

and has heen made under his per- 
^¥^- / ^ f ~'l sonal supervision since its infancy. 
_ f-CCCc^i44^ Allow no one to deceive yoii in this. 
All Counterfeits, Imitations and ** Just-as-good*' are hut 
Experiments that trifle with and endanger the health of 
Infants and Children— Experience against Experiment. 

What is CASTORIA 

Castoria is a harmless suhstitnte for Castor OH, Pare- 
goric, I>rops and Soothing Syrups. It is Pleasant. It 
contains neither Opium, Morphine nor other Narcotic 
substance. Its ago is its guarantee. It destroys "Worms 
and aUay.4 Feverishness, It cures Diarrhoea and "Wind 
Colic. It relieves Teething Troubles, cures Constipation 
niul Flatxdency. It assimilates the Food, regulates the 
Stt>niu«h and Bowels, giving healthy and natural sleep. 
The Children's Panacear— The Mother's Friend. 

GENUINE CASTORIA ALWAYS 

►Bears the Signature of 



COUNCIL CONSIDERS NEEO OF 
PLANNING NEW GOVERNMENT 



Finance Committee Will In- 
vestigate and Secure 
Data. 



City Attorney Retains Spe- 
cial Counsel for Fran- 
chise Case. 




The Kind You Have Always 

Use For Over 30 Years 




In 



THt CENTAUR COMPANY, 77 MUBHAV STREET. NEW YORK CITY. 




ll:l.:P.M. ).45P.M.|Lv DVLUTH Ar 


7:21) P.M.' 6:30 A.M. 1 


n:40P.M-j 2:15 P.M. 


Lv SUPERIOR Ar 


6:50 P.M. 


6K)0A.M. 


6:2('A.M.i e.-^OP.M. 


Ar ST. PAUL Lt 


2:30 P.M. 


11:40P'M. 


710 A.M. j 7:10 P.M. 


Ar MINNEAPOLIS Lt 


lu55P.M. 


llfiOP.M. 


ALL-STEEL ELECTHIC LIGHTED, VACUUM CLE;.\NED 
Coacbes<~Parlor Car* — Sleepers — Cafe Obaervatlon Cars. 




The city council last evening passed 
a resolution requesting the finance 
committee of that body, consisting of 
Aldermen Jt)rdan, Gibson and Makow- 
ski, to investigate the advisability of 
outlining a tentative plan relative to 
the division of the duties of the com- 
missioners under the new plan and 
other changes which will be necessi- 
tated. The committee is also re- 
quested to secure data from other 
cities approximately the size of Du- 
luth whuh have tlie commission form 
of government. 

Tne resolution passed by a vote of 
14 to 2, Aldermen Miller and Scott 
voting against It. 

When it was presented Alderman 
Curren said that it was an indirect 
way of getting the same result as 
\as intended in the resolution voted 
down last week providing for a com- 
mittee to investigate the advisability 
of employing an expert. He stated 
that he would not oppose it, however. 
Alderman Gibson pointed out that 
the resolution did not necessitate the 
expenditure of any funds and ought 
to be passed in the best interests of 
the city. 

Enough Kxpertii. 
Alderman John MacDonell was em- 
phatic in the declaration that there 
are enough experts in the city amply 
cEpable of handling the outlining of 
any tentative plan. He declared that 
the present council or any one else 
l.ad not tfie right to dictate to the 
commissioners to be elected and ad- 
vise them as to what they should do. 
"Leave tliat to the new commissiou- 
ers,'' he said. ,^ ^^ ^ . ,,, 

Alderman Hogan said that he did 
not see anything wrong in the reso- 
lution but that he agreed that the 
citv lias plenty of experts without 
going outside. He said it would be 
all right to investigate the situation 
as provided by the resolution. 

Alderman MacDonell again took the 
floor and reiterated that the city has 
capable experts. He averred that City 
Treasurer Voss. Comptroller McCor- 
mick, City Clerk Palmer or Secretary 
Murchison have an extensive knowl- 
edge of the needs of Duluth. "But we 
ought to leave it to the new comniis- 
sioncrs." he said. -They may be wiser 
than we are. They will be responsible; 
they can be held responsible. Every 
one of them will be under |25,000 bonds 

each." 

The ReHoIntlon. 

The resolution and the vote was as 
follows: 

"Resolved, That the committee on 
flnance of this council is hereby re 
quested to investigate as to the 



the new form will have power as under 
the present charter lo hire or fire any 
employes. 

• • « 

Chief Troyer asked that the police 

department be supplied with a new 

patrol as the present machine is almost 

worn out and Is liable to break down 

any time. 

« • • 

The health commissioner asked for 
authority to hire a man at $90 a month 
to aid in the enforcement of the hous- 
ing ordinance. 

• • • 

The city engineer was directed to 
prepare an estimate of the cost of 
grading and paving Woodland avenue 
from Fourth .street to Minneapolis ave- 
nue and of macadamizing it to the city 

limits. 

... 

The health commissioner was au- 
thorized to purchase three fire ex- 
tinguishers for the incinerator. 

« . • 

A ni\v plumbing ordinance presented 
by Alderman Frank Makowski had its 
first reading. 

MUSTMOVE 
THEJTABLE 

Council Passes Ordinance 

Aimed at Board of 

Trade Livery. 



Attorney Objects, Claiming 

the Council te Showing 

Discrimination. 




ad- 



NATURE FAKER IS 

BUSY IN VIRGINIA 



"A Su1j^«r!b-r" has scnf to The 

Herald a -■ tt. r from Virginia, Miiin., 

coiiliiiniiig a turkt-y story which as »• 

"f:;lie" vvcuUl be a prize, and as the 
truth ;soulJ be a greater one. He is 



vlisitint:- 
friend 
He u»^ 

cable a 
dry :h' 
to the 
thi:j ij). 
Btory : 
••I.,a> 
he.trd 
«rd *•• 
w;t 

to:. 



friend in Virginia, and this 

iiipenious sort of a man. 

r:il hundred feet of wire 

. Liothes line, and in order to 

If'th. s fr-iickly, has attached 

i" electric wire. All 

; according to the 

1. To quote the letter: 

;iy about daylijrht we 

ion in the back yard 

found the lines filled 

My friend used his 

und touched the but' 



the whole flock. They maintained their 
equilibrium for an instant and then 
toppled over, still held to the wire by 
the electric current, but dead. We 
hastened to the yard and in a few 
minute.s had cut their throats and bled 
them. We dry-picked them, saved the 
feathers and as a result have two fine 
feather beds and three pair of pil- 
lows. 

•Turkeys have gone down 10 cents a 
pound as many neighbors have been 
ir.flde a Christmas present and many 
more are waiting to see if they will 
get a goos?." 

Incidentally the writer compliments 
Virginia saying that he finds that city 
one of the most wide-awake, up-to- 
date, snappiest littl^ cities he has 
found in his wanderings. 



.?t.>.:it had electrocuted l Pharmacy. 



A Christmas suggestion — Buy your 
mother, your brother, your sister or 
your lover a bottle of Hygenol Toilet 
Water for Christm is. Sold by Lyceum 




LEAVE THE WORRY TO US ! 

If you are going to move into the city, out of the city or 
about the city, consult us. We will do the work and as- 
sume Jthc worry and responsibility. Best facilities for 
packing, shipping and storage of household furniture. 

DULUTH VAN AND STORAGE CO. 

18 FOURTH AVENUE WEST. 




i 



P RINTERS ) mi^Qwu£em/S£^ 
- WHO KfSO W HOW \ KIJiit:i}hfihiLlUL2kl/ 

' I iTtviiteace Bldj., 4tb Ave. W««t ui4 Superior Strr»t 



a£5T VVORK. BSTTER SERVICE 



Mjjrr^/fs*Bjtito£PS 



i'rtviiteuce Bid]., 4tb Ave. W««t taii Superior Str*9t 



Isability of outlining a tentative plan 
elative to the division of duties of 
the commissioners under the connnis- 
sion form of government, and other 
matters made necessary by the change 
from the present government to that 
of the commission form, and this coun- 
cil offers as a suggestion to said com- 
mittee in investigating said question 
that thev secure data from other cities 
of approximately the size of Duluth 
which are operating under the com- 
mission form of government." 

The vote was: 

Yeas — Aldermen Hicken, Makowski, 
Jordan. Hector. Curren. Neff. Hogan, 
MacDonell, Sandberg. Gibson, Bernard, 
Phillips, Krueger. President Hoar. 

Xavsi — Aldermen Miller, Scott. 

• • • 
Petitions were received for improv- 
ing One Hundred and Twenty-sixth 
avenue west, for a sanitary sewer In 
Piedmont avenue from Twenty-third 
avenue west to Seventh street and for 
grading and paving Seventeenth ave- 
nue east from Fourth to Sixth stroets. 
The board of public works was di- 
rected to proceed with the improement 
of Victoria street from Woodland ave- 
nue to the Hartley road. The esti- 
mated cost of plain or silica ooncrt te 
was $14,476.05 and of gravel, $S,7o9.30. 
The board was also ordered to go 
ahead with paving Robinson street 
between Fortieth and Forty-first ave- 
nues the estimated cost of which wi's 

|4,77"2.84. 

• • • 

The cItv attorney reported that he 
had concludfd the a^eement for re- 
taining the law firm of i>avls, Kellosg 
& Severance and Attorney F. W.Sulli- 
van to aid the city in defending the 
action brought by the Central Trust 
Company of New York in the United 
States district court. The salt is to 
enjoin the city from attarking the 
validity of the franchise of the street 
lailwav company. The attorneys will 
be paid $1,500 cash and $750 per month 
until $10,500 has been paid, tho bal- 
ance on $15,000 to be paid upon th? 
completion of the case. If it is settled 
in thp meantime the sum necessr^ry ta 
bring the fee to a total of $15,000 will 
be paid. 

• • • 

Mavor McCuen notified the council 
that "he had accepted the resignation 
of C. T. Fitzslmmons as a member of 
the board of fire commissioners. City 
Attorney Carmichael informed the 
council that M. M. Forbes has resigned 
as assistant city attorney and that he 
had appointed William P. Harrison to 
serve until April 14, next. 

• • • 

The resolution fixing salaries for 
the coming year was laid over until 
next wtck. Alderman Gihson said that 
he did not think the council should fix 
for them for any period past the time 
the commissionpra taUe their offices. 
He did not think it right to interfere 
with the commissioners !n Bo import- 
ant a matter. The city att-rney cx.- 
plaine.l that in order to be in rHarter 
form the resolution must fix the sal- 
aries for a period of a year. He said 
that the heads of departments under 



The city council last night passed 
an ordiuauoe which requires the Board 
of Trade livery stable on First street 
between Fourth and Fifth avenues 
Wist to vacate by April 1, 1914. 

The so-called livery stable or- 
dinance exempts all otner liveries in 
the downtown section ol the city. 

Attorney Charles U. Baldwin, at- 
torney for Capt. Sullivan of the Board 
of Trade livery, made a strong plea 
to the alderman, asking them not to 
pas3 the 01 inance, as it was in the 
interest of t-jvcral individuals and di- 
rected against Capt. Sullivan and not 
in the general interests of the city. 
He presented a letter from the health 
department in which the health com- 
missioner stated that the stable is sani- 
ary, although complaints have been 
made against it in the hot weather. 

N. J. Upham said that the point to 
be considered was the greatest in- 
terest of the greatest number. He 
pointed out that there are 414 tenants 
of adjacent buildings who are dis- 
comfited by the odors arising from 
the stable, as well as the 1,000 mem- 
bers of the Commercial club. He as- 
serted that the other stables which 
are exempted do not inconvenience 
nearly so large a number of people. 
He denied that the ordinance was in 
the interest of individuals. 

Charles A. Duncan stated that his 
building had beeh erected long before 
the stable and that for years he had 
been a silent sufferer. He declared 
that the stable is a positive nuisance. 
He said that it will not be a difficult 
matter for Capt. &illlvan to secure an- 
other suitable location for a livery 
stable.- 

Alderman Hicken said that in pre- 
senting the ordinance the committee 
had no ulterior motive; that the com- 
mittee had no personal considerations 
and that Its position throughout had 
been the benefit of the greatest num- 
ber 

Aldermen Curren, Scott and Bernard 
said that there can be no question but 
what the stable is a nuisance and 
ought to be moved, but that Capt. Sul- 
livan should be given ample time in 
which to secure another location. Al- 
derman Curren thought it should be 
two years, but Alderman Scott's reso- 
lution fixing the date as April 1, 1914, 
was carried. ^ x, 

"The limits fixed by the ordinance 
arf^ Lake avenue to Fifth avenue west 
and Michigan street to Second street. 
Within that district It makes It un- 
lawful for any stable to be erected 
within 150 feet of any church, school, 
club or public building. It was carried 
by a vote of 11 to 5 after the amend- 
ment had been passed providing that 
it shall not take effect until April 1, 
191i. 



NewYork&ntral lines 

Lake Shore Railway 

Smooth "Water-Level Route'* 

TO 

NEW YORK, BOSTON 

New England and Atlantic Coast 

Twentieth Century Limited 



Arrive New York 9v40 a. m. 



Leave Chicago 12:40 noon 

Lake Shore Six 

Leave Chicago 10:15 a. m. Arrive New York 9:15 it. m. 

Lake Shore Limited 

Leave Chicago 5:30 p. m. Arrive New York 5:25 i>. m. 

Arrive Boston 8:30 p. m. 

New York Express 

Leave Chicago 11:30 p. m. Arrive New York 7K>0 ii. m. 

Arrive Boston 7:05 a. m. 

Seven Other Daily Trains between 
Chicago, New York and Down East. 

The Best Traveling Fraternity consists of those who 
use for their trips to the East this peerless service over 
the smooth "Water-Level Route.'* 

All trains leave from La Salle Street Station, most conver.ienlly 
located in the very heart of Chicago, the only station on tie 
Elevated Loop, and arrive at the wonderful, new Grand Central 
Terminal, in the heart of New York's business and liotel distrit:t« 
on subway, surlace and elevated lines. 



Apply to your local agent for tickets end sleeping car 

reservations, or for complete inlormation caU on or 
aadress our 

Winnipeg Office, 

501 Union Trust Building 

T. J. Randall, 

Traveling Passenger Agent 



Arrive Boston ll:5^'a. tXk 




tertainment was followed by refresh- 
ments served in the banquet hall. 

At the installation ceremonies, War- 
ren E. Greene, retiring worshipful 
master of the lodge during its twenty- 
third year, 1912, presided. The elect- 
ive officers installed were: Carl E. 
Lonegren, worshipful master; Edward 
Armstrong, senior warden; Chauncey 
Colton, junior ■jvarden, and Burr Por- 
ter, secretary. 

The appointive officers who received 
the installation ceremonies were: Dr. 
W. J. Works, senior deacon; Parker M. 
Paine, junior deacon: Fred R. Levins, 
senior steward: Stanley L. Mack, jun- 
ior steward; Henry Van Brunt, tyler; 
H. "\A'. Richardson, chaplain, and 
George L. Hargraves, marshal. 

Warren E. Greene, retiring worship- 
ful master, was appointed orator for 
the coming year. During the evening, 
Mr. Greene was presented with a 
handsome past m-aster"s jewel by his 
Ionic brethren. 



an alderman here and was ht-ld for 
court in $.50,000 ball to answer to the 
charge of embezzllnK |187,000 f ; om the 
Federal Oil & Gas company cf i.>kla- 
homsT. Moore was the company's treas- 
urer, and contended that as such h.> 
was allowed to use the money. He 
claims that the chaige is purely tech- 
nical. 



WAR VETERANS 

MAY UNITE 



Theft Laid to I^nwyer. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Dec. 24. — Elmer Moore, 
an attorney, waived a hearing before 



Some Talk of Consolidating 

the Two Local 

Camps. 

Camp John G. MeEwen, No. 6 "and 
Camp Maj. A. M. Diggles. No. 13, 
United Spanish War Veterans. may 
consolidate within the next two 



months. A n-ovenient in ih-.t directi' n. 
is now on foot. .Special meetings vf 
both will be called tarly next month 
lo consider the ccnsolidation. 

Diggles tamp was crfe-anized two 
years ag? with a charter membersh-p- 
of thirty. It has now dcuLled in ?>«:•. 
McEweri famp now has about '.<'(•■ 
n»embers and during the past two- 
\ears has shewn a n.-avked incrc.'ise m 
membership. 

"There really is little cal: for th^ 
two camps of v<rt^ran«' in Duluth." d»-- 
clared P.ollai^d H. Hcughtalirg, cm- 
mand^r-ele.-t of McEwcn camp y«»et*-r- 
day. "I am sure all cf the member!* 
of both camps V7ill agree with n^e 
that with the ur-it^d camps better 
work can be done and more efficient, 
heln given those members that need 
it."' 

Camp McEwen recfntly elected ti^e 
followlr.er offif-ers for *the following 
ye.ir: R. R. Hcughtaling, commander: 
Adam I apoint. s'nicr vice commanv'.er: 
Han? B. Brer holm, junior vice com- 
mandtr: W. 1>. Pieicc. rffictr of th» 
d'av: Nick Be- g* 3on. officer of the- 
gua:d, hr.i\ C. C Tcare, trustee. 



an^ 






Here*s Health 

TrrlE best medicine you can take 



y.i :• ^: 



for sleeplessness, tnin blood, 
**tliat tireJ feeling' or a "^grouch 
is a glass of foaming, sparkling 






^. 






r\ 



^ 



k^EEH 



w> 



fed 



3> 



...v^.. 



I 



"^ 



GER 



Oolut 



y/^^. 



.i" 






'VTl , 



HIOH SOHGOL GIRLS 
GIVE BURLESQUE 

Present Sketch FollowLng 

installation of Ionic 

Lodge Officers. 

Thirty high sehool girls staged a 
feminine concepfTon " of a Masonic 
lodge In session ,in a sketch entitled 
"A Lodge of Instruction" last eve- 
ning at the Masenic Temple auditor- 
ium. 

The sketch was written by Prof. A. 
F M Custance flind staged for the 
entertainment of the members of Ionic 
lodge. No. 186. A. F. & A. M. The 
program contained a number of mu- 
sical selections by the girls and sev- 
,eral numbers by the Scottish Rite 
quartet. , . ., , 

The sketch was a burlesque on the 
Installation of Ionic lodge's officers 
which had taken place at a cercmonl'al 
held earlier in the evening. Iho cn- 



:^/ 



'Jill. 



«> 



'/////, 






w 



i\\i. 



:i ^■ 



■Ii y 'yyyl 1 



'■'i , 



All Yeu Need For 
A Good Lunch 



,rS: ^ = i/M^5?l 



«n 



' '"<-^,/' 



And it's the 

most delicious 

"medicine" you 

ever took, toa 

There is no beer 

mor€' pure or brewed 

of better materials — nor 

bottled In a more wholesome"' 

manaer. 

Order a case for your home, 
will enjoy It and profit by It. 



i 



'V.N 



V^5S§5^ 



Your family 



nTGER BREWING CO. 

Over 30 Yeais in Dulutk 



A*. 



T'.-tday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



ARE PACKING 
THEMSKETS 

Members of Salvation Army 

Will Deliver Christmas 

Dinners. 



Free Treat for 500 Children 

Sunday at the 

Armory. 



Th** headauurters of the Salvatiim 
Arni.vs relief toips at 2i Fourth ave- 
nue west is one of the busiest plat-es 
In the city, an.i tliLs mornins Knsisrn 
W. i:. Graham .said that by 12 o'oloeiv 
toniglit the tiiskets now beins: i>aelved, 
t-aeh contamiiii; material for a Olirist- 
nias duiner for five people, will be in 
the hall is of the needy ones to whom 
the • are assiyrneil. Many will not be 
i!)le t" call for them and to these the 
lia.skvts will he deliverd. 

J-ast iiiiiht Knsinn Oraham addressed 
the Li-iuiis in the Diamond and 10m- 
presa theaters, the result beinff in each 
rase that lil)eral contributions were 
mad- ttvuard the army's relief fund. 
He ^v:li make short addresses in two 
more thoiters, the Odeum and Lyric 
this f «niiig. He is seelcing oll\er op- 
poriur.itied lor tomorrow, for he says 
Ohii-trn.s .lav will not be too late. 
. : ^;: ;hMii says that most people 
.; '•'< t > liave been very kind with 
«i >n:iTions of money. clothinpr. 
• '■ > ' ■ • have not yet replied. 
ler donations by this 
: :r.e tomorrow. Ohrist- 
\ ill 11 >t eiKl tlie work of grood 
t the army is doinpr. Xext 
i> aitornoon the army will give 
.^ treat" to r>00 children at the 
ind the ensign asks that 
~ iirs.^ man who handles toys. 
- and the like, be pre- 
• • to this Sunday af- 
n.)i.;y the army about it and the 
colle. tioii v.i!! h,^ called for. The en- 
sign is a; .inpT the Third Regri- 
nient l>a! ionate its services for 
this o to help make a happy 
hoi-H" i needy children. Visitors, 
he anuouiues will be welcome. 

Th*' ensisn tells many stories of 
niiii; incidents which have 
'f late in connection with 
to make Christmas cheery 
' 'ne occurred yesterdav. A 
t;rui' ■ • lanner. called at the 
hea rs and gave in the 

r :i : y suffering: from need. 
askr.i the armv to furnish 
' < 'iir!.stn;.'s dinner.' He donated 
■.V ird the dinner and will deliver 
'•<ker him.self today. It has been 
■ ! that he had been supplvinK 
the faiiiily mentionel with clothingand 
<uher necessities for some thne. His 
grut'-w — ■■ ■ '1 on the exterior. 

^ 'ery anxious that all 

"f*' " "'y spend a pleasant 

-.'^' iind urges not only dona- 

tion v.mies 



Ens 

appo 

their 

etc. 

He 

ev. 

ma - 

chi 

Sun.; 

a f' 

Ar: 

eve 

can 

pa; 

fair. 



after pas.sed away. Ili.s a-;Yil i ir. nts. 
both of whom were liviuK with iilm. 
wore at liis bedside when he died. 

VASSAR^IRLS^GET 
BABY BACK HOME 

St. Paul Mother Receives 

Her Boy From Miss 

Mary Turner. 

St. Paul, Minn.. Dec, 24.— Some moth- 
er in a humble St. Paul home la oele- 
brnting Christmas one day early with 
her 1-year-old boy, brought all the 
way from Krooklyn by tour Vasaar 
girl.s, according to Miss Mary Turner 
of Minneapolis, one of the four girls 
into whose care the child was en- 
trusted by Brooklyn Associated Chari- 
ties officials. Miss Turner, who makes 
her lionie vyith Mr. and Mrs. A. H. 
Poehler here, today refused to disclose 
the name of the mother to whom the 
child was brouglit. 

••Tliere was only one way for that 
baby to get to Its mother,'" said Miss 
Turner, -and that was for us four to 
bring him. The little boy had been left 
with the Associated Charities by her 
when her first husband died, and then 
she came West and secured employ- 
ment In St. Paul. Recently she married 
again and wanted her baby back. We 
four girls were only too willing to act 
as escorts. Miss Katherine Lewis of 
Springfield. III., acted as leader, and 
is entitled to all the credit, 

•'The other three girls stopped at 
Chicago and I brought the baby the 
rest of the way alone. The "chikl 
was not troublesome at all. He wanted 
to sleep all the time when he wasn't 
eating, but when he happened to be 
awake he just kept cooing. On the 
trip West we got to loving him so it 
was hard to give him up. It was more 
than worth it. too, when I gave the 
baby to the mother." 



NEGROES BUY 
PROPERTY AT 
LAKE GENEVA 



Chicago Syndicate Pro- 
poses to Invade Exclu- 
sive Summer Resorts. 



Florida, Alabama and Cali- 
fornia Also to Be 
Entered. 



he. I 
occ 
the 
to 

man. 
arm\ 

tiarr 
wh! 
wit 1 

$•: t. 

the ' 
leai 



SUPERIOR 

SETTLER IS ARRESTED 
FOR ATTE MPTED MURDER 

CJust Saari, a settler near Brule, 
about twenty miles trom Superior, was 
arrested tliis morning bv Deputv 
Sneriff Buchannon for attempting to 
kill his wife and son last Saturday. 
Saari drove his family out of the house 
at the point of a gun and later disap- 
peared. He was airaigned in court this 
mornins and his hearing set for Jan. 2. 
^ 

Year's Death Record. 

Oyer ,")00 people died in Superior 
during the year just closing. The to- 
tal will not equal the number that 
died in 1911 and 1910. Among the 
deaths were three murders, one of 
starvation and one from overwork. 
Thirty-nine met death bv accident, 
while six were drowned iduring the 
year. 



Jack Johnson One of the 

Prime Movers in the 

Scheme. 






(jS 



I OBITUARY 

Georgp ir. Taylor, well known in 
theatrical circle's and father of George 
C Taylor, managing director of the 
Liebler company, died at his liome in 
Xew York, Dec. 2:{. Mr. Tavler was 
Bti anient admirer of the national game 
and was as w.ll known In baseball 
circles as in the theatrical world. He 
formerly owned a newspaper In Chil- 
llcolhe. Ohio. 



On Pension Roll. 



George Whereatt, retiring court of- 
ficer, was yesterday formally placed 
on the pension roll by the police pen- 
sion board. He will receive $4l'.60 a 
month Up to his death. Mr. Wliereatt 
was on the police force over twenty- 
three years and is the first officev to 
be placed on tlie pension roll. 
^ 

Curling Season Opens. 

The annual contest between the 
president's and vice president's rink 
I will be featured tomorrow at the Su- 
I perlor Curling club. The play will 
I open the regular curling season and 
from now on the various trophy con- 
tests will be featured. 



Br. H. p. Porter, former United 
Statt -! army surgeon and once surgeon- 
geneiul ..f the G. A. R., died in Butte 
Mont Dec. 2:3. aged 73 years. He was 
born in Connecticut. 



Jean nnptlMto Kdoiiard Detallle. the 

Freiuh battle painter, better known 
as Edouard Detaille. died in Paris Dec 
•2i. at the a-,, of 64. Detaille was the 
best kn.wn ..i modern French artists 
He had -sulferrd lor a long time from 
an aft.'ction of the heart. This morn- 
ing when he awoke he found con.<5ider 
iibl(» difficulty in breathing, A doctor 
was called and administered stimulants 
wltli >ut tifect, and the painter shortly 



Saloonkeeper Fined. 

Ole Emerson, proprietor of a saloon 
at 1221 Xorth Thirti street, was fined 
150 and costs in municipal court yes- 
terday for violation of the Sundav clos- 
ing law. Emerson was given a choice 
of a fine or serving 60 davs in the 
workhouse. He paid the fine. 

« 

Riitehern .506-Poiind Hor. 

ifarquette, Mich., Dec. 24.— (Special 
to The Herald.)— J. M. John.son, a 
boardingliouse-keeper at Gwinn. has 
butchered a pig which, dressed, weighed 
506 pound.s. The animal was of Poland 
China sto<k and was raised bv John- 
son. It is claimed to be the' largest 
hog ever grown in Marquette countv. 




%ccvQattiki\i^ 



To One and All We Wish 
A Merry, Merry Christmas 







■■■■ ^^•*S^>~.^ ^'w 





Chicago, Dec. 24.— Fashionable sum- 
mer resorts In Illinois, Wisconsin, 
Michigan and even winter resorts In 
P'lorida, Alabama and California, are 
to be the scenes of operations of a 
Chicago negro syndicate under the 
name of the Lincoln Athletic and So- 
cial club. 

This was brought out today by 
statements made by those interested 
in the sale of L.ake Geneva, Wis., 
property which It was reported. Jack 
Johnson, the negro pugilist, had pur- 
chased as a present for Lucile Cameron 
Johnson, his wliite wife. 

The statements were made toy Jud- 
son G, Sherman, who • sold the Lake 
Geneva property to the negro syndi- 
cate, and W. E. Harris and James H. 
Porter said to be leading spirits in 
the sclieme. 

To get the property wherever it can 
be purchased in a fashionable district 
or resort, wliether in Lake Geneva, 
>A IS., or Geneva, Switzerland, if it is 
popular and will bring reward, is the 
purpose of the organization according 
to W, H. Harris. 

Object, "to Make Money." 

"The object of this club is to make 
money," said Harris. 'We intend to 
buy property wherever we think we 
can make money out of it. The mem- 
bers of the club are all negroes of 
mean.-*, and have capital enough to 
swing almost any kind of a real estate 
deal. 

Judson G. Sherman savs his nego- 
tiations for the sale of the Lake Ge- 
neva property were with Attorney W. 
G. Anderson, a negro. 

"t am 70 years old and must sell my 
property," said Mr. Sherman. "It has 
been on the market some time and 1 
tried to sell it to my neighbors, but 
could not come to terms. I gave -An- 
derson an option which has not ex- 
pired. 

"If the syndicate desires to purchase 
under the option I will sell, as I can- 
not go back on my word." 

"If you are approached by citizens 
with a similar offer for the property 
will you take itT' Mr. Sherman was 
asked. 

"Not until the option expires," he 
replied. 

L.lke W'heatou Affair. 
The scandal over the .sale of the 
Lake Geneva property recalls a similar 
incident which occurred at Wheaton, 
an exclusive suburb of Chicago several 
years ago. At that time it was re- 
ported that a syndicate of negroes had 
purchased a summer home in Wheaton 
and that it was to be offered to the 
late "Pony" Moore, negro saloonkeep- 
er and gambler. The syndicate is said 
to have sold out to adjacent property 
owners at a handsome profit. 

BANK WRECKER^ 

LEAVES PRISON 

Former Cashier of Defunct 
First National of Iron- 
wood is Released. 



Thursday Morning 

OUR STORE OPExXS AT 8:30 A. M. 
with .«;ome of the season's most import- 
ant sales. 

All Suits at Half 

None reserved — even the Wooltex 
Suits go at half price ! 

It's the end of the year clean-up! 



All Hats Also Va-Price 



All Furs Now on Sale at 1/4 Off, 

You May Buy Christmas Furs 

here today at the usual after Christmas 
prices ! 

And remember— Gray's furs are good 
furs. 



ararquette, Mich., Dec. 24. — (,Speclal 
to The Herald.) — Former Cashier Elven 
T. Larson, one of the wreckers of the 
First National bank at Ironwood some 
four years ago, who was convicted in 
Federal court here on a charge of vio- 
lating the banking laws, after a pro- 
longed and hard-fought trial, has been 
released on parole from the Detroit 
house of correction, to which he was 
sentenced for a term of seven vears. 

Larson was let out of prison, after 
having served one year of a three and 
one-half-year term. Details are lack- 
ing as to the Influences that were ef- 
fective in procuring demencv, but it Is 
asserted Larson will leave the state 
His destination will probably be Utah 
where it is said a prominent mining 
man will assist him in getting on his 
feet. 



HIS HORSE DID 

NOT LIVE LONG 



Tliere is an old adage about never 
looking a gift horse in the mouth, but 
.lotincy La Tour would have been wise 
to lerform this act this afternoon 

Johnny, who is a youth of tender 
years, has been spending his spare 
time around the livery stable of L. D 
Goldberg on First street between Lake 
avenue and First avenue east. Xot 
long ago the owner of the stable gave 
Johnny a "horse." The owner thought 
the ' horse'' was about ready for the 
equine cenfetery, but Johnnv disposed 
110 animal within a few hours for 

-That looked like "easv monev" to 
Johnny, and today when Mr. Goldbere 
offered him another horse. Johnny 
leapt^d at tlie bargain. He offered to 
give Johnny the "horse- if he would 
take It away. Johnny carefully led 
the animal from the stable. TheV had 
gone less than 200 feet when the" ani- 
mal fell to the ground and expired 
Johnny took to his heels, and the po- 
[j^« and health department were no- 



BREATHITT COUNTY 

MAN M URDERED. 

Jackson, Ky.. Dec. 24. — Frank Os- 
born. a prominent merchant, was shot 
and killed hei'e last night while in his 
store. Dexter and John Howard 
brothers, were arrested in connectiun 
witii the shooting and are under guard 
in tlie Breathitt county jail, N'o cau.-ie 
for the shooting i.s known by the po- 
lice. 



ARRESTED FOR 

B IWABI K POLICE. 

Robert McMahan, formerlv log in 
spector for the Duluth Log" companv 
was arrested at the union rtep it to ' 
day as he got off a Mlssabe train fhe 
police here having been notified 'that 
he is wanted at Biwabik for stealing 
He quit work about Dec. 1. and since 
I that time, it is claimed, hau been loaHng 




December 24, 1912. 



II 




Grand Original 

Christmas Cabaret 

Entertainment 

IN THE CAFE, COMMENCING AT TEN O'CLOCK 

TONIGHT! 

1 ni ^?^l entertainment by real entertainers- Misses 
LeClair, Messiere Rischere and Sfierman will be cos- 
tumed as dolls. You 'II enjoy the fun, so be on hand. 




MAKIE ROSE LE CLAIR. 



l L^M^ 




OLLAND 




(THE HOTEL WITH THE CHRISTMAS SPIRIT) 

Tomorrow We Will Serve a Sumptuous Christmas Dinner 
— a la Carte, Commencing at 11 a. m. 

Everything that's good for satisfying the appe- 
tite will be here for your choosing at reasonable 
prices, bring your friends here for Christmas 
dinner. 



Christmas Night Vaudeville 

STARTS AT TEN O'CLOCK 
Peserve your tables so as to avoid disappointment. 



In Preparation for New Year's Eve Grand Bacchanale and 
Reveille Musicale, Tables Should Be Reserved Now! 




3IARGUERITA RISCHERE. 

- 




GEORGIA SHER>LVX. 



-^ 



around the saloon of his brother-in-law 
at Biwabik. 

• The brother-in-law is the complain- 
ant, and says that McMahan stole $110 
in cash and four boxes of cigars from 
the saloon. McMahan was sent back 
at once. He claims that he had 585 
when he quit work and that he won the 
rest playing poker. He was on his 
way to Wisconsin to spend Christmas 
with relatives. 



Exquisite Flowers. 

Big assortrnent. Prices right at Huot'3. 



MRS. WARD MAY GET 

THE ORDER OF MERIT 




ST. PAUL POSTOFFIGE 
REOOBD IS eROKEII 

Holiday Travel Through the 

Saintly City Also Is 

Heavy. 

St. Paul. Minn., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.)— With a ticket sale at 
the Union depot of approximately 
J15.000, the local holiday travel through 
the St. Paul gateway probablv reached 
its niaximum for the season yesterday, 
ihe Lnion station record for one day's 
ticjket sales is about $18,000. 

The number of travelers who passed 
through the passenger terminal ves- 
terday aggregated 50,000. The travel 
rusn IS expected to continue tomorrow 
morning. 

7^^- ,?*•, ^^"^ postoffice yesterdav 
established a new record for the amount 
of iirst class mail handled in anv one 

Qo-'o-n-^''?'" ^ f- "^- ""t" midnight, 
•i Jo, 8a0 pieces of first-class mail were 
handled at the main office. Prior to 
this the largest day's business wa.<? a 
week prior to the last election, when 
about 280,000 pieces of mail passed 
through the canceling machines. 

The figures for yesterday do not in- 
clude the first class mail stamped by 
hand, the first-class mail handled by 
the various sub-stations or the second, 
third and fourth-class mail handled 
during the dav. 




1^1°^^'"^' "^P^tinsa of «tudents. There 
are rumors also of the discovery of I 
made """'"■«<'' °f arrests have been 



ANOTHER POISON 

CASE IN CHICAGO. 

^-^vf"^^-^^^"'**' * wealthy contractor 

^everatdiv.^'.r^*^'" home last Friday 
se\erai dajs af-.er making a will leav- 

"ctim' of'/'^^^J'*' *« hi/wife. was tAe 

uY. ^ murder plot. 

Physicians who analyzed Raude's 
viscera testiaed that thev found a 
\^;:r 5"''^»t^'>- '»5 poison in -the organs 
quest coHapsed during the in- 



, °". ^" "Which the rebels were re- 
pulsed, the Orozco revolutionists con- 
trol the Mexican Northwestern railway. 
wTiich runs between Juarez, on tho 
^2ifr< ^llA <^''^»huahua City, the state 
capital. The territory tributary to tho 
American railway, which Inolfdes tho 
Pearson syndicate's lumbering towns 
of Pearson and Madero. and the San 
Pedro mining district, also Is brought 
under rebel rule. 



WOUNDS HIS WIFE 
AND KILLS HIMSELF 

Cleveland Man Enacts 

Double Crime in Son's 

Presence. 

Oalveston, Tex.. Dec. 24. — A. M. 
Funk of Cleveland, Ohio, today shot 
and seriously wounded his wife and 
killed himself in their room in Gal- 
veston hotel. Their 10-vear-old Fon 
who witnessed the tragedv, rati 
screaming from the room and gave the 
alarm. Funk is believed to have been 
in poor health. 



REBELS SEIZE 

CASAS GRANDES, 

El Paso. Tex., Dec. 24.— Casas Gran- 
des, the most important town in the 

r.?'"^»'^''}^T^"'* lumbering district south- 
west of Juarez, has been taken by th.^ 
rebels, personally commanded by Gen" 
Pasquale Orozco, Jr.. it is reported 
troni federal and rebel official sources 

A column of 800 men marching 
against the rebels at Ascension was 
aefeated, it was; announced. The fed- 
eral commander, Gen. Jose Blanco, Was 
taken prisoner. 

By taking Ca ?as Grandes, i/ e scene 
of a hard struggle in the Madero revo- 



HIS TWO AIMS. 

Los Angeles Times: Frank Krauso, 
a Cleveland philanthropist, has estab- 
lished the Thirty Cent Egg club, and 
hopes by means of a club bovcott. to 
bring down the price of eggs to a 
reasonable figure. 

Being complimented on the hard and 
unselfish work he has given to this 
movement, Mr. Krause replied- 

"Unselfish work, work that doesn't 
pay, is what this country needs more 
than anything else. We are all too 
mercenary here. I once said to a little 
newsboy: 

•"Have you an aim in life?* 

'• 'Yes, sir. I have two aims,' he re- 
plied. 

•■ What are they, my son?' 

" 'The first Is to become a million- 
aire. 

"'Aha! And the second?" 
•• nhe second Is to become a mulU- 
milhonaire.' " 



INHERITED TALEXT. 

New York Sun: Knicker — Verv talk- 
ative. Isn't she? " 

Bocker — Yes; her father was a bar- 
ber and her mother was a woman. 




MRS. HUMPHRY WARD. 

Tt Is reported that Mrs. Humphry 
Ward, the well-known English author, 
is to receive the Order of Merit when 
the New Year honors are announced. 
This order was Instituted by the late 
King Edward and is designed as a 
special distinction for those eminent 
in war, science, literature <^r art and is 
limited to twenty-four. The badgV^ is 
a cross of red and blue enamel and 
bears the words "For Merit" in gold 
letters with a laurel wreath. Mrs 
Ward was born at Hobart, Tasmania, 
June 11, 1851. She has written many 
books which are known all over tbe 
n'orid. 



STATISTICS OF THE 

DU LUTH DIOCESE. 

. The official Protestant Episcopal di- 
rectory. Just Issued, gives the follow- 
ing statistics on the Duluth diocese for 
tlie past year: Clergy. 40: parishes and 
mlssion.s. 73; baptisms. 479; confirmed, 
303; communicant.s. 2,915; marriages 
133; burials. IT.S; Syndav school schol- 
ars. 1.770; teachers, 210; contributions. 
$128,645. 



Best Christmas Gifts 



OUR LEADERS AT 



REBEL PLOT LAID 

BARE IN RUSSIA 

St. Petersburg, Dec. 24. — Searches bv 
the police of various colleges, but 
notably the twelfth gymnasium, which 
communicates with the apartment of 
Minister of Instruction L. V. Casso. 
have revealed, it is said, nightly rcvo- 



ALL TOYS 
HALF PRICE 

R. R. FORWARD & CO. 




aind up. One look will convince you. 

NOVELTIES, 25c UP. 

Writing Paper in elegant boxes, 25c up to $7.50. 

Cigars and Pipes— Largest and best line in the city. 



Edward M. Stone. 

THE B(DOKMAN. 221 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

OPEN CHRISTMAS DAY UNTIL 1 O'CLOCK 



12 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 



%^/^%^^^^^^'9/%^^^^^^%'9'^^^/^^%^%^^^ 



LATEST SPORTING NEWS OF THE DAY 



have summer homes adjoining the pro- 




OSSIP AND COM- 
MENT ON SPORTS 
AND PASTIMES 
OF ARENA, FIELD 
A ND TRACK. 

! 



I By BRUCE 



R 



ly ki 
ether - 
t:«.'ii 
rtiati 
In 

hand 

iurti 
makes 

ci :>e 

\V1. ; 
tliillk • 

any ■• 
you ]. 
to in 
boss 

of t!.' 
aban< 

TI. 
vith 
gage 

Eddi 
f ath>. 
of t! 
h:.5 i 
He 1 
in h> 
weiy 
the : 
to hi; 

weiglit 

Curlv 

But 

Harry 

I\rns 

clains': 



IGHT before Christmas the 
I'.i 5-e tnrns to \hc "what- 
\v< uld - they - like - the -most" 
■■•:.::. What you and the rest 
vant, and what we are 
: 1. are matters general- 
wife to be, and those 
■ ir.g out on the affec- 



wcaker hemp of the 



■'•ig- 



\\. 



S world everyone who 

s insists (-n having a 

ning of the most ap- 

for those whose fea- 

;ght brightens up and 

to the vast following 

aired kids. 

will we begin? It's hard to 

tr.e fir^t one. We haven't 

. \ ?. !:^ht champic n any more, 

..:u! the time honored cus- 

; at the stocking of the 

..vvwoii.'!"t division, and 

t;^.,a to the little brother 

?ir. v'c-- brigade, must be 

weigh.t championship, 

cd and the old mort- 

liilly Papke wiped out, 

: the nicest present for 

:ty. Since a kid on 

i' we can believe some 

s we hear, this Eddie chap 

• '•rtged to be the champion. 

I boxing since he was a kid 

r teens, so that the middle- 

. npionship would be about 

gift that could be handed 



i!' knows who is the welter- 
,.^ji of the world. Even 
iias a right to claim it. 
■ ;l t — he's getting wiser. 
Lrewer. Art Magill, Wild Cat 
and some of the oth.ers arc 
•^ :'.. and the old title, regilded, 
rcfurb:-iied and presented on a nice 
little silver tray, would make a cork- 
ing C'nristmas gift, old fellow, to any 
cf the promising boys battling in the 
welterweight division. 



.••iV. r^"- ' 



Jim 
v.-ii 

ami 

eld 

Fitz 

chance 



' 't would like to pick a 

.1. he dies. That is the 

1 his life, superceding the 

■ 'ood desire to beat Bob 

Zbyszko would like the 

meet Frank Gotch, now that 



would be a nice, long cherished gift. 
But wlio in the world can give it? 

Frank Chance, despite the orange 
grove at Glendora, Cal.. it's a good 
bet, wouldn't sneer at the much dis- 
cussed twentj' thousand per year and 
the proviso calling for a slice of the 
profits. But, you might ask, what I 
would he care for profits with $20,000 
a year in real monc3'? 

Riding home, which is after all the 
H I best place, it migiit be stated that 
Harry Blume and Doc McCuen would 
be tick1e<l to death with the Associated 
Press verification of the story that 
Duluth is going to break into the 
Twin Cities. This established fact 
would cause uproarious laughter, 
many cigars and several other things. 
Doc ^IcXulty, genial, complacent, 
and one might say, sangfroid, would 
like to catch just one fish as big as 
some of the ones he has painted with 
fervid and eloquent imagination. 

Paddy McDoimell would like to 
have a photograph of himself when 
he was breaking the world's record 
with a 125-pound dumbbell. 

Funny how these old boys hanker 
after some of the athletic glory of the 
past. 

Ed Furni's dream of the enclosed 
hockey rink is about to be realized — 
a Christmas present of a winning 
hockey team would be a very nice lit- 
tle present for Edward. 

A victory over Mike Yokel, his 
hated rival, would be the nicest little 
Yuletide remembrance that anyone 
could possibly give to Walter Miller — 
and this lad is verj^ appreciative. 

Art White would like a new style 
in soft tuxedo shirts and the ability 
to walk up Second avenue hill with- 
otit puffing. 

Cub Lajoie would like tJie ability to 
prophesy when weak pitchers are go- 
ing to have good days. Leave the 
rest to him. 

Garry would like to make a W'estern 
trip with the Giants and room with 
Chief Meyers and Fred Snodgrass. 

Yussift Malimout would like to have 
the allies sign the peace protocal and 
the right to speak his mind regarding 
Frank Gotch. 

Al Ribenack would like some new 
fish stories. 

Johnny Geistman would like to for- 
get about the Shamrocks, 
w • • 

Matsuda. the Jap, became tangled 

up in some of his dates and will not 

wrestle Walter Miller until the third 

of the new year. The little Pole says 

the later they come the harder they 

fall. 

• • • 

Jim McLennan has become circula- 
tion manager for Robert W. Service. 



FIGHTING POSE OF BIG 

OPPONENT OF MCARTY 




posed negro club property, 

If either Jack .Johnson or members 
of the so-called "social club" of ne- 
grroes attempt to establish a residence 
In Lake Geneva, they will find Mayor 
Frank Autesky arrayed against them. 
The mayor declared he would confer 
with residents of the village and take 
whatever action they deemed best. 

"I don't think either Johnson or any 
members of his race will establish 
themselves In our midst," tUe mayor 
said. "bt\t should any of them attempt 
Bucli a move. I will t«ke the case up 
with the residents. I suppose the po- 
lice powers would cover such a case." 

THINK THEY HAVE 
A SECOND WALSH 



AL PALZER. 



TEN EYGX WELL 

RETURN SHORTLY 



a ,- . 




SW( 




to L 




srit> 
thi: 

Ail 

Wu.:, 
Vr, 


y 

■1 


to • 


. . . 1 


tmv 

d!e 




erf. 
Ca. 




Ti;t 
the n 
the 


ret 
ce*t 

V 


c^ne .( 


.: iti 



he h:.s become one of the adepts in 
the -Ptch-as-catch-can game, and 
liari'' . rticles of the match to tlie 

Pol'- salver, there would be a 

smii: e to greet you. 

Luti;er McCarty and Al Palzer 
have their eyes on the diamond belt 
that Uncle Tom McCarey and one of 
the leading jewelers of Los Angeles 
are figuring on. Both of the boys 
would thank Santa and cherish all the 
pood will stuff, should some one slip 
this liitlc emblem in their large never- 
wears. 

'■ of us, from the tender 
y have been taught the 
and humility of this better 
an to receive maxim, it is 
that Ad Wolgast can't see 
t: is subdued light." Now 
•ve tlie championship belt to 
:hie; the new belt that 
had made and turned over 
• Dutchman, witli the sen- 
; that the diamond mid- 
ou'id be the personal prop- 
prominent agriculturist of 
- some brief spell. 

:urn of this belt would be 
. the most thoughtful and 
rlieerful little gift that any- 
bestow upon little Adolph. 
This also goes for Tom Jones. 

A pei.nant for the Boston Nationals 



INDOOR BASEBALL 
AND DANCE 

COMPANY i\ THIRD INF., VH. 

FIRST DIVISION, M. S. M^ 

'U'ednefiday evenlnjr, Deo. 25tli. Game 
called, .S;:{0; dancing, 0:30. Admi-s- 
Mlftn, 271 centH. 



WILL GOTCH 

ENTER RING? 



Indications Point to Awak- 
ened Interest Upon the 
Part of Champion. 

Buffalo. N. Y., Dec. 24. — Is Frank 
Gotch beginning to sit up and take 
notice of Zbyszko's challenge for the 
world's wrestling championship? Indi- 
cations are pointing that way. At any 
rate, following the arrival of the Pol- 
ish wrestler in America on Thursday, 
John Day, sporting editor for the Chi- 
cago Inter Ocean, last night wired to 
Buffalo stating that Gotch had sala 



Duluth Boat Club Coach Is 

Expected Here on 

the First. 

.Tames E. Ten Eyck, coach of the 
Duluth Boat club, wlU return to Du- 
luth on the first of the year, accord- 
ing to the statement made today by 
one of the officials of the Boat club. 
Shortly after the first of the year the 
work of instructing the men on the 
machines will be taken up, the new 
rowing apparatus, the very latest of its 
kind, teing on its way to Duluth at the 
present time. 

Some of the men are working out at 
the Y. M. C. A. gymnasium at the 
present time. With the arrival of Ten 
Eyck there will be a call Issued for 
candidates and it is expected that a 
large crowd of men will get out and 
trv for places In the boat. 

Owing to the laudable fact that Du- 
luth won both the junior eight and 
bantam four events at Winnipeg last 
season it will be necessary to make up 
new crews. This gives the new men 
who trv for the crew a greater op- 
portunitv than has been the case dur- 
ing the last — well, anyway, for a good 
manv years past. 

Duluth's ambition is to place a crew 
on the water that can defeat the crack 
' senior eight of Winnipeg. According 
to the present Indications Duluth 
should have the best rowing year In 
the history of the club. 

BIG MATClTSEt 

FOR LATER DATE 

Miller and Matsuda Will 

Clash After New 

Year's. 

After some strenuous worlt on the 
telegraph wires the match between 
Matsuda, the famous Jap, and Walter 
Miller was yesterday postponed from 
the night of Dec. 30 until the evening 
of Jan. 3. The delay was made at the 
reoue^t of Ed Adamson, who says that 
he wants just that much additional 
time to put the little Jap in the very 
best condition of his life for the match 
with Mill'^r. 

The match has been finally set for 



receive a remarkable sum as retainer 
and commissions — a sum that would 
make the average agent of a business 
house gasp with envy. Since, accord- 
ing to Harvard statistics made public 
last week, the 6,000 young men en- 
rolled at the university pay almost 
$350,000 a year for their clothes, the 
business is worth a small fortune to 
tailors. 

The business of acting as representa- 
tive for various establishments is an 
old custom for noted athletes at both 
Yale and Harvard, and adds substan- 
tially to their bank accounts, as the 
students like to show their apprecia- 
tion of the deeds of- valor of their 
heroes by helping them along in a bus- 
iness way. 

Brickley has also "taken up" shot 
putting. He is training at the gym- 
nasium for the shot put events to be 
held at various indoor meets. 

Brickley Is reported to have also 
gathered in $1,000 for lending his name 
to football articles in the newspapers. 



New York Yankees Believe 

Pitcher Keating a Won- 

. derful Find. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — The News says: 
Rumors In New York indicate the 
Highlanders of that city may have 
obtained a second edition of Ed Walsh 
In the person or Recruit Pitcher Keat- 
ing of the Lawrence club in the New 
F:ngland league. Chicago fans are hop- 
ing ^Ceating is all that is said of him, 
since Frank Chance is to pilot the 
Yankees in 1913. 

It was Ted Sullivan, according to the 
rumor, who told the glad news to th.e 
desperate Yankee fans. Said he: 

"It looks to be small in time stuff 
nowadays to say that there is another 
Ed Walsh in the pitchig woods. Walsh 
is all alone in this world as a pitcher, 
iie is all alone with that spit-ball he 
handa to the tatters in his league, and 
we will taTi? ffrf authority such as Wil- 
lie Keeler, who said, when asked 
about the spitball Walsh uses; 

"I will tell you. There never has 
been a spit-ball that I recall with such 
a dip on it as the one Walsh handles. 
I have often told the men who were 
with me on the Yankee team and other 
clubs not to get discouraged when 
they failed to hit his offerings. I al- 
ways made It a rule to take my little 
bat up to the batting depot, stand 
there like vou would If another 'chuck- 
er' was In the box, and then swing. If 
you miss, just laugh at it. 

" "Take a chance on connecting with 
the bulb, but never worry. Walsh is 
the only man who ever struck me out 
twice In one day since I have been 
in baseball." 



RINKS ARE REGISTERING 
FOR THE TROPHY EVENTS 



Many rliilcs are already registered 
for the openlngr of the curling season. 
According to the present plajis of the 
games committee i\f the club, the first 
game in the new rink will b« pilled 
on the first of the year. 

It was also stated today that the 
skating would also be started on the 
first of the year if the present plans 
of the officers or "he club are carried 
out. 

It is particularly desired that the 
skips nave the names of their rinks 
sent in to the games committee, as tlils 
will facilitate the work of preparing 
the draws. Curling will be started 
within a very shor : time and the mem- 
bers of the games committee are anx- 
ious to be in readiness to be able to 
start on the important work of get- 
ting ready for the prize events. 

Following are the names of the 
rinks that have bten handed in to the 
games committee: 

W. Carson, lead. 

W. R. Patton, Ray Cozen. 

R. Bishff, Bob Chrudensky. 

W. P. Majo, skip. Bill Dinham, skip. 



W. L. Mack ay, 
W. Harris, skip. 

H. A. Carmichael, 

lead. 
J. H. Ball, 
fl". R Newell, 
E. Jacobl, skip. 



Sam Cleveland, 

R. D. Bradley, skipk. 

Ed Ingalls, lead, 
Fr^nk Stud, 
W. W. McMillan, 
a. P. Stillman, skipu 



1- 



Roy Ostrom, 

Alex McRae, skip. 

W. C. Sherwood, 

lead. 
W. N. Hart, 
C. C. Staacke, 
G. E. W-arren, Ekip.J. 



H. Palmer, lead» 

E. Burns, 
J. A. "Scott. 
T. E. McKlbbin.skipu 



George Smith, lead. 
H. R. Ketchum, 
E. W. Deetz, 

E. MacGrcgor, 

Ekip. 



A. Kinsaid, le*d; lead. 

L. Cheney, Leon Cooley, 



F. A. Sheridan, lead 

H. M. Blackmar. 

H. S. Macgregor. 

P. F. Heimick. skip. 

Duluth KveniuK Hemld Rink. 

R. B. Liggett, lead. 
Geo. D. McCarthy^ 
Stanley Strand, 
"Colie" Naughton, 
skip. 



OUTOOOR LIFE KEEPS 



BinER ROAST FOR 
CINCINNATI FANS 

Chicago Post Charges 
Them With Being Spe- 
cialists in Knocking. 



HONUS WAGNER YOUNG 



INTEREST HIGH 

WBIG BATTLE 

McCarty and Palzer Eagerly 
Watched in Their Train- 
ing Bouts. 

Los Angeles, Cal.. Dec. 24. — With A\ 
Palzer completely recovered from his 
two days' indisposition, which Manager 
O'llourke attributed to climatic changes. 

Chicago, Doc. 24. — The Post printed ^^d fchowlng his customary dash and 
the following yesterday: enthusiasm in his training work at 

Cincinnati Is known as a "one year Doyle's camp, and with Luther McCarty 
4 V... j« t,o=«>Koii working daily at Venice, interest in the 

job in baseoau. forthcoming New Years heavywe'ght 

This coming spring Joe Tinker will ^ygH^i^ j^ again at fever heat, 
be in charge. Hank O'Day had it for Reports to the effect that Palzer was 
a season; before him -w-as Clark Grif- gick and not able to train properly 
flth If Tinker can hold on for more ', caused betting commissioners to set 
than twelve months, he will be the oven money as the basis of opening 
seventh wonder of baseball, the others ; betting upon the result of the fight, 
being Roger Bresnahan, Mrs. Britton, | and the first day's wagering showed 
Horace Fogel Ed Walsh, Charles W. both sides with plenty of money. 
Murphy and the Highland ball park. Biliousness and climatic changes af- 

The reason for so many Hat failures fected the big Dutchman for a few 
at Cincy is the large number of bosses, days, but he has about recovered from 
First comes Garry Herrmann and then ' all these ailments, and Manager Tom 
Frank Bancroft. If there are 14,673 | oRourke has ceased to worry about 
fans in the stands at a certain game, | his championship candidate. Reports 
Joe will have 14,673 bosses. Every i from Palzer's camp on his Friday aft- 
follower of the national pastime there ernoons workout are to the effect that 
believes himself « regular little man- | the big boy was rather reckless with 



his sparring partners after ORourke 
had instructed them to let loose every- 
thing they had, McCluskey being the 
worst pummeled of the two glove 
slingers. 

Sunday afternoon Palzer will put on 
an extended program and will box at 



HOTEL HOLLAND 



EUROPEAN 



Model of Fireproof 
Construction 



3 



A Magnificent Structure— Equipment 
tile Best in th.' Northwest. 

BUSINESS MEN'S NOONDAY 
LUNCHEON SERVED DAILY! 




[^ 



arily in Gotham 

Herman made this reply to the mes- 
sage: 

"Zbyszko will wrestle Gotch winner 
take all, or split the purse winner and 
loser end any w»y Gotch wants It 
done." 

To a reporter for the Express Her- 
man said; 

"Wlien Gotch wrestled Zbyszko in 
Chicago we had to sign articles calling 
for 5 per cent of the gross receipts, 
while Gotch took 60 per cent. This fine 
division by tlie articles was confirmed 
by Gotch, his maneger, Klank, tlie club 
officials and ourselves. We lost that 
match. If Gotch can beat us again on 
tlie winner-takc-all ba-sit we will do 
even worse. But he won't beat thvj 
Pole again. I only hope he wrestles 
iiim." 

Herman says that Zbyszko is In 
splendid form foilov.-ing his voyage 
from Europe and Is better qualified for 
mat work now than ever before in his 
life. 



ager. If the team is on top the 
told you so" chorus is something im- 
pressive. When the squad slips back 
a peg, the anvil chorus swells, ex- 
pands and Increases in volume. 

Enthusiasm Is so great at times that 
tht ball park's tap rooms are crowded ..„ - - , ,^ . 

with fans and bulletins from the game ; least a dozen rounds. He is now at 
outside are posted up. It has become ; the stage where O'Rourke regards it 
•a common saying around baseball 
stamping grounds ehat the man who 
fails at Cincinnati, becomes an over- 
whelming success elsewhere. For ex- 
amples take the cases of Clark Grif- 
fith John Janzell. Mike Donlin, Orvie 
Overall, Cy Seymour, Heine Steinfeldt, 
and Hans Lobert. Do you c-are for 



Pittsburg. Pa., Dec. 24. — "Hans Wag- 
ner's remarkable vigor year in and 
year out isn't so remarkable when you 
look at it sensible.-," says a prominent 
physician fan of this city in discussing 
the fact that Hor.us will soon embark 
on his seventeenth year as a star ma- 
jor leaguer. 

"When a man of his natural phys- 
ique can eat what he wants, drink 
what he wants and do what he pleases 
in the open air all the year around 

it isn't any real wonder that he pro- 
longs his athletic career and stands 
off the slowness and stateness that 
comes to the best of them as the years 
go by," conlinuef: the doctor, who for 
professional reasons withholds his 
name. 

"Honus is the living Ideal of the 
simple life. He clings to nature. He 
spends his fall and winter in the 
woods and the spare time of the sum- 
mer at the banks of a stream — fishing. 
He loves the fre'?dom of the open air 
and he is at liome In the wildest 
woods. He has the nature of an In- 
dian in this respect. You don't catch 
Honus browsing about the city or 
on the streets of his home town. He 
keeps to himsel:' or in his own pet 
little circle of woodmen. 

"I have known him personally for 
vears and I know that his fondness for 
hunting and fishing and life in the 
open air has kei't him from going to 
the discards as u really great player. 
I have tried to prescribe such living 
to certain of my patients, but it is^n't 
born in them. Honus roams tlie woods 
from pure desire. He doesn't worry. 
He sleeps a lot and he eats what he 
pleases and when he pleases. Ham 
and eggs look good to him three times 
a day. Betweer meals he seeks the 
open air — either in his automobile or 
on foot. 

Inroliinfar?' Poet. 

"Honus has a pot-tic nature in this 
respect, though he is anything but a 
poet. But the open air, the trees, the 
streams and the wild freedom of the 
woods have a fancy for him and in 
this environmen'. only is ho happy. Is 
it any wonder then that he retains 
his vigor and conserves much of that 
dash and speed that make him the 



annual wonder on the ball field? 

"Let us fancy another kind of Waar- 
ner. What if Honus had been an In- 
different kind of a chap with a fancy 
for the limelight and the streets of the- 
city in the off season. What If he just 
loafed around and did nothing? Four 
or five years ago Honus would have 
passed from the realm of the truly 
great. But to his roving nature and 
his love for the eimple life the Pitts- 
burg club and the fans of Pittsburg 
dwe the fact that Honus comes around 
every year and is the mainstay of the 
Pirates. Yes, sir — r — e — e. I have 
patients with whom I could work won- 
ders if I could only get them to tramp 
around in the dead leaves during the 
fall of the year instead of grouching 
around gas stoves and eampling every 
kind of medicine under the heavens. 
But the desire for outdoor life has to 
be part of a man's nature and Hana 
Wagner has that nature." 

Loyal to Ham and. 
Our friend, the doctor, certainly ha» 
a good line on Wagner, writes Jamea 
Jerpe in the Gazette Times. He calls 
the turn, so to speak, when he discusse* 
Wagners fondness for ham and eggs. 
There is nothing tempting on the hotel 
or dining car menu for Honus. He 
prefers the simplest kind of fare and 
plenty of it. Honus would stop at th© 
Waldorf .Astoria and calmly order 
"ham-and " all the while Ignoring with 
characteristic contempt the alleged 
tempting merits of lobster a la New- 
burg, pate de fois gras, crab ravlgotte 
and the pastries and knick nacks of the 
steward's batting order. For fifteen 
years they have tried to wine and dine 
Honus and educate him up to these 
lofty notions in the culinary art, but 
the German would rather order his own. 
meals and pay twice as much for them 
as the chap who fusses over the 
Frenchy menu and its varieties. 

As for the evenings in a large city 
Honus alwavs enjoys himself. In New 
York he hunts out the big moving pic- 
ture shows where the movies may be 
showing African game hunts or some 
sort of adventure in the jungle, woode 
or on sea. The next morning he may 
be up bright and early and within a» 
hour or two he will be 4S minutes from 
Broadway where the fishes have na 
idea of the closeness of little old New 
York town. 

Yes. It Is funny, how the Dutchmatt 
keeps in shape year in and year out 



THE NEW STi LOUiS I to managewilliard. 



Siieclal winter rates for fanil- 
lirn — Kiiroiican or American 
(il&n. Dine in the Woodland 
C'nfe. a Btrlklngly beautiful 
decorated retreat. Service a la 
Carte. After-tlie-tbeater anpper 
KlieciaUIOK. Rscelleut munlc. 

Club nreiikfn::tH. 

nuslnes!* Men's Lnncheon. 

TILTON LEWIS, Manager 



CAFE GRUENEWALD, 

the New Restaurant 
of Minneapolis 

In the lieart of tlie tlieater. wiiup- 
pinK and biiMineMM district, '^4 !«»utli 
Sixth Mtreet, .^liunea'tolis, Mlun. 
Striotly taeriiiun CooKinji-. A coniie 
and refined t'abaret. >Iar>iaret 
ThoinpMon of Duluth, SoloiHt. Wire 
or phone Xew Vear'a Eve re.nerva- 
tions. 

J. A. HICKKV, .Manaj^er. 

Formerly of the Xe^v St. Louiit Hotel 

of Duluth. 



Abe Atteli Takes Charge of White 
Hope From Kansas. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — Abe Atteli, pilot 
of a "whito hope." That's the new 
title the former featherweight cham- 
pion expects to be wearing in a few 
days. Abe stopped off in Chicago on 
his way to San Francisco and had a 
long talk with Jess Willlard a 'hope" 
from Kansas, on the subject of man- 
aging him. They agreed on terms and 

I will be ready for teamwork in a few 

I days. 

WUliard, who holds a decision over 
Luther McCarty, has caused surprise 
by his work in a gymnasium here in 
the last week. Jim Flyn looked him 
over and pronounced him a good man. 
Williard Is almost six feet, six Inches 
tall and weighs 215 pounds. 

Atteli will go from here to the bed- 
side of his mother, who is seriously 
111. 



ZBYSZKO MAY 

MEET BIG STAR 

Attempts Are Being Made to 

Have Match Wrestled 

Here. 

Realizing that the present season Is 
his last on the mat, and also knowing 
that of all the big wrestlers who have 
ever visited this city Stanislaus Zbys- 
zko is the overwhelming f-avorlte, of- 
ficials of the Greater Duluth Athletic 
club vesterday began negotiations 
with the idea of matching him with 
one of the greatest heavyweights in 
the world. 

There is on his way to this country 
at the present time a giant who last 
year in this country beat some of the 
best of the American wrestlers. Ac- 
cording to the representative of this 
man, who Is in Montreal, Quebec, he 
has decisively defeated Dr. Roller and 
Jess Westergaard and also holds vic- 
tories over the greatest men in Eu- 
rope. 

Knowing that the fans want to be- 
hold a real wrestling match and not 
merely an exhibition, the officials of 
the club are striving to sign up the 
big star from the other side of the 
pond, "and In that event Duluth will 
land one of the big matches between 
big men of the year. 



any more.' . ^^ 

The fault Is not Herrmanns. The 
burden rests with the fans. Cincin- 
nati rooters can't st-and a winner or a 
loser. A victor goes to their heads, a 
loser to their feet. 

This Is what Joe Tinker has to laco. 

One of the best things "Hek" ever 

s-aid was just before Hank O'Day was 

appointed manager of the Reds last 



year 



"The Cincinnati crowd can scarcely their camp. 



safe to turn on the high speed, and the 
Dutchman will have all he can attend 
to for the remainder of the training 
period. 

McCarty also plans to give an en- 
tertainment Sunday afternoon. In which 
ten or a dozen rounds of sparring will 
be the main feature. On Monday Mc- 
Carty will box Walter Monohan. his 
chief sparring partner, four rounds at 
the Rosemary theater in Ocean Park, 
the proceeds of the exhibition to go to 
the fire sufferers. 

Palzer is slated as referee. 

.-^n interesting sidelight on the big 
mill is the Interesting rivalry between 
the two camps. McCarty's camp is up 
in arms over O'Rourke's declaration 
that his three fighters can clean out 



^...^ --■■ I i..^.. • f As a result there will be 

wait'To'learn" the name of" the next ; a general melee on Jan. 13. in which 
manager. They are so anxious to st-art I Al McCluskey will box Walter Monohan 
knocking" and Charley Young will meet Bull 

Back In 1869 the Cincinnati Red i Young In 10-round bouts, the two win- 
stocking didn't lose a single game ners to be matched, 
during the whole season. That Is the 
standard the followers of the pas- 
time have evidently set. 



TRACK M EET AT HURON. 

Minnesota-Dakota Conference Decides 
on South Daltota Town. 

St. Paul, Minn., Dec. 24. — The 1913 
track meet of the Minnesota-Dakota 
college athletic conference will be held 
at Huron, S. D., on the first Saturday 
in June. This was decided at the an- 
nual conference here yesterday. 

A fight developed in the conference 
over the attempt to expel the Unlver- 
Eity of South Dakota. Prof. E. F. 
Chandler of the University of North 
Dakota, led the proposition against the 
South Dakota university, alleging fail- 
ure of that school to live up to the 
spirit of the eligibility rules, and lack 
of Interest in conference matters. It 
was decided to allow the university 
another year before taking action. The 
South Dakota Institution was not rep- 
resented at the conference. 



JOHNSON BUTTING 

INTO LAKE GENEVA. 



MAY TRAIN AT TAMPA. 

Cubs Spring Camp May Be Shifted 
About the South. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — Charles Webb 
Murphy, president of the Chicago Na- 
tional baseball club, yesterday said It 
was probable his players would do 
their spring training at Tampa, Fla. 
Should Tampa not suit them, St. Pe- 
tersburg would be tried. St. Peters- 
burg, failing. Murphy says he will go 
to Havanna. 

Murphy is known to be trying to 
sell or trade Jimmy Sheckard and 
Jerry Downs to Miller Huggins, mana- 
ger of the St. Louis Nationals. As yet 
Huggins has not shown any great 
amount of enthusiasm over the over- 
tures of the Chlcagoan. for Murphy 
always coupled the names of Bob Har- 
mon or Harry Sallee with those of his 
trading material. Thus far, Huggins 
has offered ''Rube" Geyer as a trading 
possibility, and that did not interest 
Murphy. 

T0"CLASH AGAIN. 



International Polo. 

New York, Dec. 24. — The first match 
between the American and English 
teams for the International polo trophy 
will be played at Westbury, L. I., on 
June 10 next. The second game will 
be contested four days later. This 
schedule was made public in a letter 
from the American Polo association to 
the British challengers. The date for 
tlie third game. If one Is necessary, 
will be decided during the match. 



IT'S GETTING PRETTY 
SOFT FOR B RICKLEY. 

Boston, Dec. 24. — Charley Brickley. 
champion football player of 1912, Is 
now a shot putter and a tailor's agent. 

The versatile halfback of the Har- 
vard team — the only man selected by 
all the experts for the All-.\merican 
eleven — began last week to take orders 
for fashionable clothing from the un- 
dergraduates at the Cambridge instltu- 

The young salesman wa.s sufficiently 
advertised by a New York firm, who 
announced In the Harvard Crimson that 
at a given time and place "Charles E. 
Bricklev, Harvard representative," 
would be pleased to take the orders 
of the students for winter and spring 

It is understood that Brickley will 



Chicago, Dec. 2«. — The purchase of a 
summer home by Jack Johnson, the 
negro heavyweight champion pugilist, 
in the exclusive millionaire colony of 
Lake Geneva may be followed by the 
establishment of a negro club there, 
it is announced. A number of acres 
at the north end of the lake In one of 
the most desirable portions of the col- 
ony which Is known asi the "Newport 
of the West," were secured by option 
on Dec. 17, It wa.s stated by W. G. 
Anderson, a negro attorney and for- 
merly one of Johnson's counsel. An- 
derson said that he would close the 
deal today. 

The property, is was said, was to be 
owned by a syndicate of ten negro men 
associated for the establishment of a 
club which will be known as the Lin- 
coln Social Athletic club. Many of Chi- 
cago's social leaders. Including some 
of the wealthiest men In American and 
financiers of nation-wide influence 



Ordemann and Westergaard Will 
Meet on Jan. 7. 

Minneapolis, Minn., Dec. 24.— Ilcnry 
Ordemann, Minneapolis, will meet Jess 
Westergaard of Des Moines, Iowa, here 
Tuesday night. Jan. 7. The winner of 
the match, which will be at straight 
catch-as-catch-can style, best two in 
three falls, will claim the heavyweight 
wrestling cliamplonship of America. 
The men have met twice before, each 
having won a victory. 

Chicago, Kansas City and Omaha 
promoters were after the match. 

Experts on Team. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — The University of 
Iowa rifle team which last year won a 
couple of league championships. Is In 
good shape again this year, several ex- 
pert shots being in school. Arthur 
Arnsson. who won the Individual cham- 
pionship last year. Is not In school. 



WILL MUTUALLY AGREE. 

No Standard Sdt for Big Nine Water 
Polo Contests. 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — Big Nine swim- 
ming directors net here yesterday in 
the hope of setting a standard for a 
championship water polo game, but 

failed. Several kinds of games were 
suggested, but the directors could not 
get together on any one. It was there- 
fore agreed that the colleges might 
choose their ow:a style of play in their 
dual meets. 

Opinions differed as to whether 
rugbv polo, 60?cer or water basket 
ball should be played. It was agreed 
that when Northwestern meets Wis- 
consin at Madison. soccer will be 
plaved. At Evanston the teams will 
play basket ball Other universities will 
agree on a game a few days before 
their meets. 

REWA"RDFORmfCHIE. 

Cubs' Great Pitcher Gets Thousand 
for Se8ison*s Record. 

Chicago, Dec. 24.— Pitcher Louis Ri- 
chie of the Chicago National league 
club will receive a Christmas check for 
11.000 from C. W. Murphy, prefildent 
of the club, for winning more than 
60 per cent of his games last season. 
Murphv promised Richie |500 if he 
would "exceed that average of wins in 
191. but Riclil<. missed the mark by 
a few points. Murphy repeated the 
offer at the beginning of last season, 
ai'd in addition said that he would 
make up the $000 Louis failed to se- 
cure In 1911. , .... , 

Murphy exhibltf^d the check In his of- 
fice vesterdav and said It would go 
in the mall at once to Richie, who is 
visiting his tea nmate. James Lavender. 
at Montezuma. Ga. 

HORSED WNERSMEET. 

The Head of Lakes Racing Associa- 
tion Is Formed. 

A meeting of the horsemen of Du- 
luth and Superior was held at the St. 
Louis hotel lastt evening for the pur- 
pose oi perfecting the Duluth-Superior 
Ice Racing association. 

C E. Armstsad of Superior was 
elected preeldi nt of the association" 
H R. Elliott or Duluth, vice president; 
and D. E. Stevens of this city, secre- 
tary James Henderson, Dr. John Mc- 
Kay and D. E. Stevens were appointed 
members of a committee to see about 
arrangements ;'or putting the track on 
the bay In shape and getting ready for 
the first raclnir matinee of the year. 

At the present time plans are being 
made to hold a racing card on New 
Year's afternoon. 

Britton Beats Ahearn. 

New York, I>ec. 24. — Jack Britton of 
Chicago outfought Young Ahearn of 
Brooklyn in a 10-round bout In Brook- 
lyn last night. Britton was the ag- 
gressor, but nrany of his swings went 



wild. His bodv punches were used to 
good effect. The Chicago man weighed 
135 ><: and the Brooklynite 136^. 



ROLLER HOCKEY SEASON 
IS OFFI CIALLY OPENED. 

In the official opening of the Duluth 
Roller Hockey league season at th» 
Auditorium la.«t evening the Big Du- 
luths defeated the Northerns by the 
score of 3 to 2 in one of the closest 
and best games ever played at the 
big rink. The Broadways of Superior 
won from the Kelleys by the score of 
3 to 1. 

Both of the games were featured 
by some fine playing upon the part 
of the contestants and the Iarg» 
crowd was kept in a high pitch of ex- 
citement by the closeness of the score* 
and bv some of the great playinsr 
stunts.' If la»t evenings opening Is aa 
augury, the present season is golnff 
to be the best in the history of th*. 

game In this cUy. 

* 

Dixon Wins Easily. 

Omaha, Neb.. Dec. 24. — Tommy Dixon, 
of Kansas City had a decided shad* 
over Tommy Brasnahan of Newcastle, 
Pa., In a 10-round fight before a South 
Omaha club last night. Dixon showed 
remarkable cleverness In blocking anA 
defensive work and worked a stralgrht 
left to advantage throughout the fight. 
In the tenth round he landed repeatedly 
on his opponent and had an easy news- 
paper decision. 

« 

MuIIin Signs Up. 

Detroit. Mich.. Dec. 24. — Pitcher 
George MuUin yesterday signed hl» 
contract to play with the Detroit 
American league team in 1913. In point 
of service MuUin is the oldest mem- 
ber of the team, having already played; 
twelve years with Detroit. 



NO FAULT FOUND 

W ITH C AMPBELL 

Chicago, Dec. 24. — Inquiry into al- 
leged political activity of Postmaster 
D. A. Campbell of Chicago has come- 
to an end before the Federal trial 
board. The investigation failed to 
discloFe any evidence connecting the 
postmaster directly with the offense^ 
charged, according to Federal officials. 
The report will be taken to Washing- 
ton to be placed before tlie Federal^ 
civil service commission. 



RAILROAD WANTS 

TO USE W IRELESS. 

Omaha, Neb., Dec. 24. — The Union. 
Pacific railway has made application, 
to the dep.irtment of commerce and 
lator at Washington for a license to 
operate and maintain a wireless tele- 
graph system along Its lines. The com- 
pany wishes to install a technical ex- 
periment station, and tfce government 
is requestc^d to give permission for 
such a station, which, it is stated, will 
be the second of the kind In the coun- 
try. Several wireless stations, It i». 
announced, will be constructed whea. 
the license is issued. 



\ 



M 



(«. 



- -■ I? 



■JUiiMi 



"T 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH H E R A L I> 



December 24, 1912. 



IS 



.if 



ON THE IRON RANGES I 

USES His KNIFE 

UFON ADVEHSARY 



MANY RIDI 
INN[W 



First Passengers Hauled on 

Mesaba Railway Out 

of Virginia. 




Kins 
poo- 



Virginia and Other Towns 

Are Rejoicing Over Their 

Christmas Gift. 



Ti: 

Vii ; 

nea: 

wit' 

tod 1 

over 

stn 



M 



nn., l>ei'. 24. — (Special to 
— Santa Olaus presented 
\oletli, ttilbort and other 



KivltiK- cash (loiKitions and tlu» I.ailit^s' 
I'le.soeiit aiil liavf Ijeen f o-ij[)erati'd 
with to the i-nd tliat the aid extended 
nuLiht he woitliilv »>estcnved and rover 
as wide a ttehl as pos.sihle. Many 
local business nuii have also niv^ii 
lil>eral casli <-ontributloii« ti> t:hrist- 
mas fund. The distriJ.ution m 
he^an toda.v and lias kept si-veral 
pie full.v luiupied alt ilav. 

T«vo I'hililrpu'H ]>liitlneeM. 

Tomorrow at Use Drpheuiu theater, 
tlirou-.?h the fourte.>^y <>r tlie loeal lodge 
of Klks. theri< will he two afternoon 
matinees tor children onlv. Free tick- 
ets will he priven tile children from 9 
untjl .. ocloik today and f i oni S o'diM-k 
until noon tomorrow at tlie bo.x office. 
There will he a matinee prosrain of 
three acts of vaudeville and three 
reels of motion pii ture.s. The first per- 
formance will he^in at - o'clock ami 
the second at .',A;>. N'o adults will be 
admitted to either peiformance 

Tonisht there will be t'hristmas 
trees ;iud !>roKrams at the Methodist 
Iresbyterian and Swedish Lutheran 
churches and the Swedish-Finnisli 
benevolent association will Rive a pro- 
Kram and Christmas tree at W'asa hall 
tonight. 

At the i:iks' entertainment at the 
(•rpheum Santa Clans will distribute 
caiid.\. fruit an 1 nuts to all the ehil- 
drell. 



'.si 



l-e 



• o{ the Mesaba ranpe 
welcome Christmas gift 
the fiist cars were run 
V Mesaba railway con- 
'^it of a million and a 
<i];«" ' vii.,i^:ned to connect all 

<^f -; communities. 

I'. « .1 a>;en--en of the state railway 
conmussion inspected the line yester- 
day and ;; ive permission to carry pas- 
hen^ers. Two cars were started out 
toda\ iri:,i tile car barns here and thev 
were ' :,.\vded full of local people in a 
all anxious to ride as far 
Power was furnished by 
plant of the A^ir^inia X- 
sawmill here. The first 
to i:veleth four miles dis- 
about the whole town 
' ffreet the visitor.s. The 
to Gilbert and will soou 
' > Buld, Hibblng. Chis- 
•r points. 
• Kieai rejoicing: here as the 
• el that a new era has dawned 
Me.'^aba r.inere. the electric lino 
\ pec ted to knit all th towns 



few minutes 
as po3sii>i.-. 

••lecri-.,- 
L;.k.- 
t(i over 
v\ tie re 



the 
Itaifi 
C:*r r 
i i n t . 
turn 
I irs 
he r 
holm 

There 
people f 
for the 
beln< e 
close I t! 



■ i . 

U r i • 



at t. 
■ r.if 



!.- 



VirfciuinnN llrmrmber Needv. 

\ irKinla. Minn.. l>ec. :;4. — (Spe<ial to 
The Herald.) — The boxes and baskets 
containing the portions for the sev- 
enty-five or more poor families in the 
clt.v to which donations are made by 
the city hall poor organization were 
di.stributed Tuesday. 

The cost for the supplies was nearlv 
$f. per family. Kach received the fol- 
lowing: One bushel potatoes: 1 50- 
lunind sack of tlour: 2 pounds of sugar; 
I can of pumpkin; 1 can of peaches; 1 
can of cranberries: la-pound can of 
baking powder; 1 ID-pound turkey; I 
peck of apples; package of candv, nuts, 
popcorn: toys where there are little 
ones; 1 pound of butter; 1 pound of 



line 

Kars 

Xick 



coffee. Coal and wood will 
given where fuel is needed. 



also be 



)ifether. 



DUEUSTS A»E 

GiVEH mmna 

Chisholm Pair Who Tried to 

Kill Each Other Held 

for Trial. 

Chisholm. Minn., Dec. L'4. — (Special to 
Tho lie: lid. >— Gust Mattala and John 
iMacki tile two Finns who fought a 
pistol duel in a house in the South End 
le se\eral weeks ago, in 
was seriously wounded. 



:ia 



be- 
for 

as 

de- 

the 

fur- 



I oca f 

wh 

were in uiged yesterday afternoon 

lore Judge Master^ and were held 

trial 

bo. waived examination and 
Mack I was ciiarged with secoml 
gree assault he was bound over to 
gr;.nd jury on $.-.(iO bail, which he 
nished and secured his release. Mat- 
tAla was held on a first degree assault 
and ttie crime not being bailable In 
this . .urt he was taken to i>uluth to 
awdit the convenint? of the grand 
jury. \N luch convenes in Hibbing Feb 4 

Macki stated that he intends to go 
to work at once and will conduct 
hims.-If m a manner that will be per- 
fectly commendable to him henceforth 



(iitebolm ^buivM True Spirit. 

Chisholm. Minn., l»ec. '^i. — (Special to 
The ilf raid.)— INIrs. Mark Harris of the 
Associated Charities. Poor Commission- 
er Talboy.s and others who have been 
looking after the relief of local need.v, 
yesterday afternon distributed articl-s 
among thirteen needy families for 
Christmas, as against twenty-seven 
families cared for last year. Every- 
thing is in readiness for entertaining 
the children at the Doric theater to- 
morrow afternoon, when an Irish plav 
vsill be given for the poor families. In- 
cluding parents. A generous supplv of 
popcorn, candies, nuts and fruits will 
be distiibuted to ever.v one present. 

The committee has arranged to have 
til the families at tiie locations that 
come under this class picked up by 'bus 
and brought to the theater and re- 
turned to their homes after the after- 
not.ns program has been carried out. 
The committee in charge of the distri- 
bution of supplies for the poor desf^rve 
much praise for the diligent manner 
and thorough wa^- in which thev have 
canvassed the situation. Nothing has 
been left undone that reciuired atten- 
tion, and much suffering has been re- 
lieved and much happiness brought to 
these homes as a result of their efforts. 



BiNG SHOWS 

PROPER SPIRIT 

Village Canvassed and 
Plans Made for Christ- 
mas Cheer for Needy. 

Hibbing. Minn., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
Tlie Herald. J — Hibbing poor, through 
the aid of the various secret societies 
and cliari table organizations, will have 
a merry Chri.stmas tomorrow and If 
there is a single home in all this dis- 
trict that does not have its full meas- 
ure of C!:ristmas cheer it will not he 
the fault of the best organized and 
mo.st systematic campaign to searcii 
*»ut and relieve tlie poor and needy 
that has ever been undertaken here 

It is e.vpecled to bring warm cloth- 
ing where that is most needed, food 
where that is desired and tovs for everv 
» hiid, so situated that he might be 
<ieprlved of having things of this na- 
ture. 

Laisr tvof-k committees from the la- 
dies ( ! ■■-..■ I ity made a thorough can- 
vass -iT Hibbing locations. They per- 
sonally visited each needv home and 
made a list of the things needed 
whether clothing, food or tovs. Everv 
case knovk-n or which the committees 
have been able to search out, will be 
tJken care of. Several of the secret 
fijcieties helped the work along bv 



VIRGINIA STREET 
IN HOLIDAY DRESS 

Chestnut Street Beautified 

With Electric Wreaths. 

Greens and Bunting. 

Virginia. Minn., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — If there is any better 
decorated street in Minnesota for the 
Yuletide celebration than Chestnut 
street in this city, Virginians would 
like to know it. The main business 
thoroughfare of the largest city on the 
Mesaba range has been transformed 
into a vertial)ie kaleidoscope of winter 
fairy land. When all is readv tonight 
and the two great electric " wreaths, 
hanging high over the white wav, are 
turned on, it is expected the spectacle 
will rival anything ever seen in this 
section. 

The white way standards have been 
dressed with evergreens, bunting, flags 
and red Christmas bells. 

Mayor Murphy and all the members 

the committee that have wrought 

arc being round- 



John Kars Carves Earl 

Case Near Mountain 

Iron. 

Virgini.a. Minn.. Dec. 24— (Special to 
The Herald.* — Assault, in the first de- 
gree is the charge against John Kars, 
who will be held at the county jail 
to await action by the grand jurv at 
the Hibbing term of the district court. 

He l.s accused of cutting and ter- 

riiy disfiguring for life Earl Chase 

at oi e of the Mesaba electric railway 

camps, west of Mountain Iroti. 

was arraigned before Justice 

i;ilerls.>n at Mountain Iron. 

TkniiKbt H*" WMH Uohlt^d. 

The story told, is that Kars thouglit 
he had lost some money. It was in a 
discussion over this that Chase was 
attacked. The weapon used was a 
pocket knife with a long blade. Kars 
is said to have swung the weapon a 
dozen times or more and Chase re- 
ceivffl three gashes, two through his 
scalp and into his face and one in the 
neck. It took eleven stitches to close 
one ot the wounds and four to closi? 
another. There were many other cuts 
in Chase's clothes, showing that his 
assailant iiad made thrusts and slashes. 

HAS RETURNED 

TO CHISHOLM 

John Fontana, Wanted for 

Wife Desertion, Comes 

Back and is Arrested. 

Chisholm. Minn.. Dec. 24. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— John Fontana. who 
has been wanted here for some 
for wife desertion was arrested 
terday afternoon at the Monroe 
the home of a friend. 

about two montlis 

him his 8-year-ola 

first wife deserting at 

second wife and 



I OFFICIAL MAP OF THE WEATHER i 



time 
yes- 
loca- 
Fon- 
ago 




MAILING RUSH 
ABOUT OVER 

Duluth Postoffice Has Busi- 
est Christmas Season 
in Its History. 



Carriers Will Work All Day 

on Holiday With One 

Delivery. 



SNOW 



tion in 

tana left here 
and took with 
daughter by his 
the same time his 
two small chiildren. 

He claims he now returned to make 
peace terms with his second wife 
whom he claims to have seen since his 
return and that there is a prospect 
that they will again live together. 
He left his daughter in Ironwood, 
where he ha.s been spending the 
last couple of months. 

He claims the reason that hc> could 
not agree with his wife before was 
she wanted to move to Buhl but 
he told her that his work was 
here and that they would have to live 
in Chishoim if together. 

He will be brought before Judge 
Masters and if his family troubles can 
patched up he will no doubt be re- 
If not he will be placed un- 
to support his wife who is 
now in a delicate condition and not 
to support the two small children 
.^''^'"'^i.^'^''*'^'" "Pf*" '!'?'■ for sup- 
E^'i •T<^*'"u^^'\''"'''**^""^ I*'"- Fontana 
had $10 when he arrived in Chisholm 



o ^ ^ 


fi 



The fair, mild 
Christmas weather 
promised by the 
weather man is on 
hand - and Santa 
Clau:s should hav<^ 
an easy time get- 
ting around to- 
il i g h t. T Ii e mer- 
liianta and the 
shoppers have no 
cau^e for com- 
plaint on this 
weather S n o w 
temperatures are pre- 



Mich. 



that 
that 



be 

leased, 
der bond 

able 
which 



BAD CONDITIONS. 

North Chisholm Home Where Children 
Saw Many Sinful Acts. 



W. B. 

Broesky. 
aiKl she 
before Judge 



of 

such beautiful effects 

ly congratulated. 




Medical Book 
On Rheumatism 



No matter liow long .vo-'ve sufTered— no 
matter how many ph.rxicians and treat- 
metiCM you've tried— no matter how bope- 
less yoti are— we ««jr rhroisBtiim eon be cored. 
»)tir trt-atmetit IH relievlun |.ain .iiirt cleaiis- 
Injf thsetitiru Kysjeiii, caring thousamls of 
ra;»(;a today. Vour friends will tell you that 
60>i8 Is a dependable remody— absolutely 
Iri'O from dunKorous driiKS. 

O'lr booU Klve*) till) details of just Tvhat 
60H8 willdoln fnurejive wltli the Knaranteo 
<>t eore or mmi-y bark. (!• t tills book la 
V'^tir liaTiJs. Villi*!! ni**rr rrad a more eonr!«r« 
practical, iBtellisent dlsru«<ioa of <h. eDtIre 
■ulijrri orRhrBiaallHi 
— I 11 U a III ui a to ry. 
Chronic, Artienlar 
and Muscular KUeu- 
mattsim-Gout and 
Rheumatic Oout. 
Full de-orlptloa of 
symptoms and ef- 
fecta— refjlmeh and 
diet. This book will 
open jroar »j»» — It 
expluius la full IK/SS. 




Stxtjr • Eighty • Eight 



It ba:« cured otliern 
"It wiiicureyou. If 
It fail* yrrnr money D -i- i /-^ 

19 returned - this fositively Cures 

\t our e'larantee. 
And wealmost never 
bare a bottle re- 
turned. Doa't suf- 
fer loairer -learn how t.- 
Wrlta for the free booi: 

MATT J. JOHNSON CO.. 
Dapartmant F, St. f'aul. Minn. 



Guaranteed ; 



Rheumatism 

—Or Your Money Back 



! ran bo riirrd. 
:iO W. AddreM 



WOMAN DENIES 

BREAKING LAW 

Alleged to Have Sold Liquor 
I and Run Disorderly 
Hibbing Place. 

Hibbing, Minn.. Dec. I'l. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Mrs. Julia Thomas, re- 
siding at the corner of Fifth avenue 
und McKinley street, in one of the 
best residence districts pleaded not 
guilty in muriicipal court to a charge 
of selling- beer and conducting a dis- 
orderly house. John Ilikkala and Mike 
Mackl. Finnish miners, testified thev 
had bought eight bottles of beer at 
her j)lace and to several different cases 
of disorderly conduct. 

Ilikkala testified that two bottles of 
the beer purchased were served by a 
young girl. Mrs. Thomas denied both 
charges and told the court she could 
bring boarders at her place. Tom 
Thomas and Fred !?olar to disprove the 
charges. .She asked to have the cases 
against her continued until Thursday 
night and was put under Jloo bond 
bond on each charge for appearance. 
One Woutau PleailM Ciullty. 

The same witnesses brought similar 
chai-ges against Lena Straiig, residing 
at \n \A ashington street. She en- 
tered a plea of guilty and was fined 
%i'-y and costs or seventy-nine days in 
the county jail. 

Mrs. Thomas' husband some time 
ago began an action to have noUed 
deeds to residence property in Rib- 
and farm lands, which he al- 
she had induced him to sign In 
of Fred .Solar, a boai-der at their 
She testified that shf was not 
with her husband and that her 
daughter had until recently 



Chisholm, IMinn., D.-c. 24. — (Special 
to The Herald.)— Humane Officpt 
Brown arrested Mrs. .Stanley 

*^'m? i'^'^^ "' ^'o'th Chisholiii 

vvlll have an examination 

Martin Hughes in Hibbing todav 

Juvenile Court Officer C. E Everett 
as.-istcd Mr. Brown in getting the facts 
H?^ h" "'Y^^^ti^ating the conditions at 

fll "I^'mL^-' ''°"^^- ^t developed that 
thiee childi-en. a boy of about 16 and 
Vl^\ V-'V" °^'^ younger age. weie com- 
pelled to witness many sc-nes that 
weie ver,v distressing. Much liquor 
has been brought to the premises and 
It was found that the bov, .Stanley 
was often forced to purcha.se it. The 
young girls. Hattie and Elvina. wen- 
not prop.-rly cared for and were dailv 
witnesse.s of conditions that made tiie 
officers heart ache for them. 

virgTnjaJ^oTes. 

Virginia Minn Dec. 24.— (Special to 

^i!^-^^"^''^^*^'— ^^'■•''- W. J. Schulze and 
children are in Duluth to spend Christ- 
mas with Mrs. Fay's parents. Mr 
Mrs. M. r>. Fay. Mr. Schulze, who 
been in New York on business 
.joins the family in Duluth 

Mrs D. E. Carlton, late 
Mich., and her young son are spending 
the holidays with Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur 
\ an Evei-a, ■]07 Locust street 
after Jan. I will reside 
street. Mr. Carlton 
nd comes h 



Hurries and mild 
dieted for tonight 

Cold weather prevailed a year age 
today. 

The sun rose this mornitig, at 7:53 
and it will set at 4:23 thi:j" evening, 
giving eight hours and thirty minutes 
of .sunliglit. 

Mr. Richard.son makes the following 
comment on weather conditions: 

"Ilather unsettled conditions prevail. 
Ten-peratures are moderate grenerall.v. 
except that zero weather prevails in 
N'ew Mexico and indications favor i 
turn to colder over the whole Nortn- 
west during Wednesday or WV?dnes- 
day night Heavy frosts occurred last 
night in Southeastern Te.x.as. Tt>? 
bart)metric depressions centered of' 
tiie North Carolina coa.st and' ovc 
P^ast^rn Ontario and Alb<»rta caused 
snow or rain over Atlantic and Gulf 
states, the Ohio and Lower Misst.^.^ipp'. 
\ alley, t'pper Michigan, Montana, Ore- 
gon and Washington during the la.-t 
twenty- four hours. Heavy rains fell 
c \'er th.e Carolina.^ and Alabanta." 



"ight or Wednesday; colder. 

.<outh Dakota — Fair tonight with 
wanner in southeast portion: Wednes- 
day increasing cloudiness and colder. 

Montana — Snow tonight or Wednes- 
day; colder tonight and in east por- 
tion Wednesday. 

Shippers' Forecast: Protect thirty- 
si.x-hour shipments of perishables 
against temperatures 5 deg. to 10 deg. 
above zero in the Dakotas, Minnesota 
and W isconain. 



The TeiuiteratureM. 

Following were the highest 
at'ires for twenty- 
for twelve. 



lowest 
today: 



Abilene 

Alpen.t 

Atia'itio City 
Baltimore 
Kaiileford ... 
l>l-.:iiai'<:tt . . . 

Hjise 

Boston 

liMiTalo 

Ca!«aiy 

Cliarteston . . 
CUlcag) 



■four hours 
ending at 



temper- 
and the 

7 ii. m. 



to families and boarding houses wliere 
there are sufficient people to warrant 
its reasonable and temperate use. Not 
every family will be allowed a case a 
day. but families large enough to war- 
rant it may have delivered at their 
homes that much. Not more than a 
case a day may be delivered to anv 
one house. Beer in kegs must not be 
delivered at all. 



HIjh. 
....10 
. . . . :50 
....43 
....10 

3() 

....41 
. ...2S 
.....■$<> 
....32 

42 

. ... 48 
....42 



and 

has 

also 



of Marquette, 



re with 
Mining company. 

Nearly all of the young 



and 

at 325 Hickory 

is an engineer 

the Oliver Iron 



General Forecns»t». 

Chicago, Dee. 21. — Forecasts fov 
twent.v-four hours ending at 7 p. m. 
Wednesday: 

Iowa — Fair tonight and Wednesday; 
warmer tonight. 

I'pper Michigan — Snow flurries to- 
night or Wednesday. 

Wisconsin — Fair tonight and 
Wednesday, becoming unsettled by 
Wednesday night: warmer toifight and 
in east portion Wednesday. 

Minnesota — Increasing cloudines.s 
with probabl.v snow flurries tonight or 
V.'ednesda.v; warmer in east portion to- 
night; colder in north and v.'est por- 
tions Wednesday. 

North Dakota — Probably snow to- 



w-mien who have been away at the 
various schools attd colleges are home 
for the holidays. 



Corpus Clirteli.. 

Deiner 

r)e» Moines .... 
I>svi!.< Lake ... 

Dr..!si> 

Dubmue 

DULUTH 

Duiango 

Ka.sti<oit 

I^llUOllt^Jl 

HS'-;l;'.al)A 

Oa'-vt.-itii'i 

Gr.iiui Fort.s ... 

Oramt Ilarea 

Creeii Bay 

Hatieras 

HaMe 51 

n«le!ia 4: 

Hrii.slit'.n 

H'lron 

Jaotffi.iiviile . 
K.imlco^.-i . . . 
Kaitsma tUtr.. 
Kiioxville .... 
I>a Cnisse . . . 
I.oiiisville 
Ma.lison .... 
Marqi'ette . .. 
M0(lU'if3 Hat 
NfeniitUU .... 

Miami 

Miles City .. 



.50 
.44 
.44 
.2<5 
.4(j 
.40 
.39 

:.vi. 

.31 
.4G 

.:;4 

.44 

.:ifi 
.32 



..36 
. .154 
..3<5 
..4G 
..36 

.ni 

, ..■?! 
.48 
.38 



44 



Low. 
24 

2G 

28 
10 
18 
18 
2'4 
30 
oo 

42 
21 

3S 
24 
22 
18 
20 
20 
IS 
4 
14 
24 
22 
40 
Hi 
30 
24 
50 
28 
23 
20 
Iti 
Gil 
3'> 
3.< 
%•} 
II 
'W 
18 
'.2 
24 

:v\ 

70 
31 



Milwaukee 
Mini;e<ti)sa . . . . 

Mi.dena 

Mf'!itgoiueo . . . 

Montreal 

Sloorhead 

New Orleariii . . 

New Y' rk 

North Platte . . 

Oklalioma 

Oniaha 

PatiT Sound... 

I'lioeiiix 

Piei re 

Pittsburg 

Port Aninir 

Portlaiiil. Or . . 
Prince .\li»ert. . 
Qu'.Vppelle . . . . 

Rahi-lh 

nai'iil City 

Uosehui g 

Kojweli 

Sf. Louis 

St. Piul 

.*iaU LaUe City. 
San Diego .... 
S.^n Francisco . 



High. 
...34 



..38 

..44 

..20 

..26 

..70 

..m 

.44 

.4ii 

,.48 

..30 

. r.S 

.44 

. .3S 

..2G 

.44 

, .2o 

.24 

.31 

.18 

.48 

.30 

.42 

..30 

.30 

.09 

.r,i 



24 

16 
3i 
10 

10 
42 
10 
IS 
24 
2S 
20 
30 
22 
28 
4 
Z'i 
10 
II 



Sault .Ste. Marie. 32 

Seattle 44 

Slierid.in 46 

."^hrescport 40 

Sio'.ix City 42 

.Spokane 40 

.<«wift Current 4S 

Tami>«- 78 

Tnleilo 32 

Valentine 

Wa.s!iington 40 

WlilUton S4 

Wli'iipm:u-ca ... .38 

\Viii:u;>eg 20 

Yellow3toue 22 



38 
2 

2S 
10 
20 
42 

42 

2S 

30 
31 
24 
30 
20 
6S 
24 
21 
28 
24 
It 
20 
IS 



Biwablk EaKlrii I'lan Dance. 

Biwabik, Minn.. Dec. 24. — The local 
aerie, Fraternal Order of Eagles, will 
give its fourth annual dance Thurs- 
day evening. Eec. 31. in the Finnish 
Temperance ha I. The parties hereto- 
fore given by this lodge have been 
successful and enjoyable, and this »ne 
wiil be no excei)tion to the rule. 

It is expected that the postoffice will 
be in its new cuarters by the first of 
the year. The bank goes temporarilv 
into the store room at the rear of the 
new building, with the Myers companv 
accommodated In rooms on the second 
door. 



CHRISTMAS 
INJOTELS 

Special Entertainments and 
Dinners Are Being Pre- 
pared for Holiday. 



DiFFERENT METHOD 

OF mmm used 



the Brotherhood of 

neers and Firemen 

ball in Hawkinson's 

Jan. 7. the first anniversary 

local organization. 



Locomotive Engl- 

will give a mask 

hall the night of 

of the 



men and 



Winter Rashes 
DemandUseOf 



bing 
leged 
favor 
home, 
living 
little 
been 



with a friend. 



TO MARKET LANDS. . 

Chicagoan to Offer His Itasca County 
Cutover Tracts. 

Grand Rapids, Minn., Dec. 2i. — (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.) — As a result of 
the recent visit to this section of 
Charles F. Ruggles, a Chicago million- 
aire lumberman having e.vtensive cut- 
over land holdings In Itasca county 
much land will be offered for settle- 
ment next spring. 

Mr. Ituggles owns a large area of 
cut-over lands in Itasca, Cass and Bel- 
trami counties, and he is at present 
makin.g arrangements to have this 
put on the market next spring 

All the lands in the different coun- 
ties have been surveyed and aopraised 
during the past season, and Mr. Rug- 
gles will commence an active selling 
campaign at once. He left later for 
Remidjl, In the vicinity of which he 
owns considei-ablo. standing timber 
which it is also his Intention to mar- 
ket at once. 




Cirticura Soap 
and Ointment 

Frost bites, chappings, chafings, red, 
rough and tender faces and hands, 
eczemas, itchings and irritations inci- 
dental to winter sports are promptly 
relieved by warm baths with Cuti- 
cura Soap, followed by gentle ap» 
plications of Cuticura Ointment. 

Cutlcura Soap and Ointment sold throughout tlia 
world. LltH^ral sample of each niaileil free, witu 
32-p. tvwk. Addresd "Cutlcura," Dept. 1,5P. Boston, 

«*"Tender-faced men shAve In comfort with t"uU« 
cura Suup Sbavtog Stick. 25c. Liberal Bampte Irae. 



The Oliver Mining Company 

Changes System of Work 

In Ely District. 

Elj-, Minn.. Dec. 24. — ^Special to 
The Herald.) — The Oliver Mining com- 
pany Is gradually altering Its style 
of mining here in Ely. Up to a few 
weeks back the pillar caving method j 
was the general method employed fori 
the taking out of the ore but now tiie 
method is to be changad to .-luicing. j 
The Zenith Sibley and the east side j 
of the Pioneer have already adopted | 
this method, by which It is expected j 
to keep the ore cleaner and to bring 
it up to a higher percentage of purity, i 
The company officials are also consid- 
ering the advisability of discontinuing 
the i;.se of candles in the mines and to 
adopt the carbide lamps for illuminat- 
ing purposes. Carbide lamps after a 
series of tests having proved superior 
to the candle. 

Home for ('brltitmaii. 

Howard Nicholas and Elvira Limbeck 
are home again for their Christmas 
holidays from the Stout Manual Train- 
ing college. E^ol Ellefsen is also home 
again for Christmas. Miss Ellefsen is 
a student at the normal at Winona. 

On Tuesday evening from 5 o'clocik 
to 7 the teachers and scholars of the 
Methodist Sunday school had a romp 
in the church basement. The childry^n 
were given lunch and afterwards games 
were played. The evenitig was in 
charge of Miss Rutli Frout. 

Richard Williams who Is a student 
at one of the schools of chemlstr.v in 
Chicago, is spending his Christmas va- 
ca.tion with his parents. Capt. T. H. and 
Mrs. Williams. 



SPECIAL ATTORNEY 

FO R CITY PLANTS. 

Virginia, Minn.. Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Hf'rald. ) — A project has been 
launched by R. J. Montague and his 
friends to obtain for him an appoint- 
ment as special attorney for the water 
and light commission which will as- 
sume tiie management of the city's 
plant April 1. Mr. Montague is to re- 
; ceive a salary of $1,800 a year and tiie 
I duties to commence .Jan. 1. It is stated 
that the first work that would fall to 
the attorney for the commission would 
be legal work in taking care of the 
transfer of the property and the is- 
suance and marketing of the city's 
bonds. 



be 
year in 



one of the 
the Du- 



CONTROLLING BEER 

SALE BEIN G SOUGHT 

Hibbing, Minn., Dec. 24. — ("Special to 
The Herald.) — The police have under- 
taken to control the sale of beer at 
Brooklyn, the suburb where the blind 
pig evil has always been a grave prob- 
lem. 

Keg beer is absolutely barred. Case 
beer may be had, but there is a limit 
A case of beer a day may be delivered 



Cliristmas eve will 
merriest nights of the 
luth hotels and cafes. 

The Holland is to have a special 
Christmas program in the cafe this 
evening, when ttie cabaret entertainers 
will put on some special stunts for 
those who love to make the night be- 
fore Christmas the occasion for enter- 
tainment, music and laughter. 

E. H. Lee, managing director of the 
SpalJing. stated today that the big 
hotel would hare just a simple, old- 
fashioned Christmas day dinner. There 
%vill be special Christmas dishes pre- 
pared for the regular guests of the 
hotel, the out of town guests and those 
who come to the hotel for their Christ- 
mas day dinner. 

There will be nothing in the wav of 
entertainment at the Spalding, but' Mr 
Lee says the employes of the house 
are going to try and make the lonelv 
knights of the road and others try anil 
forget that they are not at home. 

The McKay is going to have a big 
dinner and the handsomest menu cards 
tliat the house !ias ever prepared for 
holiday dinner. This dinner, served 
manner that has made friends 
hotel swear by the chef will 
only Christmas entertainment 
will have, 
is planning entertain- 



The Christmas rush at the postoffice 
and at the express offices is about 
over, but today there is still a mild 
rush of tho.se who are .sending belated 
presents to people only a short dl.>i- 
tance away, or of those who are "get- 
ting back", having received presents 
fr-jm unexpected sources. 

.'Saturday, the postoffice authorities 
sa.v, was the busiest day they have 
ever ha«l in the historv of the local 
postoffice. Yesterday was bad enough, 
lor there were lines of people waiting 
to mail and to register parcels from 
early in the morning until late in the 
afternoon. But on Saturdav everv de- 
partment was overwhelmed with work 
The registry department got it per- 
haps the worst, for it had to handle 
not only outgoing but incoming pack- 
ages, and it was heaw both wavs. 
bupt. Barker of that department sa'vs 
that he expects wlien he checks up 
inisiness after the rush to fin-J that 
there has been double the amount of 
any previous year. 

The attendants at the general de- 
Inery window are working hard as 
well as thosf in tiie other departments. 
Evidently the -folks at home" do not 
forget many of the wanderers who 
nave not permanent addresses, for 
packages and remembrances are being 
pas.sed through the general delivery 
window about as regularly as tiiey go 
into the bags ol the carriers to be con- 
veyed to home.s. Scores of those who 
drift from place to place, "blow in and 
blow out," as .some of them term it. 
race the general delivers- window tiiese 
days with a look of expectancv in most 
oases, and others appear at "the win- 
dow and ask without much of an ex- 
pression of hope. In the latter cases, 
particularly, when it is found that 
there is a package the men at the gen- 
eral delivery window sav that the 
change- of expres.sion is invariably one 
not to be forgotten. 

No Parcel Pout Vet. 

Evidently som.e people do not under- 
stand that the parcel post does not go 
into effect until Jan. 1, for there have 
been .several applications for statnps of 
that department within the last few 
"^P- .a"<l two packages of consider- 
able size came from Northern Michigan 
to local addresses with parcel post 
stamps on them. They were accepted 
as I ncle Sam's employes are too busv 
to weed these things out. but the local 
authorities do not understand how the 
senders happened to get the stamps. 
It is thought that perhaps the post- 
masters at the places of shipment did 
not understand the law themselves 

One woman who applied for parcel 
post stamps yesterday had a bundle 
which she said weighed exactlv eleven 
pounds the limit in weight, and which 
the postal authorities sa.v. looked more 
like fifteen pounds. She was verv In- 
dignant that she could not get stampH 
and went away evidentlv 
that the postoffice people 
ting one over' on her. 

Already many packages without ad- 
dresses or return cards are coming 
Into the local office. The regi.=<trv de- 
partment ha.e several of these \\\ 
marks on them are those that 
what town they came from 

cZ'^'^^V"'"'' ^'.'^'■^ ^"■" be one deliv- 
er>. The carriers will get out of the 
office between 9 and 10 o'clock, but 
they do not expect to finish 
late in the dav. 

The general delivery window 
be open from 9:20 to 10:30 o'clock 
then be closed for the rest of the 

If you 



convinced 
were "put- 



the 

show 



up until 



will 

and 
day. 

"ti ., appreciate beautiful hair u.se 

Hvgenol Cream of Green Soap" for 

m«/,-^^^'"'''*'*- ^^^'^ »^>' Lyceum Pha?r 



BETTER FARMING 

MOVEMENT GROWS. 



24. — (Special to 
Better Farming 



SURVEYING LINE 

TO MUD CREEK 

Tow'-r. Minn., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Surveyors have been 
working for several weeks trying to 
find a favorable route for tlie new line 
which the Duluth & Iron Range rail- 
road contemplates building to the 
Consolidated Vermilion company mines 
at Mud creek. It Is thought the only 
way there will be from the company's 
main line east of Robinson lake. It ia 
said the road will be built tliia winter. 



Famous "Pint of Cough 
Syrup*' Receipt 

No Better Remedy at Any Price. 
Falljr Guaranteed. 



■^« ■■ ■ ■■< 



Make 



DID N OT SU RVIVE. 

Tower Man Hit By Train Last Sum- 
mer, Dies From Injuries. 

Tower. Minn., Dec. 24. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — After several operations 
and long hospital treatment. James 
Haney, a local contractor, who was 
•struck by a Duluth & Iron Range 
freight train last summer, having his 
foot crushed, is dead. Mr. ITaney was 
63 years of age, and during the early 
days was a prominent building con- 
tractor In this city. He leaVes 'three 
.sons and one daughter, Mrs. Ei. Ed- 
wards of Ely. ' 
— » 

LadicM' AuxillarT Ball. 

Virginia. Minn., Dec. 24. — (%Spe.-ial to 
The Herald.)— The Ladles' Auxiliary of 



lu- 
most 
tones 
just laxa- 
in a couj^h. 
Also excellent^ 



a plain syrup by mixing one 
pint of granulated sugar and ^2 pint of 
warm water and stir for two minutes. 
Fut 2% ounce-s of pure Pinex (fifty 
cents wortli) m a pint bottle, and fill it 
up with the Sugar Syrup. This gi%-es 
you a family supply of the best coucrh 
syrup at a saving of $2. It never spoils. 
Jake a teaspoouful every one, two or 
three hours. 

^ The effectiveness of this simple remedy 
13 surprising. It seems to talce hold " 
stantly. and will usuallv stop the 
obstinate cough in 24 hours: It 
up the jaded apptite and is 
tive enough to be helpful 
^^^^^"^ a .Plea-'^ing taste. ...^. ...wc.iem. 
tor bronchial trouble, throat tickle, sore 
lungs and asthma, and an unequaled 
reniedy for whooping cough and croup. 

.f/"* r<»cip(} for making cougli remedy 
with Pinex and Sugar Svrup (or 
strained honev) is a prime favorite in 
thouRands of homes in the United States 
and Uinada. The plan has been imita- 
ted, tliough never successfully. If you 
try it, use only gentrine Pinex, which is 
the most valuable concentrated com- 
potJnd of Non^'ay white pine extract, and 
IS rich in guaiacol and all the natural 
healing Pine clempnt.s. Other prepara- 
tions will not M-ork in this recipe 

A guaranty of absolute satisfaction, 
or money promptly refunded, goes with 
this recipe. .^Your dru^i.st has Pinex, 
or will get it for you. If not, sead to 
The Pines Co., PL Wayne, lad 



any 

in the 

of the 

be tlie 

that the McKav 

The St. Louis 
ment for this evening, according to the 
•statement made by Manager Tilton K 
Lewis. There will be the regular 
cabaret form of entertainment in th^ 
big cafe this evening, also tomorrow, 
and there will l>e some special Yule- 
tide dishes prerared for the guests. 
The cafv.^ is to te specially decorated 
as are the cafes of all the hotels but 
aside from this there will be nothing 
out of the ordinjir.v attempted. 

At the Lenox the annual custom will 
be followed. There will be the big 
old Mr. Dinner that has year after year 
attracted many diners to this hotel 
and on this dinner will be spent all 
of the efforts of commemoration of the 
holiday event. Tlie Lenox holiday din- 
ners have long been one of the events 
of the holidays, and this vear will be 
no exception to the other vcars of the 
past. 



Fargo. N. D., Dec 
The Herald.) — The 

movement reports that sixty farmers' 
clubs have been organized in the state 
The assistants to Manager Cooper are 
at work along these line.<, in each 
county during the wint -r month" It ia 
pl.i lined to get at least 150 clubs in op- 
eration during the winter. While the 
primary idea of the club is to advance 
new ideas for farming, the incidental 
plan IS to create better social condi- 
tions in rural communities and to 
duce the farmers to rallv around 
central point. 



In- 
some 



HIT WITH BOTTLE. 

strenuous Argument in Kenmare, N. 
D. . Restaurant May Prove Fatal. 

Kenmare, N. D., Dec. 24.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — From a blow on the head 
alleged to have been given bv W M 
Gray with a bottle in a local "restaur- 
ant. Jesse Woods is in a local hospital 
with a fractured skull and he mav die 
Gray Is in jail. The officials charge 
the pair became Involved In an argu- 
ment. 



CAR OF HONEY BURNS, 

Nearby Car of Nitro-Glycerin Halts 
Those Seeking Sweet Stuff. 

Portal, N. D.. Dec. 2 4.— (Special to 
The Herald.) — A carload of honey 
caught fire in the Soo freight yards 
here from a stov». placed in the car to 
keep tlie shipment from freezing 
vvhen the deliciojs contents began to 
flow from the car to the ground manv 
people hastily prepared for a feast, 
until it was di^u•overed a car con- 
taining thirty dnmis of nltro-glvcerln 
was .standing adjoining the honev car 
The stampede was one of the most ex- 
citing ever seen lere. 



CAUGHT IN ACT. 



North 



Dakota Grain Thieves 
Upon Farmer Then Flee. 

24. — (Special 



Fired 



Kenmare, N. D., Dec. Z4. — (Special to 
The Herald.) — Robert and William 
Mahnke were arr?sted on a charge of 
shooting .lohn Bird north of here some 
months ago. Bird had been missing 
grain flrom a gnnary some distance 
from home. One night he thought he 
would conceal himself at the building 
and await results. He found two men 
with teams after grain. They fired on 
him and one shot took effect in his 
.'Shoulder, knocking him down, follow- 
ing which the men escaped. 



SAINTLY CITY FIRM 

TO D ESIGN BUILDING. 

Grand Forks, N. D., Dec. 24 (Spe- 
cial to The Herald.* — Buechner & Orth 
of St. Paul, have been selected by the 
county commissioners as architects for 
the courthouse which will be built 
here next year costing about $200,000. 
The St. Paul architects were success- 
ful in competition with fourteen archi- 
tects from all sections of the United 
States. The building will be three 
stories high, materials, etc., not being 
selected yet. 



VoTK^ry at Wllltittoa. 

"VMIliston. V D., Dec. L'4. — (Special 
to The Herald.) — Three bogus checks 
made out in the name of Harry Mar- 
shall and supposed to have been Is- 
sued by William Hartman, a local 
dairyman, have shown up. Thev were 
from lis to $4 6. All were cashed In 
local stores aftor small purchases were 
made. The officials have been unabW 
to locate the forger, who at first 
thought to have been a former 
ploye of Mr. Hartman. 



was 
em- 



Overman Intprovtoiir. 

Washington, De.\ 24. — Senator Lee S 
Overman of Norti Carolina, operated 
on for appendiciiis hero last week, 
continues to impr<»ve. 



Reputation 

proves value. Tested throughout 
three generations — known the 
world over as themost reliableprc- 
ventive and corrective of stomach, 
liver, bowel troubles — an unequal- 
ed reputation has been secured by 

BEECHAMS 
PILLS 





14 



CHRISTMAS 
AT CHURCHES 

Elaborate Programs Ar- 
ranged for Places of 
Worship on Holiday. 



Christmas Music Will Be 

Feature of Nearly All 

Services. 



A'.:' 






A!. 



a\ ■ 
It 



i>lv 



Mrs 
IVt. .■ . . 

CU ; , 

KitP . . . 
Cornt lius 
K»lv 



many of the Duluth 

d their Christmas services 

1 programs last Sunday, 

m are having: (.elt'bratlonn 

or another at various 

h the I'restnt week. 

• ♦ • 

v. Mi-Caughiy of tho Secomi 
-. church, lolo West Supe- 
onducted services and tlie 
':nas festival Monday eve- 
wins the sermon all the 
- of the church united in 
n the festival. Rev. Mr. 
v\iil conduct another serv- 
na.s morning. 

• « • 

:. uv school of 
M. H. church, 
: and Halifax 
ast eveniuK- 
■ w s : 
I i. raids of the 
School. 

! k ' The Angels Sing" 

.\l:ss Sylvia IJevier. 
iphcrds Vigil.s Keeping"... 
fi-is l>orothv rierson. 
in "Tlie Biruti' Christmas 



the Merritt 

Forty-sixth 

street, held 

The program 

Morning". . 



Mu.u 



thi 



1 .-. t S: 
last 



k. 



CAST: 

Pearl Ayotte 

Mildred Ayotte 

Harry Randall 

Florence Bryant 

Earl Holmes 

Gladys VoHne 

Elsie Gundry 

David Ramsey 

Helen Merritt 

I'hillp Merritt 

1 ("liristmas exercises and 

I of the Sunday school of 

I Presbyterian church took 

tvtning beginning at T:30 



« « « 
St M.athew"s Elvungellcal T^uth- 
: '.Mih. 115 Sixth avenue east, of 
wu; I H'\. E. Lehne is pastor, on 
Tu. .iay afternoon announcement for 
the I.urd s Supper was given. On 
W» 'Iri'sday morning at 1(» o'clock, pre- 
par;'t(.iy .sf-rvice (Beicht-Gottesdlenst) 
will Im h- id. A ft stive service, with 
8!»e<^i'tl music opens at 10:30 a. m. Holy 
Communion will be held at 11:30 a. m. 
A .'••p'^ 'iiil prof^ram will be rendered In 
the . V. niiiir by the Sunday school, as- 
slKl( d ky the male choir and the quar- 
tet. Ti.r- .•Service will commence at 7 
o'llock si ;irp. ^n Thursday evening? 
1h(- I.utiuf league will meet at tha 
hunu- of Julius Froehlich, 121 Fifty- 
sixth avenue west. 

• * * 

At Trinity pro-cathedral a midnight 
servir.- fn- Christmas eve opens at 
11 :j:. .)cloi k tonight. The program is 
as follow s: 
Ort-.ii !•:, lude— 'Holy Night" 

i>udley Buck 

Pro'-essional — "It Came Upon the 

Midnigia Clear ' Willis 

Cnnimunion Service in G Field 

Carol— -Holv Night" 

Traditional Melody 

(iffcrtorv Anthem — "A Virgin Un- 

sp('tt( iV Old English 

••Gloria in Excelsis" Old Chant 

Hvmn — ■Cairn on the Lisfning Ear 



of Night" 

"Nunc l>imittis" 
Recessional — "O 

Bethlehem" . . 
Organ — "Noel ' . 

Music for the 



Sykes 

Slainer 

Little Town of 

Barnby 

Dubois 

Christmas day service, 



opening at 10:30 a. m.. is as follows: 

Orgitn Prelude — Prelude on two 
Chiistmas hvmns Guilmant 

Froces.«ional — "O Come, All Ye Faith- 
ful " Adeste Fideles 

Cur<l — "A Virgin Unspotted" 

Traditional Melody 

Con. iii;ni' n Service in G Field 

Hvn II- .<!ng, O Sing, This Blessed 
Mo: t. ' Smart 

Anthem — 'The Shepherds in the 



Field- 
"Sur«iuni 
"Glo?-ia 

-s. 

A;.;-. .-- 
Cli-.'.> i' 



Coida" . . . 

n Excelsis' 

1 Amen" . , 

,<tl— "Hark, 

Sing" 
istlude 



1; 



il. 



Vincent 

Field 

Old Chant 

Stainer 

tho Hrrald 
. . .Mendelssohn 
Hallelujah Chorus" 

Handel 

is organist and 



Pearson 
( h'lr uirector. 

• ♦ * 
At the First Christian church. 
Twelfth avenue east and Fourth street, 
the Christmas program of the Bible 
Bcnool will l.e given this evening. 
« « « 
children's Christmas tree 
of I'ark Point mission 



The 



ex- 



for this evening at 



and 

are 

7:30 



Bci. , .:■ 1 
o'clock. 

* • « 

The Sunday school of the Proctor 
Methodist church will give a Christmas 
program with a tree this evening. A 
useful article will be given by the 
school to every boy and girl who has 
been in attendance. 

* « • 

Early Christmas morning, many of 
the churches will have services. At 
the Catholic churches, there will be 
early masses, some beginning at 6 
o'clock. At the Episcopal churches 
there will be early communion. 

The Catholic churches will hold 
Christmas services Christmas morning 
at 10:30. The principal service will 
take place at the Sacred Heart cathe- 
dral where the sermon will be 
preached by the Rt. Rev. James Mc- 
Golrick, bishop of the Catholic dio- 
cese of Duluth. As is the custom on 
Christmas, the Catholic churches will 
have elaborate musical programs. The 
service at the cathedral will be opened 
at 10:30 with pontifical high mass in 
C. assisted by Flaaten's orchestra. The 
choir will be directed by John Goloz. 
Miss Theresa Lynn will play the ac- 
companiments at the organ. The of- 
ffrtory will be Gounod's "O Dies 
Praeclara," sung by Mesdames Des- 
Misses Claire Foltz 
Messrs. J. S. Lynn. 
Coates and J. Zell- 



lauries and Carl, 
and MnP>nev, and 
J. E. For an, H. C. 



Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 



w" 



"■^^r7S 



man. 

« « • 
At St. Paul's Episcopal church there 
will be holy communion at 8 and 10 
a. m. A Christmas service will open 
at 10:^0 a. m. Tlie musical program is 
as follows: 
Processional — "Christmas, Awake".. . 

Custance 

C. o. Applehagen and Choir. 
Tntrolt — "Pehold, I Bring You Good 

Tidings F. Peel 

Cnnnmunion Service, in G. . . .B. Agulter 
Hymn — "O Come, All Yc Faithful"... 

Adeste Fidf ics 

Solo — "O Holy Night" Adam 

C. O. Applehagen. 
Anthem — "While Shepherds Watched" 
Communion Solo — "Sleep, Holy Rabe" 

Custance 

. Mary Syer Bradshaw. 

Gloria Schubert 

Mr.". Aljihln Flaaten and Choir. 

Nunc I>imlftis (Gregorian) 

Recessional — "Hark, the Herald An- 
gels Sing" Mendelssohn 

A. F. M. Custance is organist and 
choirmaster. 

* * • 
The children of St. Stephen's Ger- 
man-Engl'sh Evangelical Lutheran 
church, Sixt.v-seventh avenue west and 
Raleisrh street, will hold their festival 
on Christmas eve. Rev. Walter Sievers 




"To you In David's town this day 

Js born of Davids Un^ 

Tho Saviour, who Is Christ the Lord; 

And this shall be the sign: 

The heavenly Dahe you there shall find 

To human view displayed. 

All meanly wrapped in swathing bands. 

Apd lu a manger laid." 



Thus spake the seraph; and forthwith 

Appeared a shining ihrong 

Of angels, praising God, who thus 

Addrc.«.sed their joyful song: 

"All glory he to God on high. 

And to the eartli be peace; 

Good will henceforth, from heaven to men 

Begin, and never cease." 



will hold Christmas services the next 
morning. 

Rev. H. A. Stoughton of the West 
Duluth Baptist church. Fifty-ninth 
avenue west and Grand, will conduct 
the annual festival Thursday evening. 

Christmas services at Immanuel's 
Norwegian Lutheran church. Fifty- 
seventh avenue west and Roosevelt 
street, will be held by Rev. J. E. Ros- 
holdt at 10:45 o'clock on Christmas 
morning. The Sunday school will hold 
its festival on Thursday evening. 
• * « 

La Julotta service will be conducted 
by all the Swedish pastors at 5:30 
o'clock on Christmas morning. Special 
street cars have been arranged for by 
the local pastors, one car leaving 
Twenty-fourth avenue east and Supe- 
rior street at 4:50 o'clock In the morn- 
ing, another leaving Lakeside at 4:40 
o'clock, the owl car leaving Woodland 
at 4:02 o'clock and the Grand avenue 
car leaving Seventy-first avenue west 
at 4:02 o'clock. 

The following special music program 
will be featured at the early morning 
of Julotta service at the Swedish Mis- 
sion church. Twenty-first avenue west 
and Second street: 
March by the choirs — "Ara Vare Gud 

1 Hojden" 

Song — "Var Halsad Skona Morgon 

Stund" J. O. Wallin 

Congregation. 

Thanksgiving and prayer 

Rev. John J. Daniels. 

"Helga Natt ' Beethoven 

Choir and children's chorus. 
Scripture reading — "A Prophesy".... 

"Utur Juda Gar En Spira" Ashford 

Miss Anna Norain and choir. 

•'Frojdens, I Himlar A. L. S. 

Male chorus. 

"Sing, Oh Heavens" Tours 

Quartet and solo, 
reading — "The Birth of 



. . .Hjertelius 
chorus. 

.... Gruber 



A. L. Skoog 



Story of 



Scripture 

Christ" 

"Och Nagra Herdai" . . . 
Choir and childrens' 

Offertory 

"Stilla Natt" 

Ladies' Octet. 
Sermon — 'The Prince of Peace". 

Rev. John J. Daniels 
"Ett Barn Ar Oss Fodt 
Choir. 
Song — "O Du Saliga, O Du Heliga" 
Congregation. 
Rev. Swanev Nelson of the First 
Swedish Baptist church. Twenty-sec- 
ond avenue west and Third street, will 
conduct a Julotta service early Christ- 
mas morning. Following is the pro- 
gram : 

Song — "Jublen. 1 Him.lar" 

Congregation. 
Scripture reading — "The 

Christ's Birth" 

Rev. Swaney Nelson. 

Solo — "Glory to God" 

Ehard Palin. 

Prayer 

Spng — "Var Halsad Skona Morgons- 

tund" 

Congregation. 
Song — "What Sounds Are Those"... 

Choir. 
Sermon — "Born This Day, a Savior, 

Which Is Christ" 

Rev. Nelson. 

Song — "Bethlehem" 

Choir. 

Benediction 

• • • 

A Julotta service will be held at the 
Elim Swedish Lutheran church. Fifty- 
sixth avnue west and Elinor street, 
at 5:30 o'clock on Christmas morning. 
Rev. J. A. Krantz. D.D., will be as- 
sisted by the choir during the service 
and at the later service at 10:30 
o'clock. The Sunday school will hold 

its festival in the evening. 

* • * 

Rev. J. C. Reirertson of Our Savior's 
Norwegian Lutheran church, Fifty- 
seventh avenue west and Wadena 
street,will conduct a Christmas serv- 
ice at 10:30 o'clock Wednesday morn- 
ing and at Proctor in the afternoon. 
The children will hold their festival 
Friday evening. 

* * • 

Another Julotta service will be held 
at 5:30 o'clock Christmas morning at 
St. Peter's Episcopal ctinrch. Twenty- 
eighth aveniie west and First street. 
An English service will be held at 10:30 
o'clock, with the following special pro- 
«rra m : 
Processional — "Sing, Oh, Sing, This 

Blessed Morn" 

Congregation. 

Tntrolt — "Sing. O Heavens' 

Mrs. N. B. Morrison. 

"Kvrie Elelson" Simper 

"Gloria Tibi" Simper 

Hvmn before sermon — "It Came Upon 

the Midnight Clear" 

Choir and Congregation. 

Doxologv Bourgeois 

Anthem — "The Birthxaay of a King" 
Congregation. 

Offertory Anon 

"Sursum Corda" Simper 

"Sanctus" Simper 

"Ronedictus Qui Venif' Morley 

"Agnus Dei" Cooper 

Communion hymn — "And Now O 

Father" 

"Gloria in Excelsis'' Simper 

"Nunc Dimittis" Round 

Recessional — "Hark, the Herald An- 
gels Sing" 

Rev. Elward Erickson of the First 
Norwegian-Danish M. E. church will 
conduct services at 6 o'clock and 10:30 
o'clock Christmas morning. The Sun- 
day school will hold its festival Thurs- 
day evening and the Epworth league 
Friday evening. Rev. J. M. Nervig of 
the Zlon Norwegian Lutheran church 



will hold services at 10:30 o'clock on 
Christmas morning and at 7:45 o'clock 
in the evening. The Sunday school 
class will hold its festival Thursday 
evening. 

* • • 

Rev. C. G. Olson of the Bethany Swe- 
d'sb Lutheran church, Twenty-third 
avenue west and Third street, and Rev. 
C. W. R. Wermine of the P'irst Swe- 
dish M. E. church. Twentieth avenue 
west and Third street, will both con- 
duct early Julotta services. Their Sun- 
dcy school classes will hold their fes- 
tival Thursday evening. 

Rev. W. G. Fritz of the Clements 
Mission M. E. church. 830 Garfield ave- 
nue, will conduct a Christmas service 
at 7:30 o'clock tomorrow evening. 

• * • 

At the Bethesda Norwegian Luther- 
an church. Sixth avenue east and Fifth 
street, services will be conducted on 
Christmas day in the forenoon at 10:3!) 
in the Norwegian language and in the 
evening at 7:45 in the English lan- 
guage. The program will be as fol- 
lows: 

MORNING. 

Organ prelude 

Solo — "The Birthday of a King" 

W. H. Neidllnger 

Miss Cora Olson. 

Prayer 

Song— "Unto Us a Child Is Born"... 

August Krapf 

Choir. 
Sermon — "Behold, I Bring You Good 

Tidings of Great Joy" 

Song — "Bethlehem" C. H. Gabri-l 

Choir. 

Offertory Dr. Alfred Beirly 

Postlude — "Vor Gud, Han er Saa 

Fast en Borg" Carl Sand-.ir 

EVENING. 

Organ prelude . . 

Solo — "Star of Betlilehem " . .Caro Roma 
Miss Betsy Duclett. 

Prayer 

Song — "The Angels Hosannas" 

R. Frank Lehman 

Choir. 
Sermon — "The Manner in Which 

the Shepherds Received the Mes- 
sage" 

Solo — Selected 

Miss Edith Walker. 
Offertory — Selected 
Postlude 

Miss Ella Hanson 

The Norwegian 
Christmas program 
Thursday, Dec. 
English Sunday 



gram Friday, 



Beethoven 

Is organist. 
Sunday school 

will be rendered 
26. at 8 p. m., and the 
school Christmas pro- 



Dec. 27, at 
• * * 



S p. m. 



At Tm.manuel's Lutheran church, 
Fifty-Seventh avenue west and Roose- 
velt .itreet, of which Rev. J. W. Ro- 
sholdt is pastor, there will be services 
on Christmas day at 10:45 a. m. The 
services will be conducted by the pas- 
tor in the Norwegian language. The 
Sunday school Christmas festival will 
be held Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. 
The following is the program for 
Christmas day: 

Opening prayer 

Hymn 

Congregation. 



"Minsjal Lov Henen". 
Choir. 



Chant 
Song — 

Hymn 

Congregation. 
Sermon — "Glory to God in the High- 
est, and on Earth, P'eace, Good 

Will Toward Men" 

Hymn 

Congregation. 
Song — '*Fra Himlen Kom en Engel 

Klar" 

Choir, 

Offertory 

Chant 

Hymn 

Congregation, 
« * • 
On Christmas day, services at the 
First Narweglan Lutheran church. 
First avenue east and Third street, 
will be held morning and evening. The 
subject for the morning sermon will be 
"The Child in the Manger," and for tho 
evening serm.on, "The Sun Is Risen," 
Mai. iv, 2. The musical program will 
be as follows: 

MORNING. 
Prelude — Improvisation on "Holy 

Night' 

"Du Deilige Ful" 

F. Melius Christiansen 

Choir. 
••I Know That My Redeemer Liveth" 

Handel 

Choir. 

Offertory — "Cantabile" Guilmant 

Postlude — "Hallelujah Chorus" from 

"Messiah" Handel 

EVENING. 

Prelude. — "Romanze" Mozart 

"Deillg er Jorden," air from "Twelfth 

Century" 

Choir. 

"Ring Ind, Ring Ind" 

F. Melius Christiansen 

Choir. 
•'Thine Is the Kingdom," from "Holv 

City" Gaul 

Choir. 
Offertory — "Air and Variations". Haydn 

Postlude — "Processional March" 

Guilmant 

Miss Alice M. Olsen is organist and 
John Olsen is choir director. 
* * * 

At the First Swedish M. E. church. 
Twentieth avenue west and Third 
street, on Christmas day early service 
will be held at 6 o'clock in the morn- 
ing. There will be special music and 
song by the choir. A Sunday school 
program will be rendered at 7 p. ro. 



It will include recitations, dialogues, 
speeches, songs by the church choir and 
the different classes of the Sunday 
school instrumental music and an ad- 
dress by the pastor. 

* * • 

St. John's Episcopal church. Lake- 
side, on Christmas morning will have 
holy communion and service at 10 
o'clock, as follows: 
Processional — "Oh, Come All Ye 

Faithful" J. Reading 

"Kyrie Eleison' G. J. Kimmins 

Anthem — "Cradled and Lowly" 

Custance 

Sermon 

Solo — " OHoly Night" A. Adams 

Mrs. Stanley Butchart. 

"Gloria Tibi" G. M. Garrett 

"Sanctus" J. Stainer 

"Benedictus" T. Morley 

"Agnus Dei" W. B. Gilbert 

Communion Hymn E. Miller 

"Gloria In Excelsis" C. Zenner 

Anther — 'O Come, O Come, Em- 
manuel" A. F. M. Custance 

Recessional — "Hark, the Herald 
Angels Sing" Mendelssohn 

♦ .♦ * 

The feunday school class of the First 
Swedish Baptist church will hold its 
annual festival at 3 o'clock Christmas 
afternoon and at 7 o'clock in the eve- 
ning. The following program will be 
featured: 

Organ prelude 

Prof. N. E. Ericson. 

Song 

Audience. 

Scriptural reading 

Rev. Swaney Nelson. 

Song 

Primary Department. 

Address of welcome 

Alice Wilson. 
Reading — "Christmas Greetingr" .... 
Lillian Jacobson. 

Reading — "Julefrid" 

Elsie Wiren. 

Reading — "Christmas Wish" 

Kermit Johnson. 
Recitation — "Christmas Morning".. . . 
Francis Carlson. 

Reading, from Bible 

Edna Malin. 

Song 

Choir. 

Reading 

George Malin. 

Recitation — 'Juletide' 

Ella Jacobson. 

Exercise — "Salvation" 

By Thirty-six I'uplls of the School. 
Address — "Why Young Men Should 

Go to Sunday School" 

Leonard Anderson. 

Recitation 

Ruth Malin. 

Song 

Young Ladies' Quartet. 

"Chrlstmastide" 

Mildred Summers. 

Declamation 

Andrew Johnson. 

Reading 

Class No. 8. 

Song 

Sunday School Teachers. 
Recitation — "Christmas Memory" .... 
Ruth Carlson. 

Declamation 

Hannah Nelson. 

Song 

Florence Nelson. 

Recitation 

Arthur Martinson. 

Reading 

Arthur Peterson. 

Recitation 

Gordon Mortlnson. 

Song 

Choir. 

Recitation 

Lillian Svenson. 

Recitation 

Alice Jacobson. 
Reading — "The Best Day of the Year" 
Mildred Johnson. 

Recitation 

Irene Nelson. 

* • * 

The Sunday school of the West- 
minster Presbyterian church. Fifty- 
eighth avenue west and Ramsey street, 
will hold its festival next Thursday 
evening. A cantata. "The Genuine 
Santa Claus," will be featured during 
the evening. The cast is as follows: 

Dorothy Katherine Macauley 

Ada Andria Simpson 

Fjancis Elsie Krueger 

Margaret Mary Hanson 

Christmas Fanny Muriel Strand 

Ned Robert Boreen 

.lack Leslie Goodhand 

Santa Claus Himself 

Capt. Blowhard Himself 

The following numbers will be sung 
during the evening, with Miss Flor- 
ence Melin as accompanist: "The 
Christmas Time," "Writing Song," 
"Stocking Song," "Billikin Song," 
■'Spook Song," "Sandman's Song," 
"Hun-ah For Christmas," "Jig Saw 
Puzzle Song," "'Shinney Song," "Santa 
Claus Song,"" "Automobile Song,"" 
"Dressmakers' Song," "Defenders' 
Song," and the finale, "Spirit of 
Christmaatide."" 

Rev. W. L. Staub, pastor of the 
Westminster church, will preach his 
Christmas sermon next Sunday morn- 
ing. The choir will render the Chrliit- 
mas cantata, "Everlasting Light," 

• • « 

St. Patjrs Evangelical church. Tenth 
avenue east and Third street, of which 
Rev. Paul T. Bratzel is pastor, will 
haver services on Christmas day at 
10:30 a. m. The subject of the sermon 
Is "He Shall Save His People From 
Their Sln«." Christtnas anthems will 
be sung by the choir. The celebra- 



tion of the Lord's Supper will take 
place during the services. The chil- 
dren's program will begin at 7 p. m. 

• * • 

At the Asbury M. E. church. Six- 
tieth avenue west and Raleigh street. 
Wednesday evening the Sunday school 
will hold Its annual festival, the pro- 
gram for which is as follows: 

Song— "The Day of Days"' 

School. 

Invocation 

Rev. W. H. Farrell. 

Responsive scripture reading 

Song — "Hall the Merry, Merry Christ- 
mas" 

School.' 

Prayer ,., 

Rev. W. H. Farrell."* 

Song — "Ring Ye Glad Bells" 

School. 

Recitation. — "Good Night" 

Misses Signe Wangen, Helen Johnston, 
Helen Meldahl and Stella Graves. 

Song — "O Quiet Night" 

Asbury Quartet. 
Recitation — "The Christmas Vision". 

Raymond Wollan 

Song — "When We Hung Up Our 

Stockings" 

Emple Mattson. 
Recitation — "Grandma Is Growing 

Old" 

Donald Holcomb. 

Song— "The Angels' Song"" 

School. 

Recitation — "Christmas Seeds"" 

Miss Violet Gilliland. 

Violin solo 

Russell Johnson. 

Recitation— "Christma.s Spirit" 

Miss Lillian Holcomb. 

"The Dance of the Stockings" 

Lloyd Cayo, Wallace (Jranley and 
Donald Holcomb. 
Recitation— "Santa Claus and the 

Brownies" 

Miss Stella Ransbottom. 

Recitation — "Just One" 

Miss Elizabeth Owen. 
Song — "The Happy Christmas Time 

Is Here"' 

School. 

Recitation — "Christmas" 

Miss Mabel Peterson. 

Song — "O Holy Night" 

Asbury Quartet. 

Recitation — Selected 

Miss Maud McDonald. 

Song — ".Santa" 

Miss Bertha Robinson. 

Lullaby 

Primary Department. 
Recitation — 'The Shepherd Boys' 

Carol" 

Miss Kitty Seymour. 

Solo — "Glory to God" 

Miss Eva McLyman. 

Recitation— 'A Guiding Star" 

Leland Erickson. 

Song— "Hark, a Song" 

School. 

Song — Selected 

Miss Adella Hermans. 
Recitation — "Giving Away Dollies".. 
Miss Maud Gilbert and Class. 

Song — Selected 

Asbury Quartet. 

Recitation — Selected 

Lillian Showers. 
Recitation — "O Happy Christmas 

Night" 

Hugh McMillan.' 

Song — "In the Light of the Star".... 
Scliool. 

Recitation — Selected 

Laurence Caya. 

Recitation — "Christmas Bells" 

Miss Lillian Mattson. 

Song— -The Klnp of Kings" 

School. 
Benediction 

• * * 

At the Hope church of the Evangel- 
ical association. Sixth avenue east and 
Fifth street, on Wednesdav evening, 
beginning at 7 o'clock, the" Christmas 
exercises will be given by the Sunday 
school. 

* • • 

At the Bethel chapel on Wednesdav 
evening the Sunday school Christmas 
entertainment will be held. The par- 
ents are invited to come with their 
children. 

* • • 

The annual Christmas Sunday school 
entertainment of the Union church will 
be held on Wednesday evening at 8 
o'clock at the K. P. hall. The con- 
gregation is invited. The program for 
the evening Is in the hands of Miss 
Marga; et Tidball and Mr. and Mrs. E. 
H. McAllister. 

* • • 

At St. John's English Lutheran 
church. Lake avenue north and "Third 
street, an early morning Christmas 
service of song will be held on Christ- 
mas at 6 o'clock and the Sunday schooj 
will render the service entitled "The 
Song of Joy," beginning at 7 p. m. on 
Christmas. 

• ♦ • 

At St. Stephen's German-Engli)=h 
Lutheran church. Sixty-seventh avenue 
west and Raleigh street, on Tuesday 
evening the Sunday school will render 
a program at the church. The services 
begin at 8 o'clock. On Wednesday 
morning at 10:30 o'clock special Christ- 
mas services will be held. An offering 
will be taken for missions. 

• » • 

At the Swedish Bethel Baptjst church. 
Ninth avenue east and Third street, 
an extra Christmas program will be 
rendered. "Julotta" will be held Christ- 
mas mornTng at 5:30. The Sunday 
school Christmas program will be given 
on Thursday night at 7:30. 

• • • 

At St. Paul's Lutheran church. 
Twentieth avenue west and Third 
street, on ChrL^tmas day at 11 a. m. 
services will be conducted in the Eng- 
lish language, with special music by a 
chorus choir. A Christmas tree fes- 
tival for the Sundav school opens Fri- 
day evening at 7:3() o'clock. 
« • * 

At the First Swedish Lutheran 
church, Sixth avenue east and Third 
street, of which Rev. Carl C. Swan 
is the pastor, on Christmas morning 
there will be early mass at 5 o'clock 
and high mass at '6 o'clock. The chil- 
dren's Sunday school festival will be 
held on Thursday night. 

• • • 

At the Trinity Lutheran church. 
Fourth avenue east and Fifth street, 
of which Rev. J. Flagstad Is the pas- 
tor, there will be service on Christ- 
mas day at 7:30 in the evening. The 
Christmas tree program will be given 
Thursday evening. 



Employmenf and Safety 

will y«u invest In an Mlueatioa with • provitloa 
abM>lute!y fuanuiteelni you •mplayment twelve 
month* In the year or put you iato buiincea for 
younelfT Then write the New Era ButineM college, 
Superior, WIe. The best equipped tcheol in the 
Northweet where private board and room is fur- 
niched for $16 per month. Speelai rate* to these who 
enter early in January. Write for Infermatioii. 



LOOKING FOR 

A LONELY MAN 

"An Elderly Single Gentle- 
man" Has Invitation 
to Dinner. 

If there Is an elderly single man in 
Duluth, who has no home and sees a 
lonesome Christmas ahead, he has an 
Invitation to dinner with another elder- 
ly single man. 

The new "good fellow" stunt appeared 
today. A man called up The Herald 
and said he wanted to extend an Invita- 
tion to dinner tomorrow to an elderly 
single man. The Herald didn't know of 
anybody right at the moment, but 
promised to look up a dinner companion 
for the inquirer. 

Another "good fellow" who called at 
The Herald today showed the right 
spirit. He took the names of three 
deserving poor families, about a dozen 
people in all, and promised to supply 
not only toys for the children, but food 
and other substantial gifts. He said he 
Intended to get a cutter this afternoon 
and make a Santa Claus trip all his 
own. 



PIPER'S SON 
IS REFORMED 

"Tom, Tom," of Nursery 

Rhyme Fame No Longer 

Steals Pigs. 



Your husband is waiting, 
Your children are home." 



"Doctor Foster 
Went to Gloeter 
In a shower of rain: 
He buttoned his coat 
Up to his throat. 

And laughed — and was glad be 
came." 




Debrutalized Edition of 
Mother Goose Received 
in Duluth. 



"What are little boys made of, 

ir.-ade of. 
What are little boys made of? 
laughs and smiles and cunning wiles. 
That's wr.at little boys are made of, 

made of. 

What are little girls made of, 

made of. 
V.'h-at are little girls made of? 
Laughs and kisses, the dear little 

misses. 
And that F what l;tll« girls are made 

of, made of." 



It's come at lust! The reformers have 
reached the outside limit. They can go 
no farther. They've debrutalized 
"Mother Goose, ' taken the "pepe," as 
it were, out of the friend of our child- 
hood days. 

"Tom, Tom, the piper's son" will 
steal no more rigs. He'll pick a flower 
instead. Taffy will not be a "thief," 
but a 'chief." Mother Hubbard will 
find all kinds of bones In the cup- 
board. The old R-oman who lived in the 
shoe will not be an argument for race 
suicide, for sh<-'Il know just what to 
do with all hei- children. Mary, Mary, 
will be "never contrary. ' "Pussy" will 
not be in a well, it's to be a bucket. 

Some reformer with an idea that 
improper impnssions are created in 
the mind of a child by the jingles of 
childhood has eliminated every sug- 
gestion of Impropriety. 

A book containing the reformed ver- 
sion of the Mother Goose rhymes has 
been discovered in a Duluth book- 
store. 

Imagine the groans of agony that 
will come from father when he hears 
his young hopeful reciting: 
"Needles and pins, needles and pins. 
When a man riarries his comfort be- 
gins." 

That's what the new Mother Goose 
book says. 

Tom, the Thief. 

You'll remember what a riotous ca- 
reer was led by Tom, the piper's son, 
who "stole a jiig and away he run?" 
Tom has been regenerated and thus 
we see him: 

"Tom, Tom, th< piper's son, 
Picked a flow'^r and away he runl 
The flower wis sweet. 
And Tom was fleet. 

And how they laughed along the 
street." 

That brutal exclamation point is in 
the new versian, and doubtless was 
overlooked. Also it Is strange that 
the children should have been allowed 
to laugh along the street. 

And there was "Mary, Mary, quite 
contrary." Alas, she, too, has been 
converted from her nefarious ways. 
Now Mother Goose has it: 

■'Miss Mary. 

Never contrary. 

How does your garden grow — 

With its lily bells, 

And pretty shells. 

All standing in a row?" 

With what abandon Tommy Green 
and Tommv Trout used to play. Not 
so, now. Littl? pussy, likewise, has 
been rescued. This is the new style 
Mother Goose: 

"Ding, dong, bell, bucket's in the well. 
Who put it in? Little Tommy Gre^n. 
Who pulled it out? Little Tommy 

Trout. 
What good boys were they. 
On a warm summers day. 
To give everybody a nice, cool drink — 
Now isn't that Just what you think?' 
Xo >lore BefSKnrm. 

Under the ne'v regime in the nursery 
there shall be no more beggars: 

"Hark, hark, the dogs do bark. 
The children have come to town: 

Some with bigs and some on nags. 
And some in velvet gowns." 

But see wh.it they have done to 
Jack Horner: he should worry. Jack 
used to be considerable person in the 
old book, but has become a molly- 
coddle; witness: 
"Little Jack Horner 

Sat in a corner. 
Eating a Christmas pie. 
He put in his ihumb 

And pulled t.ut a plum. 
And said, '"U'hat a big plum — oh my.'" 

The Mother Goose that most of us 
knew had "sin;? a song of sixpence, a 
pocketful of rye." The new version 
ij a teetotaler: the author has cut out 
the booze, anl Instead of rye one 
reads: 

"Sing a song of sixpence, 
A heart filled full of love. 

Four and twenty blackbirds 
And one v-hlte dove. 

When the dcor was opened 
The birds began to sing; 

"VVasn't that a pretty sight 
To set before a king?" 

The big man of Bombay seems to be 
the only one no far who has played 
in luck in the Goody Goody book. It 
used to be: 

•'When a bird called a snipe 
Ran away with his pipe," etc. 

But to instill the idea into the youth- 
ful mind that it is a violation of the 
city ordinance to take a man's pipe 
the new version says: 
"When a bird called a snipe 
Came and sat on his pipe, 
Which pleased the Big Man of Bom- 
bay." 

Trying it on the dog, we encounter 
another alteration that is surprising, 
but fine for tlie dog: 

"Old Mother Hubbard 

Went to the cupboard 

To get hei dear dog a bone; 

And when she got there 

Many bonesi made her stare. 

And the dog got one all his own." 

In the old dJ.ys, when Friday after- 
noon was execution day (they called 
it elocution) and every one had to 
"speak a piece,"" this used to go pret- 
tv well: 
"Taffv was a ""tVelshman, Taffy was a 

thief; 
Taffv came to my house and stole a 
leg of beef '" etc. 

Rrfermlaa: TafTy. 

Those days are gone for Taffy. He's 
turned over a new leaf. and he 
wouldn't steal a leg of beef for any- 
thing in the world, because If he did 
maram«, wouldn't let him embroider 
anv more, so there. And in the 1913 
model of Mother Goose we have 
"Taffy was a '^N'elshman, Taffy was a 

chief; 
Taffy c%me to my house and brought a 

piece of beef. 
I went to Taffy's house, Taffy wasn't 

home; 
Taffy came to my house and brought 

a marrow bone. 
I went to Tafff's house. Taffy was In 

bed, 
I said, 'Thank you. Taffy' — and he 
covered up his head. ' 

The cat "and the fiddle jingle also 
has been altered to suit the millen- 
nium, should It arrive this season: 

"Hey, diddle diddle 

The cat and "he fiddle; 

The cow jumped over the moon — 

The little dog barked to see such 

sport. 
And the dish danced away with the 

spoon." 
All the following verses are taken 
from the new books: 

"Little Bo-peep *o loves her sheep 
She knows just where to find them; 

If she leaves them alone they'll come 
home. 
Bringing the r l«amb8 behind them." 

"I had a little pony. 

They called him Dapple-gray; 
I lent him to a lady 

To ride a mile away. 
She petted him, she loved him. 

She kept him from the mire; 
I'll always b^nd my pony now 

For the little lady's hire." 



"There was an old woman who lived- 

In a shoe. 
She had so many children she knew^ 

Just what to do: 
She gave them some broth with plenty 

Of bread. 
And kis^•ed them all fondly and put 

them to bed." 



•J^dy bird. 
Fly taway 



lady bird, 
home, 



"Dickery, dlcker>' dock? 

The mouse looked up at the clock; 

The clock struck 'one' — 
Happy dav's begun — 
Dickery. dickery. dock!'' 

There are many others, all of then* 
freed of anything that might give rise 
to an Idea in the brain of the child. 
In the introduction the expert says: 

"Rfilizing how potent is the power 
of all good thought planted In the 
fertile tjround of the mind of a grow- 
ing child, the modern mother hesitates 
over the old Mother Goose rhymes. 
Dear as they are for old custom's 
sake, many of them are l>rutal or too 
sad to be mentally healthful at "a 
time when the little brain Is most 
plastic to absorb and to retain." 

HOLIDAYlFT 
FROJWCOURT 

John T. Pritchard Is Given 

His Release By Judge 

Dancer. 



Had Served Forty-Four 

Days of Ninety-Day 

Term in Jail. 



John T. Pritchard, county jail pris- 
oner, was this morning given his lib- 
erty as a Christmas present from Judge 
Dancer of the district court. 

Pritchard on Nov. 10 last was sen- 
tenced to a ninety-day term on his 
plea of guilty to an indictment charg- 
ing him with grand larceny, second 
degree. 

When brought before the court to- 
day, Pritchards sentence was com- 
muted. He had served forty-four out 
of the ninety days. 

The judge admonished Pritchard to 
walk upright in the future and to fol- 
low the straight and narrow path. He 
was cautioned to keep away from sa- 
loons and bad company. 

Judge Dancer put him on parole and 
placed him in charge of Mrs. A. B. 
Siewert, a local probation officer, with 
orders that he should report to her at 
.such times as she might direct. 

Pritchard was arrested on Sept. 30 
for stealing material from a West end 
plumbing shop. He is 2S years old. 
^ 

••None Xlcer.** 

Victor Huofs delicious fresh candies. 



COULLNT HEAR THE WATCH. 

Newark News: A man went to a 
Newark physician and said: 

"Doctor. Ive got trouble with my left 
ear. What can you do for me?" 

The doctor held his watch a foot 
away from the patient's ear and asked. 
"Can you hear the tick?" 

'I can barely hear it." 

The phytician got out some interest- 
ing looking instruments and removed 
a birge limp of wax from th<' ailing 
member. 

"Now you ought to hear better," he 
said, and held the watch as before. 

The man listened. 

"Don't you hear it better now?' 

"No, I don't hear it at all." 

"That's queer, " said the doctor and 
he took another look. 

"Are you sure you don't hear now?" 

"I can hear you, but I cant hear the 
watch." 

"Let's try your well ear. Can you 
hear?" 

"Never a tick." 

The doctor looked puzzled. Tlie pa- 
tient looked alarmed. 

"See here, doctor, when you dug me 
that time you didn't destroy my hear- 
ing, did you?" 

"I couldn't have done that." said the 
doctor, 'ypt something is certainly 
wrong. Listen again." 

The man listened with the inter.tness 
of an East Orange man trying to hear 
a street car at 11:30 o'clock on a 
stormy night. But he shook his head 
at last. 

"If vou have wrecked my ear drum, 
doctor," he began. "I'll — " 

But he did not finish his threat, for 
iust then the doctor put his watch to 
his own ear, grinned foolishly and 
said — 

"I guess I forgot to wind the blamed 
thing last night." 

• 

BRINGS THE THOUGHT OF HOME. 

Collier's Weekly: Distant blue of the 
New England hills, sparkling white of 
the New England fields, and. within, 
tlowers and much-read books, work 
done with laughter, love with sincerity, 
and hymn* sung by the firelight — that 
is "Little Women." Many have been 
the eulogies and monuments to those 
sturdy old New England exponents of 
high thinking; this simple book is an 
eternal tribute to the charm of its 
plain living. From Ohio to California 
and in the cities of the East live chil- 
dren of the Puritans, and in every 
home there is some common toucn 
transplanted from the common source. 
Sometimes it Is a bust of Plato and a 
tradition that learnlner is more to be 
desired than riches. Sometimes it is a 
lullaby and a chintz covered chair by 
the fire, sometimes only a trick of 
speech or a simple family custom, but 
always it is the one thing that most 
surely touches the chord of remem- 
brance and Rives to the wanderer the 
thought of home. 

That Is why "Little Women" makes 
grown people smile and men cry as 
they see it acted out upon the stage. 
That is why the nlav is a source of 
real Joy. even as the book has been so 
many years. To move great men to 
great deeds, to srive knowledge to the 
w^ise, to give spiritual exaltation to the 
saint, are good and beautiful things, 
but to bring happiness to the hearts of 
uncounted numbers of ea^er little chil- 
dren Is not to be desnlsed. 

How manv rollicking families have 
acted "IJttle Women?" How many 
lonely little girls have there discov- 
ered playmates? How many aspiring 
and dreaming young souls have found 
in Laurie th^ir first lover and in Jo 
their first friend? It will be long be- 
fore this book dies out of the national 
life, long before that touch of the New 
England home fails to strike a deep 
responsive chord, long before the suc- 
ceeding generations of awakening 
girlhood cease to rise up and call It 

blessed. 

* 

JUST THE OPPOSITE. 

Philadelphia Telegraph: "And vour 
husband gave <1,000 for that " old 
bookr* 

"Yes." 

"To show how much you care for 
literature, I suppose?" 

"No. To show how little we ear* 
for 11,000." 



i 






V 



F"Pi« 





Tuesday, 



THE DULUTH HERALD 



December 24, 1912. 






u 




T DULUTH 



;is.-3.s«/s^^s^»'®^^i^®.-s- -; j 2 s a s-s-^m^^S's i>.a'^®©a,^^^'s:^,^_3.@..3,^.®^^^ae 



IIRRALl) 
North 57tb Ave. 



A. JeBNea. 330 



DR-wcn orKiriiSi 

W. J. J. Moran, 3ie';,i North Central 



Ave. 



MAR/NE 





BE CANDIDATE 

West Duluth Lawyer Talked 
of for Assistant Munic- 
ipal Judge. 



Division of Municipal Court 

Provided for in New 

Charter. 



Harry \V. l.arinera, the only lawyer 
practivins in Wost I>ulutli, is a pros- 
I'eetive oiimiiJatf for assistant inunii- 
ll>al jvidge to tak*' charjje of the West 
i\ court under the new 
I riimenL 

h IS been the only lavr- 
puat twelve 



fltl dauBrhtor of ifr. ami Mrs. Louis 
ilaley. 9 South Slxty-tlrst avenue we^•t, 
wlio died yesterday after u short ill- 
ness, was lield at 10 i-'eloek tills n'.orn- 
iiit? from the .^t. James' Catholic 
ehureli, Fifty-seventh avenue west and 
Kinnear place, liev. 1). AV. I.yneh of- 
ficiattd and interment was at Calvary. 

REACH SEMI-FINALS 

IN TR OPHY COMTEST. 

Wieland and litis last evening en- 
tered the semi-finals of the [Tnion 
Match contest at the Western Curling 
club by defeating Xauft and Keyes re- 
si>ecti\ely. Wieland won hv the score 
of 12 to 11 and llti.s by 12 "to 10. The 
slaiuiins to date follow;*: 

Kirst Itound. Steml-lMiiHlN. 

Jud^son 
Sulli\ an 



AVI, land 
Zault 

litis 
Keyes 



Wieland 



I 



litis 



l»u! 



in;: nir 



11 M'. 



l.aiirjr 



IS 

Ml Hi til 



for tht 



toil 

"years and hus i:ra -ticed in this end of 
the iity (or .sevcnu .-n y».ars. He has 
been a ri si.ienc of Uuluth for nearly 
iweii! > > c;irs. 

in ...iiiuiun to reccivinsj the support 
of loial business men and residents, it 
is reported that Mr. l-anners name has 
already been »i:^i<ested by downtown 
lawyers, w h > favor iiis election to the 
office. A i>» titi..n will be circulated 
aft»r Jan. Z and an effort made to se- 
4 ure I'.if cu-e!A'!;iti'>ii and indorsement 
•of e y ors;ani7.ation in this end of 
^he . • rt,. West Duluth Commer- 

cial clu also be, asked to tsupport 

Mr, I.aii:. . . it is understood at pres- 
ent tiiat there Is no opposition what- 
T iTuiers and he stated this 
il' the proper pressure Is 
ir. lie will announce his 
in:i!!cdiately after the new 



>T, 



t ver to 
morniii- 
hrousiht ; 
» an di. lacy 
year. 

■*.Severai 
regarKi - , 
Jam,'. 

this . ; .,.;. 

actiut: until 

In t;u- r.- 

at t 

.'^ion- 



Mallorv 
Holland 

Tomorrow afternoon Judson will play 
asainst Sullivan and Mallory against 
Holland, the winner to play Wieland 
and litis for the rit^lit to meet in the 
finals. It Is hoped to finish the eon- 
test tomorrow evening. There will be 
no games or skating this evening, spe- 
cial music having been prepared for 
tomorrow. 



LIFE SAVERS' 
BUSYJEASON 

Capt. M. A. McLennan 

Makes Public His Annual 

Report of Work. 



No Strenuous Rescues Like 

Some Years But Active 

and Valuable Work. 



TUGSE 
NEARIJ 




Ice-Breakers Wtfl Be Laid 

Up in a Few Days 

for Winter. 



Axford Funeral. 



The funeral of Mrs. Elizabeth Anna 
Axford. 69 years old, wife of Hamuel 
Axford, 626 North Fifty-sixtl) avenue 
west, who died Sunday, was held at 
2 o'clock this afternoon from tlie fam- 
ily residence and at 3 o'clock from the 
Asbury XL K. church, Sixtieth avenue 
west and Raleigh street, liev. W. H. 
I'arrell officiated and interment was 
at the Oneota cemetery. 



The llfe-aavlng crew, during the 
season just ended, did not have tlie 
life-straining work that sometimes 
falls to its lot. but it passed anything 
but an idle year. It was called upon 
to rescue a lot of people and to save 
such property as launches a great 
many times. Capt. M. A. XIcLennan, 
charge of the crew, has just given 
a report of the work done by 
his men during the season 
It is as follows: 
Recovered two bodies at 



No. 
one 

for 
tha 



body at 

a suitcase 
Pendeiinis 



Dwyer Funeral. 



'' !'l^ have called me up 
!y '.cndiJaiy for assistant 
i i-''. ' said Mr. I^nners 
r. 'it T will not take any 
1 s ■ what is being done." 
> larier recently adopted 
I lection, special provi- 
!• for a muriicipal court 
in vV . St l>uiuth. to be Jtnown as the 
\\ e.st I'ul !!• ,i!vi.-.ion. ^The salary of 
the juu- , >,e $1,500 a year and 

court v\ . . held in this end of the 
city on the ilr.-^t Wednesday of each 
month and at any otlier time as is nec- 
essai : !!.• V ill also hold court in the 
mum ipal i .;;it wlien called upon to 
do so by til-- ,■.:• 1- judges. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL 
TO HAVE PBOGBAM 

Christmas Festival at Our 
Savior's Church Thurs- 
day Evening. 



The funeral of .John Dwyer, 4S years 
old, 2102 West Superior street, who 
died Saturday from injuries received 

i at the Alger-Smith mill la.st week, was 

j held at y o'clock this morning from 
St. James' Catholic church. Fifty-sev- 
enth avenue west and Kinnear pl?ce. 

I lit V. D. \V. Lynch officiated and iater- 

i ment was at Calvary. 



-t:ni, 
1:1 11 
.1 \ 



Th 
■Noru 
sv>vei 
^:tre. ■ 
fur 1 

be hc.'i m 
iiing. The 
follows: 
Song 

Prayer . . . 

Song 



> - lool of Our Savior's 

Luih ran church, Fifty- 

vu. West and Wadena 

Kged a special program 

1 I'hristmas festival to 

church Thursday eve- 

Jjiram for the eveninvr 



Scliool. 



Ill 
i'l 



Bible 

Heri..- 
H u 

i:u.-^ 
Ili'CiMt: 



a 



ling 



II. Larsen. 
Choir. 



Ml, 

\ il;. 



Clarence Hansen, 
.\lmond Volstad and 



i 
•ii K.any.,.!:. 
Ion 

Hazel tunleigii, Lilliaii Nelson, 
Hiri.im Nelson and Signe Henricksen. 

Vocal -solo 

Huss-'il Fvaiison. 
I>ecln:;M.t 1: >n 

Haii-> Hoiiiian and Clarence "iMiorpe*. 
.Song 

Chiiar.-ns Choir. 

r>eclainatioti 

Misses i:isi.- 1 rson, Ethel Fluaten, 

AgiHs Jorg; ;..,o;. and Nellie Hansen. 

J'iano solo 

Arthur Lund. 

Declaniatlon 

Miss Laura Thorpe. 

Song 

Choir. 

Address 

ilev. J. C. Reiner tson 

^ong 

Bible Class. 

Declamation 

Misses Victoria Storto, Clara Anderson 
and Jo.sephine Pederson. 

Heading 

IVIiss Celeste Berg. 

Kecltation 

Misses J. Mikkelson, Bessie LarJson. 
HiM I Olsen. Mildred Olsen and Editli 

OlSeli. 

Song - 

School. 

DecLun ition 

Misse.-> Jurii 



Annual Ball. 

West Duluth council. No. 255, Royal 
league, will entertain at its first an- 
nual ball Friday evening at the Dor- 
ntedy hall. Central avenue and Ram- 
sey street. The following committee 
is in charge of the affair: M. J. Mur- 
ray. George Rise, E. W. Lund and E. 
G. K re idler. 

WesFouiutii^iefs. 

Miss -Anna I^ailow, a teacher at the 
Longfellow school, left yesterday for 
Washburn, Wis., where she will visit 
with her parents over the holidays. 

Miss .Myrtle Stark of t)23 North 
Fifty-sixth avenue west left yesterday 
for Two Harbors to spend Christmas 
with her parents. 

Holiday overcoat bargains. Twenty, 
five per cent discount on all men's and 
boys' overcoats. Some fine boys' over- 
coats at half price. The Great Eastern. 

Miss Clara Johns, a teacher at the 
Fairmont school, left yesterday for 
.Alma, Wis., where she will visit over 
the holidaj's with her parents. 

Band at Western Curling club Tues- 
day and Friday. Gentlemen, 2oc; la- 
dies, IjC. 

Dr. and :Mrs. K. W. Boerner of 4^30 
West Sixth street left last evening 
for Minneai)olis, where they will spend 
Ciiristmaa with relatives. 

Modern houses and cottages for rent. 
W. B. Getchell, 319 Central avenue, 
eler. 

Victor Kartlund of Minneapolis has 
left for his home after spending the 
past week with his sister. Mrs. C. V. s. 
Engstrom. 5215 Wadena street. 

Mrs. Einolander of 0407 Lexington 
street will entertain the Ladies' Aid 
Society of the Swedish iUssion church 
at her home Thursday afternoon. The 
Young People's society will meet there 
in tlie evening. 

Beautiful holiffay gifts. Fur caps 
gloves, umbrellas, suspenders, mufflers 
and neckwear. Dalntilv boxed" at 
popular prices. The Great Eastern. 
Watch repairing. Hurst, AV. Duluth. Adv 

Miss Gina M. .Jen.=en of Deei-wood 
and Miss Ella F. Jensen of Poupore 
Siding are spending the holidays with 
their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Jensen 
of 314 South Sixty-first avenue west. ' 
— — • « 

i RAILROADS * 

RATE REDUDTSON 
BENEFITS DULUTH 



to Allouez 
skiff in an 



to 
ice 

to 



to a 



Heading . . . 
Misses -Mar^ 

Song 

Declamation 

Heading 

Song . . 



-; Lreck and Amanda 
Jvluvstad. 



lift -laeobson 
Klovstad. 

Class. 

l'l'!"'r Class. 



Tpi" I- Cla.s8 Girls. 



and Margaret 



Concrete Examples of Ef- 
fect of Canadian North- 
ern Announcement. 



l:eading 
Misses 



School. 



A J 



W 



giie.s Haldorson and Marie 
.Anderson. 

Declamation 

Jlisses Gertru If 

Reading 

Upper 

A ocal solo 

Elmer 

Reading 

Mibsvs Lillian 

I'ederson 

Hecltation 

Misses Alfhild Ol.sf^, .Amanda Mikkel 
son atid !• rida Olsen. 

Reading 

LpP' I Class Boys. 

Declamation 

Miss Bertha Olsen and Class 

Song 

Choir. 



tng and Karen Buck. 
Class Boys. 
Kelnertson. 
Fiaaten and Mabel 



Apropos to tlfe 
reduction of freig 
nadian Northern 
and International 
classes having been given in 
aid of last evening, a f«w 
examples were 
of the company 

For instance, 

weight 



Haley Funeral. 

The funeral of 1 »o r o t h v 



the 1-month- 



Cheaper Eggs for Christmas 



strictly Fresh Esc^. uer doi. 
No. 1 .Slorase ):g«s. iJi-r doz 
.New Pack Com. t caaa for. 
Or 70e per tlon. 

MlxeU NuU. I>er |li 

25 lb Sack of Sugar 

It pays to buy your llriu-criea 



.30c 
.22c 
.25s 



Thos. Foubister 



at 

Cash Groc 



rso 

$1.25 

Wliolesale from 



Store. 



THINK 



OF STEWART 
SHOE CO.- 



For those felt Slippers for Father 
Mother, Sister and Brother. 

Men** 



Cat Prices 
liubbcrs. 



on 



Leather Top 



announcement of the 

ht rates over the Ca- 

road between Imiuth 

Falls, the different 

The Htfr- 

concrete 

given by the officials 

here this morning 

v,^ , , ^^S ^^^^ °" brick has 

been reduced per hundred 

V) to 7U cents: on flour and other 
grain products, from 17V' to IG c«n ts- 
on horses, from S2V^ to 27 cents, and 
on cattle from 29.4 to 24 cents 

The reduction is regarded by shln- 
per.s and receivers alike as most ad- 
vantageous, for the reason that with 
the Canadian Northern now in oper- 
ation there will be stronger Invasion 

'^^ J^^% ^P^^^S'^^^'"'''' ^a'*: of this state 
and of the Canadian Rainv lake coun- 
try from Duluth. md this point will 
have a very decid # advantage in com- 
peting for business. 

Powers Much Improved. 

W. J. Powers, assistant general 
freight agent of the Great Northern 
Is much improved. He was operated 
on a few days ago at St. Marys hos- 
pital for appendicitis, and for a time 
was dangerously ill. He is considered 
to be out of danger now, however. 
■ •* 

Rea on New Haven Board. 

Xew Haven. Conn., Dec 24 The 

election of President Samuel Rea of 
the Pennsylvania railroad to the di- 
rectorate of the New York, New Haven 
& Hartford railroad, is announced He 
succeeds Former President .lames' Me- 
dea of the Pennsylvania railroad, who 
retires Jan. 1. 

COAL roadsTrT' 

AS KED F OR DATA. 

AA'ashington. Dec. 24. — In course of 
Its investigation of the rates, prac- 
tices and regulations governing the 
transp->rtation of anthracite, the In- 
terstate commerce commission today 
called upon all anthracite carrying 
railroads and their affiliated coal com- 
panies to furnish the commission de- 
tailed information as to their coal 
operations. 

All the carriers are required to re- 
port the names of the coal companies 
owned or controlled bv them and to 
submit an accurate statement of their 
milling and sales operations. 



in 
out 

himself and 
new closed. 

April :i.3- 
Noi thern Pacific Dock 

April 26 — Uecovered 
same place 

April 27 — Dragged 
last by the captain of 
White. 

May 3 — Made a trip 
rescue three men in a 
lield. 

May 6 — Towed, a gasoline launch 
a place of safety; two aboard. 

May 12 — riimilar incident; two 
aboard. 

May 111— Similar incident; one aboard. 

May 15 — Towed an empty skiff 
ashore and delivered it to owner. 

May 2'> — Rescued one man from 
drc. wiling; capsized boat. 

June a — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; two aboard. 

June 4 — Went to the rescue of two 
men in a capsized boat. 

June S — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; three aboard. 

June IS — liescued two men from 
drowning; capsized canoe. 

June 22 — Assisted in search for the 
boy drowned in Superior. 

June 25 — Went to the rescue of four 
men in a capsized boat. 

June 29 — Towed a gasoline launch 
to a place of safety; one aboard. 

June 29 — Rescued two from a canoe 
adi'ift. 

June 29— Towed a gasoline launch 
to a place of safety; six aboard. 

June 30 — Rescued four men; capsized 
boat. 

June SO— Towed a gasoline launch 
to a place of safety; two aboard. 

July 3 — Rescued two men from 
drowning; boat capsized. 

July 3 — Towed a gasoline launch to a 
place of safety; three aboard. 

July 7 — Assisted in search of body 
of a man drowned at Spirit lake. 
July 7 — Same. 

July 9— Towed a small lighter 
place of safety; fe«r aboard. 

July 9 — Towed a sailboat to a pla^e 
of safety; two aboard. 

July 10 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; three aboard. 

July 11 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; two aboard. 

July 13 — Rescued five men: boat 
capsized. 

July 14 — Rescued two boys from a 
rowboal adrift. 

July 14— Made a trip out in lake to 
the assistance of a fisherman. 

July 21 — Rescued two from a canoe 
adrift 

July 21 — Made a run down the har- 
bor; false report of a motor boat burn- 
ing. 

.Hily 22— Towed a small lighter to a 
place of safety; adrift. 

July 26 — Towed a small gasoline 
launch to a place of safety; two 
aboard. 

July 27 — Rescued a man from drown- 
ng; capsized boat. 

July 28 — Towed four rowboats to a 
..lace of safety: adrift. 

Aug. 3 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; two aboard. 

Aug. 4 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; adrift v-ith one wom- 
an aboard. 

Aug. 5 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; tliree aboard. 

Aug. 13 — Towed a gasoline supply 
boat to a place of safety; one aboard. 
Aug. IS-^Recovered the body of man 
drowned at Allouez ore docks. 

Aug. 18 — Made a trip out in lake. to 
a launch that appeared to be disabled. 

Aug. 23 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; one aboard. 

Aug. 2G — Recovered the body of 
woman drowned at Spirit lake; suicide. 
Sept. 2 — Made a run to a fire at Ma- 
rine Iron works. 

Sept. 3 — Made a run to Lake avenue 
•slip in answer to a telephone message 
stating tiiat a body was floating in 
slip; false report. 

Sept. S — Rescued two from a row- 
boat: adrift. 

Sept. 8 — Rescued two from drown- 
ing; capsized canoe. 

Sept. 8 — Towed a gasoline launch to 
a place of safety; two aboard. 

Sept. 9 — Rescued two men; hoat 
sized. 

Sept. 1." — Towed a gasoline launch 
a place of safety; two abboard. 

Sept. 14 — Towed a gasoline launch 
a place of safety — three aboard. 

Sept. 1.'. — Towed a gasoline launch 
a place of safety; three aboard. 

Sept. 19 — Towed an empty skiff 
ashore; adrift. 

Oct. 5 — Towed a gasoline launch to a 
place of safety: six aboard. 

Oct. 6 — Made a trip out in lake to the 
assistance of fligabled launch. 

Oct. 7 — Recovered the body of man 
drowned at Omaha dock. 

Oct. 1.") — Assisted launch Decima in 
relieving launch stranded on dyke. 

Oct. 18 —