(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Book of the Varian family : with some speculation as to their origin..."

H^^^HH 




BOSTON 
PUBLIC 
LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Public Library 



http://archive.org/details/bookofvarianfami1881brig 



* 



R; 






3 



«**.** •>* 



tf^s?*^ 



w 



i-. 



k^ * ^ ~* 



X 



uy 













r^^A 



''tsrf 



- ■ / 



zm^m 






ffiHQKJl 



*4W$-- 






. 




m 



fev 



*:"^*: : *. 



■c 



■yt; 



-■mm^^M 






>^ 





'//,- .///J 



^v*»r/./.^ 



THE 




BOOK 



OF 




opian 




With some Speculations as to their Origin, Etc 



BY 



JtSam. JJBpiggs, 



o 

MEMBER OF 
THE WESTERN RESERVE AND NORTHERN OHIO HISTORICAL SOCIETY. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



•' By Jove, I am not covetous for gold; 
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost, 
It yearns me not if men my garments wear ; 
Such outward things dwell not in my desires : 
But if it be a sin to covet honour, 
I am the most offending soul alive." <■ 

King Henry V. 



r - P-Rir/Te:& ^bt "^ C.Sc we*** & co.-j 

C L E V E LAND, OHIO. 

1881. 



■» t :> > » , i 

* » J J-> J JJJJ 






* C S 7 / 



Printed by Theo. C. Schenck & Co. 
Herald Building, Cleveland, Ohio. 



SdL^ 




" A painful work it is, and more than difficult, wherein what 
toyle hath been taken, as no man thinketh, so no man believeth 
but he that hath made the triall."— Anthony a Wood. 



EDITION 100 COPI ES- 



No 



TO 

THE MEMORY 
OF 

ELIZABETH VARIAN, 

THE MOTHER OF MY FATHER, 

ISAAC VARIAN ERIGGS, 

THIS VOLUME 

IS 

AFFECTIONATELY DEDICATED. 



"—I should sin 
To think but nobly of my grandmother," 

The Tempest. 



Either our history shall with full mouth 
Speak freely of our acts; or else our grave, 
Like Turkish mute shall have a tougueless mouth, 
Not worshipped by a waxen epitaph." 

King Henry V. 



Contents. 



" I humbly pray them to admit the excuse 
Of time, of numbers, and due course of things 
Which cannot in their huge and proper life 
Be here presented." 



King- Henry V. 



Preliminary Discourse — which may be regarded as the result of a 
literary dyspepsia, and which, though intended for genealogists 
and compilers of family history in particular, may be read with 
impunity by any one 



Concerning Normandy and the Normans — some selections and 
comments never before appearing ( to my knowledge ) in a work 
of this kind, and which may serve to amuse or excite ; for either 
of which sensations the author holds himself solely responsible 5 



The Name Yarian— A disquisition on the origin of the cognomen. 
the premises of which perhaps are entirely wrong and of which 
error no one would be more happy to be convinced than the 
writer , 9 



Ihe Family in France — A collection of instances of the name, — a 

brief chapter, unfortunately, or otherwise 11 



The Family in Canada — which speaks for itself . . 13 

" O brave new world, 
That has such people in't !" 

The Tempest. 



The Family in Ireland — a brief allusion to a few respectable 
individuals of the name in that unfortunate island, of whose 
ancestry I regret we cannot say more 16 



CONTENTS. 

The Family in the United States — the country in which we pay 
taxes, and where the majority of the persons whose names are 
herein found have performed that duty, lived and married, (with 
a few exceptions) propagated the name, and have been gathered 
to their fathers 20 



ISAAC Varian — the party responsible for the existence of the name 
in the United States, and a short account of his habitat and 
career 20 



Joseph Vakian and his descendants 23 



James Varian and his progeny 25 



" Bearing their birthrights proudly on their backs." 

King John, 



Richard Varian and what he accomplished 40 



Michael Varian and the results of his life 47 



' For new made honour doth forget men's names ; 
"lis too respective; and too sociable 
For your conversion," 

King John. 



Isaac Varian, Jr. — and those who " may rise up and call him blessed" .... 50 

" In every branch truly demonstrative ; 
***** overlook this pedigree:" 

King Heney V. 



APPENDIX — containing the names of sundry persons of the name 
VARIAN who may reasonably be supposed to have had ancestors, 
but the means of identification have not transpired, — also addi- 
tions, and emendations to families and individuals mentioned in 
other portions of this book 79 



Index— persons bearing the name Varian 91 



Index — of other names. Those intermarrying with VARIANS, and 

those incidentally mentioned 95 



Additions and Corrections — a few blank pages designed for the 

use of other people who wish to make remarks 99 



Illustrations and Portraits. 



Hon. Caleb Tompkins, - 

Rev. Alexander Varian, - 

Samuel Briggs, 

Hon. Isaac L. Varian, 

Old Varian House, 

Map of a portion of New York City, 

Hon. George W. Varian, 

Alfred Varian, - 



Faci 



ng page 26 
32 

52 
56 
60 
62 
64 



Abbreviations. 



a. aet. — aged, 
b. — born, 
bap. — baptised, 
bro. — brother, 
bur. — buried. 
ch. — children. 
circa. — about, 
d. — died, 
dau. — daughter. 



dec. — deceased, 
em. — emigrated, 
grad. — graduated . 
habitat. — place of abode, 
m. — married, 

rem. — removed, 
res. — residence, resided, 
unm . — unmarried. 
yo. — youngest. 



A + after the name of an individual, or at the end of the line where the 
individual's name occurs, signifies that the descendants of the person may be 
found under the proper number on a subsequent page. 



Preliminary Discourse. 



N undertaker or a grave digger is not considered a valuable 
acquisition, or a cheerful element at a social party. I cannot 
recollect an instance where one of either profession was to be met 
at any merry-making, nor can I recall any individual among my 
acquaintance who confessed any relationship to a member of either 
one of these dismal guilds. The daughter of the grave digger, or 
the consort of the undertaker are nonentities. These dismal human 
necessities appear to be barred from society and its pleasures, and 
are the last persons which one wishes to have about, and then " at 
the last scene of all which ends this strange, eventful history. 11 

I am ready to believe that the genealogist will soon reach the 
social status of the ghastly undertaker and the earthy grave digger. 
It would seem that the study of genealogy should meet with more 
encouragement in this age of inquiry and investigation, but the 
contrary of this proposition appears to be in the ascendant, 

No argument can convince many correspondents of the advan- 
tages of genealogy. The benefits to be derived from a pursuit of 

* ■ 

genealogic inquiry appear not to be appreciated, and the results of 

years of labor (if successful and placed in book form) are looked 
upon as a vade mecum for the especial gratification of those inquisi- 
tive individuals who desire to know "how old such a person is? 11 or 
"how successful such a couple have been in the propagation of the 
family name P 11 

The genealogist quite often is considered in the light of a ghoule 
or a resurrectionist— a social hyena desecrating the graves of a past 
generation, or a sort of Tybalt, "with some great kinsman's bone, 
as with a club 11 menacing the living world for information con- 
cerning the ancestral line. 



£ PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE. 

A circular of inquiry addressed to certain individuals con- 
cerning their ancestry, inspires a certain degree of horror and the 
recipient soliloquizes — "What do I know about my ancestors ? and 
what if it should be true that my great-grandfather was, in con- 
sequence of some 'trespass on the law,' made an example of 
suspended animation ? Perish the thought! Why will some people 
persist in annoying the living by prying into the dead past ?"— and 
after this philosophical reflection the circular is committed to the 
flames, and the genealogist u tears his hair. 11 In this connection, 
it is "queer 11 that probably the same individual whose philosophy/ 
is noted above, or who knows little and cares less for his own 
ancestry, be it honestly humble or gloriously noble, will ransack 
the entire publications of the "Turf" or "Spirit, 11 the herd books 
of the "Short-horn Association, 11 or "Jersey Club, 1 ' or the archives 
of the Swine-breeders 1 Convention, to discover the grandsire of a 
sway-backed gelding, the antecedents of a Durham bull or an 
Alderney heifer, the ancestry of a short-faced Lancaster boar or a 
Jersey red sow. It is a curious world — in more cases than one, 
" religion is one thing, and business is another. 11 

Females generally manifest more interest in the matter of 
genealogy than the "sterner sex ;" but the "girls 11 have their little 
peculiarities also. The lady of "a certain age, 11 after a suppressed 
squeak, drops the circular of inquiry into the fire for obvious rea- 
sons, seemingly forgetting that when the mortal coil is shuffled, and 
the monumental marble is dealt, that the graver is quite liable (if the 
estate is sufficient) to advertise to an unsympathetic world the infor- 
mation so carefully withheld, if perhaps, the "Bureau of Statistics 11 
has not sold the particulars of her advent into the world for the 
" usual fee. 11 

Various other sentiments prevail among the "world's people 11 
in reference to the objects of genealogic inquiry. All sorts of 
motives are imputed for inquiries made — desire to discover property 
improperly disposed of— money in the Bank of England — and other 
financially founded suspicions. 

Mr. La yard, the traveler and historian, once applied to an East- 
ern caliph for information concerning certain antiquities, and in 
reply the follower of the Prophet said, "The answer which you seek 



PBEL1 M T NA B Y DISCO TIB SE. 3 

of me, 0, illustrious friend and Joy of my Liver, is both difficult 
and useless to be given. 11 

The ordinary courtesy of business is rarely applied to the 
subject of genealogy ; answers to letters on the topic are excep- 
tional — and if statistics could ■ be obtained I believe that gene- 
alogists contribute more extensively to the "mail service, 11 and 
receive less corresponding return than any other class of patrons 
who moisten postage stamps. 

As to the kind of information received in response to inquiry, 
some of it savors of the quality of the charity dispensed by the 
parish beadle who in such cases recommended the following 
method : " First find out what the pauper wants, give Mm 
something else^ and he will never bother you again. 11 

The affection of some families for bibles, muniments and other 
documents containing items of family history is surprisingly de- 
veloped when the genealogist makes inquiry therefor. A bible 
centuries old, and whose only use for generations has been to 
elevate the junior member of the family to a proper altitude at 
the dinner-table, and which sacred volume contains the "family 
record, 1 ' suddenly becomes an object of holy adoration when the 
genealogist desires to investigate the subject. No inducement 
can obtain its contents which are religiously sealed against the 
gaze of the family historian, who humbly bows his head, gropes in 
the darkness, and mentally curses the memory of James the First, 
whose neglect to expunge the writings of the Apostle who advised 
against "endless genealogies, 11 has undoubtedly caused all the 
trouble which the compiler of domestic history has experienced. 

Perhaps the revision of the sacred writings, now in progress, 
will modify the text, and give a new impetus to genealogical 
success, leaving no Apostolic excuse for non-attention to cor- 
respondence on the subject. 

As an apology for any imperfections which are certain to be 
discovered in this, or any similar work, I desire to say — I am not a 
professional genealogist, and this production will be a sufficient 
evidence of the fact. My experience has taught me sympathy for 
any who take up the study professionally. My sole ambition has 



4 PRELIMINARY DISCOURSE. 

been to know more of my ancestry, and to furnish the information 
that I have accumulated for the benefit of others to whom the mat- 
ter certainly should possess some interest. Persons who pursue 
this channel of investigation are generally persons of leisure — 
which I am not — and are possessed of a generous income to enable 
them to do it thoroughly — my purse is limited — but the labor has 
been a pleasure to me, answering as a sort of "knitting work" to 
fill in time which otherwise might have been wasted. 

The work might have been more ample and complete but for 
reasons with which many of my correspondents should be familiar, 
and in conclusion I will merely quote "In completing this work, 
let me say to the descendants: I claim for you no greatness save 
a virtuous and honest parentage. May future generations keep up 
the standard in these respects, whatever they may do in others. 1 '* 

73 Huntington St., ) SAM. BRIGrGS. 

Cleveland, Ohio. [ 

4 July, 1881. ) 

*Todd Genealogy, by Mr. Richard H. Greene. 



Concerning Normandy and the Normans.* 



N England, among many families it has been esteemed an 
evidence of gentle blood, and consequent honor, to trace their 
origin to some one of the gentry who " came over with the 
Conqueror." William, Duke of Normandy, surnamed the Con- 
queror, laid claim to the throne of England, at the death of Edward 
the Confessor, in opposition to the alleged title of Harold. In 
support of his claim, William invaded England with a large army 
on the 28th of September, 1066, and on the 14th of October 
following, the great battle of Hastings was fought, in which Harold 
was slain, and England passed under the domination of the Nor- 
man dynasty. 

The companions of the Conqueror, who have always borne the 
reputation of having been of the " first families" of Normandy, do 
not appear in such an estimable light when their antecedents are 
submitted to the crucible of historical investigation — they being 
but a generation of powerful land pirates with whom " might made 
right" and which principle governed all their movements. The 
honor therefore, of being descended from this body of troops is 
somewhat questionable; and to urge the importance of a descent 
from this gentry is not considered the " correct thing " as much as 
it was. 

The tendency of the world, and its peoples, is to improve, and 
this feature is markedly apparent in the case of the Normans, who 
in early times enjoyed a questionable moral reputation as is 
evidenced in several literary works upon the manners and customs 
of that province. In support of this proposition I quote from 
" Blason Populaire de la JVormandie" comprising the proverbs, 
nicknames, and sayings relative to this ancient province, and to 
its inhabitants, " by M. A. Canel, Member of the Norman Society of 
Antiquaries." 

*This chapter may not be deemed absolutely necessary to this volume, but as 
I am convinced that the family is of Norman French extraction, I have thought 
proper to make these extracts that the "march of improvement " might be noted. 



6 N OEM ANDY AND THE NOB MANS. 

"In our old language, blasoner (heraldic, to blazon), signifies 
either to say good or bad, to praise or to revile: but popular 
blazonry inspires more of satire than eulogy. * * * Popular 
blasonry embraces all the vernacular expressions adopted by cus- 
tom to quality an individual, a portion of a people, an entire people, 
or a collection of peoples. * * * It is a branch of the numerous 
family of proverbs. * * * « Proverbs are called the ' wisdom of 
nations." * * * "During the government of the dukes, the 
French were animated, with respect to the Normans, with a cordial 
hatred. * * * In the xvnth century, Etienne Pasquier was 
obliged to recognize the fact, that the French, piqued by the memory 
of their ancient quarrels with the Normans, naturally wished them 
evil : and with a common purpose even detested those who succeeded 
tJiem. 

"With such a disposition, slander (blason) ought to have full 
scope, and as a resume of all slanderous attacks, a Doctor of Paris 
published a Norman Catechism, in which was set forth with all the 
strength of prepossessing explanation, that the merciful works of 
these same Normans were treason, flattery, gluttony, larceny, 
falsehood, envy, and imposture." 

An extract from the Catechism will show its general character: 

Q. Do you know anything of the history of the Normans ? 

A. Yes: I know that anciently our province bore on its arms 
three faults (faulx) which signified that among us were found 
three kinds of persons ; viz., false witnesses, salt smugglers (faux 
sauniers) and counterfeiters (faux monnayeurs). 

Q. Is there any other remarkable thing in connection with the 
history of your province '? 

A. Our province is so ancient that it has had the honor of 
being the birth place of the thirteenth apostle of Jesus Christ, 

Q. Where was he from ? 

A. From Haie-Pesnel. 

Q. What was his name ? 

A. Judas Iscariot. On Good Friday the following epistle is 
sung in his honor : -There was a man of Haie-Pesnel, a captain of 
Highwaymen. He was in the Garden, of Olives, where he found our 
Lard J. C. to whom he said, "Good day, my gentle master, etc." 

Here is another' extract : 

Q. Who are those who should be called Normans ? 
A. They are those who enrich themselves at all hazards and 
with both hands. 

Q. What is the sign of a Norman V 



N E M A N I) Y A N 1) T 11 E N 1? M AN S. 7 

A. To have the hand on top of the head, ready to take a false 
oath. 

Q. What are the necessary virtues for a Norman, and without 
which he would degrade his profession ? 
A. There are five principal virtues. 
Q. What are they ? 

A. It is to be: first, a traitor, second a glutton, third a free- 
booter, fourth a flatterer, fifth a liar. 

Q. How many commandments are there in this nation ? 

A. Seven. 

Q. Repeat them. 

A. To God in vain thou mayest plead 

To affirm thy false oath. 

Thy parents' death thou shalt desire 

To early have their goods. 

The money of others do not spare 

And their goods not at all. 

False witness thou shalt always bear, 

And dexterously it maintain. 

The work of thy hands do not omit. 

To constant reap thy gain. 

Great favorite always make thyself. 

For long time to maintain. 

Thy neighbors goods do not restore, 

Butknowinglv restrain. 



Among the soubriquets borne by the Normans in ancient times 
w T as the title of "Scourge of God: 11 and in the early litanies, the 
faithful, after having prayed to God to avert all other dangers, 
added: A furore Normannorum libera nos Domine! 

The proverbs relative to Normandy and the Normans are 
almost without number. The following will suffice to show their 
character : 

From Normand}^ bad winds and bad people. 

Normans are inquisitive: where are you from? what do you 
want V where are you going ? 

A Norman never says yes, or no. 

A Norman has his say and his unsay.* 

If you are wise, do not trust a red Frenchman, a black English- 
man, or a Norman of any shape. 

*In a prayer, a peasant of another province was heard to say, '' Thou hast 
promised, O Lord, to assist us in time of trouble, and Thou wilt not refuse, for 

Thou art not a Norman.'''' 



8 NOB MA ND Y A ND THE NORMANS. 

A Norman dies when his right arm is paralyzed. 

Normans are a cross between a fox and a cat. 

Judas was a Norman as everybody knows. 

Between Caen and Rouen was this sorry rascal born. 

He sold his good Lord Jesus for thirty crowns cash. 
To the d with all the Normans. 

We ask nothing of you my Lord, only place us along side of 
those that have something. 

Ninety-nine pigeons and one Norman make one hundred robbers. 

If a Norman is not a sea pirate, he practices the profession on 
the land. 

The Norman milks the East and West, 

Paris is "happy Arabia" for Normans. 

He is a Norman, he draws everything toward him. 

Normans are born with crooked fingers. 

When a Norman comes out of a house and brings nothing 
with him, he is believed to have forgotten something. 

In Normandy if a newly born babe is thrown against a mirror 
it will find some way to catch on. 

Norman priests collect the burial fee at time of baptism, 
because their flocks are in the habit of getting hung. 

Normans are born with a grain of hemp seed in one hand, and 
an acorn in the other.* 



These proverbs and sayings in all probability date from a 
remote period, and from their general tendency it would lead 
us to believe that they were not altogether founded on fancy, 
conveying also the idea that the early Norman was not a "pleasant 
person to do business with." 



*Hemp seed beeomes hemp, and hemp becomes rope : The acorn grows 
to an oak, and the oak may become a gallows. Hemp seed is also called 
" Norman salad." Curse the salad ! " said a Norman who heard it so called, " it 
has strangled my father and my grandfather, without mentioning uncles and 
cousins." A commentator on this proverb says that the rope counted greatly in 
t he chances for the future of our ancestors, for they hung many in Normandy. 
It is frightful to calculate how many have been hung in the old market place at 
Rouen. 

A poor Norman who was being led away to the gallows, and who was 
a practical philosopher and well knew his destiny, said to his wife for her consola- 
tion, "There are but two kinds of persons in the world, those who are hung and 
those who are not; it is absolutely necessary to be either one or the other." 



THE NAME VARIAN. 



/~pHE origin of the name is undoubtedly French, it being quite 
common in various parts of France, notably in the ancient 
province of Normandy, where the family is still extant, its advent 
there dating from an exceeding remote period, and at present is 
reputed as "one of the good old families" in the vicinage of Rouen. 

The appellation has existed under various forms of orthography, 
and in reference to its origin and signification I translate the fol- 
lowing from Lw Origins et Signification des Noms Propres et des 
ArmoireS) par le Baron de Coston, Paris, 1867": 

P. 420, note: "The original name of the Tencin family was 
GUERIN in the 16th century, GARIN in the 15th, GARINUS and 
GUARINUS in the deeds of the 12th century. This family, originally 
of Rome, was represented in 1589 by Antoine GUERIN, a royal 
judge, recently ennobled. GARIN, WARIN * and GUERIN {de gar 
win or ger win) signified "lover of war" (warlike) in the Teutonic 
dialect. The Guerins bought in the 17th century the lands of 
Tencin, from which they took their name, establishing themselves 
there in the 18th century." 

The orthography of the name as now existing in France, as 
well as in the branches in Canada, is Varin, from which its cor- 
ruption to the English form Varian, which is the orthography now 
in vogue in the families of the name, established in Ireland, Wales, 
England and the United States. 

The assumption that " VARIAN" is a corruption of " VARIN " is 
undoubtedly true: the pronunciation of the latter name according 
to the French method, with accent on the last syllable, being strictly 
in consonance with the pronunciation of the anglicized name 
Vari^m; the interpolation of the extra syllable or letter "i" being 
a not uncommon form of corruption of proper names. 



* There being no W in the French alphabet, and said letter being, in the 
modern tongue when, required for a foreign word, known as " double-ve," the 
transition from War in to Varin would be natural and probable. 
2 



10 TEE NAME V A E I A N. 

Many family names of French or other foreign origin have 
nearly if not quite lost their identity through this custom of con- 
forming them, first, by pronunciation, and then by orthography, to 
the language of other peoples among whom the original proprietors 
have become established. Thus Corneille has become Cornell — 
Sicard, Secor — Angevin, Angevine — Bailli, Bailey — Bertein, Bertine or 
Bartine — Feriers, Ferris — V Espinard, Lispenard — Guy on, Guion — 
Bertaut, Bartow, etc. 

An odd instance of this transmutation of names has come to my 
notice. A German family Eismann settled in a western town. 
The children were sent to the village school, and the pedagogue, not 
familiar with the German method, registered their names u Icsman." 
When the urchins were instructed in the mystery of writing and 
spelling they were taught the schoolmaster's orthography of their 
patronymic. The parents, not being familiar with the English 
characters, did not correct the blunder, and the "Icsman 1 ' family 
in America became established in name as well as in fact. 




The Family in France. 



~\EE scarcity of books on French Genealogy and Heraldry in 

our libraries has prevented me from making as full inquiry as I 

desired in reference to the family in that country. 

The following notices of the name are taken from " Nobiliaire 

DE NoRMANDlE, published by a Society of Genealogists, with the consent 

of the 'principal noble families of the province, under the direction of 

E. DeMagny, Paris, 1862-1864. 

I. p. 145. VARIN — Esquire, lord of St. Germain, Pretreville, 
Beauchamp, etc. Election of Pont-l'Eveque, bore 
for arms, 13 Jan., 1668, Or. 3 flames, gules, a 
chief azure, charged with a besant of the field, 
accosted with 2 crescents of the same. 

VARLN. — Esquire, lord of La Fontaine. Election of 
Falaise, bore for arms, 15 Feb., 1668, Argent, 2 
roses gules in chief, and a shell of the same, 
pointwise. 

III. p. 208. VARRIN. — Frangois, lord of Moustier, counsellor of the 
bailiwick of Bayeux, bore 1699 arms as above. 



I. p. 182. List of the nobility assembled for the election of 
deputies to the States-General of 1789. 

Bailiwick of Exmes. 

Le Chevalier Pierre-Louis-Auguste de VARIN, old 
officer of dragoons. 

I. p. 186. Bailiwick of Honfleur. VARIN de Pretreville. 



12 THE FAMILY IN F BAN C E . 

I. p. 192. Bailiwick of Orbec. 

De VARIN of Morainville. 

De VARIN, represented by Mr. Verriere of Remilly. 
I. p. 185. Bailiwick of Kouen. VARIN de St. Ouen. 



II. p. 506. Marie- Anne de VARIN, m. -20 Jan., 1753, Claude 
Nicolas Baron de Saint-Sauveur. 

II. p. 85. Pauline-Marie VARIN de la Bruneliere, descended 
from an ancient family of Bennes, m. Leopold- 
Ed mond-Regnald de Bouttemont, b. 24 Feb., 1819, 
d. 12 June, 1860. 

II. p. 130. Louise-Marie VARIN de Beautot, m. 1851, Stanislas- 
Alexandre- Amable Le Filleul des Guerrots, b. 9 
Mar., 1823. 



III. p. 221. Patents of nobility granted 

VARIN de Mallot, Frangois, Counsellor at Court, 9 
Aug., 1754. 



The Family in Canada. 



/~PHE branches of the Varin family established in Canada all 
claim a Norman ancestry, and are descended from individuals 
T of the name formerly resident at or near the City of Rouen. 

For much of the following information I am indebted to the 
excellent volume entitled " Dictionnaire Oenealogique des Families 
Canadiennes from the foundation of the colony until the present 
day, 1 ' by M. L'abbe Cyprien Tanguay, Quebec, 1871." 

VARIN, surnamed La Pistole.* 

YARIN, was deputy at Quebec, 1621.* 

YARIN, Catherine, dau. of Robert and Marie (L'Apotre) Varin 
of St. Pierre du Grand Cavilly de Rouen, b. 1644, m. 1, 1666, Pierre 
Bessier; 2,1667, Rene Branche; 3,9, Sept., 1681, Pierre Courois at 
Quebec; 4, 27 Nov., 1684. Anicet Boyer. She d. 27 Jan., 1706, at 
Montreal. 

VARIN, surnamed Gaudria, Marin, son of Louis and Franchise 
(Lucas) Varin of St. Vincent de Rouen, m. at Quebec 28 June 
1688, Marie Massard, widow of Louis Meline and had ch. 

1. Joseph Nicolas, b. 28 Nov., 1691. 

2. Marie-Michelle, b. 13 Feb., 1695, m. 26 Nov., 1712, at 

Montreal, Leonard Jean. 
VARIN, surnamed La Pistole, Nicolas, son of Nicolas and Jeanne 
(Lacroix) Varin, b. 1669, at Groincour, bishopric of Rouen, m. 29 
Octo., 1697, at Boucherville, Marie-Anne Rouseray, and had ch. 

1. Nicolas, b. 31 Aug., 1698, d. 1 Sep., 1698. 

2. Jacques, b. - , m. 31 Mar., 1723, at La Prairie, 

Marie-Madeleine Dumay. 

Through the kindness of Mr. J. E. Varin, an attache of the Court 
of Queen's Bench at Montreal, I am favored with the following 



* See contribution from Mr. J. E. Varin. 



U THE FAMILY IN CANADA. 

notes of the " Varin " family, partially procured from the archives 
of the Montreal Historical Society. 

The family was originally from the neighborhood of the City of 
Rouen, in the province of Normandy in France. 

In the year 1582 the Chevalier VARIN a St. Pierre du Grand 
Oavilly de Rouen bore arms " Chevron de sable, sur fond d'azur, lance 
en tete, et mollettes en sautoir." 

In 1598 a person of the name of VARIN was hung at the Isle 
aux Sables for mutiny on board one of the vessels forming part of 
the expedition of the Marquis de la Roche to Canada in that year. 
It is not claimed that any of the present VARIN family in Canada 
are descended from this individual. 

VARIN appointed commissary in the army in Canada 

under the intendant Bigot in 1748, filled the position of intendant 
during the absence of Bigot in France. He was appointed com- 
missary of the navy in 1755; was an industrious financier, sought to 
make money, and succeeded. He founded a mercantile house 
which was called u La Triponne" (sharper's or swindler's house) on 
account of the high-toned transactions of the proprietor. He finally 
started for France in 1754, loaded with wealth, which he, with Bigot, 
had accumulated, having ruined the country, and left it to its own 
resources to be conquered by England, whose armies encountered 
but troops without arms or ammunition and destitute of food or 
clothing. 

This latter VARIN .figures as a character in an historical 
novelette entitled u Le Grand Vaincu," published the last year 
(1880) in " Feuilleton Illustre," at Montreal. In this tale the finan- 
cial peculiarities of this VARIN are elaborately portrayed.* 



* r 



The following description of M. Yarin, taken from the novel mentioned, 
must be read with due regard to the source from whence it came. 

" M. Varin was a man of small stature, and whose ornamented coat and 
powdered peruke illy concealed his low and vulgar origin. Bushy and black 
eyebrows surmounted small active eyes which flashed with intelligence, a large 
chin, a mouth with thick lips, two great red hands extending heavily beyond the 
lace of his coat-sleeves, which were so tight that the ends of his Angers were 
1)1 ue, a manner at once cunning and cringing, but which changed to that of arro- 
gance when the intendant was in the presence of an inferior. Such, in a few 
words, was this personage, the living incarnation of the most sordid vices, the 
veritable image of a parvenu presumptuously covetous and insolent, without 
heart, soul or tenderness, and whose singular and active intelligence passionately 
sought but a single end — lucre." [Evidently an old time Norman. — Ed.] 



THE FAMILY IN CANADA. 



15 



In common with many others, the contributor of the foregoing, 
Mr. J. E. Varin, knows but little of his ancestry, save that his 
great-grandfather, grandfather, as well as his father, bore the sur- 
name "La Pistole" His father, deceased at Oohoes, N. Y., having 
served three years in the Union army during the Rebellion 1861- 
1865. He enlisted as a private, was wounded severely in the 
battles before Richmond, Va., and, having been a physician of 
repute in Canada, succeeded upon his discharge from the hospital 
in obtaining a commission as surgeon, ranking as major in the 
Army of the Potomac. 

Mr. Varin expresses the opinion that his family is descended 
from the commissary who contributed to sell Canada to England. 

Besides the acknowledgements already made, I am under obli- 
gations for information to Mr. O. Bouchard. Montreal, Mr. A. Varin, 
Quebec, Mr. Ernest Varin, Montreal, and Mr. G. Arthur Varin, 
Quebec. 




The Family in Ireland. 



HE tradition concerning the family in Ireland is, that it was 
established there alter the Cromwellian invasion of that 
island, and the various persons with whom I have corresponded 
on the subject m England, Ireland and Wales, each attribute the 
origin of their ancestors to Normandy in France, from whence 
they were driven by religious persecution. 

The tradition says that the first of the name in Ireland were 
brothers, Isaac and John Vakian, who were officers in a regiment 
of Cromwell's cavalry, and in the partition of the confiscated lands 
among the followers of the Protector, Isaac received a grant of 
"fifty town lands' 1 in the Co. Kerry, but he, disregarding the con- 
ditions of the gift by "marrying a native" forfeited the property in 
consequence. 

John Varean is supposed to have settled near Middleton, and 
no trace of his descendants (if he had any) can be obtained. 

Isaac Vakian, a descendant of the Isaac mentioned above, was 
a musician and dancing master who resided at Cork, about the year 
1723. He married late in life and had children, 

1. Isaac, of whom hereafter. 

2. Thomas, of whom hereafter. 

8. Amos, b. Cork, Aug. 1771. d. 1853 of whom hereafter. 
4. Nancy, of whom hereafter. 

1, Isaac, followed the profession of his father, was a great 
favorite in Cork, a good musician, and sustained a circle of amateur 
theatrical and musical friends by his general kindly manners. He 
was unmarried. 

2. Thomas, married a very young wife, a Miss Skinner, aged 
1(> years, and had a family of about seventeen children, who all 
died young, or in early prime. He founded a brush factory in 
Cork, bringing skilled labor from London, and was very successful. 



THE FAMILY IN I BEL AND. 17 

3. Amos, was a wool comber for some years, and subsequently 
became a grocer. He married, 1807, Dora Walpole, b. Cork, 1788, 
d. 1826, and had issue. 

5. Ellen, b. Cork 9 June 1808, d. Apr. 1816. 

6. Ann, b. Cork 9 Dec. 1809, d. 1843. 

7. Isaac Stephen, b. Cork, 26 Dec. 1811, d. 1869, m. 1849, 

Susan Osborne, was a brush manufacturer in London, 
then at Dublin. Has six sons and two daughters living. 
One son, Walter A., resides at Washington D. C, U. S. 
A., with his uncle, J. W Osborne. 

8. Thomas Hincks, b. Cork, 11 Feb. 1813, d. 1824. 

9. Dora, b. Cork, 7 Jan., 1814, d. 1849, m. 1843 Abel Dean, 

professor of music, Halifax, York. No issue living. 

10. Agnes, b. Cork, 6 Mar., 1816, d. 1874. 

11. Mary, b. Cork, 19 May, 1818, d. 1867, m. 1849, Kalph 

Varian, her cousin, a brush manufacturer at Cork, in 
business with his bro. William. 

12. Rebecca, b. Cork, 3 Apr., 1821, d. 1875, m. 1851, Alexander 

Henderson of the British Legation, at Lisbon, Portugal. 

13. Amos John, b. Cork, 20 Oct., 1822, m. 7 May, 1860, Anna 

Richards Spencer. He is a brush manufacturer; firm 
I. S. Varian & Co., 92 Talbot St., Dublin. Children, 
Agnes, Dora and Annie. 
, 14. Thomas Hincks, b. Cork, 6 Dec, 1824, d. 1825. 
15. Hetty, b. Cork, 1 May, 1826, m. 1861, George Ligerson, 
M. D., and Professor of Botany, Catholic University, 
Dublin. 

The gentlemen of this family of Varian have been for many 
years active in the temperance movement in Ireland, Isaac S. (7) 
being particularly vigorous in the cause, and assisting in intro- 
ducing the work to the notice of the great Temperance Apostle, 
Father Mathew. 

In religious affairs they are "Humanitarians," or liberal Unita- 
rians, not # attaching much importance to doctrinal matters. 

4. Nancy, m. about 1800, Thomas Ladd, of London, a brush- 
maker. 

The family tradition in Ireland makes the City of Rouen, 
France, as the ancient home of the Varians, and derives the name 
from an old Norse appellation, denoting "strength." The crest is 

3 



18 THE FAMILY IN IBELAND. 

stated also to be a " drum on a battle field," which, together with 
the " arms and motto," is to be found in Norman Heraldry. The 
family were said to be very powerful in Normandy in feudal times, 
and many of the race were then interred in the Cathedral at Rouen, 
where the family is still extant, and is looked upon as one of the 
" good old families." 

A variation of the tradition regarding the lands in Ireland 
received from Oliver, locates the possessions in the western part of 
Co. Cork (Bantry), and states that the patrimony was wasted in 
" riotous living," in accordance with the custom of the "fine old 
Irish gentleman " of the ancient days. 

Another statement regarding the " crest," etc., mentions the 
"arms" as being a "drum, with mailed hand holding a dagger 
above it," with motto in Latin, rendered "without change." 

One William Varian, under Charles I., is said to have been a 
collector of imposts at Cork, married "a wild Irish girl," and for- 
feited his property and place. 



Another source furnishes the following scanty information 
concerning a branch of the Irish family : 

John Varian (a great-grandson of the Cromwellian officer) was 
a barrister-at-law, and had two brothers who were clergymen of the 
Church of England, and probably were brought up in " holy 
orders" to partially atone for the sanguinary avocation of their 
ancestors. The aforesaid John had four sons, viz.: 

a. John. 

b. Richard. 

c. Thomas. 

d. Stephen. Has son living at Cork, Ireland. 

c. Thomas had seventeen children, many of whom died in 
infancy, but those who lived to maturity were: 
Eliza, deceased. 
Daniel. 

Maria, widow, lives in Australia. 
Catherine, single, lives in England. 
John. 
Henry H., in government service at present (1881) at 

London. 
Jane, deceased. 



THE FAMILY IN I BE LAND. 



19 



Georgina, deceased. 

Thomas James, res. Holyhead, Wales, Capt. of Dublin 

Steamer. 
Eliza, m. George Rogers and em. to America, where he d., 



and she m. again. 



One Justin Varian, a bachelor, said to have emigrated from 
Ireland when very young, was resident, 1844, on Tchoupitoulas 
Street, New Orleans, La., and was reputed very wealthy. He died 
shortly after, leaving his property to the municipality. 



For the information herein contained I express my obligations^ 
to Mr. Amos J. Varian, Dublin, Ireland; Mr. Walter Amos Varian, 
Washington, D. 0. ; Capt. Thomas J. Varian, Holyhead, Wales; Mr. 
Henry H. Varian, London, England. 




The Family in the United States. 



FIRST GENERATION. 

1. ISAAC VARIAN, the first of the name in the United States 
appears as a butcher in the City of New York in the year 
1720,* located in the " Old Slip Market." The place of his 
nativity (as is frequently the case in regard to original 
emigrants) is unknown, except through tradition, which 
varies among the different branches of his posterity; some 
claiming his antecedents as French, others attributing his 
origin to Holland, while others hold that he emigrated 
hither from the north of Ireland. 

I am inclined to believe that the family originated in 
France, but am of the opinion that his ancestors emigrated 
to Holland about the time of the revocation of the Edict of 
]¥antes,\ and were established in Holland for some years 
prior to his advent in America. This would seem to be quite 
probable from the affiliations formed in New York by him- 
self and his children. The idea of his Irish origin may 
possibly be supported by the existence of the name 
"Isaac" in several generations of the family in that 
country. Either of these theories are but suppositions, 
and unsupported by any evidence yet discovered, except 
what is contained within these pages. 

Isaac Vakian was admitted as a "freeman" of the City 
of New York, 23 Jan., 1733. He followed the vocation of 
a butcher in that city for many years, and has always been 
regarded as one of the "fathers of the guild" in Man- 
hattan. He was lessee of Stand No. 3 in the "Fly 



* The Market Book, by Thomas F. De Voe. 

t The Edict of Nantes was promulgated during the reign of Henry IV., 1598, 
and guaranteed to his Protestant subjects (Huguenots) immunity from persecution 
for their religious belief. It was annulled during the reign of Louis XIV., 1G85, 
at which period the general emigration took place, though many Huguenots had 
previously expatriated themselves. 



THE FAMILY IN THE UNITED STATE JS. 21 

Market " in 1750, and had occupied the same since 10 Dec, 
1735. In 1737-8 he was a member of the military com- 
pany of Capt. Cornel us Van Home. He owned a negro, 
"Worcester," who was implicated in the "Great Negro 
Plot " in 1741, and for which crime said African was trans- 
ported. In May, 1710, he was proprietor of a stall in the 
"Meal" or " Wall Street Market." In 1784 he appears as 
a petitioner for the establishment by Richard Deane of a 
public slaughter house on the North River. He is also 
probably identical with Isaac Varian, butcher, who resided 
or was in business at 105 Queen Street; 33 Bowery Lane, 
1790; 35 Bowery Lane, 1791; 38 Boweiw Lane, 1792-3; 61 
Bowery Lane, 1795-7; 98 Bowery Lane, 1798. 

He accumulated considerable property, and deceased at 
his residence on Bowery Lane, about the year 1800. He 
was married in the Old Dutch C [lurch in New York, 12 
Aug., 1732, to Elizabeth De Vouw,* who survived him and 
deceased at an advanced age in 1828. 



SECOND GENERATION. 

The children of Isaac and Elizabeth (De Vouw) Varian were 
born in the City of New York, and are named: 

2. Joseph, b. 24 Feb., 1732-3. 

3. James, b. 10 Jan., 1734; d. 11 Dec, 1800. 

4. Richard, b. 25 Dec, 1736; d. 20 Dec, 1822. 

5. Michael, b. 9 Dec, 1738; d. 1825. 

6. Isaac, b. 8 Sept., 1740; d. 29 May, 1820. 



Note. — The following is a copy of the Record of Marriages of 
Isaac 1. and of some of his children: 

Ingeteekent. Personen met Liceniie. Oetrouwt. 

1732, Aug. 7. Isaac' Varian and Elizabeth De Vouw. 12 Aug. 

1761, Juny. 27. Richard Varian and Susanna Gardinear. 28 Juny. 

17G5, Oct. 2. Isaac Berrian (? Varian) and Hanna Van den Berg. 3 Oct. 

1772, Feb. 25. Michael Varian and Cornelia Horser. 27 Feby. 

True copy from Records of Marriages in the Reformed Protestant Dutch 

Church of the City of New York. 

GEORGE S. STITT, Clerk. 



* Daughter of Daniel De Voe, born at Morrisania, 1ST. Y., and married when 
quite a young girl. — Thos. F. De Voe. 



22 THE FAMILY IN THE UNITED STATES. 

For convenience in reference, and also for the reason that the 
descendants of the children of Isaac 1, have become as different 
families, I have departed from the usual plan in genealogies, and 
have traced the posterity of each of the children named, separately? 
down to the present generation. 




Descendants of Joseph Varian. 



THIRD GENERATION. 

2. JOSEPH VARIAN, eldest son of Isaac 1, b. in New York, 24 

Feb., 1732-3, d. , was a butcher by profession, and 

was admitted as a " freeman" 5 Aug., 1755. In a newspaper 
of this year (1755) he is empowered by Isaac Varian to 
settle some business affairs of the latter. In 1781 he was a 
butcher in "Bear Market, " and signed a petition endorsing 
Richard Varian as superintendent of the public slaughter- 
house. He appears to have had business reverses, as, in 
1784, his property was sold to pay his creditors. 

His first wife was Hannah , (family name and 

date of marriage unknown.) He m. 2. 31 Oct., 1764, (N. Y. 
Marriage Licenses, p. 436,) Rachel White, of Connecticut. 
All the information that I have been able to obtain 
concerning his posterity, is taken from the JVew York 
Genealogical a ltd Biographical Record, (Vols. IV., 143, 198; 
V., 36; VI., 50; VII.,' 139; VIIL, 23, 79; X., 132,) which, in 
the published records of the First Presbyterian Church of 
New York, notes the following births and baptisms of his 
children : 

By Hannah : 



7. John* b. at N. Y. 3 June, 1756; bap. 4 July, 1756. 

8. Hannah, b. at N. Y. 24 Sep., 1758; bap. 22 Oct., 1758; 

prob. d. young. 

9. Isaac, b. at N. Y. 3 Aug, 1760; bap, 30 Aug., 1760. 



*John 7. may be identical with John Varian, file cutter, residing on Des- 
brosses St., N. Y., 1808. Jeanet Varian, tailoress, resident on same street, 
near Hudson St., 1817-19, may have been the widow of this John. 



H DESCENDANTS OF JOSEPH VAB1AN. 

By his wife Rachel White: 

10. Hannah, b. at N. Y. 13 Apr., 1765; bap. 30 Jan., 1766. 

11. David Devoir,* b. at N: Y. 21 July, 1767; bap. 25 Dec, 

1768. 

12. Richard, b. at N. Y. 11 Mar., 1770; bap. 8 Apr., 1770. 

13. Timothy White, b. at N. Y. 9 Mar,, 1771; bap. 7 Apr., 1771. 

14. Deborah, b. at N. Y. 28 June, 1774; bap. 26 Nov., 1774. 

As the name ot Joseph Varian 2, does not appear in the 
Directories of New York City alter 1784, it may be that he removed 
from the city, and his family became extinct, but the latter con- 
tingency is hardly probable. He may also have had other children 
besides those named above. In the Appendix to this book are the 
names of Varians who could not be identified as of any particular 
family, and among these may be found some of the descendants of 
Joseph Yarian 2. 



*David Devoir, or De Voor, was of a prominent Dutch family of ISew York 
at this period. 




Descendants of James Varian. 



THIRD GENERATION. 

3. JAMES VARIAN, second son of Isaac 1, b. N. Y. City, 10 Jan. 
1734, d. Scarsdale, N. Y., 11 Dec. 1800, was a butcher in 
N. Y. until the capture of that city by the British during 
the war of the Revolution, at which time, in common with 
other patriots, he removed. He withdrew to a farm at 
Scarsdale on the "neutral ground'' where he remained 
until his decease. His name does not appear in any N. Y. 
Directory after 1781. During the war he rendered service 
under the Colonial flag, and his possessions were despoiled 
by the human wolves infesting this part of Westchester Co. 
during the war and who were known as "Skinners" and 
" Cowboys." For twenty years prior to his decease he was 
a helpless paralytic, caused by exposure in the patriot 
cause. Both he and his family were driven from their 
farm by the British, and took refuge at Danbury, Conn., 
from whence they returned after the peace was proclaimed. 

His will is dated 10 Dec. 1797, and proven and recorded 
at White Plains, N. Y., 26 June 1801. In it he is mentioned 
as "of Scarsdale," N. Y., and he names wife and all his 
children except Elizabeth, who perhaps d. young. 

He m. 25 Feb. 1759, (JST. Y. Marriages, bond dated 16 Feb. 
1759,) at New York, Deborah Dibble, of Connecticut, who 
d. 12 Apl., 1823. 

Their children were: 

15. Elizabeth, b. ? N. Y., 5 Dec, 1760; bap. 18 Jan., 1761. 

(N. Y. Gen. and Biog. Rec, V. 37.) d. young. 

16. Jonathan, b. ? N. Y., 13 Nov., 1763, bap. 12 Feb!,1764. (N. 

Y. Gen. and Biog. Rec, V. 181.) d. 14 Feb., 1824. + 

17. James, b. ? Scarsdale, 22 Nov., 1765: d. 26 Dec, 1841, + 

4 



26- DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VABIAN. 

18. Michael, b. Scarsdale, 31 Dec, 1767; d. 14 Aug., 1816. 

19. Deborah, b. Scarsdale, 8 Apr., 1770; d. 14 Aug, 1816. + 

20. Joseph, b. Scarsdale, 27 May, 1773; d. 4 Sep, 1828. + 

21. Ichabod, b. Scarsdale, 26 Sep, 1775; d. 20 Sep., 1842. + 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

16. Jonathan Varian, b. N. Y. City, 13 Nov, 1763, d. 14 Feb, 1824, 

aged 6.0-9-29, was a drover by occupation,* and also a Col. 
in the " War of 1812." He resided at Scarsdale, N. Y, and 
m. 11 Apr, 1811, Phebe, dau. of James and Susan Angevine. 
She b. 9 Aug, 1781, d. 19 Eldridge St, N. Y, 29 May, 1849, 
cet 68, of carcinoma, and was bur. at White Plains, N. Y. His 
will is dated 23 April, 1823; proved and recorded at White 
Plains, N. Y, 25 Feb, 1824, and in it are mentioned 
"brother James," " wife Phoebe " and issue as below. The 
estate of his wife was administered by authority of letters 
granted to her son-in-law, Jacob H. Varian (husband of 
Susan A.) 4 Apr, 1850.— N. Y. Co. Records, Liber 50, p. 288. 

Their children were: 

22. Samuel, b. Scarsdale, N. Y, 4 Nov, 1813; d. N. Y. City, 

3 Mar, 1843, unmarried. 

23. Henry Astor, b. Scarsdale, N. Y, 21 Sep, 1816; d. 20 

Sep, 1865, at New Rochelle, N. Y. + 

24. Susan Angevine, b. Scarsdale, N. Y., 23 Sep, 1819; d. 29 

May, 1870, N. Y. City. + 

25. Andrew Jackson, b. Scarsdale, N. Y., 31 May, 1822; d. 

Brooklyn, N. Y, 2 Mar., 1875. + 

17. James Varian, b. Scarsdale, N. Y, 22 Nov, 1765, d. 26 Dec, 1841, 

cet. 76-1-4, was possibty the same person who was in busi- 
ness in N. Y. at the following places: " livery stable," 39 
Barclay, 1798; 104 Henry, 1806; rear 28 Oak, 1807-1810; 15 
Jew's Alley, 1811; 171 Duane, 1814; 117 Anthony, 1815 5 
victualler (retail butcher), 173 Duane, 1817. 

He m. 18 June, 1800, Elizabeth, dau. of John (b. 1743, d. 
1827) and Alice (b. 1741, d. 1830) (Williams) Cornell, b. 22 

* May 21, 1794, Jonathan Varian sold fat bullock to Samuel Winship at Bear 
Market. — The Market Book. 




i 
-v: 








JTOK CALEB TOMFHI§ a 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN. 27 

Sep., 1771), d. 26 Aug., 1863, aged 83-1-14, bur. in Presby- 
terian Cemetery at White Plains, N. Y. 

They had issue : 

26. Sarah, b. 13 Oct., 1801, d. 19 Sep., 1848. 

27. George D., b. 3 Aug., 1803. 

28. Mary, b. 24 Feb., 1805. + 

29. Jonathan, b. 19 Dec, 1808,+ 

30. James, b. 30 Oct., 1810, had homestead at Scarsdale. 

31. David M, b. 18 Jan, 1814. + 

32. Deborah, b. 2 May, 1817, d 12 Oct, 1818, aged 2-5-10. 
• 33. William A, b. 23 Jan., 1820. + 

34. Elizabeth, b. 22 Mar, 1823. 

18. Michael Varian, b. Scarsdale, N. Y , 31 Dec, 1767, third son of 

James 3, m. J , dau. of Pool. He was acciden- 
tally drowned 14 Aug, 1816, being run down by a sloop. 

They had issue: 

35. Malachi, b. 6 Aug, 1798, killed in a duel 13 June, 1818, 

by James Henry, at Sacketts Harbor, N. Y, 

36. Harriet, b. 29 Mar., 1800. 

37. Henry, b. 29 Mar., 1802. 

19. Deborah Varian, b. Scarsdale, N. Y, 8 Apr, 1770: second 

dau. of James 3, d. 14 Aug., 1816, m. Caleb (for lorty years 
Co. Judge of Westchester Co, N. Y.), son of Jonathan G. 
and Sarah (Hyatt) Tompkins (b. 22 Dec, 1759: d, 1 Jan, 
1846) and bro. of Daniel D. Tompkins, Governor of New 
York and Vice President of the U. S, 1817-1825. 

The issue of this marriage was: 

38. Elizabeth Varian, b. 15 Dec, 1794; d. 13 Aug, 1870. 

39. Jonathan Griffin, b. 25 Oct, 1796; m. Dorothy S. Peterson; 

d. 8 Aug, 1868. 

40. Mary, b. 2 Jan, 1799; d, 4 Sep, 1875. 

41. Deborah, b. 24 Jan, 1801; m. Richard E. Peterson, 1 

Oct, 1823. 

42. James, b. 22 Nov, 1803; d. 7 Jan, 1828. 

43. Sarah, b. 13 Jan, 1806; d. 5 Feb, 1881. 

44. Angeline, b. 14 Apr, 1808; d. 9 July, 1869. 

45. Varian, b. 11 Nov, 1810; m. 17 Jan, 1844, Sophia D. W. 

Kellogg, d. 18 Dec, 1847. 

46. William Oakley, b. 22 Feb, 1815, d. 14 Oct. 1818. 



28 DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN. 

20. Joseph Varian, fourth son of James 3, b. Scarsdale. N. Y., 27 

May, 1773, d. 4 Sept., 1828, aged 56, m. Sarah, dau. of John 
and Alice (Williams) Cornell, a sister of the wife of his elder 
brother James. She died 11 Nov., 1843, aged 68. 

Their children were : 

47. Caroline. 

48. John (?W.),* whose wife was probably Mary Ann 

, of East Chester, N. Y. Her will was dated 14 

Aug., 1862; proved 1 Dec, 1862 ( White Plains, N. T., 
Records) Heirs mentioned: John W. Varian, hus- 
band, Evelina Ketchum, daughter, J. V. Ketch um, 
adopted son. Executor, Cornell Varian of N. Y. 
City. 

49. Cornell, a cabinet maker, who is now living cor. 141st 

St. and Willis Ave., N. Y., 1875-1881, and is probably 
the same person who res. or was in business in N. Y. 
at 35 Provost, 1831; 89 Chapel, 1833-4; 710 Washing- 
ton, 1835; E, 32d nr. 3d Ave., 1851-2; 151 E, 36th, 
1854-1865; 145 E. 36th, 1866; 223 E. 36th, 1867. 

50. Allen. Probably the person who was " Inspector of 

Baled Hay" in N. Y. City, 1847, and perhaps m. 6 
Jan., 1838, Harriet, dau. of Josiah and Maria (Valen- 
tine) Briggs, of Fordham, N. Y. She was b. 11 Mar., 
1820. 

21. Ichabod Varian, sometime a hatter at Easton, Pa.,b. Scarsdale, 

N. Y„ 26 Sep., 1775, youngest son of James 3, d. Piqua, O., 
20 Sep., 1842; m. 8 Oct., 1797, Elizabeth, dau. Jared Patchen. 
She born 30 June, 1776; d. 9 May, 1818. 

Their children were : 

51. Alexander, b. 15 Apr., 1799; d. Cleveland, 0.,3 Mar., 1868. + 

52. James, b. 13 Jan., 1801; d. 4 July, 1807. 

53. Charles Mather, b. 18 Dec, 1802; d. Jan., 1834. + 

54. Edward, b. 29 Mar!, 1805. + 

55. Phebe Maria, b. 6 June, 1807. + 



*John W. Varian was a carter, res., 61 Elm, N. Y., 1830. 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN. 29 

56. Horace Dibble, b. 11 Mar., 1810. + 

57. Laura, b. 28 June, 1812. + 

58. Miles Beach, b. 25 Feb., 1818: d. 28 July, 1849. + 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

23. Henry Astor Yarian, butcher, b. Scarsdale, N. Y., 21 Sep., 1816; 

d. about 1865, aged 49 years; son of Jonathan 16; m. Mar., 
1845, Mary Ann, dau. of Richard and Maria (Gallaudet) 
Secor, of New Rochelle. His widow now (1881) resides at 
New Roclielle, N. Y. Letters of administration were issued 
on his estate at White Plains, N. Y., 18 Oct., 1865, to Mary 
A. Varian and Franklin B. Secor. 

Their issue was: 

59. Charles Henry, b. Jan., 1846; unmarried (1881) and res. 
(a butcher) at New Rochelle, N. Y. 

24. Susan Angevine Varian,* b. 23 Sep., 1819, d. N. Y. City 29 May, 

1870, m. 22 Nov., 1841, her second cousin, Jacob Harsen 
(b. 15 Sep., 1811), son of Jacob and Hester (Murphy) 
Varian. He was a butcher in New Y^ork, 2 Catherine 
Market, and lived at 7 Avenue A, 1842-1847; 19 Eldridge St., 
1848-1855. He deceased 3 Feb., 1855, and his widow sur- 
vived him, residing at the latter place until her death. 
Her estate was administered under letters granted her 
daughter Laura 12 Feb., 1872.— N. Y. Co. Records, Liber 99, 
p. 216. 

Their issue was: 

60. Laura, living N. Y., 1881, Av. A, cor. 87th St. 



* White Plains, N. Y., Records. — Mary P. Varian, of New Eochelle, 1ST. Y., 

will elated 14 June, 1858, proved , 1859. Heirs mentioned: Susan A. 

Varian, cousin; Thomas T. Tompkins, nephew; Emeline, Harriet and Amanda, 
daurs. of Nathaniel and Harriet Barker; Henry A. Varian, cousin; Andrew J. 
Varian, cousin; Mary. dau. of Susan A. Varian ; Wm. H. Varian; John, son 
of Andrew J. Varian; William H. Dixon, Eliza Ann Dixon, Harriet Dixon, 
Phebe Dixon, Amelia C. McCullough, Charles H. Varian, son of Henry A. 
I have not been able to connect the name of Mary P. with the family through 
any of my correspondents. 



30 DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VABIAN. 

61. Henrietta, b. 1846, d. Bright' s disease, 29 May, 1870, at 

19 Eldridge St., N. Y., and was interred at White 
Plains, N. Y. 

62. Mary, living N. Y. (1881), widow of George Lewis Hill, 

of Niagara, N. Y., whom she m. 3 Nov., 1875, and who 
d."27 Jan., 1877. 

63. William Henry, living N. Y., 1881, ? Ave. A, cor. 87th St. 

25. Andrew Jackson Varian, b. 31 May, 1822, d. 2 Mar., 1875, was a 
sergeant in N. Y. Vol. Engineers during Rebellion 1861- 
1864. He is possibly identical with the person of that 
name, a goldsmith, 134 W. Broadway, N. Y., 1845; carriage 
maker, 75 Delancey St., N. Y., 1848; 161. Eldridge St., 1851- 

1855. He m. 2 April, 1845, Mary Eliza, dau. of 

Eichells. She was b. N. Y. City, 26 April, 1823, and now 
resides 83 Carlton Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

They had issue : 

64. John Eichells, b. N. Y. City, 31 Oct., 1846. + 

65. Mary Eliza, b. N. Y. City, 6 Mar., 1849, d. 12 Aug., 1877. 

66. Emma Cornelia, b. N. Y.. City, 30 May, 1852, d. 26 May, 

1875. + 

67. Andrew Louis, b. Brooklyn, N. Y., 30 July, 1856, 

unmarried 1881. 

68. Alice Augusta, b. Brooklyn, N. Y., 29 Nov., I860, unmar- 

ried 1881. 



28. Mary Varian, b. 24 Feb., 1805, dau. of James 17, m. Benjamin 
Reynolds, and had only dau. 

69. Hannah, m. Romaine, d. 16 April, 1881. 



29. Jonathan Varian, son of James 17, b. 19 Dec, 1808, was in the 
dry goods business in N. Y., 442 Pearl St., 1829; res. 159 
Mott, 1830; 183 Walker, 1831; 88 Elizabeth, 1832-3; 249 
Bowery, 1834-5; 43 Delancey, 1838; was a carter, res. 461 
Fourth, 1841; a clerk, res. 100 Elizabeth, 1842-3; 123 Hester, 
1844-5; afterward lived at 77 East Broadway. He. m. 
Lavinia Hall, who survived him as a dressmaker at 7 Prince 
St., 1856-8, about which time she deceased, and her estate 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VABIAN. SI 

was administered by letters issued 12 Sep,, 1859 (N. Y. 
Co. Records, Liber 68, p. 355), to her only surviving child. 

Their children were : 

70. Anna L. 

71. Elizabeth, b. d. 28 Feb., 1839, aged 6-8-21. 

31. David M. Varian, b. 18 Jan., 1814, son of James 17, was a carter, 
residing in N. Y., at 80 Delancey, 1834; 63 Columbia, 1835; 
88 Barrow, 1839-41; 127 Barrow, 1842-4; 32 Downing, 1845-6. 
He m. Sarah Fuller, who survived him, and lived in N. Y., 
at 144 3d Ave., 1847; 180 3d Ave., 1848, 61 7th Ave., 1869. 

They had children: 

72. James, b. 8 Oct., 1836, d. 29 Jan., 1839. 

73. James, b. 1 Feb., 1839, d. 23 April, 1844. 

74. George D., b. 7 Jan., 1841, d. 9 Nov., 1843. 
And perhaps others. 

33. William A. Varian, son of James 17, was b. 23 Jan., 1820, is a 
physician at Kingsbridge, N. Y., formerly a druggist at 325 
Bowery, N. Y., 1846-7; m. Frances E. 

They had children: 

75. Sarah, b. 17 Sep., 1858, d. 22 Aug., 1860. 

76. James, now (1881) res. Council Bluffs, Iowa. 

77. A daughter. 
And perhaps others. 



A NOTABLE HEIRLOOM— THE HISTORY OF A QUEER OLD 

BIBLE WANTED. 

To the Editors of the "Evening Post:" 

I come to the Evening Post for some bibliological information. In the 
good keeping of Dr. Wm. Varian, of Kingsbridge, New York City, is now, 
and has long been, the ancient family Bible of his ancestors, the Varians of 
Westchester Co.. N. Y., the fortunate lot of which was to be preserved 
uninjured through the war of the Revolution by being buried* in the cellar of 
their dwelling house, the old residence in the town of Scarsdale, near the former 
Morris or Popham estate, still standing and occupied by a Varian. 



32 DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN. 

Although much exposed (the family being patriotic) to the depredations 
of British soldiers, and especially to the " Cowboys," those notorious brigands 
of the period, so well described in Cooper's " Spy " and Bolton's " History of 
the County of Westchester," this farm-house escaped both the torch and total 
pillage, and the dark cellar at the dawn of peace, true to its trust, delivered up 
the venerable volume as good as ever, to be the household companion of sub- 
sequent generations, whose names are registered therein. This ancient English 
Bible is a large folio, with thick embossed lids, fitted originally to clasps, and 
bears the date 1715 on its title page, but not the name of the place where it 
was printed. Strangely, too, the illustrative pictures, of which there are 
several, are explained in the Dutch language. Our friend, the custodian of 
this precious heirloom, a nephew ( ?) of Isaac Varian, a former mayor of this 
city, informs me that his family is of Huguenot descent. Can any one tell 
something more about this singular edition of the Bible — where printed and by 

whom ? 

W. H. 

JNeiv York. December 6, 1879. 



51. Alexander. Varian (Rev.), b. Ballston, N. Y., 15 April, 1799, d. 
Cleveland, 0., 3 Mar., 1868, a minister of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, m., 1, 24 Mar., 1824, Elizabeth Amelia 
Atlee, of Lancaster, Pa., who d. 11 Sep., 1848; 2, 30 April, 
1850, Mrs. Mary Randal Oakley, of Brooklyn, N. Y., now 
(1881) living at Cleveland, O. 

Their children were, by Elizabeth Atlee: 

78. Sarah Atlee, b. Lancaster, Pa., 18 Mar., 1825, living 

(1881), unmarried, at Cleveland, O. 

79. Emily Roberts, b. Lancaster, Pa., 20 Aug., 1826, d. 5 

Dec, 1839, Painesville, O. 

80. Catherine Light, b. Lancaster, Pa., 15 Oct., 1827, d. 17 

May, 1828, Lancaster, Pa. 

81. Harriet McCall, b. Flushing, N. Y., 16 Sep., 1830, d. 

12 Mar., 1881, Cleveland, O., m. 7 July, 1853, Rev. 
Richard S. Smith, at Meadville, Pa., no issue. 

82. William, b. Sidney, O., 11 Oct., 1832. -|- 

83. Laura, b. Springfield, O., 17 April, 1835. 

84. Elizabeth Amelia, b. Lancaster, 2 Nov., 1836. 

85. Esther Maria Granger, b. Painesville, O., 13 Aug., 1839, 

d. 13 Dec, 1867. 




-■• -.■.- ■•..•>,. ■ 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES V A B I A N . S3 

86. Alexander, Jr., b. Painesville, O., 8 April, 1842, d. 2 
June, 1864, at Chattanooga, Tenn., of wounds received 
at Resacca, 14 May previous. 



Alexander Varian, Jr., son of the Rev. Alexander Varian, 
early enlisted in the Union army during the Rebellion, and deceased 
in consequence of wounds received at the battle of Resacca, 2 June, 
1864. The following worthy tribute to his memory and patriotic 
services was indited by the Rev. Dr. Starkey, now Bishop of 
Northern New Jersey: 

Died, June 2d, in the General Hospital at Chattanooga, Tenn., of a 
wound received in the battles near Dalton, Georgia, on the 14th of May, First 
Lieutenant Alexander Varian, of Company D, First "Regiment, " Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry,'' in the twenty-second year of his age. 

Thus sadly for his family and friends, but gloriously for himself and 
country, has closed a life whose beginning was full of generous promise. At 
the beginning of this war young Varian was earnestly desirous of taking his 
part in its responsibilities and perils, but, withheld by private considerations 
which could not be put aside, it was not until after the first battle of Bull 
Run, when the First Regiment returned on recruiting service, that Mr. Varian 
was able to carry out his fixed purpose of enlisting in its ranks. Recom- 
mended from the first by his character and his intelligence, he was soon made a 
corporal in his company, and in that capacity distinguished himself so greatly 
by his skill and courage in the second day's battle at Pittsburg Landing, and 
the scenes of hardship which preceded and followed that sanguinary engage- 
ment, that he was immediately after promoted to a second lieutenancy. In the 
battle of " Stone River " Lieutenant Varian was wounded in the ankle whilst 
generously engaged in rescuing a fallen comrade from under the enemy's fire, 
and it was during his confinement in the hospital at Nashville that he received 
his next promotion as a just reward of his valor. At the fierce assault on 
Missionary Ridge he was again struck down by a spent bullet, and still later, in 
close quarters at Rocky Ridge, had his clothes cut by a musket ball. The 
wound which finally closed his career, near Dalton, was in the breast. He 
lingered for something more than two weeks, and it was hoped, for a time, that 
he might recover, but a wise Providence had ordered otherwise, and he died on 
the 2d June the death of a brave soldier of the Republic and a sincere and 
humble Christian. Brave as a lion, but gentle as a child; earnest in purpose, 
but u easily entreated " ; ingenuous and frank, but with a fund of wisdom 
beyond his years ; thoughtful and considerate for others, but freely exposing 
his own life whenever duty called him, Lieutenant Varian is a loss to the 
5 



34 DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VABIAN. 

service — an irreparable loss to his family and friends. His life and death 
honored the Savior, whose disciple he had early professed himself, and the 
country, on whose altar he was a willing sacrifice. To God we recommend his 
gentle spirit. JRequiescat in pace. 



87. Mary Oakley, b. Meadville, Pa., 20 July, 1844. 

By Mary Randal Oakley : 

88. Emily Augusta, ) b. Meadville, Pa., j d. 7 Oct., 1852. 

89. John Miles, j 8 April, 1852, ( d. 19 Sept., 1852. 

90. Edward, b. Meadville, Pa., 6 Mar., 1855. 

Williams- Vakian.— Mr. Ed. Varian, formerly of this city, and Miss 
Florence M. Williams, daughter of Mr. B. Williams, Jr., of Chagrin Falls, 
were quietly united in marriage at the residence of Rev. George W. Hinkle 
yesterday afternoon. Mr. Varian was for several years connected with various 
Cleveland newspapers, and is now one of the staff of the Kansas City Evening 
Star. He has been spending a few days with his relatives and frjends, and 
last evening departed with his bride for his new home in Missouri. — Cleveland 
Herald, 22 June, 1881. 

Rev. Alexander Varian established first the Lancasteriau 
(graded schools on the English plan) system of education, super- 
intended and taught at Lancaster and Philadelphia before he 
entered the ministry. He erected his first parish (All Souls) at 
Springfield, ()., holding services first in an old blacksmith shop, 
which he had fitted up lor the purpose. The Church thus estab- 
lished is now known as Christ Church. He afterward had charge 
of St. James Church, at Painesville, O., and was twice called to the 
pastorate of Christ Church, at Meadville, Pa. At one time he had 
a parish at Vincennes, Ind., and was the originator of the present 
Grace Church, at Cleveland, O. The services in this parish were 
first held in the old Court House, on the southwest corner of 
Monumental Park, and afterward in the lecture room of the 
Medical College, until the Church was erected. 

Before entering the ministry he was Professor of Mathematics 
in Rev. Wm. Muhlenberg's Institute for Boys, at Flushing, N. Y., 
and among his pupils were: Bishop Bedell, of the diocese of Cleve- 
land; Bishop Kerfoot, of the diocese of Pittsburgh; the late Bishop 
Odenheimer, of Pennsylvania; Rev. Mr. Van Bokkelen, of Buffalo, 
and the late Rev. J. Diller, of New York. At one time he had 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN. 35 

charge of a female seminary, at Nashville, Tenn. He educated his 
brother Miles and sister Laura, and contributed liberally to the 
support of his aged parents and their family. 

His was emphatically a busy life, and he had the reward of 
viewing the fruits of his labor before being called to a higher 
sphere. 

53. Charles Mather Varian, merchant, b. Ballston, N. Y., 18 Dec, 

1802, d. Dayton, O., 12 Jan., 1834, m. Cincinnati, ()., 27 Oct., 
1829, Eliza, dau. of Oliver and Sophia Goodwin, of Cincin- 
nati, O. 

They had issue : 

91. Sophia Goodwin, b. Aug. 1831,) d. at Dayton, O., both on 

92. Elizabeth Sackett, b. May, 1833, j same day, Nov., 1834. 

54. Edward Varian, manufacturer of steel brushes, res. Philadel- 

phia, born 29 Mar., 1805, m., 1, Eliza Wilson Lambert, of 
Lambertville, N. J., who d., leaving no issue; 2, 8 Feb., 
1838, Mrs. Margaretta Pearce, of Dayton, O., By whom 
he had : 

93. Margaretta Jones, b. Dayton, O., 30 Mar., 1840, d. 5 

Sep., 1847, at Dayton, O. 

94. Mary Hannah, b. Dayton, O., 19 Dec, 1843, d. 19 Oct., 

1850, at Dayton, O. 

95. Laura. Maria, b. Dayton, O., 20 Sep., 1846, d. 8 May, 

1865, at Dayton, O. 

96. Emma Graham, b. Dayton, O., 1 Aug., 1851, res. Phila- 

delphia. 

55. Phcebe Maria Varian, b. Ballston, N. Y., 6 June, 1807, m. 24 

Nov., 1829, William Andrew Clewell, of Nazareth, Pa., he 
b. Schoeneck, Pa., 29 Oct., 1804, and died ante 1880. 

Issue: 

97. Laura Margaret, b. 2 Sep., 1830, m. W. Beaumont 

Whitney, of German town, Pa. 

•i 

56. Horace Dibble Varian, farmer, res. sometime at Princeton, 

N. J., b. near Rochester, N. Y., 11 Mar., 1810, m. 1 Nov., 
1832, Sarah Lanning, b. 30 Sep., 1806, at Lawrenceville or 
Lambertville, N. J., and had issue: 



86 DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VABIAN. 

98. William Hunt, b. Kingston, N. J., 13 Nov., 1834. + 

99. Ann Elizabeth, b. Hopewell, N, J., 20 April, 1838, d. 17 

Dec, 1840. 

100. Mama Clewell, b. Hopewell, N. J., 9 June, 1840. + 

101. Nancy Lanning, b. Clarksville, N. J., 11 May, 1844, d. 13 

May, 1844. 

102. Price Lanning, b. Clarksville N. J., 21 June, 1845. + 

103. Miles Alexander, " " 27 Aug., 1847. + 

104. Margaret Ann, b. Clarksville, N. J., 25 Feb., 1849, d. 

1 April, 1849. 

57. Laura Yarian, b. 28 June, 1812, m. 20 Aug., 1835, James Sykes, of 

Springfield, O., son of John and Fannie (Pepperell) Sykes, 
of Trowbridge, Wilts, England. 

Their issue : 

105. Frances Ann, b. Springfield, O., 19 June, 1836, d. 13 

Dec, 1872. 

106. John Yarian, b. Springfield, O., 16 Aug., 1838, m. 31 

Oct., 1865, Mary A. Morenus. 

107. William, b. Springfield, O., 24 Jan., 1841, m. 15 Oct., 

1874, Martha E. Connell. 

108. Alexander Yarian, b. Springfield, O., 19 Sep., 1843, m. 

15 July, 1869, Nancy J. Marshall. 

109. James, b. Springfield, O., 20 Mar., 1846, d. 25 April, 1846. 

110. Charles McMurphy, b. Springfield, O., 9 May, 1847. 

111. Laura Maria, " " " 10 Mar., 1850. 

112. Henry Miles, " " " 6 Sep., 1854. 

58. Miles Beach Yarian, merchant, b. Easton, Pa., 25 Feb., 1818, d. 

Dayton, O., of cholera, 28 July, 1849, m. Cincinnati, O., 15 
Dec, 1845, Charlotte Bartlett, b. Eastport, Me., 4 Nov., 
1825. He left an only son : 

113. Charles Stetson, b. Dayton, O., 10 Sep., 1846. + 

After the decease of Miles Beach Yarian, his widow, nee 
Charlotte Bartlett, went to Italy to cultivate her voice, and while 
there m. a Mr. James, by whom she had a daughter Nina, who was 
b. in Italy. Mrs. James left her husband and returned to New 
York in company with her daughter, and came out as a Madame 
Yarian," the singer, shortly after marrying a Mr. Hoffman, after 
which she was known as " Madame Yarian -Hoffman," a name 
familiar to concert-goers of twenty years ago. Her daughter Nina 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN. 37 

was a Charming, graceful little Italian, and her mother brought her 
out as an actress under the name of Nina Varian. Nina married a 
Mr. Wolcott, and died on a voyage to Europe. Her remains were 
brought back to New York, and from thence conveyed to Mead- 
ville, Pa., where they were interred about 1879. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

64. John Eichells Vakian, b. 31 Oct., 1846, m. 22 April, 1872, Susan 
T. Murray, and have the following issue: 

114. Harry Vincent, b. Brooklyn, N. Y., 21 Jan., 1873. 

115. Corinne Estelle, " " " 16 Aug., 1874. 

116. Louis Edward, " " " 27 Mar., 1876. 

117. Mary Emma, " " " 23 Nov., 1877. 

118. Susie, " " «« 21 Nov., 1880. 

66. Emma Cornelia Yarian, b. N. Y. 30 May, 1852, d. 26 May, 1875, 
m. 29 July, 1872, John A. Munro, of Brooklyn. N. Y., and 
had: 

119. Emma Lillian, b. 14 May, 1873. 

82. William Varian, a physician and surgeon, V. P. Medical 
Society of Pennsylvania, now (1881) resident at Titusville, 
Pa., b. Sidney, 0., 11 Oct., 1832, was during the Rebellion 
brigade surgeon on the staff of General Prentice, and was 
afterward ranked as major on General Gordon Granger's 
staff, and at the close of the " unpleasantness " had a com- 
mission sent to him as colonel in the Volunteer Service. 
He was detailed from Island No. 10 to establish a hospital 
at Hamburg, Tenn., after the battle of Pittsburg Landing, 
and later was detailed to the charge of Camp Denison, near 
Cincinnati. He participated in many engagements during 
the campaign about Chattanooga and Atlanta. He m. at 
Chicago, 2 Sep., 1859, Ann Eliza Litchfield, b. at Wood- 
stock, Conn., 8 Aug., 1832. 

Their children were : 

120. Eliza Atlee, b. Evanston, 111., 28 June, 1860. 

121. Helen Louise, b. Palmyra, Mo., 5 Feb., 1862, d. Hamp- 

ton, Ct., 2 July, 1863. 



38 ^ DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VABIAN. 

122. William Litchfield, b. Camp Denison, O., 6 Nov., 

1864, d. Evansville, Ind., 8 Jan., 1865. 

123. Mary Litchfield, b. Titusville, Pa., 5 Jan., 1866. 

124. Cleveland, b. Titusville, Pa., 14 Dec, 1867, d. 12 July, 

1871. 
125 Helen Cleveland, b. Titusville, Pa., 22 Aug., 1874. 

98. William Hunt Varian, 2d Lt, Co. A, 3d Kegt. N. J. State 
Guards, 4 Dec, 1861, a farmer near Princeton, N. J., b. 13 
Nov. 1834, m. 4 Dec, 1862, Mary Amanda Stults, b. 7 Nov., 
1838, at Cranberry, N. J. 

Their issue: 

126. Henry Irwin, b. 27 Dec, 1868. 

100. Maria Clewell Varian, b. 9 June, 1840, m. 7 Dec, 1864, 
Liscomb Blackwell Peed, b. 9 Mar., 1842, Hopewell, N. J., 
and has issue: 

127. Mercer Beasely, b. near Princeton, N. J., 17 May, 1866. 

128. Miles Varian, ' " " " " 24 Apr., 1869. 

129. Lemuel Allen, " " " " 22 Oct., 1871. 

130. Laura Hattie Maria, b. near Princeton, N. J., 9 Aug., 

1874. 

131. Liscomb Beaumont, b. near Princeton, N. J., 19 May, 

1877. 

132. Elmer Ellsworth, b. near Princeton, N. J., 21 Jan., 1880. 

102. Price Lanning Varian, a farmer near Princeton, N. J., b. 21 

June, 1845, m. 27 Jan., 1869, Jane C. Flock, at Hamilton 
Square, N. J., she b. 1 Mar., 1843. 

Their children : 

133. Susan Elvira, b. Clarksville, N. J., 6 Aug., 1871. 

134. Mary Yard, b. Allentown, N. J., 17 Feb., 1875. 

135. Beaumont Whitney, b. Princeton, N. J., 17 Oct., 1878, 

d. 29 Oct., 1878. 

103. Miles Alexander Varian, manager of Carson's Book Agency 

at Baltimore, b. 27 Aug., 1847, m. 18 Nov., 1874, Bessie 
Leech Baker, b. at Franklin Park, N. J., 12 Mar., 1855, and 
has issue: 

136. Dora May, b. Philadelphia, Pa., 9 July, 1876. 



DESCENDANTS OF JAMES VARIAN 



39 



1.13. Charles Stetson Varian, lawyer, U. S. District Attorney at 
Reno, Nevada, b. Dayton, ()., 10 Sep., 1846; emigrated to 
Nevada 1858, took the census of Humboldt Co., and resided 
at Union ville, Nev. , 1869; was Assessor of the county, and 
afterward (1870) County Clerk; State Senator 1872, He 
m. 29 July, 1871, at Unionville, Nevada, Florence Guthrie, 
and has issue: 

137. Bertram Stetson, b. Unionville, Nev., 12 May, 1872. 

138. Miles Guthrie b. (indistinct) 22 Nov., 1874. 

139. Charles Ernest, b. Reno, Nev., 29 May, 1877. 

140. Philip, " " " 31 Dec., 1879. 



For the information concerning the descendants of James 
Varian, I am mainly indebted to the efforts of Miss Elizabeth A. 
Varian, of Cleveland, O., who has directed the correspondence 
necessary to secure what has been gathered in the foregoing 
pages. 




Descendants of Richard Varian. 



THIRD GENERATION. 

4. RICHARD VARIAN, b. at N. Y. City, 25 Dec, 1736, was a 
butcher by trade, and carried on the business for many 
years in the City of New York in the following localities: 
19 Bowery Lane, 1791-7; 12 Bowery Lane, 1801-2; 12 
Division, 1803-5; 12 Fisher (now ), 1806-9; 12 

Bayard, 1810; grocer, cor. Chapel and Thomas, 1811; 88 
First, 1811-12; 10 Catherine Market, 1812-14 (res. Third, 
near Rivington, 1813; 88 Chrystie, 1817; 117 Forsyth, 1818); 
10 Catherine Market, h. 147 Ludlow, 1819-22, where he 
died. He also was proprietor of the old "Bull's Head 
Tavern," from 1776 (on the 16th June, in which year he 
was listed as a "retailer of liquor" on Bowery Lane) until 
about 1802 or later. In 1803 he also had a stand at 53 Fly 
Market, where he is said to have been a butcher as early as 
1770. 

He, with his younger brothers Michael and Isaac, were 
active patriots in the Revolution (Bolton's Westchester, 
II. 127). Richard was commissary to the army encamped at 
Danbury, Conn., 1776, and was Superintendent of the 
Public Slaughter House under Nicholas Bayard, both before 
and after the war, but not during the struggle, as in his 
petition, dated April, 1784, for reinstatement to the latter 
position, he represents that " he was an exile at that time," 
and at the date of his petition " he has a family of sixteen." 
His exile, or a portion of it, was being engaged in the 
privateer service, but near the close of the war the vessel 
in which he was serving was, with a prize that they had 
captured, taken by a superior force, and the vessels and 
crew carried to Halifax, N. S., as prisoners, where he 
remained until the close of the war. When peace was pro- 
claimed he returned to New York, and found the "Bull's 



DESCENDANTS OF B1CHABD VABIAN. U 

Head Tavern" running in prosperous condition, under the 
management of his wife. In answer to his petition he was 
re-appointed as Superintendent of the Slaughter House. 

"The Bull's Head Tavern " was situated on the Bowery, 
where the present Bowery Theatre now stands. The 
property then belonged to a wealthy gentleman, Henry 
Astor, residing in the vicinity. In 1826 a theatre was 
erected on the tavern site, and which was destroyed by 
fire, but the present appearance of the " Old Bowery" does 
not differ much from the original. The bond of marriage 
(X. Y. Marriage Licenses) between Richard Varian and 
Susannah Gardinear, of N. Y., his wife, bears date 27 June, 
1761, and they were m. in the Old Dutch Church in N. Y. 
the day following. He died 20 Dec, 1822, of old age, aged 
86, and his estate was administered by his friend John 
Bremner (clerk of Catherine Market 1816), letters being 
granted 2 April, 1823 (N. Y. Co. Records, Lib. 19, p. 142). 
His remains were interred in the cemetery of the Brick 
Presbyterian Church in N. Y. 

His children were: 

141. Isaac (?R.), b. 14 Feb., 1763, bap. 13 Mar., 1763 (JST. Y. 

Gen. and Biog. Record, V. 183).+ 

142. Cornelia, b. 21 July, 1764, bap. 5 Aug., 1764, (JST. Y. 

Gen. and Biog. Record, V. 185).+ 

143. Elizabeth, b. 20 Dec, 1765, bap. 12 Jan., 1766 (JST. Y. 

Gen. and Biog. Record, VI. 50). 

144. Sarah, b. 21 May, 1768, bap. 12 June, 1768 {X. Y. Gen. 

and Biog. Record, VII. 186). 

145. Jacob, b. 29 April, 1770, bap. 20 May, 1770 {X. Y. Gen. 

and Biog. Record, VIII. 24).+ 

146. Abraham Odell, b. 29 Jan., 1772, bap. 1 Mar., 1772 

(JN. Y. Gen. and Biog. Record, IX. 82). 

147. Dorothea Elsworth, b. 1 July, 1774, bap. 31 July, 1774 

(A r . Y. Gen. and Biog. Record, X. ISO). 

148. Verdine Elsworth,* b. 9 Jan., 1776, bap. 29 Jan., 1776 

(X. Y. Gen. and Biog. Record, XI. 31). 

149. George Washington, b. + 



* The " Els worths " were a wealthy family, resident in New York about that 
period. 

6 



42 DESCENDANTS OF BIOHABD VABIAN. 

150. Richard, b. 1783, d. 18 Aug., 1817, unmarried. 

He was a butcher, and served in war of 1812. He 
deceased of consumption, and was bur. in cemetery 
of the Presbyterian Brick Church in New York. 



FOURTH GENERATION. 

141. Isaac (R. ?) Varian, b. N. Y., 14 Feb., 1763, eldest son of 

Richard 4; was a butcher at 180 Bowery, N. Y., 1807-19, 
and his estate was administered by Gilbert Coutant in 1819, 
letters issuing 20 Feb. of that year. — N. Y. Co. Records, 
Liberia, p. 231. 

He d. 9 Aug., 1818, aged 56, at 180 Bowery of inflamma^ 
tion of liver, and was bur. in graveyard of Brick Presby- 
terian Church, N. Y. 

His wife probably was Elizabeth , of Mass., 

who d. 3 Jan., 1819, of inflammation of bowels, at same res., 
and was bur. near her husband. 

Of his issue we have no account, and possibly some of 
his posterity may be found among the names recorded in 
the "Appendix" 

142. Cornelia Varian, b. N. Y., 21 July, 1764, eldest dau. Richard 4, 

m. 10 July, 1784, John Berrian, of N. Y. (N. Y. Gen. and 
Biog. Rec, XII. 36). 
No record of issue. 

145. Jacob Varian, b. N. Y., 29 April, 1770, was a butcher on Bowery 
Lane and at 45 Division St., 1794-6; 16 Second St., 1800- 
1811; inspector of slaughter houses, 1806; 23 Catherine 
Market. 1812-1815; 25 Catherine Market, h, 146 Ludlow, 
1819-1835, 335 Bowery, cor. Great Jones St., 1835, at which 
period he disappeared, and no tidings were ever heard of 
him. He is supposed to have been murdered for a sum of 
money which he was known to have had with him when 
* last seen. 

The following were probably his children: 

151. William P.+ 

152. Thomas. + 



DESCENDANTS OF BICHABD VABIAN. 43 

153. Richard, d. 146 Ludlow St., N. Y. of 

apoplexy, 10 Nov., 1820, aged 22, and was bur. in 
cemetery of Allen St. M. E. Church, N. Y. 

154. George W. d. 146 Ludlow St., N. Y., of 

consumption, 22 Sep., 1837, aged 30 years, and was 
bur. in cemetery of Allen St. M. E. Church, N. Y. 

149. George Washington Varian, b. N. Y., was a 

butcher there, located Elizabeth St., 1798-1801; Bowery, 
1802-5; Third, near Rivington, 1806-1811; lived at Green- 
wich village, and had stall 16 Bear Market, 1812-13; Third, 
near Stanton, 1815; Rivington, cor. Forsyth, 1817; 122 
Delancey, 1818; 18 Catherine Market, h. Eldridge, near 
Delancey, 1820-1; 13 Catherine Market, h. Delancey, near 
Allen, 1821-1830; 12 Catherine Market, h. 72 Delancey, 
1832-1844. During the " war of 1812" he was lieutenant of 
the Columbia Volunteers, a company of militia composed 
entirely of butchers. In this war they performed three 
months' duty on Staten Island, and then again three 
months' more service in guarding the steam frigate " Fulton 
the First" while building. He m. 27 April, 1797, Susan 
Tier, and d. 1853, and had children : 

155. Susan, b. 27 Oct, 1798, d. 27 Aug., 1799. 

156. Margaret, b. 24 April, 1800, living April, 1881, m. 

Daniel Harmony. 

157. Sarah, b. July, 1801, m. 25 Jan., 1819, Richard M. 

Ellison. 

158. Eliza, b. 15 Jan., 1803, living April, 1881, m. John 

Snyder. 

159. Richard, b. 4 Jan, 1804, d. 7 Aug, 1805. 

160. Maria, b, 4 Jan., 1806, living April, 1881, m. Stephen 

Ward. 

161. George W, b. 8 Oct., 1807, d. 10 Aug., 1808. 

162. Delia, b. 17 Mar, 1809, d. m. David King. 

163. Susan, b. 31 Jan, 1811, cl. m. James McKinley. 

164. George W, b. 29 Nov, 1812, m. Rosina Forshay, d. 7 

Feb., 1833, of inflammation of the brain, and was bur. 
in cemetery of Allen St. M. E. Church, N. Y. 

165. Joshua M, b. 24 Jan., 1815. + 

166. Samuel M, b. 29 Mar, 1817, d. 9 Aug, 1818, bur. ceme- 

tery Allen St. M. E. Church. 



U DESCENDANTS OF RICHARD VARIAN. 

167. Mary Tier, b. 29 July, 1819, d. m. Julius 

Johnson. 

168. Jacob, b. 26 Aug., 1821. + 

169. Cornelia Ann, b. 23 Feb., 1825, d. 26 Nov., 1825. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

151. William P. Varian, b. N. Y., was a butcher at 

that place, and was in business and resided at the follow- 
ing localities: Rivington, cor. Pitt, 1820; Ludlow, near 
Rivington, 1821-2; 64 Spring, 1823; 146 Ludlow, 1829; 20 
Center Market, h. 146 Ludlow, 1830; h. Ill Allen, 1831; h. 
68 Delancey, 1832; 24 Center Market,* h. 146 Ludlow, 1833, 
till his decease 1840. In 1827 he sold stand 2, Gouverneur 
Market, to George W. Varian, Jr. His will is dated 1840, 
in which he leaves his property to his wife (N. Y. Co. 
Records, Liber 81, p. 438). He m. Mary Ann Garret. 
She resided at 146 Ludlow St. until her death, 1854. Her 
estate was administered by her brother-in-law, William 
Dunham, letters being issued 8 Oct., 1855 (N. Y. Co. 
Records, Liber 62, p. 53), the property passing to her 
brother, Stephen Garrett; sister Harriet, widow of John 
Tier; and sister Ann, wife of William Dunham. 
William P. Varian, d. 24 Aug., 1840, at 146 Ludlow, of con- 
sumption, and was bur. at Allen St. M. E. Church 
cemetery. 

152. Thomas Varian, b. N. Y., was a butcher at 10 

Catherine Market, 1823-1828 (which stand he obtained of 
his brother Richard, deceased), and resided 146 Ludlow, 
1823-1826; 143 Orchard, 1827; 143 Essex, 1828-1835. While 
at latter residence he had stands at 28 Clinton Market, 
1829-1831; IT Center Market, 1832-1835. He m. Elizabeth 

, who survived him, and lived at 143 Essex after 

his decease (about 1835) until 1854. 

165. Joshua M. Varian, b. N. Y., 24 Jan., 1815, was a butcher there 
for many years, and afterward in the clothing business. 



* When located in Center Market he purchased the ox "President' 1 (live 
weight 4,000, dressed weight 1,900)), a portion of which was sent to President 
Jackson. 



DEtiC t&NDANTb OF RICHARD VARIAN. tf 

Was a butcher, h. 137 Forsyth, 1839; 134 Forsyth, 1840; 13 
Ave. A, 1841; 15 Catherine Market, h. 13 Ave. A, 1842- 
1849; h. 293 10th, 1850-1859. In connection with Roll- 
wagen, 15 and 17 Catherine Market, 1842-1860. In part- 
nership with brother Jacob, 15 Catherine Market, 1856. 
Had stand 7, Jefferson Market, 1858. Provision establish- 
ment, 173 Ludlow, h. 60 E. 8th St., 1859-1868. In clothing 
business with son Joshua M., Jr., 70 Bowery, h. Madison 
Ave. and 132d St., 1869-1876. Superintendent of Markets 
of City of New York, 1877-1880, h. 151 W. 13th St., where 
he now (1881) resides. He has been for many years identi- 
fied with the National Guard of the State of New York, 
having been Captain of the " Washington Greys," 8th 
Regiment N. G. S. N. Y., afterward Colonel of the corps, 
and now holding the commission of Brigadier General, 
commanding 3d Brigade N. G. S. N. Y. He was also a 
member of the Manhattan and Harlem Yacht Clubs. He 
m. 18 July, 1836, Sophia Fish, who was b. 1 Feb., 1819, d. 8 
Dec, 1880, aged 61 years, 10 months and 8 days, and was 
bur. at Hackensack, N. J. 

He had children : 

170. Sophia M., b. 21 May, 1837. + 

171. Joshua M., b. 24 Feb, 1844. + 

172. Charles J, b. 13 Mar, 1851. 

168. Jacob Varian, b. cor. Allen and Delancey Sts, N. Y, 

butcher, 31 Catherine Market, 1842-1850; res. 72 Delancey, 
1842-3; 7 Ave. A, 1844; 9 Ave. A, 1850; 19 Catherine 
Market, h. 367 Houston, 1853-4; 17 Catherine Market, h. 
293 10th St., 1856-8; 8 Jefferson Market, h. 574 3d Ave., 
1859; 15 Catherine Market, h. 122 Second St, 1861-2; 2 
Catherine Market, h. 18 Third St, 1863-4; 173 Ludlow St, 
1863-4; h. 137 Allen, 1867-8; h. 858 Second Ave, 1869. He 
was in the pickle business, 175 Ludlow and 15 Catherine 
Market, h. 1038 Second Ave, 1870; 15 Catherine Market, h. 
302 E. 58th St, 1872-9. In the liquor business, 34 Park 
Row, h. Plainfield, N. J, 1880-1. Was Commodore of the 
Manhattan Yacht Club in 1870, the year the club organ- 
ized. He m. 1862, Sarah E. dau. of David P. 
Arnold, who formerly kept a coffee-house opposite 
Catherine Market, next to Vandyke's hotel. 
They had children: 



46 DESCENDANTS OF BIG HARD VARIAN. 

173. Carrie A., b. N. Y., 6 Dec. 1863, d. 12 Nov., 1864. 

174. George W., b. N. Y., 23 Aug., 1865. 

175. Clarence E., b. N. Y., 7 Nov., 1873. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

170. Sophia M. Varian, b. 21 May, 1837, m. 25 Dec, 1856, Benjamin 

F. Ingraham, and had issue: 

176. Emma Louise, b. 22 Sep., 1857, d. 3 April, 1859. 

177. Frank V., b. 16 May, 1860. 

178. William V., b. 11 June, 1866. 

171. Joshua M. Varian, b, 24 Feb., 1844, m. 16 Dec, 1848, M. E. 

Tyrrel, and has: 

179. Marian Estelle, b. 30 Jan., 1876. 



Note. — As intimated in reference to the descendants of Joseph 
2, many also of the posterity of Richard 4 may perhaps be found in 
the "Appendix*" 




Descendants of Michael Varian. 



THIRD GENERATION. 

5. MICHAEL VARIAN, butcher, b. N. Y. City, 9 Dec, 1738, and 
was in that vocation for many years at that place. 

At the time of the Revolution (1775) he moved to 
Scarsdale, Westchester Co., N. Y., but returned at the 
close of the struggle, in which he took an active part on 
the patriot side. 

In old directories of the City of New York he is found 
located at No. 6 Second St. (probably his residence), 1789- 
1816, and is also mentioned as a butcher, at 27 Division St., 
1798, and as a grocer, at 25 Peck Slip, 1800. 

The "Market Book 11 notes that he began business at 
the " Fly Market, 11 * and was the first butcher in " Catherine 
Market." 

He resided at 74 Forsyth St., New York, from 1817 
until his decease in 1825. He is said to have been familiar 
with the " Low Dutch" tongue, and to have been a large 
land-holder, owning property south of Canal St., and east 
of the Bowery, besides other realty in the lower part of the 
city. He married at the Old Dutch Church in N. Y., 27 
Fek, 1772 (N. Y. Marriages, bond dated 25 Feb., 1772) 
Cornelia Horser, of N. Y. His will was proved (N. Y. Co. 
Records) 1826, and in it are mentioned issue that survived 
him as below : 

180. Jacob Harsen,! b. Jan., 1773, d. 16 April, 1849. + 

181. James, b. , 1779, d. 21 July, 1826. + 

* Located there 19 Aug., 1795, and occupied stand No. 53 in 1803. 
t Probably named for Jacob Harsen, Esq., >vho was the Federalist Alderman 
for the Ninth Ward in N. Y., 1803-4. 



48 DESCENDANTS OF MICHAEL VARIAN. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

180. Jacob Harsen Varian, b. N. Y., Jan., 1773, may be identical 

with the person of same name who is mentioned in old 
directories of N. Y. as residing or doing business as butcher 
at 74 Bowery, 1796-7; 113 Bowery, 1798-1805; 24 Catherine 
Market and 95 First St., 1809-1815; Rivington St., 1817; 
Forsyth, near Rivington, 1817; 26 Catherine Market, h. 233 
Forsyth, 1819-1821; h. 21 Eldridge St., 1823-1827 and 
1836-46. He resided at 74 Forsyth St., 1848-9, and deceased 
of paralysis there, 16 April, 1849, aged 76 years and 3 
months, and was bur. at St. Mark's Cemetery. 

He m. Hester Murphy, and at the decease of his 
father received but a life interest in his estate, which was 
entailed to his (Jacob's) children and their heirs. 

Such children would appear by said will to have been: 

182. Elizabeth, m. and had issue at date of will. 

183. Charlotte, m. Webster and had dau. Mary. 

184. Cornelia. 

185. Alletta, m. and had issue at date of will. 

186. Hester. 

187. Margaret. 

188. Ann. 

189. Michael. 

190. James. 

191. Jacob Harsen, b. N. Y., 15 Sep., 1811, d. 4 Feb., 1855, at 

19 Eldridge, N. Y., of nephritis, aged 43 years 5 
months, bur. St. Mark's Cemetery. + 

192. Deborah . 

193. Mary, d. 74 Forsyth St., N. Y., 19 Dec, 1848, of phthisis, 

aged 32 years, 7 months, 6 days, and was bur. at St. 
Mark's Cemetery. Her will was proved 1849 (N. Y. 
Co. Records, Lib. 97, p. 100), and mentions " mother 
Hester," Mary Webster, dau. of Charlotte 183, and 
late sister — 

194. Lucretia, and her sons Joseph, Samuel H. and Jacob 

H. Graham. 

181. James Varian, b. 1779, d. of liver complaint, at 19 Eldridge St., 

N. Y., 21 July, 1826, and was bur. in cemetery of Rutgers 
St. Presbyterian Church. He probably had no issue, or 
was not married, at the decease of his father, who, in his 



DE8VEJV DANTS OB" MICHAEL VARIAN. 49 

will, gives him but a life interest in his estate, which interest 
is entailed to his (Michael 5) great grandson, James M. 
Oockroft, who is now (1881) a physician in New York. 

The estate of James Varian was administered by his 
brother Jacob H. Varian, letters being issued to him 28 
Sep., 1826 (N. Y. Co. Records, Liber 22, p. 145). 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

191. Jacob Harsen Varian,* b. N. Y., 15 Sept, 1811, d. at 19 
Eldridge St., N. Y., 4 Feb, 1855, m. 22 Nov, 1841, Susan 
Angevine, dau. of Jonathan 16 and Phoebe (Angevine) 
Varian. She b. 23 Sep, 1819, d. N. Y. City, 29 May, 1870. 
His (Jacob 191) will was proved 1855 (N. Y. Co. Records, 
Liber 112, p. 305). 

Their issue was: 

195. Laura. 

196. Henrietta. 

197. Mary. 

198. William Henry. 

For details concerning this family see "Susan A. Varian," 
24, page 26. 



Note. — The information concerning the posterity of Michael 
Varian 5 has been almost wholly obtained from "Public Records," 
hence the brevity of this chapter. 

* Was a butcher at 2 Catherine Market, N. Y., 1847. 



Descendants of Isaac Varian, Jr. 



THIRD GENERATION. 

6. ISAAC VARIAN, was the youngest son of Isaac 1, and was b. 
in the City of New York, 8 Sep., 1740. He followed the 
profession of his father, and was a butcher in New York 
for a long period, residing and doing business at 176-180 
Bowery, 1806-1818. His name frequently occurs in the old 
city records. In 1784 he, with his father, was a petitioner 
in favor of the establishment by Richard Deane of a public 
slaughter house on the North River. He was also one of 
the first butchers located in Catherine Market, being in 
business there in 1805. In connection with Gilbert 
Coutant he petitions, 20 July, 1790, for a proper place in 
the " Fly Market" for himself and u other farmers and 
gardeners " to transact their business. He was located as 
a butcher in a Fly Market" in 1803, occupying stand No. 
29, and in 1795, in company with other butchers of said 
market, signed a certificate of the apprenticeship of Caleb 
Vandenburg. 

He was quite prosperous in his calling and accumulated 
a handsome competence consisting of landed estate in both 
New York and Westchester Counties. The old " Varian 
House " and the farm on which it was situated was 
originally purchased by him, and for a long period existed 
as a prominent land-mark on Manhattan Island. 

Isaac Varian deceased of dropsy in the chest, 29 May, 
1820, aged 79 years, 9 months and 21 days, on one of his 
estates in the County of Westchester, N". Y., and was 
interred in graveyard of Forsyth St. Methodist Church, 
N. Y. His estate was administered through the Surro- 
gate's office at White Plains, letters issuing to his sons 
Isaac and Jacob, and his son-in-law Gilbert Coutant, 8 
June, 1820. 
He was thrice married: 



DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VABIAN, J II . 51 

1. 3 Oct., 1765, Hannah (possibly dau. of Cornelius or 
Adam, the inn-keeper) Van Den Berg (N. Y. Marriages, p. 
410; bond dated 2 Oct., 1765). She died 17 Dec, 1775. 

2. 26 Feb., 1777, Alletta Harsen, who d. 30 July, 1801. 
3. 1803, Jane Betts. 

The issue of these marriages was: 

By Hannah Van Den Berg: 

199. Isaac, \ b. N. Y. City, j bap. 15 November, 1767 +| 

200. Mary, j 13 Oct., 1767, ( d. 23 December, 1767 $ 

(N. Y. Gen. and Biog. Kec. VII. 67). 

201. Mary, b. N. Y. City, 10 Sep., 1769, bap. 15 Oct., 1769 

(N. Y. Gen. and Biog. Bee. VII. 172).+ 

202. Michael, b. N. Y. City, 24 Jan., 1771, bap. 7. April, 

1771, d. young (N. Y.'Gen. and Biog. Kec. VIII. 79). 

203. Elizabeth, b. N. Y. City, 1 July, 1772, bap. 15 Aug., 

1773, d. 30 Jan., 1809 (N.'Y. Gen. and Biog. Rec. 
X. 46).+ 

204. Hannah, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 17 Dec, 1775, d. 10 

Sep., 1777. 

By Alletta Harsen : 

205. Catherine Washington, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 4 April, 

1778, d. young. 

206. George Washington, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 21 Mar., 

1779, d. young. 

207. Jacob Harsen, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 8 Sep., 1781, d. 

24 Oct., 1846. + 

208. Richard, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 2 Sep., 1783. + 

By Jane Betts: 

209. Dorcas, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 20 May, 1804. + 

210. Jane, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 15 June' 1805, d. 1 Sep., 

1880, unmarried. 

211. Gilbert Coutant, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 9 Feb., 1807, 

d. 29 Jan., 1830, of bronchitis (unmarried), and was 
bur. in cemetery of Allen St, M. E. Church, N. Y. 

212. Michael, b. ? Westchester, N. Y., 26 Nov., 1808. + 

213. James, } , u u ^ N 1809 + 

214. Hannah, d ' ^>inov, i»uy. + 



52 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VABIAN, JR. 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

199. Isaac Varian, eldest son of Isaac 6, was born in the City of 
New York, 13 Oct., 1767, and was bap. in the Presbyterian 
Church in that city, 15 Nov., 1767. He was a butcher, and 
was located at 176-180 Bowery, in the years 1806-1818; in 
Catherine Market, 1811-1813, residing at 125 Mott, near 
Grand St., and possibly is identical with the person of the 
same name residing on Spring St., near Mott, 1814; 83 
Elizabeth, 1815; 42 Elizabeth, 1817. In 1793-6 he was 
foreman of Engine Co. 19, which "laid" in Hester St., near 
Bowery Lane. In 1820 the directory mentions him as a 
" gardener," near the "Arsenal" (?Varian farm), and in 
1841 he was resident cor. Broadway and 27th St., in the 
" old Varian homestead," which he inherited from his 
father, and where he deceased of old age 1 July, 1842, and 
was buried in Marble Cemetery, N. Y. His will was 
proved 1842, and is of record in N. Y. Co, Records, Liber 85, 

p. 445. He m. 20 June, 1791, Tamar, dau. of Leggett, 

b. West Farms, N. Y, 26 Mar., 1771, d. 26 Mar, 1840. 

Their issue was: 

215. Isaac Leggett b. N. Y, 25 June, 1793, d. Feekskill, 

N. Y, 4 Aug, 1864. + 

216. Jacob, b. N. Y, 9 July, 1795, d. 1810. 

217. William, b. " 4 Sep, 1797, d. 3 Dec, 1863. + 

218. Alletta, b. " 28 Sep, 1799. + 

219. John, b. " 27 Oct, 1801, d. 31 Mar, 1836. + 

220. Richard, b. " 12 May, 1804, d. 18 Dec, 1864. + 

221. Gilbert Ooutant, b. N. Y, 5 Feb., 1807, d. 6 Mar., 

1846. + 

222. George Washington, b. N. Y, 3 April, 1809, d. 8 Feb, 

1879. + 

223. Emeline C, b. N. Y, 27 Feb., 1813. d. 18 Feb., 1869. + 

201. Mary Varian, b. N. Y, 10 Sep, 1769 (second dau. Isaac 6), d. 
29 Sep, 1853, m. 26 April, 1789, Gilbert Coutant, a descend- 
ant of the Huguenot of that name, settled at New Rochelle. 
He was a drover originally, afterward a grocer, located at 
the " two-mile stone," in the Bowery, 1818, and in 1838-40 
was a resident on Broadway, near 21st St., where he 
deceased. He b. 7 June, 1766, d. 9 July, 1845. 

Thev had issue : 



"i^* 




W.T.l/Tornan X fl, I ,4;-fjJrrI>li3-l if 




VW.Morgan&tfci.nFCL^l^,^ J 



DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VABIAN, JB. 53 

224. Hannah, b. 1 Aug., 1790, d. 13 April, 1815, m. Daniel 

Clark. 

225. Eliza, b. 18 Dec, 1791, d. m. Nicholas 

Sch u rem an. 

226. Mary Ann, b. 22 April, 1794, d. 15 April, 1814, m. 

Nathaniel Marline. 

227. Alettha, b. 11 Jan., 1796, d. circa 1806. 

228. Isaac, b. 19 April, 1798, d. 4 Aug., 1833, s.p. 

229. Jane Simmons, b. 13 April, 1800, living Feb., 1881, 

at'Sing Sing, N. Y., m. Wm. H. Peck. 

230. Susanna Nelson, b. 22 Mar., 1802, cl. 14 Mar., 1816. 

231. Catharine Varian, b. 26 Feb., 1804, d. 20 Jan., 1880, m. 

Charles Ketchum. 

232. Emmerline, b. 22 May, 1806, d. m. Ely Moore. 

233. xllletha. b. 7 June, 1808, living N. Y. City Feb., 1881, 

m. Schureman Halsted. 

234. Henry Gilbert, b. 5 Aug., 1810, d. circa 1812. 

235. Daniel Chadeayne, b. 1812, d. aged 8 mos. 

203. Elizabeth Varian, b. N. Y., 1 July, 1772, third dau. Isaac 6, d. 
30 Jan., 1809, m. 1803, Samuel (a farmer), son of 

Edward and Mary (Lynch) Briggs, of Westchester, N. Y., 
and had issue : 

236. Mary Ann,b. Westchester, N. Y., 25 Mar., 1804, cl. N. Y. 

10 Mar., 1862, m. 11 May,' 1829, Robert Stead, of N. Y. 

237. Isaac Varian,* b. Westchester, N. Y., 12 Oct., 1805, d. 



*The children of Isaac Varian Briggs and Elizabeth Barker were: 

1. Samuel (the author of this book), b. N. Y., 12 April, 1841, living (1881) 

Cleveland, O. 

2. Elizabeth Evelyn, b. X. Y., 5 Jan., 1843, m. Edward P. Robins, of New- 

York. 

3. Genevieve Augusta, b. N. Y., 6 Jan., 1845, d. 29 Dec, 1849. 

4. Isaac Varian, b. X. Y., 1 Dec, 1846, d. 30 May, 1871, unmarried. 

5. Mary Jane Lockhart, b. X. Y. 9 Dec, 1848, m. Albert Riblet, of New 

York. 

6. Robert Stead, b. N. Y., 19 Oct., 1850, living (1881) New York. 

7. Frank Pierce, b. N. Y., 31 Oct.. 1852, cl. 3 Feb., 1864. 

8. Genevieve Augusta, b. N. Y., 26 Jan., 1855, m. Lindsey Watson, of New 

York. 

9. Edward, b. N. Y., 11 Jan., 1860, d. 17 Mar., 1861. 

10. Edward, b. N. Y., 17 Aug., 1862, living (1881) Cleveland, O. 



54 DESCMNDANTii OF ISAAC VAHIAN, JR. 

N. Y., 10 Dec, 1877, m. 1 June, 1840, Elizabeth, dau. 

Richard and Clarisse (White) Barker, of N. Y. 
Edward S., b. Westchester, N. Y., 28 April, 1807, d. 17 Aug., 

1815. 
Elizabeth, b. Westchester, N. Y., 16 Jan., 1809, living (1881) 

at Yonkers, N. Y., m. 16 Dec, 1829, Prince William, 

son of Isaac and Temperance Paddock, of Southeast 

N. Y. 

207. Jacob Harsen Varian, farmer, b. Westchester, N. Y., 8 Sep., 
1781, fourth son of Isaac 6, d. 21 Oct., 1845; estate admin- 
istered 6 Nov., 1845; m. Jan., 1806, Hannah Leggett, of 
West Farms, N. Y., b. 1780, d. 18 April, 1854. He (Jacob) 
was a man of integrity, content with his farm and the 
welfare of his family, with an ever ready hand for the 
assistance of the needy. They had issue b. at Yonkers, 
N. Y., two and a half miles from King's Bridge, on the 
road to William's Bridge: 

240. Alletta, b. 11 Oct., 1806, d. 25 Feb., 1875, unmarried. 

241. Mary Ann, b. 30 Mar., 1808, d. 15 Oct., 1874. + 

242. Isaac, b. 24 Dec, 1809, d. 24 (? 12) Oct., 1827. 

243. Cornelia, b. 20 Oct., 1811, living, unmarried, 1881, 

Elkton, Md. 

244. Jane Coutant, b. 30 Aug., 1819. + 

245. Jacob Harsen, b. 3 Aug., 1822, m. Sarah S. Lawrence; 

no issue. 

208. Richard Varian, b. Westchester, N. Y., 2 (? 9) Sep., 1783, d. 5 
Dec, 1842, was a farmer near William's Bridge, N. Y. He 
m,l, 1810, Elizabeth Fowler, b. 3 Mar., 1786, d. 11 June, 
1822; 2, 13 April, 1823, Elizabeth Dodge. His issue was; 

By Elizabeth Fowler: 

246. Richard, b. 10 Dec, 1810, d. 19 Aug., 1817. 

247. Alfred, b. 2 Aug., 1814, d. 5 May, 1877. + 

248. Elizabeth, b. 25 Sep., 1815, d. Aug., 1870, in. 

Charles Leviness. 

249. Mary Coutant Briogs, b. 10 July, 1817, at Fordham, 

N. Y., d. 1 Nov., 1872. + 

250. Jane E., b. 18 Sep., 1819, d. 18 June, 1872. + 

251. Egbert, b. 19 May, 1822, d. 11 Sep., 1822. 



DESCENDANTS OF ISA A C V AMI AN, JR. 55 

By Elizabeth Dodge: 

252. Jacob, b. 14 Mar., 1824, living (1881) New York.+ 

253. Gilbert Coutant, b. 19 Oct., 1826, d. 25 1852. 

His will is dated Westchester, N. Y., 2 Mar., 1852, 
and proved 14 June, 1852 (White Plains, N. Y. 
Records). It mentions ''mother Elizabeth" and 
" brother Jacob.' 1 The latter, with " cousin Jacob L. 
Dodge, 11 both of N. Y. City, executors. 

209. Dorcas Varian, b. Westchester, N. Y., 20 May, 1804, d. 

m. John Corsa, farmer of Fordham, N. Y. ; he 

b. d. 

They had children: 



254. 


Isaac, b. 








255. 


Helen, b. 




m. 


Ward; several children. 


256. 


Gilbert, 




d. 




257. 


George, b. 




d. 


m. adopted dau. 




of 


St. 


Drms, o 


f Tarry town, N. Y.; 1 child. 


258. 


Jacob, b. 




d. 


infancy or early youth. 


259. 


Edmund, b. 






m. d. early. 


260. 


Andrew. 








261. 


William, b. 






m. 


262. 


Henry Clay, 


b. 




m. has issue. 


263. 


Charles, b. 
Chester, N. 


Y. 




m. Bussing, of East 



Note.— Another account of this family does not mention 
Gilbert or Andrew, but gives Edmund as Edward, and also names 
John, who m., had issue, and emigrated to Long Island, and 
Richard, who m. Varian, and had one child. 



212. Michael Varian, farmer, b. Westchester, N. Y., 26 Nov., 1808, 
seventh son of Isaac 6, m. Martha Huestis, d. 

?1876. He lives (1881) at Fordham, N. Y. 



Thei 



r issue was: 



264. Martha, b. + 

265. Michael, b.+ 



56 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VABIAN, JR. 

266. Jesse H., b.+ 

267. Isaac, b.+ 

268. Jane, b. d. infancy. 

213. James Varian, b. Westchester, N. Y., 25 Nov., 1809, d. 

m. Angeline Stevenson, who lives now (1881) at King's 
Bridge, N. Y. 

Their children were: 

269. James, b. 20 April, 1831, d. Mar., 1881. + 

270. Gilbert, b. 28 Mar., 1833, d. 1 Oct., 1866. + 

271. William H., b. 15 Feb., 1835. + 

272. Carman S., b. 5 Nov., 1836, m. Angeline Sherwood; no 

issue. 

273. Jacob, b. 30 Nov., 1838, d. 19 Nov., 1873. + 

274. Harriet, b. 12 Dec, 1840. + 

275. George W., b. 23 Mar., 1842. + 

276. Francis M., b. 11 Sep., 1845, carpenter, King's Bridge, 

N. Y-, unmarried; res. King's Bridge, 1875-8; 24th 
Ward, N. Y., 1880. 

277. Huram B., b. 27 Jan., 1848. + 

278. Charles A., b. 10 Mar., 1850, d. 3 May, 1873, unmarried. 

279. Isaac L., b. 14 Aug., 1852, unmarried, lives at Pough- 

keepsie, N. Y. 

280. Eugene W., b. 11 Aug., 1854, unmarried, res. Toronto, 

Woodson Co., Kansas. 

281. Angeline, b. 9 Jan., 1857. + 

214. Hannah Yarian, b. Westchester, N. Y., 25 Nov., 1809, eighth 

dau. Isaac 6, m. John Taylor, a woolen manu- 

facturer, of Connecticut, and now resides at Council Bluffs, 
Iowa. 

Their children were: 

282. Charles, b. d. infancy. 

283. Charles, m. no issue, deceased. 

284. John, b. m. has several children. 

285. Levi, b. unmarried. 

286. William, b. d. single. 

287. Gilbert, b. m. of Harlem, N. Y. 

288. Jane, b. m. Baker. 

289. Mary Esther, b. m. Page, has children. 



.. .■' ' ' 




HOE ISAAC UiBffl. 



DMSCENDAJSTIS OF ISAAC VARIAN, JR. 57 

290. Frances, b. m. 

291. Elizabeth, b. m. 

292. Isaac, b. deceased. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

215. Isaac L. Varian, son of Isaac 190, was born on the "old home- 
stead," in the City of New York, 25 June, 1793, and resided 
on a portion of the farm for many years. He never 
engaged in mercantile pursuits, being possessed of an 
ample competence. He was, however, actively interested 
in politics, being an " old school Democrat" and a mem- 
ber of the Tammany Society. He was chairman of the 
meeting held 20 October, 1835, on which evening the 
" Loco-foco " party was born. He held various offices of 
trust in the gift of the people: member of the State 
Assembly, 1831-4; alderman 12th ward, 1833-6; alderman 
16th ward; president of the board, 1835-6; mayor of New 
York, 1839-40; State senator, 1842; school commissioner 
16th ward, 1842-3. His portrait adorns the walls of the 
" Governor's Room " in the City Hall, New York, and no 
one can contemplate his picture without being impressed 
with his evident ability and sterling honesty and integrity. 
He removed to Peekskill, Westchester Co., N. Y., 1845, 
where he died 10 August, 1864, and his will was proved 
12 Sep., 1864 (White Plains Records). He m. 25 June 
(V July), 1811, Catherine Hopper Dusenbury, b. 19 May, 
1789. d. Peekskill, N. Y., 13 April, 1870, and had issue: 

293. Andrew Hopper, b. N. Y. 6 May, 1812, d. 4 May, 1826. 

294. Tamar Letitia, b. N. Y. 14 Aug., 1813. + 

295. Isaac, b. N. Y. 16 Aug. 1815, d. 5 April, 1816, 

296. Matilda Campbell, b. N. Y. 16 July, 1817. + 

297. Mary Elizabeth, b. N. Y. 7 July 1819, d. 14 June, 

1868, unmarried. 

298. Isaac, b. N. Y. 19 May, 1823. + 

299. Catherine Emeline, b. N. Y. 28 Jan., 1826. + 

300. Jacob HarsenJ k KT v oi \/r iqoq + S 

301. Hannah. [ bl N.Y.24May, 1828,+ ] d 19 Feb? Km 



58 DESC MNDANTS OF ISAAC VARTAN, JR. 

Hon. Isaac L. Varian died at his residence, near Peekskill, N. Y., on 
Wednesday, August 10th, 1864, in the seventy-fifth year of his age. 

Thus has passed away a life adorned with many virtues, and crowned 
with a Christian's Hope. His family have lost a devoted husband and kind 
father and the community an upright citizen, the poor a sympathizing friend, 
and the Church a liberal supporter and valued member. 

He will be remembered by many as once prominent in public life, in the 
Legislature and as mayor of the City of New York, in which positions his 
incorruptible integrity, sound judgment and kind heart, won respect from all 
classes. But above these unsolicited honors of civil trust, he valued an humble 
place at the foot of the cross. 

An immense concourse attended his funeral, attesting how great was the 
respect, how deep the sense of loss, felt at his departure. — Christum Intelli- 
gencer. 



217. William Varian, son of Isaac 199, was born at the "Varian 
House," in New York, 4 Sep., 1797, and was a gardener on 
the old farm, Bloomingdale Road, near 26th St., 1835; 6th 
Ave., near 27th St., 1839-1847. The house where he resided 
is still standing, and known as the " Knickerbocker Cot- 
tage." About the latter dale he removed to Westchester, 
and resided upon a farm about one mile from the village, 
on the road to Fordham, until about the year 1860, when lie 
sold the farm to the Roman Catholics, who erected thereon 
a "Protectory" for the reclamation of juveniles, and their 
education in industrial and religious matters. After the 
sale he removed, and deceased 3 Dec, 1863. His estate 
was administered 31 Dec, 1863 (White Plains, N. Y., 
Records), letters being issued to his widow and Albert 
Ward. He m. 23 Dec, 1819, Susan A., dau. of Isaac 
(b. 1767, d. 1832) and Sarah (Bennett) Cornell. She d. 
and her estate was administered 5 April, 
1865 (White Plains, N. Y., Records). 



Issue: 



302. Mary W., b. + 

303. Letitia S., 1). i d. about 1876-7 

304. William H., b.J 

305. Sarah E., b.+ 

306. John J., b.+ 



DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC' V A til AN, Jti. 59 

307. Tamak L., b.+ 

308. Esther 0., b. unmarried, res. (1880) New 

Castle, N. Y. 

309. Matilda M., b.+ 

310. George W., b. 1835, d. 6th Ave. and 27th 

St, N. Y., 28 Jan., 1836. 

311. Hannah Jane, b.+ 

312. Charles C, b.-i- 

313. Albert W, b. July, 1839, d. 6th Ave. and 27th St., 

N. Y., 28 Nov., 1841. 

314. Caleb Ward, b. m. 2 Feb., 1868, Catherine 

A. Reed, res. (?) Bedford, N. Y., 18S0. 

315. Edward A., b. 

218. Alletta Varian, dan. Isaac 199, was b. N. Y. City, 28 Sep., 

1799, living, 1881, m. Thomas Jefferson Stevens, 

and had issue: 

316. Isaac, b. deceased. 

317. Thomas G., b. deceased, m. Emma (325), 

dau. of John and Harriet (Kingsland) Varian; no 
issue. 

318. John, b, deceased. 

319. Charles, b. deceased. 

320. Carrie V., b. m. 1, George Conway; 2, 

Charles Folsom; 4 children. 

321. Louis William, b. deceased, m. Sarah Pentz; 

2 children. 

322. Jerome, b. deceased. 

219. John Varian, b. on the Varian estate in N. Y. City, 27 Oct., 

1801, d. 31 Mar., 1836, m. 20 June, 1827, Harriet Kingsland, 
who survived him, and resided on 26th St., bet. Broadway 
and 6th Ave., 1848-50; 32 W. 29th St., 1855-1857. 

They had issue: 

323. Isaac R, b. N. Y., 8 May, 1828. + 

324. Margaret jANE,b. N. Y., 11 Sep., 1829, m. 23 Sep., 1851, 

Wm. TL Johnson; no issue. 

325. Emma, b. N. Y., 29 Jan., 1832, m. 26 Dec. 1850, Thomas 

G. Stevens (317); he d. 21 Sep., 1852; no issue. 



GO DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VARIAN, JE. 

326. George Washington, b. N. Y., 31 May, 1834, unmar- 

ried. Bureau Fire Department, N. Y., 155 Mercer 
St.; 210 VV. 32d, N. Y., 173 W. 25th, N. Y., 1876; 664 
6th Ave., N. Y., 1879. 

327. Tamar Letitia, b. N. Y., 15 Aug., 1836. + 

220. Richard Varian, son of Isaac 199, was born on his father's 
farm, and in the old " Varian House," in the City of New 
York, 12 May, 1804. He was at one time in the milk busi- 
ness, and resided at Broadway, near 21st St., 1831, and 
occupied the u old homestead," 26th St., between 6th Ave. 
and Broadway, until its demolition in 1849, at which time 
he removed to 27 W. 26th St., where he resided until his 
decease, of hsematitis, 18 Dec, 1864. He was buried in 
Marble Cemetery, N. Y. He m. 11 Feb., 1829, Maria, dau. 
of Fulmer, who survived him, and d. of Bright's 

disease 28 May, 1867, aged 59 years, 3 months, 9 days. Her 
will was proved the same year, and is recorded N. Y. Co. 
Records, Liber 169, p. 419, naming children John J. and 
Emma J. as executors. 

Their issue was: 

328. Alletta Maria, b. N. Y., 22 Mar., 1830, d. 28 Mar., 1858. + 

329. Hannah, b. N. Y. 22 Aug., 1832, d. 18 Oct., 1833. 

330. Sarah Elizabeth, b. N. Y., 12 Jan., 1834, d. 1 Oct., 1850, 

of liver complaint; bur. Marble Cemetery, N. Y. 

331. Hannah Louisa, b. N. Y., 7 June, 1836. + 

332. Emma Jane, b. N. Y., 16 Sep., 1838, unmarried. 

333. Thomas Jefferson, b. N. Y-, 5 April, 1841, butcher, N. 

Y. City, 1195 Broadway, 1863-4-5; res. 27 W. 26th, 
1866-7; 413 E. 83d, 1872; 129 E. 93d, 1872-3; 349 E. 
84th, 1874-1881. 

334. John Jacob, b. N. Y., 20 Oct., 1843, d. 18 Nov., 1866; 

will recorded Lib. 160, p. 300, N. Y. Co. Records. 

335. Harriet Lucretia, b. N. Y., 13 Jan., 1846. + 

336. Clara Amelia, b. N. Y., 28 June, 1849, unmarried. 

Richard Varian inherited the "Varian homestead,' 1 and all of 
liis children were born therein (except the youngest), and spent 
the earlier portion of their lives there. When the house was taken 
down in 1851 Richard had had built two houses on 26th Si., into 
one of which his family removed. Richard was born, brought up 



DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VARIAN, JR. 61 

and died on the old farm. The place is said to have been in the 
family previous to the " Revolution," at which time they aban- 
doned it, and, upon the capture of Manhattan Island by the British, 
the family moved into Westchester County, within the American 
lines. 

"VAKIAN'S HOUSE.' 1 

The dwelling-house here represented was taken down some years since 
(1851) to make room for the splendid edifices which now beautify the portion 
of the city in which it was situated. It was the residence of Isaac Varian, 
and the birthplace of his children (among whom were ex-mayor Isaac L. 
Varian and the present alderman George W. Varian), and was occupied by 
him as his home at the time of his death, a few years since. The farm 
attached to the property contained about twenty-seven and a half acres, front- 
ing originally on the Bloomingdale Road, and covering the blocks within the 
present limits of Broadway, 26th to 30th Streets, and extending nearly to the 
7th Avenue. The northerly seventeen and a half acres were purchased by 
Mr. Varian of the executors of John De Witt, to whom the same was con- 
veyed by Jacob Horn in 1751. The southerly ten acres were purchased from 
Adam Vandenburgh. The property is said to have been in the family about 
eighty years, and was cultivated as farming land. The old house is said to 
have shown evidences of having been in part constructed out of a ship's 
cabin, but whence this relic was derived we have no account. The building 
itself was a noticeable object in late years, when seen from the fashionable 
drive near which it was situated, partly owing to its humble appearance in the 
midst of a rapidly improving neighborhood, and partly from the pertinacity 
evinced by its wealthy occupant, who, although raised to very affluent 
circumstances by the rise in value of his land, yet clung to the humble home- 
stead of his childhood, where his father had lived before him, until his grasp 
was released by death. — Valentine's Manual of the City of New York for 
1856. 

A view of the Varian building which was demolished in 1850-1 
presents the most suggestive idea of the condition of Broadway in 
early times which can be produced. 

It was situated south of a pleasant cross-road known as the 
"Abingdon Road," which connected Greenwich Village with the 
" Great Post Road," which branched off eastward from the present 
Broadway, near Madison Square. It was originally a swampy piece 
of land, containing about eleven acres, and belonged to the corpo- 
ration of the city, and by them was presented to Sir Peter Warren 
in 1740 as a free gift. It was subsequently purchased by Henry 
Gage, who, after the Revolution (having returned to England) sold 



62 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC V AMI AN, JB. 

it to Isaac Yarian for £600. Mr. Varian also owned a considerable 
tract, situated on the west side of Broadway, between 26th and 31st 
Streets, containing about fifteen acres, which he bought from the 
family of John De Wit tin 1787, at the price of £1,280. The locality 
as it then existed may be seen by the map herewith. (Manual Com- 
mon Council N. Y., 1865.) 

221. Gilbert Coutant Yarian, b. on the " Yarian estate," City of 

New York, 5 Feb., 1807, d. 6 Mar., 1846. He was a grocer 
at 426 Bowery, near Yauxhall Garden, 1833-5; cor. Broad- 
way and 21st St., 1836-7; was mentioned in directory 1841 
as a " carter," living at 6th Ave., cor. 26th St. He m. Jane 
Sneden, who survived him, and resided on 6th Ave., near 
27th St., in 1848-9, about which time she moved to .Plain- 
field, N. J., where she now (1881) resides. 

Their children were : 

337. Isaac C, b. N. Y., 24 Dec, 1832. + 

338. Jane M., b. N. Y.+ 

339. Sarah L., b.N. Y., April, 1837, d. 16 Jan., 1841, cor. 

Bowery and 21st St., N. Y 

340. Samuel T., b. N. Y.+ 

222. George Washington Yarian was born 3 April, 1809, in the 

" old homestead," lived and died on the land formerly 
occupied by the old farm. He was never engaged in any 
business except caring for the property which he inherited 
from his father's estate. He was universally respected, 
and held several offices by will of popular suffrage, was 
justly esteemed for his many virtues, and was a veritable 
type of the New York gentleman. He was councilman 
56th district 1854, alderman 21st ward 1855-6, member of 
State Assembly 1860. He resided on W. 26th St., between 
Bloomingdale Road and 6th Ave., 1847-8, and at 30 W. 
29th St., 1851, until his decease 8 Feb., 1879. He died of 
pneumonia, and was bur. in Marble Cemetery, N. Y. His 
will was dated 1879, and is recorded Liber 261, p. 2S9, N. Y. 
Co. Records. He m. 4 Jan., 1837, Margaret, dau. of 
Segur, who survived him. 

Their issue was: 

341. Lucy, b. i 



/; E 8 O E JS D A N TB F M 1 (J HA EL V ARIA N. 63 

The following newspaper extracts will prove of interest in 
connection with the name of George W. Varian: 



A SCEAP OF HISTORY. 

The Old Varian Tree on Broadway. — A Father in Manhattan 

Recounts its His tor}). 

Gradually the old land-marks of the city, around which the memories of 
our fathers clustered, have succumbed to the necessities of this fast age of 
improvement in steam, electricity, mechanics, etc. The last that has fallen 
before the axe of the destroyer is the Varian tree on Broadway, that was hewn 
down last fall, and cut up into butcher's blocks. One of the fathers of the 
present generation the writer saw standing by, as limb after limb of the veteran 
tree was lowered to mother earth, and tears unbidden coursed down his aged 
cheeks, as he witnessed the destruction of a forest king, planted and nursed 
by his distinguished progenitors. While the work was progressing the writer 
and Mr. Varian stood by and watched the movements of the sacrilegious hands 
of the destroyer, and saw the last branch stripped from the parent stem. Mr. 
Varian at that time expressed his intention to send a part of the tree to the 
Police Department for preservation. 

He has done so. Yesterday at the session of the Board of Police Com- 
missioners the following letter was handed in by Superintendent Kennedy, in 
whose custody the relic is placed. The board accepted it with thanks, and 
will likely place it beside the branch of the Stuyvesant tree that adorns the 
room of Commissioner Brennan. The following is Mr. Varian's letter on the 
subject. It will be seen from it that the tree is fully 240 years old — probably 
the oldest tree on Manhattan Island : 

New York, January 24, 1870. 
John A. Kennedy, Superintendent, etc., etc. 

Dear Sir: Through you to the department I send a piece of the old 
buttonwood, or sycamore, tree (commonly known as the old Varian tree) that 
stood on the sidewalk, west side, between 26th and 27th Streets, Broadway, 
formerly the old Albany post road. The history of this tree, with three others 
that stood in front of the old house in which I was born, as near as I can ascer- 
tain, was planted by some of the Dutch settlers on this island between the 
years 1625 and 1630, making it 240 years old at least. The house was built 
partially from some old Dutch galiot that was drawn up Stuyvesant Creek, 
and ran across where 22d St. and the 3d Ave. now is, thence northward to 
about the northeast corner of the present Madison Square, formerly the site 
of the old State arsenal and Potter's Field; thence north side of arsenal and 



64 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VARIAN, JR. 

Potter's Field to and across the old Albany post road, now Broadway, where 
was about the headwaters that followed into Stuyvesant Creek. 

As a relic of the pioneers of the Western Continent of America I send 
a small piece of the old tree, to be placed in your headquarters, that future 
generations may contemplate the rapid growth of our city. 

Very respectfully, 

GEO. W. VARIAN. 

The portion of the tree presented with the letter is mounted on a bracket, 
nicely oiled and varnished, and is in a good state of preservation. Travelers 
on Broadway can see the remains of the trunk protruding through the side- 
walk, on the west side, between 26th and 27th Streets.— From the N. Y. 
Herald of January 29th, 1870. 

Here is an old school Democrat, and one of the genuine Knickerbockers. 
He has a stout form, bushy gray hair and whiskers, is about 58 years of age, 
and exceedingly vigorous. He dresses in black, wears a large brimmed felt 
hat, and carries a good trusty stick as his companion. He was formerly 
alderman of the 21st ward, and in 1861 was a member of the Legislature, and 
made some sound speeches on the war question. He is known as Aid. George 
W. Varian, and is a brother of the late ex-Mayor Varian. He has retired 
from the active pursuits of life, having a fine income, and, being a staunch 
State's Rights Democrat, is the president of the Thomas Jefferson Association 
of New York ; and when on this theme few men can debate with him, for he 
bears them down with a torrent of Democratic logic and tradition, that over- 
whelms and covers them with defeat and confusion. He is like a noble old 
Roman, for he will endure no striplings in political antagonism — he brushes 
them away like cobwebs, and seeks to grapple with sterner stuff, foemen 
worthy of his steel. If we had more men of his metal in the Democratic 
party there would be no fear for the Republic. — New York Newspaper. 

OBITUARY. 



GEORGE W. VARIAN. 

This gentleman died yesterday (8 Feb., 1879) at his residence in 29th 
Street, adjoining the Fifth Avenue- Theatre, after a few days 1 illness, from 
pneumonia. He served the city as one of its councilmen in 1854. as one of its 
aldermen in 1855 and 1850, and as one of its assemblymen in 1860. He once 
refused the use of his name in connection with a Democratic nomination for 
mayor when his election would have been assured, but having seen the annoy- 
ances to which his brother, the late Isaac L. Varian, while mayor in 1839, was 
subjected, he shrunk from the responsibility. He never had a real taste for 




MOW. OTQQRdGE l^^MOAN. 



DESG ENDANTS OF TSAAC VARIAN, J B . 65 

politics, but his proverbial integrity, coupled with his frank, hearty bearing, 
made him not only a popular gentleman, but an extremely available candidate. 
He was born seventy years ago on the well known old Varian farm, that was 
bounded by the Bloomingdale Road — now upper Broadway — and the present 
7th Avenue, and at the points where the streets between 26th and 30th were 
cut through, and he lived and died within the area of the original farm land. 
He was born to an ample competence, and never had other occupation than 
aiding in the care of the family real estate, that rapidly developed in value as 
the city became extended. Some of the ancient estate yet remains to duly 
pass into the possession of his widow and his daughter, who is the wife of Mr. 
Henry Gilsey, one of the owners of the great Gilsey property. 

It was natural that Mr. Varian should be fond of New York City and of 
its well being, and in or out of office he intelligently and zealously supported 
every measure that could promote its prosperity, if that measure was coupled 
with honor and divested of extravagance. Hence his name and influence 
during the past quarter century were often found actively on the side of 
municipal reform. In private life he was just, courteous, full of good humor 
and greatly attached to home, family and friends. 

223. Emeline Coutant Varian, b. N. Y., 27 Feb., 1S13, d. 18 Feb., 
1869, m. 1 Jan., 1837, Lawrence Pell, son of Jordan, 

who d. May, 1811. He was a chairmaker, and was 
assistant alderman 10th Ward, N. Y., 1835-6. 

They had issue: 

342. George Lawrence, b. 21 Nov., 1837. 

343. Emma Augusta, b, 16 Dec, 1839, m. 12 June, 1872, 

James Hopkins, and had James Jordan, b. N. Y^., 30 
July, 1874; Caleb, b. Catskill, N. Y., 20 June, 1877, d. 

28 Feb., 1878. 

Obituary Notice of the Death of Mrs. Emetine C. Jordan, written to 

the "Christian Intelligencer," by the Rev. Abr. B. Van 

Nest (at that time in Italy). 

Your journals have lately reported the death of another estimable lady, 

Mrs. E. C. Jordan, and you will permit one who has enjoyed her frequent 

hospitality to present this grateful tribute to her memory. She belonged to 

one of our old Dutch families, was the sister of our former mayor, Isaac L. 

Varian, and the widow of Alderman Jordan. Her residence was in Broadway, 

by the big button-ball tree, above 23th Street, on the very site of her father's 
9 



66 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VABIAN, JR. 

farm. She was a real mother in Israel, and nothing delighted her so much as 
to entertain the prophets of the Lord. She lived a quiet, religious life, but 
many were her deeds of Christian charity. Her record is on high, and her 
name is written in the book of life. 



241. Mary Ann Varian (dau. Jacob Harsen Varian 217), b. Yonkers, 
N. Y., 30 Mar., 1808, d. 15 Oct., 1874, m. 28 Aug., 1830, 
Charles Wighton, of Yonkers, N. Y., who d. 25 Oct, 1874, 

Issue: 

344. Charles, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 11 Oct., 1831, d. 4 Sep., 1835. 

345. Jacob Varian, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 3 July, 1833, d. 4 Nov., 

1874, m. 2 July, 1863, T. Ann Anter, and had Charles 
E., b. N. Y., 28 Mar., 1864; Mary Emma, b. N. Y., 10 
April, 1867, d. 16 July, 1867; Emma Jane, b. N. Y. 10 
Oct., 1868; Kobert, b. N. Y. 24 Oct., 1873. 

346. Robert, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 21 Sep., 1835, d. 1 Jan., 1867, 

m. Sarah Mittleberger, and had Mary Elizabeth, b. 
N. Y. 1 Jan., 1866. 

347. Hannah Varian, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 2 Oct., 1837, m. 1 

May, 1878, Alfred Anderson. 

348. Isaac, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 12 Mar., 1840, m. 21 Oct., 1878, 

Sarah Wilson, and has Charles Albert, b. Yonkers, 
N. Y., 26 Oct., 1879. 

349. Jonah, ) , v , mv oou™ iq^o! d. 28 Sep., 1842. 

350. Thomas,| b. Yonkers, N.Y., 29 July, 1842 j d lg ^ 1MS 

351. Sarah Louisa, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 23 July, 1844. 

244. Jane Coutant Varian, b. 30 Aug., 1819, at Yonkers, N. Y., m. 
6 Oct., 1847, Pembroke Lawrence, of King's Bridge, N. Y., 
where they now reside. He was b. Yonkers, N. Y., 17 
April, 1823. 

Their children were: 

352. Hannah Cornelia, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 24 Aug., 1848. 

353. Charles Pembroke, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 8 Aug., 1853. 

354. Jane Elizabeth, b. Yonkers, N. Y., 2 Sep., 1853 (? 1855), 

m. 5 Sep., 1877, Abijah Pratt, and had: 1, Charles 
William, b. Yonkers, N, Y., 3 Nov.. 1878. d. 27 June, 
1879; 2, Henry Morris, b. N. Y. City, 10 July, 1880. 



^rag^WjigS 







- f' , 

■'....■. ■ ■ . ■ ■,.■■■ ;-.■ - 





e> 



c/ 



/^Jt^ 



Ct^L/L &Slx; 



I) E 8 C E NDA N T S OF ISAAC VARIAN, J li . 67 

247. Alfred Varian was born near William's Bridge, N. Y. (now a 
part of the City of New York, but then quite a farming 
district), 2 Aug., 1814. In boyhood he worked on the farm 
of his uncle, Michael Varian. At about the age of nine- 
teen years he came to the City of New York, and was 
apprenticed to a butcher in Catharine Market. He after- 
ward established himself in the same trade at the same 
place (3, 4 and 5 Catharine Market), where he continued 
thirty years. In 1871 he removed to Mott Haven, and from 
thence to Oyster Bay, L. I., where he began farming on a 
small scale. Some years before he left Catharine Market 
he was requested by " a friend " to accommodate him with 
an " endorsement," which he did, and, as is too often the 
case, Mr. Varian was left to " settle the bill," occasion- 
ing him a great loss, from which he never recovered. 

Mr. Varian resided in New York, on 7th Ave, 1842; 7 
Ave. A, 1844-5; 295 Bowery, 1846-7; 53 5th, 1848-50; 13 
Ave. A, 1851-2; 03 5th, 1853-65; 77 E. 15th, 1866; 204 2d 
Ave., 1867; 232 E. 13th, 1868; 1056 2d Ave., 1869-70; 1st 
Ave., cor. 86th, 1872-3. 

From Oyster Bay he removed to Syosset, L. I. His 
health began to fail about the year 1876-7, and while on a 
visit at Mott Haven, N. Y., he was taken ill, died 5 May, 
1877, and was buried at Woodlawn Cemetery. 

He was identified with the State militia of N. Y., being 
lieutenant in the troop attached to the Seventh Regiment. 
He was also a member of the Kosciusko Boat Club, and 
one of the organizers of the Manhattan Yacht Club of New 
York. 

He m. 10 April, 1843, Eliza L., dau. of Charles Ridabock, 
who was for many years proprietor of the Tontine Restau- 
rant in Wall Street. She is living (1881). 

Their children were : 

355. Charles Rae, b. N. Y., 6 June, 1846. + 

355$. , b. N. Y, 1850, d. infancy. 

356. Alfred, b. N. Y., 14 July, 1855, unmarried. 

357. Henry Balcom, b. Mott Haven, 14 Aug., 1859, d. April, 

1861. 

Alfred Varian (356), whose portrait is on opposite page, was 
educated in the Common Schools of New York, graduating from 



68 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC V AMI AN, JR. 

Grammar School No. 35, and being admitted to the Free Academy, 
now dignified by the title of "The College of the City of New 
York." In 1870 he was employed in the clothing house of Joshua 
M. Varian & Son, at 70-72 Bowery, remaining three years; thence 
he went into the jewelry establishment of B. W. Ellison, at 181 
Broadway, for two years. Then he tried a year at farming with his 
father on Long Island, and afterward (1876) took charge of a num- 
ber of yachts at New York. From this period he became con- 
nected with several mercantile houses at different times, and for 
the past four years has been in the employ of Ira Perego's Sons, at 
85 Nassau St. Mr. Varian is quite well known in New York as an 
amateur athlete and yachtsman, being connected with several 
respectable organizations — Excelsior Social, Charter Oak, Knicker- 
bocker Gun Club and Knickerbocker Yacht Club, of the latter the 
secretary, and captain and owner of the yacht " Quits." 

A prominent New York journal, speaking of Mr. Varian in con- 
nection with a number of pedestrian contests, says: u He has been 
in a great many races not mentioned in this sketch. Such success 
as he has achieved has been hard earned. He never trained for a 
race, his business confining him to work, so that he has never been 
able to spare any time for preparation. Last season he was not 
seen on the track, but he may be heard from again this (1881) 
year. 

In 1873 at Rockaway, L. L, he and a companion were instru- 
mental in saving the life of Captain Bo wen, of Mott Haven, who 
had ventured in the surf beyond the "life line," and was seized 
with cramps. 

249. Mary Coutant Brigg-s Varian, b. Fordham, N. Y„ 10 July, 1817, 
d. 1 Nov., 1872, m. at Fordham, 30 June, 1844 (by Rev. Peter 
J. Van Pelt) Daniel Mahar, a ship carpenter, b. Albany, 
N. Y., 16 June, 1810, d. 26 Feb., 1876. 

They had children: 

358. John Smyth, b. N. Y., 28 Mar., 1845, m. , res. 

N, Y. City. 

359. Mary Elizabeth, b. N. Y„ 20 Oct., 1846, m. 24 April, 

1867, L. D. 0. Wood; 3 ch.; res. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

360. Wesley Whitfield, b. N. Y., 5 Aug., 1848, d. 26 Oct., 

1848/ 

361. Susan E., b. N. Y., 13 Feb., 1850, d. 19 Jan., 1853. 

362. Jennie A., b. Brooklyn, N. V., 11 Nov., 1851, m. 28 Sep., 

1870, F. IVI. Ross; 3 ch.; res. llorseheads, N. V. 



I) E 8 C EN DAN TVS' O F USA AC VARIAN..TB. 09 

363. Franklin, b. 13 June, 1855, m. 22 Jan., 1878, 

Fannie E. Hordern: 1 son; res. Brooklyn, N. Y. 

250. Jane E. Varian, b. N. Y., d. 1872, m. Robert 

Cromwell, farmer, of King's Bridge, N. Y., and they 
removed to Horseheads, N. Y. 

Their children were : 

364. James, b. 

365. Jane Louisa, b. 

366. Alfred, b. 

252. Jacob Varian, butcher, b. near William's Bridge, N. Y„ was in 
business at 238 Bleecker St., N. Y., 1857-1881, and resided 
at 8 Leroy St., 1857-1870, and at 22 Leroy St., 1871 to present 
time. He m. , and had children: 



367. Jacob. 




368. 


son. 


369. 


dau., m. 



Barker, who dec'd 1880. 

370. Sallie, d. 27 Jan., 1860, of scarlet fever, aged 2-3-1, 

bur. Greenwood. 

264. Martha Varian, b. m. William H. Archer, 

and res. Scarsdale, N. Y. 

They have one child: 

371. , b. 

265. Michael Varian, b. is now a grocer at Mount 

Vernon, N. Y., and possibly may be the same person who 
lived at 511 E. 12th St., New York, 1880. He m. 
and had issue: 

(Not communicated.) 

266. Jesse H. Varian, b. m. Conklin, 

and now (1880) lives at Yonkers, N. Y. He was (1861-3) in 
partnership with bro. Isaac in the feed business, 952 3d 
Ave., New York; res. 141 E. 50th St., N. Y. 

(No communication.) 



70 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VAtfTAN, JR. 

267. Isaac Varian, b. m. and 

was formerly in the feed business with bro. Jesse at 952 
3d Ave., New York; res. then (1861-3) 141 E. 50th St. 

(No communication.) 

269. James Varian (a mason at King's Bridge, 1875), b. 20 April, 

1831, d. 319 Warburton Ave., Yonkers, N. Y., Mar., 1881 , 
m. Emily Curser, of Yonkers, N. Y., and had children: 

372. Catherine, b. 

373. Emily, b. 

374. Grace, b. 

270. Gilbert Varian, b. 28 Mar., 1833, d. 1 Oct., 1866, m. Mary Gar- 

rison, of Yonkers, and had children. 

375. Emily, b. 

376. Warren, b. 

377. James, b. 

378. Frank, b. d. (St. John's 

Cemetery, Yonkers, N. Y., 1880.) 

379. Albert, b. d. (St, John's 

Cemetery, Yonkers, N. Y., 1880.) 

271. William H. Varian, farmer, res. Sprain Road, Yonkers, N. Y., 

b. 15 Feb., 1835, m. Mary, dau. of 

and ( ) Berrian, of King's Bridge, 

N. Y., and had issue: 

380. Sarah L. , b. 1856, res. Sprain Road, 

381. Mary R, b. 1858, res. Morrisania, N. Y.. m. 

Clarence G. Morey, of Morrisania, N. Y. ; 1 ch. 

382. Ella F., b. 1859, res. Yonkers, N. Y, m. 

William Seymour Thorn, of King's Bridge, N. Y.; 2 ch. 

383. Angeline J., 

384. Irene E., 

385. A BR AM AN A, 

386. Harvey Ellsworth, b. 

387. Lulu, 

388. William Norman, 

389. Bertha A., 

390. Carman. 

391. Edward V 



b. 


1861, res. Sprain 


Road. 


b. 


1863, 


u 


b. 


d. 




b. 


1866, res. Sprain 


Road. 


b. 


1867, 


a 


b. 


1869, 


u 


b. 


1870, 


a 


b. 


1873, d. 1880. 





DkHSVEMDAJST* OF ISAAC VARIAN, JR. 71 

392. Charles. 

393. Eugene 0., b. 1877, res. Sprain Road. 

394. Garfield Arthur, b. 1880, 

273. Jacob Varian, b. 30 Nov., 1838, d. 19 Nov., 1873, m. Jane 

Oonklin, of King's Bridge, N. Y., and had children: 

395. Jesse, b. 

396. Leonard, b. 

397. Herbert, b. 

274. Harriet Varian, b. 12 Dec, 1840, m. Frederick Denton, of 

King's Bridge, N. Y., and had children: 

398. Eugenia, b. 

399. Laura E., b. 

400. Alice V„ b. 

401. Charles, b. 

275. George W. Varian (a carpenter) b. 23 Mar., 1842, m. Juliette 

Dodge, of King's Bridge, N. Y., where they now reside. 

Their children are: 

402. John P., b. 

403. Harriet L., b. 

404. Evaline, b. 

405. Gilbert, b. d. 1880. 

406. Julia A., b. 

407. Alida, b. 

408. Mary L., b. 

409. Ida P., b. 

410. George Francis, b. d. 22 Nov., 1875. 

411. Maud, b. d. 12 Sep., 1878. 

412. Laura E, b. 

413. Warren J., b. 

277. Huram B. Varian, painter, res. Woodlawn, N. Y., b. 27 Jan., 
1848, m. Ella Austen, and has children : 

414. Clarence, b. 

415. Claude, b, 

416. Infant, b. deceased. 



72 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VARIAN, JR. 

281. Angeline Yarian, b. 9 Jan., 1857, res. King's Bridge, N. Y., m. 
George H. Carlough, and has issue: 

417. Hetty P. 

418. Louis E. 



SIXTH GENERATION. 

294. Tamar Letitia Varian, b. N. Y., 14 Aug, 1813, m. 17 May, 1838, 
Cornelius Concklin, and had issue, b. in City of New York, 
as below: 

419. Catherine Yarian, b. 26 Mar., 1839, d. 14 Sep, 1855. 

420. Isaac L. Yarian, b. 12 May, 1841, d. 15 July, 1871, m. 25 

Mar, 1867, Juliet Warner; had ch. Cornelius and 
Charles. 

421. Starks W. L, b. 13 April, 1843, d. 20 Aug., 1844. 

422. Mary Elizabeth, b. 15 Mar, 1845. 

- 423. Starks W, b. 10 July, 1847, d. 26 May, 1856. 

424. Cornelius Newell, b. 10 Oct, 1849, d. 3 April, 1851. 

425. Helen Augusta, b. 1 Sep, 1852. 

296. Matilda Campbell Yarian, b. N. Y., 16 July, 1817, m. 26 Oct, 
1836, Starks W. Lewis (1839-40 merchant N. Y,26 Coenties 
Slip, res. 147 Macdougal St.), and had issue: 

426. Eliza M, b. N. Y, 23 Jan, 1838, m. 20 Nov, 1862, 

Howard M. Baker. 

427. Isaac L. Yarian, b. N. Y, 23 Jan, 1840, m. 1, 21 Nov., 

1861, Eliza Manley, and had ch. Starks W, Florence 
A., Arthur S. ; m. 2, 12 June, 1877, M. Louisa Living- 
ston. 

428. Ezra, b. N. Y, 29 May, 1842, d. 18 April, 1843. 

429. Catharine A, b. N. Y, 4 Aug, 1844, cl. 14 Feb, 1873, m. 

27 May, 1868, Charles C. Harrison. 

430. Starks W., b. N. Y, 6 Nov., 1846, d. 16 July, 1862. 

431. John J, b. N. Y, 29 Jan, 1848, m. 19 Jan., 1875, 

Josephine A. Fisher, and had ch. Ida L. and Edith M. 

432. Georgianna IL, b. N. Y., 15 Sep, 1851, m. 12 June, 1873, 

Winfield S. Baker, and had ch. Everett H. and Har- 
riet M. 

433. Ida L., b. N. Y, 14 Nov, 1855, d. 27 May, 1875. 



u /•; s c /•; .v i) . i y r s or i s a a c v a hi a n . ■/ /.' . ? s 

298. Isaac Varian, b. N. V. City, L9 May, 1823, m. 9 -July, 1845, Ann 

Eliza Hegeman, b. 24 July, 1822. They reside at Peek- 
skill. N. Y. 

Their children were: 

484. Benjamin Arrowsmitii Hegeman, b. Peekskill, N. Y., 

25 Nov., 1846. 

485. Isaac L., b. Peekskill. N. Y., 27 Aug., 1850. + 
436. John J., b. " l 26 Jan., 1858. 

299. Catherine E.meline Varian, b. N. Y., 28 Jan.. 1826, m. 16 June, 

1852, Samuel Fugsley, of Peekskill, N. Y., and had issue 
born near Peekskill, N. Y., as followeth: 

487. Catharine L. b. 10 Mar., 1854, d. 20 Mar., 1855. 

438. Hannah M., b, 2 Aug., 1855. 

430. Isaac L. Varian, b. 27 Nov., 1856. 

440. Ann E., b. 12 Oct., 1857, d. 14 Aug., 1858. 

44L. Samuel J., b. 21 Jan., 1859, m. 9 Oct., 1880, Hattie L. 

Powell. 
442. Caro May, b. 26 Aug., L866. 

300. Jacob Harsen Varian, I). N. Y., 24 May, 1828, m. 1855, 

Harriet D. Brown, and had issue born near Peekskill, N. Y., 
as follows: 

448. Jacob Harsen. b, 17 Nov., 1855. 

444. Cornelius Concklin, b. 10 Mar., 1857. 

445. Isaac L>., 1). 24 Nov., 1858, d, 11 Aug., 1878, 

446. Sarah II., b. 27 Sept,, 1860. 

447. Frederick S., b. 7 June, 1865. 

448. Nellie B., b. 3 Dec. 1866. 

449. Mary E., b. 2* Jan., 1869, d. 1 Jan., 1877, 

802. Mary W. Varian, m. 3 June, 1846, Abraham Weeks,* of Chap- 
paqua, N. Y., and had: 

450. W infield, b. 

451. Albert, b. 

452. Sarah, b. 

453. Howard. 1). 



* Deceased. 
10 



74 DESCENDANTS OF ISAAC VARIAN, JR. 

303. Letitia S. Varian, m. 22 Jan,, 1846, Israel Tompkins, of Preak- 

ness, N. J., and has: 

454. William V., b. 

455. Emma C. J., b. 

456. Caroline^ b. 

304. William H. Vakian, m. 12 Dec, 1844, Adaline Baker, and is 

probably the same person who is mentioned in N. Y. City 
directories, res. 6th Ave. and 27th St., 1847-8; milk, 473 6th 
Ave., 1851; 56 W. 29th, 1853-4; conductor, 472 6th Ave.. 
1855-7; police, 472 6th Ave., 1854-8; 255 W. 30th, 1872-80; 
317 E. 45th, 1881. 

They had issue: 

457. Henry, b. 

458. Sarah, b. 

459. William, b. 

460. Tamar, b. 

461. Adaline Ann, b, N. Y., Dec, 1855, d. 18 Aug., 1877. 

462. Luella, b. 

463. Cecilia, b. 

464. George M., b. 



305. Sarah E. Varian, m. 27 Sep., 1849, Robert Wright,* and had 

465. George A. V., b. 

466. Emma L., b. 



306. John J. Varian, m. 25 Nov., 1847, Sarah M. Seaman, and had: 

467. George, b. 

307. Tamar L. Varian, m. 26 Nov., 1853, James T., son of Josiah 

and Maria (Valentine) Briggs,* of Fordham, N.Y., and had: 

468. George A., b. 11 Sep., 1S54. 

* Deceased. 



D ES CENT) A JS Ttf F T8A A (J V Alii A iV\ J E . 75 

309. Matilda M. Varian, m. 1859, William Jewell, Fisher,* 

and had: 

469. Laura, b. 

470. Joseph C., b. 

471. Samuel W., b. 

472. William V., b. 

473. Jewetl, b. 

311. Hannah J. Varian, m. 10 Apr., 1856, Jacob L. Coles, of West 

Farms, N. Y., and had: 

474. William J., b. 

475. Charles H., b. 

476. Ella L. b. 

477. Susan V., b. 

312. Charles C. Varian, m. 6 Nov., 1862, Margaret T. Tiebout,* and 

(?) res. 1876-81, 147 E. 126 St., N. Y.; was probably 
ice dealer, 7 Garden St„ N. Y., 1876; and " driver, 1 ' 3d Ave. 
cor, 143d St., N. Y.. 1876. 

They had children: 

478. Emeline, b. 

479. Charles, b. 

480. Florence, b. 

481. Hattie, b. 

323. Isaac R. Varian^ b. N. Y. City, 8 May, 1828; now living (1881) 
at 550 Broome St., N. Y.;' m. 9 Aug., 1849, Mary E. Kass 
who d. cor 4th Ave. and 132d St., N. Y., 10 May, 1873, of 
phthisis, aged 45 y. 3 mo. and was bur, at Woodlawn 
Cemetery. 

Their children were: 

482. Isaac S., clerk, res. 4th Ave., cor. 132d St., N. Y., 1876. 

483. Emma, b. 29 Nov., 1852, d. cor. 4th Ave. and 132d St., 



* Deeensetl. 

t Res. 1026 Broadway, K. Y,, 1853-4 ; 1022 Broadway 1855; 1017 Broadway 
1856-7; Clerk Essex Market, h. W. 49th St., N. Y., 1858-1863; 50 Columbia St. 
N". Y., 1870; 03 East 132d St., X. Y., 1875; 550 Broome St., N". Y., 1876-1881. 



70 D E S END A N T 8 OF IS A A G V A BJ A N , J I? . 

N. Y,, 11 Oct., 1873, of pulmonalis; bur. at Woodlawn 
Cemetery. 

184. Hattie, deceased, 

485. Frank. 

486. Ella. 

327. Tamak Letitia Varian, b. N. Y., 15 Aug., 1836, (living 1881), m. 

6 Dee. 1854, George 8. Phillips, and lias: 

487. George Clarence, b. N. Y. 12 Dec, 1860. 

328. Alletta Maria Varian, b. N. Y. 22 Mar., 1830, d. 28 Mar... 1858, 

in. 26 Apr., 1852, Ebenezer Smith, of N. Y., who d. 21 Nov r . 
1S6D. 

9 

Issue: 

488. Lewis Van Alyn, b. 27 Apr., 1854, m. 6 Nov., 1874, Kate 

Pricket, and has children: Henry Eben, b. N. Y. 17 
Apr., 1876; Harriet Alletta, b. N. Y. 29 Sep., 1878. 

331. Hannah Louisa Yartan, b. N. Y. 7 June, 1836, m. 22 June, 1864, 
Charles Gratiot Drinker, of Clifton, Luzerne Co., Pa,, who 
d. 24 ,1 uly, 1870. 

Issue : 

489. Maria Gratiot, b. Clifton, Pa., 3 Aug., 1867. 

335. Harriet Lucretta Varian, (dan. of Richard, 220), b. N. Y. 13 
Jan., 1846, m. 3 Oct., 1872, James Carter Russell, of New 
York, and has 

490. James Varian, b. N. Y. 13 Oct., 1878. 

337. Isaac C. Varian, b. N, Y. 24 Dec, 1832, was heir to a liberal 
competence left him by his father, which unfortunately he 
invested badly and met with consequent losses. First he 
embarked in the cloth trade, and subsequently became a 
photographer, and in New York City directories he is loca- 
ted in that business, cor. W. 29th and 6th Ave., 1853-4; 186 
Bowery 1861-3; 624 6th Ave. 1870-72; 164 E. 56th St. 1873; 
1241 3d Ave. 1874. He m. 1 Jan., 1852, Sarah M. Burhans- 
of Cherry Valley, N. Y., b. 25 June, 1S32, d. L868. He 



I) E 8 < ' E N n A N T S OF I 8 A A (I V A 11 1 A N , J B . 77 

then m. again, and now (1881) lives in N. Y. City. The 
issue by first wife was: 

491. Alfred Randolph, b. N. Y. 2S Dec, 1852. + 

492. Ernest Philip, 1). N. Y. 5 Oct., 1854; architect at Den 

ver, Col.; m. J 8 Oct., 1880, Mary McLenathen. 

493. Alonzo, 1). N. Y., 25 Dec, 1855, d. 27 Mar., 1850. 

By His second wife lie has: 

494. Ralph, and perhaps others. 

338. Jane M. Vartan, b. N. Y. m. Randolph 

Harriott, and res. at Plainfield, N. J. 

They have children: 

495. Ida, b. 

496. Gilbert, b. deceased. 

497. Randolph, II. b. 

498. Belle, b. 

499. Jennie, b. 

340. Samuel T. Yarian, h, N. Y. now resides at Plainfield, 

N. J. He m. Kate Drake, and has issue. 

(No communication.) 

341. Lucv Varian, b, N. Y. City. m. Henry Gilsey, of New 

York, and has children: 

500. Daisy, b. 

501. Harry, b. 

355. Charles Rae Varian, b. N. Y. City, 5 June, 1846; was in busi- 
ness as butcher there until 1876, when he removed to 
Philadelphia, Pa., where he now resides, at 5426 Vine St. 
He m. at New York, Mary Wright, and has issue : 

502. Percy A. R., b. N. Y. City, 16 Aug., 1871. 

503. Charles Rae, b. " 8 Dec, 1873. 

504. Marian K. b. " 28 Jan.. 1876. 

505. Alfred Wright, b. Philadelphia, 7 Apr., 1879. 



78 



D EH (J END ANTS 0F1SAACVARIAN, .11?,. 



SEVENTH GENERATION. 

435. Isaac L. Yarian, b, PeekskilL N. Y., 27 Aug., 1850, in. at 
Albany, N. Y., (by Rev. Rufus W. Clark). 22 Feb,, 1879, 
Anna Miller, b. 20 June, 1852. 

They have issue: 

506. Gertrude, b. Peekskill, N. Y., 30 Dec, 1879. 

491. Alfred Randolph Yarian, b. N. Y. City, 28 Dec., 1852, now 
(1881) traveling salesman for Dennison Manufacturing 
Company of Chicago; m. 9 May, 1875, at Saint Louis, Mo^, 
Elfleda Malcolm Curtis, b. Bergen, Genesee Co., N. Y\, 7 
Feb., 1855. They have issue : 

507. Alfred Sibley, b. Chicago, Ills., 26 Sep., 1880. 



For the greater portion of the information concerning the 
descendants of Isaac Varian, Jr., ( 6 ), I am indebted to the efforts 
of Miss Emma J. Yarian, of New York. 




APPENDIX. 



HE following names have been collected from various sources^ 
principally from directories, poll lists, census reports, and 
cemetery inscriptions in and about the City of New York, and 
Counties of Westchester, Kings and Queens. It has not been pos- 
sible to connect them with any of the families herein mentioned, 
though, for the most part, they are undoubtedly descended from 
the sons of Isaac 1. 

Augustus, ship-carpenter, 603 Water St., N. Y., 1842-3. 

Augustus F., shipwright, 348 Cherry, h. 4th Ave, cor. 31th St., N. Y., 

1866. 
Amos, painter, 139 Bowery, N. Y., 1860. 

Ann, (widow of Joseph), boarding, 4 Lewis St., N. Y., 1865-6. 
Ann, dressmaker, 69.7 Broadway, N. Y., 1870. 
Aaron Burr, pedler, (see Sarah), 89 Pitt St., N. Y., 1854. 
Aaron Burr, a. 22 yrs„ d, Delancey St., N. Y., 13 Feb., 1823; d. of 

locked-jaw, and bur. in Presbyterian Brick Cemetery. 

Catherine, res. Bedford, N. Y., 1881. 

Carrie A., a. 11 mo. 6 da., bur. Greenwood Cemetery, N. Y., 14 
Nov., 1864. 

Ernest, res. Yonkers, N. Y., 1880. 

Elizabeth, (wife of Charles J. Donmall), b. 1813, d. 1853. bur. at 

St. John's Cemetery, Yonkers, N. Y. 
Elmira S., a. 31 y., bur. at Greenwood Cemetery, N. Y., 7 Apr., 1873. 
Elias, driver, 112 Ave. C, N. Y., 1864. 
Emily, d. infancy, 308 Madison St., N. Y., 23 Sep., 1863. 

Frederick W., d. infancy, 164 E. 56th St., N. Y., 17 Aug., 1872. 



80 AT T E N BIX. 

Gilman Z., a. 1 y., bur. Greenwood Cemetery, N. Y., 7 Apr., 1873. 

George W., cartman, 146 Perry St., h. 206 W. 19th St., N.Y., 1867-74. 

George, driver, cor. Manhattan and 12th Ave., N. Y., 1876. 

George, d. infancy, 127 Barrow St., N. Y., 1 Nov., 1843, d. of conges- 
tion of the brain, and bur. at White Plains, N. Y. 

Gilbert, d. on Long Island, a. 23 y. 4mo. 1 d., 29 Jan., 1830; d. of 
bronchitis, and bur. in Cemetery of Allen St., M. E. Church, 
N. Y. 

George W., butcher, 27 Fulton Market, N. Y., 3 Jan., 1822. 

George W., Jr., butcher, 7 Catherine Market, h. 13 Ave. A, N. Y., 
1842-3; ^Catherine Market, N, Y: t 1845-53; h. 9 Ave. A, 
N. Y., 1845-7; h. Williamsburg, N. Y., 184S; h. 9 Ave. A, 
N. Y., 1850-3. 

Ira, res. Gallipolis, (or vicinity), 0., family emigrated there 1800. 
Isaac, butcher, cor. Pearl and Cross Sts, N.Y., 1817; cor. Forsyth and 

Delancey, N. Y., 1820; Eldridge, near Broome St., N. Y., 

1821; 227 Delancey St., N. Y., 1827-30. 
Isaac, butcher, petitioned for remission of fine, Sept., 1821. 

He was lined, (and imprisoned for non-payment), for ''selling sheep 
and lamb in the lower Fly Market without a permit." Ln petition he 
represents that he is in " impoverished eircu instances and has a wife 
and children (all of whom are sick), dependent on him for support." 
The Market Committee resolved " that it will be inexpedient to grant 
the prayer of the petitioner." — The Market Book. 

Isaac, d. of cholera, at Rivinglon Hospital, a. 40,3 Aug., 1S32; buried 

in Potter's Field. 
Isaac, butcher, 332 E. 55th St., New York., 1872: 237 E. 15th St. 

N.Y., 1873-1; foot E. -13d St., N. Y., 1875; 317 E. 49th St., N.Y., 

1876. 
Isaac, clerk, 215 6th Ave., N. Y., 1876-8. 

James, lawyer, 191 Orchard St., N. Y., L855. 

James, 151 East 35th St , N. Y., 1859; 143 East 36th St., N. Y., 1861. 

Joseph, (see Ann). 

John, saddler, 3 Doyer St., N. Y., 1828. 

John J., 449 First Ave., N. Y., 1849. 

John, shoemaker, 32 Elizabeth St., N. V., I860. 

John, express, 1349 Broadway, h. 12 Renwick St., N. Y., 1867-8. 

Jacob, (native of Germany), d. 528 6th St., N. Y., a. 43, 31 July, L872. 

Lucy, d. infancy, Lewis St., N. Y., 28 May, 1828, bur. at Cemetery of 
Rutgers St. Presbyterian Church. 



A P P E N D I X . 81 

Lillie M.,.d. aged 2 yrs, 200 West 19th St., N. Y., 10 Aug., 1871, bur. 

at Oak Hill Cemetery. 
Leontine, (JNative of France) d. infancy at Childs Hospital, N. Y., 

8 Jan., 1878. 

Michael G., butcher, 21 Eldridge St., N. Y., 1835-40. 

Michael, butcher, 102 Suffolk St., N. Y, 1838. 

Michael, 511 East 12th St., N. Y., 1881. 

Michael II., aged 70 yrs., bur. Greenwood Cemetery N. Y., 17 Jan., 

1878. ^ 
Mary P., dressmaker, 74 Mott St., N. Y., 1825. 

Mary P., deceased at New Rochelle, N. Y., about 1858. 

Mary M., res. Yonkers, N. Y., 1880. 

Mary, res. Yonkers, N. Y„ 1880. 

Margaret, d. aged 71, of palsy, Forsyth St., N. Y., 2 July, 1818, bur. 

at Cemetery of Brick Presbyterian Church. 
Norton, aged 1 mo., bur. Greenwood Cemetery N. Y., 1 Jan., 1865. 
Octavia Z., d. infancy, 624 6th Ave., N. Y., 16 July, 1869, buried in 

Lutheran Cemetery. 
Richard, cl. aged 34 yrs., of consumption, at Rivington St., N.Y., 18 

Aug. 1817., bur. in Cemetery of Brick Presbyterian Church. 
Samuel M., conductor, 235 E. 109th St., N. Y., 1877-8. 
Samuel, tailor, ('? Varian & Staats), 92 Bowery, N. Y., 1837-40. 
Sarah, boarding, 114 W. 26th St., N. Y., 1854/ 
Sarah, 320 4th St., N. Y., 1863-4, 

Sarah, aged 2^ yrs., bur. Greenwood Cemetery, N. Y., 29 Jan. 1860, 
Sarah, widow of Aaron 405 Grand St., N. Y., 1862; 150 Orchard St., 

N. Y, 1865; parasols, 66 Sixth St., N. Y., 1867; 655 Second 

Ave. N. Y., 1875-fi; h. 347 Sixth St., N. Y., 1870-3. 
Sarah, widow of George, h. 347 Sixth St., N. Y., 1869-74. 
William H., seaman, 341 Water St.. N. Y. 
William H., clerk, 317 E. 45th St., N. Y., 1879-80. 
William H., 373 Harrison St., San Francisco, Cal., 1881. 
William H., (parents b. Ireland), d. infancy^308 E. 45th St., N.Y., bur. 

Calvary Cemetery, N. Y., 15 Jan. 1876. 
William B.,d. infancy, Rivington St., N. Y.,28 Mar. 1824., bur. Bethel 

Baptist Cemetery, N. Y. 
William, clerk, 313 West 24th St., N. Y. 
William, d. Rivington St., N. Y., aged 2 years, 27 July, 1820, bur. at 

Cemetery of Brick Presbyterian Church., N. Y. 
William, d. aged 56 of bronchitis, atBellevue Hospital N. Y., 5 Sep., 

1849, bur. at Potters Field. 
"Widow" Varian, but chers' stand, 33 Center Market N. Y., 1850. 

11 



82 APPENDIX. 

Allan Varian 50., (p. 28) son of Joseph 20, emigrated to Chemung, 
Co., N. Y., where he d. about 1875. He had sons: 

Charles F., of Elmira N. Y. 
Isaac, res. unknown. 
Joseph, of Horseheads, N. Y. 



From the "Market Book " bij Col. Tho's F. DeVoe. 
Jacob Varian, the first, 14 June 1806, was appointed "Inspector of 
Slaughter Houses;" Aug. 1799, butcher, No. 2 Catharine 
Market; 4 July 1816, butcher No. 25 Catharine Market. 

Jacob Varian, the second, 1828 butcher, 25 Catharine Market; 1847 
butcher, 15 Catharine Market. 



Michael and Salathiel Varian, are mentioned as being descendants 
or relatives of Ira Varian, deceased, of Gallia Co., Ohio. A 
branch of this family is said to be resident at or near Mays- 
ville, Ky. 



A"VAIRIN" FAMILY. 

From Mr. A. L. P. VairinoC Owensboro, Ky., the following inform- 
ation is received. 

"Owing to the many changes and removals of our family no records 
or papers have been preserved. Tradition says that our family 
came originally from the neighborhood of Chalons, France. Being 
Huguenots, at the revocation of the Edict of Nantes (1685,) a portion 
emigrated to Germany, and settled at or near Hamburg. 

" The first name which I recollect is Charles Vairin who had 
three sons, Nicholas, Charles and John P. They settled early in 
life at St. Petersburg, Russia, where, owing to political troubles, they 
separated, the first two remaining in Russia, while the latter went 
to France where, for many years, he was in government employ. 
In 1815 he emigrated to the United States, where he deceased in 
1817, leaving three sons from whom the Vairins in New Orleans 
(Julius) are the descendants. 



A P P E N D IX. 83 

" In several French records, are found many persons of the name, 
but no traceable relationship. Forty years since I knew a family 
of the same name at Dayton O. of Irish descent. There is also one at 
Orangeburg Ky. 

"The difference in the spelling of the name may be accounted for 
by time and nationality. During the reign of Louis XIV. we find 
the name of a noted engraver written Ouarin, Warin, Varin, etc." 



CANADA. 

The following concerning a family "Varin" was held in anticipa- 
of further information, but none being received it appears here. 

1. Varin b. at Laprairie was engaged in the fur trade as an early 

agent of the North West Company and was the father of 

2. Jean Baptiste Varin, Esq. notary public,_government agent for the 

Seignory of Laprairie, ex-member of the Dominion Parlia- 
ment, and present (1881) Registrar for Laprairie. He m. 
Hermine, dau. of M. Raymond, member of Parliament for 
L' Assumption and had issue: 

3. Josephine, who m. Henry Barbeau, Esq., manager of the City and 

District Savings Bank, Montreal. 

4. Eliza, who m. Hon. Judge Chagnon, of St. Johns, P. Q. 

5. Elmire, who m. L. B. A. Charlebois, member of Parliament for 

Laprairie. 

6. Hermine, res. Laprairie. 

7. ANGELiQUE,d.«e£. 22 years, m. Joseph Doutre, Esq., advocate and 

Queen's Counsel. 

8. Arthur, chief clerk of Department of Crown Lands, Quebec. 

9. Adolph, clerk at the Registry office, Laprairie. 

10. Joseph, clerk at the Registry office, Montreal. 

11. Alphonse, d. 1880. 

12. Ernest, cashier, City and District Savings Bank, Montreal. 



84 APPENDIX 



DESCENDANTS OF DAVID DeVOIR VARIAN. (11, p. 24.) 

The following family record is based upon the record contained 
in the bible (printed at Edinburgh by Alexander Kincaid, his Maj 
esty's Printer MDCCLXIX) of Joseph Varian, (2 p. 21) which at his 
decease descended to David DeVore Varian, (11, p. 24), whose wife 
left it to Lemuel Varian. At the decease of the later it passed into 
the possession of Laura Ann Varian, and is now in the custody of 
Madelaine A. Saunders her daughter by whom this abstract was fur- 
nished. The "loot notes" by Dr. N. B, Sisson, 



SECOND GENERATION. 

^.—Joseph Varian* (2, p. 21.) was a butcherin the city of New York, / 
and associated in the same business with his father Isaac 
Varian (1, p. 20.) They lost their property at the timeof the 
capture of New York by the British during the Revolution- 
Joseph was b. at N.Y., 7 Feb. 1732, and d. at Danbury Conn., 
13 Sept, 1790. His son, 



THIRD GENERATION. 

b.— David DeVore VarIan, b. at N. Y., 21 July 1767, m. 8 Nov. 1798 
Mary, (b. 27 Aug. 1766), clau. of Israel and Abigail Lyon, of 
Bedford, Westchester Co. N. Y. They first settled near the 
city of New York and Richard (12, p. 24) a bro. ot David 
lived with them until they removed from Westchester Co. 
They had issue : 



*From an old family bible formerly belonging- to Joseph Varian, 2, the fol- 
lowing record of his children by his second wife Rachel While, is taken 
Joseph Vapian, (2) b. 7 Feb.-, 1732. d. 13 Sept., 1790. Rachel, his wife b.13 April, 

1735 d. 25 Feb. 1778, Danbury Conn. They were m. 31 Oct., 1761, and 

had issue : 

Hannah, b. 13 Apr., 1764, d. 13 Feb., 1780. 

David DeVore, b. 21 July, 1767, d. about 1841. 

Rich AiiD, b. 11 Mar., 1770. 

Timothy, b. 

Deborah, b. 28 June, 1773. 

Elizabeth, b. 23 Dec, 1775. 

Rachel, b. 8 Feb., 1778. 



A P P E N T) T X . 85 

FOURTH GENERATION. 

^.—Elizabeth, b. near N. Y., 17 Dec, 179L. d. at Leavenworth, Kan- 

aged 75. 
^.—Israel, b, near N. Y., 8 July, 1793, d. single 8 Dec, 1818. 

In the year 1791 he (David) moved to Troy, Rensselaer Co.,N.Y., 
where were born : 

c— Lemuel Wolcy, b. 9 Sep., 1795, d. 1877, aged 83. 
f.— Lausa Ann, b. 16 June, 1798, d. 22 May, 1878. 

In 1800, David with his family emigrated from Troy N. Y., to 
Montreal, Canada, where he settled on a farm about two miles from 
the city. Here the following children were born: 

^/.-Matilda, b. 28 Aug., 1800, d. 2 June, 1828. 
fc— Abigail, b. 4 Aug., 1802, d. 4 Mar., 1865. 
I— Sarah L., b. 9 July, 1804. 

David, the father, being too much of a Republican to live under 
monarchical government, and the "War of 1812" being about to assume 
a dark and serious character, his situation in Canada began to be 
unpleasant because of his out spoken sentiments. Consequently 
under the advice of friends he was influenced to emigrate to Ohio in 
company with his brother Timothy* (13 p. 24.) who had married and 
was also dwelling near Montreal, and with a neighbor named Holt 
they built a boat and on the first day of May 1807, they sailed up 
the St. Lawrence river, coasted along the shore of Lake Ontario, and 
after many trials they reached a point where they could, by having 
their boat hauled nine miles across the country, re-embark on the 
head waters of the Allegheny river. They floated down this river 
to the Ohio, and thence to what is now known as Meigs Co., in Ohio 
where Timothy Varian and Mr. Holt settled, while David established 



*Timothy (son of Joseph 2) Varian had issue, 
David. 
Joseph. 
Timothy. 
Polly, deceased. 

Margaret, lives (1881) at Vega, Jackson Co,. O. 
Joanna, lives (1881) at Letart Falls, O, 
Matilda, 
Betsey. 



86 A P P E N D I X . 

himself at Gallipolis in Gallia Co., O., where he purchased a farm 
and resided until decease, 4 Feb., 1826. 

In the "War of 1812" David volunteered the services of himself 
and team, endured all the hardships of the service, lost his team, 
and was obliged to return on foot from Fort Wayne to Gallipolis 
where he arrived weary and foot-sore, but with a cheerful disposition 
which was ever a marked characteristic of his life. He was small in 
stature, very fair complexion, large blue eyes, and light hair. 

During the "fever scourge" at Gallipolis, in 1824, he was one of 
the five who were not stricken with the fever, and his name is not 
forgotten by the early settlers who remember gratefully his efforts 
to succor the helpless women and children during this period of their 
severe trial. Both David and his wife were buried in the old cem- 
etery at Gallipolis, the land for which purpose he set off from his 
farm. The road on which it was located is now one of the principal 
streets, and passers by may note his tombstone, inscribed, 

§i\vU\ JjffflM lanntt, 

tan in t\xt city irf DPew !!ȴ&; 

lulu 21jrt, 1767, 

Am\ Jeft, tltc m, 1826, 

in the toum of toUipttssi. 

The farm is now the most prosperous part of Gallipolis; the rail 
road depot being exactly opposite the former location of his house. 
The family which he left are now scattered over the United States. 



FIFTH GENERATION. 

c. — Elizabeth Varian, m. James Hill, and had issue. 

k. — Joseph Varian, b. at Gallipolis, lived there till about his 30th year. 
At 21 he m. Pamelia Palmer of Gallipolis. In 1815 they 
moved to Princeton, Gibson Co., Ind., where they had a large 
family. He d. 1 879, aged 65. 

/.— Mary A., m. 1, John Ford about 1831, by whom one child, Lyman 
Ford; 2, Henry Vienier, of Quebec, Canada, by whom two 
children, one deceased; the survivor, Henry Vienier, now 
(1881 J resident with his mother at Boston, Mass. 

m. — Sarah A., m. 1882 William Sloan of Gallipolis and emigrated in 
L857 to Leavenworth Kan., accompanied by her mother. 
Mr. Sloan kept the American House at Gallipolis for many 
years, and is now deceased. They had ch., Joseph, Henry, 



A P P E N D I X . 87 

John, Thomas, (all residing in Huron, Atchison Co., Kan.) 
Emily, (m. Moser) living at Colorado Springs, Col., 

and Julia living in Nebraska. 

e. — Lemuel W. Varian, m. 16 Feb., 1821, Roxana Griffis and had: 

n. — Samantita, res. (1881) Porter, Gallia Co., (_)., unmarried. 

o.— Ira A., a student at Cleveland, O., Medical College, d. soon after 

finishing the course. % 

p. — Ansel. 
q. — David H., druggist, Jackson, O., m. and has ch., Truman, Zinna, 

Lula and Wellman. 

v.— Mary E., m. Glassburn, res. Politico, Ills., 2 dau'rs. 

s. — Louisa V., m. William Payne of Purdyville, Kan., has ch., Zelia 

and Lemuel V. 
t— Henry J., res. Pontico, Ills., a mail contractor. 

u. — Alonzo D., m. and em. to Los Angeles, Oal., has 2 sons, 1 dau. 

/.—Laura Ann Yarian, m. 1, 8 Feb., 1818., Levi H. Wakeman of Con- 
necticut; 2, 1 Nov. I835.,William Reeves, who deceased about 
1837. Her issue was: 

v. — Maria Louisa, b. Gallipolis 0., 6 Sep., 1820. d. therein 1865, m. 1 
Nov., 1845, Richard (bro. of William, above) Reeves of Shrop- 
shire Eng., and had 1, William Henry, a soldier in the 4th 
Va. (Union) Reg't of Infantry during the Rebellion. 2, 
Thomas H., grad., Amherst Coll., and pastor of First Cong'l 
Church Kingston, N.Y. 3, Frank, a machinist, res. Springfield 
L. I. 4, Edward H., a telegrapher at Hicksville, L. I. 5, 
Marian m. William Lawrence, chemist, of Pepperell, Mass. 
6, Madelain M., m. Edward Otis, of Kingston, N. Y. 

w.— Madelaine A. b. Gallipolis 10 Nov., 1822, m. 5 Oct., 1843, Dr. Alon- 
zo D. Saunders of Ashtabula Co., O. res., in Gallia Co., until 
1873, and then moved to Pomeroy, O., where they now reside. 
They have dau.. Mary Ellen, b. 27 Jan., 1853, m. Dr. William 
P. Wells of Wellsville, O., a graduate of Sterling Medical 
College, Columbus, O. 

x.— William, b. Gallipolis, O., 25 Dec, 1836, m. 14 Mar., 1861, Evaline 
Logue and lives Porter, O., ch. Laura, Louisa, Lelia, Maddie, 
Hattie, Henry, Edger, Claude and Wyatt. 

g. — Matilda Yarian, m. 12 Sep., 1819, Stephen Sisson who survived 
her and lives (1881) at Porter, O., a. 86., having had issue. 

y — Nelson Banks, b. Gallipolis, 1820, grad., Louisville, Ky., Med. 
Coll. 1845, for two years Surgeon 92nd Regt., Ohio Vols., 



88 APPENDIX. 

1846, m. Mary Cable of Louisville, Ky., who d. 1848, leaving 
son Samuel, now (1881) an Attorney at Marietta, O. 2. He, 
(Nelson B.) m. Locevia Blakesly of Porter who had issue, 
Carrie, a student at Delaware O. College, and Nelson, at 
Yale College. 
z. — Mary Miranda, in. 1846, Dr. Joseph Payne of Porter, O., and 
about 1861, moved to Dwight, Livingston Co., Ills., where 
they now reside. They had issue: 1, Warren, a grad., of 
Andouer College, and admitted to the bar, ( ? Chicago 
Ills.,) 2, Ellen R 3, Matilda, deceased, aged. 17. 4, Jennie. 

h. — Abigail Vabian, m. 7 Aug., 1823, at Gallipolis, O., Ira Sabine of 
Albany. N. Y., whither they removed. They had issue: 

z. 1.- -Anson, b. 1824, d. ApL, 1865, 

z. ^.—Harriet Amelia, b. 1829, d. — 1867. 

This family was intimate with their Varian relatives of New 
York City, and frequent visits were interchanged ; particularly 
with the descendants of Richard 4. 

Note. — There is a tradition among the descendants of David De Vore Varian 
that Isaac l.had a brother Michael who settled on the New Jersey shore of New 
York bay on Hudson Kiver, and that this Michael had a son Joseph who occupied 
the estate as late as 1824 — 1829, and where Abigail (h) visited them. It is said 
that the house, when the tide was high stood upon an island, and that the same 
old high-roofed house that the Michael alluded to, built before the Revolution, 
is still in existence. 

Abigail (Varian) Sabine (h) was the "first white woman" at 
Hot Springs, Arkansas, to which place she and her husband emigrat- 
ed from Albany, N. Y., 1 Oct., 1833, arriving there 13 Mar., 1834, 
having spent the winter at Gallipolis, O. 

At the breaking out of the Rebellion, this family having been 
long resident in Arkansas espoused the cause of the South. Anson 
(zl) being a lieutenant in the Army of the Confederacy. When the 
Union troops captured Hot Springs he was wounded, and fell in the 
door yard in front of his mother's house, and lived but a few moments, 
dying in April, 1865. 

His sister Harriet Amelia survived him but two years. 

i. — Sarah L. Varian, m. 8 Nov., 1824, Absalom Ulin of Greenup Co., 
Ky., and settled at Pendleton, Madison Co., Ky., where 
they and their descendants now reside. 



.1 P P E N I) I X . 89 

It is to be regretted that the foregoing contribution could not 
have been placed under the propei— head in this book, but the 
lateness of its reception precluded this. 

It will however, prove of interest not only to the immediate 
descendants of Joseph Varian 2, but will also be attractive to those 
who are descended from the brothers of Joseph and Avho a never 
knew of a Varian who moved out of sight of the smoke of the 
chimneys on Manhattan Island. " 

In conclusion, and in regard to the repute of this family I may 
quote that " none of the descendants ever used intoxicating liquor, 
none were ever arrested for a crime, and none but what bore a re- 
spectable character." Truly they may be proud of the standing of 
their family. 



IN CONCLUSION 

I have finished this work and with the material at my command 
have endeavored to compile as lucid and interesting a volume, as 
possible. I may have failed, but I certainly have struggled. Other 
abler hands than mine might have attained better results, and I am 
willing to concede this. Errors are certain to be found, but I hope 
that the discoverers may prove charitable. " To err is human etc., etc." 
But types may have become misplaced, and thereby wrung the tem- 
per of the sensitive, — but types have always been addicted to gym- 
nastics since, Faust, Guttenberg & Co., first opened an office. 

This brochure cannot be expected to please all, but one certainly 
will be gratified — " mine enemy," for "I have written a book." 

S. B. 



12 



Index I. 



OF THE NAME OF VARIAN. 



A 



A. L. P. 

Aaron, 

Abigail, 

Abraham, 

Abramana, 

Adaline, 

Adolph, 

Agnes, 

Albert, 

Alexander, 

Alfred, 

Alice, 

Alida, 

Allen, 

Alletta. 

Alonzo, 

Alphonse, 

Amos, 

Andrew, 

Angeline, 

Angelique, 

Ann, 

Anna, 

Anne, 

Ansel, 

Arthur, 

Augustus, 



B 



eaumont, 
Benjamin, 
Bertha, 
Bertram, 
Betsey, 



15 

82 

79 81 

85 88 

41 

70 

74 

83 

17 

59 70 

28 32 33 34 

54 67 77 77 78 

30 

71 

28 82 

48 52 54 59 60 76 

77 87 

83 

16 17 19 79 

26 29 30 55 57 

56 70 72 

83 

17 36 48 79 80 

31 

17 

87 

15 83 

79 

38 
73 
70 
39 

85 



c 



aleb, 



59 



Carman, 
Caroline, 
Carrie, 

Catherine, 3 

73 
Cecilia, 

Charles, 28 29 
67 71 
Charlotte, 
Chevalier, (1 e) 
Clara, 
Clarence, 
Claude, 
Cleveland, 
Corinne, 
Cornelia, 
Cornelius, 
Cornell, 



D, 



aniel, 
David, 24 27 31 
Deborah, 
Delia, 
Dora, 
Dorcas, 
Dorothea, 



E 



28 



award, 

Edmund, 

Egbert, 

Elias, 

Eliza, 

Elizabeth, 25 27 
48 51 
86 

Ella, 

Ellen, 



56 70 

28 

46 79 

18 32 51 57 70 

79 

74 

35 39 45 56 59 

75 77 82 

48 
14 
60 
46 71 
71 
38 
37 

41 42 44 48 54 
73 
28 

18 

84 85 86 87 88 

24 26 27 48 84 

43 

17 38 

51 55 

41 

34 35 55 59 70 
55 
54 

79 
18 19 37 43 83 
31 32 35 39 41 
53 54 79 84 85 

70 76 

17 



92 














INDEX. 












Elmira, Elmire, 








79 


83 


Israel, 










85 


Emeline. 










52 


65 


75 


J. E. 












Emily, 








32 


34 


70 


79 










13 15 


Emma, 


30 


35 


37 


59 


60 


75 


78 


Jacob, 26 


29 


41 


42 


44 


45 47 48 


Ernest, 








15 


77 


79 


8o 


49 


50 


51 


52 


54 


55 56 57 


Esther, 












32 


59 


66 


69 


71 


73 


80 


82 


Eugene, 












56 


71 


Jacques, 










13 


Evaline, 














71 


James, 21 


25 


26 


27 


28 


30 31 39 


J. lorence, 
















' 47 


48 


49 


51 


56 


70 80 














75 


Jane, 18 


51 


54 


56 


62 


m 69 77 


Francis, 














56 


Jean, 










83 


Francois, 












11 


12 


Jeanet, 










23 


Frank, 












70 


76 


Jesse, 








56 


09 70 71 


Frederick, 












73 


79 


Joanna, 










85 


IT. Arthui 
















John, 16 


18 


23 


28 


29 


30 34 37 


j 












15 


52 


58 


59 


00 


71 


73 74 80 


Garfield, 














71 


82 












George, 


27 


31 


41 


43 


44 


46 


51 


Jonathan, 






25 


26 


27 30 49 




59 


56 


59 


60 


01 


62 


63 


Joseph, 13 


21 


23 


24 


20 


28 79 80 




(54 


71 


74 


80 


81 






82 


83 


84 


85 


88 


89 


Georgina, 














19 


Josephine, 










83 


Gertrude, 














78 


Joshua, 






43 


44 


45 46 68 


Gilbert, 51 


52 


55 


56 


62 


70 


71 


80 


Julia, 










71 


Gilman, 














80 


Julius, 










82 


Grace, 
XI an n ah, 














70 


Justin, 
Xjanra, 










19 


23 


24 


51 


56 


57 


59 


60 


29 


32 


35 


36 


49 71 84 




75 


76 


84 












85 


87 








Harriet, 


27 


32 


56 


60 


71 


75 


76 


Lemuel, 










84 85 87 


Harry, 














37 


Leonard, 










71 


Harvey, 














70 


Leontine, 










81 


Hattie, 












75 


76 


Letitia 










58 74 76 


Helen, 












37 


38 


Lillie, 










81 


Henrietta, 












30 


49 


Louis, 










13 37 


Henry, 


18 


i 9 


26 


27 


29 


38 


67 


Louise, Louisa, 








12 76 87 




74 


87 












Lucretia, 










48 70) 


Herbert, 














71 


Lucy, 










62 77 80 


Hermine, 














83 


Luella, 










74 


Hester, 














48 


Lulu, Lula, 










70 87 


Hetty, 
Horace, 












29 


17 
35 


lVXalachi, 










27 


Huram, 












56 


71 


Margaret, 




30 


43 


48 


59 81 85 


leliabod. 
















Margaretta 


) 








35 












26 


28 


Maria, 






18 


36 


38 43 70 


Ida. 














71 


Marie, 










12 


Ira. 










80 


82 


87 


Marian, 










40 77 


1 rene, 














70 


Martha, 










55 0)9 


Isaac, 16 


17 


20 


21 


22 


23 


25 


32 


Mary, 17 


27 


29 


30 


34 


35 37 38 


40 


41 


42 


50 


51 


52 


53 


54 


44 


48 


49 


51 


52 


54 57 58 


55 


56 


57 


58 


59 


60 


61 


62 


66 


68 


70 


71 


73 


SI 87 


(VI 


65 


69 


70 


73 


75 


70 


7S 


Matilda, 






57 


51) 


72 85 87 


80 


82 


s| 


88 










Maud, 










71 

















INDEX. 










93 


Michael, 


21 


26 


27 


40 


47 


48 


49 


kJalathiel, 














51 


55 


07 


69 


81 


82 


88 










82 


Miles, 






29 


35 


36 


38 


39 


Sallie, 










69 


JLiancv, 
















Samantha, 










87 










16 


17 


36 


Samuel, 




26 


43 


62 


77 81 


Nellie," 














73 


Sarah, 27 


31 


32 41 


43 


58 


60 62 


Nicolas, 












13 


82 


70 


73 


74 79 


81 


88 




Nina, 












36 


37 


Sophia, 








35 


45 46 


Norton, 














81 


Stephen, 










18 


V/ctavia, 
















Susan, 




26 29 


37 


38 


43 49 














81 


m 

X amar, 












1 auline, 


















57 59 


60 


72 


74 76 














12 


Thomas, 


16 


17 18 


19 


42 


44 60 


Percy, 














77 


Timothy, 








24 


84 85 


Philip, 












39 


77 


Truman, 










87 


Phoebe, 












28 


35 


V erdine, 












Pierre, 














11 










41 


Polly, 
Price, 












36 


85 
38 


VV alter, 










17 19 


ftachel, 
















Warren, 










70 71 














84 


Wellman, 










87 


Ralph, 












17 


77 


u Widow, v 










81 


Rebecca, 














17 


William, 


17 


18 27 


29 


30 


31 32 


Richard, 


18 


21 


23 


24 


40 


41 


42 


36 37 


38 


42 44 


49 


52 


56 58 




43 


51 


52 


54 


00 


81 


84 


70 74 


81 












88 














rj 












Robert, 














13 


Zjinna, 










87 




'*%$%$ 



Index II. 



OF OTHER FAMILY NAMES. 



Allen, 










Bo wen, 






68 








38 


Boyer, 






13 


Angevin, (e) 


10 


26 


29 


49 


Branche, 






13 


Anter, 








()6 


Bremner. 






41 


Archer, 








69 


Brennan, 






63 


Arnold, 








45 


Briggs, 


4 


28 


53 68 74 


Arrowsmith, 








73 


Brown, 






73 


Arthur, 








71 


Burhans, 






76 


Astor, 








41 


Bussing, 






55 


Atlee, 






32 


37 


\Jable.-, 








Austen, 








71 






88 


JDailey, (Bailli,) 










Campbell, 






57 72 








10 


Canel, 






5 


Baker, 


38 


56 


72 


74 


Carlough, 






72 


Balcom, 








67 


Carson , 






38 


Banks, 








87 


Caiter, 






76 


Barbeau, 








83 


Chadeayne, 






53 


Barker, 


29 


53 


54 


69 


Chagnon , 






83 


Bartine, 








10 


Charlebois, 






83 


Bartlett, 








36 


Christ, 






(5 


Bartow, 








10 


Clark 






53 78 


Bayard, 








40 


Clay/ 






55 


Beach, 






29 


36 


Cleveland, 






38 


Beasely, 








38 


Clewell, 






35 36 38 


Beaumont, 






35 


38 


Cockroft, 






49 


Bedell, 








34 


Coles, 






75 


Bennett, 








58 


Conklin. 




(59 


71 72 78 


Berrian, 






21 


42 


Connell, 






36 


Bertaut, 






- 


10 


Conway, 






59 


Bertem, (Bertine,) 








10 


Cooper, 






32 


Bessier, 








13 


Cornell, (C 


orneille,) 


JO 


26 28 58 


Betts, 








51 


Corsa, Curser, 




55 70 


Bigot, 








14 


Coston, 






9 


Black well. 








38 


Courois, 






13 


Blakesly, 








88 


Coutant, 


42 50 51 


52 


54 55 62 


Bolton, 






32 


40 


65 ()6 


68 






Bouchard, 








15 


Cromwel] , 






16 69 



96 




INDEX. 




Curtis, 




78 


Graham, 


35 48 


Uean, (e) 17 






Granger, 


32 37 


21 


50 


Gratiot, 


76 


DeMagny, 




11 


Greene, 


4 


Dennison, 




78 


Griffin, 


27 


Denton, 




71 


Guarinus, 


9 


DeVoe, DeVouw, 20 


21 


82. 


Guerin, 


9 


Devoir, Devoor, DeVore, 


24 £4 


Guion, Guy on, 


10 


86 88 






Guthrie, 


39 


DeWitt, 


61 


62 


Guttenberg, 


89 


Dibble, 


25 


29 


Hall, 




Diller, 




34 


30 


Dixon, 




29 


Halsted, 


53 


Dodge, 54 


55 


71 


Harmony, 


43 


Donmall, 




79 


Harold , 


5 


Doutre, 




83 


Harriott, 


77 


Drake, 




77 


Harrison, 


72 


Dumay, 




13 


Harsen, 29 47 48 51 54 57 


Dunham, 




44 


66 73 




Dusenbury, 




57 


Hegeman, 


73 


Ejdger, 






Henderson, 


17 




87 


Henrv, (IV) 


20 27 


Edward, (the confessor) 




5 


Hill, 


30 86 


Eichells, 




30 


Hincks, 


17 


Eismann, 




10 


Hinckle. 


34 


Ellison, 


43 


68 


Hoffman, 


36 


Els worth, Ellsworth, 38 


41 


70 


Holt, 


85 


Everett, 




72 


Hopkins, 


65 


J- aust, 






Hopper, 


57 




89 


Hordern, 


69 


Feriers, Ferris, 




10 


Horn, 


61 


Fish, 




45 


Horser, 


21 47 


Fisher, 


72 


75 


Huestis, 


55 


Flock, 




38 


Hunt, 


36 38 


Folsom, 




59 


Hyatt, 


27 


Ford, 
Forshay, 




43 


lesman, 


10 


Fowler, 




54 


Ingraham, 


46 


Fuller, 




31 


Iscariot, 


6 


Fulmer, 




60 


Irwin, 


38 


VjTage, 




61 


J aokson, 


44 


Gallaudet, 




29 


James, (I) 


3 36 


Gardinear, 


21 


41 


Jean, 


13 


Garin, Garinus, 




9 


Jefferson, 


60 64 


Garret, 




44 


Johnson, 


44 59 


Garrison, 




70 


Jones, 


35 


Gaudria, 




13 


Jordan, 


65 


Gilbert, 
Gilsey. 


65 


53 

77 


K 

l\»ass, 


75 


( rlassburn, 




87 


Kellogg, 


27 


Goodwin, 




35 


Kennedy, 


63 







I N I) 


E X . 


97 


Kerfoot. 




34 


McCall, 


32 


Ketchum, 


28 


53 


McCullough, 


29 


Kincaid, 




84 


McKinley, 


48 


King, 




43 


McLenathen, 


77 


Kmgsland, 




59 


McMurphy, 


36 


Knickerbocker, 


64 


68 


1M elson, 




Kosciusko, 




67 


53 88 


JLia Croix 






Newell, 


72 




13 


Norman, 


70 


Ladd, 




17 


Uakley, 




Lambert, 




35 


27 32 34 


Lanning, 


85 36 


38 


Odell, 


41 


La Pistole, 


13 


15 


Odenheimer, 


34 


Lawrence, 54 


65 6G 


87 


Osborne, 


17 


Layard 




2 


Otis, 


87 


Leggett, 


52 


54 


Ouarin, 


83 


L'Espinard, Lispennrd, 




10 


X addock, 




Leviness, 




54 


54 


Lewis, 




72 


Page, 


56 


Ligerson, 




17 


Palmer, 


86 


Light, 




32 


Pasquier, 


6 


Liscomb, 




38 


Patchen, 


28 


Litchfield, 


•37 


38 


Payne, 


87 88 


Livingston. 




72 


Pearce, Pierce, 


35 53 


Lockhart, 




53 


Peck, 


53 


Logue, 




87 


Pell, 


65 


Louis, (XIV.) 




20 


Pembroke, 


66 


Lucas, 




13 


Pentz, 


59 


Lyon, 




84 


Pepperell, 


36 


Lynch, 




53 


Perego, 


68 


M ahar , 






Pelerson, 


27 




68 


Phillips, 


76 


Malcolm. 




78 


Pool, 


27 


Manley. 




72 


Popham, 


31 


Marshall, 




36 


Powell, 


73 


Martine, 




53 


Pratt, 


66 


Massard 




13 


Prentice, 


37 


Mather, 




28 


Price, 


38 


Mathew 




17 


Pricket, 


76 


Meline, 




13 


Pugsley, 


73 


Mercer, 




38 


Hiae, 




Miles, 


34 


36 


67 77 


Miller, 




78 


Randolph, 


77 78 


Mittleberger, 




m 


Reed, 


38 59 


Morenus, 




36 


Reeves, 


87 


Mo T 'ey, 




70 


Reynolds, 


30 


Morris, 


31 


66 


Riblet. 


53 


Moser, 




87 


Ridabock, 


67 


Muhlenberg, 




34 


Roberts, 


32 


Munro, 




37 


Robins, 


53 


Murphy, 


29 


48 


Roche, 


14 


Murray, 




37 


Rogers, 


19 



98 



INDEX. 



Romame, 
Ross, 
Rouseray. 
Russell, 



O; 



abine, 
Sackett, 
Saunders, 
Schureman, 
Seaman, 
Secor 
Segur, 
Sherwood, 
Sibley, 
Siccard, 
Simmons, 
Sisson, 
Skinner, 
Sloan, 

Smith, Smyth, 
Sneden, 
Snyder, 
Spencer, / 
Staats, 
Starkey, 
Stead, 
Stetson, 
Stevens, 
Stevenson, 
Stitt, 
Storms. 
St ults, 
Sykes, 



T 



anguay, 
Taylor, 
Tencin, 
Thorn, 
Tiebout, 
Tier, 

Tompkins, 
Tybalt, 
Tyrrel, 



30 

68 
13 

76 

88 
35 
84 87 
53 
74 
10 29 
62 
56 
78 
10 
53 
84 87 
16 
86 
32 68 76 
62 
43 
17 
81 
33 
53 
36 39 
59 
56 
21 
55 
38 
36 

13 

56 

9 

70 

75 

43 44 

27 29 74 

1 

46 



U: 



alentine, 
Van Alyn, ' 
Van Bokkelen, 
Van den Berg, 
Vandyke, 
Van Home, 
Van Nest, 
Van Pelt, 
Varin, Varrin, Vairin, 

14 15 82 83 
Verriere, 
Vienier, 
Vincent, 



21 



9 



w, 



88 

28 61 74 
76 
34 

50 51 61 
45 
21 
65 
68 

11 12 13 

12 

86 
37 



akeman, 

Walpole, 

Ward, 

Warin, 

Warner, 

Warren, 

Washington, 

Watson, 

Webster, 

Weeks, 

Wellman, 

Wells, 

Wesley, 

White, 

Whitfield, 

Whitney, 

Wighton, 

William, 

Williams, 

Wilson, 

Winship, 

Wolcott, 

Wright, 

Wyatt, 



43 



41 4; 



23 



(of Normandy) 



87 
17 

55 58 
83 
72 
61 88 
» 51 52 60 
53 
48 
73 
87 
87 
68 
24 54 84 
68 
35 38 

5 

m 28 34 

26 
37 

74 77 

87 



SUPPLEMENT. 



Descendants of Timothy Varian. 

(13, p. 24.) 

1. Timothy White Varian, bro. of David DeVoir Varian, (11 p. 24) 

and son of Joseph Varian (2 p. 21) was born in the city of 
New York, 9 Mar., 1771, and bapt. in the First Presbyterian 
Church at that place 7 Apr., 1771. He m. about 1795, Martha 
dau. of Isaac and Martha J. Van Duser, who res. on a farm 
near New York City and deceased at Ohio about 

1865, aged 94 years. 

They had children : 

2. Isaac d. 1883, + 

3. Joseph, d. 1880, aged 87. (?) + 

4. Matilda, + 

5. Timothy, d. about 1873. + 

6. David, + 

7. Polly, + 

8. Margaret, + 

9. Joanna, + 

2. Isaac, em. to Terre Haute, Ind., where he m., 1829, Sarah Cope- 

land, and d. 1833, leaving issue: 

10. John, 

11. Martha, 

3. Joseph, settled at Letart Falls, W, Va., andm. Hannah Dunn of 

Point Pleasant, W. Va. They both deceased in 1880, and had: 

12. Plyra, + 

13. William. + 

14. Malinda. + 

15. Matilda. + 

16. Elmira. + 

17. Urena. + 

18. Rebecca. + 

19. Eliza, m. Washington Sayre, and res. Letart, W. Va. 



DESCENDANTS OF TIMOTHY VAftlAN. 

4. Matilda, m. Alexander Glassburn of Porter, Gallia, Co..O. Em. 

toChambersburg, Clark Co., Mo., in 1835, and have children: 

20. Cynthia. 

21. Sylvester. 

5. Timothy, m. Nancy Oowen of Point Pleasant, W. Va., and had 

ch. now res. at Point Pleasant and Clifton, W. Va. 

22. Mary. 

23. GRANnisON, 

24. William, 

25. Daniel, 

26. Augustus, 

6.- David, m. Sarah Calhoun of Jackson, O. They live at Ports- 
mouth, O., and have children: 

27. Joseph of •' J. Varian & Sons," Maysville, Ky. 

28. Joseph, ) 

29. George, >• res. Portsmouth, Q. 

30. Electa, \ 



7. Polly, m. Smith Stephenson of Portland, Jackson Co., O., and 

reside on a farm in the a coal and iron region" in that 
county. 

Their children are: 

« 
- 31. James. 

32. Samuel. 

33. William. 
34 Mary Ann. 

8. Margaret, m. Robert Calhoun of Jackson, O., and res. at Vega, 

Jackson Co., O. 

Their children are: 

r 

35. Nica, m. and res. Vega, O. 

36. Hannah, m. and res. Vega, O. 

37. Evie, m. and res. Vega, O. 

38. Margaretta, m. and res. Vega, O. 

9. Joanna, m. Jonas Woolf of Letart, Meigs Co., O., and settled 

in 1835, on a farm at that place which was the property 



DESCENDANTS OF TIMOTHY VARIAN. 

of his lather as early as 1802. Mr. Woolf d. 29 Dec, 1880, 
having had issue: 

39. Peter, m. 

40. Daniel, m. 

41. John, m. 

42. George, m. 

48. Mary C, ra. Peter Bentz of Letart, O. 

1*2. Plyra, m. Hayman of Letart, O., and res. at Letart, W. Va. 

They have children : 

44. Elmer, 

45. Homer. 

46. Ivy. 

13. William, m. and res. Point Pleasant, VV. Va., has 

issue: 

47. Enos. • 

48. Freeman. 

49. Charles. 

50. Joseph. 

51. Camden. 

14. Malinda, m. G. P. Woolf of Letart, 0., and they have: 

52. Melissa. , 

53. Melvin. 

54. Calvin. > 

55. Paulina. 

56. Ervin. 

57. Henry, 

58. Van Ambrose. 

15. Matilda, m. Jonas Sayre of Letart, O., and they have: 

59. Joseph. 

60. Martha. 

16. Elmira, m. Nathaniel Powell of Letart, O., and res. at Antiquity, 

O, having: 

61. Albert. 

62. George. 

63. Roxie, m. Thomas Malone, res. Pittsburgh, Pa. 



DESCENDANTS OF TIMOTHY YABIAN. 

17. Urena m. Henry Thornton of Letart, W. Va , res. El Dorado, 
Kan., and has: 

64. Joseph. 

65. Dimit, (?) 

66. Elmer. 

67. Thomas. 



18. Rebecca, m. Thomas Key bum of Clifton. W. Va., and has 

68. Martha. 

69. Irwin. 

70. Jennie. 




ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 99 



100 



ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 



ADDITIONS AND (JOIIREOTIONS. 101 



in n 

ADDITIONS AND CORRECTIONS. 



'^P'v "--#■-,"-. ..- *"->**■ ^~" 



.v^St&J \ r #s 



J* 







IV 




4"V:# ® 






&P** * 







j i 




' „'-*»?" a ^H 




X ./-' '' 


ig!**' 4 -:*^ :/*fe 




-„>: -.■■■< 


!^ ; -V;.*-V'-**.:« '*> ' 


nV«dDMi 


IT ■ **« 




. vv : 


^ I Hh^^vI^H 









'••■&■* 

.-■■ w« 



r^ 



# v 



#,./^ 



■■•*A# ; '' ; j*'- : # 



»:;JA' ♦ TL 



• fj ,**< 






■-f^FC 



■■:■ ' : '' 



A** :*! 



'•..■#^ 



*••■■: «f 






'i '"'•$>' *W^- 



%ft #