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Full text of "The bond of sacrifice; a biographical record of all British officers who fell in the Great War"

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THE BOND OF 

SACRIFICE 

A BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF .\LL 

BRITISH OFFICERS ^^TIO FELL IN 

THE GREAT WAR 



VOLUME I 

AUG — DEC, 1914 



Military^ Edao/-- 

COLONEL LA. CLUTTERBUCIC 

til association wit/j 

COLONEL W. T. DOONER 

Ahva/£ditor 

COMMANDER the Honble CA.DENiSGN 

(Title by Mr. Rudyard Kipling) 



THE BOND OF SACRIFICE 

COPYRIGHT 



Published by the Proprietors: THE 
ANGLO-AFRICAN PUBLISHING CONTRACTORS. 
20/13. Bank Chambers, High Holborn. London, W.C. 

Printed at THE CRANFORD PRESS 6v 
GEORGE PULMAN & SONS, LIMITED. 
Thayer Street, London, W . & Wealdstone, Middlesex. 



FOREWORD 

by 

FIELD-MARSHAL the VISCOUNT FRENCH of YPRES, 

g.c.b., o.m., g.c.\'.0., k.c.m.g., 
Colonel iqth Hussars, Colonel Irish Guards, 
Colonel-in-Chief Royal Irish Regiment. 



I HAVE been asked to write a foreword to 
this deeplv interesting volume. 
Its pages teem with deeds of gallantry and 
devoted selt-sacrihce in the cause of King and 
Countrv. The brief and concise narrative which 
recalls the glorious ending of each separate life 
must appeal with simple and pathetic grandeur 
to every British heart. 

If we search for the manv causes which have 
made for the British Army so magnificent a 
record, we will find amongst the most marked 
and prominent is the close and cordial relation- 
ship which has existed at all times between 
Officers and men. 

British soldiers have learnt from an experience 
which now covers centuries that in their OfBcers 
they possess leaders of indomitable courage, 
determination and self-reliance. A mutual con- 
fidence is established wliich has ensured many 



FOREWORD 

a glorious viclorv and often converted imminent 
defeat and disaster into a brilliant success. The 
Officers who have fallen in this great war have 
splendidly maintained these traditions. This is 
made abundantly evident to anyone who makes 
a study of the Rolls of Honour which have filled 
the columns of the daily paper. 

Enormous beyond all precedent as these death 
rolls have been it is a fatt that the proportion 
of Officers to men is in excess of what it has 
been in any former war. Deep as must ever be 
the debt of gratitude which the Nation owes to 
its soldiers in the ranks, at least the same is 
owing to the devoted and intrepid leaders who 
have so freely sacrificed their lives on these 
blood-stained fields. 

These volumes are indeed well calculated to 
inspire the youth of this Countrv to maintain 
and improve the attributes which have enabled 
our fallen leaders to effecl such splendid results 
for their Country and which, thank God, are 
bred in them, and, so to speak, form part of 
their flesh and blood. 




z<-- /f/^ 



<^^ 



EDITORIAL NOTE 

A few words are necessary to explain the system adopted 
in compiling "The Bond of Sacrifice." 

The publication will be issued in volumes, each covering 
a period of, as nearly as possible, six months, and includ- 
ino- the names of all Officers who lost their lives within 
that period from causes directly attributable to active 
service in the Great War. 

When doubt exists regarding the fate of an Officer, his 
name is not included until authentic confirmation ot his 
death has been received. 

Special volumes are in course of preparation for the Royal 
Navv and for the Overseas Forces respectively, which it 
is intended to publish after the conclusion ot the war. 

The biographies are inserted in alphabetical order: in the 
case of composite surnames (with or without hyphen) the 
initial letter of the last name governs their place in the 
book. Prefixes are treated as part of the surname. 

Officers holding permanent commissions in the Royal 
Marines will be included in the Naval Volume. 

L. -A. CLUTTERBUCK 
W. T. DOONER 



MILITARY DESPATCHES 



FROM THE 



FIELD=MARSHAL COMMANDING = IN=CHIEF, 
BRITISH FORCES IN THE FIELD. 



War Office. September 9, 1914. 
The following despatch has been received by the Secretary of State for ^^■a^ from the Field- 
Marshal Commanding-in-Chief, British Forces in the Field : — 

7th September, 1914. 

5Iy Lord, 

I have the honour to report the proceedings of the Field Force under my command up to the time 
of rendering this despatch. 

1. The transport of the troops from England both by sea and by rail wa.s effected in the best order 
and without a check. Each unit arrived at its destination in tliis country well within the scheduled 
time. 

The concentration was practically complete on the evening of Friday, the 21st ultimo, and I was 
able to make dispositions to move the Force during Saturday, the 22nd. to positions 1 considered most 
favourable from which to commence operations which the French Commander-in-Cliief, General 
Joffre, requested me to undertake in pursuance of his plans in prosecution of the campaign. 

The line taken up extended along the Hue of the canal from Conde on the west, through Mons and 
Binche on the east. This line was taken up as follows : — 

From Conde to Mons inclusive was assigned to the Second Corps, and to the right of the Second 
Corps fi-om ^klons the First Corps was posted. The 5th Cavahy Brigade was placed at Binche. 

In the absence of my Third Army Corps I desired to keep the Cavalry Di\-ision as much as possible 
as a reserve to act on my outer flank, or move in support of any threatened part of the hne. The 
forward reconnaissance was entrusted to Brigadier-General Sir Philip Clietwode with the 5th Cavalry 
Brigade, but I directed General Allenh>y to send forward a few squadrons to assist in tliis work. 

During the 22nd and 23rd these advanced squ^rons did some excellent work, some of them 
penetrating as far as Soignies, and several encounters took place in which our troops showed to great 
advantage. 

2. At 6 a.m.. on August 23rd. I assembled the Commanders of the Urst and Second Corps and 
Cavalry Division at a point close to the position, and explained the general situation of the Allies, 
and what I understood to be General Joflre's plan. I discussed with them at some length the immediate 
situation in front of us. 

From information I received from French Headquarters I understood that little more than one, 
or at most two, of the enemy's Army Corps, with perhaps one Cavalry Di\Tsion, were in front of my 
position : and I was aware of no atteuipted outflanking movement by the enemy. 1 was confirmed 
in this opinion by the fact that my patrols encountered no undue opposition in their reconnoitring 
operations. The observation of my aeroplanes seemed also to bear out this estimate. 

About 3 p.m. on Simday, the 23rd. reports began coming in to the effect that the enemy was 
commencing an attack on the Mons line, apparently in some strength, but that the right of the position 
fronrMons and Bray was being particularly threatened. 

The Couunander of the First Corps had pushed his fiank back to some high ground south of Bray, 
and the 5th Cavalry Brigade evacuated Binche, moving slightly south : the enemy thereupon occupied 
Binche. 

The right of the 3rd Division, under General Hamilton, was at ^lons, which formed a somewhat 
dangerous salient : and I directed the Commander of the Second Corps to be careful not to keep the 
troof>s on this salient too long. but. if threatened seriously, to draw back the centre behind Mons. 
Tliis was done before dark. In the meantime, about 5 p.m., I received a most unexpected message 
from General Joffre by telegraph, telling me that at least three German Corps, viz., a reserve corps, 
the 4th Corps and the 9th Corps, were mo\Tng on my position in front, and that the Second Corps 
was engaged in a timiing movement from the direction of Tom-nay. He also informed me that the 
two reser\-e French Di^^sions and the 5th French Army on my right were i-etiring, the Germans having 
on the previous day gained possession of the passages of the Sambre between Charleroi and Namur. 



3. Tn view of the possibility of my boint; drivon from tlie Moiis position, I had previously ordered 
a position in rear to be reconnoitreii. Tliis position rested on the fortress of Maubevine on tlie right, 
and extended west to Jenlain, south-east of \'ivlenciennes, on the left. The position was repoited diHl- 
cult to hold, liecause standing crops and buildings made the siting of trenehes very dillieult , and limited 
the field of fire in !nany important localities. It nevertheless afforded a few good artillery positions. 

\\'lien the news of the retirement of the p'ronch and the heavy German threatening on my front 
ic.uhcd me. I endeavoured to confii-m it by aerojjlane reconnaissance ; and as a result of this I deter- 
mined to elTeet a retirement to the Maubeuge position at daybreak on the 24th. 

A certain amount of lighting continued along the whole line throughout the niglit, and at day- 
break on the 21th tlie 2nd Division from the neighbourhood of llarmignit's made a powerful demon- 
.stration as if to retake BinclK'. This was supported by the artillery of both the 1st and 2nd Divisions, 
whilst the 1st Division took up a supporting position in the neighbourhood of Peissant. Under cover 
of this demonstration the Second Corps retired on the line Dour-Quarouble-Frameries. The 3rd Division 
on the right of the Corps suffered considerable loss in this operation from the enemy, who had 
retaken Mons. 

The Second Corps halted on tliis hnr. uliei-c tlicy |).irtially entrenelicd themselves, enal)ling 
Sir Douglas Ilaig with the First Corps gradually to withdraw to the new jiosition ; and he effected 
this without much further lo.ss, reaching the line Bavai-Maubeuge about 7 p.m. Towards midday the 
enemy appeared to lie directing his principal effort again.st our left. 

I had lucviously ordeied (ieneral AUenby with the Cavah y to act vigorously in advance of my 
left front and endeavoiu- to take the press>U'e off. 

About 7.30 a.m. (ieneral -Mlcnby received a message from Sir Cliarles Fergusson, counnanding 
.5th Division, saying that he was very hard pressed and in urgent need of support. On receipt of this 
message Geneial Allenliy dreu hi tlie Cavalry and endeavoure<l to bring direct .support to the oth 
Division. 

Duiing the couise of this operation (ieneral De Lisle, of the 2n(i Cavalry Brigade, thought he 
saw a good opportunity to jiaialyze the tinlher advance of the enemy's infantry by making a mounted 
attack on his (lank. He formed up and advanced for this purpose, but wa,s held up by wire about 
500 yards fi-oiu his objective, and the 9th Lancers and 18th Hussai-s suffered severely in the retirement 
of the Brigade. 

The Unli liirantry Biigade. which had been guarding the Line of Communications, was brought 
up by rail to X'alenciennes on the 22nd and 23rd. On the morning of the 24th they were moved out 
to a position south of (^uarouble to support the left Hank of the Second Corps. 

With the a,ssislance of the Cavalry .Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien was enabled to effect his retreat to 
a new position : although, having two corps of the enemy on his front and one threatening his flank, 
he suffered great losses in doing so. 

At nightfall the position was occupieil by the Second C!orps to the west of Bavai, the First Corps 
to the right. The right was protected by the Fortress of Maubeuge, the left by the 19th Brigade in 
position between .Tenlain and Bry. and the Cavalry on the outer flank. 

4. The French were still i-etiring. and I had no support except such as was afforded by the Fortress 
of M.iubeiige : and the determined attempts of the enemy to get round my left flank assured me that 
it was his intention to hem me again.st that place and surround me. I felt that not a moment nmst 
be lost in retiring to another position. 

I had every reason to believe that the enemy's forces were somewhat exhausted, and I knew that 
they had suffered heavy losses. 1 hoped, therefore, that his pursuit would not be too vigorous to pre- 
vent me effecting m>' object. 

The operation, however, was full of danger and dillieult y. not only owing to the very superior 
force in my front, but also to the exhaustion of the troops. 

The retirement was recommenced in the early morning of the 25th to a position in the neighbour- 
hood of Le Cateau, and rearguards were ordered to be clear of the Maubeuge-Bavai-Eth Road by 
5.30 a.m. 

IVo Cavalry Brigades, with the Divisional Cavalry of the Second Corps, covered the movement 
of the Second Corps. The remainder of the Cavalry Division with the 19th Brigade, the whole under 
the command of General AUenby, covered the west flank. 

The 4th Division commenced its detrainment at Le Cateau on .Sunday, the 23rd, and by the 
morning of the 25th eleven battalions and a Brigade of .Artillery with Divisional Staff were available 
for service. 

I ordered General .Snow to move out to take up a position with his right south of .Solesmes, his 
left resting on the Cambrai-I^e Cateau Road south of La Chaprie. In this position the Division rendered 
great help to the effective retirement of the Second and First Corps to the new position. 

Although the troops had been ordered to occupy the Cambrai-Le Cateau-Landrecies position, 
and the ground had, during the 25th, been partially prepared and entrenched, I had grave doubts — 



owing to the information I received as to the accumulating strength of the enemy against me — as to 
the nisdom of standing there to fight. 

Having regard to the continued retirement of the French on my right, my exposed left flank, 
the tendency of the enemy's western corps (II) to envelop me. and. more than all, the exhausted con- 
dition of the troops, I determined to make a great effort to continue the retreat till I could put some 
substantial obstacle, such as the Somnie or the Oise, between my troops and the enemy, and afford 
the former some opporttuiity of rest and reorganisation. Orders were therefore sent to the Corps 
Commanders to continue their retreat as soon as they possibly could towards the general line Vermand- 
.St. Quentiu-Ribemont. 

The Cavalry, under General Allenby. were ordered to cover the retirement. 

Throughout the 25th and far into the evenins. the First Corps continued its march on Landrecies, 
following the road along the eastern border of the Foret de ilomial. and arrived at Landrecies about 10 
o'clock. I had intended that the Corps should come further west so as to flU up the gap between Le 
Cateau and Landrecies. but the men were exhausted and could not get further in without rest. 

The enemy, however, would not allow them this rest, and about 9.30 p.m. a report was received 
that the -Ith Guards Brigade in Landrecies was heavily attacked by troops of the 9th German Army 
Corps who were coming through the forest on the north of the town. This brigade fought most gal- 
lantly and caused the enemy to suffer tremendous loss in issuing from the forest into the narrow streets 
of the toma. The loss has been estimated from reUable soxu-ces at from 700 to 1,000. At the same time 
information reached me from Sir Douglas Haig that his 1st Division was also heavily engaged south 
and east of MaroUles. I sent urgent messages to the Commander of the two French Reserve Divisions 
on my right to come up to the assistance of the First Corps, which they eventually did. Partly owing 
to this assistance, but mainly to the skilful manner in which Sir Douglas Haig extricated his Corps 
from an exceptionally difficult position in the darkness of the night, they were able at dawn to resume 
their march south towards W'essigny on Guise. 

By about 6 p.m. the Second Corps had got into position with their right on Le Cateau, their left- 
in the neighbourhood of Caudry, and the line of defence was continued thence by the 4th Division 
towards SeranvUlers, the left being thrown back. 

During the fighting on the 24th and 2oth the Cavalry became a good deal scattered, but by the 
early morning of the 26th General AUenby had succeeded in concentrating two brigades to the south 
of Cambrai. 

The ith Division was placed under the orders of the General Officer Conunanding the Second 
Army Corps. 

On the 2-lth the French Cavalry Corps, consisting of three divisions, under General Sordet, had 
been in bUlets north of Avesnes. On my way back fi-om Bavai. which was my " Paste de C'ommande- 
nient " during the fighting of the 23rd and 24th. I visited General Sordet, and earnestly requested his 
co-operation and support. He promised to obtain sanction from his Army Conunander to act on my 
left flank, but said that his horses were too tired to move before the next day. Although he rendered 
me valuable assistance later on in the course of the retirement, he was vmable for the reasons given to 
afford me any support on the most critical day of all. viz., the 2t>th. 

At daybreak it became apparent that the enemy was throwing the bulk of his strength against the 
left of the position occupied by the Second Corps and the 4th Division. 

At this time the gims of four German Army Corps were in position against thenj. and Sir Horace 
Smith- Dorrien reported to me that he judged it impossible to continue his retirement at daybreak 
(as ordered) in face of such an attack. 

I sent him orders to use his utmost endeavours to break off the action and retire at the earliest 
possible moment, as it was impossible for me to send him any support, the First Corps being at the 
moment incapable of movement. 

The French Cavalry Corps, under General Sordet, was coming up on our left rear early in the morn- 
ing, and I sent an urgent message to him to do his utmost to come up and support the retirement of 
my left flank : but, owing to the fatigue of his horses, he found himself unable to intervene in any way. 

There had been no time to entrench the position properly, but the troops showed a magnificent 
front to the terrible fire which confronted them. 

The Artillery, although outmatched by at least foiu- to one, made a splendid fight, and inflicted 
heavy losses on their opponents. 

At length it became apparent that, if complete annihilation was to be avoided, a retirement must 
be attempted : and the order was plven to commence it about 3.30 p.m. The movenient was covered 
with the most devoted intrepidity and determination by the ArtUlery, wliich had itself suffered heavily, 
and the fine work done by the Cavalry in the fmlher retreat from the position assisted materially in the 
final completion of this most difficult and dangerous operation. 

Fortunately the enemy had himself suffered too heavily to engage in an energetic pursuit. 

I cannot close the brief account of this glorious stand of the British troops without putting on 



record my deep appreciation of tlie valuable services rendered by General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien. 

I say witliout hesitation that the saving of the left wing of the Army under my command on the 
morning of the 2t>th August covild never have been accomplished unless a coininaiider of rare and 
unusual coolness, intrepidity, and determination had been present to pei-sonally conduct the operations. 

The retreat was continued far into the night of tlie 2(>th and through the 27th aiul 2Sth. on which 
date the troops halted on the line Xoyon-Chauny-La Fere, having then thi-own off the weight of the 
enemy's pursuit. 

On the 27th and 2Stli 1 was nuich indebted to fieneral Sordet and the French Cavalry Division 
wliich he commands for materially assisting my retirement and successfully driving back some of 
the enemy on Cambrai. 

General D'Amade also, witli the 61st and 62nd French Heserve Divisions, moved down from the 
neighbourhood of Arras on the enemy's right flank and took much pressure off the rear of the British 
Forces. 

This closes the period covering the heavy fighting which commenced at Mens on Sunday after- 
noon, 23rd August, and which really constituted a four days' battle. 

At this point, therefore. I propose to close the present despatch. 

I deeply deplore the very serious losses wliich the British Forces have suffered in this great battle ; 
but the}- were inevitable in view of the fact that the British Army — only two days after a concentration 
by rail — was called upon to withstand a vigorous attack of five German Anny Corps. 

It Ls impossible for me to speak too highly of the skill evinced by the two General Officers com- 
manding Army Corps : the self-sacrificing and devoted exertions of their .Staffs : the direction of the 
troops by Divisional. Brigade and Regimental Leadei-s : the command of the smaller units by their 
officers : and the magnificent fighting spirit displayed by non-commissioned officei's and men. 

I wish particularly to bring to your Lordship's notice the admirable work done by the Royal 
Flying Corps under Sir David Henderson. Their skill, energy and pei'severance have been beyond all 
praise. They have furnished me with the most complete and accurate information which has been of 
incalculable value in the conduct of the operations. I'lred at coivstantly both by friend and foe, and 
not hesitating to fly in every kind of weather, they have remained luidaunted throughout. 

Further, by actually fighting in the air, they have succeeded in destroying five of the enemy's 
machines. 

I wish to acknowledge with deep gratitude the incalcvdable assistance I received from the General 
and Personal Staffs at Headquarters during this trying period. 

Lieutenant-tieneral Sir .\rchibald .Murray. Chief of the General Staff ; Major-General Wilson, Sub- 
Chief of the General Staff : and all under them have worked day and night uncea-singly with the utmost 
skill, self-sacrifice, and devotion : and the same acknowledgment is due by me to Brigadier-General 
Hon. W. Lambton, my Military Secretary, and the Pei-sonal Staff. 

In such operations as 1 have described, the work of the Quartermaster-General Is of an extremely 
onerous nature, Major-General .Sir V^'Uliam Robertson has met what appeared to be almost insuperable 
difficulties with his characteristic energy, skill and determination ; and it is largely owing to his exer- 
tions that the hardships and sufferings of the troops — inseparable fixjm such operations — were not 
much greater. 

Major-General Sir Xevil ilacready. the Adjutant-General, has also been confronted with most 
onerous and difficult tasks in connection with disciplinary arrangements and the preparation of casualty 
lists. He has been indefatigable in his exertions to meet the difficiUt situations which arose. 

I have not yet been able to tomplete the list of officers whose names 1 desire to bring to your Lord- 
ship's notice for services rendered diu-ing the period under review : and, as I understand it is of 
importance that this despatch should uo longer be delayed, I propose to forward tliis list, separately, 
as soon as I can. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Lordship's most obedient Servant, 
(Signed) J. D. P, FRENCH, Field-Marshal, 
Commander-in-Chief, 
British Forces in the Field. 

TTar Office, October ISth. 1914. 
The following despatches have been received by the Secretary of State for War from the Field- 
Marshal Commanding-in-Chief, British Forces in the Field : — 

I, 17th September, 1914. 

My Lord, 

In continuation of my despatch of September 7th, I have the honour to report the further pro- 
gress of the operations of the Forces under my command from August 28th. 



On that evening the retirement of the Force was followed closely by two ot the enemy's cavalry 
columns, mo\'ing south-east from St. Quentin. 

Tlie retreat in this part of the field was being covered by the 3rd and 5th Cavalry Brigades. .South 
of the Somme. General Gough. with the 3rd Cavalry Brigade, threw back the Uhlans of the Guard 
with considerable loss. 

Gener&l Chetwode, with the .5th Cavalry Brigade, encauntered the eastern column near Cerjzy, 
moving south. The Brigade attacked and routed the column, the leading German regiment suffering 
very severe casualties and being ahnost broken up. 

The 7th French Army Corps was now in course of being railed up from the south to the east of 
Amiens. On the 29th it nearly completed its detrainment, and the French 6th Army got into position 
on my left, its right resting on Rove. 

The 5th French Army was behind the line of the Oise between La Fere and Guise. 

The pursuit of the enemy was very vigorovis : some five or six German corps were on the Somme, 
facing the 5th Army on the OLse. At least two corps were advancing towards my front, and were 
crossing the Somme east and west of Ham. Thi-ee or four more German corps were opposing the 6th 
French Army on my left. 

This was the situation at 1 o'clock on the 29th, when I received a visit from General Joffre at 
my headquarters. 

1 strongly represented my position to the PYench Commander-in-Chief, who was most kind, 
cordial, and sympathetic, as he has always been. He told me that he had directed the 5th French Army 
on the Oise to move forward and attack the Germans on the Somme, with a \"iew to checking pursuit. 
He also told me of the formation of the Sixth French Army on my left flank, composed of the 7th Army 
Corps, four Reserve Divisions, and .Sordet's Corps of Cavalry, 

I finally arranged with General Joffre to effect a fvu1:her short retirement towards the line Com- 
piegne-Soissons, promising him. however, to do n\y utnaost to keep always within a day's march of him. 

In pursuance of this arrangement the British Forces retired to a position a few miles north of the 
line Compiegne-Soissons on the 29th. 

The right flank of the German Army was now reaching a point which appeared seriously to 
endanger my line of communications «ith Ha\Te. I had already evacuated Amiens, into which place 
a German reserve di^^sion was reported to have moved. 

Orders were given to change the base to St, Xazaire. and establish an advance base at Le Mans. 
Tlus operation was well carried out by the Inspector-General of Communications, 

In spite of a severe defeat inflicted upon the Guard 10th and Guard Reserve Corps of the German 
Army by the 1st and 3rd French Corps on the right of the 5th Army, it was not part of General 
Joffre's plan to pursue this advantage, and a general retirement on to the line of the Marne was ordered, 
to which the French Forces in the more eastern theatre were directed to conform. 

A new Army (the 9th) had been formed from three corps in the south by General Joffre, and 
moved into the space between the right of the 5th and left of the ith Armies. 

Whilst closely adhering to his strategic conception to draw the enemy on at all points until a 
favourable situation was created from which to assume the offensive. General Joffre foimd it necessary 
to modify from day to day the methods by which he sought to attain this object, owing to the develop- 
ment of the enemy's plans and changes In the general situation. 

In conformity with the movements of the French Forces, my retirement continued practically 
from day to day. Although we were not severely pressed by the enemy, rearguard actions took place 
continually. 

On the 1st September, when retiring from the thickly wooded country to the south of Compiegne, 
the 1st Cavalry Brigade was overtaken by some German cavalry. They momentarily lost a Horse 
Artillery battery, and several officers and men were killed and wounded. With the help, however, of 
some detachments from the 3rd Corps operating on their left, they not only recovered their own guns, 
but succeeded In captxiring twelve of the enemy's. 

Similarly, to the eastward, the 1st Corps, retiring south, also got into some very difficult forest 
country, and a somewhat severe rearguard action ensued at \'lllers-Cottercts, In which the 4th Guards 
Brigade suffered considerably. 

On September 3rd the British Forces were In position south of the Marne between Lagny and Signy- 
Signets. Up to this time I had been requested by General Joffre to defend the passages of the river as 
long as possible, and to blow up the bridges in my front. After I had made the necessary dispositions, 
and the destruction of the bridges had been effected, I was asked by the French Commander-in- 
Chief to continue my retirement to a point some 12 miles m rear of the position I then occupied, with 
a view to taking up a second position behind the .Seine. This retirement was duly carried out. In 
the meantime the enemy had thrown bridges and crossed the ilame In considerable force, and was 
threatening the Allies all along the line of the British Forces and the oth and 9th French Armies, 
Consequently sev'eral small outpost actions took place. 



On Saturday, September oth, I met the French ("ommander-in-Chief at liis re(iuest. and he 
informed me of his intention to take the offensive fortliwitli. as lie ((Hisidcred conditions were very 
favourable to success. 

General Joffre announced to me his intention of wheeling up the left Hank of the tJth Army, 
pivoting on the Marne and directing it to move on the Oufcq : cross and attack the flank of the 1st 
(ierman Army, which wa.s then moving in a south-easterly direction east of that river. 

lie retjuested me to elTect a change of front to my right — my left resting on the Marne and my 
right on the 5th Army — to fill the gap between that army and tlie litli. I wa.s f lieu to a<lvance against 
the enemy in my front and join in the general olTeiusive movement. 

These combined movements jiractically commenced on Sunday, September 6th, at suni-ise ; 
and on that day it may be said that a great battle opened on a front extending from Ermenonville, 
which was just in front of the left flank of the lith l'>ench .-Vrmy, through Lizy on the Marne, Mau- 
perthuis, which was about the British centre. Court eeon. which was the left of the .^th French Army, 
to Ksternay and Charleville, the left of the 9th Army under (ieneral I-'och. and so along the front of 
the 9th, 4th, and 3rd French Armies to a point north of the fortress of \'erdmi. 

This battle, in so far as the ()th French Army, the British Army, the 5th French Army and the 
Oth French Anny were concerned, may be said to have concluded on the evening of September 10th, 
by which time the Germans had been driven back to the line Soissons-Kheims, with a loss of thousands 
of prisonei's, many giuis, and enormous masses of transport. 

Aboxit the 3rd September the enemy appears to have diangod his plans and to have determined 
to .stop his advance south direct upon Paris : for on the Jth .September air reconnaissances showed 
that his main colunms were moving in a south-east eily direction generally ea.st of a line drawn through 
Nanteuil and Lizy on the Ourcq. 

On the 5th September several of these columns were observed to have crossed the .Marne : whilst 
(ierman troops, which were observed moving south-east up the left bank of the Ourcq on the 4th, 
were now reported to be halted and facing the river. Heads of the enemy's columns were seen crossing 
at Changis, La Ferte, Xogent. Chateau Thierry and Jlezy. 

Considerable (ierman colunuis of all arms were seen to be converging on .Mont luirail, \\ hiLsl before 
sunset large bivouacs of the enemy were located in the neighbourhood of Coulommiers, south of 
Rebais, La Ferte-Gaucher and Dagny. 

I should conceive it to have been about noon on the (ith September, after the British Forces 
had changed their front to the right and occupied the line .Jouy-Le Chatel-Faremoutiei's-Villeneuve 
Le Conite, and the advance of the tJth French Army noith of the Marne towards the Ourcq became 
apijarent, that the enemy realised the powerful threat that was being made against the flank of his 
columns moving south-east, and began the great retreat which opened the battle above referred to. 

On the evening of the (ith September, therefore, the fronts and positions of the opposing armies 
were roughly as follows : — 

Alues. 
ath Frrnrh Anny. — Right on the Marne at Meux, left towards Betz. 
British Forces. — On the line Dagny-Coulommiere-Maison. 
alh Freiwh Army. — ^At Courtagon, right on Esternay. 
Coiineati's Cavalry Corps. — Between the right of the British and the left of the French 5th Army. 

Germ.\n.s. 
ith liescrve and 2nd Corps. — East of the (jurcq and facing that river. 
9</i Cavalry Division. — West of Crecy. 
2nd Cavalry Division. — North of Coulommiers. 
Ath Corps. — Rebais. 
3rd and 1th Corps. — South-west of Montmirail. 

All these troops constituted the 1st German Army, which was directed against the French 6th 
Army on the Oui'cq, and the British Forces, and the left of the 5th French Army south of the Marne. 

The 2nd German Army (IX, X, X.R. and Guard) was moving against the centre and right of the 
5th French Army and the 9th French Army. 

On the 7th September both the 5th and 6th French Armies were heavily engaged on our flank. 
The 2nd and 4th Reserve German Corps on the Ourcq -vigorously opposed the advance of the French 
towards that river, but did not prevent the 6th Ai'my from gaining some headway, the Germans them- 
selves suffering serious losses. The French 5th Army threw the enemy back to the line of the Petit 
Morin River after inflicting severe losses upon them, especially about .Montceaux, which was carried 
at the point of the bayonet. 

The enemy retreated before our advance, covered by his 2nd and Oth and (iuard Cavalry Divisions, 
which suffered severely. 

Our Cavalry act-ed vr\t\i great vigour, especially General De Lisle's Brigade with the 9th Lancers 
and 18th Hussars. 



On the 8th September the eaeiny continued his retreat northward, and our Anny was successfully 
engaged during the day with strong rearguards of all arms on the Petit Morin River, thereby materially 
assisting the progress of the French Armies on our right and left, against whom the enemy was making 
his greatest efforts. On both sides the enemy was thrown back witli very heavy loss. The First Army 
Corps encountered stubborn resistance at La Tretoire (north of RebaLs). The enemy occupied a strong 
position nith infantry and gims on the northern bank of the Petit Morln River ; they were dislodged 
with considerable loss. Several machine gims and many prisoners were captured, and upwards of 
two hundred German dead were left on the ground. 

The forcing of the Petit Morin at this point was much assisted by the Cavali-y and the 1st Division, 
wliich crossed higher up the stream. 

Later in the day a counter-attack by the enemy was well repulsed by the First Army Corps, a 
great many prisoners and some gims again falling into our hands. 

On this day (8th September) the Second Army Corps encountered considerable opposition, but 
drove back the enemy at all points with great loss, making considerable captures. 

The Third Army Corps also drove back considerable bodies of the enemy's infantry and made 
some captures. 

On the 9th September the Firet and Second Army Corps forced the pa.s.sage of the .Marne and ad- 
vanced some miles to tlie north of it. Tlie Third Corps encountered considerable opposition, as the 
bridge at La Ferte was destroyed, and tlie enemy held tlie towTi on the opposite bank in some strength, 
and thence persistently obstructed the construction of a bridge : so the passage was not effected until 
after nightfall. 

During the day's pursuit the enemy suffered heavy loss in killed and wounded, some himdreds 
of prisoners fell into our hands, and a battery of eight machine guns was captured by the 2nd Division. 

On this day the 6th French Army was heavUy engaged west of the River Ourcq. The enemy 
had largely increased his force opposing them : and very heavy fighting ensued, in which the French 
were successful throughout. 

The left of the 5th French Army reached the neighbourhood of Chateau Thierry after the most 
severe fighting, having driven the enemy completely north of the river with great loss. 

The fighting of this Army in the neighbourhood of MontmiraU was very severe. 

The advance was resumed at daybreak on the 10th up to the line of the Ourcq, opposed by strong 
rearguards of all arms. The 1st and 2nd Corps, assisted by the Cavalry Division on the right, the 3rd 
and 5th Cavah-y Brigades on the left, drove the enemy northwards. Thirteen guns, seven machine 
gims, about 2,000 prisoners, and quantities of transport fell into our hands. The enemy left many 
dead on the field. On this day the French 5th and 6th Armies had little opposition. 

As the 1st and 2nd German Armies were now in full retreat, tliis evening marks the end of the 
battle which practically conmienced on the morning of the 6th instant : and it is at thLs point in the 
operations that I am concluding the present despatch. 

Although I deeply regret to have had to report heavy losses In killed and wounded throughout 
these operations, I do not think they have been excessive in view of the magnitude of the great fight, 
the outlines of which I have only been able very briefly to describe, and the demoralisation and loss 
in killed and wounded which are known to have been caused to the enemy by the vigour and severity 
of the pursuit. 

In concluding this despatch I must call your Lordship's special attention to the fact that from 
Sunday, August 23rd, up to the present day (September ITth), from Mons back almost to the Seine, 
and from the Seine to the Aisne, the Army under my command has been ceaselessly engaged without 
one single day's halt or rest of any kind. 

Since the date to which in this despatch I have limited my report of the operations, a great battle 
on the ALsne has been proceeding. A full report of this battle will be made in an early fiu-ther despatch. 

It will, however, be of interest to say here that, in spite of a very determined resistance on the 
part of the enemy, who is holding in strength and great tenacity a position peculiarly favourable to 
defence, the battle which commenced on the evening of the 12th instant has, so far, forced the enemy 
back from his first position, secured the passage of the river, and inflicted great loss upon him, including 
the capture of over 2,000 prisoners and several guns. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Lordship's most obedient Servant, 
(Signed) J. D. P. FRENCH, Field- Marshal, 
Commanding-in-Chief, 
The British Forces in the Field. 

My Lord, II. 8th October, 1914. 

1 have the honour to report the operations in which the British Forces in France have been engaged 
since the evening of the 10th September. 



1. In the early iiiorning of the 1 Itli the furtlicr puisiiit of the enemy was coininenced : aiul the 
three Corps crossed the Ourcq piaclically unopposcil. the Cavahy icacliin^; the Une of the Aisue Hivei- ; 
the 3i'd and .")th Brigades south uS Soissons. the 1st. liml .ujil II h nn Ihc hii;h i;idiiiul at ( 'ouvii'lli-s and 
Cerseuil. 

On the afternoon of the llilli from the oppositinri iiicduutrrcd liy the litli t'lciicli Army to tlie 
west of Soissons, hy the lird ('or|)s south-east of that place, hy the 2iid Corjjs south of Missy and X'aiUy, 
and certain indications all alonj; the hne, I formed tlie opinion that the enemy had, for the moment 
at any rate, arrested his retreat and wa.s prepaiin^; to ihspute the passage of tlie Aisne with some vigour. 
South of Soissons the (iermans were holding Mont de I'aiis against the attack of the right of the 
Fi'ench 6th Army when the 3rd Corps reached the? neighbourhood of Buzaney. sout h-ea&t of that place. 
With the a.ssi.stance of the Artillery of the 3rd Corps the l-'reneh drove them liack across the river at 
Soissons, where they destroyed the bridges. 

The heavy artillery fire wliieli was visible lor several miles in a westerh- direction in the valley of 
the Aisne showed that the lith Krench Army Wius meeting with strong opposition all along the line. 

On this day the Cavalry under (leneral AUenliy reached the neighbourliood of Brainc and did good 
work in clearing the town and the high ground beyond it of strong hostile detachments. The t^ueen's 
Bays are particularly mentioned by the General a.s having assisted greatly in the success of this 
operation. They were well siipported hy the 3rd Division, which on this night bivouacked at Brenelle, 
south of the river. 

The 5th Division approached .Missy, bvit were unable to make headway. 

The 1st Army Corps reached the neighbourhood of X'auxccre without umch opposition. 

In this manner the Battle of the Aisne commenced. 

2. The Aisne Valley runs generally east and west, and consists of a flat- bottomed depression of 
\\ idtli var>-ing from half a niile to two miles, down which the river follows a winding course to the 
west at some points near the southern slopes of the valley and at othere near the northern. The high 
groimd both on the north and south of the river is approxinaately 400 feet above the bottom of the 
vaUey, and is very similar in character, as are both slopes of the valley itself, which are broken into 
numerous rounded spm's and re-entrants. The most prominent of the former are the Chivre spur 
on the right bank and Sermoise spur on the left. Near the latter place the general plateau on the south 
Ls divided by a subsidiary valley of much the same character, down which the small River Vesle 
flows to the main stream near Sermoise. The slopes of the plateau overlooking the Aisne on the north 
and sf)uth are of varying steepness, and <are covei'ed with munerous jiatches of wood, which also stretch 
upwards and backwards over the edge on to the top of tlie high ground. There are several villages and 
small towns dotted about in the vaUey itself and along its sides, the chief of which is the town of 
Soissons. 

The Aisne is a sluggish stream of some 170 feet in breadth, but, being 15 feet deep in the centre, 
it is unfordable. Between Soissons on the west and Villers on the east (the part of the river attacked 
and secured by the British Forces) there are eleven road bridges across it. On the north bank a narrow- 
gauge railway rims from Soissons to \'ailly, wheie it crosses the river and continues eastward along the 
south bank. From Soissons to Sermoise a double line of railway runs along the south bank, turning 
at the latter place up the Vesle VaUey towards Bazoches. 

The position held by the enemy is a very strong one, either for a delaying action or for a defensive 
battle. One of its chief military characteristics is that from the high groimd on neither side can the top 
of the plateau on the other side be seen except for small stretches. This is chiefly due to the woods 
on the edges of the slopes. Another important point is that all the bridges are under either direct or 
high-angle artillery fire. 

The tract of country above described, which lies north of the .:Visne, is well adapted to conceal- 
ment, and was so skiLfully turned to account by the enemy as to render it impossible to judge the real 
nature of his opposition to our passage of the river, or to accurately gauge his strength ; but I have 
every reason to conclude that strong rearguards of at least three army corps were holding the passages 
on the early morning of the 13th. 

3. On that morning I ordered the British Forces to advance and make good the ALsne. 

The 1st Corps and the Cavalry advanced on the river. The 1st Division was directed on ChanouUle 
via the canal bridge at Bourg, and the 2nd Division on Courtecon and Presles via Pont-Arcy and on 
the canal to the north of Braye via Chavonne. On the right the Cavalry and 1st Division met with 
slight opposition, and found a passage by means of the canal which crosses the river by an aqueduct. 
The Division was therefore able to press on, supported by the Cavalry Division on its outer flank, 
driving back the enemy in front of it. 

On the left the leading troops of the 2nd Division reached the river by 9 o'clock. The 5th Infantrj' 
Brigade were only enabled to cross, in single fUe and under considerable shell Are, by means of the 
liroken girder of the bridge which was not entirely submerged in the river. The construction of a 
pontoon bridge was at once undertaken, and was completed by 5 o'clock in the afternoon. 



Oa the extreme left the 1th Guards Brigade met with severe opposition at CTiavonne, and it 
was only late in the afternoon that it was able to establish a foothold on the northern bank of the 
river by ferrying one battalion across in boats. 

By nightfall the 1st DiNTsion occupied the area JEoulins-Paissy-Geny, with posts in the village of 
Vendresse. 

The 2nd Division bivouacked as a whole on the southern bank of the river, leaving only the 5th 
Brigade on the north bank to establish a bridgehead. 

The Second Corps found all the bridges in front of theui destroyed, except that of Conde. v^birh 
was in possession of the enemy, and remained so until the end of the battle. 

In the approach to >Iissy, where the .5th Division eventually crossed, there is some open ground 
which was swept by heavy fire from the opposite bank. The 13th Brigade was, therefore, unable to 
advance : but the 14th. which wa." directed to the east of Venizel at a less exposed point, was rafted 
across, and by night established itself with its left at .St. Marguerite. They were followed by the 1.5th 
Brigade : and later on both the 11th and loth supported the 1th Division on their left in repelling 
a heavy counter-attack on the Third Corps. 

On the morning of the 1.3th the Third Corps found the enemy had established himself in strength 
on the Vregny Plateau. The road bridge at Venizel was repaired during the morning, and a recon- 
naissance was made with a view to throwing a pontoon bridge at -Soissons. 

The 12th Infantry Brigade crossed at Venizel, and was assembled at Bucy Le Long by 1 p.m., 
but the bridge was so far damaged that artillery could only be man-handled across it. Meanwhile 
the construction of a bridge was commenced close to the road bridge at Venizel. 

At 2 p.m. the 12th Infantry Brigade attacked in the direction of Chivres and Vregny with the 
object of securing the high ground east of Chivres, as a necessary preliminary to a further advance 
northwards. This attack made good progress, but at 5.30 p.m. the enemy's artillery and machii>e-gun 
fire from the direction of Vregny became so severe that no further advance could be made. The 
positions reached were held tiU dark. 

The pontoon bridge at Venizel was completed at 5.30 p.m., when the 10th Infantry Brigade crt«sed 
the river and moved to Bucy Le Long. 

The 19th Infantry Brigade moved to Billy-siu--Ai5ne. and before dark all the artillery of the Division 
had crosssed the river, with the exception of the Heavy Battery and one Brigade of Field Artillery. 

During the night the positions gained by the 12th Infantry Brigade to the east of the stream 
running through Chivres were handed over to the .jth Division. 

The section of the Bridging Train allotted to the Third Corps began to arrive in the neighbourhood 
of Soissons late in the afternoon, when an attempt to throw a heavy pontoon bridge at Soissons had 
to be abandoned, owing to the fire of the enemy's heavy howitzers. 

In the evening the enemy retired at all points and entrenched himself on the high ground about 
two miles north of the river along which runs the Chemin-des-Dames. Detachments of Infantry, 
however, strongly entrenched in commanding points down slopes of the various spurs, were left in 
front of all three corps with powerful artillerj- in support of them. 

During the night of the 13th and on the 14th and following days the Field Companies were 
incessantly at work night and day. Eight pontoon bridges and one foot bridge were thrown across 
the river under generally very heavy artUlerj' fire, which was incessantly kept up on to most of the 
crossings after completion. Three of the road bridges, i.e.. Venizel. Missy and VaUly. and the railway 
bridge east of VaiUy were temporarily repaired so as to take foot traffic and the Villers Bridge made 
fit to carry weights up to six tons. 

Preparations were also made for the repair of the Missy, VaiUy and Boui-g Bridges so as to take 
mechanical transport. 

The weather was very wet and added to the difficulties by cutting up the already indifferent 
approaches, entailing a large amount of work to repair and improve. 

The operations of the Field Companies during this most trying time are worthy of the best 
traditions of the Royal Engineers. 

4. On the evening of the 14th it was stiU impossible to decide whether the enemy was only 
making a temporaiy halt, covered by rearguards, or whether he intended to stand and defend the 
position. 

With a view to clearing up the situation, I ordered a general advance. 

The action of the First Corps on this day under the direction and coumiand of Sir Douglas Haig 
was of so skilful, bold and decisive a character that he gained positions which alone have enabled me 
to maintain my position for more than three weeks of very severe fighting on the north bank of the 
river. 

The Corps was directed to cross the line Moulins-Moussy by 7 a.m. 

On the right the General Officer Commanding the 1st Division directed the 2nd Infantry Brigade 
which was in billets and bivouacked about Moulins), and the 25th Artillery Brigade (less one battery). 



uuilt'i' (ieiuTiil Bulliii, 111 iiii>\c I'oi-uaiil lirfoiv iljiylnvak. in milii' In piolvfl the advaiiuu uf tliu Divisimi 
sent up the valley to \'endressc. An ollicei's' patrol sent mil li> Ihis Brigade reported a considerable 
force of the enemy near tlie factory iioilli of Troyon, and the HriKadier acoordinely directed two regi- 
ments (the King's Koyal Killcs and Uw Hoyal Sussex Hegimont) to move at '.i a.m. The Xortham|)ton- 
shirc Regiment was ordered to move at 1 a.m. to occupy the sjhu' east of Troyon. The remaining regi- 
ment of the Brigade (the Loyal North Lancashire Kegiment) moved at .5.30 a.m. to the village; of 
\'endresse. The factory w sis found to be held in considerable strength by the enemy, and tlie Brigadier 
ordered the Loyal North Lancivsliii-c Regiment to suppoi't the King's Royal Rifles and the Sussex 
Regiment. Even with this svipixirt tlie force was unable to make headway, and on the arrival of 
tlie 1st Mrigade the Coldstream (iuards were moved up to support the right of Die leading Hiigade 
(the 2nd), while the remainder of tlie 1st Brigade supported its left. 

About noon the situation was, roughly, that the wliole of these t«(> lirigades were exteiiiliil along 
a line running east and west, north of the line Troyon and soutli of tlu: Chemin-des- Dames. A party 
of the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment had seized and were holding the factory. The en. in\ held 
a line of entrenchments north and eiist of the factory in considerable strength, and every clTort to 
advance against this line was driven back by heavy shell and machine-gun lire. The morning was wet 
and a lieavy mist hung over the hills, so that the 2.')th Artillery Brigade and the Divisional Artillery 
were mialile to render elTective support to the advanced troops until about !t o'clock. 

By 10 o'clock the 3rd Infantry Brigade had reached a point one mile south of N'endi'esse, and 
from there it was ordered to continue the line of the 1st Brigade and to connect with and help the right 
of the 2nd Division. A strong hostile column was found to be advancing, and by a vigorous counter- 
stroke with two of his battalions the Brigadier checked the advance of this column and relieved the 
pressure of the 2nd Division. From this period until late in the afternoon the fighting consisted of 
a series of attacks and counter-attacks. The counter-strokes by the enemy were delivered at fii'st 
with great vigour, but later on they decreased in strength, and all were driven off with heavy loss. 

On the left the 6th Infantry Brigade had been ordered to cross the river and to pass through the 
line held during the preceding night by the 5th Infantry Brigade and occupy the Courtecon Ridge, 
\\ hilst a detached force, cijiLsisting of the 4th Guards Brigade and the 36th Brigade, Royal l^'icld Artil- 
lery, under Hrigadier-tieneral Perceval, were ordered to proceed to a point east of the village of Ostel. 

'J'he (ith Infantry Brigade crossed the river at Pont-Arcy, moved up the valley towards Braye, 
and at 9 a.m. had reached the line Tilleul-La Buvelle. On this line they came under heavy artillery and 
rifle fire, and were unable to advance until supported by the 34th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, and 
the 44th Howitzer Brigade and the Heavy ArtiUery. 

The 4th (iuards Brigade crossed the river at 10 a.m. and met with very heavy opposition. It had to 
pass through dense woods : field artillery support was dinicult to obtain : but one section of a field battery 
pushed up to and within the firing line. At 1 p.m. the left of the Brigade was south of tlie Ostel Ridge. 

At this period of the action the enemy obtained a tooting between the Fii'st and Second Corps, 
aiul threatened to cut the communications of the latter. 

Sir Douglas Ilaig was very hardly pressed and had no i-eserve in hand. I placed the Cavalry 
Division at his disposal, part of which he skilfully used to prolong and secure the left flank of the Guards 
Brigade. Some heavy fighting ensued, which resulted in the enemy being driven back with heavy loss. 

About 4 o'clock the weakening of the counter-attacks by the enemy and other indications tended 
to show that his resistance was decreasing, and a general ad\ance was ordered by the Army Corps Com- 
mander. Although meeting with considerable opposition and coming under very heavy artillery and 
rifle flre, the position of the corps Ut the end of the day's operations extended from the Chemin-des- 
Dames on the right, through Chivy, to La Cour de Soiipir, with the 1st Cavalry Brigade extending to 
the C'havonne-Soissons road. 

On the right the corps was in close touch with tlie I'^rench Moroccan troops of the IStli Corps, 
which were entrenched in echelon to its right rear. During the night they entrenched this position. 

Throughout the Battle of the Aisne this advanced and commanding position was maintained, and 
I cannot speak too highly of the valuable services rendered by Sir Douglas Ilaig and the Army Corps 
under his command. Day after day and night after night the enemy's infantry has been hurled against 
him in violent counter-attack which has never on any one occasion succeeded, whilst the trenches all 
over his position have been under continuous heavy artillery flre. 

The operations of the Firet Corps on this day resulted in the capture of several hundred prisoners, 
some field pieces and macliine guns. 

The casualties were very severe, one brigade alone losing three of its four Colonels. 

The 3rd Division commenced a further advance and had nearly reached the plateau of Aizy 
when they were driven back by a powerful counter-attack supported by heavy artiUery. The Division, 
however, fell back in the best order, and finally entreiiclied itself about a mile north of N'ailly Bridge, 
effectively covering the passage. 

The 4th and 5th Divisions were unable to do more than maintain their ground. 



5. On the morning of the loth, after close esanilnation of the position, it became cleai- to me that 
the enemy was making a determined stand : and this view was confirmed by reports which reached me 
from the French Armies fighting on my right and left, which clearly showed that a strongly entrenched 
line of defence was being taken up from the north of Compiegne, eastward and south-eastward, along 
the whole valley of the Aisne up to and beyond Rheims. 

A few days pre\-iously the Fortress of Maubeuge fell, and a considerable quantity of siege artillery 
was brought down from tliat place to strengthen the enemy's position in front of us. 

Dm-ing the loth shells fell in our position which have been judged by experts to be thrown by 
eight-inch siege guns with a range of 10,000 yards. Throughout the whole course of the battle our troops 
have suffered very hea\Tly from this fire, although its effect latterly was largely mitigated by more 
efficient and thorough entrenching, the necessity for which I impressed strongly upon Army Corps 
Commanders. In order to assist them in this work all villages within the area of our occupation were 
searched for heavy entrencliing tools, a large number of wliich were collected. 

In view of the peculiar formation of the groimd on the north side of the river between Missy and 
Soissons, and its extraordinary adaptability to a force on the defensive, the .5th Division found it 
impossible to maintain its position on the southern edge of the Chivres Plateau, as the enemy in 
possession of the ^-illage of Vregny to the west was able to bring a flank fire to bear upon it. The 
Division had. therefore, to retire to a line the left of which was the \-illage of Marguerite, and thence 
ran by the north edge of ML>sy back to the river to the ea«t of that place. 

With great skill and tenacity .Sii- Charles Fergusson maintained this position thi-oughout the whole 
battle, although his trenches were necessarily on lower ground than that occupied by the enemy on 
the southern edge of the plateau, which was only -100 yards away. 

General Hamilton with the 3rd Di\-ision vigorously attacked to the north, and regained all the 
ground he had lost on the 15th. which throughout the battle has formed a most powerful and effective 
bridgehead. 

6. On the 16th the 6th Division came up into hue 

It had been my intention to direct the First Coips to attack and seize the enemy's position on 
the Chemin-des- Dames, supporting it with this new reinforcement. I hoped from the position thus 
gained to bring effective fire to bear across the front of the 3rd Di\-ision, which, by securing the advance 
of the latter, would also take the pressure off the oth Division and the Tliird Corps. 

But any further advance of the First Corps would have dangerously exposed my right flank. 
And. further. I learned from the French Commander-in-Cliief that he was strongly reinforcing the 6th 
French Army on my left, with the intention of bringing up the Allied left to attack the enemy's flank, 
and thus compel his retirement. I therefore sent the 6th Division to join the Third Corps with orders 
to keep it on the south side of the river, as it might be available in general reserve. 

On the 17th. 18th and 19th the whole of our line was hea\ily bombarded, and the Fu-st Corps was 
constantly and hea%-ily engaged. On the afternoon of the 17th the right flank of the 1st Di\-ision was 
seriously threatened. A counter-attack was made by the Xorthamptonshire Regiment in combination 
with the Queen's, and one battalion of the Di^^sional Reserve was moved up in support. The North- 
amptonshire Regiment, under cover of mist, crept up to witliin a hundred yards of the enemy's trenches 
and charged %vith the bayonet, driving them out of the trenches and up the hill. A very strong force 
of hostile infantry was then disclosed on the crest Une. This new line was enfiladed by part of the Queen's 
and the Kill's Royal Rifles, which wheeled to their left on the extreme right of our infantrv line, and 
were supported by a squadron of cavalry on their outer flank. The enemy's attack was ultimately 
driven back with heavy loss. 

On the ISth, during the night, the Gloucestershire Regiment advanced from their position near 
Chivy, filled in the enemy's trenches and captured two Maxim guns. 

On the extreme right the Queen's were heavily attacked, but the enemy was repulsed with great 
loss. About midnight the attack was renewed on the Firet Di\Tsion, supported by artillery fire, but 
was again repulsed. 

Shortly after midnight an attack was made on the left of the 2nd Division with considerable force, 
which was also thrown back. 

At about 1 p.m. on the 19th the 2nd Di\-ision drove back a heavy infantry attack strongly sup- 
ported by artillery fire. At dusk the attack was renewed and again repulsed. 

On the ISth I discussed with the General Officer Conunanding the Second Army Corps and his 
Divisional Commanders the possibUity of driving the enemy out of Coude, which lay between his 
two Divisions, and seizing the bridge which has remained throughout in his possession. 

As, however, I found that the bridge was closely commanded from all points on the south side 
and that satisfactory arrangements were made to prevent any issue from it by the enemy by day or 
night, I decided that it was not necessary to incur the losses which an attack would entail, as, in view 
of the position of the Second and Third Corps, the enemy could make no use of Conde, and would be 
automatically forced out of it by any advance which might become possible for us. 



7. On this day iiiforiiiation reai'hed nip from licncial .lolTic that he had found it necessary to make 
a new plan, and to attack and envelop the (Jerman right flank. 

It was now evident to me that tlie hattlc in whicli we had been engaged since the 12th instant 
must last some days longer vmtil the effect of this new flank movement could be felt and a wa\- opened 
to drive the enemy from his positions. 

It thus became essential to establish some system of regular relief in the trenches, and 1 have 
used the infantry of the 6th Division for this purpose with good results. The relieved brigades were 
brought back alternately south of the river, and, with the artillery of the 6th Division, formed a general 
reserve on wliich I could rely in case of necessit>'. 

The Cavalry ha-s rendered most elTicient and ready help in the ti-enches. and have done all they 
possibly could to lighten the arduous and trying ta.sk whicli has of necessity fallen to the lot of tlie 
Infantry. 

On the evening of the I'Jth and throughout the 20th the enemy again commenced to show con- 
siderable activity. On the former night a severe counter-attack on the 3rd Division was repulsed with 
considerable loss, and from earlj- on Sunday morning various hostile attempts were made on thi- 1 renches 
of the 1st Di^•^sion. During the day the enemy suffered another severe repulse in front of the 2nd 
Di\"ision. losing heavily in the attempt. In the coui'se of tlie afternoon the enemy made desperate 
attempts against the trenches all along the front of the First Corps, but with similar results. 

After dark the enemy again attacked the 2nd DiNision, only to be again driven back. 

Our losses on these two days were considerable, but the number, as obtained, of the enemy's 
killed and wounded vastly exceeded them. 

As the troops of the First Army Corps were mudi exhausted by this continual fighting, 1 reinforced 
Sir Douglas Haig \\ ith a brigade from the reserve, and called upon the 1st Cavalry Division to assist them. 

On the night of the 21st another violent counter-attack was repulsed by the 3rd Division, the 
enemy losing heavily. 

On the 23rd the four sis-inch howitzer batteries, which I had asked to be sent from home, arrived. 
Two batteries were handed over to the Second Corps and two to the Fii'st Corps. They were brought 
into action on the 24th with very good results. 

Our experiences in this campaign seem to point to the employment of more heavy guns of a larger 
calibre in great battles wliich last for several days, during which time powerful entrenching work on 
both sides can be carried out. 

These batteries were used «itb considerable effect on the 24th and the following days. 

S. On the 23rd the action of General de Castelnau's .4rmy on the Allied left developed con- 
siderably, and apparently withdrew coiLsiderable forces of the enemy away fi-om the centre and east. 
I am not aware whether it was due to this cause or not. but until the 2t)th it appeared as though the 
enemy's opposition in our front was weakening. On that day. however, a very marked renewal of 
activity conunenced. A constant and vigorous artillery bombardment was maintained all day, and 
the Germans in front of the 1st Division were observed to be " sapping " up to our lines and trying to 
establLsh new trenches. Renewed counter-attacks were delivered and beaten off diu'ing the course 
of the day, and in the afternoon a well-timed attack by the 1st Division stopped the enemy's entrench- 
ing work. 

During the night of 27th-28th the enemy again made the most determined attempts to capture 
the trenches of the 1st Di\'ision. but without the slightest success. 

Similar attacks were reported during these three days all along the line of the Allied front, and it 
is certain that the enemy then made one last gi-eat effort to establish ascendancy. He was, however, 
unsuccessful everywhere, and is reported to have suffered heavy losses. The same futile attempts 
were made all along our front up to the evening of the 28th. when they died away, and have not since 
been renewed. 

On former occasions I have brought to yom- Lordship's notice the valuable services performed 
diu'ing this campaign by the Royal Artillery. 

Throughout the Battle of the Aisne they have displayed the same skiU. endurance and tenacity, 
and I deeply appreciate the work they have done. 

Sir David Hendei'son and the Royal Flying Corps under his command have again proved their 
incalculable value. Great strides have been made in the development of the use of aircraft in the 
tactical sphere by establishing effective communication between aircraft and units in action. 

It is difficult to describe adequately and accurately the great strain to which officers and men were 
subjected ahiiost every hour of the day and night throughout this battle. 

I have described above the severe character of the artillery fire wliich was directed from morning 
tUl night, not only upon the trenches, but over the whole surface of the ground occupied by our Forces. 
It was not until a few days before the position was evacuated that the heavy gurus were removed 
and the fire slackened. Attack and counter-attack occurred at all hours of the night and day throughout 
the whole position, demanding extreme vigilance and permitting only a minimum of rest. 



The fact that between the 12tli September to the date of this despatch the total numbers of killed, 
wounded and missing reached the figures amounting to 561 officers, 12,980 men, proves the severity 
of the struggle. 

The tax on the endurance of the troops was further increased by the heavy rain and cold which 
prevailed for some ten or twelve days of this trying time. 

The Battle of the Aisne has once more demonstrated the splendid spirit, gallantry and devotion 
which animates the officei-s and men of His Majesty's Forces. 

With reference to the last paragraph of my despatch of September 7th, I append the names of 
officers, non-commissioned officers and men brought forward for special mention by Army Corps 
commanders and heads of departments for services rendered from the commencement of the campaign 
up to the present date. 

I entirely agree with these recommendations and beg to submit them for yourLordship's consideration. 

I further xsish to bring forward the names of the following officers who have rendered valuable 
service : General Sir Horace Smith- Dorrien and Lieutenant-General Sir Douglas Haig (conimanding 
First and Second Corps respectively) I have already mentioned in the present and former despatches 
for particularly marked and distinguished ser\'ice in critical situations. 

Since the conunencement of the campaign they liave carried out all my orders and instructions 
with the utmost ability. 

Lieutenant-General ^^^ P. Pulteney took over the command of the Third Corps just before the 
commencement of the Battle of the Marne. Throughout the subsequent operations he showed himself 
to be a most capable commander in the field and ha-s rendered very valuable services. 

JIajor- General E. H. H. AUenby and Major-General II. de la P. Gough have proved themselves to 
be Cavalry leaders of a high order, and I am deeply indebted to them. The undoubted moral superiority 
which our Cavalry has obtained over that of the enemy has been due to the skill witli whicli they have 
turned to the best account the qualities inherent in the splendid troops they command. 

In my despatch of 7th September I mentioned the name of Brigadier-General Sir David Henderson 
and his valuable work in command of the Royal Fljong Corps ; and I have once more to express my 
deep appreciation of the help he has since rendered me. 

Lieutenant-Cieneral Sir Archibald Murray has continued to render me invaluable help as Chief of 
the Staff : and in his arduous and responsible duties he has been ably assisted by Major-General Henry 
Wilson, Sub-Chief. 

Lieutenant-General Sir XevU Macreadj' and Lieutenant-General Sir William Robertson have 
continued to perform excellent service as Adjutant-General and Quartermaster-General respectively. 

The Director of Army Signals, Lieutenant-Colonel J. S. Fowler, has materially assisted the opera- 
tions by the skOl and energy which he lias displayed in the working of the important department 
over which he presides. 

My Military Secretary, Brigadier-General the Hon. ^V. T^ambton, has performed liis arduous and 
difficult duties with nmch zeal and great efficiency. 

1 am anxious also to bring to your Lordship's notice the following names of officers of my Personal 
Staff, who throughout these arduous operations have shown untiring zeal and energ>' in tl>e performance 
of their duties : — 

Aides-de-Camp. 

I/ieutenant-Colonel Stanley Barry. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Lord Brooke. 

Major Fitzgerald ^\att. 

Extra Aide-de-Camp. 

Captain the Hon. F. R. Guest. 

Private Secretary. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brindsley Fitzgerald. 

Major His Royal Highness Prince Arthur of Connaught, K.G., joined my Staff as Aide-de-Camp 
on the 11th September. 

His Royal Highnes-i-'s intimate knowledge of languages enabled me to employ him with great 
advantage on confidential niissions of some importance, and his ser\-ices have proved of considerable value. 

I cannot close this despatch without informing your Lordship of the valuable services rendered 
by the Cluof of the French ^Military Mission at my Headquarters, Colonel X'ictor Huguet, of the French 
Artillery. He has displayed tact and judgment of a high ordei- in many difficult situations, and has 
rendered conspicuous service to the AUied cause. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Lordship's most obedient Servant, 
(Signed) J. T). P. FRENCH. Field- Mai-shal, 
Commanding-in-Chief, 
The British Armv in the Field. 



]Var Office, Surember IQih, 1914. 
The following despatch has been received by the Secretary' of State for War from the Field-Marshal 
Comnianding-in-C'hief, British Forces in tlio Field : — 

General Headquarters, 

20th November, !9U. 

My Lord, 

1. 1 have the honour to submit a further despatch recounting the operations of the Field Force 
under my eonunand througliout the Battle of Ypres-Amientieres. 

Early in October a study of the iieneral situation strongly impressed me with tin- necessity of 
bringing tli(> greatc>st possible force to bear in support of the northern flank of the Allies in order to 
effectively oulllank tlie enemy and compel him to evacuate his positions. 

At the same time the position on tlie .\isne. .-is dcscril)ed in the concluding paragraphs of my last 
despatch, appealed to uie to warrant a witlidrawal of tlio British Forces from the positions they then 
held. 

The enemy had been weakened by continual aVxirtive and futile attacks, whilst tlie fortification 
of the position liad Ijeen much improved. 

I represented these \-ie\\s to (ieneial .Toftre. wlio i\illy agreed. 

Arrangements for withdrawal and relief liaving iieen made l)y the French General .Staff, tlie oper- 
ation conunenced on the 3rd October : and the 2nd ("avah-y Division, under General Oougli. marelied 
for Compiegne en route for the new theatre. 

The Army Corps followed in .succession at intervals of a few da\s, and the move was completed on 
the 19th Octobei-. when the First Corjis. under Sir Douglas Haig, completed iU detraiument at St. Omer. 

That tliis dehcate operation was carried out so successfully is in great mea.sure due to the excellent 
feeUng whicli exists between the French and British Armies : and I am deeply indebted to the Com- 
mander-in-Cliief and the Freucli (ieneral Staff for their cordial and most effective co-operation. 

As General Foch was appointed by the Conunander-in-Chiet to supervise the operations of all 
the French troops north of Xoyon. I \isited his headquarters at Doullens on Sth October and arranged 
joint plans of operations as follows : — 

Tlie Second Corps to arrive on the line Aire-Bethune on the 11th October, to connect with 

the right of the French 10th Army and. pivoting on its left, to attack in flank the enemy who were 

opposing the Iflth French Corps in front. 

The Cavalry to move on the noi-thern flank of the Second Corps and support its attack until 

the Third Corps, which was to detrain at St. Onier on the 12th, should come up. They were then 

to clear the front and act on the northein flank of the Third Corps in a similar Tiiaimer. pending 

the arrival of the First Corps from the Aisne. 

The 3rd Cavalry Division and 7th Division, under Sir Henry Rawlinson, which were then 

operating in support of the Belgian Amiy and assisting its withdrawal from Antwerp, to be ordered 

to co-operate as soon as circumstances would allow. 

In the event of these movements so far overcoming the resistance of the enemy as to enable 

a forward movement to be made, all the Allied Forces to march in an easterly direction. The road 

running from Bethune to LiUe was to be the di\-iding line between the British and French Forces, 

the right of the British Aniiy being directed on Lille. 

2. The gi-eat battle, which is mainly the subject of ttiLs despatch, may be said to have commenced 
on October 11th, on which date the 2nd Cavah'y Division, under General Gough, first came into contact 
with the enemy's cavalry who ware holding some woods to the north of the Bethune-Aire Canal. 
These were cleared of the enemy by our cavalry, which then joined hands with the Divisional Cavalry 
of the tith Division in the neighbourhood of Hazebrouck. On the same day the right of the 2nd Cavalry 
Di\Tsion connected with the left of the .Second Corps, which was moving in a north-easterly direction 
after crossing the above-mentioned canal. 

By the 11th October .Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien had reached the line of the canal between Aire 
and Bethune. I directed him to continue his march on the 12th, bringing up liis left in the direction 
of Jlerville. Then he was to move east to the line Laventie-Lorgies, which would bring him on the 
immediate left of the French Army and threaten the German flank. 

On the 12th this movement was commenced. The .5th Division connected up with the left of 
the French .\rmy north of Amieqiiin. They moved to the attack of the Germans who were engaged 
at this point with the F"rench : but the enemy once more extended his right in some strength to meet 
the threat against liis flank. The 3rd Division, having ci-ossed the canal, deployed on the left of the 
5th ; and the whole Second Corps again advanced to the attack, but were unable to make much 
headway owing to the ditticidt character of the gi-ound upon wiiich they were operating, which was 
similar to that usually found in manufacturing districts, and was covered with mining works, factories, 
buildings, etc. The ground throughout this country Ls reiiiarkalily flat, rendering effective artillerj- 
support, very difficult. 



Before nightfall, however, they had made some advance and had successfully driven back hostile 
counter-attacks «-ith great loss to the enemy and destruction of some of his machine guns. 

On and after the 13th October the object of the General Ofticer Commanding the Second Corps 
was to « heel to his rigljt. pivoting on Givenchy to get astride the La Bassee-Lille Road in the neigh- 
bourliood of Foumes, so as to threaten the right flank and rear of the enemy's position on the high 
ground south of La Bassee. 

This position of La Bassee has throughout the battle defied all attempts at captxu-e, either by the 
Frencli or the British. 

On this day Sir Horace Smith- Dorrien could make but little progress. He particularly nientions 
the fine fighting of the Dorsets. whose ComTiiandins Officer, Major Roper, was killed. They suffered 
no less than 400 casualties. 130 of them being killed, but maintained all day their liold on Pont Fixe. 
He also refers to the gallantly of the Artillery. 

The fighting of the SecOTid Corps continued throughout the 14th in the same direction. On this 
day the Army suffered a great loss, in that the Commander of the 3rd Division, General Hubert 
Hamilton, was killed. 

On the 1.5th the 3rd Division fought splendidly, crossing the dykes, with which this country is 
intereected. mth planks, and driving the enemy from one entrenclied position to another in loop- 
holed villages, till at night they pushed the Germans ofl' the Estaires-La Ba-ssee road, and establishing 
themselves in the line Pont de Ham-Croix Barbee. • 

On the 16th the move was continued until the left flank of the Corps was in front of the village 
of Aubers, which was strongly held. This village was captured on the 17tli by the 9th Infantry 
Brigade : and at dark on the same day the 1 jncolns and Royal Fusiliers carried the village of Herlies 
at the point of the bayonet after a fine attack, the Brigade being liandled with great dash by Brigadier- 
General Shaw. 

At this time, to the best of oui' information, tlie .Second Corps were believed to be opposed by the 
2nd, 4th, 7th and 9th German Cavalry Divisions, supported by several battalions of Jagers and a 
part of the 14th German Corps. 

On the ISth powerful counter-attacks were made by the enemy all along the front of the Second 
Corps, and were most gallantly repulsed : but only slight progress could be made. 

From the 19th to the 31st October the Second Corps carried on a most gallant fight in defence 
of their position against very superior numbers, the enemy having been reinforced during that time 
by at least one Division of the 7th Corps, a brigade of the 3rd Corps and the whole of the 14th Corps, 
which had moved north from in front of the French 21st Corps. 

On the 19th the Royal Irish Regiment, under Major Daniell, stormed and carried the ^•illage of 
Le I'illy, which they held and entrenched. On the 20th. however, they were cut off and surrounded, 
suffering heavy losses. 

On the morning of the 22nd the enemy made a very determined attack on the 5th Division, who 
were driven out of the village of \'iolaines, but they were sharply counter-attacked by the Worcesters 
and Manchesters, and prevented from coming on. 

The left of the Second Corps being now somewhat exposed. Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien withdrew 
the line during the night to a position he had previously prepared, nuining generally from the eastern 
side of (iivenchy. east of Xeuve Chapelle to Fauquissart. 

On the 24th October the Lahore Di\'ision of the Indian Army Corps, under Major-fieneral Watkis, 
having arrived, I sent them to the neighbourhood of Lacon to support the Second Corps. 

\'ery early on this morning the enemy commenced a heavy attack, but, owing to the skilful 
manner in which the artUlery was handled and the targets presented by the enemy's infantry as it 
approached, they were unable to come to close iiuart^ers. Towards the evening a hea\'^- attack de- 
veloped against the 7th Brigade, which was repulsed, with very heavy loss to the enemy, by the Wdt- 
shires and the Royal West Rents. Later, a determined attack on the 18th Infantry Brigade drove 
the Gordon Highlanders out of their trenches, which were retaken by tlie Middlesex Regiment, gallantly 
led by Lieutenant-Colonel Hull. 

The 8th Infantry Brigade (which had come into line on the left of the .Second Corps) was aLso 
heavily attacked, but the enemy was driven off. 

In both these cases the CJemians lost very heavily, and left large numbers of dead and prisoners 
behind them. 

The Second Corps was now becoming exhausted, owing to the constant reinforcements of the 
enemy, the length of line which it had to defend and the enormous los.ses which it had suffered. 

3. By the evening of the 11th October the Third Corps had practically completed its detrainment 
at .St. Omer. and was moved east to Hazebrouck. where the Corps remained throughout the 12th. 

On the morning of the 13th the advanced guard of the Corps, consisting of the I9th Infantry 
Brigade and a Brigade of Field Artillery, occupied the position of the line Strazeele Station-Caestre- 
St. Sylvestre. 



On tliLs day I directed Oeueral Pulteney to move towards the line ^Xxnientiercs-Wytschaete, 
warning him, however, that should the Second Corps require his aid he must be prepared to move 
south-east to support it. 

A French Cavalry Corps under General Conneau was operating between the Second aiul Tliiid 
Corps. 

The Fourth (ierinan Cavalry Corps, supported by some Jager Battalions, was known to be 
occupying the position in the neighbourhood of Meteren : and they were believed to be further sup- 
ported by the advanced guard of another (iennan Army Corps. 

In pui'suance of his ordei's. fieneral Pulteney proceeded to attack the enemy in liis front. 

The rain and fog which prevailed prevented full advantage being derived from our much superior 
artillery. The count i-y was very much enclosed and rendered ditlicult by heavy rain. 

The enemy were, however, routed, and the position taken at dark, several prisoners being 
captured. 

During the night the Third Corps made good the attacked position and entrenched it. 

As Bailleul was known to be occupied by the enemy, arrangements wore made diu'ing the night 
to attack it : but reconnaissances sent out on the morning of the 11th showed that they had with- 
drawni. and the town was taken by our troops at 10 a.m. on that day, many wounded Germans being 
found and taken in it. 

The Corps then occupied the line St. Jans Cappel-Bailleul. 

On the morning of the 15th the Third Corps were ordered to make good the line of the Lys from 
Annentieres to .Sailly, which, in the face of considerable opposition and very foggy weather, they 
succeeded in doing, the (ith l)i\-ision at Sailly-Bac .St. .Main- and the Ith Division at Xieppe. 

The enemy in its front having retired, tlie Third Corp?; on the night of the 17th occupied the line 
Bois Grenier-Le Gheir. 

On the ISth the enemy were holding a line from Radinghem on the south, through I'erenchies 
and Frelinghien on the north, whence the German troops which were opposing the Cavalry Corps 
occupied the east bank of the river as far as Wer^•ick. 

On this day I directed the Third Corps to move doH^l the valley of the Lys and endeavour to 
assist the Cavalry Corps in making good its position on the right bank. To do this it was necessary 
first to drive the enemy eastward towards LiUe. A vigorous offensive in the direction of Lille was 
assumed, but the enemy was found to have been considerably reinforced, and but little progress 
was made. 

The situation of the Third Corps on the night of the 18th was as follows : — 

The t)th Division was holding the line Radingham-La Vallee-Ennetieres-Capinghem-Preniesques- 
RaOway Line 300 yards east of Halte. The 4th Di%-ision were holding the line from L'Epinette to 
the river at a point 400 yards south of Frelinghein. and thence to a point half a mile south-east of 
Le Gheer. The Corps Reserve was at Armentieres .Station, with right and left flanks of Corps in close 
touch with French Cavalry and the Cavalry Corps. 

Since the advance from Bailleul the enemy's forces in front of the Cavalry and Third Corps had 
been strongly reinforced, and on the night of the 17th they were opposed by three or tour di\'isions 
of the enemy's cavalry, the 19th Saxon Corps and at least one division of the 7th Corps. Reinforce- 
ments for the enemy were known to be coming up from the direction of Lille. 

4. Following the movements completed on the 11th October, the 2nd Cavalry Division pushed 
the enemy back through Fletre and Le Coq de PaUle, and took Mont des Cats, just before dark, after 
stiff fighting. 

On the 14th the 1st Cavalry Division joined up. and the whole Cavalry Corps under General 
Allenby, moving north, secured the high ground above Berthen. overcoming considerable opposition. 

With a view to a further advance east, I ordered General Allenby, on the loth, to reconnoitre 
the line of the River Lys, and endeavovir to secure the passages on the opposite bank, pending the 
arrival of the Third and Fourth Corps. 

During the 15th and 16th this reconnaissance was most skilfully and energetically carried out 
in the face of great opposition, especially along the lower line of the river. 

These operations were continued throughout the 17th, 18th and 19th : but. although valuable 
information was gained, and strong forces of the enemy held in check, the Cavalry Corps was unable 
to secure passages or to establish a permanent footing on the eastern bank of the river. 

5. At this point in the history of the operations under report it is necessary that I should return 
to the co-operation of the forces operating in the neighbourhood of Ghent and Antwerp under 
Lieutenant- General Sir Henry Rawlin.son. as the action of his force about this period exercised, in 
my opinion, a great influence on tlie course of the subsequent operations. 

This force — consisting of the 3rd Cavalry Di\-ision. under Major-tieneral the Hon. Julian Byng, 
and the 7th Division, under Major-Cieneral Capper — was placed imder my ordei-s by telegraphic 
instructions from your Lordship. 



On receipt of these instructions I directed Sir Henry Rawlinson to continue his operations in 
covering and protecting the withdrawal of the Belgian Amiy, and subsequently to form the left column 
in tlie eastward advance of the British Forces. These withdrawal operations were concluded about the 
16th October, on which date the 7th Division was posted to the east of Ypres on a line extending from 
Zandvoorde through Gheluvelt to Zonnebeke. The 3rd t'avalry Division was on its left towards 
Langeniarck and PoelcappeUe. 

In this position Sir Ilenry Rawlinson was supported by the S7th French Territorial Di\ision in 
Ypres and \'laniertinghe, and by the S9th French Territorial Division at Poperinghe. 

On the niglit of the llith I informed Sir Henry Rawlinson of the operations which were in progress 
by tlie Cavalry Corps and the I'liird Corps, and ordered liim to confomi to tliose movements in an 
easterlj- direction, keeping an eye always to any threat whicli might be made against liim from the 
north-east. 

A very difficult task was allotted to Sir Henry Rawlinson and his command. Owing to the im- 
portance of keeping possession of all the ground towards the north which we already held, it nas 
necessary for him to operate on a very wide front, and, untH the arrival of the First Corps in the 
northern theatre — which I expected about the 20th — I had no troops available with which to support 
or reinforce him. 

Although on tliis extended front he had eventually to encounter very superior forces, his troops, 
both Cavalry and Infantry, fought with the utmost gallantry, and rendered very signal ser%-ice. 

On the 17th four French Cavalry Di\-isions deployed on the left of the 3rd Cavalry Division, and 
drove back advanced parties of the enemy beyond the Foret d'Houthulst. 

As described above, instructions for a vigorous attempt to establish the British Forces east of the 
Lys were given on the night of the 17th to the Second. Third and Cavalry Corps. 

I considered, however, that the possession of Menin constituted a very miportant point of passage, 
and would much facilitate the advance of the rest of the Amiy. So I directed the Oeneral Olticer 
Commanding the Fourth Corps to advance the 7th DivTsion upon Menin, and endeavour to seize that 
crossing on the morning of the 18th. 

The left of the 7th Division was to be supported by the 3rd Cavalry Brigade, and further north 
by the French Cavalry in the neighbourhood of Roulers. 

.Sir Henry Rawlinson represented to me that large hostile forces were advancing upon him from 
the east and north-east, and that his left flank was severely threatened. 

I was aware of the threats from that direction, but hoped that at this particidar time there was 
no greater force coming from the north-east than could be held off by the combined efforts of the French 
and British Cavalry, and the Territorial troops supporting them until the passage at ilenin could be 
seized and the Fii-st Corps brought up in support. 

Sir Henry Rawlinsoc probably exercised a wise judgiiicnt in not committing his troops to tliis 
attack in their somewhat weakened condition : but the result was that the enemy '.s continued posses- 
sion of the passage at Menin ceitainly facilitated his rapid reinforcement of his troops and thus 
rendered any further advance impracticable. 

On the morning of the 20th October the 7th Di\Tsion and 3rd Cavalry Division had retired to their 
old position, extending from Zandvoorde through Kruiseik and Gheluvelt to Zonnebeke. 

6. On the 19th October the First Corps, coming from the Aisne. had completed its detrainment 
and was concentrated between St. Omer and Hazebrouck. 

A question of vital importance now arose for decision. 

I knew that the enemy were by this time in greatly superior strength on the Lys, and that the 
Second, Third, Cavalry and Fourth Corps were holding a much wider front than their numbers and 
strength warranted. 

Taking these facts alone into consideration it would have appeared wise to throw the First Corps 
in to strengthen the line ; but this would have left the country north and east of Ypres and the Ypres 
Canal open to a Avide turning movement by the 3rd Reserve Corps and at least one Landwehr Division 
which I knew to be operating in that region. I was also aware that the enemy was bringing large 
reinforcements up from the east which could only be opposed for Several days by two or three tVench 
Cavalry Di^^sions, some French Territorial tixDops. and the Belgian Army. 

After the hard fighting it had undergone the Belgian Army was in no -condition to withstand, 
unsupported, such an attack : and unless some substantial resistance could be offered to this threatened 
turning movement the Allied llank must be turned and the Channel Ports laid bare to the enemy. 

I judged that a successful movement of this kind would be fraught with such disastrous conse- 
quences that the risk of operating on so extended a front must be undertaken ; and I directed Sir 
Douglas Haig to move with the First Corps to the north of Ypres, 

From the best information at my disposal I judged at this time that tlie considerable reinforce- 
ments which the enemy had undoubtedly brought up during the lOth, 17th and 18th had been directed 
principally on the line of the Lys and against the Second Corps at La Bassee : and that Sir Douglas 



Ilaig would probably not be opposed north of \'pre.s by niucli more than the 3rd Reserve Corps, 
which I knew to have suffered considerably in its previous operations, and perhaps one or two l^andwehr 
Divisions. 

At a personal interview with Sir Douglas llaig on the evening of the 19th October I communicated 
the above information to him, and instructed him to advance with the First Corps through Ypres to 
Thourout. The oliject he was to have in vie«' wiis to be the capture of Bruges and subseiiuently, if 
possible, to drive the enemy towards (ihent. In case of an unforeseen situation arising, or the enemy 
provingtobestrongerthananticipated.he was to decide after passing Ypres, according to the situation 
whether to attack the enemy lying to the north or the hostile forces advancing from the east : I had 
arranged for the Fi-ench Cavalry to operate on the left of the First Corps and the 3rd Cavalry Division, 
imder (icncral Hyng, on its right. 

The Belgian Army were rendering what assistance they could by entrenching themselves on the 
Ypres Canal and the Yser River ; and the troops, altliough in the last stage of exliaustion, gallantly 
maintained their positions, buoyed up with the hope of sulistaiitial British and French supjiort. 

I fuUy realised the diflicult task which lay before us, and the onerous role which the British Army 
was called upon to fulfil. 

That success has been attained, and all the enemy's desperate attempts to break through our 
line frustrated, is duo entirely to the marvellous fighting power and the indomitable coinage and 
tenacity of ollicei'S, non-commissioned oflieei's and men. 

No more arduous task has ever been assigned to British soldiers ; and in all their siilciulid history 
there is no instance of their having answered so magnificently to the desperate calls w hich of necessity 
were made upon them. 

Having given these orders to Sir Douglas Haig, I enjoined a defensive role upon the Second antl 
Tliird and Cavalry Corps, in view of the superiority of force which had accumulated in their front. As 
regards the Fourth Corps, I directed Sir Henry Rawlinson to endeavour to conform generally to the 
movements of the First Corps. 

On the 20th October they reached the hue from Flverdinghe to the cross-roads one and a half 
miles north-west of Zonnebeke. 

On the 21st the Corps was ordered to attack and take the line Poelcappelle-Passchendaele. 
Sir HeiU'y Kawliuson's Command was moving on the right of the First Corps, and French troojis, 
consisting of Cavalry and Territorials, nioved on their left under the orders of fieneral Bidon. 

The advance was somewhat delayed o« ing to the roads being blocked : but the attack progressed 
favourably in face of severe opposition, often necessitating the use of the bayonet. 

Hearing of heavy attacks being uaade upon the 7th Division and the 2nd Cavaky Division on 
his right, Sir Douglas Haig ordered his reserve to be halted on the north-eastern outskirts of Ypres. 
Although threatened by a hostile movement from the Foret d'Houthulst, our advance was suc- 
cessful until about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, when the French Cavalry Corps received orders to retire 
west of the canal. 

Owing to this and the demands uiade on him b>- the Fourth Corps, Sir Douglas Haig was unable 
to advance beyond the line Zonnebeke-St. Julien-Langemarck-Bixschoote. 

As there was reported to be congestion with French troops at Ypres, I went there on the evening 
of the 21st and met Sir Douglas Haig and Sir Henry Rawlinson. With them I interviewed General 
De Mitry, Conunanding the Fi'ench Cavalry, and (ieneral Bidon, Commanding the French Territorial 
Divisions. 

They promised me that the town would at once be cleared of the troops, and that the French 
Territorials would iumiediately move out and cover the left of the flank of the First Corps. 

I discussed the situation with the General Officers Commanding the First and Fourth Army 
Corps, and told them that, in view of the luiexpected reinforcements coming up of the enemy, it would 
probably be impo.ssible to carry out the original role assigned to them. But I informed them that 
I had that day interviewed the Fi'ench Conunander-in-Chief, General Joffre, who told me that he was 
bringing up the 9th French Army Corps to Ypres, that more French troops would follow later, and that 
he intended — in conjunction vidth the Belgian troops — to drive the Germans east. General Joffre 
said that he would be unable to commence this movement before the 24th ; and I directed the General 
Officer's Conunanding the First and Fourth Corps to strengthen their positions as much as possible 
and be prepared to hold their ground for two or three days, until the Fi'ench offensive movement on 
the north could develop. 

It now became clear to me that the utmost we could do to ward off any attempts of the enemy 
to turn our flank to the north or to break in from the eastward was to maintain our present very 
extended front, and to hold fast our positions until French reinforcements could arrive from the 
south. 

During the 22nd the necessity of sending support to the Fourth Corps on his right somewhat 
hampered the General Officer Commanding the First Corps ; but a series of attacks all along his front 



had been driven back during the day with heavy loss to the enemy. Late in the evening the enemy 
succeeded in penetrating a portion of the Une held by the Cameron Highlanders north of Pilkem. 

At 6 a.m. on the morning of the 23rd a counter-attack to recover the lost trenches was made by 
the Queen's Regiment, the Xorthamptons and the King's Royal Rifles, under Major-General Bulfin. 
The attack was very strongly opposed and the bayonet had to be used. After severe fighting during 
most of the day the attack was brilliantly successful, and over six hundred prisoners were taken. 

On the same day an attack was made on the 3rd Infantry Brigade. The enemy advanced with 
great determination, but with little skiU, and consequently the loss inflicted on him was exceedingly 
heavy ; some fifteen hundred dead were seen in the neighbourhood of Langemarck. Correspondence 
found subsequently on a captixred German Ofiicer stated that the effectives of this attacking Corps 
were reduced to 2.5 per cent, in the course of the day's fighting. 

In the evening of this day a division of the French Xinth Army Corps came up into line and 
took over the portion of the line held by the 2nd Division, which, on the 24:th, took up the ground 
occupied by the 7th Division from Poelzelhoek to the Becelaere-Passchendaele Road. 

On the 2-tth and 2.5th October repeated attacks by the enemy were brilUantly repulsed. 

On the night of the 2-lth-25th the First Division was reUeved by French Territorial troops and 
concentrated about Zillebeke. 

During the 2oth the 2nd Division, with the 7th on its right and the French 9th Cori)s on its left, 
made good progress towards the north-east, capturing some guns and prisoners. 

On the 27th October I went to the headquarters of the First Corps at Hooge to personally 
investigate the condition of the 7th Division. 

Owing to constant marching and fighting, ever since its hasty disembarkation, in aid of the 
Antwerp Garrison, this division had suffered great losses, and was becoming very weak. I therefore 
decided temporarily to break up the Fourth Corps and place the 7th Division with the First Corps 
under the command of Sir Douglas Haig. 

The 3rd Cavalry Division was similarly detailed for service with the First Corps. 

I directed the Fourth Corps Commander to proceed, with his Staff, to England, to watch and 
supervise the mobilisation of his Sth Division which was then proceeding. 

On receipt of orders, in accordance with the above arrangement. Sir Douglas Haig redistributed 
the line held by the First Corps as follows : — 

(a) 7th Division from the Chateau east of Zandvoorde to the Menin Road. 

(6) 1st Division from the Menin Road to a point immediately west of Reytel \"illage. 

(c) 2nd Division to near Moorslede-Zonnebeke Road. 

On the early morning of the 29th October a heavy attack developed against the centre of the 
line held by the First Corps, the principal point of attack being the cross-roads one mile east of Ghelu- 
velt. After severe fighting — nearly the whole of the Corps being employed in coimter-attack — the 
enemy began to give way at about 2 p.m. : and by dark the Kruiseik Hill had been recaptured and 
the 1st Brigade had re-established most of the line north of the Menin Road. 

Shortly after daylight on the 30th another attack began to develop in the direction of Zandvoorde, 
supported by heavy artillery fire. In face of this attack the 3rd Cavalry Division had to withdraw to 
the Klein Zillebeke Ridge. This withdrawal involved the right of the 7th Division. 

Sir Douglas Haig describes the position at this period as serious, the Germans being in possession 
of Zandvoorde Ridge. 

Subsequent investigation showed that the enemy had been reinforced at this point by the whole 
German Active Fifteenth Corps. 

The General Ofiicer Commanding First Corps ordered the line Gheluvelt to the comer of the canal 
to be held at all costs. When this Une was taken up the 2nd Brigade was ordered to concentrate 
in rear of the 1st Division and the -Ith Brigade line. One battalion was placed in reserve in the woods 
one mile south of Hooge. 

F\irther precautions were taken at night to protect this flank, and the Xinth French Corps sent 
three battalions and one Cavalry Brigade to assist. 

The First Corps' Conununications through Ypres were threatened by the advance of the Germans 
towards the canal : so orders were issued for every effort to be made to secure the line then held, and, 
when this had been thoroughly done, to resume the oS'ensive. 

An order taken from a prisoner who had been captured on this day purported to emanate from 
the German General, Von Beimling, and said that the Fifteenth German Corps, together with the 2nd 
Bavarian and Thirteenth Corps, were entrusted with the task of breaking through the line to Ypres ; 
and that the Emperor himself considered the success of this attack to be one of vital importance to 
the successful issue of the war. 

Perhaps the most important and decisive attack (except that of the Prussian Guard on 15th 
November) made against the First Corps dimng the whole of its arduous experiences in the neighbour^ 
hood of Ypres took place on the 31st October. 



General .Moussy, who coiuiiiamled the detachment wliich liad been sent by the French Ninth 
Corps on the previous day to assist Sir Douglas Haig on the right of the First Corps, moved to the 
attack early in the morning, but was brought to a complete standstill, and could make no further progress. 

After several attacks and counter-attacks during the coui-se of the morning along the Menin- 
Ypres road, south-east of (iheluvelt, an attack against that place developed in groat force, and the line 
of the First Division was broken. On the south the 7th Division and (ieneral Bulfin's detachment 
were being hea^-ily shelled. The retirement of the 1st Division exposed the left of the 7th Division, 
and owing to this the Royal Scots FHisiliers, who remained in the trenches, were cut off and surrounded. 
A strong uifantry attack was developed against the right of the 7th Division at 1.30 p.m. 

Shortly after this the Headquartei-s of the 1st and 2nd Divisions were shelled. The General Officer 
Conmianding 1st Division was wounded, three .Staff OtTicei-s of the 1st Di\'ision and three of the 2nd 
Division were killed. The General Oflicer Commanding the 2nd Division also received a severe shaking, 
and was unconscious for a short tune. General Landon assumed conmiand of the 1st Division. 

On receiving a report about 2.30 p.m. from General Lomax that the 1st Di\'ision had moved back 
and that the enemy was coming on in strength, the General Officer Commanding the First Corps issued 
orders that the line, Frezenberg-Westhoek-bend of the main road-Klein ZUlebeke-bend of canal, 
was to be held at all costs. 

The 1st Division rallied on the line of the woods east of the bend of the road, the German advance 
by the road being checked by enfilade fire from the north. 

The attack against the right of the 7th Division forced the 22nd Brigade to retire, thus exposing 
the left of the 2nd Brigade. The General Officer Commanding the 7th Division used his reserve, ah-eady 
posted on his flank, to restore the line : but, in the meantime, the 2nd Brigade, finding their left flank 
exposed, had been forced to withdraw. The right of the 7th Division thus advanced as the left of the 
2nd Brigade went back, with the result that the right of the 7th Division was exposed, but managed 
to hold on to its old trenches till nightfall. 

Meantime, on the Menin road, a counter-attack delivered by the left of the 1st Division and the 
right of the 2nd Division against the right flank of the German line was completely successful, and by 
2.30 p.m. Gheluvelt had been retaken with the bayonet, the 2nd Worcestershire Regiment being to 
the fore in this, adnurably supported by the i2nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. The left of the 7th 
Division, profiting by their capture of Gheluvelt, advanced almost to its original line : and connection 
between the 1st and 7th Divisions was re-established. The recapture of Gheluvelt released the 6th 
Cavalry Brigade, till then held in support of the 1st Division. Two regiments of tliis brigade were 
sent at once to clear the woods to the south-east, and close the gap in the line between the 7th Division 
and 2nd Brigade. They advanced with much dash, partly mounted and partly dismounted : and, 
surprising the enemy in the woods, succeeded in killing large numbers and materially helped to restore 
the line. About 5 p.m. the French Cavalry Brigade also came up to the cross-roads just east of Hooge, 
and at once sent forward a dismounted detachment to support our 7th Cavalry Brigade. 

Throughout the day the extreme right and left of the First Corps' line held fast, the left being only 
slightly engaged,- while the right was heavily shelled and subjected to slight infantry attacks. In the 
evening the enemy were steadily driven back from the woods on the front of the 7th Di\Tsion and 2nd 
Brigade : and by 10 p.m. the line as lield in the morning had practically been reoccupied. 

During the night touch was restored between the right of the 7th Division and left of the 2nd 
Brigade, and the Cavalry were withdrawn into reserve, the ser%'ices of the French Cavalry being dis- 
pensed with. 

As a result of the day's fighting eight hundred and seventy wounded were evacuated. 

I was present vrith Sir Douglas Haig at Hooge between 2 and 3 o'clock on this day, when the 
1st Division were retiring. I regard it as the most critical moment in the whole of this great battle. 
The rally of the 1st Division and the recapture of the \-illage of Gheluvelt at such a time was fraught 
with momentous consequences. If any one unit can be singled out for especial praise it is the 
Worcesters. 

7. In the meantime the centre of my- line, occupied by the Third and Cavalry Corps, was being 
heavily pressed by the enemy in ever-increasing force. 

On the 20th October advanced posts of the 12th Brigade of the 4th Division. Tliird Corps, were 
forced to retire, and at dusk it was evident that the Germans were likely to make a determined attack. 
This ended in the occupation of Le Gheir by the enemy. 

As the position of the Cavalry at St. Yves was thus endangered, a counter-attack was decided 
upon and planned by General Hunter- Weston and Lieutenant-Colonel Anley. This proved entirely 
snccessfiil, the Germans being driven back with great loss and the abandoned trenches reoccupied. 
Two hundred prisoners were taken and about forty of oiu- prisoners released. 

In these operations the staunchness of the King's Own Regiment and the Lancashire Fusiliers 
was most conunendable. These two battalions were very well handled by Lieutenant-Colonel Butler, 
of the Lancashire Fusiliers. 



I am anxious to bring to special notice the excellent work done throughout tliis battle by the Third 
Corps under General Pulteney's coniniand. Their position in the right central part of my line was of 
the utmost importance to the general success of the operations. Besides the very undue length of 
front which the Corps was called upon to cover (some 12 or 13 miles), the position presented many weak 
spots, and was also astride of the River Lys, the right bank of which from Frelinghein downwards 
was strongly held by the enemy. It was impossible to provide adequate reserves, and the constant 
work in the trenches tried the endurance of officers and men to the utmost. That the Corps was 
invariably successful in repulsing the constant attacks, sometimes in great strength, made against 
them by day and by night is due entirely to the skilful manner in wliich the Corps was disposed by its 
Conmiander. who has told me of the able assistance he has received throughout from his Staff, and the 
ability and resource displayed by Di\-isional, Brigade and Regimental leaders in using the ground and 
the means of defence at their disposal to the very best advantage. 

The courage, tenacity, endurance and cheerfulness of the men in such unparalleled circumstances 
are beyond all praise. 

E)uring the 22nd. 23rd and 24th October frequent attacks were made along the whole line of 
the Tliird Corps, and especially against the 16th Infantry Brigade ; but on all occasions the enemy 
was thrown back with loss. 

During the night of the 25th October the Leicesterslvtre Regiment were forced from their trenches 
by shells blowing in the pits they were in : and after investigation by the General Officers Conmianding 
the 16th and ISth Infantry Brigades it was decided to throw back the line temporarily in this 
neighbourhood. 

On the evening of the 29th October the enemy made a sharp attack on Le Gheir, and on the line 
to the north of it. but were repulsed. 

About midnight a very heavy attack developed against the 19th Infantry Brigade south of Croix 
Marechal. A portion of the trenches of the Middlesex Regiment was gained by the enemy and held by 
him for some hours tiU recaptured with the assistance of the detachment from the Ar«ryll and .Sutherland 
Highlanders from Brigade Reserve. The enemy in the trenches were aU bayoneted or captured. Later 
information from prisoners showed that there were twelve battalions opposite the 19th Brigade. 
Over two himdred dead Germans were left lying in front of the Brigade's trenches, and forty prisoners 
were taken. 

On the evening of the 30th the line of the 11th Infantry Brigade in the neighbourhood of St. 
Yves was broken. A counter-attack carried out by Major Prowse with the Somerset Light Infantry 
restored the situation. For liis ser\-ices on this occasion this officer was recommended for special reward. 

On the 31st October it became nece-ssary for the -Ith Division to take over the extreme right of 
the 1st Cavalry Division's trenches, although this measure necessitated a still further extension of the 
line held by the Tliird Corps. 

S. On October 20th, wliile engaged in the attempt to force the line of the River Lys, the Cavalry 
Corps was attacked from the south and east. In the evening the 1st Cavalry Division held the line 
St. Yves-Messines : the 2nd Cavalry Division from Messines through Garde Dieu along the Wambeck 
to Houthem and KortewUde. 

At i p.m. on the 21st October a heavy attack was made on the 2nd Cavalry Division, which was 
compelled to fall back to the line Mes.sines-9th kilo stone on the Wameton-Oostaveme Road-Hollebeke. 

On the 22nd I directed the 7th Indian Infantry Brigade, less one battalion, to proceed to Wul- 
vei^hem in support of the Cavalry Corps. General Allenby sent two battalions to Wytschaete and 
Voormezeele to be placed imder the orders of General Gough. Commanding the 2nd Cavalry Division. 

On the 23rd, 2-lth and 25th several attacks were directed against the Cavalry Corps and repulsed 
with loss to the enemy. 

On the 26th October I directed General AUenby to endeavour to regain a more forward line, moving 
in conjunction with the 7th Division. But the latter being apparently quite unable to take the offensive, 
the attempt had to be abandoned. 

On October 30th heavy infantry attacks, supported by powerful artillery fire, developed against 
the 2nd and 3rd Cavalry Divisions, especially against the trenches about Hollebeke held by the 3rd 
Cavalry Brigade. At 1.30 p.m. this Brigade was forced to retire, and the 2nd Cavalry Brigade, less 
one regiment, was moved across from the 1st Cavalry Di\-ision to a point between Oostaverne and St. 
Eloi in support of the 2nd Cavalry Division. 

The 1st Cavalry Division in the neighbourhood of Messines was also threatened by a heavy infantry 
colimrn. 

General Allenby still retained the two Indian Battalions of the 7th Indian Brigade, although they 
were in a somewhat exhausted condition. 

After a close siu'vey of the positions and consultations with the General Officer Conunanding the 
Cavalry Corps, I directed four battaUons of the .Second Corps, which had lately been relieved from the 
trenches by the Indian Corps, to move to Neuve EgUse under General Shaw, in support of General Allenby . 



The London Scottish Territorial Battalion was also sent to Neuve Eglise. 

It now fell to the lot of the Cavalry Corps, which had been much weakened liy constant fighting, 
to oppose the advance of two nearly fresh German Army Corps for a period of over forty-eight hours, 
pending the arrival of a French reinforcement. Their action was completely successful. I propose 
to send shortly a more detailed account of the operation. 

^\fter the critical situation in front of the Cavalry Corps, which was ended hy the arrival of the 
head of the French 16th Army Corps, the 2nd Cavalry Division was relieved by General Conueau's 
French Cavalry Corps and concentrated in the neighbourhood of Bailleul. 

The 1st Cavalry l)i\nsion continued to hold the line of trenches east of Wulverghem. 

F^'om that time to the date of tliis despatch the Cavalry Di\asions have relieved one another at 
intervals, and have supported by their artillery the attacks made by the French throughout that period 
of ITollebeke. W>-tschaete and Messines. 

The Third Corps in its position on the right of the Cavalry Corps continued throughout the same 
period to repel constant attacks against its front, and suffered severely fi-om the enemy's heavy 
artillery fire. 

The artillery of the 1th Division constantly assisted the French in their attacks. 

The General Ollicer Commanding Third Corps brings specially to my notice the excellent beha^•^our 
of the East Lanca.shire Kegiment. tlie Hampshire Regiment and the Somei-setshire Light Infantry in 
these latt«r operations ; and the skilful manner in which they were handled by General Hunter- Weston, 
Lieutenant-Colonel Butler and the Battalion Commandei's. 

9. The Lahore Division arrived in its concentration area in rear of the Second Corps on the 19th 
and 20th October. 

I have already referred to the excellent work performed by the battalioiLs of this Division which 
were supporting the Cavalry. The remainder of the Division from the 25th October onwards were 
heavily engaged in assisting the 7th Brigade of the Second Corps in fighting round Neuve Chapelle. 
Another brigade took over some ground previously held by the French 1st Cavalry Corps, and did 
excellent service. 

On the 28th October especially the 47th Sikijs and the 20th and 21st Companies of the 3rd Sappers 
and Miners distinguished thentselves by their gallant conduct in tlie attack on Neuve Chapelle, 
losing heavily in ofHcers and men. 

After the arrival of the Meerut Division at Corps Headquarters the Indian Army Corps took over 
the line previously held by the Second Corps, which was then partially drawn back into reserve. Two 
and a half brigades of British Infantry and a large part of the Artillery of the Second Corps still remained 
to a.ssist the Indian Corps in defence of this line. Two and a half battalions of these brigades were 
retvu'ned to the Second Corps when the Ferozepore Brigade joined the Indian Corjjs after its support 
of the Cavalry fui'ther north. 

The Secunderabad Cavalry Brigade arrived in the area during the 1st and 2nd November, and 
the Jodhpvir Lancers came about the same time. These were all temporarily attached to the Indian 
Corps. 

Up to the date of the present despatch the line held by the Indian Corps ha.s been subjected to 
constant bomljardment by the enemy's heavy artillery, followed up by infantry attacks. 

On two occasions these attacks were severe. 

On the 13th October the Sth Gurkha Rifles of the Bareilly Brigade were driven from their trenches, 
and on 2nd November a serious attack was developed against a portion of the line west of Neuve 
Chapelle. On this occasion the line was to some extent pierced, and was consequently slightly bent 
back. 

The situation was prevented from becoming serious by the excellent leadership displayed by 
Colonel Norie, of the 2nd Gurkha Rifles. 

Since their arrival in this country, and their occupation of the line allotted to them, I have been 
much impressed by the initiative and resource displayed by the Indian troops. Some of the ruses 
they have employed to deceive the enemy have been attended with the best results, and have doubtless 
kept superior forces in front of them at bay. 

The Corps of Indian Sappers and Miners have long enjoyed a high reputation for skill and resource. 
Without going into detail, I can confidently a-ssert that throughout their work in this campaign they 
have fully justified that reputation. 

The General Officer Commanding the Indian Army Corps describes the conduct and bearing of 
these troops in strange and new surroundings to have been highly satisfactory, and I am enabled, 
from my own observation, to fully corroborate his statement. 

Honorary Major-General H. H. Sir Pratap Singh Bahadur. G.C.S.I., G.C.V.O., K.C.B., A.D.C., 
Maharaja-Regent of Jodhpur : Honorary Lieutenant H. H. The Maharaja of Jodhpur : Honorary 
Colonel H.H. Sir Ganga Singh Bahadur, G.C.S.I.. G.C.I.E., A.D.C., Maharaja of Bikanir : Honorary 
Major H.H. Sir Madan Singh Bahadur, K. C.S.I. , K.C.I.E., Maharaja-Dhiraj of Kishengarh ; Honorary 



Captain The Honourable Malik Umar Hayat Khan, C'.I.E., M.^■.0., Tiwana : Honorary Lieutenant 
Raj-Kumar Hira Singh of Panna : Honorary Lieutenant Maharaja-Kiunar Hitendra Xarayan of 
Cooch Behar : Lieutenant ilalik Mumtaz Mahomed Khan. Native Indian Land Forces : Eesaldar 
Khwaja Mahomed Khan Bahadur, Queen \'ictoria'3 Own Corps of Guides : Honorary Captain Shah 
Mirza Beg, are serving «"ith the Indian contingents. 

10. Whilst the whole of the line has continued to be heavily pressed, the enemy's principal efforts 
since the 1st Xovember have been concentrated upon breaking through the line held by the First British 
and 9th French Corps, and thiis gaining possession of the town of Tpres. 

From the 2nd Xovernber onwards the 27th. the loth and parts of the Bavarian 13th and 2nd Ger- 
man Corps, besides other troops, were all directed against this northern line. 

About the 10th instant, after several miits of these Corps had been completely shattered in futile 
attacks, a division of the Prussian Guard, which had been operating in the neighbourhood of Arras, 
was moved up to this area with great speed and secrecy. Documents found on dead officers prove 
that the Guard had received the Emperor's special conmiands to break through and succeed where 
their comrades of the line had failed. 

They took a leading part in the vigorous attacks made against the centre on the 11th and 12th ; 
but, Uke their comrades, were repvdsed with enormous loss. 

Throughout this trying period Sir Douglas Haig, ably assisted by his Divisional and Brigade 
Commanders, held the line with marvellous tenacity and undaunted courage. 

Words fail me to express the admiration I feel for their conduct, or my sense of the incalculable 
services they rendered. I vent\u« to predict that their deeds diuing these days of stress and trial will 
furnish some of the most briUiant chapters which will be found in the military history of our tinie. 

The First Corps was brilliantly supported by the .3rd Cavalry Division under General Byng. Sir 
Douglas Haig has constantly brought this officer's eminent services to my notice. His troops were 
repeatedly called upon to restore the situation at critical points, and to fill gaps in the line caused by 
the tremendous losses which occurred. 

Both Corps and Cavalry Division Commanders particularly bring to my notice the name of 
Brigadier-General Kavanagh. Commanding the 7th Cavalry Brigade, not only for his skill but his 
personal bravery and dash. This was particularly noticeable when the 7th Cavalry Brigade was brought 
up to support the French troops when the latter were driven back near the %-illage of Klein ZLUebeke 
on the night of the 7th Xovernber. On this occasion 1 regret to say Colonel Gordon WUson, Commandingl 
the Royal Horse Guards, and ilajor the Hon. Hugh Dawnay. Conunanding the 2nd Lite Guards, 
were killed. 

In these two officers the Army has lost valuable cavalry leaders. 

Another officer whose name was particularly mentioned to me was that of Brigadier-General 
FitzClarence. V.C., Comnaanding the 1st Guards Brigade. He was, unfortunately, killed In the night 
attack of the 11th November. His loss wiU be severely felt. 

The First Corps Commander informs me that on many occasions Brigadier-General the Earl of 
Cavan. Commanding the 4th Guards Brigade, was conspicuous for the skill, coolness and courage with 
which he led his troops, and for the successful manner in wliich he dealt with many critical situations. 

I have more than once during this campaign brought forward the name of Major-General Bulfin 
to your Lordship's notice. Up to the evening of the 2nd November, when he was somewhat severely 
wounded, his services continued to be of great value. 

On the oth November I despatched eleven battalions of the Second Corps, all considerably reduced 
in strength, to relieve the infantry of the 7th Division, which was then brought back into general 
reserve. 

Three more battalions of the same Corps, the London Scottish and Hertfordshire Battalions of 
Territorials, and the Somersetshire and Leicestershire Regiments of Teomanry, were subsequently 
sent to reinforce the troops fighting to the east of Ypres. 

General Byng In the case of the Teomanry Cavalry Regiments and Sir Douglas in that of the Ter- 
ritorial Battalions speak in high terms of their conduct In the field and of the value of their support- 

The battaUons of the Second Corps took a conspicuous part in repulsing the heavy attacks deUvered 
against this part of the Une. I was obUged to despatch them immediately after their trying experiences 
in the southern part of the line and when they had had a very insufficient period of rest : and. although 
they gallantly maintained these northern positions until relieved by the French, they were reduced 
to a condition of extreme exhaustion. 

The work performed by the Royal Flying Corps has continued to prove of the utmost value to 
the success of the operations. 

I do not con-sider it advisable in this despatch to go into any detail as regards the duties assigned 
to the Corps and the nature of their work, but almost every day new methods for employing them, 
both strategically and tactically, are discovered and put into practice. 

The development of their use and employment has indeed been quit* extraordinary, and I feel 



sure that no effort slio\il<l he sparod to iiuTea.«e their n\iiiibci-s and perfect their equipment anil 
etTiciency. 

In tlie period covered liy this despatch Territorial troops \in\r. been used foi' (he fii-st time in the 
Army under my command. 

Tlie units actually enf;ai;ed have been tlie Northiimherland, Northami)t()nshire, North Somei'set, 
Leicestershire and Oxfordsliire HeKiments of Yeomanry Cavalry : and (lie London Scottish, Hert- 
fordshire, Honourable Artillery Company and the (Queen's \\'estminstc>r Hattalioiis of Territorial 
Infantry. 

The conduct and bearing of these units under (iie :nid the ellicient manriei' in which they cairied 
out the various duties assijined to lliem have imbued me with the higliest hope as to the \alue and 
help of Territorial lroo])s generally. 

Units which I have mentioned above, other than these, as liaving been also engaged, have by their 
conduct fully justified these hopes. 

Regiments and batt.alions as they arrive come into a temporary camp of instruction, which is 
formed at Head(|uartci's, where they are closely inspected, their e(|uipment examined, so far a-s possible 
perfected, and such instruction as can be given to them in (he biief time available in the use of machine 
guns, etc., is im]5arted. 

Several units have now been sent up to the fi(in( besides (hose I have already named, but have not 
yet been engaged. 

I am anxious in this despatch to bring to your Lordship's special notice the splendid work which 
has been done throughout the campaign by the Cyclists of tlie Signal Corps. 

Carrj-ing desjiatches and messages at all houi-s of the day and night in every kind of weather, and 
often traversing bad roads blocked with transport, they havi' been conspicuously successful in main- 
taining an extraoi-dinary degree of efficiency in the service of communications. 

Many casualties have occurred in their ranks, but no amount of ditliculty or danger has ever checked 
the energy and ardour which has distinguished their Corps throughout the operations. 

11. As I close this despatch there are signs in evidence that we are possibly in the last stages of 
the Battle of Ypres-Armentieres. 

For several days past the enemy's artillery fire has considerably slackened, and infantry attack 
has practically ceased. 

In remarking upon the general military situation of the Allies as it appears to me at the present 
moment, it does not seem to be clearly understood that the operations in which we have been engaged 
embrace nearly all the Continent of Central Europe from east to west. The combined BVench, Belgian 
and British Armies in the west and the Russian Army in the east are opposed to the united forces 
of Gennany and Austria acting as a combined army between \is. 

Our enemies elected at the commencement of the war to throw the weight of their forces against 
the armies in the west, and to detach only a comparatively weak force, composed of very few first-line 
troops and several corps of the second and third lines, to stem the Russian advance till the Western 
Forces could be completely defeated and overwhelmed. 

Their strength enabled them from the outset to throw greatly superior forces against us in the 
west. This precluded the possibility of our taking a vigorous otTensive. except when the miscalculations 
and mistakes made by their commanders opened up special oijport unities for a successful attack and 
pui'suit. 

The Battle of the ilarne was an example of this, as was also our advance from St. Omer and 
Hazebrouck to the line of the Lys at the commencement of this battle. The role which our armies in 
the west have consequently been called u]5on to fulfil has been to occupy strong defensive positions, 
holding the ground gained and inviting the enemy's attack : to throw these attacks back, causing 
the enemy heavy losses in his retreat and following him u]! with powerful and successful counter- 
attacks to complete his discomfiture. 

The value and significance of the role fulfilled since the commencement of hostilities by the Allied 
Forces in the west lies in the fact that at the moment when the Eastern Pro\'inces of Germany are in 
imminent danger of being overrun by the numerous and jiowerful armies of Russia, nearly the whole 
of the active ai'my of Germany is tied down to a line of trenches extending from the Fortress of Verdun 
on the Alsatian FYontier round to the sea at Nieuport, east of Dunkirk (a distance of 2(50 miles), where 
they are held, much reduced in numbers and morale by the successful action of our troops in the west. 

I cannot speak too highly of the valuable services rendered by the Royal Artillery throughout 
the battle. 

In spite of the fact that the enemy has brought up gims in support of his attacks of great range 
and shell power ours have succeeded throughout in preventing the enemy from establishing anything 
in the nature of an artillery superiority. The skill, courage and energy displayed by their conuiianders 
have been very marked. 

The General Officer Commanding Third Corps, who had special means of judging, makes mention 



of the splendid work performed by a number of young Artillery officers, who in the most gallant 
manner pressed forward in the vicinity of the firing line in order that their guns may be able to shoot 
at the right targets at the right moment. 

The Royal Engineers have, as usual, been indefatigable in their efforts to a-sstst the infantry in 
field fortification and trench work. 

1 deeply regret the heavy casualties which we have suffered : but the nature of the fighting has 
been very desperate, and we have been assailed by vastly superior numbers. I have every reason to 
know that throughout the course of the battle we have placed at least three times as many of the enemy 
hors lie covibat in dead, wounded and prisoners. 

Throughout these operations (ieneral Foch has strained his resources to the utmost to afford me 
all the support he could : and an expression of my warm gratitude is also due to General D'Urbal, 
Commanding the 8th French Army on my left, and General Maud'huy, Commanding the 10th French 
Army on my right. 

I have many recommendations to bring to your Lordship's notice for gallant and distinguished 
service performed by officers and men in the period under report. These will be submitted shortly, 
as soon as they can be collected. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Lordship's most obedient Servant, 
J. P. D. FRENCH, 
Field-Marshal, Commanding-in-Chief, 
The British Army in the Field. 

The following Despatch was received on the 12th February. 1915 : — 

From the Field-Marshal Comiiianding-in-Chief. The British Army in the Field. 

To the Secretary of State for War, War Office, London, S.W. 

General Headquarters. 

2»rf Februari/. 1915. 
My Lord, 

I have the honour to forward a further report on the operations of the Army \mder my command. 

1. In the period under reriew the salient feature was the presence of His Majesty the King in 
the Field. His Majesty arrived at Headquarters on the 30th November, and left on the 5th December. 

At a time when the strength and endurance of the troops had been tried to the utmost through- 
out the long and arduous Battle of Ypres-Armentieres the presence of His Majesty in their midst 
was of the greatest possible help and encouragement. 

His ^Majesty visited all parts of the extensive area of operations and held numerous inspections 
of the troops behind the line of trenches. 

On the 16th November Lieutenant His Royal Highness the Prince of Wales, K.G., Grenadier 
Guards, joined my Staff as Aide-de-Camp. 

2. Since the date of my la'-t report the operations of the Army under my command have been 
subject almost entirely to the limitations of weather. 

History teaches us that tlie course of campaigns in Europe, which have been actively prosecuted 
during the months of December and January, have been largely influenced by weather conditions. It 
should, however, be thorouglily understood throughout the coimtry that the most recent development 
of armaments and the latest methods of conducting warfare have added greatly to the difficulties 
and drawbacks of a vigorous winter campaign. 

To cause anything more than a waste of ammunition long-range artillery fire requires constant 
and accurate observation : but this most necessary condition is rendered impossible of attainment 
in the midst of continual fog and mist. 

Again, annies have now grown accustomed to rely largely on aircraft reconnaissance for accurate 
information of the enemy : but the effective performance of this service is materially influenced by 
wind and weather. 

The deadly acciu-acy, range and quick-firing capabilities of the modern rifle and machine gim 
require that a fire-swept zone be crossed in the shortest possible space of tune by attacking troops. 
But if men are detained under the enemy's fire by the difficulty of emerging from a water-logged trench, 
and by the necessity of passing over ground knee-deep in holding mud and slush, such attacks become 
practicaUy proliibitive owing to the losses they entail. 

During the exigencies of the heavy fighting which ended in the last week of November the French 
and British Forces had become somewhat mixed up. entailing a certain amount of diflficulty in matters 
of supply and in securing unity of conimand. 

By the end of November I wa* able to concentrate the Army under my command in one area. and. 
by holding a shorter line, to establish effective reserves. 

By the beginning of December there was a considerable faUing off in the volume of artUIery fire 



directed against our front by the enemy. Reconnaissance and reports showed that a certain .•Hiiouiit of 
artillery had been withdrawn. We judged tliat thc^ eavjilry in oui' front, witli the exeepl-ion of one 
Division of the Guard, had disappeared. 

Tliere did not, however, appear to have been any great diminution in tlic mmil)crs of infantry 
lioldiny; the trendies. 

3. Altliougli l)otli ai-tilleiy and lillr lire were exelianged with tlie enemy every day, and siii])inf; 
went on more or less contimionsly during tlie lioui's of daylight, tlie operations wtiiel\ called for special 
record or comment are comparatively few. 

During the last week in Novemlier some successful minor niglit operations were cairied out in 
the Ith Corps. 

On the night of tlie 23rd-24t.h Novemliei- a small party of the 2nd Lincolnsiiire Regiment, under 
Lieutenant I'^,. If. Inipey, cleared three of the enemy's advanced trenches oppo.site the 2."jth Brigade 
and withdrew without loss. 

On the night of the 24th-2,5tli Captain .J. R. .Minsliull Ford, Royal Welsh Fusiliei's. and I^ieutenant 
K. L. Morris, Royal Engineers, v\-ith 15 men of the Royal Engineers and Royal Welsli Fusiliers, success- 
fully mined and blew up a group of farms immediately in front of the Gennan trenches on the Touquet- 
Bridoux Road which has been used by German snipei-s. 

On the night of tlie 26th-27th November a small jiarty of the 2nd Scots Guards, under Lieutenant 
Sir E. 11. W. Ilulse. ]?art.. rushed the ticnclies opposite the 2(lth Brigade ; and after iiouring a heavy 
fire into them returned with useful information as to the strength of the Germans and the position 
of machine guns. 

The trenches opposite the 25th Brigade were rushed the same night by a patrol of the 2nd Rifle 
Brigade under Lieutenant E. Durham. 

On the 23rd November the n2th Regiment of the 1 Itli (ierman Army Corps succeeded in capturing 
.some SOO yards of the trenches held by the Indian Corps, but the General Offlcer Commanding the 
jMeerut Division organised a powerful counter-attack, which lasted tliroughout the night. At day- 
break on the 24th November the line was entirely re-established. 

The operation was a costly one, involving many casualties, but the enemy suffered far more 
hesivily. 

We capt lu'ed over 100 prisoner, including 3 officers, a.s well as 3 machine guns and 2 trench mortars. 

On Decemlier 7th the concentration of the Indian Corps was completed by the arrival of tlie 
Sirliind Hi-igade from Egypt. 

On December 9th the enemy attempted to commence a strong attack against the 3rd Corps, 
particularly in fi'ont of the trenches held by the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders and the Middlesex 
Regiment . 

They were driven back with lieavy loss, and diil not renew tlie attempt. Our casualties were 
very slight. 

During the early days of December certain indications along tlie whole front of tlie Allied Line 
induced the Frencli. Commanders and myself to believe that the enemy had withdrawn considerable 
forces from the Western Theatre. 

Arrangements were made with the Commander of the 8th French Army for an attack to be com- 
menced on the morning of December 14th. 

Opeiatioiis began at 7 a.m. by a combined heavy artillery bombardment by the two Frencli and 
tlic 2nd Hriti.sh Corps. 

The British objectives were the Petit Bois and the Maedelsteed Spur, lying respectively to the 
west and south-west of the village of Wytschaete. 

At 7.45 a.m. the Royal Scots, with great daph, ruslied forward and attacked the former, while 
the fioi'don Highlandei-s attacked the latter place. 

The Royal Scots, commanded by .Major F. J. Duncan, D.S.O., in face of a terrible macliine-gun 
and rifle fire, carried the (ierman trencli on the west edge of the Petit Bois, capturing two machine 
guns and 53 prisoners, including one ofificer. 

The Gordon Highlanders, vrith great gallantry, advanced up the Maedelsteed Spur, forcing the 
enemy to evacuate their front trench. They were, however, losing heavily, and found themselves 
unable to get any further. At nightfall they were obliged to fall back to tlieir original position. 

Captain C. Boddam-Whetham and Lieutenant W. F. R. Dobie showed splendid dash, and with 
a feu- men entered the enemy's leading trenches, but tliey were all either killed or captured. 

Lieutenant G. R. V. Hume-Gore and Lieutenant W. H. Patereon also distinguished themselves 
by their gallant leading. 

Although not successful, the operation was most creditable to the fighting spirit of the Gordon 
Highlanders, most ably commanded by ^lajor A. W. P. Baird, D.S.O 

As the 32nd I<^rench Di\ision on the left had been unable to make any progress, the further advance 
of our infantry into the Wvi;schaete Wood was not practicable. 



Possession of the western edge of the Petit Bois was. however, retained. 

The ground was devoid of cover and so water-logged that a rapid advance was impossible, the men 
sinking deep in the mud at every step they took. 

The artiller\- throughout the day was very skilfully handled by the C.R.A.'s of the 3rd, 4th and 
.5th Divisions : ^Major- General F. D. V. Wing, C.B., Brigadier-General G. F. MUne, C.B., D.S.O., and 
Brigadier-General J. E. W. Headlani, C.B.. D.S.O. 

The casualties during the day were about 17 officers and 407 other ranks. The losses of the enemy 
were very considerable, large numbers of dead being found in the Petit Bois and also in the com- 
municating trenches in front of the Gordon Highlanders, in one of which a hundred were counted by 
a night patrol. 

On this day the artillery of the 4th Division, 3rd Corps, was used in support of the attack, under 
orders of the General Officer Conrunanding 2nd Corps. 

The remainder of the 3rd Corps made demonstrations against the enemy with a view to pre- 
venting him from detaching troops to the area of operations of the 2nd Corps. 

From the 1.5th to the 17th December the offensive operations which were conunenced on the 14th 
were continued, but were confined chiefly to artillery bombardment. 

The infantry advance against Wytschaete Wood was not practicable until the French on our left 
could make some progress to afford protection to that flank. 

On the 17th it was agreed that the plan of attack as arranged should be modified : but I was 
requested to continue demonstrations along my line in order to assist and support certain French 
operations which were being conducted elsewhere. 

4. In his desire to act with energy up to his instructions to demonstrate and occupy the enemy, 
the General Officer Commanding the Indian Corps decided to take the advantage of what appeared to 
him a favom^ble opportunity to launch attacks against the advanced trenches in his front on the ISth 
and 19th December. 

The attack of the Meerut Division on the left was made on the morning of the 19th with energy 
and determination, and was at first attended with considerable success, the enemy's advanced trenches 
being captured. Later on. however, a counter-attack drove them back to their original position with 
considerable loss. 

The attack of the Lahore Division commenced at 4.30 a.m. It was carried out by two companies 
each of the 1st Highland Light Infantry and the 1st BattaUon. 4th Gurkha Rifles, of the Sirhind 
Brigade, under Lieutenant- Colonel R. W. H. Ronaldson. This attack was completely successful, 
two lines of the enemy's trenches being captured with little loss. 

Before daylight the captured trenches were filled with as many men as they would hold. The 
front was very restricted, comraunication to the rear impos-sible. 

At daybreak it was found that the position was practicallr untenable. Both flanks were in the 
air. and a supporting attack, which was late in starting, and. therefore, conducted during daylight, 
failed, although attempted with the greatest gallantry and resolution. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Ronaldson held on till dusk, when the whole of the captured trenches had to 
be evacuated, and the detachment feU back to its original line. 

By the night of the 19th December nearly aU the ground gained dxiring the day had been lost. 

From daylight on the 20th December the enemy commenced a heavy fire from artillery and trench 
mortars on the whole front of the Indian Corps. This was followed by infantry attacks, which were in 
especial force against Givenchy, and between that place and La Quinque Rue. 

At about 10 a.m. the enemy succeeded in driving back the Sirhind Brigade and capturing a con- 
siderable part of Givenchy, but the 57th Rifles and 9th Bhopals, north of the canal, and the Connaught 
Rangers, south of it, stood firm. 

The 15th Sikhs of the Divisional Reserve were already supporting the Sirhmd Brigade. On the 
news of the retirement of the latter being received, the 47th .Sikhs were also sent up to reinforce General 
Bnmker. The 1st Manchester Regunent. 4t.h Suffolk Regiment, and two battaUons of French Ter- 
ritorials under General Camegy were ordered to launch a vigorous counter-attack from Pont Fixe 
through Givenchy to retake by a flank attack the trenches lost by the Sirliind Brigade. 

Orders were sent to General Camegy to divert his attack on Givenchy Village and to re-estabUsh 
the situation there. 

A battalion of the oSth French Division was sent to Annequin in support. 

About 5 p.m. a gallant attack by the 1st Manchester Regiment and one company of the 4th 
Suffolk Regiment had captured Givenchy. and had cleared the enemy out of the two lines of 
trenches to 'the north-east. To the east of the village the 9th Bhopal Infantry and 57th Rifles had 
maintained their positions, but the enemy were still in possession of our trenches to the north of the 
village. 

General Macbean, with the Secunderabad Cavalry Brigade. 2nd Battalion, 8th Gurkha Rifles, 
and the 47th Sikhs, was sent up to support General Brunker, who at 2 p.m. directed General Macbean 



to move to a position of readiness in the second line trenches from Maris northward, and to counter- 
attack vigorously if ojjportunity offered. 

Some conhiderablc delay appeals to liave occurred, and it Uii-s not luitil 1 a.m. on the 21st lliat tlie 
47t.h Sikhs and the 7th l)raf<oon Guards, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel H. A. Lempriere, 
D.S.O., of the latter regiment, were launched in counter-attack. 

Tliey reached the eni-my's trenches, hut were driven out by enfilade fire, tlicii- gallant ( 'oiiiin.inder 
being killed. 

The main attack by tlie remainder of (ieneral Machean's force, with tlie rfinnanls of Lieutenant- 
Colonel Lenipriere's detachment (which had again been rallied), was finally piLshed in at about 
4.30 a.m., and also failed. 

In the northern section of the defensive line the retirement of the 2nd Battalion, 2mi1 Cuiklia 
Rifles, at about 10 a.m. on the 20th, had left tlie llatik of the 1st .Seaforth Ilighlaiuh'i-s. on the extreme 
right of the Meerut Division line, much exposed. 'I'liis battalion was li-tt shortly afterwards comjiletely 
in the air by the retirement of the Sirhind Brigadi>. 

The oSth Rifles, therefore, were ordered to siipport tlie left of the .Seaforth lligldandei's, to fill 
the gap created by the retirement of the Gui'kha-s. 

During the whole of the afternoon strenuous efforts were made by the Seaforth Itighlandei'S to 
clear the trenches to their right and left. The 1st Battalion, 9th Gurkha Rifles, reinforced the 2nd 
Gurkhas near the oi'chard where the Germans weie in occnj^ation of the trenches abandoned by the 
latter regiment. The (iarhwal Brigade wa.s being very heavily attacked, and their trendies and loop- 
holes were much damaged : but the brigade continued to hold its frf)nt and attack, connecting with 
the (ith Jats on the left of the Dehra Dun Brigade. 

No advance in force was made by the enemy, but the troops were pinned to their groiiiul li> heavy 
artillery fire, the Seaforth Highlanders especially suffering heavily. 

Shortly before nightfall the 2nd Royal Highlaiidei's on the right of the Seaforth Highlanders 
had succeeded in establishing touch with the Sirhind Brigade, and the continuous line (though 
dented near the orchard) existed throughout the Jleerut Di%'ision. 

Early in the afternoon of December 20th orders were sent to the 1st Corps, which was tluMi in 
general army reserve, to send an infantry brigade to support the Indian Corps. 

The 1st Brigade was ordered to Bethune, and reached that place at midnight on 2()th-21st 
December. Later in the day Sir Douglas Haig wa-s ordered to move the whole of the 1st Division in 
support of the Indian Corps. 

The 3rd Brigade reached Bethune between S a.m. and !) a.m. on the 21st, and on the same date 
the 2nd Brigade arrived at Lacon at 1 i).m. 

The 1st Brigade was directed on Gjvenchy, via I'ont Fixe, and the 3rd Brigade, tliiough Gorre, 
on the trenches evacuated by the Sirhind Biigade. 

The 2nd Brigade was directed to suppoi-t. the Dehia Dun Brigade being placed at the disposal 
of the General Orticer Commanding Meerut Division. 

At 1 p.m. the General Officer Commanding 1st Division directed the 1st Brigade in attack fiom 
the west of Givenchy in a north-easterly direction, and the 3rd Brigade from Festubert in an east-north- 
easterly direction, the object being to pass the position oi-iginally held bj' us and to capture the German 
trenches 100 jards to tlie east of it. 

By .■) p.m. the 1st Brigade had obtained a hold in Givenchy, and the ground south as far as the 
canal : and the 3rd Brigade had progressed to a point half a mile west of Festubert. 

By nightfall the 1st South Wsiles Borderers and the 2nd Welsh Regiment of the 3rd Brigade had 
made a lodgment in the original trenches to the north-east of Festubert, the 1st Gloucestershire Regi- 
ment continuing the line southward along the track east of Festubert. 

The 1st Briiiade had established itself on the east side of Givenchy. 

By 3 j).m. the 3rd Brigade was concentr.ited at Le Touret, and was ordered to retake the trenches 
whicli had been lost by the Dehra Dun Brigade. 

By 10 p.m. the support trenches west of the orchard hail Ijeen carried, but the origuial tire trenches 
had been so completely destroyed that they could not be occupied. 

This operation was performed by the 1st Loyal North I^ancashire Regmient and the 1st North- 
amptonshire Regiment, supported by the 2nd King's Royal Rifle Corps, in reserve. 

Throughout this day the units of the Indian Corps rendered aU the a-ssistance and support they 
could in view of their exhausted condition. 

At 1 p.m. on the 22nd Sir Douglas Haig took over command from Sir James WiUcocks. The 
situation in the front hne was then approximately as follows : — 

South of the I^a Bassee Canal the Connaught Rangers of the Ferozepore Brigade had not been 
attacked. North of the canal a short length of our original line was still held by the 9th Bhopals and 
the .57th Rifles of the same lirigade. Connecting with the latter was the 1st Brigade holding the \illage 
of Givenchy and its eastern and northern approaches. On the left of the 1st Brigade was the 3rd 



Brigade. Touch had been lost between the left of the former and the right of the latter. The 3rd Brigade 
held a line along, and in places advanced to, the east of the Festubert Road. Its left was in com- 
munication with the right of the Meerut Division line, where troops of the 2nd Brigade had just relieved 
the 1st Seaforth Highlanders. To the north, units of the 2nd Brigade held an indented line west of the 
orchard, connecting witti half of the 2nd Royal Highlanders, halt of the list Dogras and the 1st Bat- 
talion, 9th Ciiu-kha Rifles. From this point to the north the tith Jats and the whole of the Garhwal 
Brigade occupied the original line which they had held from the commencement of the operations. 

The relief of most units of the southern sector was effected on the night of 22nd December. The 
Meerut Division remained under the orders of the 1st Corps, and was not completely withdrawn untU 
the 27th December. 

In the evening the position at Givenchy wa-s practically re-established, and the 3rd Brigade had 
reoccupied the old line of trenches. 

During the 23rd the enemy's activities ceased, and the whole position was restored to very much 
its original condition. 

In my last despatch I had occasion to mention the prompt and ready help I received from the 
Lahore Di\-ision, under the command of Major-fJeneral H. B. B. Watkis, C.B., wliich was thrown into 
action inunediately on arrival, when the British Forces were very hard pressed during the Battle of 
Ypres-Armentieres. 

The Indian troops have fought with the utmost steadfastness and gallantry whenever they have 
been called upon. 

Weather conditions were abnormally bad, the snow and floods precluding any active operations 
during the first three weeks of January. 



(Conlinued in Volume II. 



REGIMENTALLY CLASSIFIED LIST 

OF THE OFFICERS INXLUDED IN VOLUME I. 

(The biographies of Officers with composite surnames will be found under the initial letter of the last name.) 



COMMANDS AND STAFF 

Major-General Hamilton, H. I. \V.. late Royal West Surrey Regiment. Divisional Commander. 
Brigadier-General Findlay. X. D.. Royal Artillery, R..\. DiWsional Commander. 
Brigadier-General Fitzclarence, C, late Irish Guards, Commanding 1st Guards Brigade. 
Colonel Boileau. F. R. F.. late Royal Engineers, G.S.O. 1st Grade. 

Kerr, F. W., late Gordon Highlanders, G.S.O. 1st Grade. 

Marker, R. J., late Coldstream Guards, A. A. and Q.M.G. 
Major Cavvley, J. S.. 20th Hussars. Brigade-Major 1st Cavalry Brigade. 
,, Chenevix-Trench, F. M., Royal Field Artillery, Brigade-Major R.A. 
,, Green, A. D., Worcestershire Regiment, Brigade-Major. 

Paley. G.. Rifle Brigade, G.S.O. 2nd Grade. 

(temp. Lieutenant-Colonel) Percival .\. J.-B., Northumberland Fusiliers, G.S.O. 2nd Grade. 

Young, A., 1st Gurkha Rifles, Brigade-Major. 
Captain Barker, R. V., Royal Welsh Fusiliers, Staff Captain 22nd Brigade, Vllth Division. 

Giffard. R.. Royal Field Artillery, Aide-de-Camp. 

Hawley. C. F., Kings Royal Rifle Corps. G.S.O. 3rd Grade. 

James. G. M.. East Kent Regiment. Brigade-Major, 22nd Infantry Brigade, \llth Division. 

Jenkinson, J. B., Rifle Brigade, Brigade-Major, 3rd Infantry Brigade, 1st Division. 

Neill, X., 13th Hussars, Brigade-Major, 6th Cavalry Brigade. 

Stevens, R. W. M., Royal Irish Rifles, Brigade-Major, 9th Infantry Brigade. 

Stewart, B., West Kent Yeomanry, attd. Intelligence Corps. 
2nd Lf. Sang, A., (temp.) Intelligence Corps. 

Seabrook, J. H., (temp.) Intelligence Corps, attd. Royal Engineers. 

Smith. J. H. M., (temp.) Intelligence Corps, attd. 9th (Queen's Roj-al) Lancers. 



ROYAL FLYING CORPS 

Captain Crean, T., Xorthants. Regt. 

,, Picton-Warlow, W., Welsh Regiment. 

Lieut. Bayly, C. G. G.. R.E. 
2ndLt. Perry, E. W. C. 

Waterfall, V., East Yorkshire Regt. 

CAVALRY 

1st Life Guards 
Lt.-Col. Cook, E. B. 
Major Cavendish, Lord J. S. 
Lieut. Levinge, Sir R. W., Bart. 
2nd Lt. St. George. H. .\. B. 

2nd Life Guards 

Major Dawnay, Hon. H. 
Captain O'Xeill. Hon. A. E. B. 

Pemberton, F. P. C. 
Lieut. Duff, Sir R. G. V., Bart., (attd.). Reserve 
of Officers. 

Smith, A. G. M. 
2nd Lt. Petersen, W. S. 



Royal Horse Guards 

Lt.-Col. Wilson, G. C. 
Lieut. Heath, V. P. 

Naylor-Leyland, G. V. 

Worsley, C. S. P. Lord 
2nd Lt. Lambton. Hon. F. 



1st (King's) Dragoon Guards 

Lieut. Hawkins, L. H. 
White, L. W. 



2nd Dragoon Guards Queen's Bays) 

Major Browning, J. A. 
Captain Springfield, P. O. 
Lieut. de Crespigny, C. X. C. 

McGrath. N. G. S. 
2nd Lt. Paul, G. 



3rd (Prince of Wales's) Dragoon Guards 

C^iptain HmlgklnMin. J. K., Special Reserve. 

Sailler. G. G. 

Wright, K. 
Lieut. Chapman, K. W. 

Talbut, H. R. 

4th (Royal Irish) Dragoon Guards 

Captain Fitzgerald, G. H. 

Oldrey, R. J. B.. Adjutant. 
Lieut. Elmslie, K. \V.. Special Reserve. 
,, Hiilman, J. 

Ramsay, N. (attd.). Reserve of Officers. 
2nd Lt. I'ciwell. H. ()., Special Reserve. 

5th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) 
Dragoon Guards 

Lt.-Col. Ansel!, G. K. 
Captain Crawshay, M. 

Paitridge, R. C. 
2nd Lt. Pattcson. J. D. 

6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniers) 

.NLij.ir Home. W. G. 

Watson, W. E. 
Captain Gwyer, A. G. 

7th (Princess Royal's) Dragoon Guards 

Lt.-Col. Lemjirierc, H. A. 

1st (Royal) Dragoons 
Major Dorington. T. P. G. 

Mercer-Xairne, Lord C. G. F. 
Captain Charrington. A. C. 
2nd Lt. Burn, A. H. R. 

2nd Dragoons (Royal Scots Greys) 

Major Swetenham, F. 

2nd Lt. Baillie, Sir G. G. S.. Bart. 

3rd (King's Own! Hussars 

Captain Sherlock, (j. L , (empl. Nigeria Regiment, 

West African Frontier Force). 
Lieut. Leechman, C. B. 
2nd Lt. Gath, C. H. 

4th (Queen's Own) Hussars 

Lt.-Col. Hogg. I. G. 
Major Gatacre. J. K. 
Lieut. Levita, F. E. 

Lonsdale, J. R. Mc. 
North, K. C. 
,, Schuster, A. F., Special Reserve. 
,, Sword, J. H. 

5th (Royal Irish) Lancers 
Lieut. Juler, G. C. 

Robinson, E. W. 
Wordsworth, J. L. 

6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons 

Captain Herringham, G. W. 



9th iQueen's Royal) Lancers 

Major -Abadie. E. H. E. 

Brooke, V. R. 
Captain Lucas-Tooth. 1). K. L. 
Lieut. Allfrey F. de V. B. 
2nd Lt. Garstin, C. W. N. 

Harvey, D. L. 

Taylor- Whitehead, G. E. 

Xth iPrince of Wales's Own Royal) Hussars 

Major Cadogan, Hon W. G. S. 
Captain Annesley, Hon. A. 

Peto. C. H. 

Rose. Sir, F. S., Bart. 
Lieut. Drake. R. F. 

Turnor, C. R. 

11th (Prince .Albert's Own Hussars 
Captain Halliday, J. .A. 
Lieut. Ainsworth, J. S. 
Marshall, G. G. 
2nd Lt. de Gunzburg, Baron A. 
Lumley. R. J. 

I2th (Prince of Wales's Royal) Lancers 

Major Crawley, E. 
Captain Michell, J. C. 

Murray, F. W. S. 
Lieut. Eden, J. 

Leatham. E. H. 
2nd Lt. Wroughton, M. C. 

13th Hussars 
Captain Neill, N.. Staff. 
Lieut. Lawson-Smith, T. E. 

15th (The King's) Hussars 

Captain Walker. <). B. 

Lieut. Hardinge, Hon. E. C. 

Hoare, C. M. 
,, Osborne, B. 

Tylee, J. M. 

Whittle, C. H. S. 

16th iThe Queen's) Lancers 

Captain Dixon, C. M., Special Reserve. 

Macarthur-(])nslo\v, A. W. 
2nd Lt. Macneill W. M., Special Reserve. 

18th iQueen Mary's Owni Hussars 

Lieut. Denroche-Smith, A.J. 
2nd Lt. Nicholson, A. K. 



19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) 
Hussars 

Major McClure, C. R. 
2nd Lt. Murray, E. D. 



20th Hussars 

Major Cawley, J. S., Staff. 

Captain Christy, S. H., Reserve of Officers. 

Lieut. Soames, H. M. 

2nd Lt. Carew, F. L. 



21st (Empress of India's) Lancers 

Lieut. Payne Galhvey, P. F. 

Special Reserve 
North Irish Horse 

Lieut. Combe, S. B. 



YEOMANRY 

(Territorial Forcei 

Buckinghamshire 

Captain Grenfeli, R.\., attd. 9th Lancers. 

West Kent 

Captain Stewart, B , attd. Intelligence Corps. 

Leicestershire 

Captain Blackett, W. S B. 

Lincolnshire 

Captain Wyndham, Hon. \V. R., attd. 1st Life 
(Juards. 

2ad County of London 

Captain Xorwood, J . attd 5th Dragoon Guards. 

1st Lovat's Scouts 

Captain Maxwell, A. E., {temp.) Lieut. -Col. Roval 
Marines. 

Oxfordshire 

Captain Molloy, B. C. B. 

North Somerset 

Lieut. Davey. J. S. 

Liebert. F. A. C. 

Warwickshire 

Captain Guernsey, H. G.. Lord. Reserve of Officers, 
attd Irish Guards. 



ROYAL REGIMENT OF ARTILLERY 
Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery 

Major Baillie, G. 

Bolster, G. E. 

Chenevix-Trench. F. -NL, Staff. 
,, England, R. 

Holland, C S. 
,, Johnstone, J. H. \V. 

Mackivorth, F J A. 

Maidlow, J. S. 

Phillips. E H. 

Smith-Rewse, H. B. \V. 

Stapylton, G. J. C. 

Wynter. H T 
Captain Barber-Starkey, W. H. J. 

Battersby, C. F. P. 

Blathwayt, G. \V. 
,, Blount,G H R , Adjutant XW'th Brigade. 



Captain Bradbury. E. K. 
,, Browning, C. H. 

Buckle. H. 

Charles, A. A. MacG. 

Cree, W. C. H. 

Fitze, G. G. 
,, F'urse, G. A 

Giffard, R., Staff. 

Grayson, A. D.H. (attd.. Reserve of Officers.) 

Jones, R. A. 

Kerr, \V. C. R. 

O'Brien, A. U. M. 

Woodhouse, A. J. 
Lieut. Bowles, J, A., Adjutant XWIIIth Brigade. 

Campbell, J. D. 

Clarke, J. E. L. 

Davies, H. L. 

Dennis, J. O. C. 

Edwards, F. G. de B. 

Forsyth, J. C 
,, Gough, J. B. 

Hosking, C. G. 

Mundy, L F. H. 

Nixon, G. F'. 

Parker, R. E. 

Pollard, G. B. 

Simson, R. F. 

Talbot, E. I. 

Welch, \V. G. F. 

Wissmann, J . R. 
2nd Lt. Brown, J. \V. 

Coghlan, \V. H. 

Coxe, .\. N. 

Farmer, J. D. H. 

Fletcher, R. \V. 

Gosset, W. B. 
,, Harman, J. B 

Morse, G. S. 

Owen, N. M 

Pilliner, R. C. L. 

Rogers. C. H. 

Tucker, J A. 

Wright, X. J. R. 

Royal Garrison Artillery 

Major Chrystie, J. 

.Massie, J. H. 
Captain Dodgson. D. S. 

Pierson, C. F. L. 

Shedden, G. P. 

Smyth, R. A. N. 
Lieut. Caldecott, J. L. 
2nd Lt. Scott, E. C. 

Williamson, R. H. 

Royal Field Artillery, (Territorial Forcei 

Lieut. Clialmers, J. B. 



CORPS OF ROYAL ENGINEERS 

Royal Engineers 

Major Barstow, J. B. 
Corry, J. B. 
,, Douglas, W. S. 
,, Gardiner, A. 



attd. Indian Armv 



Major Molcsworth, E. K. 

Moore. J. O'H. 

Neville. L. J. N. 

North, C. N. 
,, Ommanney, R. 

Rose, L. St. V. 

Tyler, A. H. 

Captain Bamberger; C. D. \V 

,, Carr-Harris, E. D. 

Collins, A. E. J. 

Cumine-Robson, R. G. (}., attd. Indian 
Army. 

Dawson-Scott. J. K. 

Kelly, H. H. 
,, McEnery. J. A. 

McKay, H. M. 

Moores, C. G. 

Twiss, A. M.. attd. Indian .\rmv. 

Wright. T. 
Lieut. Bayly, C. G. G., attd. Royal Flying Corps. 

Dewar, A., Special Reserve. 
,, Egerton, R. R. 
,, Hayes Sadler, E. J. B. 

Hutton, G. A. 
,, Schneider, H. H. 

Smeathman, J. M. 

Smith. A. G. 

Tyler. A. 
,, Wynne- Jones, M. 
2nd Lt. Holl, H N., Special Reserve. 

Manley, J. D. 

•Miller, G. L. 
,, Renny-Tailyour, H. F. T. 

Royal Engineers, (Territorial Force) 

East Lancashire Division 

2nd Lt. Woods. B. H. 



Major 



FOOT GUARDS 
Grenadier Guards 

Colby, L. R. V. 
(jordon-Lennox, Lord B. C. 
Stucley, H. St. L. 
Weld Forester. Hon. A. O. W. C. 
Captain Cecil, Hon. W. A. 

Cholmeley, Sir M. A R. 
,, MacDougall. I. 

Stephen, D. C. L. 
Symes-Thompson, C. 
Wellesley, Lord R. 
Lieut. Antrobus, E. 

,, Congleton, Lord H. B. F. 
,, des Voeux, F. W. 
,, Douglas-Pennant, Hon. A. G. S. 
Lee Steere, J. H. G. 
Manners. Hon. J. N. 
Miller, F. W. J. M. 
Stocks, M. G. 
Tudway, H. R. C. 
Tufnell, C. W. 
Van Neck, P. 
Welby. R. W. G. 
2nd Lt. Cecil, G. E. 

Pickersgill-Cunliffe, J. R. 



2nd Lt. Somerset, N. A. H. 
Vereker. R. H. M. 
Walter S. 

Special Reserve 
■2nd Lt. Xevill, J. H. G., attd. 3rd Baitn. 

Coldstream Guards 

.Major Hamilton. Hun. L. d'H. 

Markham. R. A. 

Captain Banbury. C. W. 

Campbell, G. A. 

Dawson. R. L.. Reserve of Officers. 
FuUer-Maitland, W. A. 
Monck, Hon. C. H. S. 
,, Stewart, G., Reserve of Officers. 
,, Tritton, A. G. 
Lieut. Bingham, D. C. 

Douglas-Pennant, Hon. C. 
., Gordon-Ives. V. M. G. 
Graves-Sawle. R. C. 
Hawarden, Viscount (Sir R C Maude) 
,, Lambton, G. 
,, Legge-Bourke, N. W. H. 
Pollock, F. R. 
Smith, G. K.-F. 
Trotter, A. 
,, Windsor-Clive, Hon. A. 
Wyndham. P. L. 
2nd Lt. de Wintun. W. 

Freeman-Thomas, Hon. G. F. 
Lock wood, R. W. M. 
Tullemache. B. D. 
Williams-Wynn, C. W. 

Special Reserve 
Lieut. Campbell, A. \V . G., attd. Ist Battn. 

Wallis. H. D., attd. 3rd Battn. 
2nd Lt Boscawen, Hon. V. D., attd. 1st Battn. 

4tlt (Reserve) Battalion 
Captain .Vdeane. H. K. A.. Reserve of Officers. 
Lieut. Murray. C. J. 
2nd Lt. Beauchamp, E. A. 

Scots Guards 

Major Carpenter-Garnier, J. T. 

,, Eraser, Hon. H. J. 
Captain Balfour. R. F. 

Bulkeley, T. H. R. 

Campbell. C. F. F. 

de la Pasture, C. E. M, 

Hamilt.m, C. F. P. 
,, Kinnaird, Hon. D A 

Smith, B. R. W. 

Stephen, A. A. L.. .Adjutant. 

Taylor. H. 

Wickham, W. J. 
Lieut Compton-Thornhill, R. A. 

Cottrell-Dormer. C. 

Drummond. D. R. 

Gipps. R. N. 

Hanbury-Tracy, Hon. F. C. H. 

Hill-Trevor, H. G. E. 

Holbech, W. H., Reserve of Officers. 

Jones, H. R. 1. 

Lawson, W. B. W. 



Reserve of Officers 
Bart. 



Lieut. Loyd. G. A. 

Macdonald, Hon. G. E. H 

Monckton, F. A. 

Nugent, R. F. R 

OgiUy, Sir G. X 

Ottley. G. C. L. 

Stirling Stuart, J. 
2nd Lt. Gibbs, R. C. -M. 

Houldsnorth, \V. G. 

Special Reserve 
Lieut. Gladwin. R. H. F.. attd. 1st Batin. 

Irish Guards 
Lt.-Col. Morris. Hon. G. H. 
Major Crichton, H. F. 

Herbert-Stepney. H. A. 

Tisdall, C. A. 
Captain Berners. H. H. 

Gough. E. J. F. 

Hay. Lord A. V. 

MulhoUand. Hon. A. E. S. 

StaflFord-King-Harman. E. C. 
Lieut. Brooke G.. Reserve of Officers. 

Coke. L. S.. Reserve of Officers. 

Hope. W. E. 

Woodroffe. X. L. 

Special Reserve 
Captain Hamilton. Lord A. J., attd. 1st Battn. 
Lieut. Mathieson. K. R., attd. lit Battn. 



Lieut. 



2nd Lt. 



Strong. H. B. 
Thomas. A. C. 
Wilson, D. R. 
Ive. D. 
Schunck. R. H. 



INFANTRY 

The Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment 

Captain Hewat. A. M. C. 

Price, C. L. 

Shafto. A. Duncombe 
Lieut. Thompson. G. M.,(empl. Gold Coast Regt.) 

3rJ Battalion 
Captain Bruce, Hon. H. L., attd. 2nd Battn. 
Lieut. Trotter, A. N., attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt. Cowan, R. C, attd. 2nd Battn. 

Hewitt, W. G. 

Kerr, D. A., attd. 2nd Battn. 

Snead-Cox, R. M., attd. 2nd Battn. 

8th Battalion {T.F.) 
Captain Todrick, T. 
Lieut. Burt. A. 

The Queen's Royal West Surrey Regimenti 

Lt.-Col. Pell, B. T. 

Pilleau. H. C. 

Warren. D. 
Captain Foy, M. V. 

Wilson, C. E. 
Lieut. Bird, J. G. H. 

Eastwood, F. M. 

Haigh. C R , Adjutant. 

Henriques, R. L. Q. 

Ingram. G. S. 

Oldfield. G. C. O.. (empl King s African 
Rifles). 



Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Holmes, T. S., attd. 1st Battn. East Kent 
Regiment. 
Pound, M. S., attd. 1st Battn. 



The Buffs (East Kent Regimenti 

Captain James, G. M., Staff. 
Lieut. McDougall, R. 

Philips, J. D. 
2nd Lt. Xoott, M. 

Stock, H. R. 

3rJ Battalion 
Captain Chichester. E. B. 

Wells, W. X., attd. 1st Battn. 
Lieut. Glyn. R. S., attd. 1st Battn. 
2nd Lt Cronk. W. G.. attd. 1st Battn King's 
Royal Rifle Corps 
Lev. M. A., attd. 3rd Battn. 



The King's Own Royal Lancaster Regt.) 

Lt.-Col. Dykes, A. McX. 
Major Lysons, N. L. S. 

Morrah. J. H. 
Captain Clutterbuck. H. 

Sparenborg. H. R. 

Theobald. F. G. 
Lieut. Aitchison, R. A. C. 

Morris, .\. G. A. 

Steele-Perkins. C. S. 

Thorn vcroft. E. G. M. 
Rifles I. 

Wiiodgate. L. S. 
■2nd Lt. Heanev, P. O. 



empl King's.^frican 



3rd Battalion 
Captain Lendon, P. B.. attd. 1st Battn. 
Lieut. Brockelbank, L. S. 
2nd Lt. Waterhouse, A., attd. 1st Battn. 



The Northumberland Fusiliers 

Major itemp. Lieut. Col.) Percival. A J.-B.. Staff. 
Captain Fletcher, R. S. 

Matthews, J. H. 

Selby, B. H. 

Toppin, H. S. 
2nd Lt Boyd, E. F. 

Laws, A. V. 

Tottie. E. H. 

3rJ Battalion 

Captain Lamb, E. J., attd. 2nd Baitn. King's Own 
Yorkshire Light Infantry 

Lambert. J. M.. attd. Isi Battn 
Lieut. Coles, D. M.. attd. 1st Battn. 

Leather, C. attd. 1st Battn. 

Xunneley, C. F., attd. Ist Battn. 

Van Neck. C. H., attd. 1st Battn. 

Willans, R. St. J., attd. 1st Battn. 



The Royal Warwickshire Regiment 

Lt -Col. (temp.) Hrcwis, K 11 W 

l.oring, W. L 
Majiir Christie, W. t'. 
Captain Bentlcy. C. A. C. 

Brownfield, K. J 

Gilliat, C. G. I'. 

Methuen. C. OH 11. 
,, Taylour, G. K. 
Lieut. Bernard, B. K. 1*. 

Knapton, I). A. 

Ratclifif, J. E. 

Stainforth, K. T. 
2nil T.t. Deane, 1). 

Monk, G. B. Y . 
,, I'earce, G . V. 
,, Standring, B. A. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Crowe, \V. M. C, attd. 1st Battn. 
Hodgson, C. A. R. 

4th Battalion 
Captain McCormick, J. H. G., attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt. Campbell, B., attd. 2nd Batln. 
\aclier. G. 11., attd. 2nd Battn. 

The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regt.) 

Lt.-Col. McMahon, N. R. 
Captain Attwood. A. F. 

Bowden-Smith, W. A. C. 

Brand, K. S. (empl. West African Regt). 

Byng, A. M. 

Carey, L. \V. le .M. 

Docker, G. A. M. 

Forster, F. 

Puzey, A. K. 

Steele, F. \V. A. 
Lieut. Oease, M. J. 
,, Ldngman, F. 

2nd Lt. Gorst. V.. W. 

Hodges, S. H., Reserve of Orticers, attd. 

Mead, J. F. 

Undery, J. A. 

Special Reserve 
Lieut. Johnstone, W. (i. T. H., attd. 4th Battn 
2nd Lt. Hardman, F. McM., attd. 4th Battn. 

5tli Battalion 
Captain Shaw, H. J., attd. 1st Battn. 
2nd Lt. Rennie. D. W., attd. 1st Battn. 

Stables, H. R., attd 1st Battn. Cheshire 
Regiment. 

6th Battalion 
Captain Waller, Sir F. K., attd. 4th Battn. 
Lieut. Combe, B. .A., attd. 4th Battn. 



Lieut. 



7th Battalion 
Fcrrier, G. C. C, attd. 4th Battn. 



The King's (Liverpool Regiment) 

Lt.-Col. Bannatyne, W. S. 
Captain Batten, J. H. S. 

Kyrke-Smith, A. 

Marshall, F. 

Tanner, R. E, 



Lieut. Doll, P. W. R. 

Furneaux, P. T. 
2nd Lt. Denny, B. M. R., Reserve of Officers. 

Wallace, H. B. 

Ward. A. 

Jrd till I til I ion 
Lieut. Baker, E. B., attd. 1st Battn. 

Swcet-Escott, M. R., attd. 1st Hattn 

4th Battalion 

Lieut .Andrews, F. G., attd. 2nil Battn, Sfjutli 
Lancashire Regiment. 

10th [Scottish) Battalion. T.F. 
Captain Tuentyman, A. 



Major 

Captain 

Lieut. 



Lieut. 



The Norfolk Regiment 

Orr, J. B. 
Cresswell, F. J. 
Foley, T. A. F. 
Openshaw, H. M. 

3rd Battalion 
Teeling, A. M. A. I. de L. 



The Lincolnshire Regiment 

Captain Dawson, H. E. 

Drake, R. E. 

King, R. N., Reserve of Officers. 

Lyall, C. G., Reserve of Officers. 
Lieut. {temp. Capt.) Holmes. C. C. 

Huntington, J. N. S. 

\W^lchnian, \i. L. 
2nd Lt. Barnes, E. 

Wade, S. S. A. 

Willis, R. 

.h-d Battalion 
Lieut. Bransliury, \'. D. B,, attd. 1st Battn. 

Owen, E. H.,attil. 1st Battn. South Wales 
Borderers. 

The Devonshire Regiment 

Captain Besly, B. H. 





Elliot, H. G. 


, , 


Featherstone, R. B. 




Spencer, C. J. 




Whipple, H. C. 


Lieut. 


Dunsterville, G. E. 




Hancock, R. E. 


2nd Lt. 


Ainslie, D. A. L. 




Jrd Battalion 


Captain 


Chichester, H. A. 


,. 


Quicke, E. O. St. C. (J. 


Lieut. 


Toms, A. W., attd. 2i 



attd. 1st Battn. 



The Suffolk Regiment 

Lt.-Col. Brett, C. A. H. 
Captain Reid, E. H. 

Temple, A. H. W., Reserve of Officers. 
Lieut Payne, G. H. 

3rd Battaiion 

Captain Pollock-Hodsoll, G. B,, attd. 1st Battn. 
Cheshire Regt. 
Winn, A. 
Lieut. Myddelton, E. G., attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt, Wilder, R. C. P., attd. 2nd Battn, 



Prince Albert's (Somerset Light Infantry: 
Major Thoyts. F. G. G. 
Captain Bradshaw. F. S. 

Maud. C. C. 
Lieut. Moore. R. L. 

Parr. G. R. 
2nd Lt. Read. A. B. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Filleul. L. A., attd. 1st Battn. 

Henson. S. B., attd. 1st Battn. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Orr, R. C . attd. 1st Battn. 

The Prince of Wales's Own 

(West Yorkshire Regiment 
Major Cooper-King, R. G. 

Ingles. A. W. 
Captain Clothier. J. K. 

Fisher. M. 

Welchman. E. T. 
Lieut. Costin. B. D. 

Eliot. W. L. 

Laxvson-Smith, J. 

[temp. Capt.) Loveband. .A. R. 
,. Meautys, T. G. 

Shaw. B. H. G. 

Thompson, O. C. W. 
2nd Lt. Carew, J. 

Wilson, E. W. 

3rd Battalion 
Major Cliff. H. T.. attd. 1st Battn. 
Captain 1' Anson. J. F., attd. 1st Battn. 

4th Battalion 
Major Slade, C. G. M., attd. North Lanes. Regt. 
Captain Smart, G. H., attd. 1st Battn. 

The East Yorkshire Regiment 
Lt.-Col. Benson. RE 
Major Campion, W. E. 
Captain Edwards. E. L. P. 

Hind, F. 

Lawrence, B. 

Maxwell. P. B. 

Wilson. A. H. 
Lieut. Cosens, H. S. F. 
2nd Lt. Bottomley, T. R. 
., EIrington, G. G. C. 

Studley. L. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Pease. M. R . attd. 1st Battn. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Walker, E. W.. attd. 1st Battn. 

Wood, C. S., Res. of Off., attd. 1st Battn. 
2nd Lt. Waterfall, V., attd. Royal Flying Corps. 

The Bedfordshire Regiment 

Major Stares, R. P. 

Traill, J. M. 
Captain Garnett-Botfield, C. S. 

Hall, A. G, 

Ker. C. H. 

McCloughlin, R. J. 



Lieut. Bastard. W. 

Punchard. E. E. 
2nd Lt. Bell. CO. 

Fernandes, D. L. de T. 
,, Paterson, J. A. 

Rendell. L. W. 

Stafford. C. C. ReserveofOfiScers. 

Wright, G. D. C. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Downes, V. C, attd. 1st Battn. 

Edwards, E. A. J., attd. 1st Battn. 
Graves, W. F , attd. 1st Battn. 
Shippey. J. R.. attd. 1st Battn. 

4th Battalion 
Captain Baird. W. F. G., attd. 1st Line. Regt. 
Lieut. Charlton, St. J. A., attd. 1st Battn. 
Harding. R. D. S., attd. 1st Battn. 

The Leicestershire Regiment 

Captain Grant, H. A. 

Gruchy. F. le M. 
Hawes. R. F. 
,. Puckle. T. X.lempl. West African Frontier 

Force) . 
,, Tristram, L. B. C. 
Viney, P. E. 
Lieut Dods, W. H. G. 
Prain. T. 

Seton-Browne, M. W. 
,. Smeathman. C. 

Wateridge, E. L. 
2nd Lt. Bowley, T. H., attd. Border Regiment. 

3rd Battalion 

Lieut. Vandeleur, J. B., attd. .Srd Battn. Wore. 

Regiment. 
2nd Lt. Farrar. H. R., attd. 2nd Battn. Man. Regt. 
Hutton. R., attd. Royal Warwick. Regt. 

The Royal Irish Regiment 

Major Daniell, E. H. E. 

Capt. (Bt. Maj.) Panter-Downes, E.M., (empl. West 
African Frontier Force). 

Mellor. W. 
Lieut. Brown, H. W. 

Rushton, F. H. L. 

Tandy, A. M. S. 
2nd Lt. Howard, P. E. N. 

Shine, J. D. 

3rd Battalion 
2nd Lt. Anderson, A. J. R.. attd. 2nd Battn. 
Smyth, J. R., attd. 2nd Battn. 



Alexandra. Princess of Wales's Own 
Yorkshire Regiment 

Colonel King. C. A. C. 
Major Walker, W. B. 
Captain Broun, E. S. 

Jeffery, C. G. 
Lieut. Brooksbank, H. G. 

Ledgard, F. C. 

Phayre, R. H. 

Walmesley, R. 
2nd Lt. Hatton. F. C. 



The Lancashire Fusiliers 

Captain M.H,d\ , R. II. M. 
,, Sideliuttom, R Y. 

Ward, A. C. 
Lieut. Boyle, D. E. 

Stuart. C. E. 
I'nd l.t. Humfrcy, \V, K. 

Paulson, J . S. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Bass, C. IL, attd. 2nd Battn. 

Lucas-Tooth, S. L., attd. I'nd Battn. 

4th Battalion 
Captain Barnsley, A., attd. 1st Xortliunili. V\\>. 
Sneyd, T. H., attd. 2nd Battn 

The Royal Scots Fusiliers 
Captain Barrett, C. J. C. 

Boyle, The Hon. J. 
Briggs, Ct. C. 
,, Fairlie, F. 

Hurt. S. F. A. A. 
Tullis, J. n. 
Young, J. F. 
Lieut. Alston, C. McC. 

,, Henderson. \. W. A. 
,, Kennedy, N. 

Lyon, C. J. 
,, Mackenzie, C. G. G. 
Thomson, K. C. 
2nd Lt. Anderson, E. L. L. 
Barton, H. W. F. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Ness, G. S., attd. 1st Battn 
2nd Lt. Cozens-Brookc, J. G. S., attd. UK Battn. 

The Cheshire Regiment 

Captain Forster, L. A., Reserve of Officers. 

Hartford, H. 1. St. J. 

Jones, E. R. 

Mahony, F. H. 

Nicholson, H. \V. 

Rich, W. S. 
Lieut. Campbell, C. A. 

Maitland-Addison, A. C. 
2nd l.t. Hownes, A. C 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Frost, K. T. 
2nd Lt. Anderson. G. R L., attd. 1st Battn. 

The Royal Welsh Fusiliers 
Lt.-Col. Cadogan, H. O. S. 
Captain Barker, R. V., Staff. 
,, Jones-Vaughan, E. N. 
,, Kington, W. M. 
Lloyd, M. E. 
Philips, R. N. 
Stable, L. L. 
,, Vyvyan, \V. G. 
Lieut. Ackland-Allcn, H. T. 
Chance, G. O. de P. 
Dooner, A. E. C. T., Adjutant. 
,, Egerton, R. le B. 
„ Hoskyns, E. C. L. 



2nil l.t. Collingwood-Tliiinipson, F. J. \ . 
,, Ciore, G. R. 

SneadCox, G. P. J. 
Stone, E. R. C. 

Jrd Battalion 
Captain Brennan, J. 11., attd 1st Battn. 
Prichard, T. L., attd. 2nd Battn. 

The South Wales Borderers 

Major Lawrence, \V. L. 
Welby, G. E. E. 
Captain Curgenven, W. C. 
,, Paterson. C. J. 

,, Peel, A. R. (cnipl. Nigeria Regiment). 

,, Y'eatman, M. E. 
Lieut. Blackall-Sinionds, G. P., Reserve of Officers, 
attd. 
C.ker, J. C. 
Homfray. .1. R. 
Johnson, .M . T. 
2nd Lt. Farrier, A. M. 

Pryce-Jenkin, R. D. 
Silis, C. C. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Maxwell, L B., attd. 1st Battn. 
Lieut. Sparrow, L. G., attd. 2nd Battn. K.O S.B. 
2nd Lt. Watkins, H. H., attd. 1st Battn. 



The King's Own Scottish Borderers 

Major Leigh, C. 
Captain Turnbull, H. V. C. 
Lieut. Holme, R. H. P. 
2nd Lt. Amos, G. S. 

Bayley, G. B., attd 2nd Battn. Royal 
Scots Fusiliers. 

Gillespie, T. C. 

HamiTiond, G. P. 

Woollcombe, C. S. 
Hon. Capt. and Quartermaster Murray. A. 

3rd Battalion 
Major .-XUan. \V. L. C, attd. 2nd Battn 
Lieut. Cox. G. H., attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt. MacRae, L A., attd. 2nd Battn. 

The Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) 

Captain Gilkisun. L). S. 

Gordon, J. F. 
Fusiliers 

Ritchie, A. G. 

Rose, R. H. W. 
Lieut. Dunn, T. K. I). 

Hewitt, J. F. 

Hopkins, C. R. I. 



attd. Roval Scots 



4th Battalion 

Lieut. Miller, C. R. E., attd. King's Own Scottish 
Borderers. 



The Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 

Captain Auchinleck. D. G. H. 
,, Geoghegan, J. R. 
Lloyd, E. R. 
Ponsonby, G. M. 
Roe, S. G. 



Lieut. Dunlop, C. 
2nd Lt. Boyd. H. A. 

Miller. I. F. R. 

Thomas. J. G. B. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Aplin. K. S.. attd. 2nd Battn. 

Roberts. A. G. ^L. attd. 2nd Battn. 

The Gloucestershire Regiment 
Major Gardner, R. >L S. 

Rising. R. E. 
Captain McLeod. A. A. 
Pritchett. \V. P. 
,, Shipuay. G. NL 

Temple. W. .\. .\L 
Lieut. Danckwerts, R. W. 
Holme. A. C. 
,, Stewart. A. H., empl.^^'est African Frontier 
Force. 
Yalland. W. S. 
2nd Lt. Foster. H. K. 

,, {temp. Lieut.) Wiggin. D. H. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Hippisley, H. E.. attd. 1st Battn. 

3rd Battalion 

Captain Duncan, S., Reserve of Officers. 

Lieut. Hickling. E. R. E., attd. 1st Battn. Loyal 

North Lancashire Regiment. 

Swanwick. R. K.. attd. 1st Battn. 

2nd Lt. Walters, E. C. attd. 1st Battn. 

4th Battalion 
Lieut. Harding. A. D., attd. 1st Battn. 



The East Lancashire Regiment 

Lt.-Col. Le Marchant. L. St. G. 
Captain Aubin, A. C. 

Cane, L. A. F. 

Clayhills, G. 
,, Coventry. E. E. 

Warner, H. M. 
Lieut. Chisholm. W. M. 

Hughes. F. D. (empl. West African Frontier 
Force). 

Mathews, T. H. 

Waud, L. D. 
2nd Lt. Stanley, G. H. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Preston, T. H., Lieut. Reserve of Officers. 

The East Surrey Regiment 
Captain Benson, J. P. 

Burn, A. G. McC. attd. 1st Battn. Glou- 
cestershire Regiment. 
Hopkinson. C. R. T. (empl. 1st Battn. 

Nigeria Regiment). 
Whish. J. K. T. 
2nd Lt. Relton, G. L. 
Ward. N. L. 

Special Reserve 
Captain Maclean, A. de V. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Benning, ^L S., attd. 1st Battn. 
Bridgland, N. L., attd. 1st Battn. 
Simpson, W. H. 'SI., attd. 1st Battn. 

4th Battalion 
2nd Lt. Housecroft. H.. attd. 1st Battn. 



The Worcestershire Regiment 

Major Bacon. B. K. W. 

Green. A. D.. Staff. 
Captain Carr. M. R. 

Eliott, H. R. 

Hughes. T. H. 

Lea, G. E. 

Nesbitt. A. S. 

Pepys, R. W. 

Underhill, W. A. 
Lieut. Clarke, M. E. L. H. 

Gilmour, H. J. G. 

Goldsmid, S. A. 
,, Harrison, C. C. 

Hartnoll, H. P. 
,, Henry, C. 
., Lowe, H. S. 

Northey. A. 

Pope. C. M. 

Slater. R. M. 
2nd Lt. Battle. E. C. V. 

Curlier. F. G. O. 

Darby. F. 

Hastings-Medhurst, F. L. 

Smythe. F. F. 

5th Battalion 
Lieut. Hudson, A. W. 

6th Battalion 

Captain Graham, A. G. -NL, attd. 1st Battn. Loyal 

North Lancashire Regiment. 
2nd Lt. Gallon, T. H., attd. 3rd Battn. 



The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry 
Captain Olivier. R. H. 

Passy, L. D. 

Romilly. A. H. 
Lieut. Garsia, O. D. M. 
2nd Lt. Crane, C. E. 

Elliott, P. L. 

The Duke of Wellingtons 
(W'est Riding Regiment) 

Major Strafford, P. B. 

Captain Denman-Jubb, C. O., Adjutant 

Lieut. De Wend, D. F. 

Russell, L. E. 

Thompson. J. H. L. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Wilhamson, G., and. 1st Battn. 

The Border Regiment 
Major Allen, W. L. 
Captain Andrews, C. G. W., .Adjutant. 
Askew, H. A. 
,, Cholmondeley. C. A. J. 

Gerrard, H. \'. 
,, Gordon, R. N. 
,, Lamb, C. 

Lees, E. H. H. 
Molyneux-Seel. L. E. H. 
Radcliffe, >L 



xl 



Lieut. t'om-li. f. R. 
., Kgcrtnn, r .1. 

Hodgson, <; W II. 

Warren, .1 H 1! 
2nd I.t. Clancey. T. J. 

Surtees. C. G. \'. 

.)></ lialtalion 

Capt.iin I'vman, J., attil. L'nil B.itin. .M.incliester 
Regiment. 

The Royal Sussex Regiment 

Lt.-C'dl. Crispin. 11. T. 

Montresor, K. II. 
Major Cookson. M. 1''. 
Captain Aldridge, R. J. V. 1). 

Crawlcy-Boevey. K. M.. attil. 4tli Battn. 
Royal Fusiliers. 

Jemmctt- Browne, A. K. 

Slati-r. I,. 
Lieut. Oaun, K. C. 

Lousada, K. A. 

Pelham, The Hon. H. L., Adjutant. 

Rainsav, D.G., attd. Royal West Surrey 
Regiment. 

\'crrall, C. F. 
L'nd Lt. Croft, L. R. 

Hughes, W. S. 

Marillicr, F. C. J. 

Moore, G. 

Special Reserve 
l'nd Lt. Shaw, C. F., attd. 2nd Battn. 

Silvester, A. 1,., attd. 2nd Battn. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Duke, B. P., attd. 2nd Battn. 

The Hampshire Regiment 

Major Parker, (J. II. 

Captain {temp. RLijor) Connellan, P. NL 

Dolphin, J K. W. 

Harland. R. W. (attd. I 
Lieut. F"ostcr, A. C. H. (cmpl. King's African 
Rifles). 

Kent, E. NL S. 

Trimmer. W. I). M. 
2nd Lt. Cowan, 1). H. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Griffith, (i. 

Harington, H. A. B., attd. 1st Battn. 



3rU Bitttitlion 
Lieut. Archer Shee, CJ., attd. 1st Battn. 

Fitzpatrick, I). T. F., attd. 2nd Battn. 
Robinsl^n, F. l... attd. 2nd Battn 

///( Battalion 

Captain Campliell, 1). W. A., attil. 1st B.ittn. 
SluTwooil l''orcsters. 



The Dorsetshire Regiment 

Major Mercer, A. A. 

Roper, R. T. 
Captain Davidson, W. T. C. 

Cieorgc, A. K. D. 

Middlcton. I', 

Moffat, A. L. N. M. 

Parkinson, J. A. F. 

Priestley, A. B. (cmpl. West African Fron- 
tier Force). 

Roc, A. R. M. 
Lieut. Pitt, J. M., Adjutant. 
2ncl Lt. Smith, T. S. 

3rit Battalion 

Lieut. Bishof), l:. M.. attd. 2nd B.ittii K.O. 
Yorks. I.. I. 
Turner, .1. K. (Spec. Kcs.),attd. 1st Battn. 

The Prince of Wales's Volunteers 
(South Lancashire Regiment) 

Lt.-Col. Green, M. C. .\. 
Captain Robson, K. 

,, WeschS, E. B. (cmpl West African Frnn- 

tier Force). 
Lieut. Fulcher, B. V. 

Gebbie, J. F. R. 

Hadfield, W. J. M. 

Hewitt, G. H. 
2nd Lt. Birdwood, G. A. B. 

Mitchell, E. A. 

Spendlove, G. T. 

Waldy, C. T. 

Wallace, D. S. 

Watson, K. G. 

Special h'cseri'e 
2nd Lt. Widd.nvson, A. .1. II. K. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Gibson, A. T., attd. 2nd B.ittn. 



The South Staffordshire Regiment 

Major Loder-Symiinds, .1. F. 
Captain Dunlop, J. S. S. 

Powell, H. M. (empl. West African Regt.). 
,, Ransford, C. G. 

Thomas, C. H. 

\'allentin, J. F. 
Lieut. Bean, C. R. C. 

Bower, H. R. S. 

Crousaz, C. V. 

Fost-r, W. A. P. 
,, Holmes, ¥. L. 
,, Hume, C. G. 

Moor-Radford, L. C. 

Tomlinson, F. R. J. 
2nd Lt. Scott, B. J. H. 



The Welsh Regiment 

Lt -Col. Morland, C. B. 

Major Kerrich, J. H. 

Captain Davies, H. C, (attd.) Reserve of Officers. 

I'Vrrar, W. H., Adjutant. 

Haggard, M. 

Moore, W. A. (}. 

Picton-Warlow, W.. attd. Royal Flvins 
Corps. 
2nd Lt. Weeding, .1. R. B. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain F'itzpatrick, (.}. R., attd. 2Tid Battn. 

Herd, H. F., attd. 2nd Battn. 
Lieut. Cornelius, C. V. P.. attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt. Nicholl, J. W. H.. attd. 2nd Battn. 



x!i 



The Black Watch iRoyal Highlandersi 
Lt.-Col. Duff, A. G. 
Captain Dalglish, C. A. de G. 
Strahan, C. E. 
Urquhart. E. F. M. 
Lieut. Cumming, L. R. 
Poison. G. W. 
Wilson. E. H. H. J. 
2nd Lt. Blair. P. E. A. 
Boyd, N J. L. 
Law son. A. S. 
,, McAndrew, A. 

,, Stirling-Smurthwaite, D. S. 

3rd Battalion 

Captain Boddam-Whetham. C. atid. Ist Battn. 
Gordon Highlanders. 
Moubray, P. L.. attd. lit Battn. 
Parker, A. £., attd. 2nd Battn. Seaforth 

Highlanders. 
Stewart-Richardson. Sir E. A., Bart., attd. 
Ist Battn. 
Lieut. Lyon, C. L. C. B.. attd. 1st Battn. 

Nolan, R. P. D.. attd. 1st Battn. 
2nd Lt. Webster, J. F.. attd. Ist Battn. Gordon 
Highlanders. 

The Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire 
Light Infantry 
Captain Evelegh, R. C. 

Harden, A. H. 
Lieut. Mockler-Fcrryman. H. 

Murphy, C. F. 

Worthington. R. G. 
2nd Lt. Barrington-Kennett, A. H. 

Girardot, P. C. 

Jones. J. 

Marshall, J. S. C. 

Pepys, F. 

Ward, J. B. M. 



Lieut. 



3rd Battalion 
Turbutt. G. ^L R.. attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Essex Regiment 
Captain Vandeleur. W. M. C. 
Lieut. Round, A. F. H. 
Vance, J. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Rose, A. H. P., attd 2nd Battn. 

The Sherwood Foresters 
(Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regt.' 
Captain Frend, W. R., Adjutant. 
Lieut. Ash. B. C. 

Bernard, L. A. 
DiKvorth, M. P. 
Murray. P. M. 
2nd Lt. Browne, A. G. 
Harris, L. G. H. 
Milner, R. D. P. 
,, Ruegg, K. S. 

Smalley, W. M. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Atkin, J. NL. attd. Worcestershire Rcgt. 
Smith, H. L. C. attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Loj-al North Lancashire Regiment 

Lt.-Col. Knight, G. C. 

Lloyd. W. R. 
Major Braithwaite. F. J. 

Carter. A. J. 
Captain .-\llason, L. T. 

.■\llen, J. F., Adjutant. 

Helnie, H. L. 

Prince, A. L. 
Lieut. Dickson, C. G. 

Loomes. H. R. 

Mason, R. C. 
2nd Lt. Calrow. W. R. L. 

Einem-Hickson. S. V. 

Kingsley, G. C. 
Lieut, and Quartermaster Wilkinson, E. 

3rd Battalion 
Captain Miller, E. C attd. 1st Battn. 

The Northamptonshire Regiment 

Major Norman, H. H. 
Captain Bentley, G. M. 

Crean. T.. attd. Royal Flying Corps. 

Gordon. R. E. 

Parker, R. B. 

Russell, W. R. 

Savage, J. A. 

Watts. C. H. R. 

White, E. E. 
Lieut. Paget. G. G. B. 

Rastrick. C 

Vandell, H. I., (attd. I. Reserve of Officers. 
2nd Lt. Gordon, C. G. 

Jarvis, A. S. G. 

Sherriff, A. N. 

Wainwright. G. C. 

Princess Charlotte of Wales's 

(Royal Berkshire Regiment) 
Captain Shott. H. H. 

Steele. O. 
Lieut. Garnett, P.N. ^empl. King's African Rifles). 

Perro'.t. A. H., Adjutant. 
2nd Lt. Knott. T. A. 

Perkins. R. G. B. 



Lieut. 



3rd Battalion 
Nicholson, L. C. attd. 1st Battn. 



The Queen's Own 

(Royal West Kent Regiment 
Maj..r Buckle, M. P. 

Hastings, P. 

Pack-Beresford, C.G. 
Captain Fisher. F. 

Keenlyside, G. F. H. 

Legard, G. B.. Adjutant. 

PhUHps, W. C. O. 
Lieut. Ames. W. K. 

Gore, S. K. 

Pringle. R. S. 

Vicat. H. J. 
2nd Lt. Broad wood. M. F. 

Harding, J. ^^ 
,, Thompson, ^L N. 



xlii 



Sficcial Reserve 
2rul I.t. Mcnonafjli. I'.. Md. Siiff.ilk Kcf,nniciu 

Jril liattcilioit 
Captain Hattershy, li. M., attd. 1st Baltn. 

Beeman, A. C attd. 1st Battn. 
Lieut. .\ndcrson, C. K., attd. 1st Battn. 

Scwell, D.. C. C, attd. Ist Battn. 
2nd Lt. Waghurn, I.. 1'.. attd. Berks. Rcgirnunt. 

Whitehiiiisp, 1'. J., attd. Northants. Kefft . 



The King's Own (Yorkshire Light Infantry) 

Majdf Yate, C. .\. L. 
Captain Simpson, J. K. 

Smyth, A. B. 
2nd Lt. Criibh, I,. K. P. 

Pepys, J. 

Ritchiu, A. V. 

3rd Battalion 

Captain Richmond, T. H., attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt. Carsuell, R. N., attd. 2nd Battn. 



The King's (Shropshire Light Infantry) 

Major Maseficid, R. 

Captain Miles, R. P., attd. Royal Irish RiHes. 
Lieut. Ilcrilman, A. \V. 
Jenings, (j. P. C. 
,, Verncr, K. C. 

Jrtl Battalion 
Captain Mitchell, J. A. S. 



The Duke of Cambridge's Own 
(Middlesex Regiment) 

Lt.-Col. Ward, B, E. 
Major Ahell, W. H. 

Bentley. G. W. 
Captain Evatt, (.'i. R. K. 

Know Ics, J. E. 

Roy, K.J. 

Skaife, A. F. 

Tullnh, C. K. 

Wordsworth, A. G. 
Lieut. Harvey, C. M. 

Henstock, K. P. 
,, Tagg, H.A. 
,, Trewman. A. B. 

Wilkinson. J. R. M. 
2nd Lt. Morse, G. T. H. 
,, Savers, R. 

3th Battalion 
-Major Corcoran, W. J. 
2nd Lt. Bosanquet, S. C, attd. 1st Battn. 
Hilton, H. D., attd. 4th Battn. 
Hughes, G. W., attd. 4th Battn. 
Rohinson-Pastfield, J. T., attd. Northants 
Regiment. 
,, Shawyer, M. A. P., attd. 1st Battn. 

6th Battalion 
Lieut. Sneath, C. 1)., attd. 4th Battn. 
2nd Lt. Coles, S. H., attd. 4th Battn. 



The King's Royal Rifle Corps 

Major Foljambe, H. F. F. B. 
Captain Cathcart, A. E. 

Hawlcy, C. F.. Staff 
Lieut. Battenberg, 11. H. Prince M. V. 1). ol 

Bond, R. II. 

Pleydcll-Bouvcric, J. E. 
2nd Lt. Anderson, C. A. K., attd. R. Si 

Barclay, R. H. M. 
,, Casey, J. 

Crossman, \\^ K. M. 

Davison, S. 

Dean, F. 

Forster, J. 
,, Lawrence, C. H . 
,, Thompson, G. S. R. 

Tindall, E. V. 



Kus 



2nd Lt. Wai 



5th Battalion 

v.. R., attd. 1st Battn. 



6th Battalion 
Captain Spottiswoode, J., altd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd Lt. St. Auliyn. The Hon. P. S.. attd. 2nd 
Battn. 



The Duke of Edinburgh's 
(Wiltshire Regiment) 

Major Roche, T. 

Captain Browne, G. S., .Adjutant 1st Battn. 

Carter, C. G. .M. 

Dawes, W. R. A. A. 

Formby, M. L. 
,, Grimston, H. S. 

Stoddart, F. W. 
Lieut. Spencer, E. 
2nd Lt. Chandler, C. H. 

Shccial Reserz'e 
2nd Lt. Roseveare, H. \V., attd. 1st Battn. 

Jrd Battalion 
Captain Magor, A. C, attd. 2nd Battn. 
Reynolds, H. C. C. 

Wyld, G. R.. attd. R. Berkshire Regiment. 
Lieut. Cruikshank, F. O. 

2nd Lt. Burges, E. L. A. H., attd. 2nd Battn. 
Campbell, W. P., attd. 2nd Battn. 
,, Gee, R. E. McL.,attd. 1st Battn. 



The Manchester Regiment 

Captain Creagh, L. 

Dunlop, F. C. S. 

Fisher, H. 

Fowke, M. C. 

Mansergh, W. G. 

Xisbet, F. S. 

Trueman, C. F. H. 
Lieut. Caulfeild, J. C. 

Connell, S. D. 

Davidson, R. 1. M. 
,, Norman, S. S. 

Reade, J. H. L. 

{local Capt.) Wickham, T. S.. (empl. West 
African Frontier Force). 



xliii 



2nd Lt. Bentley, C. L. 

Chittenden, A. G. B. 
Smith. J. H. M. 
Walker, R. F. 

3rJ Battalion 
Captain King-Peirce. W. G.. attd. 2nd Battn. 
Tillard. A. G.. attd. 2nd Battn. 



Lieut. 



Jth Battalion 
Horridge. R.. attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Prince of Wales's 
(North Staffordshire Regiment 
Captain Hume-Kelly. G. H. 

Reid, E. B. 
Lieut. Leggett. A. R. A. 
Royle. A. C. F. 

3rd Battalion 
Lieut. Hill. W. E., attd. lit Battn. 
2nd Lt. Chester, G. A. B.. attd. Ut Battn. 
Hughes. L. H.. attd. 1st Battn. 

Jth Battalion 
Lieut. Meakin, S. A., attd. 1st Battn. 

The York and Lancaster Regiment 
Captain Sandys. M. K. 

Lieut. Hardy. V. H..attd. lit Battn. Lincolnshire 
Regiment. 

jrd Battalion 
Lieut. Peace. H. K. 

Ripley. C. R.. attd. 2nd Battn. 

The Durham Light Infantry 

Major Blake. E. A. C. 

Mander. VA. W. 

Xorthey. W. 

Robb. A. K. 
Captain Hare, H. V. 
Lieut. Parke. W. E. 

Swetenham, E. 
2nd Lt. Marshall, R. 

Stanuel. C. M. 

Storey. H. H. 

The Highland Light Infantry 
Captain Cameron. \\ . H. \ . 

Chichester. R. G. I. 

Pringle, L. G. 
Lieut. Cornish. C. L. 

Dickson. A. J. 

Fergusson. J. A. H. 

Gibson-Craig. Sir A. C. Bart. 

Hall. G. P. 

Kerr. H. R. G. 

Mackenzie. C. L. 

Pitts-Tucker. CM. 
2nd Lt. McBride. A. 

Macdonald. E. R. H. K. 

Mears. J. W. 

Powell, R. C. ff. 

3rd Battalion 
2nd Lt. MvUes. J. R. J., attd. 1st Battn. Gordon 
Highlanders. 



The Seaforth Highlanders 
(Ross-shire Buffs, the D'uke of Albany'si 

Lt.-Col. Bradford, Sir E. R., Bart. 
Major Stock well. C. L 
Captain Forbes-Robertson, K. 

Mackenzie. K. B. 

Methven. D. G. 

St. Clair. The Hon. C. H. M. 

Wilson. R. S. 
Lieut. Macandrew. I. M. 
2nd Lt. Hepburn. M. .A. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Williamson. A.J.N. 

3rd Battalion 
2nd Lt. Maitland. W. E.. attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Gordon Highlanders 

Captain Brooke, J. A. O.. Ass. Adj. 2nd Battn. 
Hamilton, M. J., Reserve of Officers. 
Ker, A. M. 
Lumsden, C. R. 
Eraser, J. H. 
Graham, A. S. B. 
Latta. C. K. 
Lyon. A. P. F. 
MacWiUiam. J. J. G. 
Richmond. L. 
Sandeman. W. A. F. 
Trotter. J. K. 
McGrigor, J. X. G. 
Pine. A. 



Lieut. 



2nd Lt. 



Jrd Battalion 



Major Buckingham, A. W.. attd. 1st Battn. 
Captain Gordon-DuflF, L.. attd. 1st Battn. 

Murray. W. E..attd. Seaforth Highlanders. 
2nd Lt. Fraser, The Hon. S.. attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Queen's Own Cameron Highlanders 

Major Maitland, The Hon. A. H. 
Captain Brodie, E. J. 

Cameron, A. G. 

Cameron. X. C. G. 

Home. A. 

Miers. D. X. C. C. 

Orr. J. A. 

Robertson. L. 
Lieut. Johnstone. R. F. L. 

Macdonald. R. -M 

Meiklejohn. K. F. 

Sprot. I. B. 
2nd Lt. Gearey. E., attd 
Light Infantry. 

McAuliffe, G. H. 



.\djutant 1st Battn. 
1st Battn. Highland 



The Royal Irish Rifles 

Captain Kennedy. H. -A. 

Master. C. L. 

Stevens. R. W. M.. Staff. 

Whelan, J. P. 
Lieut. Rea. V. T. T. 

Whitfeld. A. X. 
2nd Lt. Swaine. H. P. 



xliv 



3rti Battalion 

w 

Captain AI1{;c"hI. B.. altJ. 1st Battn. 

Keynolds, T. J., attd. 2nd Battn. 
2nd I.t. Magenis, R. H. C. 

Jth Battalion 
Captain IJavis, H, O., attd. 2nd Battn. 

Princess Victoria's (Royal Irish Fusiliers) 

.Majnr l'hihli.s. \V. G. B. 
Captain Carbery, M. B. C. 
Lieut. Wakefield, R. O. B. 
2nd Lt. SaiDuels, A. M. 

3id Battalion 
Lieut. Crynible, C. R., attd. 1st Battn. 

The Connaught Rangers 

Mii'yir SarsHeld, W. S. 

Captain Armstrnng-Lushingtcm-Tullcch. (J. Dc M. 

Hack, C. E. 
,, -lack son, F. H. 

Leader, F. W. M. 
Lieut. Abbott. G. ]). 

Blacker, C. F. 
,, de Stacpoole, R.A. 
,, Fenton, G. K. 
.. Fraser. J, 

George, F. R., .Adjutant 1st Battn. 

Henderson, R. .M. H. 
,, Ovens, J. R. 

(temp.) Spreckley, R. L. * 

Thomas, R. I. 
2nd Lt. Benison. R. B. 
,, Lentargne, \'. A. 

Mallins, C. J. O'C. 
,, Vaughan, H. R. 
,, Winspear, A. 

Jrd Battalion 
2nd Lt. Montgomery, A., attil. 2nd Battn. 

Jth Battalion 
Captain .Saker, F. H. 
Lieut. Wickham, A. T. C, attd. 2nd Battn. 



Princess Louise's 
(Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders) 

Major Maclean, A. H. 

Captain Bruce, The Hon. R., Master of Burleigh. 

Fraser, J. A,, 2nd Battn. 

Henderson, W. A. 

Kennedy, A. E. 
Lieut. AytouTi, R. M. G. 

Burt-.Marshall, \V. M. 
,, Gilkison, J. ]) , 

MacLean, A. K. 

Rose, J. C. R., 2nd Battn. 

nil Battalion 
Captain Thomas, D. C. W., attd. 1st Battn 
Gordon Highlanders. 

The Prince of Wales's Leinster Regiinent 
(Royal Canadians) 

Captain Maffett. H. T. 



Captain .Montgomeric. W. G. 
Lieut. Cormac-Walshe, E.J. 

Gaitskell, C. E. 

Lecky, A. 
2nd Lt. Eldred, J. S. 



The Royal Munster Fusiliers 

Major Charrier, P. A. 

Oay, F. 1. 

Thomson, E. P. 
Captain Barrett, P. G. 

O'Brien, H. C. H 

Pemberton.O., attd. Royal Dublin Fusiliers. 

Simms, G. N. 
Lieut. Banning, P. S. 

Chute, C. F. T. 

O'Brien, J. F. 

Phayre. C. F. 

Styles, F. E. 
2nd Lt. Aw dry, C. E. V. 

Cro^ier, J. C. B. 

Sulivan, P. H. 

Young, R. A. 

Jrd Battalion 
Captain Durand, F. W., attd. 2nd Battn. 

Reymes-Cole, W. E , attd. 2nd Battn. 

Jth Battalion 
Cajitain Tra\ers, H. M., attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Royal Dublin Fusiliers 

Major (fciiip. Lieut. -CipI.) .Maclcar, P. (cmpl. 

West African Frontier Force). 
Lieut. Philby, U. D., attd. Royal Munster 

Fusiliers. 
2nd Lt. .McGuire, B. 

Special Reserve 
2nd Lt. Ounlop, J. G. .M., attd. 2nd Battn. 



The Rifle Brigade 
(The Prince Consort's Own) 

Lt.-Col. Alexander, R. 
Major Harman, G. -M. X. 

Paley, G., Staff. 

Percival, C. V. N. 

Rickman, S. H. 
Captain Gilliat, O. C. S. 

Grenvillc, The Hon. R. C, . (.',. M. 
,, Jenkinson, J. H., Staff. 

Leslie. N. J. B. 

Toynbce, (i. P. R. 

Whitaker, H. 
Lieut. Landale, D B. 

Jth Battalion 
Captain Prittie, Hon. F. R. D., attd. 1st Battn. 
2nd Lt. Uaniell, A. S. L., attd. 1st Battn. 

6th Battalion 

Captain Turner, B. A., attd. Kings Royal Rifle 

Corps. 
Lieut. Bradley. G. M., attd. 2nd Battn. Welsh 

Regiment. 



xlv 



INFANTRY TERRITORIAL FORCE 

The Monmouthshire Regiment 

2nd Battalion 
2nd Lt. Paton. J. E 

The London Regiment 

County of London Battalions 

74th London Scottish 
2nd Lt. Gulland. R. G. K. 



The West India Regiment 

2nd Lt. Williams. A. J. F. de C. attd. 4th 
Battn. Middlesex Regiment. 



INDIAN ARMY 

INDIAN CAVALRY 

14th Murray's Jat Lancers 
Captain Bradshau . A. E.. attd. l.Sth Hussars. 

18th King George's Own Lancers 

Lieut. RaiUton. S. J. NV.. attd. 4th Dragoon 
Guards 

19th Lancers (Fane's Horse) 

Captain Blane. H. S.. attd. 5th Dragoon Guards. 
Hunt. F. \V. 

20th Deccan Horse 
Captain McEuen, J. S. 



The Army Service Corps 

2nd Lieut. Walker. W. A. B.. and. 2nd Battn. 
Bedfordshire Regiment. 



Royal Army Medical Corps 

Lt.-Col. Dalton. L . 
Major Steel. E. B 
Captain Conyngham. C. A. T. 

Forrest. F. 

Glanvill. E. M. 

Kinkead. R. C. G. M. 

Leckie. M. 

Lochrin, ^L J. 

Macnab. A.. Territorial. 

Nolan. R. H. 

O'Brien-Butler. C. P- 

O'Connor. R. D. 

Phillips. T. McC. 

Ranken. S. 

Scatchard. T. 
Lieut. Armstrong. A. K. 

Ball. W. O. W. 

Chisnall. G. H. 

Crocket. J. 

Hopkins, H. L. 

Huggan. J. L. 

lies. C. C Special Reserve. 

OConnell. J. F. 

Porter. RE. 

Richardson. M. J. 

Rintoul. D. W. 

Shields, H. S. J. 



Army Veterinary Corps 
Lieut. Fox. V. 

Jones. S. K.. Special Reserve. 



21st Prince Albert Victor's Own Cavalry 
(Frontier Force/ iDaly's Horse 

Captain Whitchurch. L. S. 

26th King George's Own Light Cavalry 
Captain Chaytor. H. C. 

27th Light Cavalry 
Major Henderson. A. F. 

34th Prince Albert Victor's Own 
Poena Horse 

Lt.-Col. Snanston. C. (). 
Lieut. de Pass. F. A. 

37th Lancers Baluch Horse 
Major Loring. C. B., attd. Poona Horse. 

INDIAN INFANTRY 
Captain Birdwood, R. L. 

6th Jat Light Infantry 
Captain Anderson. A. C. 

Dudley. L. G. 
Lieut. Liptrott. E. C. 

9th Bhopal Infantry 
Lt.-Col. Anderson. H. L. 

10th Jats 
Captain Mortimer. G. H. W.. attd. 9th Bhopal 
Infantrv'- 

13th Rajputs The Shekhawal Regimenti 
Captain Clothier. R. F. 
Lieut. Day. M. C. 



West African Regiment 

Captain Brand. E. S.. Royal Fusiliers. 

Powell. H. M., South Staffordshire Regt. 



20th Duke of Cambridge's Own Infantry 
iBrownlow's Punjabis 
Major Ducat. R. 

Rome, H. C. 



xlvi 



31st Punjabis 

Lieut. Reilly, R. A., attd. 5Sth Wiughan's Rifles. 



97th Deccan Infantry 
Captain Cavendish. G. L. J. 



34th Sikh Pioneers 

Lt.-Col. Kelly, G. H. K. 
Captain Mackain, J. F. 

,, Masters, A. 

,, \'auglian-Saw yer. G. H. 

35th Sikhs 
Captain Buchanan, C. G., attd. Sth Gurkha Rifles. 

36th Sikhs 
Captain Padday, W. H.. attd. 47th Sikhs. 

38th Dogras 
Captain Waller, R. H. 

39th Garhwal Rifles 
Captain Robertson-Glasgow, A, \V. 

41st Dogras 

Captain Marsh. G. H. .M. 



98th Infantry 

Captain Hall. li. H. 

101st Grenadiers 
Major Tatum, H. 
Captain Brookes, H. R. 

Brown, K. G. 

Hogg, I. D. M. 
Lieut. Hughes. R. P. 

107th Pioneers 
Major Bruce, J. M. 
Lieut. Burridge, H. G. 

108th Infantry 

Lieut. Hanier, H. J. T., attd. 101st (Jrenadiers. 

127th Queen Mary's Own Baluch 
Light Infantry 
Major Humphreys, G. (i. P. 



46th Punjabis 
Captain Gilchrist. R. C. 

47th Sikhs 

Captain McCleverty. R.J. 

54th Sikhs (Frontier Force) 

Captain Kt-11. M. .A. R..attil. ,>Sth Vaughans Rifles. 

57th Wilde's Rifles (Frontier Force) 
Major Barwell. E. E. 
Captain Gordon, R. S. 

Shepherd, G. A. G. 
Craig, J. M. 

58th Vaughan's Rifles Frontier Forcel 
Lt.-Col. Venour, W. E. 
Captain Baldwin. H. L. C. 

Black. W. McM., Adjutant. 
Lieut. Gaisford. L. 

59th Scinde Rifles i Frontier Forcel 
Lt.-Col. Fenner, C. C. 
Captain Lee, H. N. 

Scott, W. F. 
Lieut. Atkinson, J. C. 

Bruce. W. A. McC. 



129th Duke of Connaught's Own Baluchis 
Captain Adair, \V. F. 

Hanipe-\"incent. P. C. 
,, Ussher, S. 

1st King George's Own Gurkha Rifles 
(The Malaun Regiment- 
Major Bliss, C. 

,, Young, A., Staff 
Captain Burke, T. C. 
Duff, B. O. 
Money, H. I. 
Lieut. Rund:dl, L. B. 

2nd King Edward's Own Gurkha Rifles 
(The Sirmoor Rifles) 
Major Becher, H. S. 
,, ^lacpherson, N. 
Ross, F. G. C. 
Captain Barton, F. H. 
Lieut. Innes, 1. C. 

Reid. J. L. I. 
2nd Li. Walcott, J. H. L. 

3rd Queen Alexandra's Own 
Gurkha Rifles 

.Major Drumnicjnd, E. G. (attd.). Res. of Officers. 
,. Manners-Smith. F. 



61st King George's Own Pioneers 
Captain Hart. L. G. 

Manson, B. E. A. 



4th Gurkha Rifles 
Captain Inglis, D. 

Rundall. A. M. 



83rd W'allajahbad Light Infantry 

Captain Fuller. J. H. M., attd. fiSrd Palmacottah 
Light Infantry. 



Sth Gurkha Rifles 'F"rontier Force) 
Captain Graham, A. M., attd. King Edward's 
Own Gurkha Rifles. 



xlvii 



7th Gurkha Rifles 

Major Elliott. R. W. S. 
Lieut. Macpherson, D. S. R. 
Rogers, L. C. C. 

8th Gurkha Rifles 

Major Wake. H. St. A. 
Captain Davidson. D. B. 

Hartnell, H. 

Hayes Sadler. E. R. 

Stack. E. H. B. 

Wright. H. S. N. 
Lieut. Maxwell, C. W. 

9th Gurkha Rifles 

Lieut. Baillie. D. 

Walton. R. C. 

Supply and Transport Corps 
Major Logan. L. S. 



WEST AFRICAN FRONTIER FORCE 

Nigeria Regiment 

Major (^em^. Lieut.-Col.) Maclear. P.. R. Dublin 

Fusiliers. 
Captain Hopkinson. C. R. T.. East Surrey Regt. 
,, Peel. A. R.. South Wales Borderers. 

Priestley. A. B.. Dorsetshire Regiment. 
(temp. Ma'jorj Puckle. T. N".. Leicestershire 
Regiment. 
,. Sherlock, G. L. E.. 3rd Hussars. 

Wesche, E. B.. South Lancashire Regt. 
Lieut. (local Capt.) Wickham. T. S.. Manchester 
Regiment. 
,, Hughes, F. D.. East Lancashire Regiment. 
Stewart. A. H., Gloucestershire Regiment. 



Gold Coast Regiment 

Bt. yiajoT ttemp. Lieut. -Col. I Famer-Dounes. E.M. 

Royal Irish Regiment. 
Lieut. Thompson. G. M.. Royal Scots. 



Unattached List for Indian Army 

2nd Lt. Mercer. E. C.attd. Rnyal Dublin Fusiliers. 
Tucker. A. R. L., attd. 4th Royal War- 
wickshire Regiment. 

Indian Medical Service 

Major Atal. P. P. L. 
Captain Singh, K.I. 



THE KING'S AFRIC.\N RIFLES 

Lieut. Bowen. C. E. L. (attd. J. late Royal West 

Surrey Regiment. 
Garnett. P. N.. 1st (Central .Africa) Battn., 

Royal Berkshire Regiment. 
Oldfield. G. C. O.. 4th (L'ganda) Battn.. 

Royal West Surrey Regiment, 
(local Capt.) Thornycroft. E. G. M.. 4th 

(Ugandal Battn. Royal Lancashire Regt. 



THE BIOGRAPHIES 




MAJOR EUSTACE HENRY AGRE- 
M O N T A B A D I E . D . S . O. , p. s. c. , 
9th OLE ENS ROYAL) LANCERS, 

is reported to have 
been killed In action 
at ilessines in Octo- 
ber, 1914. Hewasat 
first officially report- 
ed to be a prisoner of 
war ; as no official 
confirmation of his 
death has been re- 
ceived, and as noth- 
ing has been heard of 
or from him since, it 
must be unhappily 
assumed that the gallant officer has lost his life. 
He was the elder surviving son of the late ilajor- 
General Henry Richard Abadie, C.B., 9th 
Lancers, whose death occiured after that of his 
son, and was born on the 24th January, 1877, 
He joined the 9th Lancers in August, 1897, 
becoming Lieutenant in Jlay, 1899. He 
served with much distinction in the South 
African War. having taken part in the advance 
on and relief of Kimberley, including the actions 
at Belmont, EnsUn. and Jlagersfontein ; he was 
present at operations in the Orange Free State, 
and at Paardeberg. including actions at Poplar 
Grove. Driefontein, Karee .Siding, Houtnek 
(Thoba Mountain), Vet River and Zand River, 
between February and May, 1900 ; at opera- 
tions in the Transvaal, East of Pretoria ; and 
in the Cape Colony between November, 1900, 
and May, 1902. He was mentioned in Des- 
patches, " London Gazette," 10th .September, 
1901, was awarded the D.S.O., and received the 
Queen's medal with eight clasps, and the King's 
medal with two clasps. It is beheved that no 
other officer received more than eight clasps with 
the Queen's medal, in that campaign. 
Major Abadie, who was a -Staff College Graduate, 
was promoted Captain in March, 1904 ; from 
FeVjruary, 1906, to August, 1907, he was 
Adjutant of liis Regiment, and he received his 
ilajority in March, 1912. For his services in 
the Great War he was mentioned in Sir 
John French's Despatch of the 14th January, 
1915, 

It is an interesting fact, illustrating how the 
name of the same familv recurs in military 



history, that the first name in " The Last 
Post," a work containing biographies of officers 
who lost their lives in the South African War, 
which commenced fifteen years before the 
present war, was also that of a cavalry 
officer named Abadie, viz., Lieutenant H, B. 
Abadie, 11th Hussars. That officer was Major 
E. H. A. Abadie's eldest brother ; and another 
brother. Captain G, H, F, Abadie, late 16th 
Lancers, died of fever in February, 1904, 
at Kam, West Africa, where he was serving 
as Resident, after having been awarded the 
C.M.G. for his services in the Kam-Sohoto 
Campaign. 

ilajor-General Abadie, the late officer's father, 
also had a most distinguished mihtary career 
of 46 vears. 



LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY DYETT 
ABBOTT, 1st BATTN. CONNAUGHT 
RANGERS. 

who was born on the 

12th October, 1891. 

at .Srinagar, Kasli- ^3i*~ 

mir, was the son ot B 

the late Colonel _ ^ 

Frank Abbott, late 
37th Lancers 
(Baluch Horse), and 
a grandson of the 
late Lieutenant- 
Gene ral H, D. 
Abbott, C.B., and of 
Major-General J. C. Berkeley, CLE. 
He was educated at Cheltenham College and 
the K.M.C.. Sandhurst. Having been gazetted 
to the Connaught Rangers in March. 1911, he 
served with the 1st Battalion in India, and 
was promoted Lieutenant In June, 1914. 
He was a good shot, and played football, 
cricket, billiards, and tennis, 
Lieut, Abbott was killed in action at Laventie, 
France, on the 2nd November, 1914. His 
Company Commander sent the following 
account of the circumstances : — 
" On the 2nd instant (November, 1914) we 
went to relieve the 2nd Gurkhas and came 
under rather heavy fire crossing an open place. 
It was in the above open place he was 
killed." 




ABE— ADE 




MAJOR WILLIAM HENRY ABELL, 
4th BATTN. DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE'S 
OWN (MIDDLESEX REGIMENT), 

who was stated in the 
Casualty List pul)- 
lished by the War 
Office in the Novem- 
ber Army List to 
liave l)een " report e<l 
killed in action," it is 
l)elicved at Oboiirg. 
near Jlons, was the 
second son of the late 
ilartin Abell. of Nor- 
ton Hall, Worcester- 
shire. He was born 
on the 20th September, 1873, and joined tlie 
Middlesex Regiment from the Militia in Decem- 
ber, 1896, becoming Lieutenant in October, 1S99. 
JIajor Abell served in St. Helena during the 
South African War from March to May. receiving 
the Queen's medal. From .September. 1907, to 
March, 1908, he was an Adjutant of Volunteers, 
and from April, 1908, to March, 1910, an Ad- 
jutant of the Territorial Force ; he was promoted 
to his Majority in Sepi ember. 1912. Major 
Aliell left a widow. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM FINLAY ADAIR, 

129th DUKE OF CONNAUGHT'S OWN 

.. B A L U C H I S, 

was born at Mauch- 
line. Ayrshire. Scot- 
land, on the 21sl 
September, 1877, the 
youngest son of the 
late Major Wallace 
Adair. Xorthumljer- 
land Fusiliers (the 
" Fighting Fifth "). 
He was educated at 
the French College at 
- - - - St. Serven. Brittany, 

and afterwards in Jersey. He obtained his 
commission as unattached Second Lieutenant 
in January. 1897, joining the Indian Stafi' Corps 
in March, 1898, in which he became Lieutenant 
in July, 1899, and Captain in January, 190(5. 
He saw most of his service with the 1.30th 
King George's Own Baluchis. of which for some 
years he was Adjutant, being transferred to 
the 129th, on promotion, as Double Company 
Commander, and lie was also qualified as a 
First Class Interpreter in French. He served 
in China in 1900 and received the medal ; in 
the operations in Somaliland, 1902, receiving 
the medal and clasp, and in operations in the 
interior, Aden, 190.3-04. 

He was a member of the Junior Army and Navy 
Club, and of the Bath and County Club, Bath. 
Captain Adair was killed on the 30th Octolier, 
1914, at Hollebeke, Belgium, having been, at 




his own request, l.^ft mortally wounded in a 
trench when his men had to retire. The follow- 
ing account of the circumstances was received 
by his relatives : — " On October 30th, 1914. at 
Ifnllcbcke, Belgium, Captain .Adair had orders 
fnini Ills General to retire, as the Germans were 
close up ; while giving instructions to his men 
he was shot high up under the arm. The native 
Corporal wished to carry him away, but he 
refused, fearing to delay them, and so insisted 
on being left in the trench alone. The Germans 
came up almost immediately, and nothing 
further has been heard. The Corporal, who 
said Captain Adair was mortally wounded and 
could not have lived long, led the men back 
to a safe position already prepared, without any 
loss, and so the sacrifice was not in vain." 
Captain Adair was mentioned in Sir .Inlin 
French's Despatch of I Itli .Tanuary. 1915. 

LIEUTENANT .\LEC CRICHTON 
MAITLAND- ADDISON, 1st B.\TTN. 
THE CHESHIRE REGIMENT, 

born at Brighton in IS.SO, was the son of .Major 
A. Maitland-Addi.son, late 71st Highlanders; he 
was a great grandson of Charles Bisset, 42 nd 
Highlanders (mentioned in " Lives of Eminent 
.Scotchmen ") and closely connected .vith the 
family of the poet Joseph Addison. 
He was educated privately, and was gazetted 
to the Chesliire Regiment in .September, 1914, 
as Second Lieutenant. 

Joining the Royal Flying Corps, he landed in 
France in August, 1914. and served continuously 
till the time of his death, having been promoted 
for distinguished service in the Field. He was 
wounded at Ypres on the 25th October. I!!M. 
and died at Boulogne on the 27th October. 1911. 
Lieutenant Maitland-Addison was a fine man 
— feet 3 inches in height, and broad in pro- 
portion — extremely powerful, and without fear. 

CAPTAIN HENRY ROBERT 
AUGUSTUS ADEANE, COLDSTREAM 
GUARDS, 

son of the late 

Admiral Edward 

Adeane and the late 

Lady Edith Adeane, 

was born at 28, 

Eaton Place, London. 

onthe31stJuly,1882. 

He was educated at 

Winchester, and the 

R.ir.C, Sandhurst, 

and was gazetted to 

the Coldstream 

Guards in 1902. becoming Lieutenant in 1905, 

and Captain in 1912, retiring in .May, 1913. 

At the outbreak of the war, he was voluntarily 

in the Reserve of Officers, and joined his 

regiment for service at the front. He was killed 

near Ypres on the 2nd November, 1914. 




AIN— ALE 




Captain Adeaiie married in 1909. Victoria 
Eugenie Bigge. daugliter of Lieutenant-Colonel 
Ijord Strtiufordham. and left one son, Miiliael 
Edward, liorn :inth Sei)teml)er. 1910. 

2nd LIEUTENANT DENYS ALFRED 
L.\FONE AINSLIE. 1st B.\TTN. DEVON- 
SHIRE REGT., 

who was killed in 
action on the 21th 
^^^ ^^^ October. 1911, in 

I^^^B ^^^1 France, was the third 

'^^^^ "^ "^ ^^^^ son of ilr. and ilrs. 
W. L. Ainslie, of 
Hanworth House, 
Harrow Weald. 
He was educated at 
Wellington, where he 
was in the Talbot 
from 1906 — 1910. 
He was gazetted to the 3rd Battalion of his 
regiment in April. 1913, and was granted a 
commission in the Ist Battalion in Aug\ist. 1914. 

LIEUTEN.\NT JOHN STIRLING 
AINSWOR IH. nth PRINCE ALBERT'S 

OWNi HUSS.\RS, 

who was killed in 
action on the 14th 
October, 1914, was 
the second son of 
J. S. Ainsworth, 
Ardanaiseig, Argyll- 
shiri", and of 55, 
Eaton Place,London, 
S.W. ; his mother. 
Margaret Catherine, 
being a daughter of 
K.R.Macredie, D.L., 
J. P. tor x\rgyUihire and Cumlierland, and M.P. 
for the first named County from 1903. He was 
born on the 9th November, 18S9, and joined 
the 11th Hussars in April, 1909. Lieutenant 
Ainsworth. who reached that rank in November, 
1912, was mentioned in .Sir John French's 
Despatch of the Sth October. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT RONWLD .\NDRE\V 

COLQUHOUN -MTCHISON. 1st BATTN. 

THE KING S OWN ROYAL LANCASTER 

REGIMENT, 

who died on the 14th 
September, 1914, of 
wounds received in 
action, was the son 
of G. Colquhoun 
Aitchisou, of South 
Collingham, Newark. 
He received his com- 
mission inSeptember, 
1913, and was promo- 
ted Lieutenant on the 
1 51 h November, 1914 






CAPTAIN REGINALD JOHN PETTY 
DEVENISH ALDRIDGE. 2nd BATTN. 
THE ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT, 

was born on the 7th ,. . - — r; 

September, 1877, at 
Poole, Dorset, and 
was the son of the 
late Reginald Ald- 
ridge, solicitor, and 
Mrs. Aldridge, of 
Parkstone, Dorset. 
He was educated l)y 
a private tutor, and 
at ^i\'orcester College. 
Oxford.where hetook 
hisB.A. degree ; won 

some prizes for Athletics, and wa,s an Oxford 
Blue for Foot ball. He was also a hockey player. 
In May, 1900, he received his commission in 
the Royal .Sussex Regiment, in which he became 
Lieutenant in March, 1903. In 1902 he was 
Instructor of Signalling at Kasauli. India, and 
in 1004 he conmianded a Comjiany of Mounted 
Infantry in Malta. He was attached to the 
West .\frican Regiment from 190.5-08, being 
appointed Assistant -Adjutant and Quarter- 
master in January, 1906. From January. 1908, 
to January. 1912, he was Adjutant of the 
Guernsey Light Infantry, and then rejoined liis 
liattalion at Woking, becoming Captain in 
April. 1910. 

At the Battle of the .Aisne he was killed Ijy a 
shell on the 7th October, 1914, and was buried 
at Troyon. 

Captain Aldridge married, in ilay, 1908. Mabel 
Dulcibella. daughter of the late Rev. J. 
Padmore Noble, \'icar of Childs Ercall. ilarket 
Draj-ton, from 1876-96, and left two children, 
Dulcibella Noble, born 24th December, 1909, 
and Reginald Charles Petty, born 24th Decem- 
ber, 1914. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL REGINALD 
ALEX.\NDER, 3rd B.\TTN. RIFLE 
BRIGADE, 

(lid on the 29th 

December,1914, from 

ivouuds received in 

action. He was born 

on the 6th Sept em- ^K^ ' * 

lier. 1867. and joined 

the Royal West Kent 

Regiment from the 

Militia in January. 

1889. In December. ^^^^ ^^^-m 

1891. he was trans- |^|^_^ ,J^!^C3al 

ferred to the Rifle 

Brigade as Lieutenant, anil from 1894-98 was 

Adjutant of his Battalion. 

He was a fair cricketer, very fond of racing and 

of a most cheery disposition. 




ALL 




He served in the South Afruaii War. takiui; 
part ill operations in Natal, ineUuling the action 
at Laing's Nek ; ia the Transvaal east of 
Pretoria, including action at Belfast, l)ein^' 
severely woundeil. Ijater he was Cominandaiil 
at Uitkyk, and afterwards at Olifant's Hivcr. 
lie was twice mentioned in Despatelies ("London 
Gazette," 10th September. 1901. and 29th .Tuly. 
1902), and received the Queen's and the King's 
medals, each with two clasps. 
He obtained his Majority in Api-il. HMI.">. ami 
succeeded to the command of his Hattali'in in 
October, l!)i:i. 

MAJOR WILLIAM LEWIS CAMPBELL 
ALLAN. 3rd a t t d. 2ndi BATTN. 
KING'S OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS. 

was killed in action 
on the 12th October. 
1914, near Cuinchy, 
La Bassee, France. 
He was the eldest 
son of Major-General 
l^ ' t^l^ ^^^B William Allan. 

Colonel of the Welsh 
rJegiment, of Hill- 
side. Edinburgh, and 
Bidborougb. Kent, 
and was born at 
Dalhousie, India, 
on the Cth July. 1871. 

Major-General Allan, the late officer's father, 
had himself a \'ery distinguished military 
career, for he served in the Crimea with the 
41st Regiment — now the Welsh Regiment — 
taking part in the battles of the Alma and 
Inktrman, both the assaults on the Redan, 
and was present at the siege and fall of 
•Sebastopol : his services were recognised by 
the award of the Briti.sh medal with tluve 
clasps, the Turki.sh medal, and by his being 
appointed a Knight of the Legion of Honour. 
.Major Allan n'as educated at Wellington College, 
where he was in the Hopetown from 1885-1889, 
and at Erase nose College, Oxford. He joined 
the 3rd Battalion King's Own Scottish Bor- 
derei-s in November. 1890. and served in the 
South African War of 1900-1902, being Station 
Start' Officer on the Lines of Communication 
at Modder River (graded as a .Staff Captain) 
from the 21.st ilarch, 1900. He was present 
at operations in Cape Colony, and for his 
services received the Queen's medal with two 
clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. 
He was at the School of Musketry and went 
through the Machine Gun course at Hythe, 
and received the rank of Hon. Major in June, 
1899. 

Major Allan was fond of cricket, shooting and 
fishing, and was a member of the Conservative 
Club, Edinburgh, and of the Junior Carlton 
Club, London. 




C.\PTA1N LIONEL THEOPHILUS 
ALL.\SON, 1st BATTN. LOYAL 
NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

fourth sun of the 
late Alfred Allason. 
Esq., of Randolph 
Crescent. Lonrlon. 
W., was born on the 
3rd February, 1877, 
and was educated at 
iMihvich College ami 
liy private tviiticui 
aliroad. 

He joined the 3rd 
(Militia) Battalion 
East Lancashire 
Regiment, and served with it. when cmliodied. 
in the .South African War; he was Station 
StatT Officer at Vet River. an<l was i>rcsent al 
operatioiLS in Cape Colony south of Orange 
River, in the Orange River Colony in 1900, 
and again in both Colonies in 1901 and 1902. 
Before that war was over he was gazetted to 
the Loyal North Lancashu-e Regiment in Jidy. 
1901. For his .services he received the 
Queen's and the King's medals, each with two 
clasps. 

Captain Alla.son, who was promoted Lieutenant 
in September. 1904. and Captain in November. 
1912, was qualified as a first-class Inter- 
preter in German, but above all he was a regi- 
mental man who took keen interest in all the 
sports and doings of his regiment. 
He was killed by shrapnel on the 7th Octoljer. 
1914, at Veudresse. near Troyon. and was 
buried there. He was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1911. 

LIEUTENANT HUGH THOMAS 
AC K L A N D A L L E N, 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS, 

who was killed in 
action on the 23rd 
October, 1914, was 
the only son of 
C. Ackland- Allen, of 
.St. Hilary Manor, 
Cowbr.idge, South 
Wales. IJeuteuant 
Ackland-^Vllen was 
educated at Welling- 
ton College, where he 
was in tlie Beresford 
from 1907-1910. pro- 
ceeding to the B.M.C.. .Sandhur.st. in 1912. 
He received his commission in the Royal Welsh 
Fusiliers in September, 1913; the battalion 
went to Malta in January. 1914, i-eturned to 
England in .September, and went out with 
the Vllth Division on the 4th Octol)er. 
He was 21 years of age when he was killed near 
Zonnebeke on the 23rd October, 1914. 




ALL 




CAPTAIN AND ADJUTANT JOHN 
FRANCIS ALLEN. 1st LOYAL 
NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

son of William Henry 
Allen, J.P., D.L., of 
Bromhain House, 
Bromhani. near Bed- 
ford, was horn at 10, 
Greville Road, Kil- 
burn. X.W., on the 
0th October, 1881, 
and was educated at 
Repton School. 
He obtained his com- 
mission in 1899 in 
the Loyal North Lan- 
cashire Regiment from the Militia during the 
Boer War. He served with the 2nd Battalion 
in Malta, (iibraltar. South Africa, Mauritius, 
and India, and was transferred to tlie 1st 
Battalion, in winch he became Captain, in 
April, 1912. He received the South African 
War (Mediterranean) medal ; also the Delhi 
Durliar medal whilst he was A.D.f. to Jjurd 
Sydenham. Governor of Bombay. 
Captain Allen left Aldershot August. 1914, 
attached to the 1st Division Staff, and was 
appointed Adjutant in September, 1914. He 
took part in all the engagements in Belgium 
and France, froni the commencement of lios- 
tilities up to the time of Ins death, which 
occurred on the 4th November, 1914, from 
wounds received near Ypres, while in the act of 
I'escuing two men who had been buried by 
earth tlirown up by a shell. 

Captain Allen was a good all-round sportsman, 
interested in all forms of sport, and also in 
amateur theatricals. He was not married. 



MAJOR WILLIAM LYNN ALLEN, 
D.S.O., 2nd BATTN. BORDER REGT., 

who was kiUed in 
action on the 25th 
October. 1914. was 
the son of the late 
Bulkeley Allen. E.scj., 
.T.P., and Mrs. 
Bulkeley Allen, of 
West Lynn, Altrin- 
cham, Cheshire. He 
had two .soldier 

brothers : the late 
ilajor K. Lynn Allen, 
Royal War^-ickshire 
Regiment, p.nd Major A. Lynn Allen, A.P.U.. 
formerly in the Suffolk Regiment ; and his 
cousin, Captain J. Derwent Allen, C.B., R.N., 
is now commanding H.M.S. " Kent " ; while 
another cousin is ilajor W. A. Frere Jones, 
R.F\A , also on Active Service. 
He was born on the Sth ilaj-, 1871, and was 




educated at Rugby (Rev. C. Elsee's house), to 
which he went in 1885. He joined the Border 
Regiment from the ililitia in September, 1893, 
becoming Lieutenant in 1896. From August, 
1901, to August, 1904, he was Adjutant of his 
tiattalion. He served all through the South 
.:\irican War, being present at operations in 
Natal in 1899 ; at the Relief of Ladysmith, 
including action at Colenso, and the actions at 
Spion Kop and Vaal Krans : operations in the 
Tugela Heights and action at Pieters Hill ; 
operations in the Orange Free .State, in the 
Transvaal east and west of Pretoria, in the 
Orange River Colony, and in Cape Colony 
north and south of Orange River. During the 
latter part of the war he was Adjutant of his 
Battalion. For his services he was twice men- 
tioned in Despatches (■• London Gazette," 10th 
.September, 1901, and 29th July, 1902), was 
awarded the D.S.O.. and received the Queen's 
medal with five clasps and the King's medal 
with two clasps. 

From September. 1905. to .September. 1909, 
Major Lynn Allen was Adjutant of the Discharge 
Depot, and he received his Majority in October, 
1913, in the 2nd Battalion, in which he had 
commanded a Company. 

The circumstances under which Major Lynn 
Allen met his death were as follows : — 
On the evening of the 25th October, about 7.30. 
he was holding a point between the villages of 
Kruiseik and America, about 4| miles from 
Y'pres. For the previous seven days Jlajor Lynn 
Allen had been occupying with his men a salient 
point at the extreme left of his regmient, and 
his Company was badly in need of reinforce- 
ments. On that particvUar night about 100 of the 
enemy made their way over trenches occupied 
by a neighbouring battahon, and appeared in 
the viciiuty of a farmhouse in the rear of the 
Borderers. These men were at first mistaken 
for Belgians sent in support, but the error 
having been realised they were fired upon 
and a considerable number killed. Immedi- 
ately afterwards the remainder signified their 
wish to surrender and asked for an English 
Officer. In response Major Lynn Allen left his 
trench with two men. and had hardly advanced 
more than a step or two l)efore the enemy 
treacherously opened Are, and he fell back 
mortally wounded. 

Colonel Wood, the Commanding Officer, in a 
letter to Mrs. Lynn Allen, and subsequently at 
a personal interview with a brother of the 
deceased officer, paid a high tribute to his 
value as an officer, to his popularity with the 
men of the regiment, and to the splendid 
example he set them by his coolness under fire. 
Major Lynn Allen married Adeline Miriam, 
thu'd daughter of the late Isaac Carbutt 
Dickinson, of Newcastle-on-Tyne, and leaves 
two sons and one daughter. 



ALL AME 




LIEUTENANT FREDERIC DE VERE 
BRUCE ALLFREY, 9th LANCERS. 

wild was tin- sdii iif 
Mr. and .Mrs. V. Xno. 
.\llfr.'y. of WokiiiK- 
liani. ReaditifT, was 
[■•■ported \i IK >l1iria 1 1 y 
as havinjr lii'cii killi-d 
ill actimi in Srj.tciii- 
l.er, I'Jll. 

Lieutenant .Mlfny 
was liorn on tlic 21st 
Septeinlicr. 1. Si) Land 
was educated at Wel- 
lington College, his 
father having been at the same school.and was in 
Brougham's and Upcott's from 1905-09, going 
to the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1910, from which he 
passed into the 9tli Lancers in Fel)ruary. 1911. 
lie was promoted Lieutenant in .January. 1913. 
Since the unoBicial report of his death it lias 
transpired that after a charge of the 9tli Lancei's 
on the 6th September, 1914, near Provins, 
Lieutenant Allfrey dismounted to help a 
wounded lirother officer, and was himself shot 
and killed by a wounded (ierinan. 

C.\PT. BERTRAM .\LLGOOD, ROYAL 

IRISH RIFLES, 

who was killed in 
action on the 7th 
Decemlier. 1914. was 
the second son of the 
late ilajor-Ocneral 
Allgood, C.B., Indian 
Army, latterly Chief 
Constable of North- 
umberland. 
1 le was born on the 
1 1th February. 1ST4. 
was educated at Eton 
and received liis commission in the Royal Irish 
Rifles from the Militia in May, 1,897, becoming 
Lieutenant in the following year and Captain 
in February, 1904. At the tim»; =of the Soutli 
-Vfrican War he was serving with the 1st 
Battalion at Calcutta, and so did not take part 
in that campaign. He continued to serve in 
India till 1905. when he came home for duty 
at the Depot at Belfast. He returned to India, 
but again came Ijack to Belfast, and then served 
for a time in the 2nd Battalion at Dover. In 
1912 he was appointed Adjutant of the 4th 
Battalion, which appointment he gave up on 
retiring from the .\rniy in February. 1914. when 
he joined the Reserve of Officers. On the out- 
break of the war with Germany he was called 
vip for service with the 3r(l Battalion, but later 
went to the F>ont with liis old battalion, the 
1st, on the 7th November, 1914. He was shot 
through the heart on the 7th December, 1914. 
while seeing his men into safety on returning 





to the trenches ne;ir Vpres, and was Imried In .-i 
I enietery at Estairi's. 

He was very fond of hunting, polo, and all sport, 
and wasamemberof theXavaland .Military Club. 
Captain Allgood married in .\in-il. lOl.'i. ]sa 
Cochrane, daughter of the late .\rthur Bayley 
and Mi's. Herbert Lyde, and left a dau-liter. 
burn August. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT CL.\UDE McCAUL 
ALSTON, 2nd B.\TTN. ROY.\L SCOTS 
FUSILIERS, 

who was reporte<l as 
wounded and mis- 
sing, no news being 
subsequently re- 
ceived for many 
months, is now le- 
ported to have been 
killed near Vpres, in 
Flanders, while with 
the \IIth Division 
about the 27th 
October. 1914. 
He was the only son of C. Ho» Al-t<in. 
Barrister-at-I>aw. and Mrs. Ross Alston. Alla- 
habad, India, and nepliew of Ceo. R. Alston. 
Rosemount. Chislehurst. 

Lieutenant Alston was liorn on the 29tli Sep- 
tember. 1,S92. was educated at Charterhouse, 
and re<'eived his commission in the Royal .Scots 
Fusiliers in Septemlier. 1912. He was gazetted 
Lieutenant, to date from the 27tli October. 
1914, the day on which he \\as killed. 

LIEUTENANT \VILLI.\M KERR .\MES, 
1st B.\TTN. ROYAL %VEST KENT 
REGIMENT. 

who died of wnunds 
in hospital at Com- 
piegne on the 17th 
September. liMl. 

being then just 23 
years of age. was the 
youngest son of the 
late Mr. Thomas 
Ames, Huish House, 
Kilmersdoon. Somer- 
set, and of Mrs. Ames. 
29. Clifton (iardens, 

Folkestone. He was bia-ii at llui^li iiuuse, 
Southampton, on the 6th September, 1891. 
He was educated at Dover College, and by an 
Army coach, passing into the R.M.C., .Sand- 
hurst, whence he joined the ^^'est Kent Regi- 
ment in -March. 1912. 

He was sliot through both legs at Crepy. near 
Compiegne, during the retirement from Mons, 
on the 1st .September. 1914. His Company 
Officer had been killed, and Lieutenant Ames 
had tlxen assumed command of the Company, 
when he too was hit. 




AMO— AND 




2nd LIEUTENANT GILBERT 
STRATTON AMOS, 2nd BATTN. 
KINGS OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS, 

who was killed in 
action at the battle 
of the jVisne on the 
UthSeptember.1914, 
a few days before he 
had completed his 
19th year, was the 
only son of Major 
Amos. D.S.O.. late 
Kind's Own Scottish 
Borderers, of St . I bbs, 
Hit chin. 
Second Lieutonant 
Amos was educated at Wellington College, 
where he was in 51r. L'peote's House from 1909- 
1912. when he went to the R.il.C. Sandhurst, 
whence he was gazetted to the Kiiisj's Own 
Scottish Borderers in February. 1914. 

CAPT.\IN ALEXANDER CL.\IR. 
MONTE ANDERSON, 6th JAT LIGHT 

INFANTRY. 

'' son of Lieutenant- 
Colonel A. Anderson. 
late K.A.M.C.. was 
born at Muttra. 
Xorth-West Pro- 

vinces. India, on the 
28th April, 1885. 
After his education 
at Kelly College, 
Tavistock, 
and the 
Sandhurst, 




ceived his comnii>siijii 



Devon, 
K,M,C,, 
he, re- 
Second Lieutenant in 
the Royal Sussex Regiment in January, 189,5. 
joining the Indian Army in 1907, and becoming 
Captain in January, 1911, 

He was killed in the trenches at Festubert. 
near Betluine, France, on the 22nd November, 
1914, by the premature explosion of a hand- 
bomb which he was about to tlirow. 
Captain Anderson was a member of the Junior 
Army and Navy Club, He was not married, 

2nd LIEUTENANT ALAN JAMES 
RA.MS.W ANDERSON, 3rd B.\TTN, 
ROYAL IRISH REGIMENT, 

was tne third son 
of Robert Andrew 
Ander.son. .Secretary 
of the Irish Agricul- 
tural Organisation 
Society, and was born 
at Donerailc. Co, 
Cork, Ireland, on the 
1 5th Decern ber, 1 89 1 . 
He was educated at 
Bedford Grammar 
School, and Univer- 




.sity College, Oxford, He won Ihir Public 
Schools Boxing Championship. Feather Weights, 
in 1909, and was the Oxford LTniversity Boxing 
Club Light Weight in 1912, 1913, and 1914. 
He was a meinljer of Vincent's Club, Oxford 
University, and of the Oxford Union ; Secre- 
tary of the Oxford University Boxing Club, 
and President of .St. Patrick's Club, Oxford ; 
he was also a member of the Royal Dublin Golf 
Club. 

Applying through the Oxford University O.T.C. 
on the outbreak of tlie war. he was given a com- 
mission in the Royal Irish Regiment in August, 
1914. 

He was killed at Le Pilly. near Aubers. Lille. 
on the 20th October. 1914. his second day in the 
firing line. His battalion had carried Le Pilly 
with the bayonet, when it was cut oil and sur- 
rounded, and Second Lieutenant Ander.son was 
shot through the head in the front trench, 

2nd LIEUT, CHARLES ALE.YANDER 
KENNETH .\NDERSON, 1st BATTN. 
THE KING'S ROV.\L RIFLE CORPS. 

aged 21, was the ordy 
son of A. R. Ander- 
son. Esq.. F.R.C.S,, 
of Nottingham, 
He was educated at 
.Stanmore Park, and 
at Harrow (Mr. iloss, 
1907-1911). After 
leaving Harrow he 
went to Pembroke 
College, Cambridge, 
and w^as gazetted to 
the 1st Battalion 
The Royal Scots Fusiliers as a University 
Candidate on the 4th August, 1914. On the 
14th August he was gazetted as Second Lieu- 
tenant to the King's Royal Rifle Corps, but 
having already left England with the Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, he remained attached to that 
regiment throughout the campaign. 
He took part in the successive engagements at 
Mous, the Marne, the Aisne. and lastly on the 
Franco-Belgian frontier in the first battle of 
Vpres, He was killed in action about 3 a,m. 
in the 12tli November, 1914, while leading his 
men in a night attack on the German trenches, 
lieing at that time in command of half of "C" 
Company, 1st Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers. 
Second Lieutenant Anderson was a member of 
the University Pitt Club. Cambridge. 

LIEUTENANT COLIN KNOX 
ANDERSON, 3rd BATTN, THE 
QUEEN'S OWN (ROYAL WEST KENT 
REGIMENT), who.se name appeared in the 
tirst list of British losses issued by the War 
Otlice on the 1st .September, 1914, as killed in 
action, was the youngest son of G. K. .Vnderson, 




AND 




truant in .\]>iil. lli| 1. 



Esq., D.h.. (if ]{riil-r Hill, n.-ar Cantcrliuiy. 
Lieutenant Anderson, who was 20 yeai-s of afje 

.•\t tlif time of his 
d.-ath. was (Mhicatcd 
at .Malvi-ni ('ollct;i'. 
wliere lie was a 
s(lHn,l I'l-effct. in 
tlie Ciitket XI, and 
Football XXII. 
Lieut onaiit Anderson 
joined the iiid Bat- 
talion Royal West 
Kent Regiment, in 
December, 1908, and 
was promoted Lieu- 
W'lien war was declared 
he was employed on civil work in Rochester, 
but at once o(Tere<l his .services whicli were 
accepted. lie was then attached to the 1st 
Battalion of his regiment and proceeded with 
it to France. 

lie was good at all games, but chiefly excelled 
at cricket, being a .successful fast bowler, lie 
was well known in regimental cricket and with 
the Kent Amateurs "The Baml of Brothers." 

2nd LIEUTENANT ERNEST LIONEL 
LANE ANDERSON, 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS. 

who was killed in action oji the lOth-llth Nov- 
ember, 1914, aged 20, was the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Lane Andei\sou, of The Drive, Hove. 
He was born on the 24th December, 1893, ami 
went to the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1912, l)e- 
coming an under-oHicer and winning tlie sword 
for drill, lie joined the Scots Fu.siliers in 
February, 191:5, and went to the Continent 
with them at the beginning of the war, being 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 
8th October. 1914. 

2nd LIEUT. GERARD RUPERT LAURIE 
ANDERSON, 3rd BATTN. CHESHIRE 

REGIMENT, 

who \ras kUled in 
action on the 8th 
Xovember, 1914, 

aged 25, was the 
son of I'rebendary 
and Mrs. Anderson, 
of 20, Chester Street. 
London, S.W., and 
u'randson of Sir 
l-.milius Laurie, Bart., 
of Maxwelton House, 
Dumfrieshire. 
He was educated at Eton, where he estab- 
lished a reputation as an athlete, especially 
in Fives and the Field game. He was 
captain of the Oppidans, President of the 
Eton Socief y, and Keeper of the Field ; lie 
won the School 1-ives and House Fives each 




three times, anil the Hurdles also lliiice. lie 
won a scholarship at Trinity College, Oxford, 
where he took first classes in " Mods " and 
" Greats," and was President of the Universitj- 
Athletic Club, being finally elected a Fellow of 
All Souls in 1913. He continued his athletic 
successes at the '\'arsity, where he ran in the 
quarter and half miles and Hurdles, also com- 
peting in 1911 for Oxford and Cambridge 
against Yale and Harvard. He twice won the 
English, and once the Scotch, Chamiiionsliip 
over hurdles, and made his final appearance in 
the athletic field at Stockholm. 
After leaving College he entered the firm of 
Cammell Laird, at Birkenhead, and on the out- 
break of the war with Crermany, applied for and 
was given a commission on probation in the 
3rd Battalion Cheshire Regiment on the 14tli 
August, 1914, and was attached for active 
service to the 1st Battalion of that Regiment, 
sailing for France on the 21st September. 
Mr. Anderson was twice wounded at La Bass<>e, 
l)ut remained on duty, and was shot through the 
heart on the 8th Xovember, 1914. while leading 
a charge against the German trenches. For 
his services he was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL HENRY 
LAWRENCE ANDERSON. SECOND IN 
COMMAND, 9th BHOP.\L INFANTRY, 
INDIAN ARMY, 

wlio died on the 
L'.sth-29tli October, 
lull, of wounds re- 
ceived in action, was 
the son of the late 
General R. P. and 
Mrs. Anderson, Hol- 
land Road, Kensing- 
ton. 

He was born in June. 
1807, and was gaz- 
etted to the York- 
shu-e Light Infantry in August, 188S. He « as 
promoted Lieutenant in March, 1890, and in the 
follo«ing month was transferred to the Indian 
.Staff Corps. He was promoted Captain in the 
Indian Army in August, 1899. and in 1903-4 
saw active service in Tibet, for which he riTei\ i-d 
the medal. 

liieutenant-Colonel Anderson, who left n \\ idow, 
obtained his Majority in August. 1900, and was 
promoted Lieutenant-Colonel in August, 1914. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES GEORGE WIL- 
LIAM ANDREWS. ADJUTANT 2nd 
BATTN. BORDER REGIMENT, 

who was killed in action on the 2Sth October, 
1914. leaving a widow, was the only child 
of the late G. J. W. Andrews, of Dorchester, 
anil of Mrs. Andrews, of Bedford. He was born 




AND ANS 




on the lOtli -May, ]t>78, and joined the 
Border Regiment from the Militia in May, 
1898, becoming 
Lieutenant in August. 
1901. He took part 
in the South African 
War, heing present 
at operations in 
Xatal. at the Ke- 
Hef of Ladysmith 
(wounded on the 21st 
January,1900): at op- 
erations in the Orange 
Free .State,the Trans- 
vaal, Orange River 
Colony, and Cape Colony, south and north of 
Orange River. He received the Queen's medal 
with four clasps and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

From Xovember. 1905, to November, 1910, he 
was an Adjutant of Volunteers and of the 
Territorial Force, having been promoted Cap- 
tain in his regiment in April. 1909. In De- 
cember, 1911. he was appointed Adjutant of the 
2nd Battalion of his regiment, and held that 
position when he was killed. 
His battaUon formed part of the 20th Brigade 
of the memorable Vllth Division which left 
hyndhurst for Belgium on October 4th. and 
Captain Andrews was with it in aU the fighting 
which took place in the retirement from 
Bruges and Ghent, to Ypres, and feU in the first 
battle which took place to the east of that t own. 

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK GEORGE 
ANDREWS. 4th B A T T N . THE 
KINGS LIVERPOOL REGIMENT, 
who was killed in 
action on the 21st 
October, 1914, at the 
age of 43, was born 
in New Zealand, and 
educated at Christ 
College, WeUington. 
WTien the war with 
Germany broke out 
he was living at 
HaUaton. ilarket 
Harborough. Lei- 
cestershire, where 
he had resided for several years. 
He received a commission as Lieutenant in the 
Liverpool Regiment in August, 1914, and was 
attached to the 2nd Battn. South Lancashire 
Regiment when he was killed. 

C.\PT.\1N THE HON. ARTHUR 
A N N E S L E Y, 10th PRINCE OF 
WALES'S OWN ROYALi HUSSARS. 

was the sou and heir of Arthur. 11th Viscount 
^'alentia, and was bom at Bletchingtou Park, 
Oxford, on 24th August, 1 SSO. His next brother. 





w ho is now heir to the title. Ls a Lieutenant in 

the Oxfordshire Light Infantry. He was 

educated at Etoi 

and received hi 

couimission in tli 

10th Royal Uussar- 

from the 3rd (Militi;. ^ 

Oxfordshire an ^^^ ^^ 

Buckinghamshii 

Light Infantry ii 

April. 1900. U. 

became Lieutenaii' 

in Xovember, 1901. ,r 

With his regiment he I' 

served in the South 

African War from 1900 to 1902, being present 

at operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony, 

for which he received the Queen's medal with 

tliree clasps and the King's medal with two 

clasps. He also received the Coronation medal 

of King George V. 

Having obtained his Captamcy in 1907, he 

served as Adjutant of his regiment from 3Iay, 

1907. to December, 190S, andin Xovember, 191 2, 

was appointed A.D.C. to the General OfBcer 

Commanding in Egypt, an appointment he was 

holding when the Great War broke out. 

He was kUled in action by a sniper at Zillebeke, 

near Ypres, on the 16th Xovember. 1914. 

Captain Annesley was a meiuber of the Cavalry 

Clul), and his recreations were hunting and polo. 



L I E U T F N A N T- C O L O N E L GEORGE 
KIRKPATRICK ANSELL. p.s.c. COM- 
-M.\NDING 5th PRINCESS CH.VRLOTTE 
OF WALES'Si DRAGOON ^ GUARDS. 
son of the late 
Colonel R. Ansell. 
Royal Marine Artil- 
lery, was born at 
Fort Cumberland . 
near Portsmouth, in 
1872. 

He was educated at 
WeUington College, 
and joined the 0th 
(InniskiUing) Dra- 
goons from the 
Mihtia in April. 1894. 
becoming Ijeutenant in September, 1895, and 
Captain in July, 1001. He served with dis- 
tinction in the South African War as Regimental 
Adjutant, which appointment he held with the 
break of a few mouths from 1897 to 1902, after- 
wards acting as Brigade-Major to General 
Rimington. He took part in operations in the 
Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including actions 
at Reit Vlei and Belfast, and in operations in 
Cape Colony, south of Or^ange River, including 
the action of Colesberg. For his services he was 
twice mentioned in Despatches, received his 




ANT ASK 



10 



BrcNi'l M^iionty. tlii' (Juccn'-; iikmI.-iI \\itli tliicc 
clasps and tlic Kind's iiicilal witli (\m) iliis|)s. 
Lieutenant-ColoiiolAiLscU also hold (lie 1 )iaiii(>iicl 
Jubilee modal, 1897, and the Boy.al Iliiniaur 
Society's liion/i' humImI for saving a lif<' in Soul li 
Africa. 

Lieulonaiit-Coloml AiimII was not only qiialifii^d 
for Stall' ciuijloynicrd in lonscqupnco of service 
on llie Stall' in the I'^icld, Imt be was also a 
fri'aihiate of tbe SlalT Colii'^e, where he passed 
till' llnal e\aniinat ion in 1!)0:!, receiving the 
ajipointnient of Hrinade-Major, :5rd f'avahy 
JJriKade, in lilOl. and retaining it till 1!)07. 
lie lield an api)ointnient as General SI a II 
Onicer. L'nd Grade, at the War Office froni IHHI- 
I'.lll. ill .\u;^usl of ulurli year lie was sel iled 
for the (cminiauil of tbe.'itli I Iragoon Guards. 
Ho was a iioli'd ]miI(i playei- and fornieil one of 
tlio regimental (earns of the InnisUillings and 
(he .5tb Dragoon Guards, lieing in the winning 
team of Ibo former when they won the Inter- 
regimental Cup in 1897, 1898, and 190.5 ; he was 
also in the team when the same regiment won 
the Army Cup in 1899. He won several point- 
to-point races with his horses — Glencoe, Absa- 
lom, Newboy, and Napper Tandy. 
Just lieforc the war with Germany broke out 
he had been olTerod the appointment of Com- 
mandant at (ho Cavalry School, but this 
po.vition, of course, was not taken up. He was 
killed on (bo 1st September. 1914. while leading 
his regiment. I'Vir his services in (his wai' he 
was mondoned in Sir .John French's Despalch 
of 8th October, 191 J. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Ansell married in 1S99. 
Kathleen, daughter of .T. P. Cross, of Catthorpe 
Towers, Kugby, and leaves a son and a daughter. 

LIEUTENANT EDMUND ANTROBUS, 
1st BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, 

who was killed in action on the 24th October. 
1914, was the only son of Sir Edmund Antrolwis, 
4th Baronet, of Antrobus, County Chester, and 
Rutherford, County Roxburgh, at one time 
commanding 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards. 
Lieutenant Antrobus was born on the 2;ird 
December, 1886, and received his commission 
as Second Lieutenant in the Grenadier Guards 
from the .Militia in May, 1908, being pro- 
moted I..ieutonant in November, 190S. 
The 1st Battn. Grenadiei Guards foimed 
]>ar( of (he 20th Brigade of the \IIth Division 
which was in the centre of our line at the first 
Battle of Ypres. On (he 24(h October the 
Germans made a determined effort to break 
through on the left of the Grenadiers near 
Kridsoik. and No. 4 Company, (o which 
Lieu(. Andobus belonged, made a counler- 
attack, ilriving back the enemy. He was 
killed while gallantly fighting with bis platoon, 
only one officer and forty-five men of (he 
Company rodirning unhur(. 




2nd LIEUTENANT K . S . .\ I' L I N 
attd. 2nd BATTN. ROYAL INNISKII.- 
LING FUSILIERS, 

ulio «as killed in 

action on (he ls( 

\o\criiber. 191 1. was 

(lie son of Mr. and 

.Mrs. J. Sliorland 

Aplin, of ICnglefiold 

Green, and Yeovil, 

and was born in 1 892. 

]\i- was (>(lucated at 

Mill Hill School. 

London, and at 

Worcosler College, 

Oxford. lie \\a^ ap]iiuntod to (he Special 

Reserve. Uoyal InnisUjUing Fusiliers, on pro- 

balion. on (be 0(h .\ugiis(. lilb!. his connnis- 

sion being linally da(ed (be 27tli .luiic'. 1911. 

LIEUTENANT (temp.) ARTHUR KEITH 
ARMSTRONG, ROYAL ARMY MEDI- 
CAL CORPS, 

wbo was killed in 
arlioii on (he llitb 
September, 1914, 
aged 33, leaving a 
widow, was the 
only son of Mr. and 
Mrs. H. Armstrong. 
42, Dartmouth I'ark 
Road, I^ondon, 
N.W. He was 
gazetted Temporary 
Lieutenant in (be 
R.A.M.C. on (be l.")(li Aiigus(. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT BASIL CLAUDIUS 
ASH, THE SHERWOOD FORES- 
TERS (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE AND 
DERBYSHIRE REGIMENT), 

who was killed in action on the 20tli September, 
1914. was the son of Claudius James Asli, of 
Blakeney, Norfolk, and 2, Parkhill Road, 
Hampstead,and was born on the2.'>th April, 18h(i. 
He joined the Sherwood Foresters from 
(he MilKia in March, 1907, and became Lieiiten- 
antin Jime, 1909. I'Vom October of that year (ill 
the Great War broke out, he was emjiloyed 
with the Nigerian Regiment, West African 
Frontier Force. 

CAPTAIN HENRY ADAM ASKEW, 
2nd BATTN. BORDER REGIMENT, 

was the sf^n of the late Canon Edmund Adam 
Askew, Rector of Greystoke, Cumberland, u lieic 
he was born on the 8th September, 1881 ; he 
was a grandson of Mr. Askew, of Burwood I'ark. 
■VValton-on-Thames. 

Captain Askew was educated at Aysgarth 
Sehooh Harrow, and the R.M.C., Sandhurst ; 
he obtained the Gvmnastic Cerdficale at 




11 



ATA— ATK 




Alilerslio!, 11)08. and that for the Mounted Infan- 
try previously at Bulford. He joined the Border 
i.,i„i Regiment in 1901. and 

with it served in the 
Soutli African War, 
having been present 
at the operations in 
the Transvaal, receiv- 
ing the Queen's medal 
with five clasps. 
Among other ap- 
poiutnients he held 
that of Assistant 
.S \i p e r i n t e 11 d e n t 
of Gymnasia at 
Devonport for four years. 
Captain Askew only obtained promotion a few 
days before the battalion left for Flanders ; 
he went out as an Olificer in charge of the 
regimental transjiort. and wa< twice mentioned 
in Despatches. 1-ith January and 31st May. 
191.T. He was one of the 44 officers remaining 
of the Vllth Division after the heavy fighting 
at Ypres, and one of the five left of the 2ud 
Battn. Border Regiment ; he then became 
Adjutant, and also, for about a fortnight, 
held command of the Borderers and the 
Gordon Highlanders, which position he occupied 
at the time ot the King's visit. 
He was killed on the 19th December. 1914. 
while leading an attack on a German trench, 
and was buried by the enemy, who, as a tribute 
to his bravery, erected a cross inscribed with 
the words. " To a brave British OfTicer. Captain 
Askew." 

He was a keen sportsman, horse master, and 
gymnast. He married in 1908, Winifred Lucy, 
daughter ot the late Colonel and Jlrs. Irwin, of 
I/ynehow, Cumberland, and left a daughter, 
Anne, age 4 years, and two sons, Cuthbert 
and David, age .5 years and 1 year respectively. 

MAJOR PANDIT PIARAY L.\L ATAL. 
I N D 1 .\ N MEDICAL SERVICE, 
attd. to the 129th DUKE OF 
CONNAUGHT'S OWN BALUCHIS, 

was born on the 2iul 
August. 1872. He 
was the son of Pandit 




Kishan 
formerly 
Secretary 
^laharaja 
pore and 



lal Atal. 

Private 

to the 

of Jodh- 

afterwards 



to the ^Maharaja of 
Jaipur State, and was 
a grandson of the 
late Dewan Pandit 
Motilal Atal, Prime 
Minister of Jaipur State. Rajput ana. 
He was educated in the ilaharaja's Collegiate 
School, Jaipur, until matriculating, when he 



entered the Jledical .School, Lahore. After 
studying there for three or four years he came 
to England, and passing the competitive 
examination for the I. M.S. in May. 1898, was 
appointed I>ieutenant in February. 1899. After 
serving in India he returned to England and 
specialised in diseases of the nose, throat and 
ear. during the year 1912. 

While in the Army he served in China in 1900, 
receiving the medal for his services. After a few 
years he left the Military and was employed 
in the CivU Service, but was again, a few years 
later, transferred to the military side. 
When at school he was fond of cricket, and later 
was a well-known cricketer in the teams of the 
States in which he was employed. He was a 
member of several clubs in the Madras Presidency . 
Jlajor Atal was killed on the 2;5rd November, 
1914, by the destruction of the ^lilitary Hos- 
pital from the effects of shell fire while he was 
attending to a wounded officer. Previously he 
had escaped unhurt wliile attending wounded 
in the field under heavy fire. 
He married Mrs. Raj Atal. daughter of the late 
Pandit Sri Kishan Kichloo, Extra As.sistant 
Commissioner of Ferozepore, Punjab, and only 
granddaughter of the late Judicial Commis- 
sioner, Pandit Bihari Lal Kichloo, Rai Bahadur. 
Major Atal left five children : three sous, Hiralal 
born January. 1904, Ram Xath born August, 
1908, and Kanahiya Lal born December, 1912, 
and two daughters, Kamlapati born December, 
1910, and Brijpati born December 1911. 
He was promoted Captain in 1902 aiifl IMajor 
in 1911. and was shortly to be promoted to the 
rank ot Lieut. -Colonel. He was in his 43rd 
year when he met liis death. 

2nd LIEUTENANT JESSE .M.\RSON 
.\TKIN, SHERWOOD FORESTERS 
(NOTTINGHAMSHIRE & DERBYSHIRE 
REGIMENTi. attd. 3rd BATTN. 
WORCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT, 
was the youngest sou 
of Mr. H. Atkin, of 
New West wood, Not- 
tingham, where hi- 
was born on the 23r(l 
September, 1S91. 
After a very success- 
ful career at the Not- 
tingham Mundella 
School he studied at 
the University, ob- 
taining his B.A. at 
the age of 20. Wliile 

there he joined the O.T.C. and was offei-ed and 
accepted a commission, being gazetted to the 
Special Reserve of his Battahon in May, 1913. 
On taking up a scholastic position at Bourne- 
mouth he took a very prominent part with the 
O.T.C. in connection with lus school. 




ATK -AUB 



12 




lie joiiK'd tlic I'lxpfditionnry Fdicc in l^'iniuc 
on the 25th October, 1914, and was killerl on tlic 
7(h Novrmlior in the s.-iino yoar at l*Io('K<stooH.. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN CYRIL ATKIN- 
SON. 39th SCINDE RIFLES iFRON- 
TIER FORCEi. 

elder son of .Alajor- 
freneral J. R. B. 
Atkinson, Indian 

Army (retired) and 
Mrs. Atkinson, was 
liorn on the :iOth 
December, 1888, at. 
Rajanpur, Xorth 
West Frontier, Trans 
Indus. India. 
He was educated at 
Chfton College, and 
the R.M.C..Sandluu-.-t, at which he was a King's 
Indian Cadet. He joined the Army in Novem- 
ber, 1908, being attached at first to the West 
Yorkshire Regiment in India, and being 
appointed to the 59th Scinde Rifles Field 
Force in December, 1909. He was promoted 
Lieutenant in December, 1910. 
Fond of all sports, ho spent his leave in India 
shooting in Kashmir and Ladak. He was a 
member of the East India United Service Club. 
Lieutenant Atkinson landed at Marseilles witli 
the Indian Expeditionary Force in September. 
1914, and went to the front the following month. 
He was killed in action on the 19th December. 
1914, on the parapet of a German trench near 
La Bass^e, F''rance. The Officer Commanding 
his regiment thus described his death : — " He 
had led his platoon right up to the German 
trench and was shot dead on the parapet. 
His action could not have been more gallant." 
The Ortioer Commanding also referred to liim 
as " a most gallant officer and a very well-loved 
comrade." 

The Officer commanding his Company, who sa«- 
him killed, wrote : — " He was such a fine fellow 
in every way, and we all loved liim. He was 
most hardworking and efficient as Quarter- 
!Master in this war. and he was always keen on 
any dangerous or difficult job." 
.Another brother officer wrote : — " .Since I have 
been in the regiment there has never tieen 
anyone who was more popular, not only « ith tlie 
officers, but also with the men. We have lost a 
splendid Officer and a good friend." 

CAPTAIN ALGERNON F O U L K E S 
ATT WOOD, 4th BATTN, ROYAL 
F'USILIERS, was the only son of Mr. Llewellyn 
C. F. Attwood, J.P., and Mrs. Rachel Edith 
Attwood (nee Corsellls). of Pandy, near 
Abergavenny, ilonmoutlLshire. and was liorn on 
the 17th May, 1880. 
He was educated at Haileybni y. and Chri>-t 



1 a Iniv irsily 
Alriran War. 




( 'liurch. ( )xt(iril. « hiir he accept 
I'linunission during the South 
He was gazetted 
Second Lieutenant 
in the 4th Battalion 
Royal Fusiliers in 
.May, 1901, became 
Lieutenant in 1904, 
and Captain in March , 
]!tl2. In the spring 
111' 1 !l 1 4 he underwent 
a course of instruc- 
tion in aviation at 
IJpavon, and was 
recommended for an ^ ^ 

appointment In the Royal Flying ('(jrjis. but 
rejoined his liattalion on nioliilisation in 
August. This was one of the first units of tlie 
British Expeditionary Force to arrive on tlir 
Belgian frontier in that month. 
He fought at the battle of Mons.and took |i,irt 
in the retirement to the Maine and in the sub- 
sequent advance to the Alsne. but on the 11th 
Septemljer he was reported severely wound e< I 
and missing, and it has since been ascertained 
that at Vailly, near Soissons, at the battle of 
the Aisne " while skilfully and gallantly with- 
drawing his men from an advanced position 
which could not be held, he was hit twice in 
rapid succession and fatally wounded." 
He «as unmarried and was the otdy male rep- 
resentative of the last generation of the family 
of Attwood, formerly of Hawne House, Coi-n- 
greavesHall, and The Leasowes, Worcestershire. 

CAPTAIN ALFRED CH.\RLE.S .\IBIN. 
EAST LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was reported in 

the War Office 

monthly Casualty 

List published in 

Xovemlier. 1914. as 

having been killed 

in action at Garua 

on the 30th .August. 

191 4. was l)orn on 

tlie 16th October. 

1878. 

He joined the East 

Lancashire Regiment ■" 

from the .Militia in April. IIMKI. He served in 

tlie .South .Vfrican War, where he was employetl 

with the Mounted Infantry, and acted as 

Railway Staff Officer for a short time ; he «as 

present at operations in the Transvaal and 

( trange River Colony, receiving the Queen's 

medal with three clasps and the King's medal 

with two clasps. 

From July, 1904, to February, 1909, he was 

employed with the West African Frontier Force, 

and was again appointed to that Corps in 

Jan\iary, 1911. 




Ki 



AUC-AWD 



CAPTAIN DANIEL GEORGE HAROLD 



AUCHINLECK, 2nd 
1 N N I S K 1 L L I N G 




BATTN. ROYAL 
FUSILIERS, 

\\ Iio wa-; killril in 
action on tliH '2\<t 
Ootober, 1911, while 
gallantly leading his 
Company asrainst the 
■ neniy. wlio had 
liioken through our 
trenches at Ploeg- 
steeit, Belgium, was 
the only son of the 
late ilajor Thomas 
Auchinleck. D.L., of 
Crevenagh, t'ounty 
Tyrone, and Sliannoch Green, County Fc: - 
managh, and succeeded his father in 1S93. 
He was born on the 18th September, 1,S77, and 
was educated at Winchester and Trinity College, 
Oxford. He joined the Army in September, 
1898, and became Lieutenant In March, 1900. 
In the South African War of 1899-1900 he was 
present at the Relief of Ladysmith as Divisional 
Loot Officer, and at the actions at Colenso and 
Spiou Kop ; at operations on the Tugela 
Heights, in Xatal, and the Transvaal east of 
Pretoria, including the actions at Belfast and 
Lydenberg : also at operations in the Transvaal 
from November, 1900, to Fel)ruary, 1901. He 
received the Queen's meilal with five clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in January, 1904, 
and from October of that year to March, 1908, 
was an Adjutant of ilOitia. 

Captain Auchinleck married in 1902 iladoline, 
only daiighter of the late Robert .Scott, Esq., 
formerlj' of Bloomhill, County Tyrone. 

2nd LIEUTENANT CAROL EDWARD 
V E R E A W D R Y , 2nd BATTN. 
ROYAL MUNSTER FUSILIERS, 

, — ^^: ^ born at Broad liiu- 

I^^^^^H^^^H^H; ton 

don, Wilts, on the 
nth June, 1894, was 
the son of the Rev. 
^'ere Awdry, Vicar 
(since 1895) of Amp- 
field, Hants. and Mary 
Louisa (n^e Man), his 
second wife. He was 
also related to the 
late ^lajor-Cieneral 
Webber Desborough 
Harris, who commanded Second Lieutenant 
Awdry's battalion when it was the 104th 
Bengal F-usiliers. 

Second Lieutenant Awdry was cdu<ated at 
Marlborough House, Hove (Mrs. Wolsey White 
and Rev. T. BuUick), from 190:5 to 1907 ; he 
was then a Foundation Scholar at Marlborough 
College from 1908 to 1912, in June of which 




year he ent.'i'ed the R.M.C., .Sandhui-st, passing 
ou in June, 1913. He was gazetted to the Mun- 
stei- Fusilie s in September and joined the 2nd 
Battalion at Aldershot in October, 1913. With 
it he left for the front on the 13th August, 1914. 
He was killed in action on the 27th August, 
and Captain Jervis, the senior surviving officer 
of the battahon, wrote the following account 
to .Second Lieutenant Awdry's father, when 
he liimself was a prisoner in th2 hands of the 
Germans : — 

"In order to better safeguard the withdrawal of 
part of our Army, the 2nd Royal Munster Fusi- 
liers were occupying an important position and 
were attacked on three siiles, and when finally 
ordered to withdraw found themselves cut off 
from the main body. Faced by odds of ^ix or 
eight to one they put up the best fight they could, 
till the fire from all sides compelled a surren- 
der. Second Lieutenant Awdry's Company was 
chosen to watch the right rear, and that Officer 
was selected to take his platoon to an exposed 
position at the far end of a village named 
Fesmy, through which the line of retreat lay. 
He performed this duty in a most able manner, 
and holding on in face of a heavy fire, rejoined 
the main body with his little force intact. It 
was a commendable performance, worthy of one 
of far greater age and experience. Later on 
C Company (Second Lieutenant Awdry's) was 
detailed to act as rearguard, and again through 
their gallantry, the battalion was able to safely 
withdraw, Second Lieutenant Awdry's party 
being the last to come in. It was then about 
6 p.m., and it was found that the battalion was 
cut off from the main body. The battalion 
extended in an endeavour to break through, 
every officer doing good work. Second Lieu- 
tenant Awdry, with drawn sword, led his men 
in support of the attack that was in progress, 
and fell, shot tlu'ough the lungs, as he advanced. 
His death was painless and practically instan- 
taneous." 

His brother Officers and all his Company 
expressed their deepest sympathy. By Second 
Lieutenant Awdry's death they lost a cheery 
companion, an honourable gentleman, and an 
Officer of distinct promise. He was liuried 
with eight of his brother Officers who fell the 
same day, in a grave near the railway station 
of Etreux, a service being read over the grave 
at the time. 

One of Second Lieutenant Awdry's platoon, 
who saw him actually fall, stated that " at one 
time during the last stand this platoon of 54 
men all told, held 500 Germans back for full 
three-quarters of an hour. Only 17 of them 
got away." He states that Second Lieutenant 
Awdry was kneeling behind a mound with 
his revolver levelled and actually giving the 
command *' Open fire on the Cavalry," when 
he was shot through the chest. 



AYT BAI 



14 




LIEUTENANT ROBERT MERLIN 
GRAHAM AYTOUN, 2nd BATTN. 
PRINCESS LOUISE'S (ARGYLL 
AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS, 

who had Inen previously rupoitcd uuonicially 
as killed in action, died, as has since been 
ascertained, in liO Cateau Town Ilospital 
(French Red Cross), on the 2Tth August, 1914, 
of wounds received the previous day while 
leading his platoon. 

He was the only child of Lieutenant-Colonel and 
Mrs. Andrew Aytoun, and was born on the 19th 
January, 1890. 

He was gazetted to the .Argyll and Sutherland 
Highlanders in May. 1910. and wa.s promoted 
Lieutenant in July. 191:i. 

MAJOR BASIL KENRICK WING 
BACON, 1st BATTN. WORCESTER- 
SHIRE REGT., 

born at Eastliourne, 
Sussex, on tlie 2Sth 
May, 1872, was the 
son of Kenriclc Veru- 
lani Bacon. Esq., J.P. 
for Surrey, formerly 
Captain 1st Batta- 
lion Worcestershire 
Heeiment, of The 
I .odge. Hale, Farn- 
hani. He was edu- 
cated at the United 
Services ('ollege, W est ward Ho ! North Devon. 
Jlajor Bacon joined the Worcestershire Kegi- 
incnt from the Jlilitia in October 189;-!, liecoming 
Lieutenant in 189(i. Captain in February, 1900, 
and ^lajor in April, 1909. He served in the 
South African War from 1899-1902 ; being 
present at operatioiLs in the Transvaal and 
Orange Kiver Colony, including actions at 
Bethlehem and Wittebergen, and at operations 
in Cape Colony, including the action at Colesberg 
For his services he was mentioned in Despatches, 
and received the Queen's medal with three 
clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. 
He wa,s serving with Ids })attaIion when he 
was killed in action near Neuve Chapelle, 
France, on tlie 13th December, 1914. A 
Memorial Brass has been erected to his memory 
in Hale Church by the non-commissioned 
officers and men of his Company. 
Major Bacon was a member of the Junior United 
Service Club. 

LIEUTENANT DUNCAN BAILLIE, 9th 
GURKHA RIFLES, INDIAN ARMY, 

who was killed m action on the 4th November. 
1914. was the eldest son of Sir Duncan Colvin 
Baillie, K. C.S.I. , lately acting Lieutenant 
Governor of the United Provinces. 
He was born on the 23rd .September, 1889, at 
.MuzzafVarnagar, India, and was educated 
at Cliarterhouse and the li.M.C., Sandhurst. 



oug 
He 




at both of whicli lii' wa- di-l iiiii\n>liiil ;is a 
distance runner, gyiiui.ist. ami suiniim-r. 
passed first out of 
Sandhurst, and re- 
ceived the Sword of 
Hono\ir. He oljtain- 
ed liis fii-st commis- 
sion in September, 
1909, !ind wasselected 
for the Indian Arniv. 
After being attached 
for a veartotheHigh- 
land Light Infantry 
at Lucknow, he was 
posted in October. 

1910. to the 2, 9tli Ciiiklia Itill.-. in whicli he 
became Lieutenant in liill. He was attached 
for active service in the wni- (o the 1st Battalion. 
The following account nl the circiunstances 
attending his death and u( the remarks upon 
him. was received from IJeutenant-General 
Sir James Willcocks. Commanding the Indian 
Expeditionary Army Corps : — " The evacuation 
of Xeuve Chapelle left the trenches of the 2nd 
Gurkhas in a very vidnerable salient wliich was 
enfiladed by a German mortar at a range of 400 
yards. The three right double Companies w'ere 
in a short time blown ovit of their ti'enches. 
A movement in relief was organised and Duncan 
Baillie was .sent with two platoons of the 9th 
to help. All his brother officers were unanimous 
in their praise of the manner in which he took 
up his men. After he had accomplished this he 
proceeded to recomioitre to ascertain the exact 
situation amongst the 2nd Gurkhas. Whilst 
running acro.ss a road towards the 2nd Gurkha 
trenches he was hit by a rifle bullet thro\igh the 
temple and killed instantaneously. Although 
still quite a junior officer in the 9th Gurkhas he 
had already made hLs mark as a first-iate 
soldier, beloved alike Ijy officers an<l men." 

MAJOR GEORGE B.\ILLIE, 
46th BATTERY ROYAL FIELD 
ARTILLERY, 

who was killed near 
Ypres on the 18th 
Novemlier, 1914, was 
born at Mhow, Cen- 
tral India, on (he 
2,Srd Xovember,1870, 
son of the late Cap- 
tain George Baillie, 
Bengal Artillery, and 
Mrs. Baillie. of Meon- 
stoke, Hants, and 
nephew of ^fajoi- 
General John Baillie, Bengal Staff Corps. 
Educated at Cheltenham College, and t)ie 
R.M..\.. Woolwich, anil joined the Royal 
Artillery in ls9li. liecoming Lieutenant in 1893, 
Captain in 1900, and .Major in lOOS He served 




15 



BAI 



in the South African War from November, 1899, 
to May, 1902, at first with " P " Battery, 
Royal Horse Artillery, and then on promotion 
to Captain in 1900 in fljing columns with 
Pompom Section F. He was present at the 
Relief of Kimberley and took part in the follow 
ing operations : in the Orange Free State from 
February to May. 1900. including the operations 
at Paardeberg (17th to 2i5th February) and the 
a'-tion at Driefontein. He was aLso present at 
operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 
1900, including the actions near Johannesburg 
and Diamond Hill (11th and 12tli Jime). He 
afterwards took part in further operations in 
the Transvaal, to the west of Pretoria from 
July to November, 1900, and in operations in 
the Orange River Colony, including the action 
at Wittebergen (1st to 29th .July). Finally he 
was present in subsequent operations in the 
Transvaal and Orange River Colony. For his 
services in the campaign he received the Queen's 
medal with six clasps and the King's medal with 
two clasps. 

Colonel Carey. Royal Field Artillery, wrote the 
following account of Major BaiUie"s death : — 
" He was a most gallant soldier, and had always 
set such a good example to those about him for 
courage, and kindness, and thoughtfulness for 
others. I saw him only a few minutes before his 
death. We had been rather heavily shelled 
in our cottage, and he came down from his 
battery to see how we were. While we were 
talking the shelling began again, and we moved 
our headquarters to a safer place, while he 
walked away towards his battei-y, and was 
killed about 100 yards from the hoiise. I am 
glad to think that he suffered no pain, as he was 
kiUed instant.aneously. His death has caused a 
gap in the 39th Brigade which it will be im- 
possible to fUl. All the Officers of the Brigade 
and the men in his l>attery were devoted to him, 
and his loss is very keenly felt by all. He was 
always thinking of others, and what he could do 
to make things pleasant for everybody : to 
soldier with him was a real pleasure." 
A jjinior Officer wrote : — " He was beloved by 
everyone. Officers and men, and their grief was 
pitiable to behold when I returned to the battery, 
as I had been away at the time of the sad event." 
Major Baillie married IxjuLse Isabel (who died 
6th December, 1904), daughter of the late 
Major Phillipp, of Barham. Suffolk, and left one 
son, bom 6th December, 1904. 

2nd LIEUTENANT SIR GAWAINE 
GEORGE STUART BAILLIE. BART.. 2nd 
DRAGOONS ROYAL SCOTS GREYS. 

of Polkemmet, Whitburn, Linlithgowshire, boru 
on the 29th May, 1893, was the elder son of Sir 
Robert Alexander Baillie. fourth Bart., B.A. 
(Oxon.), late Major Commanding the Australian 
Squadron The King's Colonials, Imperial Yeo- 




manry, whom he succeede<l as fifth Baronet in 
1907, and of Lady Isabel Baillie, daughter of 
David Elliot Wilkie, 
of Ratho Byres. Mid- 
lothian. 

.Sir Gawaine Baillie 
was gazetted 2nd 
Lieutenant in the 
Royal Scots Greys 
in September. 1912. 
That regiment went 
to Flanders in the 
early stages of the 
Great War and was 
present at the retire- 
ment from Mons, and in the subsequent fighting 
at the Mame and round Ypres. 2nd Lieutenant 
Sir Gawaine Baillie was killed in action in 
France on the 7th -September, 1914. He was 
sncceeiled in the baronetcy by his brother. Sir 
Adrian William Maxwell Baillie, for whom the 
property is held in trust until he attains the age 
of twenty-two yeais. 

CAPT. WILLIAM FRANK GARDINER 
BAIRD. 4th BATTN. BEDFORDSHIRE 
REGIMENT, attd. 1st BATTN. THE 
LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT, 
was the second son of 
Sir William .James 
Gardiner Baird.eighth 
Bart., of Saughton 
Hall, Midlothian, for- 
merly Lieutenant 7th 
Hussars, late Lieu- 
tenant - Colonel and 
Honorary Colonel 
Lothians and Ber- 
wickshire Imperial 
Y'eomanry. and of 
the Honble. Arabella 
Rose Evelyn Hozier, eldest daughter of the 
first Baron Newlands. He was horn on the 
ISth Afiril. 188.5, and was educated at Eton and 
the R.M.C.. -Sandhurst, and served for a time in 
the 7th Dragoon Guards and Scots Guards, after- 
wards retiring from the active list and joining 
the Reserve of Officers as Second Lieutenant, 
from which he was gazetted Captain in the 
4th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment on the 
11th August, 1914. He went to the front 
attached to the 1st Lincolnshire Regiment, 
was wounded in the British attack on Xeuve 
ChapeUe on October 27th or 28th, and died on 
the 5th November. 191 4. in hospital at Boulogne. 
Captain Baird. who was a memlier of the Cavalry 
Club and of the New Club. Edinburgh, married 
in 1910 Violet Mary, daughter of Richard Croft 
Benyon, D,L., of Fanhams Hall, ^\'are. Herts, 
and left three children : James Richard Gardiner, 
bom 1913, lihas Mary, born 1911, and William 
Henry Gardiner, bom 1914. 




BAK BAL 



16 



LIEUTENANT EDWARD BENJAMIN 
BAKER, 3rd lattd. Isti BATTN. THE 
KINGS (LIVERPOOL REGIMENT), 

r ' "as born at Cainp- 




I. 



Ipore, 



Piinjali. 



Iridiii. on the 
.Inly. l.S!»-|, Ih,. 
sou of the 



uul>- 
late 



Edwar.l Baker, Kx- 
Engiiieer, Indian 

State Eaihvay. and 
Mrs. E. .1. Boyle, 
now the wife of 
.Tosepl) Barnes Boy le, 
Barrister-at-liaw. 
Lieutenant Baker 
was educated at (iienville Sehool, Guildford, 
afterwards joininp: the Special Reserve King's 
Liverpool Regiment, from which he was attached 
to the 1st Battalion for service in the Great War. 
He was killed on the 20th October, 191 1, while 
leading his platoon in an attack on a village. 
The following letter was received from his 
Commanding OHicer : — 

" Ijieutenant Baker had done so well with the 
regiment since he joined, and his name had 
gone up for mention in despatches." 
Lieutenant Baker has since been mentioned in 
Sir .Tohn French's Despatch of :ilst May. 1915. 

CAPT. HUGH LAURENTS CHENEVIX 
BALDWIN, 58th VAUGHAN'S RIFLES, 

INDIAN ARMY, 

ixtrn on tlie Kith 
June, 1878, at the 
t'astle, Cape Town. 
W.1S the son of the 
late Major F. Chene- 
vix Baldwin, the 
Connaught Rangers 
(the old 88th Regi- 
ment), and Jlrs. 
Baldwin, of Lance- 
field, Cand)erley. 
'~~' He \vas educated at 
Ilaileybury, and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, He 
received his commission in July, 1898, being 
first attached to the Jliddlesex Regiment, and 
entered the Indian Aiuuy in 1899, joining the 
27th Madras Infantry, in which he became 
Lieutenant in October, 1900. He was trans- 
ferred to the 58th Rifles in 1901, and olitained 
the " Distinguished " Musketry certificate in 
1906, and the " .Special " Signalling and 
Mounted Infantry certificates in 1903. 
In 1901-02 he served in the Waziristan Expedi- 
tion on the North- West Frontier (operations 
against Darwesh Khel \V'aziris) for which he 
received the medal, with cla.s]) for Waziristan. 
On the outbreak of the Great War he was on 
leave in England, and, having volunteered for 
active service, was appointed a Company Com- 





mander in the 7th Battalion Ritle Brigade of 
the New Army (Service Battalion). He brought 
the oflicers and men uinh'r hiiu to a high state 
of ellicicncy diu'ing the time he was with them. 
On the (ith November, 1914, he received orders 
to rejoin his own regiment at the front, where 
they had arrived a month previously, and left 
England the next day. On the 23rd of that 
month he was killed while leading a charge on 
the German trenches near Festubert, Pas de 
Calais. He «as mentioned for his services in Sir 
John French's Despatch of 14th January, 191.5. 
Captain Baldwin was a good hockey and football 
player, having been captain of the regimental 
team on several occasions. He was the keenest 
of soldiers, and a general favourite. 

CAPTAIN ROBERT FREDERICK 
BALFOUR, 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, 

was the eldest son _ ^ 

of Edward Balfour, 
J. P., D.L., and Mrs. 
Balfour, of Balbirnie, 
Fifeshire, and a 
grandson of the lati' 
Colonel John Balfour 
and Lady Georgeina 
Isabella, second 
daughter of the first 
Earl of Cawdor. Cap- 
tain Balfour's uncle, 
Brevet-Colonel A. G. 
Balfour, late Highland Light Infantry, served 
in the Great War as Assistant Embarkation 
Commandant, to which position he was ap- 
|jointed in August, 1914. 

Cajitain Balfour' was born on the Kith Alarch, 
1883, and was gazetted to the Scots Guards as 
2nd Lieutenant in Janiuiry, 1903, becoming 
Lieutenant in J\me, 1904. From July, 1907, to 
August, 1910, he was Adjutant of liis battalion, 
and he was promoted Captain in ,Tanuary, 1913. 
His Staff Appointments included one as A.D.C. 
to the General Ollicer Conunanding the Vlth 
Division of the Irish Couunand from 1st Ainil, 
1912, to 17th January, 1913. 
In the Great War the 1st Battalion Scots 
Guards formed part of the 1st Infantry Brigade, 
1st Division, whicli was the first portion of the 
Expeditionary Foice to leave Great Britain, 
being present at the fighting from the very 
connnencement of the \\'ar. Captain Balfour 
was killed in action at Gheluvelt. near Vpres, 
on the 28th October, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM ORMSBY 
WYNDHAM BALL, ROYAL ARMY 
MEDICAL CORPS, born at 5, Palmer.ston 
Park, Dublin, on the 27th September, 1889, 
was the son of the late Henry Wyndham 
Ball, Registry of Deeds Office, Dublin, and 
Mrs. Ball, of the above address. He was a 
step-brother of I>ievitenant-Colonel A. A. Seeds, 



BAM BAN 




R.A.il.C, now serving with the Expeditionary 
Force in France, and of the late Captain J. T. 

-Seed-s. 5th Battilion 
Royal Irish Rifles, 
^ho died on active 
-•p-r^-icc in the South 
Airican War. 
Lieutenant Ball re- 
eived i be degrees of 
M.B. and B.A. at 
I >ubl;n UnveKity, 
:ia%-ing been a resi- 
• lent Student in Sir 
Patrick Dun's Hos- 
pital in 1911-1912. 
where a tablet has been erected to his memory. 
He obtained his colours in the University 
Hockey XI. in 1909 and 1910, and represented 
Ireland in the six International Hockey 
matches in 1910 and 1911. 

Receiving his commission in the R.A.3I.C. in 
January, 1913, he was stationed in the Aldershot 
command till the war broke out, when he was 
attached for active service to the 2nd Battalion 
South Staffordshire Regiment. He arrived in 
France on 13th Atigust. was present during the 
retirement from Mons to the Mame. and was 
killed by a shell while attending to the wounded 
under fire, at .Soupir, on the Aisne, on the 26th 
September. 1914. 



CAPTAIN CECIL DAVID WOODBL RN 
B.\MBERGER. ROYAL ENGINEERS, 
who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
December, 1911, was 
the eldest son of Mr. 
Louis Bamberger, of 
Lancaster Road. Bel- 
size Park, London. 
X.W. 

He was bom on the 
22nd December. 18S3, 
and was educated at 
ITniversity College 
School, whence he 
passed into the R.3I.A., Woolwich, in 1901. 
He was gazetted to the Royal Engineers in 
March. 1903. l)ecoming Lieutenant in December. 
1905. 

He served in India, where he wa< employed on 
the Eastern Jumna Canal Works, and with the 
Mishmi Road Work party. Sadiya. -\ssam. In 
1913 he was in charge of the Jhansi Division 
Betwa CanaL and was promotetl Captain in 
Jl.irch. 1914. On the outbreak of the war with 
Germany he joined the Meerut Division of the 
Indian Expeditionary Force, and was killed 
while helping to build a barricade in a trench 
that had been captured from the Germans. 






CAPTAIN CHARLES WILLIAM 
BANBURY. 3rd B.\TTN. COLDSTREAM 
G U A R D S , 
was the son of Sir 
Frederick Banbury, 
Bart., 31.P.. of 
Wameford Place, 
Highworth, Wilts, 
and was bora at 19, 
Grosvenor Street, 
London, on the 11th 
February, 1.S77. 
He was educated at 
Eton and Oxford, at 
both of which he 
rowed, in the Eton Eight m l.'*91. ami 
in the University College boat at Oxford 
iu 1896. .Joining the Coldstream Guarvls in 
August, 1899. he soon saw active service in the 
South African War, during whicli he took part 
in operations in Cajie Colony, south of Orange 
River ; and in the Transvaal, at the end of 
the year 1900 : also at operations in the 
Orange River Colony in November, 1900, and 
at further operations in Cape Colony between 
November, 1900, and May, 1902: for his 
services he received the Queen's medal with 
three clasps, and the King's medal with two 
clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in Feb- 
ruary. 1901, and Captain in March, 1909. In 
the latter year he was appointed A.D.C. to 
the General Commanding in Chief, Eastern 
Command, and in April, 1912, A.D.C. to the 
late Lieutenant-General Sir J. M. Griersoa, 
K.C.B., C.T.O., C.M.G., and was with that 
Officer when he die<l suddenly in France in 
August, 1914. He accompanied Lieutenant- 
General Grierson's body to England, and 
attended the military funeral at Glasgow. 
Captain Banbury retimied to France on the 
23rd August, and joined the 3rd Battalion of his 
Regiment, forming part of the 3rd Brigade, on 
the 30th of that month. He was twice woun- 
ded, the second wound received on the 14th 
September, 1914. while he was in command of 
the 2ud Company of his battalion, proving 
tatal ; from the effects of that wound he died 
on the 16th of the month at Soupir. He was 
burie<l. with several other officers of the Brigade 
of Guanls. in the little graveyard at Soupir. 
Captain Banbury, who was known to all his 
friends as " Cakes." was a very successful rider, 
winning both the Grand Military and the 
Household Brigade Cup in 1909-1910 on 
■" Sprinkle Me.'' He was a member of the 
Guards' and the Turf Clul>s. 

He married Josephine Jlarguerite, daughter of 
Don Jose Reisach. aiwl left two children : Mary 
Heritage, bora 28th March, 1914. at Woflley 
Manor. Faringtlon. Berks, and Charles WiDiani. 
bom after Lis father's death, on tl:e ISth 3fay. 
1915, at 19, Queen Street, Mayfair, London. 



BAN -BAR 




LIEUT.-COLONEL WILLIAM STIRLIN(; 
BANNATYNE. p.s.c, COMMANDING 
1st BATTN. THE KING'S LIVERPOOL 

REGIMENT. 

was the sou of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
John >nilar Banna- 
t_\ lie, late of (he same 
regiment, who served 
throiigli the Indian 
Mutiny, and was 
lioi-n at Farme, 
Lanarkshire, Scot- 
l.ind. on the 9th 
Deii-niber, 1868. He 
was a nephew of 
Lieutenant-Colonel ^^'ilHalll Bannatyne, also of 
the same regiment. 

The suhjeet of this memoir was educated 
privately in Switzerland, and passed first into 
the 1{.,M.C.. Sandhurst, obtaining his commis- 
sion in the King's in .\ngust, 1888, becoming 
Lieutenant in Jlay. 1890, and Captain in June, 
189ti. He served in the South African War, 
1899-1902, being present at operations in 
Natal, including actions at Riettont-ein and 
Lombard's Kop ; the defence of Ladysmith, 
including the sorties of 7th and 10th December, 
1899, and the action of 6th January, 1900 ; 
operations in Northern Natal, inchiding the 
action at Laing's Nek ; operations in the 
Transvaal east of Pretoria, including actions at 
Belfast and Lydenberg, and elsewhere in the 
Transvaal. From ;March, 1900, to October, 
1902, he was employed as Provost-^Marshal, 
first on General Lyttleton's staff and then at 
Middelburg. For his South African services 
be was mentioned in Despatches (8th February, 
1901). and received the Queen's medal with 
three clasps and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

He was Deputy Assistant Adjutant-General 
anil General Staff Officer (2nd grade) at Gibraltar 
from 1903 to 1907, having become a Major in 
February, 1904 ; served on the General Staff 
(2nd grade) under the late Sir Charl&s Douglas 
from April to November, 1910, and was General 
Staff Officer (2nd grade) to the 2nd London 
Division, London District, from January, 1911 — 
February, 191 2. He succeeded to the command 
of his battalion in the latter nionth and left 
England with it on the 12th August, 1914. He 
took part in the Battle of Mons, the retirement 
towards Paris, the battles of the Marne and the 
Aisne, and finally in the actions in Flanders. For 
his services he was mentioned in Field-Marshal 
Sir John French's Despatch of September, 1914. 
He was killed in action near Ypres on the 24th 
Octolier, 1914. being shot through the heart from 
a loop-holed house in the village of Nord West- 
hoek, aljout five miles from Ypres, which village 
bis battaUon had received orders to clear of 




(icrmans. He was again mciitioiKiI in Dcs- 
liatihcs of 14th January, 1915. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Bannatyne, who was an 
ollicer of the highest merit, married in 1889 
Ktliel Louisa, daugliter of the Kev. II. H. 
W'inwood, of Bath, and sister of Lieutciianl- 
Colonel W. Q. Winwood, D.S.O., 5th (Princess 
Charlotte of Wales's) Dragoon Guards. He loft 
no chihlieii. 



LIEUTENANT PERCY STUART BAN- 
NING, 2nd BATTN. ROY.\L MUNSTER 
FUSILIERS, 

who was killed in 
action on the 4th 
November, 1914, was 
liorn on the 22n(l 
June, 1887. 
He obtained his first 
appointment in the 
Army in September, 
1908, when he was 
gazetted 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in the Royal 
MuiLster Fusiliers and 
was posted to the 1st Battalion of that 
Regiment. His promotion to Lieutenant was 
gazetted in Jfarch, 1910. For active service in 
the Great War, Lieutenant Banning accom- 
panied his battalion to France, wIhic he took 
part in operations in October. 191 I. 



2nd LIEUTENANT RAFE HEDWORTH 
MYDDELTON BARCLAY. 3rd BATTN. 
KINGS ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, 

wfi.s born in London on the Ulh Xo\ ember, 
1892, and was the only son of ilajor Hedworth 
T. Barclay, Leicestershire Y''eomanry, of the Turf 
Club, London, W. He was educated at Rugby, 
and at the Military College, Farnham (R. C. 
Welch, Esq.). 2nd Lieutenant Barclay joine<l 
the 8rd BattaUon. Duke of Edinburgh's (Wilt- 
shire Regiment), in which he became Lieutenant 
in Augast, 1913, and was transferred as Second 
Lieutenant to the King's Royal Rifle Corps in 
June, 191 1. with which he served in the Great 
War. He was reported "missing" on the 11th 
September, 1914, the first day of the battle of 
the Aisne, near Troyon. and was subsequently 
reported by a Court of Inquiry as killed. 
Lieutenant Barclay was a member "f White's 
Club. 

CAPTAIN RICHARD VINCENT 
BARKER, 1st BATTN. ROYAL WELSH 
FUSILIERS, liorn at Middleham, Yorkshire, 
was the son of the late Rev. Frederick Barker, 
Rector of Wimljorne St. Giles ; wa.s a Scholar 
of Winchester, and subsequently went to New 
College, Oxford. 



19 



BAR 




Entering the Army tlxroiigh the Jlilitia iii 
January, 1901, he served from that date in 

the South African 
War as Second T^ieu- 
tenant in the Royal 
Welsh Fusiliers, being 
present at operations 
in the Transvaal and 
Orange River, for 
which he received the 
Queen's medal \vith 
tour clasps. He was 
Adjutant of his bat- 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ talion from July, 
^^^^"^^^^^^^" 1901, to January, 
1909, and of the West African Frontier Force 
from April, 1909. 

Ho was a fine tider to hounds, and was well 
known in the South of Ireland with the United 
and other Hunts. 

When the Great War broke out. Captain Barker 
was with his battaUon in Malta, and, upon 
returning to England, was appointed Staff 
Captain to the 22nd Brigade, Allth Division, 
under Brigadier (Jeneral Lawford. On the 
31st October, 1914, at the Battle of Ypres, 
after very severe fighting for two days — when 
nearly all the regimental officers were killed 
and some men were faUing back — Captain 
Barker, who was then attending to wounded 
men under a heavy fire, a.'sked permission to 
rally them, and while leading them forward, 
fell shot tlu-ough the chest. 
His Brigadier reported of him " Quite excep- 
tional, a good friend and splendid officer, no 
matter how hard the work and discomforts 
great, he was always cheerful." 
Captain Barker was mentioned, after his death, 
in Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th 
January, 1915. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ERIC BARNES. 1st 
BATTN. LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was the son of John 
Barnes. Sohcitor, and 
grandson of the late 
John Carter Holding, 
of Kingsclei-e. Hamp- 
shire, and .Southsea. 
He was born at 
Kingsclere on the 
26th October, 1S94. 
and was educated 
at Bruton (Kins's 
School) from 1904- 
1912. The Head- 
master's report of him was "' an admirable 
specimen of the best type of all-round useful- 
ness at athletics and of good intellectual attain- 
ments." 

He passed through the R.M.C., Santlhurst, and 
was gazetted to the 1st Lincolnshire Regiment 




as Second Lieutenant on the 1st February, 1914. 
He had been in the fighting line from the com- 
mencement of the War till he fell. He was 
killed on the 1st >>ovember, 1914. while leading 
his men in an attack to take the village of 
Wytschaete, near Ypres. Belgium, from the 
enemy. The Commanding Officer of his regi- 
ment wrote the following account of the action: — • 
" He fell whilst gallantly leading his Company 
in the attack on a village called Wytschaete 
which the regiment had been ordered to take. 
He was struck bj- a bullet and died immediately. 
He died, as he had Uved, upholding the best 
traditions of the regiment he loved so well, 
and his loss is deplored by us all." 
Another brother officer wrote : — • 
" Eric wa^ near me in the advance, and when 
I got up to take a few men forward, he was 
the nest to come, but as he stood up from 
the ditch where we had been lying, to lead his 
men under very heavy fire forward, he was shot 
straight through the head and died immediately. 
He was so plucky, always eager and active in 
the firing line." 

His friends expressed their appreciation of the 
young Officer as follows : — 

" There are some who possess a certain indefin- 
able charm which makes them general favourites. 
Barnes was one of these. Strangers took a fancy 
to him and the longer one knew him, the more 
one liked him. One of the traits which made 
liim such an attractive character was his cheer- 
fidness ; he was a born optimist, and genuine 
optimism is infectious. Another was the frank- 
ness so clearly expressed in his features. A third 
was the keenness he displayed in everything he 
took up. The fact that he enjoyed life 
immensely heightens the tragedy of his early 
death." 

C A P,T A I N ALAN B A R N S L E Y. 4th 

BATTN. LANCASHIRE FUSILIERS. 

who was killed m 

action on the 27th 

October, 1914, aged 

37, was the youngest 

son of the late Jlr. 

Arthur Barnsley, of 

Southward Road. 

Liverpool. 

He served with the 

Imperial Yeomanry 

in the South African 

War, during 1900 and 

1901, being present 

at operations in the Transvaal and the Orange 

River and Cape Colonies ; he was twice 

mentioned in Despatches and was granted the 

Queen's medal with two clasps. On entering 

the Lancashire FiLsiliers he was given the rank 

of Honorary Lieiitenant in the Army front 

December, 1902. While serving Captain 




BAK 



20 



ISariLslcy U>ok tUu oppiutuiiity of luiDiuin.; 
profu-iont in many military subjects : In; liacl 
pa=;sed for the ranJv of Captain, lie was 
(lualilieil as an officer of Militia in military 
siihjccts, and at a School of .Musketry, had 
obtained a certificate in Transport (A.S.C.) 
duties, and was fjiuilificd as an Instructor in 
Signalling. 

On the outbreak of the war with Germany. 
Captain Harnsley. who attaineil that rank in 
JIay. 1S!)0, was Instructor of MiLsketry of his 
battalion. For active service he was attached 
to the 1st Battn. Xorthumljerland Fusiliei's. 
and was serving with that Corps when he 
was killed. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES JOHN CHARD 
BARRETT. ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS, 

who Wivs killed in 



action at Hooge, near 

^^^^ Ypres. on the 14th 

JM^Bk November. 1914, was 

^y^^^k ''orn on the 2(>th 

I ^ flft August, 1873. He 

'■ 4^^f "as the youngest son 

^^B of the lat<? Major 

^flH^^^^^ Barrett, and of Mi-s. 

^M^^^^^^^^^^ Barrett. 

I^^^^^^^^^H Taim- 

and a nephew of 
Colonel J. R. M. Chard. V.C. R.F,., the hero of 
Korke's Drift, fie married, in 1904. Lena, 
daughter of tlie late Albert Vaucamps. Esq. 
He was educated at Eton, and the R.M.C., 
Sandhm'st, where he won the riding prize 
(the saddle) in July, 1894, and the billiard cue, 
and whence he passed out third. He was 
gazetted Second Lieutenant in the Royal Scots 
Fusiliers in Octolier, 1894. becoming Captain 
in 1900. Three years later (in 1903) he was 
appointed Adjutant of the 1st Battalion, 
which he was leading when he fell. 
He served in the South African \\'ar. cuiii- 
niencing with the operations in Natal in 
March. 1900 : also in operations in the Trans- 
vaal, the Orange River Colony, and the action 
of Kuidani. He raised a Company of Moimted 
Infantry on active service, and gained the 
(Jueen's medal with three clasps. He was 
Adjutant of the 1st Volunteer Battalion the 
Welsh Regiment from .Tannary. 190.5 — 1908. 
While stationed in Dublin with his regiment in 
1909 lie won the IrLsh Grand Military at 
Punchestown with his horse " Scarlet Runner." 
He had nearl>- completed four years as an 
Officer of Gentlemen Cadets at Sandhurst, and 
had raised a new Company (L Company), 
which he was commanding, when he was called 
on to join the 1st Battalion Royal .Scots 
Fusiliers at the front. 



He was killed iliiiiiig the attaek of the 
Prussian Guard, when the Royal Scots Fasiliers 
held them back so splendidly, and was in 
temporary command of his battalion at the 
time ho fell. He was mentioned in Sir John 
I'Vench's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. 
Capt. Barrett was a good all-round sports- 
man : played polo, cricket, was a good shot 
and a very line ritler to hounds. He won 
several races in India, including his regi- 
mental Cup (the St. Andrew's Cup), and was 
very keen on pig-sticking. 



GODFREY B.\R. 
ROYAL MUNSTER 




CAPTAIN PHILIP 
RETT. 2nd BATTN. 
FUSILIERS, 

who is believed to 
have been killed in 
action in November, 
1914, was liorn on 
the 17th April. 1870. 
He received his com- 
niLssion in the Royal 
.Munster Fusiliers 
from the ililitia in 
April, 1900. He pro- 
ceeded almost at 

once on active 

service in the .South African W i 114 )>i.siiit 
at operations in Cape Colony in September, 
1900, for which he received the Queen's medal 
with two clasps. 

lie was promoted Lieutenant in March. 1902 ; 
from November. 1907. to Septemlier. 1908, he 
was an Adjut.int of Militia and of the Special 
Reserve, and was promoted Captain in Augast, 
1908. 



M.\JOR JOHN BAILLIE BARSTOW, ROY- 
AL ENGINEERS, 

\\\\o was killed in 
action at Bailly on 
the 31st August, 
lit 14. was the eldest 
son of Henry C. 
Barstow, Hazelbush. 
York. He was fiorn 
on the 31st Octolier, 
1.S72. and was edu- 
cated at Clifton 
College, and the 
R.M.A., Woolwich, 
entering the Royal Engineers in 
He became Lieutenant in July, 
promoted Captain in July. 1902. 
his Majority in July, 1911. 

Major Barstow left a widow and four <hiMren. 
He was a member of the Army and Navy Club, 
and of the Royal and Ancient (St. Andrew's) 
Golf Club. 




July. 1891. 
1894. was 
and obtained 



21 



BAR BAS 



CAPT. FRANCIS HEWSON BARTON, 



2nd BATTN. 2nd 
OWN) GURKHA 




KING EDWARDS 

RIFLES THE SIR 

MOOR RIFLES), 

\\)io was killed in 
action, it is l)elieved 
on the 2nd Xoveni 
ber, 1914,was born on 
the 10th June, 1880. 
After ser^^ng with 
the embodied ililitia 
for a year and three- 
iliiarters, he joined 
tlie Royal Irish 
Rifles in October. 
1901. entering the 
Indian ^Vrmy in Xovember, 1!J0:>. 
He served in the South .Vfrican War. Vteing 
present at operations in the Transvaal, Orange 
River Colony and the Cape Colony. He wa.s 
mentioned in Despatclies (" London Gazette," 
10th September, 1901) and received the Queen's 
medal tvith three clasps and the King's medal 
with two clasps. 

He received his promotion to Lieutenant in 
January, 1904. and to Captain in February, 
1909. 

2nd LIEUTENANT HAROLD WILLIAM 
FERGUSON BARTON. 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS, 

«lio was reported as 
" missing " in Octo- 
ber, 1914, is .since 
reported to have 
been killed near Lille 
on the 18th of that 
month. 

He was the younger 
son of the late Mr. 
^^'. S. Barton, and 
Mrs. Barton, of 
Woodstock, Camber- 
ley, and grantlson of 
the late Dean of Moray and Ross. He was 
Viorn on the oth September, 1893, at Morriston. 
Elgin, .Scotland, and received his education at 
Stratheden House, proceeding to Radley College 
and the R.M.C., Sandhurst. He received his 
commission in August. 1914. 
Mi-s. Barton received a letter from a German 
ollicer, saying : — " Dear ilrs. Barton, Yovu- son 
tell on the field of honour against our regiment. 
I admired his courage after a very hard struggle 
against us. Your son will be buried in the 
near {sic) of Castle Warneton, near Lille." 
(Signed) Ewald, Lieutenant Feldart.. Regiment 
No. 7. 

MAJOR EDWARD E G E R T O N 
BARWELL, 57th WILDE'S RIFLES 
(FRONTIER FORCE 1, who was kille.l in 





action aliout the :>Oth Octoljer, 1914, was the 
youngest son of the late General Charles Arthur 
Barwell, C.B., who 
served all through 
the Indian Mutiny, 
ilajor Barwell was 
born at Harrow on 
the 20th May, 1872, 
and was educated at 
Harrow,beinga Home 
Boarder from 1880 
to 1889, and at the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, 
where he was a 
Queen's India Cadet. 
After receiving his commission in September. 
1892, he was attached for a year to the East 
Lancashu-e Regiment at Lucknow, and joined 
the Indian Staff Corps in December, 1893, being 
attached to the 9th Gurkhas for two months, 
and then transferred to the 4th Punjab 
Infantry, Punjab Frontier Force, now the .57th 
Rifles Frontier Force. He liecame Lieutenant 
in that regiment in December, 1895, and served 
with it for 20 years. 

Major Barwell had seen a good deal of war 
service : he took part in the Waziristan 
Expedition, 1894-5, receiving the medal and 
clasp ; was at Tochi, Xorth-West Frontier of 
India, in 1897-8. again receiving a medal and 
clasp ; in China in 1900, for which he received 
the medal, and again in 1908 — haWng l)een 
promoted Captain in SeptemV>er. 1901 — on the 
North-West Frontier of India, serving on the 
Staff during operations in the /akka Khel 
country, and at operatiorLS in the ilohmand 
counti-y, including engagements at Malta and 
Kargha. In the latter expeditions he served as 
Deputy Assistant Quarter-Master-General of the 
1st Brigade, was mentioned in Despatches 
(" London Gazette," AvigiLst, 1908) and received 
the medal with clasp. 

Major Barwell. who received Ids ^lajority 
in September, 1910. went to Belgium with his 
regiment as part of the Indian Expeditionary 
Force. He was killed at Messines, whilst leading 
his men into action. 

He married in 1902 ^lary Cicely, eldest 
daughter of H. Tunstill, Esq.. Thornton Lodge. 
Aysgarth. Yorkshire, and left three children : 
James William, born Decemlier, 1903. Eric, 
born June. 1908. and Cicely Egerton, Viorn 
August. 1909. 



CAPTAIN CHARLES HAROLD BASS, 
3rd BATTN. L.\NCASHIRE FUSILIERS. 

who was stated in the Casualty List issued by 
the War Office in May, 1915, to have been 
" un-offlciaUy reported killed or died of 
wounds," was the only child of the Rev. Charles 
and Annie Bass, Steeple Claydon Yicarage. 



BAS BAT 



22 




Bucks. Captain Bass, who was 24 years of 
age at the time of his death, was educated 
t il at Oanleigh Seliool, 

Surrey, where he was 
a nieiiiber of the 
Officers' Traiiiinj; 
Corps. 

lie joined the Special 
Heserve of OtTiccrs in 
HlOS, and received 
lii-; coniniLssion in 
tlie l,ancashire FiLsil- 
icrs in May. 1909. 
I becoming Lieutenant 
in 1911. He was 
gazetted Captain in .Tannary. 1915. 
He was wounded on the 26th August, 1914, 
during the retirement from Morts, four days after 
Ills liattaliou landed in France. No news of 
him could he obtained until his identity disc was 
received, in !March, 1915, from the American 
Ambassador in London. It appears tliat a 
British Sergeant, who was a prisoner of war at 
Dobei-itz, had given it to his Camp Commandant, 
who in bis turn forwarded it to the Ambassador 
in Berlin. Later, a postcard was received from 
a Corporal of the Lancashire Fusiliers, a 
prisoner at Doberitz, saying " Lieutenant Bass 
is dead." From the same source it has since 
been ascertained that Captain Bass was wounded 
in the Battle of Cambrai on August 26th, 1914. 
tiled of wounds the same day, and was buried 
in a chm'chyard, together witli Lieutenant- 
Colonel Dykes, of the King's Own Regiment, 
and Lance-Corporal Sturgess, of the Essex 
Regiment. The writer adds : — " There was also 
a Captain of our regiment buried there, and I 
know it was not Captain Sidebottom, because 
he was buried in the same trench where he 
feU." 

A superior ollicer wrote to Captain Bass's 
friends : — " I cannot find words to say all 1 
should like ; but this I can say, that Harold's 
example, whether in his life or his death, will be 
to me a great help. Those of us who knew and 
loved him realise what an example such a life 
as his can be." 

A former schoolf(^llow and friend writes from 
Ceylon : — " I always valued Harold's friendship, 
and I valued it especially liecause he was, to my 
mind, a splendid type of a God-fearing man, 
botli mentally and physically." 
Another friend in the regiment, when writing 
after Captain Bass was wounded, said : — " It 
Is very hard luck that he has been wounded 
before he had time to show what a fine officer 
he was." 

LIEUTENANT WILLL\M B.\ST.\RD, 
2nd BATTN. BEDFORDSHIRE REGT., 

bom on the 20th April, 1891, at Coltscombe, 
Slapton, near Kingsbridge, South Devon, was 




the son of William and Helen Bastard, an<l a 
nepliew of Dr. Adkins, Medical Officer for 
the County of Devon. 
Educated at Blun- 
dell's School, Tiver- 
ton, he won the 
" Spurway " medal, 
and «as one of the 
cadet \\-innei's of the 
Devon Count y.Slneld, 
1910. Proceeding to 
Exeter College. 
Oxford, he obtaineil 
the degree of B.A., 
and received his 
commission in the Bedfordshire Regiment in 
January, 1912, becoming Lieutenant in Sep- 
tember, 1914. He served with his battalion in 
South Africa, and, returning to England in 
Septeml)er, joined the Expeditionary Force in 
Belgium on the 4th October, 1914. 
On tlie 26th October he was in the trenches 
directing the fire of his platoon to help tlie 
advance of another battalion, when a German 
machine gun opened fire and killed liim instantly. 
This occurred at GheluveU, aboutsix miles from 
Yprcs. He was mentioned for his services in Sir 
John French's Despatch of 14th January, 1915. 
His Colonel wrote of him : — " Fi'om the day he 
joined I recognised that your son was one of the 
best types of officers ; very keen on his work, 
thoroughly sensilile, and wUling to take res- 
ponsibility. I always had him in my eye as 
being well fitted for the Adjutancy later on. 
He was very popular with botli officers and men, 
and I can assure you his loss to the Battalion is 
very, very great." 

His Company Sergeant-Major and Quartei- 
master-Sergeant also WTote expressing the 
regard which not only his platoon, but the whole 
of his Company had for this young Ofiicer, who 
died gallantly, rifle in hand, and who was always 
soUcitous for the welfare of his men. whom he 
led in battle without fear. 



C.\PTAIN JOHN HENRY STRODE 
BATTEN, 1st BATTN. THE 
KING'S (LIVERPOOL REGIMENT), 

who was killed in 
action on the 26th 
October, 1914, was 
the son of Colonel J. 
ilount Batten, C.B.. 
Mornington Lodge, 
West Kensington, 
and was born on the 
23rd December. 1875. 
He was educated at 
RossaU, and Trinity 
Hall, Caml)ridge, 

where he took his 




23 



BAT 



B.A. degree, and joined the Lherpool Regiment 
in May, 1899, becoming Lieutenant in March, 
1900. He took part in the South African War, 
being employed with the Mounted Infantry, 
and was present at operations in Xatal, in- 
cluding actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's 
Kop, the defence of Ladysmith, including 
action on 6th January, 1900 ; operations in 
Xatal, the Transvaal, and Cape Colony ; from 
June to October, 1001, he acted as Supply 
Officer. He received the Queen's and King's 
medals each with two clasps. He was pro- 
moted Captain in December, 1909. 
He was shot through the heart at Zonnebeke, 
death being instantaneous. 

He was a member of the Junior Army and Xavy 
Cluli, and was married, but left no familv. 



LIEUTENANT HIS HIGHNESS PRINCE 
MAURICE VICTOR DONALD OF 
BATTENBERG, K.C.V.O., 1st BATTN. 
KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, 

who died of wounds 
received in action on 
the 27th October, 
1914, was the youn- 
gest son of H.R.H. 
Princess Henry of 
Battenberg (Princess 
Beatrice of England), 
daughter of Her late 
Majesty Queen Vic- 
toria, and was bom 
at Balmoral on the 
3rd October, 1891. 
His father, 1^'ince Henry of Battenberg, died of 
fever contracted in the Ashanti War in 1896. 
Prince Maurice's two elder brothers are in the 
Ai'my. Prince Alexander in the Grenadier Guards, 
and Prince Leopold in the King's Royal Rifle 
Corijs. 

He was educated at Wellington and the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst, where he was a Sergeant, from which 
he was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifle Corps 
as second Lieutenant in March, 1911, being 
promoted Lieutenant in February. 1911. 
The following account of his death was pub- 
lished in the WeUington Tear Book of 1914 : — 
" He met his death leading his men against a 
German position. On the advance, they came 
to a wood which was too thick for them to get 
through conveniently, and they had to cross an 
open field. Prince ^Maurice was leading his men 
across this open space when a shell fell and burst 
right by him. He knew that his injuries were 
mortal. He was carried to a field dressing room, 
but died before it was reached." He was buried 
in the cemetery at Tpres. 

Prince Jlaurice was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 8th October, 1914. 





CAPTAIN CHARLES F R E M O U L T 
PRESTON BATTERSBY, 113th 
BATTERY, XXVth BRIGADE, 
ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

who was kUled bv a 

shell at Ypres on the 
4th XovemDer, 1914. 
was the only diild 
of Major - General 
Thomas Preston Bat - 
tersby, late Royal 
Artillery, now Princi- 
pal Ordnance Officer, 
of "Cromlyn,'' 
Westmeath, Ireland. 
He was born at the 
Castle Barracks, Eu- 
niskiUen, on the 11th July. 1887. and was 
educated first at a preparatory school at 
Colchester. He gained the Probationers' and 
Junior Scholarsliips in Classics at the King's 
.School, Canterbury, and passed direct from the 
Army Class to the R.M.A. Woolwich. He re- 
ceived his commission in the Royal ArtiUery in 
June, 1907, becoming Lieutenant in June, 1910, 
and obtaining his Company in October, 1914. 
He was very keen on all games and sports, and 
though not distinguished in any, could play a 
good game of cricket, football, golf, and tennis ; 
was fond of hunting and shooting, and very 
keen on his profession, in which he won the 
liking, respect, and confidence of the officers 
and men with whom lie served. 



M.\V B.\TTERSBY, 
BATTN. ROYAL 
R E G I .M E N T . 



CAPTAIN ERIC 

3rd lattd. Isti 

WEST KENT 

was the third son of 

Worsley Battersby, 

Esq.. J. P., for 

West Somerset, of 

Knowle DunsLer, 

and of his wife Jessie 

Battersby. 

He was educated at 

Sherborne, and 

joined the 3rd 

(.Alihtia) Battalion 

of the Regiment in 

1903, resigning with 

the rank of Lieutenant in I'.inr.. WhentheW'ar 

broke out he at once volunteered liis services 

in his old battaUon, and was sent out to France 

in command of a draft on the 19th September, 

being promoted Captain a week later. 

He fell in the action at Xeuve ChapeUe on the 

28th October, 1914. Brigadier F. W. X. 

McCracken, C.B., D.S.O., said to Captain 

Battersby on that day : — " Tour regiment has 

done splendidly ; you wiU hear more of it." 

Captain Battersby was then in couunand of the 




BAT— BAY 



24 




battalion, and was killed a few hours after- 
wards. He was 30 years of age, and was not 
married . 

2nd LIEUTENANT EDWARD CHARLES 
VULLIAMY BATTLE, 3rd BATTN. 
WORCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was the elilest son of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
W. H. Battle, 
R.A.-ALC. (T.F.), and 
was born in London 
on the 17th Novem- 
ber, 1894. 

He was educated at 
]\Ialvern College, 

where he was a Cor- 
poral in the OfYicei-s' 
Training Corps and 
■ ■ a memljer of the 

College Eight, making the highest possible score 
in the Public Schools Competition at Bisley in 
1912. 

In .Septeml)er, 1913, he entered the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst, where he became Sergeant of his 
Company, and in August, 1914, was gazetted to 
the Worcester.rliire Regiment as Second Lieu- 
tenant. He went to France at the beginning of 
September ; on the 21st October, at lUies, near 
La Bass^e, he was shot through the shoulder, 
and after getting his men to bandage him, he 
went on fighting. He got into a trench \vith 
another officer and some men, making a gallant 
attempt to repulse the Germans, who came up 
in great numbers in front and on the flank, 
when he was shot through the head. 
Much regret was expressed at his death by the 
officers, non-commissioned officers, and men of 
his battalion, who had learned to know him, 
and appreciated hLs constant cheerfulness and 
brave endurance during the trying night marches 
of the Brigade on the way from the Aisne to the 
North of France. 



2nd LIEUTENANT 
BAY LEY, 2nd B 
OWN SCOTTISH 




to till' I'lC'lll. at llic euuim 

He was slightly wounded 



GEORGE BAIRD 

ATTN. KING'S 

BORDERERS, 

son of I. F. Bayley, 
Halls, East Lotliian, 
was born there on 
the 1st July, 1894. 
After receiving lus 
education at Chel- 
tenham College, and 
the R.M.C., Sand- 
hurst, he was gaz- 
etted to the Scottish 
Borderers in Janu- 
ary, 1914, and went 
«ith his battahon 
mcement of the War. 
during the retirement 



from Mons on the 2(5th August at Le Cateau, 
and after being invalided home for a few weeks 
returned to the front with the Vllth Division, 
attaclied to the 2nd Battalion Koyal Scots 
Fusiliers. It was wliile serving with this 
battahon that he met his death at the Battle of 
Ypres on the 24th October, 1914. 
On the morning of that day the Royal Scots 
Fusiliers were holding a line of trenches running 
from the Y'pres-Menin road northwards to- 
wards the village of Reutel, Second-Lieutenant 
Bayley's Company being in reserve. On the 
Germans breaking through the line, his com- 
pany was ordered up in support, and while 
running forward to the trenches he was shot, 
death being instantaneous. He was mentioned 
in Sir John French's Dcsiiatches of 17th 
February, 1915, for gallant and disliiit;uislii-(I 
service in the field. 

LIEUTEN.\NT CHARLES GEORGE 
GORDON BAYLY. 56th FIELD CO. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS, AND No. 5 
SQUADRON ROYAL FLYING CORPS. 

was born at Ronde- 
bosch. Cape Colony. 
South Africa, on the 
30th May, 1891. He 
was the only son of 
the late Brackenbury 
Bayly, Memb. Inst. 
Elec*-. Eng. (died 4th 
August, 1914), of the 
Cape Civil Service, 
who saw service as a 
civilian under the 
uuUtary authorities 
in the Zulu War of 1879, for which he 
received the War medal and clasp ; he also 
served in the Tembu Campaign of 1881, for 
which he received the General Service medal 
and clasp. 

Lieutenant Bayly came of mihtary stock : one 
grandfather was the late Major Neville Saltren 
Keats Bayly, R.A., who served in the Crimean 
War and Indian Mutiny, and was wounded 
at Aden ; the other is Colonel William Jesser 
Coope, late Captain .57th Regiment, who also 
served in the Crimea and Mutiny, for which he 
received the medals ; and in the Ru-sso-Turkish 
War of 1878 with the Red Cross, when he was 
taken prisoner of war at the fall of Plevna, as 
he was an officer in the Imperial Ottoman 
Gendarmerie at the time ; for these services he 
received Turkish orders of two degrees, and 
afterwards took part in the South African War, 
1899-1902, for which he received the King's and 
the Queen's medals. Lieutenant Bayly was also 
a great-nephew of General Charles George 
Gordon of Khartoum, his grandfather (Major 
Bayly) having married General Gordon's sister. 
Lieutenant Bayly was educated at the Diocesan 




BEA— BEC 



College School. Rondebosch, Cape Colony ; St. 
Ediuund's Preparatory School, Hindhead, 
Surrey ; St. Paul's School, Hainmersniith. and 
finally at the Royal Military Academy, Wool- 
wich. At all of them he took a prominent place 
in athletics and sports, as well as on the 
academic roll : he won the Rifleman's Certificate, 
and was in the cricket and football teams of his 
earlier schools : at .St. Paid's he won a senior 
scholarship, got his football and cricket colours, 
was Sergeant in the School Cadet Corps, taking 
certificate A, and gained the School Exhibition 
for Woolwich : he was proficient at boxing, in 
which he represented his School House ; and 
later won his coloiu^ in the Rosslyn Park 
Football Team. At the Royal .Military Academy 
he unfortunately broke his wrist during his 
first season and was therefore unable to play 
football for Woolwich, but he won several prizes 
for other forms of athletics, including the 
swinnning obstacle race in 1910, and he was 
twice in the leading team of the swimming 
relay race : he was also one of the twelve 
select-ed to compete for the saddle awarded to 
the best rider of the cadets receiving commis- 
sions. He passed seventh out of Woolwich, and 
was gazetted to the Royal Engineers in August, 
1911, as Second Lieutenant. Proceeding to the 
School of ilihtary Engineering at Chatham, he. 
while there, passed the test for a Pilot's Certifi- 
cate at the Hendon Aerodrome in March, 1913, 
and after attaining what was then considere<l the 
good altitude of 100 feet, and making good land- 
ings, he received hisA%-iator's Certificate(No.l4]). 
He obtained his football colours in the Royal 
Engineers and played cricket for the Corps. 
Passing out of Chatham he was gazetted Lieu- 
tenant on 2nd August, 1913, and was posted to 
the 56th Field Company st-ationed at Bulford 
Camp. He rode in the Royal Artillery Han-lers' 
Point -to -Point Lightweight Hunt Cup. wi nnin g 
second prize, 1914. He joined the Royal Flying 
School, Upavon,in May, 1911, and on leaving — 
having been highly reported on as Pilot and 
Observer — on the outbreak of the War was 
gazetted to Xo. 5 Squadron Royal Flying Corps, 
dating from June. 1911. He was entrusted with 
varioiLs duties prior to his flight to France on 
the 12th August, reaching Amiens the same day, 
and flying thence to Maubeuge. 
He was killed on the 22nd August, 1911, wliile 
on reconnaissance duty, fi>"ing over the German 
lines in the neighbourhood of Enghien-Rassily 
as Observer, with Second-Lieutenant Waterfall 
a.s Pilot. They were fired at by a column of 
infantry, and finally brought do\vn by anti- 
aircraft gun fire. They were hastily bui-ied by 
the Germans under 10 centimetres of soU. and the 
Belgians covered the grave with flowers. Later, 
the owner of the park where they were buried, 
exhumed the bodies and placed them in zinc-lineil 
coffins, in order to give them more decent burial. 




LIELTENANT CH.\RLES REGINALD 
CHAMBERLAIN BEAN. 1st BATTN. 
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 
who was officially re- 
ported to be wounded, 
in the middle of 
November, 1914, 
but whose death was 
unofficially con- 
firmed, and who is 
now reported to have 
been killed on the 
26th October, 1914. 
was born in 1892. 

He was educated at 

Sherborne School, 

on the Continent, and at Sandhiu-st, joining the 
South Staffordshire Regiment in January, 1913, 
and becoming Lieutenant in September. 1914. 
It was stated in " The Times " that, having 
gone to the front early in October, he was, on 
the 25th of that month, sent to support a hotly- 
pressed trench near Ypres. and, after fighting 
aU night, was wounded on the morning of the 
26th. Although pressed to leave the trench for 
medical aid, he refused, and was killed shortly 
afterwards, his body having been last seen 
lying on the parapet of the trench. 

2nd LIEUTENANT EDWARD ARCHI- 
BALD BEA UC HA MP, attd. 3rd 
BATTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 
was the elder son of 
.Sir Edward Beau- 
champ, Bart., M.P. 
for Lowestoft, .Suf- 
folk, J.P. for Nor- 
folk, and his second 
wife Betty Campbell, 
daughter of Archi- 
bald Woods, of 
Columbus, Ohio. 
U.S.A. 

Born on the 5th 
AprU, 1891, he was 
educated at Eton, and joined the Special Reserve 
of the Coldstream Guards in February, 1914, 
being gazetted as Second Lieutenant in that 
regiment in November, 1914. After being 
wounded near Ypres in November he came to 
England, but on his recovery returned to the 
front and joined the 1st Battalion, when he 
again received wounds from the eflects of which 
he died on the 22nd December. 1914. 

.MAJOR HENRY SULLIVAN BECHER, 
1 2nd KING EDWARDS OWN GURKHA 
RIFLES THE SIRMOOR RIFLES), 

who was killed in Flanders on the 2ud November, 
1914, was the only son of the late Colonel SidUvan 
Becher and ilrs. Becher, of Kingswood House, 
Wotton - under - Edge, Gloucestershire. The 




BEE— BEL 



2H 



regiment in wliich ho 
by his lather in 1,S84. 




served was raised 
He was horn on the 
9th April, 1S71S, and 
was educated at 
^hirlliorongli I'roin 
1888-1892, in tier- 
man \. and at lie- 
li.Al.C, Sandlun'.^. 
He received his com- 
mission as Second 
Lieutenant (unat- 
tached) in .lanuar\ . 
1S90, and joined the 
Indian Stall' Corps 
in April, 1897, 
becoming Lieutenant in the Indian Army in 
April, 1898. and Captain in January, 1905. 
He ser\ed in operations on the Samana, North- 
West Frontier of India in 1897, receiving the 
medal with two clasps. He also took part in the 
Tirah Expedition, 1897-98, and was present at 
the actions of Chagru Kotal and Dargai, tlie 
capture of the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes : 
at operations in the Waran and Bara Valleys, 
and action of the 10th November, 1897 ; opera- 
tions at and round Dwatoi and action of the 
24th November, 1897 ; also operations against 
the Khani Khel Chamkanis, and in the Bara 
Valley in December, 1897, receiving a clasp to 
his medal. He took part in the Waziristan 
Expedition, North- West Frontier, of 1901-02, 
receiving an additional clasp. 
From November, 1909, to September, liill, lie 
was A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief, lOast 
Indies, which appointment he gave up to rejoin 
his regiment in 1912, to take part in the 
Expedition to the Abor Country, foi' \\liich 
campaign he received the medal and was 
mentioned in Despatches. He was promoted 
Major in January, 1914. 

"The Times" of the 11th Noveml)er, ION. 
pul)Hshed the following letter from one who 
knew him well : — 

" Sullivan Becher's was a personality widely 
known and universally beloved. He lived in and 
for, and has died, as he would have wished, lead- 
ing the gallant (inrkhas of the regiment whieli 
his father. Colonel Sidlivan Becher (who was re- 
commended for the \'ictoria Cross for his gallan- 
try at the Battle of Kandahar), raised in 1884." 

CAPTAIN A. C. BEEMAN, 3rd (attd. 
1st) BATTN. THE QUEEN'S OWN 
(ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT), 

who was killed on the 26th October, 1914, 
joined the 3rd Battalion in September, 1899, 
as Second Lieutenant, being promoted Lieu- 
tenant in June, 1900, and reaching the rank of 
Captain in his regiment in May. 1902. 
He served in the South African War, having Ix-en 
present atoperations in Cape Colony in :May.l902, 
receiving the Queen's medal with two ilasps. 




2nd LIEUTENANT CHARLES OCKLEY 
BELL, 2nd BATTN. BEDFORDSHIRE 
REGIMENT, 

was born in 1891 at 
(irinisby, tlie son of 
Alfred [''rederick 

and Sarah Susanna 
Bell. He was edu- 
cated at Alford 
(irammar School. 
Lincolnshire. 
This yovmg ollirer 
served in the ranks 
of the South Staf- 
fordshire Regiment 
for four and a half years, and when lie had 
attained the rank of Corporal his conspicuous 
ability was rewarded by his being selected 
for a commission as Second Lieutenant in 
the Bedfordshire Regiment, which ho received 
on the 20th May, 1914. He was, it is believed, 
the first officer to gain his commission from 
the ranks vmder the new regidations in- 
troduced in 1914. 

He proceeded to South Africa to join his new 
regiment, and returned to go to the front with 
it at the commencenaent of the War. 1 1 e was 
killed on Sunday, the 18th October. 1911. and 
was buried at Le Touret. 

His mother's father was an Indian Mutiny 
veteran. Jlr. and .Mrs. Bell had the lionour of 
receiving the following telegram on the occasion 
of their son's death : — 

" The King and Queen deeply regret the loss 
you and the Anny have sustained by the death 
of your son in the service of his country. Their 
^Majesties tridy sympathise with yon in your 
sorrow." — Priv.\te Secretary. 
Second-Lieutenant Bell was unmarried. 



CAPTAIN MALCOLM ARTHUR 
RUSSELL BELL, OF THE 
54th SIKHS, FRONTIER FORCE, 

born in Kdiubm-gh 



in 1880, was the 
eldest son of the late 
Russell Bell, Advo- 
cate, Sheriff-Substi- 
tute of Stirlingshire, 
and the late ]Mrs. 
Russell Bell, of The 
< 'lose, Salisbviry : his 
brothers are in the 
Services, Lieutenant- 
Commander Norman 
Leven Russell Bell, 
R.N., H.M.S. " Vanguard," and Second-Lieu- 
tenant Gerald Ilallam Russell Bell. 3rd Bat- 
talion King's Own Scottish Borderers ; he was 
a nephew of Mr. H. D. Bell, of Peehvalls, Ayton, 
Berwickshire. 




27 



BEN 



Captain Bell was educated at St. Salvators, St. 
Andrews, Fettes College, and the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst. In 1900 he was appointed to the 
King's Ovm Scottish Borderers, and two years 
later was ransferred to the Indian Army, in 
which he was promoted Captain in January, 
1909. He was on active service on the Xoi-th- 
West Frontier in 1902, being present at opera- 
tions against the Darwesh Khel Waziris, and in 
1908 at operations in the Zakka Khel Country, 
and m the ilolvniand Country : for his ser\-ices 
he received the medal with cla.sp. 
Captain Bell volunteered for service in the 
Great War in November, 1914, and was attac-hed 
to the 58th RiHes, Frontier Force, Meerut 
Di\ision ; he was killed in action in France on 
the 26th December, 1914. He had lieen ordered 
up to support a part of the line where the enemy 
had broken through, and was leading his men 
towards the German trenches when he was shot 
through the head, dying almost immediately. 
He was buried by the Divisional Chaplain, the 
Rev. R. Irwin, close to Le Touret, four miles 
east of Bethune. on the Bethime-Richebourg 
Road, at a little burial ground, where some .50 
other officers are laid. A cross is erected at the 
spot. 

Captain Bell was a member of the Junior Army 
and Xavy Club, and his recreations were golf 
and polo. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ROBERT 
BURTON BENISON, 2nd B.\TTN. 
THE CONN AUGHT RANGERS, 

who was kUled in action on the 20th Sep- 
t-ember, 1914, was the youngest son of the late 
Mr. T. T. Benison, of .Slieve Russell, BaUycon- 
nell, Co. Cavan. 

He was born in 1891, and entered the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst, in Augtist, 1910, being gazetted 
to the Connaught Rangers in September, 1911. 

LIEUTEN.\NT MURR.W STU.\RT 
BENNING, 3rd BATTN. EAST SURREY 
REGIMENT, 

was Ijorn at Dun- 
stable, Bedfordshire, 
on the 23rd Augvist, 
1894, the youngest 
son of Mr. Charles 
Crichton Stuart Ben- 
ning. Town Clerk, of 
The Limes, Dun- 
stable. Among his 
relatives are ilajor 
A. C. S. Benning, 
Bedfordshire Yeo- 
manry, Lieutenant-Commander C. S. Benning, 
Sul)marine E.5. and Flight-Lieutenant Brian 
Stuart Benning, Royal Naval Air Service. 
I^ieutenant Benning was educated at Dunstable 
Grammar Sdiool, and at Uijpingham, where he 




was in the Officers' Training Corps. He 
was gazetted to the 3rd Battalion, Ea.st Sun-ey 
Regiment in December, 1912, being promoted 
Lieutenant on the 5th August, 1914. 
In the Great \\'ar he was attached to the 
1st BattaUon and was wounded at Richebourg 
L'Avouc on the 28th October, and died 
at ChrLstol Hospital, Boulogne, on the 1st 
November, 1914. The following is extracted 
from an account of the circumstances published 
in the " Bedfordshire Standard " of 13th 
November, 1914 : — 

" From a letter received from a Ijrother officer, 
it appears that the Surreys had been subjected 
to tremendous shell and rifle Are for three days 
by greatly superior numbers of the enemy, but 
held their own. On this particular day the Ger- 
mans poured shot and shell at them in a perfect 
storm, and men who have been at the front all 
the time say that it was the hottest fire they 
ever saw. Lieutenant Benning was on the right 
of the trench, and was very cool, but a bullet 
caught him in the head. It was too hot to 
remove him from the trench, as by that time 
the Germans had got within about 150 yards, 
and were actually shelling them with the siege 
guns they used at Antwerp. Another officer 
knelt beside him to protect him from injury by 
shrapnel, and it was lucky he did, as a piece of 
shell quite six inches in length fell and caught 
him instead of striking the wounded Lieutenant 
in the face. At last he was got under cover 
until a stretcher arrived to take him out of the 
fu-ing line. He was operated on at Boulogne 
and seemed to be going on well, untU a relapse 
occurred." 

At the time he answered the call to serve his 
country. Lieutenant Benning was the repre- 
sentative of Messrs. Wright & Co., rubber 
brokers, and, although a very young man, was 
already well known among Mincing Lane 
brokers. HLs comrades in the field have spoken 
of him as being wonderfully cool and brave in 
the firing Une. He was one of the earliest of 
many members to go to the front from ilincing 
Lane. 

CAPTAIN JOHN PENRICE BENSON 
1st BATTN. EAST SURREY REGIMENT. 

who was born at 
Kil\TOugh, Glamor- 
ganshire, on the 1st 
October, 1877, was 
the son of Judge 
William Denman 
Benson and Jane 
Penrice his wife. He 
had several relations 
in the Army and 
Navy, among them 
his grandfather, the 
late General H. R. 




BEN 



28 



Benson, CH., ITIli Lnnoors ; Coliniil II. W. 
Benson, D.S.O. : CnhMnl S. .\l. Hcnson, ITtli 
Lanrers ; Colonc^l 1!. 10. Benson, lOast Voiksliiii' 
J{(^ginient, also killed in this war, and Admiral 
of the Kleet, fSii- A. I>yons G.C.Ji. 
Captain Benson was cdueatcd at Chaiti'ilioiisc 
and tlie [{..M.C, Sandluirst. havinji Ixu^n at liotli 
a cricketer and a fo()tl)aller. He roceiv(;d liis 
commission in llie Kast Surrey Regiment in 
IS!)7. and s(i\i'd with it through the wholr nl' 
till' South Atri'-an War. having l)een WDiiinlrd 
on I'ietcr's Hill, at the Belief of l,adysniit.h. 
He received the (Queen's medal with five clasps 
and (lie Iving's medal with two clasps. 
In September, 10(12. lie was appointed Adjulanl 
of his battalion and sidisequently passed to the 
Reserve of Ollicrrs ha\ ing become a Captain in 
()ctol)er, lllOl. 

On the outbreak of the war he rejoined his old 
regiment, and went with it to the fiont. At the 
Battle of Mons he was wounded by a machine 
gun whi'.e fighting in the first line of trenches 
on the 23rd August : he was taken down to a 
convent school hospital at Boussu. left there on 
the retirement, and died there. prnl)ably on (h<> 
21th August, 1914. 

Captain Benson, who was a meniljcr uf the 
Army and Navy Club, married Laura Annette 
Rideout. daughter of General Rideout and 
grand-daunhter of tlie late Admiral Montresor. 
He left two children, William Frank ^Montresor, 
born 7th October, 1907, and Jane Penrice, born 
2nd .lanuarj-, 1915. 

LIEUTENANT - COLONEL RICHARD 



ERLE BENSON, 
BATTN. THE 




COMMANDING 1st 
EAST YORKSHIRE 
REGIMENT, 

was the son of 
General H. R. Ben- 
son, C.B., 17th Lan- 
cers, grandson of Sir 
William W^ightnian, 
one of Il.M.'s .Judges, 
and a nephew of 
Father Eicliard il. 



Benson, 
Father. 



a Cowley 
The family 
in 



I^^^^HtT ^^ residence was 

""-"' — ■■:^-=^ Glamorganshir, . 
Lieutenant-Colonel Benson was born on the 
4th October, 1802, and was educated at Eton, 
where he was in the College Boats. 
He joined the East Yorkshire Regiment in May, 
1SS4. became Captain in 1891, and Major n 
1903. He was twice Adjutant of his battalion, 
from 18S5-188G, and again from 1891-lS;i4. 
and wa^i specially employed with the Bechviana- 
land Police from July, 1889-May, 1890. He 
was also Adjutant of the 4th Battalion East 
Surrey Reuiment tor five years from 1899. After 
the embodiment of the Battalion in December, 



1899, he accompanied it to South Aiiica in 19(12, 
for tlie Boer War ; he received th(^ (Queen's medal 
with three clasps, and was recomnieiidiHl for the 
M.S.O., but it was tlecided not to give that 
decoration for services after a certain date, so 
he was precluded from receiving it. 
Major Benson, as he then was, accompanied 
the 2nd Battalion of tlie regiment to Binnia 
in 19()(i, and afterwards to Fyzaljad. wliere he 
allied as Second in Command ; in 1 9 II he was 
transferred to the 1st Battalion, and im (he 
l.")tli of August of that year succeeded to the 
Command of the Battalion. An a))i)re- 
ciativo notic(> of Lieutenant-Colonel Hiii-.(in 
appeared in tlie monthly journal ol the 
regiment, tlie " Snapper," for October, 191 I. 
S|)ecial mention is therein made of the very 
liigli state of efficiency to wtueli Lieutenant- 
Colonel Benson had lirought his battalion, and 
in whicii it embarked for the front in tlie Great 
War It says : — " His period of command 
will long lie known as one of the brightest chap- 
ters in the history of the 1st Battalion . 
wherever he went his popularity with all ranks 
was soon sesn." 

While leading his battalion in a charge at tlu; 
Battle of the Aisne Lieutenant-Colonel Benson 
was wounded, on Sunday, the 20th Septendier, 
1914, and died in the Australian Hospital, St. 
Nazaire, on the following Sunday, the 27th 
September. 

A brother t^fficer wrote of him : — " He was so 
magnificent, so full of energy and courage — al- 
ways in the front — and the men would have fol- 
lowed him anywhere. Even after he was woun- 
ded he would not be brought in till he knew t he 
other wounded were safe, and his one thought 
was for the safety and welfare of his regiment." 
Lieutenant-Colonel Benson was keenly in- 
terested in all sporting matters connected with 
his l)attalion, and was a member of tlie Xaval 
and Jlilitary Club. 

He married Florence, daugliter of M. W. 
Armour, Esq., and left three cliildren — two 
girls, Rita and Jlolly. and one hoy, .Tack. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES ARTHUR CAMP- 
BELL BENTLEY, 1st BATTN. ROYAL 
WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was the eldest son of 
Dr. George Herbert 
Bentley, of Kirklis- 
ton, Linlithgow- 
shire, and his wife 
Anna Campbell of 
Edinburgh, and 
grandson of Cajjtain 
C. S. Bentley, 31st 
Regiment ; he was 
born at Kirkliston, 
Linlithgowshire, on 
the 24th March, 1879. 



■ ;.^^ 


' 


Am •;. I 




m^ 




^\l 





BEN 



After his school edui-ation he matrk-ulateil at 
Edinburgh University, and studied for the 
Jledical Profession. When a medical student 
at the University he enlisted in the S<-ots Greys, 
in 1898, and served with them through the Boer 
War, having been present at the Relief of 
Kimberley, operations in the Orange Free State, 
including actions at Paardeberg and Driefon- 
tein ; in the Transvaal, in actions near Johan- 
nesburg and Wamond Hill, and in the Transvaal 
East of Pretoria, including the action at Belfast. 
He received the Queen's medal with six cla.sps. 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
In April, 1902, he received his commission as 
Second Lieutenant in the Royal Warwickshire 
Regiment, becoming Lieutenant in October, 
1905, and Captain in June. 191-1. 
In 1910 Captain Bentley was selected as 
Staff Officer of the Local Forces and Adjutant 
of Constabulary at Trinidad, with the local rank 
of Captain, carrying on his duties to the entire 
satisfaction of the authorities. He returned to 
England at the expiration of his appointment, 
early in 1914. It is a remarkable coincidence 
that his grandfather. Captain Bentley. of the 
51st Regiment, also did good service in Trinidad 
when he was Adjutant of his regiment in 1837. 
and acted very bravely in helping to suppress a 
meeting of the Xative Troops, as recorded by 
Charles Kingsley in his book '" At Last."' 
Captain Bent'ey went with his battalion to the 
front in August, 1914, and was in the retirement 
from lions, and in the subsequent advance, 
and on the 23rd October, 1914, was killed 
while gallantly leading his company at 
the captiu-e of an entrenched village close to 
-\rmentieres ; he was buried in the cemetery 
at that place. He was mentioned in P'ield- 
Marshal Sir John French's Despatch. January. 
14th. 1915. •■ for gallant and distinguished 
service in the field." 

The following is an abbreviated account of his 
death, given by a Private of his Battalion: — 
"Captain Bentley always went ahead 'of his 
men, cheering them on. He did not seem to 
know what fear was. and that made them all 
brave, too. The Warwicks were told a little 
village near Armentieres must be taken at any 
cost, and Captain Bentley's Company had to 
lead the four Companies sent out. Two hundred 
and seventy set out to do it. and when t hey took 
the place there were only 20 left : 100 were 
killed, and 150 wounded. Tee Captain was at 
the head of the 20 when he fell, sniped in three 
places. He never seemed to think of his 
wounds, but went on cheering the men, and 
almost the last words he said were : ' Go on, 
my men ; keep up the good name of the 
Warwicks : don't give in.' He lived for a few 
hours after he was wounded." 
Three days after the publication of the article 
referring to his death, in the " Daily Graphic," 




the " Times " printed a touching poem, " After- 
math," prol>ably inspired by the " DaQy 
Graphic " notice ; at all events, the poem's 
opening Lne; were perfectly true as regards 
Captain Bentley : — 

•" Slain by a Prussian bullet, leading the 
men who loved him. 
Dying, cheered them on." 
Captain Bentley married Geraldine Sadleir, 
daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel F. S. "Stoney, 
J.P., late R.A.. of The Down^. Delgany, Co. 
Wicklow, and left three young children : Charles 
Francis Campbell, born 1907 ; Sybil llojrra, 
bom 1908 ; and Hester Dorten. born 1912. 

2nd LIEUTENANT CL.\RENCE LESLIE 
BENTLEY. 2nd B.\TTN. MANCHESTER 
REGIMENT, 
was born at York on 
the 8th August. 1894, 
and was the youngest- 
son or Mrs. Bentley. 
of Fulford Grange. 
York, and of the late 
Alderman Bentley. 
J.P. He was a 
nephew of the lat>- 
Colonel J. W. Came- 
ron, of the 4th Dur- 
ham Artillery, West 
Hartlepool. Second Lieutenant Bentley's 
eldest brother is a Captain in the West Riding 
Heavy Artillei^ Batter}-, now on the Humber 
Defences : and his second brother Ls a Lieutenant 
in the 2nd Battalion A.P.W.O. Yorkshire Regi- 
ment (■■ Green Howards '"). and was wounded 
in the great advance at Neuve Chapelle on the 
11th March, 1915, having since recovered from 
his wounds and returned to the front. 
Second Lieutenant Bentley was educated at 
Bootham School. Y'ork. and Mill Hill School. 
London, X.W. ; afterwards he went to the 
R.M.C.. Sandhurst. At school he took all his 
colours, and at Sandhurst took his " blue " for 
hockey. He received his conunission on the 
8th Augxist. 1914. his twentieth birthday, and 
was with the 3rd Battalion of his regiment on 
the Humber Defences for a short time. He 
then took a draft across to the Continent, and 
joined his own battalion at the front. He saw 
a good deal of fighting all along the Y'ser and 
Marne. and was killed in action near Ypres on 
the 29th October. 1914. A sniper shot him 
through the head when directing his men in a 
supporting trench, the front trenches having 
been rushed by the Germans. 
2nd Lieut. Bentley was buried in a garden at the 
back of a farm on the west side of La Quinque 
Rue. A little cross over the grave marks his rest- 
ing place. His Company's Captain, in expressing 
the regret he felt at his loss, spoke of him as being 
of an exceptional and outstanding character. 



BEN BER 



30 




CAPTAIN GEOFFREY MALCOLM 
BKNTLKY, 1st BATTN. NORTH- 
AM P 1" O N S H I R E REGIMENT, 

wild (lii'd (111 llir 
2!)tli October, UH I. 
of wounds receiv('<l 
ill action, was llu; 
fifth son of Lieii- 
tonant-Colonel A. W. 
Bentley, V.l)., J.l>.. 
I The Grove, ^Ioiik<>n 
Hadley, Middlesex. 
He was liorn on the 
:ird May, 18s:5, and 
was edvicated at Wel- 
lington C'ollefje. where 
he was in (he I'ieton from 1897-1900. After 
serving with the embodied Militia for a year 
and a half, he joined the Northamptonshire 
Regiment in January, 1903. He took jiart in 
the South .Vfrican War, being present at opera- 
tions in Cape Colony from June, 1901, to 
January, 1902, and served in St. Helena from 
January to May, 1902, receiving the Queen's 
medal with two clasps. 

He was promoted Lieutenant in December. 
1904, and Captain in May, 1910. 
In the Great War he had taken part in the 
retirement from Mons, and the battle of the Aisne, 
and was shot by a sniper while handing over 
the trenches to the French troops at Pilkem. 
He was mentioned in Sir John French's Des- 
patch of the 14th January, 191.5. 
His elder brotlier, Major Gerald W. Bentley, 
Jliddlesex Regiment, died of wounds received 
in this war on the 14th October, 1014. 
Captain GeolTrey Bent!ey married Edith Marie 
(nee Galway). Belgravia, Bangor, Co. Down, 
and left an only daughter, Maureen Sheila. 



MAJOR 
BENTLEY, 



GERALD WILSON 
MIDDLESEX REGIMENT, 

who was shown in the 
monthly War Office 
Casu-olty List, puli- 
lished in November, 
1914, as having been 
killed in action be- 
tween the 12th-14th 
Octolier. 1914, died 
on the latter date at 
Croix Barbee of 
wounds received in 
action. He had 
been at Mons and 
j-ucreedin^' ill- ji-iriii-iits Until his death. 
He was the third son of Lieutenant-Colonel 
A. W. Bentley, J.P., of The Grove, Monken 
Hadley, Middlesex, and was born on the 1st 
August, 1879, and educated at Haileybury. 
He joined the Jfiddlesex Regiment from the 
-Militia in May. IS99, liecoming Lieutenant in 




.\l:uvh. IllOil. and Caiitaiii in Octolier, I'.HII. 
His rapid promotion was due to the South 
Afiican War. in which he served from 1S!I9— 
111(12. He was present at the relief of L.idy- 
smith and the action at Spion Kop, where hi^ 
was severely wounded ; at operations on th(^ 
Tugela Heights, and action at Pieter's Hill ; 
operations in Natal, the Transvaal, East of 
Pretoria, and in Cape Colony, Sovith of the 
Orange River in 1899-1900, and again in the 
Transvaal from 1900-1901. II,. i,-,rivicl the 
Queen's medal with four clasps, and the King's 
medal with two clasps. In .\pril, 1012. he was 
appointed Superintendent of Gymnasia. Nin- 
therii Connnand, which appointment lir luM 
till the outbreak of the Great War. 
His younger lirother. Captain GeolTrey M. 
Bentley. Northamptonshire Regiment, died of 
wounds on the 29th October, 1914. Major 
Bentley, who was unmarried, was promoted 
temporarily to his rank in October, 1914. 
He won the light and heavy-weight boxing 
competitions at the Army and Navy Boxing 
Championships in 1910. 

MAJOR CHARLES GEORGE PACK- 
BERESFORD, 1st BATTN. THE QUEEN'S 
OWN (ROYAL WEST KENT REGT.), 

was born on the 21st 
of November, 1809, 
and was the son of 
Denis W. Pack- 
Beresford, Esq.. J.P., 
D.L., M.P., Co. 
Carlow, of Fenagh 
House, Bagnalstown. 
Ireland, and grand- 
son of ilajor-General 
Sir Denis Pack, 
K.C.B. 

He was educated at 
WelUngton College and the R.il.C, .Sandhur.st, 
joining the Royal West Kent Regiment as 
Second Lieutenant in November, 1889, be- 
coming Lieutenant in February, 1893. From 
December, 1890, to March, 1900, he was Adju- 
tant of his Battalion, having become Captain in 
December, 1899, and Major in March. 1908. 
Major Pack-Beresford was employed on the 
North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, having 
been in Malakand and the action at Landaki ; 
at operations in Bajaur and in the JIamund 
country ; at Buner in the attack and captur(! of 
the Tanga Pass. For these services he leceived 
the medal with clasp. 

He also served in the South African War from 
1900-02, and was engaged in operations in 
the Orange River Colony, in 1900 ; in the Trans- 
vaal and Cape Colony in 1900 and 1901. He 
was mentioned in Despatches (" London 
Gazette," September, 1901). and received the 
(Queen's medal with four clasps. 




31 



BER— BES 



From 1905-09 Major Pac-k-Beresford was 
Officer of a Company of Gentlemen Cadets at 
the R.M.C., Sandhurst. He commanded the 
Depot of Ills regiment at Maidstone from 1910 
to 1914. 

He was killed in action at Wasinies, near Mons. 
on the 24th August, 1914. He was not married. 



LIEUTENANT BERNARD FREDERICK 
PAUL BERNARD. 2nd B A T T N . 
ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was killed in Lleceml)er. 1914. at the 
age of 20, wa.s the only son of Colonel E. E. 
Bernard, C.M.G.. Financial Secretary to the 
Sudan Government. 

He only joined the Army in October, 1914. 
and, on the 20th December, was promoted 
temporarily to Lieutenant. 

LIEUTENANT LAURENCE ARTHUR 
BERNARD. 2nd BATTN. THE SHER 
WOOD FORESTERS NOTTlNGH.\M 
SHIRE AND DERBYSHIRE REGIMENT), 

was liorii un the 
27th August, 1886, 
at Copdock, Ips- 
wich, Suffolk, the 
son of Arthur !Mon- 
tague Bernard, J. P. 
tor Suffolk. 
Lieutenant Bernard 
was educated at 
Bradfield College, 
Berkshire, and at 
the Koyal Military 
College, Sandhurst. 
At both Colleges he was in the cricket and 
football first XIs, and gained the Marksman.ship 
Badge at Sandhurst. He joined the Sherwood 
Foresters in 1906, and was stationed at 
Bangalore till 1909. During the following four 
years he was seconded for sen'ice with the 
S. Nigeria Regiment W.A.F.F., ■with wliich he 
served in the Expeditions at Munshi, Agoni, 
and Sontwala. 

On the outbreak of the War his battalion 
joined the Expeditionary Field l-'orce ; on 
Sunday, 20th September, 1914, Lieutehant 
Bernard vas killed near Troyon wliile leading 
Ills men to recapture trenches taken by the 
Germans in the battle of the Aisne. This 
action was successful and most important 
in preserving intact the British Line. 

CAPTAIN HAMILTON HUGH BER 
NERS. 1st BATTN. IRISH GUARDS, 

who was killed on the 14th September, 1914. 
was the son of Charles Hugh Berners, Esq.. 
and his late wife Mary, daughter of Sir Ralph 
Anstruther. He was borninlS81 at Longcross, 
Surrey, England, educated at Eton, and, joining 



the Irish Guards from the Militia in 
November, 190.5, was promoted Lieutenant in 
April, 190(5, and Cap- 





/ 



J 



tain in December, 
1912. At the time 
of his death Captain 
Berners was second 
in command of his 
battaUon, owing to 
the heavy casualties 
which had occurred 
in the battalion 
at Villiers Cotteret. 
Five minutes before 
he was killed he 
carried into safety, under heavy fire, one of his 
men badly wounded by a shell. He was in the 
act of raising his field glasses to locate the 
source of the enemy's fire, when he was shot 
through the chest and body, and died in a few 
minutes. 

The following account was given by a Corporal 
of the Guards : — 

" Captain Berners, of the Irish Guards, as at the 
depot, was the hfe and soul of our lot. When 
shells were bursting over our heads he would 
buck us up with his humour about Brock's dis- 
plays at the Palace. But when we got into 
close quarters it was he who was in the thick 
of it, and didn't he fight ! 

" He was one of the best of officers, and there 
is not a Tommy who would not have gone under 
for him." 

Captain Berners married Edith Mary Georgina, 
daughter of the late Charles Sandham, Esq., of 
Rowdell, Pulborough, Sussex, and of Evelyn 
Sandham, of 13, Egerton Place, London, and 
grand-daughter of the late Right Hon. Sir 
Walter Barttelot, Bart., M.P.. of Stopham. 
Pulliorough, Sussex. 



C.\PT.\IN BARTON HOPE BESLY. 1st 
BATTN. DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT, 
who was killed in 
action at Givenchy 
on the 2oth October, 
I9I4, was the only 
sur\iving son of the 
late Rev. W. Blundell 
Besly and Mrs. Besly, 
of Ivedon, Honiton. 
He was born on the 
2Sth February, 1879. 
and was educated at 
Bradfield College. 
Berks, from 1891 to 

1897. He joined the Devonshue RegiiiiL-nt 
from the Mihtia in May, 1899, liecoming Lieu- 
tenant in Aprn. 1900. 

He took part in the .South African War. being 
employed with the Mounted Infantrj- from 




BIN-BIR 



32 



OctoliCT, VMM, to .May, l'M2. ami being present 
at the relief of Ladysmitli, including the action 
at Oolenso ; the actions at Spion Kop and ^'aal 
Krans ; op<a'atioiis on the TuK<'la Hcii;ht>< ami 
action at rictcr's Hill ; operations in Natal, 
iiuludint; the action at Laing's Xolc ; operations 
in tlie Transvaal. Orange River Colony, on tin- 
'/ululand frontier of Natal, including the 
defence of Forts Itala and Prospect. He received 
the Queen's medal with five clasps, and the 
King's medal with two clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in I'llmiary. 1901). 
He was a good rider, fond of hunting and polo, 
and a Iceen all-round sportsman. 
Captain Besly took part in the liattle of the 
Aisne, and in the operations around T.,a Bassi^e. 
He was mentioned for his services in Sir .Toliu 
French's Despatcli of the 14th January. 10 1.'). 

LIEUTEN.\NT DAVID CECIL 
BINGHAM, 3rd BATTN. COLDSTREAM 
GUARDS. 

who was killed in 
action on tlu- 1 Itli 
.S e p t e m b e !■ , 1 !U 1 . 
during the battle of 
the Aisne, was the 
younger son of Major- 
General the Hon. 
C. E. Bingham, 
C.V.O., C.B. (second 
son of the 4th Earl of 
Lucan), now Com- 
manding the 1st 
Cavalry DivLsion, British Expeditionary Force. 
He was born on the 18th March, 1887, and was 
educated at Eton, and the R.M.C., Sandhurst, 
receiving hi? commission in the Coldstream 
Guards in August. 190(>, and becoming Lien- 
tenant in JIarch, 1909. In July. 1911, he was 
appointed .\iljutant of his battalion. 
Lieutenant Bingham married, in 1912, Lady 
Rosabelle ^lillicent St. Clair-Erskine, only 
daughter of the 5th Earl of Rosslyn. and left a 
daughter. Rose, born 1913. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN GREVILLE 
HOBART BIRD, 2nd BATTN. THE 
QUEEN'S (ROYAL WEST SURREY 

REGIMENT), 

liorn at Wolver- 
hampton on the 11th 
November, 1888, was 
the only son of ilr. 
William Ilobart Bird, 
-M. Inst..'\l. E., The 
Gate House, Coven- 
try, and grandson of 
Alderman IMaycock, 
.T.I'., a former Mayor 
of Coventry. 
He was educated at 





Eversley House, SouthwoKI, and privately, 
receiving his commission in The Queen's in 
June, 1913. He came, at the commencement 
of the war with Germany, with his regiment 
from South Africa, and proceeding to the 
front, was shot dead in the desperate fighting 
near Ypres on the L'llth ()<t(.liiT. 1911: 
he had been sent with his platoon to defend 
a trench at a spot where the enemy's firing 
was particularly severe, and while directing 
his men's return fire, he was told that one of 
his best men had been hit. and in trying to go 
to his aid he was instantaneously killed. 
His promotion to Lieutenant. Ici lake ilircl 
from the 21.st October, 1914, was nut ill. d 
in the "London Ga/ette," of 22nd .Ma\ . lUl."). 



2nd LIEUT. GORDON ALIC BRODRICK 
BIRDWOOD, 2nd BATTN. THE PRINCE 
OF WALES'S VOLUNTEERS 
(SOUTH LANC.\SHIRE REGIMENT), 

born at Mhow. India, 
on the 22nd Dece 
ber, 1895, was 
son of Colonel 
liam S. Bu'dwood, 
Indian Army (re- 
tired). General Officer 
Commanding the 

Baroda State Army, 
and a grandson of 
General Christopher 
Birdwood, Bombay 
Staff Corps, and of 
George Frederick Sheppard, Esq., Indian Civil 
Service ; he was also related to Sir George 
Birdwood, K.C.I.E., C.S.I., Lieutenant-General 
Sir William R. Birdwood, K.C.S.I.. C.B.. 
CLE., D.S.O., and to Colonel S. H. Sheppard, 
R.E., D.S.O., and was a nephew of Herliert 
MUls Bu-dwood, C.S.I., I.C.S., who is the 
father of the present Lieutenant-General .Sir 
William R. Birdwood, Commanding the 
Australian and New Zealand Contingents at 
the front. 

Educated at Mr. Bickmore's. Yardle> Coiu't. 
Tonbridge, and at TonViridge School. Kent, 
at both of which he won prizes for running 
and swimming, he proceeded to the ILM.C, 
.Sandhurst, where he was a Prize Cadet, and was 
gazetted to the 2nd Battahon The Prince of 
Wales's \'olunteers (.South Lancashire Regi- 
ment), in August, 1914. three months before he 
would liave been in ordinary circumstances. 
-Vfter a short preliminary training at Liver- 
pool, he left England to join his battalion in 
France on the 8th .Septeinber, reaching liis 
Corps on the 17th of the month. On Sunday, 
the 20th Septeml)er, the battalion was in 
support, in rear of two other battalions of the 
lirigade, in a thickly-wooded bill side, when 




33 



BIR— BLA 



at .■) p.m. the Germans Iiroke through the two 
battalions. The So\ith Lancashire.s charged 
and the hill was retaken, bnt at the cost of seven 
officers killed (of whom Second Lieutenant Bird- 
wood was one) and wounded, hi-; own company 
losing three officers and 66 of the rank and file, 
including the Company Sergeant -Major and 
three platoon Sergeants. One of the men. 
who was subsequently wounded and who 
helped to carry Second Lieutenant Birdwood 
from the battlefield, described the fight to an 
Officer, who conrmunicated the account to 
Second Lieutenant Birdwood's grandfather. 
He said " the extreme gallantry of your grand- 
son seems to have been the cause of liLs early 
death," and then quoted the words of the 
wounded man : " There was a young Officer 
who joined us, called Lieutenant Birdwood, he 
was almost too brave, and as a matter of fact 
it eventually got bun knocked over. 
Lieutenant Birdwood led a brUliant bayonet 
charge, and it was mainly due to liiiu that this 
was successful, and that this part of the position 
was captured." It appears some of the enemy 
surrendered, and the Crermans tittned their 
machine guns on their surrendering couu'ades, 
and. Lieutenant Birdwood being riddled by 
their bullets, must have died instantaneously : 
his body was recovered next day and bui-ied 
near where he fell, with two other officers. 
Second Lieutenant Birdwood «as a member of 
the " Old Tonbridgians' Society." 

CAPTAIN RICHARD LOCKINGTON 
BIRDWOOD. INDIAN ARMY, 

who wa.s kUIed on 
the 17th November, 
1914. in the attack 
on Basra, in the 
Persian Gulf, was 
the youngest son of 
the late Herbert. M. 
Birdwood, C.S.I., 
Jiidge of the High 
Court, and Member 
of Council. Bombay. 
Captain Birdwood 
was Ijorn on the 7th 
September, 1879, and was educated at Clifton 
College, and the E.M.C.. Sandhurst, receiving 
his commission as Second lieutenant, un- 
attached, in .July. 189S. In November of the 
following year he joined the Indian Start Corps, 
becoming Ijeutenant in January, 1901. 
He served in the Tibet Expedition of 1903-04. 
for which he received the meilal. and obtained 
his Captaincy in Jiily. 1907. His service was 
chiefly in the Political Department, and before 
the war he was Assistant Political Agent in the 
Persian Gulf. 





1912, becouiins 



LIEUTENANT E. MAURICE BISHOP, 
SrdBATTN. DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT. 

was the son of 

Edwin and Janettc 

Bishop, of The 

Lawns, .Swanwick. 

near Southampton. 

and was born on the 

19th June, 1891. at 

Gosport, -\lverstoke. 

He was educated at 

Bradfield College, 

Berks, and was 

gazetted to the 3rd 

Dorset Regiment as 

Second Lieutenant in June, 

Lieutenant in >Iay, 1913. 

In the Great War he was attached to the King's 

Own Yorkshire Light Infantry from September, 

1914, and was serving with the 2nd Battn. 

of that regiment when he was killed at lilies. 

Fiance, on 18th Octo))er. 1914, while gallantly 

leading his platoon to the attack. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM McMILLAN 
BLACK. ADJUTANT 58th VAUG- 
H.\NS- RIFLES FRONTIER FORCE 
INDIAN ARMY, 

who was killed in 
action on the 31st 
October, 1914. was 
the elder son of the 
late Rev. \\-. 

:McMillan Black and 
Mrs. Black. He was 
born at iVnwoth 
!Manse, Gatehouse 
of Fleet, Kircud- 
brightshire. on the 
1 2th Septeml )er. 1 883, 
and was educated at Edinburgh Academy, 
where he was Captain of the 2nd Football XY., 
and won prizes for atliletics. 
He joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers from the 
Jlilitia in May, 1902. In November of the 
following year he was transferred to the Indian 
Army, becoming Lieutenant in August. 1904, 
and Captain in May. 191 1. 

He served with the 111th Mahrattas in Hong- 
Kong, and was transfeiTed to the 58th Yaughans' 
Rifles in June. 1900. 

Captain Black had qualified in Musketry and 
Transport Work, and could speak many of the 
Eastern tongues, having passed the Higher 
.Standard in Baluchi, Cliinese (Pekingese 
dialect), ifaratlii and Phuhtu, and the Lower 
Standard in Persian. 

He was a very keen sportsman, fond of polo, 
shooting and other sports, and won several 
Cups in point-to-point i-aces. 
The following account of the circumstances of 
his death was given br a senior brother-officer : — 




BLA 



34 



" We liail lii'cii ordered ti> drive tlic (ierniau^ 
from a position they liad cai)turt'd a day Ix'foic, 
and yoiu- son and I had crawled forward to 
reconnoitre the jjosition, wbicli we had difliculty 
in making out in the dark. We managed to get 
within some twenty yards, and were then dis- 
covered. Your son \\ as shot tlirough the heart 
and ileath was instantaneous. We brought 
hack his liody. and lie is li\iriod in a httle village 
near here. . . . We shall miss your son 
in the regiment very much. He was always 
most popular with everyone, and a great loss to 
us. In my report on the operations, in which 
we lost some one hundred killed and wounded, 
I am specially mentioning your son's name for 
the skill and daring he displayed yesterday : 
the brUUant success we achieved was mainJy 
due to the excellent manner in which lie guided 
us to tlie position we had l)een ordered to 
attack." 

A lirother-officer says : — " He was uinrvellously 
cool and plucky, and lus example all through tlie 
night did much to cheer up the men through 
the trying conditions of their first fight. He 
worked like a slave all night, and met his death 
in a very dangerous but necessary piece of work 
wMch he undertook as he was going oft to 
moinit a guard." 

Captain Black was only one night in the firing 
line and w-as mentioned in Sir John Frencli's 
Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. 

LIEUTENANT CECIL FRANCIS 
BLACKER, 2nd BATTN. CONNAUGHT 

RANGERS, 

was the son of Major 
F. H. Blacker, late 
4th Queen's Own 
Hussars, and IMrs. 
Blacker, and was 
liorn at Scaftworth 
Hall, Bawtry, York- 
shire, on the 1.5th 
May, 1889. ' 
He was educated at 
ilr. A. E. TiUard's 
School at May Place, 
Malvern Wells, at Wellington College, and at 
the B.M.C., Sandhin-st. 

Lieutenant Blacker received liLs commission as 
Second Lieutenant in the Connatight Bangers 
in November, 1909, and was promoted Lieu- 
tenant in Januai'y, 1911. 

He was severely wounded at the Battle of 
Mons on the 23rd Augvist, 1914, and died at 
Netley Hospital from the effects on the 6th 
September, 1914. At the time he was woimded 
he was serving in the Brigade Cycling Corps. 
Ijeutenant Blacker was a good rider, and won 
several races at Punchestown and other places 
in 1912-1.3. 





CAPTAIN WILLIAM STEWART 
BURDETT BLACKETT attd. 
LEICESTERSHIRE YEOMANRY, for 
merly 3rd GRENADIER GUARDS, 

(of Arbigland. Dum- 
fries), was born in 
1873, and was the 
only son of Com- 
mander A. S. Blac- 
kett, R.N. Captain 
Blackett was the 
nephew and heir of 
his uncle. Colonel 
Blackett, of Arbig- 
land, Dumfries. 
He was educated at 
Wellington College, 

and at the R.jNl.C, Sandhurst, and joined 
the Grenadier Guards in May. 1S95, being 
promoted Lieutenant in February, 1898, 
and Captain in May, 1900. 

With the 3rd Battalion he served during the 
wliole of the South Afriian ^^'ar, for which he 
received the Queen's meilal with three clasps, 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
In the Great War he was attaclied for service 
to the Leicestershire Yeomanry, and died on 
the 24th November, 1914, from wounds received 
at Ypres on the 20th Noveml)cr. 
Captain Blackett was a keen fisherman and 
cricketer, and fond of liunting and shooting. 
He was a member of the Guards', Bachelors', 
and Army and Navy Clubs. 

He married Kathleen Prudence Eirene, yoimgest 
daughter of B. F. Bagenal, D.I^., of Benekerry, 
Carlow, and left one son, C. W. S. Blackett, 
born 1908. 

2nd LIEUTENANT PATRICK EDWARD 
ADAM BLAIR, 2nd BATTN. THE BLACK 
W.\TCH (ROYAL HIGHLANDERS), 

was the elder sou of Jlr. A. S. Blair, Writer 
to the .Signet, Ediuliurgh. who as l>ieutcnant- 
Colonel Commanding the 9t)i Battalion (High- 
landers) Royal Scots, is himself taking part in 
the war with Germany. 

Second Lieutenant Blair was born in June, 
1893. and was educated at Cargilfield School, 
Midlothian, and Malvern College. He was 
gazetted to the Black Watch from the 
Special Reserve, in June, 1914, and accom- 
panied the 1st Battalion to the front in 
August. Early in November Second Lieu- 
tenant Blair was reported " missing," but 
is now stated to have lieen killed near 
Gheluvelt on the 29th October, 1914. 



MAJOR EDWARD ALGERNON 
CLEADER BLAKE, 2nd BATTN. 
DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY, 

was the younger son of the late Mr. 
Samuel PVederick Blake, of Great Budbridge 



35 



BLA 




Manor, and Shanklin. ble of Wight, and 
was bom on the 27th Aogost, 1871. 
m -^^^^ - - ^=r^ He was educated at 

IJH^^^PJ^^^H (niiitelaw). 

which he entered in 
1S86. He receive<l 
his commission in 
the Durham Light 
Infantry from the 
Militia in April. 1S93, 
licing posted to the l.st 
Battaiion.and became 
Lieutenant in May, 
1S96, and Captain in 
February, 1900. 
He served in the South African War while 
Adjutant of his battalion, an appointment he 
held from April, 1901, to April, 1904, and was 
present at the relief of Ladysmith, including 
action at Colenso. the action at Vaal Krans, 
where he was severely wounded, and at opera- 
tions in the Transvaal from Xovember, 1900, 
to 3Iay, 1902. For his ser\'ices he was men- 
tioned in Despatches (" London Gazette,"' 29th 
July, 1902), received his Brevet Majority 22nd 
August, 1902, and the Queen's and King's 
medals, each with two clasps. 
He was Adjutant of the 3rd (Special Reserve) 
Battalion of his regiment at Newcastle from 
August, 1912, to Jvdy. 1913. when he obtained 
his substantive Majority. 

3fajor Blake, who was not married, was fond 
of all kinds of sport, especially hunting, shoot- 
ing and golf, and extremely popular with all 
ranks in his regiment. He was killed at 
Ennetieres, France, while gallantly leading his 
men on the 20th October, 1911. and by his 
bravery and good leadership drove back a 
strong attack of the enemv. 



CAPT.\IN' HUGH 
19th LANCERS 



SEYMOUR BLANE. 
FANES HORSE. 
INDIAN ARMY. 
'.va.- the youngest son 
of Mrs.KodneyBlane. 
Montpelier Street, 
London, and of the 
late Captain Rodney 
Blane. Commander 
R.N. Captain Blane's 
eldest brother is 
Sir Charles Rodney 
Blane, who succeeded 
his uncle as fourth 
Baronet in 1911. 
He was bom on the 2nd February. 18S.o, and was 
educated at Aldenham. and after receiving his 
commission in August, 190.5, was attached to 
the Wiltshire Regiment for a year before he 
joined the 19th Lancers, Indian Army, in 
Xovember, 1906. 
He was promoted Lieutenant in November, 




1907, and Captain in August, 191-1. In June. 
1907, while in India. Captain Blane was shot 
at and wounded in a train by Pathans, but 
recovered after being in King Edward VTI 
Hospital in Grosvenor Gardens. 
He was a good polo player ; in 1913 he was 
Captain of the Regimental Polo team, and 
acted as umpire at Hurlingham in the summer 
of 1911. He was a member of the Cavalry 
Club. He married in April, 191-t, Molly. 
daughter of ilrs. OX'allaghan. 
For active service Captain Blane was attached 
to the .5th (Princess Charlotte of Wales's) 
Dragoon Guards. He was wounded on the 31st 
Octol)er and lay in the trenches for sixteen 
hoius before he was moved to the Field Hos- 
pital, where he died on the morning of 1st 
Noveml>er, 1914. He was buried at Neuve 
Eglise. The man who carried him out of the 
trench received the D.C.M. for the action. 



C .\ P T A I N G E R .\ L D W Y N T E R 
B L A T H W A Y T . ROYAL FIELD 
.\ R T I L L E R Y. 
was bom at Belve- 
dere, Kent, on the 
30th June, 1879. 
being the son of 
Arthiu- P. Blathwayt, 
Esq., of Northwood 
Grange, Middlesex. 
He was educated at 
Aldenham School, 
Herts. 

In 1896 he received a 
coQunission in the 
Kent Artillery 3Iilitia, and having passed the 
qualifying examination obtained a commission 
in the Garrison Artillery in 1S9S, and was trans- 
ferred to the Royal Field ArtiDery on the out- 
break of the South African War. to which he 
went in the specially formed Royal African 
3Iounted Rifles. For his services he received 
the South African medal, with three clasps. 
On his return to England he was appointed 
Adjutant of the 49th Brigade Royal Field 
Artillery, and subsequently Garrison Adjutant 
at ^\'oolwich. having become Captain in July, 
1906. On expiration of his Staff appointment 
in February, 1914. he joined the 56th Battery, 
44th (Howitzer) Brigade, at Brighton. 
On the first day of the Battle of the ^isne, 
14th September. 1914, he was killed by the 
bursting of a shell, and his body was buried 
in the garden of the Chateau Vemeuil. in the 
village of that name. Major Barker, Com- 
manding the 56th Battery, wrote : — " In him 
the .\rmy has lost a gallant Officer, and myfelf 
and his other companions in the Brigade a 
beloved conuade and friend." 
Captain Blathwayt was for some years Honorary 




BLI— BOE 



36 




Secretary of tlu; Garri-~iiii Cricket Chili, Wodl- 
\\i<li; lie was a iiieiiilier of the " Baiul of 
Urol hers," and of tlie .Tii iiioi'l "nit eil Service (Miili, 
He married .\lari;are( Ahiie, chuij^iiter of Hie 
hile C. PiclcersfiiJl-Ciiiiline, of Beacon Hill Park, 
Hindhead, and of Mrs. I'ii Icers^ill-CuiiJilTe, 
of CoIiIp Court. CooHiaiii. Su.«.sex, and li-fl tun 
daiiyhlers, .Madeleine .Marijarel. and ICli/.aheHi, 
aged two years and one >ear respeitively at 
Hie lime of Hieir father's death. 

MAJOR CHARLES BLISS, CLE., 1st 
BATTN. 1st KING GEORGE'S OWN 
GURKHA RIFLES (THE MALA UN 

REGIMENT), 

w lio died on tlie 22nd 
December, 1914, at 
I.illers, France, of 
wciunds received on 
tlie 20tll Decemlier, 
was the second snr- 
vivint; son of Sir 
Henry William Hliss. 
K.C.l.l':.. Indian 

Civil Si'ivice (re- 
tired), and was born 
on the I'Otli Decem- 
ber 1S71, at Hindi-Ill. .Madiir;i District. 
^ladras Presidency, India. 

He was ediicateil at Clifton College. Neuenlieiin 
College, and the 1{..\[.C., Sandhurst, and 
received his first commission in the North 
Staffordshire Kegiinenfc, to which he was 
gazetted in 1S!)1. Two years later he was 
transferred to the Derbyshh'e regiment, in 
which lie became Lieutenant in ISiKl. In 
DecemVier of the latter year he joined the 
Indian Statf Corps and was appointed to the 
■11th Gurkh.i l?ifles. Having been promoted 
Captain in llinl. In- was Deputy Assistant 
Adjutant-tleiiei'al for ilusketry in l!tO:i, an 
apjiointment he gave up to rejoin his regiment 
for service in Tibet : he took part in the 
action at Niani, the operations at anel around 
Gyantse, and the march to Lhasa, during \\hich 
he was wounded. He was mentioned in 
Despatches ("London Gazette," 13th Deccmbei', 
inOl). and received the Tibet medal and clasp. 
From 1907 he was seconded for service with the 
Assam MOitary Police, and commanded several 
small expeditions on the North-East Frontier ; 
he received the CLE. and the Police medal 
and also had the Durbar medal, 1911, ami 
Abor medal. 

He was appointed to the 1st Gurkha Rifles in 
1908, but only joined hi.s regiment in August, 
19 U, just before it left India for the front. 
He was mentioned in Sir .Tohn French's 
Despatch of 31st :\Iay, 19].-,. 
Major Bliss married Mabel Kmmeline, daughter 
of Colonel Jfaxwell, late Derbyshu-e Pegimeiit, 
and left one daughter, aged nine years. 




CAPTAIN GREVILLE HUBERT ROBINS 
BLOUNT, ROYAL ARTILLERY, 

son of the late .Major 

11 11 Ipert Blount. 

Koyal Artillery, wlu. 

died of fever on -.i-r 

\ ice ill till' South 

African W.ir. was 

Ijorn at Wdolw irh on 

the 23r(l l''i'lii'u.'ir\'. 

1883. 

He was educated at 

Harrow, and the 

B..M.A.. Woolwich. 

and joined the Royal 

Field Artillery as Second l.ii-uteiiant in August, 

19(»tl. becoming Lieutenant in Auu;nst. 1903, 

and Ca])tain in Kovember. 1911. Ilr was 

ap])ointed Adjutant of the :!."itli Hiig.ide at 

Farnlioroiigh in .liily, 1913. 

Captain Blount died on the 2:ird September. 

1911. of wounds received in action. 

He mari'ied (iladys, younger daughter of t he 

Bev. Canon Wilson, of Jlilchain. and left an 

orphan boy four years old. 



CAPTAIN EDWARD MARTIN 
CRA WLEY-BOEVEY, 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT, 

nas the second son 
of Sir Thomas Hyde 
Crawley-Boevey, .5 th 
Baronet, t)t Flaxley 
Abbey, Newnham, 
Gloucestershire, am 1 
\\as born at Maxley 
on the 2t>tli March, 
1S73. 

He was educated at 
Hugby, and the 
H.M.C.. Sandhurst, 
joining the Royal 
Ifegiment as 




Sussex 
March. 



Second Lieiil 



189-). becoming Lieutenant 



•naiit m 
in .Inly. 

1897, and Captain in December. 1902. He 
served with liLs battalion in the South African 
War, taking part in actions at Iloutnek, Vet 
River, Zand River, Pretoria. Johannesburg, 
Diamond Hill. Wittebergen, and Ladybrand. 
He received the Queen's medal with four clasps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
As a Lieutenant Captain Crawley-Bocvey was 
sent from South Africa to England with some of 
the battalion to represent the Royal Su.ssex 
IJegiment at the Coronation of H.JI. King 
Edward ML 

Captain Crauley-Boevey was killed in the 
trenches near Bailleul. on 24th December. 1914. 
while attached for duty with the 4tli Battalion 
Hoyal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), 
when he was trying to shoot a sniper. 



37 



BOI— BOL 




Captain Crawley-Boevey was a member of the 
Junior Army and Xavy Club. He was fond of 
.shooting and all sport. He was a particularly 
trifted draughtsman and good shot with both 
revolver and rifle. Most of his service was 
spent in India with the 1st Battalion. 
He married Rosalie Winifred, daughter of 
Colonel Sartorius, C.B., and granddaughter of 
Sir George Rose Sartorius, K.C.B., late Admiral 
of the Fleet, and left one son, Ric-hard Martin, 
bom 31st Jidv. 190S. 



COLONEL FRANK RIDLEY FARRER 
B O I L E A U. p. s . c . . LATE ROYAL 
ENGINEERS. 
died on the 27th 
August, 1914, of 
wounds received at 
Ham, France. 
He was the eldest sur- 
\"iving son of Colonel 
F.W. BoUean.C.B.,of 
Elstowe, Camberley, 
was born on the 29th 
November, 1S67, and 
was educated at 
Cheltenham CoDege. 
He joined the Ko>'aI Engineers in February, 
1887. becoming Lieutenant three years later. 
In 1S92 he took part in the Lushai ExpecUtion, 
for which he received the medal and clasp, 
and in 189.5 was employed with the Relief Force 
in the Chitral Expedition, receiving the medal 
and clasp. In July. 1897. he was promoted 
Captain. From April, 1898, to February. 1900, 
he was Assistant Commissioner, Anglo-German 
South-East African Boundary Commission. 
From June to November, 1900, he was Deputy 
Assistant Adjutant -General in South Africa, 
and took part in the Boer War, being present 
at the advance on KJmberley, including actions 
at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magers- 
fontein ; operations in the Orange Free State, 
and at Paardebei^ ; actions at Poplar Grove, 
Driefontein. Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet 
and Zand Rivers ; in the Transvaal, with 
actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and 
Diamond Hill ; at fiu^her operations in the 
Transvaal west of Pretoria, including action 
at Zihkats Nek. For his services he was men- 
tioned in De-patches (London Gazette, Sth 
February. 1901), given his Brevet Majority 
November, 1900, and received the Queen's 
medal with six clasps. 

From ilay, 1901, to .luly, 1905. he was Deputy- 
Assistant Adjutant-General, Royal Engineers, 
at Head Quarters of the Army. In addition to 
being a Staff College Graduate, Colonel Boileau 
was a second-class Interpreter in French. He 
received his substantive Majority in August, 



190.5, and in March, 1906, was given a half-pay 
Lieutenant-Colonelcy, with the appointment, 
of Professor at the Indian Staff College, which 
he held till January, 1910. He was promoted 
Brevet-Colonel in March, 1909, anfl a sub- 
stantive Colonel on the 21st January. 1910, 
going on half -pay till July, 1910, when he was 
appointed a General Staff Officer, First Grade. 
Ilird Division, Southern Command. This 
appointment he was holding when the war 
broke out, and he then became Chief .Staff 
Officer of the Illrd Division Expeditionary 
Force, and was so ser\"ing when he receive<l 
the injuries from which he died. 
He married in 1902, Mary, daughter of Preben- 
dary Tudor, LiLstleigh, Devon, and leaves three 
sons. 



MAJOR GEORGE ENIL BOLSTER. 
ROYAL FIELD .\RT1LLERY. 

was born at Dagshai, 
India, on the 21st 
July, 1876, the son 
of Surgeon-Major T. 
G. Bolster, .M.D., 
F.R.C.S., A.M.S.. 
anil Mrs. Bolster, of 
Twickenham. and 
grandson of Brevet 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
J. F. Nembhard. 
Bengal Army. 
His early years were 
spent at various places at home and abroad, 
where his father was stationed. After coming 
to England in ISSS, he was educated at Ipswich 
Grammar School, whence he passed direct into 
the Royal Military Academy in 1893, and in the 
passing out examinations gained the sixth place, 
and the prize for Artillery. 

He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery in 
November, 1895, became Lieutenant in Novem- 
ber, 1898, Captain in September, 1901. and 
Major in February, 1912. Much of his early 
service was spent in India. In 1903 he was ap- 
pointed Adjutant of the 35th Brigade Royal 
Field Artillery, and held the position for over 
three years. In 1909 he was appointed Staff 
Captain, Vth Division, Irish Command, and 
left that post on being nominated for the Staff 
College in 1911. On completion of his course 
there in 1914, he joined the 106th Battery 
in South Africa, and returning home he em- 
barked for the Front with the 106th Battery, 
22nd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, forming 
part of the Vllth Di\-ision of the Ex- 
peditionary Force. 

He took part in the heroic stand made by 
that Division at Tprcs, until the 1st Army 
Corps came up from the Aisne on the 21st 




BON— BOT 



MS 



October. On the 2:U(1 ()(t<>l)iT, I'.lll, uliilr 
taking up an observation jiost in ad vauio of liLs 
battery, a high explosive shell bui-st closer to 
him, and he was killed instantaneously by the 
shock, there being no external wounds. Ills body 
\va« buried in the portion of the Aluiiicipjd 
Ceiiiet<'r> , Ypres, set aside for Britisli Ollicers, 
a wooden crcs.s with his name lieing erected 
over his grave by the Officer who succeeded liiiu 
in the command of the l)ntlery. 
.\ distinguished Officer of Head Quarters wrote 
to his mother, saying : " 1 cannot tell you how 
sorry I was to hear that George had lieen 
killed . . . we all mourn his loss. In 
George not only the regiment but the army- 
has lost a. most able OlTicer and also a most 
staunch friend . . . Ion ed by all who have 
had to serve with him." 

Sliortly before leaving for the front, Major 
Bolster's engagement to a da\ighter of Colonel 
T. J. de Burgh, of Oldtown, Naas, had been 
publicly announced. 

.Major Bolster was a keen huntsman, and rode 
in several point-to-point races. He was well 
known with the Kildare and Huhallow Hunts. 
He «as also a hockey player and often joined in 
games \\ it h bis men. 



LIEUTENANT ROBERT HAROLD 
BOND, 2nd BATTN. KING'S 
ROYAL RIFLE CORPS. 

was t>orn at Akler- 
shot in 1882, only son 
of Colonel B. J. 
Bond, B.E., of 
jNIoorefield, Co. Kil- 
dare, Ireland, and 
nephew of General 
Bond, C.B. 
He was educated at 
Wellington College, 
where he was Head 
of his House. 
He joined the King's 
Itoyal Rifie Corps in 1003 from the I.,eicester- 
shiro .Militia, and N\as promoted to his 
Lieutenancy in 1007, serving in India 
till 1909, and then at Shornchffe and Black- 
down. 

He was killed on the 14lh September, 1014, 
in tlw Bailie of the Aisne. In the early morn- 
ing of that day Lieutenant Bond's company 
were in a brilliant action in which they lost all 
their officers killed or wounded, as well as 
many riflemen, but held their position most 
gallantly. 

Lieutenant Bond was a keen soldier, line horse- 
man and athlete, being a very good long dis- 
tance runner. 





2nd LIEUTENANT SIDNEY COUR- 
THOPE BOSANQUET, 5th BATTN. 
DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE'S OWN (MID- 
DLESEX REGT.l, 

who was killed in 
trciiib fighting at 
lloupliues, near 

Aiinentiferes, on the 
KithDei'ember.lOl 1. 
wa> the elder si>n 
of Chai'les John 
Bosanquet, M.S.A., 
A. il. I. E. E.. o f 

" Stokesay," BlacU- 
heath, and a nephew 
f)f Samuel Courthopir 
Bosamjuet, I]sq., of 1 )ingestow Court, Monmouth. 
He was educated at St. LaN^Tence College, 
Ramsgate. He was fu'st given a commission 
in March, 191;!, in the 5th Battalion Middlesex 
Regiment, and went throiigh his training and 
the manceuvres of that autumn. Later he 
resigned his commission and went into the 
Ironworks of David Bridge & Co., Castleton, 
Lancashire. On the mobilisation for the war 
he at once offered his services and was gazetted 
Second Lieutenant on probation in his previous 
battalion on the 15th August, 1914. He was at- 
tached to the 1st Battalion while on active service. 
He was in his 21st year, having lieen born at 
Belvedere on the loth July, 1894. 

2nd LIEUTENANT the Honble. VERE 
DOUGLAS BOSCAWEN, COLDSTREAM 
GUARDS (SPECIAL RESERVE), 

whose death was 
notified in the official 
monthly list pub- 
lished in January, 
1915, but who i.s 
believed to have been 
killed on the 29th 
October, 1914, was 
the third son of the 
seventh Viscount Fal- 
mouth, K.C.V.O., 
C.B. 

It was stated in the 
" Times " of the 21st December, 1914, that, 
071 the 29th October four companies of the 
Coldstream Guards were completely siu-rounded 
. and that Mr. Boscawen, refusing to sur- 
render, fell fighting against overwhelming odds. 
Second Lieutenant Boscawen was born on the 
3rd August, 1890, and was attached to the 1st 
Battalion Coldstream Guards in March, 1914. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES SIDNEY 
GARNETT-BOTFIELD, 2nd BATTN. 
BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

son of the Rev. C. R. Garnett-Botfield, M.A., 
Moreton Vicarage, near Oswestry, was born 




39 



BOT— BOU 




at Rochdale on the 5th October, 1887. He 
was educated at Bossall School, ami the 

R.M.C, Sandhurst. 
He joined the Bed- 
fordshire Keginient 
as Second Lieutenant 
in February. 1908. 
becoming Lieutenant 
in .March. 1910. and 
t'aptain in Septem- 
ber. 1914. 

In the Great War 
W^-^ . '^^^^^B Captain Garnett- 

llT j \ *' J^^^^l Bot field was wounded 
"^ in the elbow at Ypres 

on the 80th October, 1914, but contiiuied 
fighting, till later his right thigh was shattered. 
He was removed to the ChrLstol Base Hospital. 
Boulogne, where he died on the 14th December, 
1914. 

Captain Garnett-Botfield, who was said to be 
one of the finest 3Iachine Gun Officers, was 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of 
14th January, 1915, for gallant and distin- 
guished service. 



2nd LIEUTENANT THOMAS REG- 
INALD BOTTOMLEY. 1st BATTN. 
THE EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT. 

was born at Rippon- 
den, Yorkshire, on 
the 17th October, 
1887, the son of 
Thomas and Ellen 
Bottondey, now of 
Thornton Heath, 

Surrey, formerly of 
Belle Vue, Barkis- 
land, Halifax, Y'ork- 
shire. He was edu- 
cated at Rishworth 
Grammar School 

from 1S98 to 1903, at the Halifax Technical 
College till 1907, and subsequently at St. 
John's College, Battersea, and Bh-kbeck College, 
London, till 1914. 

Second Lieutenant Bottondey olitained many 
academic distinctions, including the degree of 
B.A., London University (as an Internal 
student), in 1913, and the Teachers' Diploma 
of the Board of Education ; moreover, after 
joining the Army he passed successfully exam- 
inations for promotion and in Physical drill. 
In athletics also he won prizes, including the 
College mile and half mile : was a member 
of the St. John's CoUege First XV., and of 
the South London Harriers. 
Mr. Bottomley had intended to adopt the 
Teaching profession as his career, and on leaving 
St. John's College was appointed Teacher by 




the Croydon Educational Committee. He was 
acknowledged by aU who knew him to have 
had an enormous influence for good over boys 
under him. preferring to teach by example 
rather than by precept alone. One o! his 
Headmasters said of him : " His life was a 
pattern — steel true and blade straight." 
UTule at London L'niversity, Mr. Bottomley 
joined the Officers' Training Corps, in which he 
spent three years, up to April. 1914, when he 
received his commission as .Second Lieutenant 
in the 1st Battalion East Y'orkshire Regiment 
(.Special Reserve), joining in June for liis first 
year's period of training. Pre\-iou.sly he had 
served as cadet and sergeant in the 10th 
(Territorial) Battalion Duke of Cambridge's 
Own (Middlesex Regiment) from 1908-11. 
On September 7th .Second Lieutenant Bottom- 
ley accompanied his l)attalion to the Continent, 
and three days after arriving in the fighting 
line, was killed by shell, in a trench, early on 
the morning of the 23rd .September. 1914. 
A senior Officer gave his widow the following 
account of his death : — " The whole company, 
officers and men. deeply sympathise with you 
in your loss ; he was our loss too, as we all 
admired and respected him. He feU in the 
trenches, hit by the first shell of the day ; 
he could not have suffered at all. The nearest 
village to the place is Vendresse, and the 
trenches were on the ridge north of the village. 
He was l)uried near Troyon, a cross marking his 
grave." 

Second Lieutenant Bottomley had married on 
the 29th August, a few days before leaving for 
the front, Evehne ilary. only daughter of 
W. H. Gibson. Esq.. of Sowerby Bridge, and 
sister of Doctor Gibson, I'rofessor of Engineer- 
ing. .St. Andrew's University, now serving as 
Lieutenant in the 2nd Highland Brigade. Royal 
Field Artillery (Territorial ). 



LIEUT. NIGEL WALTER HENRY 
LEGGE-BOURKE. 2nd BATTN. COLD- 
STRE.\M GUARDS, 
was the only son of 
Colonel the Hon. 
Sir Harry Legge, 
K.C.V.O., late Cold- 
stream Guards, and 
Lady Legge, and was 
born at 45, Gros venor 
Square, London, on 
the 13th November. 
1889. 

He was educated at 
■Evelyns" (Mr. G. T. 
Worsley's) from April, 1 899. to August, 1902, and 
at Eton (Rev. U. T. Bowlby's) from September, 




BOU -BOW 



40 



1902— Deccmhci-. I'.IUT. aiul cnlei-c.l the Royal 
Military CdllcLrt', Saiulhui'st, afU-r attaining 
the ajjo of IS in .lanuary, 1908. From Sanil- 
liui-st he received hLs commission in the 1st 
Coldstream Guards in February, 1909, l)ecoming 
Lieutenant in the 2nd Battalion in .Tune, 19l(). 
IIo left with liis battalion for tl\e front on the 
12th August, 1911. On the 4tli Dctober his 
name was sei\t in for mention " tor his ver\' 
excellent work and exceptionally ^oo<l leading 
of his platoon on all occasions up to the batth' 
of llie Aisnc." 

lie was killed in aiiion on the Hdtli ()(lolirr. 
1914. while in euinniaud of a platoon of No. 1 
t'oniiKUiy. holding advanced trenches in Hiiit.il 
Wood, near Ypres. 

Lieutenant Legge-Boiuke married on linl .lune. 
1913. at the Guards' Chapel, Wellington 
Barracks, Lady Victoria Carrington. daughter 
of the Marquis of Lincolnshire, and left one 
son, Kdward .Mexander Henry, l.diii Kith 
31ay, ]91.-,. 

LIEUTENANT JACOB EDWARD 
PLEYDELL-BOLVERIE, 2nd BATTN. 
KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS. 

who died in hosjiital 
at Boulogne on the 
1st November, 1911. 
was tlie only son of 
the late Hon. Diui- 
condje Pleydell-Bou- 
verie. second son of 
tlie fourth Earl of 
Radnor, and his wife, 
Marie Eleanor I'lej- 
dell-Bouverie, of 
Coleshill House. 
Higliworth. Berk- 
shire, daughter of Sir Edward Hulse..')tli Baronet. 
He was horn on the 12tli July, 1SS7, and 
was educated at Eton and the R.il.C., 
Sa'idhurst, from wliicli lie was gazetted to tlie 
King's Royal Rifle Corps in February, 1908. 
behsg posted to the 1th Battalion. In 19(19 he 
went to India witli his battalion, and having 
been piomoted Lieutenant in January, 1911, 
soon after leturned to England and wa^^ 
stationed at the Rifle Depot, VMncliestev, until 
the war broke out. 

Lieutenant Pleydell-Bou\ erie, u ho was a 
member of the Batli Club, was a keen cricketer 
and played frequently for the Green Jackets 
and Free Foresters. 

At the end of August, 1914, he left Sheerne-s 
with a draft, and joined the 2nd Battalion of 
his regiment on the 20th Septendier, taking 
command of tlie 13tli and 14th platoons. He 
was mortally wounded at Gheluvelt on tlie 31st 
October during tlie German attack on Ypres. 
and died early next morning in No. lii 
Stationary Hospital at Boulogne. 





LIEUTENANT CUTHBERT EDWARD 
LATIMER BO WEN. attd. to the 
KING'S AFRICAN RIFLES, 

son of the ]{ev. 
Thomas James and 
.Susan Elvina Bow en. 
was born at .Vll 
.Saints' ^'i<•arage. 

Sw ansea, on the 2:!rd 
•Septemljer, 1881. 
He received his eilu- 
eation first at .Mr. 
I'ridden's Prepara 
lory Seliool. Grovi- 
Ibiu>e. Boxgrove. 

(iiiildford, ami after- 
wards at Rugby (.Mr. .Stallard's House). in 
1902 he entered the Queen's Royal West Surre\ 
Regiment (.Militia) and served with it in South 
Africa. After the Boer War he ent(>red the 
Regular Army, being gazetted to the Queen's 
Own Royal West .Surrey Regiment, January, 
1903, and joined tlie 1st Battalion at Peshawar, 
India. Leaving the Army in lOO.j, he accepted a 
[lost under the Colonial Office as Assistant IMs- 
ti'ict Inspector of Police in British East .\frica. 
.\t the time of his deatli. whieli occurred 1st 
December, 1911, he was operating on the 
border of tlie KLssi District under .Major Ross, 
with half a company of the King's African 
Rifles, to which regiment he was then attaclied, 
and some thirty European Scouts. A day or 
two previously he had captured a Gernian, and 
on the day lie was killed news was l)rought in 
concerning two more GermaiLs. 1 le obtaine<l per- 
mission to go out and endeavour to capture 
them, and left with an officer of the King's 
-Airican Rifles, some men of the regiment, and 
some police. The Germans were located on 
a stony hill and tlie Otlicer of the King's .\fi-ican 
Rifles went up one way. Lieutenant Bowen 
another, the latter apparently reaching the 
top fii-st with his Sergeant, a Corporal, and other 
police. On meeting the enemy a fight ensued 
in wiiich Lieutenant Bowen and some of liis men 
Were killed, liut tlie Germans were eventually 
driven out of tlie position. His body and those 
of the men killed were recovered next morning 
and buried at the foot of the iiill. 
The General Officer Commanding, on hearing 
of the death of Mr. Bowen and the men of the 
East Airican PoUce, desired to express his 
regret, adding that Mr. Bowen evidently lost liis 
life in a gallant attempt to take Susuni Hill, 
and Major Edwards, Inspector-General of PoUce, 
added : — " I feel I have lost both a gallant and 
loyal friend. The Police intend at the end of 
the war to erect a memorial, either over the spot 
wliere he rests, or ekewherc, in memory of a 
brotlier officer who died so gallantly, and whose 
name wiU always be amongst those most 
lionourcd by us." 



41 



BOW— BOY 



LIEUTENANT HENRY RAYMOND 
SYNDERCOMBE BOWER. 1st BATTN. 
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was kUleil in 
action at the age of 
20, was the eld&st 
son of Mr. H. G. S. 
Bower, of JIainhiill. 
Dorset. 

He was educated at 
a jiieparatory scliool 
at IJepton, then at 
Repton School itself, 
and the R. M. C. 
.Sandhurst. He re- 
ceived his commis- 
sion in September, 1913, and was promoted 
Lieutenant in Xovember, 1914. 
Lieutenant Bower was killed on the 20th 
December, 1914. while helping a wounded 
soldier to shelter. ha\ing ah-eady brought in 
several others safely. He had himself been 
previously wounded ou the 2lith October at 
Y"^pres, where his battaUon formed i)art of the 
famous VJIth Division. 

His recreations were cricket, tennis, hmiting and 
hockev. 




L 1 E U T E N .\ N T 
BOWLES. ROYAL 




J .\ M E S ARTHUR 
FIELD ARTILLERY, 

was born on ilarch 

9th, 1883. and was 

;i5« the son of General 

rfC^JA . F. A. Bowles, C.B., 

f ^ M Royal ^Vitillery. and 

was educated at 

Boxgrove School. 

Guildford, Surrey ; 

Clifton College, and 

the Royal 3Iilitaiy 

Acailemy. 

He obtained his fii-st 
Commission in the 
Royal .Aitillery in Jidy. 1902. From 1909-12 he 
served ou the Stail' as A.D.C.to his father. General 
F. A. Bowles, when commanding at Devonport. 
In April. 1912, he joined the 28th Brigade 
Royal Field Ai'tiUery, and in the same year 
was appointed Adjutant of the Brigade. 
Previous to this he had served with the 132nd 
Battery at Fermoy, and in the Royal Horse 
.Artillery at the Depot, Woolwich. 
He was killed in action at Le Cateau, France, 
on the 26th August. 1914. 

He married Dorothy Emily, youngest daughter 
of Mrs. Bainbridge and the late Rear-Admiral 
.T. H. Bainliridge, of " Elfordleigh," Plympton. 
South Devon, and " Frankfield," Cork. Ireland, 
and left two children. Rose Ella .Moina. 
born 2(jth June. 1912. and Ruth Kathleen, 
born 2(ith September, 1913. 

Lieutenant Bowles was a member of the Junior 
Armv and Xavv Oub. 




2nd LIEUT. THOMAS HENRY BOWLEY. 
1st BATTN. LE IC EST FR S H I R F 
REGIMENT, 

who is i>resumed to i 

have been killed on 
20th October, 1914, 
was boru at Huggles- 
cote, Leicester, on 
18th May, 1875, the 
son of John Wel- 
borue Bowley (be- 
lieved to be from 
the French name de 
Boulay) of Ashby dc 
la Zouche. 

After receiving the usual elementary education 
he joined the Border Regiment, and served in its 
ranks for just twenty-one years, including the 
South African War, for his services in which he 
was made King's Sergeant, was mentioned in 
Despatches for captiu'ing a " Commandant " 
and taking a Boer position, after his Officer 
had been killed, and received the King's and 
Queen's medals with seven clasps ; he also 
held the Grood Conduct medal, and almost 
every certificate, including " D." in JIusketry, 
which It was possible for a soldier in his position 
to obtain. He was an all-round sportsman 
and was noted for the remarkalile control he 
exercised over his men. 

On the 10th October, 1914, while on active 
service la the Great War, he was gazetted to a 
commission in the 1st Battalion Leicestershire 
Regiment, but never joined liis new Battalion, 
continuing to serve, till his presumed death, 
in his old i-egiment. Though endeavours have 
been made to obtain authentic information 
about lilni through the usual official chaimeLs, 
the Red Cross Society and the American 
F^mbassy, they have unfortunately been unsuc- 
cessful. 

More than one account has been received from 
men of the battahon who professed to be able 
to give information, but the accounts dlflfer so 
materially that it is feared little reliance can 
be placed on them. 

Second Lieutenant Bowley married Louisa S., 
daughter of the late John Thomas Palmer, of 
Camberwell, and left three children, Violet 
Lydia. born in Burmah in September, 1903, 
Ronald Graham, born in India in February, 
1905, and Leslie \A'elborne, born iu Carlisle in 
May. 1908. 

2nd LIEUTENANT EDWARD FENVVICK 
BOYD, 1st BATTN. NORTHUMBER- 
LAND FUSILIERS, killed in action at the 
battle of the Aisne on the 20th September, 
1914, was the only .sou of the late Rol)ert 
Fenwick Boyd, of Houghton-le-.Spring, Co. 
Durham, and of !Mrs. Boyd, of Hill House. 
Wadhurst. Sussex. 



BOY 



42 




lie was horn in 1890, and educated at Rugby, 
where he was Cadet OITiccr in the Offii-<'rs' 
Training Corps, and 
1 ' won liis foot liall 

colours in 1912 ; and 
I ' 11 i ver^ity College, 
( )xford, where lu^ w as 
a nicniberof Vincent's 
Chill. lie ])lay(Ml 
t'ootliall for Black - 
heat h fortwoseasons. 
and for 'the Army r. 
Navy in 191 1. 
Mr was gazetted 
Si-iiiiid Lieutenant 
in tin- Xiirt liuiiilicrland I'u.siliers in Septenilier. 
I'.il:^. Second Lieutenant Boyd went out 
to l''raucc witli llic Isl liattaliou on the 
l.'lth Aiiuust. 1914, and was nientioncd 
in Sir .tolm l-'iciich's Despatch of the Stli 
Octolicr. nil 1. 



2nd LIEUTENANT HAROLD ALEXAN- 
DER BOYD, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL 
INNISKILLING FUSILIERS, 

«a.s the only son of 

,^^m-^^m^^^^^ Dr. A. J. Boyd, The 
I^^Bbm^^^^H^I Manor House, Ware. 

Herts, and was born 
there on the 19th 
January, 189.'). Mrs. 
Boyd was a daughter 
of the hate B. C 
Berkeley, of Collet t 
Hall. Ware. Dr. 

Hii\il had served in 
tlir 1st (Herts) Vol- 
unteer Battalion Bed- 
foi'dsliiiv Kegiment. retiring as Captain in 1902. 
Second laeutenant Boyd was educated at 
Bugby, and Trinity College, Camliridge. where 
he was a niemljer of the First Trinity Boat Cluli. 
He joined the Ariny in the Special Beserve in 
April, 1913, and on the outbreak of the' war was 
first stationed on coast defence duty at Lough 
Swilly. Co. Donegal, and in August. 191-t. pro- 
ceeded to France with the 2nd Battalion Boyal 
Inniskilling FusiUers, in which he had been 
appointed Second Lieutenant. 
A corporal of the battalion gave the following 
account of Second Lieutenant Boyd's death, 
which occurred on the 7th September. 1914 : — 
" In the evening the Inniskillings had to fiiiil 
the outposts at a village to which we had come : 
. . . the shelling was terrific and we had 
no artillery with us. Our officers were trying 
to find the range, and had no cover from the 
shells, thus exposing themselves, notably 
Mr. Boyd, who was standing l>y an apjilc 
tree. He was struck by shrapnel and killed 
instantly." 





2nd LIEUTENANT NIGEL JOHN 
LAWSON BOYD, OF THE 1st BATTN. 
THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL HIGH- 
LANDERS), 

was born at Edin- 
biir'j;h on the 1 Ith 
Seplciidier, 1894, the 
son (<( William Boyd. 
Fs(|., Writer to the 
Signet. Edinburgh. 
Member of the King's 
Body Guard for Scot - 
laud (H.C.A.). ami 
his wife Laura, 
(laughter of the kite 
.lohn Crerar, Esq., of 
Halifax, Nova Scotia. He was a grandson of 
Sir John Boyd, of ^laxpoffle, Boxbui'ghshire. 
and great grandson of John Ijawson, Esq., 
1 llh 1/aud of Cairninuir, Peebleshire, Scotland. 
Secojul Lieutenant Boyd was educated at 
Cargilfleld School, iVlidlothian : Winchester 
College, and the Royal JMilitary College, Sand- 
hurst. In passing into Sandhurst he obtained 
a Prize Cadetship. and in passing out was 
fourth on the list. From his earliest childhood 
it had been his ambition to lie in the Black 
Watch, and he was gazetted to that distin- 
guished regiment in Februaiy, 1914. Accom- 
panying it to France at the beginning of August, 
1914. he took part Mith it in all the fighting 
ill wliich it was engaged, including the memor- 
able retirement from Mons to the .Marne. until 
the Battle of the AJsne. Here, on his birthday, 
he received the wound which proved fatal. 
From a description he gave his father, when in 
hospital at Rouen, it seems that early in the 
morning of that day the Black Watch, in con- 
cert with the Cameron Higldanders, found 
themselves on the banks of the ^Usne, opposed 
by a strong force of Germans. Second Lieu- 
tinant Boyd had been directed to take up a 
position with his platoon and li.ad been in- 
structed to hold it at all costs. The enemy 
pressed him in overpowering numbers, till they 
were within 100 yards. Second Lieutenant 
Boyd, having fired ten rounds from a rifle, 
afterwards emptied his revolver at them. 
He had stood up to give an order to those of 
his men who were left, and had drawn his 
claymore, when a bullet struck the scabbard, 
and. glancing off it, entered the left hip and 
lodged in the bladder. The position was then 
rushed liy the enemy. The young Officer and 
his men had luiquestionalily upheld the best 
traditions of the grand old regiment to which 
he was so proud to belong. 

While lying wounded, he asked a passing 
Geiinan for assistance, who replied \^ith a 
threat to shoot him ; after this he pre- 
tended to be dead when GermaiLs passed. At 
last Captain Napier Cameron, of the Cameron 



43 



BOY— BRA 



lli^lilaiulers. liappened to sec liiiii, ami tarneil 
liiin, under fire, to shelter in the rear. At the 
time this undoubtedly saved his life, ^^^lilo 
lying wounded he had most of his lielongings 
stolen, revolver, field glasses, flask, and money. 
He lay where Captain Xajjier Cameron had 
placed him for 10 hours in the rain, and was 
then found by a stretcher party and carried to 
the Field Hospital. .Subsequently, at the 
Hospital in Rouen, he was operateil on. and 
throughout behaved with the greatest fortitude, 
being held up as an example to men less severely 
hurt than himself. Great hopes were enter- 
tained of his recovery, but in the early morning 
of the 12th October, he suddenly succumljed. 
the iuunediate cause of deatli being a blood clot. 
Thus ended a young hfe, not, we may be s\U'e, 
given in vain for his country. His Ijody was 
brought to .Scotland and interred with niiUtary 
honours in the Dean Cemetery. Edinbiirgh, on 
the 19th October, 1911. 

From the Head Master, his Ho\ise llaster at 
Wincliester, an-l other sources, came striking 
testimony to the respect and aflection in which 
he had been held there. 

A Senior Officer of his regiment wrote that 
" He was very popiUar with ail ranks." 
He was keen on aU outdoor sports. At Win- 
chester he played in the " Hou^e^ Fifteen " 
matches, was a fan* cricketer, and Scratch Golf 
player ; a good rider, keen fisherman and 
excellent shot ^vith gun and rifle. He shot for 
Winchester at BLsley in 1911 for the Cadet 
Trophy, and was again at Bisley in the Win- 
chester " Eight " in 1912. 

LIEUTENANT DAVID ERSKINE 

BOYLE. 2nd B.\TTN. LANCASHIRE 

FUSILIERS, 

who was killed in 

J^^ action near Cambrai, 

1^^ on the 2(ith August, 

^J 191 !, was the son of 

^f, the late Rear 

' Admiral Robert 

r^ Hornby Boyle. 

r^^^ He was born on the 

9th .September. 1.S.S9. 
and was educated at 
ilalvern College 
(Swann, 1903-08), 
where he was a school prefect, head of his house, 
in the cricket XXII. the football XI. and in the 
Officers' Training Corps. 

He entered the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in .Septiun- 
ber, 1908, became a Colom--sergeant in 1909. was 
gazetted Second Lieutenant in September of that 
year, and promoted Lieutenant in January. 1911. 
Wlien he was killed he was in the act of sum- 
moning aid for a fellow officer wlio had just Ijeen 
wounded. He was buried by liis own men 
close to where he fell. 




CAPT.\IN the Honble. JAMES 
BOYLE. 1st BATTN. KOY.\L SCOTS 
FUSILIERS. 

thu'd son of the 7th 
Earl of Glasgow, was 
Viorn at Shewalton 
on the 11th March, 
1880. He was edu- 
cated at Wanganui. 
New Zealand, ai\d 
Trinity Hall. Cam- 
bridge. 

He joined the Ajt- 
slure Mihtia in 1S90. 
and served with it in 
the South African War 1901-02. for which he 
received the Queen's medal with five clasps. 
In 1903 he was transferred to the Royal Scots 
Fusihers : from October, 1908. to AprU. 1911, 
he was exti-a A.D.C. and A.D.C. to the Governor 
of Victoria. He became Captain in April. 1912. 
In that year he was appointed A.D.C. to 
General Su- H. Smith-Dorrien till Apiil. 19U, 
when he became Adjutant of his battaUon. and 
proceeded with it to Fi-ance in August. 
He was killed onthel 8th Octolier. 1 9 1 4 . at Chateau 
Warneton.nearLa Bassee. while charginga trench. 
Captain Boyle, who nas a memlier of the 
United Service and Caledonian Clubs, married 
in 1908 Katherine Isabel Salvin, daughter of the 
late Edward Salvin Bowlby, of GUston Park, 
Herts, and Knoydart, Inverness ; he left three 
children. Patrick John Salvin, liorn April. 1910, 
Edward James, born February, 1912, and 
Belinda Margaret Graeme, born December, 1913. 

CAPTAIN EDWARD KINDER BR.\D- 
BURY, V.C., ROYAL HORSE 
ARTILLERY, .. 

wlio was killed in 
action at Nery in 
.September, 1914, was 
born on the 16th 
August, 1881, and 
was educated at 
Marll>orough and the 
R.M.A.. Woohrtch. 
He joined the Royal 
Artillery in May, 
1900. and was pro- 
moted Lieiitenant in 
April, 1901. Pi-om .January to Octol)er. 1902. 
he was employed with the Imperial Yeomam-y. 
He served in the South African War, being 
present at operations in Cape Colony in 1902. 
and received the Queen's medal with two 
clasps. From FeViruary. 190.5, to ;March, 1907, 
he was employed with the King's African Rifles, 
and was promoted Captain in February, 1910. 
He was a member of the .Junior Xaval and 
MiUtary and of the Royal Automobile Clubs, 
and was a well-known follower of hounds in the 
.South of Ireland, and a keen fisherman. 




BRA 



A4 



Captain HiMillmiy was one i>f tlir (illim-s of the 
famous '• L" Battciy, Hoyal Iloise Artillery, all 
the olTirors and men of Avhich have gained 
undying fame for their gallantry mi the 1st 
Septemher, Mill. ("aptain Bradbury was 
awarded the X.C. for his part in this aetion, 
the following being the oflReial reeord in the 
•■ London Gazette"- of the 25th Noveinlier. 1911: 
— " l''or gallantry and ability in organising the 
defence of ' L ' Battery against heavy odds 
at Nery on 1st September, 1914." 
A General Officer referring to the incident 
wrote : — " Poor Brad was killed yesterday ; 
he knocked out eight German guns first and we 
got his gun and the German ones afterwards. 
I have sent Brad's gun to Paris with 
three of the ones he knocked out. A foot of the 
nnizzle of his own gun was blown ofl witli 
mehinite. and it shows what work he had done." 
Another General, writing of Captain Bradbiu'v, 
said : " I nuist tell yon how deeply we all in 
the .\rtillery of Vlth Division sjanpathise with 
you in the loss of your sou. He was simply 
belo\cd by us all. from me, his General, to the 
last joined subaltern. He was very nearly 
four years under my command, and I looked 
upon him as one of the most brilliant officers 
I had ever come across, one who, had God 
willed it, had a great career in front of him, 
and the manner in which he met his death 
fighting a single gun to the end after the loss 
of one leg. was worthy of him." 
An Officer of the Queen's Bays wrote : — " Yoiu" 
son died the bravest of the brave, he served tlie 
last gun himself when all his battery were 
either killed or wounded." 

The following account of " L " Battery's fight 
at Xery has been published : — 
" The battery got into bivouac after dark on 
the night of August 31st, near the little callage 
of Nery, altout twelve miles south-west of 
Compiegne. A squadron of the Queen's Bays 
were bivouacked in the same field. In the 
morning, while the men were having their 
breakfasts, and before the rivei" mists had yet 
cleared away, the camp was startled by the 
sound of guns very close to. Soon the shells 
began to fall among the teams harnessed up 
ready to march. In two minutes there was imt 
a hoi-se living in the field, and many men were 
lying about killed and wounded. Captain 
Bradbury, Royal .Vrtillery, and Lieutenants 
John Campbell, Mundy, and Gififard each tried 
to bring guns into action against the Germans, 
who had eight guns and were only 500 yards 
away Captain Bradbury succeeded in getting 
his gun into action and seeing there was no 
chance of the other guns being brought to bear 
he called their detachment over to lend a hand 
to his gun. Lieutenant Giffard was wounded 
in four places, getting across to the gun. The 
detachment then consisted of the three officers, 



Sergeant-Ma jor Dorell. a sergeant and a gunmr 
and driver, every other on the lield being killed 
or wounded. Unfortunately they could not get 
an anuuunition wagon alongside the gun, so 
had to cany up each round separately. Captain 
Bradbury early in the fight had had one leg 
I aken oft by a shell, but insisted on still direct ing 
the fire of the gun. Lieutenant ,Iohn Cami)bell 
liehaved in the most gallant way. bringing up 
anuuunition, and was kiUed Just as he had 
1 nought up the last round from the wagon. 
Lieutenant !Mundy had his leg partly taken olT 
liy a shell and has since died. He could not se(! 
how tin- fire was going, so he stepped out to have 
a lietter look, saying. ' They can't hit me.' and 
(ben he stayed observing till a shell wounded 
liini. But still the light wiMit on. .Sergeant - 
Major Dorell, aided by the sergeant and the 
gunner and driver, lirought up animnnition 
from another wagon, and then poor Bradljiuy, 
who refused to give in, was struck by another 
shell. This gun did not cease fire till they had 
used every round of ammunition in the wagon, 
and alone it succeeded in knocking out four guns 
of the Germans. ' I ' Battery finally arrived, and 
with the help of a machine gun of the Bays 
silenced the other four German guns, the eight 
being captured. It is an open secret that Cap- 
tain Bradbury was to have had the X.C. had he 
lived, and were postliumou«V.C.'s given, both he 
and Ivieutenant John Campbell would certainly 
get them. Ijieutenant Mundy was re<ominended 
for the V.C., but died from liis wounds. Lieu- 
tenant Giii'ard, the sole surviving officer, has 
been awarded the French Order of Merit. 
"Sergeant'MajorDorell and thesergeant have bof 1 1 
been recommended for the X.C. and the gunner 
and driver for the I)istinguishe<l Conduct .Medal, 
■■ Though ow ing to the German fire the battery's 
guns are never likely to be of use again, they 
are at the base for a memorial to the gallant 
officers and men. No better trophy will ever 
be shown than these six Indlet -riddled, guns." 

LIEUTENANT-COLONEL SIR EVELYN 
RIDLEY BRADFORD, BART,, p,s,c,, 
COMMANDING 2nd BATTN, SEA- 
FORTH HIGHLANDERS iROSS-SHIRE 
BUFFS, THE DUKE OF ALBANY'S), 
\\as the second son 
of the late Colonel 
Sir Edward R. C. 
Bradford, Bart., 

some time Commis- 
sioner of Police, and 
was Ijorn on the l(5t!i 
April, 1809, 
Educated at Eton 
and the R,M. C. 
Sandhurst, he was 
gazetted to the Sea- 
fortli Highlanders in 




45 



BRA 



August, 1SS8, becoming LiuuU'iuuit in June, 
1890, and Captain in July, 1895. As an Officer 
qualified lor Staff employment in oon'sequence 
of service on the Staff in the Field, and as a Staff 
College Graduate, he had consideral)le Staff' 
service at home and abroad, in peace and in war. 
lie served with his battalion in the Xile Expedi- 
tion of 1898, being pre.-;ent at tlie battles of 
Atbara and Khartoum. From .May, 1899, to 
January. 1900. lie was A.D.C. to the Governor 
and Commander-in-Cliief. .Malta. He also went 
through the South African War. partly with liis 
battalion, and during 1901 — 1902 a^ a SlalT 
Olliier and as Deputy Assistant Adjutant- 
General, being pre.sent at operations in the 
Orange Free State from February to Jlay, 1900, 
including actions at Pophir Grove and Driefon- 
tein : at operations in the Orange River Colony 
from May to November, 1900, including action 
at WitteViergen. and again from the latter date 
to January, 1901 ; at operations in Cape Colony 
from ]"'ebruary to ilai'ch. 1901. For his ser- 
vices he was twice mentioned in Despatclies 
(•" London Gazette."7th May and 10thSei)tendHr. 
1901 ). was placed on the list of Officers (jualified 
for Staff employment, and received his Brevet 
-Majority June, 1902, the Queen's medal with 
four clasps and the King's medal with t«o 
clasps. After returnins to England lie lield 
appointments as Brigade-JIajor at Aldershol, 
Commander of a Company of Gentlemen Cadets 
(General Staff Officer second grade), and a 
General Staff Officer at Head- quarters of the 
-Army, War Office. 

He obtained his substantive majority in March. 
1905. and reached the ranli of Lieutenant- 
Colonel in May, 1913, succeeding to the com- 
iiKind of the 2nd Battalion of Ins regiment in 
June. 1913. He took his battalion to the front 
in August, 1914. For his services in the earlier 
part of the war he was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of 8th October, 19 U. He 
was killed in action by a shell on the 14th 
September, 1914, at the battle of the Aisne. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir E. Bradford was a 
cricketer, and played for the county of Hamp- 
shire, and for the Army. 

He married in 1909. Elsie Clifton, daughter of 
Colonel J. Clifton Brown, v,\\o survives him. and 
left three sons. Edward Montagu Andrew, born 
Xovemlier, 1910 — who succeeds to the title — 
I!i(llc\ Lewkenor, born April, 1912, and Donald 
Clifton, liorn May. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY MONTA 
GUE BRADLEY, 6th BATTN. RIFLE 
BRIGADE (THE PRINCE CON- 
SORT'S OWN), born at Dover in F.-bruary. 
1893, was the third son of Edwin Bradley. J.l'. 
for the Comity of Kent. 

lie was e<lucated at Dover College and Jesus 
College, Cambridge, where he gained a classical 



scholarshi]), and grailuated H.A., second class, 
in the Classical Tripos : at Cambrid<_"' In- u a- 
Captain of the Uni- 
versity ShoothigVl 1 1 . 
in 1914. was a meiii- 
l)er of the first Ruglix' 
footliall teanr of his 
College, and was 
a keen Lacrosse 
player. 

On the outbreak of 
the War he was 
given a commission 
ill the 6th Bat- 
talion Rifle Brigade, 
and went to France in .\i)\ cMilu-r. 1914, being 
attaclied to the 2nd Battalion Welsh Regiment. 
He was promoted Lieutenant in December. 
1914, and was mentioned in Sir John I-^-ench's 
Despatch of the 31st .May. 1915. for his eallantry 
at Festubert on the 21st December. 191 t. the 
date of his death, which occurred during a 
night attack. 



CAPTAIN ARTHUR EDWIN BRAD- 




MURR AYS J.\T 
15th H U S S .\ R S , 




SH A W. M.A., 14th 
LANCERS, attd. 

who was killed in 
action on the 13th 
October, 1914, leav- 
ing a widow (Flor- 
ence Mary, sister of 
Sir William Price, of 
( juebec, Canada). « as 
the youngest son of 
Surgeon Major-Geiie- 
ral Sir A. Frederick 
Bradshaw. K.C.B.. 
K.H.P., and Lady 
Bradshaw, of Oxford. 
He was born on the 20th March. 1882, and was 
educated at ^farlborough College. 189(5 — 99. 
and at the R.il.C, Sandhui-st. On his mother's 
side he came of a family which had seen service 
at the Battle of Plassey and in almost every 
Indian campaign since then. His father seived 
in India for thirty-five years from 1 1S57. ami in the 
Mutiny, Afghan, Zhob and Hazara campaigns. 
Captain BratLshaw entered the Ainiy as Second 
Lieutenant in the Bedfordshh-e Regiment in 
May. 1901 ; in December, 1902. he joined the 
Indian Army, 14th Jat liancers, becoming 
Lieutenant in August, 1903. and Captain in 
-May, 1910. He was Adjutant of his regiment 
for several years and qualified as a second-da.ss 
Interpreter in French. While on leave in 
England he entered Worcester College and 
obtained the degree of .M..\. in June. 1914. 
In the following Septemlier he was sent to 
France and was killed during a reconnaissance 
in the village of Bout de Ville, Pas de Calais. 



BRA 



46 




CAPTAIN FRANK SEYMOUR BRAD- 
SHAW. 1st BATTN. PRINCE ALBERT'S 
(SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY), 

son of iMajor Frank 
Boyd Bvailsliaw, for- 
iiicily of theSomerset 
l.ii;ht Infantry, who 
ilii'd of fever in the 
ISurmeseWar in July, 
18,S(), and a great 
grandson of General 
Lawrence Bradshaw, 
w lio conimanded the 
loth Foot in Egypt 
in 1S(K), was l)orn at 
Weston -super - JIare, 
S(iiiii-r-.|. nil ili(. Iih Deeemher, 188;$. 
lie was educated at Temple Grove, East Sheen, 
at Harrow, and the R.JI.C., Sandhurst ; lie 
was good at all sports, hunting and shooting, 
and especially polo. 

He joined tlie Somerset Light Infantry in 
Januaij-, 1904. and went to India, where he 
served till 1908, having been promoted Lieu- 
tenant in June, 1906 ; on returning to England 
he was stationed at Portland, and in 1911 went 
to the Depot at Taunton. 

In 1914 he rejoined the 1st Battalion at Col- 
chester and accompanied it to France in 
August ; he was promoted Captain (tem- 
porarily) in November, 1914. 
He took part in the action at Le Cateavi (huing 
the retirement, in the subsequent advance to the 
Aisne and in the Battle of the JIarne. He was 
slightly wounded on the 2nd November, 1914, 
l)ut returned to duty on the 22nd of the month. 
On the 19th December his battalion attacked 
some Saxon trenches in front of Ploegsteert ; 
Captain Bradshaw's company was in reserve, 
but seeing Lievitenant I'arr killed at the head 
of his platoon. Captain Bradshaw at once left 
his trench and took command of Mr. Parr's 
men. He was shot almost immediately and 
died in a few minutes. 



MAJOR FRANCIS JOSEPH BRAITH- 
WAITE, 2nd BATTN. LOYAL NORTH 
LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was killed in action in East Africa at the 
end of the year 1914, was the eldest son of 
the late F. J. Braithwaite, R.D., Rector of 
Great Waldingfield, Sudbury, .Suffolk. 
He was born on the 5th December, 1872, 
and joined the North liancashire Regiment 
in January, 189.'!, becoming Lieutenant in 
February, 189,5, and Captain in !May, 1901. 
He served in the South African War, being 
employed with the Mounted Infantry, and for 
his services was mentioned in Despatches 
('■London Gazette," 10th .September, 1901), and 
received the Queen's and King's medals, each 
with two clasps. 




.Major Hiaithuaitc afterwards served on the 
Claims Conmiission Hoard of the Orange River 
Colony, and latterly was stationed in India. 
Major Braithwaite, wlm uas promoted to that 
rank in I'^'bruary. 1911. U-I't .i widow .nul I'oui- 
<-liiIdren. 

CAPT.\IN ERNEST STANLEY 
BRAND, ROYAL FUSILIERS 
(CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), 

who was killed in 
action while serving 
with the West Afri- 
can Keginient in the 
Cameroons, ^^■est 

Africa, wa.s the son 
of W. B. Brand. 
Esq., late of The 
Grange, Finchley. 
and Boxwood, Herts. 
He was born on the 
3rd December, 1878, 
at Stoke Newington, 

and was educated at Arlington House, Brighton, 
and Charterhouse, joining the iird Battalion 
Royal Fusiliers from the Militia in January, 
1897, becoming Lieutenant in January, 1900. 
He served in Malta, Gibraltar, and China for 
five years, and while at the latter obtained his 
Company in October, 1904, and passed in the 
Chinese language. 

From July, 190(>, to December, 1910, he served 
with the West African Regiment, to which he 
was transferred in September, 1912, and w-itli 
wliich he did nseful work untU he was killed. 
He was ordered to the Cameroons on the out- 
break of the war an<l was acting as Second-in- 
Command, West African Regiment, when he 
was shot in the neck and killed instantaneovLsly 
in the attack on Yabassi on the 8th October, 
1914. 

Captain Brand was a member of the .Timior 
Naval and Jlilitary and Sports Clubs, and his 
recreations were steeplechasing, shooting, hunt- 
ing, and polo. 

LIEUTENANT VERNON DUDLEY 
BRAMSDON BRANSBURY. 3rd 
lattd. 1st) BATTN. LINCOLNSHIRE 
REGIMENT, _^^^^^____^___^ 

born in 1883, at 
Soutlisea, Hants, was 
the son of Mr. and 
Mrs. Henry Brans- 
bury, of Holme 
Chase, Putney, and 
a nephew of Sir 
Thomas Bramsdon, 
late M.P. for Ports- 
mouth. 

He was educated by 
private tutors, and 




47 



BRE 



at Clifton College, and received a commission in 
the Royal Irish Rifles, being suljeequently 
appointed to the 3rd Battalion (Special Reserve) 
Lincolnshire Regiment, in June, 1913. 
He was killed at Xeuve ChapeDe on the 25th 
October, 1914 : while trying to locate a machine 
gun which had been firing on his trench, he was 
struck by a bullet in the temple and killed 
instantaneously. 

Lieutenant Bransbury married in February. 
1908. Zoila Kathleen Mary, daughter of Dr. 
Ponsonby Widdup, late Medical Service British 
Guiana, and left two sons, Stuart Ponsonby 
Bramsdon. bom May, 1910, and John Brian. 
»x>rn June. 1913. 

C.\PTA1N JOHN HENRY BRENNAN. 
3rd BATTN. ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS. 

was Ixirn on the 14th 
3Iay. 1869, only son 
^^^^^ of the late T. C. 

^^^^H^^^^ Brennan, 

^^tK^^^^f treal, Canada. 

^•^ fc i^ He was a Dublin 

" ^^^^ man, and was edu- 

cated at St. Colum- 
ba's, matriculating 
thence at Dublin 
University, where he 
was a prominent 
member of the 
Cricket Team, and after leaving, played in 
matches with the Long Vacation Team. 
In 1902 Captain Brennan joined the -1th (VoL) 
Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers, becoming 
Captain in the 3rd Battalion in June, 
1903, and seriously devoted himself to his 
military duties ; at the Hythe Musketry Course 
he obtained special distinction. In civil life 
he was a prominent member of the Irish Land 
Commission, a body from which many meml>ers 
have joined the colours for this war, on the 
outbreak of which Captain Brennan was 
attached to the 1st Battalion of his regiment, 
with which he proceeded to the front. 
While gallantly leading his men across an open 
plain at Zonnebeke on the 19th October, 1914, 
he was shot through the head. 
A sergeant in Captain Brennan's company, 
himself wounded on the same date, gave the 
following account of his Officer's death : " He 
fell gallantly cheering on his nxen. and had just 
said, ' Come on boys, we will show them the 
way to Tipi)erary,' when a shell burst and he 
was killed instantly." 

Captain Brennan was a member of the Hibernian 
United .Service, Yeomanry, and Ean^town Golf 
Clubs. He married ^liss K. C. Murray, daughter 
of the late T. Murray, of Millmount. Co. West- 
meath, and left three children. Gladys Evelyn H., 
age 16, S. Charlotte, age 14}, and T. Henry 
L'Estrange, age 11}. 




LIEUT.-COLONEL CHARLES ARTHUR 
HUGH BRETT. D.S.O.. COMM.\NDlNG 
2nd BATTN. SUFFOLK REGIMENT, 
was lx»m at Muttra, 
India, on the 2»th 
March, 1865, the 
eldest son of Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel Arthur 
Brett, A.P.D., for- 
merly of the 2nd 
Dragoon Guards 
(Queen's Bays), and 
his wife Georgina. 
daughter of Hugh 
Hannay. Paymaster, 
Royal Navy. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brett came of an old Anglo- 
Irish family, having been a grandson of Mr. 
Curtis Brett, of Oadby HalL Leicestershire, 
whose ancestors came from Ireland : his 
mother was a member of an old Wigtownslure 
family, formerly the Hannays of Sorbie Castle 
(a baronetcy now in abeyance), many meniljers 
of which were in the Royal Navy ; his maternal 
grandfather and great-uncle were in the wars 
against Napoleon, 

After being educated privately, Lieutenant- 
Colonel Brett proceeded to the R.M.C., Sand- 
hurst, from which he was gazetted to the 
Suffolk Regiment in 1885, in which he obtained 
his Company in 1894. From 1895-99 he 
was Adjutant of the 1st BattaUon, and from 
1900 was Adjutant of the 4th (Territorial) 
Battalion at Ely, Cambridge. He served with 
the Hazara Expedition of 1888, receiving the 
medal and clasp, and was again on active 
service in the .South African War. taking part 
in the operations south of the Orange River in 
1899-1900, including the action at Colesberg. 
where he was severely wounded, and taken 
prisoner by the Boers while unconscious, being 
afterwards sent to Pretoria. An officer, who 
was his subaltern on this occasion, said that, 
though shot through the lungs, he kept com- 
mand of his company, and actaaDy charged 
the Boer trenches in this state, till he fell 
exhausted from loss of blood, adding that "his 
comrades of that night will always rememl>er 
him as one of old England's most gallant 50ns." 
Later he was present at operations in the 
Transvaal east of Pretoria, and in the Orange 
River Colony. He was mentioned in Des- 
patches, awarded the D.S.O. for his gallantry 
at Colesberg, and received the Queen's medal 
with three clasps. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brett was toni oi travel, 
and interested in astronomy, and while on leave 
in 1904. joined Sir W. Christie's party, going to 
Sfas, Tunisia, to observe the eclipse, and 
recaved the thanks <^ the Admiralty for his 
assistance to the Astronomer Royal. He also. 



BRE BRI 



48 



at other times, visited Mesopotanii;i. and 
engaged in explorations in .Muscat. Busia. 
Bagdad and Babylon ; liis visits were the more 
interestini; from thi^ fact that he was a good 
water colour artist, a talent possibly inherited, 
for his \mcle ,Tohn Brett. A.R.A., was celebrated 
as a sea painter, and his avmt, Rosa Brett, 
A.R.A., was also a well-known artist in her 
time. 

Very early in the Great War. Lieutenant-Colonel 
Brett took liis liattalion abroad as part of the 
Expeditionary Force. He was killed at I.e 
Cateau, France, on the 26th August, ION. 
after the retirement from JIon.s. 
Lieiitonant-Colonel Brett married in January. 
1009, Enid Geraldine. daughter of the late 
Lieutenant-Colonel Harry llamer.sley .St. 
George, Senior Oi-dnance Officer, Scottish 
District ; lie left one daughter. lone MoncrietT 
St. George, born October, 1909. 
Jlrs. Brett received a great number of letters 
of sympathy and appreciation of her late 
husband from comrades of all ranks. Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel Brett seems to have been the 
possessor of a peculiar " magnetism" whidi 
attracted and endeared him to all who met him. 
A brother officer «Tote : "I don't suppose 
there was a single Commanding Officer in the 
ser\-ice more beloved by the ofTicere aufl men ; 
his loss to the regiment is absolutely u-repar- 
able." In another letter a brother officer, who 
ha,s himself since fallen on the field of honour, 
says : — " If ever there was a commanding 
officer tliat I would wish to liave gone on 
service \vith, it was he whose loss we now 
mourn. The one consolation is that he tell 
as a soldier at the head of his regiment for 
which he did so much, and every man of which 
looked up to him, admired liim and tried 
to follow liis grand example in everjthing. His 
life was uoVile and straiglit and his death was 
tlie same. We of the regiment, or what is 
left of it, mourn his loss a^s the best of com- 
rades." 

A Private states : — " He was a hero to the 
last in the way he encouraged the men." 
Lieutenant -Colonel Brett was in command of 
the Depot. Bury St. Edmunds, from 1909 till 
1912. At a meeting of the Bury St. Edmunds 
Town Council, the Jlayor refen-ed to the death 
in action of Lieutenant-Colonel Brett, and said 
that he knew he was voicing the feelings of all 
the Council in suggesting tliat they should pass 
a vote of condolence with ^Mrs. Brett in the 
great loss she had sustained, coupled with an 
expression of their deep respect and admiration 
of that gallant soldier. The Council signified 
their agreement by standing. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brett's name was men- 
tioned in .Sir John French's first Despatch, 8th 
October, 1911. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ROBERT 
HENRY W.\TKIN BREWIS. 2nd BATTN. 
ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REfilMENT, 

w.is burn at liowliery I'ark, Walliiigtord. on (he 
29th September. lS7:i, and was the eldest son 
of the late .S. R. Brewis, of Il)stone, Bucks, and 
.Mrs. Brewis, of SO, Cromwell Koad, S.W. On 
the maternal side. Lieutenant-Colonel Brewis 
was a great-grandson of the Right Hon. Sir 
Henry Watkin Williairus Wynne. .Minister 
I'lenipotentiary to the Court of Denmark. an<l of 
Hester.daughterof Hobert . 1st Baron Carrington. 
He was educated at Harrow, and at Jesus 
College. Cambridge, subsequently joining the 
4th BattaUon Oxford Light Infantry (.Militia) 
in .March, 1892: from it he obtained his com- 
mission in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment 
in 1.S95, becoming Captain in 1900. and .Major 
in December, 1912. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brewis .served in the Nile 
Expedition of 1S9.S. and was present at the 
battles of Atbara and Khartoum, receiving the 
Queen's medal with two clasps, and the ICtrvp- 
tian medal. From lilOT — 1910 he was .Vdjutant 
of his battalion, and in.Vpril of the latter year 
was appointed .-Vdjutant and Quartermaster at 
the .Staft" College. On the 19th August. 1914. 
he was appointed to the Staff of the I^Ixpedi- 
tionary Force as I)e))uty .VssLstant .\djvitant- 
Geueral. and on the 14th October was pro- 
moted to Assistant -Vdjulant-General with the 
temporary rank of Ideutenant-Colonel. Tliis 
appointment he resigned in order to rejoii\ his 
battalion, which he was commanding when he 
fell on l<Sth December, 1911, at Sailly. near 
.Vrmentieres. where he was buried. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brewis was not married. 

LIEUTEN.\NT NEVILLE LINTON 
BRIDGLAND. 3rd B.-VTTN. EAST 
SURREY REGT., 

was born at Graves- 
end, Kent, on 9th 
August, 1894, and was 
the son of ilr. and 
itrs.Loftus Frederick 
Linton Bridgland. of 
The Cedars. Graves- 
end. He was a great 
gi'andson of William 
Alchin, of Court 
Lodge Farm. Linton. 
Kent. 

Lieutenant Bridgland was educated at Ivinc's 
.School, Rocliester. Ivent, where he attaineil dis- 
tinction as a cricketer, having been in the 1st 
XI. from 1909 to 1912 inclusive. In playing 
for liis school against St. LawTence's College, 
Ramsgate. in partnership with liLs brother, he 
scored 110 runs, not out. out of 201 for one 
wicket in an hoiu--and-a-haIf. He was also in 
the first Football XL Playing for his regiment 




49 



BRI— BRO 



ill June, 1914, at .Shorncliffe, lie mado :i(tO runs 
for eight innings, an average of 37 odd. 
lie «as gazetted to the Special Reserve of 
Otticer.s as Second Lieutenant 3rd East Surrey 
I'l'iriiucut in November, 1912, doing his six 
iiKiutlis' probationary training with the 1st 
Battalion in Dublin. lie was coiifirnu'd in his 
rank in April, 1913, and promoted Lieutenant 
in March, 1914. 

On the 11th September, 1914, he took a draft 
of the 1st Battalion to Fi-ance, and was in 
several engagements ; he was killeil on the 
22nd October, 1914, at Lorgies, near La Ba-ss(?e, 
and was buried in the garden of a hoase in that 
village. The church and churchyard were under 
the fire of German guns, thus preventing lus 
being buried in the churchyard. 
Possessed of charming manners, he was like<I 
and loved both by his friends in private life 
and also by his lirother ofiicers and men. His 
Colonel wrote of him very highly at. the time of 
his death, and liis soldier servant, ATOting at 
the same time, said "he was a brave officer and 
a gentleman, he led his men into action without 
any f<'ar. and hLs heart was in the right place." 

CAPTAIN GEORGE CLARK BRIGGS. 
1st B.\TTN. ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS, 

born at Trinit>. 
Edinburgh, on 4th 
^larch, 1878, was the 
onh son of Francis 
Briggs. of Hunting- 
ton, Haddington, and 
a grandson of the 
late Dr. Munro of 
JloOat. 

He was educated at 
Edinburgh Academy, 
Malvern College, and 
Clare CoUege, Cam- 
Ipiidge. and joined the Royal Scots FiisUiers in 
May, 1899, six months before the outbreak 
of the Boer War. through which he served ; 
during the latter part of the war he «as chosen 
for duty with the 2nd Mounted Infantry, 
lie was present at the attempt to relieve 
Ladysmith. being taken prisoner at Colenso. 
After his release he escorted Boer prisoners to 
Ceylon. He received the Queen's medal with 
four clasps and the King's medal with tA\o clasi^s. 
Serving with hLs battalion in the Great War. 
lie w as mentioned in Sir- John French's Despatch 
of stli Octolier, 1914, for his services during the 
retirement from Mons, and was killed at the 
Itattle of the .\isne on 14th Septemljer, 1914. 
His company had to retire and he waited to 
sec all his men a\\ay before he left the position ; 
he was hit and fell, and was at first reported 
missing on 19th September, but subsccjuently, 
on the 6th October, as having been killed on the 
date mentioned. 





2nd LIEUTENANT MAXIMILIAN 
FRANCIS BROADWOOD. 1st BATTN. 
THE QUEENS OWN ROYAL WEST 
KENT REGT.I, 

was the son of 
Francis and JIary 
Sylvestre Charlotte 
(nee Dalison) Broad- 
\\ood. and was born hb^ gm: 

at Hove. .Sussex, on 
the 1st April, 1893. 
He w as a grandson of 
the late Thomas 
Broadwood, of Holm- 
bush, SiLssex, and of 
the late M. H. 
iJalison, of HamptoiLs. Kcul. 
Second Lieutenant Broadwood was educated at 
" Evch-ns " (G. T. Worsley, Esq.), 1902-06 ; 
Wellington CoUege (T. A. Roger's House), 1906 
-11 ; passing from there into the Royal Mili- 
tary College, Sandhurst, he ol)tained his commis- 
sion in the Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regi- 
ment) on the 12th September, 1912, and joined 
the 1st Battalion in Dublin the following month. 
He was killed in action at Wasmes. near !Mons, 
on the 24th AugiLst, 191 1. 

Second Lieutenant Broadwood was a memlier 
of the Royal Aero Chili. 

LIEUTENANT LAWRENCE SEYMOUR 
BROCKELB.\NK, 3rd B.\TTN. 
(RESERVE! THE KING'S OWN (ROYAL 
LANCASTER REGIMENT), 

«ho is lielieved to ha\-e been killed at the end 
of the year 1914, though his name has not 
appeared in the official Casualty Lists, was 
educated at King's College and entered the 
Theological Faculty in 1910. He left in 1914. 
and shortly afterwards received a commission 
as Second Lieutenant in the Special Reserve. 
On the outbreak of the war he was appointed 
Second Lieutenant on probation to the 3rd 
Battalion Royal Lancashii'C Regiment and was 
promoted Lieutenant in I*'eliriiaiy. lOl.'S. there 
evidently having been some doubt of his death. 

CAPTAIN EWEN JAMES BRODIE (of 
Lethen), 1st BATTN. THE QUEEN'S 
OWN CAMERON HIGHLANDERS, 

liorn 17th July, 1878, 
was the son of the 
h-.te J. C. J. Brodie. 
of Lethen. Lord 

Lieutenant of the 
County of Nairn. 
Captain Brodie suc- 
ceeded to Lethen on 
the death of his 
brother in 1908. 
He was educated at 
Harrow and Cam- 
bi-idge, joining the 




BRO 



50 



iind f':ini('r(Mi 1 li';lilaiii!cis in M;iy, 11111(1, liniii 
till' Militi;i, liccoiiiiiiii; l,ir\itrii.ui1 in Fcliruiu-v, 
1!)()2, and <'ai>taiii in .May. I'.U 1. lie .served in 
the ^loditiM-ranean, .\fiiia. and t'liina. in 
lilOO he was appointed Adjutant to the Lo\.it 
Scouts, an appointment he held for lour xcar, 
when lie rejoined his battalion and jell witli 
it for the front in August, 191-1. 
After having l)eeu through the Battle of the 
Aisno and all the suliseqiient fisihting in Belgium 
he \va.s killed at the Battle of Yprcs on the 11th 
November, 1914, the day of the tremendous 
assault of the I'russian Guard on our thin line. 
He fell in the Nonne Boseh Wood, having 
succeeded in driving back the last survivor.^ 
of the Guard with a handfid of transpoi't 
drivers, cooks, and other details. Captain 
Brodie had acted as Adjutant of his battalion 
since 25th September, 1914, and ho and two 
other officers were at tlie time of his death the 
sole survivors of the thirty officers \\ho left 
Kdinbnrgh Castle in August. 
Captain Brodie married in 1911 jSliss Stirling, 
of ]'"airburn, and left two sons and a daughter. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE BROOKE, RE- 
SERVE OF OFFICERS, IRISH GUARDS. 

was serving with the 1st Battalion <if that 
regiment when he met his death. 
He was the eldest son of Sir George Brooke, 
Bart., and his first wife Anna, daughter of 
GeolTrey Shakerley, and niece of Sir Charles 
Shakerle)-, Bart. ; he was also related tf) 
Viscount Monck, and Sir Basil Brooke, Bart. 
He was horn on the 10th June. 1877, at Smii- 
merton, Co. Dublin, educated at Eton, and last 
resided at Ballyford, Coolgreaney, Co. Wexford, 
During the South African War he served with 
the ll.imp.shire Regiment, and obtained the 
South African n\edal with three clasps. He was 
one of the first group of officers appointed to the 
Irish Guards when that regiment was raised 
in 1900. 

He «as mounded near the trenches at the 
Battle of the Aisne on the 7th October, 1914, 
when with the Irish Guards, and died of his 
wounds on the 9th October, 1914. 
At one time he kept hounds in Wexford, and 
was much interested in the breaking-in of dogs 
for shooting. He was a member of the Kildare 
St. Club, Dulilin. and the Guards' Club, London. 
He married, in 1907, Nina, daughter of the 
Right Hon. Lord Arthur Hill, P.C., and left 
a daughter, Nancy -Myra, the only child who 
survived him. 

CAPTAIN JAMES ANSON OTHO 
BROOKE, V.C, ASSISTANT ADJU- 
TANT 2nd B.\TTN. THE GORDON 
HIGHLANDERS, was born at Fairley, 
Coiintesswells, Aberdeenshire, on the .Srd 
February, 1S84, and was the son of Captain 



. D.l I' Faii-lry. and 

Brooke, Hart., AM", 




Many V'esey Brooke, .1.1'. 

graiKlson of .Sir .Vi'tliui 

of Colebrooke, Co. 

■■'rrmanagh, Ireland, 

and great grandson 

of General Sir Geoi'g(! 

.\nson, G.(!.B. 

Ca])tain Brooke, V.C, 

was educated at 

Winton Hoilsc, Win- 

1 he,ti T : Wellington 

College, and the 

R..M.C., Sandhurst. 

where he was Senior 

I'nder Officer in 1905. 

lie was also Captain of the Shooting lOight. was 

in the Football team, won the Obstacle race. 

tied for the saddle, and on leaving was the 

cadet selected for the Sword of Honour. 

He joined the 1st Battalion of his reginu'iit at 

Cork in November. 1905, and was transferred 

to the 2n<l Battalion in 1900. serving with it in 

India and Egypt till the outbreak of the Great 

\Var. He was one of the officers to ri'ceive the 

new colour's of the i-egiment from ll.M. the 

King at Delhi, and received the Durliar medal. 

He was killed on the 2!)th October, 1914. and 

was awarded the V,C. after his death " for 

conspiiuous bravery and great ability near 

Gheluvelt on 29th October, in leading two 

attacks on the German trenches under heavy 

lire, regaining a lost trench at a very critical 

moment, and thus saving the situation." 

In the "London Gazette " of the llith March. 

1915. he was promoted temporary Captain. 

such promotion to take etTect from the lltli 

September, 1914. 

Captain Brooke, V.C, was a good shot, rider, 

and golfer : he procured many head of l)ig game 

in India and Arabia, including ibex, bison, and 

samboc, 

MAJOR VICTOR REGINALD BROOKE, 
CLE., D.S.O., p.s.c, 9th LANCERS, 

a notification of whose death on the 29th 
August, 1914, was included in the monthly 
Casualty List published by the War Office in 
September, 1914, was born on the 22nd .lauu- 
ary, 1873, and was the fifth son of Sir \'icfor 
Alexander Brooke, 3rd Bart. He joined the 
9th (Queen's Royal) I^ancers in December, 
1S94, becoming Lieutenant in .\pril. 189(5, and 
Captain in May, 1901. 

He served in the South African War, taking part 
in the advance on and relief of Kimberley, 
including actions at Belmont, Enslin, IModder 
River and Magersfontein ; was present at 
operatioi^s in the Orange Free State and at 
I'aardeberg, and actions at Poplar Grove and 
Karee Siding. From November, 1901, to 
September, 1902, he served as A.D.C. to the 
Chief of the Staff in South Africa ; he was then 



51 



BRO 



at operations in the Transvaal. He was slightly 
wound e<l in the war. and for his services was 
twice mentioned in Despatches ("London 
Gazette,"' 16th April. 1001. and 29th July, 1902), 
was anarde;i the D.S.O. and receivefl the 
Queen's medal with four clasps, and the King's 
medal with two clasps. From Xovember. 1902, 
to December, 1905, he was A.D.C., and from 
1905 to May, 1907, Assistant ilihtary Secretary 
and Interpreter to the Commander-in-Chief, 
East Indies, and from June, 1907, to Xovember, 
1910, ililitary Secretary to the Ticeroy 
of India. He received his Brevet ilajority 
in June, 1905, and his substantive rank in 
February, 1907. 



2nd LIEUTENANT JOHN GILBERT 
SOMERSET COZENS-BROOKE. 3rd attd. 
1st BATTN. ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS, 
who was killed in action on the 18th October, 
1914. aged 20 years, was the only son of Ernest 
and Isabel Cozens-Brooke, of 6, ColUngham 
Road, London, S.W. 

He joined the Royal Scots Fusiliers as 2nd 
Lieutenant in April. 1912, becoming Lieutenant 
in August. 19U. 



CAPTAIN 
BROOKES. 




HENRY RICHARD 

101st GRENADIERS. 

INDIAN ARMY, 

was Viorn at Port 
Blair, Andanians, on 
10th January, 1SS6, 
and was the youngest 
son of Octavius 
Henry Brookes, of 
Chaucer Road. Bed- 
ford, and a grandson 
of the late Colonel 
\MUiam Brookes, 
Gordon Highlanders, 
formerly tlie 75th 
Stirlingshire 1' _ t 

Captain Brookes was educated at Bedford 
and entered the Bedfordshire Regiment from 
the iliUtia in 1905. being transferred two years 
later to the Indian Army and ))ecoming Lieu- 
tenant in 1908. His promotion to Captain, 
dating from 29th November, 1914. was not 
gazetted until ilarch, 1915. He was a member 
of the Sports Club, Bangalore. 
In the Great War Captain Brookes w as serving 
in German East Africa when he met his 
death. After the unsuccessful attack upon 
Tanga on the Ith November, 1914, he was 
reported missing;, and, as no definite news has 
been received since, liis parents have been 
reluctantly bo\ind to assume that he was killed 
on that dav and buried bv the Germans. 



The landing and attack were carried out under 
great difflcidties, after giving notice of the 
intention to bombard what was believed to be 
an open and undefended towm. Owing to the 
dense bush it was almost impossible to use 
artillery, and when the advance began, our 
troops came under a heavy fire from rifles and 
macliine guns. 

The 101st Grenadiers, making a fine effort to 
fill a gap in the firing line due to the difficulty of 
advancing in line through the dense bush came 
under exceedingly heavy cross fire of rifles 
and machine guns, and were unable to advance, 
liut tenaciously held their own. Darkness 
coming on brought the action to a conclusion, 
after which our troops withdrew unmolested to 
an entrenched position a quarter-of-a-niile in 
the rear. In \-iew of the extreme difticulty of the 
counti-y in the vicinity of Tanga it was judged 
inadvisable to attempt a second attack without 
adequate reinforcements. Orders for embarka- 
tion were accordingly issued, and this was 
carried out without any interference on the part 
of the enenw. 



LIEUTENANT HUGH GODFREY 
BROOKSBANK, 2nd BATTN. ALEXAN- 
DRA PRINCESS OF WALESS OWN 
YORKSHIRE REGIMENT, known in 
the Service as the " Green Howards," 
was born on the 24th : 

November, ISO.'J, at 
Healaugh Old Hall, 
Tadcaster, and was 
the son of Edward 
CUtherow Brooks- 
bank liy his wife 
Katherine Graham, 
daughter of H. M. 
Lang, of Broad- 
meadows, Selkirk- 
shire. 

Lieutenant Brooks- 
bank was educated at Radk-y. ami joined the 
Y'orkshire Regiment in Felmiary. 1913. be- 
coming Lieutenant in October, 1914. While 
serving with his battaUon in the Great War. he 
was severely wounded at the Battle of Ypres. 
on the 1st November, 1914, and died from the 
effects on the 16th December, at 26, Park Lane, 
London. 

He was mentioned in Sir John French's Des- 
patch of 14th January. 1915. for gallantry in the 
battle in which he was wounded. His relatives 
received the foUowing tribute to his memory 
from a senior officer in the battaUon : — " A 
braver lad never stepped the earth ; he was left 
in command of " B " Company when all Ms 
seniors had been shot. He commanded it Uke a 
veteran, and on two occasions he was largely 
responsible for the regiment being saved." 




BRO 



52 




CAPTAIN ERNEST SCOTT BROUN, 

2nd BATTN. ALEXANDRA PRINCESS 

OF WALES'S OWN (YORKSHIRE 

REGIMENT), 

u)io was lepcirted in 
Hi'cember, 1914, as 
liaving been killed 
in action near Ypres, 
was the youngest son 
I if the late James 
liroiin. of Orchanl. 
(avhike, Lanark- 

^liire. and only son 
of ih-s. Broun, of St. 
Mary Abbot's Ter- 
race, Kensinfiton. 
He ^\a■- Im.iti c.ii th, 7th December, 1S79, was 
educated i)rivately, and ioined the Yorkshire 
IJegiment from the :MiUtia in February, 1899, 
becoming Ijeutenant in December, 1900. He 
served in the South African War, bein^; jn-esent 
at the relief of Kiniberley, at operations in the 
Orange Free State, and at Paarilel)erg ; actions 
at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, \'et and Zand 
Rivers ; in the Transvaal, including action-^ 
near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill, 
also east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast ; 
and Cape Colony, including action at Cole-sberg; 
and further operations in the Tran-svaal in 1900 
and 1902. He received the Queen's medal with 
six clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. 
Having been promoted Captain in April, 1906, 
he was appointed A.D.C. to the Go\ernor and 
Commander-in-Chief, Barbados, in July, 1911. 
He was fond of shooting, and was a member of 
the United Sei ^ ice and Sports Clubs. 
Captain Broim was killed instantaneously by a 
bullet wliile looking over a parapet on the 30th 
October, 1914. He was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 31st INfay. 1915. 

CAPTAIN FREDERICK GEORGE 
BROW^N, 101st GRENADIERS, IN- 
DIAN ARMY, 

who was killed ou the 
2nd Novemlicr, 1914, 
was born on the 7th 
December, 1881, and 
joined the Royal 
InnLskilling Fusiliei-s 
from the 4th Batta- 
lion Royal Dublin 
Fusiliers in October, 
1901, 

He served in the 
South African War. 
being present at operations in the TraiLsvaal, 
and in the Orange River and Cape Colonies, 
receiving the Queen's medal with four clasps, 
and the King's medal with two clasps. He was 
promoted Lieutenant in January, 1904. joining 
the Indian Army in June of the same year, 
and was promoted Captain in October. 1910. 





LIEUTENANT HUBERT WILLL\M 
BROWN, 2nd B.\TTN. ROYAL IRISH 

REGIMENT, _ _ 

who died in .Sei)ti-m- 
l)er, 1914. of wounds 
received when fight- 
ing in the Cameroons. 
was the son of the 
late John Mosse 
Brown, and was born 
at Greenville, \\ ater- 
ford, on the 11th 
January, 1890. 
He was educated at 
^Vravon, Bray, St. 
Faughnans College. Co. Cork, and Cheltenham 
College, where he was a prefect, and in the 
cricket XI. He joined the Royal Irish Regi- 
ment in XovemI)er. 1909, becoming Lieutenant 
in September, 1911. 

No details of Lieutenant Brown's death havi- 
been procurable. 

2nd LIEUT. JAMES WILLIAM BROWN, 
X .\ %• t h BRIGADE R O Y .\ L FIELD 
ARTILLERY, 

was born on tlie 
26th May, 1888, at 
Upper Dean, Bed- 
fordshire. 

He joined the 117th 
Battery, l{o\al Field 
-Vi'tillery, as a gunner 
in 1907, While in 
the ranks he ob- 
tained a First Class 
Certificate, 1909, and 
passed through the 

School of (iimnery at Shoebiiryness in t li 
year. He left Aldershot witli the 
Battery 26th Brigade, on the 16th August, 
1914, and while on service was given his 
commission on 1st October, 1911, being trans- 
ferred to the 2.jth Briga<le Ammunition Cohuun. 
He was wounded on the 31st October anil died 
from the effects on the 2nd November, in 
Xo.- 5 Field Hospital. 

The ^lajor of his old battery, the 117th, wrote 
to Ills widow : " Before he left the liattery he 
dined with us in our mess (an old liarn) as a 
farewell. 1 cannot tell you what a help he was 
to the \arious Battery Commanders of the 
117th Battery during his time in it, as he was 
such a capable chap at his work ; always willing 
to do anything for us, and we sliouhl all have 
been pleased indeed if he had l)een posted to 
the battery as an officer. I. of course, had known 
him the longest, and knew what it was to have 
such a good and capable man at one's elbow. 

" The battery had seen a great deal of 
fighting before your husband left us, and I 
sent his name in to my Colonel for his good 




117th 



53 



BRO 




work Jill tin- time, especially at tlie loii^ battle 
of the Aisne, w here he mended a telephone wire 
for us at a particularly nasty time." 
The Officer Commanding the Ammunition 
Column wrote : "As far as I know, the circum- 
stances are these. The Sussex Regiment had 
had both their machine guns put out of action 
in a hot attack, and we were told to get another 
one through to them as soon as possible, as it 
might be the means of saving the situation. 
Your luLsband went up to try and get into 
coranumication with the Sussex Regiment, and 
I much regret dial he was wounded, gallantly 
cloing his duty." 

CAPTAIN ANTHONY EDWARD 
JEMMETT-BROWNE, 2nd BATTN. 
ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT, 

younger son of Lieut. 
Colonel and Jlrs. 
Edward Jemmett- 
Browne, of 50, Elm 
Park Gardens, Lon- 
don, S.W., was horn 
on the 2Gtli January, 
18S2. 

He was educated at 
Wellington, being the 
younger of two 
lirothers who were 
in the .Anglesey 
1895-98. Thence he went to the R.JI.C, 
.Sandhurst, and in August, lUOO. joined the 
1st Battalion l?oyal Sussex Regiment, in 
which, when it was the 35tli Royal Sussex, his 
father had served for many yeare. 
Ue served in the South African War lOlil-ni'. 
being present at operations in the Cape and 
Orange Ri\er Colonies and in the Transvaal, 
receiving the Queen's medal with two clasps. 
He liecame Lieutenant in July, 1903, and on 
obtaining his company in April, 1910, was 
transferred to the 2nd Battalion of his regiment. 
Captain Jemmett-Bro^^Tie, w-ho was a member 
of the United Service Clul), was most active in 
promoting .sports in his battalion, and the best 
men — two of whom were Army Champion 
runners — belonged to his company. 
He was killed on the 10th September. 1914. 
the last day of the battle of the ]\Iarne, at Priez. 
leading the front platoon of the advance guard 
of tlie division into action, and was buried 
that evening at the spot where he fell. 

2nd LIEUTENANT A. G. BROWNE, 2nd 
BATTN. SHERWOOD FORESTERS 
(NOTTINGH,\MSHIRE AND 
DERBYSHIRE REGIMENT), 

who was unofficially reported to have died of 
womids received in action on the 201h October, 
lOU, was gazetted to his regiment on the Itith 
Septendier, 191 4. 




CAPTAIN GORDON STEWART 
BROWNE. 1st BATTN. THE DUKE OF 
EDINBURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGT.i, 

died on the 27th 
November, 1914, at 
the Allied Forces 
Base Hospital, 
Boulogne, from the 
effects of wounds 
received in action 
near Y'pres on the 
1 7th November, after 
being previously 

wounded on the 
fourth day of the re- 
tirement from ^lons. 
He was the fourth son of .Mr. lb my J. Browne, 
of Grosvenor IIoiLse, Faversham, and wa,s born 
on the 15th May, 1890. He was educated 
at Hailoybury College, and Sandhurst, from 
which he was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regiment 
in September, 1909, becoming Lieutenant in 
January, 1911. He wa^ promoted Captain 
after his death, to date from October, 1914, 
and was Adjutant of his battalion, having 
been Assistant Adjutant since April. 1913. He 
was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch 
of 14th January, 1915, for gallant and dis- 
tinguished service in the field. 
He served w'ith his battalion for three and a halt 
years in South Africa, was captain of the 
regimental rifle team wliicli won the ifethuen 
Cup, and was A-ssistant Commandant, and 
then Commandant of the School of Signalling 
at Rolierts Heights, Pretoria, in 1912-13. 
Captain Browne was a member of the Junior 
Army and Navy Club. He was a keen cricketer 
and golfer, was fond of hunting, and was a good 
game shot. He was not married. 
The following is an extract from the letter of 
the Commanding Officer of the Gordon High- 
landers to Captain Browne's father, which led 
to his mention in Despatches : — 
" When the brigade, of which the Wiltshires 
and my own regiment formed part, was ordered 
to take over the trench lines near Y'pres, I 
happened to be. temporarih'. in command of it, 
and was lucky enough to obtain the services of 
your son as stall' officer during the few days 
that I was in command. Not only did your 
son do yeoman service during those few days 
when he was acting as staff officer for me, but 
throughout the very trying period which 
followed, it was easy to see what sterling stuff' 
he was made of. . . . Y'oiu: son's gallant 
behaviovir will live long in the memory of others 
beside those of his own particular brother 
officers, and I considered it my duty to bring to 
the official notice of our Brigadier the very 
splendid way in which he had performed his 
duties during those strenuous days near Y'pres." 



BRO 



54 




LIEUTENANT MONTAGUE WILLIAM 
S ETON -B ROW NE, 2nd BATTN. 
LEICESTERSHIRE REGIMENT, 

- \\liri was liorii at 

(iiriiada, British 

West Inilies, on llio 
ITtli February, lS9:i, 
w as the son of G. S. 
Siton-Browne, Esq., 
Mriutier of the Ex- 
iMiitivo and Legishi- 
tivc t'oiincils, .T.P., 
Grenada ; ho was 
related to M a j o r 
S e t o n - B r o \v n e. 
I). .S.O.. Indian Army. 
He was educated at a private school at (^ron- 
il.dl. Surrey, and at Berkhajnpstead School, 
Herts, being gazetted to the I^eicestersliire 
Regiment as Second Lieutenant in September, 
1913, and joining it in India two months later. 
With it he went to Fi'ance for the Great War, 
and was kille,<l while leading an attack on 
German trenches at Kiclieliom'g I'Avou(i, on the 
24thNovember,1914. The attack was successful, 
and Second Lieutenant Seton-Browne's name was 
mentioned for his gallantry in Sir John French's 
Despatch of the 14th .January, 1915. Jle was 
gazetted Lieutenant on the 1st November, 1914. 
The following account of his death was received 
from a brother officer : — '" I joined our 2ncl 
Battalion on getting home and have the same 
Company " B " that your son was in and 
Captain Grant. My Company Sergeant-Major 
was with your son w lien he was killed in action. 
They had got into a German trench at night 
anil your son was getting on to a traverse with 
Gei'mans on the other side. He was wounded 
and called out to the men and lay still ; before 
they coidd get him back he was hit again and 
killed. They got him back amongst them into 
the trench. . . . He was very well thought 
of by all ranks, and the men would have 
followed him anywhere." 

Lieutenant Seton-Browne was a memlier of the 
Junior United Service Club. 

CAPTAIN REGINALD JOHN BROWN- 
FIELD, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL 
WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT, 

the .son of Douglas 
Harold Brownfield, 
was born at Hem- 
Heath, Trentham, 
S t ii If ords li i re, in 
April. 1886. Captain 
Brownfield was a 
cousin of Major Ed. 
Etches, many years 
at tlie School of 
.Musketry, Hytlie, 
and one of the best 
shots in the Armv. 




Caiitaiii lirciu iifield joined (he Koy.'d Waiuicks 
in August, 19(15, being promoted Lieutenant in 
.lanuary, 1909. With his regiment he served at 
dilTerent ]>laces in iMigland, and in I'esliawar. 
In 1913 he I'etired from the regular Army an<l 
joined (he l(h Ha((ahoii. the old lind Wainvick 
■MiUlia. On Ihe outbreak of the war he rejoined 
the Llnd Battalion of his regiment, and was 
serving with it when he was killed outhe 1 St h 
December, 1914. 

An Officer of the 1st Battalion sent the following 
account of his death: — " They had to attack 
the German trenches, and he, followed by three 
subalterns and 30 men, went for a machine gun 
— a plucky thing to do — and every one of them 
were killed within five yards of the German 
trenches. The three subalterns were killed, 
and I believe they all lay in a heap. They tell 
me that it was a very fine effort to take the 
maxim, and would have greatly helped the rest 
of the attack ; but tmfortunately they were 
just killed before they got there. They all 
thought the world of liim." He was a 
splendid athlete. 

The action was also descril>ed as follows : — 
" On December 18th the W^arwicks attacked 
the main German trenches at Houge Bancs, 
near Armentieres. They were double trenches, 
and were held in imexpected strength. It was 
a desperate and bloody business, for there were 
wire entanglements and the enemy had guns in 
the trenches. ... In that action 13 out 
of 17 officers were killed, and more than half 
tlie rank and (He of the regiment." 

CAPTAIN CHARLES HUNTER 
BROWNING, 124th BATTERY, XXVIIIth 
BRIGADE, ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

son of Captain Hugh 
Rdmond Browning, 
late of the 2nd 
Dragoons {Royal 

Scots Greys) of Clap- 
ham Park. Bedford- 
shire, was born at 
The \\' o o d 1 a n d s, 
Clapham, Bedford, 
on the 9th April, 
1878. 

He was educated at 
Eton, where he was 
captain of the School in laUl . and in tlie Eton 
XI (kept wicket) in 1896 and 1S97. Proceed- 
ing to the Royal Jlilitary Academy, Woolwich, 
he ol)tained his commission in the Boyal Field 
Artillery in June, 1898. beconnng Lieutenant 
in February, 1901, and Captain in ^larch, 1908. 
He served in the South African War, taking 
part in operations in the Orange Free State, 
in< hiding engagements at Poplar Grove and 
Driefontein, from February to May, 1900, 




55 



BRO— BRU 




subsequently ^ecei^^ng the Queen's medal with 

two clasps. 

Captain Browning was killed on the 2(5th 

August at Le Cateau. wliile his battery was 

under very hea\-y fire. 

He was the prospective Liberal candidate for 

Windsor at the next election. 

MAJOR JAMES ALEXANDER 
BROWNING. 2nd DRAGOON GUARDS 

(QUEENS BAYSi, 

u ho was killed in 
action on the 31st 
October. 1914. was 
born on the 25tli 
June, 1878. and 
joined the 2nd Dra- 
goon Guards in May. 
18 9 8, becoming 
Lieutenant on the 
loth August, 1899. 
From March, 1900, 
to November, 1901, 
he was A.D.C". to the Inspector General of 
Ca\alry in Great Britain and Ireland. 
He served in the South African War. 1901-<12. 
being present at operations in the Transvaal, 
Orange River and Cape Colonies, and received 
the Queen's medal «-ith five clasps. He was 
promoted Captain in September. 1001. From 
July, 1906 to July, 1909. he was Adjutant 
of his regiment, and obtained Ms Majority 
in July. 1911. 

CAPTAIN THE HON. HENRY LYND- 
HURST BRUCE. 3rd lattd. 2nd) 
B.\TTN. ROYAL SCOTS iLOTHIAN 
REGIMENT), 

wa-s the eldest son 
of Henry Campbell. 
2nd Baron Aberdare 
of Duf^'ryn, Jloun- 
tain Ash. Glamorgan, 
and was liorn on the 
25th :May, 1881, at 
42, Lowndes Street. 
I^ o n d o n , S. W. 
Through Us mother 
he was related to the 
late Lord Lyndhnrst, 
anil tlie great |..niit.i. J. S. Copley. 
He was educated at Winchester, and New 
College, Oxford, and was gazetted Lieutenant 
in the 3rd (Militia) Battalion the Hampshire 
Regiment in 1903. and in May, 1906. became 
Captain in the 3rd (Special I{eserve) Battalion 
Royal .Scots. 

Captain Bruce was very fond of polo, shooting, 
and motor racmg, and was a member of the 
Royal Automobile Chib. Pall :Mall. He 
married in October, 190(i. Camilla, daughter 
of the late Hej nold Clillord ; their daughter, 




Margaret, born in August, 1909, died t«o days 
after her birth. 

In the middle of December, 1914, the Royal 
Scots had been for several weeks in the neigh- 
bourhood of Ypres, holding back the enemy : 
all through that time Captain Bruce and his 
men had been under almost continuous fire, 
and had taken part in many brUliant l)ayonet 
iharges. During the greater part of that time 
Captain Bruce was acting as Second in Com- 
mand of the battalion. 

On the 14th December came the order for the 
olfensive movement that proved successful, 
and of which Captain Bruce partly planned 
the attack. He led his men most gallantly 
against the enemy over the intervening ground, 
which had become a swamp, ankle deep in 
mini, in face of a terrible fire. They captured 
the trench they were attacking, taking 59 
prisoners and several guns. Captain Bruce 
was shot in the forehead by a German con- 
cealed in a dug-out while he was climbing out of 
the captiu-ed trench to leadliismenontotheuext 
line of trenches. He was buried where he fell. 
The battaUon received the congi-atulations of 
Sir John French and Sir H. Smith-Dorrien, 
and the charge was described as magnificent. 
General Haldane also wrote saying how much 
Captain Brace's services had been appreciated, 
and what skiU and bravery he had displayed. 
He was greatly beloved by his men, and Ids 
death was a real sorrow to them and to his 
brother officers. He had written most interest- 
ing letters home, always cheerful and never 
complaining. In one letter he said. "It is 
the finest lite I have ever lived." 
Captain Bruce was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. 
His daring conduct on the night of the 24th 
October had attracted the attention of the 
Officer in Command of the battalion, and 
there is little doubt but that had he lived he 
woidd have received some recognition of it, as 
well as of his gallantry on the 14th December, 
in addition to being mentioned in Despatches. 



MAJOR JONATHAN 
BRUCE, 107th P 
INDIAN ARMY, 

liorn at Dliarmsala, 
Punjab, India, on 
the 22nd June, 1873. 
was the eldest sou of 
Richard J. Bruce, 
CLE., of Quetta. 
Teddington, a direct 
descendant of the 
Bruces of Miltown 
Castle, County Cork, 
Ireland (whose 
genealogy is given 
in Burke's Landed Gentry). 



M A X W 
1 O N E E 




BRU 



56 



.Mmjcip Hi-iHO w.-is fiUicalcd at ][aile\ Imi-y 
and tlur H.M.C., Saiidluii-st, ivceiviiiK liis fii'st 
loiniiiissiou in Jiinuary, IS!).'), hefoniing Licu- 
tfiiaiit in the following year, and Captain in 
1001, liaving joined the Indian Army in ISOd. 
In 1908 he was appointed Double Company 
Commander in tlu- IHTtli I'ioneers. ![<■ saw 
active service on- the NUi lU-W est Frontier of 
India in 1S97-9S, and was present at the 
relief of Malakand, receiving the medal and 
two clasps. 

Having obtained hLs Majority in 1913, he was 
serving «ith his regiment when he was killed 
on the 24th November, 191-1, in the desperate 
lighting whicli look place on that day between 
Ypres and Bellume ; he was biu'ied at Betluine. 
Major Bruce, \\ho was a very keen sportsman, 
good at polo and otlier games, was a member of 
the East India United Service Chib. .St. James's 
.Squai-e, S.W. 

lie married in SeptemVier. 1905. Mabel Walrond, 
youngest daughter of Hem-y Trengrou.se, Ksq., 
J.V.. of Che.sfield, Teddington, and left two 
girls : Mary Aileen. born May. 190S. and 
Barbara Maxwell, born ]\larch, 191(1. 

CAP T.\ IN the Honble. ROBERT 
BRUCE, MASTER OF BURLEIGH, 
PRINCESS LOUISE'S (ARGYLL 
AND SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS), 

\\ ho waj? killed at 
Le Cateau on the 
2Cth August, 1914, 
was the elder son of 
Lord Balfoxu' of Bur- 
leigh, lie was born 
on the 2r)th Septem- 
ber, 1880, in Edin- 
burgli, and was 
i-diicalcd .-it Horris 
Hill (.Mr. A. 11. 
Evans) and at Eton. 
Cajitain Bruce joined 
tlie :;i-d Hallali.in i.l tb.- Argyll and .Sutlierland 
Highlanders in 1898. and aecou>panied the II li 
BattaMon to South Africa in Jamiary, 1900 ; 
in April of the latter year he was transferred 
to the 1st (Regular) Battalion, and vnth it 
served throiigli the South .\frican War. He 
was present at o|)erations in the Orange Free 
State, in the Transvaal, in Orange River 
Colony, and t\ipe Colony ; he received the 
Queen's medal with three clasps, and the 
King's medal with two clasps. Subsequently 
Capfain Bruce joined the 2nd Battalion and 
served with it in India and South Africa. In 
March, 1910, he was attached to the Egyptian 
-Army, with the rank of Bimbashi, and in 
September of that year became Captain in the 
British Army. In 1912 he took part in an 
expedition against certain tribes between the 
sources of the Wliite and the lUiie Nile, receiving 




a niidal Idi- his services. In tbc following 
year he w;is Intelligence Ollicer to the force 
wliich accoini>anied the Joint Commission sent 
to delimit the boundary lietween the Soudan 
and I'ganda. i-eceiving for his sci-vic-es the 
1th Cl.-\ss Order of the Medjidie. 
Captain Bruce proceeded on active service at 
the very commencement of the Great War, 
and w ,-i~ line nf tlu- otlii-ers killed ^omi aflrr 
lliu British Force entered the field. Only a 
short time before the outbreak of the wai-. the 
engagement had lieen announced of the Mastei' 
of Biuleigb to .Miss Cicely Blair, only daughter 
of Colonel and .Mrs. Blair of Dairy, .\yrsliire. 
In Clackmannan Church on the .'>tli Xiiveniber, 
the Rev. A. Irvine Robertson. D.l'., in tlu- 
course of liLs address, made sympathetic 
reference to the loss that parish and the country 
had sulTered through the untimely death of 
this young ollicer, representative of a family of 
whom it can be said " that no name for the 
last six centuries has stood higher in the esteem 
of Scotland than the name of Bruce." 
In a report received a few days after the 
arrival of the Argyll and .Sutherland Highlanders 
at the front, reference was made to the blaster 
of Burleigh : — " There the same spirit of 
brotherly helpfulne.ss that had always urarked 
otir friend once more manifested itself. He 
would not l>e content w ith supervision ; he 
would share the laliours of the lads he com- 
nian<led ; and so doing, with rille and bayonet 
in hand, leadint; on his men against over- 
whelming odds, Robert Bruce met a hero's fate." 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM ARTHUR 
McCRAE BRUCE, 59th SCINDE RIFLES, 
FRONTIER FORCE, INDIAN ARMY, 

only son of Colonel 
Andrew 31 c C r a e 
Bruce, C.B., Indian 
Army, and Mrs. 
^IcCrae Bruce, of 
Roche d'Or Samares, 
Jersey, was born in 
Edinhurgh on the 
15th June, 1890. 
He was educated at 
Cliir House School, 
Southbourne. Hamp- 
shire, antl Victoria 
College, St. Helier, Jersey, from whicli he 
jjroceeded to the R.iJ.C, Sandhurst, where lie 
was a King's Indian Cadet, and a Corporal. 
Passing out of .Sandhui'st, he received his 
commission as Second Lieutenant in January, 

1910, and, leaving for India the following 
month, was attached for a year to the 1st 
Battalion Noi-thumberland Fusiliers : in Mai-ch. 

1911, he joined the 59th Scinde Rifles F.F.. 
and became Lieutenant in April, 1912. Ho 




BUG 



was good at golf and cricket, and a keen 
hockey player. 

When the war broke out Lieutenant Bruce 
was at home on leave, and, being ordered to 
rejoin liLs regiment in India, sailed from 
England on the 11th August. On reaching 
Egypt he received orders to proceed to Cairo 
and await the arrival of his regiment there : 
in September he landed with it in France. 
Ijeing tlie first part of the Indian Expeditionarj- 
Force to arrive. 

He was killed in a German trench to the east 
of Givenchy. near La Bassee, on the 19th 
December, 191-t ; he was in command of a 
bombing party of his regiment in a night 
attack on a Grerman trench, was wounded on 
the way up to the trench but continued to 
lead his men, and was the first man to get 
into the trench : shortly afterwards he was 
shot through the chest, being killed instan- 
taneously 

C .\ P T A I N CLAUDE GRAY 
BUCHANAN, p.s.c. 35th SIKHS, attd. Sth 
GURKHA RIFLES, 
who was kUled on 
the -Ith November. 
191-t. having pre- 
%-iously been reported 
missing, was the 
eldest son of Lieut- 
enant-Colonel M. R. 
Gray Buchanan. 
Ettrickdale, Isle of 
Bute. 

He was bom on the 
11th February. 1S7S, 
iiiiil was cducatetl at Harrow (Small Houses 
and The Park) from 1892-96, afterwards 
going to the K.M.C., Sandhurst. He passed 
first out of the latter and was gazetted to an 
unattached Second Lieutenancy in July, 1S9S, 
and served his probationary period with the 
Hampshire Regiment at Limdi Khotal (Khyber 
I'ass) and on the North- West Frontier of India, 
jo in ing the Indian .Staff Corps in 1809. He 
served in the Waziristan Campa^n, North- 
West Frontier, of 1901-02. recei\-ing the medal 
with clasp. 

He was promoted C'aptain in Jidy. 1907, and 
passed out of the Staff College, Quetta, in 
December, 1913. In August, 1914, he was 
appointed to the Headquart-ers Staff of the 
Royal Flj-ing Corps, Expeditionary Force, and 
in November was attached to the Sth Gurkha 
Rifles- 
Captain Buchanan married in July, 1914. Jane 
CecUia Hope, only daughter of >lr. Rol>ert 
Elmsall Findlay. of Boturich, Dmiibartonshire. 
JIany of the above details were printed in the 
'■ Harro\-ian War .Supplement " for November, 
1914. 





MAJOR A U B REV WEBSTER 
BUCKINGHAM. 3rd attd. 1st BATTN. 
GORDON HIGHL.\NDERS. 

of Harrietsham 
Manor, Kent, who 
was killed in action 
on the 17th Novem- 
•>er, 1914, near 
Tpres. was the son 
of the late J. H. 
Buckingham, of Lan- 
caster Gate, and was 
bom in 1870. 
He was educated at 
Elstree and Harrow 
(Rendalls 1884 — 

1SS7), and served in the South African War, 
being present at operations in Natal in 1899. 
He was in command of Volunteer details, and 
afterwards Garrison Adjutant at Green Point 
Camp, near Capetown, For his ser\-ices he 
received the Queen's medal with three clasps, 
and the King's medal with two clasps. He 
also had the Coronation medal. 1911. 
Major Buckingham was a member of the Junior 
Athenaeum Club, and of the 3I.C.C. He was 
promoted honorary Captain in the Army in May, 
1901, and honorary Major in January. 1902. 
He married Mabel Felizarda. daughter of the 
late Colonel Walter Rudge, R.A.. Stede Court, 
Harrietsham. Kent. 



V BUCKLE. 

A R T I L I. K R V , 




CAPTAIN H E N R 
ROYAL FIELD 

who died in a Ger- 
man Hospital on the 
4th October. 1914. 
from blood poisoning 
following a wound 
received at Cambrai 
on the 26th August, 
was the elder son of 
>fr. Henry Buckle. 
British Burma Com- 
mission, retired. 
He was bom on the 
24th August, 1880, 
and educated at Clifton CoUege and the K.M.A.. 
Woolwich. He was gazetted to the Royal 
Artillery in June, 1S99, becoming Lieutenant 
in 1901. He took part in the South African 
War and was present at operations in the Orange 
Free State Ln 1900 ; in the Transvaal, including 
actions near Johannesburg and Diamond Hill : 
in the Orange River Colony May to November, 
1900, including action at Wittebergen : in 
Cape Colony. South of Orange River. He was 
also present at later operations 1900-02, in 
Orange River and Cape Colonies. For liis 
services he received the Queen's medal with four 
clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. 
Captain Buckle was promoted to that rank in 
April, 1906. 



BUC-BUL 



MAJOR MATTHEW PERCEVAL 

BUCKLE, D.S.O., p.s.c, 1st BATTN. 

THE QUEENS OWN (ROYAL WEST 

. , _ KENT REGT.), 

w as th 

Adiiiiial 

Huikle, 

House, 

S]iil-il)iiry. 

sliin 




coiul soil of 
and .Mrs. 
Tlic Ktil 
Kaithby. 
Ijiucoln- 
aud was lioru 
oil till' 29th Septeni- 
liLi', 1809, at VViay 
Cottage, Amble.side, 
He was educatod at 
Siminierfiold. Ox- 
lord, a 11 d w a s 
ga/.ftti-d to the Hoyal We.st Kent Regiment in 
April, 1889, becoming lieutenant in December, 
1892. From June, 1897, to August, 1901, he 
was Adjutant of liis battalion, having been 
promoted Captain in ,Tuly, 1898. He took part 
in tlie Soutli Afiiian War, while Adjutant, and 
was present at operations in tlie Orange Free 
State in 1900, being severely wounded ; at 
operations later in the year in the Orange River 
Colony, including the action at Wittebergen ; 
operations in Cape Colony and the Transvaal ; 
later operations in the Orange River Colony, and 
on the Zululand frontier of Natal in 1901. 
He was mentioned in Despatches ("London 
Gazette," 10th September, 1901), was awarded 
the D.S.O,, and received the Queen's medal 
with four clasps and the King's medal witli 
two clasps. 

In 1903 he passed out of the StafT College 
with distinction, and from January, 1904, to 
January, 1906, he was Staff Captain {>lol)ilisa- 
tion) at Headquarters, War Office, and from 
January, 190t). to January, 1908. Brigade-Major 
at Aklersliot. IMajor Buckle, being a Stal't 
College Graduate and a qualified Second Class 
Interpreter in French, was appointed in March, 
1909, Professor at the Staff CoUege, India, later 
General Staff Officer, Second Grade, Staff 
College, Quetta, with the temporary rank of 
Lieutenant- Colonel from July, 1909. Pie o)i- 
tained his Majority in the Army in March. 1907. 
On the outbreak of hostilities Major Buckle 
was about to start for Albania to take up a 
Staff appointment at Scutari for which he had 
been specially selected, but his orders were 
cancelled and he rejoined his regiment as 
second in command, at Richmond Barracks, 
Dublin, from which place he sailed on the 1.3th 
August, 1914. en route for FVance. He was 
present at the retirement from ilons and in 
the battles of the Jiarne and the Aisne. He 
was twice mentioned in Despatches, viz,, that 
of the 8th October, 1914, and Utli January, 
191.5. 

He was killed in action near Neuve Chapelle 
on the 27th October. 1911. while in command 



of his liattalion. 'Pin- Hoyal West Kcnls held 
their iiosition at this time for eight days without 
losing a trench. Tlu' following memoir from 
the ]ien of Hiigadiei-ticiiiT.il (Jrove was pub- 
lished ill '•'The Queen's Own' Gazette": — 
" The regiment has sustained a grievous loss 
in the death of Major Buckle. He was quite 
the finest type of ollicei- that c;in lie met. 
Thoroughly knowing his duty anil very strict in 
the performance of it, he was at the same time 
always gentle and courteous. He was most 
conscientious, and never spared himself as long 
as there v^•as work to do. It may well be said 
of him that he was " sans peur et sans reproche," 
-Major Buikle married in 1909, -Marjorie Ethel 
Grace, elder daughter of Col. C. A. Swan, C.iM.G.. 
and left two children, Margaret Elizabeth, 
born January, 1910, and Peter Claude Matthew, 
liorn May, 1914, 

lie was a member of the Army and Xavy Club, 
and a Fi-eemason. belonging to the following 
Lodges : Old Wykehamists (London), Shake- 
speare (Spilsby), and the Baluchistan (Quetta, 
India). 

His recreatioas were cricket, shooting. ]ioloand 
race] nets, 

CAPTAIN THOMAS HENRY 
RIVERS BULKELEY, C.M.G.. M.V.O., 
SCOTS GUARDS, 

born on the 23rd 
.lime, 187(5, was the 
son of Colonel C. 
Kivers Bulkeley, 
C.B., and was kiUed 
in action on the 22nd 
October, 191 1. 
He was educated at 
Eton, and joined the 
Oxfordshire Militia 
in 1894, becoming 
Captain in 1897. In 
January, 1899, he was transferred to the Scots 
Guards as Second I,ieutenant, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in Apiil, 1900; from July, 1901-04 
he was Adjutant of his battalion, liecoming 
Captain in July of the latter year. He served 
in the South African War, taking part in the 
advance on Kimbeiley, including the action at 
Belmont, ^\■here he was wounded ; operations 
in the Orange Free State, and at Paardeberg ; 
actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River 
and Zand River ; operations in the Transvaal, 
including actions near Johannesburg. Pi'etoria 
and Diamond Hill : operations in the Trans- 
vaal, including action at Belfast. For these 
services he was tlu'ee times mentioned in 
Despatches, and received the Qvieen's medal 
with six clasps, and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

From 1904-05 Captain Rivers Bulkeley was 
A.D.C. and Comptroller of the HovLsehold to 




59 



BUR 



Lord Cur/.oii. N'iforoy of India ; from 1900-07 
he held the same poots under Lord .Minto. In 
the latter year he was appointed A.D.C. to 
Field ilarshal H.R.H. the Duke of Connaught. 
Inspector General of the Forces, and High 
Coininissioner in the Jlediterranean, and more 
lately Governor General and Commander-in- 
Chief in Canada. In October, 1909, Captain 
Bulkeley was appointed Equerry to H.R.H. 
the Duke of Connaught and was Comptroller 
of his Household in Canada. 

On the outbreak of the Great War. Captain 
Rivers Bulkeley resigned his appointment on the 
StaiT of His Royal Highness, and rejoined his 
regiment, lieing in command of the left flank 
Company of the 2nd Battalion Scots Guards, 
forming part of the Vllth Division. He was 
killed while leading his Company to ftU a gap 
in the fighting line. 

Captain Rivers Bulkeley was a member of the 
Guards', Carlton, Junior Carlton, and Shrews- 
bury County Clubs. He married in 1913, 
Evelyn, daughter of Lady Lilian Yorke, Lady- 
in-Waiting to H.R.H. the Duchess of Con- 
naught, and the late Su- Henry Pelly, 3rd 
Baronet, and leaves a son, Itorn in January. 
1914. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ERIC LAURENCE 
ARTHUR HART BURGES, 3rd 
(attd. 2nd) BATTN. THE DUKE 
OF EDINBURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGT.), 

was the younger son 
of the late Rev. .T. 
Hart Surges, D.D., 
Rector of De^'^zes, 
and of Mrs. Burges, 
81. Hmnber Road, 
Blackheath. and 

grandson of the Rev. 
W. C. Burges, M.A.. 
first cousin and 
Domestic Chaplain 
to the Earl of Rosse. 
He was born at 
De\-izes and educatrd at St. Ednuuid's School, 
Canterbury, and at St. John's College, Oxford, 
where he graduated B.A. in 1913, with Third 
Class Honours in Jlodern History. In August, 
1914, he had just completed bis studies 
at the University, taking with distinction the 
Diploma in Economics and Political Science, 
and the Certificate in Social Training. He was 
also a keen member of the Oxford University 
Officers' Training Corps, holding the rank of Cor- 
poral and having qualified for Cei-tiflcate " B." 
Wlien war was declared he at once applieil for 
a commission, and was gazetted to the 3r<l \\ ilts. 
I^ater he was transferred to the 2nd Battalion, 
and sailed for Belgium on the 4th October. 
His battalion was attached to the " Immortal " 
Vnth Division, and took part in its magnificent 





stand near Ypres against overwhelming numbers. 
He was killed by shell fire near the village of 
Reutel on the morning of the 23rd October, 
1914 — his 23rd birthday — the day before the 
1st .\rmy Corps came to their relief. 

CAPTAIN THOMAS CAMPBELL 
BURKE, 1/lst KING GEORGES OWN 
GURKHA RIFLES (THE MALAUN 
REGIMENT), 

in which he was a 
Douljle Company 
Commander, was the 
son of Joseph Francis 
Burke and Kate 
ilarlow Burke, and 
was Iiorn on the 
27th :May. 1877, at 
Stratford-on-Avon. 
He was educated at 
Trinity College, 
Stratford - on - Avon, 
and at the R.il.C, Sandhurst. After passing 
out of Sandhiu'st he was, in August, 1897, 
attached to the Royal Irish Rifles for a year, 
receiving his commission in the Indian Staff 
Corps in October, 1898, when he was gazetted 
to the 12.5th Napier's Rifles. In 1900 he served 
in the Boxer Rebellion in China with the 122nd 
Rajputana Infantry, receiving the medal. On 
returning from Hong Kong Tie was appointed 
Adjutant of his regiment, the 125th Napier's 
Rifles, a position he held for three years, 
earning a reputation as a hard worker and a 
conscientious and reliable officer. Fi-om 1904 — 
1907 — being promoted Captain in AugiLst, 1906 
— he was Assistant Inspecting Olficer with the 
Imperial .Service troops (Rajputana Infantry), 
his itinerary of inspection including the native 
States of Gwalior, Alwar and Bhurtpore, and 
for some time the Bikaneer Camel Corps. For 
most of this time, owing to the absence through 
illness of his senior officer. Captain Burke had 
to assume fvdl control and responsiliilities. He 
was an excellent Hindustani scholar, and. while 
being a strict disciplinarian, earned the esteem 
and regard of the native officers and men by 
his wisdom, patience, and tactful handling of 
many a difficult situation. 

From April. 1909. to Jlarch. 1913, he was 
Adjutant of the Bangalore Volunteer Rifles, 
during which time he started the first corps 
of Boy Scouts in India. He then returned to 
his own regiment as Double Company Com- 
mander, rejoining at Dharnisala. 
Captain Burke was a good all-round sports- 
man ; he was a member of the Jmiior Naval 
and JUlitary Club. 

On the outbreak of the \\'ar, the 1st Gurkhas 
were ordered to the front, but were detained 
in Egypt for ten weeks to guard the Suez 
Canal, arriving eventually in FVance in 



BUR 



60 



NovcTiilii'i'. I'.ll I. MS part of tlic Sirkiiiil Urisadc. 
On tlu' ISlh DcciMnbfi'. I'.ll 1. tlir Gurkhas 
Hcrr ill action at Fcstiil)i'rt : mi tlu; lOtli 
Captain Biirkc. with 70 iiicn, was onlerod to 
effect, a lodgment in the German Are trench, 
and, in attempting to carry out the order, was 
killed within twenty yards of the British trenches. 
The official report on the incident was as 
follows : — 

•■The attack failed, hoth omceis— Captain 
Burke and Lieutenant I'lindall — being killi-.l 
and more tlian 50 per cent, otlier ranks being 
hit. It should, however, be recorded that all 
ranks showed the gi'eat&st gallantry in resolutely 
attempting sucli an operation in daylight." 
The Brigade- ^lajor, referring to the occurrence, 
wrote : — 

" As regards Burke I tliink everyone was 
absohitely unanimous in rating what he did 
as one of the most gallant deeds imaginabli', 
and he and Rundall and tlie men who followed, 
cannot be thought of except as ranking with 
the bravest." 

The Officer Commanding 1/lst Gurkhas wrote 
of him : — '* The action was most gallant and 
w^ell worthy of the Victoria Cross." 
A Captain of his regiment wrote : — " His loss 
is greatly felt by us. His sound conimonseiose, 
keenness and professional ability were recognised 
by all of us and I am very sorry w-e shall see 
him no more." 

And an Officer who was his subaltern, wrote : — 
" I cannot say how much we liked him and 
feel his loss. Having worked with him all 
Ms time here I found him one of the soundest 
and best officers I know, and his loss to the 
regiment is great. His death was a fine 
example of sacrifice to duty and obedience to 
orders which he knew could not be carried out." 
Captain Burke married in 1900, Ada ^lary. 
daughter of the Rev. Thomas WaU Langshaw, 
of West Grinstead Rectory, Sussex. 

CAPTAIN ARTHUR GEORGE 
McCAUSLAND BURN, 2nd 
BATTN. EAST SURREY REGT., 
attd. 1st GLOUCESTERSHIRE 

REGIMENT, 
born at Dorunda. 
Cliota Xagpore, In- 
dia, on the 22nd 
December, 1882, was 
the only son of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
A. G. Burn, Indian 
.<f^'. , Army, of Mansel 

Lacy, Hereford. He 
/ .. vmf yyg^^ descended from 
a long line of soldiers 
on both sides : on 
his father's side he was the fifth soldier in direct 
succession, liis great-great-grandfather having 




been Lieutenant -( 'oloncl (afterwards (inicral) 
William liurn, who in 1 S(i I sine essfiilU liild 
Delhi against llolkar. 

Captain Burn was educated at ^^■ellingtoll 
(.Mr. Ilardinge) from 1807- lOOO, wlu'ii.'e he 
passed direct into tin' H.M.l'.. Sandhurst, at 
the age of 18. In tlu- lirst Army examination 
lie did well, taking the 17th place in the llonoiu's 
list, with the prize for ^lilitaiy Engineering. 
He was gazetted in January, 1002, to the East 
Surrey Regiment, joining the 1st Battalion 
in India shortly afterwards, lie was promoted 
l^ieutenant in January, lOOl. and Captain in 
March. 1910. 

Captain Burn, wiio was a nieiiibfr of the .luiiior 
Army and Navy Club, was a great shot and a 
keen sportsman. He did a good deal of big 
g;ime shooting in India and Burmah, his 
trophies including elephant, tiger, bison. Set-. 
When war broke out he was at home on leave 
from India, and being ordered to join the 1st 
Battalion Gloucestershire Kegiment iminedi- 
ately, proceeded with it as part of the Expedi- 
tionary Force to France, and took part in the 
retii'ement from Mons. A brother officer writing 
of this time said that Captain Burn was not 
very well at the beginning of the war, l)ut stuck 
to it pluckily during the retirement, and was of 
the greatest help to his Company Commander. 
He afterwards went through the liattles of the 
^larne and the Aisne, and was killed on the 
20th October, 1914, in the first liattle of Ypres. 
At 5.30 a.m. on that morning the enemy began 
to attack, and the Gloucesters were ordered to 
advance, the fighting taking place on the 
Gheluvelt-Menin road, about half a mile from 
the former village. Captain Burn was shot 
and killed instantly while leading his men 
against the enemy, who were only 50 yarils 
from them at that point. An officer to whom 
he had just before given a message WTote : 
" He was very cool, and sent to the Jlajor to 
let lum know that there were Germans working 
round our flank," and continued, " he always 
showed to advantage under fire, apparently 
quite indifferent to bullets and shells, and had 
a wonderfully steadying effect on the men." 
His Colonel WTote : — "We all had a very high 
opinion of Captain Burn's worth as a leader 
and we all deplored his great loss ; we. indeed, 
felt we had lost one of us, although he belonged 
to another regiment and was at first a stranger." 



2nd LIEUTENANT ARTHUR HERBERT 
ROSDEW BURN, 1st (ROYAL 
DRAGOONS), who was killed in action on 
the 30th October, 1914. at the age of 22, was 
the eldest son of Colonel Charles R. Bm-n, 
A.D.C. to the King, IM.P., and the Hon. :\Irs. 
Burn, of 77, Cadogan Square, S.W., and 
Stoodley Knowie, Torcjuay. 



61 



BUR— BYN 



He was a grandsou of Ix)rd Leitli of Fyvie. 

2nd Lieutenant Bum was educated at Ludgrove. 

Eton, and f'hri«t 
CTiurch. Oxfonl, and 
was a member of 
Bullingdon and tlie 
Bachelors' Chilis. 
He obtained his 
commission as a 
University candidate 
on the Kith August. 
1914. Colonel Burn 
Is himself serving in 
tlie war as a General 
Staff Officer. 




LIEUTENANT 
DINER BURRIDGE. 




HENRY G A R - 
107th PIONEERS. 
INDIAN ARMY, 
who was shot 
through the head 
near La Bassee on 
the 16th November, 
1914, while examin- 
ing the damage done 
I>y German shells, 
was the son of the 
late Lieutenaut- 

Colonel F . J . 
Bun-idge. R.A.. and 
was l)orn on the 
20th January. 1S90. at Bareilly. Xorth-West 
Provinces. India. He was a gi-an<lson of the 
late William Biuridge. Bradfoi-d Court, Taunton. 
.SomeKet. 

Lieutenant Bun-idge was educated at Wintou 
House. Winchester, and Wellington College, 
where he was a prefect, was in the first fifteen 
and first eleven, was a gentleman of the Hunt, 
and where he won the Challenge Cup in 1906 : 
he also broke the College record in 1908 by 
ninning the half-mile race in two minutes one 
second. In 1909 he joined the Infantry Com- 
pany at the K.M.A., Woolwich, and there he 
won the mile race, was second in the two mile, 
and third in the half-mile, in the sports between 
the R.M.A. and the R.M.C. 

On joining the Army he was attached to the 
North Staffordshire Regiment for his year's 
training, beir^ then posted to the 1.5th 
Ludlilana .Sikhs, and. two years later, to the 
107th Pioneers, in wliich he ranked as Lieutenant 
from December, 1911. He was known to all 
his friends as " Lai." 

LIEUTENANT ANDREW BURT. 
8th BATTN. THE ROYAL 

SCOTS. LOTHIAN REG1MENT^ 
who was killed in action near Armentieres 
between the 18th and the 20th October. 1914, 
became lieutenant in his regiment in Jfay. 
1913. and had qualified for the rank of Captain. 




CAPTAIN CH.\RLES PAGET 
OB R 1 EN -BUTLER. ROYAL ARMY 
MEDICAL CORPS, 
born at TheCurragh, 
Ii-eland, on the 19th 
July. I8S1, wa.s the 
son of Major I'ierce 
OBrien-Butler, 00th 
Rifles, and a great- ; 
great -gi'andson of 
Edmund Butler. 

Seventeenth Baron 
DunbojTie. 
He was educated at 
Belvedere College, '" 
Dublin. He was a good footljaller. playing in 
the Monkstown eleven, Ireland, but gave up 
football for racing, in which he soon became 
famous as a gentleman rider : he rode for Hi s 
^lajesty the late King Edward VII, was 
head of the list of wiiining riders in Ireland in 
1907, and won races for many well-known owners 
in England, Ireland, India, and on the Conti- 
nent, both on the flat and over country. His 
brother. Pierce O'Brien-Butler, was an Inter- 
national football player, and lost his life in the 
Boer War. 

After qualifvTng he entered the Army in Jidy, 
1907, becoming Captain in January. 1911. He 
left for France, attached to the 5th I>aiicer-s, in 
August. 1914, and was mentioned in .Sir John 
French's Despatch of Sth October. 1914. On 
the 1st Xovemljer. 1914. he was shot down by 
maxim gun fire when going across an open space 
to help some wounded comrades. 
Captain O'Brien-Butler married Winifred 
O'Brien, and left one son, Terence, born at 
Poona in August. 1911. 



MA I TL AND 
FUSILIERS 
REGIMENT), 



CAPTAIN ARTHUR 
BYNG, 4th ROYAL 
CITY OF LONDON 

was the son of Major 
A. H. Byng, late of 
the Prince of Wales's 
Leiuster Regiment, 
and formerly Lieu- 
enant Royal Xavy, 
and was related to 
the Viscount Tor- 
rington. He was 
bom at Southsea on 
the 26th October. 
1872. 

Captam Byng was 
educated at " The Grange," Cowes, and by an 
Army Tutor at Caen. In Septemljcr. 1S9.5. lie 
was gazetted to the West Indian Regiment. 
and served in it till March, 1901, being pro- 
moted Captain in June, 1900 ; he was trans- 
ferred to the Royal Fusiliers, as Captain in 
March, 1901. He served in the South African 




CAD 



62 



War ill I '.Ml I ami I'.KIL'. liaviiit; ln'iTi eiii|ilii\ nl 
with till' .Mounted Infantry, and lioius; pi'iwcnt 
at operatioiLs in the Transvaal. ()rani;e Kivcr 
Colony and Capo Colony. lie rriciMvl tin- 
(iucon's modal with four elasi)s. 
From 1903-0") he was einplojed with the 
Egyptian jVi'my aiul was Adjutant in the 
Special Reserve from 1908-1912. At llouns- 
low he inaufiurated a Labour Department 
for Old Soldiers who were out of v\ork, and set 
on foot schemes for the social improvement 
of Army dependents, and amongst other things 
had such soldiers' wives as wished it, taught 
to cook properly. 

Captain Byng was killed at ^'ailly, at the 
battle of the Aisne, on the 14th September. 
1914, while looking through his field glasses ; 
he was shot in the throat and killed instan- 
taneously. 

Brother officers gave the following account of 
him and his work during the early part of the 
war : — " He has done very ivell w'M\ his 
Company ; no man could have done more. 
He was our great interpreter, being 
\ery good at French." Again : " He was 
always taking risks and lea\ing the trenches 
with a rifle to walk about in front." 
Cai)tain Byng was a member of the IM.C.C. 
and had played both cricket and football 
for Hampslure. He was a fine all-round 
cricketer, being a clean and effective bowler, 
with very deceptive pitch and pace, and a 
polished and punishing bat. He had taken 
many wickets and made hundreils of runs for 
the Roval Fusiliers. 



LIEUTENAN T-C OLONEL HENRY 
OSBERT SAMUEL CADOGAN, 
ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS, 

was serving at Malta 
in command of the 
1st Battalion when 
war was declared. 
It was shortly after- 
wards decided to 
order this Unit to 
England , to form 
part of the Vllth 
Division, which was 
to be organised for 
active service as 
quickly as possible. 
The Battalion arrived at Southampton on the 
15th September, 1914, and was then sent to 
Lyndhurst to prepare for embarkation for the 
Continent, and left for the seat of war on the 
4th Octolier. Having disembarked at Zeelirugge, 
the Division moved in the direction of Ghent, 
the Royal Welsh Fusiliers taking up a position 
in front of that town on the 9th October. Here 
a scene of great confusion was noticeable, as 




tile iiibaliitaiits were fleeing in a westerly 
directiiiri in order to escape^ from the ailvanciiig 
(Jernians. 

On the night of the 11th the Battalion moved 
liack with the Division through Roulers to 
Ypres, which was reached on the 14th, and on 
the 19th was heavily engaged in front of 
Dadizeele against vastly superior iiuinliers. 
Severe fighting continued daily until the 30tli 
October, on which date the battalion — owing 
to casualties — had been reduced to about three 
hundred officers and men, and formed part of 
the Vllth Division line in front of Zandvoorde. 
The long line from near the Menin Canal to 
Zonnelieke was thinly held, and the enemy in 
very superior strength was endeavouring to 
capture Y'pres, and thus penetrate to Calais. 
On the 30th the attack was renewed, and some 
dismounted cavalry on the right of the Welsh 
Fu..iliers having suffered severe losses were 
forced back, thus leaving the battalion open 
to a flank attack. Seeing this danger, the 
Adjutant (Lieutenant Dooner) rushed across a 
fire-s«'ept piece of ground — the trenches were 
not continuous — to give some instructions to 
the company on the right, and was returning to 
rejoin his Commanding Officer when he was 
seen to fall. Survivors of the regiment, now 
prisoners in Germany, state that Lieutenant- 
Colonel Cadogan at once ran out of the trench 
to his Adjutant's assistance, and while stooping 
over him was shot down and, they believe, 
killed. Shortly after, the remnant of the batta- 
lion, many having been killed or wounded, was 
surrounded and captured. Only one officer — 
Captain Parker — and eighty-six men, answered 
the roll-call that evening. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Cadogan was a member of 
a \\'elsh family formerly settled for many 
generations in Monmouthshire, and was the 
only surviving son of the late Rev. Edward 
Cadogan, Rector of Wicken, Northamptonshire. 
He was born in 1868, was educated at the Royal 
Military Academy, Gosport, and, joining the 
Royal Welsh Fusiliers from the Militia in 18S8, 
was promoted Captain in 1890, Major in 1907, 
and succeeded to the command of the 1st 
Battalion in 1912. He had been Assistant- 
Commandant, Indian ^Mounted Infantry School, 
from 1900 to 1908. and commanded at Kasauli 
in 190S and 1909. lie served throughout the 
Hazara Expedition in 1891, being granted the 
!Medal, and in the China Expedition and relief 
of Pekin in 1900, receiving the Medal and clasp. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Cadogan was twice men- 
tioned in Sir John French's Despatches (14th 
January and 31st May, 1915) for his gallant 
and distinguished conduct during the eleven 
days' fighting from October 19th to 30th. 
He married in 1906 Evelyn, daughter of the 
late H. T. Ross, and leaves one ;^on born in 1908. 



63 



CAD— CAM 




31rt January, 
Eton, joining 
Lieutenant in February. 
Lieutenant in January, 
the South African War. 



MAJOR THE HON. WILLIAM GEORGE 
SYDNEY CAUOGAN. M.V.O.. 10th 
PRINCE OF WALESS OWN ROY.\L 
HUSSARS. 
who was killed in 
action on the 14th 
November, 1914, 
while in command of 
his regiment, was the 
fifth son of the fifth 
Earl Cadogan and 
Countess Cadogan. 
fourth daughter of 
the second Earl of 
Craven. 

He was Iiorn on the 
lb~9, and was educated at 
the 10th Hussars as Second 
1899, and becoming 
1900. He served in 
being present at the 
relief of KlmVierley. operations in the Orange 
Free State, and at Paardeberg ; actions at 
Driefontein, Poplar Grove, Houtnek (Thoba 
ilountain). Vet and Zand Kivers : in the 
Transvaal, 1900 and 1901. and in Cape Colony, 
1901 and 1902. He received the Queen's medal 
with four clasps, and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

In 1906 he was awarded the M.V.O., and he also 
received the Cross of Honour of the Order of 
the Crown of Wiirtemberg. He was promoted 
Captain in March. 1904. Major in January. 
1911. and in 1912 was appointed Equerry to 
H.R.H. the Prince of Wales. Prior to this he 
was A.D.C. to His Royal Highness during his 
Indian Tour, 1905-06. 

Major Cadogan was a member of the Turf and 
Whites Oubs. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN LESLIE CALDE- 
COTT. ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY, 
was reported as killed in action in Xyassa- 
land in September, 1914. 

He was born on the 7th August, 1886, and 
joined the Royal Artillery from the Militra in 
February. 1908. becoming Lieutenant in Feb- 
ruary. 1911. In August. 1913. he was appointed 
A.D.C. to the Governor and Commander-in- 
Chief of Nvassaland at Zomba. 



2nd LIEUTENANT W1LLL\M ROBERT 
LAUNCELOT CALROW. 1st BATTN. 
LOYAL NORTH L.\NC.\SHIRE REGT.. 
was born at San .\ntonici. Texas. U.S.A., on the 
12th March, 1895. His parents were both EngUsh, 
Gerald Walton Calrow. and Mabel Calrow, 
daughter of the late Edmund King. He was a 
great-grandson of the late WUliam Calrow. Esq., 
J.P., D.L., of Walton Lodge. Lancashire. 
Second-Lieutenant Calrow lost his mother when 




he was only a year-and-a-half old, and hav- 
ing come to England with his father was 
brought up by his 
grandmother, ^Irs. 
Calrow, and educated 
in England. He was 
first at a preparatory 
school at Seascale. 
Cumberland, then at 
the School House, 
Rugby, and finally 
at the R.M.C.. Sand- 
hurst. He was 
gazetted to the Army 
in September, 1913, 
and joined at .\ldershot, where he remained 
till the 12th August, 1914, when he accompanied 
his battslion to France for the Great \^"ar. He 
was present at the battle of 3Ions. in the retire- 
ment thence, and in the battles of the .\isne 
and the Marne. 

He was killed instantaneously by high-explosive 
sheU on the 7th October, 1914. Both officers 
and men testified in the highest terms to his 
courage, coolness and efficiency, and to his 
kindness and consideration for his men. Only 
on the morning of hLs death one of the latter 
said to the Officer commanding hLs company : 
" Young Mr. Calrow is a hero, if ever there was 
one." The same Officer, in writing to his Aunt 
said : " Calrow liehaved perfectly splendidly ; 
he was wonderfully cool and collected." While 
yet another wrote : "A thoroughly efficient 
young officer, as brave as you make them, and a 
great loss to us." 

Second-Lieutenant Calrow was very fond of 
hunting and was a fearless rider from early 
I)Oyhood. His recreations also included camp- 
ing out, and walking among the mountains of 
Wales. Cumberland, and Switzerland, where 
he enjoyed ski-ing. 



C.\PTA1N ALL.\N GEORGE CAMERON. 

1st BATTN. THE QUEENS OWN 

C.VMERON HIGHL.\NDERS, 

who was liorii al 

Achnacarry on the 

27th July. 1880. was 

the third son of the 

late Lochiel and 

I^dy Margaret 

Cameron, daughter 

of the fifth Duke of 

Buccleuch. 

He was educated at 

Eton (where he was 

in the "Field" XII. 

whence he passed 

direct into the R.M.t.. Siuiiiiiui-st. having 

previously been gazetted to the Royal Scots 

3Iilitia, with which regiment he served during 




CAM 



R4 



Olio annual training. Captain Canioron was 
gazctti'd Sccond-Ijioutenant in OctolnM', IS!)!), 
and joined the 2nd Battalion of liis rogitnont 
at (iiliraltai-. i)i-o(e('ding witli it to Crete, .Malta, 
ami Sniitli Alriiji. He was promoted Lieutenant 
in lllKl and Captain in May, 1910. He was 
Adjutant of the lut Lovat's Scouts from 1907 — 
1911, when he joined the 1st Battalion of his 
regiment at Aldershot and went with it to 
l''ranee in August, 1914. 

lie was killed on the li.'.th Septemljer. 1911, 
ne;ir Beaulne. north of the river Aisne. Being 
the senior unwounded otlieer at the moment, 
he was sent for to take over command of the 
battalion : he walked to Headquarters through 
heavy shell lire. and as he entered the cave, where 
the regimental Headquarters were, a high- 
explosive shell blew it in. and he and thirty 
others were killed, only one man getting out 
alive. He was buried at Bourg, on the Aisne. 
Captain Cameron possessed in a marked degree 
the qualities of chivalry and courage that have 
been characteristic of his family ; tall, hand- 
some, and of martial bearing, while modest and 
genial in manner, he was extremely jiopidar. .\ 
hard worker himself, he expected those under 
hhn to maintain a high standard of eniciency. 
He was a good piper, and rifle shot, winning the 
Officers' aggregate for the highest niunber of 
points at the Scottish Command Rifle ileeting 
in 1913, and being third in the individual 
aggregate of all ranks. At Sandluu'st he was 
in the revolver team and at Alalia rowed stroke 
in the OlTficers' Ijoat race. He was fond of 
stalking, and all kinds of shooting. In 1902 
he received the Koyal Humane Society's 
Certificate for jumping into the sea off 
the embankment at Olian and saving a 
child's life. 

Captain Cameron married in Uctolier, lUUS. 
Hester Vere, daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel 
and the late Mrs. Fraser-Tytler, of Aldourie, 
and left one son, Angus Ewen, born 20th 
Januarv, 1914. - 



CAPTAIN NAPIER CHARLES GORDON 
CAMERON, 1st BATTN. THE QUEEN'S 
OWN CAMERON HIGHLANDERS, 

was born at Gibraltar 
on the 14th Decem- 
ber, 1870, being the 
son of the late 
General Sir William 
(iordon Cameron, 
G.C.B..ot Nea House, 
Christchuv<-h, Hants, 
who served in the 
Crimea. 

( 'aptain Cameron be- 
gan his military 
cireir by joining 




Sfrathcona's Horse in 19(10 ; in (lie lollowing year 
lie received a commission in the S<(i(tish Horse, 
and served with them during the reMi.-iindev of 
tint South African wai', in which he w.is 
wounded. For liis services \\r was mentioned 
in I )esp,itrhes .-ind I'eceivcd tile (Queen's medal 
«itli foul- clasjis. Ill .liHir, 1!)(I2, he was 
ga/.elted to thtt Xortluimberhiiid l''usillrrs. and 
when the battalion was disbMndeil in lildS. 
obtained a commission in the Ut. li.itt:ilioii 
Cameron Highlanders as a Liiuiti'uant. 
With this battalion he served in the (ireat W.ir, 
luMug promoted Captain in September, 1911. 
On the 1 Ith of thai month he was n^ported 
wounded and nussing, but rejoined his regiment 
after two days. On this occasion he owed his 
escapit from capt nri' by t lie ( iermans by leigning 
death, and lay lor some time on tin' ground 
while (iernian soldiers cnf oil his belt .■iiid 
removed his claymore and ri^volver. I.;iter on, 
while waiting till darkness to return to the 
regiment, with some private soldiers, they heard 
an ollicer of the Black Watch calling for help, 
and Captain Cameron witli a private, in th<,' 
Camerons went out and lironi.dit him in under 
heavy fire. 

He was killed in action at the Battle of the 
Aisne on the 2.")th September, 1914. 
On the 4th November, 1913, Captain Cameron 
married Constance Geraldine, eldest daughter 
of Captain Hai-ry Brooke, D.L., late (iordon 
Highlanders, of Fairley, Countcsswells, Aber- 
deenshire, and grand -daughter of the late Sir 
Arthur Brooke, Bart., of Colebrooke, County 
Fermanagh, Ireland, and left one child. Honor 
Napier Gordon Cameron, liorn on the :!lst 
Decendier, 1914, after her father's death. 
Captain Cameron was a mendier of the llniti'd 
Service Club. He took his Flying ( Crtitieale 
at Brooklands in ,Iulv, 1913. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM HENRY VEITCH 
CAMERON, 1st BATTN. (attd,) 
HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY, 

is believed to have been killed in action on 
the 20th December, 1914, near Feslnberl. 
lhi>ughhis name had not been iniliidid in the 
iiKnithly official casualty lists up to June, 191."). 
He was the second son of the late Sir Ewen 
Cameron, K.C.M.G.. and of Lady Cameron, of 
39, Hyde Park Gate, London. S.W.. and was 
born (111 the Ith February, 1883. He joined 
Hie Highland Light Infantry in May. 1901. 
becoming Lieutenant in .July, 1900. 
He served in the Smith African Wai-. being 
present at operations in the Cape Colon\ from 
October, 1901, to May, 1902, receiving the 
Queen's medal with three clasps. From .August, 
1908, to .\iigiist, 1911, he was Adjutant of his 
battalion, and was promoted Captain in 
September, 1912. 



65 



CAM 




LIEUTENANT ALLAN WILLIAM 
GEORGE CAMPBELL, SPECIAL RE- 
SERVE, COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 

who died of wounds 
ri'coived at the battle 
' if the Aisne on the 
L'llth September, 

11J14, was the only 
-on of Mr. and Mrs. 
Allan Campbell, of 
21. LTpper Brook 
Street, London. 
He was born in 
London on the 20th 
October, 1884, and 
was educated at E. P. 
Ai-nold's \\'ixenford Preparatory School, where 
he was in the school XI. for cricket and foot- 
ball : at Eton, and New College, Oxford. He 
was gazetted to the Coldstream Guards as 
Second-Lieutenant in February, 1908, becoming 
Lieutenant in October. 1910. In August, 1913, 
he joined the Special Reserve of the 2nd 
Battalion Coldstream Guards 
When at Eton he was captain of, and played 
cricket and football for his House, Mr. A. A. 
SomervUle's, was a leading member of the 
Musical Society, and won a cup for fives ; he 
was a member of the Volunteer Band and was 
" sent up tor good " several times (original 
Greek and Latin verse), and won the Head- 
master's Prize. Later in life he frequently 
played cricket for the Household Brigade. His 
recreations were cricket, shooting, fishing, golf, 
tennis, billiards, racquets and motoring. He 
was also very fond of music, and was a good 
musician, being able to play liy ear an}i:hing 
he heard, including operas. While at Oxford 
he conducted a small orchestra of his own. 
He was a memlier of the following clubs : the 
Guards', Lord's, Travellers', Bath. Junior 
Carlton, United Empire, Royal Automobile. 
Prince's, Queen's, Alpine Sports ; Worpleston 
and Harewood Downs Golf Clubs, and of the 
Free Fore.sters and Eton Ramblers. 
In June, 1914, he was accepted as Unionist 
Candidate for the Doncaster Division of 
Yorksliii-e. 

On the outbreak of the war lie rejoined his 
regiment, and was one of three officers to take 
out the first draft to the front. He was 
serving with the 1st Battalion when he was 
mortally wounded at the Aisne on tlie 19th 
September, 1914, and succumbed to his wounds 
next day. He was buiied in Troyon Chiu'ch- 
yard. 

Lieutenant Campbell married on the 1.5th 
February, 1912. Lady Moya ilelisende Browne, 
second daughter of the sixth Marquess of .Sligo, 
and Agatha Stewart, daughter of .1. Stewart- 
Hodgson of Lythe Hill, Haslemcre, and left a 
son born October, 1913. 




2nd LIEUTENANT BRABAZON CAMP- 
BELL, 4th BATTN. ROYAL WARWICK- 
SHIRE REGT., , 

was the only son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Braba- 
zon Campbell. The 
Xorthgate, Warwick, 
and was 21 years of 
age at the time of 
his death, having 
been born on the 3rd 
March, 1893, at The 
Northgate, Warwick. 
He was educated at 
Repton and Queen's 
College, Oxford, where he had nearly com- 
pleted his second year when war broke out. 
He was given a commission in the Royal War- 
wickshire Regiment on the 15th August, 1914, 
joining it in the Isle of Wight, and on the 26th 
November was sent out to the 2nd Battalion. 
He fell on the 18th December, 1914, with three 
other officers of his battalion. The senior 
Officer left of this battalion gave the following 
account of the circumstances : — 
■' May 1 be allowed to express on behalf of 
all ranks our deep sympathy with you in the loss 
of your son. He died a gallant death when 
within a few yards of a machine gun in the 
enemy's trenches, together with four officers 
and 32 men. It was obvious that the party 
was trying to capture the gun when they were 
kUled. It may be some consolation for you to 
know that the General Officer Commanding 4th 
Army Corps has issued an order praising in the 
highest terms the effort made to captiu'e the 
enemy's trench, an effort in which your son 
took a very prominent and gallant part." 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES ARTHUR 
CAMPBELL. 1st BATTN. CHESHIRE 
REGIMENT, 

was born in London 

on the 3rd June, 1891, 

the son of Arthur 

Campbell, of Wye 

House, West \\'orth- 

ing, and grandson of 

the late Robert 

Campbell, of Buscot 

Park, Berkshire. 

He was educated at 

Downside School 

from 1901 to 1909, 

when he passed into the R.M.C., Sandhurst. 

He received his commission in October, 1911, 

and served with his battalion in Ireland until 

the war broke out, when it was one of the first 

to go to the front. 

He was a keen motor-cyclist, and captain of 

the regimental hockey team. 

Lieutenant Campbell, who was promoted in 

AprU, 1914, took part in the fighting at Mons 




CAM 



66 




on the 21th August and was shot through the 
head while leading his men, and kUled instantly. 
He was Iniried in the cemetery at Andregnics. 

CAPTAIN COLIN FREDERICK 
FITZROY CAMPBELL, 1st BATTN. 
SCOTS GUARDS, 

was killed in action 
nt'ar ^'pres on the 
l^'.nh October, 1914. 
He was the only son 
oE Major-General F. 
Lorn Campbell, High- 
field House, West 
Byfleet, Surrey, of 
the Melfort family, 
Ai'gyllshu'e, and was 
born on the 29t.h 
September, 1880. 
He joined the Cameron Highlanders from the 
ililitia in .January. 1901, l^ecoming Lieutenant 
in August. 1904. He was transferred to the 
Scots Guard in ^March, 1905, and from Septem- 
ber, 1 9 11 , to September, 1 9 1 3 . was Adjutant of the 
Guards' Depot. Captain Campbell was gazetted to 
his rank on the 29th October,the dateof hisdeath. 
He married on the 11th Jxme, 1914, Helen 
ilargaret, eldest daughter of ^Ir. C. J. and 
Lady ilary .Stewart. He was a member of the 
Guards' and Caledonian Clubs. 

CAPTAIN DONALD WILLIAM 
AUCHINBRECK CAMPBELL, 4th BATTN. 
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

third son of the late Kev. W. P. A. Campbell, 
Rector of Fladbury Worcestershire, was born 
on the 20th March, 1S72. 

Educated at Clifton College he was gazetted to 
the 1st Battalion .South .Staffordshire Regiment 
in June, 1892, serving with it at home and in 
Egj-pt until 1899 ; in that year he was appoin- 
ted Adjutant of the 3rd V.B. South Stafford- 
shire Regiment, retaining the appointment till 
1903. He then resigned his commission in the 
Regular Army and joined the Special Reserve 
of his regiment, which, however, he left In 1913. 
On the ovitbreak of war with Germany he 
vohmteered for service, and rejoined the 4th Bat- 
talion in August ; in October he volunteered for 
active service with the Vlllth Division, and was 
attached to the 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters 
with which he went to France early in November. 
Captain Campbell was kUled at Neuve Chapelle 
on the 22nd November, 1914, in an attempt to 
recover the body of the machine-gun officer, 
which lay a short distance in front of his trench ; 
he had made an unsuccessful attempt alone the 
previous night, and at daybreak tried again with 
two volunteers, one of whom also lost his life. 
He was mentioned for his gallant conduct in Sir 
John French's Despatch of 14th January, 191.5. 
Captain Campbell married, Helen Gertrude 
Philpott, and left two daughters. 



C.\PTAIN GEOFFREY ARTHUR 



BATTN 
GUARDS 



CAMPBELL 
COLDSTRE 

killed in action on 
the 29th October, 
1914, at Gheluvelt, 
Flanders, was tlie 
youngest son of !Mr. 
and the Hon. Mi-s. 
George Campbell, 40, 
Wilton Crescent, 
London, S.W., and 
Market House, 
Brackley, and was 
born on the 8th 
January, 1885. 
He was educated at Eton and joined his regi- 
ment in February, 1907, became Lieutenant in 
June, 1909, and was appointed Battalion Adju- 
tant in January, 1912. He was a member of the 
Guards' Club, and was fond of himting and polo. 
He was mentioned in Sir John French's Des- 
patch of the 14th October. 1914, and was 
promoted temporary Captain. 




DAVIES 
ROYAL 



CAMP- 
HORSE 




LIEUTENANT JOHN 
BELL, "L' BATTERY 
ARTILLERY, 

was born at Tacna, 

ChUe, .South America, 

on the 1st March, 

1883, the son of J. D. 

Campbell, Esq., of 

H o w d e n Court, 

Tiverton. Devon. 

He was educated at 

Cheltenham CoUege, 

and the R.M.A., 

Woolwich, entering 

the Royal Artillery in 

190 1 ,and becoming Lieutenant in December, 1 904. 

He was killed on the 1st September, 1914, 

at Nery, near Compiegne, France, during " L " 

Battery's glorious stand at that place (see 

Captain E. K. Bradbury, V.C). 

2nd LIEUTENANT WILLIAM PERCY 
CAMPBELL, 3rd RESERVEi attd. 2nd 
BATTN. THE DUKE OF EDIN- 
BURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGIMENT), 

was the second son 
of John Edward 
Campbell, Esq., 
F.B.S., Fellow and 
Bvirsar of Hertford 
College, Oxford. 
He was born on the 
2nd May, 1894. and 
was educated at the 
Oxford Preparatory 
School and at Clifton 
College, of which he 
was a scholar. He 




CAM— CAR 




gained a scholarship at Hertford College, where 
he had been in residence a year, studying medi- 
cine, when the war broke out. He at once 
volunteered and was gazetted in August, 1914, 
to the Wiltshire Regiment, proceeding to the 
front with the Vllth Division at the beginning 
of October. 

It is believed that he was killed on the morning 
of Saturday, the 24th October, 1914, a few 
miles East of Ypres. in an attempt to bring a 
wounded comrade to a place of safety. 



MAJOR WALTER ERNEST CAMPION. 
1st BATTN. EASl YORKSHIRE REGT., 
son of Henry Cam- 
pion, Esq., Bletsoe 
^j|^."» Castle, near Bedford, 

^r^ \ "^* born at Dean. 

f jnl^ , Bedfordshire, on 9tb 

' ''- August, 1871, and 

was educated at the 
ilodem School, Bed- 
ford. 

He was gazetted to 
the 2nd Battalion 
East Yorkshire Regi- 
ment from the 
iliiiii.i 111 L>.i .luiii-i-. Ii.y4, becoming Captain in 
May, 1900, and Brevet-Major in August, 1902. 
After serving in Ireland, he went through the 
.South African War, where he was employed 
with the Mounted Infantry, and was slightly 
wounded. He was present at operations in the 
Transvaal, including actions near Johannesburg, 
Pretoria and Diamond Hill ; operations in the 
Orange River Colony, including actions at 
Wittebergen. Bothaville, and Caledon River, 
and the action at Frederickstad. He was twice 
mentioned in I)espatches, "London Gazette," 
10th September. 1901, and 29th July, 1902. 
promoted Brevet-Major and received the 
Queen's medal with four clasps and the King's 
medal with two clasps. 

Suljsequently he served in Burma and India. 
He was a keen sportsman, hunt«d with the 
Oakley and won many races in Ireland, England, 
South Africa and India, including the Army Cup 
in 1910. 

In the Great War he was wounded on 20th 
.September, 1914, but returned to the front, 
and was killed in action near Lille on the 28th 
October, 1914. 



CAPTAIN LIONEL ALFRED FRANCIS 
C.\NE. 1st BATTN. EAST LANCASHIRE 
REGIMENT, son of the Reverend A. G. Cane, 
Mcar of Great Paxton. formerly Chaplain to 
the Indian Government, and Mrs. Cane, was 
born at Poona on the 19th December, 1884. 
He was first cousin to Lieutenant-Genera' 
Sir E. Allenby, K.C.B. Captain Cane was edu- 




cated at Haileyl)ury, and joined the .Sherwood 
Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire 
Regiment) in Feb- 
ruary, 1903, being 
transferred to the 
2nd Battalion East 
Lancashire Regiment 
in December, 1904. 
From 1910 to 1913, 
when he was pro- 
moted Captain, he 
was Adjutant of his 
battalion at the 
Cape, South Africa. 
On the expiration 
of his Adjutancy he returned to England on 
leave and was, almost at once, posted to the 
Depot at Preston. While serving there the 
war broke out, and he applied to join the 1st 
Battalion in the field. 

He was ordered to the front at the end of 
September. When Major Green was wounded. 
Captain Cane took charge of his two Companies, 
"C" and "D." and was in command of them 
when he fell, on the 7th November, 1914, while 
leading them to att-ack a trench, which was 
captuired just after he was kUled. 
Captain Cane won the Himt Point-to-Point and 
the Regimental .Steeplechase at Wj-nberg, South 
Africa, in 1914, riding his own horse. 



CAPTAIN MILES BERTIE CUN- 
N I N G H A M E C A R B E R Y. 1st 
BATTN. PRINCESS VICTORI.\S 
(ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS;. 

who was killed in 
action on the 17th 
October, 1914, in 
France, was the son 
of the late William 
Carbery, Esq.. and 
Mrs. Carbery, of 17. 
Hartington Man- 
sions, Eastbourne. 
He was bom on the 
6th June, 1S77, and 
joined the Royal 
Irish Fusiliers from 
the iUlitia in December, 18!i7, becoming 
Lieutenant in December, 1899. He served in 
the South African War, being present at 
operations in Natal, including the action at 
Talana, where he was dangerously wounded ; 
he received for his services the Queen's medal 
with clasp. 

He got his Company in February. 1903, and 
from 1910 to 1913 was an Adjutant of the 
Territorial Force. 

Captain Carbery married a daughter of the late 
Right Honourable Thomas Sinclair. 




CAR 



68 




2nd LIEUTENANT FRANCIS 
LUDOVIC CAREW, XXth HUSSARS. 

was the son of 
Charles Carew, Esq.. 
of Collipriest, Tiver- 
ton, and was born 
there on the 4th 
March, 1895. 
He was educated at 
Winchester College, 
and the R.M.C.. 
Sandhurst, receiving 
his commission in 
the 20th Hussars on 
the 24th March, 191 4. 

He was kdled in the trenches at Oosttaverne. 

near Ypres, on the 30th October, 1914. 

2nd LIEUTEN.\NT JASPER CAREW, 
1st BATTN. PRINCE OF WALESS OWN 
(WEST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT). 

who was killed in action on the 14th October. 
1914, was the younger son of the late Rev. Henry 
Carew and Mrs. Carew of Airlea, South Brent. 
Devon. He was born at Rattery Vicarage, Devon, 
in 1894, and was educated at Blundell's School. 
Tiverton, and the R.M.C.. Sandhurst, joining 
the West Yorkshire Regiment in January. 1914. 
He fell while leading his platoon in an advance 
guard action near Hazebrouck, where he was 
killed instantaneously by machine gun fire. 

CAPTAIN LEICESTER WILLIAM 
LE MARCH ANT CAREY. 4th 
BATTN. THE ROYAL FUSILIERS 
(CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), 

who had been report- 
ed wounded and mis- 
sing, is believed to 
have been killed on 
the 20th October, 
1914, near Kerlies. 
hut his name had not 
been included in the 
monthly official 
casualty Usts up to 
June, 1915. 
He was the only son 
of the late Major- 
General C. 1'. Carey, R.E., C.B., and of Mrs. 
Carey, and was born on the 12th Xovember,1877. 
He joined the Royal FusUiers in February, 1908, 
becoming Lieutenant in November of the same 
year, and Captain in July. 1901. He served in 
the South African War taking part in the rehef 
of Ladysmith, including the action at Colenso ; 
he was present at operations in the Transvaal 
in 1900 and 1901, in the Cape Colony, north of 
the Orange River in April and IMay. 1900. in- 
cluding the action at Ruidam, and again in 
Cape Colony between January. 1901. and March, 
1902 ; he received the Queen's medal with five 
clasps anil the King's medal with two clasps. 





From July, 1903, to October, 1910, he was em- 
ployed with the Egyptian Army, and from March 
to August. 1912, was A.D.C. to the General Officer 
Commanding-in-Chief, .Southern Command. 
Captain Carey, who was married, was qualified 
as an interpreter in French, and was entitled 
to wear a foreign order. 

CAPTAIN MARTIN RAYMOND CARR, 
2nd BATTN. WORCESTERSHIRE 
REGIMENT, 

who was killed in 
action at the battle 
of the Aisne on the 
18th September, 
1914, was born on 
the 8th July, 1877. 
and joined the 
Worcestershire Regi- 
ment from the Mili- 
tia, in January, 1899, 
becoming Lieutenant 
in February. 1900. 
Captain Carr served in the .South AfiicanWar. 
in which he was wounded, being employed with 
the Mounted Infantry ; he was present at 
operations in the Orange River Colony in 
1900, 1901 and 1902, and in Cape Colony, 
1901 and 1902. receiving the Queen's medal with 
foiu- clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. 
Captain Carr. who reached that rank in 
December, 1901, after rather less than three 
years' service with the Regular Army, married 
Gwen, second daughter of T. Putnam, Esq., of 
Greylands. Darlington, who survives him. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ROBERT NEVIN 
CARSWELL, 3rd BATTN. THE KING'S 
OWN (YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRYi, 

was the eldest son —.^ , - 
of John George UPW^SW^^ 
Carswell and his wife 
Sarah Constance (nee 
Bell) and was born 
at Shortlands, Kent, 
on the 31st August, 
1889. 

He was educated at 
Blundell's School, 
Tiverton, and Shef- 
field University. At 
the University he was 
Quarter-Master-Sergeant of the Officers' Traming 
Corps and received his commission in the 3rd 
(Reserve Battalion) of the King's 0\\^l Yorkshire 
Light Infantry on 15th August, 1914, sailing 
from Southampton for France on 7th October. 
He was killed, shot through the head, on 26th 
October. 1914. when, leading a bayonet charge 
at La Bass^e. he met a body of Germans coming 
down the road. He was buried by his own men 
in the orchard of a farm at Richebourg I'Avoue. 




69 



CAR— CAS 




MAJOR AUBREY JOHN CARTER, 
D.S.O., LOYAL NORTH LANCASHIRE 
^.^^^^^^ REGIMENT, 

II^^^^H^^^^^^^H the 

^^^^^^^^^^^ the late T. A. Carter, 
Esq., Shottery Hall, 
Stratford-on-Avon. 
He was born on the 
18th January, 1872, 
and was gazetted to 
the Loyal North 
Lancashire Regiment 
in January, 1892, 
liecoming Lieutenant 
in >lay, 1893, and 
Captain in February, 1901. 

He served in the South African War as a 
Railway Staff Officer from Deceml)er, 1899, to 
March, 1900, and as a Brigade SignaUing Officer 
from October, 1900, to March, 1901 : he was 
mentioned in Despatches, " London Gazette," 
10th September, 1901, was awarded the D.8.O., 
and received the Queen's medal witli five clasps. 
From December. 1905. to December. 1909. 
he was an Instructor at the School of Musketry, 
where with Lieutenant-Colonel Norman 
Jlcilahon he was largely responsible for the 
revolution in the musketry training of the 
Army, and in July, 1911, having obtained his 
Majority in February, 1910, was appointed 
Commandant of the School of Musketry, South 
Africa, with the temporary rank of Lieutenant- 
Colonel. His services in this post were recog- 
nised in the following extract from a letter 
signed by Lord Gladstone : " In a special 
measure. Ministers ask me to record their 
gratefid acknowledgement of the services 
rendered by Lieutenant-Colonel Carter, Com- 
mandant School of Musketry, Tempe, and 
his Staff." 

He was subsequently placed in charge of 
musketry in the Irish Command, and eventually 
proceeded to France to take command of the 
1st Battalion, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. 
It fell to him to lead the Battalion in a charge, 
which is well described by a brother officer : — 
" The men meant business this time. I looked 
into their faces and could see a sort of didl. 
fierce look. After the many days of l>eing 
cooped up in the trenches before we ever arrived 
in this portion of the theatre of war, it was a 
real joy to them to be on the move and on the 
attack. They longed to get at them, and 
gradually, without a word of command being 
given, you could hear the click of the liayonet 
as each man fastened it to liis rifle. Suddenly 
the cry arose, ' Come on. my lads, now for the . 
trenches.' The cry went along the line. Everj"- 
one started yelling above the din of battle. 
We charged yelling, shouting, screaming, rushing 
madly forward at the enemy. How it looked 
from the German side I do not know, but it was 



grand, simply magnificent from our side. We 
crossed two hundred yards of root field at a 
steady run under fii-e. We leapt into the 
enemy's trenches, bayoneted those who were 
still living, and then rushed on to another line 
of trenches in front. The whole of my battalion 
were in it. It was our show." 
He was killed in action near Ypres on November 
4th, 1914. and the following tribute to him 
voices the opinion of all of his many friends : — 
" He was a tall soldier-like figure, standing 
six feet fom- inches, and straight as the pro- 
verbial pine. His was a soldier's end. He 
went out from the trenches to direct the 
machine-gun fire, but fell, shot dead, as the 
enemy retired. He was a gallant commander, 
and a great leader under \\hom it is an honour 
to have served." 

Major Carter married in 1900, Edith Mary, 
daughter of the late Rev. G. H. Rigl)y, and 
niece of the late Right Hon. Sir John Rigby. 



CAPTAIN CLEARY GEORGE MOLY- 
NEUX CARTER, 2nd BATTN. 
THE DUKE OF EDINBURGH'S 
(WILTSHIRE REGIMENT), 

who was killed in action on the 23rd October, 
1914, was born on the 3rd January, 1882, 
and was educated at Marlljorough College 
(Star) from 1893-1900. 

He was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regi- 
ment in May, 1901, and took part in the 
South African War, where he was employed 
with the Mounted Infantry, being present at 
operations in the Transvaal, Cape Colony, and 
Orange River Colony, receiving the Queen's 
medal with five clasps. 

He was promoted Lieutenant in Septeml)er, 
1903, and from September. 1908, to September, 
1911, was Adjutant of his Battalion, obtaining 
his Company in ^larch, 1910. 

2nd LIEUTENANT JAMES CASEY, 1st 
BATTN. THE KINGS ROYAL 
RIFLE CORPS, — 

was born in London 
on the 30th Novem- 
ber, 1879, the son of 
the late James Casey, 
formerly a Corporal 
in the same Corps. 
2nd Lieutenant Casey 
joined the 1st Batta- 
lion King's Royal 
Rifles in 1897, and 
served through the 
South .African War " 

with the Mounted Infantry. H.- \\j- pi iri.,, iied 
Sergeant for conspicuous gallantry on the field 
at Balkerlaagte. Transvaal, on the 30th Octo- 
ber, 1901, and was mentioned in Despatches, 




CAT CAV 



70 



in .Taniiary, 1902, for distinguislied gallantry. 
IIo recoivoil the Queen's medal with four clasps, 
and the King's medal with two clasps. After 
the South African War he rejoined his Battalion 
and went to France with tli(' Kxpeditionary 
Force of which it formed part. 
On Octolicr 1st he was promoted Second- 
l/ieutonant for gallantry, and was killed in 
action on tlie SOth October, 1914, and was 
mentioned in 8ir John French's Despatch of 
14th .Tanuary, 191."). 

2nd Lieutenant Casey was married in 1912 to 
Daisy Casey, and left two children, Ronald 
.Tame^ Spion. age two years, and Thomas 
Henry, age one month, at the time of their 
father's death. 

CAPTAIN AUGUSTUS ERNEST CATH- 
CART, 2nd BATTN. KINGS ROYAL 

RIFLE CORPS, 

who was killed in 
action on the 14th 
8epteml)er, 1914, 
was born on the 4th 
March, 1875, and 
joined the K.B.R.C. 
from the Militia in 
.Tanuary, 1897, be- 
coming Liexitenant in 
February. 1899. 
He took part in the 
South African War 
as a Special Service Officer (including service 
as Station Staff Officer from February, 1901), 
and was also employed with the Mounted In- 
fantry. He was present at operations in the 
Transvaal and Orange River Colony, receiving 
for his services the Queen's medal with three 
clasps, and the King's medal with two clasps. 
Captain Cathcart obtained his Company in 
.January. 1902. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES CROSBIE CAUL- 
FEILD, 2nd BATTN. MANCHESTER 

R E G I M E N T, 

who was killed in 
action on the 18th 
November, 1914, 
was the youngest son 
of Brigadier-General 
(Commanding Sth 
Reserve Infantry 
Battalion) and Mrs. 
James E Caulfeild, 
of Corozal. .Jersey. 

' "■"' 21st February, 1892, 

and was educated at Bradfield College, where 
he became a Prefect, from 1905 to 1910. He 
joined the Army Service Corps as Second 
lieutenant in September, 1911. from the 
R.M.C., Sandhui'st, becoming Lieutenant in 






September, 1911. He was tr.-uisferred to the 
Manchester Regiment in Octoljer, 1914. 
He was struck by a high explosive shell while 
in command of a company of liis battalion in a 

front trench nrai' W'uh erglieni, Heluiuiii. 



CAPTAIN GODFREY LIONEL JOHN 
CAVENDISH, 97th DECCAN INFANTRY, 

born at Eastbourne 
on the HOth March, 
1 8S4 , was the son of 
Reginald R. F. 
Cavendish, and 
grandson of the late 
Francis W.H. Caven- 
dish, D.U, J.P., of 
St. Margaret's, East- 
bomiie. He was a 
kinsman of the Duke 
of Devonshire, and a ^^^^Kf\~ 
great-grandson of 
General the Hon. H. ¥. C. Cavendish, and of 
the third Earl of Clare. 

Captain Cavendish was e(hicatcd at Frandiiig- 
ham College, Suffolk, where he showed liimself 
a good swimmer and cricketer. He received his 
commission in April, 1903, being gazetted to the 
Manchester Regiment, joining the 1st Battalion at 
Singapore, and later was transferred to tlie 2nd 
East Surrey Regiment. After a prol)ationary 
period with the S3rd Wallajahbad Light In- 
fantry, he was finally appointed to the 97th 
Deccan Infantry. His own regiment remaining 
in India, Captain Cavendish was, at his request, 
attached for active service to the Reserve of 
OtTicers for " A " Force ; on arrival at Mar- 
seilles he was attached 1/9 Gurkha Rifles, and 
a few days later again transferred to 9th 
Biioi)als. which had lost very hea%aly, joining 
them on the 15th December, 1914. He was 
wounded on the 20th of that month and died 
two days later in a Field Hospital, after having 
lieen aliout three weeks at the front. 
The following accoimt of the circumstances 
is taken from a brother officer's letter : — 
"Onthe 17th December the half -battalion which 
Captain Cavendish was commanding was 
ordered up to support the trenches at Givenchy. 
He remained in these trenches in support till the 
20th. when he was ordered to take his connnand 
up to support a regiment in front which was 
lieing attacked. On the way up he received an 
order to halt in the support trenches, and he 
went a few yards ahead to find out what was 
wanted when he was hit by a rifle Indlet. which 
entered his neck. His wound was tied up and 
his comrades and himself thought the wound 
was not serious, so he walked back about two 
miles to hospital. His brother officers were 
much distressed to hear a few days later that the 
wound had proved fatal. He was always very 



71 



CAV— CAW 




cheery under fire, and helpful by his good 
spirits." 

Captain Cavendish married in March, 1911, Cora 
Grace Graham Cavendish, and left two sons, God- 
trey Herliert Richard, liom January, 1912, and 
Hubert Gordon Compton, born February, 1913. 

MAJOR LORD JOHN SPENCER 
CAVENDISH. D.S.O.. 1st LIFE GUARDS. 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
October, 1911, was 
the third son of the 
late Lord Edward 
L'avendish and Lady 
Edward Cavendish, 
and grandson of the 
-eventh Duke of 
Lievonshire. 
He was bom on the 
27th March, 1872, 
and joined the 1st 
Liie (juards from the Militia in February, 1897, 
becoming Lieutenant in April, 1S98. He 
served in the .South African War, where he was 
Divisional and Brigade .Signalling Officer from 
October, 1899, to October, 1900, and was 
present at the relief of Ladysmith, including 
action at Colenso ; at the actions of Spion Kop 
and Vaal Krans : operations on the Tugela 
Heights and action at Pieter's Hill ; in the 
Orange Free .State, and action at Zand River ; 
in the Transvaal, and actions near Johannes- 
burg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill ; also in the 
Transvaal. West of Pretoria, including actions at 
Elands River : in the Orange River Colony, 
including actions at Bethlehem and Witte- 
bergen. He was mentioned in Despatches 
(•• London Gazett-e." 1st February, 1901), was 
awarded the D.S.O.. and received the Queen's 
medal ■ivith sis clasps. 

He was promoted Captain in August, 1902, 
and from June. 1907, to September, 1910. was 
employed with the West African Frontier Force, 
obtaining his Majority in April. 1911. 

MAJOR JOHN STEPHEN CAWLEY. 
p.s.c. 20th HUSSARS. BRIGADE 
MAJOR 1st CAVALRY BRIGADE, 
quaUfled as second- 
class Interpret-er in 
French, was the son 
of Sir Frederick 
Cawley, Bart., M.P.. 
of Berriugton Hall. 
Leominster, and was 
liorn at Crunipsall, 
Lancashire, on the 
27th October, 1879. 
He was educated at 
Ix>ckers Park, at 
Hugby, and at the 




R.M.C, .Sandhurst, and obtained his commission 
in the 20th Hussars in 1898, joining them at 
3Ihow, India. He became Lieutenant in 
January, 1900, and obtained his Troop in 
October, 1906. He served in the South 
African War, going to the Cape in 1901, where 
he was Signalling Officer to General Low's 
column, being present at operations in Orange 
River Colony and Cape Colony ; he received 
the Queen's medal \vith four clasps. He subse- 
quently served in Egj'pt, where he became 
Adjutant of his regiment. Having passed 
through the StaflE College, he became Instructor 
at the Cavalry School at Xetheravon in 1911, 
and in 1912 was appointed a General StaflE 
Officer at the War Office. In 1913 he was 
appointed Brigade Major of the 1st Cavalry 
Brigade at Aldershot, and accompanied it to 
France for ser\-ice in the Great War. 
Major Cawley was a good all-round sportsman ; 
he was in the Rugby football team and shoot- 
ing eight at Sandhurst ; was in the hockey 
team and was whip to the drag at the .Staff 
College ; played for his regiment at polo 
when they won the Inter-regimental Cnp in 
India (Meerut), 1901 ; the Clements Polo Cup 
in South Africa (Pretoria), 1903 ; and the 
Inter-regimental Cup (Hurlingham). 190ti and 
1907. He won the Officers' riding and jumping 
prize at the Royal 3Iilitary Tournament in 1905, 
and was well known with the North Hereford 
and \^"^laddon Chase Hunts. 
Major Cawley was killed in action in the 
retirement from Mons on the 1st September, 
1914, at Xery, and was buried there. A 
brother officer gave the following account of 
his death : — 

" Oiu- Brigade was attacked soon after dawn 
at Xery by a force double our number — a 
Cavalry Division with 12 gxms. Owing to 
thick mist they managed to get within 600 
yards of us ; 350 horses of the Bays stampeded 
and their men went after them, and the ' L ' 
Battery was cut to pieces. The occasion was 
one which caUed for personal example, and 
Major Cawley, by permission of the General, 
went to help to restore order and get the 
broken remnants in their places. The situation 
being met and everyone being in his place, he 
joined the advanced line and was almost 
immediately killed by a piece of shell. The 
splendid manner in which he met his death 
in deliberately facing the awful fire to help 
others when he really need not have done so. 
is only what his whole Ufe has led us to expect." 
General Briggs, commanding the Brigade, 
wrote of biin : — ' He has been a true friend 
and a loyal conscientious Staff Officer to me 
for nearly two years, and it is needless to 
say how much I feel his death. He proved 
himself to be a real fighter in war and was 
alwavs cool and collected." 



CEC— CHA 



72 




2nd LIEUTENANT GEORGE 

EDWARD CECIL, 2ml BATTN. GRENA- 

DIER GUARDS, 

wlio was reported 
iu the niontlily 
Casualty List pul)- 
lished ill DeceiiUier, 
1914, to have died of 
wounds received in 
action, was the only 
son of l>ord and 
Lady Edward Cecil, 
He was liorn on the 
t)th Septenil)er, 1895, 
■"■ at 20, Arlington 

Street, the house of liis grandfather, the 
Marquess of Salisbury. He was educated at 
Winchester, and the B.M.C., Santlhurst, where 
he took a prize cadetship. and from whicli lie 
was gazetted to the Grenadier Guards iu 
February, 1914. In that year he qualified as 
a second-class Interpreter in French. 
His battalion was among the first troops of 
the Expeditionary Force to proceed to the 
Continent, and at the battle of Landrecies 
Second-Lieutenant Cecil acted as Cnh'rly 
Ofticer to a General Officer. 

CAPTAIN the Honble. WILLIAM 
AMHERST CECIL. 2nd BATTN. GRENA- 

DIER GUARDS, 

was born in London 
on the 30th June, 
isyo, the eldest son 
of liOrd William 
Cecil, G r e n a d i e r 
Guards, anil Lady 
William Cecil, 
Baroness Amherst of 
Hackney, and heir 
to tlie Barony. 
He was educated at 
Eton, and joined the 
Grenadier Guards in August, 1907, becoming 
Lieutenant in July, 1908. 

For his services in tlie Great War he was 
mentioned in Sir .lolin French's Despatch of 
the 8th October, 1914, was awarded the j\lili- 
tary Cross, and recommended for the Legion of 
Honour. He was promoted Captain on the 
9th September, 1914. Captain Cecil was at 
Landrecies in command of the Machine Gun 
Section of the 2nd Battalion Grenadier Guards, 
and was killed at tlie Battle of the Aisne on the 
lOtli September, 1914. 

Captain Cecil was very keen al>out his profession, 
especially everything in relation to machine 
guns ; he was a clever draughtsman and took 
a special interest in Egyptology, in which he 
was an expert. He was very musical, played 
the piano, and also the bagpipes. He was also 
fond of all sports, particularly cricket, hunting. 





ya<'litiiig, and shooting. He was a nieinber of 
tlie Guards' and the Junior Carlton clubs. 
Captain Cecil married in 1910, Evelyn Gladys, 
only child of Henry Baggallay, Esq., of Heathcr- 
liurst (irange. Friniley. Surrey, and left two 
sons, William Alexander Evering, liorn May. 
1912. aud Henry Kerr Auchnuit/,. born April. 
1914, the elder of whom becomes licir to the 
Barony of Amherst of Hackney. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN BINNY CHAL- 
MERS, ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY (T.F.) 

of Moor Court, Sid- 
mouth, only son of 
the late Mr. J. H. 
Chalmers, C!.E., and 
grandson of the late 
.Mr. John Binny 
( 'lialmers, of the 
Diplomatic Service, 
and of The Elms, 
Ilighgate, and 
Westnuiir, Forfar- 
shire, was born in 
August . 1 S89, and 
educated at Ovingdean Hall, Sussex. 
After completing his period of attachment to 
the Scots Greys and South .Staffords. he resigned 
his comuiissiori and went abroad. He returned 
immediately on the outbreak of hostilities and 
received a temporary commission in the Royal 
Field Artillery. 

Hi' was killed by a fall from bis horse in Octolier, 
1914. 

He was a tine horseman and hunted with the 
East Devon and Cobleigh packs ; was also a 
splendid shot, an ardent angler, and devoted 
to all outdoor sports. 

LIEUTENANT GUY OGDEN DE 
PEYSTER CHANCE, 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS, 

who was killed in 

action on the 19th 

October, 1914, was 

the yoimgest son of 

Mr. W. E. Chance. 

Thurston Grange, 

Bury St. Edmunds. 

and was born on the 

28th February, 1892. 

He entered the Arm\ 

in September. 1911. 

becoming Lieutenant 

in April, 1913. 

He accompanied his battalion — which formed 

part of the Vllth Division — froui Lyndhiirst, 

disembarking at Zeetirugge, and was killed in 

the severe fighting near Dadizeele on the date 

mentioned. 




73 



CHA 




2nd LIEUTENANT CLIVE HEREWARD 
CHANDLER, 1st BATTN. THE DUKE OF 
EDINBURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGT.). 

was liorii at Exeter 
on the ISth July. 
1884. 

He was for many 
years in the Wilt- 
shire Regiment, and 
when he accom- 
panied it to the front 
was Sergeant-Drum- 
mer of his Battalion. 
He was a noted 
athlete and when 
stationed at Pretoria 
won thu liliu yards, and other events, at the 
Army Championship Sports in October. 1910. 
He had a number of civilian as well as military 
friends in Maritzburg, and has been descrilied 
as one of the best all-round Army athletes in 
South Africa. 

During the Great War he was given his com- 
mission as Second-Lieutenant for service in the 
field on the 1st October, and was kiUed in the 
firing line on the Yser. on the 17th November. 
1914. 

One of his senior Officers sent the following 
account of the circumstances to his widow : — 
" It is with the deepest regret I have to send 
you the sad news that your husband was killed 
in action on the 17th instant (November). Your 
poor husband was killed by a bullet wound in 
the head when defending the trenches. I only 
saw him half an hour before, as I was command- 
ing the trench at the time. He was a Virave 
fellow and was doing so well ; it is sad that his 
life should have been forfeited so soon." 
Second-Lieutenant Chandler, two of whose 
brothers are now serxnng in the Army, married 
Olivia May Court, and left one daughter. Ethel 
Muriel, born at Maritzburg. Natal, in .Septem- 
ber. 1912. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD WYNNE 
CHAPMAN, 3rd PRINCE OF 
WALESS) DRAGOON GUARDS, 

was the eldest son of 
the late Edward 
Chapman of Spring- 
bank, New Zealand. 
He was born in 1887 
and educated at 
Christ's College. He 
held comniLssions as 
Lieutenant in the 
College Cadets and 
later in the Christ - 
church Mounted 
Rifles. 

Ue came to England in 1909 and was attached 
to the 3rd Dragoon Guards at Aldershot during 




the following year, becoming 2nd Lieutenant in 

May, and Lieutenant in November, 1911. 

In 1912 he married Elvii'a Maude, second 

daughter of H. W. Henderson of Serge HUl, 

King's Langley, Herts, and went to Egypt, 

where the Regiment was stationed at Abbasiyeh, 

Caiio, till the war broke out. 

Arriving in England on the 20th October, he 

went straight to the front, and was killed in 

action on the 17th November, 1914, near Ypres, 

being mentioned in Su- John French's Despatch 

ot the 14th January, 1915. for conspicuous 

bravery. He was biu-ied in the cemetery at 

Ypres. 

Lieutenant Chapman leaves a daughter, born 

in March, 1915. 



CAPTAIN ANGUS ALAN M.\CGREGOR 
CHARLES, ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
December, 1914, 

while on observation 
duty near Cuinchy, 
was the son of 
Deputy -Surgeon 
General Thomas Ed- 
mondston Charles, 
Indian Medical De- 
partment, M.I)., 
Edin.,K.H.P.,LL.D. 
(Edin.), and Ada Hen- 
rietta, eldest daughter of General Kuiulall. t'.S.I.. 
Royal Engineers ; he was a grancison of the 
late Rev. James Charles. D.D.. of Kirkcowan, 
Wigtownshir e . 

Captain Charles was born on the 8th .September, 
1887, and was educated at Winchester College, 
where he obtained a scholarship in 1901, passing 
thence direct into the R.M. A. .Woolwich, in 1906. 
PYom Woolwich he was gazetted to the Royal 
Field Artillery in December, 1908, and was 
posted to the 97th Batt-ery in which he served 
for about five years Ln South Africa and ^Madras. 
At the outbreak of war he was transferred t<j 
the 73rd Battery then at Lucknow, with which 
he proceeded to France, and with which he 
was serving when killed. 

An Officer under whom he was serving wrote : 
•• He was shot at our most dangerous job, i.e.. 
Observation Officer, and had just finished an 
excellent piece of work, having silenced a 
German Battery." 

The following account of the circumstances was 
received : — 

" Sergeant Harrell was by his side when he was 
killed. They were observing the fire of the 
Battery from a position in the advanced 
infantry trenches. ... A telephone wire 
connected him with his battery, which was 
about three-quarters of a mile further west, and 




CHA 



74 



he was tclfphouiiiy the riwultj^ of tin- liring. 
He ami the .Sergeant went to this position at 
ll.:JO a.m. on Deeeuiher 20th; the Sergeant 
was grazed in the hand by a rifle bullet. He 
saiil soiuethiug about the Sergeant being the 
first man in tlie t)attery to be hit when his 
sentence was out short and he fell against 
the Sergeant . . . who saw he had been 
hit just above the right eye liy a liidlit. killing 
him on the spot." 

The Madras Correspondent of the Calcutta 
" Statesman " wrote : — " Lieutenant A. A. ^I. 
Charles, OTth Battalion, Royal Field Ai'tillery, 
who has been kUled in action, is well remem- 
bered as a fearless and dashing rider and bold 
sportsman." 

Captain Charles was gazetted Captain after his 
death, but to rank from the 18th December, 
1914. and was mentioned in Sir John French's 
Despatch of 31st :\lay, 1915. 

LIEUTENANT ST. JOHN A. CHARL- 
TON. 4th (attd. Isti BATTN. 
BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was killed in 
action at the Battle 
I if the Aisne on the 
•-'.")th— 26th October, 
1914. was the only 
son of St. John 
Charlton and Elis- 
^^^^^^^ ^^^^H alii'th B r o n n e n. 

Robert and Lady 
Florentia Hughes, of 
Kinniel Park, Xorth 
Wales. 
He was l)orn on the 17th November, 1889, and 
was educated at Eton. He became Lieutenant 
in hLs Regiment in December, 1911. He was a 
member of the Junior Carlton Club, and was 
fond of shooting and hunting. 



MAJOR PAUL ALFRED CHARRIER, 2nd 
BATTN. ROYAL MUNSTER FUSILIERS, 

who is believed to 
have lieen killed in 
action near Etreux, 
France, on the 27th 
August, 1914, was 
the only son of the 
late il r . Paul 
Antoine Charrier, of 
Dinapore, India. 
He was born on the 
•Srd December, 1868, 
and joined the Royal 
Munster Fusiliers 
June, 1890, becoming 
1892. From AprU to 
November, 1899, he was employed with the 





Central Aliican Kcgiuirut. and finin I iccenilnT. 
1900, to October. 1901 — having been promoted 
Captain in March, 1900 — he was Adjutant of 
the West African Regiment. Wliile liolding 
this position he saw active service in West 
Africa, being present at operations in Ashanti. 
where he was slightly wounded, and for his 
services was mentioned in Despatdies •• London 
Gazette," 8th Marcli. 1901. 

He also served in tlie South African War, being 
employed with the Imperial Yeomam-y, and 
was present at operations in Cape Colony in 
Jlay, 1902, for which lie received the Queen's 
medal with two clasps. ^Major Charrier again 
saw service in 1903-04 in East Africa, where 
he was employed on the Staff (Special Service 
Officer), and on Transport duty from November, 
1903, receiving the medal with clasp. 



CHARRING TON, 
DRAGOONS, 




from the .Militia in 
Lieutenant in AprU, 



CAPTAIN A. C. 
1st (ROYAL 

was bom on the 17th 
May, 1882, at Marten 
Ash, Ongar, Essex, 
the son of N. Edward 
Charrington, ICsq., of 
Bures Manor, Rei- 
gate. 

He was educated at 
Eton, and enteretl 
the King's Royal 
Rifle Mflitia in 1902, 
being transferred to 
the 1st (Royal) Dra- 
goons in 1903, and obtaining his Troop in April, 

1910. In India he served on the .Staff of the 
X'iceroy, Lord Minto, and of the Conimander- 
in-Chief, Sir O'Moore Creagh. 

Captain Cliarrington — who was known to his 
friends as " Kid " — was a fine hocseman ; 
he won many races in India, rode the winner of 
the Ai-my Cup in 1909 and 1910, of the Grand 
Annual in 1910, and tlie Indian Grand National 

1911. He made a wonderful record at Simla 
in 1909, where he rode in twenty races in four 
days, %\-inning thirteen, coming in second in 
tliree and third in one. 

He was instantaneously killed liy bullet or sliell 
on the 20th October, 1014, and was buried in 
the cemetery at Y^pres. 
Captain Charrington was not married. 



CAPTAIN HUGH CLERVAUX 
CHAYTOR, 26th KING GEORGE'S 
OWN LIGHT CAVALRY, 

secon<l son of the late Mr. Clervaux Darley 
Chaytor, of Spennithorne HaU, Y'orkshire, was 
born there on the 28th Novemlier, 1883. He 
was a cousin of Sir Edmund Chaytor, Bart., 
of Croft. 



CHE— CHI 



He was educated at Clifton College, and the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst. On passing out of the 
latter into the Indian 
Army he was at- 
tached for the usual 
probationary period 
of a year to the >Kd- 
dlesex Regiment, 
joining the 26th Kin^ 
George's Own Light 
Cavalry in April. 
1904. and getting his 
?tep in 1905. In 
February, 1911, he 
became Adjutant 
in Januarv. 1912. 




and 



of his Regiment, 
became Captain. In 1913-1-1 he was Com- 
mandant of the Bodyguard of the Governor 
of Madras. 

While in India he did much pig-sticking, and 
was also in his regimental polo team, helping 
to win many tournaments. When the war with 
Germany broke out. he was at home on leave 
and at once applied to be sent on active service. 
l>eing attached to the 11th Hussars. He was 
killed in action at Messines on the 31st October, 
1914. 



2nd LIEUTENANT GREVILLE ARTHUR 
BAGOT CHESTER. 3rd attd. 1st BATTN. 
NORTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT. 

was lK)m on the 3rd 
April. 1891. at 
Pyrton. Oxfordshire, 
the son of the Rev. 
John Greville Chester. 
Vicar of Gilling. and 
grandson of Colonel 
C. M. Chester. D.L.. 
J.P.. Chicheley Hall. 
Newport Pagnall. 
Bucks. He was edu- 
cated at Rossall 
School, and St. 
John's College. Oxford. 

He was appointed to the 3rd (Reserve) Batta- 
Uon North StafTordshire Regiment in Februarj-. 

1913, and on the outbreak of the war was 
attached for service to the 1st BattaUon of the 
Regiment. 

He was killed in action on the 13th October. 

1914. during an attack on a German rear guard 
at Oultersteen, a smaU village near Hazebrouck. 
His company was in front and carried out the 
chief attack. The Colonel of his battalion and 
the Captain of his company testify that " he 
behaved exceedingly well and showed not only 
courage but common sense in leading his 
platoon. . . . He had the makings of a 
first rate officer — ^wflling. keen, and reliable. "' 
He was not married. 





CAPTAIN EDMUND BASIL CHICHES- 
TER. 3rd BATTN. THE BUFFS 

EAST KENT R E G 1 M E N T j , 
who died on the 7th 
November, 1914, of 
wounds received in 
action, was the fifth 
son of the late 3Iajor 
Xewton Charles 
Chichester and Mrs. 
Chichester, of Clay- 
ton House. Lech- 
dale. 

He was Ixim on the 
6th February, 1S81. 
and joined the Army 
in 1900. retiring from the East Kent Regiment 
with the rank of Lieutenant in September, 
1909. He served in the South African War, 
being present at operations in Cape Colony, the 
Orange River Colony, and the Transvaal, 
receiving the Queen's medal with five clasps. 
One of Captain Chichester's brothers. Captain 
C. O. Chichester, is now serving in the Oxford- 
shire Light Infantry, and one. Lieutenant J. F. 
Chichester, is in the Royal Navy ; two of his 
brothers died on active service, one in 1898. 
and the other killed in action in .Somaliland in 

1902. 

CAPTAIN HENRY ARTHUR CHICHES- 
TER. 3rd BATTN. DEVONSHIRE 
REGIMENT SPECIAL RESERVE, 
was l>om on the 17th 
August, 1SS2. at 
Stowf ord House . 
Swimbridge. North 
Devon, son of the late 
Colonel Chichester, 
of Kerswell House. 
Broad Clyst. near 
Exeter, and of Stow- 
ford House. XortL 
Devon, and Mrs. 
Chichester, of Wood- 
hayne. Culmstock. 
Devon. He was a first cousin of Brigadier- 
General A. A. Chichester, now serving in the 
war. 

Captain Chichester was educated at Crewkeme 
Grammar School, and joined the Exeter 
Volunteers in 1900 : the following year he 
joined the ilditia. serving for twelve months 
in Jersey, and then proceeded to South Africa 
with the 3rd Battalion East Yorkshire Regi- 
ment, to take part in the Boer War. for which 
he received the medal. He afterwards joined 
the Special Reserve and was called up for duty 
on the outbreak of the war with Germanv, 
on the 7th August. 1914. and was killed in 
action at Canteleux, near La Bassee. on the 20th 
October, 1914. 




CHI 



7<i 




CAPTAIN ROBERT GUY INCLEDON 
CHICHESTER, 2nd BATTN. 

HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY, 

who was killed in 
action near Ypies on 
the 13th NovemVier, 
1914, leaving a 
widow, was the 
second s(ni of the 
Hev. Richard Chi- 
cliester. Rector of 
D r e w s t e i g nto n . 
Devon, and was born 
on the 2St.h January, 
1873. 

He joined the High- 
laml Ijight Infantry from the .Militia in May, 
1895, becoming Lientenant in September. 1898. 
He was on active service on the North-Wcst 
Frontier of India in 1897-98 with the Malakand 
and Buner Field Forces, and was present at 
the attack and capture of the Tanga Pass, 
receiving the medal with clasp. In the South 
African War he was employed with the Mounted 
Infantry, and was present at operations in 
Cape Colony, January to March, 1901, Orange 
River Colony 1901-02, and in the Transvaal 
in April and -May, 1902, receiving the Queen's 
medal with five clasps. He was promoted 
Captain in ^larch, 1901. 



LIEUTENANT WILLIAM MALCOLM 
CHISHOLM, 1st BATTN. EAST LANCA- 

SHIRE REGT., 

born on the 25th 
February, 1892, at 
1 39. Macqnarie Street, 
Sydney, New South 
Wales, Australia, was 
the son of Dr.William 
and Isabel Chishohn. 
and great great- 
grandson of Gabriel 
Louis Marie lluon de 
Keriliau, of St. Pol- 
(le-L^on. Brittany. 
He was educated at Sjdncy Grammar Sdiool, 
and the R.IM.C., Sandhurst ; at Sydney he was 
a Lieutenant in the Senior Cadets of the Gram- 
mar School, and afterwards a Lievitenant in 
the Scottish Rifles, Sydney. He entered Sand- 
hurst in 1911, and on passing out was gazetted 
to the East Lancashire Regiment in Septem- 
ber, 1912 ; he became Lieutenant in Decemlier, 
1913. 

The 1st Battalion East Lancashire Regiment 
formed part of the 11th Infantry Brigade, 
IVth Division of the Expeditionary Force, 
which Lieutenant Chisholm accompanied to 





l''i'ance. He was shot through the abdomen 
on the 20th August, 1914, and died on the 
following day at Ligny, France, where he was 
buried. He had only detrained at Le Cateau at 
about 5 p.m. on Tuesday, the 25th August, 
was in action at 4 a.m. on the 20th, and was 
wiiuiided at aliout 3 p.m. that day. 



LIEUTENANT GEORGE HENRY CHIS- 
NALL, ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL 
CORPS, attd. for duty to the 1st 
BATTN. CAMERON HIGHLANDERS, 

was born at Great 
Bentley, Essex, on 
the 4th April, 1880, 
the son of Charles 
Hemy Chisnall, of 
Frating Abbey, near 
Colchester. He was 
educated at Fram- 
lingham College, and 
the London Hospital 
Medical College ; he 
held the degrees of 
M.B., B.S. London, '- 
and the diploma of F.R.C.S., England. 
He volunteered for active service on the (ith 
August, 1914, immediately on the outbreak 
of the Great War, and left England on the 
14th August. He was wounded by shell fire 
on the 23rd October, while attending to a 
wounded man in the open, during an engage- 
ment between the villages of Bixschoote and 
Langemarck, and died the next day. He 
was buried in Elverdinghe churchyard. 
Lieutenant Chisnall was a plucky rider with 
the Essex and Suffolk foxhounds. He was 
not married. 



2nd LIEUTENANT ARTHUR GRANT 
BOURNE CHITTENDEN, 2nd BATTN. 
THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT, 

who was reported as 

having died of 

wounds received in 

action, in France, the 

actual date of his 

death not being 

known, was the 

youngest son of the 

late Charles Grant 

Thomas FaithfuU 

Chittenden, and of 

Mrs. Chittenden, 

Steyning. .Sussex. 

Second Lieutenant Chittenden, who was (mly 

twenty years old when he died, was gazetted 

to the Manchester Regiment on the 24fh 

Januai-y, 1914. 




77 



CHO-CHR 




CAPTAIN SIR MONTAGU AUBREY 
ROWLEY CHOLMELEY, 4th BARONET, 
(of Easton Hall, Grantham, and Norton, 
Place, Lincoln), 3rd BATTN. iRESERVE 
OF OFFICERS), GRENADIER GUARDS, 

who \vas killed in 
action near La 
Bassde on the 24th 
December, 1914, was 
born on the 12th 
June, 1876, in 
London, and lived at 
Easton Hall, Grant- 
ham. He succeeded 
his father in 1904. 
After his education 
at Eton he joined the 
South Lincoln 
Militia, and Iruiu that regiment entered the 
Grenadier Guards in 1896. Two years later he 
became Lieutenant, and in 1904 obtained his 
Company. While in the Guards he was blaster 
of the Household Brigade Draghounds at Wind- 
sor from 1899 until he went to Soutli Africa. 
He was particularly fond of hunting, being a 
fine and fearless rider. He was Master of the 
Burton Hounds from 1912 to 1914 and won 
the Burton Hunt Members' Race in 1913 on 
" Cardinal." He was also fond of shooting 
and fishing. 

He was on active service in the South African 
War, and also in the Expedition to Kliartoum, 
for which he held the British and Egyptian 
medals. Retiring from the active list of the 
Army, he entered the Reserve of Officers as a 
Captain in 1906, and in civil life took an 
interest in all local affairs of his county, being 
a member of the Lincoln-shire Territorial Force 
Association, Chairman of the Grantham and 
District Agricultural Association in 1906, and 
had been ^'ice-President of the Lincolnshu-e 
Agricultural Society since 1907, and Chairman 
of tlie Liucolnsliire Chamber of Agriculture, on 
the Council of which body he continued to serve 
after his period of office as Chairman had ex- 
pired. He entered the Kesteven County Council 
without opposition in 1907, and was also a 
member of the Grantham Board of Guardians 
and Rural District Council, and was a J.P. 
for the Parts of Kesteven. He was also deeply 
interested in the Boy Scout Movement, and, 
as Chief Commissioner of the organisation 
in Lincolnshire, rendered it highly valuable 
service. On the eve of his departure for the 
front he wrote a characteristic letter to the 
Scouts of Lincolnshire, expressing a sense 
of his good fortune in being able to go where 
he knew they would all wish to be. and urging 
them to respond loyally to their countrj-'s call 
when occasion arose. 

On the outbreak of the war with Germany he 
was called up for service with the 3rd Battalion 



of his regiment, taking precedence as Captain 
from the 6th August, 1914. The following 
account of his death was received from an 
officer of the Grenadier Guards : — " Captain 
Cholmeley was in command of Xo. 1 Company, 
2nd BattaUon Grenadier Guards, and they were 
attacked in the trenches on the 24th December. 
The Germans blew up one of the trenches 
further along the line, so that they could fire 
down his line of trench. Captain Cholmeley dur- 
ing an attack rushed forward towards the flank of 
the company which was threatened, and was shot 
tiu-ough the head and killed instantaneously." 
He married in 1903. Mabel Janetta, eldest 
daughter of Montagu Richard Waldo Sibthorp, 
Canwick Hall, Lincoln, and left two children, 
Hugh John Francis Sibthorp, Ijorn February, 
1906, and Rosamund .Mary Edith. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES ALMERIC 
JOHN CHOLMONDELEY, 2nd 
BATTN. BORDER REGIMENT, 

who was killed iu 
action on the 28th 
October, 1914, was 
the younger son of 
the late Lord Heiu-y 
Vere Cholmondeley, 
and grandson of the 
third Marciuess of 
Cholmondeley, and 
was born on the 5th 
March, 1880. 
After serving nearly 
four months with 
the embodied ililitia he joined the Border Regi- 
ment in April, 1900, becoming Lieutenant^ in 
January, 1902, and Captain in AprU, 1910. 
On war being declared Captain Cholmondeley 
was serving with his battalion at Dublin. It 
afterwards formed part of the 20th Brigade. 
Vllth Division, which embarked for Belgium 
early in October, and fought in the first battle 
of Ypres, near which town Captain Cholmon- 
deley was killed. 

MAJOR WILLIAM CHARLES 
CHRISTIE, 1st BATTN. ROYAL 
WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was the son of the 
late Mr. John Robert 
Christie, Shipowner, 
of Cardiff. 

He was born on the 
13th December, 1872, 
and was educated at 
Rugby, where he was 
in Elsee House, 
entering the School 
in 1887. There he 
proved himself an 
all-round athlete, 





CHR 



78 



setting up a nuinbor of records for the long- 
distance runs lor wliit-h tlu; public scliool is 
famous, anil winning the well-known " ("ricU 
run (12i miles) twice in succession, in ISIHI 
and 1891 ; this in addition to obtaining 
honours at football and gymnastics. Prom 
HugliN- he entered the R.M.C., Sandhurst, 
thirly-lifth out of eleven hundred conipetitt>rs, 
passing out fourth in the honoiu' list, and again 
represented his College for football (being 
Captain of the Rugby football team), and also 
for athletic sports against Woolwich. 
He joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in 
Octolier, 1893, becoming Lieutenant in Feliruary 
1898. In that year he served in the Nile 
Expedition, being present at the liattles of 
Atbara and Khartoum, for which he was 
mentioned in Despatches, " London Gazette," 
;50th September, 1898, received the Egyptian 
medal with two clasps, and the fourth class 
of the iMedjidieh. During this campaign he 
acted as Orderly Officer to the late General 
Wauchope. and later as Galloper to General 
Gatacre. 

lie next saw active service in the South African 
War, where he was employed with the 
Mounted Infantry ; he was present at operations 
in the Orange Free State in the early part of 
1900, including the actions at the Vet and 
Zand Rivers ; at operations in the Transvaal 
in May and June, 1900. including actions near 
Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill ; 
operations in the Transvaal, East of Pretoria, 
including the action at Belfast. For his services 
he was mentioned in Despatches, " London 
Gazette," 29th July, 1902, was given his 
Brevet Majority (August, 1902), and received 
the Queen's medal with five clasps, and the 
King's medal with two clasps. From 1904 
to 1907 he was an Adjutant of Militia, and in 
November, 1912, was appointed Adjutant 
(attached to General Staff) of the Officers' 
Training Corps, Birmingham University, Bristol 
University, and the Royal Agricultural t'ollege. 
Cirencester. He was promoted Substantive 
Major in November, 1912. 

Major Christie was the author of a text book 
on Tactics, which is widely used by Officers' 
Training Corps, and has reached its fifth 
edition. His recreations w'ere steeplechase 
riding, hunting, and polo. 

For his services in the Great War he was twice 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches, 
8th October, 1914, and 1-lth January, 191.5. 
He was killed on the 13th October, 1914, while 
leading an attack to the right of the village of 
Meteren on the Belgian Frontier, having been 
shot in six places. The Officer Commanding 
the 1st Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regi- 
ment, wTote : — 

" Charles Christie was one of the bravest 
soldiers in the British Army and his loss to 




us is irreparable. .\s my Second in Command 

during tlie past two months, he lias been simply 

in\aluable." 

.Major Christie luai-ried Fli)n'n<e Violet, 

daughter of WilH.uu N'crnou IJidcn. of Gosport, 

Hants. 

MAJOR JOHN CHRYSTIE, ROYAL 
GARRISON ARIILLERY, 3rd SIEGE 
BATTERY, 3rd DIVISION. 

was the second son of __^ 

Intlian Army, who 
served in tlie Indian 
Mutiny, and Helen 
Anne Tliomasiue 

Clu-ystie, n6e Myers, 
and was born at 
Mangalore, India, lui 
9th March, 1872. 
Major Chrystie's 

great-uncles. Lieuten- 
ant John Chrystie, 
R.N., and Captain Thomas Chrystie, R.N., 
served under Nelson ; the former was on the 
" Victory " immediately before Trafalgar, but- 
was transferred on promotion; the latter was 
at Trafalgar in H.M.S. " Defiance." His twin 
brother. Major George Chrystie, 25th Cavalry, 
Frontier Force, Indian Army, was killed in a 
raid on the North-West Frontier of India on 
the 2nd May, 1913. 

Major Chrystie was educated at Surrey County 
School, and Portsmouth Grammar School, and 
joined the Royal Artillery from the R.M.A. 
Woolwich, in 1891, becoming Lieutenant in 
1894, Captain in 1899, and Major in 1911. He 
served in India, and on the West Coast of 
Africa, and received the Delhi Durbar medal, 
1903, being on the Staff fin- the Durbar. 
From 1905-07 he served as Adjutant of 
Volunteers. 

He was killed in the Great War on the 17tli 
Novemlier, 1914, when eveixing was closing in, 
by a shell from a German heavy gun, whicli 
exploded close to him and rendered liiiu un- 
conscious, death occurring soon after. 
Major Chrystie was a keen soldier and sports- 
man, enjoying pig-sticking and l)ig game 
shooting. He married, in .January, 1913, 
.Mignonne Muriel Mavide, only daughter of Mr. 
C. L. Bruce Gumming, Indian Civil Service 
(retired), and left one daughter, Leslie Mignonne 
Comyn. born 6th .Tune. 1914. 

CAPTAIN STEPHEN HENRY CHRISTY, 
D.S.O., late LIEUTENANT 20th 
HUSSARS, RESERVE OF OFFICERS. 

was the youngest son of the late Mr. .Stephen 
Christy, of Highfield, Bramall, Cheshire. 
He was born in 1879 and was educated at 
Harrow (Mr. B. Smith's, 1893-97), and Christ 



79 



CHU— CLA 




k 



*^^ 



Church, Oxford. He joined the 20th Hussars 
in 1S99. and took part in the South African 
War. being on the 
staff as Signalling 
' "tBcer from March 
to May, 1902. and 
was present at opera- 
■ ions in the Transvaal 
iiid in the Orange 
River Colony from 
January to April. 
: 902. He received 
i he Queen's medal 
with four clasps. 
Captain Christy also 
served in West Africa (Xorthem Nigeria) in 
1903, taking part in the Sokoto-Burmi opera- 
tions, during which he was slightly wounded. 
For his services he was mentioned in Despatches 
(••London Gazette." 24th January. 190-5). was 
awarded the D.S.O.. and received the medal 
with clasp. 

At the beginning of the war he rejoined his 
regiment with the rank of Captain, on the 16th 
August. 191-1, and was killed in action on the 
3rd September, 1914. at ITssy-sur-Mame. 
He married in 190-5 a daughter of the late Mr. 
W. ChapeU-Hodge. of Pounds, South Devon, 
and retired from the active list of the Army in 
1906, voluntarily entering the Reserve of 
Officers. After retiring he became Master of 
the South .Shropshire Foxhounds. 

LIEUTENANT CHALLONER FRANCIS 
TREVOR CHUTE. 2nd B A T T N . 
ROYAL MUNSTER FUSILIERS. 

third son of the late 
Mr. F. B. Chute, of 
Chute Hall. Tralee 
• "ounty Kerry, and 
■f Mrs. Chute. 22 
Ashburton Road. 
Southsea. was bom 
on the 2nd April. 
18S5. 

He joined the Royal 
Munster Fusiliers 
from the Militia in 
November, 1905, be- 
coming Lieutenant in February, 1908, and 
l)ecame known as " Chuty " among the officers 
of his battaUon. 

He was killed in action on the 27th August 
1914. the following abbreviated account of the 
circumstances having been received from 
Captain Jervis, the senior surviving officer of 
the battaUon, Lieutenant Chute having been 
in charge of the machine guns : — 
"" The Regiment was left in a somewhat 
exi)Osed position, and Lieutenant Chute, with 
his guns, covered the withdrawal of Captain 
Jervis's Company at mid-day. It was pouring 




with rain and with entire disregard to personal 
comfort, he lay down in six inches of water 
to manipulate his guns the l>etter. The 
Germans were crossing the front, and he never 
neglected an opi>ortunity of delaying their 
advance. 

•• The withdrawal continued through a village, 
and on the other side he came into action again 
firing dowTi the road, on both sides of which 
a company was withdrawing. Owing to the 
help of Lieutenant Chute's guns, the company 
got safely through. The enemy was now on 
three sides, and their artillery opened fire. 
Lieutenant Chute brought his machine guns 
Iiack at the gallop along the road under a 
positive hail of lead. It was a splendid feat 
anl was successfully accomplished, and once 
agai" the guns were placed in position. We 
were now completely surrounded and Lieutenant 
Chute crossed the road to try and find a target 
to aim at. As he crossed he was shot in the 
right side and thigh and fell dead." Captain 
Jervis went on : — ■" Up to the last he was 
cheery and full of spirits as ever, in fact the 
life and soul of the mess. He will leave a large 
gap not only in the reginxent but in each and 
aU of his brother officers" hearts. 
■■ On the 28th August, the Germans allow^ed 
a burial party to go out. and they found Lieu- 
tenant Chute, who was buried in a grave with 
eight other officers of the battalion." 
Lieutenant Chute married, in June. 1911. Maud 
Emily .St. Clare, only child of the late Edward 
O'B. Hobson. and left two children. 



2nd L1EUTEN.\NT TREVOR JOHN 
CL.\NCEV. 2nd B.\TTN- THE BORDER 
REGIMENT, 
who was killed in 
action on the 24th 
October. 1914 — the 
War Office Casualty 
List giving the date 
as the 28th October 
— ^was bom in June, 
1893. 

He was educated at 
•Stoneyhiu^. and the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, 
out of which he 
pa-ssed at the end of 1912. and in February. 
1913. he received his commission as Second 
Lieutenant in the Border Regiment, being 
posted to the 2nd Battalion, with which he 
proceeded to France soon after war was declared. 
In the Great War his Battalion formed part of 
the Vllth Division, and on it feU the brunt of 
the fighting in the earlier stages of the first 
battle of Ypres. Second Lieutenant Clancey 
was killed by shrapnel a short distance south- 
east of Ypres- 




CLA— CLI 



80 



LIEUTENANT JOHN EDWARD 
LANGTON CLARKE. ROYAL FIELD 

ARTILLERY, 

was the eldest son of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
Sir Edward H. St. 
Lawrence Clarke, 
fourth Baronet, of 
IJossmore. Co. Cork ; 
lie was born at 
Barkhill. .Ajgburth, 
Iviverpool, on the 
"_'2nd Xovenilier, 

1SS9, and was 
educated at Clifton 
ililitary Academy, 




the Roval 



College, and 
Woolwich. 

Lieutenant Clarke joined the ,50th Battery, 
XXXIVth Brigade, Royal Field ArtUlery, as 
.Second Lieutenant, in JvUy, 1909, and was 
promoted Lieutenant in July. 1912. During 
the summer of 1914 he acted as Extra A,D.C, 
to Lieutenant-General Sir Horace Smith-Dorrien 
commanding Southern Command. 
He accompanied his Battery to Fiance in 
the Great War. and. for his services np to the 
battle of the ^Visne. was mentioned in Sh 
John French's first Despatch and awarded the 
distinction of the ilihtary Cross, his name 
appearing in the list of 1st January. 1915, after 
his death on the field of battle, which occurred 
while he was in a<-tion at iloussy-sur-Aisne on 
the 14th September, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT MORDAUNT EDWARD 
LEONARD HANN.\M CL.\RKE, 3rd 
BATTN. WORCF,STERSHIRE REGT., 

son of Colonel F, C. 
Hannam Clarke, 

C.M,G„ B.A., Sur- 
veyor-General of 
Ceylon, was born at 
Bath, Somerset, on 
tlie 30th October. 
ISN4. 

He wa.s educated at 
Marlborough, and 
I'nlversity College, 
Oxford, and after 
serving for a year in 
t;azetted to the Worces- 
May, 1907, becoming 
1910. He was a keen 
cricketer, and was very musical indeed : played 
the violin and sang well, having an excellent 
baritone voice. 

He was shot tlirough the head by a bullet from 
a shrapnel shell at Caudry, near Cambrai, on 
the 26th August, 1914, during the retirement 
from Mons. He was carried to a civil hospital 
near, where he died without recovering con- 
sciousness, and is believed to be buried there. 




the Kent .Vili.l ; . --:l^ 
tershire Eegiment in 
Lieutenant in October, 




CAPTAIN GEORGE CLAYHILLS, D.S,0„ 
1st BATTN. EAST LANCASHIRE 
REGIMENT, 
was born at Darling- 
ton, the son of 
Thomas Clayhills. of 
Invergowrie. For- 
farshire, and a 
nephew of the late 
Captain Clayhills- 
Henderson, R.X., of 
Invergowrie, and of 
Colonel Clayhills- 

Henderson, who 

served in the Cri- 
mean War with the 93rd Highlanders. 
Educated at Cheltenham, and Trinity Hall, 
Cambridge, he received his commission in the 
Ea.st Lancashire Regiment from the ^Militia in 
January, 1S99. From April, 190(i — April, 1909, 
he was Adjutant of his Battalion. 
\Miile serving in the South African war with 
the 8th Mounted Infantrj-, he was present at 
the actions of Poplar Grove. Driefonteiii. Karee 
.Siding. Paardeberg. Vet River. Zand River, 
and tho.se near Johannesburg and Pretoria. 
For his services he was twice mentioned in 
Despatches, awarded the D.S.O., and received 
the Queen's medal with four clasps, and the 
King's medal with two clasps. He obtained 
his Company in 1908. 

In the Great War his Battalion formed part 
of the 11th Infantry Brigade, IVth Division, 
and with it Captain Clayhills was present in 
the retirement from Mons and the subsequent 
advance, including the battles of the Mame 
and the Aisne. 

He was kUled in action at the battle of Y'pres, 
while his battalion was holding the line three 
miles north of Armenticres, in Belgium, on 
2nd Xovember. 1914. 



MAJOR H. T. CLIFF 
THE PRINCE OF W 
(WEST YORKSHIRE 

was killed in action 
on the 13th October 
1914. 

He entered liis regi- 
ment as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in October, 
1900,' becoming Lieu- 
tenant in April, 1901, 
and Captain in 
August of the same 
year. 

He served in the 
ilediterranean dur- 
ing the South African War, 
medal. He became Major in 
of his regiment in May. 1913. 
to the 1st Battalion when he 



. 3rd BATTN. 

.\LESS OWN 

REGIMENT). 




and received the 
the 3rd BattaUon 
and was attached 
was killed. 



81 



CLI— CLU 




LIEUTENANT the H o n b 1 e. 
ARCHER W I N D S O R - C L I \' E , 3rd 
BATTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 
who \yas killed iu 
action at Landrecies 
oil the uight of the 
25th August, 1914, 
was the tliird son of 
the Earl of Plymouth 
and was born on the 
(ith November, 1890. 
He was educated at 
Eton, where he was 
iu the XI for two 
years, and at Trinity 
College, Cambridge. 
His conunission as Second Lieutenant in the 
Coldstreana Guards dated from the Sth 
.September, 1911, and he was "promoted 
Lieutenant in November, 1913. 
He was a member of the Guards' Club and was 
a keen sportsman. 

On the occasion of his death, the Guards were 
defending the village of Landrecies, successfuUy 
held at liay. and eventually drove off a greatly 
superior force of German';, thereby playing 
an important part in securing the safety of the 
British Armv in the retirement from ilons. 



CAPTAIN JOHN KEITH CLOTHIER, 
2nd BATTN. THE PRINCE OF \V.\LES'S 
OWN WEST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT , 

I^^^^^^^^HjB^BBM who was killed in 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^1 on the 

December, 1914, was 
the youngest son of 
Henry Clothier, M.D. 
(London), of Inner- 
wykc Manor, Felp- 
ham, Sussex, and 
was born at High- 
gate, Middlesex,where 
his father formerly 
practised, on the 25th 
.September, 1881, 
He was educated at Highgate School, and the 
U .M.C. .Sandhurst, from wliich he passed out 
twelfth, taking the prize for Tactics, and where 
he was Corporal of his Company. He joined 
the West Yorkshire Regiment as Second 
Lieutenant in March, 1901, becoming Lieutenant 
iu .September, 1903. He served in the South 
African war. being present at operations in the 
Transvaal from June, 1901, to March, 1902, 
for which he received the Queen's medal with 
clasp. In 1907 he was employed with the 
King's African Rifles, with the local rank of 
Captain, and acted as Adjutant. In the 
Somaliland operations 1908—10, he did useful 
service, and was mentioned in Despatches, 
receiving the medal and clasp. He obtained 




1^. 



his Company in June, 1911. and, on rejoining 
at Bombo as second in conunand of the 4th 
King's African Rifles, was given the temporary 
rank of Major. 

In the summer of 1914. while holding that 
appointment, he was invalided home, and on 
the outbreak of the Great War he rejoined his 
old regiment and volunteered for active service 
with the Expeditionary Force. For some time 
he was engaged with a new battalion of the 
regiment in Y'orkshire. l)Ut eventually went to 
the front. He was looking through a loop- 
hole in the trenches when he was struck by a 
bullet in the head, and died about two houi-s 
afterwards without recovering consciousness. 
He was buried at La \'isee. a little village south 
of Armentieres. 

CAPTAIN ROBERT FRANK 
CLOTHIER, 13th RAJPUTS THE 
SHEKHAWATL REGT.. INDIAN .\RMY. 

who was killetl in 
action on the 2nd ' 

November, 1914, was 
born on the 7th 
Septsmber, 18S4, and 
received an un- 
attached .Second- 
Lieutenancy in 
January, 1904. In 
March of the follow- 
ii^ year he joine<l 
the Indian Army, 
and became Lieu- 
tenant in April. 190<>. Captain Clolliier, who 
reached that rank in .lanuary. 1913, was 
Adjutant of his regiment when he was killed. 



CAPTAIN HENRY CLUTTERBUCK. 
1st BATTN. THE KINGS OWN 
ROYAL LANCASTER REGIMENT), 
was the son of the 
late James Jacques 
Clutterbuck. Esq.. 
and was born at 
Chacewater. Corn- 
wall, on the 23rd 
January, 1874. He 
was educated chiefly 
at King Edward's 
School, Birmingham. J I 
Captain Clutterbuck || 
enlisted in the 
Coldstream Guards 
in 1893, and after having served in the ranks 
of that regiment for rather more than seven 
years, he received a commission as Second 
Lieutenant in the King's Own Y'orkshire 
Light Infantry in August, 1900. He was 
given accelerated promotion to Captain into 
the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment 



t 





COG COK 



S2 



ill Xoveiiilior, 1!)07. lie served in the South 
African war, 189!t-1902, and fought through 
all the fierce battles wliich marked Lord 
.Methuen's advance to the relief of Kim- 
herley, including the actions at Belmont, 
Enslin, Jlodder River, and .Magersfontein. He 
was present during tlie operations in the Orange 
Free State, February to .May, 1900, including 
those at Paardeberg, February 17th — 26th ; 
actions at Poplar Grove, Diamond Hill, Drie- 
fontein, Karee .Siding, Vet River, and Zand 
River, also the operations in the Transvaal, 
May to September, 1900, and from Xovember, 
1900, to May, 1902. During the latter stages 
of the war he was attachetl to the Army Service 
Corps. He received tlie Queen's medal with 
six clasi)s and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

Captain ('lutti'rl)uck was Adjutant to the King's 
Own Malta Regiment of Militia from .Txine, 1904 
— July, 1909. He served in India .ind laboured 
for the welfare of the soldier, and encouraged 
temperance and thrift, being commended by 
the Commander-in-Chief in India for this work. 
He wrote a book of ilusketry Lectures in 1913, 
which was very well reviewed. 
He had been appointetl Garrison Adjutant at 
Bordon, from October 1st, 191-t, but as war broke 
out he left for France with his regiment on 
August 19th, 1914. Captain Clutterbuck was 
mentioned in Field-Marshal Sir John French's 
Despatch, October Sth, 1914, for his con- 
spicuous bravery under heavy shell fire and his 
gallantry in leading bayonet charges. He was 
killed on the 26th August, 1914, at Haucourt, 
France, only seven days after he had arrived 
in that country, and the following account 
of the circumstances under which he gave 
his life were furnished by a brother-officer : — 
" On the fateful 26th August Captain Clutter- 
buck and myself were in a village, and about 
8-30 p.m, about 150 Germans made a night 
attack on us. Just when the attack was 
starting Captain Clutterbuck canie up with 
about 50 men to help me, as things looked bad. 
Captain Clutterbuck then performed an act of 
great gallantry : he personally led 15 men 
to drive about 50 of the Germans away from a 
church wliere our wounded were. They called 
upon Captain Clutterliuck to surrender, but he 
would not, and was then instantly killed. This 
act of Captain Clutterbuck's was most gallant. 
He would not entertain the idea of anybody 
doing the noble work which he did. thereby 
saving the lives of most of us. Xobody could 
have died a more noble death." 
Captain Clutterbuck married Cora Gwendoline 
Rafaela, youngesst daughter of the late Gerard 
Jlyburgh, Esq., of Orange Grove, Cape Town, 
Consul-General of the Netherlands in South 
Africa. 



HUM 
FIELD 




2nd LIEUTENANT WILLIAM 
PHREY COGHL.\N, ROYAL 
ARTILLERY, 

born on the 9th Jiilyi 
1890, was the ton 
of Colonel Charles 
Coghlan, C.B., D.L., 
of Ashfield, Head- 
ingley Hill, Leeds. 
He was educated at 
the Oratory School. 
Edgbaston, near 
Birmingham. of 
wliich he was Captain 
for two yeai-s, antl 
then went to Univereity College, Oxford, lb- 
joined the West Yorkshire Brigade. Royal 
Field Artillery (Territorial Force), and, after 
serving a year at Woolwich, received a com- 
mission in the Royal Field Artillery and joined 
the 11th Battery at Kildare. 
In the war he fought from JloiLS to Le Cateau, 
where, after being wounded many times, he 
was killed in action on the evening of the 2litli 
August, 1914. 



LIEUTEN.\NT L.\NGTON 
SACHEVERELL COKE. J. P., 
1st BATTN. IRISH GUARDS, 
RESERVE OF OFFICERS, 

owner of Brookhill Hall, Alfreton, Derbyshire, 
was the eldest son of the late Colonel Coke, 
J. P., D.L., 4th Light Dragoon.s, of that place, 
whom he succeeded in 191.3. This property 
has been in the family direct from fathei- to 
son for twenty - three generations; one of 
Lieutenant Coke's ancestors was Sir John 
Coke, Secretary of State to Charles the First. 
Lieutenant Coke was born on the 25th 
January, 1878, and was educated in Germany 
and France. 

He joined the Irish Guards in 1901, after 
serving for a short time with the Warwickshire 
Regiment. He was seconded for service with 
the Egyptian Army for two years, and in 1908 
he left his Regmient, joining the Special Re- 
serve. Intending to take up a political career, 
he obtained the appointment of Private Sec- 
retary to Mr. Hobhouse, Postmaster-General 
in 1913. On the outbreak of the Great War 
he rejoined his old regiment, and went to France 
on the 11th September. 

He was killed at Klein Zillebeke, near Ypres, 
on the 31st October, 1914, a critical day on 
which the Germaas nearly broke through our 
lines. 

Lieutenant Coke, who was a member of the 
Travellers' and Guards' Clubs, was a good big 
game shot, fisherman, and motorist. 
He married in Xovember. 1908, Dorothy Maye, 



83 



COK COL 



ilaughter of Captain George Hiiiitiiigtord, R.N.. 
and left a daughter, Elizabeth Joan, born 
August, 1909. and a son, Roger Sacheverell, 
born October, 1912. who succeeds to the 
Brookhill estate. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN CAD- 
WALLADER COKER, 2nd BATTN. 
SOUTH WALES BORDERERS, 

... . ., ^,, ,. who was killed in 

action at the Battle 
of the Aisne on the 
2()th September, 
1914, was (lie young- 
est son of Colonel ]j. 
K. and Mrs. Coker, 
of Bicester House, 
Oxfordshire. 
He was born on the 
20th January, 1887. 
Mud joined the South 
Wales Borderers in 
Lieutenant in .Tune, 




August. 1908, becoming 
1911. 




Lieutenant in .Tanuarv, 



MAJOR LAWRENCE ROBERT 
VAUGHAN COLBY, 1st 

BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, 

who was killed on 
the 24th t)ctober, 
1914. was the only 
son of Mr. and Jlrs. 
Colby of Ffynone, 
Pemlirokesliire. He 
was liorn on the 3rd 
\pril. ISSO. and edu- 
cated at Eton, join- 
ing the Grenadier 
(iuards in February, 
1899, and becoming 
1900. 

He took part in the South African War. being 
present at operations in the Orange Free State. 
April to May. 1900 : Orange River Colony, May 
to November, 1900. including actions at Bid- 
ilulphsberg and Wittebergen, and again in the 
same Colony from the end of 1900 to May, 1902. 
He received the Queen's and the King's medals, 
each with two clasps. 

He became Captain in September. 1905. and 
obtained his Majority in September, 1914. He 
was a member of the Guards' Club and was 
unmarried. 

In the action in which he lost his life, .Major 
Colliy was valiantly leading his men in a charge 
near Gheluvelt. and he was buried in a soldier's 
grave on the fleUl of Ijattle close to where he fell. 
For his services in his last fight he was men- 
tioned in Sir .John French's Despatch of the 
14th Januarv. 191.'). 




CAPTAIN WILLIAM ELMER REYMES- 
COLE, 3rd (attd. 2nd) BATTN. 
ROYAL MUNSTER FUSILIERS, 

who was killed in 

action on the 11th 

Novembei", 1914, was 

the eldest son of the 

late Thomas Elmer 

Cole, of Doddington, 

( 'ambridge, and 

W'ingland, Norfolk. 

Captain Reymes- 

Cole served for some 

years in various 

Government posts in 

British East Africa. 

among them that of District Commissioner at 

Gondokoro. On account of ill-health he had to 

give up tropical service, and he then became 

Agent to the Hemsted Estate in Kent. 

When the war broke out he rejoined his ohl 

regiment, in which he had become Captain in 

April, 1900. 

LIEUTENANT DONALD M. COLES. 
3rd BATTN. NORTHUMBERLAND 
FUSILIERS (SPECIAL RESERVE), 

who was appointed 2iid Lifutenant on prolia- 
tion in June, 191:5, was killed in action the 
27th October, 1914. He became Lieutenant in 
September, 1914, and was attached for active 
service to the 1st Battalion of his i-cgiment. 

2nd LIEUTENANT SIDNEY HAR- 
COURT COLES, 6th (attd. to 
4th) BATTN. DUKE OF CAMBRIDGE'S 
OWN (MIDDLESEX REGIMENT). 

wlio was killed in 
action on the 12th 
October, 1914, aged 
24, was the fourth 
son of Major and 
Mrs. Lewis Harcoiu-t 
Coles, Windsor Road. 
Denmark Hill. 
Second Lieutenant 
Coles joined the 
Middlesex Regiment 
in September. 1913. 

CAPTAIN ARTHUR EDWARD JEUNE 
COLLINS, ROYAL ENGINEERS. 

eldest son of the late Arthur Herbert Collins. 
Esq., Indian Civil Service, was born on the 
18th August, 1885, in India. 
He was educated at CUfton College, and while 
there, astonished the cricket world in 1899. 
at the age of 14, by scoring 028 not out in a 
.Junior House Match between Clarke's House 
and North Town. When in the Senior School, 
he was in the 1st Cricket XL, the l.st Football 




COM CON 




W.. Ilii' Isl r;irq\iet pair, ami rc])resoiilcil tlif 
scluml in IcMtliorweiglit boxiii}; at the I'vililic- 

Scliools Compi^titidu 
at AUlci'sliot. lliMvas 
Head of his House, 
and at the age of 17 
passed into Wool- 
wich, taking thi- 
fourth place in IIh' 
list of successful 
candidates. 
He joined tlie Hoyal 
Hngineers in Decem- 
ber, 1!)04, and at the 
ag(i of 21 went to 
India, where he was stationed till .\pril, 
U)14. when he came home and was jiostcd to 
.Vldershot . 

In India he played polo, racquets, and tennis. 
but on returning to England took up cricket 
again, jilaying for the Royal Engineers at 
Aldersliot and at Lords against tlie Hoyal 
Artillery. 

In August, 1914, he went to the front with tlii> 
otli Field Company. Royal Engineers. 
On the 11th November his Company, of which 
he was then in command (his Senior Ollicers 
having been killed or wounded), was called \ip 
to lielp thrust the enemy back at Polygon 
Wood, near Ypres. It was whilst signalling for 
reinforcements during this action that he was 
killed. 

He was mentioned in Sir John French's Des- 
patch of tlie 14th Jamuxry. 1915, and was 
gazetted Captain after his deatli. to date from 
tlie 30th October, 1914. 

( "a]it ain Collins, who was a member of the Junior 
Army and Navy Club, married in April, 1914, 
Etliel, d.augliter of the late .Stanley Slater, and 
granddaughter of the late Colonel .Slater. S2nd 
Regiment. 



LIEUTENANT BOYCE ANTHONY 
COMBE. 6th (attd. 4thl BATTN. 
ROYAL FUSILIERS CITY OF LONDON 

REGIMENT). 

w as the s e c o n d 
son of Harvey Tre- 
wythen Brabazon 
Combe. late 3rd 
Rattalion. Royal 

Sussex Regiment, 
of Oaklands, Sedles- 
combe, Sussex. 
He was born in 1889 
and was educated at 
Clieltenham. He be- 
came Lieutenant in 
his regiment in June, 1913, and was killed in 
action on the 11th November, 1914. 




LIEUTENANT S. B. COMBE, NORTH 
IRISH HORSE (SPECIAL RESERVE), 

w lio was reported in ^^_ 
October, 1914, to iO 
have been missing, 
was since shown in 
tin- otiicial lists as 
liaving biM'ii killed in 
action on the Isl 
October, 1914. 
He was tlie third son 
of Abrani Comix". 
J.l'.. Donaghcloney 
House. Donagh- 

cloney. Co. llnwn. 
and .Master of tin- t 'i 




I low u Slaghounds 



and 

was 



was born on the 20tli January. 18S(I. H 
educated at Rugby and in France, and became 
Lieutenant in tlieNortli Irish Horse in April. 1913. 
He was a member of tlie Ulster Club. Belfast. 
and the Royal Ulster Yacht Club, and was fond 
of polo and hunting. 

'I'he following particulars were obtained from 
his Alajor. Lord >Iassereene. and a brother 
oflicer : — He received StatT orders to ascertain 
if the Germans were liolding a position near 
Conde Bridge on the .\isne. Knowing tlie 
great danger, he left his men in liiding and pro- 
ceeded aK)ne on foot. He was discovered and 
fell lighting, tlie shots revealing the presence of 
the enemy. 

From the German officer, l)y whose men he was 
shot, it was subsequently learned tliat, admiring 
Ills pluck, the Germans gave him ceremonial 
burial inside their lines at Cond^, and marked 
his grave by a cross bearing liis nanu' and llir 
words " Pro Patria." 

LIEUTENANT HENRY BLIGH FORTES 
CUE PARNELL. 5th B.\RON CONGLE- 
TON. AND A BARONET OF IRELAND. 
2nd BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, 

was the first member 
of the : 
to b( 
Great 

ceeded Ills father in » ^^ " "t 

1901). 

Lieutenant LordCon- 
gleton was the eldest 
son of ilajor-General 
Lord Congleton. 

C.B., a distinguished 
officer, and was born 
on the 6th Septem- 
ber, 1890, at Annerville, Clonmel, u hcii hif~ 
father was in command of that District ; lii^ 
was a grandson of a naval officer who had 
five sons in the jVrmy and Navy. He was also 
related to the poet Parnell, a friend of Addison, 
et al., and was a distant cousin of Cliarles 
Stewart Parnell, the famous Irish politician. 



the first member ___^ 

e House of Peers I 

le killed in the t i 

t War ; he sue- { 

ed his father in ; 




CON 



He was educated at Eton (Somerville's) and 
New College, Oxford, where he took very good 
second class Honours for History; and was also 
Master of the New College and JIagdalen 
Beagles. He joined the Grenadier Guards as a 
Uruversity candidate in 1912. but his having 
taken honours at the University gave him many 
months' seniority, and his commission was ante- 
dated to July, 1911. He was promoted Lieu- 
tenant in March, 1913. 

Lord Congleton was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 14th January, 191.'j. 
for gallant conduct and skilful handling of his 
platoon against terrific odds on the 6th 
November, 1914, thereby saving the British 
line at that point. He was kUled in action near 
Ypres on the 10th November, 1914. and was 
Ijuried in ZUlebeke Churchyard. 
Lord Congleton was a gifted and many-sided 
man : a keen sportsman, a good shot (small and 
big game), and, as a traveller, he had hoped to 
go with Stackhouse to the Antarctic. He wrote 
articles in magazines and in " The Field " on 
sporting subjects over the signature of " Con." 
He was a polo player, an ardent Tariff Reformer 
and student of social prolilenis. but had joined 
no political party, though he was often in the 
House of Lords as a listener. He also took an 
active interest in Rural Housing, etc. By his 
death his famUy. his regiment, and his country 
sustained a great loss. Memoirs of his career 
have been published in " The Field," " The 
World." " Truth," " Country Life." " British 
Sports and Sportsmen," " The Tramp." and in 
several of the daUy papers. 

Lord Congleton was not married, and his 
lirother. the Hon. J. B. ^I. Parnell. a Lieutenant 
in the Xavy. succeeds him in the title. 

LIEUTENANT SYDNEY DENNIS 
CONNELL, 1st BATTN. THE MANCHES- 

TER REGIMENT, 

II l)orn on the 11th 
June. 1S94. at Alla- 
lialjad. India, was 
the son of Major 
C o n n e 1 1 , Royal 
Horse Artillery, and 
Mrs. Connell. His 
elder brother. Jjieu- 
tenant V. .T. A. Con- 
nell, is in the 13th 
Lancers of 1 he I n<lian 
Army. 

Ill- wa- I (liirat.il at Queen Elizabeth's School. 
Cranbrook. from 190S-12, where he won his 
football and cricket colours, was in the Bisley 
Team 1910-12, captain of the Gymnasium and 
of the Cricket XI in 1912, and represented the 
School at Aldershot 1911-12. He became a 
Sergeant in the Officers' Training Corps in 1011. 
He passed into the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1912, 




and received his commission, on passing out, in 
the Manchester Regiment, in January. 1914, 
joining his battalion in India in March, and 
proceeding to France in .Vugust. with the Ex- 
peditionary Force. 

He was kUIed on the 28th November, 1914, 
after successfully destroying a (ierman sap-head 
in a night attack. The following account of the 
circumstances was received from the Adjutant 
of his battalion : — 

" Lieutenant Connell was kUled just north-east 
of the cross roads at La Quinque Rue (which 
is about one mile north-east of Festubert), 
having most gallantly attacked a sap-head. 
The sap-head was a double one, and came up 
to 20 to 25 feet from our fire trench. He went 
out that night with 20 men, he going with 
10 men to one head, and a colour-sergeant with 
10 men to the other. They all got in and found 
the Germans at work and killed 10 of them, 
two or three escaping down the communicating 
trench. They then went down the communi- 
cating trench, and when coming back along it. 
found that more Germans had been sleeping 
in dug-outs at the side. These they also killed 
as they returned, and it is estimated that they 
accounted for over 40 altogether. When on the 
way back, the Germans opened a machine gun 
on the party he was leading. He and five men 
were killed and three wounded. . . . ^Ve 
were most awfully cut up aliout it." 
He was mentioned in Sir .Tohn French's Des- 
patch of the 14th .January. 1915. for his services 
in the Great War. 



CAPTAIN (TEMPORARY MAJOR) 
PETER MARTIN CONNELLAN, 1st 
BATTN. HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
October, 1914. was 
the only .son of Major 
J. H. Connellam, 
D.L., Coolmore, Co. 
Kilkenny, Ireland. 
He was born at Sale, 
('he.shire, on the 19th 
February, 18S2. was 
educated at Newton 
.Vbbot College and at 
Harrow. and he 
entered the Army, unattached, in [January, 
1901, joining the Hampshire Regiment as 
Second Lieutenant in March of that year, be- 
coming Lieutenant in November, 1003. In 
that and the following year he took part in 
operations in the interior near Aden, acting as 
Brigade Signalling Officer to the Aden Boundary 
Delimitation Column. Fi-om 1906 to 1909 he 
was Adjutant of Ids battalion, having Vtecome 
Captain in May, 1907, and subsequently was 




CON— coo 



Sfi 



appointed Adjutant, Special Heserve, in Janu- 
ary, 191 1 . He was awarded the Royal Humane 
Society's medal for saving the life of a drowning 
soldier in 1900. He was very fond of hiinting, 
salmon fishing, and tennis, and played in liis 
Regimental Polo Team. 

He rejoined his battalion in 1914, went to the 
front with it as part of the IVth Division, and 
was present all through the retirement from 
Mens. For some weeks he was in command 
of his battalion during the Battles of the Marnt- 
and the Aisne, being mentioned in Sir Jolm 
French's Despatches of the 8th October, 1914. 
and 11th January. 1915. He was recommended 
by liis Brigadier for promotion and reward. 
He married in 1911, Winifred, tliird flaughter 
of the late Arthur Xiblett. Esq.. of Haresfield 
Tourt, Gloucestershire. 



CAPTAIN CECIL A 
CONYNGH.WI, M.B., 




LLEN TAYLOUR 

ROYAL .\R.MY 

MEDICAL CORPS, 

who was killed in 
action on the 4th 
November. 1914, was 
the fourth surviving 
son of Mr. Hem-y 
( 'ouyngham, of Dub- 
lin, and was born on 
the nth May, 1883. 
He was educated at 
St. Andrew's College, 
and at Trinity Col- 
lege. Ilnlilin, where 
111- iilitaiiii-d his degree of M.B., joining the Army 
in.fuly. 1907. He was a keen athlete, and swam 
for Trinity, wlien the}' won the Senior Water 
Polo Cup in 1903; he was also in tlie Wan- 
derei-s Rugby Football Cup Team, wlien they 
won the LeiiLster .Senior Cup in 1900. 
['romoted Captain in January. UMI, he was 
stationed at Bangalore when tlie war broke 
out, and was sent to British East Africa, acting 
as Medical Officer to the Loyal North Lancashire 
Regiment. Tlie Officer Commanding tlie 2nd 
Battalion of that regiment gave the following 
account of his death : — 

" Captain C. T. Couyngham. R.A..M.C.. was 
attached to this battalion, and was killed in 
action at Tanga, German East Africa, on 4th 
November, 1914, while attending our wounded 
under fire. He behaved with great courage 
under very trying and dangerous circumstances, 
and was mentioned by me for devotion to duty 
in my Report. 

" We were unable to bury any of our killed, as 
the action was a reverse, and 1 conclude the 
Germans buried them all close to Tanga Town, 
where the fight was. . . . Your son was 
much liked by all of us, both professionally and 
socially. Please accept our deep sympathy in 
your great loss." 



.Vnother more detailed account .said : 
"With his regiment he advanced frnni tin- 
beach towards tlie town of Tanga. which was 
partly occupied. Tlie heavy fir<' to which the 
battalion was .subjected is evidenced by tin- 
casualty list, as the regiment lost. 1 think 
140 men killed and wounded. During the 
course of the second day we were unable to hold, 
the- town, as the Germans had such a prejion- 
deranee of machine guns; the Loyal North 
Lancashires. therefore, fell back and occupied 
a position near a railway embankment. There 
were several men on the railway line who wen- 
wounded, and your brother most gallantly 
climbed down the steep bank and attended to 
them. It was under such conditions that h<- 
was killed. Had he survived . . he 

would most certainly have been singled out for 
distinction, as all ranks spoke in very glowing 
terms of his coolness and gallantry. I heard 
from the German Commandant that all the men 
killed down on the railway line were buried in 
the ' Sliamba." on the outskirt of the town. 
1 lia<l an opportunity of finding this out, as I was 
myself taken prisonerwithsomeof our wounded. 
1 am afraid, therefore, 1 can give you no hope 
of his having survived. Couyngham was a fine 
officer and a very gallant gentleman, and Ik- was 
killed aclually at his work." 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES ROLLO 
COOCH, 2nd B.\TTN'. THE BORDER 
REGIMENT. 

was born at Leam- 
ington on the 3rd 
October, 1894, the 
.son of .Major C. E. H. 
Cooch, Reserve of 
Officers, the Border 
Regiment, and Mrs. 
Cooch. He was a 
grandson of Colonel 
Charles Cooch, 
.M.V.O.. the King's 
Bodyguard, and lat^ 
of the 02nd Regiment, and a great-nepliew of 
General Robert Rollo Gillespie, i'.H. 
Lieutenant Cooch was educated at the Victoria 
College, Jei-sey, from 1904— 8,when he went to the 
Imperial .Service College, Windsor, till 1913, en- 
tering the R.M.C., Sandhurst, in February, 1914. 
He played hockey for the Imperial Service 
College in 1913, and was also in the Rugby 
Football XV and the School Cricket XI in the 
yeai-s 1912-13. 

On 1st October, 1914, he received his commis- 
sion in the Border Regiment, and was promoted 
Lieutenant on the 14th December, only three 
days before his death. He was killed in the 
trenches near Armentieres on the ITtli 
December, 1914, when serving with his battalion. 




S7 



COO COR 




LIEUTENANT-COLONEL EDWIN 
BERKELEY COOK, M. V. O., COM- 
MANDING 1st LIFE GUARDS, 

who died on tlic -Itli 
Xovemljer. 1914, at 
.Sussex House, Re- 
gent's Park, from 
woiuids received in 
action neai' Messines, 
Bel5<iuin. on tlie 21st 
October, 19U, was 
the elder son of tlie 
late Major Edwin 
Adolphus Cook, 11th 
Hussars, of Eoydon 
Hall, Tonbridge, 
Kent, and was born on -Jth May, IStiSt, in London. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Cook, who was educated 
at Eton, was gazetted to the 1st Life Guards 
from the ^Filitia in ISIKI, becoming Captain in 
1S94, Major in 1903, and Brevet Lieutenant- 
Colonel in January, 1909. He served as A.D.C. 
and Acting Military Secretary to General Sir 
G. Luck in India from 189S to 1903, and suc- 
ceeded to the command of his regiment in 
Xovember, 1910. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Cook, who was a memVier of 
the Bachelors' and Arllnu's Clubs, was un- 
married. 

MAJOR MOSTYN EDEN COOKSON, 
2nd BATTN. ROYAL SUSSEX REGT., 

of which he was the 
senior ^lajor, was 
the son of the late 
ilajor William Cook- 
son, 80 th Foot, and 
was bom on the 
1st January, 1868, at 
Skipton - in - Craven, 
Yorkshire. 
He joined the Royal 
Susses Regiment in 
February, 1887, be- 
coming Lieutenant 

in August, 1890, and Captain in May, 1893. 

He was a member of the Xaval and Military 

Club, and of the .M.C.C. 

He was killed on the 14th September. 1914. by 

shrapnel at the Battle of the Aisne. 

Major Cookson, who obtained his Majority in 

September, 1904. married Josephine, daughter 

of W. G. Finder, and left no issue. 

MAJOR WILLI.\M JOSEPH CORCORAN, 
5th BATTN. THE DUKE OF C.\M- 
BRIDGES OWN MIDDLESEX REGT.). 

died on the 25th October. 1914, of wounds 
received in action. He was educated at St. 
Paul's School for two years, and then at .St. 
Edmund's College, Ware. He became Captain 





in the Middlesex Regiment in March, 190ti. and 
his promotion to .Major was gazetted after his 
death, to date from the 7th September, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT CECIL VICTOR POWELL 
CORNELIUS. RESERVE OF OFFICERS. 
3rd B.\TTN. THE WELSH REGIMENt! 

son of \Valter .lohii . 

Cornelius, was born 
at Dehra Dun, U.P.. 
India, on the 14th 
April, 1889. He was 
educated at .St . 
George's College and 
York House, Mus- 
soorie, India, and at 
Wren's Coaching 
Establishment, Bays- 
water, London. 
Lieutenant Corne- 
lius, who was a member of the Athenaeum 
Club, and by profession a barrister, joined the 
Reserve of Officers in March, 1912, becoming 
Lieutenant in December of that year. He was 
attached for -active service to the 2nd Battalion 
of his regiment. 

He was killed on the 12th Xovember, 1914, at 
Klein Zillebeke, near Ypres, being engaged with 
the enemy at close quarters. Captain Venables, 
of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, had been wounded 
there, and Lieutenant Cornelius was crawling 
down at the back of the trench to see if he could 
help him. when he was shot through the heart. 
The officer commanding the battalion wrote : 
" He was only with us a short time, but im- 
pressed himself on me as a gallant leader and 
a brave man." 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES LAWSON 
CORNISH, 2nd B.\TTN. HIGH- 
LAND LIGHT INFANTRY, 

son of Henry Cor- 
nish and Emily Hen- 
rietta Cornish, of 
Glastonbury, .Sur- 
biton, was born at 
Brighton on the 13th ^ . 

August. 1887. 
He was educated at 
.Stoke House. 

.Slough, at Charter- _ ^i^h^^^^hh > 

house, and Trinity ^C ^1^^^^^^^^ 

College, Cambridge, 
where he took the 
degree of B.A. (iazetted to the 2nd Battahon 
Highland Light Infantry in 1910, he became 
Lieutenant in 1912, afterwards resigning his 
commission, and voluntarily joining the Reserve 
of Officers in the spring of 1914. On the out- 
break of the war he rejoined his battalion, which 




COR COS 



88 




was one of tlic first units of tlie First .\riii\' 
Corps to go to tliu relief of tlio ^'IItll Division 
near Ypres, and was almost continuously en- 
gaged till the oneniy's assaults were broken in 
November. Lieutenant Cornish took part in 
the retirement from Mons, and tlie Battles of 
the JIarne and the Aisne, being killed at last 
by a shell in the Battle of Ypres on the llitli 
November, 1911, while his company was taking 
up its position in tlie trenches. He was bmieil 
alongside tlu> I'asschendaele-Becolaere Road. 



MAJOR .lOHN BEAUMONT CORRY, 
D.S.O., ROYAL ENGINEERS, 

r^— ^— -- who was killed by 

shell near Sailly->vir- 
1 a - L y s, No r t h 
France on the Itli 
November, 1 !l 1 1 . 
while serving with 
the 3rd (Bombay) 
Sapjiei's and Miners, 
^^^^^^ was the son of 

^^•■y^ )\^^^^^^K»| the late Job n 
•^ Vv XIM^^Bt Corry, Esq., .T.P.. 

of Croydon. Surrey, 
and was born there 
on the 21st August, 1871. He was educated at 
St. Paul's School, Kensington, where he held a 
scholarship,and from there passed second into the 
E.M. A., Woolwich, and became Pollock medallist. 
He was gazetted to the R.E. in 1894, joined the 
Bombay Sappers and ^Miners, and became 
Lieutenant in February, 1897. In the latter 
year and in 1898 he served on the north-west 
frontier of India, taking part in the operations 
on the Samana and in the relief of (Uilistan, for 
which he received the medal with two clasps. 
He took part in the Tirah Campaign of 1897-98, 
being present at the capture of the .Sampagha 
and Arhanga Passes, and at ojierations in the 
Waran Valley, Bazar Valley, and other places. 
For these services he received the clasp. In 
1901 he took part in the .Mekran Campaign, 
led the attack on Nodiz Fort (which was cap- 
tured), and w-as severely wounded. For this 
campaign he was mentioned in Despatches, 
and was awarded the D.S.O. 

Major Corry received the Delhi Durbar medal, 
1902-03, having helped to construct the light 
railway, and became Captain in 1904. He was 
also sent to Somaliland to strengthen the de- 
fences of Berbera, and in 1912-13 was employed 
in building roads and bridges in the ]\Iishini 
country. In 1914, in which year he obtained 
his Majority, he was appointed to the Military 
Works, Bannu, North Western Province, receiv- 
ing his orders for the front in the Great War 
at the end of August. He was delayed for some 




t ime at Karachi and at the base, linally reaching 
the fighting line onh- two days before he was killed. 
Major Corry was a member of the Army and 
Navy Club and of the Alpine Club, and had 
climbed in the Alps, in Cashmir. and in the 
mountains near Ouetta : he was also a member 
of the Poona Rowing Club. 

LIEUTENANT HARROLD STANLEY 
FREDERICK COSENS. 1st BATTN. 
EAST YORKSHIRE ^iREGIMENT, 

was born on tlu' 
2nd December. 1889. 
at Observatory Ave- 
nue. Kensington. 
W., and was the 
son of Frederick 
fieorge Cosens. of 
Hacton, Norfolk, and 
late of Airlie Gar- 
dens, Kensington, 
and Mrs. Cosens (nee 
Ambrose), of Cop- 
ford. Essex. He was 

a grandson of the late F. W. Cosens, Esq.. of 
" The Shelleys," Lewes, Sussex. 
Lieutenant Cosens w'as educated at St. Paul's 
School. Kensington, and at the R.M.C., Sand- 
hurst. He was a prominent supporter of the 
Boy Scout movement, and a year or two ago, 
during his leave, gave up every evening to go 
down to different troops in the East End to 
teach the boys signalling. He was remark- 
able for his patience and good temper, and the 
success he had with boys, even those who were 
not brilliant. Some of those instruct<xl by him 
are now non-commissioned ollicers in the Army 
an<l Navy, " as a result of his self-sacriflcing 
laliour." At the end of his leave he was given 
a supper, at which nearly seventy- boys, who 
were said almost to worship him, were present. 
The above particulars are taken from a report 
of the ^'icar of St. Agatha's Church, Finsbury 
.\ venue, E.C.,ol the Boy Scouts" Association. The 
Secretary of St. Barnabas Troop also wrote ex- 
pressing how much they owed to the young officer. 
Lieutenant Cosens was gazetted to the East 
Yorks as 2nd Lieutenant in September, 1909, 
and promoted Lieutenant in February, 1912. 
He was for a time with the Mounted Infantry 
at Longmoor and Strensall Camps. He passed 
\\ith distinction his examinations for pro- 
motion, including Army signalling. 
He was killed on tlie 2Sth October, 1914, during 
the struggle for Calais, while retaking trenches 
from the Germans near La Bassee. He had led 
his men successfully in accomplishing the work, 
and was actually in the trench when he was shot 
by a sniper and instantly killed. 



COS— cow 




L I E L T E N A N T B R L C E D L F F V S 
COSTIN. 1st BATTN. PRINCE OF 
WALESS OWN WEST YORKSHIRE 

R E G I M E NTi. 
son of Adele Hob- 
son. Tan-y-Bryn. 
Bani:or. was bom in 
Australia on the 
20th June. 1S.S9. 
He was educated at 
Bedford, and passing 
throush the R.M.C.. 
Sandhurst, ob- 
tained his couuiiis- 
sion as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in the West 
York.-!.-: 1, -iriient in 1909. joining his bat- 
talion in India, w^here he served two years, 
being promoted to his Lieutenancy in April, 
1910. 

When at Bedford, Lieutenant Costin played in 
the Ruuby XV, and also in the Sandhurst 
XV, where he was in the winning teams for 
rifle and revolver shooting and riding. He 
played footbaU occasionally for Rosslyn Park, 
and was cai>tain of the battalion football 
team. 

While on active service in the Great War. 
during the Battle of Ypres-Armentieres, he 
was brought in wounded on the 20th October 
from the West- Yorkshires' trenches between the 
cross roads at Le Paradis and Ennetieres. 
Four days later he died in hospital at Botdogne, 
and was buried with military honours in the 
cemetery there on the 25th October, 191-1. 
His Colonel being wounded, the officer com- 
manding wrote of him as follows to his mother : 
■■ You know without niy telling you what a 
favourite he was with all ranks of the regiment, 
and how we shall all miss him. He had done 
splendidly throughout the war, and was in- 
valuable to us. He was always cool and cheery 
under fire, qoite fearless, and had done very 
well on the 20th under an appalling shell fire. 
He is a great loss in every way to the regiment 
and the mess, so keen on both work and play, 
and the Rugby team will be nothing without 
him." 

The Chaplain to the Forces, who saw him 
when he was brought in wounded, wrote : "I 
had many opportxmitics for forming an estimate 
of his character, for I knew him well, and I know 
he was a man of highest qualities and ideals, 
brave and honourable, respected by all who 
knew him, and loved by his brother officers 
and men under his command. TTis loss is a 
loss to the whole Army, and the cutting off 
of a keen soldier who had promise of a brilliant 
career." 




1897, becoming lieu- 



C.\PT AIN EDG.\R ERNEST COVENTRY- 
1st BATTN. EAST LANCASHIRE REGT., 
who was killed in 
action on the 1st 
November. 1914. was 
the fifth son of 
the late ilr. Edward 
Coventry, of Boling- 
broke Grove. 
Wandsworth Com- 
mon, and was bom 
on the 11th Sep- 
tember, 1876. H'- 
joinedthe East Lan- 
cashire Regiment 
on the 20th February. 
tenant in 1899. 

He took part in the South African War, being 
present at operations in the Orange Free State 
in the eariy part of 1900, including actions at 
Karee Siding and the Vet and Zand Rivers : 
also at operations in the Transvaal and Orange 
River Colony, November, 194X). to May, 19«J2. 
He received the Queen's medal with three clasps, 
and the King's medal with two clasps. He 
obtained his Company in July. 1900. 

2nd LIEUTENANT DOUGLAS HEN- 
DERSON COWAN. 1st B .\ T T N. 
THE HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT, 
son of David T. Cowan, .M.A.. Director of 
Education for Hampshire, of The Castle, 
Winchester, was bom at Beceles, Suffolk, 
on the 10th October, 1890. He was educated 
at a private school at Winchester, and at the 
Orammap .School, Bedford. 

Joining the 3rd Hampshire Regiment as 2nd 
Lieutenant in February. 1910. he became Lieu- 
tenant in the following year, and in May, 1912. 
was transferred to the 1st (Regular) Battalion as 
2nd Lieutenant. He left England with the Ex- 
peditionary Force on the 22nd August, 1911, and 
was killed at Cambrai on the 20th of that month, 
only four days after reaching the scene of action. 
2nd Lieutenant Cowan was a good all-round 
athlete, a first class swimmer, played cricket 
and Rugby football, while his strongest game 
was hockey, at which he represented his county. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ROBERT CRAIG 
COWAN. 3rd attd. 2nd BATTN. THE 
ROYAL SCOTS LOTHIAN REGT.. 
born on the .5th March. IS't'l. at Craigiebield. 
Penicuik, was the eldest son of Mr. R. C. Cowan, 
of Elskiiill, Inveresk, Midlothian, and grandson 
of Mr. C. ^'. Cowan, D.L., Dalhousie Castle. 
He was educated at Cargilfield, Cheltenham 
College, and Pembroke College, Cambridge, 
and, having been in the O.T.C., was gazetted to 
his regiment at Glencorse eariy in August. 191-t, 



cox CRA 



iW 





being sent to Franco with :i ilial't in Siplinilj.-i-. 
rie was killoil on the 2Jtli OcIdIht. I'M I. at La 

PliiK-lic. near Neuve 
('liapcllo. Mis C'om- 
nianiliiit; Otiicer 
\\n>lc : •■ W'l- miss 
liiiii. not (inly as a 
('(>iiM'aclc.)>iit as a very 
^'allant Ijii\ \\Iiii lias 
set a iiolilc cxaiiiiilf ol 
courage and fearless 
exec II t ion of tiis 
iliity." 

Mr. Couaii's recrea- 
tions were fisliinj;, shootiiisi. ami lout hall. 

LIEUT. GEORGE HENRY COX, 3rd lattd. 
2ndi BATTN. KINGS OWN SCOTTISH 

BORDERERS, 

( >f l{ eeilhani.Norfol k . 
was killed in action 
in France on the 
:«lth-:Ust October, 
Ml 14. Jle became 
Lieutetiant in his 
re)iiment in Jidy. 
1913. having re- 
ceived his commis- 
sion as l!nil Lieut- 
enant in .May. IHKI. 

2nd LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY PHILIP 
JOSEPH SNEAD-COX, 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL WELSH FUSILIERS. 

who was horn on 
the 20th February. 
18i).">, was the second 
son of .John Snead- 
("ox, of Broxwood 
Court, and Eaton 
Bishop. llereford- 
sliire. Lord of the 
.Manor of Broxwood, 
and late of Souldern 
.M anor.Banbury ,also 
of 38, Egerton Gar- 
dens. I^jndon, S.W. 
1 1<- w ^1- I iliii .il . il .it I ii .wnside School, near Bath, 
and passed intotheK..M.C., Sandhurst, in 1912, ob- 
taining his commis.sion in September, 1913. After 
joining he qualified as an interpreter in French. 
At the outbreak of the war his battalion was 
in Malta, but was ordered home, and it formed 
I)art of the 22nd Brigade of the " immortal " 
Vllth Division, which left England on the 4th 
October, and landed at Zeebrugge. 
2nd Lieutenant ,Snead-Cox was shot through 
the head on the 21st October, 1914, in the fii-st 
part of the Battle of Y'pres, where his battalion 
'■ fought itself to a standstill." 





2nd LIEUTENANT RICHARD .MARY 
SNEAD-COX. 3rd BATTN. THE 
ROYAL SCOTS (LOTHIAN REGIMENTi. 

born on the 2.5th 
November. 1892. 

was the eldest son 
of .John Snead-f'ox. 
of Broxwood Court . 
and Katon Bishop, 
i lerefiirdshire. L<n(l 
of the -Manor ol 
Broxwood. 
He was educated at 
Downside School, 
near Bath, and Xew 
t'ollege, Oxford, 
where he wa-s reading for Honours when war was 
declared. He inunediately offered liis services, 
and on the 7th Augu.st, 1914. was given a com- 
mission in the 3rd Battalion Royal Scots. After 
seven weeks' training he was sent to St. Nazaire. 
Fi'ance, and thence, on the 7th October with 
seven other officers and a draft of ninety-foiu' 
men. to reinforce the 2nd Battalion at the front . 
His battalion was ailvancing near Xeuve Chapelle 
on the 28th October, 191 I. uli.n 2n(l l.i>utenant 
Snead-Cox was shot through the heart as he 
was leading his platoon to take a (iermaii trench. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ARTHUR NELSON 
COXE, ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

who died on tlie 3rd 
November, 1914, of 
wounds received in 
action, aged nine- 
teen years, was the 
tliird son of Mr. 
.Tustice Coxe, I.C.S.. 
Judge of the High 
Court, Calcutta and 
of Mrs. H. ]?. ir. 

Coxe, of Therfield. 

Farnhani. He onh --— — ~ 1 

joined the Army in August. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT SIR ARCHIBALD 
CHARLES GIBSON-CRAIG, 4th BART, 
lof Riccarton, Midlothian!. 2nd, BATTN. 
HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY. 

who is shown in the 
official monthly ca- 
sualty list published 
in October, 1914, as 
having been killed 
in action, no date 
or place being re- 
corded, was the 
third surviving son 
of .Sir James Henry 
Gibson-Craig, Bart., 
and Julia Lady Gib- 
son-Craig, daughter 





91 



CRA 



of Archibald Buchanan of Currieliill. Mirllotliian. 
He succeeded his fatlier in lOUS. His elder 
Iji'other, Robert James, Lieutenant 3rd Battalion 
no\al Scots, died of dysentry in South Africa, 
in April. 1900, at the age of seventeen. 
He was born on the 24th August. 1883, and was 
educated at Harrow (Head Master's House, 1890 
-1901). From there he went to Trinity College. 
Cambridge, where he took his degree of B.A. in 
1905. He joined the Highland Ligiit Infantry in 
.hily. 1906. becoming Lieutenant in April, 1909. 
In August, 1914. Sir Archibald Gibson-Craig 
was in Colonial employment with the Nigeria 
Heginient, West African Frontier Force, to 
which he was appointed in Jlarch. 1913. 
The following account of the circumstances 
attending his death was published in "The 
Harrovian" of November, 1914: — 
" ' Gibson-Craig was shot,' says a narrator, 
whose communication has been forwarded to 
the "Morning Post." ' wliile leading his men to the 
attack on a German machine gun, which was 
hidden in a wood. He located the gun, and 
asked our Second-in-Command whether he 
might take his platoon (about twenty men) 
and try to capture the gun, which was doing a 
lot of damage to our troops at the time. The 
Major gave his consent, and Gibson-Craig went 
off to get the gun. . . . He and his men crawled 
to the top of the hill, and found themselves 
unexpectedly face to face with a large body of 
Germans. Our men fired a volley, and then the 
Lieutenant drew his sword and rushed forward 
in front of the troops, calling to them, "Charge, 
men ! At tliem ! " He got to within ten yards 
of the enemy and then fell. The Germans held 
>ip flieir hands, but our men were so mad at 
their otticer being killed (and also suspected 
treachery, as the Germans had not tlirown down 
their arms) that about fifty Germans were killed 
on the spot. By his gallant action Gibson- 
Craig did a great deal to assist the general 
advance of the regiment, and. indeed, tlie whole 
of the troops concerned. The remaining men 
silenced the gim, and brought their comrades 
(two killed and three wounded) back to their 
lines — two miles, under shell fire the whole way, 
and not one was touched ! One of these, a 
Private now in hospital in this country, said 
that if the Germans had ke|)( cool and used their 
gun they nuist have wiped out the whole of the 
little band of Britishers.' " 

Sir Archibald Gibson-Craig was unmarried, and is 
succeeded in the liaronetcy by his brother, Henr\ 
Thomas, late Lieutenant 3rd Battn. Royal Scots. 
He was a member of the Carlton and Royal 
Automobile (^lubs. London, and of the New 
Club. Edinburgh. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN MAC- 
ADAM CRAIG. 57th WILDE'S 
RIFLES (FRONTIER FORCEl, 

who was killed in action on the 2nd November. 
1914, was the youngest son of Dr. and Mi-s. 
.Tames Craig, late of Beckenham. Kent. 
He was born on the 1 1th May. ISSli. and was 
a Queen's scholar of Westminster: he was 
gazetted to the Seaforth Highlandei-s in Octoliei-. 
lOOf). was promot«d Lieutenant in .January. 
1909, and transferred to the Indian Aiin> in 
September of that year. 

He saw active service on the north-west<-rn 
frontier of India in 1908, taking part in opera- 
tions in the Mohmand country, for which lie 
received the medal with clasp. 

2nd LIEUTENANT CHARLES EDWARD 
CRANE, 1st BATTN. THE DUKE OF 
CORNWALL'S LIGHT INFANTRY, 

was born on the 
18th February, 1892, 
at the Manor House, 
Birlingham. Worces- 
tershire, the son of 
Cliarles Arnold and 
Georgina C!rane. 
He w-as educated at 
Oakfield, Rugby, 
from 1902-0(5, Chel- 
tenham College 
from 190(5-10. and 
the R.M.C., .Sand- 
hurst. 1911-12. At Cheltenham and Sandhurst 
he was in (he Rugby Football X\'. and also in 
the hockey team at Sandhurst. 
2nd Lieutenant Crane received his connnissiun 
in the D.C.L.I. in September, 1912. The 
battalion assembled at tlie Curragh, was (,'m- 
jjloyed at Fermoy during the Home Rule 
excitement in Ulster in March. 1914. 
On the 14th September, 1914. at the Battle of 
( he Aisne, while on his way back from success- 
fidly locating — while alone and imder heavy 
lire — a tnaxim gun. he W'as wounded, and dieil 
from the effects on the 18th September. 191 1. 
His body was buried at the Farm. Mont de 
.Soissons. with a very impressive service, during 
which there happened to be a lull in the light ing. 
A temporary wooden cross was erected over his 
grave by his brother officers. 
His Commanding Officer, Lieutenant -Colonel 
M. N. Turner, C.B., D.C.L.I., wrote to his mother 
of him as follows : " Your boy was absolutely 
brave and good. We were all so very fond of 
him. and he was such an excellent officer : 
he was absolutely fearless, and one of the best." 
A young brother otTicer wrote : " The cause of 
yourson's death was a very valiant (lieceof work." 
.Several of his non-commissioned officers and 




CRA-CRE 



92 




men also sent their tribute to 2nd Lieutenant 
Crane's worth, among them Lance-Corporal 
J. IToran. who wrote to the following effect : 
■■ His kindness wiU always live in my memory : 
he picked me up when I was lying beside the 
road one night, and put me, with a private, 
in an ambulance wagon. We both owe our lives 
to him. He was most kind and considerate, 
and n ould never ask his men to go to any place 
where he would not go himself. I have seen him 
carrying the men's rifles." 

MAJOR EUSTACE CRAWLEY, 12th 
(PRINCE OF WALESS ROYAL) 

LANCERS, 

who was killed neai- 
Ypres on the 2nd 
November, 19 14, 
«as born on the 
Kith April. 18()S, 
third son of the late 
Baden Crawley. 
He was educated at 
Harrow, and joined 
the 1 2th Lancers 
from the llUitia in 
August, 1889, be- 
corniui,' I.i.ui.nant i'l |s!)l, and Captain in 
November, 1897. JIajor Crawley saw much 
active service. In 1898-99 he took part in 
operations at Sierra Leone, West Coast of 
Africa, for which he received the medal and 
clasp. Again, in 1899 he was in command of 
the Bula Expedition in Nigeria, being men- 
tioned in Despatches by General Wilcox, in 
December, 1899. He commanded the Nigeria 
Company Constabulary from the latter date. 
In 1900-02 he was appointed a Special Service 
Officer in the South African War ; was D.A.A.O. 
Ridley's Corps of Movmted Infantry from April 
to December, 1900 ; took part in General Ian 
Hamilton's march, being present at the actions 
of Diamond HiU, Johannesburg, and Witte- 
bergen ; and also at operations in Cape Colony 
under General French : he was Intelligence 
Officer to Capper's Column at the end of 1901, 
and Staff Officer to Doran's Column from 
December, 1901, to .May, 1902. For his services 
he was mentioned in Despatches by Lord 
Roberts, 4th September, 1901, given the 
Brevet rank of Major from November, 1900, and 
received the Queen's medal with four clasps, 
and the King's medal %vith two clasps. From 
May to November, 1902, he was D.A.A.G. on 
the stafi of Colonel Hickman, commanding the 
troops at ^liddelburg. Cape Colony. 
In 1902—03 he again saw service in Nigeria, 
being in command of a column in the Kano 
Expedition, for which he received the medal and 
clasp. In 1903 he commanded Moimted In- 




fantry, in India, and obtained the substantive 
rank of Major in July. 1905. In 19015-07 he 
was ollkiating Brigade-Major of the Ainballa 
Cavalry Brigade and to the Inspector-General 
of Cavalry in India. 

.Major Crawley married, in December, 1904, 
Lady Violet Ella Finch, elder daughter of the 
eighth Earl of Aylesford. 

CAPTAIN MERVYN CRAWSHAV, 
5th (PRINCESS CHARLOTTE OF 
WALES'S) DRAGOON GUARDS. 

who was killed in 
action on the 31st 
October, 1914, wa-s 
the son of T. Craw- 
shay, Esq., of Dim- 
lands, (ilamorgan- 
shire. 

He was born on the 
4th .May, 1881, and 
after serving with 
the embodied ^lilitia 
and being attached 
to the Regulars for 
a year, received his commission in the \\'oi(cster- 
shire Regiment in .\pril, 1902. He became 
Lieutenant in that regiment in November, 1904, 
having served with it in the South African War, 
being present at operations in the Cape Colony, 
for which he received the Queen's medal with 
two clasps. 

In February, 1908, lie was transferred to the 
5th Dragoon Guards, in which he became 
Captain in .\pril, 1911. 

Captain Crawshay was noted as a fine horse- 
man, representing England in the Military 
Tournaments in .-Vmerica in 1913, and winning 
the Gold Cup in the competition open to the 
world. He also won the King George Challenge 
Cup at the International Military Tournament 
in the same year. 

CAPTAIN LEO CREAGH, 1st BATTN. 
THE MANCHESTER REGIMENT, 

who was killed in 

action on the 20tli- 

21st December, 191 4. 

was the eldest son of 

Brigade-Surgeon W. 

Creagh (retired) and 

of Jlrs. Creagh, of 

Grangewood Ix)dge, 

Lullington near 

Burton-on Trent. 

He was born on the 

20th October, 1878, 

and was educated 

at Stonyhurst College, Blackburn. He joined 

the .Manchester Regiment from the Jlilitia 

in January, 1899, becoming Lieutenant in 




93 



CRE 



September of the same year, and Captain in 
Xovember. 1901. He served in tlie South 
African War, being present at operations in 
Xatal. including the action at Lombard's Kop 
in 1S99. and taking part in the defence of Lady- 
smith, including the sorties of the 7th and 10th 
December, 1S99. He i-eceived thi- Quf-cn's med.il 
with clasp. 

The following account of the circumstances 
attending his death is taken from the "Stony- 
hurst Magazine," of February, 1915: — 
" Captain Creagh fell in the heavy fighting 
that took place near Givenchy on the 20th and 
21st December. His battalion had only left 
the trenches on the 17th when they were ordered 
out again on the 20th. Tliey attacked a village 
and some trenches in the afternoon, during which 
action Captain Creagh was reported to have 
done good work. On the morning of the 21st 
tlie attack was renewed at daybreak, and 
Captain Creagh was shot down in front of the 
enemy's trenches. A sergeant, who was with 
him at the time, said he was leading his men with 
conspicuous gallantry. The above details were 
received from his Colonel, who, writing to 
Captain Creagh's mother, expressed his deep 
regi-et at the loss of so gallant and capable an 
officer." 

Captain Creagh had been at home on short leave 
a few davs before his death. 



In the (ireat War Captain Crean was attached 
to the Royal Flying Corps, and was shot down 
on the 26th October, 191-1, while signalling from 
an aeroplane to tlie Royal Field .\j'tillery. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM CECIL HOLT 
CREE. 71st BATTERY. ROYAL II KID 
ARTILLERY, 
who died of wounds 
on the 24th October. 
1914, in hospital at 
Boulogne, was the 
son of the Rev. 
WilUam Cree. M.A.. 
St. Matthias. Ken- 
sington. 

He was bom on the 
4th August. 1882, 
at MUton Abbott, 
Tavistock, Devon, 
and went to Marllwrough College in September, 
1895, proceeding to the R.M.A., Woolwich, in 
January, 1900. He joined the Royal Artillery 
in July, 1901, becoming Lieutenant in .luly. 
1904. In July, 1909, he was appointed an 
Adjutant of the Territorial Force, and attained 
the rank of Captain in July 1914. 
He married, in 1910, Avis, daughter of the Rev. 
Canon T. S. Hichens, Guilsborough, North- 
ampton. 




CAPTAIN THEODORE CREAN. 
1st BATTN. NORTHAMPTON- 
SHIRE REGIMENT, a 1 1 d . ROYAL 

FLYING CORPS. 
was the son of Mrs. 
Crean. of Chester, 
and of the late 
R. Crean, M.D.. and 
was bom at Man- 
chester on he 23rd 
October, 1880. He 
was educated at 
Stonyhurst College, 
and at Gonville and 
Caius College, Cam- 
bridge. 

Captain Crean joined the Lancasliire Fusiliers 
from the Militia in April, 1902, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in ilarch, 1906. He served in the South 
African War. having been present at operations 
in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, and 
Cape Colony, for which he received the Queen's 
medal with five clasps. He was employed with 
the West African Regiment and the West 
African Fiontier Force for several years, and 
transferred to the Northamptonshire Regiment 
in May, 1908, being gazetted Captain in June, 
1913. 




CAPTAIN FRANCIS JOSEPH 
C R E S S W E L L. ADJUTANT 1st 
B.\TTN. NORFOLK REGIMENT. 

son of George and Eva Cresswell, was bom 
on the 15th July, 1883, at King's Lynn, 
Norfolk, and was educated at Radley CoUege. 
He served with the 3rd Battalion in the South 
African War, 1901-02, taking part in operations 
in the Orange River Colony and in Cape Colony, 
for which he received the Queen's medal with 
four clasps. He was given his commission in 
the Norfolk Regiment from the Militia in 
October. 1902, serving with the 1st Battalion 
in India, and with the King's African Rifles in 
British East Africa. He was promoted Lieu- 
tenant in Febmary. 1905, and Captain in 
March, 1912, and passed the examination for 
liis ilajority, gaining also the special Signalling 
Certificate. In August, 1913, he was appointed 
Adjutant of his battalion. 

Captain Cresswell was killed during the retire- 
ment from Mons on the 24th August, 1914, 
while he was taking a message to a battery of 
Royal Field Artillery. 

He was a member of the Isthmian Club, and 
a Freemason. His favourite sport was shooting, 
and he had killed elephant, lion, rhinoceros, 
and buffalo in Africa. 



CRI 



94 



He married Barbara, niece ui Sir \V. H. B. 
Ffolkes, Bart., ami left two (lau<;litei's. Barbara, 
age three years, and Eve, age eleven weeks, 
at the time of his death. 



M.\JOR HUBERT 
TON. 1st BATTN. 




FRANCIS CRICH- 
IRISH GUARDS, 

son of Lieutt-nant- 
Coloni'l the Hon. 
Charles C'richton and 
Lady Madeline 
Crichton. and a 
nephew of the Earl 
of Erne and of the 
present Marquis of 
Headfort, was born 
in London on 
the 17th December, 
1874. 

He was educated at 
Eton, and the K..M.C'., Sandhurst, receiving 
his commission m the Grenadier Guards in 
1896. With his battalion he served in the Nile 
Expedition of 1S9S, being present at the Battle 
of Khartoum, receiving the British medal and 
the Egyptian medal with clasp. When the Irish 
(iuards were formed in 1900 he was transferred 
to them, and was appointed Adjutant in May, 
1900. He went to South Africa for the Boer 
War with the 29th Battalion Imperial Yeo- 
manry, taking part in the operations in Cape 
Colony. For his services he received the Queen's 
South African medal with two clasps. In 1903 
he was A.D.C. to the Commander of the 1st 
Army Corps at Aldershot. 

Having obtained his Majority in March. 1908, 
Major Crichton accompanied his battalion to 
Fi'ance in Augu.st, 1914, where he was killed, 
on the 1st September, in the rearguard action 
of the 12th Infantry Brigade, the Irish Guards 
forming part of the 4th Guards' Brigade. He 
was mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch 
of 8th October, 1914. 

Jlajor Crichton, who was a member of the 
Guards' Club, Bachelors', and Pratt's Clubs, 
was a keen fisherman, a good shot, and played 
polo. He married, in July, 1903, Esther, 
daughter of Captain and Lady Rachel Saunder- 
son, and left two daughters, Doris, born in 
May, 1904, and Enid, bom in February, 1907. 

LIEUTENANT - COLONEL HUGH 
TREVOR CRISPIN. COMMANDING 2nd 
BATTN. THE ROYAL SUSSEX REGT.. 

was the eldest son of the late Trevor Crispin, 
of His Majesty's Treasury (Legal Department), 
and was born in London on the 18th Sep- 
tember, 1868. 

He was educated at Bradfield College : Trinity 
College, Cambridge, where he obtained the 




degree of B.A.: and at the K.M.C. .Sandhurst. 
Lieutenant-ColonelCrispinobtaineil his first com- 
mission in the Prince 
of Wales's Leinster 
Regiment (Royal Can- 
adians) in May, 1892, 
being transferred to 
the Xorthumberland 
Fusiliei-s. in whicli 
nearly all his Army 
service was spent, in 
December of the same 
year. He became 
Lieutenant in July. 
189.5: Captain in February, 1900: Bi.\ it- NUijim 
for war service in South Africa in November, 1 900: 
and Substantive Major in February, 1911. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Crispin served with the 
Xorthumberland Fusiliers in the Nile Expedition 
of 1898, being present at the Battle of Omdur- 
man, afterwards receiving the Queen's medal 
with clasp and the Khedive's medal. He also 
served in Crete during the suppression of the 
disturliances there. In the Soutli African War 
he served with the ilounted Infantry in ISilll- 
1000, and was present at the advance on 
Kimberley (severely wounded), and in actions 
at Belmont. EnsUn, and Modder River. He was 
present at operations in the Orange Free State 
from February to May, 1900, when he com- 
manded a battalion of Mounted Infantry, 
including actions at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove, 
Driefontein, Vet River, and Zand River. He 
was also present at operations in the Transvaal 
in May and .Tune, 1900, including actions near 
JohannesbiH'g. Pretoria, and Diamond Hill, 
being again severely wounded. For these 
services lie was mentioned in Despatches 
("London Gazette," 10th .September, 1901), pro- 
moted Brevet-ilajor, and received the Queens 
medal with sis clasps. 

Prom 1901-02 Lieutenant- Colonel Crispin was 
A.D.C. to the Major-General Commanding an 
Infantry Brigade at Aldershot, and from 1902- 
04 was A.D.C. to the Major-General Command- 
ing a Division of the 1st Army Corps. He com- 
manded the 6th Regiment of Mounted Infantry 
in South Africa in 1907-08. and was Adjutant 
at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, from 1910-14. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Crispin was selected to 
command the 2nd Royal Sussex Regiment on 
the 14th .September. 1914, and, while in com- 
mand, was killed in action, near Ypres, on the 
30th October, 1914. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Crispin, who was unmarried, 
was a member of the Army and Navy, and of the 
Roval Automobile Clubs. 



95 



CRO 




LIEUTENANT JOHN CROCKET. 
ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS, 

who was boin on 
the 3rd August. 
188(5, was the son 
of William Crocket, 
Head >I aster 
Sciennes Public 
School, Edinburgh. 
He was a cousin 
of the late S. K. 
Crockett, the novel- 
ist. 

After Ills education 
at George Watson's 
College, Edinburgh, he qualified as a medical 
man, and held the appointment of resident 
House Surgeon at the Edinburgh Royal In- 
firmary, and afterwards at the Eoyal Hospital 
for .Sick Children and Chalmers Hospital, 
Edinburgh. At the University he took a 
prominent part in the Dumfries and GaUoway 
Literary Society, of which he wa.s President 
for a time, and was one of the Executive Com- 
mittee of the Students' Representative CouucU. 
AMaen at the L'liivei-sity he played golf and 
tennis. 

He entered the R.A.M.C. in 1913, and took the 
degree of M.D. at Edinburgh University in 
July, 1914. After joining the Army he was 
attached to the 1st Battalion Cameron High- 
landers at Edinburgh Castle, and left there for 
the front in August, 1914. 

During the Battle of the Aisne on the 2.5th 
September, 1914, Lieutenant Crocket was in a 
cave used partly as headquarters and partly as 
a collecting base for the wounded. Just after 
he had fimshed dressing a soldier's wound the 
roof, having been struck by two shells, fell in, 
. kUling him, together with five Staff officers 
and about thirty men. The officers were buried 
at Bourg. It was supposed that the exact 
locality of the cave had been ascertained by 
spies and communicated to the enemy, who 
were thus able to find the exact range. 
The following extract is from the " Educational 
Xews " : — " Lieutenant Crocket was a pupil of 
George Watson's College, and a student of 
Edinburgh University. As pupil and student 
his career was most briUiant, and gave promise 
of a highly successful future in his chosen 
profession. Add to his academic record the 
fact of his bright manner, his winning 
personality, liis almost boyish smile, liis un- 
failing good nature, lit up with a touch of ready 
humour, and readers can conjure up a picture 
of one who was beloved by all who knew 
him, one of whom the nation might well be 
proud." 




2nd LIEUTENANT LESLIE ROBERT 
CROFT, 2nd BATTN. ROYAL SUSSEX 
REGIMENT;, 

youngest son of 
-Major G. Croft, late 
Y'orkshire and Royal 
Sussex Regiments, 
and of Mrs. Croft, 
of ilanor House. 
Hale, Famham, Sur- 
rey, was bom in 
1892, and was edu- 
cated at the Fam- 
ham Grammar 
School. The Head 

Master, the Rev. G. Priestley, writing of him 
says : " All the boys of his time \vill remember 
his . . . unfailing cheerfulness . . . and his 
absolutely sterling character." 
He received his commission in the Koyal Sussex 
Regiment from the ranks of the Chesliire 
Regiment in September, 1912. 
The following account of his death was received 
from a Sergeant who was with him at the time : 
Lieutenant Croft was in command of Xo. 10 
Platoon, which was leading " C " Company of 
his battalion on the 30th October, when advanc- 
ing against the Germans tlirough a pine wood. 
As the enemy was found to be in force Lieu- 
tenant Croft sent for reinforcements, and a few 
minutes after was wounded in the head. The 
Sergeant bandaged his head and selected a 
way for liim to get away safely. Lieutenant 
Croft, however, refused to leave, saying. " I 
must see thLs job finished first." These were 
his last words, for as he raised his head to give 
some command he was mortally wounded in 
the neck, death bemg pi-actically instantaneous. 
" We all felt," said the Sergeant, " that we had 
lost, not only an officer and a leader, but a great 
friend." 



2nd LIEUTENANT WILLIAM 

CRONK. THE BUFFS EAST 

REGIMENT, 

the son of William 

Henry and Winifred 

Ruth Cronk. was 

bom ' at .Suflolk 

Place, Sevcnoaks, 

Kent, on the 28th 

AprU, 1893. 

Educated at Eton 

and the Royal 

^Military Academy, 

Woolwich, he was 

gazetted to the 

Buffs on the 14th 

attached to the 1st 



GUY 
KENT 




March, 1914. He wa.s 
Battn. K.R.B.C. in the 



Great War. and was killed on the 24th October, 



CRO 



98 




111] J, al.iout two and a half iiiilfs sfnitli-cast of 

Zonnebeke, while leading his platoon to take a 

Oeinian trench, when he came under the 

lire of a niacliino jjnn at short range. 

nis recreations were huntinir. i)olo. cricket, and 

tennis. 



2nd LIEUTENANT WILLIAM RONALD 
MORLEV GROSSMAN. 2nd BATTN. 
KINGS ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, 

who was killed in 
action at Veldhoek. 
in Flandere, on the 
"2nd Noveniber.1914, 
was horn on the tith 
.September. ISiU. at 
(ioswick House, 
Beal, Xorthumber- 
land. He was the 
younger of two sons, 
both in the Army, of 
the late ilajor Law- 
rence ilorley 
('iii^>inan, J.l'.. a freeman of Berwick and 
Lord of the .Manor of Holy Island, and 
Mrs. ^lorley Crossman, of Cheswick House. 
Beal. 2nd Lieutenant Crossman was a grandson 
of the late Major-General Sir William Cross- 
man, K.C.M.O., R.E., sometime member of 
Pai'liament for Portsmoutli. 

2nd Lieutenant Crossman, who was educated 
at Lyndhurst, ^Yellingtou College, and the 
R.JI.C, Sandhui'st, only received his commission 
in the K.R.B.C. in Febniary, I'JIL 



LIEUTENANT CECIL FRANCIS 
CROUSAZ. 1st B.\TTN. THE SOUTH 
STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was the youngest son 
of \\'. de P. Crou- 

«« saz. Jurat of the 
'^ Koyal Court of 
(iiiernsey, and was 
* ; boi n in that island 
_ j on the 7th Hecem- 
: ber. 1SS8. 
^ .. He was educated at 

Elizabeth College, 

(iuernsey, and the 

Ij R.M.C., Sandhurst. 



entering the South 
StafTordshire Hcgiment in Xovember, 1000. and 
becoming Lieutenant ni March, 1912. 
He served with liis battalion in Soutli Africa 
and Gibraltar from 1910-1-1. He won the 
Featherweight Aimy Boxing Cup at Aldeishot 
in 101.3. 

He was killed in a trench at Zonnebeke, near 
Ypres, by shell on the 31st October, 1914. 




CAPTAIN WILLIAM MAYNARD CAR- 
LISLE CROWE, RESERVE OF 
OFFICERS, ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE 
REGIMENT, 

was the son of 
Major-General 
Thomas Carlisle 
Crowe, R.H.A. (re- 
tired), and was born 
at the Curragh 
Camp, Ireland, on 
the 11th September, 
1870. 

He was educated at 
St. Paul's School, 
and the R.A.M.C. 
Sandliuret, obtaining liis commission as 2 ml 
Lieutenant in the Royal Warwicks in July, 
1891. He became Captain in September, 180,s, 
and retired in August, 1907, joining the Heserve 
of Officers. 

In the Great War Captain Crowe was attachetl 
to the 1st Battalion Northamptonshire Regi- 
ment, when he was killed near Ypres on the 
8th Xovember, 1911. 

Captain Crowe was a member of the United 
Ser\ice Club, and of the Swiss Alpine and 
Swiss Ski Clubs. He married, in 1901, Eliza- 
beth Hannah Stanley, widow of C. Archer, 
Esq. 



2nd LIEUTENANT J.\MES CYRIL 
B.\PTIST CROZIER. 2nd BATTN. 
ROYAL M U N S T E R FUSILIERS. 

who was born at 
Bowden, Cheshire, ' 
on the 24th October, ^^^ 

1890, was the son ^r^ j 

of the late Rev. ^ ^ $ 

Henry Wilcox Dtoi *^ ^ 

Crozier (brother of 
the .Vrchbishop of 
Arnuigh, Primate of 
All Ireland), and of 
.Susannah M. .M. 
.Spence, daughter of 
the late James 
.Spence, well known in Liverpuul ami Uii keiiluad. 
He was educated at Loretto School, where he 
was in the XV, and at Edinburgh Univereity, 
where he also played for the 'Varsity XV. At 
the latter he had studied medicine for two 
years, when he appUed for a commission in the 
3rd Battalion Royal .Scots, Special Reserve. He 
was gazetted to the Royal .Munster Fusiliers in 
June, 1914. 

He was killed on the 27th August, 1914, near 
Etreux, when the battalion was nearly sur- 
rounded, and no fewer than eight of its ollicei's 
were killed 




97 



CRU— CUN 




LIEUTENANT E. O. CRUIKSHANK, 
3rd BATTN. THE DUKE OF EDIN- 
BURGHS (WILTSHIRE REGIMENT), 
was killed in action on the I'Jth September, 
1914. He was appointed 2nd Lieutenant on 
probation in December, 1912. and promoted 
Lieutenant in July. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT CECIL REGINALD 
CRYMBLE. D.Sc. 3rd B.\TTN. PRINCESS 
VICTORIAS ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS), 

was the youngest 
son of the late Mr. 
George G. Crymble, 
of Gordon House, 
Annadale, and was 
bom at Belfast on 
the 6th April, 1885. 
He was a graduate 
of the Queen's Uni- 
versity, Belfast, of 
which he was one 
of the most popular 
and brilliant 
students. His most marked abilities were shown 
in chemical work, in which he gained several 
distinctions. He was the students' repre- 
sentative in the Senate, and a prominent 
member of the O.T.C. He held the " Andrews " 
.Scholarship and the 18.51 Exhibition for re- 
searcli work for three years, and obtained his 
degree of D.Sc. with the gold inedal. For 
several years lie was also demonstrator of 
chemistry at Queen's College. Besides being a 
student of conspicuous ability, he took an 
active part in the social life of the University, 
and was President of the Students' Union 
and of the Students' Kepresentative Council. 
He was aLso one of the prime movers in the 
formation of the O.T.C, and from that Corps 
was one of the first to join the 3rd Battalion 
Royal Irish FnsUiers, as 2nd Lieutenant in 
December, 1910, and in which he became Lieu- 
tenant in August, 1912. After leaving Belfast 
in 1910, he proceeded to University College, 
London, where he worked under Sir William 
Ramsay, and subsequently obtained an appoint- 
ment a.s Lecturer in Biological Chemistry in the 
physiological department at University College. 
On the outbreak of the Great War he was 
attached for active service to the 1st Batta- 
lion of his regiment, and was .serving with it 
when he was shot by a sniper while working 
at a trench near Armentieres on the 20th 
November, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT LEWIS ROBERTSON 
GUMMING. 1st BATTN. THE BLACK 
WATCH ROYAL HIGHLANDERS, 

who was bom on the 5th October, 1892, was 
the eldest son of John Fleetwood Cunmiiug, 




J.P.. late Captain X.B. Seaforth Highlanders, 
of " The Dowans," Aberlour. Banffshire. 
He was educated at 
Rugby, where he 
played for his House 
XV, and at tlie 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, 
where he rode for the 
.Saddle. He was a 
member of the Cale- 
donian Club, and was 
fond of hunting, 
shooting, and golfing. 
Ha\'ing been gazet- ^ 
ted to the Black Watch in February. ' .-j. 
coming Lieutenant in ^lay, 1914, he left with 
the Expeditionary Force in August, 1914, was 
present in the retirement from Mons and the 
Battle of the Mame. and was killed at the 
Battle of the Aisne on the 14th September, 1914. 
The following account of his death was given 
by brother officers : " Lewis was, as you know, 
.Scout Officer of the regiment. After the battle 
started there was no work for the Scouts, and 
Lewis was at the headquarters of the battalion 
with Colonel Grant Duff and the Adjutant. 
AU the time he was anxious to go forward, 
but was kept back. Eventually, when the 
Colonel went forward himself at a time when 
things were not going very well. Lewis collected 
as many men as he could find, formed them into 
a platoon, and went fonvard with them, taking 
wliat ammunition he could get to those in 
front. . . . There was a heavy fire from 
front and flanks, and Lewis and his men were 
practically annihilated." 

Lieutenant Cuniniing's body was found by the 
Gloucestershire Regiment, with those of two 
officers of the Cameixin Highlandei^, and the 
three were buried together near the woods to 
the north of Chivv. 



2nd LIEUTENANT JOHN REYNOLDS 
PICKERSGILL-CUNLIFFE, 2nd 

BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS. 

who was included as 
killed in action in 
the War Office 
casualty list issued 
on the 9th October, 
1914, but whose 
death had been an- 
nounced on the 21st 
September, was the 
only son of Harry 
PickersgUl - Cunliffe. 
of Haughton ilanor. 
St. Xeot's, and 27, 
Beaufort Gardens, London 




S.W. 



CUR DAL 



liiid I.icntcn.-inl I'ickersgill-C'uiililVr. who was 
only nineteen years of age, was gazetted to llu' 
Grenadier Guards on the 17th September, llll:!. 

2nd LIEUTENANT FREDERICK 
GWATKIN OLDHAM CURTLER, 2nd 
BATTN. WORCESTERSHIRE REGT., 

who was killed in action on the 21st October, 
1914, was the only son of Mr. Frederick Lewis 
Curtler, of Bevere House, Worcestershire, 
lie was educated at Rugby, which he entered 
in 1907. 

2nd Lieutenant Curtler, who was twenty-one 
years old when killed, first entered the Army 
in the .'jth Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, 
as 2nd Lieutenant in April. Ill 12. being pro- 
moted Lieutenant in December, 1013, and 
afterwaids transferred as 2nd Lieutenant to 
the Regular Battalion in October, 1914. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM CHARLES CUR- 
GENVEN, 1st BATTN. SOUTH WALES 

BORDERERS. 

the son of Cliarles 
James Curgenven, 
Paymaster-in-Ch;ef, 
R.X., was born at 
Great Missenden, 
Bucks, on the 7th 
November, 1876. 
He was educated at 
Hazlehurst School, 
Frant, and Repton , 
j^^^BBQ^H^^^^Bi where he was cap- 
tain of both the 
cricket and football teams, and was also Repton 
member of the " Hampshire Hogs " and In- 
cognito Cricket Clubs. 

He joined the South Wales Borderers from the 
Militia in December, 1897, and became Lieu- 
tenant in April, 1899. He served in the South 
African War, where he was slightly wounded, 
taking part in operations in the Orange Free 
State, including actions at Karee Siding, Vet 
River, and Zand River ; in the Transvaal, 
including action near Johannesburg ; in the 
Transvaal, west of Pretoria; and in Orange 
River Colony. He received the Queen's medal 
with three clasps, and the King's medal witli 
two clasps. He was Adjutant of his battalion 
from February, 1906, to February, 1909, and 
from 1909-13 was Instructor of Topography at 
the R.M.C., Sandhurst. 

In the Great War he was in command of No. 4 
Company South Wales Borderers, when the 
regiment was attacked by the enemy near the 
village of Langemark, on the 21st October, 
1914 ; and, while leading the company under 
a hot fire, was wounded in the arm, and almost 
immediately after was shot through the head. 
Captain Curgenven was a first-rate all-round 





athlete, and was a member of the Junior Army 
and Xavy Club. 

He married the elde.st daughter of the late 
Henry Forrester, Esq., of " Woodfield," Colin- 
ton, Midlothian, and left a daughter, Angela 
I'^mily Muriel, born at the Royal Military Col- 
lege in August, 1912. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES ANTOINE DE 
GUERRY DALGLISH, 1st BATTN. 
THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL 
HIGHLANDERS! , 

\x lio dird on the 9th 
.September, 1914, 
of wounds received 
in action at Sablon- 
niercs, was the third 
son of the late J. C. 
Halslish. Wandara. 
(a>ull>urn. X.S.W., 
and of .Mrs. Dal- 
glish. Bellasis, Sun- 

d o r n e Castle, 

Shrewsbury. 

He was born on the 11th February, 1SS3, and 
was educated at the Oratory School, I'^lg- 
baston. He joined the Royal Higlilandcrs 
from the Militia in January, 1901, becoming 
Lieutenant in October, 1903, and Captain in 
January, 1910. 

Captain Dalglish served in the South African 
War from 1901-02, being present at operations 
in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, and 
received for his services the Queen's medal with 
foin- clasps. 

He was a member of the Caledonian Chili, ami 
married Carline de Burgh Purves, daughter of 
(ieorge Purdis Purves, ^Middle Temple, son of 
James Purves, of Chintin and Glen Isla, Cape 
Sliank, Australia, and late of .Mosspennock, 
(ireenlaw, Berwickshire ; he left three daughters : 
Rosemarie Constance Dorothy, born January, 
1908 ; CarUne Frances, born November, 1910 : 
and Margaret Veronica de Lauret, born Feb- 
ruary, 1912, 

LIEUTENANT - COLONEL CHARLES 
DALTON, ROYAL ARMY MEDI. 
CAL CORPS, 

the second son of 
John Edward Dal- 
t o n. J. P., and 
Katherine Dalton, 
was born at Golden 
HiUs, County Tip- 
perary, on the 3rd 
May, 1867. He was 
a grandson of Ed- 
ward Dalton, of 
Ballygriffin, County 
Tipperary. 




99 



DAL 



Lieutenant- Colonel Dalton was educated at 
Clongowes Wood College, to which he went in 
1879, remaining there four years, where he is 
remembered as a steady worker, a leading spirit 
in all games, and as an influence which, for his 
age, was almost uni({ue and altogether good. 
In 1883 he began the study of medicine at the 
Carmichael Medical School, DubUn, where, 
again, in work and play he made his mark. 
He rowed for the Pembroke Rowing Club, 
helping more than one boat to victory ; and 
as a football player is remembered in the Monks- 
town Football Club, of which he was vice- 
president at the time of his death. When in 
India and on tlie West Coast of Africa he did 
some big-game shooting, but it was his hunting 
and racing career which showed the real grit 
of the man. Charley Dalton was the first 
member of the R.A.M.C. to win a military 
steeplecliase in Ireland, and he added to the 
already high sporting status of the corps when 
lie carried off the Irish Grand !MiUtary on 
" Thowl Pin " in 1912. He took the diploma 
of tlie Royal (Colleges of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Ireland, in 1888. At the end of that year, 
wishing to see the world, he took the appoint- 
ment of Ship's Surgeon on the R.M.S. " ^Magel- 
lan," sailing to Valparaiso, and repeated the 
trip in March the following year in R.M.S. 
Cotopaxi." This vessel sank after a collision 
with a Ciermau steamer in the Straits of Magel- 
lan. Though badly damaged, the " Cotopaxi " 
continued the voyage through a narrow channel 
instead of the ordinary route, hoping to escape 
bad weather. After a week she struck an 
unknown rock in mid-channel and sank in eight 
minutes, just giving the passengers and crew 
time to get into the boats. Everything was lost, 
and the party landed on the shores of Patagonia, 
living for four days on mussels and some casks 
of tallow that floated ashore. On the fourth day 
t hey were rescued by a Oerman steamer. During 
the sinking of the ship Lieutenant-Colonel 
Dalton behaved with great gallantry in rescuing 
two of the passengers who were paralysed — 
one completely so — carrj'ing them up on deck 
and putting them into a boat. The French 
Government awarded him a silver medal of the 
1st class, and the Royal Humane Society con- 
ferred on him their gold medal for saving lite. 
He was also awarded the Albert medal. 
After his return to Dublin, Lieutenant-Colonel 
Dalton was appointed Resident Surgeon to 
Jervis Street Hospital, and in June, 1891, com- 
peted successfully for a commission in the 
H.A..M.C. lie proceeded very .shortly to India, 
and while there served in the Kachlin Hills 
I'^xpeditioii in Burma, receiving the medal and 



clasp. Afterwards he saw service on the north- 
west frontier of India, 1897, receiving a second 
medal with clasp. In November of the same year 
he returned from India, and was stationed at 
Belfast till March, 1898. when he left England 
for Sierra Leone, and took part in the Karene 
Expedition. For his services there he was 
mentioned in Despatches, receiving a medal 
and clasp. The following was the report 
made by the Officer Commanding the column : — 
I wish to specially mention the following 
ollicer : Captain C. Dalton, R.A.M.C, who dis- 
played conspicuous bravery in attending to 
Lieutenant Craig-Brown, who was dangerously 
wounded, under an extremely heavy fire from 
a stockade a few yards away. While he was 
binding up this officer's wounds four or Ave 
carriers who were lying close by at the time were 
killed. It was entirely owing to Captain Dalton's 
coolness and courage that Lieutenant Craig- 
Brown is now alive." 

On another occasion Captain Dalton (as he was 
then) went out and brought back a private under 
lioavy fire. Tlirough some mischance, the 
original reports of Captain Dalton's conduct on 
these two occasions, sent in March, 1898, were 
not forwarded to or received by the proper 
authorities, and it was not till tliree years later 
that the information was furnished. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Dalton returned from Sierra 
Leone in March, 1899, and in November of that 
year was posted to the 14th Hussars, then under 
orders for the South African War, in which he 
took part, being present at operations in Natal, 
1899, the Relief of Ladysmith, including opera- 
tions of 17th -24th January, 1900 (severely 
wounded on the 23rd January) ; in the Orange 
Free State, February- May, 1900, including 
actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet 
River, and Zand River : and in Orange River 
and Cape Colonies. For these services he re- 
ceived the Queen's medal with three clasps, 
and was mentioned in Despatches. Having 
obtained special permission to go and attend 
the wounded under heavy fire, he himself was 
dangerously wounded in nobly doing his duty 
as a good soldier surgeon. Soon after he 
returned home in 1901, he was awarded the 
Arnott gold medal for distinguished gallantry 
in the field by the Irish Jledical School and 
Graduates' Association, this being the fii'st 
award made. 

After a year at home he went a second time to 
Sierra Leone, and in 1905 to India, where he 
did some valuable plague work in Pindi, and 
was selected, " for distinguished service in the 
field, for appointment as Honorary Surgeon to 
His Excellency the Viceroy " in May, 1908. 



DAN 



100 



Dui'ing his next period of home service he 
filled the position of D.A.D.M.S., Irish Com- 
mand, and on the outbreak of the Great War 
he embarked on the 18th August, 1914, with 
the Expeditionary Force in charge of No. 1 
General Hospital. On the Sth September 
he joined the headquarters, Ilnd Division 1st 
Army Corps as A.D.il.S.. at iloussey. The 
follo«-ing account of his fatal injury is 
from a statement of an eye-w"itness : — 
" Dalton and Bostock went up with G.S. of 
Ilnd Division to Verneuil hot-shelled. Teams, 
etc., knocked about, and nobody but Dalton 
and Bostock to do the carrying. Dalton did 
all he coxild in personally carrying wounded into 
A'erneuil Chateau. In doing this he got hit in 
the back (shell). As he lay on the ground a 
stampeding gun limber bmised his left hip. 
Rescued by Persell, of Signals, who just pulled 
him out in time. Was paralysed by concussion 
of spine, only pain round chest (girdle), but 
thought he was dying. On admission to the 
temporary hospital, where he was under the 
care of Colonel Copeland and Captain Carter, 
it was found that he was paralysed from the 
waist downwards. There was a wound between 
his shoulders ; also some small wounds on his 
head and face. He considered that the paralysis 
was caused by the shell before the limber passed 
over him. Was not too hopeful of his chances, 
but was very calm, and suffered very little 
pain. He remained two days in the temporary 
hospital (a chateau), and while there was 
visited by Father Dey, the Army Chaplain, 
who administered to him the last sacraments. 
Throughout this time Dalton was cheerful, 
and more anxious as to how others were faring 
than troubled about himself. He appeared to 
do fairly well at first, improved as regards 
sensation and movement, and got more hopeful. 
Spoke of going to Paris in a motor-car, and then 
on home. As the chateau became too dangerous 
to be continued as a hospital (it was under very 
heavy shell fire), Major P. Davidson decided to 
evacuate it, and risk a journey down the hill, 
back across the Aisne in the dark, to the next 
temporary hospital at Vieil Arcy. Dalton stood 
the journey fairly well, and was pleased to 
leave Verneuil, but was a bit coUapsed at the 
end. Next morning, at 6 a.m., it was found he 
had developed gangrene of the hip (where he had 
been bruised only), and he became comatose 
and died on the 18th September. He had a 
peaceful death. Although the injury was so 
grave the hopes raised by his cheerfulness and 
great powers of endurance gave an unexpected- 
ness to this early termination. He was buried 
in the churchyard of Vieil Arcy, near Braisne, 



by lu\ther Dey, the Roman Catholic Chaplain, 
Oth Field Ambulance. There was a big attend- 
ance of the R.A.M.C., with shells falling about 
all the time." 

Lieutenant- Colonel Dalton was mentioned in 
Field- Marshal Su- John F'rench's Despatch of 
the Sth October, 1914. 

During his expeditions abroad Lieutenant- 
Colonel Dalton wrote home interesting letters 
describing his various experiences, some of 
which were published in a memoir in the 
"Journal of the R.A.M.C." for January, 1915, 
from which many of tlu' details given above 
have been obtained. 



RICHARD WILLIAM 
THE GLOUCESTER. 




LIEUTENANT 
DANCKWERTS, 
SHIRE REGT., 

born in London on 

the 16th June, 1893, 

was the youngest 

son of the late ilr. 

W. O. Danckwerts, 

K.C., and of Mrs. 

Danckwerts, of 22, 

Orsett Terrace, 

Hyde Park, London, 

W. 

He was educated at 

Winchester and L^ni- 

versity College, Oxford, and was gazetted to 

the Gloucestershire Regiment in August, 1914, 

being promoted temporary Lieutenant on the 

15th December. He was mortally wounded in 

action at Festubert, in Flanders, on the 22nd 

December, 1914, and died the same day of his 

wounds. 

When at the 'Varsity he rowed for his College 

in the Torpids in 1913 and 1914, and was a keen 

cricketer. 



2nd LIEUTENANT ARCHIBALD 
STEUART LINDSEV DANIELL, 5th 
(attd. Isti BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE 
(THE PRINCE CONSORTS OWN). 

was the only child ___ 

of Lindsey and 
-Marion Daniell, and 
grandson of Sir 
Steuart Colvin Bay- 
ley, G. C.S.I. He was 
born on the 6th June, 
1895, and was edu- 
cated at Winchester. 
He joined the .Special 
Reserve of Officers 
in June, 1914, and 
was gazetted to the 
5th Battalion Rifle Brigade, and attached to 




101 



DAN— DAU 



the 1st Battalion, which he joined at the front 
at the end of August, 1914. He was killed 
while leading his platoon into action at Ploeg- 
steert on the 19th December, 1914, and was 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 
14th January, 1915. 

MAJOR EDWARD HENRY EDWIN 
D.\NIELL. D.S.O.. p.s.c. 2nd 
BATTN. ROYAL IRISH REGIMENT, 
who is believed to have been killed in 1914. was 
bom on the 5th June, IStiS, and joined the Royal 
Irish Regiment from the ^lilitia in April, 1892, 
becoiidng Lieutenant in June, 1S94, and Captain 
in October, 1S99. He had a long and varied 
cai-eer on the Staff at home and abroad, and on 
active service. 

In 1897-98 he was present at operations on the 
.Samana. north-west frontier of India, for which 
lie received the medal with two cla.sps. 
He took part in the South African War, being 
Assistant Provost-Marshal (graded as D.A.A.(J.) 
from October, 1900, to May. 1901. and being 
pi-esent, in 1900. at operations in the Orange 
Free State, the Transvaal east of Pretoria, 
including actions at Belfast and Lydenberg ; 
at operations in the Orange River Colony, 
including actions at Betldeheni and Witte- 
bergen : at operations in Cape Colony, south of 
the Orange River, including actions at Coles- 
berg. He was afterwards employed with 
Damanfs Horse (formerly Remington's Guides). 
He was also present at later operations in the 
Transvaal and Orange River Colony between 
1900 and 1902. For his services he was twice 
mentioned in Despatches — " London Gazette," 
the 10th September, 1901, and the 29th July, 1902 
— was awarded the D.S.O., was placed on the 
list of officers qualified for Staff employment 
in consequence of service on the Staff in the 
Field, and received the Queen's medal with 
three clasps and the King's medal with two 
clasps. Subsequently he passed through the 
Staff CoUege. 

From June. 1902. to May. 190.3, he was Adjutant 
of his battalion : from August, 1903, to August, 
1907, he was D.A.A.G., D.A.A. and Q.M.G., 
North China : from October. 1909. to November. 
1911. he was employed as a General Staff Officer 
at Headquarters, War Office : and in November. 
1911, was appointed General Staff Officer, 
2nd Grade, at Malta, an appointment he held 
till 1914. 

2nd LIEUTENANT FREDERICK 
DARBY'. 1st BATTN. WOR- 
CESTERSHIRE REGl.MENT, 

bom at Birmingham on the 23rd March, 1880, 
was the son of Mr. Joseph Darby, of that city. 




2nd Lieutenant Darby enlisted in the Wor- 
cestershire Regiment in June, 1898, and with 
it served through the 
South African War. 
At the defence of 
Ladybrand. accom- 
panied by a patrol 
who volunteered, he 
went out to mislead 
the enemy, and 
carried out the action 
with conspicuous 
enei^y and skiU. 
subsequently dLstin- 
guisliing liimself in leadiii_' latnils at Bethle- 
hem. For the Ladybrand action he was 
awarded the D.C.il. on the 10th December, 
1900. and for his services in the war generally 
he was promoted Sergeant in the field, mentioned 
in Despatches, and received the Queen's and the 
King's medals with five clasps. In 1908 he was 
advanced to the rank of Company Sergeant- 
Major. and was given his commission as 2nd 
Lieutenant on proceeding to France in 
November, 1914. 

He was killed on the morning of the 29tb 
November, and was buried at Neuve Chapelle. 
The exact circumstances attending his death 
have not been ascertained. Both in the ranks 
and for the very short time he lived to serve as 
an officer, 2nd Lieutenant Darby enjoyed the 
esteem and i-espect of both officers and men, 
and in the Great War had been noticed for his 
skill and absolute fearlessness. One of the 
officers of the battalion spoke of him as "' an 
officer they could ill afford to lose." 
The Commander of the Division in which 2nd 
Lieutenant Darby was serving, in a letter of 
sympathy to his widow, said : " It may perhaps 
be some consolation to you to know that he had 
won golden opinions from his brother officers 
of all ranks, and that ever since we began to 
take our part in active operations he had been 
conspicuous for his gallant conduct." 
2nd Lieutenant Darby was a good all-round 
sportsman, and an especially good hockey player. 
He married Alice, third daughter of Mr. Joseph 
Kirkhain. of Brookfields. Birmingham, and 
left four children : Joseph, bom April. 1908 : 
Alice, born November, 1909 : Winifred, bom 
March, 1911 : and Evelyn, bora May. 1913. 

LIEUTENANT EDWARD CHARLES 
DAUN, 2nd B.\TTN. ROYAL SUSSEX 
REGIMENT, who was bom in June. 1885, 
at .Streatham, Surrey, was the only son of 
Charles James Daun, Esq., and Ada Margaret, 
Ids wife, daughter of the late Lieutenant- 
General E. A. WiU:ams, C-B., Colonel Com- 



DAV 



102 




iiiiuniant of tile Hoyal Artillery. lli' came of 
inilitaiy stoek. arTiont; his iiuinediate relatives 
and ancestors beinj;' 
I lieutenant - C o 1 c j i n • I 
i:.(i.Willianis,C..M.O., 
( 'oninianding the 1st 
Battalion Devonshire 
Regiment in the pre- 
sent war; Lieutonant- 
(ieneral Sir II. F. 
Williams, K.C.B., 
Colonel Royal Sussex 
Hegiment, and after- 
wards Colonel Com- 
mandant 3r(l K.R.K.C. ; Colonel Henry 
Williams, R.A.. who was present at Waterloo : 
Captain G. B. Williams, R.N.. and others more 
remotely connected . 

Lieutenant Daun was educated at Sunningdale 
School and Harrow, and joined the 3rd Battalion 
Royal Sussex Regiment in 11104, being gazetted 
to the 2nd Battalion in 10O.j. and beconung 
Lieutenant in November, 1909. He served with 
liis battalion in the Mediterranean and in In- 
land (including the Belfast riots). He had been 
Instructor of :Musketry and of Machine Gunnery, 
and also Assistant Adjutant. 
He fell at the Battle of the Aisne on the Uth 
September, 1914, the following account of the 
occurrence appearing in the "Sussex Daily 
News" of the Uth January, 191.5 :— 
" On reaching the top of the ridge ' A ' Company 
came imder rifle fire from the trenches near 
the Chenun de Uames. ' B ' Company and the 
machine gun came up, and a strong firing line 
was built up. Soon a white flag was seen dis- 
played by the Germans, and large numbers of 
them came forward to surrender. Shortly 
a heavy rifle and artillery fire was opened by the 
Germans upon the assemlded mass of friend and 
foe. Under this fire ' A ' Company suffered 
heavily, and it was during this time tliat . . . 
Lieutenant Daun was killed." 
A Captain in his company wrote : " He was a 
splendid officer, and worked night and day for 
the good of his regiment and his company, 
and had a great future before him. He was 
to have been our next Adjutant, and will be 
a great loss to the regiment." 
Lieutenant Daun was a member of the United 
Service Club and of the M.C.C. He was a good 
rifle shot, winning the Officers' Cup at the Alder- 
shot Command Meeting in 1912 and 1913, 
securing second place in 1914. 



LIEUTENANT JOHN STANLEY 
DAVEY, NORTH SOMERSET 
Y'EOMANRY, who was killed in action 
near Ypres on the 17th November, 1914, was 




llie youngest son of the late .Mr. 'I'luimas Davey 
and Mrs. Davey, of Bannerleigh, Leigh Woods, 
Bristol. 

He was born on the 
12th July, 1881, 
and was educated 
at the Rev. S. Cor- 
nish's School, Wal- 
lon Lodge, Clevedon, 
and at Charterhouse 
((iirdlestonite). 
In 1S97 he entered 
the business of 
Franklyn, Davey & 
Co., which subsequently l)ecaiiie a branch of 
the Imperial Tobacco Coiii|)any of (ireat 
Britain and Ireland, Ltd. lie was fond of 
shooting, fishing, hunting, and polo, 
lie joined the Somerset Yeomanry in .Vpril, 
111(19, and became Lieutenant in August, 191 I. 

CAPTAIN DOUGLAS BYRES DAVID- 
SON, 8th GURKHA RIFLES, 

of whicli he was Ad- 
jutant, who was re- 
ported as " missing, 
believed killed," in 
1014, was the eldest 
son of the late Lieu- 
terianl-Colonel D. C. 
Davidson, I. M. S., 
and Mrs. Davidson, 
78, Lexham Gardens, 
Kensington. He 
was born on the 
15th September, 

1895, and was a grandson of the late General 
John Clarke, formerly Comnnssioner in Oudh, 
Sitapiu". 

He was educated by tutors and at (he H..\I.C., 
Sandhurst. After passing out of Sandhurst 
he was attached for a year to the K.R.R.O., 
and joined the Indian Army in April. 1900. 
He was promoted Lieutenant in April, 1907, 
and Captain in January, 1014. 
He was a very good game shot, and played polo 
and football. 

He was last seen on the 30th October, 191 1 , 
leading a charge at Festubert to save a picket, 
U'ith ten volunteers, only one out of the party 
returning. He is supposed to have fallen, 
wounded, into the enemy's trench. 
His younger brother. Lieutenant R. I. .M. 
Davidson, Manchester Regiment, died on the 
24th November, 1914, of wounds received in 
action at Festubert. 

LIEUTENANT RALPH IVAN MEYNELL 
DAVIDSON, 1st BATTN. MANCHESTER 
REGIMENT, born at Satara, Bombay, on 




103 



DAV 




the 12th Jiine, 1SS9, was the second son of the 
late Lieutenant-Colonel D. C. Davidson, I. M.S., 

Bombay Presidency, 
and 3Irs. Davidson, 
Lexham Gardens. 
Kensingrton. He was 
a jirandson of the 
late General John 
Clarke, 25th Bengal 
Native Infantry, 
f omierly C o m ni i s - 
sioner in O u d h , 
Sitapur. 

He was educated at 
Temple Grove, East 
Hheen. at Cnt-iteiuiaiu College, and at the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst. He was gazetted to the Manchester 
Regiment in September, 1909, and was pro- 
moted Lieutenant in July, 191.3. While serving 
in India he passed the Higher Standard in 
Hindustani, Pushtu, and Punjabi. He was 
present at the Delhi Dunbar, 1911, for which he 
received the medal. 

He played Rugby football, hockey, and cricket 
for his regiment. 

While giving orders to his men the previoiLS 
day, at Festubert, about repairing a damaged 
trench, he was shot through the head, and died 
of his wounds on the 21th November, 191-1. 
He was buried at Locon, France. 
Lieutenant Davidson's elder brother. Captain 
D. B. Davidson, Indian Army, is believed to 
have been killed at Festubert on the 30th 
October, 191-1, on which day he was last seen 
alive, and no news has since been heard of 
him. 



C.\ P T A 1 N \\ I L I. I A M T H O M A S 
CHORLEY DAVIDSON. 1st BATTN. 
THE DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT, 

bom on the .5th 
January, 1875, 
was the son of 
Thomas Davidson. 
M.B.. Oson., and 
grandson of Thomas 
Davidson, M.D., 
Oxon. 

He was educated at 
Marlborough f r o lu 
1887 to 1891, and 
joined the Dorset- 
shire Regiment as 
2nd Lieutenant from the ililitia in May, 1897, 
becoming Lieutenant in October, 1899. 
He served in the South African War, 1899- 
1902, taking part in the relief of Ladysmith, 
including the action at Spion Kop : was present 
at the action at Vaal Krans, and at operations 
on the Tugela Heights and action at Pieter's 




Hill ; operations in the Transvaal, Natal. 

with actions at Laing's Nek and Orange River 

Colony in 1900 : again, at later operations, in 

the Transvaal and Orange River Colony in 1901 

and 1902. He received the Queen's medal 

with five clasps and the King's medal with two 

clasi)s. 

He was kiUed at Givenchy on the 13th October, 

19U. 

Captain Davidson, who was a member of the 

United Service and Ranelagh Clubs, attained 

the rank of Captain in October, 190-1. 

C.\PTA1N H.\ROLD C AS AM A JO R 

DAV'IES of Warniil Hall, Mildenhall, 

Suffolk,. RESERVE OF OFFICERS, 

having volunteered 

for service, was killed 

in action on the 2tith 

September, 19 14. 

while attai-heil ti> 

the Welsh Regiment. 

He was the fourth 

son of the late Major 

T. H. Davies. of 

Odiham Close.Hant s. 

and was born on the 

27th February, 1879. 

.Joining the Welsh 

Regiment from the Militia as 2nd Lieutenant 

in March. 1900, he became Lieutenant in 

February, 1902. He served in the South 

African War, being present at operations in 

the Transvaal, 1900-02, and receiving the 

Queen's medal with three clasps. 

LIEUTENANT HARRY LLANOVER 
DAVIES. ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY', 

who died oa llie 2t)th October, I'Jll, from 
wounds received in action, was the youngest son 
of the late Theo. H. Davies, of Craigside, 
Honolulu, and of Tunbridge Wells. 
He was bom on the 29th January, 188.5, and 
joined the Royal Horse Artillery in July, 1904, 
becoming Lieutenant in July, 1907. 




CAPTAIN HENRY 
5th attd. 2nd B 
IRISH RIFLES, 
born at Holywood, 
County Down, Ire- 
land, on the 15th 
September, 1 8 S -I, 
was the eldest son 
of the late Henry 
Davis and Mrs. 
Davis, of Holywood, 
and a great-grand- 
son of the late Major- 
General .Sir Ralph 
Ouselev. 



OUSELEY' DAVIS, 
ATTN. R O Y .\ L 




DAV DAW 



1(14 



lie was educated at Portora Royal Sehool. 
l')niiiskilleii, and Campbell College, Belfast, 
from wliieh he passed direct into the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst. lie was gazetted to the Royal 
Dublin l-'usiliers in August, 1905, and posted 
to the 2nd Battalion, becoming Lieutenant in 
June, 190S. His recreations were cricket and 
golf. 

He resigned liis coMiniissiou in lUlO, and on 
the outbreak of the war was gazetted Captain 
in the .5th Battalion T?oyal Irish Rifles at the 
end of August. 1914, being attached to the 2nd 
Battalion for active service in September. 
He was killed in action by shrapnel on the 27th 
October, 1911, in the trenches before Neuve 
Chapelle. 

2nd LIEUTENANT STUART DAVISON. 
3rd BATTN. THE KING'S ROYAL 

RIFLE CORPS, 

son of Colonel '1'. 
Pavison, late com- 
manding the 16tli 
Lancers, was born 
at Lea Park, Godal- 
ming, Surrey, on the 
2nd July, 1895. 
He was educated at 
Wellington College, 
and the R.il.C, 
Sandhurst, where he 
won the mile and 
two-mile races, and the Victor Ludorum medal 
in 1913, for winning tlie cross-country and tsvo- 
nule race. 

Joining the King's Royal Rifle Corps in Feljru- 
ary, 1911, lie was killed on the Uth September, 
1911. 

2nd Lieutenant Davison won the regimental 
point-to-point race (heavy weight) in 1914 on 
" Nutmeg." 



CAPTAIN WALTER RICHARD 
AUGUSTUS ASTON DAWES, 1st 
BATTN. THE DUKE OF EDIN- 
BURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGIMENT), 

who was killed on 

^- -— — I j^j^g 24th August, 

1914, was well 
known in Salisbury, 
liaving been born 
there on the 26th 
April, 1S78, and 
lieing the son of the 
late Mr. Frederick 
A s t cj n D a w e s, 
()l1icial Receiver of 
(hat town. 
He was educated at 





Salisbury, t lien spent some years in his father's 
olTice, and subsequently had a varied military 
career. In 189(3 he joined the 1st Wilts Rifle 
X'olunteers as a Private, being appointed 2nd 
Lieutenant in the same corps in .Inly, isitll. 
a position he resigned in 1900. He tlien enlisted 
in I lie X'olunteer Service Company of tlie Wilt- 
shire Regiment, and proceeded with that unit 
to South Africa for the Boer War, becoming 
successively Lance-Corporal, Corporal, ami 
Lance-Sergeant during the year 1900. Then for 
about five months he served as Sergeant -.Majoi' 
of .Mounted Infantry, as well as Quartermaster- 
Sergeant and Sergeant of Military Police at 
various times. For that war he received the 
King's medal with four clasps. Returning from 
South Africa with the Volunteer Company in 
1901, he was, in June of that year, given a com- 
mission in the Wiltshire Regiment, serving witli 
it in India from 1901-09. 

l"'rom 1900-08 he was Station StalT OlVicer and 
Cantonment Magistrate at Dagshai, for part of 
wliich time he was in charge of the Dagshai 
.Military Prison. In 1909 he was posted to the 
deijot of his regiment at Devizes, remaining 
there till he obtained his promotion to Captain 
in .January, 1911, when he joined the 1st Bat- 
talion in Natal. 

He was killed when serving with his battalion in 
the Gi-eat War, one of his Company oflicers 
giving the following account of the circuni- 
stances to his widow : " 1 was quite near at the 
time. . . . Your husband's death occurred near 
!Mons on Monday, Augu.st 24th, somewhere be- 
tween 7 and S a.m. ' A ' Company was occupy- 
ing a line of trenches which we dug the previous 
afternoon, and from daylight that morning till 
the time we retired at about S o'clock we were 
under a very heavy shell Are, with no chance of 
replying, as the enemy's guns were a long way 
off, and completely hidden from view. Your 
husband was in Mr. Loder-Symonds's trencli, 
quite close to him, and a shell burst light over 
them, killing your husband and one other man 
and wounding several. As far as I could gather, 
he was lying on his back at the time, chatting to 
.Mr. Loder-Symonds (of course there was no- 
thing to be done at the time), and a fragment 
of tile shell pierced his heart, death being quite 
instantaneous and painless." 
Some men of the Wilts Regiment, who were 
taken prisoners and kept in the Doberitz Camp, 
spoke to an officer there, who wrote home 
in very highest terms of Captain Dawes, sa\ing 
they owed their lives to his courage and cool- 
ness. 

A very great number of Captain Dawes's re- 
latives and ancestors have been, and are, in the 



105 



DAW 



services, four, if not more, being at present 
figliting iu the Great War in different parts of 
the world, while others are serving at home. 
Captain Dawes married !^^u^iel Gertrude, eldest 
daugiiter of Adam Scott Rankin, Esq., and 
left two children : Isobel Mary, born November, 
1!J12 ; and Richard Arthur Aston, born Decem- 
ber, 1!)14. 

MAJOR the Honble. HUGH DAWNAY, 
D.S.O., p.s.c, 2nd LIFE GUARDS, 

- who was killed in 

action on the 6th 
Xovember, 19 1 4, 
was the second son 
of Viscount Downe. 
Fie was born on the 
lOtli September, 
1875, and received 
his conunission in 
the Rifle Brigade 
in October, 1895, 
becoming Lieuten- 
ant in January, 
1899, to November, 




1898 
190n. 



from February, 
he was Adjutant of his battalion. He 
became a Captain in the Rifle Brigade in March, 
1901, and in February of that year wa.s ap- 
pointed A.D.C. to the Commander-in-Chief, 
retaining the position till February, 1904, 
and from April, 1904, to January, 1905, was 
A.D.C. to the G.O.C., North West District. 
He took part in the Nile Expedition, being 
present at the Battle of Khartoum, and being 
mentioned in Despatches, " London Gazette," 
30th September, 1898 ; received the medal, 4th 
class of the Order of ^Fedjidieh, and the 
Egyptian medal with clasp. 

He next served in the South African War, 
1899-1900, whOe Adjutant of liis Battalion, 
being present at operations in Natal, including 
actions at Lombard's Kop ; the defence of 
Ladysmith, including sortie of the 10th Decem- 
ber, 1899, and action of the 6th January, 1900. 
He was twice mentioned in Despatches ( "London 
Gazette," 8th Februarj^ and 10th September, 
1901) ; was awarded the D.S.O., and received 
the Queen's medal with clasp. 
He also served in East Africa, Somaliland Ex- 
pedition, 1908-10 for which he was mentioned 
in Despatches (" London Gazette," 17th June, 
1910), and received the medal with clasp. 
In the Great War, Major Dawuay was serving 
as General Staff Officer, 2nd grade, and was 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 
8th October, 1914. 

Major Dawnay married, in 1902, Lady Susan 
Beresford, daughter of the fifth Marquess of 
Waterford, and left four sons. 



CAPTAIN HERBERT EDWARD 
DAWSON, 2nd BATTN. THE 
LINCOLNSHIRE REGIMENT, 

who is believed to have been killed in action 
at the Battle of the Aisne on the 14th Septem- 
ber, 1914, was the only child of Colonel and 
Mrs. H. C. Dawson, and was married. 
He was born on the 3rd May, 1881, and joined 
the Lincolnshire Regiment in January, 1900, 
becoming Lieutenant in October, 1901. His 
military career began on active service, for 
he took part in the South African War, being 
present at operations in the Orange Free State 
from February to May, 1900. He was also at 
operations in the Transvaal from November, 
1900, to !May, 1902, and received the Queen's 
medal with three clasps and the King's medal 
with two clasps. 

He became Captain in February, 1906, and 
from ilay of that year to May, 1911, was an 
Adjutant of Volunteers and of the Territorial 
Force. 

CAPTAIN RICHARD LONG DAWSON, 
3rd BATTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS 
(RESERVE OF OFFICERS), 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
November, 1914, at 
Zillebeke, was born 
on the 23rd June, 
1879, the only son of 
the late ITonble. 
Richard M. W. Daw- 
son and Mrs. Daw- 
son, and a grandson 
of the first Earl of 
Dartrey. 

In 1898 he recoi\ ed 
his first appointment in the Army when he 
was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the Coldstream 
Guarfls. He was advanced to the rank of 
Lieutenant in 1899 and was promoted Captain 
in 1907. Four years later, in 1911, he volun- 
tarily joined the Reserve of Officers with the 
lank of Captain. 

While on the active list he served in the South 
African War, being present at operations in the 
Orange Free State, 1900, including actions at the 
Vet and Zand Rivers ; at operations in the 
Transvaal in May and June of the same year, 
including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, 
and Diamond Hill : operations in the Transvaal, 
east of Pretoria, and in the Orange River 
Colony between July and November, 1900 ; 
and operations in Cape Colony from 1900-02. 
He received the Queen's medal with four clasps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
He rejoined the Coldstream Guards, as Captain, 
in August, 1914, on the outbreak of the war. 




DAY 



l()(i 




MAJOR FRANCIS INNES DAY, 2iid 
BATTN. ROYAL MUNSTER FUSILIERS, 

was born at Fort 
(iomer on the 21st 
Jaiuiary, 1870, and 
was tlio son of llu' 
1 a I (' l.ii'Ulriiant- 
(' o 1 o 11 (■ 1 11 (• II r y 
.Tames Day, U'.ltli 
K e g i 111 e n t, ami 
grandson of the laic 
Colonel Thomas 
Shadforth, 59th 
Regiment, an d 
the late Colonel 
II. J. Day, until Hc-t;iiiif'nt, and great-grandson 
of Lieutenant and Adjutant Joliii Hay, :!ltli 
Regiment. 

Major Day was educated at a graniiiiar school, 
and was an example, now becoming more com- 
mon, of an officer attaining a high position 
after serving in tlie ranks, thus introducing a 
very valuable element into the service. 
He was for six years in the ranks of tiie 
Middlesex Regiment before obtaining his com- 
mission in the South Wales Borderers in 
February, 1895. He received special extra- 
regimental promotion to Captain in the !Middle- 
sex Reghnent in September, 1902 ; and, again, 
extra-regimental promotion to iMajor in the 
Royal Munster FusUiers in June, 1913. 
Major Day served under the Royal Niger 
Company in West Africa, as a Sub-Com- 
mandant, from September, 189(3, to June, 1898, 
and in the course of active service was present 
at the captvire of Bida and of Ilorin, and took 
part in operations on the Niger in 1898. For 
these services he received the Royal Niger 
Company's medal with clasp and the West 
African medal with clasp. j\Iajor Day also 
served in the Uganda with the punitive exj^e- 
dition against the Wa Nyangori tribe in 1900. 
In the South African War he served in Cape 
Colony in 1902, in command of a squadron of 
Imperial Yeomanry, and received the (Queen's 
medal with two clasps. 

After the conclusion of the war Major Day 
remained in command of a squadron of Imperial 
Yeomanry, and afterwards was employed with 
the Army Service Corps for two years, 1904 
to 1906. 

He received the Delhi Durbar medal during the 
visit of Their JIajesties the King and Queen to 
Calcutta in 1913. 

In the Great War he was with the Expeditionary 
Force from the 13th August, 1914, till he was 
kUled in action, while commanding his company 
in a bayonet charge at Givenchy, on tlie 22nd 
December, 1914. 



.Mrs. Day was the recipient of many sympathetic 
letters from ollicers and others. A senior ollicer 
of the R.A..M.C. wrote : " So poor Day lias 
gone at last ; died like a gallant soldier. The 
Munsters behaved magnificently." 
Another ollicer wrote : " I have seen many 
Munster men w'ho were close by your husband, 
w ho was leading the charge which has won the 
admiration of all. They all speak of his gal- 
lantry, lie died hai)py — no suffering." 
A later letter from the same ofticer says : "He 
was rallying his men for a second attack when he 
was sliot in the face and legs. A Private Wills, 
who was just behind him, turned him over, 
and called some men to carry him away, but 
he said, ' (Jo on, lads ! Don't waste your time 
on mo ! Here, Wills ! take this revolver and 
give it to my wife, and tell lier 1 died happy.' 
Is it not very sad ? Was it nut a true soldier's 
death ? " 

Major Day married Florence, daughter of Mr. 
O. U. D. Stokes, of Tenby, and left two children : 
Catherine, age ten and a IimII years : and 
Francis, eight and a half years. 



LIEUTENANT MAURICE CHARLES 
DAY, I3th RAJPUTS, INDIAN ARMY, 

who was killed in 
action at Tanga, 
German East Africa, 
on the 3rd Novem- 
ber, 1914, was the 
eldest son of the 
Very Rev. JIaurice 
W. Day, Dean of 
W a t e r f o r d, and 
Katherine L. F. Day, 
and was born at 
The i'alace. Water- 
ford, on the 2f)th 
February, 1891. 

He was educated first at Aravon, Bray, and 
subsequently had a brilliant college and uni- 
versity career at Marlborough and Trinity Col- 
lege, Cambridge. At the former he won Found- 
ation, Senior, and Leaving Scholarships, and 
at the latter an exhiliition and scholarship, 
together with Bell's University Scholarship. 
and his Wranglership in 1913. 
He received a University nomination for the 
Indian Army, in which he obtained a commis- 
sion as 2nd Lieutenant, dated 13th August, 

1913, but to rank from September, 1911. He 
served his probation with the Royal West Kent 
Regiment from November, 1913, to September, 

1914, when he was promoted Lieutenant and 
joined the 13th Rajputs. 

The following account of Lieutenant Day's 




107 



DEA 



death was received by his father from the 
Colonel commanding the 13th Rajputs : " It 
is with profound regret that I write to inform you 
of the sad news of the death in action of your 
son, 2nd Lieutenant 31. C. Day, at Tanga, 
German East Africa, on the 3rd November, 
1914. The Commandant, Lieutenant-Colonel 
H. W. Codrington, and the Adjutant, Captain 
R. Clothier, and Major R. Corbett were all hit 
at the same time and place. Yoiir son was 
buried by the Germans subsequently. Mr. 
Day joined us just before we came on service, 
and when we landed was acting as Brigade 
Transport Officer. Dvu'ing the short time he 
was with us we realised what a keen and promis- 
ing officer he was. Tliere can be no doubt 
that he would have made a name for himself and 
that soon. Please accept the sincere condo- 
lences of all ranks of the regiment." 
A second letter from a brother officer gave the 
following details : "I was with him when he 
was killed. Colonel Codrington, the Adjutant, 
your son, and myself had just got on to a small 
hillock to have a look round when a machine 
gun opened on us at close range, and the first 
three named went down instantaneously. Your 
son was killed outright. I cannot tell you how 
very deeply we mourn his loss : for, although 
he had been with us such a short time, we knew 
him for a brave, capable, and resourceful boy. 
Our casualties at Tar^a on the 3rd and 4th 
Xovember were heavy, and the fact of our at- 
tack being unsuccessful makes them feel hea^^er 
still. Our regiment lost two officers killed and 
seven wounded, including myself." 



2nd LIEUTENANT FRANK DEAN, 2nd 
B.\TTN. KINGS ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, 
was bom at Widnes, Cheshire, on the 28th 
August, 1876, and enlisted in the K.R.R.C. 
in October, 1898. He ran through the non- 
commissioned ranks, becoming Colour-Sergeant 
in September, 1910, being given his commission 
during the war on the 1st October, 1914, in 
his old regiment. 

He had served in the Boer War, where he was 
present at the reUef of Ladysmith, at the action 
on the Tugela Heights and in the Transvaal and 
Cape Colony. 

He was killed in action on the 3Ist October, 
I9I4, near Gheluvelt in the Battle of Ypres, 
and was mentioned in Sir John French's Des- 
patch on the Battle of the Aisne, dated the 
7th September, 1914. 

2nd Lieutenant Dean was a good shot, and 
took an active interest in the sports of the 
battalion, especially cross-country running. 




2nd LIEUTENANT DENIS 

D E A N E , 2nd B A T T N . ROYAL 
WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who was killed in 

action on the 23rd 

October, 1915, was 

the son of Major C. 

L. Deane, " The 

Lodge," Kent Road, 

Fleet. Hants. 

2nd Lieutenant 

Deane, who was just 

eighteen when he wa« 

killed, was educated 

at Wellington (where 

he was in the 

Combennere) and at the R.M.C., .Sandhurst, at 

both of which he distinguished himself as a 

footballer. 

He was gazetted to the Royal Warwickshire 

Regiment on the 15th August, 1914. 



LIEUTENANT MAURICE JAMES 
DEASE, V.C. 4th BATTN. THE ROYAL 
FUSILIERS iCITY OF LONDON REGT.), 

was the son of Ed- 
mund FitzLawrence 
Dease, Esq., and 
was born on the 
28th .September, 

18S9, at Gaulstown, 
Coole, County West- 
meath. He was edu- 
cated at Stonyhurst 
College, at Wimble- 
don College, and at 
the R.M.C., Sand- 
hurst. 

Lieutenant Dea.se, ^'.C., joined the Royal 
Fusiliers at Aldershot in 1910. becoming 
Lieutenant in April, 1912. In October. 1910, 
he was selected by his Commanding Officer 
to attend a class, which was being held in North 
Wales by an officer of the Indian Army, to 
instruct officers in the art of mountain warfare, 
and subsequently he was Scout Officer of the 
battalion : also Machine Gun Officer and at 
different times Acting Adjutant. 
On the 23rd August, 1914, as MacMne Gun 
Officer he was defending the Canal Bridge at 
Ximy. near Mons, and for his gallantry was 
mentioned in Field Marshal Sir John FYench's 
Despatch of the 18th October, 1914; he was 
one of the first ten to be awarded the coveted 
distinction of the Victoria Cross in the Great 
War. The following is the official record of 
the circumstances : — 

■■ For Valour. 
War Office, November 16th, 1914. 
His Majesty the King hais been graciously 




DEC DEG 



108 



pleased to approve of Uio tyrant of thr \'i(t()ria 
Cross to the iinder-iiieiitioiied otticcr lOr con- 
spicuous bravery whilst siTviiit: witli the Kx- 
peditionary Force : 

Lieutenant Maurice James Dease, 
4th Battalion the Royal Fusiliers. 
Though two or throe times badly wouihI<iI. 
he continued to control the fire of his niacliine 
guns at ]Mons on the 23rd August until all liis 
men were shot. He died of his wovinds." 
Lieutenant Dease was heir to his uncle. Major 
Gerald Dease, D.L., of Turbotston. Comity 
Westmeath, who liad liiiiiselt served in llir 
Ttoval Fusiliers. 



LIEUTENANT CLAUDE NORMAN 
CHAMPION DE CRESPIGNY, 2nd 
DRAGOON GUARDS (QUEENS BAYSl, 

was born at Soutli- 
sea on the 11th 
.Tune, 1888, the 
fifth son of Sir 
Claude Champion dc 
Crespigny.Bart., and 
Lady Champion de 
Crespigny. 
He was educated at 
Hawtrey's, where he 
was the swimminfj; 
ilianipion ; Clielten- 
ham College, wlicre 
hewontlie (|uartiT-niile under sixteen; and the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst. At the latter he won the 
saddle, and was a representative of the College 
in Athletics r. Woolwich. 

Lieutenant Champion de Crespigny entered the 
1st Dragoon Guards in February, 1907, becoming 
Lieutenant in .January, 1908, and. after a short 
period on half-pay, joined the Queen's Bay.s in 
November, 1910. He had been awarded the 
Emperor of Austria's decoration. He was killed 
at Compiegne on the 1st September, 1914, the 
following account of the action being given by 
General AUenby to his parents: "I and the 
whole Cavalry Division sympathise with you, 
and we deeply feel Norman's loss, but I must 
tell you he died a hero's death. The brigade 
was hotly engaged, and on the ' Bays ' fell the 
brunt of the fighting on September 1st. Norman, 
with a few men, was holding an important 
tactical point, and he held it until every man 
was killed or wounded. No man could have done 
more ; few would have done so much." 
Letters from others present went to show that 
his sortie from the right of his regiment saved 
the " Bays " from being outflanked and wiped 
out, and enabled them to charge and capture 
eleven guns. 
Lieutenant Champion de Crespigny was men- 





tioned posthumously in Sir .Tohn French's 
Despatch of the 8th October, 1911. 
Ilis body was exhmnod from the cemetery of 
Nery, a village at the south-western corner of the 
Forest of Compiegne, and placed, uiih military 
honours, in the ^lausoleuin at Cli;ini|iioii Lodge, 
on the 12th November, 1911. 
He married, in September, 1913, Rose, daughter 
of Captain Gordon, of Roberts' Horse, a son of 
the late Sir Henry Gordon, K.C.B., and elder 
lirotlier of (ieneial Charles (iordon, C.R., of 
Khartoum. 

BARON ALEXIS DE GUNZBURG, 2nd 
LIEUTENANT 11th (PRINCE 
ALBERT'S OWN) HUSSARS, 

who was given ids 
commission at the 
beginning of Sep- 
tember, 1914, and 
was subsequently 
attached as Galloix r 
and Interpreter to 
tlle Hi.vmI llol'se 

(iuards (7th Cavalry 
Brigade), was born 
on the <)th May, 
1887, and was the 
youngest son of the "^"^^ 

late Baron and of Baroness de (imizburg, of 
Paris. He was related to ilrs. Bischoffsheim. 
to the Dowager Countess of Desart, and to Sir 
^laurice and Lady Fitzgerald. He was a 
member of the St. James's and Bath Clubs. 
Baron de Gunzburg, who was Russian by birth 
and was educated at Eton, was naturalised in 
order to enlist in the British Anny on the out- 
break of the war witli Germany, He left Eng- 
land with his regiment at the Ijeginning of 
October, 1914, proceeding directly to the 
firing line in Belgium, where, by his bravery 
and coolness under fire, he attracted the favour- 
able attention of both officers and men. He was 
ever ready to undertake dangerous missions, and 
always cheery. It was I'elated of him how lie 
left the trenches at great risk to fetch a doctor, 
after he had himself attended to a wound re- 
ceived by Lord Alastair Innes Ker. 
He was killed near Ypres on the lith November. 
1914. At the time he was witli the Life Guards, 
and was sent with three other young officers, 
who had constituted themselves a little band 
they called " The Fire Brigade," to bring up 
the Royal Horse Guards to support an attack 
at Zillebeke. They veere all on foot, and safely 
carried out their mission, having had to run 
across an open field for some two hundred yards 
under fire, but on the way back were shot. 
2nd Lieutenant de Gunzburg was buried with 
Colonel Gordon Wilson, Royal Horse Guards, 



109 



DEL— DEP 



Major Dawnay and Captain Wj-ndham, Life 
Guard?, who were killed on the same day, 
in the churchyard at ZUlebeke. During the day 
he was killed he had been carrying messages 
under heavy fire to all parts. Several officers 
who served with him wrote to his aunt. Mrs. 
Bischofisheim, most appreciative accounts of 
the young officer's conduct, and the Baronet 
de Ounzburg received a telegram from Their 
ilajesties the King and Queen expressing tlieir 
sympathy, and adding : " His Majesty has 
learnt how gallantly Baron de Gunzburg fought 
with his conu^des of the Royal Horse Guards, 
although his duties as interpreter did not 
necessitate his presence in the firing line." 

CAPTAIN CHARLES EDWARD M. DE 
L.\ P.\STURE. 1st BATTN. SCOTS 

GUARDS, 
who was killed in 
action near Ypres 
on the 29th October. 
1914, but whose 
name has not ap- 
peared in the official 
casualty lists, was 
the eldest son of the 
Marquis de la Pas- 
ture, Cefn, Fsk. 
Monmouthsliire. 
He was bom at 
Caley Hall. Otley. Torkshire. on the 1.5th 
.September, 1S79, and was educated at Downside 
Abbey, Bath. After serving with the embodied 
Militia for nearly three months he was gazetted 
from it to the Derbyshire Regiment in April. 
19CHJ. Later in the year, being in South Africa, 
he joined Plumer's Force as a trooper for the 
relief of Mafeking. and was also present at 
operations in Rhodesia from October, 1S99, to 
.May, 19(m;) : he received the Queen's medal 
with two clasps. In September, 1900, he was 
gazetted to the Scots Guards, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in April, 190.3. and Captain in June, 1907. 
From June. 1907, to August, 1910. he was A.D.C. 
to the late General .Sir Frederick Forestier Walker. 
Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Gibraltar. 
Captain de la Pasture, who was a memljer of the 
Ciuards' and Travellers' Clubs, married, in 
April, 1914, Agatha, second daughter of Alex- 
ander Mosley, Esq., C.M.G., of Gibraltar. 
He left early in August, 1914, with the Ex- 
peditionary Force for France, and was in com- 
mand of the right flank Company, 1st BattaUon 
Scots Guards, « ben he was killed. He was men- 
tioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 
14th January, 191.5. 

He was officially reported missing on the 29th 
October, 1914, and has since been unofficially 
reported killed on that date. 




LIELTENANT JAMES OWEN CUN- 
NINGHAME DENNIS. 12th BATTERY, 
ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 
who was killed in action on the 24th October. 
1914. was the only son of Mrs. Dennis, Cumber- 
land Mansions, London, W.. and of the late 
Colonel Dennis, 6th Dragoon Guards iCara- 
biniers). 

He was bom on the 5th August, 188S, and was 
educated at Malvern College from 1903 to 
1907. There he was a school prefect, head of his 
house, in the Shooting VTII, 1906-07, and in 
the House Football XI. He then went to the 
R.M.A., Woolwich, and entered the Royal 
Artillery in July, 1909, becoming Lieutenant 
three years later. 

The following account of the circumstances 
attending his death wa.= published in "The 
Malvemian '" for December, 1914 : — 
" Owen Dennis was kiQed by a shell when he 
was directing his battery fire from the infantry 
trenches. His Alajor states that he considered 
him to be his smartest officer. Throughout the 
time that he was at the front he displayed un- 
flinching bravery. This was quite in accordance 
with what we noted in him at schooL" 

2nd LIEUTENANT BARRY M A Y- 
N A R D R Y N D DENNY. 1st 
BATTN. THE KINGS LIVERPOOL 
REGIMENT, SPECIAL RESERVE. 
who died on the 2i)th October froru wounds 
received on the 24th October. 1914, was the 
third surviving son of the Rev. Edward Denny, 
of Drumlone. Southbome. Bournemouth. At 
the time of his death he was twenty-nine years 
old, and was gazetted to the Special Reserve 
of the King's in April, 1011. 

LIEUTENANT FRANK. ALEXANDER 
DE PASS. V.C. 34th PRINCE ALBERT 
VICTORS OWN . POONA HORSE, 
son of EUot Arthur 
and Beatrice de Pass, 
was bom in London 
on the 26th April. 
1SS7. He was edu- 
cated at the Abbey j /^ 
School, Beckenham, i 
and Rugby, from 
which he passed di- ■ '—^ ' 
rect into the R.M.A.. -Jl. 
Woolwich .being third 
on the list of success- 
ful candidates. 
He was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in the R.F.A. 
in December, 19<)0. and Lieutenant in March, 
1909. In the latter year he exchanged into the 
Poena Horse. From November, 1913, till the 
outbreak of the war he was Orderly Officer. 




DES 



110 



with the local rank of Captain, to Sir Percy 
Lake. K.C.:M.(;.. C.B.. Chief of the Staff in 
India. 

Lieutenant dc I'ass, \'.('., was killed on tlie 2,'jlh 
November. 191 1. near Festubert. On the 2-lth 
he had brought in a wounded sepoj^ with the 
assistance of Trooper Cook, of the 7th Dras^oon 
Ciuards ; next day he was shot by a German 
sniper while at the head of a sap supervisini; 
repairs. 

Lieutenant de Pass was awarded the ^'.C. for 
his bravery, the following being the otiirial 
account in tlie "London Gazette" February ISth, 
1915 :— 

" For conspicuous bravery near Festubert, on 
the 21th November, in entering a German sap 
and destroying a traverse in the face of tlie 
enemy's bombs, and for subsequently [i.e., iic.rt 
day. Ed.] rescuing, under heavy fire, a woiuided 
man who was lying exposed in the open. 
Lieutenant de Pass lost his life on this [i.e., 
'lath, Ed.] day in a second attempt to capture 
tlie afore-mentioned sap, which had been re- 
occupied by the enemy." 

The whole circumstances, as detailed by the 
Captain of the squadron, were as follows: 
The enemy, by means of a sap, had blown in 
the main parapet of a trench, causing a breach 
which left the trench exposed to rifle fire from 
the sap. Sowar AbduUah Khan volunteered 
to enter the sap : he returned and reported 
that the enemy had erected a sandbag traverse, 
about ten yards fioui the trenches, and that a 
man with a rifle was at the loophole. At daylight 
on the 23rd November the enemy commenced 
throwing bombs into our trenches, which con- 
tinued all day, causing many casualties. Eai-ly 
on the morning of tlie 24th, Lieutenant de Pass, 
accompanied by Sowars Fattle Khan and Fir- 
man Shah, entered the enemy's sap, and, pro- 
ceeding along it. Lieutenant de I'ass placed a 
charge of gun-cotton in the enemy's loopliole 
and fired the charge, completely demolishing 
the enemy's traverse, and rounding off the bend 
sufficiently to expose to our rifle Are the sap for 
some thirty yards. This action of Lieutenant 
de Pa.ss stopped all bomb throwing during the 
24th. The next day Lieutenant de Pass, ac- 
companied by a trooper of the 7th Dragoon 
Guards (Trooper Cook), went out in broad day- 
liglit and brought in a sepoy of the 58th Rifles, 
who was lying wounded in the rear of our 
trenches at about 200-ft. distance. Lieutenant 
de Pass again volunteered to enter the enemy's 
sap and blow up the traverse, which the enemy 
had replaced during the night, but permission 
was refused. About 3 p.m. on the 25th the 
bomb-throwing by the enemy became worse. 




and Lieutenant de Pass went to the head of the 
sap to supervise repairs to our defences, which 
had been seriously impaired. lie endeavoured 
to shoot the enemy's sniper thi'ough a loophole, 
and in so doing was himself shot tlinMit;h tlie 
head. 

Sowars Abdullah Khai\. l''attle Khan, and 
Firman Shah were all a« aided the Indian 
Distinguished Service medal. 
Lieutenant de Pass was a member of the Cavalry 
Club. He played polo, and was a successful 
rider, winning several flat races and steeple- 
cliases in India. 

LIEUTENANT ROBERT ANDREW 
OE STACPOOLE, 2nd BATTN. 
THE CONNAUGHT RANGER S', 

who was killed at 
\'erneuil. on the 
Aisne, by rifle fire 
on the 20 th Sep- 
tember, 1914, was 
the fourth son of the 
Duke de Stacpoole, 
J. P., County Gal- 
way, late Lieutenant 
3rd Battalion York- 
shire Regiment. 
He was born at 
Mount Hazel, Co. 
(ialway, on the 24th May, l.S!»2, and W"as 
educated at Downside School, Wimbledon 
College, and the R.M.C., Sandhurst. He was 
gazetted to the Connaught Rangers in Sep- 
tember, 1911, and was promoted Lieutenant 
on the 22nd August, 1914. 

Lieutenant de Stacpoole was a keen lider to 
liounds, and hunted with the Galway Blazers, 
and with the Kildare Hounds when ipiartered 
at the Curragh. 

LIEUTENANT FREDERICK 

WILLIAM DES VOEUX, 2nd 
BATTN. GRENADIER GUARDS, 

u lio was killed in 

action in France at 
tlie Battle of the 
■Visne, was the youn- 
ger son of the late 
Sir O. William des 
Voeux.G.C.M.G.,and 
Lady des Voeux, of 
35, Cadogan Square, 
.S.W. 

He was born on the 
2 9 til November, 
1889, and received 
his commission in the Grenadier Guards from 
the Special Reserve, in May, 1910, becoming 
Lieutenant in October, 1911. 




Ill 



DEW— Die 




LIEUTENANT ALEXANDER DEWAR. 
ROYAL ENGINEERS SPECIAL 

RESERVE!, 

who died on the 21st 
December. 1914. 
aged 29. of wounds 
received in action, 
was the elder son of 
Mr. John Dewar.J.P.. 
Villa Rosa. Trinity. 
Edinburgh. 
He was educated at 
the Edinburgh 
Academy from 1894- 
1904, ending up as 
Dux of the Upper ilodem Class, and head boy of 
Scott House in 1904. He won the Weir Class Es- 
say Prize, and was a most consistent and earnest 
worker. Endowed «ith a fine physique, hetrained 
indetatigably, and besides winning his X^' cap, 
he won the open mile, 100 yards, and quarter- 
mile races. He took his degree of B.A. at Clare 
College. Cambridge, and won the Robert 
Greene Cup, and was captain both of his College 
XV and Eowing VIII. After gaining extensive 
experience in civil engineering at Glasgow, 
he served one year with the Royal Engineers 
at Chatham, on probation, and obtained his 
commission in the Special Reserve of Officers, 
He subsequently received a good Government 
appointment in Egypt, and was employed in 
operations connected with the draining and 
reclamation of waterlogged districts in the Nile 
Delta. His work had already received recog- 
nition from Lord Kitchener, and a bright and use- 
ful career had dawned for him, for which he had 
schooled himself by a wide and thorough training. 
Shortly after the outbreak of war he was posted 
to the 15th Field Company Royal Engineers, 
and crossed to France with the Vlllth Division 
early in Xovember. On the 21st December, 
in the afternoon. Lieutenant Dewar was engaged 
in making a sketch of the ground on the German 
side of the British trenches. In order to do this, 
he made use of a periscope, which enabled him 
to see the desired ground without exposing 
himself. He was shot in the trenches, and 
received, two bullet wounds, one in the left 
forearm and one in the abdomen. He was 
immediately taken to the dressing station, 
after wliich he was brought to the hospital, 
where he died about ten o'clock in the evening, 
without recovering consciousness. 
Lieutenant Dewar was higlily spoken of by his 
brother oflBcers. In the official report by the 
Brigadier-General in whose lines he was working, 
reference to his death was made as follows : 
" The Brigadier wishes to say how very sorry 
we all are to hear this news. He has done such 
verv excellent work for us." 




The Commanding Officer, in a letter to Lieu- 
tenant Dewar"s father, says : " Tour son 
devoted himself heart and soul to his work, 
and never spared himself. He was never fool- 
hardy, but brave to excess." 
He was mentioned in Sir John French's Des- 
patch of the 14th January. 191.5. 

LIEUTENANT DOUGLAS KENTON DE 
WEND. 2nd B.\TTN. THE DUKE OF 
WELLINGTONS WEST RIDING 
REGIMEN T), 
who was killed in 
action on the 10th- 
11th Xovember, 

1914, aged twenty- 
four years, was the 
surviving twin son 
of the late Colonel 
Douglas de Wend. 
1st Battalion Duke 
of Wellington's Regi- 
ment, and of Jlrs. 
de Wend (ne'e Ches- 
ter), of Aislaby Hall, Sleights, Yorkshire. 
Lieutenant de Wend's grandfather served in the 
44th Regiment, and his great-grandfather in the 
60th Rifles. 

He was educated at Wellington College, where 
he was in the WeUesley from 1904-08, and where 
he was a prominent member of the Rifle Club. 
In 1908 he went to the R.M.C, Sandhurst, 
from which he obtained his commission in his 
father's old regiment in December, 1909, 
becoming Lieutenant in January, 1914. 
He was fond of football and hunting, and was a 
member of the PubUc Schools Club. 
Lieutenant de Wend was killed wliile fighting 
the Prussian Guard at the great Battle of Ypres. 

2nd LIEUTENANT WALTER 
D E W I N T O N . 3rd B A T T N . 
COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 

joined the regiment in February, 1913. 

He was unofficially reported as having been 

killed in action on the 6th September, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT ALAN JAMES DICKSON. 
2nd BATTN. HIGHLAND LIGHT 
INFANTRY, 

who was killed on 
the 16th Xovember. 
1914, was the son of 
Patrick Dickson, 
J.P., of Bamhill. 
Kincardineshire, and 
Mrs. Dickson, of 
Sunnyside House, 
ilontrose, and was 
born at Laurence ■ 
kirk,.Scotland, on the 
2Sth February, 1892. 




112 



Die— DOC 

lie was (•(liicatctl at Kottes Collcso, I'Aliiilmitjli. 
and .Mei-ton CoUcsc. Oxford, wlu-rc hi- obtaiiuil 
the degice of H.A. in \'.ni. lie received his 
commission as 2nd Lieutenant from the Uni- 
versity O.T.C. in July, UM 1, was ordered In tlir 
front in August, and was promoted Lieutenant 
in November. 

Lieutenant Dickson was killed in tlie trenches 
by a sni|ier. when Inokinj; out to try and locate 
him. 



LIEUTENANT CYRIL GARLIES 
DICKSON, 2nd BATTN. LOYAL 
NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was killed in action in East Africa at Ihi- 
end of 1914, aged twenty-four, was the son of 
James F. O. Dickson, Nuthurst, Avondale Road. 
Croydon. He joined the T-oyal North Lan- 
cashire Regiment in February, l!n2, and became 
Lieutenant in March. I'.IM. 



LIEUTENANT MACLEAN PROCTOR 
DILWORTH, 1st BATTN. SHERWOOD 
FORESTERS (NOTTINGHAMSHIRE 
AND DERBYSHIRE REGIMENT), 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
November, 1914. 
was the only son of 
.Mr. and Jlrs. Proctor 
Dilworth.St.Alban's 
Mansions, Kensing- 
ton Court, London, 
W. 

He was liorn on the 
2tJth April, 1S.SS, 
was educated at 
Harrow (The Knoll, 
1 '.101-05). and joined the Army in Jlay, 1907, 
becoming Lieutenant in February, 1910. 




APTAIN CLIVE MACDONNELL 

IXON, 16th LANCERS (SPECIAL 

RESERVE), 

of Chapel-Garth, 
Stokesley, Y' o r k- 
sliire, who was killed 
in action near Y'pres 
on the 6th Novem- 
ber, 1914, was the 
eldest son of the late 
Sir Raylton Dixon, 
D.L.. of Ciunnergate 
Hall, :\I i d d 1 e s - 
brough. 

Captain Dixon, who 
as born in February, 1870, was educated at 




Kugby. which he entered in 1884. He joined 
the llilh Lancers in October, 1890, was pro- 
moted Lieutenant in Januai-y, 189:?. and Captain 
tix years later; and, from August, 1898, to 
March, 1900, was Adjutant of his regiment. 
He .served in the Chitral Campaign, and took 
part in the South African Wnv. being iii<-sent 
at the defence of Ladysmilli : he was 
mei\tioncd in Despatches, given 1 hi' brevet of 
.Major. .November, 1900, and received the 
Queen's and King's medals with seven clasps. 
He retired from the active list in 1902, 
joining tlie Reserve of Officers. On the out- 
break of this war he was posted to his old 
regiment, of which he was in temporary com- 
mand when he was killed. Captain Dixon was 
a keen sportsman and a clever artist, having 
often exhibited in the Royal Academy. 
He married a daughter of the late Mr. .lolui 
Bell, of Rushpool. and left six children. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE ARTHUR MURRAY 
DOCKER, ROYAL FUSILIERS, 
(CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), 

who was born on the 

ISth N o V e m b e r. 

1870, was the elder 

son of A r t h u r 

Robert Docker, late 

of Sydney, New 

South Wales. He 

was at Oriel College, 

Oxford, where he 

studied Law, and 

passed the Law Pre- 
liminary Examin- 
ation, but did not 

take his degree, as he proceeded to Soulli Aliiea 
with the 3rd (Militia) Battalion King's Own 
Royal Lancaster Regiment. 

He received his commission in the King's 
(Liverpool Regiment) in 1900, becoming Lieu- 
tenant the same year : he was transferred 
to the Royal Fusiliers in 1901 as Lieutenant, 
and was promoted Captain in 1908. Captain 
Docker served during the South African War, 
where he raised and commanded a section of 
Jlounted Infantry at Zand River, and fought 
in the engagement there on the 14th June. 1900. 
Shortly after this, he was on the Staff of 
Lieutenant-Colonel White, R.A., for two months, 
while the latter was in command of a flying 
column sent in pursuit of De Wet in the Orange 
Free State, and also took part in the action 
at Ladybrand. 2nd to 7th September, 1900. 
In October, 1900. he joined the 1st Battalion 
King's at Machadodorp, in the Transvaal. 
From there he went to Balmoral, under Briga- 
dier-General Barker, and was in several 
engagements, including an attack on Balmoral 




113 



DOD 



on the 19th November. 1900. Subsequently 
he had charge of a Mounted Infantry detachment 
at wage Bivor. He was invalided home in 
June, 1901, having had a very severe attack of 
rheumatic fever. For his services he received 
the Queen's medal with four clasps. 
In 1902, after six months' sick leave, he went 
to Burma to join the 1st Battalion Royal 
Fusiliers. In March. 1901, he was posted to the 
Depot at Hoonslow. He rejoined the 1st 
Battalion at Parkhnrst, Isle of Wight, in March. 
1906. In that year he went through the 
musketry and Maxim gun courses at the School 
of Musketry, Hythe, passing out well in both 
examinations. From the 16th April, 1907, to 
the 31st July, 1911 , he was Instructor of Military 
Law and Administration to "F" Company at 
the R.M.C., Sandhurst, which appointment he 
held three months beyond the usual term. 
In June, 1910, he passed with honours his 
examination for promotion. On the expiration 
of his appointment at -Sandhurst, he was 
sent to the 1th Battalion of his regiment at 
Aldershot, pending absorption, and was ulti- 
mately posted to the 3rd Battalion in India. 
He returned home in April, 1912. to take up 
the apiKjintment of Adjutant of the 10th 
Battalion (Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex 
Regiment. While Adjutant of this battalion. 
Captain Docker did a great deal to enable it 
to gain the reputation it has earned since its 
formation by Colonel St. Leger Glyn (late 
Grenadier Guards) in 190S. 

When the 10th Middlesex were mobilised on the 
outbreak of the war with Germany, they were 
sent to Sittingboume. and very shortly after 
that, as both the Colonel and the Second- in- 
Command had to go on sick leave. Captain 
Docker was for some time in temporary com- 
mand of the battalion, as well as being Adjutant, 
and his untiring zeal helped to bring it to a 
high state of efficiency, while his personal 
influence did much to raise the whole morale 
of the corps. At the end of October the 
battalion was ordered to proceed to India. They 
had actually embarked, and the ship was on the 
point of leaving, when Captain Docker was 
recalled by telegram for service with the 
Expeditionary Force, and was ordered to take 
out a draft of the 3rd King's Own Royal 
Lancaster Regiment to the 1st Battalion of that 
regiment in Flanders. 

He left England with the draft on the Sth 
November, and reached the 1st Battalion on the 
15th November, 1914. The following evening 
he went into the trenches, and he was killed next 
morning, the ITth November, at Le Touquet, 
near Amientieres. He was buried near the 



station there, where there were already many 
graves of officers and men of the King's Own. 
Captain Docker married in 1903 Anna Louisa 
Maud Josephine, daughter of the late Louis 
Arthur Goodeve, Barrister-at-Law, and left 
four children : Arthur Guy. born November, 
1904 ; Peter Goodeve. bom June, 1908 ; ilichael 
Lee, bom November, 191 1 : and Alison Everilda 
Josephine, born February. 1914. 
Captain Docker was well known as a cricketer. 
He was a member of the M.C.C., the Free 
Foresters, and the Oxford University Authentics, 
and was one of the M.C.C. team sent to the 
West Indies in 1913. He represented his 
college in cricket, football, and athletics, and 
played polo and cricket for his regiment. He 
also won many prizes for athletics and golf. 
He was a member of the Inner Temple, and was 
called to the Bar in June, 1914. 

CAPTAIN DAVID SCOTT DODGSON. 
ROYAL GARRISON ARTILLERY, 
was the son of the _ ^ . 

late General Sir 
David Scott Dodg- 
son, K.C.B., who 
served through the 
Indian Mutiny, and 
of Lady Dodgson, 
of Southsea. 
He was bom on the 
24th November. 
1SS4. and was edu- 
cated at Summer- 
fields, near Oxford, 
at Harrow (The Grove, 1S9S-1901), and the 
R.M.A.. Woolwich, receiving his commission in 
December. 1904, becoming Lieutenant three 
years later, and Captain on the 30th October, 
1914. He left for the front on the 17th Septem- 
ber, 1914, and was in the ammunition column 
attached to the 1st and 2nd Siege Batteries 
of the First Siege Brigade. 

He was shot by a German sniper at Gorre. 
near Bethune, on the 14th November, 1914, 
and killed instantaneously. It was found 
necessary to lay a telephone cable for his 
battery, a task which invariably exposes those 
employed on it to considerable danger from 
snipers. Captain Dodgson bravely volunteered to 
do this work, though it was not part of his 
duties, and was shot while attempting to 
carry it out. For his gallantry he was 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of 
January, 1915. 

Captain Dodgson married in 190S Blanche 
Mary, youngest daughter of the late Dr. and 
Mrs. Leacroft, of Derby, and left one son, 
David Scott, bom in January, 1913. 




DOD— DOO 



114 




LIEUTENANT WILLIAM HENRY 
GORDON DODS. 1st BATTN. 
LEICESTERSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who was killed in 
action on the 22nil 
October, 19U, was 
the son o[ JIajor 
William San d a r s 
Dods, formerly in 
the Norfolk Regi- 
ment, of Uvedale, 
Norfolk. 

He was born on the 
27th October. 1S91. 
and joined the 
Leicestei-shire He<ri- 

nient as 2nd LieiiU-nant in September, liUI. 

getting his step in May, 1913. 

LIEUTENANT PHILIP WALTER 
RUDOLPH DOLL. 1st BATTN. THE 
KING'S (LIVERPOOL REGIMENT), 

was killfd in aitioii 
near Ypre.^ on the 
31st October, 1914, 
having previously 
been reported as 
missing. 

He was the fourth 
son of -Mr. Charles 
FitzRay Doll, J.P., 
and Emily Fi-ances, 
his wife, of Hadham 
Towers, .Much Had- 
ham, Herts. He was 
born on the 28th May, 1890, and was edu- 
cated at Charterhouse, where he was in the 
Cricket XI, and at the R.M.C., .Sandhurst, 
where he was in the Football Team ; he played 
both cricket and football in the Army, and at 
the Army Rifle Association meeting won Lord 
Roberts's prize for machine-gun practice with 
his squad. He entered " The King's " in 
November, 1909, and was promoted Lieutenant 
in AprU, 1910. 




CAPTAIN 
DOLPHIN. 



JOHN ERIC WESTERN 
1st BATTN. THE HAMP- 
SHIRE REGT.. 

was the son of Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel H. E. 
Dolphin, Royal 
Artillery (retired), 
and was born at 
Queenstown on the 
27th December, 
1SS5. He was edu- 
cated at Stubbing- 
ton, and the R.M.C., 
Sandhurst. 
Captain Dolphin re- 
ceived his commission in the Hampshire Regi- 





ment in 190(). becoming Lieutenant iu M.-irch, 

1909, and being promoted Captain 21st October, 

1914. 

He was treacherously shot by the Germans 

on the 8th November, 1914, after they had 

called out " Don't shoot," near Ploegsteert, 

about four miles north of Arnicntieres. 

Captain Dolphin was a good shot and rider, and 

a fair golf player. 

LIEUTENANT AND ADJUTANT 
ALFRED EDWIN CLAUD TOKE 
DOONER. 1st BATTN. ROYAL WELSH 
FUSILIERS. 

third son of Colonel 
William T o k e 
Dooner, of Ditton 
Place, near Maid- 
stone, Kent, was 
born at Victoria 
B arrack s, Ports- 
mouth, on the 3rd 
April. 1892. His 
great - grandfather. 
Major Lawrence 
Dundas, served in 
the Peninsula in the 5th Fusiliers, gaining the 
medal with cla.sps for Corunna, Albuhera, 
Badajos, and Busaco. Lieutenant Dooner was 
educated at Tonbridge School, having obtained 
a scholarship there in 1905 from the King's 
School, Rochester. At Tonbridge he was in the 
Shooting VIII during 1907-10, and won the 
Warner Challenge Cup in 1908-09, helping also 
to win other trophies forliLs House. In 1910 he 
represented his school in the contest for the 
Spencer Cup, and he was also in the School XV. 
From Tonbridge he passed tliird into the 
R.il.C, .Sandhurst (Woolwich Company), in 
1910, and there gained the prizes for drill and 
German, and the 1st prize for revolver shooting. 
He was gazetted to the Royal Welsh Fusiliers 
ill .September, 1911. In 1912 he passed as a 
first class Interpreter in German, having in 
1908; when at Tonbridge, gained the first prize 
in that language in an examination open to all 
the public schools. 

In September, 1912, he was promoted Lieu- 
tenant, and in July, 1914, he was appointed 
Adjutant of his battahon at the early age 
of twenty-two years and three months. Lieu- 
tenant Dooner was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 14th January, 1915. 
Conflicting reports as to the actual circumstances 
of his death have been received, he ha^^ng 
at first been reported as missing on the 30th 
October, 1914, but since that date a Ust of dead 
has been received from the German Government, 
through the American Embassy, in which Lieu- 
tenant Dooner is included as having been 



115 



DOR 



killed, about the date mentioned, at Zaiidvoorde, 
near Ypres. 

It would appear, from reports received from 
otlicers, non-commissioned otficei-s, and men, 
now prisoners of war, who were present at the 
fighting on the 30th that the Germans were then 
making a severe struggle to get through to 
Calais, and on the riglit of the Royal Wel-li 
Fusiliers, who held part of a very extended line, 
were some trenches occupied by dismounted 
cavalry. Nearly all the latter were killed or 
wounded, and the trenches taken, thus leaving 
the right flank of the Royal Welsh Fusiliers open 
to an attack. Lieutenant Dooner, seeing the 
danger, ran across an open piece of fire-swept 
ground to tlie company on the right, and. having 
given his instructions, was returning to rejoin 
his Commanding Officer, when he was seen to 
faU, it \vas believed, woimded. Lieutenant- 
Colonel Cadogan, couniianding the battalion, 
ran to his assistance, accompanied, it is stated, 
by Sergeant Evans, now a prisoner at .Miinster. 
They found Lieutenant Dooner had been killed, 
and as they were returning. Sergeant Evans 
states, Lieutenant-Colonel Cadogan was himself 
shot down and killed, and thus lost his life 
in a brave and noble attempt to assist a brother 
officer and comrade. 

The previous fighting, from October 19th, had 
been incessant, and the Royal Welsh Fusiliers 
had suffered very severely. A letter to the 
Vicar of Carnarvon from a survivor stated that 
the Colonel and Adjutant appeared " to bear 
charnied lives, and did splendid work, and were 
the talk of the Division." On the evening of the 
30th only one officer (Captain Parker) and 86 non- 
conimissioned officei-s and men answered the roU- 
caU out of a total of 31 officers and 1,100 men 
who had left Lyndhurst on the 4th October. 
Lieutenant Dooner was a member of the 
.Junior United Service Club, and his name 
appears on the Roll of Honour in the entrance 
hall of that club. 

MAJOR THOMAS PHILIP GODMAN 
DORINGTON, 1st (ROYALi DRAGOONS, 

who was killed in the 
trenches near Ypres 
on the 12th Xovem- 
ber, 191-1, was the 
third son of the 
late ilajor-General 
R. Temple Godman 
and Mrs. C. .M. God- 
man, of llighden. 
Pulborough, Sussex, 
and assumed the sur- 
name of Dorington. 
He was born on the 
T2nd May. 1S77. and was educated at Harrow 





(.Small Houses and Druries) from 1(591 to 1894, 
joining the 1st Dragoons in AprU, 1897, and 
becoming Lieutenant in July, 1S99. He served 
m the South African War, taking part in the 
relief of Ladysmith, including the action.s at 
Colenso. Spion Kop. \'aal Krans, Tugela 
Heights, and Pietei-s Hill : operations in Natal, 
1900 ; in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony, 
and Cape Colony, from May, 1901, to May, 1902. 
He received the Queen's medal with five clasps 
and the Kmg's medal with two clasps. 
Major Dorington was gazetted to his Majority 
on the 31st Octolx-r. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT CLEMENT COTTRELL- 
DORMER, 2nd BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, 

the elder son of - - - 

Captain and .Mi's. 
Cottrell- Dormer, uf 
Rousham, came of 
a family wliich had 
been settled in Ox- 
fordshire for over 
four centuries, and, 
through his mother, 
he was a great- 
grandson of David, 
eighth Earl of Leven 
and seventh Earl of 
Alehille. The fli'st of his name to acliieve 
distinction was Sir Michael Dormer, Lord 
Alayor of London in l.jll. Possibly one of 
the most famous of the family was James 
Dormer, born in 1079, who served under 
Marlborough at Blenheim, and was engaged at 
the sieges of Mons, Liege, and Namur. He also 
commanded a brigade in tlie ill-starred Jacobite 
rismg in 1715. 

Lieutenant CottreU-Dormer, who wa.s born 
in February, 1891, was educated at Mr. 
Lionel Helbert's Preparatory School. West 
Downs, near Winchester, from 1901. His 
Eton life commenced in 1905 at Mr. J. H. M. 
Hare's House. He rowed in the Junior House 
P'our, and became a member of the boats, 
lowing in the " Alexandra." He joined the 
Eton Volunteer Band, and became a member 
of the Corps itself. He was very keen on 
beagUug, and was an expert carpenter. He 
al-so joined the Eton Debating Society. After 
leaving Eton in 1910 he went for a short time to 
-Mr. William Trevor's. Lathbury Park : and in 
-May, 191(1. he was given a commission in the 
Queen's Own Oxfordshire Hussai's, the Duke of 
-Marlborough being Ms Colonel, and Major the 
Hon. Eustace Fiennes his Squadron Commander. 
The latter wrote of him : " Clement is a first- 
rate officer, and w-ill make an Al soldier." He 
was gazetted to the .Scots Guards on probation 
in 1911. His ever bright and cheerful dis- 
position made him the idol of his brother officers 



DOU DOW 



llfi 



and nu'ii : and. being a 'Jiiil l.iculi'iiaiil , lliu 
liciiuiui 1(1 lariy the Colours I'cll tn liiin in llic 
('oiona(i(iM I'loi-cssion, 1911. lie wa.s linally 
gazottcd to tlio Scots Guards in Kchmary, lillli. 
l'revio\is lo llu' outbreak ol' hostilities lie liad 
undertaken a course of sif;nallin';, as a help to 
liis I'utMie career, and worked liard all day loni;. 
He was vei-y keen, and liad been promised the 
post of A.ssistant Ailjutant .'il lbcnc\t \ac.iiicy. 
Lieutenant Cottrell-Dornier, who was pro- 
moted to that rank on the 2:ird October, 191 I. 
was killed in action three day.s later at Kruiseik. 
ueai' ^■pres. A member of the regiment wrote 
that he was defending his trench when struck 
by a shell and killed, adding ; " lie was splen<lid 
in front of his men." The Conmiamling Ollicer 
of his battalion — now a prisoner of war — wrote : 
" We weie captured the same day that yoiu' 
boy was killed wdiilst gallantly defending his 
trenches against repeated and most determined 
attacks in foice. He was one of the verj- ))est 
and bravest of regimental ollicers 1 have evei' 
.seen on active service, besides being most 
jiopular with all his brother ollicers. 1 1 is 
Captain — C. Fox — could not say enougli. ln' 
told me. to express bis tliorougli cf)nfidence in 
him on all occasions, wliieli confidence was 
always justified up to the hilt in everything 
he most cheerfidly did so well. It will, 1 hope. 
comfort you a little to know this, and liou 
dreadfidlj we all deplore his los.s." A Brigade- 
^lajoi' \\ rote : •■ I lis men loved him : yet he was 
strict with I hem. and always upheld discipline 
liefore everything. He was just the bravest 
boy we had : and. though little more than a 
boy, he set every ofificer an example of wliat a 
soldier should be. He died as he had lived — 
a soldier and a man." 

Lieutenant Coltrell-Doruier, who was devoted 
to liunting and a very- good ridei-, had lumted 
all his life with tlie Bicester and Ileytln-op 
Hoimds. He was a member of Wliite's and of 
the (iuards' Chilis. 

MAJOR WILLIAM SHOLTO DOUG- 
LAS, p.s.c. ROYAL ENGINEERS. 

whodieilat Bmdogne 
on the 14th Novem- 
ber. 191 1. of wounds 
received in action 
near ^ijre.s on tlie 
2nd of that month, 
leaving a widow, was 
the only son of 
Colonel and Mrs. 
Douglas, Lansdowne 
House, Bath. 
He was born on the 
1 Sth .September. 

lS75.and joined tin; Koyal luigineers in October. 

I.SOo. becoming Lieutenant in October. lSi)S. 

He saw much Staff service, chieflv with the 




Intelligence Department, being a StatT College 
graduate and a first-class interpreter in French, 
rntm Decembei', ISilO, to September, 1899. 
he was sjiecially employed with the Egyptian 
Ainiy. and from December. 1900, to September, 
1901, in the Intelligence Departiiieid at head- 
(piarlersof the Army, l>ecoming in ( )ctober in the 
latter year Staff Captain (Intelligence) at head- 
i|narters,and remaining so emi)loyed till. May, UKIti 
having been promoted Captain in October, 1901. 
In 1910 he was ajipointed Assistaid T)irecloi' 
of Army Signals. II nd Division .\ldershot Com- 
m.ind. and in the (ireat War he wa.s employed 
as a General Stall' Oflicer, 3rd grade. He was 
ga/.etted lo tin- r.ank of Major after his death, 
to date from the :iOth October. 1911. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ARCHER CHER- 
NOCKE DOWNES. 1st BATTN. CHE- 
SHIRE REGT.. 

was the son of the 
late Lieut enant- 
Colonel C. Villiers 
Downesand of Mrs. 
\illiers Downes. of 
Aspley lIous<',.\spley 
( i uise, Beds, and was 
boiii there on the 
.'ith August, 1S92. 
He was educated at 
W i n c h e s t e r and 
Trinity College, Ox- 
ford, receiving his 
O.T.C. on the 4th 




through th 

1914. Pro 

October, h 



commission 

of Augu.st, 
ceeding to the front early in 
was himself wounded at Neuve lOglise, near 
Bailleul, while attending to a wounded man of 
his regiment, and died in hospital at Poporinghe, 
West Flanders, on the 20th of November, 1914. 
His bidtlier. Lieutenant V. C. Downes, 1st 
Battalion Bedfordshire Begiment, was wounded 
near Ypres, and died in hospital, at St. Omer, 
on the KSth October, 1914. 

.\t Trinity College 2nd Lieutenant Downes was 
('ajifain of the Hockey Club. 

BREVET-MAJOR EDWARD MARTIN 
PANTER - DOWNES, ROYAL IRISH 
REGIMENT, 

was liorn at Bush- 
ford Bectory, Nor- 
folk, on the 3rd 
December, 1S73, tlie 
son of Captain Ed- 
w a r d Banter- 
Downes. R.N. He 
was educated at 
Clifton College and 
the B..\I.C., Sand- 
hurst, distinguishing 
himself at both 




117 



DOW DRA 



places in athletics and football. He won the 
gold medal for the half-mile against the R.M.A.. 
Woolwich, and many other races. 
He served with his regiment through the South 
African War, and was for some time on the 
Staff of Sir Horace .Smith-Domen. He was 
present at operations in the Orange Free .State. 
in the Transvaal, including operations at Belfast 
and Lydenberg : in the Orange River Colony, 
including actions at Bethlehem and Witte- 
bergen : and in Cape Colony, including the action 
at Coles berg. For his services he was twice 
mentioned in Despatches (" London Gazette," 
10th September, 1901. and 29th .July, 1902), 
promoted Brevet- Major for distinguished con- 
duct in the field, and received the Queen's medal 
with three clasps, and the King's medal with 
two clasps. He was also awarded the Royal 
Humane Society's medal, the official record of 
which runs as follows : — 

• At 7.30 a.m. on the 2.5th August. IS9S, a 
man. who was bathing in the sea at Kilkee. 
could not regain the shore, the sea being very 
rough with a heavy swell on. Lieutenant 
E. M. Panter-Downes, 1st Battalion Royal 
Irish Regiment, plunged in, and with difficulty 
succeeded in bringins him to the ladder, where 
they were both helped out. 

" Bronze medal awarded 17th October. 1898." 
From 1903-06 he was an Adjutant of ililitia, 
and from September, 1909, was employed with 
the West African Frontier Force, with the 
temporary rank of Lieutenant-Colonel from 
.September, 1911. 

In the Great War he was mortally wounded 
during the retirement from >tons, and died on 
the field on the 26th August. 1914. The bat- 
talion was cut off at Mons, not having received 
the order to retire, and as nearly all who were 
with him were Idlled it has not been possible 
to procure authentic details of the circumstances. 
Major Panter-Downes married Kathleen Cowley, 
and left one daughter. 



After leaving Oxford Lieutenant Downes was 
for a time at the Royal Agricultural College, 
Cirencester, where he studied farming and 
agriculture. In September. 1 9 1 1 , he was gazetted 
to the 3rd Battalion of his reaiment as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant, and became Lieutenant in .July, 1913. 
Lieutenant Downes joined the 1st Battalion of 
his regiment from the 3rd Battalion on the 
•5th August, the day of the public announcement 
of a state of war between this country and Ger- 
many, and proceeded to the front soon after. 
He was with this battalion in the retirement 
from Mons. 

In the fighting near Ypres he succeeded in saving 
three Maxim guns, was wounded there later 
on, and died of his wounds in hospital at St. 
Omer on the 18th October, 1914. 

CAPTAIN ROBERT EDWARD DRAKE. 
ADJUTANT 1st BATTN. LINCOLN- 
SHIRE REGT.. 
son of the Rev. 
John Drake, was 
bom at Great Wrat- 
ting. Suffolk, on the 
4th .January, 1878. 
He was educated at 
Lancing College. 
Sussex, and was in 
the .3rd Battalion 
Suffolk Regiment 
(.Militia) from 1899- 
1900. In April of '^"^ 

the latter year he received a commission as 
2nd Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion Lincolnshire 
Regiment, becoming Lieutenant in May, 1902, 
and Captain in August, 1912. He was appointed 
Adjutant of his battalion in November, 1913. 
He was serving as Adjutant when he was mor- 
tally wounded at the Battle of the >larne on 
the 8th September, 1914, during a successful 
attempt made by the battalion to capture a 
German batterv. and died the same day. 




LIEUTEN.\NT VILLIERS CHERNOCKE 
DOWNES. 3rd attd. 1st B.\TTN. THE 
BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT. 

was the son of the 
late Lieutenant- 
Colonel C. Villieis 
Downes and Mrs. 
C. Villiers Downes, 
of Aspley House, 
Aspley Guise, Bed- 
fordshire, and was 
bom there on the 
.5th March, 1891. He 
was educated at Win- 
^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Chester and Trinity 
!S^^^^^^^^^^ College, Oxford. 




LIEUTENANT 
DRAKE. X t h 

WALES'S OW^N 
who was killed near 
Ypres on the 17th 
November. 1914. 
aged twenty - two, 
was the third son of 
ilr. and Mrs. J. 
Ramsay Drake, of 
Batch Wood, near 
St. Alban's. 
He was educated at 
Eton and the 
R.3I.C.. Sandhurst. 
At the former he was 



ROBERT FLINT 

PRINCE OF 

ROYAL HUSSARS. 




DRU DUG 



IKS 



in the Field, Oppidan Wall, and President o{ tlie 
Eton Society : and at the latter he was a 
Colour-Sergeant . 

He was gazetted to the loth Ilussaw in Septem- 
ber, 1912, and became Lieutenant on the 27lh 
October. 1!U 1. having been gazetted after his 
death. 

LIEUTENANT D.W'ID ROBERT 



DRUMMOND, 2nd 




BATTN. SCOTS 
G U .\ R D S . 

born on the 30tli 
October. 1SS4. at 
14, Belgi-ave Square. 
London. S.W., was 
the second son of 
George James 
Druniniond, Esq., of 
.Swaylands House, 
Pensliurst. 
After being educated 
at Harrow, he joined 
the 3rd Battalion 
Black Watch (.Militia), from which he was trans- 
ferred to the Scots Guards in 1904. He after- 
wards voluntarily joined the Reserve of Officers 
and. in July, 1911, the Special Reserve of the 
Scots Guards. He held that position when the 
war broke out, and rejoined the 2nd Battalion 
of his regiment for active ser\-ice. 
He was killed at Ypres on the 3rd November, 
1914. having been shot in the head by a German 
sniper. 

Lieutenant Druiiuiiond, who «as a member of 
the Carlton, Guards', and Royal Automobile 
Clubs, was fond of cricket and shooting. He 
married, in 1907, Hilda Margaret, daughter of 
Alfred Harris, Esq., of Donnington. Chichester, 
and left three daughtei-s : Joan Cecile, born 
1909: Violet Hilda, born 1911 : and Winifred 
Pansy, bom 1914. 

M.\JOR ERIC GREY DRUMMOND, LATE 
4th attd. 3rd GURKHA RIFLES, 
wlio was killed in action on the 14th November, 
1914, was the foiu'th son of the late ilajor-General 
Henry Drummond, and a grandson of Colonel 
.John Drummond, of Strageath. Perthshiiv. 
He wa-s born on the 10th September, XSl^t, 
and was educated at Bedford College, joming 
the Prince Albert's (.Somerset Light Infantry) 
in September, 1895. In November, 1898, he 
was transferred to the Indian Army as Lieu- 
tenant, and was pi-omoted Captain in 1904. 
He saw active service on the nortli- western 
frontier of India, in the ilohmand Campaign, 
I897-9.S, including the engagement near Shab- 
kadr on the 9th August, 1897, where he was 
severely wounded. For that campaign he 
received the medal with clasp. He retired in 



Xovemlier. 1913, and was appnintcil a King's 
Foreign Messenger, but on tin- outbreak of 
war with (iermany rejoined the Army, being 
attached for duty to the ."ith Hattatinn King's 
|{oyal Rifle Corps as Major. 

For active service he was attached to the 3rd 
(inrkha Itilles, which regiment he joined in the 
trenches on the Frith November. I'.M I. 'I'hi-sami- 
evening, after one attack by our troojjs had 
failed, he was standing by the Commanding 
Officer, who had kept him near him owing to 
his bemg new to the trenches. Major Drum- 
mond volunteered to lead a second attack, and 
permission being granted he fell mortally 
wounded while gallantly leading his n\en. 
He was a member of the Caledonian Club. 
St. Janips's Square, and was unmarrii'd. 

MAJOR RICHARD DUCAT. 2nth 
INFANTRY. INDIAN .\ R M V . 

born at Ahmed- 
nuggar. India, on 
12th July, 1871. was 
the son of the late 
-Major-tieneral C. M. 
Ducat, and a grand- 
son of Mr. Hugh 
Ilamersley, .1. P., 
D.L.. Pyrton Manor, 
Oxfordshire. 
He was educated at 
a private school, and 
at the R. M. C, 
Sandhurst, joining the Duke of Cornwall's 
Light Infantry in August. 1S!»2. Four yeai-s 
later, having received his ]>romotion to Lieu- 
tenant, he joined the Indian Army, in whicli he 
obtained his Company in 1901 and his Majority 
in 1910. 

Major Ducat saw active service on the north- 
western frontier of India. 1897-98, and was 
present at actions at -Malakand and Utman 
Khel. and at the capture of the Tanga Pa-ss. 
For his services he received the Frontier medal 
with, clasp. He also saw service in China and 
Thibet, receiving the China medal (lOOli) 
and the Thibet medal (1903-04). 
Major Ducat fell mortally wounded at Fao. in 
the PeiNian Gulf, on the 11th November, 1914. 
He was leading an attack again.st the enemy, 
enabling the other i-egiments to make a flanking 
movement, which was entirely successful. His 
Colonel wrote the next day, saying : " You will 
like to know that in the position which your hus- 
band's companies occupied when he fell he was 
rendering me an invaluable service in protecting 
the left of the regiment, and leaving me free to 
operate with entire confidence on the right." 
Major Ducat was a member of the Jiniior 
United Service Club. 




119 



DUD— DUF 




CAPTAIN LEONARD GREY DUDLEY, 
6th JAT LIGHT INFANTRY, IN- 
^ D I A N ARMY, 
^■■I^^^^^^IIBI' Adjutant 

inent at the time 
of Ills cleat li, was 
Ijorn on Kaster Day, 
2.')th March, 1S8:!. 
at Poena, India, the 
son of Brigade- 
Surgeon Lieutenant- 
Colonel \V. K. 
Dudley, A. .M.S., of 
Sion Hill, Bath, and 
Teinpleinore, Ire- 
land. Ill' \\ a-~ a grandson of General George 
I'rince Sealy, Royal (late Bombay) Artillery, 
and had two brothers serving in the Army. 
He was educated at Bath College, where he was 
Captain of the Cricket XI for two years, and 
from which he entered the R.M.C., Sandhurst, 
in 1901. Passing out in the Honours list in 1902, 
taking the third place, and the prize for military 
history, he was appointed to the Indian Army, 
and on arriving in India was attached for his 
probation to the Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers (the old 93rd) at Calcutta, moving with 
the battalion to Poona in 1903. In December, 
1903, he was gazetted to the (ith Jat Light 
Infantry, and joined his regiment at Meerut. 
After two years they moved to .Thansi, where 
they remained tour years, and then went to 
Secunderabad, from which they went to France 
in ()cto))er, 1914. He had become Lieutenant 
in 1904, and had been appointeil Adjutant of 
Ills regiment in 1911. 

Captain Dudley died on the 24th Xnvember, 
1914, from wounds received four hoiu's pre- 
viously, when in action at Festubert, in Flanders, 
resisting the German attempt to break through 
to Calais. 



the Tirah Exjiedition in Peshawar, and received 
lor his services tl\e thanks of the highest 
military authoritii^s in India, ami the Tirah 
medal with clasp. 

He served in the South African War from 
.January, 1902. till the end. being present at 
operations in the Transvaal and Orange River 
Colony, for whicli he received the Queen's 
medal with two clasps. In 1904 he graduated 
at the Staff College, and from 190.5-09 was em- 
ployed at the War Office as Staff Captain, 
D.A.Q.:M.G., and General Staff Officer, 2nd 
grade, obtaining his Majority in December, 1907. 
He also qualified as an Interpreter in French. 
From 1910-13 he was Assistant .Military Secre- 
tary to the Conmiittee of Imperial Defence, 
being awarded the C.B. in the latter year. He 
succeeded to the command of the 1st Battalion 
the Black Watch in May, 1914. and took it to 
the front for the (ireat War. 
He was killed at the Battle of the Aisne on the 
14th September, 1914. Some time after tiie 
regiment had been deployed and engaged, it 
became imperative that a certain locality should 
be held against the German counter-attack. 
Having none of his battalion now left in reserve, 
Lieutenant-Colonel lirant Duff, collecting all 
available men, personally led them forward, and 
held this important position, but shortly after- 
wards was mortally wounded. At the Battle 
of the Marne, on the 8th September, 1914, he 
had commanded the advanced guard of the 
1st Division with great ability. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Grant Duff married, in 
1900, the Hon. Ursula Lubbock, daughter of 
the first Lord Avebury, and left four children : 
.Tean, born November. 1907 ; Ursula Fiona, 
born December, 1908 : Xeill Adrian Mount- 
stuart, born October, 1910 : and Shiela. born 
.\Iav, 1913. 



LIEUTENANT-COLONEL ADRIAN 
GRANT DUFF, C.B., p.s.c, 1st BATTN. 
THE BLACK WATCH (ROYAL HIGH- 

L A "N D E R Si , 

was the son of the 
Right Hon. Sir 
Mountstuart Kli)hin- 
stone Grant Duff. 
G.C.S.I., and was 
born on the 291 h 
•September, 1809. 
He was educated at 
\\'ellington College 
and the R.M.C.. 
Sandhurst, from 
w h i c h he w a s 
gazetted to the Black Watch in March, 1889, 
becoming Lieutenant the following year. In 
1897-98 he was in charge of the Base Depot of 




CAPTAIN BEAUCHAMP OSWALD 
DUFF, 1st KING GEORGE'S OWN 
GURKHA RIFLES (THE MALAUN 



REGIMENTl, attd. 2n 
EDWARD'S OWN G 
RIFLES (THESIRMOOR 

who was killed in 
action on the 7 1 1 1 
November, 1914. 
was the elder son 
of General Sir 
Beauchamp Duff. 
(i.C.B.. Commander- 
in-Chief in India, 
and Lady Duff, lie 
was born on the 
8th 8 e p t e m b e r. 
1880. and was edu- 
cated at Clifton 



d KING 
U R K H A 
RIFLES), 




DUF— DUK 



120 



CoUffro and the R.M.r., Sandhurst. He received 
an vinattaihed 2iid liieutctiaiicy in .Tuly, 1000. 
and joined the Indian StafT Corps in October, 
1001. beconiini; Lieutenant in October, 1902. 
He served on the noi-th-western frontier of 
India in the Waziristan Expedition. 1901-02. 
receiving the medal witli clasp. He also saw 
active service in East Africa in 1903, takini^ 
part in operations in Somaliland, where he was 
a Special Service Ollicer : was employed under 
the Director of Supplies and Transport, and 
was present at the action at Jidballi. He re- 
ceived the medal with two clasps. 
Captain Duff was promoted to liis rank in tlie 
Indian Armv in .Tulv, 1909. 



CAPTAIN LACHLAN 
3rd BATTN. GORDON 




St. David'.s, Keigate (\V, 
(Miss Evans's House). 



GORDON- DUFF, 
HIGHLANDERS, 

born in Edinburgli 
on the 17th January, 
1880, was the eldest 
son of Thomas Goi'- 
don Duff, D.L., of 
Drummuir.and I'ark. 
Banft'sliire, by his 
lirst wife, Pauline 
ICmma, daughter of 
Sir Charles Tennant, 
Bart., of " The 
Glen." Peble.s.shire. 
He was educated at 
11. Churchill), at Eton 
and at the R.^LC. 



Sandhurst. He joined the 1st Battalion (iordon 
Highlanders in August, 1899, in Edinburgli, an<i 
served witli them tlirough the South African 
War, taking part in actions at Paardeberg, 
Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek, Vet and 
Zand Rivei-s, Belfast, and Lydenberg. He re- 
ceived the Queen's medal witli five clasps and 
the King's medal witli two clasps. He was 
promoted Lieutenant in .Taiinary, 1900, and 
Captain in February, 190-1. 

In Augiist, 1909, he retired from the Regular 
Army, and voluntarily entered the Special Re- 
serve, 3rd Battalion Gordon Highlanders, in 
w hich his rank of Captain was dated the 12tli 
August, 1909. Captain Gordon-Duff was a 
good shot and rider to hounds, and won several 
point-to-point races. In 1907 he won Lord 
(irenfell's Cup for lightweights, Irish Army 
Point- to- Point, at Knocklong, on his own mare, 
" .Tuanita." 

On retiring from the Army he had settled at 
Park House, Banffshire, and occupied himself 
with county work, being a J.P. and D.L. of 
Banffshire, and taking an interest in the 
Boy Scouts movement. 
He left Aberdeen on the 7th October, 1914, for 



the Great War, for which he was attached to the 
1st Battalion, and was killed on the 24th of the 
same month. The battalion occupied trenches 
near Neuve Chapelle. .lust after dark a German 
attack temporarily broke through, and Captain 
(iordon-Duh' was shot in the struggle to regain 
the line. 

He married, in 1908, Lydia Dorothy Muriel, 
daughter of Joseph Pike, D.L., of Dunsland. 
Co. Cork, and left three children : Frances 
Pauline, born 1909 : Thomas Robert, born 
1911 : and Lachlan Cecil, born 1914. 

LIEUTENANT SIR ROBERT 
(ROBIN) GEORGE VIVIAN DUFF, 
BART., RESERVE OF OFFICERS, 
attd. 2nd LIFE GUARDS, 

ulio was killed in action on the 16th October, 
1914, was the only son of Sir Charles Garden 
Assheton-Sniith, first Bart., of Vaynol Park, 
Bangor, County Carnarvon, but retained the 
surname of Duff. He was born on the lltli 
November, 1876 ; and, having served for two 
months in the embodied Militia, was appointed 
to the 2nd Life Guards in July, 1900, being pro- 
moted Lieutenant in September, 1901. After 
serving in the 2nd Life Guards, of which lie was 
for a time Adjutant, he voluntarily joined the 
Reserve of Officers. 

Sir Robert Duff married, in June. 1903, Lady 
(Gladys Mary) Juliet Lowther, only daughter 
of the fourth Earl of Lonsdale, and left two 
children : a daughter, Victoria Maud Veronica, 
liorn September, 1904 ; and a son, Charles 
.Michael Robert Vivian, born ^lay, 1907, who 
succeeds him in the baronetcy. 



LIEUTENANT BARRY PEVENSEY 
DUKE, 3rd (attd. 2nd) BATTN. 
ROYAL SUSSEX REGIMENT, 

who was killed in 
action on the 3rd 
Novenilier, 1914, was 
the eldest son of 
I iieii t enant-C o 1 o ne 1 
O. T. Duke and :\Ir.s. 
HuUe. B o u V e r i e 
Road, W., Folkes- 
tone. He was born 
on the 5th Septem- 
ber, 1889, and was 
educated at Welling- 
ton College, where 
he was in the Murray, 1900-04, was captain of 
the shooting eight, and passed tlience into the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst. 

He was gazetted to the Royal Sussex Regiment 
in October, 1906, and became Lieutenant in 
December, 1909. 




121 



DUN 




CAPTAIN STUART DUNCAN. 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT. 

killed in action at 
Hooge on the 13th 
November. 1914. 
wa-s bom in London 
in 1S65, the youngest 
son of the late Dr. 
.James Duncan and 
Mrs. Duncan, of 24. 
Chester Street. 
Grosvenor Place, 
S.W. 

He was educated at 
Marlborough College, 
and obtained his commission in 1S84, becoming 
Captain in 1891. With his regiment he served 
in the South African War, taking part in 
operations in Natal, including actions at Riet- 
fontein and Lombard's Kop, where he was 
slightly wounded. He was also at operations in 
the Transvaal and Orange River Colony. He 
received the Queen's medal with three clasps. 
In 1904 Captain Duncan left the Army and 
joined the Reserve of Officers, Gloucestershire 
Regiment. He had therefore been retired from 
the active list for ten years when the Great War 
broke out, but at once patriotically volunteered 
for active service, and was posted first to the 
3rd Battalion of his old corps, from which he 
was sent out to the 2nd Battalion South Lan- 
casliire Regiment at the front, but wlien killed 
was serving with the 4th Battalion Middlesex 
Regiment. He behaved with great gallantry 
during the war, particularly on the day of his 
death, when he had been ten days in the 
trenches, continually shelled, and was shot down 
wliile leading his men, by whom he was specially 
beloved. Captain Duncan left a large circle of 
friends to deeply mourn his loss. He was 
unmarried. 



LIEUTENANT CHARLES DUNLOP. 2nd 



BATTN. ROYAL 



I N N 1 S K 1 L L I N G 
FUSILIERS. 

who died at Ver- 
sailles on the 22nd 
October, 1914. from 
wiiunds received at 
tlie Battle of the 
Ai.sne, was the elder 
son of Fleet Siirge<'>n 
James Duulop. K.N.. 
of Eden Perry House. 
Ballylesson. Ireland. 
He joined the Royal 
Inniskilling Fusiliers 

in January, 1913, and was promoted Lieutenant 

in September, 1914. 





CAPTAIN FREDERICK CLEAVE 
STRICKLAND DUNLOP. 1st 
BATTN. MANCHESTER REGIMENT, 

who was killed in 
action on the Sth 
November, 1914, 
was the fourth son 
of Andrew Dunlop. 

M.D.. of St. HeUer. , — "' > 

Jersey, and was born 
there on the 14th 
December,lS77. His 
brother. Captain 
J. S. S. Dimlop. 1st 
Battalion .South 
.Staffordshire Regi- 
ment, was killed in action on the 24th October. 
1914: while another brother. Lieutenant (now 
Captain) W. H. .S. Dunlop. 3rd East .Surrey 
Regiment, was wounded on the 2.5th AprU. 191o. 
Captain Dunlop was educated at Victoria Col- 
lege, Jersey, afterwards entering the Royal 
Jersey Jlilitia, from wliich he became 2nd 
Lieutenant in the Manchester Regiment in 
December, 1S97 ; Lieutenant in March, 1)>99 : 
and in which he obtained his Company in March. 
1901. He served in the Boer War, taking part 
m the defence of Ladysmith, and being present 
at operations in the Transvaal, February to 
August, 1901, for which he received the Queen's 
medal with three clasps. From 1902-05 Captain 
C)unlop was Adjutant of the 4th Battalion 
Manchester Regiment, and from 190(5-11 of the 
Malabar Volunteer Rifles. 

He married Maud, daughter of the late .Surgeon- 
(ieneral Williams, Heathfield, Jersey, and left 
two children : ilavis, born 100.5 : and Andrew, 
bom 1907. 



2nd LIEUTENANT JOHN GUNNING 
MOORE DUNLOP. SPECIAL RESERVE, 
2nd BATTN. ROYAL DUBLIN 
FUSILIERS, 
was the third sou 
of the late Archibald 
Dunlop, Esq.. M.D., 
and was bom on 
the 14th December. 
1885, at Holywood. 
Co. Down. 
He was educated at 
Summerfields, Char- 
terhouse, and Caius 
College, Cambridge, 
where he obtained 
the degree of M.A., and was a member of the 
O.T.C. He joined the Special Reserve in Sep- 
tember, 1910 ; and, being called up for active 
service in the Great War, he was killed in action 
at Clary, France, on the 27th August, 1914. 
while directing part of the firing line. 




DUN DUR 



122 




CAPTAIN JULIAN SILVER STRICK- 
LAND DUNLOP. 1st BATTN. SOUTH 
S T A I I O R O S H 1 R K REGIMENT, 

r u ho was killfil « liilc 

lc-.i(lin<; a bayoiift 
iliMiKf on the 2llh 
OctolHT. 1911. was 
hiiiii al SI. HchiT. 
.Icl'sc\ . nil Ihi- l.'.lh 
Sc|)lfiiil)cr. ISTli. 

Iho son of An(hi'W 
hiinlop. M.It,. ol' SI. 
Ilchci-. On.- ol' his 
hiol hers. Captain 

!■'. ('. S. Umilop. 
Maiii'hcstiT KcKi- 
Mient. was killed in action on the SI h .Xoveinber, 
I'.tl 4. and another, Lieuteiiaid \V. U.S. Dnnlop, 
:!rd Jvisl .Sin'i'ey Hoi;inient, was wimnded on the 
2.-)th .\piil, 1!11."). 

Captain Duidop Has educated at \'ictona Col- 
lege, .lersey, and entered the South StalTord- 
shire Heginient, I'loni the Hoyal .Jersey .Militia, 
in USil.T, heeoniins a Lieutenant in KS9.S and a 
Captain in I'.Mi I. 

From isil!) to l!Mi:; he was .\.|).C. to the Lieu- 
leiiant-(Jovern<ir of Burma, and was Adjutant 
of the South Staffordshire .Militia from 1905-10. 
He reeei\ed the Delhi Iturliar decoration 
awarded in lill I . 

For his services in the (ireat War he was men- 
tioned, after his <leafh. in Sir .John French's 
Despatch of the I jth .lanuar>-. lill.'i. 
Captain Dunlop was a polo i)layer. and was for 
some lime .Secretary to the (iarrison Beagles at 
l.iclillehl. 



LIEUTENANT THOMAS EDWARD 
DONCASTER DUNN, 2nd BATTN. THE 
CAMERONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES), 

who died on the 
21st \j e c e m 1) e r. 
1914, of wounds re- 
ceived in action, was 
tlie eldest son of 
the late Lieutenant- 
Colonel Duncan 
Dunn, Hampshire 
Koginient. and Mrs. 
Duncan Dunn, of 
:! I. Hill Street, 
Knightshridge. 
He was born on the 
:^(ith .lune. IsOd.and was educated at Wellington 
College, where he was in the Wellesley from 
I9(l4-0ii. passing into the H..M.C., .Sandhurst, 
in the latter year. He was ga/.etted to the 
.Scottish Hilles in .April. 191(1. and was promoteil 
Lieutenant in Febniarv, lit I:!. 





LIEUTENANT GRAHAM EARDLEY 
DUNSTERVILLE, 1st BATTN. 
DEVONSHIRE R E (i 1 M E N T , 

was the younger son 
ot Colonel Knighlle\ 
Dunsterville. late 

H.A.. ( iu) ers I louse. 
Corsh.im. Wiltshiic 
lie was liorn on 
th.' 9lh .hdy. IS.sj, 
educated at Chelten- 
ham College, and 
joined the Devon- 
shii'e Regiment from 
the .Militia in .lun<'. 
I!t0 I. hecoming Lieu- 
tenant in the .\rMi\ in Septeml>er. I90(i. 
and being transferred to the Indian ,\iin\ in 
.Septend)er. 190.S. In the s.niie niordli of the 
latter year he joined the iTidian .Vrmy, with which 
he .served till 1910, when he rejoined the Devon- 
.shire Regiment a.s Lieutenant from .July, 1 9 Hi. 
He was ;i born fighter an<l all-round athlete, 
especially fond of boxing, football, and all 
military sports and physical exercises, lb- iliil 
well in the fencing tournaments at The Hague, 
and twice in Paris. At the Naval and .Military 
Tovuiiami'nt at Olympia, in the years 1911-14, 
he won six challenge cups for otticers for all the 
four dismoinitt'<l events — bayonet fighting, 
sabres, epees, and foils — and for two ot the 
mounted events — sword v. sword and sword 
c. lance. These si.v wins uith six different 
weapons is quite a record. 

He was in connnand of " A " Coni|iany in the 
trenches at Festubert, when, on the29tli October, 
1914, hearing a wounded man crying out for 
water, he went out to bring him in, and was 
killed in the attempt by a bullet in the head. 
Mr. Dunsterville married Eveline, daughter of 
F. Hastings Coldney, lisq,, J.l*., of Corsham. 
in Wiltshire, and leaves a daughter, I'etronilla. 
1)0111 the 7th ,Iul.\, 19l:>: and a son, Hugh 
(iiaham ICvelvn, hoiii the "JOth December. 1911. 



CAPTAIN FRANCI 
DURAND, 3rd BATTN. 
STER FUSILIERS, 

was born on the 
29th January, 187o, 
at Earley Vicarage, 
Berkshire, the .son 
of the Rev. Havil- 
land Durand, ^I..\., 
Vicar of Earley. He 
was educated at 
Elizabeth College, 
(iuernsey, where he 
won the quarter- 
mile, and was .second 



S WILLIAM 
ROYAL MUN- 




Lir- — ~- 



123 



DYK EAS 



in the one hundred yards race in 1889, xvinning 
two cups. 

Captain Durand was gazetted to the 3rd Royal 
fiuemsey Light Infantry (Militia) as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in 1891, and in 1895 he joined the 
Rhodesian Horse. He served in the Matabele- 
land campaign with the (iwelo Field Force. 
i-ecei\'ing the Matabeleland medal. 1896 : and 
in the Mashonaland campaign with the Mashona- 
land Field Force, receiving the clasp for 
.Mashonaland, 1897. 

From 1899-1901 he was employed in the African 
Transcontinental Survey through German East 
Africa, and in 1901-02 with the Tanganyika 
Concessions Expedition to Katanga, Congo Free 
.'^tate. In 1903 he served in the Zanzibar 
Protectorate under the Foreign Office, being 
Secretary and A.D.C. to the First Minister. 
In 190(5 he was promoted Captain in ttie 3rd 
Munster FusUiers. remaining seconded for 
duty under the Foreign Office. In 1907 he was 
Acting Commandant of the Zanzibar Military 
Police, and Acting Governor. Centi-al Jail. 
In this year he received the Zanzibar Order of 
" El Aliyeh.' 

Returning to England he, in 1908, passed the 
School of Musketry at Hythc. In 1909 he was 
again in civil employment in Zanzibar, as 2nd 
na.ss ^lagistrate and Governor of the District 
.lail, and in 1911 was second in command of 
the Zanzibar Armed Constabulary. In 1912 he 
passed in all subjects for promotion to the rank 
of Field Officer, being one of only five officers 
specially mentioned in the Examiner's Report 
(May. 1912) to the Army Council. In 1914 he 
received the decoration of the 3rd Class BrilUant 
Star of Zanzibar. 

On the mobilisation for the Great War, the .")th 
August, 191-1, he joined the 3rd Battalion Royal 
Munster FusiUers. and went to Bere Island. On 
tlie 8th September he joined the 2nd Battahon 
in Fi-ance. and was pi-esent at the Battles of 
the Aisne and the Marne. He was killed on 
the 22nd September, 191-1. while leading his 
men in an attempt to retake trenches between 
(iivenchy and Festubert. near La Bassee. 
Captain Durand was a member of the Xaval and 
Military and of the Sports Clubs. While in 
Africa he enjoyed much big-game shooting. 
He married, in 1903. Geraldine Vesey. daughter 
of the late Rev. John W. Hawtrey, of Aldin 
House, Slough, and St. Michael's, Westgate- 
im-Sea. 

LIEUTENANT COLONEL ALFRED 
M c N A 1 R DYKES. p . s . c. . 1st 
B A T T N . THE KINGS OWN 
ROV.\L LANCASTER REGIMENT. 
who was killed in action on the 20th August, 




1914. was the son of the late William Alston 
Dykes and of Mi-s. Dykes of the Orchard. Hamil- 
ton.Si-otland. He was 
born on the L^th 
March, 1874. an<l 
joined the Royal 
Ijancaster Regiment 
from the Militia 
in December. 1894. 
He became Lieu- 
tenant in November. 
1896, and from 
November. 1897. 
to November. 1899. 
was Adjutant of 
the 2nd Battalion : becaine Captain in Feliruary. 

1900. and. again. Adjutant of liLs battahon from 
.January, 1900. to July. 1902. He served in the 
South African War as a Special .Service Officer 
from November. 1S99, to January, 1900 ; wae 
present at the relief of Ladysmith and opei-a- 
tions in January, including the action at Spion 
Kop, where he was severely wounded : opera- 
tions in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, 
November, 1899. to January, 1900, and in the 
Transvaal, September to November. 1900 : also 
fiu-ther opei-ations in the Ti'ansvaal and Oranse 
River Colony in 19<il. 

For his services he was twice mentioue;! in 
Despatches (•'London (iazette." 10th .September, 

1901. and 29th .July. 1902) : received the 
Brevet of Major, the Queen's medal with four 
cla-sps and the King's medal with two clasps. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Dykes, who left a widow, 
succeeded to the command of his. the 1st 
Battahon. the King's Own. on 1st August, 
1913. 

LIEUTENANT FRANK MOLYNEUX 
EASTWOOD. 1st BATTN.THE QUEENS 
ROYAL WEST SURREY REGIMENT, 
who died on the 
30th October, 1914. 
of wounds i-eceived 
at Gheluvelt, near 
Ypres, on the even- 
ing of the same day. 
was the fourtli son 
of John Edmund 
and Ethel Eastwood, 
of Enton, Witley. 
He was bom in 
November, 1892. and 
was educated at .Mr. 

Arthur Dunn's, Ludgixjve: a't Eton: and the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst. He received his com- 
mission in the Queen's Royal West Surrey 
Regiment in .September, 1912. becomimr Lieu- 
tenant in .September. 1914. He was a member 
of the Conservative Club. 




EDE— EGE 



124 




and till- R..M.r 



He wont out with the rcgimpiit on tlie outbreak 
of the war, was at the Battle of Mons and 
tlirough the retirement, and at the Battles of 
the Marue and the Aisne. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN EDEN, 12th 

PRINCE OF W A L E S ■ S ROYAL) 

LANCERS. 

I'Idest son of Sir 
William and Lady 
IMin. was born on 
Hu' iUh October, 
isss. and was killed 
uhilc on patrol duty 
near \V<rve((|. on 
theSth()ctober,l'J14. 
He was buried near 
^a^^^^fc^tev. the small village of 

^^F ^S R^ ' l^^si*^^ America, in Belgium. 
'^"' I'^ducatod at Eton 

Sandhurst, he joined the 12tli 
r..ancers in India, in .lanuary. UlOi). and became 
Lieutenant in May. 1914. He went to France 
with liis regiment in .\ugust, 1914 : was at 
the Battle of Mons. through the retirement: 
the Battles of the .Marne and the Aisne, and 
the first Battle of Ypres. 

LIEUTENANT EDWIN ALLEN JAMES 
EDWARDS. 3rd B.^TTN. BEDFORD- 
SHIRE REGT.. 

was born at Brixton 
on the 13th March. 
I.S95, and was the 
^^, youngest son of Mr. 

^' and Mrs. H. Ed- 

wards, of Suva. 
(Uenbuck Eoad, Sur- 
y ^^^^^^^_ liiton, Surrey. His 

'•' ^ Al^H^B^^ t «o brothers are 

serving their coun- 
try, one in the 
Boyal Navy and 
one in a London regiment. 
He was educated at St. John's College, Brixton, 
and Dulwich College, matriculating in June. 
1911. At Dulwich he was in the O.T.C.. and in 
the Army qualifying examination passed at 
the top of the list, being gazetted to the Bed- 
fordshire Regunent in June, 1913, and getting 
his step in June, 1914. He was a good 
left-handed tennis player, and was fond of 
boating. 

He went to France witli the 1st Battalion in 
August, 1914, and fought with it at the 
Battles of the Marne and the Aisne. He was 
wounded on the 15th October, while gallantly 
leading his men at Givenchy, and died from 
his wounds on the 31st December, 1914, in the 
Fishmongers' Hall Hospital, London Bridge. 




CAPTAIN ERIC L E .\ PRIEST- 
LEY EDWARDS. 1st BATTN. 
EAST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT, 

born at .Scarborough on the 2nd March, 1S77, 
was the son of Lea Priestley Edwards, Ks(|.. 
of Warberry Coiu't, Torquay, Devon, and grand- 
son of the late Sir Henry Edwards, Bart., C.B. 
Having been educated at Harrow and the 
Royal .Military College, Sandhurst, he joined 
the East Y'orkshire Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant 
in February, 1897, becoming Lieutenant in 
July, 1898, and Captain in May, 1903. 
Captain Edwards served in the Tirah Cam|)aign 
of 1S97-9S. and was present at operations in tlie 
Bara \'alley. receiving the medal with two 
clasps. 

He was killed in the Battle of the Aisne on 
the 20th Septemhcr. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT FRANK GLEN- 
CAIRN DE BURGH EDWARDS 
ROY.\L HORSE 
ARTILLERY. 

was born on tlie 9tli 
June, 188.5, and 
entered the Boyal 
Artillery from the 
.Militia in May, 1907. 
being promoted 
Lieutenant in May. 
1910. 

He was killed in 
action on the 12tli 
Oct* her. 1914. 



LIEUTEN.\NT PHILIP JOHN EGER- 
TON, 1st BATTN. BORDER REGIMENT, 

who died of wounds 
on the 1 7th October. 
1914. was the elder 
son of Hul)ert D. 
and Annie ICgerton. 
St. .Michael's Lodge. 
C h i s I e h u r s t . anf 1 
was b'orn on the 
lOlh April. 1SS2. 
He fiist joined the 
3rd{.Militia)Battalion 
W e s t Y o r k s h i r e 
Regiment, in Janu- 
ary. 1901. being promoted Lieutenant in the 
following August, and was given a commission 
as 2nd Lieutenant in the Border Regiment, 
on the 29th July. 1903. becoming Lieutenant 
in June, 1905. 

During tlie .South African War, 1901-02 
Lieutenant Egerton served in the Mediterranean, 
receiving the medal. In October, 1910, he was 
appointed Adjutant of liis battalion, wliieh 
appointment he held till September, 1913. 





125 



EGE ELI 




LIEUTENANT R O %%' L A N D L E 
BEL WARD EGERTON. 2nd attd. 
1st) BATTN. ROYAL WELSH 

FUSILIERS, 
BF ' whose name has not 

yet appeared in the 
official lists as killed, 
lost his life on the 
30th October. 1914. 
beint; killed in action 
near the village of 
Zonnebeke on that 
date. 

He was the younger 
(twin) son of Sir 
Philip Henry Brian 
Grey-Egcrtou, twelfth Bart., of Egerton and 
t)ulton, fount y t'hester. and was boi'n on the 
4th April, 1S95. He was educated at Wellington, 
where he was in the Talbot from 190S-12. and 
went to the R.M.C.. Sandhurst, in 1913. He 
joined the Royal Welsh FusUiers in August, 
1914. and was gazetted Lieutenant on the 24th 
( )ctober. He was fond of cricket and shooting. 

LIEUTENANT ROBERT RANDLE 
EGERTON, ROYAL ENGINEERS, 

who was killed iu 
action on the 15th 
November. 1914, 
was the only son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert 
Egerton. of Stansty 
Lodge. Wrexham. 
He was born on the 
20th :March, 1888. 
and was educated at 
Clifton College and 
the R.M.A., Wool- 
wich, from wlijch he 
passed into the Royal Engineers in December, 
1908, becoming Lieutenant in February, 1911. 
Lieutenant Egerton was a cricketer and hockey 
player, having twice played cricket for his corps 
against the R.A., and twice as goalkeeper at 
hockey for Army v. Xavy. He was aLso a good 
revolver and rifle shot, having won the Army 
championship for the former, and having often 
shot at Bisley in the Army Eight. He also 
held the Royal Humane Society's certificate 
for saving a man from drowning. 

2nd LIEUTENANT JOHN STURGESS 
ELDRED. 2nd BATTN. THE 
PRINCE OF W^ A L E SS L E I N S T E R 
REGIMENT iROYAL CANADIANSi. 

born at Sheerness-on-Sea on the 19th Sep- 
tember, 1894, was the second son of Fleet- 
Paymaster Ed%vard H. Eldred. R.X.. and a 
grandson of Edgar Eldred, Esq., of Petersfield, 
and of the late Commander Richard Sturgess. 
He was educated at Weymouth College (Junior 





.ScIkmiI). old Catton, Xor\rich, and the R..M.C. 

Saudhiu^t. He was gazett«»d to the Leinster 

Reg i ment in 

August, 1914, and 

served for a short 

time at Tipperary 

and Cork, being then 

attached to the 2nd 

Battn. Royal Irish 

Rifles in the North 

of France. 

He died at Boulogne 

on the 27th Novem- 

ber of wounds 

received at Ypres on the Sth November, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM LAURENCE 
ELIOT, 1st BATTN. PRINCE OF 
WALES'S OWN WEST YORKSHIRE 
REGIMEN Ti. 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
.September, 1914, in 
France, was the son 
of Commander Lau- 
rence Eliot, R.N., 
and ilrs. Laurence 
Eliot, ilullion, Corn- 
wall, and was born 
on the 9th July. 
1890. 

A brother of Lieu- *" 
tenant Eliot's, Laurence Charles I)rake Eliot 
served in the war as a Private in Lord Strath- 
cona's Horse, Royal Canadians, and was killed 
in action on the 22nd May, 1915. Another 
brother is in training as a 2nd Lieutenant in 
the Royal ^larines : while another is serving as 
Second Officer on a transport in the Dardanelles, 
Mediterranean Station. 

Lieutenant W. L. Eliot was educated at Fal- 
mouth Grammar School and Exeter School, 
and joined the West Yorkshire Regiment in 
October, 1910, becoming Lieutenant in Sep- 
tember, 1912. 

C.\PTAIN HUGH RUSSELL ELIOTT. 
3rd BATTN. WORCESTERSHIRE REGT.. 

was the son of the 
late Major-General 
William Russell 
EUott, grandson of 
the late Sir Daniel 
Eliott, K,C.S.I., and 
a descendant of 
General Eliott Lord 
Heathfleld, defender 
of Gibraltar, and 
was born at -South 
Kensington on the 
lOth.February, 1873. 





ELL 



126 



He was filucated at WfUiiiijtoii College, anil 
joined Ihe ;5id Battalion lioyal Welsh Fusiliers 
in 1899, being attached to the 2nd Battalion 
Hie BufTs (Kast Kent Regiment) iu 1900: 
he was giveti a commission as 2nd Lieutenant 
in the Woi-ccstershire Regiment in April, 1900. 
and served witli it through the .South African 
War. In that year he was present at operations 
in the Orange Free State, in the Orange River 
Colony, including the actions at Bethlehem and 
Wittebergen : and operations in the Transvaal 
West of Pretoria. In 1901-02 he took part in 
further operations in the Transvaal and Orange 
River Colony : he received the Queen's medal 
with three clasps and the King's medal with 
two clasps. He was promoted Lieutenant in 
November, 1900, and attained the rank of 
Captain in November, 1904. 

Captain Eliott served with the Southern 
Nigerian Force from 1903-05, receiving the 
medal with two clasps, and subsequently was 
appointed Adjutant to the 7th Royal War- 
wickshire Regiment (Territorial! from 1910-13. 
In the (ireat War he was in the retirement 
from .Mons, Le Cateau. the Battles of tlie 
Rivei-s Marne and Aisne, and La Couture. He 
was killed in action, on the 12th October at 
Hicheboiu'g .St. Vaa.st, while leading his Com- 
pany against the Germans at the beginning of 
the struggle for Ypres. 

He w-as a member of the Junior Army and 
Navy Chill, and his recreations were fishing and 
hunting. 

Captain Kliott married Constance Mary, daugh- 
ter of the late A. O. Sedgwick, Esq.. North End 
House, Watford, Herts. 

C.\PT.\IN HENRY GRATT.\N ELLIOT. 
1st B.\TTN. DEVONSHIRE REGIMENT, 

born on the 21st 
.Tune. 1881. was the 
son of the late 
Colonel G. A. EUiot 
and ^Irs. Elliot, of 
" The M a r c h e s," 
I.eatherhead, Sur- 
rey, and a kinsman 
(if the Earl of Min- 
li>. He had a very 
large lunnber of rela- 
lions in the ser%-ice, 
including two 
brothei-s. one of whom. Captain G. A. Elliot, 
of the Royal Irish Regiment, was taken prisoner 
at Canibrai, and was one of the thirty-nine 
British officei's subjected to reprisals by the 
German Government on account of our differ- 
ential treatment of officers of German submarines 
who sank unarmed vessels. Another brother. 




t'a]itaiii I'. 15. Elliot, is serving in the Princess 
Charlott.' ol Wales's (Royal Berkshire Regi- 
ment), (ienerals William Elliot and W. (). 
Barnard were his uncles, and an ancestor was 
General G. A. Elliot, afterwards Lord Heath- 
field, the defender of (iibraltar in the great siege. 
Educated at Wellington College and the R..\LC., 
.Sandlnu-st. he joined the Devonshire Regiment 
in December. 1S99, serving with it through the 
Soutli African War, and being present at the 
relief of Ladysmith. action at Vaal Krans, 
operations on the Tugela Heights, and action 
at Pieter's Hill : operations in Natal, including 
actions at Laing's Nek and in the Transvaal. 
He received the Queen's medal with five and the 
King's medal with two clasps. On his return he 
was appointed A.D.C. to General Sir O". Moore 
Creagh, G.C.B., G.C.S.I., Commander-in-Chief 
in India, subsequently serving in Ci'ete. On 
the outbreak of the Great War he was Adjutant 
at the depot of his regiment at Exeter, and 
proceeded to the front with his battalion. 
Captain Elliot was killed in the trenches at 
\'ailly during the Battle of the Aisne on the 
19th September, 1914. 

He was a member of the .Tunior Army and Navy 
Club, and was unmarried. 

2nd LIEUTENANT PHILIP LLOYD 
ELLIOTT. 1st BATTN. DUKE OF 
CORNWALL'S LIGHT INFANTRY, 

who was killed in action on the 20th October- 
1914, in his nineteenth year, was the second son 
of the late GUbert Lloyd Elliott. D.C.L.I.. and 
13th Hussars, of Dolhaidd. Carmarthenslure, 
and of Mrs. Lloyd Elliott. He was educated at 
Cheltenham and the R.M.C., Sandliurst, and 
was gazetted to his regiment in .\ugust, 1914. 

MAJOR R E G I N .\ L D WIL- 

LIAM SIDNEY ELLIOTT, 1st 
BATTN. 7th GURKHA RIFLES, 

was born at Johns- 

town Hovise. County H 

Carlow, on the 18th 

April. 1874, son of 

Nicholas G. Elliott. 

Esq., late of the 

(52nd Regiment, and 

a grandson of the 

late Captain .Sir 

Thomas Ross, R.N, 

Major Elliott went 

to Cheltenham 

College in 1887, and 

gained a cla.s.sical scholarship there in 1888. 

and the Schacht German prize in 1891. He was 

in the College boat, and in the football NV 

in 1891, in which year he also passed into the 

R.M.C., Sandhurst, taking the seventh place. 




127 



ELM— ESC 




He received an unattached coiainission in 1893, 
and in the following year joined the Indian 
Army, becoming Lieutenant in 1895, Captain 
in 1902, and Major in 1911. 

He fell at Festubert on the 23rd November. 
1914, while leading part of the 2nd Battalion of 
the Sth Gurkha Rifles in an attack to recover 
lost trenches. 

Major Elliott married Mary Emilia. >-oungest 
daughter of the late Captain Robert H. Swinton, 
R.X., and left one son, Robert Allen, born May, 
190«5. 

LIEUTENANT KENWARD WALLACE 
ELMSLIE. 4th ROYAL IRISH DRA- 
GOON GUARDS SPECIAL RESERVE). 

who was killed in 
action on the 4th 
Xovember, 1914, 
aged twenty - seven 
years, was the seconil 
son of -Mr. ami Mi-s. 
Kenward Wallace 
£lnislie. of .May 
Place. Hampton 
Wick. Middlesex. 
Lieutenant Elmslie. 
who was an LL.B.. 
Cambridge, joined 
the Special Reserve in May, 1909, and became 
Lieutenant in May. 1914. In the war he wa-s 
in command of a inai-liine-gun section. 



2nd LIEUTENANT GERARD GORDON 
CLEMENT ELRINGTON. 1st BATTN . 
E.\ST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who was born on 

{^^■^■j^^^^H the 

late Captain Gerard 
Gordon Elrington. 
Doi'setshire Regi- 
ment, and of Mrs. 
Miles, and stepson 
of (ieneral Miles, 
Indian Army. 
He was educated at 
Cranleigh School, 
Surrey, where he 
was a Corporal in the Cadet Corps. He received 
his commission in the 3rd Battalion. East 
Yorkshire Regitnent, in October. 1912, and in 
August. 1914, was transferred to the 1st 
Battalion. 

He went to the front in charge of a draft for 
the 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington's Regi- 
ment, and on arrival was attached to that 
regiment. He was killed at Festubert on the 
.30th to 31?t October, the officer commanding the 
battalion to which he was attached giving the 




following account of the circumstances : after 
saying that this young oHicer bad on previous 
occa.sions during the fighting on the Aisne 
and north of Arras shown conspicuous gallantry, 
cheerfulness, and disregard of danger, he con- 
cluded : ■■ Near Festubert, on the night of the 
.30th to 31st, a company of this battalion was 
ordered to co-operate with the .Sikhs in recover- 
ing a trench captured by the Germans the 
previous night. 2nd Ueutenant Elrington was 
leading his platoon in this attack, and was 
shot through the head within a few feet of the 
trench. The trench was not taken, but I assured 
myself later that he was quite dead, and his 
burial was carried out by the ofiRcers of the 
Sikh (o8th Rifles) Company in the trench later 
on." 

M.\JOR RAYMOND ENGLAND. 
ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY', 

who was killed in action, it is stated, on the 2t}th 
Augu-st. no date being given in the official 
casualty list issued in October, 1914, was the 
fourth son of 3Ir. Nicholas England, The 
Gables. Colne, Lancashire. He was bom on 
the 31st May. 1871. and joined the R.A. in 
February, 1891. beconung Lieutenant in Feb- 
i-uary, 1894, and Captain in February. 1900. 
He served in the South ^Vfrican War, in which 
he was slightly wounded, being present at 
operations in the Orange Free State, including 
actions at Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet and 
Zand Rivers : in the Transvaal, including 
actions near .Johannesburg, Pretoria, and 
Irtamond Hill. He received the Queen's 
medal with four clasps. From November, 1901, 
to June, 190.5, he was an Adjutant of his 
reginjent, and he obtained his ^lajority in 
June, 190S. 

LIEUTENANT MURRAY ROBERTSON 
SWEET-ESCOTT, 3rd attd. 1st BATTN. 
KINGS LIVERPOOL REGIMENT. 
who was killed in 
action near Jlissy, 
on the .Aisne. on 
the 20th September, 
19 14. was the 
younger son of the 
Rev. E. H. and Mrs. 
Sweet - Escott, of 
Dulwich CoUege, and 
H a r t r o w ilanor. 
Taunton. Somerset. 
He was bom on 
the 14th December, 
ISS7, and educated 
joined the 3rd Battn. of the King's in Novem- 
ber. 1909. became Lieutenant in Februai-y, 1911, 




at Marlborough. He 



EVA FAR 



12S 



and, in January, 1012, was appointed A.D.C. 
to Sir E. B. .Swcet-Escott, Governor and f'oin- 
niander-in-Chief of the Leeward Islands, wliioli 
position he lield till September, 1913. 
Me was twenty - seven years of age at the 
time of his death. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE RALEIGH KERR 
EV.\TT. 1st B.\TTN. THE DUKE OF 
C.\MBR1DGKS OWN MIDDLESEX 

R E G I M E N T I, 

whii was killed in 

aattion in Franee on 
the l:5th Noveml)er. 
It.U. was the only 

son of .Surgeon- 

General G. .T. H. 

Evatt, M.D.. C.B.. 

Army Medical St a IT. 

retired, and Mrs. 

Evatt. of Wayside. 

Camherley, Surrey. 

He was born on the 
30th September, 18S3. and joined the Mid- 
dlesex Regiment in March, llldl. becoming 
Lieutenant in May, 190(i. From April. 
190i), to December, 1913. he was employed 
with the West African Frontier Force, and was 
promoted Captain in .September. 1911. 

CAPTAIN ROSSLYN CURZON EVE- 
LEGH, 2nd BATTN. OXFORDSHIRE 
.\ND BUCKINGHAMSHIRE LIGHT 

INFANTRY. 

who was killed in 
action at the Battle 
of the Aisne on the 
1 9th September, 
1914 was the elder 
son of the late 
Colonel Frederick 
Kvelegh, formerly in 
the ffind (Oxford- 
shire) Light In- 
fantry, and of .Mrs. 
E V e 1 e g h. Elder 
Wick, >^li..t(iv.i-iiill. near Oxford. 
Captam Evelegh was bom at Eccles, Lancashire, 
on the 13th May, 1885, and was educated at 
Hinwick House, near Welhngborough : at 
Rugby: and the R.M.C., Sandhiu'st. He joined 
tlie Oxfordshire Light Infantry, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in the combined Oxfordshire and 
Buckinghamshire Light Infantry in December, 
1905. He played Rugby football, and was good 
at all sorts of gymnastics. 

From November, 1906, to November. 1909. 
he was A.D.C. to the G.O.C., Mauritius. He 
was qualified as an interpreter in both French 
and German. 



His fatal wound was caused by a piece of shell 
striking him over the heart. He had been 
wounded by shell in five places tliii'c days 
before, but remained on diil\ .ind atlriiil.il Ici 
his wounded conu'ades. 




RLIE, 2nd 
FUSILIERS. 




C.\PTA1N FRANK FAl 
BATTN. ROYAL SCOTS 

who was killed in 
action on the 23rd 
Octolier. 1914. at 
Gheluvelt, while tak- 
ing a house at the 
head of his men, was 
bornonthe 17th .lan- 
uary, 1S7S, and was 
educated at St. Paul's 
School, to which he 
went in 1893. 
He was appointed 
liieutenant in the " 

3rd Battn. Scottish Rifles in February. 19n|. 
and after serving for nearly eight months with 
that battalion when embodied, was given a 
commission in the Royal Scots Fusiliers in 
October, 1901. He served in the South .Xfrican 
War, 1899-1901, being present at operations in 
the Orange Free State : in the Transvaal, west 
of Pretoria, including actions at Frederickstad : 
and in Cape Colony, south of the Orange River, 
receiving tlie Queen's medal with foiu' clasps. 
He was promoted Lieutenant in June, 1905. 
and from 1911 to 1913 was employed with the 
West African Frontier Force. 
Captain Fairlie. who was married, att-ained his 
lank in .lamiary. IVI12. 

2nd LIEUTENANT JAMES 

DOUGLAS HERBERT FARMER, 
ROYAL FIELD .\RTILLERY, 

who was killed in action on the 4th November. 
1914. at the age of twenty-one. was the second 
son of .Tames Herbert Farmer, of Fairfield. 
Mundjesley, Norfolk, and a grandson of the late 
.James Farmer, Esq., .LP., and of the late Sir 
George Harris. J.P.. L.C.C. 

2nd Lieutenant Farmer was the second of three 
brothers educated at .St. Paul's, all of whom were 
keenly interested in the school games : he was a 
member of ilr. Cholmeley's House, and playi^d 
occasionally tor the First XV. 
He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery in July. 
1913. 

2nd LIEUTENANT HERBERT RON,\LD 
FARRAR. 3rd BATTN. LEICESTER- 
SHIRE REGIMENT, attd. 2nd BATTN. 
MANCHESTER REGIMENT, 

who was killed on the 24th December, 1914, 
at the age of twenty-seven, was the elder son of 



129 



FAR— FEA 




the Rev. H. W. and Mrs. Farrar, All Saints' 
Vicarage. Woolwich. 

2nd Lieutenant Farrar. who was a B.A. of 
Cambridge (Queens' College), was for some years 
in the O.T.C.. and received his commission on 
probation in the Leicestershire Regiment in 
August. 1914. 

2nd LIEUTENANT ARCHIBALD 
MANATON FARRIER. 1st BATTN. 
SOUTH jWALES BORDERERS. 

was born at .South 
Molton. Devonshire, 
on the 13th July, 
1S91, and was the 
son of Richard and 
Lucy Farrier, and 
a grandson of WU- 
liam and Belvedera 
Manaton. He was 
at an early age 
adopted by his aunt, 
Mrs. Edwards, of 
Dulverton, who 
brou^t him up. TTjg brother is now serving 
in the Royal Navy. 

2nd Lieutenant Farrier was educated at Devon 
County School, where he showed considerable 
abilitry, for he took a silver medal at the age 
of ten, and when eleven years old won a 
scholarship of £30. 

In 1907 he joined the 2nd Battalion Devonshire 
Regiment, with which he served in Crete, Malta. 
Cyprus, and other places. WhUe in the ranks 
he earnestly applied himself to his work and 
duties, obtaining a first-class (highest) certificate 
of education in October. 1910, and in August. 
1911, as a Lance-Corporal, he obtained the 
certificate qualifying bim to teach, among other 
subjects, map-reading, English history, and 
physical exercises, and he acted for some time 
as Assistant Schoolmaster of his battalion. For 
his success he was congratulated by General 
Kelly Kenny, then commanding in the district 
in which he was serving. He did not neglect 
the physical side of his education, for in 1911 
he received a regimental certificate for swim- 
ming one mile while stationed at Pembroke 
Barracks, 31alta. 

He returned to England in August, 1914. 
having received his commission in the South 
Wales Borderers, and joined the 1st Battalion 
eariy in November. 

He was wounded on the 2Sth December, 1914. 
and died the following day " somewhere in 
Flanders.'' Major Reddie, commanding the 
battalion at the front, writing to his relatives to 
express his sympathy in a letter dated the 29th 
December, gave the following account of 



the circumstances attending his death : — 
" Last night he was sent out with a party 
to dig some trenches, was wounded in three 
places, and unfortunately died from his wounds 
this morning. . . . During his short stay with 
the regiment he made himself very popular 
with all ranks, and did not seem to know the 
meaning of the word 'fear.' . . . We feel his 
loss very much. I am unable to mention places 
in letter." 

He was buried in the grounds of Chateau Gorre. 
Another comrade wrote saying how cheerful 
be always was. and that the men formed a high 
opinion of him at once. He was always ready 
to undertake little odd jobs that could only 
be carried out with danger, whenever an officer 
was required. " If Farrier goes on like this 
hell be getting the D.S O.." one of the officers 
remarked on the evening before he died. A 
Captain of his battalion said : " He was a 
feariess officer, and will be missed by us all who 
had grown to like him so much." 

CAPTAIN REGINALD BENJAMIN 

FEATHERSTONE. 1st BATTN. DEVON- 
SHIRE REGT.. 
bom at Anerley, 
Surrey, on the 2Sth 
November, 1 S S 1, 
was the son of the 
late Benjamin 
Feat herst one, Esq., 
of Adelaide, South 
Australia, and Tork 
House, Blenkame 
Road, Wandsworth 
Common, S.W. 
He was educated at 
Westminster School, and after serving with 
the embodied 2klilitia for a year and two months 
joined the Devonshire Regiment in December, 
1901, becoming Lieutenant in December, 1904. 
He took part in the South African War. being 
present at operations in the TraasvaaL Orange 
River Colony, and Cape Colony in 19')2. He 
received the Queen's medal with four clasps. 
Afterwards he served with the 1st Battalion of 
his regiment in India, subsequently being posted 
to the depot at Exeter, where he did duty with 
the 3rd Battalion. In November, 19«)9, he was 
appointed Adjutant of the 5th (Prince of 
Wales's) Battalion (Territorial Force) of the 
Devonshire Regiment. Later he served in Egypt, 
and was promoted Captain in October, 1914. 
He went to Flanders with the 2nd Battalion 
in November, 1914. and was killed near Neuve 
Chapelle on the ISth December, 1914. 
Captain Feat herst one married FUizabeth, daugh- 
ter of Ernest Robinson, Esq., and left two 
children : Betty, bom October. 1910 : and 
Jack, born May. 1912. 




FEN 




LIEUTENANT-COLONEL CLAUDE 
CAMBRIDGE FENNER, COMMAND- 
ING 59th SCINDE RIFLES, FRON- 
TIER FORCE, INDIAN ARMY, 

^^^^^^1^^ was the only son of 

jSj^^^P^ Mr. H. A. Shrapnel 

IHpW^^R^P ll Department, Iiuli.-i 

^^^a ^ (rotirofl). of (i, Eliot 

**■ Hill, Hlackhealh, 

a u ll was killed 

at K i c ll e bo u r g 

I.'A\(uir. France, in 

the forty-seventh 

year of his age ; he 

was Imrieil at Le 

■JMUi.t. Itu.- .lu Im.i-. 

lie was gazetted to the 1st Battalion, Dorset- 
shire Kegiinent (the old 39th) from Sandhurst 
in February, 1888, and served with that regi- 
ment for about two and a quarter years, when 
he was transferred to the Indian Army, lie 
obtained his ijromotion to Lieutenant in 1889, 
Captain in 1899, Major in 1901), and Lieu- 
tenant-Colonel in August, 1913, when he became 
Commandant of the 59th. With the exception 
of a short time spent in the 24th Bombay 
Infantry (now the 124th Duchess of Connaught's 
Own Beluchistan Infantry), his entire service in 
the Indian Army was with the r.9th. In 19(12 
the 59th Kifles (then the tith Punjab Infantry) 
gained under his instruction the distinction of 
being second in all India in Musketry, Colonel 
Fenner himself being a marksman. 
In 1903-<ll he was on active service in Somali- 
land as Second-in-Conunand of the 52nd Sikhs, 
F.F.. his linked battalion. He connnanded the 
regiment at the Battle of Jidballi, where it 
formed the front of the square when attacked 
by the Mullah and his hosts. He was attached, 
with some four hvindred of his men, to a force 
of Mounted Infantry, the whole under the 
command of Colonel Kenna, \'.C., which force 
went through incredible hardships from hunger, 
thirst, and long marches in intense heat, 
(leneral Sir Charles Egerton, K.C.B. — himself 
an old frontier officer — mentioned him in his 
sjjccial despatch, and he received the medal 
and two clasps. In 1908 he took part in the 
ojierations against the Zakka Khel tribesmen 
who inhabit the mountains near Peshawar, and 
which led to a rising of the Kyber Pass tribes 
and the great Mohmand tribe. He received a 
medal and clasp lor these services. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Fenner spent a month in 
the trenches in France, with the exception of 
a few hours, during most of which tinie his 
regiment held neai-ly a mile of the line. He 
was killed instantaneously by a bullet from the 
German trenches, while standing up directing 
operations. He was mentioned in Sir .Tolm 



Freurh's Despatch of :;is( Al.-iy. IIH."., the 
.'>'.ith having the sail and imii|ue <listinction of 
liaving three Connnanding Ollicers mentioned 
in that one despatch. Colonel Fenner, under 
whose conunand they went to France, being 
tlie first to fall. The 59th was one of the llrst 
Indian Regiments to land in I'rance. 
Colonel Fenner was a gallant gentleman, if 
we may use the term, which denotes so mueli. 
Dauntless and brave, his numerous letters home 
are full of thought for his men and tlieir comfort, 
and recognition of the services of the splendid 
European officers in his regiment. Many of 
his native officers and men he nmst have known 
for years, and they were as comrades to him. 
lie was a keen sportsman and an expert rifle 
shot, much big game having fallen to his gun. 
He played back tor his regiment at polo, and 
had a handicap at three at golf. 
Colonel Fenner married on the 27th Maich. 
1899. Louise ^'ictoria MacMahon, daughter of 
the late Major O. F. W. MacMahon. 1, ,\.. 
and grand-daughter of the late General W. I'. 
MacMahon. 



LIEUTENANT GEOFFREY RUSSELL 
FENTON, 2nd BATTN. CONNAUGHT 

RANG E R S, ^,„^,_ _ 

who was killed in 

action at the Battle 

of the Aisne o n 

the 20th September, 

1914, was the son of 

William Russell 

Fenton, of Ardag- 

howen, Sligo, and 

was born on the 

7th November, 

1889, at Sligo. 

He was educated at 

Cheltenham College and the R.JM.C, Sandhurst, 

and joined the Connaught Rangers in September'. 

1909, becoming Lieutenant in February, 1910. 

He was a keen all-round sportsman, a good 

shot and fisherman, and constantly rode to 

hounds when stationed in Ireland. 

Lieutenant Fenton joined his battalion with 

a draft in August, 1914, during the early part of 

the retirement from Mons, in which therefore he 

took part, and subsequently in the advance to 

the Aisne, where he was killed within about 

three hundred yards of the Herman trenches. 

The Observation Officer of his platoon was 

killed by a sniper, and Lieutenant Fenton at 

once took his place, and was shot through the 

brain a few minutes later. This occurred before 

the use of periscopes by our men, who were 

thus left at a great disadvantage compared with 

the enemy's snipers, who were using telesco|iic 

sights. 




131 



FER 




LiiMitcnant I'Viitoii iiiairicd in Octolicr. I'Jl'J. 
.Millicent, elder daughter of Lieutenant-Colonel 
v.. H. Montresor, Royal Sussex Regiment, who 
also was killed at the Battle of the Aisne on 
the 14th September. 1911. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES ADAM HAMIL- 
TON F E R G U S S O N. 2nd B A T T N. 
HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY, 

wa.s the son of Sir 
James Fergusson. 
Bart., of Spital- 
liaugh. West Linton. 
Peeblesshire, and 
was born on the 
22nd >Iarch. l.Sfl2. 
at Curzon Street, 
Mayfair. London. 
He was educated at 
Ardvreck, Pert li- 
shire : Winchester 
College ; and the 
Hoyal ililitary College, Sandhurst. He joined 
the Highland Light Infantry as 2nd Lieutenant 
on the 14tli February, 1912. and was promoted 
Lieutenant in August, 1914. 

At the Battle of the Aisne on the 20th Septem- 
ber, 1914, he had Ijeen kneeling while attending 
to a wounded man, and on rising a bullet 
struck him in the forehead and killed him 
instantaneou'-ly. 

He was a keen sijortsman. an exceUent shot, 
and a good golfer. 
■' He was an affectionate and dutiful son." 



2nd LIEUTENANT DUDLEY LUIS DE 
TAVORA FERN ANDES, 2nd BATTN. 
BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

wlio was killed in 
action on the 23rd 
October, 1914, aged 
twenty-one, by the 
_ _ ^^ binsting of a shell, 

l^r |P5^' 5i.^ """^ *'^® ^'^^ °^ ^^'■- '''• 

W. L. Fernandes, of 
Scarborough. He 
was educated at St. 
Peter's .School, York, 
and theR.M.C, Sand- 
hurst, from which he 
was gazetted to the 
Bedfordshire Regiment in September, 1913. He 
joined his battaUon in South Africa, coming 
to Europe with it in the autumn of the year 
1914 for active service. 

CAPTAIN WALTER HUGHES FERRAR, 
,\DJUTANT 2nd BATTN. THE W'ELSH 
REGIMENT, who was killed in action on 
the 31st October, 1914 (according to the oflicial 
lists), was the youngest son of the late A. il. 





]"(ri-ar. Fs(j.. n.Iy.,of Torwood. Belfast. He wa.s 
born on the 29th June. 1 STfi. and « ;is ediical i-d nf 
Marlborough College 
(Crescent, 1889-93). 
jolixing the Welsh 
Regiment from the 
:Militia in May. 1S97. 
becoming Lieutenant 
in June, 1S99. 
He took part in the 
South African War. 
(hu-ing which la- 
served with tlie 
Mounted Infantry, 
and was present 
at the relief of Kiiiiljerle> . at i.iHiai imj^ 
in the Orange Free State and Paarde- 
berg, actions at Poplar Grove, Karee 
Siding, lloutnek (Thoba Mountain). Vet and 
Zand Rivers : operations in the Transvaal, 
including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, 
and Diamond Hill ; operations in the Orange 
River Colony, including actions at Wittebergen 
and Witpoort : in Cape Colony, soutli of the 
Orange River : again in the Orange River and 
Cai>e Colonies in 1901, and in tlie Transvaal, 
1901-02. He received the Queen's njedal 
with five clasps and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

Captain Ferrar, who reached that rank in 
^larch, 1904, was employed with the Egyptian 
Army from May of that year to July, 1911, 
during which time he again saw active service, 
takmg part in operations in the Soudan in the 
Jebel Nyinia District of Southern Kordofan. 
for which he received the medal with clasp, 
and the 4th class of the Osmanieh. 
He was killed whilst leading a charge on the 
village of Gheluvelt, and was mentioned in .Sir 
John French's first despatch of the 8th October, 
1914. 

He was a member of the Army and Xavy 
Club, Pall Mall, and was not married. 



LIEUTENANT GILBERT COLIN 
CUNNINGHAME FERRIER, 7th 
BATTN. ROYAL FUSILIERS 
CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT). 

about whose fate there was for a long time some 
uncertainty, was included in the casualty list 
published by the War Oflfice in May, 1915. as 
" unofficially reported killed or died of wounds " 
on the 11th November, 1914. 
Lieutenant Ferrier was appointed to his regi- 
ment, on probation, from the Xew Zealand 
Defence Forces, in August. 1914, and was 
attached for service to the 4th Battalion of his 
regiment when he died. While his death was 
still in doubt, he was promoted Lieutenant, 
to date from February, 191.5. 



FER— FIN 



132 




LIEUTENANT HUGH MOCKLER- 
FERRYMAN, 2nd B A T T N. OX- 
FORDSHIRE AND BUCKINGHAM- 
SHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY, 

was the son of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
A. F. Mockler-FeiTy- 
nian, late Oxford- 
shire Light Infantry, 
and of Evelyn L. 
Jloekler - Ferryman, 
daughter of the late 
Sir C. 'UTutehead, 
and was bom at 
Maidstone on the 
8rd May, 1892. 
Lieutenant Mockler- 
Ferryman was educated at Wellington College, 
Berkshire, where he was in the Cricket XI 
in 1909-10, and at the Royal Jlilitary CoUege, 
Sandliurst. He received his commission as 
2ud Lieutenant in .September, 1911, and became 
Lieutenant in April, 1914. Pi-oceeding abroad 
with the Expeditionary Force in August, 1914, 
he was present in the retirement from :Mons 
up to the Battle of the Aisne, where he was 
killed near La Soupir on the 16th September. 
1914. 

Lieutenant ilockler-Ferryman played cricket 
for Berkshire, the Aldershot Command, and in 
other club teams. Among his other recreations 
were Alpine sports and curling, he having been 
a member of the Caledonian (Curling) Club. 



2nd LIEUTENANT LEONARD AMAURI 
FILLEUL, B.A., SPECIAL RESERVE, 
SOMERSET LIGHT INFANTRY, 

was the son of the 
Rev. Philip William 
Girdlestone PiUeul, 
Rector of DcAnzes, 
Wiltshire, and was 
born at St. .Tames's 
Lodge, Bath, on the 
lith February, 1888. 
"-'nd Lieutenant 
I'illeul wa.s a relative 
of the late Dr. Valpy, 
of scholastic fame, 
whose daughter was 
his grial-j;raiidinother. and to Canon Robert 
Girdlestone, formerly Principal of Wycliffe Hall, 
Oxford. 

2nd Lieutenant Filleul was educated at the 
Preparatory School, Cleveland Hnuse. Wey- 
mouth : and at Trent College, Derbyshire ; 
afterwards proceeding to Lincoln College, 
Oxford. At the University he rowed for four 
years in his college eight. While he was Secre- 
tary and Captain the College boat rose to fifth 
on the river. In 1910 he rowed in the \vinning 




Trial Eights. He was in his .School Cadet Corps, 
winning tlie National .Service League gold 
medal for proficiency, and was in the Oxford 
University Officers' Training Corps. On leaving 
the 'Varsity he, in January, 1912, received a 
commission in Prince Albert's Regiment (.Somer- 
setshire Light Infantry), with which he trained 
for three weeks each year during his vacations. 
He was a master at ilonkton Combe .School, 
Bath, until the war broke out. For two years 
he was Captain of the Football Club at Trent 
College, and an oarsman at Oxford : «hile at 
Monkton Combe School he greatly developed 
the School Rowing Club. 

He left England at the end of .September, 1914, 
with a draft of the Oxfordshire and Buckingham- 
shire Light Infantry, to which regiment he 
was then attached. On the 21st October, 1914 
(Trafalgar Day) he was engaged in an attack 
on German infantry in the great Battle of 
Ypres, near St. Julien. During a rush forward 
in the early morning over some open ground 
he was struck by a bullet near the heart, d>-ing 
instantlv. 



BRIG.\DIER-GENERAL NEIL DOUG- 
LAS FINDLAY, C.B., p.s.c, COMM.\ND- 
ING ROYAL ARTILLERY 1st DIVISION, 

was killed in action 
near C o u r c h a m ps, 
Fi-ance, on the 10th 
September, 1914, 
whilst directing the 
fire of his guns. 
He entered the 
R.M.A., Woolwich, 
on the 19th January, 
1877, and was com- 
missioned into the 
Royal Artillery as 
Lieutenant on the 
18th December. 1878. He l»-caiiii- ( aiitaiii on the 
28th April. 1887 : .Major on the 21st December, 
1896 ; Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel on the 29th 
November, 1900 : Lieutenant^Colonel R.A. on 
the 1st September, 1904 : Brevet-Colonel on 
the 15th October, 1905 : Substantive Colonel 
on the 2nd March, 1908 ; Brigadier-General 
on the 14th July, 1910. He pa.ssed the final 
examination Staff College. 1897. He held the 
following Staff appointments: Adjutant R.A.. 
1st March, 1894, to 14th January. 1896 : Staff 
Officer R.A.. 1st Army Corps, and Brigade- 
Major R.A., Aldershot. oth March. 1901, to 
14th April, 1904: A.A.G., headquartei-s of 
Army and A.A.G., War Office, 2nd March. 
1908, to 13th July, 1910 : Commanding R.A., 
1st Division Aldershot Command. 14th July. 
1910. 

His war services included the Hazara Expedition, 
1888, for which he was mentioned in despatches 




133 



FIS 



and received the medal with clasp. He als«i 
took part in the South African War, 1899-19IX), 
being present at operations in Xatal in Decem- 
ber, 1899, at the reUef of Ladysmith, at further 
operations in Xatal from March to June, 1900, 
at operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, 
July to Xoveniber. 19W. For these services 
he was mentioned in Despatches " London 
Gazette," 8th February, 1901 ; (Sir R. H. 
Buller, 30th March and 9th November. 1900) ; 
and '■ London Gazette," 22nd February, 1901 ; 
and received the Queen's medal with six clasps 
and the Brevet of Lieutenant-Colonel. 
Brigadier- General Findlay was the second son 
of Thomas Dunlop Findlay, of Easterhill, 
Lanarkshire, and married, in 1892, Alma, 
daughter of Thomas Lloyd, of Minard, Argyll- 
shire. 

CAPTAIN FRANK FISHER. 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT. 

who was killed in 
I action on the 13th 

September, 19 14, 
whilst leading his 
company when ad- 
vancing to the Aisne, 
was the younger son 
of Frederick 
j ^^^^^^ Fisher. of Ttilse 

jA ^ ^hP^^ Hill. London, S.W., 
|H|t . yf^- ^^1 ^'^'^ ^^^ bom in 

IHB^^^^^M|&j^^ London on the 23rd 
^ December, 1883. 

He was educated at Chaiterhouse and the 
R.M.C, .Sandhxirst. and joined the Royal West 
Kent Regiment in October, 1903, becoming 
Lieutenant in January, 1906. He was promoted 
Captain on the 5th August, 1914. 
Captain Fisher was a member of the Junior 
Naval and MiUtary and the Royal Automobile 
Clubs, and was unmarried. 



CAPTAIN HAROLD FISHER. D.S.O., 
1st BATTN. MANCHESTER REGT.. 

— _.,_ — , — _ - was the son of the 

Rev. Canon F. H. 
Fisher, Church Croft, 
Hemel Hempstead, 
and was bom at Ful- 
ham on the 3rd 
March. 1877. 
He was educated at 
Haileybury. and first 
joined the Suffolk 
Artillery Militia, in 
October, 1895, enter- 
ing the Manchester 
Regiment in April. 1898, becoming Lieutenant 
in May, 1899, and Captain in July, 1901. 
With his battalion he served in the South 






African War. being present at operations in 
Natal and the Transvaal, includuig action at 
Belfast : again at operations in the Transvaal, 
1901—02. For his services he was mentioned in 
Despatches ('" London Gazette," 8th February, 
1901 : Sir G. S. White. 2nd December. 1899. 
and 23rd March. 19W : and "London Gazette," 
10th September, 1901). He was awarded the 
D.S.O.. and received the Queen's medal with 
three clasps and the King's medal with two 
clasps. 

He was killed in action near La Basseo on the 
16th December. 1914. 



CAPTAIN MORTIMER FISHER. 1st 

BATTN. THE PRINCE OF WALES'S 

OWN WEST YORKSHIRE REGIMENT), 

was the son of 

Frederick Charles 

Fisher, Esq., 

F.R.C.S., and was 

bom at King's 

Langley, Herts, on 

the 24th March. 

1883. 

He was educated at 

Aldenham .School, 

Elstree, Herts, and 

joined the 3rd (then 

IMilitia) Battalion of 

the West Yorkshire Regiment in April. 19tX», 

and, having passed third in his examination 

was transferred to the 2nd Battalion in June, 

1901. He joined his battalion in .South Africa 

on active service in October, 1901, remaining 

there over two years, during which he held the 

posirion of Acting Adjutant, and. as he held 

the Hythe certificate. Musketry Instructor. He 

was present at operations in the Transvaal, 

November, 1901 — May, 1902, receiving the 

Queen's medal with three clasps. 

In 1905 he exchanged into the 1st BattaUon 

and went to India, where he went tlirough the 

Mohmand Campaign. 1908. receiving the medal 

with clasp. 

On promotion to Captain in July, 1910, he 

joined the depot of his legiment at York. 

Captain Fisher accompanied his battalion to the 

Continent for active service in the Great War 

and took part in some of the s?vere fighting in 

the early stages of the campaign. 

He was killed on the 20th September, 1914, 

near Troyon, but it has not been possible to 

obtain particulars of the occurrence, as so 

many of the battalion were killed, wounded, or 

missing. 

He married Margaret Sarah, daughter of C. H. 

Bailey, Esq., of Charlcombe, Watford, and left 

one son, Richard Mortimer, bom 3rd February, 

1913. 

He played football, golf, and polo. 



134 




FIT 

BRIGADIER-GENERAL CHARLES 
FITZCLARENCE, V.C., p. s.c, 
IRISH GUARDS. COMMANDING 
T H,E 1st GUARDS BRIGADE, 

was the sou of the 
late Captain the 
lion. George Kit/.- 
Clarence, R.N. , third 
son of the first Earl 
of Munster, and was 
born on the 8th 
May. 180."). at 
Bishop's o u r t, 
Comity K i 1 d a r e. 
Ireland. All four 
sons of the Eai-1 of 
.M u n s t e r served 
either in the Xavy or Aruiy, the youngest dying 
of wounds received in the attack on the Kedan 
in the Crimea. A t\rin brother of Brigailier- 
General FitzClarence served with distinction 
in the Egyptian Army, and was killed at Abu- 
Hanied in 1897. 

Brigadier-General FitzClarence was educated 
at Eton, and Wellington CoUege, and joined the 
Army, in which he had a most distinguished 
career, by entering the Royal Fusiliers (City 
of London Reghuent) from the Militia in 
November, 188(5, as Lieutenant, lie became 
Captain in that regiment in AprO. 18U8, and was 
transferred to the Irish Guards on the formation 
of that regiment in October, 1900. 
In the South African War Brigadier-ticneral 
FitzClarence earned the X.C. for three distmct 
acts of great bravery, durmg the siege of Mafe- 
king, on separate dates, he having gone to 
South Africa on special service in July, 1899. 
His gaUantry and daring throughout the siege 
had become proverbial, and earned for lum the 
sobriquet of " The Demon " among his men. 
Three specific acts of valour are officially re- 
corded in connection with the award of the ^^C., 
the first having been at Five jVIile Bank. The 
armoured train had gone out on the 14th Octo- 
ber, 1899, and had got into difficulties. Captain 
FitzClarence took about fifty men of the newly 
formed Protectorate Regunent — which he had 
himself helped to raise — to its assistance. It 
was their first engagement, but starting at 
one thousand yards FitzClarence advanced them, 
under a very heavy fire, to a distance of between 
four and five hundred yards from the train. At 
one time the squadron was nearly surrounded, 
but the Captain's perfect coolness and clever 
handhng effected the object in view, with a 
loss of only two killed and fifteen wounded, 
they having succeeded in killing fifty of the 
enemy, besides wounding a large number. 
They were supported by No. 2 Troop, and a part 
of "D" Squadron covered their retirement, 
but the moral eflect upon the enemy was very 
great. 



The second occasion was a idtch-dark night, 
on the 27tli October, when he led about sixty 
men, supported by a handful of police, in a 
sortie to attack the Boers' main trench to the 
east of the town. So cautiously did they work 
that they came on the enemy sleeping, and 
attacked them with bayonet and butt end of 
rifles. FitzClarence was the first man in. 
sword in hand, and is said to have killed four 
himself. The Boers in the rear fired on the 
trench indiscriminately, and when the whistle 
sounded to retire the Uttle party return..!, 
leaving six dead and nine wounded. 
The third time was on the 23rd December, when 
he greatly distinguished himself by his courage 
and dasli in the action at Game Tree, being 
himself shot through the leg and seriously 
wounded. 

Fi-om August. 1900. to February. 19(11. having 
received his Brevet .Majority in November, 
1900, he was Brigade-Major in South Africa. 
For his war scrNice she was mentioned in Des- 
patches ("London Gazette," Sth February, 
1901 ), and in addition to being awarded the V.C. 
and his brevet promotion he received the Queen's 
South Africa -Medal with three clasps. From 
April. 1903, to March, 1900, he was Brigade- 
.Major of the 5th Brigade at Aldershot. He 
received his substantive Majority in the Irish 
Guards in May, 1904, and succeeded to the 
command of the 1st BattaUon in July, 1909. 
In 1913 he was appointed to the command of 
the regiment and regimental district, a post he 
held till the outbreak of the war with Germany, 
when he took over command of the 29th Brigade, 
Xth Division, at the Curragh till the 22nd 
September, and on the 27th of that month he 
took conmtand of the 1st Guards Brigade of the 
Expeditionary Force, wliich he held till his 
death in action at Ypres on the night of the 
11th November or early morning of the 12th 
November, 1914, leading the 1st Guards' Brigade 
against the Prussian Guard. 
At the time of the fighting near Gheluvelt on 
the 31st October, 1914, w^hen the Germans 
had broken the line of the 1st Di\-ision and 
taken the vUlage, Sir John French, in his 
Despatch pubU.shed on the 30th November, 
1914, referring to this incident, says: "Per- 
haps the most important and decisive attack 
(except that of the Prussian Guard on the 
10th November) made against the 1st Corps 
during the whole of its arduous experiences 
in the neighbourhood of Ypres took place 
on the 31st October. After several attacks 
and counter-attacks during the course of 
the morning along the Menin- Ypres Road, 
south-east of Gheluvelt, an attack against that 
place developed in great force, and the line of 
the 1st Division was broken. .Aleantime. on the 
Menin Road, a counter-attack delivered by the 



135 



FIT 



left of the 1st Division and the right of the Ilnd 
Division against the right flank of the German 
line was completely successful, and the 2nd 
Worcester Regiment was to the fore in this. 
I was present, with Sir Douglas Haig, at Hooge 
between two and three o'clock on this day 
when the 1st Division was retiring. I regard it 
as the most critical moment in the whole of this 
great battle. Tlie rally of the 1st Division and 
the recapture of the village of Gheluvelt at such 
a tuue was fraught with momentous conse- 
quences. If any one unit can be singled out for 
especial praise it is the Worcesters." 
Sir John French, in a speech he made to the 
Worcesters on the 26th Xovember, 1914. which 
appeared in " The Times" of the 14th December. 
1914. praising the Worcesters for what they had 
done on the 31st October, said : "I have made 
repeated enquiries as to what officer was re- 
sponsible for the conduct of thus counter-attack 
on October 31st, but have never so far been 
able to find out." 

It has since been officially established that it 
was Brigadier-General FitzClarence. V.C.. who 
was responsible. 

In his despatch of the 20th November, 1914, 
Sir John French made the following reference 
to the late officer : " Another officer whose 
name was particularly mentioned to me was 
that of Brigadier-General FitzClarence, V.C., 
commanding the 1st Guards' Brigade. He was 
unfortunately killed in the night attack of the 
11th Xovember. His loss will be severely felt." 
Brigadier-General FitzClarence was a military 
member of the London Territorial Force Asso- 
ciation, and a member of I Zingari, the Guards', 
and the Naval and ililitary Clubs. 
He married, in April, 1S9S, Violet, youngest 
daughter of the late Lord Alfred Spencer 
Churchill, son of the sixth Duke of Marlborough, 
and left a son and a daughter : Edward Charles, 
born October, 1899 : and Joan Harriet, bom 
December. 1901. 

CAPTAIN GERALD GADSDEN FITZE. 

"C" BATTERY. ROYAL HORSE 

ARTILLERY, 
who is believed to 
have been killed 
whilst reconnoitring 
on or about the 
28th October, 1914, 
at or near Zand- 
voorde, Belgium, 
was the elder son 
of the late 5Ir. 
.Samuel Fitze, of 
Trevanion. East- 
bourne, and of !Mrs. 

Fitze,Trehayne, Ashburnham Road, Eastbourne. 

Bom at 56 Kensington Park Road, London. W., 

on the 11th January, 1886, he was educated at 




Lambrook, Bracknell, and at >Iarn)orough 
College, proceeding afterwards to the R.M.A.. 
Woolwich. 

He received his first appointment in the Army 
in July, 1906, when he was gazetted 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in the Royal Field Artillery ; and in 
January, 1907, he joined the 31st Battery at 
Kilkenny, Ireland. He became Lieutenant 
two years later, and in 1912 was posted to 
" C " Battery. Royal Horse Artillery. His 
promotion to Captain was gazetted to date from 
the 30th October, 1914, after his presimied 
death. 

Captain Fitze, whose favourite recreation was 
hunting, was a member of the Junior Army 
and Navy and ilarlborough Clubs. 

CAPTAIN GERALD HUGH FITZ- 
GERALD. 4th ROYAL IRISH DRAGOON 
GUARDS, 

born at Johnstown 
Castle, Wexford, 
Ireland, on the 11th 
April, 1S86. was the 
only son of the late 
Lord Maurice 
FitzGerald, second 
son of the fomth 
Duke of Lein.ster. 
and Lady Adelaide 
Forbes, eldest 
daughter of the 
seventh Earl of Granard. K.P. 
He was educated at Eton, and joined the Royal 
North Devon Hussars (Yeomanry), from which 
he was gazetted to the (Royal Irish) Dragoon 
Guards in December, 1907, obtainiiig his troop 
in November, 1913. 

He was shot through the head while taking 
machine-gun observations on the 13th Septem- 
ber, 1914. at Bourg-et-Comin (Aisne). 
Captain FitzGerald belonged to the Cavalry 
Club, and his recreations were hunting, shooting, 
polo, and cricket. 

He married, on the 6th August, 1914, Dorothy, 
youngest daughter of Spencer Charrington, Esq., 
of Winchfield. Hampshire. 

LIEUT. D. T. F. FITZPATRICK. 3rd attd. 
2nd I BATTN. SOUTH STAFFORD- 
SHIRE REGT.. 

was killed in action 
on the 27th October. 
1914. He was edu- 
cated at .Stonyhurst, 
and joined the 3rd 
Battalion .South 
.Staffordshire R e g i - 
ment, on probation, 
in March, 1913, be- 
coming Lieutenant 
in February, 1914. 





FIT FOL 



1,16 



CAPTAIN GABRIEL ROY FITZ- 
PA TRICK. 3rd lattd. 2nd) BATTN- 



T H F. 



WELSH 




REGIMENT, 

was born at Chelsea, 
London. S.W.. on 
(he 20tli October. 
1883. and was the 
son of J. F. .1. 
Fitzpatrick, Esq., of 
Ilij^h^iatt'. He was 
educated at tlie 
.result C.illiL.'c. 
.Stamford Hill, and 
Ratcliff CoUege. He 
served in the Oity 
Imperial Yeomanry 
from 19(ll-(l2. in the .3rd Essex Regiment from 
1905-09, and became Lieutenant in the 3rd 
Battalion Welsh Regiment in August, 1909. 
He also served with the British Ea-st Afi'ican 
Police from 1909-12. 

He was with the 2nd Battalion Welsh Regiment 
in this war. being present in the retirement from 
Mons to the Marne, was promoted Captain on 
the 1st .Septeniber, 1914, and was killed on the 
14th of that month at Beaulne, in the Battle 
of the Aisne. 

Captain Fitzpatrick married May. daughter of 
the late Rev. W. F. Attenborough. Vicar of 
Fletching, and adopted daughter of the late 
Henry North, Earl of Sheffiel.l. of Slieltield 
Park. Sussex. He left no family. 

CAPT.\IN ROL.\ND S.\CKVILLE 
FLETCHER, 1st BATTN. 

NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS, 

born in London on 
the 24th .March. 
18S2, was the second 
son of LionelFletcher 
and Eleanor Mary, 
his wife {»ec Stop- 
ford Sack\Tlle), of 
Ehusf^roft,We.st Far- 
leigh, Kent, and a 
nephew of Colonel 
.Stopford Sackville, 
of Drayton House, 
Xorthants. 

He was educated at Charterhouse, and entered 
the Northumberland Fusiliers from the North- 
amptonsliire Militia (with which he served when 
it was embodied for nearly nine months), in 
January, 1901, becoming Lieutenant in Febru- 
ary, 1902, From November, 1904, to January, 
1910, he was seconded for employment with the 
North Nigeria Regiment. West African Frontier 
Force, under the Colonial Office, and was pro- 
moted Captain in. .September, 1912. 
On arrival at the front on the 29th October he 
wa.s sent on the 1st November, 1914. \vith his 
company to help in holding Wytschaete against 




an overwhelming force of tlio enemy. He was 
seen to fall on the morning of the 1st November, 
after which he was not seen again, but the news 
of his death on the following day was obtained 
from one of the prisoners in a (ierman cam]) in 
.lune, 1915. 

Captain Fletcher was of a very literary turn 
of mind, and several articles by him. chiefly on 
his exjieriences in Northern Nigeria, appeared in 
■• Blackwood's Magazine." He made a great 
study of the language and customs of the 
natives, and published a book called " Hausa 
.Sayings and lAjlk-loic." lie was ([ualified as 
a first-class Inlerpreler in llausa. In 1912. as 
part of his examination for tlie .St.ilT College. 
He was a member of the Wellington Club, and 
was very fond of sports and games. 

2nd LIEUTENANT REGINALD WILLL\M 
FLETCHER, ROY AL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

who was killed in 
action on the 31st 
October, 1914, at the 
age of twenty-two, 
was the youngest son 
of C. R. L. Fletcher, 
Esq.. Norhani End, 
Oxford, and was born 
on the 19th March, 
1892. He was edu- 
cated at Eton, where 
he was a scholar, and 
was a commoner of 
Balliol College, Oxford. At Oxford he was in 
the Artillery Section of the O.T.C. He rowed 
in the Leander Four at Henley Regatta, 1913. 
and in the Oxford University Eight in 1911. 
and was also for some years stroke of his 
college boat, 
fie was gazetted to the R.A. in Decemln-r. 1912. 

LIEUTENANT THOMAS .\LGERNON 
FITZGERALD FOLEY, 1st B.\TTN. 
THE NORFOLK REGIMENT. 

who was born on 
the 2i)th December, 
1889, at Egerton 
Gardens, London, 
S.W., was the only 
son of the late Vice- 
Admiral Francis 
John Foley, 
grandson of Admiral 
the Hon. Fitzgerald 
A. C. Foley, a grand- 
nephew of Colonel 
the Hon. Augustus 
Frederick Foley, Grenadier Guards, and of 
General the Hon. Sir St. George Gerald F^oley, 
and a cousin of the present Baron Foley. 
He was educated at Eton 0<lv. F. H. Rawlins' and 
Mr. H. de Havilland's Houses), to which he went 





137 



FOL— FOR 



in 1904. There he was in the Army Class, took 
prizes for history, mathematics, etc.. and was 
In the O.T.C. From Eton he passed direct into 
the R.M.C., .Sandhurst, in 1908. pas-^ing first in 
order of merit in the Junior Trials. He was in 
the revolver team in 1909, which won many 
competitions, and he himself made the liighest 
score against Woolwich. He passed sixth out 
of .Sandhurst, and was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant 
in the Xorfolk Regiment in September. 1909, 
joining his battaUon at Brentwood, from which 
it went to Aldershot. There he shot successfully 
in several of the Aldershot rifle meetings, and was 
in his company's team for the Inter-Begiiiiental 
firand Challenge .Shield, which they retained. 
He was promoted Lieutenant in October, 1911. 
and on the 3rd August. 1914, his battalion being 
then at Holywood, Belfast, was sent to take 
charge of Grey Point Fort. On the 6th he was 
recalled to his battalion for mobilisation, 
and sailed with it for the front on the 14th 
August, landing at Havre. Within a few days 
the battalion was in action at Dour, in Belgium : 
and. beginning with the retirement from Mons, 
Lieutenant Foley was in every action till he 
fell at Festubert on the 2.5th October, 1914. 
The following account of the circumstances 
was given by the Colonel and others : — " He 
had just made a most gallant advance to 
the trenches with his men under a very hea^"y 
fire, and had reached there safely. He was in 
the very foremost of the British lines when he 
fell, and he died at the head of his men, driving 
back a most desperate attack by overwhelming 
numbers of the enemy. He was buried, like a 
soldier, where he fell. The actual place where he 
was laid to rest is close to the most advanced 
trenches, as our line in that part of the battle- 
field has not advanced a yard since the day when 
he fell, gallantly defending it." 
Lieutenant Foley was a keen soldier, an excellent 
shot and horseman, his chief recreation having 
been hunting. 

His mother received several letters from soldiers, 
showing that they held their late officer in srreat 
esteem . 

MAJOR HUBERT FRANCIS FITZ- 
WILLIAM BRABAZON FOLJAMBE. 
2nd BATTN. THE KINGS ROYAL 

RIFLE CORPS, 
who was bom on 
the 16th November, 
1S72, was the son 
of the Eight Hon. 
F. J. S. Foljambe 
and the Lady Ger- 
t r u d e Foljambe. 
daughter of the third 
Earl of Gosford, of 
Osberton. Notting- 
hamshire. 
He was educated at 




Eton, and joined the King's Royal Rifle Corps 
from the Militia in March, 1>>9.5. becoming 
Lieutenant in February, 1898. and Captain in 
July, 1901. He served in the .South African 
War, being present at operations in Natal in 
May, 1900, and in the Transvaal from November, 
1900, to May. 1902. He was Commandant at 
Helvetia for some time from December. 1901, 
and for his services he received the King's and 
the Queen's medals, each with two clasps. 
Major Foljambe was a member of the Army and 
Navy Club. He was a good rider, a very keen 
cricketer, a good shot, and fond of racquets. 
He played cricket for the Eton Ramblers, 
Free Foresters, and the '" Green .Jackets." 
He was kiUed on the 14th September. 1914, 
while leading his company up the heights of 
the Aisne. near Troyon. 

Major Foljambe, who was promoted to that rank 
in July, 1912. married Gladys, daughter of 
General and ilrs. Bewicke-Copley. of Sprot- 
borough. Torkshii-e, and left one son, John 
Savile. bom October. 1911. 

MAJOR the Honble. ARTHUR ORLANDO 
WOLSTAN CECIL WELD FORESTER. 
M.V.O.. 1st B.\TTN. GRENADIER 
GUARDS. COMMANDING THE KING'S 
COMPANY, _ 
died at King Ed- '| 
ward VII Hospital. 
London, from 
wounds received 

near Ypres, Bel- 
gium, on the 29th 
October, 1914. 
having gone out with 
the \ 11th Division. 
He was the fifth son 
of Cecil, fifth Baron 
Forester, and wa> 
bom in London on tl. •- i^TT. 

He was educated at Harrow, and joined the 
Grenadier Guards from the 3rd Shropshire Light 
Infantry Olilitia) in December, 1897, becoming 
Lieutenant in October, 1899. With his battalion 
he served in ^lalta. and subsequently, under Sir 
Leslie Bundle, in the Vlllth Division through 
the Boer War, receiving the Queen's medal with 
three clasps and the King's medal with two 
clasps. He was promoted Captain in the 3rd 
Battalion in .January. 190.5. of which he was 
Adjutant from January. 1907, to 31st Decem- 
ber, 1909. From 1910 to 1912 he was A.D.C. 
to Ix)rd Hardinge. Viceroy of India, and was 
awarded the M.V.O. for his services in that 
position during the visit of King George V. 
In 1912 he obtained his Majority, with the 
command of the King's Company of his regiment. 
Major Weld Forester was a member of the 
Guards' and Turf Clubs, played cricket and 
golf, and was fond of hunting and shooting. 




FOR 



1 ;(,s 



( ' 



WaM 



CAPTAIN MYLES LONSDALL FORMBY, 
1st BATTN. THE DUKE OF EDIN- 
BURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGIMENTi, 

■ — who was killeil in 

action at Ncuve 
J^f^L Chapcllc on tlu' 2titli 

^^^S Octobci-, 1914, was 

' <^ m^ ' t he son of tho late 

.Myles L o n s d a 1 1 
iMiiniby. .T.I'.. I>.L. 
Uiv I'lsscx. forinciTy 
of the Carabinieis, 
and Mrs. F''onnljy, 
llaydown, (ioiing, 
Oxfordsliire. He was 
born on the 15th 
IJeeeniber, 1874, and was educated at Newton 
College, Newton Abbot, South Devon. 
He first served in the Wiltshire .Militia, from 
which he was gazetted to the Wiltshire Regiment 
in December, 1896, joining the 1st Battalion in 
Karachi, India. During the South African War 
he was sent from India to South Africa with a 
draft ; so, being in the Transvaal while hos- 
tilities were proceeding, he received the Queen's 
medal. He was sent home to the depot, and 
afterwards to ]Mullingar as Adjutant of the 
13th Provisional Battalion. He was promoted 
Captain in February, 1902, and from October, 
1903, to September, 1908, was Adjutant of the 
\\'armiuster Vohmteers. 

He went to the front in August, 1914, and was 
all through the fighting at, and the retirement 
from, Mons, gaining the reputation of a brave 
officer, beloved by his men. 

Captain Formby married, in April, 1903, 
Winifred I'owys, daughter of Percy Stone, Es(j.. 
Mer.ston, Isle of Wight. She died in June, 1914, 
leaving two children : a son, Myles Lonsdall : 
and a daughter, Winifred Joan. 

CAPTAIN FRANK FORREST 
ROYAL ARMY MEDICAL CORPS] 

born at Blackburn 
on the 21st ^biy. 
1<S79, was the son of 
Dr. Forrest. 
He was educated at 
Clitheroe Grammar 
School. Blackburn, 
.1 nd at Owens College, 
Mancliester. After 
qualifying in medi- 
cine he passed into 
the H.A.M.C. in 
.laimai'y, 1900, be- 
coming Cajjlain in July, 1900. In 1914 he 
passed the Captain's course, obtaining a 
" special " in pliysical training. 
He was killed on the 13th September, 1914, by 
a shell bursting whUe he was attending to 
wounded men under heavy shell fire. 





Captain l''(iri'c.st inarrii'd. in .Srplcmbci-. 1913, 
.\Iauil. (laughter of .I(ih]i .nid Amelia Chilii. 
He left no family. 

He belonged to the .Tmiior Army and Navy Club, 
was a very keen sportsman, very good at foot- 
ball, cricket, and billiards, and won many cups 
at lawn tennis. 

CAPTAIN FREDERICK FORSTER, 4th 
BATTN. THE ROYAL FUSH^IERS, 
(CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT), 

was the sec()n(l son 
of the late I'anl 
Forster, of ^lalver- 
leys. East Woodhay, 
Hants, was born 
on the 24th Decem- 
ber, 1879, and edu- 
cated at Eton and 
Trinity College, Cai n- 
bridge. 

He joined the 
Royal Fusiliei'S in 
May, 1900, becoming ^" ' ^^-.-. 

Lieutenant in April, 1902. He was employed 
with the West African Frontier Force from 
April, 1904, to January, 1907, during which 
time he saw active service in Northern Nigeria 
in 1900, receiving the medal \\ ith clasp. 
He was promoted Captain in April, 1909, and 
in October, 1910, was appointed Adjutant of 
the 1st Battalion, an appointment he held till 
September, 1913. In April, 1914, he was 
appointed Adjutant (attending General Staff) 
of the O.T.C.'s of the LTniversities of I^eeds, 
Manchester, Sheffield, and Nottingham. 
On the outbreak of the war Captain Forster was 
ordered to join the ith Battalion of his regiment 
at Newport, Isle of Wight, and proceeded with 
it to France on the 13th August, 1914. 
At the beginning of the year 1915 it was .stated 
in the casualty lists that Captain Forster had 
been " unofficially reported killed or died of 
wounds," but it has since been ascertained that 
he died on the 23rd August, 1914, two hours 
after he was wounded. He was wounded three 
times while defending a bridg(> on the canal at 
Nimy, a subiu'l) of Mons, and was buried on the 
battlefield. 

His recreations were hunting and shooting, and 
he was a member of the LTnifed .Service Club, 
London, and of the Kildare .Street Club, 1 )ubliu. 

2nd LIEUTENANT JOHN FORSTER, 2nd 
BATTN. KING'S ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, 

who \\'as killed in action at the Battle of the 
Aisne on the 14th September. 1914. at the age of 
twentj'-one, was the elder son of ]\Ir. H. M. 
Forster, M.P., and the Hon. .Mrs. Forster, of 
1 1 Hans Place, S.W. 

He obtained his commission in the K.R.R.C. in 
September, 1913. 



13P 



FOR— FOS 



CAPTAIN LIONEL ARCHIBALD 
FORSTER. RESERVE OF OFFICERS attd. 
1st BATTN. CHESHIRE REGIMENT. 
who died on the -tth November, 1914. at the 
Lycee Hospital. Douai. of wounds received in 
action, but whose name has not appeared in the 
official casualty lists, was the youngest son of 
the late Ri^ht Hon. William Forster. M.P.. and 
of Maud Foi-ster. of Bomhill, Bramford Speke. 
Devon. (•"Times" Obit. Notice.) 
He was born on the Itjth March. 1S79. and joined 
the Army in August, 1S9S. He served in the 
South African War, in the course of which he 
acted as Station Stafif Officer and as Garrison 
Adjutant. He took part in operations in the 
Orange Free .State, and in the Transvaal 
between 19W and 1902. including actions at 
Karee -Siding, Vet and Zand Rivers, and near 
.Tohannesburg. He received the Queen's medal 
with three clasps and the King's medal with 
two clasps. 

Captain Forster, who was married, obtained 
his Company in October, 190.5, and retired from 
the active list with that rank in January. 1914. 

L I E L T E N A N T JOHN C L S .\ C K 
FORSYTH. ADJUTANT 23rd BRIGADE. 
ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 
was the son of the late Lieutenant-Colonel 
Frederick Arthm- Forsyth, late Northumberland 
Fusiliers, and of Mrs. EUen Sanford Forsyth, of 
Leamington. He was bom at Leamington 
Spa on the 2nd November, 1883, and was 
educated at Wellington College from 1897-1900, 
and the Royal Jlilitary Academy. Woolwich, 
from 1900-1902. 

He received his commission in the Royal "Field 
Artillery in 1902, becoming Lieutenant in 
December, 1905. He was appointed Adjutant 
of the 23rd Brigade in August. 1912. 
In this war he served with the 3rd Division at 
Mons. Le Cateau, the Battles of the Mame 
and the Aisne. and was mentioned in Field- 
Marshal Sir John French's Despatch of the Sth 
October, 1914. 

He was killed in action on the 22nd September. 
1914, at BreneUe, during the Battle of the Aisne. 
Lieutenant Forsyth was a member of the 
Caledonian Club, and urmiarried. His recrea- 
tions were hunting and racing. 

LIEUTENANT .\RCHIB.\LD COURTE- 
NAY HAYES FOSTER. H A M P - 
SHIRE REGIMENT, attd. 4th BATTN. 
THE KINGS AFRIC.\N RIFLES, 
of which he was commanding "" A '' Company 
when killed, was the fourth son of the late Mon- 
tagu H. Foster, of Stubbington House, Fareham. 
and of Mrs. Foster. The Lodge. .Stubbington. 
He was bom at Stubbington House on the 19th 
May, 1SS6, and was educated at Stubbington and 
at Cheltenham College. He received his conuiiis- 
sion in the Hampshire Regiment in January, 




lyiO. becoming Lieutenant in October, 1907. 
In October, 1913, he was seconded in his regi- 
ment for employ- 
ment with the 4th 
(Uganda) Battalion 
King's African Rifles, 
with whom he was 
serving at the time of 
his death. He had 
only recently retur- 
ned from an expe- 
dition in Jubaland. 
He was killed in 
action on the 19th 
September, 1914. at 
Campi ya Marabu. 
Africa, gallantly urging on his men after he 
was hit. The following account of the action 
forwarded by the General Officer commanding 
troops. British East Africa and L'ganda Pro- 
tectorate, to His Excellency the Governor and 
Commander-in-Chief, East African Protectoi^ 
ate, was published in the " East African 
Standard "of the 14th October. 1914: — 

■' Campi ya 3Iarabu. 
'• This little action was fought with spirit and 
determination. Lieutenant Foster died a gal- 
lant death, and the British officers and rank and 
file of the Somali section and 'A' Company 
K.A.R. gave him courageous support." 



Tsavo, British East 



HERBERT 

1st BATTN. 

REGIMENT. 




2nd LIEUTENANT 
K N O L L Y S FOSTER. 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE 
Ijorn at All Saints' 
Vicarage. Gloucester, 
on the 18th October. 
1895, was the son of 
the Rev. Canon and 
Edith Susan Foster. 
St .Thomas' Vicarage. 
Groombridge, Tun- 
bridge Wells. 
He was educated at 
ilarlborough College 
and the R.M.C.. 
.Sandhvu^st, and was 
gazetted to the Army in Angnst. 1914. 
2nd Lieutenant Foster Is believed to have been 
killed at Gheluvelt. in Flanders, on the 29th 
October, 1914. 

LIEUTENANT WILLIAM .\UGUSTUS 
PORTMAN FOSTER. 1st BATTN. THE 
SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGIMENT. 
eldest .-ion of Colonel .Sir William Yorke Foster. 
Bart., and of Lady Foster, daughter of the late 
Colonel Augustrus Berkeley Portman, Bomb.iy 
Staff Corps, was born on the 2nd June. 1887. at 
Hardinghain, Norfolk. 

He was educated at Wellington College, 
where he was in the Blucher from 1901 to 1905, 



FOW FOY 



140 




and at tla- H.M.l'.. Saiidliuist. Gazt-ttcil to tlie 
South Staffoi'dsliire Hegiiiicut in Febi'uary, 1908, 

he l)cc-aint' Lieutenant 
in September of tlie 
same year. He served 
with tlie2ndBat t alion 
in South Africa and 
subsequently in Gib- 
raltar, and again in 
South Africa ; then 
with the 1st Bat- 
talion, with which, 
after its return to 
England to form part 
of the immortalVIIth 
Division, he saUed for Belgium in October, 
1914. 

After many days of continuous fighting, being 
the last officer left with his company, he was 
severely wounded on the 31st October, 1914, 
while holding liis position with the remnants 
of his battalion towards the end of the first 
great Battle of Ypres. Having lain on the 
field for two days and nights, he fell into the 
hands of the Germans and died of his wounds 
in hospital at Frankfurt-on-Maine on the 11th 
November, 1914. 

Lieutenant Foster was devoted to polo, and a 
fine racquet player, playing both games for his 
I'egiment. With Lieutenant Nay lor, of the 
battalion, he won the tiarrison Racquet cup at 
Gibraltar in 1912. 



CAPTAIN MANSERGH CUTHBERT 
FOWKE, 2nd BATTN. MANCHESTER 

REGIMENT, 

«hose name is shown 
in the monthly 
casualty list jnib- 
lished in June, 191.5. 
as having been killed 




in action, no date 
being given, is be- 
Ueved to have died 
in AugusL1914, after 
liaving been severely 
w o u n d e d at L e 
t'ateau. 
He was the elder son of C. H. F. Fowke, Esq., of 
Wolverhampton, and was born on the 14th 
May, 1882, at Codsall, Staffordshire. He was 
educated at Clifton College, and joined the Man- 
chester Regiment from the Militia in January, 
1901, becoming Lieutenant in October of the 
same year. 

He took part in the .South African War, being 
present at operations in the Transvaal in July, 
1901, and in the Orange River Colony from July 
1901, to iMay, 1902. He received the Queen's 



medal willi three clasps and the King's medal 
with two clasps. From November, 1908, to 
November, 1913, he was employed with the 
King's African Rifles, and took part in operations 
in Soinaliland, 1908-10. for wliiih lie received 
the medal with clasp. 

He was given the local rank of Captain in 
January, 1911, and was promoted Captain in his 
regiment in December, 1912. He was a member 
of the Sports Club and was not married. 
Captain Fowke was reported missing after the 
engagement at Le Cateau on the 25th August, 
1914, and official confirmation was received 
on the 18th May, 1915, by his name appearing 
in the German lists, as dead and buiied at a 
place unknown. 



LIEUTENANT V. FOX, 
ARMY VETERINARY CORPS, 

was killed in action on the 2(jth .\ugust, 1914. 



CAPTAIN MARTIN VICTOR FOY, 1st 
BATTN. THE QUEEN'S (ROYAL WEST 
SURREY REGT.), 

who was killed in 
the trenches on the 
13th October. 1914. 
was the son of the 
late John Foy, and 
was born at Edith 
Grove, Chelsea, on 
the 20th June, 1884. 
He was educated at 
Bradfleld College, 
where he was in 
the Cricket XI, and 
at the R.M.C.. Sandhurst. 

Captain Foy was gazetted to the Queen's in 
1903, becoming Lieutenant in May. 1909. He 
served in India and at home, and was Assistant- 
Adjutant of his battalion. He played cricket for 
his regiment, and was good at all games. In 
1914 he took part in the final lawn tennis doubles 
in the Army Championship. 

He left Bordon Camp for the front on the 12th 
August, 1914, and became Captain on the 8th 
October, 1914, only a few days before he was 
kiUed. 

The General commanding his Brigade wrote as 
follows of C'aptain Foy : — 

" To the grief of all, your gallant husband was 
killed in the trenches last evening by some one 
of the enemy, who have been picking off anyone 
whom they could see. The trenches are so 
close to each other that the risk has been ever 
present. He was shot through the head and died 
very soon afterwards. He had done no well, 
always cheerful and ready for anything. His 
sad death is felt by all to be an irreparable 
loss. It must in time be a source of pride that 




your husband has given his life for his country, 
and that all who knew him loved and respected 
him as an example of bravery which must be a 
lasting help in enabling us to bring this war to 
an end." 

The following account was given by a Sergeant 
of the Queen's, and was published in the 
•• Hindhead Herald " : — 

■' Captain Foy was, as usual, looking after the 
comfort of his men, and was just asking if 
Xo. 4 platoon had had hot tea, when he in- 
cautiously stood up in the trench and was picked 
ofif by a sniper. He was buried the following day. 
and I acted as one of the bearers." 
A brother ofBcer wrote : — 

" I wish you could have seen Martin one day 
— about the thiid day on the Aisne. My half- 
company was in the trenches in support, when 
the front line was frightfully hea\-ily attacked, 
and we were wanted badly. Martin came 
doubling back through an absolute had of stuff 
and got us up. It was grand to see him shoving 
the men on through it." 

.MAJOR the Honble. HUGH 
JOSEPH FRASER. M.V.O., 2nd 
BATTALION SCOTS GUARDS, 

who wa.« killed in 
action at Ypres on 
the 27tli October. 
IfiU, was the third 
and second surviv- 
ing son of Simon 
Fraser, thii-teenth 
Baron Lovat, and 
the Dowager Xady 
Lovat {nee Alice 
Weld BlundeU). and 
brother of the pre- 
sent peer. 
He was bom on the (jth Jidy. 1874. at Phoiness, 
Beauly, Inverness-shire, was educated at St. 
Benedict's Abbey School, Fort Augustus, 
Scotland, and joined the Scots Guards from 
the Militia in December, 1894. becoming 
Lieutenant in November, 1897. 
He took part in the South African War, being 
present at operations in the Orange River 
Colony from ilay to November, 1900. including 
actions at Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen, 
and at operations in the Transvaal and Orange 
River Colony from November. 1900, to May. 
1902. He was mentioned in Despatches (" Lon- 
don Gazette," 10th September, 1901), and 
received the Queen's medal with three clasps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in Jlarcli. 1901 : 
fifjni April. 1903. to July. 1907. he was an 
Adjutant of Imperial Yeomanry : and from 
November. 1910. to 1913 A.D.C. to the Viceroy 
of India. At the time of his death he was Second 
in Command of his battalion. 





141 FRA 

LIEUTENANT JOHN FRASER, 2nd 
BATTN. THE CONNAUGHT RANGERS. 

was the sou of John 
Fraser, Esq., J.P., 
of Riversdale, Boyle, 
Ireland, and was 
bom at Tientsin, 
China, in 1884. 
He was educated at 
Mr. Bookey's School, 
Bray, County Wick- 
low, and at the 
Royal ^Military Col- 
lege. Sandhurst, 
whence he obtained 

his commission in the Connaught Rangers in 
January, 1905. becoming IJeutenant in April. 
1906. 

After tlu-ee years' ser\"ice in India he was 
employed with the King's African Rifles in the 
operations in Somaliland from 1908 10. For his 
services he received the Somaliland medal. 
For some time he acted as A.D.C. to the Gover- 
nor and Connnandei^in-Chief in Uganda. 
At the Battle of the Aisne he was wounded 
while attempting the rescue of a wounded 
brother officer, and died from the effect of his 
wounds on the 14th September, 1914. The 
notebook of the late ^lajor Sarsfield, who com- 
manded the 2nd Battabon Connaught Rangers, 
which has been discovered, contains a note, 
mentioning Lieutenant Fraser. 2nd Connaught 
Rangers, for his coolness under lire, and his 
efficient leading of his men at all times, 
especially at the action of La Cour de Poupiere 
on the 14th of September, where he behaved with 
conspicuous gallantry, and was very dangerously 
wounded. 

Lieutenant Fraser was a keen soldier, fine 
sportsman, and a very successful big-game 
hunter. He was a niember of the Junior 
United Service Club. 



CAPTAIN JOHN ALEXANDER 
FR.\SER. 2nd BATTN. PRINCESS 
LOUISES ARGYLL AND SUTHERLAND 
HIGHLANDERS . 

who was killed at 

Le Cateau on the 

26th August. 1914. 

was bom in India 

on the 2Sth October. 

1S72, son of John 

Alexander Fraser. 

and a nephew of 

Sir Thomas Fraser. 

of Edinburgh. 

Captain I^Yaser 

served in the rank> 

with Lumsden's Hor-^ .:. ;.. „... , ,. 

South African War, having joined that 




corps in 



FRA FRO 



142 



Calcutta whon tlie ISoi r War broke out. Ik; was 
present at operations in tlie Orange Free State, 
iniUulin^ actions at Karee Sidins, Hontnck 
(Thoba Mountain), Vet River, atid Zand IJivcr. 
In the same year — 1900 — he was in the Trans- 
vaal, taking part in actions near Johannesbxirg- 
and Pretoria. He .received the Queen's medal 
with three clasps. In .Inly. 1900, he was pro- 
moted from the ranks of Lumsden's Horse, 
and given a commission in the West India 
Ucginicnt, in which he becan\e Lieutenant in 
I'Vbniary, 1901. Subsequently he was trans- 
ferred to the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 
in which he obtained his company in April. 
1909. He served as an Adjutant of the 
Territorial Force forthi-ee years from February, 
1911. He was a very keen sportsman. 
Captain Fraser married Mary Claudine Stij'ling. 
daugliter of the late Colin Dunlop Donald, and 
left two daughters : Mai'garet Stirling, born at 
Bloemfontein. July, 1909 : and Alexandra Mary 
Agnes, born at Nairn, September. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES HOWIE FRASER, 
2nd BATTN. GORDON HIGHLANDERS, 

son (if Edward 
('leather F rase r, 
C.M.G.. M.L.C. of 
ilauritius, was born 
at Blackheath on 
the 4th April, 1888. 
He was educated at 
Rugby, and was 
gazetted to the (ior- 
don Highlanders in 
October, 1907. lb- 
served with his bat- 
taUon in India and 
Egypt, and was promoted Lieutenant in March. 
1909. 

Lieutenant Fraser was killed on tlie :!Otli 
October, 1914. wiiile advancing on Klein 
Zillebeke Farmhouse. For his services he was 
mentioned in .Sir John French's Despatch of the 
14th .January, 191.5. 

2nd LIEUTENANT the Honble. 
SIMON FRASER, 3rd (attd. 2nd) 
BATTN. GORDON HIGHLANDERS, 

who was killed in action near Ypres on the 
29th October, 1914, was the third son of the 
eighteenth I^ord Saltoun, of Abernethy. 
He was born on the 7th September, 1888, and 
was educated at Winton House, Winchester 
(preparatory school), and at Charterhouse. 
He received a commission as 2nd Lieutenant 
in the 3rd Battalion Gordon Highlanders on the 
7th September. 1914, and at the end of that 
month was attached to the 2nd Battahon, 
leaving with it for the front on the 4th October, 
1914. 





2nd Lieutenant Fraser was a menilier of tlie 
Stock lOxchange. Two of liis lnntlieis are 
serving in the (iordon Highlanders as Lieuten- 
ants : the :Master of Saltoun and the Hon. 

Williiiiii Fraser. 



CAPTAIN WILLIAM REGINALD 
FREND, ADJUTANT 2nd BATTN. SHER- 
WOOD FORESTERS (NOTTINGHAM 
SHIRE AND DERBYSHIRE REGIMENT), 

was killed in action 

at the Battle of the 

Aisne on the 21st 

September. 1914. 

lie was born a1 

Mambledon, Henley- 

on-Tliames, on the 

Sth May, 187.5. tin- 

second son of the 

late Edwin Fi'end, 

Esq.. of Brighton, 

and was educated at 

H a i 1 e y b u r y , anil 

Trinity College, Cambridge. He joined the 

Derbyshire Regiment in November, isits. 

becoming Lieutenant in the amalgamated 

Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment in 

.May, 1900. 

He took part in the South African War. being 

present at operations in the Orange Free .State. 

including actions at Houtnek (Thoba ilountain). 

Vet River, and Zand River : also at operations 

in the Transvaal and Cape Colony, and received 

the Queen's medal with three clasps and the 

King's medal with two cla.sps. He also served 

with the 1st Battalion in China. 

Becoming Captain in September. 19111, he was 

from April, 1906, to December. 1910. Adjutant 

nt a battalion of Volunteers, afterwards the 

.5th Territorial Battalion of his own regiment : 

while in December, 1912, lie was appointed 

Adjutant of the 2nd Battalion. 

Captain Frend married, in July. 1907. Phyllis. 

.second daughter of Mr. and .Mrs. T. H. Mills, 

of White Bank House, Stockport, Cheshire, 

and leaves two children : Richard William, 

born June, 1009 : and Dorothea Eli/.alieth. 

born November, 1911. 



LIEUTENANT K. T. FROST, 3rd 
BATTN. CHESHIRE REGIMENT, 

whose name was included in the monthly 
casualty list published in October among 
officers ■■ reported (unofficially) killed, or died 
of wounds received in action," no date being 
given, became Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion 
Cheshire Regiment in June, 1913, having joined 
in September of the previous year. 



143 



FUI FUR 




LIEUTENANT BERNARD VINCENT 
FLLCHER. 2nd BATTN. THE PRINCE 
O E \\- A L E S • S VOLUNTEERS 

SOUTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT . 
was bom at Lome 
House, Gi-eat Yar- 
mouth, on the 22nd 
January. 1S92. and 
was the son of Wil- 
liam Popplewell 
Fulcher and Alice, 
his wife, of '" Wal- 
ton." Wimbledon 
Hill Road, Wimble- 
don. 

He was educated at 
Wimbledon College, 
and was at King's College School from 1906 
to 1910, where he was Captain of the VIII 
(shooting), and was also in the First XV (foot>- 
baU) in 1909 10. He was a member of the 
OfKcers' Training Corps, and was " efficient "" for 
three years, holding the "' A " certificate. 
Lieutenant Fulcher went to the R.M.C., Sand- 
hurst, in 1910, and received lus eonuuission in 
1911, becoming Lieutenant in Jtdy, 1913. 
He was present %vith his battahon in the Great 
War from August tUl the day he died. He was 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatches of the 
8th October, 191i. and of Uth January, 1915, 
and was awarded the IMiUtary Cross in the latter 
month, but he did not hve to personally receive 
the decoration, for he had been kUled in a dug- 
out by shell on the 17th November, 1914, at 
Ypres, being at the time the only surviving 
otficer left of his battahon. 

Major Baird, commanding 1st Battahon Gordon 
Highlanders, who was for fifteen days, between 
the 5th and 20th November, in command of 
the line of trenches in which Lieutenant Fulcher 
was kiUed, wrote to his mother saying : " I 
wish to teU you how nobly your boy was doing 
his duty when he met his death. . . . Your son 
was quite indefatigable in doing his duty under 
conditions the difficulties of wliich can never be 
fully realised except by those who were there. 
. . . Often I used to feel that he was destined 
to go far in our profession. . . . None of us 
who served together in those fifteen strenuous 
days will ever forget his splendid work. As 
officer commanding that particular section of 
the trenches, I have officially bi-ought to notice 
the very splendid way in which his conduct was 
distinguished." 

The late Head Master of King's College School 
aLso wrote saying : " He was with us just the 
best kind of English boy. straight and loyal and 
keen, . . . with a healthy influence with his 
friends and all the school." 
The Adjutant and other officers, and al.so men 
in the ranks, wrote most feelingly, saying how 
all appreciated his courage and capacity. 




C.\PTAIN JOHN HENRY MIDDLETON 
FULLER. S 3 r d W.\ L L A J A H B A D 
LIGHT INF.\NTRV attd. 63rd PALAM 
C O T T A H LIGHT INFANTRY), 
who was killed in ,., 

action in German 
East Africa, was the 
son of Deputy 
.Surgeon - General 
John Charles Fuller, 
and was born at 
Ealing on the 19th 
November, 1879. 
He was educated at 
Banister Couit 
School, Southamp- 
ton, and received 
his commission fi'om llic lauka in I'^^njl, being 
transferred to the Indian Army two years later. 
He served in the South African Wai-. for wliich 
he received the Queen's medal with tlu-ee clasps. 
He also had the Durbar medal, 1912, for his 
services during the Royal visit while fulfilling 
the appointment of Garrison Quartermaster of 
Fort WUham, Calcutta. 

Captain Fuller was made an honorary member 
of Bisley in i-ecognition of his success in shooting, 
and in training the S8th Carnatic Infantry 
Rifle Corps, who won the Cubbom Cup on several 
occasions for their regiment. 
He was shot on the 4th November, 191-1, at 
Tanga, German South East Africa, while showing 
one of his men how to fire to the best advantage. 
Captain FiiQer married \"iolet Overton daugh- 
ter of Brevet- Colonel Frederick Smith, D..S.O., 
R.A.M.C, on the 31st October, 1912 ; and left 
one daughter, Jean Violet Overton, born at 
Fort William, Calcutta, in March, 1915, after 
her father's death. 

LIEUTENANT PHILIP TEMPLER 
FURNEAUX. 1st BATTN. THE 
KINGS LIVERPOOL REGIMENT), 

who was killed in action on the 2iJth October, 
1914, in Belgium, was the only son of the Rev. 
Walter Furneaus, Vicar of Dean, Bedfordshire, 
formerly Chaplain to the King's Regiment, 
Mian ^lir, and gi-andson of the late Colonel 
Templer, Lyndridge, South Devon. 
He was born on the 23rd September, 1889, 
was educated at Rossall (S.E., 1905-08), and 
joined the Liverpool Regiment in September, 
1909, becoming Lieutenant in May, 1910. 
At the time of his death he was Assistant 
Adjutant of liis battalion. 

C.\PTAIN GEORGE ARMAND FURSE. 
ROYAL FIELD .\RT1LLERV. 
was bom on the 21st February, 1881, in the 
United States of America. He was the son of 
Edmund Furse, Esq., of Alphington, Frindey, 
Surrey, and nephew of the late Colonel G. A. 
Furse. C.B.. The Black Watch. 



GAI GAL 



144 




He was educated at Cheltenliaiii and the Royal 
Militaiy Academy. Woolwich, and received his 

lirst commission in 
December, 1898 , being 
promoted Captain in 
April. 1907. He was 
appointetl to the 
Royal Horse Artillery 
ill 1900, and was 
again appointed a-s 
a Captain to the 
K.H.A. in 1909. He 
1 wice qualified for the 
.StafT College, and hatl 
served twelve years 
in India. Captain Furse had just completed the 
gunnery course when war broke out, and was 
posted to the <30th Battery, 40th Brigade, R.F.A. 
He embarked with the first portion of the British 
Expeditionary Force, and was killed at the 
Battle of the Aisne on the lOth September. 1914. 
Captain Furse married Hazel, daughter of the 
late Elton Forrest (Conservator of Forests), 
son of Captain J. H. Forrest, who was tor many 
years Chief Constable of Hampshire, and grand- 
daughter of the late Rev. Fi-ederick Wickhani, 
well known as a blaster of Winchester College. 
He leaves three daughters : Lilian, born 1906 : 
Aileen, bom 1910 ; and Melanie, born 1912. 

LIEUTENANT LIONEL GAISFORD, 
58th VAUG HAN'S RIFLES, FRON- 
TIER FORCE, INDIAN ARMY, 

was born at Quetta, 
Baluchistan, India, 
on the 21st June, 
1888, the son of the 
late Colonel Gilbert 
Gaisford, Indian 
Army, Political 
Agent, Balucliistan, 
who was murdered 
by a " Ghazi " on 
the frontier in 
March, 1898, and a 
grandson, on the 
maternal side, of the late General C. W. 
Hutchinson, R.E. (Bengal). 

He was educated at Brighton College and the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, and qualified as 1st Class 
Interpreter in French in June, 1914. He obtained 
his commission as a King's Indian Cadet in 
August, 1906, and joined the Boyal Irish 
Regiment at Rawal Pindi in October of that 
year, being transferred to the 58th Vaughan's 
Rifles in April, 1907. With this regiment lie 
formed part of the Expeditionary Force to 
Prance during the Great War. Previously he 
had served in the ilohmand Expedition of 1908, 
lor which he received the Indian Frontier medal. 
He was killed in an attack on German trenches 
in the La Bassee district, France, on the 24th 




November, 1914, and was buried in Bethune 

Cemetery. 

Lieutenant Gaisford was a uriiiIm r nl the Junior 

Army and Navy Club. 

LIEUTENANT) CYRIL EGREMONT 
GAITSKELL, 2nd BATTN. PRINCE OF 
WALES'S LEINSTER REGT. (ROYAL 
CANADIANS), __„__»_^_.^_ 

was born at Chel- fl 
tenhain on the 
15th November, 
1892, the son of 
Major Charles 
GaitskeU, late Lin- 
colnshire Regiment, 
and a grandson of 
the late Lieutenant- 
Colonel GaitskeU, of 
W a 1 d o n House, 
Cheltenham. 
He was educated at Heidelberg, Germany, and 
at Cheltenham College. He joined the Leinster 
Regiment from the R.il.C. Sandhurst, in 
September. 1911, and became Lieutenant in 
January, 1913. 

At Armentieres, France, while gallantly leading 
Ills men to attack a position, he was mortally 
wounded on the 19th October, 1914. He was 
interred on the same day in a temporary 
cemetery, called " Le Maroc." in the quarter 
" Cit6-Bon-Jean " at Armentieres. 
Lieutenant GaitskeU was a good all-round 
athlete, fond of golf and boxing. 




LIEUTENANT PHILIP 



F R A N ■ 



GALLWEY, 21st 
INDIA'S) LANCERS, 



CIS PAYNE 
(EMPRESS OF 

\\as born on the 7th 
March, 18 9 4, at 
Kirby Knowle Rec- 
tory, near Thirsk, 
Yorkshire, and was 
the son of the Rev. 
Francis Henry Payne 
Gallwey, Rector of 
Sessay, Thirsk. He 
«as cousin to Sir 
Ralph Payne Gall- 
wey, Bart., and a 
nephew of General 
A. Lowry Cole, C.B., D.S.O. He was educated 
at West Downes, Winchester College, and the 
R..M.C., Sandhurst. Lieutenant Payne Gallwey 
joined his regiment in September, 1912, becom- 
ing Lieutenant in March, 1914. 
On the outbreak of the war, being on leave at 
home from Rawal Pindi, India, where his 
regiment was stationed, he was attached for 
service to the 9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers. 
He was killed near ilessines, in the Battle of 
Ypres, on the 31st October. 1914. 




145 



GAL-GAR 




2nd LIEUTENANT THEODORE HUGH 
G ALT ON. 6th attd. 3rd BATTN. 
WORCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who wa^ killed in 
action on the 21st 
October, 1914, was 
the eldest son of 
Major Galton, late 
R.A., and Mrs. Gal- 
ton, of Hadzor, 
Droitwich. and was 
bom on the 20th 
October, ISSS. 
He was educated at 
the Oratory School, 
Edgbaston, and 
Exeter College. Oxford. He ofifered his services 
a-s soon as the war broke out, and was gazetted 
to the Worcestersliire Regiment on probation 
in August, 1914, joining the 3rd Battalion in 
October. He had been attached to the Irish 
Guards for a year in 1911, and was a member 
of the Windham Club. 

When he was killed the German trenches were 
attacked at 7 a.m. : at about S a.m. the enenay 
began to retire, and 3Ir. Galton — the foremost 
of the party that advanced to cut them off — 
was shot through the heart. 

MAJOR ALEC GARDINER. ROYAL 

ENGINEERS, 
was the elder son of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
R. Gardiner. R.E. 
(retired), 2S, Barks- 
ton Gardens. Lon- 
don, S.W.. and 
grandson of the late 
Major-General 
Irving. C.B., R.A. 
He was bom on the 
2Sth June, 1S73. at 
Ulwar, Rajputana, 
India, and educated privately, mainly under 
Dr. Stevenson Jellie, of Clifton. 
After passing successfuDy through the R.M.A.. 
Woolwich, he gained a commission in the Royal 
Engineers in July, 1891, becoming Lieutenant 
three years later. Captain in April, 1902, and 
Major in July. 1911. He took part in the ex- 
pedition to the Soudan in 1S96 as Assistant Field 
Engineer with the force at Suakin. for which 
he received the English and Egyptian medals. 
Major Gardiner proceeded to India in 1S93, 
and after a short period on military works 
joined the Railway Department of the Govern- 
ment of India, and with ^ome short intervals of 
military duty continued serving on the survey 
construction and administration of Indian 
railways up to the outbreak of the Great War, 
when he was holding the appointment of 
Agent (Chief Administrative OfiBcer) of the Oudh 




and Rohilkhand South Railway. Previously, 
in 1909, ilajor Gardiner had been appointed 
Lieutenant-Colonel Conunandant of the Oudh 
and Roliilkhand Railway Rifle Volunteers, 
a corps which he brought to a high pitch of 
efficiency, devoting special attention to ar- 
moured train working and fighting.forwhichthey 
offered their services on the declaration of war. 
Major Gardiner's services were placed at the 
disposal of the Commander-in-Chief of India 
in October, 1914, and he was ordered to proceed 
to England, but was intercepted in the Mediter- 
ranean, and directed to join the Indian 
Expeditionary Force in Northern France. He 
was serving as a Field Engineer with the Lahore 
Division when he fell in the fighting before 
Givenchy on the 20th December. 1914. 
He was at first rei>orted as missing, and it 
was hoped that he might be alive as a prisoner 
of war in Germany, but all enquiries proved 
fruitless. His fate was not definitely set at 
rest until the 25th July. 1915. when his body 
was found during mining operations near 
Givenchy, it having been exposed by the 
explosion of a German shell. The body was 
subsequently buried near the Red House on 
the Sunken Road. Givenchy. some four hundred 
yards north-east of the Church. 
Letters from the officers under whom Major 
Gardiner served at the front testify to the high 
esteem in which he was held, and express 
admiration of the skill, devotion, and gallantry 
with which he carried out all the duties entrusted 
to him. Diuing the short time he was serving 
in France he was several times specially reported 
upon, and subsequently to his being killed his 
name appeared amongst those mentioned in Sir 
John French's Despatch of the 31st May, 1915. 
On his death being confirmed his widow 
received from the King and Queen a telegram 
expressing their deep regret at the loss the 
Army had sustained by the death of her husband 
in the service of his country, and adding Their 
Majesties' true sympathy in her sorrow. Lord 
Kitchener also, through the ilUitary .Secretarj", 
conveyed his sincere sympathy : and the Rail- 
way Board of India, in recording their very 
great regret at his death, remarked that he was 
an officer of whom the Board entertained the 
highest opinion. 

Major Gardiner, who was keen on the training of 
his men in rifle shooting, and captained the 
regimental team on two occasions, being also 
successful himself in individual competitions 
with both the rifle and revolver, was an executive 
member of the CouncU of the Bengal Presidency 
Rifle Association. He was conspicuous in 
connection with the work of the St. John 
Ambulance Association in India, especially as 
regards the instruction of the men under his 
command. In recognition of his services he 
was appointed a serving brother of the Order 



GAR 



146 



of St. John of Jerusalem, and received the (!<'- 
coration of the Order from the ^'iceroy of India. 
He was an Assoeiate of the Institution of Civil 
Enfrineei-s, and also of the Institute of Electrical 
Enjjineei-s, and was known in the English rail- 
way world as the inventor of a system of 
engine cab signals and for the automatic control 
of moving trains. 

JIajor (iardiner married, in ISli". Ivlith, daugh- 
ter of .Mr. Campbell Thomson. M.I.C.E., late 
Chief Engineer of the North West Railway of 
India, and left two sons and a daughter. He 
devoted most of his spare time to his ^'olunteer 
and Ambulance work. He was a good rifle 
shot, and won several prizes. His recreations 
were shooting, rowing — the E.E. crew, under 
his leadei-ship, being several times successful 
in local regattas — tennis, etc. 

MAJOR ROBERT MACGREGOR 
STEWART GARDNER. 1st BATTN- 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who was killed in 
action on the 31st 
October, 1911. was 
t he second son of 
the late Mr. \\'illian\ 
Gardner and Mrs. 
Gardner, of Thorpe. 
S u r r e y, and a 
nephew of Cieneral 
Sir Robert Stewart. 
(i.C.B. He was born 
on the 2oth August. 
1870, and joined the 
Gloucestershire Regiment from the Militia 
in February, 1891, becoming Lieutenant in 
May, 1892, and getting his company in Feb- 
ruary, 1900. 

He served in the South African War. being 
present at the relief of Kiiuberley, at operation- 
in the Orange Fi-ee State, at Paardeberg, and 
at the actions of Poplar Grove and Driefontein : 
also at operations in Natal and Cape Colon\ . 
He was mentioned in Despatches ("London 
Gazette," 10th September. 1901). and received 
the Queen's medal with four clasps. He was 
promoted Major in July, 1914. 
He proceeded to France with his regiment at 
the beginning of the Great War. On the 31st 
October his company was ordered to retake 
a trench the Germans had captured at Gheluvelt. 
He led his men close up to the Germans, and 
assembled for a further advance in a sunken 
road. There Major Gardner gave the order to 
advance and to charge the Germans. He was 
first up the bank, and was immediately mortally 
wounded in the arm and side. On the previous 
day he had led a counter-attack with what was 
described as " reckless bravery," and those 
with him said he seemed that day to bear a 
charmed life. 





Major (iardner married May. daughter of "Sir. 
Charles Whitchmch Wasbrough, of Clifton, 
and left two daughters, the younger of whom 
was born, after her father's death, on the 11th 
February, 1915. 

LIEUTENANT PHILIP NIGEL GAR- 
NETT, PRINCESS CHARLOTTE OF 
WALES'S (ROYAL BERKSHIRE REGT.I. 

who died of wounds received in action in 
Xyassaland, probably in September, 1914, was 
boi'non the 4th November, 1886, and jniind tin- 
Royal Berkshire Regiment in JIa\. IIMIT. Im- 
coming Lieutenant in .September, 1911. 
In October, 1913, he was seconded in his 
regiment for service with the 1st (Centra! 
Africa) Battalion, the King's African Rifles. 

MAJOR JOHN TREFUSIS CARPENTER- 
GARNIER, 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS. 

was the eldest son 
of .John Carpenter- 
(iarnier. Esq., J. P.. 
D.L.. M.P. for South 
Pevon. 1873-84. and 
tlie Hon. ^lary 
Louisa Carpenter- 
Garnier, daughter of 
the nineteenth 
Baron Clinton. He 
was born in 1874 
at R o o k e s b u r >• 
Park. W i c k h a m. 
Hants, and was educated at Harrow and Clirist 
Church, Oxford. 

He first served in tlie Royal .Scots .Militia from 
1.S94-96. In August of the latter year he joined 
the Scots Guards, and .served in the .South 
African War for two and a half years in General 
Rundle's Di^^sion, being present at the actions 
of Biddulphsberg and Wittebergen, receiving 
tlic Queen's medal with three clasps and the 
King's medal with two clasps. 
From 1903-00 he was Adjutant of his bat- 
talion, and Regimental Adjutant from 190(>- 
1909. In August, 1914, he was appointed 
second in command of his battalion. In the 
Battle of the Aisne he was struck by shrapnel 
on the 14th September, and died of his wounds 
on the following day. His body was buried 
in ^'endi-esse Churchyard. 

Major Carpenter-Gamier was a member of the 
(iuards' and Bachelors' Clubs, and was a keen 
cricketer, belonging to tlie M.C.C. and I Zin- 
gari. He also played polo, and was fond of 
hunting and shooting. He was not married. 

LIEUTENANT OLIVER DUNHAM MEL- 
VILLE GARSIA, 1st BATTN. DUKE 
OF CORNWALL'S LIGHT INFANTRY. 

born at Riccarton, Cliristchurch, New Zealand, 
on ISth November, 1885, was the fourth son of 
Captain Christopher Garsia, for many years 
associated with the promotion of Art in 



147 



GAR— GAT 




Christchurch as Hon. Secretary of the 
Canterbury Sot-iety of Arts. 

He was educated, like 
his four brothers, at 
the Christchurch 
Boys' High .School, 
and all five entered 
the services. The 
eldest. Haly, who was 
in the Durham Light 
Infantry, was killed 
i n India ten years ago : 
I 'live, in the Hainp- 
-hire Regiment.is now 
a General Staff Officer 
at the ti-ont : auothHr. Eric, served in the .South 
African War : Rupert, in the Royal Xavy. 
now in H.M.A..S. " Sydney " ; and Oliver, 
who was in the Duke of Cornwall's Light 
Infantry — a proud record for their gallant 
father, himself a veteran of the Mutiny, and for 
fourteen years A.D.C. to Sir William O'Grady 
Haly. Lieutenant-Colonel Garsia. C.B.. Com- 
missioner of Prisons, Inspector-General of 
ililitary Prisons, who initiated in them valuable 
reforms, was a member of the same family. 
The subject of this memoir joined the Duke of 
Cornwall's Light Infantry as Second- Lieu- 
tenant in 1907, being promoted Lieutenant in 
November, 1908. For a short time he was 
A.D.C. to .Sir Thomas Gibson Camiichael 
(now Lord Carmichael), and he had been to 
Russia to study the language, as he was con- 
vinced that the two countries would sooner or 
later be drawn together in a common defence. 
Lieutenant Garsia was killed at the Battle of 
the Aisne on the ISth September, 1914. One 
who knew him well said he was as staunch and 
sincere as he was brave and fearless, a true 
soldier, and a very gallant gentleman. 
A Private of his battalion, writing some time 
after, said : " I don't think there are more than 
sixty or seventy of us left in the battalion that 
came out first. . . . My section had to advance 
up a slope or hill, and my Lieutenant. Mr. 
Garsia, got shot through the neck." 

2nd LIEUTENANT C. W. N. G.\RST1N, 
9th QUEEN'S ROYALi LANCERS, 

whose name is in- 
cluded in the month- 
ly official list pub- 
lished in October, 
1914, as having been 
killed, no place, date, 
or circumstances 
being given, joined 
the 9th Lancers in 
February, 1913. 
He was qualified as a 
2nd Class Interpreter 
in German. 




MAJOR JOHN KIRWAN GATACRE, 

4th O C E E N • S OWN H L S S A R S, 

younger son of the 

late Major-General 

Sir Williani Gatacre. 

K.C.B., D.S.O.. was 

bom in Dublin on 

the 6th September, 

1883. 

He was educated at 

Rugby and the 

R.M.C.. Sandhurst, 

from which, after 

being attached for 

a time to the 2nd 




to 



Battalion The Black Watc;.. ..< ..^.^ post..! 
the 11th (K.E.O.) Lancers, Indian Army. 
He was a member of the Jvmior Army and 
Navy Club. When in India he was known as 
a sportsman, w innin g the Kadir Cup (pig- 
sricking), 1912, and as one of the best polo 
players in India. He was also a gifted water- 
colour artist. 

Being on leave in Europe on the outbreak of 
the war with Germany, he was attached to the 
4th (Queen's Own) Hussars, and in .September, 
1914, was promoted Major in that regiment. 
He was killed at the attack on the Mont des 
Cats on the 12th October, 1914. He had been 
previously awarded the French decoration of 
the '" Croix de Chevalier " of the Legion of 
Honour. 



2nd L I E L T E N A 


N T 


CHARLES 


HENRY G A T H . 


3rd 


HUSSARS. 


who was killed in 






action on the 30th 


^m 


^^^i^hi 


October, 1914, at 


Wr 


^■9i^^H 


Klein Zillebeke. 


W i 


f ^^^M 


Belgium, was born 




wi^ IH 


in London in Sep- 


-. ^ 




tember, 1882. In 


K ' 


■k i^^H 


1899 he joined the 


■L 


,^^^ ^^^B 


ranks of the ISth 


Hi 


i "^ ^^^1 


Hussars, with whom 


■ 


^^^^^^^H 


he served in the 


■ 


kkU^^I 


South African War 


^ 


^H^HI 


for two vears, re- 







ceiving the Queen's and King's medals with 
clasps. 

He was afterwards transferred to the 3rd 
Hussars, accompanying them to India, where 
he remained fovu- years, and then retm-ned to 
Pretoria, South Africa, for a further three years. 
In 1911 he retvuned to England for a course of 
instruction at the Cavalry School, Xetheravon. 
At the outbreak of the war he went to the front 
with the Expeditionary Force, and was given 
his commission on the 1st October, 1914. 
Mr. Gath was not married. 



GEA GEO 



1-lS 




2nd LIEUTENANT EDWARD GEAREY. 
1st BATTX. OL'EENS OWN CAMERON 
HIGHLANDERS, attd. 1st BATTN. 
HIGHLAND LIGHT INFANTRY. 

who had previously 
been reported mis- 
sing, was atterward-i 
reported to ha\e 
lieen killed on the 
2()th De(eniber.l914. 
near Festubtrt. He 
was the eldest son of 
the late James 
Gearey, Sergeant- 
Ma jor.Highland Light 
Infantry. (Blyths- 
wood). and wa? born 
at .Maryhill Barracks on the 26th April, 1881. 
Educated at .Meadowpark School, Dennistown. 
Citasorow, ilr. Gearey joined the ranks of the 
Highland Light Infantry in 1895, and serve<l 
until 1809 with the 2nd battalion in India. 
After serving for a few years at home, he re- 
turned to India in 1907 to join the 1st battalion 
of his regiment, and at the outbreak of the war 
\vith Germany he was stationed at Ambala, and 
had risen to the rank of Company .Sergeant- 
ilajor. His battalion formed part of the 
Lahore Division, and proceeded with it to 
France. In December, 1914, Mr. Gearey re- 
ceived his commission as 2nd Lieutenant in the 
Cameron Highlanders, but was attached to his 
old battalion. He was reported missing on the 
20th December. 1914. and hopes were enter- 
tained of his safety, until, in September, 1915. 
a returned prisoner of war brought evidence of 
his death, and it wa.s concluded he had been 
killed on that date. 

2nd Lieutenant Gearey. who held the Long 
Service medal and the Delhi Durbar Decoration, 
married Helen, daughter of Thomas Drawbell, 
Edinburgh, and left two sons, James and Thomas 
Drawbell, age respectively seven and four years. 

LIEUTENANT JAMES FUANCIS ROY 

GEBBIE, 2nd B.\TTN. THE PRINCE OF 

WALESS VOLUNTEERS SOUTH LAN- 

CASHIREREGT.) 

>■ 



was the son of Mr. 
James Gebbie, of 
Xetherfleld, Strath- 
aven, Lanarkshire, 
Scotland, and was 
born there on the 
27th June, 1888. He 
was educated at 
Bath College, and 
at the R.M.C., Sand- 
hurst, where he was 
in the revolver team. 
Lieutenant Gebbie was gazetted to the Soutli 
Lanca-shire Regiment in September, 1908, 
becoming Lieutenant in January, 1910. 




While serving with the 2nd Battalion he was 
wounded on the 19th September when leading 
a bayonet charge on the heights of \'ailly, and 
died of his wounds on the 4th October, 1914, 
at St. Nazaire, France. 

Lieutenant Gebbie was a iiienibi-r of tlic Junior 
United Service Club. 



OF EDIN- 
REGIMENT). 




2nd LIEUTENANT ROBERT 
FR.\NCIS McLean gee, 3rd (attd. 1st) 
BATTN. THE DUKE 
BURGH'S iWILTSHIRE 

wlio died at Net ley 
Hospital on the 27tli 
October, 1914, from 
wounds received in 
action, aged twenty, 
was the eldest son 
of Mr. and ^Irs. 
( ■ . F. Gee, of 
Williiigton, X e w 
Zealand. and of Te 
Whare. Eastbourne. 
He was a great- 
great-grandson, on 
his mother's side, of Captain William Buckley, 
Royal Scots Regiment, who w'as killed at 
Quatre Bras ; a great-grandson of Captain 
William Henry Bucklej, S2nd Regiment ; and 
a grandson of the late Hon. George Buckley, of 
Christchurch, Xew Zealand. His younger brother 
is a Lieutenant in the Royal Horse Artillery. 
He was educated at Wellington, New Zealand, 
and at Eastbourne College, and had entered at 
Trinity College, Cambridge. He was in the 
O.T.C. ; and, ha^Tng volunteered his services 
at the outbreak of the war, was given a com- 
mission in the 3rd Wiltshh-e Regiment. He 
joined on the 3rd September, and after four 
weeks' training at Weymouth was transferred 
to the 1st Battalion and sent to Fi-ance. 
He received his fatal wounds — a sniper's bullet 
in the head — a few days after his arrival 
at the firing line, during an attempt to captm-e 
tlie village of Hies. His body is buried in the 
Ockljnge Cemetery, Eastbourne. 

CAPTAIN JAMES RANDOLPH 
GEOGHEGAN. 2nd BATTN. 
ROYAL INNISKILLING FUSILIERS, 

who was killed in .^_ 

action on the "tli 

November, 19 14. 

was the son of 

Samuel Geoghegan. 

Esq., C.E., and was 

born in Dublin on 

the 27th ^[arch. 

1886. 

He was educated at 

Cheltenham College, 

and joined the Royal 

Inuiskilling Fusiliers 




149 



GEO 




from the Wicklow Militia in May, 1906. In 
January, 1910, he ■nas detached for employ- 
ment with the West African Frontier Force, 
with the local rank of Lieutenant, being pro- 
moted to that rank in his regiment in February, 
1910. 

He retiu-ned from Xorthem Nigeria in April, 
1914, and rejoined his regiment. He was pro- 
moted Captain on the 22nd October, 1914. 



LIEUTENANT ATHELSTANE KEY 
DURANCE GEORGE, 1st BATTN. 
DORSETSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was born at Bever- 
stone House, 
Brixton, Surrey, on 
the 25th of March, 
1SS7, and was the 
son of Arthur 
Durance and Char- 
lotte Ada George, 
of Alderholt, 
Bournemouth 
(West), grandson of 
Jonathan Muckle- 
ston Key, D.L. of 
City lit' London, ^liddlesex, great-nephew of 
Sir Jolin Key, Bart., and direct descendant, 
through the female line, of Sir William Bloet, 
who came over with WUliani the Conqueror in 
106(5. 

Lieutenant George couunenced his education 
at Hailey. Boiu'neinouth, going afterwards to 
Tonbridge .School : thence to Caius College, 
Cambridge. 

He began liis military career in the King's 
(Liverpool Regiment), joining subsequently the 
2nd Battalion Dorsetsliire Regiment at Madras. 
While in India he served on the Staff as A.P.C. 
to Lord .Sydenham, Governor of Bombay, 
and Sir 3Iaurice Hammick, K.C.M.G., Governor 
of Madras. He returned to England in Marcli, 
1913, and joined the 1st Battalion of his regi- 
ment at Belfast, from which station he proceeded 
with it to tlie front. 

He was shot tlirough the head at Bezu-le-Query 
on the 11th September, 1914, wliile in the 
trenches, urging his men not to expose their 
heads. He was carried to the Hospice at 
Coulommiers, where he died on the 14th 
September, never having regained conscious- 
ness, and was buried, with military honours, in 
the cemetery of that towTi. 

Under date 10th March, 1915, Brigadier- 
General Bols, D.S.O., then commanding the 
battalion, wrote : — 

" I ara glad that you have written to me, as 
I have often wished to tell his friends and 
relatives how deeply every officer and man of 
the Dorsets grieved with you at the loss of your 
dear son. 



" During the period which followed our fights 
on the Mame there was Utile time to write, 
or even to think. Then came the rush north- 
wards, and the great fight of the battalion at 
Givenchy, where we lost three-quarters of our 
men, and all but four of our original corps of 
officers, and then I had to spend ten weeks in 
England recovering from wounds. 
" I first met your son about last May when he 
returned to Belfast after going through a course 
of flying, and I think that a month later he 
returned to England to begin a course of 
signaUing, from which he returned just before 
mobilisation, so that I did not get to know him 
well tiU the beginning of the war. During 
those first six weeks he was — I think there Ls 
only one word to describe him — magnificent. 
Always cheerful ; always caring for others ; 
watching over his men, no matter how weary : 
never sparing himself. To my mind he w£is the 
ideal of a British officer, gallant and brave, of 
course, but in addition tireless in helping others 
who did not possess liis powers of mind and body. 
" That fight near Bezu, on the JMame, cost us 
dear, for with your dear son fell Captain Roe 
and Captain Priestley. The next morning all 
were seen, and hopes were given that all would 
survive, but in each case our hopes were dashed. 
I fear tliis is a poor sketch to give you of one who 
earned our love and esteem to so great a degree. 
I know liis memory will live long in the Dorsets." 
Captain and Adjutant Ransome, under date 
January ISth, 1915, wrote : — 
" May I, even at this late date, offer my sym- 
pathy to you in the loss you have sustained ? 
I knew yovir son well, and am only too conscious 
of what a loss he is to the battalion. He was an 
exceptionally good officer — one of those whose 
influence did much towards bringing the 
Dorsets to the standard which this war has, 
I think, proved them to have reached." 
Lieutenant George was a member of the Junior 
Naval and Military Club, and was unmarried. 



LIEUTENANT FREDERICK RALPH 

GEORGE. ADJUTANT 1st 

BATTN. THE CONNAUGHT RANGERS. 

who was killed on 

the 5th November, 

1914, son of the 

late BaiTy George, 

13th Foot, was born 

at Mountshannon 

House, County 

Clare, the residence 

of his uncle, on the 

9th September, 1883. 

He was educated at 

Abbey School, Tip- 

perary, and Trinity 




GER— GIF 



150 



College, Dublin, wliere he was presented with 

Professor John \\'ardell's sword. 

He joined the Connaught Rangers in January, 

190t), became Lieutenant in January, 1909, and 

was appointed Adjutant of his battalion in 

June, 19U. 

He was very fond. of all kinds of sport, polo, 

hunting, shooting, fishing, and football. He 

played Rugby football for Trinity. He was 

also fond of saUing. 

Lieutenant George volunteered to take part in 

a bayonet attack on the night of the oth 

November, and was shot during the charge. 



CAPTAIN HARRY VERNON GERR.\RD. 
2nd BATTN. THE BORDER REGT.. 
born in DubUn on the 18th April, 1878, was the 
r'on of Thomas Gerrard, of DubUn, Crown 
.SoUcitor for Queen's County and Carlow. 
Captain Percy N. Gerrard. M.D.. Malay States 
Volunteers, killed in the Indian Riots at Singa- 
pore on the 15th February, 1913, was his 
brother, and other brothers are John D. Gerrard, 
Resident ilagistrate, Ireland, now a temporary 
Lieutenant in the A.S.C., Wing Commander 
E. L. Gerrard, B.N. A.S., while another relative is 
Fhght Sub- Lieutenant T. F. N. Gerrard, R.N.A.S. 
Captain Gerrard wa? educated at King's 
School, War^vick. and Tipperary Granuiiar 
School, at both of which he took part in athletics. 
He joined the -tth Battalion Royal Dublin 
FusUiers (iliUtia) in April. 1900, and was at- 
tached to the A.S.C. In August. 1902, he was 
gazetted to the 2nd BattaUon Royal Garrison 
Regiment (formed during the .South African 
War), of which he was Adjutant from May. 
1904, till July, 1905. when he was transferred 
to the 2nd Border Regiment as Lieutenant. He 
served tlu-ee tours with the West African Fron- 
tier Field Force, Southern Nigeria, and was pro- 
moted Captain in October. 1914. 
Captain Gerrard was killed in action on the 
2nd November, 1914, by a shell while command- 
ing his company at or near Ypres. His 
battalion was complimented by the Commander- 
in-Chief for their behaviour at this battle. For 
his services Captain Gerrard was mentioned in 
Sir John French's Despatch of the 14th Jan- 
uary, 1915, referring to his Despatch of the 
20th November, 1914. 



2nd LIEUTENANT RONALD CH.\RLES 
MELBOURNE GIBBS, 2nd BATTN. 
SCOTS GUARDS, bom at " SaUsbury," Mel- 
bourne, Australia, was the son of the late Hon. 
Henry Lloyd Gibbs and Alice Mary, daughter 
of the late General Charles Crutchley, of Sun- 
ninghill Park, Ascot, and nephew of the second 




Lord Aldenhatn, Aldcnham House, Elstree. 
He was educated at Wellington House, Westgate- 
on-.Sea (Rev. Her- 
bert Bull), and at 
Eton (P. V. Broke's 
House). At the lat- 
ter he was in the 
O.T.C., and obtained 
his "A" certificate. 
He rowed in the 
boats on the 4th 
June, 1913, and was 
in the procession of 
boats when Their 
Majesties King 
George and Queen Mary visited Eton. 
He received a commission in the Special Reserve 
of Officers in .September, 1913, and joined the 
1st Battalion Scots Guards at Aldershot in 
October. He passed the Army examination in 
June. 1914, joining the 3rd BattaUon of his 
regiment on the 5th August, and exchanged 
into the 2nd BattaUon at Lyndhurst in .Sep- 
tember, proceeding with it to the front on the 
4th October. 

He was killed in action at Vpres on the 28th 
October, 1914. his battalion forming part of the 
20th Infantry Brigade. Vllth Division, and was 
buried at the Chateau, Gheluvelt. 
2nd Lieutenant Gibbs was a member of the 
Guards' Club. 



L I E U T E N .\ N T .\ T H O L T H O M .\ S 
GIBSON. 3rd attd. 2nd BATTN. 
THE PRINCE OF WALES'S VOLUN- 
TEERS SOUTH LANCASHIRE REGT. , 
who was kiUed in action on the 21st October, 
1914, was the son of the late Thomas Gibson, 
of Penarth, South Wales, son-in-law of J. W. 
Pyman, Penarth. He was only appointed to 
his regunent after the outbreak of the war. and 
was promoted Lieutenant in September, 1914. 



CAPT.MN ROBERT GIFFARD, ROYAL 
FIELD ARTILLERY, A.D. C. TO 
M.\JOR GENERAL LO.M.W. COM- 
M .\ N D 1 N G THE 1st DIVISION. 
BRITISH EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, 
son of Henry Rycroft Giffard. of Lockeridge 
House, WUts. was bom at Wilton Street, Lon- 
don. S.W.. on the 27th June. 1884. 
He was educated at Marlborough College and 
the R.M.A., Woolwich, where in his second 
year he was in the Cricket and Hockey 
XI's. Joining the R.A. as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in December, 1903, he became Lieu- 
tenant in December, 1906, and Captain 
in October, 1914. He served at Bulford, 



151 



GIL 




Horfield, and Aldershot. being in August, 1910, 
appointed A.D.C. to ^Major-General Loniax, 

then commandingthe 
1st Division of the 
Field Troops at 
Aldershot, and ac- 
c o m p a n i e d him 
when the Expedition- 
ary Force proceeded 
to the Continent for 
the war. 

He was wounded at 
Hooge, nearYpres, by 
the bursting of a shell 
in Divisional Head 
Quarters on the o 1 si < teiolier.and died November 
1st, 1914. Many of the Staff of the 1st Division 
were killed or wounded on the same occasion. 
Lieutenant-General Loinax, who had received 
his promotion in October, was among the 
wounded, and, as in the case of his A.D.C, 
his wounds proved fatal, although he lingered 
until the spring of the following year. 
Captain Giffiard, who was a member of the 
I Zingari and Free Foresters' Cricket Clubs, 
married Janet Haig Boyd, of :Moor House. 
County Durham, and left one daughter, Robina, 
in lier third vear when lier father was killed. 



CAPTAIN ROBERT CROOKS GIL- 
CHRIST, 46th PUNJABIS, INDIAN ARMY, 

son of Brigadier- 
General R. A. Gil- 
christ, Indian 
Army, was born at 
Aurungabad. Dec- 
can, India, on the 
24th June, 1878. 
Educated at Dover 
College and the 
R.M.C., .Sandhurst, 
he was appointed to 
the Indian Army 
from the latter in 
August, 1890, and reached the rank of Cap- 
tain in August, 1906. Lieutenant-Colonel G. 
Mockler, Comniandant 46th Punjabis, mentioned 
that he was a most exceptionally fine officer, 
and thoroughly deserved the esteem in whicli 
he was held by all ranks — British and Indian — 
of the regiment. He served for five years in 
the Burmah Jlilitary Police on the frontier, 
for wluch he was awarded the Police medal. 
Tlie D.I. General of ililitary Police, Burmah, 
Colonel J. ffrench-MuUens, wrote : " He served 
under me for five years, and on two expeditions, 
so 1 had occasion to know of his sterling qualities 
and character." 

He was killed in the Great War on the 19th 
December, 1914, the official report from the 





officer commanding .59th Rifles, Frontier Force, 
stating : " Captain Gilchrist, attached to us, 
was killed yesterday morning, the 19th Decem- 
ber, 1914, in a night attack on the German 
trenches. He was most gallantly leading a 
storming party up a Cierman sap under heavy 
fire when he was hit in the head by a rifle bullet." 
The engagement was at La Bassee, France. 
Captain Gilchrist played polo, hockey, and 
other games with his regiment, and when he had 
opportunities in India and Cashmere he went 
in for shooting. He was not married. 



CAPTAIN DUGALD STEWART 
GILKISON, p.s.c, THE C A M E- 
RONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLESi, 

who was killed in 
action at the Battle 
of the Aisne on the 
20th September, 
1914, was the elder 
son of Mr. D. S. and 
Mrs. G i 1 k i s o n, of 
Wimbledon and Dal- 
quharran, Ayrshire. 
He was bom on the 
5th ilarch, 1880, and 
was educated at 
Rugby, which he en- 
tered in 1894, and from which he went to the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1897. He joined the 
Scottish Rifles in February, 1899, becoming 
Lieutenant in December of the same year. He 
took part in the South African War, 1899-1902, 
being present at the reUef of Ladysmith, includ- 
ing the action at Colenso, at the operations of 
17th to 24th January, including the action at 
.Spion Kop. He also took part in the opera- 
tions of 5th to 7th February. 1900, and the 
action at Vaal Krans, in the operations on 
Tugela Heights, 16th to 27th February, 1900, 
and the action at Pieter's HUl : at operations 
in Natal and the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, in 
1900; again in the Transvaal, and in the Orange 
River Colony from November, 1900-02. He 
received the Queen's medal with five clasps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in January, 1905, 
and from July, 1906, to July, 1909, was Adjutant 
of his battalion. Captain Gilkison was a Staff 
College Graduate, and was appointed Staff 
Officer at York in 1911, and Brigade-Major, 
5th Infantry Brigade, Ilnd Division, Aldershot 
Command, in April, 1912. 

His younger brother. Lieutenant J. D. Gilkison, 
Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, was killed 
in action on the 26th August, 1914, at Le Cateau. 
Captain Gilkison married, in 1905, Kate, daugh- 
ter of the Rev. I. Harcourt- Vernon, of Cocaban, 
Orange Rivtr Colony, .South Africa. 



GIL 



152 



LIEUTENANT JAMES DAVID 
GILKISON, 1st BATTN. PRIN- 
CESS LOUISES ARGYLL AND 
SUTHERLAND HIGHLANDERS). 

who was reported missing after the Battle of 
Le Cateau on the 2Cth August, 1911, and since 
stated by an officer., who is a prisoner of war, 
to have been killed on that date, was the younger 
and only surviving son of D. S. and ilrs. Gil- 
kinson, of Wimbledon, and Dalquliarran, Ayr- 
shire. He was born on the 1st August. 1S84, 
and was educated at Bugby (Donkin House) 
and Ti-inity College, Oxford, which he entered 
in 1903. He was called to the Bar (Inner 
Temple) in January, 190G. He joined the Argyll 
and Sutherland Ilighlandei-s from the Mihtia 
in December. 1907, becoming Lieutenant in 
:March, 1910. 

Lieutenant GUkison's elder brother, Captain 
D. S. Gilkison. p.s.c. the Cameronians (Scottish 
Rifles), was killed in action on the 20th Sep- 
tember, 19U. 



2nd LIEUTENANT THOMAS CUNNING- 
HAM GILLESPIE. 2nd BATTN. KING'S 
OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS, 

was the son of T. P. 
Gillespie, Longcroft. 
Linlithgow, and a 
gi-andson of the late 
Alexander Gillespie, 
of Biggar Park, 
Lanarkshire, and of 
the late Thomas 
Chalmers, of Long- 
croft. He was born 
at Clanna Cottage. 
Al^•ington, Glouces- 
tershire, on the 1-lth 
December, 1892. 

2nd Lieutenant GUlespie was educated at Car- 
gilfield .School, Cramond Bridge, at Winchester 
College, and at New College, Oxford, which he 
entered in 1911, and where he took his degree 
in June, 1914. He was a fine athlete, and rowed 
three years in the New College eight, twice 
keeping liis boat the head of the river. He also 
was one of the Xew College Olympian crew at 
Stockhobu in 1912. 

At Winchester and at the University he was 
a member of the Officers' Training Corps, and 
intended to make the Army his career. He 
obtained a University conunission. and on the 
outbreak of the war was gazetted to the 
King's Own Scottish Borderers, joining his 
regiment in France in time to take part in the 
advance from the Mame. He was in the 
trenches at Missy-sur-Aisne, took part in the 
movement towards the Belgian frontier, and 
was killed in action near Quinchy on the 18th 
October, 1914. 





Militia in 



CAPT.\IN CECIL GLENDOWER PER- 
C I V A L G I L L I .\ T . 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGIMENT, 

who died on the 14th ^ -_— — — , 

October, 1914, of 
wounds received in 
action, was the eldest 
son of Cecil and Mr-s. 
Gilliat. of Arch Hall. 
County Meath, Ire- 
land. He was born 
at Arch Hall on 
the 6th December. 
1884, was educated 
at C h e 1 1 e n h a m, 
and joined the Royal 
Worcestershire Regiment fioiii tho 
November, 1905. 

He served in operations in the Zekka Khel 
country, north-western frontier of India, in 
1908, receiving the medal with clasp. He 
became Lieutenant in AprU. 1900. and was 
gazetted Captain, after his death, on the 29th 
October, 1914, to date from the 12th September, 
1914. 

A brother officer wrote : "" We were attacking 
a village called ileteren. My company was 
next to ' Glennie's ' when I fell. He saw at 
once, and ran to me with two of his men, and 
started bandaging my wound. It was a very 
plucky tiling to do, as I was lying in a very 
exposed place, and the Germans were firing at 
me all the time. Glennie left me after he had 
put the dressing on, and said he would send 
some men to carry me back, but he was killed 
himself — shot through the forehead — when 
he got back to the trench." 



CAPTAIN OTHO CLAUDE SKIPWITH 
GILLIAT. 1st BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE, 
(THE PRINCE CONSORT'S OWN), 

born on the 7th 

December, 1881, at 

Buckingham Gate, 

London. S.W., was 

the son of the late 

Howard Gilliat, of 

Abbot's Ript on Hall. 

Huntingdon, and of 

ilrs. Howard Gilliat. 

He was educated at 

Golden Parsonage, 

Cheam ; and at 

Eton, where he was 

in the Cricket XI in 1899, andjin the Field]XI 

in 1898 and 1899. He was also a member of 

the Free Foresters, I Zingari, Eton Ramblers, 

and Green Jackets Cricket Clubs. 

Proceeding to the R.M.C.. .Sandhurst, he joined 

the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade in January, 

1901. He served in the South African War, 




153 



GIL— GLA 



being present during operations in the Orange 
River and Cape Colonies, receiving the Queen's 
medal with three clasps. From 1908-09 he 
was A.D.C. to Admiral Sir F. Bedford, in 
Western Australia, and to Earl Dudley. 
Governor-General from 1909-11, in wliich year 
he became Captain. He retired from t he Regular 
battalion, and joined the 5th Battalion : but on 
the outbreak of the Great War he rejoined 
the Regular Army, proceeding to France with 
the 1st Battalion. He was shot through the 
heart by shrapnel bullet on the 3()th October, 
1914. 

Captain Gilliat, who was a member of the Army 
and Navy Club, was a golf jjlayer, handicap 
" .scratch." He was uninarried. 

LIEUTENANT HERBERT JAMES 
GRAHAM GILMOUR, 3rd BATTN. 
WORCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT, 

„,.i,i. I,., ,111,1, M| was the son of .Mrs. 

I ^^_^^ % Price Huglies, of 

R e d h i 1 1, near 
Worcester, and her 
first husband, the 
late James Graham 
Gilmour, of Whit- 
ttngton Lodge, near 
^^^^^^^^ Worcester : gran d- 

fl^^^sB^^ ^°" ^^ '^'"^ Rev. .7. 

'-J,';i^ r' Cook, Peopleton 

Pershore. He was 
born on the 2nd 
August, 1883, at Southport, Lancashire, and 
was educated at Hartford House, Winclifield, 
and Radley College, Oxford. 

He was gazetted to the Worcestersliire ililitia 
in December, 1900, and sei'ved in the South 
African War from January to .May, 1902, for 
which he received the Queen's medal with two 
clasps. After the war he, in January, 1903, 
received a commission in the 3rd Battalion of 
the regiment. 

On the outbreak of the Great \\'ar he was at home 
on leave from the 4th Battalion, then stationed 
at Bareilly, India. He joined the 3rd BattaUou, 
and accompanied it to the front, being present 
with it in all engagements up to the time of his 
death. This occiu-red on the 19th September, 
1914, when he was kOled in action at Vailly, in 
France, while trj'ing to save his men who were 
under heavy fire. 

He was a member of the Junior Naval and ilili- 
tary and of the Worcestershire County Clubs. 
He was also a member of the Worcestershire 
County Cricket Club and St. John's, Worces- 
ter, playing frequently for both. lu his reghnent 
he was chosen as one of the twelve shots for 
England, and was in the regimental Cricket XI. 
He was a keen sportsman and fine rider, having 
won many races in India, and m 1912 was third 
in the .\rmy Cup on " Exchange." 





LIEUTENANT REGINALD NIGEL 
GIPPS, 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, 

son of the late 
General Sir Regi- 
nald Gipps, G.C.B.. 
of Sycamore House. 
F a r n b o r o u g h , 
Hants, who served 
in the Crimea, was 
born in London on 
tlie 22nd November, 
1891. 

Educated at Wel- 
lington College and 
the R.M.C, Sand- 
hurst, he joined his father'.-s old regiment, the 
Scots Guards in February, 1911, becoming 
Lieutenant in January, 1913. In that year he 
went with his battalion to Egypt, and accom- 
panied it to France, as part of the Expedi- 
tionary Force, in August, 1914. He was killed 
in action near Ypres on the 7th November, 1914. 
Lieutenant Gipps was a member of the Guards' 
and Boodle's Clubs. He played polo for his 
battalion in 1913. 

2nd LIEUTENANT PAUL CHAN- 
COURT GIRARDOT, 1st BATTN. 
OXFORDSHIRE AND BUCK- 
INGHAMSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY, 

only child of the 
late Lieutcnant- 
Colonel J. F. 
Girardot, 43rd Light 
Infantry, Colston 
Hall, Nottingham- 
shire, was born on 
the 17th November. 
189.5. 

He was educated at 
A s h a m p s t e a d 
School, Eastbourne, 
and C h e 1 1 e n h a m 

College, and was gazetted to the Aiiny in 
February, 1914. He was an all-round sports- 
man, and shot three years ruiming in the Bisley 
Eight. 

He was killed in action on the Kith September, 
1914, near Soupir-sur-Ai.sne, by the bursting of 
a shell while resting in a quarry with his 
company. The same shell killed three subalterns 
of his battalion, vvounded several others, and 
killed and wounded forty of the rank and fUe, 
and fifty of a company of the Coldstream 
Guards, whom they were relieving. 

LIEUTENANT RALPH HAMILTON 
FANE GLADWIN, 1st BATTN. SCOTS 
GUARDS, LATE LIEUTENANT 
SCOTS GUARDS, SPECIAL RESERVE, 

was ollicially reported as missing in November, 
1914, but has since been stated to have been 




GLA 



1^ 




killed near Ypres on the 2t>th October, 1914. 
He was the youngest son of tlie late Mr. Hanulton 
Fane Gladwin, of Seven Springs, Gloucester- 
shire, and was born on the Ith October, 
1885. He joined the Scots Guards in Feb- 
ruary, 1907, becoming Lieutenant in November, 
1909. Subsequently he retired from the Army, 
but on the outbreak of the war with Germany 
was gazetted to the Special Reserve of the regi- 
ment in August, 1914, joining the 1st Battalion 
for active service. 

CAPTAIN ERNEST MLRE GLANVILL. 
M.B.. ROYAL ARMY MED1C.\L CORPS, 

who was killed in 
action on the 2nd 
November, 191-1, 
wa- the only son of 
Henry Glan%'ill. late 
Registrar of the In- 
land Revenue. 
Estate Duty Depart- 
ment, and was bom 
in Edinburgh on the 
14th November, 
l.>77. 

He qualified in 
medicine at Edinburgh University in 1901, 
and joined the R.A.JI.C. in August, 1903, being 
promoted Captain in February, 1907. He 
passed through the Army iledical College, 
-Milbank, in August, 1911. with six months' 
acceleration for promotion to JIajor, and would 
have attained that rank in February, 1915, 
had he not been killed. 

He went to France in August. 1914, as Medical 
Officer in charge of the Scots Greys, and was 
mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch of the 
14th January, 1915, having shown .great cool- 
ness and conspicuous bravery on many occasions. 
Captain Glanvill left a widow and two children, 
a boy and a girl. 

CAPTAIN ARCHIBALD WILLIAM 
ROBERTSON-GL.\SGO\V. 2 39th 
GARHWAL RIFLES. INDIAN ARMY. 

who was born on 
the 24th May, 1880, 
at Montgreenan, 

Kilwinning, A y r - 
shire, was the fourth 
and youngest son 
of the late R. B. 
Robertson -Glasgow. 
Esq.. D.L., of Mont- 
greenan, formerly in 
the 7th Highland 
Light Infantry. 
The late Colonel 
J. C. Robertson-Glasgow, of the Suffolk Regi- 
ment, was his uncle. 
He was educated at Wellington House School. 




Westgate-on-Sea. from 1889 to 1894. and at 
Marlborough College from 1894 to 1897. In 
the latter year he pa.ssed the entrance examin- 
ation for the R.M.A., Woolwic'n : and later in 
the same year that for the R.M.C.. Sandhurst, 
which he entered in January. 1898. He was 
gazetted 2nd Lieutenant in January, 1899 : 
and. having pa.ssed for the Indian Army, was 
attached for a year to the Royal Scots in India. 
He joined the Indian Staff Corps in April. 
1900, becoming Lieutenant in the 16th Bombay 
Infantry in April, 1901. 

He took part in the operations against the 
Ogaden .Somalis in Jubaland, British East 
Africa, 1901, receiving the medal with clasp. 
After the return of the expedition he was 
transferred to the 2 , 39th Garhwal Rifles, in 
which he became Captain in January. 1908. 
Captain Robertson-Glasgow, who was a member 
of the Junior Naval and iliUtary Club, was a 
keen sportsman, a fine fisherman, and good shot 
with both gun and rifle. During two years 
when serving in Chitral he made some successful 
shooting trips into the hills, securing a number 
of fine heads of varioiLS sorts. He commanded 
the machine-gun section of his battalion, and 
in 1913-14 was Captain of the " Empire Day " 
Battalion Shooting Team. 

He left India for France in September, 1914, 
with his regiment, which formed part of the 
Yllth (Meerut) Division, detailed for service 
with the Indian Expeditionary Force. 
Captain Robertson-Glasgow was officially re- 
ported as ■' missing " after a local attack upon 
the enemy's trenches, some miles east of 
Bethime. on the 13th November, 1914. From 
that date till the 25th December. 1914. his 
actual fate was unknown, but on that day, 
during a short informal truce, the intervening 
ground between the lines was searched, and his 
body was found under the parapet of a German 
trench, which he alone of the party he was 
leading seemed to have reached. He was 
buried in a graveyard reserved for British 
officers near the village of Le Touret, a short 
distance east of Bethune. 

The letters of brother officers all bear witness 
to the cool and cheerful daring displayed by the 
late officer during the period of trench fighting 
which preceded his death. On one occasion he 
went to the rescue, under shrapnel fire, of 
some of his men who had been buiied by the 
explosion of a shell which destroyed part of 
their trench, his work being done in full \-iew 
of the enemy. His example in such pecuharly 
trying circumstances as these was of inestim- 
able value in encouraging his men to face the 
ine\-itable dangers to which they were exposed. 
He was exceedingly popular with all ranks, 
and his influence on those who came in contact 
with him was of the very best. 
Captain Robertson- Glasgow married, in January. 



GLY— GOR 




liUl, Philadelphia Constance Violet Flora 
JIacdonald, daughter of JIajor F. Fraser, of 
Tornaveen, Aberdeenshire, and niece to the late 
Lady Robertson, of Forteviot, and left one son, 
Arclul)ald Francis Colin, born July. 1914. 

LIEUTENANT RICHARD SPENCER 
GLYN, 3rd BATTN. THE BUFFS 
(EAST KENT REGIMENT), 

who was killed in 
action on the 20th 
October, aged 
twenty-two, was the 
son of Lewis Ed- 
nnnid Olyn, K.C., 
ot Bexley. Kent, and 
Tliistlewood. Car- 
lisle. 

He was educated at 
K i n g's School, 
Canterbury, where 
he wasintheO.T.C, 
iiinl rii(.i..d the Army in 1911), being promoted 
Lieutenant in Januarj-. 1913. 
Lieutenant Olyn, who was fond of shooting 
and fishing, afterwards entered at the Middle 
Temple. London, for the study of law. 
For active service he was attached to the 1st 
Battalion of Ids regiment, and was with it 
when lie was shot through the heart at Rading- 
liam while directing the fire of his men. 

LIEUTENANT SYDNEY ALEXANDER 
GOLDSMID, 3rd BATTN. WORCESTER- 

SHIRE REGT., 

was born at South- 
s e a, Hampshire, 
on the 6th May, 
1.S93, the only sur- 
viving son of the 
late Sydney Gold- 
sinid. and .step-son 
of Colonel Annesley- 
Smith. late Worces- 
tershire Regiment 
11 and A. P. D. He was 
second cousin to the 
late Sir Julian Goldsmid, Bart., and was related 
to the late Sir Isaac Lyon Goldsmid. Bart., 
and the late Sir Francis Goldsmid, Bart. 
Lieutenant Goldsmid was the last of the male 
line of the Goldsmid family. According to 
a family legend, there was never to be a direct 
heir to the baronetcy, which is now in abeyance, 
and the family in the direct male line has now 
become extinct. 

Lieutenant Goldsmid was educated at the 
United Services Colleges, now called the Imperial 
Services College, Windsor, and entered Sand- 
hurst in 1911, obtaining his commission in the 
3rd Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, then 
at Tidworth, in 1912. He became Lieutenant 




in September, 1914. He was spoken of by his 
Colonel as a most efficient and promising young 
officer. 

During the Great War he was mentioned in 
Field - Marshal Sir John French's Despatch 
of the 8th October, 1914, for important recon- 
naissance work. He was shot near Ypres on the 
7th November, 1914, while holding a trench 
u hich the Germans rushed during a fog. 
Lieutenant Goldsmid was a keen soldier and 
a good shot ; his favourite pastime was riding, 
and he was fond of sport. 

2nd LIEUTENANT COSMO GEORGE 
GORDON. 1st BATTN. NORTHAMPTON- 
SHIRE REGT., 

born on the 7th May. 
1894, at the Royal 
.Marine Barracks, 
Walmer, Kent, was 
the son of Major- 
General and Mis. 
Gordon, of Culdrain, 
Gartly, Aberdeen- 
shire ; a grandson of 
General Gordon, 
R. v., and great- 
grandson of Colonel 
Gordon, 92nd (Gordon) Highlanders. 
He received his education at Warden House, 
Deal, and Cheltenham College. After passing 
through the R.M.C.. Sandhurst, where he was 
known as a good football and hockey player 
(which latter game he also played for his 
regiment), he joined the 1st Battalion North- 
amptonshire Regiment six months before he 
left with the Expeditionary Force for the 
Continent on the 12th August. 1914. He had 
already passed his examination for promotion. 
On the 17th September, 1914, whUe holding 
some trenches which the Northamptons had 
attacked and taken against great odds, he was 
mortally wounded, and died in a few hours. 
2nd Lieutenant fiordon was a keen sportsman, 
a marksman with the rifle and a good game shot. 




CAPTAIN JOHN F R'E D E R I C K 

HE 

.ES. 



STRATHEARN 
CAMERONIANS i 

who was killed in 
action, near Y'pres, 
on the 13th Novem- 
ber, 1914, was the 
younger son of the 
late General Sir John 
Gordon, G.C.B., and 
a grandson of the 
late Lord Gordon, of 
Druinearn. 
He was born on 
the 19th May, 1882. 
and joined the Royal 



GORDON. T 1 
SCOTTISH RIFLI 




GOR 



156 



Scots ill August, 1900. lie served in the South 
African War, being present at operations in the 
Transvaal, Orange River Colony, and Cape 
Colony, between March, litOl, and May, 1902, 
receiving the Queen's medal with five clasps. 
He was promoted Lieutenant in December, 1902, 
and from November, 1904, to July, 1910, was 
employed with the King's African Rifles, being 
promoted Captain in the Royal Scots in April. 
1910, and in September of the same year was 
transferred to the Scottish Rifles. 
Captain Ciordon was qualified as an Interpreter 
in French and in Swaliili. In April, 1913. he 
was appointed Assistant District Ollicer in 
Nigeria, Northern Pro\-inces. 

CAPTAIN ROBERT EDDING- 
TON GORDON, 1st BATTN. 
NORTHAMPTONSHIRE REGIMENT, 

tlie son of George 
Gordon, M.Inst.C.E.. 
was born at EUer- 
slie, Toorak. Mel- 
bourne, Australia, 
on the Sth February, 
r^g 1877. 

He was educated at 
Tooi-ak College, Mel- 
bourne, and by 
private tutoi-s at 
Edinburgh, return- 
ing afterwards to 
Australia, where he was appointed 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in the Military Forces, Victoria. In 
December, 1897, he was gazetted 2nd 
Lieutenant in the Northamptonshire Regiment, 
and joined the 1st Battalion at Peshawar. 
He was pixjmoted Lieutenant in January, 1900, 
and Captain in August, 1905. In that year 
he left India to join tlie 2nd Battalion of Ms 
regiment, then in England. Captain Gordon 
applied for foreign ser\'ice. and from November, 
1907, to December, 1911, he was employed witli 
the West African Frontier Force, afterwards 
rejoining his own regiment in England. 
Captain Gordon went to France with the 1st 
Expeditionary Force in August, 1914, and was 
with the 1st Battalion Northamptonshire 
Regiment in the retirement from !Mons, and in 
subsequent fighting until the Battle of the Aisne. 
He was killed on the 15th September, 1914, 
as he was advancing, trying to get his company 
into a more advanced position during an attack 
by the enemy. He was shot in the head and 
body, death being instantaneous. 

CAPTAIN ROBERT NORMAN GORDON, 
1st BATTN. BORDER REGIMENT, 

son of John and Harriet Gordon, now residing 
at Didmarton, Tunbridge WeUs, was bom at 
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, South America, on the 
18th June, 1875, and was educated at the 





I'reparatory School of Captain Lewin. Frant, 

Sussex, afterwards going to Repton. 

He was gazetted to the Border Regiment in 

September. 1895, becoming Lieutenant in 

April. 1898. and obtaining his company in AprU, 

1904. He served with his regunent in India, 

Burma, and the Cape. 

He was killed by the explosion of a shell at 

Ypres, on the 26th October, 1911. wlien leaving 

the trenches. 

Captain (iordon mamed Miss Klioda JefTei-son, 

and left one boy, born the otli May. 1912. 

CAPTAIN RONALD STEL.\RT 
GORDON. 57th WILDE'S RIFLES (FRON- 
TIER FOR C El, 

fifth son of the lat. 
John Lewis Gordon, 
of West Park, Elgui. 
Scotland, was boin 
there on the 24tli 
November, 1870. 
He was educated at 
Trinity College, 
(ilenalmond, Perth- 
shire, and passed 
into Sandhui-st in 
July. 1895. receiving 
an unattached 2nd Lieutenancy for the Indian 
Army in January, 1897. He joined the latter 
in !March, 1898, serxdng for a short time in the 
Cist Pioneers, and being transferred later to 
the 57th Wilde's Rifles. He served as Adjutant 
of Ills regiment, and was promoted Captain in 
January, 1906. 

He was on active service in China in 1900, 
receiving the medal with clasp, and again on 
the north-western frontier of India in 1908, 
taking part in operations in the Mohmand 
country, and the engagements of Karglia and 
ilatta. For these services he was mentioned in 
Despatches (''London Gazette," 14th August, 
1908), and received the medal with clasp. 
W^len at Sandliui-st he won the bronze medals 
for cricket and Rugby and Association football. 
He was a very fine shot and keen fisherman. 
In India he helped to win many cups for polo, 
football, golf, and cricket, being a good all- 
round atlJete and sportsman. He was a member 
of the Caledonian Club, London. 
Captain Gordon married on the 6th August, 
1914, at St. Peter's. Melbovu-ne, Ruby Mary, 
eldest daughter of Hem-y Byron Moore, Mel- 
boxirne, AustraUa, and sailed the following day 
for India to rejoin his regiment. 
He was killed in action at Messines on the 31st 
October, 1914, the following account of the cir- 
cumstances being received from an officer of a 
British regiment who was present : " He did 
the most gallant thing I have ever seen : he 
took a platoon and went forward to check the 
advance of the Germans to cover the retirement 



157 



GOR— GOS 




of the rest of Ms conipany. tliou^h he must have 
known it was certain death. While advancing 
he was shot through the head and died instan- 
taneously." 

Another officer wrote : " He was the best 
olTicer I liave ever known. He was extraordi- 
narily popular witli the men, and I have never 
seen them so cut up about anything as they 
were when they came in." 

2nd LIEUTENANT GERARD RIBTON 
GORE. 1st BATTN. ROYAL WELSH 

FUSILIERS, 

who died on the 
2nth December. 
1914, fi'om wounds 
received in action on 
the pre^-ious day, 
was the only son of 
Lieutenant - Colonel 
Kibton Gore, late 
1st Royal .Sussex 
Regiment Thorn- 
fields, County 
Limerick. 

He was born on the 2nd May, 1893, and was 
educated at Cheltenham CoUege. 
He was appointed to the 3rd Battalion of his 
regiment in March. 1914, and was attached 
to and accompanied the 2nd Battalion to 
France at the commencement of the war, being 
wounded during the retirement from Mons. 
He afterwards served with the 1st BattaUon 
in Flanders, where he was fatally wounded, 
having been gazetted to the K.W.F. and 
posted to the 1st Battalion, La December, 1914: 
and was especially recommended for transfer 
to the Regular Battalion by his Conuuanding 
Officer and the General commanding the Division. 

LIEUTENANT SYDNEY KINGSTON 

GORE. 1st BATTN. THE QUEENS OWN 

ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT), 

who was killed in 
action on the 28th 
October, 1914, was 
the son of Dr. A. J. 
Gore, of Kingston, 
CheiTV Garden Ave- 
nue, Folkestone, and 
was born at Barry, 
Glamorganshire, on 
the 12th July, 1889. 
He was educated at 
the Folkestone 
Graimnar School 
and by private tuition, and entered the Army 
from the Special Reserve in December, 1912, 
becoming Lieutenant in September, 1914. He 
was a member of the United Service Club : 
played cricket for the Kent 2nd XI and Band 
of Brothers, and was wicket-keeper of his regi- 
mental team. He was also Captain of the 




Irish Army football team, 1913-14, and played 
centre-forward for Army officers against Dutch 
officers at Aldershot in 1914. 
He went out with the British Expeditionary 
Force in August, 1914, and was present at the 
Battles of Mons, the Aisne, and Xeuve ChapeUe. 
The following details of liis death were furnished 
by a sergeant of the Royal West Kent Regi- 
ment in his evidence in relation to another 
officer of the same regiment : — " It was 
the same action where we lost Lieutenant 
Gore. He was shot right through the brain. 
We were surrounded. The right front was 
held by the K.O.Y'.T-.L. the left by the 
\^'ilts. One platoon advanced and took up 
flaidi fire. Others went off, and I did not see 
them till nightfall. Lieutenant Gore went on 
with Sergeant-ilajor I'enney. Their bodies 
were found on the road. I saw them the same 
night when I was guiding a Major of the Bed- 
fords across to defend our left flank. I don't 
know about yii: Gore's biuial, but would like 
to say how pluckily we thought he died." 

2nd LIEUTENANT ERIC WILLIAM 
GORST. 4th BATTN. THE ROYAL FUSI- 
LIERS (CITY OF LONDON REGIMENT, 

who was killed in action at Neuve Chapelle 
on the 2tith October, 1914, aged twenty-one, 
but whose name has not appeared ia the official 
casualty lists, was the eldest surviving son of 
the late T. W. Gorst. 

He was gazetted to the Royal Fusihers on the 
14th August. 1914. 

2nd LIEUTENANT WILLIAM BERES- 
FORD GOSSET, 115th B.\TTERY 
ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

born at Farm Hill, 
in the Blue 3Ioun- 
tains of Jamaica, on 
the 17th November, 
1893, was the son of 
the Hon. Beresford 
Smyly Gosset, Gus- 
tos Rotidorum of 
St. Andrew, .la- 
maica. and liis wife, 
^lary Jean Gosset. 
He was educated at 
Ascham House 
School, Eastbourne, where he was captain of 
games, and at Clifton CoUege, where he was in 
the Second XI. He then proceeded to the 
R.M.A., Woolwich, in 1911, from which he 
obtained his commission in the R.F.A. in 
December, 1912, going to the front with his 
battery in August, 1914. 

He was killed in action near Ypres on the 1st 
November. 1914, when he had gone out of his 
trench to see what was wrong with a telephone, 
messages having ceased to come in. He was 
buried, with Lieutenant Tucker, the officer who 




GOU GRA 



i,s,s 



had bfi'ii wiirkiiifi the toliplionc, and wlio was 
killi'tl just liiliirc liiiH, in ^ jiiis Churchyard, the 
si'i'vicebeingconducU'd byAiinyCliaplainCieorge. 
The Captain of tlif 115tli Battery wrote to liis 
parents: " Your brave boy was killed on tin- 
1st November. He had gone forward into the 
trenches to observe fire, and was killed by a 
shell close to the trenches while returning to 
the battery. One of our gunners was with him 
at the time, and death was quite instantaneous. 
His friend. Lieutenant Tucker, was killed on 
the same day. 1 Ijrought back his body that 
evening, find we buried him with Lieutenant 
Tucker in the cemetery at Ypres the following 
day. We put up two crosses o\er their graves. 
. . . Your son was a most valuable and useful 
otTicer, always ready and eager for every kind 
of work, and always too much inclined to rim 
into danger. We all were devoted to hiui, and 
the loss of two such young and brave lives iu 
one day was a great blow to us." 
Another account said that when Lieutenant 
Tucker's telephone messages stopped, Gosset 
went to see why, and found the telephone cut. 
Under a terrible shell fire he calmly went down 
to it, and was hit by a shell and killed instan- 
taneously. 



CAPTAIN ERIC JOHN FLETCHER 
GOUGH, 1st BATTN. IRISH GUARDS, 

was born on the 
20th November, 
isss, the only son of 
tlie late Major 
Thomas Armstrong 
tiough, and of Mrs. 
Claude Langley, 
of , Onslow 
Crescent, S.W. . He 
was a member of 
the Irish family of 
(iough, which has 
contributed so many 
(listinguisheil soldiers to the Army. 
Captain Cough was educated at Mr. Hawtrey's 
School at Westgate and at Eton. He joined 
the (then) 7th BattaUon Rifle Brigade (Special 
Reserve) in 1906, and was gazetted to the Irish 
(iuards in 1909, becoming Lieutenant in Novem- 
ber, 1911, and Captain in September, 1914. 
He went to PVanee with his battalion on the 
12th August, 1914, and was present at the 
retirenu^nt from Mons, the actions at \'illers Cot- 
terets, the JIarne (where he acted as Adjutant), 
the Aisne, and the fighting at Ypres in the early 
days of November. He was killed in the trenches 
between Bethune and La Bassee on the 30th 
December, 1914, when a life full of promise was 
cut short. He was mentioned in Sir .T(j1iii 
French's Despatch of the 31st May, 1915. 
Captain Cough was a member of the Guards' 





Indian Army, 
ill the (iwalior 



and I'ratt's Clubs. His recreations wci-c lacing, 
shooting, (isliing. and golf. 

LIEUTENANT JOHN BLOOMFIELD 
GOUGH, ROYAL HORSE ARTILLERY, 

wild was killed iu . _ 

action on tlie 8tli 
September, 1914, 
was the eldest son 
of Colonel Bloom- 
field (iough, formerly 
of the 9th Lancers, 
and of Mrs. Gough, 
of Belchester, Ber- 
w i c k s h i re. 11 i s 
grandfather. Genera 1 
Sir .Tolin Bloom- 
field Gough, was a 
distinguished officer u! tlie 
who fought at Sobraon and 
campaign, member of a family which has given 
so many ofTicers to the Army. 
Lieutenant Gough, who was born mi the "JItli 
July, 1886, was educated at Ilaileybuiy. and 
received his commission in the Boyal Artiller\- 
in December. 1906, becoming Lieutenant in 
December, 19(19. 

He was an all-i'ound sportsman, very good lid.i' 
in races, first-class man to hounds, and a most 
successful pig-sticker. 

The following account of tin- lirrunistances 
attending his death was given by the .Major of 
his battery ; — 

" Wlien I was hit he ran up to take my place 
and command the battery, and was hit by the 
very next shell as he reached me. What liis 
loss means to me and to the old tioop 1 cannot 
at all express, nor can I ever forget. He has 
been magnificent all thi'ough our very trying 
reai'guard ordeals. As Battery Leader he was 
quite invaluable, and so very clever at using 
ground, which probably saved us heavier lo.sses 
on mmierous occasions." 

CAPTAIN ALEC G. M. GRAHAM, 6th 
BATTN. WORCESTERSHIRE REGI- 
MENT, attd. 1st BATTN. LOYAL 
NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

was killed in action 
on the 22nd Decem- 
ber, 1914. 

Captain Graham 
was promoted to 
that rank in the 
Worcestershire Regi- 
ment in August, 
1914, having first 
entered the fith 
Battalion in Decem- 
ber. 1901 ; with it 
he served in the 

South African War. being jjresent at operations 
in Cape Colony from January to JNlay, 1902 




159 



GRA 



CAPTAIN 
GURKHA 
attd. lad 
GURKHA 



ALAN 
RIFLES 

KING 
RIFLES 




MOIR GRAHAM. 5th 
FRONTIER FORCE . 
EDWARD'S OWN 
SIRMOOR RIFLES . 
who was killed on 
the 21st December. 
1911. was the 
younger son of 
-Major-General Sir 
Thomas Graham. 
K.C.B.. of Heather- 
dale Lodge. Cani- 
tierley. Bom on the 
2.5th .June. 1878. 
he was educated at 
HaUeybuiy and the 
R.M.C.. -Sandhurst, 
on passing out of which he received an un- 
attached 2nd Lieutenancy in August. 189T. and 
served his probationary period with the Devon- 
shire Regiment. 

In Xovember, 1898, he was gazetted to the 
Indian Staff Corps, became Lieutenant in 
the Indian Army in .Tuly. 1900, and was pro- 
moted Captain in August. 190ti. He was in 
command of the Military Police Escort to a 
SiUTeying Party in the iliri country in 1912. 
and was granted the King's Police medal for 
conspicuous gallantry in repelling an attack. 
Captain Graham also commanded the ililitary 
PoUce diuing the Akha Expedition in the early 
part of 1914. and obtained the medal. 
He was killed on the 21st December, 1014. while 
covering the retreat of his company from an 
attack which had taken it in flank at Festubert. 
Captain Graham, who was a member of the 
.Junior Xaval and Military Club, married Edith 
Margaret, second daughter of Stafford F. Still. 

LIEUTENANT ARCHIBALD STUART 
BULLOCH GRAHAM. 2nd BATTN. 
GORDON HIGHLANDERS. 

bom on the 28th 
April, 1891, was the 
-on of Archibald 
Bulloch Graham. 3, 
E'ark Gardens. 
I ilasgow, \V., for- 
riierly Captain in 
the Glasgow High- 
landers, T.F. 
He was educated at 
irlasgow Academy. 
RossaU School, and 
the R.M.C.. Sand- 
hurst, from which he was gazetted to the Gordon 
Highlanders in March. 1911. joining the 1st 
Battalion at Colchester. In October. 1911. he 
was transferred to the 2nd Battalion at Cawn- 
pore, India, from which place the battalion 
went to Cairo in December. 1912. He was pro- 
moted Lieutenant in Jtdy, 1914. 




He left Cairo with his battalion for Southampton 
in September. 1914. and after a few dajrs at 
Lyndhurst they left for Zeebrugge as part of the 
\TIth Division. Dtiring the latter days of Octo- 
l>er. Lieutenant Graham frequently attracted 
attention by his bravery and cheeriness under 
trying conditions, and especially in the charge 
after which he was treacherously killed. Several 
officers wrote saying how well he had done, and 
in 191.5 his father received a parchment cer^ 
tificate to the effect that Lieutenant Graham's 
conduct on the 29th-31st October, 1914, had 
been brought to the notice of the Commanding 
Officer, who had had much pleasnre in bringing 
it to the notice of higher authority. 
He was killed on the afternoon of the 31st 
October. 1914. the following account having 
been received from his soldier servant : " At 
the time of his death he was one of three officers 
left with the remains of the battalion, which 
after the recent severe fighting had been 
largely reduced in numbers. They were ordered 
to take a wood, and this they did in such a 
manner that the enemy thought they were over- 
powered by numbers, and threw up their hands 
to surrender. While the officers were seeing 
that the enemy's arms were given up a wounded 
German officer, pretending to be dead, waited 
till Lieutenant Graham was close in front of 
him, and then shothim in the back of the head 
with his revolver. Our men were so enraged that 
they gave the Germans no quarter." 
His Commanding Officer, writing on the 12th 
November. 1914. said : " The Gordons had 
charged through the Germans, and had them in 
full retreat when your boy (Stuart) was hit 
from behind, and has not been heard of from 
that time. I can tell you that he was a splendid 
officer and a great loss to his country, the Army, 
and his regiment. When he had to do a thing I 
knew it would be well done, and it always was well 
done. I cannot tell you ho w much I regret his loss." 
And writing again on the 1.5th he said : "" His 
popularity with the men was very great, and he 
proved himself a bom leader of men. He Ls a 
great loss to us and the Army at large." 

C .\ P T A I N HUBERT A N,T H O N V 
GRANT. 2nd BATTN. LEICESTERSHIRE 
REGIMENT, 
son of the Reverend 
('anon Grant, and 
grandson of Arch- 
deacon Grant, both ^^^ 
formerlv of Avles- ^^^m ^> 
ford. Kent, was bom 
there on the 16th 
-January, 1878. 
He was educated 

at Marlborough ^^^^^^^1^^ \ 
Collie, and joined 
the Leicestershire 1- 




GRA-GRE 



IHO 



lU-giinent, fioui tin- K.-M.C. Sandliurst. in .May, 
1898, becoming Lieutenant in 1900. He served 
ill the South African War, 1900-02, being present 
at operations in Natal, iiKhitling the action a1 
Laings Nel< : in the Tiansvaal. inchuling 
actions at Bellast aiul 1,.\ denburg : in the Orange 
River Colony ; and on tlie Zululand frontier of 
Natal. For his services he received the Queen's 
medal and the King's medal, each with two clasps. 
Captain Cirant was serving with his battalion 
«lu-n he was killed on the 24th November, 
mil. The Lieutenant-Colonel commanding 
his battalion gives the following account of the 
circumstances : — 

" We had been out of our trenches for some days 
to have a rest, and on the night of the 2:3rd- 
2'lth November we were ordered to go in support 
of another brigade on our right. The enemy had 
taken, early on the 23rd, a part of the trench 
belonging to this brigade, and the order came 
that this treneli was to be retaken at any cost. 
It was a most important and \u-gent task, and 
half of our battalion was told oft' to attack a 
certain point in the line. ' B ' Company, 
commanded by Captain Grant, was leading, and 
he led his men with great dash right into the 
enemy's trench, and as he got there was shot 
through the head. The men followed and took 
the trench, with the result that the Germans 
were routed, and over one hundred prisoners 
and other things, such as machine guns, rifles, 
etc., were captured, and a good many of the 
enemy were killed. The Army Corps Com- 
mander and the Commander-in-Chief both 
congratidated the troops concerned in the 
action, and Captain Grant's name was brought 
to notice for gallantry. He died a fine death 
for a soldier at the head of his men, leading them 
to the enemy. His death was instantaneous. 
" He was buried by Kev. Irwin, our Cliaplain, 
in consecrated ground, which we have bought 
for the burial of officers and men of our regiment, 
in the presence of the officers and as many men 
as could be spared from the regiment. He will 
be long remembered in the regiment, lor all 
loved him, and will feel his loss very much. 
" He will be remembered as one of the best of 
comrades and kindest of men. He was loved by 
his men, and, as you know, all of us ofllcers 
mourn his loss deeply." 

Captain Grant was mentioned in Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 18th February, 191.5, 
for his gallantry. 

He married in January, 1906, Cara (iillespie, 
daughter of the late Major-General Robert 
Rollo (iillespie, C.B., and grand-daughter of the 
late Admiral John Townsend Coffin. 

LIEUTENANT WALTER FRANCIS 
GRAVES. 3rd (attd. 1st) BATTN. 
BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT, 

who was killeil in action on the 9th November, 




till 1. at tin- age of I w cnt y-ninc. was the eldest. 

sou of .Mrs. \V. (iravcs. Sands c I'lace, S;indy. 

Bedfordshire. 

He was appointed Lienten.uit in tli.' :'.rd i!al- 

talion of his regiment in ScptmilMT. liHI. 

having previously been a lind hicnlriKinl ni 

the same battalion. 

Lieutenant Graves was a iiu-mlicv of tlic Cardilt 

City Council and of the Coal K.xchangc. and was 

interested in education.il woi'k. 

CAPT. AMBROSE DIXON HALDREGE 
GRAYSON, RESERVE OF OFFICERS, 
attd. ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

who was killed in 

action near Festu- 

bert on tlie \'Mh 

October. 1914, was 

the third son of 

the late Henry H. 

and Mrs. Grayson. 
12, Bolton Gardens. 

London, S.W.. and 

was born on the 
14th May, 1874. 
He was educated at 
Wellington College 
and the R.M.A., Woolwich, from which he was 
appointed 2nd Lieutenant in the R.A. in IS'.U, 
Lieutenant in 1897, and Captain in No\ rmi.er, 
190(1. He served with both horse and lield 
batteries, and in 1901-02 took part in the Aro 
Expedition, Southern Nigeria. He was a mem- 
ber of the Naval and Military Club, and played 
polo, tennis, and golf. In March, 190H, he 
retired from the Army for family reasons, but 
at the outbreak of the war Captain Grayson 
was again emplo>ed with the Royal Field 
Artillery, ranking as Cai)tain from the 30th 
August, 1914. 

MAJOR ARTHUR DAWSON GREEN, 
D.S.O., p.s.c, THE WORCESTER- 
SHIRE REGT., 

son of the late Henry 

Green, Esq., of 

Blackwall, Old 

Charlton, was born 

on the 13th April. 

1874, at Belvedere, 

Kent, and was 

educated at Hailey- 

bury College, wheiv 

he had a reputation 

as a good athlete. 

He joined the Lst 

Essex Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant in 1894, 

and in the course of his military career obtained 

many decorations and distinctions. He became 

Lieutenant in 1897, and served with the West 

African Regiment in the Sierra Leone Hut Tax 




161 



GRE 



Rebellion and in the Sierra Leone Hinterland 
Expedition, under the late General Sir E. R. P. 
Woodgate, from April, 1S9S, to Jane, 1S99. 
For these services he received the West African 
medal and two clasps. He was promoted to a 
Captaincy in the Worcestershire Regiment on 
the 20th June. 19fXi. From January, 1903, 
to February, 1907, he was employed with the 
West African Frontier Force. For his Nigerian 
service in 190tJ he was mentioned in Despatches 
(Major Goodwin, 1.5th ilarch : and Colonel 
Cole, 20th May, lOOti : recorded in " London 
Gazette" of the 2nd July, 1907) and received 
the medal with clasp. 

From 1S99-1902 he served hi the Boer War 
with Thomeycroft's Mounted Infantry : was 
present at the rehef of Ladysmith : at operations 
on the Tugela Heights, and al.so in Xatal, 
including the action at Laing's Nek. He also 
took pari: in operations in Cape Colony, Orange 
River Colony, and the Transvaal. For these 
services he was mentioned in Despatches by 
General Sir Redvers Buller on the 19th Jvine 
and the 9th November, 1900 ("London Gazette'' 
of the 29th July, 1902) ; was decorated with the 
D.S.O., and received the Queen's medal with six 
clasps and the King's medal with two clasps. He 
was appointed Brigade- Major of the ITth Infantry 
Brigade in the Irish Command in June, 1911. 
^XTien he met his death he was reconnoitring 
with his General in the trenches at Soupir, 
and was shot through the heart by a sniper on 
the 2Sth -September. 1911. 

He was fond of hunting, was Master of the 
Staff College Drag Hounds in 1909-10. and was 
a member of the Army and Navy Club. 
He married Isabella Margaret, second daughter 
of the late William Lindsay Stewart, Esq.. of Stan- 
more. Lanarkshire. N.B., and left a son, Henry 
James Lindsay, born 2-tth September, 1911. 

L I E UTEN ANT-C O L O N E L M AL C OLM 
CHARLES ANDREW GREEN. PRINCE 
OF WALES'S VOLUNTEERS 
SOUTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT.. 
who was killed in 
the trenches near 
Ypres on the ITth 
November, 19 14, 
•Aas bom at St. 
li eorge's Road, 
London, S.W., on 
the 2nd July, 1871, 
the son of the late 
I'olonel Malcolm S. 
i>reen, C.B., of 3rd 
Scinde Horse, and a 
grandson of Admiral 
Sir Andrew Pellet Green, who couuuanded 
H.M.S. ■• CoUingwood'' at Trafalgar. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Green was educated at the 
Oxford Military CoUege and at the R.M.C., 




Sandhurst, receiving his commission in the 
South Lancashire Regiment (the old S2nd) 
in 1891, becoming Lieutenant in 1891, Captain 
in 1900, and obtaining his Majority in ilay, 
1909. He served in India and in the South 
African War, being present at operations in 
Natal, including the action at Laing's Nek 
and operations in Cape Colony. He received 
the Queen's medal with four clasps. 
On t lie outbreak of the Givat War Lieutenant- 
Colonel Green was serving at Tidwortli. having 
just previously been in command of the depot 
of his regiment at Warrington with the newly 
formed Army, but received his orders to proceed 
on service to take command of his battaUon. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Green, who was a member 
of the United Service Club, Pall Mall, married 
iliss Elsie BLsdee, and left three sons, age 
five, three, and two years respectively, at the 
time of their father's death. 

CAPTAIN RIVERSDALE NONUS 
GRENFELL. BUCKINGHAMSHIRE 
YEOMANRY ROYAL BUCKS HUS- 



9th 



LANCERS 




S A R S I , a 1 1 d . 

was killed in action 
on the Uth Sep- 
tember, 1911, at the 
beginning of the 
Battle of the Aisne. 
He was the ninth son 
of Mr. Pascoe Dupre 
GrenfeU, of Wilton 
Park. Beaconsfleld. 
Bucks, and a nephew 
ofField- Marshal Lord 
Grenfell. He was 
bom on the 1th 
September. 1880, was educated at Eton, and 
joined the Royal Bucks Hussars in Septem- 
ber, 190S, becoming Captain in August, 1911. 
He was well known as a fine polo player, and 
was a member of the " Old Etonian " team 
that won the Champion Cup in 1907. While on 
a visit to his twin brother in India he won the 
Kadir Cup. Captain Grenfell was a member of 
the Turf and Bath Clubs, was very interested 
in philanthropy, and organised a branch of the 
Invahd Children's Aid Association at Islington. 
One of his brothers. Lieutenant R. S. Grenfell, 
12th Lancers, was killed in action at Omdurman, 
and his twin brother. Captain Francis Octavius 
Grenfell. V.C., 9th Lancers,after being twice woun- 
ded, fell in action at Y'pres on the 21th May, 1015. 

CAPTAIN the Honble. RICHARD 
GEORGE GRENVILLE MORG.\N 
GRENVILLE. Master of K i n 1 o s s. 
1st BATTN. RIFLE BRIGADE. 

was the son of Major Morgan Gren\"ille, late of 
the Y'ork and Lancaster ^lihtia. and the 
Baroness Kinloss. He was a grandson of the 
late Duke of Buckingham and Chandos. 



GRI GRU 



182 




("aptaiTi .Mor>;;m (Jrciivillc was Ijorn on the 
2.">tli SciilciiihiT. 1SS7. and was cUucated at 

KtonandtheR..\I.( '.. 
Sandhui-st. obtaining 
liis connnission in tlio 
Kilk- Hiigadoin li»ni>. 
licciiinini; I>ie\itcnant 
in .January, 1910. 
a n d Captain i n 
August. I'.M 1. 
lie was killi'd in 
actional I'loej^'stfoit. 
.*^^| ncai- Arnientieres, 
when serving with 
his battalion on the 
lltth December, 1011. having been twice 
previously wounded, his name having appeared 
hi the casualty lists published on September 
loth and November Kith. He Wiis mentioned 
in Sir Jolin French's Despatch of the 8th 
October. 1914. 

He was a mendjer of tlie liatli Club. Londdii. 
Captam the Hon. Richard (i. (i. .Morgan 
(irenville having been the eldest son, liis 
brotiier, the Hon. Luis Chandos Francis 
Tenii)le, becomes heir to the barony. Another 
brother. Lieutenant tlic Hon. T. O. B. .Morgan 
(iienville. is also serving in the Rifle Brigade. 



LIEUTENANT GERALD GRIFFITH, 
.^rd BATTN. H.\MPSHIRE REGIMENT, 

younger son of 1 >r. 
and Mrs. P. Ci. 
Criffitli. St. Colomb. 
W'alton-on -Thames, 
was born at Pur- 
n e a u X P e 1 h a ni. 
IIiTtfordshire, on 
llic 14th July. I,sy3. 
He was educated at 
P i n e w o o d, Farn- 
boiiough, Hants, and 
at Blundell's School. 
Tiverton. He was 
gazetted to the Hampshire Regiment in .Sep- 
tember. 1911, and was promoted Lieutenant 
in January, 1914. 

Lieutenant Griffith went to the front ou tlie 
21st August. 1914, and was unofficially reported 
as liaving been killed in action soon afterwards, 
no definite news being obtained for some time. 
\t last it was ascertained tliat he was wounded 
and left behind in the trenches on the 26tli 
August, 1914, and it must unhappily be assumed 
that he died on or about that date. 
A brotiier officer wrote of him : " He was 
killed and left behind in the trendies he had 
helped to Iiold so gallantly. He was a gallant, 
cheery lad, and we can ill spare such boys. He 
was much liked bv his brotiier officers and men." 





.r til 



CAPTAIN HOR.XCF SYLVESTER 
GRIMSTON. 2nd B.\T TN. THE DURE 
OF EDINBURGH'S (WILTSHIRE REGT.i, 

was born on the 

27th October, 1S9I, 

at Xewera Elixa. 

Ceylon. He was the 

son of I'Alward .lolin 

(irimston, of Ram- 

l)odde, Ramboda, 

Ceylon, and his 

second wife. Toonie 

Clara (iie'i- Wood- 

lioiise). and was a 

grandson of tlie Hon. 

and Rev. Francis 

Sylvester (irimston, and great-grands 

second Earl \erulaiii. 

Cajitain (irimston was educated at .St. I-Mward's 

School. Xewera Kliya, Ceylon, at CUfton College 

and the R..M.C., .Sandliurst. 

He joined the 2nd Battalion VViltsliire Hegiment 

as 2nd Lieutenant in .\pril. 1911; liecame 

Lieutenant in March. I '.HI. .likI wa.? promoted 

Captain on the battlefield in (Jctolier. 1914. 

Captain (irimston was sliot through tlie temple 

in tlie trenches at Reutel, near Ypres, on the 

2:?rd October, 1914. His battalion formed part 

of the Vllth Division, wliich has since been 

named " The Immortal Divtsion." because of 

the glorious stand it made in fiont of Ypres. 

lie was a keen polo player and gentleman jockey. 

and was a member of the United Service Club. 

2nd LIEUT. LAWRENCE ERNEST PEL- 
HAM GRUBB, THE KING'S OWN 
(YORKSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRYi, 

was killed in action 
on the loth Xovem- 
ber. 1914. 

He was born in 1.S92 
at Wembley. Middle- 
sex, the ordy son of 
Ernest Pelham 
firubb. gentleman, 
and Emily Mary 
(irubb. He was a 
great-grandson o f 
Mr. Richard (irubl). 
of Cahir Abbey, 
County Tipperary. He was educated at Rugby 
(Town House), whicli he entered in 190(3. and 
proceeded with an exliibition to Brasenose 
College. Oxford, in 1911. There he obtained 
his degree with honours in 1914. A\'hen war 
was declared he threw up an excellent post 
abroad, and, having belonged to the O.T.C.. 
went out as a despatch rider. He received his 
commission a few weeks before his death, which 
he met while leading a cliarge against a chateau 
near Hooge on the night of the 1.5tli Xoveml)er. 
1914. 




163 



GRU— GUL 




in Jersey and England. 



CAPTAIN FRANK. L E M A I S T R E 

GRUCHY, 1st BATTN. LEICESTER- 

_ SHIRE REG T., 

was the son of the 
late (ieorge Oruchy. 
Esq.. and Mrs. 
(iruchy. of Rouce- 
\ille. .St. .Saviour's. 
Jersey, and was boi-n 
there on the 23rd 
.January, 1S76. 
He wa.s educated at 
\'ictoria College. 
.Jersey, and also 
studied with tutoi-s 
For two years he was 
in the Jersey Militia, and joined the 2nd Bat- 
talion Leicestei'shire Regiment in 1S98, being 
subsequently transferred to the 1st BattaUon. 
in which he became Captain on the 3rd March. 
1903. being at the time of his death the senior 
Captain with the battalion. 
He served at various stations in Ireland, and 
went to South Africa in February, 1900. with 
the 2nd ilounted Infantry, remaining there till 
the end of the Boer War, during vvMch he was. 
in December, 1901. wounded in the knee. 
For his ser\-ices he wa.s mentioned in Despatches, 
and received the Queen's and the King's iiiedals. 
with five clasps. Afterwards he served in 
India, and later at the depot at Leicester and 
i>ther English stations. 

While leading his men towards the enemy he 
was shot through the heart, and died instantane- 
ously, on the 23rd October. 1914. His body was 
buried near La Houssaie, close to the Armen- 
tieres-Ecquinghem Railway, west of Lille. 
Ills battalion formed part of the 16th Brigade. 
\'Ith Division, of the Expeditionary Force. 
Captain Gruchy rode well and hunted. He was 
also a very good ski runner and fond of all 
athletic sports. He was unmarried. 

C.\PTAIN HENEAGE GREVILLE, 
LORD GLERN.SEV. IRISH GUARDS. 

was the eldest son 
of the eighth Earl 
of Ayle.sford and 
Lady Aylesford. 
daughter of the third 
Lord Bagot, and was 
born in London on 
the 2nd .Tune, 1883. 
He was educated at 
Eton, and fh^t joined 
the 3rd Battalion 
Wiltshire Regiment 
in August. 1901, with 
which he served in the .South African War. 
receiving the South African medal. He was 
then for a short time in the Tth Ilussai-s, and 
in .June, 1902, was gazetted to the Irish 




(iuards. He was on the .Staff as A.I^.C. to the 
(iovernorof Gibraltar in 1905. In 1911 he was 
on duty at the Coronation of Their ilajesties 
King George and Queen ilary, and received 
the Coronation medal. He also served in the 
Warwickshire Yeomanry, in which hLs com- 
mission as Captain was dated the 17th August. 
1910. and subsequently pa-ssed into the Reserve 
of Omcei-s on April, 15th, 1914. 
In the Great War Lord Guernsey was leading 
his men to an attack at Soupir on the 14th 
.September, 1914, when he was shot. 
Lord Guernsej-, who was a member of the 
Turf Club and of White's Club, married on the 
11th June. 1907. the Hon. Gladys C. G. Fellowes, 
second daughter of the second Baron de Ramsey, 
and left a son, .Michael Charles Heneage Finch, 
born 1908, who succeeds as next heir to his 
grandfather, and foui" other children — two 
daughtei-s and two sons. 

2nd LIEUTEN.\NTREGIN.\LD GLOVER 
KER GULLAND. 14th COUNTY OF 
LONDON BATTN. THE LONDON 
REGIxMENT (LONDON SCOTTISH). 

was born in London 
on the 2nd Decem- 
ber, 1885, and was 
the son of James Ker 
Gulland, M.I.M.E., 
F.G.S., and F.S.A. 
He was educated at 
Clifton College and 
the Central Techni- 
cal College, London, 
becoming afterwards 
a civil and mecha- 
nical engineer. At 
Clifton he was in the Cadet Corps, and joined 
the "electrical engineei-s " while at college in 
190 L was transferred to the London .Scottish 
in 190.S, and received his conunission in July, 
1910. 

lie pa.ssed through niuskeUy and machine- 
gun courses at Hythe, and was appointed 
Instructor of Musketry and .Machine (inn 
Officer to his battalion. 

His chief hobby was rifle shooting. He was a 
member of the National Rifle Association and 
the North London Rifle Club. In 1910 he was 
in the " Thing's Hundred." and shot for .Scotland 
in the National Challenge Trophy Competition 
in 1911 : was again in the " King's Hundred," 
and also in the final stage for the .St. George's 
Vase in 1914. He was also in the Old Cliftonian 
team for the Public Schools' Veterans' Challenge 
Trophy on many occasions. 

He was hit by a sniper on the 1 1th November, 
1914. while in command of his macbine-gun 
section near Ypres, and died early next mormng. 
Lieutenant Ker (iulland married, in June. 1914. 
Miss Beatrice E. Welch. 




GWY— HAD 



l&t 




CAPTAIN ALEXANDER 

GRANT GWYER, 6th DRAGOON 
GUARDS (CARABINIERSi, 

killed in action on the 22ud October, 1914, 
was the younger son of tlie late Cecil I-'. Gwyer 
and Mrs. Gwyer, of Croftinloan, I'itloclirie. 
He was bom on the 10th May, 1883, and joined 
the 6th Dragoon Guards in January, 1902, 
becoming Lieutenant in September, 1903, and 
Captain in May, 190S. 

He had retired from the active list, and had 
voluntarily entered the Reserve of Oflicers, 
rejoining his old regiment on the outbreak of 
the war. 

CAPTAIN CHARLES EDWARD HACK, 
Istil^BATTN. CONNAUGHT RANGERS, 

was the second son 
of the late William 
Lionel Frederick 
Hack, Esq., of Silk- 
Willoughby, Lin- 
colnsldre, and of 
:Mi-s. Hack, Thrus- 
ton. Hampshire, and 
was born at Silk- 
\A'il]oughby on the 
29th August, 1S77. 
He was educated at 
Bedford Granmiar 
School, and joined the Connaught Rangers 
from the Sligo ^lilitia in December, 1897, 
being posted to the 1st Battalion, with which 
he remained for all his service. He was pro- 
moted Lieutenant in April, 1900, and Captain 
in :May, 1904. 

He had a fine record in South Africa, where he 
put in over two and a half years of active ser- 
vice, being present at a large number of import- 
ant actions, including those of Colenso, Spion 
Kop, Vaal Krans, Pieter's HUl, and Biet ^'lei. 
He was with Hart's Irish Brigade in Natal, 
in the forcing of Fourteen Streams and the 
relief of Mafeking. He was also present at 
operations on the Tugela Heights, including 
the assault on Hart's Hill, where six hundred 
of liis battaUon fell, and at other operations in 
the Orange Free State, the Transvaal, Cape 
Colony, and Orange River Colony. For his 
services he was mentioned in Despatches 
("London Gazette," 10th September, 1901), 
received the Queen's medal with five clasps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. He 
also received the Durbar medal, 1911. 
In June, 1911, he was appointed Adjutant of 
his battalion, holding the appointment till 
June, 1914. In July he came home on a year's 
leave, but on the outbreak of the war he 
rejoined his regiment. He was at first re- 
ported as wounded and missing after an action 
on the 4th-5th November, 1914, and as his bodj' 
was not recovered hopes were entertained that 



he might be alive. A Court of Enquiry sub- 
seiiuently foiuid that he had been killed in an 
attack on the enemy's trenches that night. 
It seems that a trench which had been vacated by 
our troops had been occupied by the Germans, 
and Captain Hack's company was ordered to 
retake it and fill it in. The attack was delivered 
soon after nudnight on the 4th November, and 
the company was filling in the trench when the 
enemy retiu-ned in overwhelming numbers, and 
the company was forced to retire, having lost 
its three officers. Captain Hack wa-s using his 
revolver and giving orders when he fell. 
Captain Hack was an excellent sportsman, 
especially fond of polo and hunting, and always 
took a great interest in his men's games. 
A good liorseman, a keen soldier, and a staunch 
friend, he will be missed by a large number of 
friends, as well as in his regiment. 
In announcing liis death a brother officer wrote : 
" To all of us he represented, as it were, the 
battalion." 

LIEUTENANT WILFRID JOHN MAC- 
KENZIE HADFIELD, 2nd BATTN. THE 
PRINCE OF WALES'S VOLUNTEERS 
(SOUTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT), 

was the son of 
Major-General C. A. 
Hadfield, and was 
born at Southsea on 
the 11th January, 
1889. 

He was educated 
first at Mr. Norman's 
Preparatory School, 
Sevenoaks ; then at 
Repton ; and at 
"The Army School," 
Stratford - on- Avon, 
whence he proceeded to the R.M.C., Sandhurst. 
He joined the 2nd Battalion .South Lancasliire 
Regunent on the 6th November, 1909, becoming 
Lieutenant on the 17th .\pril. 1912. 
He was Assistant Adjutant of his battalion, 
and. embarked with it for the Continent as 
Regimental Transport Officer. 
On the 6th September, 1914, he was severely 
wounded at the Battle of the ilarne, ha\-ing 
been ambushed whilst accompanymg his bat- 
talion at dusk on outpost duty. He was sent 
to the base in a hospital train, but on the 
journey he was taken from the train, on the 
10th September, 1914, to a ci%'il hospital for an 
operation, and died there the same day. He 
was buried at Angers, with fuU military 
honours, by the French garrison. 
Lieutenant Hadfield was a member of the Junior 
Army and Navy Club. He was a keen rifle 
shot and winner of the first prize at the Officers' 
Competition, Salisbirry Plain Rifle Meeting, 
in 1914. 




165 



HAG HAL 




C A P T AI N M A R K H A G G A R D, 2 n d 
BATTN. THE WELSH REGIMENT, 

b o r 11 in 1 S 7 li , 

was the son of the 
late Bazett ^lichael 
Haggard, of Kirliy 
("ane, Norfolk, and 
of Mrs. Lofthouse, 
of Sliipdham and 
Hemsby, Norfolk. 
He wa.s a nephew 
of Sir W. D. Haggard 
and of Sir Eider 
Haggard, and was 
educated at Trinity 
Hall, Cambridge, where lie obtained the degree 
of B.A. He served with the Cyclist Section, 
Inns of Court. R.V., C.I.V., and in the South 
African War vrith that Corps in 1900, receiving 
the Queen's medal with four clasps. Subse- 
quently he served with the Welsh Regiment in 
India and South Africa. For the latter services 
he received the South African medal \^ith 
four clasps. 

In 3Iay, 1910, he was appointed Adjutant of 
the Welsh Regiment (Territorial) at Cardiff, and 
became Captain in the Welsh Regiment on the 
1st January, 1911. 

He was wounded when leading a charge at 
Chivy in the Battle of the Aisne, and died of 
his wounds on the loth September, 1911. 
Captain Haggard was fond of football, polo, and 
boxing, having been a lightweight boxer at 
Cambridge and in the Army. He married, on 
the l.jth October, 1913, Elizabeth, elder daugh- 
ter of Colonel Ed\^■ards Vaughan, of Rheola, 
South Wales. 

LIEUTENANT CHARLES RODERICK 
HAIGH, ADJUTANT 2nd B.\TTN. THE 
QUEEN'S (ROYAL WEST SURREY 

REGIMENT), 

who was born on the 
3rd September, 1888, 
was the elder son of 
the late Mr. Ai-thur 
j;iam Haigh, M.A.. 
Fellow and Tutor 
of Corpus Christ i 
College, Oxford, and 
a nephew of ilr. and 
Mrs. G. T. Pilcher, 
Godahning. 
He was educated at 
the Oxford I'repaiatory School, at Winchester 
College, ^^ here he won an exhibition: and at 
Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he took 
the B.A. degree. 

He was given a commission as a University 
candidate in the Queen's (Royal West Surrey 
Regiment) in February, 1911, becoming 
Lieutenant in April, 1912, and was gazetted 





Adjutant of his battalion in January, 191-1. 
He was killed near Y'pres on the 7th November, 
1914, while " gallantly leailing a charge against 
overwhelming odds." 

CAPTAIN ARTHUR GORDON HALL, 
2nd BATTN, BEDFORDSHIRE REGT., 

eldest son of Ed- 
ward Hall, Escj., 
coffee planter, of 
Santaveri, Mysore, 
and ;\Irs. Edward 
Hall, both now re- 
siding at 17, South- 
fields Road, East- 
bourne, \\as born on 
the 20th Novem- 
b e r, 18 7 9, at 
" Sliimogah," in the 
Pi'o\'ince of Mysore, 
a Native State of India. 

Educated at Bradfleld CoUege, Berks, where 
he was good at school games, he first joined the 
Militia, and through it the Bedfordshire Regi- 
ment in 1899, becoming Lieutenant in 1900, 
and obtaining his company in December, 1906. 
In 1909 he was appointed Adjutant of his 
battalion. After serving at the depot of Ms 
regiment he was with his battaUou in Gibraltar, 
Bermuda, and South Africa during the Boer 
War from 1899-1902, being employed with the 
Mounted Infantry. He was present at opera- 
tions in the Orange Free State and in the Oi-ange 
River Colony, including action at Colesberg. 
P"or his services he was mentioned in Despatches 
('•London Gazette," 10th September, 1901), and 
received the Queen's and the King's medals, each 
with two clasps. 

In the Great War he was shot by a stray bullet 
at Gheluvelt, Flanders, in the Battle of Y'pres, 
on the 2(5th October, 1914. The following 
account of his death was furnished to his 
relatives : " He was waiting with his company, 
in support at the time, ha^^ng just come 
down from a chateau close by, and had sent a 
junior officer to the rear to ask for the orders 
of the day. Wliile looking through his glasses 
to locate snipei'S he was liimself shot by one in 
the neck, and fell at once without any pain. 
The officer who had gone for orders found Cap- 
tain Hall dead on his return and had him buried, 
with great reverence, in the trench in which he 
fell at Gheluvelt. He was much beloved by his 
brother officers and men. An officer of much 
ability was lost to the Army by his death." 
Captain HaU was a member of the Junior Naval 
and ilUitary Club, fond of sport, especially 
polo (in which he excelled), shooting, and 
fishing. He played football for liis regiment, 
taking part in the final for the Army Football 
Cup in 1907, When in the ^Mounted Infantry 
at Bordon he was in the winning polo team 



HAL HAM 



166 



in till- lntiT-( 'oiiipMHN ■ri)inii.iiiicnt of I'.Ml."). 
and ill I'.m'J ".is in the uimiinL,' Icaiii nl' (lie 
(iibi-aitar I'uln Cluli (»)irii 'riiurnaiiii-nl . In 
South Al'iica be raplaiiiL-d the team «liii-li wmi 
tlic Poll) Cup pifsciitcd by Lord (iladstiinc in 
a banilira)) I ournaincnt at .lobaniirsliuft;'. 

CAPTAIN BURTON HOWARD MALI,, 
98th INFANTRY, INDIAN ARMY, 

wlio was killed in action in Ea>st Africa on the 
2nd November. l!ll t. was the younger son of 
the Hcv. S. Howard Hall. M.A.. Hector of 
Sproatley and Chaplain. Isl class CI". I''.) ."itli 
Battalion Duke of W'ellin.uton'.s \\ est Hiding 
Regiment. 

He was educated at Haileybury and the IL.M.C, 
.Sandhurst, and passed for the Indian Army, 
being ga/.etted as unattached 2nd Lieutenant 
in .January, 1901, and becoming 2nd Lieutenant 
in the Y'orkshire Begiment in March of the same 
year. He was promoted Lieutenant in the 
Yorkshire Regiment in February. llNij. .ind 
in the following .May was ti'ansfeired to the 
Indian Army, in which he became Captain in 
.Tanuary. lit Id. 

LIEUTEN.\NT GERALD PERCY HALL, 
2nd BATTN. HIGHLAND LIGHT 

INFANTRY, 

son of Mr. and .\lr^ 
^^^^y Hall, of Olenniervyn, 

^^^^^^^ Clan mire. County 

^ ^ I Cork, was born thert 

1% «C^ I o» I'll" lltli Febru- 

ary, 1894, and was 
educated at Cliftori 
College. 

J \ ,^^^^^ He receixcd bis 

^/^ ^^^^^^^^"^ commission 

Augu.st. 1914. and 
was k i 1 1 I- (1 n I- a r 
Y'pres on the 1.3th November, 1914. 
Lieutenant Hall was fond of all sport, especially 
hunting, shooting, and fishing. 

CAPTAIN JOHN ALEXANDER 
HALLIDAY, llth HUSSARS, 

son of the late .lohn 
Ualliday, of Chick- 
lade House. Salis- 
bury, was born in 
London on the 10th 
April, 187.'). He was 
educated at Harrow, 
where, in 1893, he 
« as in the School 
Cricket XI, in 1892- 
93 in the Football 
XI, won the .second 
pri7.(> for heavy- 
weight boxing in the Public Schools' Competition 
in 1893, and the first prize for the same in 1894. 
He then went to Trinity College, Cambridge. 




while be Willi the ll.l 1 1 1 II lel-t ll li iw illg pri/.c al 
Ihe Intei-'N'arsily Sports in IS'.IT. 
C.ipt.iin ll.illiday joinnl the lllh llii---.ais in 
March. I SOS. becoming Lieutenant in .March. 
1000. and obtaining his troop in .March. 100.'). 
He took part in the South .Vfrican War in lOOl 
on special .service, and afterwards on the Stall', 
.IS signalling ollicer. He wa.s present at o])era- 
tions in the Transvaal, Orange River and Cape- 
Colonies, receiving the (Queen's medal with li\e 
(4asi)s. From A|)ril, 190S. to February. 10 11. 
he was Adjutant of his regiment, and Iriuii 
March. 1011. to February, 1011. Adjutant ol 
the Leicestershire Yeomanry. 
In the Great War he was with his regiimnl din- 
ing the retirement from .Mons, and wa.s fatally 
wounded at .Messines on the 31st October, 
dying from the effects in the Duche.ss of \\ i>t- 
ininster's Hospital at Le Touquet on the llJIh 
November, 1914. 

C.iptain Halliday. who was a menibi-i' of the 
(a \ airy Club and of the .M.C.C. and I Zingari, 
was well known in the hunting field in Ireland, 
where he hunted for twelve consecutive seasons. 

LIEUTENANT HUBERT JAMES TUDOR 
HAMER. 108th INFANTRY, INDIAN 
ARMY, attd. 101st GRENADIERS, 

born at ( dan-vr-afon , . - 



II a 11, O s w e s t r y , 
Shropshire, on the 
12th F"' e b r u a r y . 
1883, was the son of 
the late .John Parry 
Hamer. ,1.1'.. for- 
merly of the .Sth 
(tlie King's) Regi- 
ment, and of Mrs. 
Hamer. Two of his 
brut hers are serving : 
Captain J. L. P. 
Hamer, M.A. Oxon. .LP., in the 9th King's 
.Shropshire Light Infantiy : and F'lag- 
Lieutenant-Connnander R. L. Hamer. R.N. 
He was educated privately, and in September. 
1902, he received a connnission as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in the Hh Battalion Royal Welsh 
Fusiliers, and in 1904 enlisted in a Regular 
battalion of that regiment, serving in the ranks 
for three yeai's. 

In August. 1907, he recidved a connnission in 
the King's Liverpool Regiment, and was 
transferred to the Indian Army in February. 
1909, becoming Lieutenant in Novendjer of 
that year. In 1911 he was .shooting in Somali- 
land and Aby.s.sinia, and procured nian\ liin' 
heads, some of which are on loan to the .Junior 
Army and Xavy Club, of which he was a mem- 
ber, and were noticed and much admired by the 
late Field-Marshal l-^arl Roberts shortly before 
the latter's death. He was also a hockey and 
polo player. 




167 



HAM 



He was killed in action at Tanga, German East 
Africa, the following account having been 
received fronn the India Office : — 
" As an important German railway terminus was 
reported to be weakly held, a force was sent from 
British East Africa to seize it. On the evening 
of the 2nd November one-and-a-half battalions 
were landed within two mil es of the place, and 
at once advanced. This small force became 
heavily engaged just outside the town, but as 
the enemy were in much superior strength it was 
compelled to tall back and await reinforcements. 
" At 11 a.m. on the 4th the attack was renewed. 
When within eight hundred yards of the position 
the troops engaged came under very heavy 
fire. On the left flank, in spite of heavy casual- 
ties, the 101st Grenadiers actually entered the 
town and crossed bayonets with the enemy. 
The North LancasWre Regiment and Kaslunir 
Rifles on the right pushed on in support under 
very heavy fire, and also reached the town, 
but found themselves opposed by tiers of fire 
from the houses, and were eventually compelled 
to fall back to cover, five hundred yards from 
the enemy's position. 

" The losses were so heavy and the position so 
strong that it was considered useless to renew 
the attack, and the force re-embarked and re- 
turned to its base to prepare for future opera- 
tions. From recent reports just received 
the total casualties in this unsuccessful opera- 
tion were seven hundred and ninety-five, 
including one hundred and forty-one British 
ofiicers and men. The wounded are mostly 
doing weU, and many are convalescent. The 
above casualties were included in the statement 
recently made by Lord Crewe in the House of 
Lords. 

" There is no information available other than 
that contained in the above statement." 
An officer of his regiment gave the following 
additional details, writing from !Mombassa on 
the 10th November, 19U :— 

" The regiment was widely extended, and we 
were on opposite flanks, so that I can only give 
you hearsay news about your son ; and, as 
after the engagement — which was extremely 
heavy — we had to retire, we were unable to 
recover our dead, who were buried by the 
Germans (who treated our wounded with the 
greatest courtesy and kindness). I could not 
see his body. 

" We lost seven British and six native officers 
killed, but one of the native officers who was 
with your son escaped, wounded. He tells me 
your son was leading his men on when he was 
shot in the throat and died instantaneously. 
" We all feel his loss exceedingly, as a more 
perfect gentleman and better soldier one could 
not find, and everyone who knew him Uked him. 
I never met anyone who had not always the 
highest praise for him. 



" Keen in his work and keen in his play, he was 
the very ideal of the best tj-pe of British officer, 
and his loss to us is indeed irreparable. 
'■ In these few lines I am not giving only my 
opinion, but that of all his brother officers, 
both in tliis regiment and in our own." 
The Lieutenant-Colonel of his own regiment — 
the lOSth Infantry — also wrote saj'ing : — " He 
was not only popular «-ith all ranks, but 
a very able and zealous officer, and it is only 
a few weeks ago that the good work done by 
him in the training of the regimental signallers 
was the subject of favourable comment in 
regimental orders. As his Commanding Officer, 
I always found him keen on liis work and honest 
and straightforward in all liis actions ; in fact, 
a true officer and a true gentleman, whose loss 
wUl be deeply felt by the regiment." 

CAPTAIN LORD ARTHUR JOHN 
HAMILTON, attd. 1st BATTN. IRISH 
GUARDS SPECIAL RESERVEi, 
DEPUTY M.\STER OF HIS MAJESTY'S 
HOUSEHOLD, 
was included in the 
War Office montldy 
casualty list pub- 
lished in February. 
191.5, as ■" unolli- 
cially reported 
killed," no date being 
given. He had been 
officially reported 
as missing, but later 
in the same year it 
was heard from a 
German officer that he had been killed early in 
September, 191L 

Lord Arthur Hamilton was the second son of 
the second Duke of Abercorn. and was born on 
the 20th August, 1883, and educated at Wel- 
lington, where he was in the Benson from 
1898-1900. 

After serving with the embodied ^lUitia for 
seven or eight months, he received a commission 
as 2nd Lieutenant in the Irish Guards in Decem- 
ber, 1901, becoming Lieutenant in August, 
1904, and Captain in December, 1909. Retiring 
from active service, he joined the Special Reserve 
as Captain in March, 1913, and was appointed 
Deputy Master of the Household in that year. 

CAPTAIN CECIL FIFE PRYCE HAMIL- 
TON, 1st BATTN. SCOTS GUARDS, 

who died at Y'pres on the 27th October, 1914, 
of wounds received in action, was the only 
child of Mr. and Mrs. Pryce Hauulton, of Sea- 
ford. Ryde, and Villa Valetta, Nice. He 
was born on the 9th October, 1879, and, after 
serving with the embodied Jlilitia for nearly 
a year, he was gazetted to the Scots Guards in 
May, 1901. 




HAM 



168 




He served in the South African W'av, being 
present at opei-ations in ("ajje Colony ami the 
Orange River Colony in l!)()(l. receiving the 
Queen's medal with three clasps. He liecanie 
Lieutenant in June, liHCi. and lioiii October, 
1907, to November, 1S)UI. he was Adjutant at 
the School of Instruction foi' X'olunteer Inlantry 
(later Territorial Force) Ollicers at Chelsea 
Barracks. 

In February. 1 ill 1, he was appointed Kegimental 
Adjutant Scots fiuards, and was promoted 
Captain in January, 1912. 

MAJOR-GENERAL HUBERT 
ION WETHERALL HAMIL- 
TON. C. V. O.. C. B., D. S. O., p. s.c, 

wlio was killi'd in 
action on the 14th 
October, 1911, and 
who, when the Great 
War Ijroke out, was 
commanding the 
Ilird Division Field 
Troops (Regular) at 
Bulford. was the 
third son of Major- 
( ieneial Henry ileade 
IlamiUon, and a 
Ill-other of (ieiieral 
Sir Jiruce Hamilton. K.t.B.. K.C.V.O. 
He was born on the 27th June, 1861, and entered 
the 2nd Foot (now the Royal West Surrey 
Regiment) in ISSO, and was Adjutant of his 
liattalion from 18S6 to 1890. Major-General 
Hamilton, wlio was a Staff College graduate, 
had seen much active service, and held several 
Staf¥ appointments. He served in the Burmese 
Expedition, 188(5-88, recei\ang the medal with 
two clasps. He was A.D.C. from 189tJ-97 to 
the ilajor-General, 3rd Infantry Brigade. 
Aldershot, and to the Lieutenant- General, In 
fantry Division, South Afi-ica, from 1899-1900. 
He was with the Nile Expeditions of 1897 and 
1898, including the Battles of Atbara and 
Khartoum, for the first of which he received the 
Egyptian medal with clasp, and for the second 
was mentioned twice in Despatches, and had 
two additional clasps. 

From 1897-9 he was employed \\ ith the Egyptian 
Army, in the latter year as D.A.G. in operations 
in the first advance against the Khalifa, re- 
ceiving the D..S.O. and an additional clasp to 
his Egyptian medal. He was on the StafT as 
D.A.A.G., A.A.G., and Military Secretary to the 
General Officer Commanding-in-Chief the Forces 
in South Africa from January, 1900, to June 
1902, during the South African War, being 
present at operations in the Orange Free State, 
including operations at Paardeberg, in the 
Transvaal, including actions near Johannesburg 
and Pretoria : at further operations in the 
Transvaal, Orange River Colony, Cape Colony, 



and on the Ziduland frontier of Natal. He was 
mentioned tlnee times in l)es|5atches and pro- 
moted to a half-pay Lieuteiiant-Cnlonclcy. He 
also received the Queen's medal with four cla-sps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. During 
the year 1902 he was emjiloyed specially at the 
headquarters of tlic Anny. and as Military 
Secretary to the Conmiander-in-Chicf, East 
Indies. lu June of the same year he was 
appointed .\.D.C. to the King. 
From 1900-09 he served as Brigadier- (ieneral 
7th Brigade, Southern Command, and Major- 
General on tlie General Staff in the Mediter- 
ranean. In January. 1911, he was appointed 
(i.O.C., North Midland Division, Nortliern 
Command, and in June, 1914, to tlie counnand 
at Bulford. 

In the Great War .Major-General Hamilton com- 
manded a Division. The following account of 
his death was published in •'The Times" as given 
by a distinguished ollicer and personal friend : — 
" (ieneral HamOton w^as standing with a group 
of others in a covered place when a shell burst 
about one hundred yards off, and he was hit on 
the temple by a bullet and killed on the spot. 
No one else was touched. It was a fine death," 
adds the writer, " but I know how he would 
feel that he was taken before his work was done. 
All day we could not get near the place where he 
was lying owing to heavy shell fii-e, but at dusk 
we went out and carried him to a little church 
near by. .lust as we got there the attack began 
violently, so that we could not hear the Chap- 
lain's voice for musketry and pom-pom fire 
close by. Flashes from the guns lit us up now 
and then, but no other light than a tiny torch 
for the parson to see to read by. He was doing 
so splendidly that it was cruel luck that he 
should have been the one taken out of the group." 
Major-General Hamilton was mentioned in Sir 
John Fi-ench's Despatch of the 14th .January, 
1915. 

A brass tablet to his memory is placed in the 
chancel of St. Peter's Cluirch, .Marcliington, 
Lfttoxeter. 

MAJOR the Honble. LESLIE 
D'HENIN HAMILTON, M.V.O., 1st 
BATTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 

was killed in action 
on the 29th October, 
1914. 

He was tlie third 
son of the first 
Baron Hamilton of 
Dal z ell, County 
Lanark, and was 
heir-presumptive to 
the title. 

He obtained liis 
commission in 
March, 1893. and 




169 



HAM— HAN 




became Lieutenant in April, 1S9T. He took 
part in the South African Wsir. being present at 
the advance on Kunberiey, including actions 
at Behuont. EnsUn. Modder River, and Mageirs- 
fontein, and at operations in Cap>e Colony, 
receiving the Queen's medal with four clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in February, 19til, 
and Major in January. 1910. 

CAPTAIN MERVYN JAMES HAMIL- 
TON. 1st BATTN. GORDON HIGH- 
LANDERS RESERVE OF OFFICERS., 

of C o r n a c a s s a , 
County ilonaghan, 
who died of wounds 
on the 2Sth Novem- 
ber, 1914, was the 
only son of the late 
Mr. Dacre Hamilton, 
of Comacassa. 
He was bom on the 
12th December, 
1S79, and was edu- 
cated at Winchester 
College. While there 
he saved a boy from drowning, and was awarded 
the Royal Humane Society's certificate. 
He joined the Lancashire Fusiliers from the 
Militia in May, 1899, being promoted Lieutenant 
in February. 1900, and served in the South 
African War. dming which he was Adjutant of 
a Mounted Infantry Battalion from April to 
December, 1901. He was present at operations 
in the Orange River Colony. July^to November, 
1900, including actions at Bethlehem. Witte- 
bergen. and Witpoort, and at operations in the 
Orange River Colony till May, 1902. For his 
services he was mentioned in Despatches ("Lon- 
don Gazette," 10th .September, 1901), and 
received the Queen's medal with two cla-sps and 
the King's medal with two clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in November, 1903, 
and from August, 19<35, to October, 1907, was 
employed with the Egyptian Army. He was 
transferred to the Gordon Highlanders in May, 
1908, and retired from the active list in May. 
1914, passing to the Reserve of Officers, from 
which he was called up on the outbreak of thewar. 
He was at first appointed Assistant Provost- 
Marshal at Plymouth, but in response to re- 
peated appUcations to be sent to liis old 
regiment i-eceived his orders to proceed to the 
front in October. 1914. joining his battalion 
on the 25th of that month. 

He was wounded in the head and hand by shell 
on the 17th November in a dug-out, and 
was moved to a convent at Popperinghe, where 
an operation was performed in the hope of 
saving hi? life, but he gradually lost con.scious- 
ness and died on the 2Sth November, 1914. 
He made himself very popular with liis men, 
always showing keen personal interest in their 



circumstances and welfare, though at the same 
time requiring strict attention to duty. 
The following account of the manner in which 
he received his wounds was given by a Sergeant 
of his company : " On the morning of the 17th 
November the enemy started to shell a wood in 
which the company was resting about a mile 
and a half behind the main trenches. Captain 
Hamilton and another officer were in a dug- 
out, when after the burst of a shell someone 
said, ' The Captain is struck ! ' On going to 
him it was foimd that, while his companion 
had got off with a bruising and temporary 
suffocation. Captain Hamilton was wounded in 
the head. The company stretcher-bearers 
were called up, and he talked sensibly while 
Ijeing put on the stretcher. On the Sergeant 
shaking hands with him his last words were, 
• .Stick it, " C " Company ! '" 
He was a keen sportsman and shot big game, once 
securing by himself at fifty yards a very fine lion. 
Captain Hamilton married, in 1909, Hildred 
Laura, daughter of General the Hon. B. Ward. 
C.B., of Staplecross, Christchurch, Hants, and 
left a daughter, Phrebe Maxwell, bom 1911. 

2nd LIEUTENANT GILBERT PHILIP 
HAMMOND. 2nd BATTN. KINGS 
OWN SCOTTISH BORDERERS, 
eldest son of the 
late Frederick 
Hammond, Esq., of 

• The Bank," New- 
market, and Plor- 
ence Amy Holland, 

• The Cottage," Fin- 
borough Stow- 
market, whose name 
appeared in the fii-st 
list of British losses 
issued by the War 
Office on the 1st 
.September, 1914, was killed in action at the 
age of twenty-two. 

He obtained his commission in Ids regiment in 
December, 1912, from the .Special Reserve. 

LIEUTENANT RALPH ESCOTT HAN- 
COCK. D.S.O.. 2nd BATTN. DEVON- 
SHIRE REGT.. 
was bom at Llan- 
daff. South Wales, 
on the 20th Decem- 
ber. 1SS7, the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Fi-ank 
Hancock, of Ford. 
W i velisc o mbe, 
Somerset. 

He was educated at 
Connaught House 
Preparatory School, 
Portiiiore, Wey- 





HAR 



170 



mouth, and at l{ugb\ , wliore he phiyod for the 
1st Cricket XI in 1905 and 1906, and from whicli 
he passed du-ect into the R..M.C., Sandhui'st. 
in August, 190(i. He was ftazetted to the 2nd 
Battalion Devonshire Ref;i'i"^"t. then stationed 
at Devouport, in January, 1908, becoming 
Lieutenant in February, 1911, and served with 
it at Crete, Malta, and Ah'xandria from 1909-12. 
He was then at the depot. Kxetcr, for two veal's, 
and on the 30th August, 191 4. left with a (haft 
to reinforce tin; 1st BattaHon in France. 
During the war lie was awarded the l)..S.().. 
the following being the otHcial record from the 
" London Gazette " of 1st December, 1914: — 
" T^ieutenant Balph Escott Hancock, 1st Bat- 
talion Devonshii-e Regiment, on October 23rd 
displayed conspicuous gallantry in leaving 
his trench under very heavy fu-e. and going back 
some sixty yards over absolutely bare groimd 
to pick up Corporal \\'arwick. who had fallen 
whilst coming up with a party of reinforcements. 
Lieutenant Hancock conveyed this non-conunis- 
sioned officer to the cover of a haystack, and then 
returned to his trench. (.Since killed in action.)" 
He was kUled on the 29th October, 1914. and 
was subsequently mentioned in Sir .lohn 
French's Despatch of the 14th January. 191.j. 
Lieutenant Hancock was a good athlete and 
rider. At Malta he played in the polo team 
that won the regimental cup, and captained the 
Ai-my polo team v. the Navy. He also won 
several prizes for shooting. He played cricket 
and football for the County of Somerset : won 
the East Devon Hunt heavj-weight Point-to- 
Point in 1913 and 1914 on hoi'ses taught and 
trained by himself ; and was a well-known 
follower of the \\'est Somerset and East Devon 
Foxhounds. 

Lieutenant Hancock married Mary Hamilton, 
younger daughter of the Rev. P. P. Broadmead. of 
Olands. Milverton. .Somerset, in September. 1913. 
and left one son. Patrick Frank, born June. 1914. 

CAPTAIN ALLAN HUMPHREY 
HARDEN. 2nd BATTN. OXFORDSHIRE 
AND BUCKINGHAMSHIRE LIGHT 
^ I N F A N T R Y, 

I ^^^^^^^^|H^^| i was born 

Middlesex, on the 
23rd March, 1881, 
and was the son of 
the late Lieutenant- 
^^^^^ ^^^^^ Colonel .1. E. Har- 

ii '^^^* ^^M den. KUst and 109th 

Regiments(since 
named Royal Mnn- 
ster F^isiUers and 
Leinster Regiment), 
being a grandson of 

the late .Tudge Harden, of Chesliire, and, on his 

mother's side, of the late fieneral Atkinson, 

Madras Arm v. 




He was eduiali-d at I hdu icli College, and 
joined the Oxford and Uucks Light Infantry 
from the .Militia on the .'ith January, 1901. 
becoming Lieutenant in .September, 1903, and 
Captain in January. lOlii. From 19IIS to 1912 
Captain Hardi-n was Adjutant to tlie tith (Teiri- 
torial) Battalion .South St.ilTordshire Regiment, 
lie served throughout the .South African War. 
being present at operations in the Orange 
River Colony and Cape Colony, receiving the 
(Queen's medal and King's medal, each with 
two clasps. 

In the Great War. during tlie operations round 
Ypres, Captain Harden was, on the 21st 
October, 1914, in command of his company in 
extended position in close contact with the 
enemy. He was taking ordei-s from his Colonel 
when he was shot thi'ough the head by a rifle 
bullet. His body was carried to a farm building 
close by, which, being shortly afterwards set on 
fire by the enemy's shells, was totally consumed, 
and so formed a funeral pyre for a brave soldier. 
Captain Harden, for his gallantry in this war. 
was mentioned in Field-.Marshal Sir John 
French's Despatch of the 14th January. 191.5. 
His widow received several highly appreciative 
lettei-s of sympathy, showing the high esteem 
in which her late husband was held. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Davies, commanding the 
battalion, wrote : "■ Your husband's death is a 
great loss to the regiment. He was one of the 
best company commanders we had. ... I Uked 
him so much pei-sonally. His death was quite 
instantaneoui^ I wa.s talking to him at the 
moment that he was shot, and I feel sure that 
lie felt nothing. We have lost a very good 
soldier, and all of us feel nuich for you in your 
sorrow." 

Lieutenant-Colonel Waterhouse. conmianding 
the Territorial Reghnent. with which he had 
served, wrote : " His great example will be 
before us to try and follow. He was one of 
the finest men I ever knew." 
A junior officer of the battalion, who had been 
with him throughout the war, wrote : " He 
was never downhearted in the depressing days 
of that retirement from Mons. and was so brave 
and capabli-. ... I sliall always be proud to 
have served under him. ' 

A Major of his battalion said : " Your husband's 
death is a very real loss to all ranks of the 
regiment." 

Captain Harden married, in .luly. lOO.j, Daisy, 
only daughter of the late Captain George 
Thomas Scott (Scots Greys) and .Mi-s. G. T. 
.Scott. 07. ?'gerton (Jardens. London, .S.W., 
and grand-daughter of the late John Howe. 
Esq.. J. P., D.L., Ballycross House, County 
Wexford, and a cousin of the Right Honouratde 
tlie l>ord Muskerry, Spiingfield Castle. Drum- 
collogher. County Limerick, and left a son and 
a daughter. 



171 



HAR 




LIEUTENANT ARTHUR DENNIS 
HARDING, 4th lattd. 1st! BATTN. 
GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT, 

_^-- - - — - who died oil tlie uUlli 
^^H^^^^^^^l the 

^^^■^ ^^^^H' on the previous day. 

^^H^y ^fS^^^^H ^^as the only son of 

^K ^H the Major A. 

^^L ^^ Harding, R.A.M.C, 

^^^^ and of Mrs. Harding, 

^^^H^ ^^^^^Bl ^'^'^ ^ grandson of 

U.. M.L.I. He joined 
the Gloucestershire Regiment in September, 19 12. 
and was promoted Lieutenant in August. l!ll I. 

2nd LIEUTENANT JACK MAYNARD 
HARDING, 1st BATTN. QUEENS OWN 
(ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT), 

_^^_____^___^____ ^ son of [vieutenant- 
• (' o 1 o n c 1 .\I a y n a r d 

Ffolliott Harding, 
conuiianding 69 th 
Punjabis, was born 
at B e r h a m p o r e, 
India, on the 4th 
October, 1.S94. 
Educated at Fel.sted 
School, he repre- 
sented his school for 
gymnastics at 
Alder.shot, and for 
nuisketry at Bisley. He proceeded to the 
K.JI.C, Sandhurst, where he was in the gym- 
nasium team, 1913, and won his Blue. From tlie 
R.M.C. he received his commission in the West 
Kent Regiment in August, 1914, after the 
outbreak of the war. After spending two weeks 
at the depot he joined his battalion in France 
on the lltli September, and was killed in action 
on the 2(Hh October, 1914. at the Battle of 
Y'pres, while gallantly encouraging his men to 
hold a trench which was under a heavy con- 
tinuous fire of high-explosive shells, 

LIEUTEN.\NT ROBERT DENIS 
STEWART HARDING, 4th lattd. Isti 
BATTN. BEDFORDSHIRE REGIMENT. 

wlio was killed in 

action near Y'pres on 
the 7th November. 
1914, aged twenty- 
eight, was the only 
son of Mr. and Mi-s. 
S. G. Harding, of 
15, Lowndes .Square, 
S.W. 

He was educated at 
Harrow (Kendall's. 
1889 - 1903) and 
Christ Church, and 



« 




joined the 4th Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment 
in 1912, becoming Lieutenant in March, 1913 ; 
on war breaking out he offered his services 
a;id was attached for duty to the 1st Battalion. 
The following accoimt of the circumstances 
attending his death was pubhshed in the " Harro- 
vian War Supplement " for December, 1914: — 
"■ His Captain writes : ' The enemy had broken 
through the line of trenches held by a battaUon 
on our left, and its break caused a part of our 
trenches to be vacated also. Our company was 
in reserve, and we formed up, and brought off 
an entirely successful countei--attack, driving 
the enemy back, killing many, and capturing 
twenty-five prisoners. It was in this cotinter- 
attack that Harding fell, leading his men up a 
lightly wooded hill. I did not see him fall, but 
missed him when we got to the ridge, and on 
going back found him (juite dead. Death had 
evidently been instantaneous. I had fornacd a 
very high opinion of his gallantry and coolness. 
I could rely on him always, and he had gained 
the confidence of his men, though he had only 
been with his company about a month. He was 
always bright and cheei-y, and it was a real 
pleasure to have his company on the line of 
march or in the trenches.' " 
He was a member of the B.ith Club. 

LIEUTENANT the Honble. EDWARD 
CHARLES HAR DIN GE, D. S. O., 
15th (THE KINGS) HUSSARS, 

was the elder son 

of Charles Baron 
Hardinge of Pens- 
hurst, P.C, G,C.B,, 
(i.C.S.I., G.C.M.G., 
(l.C.I.E.. G.C.V.O., 
I,S,0., Viceroy and 
(iovernor - tieneiiil 
of India, and wa- 
born at Constant i- 
nople on the .3rd 
May, 1892. He was 
a nephew of ^'is- ^ 

count Hardinge. A.D.C., and of Lord AJington 
Lieutenant Hardinge was educated at WeUing- 
ton College, and while there was a Page of 
Honour of His late Majesty King Edward VII, 
and afterwards went to the R.M.C., Sandhui-st, 
receiving his commission in the 15th Hussars 
in September, 1911, in December of which year 
he was Honorary A.D.C. to the Viceroy during 
the Durbar. He joined his regiment In .South 
Africa in .January, 1912, and became Lieutenant 
in August, 1914. 

Lieutenant Hardinge rode with distinction in 
the International Horse Show at Ohniipia, 
1914. winning full marks in the London to 
Aldershot ride. He was a member of the 
Cavalry Club, a very keen rider to hounds, and 
won the Subalterns' Point-to-Point Race at 
the regimental races in January, 1914. 




HAR 



172 



He served with his regiment in the Great War, 
and died on the ISth December, 1914, from 
blood-poisoning caused by a very severe wound 
in the right arm, received on the 27th August, 
near Le Cateau, eight bullets from a machine 
gun tract lu'ing tlie bone. He had already 
done good work before being wounded, for 
which he was awarded the D.S.O., HLs Majesty 
the King-Emperor gi'aciously notifying the award 
to Lord llardinge in the following telegram : — 
■■ 1 have had great pleasure in conferring the 
Distinguished Service Order on yoiu' son for 
al)iUty and gallantry in reconnaissance under 
great diflficulty and machlne-giui fire on tlu-ee 
successive days, when he was severely wounded. 
Glad to say he is progressing satisfactorily." 
The following details of two conspicuous acts of 
great bravery and gallantry by Lieutenant the 
Hon. E.C. Hardinge have been recorded, the latter 
beingthe occasion on which he received hiswound. 

(1) On August 23rd, about 9.30 p.m.. Lieu- 
tenant Hardinge was sent out from Kouveroy 
on a most difficult and dangerous night recon- 
naissance towards Binche, to ascertain move- 
ments of the Germans, of whicli information 
was very urgently needed. He succeeded in 
reaching the village of Estinne Hud- Mont. 
Having avoided Tlilan patrols, and having 
hidden his small patrol in a stone electric 
machinery building, he chmbed the chiu'ch 
tower with a sergeant, and waited for dawn to 
break. Whilst waiting a Uhlan patrol entered 
the village, and others came round it. He re- 
mained quietly in observation, and they failed 
to discover him or his patrol. In the early 
morning he was able to locate German batteries 
in position south-west of Binche. a brigade of 
cavalry moving due west from that place, and 
their infantry massing near a wood south of it. 
His difficulty was then to get away, being sur- 
roimded, but fortunately another patrol, under 
Lieutenant Nicolson, loth Hussars. seeing his pre- 
dicament, came to his assistance by firing on the 
Lilians, and then by withdrawing drew them off 
and so enabled Lieutenant Hardinge to get through 
with his most valuable information. He was 
very highly complimented and noted for reward. 

(2) On August 27th two troops (Lieutenant 
Hardinge's being one) were sent out at i a.m. 
from Oisy on rearguard work, his troop recon- 
noitring and obser\"ing on the right front, and 
right of the rearguard position being held. 
German columns were reported advancing, 
and about 10.30 a.m. the patrols were driven 
in by German infantry. The attack gradually 
developed, and shortly before 1 p.m. became 
very heavy, and the flanking company of the 
Koyal Munster FusUiei-s, near Bergues, was in 
difficulties. Lieutenant Hardinge, with his 
troop, was sent to their assistance, and came 
into action on their left, opposite three machine 
guns, which he located and tried to silence. A 



fourth then came into action, outflanking him, 
and. causing some casualities, forced him 
to i-etire. Realising that the position of the 
.Munstere was untenable (who had to hold on 
to prevent the rest of the battalion being cut off) 
unless this machine gun was put out of action, 
he led a few men up again most gallantly to try 
and capture it. Whilst trying to locate it 
exactly he had to stand up and use his glasses, 
and so became exposed to its fire. He was very 
severely wounded, his arm l>eiiig badly shat- 
tered. ,\fter having it temporarily bound up, 
he told his men to hold on as long as they could, 
and to help the ilunstei's out, and then quite 
calndy walked back to where his horses were, 
and was then taken into the ambulance. 
For these actions he was awarded the D.S.O. 
The above details were confirmed by Major 
Pilkington, of the loth Hussars, who was 
Lieutenant Hardinge's squadi-on leader, and 
endorsed by Major Courage, second in command 
of the squadron at the time. 

2nd LIEUTENANT FREDERICK 
McMAHON H.\RDM.\N, SPECI.\L 
RESERVE, attd. 4th B.\TTN. THE 
ROYAL FUSILIERS CITY OF LONDON 
R E G I -M E N T i, 
who was killed in 
action between the 
2.5th and 27th 
October, 1914, at 
the age of twenty- 
four, was the oidy 
son of the late 
Captain Hardman, 
the Royal Dragoons, 
who died for his 
country in the South 
African War, and of 

ilrs. Hardman, Castleton, Sherborne, Dorset. 
He was a grandson of the late General Sir 
Thomas ilcilahon, Bart., C.B. 
He had only joined the Special Reserve of his 
regiment in .July. 1912. 

LIEUTENANT VICTOR HARRIOTT 
HARDY. 1st B.\TTN. YORK .\ND 
L.\N CASTER REGIMENT. attd. 
1st BATTN. LINCOLNSHIRE REGT., 

«ho was killed in 
action on the 27th 
October. 1914, at 
Xeuve Chapelle, 
was the youngest 
son of the late Cap- 
tain Harmer Hardy, 
who served with the 
97th Regiment in 
the Crimea, and wa.^ 
afterwards in the 
18th Hussare, and 
of Jlrs. Arthur 





173 



HAR 



Nightingale, of West Hill, Sandown, Isle of Wight . 
Lieutenant Hardy belonged to a family of 
vshicli many members have done, and are doing, 
memorable service for tlieir country. His 
grandfather was one of a small body of English- 
men who held the Fort of Roseau, Dominica, 
West Indies, in 1804, when the French landed, 
until relieved by the British fleet, under Nelson. 
His uncle, General Fred. Hardy, C.B.. is Colonel 
of the York and Lancaster Regiment, and has 
several sons and sons-in-law serving in tlie King's 
forces. Great-uncles of his served in the Afghan 
wars at Bhurtpoor and in the Jlutiny, all of 
whom have descendants now serving. 
Lieutenant Hardy was born on the 2()th .Tune. 
18S7, and was educated at Farnborough Park, 
and at Eastman's Royal Naval Academy. He 
was gazetted to the York and Lancaster Regi- 
ment from the Special Reserve in March, 1909, 
and was at Blackdown with the 2nd Battalion 
of the regiment until .Septend:)er of the same year, 
when he sailed for India to join the 1st Battalion 
at Quetta. After three years he came home on 
leave, having become IJeutenant in October, 

1911. He returned to India in September, 

1912, and after serving another year thei-e he 
was invalided home, his health having been 
affected by the climate. He passed liis examin- 
ation for promotion to Captain in 1914. 
Ha\-ing recovered his health he was about to 
rejoin his regiment in India when the war broke 
out, and he at once rejoined at home, being 
first sent to the regimental depot at Pontefract, 
afterwards being posted for duty to the 0th 
Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment at 
Belton Park, near Grantham. I^ater lie was 
sent to the front with a draft of tlie 1st Lin- 
colnshire Regiment. 

It is believed he was killed in an attack on a 
strong German position across a tract of open 
country under Ilea vy fire, the attack being entirely 
successful, the Lincolnshires driving the Germans 
out of their trenches at the point of the bayonet. 
Lieutenant Hardy was reported to have been 
buried at Neuve Chapelle, but owing to another 
otlicer's effects having been sent home in mis- 
take for his, tliere was for a time some doubt 
as to his death, it being hoped he might have 
been a prisoner of war. It is now feared the 
report received from the Adjutant of the bat- 
talion that he was killed on the 27th October 
must be accepted as correct. 
While a boy Lieutenant Hardy won the first 
prize at Sandown in a demonstration to cele- 
brate King Edward's Coronation in 1902. He 
was keen on sport of all kinds, especially riding, 
and was very fond of animals. While in the 
Reserve he secured the Regimental Cup in the 
officers' races, and when a 2nd Lieutenant 
carried the King's colours on the occasion of 
the visit of King George and (Jueen Mary to 
India for the Coronation Durbar. 




CAPTAIN HARRY VIVIAN HARE, 2nd 
BATTN. DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY, 

born at Folkestone 
on the 10th June, 
1881, was the son 
of Admiral the Hon. 
Ricliard Hare and 

grandson of the . ^^ ^ _ 

second Earl of « V 

Listowel, being thus 
a nephew of the 
present Earl of Lis- 
towel. 

He was educated at 
Harrow, and after 
passing through tlie R..M.C., Sandhurst, re- 
ceived his commission in the Durham Light 
Infantry in Augxist, 1900, becoming Lieutenant 
in February, 1902, and obtaining his company 
in March, 1912. From 1911 to 1913 he was 
Adjutant of his battalion. 

Captain Hare was killed on the 20th September, 
1914, wliile leading his company in an attack 
just above Troyon. 

He was a keen all-round sportsman, a good 
tennis player, and in the hockey team of his 
regiment when they won the Army Cup in 1911. 
His favourite sport, however, was hunting, and 
he was a very fine point-to-point rider, winning 
several races on his own and other people's 
horses. 

Captain Hare married EUen L. .M., daughter of 
the late Sir Edward Hudson-Kinahan, Bart., 
and left two children : Richard George Wind- 
ham, born July, 1910 ; and Emily Lavender, 
born April, 1912. 

LIEUT. HERBERT ANDRZEJ BIER- 
NACKI RARING TON, 3rd (attd. 1st) 
BATTN. HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT, 

was the only son of the late Herbert Septimus 
Harington, Director-General of Railway Con- 
struction in India, and a grandson of the late 
Colonel Thomas Lowth Harington, 5th Light 
Cavalry, who had the medals for Cabul, Sobraon, 
Gujerat, and Chillianwallah, where he was 
wounded. 

Lieutenant Harington was born at Doonga 
Gali, Murree Hills, Punjab, India, on the 3rd 
August, 1888. He inherited his father's ability 
as a mathematician. He also, even as a boy, 
showed great mechanical and scientific talent, 
and studied practical chemistry and elec- 
tricity. After completing his education, which 
was carried out privately, because he was rather 
delicate — though eventually attaining over six 
feet in height, and being broad in proportion 
— he served on the Indian State Railways 
with his father for three years, and also sur- 
veyed the Shan States Railway in Burma and 
the Kyber Pass. 

He joined the 3rd Battalion Hampshire Regi- 
ment in September, 1911, being promoted 



HAR 



174 



Lieutenant in June. 1913. He was attaclied Ut 
the 1st Battalion for active service, and went 
to the fi-ont in the autumn of lid I. He was in 
several small ensiageiiients. and was iinally 
wounded at St. Yves, between Ypres and 
^Vrmentieres, on the 31st October. Writing 
home, he made light of his wound, but he died 
on the 9th November, 1914. at Alexandra 
Hospital. Cosham. Portsmouth. 
He was wounded in the left hip in the morning, 
and having been taken out of the trench it is 
reported that he struggled back to rally his 
men, and even after being put on the stretcher 
tried to get back, saying his duty was with his 
men. 

Lieutenant Harington was a good rider and 
polo player, and keen on all sports, and when 
with the 1st Battalion of his regiment at Alder- 
shot helped to train it tor the cross-country 
race, which it won. He was a great favourite 
in Simla when he was in India. 

CAPTAIN REGINALD \V 1 C K. H A M 
H A R L A N D. a 1 1 d . 1st B A T T N. 
HAMPSHIRE REGIMENT. 

who was killed in 
action on the 30tli 
October. 1914. was 
the seventh son of 
the Rev. Albert A. 
and ^Irs. Harland, 
Harefield Vicarage, 
Jliddlesex. 
He was born on the 
10th November. 
1SS3, and was edu- 
cated at Wellington, 
being the youngest 
of thi-ee brothels who were at the same school, 
the second of whom was killed in the South 
African War. He left in 1902, and entered the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, where he won the prize 
for battalion drill. He was gazetted to the 
Hanipshiie Regiment in October. 1903. becom- 
ing Lieutenant in December. 190.'5. and Captain 
in August. 1911. 




CAPT 
FORD 



\1N EDWARD CHARLES STAF- 
KING-HARMAN. IRISH GUARDS. 

of Rockingham Ire- 
land who was killed 
in action on the 
6th November. 1914, 
was the eldest son 
of Sir Thomas and 
Lady .Stafford, and 
grandson of the late 
Colonel the Right 
Honble. Edward 
Kiug-Harman, il.P. 
He was born on the 
13th April, ISSl. and 




was educated at Stone House. Bi-oadstaii-s. and 
svibsequently at Eton and the R..M.C., Sand- 
hui-st. .\t Eton he was for two yeai's a member 
of the .Shooting VIII. He was gazetted to the 
Irish Guards in .September. 1911. and was pro- 
moted Lieutenant in June. 1912. He was a 
keen sportsman, hunted his own jiack of 
harriers in Ireland, and played polo for his 
regiment, and was a good shot with both ritle 
and gun. 

He went to Flanders in September. I'.il I. 
and was reported missing after the fighting at 
Klein ZUlebeke on the (ith November, 1914. 
when his company, under the command of Lord 
John Hamilton, was holding the forward trench, 
and it was surrounded and cut ofT fi-om the main 
body. It is reported that he and Ix>rd .Tohn 
Hamilton were killed while defending this 
trench against an overwhelming force of the 
enemy. 

Captain .Stafford-King-Harman was promoteil 
to the temporary I'ank of Captain, dating fi-oin 
the loth November, there having been some 
doubt as to his death. 

He married, in July, 1914. Olive, only daughter 
of Captain Henry Pakenham Mahon. of Sti'okes- 
town Park. Ireland, and 33. Pont Street. I-on- 
don. S.W.. and left one daughter. Lettice .\lar>. 
born April. 191."). 

Captain Staftord-King-Harman was a member 
of the Carlton, the Guards', and Boodle"s 
Clubs : and of the Kildare Street Club. Dublin. 

MAJOR GEORGE M.\LCOLM NIXON 
HARMAN. D.S.O., 2nd BATTN. RIFLE 
BRIGADE, 

who was killed in 
action on 27th No- 
vember, 1914, was 
the eldest son of 
the late Lieutenant- 
General Sir George 
Harman. K.C.B. 
He was born in Lon- 
don on the 11th 
November," 1872 : 
was educated at 
Marlborough College 
from lSiS6-90 : and joined the Rifle Britjade 
in November, 1891. He became Lieutenant in 
October, 1S93, and Captain in January, 1898. 
From 1900-04 he was employed in the Uganda 
Protectorate and with the King's African 
Rifles. He took part in 1901 in the expedition 
into the Lango country, being for Ivis services 
mentioned in Despatches (" London Gazette." 
12th .September, 1902), and awarded the D..S.O. 
and the medal with clasp. 

From 1902 04 he was employed on the Anglo- 
German Boundary Commission, west of \ic- 
toria Nvanza. After East Africa he served in 




175 



HAR 



.\I;illii and Alexandria with tin- Itli Battalion: 
and, havin)^ obtained lii;^ .Majority in June, 
1907, he joined the 2nd Battalion in Calcutta. 
When war was declared the battalion was in 
Kawal Pindi, and was then ordered to France. 
Major Hai'nian was killed by a sliell at Levantie. 
He married, in 1913, .May, elde.st daughter of 
E. D. Jones, Esq., of Addison Road, W., and 
Pentower. Fishguard. He was a iuenil)er of the 
Xaval and .MOitarv Club, Piccadilly. 



2nd LIEUTENANT JOHN BOWER 
HARMAN. 29th BATTERY, 42nd BRI- 
GADE. ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY, 

was included in the monthly official casualty 

list published in October, 1914, as having been 

killed in action, no date being given. 

He was the only son of the late Colonel .1. F. 

Harman, H.A., of 22, Kgerton Terrace, London. 

and was twenty-one \'ears of age when he was 

killed. 

He joined tlie H.F.A. in .July. 11112. 



LIEUTENANT CYRIL CAZALET HAR. 
RISON, 3rd BATTN. THE WORCESTER. 
SHIRE REGT., 

w as b (J r n i ii 
Colombo, Ceylon, on 
the 1.3th .July, 1.S91. 
the son of the late 
1 1 any Cazalet and 
Hilda B. Harrison, 
and grandson of 
Lieutenant - Cieneral 
.M. W. Willoughby. 
C..S.I.. Indian Army. 
I'Mucated at Dun- 
church Hall, near 
Rugby, Uppingham, and the K..M.C.. .Sandhuist, 
he obtained his comndssion from the latter in 
the Worcestershire Regiment on the 4th March. 
1911, becoming Lieutenant in August, 1914. 
In the Civ.it War, during the Battle of the 
Aisne, he had, with his platoon, reinforced the 
Irish Rifles, and, while observing and directing 
his men's fire from a trench, «as shot through 
the head on the 20th September, 1914. 




CAPTAIN ERNEST DALE C A R R- 
HARRIS, ROYAL ENGINEERS, 

killed in action on tlic 3rd November, 1911. in 
East Africa, was born on the 14th February, 
1878, and joining the Royal Engineers in .Tune, 
1899, became Lieutenant in December, PMU. 
He saw active service in China, 190(1. for which 
he received the medal with clasp, and was pro- 
moted Captain in June, 1908. When war 
broke out he was at the .Staff College, Quetta, 
for which lie had been specially nominated. 



2nd LIEUTENANT LESLIE GEORGE 
HAMLYN HARRIS, 2nd BATTN. THE 
SHERWOOD FORESTERS NOTTING- 
HAMSHIRE AND DERBYSHIRE REGT.), 

_ _-_ . - o ' "' 'i '^' "^ '"^ " 

obituary notice ap- 
peared in "The 
Times." saying tliat 
he was killed in 
action at Y'pres on 
the 2nd November, 
1914, at the age of 
nineteen, but whose 
name has not been 
included in tlie 
m o n t h 1 y o f f i e i al 
" casualty lists, was 
till' -'111 oi I lie late Major-General Noel Harris 
and Mrs. Xoel Harris, of 13, Brechin Place. 
South Kensington. 

He was educated at Wellington, where he was 
in the Picton. and was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant 
in the Sherwood Foresters in August, 1914. 




m^i 




CAPTAIN LAURENCE GEORGE HART, 
6lst KING GEORGES OWN PIONEERS, 
INDIAN ARMY, 

son of the late Col. 
Horatio Holt Hart, 
Royal Engineers, 
who lived in Kash- 
mir, was born on the 
10th. \ugust, 1877. at 
Sialkot. He was the 
nephew of Jlajor- 
General Fitzroy 
H a r t - S y n n o t , 
C.B.. C.:M.0., and 
General Sir 
Heginald Clare Hart. V.C., K.C.B.. K.C.V.O. 
Captain Hart was educated at Wellington Col- 
lege, where he got his cap, and proved himself 
a good all-round athlete : he joined the East 
Yorkshire Regiment from the Jlilitia in August, 
1899. becoming Lieutenant in July, 1900. He 
was transfeired to the Indian .\rmy in Decem- 
ber. 1901. and took part in the Thibet Expedi- 
tion, 1903-04, for which he received the medal. 
He was killed at the attack on Tanga, East 
Africa, on the 3rd November. 1914. the Lieut. - 
Colonel conunanding the regiment giving the 
following account of the circumstances : " At 
daybreak on the 3rd November, 1914, the 13th 
Rajputs and three companies of the 61st K.G.O. 
Pioneere made an attack on Tanga. We were 
met by a very superior force of the enemy, 
and were driven back with heavy losses to« ards 
our landing place. At about 8.30 a.m. Captain 
Hart landed with No. 1 Double Company of the 
tjlst K.G.O. Pioneers, and he immediately 



HAR 



176 



pushed forward to our assistance. Tliis he did 
in a most gallant manner, leading his men to 
where the fight was thickest, and where help 
was sorely needed. In my opinion, it was his 
timely help in coming in wliere he did that pre- 
vented many of the enemy from following us 
up, and this saved us many more casualties. 
It was about 9 a.m. that he met his death at 
the liead of his men, while liolding the enemy 
back, and giving what remained of those under 
me time to collect and re-form." 
Many of Captain Hart's other brother oflicere 
wrote saying that, in their opinion. Captain 
Hart had saved the situation and their Uves. 
He married Winifried Beatrice Florence Breit- 
haupt, wliose great-grandfather was wounded 
at the Battle of Waterloo. 



CAPTAIN HUGH IRVING ST. JOHN 
HARTFORD, 1st BATTN. CHESHIRE 

REGIMENT, is beUeved to have been killed in 
action at ^"iolaines, near La Bassee, on the 
22nd October, 1914, but his name had not 
appeared in the monthly official casualty lists 
up to Jime, 1915. He was the only son of the 
late Major Irving St. John Hartford, 22nd 
Regiment, and grandson of the late Captain 
Augustus Hartford, 59th Regiment, of Port- 
arlington. Queen's County, Ireland. 
He was born on the 11th January, 1SS3, and 
joined the Cheshire Regiment in December, 
190-t, becoming Lieutenant in January, 1906, 
and being promoted Captain in September, 
1914. 

Captain Hartford proceeded to the Continent 
shortly after the outbreak of the Great War 
and was present with his battalion during 
some of the severe fighting which occurred 
in the earlier stages of the Campaign. 



LIEUTENANT HUGH PETER H.\RT- 
NOLL, 1st BATTN. WORCESTERSHIRE 

REGIMENT, 

wlio was killed in 
action on the 12th 
December, 19 14, 
near Xeuve ChapeUe, 
was the third son of 
Sir Henry HartnoU. 
of Rangoon. 
He was born on the 
16th September, 
1S93, and joined the 
Worcestershire Regi- 
me n t from the 
R.M.C., .Sandhurst, in September, 1913, and 
was promoted Lieutenant on the 15th November, 
1914. 





CAPTAIN H.\RRY H.\RTWELL. 2nd 
BATTN. 8th GURKHA RIFLES, 
born at Lucknow 
on the 2nd Decem- 
ber, 1880, was the 
son of the late 
Charles Elphinstone 
Hartwell and grand- 
son of the late Sir 
Brodrick Hartwell, 
Bart. His inunedi- 
ate ancestors 
achieved fame in the 
annals of British 
India. His great- 
grandfather. General i-'red.Tick Young, 
n.E.I.C.S., whose name is associated with the 
raising of the Sirmoor Battalion of the tiurkha 
Rifles, served with distinction under I,Kjrd Lake 
in the early part of the nineteentli century, 
being mentioned in Thornton's " History of tlie 
British Empire in India " in connection with 
the Xepaidese ^'ar. .Subsequently he imported 
at his own expense a pack of hounds from Eng- 
land, planted the first potatoes grown in the 
Himalayas, and started the first tea plantation 
in India, which he siurendered to the Govern- 
ment on being given the choice of keeping his 
appointment as Political Resident or his plant- 
ation. 

Captain HartweU's maternal grandfather. 
Colonel J. Hadow Jenkins, Madras Staff 
Corps, served in the 44th Xative Infantry, a 
gallant Sepoy regiment that remained loyal to 
England dm-ing the great Indian Mutiny of 
1857. He also saw active service, and held 
high civil appointments in India. 
Captain Hartwell was educated at Haileybury, 
and entered the Army from the ililitia, being 
gazetted to the Welsh Regiment in April, 1900, 
and transferred to the Indian Army in 1903. 
He served in the Thibet Expedition, 1903. 
for which he received the Army medal, and 
also that conferred by the Chapter General of 
the Order of the Hospital of St. John of .Jeru- 
salem, for distinguished acts of gallantry in 
saving life at inuninent personal risk on the 
occasion of the disastrous earthquake at Dliuria- 
sala, in the Punjab. 

Captain Hartwell, who liad only arrived at tlie 
front on the 29th October, 1914, was killed next 
day near Festubert. 

He was a member of the United .Service Club. 
Captain Hartwell married EmUy Maybell, 
second daughter of Joseph Dobbs, CoolI)awn 
House, Castleconner, and left one daughter, 
Evelyn Patricia, born March, 1913. 

L I E U T E N .\ N T CHARLES MILNE 
HARVEY, 2nd BATTN. THE DUKE OF 
CAMBRIDGE'S OWN MIDDLESEX 

REGIMENT), born at Spanish Town, Jamaica, 



177 



HAR-HAT 




West Jiidies, on the lOtli Octoher. 1(S'J2. was the 
son of Thomas Lloyd Harvey, of Kingston, 

Jamaica, and a 
ifi'andson of Charles 
Ilarvey.of ("ampbell- 
town, Argyllshire. 
He was educated at 
Mereliiston Castle 
School, Edinburgh, 
and entered the 
Sandhurst Company 
at Woolwich in Sep- 
tember, 1910, being 
gazetted to the ilid- 
dlesex Regiment in 
Septemlier, 1911. and serving with it at Bordon 
and Warley Camps. 1912: at Jlalta in 1913. and 
proceeding with his battalion as part of the 
I'^xpeditionary Force to Fiance in the Great War. 
Lieutenant Harvey was killed on the 23rd 
November, 1914, in action near Estaires. An 
officer, writing from the trenches, gave the 
following account of the occurrence : " Harvey 
went out about 4 p.m. on the 23rd November 
with about a dozen men to round up a party of 
snipers who had stolen round behind oiu' 
trenches, and were taking pot-shots at us in our 
backs as we went about our various jobs. 
He rounded them up all right, but he was hit 
just as he was leading his men in a final charge 
on the house in «hich the enemy were located." 
The doctor said death must have been in- 
stantaneous. He was buried next evening, the 
Chaplain holding a brief ser^-ice whUe the 
enemy's bullets were actually humming round — 
a fitting burial for a soldier. 

Lieutenant Harvey's Colonel wrote of him : 
" We are all terribly cut up at this sad loss, as 
he had endeared himself to all ranks in the 
regiment, and was such a promising young 
olticer. .May I convey to you the sympathy 
of the whole regiment in your .sad loss ? " 
One of the ilajore of the Middlesex Regiment, 
describing eai-lier events, said : " Only this 
day month I sa«- him in action at a place not 
many miles from liere, and as 1 remarked then, 
and al-^o officially reported, nothing could have 
siu'passed the cool and admirable way in which 
he commanded his men. He was one of whom 
every regiment might well have been proud, and 
indeed a loss." 




Tomlin prize for matliematics, and became an 
Exhibitioner of Trinity College. Camliridge. 
taking a Qisi class ^ 
in the history tripos 
in 1914. 

He held a commis- 
sion in the Cambridge 
O.T.C. Cavalry, and 
was attached to the 
9th Lanceis, with a 
view to passing into 
the Reserve of Offi- 
cers, when the war 
broke out. In Ma.y, 
1914, he was ap- 
pointed 2nd Lieutenant in the Keserve and 
went to the front with the regiment in August. 
1914. being pre.sent in all their engagements 
up to the time of his death. 

Mr. Harvey was a member of the Conservative 
Club, and his recreations were polo, shooting, 
and hunting. 

MAJOR PERCY HASTINGS. 1st 
B.\TTN. THE QUEEN'S OWN 
(ROYAL WEST KENT REGIMENT), 

«ho is believed to 
have died from 
wounds on the battle- 
field in France on the 
1st .September. 1914. 

was the eldest .son of W ' i* 

W. S. Hastings, of 
2, The Grange, Wim- 
bledon, and was born 
on the .5th October, 
1872. 

HejoinedtheK.W.K. 
Regiment in March, 

1894, becoming Lieutenant in March. 1898, and 
Captain in .Tuly, 1902. Reserved on the nortli- 
western frontier of India, at Malakand. and 
the action of Landakai : also at operations in 
Bajaur and in the Mamund Country : Buner, 
and the attack and capture of the Tanga Pass, 
receiving the medal with clasp. Major Hastings 
had served as an Adjutant of \'olunteers and 
the Territorial Force for five years from 
August, 1906, and obtained his rank in .March, 
1912. 
He left a widow. 




2nd LIEUTENANT DOUGLAS LENNOX 
HARVEY, 9th (QUEEN'S ROYALl 
LANCERS, who was killed by a shell in the 
trendies on the 3rd November, 1914, was the 
second son of the Rev. E. D. L. Harvey, Beeding- 
wood, Horsham. Sussex. 

He was born on the 22nd October, 1892, and 
took a .scholarship at Eton, but entered .Mr. 
Byrne's House as an Oppidan. He won the 



2nd LIEUTENANT FREDERICK 
CHARLES HATTON. ACTING .\DJU 
TANT 2nd BATTN. A L E X .\ N D R .\ 
PRINCESS OF -VN^.^LES'S OWN 
(YORKSHIRE REGIMENT), 
born at Parkhurst, Isle of Wight, on the 9th 
.\pril, 1878, was the son of Alfred Charles Hatton, 
part founder and at one time editor of the 
"Yokohama Press." Japan, and Canteen Steward 
of the 2nd Yorkshire Regiment. He was also 



HAW 



178 



lvl,lll-(l t( 




Di. W. A. Ilatton and U> Siv Westby 
rcival. K.t'.-\l.(i., late Ai,'>"iit-(ioiu-ral 
for New Zealand. 
He was educated 
privately, and ob- 
tained his couiinis- 
sioii from the ranks 
in October, 19U. 
having pre\'iously 
(illed several regi- 
Miental positions, 
including that of 
Gymnast icinst ructor. 
Depot Drill Instruc- 
tor, Pay Sergeant, 
Ui.li ii> liuuui Sergeant, Canteen Accountant, 
Regimental Quartermaster-Sergeant, and Regi- 
mental Sergeant-Major, finally being appointed 
Acting Adjutant after receiving his connmssion. 
He served in the South African War, being 
seriously wounded at the Battle of Driefontein 
while Section Leader. He received the Queen's 
medal vrith three clasps, and had also been 
awarded the medal for long service and good 
conduct. 

He was killed on the 30th October, 1911. at 
the Battle of Ypres, while acting as Adjutant, 
by the side of his Coimnanding Olficer, Colonel 
C. A. C. King, who was also killed. 
For some time he was Secretary of the " Green 
Howards " Old Comrades' Association, and a 
contributor to tlie " "Green Howards ' Gazette." 
He wa-s also Sergeant- 11a jor of the same regi- 
ment's "Old-time Firing and Hand-grenade 
Display." 

2nd Lieutenant Hatton married Klsie, daughter 
of the late Quartermaster-Sergeant Thewlis, 
a brother of Akleruian Tliewlis, late Ix)rd Mayor 
of .Manchester, and left one son, I'"rederick 
Arthur, age twelve >-ears. 

LIEUTENANT VISCOUNT HAWARDEN 
SIR ROBERT CORNWALLIS MAUDE , 
1st B.XTTN. COLDSTREAM GUARDS, 

Baron de .Montalt, 
in Ireland, and a 
Baronet, of Hawar- 
den. County Tip- 
]) e r a r y , son of 
Robert Hem-y, fifth 
N'iscouut Ha warden. 
Baron de Montalt , 
and a Baronet, was 
l)om in London on 
tlie 6th September, 
Ill^^mjimiJI^J ' i^'M. He succeeded 

liis father as sixth 
Viscount in 1908. The present Lord Dunalley 
(through his grandmother, the Hon. Martha 
Prittie) was Viscount Hawarden's first cousin 
once removed. 
He was educated at Winchester and Christ 




Churcli, Oxford, where he took his degree, 
lie joined the Coldstream (iuards a.s 2nd 
l.iiiitenant in tlie spring of 1912. becoming 
Lieutenant in September, 1913. He accom- 
panied his battalion to Fi'ance, as part of the 
ICxpeditionary Force, on the 12th August, and 
was killed by shell at Landrecies on the night 
of the 2.5th-2l)th August, 1914. 

CAPTAIN ROBERT FRANK HAWES, 
1st BATTN. LEICESTERSHIRE REGT., 

who was killed in action on the 23rd .September, 
liUL was the younger .son of Mr. G. C. and Mi's, 
llawes, of Lindfield, Sus.sex. He was born 
on the i8th April, 1883, and joined the Leicester- 
shire Regiment in October, 1902, becoming 
Lieutenant in September, 1905, and Captain 
in May, 1910. 

In September, lull, he was appointed an 
Adjutant of the Territorial Force. 
Captain Hawes married, in 1913, a daughter of 
-Mr. and .Mrs. Hyden, of Awbrook, Scaynes Hill. 

LIEUTENANT LIONEL HOPE HAW- 
KINS. 1st iKING'S) DRAGOON GUARDS, 

was born at Cliiches- 
ter on the 28th July, 
188(5, and was the 
son of Isaac Thomas 
Hawkins, late 
Colonial Civil Ser- 
^■ice, and Mi-s. Mary 
Hope Hawkuis. He 
was related by the 
marriage of a great- 
aunt to the Berkley 
family, and was thus 
a cousin of the late 
Captain H. Berkley. R.N., and of the late 
Francis Berkley, Esq., Secretary, War Office. 
Lieutenant Hawkins wa.s educated at Wayn- 
fiete. Winchester College, and the R.M.C., 
Sandliui'st. Early in his school days he showed 
an aptitude for athletics, as a runner and 
cricketer. At Winchester he won the steeple- 
chase for his House, and distinguished himself 
as a footballer and Fives player. 
While at .Sandhurst he was asked to join the 
King's Dragoon Guards, owing to his excelling 
in games and sports, and was gazetted to that 
regiment in February. 1907, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in February, 1908. He had pa.ssed for 
his Captaincy two years previously, and would 
soon have been promoted. 

With his regiment he served in India, and 
received the Delhi Durbar medal. He competed 
with his troop for the shield in the regimental 
polo team, and was a regular polo player, being 
considered by some the best No. 1 there had 
been in the regiment for years, and helped it 
to win the Patiala Cup and many others. 
For two years Lieutenant Hawkins was Signalling 




179 



HAW— HAY 



Officer of the Anibala Cavalry Brigade, and 
the remarks of the General C'oumiaiiding on the 
report of the inspection were : " An excellent 
report, which reflects great credit on Lieutenant 
Hawkins, the Signalling Otticer." 
On the outbreak of the war he was at home on 
leave from India, and was attached for active 
ser\dce to the 6th Dragoon Guards (Carabiniei-s), 
and was killed in an attack by the Germans on 
a line between Messines and Wytschaete, 
Belgium, on the night of the 31st Octobei^lst 
Xovember, 1914. 

The Adjutant of the Carabiniers. writing on 
the 13th Xovember, gave the following account 
of the circumstances : "It appears that after 
the enemy had penetrated our Une a party was 
observed by your son approaching the trench 
which he held with his troop. He ordered fire 
to be opened on them, but they shouted, ' Don't 
fire ! We are the Scottish ! ' and he ordeied his 
men to cea.se fire, and himself bravely, but 
incautiou-sly, got out of the trench and went 
towards them. He had gone about thirty yards 
when the Germans — for it was the Germans, 
and not the London Scottish — opened fire, 
and your son was seen to fall. Two men at 
once went out and brought hina back to the 
trench. He was seen to be badly wounded in 
the right side, and he was carried back by oirr 
men and the London Scottish towards Kemmel. 
On reaching a place of comparative safety 
two of the men went off to try and find a 
stretcher, and two remained with your son, 
who died very shortly afterwards. He had been 
unconscious from a few minutes after he had 
been hit, and pa.ssed quietly away. The men 
were unable to bury him then, and weie obliged 
to leave him covered with a blanket at the edge 
of a wood, where I have no doubt he has since 
been buried. But as, unfortunately, the 
Germans now hold that piece of ground it has 
not been possible to do what otherwise would 
have been done. You have lost a gallant son, 
and we a brave and weU-loved conu'ade who 
showed military qualities of a liigh order." 
The General commanding the 4th Cavalry 
Brigade wrote of him : " During the retirement 
and subsequently he had several difficult patrols 
to carry out, and he always did his part with 
conspicuous success. He was a very brave 
man, and was careful of the lives of his men." 
The Carabiniers were in such fierce fighting 
that at one place after a night attack, on 31st 
October-lst Xovember, the Fi-ench, when 
advancing, counted three thousand five hundred 
dead in front of the trenches of the London 
Scottish and Carabiniere only. 
Mrs. Hawkins received a telegram and letters 
of sympathy from the whole of her son"s regi- 
ment. At school Lieutenant Hawkins had 
received many nicknames indicative of his 
fleetness of foot and atliletic prowess, such as 




College (Xo. o. 



" Agag " and " Diabolo." In the Army he was 
very popular with Ms men, and the officers of 
his regiment \\Tole saying : " He is a great 
loss to us." 

He was a member of the Junior Army and Xavy 
and the Junior Xaval and Military Clubs, and of 
Hmliagh.im and Kanelagh. 

CAPTAIN CYRIL FRANCIS HAWLEY, 
KINGS ROYAL RIFLE CORPS, 

wlio was killed in 
action on the 2nd 
Xovember, 1914. 
was the second .son 
of the late Sir Henry 
Hawley. Bart., and 
Frances Lady Haw- 
ley, of Leybourne 
Grange, Kent, 
and brother of the 
present Baronet. He 
was born on the 
24th June. 1878. and 
was educated at Malvern 
1892-94). Army Side. 

He joined the K.R.K.C. from the Militia in 
February, 1899, and became Lieutenant a 
year later. He took part in the South African 
War. being present at operations in Xatal in 
1899, including actions at Elandslaagte, Riet- 
fontein, and Lombard's Kop : at the defence 
of Ladysmith, including the action of the 6th 
January, 1900 ; in Xatal, in the Transvaal, 
east of Pretoria, including actions at Belfast 
and Lydenberg ; in the Transvaal between 
Xovember. 1900, and May, 1902 ; in the Orange 
River Colony and Cape Colony, 1901 and 1902. 
For his ser\-ices he was mentioned in Despatches 
(" London Gazette," 10th September, 1910), and 
received the Queen's medal with five clasps 
and the King's medal with two clasps. 
He was promoted Captain in Xovember, 1005, 
and in the Great W'av was acting as a (ieneral 
Staff Officer, 3rd grade, which appointment he 
received on the 5th August, 1914. 

CAPTAIN LORD ARTHUR VIN- 
CENT HAY, IRISH GUARDS, 

was born on the 
16th March, 1886. 
and was the second 
son of the tenth 
Marquess of Tweed- 
dale, K.T. 
He was educated at 
Eton, and joined tlie 
Cameron H i g li - 
landers from tlie 
Militia as 2nd Lieu- 
tenant in June, 19(15. 
being transferred to 
the Irish Guards 




December, 1905. 



HEA HEL 



180 




ill- rclii'cd from tho regiiiK^nl with tin' I'link of 
Captain, and on tlu' mil break of I In- « ai- re- 
joined tlie refririirnl ciri tile loth Au^;ii>.t . lie 
was killed on tlie 1 llli September, liMl, while 
forcing the passage of the river Aisne at 
("havonne. 

1,(11(1 Arllnir lla>' married Mciida. daughter of 
the lion. .Mrs. Kdward .Stonor and the late A. .1. 
Halli, Ksq.. and left one daujihtcr. .lean, lioni 
Auiiusl. 1111 I. 

2nd LIEUTENANT PAUL OTREN 
HEANEY, 1st BATTN, KING'S OWN 
(ROYAL LANCASTER REGIMENT), 

son of I'atiiek and 
Elizabeth Heaney, 
and grandson of 
Hichard .Alorris. of 
" N e w T o w 11," 
W'aterford, was born 
at W'aterford on the 
27th October, 1871). 
He was educated at 
.St. Francis Xavier's 
School. Liverpool, 
and enlisted in the 
King's Own in 1894. 
lie served through the South African War, 
during which he gained the Distinguished 
Conduct Medal. Prior to the outbreak of the 
(heat War he was on the Army Gymnastic Staff 
as Company Sergeant-Major, and was Instructor 
to the Middlesex Regiment at Mill Hill. 
As a Company Sergeant- Major he had been in 
the firing line since the first shot of this war was 
fired. He was a capable and clever soldier, 
thought ful for the needs and trials of those uniU'r 
him, with whom he was very popular. His 
battalion and others were holding an advanced 
line, and were subjected to ceaseless artillery 
lire, which rendered the ground immediately 
behind them too dangerous to be crossed. 
The battalions were thus isolated, and before 
long realised that they were out of reach of 
the deUvery of supplies. The situation was 
desperate, and Sergeant Heaney, going to t he 
-Major of the A.S.C. offered to go across the 
zone of danger and bring back food. " Sheer 
madness ! " declared the ofTlcer, but Sergeant 
Heaney did not waver. He collected wagons, 
drivers, and men. and w-ent. They traversed 
four miles under continuous shell and rifle 
fire, and at last reached the camp, loaded up, 
and started on their return journey. They got 
through and reached their position, and brought 
food, not only to their own battaUon, but to 
the whole brigade, thus saving the advanced 
line and the situation. 

Many of the above details are taken from 
"T.P.'s .Journal of Great Deeds of the Great 
War" of December 2(itli, liill. 
For his gallantry Sergeant Heaney was, in 



Sejit ember, 101 J. given a commission, an honour 
he was not to enjoy long, for on the 21.st October 
he was killed in action. II h.is not been possible 
to ascertain the exact circumstances attending 
his death. 

LIEUTENANT VOLTELIN PERCY 



HEATH, ROYAL 

was the son of Sir 
,Tames Heath, Hart., 
of Oxcndon Hall, 
.Market Harboi'ough, 
and was born at 
Clayton Hall, Staf- 
fordshire, on 
the lOtli .Tanuary. 
ISS!). 

He was educated at 
Kton and Magdalen 
C'ollege, Oxford. At 
the University he 
had a brilliant career, 
in literature, jiolitics 



HORSE (;U,\RDS. 




haviii 
and 



sp. 



'(■II prdiiiineiit 
it. He was 
.Master of the 



President of the Bullingdon (In 
Drag Hounds, and Captain of the Polo Team 
(afterwards playing in the polo team of his 
regiment), and finished his Oxford career by 
taking a good second in the final History 
Schools. 

He received his commission in the Royal 
Horse Guards in October, lull, becoming 
Lieutenant in April, 1912. 

.Serving with his regiment at the frcjiit, he was 
wounded in the retirement from .Mons, and died 
from the effects at the Chateau Baron, France, 
on the 4th September, 191 I. 

Lieutenant Heath was a member of the Marl- 
borough and Bachelors' Clubs, and also of 
Hiirlingham and Ranelagli. 
He was unmarried. 



CAPTAIN HAROLD LUTWYCHE 
HEL ME, 1st BATTN. LOYAL 
NORTH LANCASHIRE REGIMENT, 

liorn at Treuyii. 
H e !•(• f o r d s h i re, 
on the 3rd August. 
1878, was the son of 
Harold and Mary 11. 
Helme. of King's 
Thorne, Hereford- 
shire, and a nephew 
of John W. Helme, 
of Broadfield Court, 
Herefordshire. 
Educated a t 
Haileybuiy College, 

he first joined the Worcestershire .Militia, and 
from it obtained his 2nd Lieutenancy in the 
Loyal Xortli Lancashire Regiment in 1S99, 
becoming Lieutenant in Febru.ary, 19(M, and 
obtaining his Company in December, 19119. He 




181 



HEN 



served in the South African War in 1901, in 
which he was wounded, having been present 
with Mounted Infantry at operations in the 
Orange Free State and Cape Colonies, receiving 
the Queen's medal with three clasps. He also 
took part in the operation of the Irua Patrol 
in the west of the Niger with the Onitsha 
Hinterland Expedition; in West Africa (South 
Xigeria). 190.5-0(5; and with the Bende-Onitsha 
and Hinterland Expedition, receiving the medal 
with clasp. 

In the Great War he was killed at the Battle 
of the Aisne on the 14th September, 1914, 
under the following circumstances : TTis batta- 
lion (mentioned in Sir John French's Despatch 
of the Sth October, 191-1) had been ordered to 
take a factory north of Troyon to support the 
Sussex, who were being hard pressed, and 
during the action Captain Helme was killed, 
and nearly all the officers of the battalion were 
killed, wounded, or reported missing, including 
the Colonel and senior Major, both of whom 
were killed. 



MAJOR ARTHUR 
SON, p.s.c, 27th 




FRANCIS HENDER- 
LIGHT CAVALRY. 
. INDIAN .\RMY. 
who was kUled in 
action near Sois- 
-ons. France, on the 
1 2th September, 

1911. was the third 
son of Mrs. Hen- 
derson. .51, Lexham 
fiardens. London. 
W., and the late Dr. 
Henderson, of 
Shanghai, and was 
(x>rn at Shanghai on 
tlic "il^t Noveiiibcr. l.^T-t. He was educated 
at Haileybury and the R.M.C.. Sandhm^. 
He received an unattached 2nd Lieutenancy in 
June, 1895. and joined the Indian Staff Corps in 
March, IS90. He became Lieutenant in the 
Indian Army in 1897, and Captain in January, 
1904. 

Keenest of sportsmen, he was beloved in the 
regiment by all ranks for his zeal with horse and 
hound and spear. He whipped for the Poona 
Hunt for two seasons, and could have hunted 
the pack the following year had he been able to 
take it on. He was best man-at-arms at Banga- 
lore in 1911. and again at Lucknow in 1913. 
Major Henderson, who had passed through the 
Staff College, was appointed a Brigade-Major 
in India in February. 1909, and was promoted 
Major and Squadron Commander in the 27th 
Light Cavalry in January. 1913. when, in the 
absence of the Colonel and the Second in Com- 
mand, he commanded the regiment for eight 
months, coming home on leave in March, 1914. 
He was to have acted as an umpire in the 



autunm manoeuvres of that year, and was work- 
ing on the Staff at Aldershot,when war broke out. 
He was appointed extra Cypher Officer at 1st 
Army headquarters, left England on August 
12th. and was afterwards transferred to General 
Headquarters. 

On September 12th. 1914, Major Henderson was 
appointed General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, to 
General John Gough, and left that morning for 
Cavalry Headquarters, near Soissons. There he 
received definite information that General 
Gough had crossed the Aisne, by Conde Bridge, 
and, joining Colonel Danby Christopher, AJk.. 
and Q.M.G., they proceeded by motor towards 
Conde, bat were held up by the enemy near 
the bridge. Colonel Christopher being badly 
wounded and thrown out of the car. Major 
Henderson and Colonel Christopher's servant 
put up a very gallant fight, one with re- 
volver and the other with rifle ; and it was 
when he returned to the car to try and rescue 
Colonel Christopher (presumably when they 
had exhausted their ammunition) that !Major 
Henderson was shot at about eighty yards 
range. The servant was also kUIed, and Colonel 
Christopher was taken prisoner. His grave is 
where he fell, by the roadside on the way to 
Conde Bridge, south of the Aisne. 
In 1910 Major Henderson married Muriel, 
daughter of the late Capel Hanbury and 3frs. 
Hanbury. of " The Knoll," Penn, Bucks. 

L1ELTEN.\NT NORMAN WILLIAM 
.\RTHUR HENDERSON. 1st BATTN. 
ROYAL SCOTS FUSILIERS, 
who was killed in ^,— _ 

action on the 10th 
November, 1914, 
was the eldest son 
of Arthur Henderson 
and his wife, 
Gareth, late of Fair- 
mile Court. Cobham, 
Surrey. 

He was bom at 
Rosary Gardens. 
South Kensington. 
on the 23rd October, 
1891, and was educated at Rugby (S.H.), 
to which he went in 19*16. Proceeding to the 
R.M.C., Sandhurst, in 1911. he entered the 
Army in February. 1912. and joined his regi- 
ment in South Africa, being promoted Lieu- 
tenant in June, 1913. He left South Africa in 
February, 1914, and went to the front on the 
12th August. 

He was in the retirement from Mons, and took 
part in the Battle of Cainbrai. le Cateau. and 
also in the Battles of the Mame and the Aisne. 
He was killed in the wood of Herenthab 
Chateau, at Tpres, whilst leading, his platoon. 
An attack was made bv the Prussian Guard ; 




HEN 



182 



soiiio of the trt'iiolic's had to be retaken by a 
counter-attack, and it was dvn-ing this attack 
that Lieutenant Henderson was killed. 
Several of the few remaining officers of liis 
regiment have testified in letters to liis bravery 
and splendid qualities as an officer. 

LIEUTENANT R.WMOND MONT- 
GO M ERIE HUME HENDERSON, 
2nd BATTN. CONNAUGHT RANGERS, 

was born at Fort Belgaum, India, on the 13th 
August, 1884, the son of Colonel Hume Hen- 
dereon, I.M.S., retired, and grandson of the 
late Dr. Gordon, Hume .Street, Dublin. 
Lieutenant Henderson was educated at King's 
.School, Canterbury, and obtained his com- 
mission in the Connaught Rangers from the 
.Militia in 1907. being promoted Lieutenant in 
February, 1910. From December, 1909, to 
March, 1914, he was employed witli the Gold 
Coast Regiment. 

Beturning to England he acconii)anied his 
battalion to the front in the great war. and was 
killed in action on the 21st September. 1914, 
at the Battle of the Aisne. Tilleul Hill. 
His recreations were shooting, football, and 
tennis. 

Lieutenant Hendei'son married Zillah Edith, 
eldest daughter of Vere D. U. Hunt, Esq., of 
Carnahalla, Doon, County IJmerick. 

CAPTAIN WILLIAM ALEXANDER 
HENDERSON. 2nd BATTN. PRINCESS 
LOUISESi.\RGVLLANDSUTHERL.\ND 

HIGHLANDERS), 

was born at I'^din- 
burgh on the 20tli 
r)ecember, 1876, the 
son of the late Alex- 
ander Edward Hen- 
dei'son, Advocate, 
Slieriff - Substitute 
of the Lothians, and 
iif 5Irs. Henderson, 
]\Ianor Place. Edin- 
biu'gh . 
He was educated at 

>ry School, St. Andrews. 

Oriel College, Oxford, 




St. Salvator'- I'n-parat 
Loretto School, and 



where he took his B.A. degree, and played golf 
for the L^nivei-sity. He entered the 1st Batta- 
lion Argyll and .Sutherland Highlanders in 
February, 1900, and served in the South African 
War, being a Station Staff Officer from July. 
1901. He was present at operations in tlie 
Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, from July 
to November, 1900, including the action at 
Zilikat's Xek : at further operations in the 
Transvaal, April, 1901. to May, 1902: and in 
Cape Colony in the latter month. He received 
the Queen's luedal with three clasps and the 
King's medal with two clasps. 



Captain Ilendei-son was .\djutant of the "ith 
Seaforth 1 1 iglilandei-s from 191(1 l:i. when he 
returned to the 2nd Battalion of his regiment, 
lie was at first reported woimded and 
missing after a niglit attack on a (iennan 
trench at Ploegsteert Wood, near .\rmen- 
tieres, early in the morning of the 10th 
November, 1914. He was in conunand of tlie 
attack which has been described as a very 
gallant one. Over one Inmdred and thirty 
men of his connnai\d were killi-d, wnuiichd. 
or missing after the attack. On tliv 2iUh 
December. 1914. during the unofficial armistice 
at Christmas, his body, with fifteen Ijodies of 
his men, was found by the British and iden- 
tified by the name in the coat, the identity 
disc and other articles having been taken by 
tlie Germans. 

He was a keen cricketer and a well-known 
golfer, being a member of the Koyaland Ancient 
(iolf Club, St. Andrews. In 1909 he defi-ated 
.T. O. Travei-s, the American champion, in the 
fii-st round at Muirfield in the Amateur (iolf 
Championship. He was a member of the Royal 
Automobile Club. 

Captain Henderson married Constance May 
Chambei-s and left one son. Alexander Edward 
William, born June. 1912. 



LIEUTENANT R O N .\ L D L U C .\ S 
OUIXANO HENRIQUES, 2nd 

BATTN. THE QUEEN'S (ROYAL 
WEST SURREY REGIMENT), 

who was killed in 

action in France on 

the 14th .September, 

1914, was the second 

son of the late David 

Quixano Henriques 

and of Mi-s. Henri- 

ques, 17, Sussex 

Square, Hyde Park, 

W.,and was bom on 

the 8th June, 1884. 

He was educated at 

Harrow (Mr. Stog- 

don's House) from 1898 to 1901, and obtained 

his commission in the R.W.S. Regiment in 

October, 1903, beeomintr Lieutenant on the 4th 

December, 1907. 

The following account of his death, derived from 

a letter from a private of his regiment, was 

published in the " Harrovian War Supplement " 

of November, 1914 : — 

" It was on September 14th. We had just come 

through — I think it was the \-illage of Paisy — 

on to some very high ground. We halted, and 

we were told that the enemy were entrenched 

on the hills in front of us, and we were to drive 

them out. We started the advance, my platoon 

about thirty yards behind, Jlr. Henriques 




183 



HEN- HEP 




ill sujiiicut. We had just come out of a valley 
when the Germans opened fire on us. However, 
we kept on advancing until we were about thirty 
yards from the enemy. We were all up in line, 
and I wa-s the thud man from llr. Henrique.s. 
He just raised his head and shoulders and said, 
' Advance ! ' when he was shot through the 
centre of the forehead, killing him instantly."' 



LIEUTENANT CLAUDE HENRY. 3rd 
BATTN. THE WORCESTERSHIRE 

REGIMENT, 

was Ixirn at Brigh- 
ton in July, 1S^!1, 
being the son of 
.Tames and Evelyn 
Henry, of Ling- 
mell. Putney Heath, 
grandson of the late 
Sir J. H. Pelly, 
Bart., formerly of 
Warnham Court, 
Su.'isex. and of the 
late Captain J. 
Henry, formerly of Blackdown House. Sussex. 
He was educated at Bradfleld College and 
Exeter College, Oxford. He joined the 3rd 
Battalion Worcestershire Eegiment as 2nd 
Lieutenant in .January, 1903, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in December, 1906. and served for three 
years in the West African Field Force on the 
fiold Coast, rejoining his battalion in June. 
191 1. accompanied it to the front, and fell 
on the 20th September, 1914. near Vailly-sur- 
Aisne. 

He was a member of the Wellington (iub and 
was unmarried. 

2nd LIEUTENANT STANLEY 
BENSKIN HENSON, SPECIAL RE- 
SERVE, attd. 1st BATTN. PRINCE 
ALBERT'S (SOMERSET LIGHT 

INFANTRY), 
who was killed in 
action at the end of 
the year 1914, aged 
twenty-seven years, 
was the only son 
of Dr. and ilrs. 
Henson, of 2, Derby 
Street, ^Mayfair, and 
of Elmsett HaU, 
Wed more. 

He was educated at 
King's School, 
Brulon. and Pembroke College, Oxford, and 
olitaiued an appointment in the Colonial Police 
some six years before his death, being stationed 
in Singapore and Penang. 

Soon after the declaration of war he resigned his 
appointment and retmned to England. He had 




joined the Special Reserve of his regiment as 
2nd Lieutenant on probation in September, 1913, 
and in November, 1914, was attached to the 
1st BattaUon of liis regiment on going to the 
front. 

The officer conunanding the battahon gave the 
following details : "As to the manner of your 
son's death, I can only tell you that he died 
as a very brave man. He was leading his men 
in the attack on the German trenches, and had 
outstripped the rest of his company by about 
twenty yards, when he was shot through the 
heart and killed instantly. Those of his company 
who wei'e fortunate enough to come out of^the 
action ahve speak in the highest terms of your 
son's courage. He is a great loss to the regi- 
msnt." 

LIEUTENANT KENNETH PARNELL 
HENSTOCK, 4th BATTN. THE DUKE 
OF CAMBRIDGE'S OWN (MIDDLESEX 

REGIMENT/, . . .,._ ^_,. __ 

was born at Up I'ark 

Camp, Jamaica, 

West Indies, on the 

19th July, 1893, the 

son of Colonel F. T. 

Henstock, late West 

India and West 

African Regiments. 

He was educated at 

Bradfield College, 

Berks, where he was 

in the First Cricket 

XI. and at the R.M.C., Sandhurst, t'i'om which 

he received his commis.sion in the Middlesex 

Regiment in August, 1912, becoming Lieutenant 

on the 11th August, 1914. 

His amusements were hunting and shooting. 

He fell leading his platoon on Sunday, the 

23rd August, 1914. at the Battle of Mons, 

when it was said to have been completely 

annihilated. 



2nd LIEUTENANT MALCOLM ARNOLD 
HEPBURN, 2nd BATTN. SEAFORTH 
HIGHLANDERS iROSS-SHIRE BUFFS 
THE DUKE OF ALBANY'S)) 

was born at Hamp- 
stead, London, on 
the 8th January. 
1892, and was the 
son of the late llr. 
and Mrs. Hepburn, 
of 13, Well Walk, 
Hanipstead. His 

elder brother. Cap- 
tain W. D. Hep- 
burn, now Adjutant 
.■)tli Battalion Royal 
.Scots (Queen's 





HER 



184 



Iulinl>urL;li liilirs), is also in the Seaforfli Ili^h- 
laiiiliTs. 

"ind LiiMitciiaril ll.'|iljuru was educated at 
Ueddoii Comt I'lvparatory School. Ilainpstcad. 
wliciico 111' obtaiiu'd a scholarshi]) at .\hilvcrn 
College in 1905. Subsequently he <)l)taiiu>il a 
Classical Exhibition at .Magdalene College. 
Cambridge, whein; he rowed in the College Lent 
boat in 1911 ; was in the College Tennis VI : 
and won his colours for Association football. 
He joined the Reserve of Officers in the spring 
of 191.3. and did his special training with the 
2nd Battalion Seaforth Higlilanders. to whicli 
he was afterwards gazetted, and with which he 
was serving in France when killed. He was sliot 
while superintending sapping operations in 
trenches near Messines on the 30th Xoveinber, 
loll, and was h\irie(l in I'loegsteert Wood. 



CAPTAIN HORACE F.\LKLAND HERD. 
3rd (RESERVE) BATTN. THE WELSH 

REGIMENT. 

youngest son of 
.Major W. G. R. 
Herd. late 95th 
(now Nottingham- 
shire and Derby- 
shire) Regiment, 
was born at 
Han well, Middlesex, 
on the 13th .luly. 
1883. 

He was educated at 
Monmout h G rammar 
School, and after joining the Army in .March. 

1901, served in the South African War, being 
present at operations in the Transvaal and 
Orange River Colony in 1901, and in Cape 
Colony from June, 1901, to Februai-y, 1902, 
X'eceiving the Queen's medal with five clasps. 
He was promoted lieutenant in FeV)ruai'y. 

1902, Captain in May, 190-1, and had qualified 
at a scliool of musketry, as "well as having 
obtained a first-class certificate in gymnastics, 
and in supply duties at the A.S.C. Training 
Establishment at .\ldershot. 

Captain Herd was a good Rugby football player. 
and made a reputation at school as a three- 
quarter back, but had little time for the game 
afterwards, as he went practically from the 
playing field to South Africa for the Boer War 
at the age of eighteen. 

In December, 1914, he went to France with a 
draft of reinforcements for the 2nd Battalion 
Welsh Regiment, and almost immediately was 
engaged in fighting with that battalion, having 
been put in command of a company. 
He was killed in the very heavy fighting in 
front of Festnbert on the 27th December, 1914, 
by a bomb from a trench mortar, and was buried 
in a little cemetery to the west of Festubert. 





LIEUTENANT ARTHUR WIDDRING- 
TON HERDMAN, 1st BATTN, KING'S 
OWN (SHROPSHIRE LIGHT INFANTRY), 

late of Fwhurst 
I'lacc, East Sussex, 
only son nf tlie late 
Rev. H. \l. llenl- 
man, \'icar of Holy 
Trinity, North 
Shields, and of .Mrs. 
llerdman, Sunny 
Holme, Ripen, was 
born on the .31st 
.lanuary, 188t;, at 
Holy Trinity Vicar- 
age, North Shields, 
He was educated at Trent College, and was a 
graduate of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, 
Lieutenant lleidman (irst joined the Royal 
Sussex Regiment (Militia), and passed into the 
Regular Army in September, 1909, becoming 
Lieutenant in October, 1913, 
On the outbreak of the Great War his battalion 
«ent firet to Queenstown in August, and two or 
three weeks later embarked at Sovithampton 
for the Continent, landing at St, Nazaire, in the 
Bay of Biscay, Thence they proceeded by 
train to Paris and marched to Crecy. Diu-ing 
tlie Battle of the Aisne the battalion was in the 
trenches at VaUly for nearly a month. 
Lieutenant Herdman was kiJled near Lille on 
the 25t1i October, 1914, His body was found 
l)y his orderly — Griffiths — who was himself 
wounded in the arm when looking for his late 
master. 

Major Luard, of his battalion, \\ rote : " He is 
indeed a great loss to the regiment, and was very 
popular. The men of his platoon would have 
done anything he asked of them." 
By his will Lieutenant lleidman. who was very 
popular with all who knew him, left three 
acres of land for a recreation ground for the 
village of Ewhurst, and in addition the Parish 
Council received a sum of £300 for fencing and 
laying out the land, and to jjiovide for the 
upkeep, aftd gifts to the school (•liil<lr<-n at 
Christmastime, 

CAPTAIN GEOFFREY WILMOT 
HERRINGHAM, p,s,c,, 6th 
(INNISKILLING) DRAGOONS, 

was the son of Sir Wilmot Ilerringhani, JLl),, 
and Christiana Jane, daughter of T, W, Powell, 
Esq. He was born in London on the Ttli .\ugiist. 
1883. 

Captain Herringham was educated at Eton 
and the R.M.A., Woolwich. He joined the 
Royal Artillery as 2nd Lieutenant in 1900, 
became Lieutenant in 190.3, and was trans- 
ferred to the (ith Dragoons in November 
1900, becoming Captain in Marcli. lOKL He 
passed the Staff College in 1912. 



185 



HEW 




Captain Herringham was shot at ilessines on 
the 31st October, 1914, while in coinniand 
of the machine-gun section of the 5th Dragoon 
Guards, to which regiment he was attached at 
the time. 

CAPTAIN ANTHONY MORRIS COATS 
HEWAT. 2nd BATTN. THE ROYAL 
SCOTS iLOTHI.\N REGIMENT;. 

wlio wa.s killed on 
the 8th September, 
^^|A> 1014. at the battle 

|RBe^^ of the ilame, was 

'Q^^^ the son of Lieu- 

tenant- Colonel 
Henry Roper-C^u-zon 
Hewat, late Royal 
Scots Fusiliers, and 
of Mi-s. Jessie Mc- 
Kenzie Hewat. 
He was born at 
Secunderabad. 
India, on the 27th October, 1884, and was 
educated at Victoria College, Jersey, and the 
R.il.C. Sandhurst. He entered the Army in 
May, 1903. becoming Lieutenant in March. 
1905. and Captain in July. 1913. 
Captain Hewat married SteUa Eleanora. daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Rhys Bishop, and left a daugh- 
ter, Diana Gei-aldine Eleanora, born August, 
1913. 

He wa-s keen on all kinds of sport, both at home 
and in India, especially hunting, polo, sliooting 
(large and small game), and fishing. 

LIEUTENANT GORDON HUGHES 
HEWITT. 2nd BATTN. THE PRINCE OF 
WALESS VOLUNTEERS SOUTH LAN 

CASHIRE REGT.j 

was bom at 25, 
Argyll Road. Ken- 
sington, W., on the 
26th January. 1S92. 
being the son of the 
late Captain Percy 
Hughes Hewitt, 6th 
Dragoon Guards 

(Carabiniers). He 
was a relative of 
the late General 
Gordon. The late 
Captain Hewitt had raised at his own expense 
the first CycUst Corps in the Army (the 26th 
Middlesex Cyclist Corps), for wliich he received 
the honorary title of Major. 

Lieutenant Hewitt was educated at \'ictoria 
College, Jersey, from 1901-05 : then at Hadey- 
bury till 1909, subsequently, after private 
tuition and coaching, entering the Royal Mili- 
tary Academy at Woohvidi as a Sandhurst 
cadet in 1911. and iiointr to .Sandhurst itself in 




1912. He received Ms comniission in the South 
Lancashire Regiment in January, 1913. 
At the Battle of the Aisne, on the 19th Septem- 
ber, the South Lancashires, when in reserve, 
were informed that the Germans had broken 
tluwugh our line, about half a mUe away, and 
were in a wood to the right of the battaUon. 
Two companies were ordered to dislodge the 
enemy fi-om this wood, which they did at the 
point of the bayonet. It was during tlus opera- 
tion that Lieutenant Hewitt was hit by shrapnel 
in four places, one Ijullet injuring the spine. He 
was taken to the dressing station at Vailly, and 
thence at night to the Field Hospital at Braine. 
It was there found that he was very seriously 
injured, being completely paralysed from the 
waist down. On the 21st he seemed better, 
and at his own special desire was sent down to 
the Base Hospital at Versailles, where he died 
on the 24th .September. 1914, of septic pneu- 
monia. He was buried with full mihtary honours 
in the Cimetiere des Gouards, X'ereaiUes, the 
guard being furnished by a detachment of 
French cavalry, and many French ofticei-s being 
present, including a representative of the General 
commanding the district. 

Lieutenant Hewitt had been awarded the 
decoration of the Legion of Honour (Croix de 
Chevalier) at the end of August, but it has not 
been possible to ascertain from the British or 
the French Government for what particular act 
of gallantry in the retirement fi-om ilons the 
award was made. He was promoted Lieutenant 
on the 11th September. 1914. 
Lieutenant Hewitt was a member of the 
Primrose Chib..St.. James's, S.W. His recreations 
were hockey, tenius. and billiards. He was 
unmarried. 



LIEUTENANT JAMES FRANCIS 
HEWITT, 1st BATTN. THE 
CAMERONIANS (SCOTTISH RIFLES), 
son of the Hon. 
W. J. Hewitt, of St. 
C o 1 m e House, 
Aberdour, Fife, was 
born at Gatehouse of 
Fleet, Galloway, on 
the 23rd January, t 

1S88, and was edu- |^ 
cated at Winton * 
House, Winchester : 
Haileybury College : 
and the R.^^C.. 
Sandhurst. 

In February, UlOiS, hu \va,~ -rizrtl.jd and 
attached to the 2nd BattaUon Scottish Rifles 
until the trooping sea-son, when he joined his 
own battaUon at Cawnpore, becoming Lieu- 
tenant in March, 1910. He proceeded to .South 
Africa in December. 1909, and was with the 




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a very k.'.'l iiili.r. .in.l hII.T liHssilin I lil'.iui'.li 

|.lu( various niiik.-. up In .Si'i'^i'iinl he nlilalii.il 




Ills "A" I'.'i'lillrHti' liv sli.'i'l' liHi'.l wiiik ill 
N. IV. '11. ll.l'. I!ll:i. 

Ill- was a ho.kI I'unnci', Imlli In Inn^ hi.. I I. ...I 
(liMtaiK'i-M, ami w;is I'lmil nl' Hsl.lnt,'. II.' Im.l 
alwayH l.i.ik.'.l r.iruHi.l 1.. an \iiii> .ai.'.'i. ami 
WHS I Iii'I'i'IdI'I! v.'iy |il.'as.'.l wIhii, in Uil.ili.'i', 
r.M:i. Ill- waM K/l/i'tli'.l 'Jn.l I -i.'.il .nanl l.i II..' 
::i.l ItiillHlinn (iloiici'Hl.'rslili'.' Ki'^'limiil . 
In r'nini'i' Iw was hIIhcIii'iI In III.' Lnynl .Nnilli 
l.aii.-a l.ii.' Iti'ijiiiMiil , and was |ir'.ininl .'.I l.nu 
l.'ii.'inl ill III.' li.l.l. 'I'll.' I'.ill.iwinn Hc. (11. ..I ..I 
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pii .iii.'i , .iihI III' WHS il.'lail.'.l I.I I. l.nu a pally 
nl' II. .'Ill liHi'U. He I. a. I a ^..anl ..n lli.ni. \villi 
llxi'.l liH>(ini'ls. and, nl rn.ii .'. all 111.' I..ii..ai., 
w.'i'.' disarni.'.l i li.il il app.'Hi, llial II..' (..'iiiiaii 
..rii.'i'i' wh.i ua>, \mIIi III. 'Ill I. a. I a r.'\.il\.'i' 
vtliicli had iinl lic.'ii lak.ii li'niii hiiii: and, 
\sli.l.' p. ...I' \.iiin(,' llickllnn Innk his i'\cs (ilT 

linii I., I ; nil. 'Ill, Ihis swine liii'licd I'liiind 

a... I d.'lihi'i'Hl.'ly shni liliii. In llii' space nl' I".. 
.1. Ihl.'.' s.'.'nilds thai (Jel'IIIHII nllicel' ha. I lie. '11 

.iiiipli, h.'K k.'d In pii'ci'H hy nili' n'^ hay Is, 

hill, hIhs ! thai (lidn'l save pnni' IlickliiiK. H' 
was HlliiKelhei' a iiinsi li'HKie alTair." 

2fHl I.IKU TKNAN r SAMIJKI- VIJtNON 
KINI.M-IIICKSON, 2ii(l HA'l'I'N. I.OVAI, 
NOK'I II I.ANCASIIIKK K l'.(; IM l':N I', 

who uas killed in 
acl inn in l'',asl Al'iira 

Inual'.ls III.' end nl' 

Mil I. Ihe a.'liuil ilal.' 
.111.1 pl.'i.'.' ..I .l.'alh 
mil having heell I'e- 

p.lll.'.l, WHS III.' 

I'l.l.'sl s I' Cdlnliel 

,S. A. I'). Ili.'ksnil, 
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i) 1 n's U n H d, 

Itiihni.in.l, .S.ii'i'.'>, 
and washni'ii In I.Hl);i. 
II.' was .'.III. 'III. '.I hI W.llinul.in. \\l..'.'.' I..' was 

11, II,.' |lnp.'l..iiii II' 1''"!^ nil' He wan 

^.a/.'ll.'.l 1.1 II..' I..i>al Nnllh l„in('a-liil.' IfeKI- 
nl as .S.'.'.in.l I .i.iil .iia nl in S.'pl .'iiih.'i'. I!M2. 

I.IKUIKNAN'r WAI.I'KK I'.DW'AUI) 
Hill, 'lid IJA'I'I'N. NOK'III .SIAII OKI) 
SINK K K l.(; 1 ., 

w .1 ' I III' n..l,\ s.ili nl 
111.' lal.' Cniinii lt..u 

l.'llld lllll. K.'.lnl nl 
ll.>l> 'I'lillilN, llnl 

.hesler, and \\h: 

hn... nil Ihl' I'llh 

s.'pi.'iiih.'i'. ix'.<-^. 

II,' vMi-, .'.hi.al.'.l al 
liiirnlnid ll.l. IS.'. 

I.an^^l.iii ,\lal i'H\ el's. 

I In I'se I s II i re. a II d 
W illi'llesl.T Cnll.'H.'. 





HIL HOA 



lie was for Ihnv yoars in tlio Norlli sijilToni- 

sliii\> 3r»l IJjJttn. (Sjxvial KosiTvo), lu-iiii; pro- 

mototl l.i<Mit;>ni>nt in April. liM;^, ami wns 

attaoluni to tho 1st Itattnlion of tlu> r»'iiinu<nt 

on tho oulhriNfik of the «-ar, procinnlins with 

it to tho t\intinont. 

Ho was kilKnl at tho Hattlo of tho Aisno on tho 

2.">th S,>ptonilH-r. 1!>H. 

I.ioiitonaiit Hill was a nionihor of tho t'avon- 

lUsh fluli ami of two atitoinohilo olul>s. 

:iui in I 11 NAN r iii nk\ nKNNE 

HI I ION. 5>ih !Ul.1. 4ih U\rTN. 
1 U I. DtkK OF C AM 1U< 1 nc. KS 
OWN (MIDDLESEX REGIMENTt. 
who was kilUnl in action on tho l!Mh Pooonihor. 
IIIM. was thesouof tho lato Kov. H. M. Hilton. 
soinotinu> HiH-tor of Itrliniitniry. Norlhants. 
\\f was o<lnoated at Hailoylnn-y and Trinity 
("olloiK-. I'anibridiio. 

At tho ontbnvik of tho war Ijoutonant Hilton 
was a master at l'»iversity College Sohotil. 
Hanipstoa«l. \vhor»- ho was an oflU-or in tho 
O.T.t'. Continiront. (t\Mi\ which ho was iRizotlod 
to tho Mi<l<llos«>x Koginiont. in .*>opt iMnhcr. ISM I. 



CAP IAIN lK\Mv HIND, 1>I HAT IN. 
EAST YORK SHIRK REGIMENT. 

who (lio<l in tho 
Wiirtomhori: I'iold 
Hi>spital. Hanhonr- 
(lin. near l.illo. as 
a prisoner of war. on 
thi- 2!tth tlctobor. 
Ill I I. front wonnds 
ivcoivoil on the 20th 
of tho s;»nie month, 
was tho fonrth son 
of tho lato \Villian\ 
Kvoratt Hind. 
Ho was l>orn at 
n.n\<lon. Yorkshin-. on tho 21th Septoinhor, 
1S7!). and after hoini; attached to the Hoiiulars 
for nearly a year ivoeivod his conm\ission from 
the 1st V.H. Kinii's (Iwn Yorkshiiv l.iijht 
Infantry in tho East Yorkshin> Uosiinient in 
.l.-imiary, 15)01. He stTVinl in the South .\frienn 
War. in which he was live times soveryOy 
wounded, and was pivsent at operations in the 
Oniniio Kr<-e Stat<-. the Transvaal (west of 
I'n-toria). and the On^niro Uiver t\ilony. inchid- 
inji actions at l.indley. Uothleheni. and Witto- 
horvron in IttOO. and ajrain in the Orani;o Hiv<-r 
Colony fr^mi .Tuly. 1!»01. to May. li»i>2. 11. 
roceivi'Hl tho Queen's medal with four clasps 
and the Kind's niediil with tw<i clasps, and was 
one of tho very few vohn\toer oHiccrs who 
earned six clasps. From Aiijriist. 1!I0:{. to April. 
IIIOS liavini; luv^n promoted Lieutenant in 
Manh, litOI ho served with the West African 
lieginient nt .Sierra IjOjine. 





He ri-Hu'ned to l''n>;land ni 1!">>. .md was pro- 
moted Captain in .s,>picniher. ISUO. (>)ptain 
Hind w;»s woimd<-tl thr«v times, hut ixintinvu><l 
to lead his nu>n in a charyi' on the 20th Dcto- 
lH»r. 1!U4. dyinv; fr«in> his womtds as al>ove 
stat.Hl. 

He m.irritHl, in t!>l 1. Constance Evelyn. younjnT 
dausthtor of Kdnnind Harrison. l.-mipton, 
Hoston. 



2nd lllCrKNANl" IIAROIO KOWIN 
HllMMSl 1 Y. SIM C lAl RKSKRNl :Uid. 
1st BAT FN. i; 1 i> I CESTK R s 11 I R 1 
REGIMEN r . 
wjws iKtrii at Wells, 
Somerset, on tho lin\ 
Septomhor, I.>*S)0. 
jind was tin- son o( 
Mr. W. .1. and Mi^. 
11 i p p i s 1 e y. of 
Northant House. 
Wells. Somerset . Ilc 
was educat<Ml at 
K i n t: ■ s .S c h o o 1 . 
Ihiiton. Somci-sol. 
and matrie\ilat»'^l at 

lAmilon Cniversity. Wo w;>s also a niomher ol 
the Uoyal A>;ric\dtm-al CoUejjo. Cirvncestor, 
wher»> he was i^dd m<>ilallist (Estjito Manasr<^ 
mont and I'oivslryK and irainod tho National 
Piploma of Aiiricultuiw He w.as also a Cr«>- 
fessional .\.ssociate of the Surveyors" Institution. 
At Cir\Micoster ho was in the t>.T.C.. and suh- 
seiiuontly joined the SpiH-ial Hoserve of Oflicors. 
t>n the despatch of the Kxptslilionary Force 
he left for France with the ;!ril Hritrtxlo. 1st 
Pivision. as a 2nd Lieutenant in the (ilovicester- 
shiiv Hoiiimont. 

He was killed on the 2:?r.i Octoher, ION, at. 
1-anireniaivk. Heli:imn, whei-o he was in com- 
mand of on<- of the two platoons which success- 
fully held an exposal tri>nch aisiinst a lai-jjc" 
fon-o. despite the loss of all tho olVicers and 
sixty per cent, of the men. 

At Kinsi's .School Mr. Hiiipisley was Captain of 
the cricket and football teams, and at t^ir<<n- 
cestor of the cricket and hookey teams. He 
playinl cricket and hockey for his county, and 
cricket for the rnitod Services. 
2nd Lieutenant llippisley married Ivy tiwendo- 
line. daughter of tho late Mr. .1. llusssey (\wper 
and Mrs. llussey Cooper, of " The T/idiji"'," 
Whoatlcy, Oxfonl. 

IIFCPENANT C.llARl KS MOHtiAN 
IKV\RK. ISth rilK KINtrS IIISSARS. 
who was killed al the age of Iwfnty-one. w.is 
the son of Charles Tw ysdon lloaii', of IJiiinell 
I'ark. Hicestcr. and the Hon. Ulanehe IVancos 
Hoan-. daught<-r of the lii-st Haron Tivdegjir. 
He was oducatcil at (Isborne and Partmouth, 



HOD 



18S 



it having Ik-oii intcmled that hi- should go into 



the Hoyal Navv. He. 




however, decided to 
enter tlie Army, aiul 
was gazetted to the 
\r,{\\ llii^saisiii Dec- 
.•iiihei. lill:i. He was 
loud of polo, hunting, 
and point - to - point 
lacing. 

He was killed on Ih.- 
•2.5th August, ISIll. 
diu'ing the retire- 
ment from Mons. 
while coveringthe in- 
fant rv near Blautiies. 



2nd LIEUTENANT SYDNEY HOWARD 
HODGES, RESERVE OF OFFICERS, 
attd. 4th BATTN. ROYAL FUSILIERS 
(CITY OF LONDON REGIMENTi, 

who wa.s killed in 
action on the 17th 
October, 1914, was 
the son of W. D. 
and Mary Hodges, 
Alexander .Square. 
.South Kensington, 
and was born in 
London on the lith 
July. l.SOl. He was 
educated at Kokeby 
School, \Vimhledon, 
and at Monkton 
Combe Seh(iol. Hath. On leaving school he 
studied for the medical profession at King's 
College. London, where he gained the ^Varnford 
Scholarship in 1910, and took the degree of 
B.Sc. with fii-st-class honoui-s in 1913. 
The following are selected from a large number 
of letters received from those who knew him : — 
From his CO., Lieutenant-Colonel .McMahon. 
who wa-s killed in action on the 11th Novem- 
ber, 1914 : 

" You will have received or read tlie ollicial 
report of your son's death in action. « hich took 
place the day before yesterday in a successful 
attack on a village. 

" He was leading his platoon forward at the 
time in splendid fa.shion. came under machine 
fire, and was shot through the heart. 
" He was buried in a farm enclosure aliout one 
mile north of the village. 

" Your son's loss will be deeply felt by myself 
and all the l)attaUon, for he was most keen and 
energetic, and had a high sense of duty. 
" He has done valuable work since he arrived, 
and was in all re.spects brave and efficient. 
" Please accept my deepe.st sympathy and 
convey same to his relations." 
FYom the Dean of Medical Science, King's 
College, University of London : 




'■ 1 would ask you to accept tliis expression of 
tlie very deep and real sympathy whicli is felt 
lor you by the members of the Staff of lliis 
College in the loss of your son. 
" He was, I Ihhik. the best studiiil ol nuiUcine 
I have ever had here. It was to rm- a real and 
great pleasvu'e to help him in an\ «a\ 1 could 
in his work, and his inlluence among the other 
students was the very be.st. The memoi-y of hi.s 
l>iiinant work and of his character will last a 
long time here, and will be an exampU; for good 
to many of Ills fellow-students. 
■■ 1 feel I have lost a very dear friend and |)upil, 
and 1 realise something of wliat liis parents nmst 
feel." 

l'rofe.s.sor llaUiburton, of King's College, wrote 
of him to his family : " Xo news has grieved 
me more than the death of your gallant son. 
I got to know him so well during his work in 
my laboratory, and learnt, not only to value 
his liigh endeavours, but to regard him as a 
friend." 



SPECIAL 




CAPTAIN JOHN FRANCIS HODGKIN- 
SON, 3rd iPRINCE OF WALES'S) 
DRAGOON GUARDS 
RESERVE), 

was born on the 
•2.">th July, l.s-9. at 
Baslow, Derbyshire, 
the son of the late 
.1 o h n ('• r u n d \ 
Hodgkinson, of Bas- 
low. He was also 
related to the late 
Kdmimd Hodgkin- 
son. J. P., of Baslow. 
and to Lieutenant 
S. C. L. Hodgkin- 
son, of the Royal Australian Xavy. 
He was educated at Mount St. Mar\ s College, 
Chesterfield, from 1890-95, earning the admira- 
tion and affection of his companions. On leaving 
school he took to farming, but while so occupied 
lost no opportunity to educate himself in ev'ery 
way, becoming eventually an accomplished 
scholar, with a knowledge of the Kussian, 
Spanisli. and French languages, and a working 
knowledge of Kaffir and Hindustani. Xor 
did he neglect the physical side of life, for he 
was a keen fisherman, a good game shot, a good 
bat at cricket, and an excellent polo player. 
Captain Hodgkinson commenced his military 
career in the ranks of the 2nd Volunteer Bat- 
talion Sher«ood F^oresters for one year ; in 
March. 1902. he was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant 
in that battaUon, and in 1905 Captain. In the 
following year he was transferred to the 4th 
BattaUon Royal DubUn FYisUiers. He devoted 
himself seriously to his military duties, and 
obtained nearly all the special certificates 
possible, including his qualification for 



IS 



HOD 



promotion to Captain in the Regular Army : 
certificates for attendance at the Infantry School 
at Chelsea (1903) and Dublin (1907), from which 
he passed first with " special " certificate ; 
the School of Musketry. Hythe (1904 and 1909) : 
Sisniallinsr. Aldershot (1905), with Instructor's 
Certificate : .Military Engineering, Chatham 
(1906) : Veterinary School, Aldershot (1908) : 
Equitation, Dublin (1907) : and a machine-gun 
course at Vickeps, Sons i Maxim's (1909). 
He also pa-ssed the preliminary examination 
for Army Inteipreter in Eussian. He had hoped 
to serve in the South African War, but was 
not then thought sufficiently experienced, 
having only joined the Army in 1901. 
In March. 1906, Captain Hodgkinson was trans- 
feiTed, at his own request, to the 4th Royal 
Dubhn Fusiliers (MUitia) as a Captain, and did 
much useful work in the training of men and 
horses at Woolwich while detached from his 
regiment. In 1910 he was transferred to the 
3rd Dragoon Guards, and served with that 
regiment in Egypt. 

On the outbreak of the war with Germany the 
regiment was recalled to serve in France, and. 
after a short period of preparation in England, 
left for the front. A few days after arrival 
there Captain Hodgkinson, while in charge of 
the regimental machine guns, was severely 
wounded in the head by a bullet at ZUlebeke, 
and died at Boulogne on the 10th November. 
1914. from the effects. 

Captain Hodgkinson was a splendid type of 
man, standing 6 ft. 4i in. in height. Once, 
when on duty as a Guard of Honour, he was 
specially noticed by King Edward VII. He was 
modest and rather reserved in manner. 
After his death a solenui Requiem Ma.ss was 
celebrated at the Roman Catholic Cliapel at 
Hassop. wliich Captain Hodgkin.son used to 
attend when living at Baslow, the Rector of his 
old college — Mount St. Mary's — being the 
celebrant . 

CAPTAIN CHRISTOPHER ANTONY 
ROWL.\NDSON HODGSON. 3rd B.\TTN. 
THE ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGT.. 

was the son of 
Arthur Pemberton 
Hodgson, I.C.S., and 
was bom in 1873. 
He was educated at 
Worcester College. 
Oxford. 

He joined the 3rd 
Battalion (then the 
5th) Warwickshire 
Regiment in Decem- 
ber. 1S99, being 
promoted Lieuten- 
ant ui .July. lUiMi. and becoming Captain in 
March, 1901. During his service he qualified 




at the School of Musketry, obtained a certificate 
in A..S.C. duties, and was attached to the 
Regular F'orces. obtaining a satisfactory report 
for the rank of Field Officer. 

In the South African War Captain Hodgson 
served with the Remoimt Department before 
1901. After being invalided home he returned 
there in the same year with the Royal War- 
wickshire Regiment, remaining tUI 1902. For 
bis services he received the Queen's medal with 
foiu- clasps. In the Great War he was with a 
Regular battalion when killed on the ISth 
December, 1914. near Flem-baix (district of 
Annentieres ). 

The following account of his death was given 
by an officer who was near him at the time : 
"He went out in front of everyone, with a wire- 
cutter in each hand, and cut away through that 
zone of hell that Ues between the two lines of 
trenches. He was not killed untU he had got 
right up to the German trench, but liis work 
was done, and the way was clear. So far as I 
can hear, he never said anything — he just went 
and did it. though he knew fuU well that nothing 
could save him, and that he would be dead in 
ten minutes. His name deserves to be written 
for ever on the RoU of Heroes." 
Captain Hodgson married, in 1913, Miss " Alec " 
Hely, daughter of C. Wisdom Hely, Esq., of 
Dublin. He left no family. 

LIEUTENANT GEORGE W1LL1.\M 
HOUGHTON HODGSON. 2nd BATTN. 
THE BORDER REGIMENT, 
who died on the 
6th Xovember, 1914, 
of woimds received 
a day or two pre- 
viously, was bom 
on the 21st October, 
1888, at The Rec- 
t o r y, Distington. 
(Cumberland, the son 
of the late Rev. 
W. G. C. Hodgson, 
J.P.. M.A., of 
Hougliton House, 
Cumberland, and of Mi-s. Hodgson, 
ter of the late William Harrison, 
law, of Bishop Yards, Penrith, 
nephew of the Bishop of Edmundsbury and of 
Com-tenay Hodgson, Esq., Clerk of the Peace 
for the County of Cumberland. 
Lieutenant Hodgson was educated at West- 
min.ster School and Trinity College. Cambridge, 
where he took his degree in 1912. and where he 
was in the ArtUlery O.T.C. He joined the 
Boi-der Regiment as 2nd Lieutenant in Septem- 
ber, 1911, and became Lieutenant in October, 
1914, duiing the war. 

Lieutenant Hodgson die<l in the Boulogne Hos- 
pital on Friday, the 0th Xovember, 1914, of 




only daugh- 

bai-rister-at- 

He was a 



HOD— HOG 



190 



wounds received on the 2nd of that month. 
L)unnt; the figliting immediately preceding that 
date his battalion had lost heavily, and had 
repeatedly earned the admiration of the Bx-iga- 
dier and otlier senior officers in the brigade. 
He was mentioned in Sir John French's De-;- 
patcli of the 14th January, 1915. 
Captain Askew, of the Battalion, liimself 
subsequently killed in action, wi-ote the follow- 
ing account of the death of Lieutenant Hodgson : 
" We were holding a section of an entrenched 
position on the 2nd, and your son's company, 
' D,' was on the right of our line .... and 
the Germans (took) an opportunity to make a 
very strong attack upon our right. So well were 
our men kept in hand by your son and the late 
Captain Gerrard (killed the same day) that they 
hung on for several hours unsupported, and 
even after both officers were hit they fought 
splendidly. The result was the German attack 
failed, and there is no doubt that this was due 
to the splendid example set by yoiu' son. He was 
directing the fire of liis men when he was hit in 
the neck by a IjuUet." 

Lieutenant Hodgson was a keen soldier and 
sportsman, and when at Cambridge was cox- 
swain of the third Trinity boat. 

CAPTAIN GEORGE BERTRAM POL- 
LOCK-HODSOLL. 3rd BATTN. SUFFOLK. 

REGIMENT, 

born on the ISth 

June, 1875, at Loose 

Court, Loose, near 

<^^^^K ^^^H Maidstone. Kent, 

' ^^^^^^" '^*^ ^^^* was descended 

from the old Kent 
family of ■' Hodsoll " 
— Mandy Hodsoll, of 
Hol^^veU, and the 
HodsoUs, men of 
Kent, were of con- 
siderable note in the 
Army of Edward the Black Prince — and was 
the second son of Charles ilaxfleld and Georgiana 
Mary Hodsoll. His mother was the elder 
daughter of George Kennet Pollock, grand- 
daughter of Sir David PoUock, Chief Justice of 
Bombay, and grand-niece of Sir Frederick 
Pollock, Chief Baron of the Exchequer, and of 
Field-Marshal Sir George Pollock, " of the 
Khyber Pa.ss." 

He was educated at Maidstone School and 
University College, Oxford, and was an energetic 
speaker for the Unionist Party and for universal 
military service. 

Captain Pollock-HodsoU received his com- 
mission in the 4th Battalion Suffolk Regiment 
(Cambridgeshire MUitia) in December, 1902, 
being subsequently transferred to the 3rd 
Battalion (Special Reserve), in which he was 
promoted Captain in August, 1914. He was 




attached for active service to the 1st Battalion 
Cheshire Regiment, with which he was serving 
when he was killed in action on the 7th Novem- 
ber, 1914, while gallantly leading a counter- 
attack on the enemy near Ypres. 
Captain Pollock- Hodsoll was a member of the 
Jimior Xaval and ililitary Club, antt was well 
known as an Association football player, having 
for many years played for the Casuals and 
the Corinthians, and having captained the 
Army team on several occasions. 
He married, in June, 1914, OUve Jlai-garet, 
eldest daughter of the Rev. Dr. Milne Hae, of 
Edinburgli. 



DAYRELL MERE- 
GRENADIERS, IN- 




CAPT.\IN IVAN 
DITII HOGG, 101st 
D I A N A R M Y, 

who was killed in 
action on the 4th 
November, 1914, 
during the attack on 
Tanga, East Africa, 
was the third and 
youngest son of the 
late General George 
Forbes Hogg, C.B., 
and of Mrs. Hogg. 
Cromer H o u s e, 
Brentwood. 

He was born on the 2nd April, ls>l. al '.i2, 
Oxford Gardens, London, W., and was educated 
at the United Ser\-ices College, Westn-ard Ho ! 
After passing for the Indian Army, he received 
an unattached 2nd Lieutenancy in January, 
1903, and carried out his probationary period 
with the 2nd Oxford Light Infantry, and then 
with the 2nd Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers, joining the Indian Army on the 8th 
April, 1904. He became Lieutenant in April, 
1905. and was promoted Captain in January, 19 12. 
Captain Hogg married, in December, 1911, 
Bridget Eyre, youngest daughter of the late 
William H. Lioyd, of Barham House, Droitwich, 



LIEUTENANT 
GRAHAM HOGG. 
OWN HUSSARS. 

was the son of Qirin- 
tin Hogg, Esq., the 
founder of the Poly- 
t e c h n i c. Regent 
.Street, London, an 
institution known 
throughout the 
E n g 1 i s h-speaking 
world. He was born 
on the 2nd Febru- 
ary, 1875, at Rich- 
mo n d Terrace, 
Whitehall, and was 
the Roval Militarv 



-COLONEL IAN 
D.S.O., 4th OLEENS 




educated at Eton and 
College, S.indhurst, and 



191 



HOL 



subsequently passed through the Staff College. 
He entered the Army in 189(i, and had a long 
record of war services. 

From 1900-0.5 he was employed with the West 
African Frontier Force, during which period 
he was in command of several punitive expe- 
ditions, and for his services received the dis- 
tinction of the D.S.O., the rank of Brevet- 
Jlajor, and the West African war medal. In the 
Boer War he served on the .Staff of General 
Sir Bruce Hamilton, and was present at engage- 
ments in the Cape Colony, Transvaal, and