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Photographic 

Sciences 
Corporation 



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WEBSTER, N.Y. 14580 

(716) 872-4503 




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2 

97 BARRINGTON ST., 101 



HALIFAX, N. S. 



Mi 




BLAC 



GLOV 



TE>^ 



1941. 



et 



RS, 



ALSO : 

LADIES/ MISSES' AND GHILDRENS' UNDERCLOTHING 
Of a Superior Make. 



II 






PUBLIC ARCHIVES 


\ 


NOVA SCOTIA 


1 


Presented by: 




B. Eaton Paterson, Esq., 




Halifax, N. S. 


»s, 



STEIMSHIP IGeilTS IXD mUM 

HALIFAX, N. S. 






^a3q3!?rQ:]^:E?p ^ 



FURNESS LINE, 

Between HALIFAX and LONDON. 
Between HALIFAX and GLASGOW. 

PXCKFOHD & SLACK'S LtUS, 

Between HALIFAX, BERMUDA, TURKS ISLAND, JAMAICA. 

PICKFORD & BLACK'S LINE, 

Between HALIFAX and CUBA. 

^\im ^ flEW/FOUJlDLiim ^TEAHf^Hip CCMpAflY, Ltd. 

Between HALIFAX, CAPE BRETON PORTS, and WEST 

COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND. 

S. S. " HARLAW," J. A. Farqulinr, Coiiunander. Sailings alternate Tuesdays. 

HALIFAX & PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND STEAMSHIP Co., Ltd. 

Between HALIFAX, CHARLOTTETOWN and 
Intermediate Ports, 

S. S. "PRINCESS BEATRICE." 
A. H. Kelly, Commander. failings every Monday Night. 



ALWAYS TRAVEL BY THE 






SHORT LINE 



TO 



MONTREAL, OTTAWA, TORONTO, DETRIOT, 

CHICAGO, ST. PAUL, 
MINNEAPOLIS, DULUTH, and all points West. 



ONLY LINE running SOLID TRAINS via St. John, N. B. 

HALIFAX to MOITTHEAL. 



P1ILA6E SLEEPING CARS ! SUPERB DAV SOAHHES ! 

Celebrated Colonist Sleeping Cars 

On all Trains. 



Tickets aud Sleeping Car Bcrtlis secured at 

CANADIAN PACIFIC TICKET OFFICE, 

C. R. BARRY, Halifax Agent. 

D. McNICOLL, C. E. McPHEKSON, 

General Passenger Agent, District Pass. Ag't, 211 Wasliington St. 

MONTREAL. BOSTON. 



THE 



^AUIfAX • HPI^L • GglDE, 



-s*- TO THE -.s-^s 



CITY-m. HALIFAX. 



AND FOR THE 



Province of Nova Scotia. 



Mk^^^i^^iyuu^A^;:.! 




la:. HEssHiEi^T ds so^rs. 



Proprietors, Halifax Hotel. 
*—-^—^ 



PRINTED BY JAMES BOWES & SONS. 



1S30. 



2^127 



o^H^\>^ ^T\l^uT\o \i\\Ie 



SHOBTEST 

And most 




;>^:- 


1 

ONLY 

ONE NIGHT 


Direct Route '' 


^;ifcpi' 




^ At Sea. 






^^ 





TO BOSTON, 

NEW YORK, AND ALL POINTS IN THE UNITED STATES. 



The New Clyde Built Steel Steamship 
1750 TOXS. S. ItOWLAND HILL, Coiniuaiuler. 

The fastest and best equipped Passenger Steam- 
sliip between Boston and the Maritime Provinces. 
Built expressly for the Route, combining SAFETY, 
SPEED and CORIFORT. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTED THROUGHOUT! 

LUXURIOUS CABINS! ELEGANT STATEROOMS! 

GRAND DINING SALOON ON MAIN DECK! 

SPACIOUS SMOKING ROOM! 

PROMENADE DECK 240 FEET LONG! 



THHOUGH TICKE TS TO mt FH OM aU POINTS 

B. W. CIIIPxMAN, CUIPMAX BROS., 

President & ^fanagrer. General Afrents, 

Koble's Wharf, HALIFAX. Noble's Wliarf, HALIFAX. 

11. B. GARDNER, Manager, 

34 Atlantic Avenne, BOSTON. 



■'■i 




A 



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-rxt-^^^C^y-l 



Preface. 



T'UE necessity for still another Oui.le Book to the City of Halifax 
may be doubted by some who have read and profited by previous 
works of a similar nature. But the exceptional beauties of the 
capital city of Nova Scotia and its environs, as well as its great 
importance as the chief British Naval and Military station on the 
North American coast, warrant us in the publication of still another 
book in some respects more elaborate and complete than previous 
compilations of the same kind. 

This book is not intended to be emphatically a guide to our city 
and not something that will stand very well in lieu of a personal 
visit. Moreover we do not for a moment flatter ourselves that we have 
given an exhaustive description, but would rest content were we assured 
that a perusal of our book had aroused in any a desire to examine 
our city more thoroughly than they otherwise would have done. And 
here we may remark that Halifax is a city which cannot bo seen in a 
day ; the tourist should plan to spend at least a week here, and we 
can promise him that the favorable opinion engendered by his first 
hasty view will be confirmened and strengthened by a growing 
acquaintance with our city. 

We can cordially recoimnend the business houses whose advertise- 
ments appear in the " Guide " as being first-class in their respective 
lines of business, and patrons will be fairly dealt with at their estab- 
lishments, both as to quality of goods and prices. 

In conclusion, we most heartily wish for every visitor to our 
Province, and especially to Halifax cif-, a visit at once thoroughly 
enjoyable and profitable. 



IPlaces of Interest. 

THE CITADEL, commanding: the City and Harbor. 

THE NAVAL YARD, open to the public. 

THE PUBLIC GARDENS, world renowned, open from 7 A. M. 
till sunset every day. Military Band every Saturday 
from 4 till 6 P. M. 

POINT PLEASANT PARK, with its walks and drives. 

THE GREEN MARKET, on Wednesday and Saturday mornings. 

ST. PAUL'S CEMETERY, Pleasant Street. 

CAMP HILL CEMETERY, Summer Street. 

THE GRAIN ELEVATOR AND RAILWAY WHARF, Water Street. 

THE NORTH-WEST ARM, accessible by land. 

MELVILLE ISLAND, the military prison. 

THE DINGLE, at the North-west Arm. 

THE DUTCH VILLAGE, distant from the city three miles. 

THE CHAIN LAKES AND WATERWORKS, distant three miles. 

MACNAB'S ISLAND with its fortifications, as also the other 
water-side forts. 

BEDFORD, distant ten miles. 

COW BAY, distant eleven miles. This is a noted Summer Resort, 
with splendid surf-bathing and unlimited sandy beaches. 

WAVERLY AND MONTAGUE GOLD MINES. 

PRINCE'S LODGE, distant six miles. 



Contents. 



day 



igs. 



jet. 



es. 

18P 



Benevolent Institutions - - - - - - - 117 

City Streets and Walks G6 

Consuls 50 

Churches ;J0 

Defences 54 

Educational, &c - •• - 48 

General Description 22 

Historic 13 

Manufactures, &c- 4l 

Nova Scotia Hospital for Insane - - -. - - 117 

Places of Amusement - - 32 

Public Buildings 101 

Shipping 100 

The Approach by Sea 52 

The Halifax Hotel 34 



Ft, 



Ihde^x to .Idyertisements. 

Page. 

Anderson, C. & W., Grocers j,) 

Baldwin & Co., China, Glass, &c .ji 

Bates' Latherine .... ►., 

5.3 

Bedford Hotel 

o.i 

Brown Bros. & Co., Manufacturing Chemists 71 

Brown, M. S. & Co., Jewellers, &c 4,-, 

Butler, James ct Co., Fish & Commission Merchants 37 

Canada Atlantic S. S. Line n 

Canada Pacific Railway . 

Chapman, Henry A Co., Importers and Agents for Wines, etc GO 

Commercial Hotel, Moncton, N. B 79 

Downie & Larsen, Boots and Shoes 19 

Elliot, F. C, Gents Furnishings ... 07 

o J I 

Elliot, Freeman, Gents' Furnishings 93 

Eveleigh & Co.,- Trunks , ^g- 

Forbes Manufacturing Co., Skates, 6:c 43 

Fuller, H. H. & Co., Mining and Mill Supplies and Hardware 47 

Gordon & Keith, Furniture, Ac 3.. 

Hattie & Mylius, Pharmaceutical Chemists ' jo 

Hessian & Devine, Fruits, &c ^1 

Hobrecker, A., Importer Cigars, etc ' * 95 

Intercolonial Railway 

International S. S. Co - 

/3 

Johnson, W. H., Pianos and Organs r-j 

Keith, A. & Son, Ales and Porter ' loi 

Kelley & Glassey, xVles, Wines and Liquors ] I7 

Lane, C. S., Hats, Furs and Trunks gg 

Le Bon Marche, Millinery 

Le Pine Bros., Gents' Furnishings . . «a 

"= oy 



11 



]<) 

•21 
53 
83 
71 
4.-) 
37 
6 
4 
GO 
79 
19 
27 
23 

125 
43 
47 
33 
12 
24 
95 

63 

73 

77 
124 

17 

85 

67 

59 



Million Bros., Dry Goods o 

Mount St. Vincent Academy and hoarding School 51 

Nova 8cotia Nursery "o 

O'Donnell, W. D., Photographer 65 

Gland, S. Sons it Co., Brewers and Bottlers of Ales 83 

C)':\rullin, P. tt J., Brewers, ttc f,9 

Pickering, W. F. & Co., Merchant Tailors 5y 

Pickford it Black, Steamship Lines 3 

Power & Co., Machinists, etc 49 

Prince Edward Island Railway 73 

Reardon, Thomas, Paper Hangings, itc 39 

Roue, James, Soda Water, itc r,3 

Rhind, Andrew, Tohacco, &c j.-)3 

Ruggles, M. II. it f^'o., Crockery ware, itc 121 

Schuizo, C. (i., Watchmaker, itc 23 

Schwartz, W. II. it Sons, CotTees and Spices 81 

Smith & Power, Dry Goods r^Py 

Smith, J. Godfrey, Druggist j5 

Smith, W. C, Fine Tailoring (.5 

Stairs, Will., Son it Morrow, Iron, Hardware, itc 41 

St. Lawrence Hall, Montreal gg 

Taple, R. M., Hair Dresser j.-)3 

Taylor's Boot and Shoe Store gy 

Teas, W. II., Fruit and Confectionery I5 

Temple, W. L., Teas 

Tobin, John it Co., Importers it Dealers in W. I. Produce, Provisions, itc 

Ungar's Steam Laundry g^ 

Windsor and Annapolis Railway 9j 

Windsor Hotel, INIontreal 

Woolnough's Restaurant 



93 
27 



57 

87 



Nova Scotia Central Railway 



29 



12 



PHARMACE^JTICAL CHEMISTS, 

Carry llie largest & most complete stock of 

nmmi mi mm l HSTS' mmi in ih Marltine ?rom 




[Sliowing interior of Acadia DruK Store.) 

ACADIA DRUG STORE. SOUTH END PlIARMACV, 

155 MOLLIS STREET. S. W. Cor. Morris &. Pleasant. 

11-A.IL.IF-A.X:, INT. S- 

B RANCH : 50 Provost St., New Glesgow, N. S. 

N. B.— Agents for II. Harris, the "Halifax Nursary." All orders in this line jironiptly 
atteniled to. ' H. & M. 



i 




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FIaLIFAX-*(j-UIE)E1. 



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" 1jKi:athks there tlie man with soul so i]ev\. 
Who never to himself liath said, 
1'his is my own, my native land 1 
\Vii()se heart hath ne'er witiiin him hurned, 
As liome his footstejis he hath turned 
From wandering on a foreign strand ? 
If such tliere i)reathe, go, mark him well ; 
For him no minstrel rajitures swell ; 
High though !iis titles, jiroud his name, 
Doundless his wealth as wish can claim ; 
Dispite those titles, jxiwer, and pelf, 
The wretch, concentred all in self, 
Living, shall forfeit fair renown, 
And doulily dying, shall go down 
To the vile dust from whence he sprung, 
Unwi>pt, unhonour'd, and unsung." 



— Siu Wai.tek SrcTi. 




" Hail to tile day when the liritons came over. 
And i^Ianted their .stantla.d with sea foam still we.; 
Aho\e and annmd us their spirits shall hover, 
Kej( icing to mark Imw we honor it yet." 

— Hon. Jo3r:;il Howf., Sth June, 1S49. 



ALIFAX, tlu' eajiital city <>t' Nova Scotia, was t'oundi'tl liy 
fT^ (;ovornor Coniwallis, on tlu> '2Ut of Junu, 174!). The 8tli 
of .iuiio, was sclf'otcil for many years us the anniversary 
of the settlement of Halifax, in eonse(|Uence of the discovery of a 
memorandum, wiitten upon t!ie hack of the Mess Book of the settlers, 
found in the otKce of the Admiralty, as follows: — "Sphinx, sloop of 
war, arrived Nth June, 1740, with CJeneral Cornwallis and his suite. 
Thev landed on Georjje'.s Lsland soon after." I5ut a letter written Viv 
Governor Cornwallis himself, caused a chanue in the anniversar}' 
from the Sth to the 'ilst of .Itnic. 



14 



The founding of Plalifax was the consummation of a scheme 
formed in Great Britain, to strengthen and extend the British power 
in this Province. The execution of the design was put into the hands 
of tlie Lords of Trade and Plantations, of which the Earl of Halifax was 
President. The Board, by the King's command, issued a proclamation 
in March, 17-49, offering to officers and privates discliarged from the 
army and navy, as well as to nieclianics and farmers, a free passage, 
provisions for the voyage, free grants of land, supplies for a year, 
farming and building implements and arms and ammunition for 
defence against the Indians and French. To every private soldier or 
seaman they offered fifty acres of land, together with ten acres addi- 
tional for every member of his family ; to every officer under the raidv 
of an ensign in the land service, and (^f a lieutenant in the navy, they 
ottered eighty acres ; to ensigns, two liundred acres ; to lieutenants 
three hundred acres ; to captains four hundred ; and six hundred 
acres to every person above that degree, " with proportionate allow- 
ances for the nund)er and increase of every family." In addition to 
this parliament voted £40,000 sterling for the expense of the colony, 
and made provision for further grants. As an illustration of the 
generosity of the British Government, it may be stated that by 1755 
the Parliament had voted the enormous sum of 8*2,077,924 for the 
benefit of the new colony. These liberal terms attracted settlers to 
the number of 2576 " among whom were two majors, six captains, 
twenty-two lieutenants, twenty-three midshipmen, and fifteen sur- 
geons — many of whose descendants now reside in the Province." 

The command of the expedition was entrusted to Colonel the 
Honorable Edward Cornwallis, whom the King also appointed Governor 
of Nova Scotia. Mr. Cornwallis sailed in the " Sphinx " a war shiii, 
on the 15th of May, 1749, and the emigrants having cml'arked in 
thirteen transports, left England a few days after. 

The "Sphinx " reached the coast of Nova Scotia on the 14th of 
June, but was delayed for want of a pilot, and only reached Chebucto 
harbor on the 21st of the month. By the Ist of July the rest of the 
transports had all arrived safely in the harbor. The ground which is 
now the site of a large city was then covered with trees down to the 
water's edge. 

The treaty of Aix La Chapelle signed in 1748 by France and 
England, restored the town of Louisburg to the former, and thus it 



lo 



TOURISTS 

-*^ Will remember when in HALIFAX to visit the h^-- 

147 H0LIJIS STREET, 

Aqd select frornaq elegant liqe Of TOILET REQUISITES, Sponges, Hair Brushes 
Dressing Ccmbs, Nail Brushes, Bath Gloves. Toilet Soaps, Tooth Brushes, &c ' 
and get ,ittod to a pair of LAURANCE'S AXIS-CUT PEBBLE SPECTACLES. "' 

J. mm SMITH, Dhmm niemist, A^i^ent, 

Proprietor of the R. A. Tonic Phosphate, an excellent table Water. 
«-s*^ Pros<'ri;4ioiis Dispensca at all hours. V--^ 

Night Clerk on the PPemises ^ . ^ 

Telephone Call 153. 




151 HOLLIS STREET, HALIFAX. N. S.. Telephone 458. 

Fralt 




AN 



ciionery ^tore 

^°-ICE Cream Parlor. 



Heu(l<|uar(«Ms for Philadclidiia, 

Xew York, Boston ami Eim^lisli 

CHOCOLATES and BOX-UOXS, 

YIOLET and ROSE LEAVES, 

XOIGATIXES, MAKSHMALLOWS. 

^ Fruits of all kinds in the'w Season. & 



Hi 



happened that the evacuation of the town l)}' the British \va» uow in 
progress. Seizing the opportunity thus presented, Cornwallii* sent off 
five transports to Louisburg to conve}'- to Cliebucto the two regiments 
which had garrisoned the town. These regiments of infaiiitry from 
Louisburg, together with a company of rangers from Annapoljt^, greatly 
strengthened the colony. 

Knowing tlie severity of the climate in wintci-, no dy'ky was 
permitted in landing the emigrants and setting them at work. 

But first the governor organized a civil governmeut for the 
colony and appointetl a council to assist him in the legislative and 
executive business of the Province. 

Having thus prepared the way, Cornwallis selected a s|x>t for the 
settlement near the present Point Pleasant, and sot his people at work 
clearing the ground for the foundation of a town ; but s-ubsequently 
he changed the site to a place farther north on an easy ascent com- 
manding a view of all the surrounding country. 

The ground to be cleared was marked out and subdivided into 
blocks of 320 b}' 120 feet, with streets GO feet wide between. To 
excite a spirit of emulation, the governor divided the pioneers into 
small bands giving to each a special piece of work to do. Thus he 
began to build a town on a regular plan, and named it Halifax, in 
honour of Earl Halifax, President of the Board of Trade and 
Plantations, who had been most active in advancing the interests of 
the new colon}'. The original limits of the town were the present 
Buckingham street on the north, Salter street on the south, Barrino-ton 
street on the west, and the harbor on the east. Such was the ardor 
with which the work was carried on that before winter set in, 300 
wooden houses were Imilt and surrounded l)y a strong palisade. But 
many of the buildings were unsubstantial and ill-suited for the severe 
climate, and a great many settlers died from insufficient protection 
aggravated by their intemperate habits. 

For a time the Indians seemed extremely friendly. They visited 
the governor and i*eceivcd presents. Subsequently a formal treaty 
was prepared and signed by them with great ceremony, but it was 
soon violated. In October they attacked a party of six men engaged 
in cutting wood near Dartmouth, killing four and taking a fifth 
prisoner ; the sixth man escaped. 



17 






Kelley 5. Slassey 

Successors to ALEX. McLEOD & CO. 



BSTABI^ISeBO IN i818. 



ite^^T-=5^ 




\^'Z TO 204 HO\i\i\S STREET, 



IMPORTERS OF 



ROYAU ISLAY BLiEND A SPECIALTY. 

Geo. C Kelley. John Glassey. 



w 



18 

At Canso and other places they also conmiitted acts of hostility, 
insoiuuch that it became impossihle foi" the settlers to clear the woods 
or carry on fanninf,^ operations without workinj^ in parties of sufficient 
number to overcome their enemies. Many of the early settlers were 
carried as prisoners t(-) Lonisburg and sold to the French. These 
violations of the treaty led to the adoption of the principle of 
extermination on the part of the f^overnor, and a sum of mone}' was 
ottered for every Indian scalp brout^ht into the camj). This plan 
however was afterwards abandoned. 

The hostility of the Indians was encited by the French, and 
especially by Joseph de la Loutre, an avowed enemy (jf British rule, 
who was sent to Canada by the Society of Forein^n Missions at Paris. 
La Loutre held a v»'ry bad character. He was charfifed with 
treacherously surprising and killing every Englishman he found 
outside the fort, destroying their cattle and burning their houses. 
Large supplies of money and amnmnition were given hiiu by the 
French government, and these he dispensed to the Indians, over whose 
chiefs his influence seemed to be supreme. De la Loutre proved 
himself a dangerous enemy to the colonists at Halifax. fJovernor 
Cornwallis says of him : " He is the author and advisor of all the 
disturbances the Indians liave made in the Province." He is also 
accused of having caused the death of a member of the council, wlu) 
in approaching one in the dress of a French officer, displaying a white 
handkerchief as a token of his desiring a conference, was shot dead 
bj' Indians who lay in ambush waiting to kill him. On the capture 
of fort Beau Hejour, in Cumberland county. La Loutre fled to Quebec, 
and afterwards embarked on a vessel for France. But the ship was 
captured by the British, and he was made a pi-isoner and sent to 
Jersey, where he was kept in confinement for eight years. He 
returned to France after the conclusion of the peace of Paris in 1763, 
and was never heard of after. 

In August, 1750, the ship " Alderney " arrived in Halifax with 
about 8')0 emigrants who were sent to the eastern side of the harbor 
and founded the town of Dartmouth in the autumn of the same year. 
In the following year, the Indians surprised the village at night, 
scalped some of the settlers and carried off others as prisoners. The 
light of the torches and the discharge of firearms aroused the people 
of Halifax, and some put otF to their assistance, but arrived too late to 



i 



3'ear. 

The 
K'Ople 
Mto to 






1(1 




SGOI^IA HOUSEL." 




'eUfin'^ 



('(IR. IICKE AXl) D.VltlilXCTliX STS., HALIFAX, I. S. 



•s. 



/OvONSTANTLY in stock, a choice assortment of Jams, Jellies, Pickles, 
V Sauces, potted and preserved Meats, Soups, crystallized and preserved 

^ Fruits, Curries and Chutney, French Sardines, Peas, INIushrooms, 
Salad Oil, Capers and Olives, Prunes and Pate de foio Gras, and the usual 
line of 

• riRST-GLASS GR0GCRIES, • 

especially adapted to all the requirnients of HOTEL, RESTAURANT and 

FIR5T-CIi7I^f5 F^MIIiY § GENERAL WmsYu 

Telephone Call No. 1. 



RE B rRQNT SH OE StQRE. 
■ ■•••■■•• 

166 GRANVILLEv STRREIT^^. 



BOOTS .# SHOES 

OF EVERY iESCRIPTION AT fcOWEST iRICES. 

f-»-» 

7JISIT0RS to Halifax will find the largest and best 
selected stock in the City. Fine American Goods 
a Specialty. Full lines of American Rubber Boots and 
Shoes. Genuine English Army Bluchers. 

=— s* TELEPHONE 309. »?--! 



20 



render nay service. The night was still and the cries of the settlers, 
niint,ded with the whoops of the Indians, were distinctly heard on the 
western side of the harbor. From this period the settlement was 
almost entirely abandoned, till Governor Parr in 1784 induced twenty 
families to settle there. The town was laid out anew and £ir)00 voted 
for the erection of buildinf^s. The settlement has now become a flour- 
ishinr; town of some four or five thousand inhabitants. 

The Government of Nova Scotia was carried on for about nine 
years after the settlement of Halifax l>y the Governor and the Council 
appointed at the first by Cornwallis. But in October, l75iS, in 
ol)edience to the instructions of the British Government, a House of 
Assembly consistinnr of 22 members was established and met in the 
Court House in Halifax. The population of the Province was at this 
time estimated at about 13000, of which the Acadians formed about 
one-fifth — the greater number of the Acadians had been expelled 
three years previously. 

An indication of the rapid growth of the Province and of the 
enterprise of the people is afforded by the fact that in 17G9 a news- 
paper was started, edited by Capt Bulkley, for many years Secretary 
of the Province and member of the Council. This paper, styled the 
"Nova Scotia Chronicle or Weekly Gazette" was published by 
Anthony Henry and was printed in an office at tin! lower end of 
Grafton street, in rear of the residence of the once Attorney-General 
Uniacke. 

Up to 1770 the Province of Nova Scotia comprised what is now 
included in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and 
Cape Breton. In this year, however. Prince Edward Island separated 
from Nova Scotia and formed a separate Province, and in 1784 New 
Brunswick and Cape Breton also severed their connection wuth Nova 
Scotia and formed each a separate Province, but Cape Breton was 
finally reunited to Nova Scotia in 1820. 

In 1794 Edward, Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria, came to 
Halifax in the capacity of commander-in-chief of the forces in British 
America. While occupying this position he rebuilt Fort George or 
Citadel Hill as it is generally called. In this work Edward employed 
the Maroons, a band of five or six hun<lred negroes who were 
transported from Jamaica to Halifax in 179G. These people were 
given grants of land in Preston where they remained for two or three 



21 



^A\i^Vl\\l ^ GO. 

223, 225, 227 Barrington Street, 

HALIFAX, N. S. 



■■ »S=< imPORTERS OF 



English, French and German 



<f7 



»GHIRA.^ 



1^ 



Knglish and Foreign 

^ gmerioan Lamps t (iiandeiieps. iv 



Best Quality 

Silver ElectFo-Plated Vare 

^^Xlojjcif Worcester/^ 
attd otfier Higfi Gfciss JVovefttes^ 



22 

years; but thty were constitutionally uusuited to thu ri<^our of the 
climate, and were finally carried to Sierro Leone in the year 1800. 
In the year 1811 the corner stone of the Provincial Building was laid 
by Sir George Provost and was first occupied by the assembly and 
council in LSI!). At that time and for many years subsecjuently, it 
was the best built and handsomest edifice in North America. The 
most im})oi'tant act of the Assembly of 1841 was the incorporation of 
the town of Halifa.x. On three different occasions a similar measure 
had been introduced, but without success. 

The first Mayor elected was Stephen Binney, chosen by the 
aldermen from among their own numljer then directed as the law. 
The year liS4<S marked an inniiense advance in constitutional liberty. 
In January of that year the Reform party led by Mr. Howe inaugurated 
the system of responsible goverinnent. From that time the voice of 
the people has been recognized as the supreme authority, at whose 
bidding governments must stand or fall. 

Another epoch-marking year is 1807, when on the first of July, 
the confederation of the Provinces into the Dominion of Canada was 
consunnnated by Royal proclamation. 



C?^l 



cncrnl JBcscription. 



Halifa.x is situated on the western side of the harbor, on the 
declivity of a commanding hill, whose summit is more than 2.30 feet 
above the level of the sea. It is about three miles long and one mile 
in breadth, and is built mainly on the eastern slope of the hill, present- 
ing a picturesque appearance from the harbor. The city is confined 
within the liinits of a peninsula formed by the harbor on the east and 
the North-West Arm on the north and west. The ridge, of which the 
citadel forms the highest point, rises from the sea-level at Freshwater, 
and falls away again to the level of Bedford Basin beyond Richmond 
at the northern end, and at the Dutch Village near the head of the 
North-west Arm. It is laid out in squares, the streets running at 
right angles, and following pretty closely the four cardinal points. 
There are about IGO streets and lanes. The houses are mostly Ijuilt of 
wood; but within "the brick district," as it is called, which comprises 
the business portion of the city, no neiv building of wood can be 
erected. Many of the streets are lined with shade-trees; and the 



23 



) 



G. G. SGH(JLiZE 

(!]ronoii]ctcr.#\^itQbmakcr 

171 Barrington Street, 171 

'-~i«- IMPORTER OF ir^— j 

Fine (SofJ yjiiJ Sifver Watcjfiest 

eteCKS AND FINE JEWELRY. 

FUL^L. LINHl IN OPTICAL OOOOB. 

Special attention given to repairing^ Fine Watclies. 

C. G. SCHULiZE. 



mmmw FDRmsHimi emporiom, 



\()] IIOLLIS STREET, Oiipositc ifaiifax riui). 



%Ej ^ ^=T^ •N 



S 'Tii 'r^ 



m ^ 



I 



-=3 IMPORTER OF 




•1 



^ 




Engelish and Americtan Styles. 
UiATEt^PROOF COATS St LiECGlNGS. 

€1I1I)1ENS' TWEED AKI) GIOTII SUITS. 

GOODS IMPORTED EVERY MONTH. 

Stiirts and Cellars rrxade to Order. 

LiAI^GEST AND BESTT ASSOI^TED STOGI^ IN THE (SimY. 



24 



* FRdlT HOCJSE. * 




IMPORTERS OF .^ WHOLESALE DEALERS IX 
Foreign i^nd ITotticstio circcii <S; JZrlod 



----=- ^KWH^f* 




a 



<- NUTS, -> 
CONFECTIONERY 

and 
CANNED GOODS ' 
of every 
description. 




PEANUTS 

ROASTED DAILY 

on the 

Premises. 



(fllGAKS, GlGAKI^TTHB, 8^:0., 8lC:. 



>J^-~^'«ii'.A.X^;>OiK 



143 Aro'vle, and i_S2 and i;;4 Bariiiij^ton Street, 

9AX„ IN. S. 



2.) 



^' 




St. ■ ^ary's • Call)cdral. 



26 



nuinerv^us private grounds, gardens, and fine hardwood trees which 
abound in all parts of the city, add considerably to its beauty, One of 
the finest bits of street in this respect is Pleasant Street, between 
Spring Garden Road and South Street. On the shores of the North- 
west Arm are handsome private residences and grounds, the owners of 
which have sea-bathing, boating, and fishing at their doDrs. 

Halifax has greatly increased both in territorial extent and in 
population since it first began its history. Evidence of this is furnished 
by the following description of the city eleven years after it was 
founded, that is in 17G0 : " It (the city) is now divided into three 
towns Halifax, Irish town (south suburbs) and Dutch town (north 
suburbs). The whole may contain 1000 houses, great and small, many 
of which are employed as Barracks, Hospitals for the army and navy, 
and other public uses. The inhabitants may be about 8000, one-third 
of which are Irish, and many of them Roman Catholics, about one- 
fourth Germans and Dutch, th ; most industrious and useful settlers 
amongst us, and the rest English with a very small number of Scotch. 
Though our present fortifications have cost large sums of money, yet I 
would now engage that two ships of the line would destroy the whole 
settlement ; but that will not be the case when the citadel is completed, 
as it overlooks the town, commands the harbour, and is too high for 
ships to reach or make any impression upon it." 

In 1790 the city contained 4000 inhabitants and 700 houses. In 
1817, the houses numbered 1200, and in June, 1828, the population 
was 14,439 and the houses 1,580. In 1828, there were eight streets 
running through the centre of the town, intersected by fifteen others- 
while at the present time there are about IGO streets and lanes and a 
population, including Dartmouth, of 4o,000. Few places present so 
pleasing an aspect as Halifax when viewed from the harbor. Its 
streets are laiil out with regularity, its spires have a picturescjue and 
even magnificent cfiect, and the trees which are scattered throughout 
give it an appearance softened and refreshing. 

Chebucto Bay, terminating in the Harbor, contracting at the 
" Narrows," and again widening out into Bedford Basin, is, taken, 
altogether, one of the great havens not of this continent only, but of 
the world, whether for beauty, safety or capaciousness, having few 
equals, and, Canadians believe, no superior. Along the water front on, 
the western side, for about three miles, the streets and houses of the 



27 



J®HN T©BIN & @.. 

Importers & Dealers in 

West htdia 
iProdiics^ 

&* TEAS, TWUCCdS, l!HEAI)STiFFS, 
Provisions, &e. 

5, 17, 19 & 21 yppER Water Street 




105 Granville St. _ 

** ESTABLISHED 1556. ** ,,,^c\^^ 




A full Line cf the best 





EflGLiISH FUf^NisHiNCS 

ALWAYS IN STOCK. 

Visitors are requested to inspect. 



C ELLIOT, 



28 



city rise tier upon tier, until the summit of the slope is crowned by the 
Citadel. The harbor proper is six miles lone; and on an average, one 
mile wide. There is deep water all the way up, and the largest ships 
can lie alongside the wharves at any state of the tide. It i.s accessible 
at all seasons of the year and is large enough to shelter half the navies 
of Europe. It is situated in latitude 44°44!' north and longitude 03°3G' 
west. It lies nearly north and south, terminating in Bedford Basin 
within which are ten s([uare miles of safe anchorage. The entrance is 
marked by Sambro Island on which a light house was erected soon 
after the settlement of Halifax by the English. Three miks from 
Halifax, and near the mouth of the harbor is MacNab's Island, which 
is three miles in length and half a mile in breadth, and contains about 
1090 acres. On its western side is a long gravelly point of low land 
called Meagher's Beach, on which stands Sherbrooke Tower, a circular 
stone battery. On the top of the tower is a light which warns ap- 
proaching vessels to avoid the dangers of the Trumb-cap Shoals, which 
extend for some distance to the southward of the beach. 

MacNab's Island forms two entrances to the harbor, the eastern 
and western passage. At the mouth of the former is Duggan's or 
Macnamara's Island, which is well wooded, and composed of a deep 
good soil. This passage, wdiich gradually contracts to a (quarter of a 
mile in width, is ol)structed l)y a sand bar, and is only used by small 

vessels. 

Immediately opposite to the town, and midway between it and 

Dartmouth is George's Island, which with MacNab's Island forms an 

effectual breakwater for the harbor within. 

The beauty and attractiveness of Halifax Harbor attracted the 
notice of speculators at a very earl}' period, and many applications were 
at different times made for a grant of land in its vicinity. It was the 
eagerness with which petitions were pressed upon the attention of the 
government, ami the political importance of the port, that induced the 
Ministry in England to undertake the settlement at the public expense. 

The nol)l(' harbf)r, the splendid sheet of water contained in 
Bedfoni Basin, and the ex([uisite beauty of the North-west Arm are 
never failini; objects of admiration. The latter, wdiich extends in the 
rear of th' town U) within a n\ile and a half of Bedford Basin, has an 
average width of one-tliinl of a mile, and depth of from fifteen to 
twenty fathoms, and is navigable throughout its entire length. It 

I To be continued on paf/c 62.) 



vi 



29 



the 
were 
IS the 
f the 
I the 
eiise. 
1 in 
11 are 
n the 
as an 
n to 
It 



IflVi SCOTIA Central Railwai. 

♦«♦»♦■ ♦ 

The lest Equipped Road iq the Provinees ! 

-■ -■■ ■ ■♦ , — ■■■ - .. — 

jElcoant Caie ! Steel IRail ! Safety Switebe^ ! 



I r\\^ Kew l\ailwav connects witi; tf^e Windsor and 
—'m— feinnapolis l\ailway at rHiddlefon, and runs across tl^e 

W> r^rovince to Dridaewater and Qunenbura, on i\)e 

) Qtlantlc Boast. 

^|\)e ^tiortest l\oute to tfje fc^old rHinino Districts of 
(Queens County, and opening up a picturescjue country for 
^ourists. ^^^^ 

SPECIAL RATES TO COMMERCLIL TRAVELLERS. 
LOW TpI(OUI^H \mf Y\m jlALIF/^X TO /^LL pOIHT^. 

■ *«4 

Head Offices: Bribgewater, 

Tickets for Sale, Halifax, Q^O. W. BEDFORD, 

C. R. BARRY, 161 Mollis St. r 1 M 

G. M. CONNORS, North St. Depot. uenerai Manager. 

(^oagtal gteam g>a^kct (^ompaiiV, Ltd. 

The Clyde Built Steel Steamer «' BRIDGEWATER," leaves 
Halifax fcr Bridgewater. Two tripa weekly and one to Lunenburg. 
Through ticket sold to connect with Nova Scotia Central Railway 
to return by Rail. For information enquire of 

JOSEPH WOOD, Central Wharf, Halifax. 
FRANCIS DAVISON, Tres., Hridgewator. 



I 



30 



List of Churches. 



lepiscopaL 



St. Luko's (Pro-Cathe.lral - 
St. Paul's ... - 
St. George's . . . 
St. Mark'.s - - - - 
St. Stephen's (Bishop's Chapel) 
St. Matthias' Mission 
St. Alban's Chapel - 
St. Auijustine's Mission - 
St. James' Mission 
St. John's (Village Chu eh) - 
Trinity . - - - 
Garrison Chapel . - - 
Christ Church 



IRoman datholic. 



St. Mary's Cathedral 
St. Patrick's 

St. Joseph's - - - 
Chapel of the Sficred Heart 



St. Agnes 



St. Matthew's - 
St. Andrew's 
St. John's - 
Fort Massey - 
Chalmers' - 
North Park Street - 
Grove Church 
North-West Arm - 
Coburg Road Mission 
St. James' 



Iprcdbv^tciian. 



Morris Street. 
Barrington Street. 
Bru iswick Street. 
Russell Street. 
Robie Street. 
Windsor Street. 
Tower Road. 
North-West Arm. 
Dutch Village. 
Three-Mile House. 
Jacob Street. 
Brunswick Street. 
Dartmouth. 



Spring Garden Road. 
Brunswick Street. 
Gottingen Street. 
Spring Garden Road. 
Dut^^h Village. 



Plea.sant Street. 
Tobin Street. 
Brunswick Street. 
Tobin Street. 
Barrington Street. 
North Park Street. 
Richmond. 
Head N. \V. Arm. 
Coburg Road. 
Dartmouth. 



31 



P 



3et. 




Street. 




Street. 




•eet. 




et. 




treet. 




id. 




st Arm. 




lage. 




e House. 




iet. 




V Street. 




h. 




irtlen Road. 


'■I 


k Street. 




I Street. 




irdon Road. 




Uage. 






/^' 




¥ 


Street. 


■">' 


•eet. 




k Street. 




•eet. 




»n Street. 


■■■i- 


rk Street. 
1 




.1. 

W. Arm. 


- . > 


load. 


T 


th. 


;ci 




GrapoQ ■ Slrccl • ^cll;6<jisf • djuucl). 



32 

riDctboMst. 

Grafton Street. 
Brunswick Street. 

Robie Street, 

Charles Street. 

American Methodist Episcopal - 



First Baptist 
North Baptist 
Free Baptist 
Tlie Tabernacle 
Cornwallis Street 
Baptist Mission 
Dartmouth 



16apti6t. 



Kaye Street. 
Beech Street. 
Dartmouth. 



- Gottingen Street. 



Spring Garden Road. 
Gottingen Street. 
Starr Street. 
Brunswick Street. 
Cornwallis Street. 
Quinpool Road. 
Dartmouth. 



irinivcrealicit. 



vChurch of the Redeemer 



Brunswick Street. 



?*r^'i'"ii^ 



I'mii 



PnAGHB OF ^MUBHMRNT. 

a^HE principal of these are, the ACADEMY OF MdSIC, 
on Pleasant Street, a very handsonie edifice, admirably suited 
for its purpose. It is open during the greater part of the year to 
Theatrical and Opera Companies, Public Lecturers, and local Musical 
and Literary celebriti<.s. 

ORPHEdS HALL, on Granville Street, another splendid 
Music Hall, owned and managed by the Orpheus Amateur Musical 
Societv. 

The liYGEdM, on Starr Street, formerly Temperance Hall. 



■I 



33 



treet. 



len Road, 
(treet. 

Street. 
Street. 
,oa<l. 



Street. 



is=i^fet^ 



rm 



ly suited 
year to 
Musical 

splendid 
Musical 

Hall. 



Tge Wlamrgoth Furnishing ptore, 

41t 43, 43 BABBINGTON ST., 

a?'e filled to overflowing until everij description of 
Goods necessary for the complete equipment of 




DWELLINGS, OFFICES, 

^ HOTELS, H^ 
and PUBLIC BUILDINGS. 







Strangers visiting the City are cordially invited 
to inspect our premises and stock, which includes a 
sploidid variety of all kinds of 

DRAWING ROOM and PARLOR FURNITURE, 

SIDEBOARDS. DINING TABLES & CHAIRS, 
CHAMBER FURNITURE, 

PERAMBULATORS. 

WILTON, VELVET and BRUSSELS CARPETS, 

ORIENTAL and ENGLISH RUGS and SQUARES, 
CORK CARPETS and LINOLEUM, 

SCOTCH FLOOR CLOTH. 

THE CELEBRATED CORTICSINE. 

CURTAINS, WINDOW SHADES and FIXTURES, 
UPHOLSTERY GOODS of all kinds. 

The Lars^est and Best Stock and Lowest Prices in the City. 



Proprietors HALIFAX CARPET CO. 



34 





■rrr^lfj. 




j TAS loner 1 
(2|^| Canada, 



been considerefl one of tlu; larjrest and finest in 
and at the present day it is acknowledged l)y the 
travelling; Public to be one of the leadin<; Hotels in the 
Dominion in si/e, e(|uipnient, cuisine, and rjennine home comforts. 

The Halifax was l»nilt in LS40 by a joint stock compan}', who 
erected a buildintr that was then far in advance of the times in magni- 
tude and elegance of equipment, insomuch that it was found impossible 
to carry on the business on the elaljorate scale at first proposed. As 
a result of this the building passed through many vicissitudes, at one 
time being used by tlie Imperial Government as an " Officers' Quarters." 
Finally, in 18G1, the Messrs. Hesslein assumed control of the building, 
and from that time till the present it has continued under their 
management. Under the direction of these gentlemen the business 
has increased every year, necessitating fre(]uent large additions to the 
building. In 1878 the Hotel was enlarged; in 1887 new^ wings were 
added, giving an additional space of over one hundred rooms ; in 1SS9 
enlarged acconnnodation again became necessary, resulting in the exten- 
sion of the wings eastward to the adjoining street, taking in the entire 
viddth of the block ; finally this year, the large and beautifully 
furnished building on the north side has been added to the establish- 
ment, giving, in addition to other advantages, three magnificent dining 
halls, which for beauty and equipment cannot be surpassed. Thus the 
Halifax Hotel can hold out inducements to the public which cannot l>e 
offered by any other Hotel east of Montreal. 

The furnishings of the Halifax are of a sumptuous and elegant 
description, surpassed by few Hotels on tlu? continent ; and one thing 
that strikes the visitor most forcibh' is the attention that is paid 
in this respect to every detail. To describe the house, in brief, one 
would say that it has no superior in the Dominion, and, in some 
respects, no equal. 

In 1887 the managers decided to make the Halifax more attrac- 
tive, if possible, than ever before, and with this in view expended 



35 



NYTV ^jrr jTi^) .sHr rTIT' v\a' 




l^fE^ 



h^/i$ 









finest 111 
mI ]>y the 
Is in the 
;'()rts. 

lan}', wlio 
in niaii;ni- 
nqiossible 
osod. As 
I OS, at one 
.Quarters." 
building, 
ider their 
! })usiness 
ons to the 
ings were 
: ill 1S8!) 
he exten- 
;he I'ntire 
cautifully 
oscahlish- 
nt (lining 
Thus the 
cannot he 

1(1 elegant 

one thing 

it is paid 

brief, one 

, in some 





H. HESSLEIN & SONS, Proprietors. |^5? 



ire attrac- 
expended 



I! I 



I 'i| 



36 



$30,000 ill making alterations and improvements. Tin; appearance of 
the front was completely altered, the main Hoor was entirely remod- 
;led, a two-storey wing was added to the Lack, and a magnificent 
main entrance was made. The grand entrance and connnodious offices 
have been compared favorably with those of any Hotel in Am«;rica ; 
and many competent judges are found who assert that they are finer 
than those of the noted Windsor of Montreal. The two side entrances 
by which the Hotel was formerly entered were replaced l)y a single 
large one with double doors. These are panelled with embossed glass, 
each panel containing the words " Halifax Hotel " in large fancy 
gold letters. An idea of the size of the lobby and office may be formed 
from a consideration of the fact that 3,000 scjuare feet of marble were 
used in paving the floor. On each side inside the entrance is a very 
handsome and massive old-fashioned fireplace, with cherry mantel and 
a British plate mirror above, six feet six inches in length and four feet 
six inches in width, supported in a beautiful frame of cherry. The 
ceiling is panelled with white wood handsomely veneered, with cherry 
mouldings and gold trimmings, and looks uniijue and beautiful. The 
wainscotting is also in white wood, with cherry trimmings. The office 
counter is nearly opposite the entrance, and is splenditlly finished in 
walnut. On the other side is a news and cigar stand, finished in a 
style of elegance corresponding to the rest of the room. An immense 
mirror stands at the back of the office, facing the entrance, the effect 
of which, as seen from the street, is very striking. Several pillars 
finished in imitation of malachite support the ceiling. A cloak room 
stands near the office, where guests may leave their coats and hats 
wdien going into the dining room. Electric enunciators of the most 
approved pattern communicate with all the bedrooms and every part 
of the house. It is lighted throughout by electricity and gas. The 
Halifax has ample means of entrance and egress ; besides the main 
entrance already described, there is also a separate door of entry for 
ladies' use at the south of the other. Every part of the building is 
easily accessible, as three large staircases lead from bottom to top — 
one at each end of the main corridor and the other opposite the chief 
entrance. The staircase steps, which are set in with rubber treads, 
are of American pine, the hand-rails of walnut, the balusters of white 
wood and the side mouldings of cherry. At the head of the main 



37 



ariince of 
y re mod - 
i(,'nificent 
>us offices 
Ainorica ; 
are finer 
entrances 
'■ a sinMe 
sed glass, 
ge fancy 
)e formed 
■ble were 
is a very 
mtul and 
four feet 
ry. The 
ill cherry 
111. The 
Hie office 
lished ill 
hcd in a 
iiinnense 
he effect 
1 pillars 
ak room 
-ud hats 
he most 
ury part 
.s. The 
le main 
itry fol- 
ding is 
3 top — 
le chief 
treads> 
f white 
e main 



-^ ESTflBUISHED 1843. *H^ 





AND 



® 




IMPORTERS OF 



Vest India Proclu^'e, 



, dec, ^ 

And Dealers in ^*^ 



FISH'MG SUPPLIES, 

HALIFAX, N. S. 



i 



38 



Ml 



' M 



ii 



I 



staircase a large inuiiiorial wiiulow is piaciMl, which can be seen from 
the entrance. The desij^Mi of the win<low is entitled " Art," and shows 
the life-size figuri' of a female with a pallet ami brush in her hand. 

Turning to the rii,dit, in the main hall, the first apartment reached 
after passing,' the writinj^ room, is the Ladies' Reception Room. A de- 
8crii)tion of this room nmst necessarily be inadeiiuate, and the best 
thini; the ladies can do is to go and see it. The walls and ceiling are 
covered with " j)acrusta," bordered by a strip of goM, v/ith purple and 
bronze bands above and below. 

Mounting to the first floor, the most interesting places to visit are 
the Ladies' Parlor and the Bridal Chamber. The former is in the back 
part of the house, and is entered by sliding doors, op^josite which a 
largt) oval mirror is placed. From the two immense bay windows in 
this room a splendid view of the harbor is afforded. The roof of the 
wing is fitted up as a ladies' promenade, and from this vantage ground 
a magnilicent view of the Harbor and Bedford Basin is obtained. 

The funushing of the Parlor is of the most elaborate description 
The set of furniture is of rosewood covered with embossed plush, and 
the car|)et, a beautiful Axnunster, and rugs, were specially imported 
from England, as, indeed, was the carpctit)g for the entire house. The 
walls of the Parlor are ornamented with expensive pictures, among 
them three steel engravings illustrative of events in the life of Queen 
Victoria. A bust of " Jephthah's Daughter," purchased in Italy at great 
expense, stands opposite the Parlor doors. One of the most prominent 
of the Parlor ornaments is a clock made of Dresden China, the work 
on which in flowers, leaves and figures is unusually fine. This clock 
has a reuiarkable history. It is said to have been a wedding present 
to the bride of a British Admiral married at St. John's, Newfoundland, 
seventy or eighty years ago, who on leaving the colony several years 
aftei' his marriage sent the timepiece to a jeweller to be repaired, and 
no en(juiries concerning it were ever received afterwards. It fell into 
Mr. Hesslein's hands some years ago, and he would not part with it for 
a good sum. 

The Bridal Chamber is furnished in most elaborate Pt3de, and the 
most fastidious couple cannot but be delighted with it. The rooms in 
every part of the building are all beautifully painted, papered and 
furnished, and their appointments are the most comfortable that can 



:v.) 



seen from 
ind shows 
• hand, 
it reached 
in. A de- 
tho best 
L'iling are 
u-|)le and 

visit are 
the back 
which a 
iidows in 
lof of the 
e ground 
ned. 

scription 
lush, and 
injported 
so. Tlie 
s, ainoncr 
)f Queen 
■■ at <^reat 
•oniinent 
he work 
lis clock 
present 
Lindland, 
al years 
rod, and 
fell into 
th ic for 

and the 
oorns in 
red and 
;hat can 



1 HOWIES RUROOU, 



IMPeRTER & DEALER IN v- 

^APER Hangings -- 



J' 




TI0NS, 



VARNISHES, PAINTS, OILS, BRUSHES, 
Britisl} Phitc. Sbcct. Embossed i«i Sl;iiiic(l 



^^^ha 







^^ 



em P^IN'lflNG^, EN61^^VING3 ^ CPI^OMO^, 

-^^^^ ARTISTS' MATERIALS, >-^«" 

PICTURE FRAMING A SPECIALTY. 



House Painting, Decorating, Sign Writing, S:c. 

40 to 44 iSarriiiytoH St*^ 



40 



!• 



be procured. No expense is spared in keeping every article in tlio 
building in perfect condition, and the result is that everything looks 
as nice, neat and enticing as possible. In the basement of the buihling 
are the laundries, kitchens, kc. The hot water service is extended all 
over the house, and V)ath rooms are to be found on every tloor. The 
kitchen affords cooking facilities for one thousand guests at a time. 

The ventilation of the building has been lately improved, and is 
now as nearly perfect as modern science can make it. Modes of egress 
in case of fire are amply provided in the shape of fire escapes and 
other contrivances. 

In connection with the establishment is a fine Conservatory well 
stocked with rare and choice plants. It is very attractive to visitors, 
and very many, both in summer and winter, avail themselves of its 
beautiful promenades and secluded retreats. 

The increased patronage of this Hotel will convince the travelling 
public of the attention and comforts its guests receive. Deep sea 
fishing is often very attractive to visitors during the summer months,, 
and the managers, with their accustomed foresight, are always ready 
at short notice to fit out parties with competent guides, boats, lines, 
bait, kc. Streams crowded with trout and salmon abound, and that 
within easy driving distance of the Hotel, so that if any of the guests 
should happen to be piscatorially inclined they can enjoy themselves 
to the full. 




c:^^4 



41 



cle in the 
liing looks 
e buildinnr 
tended all 
oor. The 
. time, 
ed, and in 
of egres.H 
apes and 

tory well 
> visitors, 
es of its 

favellintr 
)eep sea 
months,. 
^s ready 
ts, lines, 
md that 
e guests 
mselves 




M. STAIRS, SOI m 




±± 1T4< I'^o 190 H: 



Lower Water -Street, 



V- 



WM 



^^^7!^^!^^ w 



u 



% 



t 



Wholesale Importers and Dealers in 

-* *- 1 R o K, * *- 

•^ J^lSriD STEEL, ssf. , 

Fishing and Ship's Outfits. 

i/IINTS, ©ILS ^ (SOLORS OF ALL Kl^DS. 

Boiler Makers', painters' m Bonders' Sopplies, &e. 



Mining Requisites of every description 

OUR CHIEF SPECIALTY. 



li 



42 



iy\ 



'^ 



V hi 



.Manufacturing o and JIIercantile 
m Establishments. w> * 

HALIFAX has always been a business and iiianufacturini; 
centre for the Maritime Provinces, and naturally so, for its 
location makes it peculiarly adapted for carrying on a large 

f manufacturing antl export trade. Situated by the sea, on one 
of the very very best harbors in the world, connected on its 
( land side with the rest of Canada and the United States by an 
( efficient system of railways, and exceptionally conveniently 
located with respect to the European continent, her lot has certainly 
fallen in pleasant places. A short table of distances will show^ the 
favorable locati(3n of the city better than words can describe it. 
Halifax is distant by sea from Portland 340 miles, or 24 to 28 hours ; 
from Boston, 378 miles, or 33 to 30 Tiours ; from New York, 542 miles, 
or 48 to 53 hours ; from Baltimore, 8G0 miles, or 72 to 82 hours. By 
rail Portland is 018 miles distant ; Boston, 720 : New York, 939 miles. 
In our own Dominion, St. John, N. B., is distant 277 miles: 
Quebec, 078 miles ; Montreal, 850 miles. 

A comparison of the distances of various cities from Liverpool, 
England, as compared with Halifax, is instructive : 

From Halifax to Liverpool is 2,480 miles; from St. John to Liv- 
erpool is 2,757 miles ; from Boston to Liverpool is 2,950 miles ; from 
New York to Liverpool is 3,130 miles. 

Halifax city is surrounded by inexhaustible coal and iron mines, 
which are acknowledged to yield coal and ore the equal of the liest in 
the world. One of our largest manufacturing enterprises is the cotton 
factory.built in 1881 and 1882 by the Nova Scotia Cotton Manufacturing 
Company. It is situated on Kempt Road on a lot of land consisting 
of twenty-eight and a half acres and is the largest factory of its kind 
in the Maritime Provinces. It is coniitcted by a brancli line with the 
Intercolonial Railway at Richmond and in its location is just what is^ 
to be desired. 



48 



Tories*' Ue^Pweut Sk^te. 

^TS a popnlar Winter reoroafion Skating uill nnqupstioiiably roiiiain withonl 
5"^ a rival. "THE POETRY OF MOTION" as it has been styled, has been 
made a tnitliful description, not alone by the artistic proficiency of its votaries, 
but also by the great improvements in the instrnments which have made sncli 
profcieney possible. As an inventor in this Held, mi. .JOHN FORBES, of 
Halifax, N. S., occnpies a very advanced position. He lias just made a 
Crovvninpr Success in his NEW PATENT SKATE. It is undeniably the MOST 
PERFECT SKATE EVER PROHUCEl). They will be out the coming; winter. 
All skaters should get a pair. "ACHIEVED" is the Trade Mark. 



^\^>^^s^ V^ N^ >^ N- 




FASTENS FIRMLY ON ANY BOOT WORN. 



No Key! No Screws or Nuts! No Loose Parts! 

Requires no previous fitting ! Always ready for putting right on ! 

Greater Possibilities in Speed and Points, tlian an; Skate ever Produced. 

Tfie ForOes"^ Alanf 3 ^o.f (l^tdj 

SOLE lv^.if^I^EIES, 
17, '1 and 21 Bedford Row, HALIFAX, N. S. 



44 



T 



The building was erected by S. M. Brooktield umlur the direction 
of experts from England and the United States who pronounce it to 
be one of the very best mills that has ever been >rected. In the 
factory there are four hundred looms, two thousand spindles and all 
other machines in proportion. The power to drive tlie machinery is 
supplied by a corliss engine of 500 horse power, whose fly wheel is 
twenty feet in diameter, the crank shaft seven and a half inches and 
the whole engine weighs over forty tons. The boilers, made in Glasgow, 
are four in number, each about one hundred horse power. The pump 
is a double cylinder Worthingham, with a capacity of over 42,000 
gallons per hour. Besides the regular water suppl}' from the city, the 
company have built under the " slasher room " a huge tank which holds 
56,000 gallons, and in addition are provided with automatic sprinklers, 
supplied from two tanks in a tower at the north-east end of the building. 

The company employ three hundred hands in the mill, and the 
pay roll amounts to twelve hundred dollars a week. The capacity of 
the mill is 100,000 yards of cloth weekly, besides a large production of 
single and double yarns, wicks, etc., etc. The dye house turns out 
2,500 pounds of yarn weekly, of every shade and color. In fact, this 
mill produces a larger variety of goods than any other in Canada. 
The greater part of the produce goes to the Upper Provinces, and as 
far west as British Columbia. They have also shipped goods to China- 
The company during the last few years have expended a large amount 
in o-ettin<' the verv latest improvements in machinerv, and their factory 
is now one of the very best equipped in the Dominion. 

But to attempt a description of even a small proportion of our 
manufacturing enterprises would be tedious. The only way to get a 
good idea of manufacturing Halifax is to visit the various repre- 
sentative establishments. If you are interested in ropes and cordage, 
just go into the factory of the Dartmouth Ropeworks Company, whose 
establislunent is the largest of its kind in the Dominion. Near the 
Ropeworks is the Skate Factory, where Forbes' Acme Club Skate is 
ma<le. If you wish to see machinery, call at ]\Ioir's shops, and they 
will show you machines made and in process of construction that for 
number, variety and size will more than satisfy the mest expectant. If 
you want to see steam, hot water and hot air heating manufactories, 
go to Power and Company's immense establishments on Barrington 



-to 



3 direction 
lunce it to 
In the 
les and all 
Lchinery is 
Y wheel is 
inches and 
1 Glasgow, 
The pump 
rev 42,000 
e city, the 
liich holds 
iprinklers, 
i buildini;. 
11, and the 
apacity of 
duction of 
turns out 
1 fact, this 
n Canada. 
es, and as 
to China- 
e amount 
ir factory 

n of our 
to get a 
IS repre" 
cordage, 
y, whose 

ear the 
Skate is 
nd they 
that for 
taut. If 
actories, 

rinirton 



, ^* SIHsDWM 4 



%8 



(ESTABUISHED 1840.^ 



i28 & 130 Granville S-r., Halifax 




k 



'I 



mr twwbi X Ti Ti^wi ^j^TO tmkb ^^^w ^^^^ ^fw «■ 

Watches, Diamonds and Hem EinTs, Silverware, Sronses, Trencli Clocks, Sic, Sic. 



40 






and Water streets. These geiitleiiien are the leadinij^ iiiacliiiiists in 
Halifax. 

Ont! of the hir^est and nuxst liamlsonic whok'sale and retail 
]VIannfaeti]rin<^ Jewellery enterprises in the Dominion is M. S. 
Brown and (Company's. Call upon them at their maoniHeent store 
on Granville street, and we ean assure you that you will I'eceive 
honest and generous treatment. Ami so one niiuht talk (i<l naaseicni 
about our machine shops, foundries, manufacturing and mercantile 
ostahlishments, etc. Barrington, (Jranville, IloUis ami Water streets 
are crowded with lai'ge and handsome shops, whei-c the ])r.rchaser can 
get just wdiat he wants every time ho calls. 

The largest and most thoroughly ('(piippcd furniture estahlish. 
incnt in the province is that of Gordon and Keith, whose stoi'es are 
situated on Barrington street and their factory on Dundonahl street : 
but although their furniture department is so extensive, it is in their 
carpet and oilcloth department that these gentlemen take special ])ride. 
In this department they are certainly unexcelled in the maritime 
provinces. 

Mahon Brothers, dry goods house, also on Barrington sti'eet, is th'- 
largest retail establishment of its kind in the city. Their sup})]ies of 
silks and satins, velvets and laces, capes, mantles, and dry goods 
generally are almost unlimited and of a very superior <(uality. Their 
clerks are thoroughly up in the business, anxious to suit tin.' pur- 
chaser, taking intlnite pains to supply them with exactly what is 
wanted, insomuch that we can assure every visitor to the city that in 
the Mahon Brothers' store they will meet with perfect satisfaction. 

The Forbes Manufacturing Company devote their attention 
chiefly to the iiner grades of machine work. They make a specialty 
of surgical instruments. They are the manufacturers of a new skate 
which, we are assured, will eclipse all other patents. 

James Roue is the manufacturer of a (lualitv of soda water un- 
excelled by any other maker. He is the joint owner with Mr. Bates 
in the manufacture of the celebrated Bates' Latherine. 

William Stairs, Son and Morrow, hardware merchants and ship 
chandlers, occupy an immense building on Lower Water street. Their 
establishment has a wide reputation for honesty, integrity, and a 
thorough method of transactiuir business. 



47 



a('l)inists in 



GOLD JVIiNING! 

H. H. FULLER & CO., 

-=3 HEADQUARTERS FOR ^ 

Mining and Mill Supplies. 

GOLD AND COAL MINERS, AND MILL OWNERS INTENDING TO 

CARRY ON OPERATIONS IN THIS PROVINCE, AND WHO WISH 

TO SUPPLY THEMSELVES WITH THE BEST QUALITY OF 

MATERIALS, SHOULD CALL AND EXAMINE OUR STOCK 

BEFORE DECIDING TO PURCHASE ELSEWHERE. 

WE HAVE MADE A SPECIALTY CF THESE 

LINES OF GOODS, AND ALWAYS CARRY 

A LARGE ASSORTMENT OF THE 

BEST MAKES, IN STOCK. WE 

Also Carry Full Lines of 

^^ HEAVY AND SHELF HARDWARE, ^^^ 

BUILDERS' HARDWARE of every description, 

NETS, LINES, TWINES, &c., &c. 

WE ARE PREPARED TO FILL ALL ORDERS ENTRUSTED TO US 

PROMPTLY, AND WE LOOK CAREFULLY AFTER OUR 

CUSTOMERS INTERESTS. WE ARE ALWAYS GLAD 

TO FURNISH QUOTATIONS, AND GIVE ANY 

INFORMATION WE CAN TO THOSE 

WHO MAY REQUIRE ANY 

GOODS IN OUR LINE. 

H. H. FULLER 8c CO., 

45 to 49 UPPEE WATEH ST. 






48 



Educational, m 



^jl^rHE loadi)]f( Educational Institutions are : Dalhousie College and 
li University, Halifax County Academy, Brunswick Street School 
^\ (in place of the olil wooden huildinf,^ a brick and stone struc- 
ture is l)eing erected, contract price S30,000), Albro Street School, 
Morris Street School, St. Patrick's Roman Catholic High School, and 
other public schools ; Cambridge House (a private boarding and day 
school for boys), the Art School, and the Halifax Presbyterian Ladies' 
College. 



LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES.-Of these the leading 
are the Nova Scotia Institute of Science and the Nova Scotia Historical 
Societ3^ 

BENEVOLENT AND CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS. — The more 
important of these are : The School for the Blind : Institution for 
the Deaf and Dumb; Victoria General Hospital: R. C. Infirmary; 
Asylum for the Insane, Dartmniith; Infants' Home: City Poor's 
Asylum ; Protestant Orphans' Home ; R. C. Orphanage ; Industrial 
Schools ; Visiting Dispensary ; Society for the Prevention of Cruelty ; 
Saint Paul's Almshouse of Industry : Home for the Aged. A short 
account of some of these is given in another part of the book. 

NATIONAL SOCIETIES aid in Charitable efforts. These are the 
North British, St. George's, and Charitable Irish. 

READING AND RECREATION ROOMS. — Y. M C. Association, 
cor. Granville and Prince Streets (ovci' one hundred newspapers and 
periodicals) ; Church of England Institute ; Halifax and City Clubs, 
and others. 

LIBRARIES.— Dalhousie College, Y. M. C. Association, Legislative 
Library and Citizens' Free Library. 

NEWSPAPERS.— Daily: Morning Chronicle, Morning Herald, 
Evening Mail, Daily Echo and Acadian Recorder. Tri-weekly : Herald 
and Chronicle. Weekly : Nova Scotian, Royal Gazette, Critic, Pres- 
byterian Witness and Wesleyan. 



"olloiTO and 
feet Scliool 
tone struc- 
3et School, 
"jcliool, and 
g and day 
ian Ladies' 



the leading 
L Historical 

- The more 
itution for 
Infirmary ; 
^ity Poor's 
Industrial 
)t' C'rueltv ; 
1. A short 
lok. 

ese are the 



Lssociation, 
lapers and 
ity Clubs, 

jCfjislative 

g Herald, 
ly: Herald 
ritic, Pres- 



49 



P0VER Zi GO 



289, 291 Barrington, and 132, 134 Upper Water Streets, 

HALIFAX, N. S. 



O 



STEAM & HOT WATER ENGINEERS, 
MACHINISTS, 

COPPERSMITHS, 
CAS FITTERS, 
PLUMBERS, 

Importers and fitters of the best Sanitary 
Earthenware and appliances, known to the 
Trade, Manufacturers of Copper, Brass, Lead 
and Iron Goods for Railways, Steamships, 
Lighthouses, Factories, Tanneries, etc. 

Importers and Dealers in Iron Pipe and Fittings. 

Copper and Brass Tubes. 
Boiler Tubes and Plates. 
Engineer's Rubber Goods. 
Steam Engines and Boilers. 
Steam, Power & Hand Pumps. 
Warrens Felt Roofing. 

PATENTEES k MANUFACTURERS OF 

StGam k Hot Water Radiators. 



Estimates for Warming and Ventilating Public Buildings 
and Residences w'ltJi Steam, Hot Water or Hot Jlir, furnished 
on application. 




a 



a 



li 



u 



a 



a 



50 



■^ ©ONSULS. 



United States Consul-Gexerai Wakefield G. Frye. 

Portuguese — Tliomas AMtot. 

Spanish— Jose Maria Lluek <le Diaz, 87 Tower Road. 

Brazil— George R. Hart. 

Sweden and Norway Vice-Consul— Isaac Yl. Mathers. 

French Vice-Consul— Ci. E. Francklyn. 

Hungarian and Austrian— W. IF. Hart. 

Danish— Stephen Tobiii. 

Belgian — A. E. Curren. 

German — C. A. Creighton. 

Netherlands Vice-Consul— Dr. \\. N. Wickwire. 

Italian— Consul-general eor Canada— J. Win£,^field Bonnyu. 

Vice-Consul— Well. J. Fisher. 
Chilian Vice-Consul— \V. Wint^field Bonnyn. 
Uruguay Vice-Consul— IF. W. C. Boak. 
Haytien Consul— M. Carney. 



51 






\/.\TI.IT/\rp 



•1) liy THE SISTERS OF (TL 



-^ HAliIFAX, H- S. M^ 




.<:■, >•: 
















Tins INSnTlTlOX so dolijiliinillj situatod on the shores of llio liodford 
IJiisiii, Mliilo ailonliii^: every opportunity for obtaiiiin^r a rellned and 
solid Kdiication, presents t<» the public an unrivalled advantaK'e in its 
liealtli-K:ivinK- and eharinin^ surrounding's. All the most advanced hranehes 
of an Kn^^'lisli education, Mitli Latin and the Modern Laniruaires arc caretnlly 
imparted, while (lie Fine Arts are a department in which its pupils have 
ahvays excelled. A line Hathiii;:' house on the premises trives opportunity of 
enjoying: salt water liatlis. It is within a few minutes walk of the Uailway 
Station and four miles distant from the City of Halifax, fiivinjr a retirement 
so necessary for the work of education. For particulars and terms apply to 
the Mother Superior, .Mount St. Vincent, liockinifham, Halifax, N. S. 



1 1 



52 



fl 4 



[Conliniir I from paoc 2S.1 

receives several streams of fresli wati-r tliat are supplietl liy lakes 
which lie scattered in every fiirection between its western shore and 
Margaret's Bay. 

In the centre of a little cove on the western side of the Arm, and 
about lialf a mile from its head is Melville Ishuid, the former abode of 
unfortunate prisoners of war. It is now used as the military pri.son. 

At the month of the Arm there is another little place called 
Pernett's Island, and about a mile above are two immense iron rings 
fastened into •"-'^ses of rock, to which was apjiended, durinjj; the war 
of 1812, a chi .lat secured the passage of the Arm against hostile 
fleets. Midway between the Arm and the harbor, near the southern 
part of the ptminsula, stands a strong stone tower, in a position which 
commands the approach to both, but at this battery tluu-e are no 
longer any troops stationed. About three mile« from tlm North-west 
Arm is a rocking stone of very large dimensions. It rests upon a 
strata of rock that rises to the surface of the ground, and moves on a 
pivot of twelve inches by six. It is composed of granite, and when 
.set in motion (which may be effected with ease by means of a short 
wooden lever) undulates from E. N. E. to \V. S. W, It is twenty feet 
in length, fourteen in breadth, nine in height, and sevent^'-four in 
circumference, ^d is supposed to weiyh one hundred and si.xty-two 
tons. Withi shorter distance of Halifax, on the Prospect road, 

i.s another stOi,_ of smaller dimensions, but similar as resi)ects its 
position and facility of motion. 

" And some, chance jioised and balanced, lay 

So that a stri])linj^ arm might sway 

A mass no power could raise. 

In I. ture's rajje, at random thrown, 

^'et trembling like a Druid's throne. 

On its precarious base. " — .St:oi r. 



i 



fit 



riJ 






)c ^pproacb ^^>^ i^ca. 



The traveller who prefers to arrive at Halifax by .sea, rather than 
by Railway, will have Ids attention drawn to the numerous giuirdians 
•of the coast, both of a peaceful and a warlike character. Light-houses 
and fortifications are conspicuous at every prominent point, from the 
rocky Isle of Sambro on the western coast to the jetties of H. M. 
Naval Yard near the head of the harbour. The louelv island of 



VA 













»\** \\\> 




MANUFACTURER OF 



I SODA WATER, SINGER AL^E, 

J' • ^ LiEMONABE, 5(G. N> • 



rv 



WOOD'S WHARF. 

'>" r^ALiPAx, n. s. 4 



p. 0. Itov 4(M(. 



--»=3— irtr-r* . 



Bii^gjEiS 



LATHERINE. 




THE BEST 



^rsaiiser and t^reasfier^ 

SOL.D KVBRYlATHERi:! 

A lb. package retail 5 cents. 

Ba^rb 8l Roue, 

p. 0. Box 4(Mj. HALIFAX, N. S. 



iri 






54 

Sambro, a prominent rock a mile or two from the shore, and about 
twenty miles from the Narrows, is scarcely large enough to contain 
the light-house; it was, doubtless, chosen by the iirst Legislature of 
Nova Scotia, on account of its admirable situation for the purpose 
re([uired. The lantern shews a fixed white light, warning the mariner 
of rocks and ledges in the vicinity, and casting its welcome lieams 
over a wide expanse of the surrounding ocean. A little further inland 
on the same shore, we have next in order, standing on the bold l)lufr 
of Chehucto Head, the Beacon, with its Itrilliant light revolving at 
intervals of one minute ; the Beacon being supplemented in the same 
neighborhood ])y an automatic signal buoy with a ten inch whistle. 
Still further inward, but on the opposite side, appears the anti<[uated 
light-house of Mauger's or Meagher's Beach, standing apparently in 
the water, but in "eality on a low shelving beach jutting out nose-like 
from the western shore of McNab's Island towards the harbour's 
mouth. This islanil, with its neighbour, Lawlor's, on the east, forms a 
great natural breakwater for the Port, a'.:jainst the tierce south-eastern 
gales of the Atlantic, and together they separate the Eastern Passage, 
as it is called, from the much broader ami safer entiance Itv the 
Western shore. Further East, at the entrance of the second Passag";, 
will be noticed the double white light on Devil's Islaml, and nearly 
opposite on the Western sliore, a military estaldishincnt known as tlie 
Signal Station and Fort of York Redoubt. Here a few years ago. the 
eye might have encountere*! what is supposed to be a novelty in this 
part of the world- cairn i>v the ancient motkd. It stood on a height 
above the village of Herring Cove, as we approach the harbour. Two 
rude pillars (rould be seen placed east and west, forming the elevated 
parts of the ship-cairn erected in memory of George Brown, a native of 
the Cove, who died July 8th, IST'), aged JW years, after having earned 
the title of champion oarsman of North America. Proceeding further 
inward from York Redoubt along the Western shore, tlie outlet of the 
North West "Arm" is passed, noted far and wide fi)r its quiet and 
pictures(pie beauty. This pretty little iidet runs up, in the rear, as it 
were, of the city for two or three miles, and varies in width from a 
quarter to half a mile, the shores throughout its whole length .showing a 
succession of handsome mansions, with smooth lawns extending insome 
parts to the water's edge, and in others relieved by groves of the original 
forest. We now approach Point Pleasant, the southernmost point of the 



•mm^fiBSBiismfsi. 



'inal 



(1 



.)■> 



35 and 37 George St., 

(B. A. Smith's old stand.) 

-^ RETAIL Importers ami IhMlors in ^^ 

DRY*aOOIDB. 

•t^a We make Specialities of E^si- 

MANTLES, CORSETS and rNDERCLOTllING. 

TBLEPHONK 571. 



• • 



. . -.0.^^^^,. 




N6f5. 6^ § 64 GI^^NVIIiliK mW^l 

HALIFAX, N. S. 



KIRBT-ClliABB WOKK OUAHANTKtlU. 
LUopk f^ctupncd same Day if desired. 



I 



IffV 



M 



f 



le 



TELEPHONE 653. 



^ 



5G 



5 I 



peninsula on wliich the city is built. As has been said, this point was 
at first selected by Governor Cornwallis as the site for building the town, 
but was found to be much exposed to south-easterly gales, and another 
site was selected between two and three miles further north, where the 
city at pres^;/it stands. Soon afterwards we pass George's Island, with 
its massive fortifications, built apparentl}' to last for all time. We 
are now in the harbour proper, and can take a leisurely survey of its 
capabilities and proportions. What a magnificient sheet of water it is ! 
not to speak of the roadst(;ad of George's Island outside, or of the 
broad basin inside of the Narrows, the harbour has room and verge 
enough to accommodate the fleets of the world. Every where the water 
is deep — so deep, that the largest ships may lie at the wharves without 
fear of grounding at any time of the tide — which here rises and falls 
so gently as so be hardly perceptible, and never exceeding a depth of 
six or eight feet. Practically, the state of the tide here is never taken 
into account in the usual arrangements of shipping incidental to the 
duties of a port- warden. 

On the south-western shore, between Halifax and the bounds of 
Lunenburg County, there are several good harl)ors. After passing the 
Northwest Arm, Herring Cove and Ketch Harbor, Sambro presents its 
capacious basin, to vessels that encounter contrary winds in departing 
from Halifax. Ir, is situated thr'^-* or four miles north westward of 
the light house, is easy of access, perfectly safe and deep. Coasters 
resort thither in great, numbers in bad weather, and fifty or sixty are 
frequently collected in this retreat. Sambro was settled in the year 
l7iS(), and contains a small fishing population. Uetween this and 
St. Margaret's Hay are Pennant, Upper and Lower Prospect, Molineux, 
Dover and Indian harbor, at each of which a few fisherman are settled. 
Thf iajids from Chebucto Head to St. Margaret's Bay are, with very few 
exceptions, covered with rocks, the shore iron bound, and not a tree to 
be .seen for many miles. At the first settlement of the country, this 
portion of the coast was covered with a growth of spruce, hemlock and 
other trees, but soon aftei', a fire that spread over nearly the v.hole 
township destroyed this immense forest of timber, to the irreparable 
injury of the inhabitants. St. Margaret's Bay is safe and capacious. 
It is blessed with inanN' harbors, coves and islands which afford shelter 
for shij)s of the greatest burden, and convenient situations for fishing 
or farming. There are several streams that flow into the Bay abounding 



isters 

y are 
year 
and 
eux, 

ttled. 
few 

ee to 
this 
and 
lole 
able 
ions. 
Iter 



ling 
Ming 



57 










GEO. W. SWEET, ^-* Manager. 



i:H;-!:;!:"Lv;i«tfPL£:j^- •^^'": !!:;:::s:r v^^-;. -...., 




WINDSOR HOTEL, MONTREAL. 



HE WINDoOK, jacir)q oq Iqc jiQzsf and n-jcA cenlral sauare 
ir) lr)e ^''v, slaves ui^nuallea ir) Lai^ada. II3 caol, aipy 
siluaiior), dpacieus roon^s, palalial Liarridors, J'farlors <av)<k Un^irja 
l^aarr), Ijold a W0pld--wide rzpulaliai"), ar)d place il an^enq 'h'^ I'xalacz 
rlolzls of lr)e o/irrjenearj cor)lir)Br)i. 11 is Wilrjir) anz rr)ir)ufe s wall^ 
of lr)e tlFar)d M'rur)!^ ar)d i;)2W Lrar)adiar) Nacijic I^eilwav Uepels. 

GEO. UX. SCXIEET, manager. 



f 



58 



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with salmon, trout and gaspereaux. The people living on the .shores of 
this Bay have for many years furnished a large supply of fresh fish, 
firewood and vegetables for the Halifax market. Besides the North 
VV^est Harbor, Long Cove, Hubbard's Cove, French Covo and others ; 
St. Margaret's Bay contains Head Harbor, an anchora^-e of the first 
order, and so perfectly sai. that a Heet might be moored side by 
.side, unaffected even by a hurricane. Of some of these places, more 
hereafter. 

defences. 

Garrison. — Halifax is the headquarters of the Imperial forces in 
British North America. The garrison is the only one in the Dominion 
composed of regular troops. It consists of a regiment of the Line, of 
a battery of the Royal Artillery, of two companies of the Royal 
Engineer Corps, of one company of Submarine and Torpedo Engineers, 
of detachments of the Commissariat and Transport Corps, of the 
Ordnance Store, of the Hospital Corps, besides the Medical and Army 
Pay Departments. The Commander-in-Chief is a General, who in the 
aUsence from the Dominion of the Governor-General acts as Adminis- 
itrator of the Governinent. He has a military secretary, two aids, and 
eight other staH-ofHcers, together with a military Chaplain. 

Naval Station. — Halifax is also the chief station of the North 
American and West Lidies squadron of tlie Royal Navy. It is a Vice- 
Admiral's command, and the flagship remains in port during the greater 
part of the summer, with soiue of the other ves.sels of the squadron. 

Tur: FoRriFKATioxs. — Our Halifax, from its foundation -was 
largelv a military station as well as a ufreat central rendezvous for the 
iiaval force on the cis-Atlanticduty. The star fort or Citadel, known as 
Fort George, Dccupies the site of the octangular wooden blockhouse 
erected in IT").*), having a parapet and summit tower witli port-holes 
for cannon. The whole was surmounted by a ditch and ramparts of 
•earth and wood, strengthened by palisades or pickets driven close 
togetlier. 'J'he hill toj> was as first, and up to 1778, about eighty feet 
higher than it aj)pears in LS78, the cone having been necessarily cut 
down in the progress of the successive works of fortitication. In 1753, 
a row of j)iekets was extended from the Blockhouse along the line of 



.)9 



mmm 





199 MOLLIS STREET, 



9£M TS ' Fur nishing s. 



Wo keop a llisl-class stock of MENS' XKCK AVKAH, WHITK and FAN( Y 
.SHIRTS, tiUCKET PAMS and SHIRTS, BKLTS, \v. 

^ V/ATERPROOF COATS, A 1 Goods, t-^ 

DENTS A: .lOlVIN, 1 and 2 ('las|» GIovos. IMRRELLAS. SILK 
HANDKERCHIEFS. Nalnra! W'nw Indorucar, very line (Joods, some extra 
larjre sizes in Sloek. 

LePINE BROS., 

199 HOLLin ST*, Opposite Old Province Building. 



wab 

ir the 

Ivn as 

louse 

Holes 

:s of 

Iclose 

feet 

cut 

1753, 

ic of 





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cr chant 




it^gy!l'^^<!y<^ia^<^<--;^V^.;t^V>W?<<^:v?'<^0^<nw 



(^oriicr f^iikc ^ I-^arriiigton gts.. 



HALIFAX. N. S. 



/•vfMnnRksntsaniiRsKi'. 



■!^ 



60 



II 



Jacob Street, on the one hand, and by the South Bjvi'rack: ^'rounds, 
along Salter Street, on tlio other, to the shore of the harlior, as a 
defence against sudden attack by the theik hostile Indians (the Mic- 
macs). These ])ickets had fallen into decay and disappeared before 
17G1). In the 3'ear 179G the Duke of Kent, commanding at Halifax, 
caused the fortifications to be removed, and began the erection of 
woiks of increased strength. Ho had the grounds of the fort enclosed 
securely by picket fences, parts of which were to be seen, though 
neglected, as lately as the year 1S2S, but were soon after superseded 
by an extended enclosure such as that now surrounding the entire 
Glacis to its points of junction with the several adjacent streets, as, 
shown l)y map of the City. The present fort is of great strength, and 
comprises within its limits barrack accommodation for a regiment, a 
signal house, Hag staff, station for electric telegraph apparatus, connect- 
ing adjacent outside forts, and a storm drum to give warning to the 
Royal or Mercantile Navy, if there be a threateneil disturbance of the 
weather. A number of blockhouses and batteries were built in 
defence of Halifax from the date of its settlement and during 1700 at 
intervals, u)) to 177-"). These occupied positions at Massey Hill, 
Mount Needliam, Queen's wharf off Governor's Battery, Ordinance 
sfpiare, ])ockyard. Lumber-yard, Fairbank's wharf, ]3utch Church 
redoubt. Admiralty grounds, the site of Trinity Chiu'ch by Poplar 
Grove, known as Grenadier Fort, Meagher's Beach, Point Pleasant, 
York Redoubt Point, East P)attpry Point, an(l Fort Charlotte on 
George's Island. From the head of the North West Arm to Bedford 
Basin was extendeil a line of blockhouses, as centres of defence in 
anticipation of stealthy incursions of Indians. The blockhouses were 
built of logs or stpiared timber, with loop-holes for musketry, the 
walls were of great thickness, having a parapet around the top, and 
platform at the base. These defences have, in many cases, given place 
to erections of a peaceful character, or leave oidy traces of redoubt 
outlines, as at Fort Needham and the Lumber-yard, while a few 
remain under altered conditions and with the added appliances of 
modern adaptation for defence, as may be seen at Point Pleasant, at. 
Fort Charlotte on George Island, and at Prince's Battery Fort on, 
McNab's Island. To these have been added, as defined on the plan of 
Halifax, Forts C'ambridge and Ogilvie, with their 18 tpn guns and. 
steel-pointed shot. 









01 




/"\.icrr)ac • L,arr)p, • r)car ■ Halija 



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Access to tlie several water-sido Forts of the ishmd, may lie had 
by the assistance of harbor boatmen, or by excursion steamers that 
ply (hiring the Summer months between the City and iMcNal/s Island, 
or other points of interest. A modernized specimen of tlie ohl Martello 
Tower may also be visited, which stand conspicuously on the cdevatei] 
level rock in the open space near Point Pleasant. 

The citadel which covers the summit of the hill upon which the 
city is situated, is most easily reached by ascending from Sackville 
Street at the corner of J^runswick. The citadel is a fortress of the 
first class, accordinj^ to the standards of the old school ; though of late 
years the Government has bestowed much attention on the works at 
George's Island, York Redoubt, the Point, and MacNab's Island, which 
are more important in a naval point of view. The works were; com- 
menced by Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, father of Queen Victoria, 
who was then Commander of the Forces on this station. He employed 
in the service a large number of the Maroons, who had been conquered 
by the British and were banished from Jamaica, and subsecjuently 
deported to Sierra Leone. (Jhangcs and additions have been made 
nearly every year since, until the present immense stronghoh.l has 
been completed. It is separated from the glacis by a deep moat, over 
which are the guns on the numerous bastions. The massive masonry 
of the walls seems to defy assault, and the extensive barracks within 
are said to be bomb-proof. During the years 1873-74 the artillery 
was changed, and the previous mixed armament to a great degree 
replaced by muzzle-loading Woolwich guns of heavy calibre, adapted 
for firing the conical Palliser shot, with points of chilled iron. The 
visitor is not permitted to enter the fort, but is allowed to walk outside 
the circuit of the ramparts, and this elevated station affords a Itroad 
view on cither side. Perhaps the best prospect is that from the south- 
east bastion, overlooking the crowded city on the slopes below ; the 
narrow harbor with its shipping; Dartmouth, sweeping up toward 
Bedford Basin ; Fort Clarence, below Dartmouth, with its dark case- 
mates ; Macnab's Island, crowned with batteries and shutting in the 
Eastern Pas.sage ; the outer harbor, with its fortified points; and the 
ocean beyond. 

Near the portal of the citadel is an outer battery of anti(juated 
guns; at the south end of the glacis are the extensive barracks of the 
Royal Artillery; at the north end the Pavillion Barracks — quarters for 
married men. 






(;:i 



lie had 
rs that 
IsUintl. 
laitello 
levateil 

lich the 
ickville 
s of the 
of late 
'orks at 
I, which 
ii'e com- 
VHctoria, 
inph)yeil 
;iiquereil 
2(juently 
en made 
hoh.l lias 
oat, over 
masonry 
s within 
artillery 
t degree 
adapted 
)n. The 
,v outside 
a In'oad 
e south- 
o\v ; the 
toward 
k case- 
in the 
land the 

Iticjuated 
Is of the 
Irters for 



I^HK. 



INTERGOLOmAL RAILWAY 



THE FAVORITE # FASHIONABLE ROUTE 



-^'OiS- 



CaiKi(li;ui and liiiited States Siiiiiiiicr Travel, 



a.:ltx)- 



^-DIRECT ROUTED 

To the famous seaside and fishing resorts of the Lower 
St. Lawrence and Baie des Chaleurs, and of New 
Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Cape 
Bretrn and the Magdalen Islands. 



NEW iV ELEGANT BUFFET PARLOR SLEEPING CARS 

Run on Thfough Express Trains. 



ROUND TRIP TOURFST AND SU^rMER ?:XCUR8I()N TICKETS 
issued l)(!t\voeu 1st June and 30th iScpteinber, and good for return up 
to olst Oct. Saturday Excursion Tickets issued at Sin<,de First-Class Fare, 
j^ood going l)y any passenger train of Saturday, and for return by day or 
night passenger trains of Monday. Thirty day return tickets issuetl at one 
and a half s-ngle fare, also .")00 and 1000 mile tickets can be procured at 
Agencies and principal Stations of this Railway. 



Illustrated Giikic Books to the Intercolonial Railway, 

with Maps, Hotel Lists, etc., also Time Tables, showing Rail and Steamboat 
Connections, can be had on application to City Agents, or to 



A. BUSBY, 

(Jeueral Passenger Agent, 



D. POTTINCER, 

Chief Superintendent. 



I 



M:jsi^^iiiismaf3if: 



., I 



!l 



r 



C4 

York Redoubt, which is also a si^mal station for shipping,', is a 
powerful fort on the top of a higli hhitt" and crosses its pkinging fire 
with that of a redoubt on Macnal/s Island. Forts Oyfilvie and Cam- 
bridge in Point Pleasant woods, the Point Battery, Fort Clarence on 
the Eastern Passage, and George's Island, which is one large fort, 
complete the sea fortitications ; while the citadel commands not only 
the harbor but the land side as well. 

In addition to this great array of forts bristling witli cannon and 
swarming with soldiers, a corps of submarine and Torpedo Engineers 
is maintained at Halifax. These men devote their whole time to sub- 
marine engineering. They have placed a number of mines and 
torpedoes along the bottom of the sea at the entrance to the harbor, 
and so ingeniously is everything arranged that without leaving their 
office they can tell the exact instant when a vessel is immediately over 
any one of these. All that then remains for them to do, is to touch a 
button, and the ship is reduced to splinters. 

Halifax harbor has always been a great naval station. It was 
hero that Loudon and Wolfe concentrated their mighty fleets and 
armies before advancing against Lou'sburg and Quebec. Halifax was 
made one of the chief stations wdience the Imperial forces were directed 
upon the insurgent American colonies. After the close of the 
Revolutionary War many thousands of exiled Loyalists took refuge 
here; and the wooden walls and towers with which the city had been 
fortified, were replaced by more formidable defences. 

A great part of the city area is owned and occupied by the 
military and naval authorities. Besides this a great deal owned by 
them is leased to the city for an indefinite number of years, at a 
nominal rental. The park for example is Imperial property rented to 
the city for one shilling. Once a year all roads leading into it are 
closed for twenty-four hours, to maintain the ownership, and prevent 
any possible claim to a right of w^ay. On the same day every year, 
all roads leading through the citadel are guarded, also parts of several 
streets, and no civilian is permitted to pass through them under any 
circumstances. Some of these government properties will be noticed 
later. 

Halifax city is governed by a Mayor and City Council, composed 
of eighteen aldermen, three from each of the six wards into which the 
city is divided. The Mayor is elected to serve for one year, and the 



1 



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ig fire 
Cam- 
nee on 
6 fort, 
)t only 

lon and 
<j;ineers 
to sul)- 
es and 
liarlior, 
2 their 
ily over 
touch a 

It was 

ets and 
[ax was 
tlirected 

of the 
: refuge 

(1 been 

hy the 
ned by 
[rs, at a 
mted to 
it are 
[prevent 
]y year, 
several 
ler any 
[noticed 

Imposed 
lich the 
ind the 



W. ®. <l'®#IEMlfcli 




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iiiimuss 





m, m BARRINGTON ST., - - - HALIFAX, N. S. 

CRAYONS, IHDIA INKS, Etc. 

M MADE IN THE LATEST STYLES AND SIZES. K 



PHOTOS can be Duplicated at any time. 

IXSPECTIOX INVITED. HOURS, pn) to 18.00. 

STUDIO OPPOSITE ST. PAULi'S CHUHCH. 








\ 




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on 

aldermen f(jr tliree years. The inaiiageinent of tlie water works, 
streets, internal health and city property is in the hands of the board 
of commissioners of city works, composed of six aldermen. The 
Public Gardens are mana<^ed by commissioners appointed by the Oity 
Council, six being aldermen and four private citizens. Point IMeasant 
Park is mana^jed by a commission of eleven members, of whom the 
Mayor is one, and six are aldermen. 

The Provincial Parliament meets in Halifax every winter, j;en- 
erally about February. It consists of the Lieutenant-Governor (salary 
SO.OOO), who is appointed by the Federal authorities, of a legislative 
council of eighteen members, and of a legislative assembly of thirty- 
eight members. The executive council is composed of three ministers, 
heads of departments, and of four members without portfolio. Halifax 
city and county returns three members to the legislative asseinl)ly, 
and is represented in the Federal Parliament l»y two members in the 
Senate and two in the House of (Commons. 

%t\! Streets anb ^"^alhs. 

An agreeable walk of a summer morning may be made by taking 
Sackviilc street, and turning by the right at the corner of Brunswick 
street, into the enclosure of the citadel, and along the track over the 
slopes of the glacis. At the summit near the saluting battery a fine 
view of Dartmouth, sister city to Halifax, is obtained. That town 
stands at a point of the eastern .shore of the harbor opposite the naval 
yard. The site was occupied as early as August, ^7.')0. The early 
settlement was overtaken by various misfortunes that tfcnded to retard 
its growth, but it at length struggled through all reverses to become 
at the present time an incorporated town enjoying great prosperity. 
Nestling by the lakes and hill sides partly sheltercMl by the yet 
primeval forest, it is faii* to look upon. To the right of the suburban 
picture rises IMount Hope, on whose green slopes, stooping to l)e 
touched by the tidal waters, stan<ls an imposing hospital dedicated to 
the insane of the Province. This grefit edifice and its surroundings 
will doubtless attract the stranger's eye and induce a visit. But of 
this institution we shall speak in another place. 

At this point an American visitor describes the .scene: "If you 
cast your eye over yonder magnificent hay, where ve.s.sels bearing flags 



I 

I 



ip 



^-en- 



G7 






MILLINERY, 



r -" "'*- 



Deslgr.era, Manufacturera and Impcrtera of 

Fine Millinery Goods. 



i 








f 

a 





\AT1 h°^'^ ©pccidl Jyuvers ii) lyeW^orl^ \jdj, ai^d iSzrjaoi'), Or)ejl<ar)d, 
WJ-jicr) places us ir) ct posiliar) fo give }r)C |^ula]lc il)c lafesl 
creafiorjs ir) ^illir)erv ©eaas ot ir)e Or)orlest ijofice. we carry a 
jull lir)e o[ /]'\illir)ery at all Ocasor)s, ar)a LSaaiGS car) a\ all lirr)es r)aA?e 
Iqc. r)eWest r)ovellics produced. We snail be pleased lo r)d\/e vou call 
af LSe jaor) iT)arcr)e v^rjer) in Jr)e ^i^^- Orders per rr)ail vS'ill rcceiiJe 
pren^pf alfei}tior). • • • ........ 



Ahvays sliouiii^ Ladles' niul Misses' Underwear and Kid Gloves, 

91 a 92 BARRINGTON ST.7- HflUFAX, N. 8. 



K 



i 



G8 



of all nations are at anchor, and let your vision sweep past and over 
the islands to the outlets beyond which the quiet ocean lies, you will 
see a picture of marvellous beauty. Behind us stretch large green 
plains dotted with cottages and l)Ounded with undulating hills, with 
now and then glimpses of blue water, and as we walk down from 
citadel hill we feel half reconciled to Halifax, its quaint, mouldy old 
gables, its soldiers and sailors, and all its little, odd, outlandish 
peculiarities." 

After viewing the fortilications of the Citadel, only from the 
outside however, for you will not be permitted to go within, the tourist 
should follow with the eye the approaches to Point Pleasant Park in 
the distance over land and water side, where the waves come rolling in 
from the Atlantic, to kiss the feet of the pleasant shore stooping low 
to meet them. Following the wood side to Tower Road, the view- 
takes in the gardens and green fields to the west, embracing a wide 
expanse, where picturesque suburban residences are scattered over 
many a chosen spot on the shores of this pleasant peninsula. After 
enjoying the telescopic view of the suburbs, the eye may take in the 
aspect of streets and squares immediately below and in front of the 
beholder from south Brurswick street to the harbor, which embraces 
the locality of the provincial ant' city buildings, police station, many 
of the banks and brokers offices, with the parade, markets, et?., extending 
along the harbor from Her Majesty's ordnance yard to the enclosure 
of Queen's wharf and fuel yard. Then following the course of south 
Brunswick street walking north, from the Royal Engineers' barrack 
gates, at the corner fronting on the citadel glacis is the Halifax County 
Academy. The corner stone of this building was laid on the 17th of 
July, LS78, with Masonic honors. It was Iniilt by direction, of the 
Board of Commissioners in charge of schools, and is well situated from 
a sanitary point of view. The extension of Brunswick street stnith- 
ward through the Imperial barrack ground to Spring Garden road 
will, when accomplished, add to the value of the site and facilitate the 
approach to it from the south by students ami tlie public. The 
exterior of the building is of pressed red brick, relieved with white 
and i)lack brick and granite dressings, having two stories ami a French 
roof. Originally erecteil to serve the purposes of a high school, it was 
a few years since changed into a county academy. Its Principal is A. 
H. Mackay, for many years the noted Principal of Pictoti Academy. 



^ 



C9 




FOYLE BREWERY. 



P. & d. O'MablilH 

Brewers, Maltsters and Bottlers, 

Sole Maiuitactiirers ot KRAIZER BEEIi, 



t: 9 BEERS manufactured by us were prcncunced 
by experts at the Colonial Exhibition, Lcndcn, Eng., 
"quite equal to cur own Bass." 






%^i 



-^ IMPORTERS, ^^^ 



MON"l"RnALA. 



Agents in the Dominion for 

I'KTKIt DOMKCQ. 

r. (i. SANDK.MAX & SON'S, 

CASTLKS & CO, 

<;. H. AIUMM&CO., 

LOUIS niJV'AU, 

.r. CALVKT ic CO., 

COSSAltT, GORDON & CO., 

I'INKT, CASTILLOX & CO.. 

M'CAS. F11P:I{ES & CO., 

II. DKVINK & CO., 

W. HAY FA I UMAX & CO, 

DUNVILLK & CO., 

A. C. A. NOLKT, 

.101 IN .lAMKSON' A .SOX, 

HA(iO'l'S. HIJTTC^' & CO., 

KHKDKUICIv H. (iODSKLL, 

11. <;. KKVVNKY A CO., 

1) .1. THOMSON A CO.. 

HOMKirr I'OltTKU & CO., 

MACHKX .t CO.. 

TIIK Al'OLLIXAHIS CO., |l,t.l.| 



Xcroa <le la Frontt-ra, Siii;iuui;s. 


Oporto, 




I'OKTS. 


'rarra^^uiu 


k, 


UFA) WlNK.S. 


lioiin.s. 




CllAMI'Ali.\l-:.S. 


Miinne-ef-Loirc, 


Di). 


Hordi'iiux, 




Cr.AUKTS, Sautkunes -It lUiuasDY 


Miideira, 




.MADKIltAS. 


CoKiuic, 




Hkandiks. 
Do. 
D<i. 


(Jlasifow, 




WlllSKIKS. 


Hclfiist. 




Do. 


Scliicdani 




CINS. 


Dublin, 




WlllSKIKS. 

Do. 


Lniidnn. 


OM) L( 


XDON DdCK .Jamaica I'r.MS. 


l,i\('rito()l. 


Old L( 


NDnN DdCK KlM, ill Case. 


Li'itli. 


(ilXOKI 


Wink, old Tom, ktc 


Ldiulnn. 


Kxport Hottcrsof Mass iV Co.'s .Me. 


Liverpool 


Exiinrt 


HoUlors of OiiiniicMsA Suns' Fonit^ii Stout 


Loii'lon, 


X.VTLKAL MiNKKM. W ATKK.S. 



UN 



70 



I I 



•Hv 



At the next corner is the public Dispensary. Tliis Charity began 
about tlie yt.'ar 1S32 umler the auspices of Dr. John Sterling, .senr.,an(l 
Dr. William Gregor. It had small beginnings, only occupying at first 
the ground floor of a small house on Granville street, in rear of the 
lot now occupied l»y the Club building, which fronts on Hollis street. 
The promoters were assisted in their philanthropic work by their 
several pupils of that day, who nuuibered among them Dr. George 
Snyder, afterwards of Shelburne, and Drs. Thomas and George 
Stirling, junr. T!ie grat.'itous advice and attendance of these gentle- 
men on the sick poor liad tor many years only the nsward of grateful 
blessings of the patients, whose suff.irings ever met a willing hand 
with a gentle word to help them. On the tloath or removal of these 
the charity was in some measure kept up by other practitioners and 
theii- medical students, but without any recorded organization till the 
year 1>S.')7, when a scon; or two of subscriliers agreed to contribute an- 
nually towanls its sup[)ort, a committee of management lieing chosen 
from those who contriltuted 84- each to the funds, and the Rev. J. C. 
Cochrane presided at their meetings. The late Dr. F. Morris then 
assumed the charge, and the Institution was opened at his house in 
Argvle street, wliere he c(3ntinued to <;ive his careful and laborious 
attention to the duties uj) to the year of his death, wdiich occurred in 
liSOS. The committee of management hold their monthly meetings at 
the Dispensary rooms, and ])ublished a report of operations annually. 
An eHbrt was thereafter made to provide .suitable premises, v.duch re- 
sidtcd in the erection of the present Dispensary and Morgue on South 
Bruswick street, by funds derived from various bf([uests and a grant 
from the civic treasuiv. The inanaciement is now in the hands of a 
president (\V. C. Silver, Esq.), two vice-presidents (His Worship the 
Mayor, und H. II. Fuller, Esq.), a boanl of directois, a secretary and 
treasnrer. There are in attendance on the Dispensary fourteen phy- 
sicians, all of them willing workers in the cause of true beneficence. 
An idea of the; woi k done by tins splendid institution is afforded by a 
glance at the report of ;lie medical staff' for the last year (bSSD): 
Medical dej)artiuent ... - 2,14.'} consultations. 
Surgical .... s^j " 

Woiui'ii and children . - - - 1,7.S1 " 

Eye and ear . . . . (;;}o 

Dartmoutli . . . . . is.") <• 



J 



71 



^^^ 
^ 






ESTABLISHED 1559. 



c 







ip 



ManufaGtuFing Chemists. 






• !•! • 



140«T\\ E\i\) GRI^HMWiUE STREET, 



HALIFAX, N. 



AGENTS FOR THE 






1?! 



I 



Ill 



it i i 



1,5G5 


visits 


1,097 


it 


1,243 


<( 


1,081 


(t 


479 


<( 


955 


(C 


275 




715 




11,943 


fC 



72 

North district, No. 1 - - - 

No. 2 - 
Central " ..... 
South " .... 
Dartmouth .... 
Dental .... 
Charity p- scriptions 
Dartmouth "... 
City 

Total ----- 12,095 
Patients 4,7Sl 

The Temperance Keforui Club huiklini^ now occupied by the 
Salvation Army, stands at the o])posite corner on Prince street, facing 
South Brunswick street. It was originally the Waterloo Tavern. It 
contains a hall for 58 feet lonjj and 38 feet wide with a liei<,dit of 
.10 feet. At the next corner is the Central Fire Alarm and Engine 
House, ]iead(|uarters of that indispensible organization, the Fire 
Brigade. The firemen are all volunteers and receive no salary from 
the city for their willing services. Hard by is Taylor's shoe fac- 
tory, alike useful and ornamental. Next comes the commodious 
Mission-house, erected by the late Edward Jost for the benefit of the 
poor of that vicinity. The next church we meet is the Garrison Chapel, 
erected for the convenience of tlie military. Thither every Sunday 
morning the soldiers march from the different Barracks accompanied 
by the full military brass band. The service of song in the church is 
also led by the band, except on special occasions however, the organ 
alone is used at the evening service. 

Passing on, we come the Church of the Redeemer, (Universalist,) 
on the West side, and immediately following, Brunswick street Girls* 
School. The old wooden building now in use, is to be replaced by a 
commodious brick structure, fitted with every modern convenience. 
Next at the corner of Cornwallis street stands St. George's Church. 
The parish Church of St. George, commonly known as the Round 
Church, to which the small church of 17(U contributed to form a 
congregation, was erected in tlie year 1800 on the West side of 
Brunswick ^t., one of the finest streets of the city, wheie it is crossed 
by Cornwallis street. The materials of construction are wood. There 



7:^ 



PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND RAILffAl. 






e<l 

is 



Siiitimer Tourist Travef^ 

TOURISTS fiiiil Visitors to tin' Maritiiiii' I'loviiii-es sliouM iiidii l'" in tlii'ir trip 
PRINCE KDWARD ISLAND, the "Garden of the Gulf." All th-; l.iuititul s.-a- 
siilc ami fisliiiii,' resorts of the Island are readied hy this Railway. 



ROUND TRIP 

reaRisr & summer ExeaRsiON tickets 

Issued duiiiij,' the mouths of June, July, August, and S.']itenil)er, good to 
return lip to Oetolier -'Wth. 

SATURDAY EXCURSION TICKETS 

Will he issued on and after .luni' l.')th, to j)rin(i|ul stations at siiii;li! first- 
(dass fare, gootl goins; liy any jiassenger train of Saturday, and for return l>y 
pissenger trains of Mou'lay. 

I^Iileag'e Ticket Books, good for ."iOO miles, can ho procured at -ininipa! 
Stations at a low rate. por jime Tables, Folders, etc., apply to all Ticket Agents. 

Charlottctown. I\ E. I. J. UNSWORTH, Superintendent. 



IIITERIIIITIOIIIIL STEIMSHIP COMPiillT 



— Ill r*E OF 



Side-Wfteer 




Steamers 



^i*. BETTT^TEEiT -jt- 



NOVA SaOTIA & BOSTON, 



VIA 



Intercolonial Ry. or Windsor & Annapolis Ry. 

TIMI-: TAHLE.— Steamers leive St. John, N. 1!., Mondays. We.lii.'sdavs and 
Friilays, 7.21 a. m.. and Annapolis Tuesdays ami Fridays, after arrival of Ilalifix Kxpress 

tfafFor Tirkets ainl any further iiiforination apply to your nearest Ticki't Agent. 

E. A. WALDRON, Gen. Agent, 

BOSTON, Mass. 



74 



is a tradition accountiiif^ for its shape, viz., that tho Duke of Kent,, 
father of our gracious Queen, then at Halifax, liatl a fancy for round 
buildings. His music-hall west of Bedford Basin, a relic, still left of 
the olden time, is round, and the Garrison Library, built under his 
auspices, was of horse-shoe form. He may have had in mind the forni 
of one of the three round churches in England, one of which is at 
Langham Place in Lomlon. Another tradition suggests that, as the 
Devil lurks in corners, the old Germans, who largely assisted to build 
the church, resolved to give the "old l)oy " no hiding place, made their 
sanctuary round — having no corners. The shape of the l)uilding, at 
first sight so unusual and striking, is said to have drawn from a sailor 
to his comrade in passing it the ipjaint exclamation, — " See Jack I here's 
a church built by a cooper — round as a barrel I " Notwithstanding this 
peculiarity, however, the church is very commodious and presents a 
neat appearance, 

The foundation stone was laid by Governor Wentworth, April 
10th, 1800, during tho incuird)ency of Rev. G. Wright, who held the- 
living until LS17. The cost of erection was defrayed by collections in 
the congregation, assisted l)y a gift of £200 .sterling from George III. 
On the death of Mr. Wright the Rev. B. Gerrish Gray was appointed 
rector, and held the living for eight years, when he removetl to St. 
John, N. B., 1825, and was succeeded by Rev. R. F. Uniacke, who. 
continued in othce until his death, June, 1870. During his incum- 
bency the church was consecrated by Bishop Inglis, Dec. 23rd, 1827. 
On the death of his uncle, Rev. J, B. Uniacke was chosen to till 
the vacancy. In 1827 the chancel was added to tlie church, which 
is surrounded by elm trees and a grass lawn, with the rectory and 
garden in its immediate vicinity. This church, on account of its 
shape, possesses superior advantages for decorative purposes. Still 
farther North is St. Patrick's Girls' School erected Ity the city for the 
acconnnodation of the girls of that part of the city. It is a new and 
beautiful brick structure. Almost opposite the school is St. Patrick's. 
R. C Church. This church lias a very interesting histor\'. It was 
built by a Methodist lay preacher, a Mr. Jackson, and used by him as. 
a place of worship. It was was afterwards rented by the British 
Government and used as a military chapel, and finally it fell into the 
hands of the Roman Cotholics, who conducted services there for many 
years. Finding the old church unsuited to their needs, they tore it 



IlIIl- 
i27. 
till 
ich 
and 
its 
till 
the 
canil 
ck's. 
was 
as 
tish 
the 




RreerQasorjs • pall, • palijax. 



S-'sfel 




70 

down, and erected in its place a splendid brick ami stone edifice, 
adapted to the requirements of a large congrejjation. 

Proceeding still further along till we reach Gerrish street, the 
visitor's attention is attracted to a little building, evidently a church, 
and undoul»tedly very old. The very sight of this little building ex- 
cites the interest of the anti([uarian. This building is the Old Dutch 
Church. The following description of the church was written some 
years ago : "The smallest of existing churches is perhaps the plain 
square building, commonly known as the Dutch Church, erected in the 
year 1755 by funds arising in part from private subscription, and sup- 
plemented b}' a grant of about £47 by the Executive Council of 
Government. It was first used as a school house. In 17G0 a steeple 
was added, suruiounted by a weather-cock, from which circumstance 
arose the term "chicken-cock church," jocularly applied to it. In 17GI, 
the date it IJears, the house was consecrated as a church by the Rev. 
Dr. Braynton, rector of St. Paul's, and the name St. George's given, but 
this name was subsequently taken for the parish church erected in 
1811, winch is also knowii ^s the Round Church in the parish of St- 
George. The small church was intended for the use of the Lutheran 
con<Tregatior. that came to Halifax in 1751-2, at the suggestion of Kinj; 
George II. The majority of the German settlers, however, after three 
or four years' delay, had embarked for Merliguesh harbor, and there 
founded tlie now thriving town of Lunenburg:. Those who remained 
occupied lots in the northern section of Halifax, the streets of which 
bear the names of Gottingen and Brunswick, and the settlement was 
■commonly known as Dutch-town. The grounds beside the church 
were used as a cemetery, and headstones yet remain of dates anterior 
to that of the church, bearinj; the names of earlv German settlers. 
Near by was a block-house for defence, the site of which tradition 
assigns to ground designed for a parsonage. Bernard Honzeal, one of 
the Loyalists of Now York, was the officiating missionary, who died in 
the year 1800. Finally, after the death of two successors the congrega- 
tion mt.TUfd into that of St. Georfje's and the old church reverted to its 
original character, and is now used for school purposes, being still kept 
in good repair at thu ag(i of one hundred and twenty odd 3'ears. The 
([uaint old building enables the weatherwise, as of old, to divine the 
changes by the movements of the weather-cock perched on its steeple, 
although the liarometer and storm drum are more influential in 



10 edifice, 

treet, the 
I church, 
• ling ex- 
(.1 Dutch 
ten some 
he plain 
ed in the 
and sup- 
)uncil of 
L steeple 
mstance 
In 17G1, 
he Rev. 
ven, but 
acted in 
1 of St. 
utheran 
of Kinfr 
2r three 
d there 
mained 
I which 
int was 
church 
-nterior 
iettlers. 
adition 
one of 
died in 
i'^rega- 
i to its 

11 kept 

The 
ne the 
teeple, 
iai in 





RGANS. 



.FINEST STOCK .(,\' t;,\XAJ)i^ 

••"uu- ui f „ „ „ . I. „ „ ,f „ .fu ^TssssaEaag 



Sole Afroncy for flio (Jroat Hoirses of 



Qhickering 4 Sons, Wm. Knabe 4 e©.. 

W. Bell 4 G0. 

a REWeOMBE 4 Go., mAS0N 4 RISCH. 

B0MINI0N 0RGAN 4 PlAN0 60. 




SH OR ElASY ^^KRMS. 
DON'T FAIL TO (ALL AND INSPECT. 



^^9 






*lp 



121 and 123 HOUHIS STI^EET; 
A fen- doors NoHli of Halifax Hotel, 



I. 



HALIFAX, N. S. 



78 



iiiouMiiiLj tlif iModerii woatlioi- ^'uai;o. " Tliu lost of Iji'un.swick struct 
is occnpicMl hy private rcsideiicfs, many of which are elegant in 
appearance and substantial in structure. At North st^reet turninj,' 
down we conic to the Intercolonial Railway Station, or turning up the 
hill and keeping persistently to the same road, we shall reach the 
North West Arm at its head. 



UMcneant Street. 

Four streets to the east of IJrunswick is Pleasant street, which is 
the longest in the city. Under the four names, Pleasant, Barrington, 
Lockman streets and Campbell Road, it extends from the southern to 
the northern e.Ktremity of the city. Proceeding along this street in a 
northerly direction, a jfoodly number of handsome houses appear on 
the right. When we reach Tobin Street, the sight of St. Andrew's 
Church, almost at the corner of Pleasant street, attracts our attention. 
This is a handsome structure of peculiar architectural character — the 
light tracery of the early English style, combined with the heavier 
Gothic imparting a most pleasing effect. The exterior is striking — the 
tapering spire, 150 feet high, l)eing a prominent object on entering the 
harbor. The belfry contains one of the heaviest and most sonorous 
church-bells in the city. Tlie interior, designed by the well known 
Buscho (almost a copy of the lower Kirche, Antwerp), is chase and 
elegant. The stained windows, lofty oak-panneled roof, handsome choir 
screen, and gallery with decorated wdieel-window and the richly-carved 
walnut pulpit, said to be the finest piece of carved church- work in the 
Lower Provinces, altogether produce a charming picture, and make the 
church well worth the inspection of visitors. It may be worthy of 
remark that St. Andrew's is out of debt, its congregation having 
entered in it 1870, entirely free from that objectionable appendage. 
The present congregation are the successors of the old Relief Church 
of LS18, originally members of Mather's Presbyterian Church, who 
separated in that year and built the first St. Andrew's church, insep- 
arably connected with the memory of the Rev. John Martin, who in 
his day was one of the most widely known Presbyterian clergymen on 
this continent, and for forty years filled its pulpit. Proceeding north 
along Pleasant street, we come upon Girton House, a Young Ladies' 
Private Seminary ; and immediately above it is the Presbyterian 



7!) 



street 
nt in 
iriiing 
ip the 
li tlio 



liich is 
ington, 
lorn to 
et in a 
iear on 
idrew's 
ention. 
iv — the 
heavier 
irr — the 
ing the 
)norous 
known 
se ami 
c choir 
carved 
in the 
ke the 
thy of 
[having 
nidage. 
'hurch 
li, who 
I, insep- 
Iwho in 
bien on 
north 
[Ladies' 
lyterian 



MONaa^ON, N. B. 

A. C. JONES, - - - Proprietor. 



..'iitniUy iDcali'il, aiiil fh>>v to I'ost Ollice, Cuatani lloiisi', uti'. Kuci'iitly ('nl;irj,'eil 
ail I rt'litti'il. Hlfctrii' IJi'll.s ami all iiioili'iii onnvi'iiiciices, 

A N t3 



Free Hack in attendance to and from all Passenger Trains. 



'rEiu,2::rxioaiTS 3-ao. 



•^ 







ry^ 



cyo 



■"■"'■"""'•""" '•"■• PLA NTS & CU T FLOWERS. 

TorillS'l'S and Cilizcns Kt'nt'i'iiHy dosimus of rclk'f from tlie dust ai,d din of tlic City 
are invited to visit I ho grounds and inatce use of tlic Oljscrvator:.' wliifli being al)OUt one 
liuniired am! fifty feet above sea le\el, ensures a refreshingly eool hri'eze at the most sultry 
seasons, wliile tlie (iiiiet beauty of tlie seenc needs but to be seen to be ajipreeialed. 

House C'ahs i)ass X<irsery every few minutes. 






JAMES H. HARRIS, Manager. 



■f, '^Sm^ 



80 



Ladies' Collogc. This institution was estaUIishod in 1S,S7 bv Rev. 
Mr. Laing of St. Matthew's Cliurcli, who has now resiijnoil his pas- 
torate to assume full inanaujeinont of the institution The curriculum 
embraces various departments, OollcLfiate, Fine Art, ami a Conservatory 
of Music. The teachers number about twenty, and are for the most 
part university ^^raduates. The Principal of the Collone is Miss Leach, 
a graduate of WuUsley Seminary for ladies, and the Conscrvi^tory of 
Music is under the control of Prof. C. H, Porter, Herr KlingiMifuld, 
and ITcrr Docring, graduates of Leipsig, Germany. The attendance 
has been large from the 1)eginning, ranging from 200 to '500 students. 

North of Ladies' College is Waverly House. Nortl* of IMorris 
street and near Spring Garden road is the residence of the Lieutenant- 
Governor, generally called Government Hou.se. The first site of the 
Governor's residence was that on which the Province Baildinir now 
stands. The original of Government House was a primitive structure, 
built in 1749 of materials lirought from Boston. The rooms were 
occupied by the Governor early in October, and the first meeting of 
his Council was held there on the 14th of that month. The oblong 
table at which they were wont'to assemble has been preserved. The 
Council, consisting of six persons, was organized for civil government 
on the 14th of Jul}-, 1749, and their first house of meeting had for 
defence against all enemies two or or three cannon mounted on hoirs- 
heads filled with sand. On the removal of this "cottai^^c," a new 
'residence for the Governor was erected in 17.')S Ity Governor Lawrence, 
to which Lord Campbell added a ball room, and other additions were 
made by subsequent Governors, but all these were finally removed in 
1811 to make room for a freestone building. The site of the present 
Government House was occupied originally by a large wooden building 
as a dwelling for field officers and military purposes during the time of 
the American "revolution." In the year 1811 the structure referred 
to was removed to the head of Inglis street, and there occupied after- 
wards as a residence by the late Colonel Bazalgett, who in 18.52 
administered the government of Nova Scotia. On the vacated spot 
the corner-stone of the existing gubernatorial residence was laid. The 
house as then built stands three storeys high on the central east and 
west fronts, with wings north and south of two storeys, which extend 
many feet on either side beyond the west central front. The wing 
rooms have long been used as reception, levee, dining and ball rooms. 



81 



y Rev. 
iH pas- 
iculum 
'vatory 
e most 
Loach, 
tory of 

•nilaiicu 
lents. 

Morris 
itenant- 
I of the 
nil now 
ructure, 
ns wcro 
L'tiuL,' of 
) oblong 
h1. The 
ernmont 
had for 
)n ho^'s- 
a new 
awrcnce, 
Ills were 
lOved in 
present 
iuildin;i; 
time of 
referred 
ed after- 
in 18.V2 
ted spot 
id. The 
ast and 
'xtend 
he wing 
11 rooms, 



H alifax ^ team (} oiree and ^pice JJills. 



esrpABLISHED I8;^I. 



W. p. pGHWAl(TZ \ fm^, 

Importers and Grinders of 

CAREFULLY GROWN & SELECTED ! ABSOLUTELY PURE ! 

(irouiKl by ^nulual nMluttioii Avitliont Ijeut ! 

Sec that ♦* PIJ^IILESS •' iTratlc 3Iark reffistercd,) and the 
Siffiiatiire of W. H. Sclnvartz &, Sons is on every two and four 
ouiico packaffe. 



MQCfiu, j^\^ &, JAM mji, 

ROASTED OR GROUjYD FRESH TO ORDBU. 



MACHIIffSRY. 

Foreman has Thirty Years experience Roasting Coffee. 






STEAM MILLS AND FACTORY: 

54 to 58 Brunswick Street. 

STORE AND OFFICE: 

204 Water Street. 



( 




S2 

and here the h)\-al Governors of tlie Province have ])een pleased t(j call 
round them the elite of the Provincial societ}' of fair women and 
])rave men, whose galaxy of beauty and gallantrv contributed to make 
Halifax a centre of attraction for the naval and military services. 

Opposite Government House, on the west side of the street, stands 
St. Paul's cemetery, elsewhere noticed. Overlooking these grounds is 
St. Matthew's Church — originallv Mather's Church. It is ranked 
among the finest ecclesiastical buildiuL^s of the citv. It is situated on 
Pleasant Street, having Government H-.ase on the south, with the 
Academy of Music on the north. This elegant structin-e stands on a 
lot which was formerly a part of the garden of the late Attorney- 
General UnLicke. It is the principal church belonging to the Pres- 
byterian body in Halifax. The front of the building is of freestone, 
with sides of brick covered by mastic in imitation of stono. The 
church possesses considerable architectural iicauty, is about ninety feet 
in length by sixty feet in 1 tread tli, and can accommodate nearly a 
thou.sand sitters. The main entrance is surmounted by a massive 
square turret, with elegant pinnacles, from the centre of which springs 
a spire rising upwards of one liundred feet from the base of the churcii. 
The windows are semi-Gothic in style, in excelleni keeping with the 
rest of the building. The pews in ihe area of the church are richly 
cushioned. The pulpit, which •> of the old Scotch, rather than the 
modern American, pattern, is a work of art reflecting credit on the 
taste of the artist. luunedif ely behind the puljiit, on the eastern end, 
there is a rose window cf Iteautiful design and finish, admitting a " dim 
religious ligl^t." The total cost of this tine building, with the grounds, 
was about $11,250. The present church was erected in the year 1851), 
and is the successor of the old, historical St. Matthew's (so commonly 
called), which, with several otlier buildings, perished by tire on tne 1st 
of January, ]8.")7. This latter .'•tructure stood upon a lot granted in 
1749 by Lord Cornwalli.s, which is now occupied by the extensive ware- 
houses of Messrs. Doull an.d Miller, corner of Hollis and Prince Streets. 
St. Matthew's, therefore, in age. is coeval with the city itself. It was 
at first a Con<'reo:itional bodv. but very soon connected itself with that 
section of Presbvt jrians belonjjiiig to the Church of Scotland, and with 
•wiiich it remained associated till the late union. Founded about ]7')(>, 
St. Matthew's has had during that long period only eight clergymen. 
The Rev. Thomas Russell, the father of a well-known Halifax mer- 




SBSMSSSSfSK-" 



I— 



83 



M 



-i THE JRMy » m\ BREWERY. 






<^*<~ 



^'v.-^x x^ \^ 



S . 0\l^H\i , sous 5 CO . 

^:lc B IS B "\77" E 12 S , :|hs- 



And also Bottlers of 



XX, XXX INDIA PALE and FAMILY ALES, 

ENGLISH TABLE BEER IN CASKS ..ND BOTTLED. 

HALiIFAX, N. S. 

Works : TURTLE GROVE, Dartmoutli. Office : 243 HOLLIS ST. 
Branch: 12 Nelson St., ST. JOHN, N. B. 



m 



HE 




H 



-.\ 




V 



rv\ 



■A 



H 



BEDFORD, N. S. 



The leading Summer Resort of 
the ProYinoe. 10 miles from Halifs.:' 
en the beautiful shore of Bedford 
Basin. Boats. Flcating Bath House. 
Tennis. Quoits and Bowling Alley. 
Excellent Cuisine. 10 Trains daily 
to and from the City. 




J. C. mOHRlSON, Ppoppietor. 



84 

chant, G. N. Russell, who died some 25 yccars aj,ai, was the first Church 
of Scotland minister of St. Matthew's. He resigned in 17S0, and was 
succeeded by Dr. Andrew Brown, who afterwai'ds became a professor 
in Edinburgh University. Next came Rev. Dr. Gray, who died in 1S20. 
The Rev. R. Knox was appointed ]3r. Gray's successor, but was in 1S23 
called to Scotland, and there killed by a fall frotn his horse. The Rev. 
E. Rennie succeeded Knox, but was not confirmed in the appointment. 
Then came the Rev. John Scott, who occupied the pulpit for the long 
period of 3G years. He was succeeded in 1803 by the Rev. G. M. Grant, 
i.ow Principal of Queen's College, Kingston, Ont. Principal Grant was 
followed by the Rev. Robert Laing, who has but lately resigned, so 
that the congregation is at present without a pastor. 

Next north of St Matthew's church is the Military Brigade Office, 
and farther north the Academy of Music, a beautiful building, splen- 
didly designed, and capable of seating fifteen hundred people. Opposite 
the Academy is St. Mary's Cathedral (Roman Catholic), a handsome 
stone edifice, with granite facade and spire, in which is hung a peal of 
bells which chime on Sundays. The plain wooden building at tlie 
corner of the street is the Glebe House, the ofiicial residence of the 
Roman Catholic Archl ishop of Halifax. We next pass on the east 
side, the first Masonic , iall, built eighty-six years ago, and now relegated 
to the level of a .storing ])lace for various commodities. Proceeding on 
we pass the City Club, handsomely fitted up. Farther on wo pass a 
brick building in process of erection, to be devoted to the use of Saint 
Mary's Young Men's Total Abstinence and Benevolent Society. Two 
doors north is the Church of Englaml Institute, recently opened as a 
resort for the young men of our city. Between Sackville and Prince 
streets we pass the Union Fire Protection Company's Hall on the 
v^est, and Gordon and Keith's establishment on the east. St. 
Paul's Church faces on the Grand Parade, from which in former 
days a salute of one hundred guns was fired annually on the anniver- 
sary of the settlement of the city. On the northern en<l of the Parade 
stood Dalhousie College, now replaced by the City Hall, which was 
formally opened by an "at home" in the Vujilding on the 22nd of May. 
LS9(). A desciiption of this splendid structure is given on another 
page. The street has already changed its name from Pleasant to 
Barrington street. This it does at the intersection of Spring Garden 
Road. Tlie name aunin chani^es at Jacob street, from Barrington to 
Lockman street. 



MHA'iMi'i'Tiii V fl^ 



j:n 



85 



fA 





^*^J 




I 




HATS 



# ANB # 



r^Rs. 




3Finik§ at Factor\^ PfIccs. 

Ar^ made to Order. 






C. S. LANE 

113 Graiiville StreetJIalitax, N. S. 

(Late Anderson & Billing-V, Building-.) 



i 



f 



80 

1boUi5 Street. 

Mollis and Granvillu Streets are the two princii)al thoroughfares, 
on which the best stores may he found. Mollis starts from South 
Street, and at the junction of the two is the Royal Engineer Yard, 
familiarly known as the Lumber Yard. The officers of the Com- 
mandant of the Corps are situated here, together with store and boat- 
houses, workshops, (quarters for sergeants, etc. It is connected by an 
electric cable with George's Island, which lies in front of it, in mid 
harbor. It is also the station of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht 
Squadron, all yacht races starting from and finishing here. 

Immediately to the south, and bounded by the Yard, are the Gas 
Works which supply Halifax. Proceeding along Mollis, Morris Street 
is crossed ; and after passing a block, the tourist has on his left hand 
Government House and grounds, the residence of the Lieutenant- 
Governor. In the next block, on the east side, is the 



'^ 



alifar 



3^ 



otel, 



for a description of whicli see a previous page. \V. H. Johnson's organ 
and piano forte .show rooms are now passed. 

At the corner of Prince Street is the Queen Building, which was 
burned down in 1S8L Opposite this edifice is the 

IPyovincial iparliameut JBuilMnG, 

l)uilt of brown freestone. Representative government was first estab- 
lished in Nova Scotia in 17-')>S, but the representatives were without n 
suitahle place in which to hold their meetings up to the year 1820. In 
1811 it was resolved to erect the present building, the corner stone of 
which was laid on the 12th day of August of that year, and in the 
summer of 1819 the work was completed. The length of the building 
is 140 feet, width 70 feet, and height of east front 42 feet. The entire 
cost was £o2,8G0 7s. old Nova Scotia currency, or about 8200,400. Up to 
1830 this was said to be the finest building in North America, but it 
has since been outstripped by the splendid architecture of jther cities 
both in the Dominion and the United States. Over the Mollis Street 
entrance is a convenient library, well stocked with works on law, 
historv and sciLiice. On the walls of the elective chamber arc life- 



4 
I 



87 



ighfares, 
11 South 
3r Yard, 
10 Coni- 
nd boat- 
d by ail 
in mid 
I Yacht 

the Gas 
is Street 
ift hand 
Litenant- 



i s organ 



ich wa>i 



it estab- 
ithout a 
;20. In 
itone of 
I in the 
ijuildinn; 
e entire 
Up to 
, but it 
er cities 
3 Street 
on law, 
ire life- 




FILACE BOOT AND SHOE STORE. 



'■ — J* Dealers In -*!-^ 



hgM\, Aiiicrican, Canadian & llonic-Madc 



OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

HALIFAX, nr. s. 



s*s, 



W00LN0UGH'S 



Restaurant, 



ESTABLISHED ^1865. 



Jf SALTER STREET. 

ePPeSlTE MASONIC HALL. 






r 











fi 



8.S 



size portraits of pulitical loaders of tiie past decade, viz. : Hon. J. W. 
Jolinston and Hon. Joseph Howe, long time rivals, but finally united 
by harmony of views on the l»road policy of confederation. In the 
Council Chamber arc full-length portaits of several kings and queens 
of Great Britain, those in position near the dai'i being much admireil 
for the possession of unusual merit. Here may also be seen portrayed 
the principal judicial celebrities of the Province who have passed 
away, witli^iiTova Scotia s military heroe.s, Inglis, of Lucknow, and 



oFK 



Williams, or Kars, 

^ Nearly opposite ^e Prcjvincial Builiiing stands tlu; 

iDominion BnilMiujit 

which is doubtless the finest public building in the Lower Provinces 
It is the property of the Dominion Government, and principally oc- 
ci||^d as a Custom House and Post Ottice. It stands in a ccjnvenient 
and commanding position near the harbor, and has a frontage on four 
streets, viz., Duke, HoUis, Cheapside and Bedford Row. The building 
is 120 feet in length and 5.5 feet in width, with a projecting portico on 
*the south front of oO by 5 feet. It is four stories high with pitch 
roof, and a cupola rising out of the centre of the roof to a height of 
about 100 feet. Except the basement, which is of fine cut granite, the 
building is of freestone. The st3de of architecture is Italian renais- 
sance, and with its elaborate carving is proliably the most profusely 
decorated buililinn' in the citv. The south pisdiment is surmounted by 
a statue of Britannia, 12 feet in height. The western half of the 
building on the three first stories is occupied by the PostOlKce depart- 
ment, and the eastern half 1)y the Customs, the Inland Revenue and 
Finance Offices. On the upper storey are the offices of the Marine and 
Fisheries, and some minor offices connected with the Customs. A large 
room on the south front of this st<jrey is occupieil as a Museum. 

Z\K iprovincial flDuiJcuni. 

is an nistitution wliich belongs to, and is kept up li\', the Local Gov- 
ernment of tlie Province. It is well wo^;thy of a visit. The collec- 
tions in it are extensive and well arranged, being classified under the 
heads : Mineralogy (Scientific and Econoniic), Geology, Zoology, FBotany, 
Ethnology, and Miscellaneous. The entpiirer after any department of 





so 



large 



Gov- 
2ol!ec- 
?r the 
btanv, 
nit of 






MONTRElAn. 




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Ul\ upw'ards ©{ Jr)ir)}y--[i^c vears, !r)z r)arr)e oj Iqk G)f. liaw- 
Fer)cc [Jail qas beer) jarrjiliar lo all Iravcllcrs or) irjis 



tior)Iii)cr)t. Yv*^ |iofcl is cor)ver)ier)Ily siluofed oq ©{ Jarnzs 
Ofreaf, ir) lf)a r)eart o[ Ir)2 kusir^zss C2r)trc of ^eir)fp£al, ar)d is 
cor)liquous lo Jr)G 0£r)epal jjosf (J[{icc, ar)a olr)er irr)popIctr)t J^udIic 
jauilair)qs, If is r)ar)asorr)elv cIccorafGa. luxuriously lurr)isr)eo!, 
liqr)fea by tlje eleclnc liqn^' °0^ [iffed vv'itr) a r§asser)qei* I^levafer. 
lb® ]uuilair)q, v5r)icr) f)as rccer)ily Bzer) exfer)aea, c6r)fair)S 5§0 
l'\oorr)s, ar)(a r)as ar) clGqanf t,cW ]Jrawir)q iSjoon), qxtjo. riar)asorr)ely 
Fe~aecBraIca aijd cr)larq«ci JJir)ir)q pall. 



J1)G JfoUl is njariaejeJ lay MR, SAMUEL MONTGOMERY ui)deP 
ll)£ pGrsor)al supcr^isior) o| Iqz propricfoB, MR. HENRY HO>c»AN, 




:ijiffiiii<^5y!i!»yy-'vav ^ !-.,^wJaay^J 





90 

the mineral resources of the Province will obtain information which 
he cannot otherwise reailily secure. The naturalist will see choice 
collections in the various branches of Natural History specially Pro- 
vincial. The ethnolo<'ist will find much that is interestini; in the 
department of Ethnolo<,'y ; and visitors generally cannot fail to become 
wiser by spending half an hour in this part of the building. The 
Museum is open daily. Opposite the entrance is a gilt pyramid which 
represents the amount of gold produced in the Province Ix'tween 1S(;2 
and 1.S70— ') tons, H cwt., valued at S*i;i73,4.31. 

Further north on Hollis street are the banking h(3iises of the 
Merchants, the Nova Scotia, and British North America banking 
companies. At the Ordnance gate a glance may be taken at the varied 
contents of the .square, the more striking among them being the cannon 
balls and shells with their companion implements of warfare, the 
whole being overlooked by a guard-house with a sentry on duty. 
Turning here into 

iBranvillc Street, 

which runs parallel with Hollis street, an<l going southward we pass 
the shops of various merchandise, admittedly the finest of their kind 
in the city. Passing the Provincial Building by the west front, we 
observe the Y. M. C. A. building, of six stories, reaching 105 feet from 
the street level to the top. It is built of brick with granite facings, in 
the free Gothic style. The Y. M. C. A. of Halifax is one of the very 
earliest established on the American continent ; it was founded in 18.')8. 
Further south is 

©rpheui? Iball, 

formerly the First Baptist Church. This building is justly famed, for 
it is unequalled in this respect by any other concert hall in the Dominion 
of Canada, and excelled by none on the continent of America. It is to 
be re-seated and re-furnished this summer (1890) and will then be a 
building of which Halifax can justly feel proud, as she has long been 
proud, and rightly so, of the Orpiieus Club, a band of amateur musicians 
whose superior is not to be found in Canada. At the corner where 
Granville touches Salter Street, stands 






..>.;-■<. i-.^ '..■r'i:^i';^iXih>'Si'i-iij^<kii:^:tMj,ta:«uiuuviriii^^ M-.-.-^.^^i.^.Jii^^'j^^Si^^'StL. -I 



j** **- *^*^^i,M:^*^ix 



91 



mt, we 

from 

-s, in 

very 

I So.S. 



\, for 
iinion 
t is tO' 
1 be a 

been 
icians 

'liere 



WIHDSOR IHD IHHIIPOLiS RIILWIII. 

THE "LAND OF EVANGELINE" ROUTE. 

The Favorite Route between Nova Scotia and t!ie United States and Canada. 



T.RAVELLEllS and VISITORS to tlie Mauitimk 1'u(jvin-ci:s 
sliouM avail theuiselve.s of the special iiuhieenients oti'ered 
by this old established and p()])ulai" lionte. It is shorter 
than any other by cSO miles and is 

HNRIY^LIiED IjM immm 7IND YTH^IETY OF ^CEjVERY. 



The Railway traverses the fertile and ])ictures(jue \'alleys ui 
the Anxatolis and Couxwalus Rivers, the widely famed 
"GARDEN OF NOVA SCOTIA," and the romantic and celebrated 

LAND OF EVANGELINE 

immortalized in LoXGFELLOW's pathetic story. 

******** 

l)(j\vii the loiii; street sho jia.sscd witli lier fliajilet of heads and lier missal, 
Wearing,' her Nuriiiau cap, and her kirtle ol' bhie, and tlie eai-rings. 
Brought in tlie olden times from France. 

******** 

" Siin.shine of Saint Enlalio " was she called ; for that was the sunshine 
Whicli, as tlie fanners believed, would load their orchards with apples. 

******** 

This was the forest primeval ; but wlun.' arc the hearts that beneath it 

Leaped like the roe, when he hear.s in the woodland the voice of the liuntsman ' 



Close connection is made at Annapolis with the Internat- 
ional, Yarmouth and Bay of Fundy Steamship Company's to all 
points in the United States and Canada. At Middleton with the 
trains of the Nova Scotia Central Ry., for the South Coast, and 
at Windsor Junction and Halifax, wit,h Intercolonial and Canadian 
Pacific trains for all points west. 

Via the WINDSOR & AXXATOLIS ILAILWAV, at Boston and .Maine K. R. 
Otfioe at Boston ; at the Maine Central R. K. Oliicos at J'ortland, Danville June. 
Banf^or, &c ; on board the Steamers of the International and Bay of Fundy and Yar- 
mouth Steamship Co's ; at Reed's Wharf, St. ,Iohn, N. B. ; at North Street Depot, ami 
at 12t) lloliis Street, Halifax, op[)osit') the Halifax Hotel. 

For further information as to Fares, Routes, &c., apply to th.' Station Agents of 
the Company, oi to 

W. R. CAMPBELL, General Hianiiffcr A: Secrelary, KENTVILLE N. S. 
K. SUTKEULAXD, Resident 3Ianajror, KENTVILLE, >'. S. 
P. GIFKINS, Gen. Pass. Agent, KENTVILLE N. S. 



L I 



^ 



f)2 



^hc nDaoonic ZTcmplc. 

This is an iinpo.sinfj; edifice creilitalt'j to the craft. Its lofty dome 
forms a striking' feature in the perspective, lookin;^ from north (iran- 
ville Street, where the eye is tirst cauglit hy the circular turret of the 
Y. M, C. A. Hall, and then passes to the dome of this structure. The 
style of tiie Hall is Italian, with matisard oof. On the top of the 
dome rests a cupola, from whose apex rises a ,i,dl(led vane, having a great 
eye looking to the east. The material used is hrick covered with 
mastic, and the cost of erection was over S'30,000. 

Here turning east into Ilollis Street the pedestrian will find himself 
near the door of the HALIFAX HoTKL, doubtless with an appetite 
sharpened by the bracing air of our city. 

After a delicious dinner thoroughly satisfying his inner man, the 
tourist again sets out to view the city. He takes Bedford Row, the 
ne.xt street east of Hollis, and walks northward. This street is a short 
one, only extending from Sackville Street on the south to the Ordnance 
at the foot of Buckingham Street on the north. The United States 
Consulate is on this street, between Prince Street and the Post Office, 
as is also the German Imperial Consulate. The Military Connnissariat 
Department of H. M. Forces is also on this street, just bclov/ the Post 
Office. 

lllatcv Street. 

At tlie (Jrdnance Pjedford Row merges into Upper Water Street: 
but for the sake of b(;inLj svstematic, let us start from Lower Water 
Street, that is the southern part of Upper Water Streeet. Starting 
then from l''awson Street, its southern terminus, we shall proceed 
noitliward ,is heretofore. But you nnght first take a look in, by the 
way, at the Government Engineer's wharf and 3'ard, with its deserted 
(;ld earthworks of defence, now become grass-grown and the play 
ground of children. 

Water street, as its name implies, has its course from south to 
north along the harbor front; a few oljects deserve attention, such as 
the wliarf of the Canada Atlantic Steam.ship Company, admirably 
fitted up for the accommodation of freight and passengers. Adjoining 
the Queen's wharf on the north side is the fish market. This " is not 
an oiiiamental structure. Its traditional character as 'the finest fish- 



t| 



'^^?S^MM^^^Mi^mff^^i^uiii-:.,t,it'^&.i 



93 



)fty dome 
th (iran- 
•et of the 
ire. The 
'p of the 
ii; a great 
red with 

il himself 
appetite 

man, thu 
How, the 
s a short 
)r(lnance 
d States 
it Office, 
nissariat 
ihe Post 



ytret- 1 : 
' Water 
:>tartini:i: 
proceed 

by the 
]eserted 
lie play 

outh to 
such as 
iiiirably 
Ijoining 
" is not 
St fish- 



TEMPbE'S 



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* for Purify 
Strettgth, and deiiaacy of fiav. 
our. Sold in Half and Oite 
lead foil Packages / Three IL 
Serem Top Tina and Half 
eats. 




W. L. TEMPLE, 

HALIFAX, N. S. 

209 HOblilS STI^EET. 



83 BflRFJlflGTOiSl STREET. 



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23 WEST MAIN STREET 

WEBSTER, NY. 14580 

(716) 872-4503 



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94 

market in the world,' clearly proceeding from more essential claims. 
From an arched gateway on Water street you descend a gentle incline, 
and enter a large room with aisles running lengthways on either side 
of two rows of stalls floored with rough marble. The place is clean, 
but necessarily damp, and the chief attraction to visitors is at the 
busiest season, say towards the end of May. At that time especially 
you may see dozens of salmon of an average in weight of ten or 
fifteen pounds. Examine them • broad and round-backed, deep-sided, 
the lavender of the tins contrasted with the adjoining tint character- 
istic of the king of fishes. The price may be about fifteen cents per 
pound. The figures in Yarrel and Agassiz make the fish so long and 
slender as hardly to correspond with the Nova Scotian standard. The 
halibut is now rather out of season, but may be seen stretched out in 
his huge form and ungainly proportions. If not a judge of the fin- 
piece beware how you get a slice from a grey instead of a white fish. 
Of the haddock there is a show tempting to all fish-lovers, who hold 
that after the salmon and sea-trout it is of surpassing flavor. Slab 
after slab is laden with codfishes of all the shapes and colors denoting 
the varieties of their kind, and of all sizes from two pounds up to 
fifty. A local tradition tells of a monster that when cleaned and 
dried weighed 112 pounds! a quintal of itself — and a stone weighing 
5 lbs. was formerly shown, as taken from the stomach of another 
specimen. Tlie allied pollock and hake being in less repute for the 
table, are seldom met with, though sometimes plentiful. The cusk, of 
flavor known to few, and the whiting, called here the siiver-bake, is 
common. Spring mackerel usually approach the coast at this time, 
sometimes in great numbers. Thrown in heaps on the slabs rather 
than disposed with an eye to effect, their probable next neighbors are 
the lustrous herrings, and below, refractory lobsters under their cover- 
ing of wet seaweed. A peculiar custom of this market prescribes that 
none but marine captures shall bo vended within its walls. The fresh- 
water tribes and some marine, too, of lower dignity, as the lake trout, 
smelt, gaspereaux or alewife (a kind of herring), eels and clams have 
the privilege of the curb stone — where they ave not to be lightly inter- 
fered with, even by His Worship the Mayor. 

" Now take a look at the customers ! It is early morning. Con- 
spicuous in eager throng are the regimental mess-man, the smart gun- 
room st3ward from the Dockvard, and those of the different line 



or, 



claims, 
incline, 
her side 
is clean, 
? at the 
specially 
f ten or 
ep-sideu, 
uaracter- 
lents per 
ong and 
rd. The 
d out in 
the fin- 
hite fish, 
vho hohl 
or. Slab 
denoting 
ds up to 
ined and 
weighing 
another 
for the 
cusk, of 
r-hake, is 
this time, 
bs rather 
ibors are 
cir cover- 
fibes that 
'he fresh - 
ike trout, 
ims have 
tly inter- 



ns- 



Con- 
nart gun- 
jrent line 



A. HOBRECKER, 



-=3: 

• 






c«;> 







S'-s* The leading; branch of »^-^. 

HAVANA CIGARS, 

BOCK & CO., Paptag-as, Henry Clay, Salerosa, Manual Garcia, 

Commercial, &c., &c. 

MANILL A CI GARS. 

n^v^eersdiavLirL and. Briar l=ipes. 
Plain & Fancy Cigar and Cigarette Holders and Cases 

And all SMOKERS REQUISITES. 

HALIFAX, N. S., Canada. 



immM 



11 



11 



i^i 



1 




96 

steamers that happen to he in port, jostling, thoii<^ii in no rude fashion, 
with gentlenians' servants, tidv servinjj damsels from the V^oarding 
houses, the thrifty good-wife, basket on arm, to carry her own pur- 
chase, the lady of color from Preston, happy in having secured for 'a 
song' the large head of a cod or a halibut that at Billingsgate would 
be deemed a prize for an epicure. Few of the M^ealt.iier citizens attend 
the market regularly of late years. Men and manners are changed 
since the consumer trusted nobody but himself to decide on the fresh- 
ness of the gills and the elasticity of the tail. Th(;re are those still 
living who can call to mind when the Town-major, fiter guard-mount- 
ing, would ride to market in full uniform to purchase his own dinner. 
That the prices have risen latterly is undoubted. Some say that it is 
not that the fisherman asks more, but because his commodit}' pays a 
second profit on its way to the consumer. Of the bygone reign of 
cheapness some good stories are remembered. 

" Once an old fifrhtino: Governor w^as jj^iving; a dinner in Halifax, 
when expatiating on the cheapness of living, he said, ' Gentlemen, I 
have dined you all upon that cod's head and shoulders for a crown. 
The price would have been a guinea in London !' ' And I will dine 
Your Excellency on a better one than that foi a quarter !' (then a 
shilling sterling) bluntly replied a well-known resident from the foot 
of the table. The Governor, who always knew w^here he was, even 
when hurled from the star rampart into a ditch '.n India, said nothing 
— but was seen next morning at sunrise pricing every fish in the 
market, with his cane. On returning hoaie he immediiitsJy discharged 
his servant, the middle man. 

" A naval captain, new to the station, gave his steward a sovereign 
to buy lobsters for the cabin didner. The mari returned with a boat- 
load — conveyed in two or thi-ee wheelbarrows." 

Passing from the market wharf, on the left are the former offices 
of the City Board of Works and City Engineer, and facing the Green 
Market stands the building which a few wrecks ago contained the oftices 
of the Mayor, Civic Department and Police. The old City Court House 
stands facing the Market Square on Bedford Row. All these offices 
are now accommodated in the new City Hall, of which a short descrip- 
tion has already been given. The old City Court House has a history. 
A former writer thus speaks of it: — "On the site it now occupies 
stood formerly a wooden edifice, the 1)asement of which, early chroni- 







fashion, 
oartling 
^n par- 
ti f (jr ' a 
e would 
=i attend 
changed 
le fresh - 
Dse still 
-mount- 
\ dinner, 
hat it is 
' pays a 
reign of 

Halifax, 
lenien, I 
a crown, 
will dine 
' (then a 

the foot 
'as, even 

nothing 
in the 

^charged 

sovereign 
a boat- 
er otlices 
le Green 
le offices 
rt House 
se offices 
tdescrip- 
1 history, 
occupies 
y chroni- 






97 

clers inform us, was occupied as a market, while the second story was 
in part used as an exchange where the merchants and newsmongers of 
the day were wont to congregate, to make bargains, to learn of the 
latest intelligence from Europe, or to discuss the floating gossip of the 
tov.- 1 as occasion served. Halifax was then, as now, the point of the 
American continent nearest to Europe, but near as it was, it took the 
fleetest ships of the time — the sloops and frigates of the lloyal Navy, 
two, and in one case even three months to get across the Atlantic with 
the mails. The battle of Waterloo would have been foujjht and 
Napolean on his way to St. Helena, before the men of Halifax could 
be informed of his escape from Elba. The old wooden building, 
probably among the first fur public uses ever erected in the town, was 
taken down and i-eplaced by this structure, then known as the " Ex- 
change Coffee House," early in the present century. In the basement 
story are the police station and look-up ceils for unfortunates, either 
captured for riotous behavior or arrested on suspicion of crime. Here 
the " drunks," black, white and grey, tattered and often battered, are 
accommodated with lodging, and frequently also with board, at the 
public expense, until they can be ushered into the august presence of 
the Stipendiary Magistrate on the ground floor. " Six dollars or sixty 
days!" — words easily pronounced and but lightly regarded by the 
motley crowd, filling each morning the temple — presumably — of justice, 
but how suggestive arc those words to any thoughtful mind ! A 
Hogarth or a Dickens, might find apt employment for pencil or pen in 
many a morning sitting of the civic tribunal, that from the number of 
colored berry-picking patrons formerly frequenting it, has long been 
distinguished by the soubriquet — " the huckle-bcrry court." 

Going north from the Market Square, the junction of Lower with 
Upper Water street is marked by the wall of the Royal Ordnance 
Yard and buildings. Taking the course of these waterside streets we 
pass warehouses, provision and grocery stores in great variety until 
the Cunard wharves are reached. It was at the office of tlie Hon. 
Samuel Cunard that the project of an Atlantic Steamship line had its 
origin in 1840. Continuing the walk along Water Street, we meet 
nothing of unusual interest until we come to the Deep Water Terminus 
and Grain Elevator, built by the Dominion Government. The wharf 
is nine hundred feet long and is provided with every possible con- 
venience for loading and unloading freight. The sheds are five hundred 



l» 



■ & 



98 




feet in length, and in addition to these an immense building is being 
erected providing sleeping, living, dining and hospital accommodation 
for immigrants. The elevator, with a capacity of 150,000 bushels, is 
a substantial structure, built in accordance with modern ideas. From 
this elevator, more than half a million bushels have been shipped 
during the past winter. The wharf is unequaled in its facilities for 
the shipping of goods. Its total cost was not less than S'>00,000. 

Her Majesty's Dock3'ard next attracts our attention. This Naval 
Yard occupies half a-mile of the water front, including a Commission- 
er's residence and other houses sufficient for the several employes 
whose ofHcial duties include the landing and shippin<r of naval stores. 
The Yard had its foundation laid in 17o.S, and was enclosed on the 
line of the present wall in 1770 as indicated by figures over the central 
gate. In 1815, a celebration took place in this Dockyard, on the 
memorable occasion of rejoicing that followed the battle and signal 
victory of Waterloo. The old inhabitants who were then boys and 
girls remember that time of jubilee when a miniature ship was raised 
above the gateway, and fully illuminated — thus serving as a centre of 
attraction to the joyful crowds of all classes in the town. The Yard 
is only opened to the public on special occasions, but visitors are 
admitted if having business with the resident officials on applying to 
the janitor. In former times it was frecpiently made the headquarters 
for great aquatic contests of rival boatmen ere the famous champion 
sculler George Browm had become the victor over all comers. At the 
extreme north of the Yard is the Naval Hospital. 

Opposite the Naval Yard are the 

Sutcrcolonial 'IRail\va\> 

freight and passenger stations. These buildings opened for traffic on 
the first of August, 1887. As we approach the main entrance from 
North Street, the line proportions of the building become apparent. It 
is two stories in height, with a mansard roof surmounted by a lofty 
tower and dome. At each corner are ornamental towers with circular- 
headed dormer windows. The dome on the four faces has large electric 
clock dials. The building measures 113 by 50 feet. On the ground 
floor are the general waitinrr room — ladies' waiting room — ladies' 
dressing room — and W. & A. R. ticket offices — teleg»'aph office — railway 
conductor's room, and parcel office. The building is heated by steam 



9!) 



on the most approved principle, the boilers and other apparatus being 
in a fire-proof basement vault, the passenger shed connecting with the 
main building on the north is 400 feet long and 87 feet wide. This 
building, constructed on the same design as the front building, is of 
the finest pressed brick, very ornamental, with circular-headed win- 
dows, label mouldings and granite dressings, with roof of iron, very 
light and airy, yet very substantial. There are three main tracks 
leading into the building, with two platforms of 20 feet wide. 

Again taking Water Street and proceeding north we come to 
Kaye Street, by ascending which we reach Fort Needham hill. From 
this old fort a wide view of tlie north suburbs and adjacent country 
can be obtained. Proceeding thence to the southward by Gottingen 
Street, the Wellington Barracks and Adniirality House, previously 
observed from the water front are seen to advantage. The last named 
building is reserved for the accommodation of the Admiral of the 
station while on shore. The Wellington Barracks are built on a com- 
mandinrj site north of the Admiralitv <j:rounds on Gottingen Street. 
The buildings are very commodious, affording excellent accounnodation 
for a part of the garrison. The small number of deaths annually 
occurring in the ranks of the military forces doing duty here, marks 
the salubrity of the climate, and gives emphasis to the claim of the 
title long since applied to Chebucto Bay near Halifax, " La Baie 
Sainte." From this quarter there are many buildings worthy of pass- 
ing notice ere the south end of the street is reached, where it terminates 
at the citadel gateway, notably the two exquisitely beautiful residences 
of ihe Blacks occupying lots on opposite sides of the street where 
North and Gottingen intersect. At its south facing Cogswell street is 
the Military Hospital erected in 1808 at a cost of .SGOO.OOO. It is 
furnished with every needful appliance and is well fitted to meet the 
demands of sanitary science. 

The remarks on the preceding pages constitute but a brief review 
of some of our principal streets. It is not intended to l)e an exhaustive 
description even of the streets, buildings and institutions mentioned, 
but is merely suggestive of what may be seen, no more. Many of our 
public institutions, manufactories, etc., have been passed over but are 
spoken of in another part of the book. There are in Halifax some 
hundred and sixty or seventy streets and lanes extending over more 
than one hundred miles, and it is expected that during the summer 
will be pnt in a better condition that at present, for the City Council 
have voted 837,000 to be expended on this service at once. 



rt 



If 



w 



11 

Hi 



100 

Shipping. 

That Halifax is a great centre for shippint;, is proved by the 
fact that on an average, 40,000 sailors enter the harbor annually. 
Along the water front a continuous line of wharves extends for a dis- 
tance of about one and a half miles. Many of these wharves are supplied 
with every convenience for loading and and unloading cargo, with 
freight sheds, cab stands and all acconnnodation possible for passengers 
and the travelling public generally. Noble's wharf is one of the most 
accessible and convenient wharves in the city. It is the headiiuarters 
of the Canada Atlantic S. S. Company whose splendid Cly<le built 
steamer " Halifax " plies between this city and Boston. Another 
thoroughly ecjuipped wharf is that of Pick ford & Black. These 
gentlemen are agents for a very large number of steamship lines as 
will be seen by the list below. The wharves at Hie Deep Water 
Terminus are also thoroughly fitted up, these wharves have been 
described ah"eady. The llichmond wharf is farther north than any of 
these are also large and very well adapted to the demand of trade. 

The number of steamships and other vessels that annually enter 
oui p(n-t is about eleven hundz'ed with, a total tonnage of seven 
hundred thousand. 

Tlu; following are the principal lines of steamers with the agent 
of each : — 

S. S. Line. Agents. 

Furness Line, from London to Halifax - - Pickford & Black. 
Donaldson Line, from Glasgow to Halifax - - " 

Bossiere Line, from Havre to Halifax - - «< « 

West India Lines, between Halifax and Bermuda, 

Turks Island and Jamaica . . _ " •< 

Halifax and Havana, Cuba - . . - « <« 

Halifax and P. E. Island S. S. Company, between 

Halifax and Charlottetown . . . " " 

Halifax and Newfoundland S. S. Company, 

between Halifax and Cape Breton and 

Newfoundland . . . . . " " 

Yarmouth S. S. Company, between Halifax and 

Yarmouth - . . . . " " 

Allan Line, from Liverpool - . . - 8. Cunard & Co. 



agent 



31ack. 




(alin-jpscs ■ o[ ■ il-)c • PuDlif GurJcoi 



It Co. 




THt PRESS CF JAMtS BOWtS t SONS, 1?5 HOLUIS STREET, HALIFAX N. S. 



I 



101 

Canada Atlantic S. S. Lino .... 

Red Cross Line, between Halifax and St. John's 

Newfoundland and New York - 
Anglo French S. S. Line, between Halifax and St. 

Pierre, Miquelon ..... 
Halifax and Bridgwater Line 



Chipmau Brothers. 

F. D. Corbett & Co. 

« II 

Jos. Wood. 



Bo.ston, Halifax and P. E. Island. S. S. Line. Jas. F.' Phelan k Son 



IpuDlic JBuilMmjCi. 

Daliiousie College was founded by the Earl of Dalhousie in 
18L1, " for th<^ education of youth in the hi-her branches of science 
and literature." 

The original endowment was derived from funds collected at the 
port ot Castine, in Maine, during its occupation in 1814 by Sir John C. 
Sherbrooke, then Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia. These funds 
tJie British Government authorized the Earl of Dalhousie. Sir John's 
successor, to expend " in defraying the expenses of any iinprovment 
winch It might seem expedient to undertake in the Province ; " and the 
Earl, believing that " a Seminary for the hiaher branches of education 
IS much needed in Halifax-the seat of the Legislaturo-of the courts 
ot justice-of the military and mercantile society," deci.led upon 
' toundmg a College or Academy on the same plan and principle o'" 
that at Edinburgh," "open to all occupations and se-'ts of relicrion 
restricted to such branches only as are applicable to our present state, 
and haying the power to expand with the growth and improvement of 
our society." 

The original Board of Governors consisted of the Governor-Gcnernl 
ot British North America, the Lieutenant-Governor of Nova Scotia 
tlie Bishop, the Chief Justice and President of Council, the Provincial 
Ireasurer and the speaker of the House of As.sembly. 

After unsuccessful efforts on the part of both the British Govern- 
ment and the Board of Governors to effect a union with Kinc/s Colle-e 
the only other then existing in the Province, this College'went into 
opcTation m 1838, under the Presidency of the Rev. Thomas McCulloch 
D. D., and with a stafl' of three Professors. 

In 1SG3 the College was re-organized, and in the same year the 
Presbyterian Church of the Louder Provinces agreed to support two 






"J- 




4ll 



III 




102 

chairs while the Synod of the Miiritiine Provinces founded one ; and 
the Colle<;e opened in that year, umh-r tiie Pi'incipalship f)f Rev. James 
Ross, D. ])., with a faculty of six Professors. In 1808, a Faculty of 
Medicine was organized, and in 1883 a Faculty of Law was added. 
In 187!), (leorge Munro, E.s(|., of New York, a native of Pictou County, 
this Province, placed in the hands of the {governors tlie funds necessary 
for the endowment of a Professorship of Physics. Since that time he 
has added three other Professors and two Tutors to the teaching staff 
of the University. Since 1880 he has also provided a large number 
of i'xhil)itions and l)ursaries airirreiratinir from 1?7,000 to S10,000 
ainuially, which are competed for by the jiupils of the High Schools 
and Academies of Nova Scotia and the neighboring Provinces. 

In l88.'i, Alexander McLeod, Escj., of Halifax, luMpieathed to the 
University a sum of money which was employed in founding three 
professorial chairs. 

In 188G, the late Sir William Young, one of Dalhou.sie's bi'st 
friends subscribed the sum of .^20,000 to start a Builiiing Fund and 
in his will becjueathed to the College half the residu*' of his estate. 
Other gifts have at various times been bestowed upon Dalhou.sie 
College, amountiufj in the a<;<i'refjate to a considerable sum. 

The splendid building now occupied by the College was erected 
in 1887. It is beautifully situated on a larcfc site in the south western 
part of the city, fronting on three streets, College street on the north, 
Robie on the west and Morris street on the south. The Colles^e is one of 
the first buildings that attracts the eye of the passenger on inward- 
l>ound ves.sels,as it stands on the top of a hill, separated from surrounding 
objects, clearly and sharply defined in its outlines displaying synuaetry 
in its shape and massiveness in its structure. The old building now 
replaced by the City Hall was sold to the City for S2o,000 together 
with the new site. The College Buildings as well as the course of study 
carried out are now generally acknowledged to be the best in the 
Maritime Provinces and to compare very favorably with the best 
Universities of Quebec and Ontario. An evidence of the spreading 
fame of Dalhousie is afforded by the fact that more than one of the 
Law class of '90 came as far as from British Columbia to ol)tain a 
lesfal traininu' at Dalhousie. 



108 

The Academic Staf is as follows :— 
Rev. President F.^rrost ]). D., F. S. Sc. Lontl, George Mimro Pro- 

fcsmr of Hisforij and Political Economy. 
Clmrlcs xMacDonal.l, AI. A., (Al.ercl.,) Professor of Mathematics. 
John Johnson, M. A., (Dub.,) McLeod Professor of Classics 
George Lawscn, Ph. 1)., Ll. D., F. I. C, F.R.8.C, McLeod Professor 

of Llieyriistry and MincraUupj. 
James Liechti, M. A.,(Vin(l.,) McLeod Professor of Modern Lanyvaqea. 
James Gordon MacGregor, M. A., (Dal.,) D. Sc. (Lond.,) F. R. Ss! E. 

<fe C, Georyc Mnnro Profesmr of Physics. 
Richard Chapman Weldon A. M. (Mt. All.,) Ph. ]). (Yale,) Georye 

Manro Professor of Const itiUional and International Law ' 
Benjamin Russell A. M. (Mt. All.,) Professor of Contracts, Lecturer 

on Ihlls and Notes, Sales and Equity. 

James Seth, M. A., (Edin.,) Georye Miinro Professor of Metaphysics 
and. Ethics. 

Archibald MacMoeaan, Ph. D., (Toronto,) George Man ro Professor of 

English Language and Literature. 
Hon. Samuel Leonard Shannon, D. C. L. (Vind.,) Q. C, Judge of 
Probate, Lecturer on Real Propprty and Crimes and Examiner 
in Medical Jurisjirudence. 
Hon. Judge Graham, A. B. (Acad.,) Lecturer on Insurance. 
John Young Payzant, A. J\I. (Acatl.,) Lecturer on Torts. 
C. Sidney Harrington, Q. C, Lecturer on Evidence and Partnership. 
Hon. Charles J. Townshend, B. A., B. C. L. (Vind.,) Ju.lge of the 

Supreme Court, Lecturer on Equity Jwrisprmlence. 
John Somers, M. D. (Bell. Hosp. Med. Coll., N. Y.,) Examiner in 

Physiology and Histology. 
George L. Suiclair, M. D. (Col. P. and S., X. Y.,) M. D. (Univ. Hal.,) 

Examiner in Anatony and Practical Anatomy. 
X). A. Campbell, M. D., C. M... (Dal.,) Examiner in Materia Medica 

and Theraj^eutics. 
A. W. H. Lindsay, B. A., (Dal.,) M. D., C. M., (Dal.,) M. B., C. M. 

(Edin ,) Examiner in Anatomy and Practical Anatomy. 
John Stewart, M. B., C. M., (Edin.,) Examiner in Surgery. 
A. C. Page, M. D. ^Harv.,) President X. S. Medical Board, Examiner 
in Medicine. 






7T^ 






I 



104 

Wm. B. Slay tor, M. D. (Chic.,) L. Midw. (Dab.,) M. R. C. S. Eng., L. R. 

C. P. Lond., F. O. S. Lond., Examiner in Obstetrics and 

Diseases of Women and Children. 
Edward Farrell, M. D., (Coll. F. and S., N. X.) Examiner in Surgery. 
Andrew J. Cowie, M. D. (Univ. Penn.,) M. R C. P. Lond., Examiner 

in Clinical Medicine. 
John F. Black. M. D. (Coll. P. and S., N. Y.,) Examiner in Clinical 

Surgery. 
Alexander P. Reid, M. D., C. M. (McGill,) L. R. C. 8. Edin., L. C. R 

and S. Can., 8upt. Hospital for Insane, Examiner in Medical 

Jurisprudence. 
Arthur Morrow, M. B., C. M. (Edin.,) Examiner in Physiology and 

Histology. 
William H. Sinison, Ph. G. (Phil.) M. N. S. Ph. Soc, Examiner in 

Pharmacy. 
James Curtis Shaw, B. A. (Dal.,) George Munro Tutor in Classics. 
Alexander iM. Morri.son, B. A. (Dal.,) George Munro Tutor in Math- 
ematics. 

St. iPaiU's Cburcb. 

" This Church was Built at the Expense of Government in 
the Year of Our Lord 1750." So runs the inscription on a wooden 
tablet over the south-eastern door of this now venerable edifice. 
On the 21st June, 1749, the Honorable Edward Cornwallis, accom- 
panied by over two thousand intending settlers, reached Cbebucto 
(now Halifax) harbour. By the 14th September a survey of selected 
ground was made, and the plan of a town completed. In this 
pir'.n one square was reserved for the erection of a church, and 
orders were imniediately despatched to Boston for a frame and such 
other building materials as were ncces.sary to its erection. These in 
due time arrived, the frame b^ing constructed of oak and white pine, 
w.hich remain sound to this duy. The design was sent by the Imperial 
Government, being that on which St. Peter's, Vere Street, London, was 
built. The copy was exact, even to the size of the panes of glass. 
Any visitor to the metropoh.j of Great Britain may see St. Paul's pre- 
cisely aa it was previous to the year 1812. On September 2nd, 1750, 
the Church was opened for divine service, and oi that day the Rev. 
William Tutty officiated in it for the first time. In 1752 this cleryman 



105 



ent in 
voodeii 
edifice, 
accoin- 
ebucto 
ected 
this 
and 
such 
ese in 
[)ine, 
perial 
n, was 
glass. 
8 pre- 
1750, 
Rev. 
•vman 



dying when on a visit to England, Rev. J. Breynton was appointed a 
niissionaiy in his place, and discharged his duties with zeal and success 
for a period of forty years. Events of the deepest interest occurred 
during his long incumbency — events witli which he and St. Paul's 
Church were identified. The Legislature was in the habit of tneetinir 
for divine service in the church ; the Indians assembled in it to conclude 
a treaty of peace ; the whole peo^)le gathered to it on the frequent 
occasions when the funeral oV)sequies of distinguished men, civil, naval 
a.id military were performed. It is thus replete with the early history 
of Halifax. About the year 17G5 a fund was raised for the purchase 
of an organ, and a tradition exists that a Spanish ship, on her way to 
South America, lieing brought into haibour as a prize, a suitable 
instrument was found on board, and when the sale of her cargo took 
place the organ was bought by the church wardens. This instrument 
long since became useless ; a new one was substituted A. D. 1825, 
which within the old case now stands in Trinity Church. In 1768 a 
severe storm swept over the City and demolished three of the windows. 
In 1798 the cupola and eastern side of the building were seriously 
damaged, and repaired at a very considerable expense. In 1812 the 
church was enlarged by an addition to the north end, and the erection 
of a new steeple, in which was placed a chime of three bells, cast at 
the order and expense of Mr. Andrew Belcher, the son of Governor 
Belcher, and the father of the distinguished Admiral the late Sir 
Edward Belcher. In 1787 the Rt. Rev. Chas. Inglis, the first bishop 
appointed to a colonial see, arrived in Halifax and used St. Paul's aa 
his cathedral. In 171)1 Rev. Robert Stanser succeeded Dr. Breynton 
and held the rectorshin until 181(1, wheii he was elevated to the 
bishopric and his place taken by Rev. John Inglis, who also was 
apjiointed bishop upon Dr. Stanser's resignation, which took place in 
182.5. In the month of September of this year, Rev. Robert Willis 
was inducted into the parish, retaining his olHce until 18G5, in the 
sprin'f of which year he died and was succeeded 1)^ Rev. Georije W. 
Hill, D. c. L., who had for some years been his curate. Mr. Hill was 
succeedded by Rev. Charles Hole, D. D., and he in turn by tlie Rev. 
Dvson Hague who was inducted on the 22nil of June this year. 

Saint Paul's is richer in mural tablets than any other church in 
the Dominion, than even the catheilral of historic Quei)ec. Many of 
these are of great interest. Sir Jolin Wentworth, the two Bishops 



w 



r 



I 



: 

I ! 



^11 



lOG 

Inp;lis, father an.! son, the soldier, Lord Montai^ajo, thu sailor, Captairn 
Evans, the Chief Justices Blowers and Halihurton, together with 
many others, are brought to memory by the sculptured stones. Be- 
neath the church are a number of vaults, in which are interred several 
<Hstinguished persons, one of them, the Baron de Siely, who was 
buried in full uniform and with weapons beside liim, in accordance 
with an old feudal custom when the honors and titles of a noble 
house became extinct by the death of the last of the line. St. Paul's 
is the oKlest building of any importance in Halifax. It is 150 feet in 
length, DO feet in breadth, ami will accommodate about two thousantl 
people. 

The Graving Dock of Halifax is something of which the Directors 
of the Company, the citizens and the residents of our province gener- 
ally, can feel justly proud. It is a dock built of granite and concrete, 
built in the solid rock, and if not the largest, is at least one of the 
largest Dry Docks on the American continent. Its dimensions are : — 
Available clear length cm top - - - - - - (il.S^, feet 

" bottom .... - 593 " 

Draft of water on sill at ordinary high water spring tides, - 30 " 
Averafje rise and fall of tides, al)Out - - - - o " 

Wiilth on top .-..-_-- 
Width on bottom -..--.- 

The dimensions of the great Brooklyn dock are : 
Available clear length on top 000 ft., on bottom 
Width on top 85 ft., on bottom ----- 

Thus it is evident that the Halifax <lock is the only one that can 
take in the large ships of Her Majesty '.s navy without removing their 
gfuns, &C., &c. The Bellerophon at present on the station drawing 
twenty-seven feet. 

The dry dock has the best situation in the harbor, adjoining H. 
M. Dockyard. Some of the advantages the flock offers to ship owners 
and agents are worthy of special mention : Vessels of any size can be 
docked in any weather, and at any state of the tide. They can be 
docked without discharging cargo. As the entrance faces to the south, 
the dock is comparatively warm and comfortable to work in, in winter. 
For fire protection, a six inch water main enters the Dock Company's 



102 " 

70 " 

o()7h feet 
4(5 



llll 



107 

property, aii.l the city steam tire en-ines and other apparatus are within 
easy call. Raihvay sidings are connected with each side of the dock 
also with four wharves on the eastern side, so that goods can be re- 
ceived or shipped by rail or water without loss of ti.ne. Machine an.l 
smith's shops have been erected and provided with the necessarv 
repair tools. 

The caisson or floating gate is a vessel of itself, so lar-e that she 
requires tons of ballast. The entrance to the Dock from the harbor 
IS protected by two large cribs on the west side, and a dolphin on the 
east, making the channe,' perfectly safe to enter at any state of the 
tide. 

The pumping plant is situated in the engine room at the western 
side of the dock. Its capacity is tremendous being 45,000 -mIIoiis „f 
water per minute. It is able to empty the dock, which contains seven 
millions of gallons, in three hours. 



Cit^ Ball. 

The City Hall was formally opened by the Mayor and Council on 
the evening of May 22nd this year by a splendid reception tendered 
the citizens on that niffht. 

It is many years since the(piestion of a city hall was first mooted • 
the need of one has long been recognized ; the inadequacy of the old 
building acknowledged, but no decided step was taken till the year 
18S6 when a contract was signed with A. E. Milliken for the erection 
of a building on the site of the ol.l Dalhousie College on Gran.l 
Parade. 

As early as 1874 an act was passed by the provincial legislature 
authorizing the borrowing of 8100,000 with which to purcha,^ a site 
and erect a commodious building. But difficulties stood in the way a 
suitable site could not be secured and nothing was done till 188G. Then 
the governors of Dalhousie college accepted from the city an offer of S^^ . 
000 and a new site in exchange for their building at the northern en.l of 
the Grand Parade. Invitations were at once extended to the archi- 
tects to present plans of the proposed building and a prize of S300 was 
offered for the best and another of $200 for the second best plan The 
plan finally adopted was that of architect Elliot, who also superintend- 
ed the erection of the buildinf^. 



I 







108 

The building is of freestone and presents a very handsome ap- 
pearance from whatever side it is looked at. It stands east and west with 
win<'s extendintx northward and southward on Arj-'vle and Barrinjfton 
streets. The main entrance fronts on the parade. Entering from thii> 
side one finds himself on the main floor, but below that and entered 
from Duke street is the ground floor. On this floor is the police court, 
policemen's rooms, office of chief of police, cells for men and women, 
which are placed at opposite ends of the building, and workmen's 
rooms. 

The main floor is entered from the parade as has been said. A 
large hall runs straight across the building, intersecting a corridor at 
riirhf angles that runs from east to west. On the left hand as vou 
enter from the parade is the auditor's office and the remainder of the 
space to the left and on the south side of the building is taken up 
with the offices of the Board of Works. On the right hand side as 
you enter, the whole area as far as the east wing and south of the 
corridor is occupied by the departments of the City Clerk. The front 
offices of the east wing are devoted to the use of His Worship the 
Mayor, the remainder of the east wing being assigned to the Collector 
and his associates. North of the corridor the space in the west wing 
supplies large and commodious offices for the City Engineer, and next 
to him the Treasurer has his quarters. Crossing the main hall, we 
find the remainder of the space on the north of the corridor, taken up 
by the Stipendiary room. Thus all the chief officers of the city are 
accommodated on the main floor, where the public can have easy 
access to them. 

At the north end of the great hall running from the Parade to 
Duke street, is a broad flight of steps leading up to the second floor. 
Here, as in the floor below, a corridor runs through the length of the 
main building. On the north side and to the right of the staircase are 
the offices of the Inspector of Licenses, and Collector of Rents and 
Licenses. To the left of the staircase and on the same side of the 
buildinjj are the rooms of the Foreman of Streets, and the Foreman of 
Water Works. Across the corridor, a row of five offices occupies the 
front of the main building. The corridor conducts in the east wing to 
the Council Chamber, looking out on Barrington street. In the west 
wing besides oflices the citizens' library is assigned a place. 






west 



The third Hoor closely resembles encli uf die other two It is as 

yet unappropriate,! by the eity orticinls. The buil.ling is Hnislie.l in a 

Imn, so,,,e an.l substantial style an.l the work has been done in a ver^ 

sat.sfaetory u.anner. The halls are floored with stained birch and 

"aple, and the walls wainscotted with stained oherrv and white wood 

«m, low. are supplied w,th a new English patent, calle.l Preston', 
panel h, ,t ventilator. The doors are of a specially handso, c and 
substantial e araetor. Th.y are veneered with cherry, whitewo l and 
Cahtorma redwood. These doors are warranted to a»t for Twenty 

way to the second floor, we are attracted by a beautiful stained .dass 

of rte b, ,ld,ng look as though they were made to last to the end of 
t.me They consist of oak flooring, and balusters with a cherry rail 

all t iZ'r-'r "^ '■' "' "" ""'" '"»" ^'™'''"'' "-' eharacteri.es' 
ail tne inside nni.sbino-. 

The building is heated throughout with hot water, with Guerney's 

"vaT t r''"'°" ''"'^^'' "' '"'"'^ ""^'Sl'tW.. they ofte, 
a ...eally add to the appearance of the rooms and halls. Indeed the 
^-.ty Jia I i,s a very han.lsome building and the citizens are to be 

entt.pnse and progre.^siveness. The cost of the building was some- 
thing over a hundred and thirty-seven thousand dollars. 

^\x Com Ibouse. 

This building was completed in the year 1800, under the supervLsion 
ot a board of commissioners appointed for that purpose. It is a lar-e 
and nnposing structure with a highly ornamental front. It is buFlt 
of freestone with a foundation of granite, and is nleasantly .situated 
facing on the south side of Spring Garden Road.'having on the ea t 
side te old Saint Pauls churchyard, with its grass and gro^e, and on the 
west side, an enclosure of trees. Saint Marys Cathedral, the Academy 

vicinity. The County Jail is in the rear of the Court House 

The Supreme Court, Vice-A.luiiralty Court, E,|uity Court, Divorce 
Court, County Court, and Probate Court, are all held' in the buildin'' 



i 




















f 




i 






fi^' 




no 

and there are offices on the first floor occupied by tlie Prothonotar^', 
Clerk of the Peace, Registrar of Deeds, Registrar of Probate, and 
County Treasurer. The High Sheriff has his office on the second floor, 
where also are robing rooms for the Judges and Barristers. 

Previous to the erection of the Court House, the Courts were held 
in the Old Province Building, in the rooms now occupied l)y the Pro- 
vincial Librarj'. 

Clubs an^ Sportiiui aesociations. 

The two private Clubs are the Halifax and City. The former 
occupies a splendid building on Hollis street, the latter, a clul» house 
almost as fine on Barrington street. Both of these clubs are very 
exclusive, the Halifax especially so. Other clubs organized for a 
different purpose are the Royal Nova Scotian Yacht Squadron, the 
Wanderers Amateur Athletic Association, the Phoenix A. A. A., Studley 
Quoit Club, Curling Club, Lome Amateur Aquatic Club, Snow Shoe 
Clubs, Bicicle Clubs and others. 

BEnviions of Ibalifay. 

One of the favorite drives from Halifax is to Rockingham and 
alonrr the shores of Bedford Basin. This noble sheet of water is five 
miles long and one to three miles wide, with an average depth of 
twenty-five fathoms. On the western shore, about four miles from 
the city, is Rockingham, a pleasant summer resort. The Academy of 
Mount Saint Vincent, a Roman Catholic ladies' school, is seen on the 
slope of the hill. Beyond Rockingham, on the right side of the road, 
is Prince's Lodge, a remnant of the residence formerly occupied by 
His Royal Highness the Duke of Kent. At the northern end of the 
Basin is Bedford, a charming little village with a thoroughly ei[uipped 
summer hotel under the very able management of My. J. C. Morrison. 
The building is lighted by electricity throughout and fitted with every 
modern appliance. The hotel owns a wharf, steam launch, fishing 
apparatus, bathing facilities, etc., and a more pleasant summer resort 
could not be desired. 

In the summer of 1746 the great French Armada sailed from 
Brest to conquer the British North American coast from Virginia to 
Newfoundland. It was commanded by the Due d'Anville, and was 



loiiotar}', 
)ate, and 
md floor, 

rere held 
tlio Pro- 



L' former 
lb house 
are ver^' 
Dd for a 
Iron, the 
Stud ley 
ow Shoe 



lani and 
T is five 
lepth of 
es from 
lemy of 

on the 
le roati, 
pied l)y 
I of the 
([uipped 
forrison. 
'ti every 

fishinij 
r resort 



;d from 
:^inia to 
nd was 



111 

con.posed of the line-of-battle ships Trident, Ardent, Mars, an.l Alci.le 
C4 cruns each ; the Northumberland, Carillon, Tigre, Leopard, and' 
Renommee, GO guns each; the Diamant, 50 ; M^gere, 30 ; Argonaute, 
2G; Prince d Orange. 20 ; the Parfait. Mercure, Palme, Girous Perle 
ana twenty-two other frigates, with thirty transports, carrying an' 
army of 3,lo0 soldiers. D'Anville's orders were to " occupy Louisbourc. 
to reduce Nova Scotia, to destroy Boston, and ravage the coast o^' 
^ew Eng and The Ar.nada was dispersed, however, by a succession 
of unimrallele.1 an.l disastrous storms, and D'Anvillc reached Chebucto 
Bay (Halifax) on Septeml^er 10 with only two ships of the line and a 
tew transports. Six days later the unfortunate duke died of apoplexy 
induced by grief and distress on account of the <lisasters which his 
enterprise had suffered. Vice-Admiral d'Estournelle committe.l suicide 
a tew days later. Some other vessels now arrived here, and i.nmense 
barracks were erected along the Bedfonl Basin. Tsvelve hundred men 
had c.ied horn scurvy on the outward voyage, and the camps were 
soon turned into hospitals. Over 1,000 French soldiers and 200-300 
Micmac Indians died around the basin, and were buried near its quiet 
waters. On October 13 the French fleet, numbering Ave ships of the 
line and twenty-five frigates and transports, sailed from Halifax intend- 
ing to attack Annapolis Royal : but another terrible stona arose while 
the vessels were off Cape Sable, an<l scattered the remains of the 
Armada in such wide confusion that they were oblin-ed to retire 
altogether from American waters. 

are seven miles west of Bedford, and were settled in 1815 by slaves 
brought away from the shore of Maryland and \lrginia l,y British 
iJeets, ^ 

Mavciic\>, 

with its gold-mines and powder-mills, is near Bedford. A visit to 
these would prove enjoyable. Southwest of the city are the Chain 
Lakes, from which Halifax is supplied with water. Applications for 
pesmission to fish in these lakes must be made at the "othce of the 
Boanl of A\ orks. Bedford Row. A pretty drive is round the head of 
the Arm to the Dingle, where the visitor may alight and climb to one 
ot the two look-outs, from which a beautiful view is had over the 



II 






si 



112 

harbor and city. He may also ascund to the Rockini; Stone, which 
lies to the .suiitli and west, on the top of a prominent hill. 

On the Dartmouth side of tlie harbor are several beautiful drives. 
About a mile and a half from the town, on the crest of the ridge over- 
looking the harbor, is Mount Hope Asylum for the Insane, a very large 
building, admission to which is obtained by application at the Secre- 
tary's office in the Province Building. On the shore, at the entrance 
of the Eastern Passage, is Fort Clarence, a powerful work. The East- 
ern Passage is a long, and narrow strait witli many .shoals. In 18(52 
the Confederte cruiser " Tallahassee" blockaded in Halifax harbor by 
a squadron of United States frigates. The shallow and tortuous East- 
ern Pas.sage was not watched, since nothing: but small fishint; craft had 
ever traversed it, and it was considered impassable for a steamer like 
the " Tallahassee." But Captain Wood took advantage of tlie high 
tide on a dark night, and crept cautiously out behind Macnab's Island. 
By daylight ho was far out of sight of the outwitted Ijlockade tleet. 

The Montague gold mines are four miles from Dartmouth, 

Cow 36a^, 

which is about ten miles from the ferry landing, is reached by a drive 
along the shore and through the woods. Here is a splendid stretch of 
sandy beach, where surf bathing -can be enjoyed. To the north of 
Dartmouth stretches a chain of lakes, which afford excellent skating 
in winter. A drive beside these lakes is very enjoyable. 

Within easy reach of the city are several places worthy of a visit 
even if only a day or two can be given them by the tourist. The 
towns of Truro, New Glasgow, Pictou and Amherst on the Inter- 
colonial, and Windsor, Kentville, Annapolis, Yarmouth, and other 
towms, in the western part of the Province will repay a visit. 

^ruro 

is reached in two hours by the C. P. R. express or by the Intercolonial 
express. It is sixty-two miles distant from Halifax, and is a thriving 
incorporated towm of about .5000 inhabitants, w^ealthy, enterprising, 
and populous. It is situated at the head of Cobequid Bay, a prolon- 
gation of the Basin of Minas. Into this Bay Salmon River, which 
tiows through the town, empties. The view is admirable, — a wide 
level plain, nearly surrounded by hills, the shimmer and glimmer of 



i 



large 



113 

the diked niarshlanfl, the woodj fringing the slopes, and in ♦he centre 
the pretty town itself, with its factories and public buildings. The 
whole country around is one of the finest agricultural districts in the 
Province, and the local agricultural exhibitions held at fre([uent inter- 
vals are largely attended by farmers from all parts. Truro is the 
county town of Colchester, and is also the seat of the Provincial Nor- 
mal and Model schools, the former of which turns out scores of teach- 
ers to supply the demands of the numerous scholastic sections. Many 
beautiful drives may be enjoyed in different directions, one to old 
Barns, another to Penny's Hill, a third to Riverside, and others. Truro 
is the junction point for the eastern branch of the Intercolonial Rail- 
way; it has an excellent system of water supply, and is lighted l)y 
electricity. 

Truro was settled at an early date by the French Acadians, and 
after their expulsion from Nova Scotia was occupied by Scotch Irish 
from New Hampsliire. In 17G1 a large number of disbanded Irish 
troops .settled here and engaged in the peaceful pursuits of agriculture. 

IPictou. 

situated on Pictou harbor, at the norther side of the province, and 
distant from flalifax about one hundred miles, is called by some the 
Athens of Nova Scotia. It is the seat of the renowned Academy of 
Pictou, from which scholars have gone out who have made themselves 
and their town famous all over the world. Pictonians are to be found 
in nearly every corner of the globe, and wherever found are generally 
respected and prosperous. Before reaching Pictou, we pass 

one of the most thriving and enterprising towns in Nova Scotia. It. 
is the centre of the great iron industry of the province. If you pur- 
pose visiting New Glasgow, you may be assured of a cordial reception, 
for the people are noted for their hospitality, a marked characteristic 
of nearly every Scotchman. 

On the line of the Windsor and Annapolis Railway are places of 
interest which will undoubtedly attract even the most prosaic of 
tourists. Windsor, Grand Pre, Wolfville, Kentville, Berwick, Anna- 
polis, and on the Western Counties Railway, Digby, Weymouth and 
Yarmouth are most attractive points of interest. 



i!« 



1' ' 



114 



(4,000 iiilialiitants) on joys the reputation of beinj,' one of the prettiest 
towns in Nova Scotia. 'J'he principal ohjoct of interest is King's 
College, an old wooden building on the top of a hill, witli a fairly good 
Encfonia Hall half way down the slope, and a decidedly good chapel at 
the other end. Crossing the Avon by a tine iron railway l)ridg(?, we 
soon enter the charmed land which every reader of Longfellow's 
"Evangeline" lias so often seen in imagination, and longed to see in 
reality. We are first reminded of our whereabouts by a grand view, 
across the Basin of Minas, of 

Cape 36Iomi^on, 

and presently we draw up at a little way station and lind ourselves, 
where — 

" In tlie Acailiaii laiul, on tliu short's of tlu' liasin of Mines, 
Distant, swlmlccl, still, tin- little village ot Graml I'lc 
Lay in the fruitt'ul valley." 

Still running through the same lovely country, we pa.ss Wolfville, a 
thriving village, possessed of a college, and situated in the midst of a 
fertile agricultural district. We next arrive at Kentville where the 
offices and work.shops of the Railway are situated. Passing Bewick, 
Aylesford sve arrive at Middleton where another lialt may be made. 

Resuming our journey by rail Ave now pass Lawrencetown, where 
there is Salmon fishing ; and crossing the Annapolis River at Bridge- 
town we follow its winding course through a lovely vale to Annapolis 
Royal, the site of the first town settled in Acadia. In this interesting 
old town the remains of fortifications still show signs of the many 
sieges to which it has been suljected, terminus of the railway, where 
we take the steamer for the charming watering place of ])igby ; thence 
southward and eastward to Yarmouth situated at the extreme west of 
the Province. It is from this point that the splendid steel-screw 
steamer "Yarmouth" sails for Boston, making the passage in 17 
hours. A companion steamer, to be called the " Boston " is now on her 
way out from the Clyde and will be put on the route at once. It is 
expected that the " Boston " will be a still faster sailer than her sister 
ship the " Yarmouth." 



llo 



Cbcstcr. 

forty-tive miles to tliu west of Halifax, is reacbed by road or sea on 
tbe steamer " Bridge water." The trip by water is a vJry i)leasant one, 
occupying; about five hours. 

After calling at several points on the La Have the steatner lands 
the traveller at the pretty village of Bridgewater. At liridgewater 
inimerons excursions can bo made to the adjacent villages. The drives 
are pretty and the sails on the river to such places as Crescent Beach, 
Petit Rivere, kc, otfer special inducements. These places aie unex- 
celled by any on the Atlantic coast for bathing and the beauty of their 
surroinidings. Stages also connect for Liverpool and the gold mining 
districts, which are now attracting so much attention at Malag.r 
Brookrield and Caleiionia. 

The traveller takes the Nova Sc(jtia (Vmtral Raihvav from 
Bridgewater to Middleton. This railway follows the rivJr from 
Biidgewater, passing through flourishing villages and crosses La Have 
River above New Germany, thence continuing on till it crosses the 
head waters of Nictaux, from which is a chain of lakes furnishing 
excellent trout fishing. Througli them the sportsmen can go to the 
headwaters of the Medway and Liverpool Rivers, noted for their 
sahnon fishing. This district furnishes most excellent opportunity for 
large game and Hshing. From this point the road follows along the 
mountain high above the valley of the River, the scenery of which is 
magnificent. At .Middleton the tourist is within two miles of the 
celebrated Wilinot Spa Springs, noted for their healing properties. 
From Middieton the tourist takes the Windsor and Annapolis Railway 
to Halifax, passing through the Annapolis Valley, the land of Acadia. 

To the tourist, having a few days at his disposal, we would recom- 
mend a trip to Prince Edward Island, and promise him a profitable and 
enjoyable excursion. Taking a steamer from Pictou you are carried 
across the strait of Northumberland in two or three' hours, and are 
landeil at Summerside or Charlottetown. A short trip by water is that 
from Point du Chene, near Shediac, New Brunswick, to Summerside 
or Charlottetown. 

Pleasure Resorts and Hotels, reached by the Prince Edward Island 
Railway, offer every inducement to the Health or Pleasure Seeker. 
The summer climate is the most salubrious in America, the temperature 



IKi 



biiini: Mioilified l»v a cool sea lirei.'?X' tliroii'fhoiit tlit! eiitirii season. The 
scenery, tliouLth <|uict, is chaniiinj^-, the yreat fertility of the soil [iro- 
duciiiL,' a luxuriant richness of venlure, which ^'ives the landscajte a 
niost pleasini,' effect. As a desiralilo .summer resort, either for health 
or recreation, I'rince Kdward Island is eipialled hy few other watering' 
places and surpassed by none. 

The sea, and numerous rivers and streams teem witli various kinds 
of fish, thus afFordinj,' good sport to the ungler. The Dunk and Morrell 
Rivers have liecomo famous for the excellence of theii' trout. The 
several varieties of <,'ame peculiar to the Island are jjlentiftd in their 
seasons 

The Sea Side Hotel at Ru.stico, Shaw Hotel at I'rackley Point, 
antl tlie Nortli Shore Hotel, at Malpeipie, are fast accjuirinL,' a iu^h 
reputation at first-class Watering Places. The Seaside Hotel is distant 
seven miles from Hunter River Station, at which point coaches meet 
all trains, The North Shore Hotel is readied from Kensington Station, 
from whicli point it is distant about seven nules. There are beautiful 
and well-cultivated sections of country in the vicinity of Charlotte- 
town, Georgetown, etc., etc., and the several roads leading from these 
])laces afford excellent opj ortunities for pleasant driving. For hoating, 
liner sheets of water than Charlottetown, Summerside, Malpecpie and 
Gcorgeton harbors, and tlie other princi[)al bays, cannot ha found. 
Charlottetown is convenient to several excellent fishing grounds, and a 
short drive from Summerside reaches (Jlarke's Mills, the Salmon 
Hatchery, and the famed trout stream of Dunk River. 

Cape Traverse is a place full of historic interest. For more than 
a (piarter of a century, owing to its Iteing the nearest part of the 
Island to the Mainland, it has been the point from which \'' ^ crossing 
is made in winter, by Ice Boat, between P. E. Island and New Bruns- 
wick, It can now be reached by Rail, and is a popular summer resort 
The Lansdowne Hotel is open for the accommodation of tourists at all 
seasons of the year. There is good hotel acconnnodation to be h.ad at 
Charlottetown, Summerside, Alberton, Tignish, Souris and Georgetown, 
and there are numbers of first class farm houses along the North Shore 
of the Island, at which tourists who desire quiet resting places can find 
the comforts of a home. Hotel Davies, Rankins, Osborne. Rocklin, 
and other hotel cabs meet trains at Charlottetown. 



I 



t all 
(1 fit 

)\VI1. 

Hn<l 
in. 



I 




Occr)GS • 19 • I oir)l • nleasor)! • Petrli). 



r 



^1 



117 



Benevolent 3n6titutionc\ 

For a threat many years Halifax lias been noted for the ])liil- 
antluopy of its citizens as manifested in its public charities. The 
|)ride of Halifax is its charities. A partial list of these noble institu- 
tions has already been given, a short sketch of the following named 
institutions would not be uninteresting but lack of space forbids, the 
Poor's Asylum, the Victoria General Hospital, the Infants' Home, the 
Protestant Industrial School, Home for the Aged, the Institution for 
Deaf Mutes, Institution for the Blind. 



IMova Scotia Ibocipital tor Jnsane. 

This institution is designed for the treatment of the disease 
insanit}' and as well an asylum for insane. It is bcautifuly situated 
on the hio-h ground on the eastern side of Halifax Harbour, and 
directly opposite to the cit}'. The grounds around it are well laid out, 
and the view^ from the building up and down the harbour is but 
rarely equalled. 

This Hospital connnenced its usefulness in l85cS, by accommo- 
dation for about 75 patients, but was not finally co' "pleted for 10 
years afterwards. 

There are nine wards for men and ten for women to accommodate 
about 3.'>0 patients, but the general average has l)een about 400 men 
and women, about ecpial inimbers of each. 

The BuiLDiNd. — It is l)uilt of brick, slate roof, and is GOO feet 
long from north to south, and constructed on the Kirkbride or 
Echelon principle, giving GOO feet of halls on each flat running north 
and south, and 500 feet of cross halls running east and west — also on 
each flat — with the ordinary internal division of space, into single and 
associated dormitaries, dining rooms, parlors, &c. 

The main building and two cross sections are four stories high, 
and the rest are three stories except the 3xtreme south end, two 
stories high. The cost of construction was al)Out SoOO.OOO. The 
iixiter supply comes from Lake Maynard, one and a (piarter miles 
distant, by a six inch pipe, and the gravitv pressure of the water is 
about 25 lbs. per square inch. The ImiMing is lighteil l)y gas made; 
<»n the premises, and heated Ity steam by nulirccf nidiatluv. 



lis 



Vehaxuahs. — The couveiiience of the building was iiiucli enliniiCL'd 
a few years ago by Imilding verandahs — " snn rooms," or open air 
additions to each of 17 wards that are at all times open for patients' 
use, and having fire proof attachment to the main building are so 
arranged asto be safe fi'om injury, and a part of the means of safety, 
in case of tire. 

Fire PlKyrEcxiON, — Each ward in addition to internal stairways 
has an independent exit (nitside the building and alongside, (in fact a 
portion of) tlie verandah which is umler the the control of the 
attendants. In connection therewith, there are in each of the six 
sections, iron stairways leadnig from the ground to the roof that are 
permanently placed, and so large as to admit of easy ascent or descent, 
and alongside each a hydrant stand pipe, connected with general water 
service, that has hose and hose connections (ju each flat and ward, and 
one at the top or rcjof of the building. These arrangements are all 
outside with tire proof connection with main buiMing. The flat 
veramlah r(jof gives convenient standing room at the to}) of the 
building, with hose (linen) and hose connections at hand. 

From each verandah roof an iron ladder is permanently attached 
to the roof which leads to its apex and there connects with a double 
foot Ijoard platform, each 12 inches wide, which runs ahjng the ridge 
froui end to end of the buildinu-. There is a iruiile rail 2 feet hiirh 
between the two foot boards which gives safety in running along the 
ridge of the roof and will also allow two persons to pass without one 
being in the other's way. This platform is raised about -t inches aboxe 
apex of ridge so that the wind preventing the snow from lodging on 
it, it is always in proper condition for use even in winter. 

The ])latforms are united by iron ladders (fixtures^ where there 
is an elevation or depression in the line t)f the roof as well as one 
connecting with each verandah. Alongside each ladder is a sky-light, 
held down by a weight only so that free access is to be h.ad from 
outside as well as inside with every attic in the Ijuilding. The design 
is such that any attendant with his ordinary ward key is able to jnit 
a Icnijth of hose to any part of the building, — insitle — roof or attic, 
in a couple of minutes and without assistance and could remain on 
duty up to tht latest moment with no fear of his retreat being cut oft". 
One man is a complete fire company, as ho has nothing to do but open 
the door leading to fire escape from verandah, i-un either up or down 



I 



s- 

f 



119 



and then take the hose to the phice needed. Ladders aiv always in 
place and fixed innjiovably and liose on every ward and fiat and roof. 
All this is in addition to the ordinary steam lire pumps (2\ hyilrants 
(6 double and 4 single), hose, hand fire extinguisher.s, &c.', that are 
in general use. 

This Hosi'ITAL is a Provincial institution under tin' authority 
and management of the Department of Public Works and Mines of the 
Provincial Government, Hon. J. E. Church, commissioner, and is partly 
supported by the payment of 82.50 for each man and 82.00 for each 
woman per week from the municipalities to which the patients l)elono-. 
Private patients pay 84.00 per week and those not chargeable to any 
municipality and unable to pay are supported by the Government. 
The difference between income and expenditure is made up by ( Jovern- 
ment grant. 

The Regulatiox.s for Admission have less formality than 
generally obtains and as no case of abuse has occurred there is no 
occasion to make them more complex. On application a blank state- 
ment is sent which when filled out is transmitted to the Superintendent 
upon which he may or may not reconnnend the admission, if recom- 
mended two blank medical certificates and a warrant in case of county 
or bond incase of private patient are forwanlcd. The medical certifi- 
cates being made out is the authority by which two magistrates make 
out the warrant of commitment with which papers the connnissioner 
gives an order of admission. 

Result of Labor of In.stitutiox up to the beginning of this 
year 2402 patients have been admitted to the institution, of whom 
130G were men and 1096 were women. 

SUM.MARY ON ToTAL AdMI.SSIONS FOIJ '.]{) YkaI!S. 

Percentage of cases recovered - 44.()(i or 1,072 

relieved - - l.-).30 " 3(i!) 

" not improved 2.8.5 " ,')(i 

that died - - 22. IS " 588 

rcmaininu: - 15.45 






Whole number discharged - - - 
Mean annual mortality of 30 years 



100 



- 2080 
5.0 per cent. 



k 



120 

Donations. — There havo been many small donations of various 
kinds l)ut few of any magnitude. Miss D. L. Dix of Washington took 
an active part in the first establishment of this Hospital and gave a 
varied assistance. The late Mr. John Brown gave £1,070, the first 
and largest legacy, it was given to the support of indigent patients. 
The late Hon. Hugh Bell gave £300 and an anonymous friend of Mr. 
Bell's gave £200 which with interest at the time made £600, the 
income of which was to go for support of a library and comforts to 
patients not otherwise provided for. The late Edwd. Binney gave 
many valuable donation.s. The late Mrs. Elizabeth Forrester gave 
S200 and late F. Charman 8500 and late S. S. B. Smith of Halifax 
gave !?200 to furnish recreation and amusement for patients. 

The Government supply anything recjuisite, and have never 
refused any recjuest yet a sufficient fund, the income from which 
would go to furnish amusements, recreation library, ward decorations 
and similar desirable adjuncts, is an object the attainment of which is 
yet in the future. 

The institution was under the charge of Dr. J. R. DeWolf for the 
first 20 years — during the latter ten years only with an assistant. 
The late Dr. R. W. McKeagney who died in the service and Dr. D. A. 
Fraser. For the past twelve years it has been under the charge of Dr. 
A. P. Reid superintentlent, and Dr. (I. L. Sinclair assistant superin- 
tendent. There are of attendants ID male and 21 female and also 
35 employees in the various duties outside the wards. There ars 
80 acres of land attached to the institution, a large part of which is 
under cultivation. There are Railway and wharf facilities, and the 
institution is thoroughly e(iuipped for performing the varied duty 
comprised under the term — Hospital for Insane. 

Visiting Days, Tuesday and Friday afternoon, l)y order from 
Connuissioner of Public Works and Mines, Province Building, Halifax. 



Z\K public 6ar^cn5 an^ point ipicasant (Park 

are truly the pride of Halifax, and with good cause too, for many 
connois visitors as well as citizens assert that both can be reckoned 
amonc: the most beautiful in the M'orld. 



121 






\^.\\.R\^GG\ltssGo 



Irrjporfcrs arid Ucalers it) 




, r4 





"A^y 




mSri 



tit momwm. 



^•^^>i^^>^^<j^.^;<^<?«^-< 



RuGGLEs' Buildings. 
123 Argyle St., 



™.i 



lJuaIqCO %g^ T& 'ti:l'iXj:j! i ^ % 



tSs\^ ^ «S(fP ^ 



TKAS A SPECIALTY. 



mm 



122 



"L^H R 



Yarmouth Steamship Co., Ltd. 



FOR BOSTON m HALIFAX via YARMOUTH. 



The Shortest and most direct Route between Nova 
Scotia and the United States. 

The Quickest Tiiiio. Only 17 Iiours between Yarnionth k Boston. 




'-^ THE FAST STEEL STEAMER ■^^. 



J > 



will leave Varmuiith for lioston every WEl»'ifc;?>DAY and SATURDAY ovenin<,^s, after 
arrival of the train of the Western Counties Railway. 

Returning leaves Lewis' wharf lioston, at lo a. ni. every TUESDAY anil FRIDAY', 
connectinj^ at Varnioulh with train for Halifax ami intermediate stations. 

The Vakmoi'TII carries a rejjular mail between \'armouth and 15oston, and is the fastest 
steamer plyint; between Nova Scotia and the United States, titled with triple Expansion 
Engines, ICleciric Lights, I'.ilge Keels, etc., etc. 

The Steamer CilV oi' St. Joil.V leaves Pickford and Black's wharf, Halifax, every 
3I0N'D.VY evening, for Yarmouth and interme<liale ports. 

The New Steel Steamshiii RasiON, 4000 horse-power, 17 knot.s, will be placed on the 
route about .August 1st. after that date the Steamers of this Line will leave \'armouth for 
IJoston every MONDVY, WEDNESDAY. THURSDAY and SATURDAY afterno.m ; 
leaving lioston lor Wirmouih every S.U'URDAY, TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY mid 
FRIDAY. 

I''nr tickets, staterooms and all oilier information apply to 
€. II. I$AKIiY, GEO. M. CONNOR, 

VIW Hollis St., HalU'iix, N. S. North St. Depot, Halifax, N. S. 

Or to any Ticket Agent (>n Windsor and Annapolis and N. S. Central and Western 
Counties Railways. 

PICKFORD & BLACK, 
L. E. BAKEK, Agents, Halifax. 

President A: .Hanapring Director. 

Varinoulh, N. S.. .March 2(>, 1S!.0. 



td. 



I 



123 



i^riDREW KfiiiiD, 



DEAUER Ifi 




Periodicals, Stationery, 

Jndian Curiosities^ Tixn^t^ ciioods^ <S;c* 



ROBT. \R.TIkPVit. 






RAIK 




K R B S ;^ R , 



a<lifa-2s: Hotel, 

ALirAX, N. S. 



Wmk Oass Workmen always m. altsodance, 



170111 1^ (sold Baths in (©onnegtion. 



124 



-^ P^OPJ^IETORS. H^ 



^« 




!1 




Their Celebrated 



AliES AND PORTER 



IN WOOD and BOTTLE. 



12" 



^\ 



r, 




'=* 




R 



J. EVELEIGH k CO., 

1753 Notre Dame Street^ Montreal^ 



MANUFAcrUKKU.S iiK 



TRUHKS, TRAVELLING BAGS, kz. 



ic 



LEATHEROID," 




The Iiightcst 6t Strongest Tpunk in the iJUopld. 

Lentlicroid the Tou^liost, Lightest, Strongest inatcrini knouii ; iinrd ns 

Rawhide ; lilie Horn in texture. 

SA 1# P C EXTRA BAGGAGE CHARGES. 
M V E O EXPENSE FOR REPAIRS. 

These sample trunks are well inacte, steel lined and practically indestnicfiblc, and are 
made to suit all classes ot (jjoods. 

Also Telescope Cases, Warehouse Cars, Mill Baskets, etc. 



TESTHs^OISri^LS : 

Stobart. Sons & Co., Winnipeg: U. U. (Jreene & Co.. J. McPherson & ("o., W. U. fJriftilli 
A ('o., Hamilton; W. Hynian & Co., Iloljinson. Little & Co., liondon ; Ueardinore & Co., Coojier 
& Smith, The Copp Clark Co., (iillicsitic, Anslev & Miirtm, .John Macdonald &< 'o.. Toronto ; 
J. H. Hotterell & Co., Quebec ; .1. M Humphrey &. Co.. St. J>hii, N. H, ; .Vmes, Holden &; Co., 
James Linton & Co., J. T. Donnelly & Co.. K. Delaiuuy. T.J. Claxton & Co.. .1. C. Watson A Co., 
James Hutton A Co., James Johnston iS: Co., Montreal ; I'Mtch, I'atillo i*t: Co., Truro, N. S. 

PRICES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION. 

C. S, LANE, Agent, Granville Street, Halifax, N. S. 



James Bowf.s & Son.s, Printkus, 12.^ Hollis Stiikkt, IIai.iiwx, N. S.